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EEPOET 



OF THE 



NEW YORK 



PRODUCE EXCHANGE 



FROM JUNE 1, 1876, TO DECEMBER 31, 1877, 

WITH THE 

CHARTER, BY-LAWS, AND THE SEVEEIAL TRADE RULES ADOPTED 
BY THE EXCHANGE, AND A LIST OP ITS MEMBERS. 

ALSO, 

THE EEPOET 



STATISTICIAN OF THE EXCHANGE, 



WITH ACCOMPANYING TABLES. 



Jones Printing Co., Steam Printers, 38 New Street. 
1878. 



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73/69 






A 



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'^^ -^^ ! ^ ^ 






CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Annual Meeting of the Excliange, May 29, 1877, Proceedings at 11-17 

Annual Report of the Superintendent to the Board of Managers 19-32 

Arbitration Committee of the New York Produce Exchange for 1877-8 vii 

Arbitration Committee of the New York Produce Exchange for 1876-7 xiii 

Articles of Agreement between the New York Produce Exchange and the Rail- 
roads relative to Grading Grain 111-120 

Board of Managers of the New York Produce Exchange for 1 877-78 v 

^ Board of Managers of the New York Produce Exchange for 1876-77 xi 

By-Laws of the New York Produce Exchange 57-74 

Charter of the New York Produce Exchange 53-56 

Donations made to the Library of the New York Produce Exchange 47-50 

Employes of the New York Produce Exchange xx 

Floor Rules of the N6w York Produce Exchange -. 75-77 

Grades of Grain Established by the Committee on Grain 121-124 

Inspector of Grain 100 

Inspectors of Distilled Spirits 154 

Inspectors of Election for 1877-78 viii 

Inspectors of Election for 1876-77 xiv 

Inspectors of Flour 129 

Inspectors of Naval Stores 141 

Inspectors of Petroleum 150 

Members of the New York Produce Exchange 169-221 

Names of Members who have deceased from June 1, '76, to December 31, '77... 41 

Newspapers received at the Exchange 46 

Oflacers of the New York Produce Exchange since its Organization 1-7 

Eates of Towing Canal Boats, and of Lightering Ungraded Grain 126 

Recommendations relative to certain Memorials of the National Board of Trade. . . 36 

Regulations of Inspection of Grain 125 

Resolutions of Respect to the Memory of Deceased Members 41-45 

Resolutions relative to a new Exchange Building 35 

Resolutions relative to Canal Tolls 34 

Resolutions relative to Municipal Reform 38 



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IV CONTENTS. 

PAGE, 

Resolutions relative to the Centennial Exhibition 33 

Resolutions relative to the Superintendent of Public Works 33 

Resolutions relative to the Use of the Belt Railroad for Commercial Purposes... 36 

Rule providing for the re-issue of Lost Certificates of Membership 77-78 

Rules Regulating Lighterage among Members of the New York Produce 

Exchange 155-156 

Rules Regulating the Cheese Trade 157-159 

Rules Regulating the Flour Trade 127-129 

Rules Regulating the Grain Trade.. 101-126 

Rules Regulating the Naval Store Trade 131-141 

Rules Regulating the Petroleum Trade 143-150 

Rules Regulating the Provision Trade 81-99 

Rules Regulating the Trade in Distilled Spirits 151-153 

Rules Regulating Trarisactions in Lard 89-99 

Rules Regulating Transactions in Oils (other than Refined Petroleum) 161-167 

Special Committees and Delegations appointed during the year 1876-77 xv-xix 

Special Committees and Delegations appointed from June 1, 1877, to December 

31,1877 ix-x 

Standing Committees of the Board of Managers for 1877-78 vii 

Standing Committees of the Board of Managers for 1876-77 xiii 

Trade Committees of the New York Produce Exchange for 1877-78 viii 

Trade Committees of the New York Produce Exchange for 1876-77 xiv 

Trade and Commerce of the City of New York for the year 1877 • 225-448 

Treasurer's Report for the year 1876-77 8-9 

Treasurer's Statement of the Surplus Fund Account 8 

Weigher of Cheese 159 



^*^ For Index to the Statistical Tables see end of the Volume. 



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BOARD OF MANAGERS 

OF "i' Hifi 

mW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

For 1877 and 1878. 



ejl.eci:ed jxjiisrE -4., x&vv. 



President, 

WILLIAM A. COLE. 

Tice-President, 

EDWAKD HINCKEN. 

Treasurer, 

BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

Secretary, 

WILLIAM I. PHILLIPS. 

Managers : 

JOHN Ot. DALE, SAMUEL DALLY, 

CHARLES PRATT, E. M. VAN TASSEL, 

JOHN P. TOWNSEND, STARKS EDSON, 

CHARLES R. HICKOX, THOMAS BAMBBR, 

E. R. LIVERMORE, GOULD H. THORP, 

MUNROE CRANE, WILLIAM I. PHILLIPS. 



Superintendent, 

S. H. GRANT. 

Counsel for the Board, 

WILLIAM R. FOSTER, Jb. 

Consulting Chemist, 

WILLIAM M. HABIRSHAW, 



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STANDING COMMIHEES 

OP THE 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

For 1877 and 1878. 



Finance Committee, 
EDWARD HINCKEN, Chairman, 
JOHN Or. DALE, SAMUEL DALLY. 

Committee on Booms and Fixtures, 
E. R. LIVERMORE, Chairman. 
MUNROB CRANE, E. M. VAN TASSEL. 

Floor Committee, 
JOHN P. TOWNSEND, Chairman. 
WILLLOI I. PHILLIPS, GOULD H. THORP. 

Law Committee, 
CHARLES PRATT, Chairman. 
B. C. BOGERT, THOMAS BAMBER. 

Committee on Trade, 
CHARLES R. HICKOX, Chairman. 
JOHN P. TOWNSEto, J. P. ROBINSON, 

WILLIAM H. SWAN, THEODORE I. HUSTED. 

Committee on Information and Statistics, 
SAMUEL DALLY, Ghairmmi. 
STARKS EDSON, FORREST H PARKER, 

HENRY KEMP, J. P. TRUESDELL. 

Tlie Complaint Committee 

Is changed every month, so that each member of the Board may serve upon, it in turn. 
The President is ex-officio a member of all Standing Committees. 



AEBITRATION COMMITTEE, 

STEPHEN D. HARRISON, Chairman. 
WILLIAM H. POWER, E. W. COLEMAN, 

S. W. CAREY, JAMES McGEE. 



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TEADE COMMITTEES 

OP THB 

New York Produce Exchange 

For 1877 and 1878. 



Committee on Grain, 
L. HAZELTINE, GJmirman. 
PAUL WORTH, S K. LANE, 

DAYID BINGHAM, GEORGE C. MABTIN. 

Committee on Flour, 
R. B. LtVERMORE, Chairman. 
JANVIER LE DUO, CONSIDER PARISH, 

H. L. DANIELS, W. S. BRACKEN. 

Committee on ProTisions, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, CJiairmom. 
CHARLES G. FOSTER, P. S. HALSTEAD, 

HERBERT TAYLOR, ASA STEVENS. 

Committee on Lard, 
JOHN H. POOL, Glmirman. 
JOHN W. CLOSJl, JOHN SINCLAIR, 

WILLIAM H. FOX, S. R. POST. 

Committee on Petroleum, 
OTTO ARENS, Chairman. 
T. C. BUSHNELL, THOMAS B. BOWRING, 

WILLIAM JAY IVES, PAUL BABCOCK, Jb. 

Committee on NaTal Stores, 
W. F. SOREY, Chairman. 

C. C. ABEL, R. W. PATERSON, 
F. R. ROUTH, Z. J. HALPIN. 

Committee on Distilled Spirits, 
EDGAR P. HILL, Chairmam.. 
J. DOWS MAIRS, EPHRAIM HOWE, 

WILLIAM G. ROSS, GEORGE H. BURNS. 

Committee on Cheese, 
JAMES F. JOYCE, Chidrman. 
THOMAS OSBORNE, M. FOLSOM, 

THOMAS H. STEVENS, S. S. MARPLES. 

Committee on Lighterage, * 

GEORGE H. WEBSTER, Chairman. 

D. M. MUNGER, JOHN McCREERY, 
LANSON BOYER, A. R. GRAY. 

Committee on Oils, 
H. C. COOKE, Chavnnan, 

E. S. WHITMAN, WILLIAM H. KIMBALL, 
WILLIAM J. BOWER, S. W. KNOWLES. 



i:NrSI»ECTOR,S Oin Ei3L.ECTIO:iSr. 

JOHN A. COOPER, Chairman. 
EUGENE L. HfiaRICK, STEPHEN VAN BRUNT, 

GRENVILLE PERRIN, HENRY McGEE, 



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SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Appointed, to i=!ei?ve on Marions Occasions. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed at a meeting of the Orain Trade, held June 6, 1877, to devise apian 
for the speedy transfer of Orain Contracts. 

W. S. WALLACE, Ghairman. 
GEORGE C. MARTIN, ' W. S. MILLER. 



COMMITTEE 

On Pet/roleum Qy/>tations. Appointed hy the Committee on Petroleum^ 
June 18, 1877. 

LIVINGSTON ROE, Ghairman, 
GEORGE H. LINCOLN, EUGENE PITOU. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed hy the President, at a Meeting of the Board of Managers, held July 
19, 1877, on Public Charities. 

A. E. ORR, CJiairman. 
SAMUEL COLGATE, P. A. WELCH, 

EDWARD HTNCKBN, E. H. TOMPKINS, 

CHARLES S. BROWN, A. F. ROBERTS, 

CARLOS COBB, JOHN ROMER, 

E. A. KENT. 



COMMITTEE. 

Appointed hy the President, August 3, 1877, to confer with CounseH and con- 
sider what steps should he taken to recover Claims for Losses occasioned 
hy the late Railroad Riots. 

A. E. ORR, Chairman. 

JOHN H. POOL, EDGAR P. HILL, 

R. B. LIVERMORE, H. C. COOKE, 

L. HAZELTINE, aMaSA SPRING, 

JAMES E. JOYCE, ALEXANDER MACKENZIE. 



At a Meeting of the Committee, hdd October 17, ths following gentlemen wei^e 
appointed a Committee for the Prosecution of Claims. 

A. E. ORR, Chairman. 
S. D. HARRISON, JAMES F. JOYCE. 



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X New York Produce Eocchcmge. 

COMMITTEE 

Appointed by tJie President, at a Meeting of the JExcTumge, held September 18, 
1877, to attend the Funeral of Mr. Ga/rlos Cobb. 

FBANKLm EDSOK, Chairman, 
L. J. N. STARK, JESSE HOYT, 

EDWARD HINCKEN, JOHN S. WARD, 

WILLIAM H. POPHATVT 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, at a Meeting of the Eccchange^ held September 18, 
1877, to attend the Funeral of Mr. Stephen Brush. 

A. S. JEWELL, Chairman. 
BENJAMESr W. FLOYD, ASA STEVENS, 

FORREST H. PARKER, THEODORE JOHNSON, 

HERBERT TAYLOR. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, at a Meeting of the Exchange, held October 18, 
1877, to attend the Fungal of Mr. Duncan R. Mackefrvde, 

JOHN G. DALE, Chairmxm. 

CHARLES G. FRANCKLYN, ALEXANDER MUNN, 

R. J. CORTIS, S. W. CAREY, 

FRANCIS MACDONALD, JAMES HAUGHTON, 

HERBERT TAYLOR, EDWARD PHILLIPS, 

DAYID BINGHAM, JACOB B. SMULL, 

SAMUEL DALLY, JOHN E. L GRAINGER, 

BENJAMIN LOGAN, ANDREW UNDERHILL, 

ARCHIBALD HARRIS, ARTHUR SINCLAIR 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, at a Meeting of the Excha/nge^ hdd November 8, 
1877, to attend the Funeral of Mr. Bobert S. Tait. 

EPHRAIM HOWE, Chairman. 
JAMES A. WEBB, HENRY PIKE, 

JOHN D. MAIRS, FRANK CURTISS, 

FRANKLIN EDSON, E. P. HILL, 

GEORGE H. BURNS. 



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BOARD OF MANAGEHS 

OF THE 

IE¥ YOEK PEODUCE EXCHANGE 

For 1876 and 1877. 



ELicCTEr) jxtne; s, Lsre. 



President, 

L. J. N. STARK. 

Tice-President, 

WILLIAM A. COLE. 

Treasurer, 

BENJAMIN 0. BOGERT. 

Secretary, 

JOHN A. AMELUNG. 

Iffanagers : 

S. A. SAWYER, CHARLES R. HIOKOX, 

JOHN G. DALE, E. M. VAN TASSEL, 

JAMES L. FLINT, J. A. AMELUNG, 

E. R. LIVERMORE, FREDERICK MEISSNER, 

FRED'K SHERWOOD, GEORGE C. MARTIN, 

SAMUEL DALLY, MUNROE CRANE. 



Saperintendent, 

S. H. GRANT. 

Ooansel for the Board, 

WILLIAM R. FOSTER, Je. 



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STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

For 1876 and 1877. 



Finance Committee, 

W. A, COLE, CMirman. 

S. A. SAWYER, JOHN G. DALE. 

Committee on Booms and Fixtures, 

E. R. LIVERMORE, Chairman. 

J. A. AMELUNa, CHARLES R. HICKOX 

Floor Committee, 

FREDERICK SHERWOOD, Chairman. 

MUNROE CRANE, E. M. YAN TASSEL. 

laTf Committee, 

JAMES L. FLINT, Chairman. 

B. C. BOGERT, GEORGE C. MARTIN. 

Committee on Trade, 
CHARLES R. HICKOX, Chairman, 
WILLIAM H. SWAN, JAMES L. FLINT, 

HENRY H. ROGERS, WILLIAM M. GRAY. 

Committee on Information and Statistics, 
SAMUEL DALLY, Chairman. 
E. O. LAMSON, FREDERICK MEISSNER, 

POPE C. TEFFT, STARKS EDSON. 

The Complaint Committee 

Is changed every month, so that each member of the Board may serve npoa it in turn. 
The President Is ex-officio a member of all Standing Committees. 



ARBITEATION COMMITTEE, 

EDWARD HINCKEN, ChaHrman. 
A. H. PHILLIPS, A M. HOYT, 

0. O. C. MULLER, ASA STEVENS. 



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TEADE COMMITTEES 

OF THE 

New York Produce Exchange 

For 1876 and 1877. 



Committee on Grain, 

L. HAZELTINE, Chairman. 

PAUL WORTH, WILLIAM S. WALLACE, 

ALEXANDER BONNELL, JOHN M. HUGHES. 

Committee on Flour, 

R. B. LIVERMORE, Chairman. 

W. E. TREADWELL, W. I. PHILLIPS, 

GEORGE W. SMITH, H. L. DANIELS. 

Committee on Provisions, 

ALEXANDER E. ORR, Chairman. 

FRANK A. FERRIS, CHARLES PARKER, 

THOMAS H. STEVENS, HERBERT TAYLOR. 

Committee on lard, 

JOHN H. POOL, Chaii^an. 

WALTER F. BRUSH, JOHN W. CLOSE, 

JOHN SINCLAIR, PETER A. WELCH. 

Committee on Petroleum, 

JAMES McGEE, Chairman. 

T. C. BUSHNELL, OTTO ARENS, 

WILLLAM JAY IVES, T. B. BOWRING. 

Committee on Naval Stores, 

W. F. SOREY, Chairman. 

C. C. ABEL, F. R. ROUTH, 
R. W. PATERSON, F. W. KRIEGE. 

Committee on Distilled Spirits, 

E. P. HILL, Chairman. 

ISAAC BRISTOW, R. S. TAIT, 

W. S. MILLER, F. B. HOWELL. 

Committee on Lighterage, 

GEORGE H. WEBSTER, Chairman. 

JOHN McCREERY, LANSON BOYER, 

D. M. MUNGER, A. R. GRAY. 

Committee on Cheese, 

JOHN ANDERSON, Chaii^an. 
THOMAS OSBORNE, THOMAS BAMBER, 

M. FOLSOM, HENRY KEMP. 



INSPECTORS OF ELECTION, 

WILLIAM H. FOX, Chairman. 
JAMES B. MOUNT, CHARLES H. JOHNSON, 

AUGUST QS H. SIMONS, WILLIAM OEST. 



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SPECIAL COMMITTEES' 

Appointed, to serve on various Occasions. 



COM MITTEE 

On Petroleum Quotations. Appointed hy the Committee on Petroleum, 
June 19, 1876. 

LIVINGSTON ROE, Chairman. 
eEOReE H. LINCOLN, EUGENE PITOU. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, August 3, 1876, with reference to a New Ex- 
change Building. 
E. R. LIVERMORE, Chairman. 
S. A. SAWYER, JOHN D. MAIRS, 

BENJAMIN W. FLOYD, GUSTAV SCHWAB. 



COMM ITTEE 

Appointed by the President^ August 3, 1876, to confer in connection with other 

Commercial Organizations of the City, with the Dock Commissioners, 

relative to Improvements going on under their charge. 

WILLIAM A. COLE, Chairman. 

S. D. HARRISON, JESSE HOYT, 

JOHN S. WILLIAMS, M. M. CALEB, 

A. M. UNDERHILL. 



COMMITTEE 

On Public Charities^ Appointed by the President, September 21, 1876. 
A, E. ORR, Chairman. 

• JAMES ARKELL, E. R. LIVERMORE, 

JAMES W. McCULLOH, E. A. KENT, 

A. S. SPAULDING, J. H. DRAKE, 

ALEXANDER BONNELL, ZOPHAR MILLS, 

EDWARD HINCKEN, CHARLES R. HICKOX, 

WILLIAM BLANCH ARD, L. B. SHAW, 

E H. TOMPKINS, JOSIAH MACY, JR. 



DELEGATES 

Appointed by the President, September 30, 1876, to attend the Annual 

Meeting of the National Association of Pork Packers and Oarers, 

to be held at Indianapolis, October 4, 1876. 

J. A. AMELUNG, SAMUEL DALLY. 



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xvi New Yorlc Produce JEJxckange. 

COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the Board of Managers, October 5, 1876, to make Arrange- 
ments for a Merchants' Day , for Visiting the Centennial Exhibition 
at Philadelphia. 

L. J. N. STARK, Chairman. 
WILLIAM A. COLE, GEORGE C. MARTIN. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President^ Octobet' 6,, 1876, to represent the Exchange at the 
Fun&ral of Josiah Macy, Jr. 

L. J. N. STARK, Chairman. 

WILLIAM ROCKAFELLER, DAVID DOWS, 

-JAMES McGEE, J. A. BOSTWICK, 

FRANKLIN EDSON, BENJAMIN W. FLOYD, 

CHARLES PRATT, LEONARD HAZELTINE, 

E. P. FABBRI. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed at a Meeting of the Petroleum Trade, held November 2, 1876, to 
effect an official interchange of Petroleum Quotations, between our 
own and Foreign Mcchanges. 

OTTO ARENS, GhaiiiTian. 
A. PAGBNSTECHER, H. H. ROGERS. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, November 16, 1876, to represent the Exchange at 
the Funeral of John 8. Williams. 

DAVID DOWS, Chairman. * 

STEPHEN D. HARRISON, CHARLES L. WRIGHT, 

STEPHEN W. CAREY, WILLIAM H. SWAN, 

EDWARD HINCKEN, L. J. N. STARK, 

JOHN G. DALE, WILLIAM A. COLE, 

R. J. CORTIS, ALEXANDER E. ORR, 

C. G. FRANCKLYN, JOHN W. MASON, 

THOMAS HENDERSON, Jr , CARLOS COBB, 
F. W. J. HURST, WILLIAM H. PHILIPS, 

GUSTAV SCHWAB, EDWARD CROMWELL, 

W. D. MORGAN, ALEXANDER MUNN, 

CHARLES LAMSON. 



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Special CorrmvUtees, ^ xvii" 

COM MITTEE 

Appointed hy tJie President^ Decemher 11, 1876, to Nominate a Special 

Committee of Nine, to whom sliovld he referred the subject of 

a New Exchange Building. 

E. R. LIYERMORE, Chairman. 
BENJAMIN W. FLOYD. JOHN D. MAIRS, 

S. A SAWYER, GUSTAV SCHWAB. 



COM MITTEE 

Appointed hy the President, December 13, 1876, to confer with the Bailroad 

terminating at New York, relative to Freights from the West 

to the Seaboard. 

FRANKLIN EDSON, Chairman. 
THEODORE I. HUSTED, H. O. ARMOUR, 

JAMES A. BOSTWICK, R. H. LAIMBEER. 



COM M ITTEE 

Appointed by the President, December 13, 1876, on Canal TraTiaportatian 

and Legislation. 

LEONARD HAZBLTINE, Chairman. 
WILLLiM H. PHILIPS, GEORGE W. SMITH, 

EDWARD ANNAN, ORSON BREED. 



CO MMITTEE 

Appointed by the President, December 13, 1876, to confer with like Com- 
mittees from other Commercial Organizations with reference to the 
use of the Belt Bailroad for Freight Purposes. 

WILLIAM A. COLE, Chairman. 
CHARLES SPEAR, E. H. TOMPKINS, 

L. F. HOLMAN, J. P. ROBINSON. 



COM MITTEE 

Appointed by the President, December 14, 1876, to confer with like Com- 
mittees from the Chamber of Commerce and the Ship Owners' 
Association of the State of New Y(yrk, relative to " 
Quarantine Matters at this Port. 

JOHN H. BOYNTON, Ohamnan, 
JOHN G. DALE, JAMES HENRY. 



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xviii New York Produce Exchange. 

C^OMM ITTEE 

Appointed at a Meeting of tTie Grain Trade, held December 15, 1876, to confer 

with the Committee on Grain, relative to proposed clianges in the 

Agreement between tJie New York Prodicce Exchange 

and the Railroad Companies. 

CHARLES R. HIOKOX, Chairman. 
H. T. KNEELAND, GEORGE C. MARTIN, 

DAVID BINGHAM, FRANKLIN EDSON, 

E. R. LIYERMORE. 



At a meeting of the foregoing Committee of Conference, held December 16, 
1876, the following Sub- Committee was appointed to Remse 
the present Grading} Mules. * 

LEONARD HAZELTINE, Chairman. 
DAVID BINGHAM, GEORGE 0. MiRTIN, 

E. R. LIVERMORE, H. T, KNEELAND. 



CO M MITTEE 

Appointed by the President, January 2, 1877, to co-operate with similar 

Committees from other Commercial Bodies, relative to tlie proposed 

Statue of Liberty to be erected in New York Ha/rhor 

by French citizens. 

S. A. SAWYER, Chairman. 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, ROBERT S. HOLT, 

CHARLES H. MARSHALL, BENJAMIN W. FLOYD. 



COM MITTEE 

Appointed at a Meeting of the Grain Trade^ held Februa/ry 7, 1877, to 

confer with the Committee on Grain, relative to 

Grades of Winter Wheat. 

W. S. PRESTON, Chai/rman. 
GEORGE C. MARTIN, E. W. COLEMAN. 



COMMITTEE 

Appointed at a Meeting of the Oil Trade, held March 31, 1877, to Draft 
Etdes for the Government of the Oil Trade. 

HEXRY C. C60KE, Chairman. 
P. M. MILLSPAUGH, THOMAS G. HUNT, 

E. S. WHITMAN, WILLIAM H. KIMBALL, 

MILO H. PARSONS. 



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Special Committees. xix 

COMMITTEE 

Appointed at a Meeting of the Grain Trade, Tield AprU 6, 1877, to c<m8ider 

Grades of Com, 

GEORGE 0. MARTIN, Chairman, 
H. T. KNEELAND, DAVID BINGHAM, 

ROBERT P. CLAPP, JAMES .WYLD. 



DELEGATES 

Appointed by the President, April 28, 1877, "^ act with the Special Cmn- 

mittee on Canals, in urging v/pon the State Senate the adoption 

of the resolution which has just passed the Assembly, 

authori'dng the Canal Board to reduce the 

Tolls one-half :' 

ALEXANDER E. ORR, Chairman. 

CARLOS COBB, JOHN H. POOL, 

THEODORE I. HI3STED, L. F. HOLMAN, 

B. W. FLOYD, E. W. MASCORD, 

W. R. PRESTON, EDWARD ANNAN, 

J. M. REQTJA, R. L. WILLIAMS, 

F. P. ALBERT, JAMES WADSWORTH. 



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EMPLOYES. 

Superintenderit S. H. GRANT. 

Statistician ELMORE H. WALKER. 

aerk FERDINAND WARD . 

Assistant Statistician : .FRANK H. TUCKER. 

Bep(yrter of Produce JEtecei/pU WILLIAM H. TRUMAN. 

CasUefr ; PAUL O. RYCKMAN. 

Cmimittee Clerk and Janitor WILLIAM E. FLETCHER. 

Stmograph&r WILLIAM H. PEARSON, Jr. 

Dom-keeper—ym.tQhsiW street FRANK M FITZGERALD. 

Moore street CASPER BOGERT. 

Cdllerof Grain WILLIAM L. EICHELL. 

Telegram Meporter. ROBERT W. ALBERTSON. 

Clerk to Statistician CHARLES 0. PIETSCH. 

Coat Room Attendant HENRY C. RALL. 

Reading Borni Attendant HARRY F. ASBURY. 

EDWARD PATTERSON. 

.WILLIAM J. ROSE. 

,^ „ ) FRANK A. STEWART. 

MessengerBoys WaLTER E. LEWIS. 

HENRY T. JONES. 

CHARLES D. FREEMAN. 

Porter CHARLES E. HICKS. 

Assistant Pc/rter DAVID HARTLEY. 

Night Watchman HERMAN TAPPE. 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

New Yom Commercial Association, 

From 1861 to 1868, 

AJSTD OF THE 

New Yoek Produce Exchange, 

From 1868 to 1877. 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

lEW Yore Commercial Association, 

1861^62. 



President, 

JOHN B. WEIGHT. 

Vice-President, 

JAMES P. WALLACE. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 



JOHN J. KINGSFORD, 
CHARLES LAMSON, 
GEORGE D. CRAGIN, 
JOHN W. THORNE, 
E. W. COLEMAN, 
FRANCIS A. RAY, 



Secretary, 
EDWARD M. BANKS. 
Managers : 

GEORGE B. POWELL, 
BALDWIN N. FOX, 
EDWARD M. BANKS, 
FRANCIS P. SAGE, 
SAMUEL NIMMONS, 
ISAAC H. REED. 



. 1862-63. 

President, 

JAMES P. WALLACE. 

Vice-President, 

JOHN J. KINGSFOED. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

GEORGE D. CRAGIN, 
FRANCIS A. RAY, 
STEPHEN D. HARRISON, 
JOHN W. THORNE, 
E. W. COLEMAN, 
JOHN S. WILLIAMS, 



Secretary, 
•WILLIAM E. BARNES. 
Managers : 

SMITH FANCHER, 
AUGUSTUS E. MASTERS, 
GEORGE B. POWELL, 
WILLIAM H. SWAN, 
WILLIAM E. BARNES, 
HERMAN STUTZER,* 



ISAAC H. REED.f 

• Readgned May 15tli, 1862. t Elected May 15tli, 



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OFFICERS 



OF T HW 



lEW York Commercial Association, 



1863-64. 



President, 

AECHIBALD BAXTEK. 

Tice-President, ^ 

GEOEGE B. POWELL. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 



GEORGE D. CRAGIN, 
WILLIAM H. NEWMAN, 
JOHN W. THORNE, 
JOHN J. MARVIN, 
SMITH FANCHER, 
AUGUSTUS E. MASTERS, 



Secretary, 
JOHN J. MARVIN. 

Managers : 

JAMES P. WALLACE, 
ELIAB H. TOMPKINS, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, 
AMBROSE SNOW, 
EDGAR HYATT, 
EDWARDS W. COLEMAN. 



1864-65. 



President, 

GEOEGE D. OEAGIN. 

Vice-President, 

EDWAED HINOKEN. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

WILLIAM H. NEWMAN, 
AUGUSTUS E. MASTERS, 
JOHN J, MARVIN, 
ELIAB H. TOMPKINS, 
EDGAR HYATT, 
ROBERT P. GETTY, 



Secretary, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON. 

Managers : 

WILLIAM H. HARRIS, 
JOHN R. GRIFFITH, 
WILLIAMS HOWLAND, 
ERASTUS S. BROWN, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
GEORGE MOORE. 



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OFFICERS 



OF THE 



New York Commercial Association, 

1865-66. 



President, 

• EDWAED HINOKEN. 

Vice-President, 

AUGUSTUS E. MASTEES. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 



WILLIAM H. NEWMAN. 
WILLIAM H. HARRIS, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
WILLIAMS HOWL AND, 
ROBERT P. GETTY, 
JOHN J. MARVIN, 



Secretary, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON. 

Managers : 

EDGAR HYATT, 
ALFRED M. HQYT, 
ERASTUS S. BROWN, 
ALBERT PEARCE, 
EDWARD BILL, 
CARLOS COBB. 



1866-67. 



President, 

AUGUSTUS E. MASTEES. 

Vice-President, 

WILLIAM H. HAEEIS. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 



WILLIAM H. NEWMAN, 
ERASTUS S. BROWN, 
EDGAR HYATT, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
WILLIAMS HOWLAND, 
GEORGE W. KENDALL, 
1 



Secretary, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON. 

Managers : 

EDWARD MARTIN, 
CARLOS COBB, 
ALFRED M. HOYT, 
WILLIAM W. WICKES, 
ROBERT P. GETTY, 
WILLIAM A. BROWN. 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

New Yore Commercial Association, 

1867-68.* 



Treasurer, 
BBNJAMm C. BOGERT. 

LEANDER B. SHAW. 
EDWARD HINCKEN, 
THOMAS W. GRIFFm, 
JACOB H. HERRICK; 
JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
ALFRED M. HOYT, 



President, 

EEASTUS S. BEOWN. 

Vice-President, 

BOBEET P. GETTY. 

Secretary, 
JOHN H. BOYNTON. 
Managers : 

EDWARD MARTIN, 
JOHN ROMER, 
VAN DEUSEN MAIRS, 
ROBERT S. HOLT, 
EPGAR HYATT, 
HARVEY E. HICKS. 



1868-69. 



President, 

EDWAED HINCKEN. 

Vice-President, 

STEPHEN D. HAEEISON. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

LEANDER B. SHAW^ 
JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
EDWARD MARTIN, 
M. M. CALEB, 
SAMUEL A. SAWYER, 
EDGAR HYATT, 



Secretary, 
ROBERT S. HOLT. 
Managers : 

JACOB H. HERRICK, 
HARVEY E. HICKS, 
ROBERT S. HpLT, 
WILLIAM BLANCHARD, 
GILBERT OAKLEY, 
H. O. ARMOUR. 



* By an Amendment to the Charter, made February 13th, 1868, the title of the Institution 
was changed from; "New York CJommeeioial Association" to "New Yobk Pboducb 
Exchange." 



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OFFICERS 



OP THE 



New York Produce Exchange, 

1869-70. 



President, 

STEPHEN D. HAEEISON. 

Tice-President, 

WILLIAM H. NEWMAN. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 



D. A. ELDRIDGE, 
ROBERT S. HOLT, 
WILLIAM BLANCHARD, 
JACOB H. HERRICK, 
ARCHIBALD BAXTER, 
EDGAR HYATT, . 



Secretary, 
ROBERT S. HOLT. 

Man aiders: 

JOHN H. BOYNTON, 
R. H. LAIMBEER, 
M. M. CALEB, 
CONSIDER PARISH, 
GILBERT OAKLEY, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR. 



1870-71. 



President, 

ISAAC H. EEED. 

Vice-President, 

WILLIAM W. WICKES. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

JAMES McBRIDE, 
EDWARD HmCKEN, 
JOHN W. THORNE, 
ERASTUS S. BROWN, 
C. H. MEDAY, 
EDWARD C. RICE, 



Secretary, 
EDWARD C. RICE. 

Managers : 

J. S. SUTPHEN, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, 
JAMES McCHESNEY, 
FRANCIS A, RAY, 
WILLIAM R. FOSTEP, 
GILBERT OAKLEY 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

lEW York Produce Exchange, 

1871-72. 



President, 

ISAAC H. EEED. 



JOHN 

Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN 0. BOaERT, 



JOHN ANDERSON, 
ERASTUS S. BROWN, 
ALEXANDER BONNELL, 
CARLOS COBB, 
FRANKLIN EDSON, 
EDGAR HYATT, 
THEODORE I. HITSTED, 

* Resigned September 7th, 



Vice-President, 

H. BOTNTON. 

Secretary, 
JAMES McBRIDE. 
Managers : 

CHRISTLiN H. MEDAY,* 
JAMES McBRIDE, 
JAMES W. McCULLOH, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, 
J. B. SMULL, 
EDWARD MARTIN, t 



1871. 



t Elected November 2d, 1871. 



1872-73. 



President, 

ABEAM S. JEWELL. 

Vice-President, 

BENJAMIN W. FLOYD. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

FRANKLIN EDSON, 
ALFRED M. HOYT,* 
ALFRED ROMER, 
L. J. N. STARK, 
HORATIO REED, 
WILLIAM E. TREADWELL,f 
DAVID BINGHAM, 
ALEXANDER E. ORR, ' 



Secretary, 
J. E. HULSHIZER. 
Managers : 

JAMES E. HULSHIZER, 
ARCHIBALD BAXTER,^ 
JOHN B. COOPER, 
SAMUEL COLGATE, 
THEODORE I. HUSTED,§ 
JAMES W. McCULLOH, II 
J. H. HEBRICK,1| 



* Declined to serve Jime 6, 1872. 

t Resigned October 3, 1872. 

t Declined to serve June 6, 1872. 



§ Elected June 6, 1872, 
I Elected June 6, 1872 . 
H Elected November 7, 1872. 



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OFFICERS 

OP TUB 

lEW York Produce Exchange, 

1873-74. 



President, 

FEANKLIN EDSON. 

Tice-Presidefit, 

BENJAMIN W. ELOYD. 



"Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN 0. BOGERT. 

L. J. N. STARK, 
ANDREW J. WOOD * 
JOHN G. DALE, 
E. W. COLEMAN, 
JOHN M. WEBB,t 
WILLIAM H. PHILIPS, 
FREDERICK MEISSNER, 

* Resigned September 4, 1873. 

t Resigned December 4, 1873. 



Secretary, 

WILLIAM H. PHILIPS. 

Managers : 

J. H. HERRICK, 

MUNROE CRANE, 

L. F. HOLMAN, 

CHARLES SPEAR, 

A S. SPAULDING, 

CHARLES T. GOODWIN,}: 

FORREST H. PARKER.§ 

t Elected September 9, 1873. 
§ Elected December 9, 1873. 



1874-75. 



President, 

FEANKLIN EDSON. 

Tice-President, 

BENJAMIN W. FLOYD. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

A. S. SPAULDING, 
WILLIAM H. PHILIPS, 
J. A. BOSTWICK, 
JOHN G. DALE, 
JOHN H. POOL, 
CHARLES SPEAR, 



Secretary, 
WILLIAM H. PHILIPS. 

Managers : 

L. J. N. STARK, 
L. F. HOLMAN, 
FORREST H. PARKER, 
JOHN ROMER, 
J. H. HERRICK, 
LEONARD HAZELTINE. 



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OFFICERS 

OF THE 

lEW lORK Produce Exchange, 

1875-76. 



President, 

BENJAMIN W. FLOYD. 

Tice-President, 

CHAKLES SPEAE. 

Treasurer, Secretary, 

WILLIAM H. PHILIPS. E. W. MASCORD. 

Managers : 
L. J. N. STARK, S. S. CARLL,t 

A. S. SPAULDING,* JAMES D WYNKOOP, 

EDWARD HINCKEN, FORREST H. PARKER, 

E. R. LIVERMORE, E. W. MASCORD, 

HARVEY E. HICKS, J. A. AMELUNG, 

JAMES McGEE, SAMUEL A. SAWYER,t 

W. F. MARTIN, ASA STEVENS. 

* Resigned Febraary 8th, 18T6. t Elected June 21st, 1875. 

t Declined to serve June 10th, 1875. § Elected February 21st, 1876. 



1876-77. 



President, 

L. J. N. STAEK. 

Vice-President, 

WILLIAM A. COLE. 

Treasurer, Secretary, 

BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. J. A. AMELUNG. 

Managers : 

S. A. SAWYER, C. R. HICKOX, 

JOHN G. DALE, E. M. VAN TASSEL, 

JAMES L. FLINT, J. A. AMELUNG, 

E. R LIVERMORE, ' HORATIO REED,* 

FREDERICK SHERWOOD, FREDERICK MEISSNER, 

SAMUEL DALLY, GEORGE C. MARTIN, 

MUNROE CRANE, t 
* Resigned January 4th, 1877. t Elected February 1st, 1877. 



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OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Iew York Produce Exchange, 

1877-78. 



President, 

WILLIAM A. COLE. 

Tiee-President, 

EDWAED HINOKEN. 



Treasurer, 
BENJAMIN C. BOGERT. 

JOHN G. DALE, 
CHARLES PRATT, , 
JOHN P. TOWNSEND, 
CHARLES R. HICKOX, 
E. R, LIVERMORE, 
MUNROE CRANE, 



Secretary, 
WILLIAM I. PHILLn>S. 

Managers : 

SAMUEL DALLY, 
E. M. VAN TASSEL, 
STARKS EDSON, 
THOMAS BAMBER, 
GOULD H. THORP, 
WILLIAM I. PHILLIPS. 



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TEEASURER'S REPORT 

OF THE 

New York Produce Exchange 

For the Year ending May 1, 1877. 



SXJRI'IaTJS TnTJ]|srr> A.CCOUNT. 



Dr. 

To Balance on hand as 
per last Annual Re- 
port: 

Casli $5,543 92 

Notes 1,900 00 



$7,443 92 



To Amount since received : 

Interest on New York City 

Bonds 14,800 00 

Interest on U. S. Grovernment 
Bonds. 7,141 39 



$29,385 31 



Or. 



By $15,000 IT. S. Government 6 
per cent. Bonds, due 1887, 

, @ 1.13;<^ $17,025 00 

Commission and Expressage on 

same .27 75 

By $8,000 U. S. Government 6 
per cent. Bonds, due 1887, 

@ 1.14% 9,150 00 

Commission and Expressage on 

same 14 00 

Notes on hand 1,900 00 

Cash ! 1,268 56 



$29,385 31 



STATEMENT OF SURPLUS FUND ACCOUNT. 





Par Value. 


Cost. 


Present Value. 


United States Government 6 per cent. Cur- 
rencv Bonds, due 1869 


$110,000 00 
23,000 00 

10,000 00 

110,000 00 

95,000 00 

20,000 00 
3,168 56 


$125,950 00 
26,216 75 

11,687 50 

114,950 00 

91,425 00 

21,550 00 
♦3,168 56 


$137,500 00 
26,306 25 

11,175 00 

127,600 00 

102,125 00 


United States 5-20 Bonds, due 1887 


United States Government 5 per cent. Gold 
Bonds, due 1881 


New York City 7 per cent. Consolidated Stock 
Bonds, due 1894 


New York City 6 per cent. Park Improvement 
Bonds, due 1901 


New York City 7 per cent. Accumulated Debt 
Bonds, due 1887 


22 300 00 


Notes and Cash 


3,168 56 






$371,168 56 


$394,947 81 


•$430,174 81 



i "William A. Cole, 
John g. Dale, 
S. A. Sawyer, 

Finance Committee, 
New York, May 25, 1877. 



B. C. BOGERT, Treasurer. 



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Treasurer's Report 

CTIRREISTT ]EXI>EJlSrSEI A.CtJOTJNT. 



To Receipts from : 

Annual Duas $48,756 00 

Stands and Drawers 2,610 00 

Rent of Telegraph Offices 3,712 61 

Transfer Fees 1,340 00 

Market Reports 4,323 00 

Licenses of Weighers, &c 22 00 

Sale of Annual Reports 12 00 

Sale of Merchandise 521 20 

Grain Inspector, Rent, &c 360 41 

Interest on Bank Balances 728 23 

Centennial Excursion Commit- 
tee ^ 60 00 

Certificates 14 00 



$62,459 45 



Cr. 

By Salaries : — 

S. H. Grant, Superintendent. . . $5,000 00 

B. H. Walker, Statistician 4,500 00. 

F. H. Tucker, Ass't to Statis- 
tician 2,000 00 

W. H. Truman, Produce Re- 
porter 1,500 00 

P. O. Ryckman, Cashier ... . 1,200 00 

W. E. Fletcher, Com'tee Clerk. 1,200 00 

Ferdinand Ward, Clerk 1,200 00 

F. M. Fitzgerald, Doorkeeper . . 1,000 00 
Casper Bogert, " 900 00 
W. H. Pearson, Jr., Steno- 
grapher 1,011 00 

J. M, Meacham, Ass't to Statisti- 
cian 267 56 

W. L. BicheU, Telegraph Clerk. . 500 00 

C. 0. Pietsch, " " .. 242 66 
Messenger Boys, Coat Room and 

Reading Room Attendants.. . . 1,686 69 

Herman Tappe, Watchman 732 00 

By Telegraphic Service 9,262 09 

Printing and Stationeiy 1, 555 65 

Newspapers, Directories and 

Public Documents 881 99 

Cleaning and Materials. 3,947 99 

Repairs and Fixtures 1,839 80 

Insurance 241 07 

Coal 690 12 

Gas 297 50 

Ice 250 00 

Sprinkling Streets 136 66 

City, County, and Water Taxes. 5,119 28 

Inspectors of Election. 420 00 

Counsel Fees 570 00 

Delegations 543 84 

National Board of Trade Assess- 
ment 1,835 05 

Cost of Annual Report 3,155 58 

Rent 2,585 00 

Sundry Incidental Expenses .... 372 07 

$56,643 60 

By Deficiency, May 1st, 1876 359 78 

Cash on hand. May Ist, 1877 .... 5,456 12 

$62,459 45 



Statement op Current Expense Account. 



To Credit of New Account $6,440 12 



$6,440 12 



Cr. 

By Annual Dues stiU unpaid $984 00 

By Cash in Treasury 5,456 12 



$6,440 12 



B. C. BOGERT, Treasurer. 



{ William A. Cole, 
Audited and Approved, < John G. Dale, 

I S. A. SAWYER, 

Finamce Committee. 
New York, May 25, 1877. 



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PROOEEDIlSrGS 

AT THE 

ANNUAL MEETING, 

TUESDAY, MAY 29, 1877. 



The Annual Meeting of the New York. Produce Exchange 
was held at their rooms^ on Tuesday, the 29th day of May, 
1877, at half past one o'clock P. M. 

Mr. L. J. N. Stark, President, occupied the chair, and 
called the meeting to order by announcing that the meeting 
was held in accordance with a provision of the By-Laws. 

The President then addressed the meeting as follows : 

Oentlemen of the New York Produce Exchange: 

My executive administration draws to a close. During 
the brief period of its continuance this Exchange has at all 
times been the centre of my earnest solicitude, and it is with 
feelings of relief, not unattended with a considerable degree 
of satisfaction at the result of our common labors, that I now 
surrender back to you this responsible trust. In doing so, 
precedent, and the proprieties of this occasion, require that I 
should make suggestive reference to such of the more impor- 
tant events of the current fiscal year as are most notably con- 
nected with the interests of the Exchange. Into its past 
history I have no occasion to enter, as my predecessors, in the 
fulfillment of their duty, have left little in that direction to 
explore. Nor shall I enlarge upon the general or political 
movement of the times. 

It may not, however, be without its advantage to direct your 
attention for a moment to a single fact connected with the 
great historic event of the year, the Centennial Exposition. 
By the wonderful diversity of production there brought 



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12 ' New York Produce Exchange. 

together under our observation we could not fail to discover 
that however independent the nations of the earth may be 
commonly regarded in their political institutions^ yet they are 
in no inconsiderable respect dependent upon each other for the 
necessaries, the comforts and the luxuries of their daily life. 
And as a natural consequence of all this, the beneficent doc- 
trine of the interdependence of nations receives new sanction, 
and assumes greater importance. To equalize the various 
conditions of mankind, to carry around the world the trades of 
freedom, the arts of civilization, and the triumphs of Chris- 
tianity ; these are the ordinary missionary work of the "Amer- 
ican Merchant," and little higher work than this is given 
for man to do. 

By invitation of the commercial organizations of New York, 
the Annual Meeting of the National Board of Trade was 
held in this city in June last, at which the Commercial 
Exchanges of the United States, the Dominion of Canada, 
and several of the Exchanges of Europe, were represented. 
The importance of this meeting we have not time to discuss 
here, further than to say that it has done much towards pro- 
moting a better understanding of conamercial transactions 
throughout the entire Brotherhood of American Merchants. 
In the endeavor to promote reciprocal trade relations between 
our General G overnment and those of foreign powers, it has 
made commendable progress, and should be encouraged in its 
work by the co-operation of this Exchange. Step, by step it 
will be the means of establishing a more general uniformity 
of commercial usage, and thereby remove much of the embar- 
rassment which is now imposed upon mercantile transactions 
by the ever- varying and conflicting customs which exist in the 
commercial world, until at last International Law shall possess 
as wide a scope and as great a measure of utility in commerce 
as in politics. 

Keturning, then, to that subject most dear to me, and I trust 
to us all, " Our Exchange/' let me call your attention to its 
current operations, its financial condition, and its more press- 
ing needs. A detailed statement of our labors in this regard 
it is unnecessary for me to give. The complete history and 



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Proceedings at the Annual Meeting. 13 

perfect record of the work of the Exchange will be found in 
the report of our Superintendent, which will be published in 
the next annual I'eport, which volume should, and I trust will, 
receive earlier publication than heretofore.. 

The Treasurer's report will fully exhibit our financial status, 
and I hazard Kttle in saying that it will receive your most 
hearty approval. Prom the Surplus Fund we have drawn 
nothing during the year for current expenses, but have added 
thereto the sum of $21,941 39, making the Surplus Fund 
invested in registered Bonds of the United States and of the 
City of New Tort of the par value of $371,168 56, and hav- 
ing a present market value of $430,174 81 ; we also own the 
building we now occupy, which cost the Exchange $265,000. 
The current expense account of the year shows also an un- 
expended balance of $6,440 12. 

Occupying as we do the centre of the Exchanges of a conti- 
nent, the subject of a New Exchange Building, whose fair 
proportions and ample accommodations shall be more in keep- 
ing with the needs of our members, and the honorable position 
we occupy in the commercial world, has deservedly and at a 
very recent period received your serious consideration. I 
regret that no final or satisfactory determination of the matter 
has yet been reached. But whether you decide to build a new 
Exchange or not, our present building requires more or less 
of alteration and repair, and something, too, must be done to 
improve its ventilation. 

Apart from the warm interest manifested in this question 
and the complaints of insufficient accommodation on the part 
of our members, the year has passed quietly and with little 
controversy. All the machinery of the Exchange, your officers, 
managers, the various committees, and employees, have worked 
in complete harmony. Notwithstanding the many and impor- 
tant questions submitted to the variotis committees, demanding 
their most intelligent and thoughtful consideration, it is grat- 
ifying to know that their decisions have uniformly commanded 
the respect and approval of all. With pleasure and pride, too, 
we record the fact that but three cases of difference between 
members have been referred to the Board of Managers during 



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14 New York Produce Excbxmge, 

the year, one of whicli was dismissed, and the other two were 
settled by arbitration. The Board of Managers have not 
found it necessary, nor have they been called upon in a single 
instance, to discipline a member, which we believe to be the 
result of a better understanding of our rules, and our duties 
under them, as well as of the intelligent action of the Trade 
Committees in adjusting at the time all business questions or 
disputes brought before them. 

The Charter and By-Laws of this Exchange constitute us, 
in no unimportant or limited sense, a " Commonwealth of 
Merchants." The obligations of membership are made com- 
mensurate with such a position. They are not satisfied by a 
simple conformity on our part to the rules and regulations 
which rightly control our every day transactions, but immersed 
in business and absorbed in our individual pursuits, as we needs 
must be, the higher duty still remains to us to acquire, pre- 
serve, and disseminate such valuable information, and incul- 
cate such just and equitable principles of trade, as shall tend 
to make this Exchange, not only a law unto ourselves, but in 
some sense an authority, instruction and guide, to that great 
Commercial Brotherhood which surrounds us, whose interests 
are identical with, and inseparable from, our own. 

Although implicit credence cannot always be placed in 
ancient maxims, yet it is just as true now as when said by 
Sir Walter Raleigh, that " whosoever commands the sea com- 
mands the trade of the world : whosoever commands the trade 
of the world, commands the riches of the world, and conse- 
quently the world itself To the early recognition of such 
comprehensive principles of statescraft as these it is that 
England owes her supremacy among the nations. Highly 
conservative in her political institutions, she is' yet ever 
among the first to accommodate herself to the ever- varying 
circumstances and exigencies of " Trade and Commerce/' 

Can we, as Americans, truthfully say as much for ourselves.^ 
Are we, as a government, or a people, doing anything to dem- 
onstrate our right to share with her in the rich brokerages, the 
golden harvest of the seas ? With an almost incredible ex- 
penditure of labor and money we have built many thousand 



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Proceedings at the Annual Meeting. 15 

miles of railroad, stretching from every direction down to the 
shore, and then we stop, as having reached the bounds, alike 
of our sovereignty and our enterprise. Content at that pointy 
we become a looker-on, beholding our harbors filled with for- 
eign steamers and vessels receiving our manifold productions, 
which, after completing ocean exchanges, return to their own 
welcome homes, laden with the tributary gold of every land 
as a proper reward for their gallant endeavors. 

And here allow me to call your attention to a letter from 
the Hon. Samuel J. Kandall, of Pa., to the merchants of Gral- 
veston, in which he says : 

*' The time has come, in my opinion, when the policy of the Grovern- 
ment should he to enlarge our trade relations with Mexico and with the 
Central and South American States. 

''It is well for us to study the statistics of the trade between these 
countries and the markets of the world, from which we find that the people 
of the United States are not receiving a due share of the commerce of the 
countries I have named. 

* ' We need more favorable commercial relations and more comprehensive 
trade connections with other nations. Let me cite a few figures to prove 
the truthfulness of my assertion. 

*' The public documents show the foreign commerce of the countries 
lying south of the United States on the American continent to be about 
$520,000,000. Our share of "this amount is about $112,000,000, of which 
only about $37,000,000 is transported in American vessels and under the 
American flag. Such a statement should at once arouse our people from 
^their lethargy. 

"The war stimulated the manufacturing facilities of the North enor- 
mously, and only by the adoption of such a policy can we keep up the activ- 
ity of our manufacturing districts and secure a market for our productions. 

" It is a discredit to our enlightenment that we as a people stand quietly 
by and do not make sufficient endeavor to increase our meagre share of this 
important trade." 

Members of the Produce Exchaage, Merchaats of New 
York, do we find nothing humiliating to us in the contem- 
plation of such a spectacle ? Granted that the question, 
" What is to be done ?'' is not easily answered. It certainly 
is not answered by doing nothing. One thing is certain, no 
State or individual goes unpunished who stands aside in mo- 
ments when the duty of action is laid imperatively on all. 
There never will be rest or peace or advancing prosperity to 
this great commercial city of the continent, until with or 



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16 New Torh^ Produce Exchange. 

without the aid of the Government, lines of American Steam- 
ships, running hence to Europe, shall be permanently estab- 
lished, carrying our exports and imports beneath our country's 
flag. 

Nor is our internal navigation, by which the very heart of 
the nation is reached, and our fields of produce are brought 
into direct communication with the seaboard, of any less im- 
portance to us than our external commerce. Without our system 
of Canals much of all the varied productions of the West 
could not reach us, unless at a cost which would seriously 
retard, if it did not entirely prevent exportation. 

It should ever be borne in mind that New York, like the 
city of Amsterdam, is indebted to her canals for no inconsid- 
erable portion of her wealth and greatness. Without the 
canals the City and State of New York could not have 
obtained their pre-eminence, and without them it is certain 
that they cannot preserve it. 

The necessary expenditure for their maintenance is likely 
soon to be tested, and I feel confident that the public will 
be most agreeably surprised at the sum which will be found 
adequate for the purpose. In* this, and the thorough recog- 
nition of the true commercial principle that not tolls, but 
transactions ; not direct revenue to the State, but increased 
volume of business to the people of the State, is the measure 
of our real prosperity. 

The question of low tolls was thoroughly discussed in both 
Senate and Assembly and before the Canal Board at their 
late sessions. This Association has given the subject its 
earnest attention, and now finds its views reflected in the im- 
portant reduction made in canal tolls, which is an acknowl- 
edgment by both government and people of the importance of 
the canals and their commerce to this City and State. I 
think I can safely say that without the efforts of this Exchange 
the reduction would not have been made. 

The Press, too, which is in our country untrammelled and 
unlimited in its power and capacity, has shown itself alive to 
the issues of the hour, has pointed out our dangers, and bat- 
tled manfully against every /orm of commercial restrictions. 



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Proceedings at the Annual Meeting. 17 

OurEailways^ in the midst of unparalleled depression, still' 
pursue the even tenor of their way, showing unexpected ca- 
pacity for transportation, and when, in addition, they shall 
have entirely overcome the discrimination in the matter of 
freights against the city of New York, and have perfected 
their system of terminal facilities and local distribution, they 
will prove themselves still more our benefactors and increase 
our metropolitan commerce. • 

In conclusion, I desire to thank you for your assistance, kind- 
ness and courtesy to me during the past year. I am proud of 
the institution that has established and maintained until now 
its dignity and its high commercial reputation, and I do not 
hesitate to predict a future that will realize the highest pur- 
poses of its earnest friends. 

L. J. N. STAEK, 

President, 

On motion, the President's Address* was received, *d the 
usual number of copies ordered printed. 

Mr. Theodore I. Husted offered the following resolution, 
which was unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the New York Produce Ex- 
change are due and are hereby tendered to the President, Offi- 
cers and Managers, for their faithful discharge of the duties 
devolving upon them during the last year. 

The Treasurer, Mr. B. C. Bogert, presented his Annual Ke- 
port, showing the receipts and disbursements of the Ex- 
change for the past year, and the investment of the Surplus 
Fund, as appended, which was, on motion, received, adopted 
and ordered to be published for the information of the mem- 
bers. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned. 

J. A. Amelung, 

Secretary, 



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Al^NUAL EEPOET. 



To the Board of Managers of the Neiv York Produce Exchange : 

Gentlemen: In accordance with, established custom, I 
respectfully lay before you the following summary of the 
official business of the Exchange for the year ending June 1, 
1877. During that time the Exchange has been open for 
business three hundred and four days, and closed nine, viz. : 
on the legal holidays, on July 3, and on October 26, which 
latter day was set apart for visiting the Centennial 
Exhibition. 

The Annual Election for Officers and Managers of the 
Exchange was held on Monday, June 5, 1876, at which time 
1,199 votes were cast, equalling in number nearly one-half 
our membership. Mr. George C. Martin was made Secretary, 
and after serving in this capacity until January 4, 1877, he 
withdrew from the position, and Mr. John A. Amelung be- 
came Secretary. One of the Managers, Mr. Horatio Beed, 
resigned January 4, 1877, on account of ill health, and 
at the next regular meeting of the Board Mr. Munroe Crane 
was elected to fill the vacancy. William E. Foster, Jr., Esq., 
was again chosen Counsel for the Board. 

The number of meetings held in connection with the Ex- 
change has been five hundred and ninety-eight, one hun- 
dred and eighty-two less than during the year immediately 
preceding. As an illustration of the general quietude that 
has prevailed during the year, it may be stated that the Board 
of Managers were convened just half as many times as 
during the year previous. 

The following is a record of the meetings held : 

12 General Meetings of the Exchange. 
33 Sessions of the Board of Managers. 
106 " " Complaint Committee. 

29 " " Arbitration Committee. 



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20 



New York Produce Exchange. 



23 Sessions of the Finance Committee. 

9 " " Floor Committee. 

2 " " Law Committee. 

29 " "' Committee on Information and Statistics. 

21 " " Committee on Eooms and Fixtures. 

12 " " Committee on Trade. 
110 " " Committee on Grain. 

17 " " Committee on Flour. 

8 " " Committee on Provisions. 

20 " " Committee on Lard. 

7 " " Committee on Naval Stores. 

13 " " Committee on Petroleum. 

74 Sessions of Special Committees and Delegates. * 

14 Meetings of the Grain Trade. 

1 " " Naval Stores Trade. 

2 " " Petroleum Trade. 
2 " " Oil Trade. 

35 Private Arbitrations. 
19 Miscellaneous. 

MEMBEKS. 

Two hundred and ninety persons have been approved for 
membership in the Exchange during the year just closed, of 
whom two hundred and sixty-eight have qualified by the 
transfer to themselves of outstanding certificates. This ex- 
ceeds by thirteen the number of transfers made during the 
year previous. Twenty-two members have been removed 
from us by death. 

NEW BUILDING. 

The question of a new Exchange Building, which has been 
more or less agitated for some time past, was brought up 
afresh this year, with a determination on the part of the 
Board to press the subject to such a conclusion as should 
leave no room for doubt as to the wishes of members in this 
particular. 

A Commission was appointed by the Board, composed of 
gentlemen thoroughly familiar with the history of the Ex- 
change, with its business, and with its needs. This Commis- 



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The Annual Report 21 

sion, after several months of patient investigation with 
reference to the capabilities of the present building for 
improvement or enlargement, came to the conclusion that 
any endeavor to adapt this structure to the future wants of 
the Exchange would not only be attended with very great ex- 
pense, butbewithoutany reasonable prospect of accomplish- 
ing the desired end. They also found that none of the 
blocks of ground lying contiguous to our own could be pur- 
chased, or even leased for a term of years, on account of 
the presence in each of entailed property, for which no title 
could be obtained. 

While unanimous in the conclusion that the location for a 
new Exchange Building should be in this general section of 
the city, that is, below Maiden Lane, or Wall street, they 
yet thought that a position might be chosen which should 
be more centrally located as regards the whole membership 
of the institution than that we now occupy. 

This Commission united in recommending to the members 
the undertaking of such an enterprise at the present time, 
for several reasons, among which were the following : 

First. The Eeal Estate which would be required for a site 
could probably be bought now at a much more reasonable 
rate than it could be obtained for a few years hence. 

Second, The erection of a new building, even after being 
determined on, would doubtless require two or three years^ 
before it could be ready for occupancy — by which time its 
want would be seriously felt by the Exchange*. 

Third. The present seems an exceptionally favorable season 
for carrying on building operations — materials being pro- 
curable at about ante-war rates, while labor is seeking 
employment on almost any terms that may be dictated. 

Fourth, The structure could be so designed as to materi- 
ally facilitate business. 

And lastly. The rightful promotion of such an under- 
taking would show the confidence we have in our own future 
business, and do much to establish that future. 

The question, when finally brought before the members, 



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22 New York .Prodttce Excharyje, 

called forth the largest vote ever cast on any occasion. Nor 
was the vote very unequally divided. Out of 2,468 mem- 
bers, 1,425 votes were cast, of which 669 were for the pro- 
posed measure, and 756 against it. 

TBADE MATTEES. 

One of the most important works ever accomplished by 
this Exchange, and, we venture to say, the most far reaching in 
its results, was the reduction effected this year on the canal 
tolls. 

Under the present State Constitution the canals must be 
self-supporting ; or, to express it more exactly, no more money 
can be expended for the maintenance of the canals during any 
season than has been received from tolls during the previous 
season. In view of this restriction all that could be at- 
tempted in the way of removing the tolls the present year was 
to lower them to such a point as should provide for their 
support on the most economical basis next year. To this 
end it was felt that on all leading articles, as grain, lumber, 
coal, iron, etc., the tolls might be reduced one-half, that the 
tax on the boats, which was felt most severely by the boatmen, 
might be wholly removed, and that the toll-sheet could be 
simplified by putting all unimportant articles on the free list. 
Authority to make these changes was finally vested in the 
Canal Board by both branches of the Legislature, after most 
persistent efforts on the part of this Exchange, in which 
efforts we had the hearty cooperation of kindred organiza- 
tions. 

The final effort was to make the members of the Canal Board 
feel that they would not be assuming an unwarranted respon- 
sibility in acting at once up to the full limit of the authority 
given them by the Legislature. For this purpose we sent 
them a delegation composed of men of large experience, who 
could answer all their inquiries, and whose views would be a 
strong support to them in taking a position that should be 
adapted to meet fully the great issues at stake. Our repre- 
sentatives were met at Albany by a similar delegation from 
Buffalo, and together these gentlemen appeared before the 



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The Annual Report 23 

Canal Board and represented how much was dependent, in 
their view, on the removal of every possible restriction from 
the traffic of the canals during the current season. The Canal 
Board took the responsibility — boats were made free, the 
free list was extended, and tolls on all other articles were 
lowered fifty per cent., making the tax on grain only one cent 
per bushel from the lakes to tide water. 

INFOKMATION AND STATISTICS. 

Very great attention has been paid this year to keeping the 
market reports well up in every respect. Little by little in- 
formation has been added with regard to the Hog movement, 
at the several packing points, on which our Provision Trade 
so largely depends, and also with reference to the receipts, 
shipments and stocks of Grain at the other seaboard ports 
— a matter that has had greater interest for us of late, than 
ever before. 

Especial pains has been taken to present these figures, as 
well as the various market reports received by us from so 
many places, at home and abroad, in the most clear, sys- 
tematic and concise form on our bulletins, that members 
may take in, at a glance, whatever relates to their especial 
interests. 

Scarcely anything is a better indication of the progress our 
institution has made within a few years, than the marked 
change that is apparent in our Bulletin Boards. It is but a 
little while since these were not half occupied. Now each one 
is fully taken up with its own specialty; new ones have had to 
be erected, while much other information is tabulated on 
sheets ; so that the daily, weekly, monthly and annual move- 
ment of Breadstuff's, Provisions, and Petroleum, to and from 
this port, and from the other leading Atlantic ports, and 
their destination abroad, is clearly shown. 

Many of our members having united in a request to have 
the arrival of vessels at this port, and the important 
arrivals abroad, posted regularly and promptly on our 
Exchange, an arrangement has been made with the Maritime 
Association, whereby we are kept closely supplied with 



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24 New York Produce Exchange, 

marine intelligence of this nature, until the close of 'Change 
each day. 

Petitions to have Kiernan's News Indicator and the Man- 
hattan Stock Indicator placed on our floor, were also favor- 
ably responded to by the Board, so that members now have 
access to every class of mercantile, financial and general 
news that is to be found anywhere. 

In one department only have we not made all the progress 
we sought. For two or three years past complaints have 
come to us that the Continental and English Petroleum 
markets have not been reported on our Exchange with the 
fidelity that this very important interest calls for. During 
this time we have repeatedly endeavored to obtain such 
suggestions as would enable us to arrange for satisfac- 
tory reports, but thus far without success. At a meeting 
of the Petroleum Trade a special committee was appointed 
to see whether an interchange of official reports might not 
be effected between our own and foreign Exchanges. As 
this interest has attained the third rank among our exports, 
we shall relax no efforts, to have its wants fully supplied. 

TBADE RULES. 

There has been a growing tendency, of late, to transact 
business on our floors through the medium of Calls. Last 
year the Provision Trade established two daily calls of Pork 
and Lard, which, with slight changes in the hours for holding 
them, have been continued ever since. This year the 
Grain Trade have introduced two daily calls of Wheat and 
Corn, the success of which was very marked from the outset. 
This new feature of the Grain Trade has involved consider- 
able change in the Grain Eules, and the preparation of some 
forms for simplifying their transactions. The dealers in 
Cotton Seed Oil likewise tried the experiment of holding a 
daily call of that article, and were so well pleased with the 
result that they prepared Kules providing for the call, which 
were made to cover all transactions in Vegetable and Mineral 
Oils, other than Refined Petroleum. These Eules called for 
a Committee on Oils, which was duly appointed by the Pres- 
ident. 



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The Annual Report 25 

Some slight changes have been made in the Eules govern- 
ing the Naval Store Trade, 

The Committee on Grain have completed the work of 
grading by establishing Grades of Barley. They have also 
been instrumental in reducing the rates of towing canal' 
boats in the harbor. As usual, their labors have been unre- 
mitting, as will be seen by reference to the number of meet- 
ings held, and of cases decided, by them. 

LEGISLATION. 

The action taken in this important branch of our institu- 
tion may best be seen by reference to the following state- 
ment : 

One hundred and six meetings have been held by the 
Complaint Committee, at which one hundred cases were con- 
sidered and the following disposition made of them. • Re- 
ferred to the Arbitration Committee, 17 ; to Private Arbitra- ' 
tion, 30 ; to the Board of Managers, 3 ; to the Committee on 
Grain, 4 ; on Flour, 2 ; on Provisions, 2 ; on Lard, 2. Mutually 
settled, 20 ; withdrawn, 9 ; dismissed, 9. 

The Arbitration Committee have held twenty-nine sessions 
and decided twenty-one cases, being one more than last year. 

The several Trade Committees have disposed of cases as 
follows : 

The Committee on Grain, 41 ; on Lard, 16 ; on Flour, 11 ; 
on Provisions, 8 ; on Petroleum, 7. 

The increase in the number of cases heard by the Com- 
mittee on Grain is largely due to the new method of hand- 
ling grain lately introduced at this port. 

We continue our comparative table of cases brought be- 
fore the Exchange during the last four years, by which it 
will be seen that each year shows a marked decrease from 
its immediate predecessor, which, we take it, is a happy result 
of the better understanding of our rules, and of the certainty 
that they will be duly enforced. 



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26 New York Produce Exchange, 

1873-4. 1874-5. 1875-6. 1876-7. 



Complaint Committee, 


104 


126 


94 


100 


Arbitration 


a 


61 


38 


20 


21 


Grain 


a 


13 


25 


33 


41 


Flour 


u 


4 


1 


16 


11 


Provisions 


u 


16 


11 


4 


8 


Lard 


a 


49 


29 


50 


16 


Petroleum 


a 


5 


18 


10 


7 


Naval Stores 


u 


4 


3 


— 


— 


Distilled Spirits" 


1 


— 


— 


— 


Lighterage 


u 


— 


— 


1 


— 


Total cases heard, 


257 


251 


228 


204 



CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

The Bcfkrd of Managers having been requested, through 
Col. J. E. Peyton, Agent of the Centennial Commission, to 
appoint a "Merchants' Day," on which they would unite 
with other Commercial Associations throughout the country 
in visiting the Exhibition, they referred the matter to a Spec- 
ial Committee consisting of the President, Vice-President and 
Secretary. This Committee entered into correspondence 
with the principal Exchanges of this and other cities, and 
received such an expression of their interest in the matter as 
led them to submit the question of closing the Exchange for 
one day to the members, by whom it was decided by a vote 
of six to one that the Exchange should adjourn for this pur- 
pose on Thursday, October 26. On that day, through ar- 
rangements made with the Central Kailroad of New Jersey, 
a special train left New York at 8 o'clock A. M., carrying up- 
wards of eight hundred representatives from our own and 
other New York Exchanges, who were joined at Philadelphia 
by as many more merchants from Baltimore, Trenton and 
other cities. There they were received by the Commercial 
Associations of Philadelphia, and escorted into the grounds, 
where they were formally met by President Welsh of the 
Centennial Commission, with an address of welcome, which 
was responded to by the President of our own Exchange, and 
by others. A collation followed, after which the day was de- 



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The Annual Report. 27 

voted to an examination of the buildings and their interest- 
ing contents. About 6 o'clock in the evening the excursion- 
ists returned, having had a day of almost unalloyed enjoy- 
ment. 

Eesolutions of thanks were subsequently adopted by the 
Board and communicated to the Centennial Commission and 
the several Commercial Associations, making acknowledge 
ment of their hospitality and courtesy on the occasion of 
their visit. 

NATIONAL BOAED OF TRADE. 

In response to an invitation extended by the Commercial 
Associations of the City of New York, the National Board 
of Trade held its Eighth Annual Session in this city. It 
convened at noon of Tuesday, June 27, at the Union League 
Theatre, and after four days' session, varied by an excursion 
around our bay and harbor, and by a banquet at Delmonico's, 
it adjourned on Friday afternoon, June 30. The meeting 
was well attended by delegates representing most of the 
leading commercial organizations of the country, and by 
honorary guests from Canada, Great Britain and elsewhere. 

Several of the delegates from this Exchange were in con- 
stant attendance, endeavoring, in every way practicable, to 
make the occasion one of enjoyment and of profit to their 
guests. The subjects considered were of large public in- 
terest, but* the earnest effort put forth by our institution to 
so change the Constitution as to materially lessen the annual 
expenses of the National Board, without interfering with 
its efficiency, did not prove successful. At a later day, we 
received several memorials to Congress, which had been 
drawn up by the Executive Committee of the National Board, 
each of which was designed for the purpose of urging our 
National Legislature to take specific action on such subjects 
as the Bankrupt Law, the adoption of a Eeciprocal Treaty 
with Canada, the abolition of the Light Dues, the establish- 
ment at the seat of Government of a Department of Com- 
merce, and other like measures of national importance. 
These memorials we were asked to consider, and if ap- 
proved, to press upon the attention of our Eepresentatives 



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28 New Yorh Produce Exchange, 

at Washington, and to enforce in every other way practicable. 
A careful consideration was given each of these recommenda- 
tions by our Board, and their action thereon will be found 
appended to this Keport. 



What has been said thus far pertains exclusively to the 
official year, closing with the first Thursday of June, 1877. 
At that time, as the result of the election held on Monday, 
June 4:th, 1877, a new Board of Officers was installed, whose 
names, as well as the committees appointed in connection 
therewith, will be found elsewhere in the volume. 

One of the first questions that this Board was called upon 
to consider, was whether delegates should be sent to the 
Ninth Annual Meeting of the National Board of Trade, which 
was to be held at Milwaukee in August, 1877. It was the 
conviction of the Board that those measures in which this Ex- 
change was vitally inteo^ested could be best accomplished by 
the efforts of our own members directed immediately to such 
ends. Accordingly no delegates were appointed, and a 
formal notice of our withdrawal from the National Board 
of Trade was communicated to them through their Sec- 
retary. 

Another important subject which engaged the attention of 
the Board, was the serious disarrangement of railroad ser- 
vice, which occurred in the last weeks of July, occasioned 
by a strike on the part of railroad operatives on various 
lines. Beginning at an interior point on the Baltimore and 
Ohio Eailroad, the strike spread with extreme rapidity to 
many other roads, causing an almost total cessation of freight 
traffic, and in some instances of passenger travel, as well as 
delays in the transmission of the mails. During the week 
that this trouble was at its height trade was more or less 
affected on our floors, while on the principal Western Ex- 
changed business was for a day or two entirely suspended. 
Eiots occurred at various points, and the injury to or de- 
struction of goods in transit, was very great. In view of the 
losses to our own members occasioned by these riots, the 



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The Annual Report. 29 

President appointed a Special Committee from the branches 
of trade most affected, who should be empowered to confer 
with counsel, and advise as to the proper steps to be taken 
to recover for the same. 

The chairman of this Committee, A. E. Orr, Esq., entered 
into correspondence with the President of the Pennsylvania 
Eailroad, upon whose freight lines almost all the losses oc- 
curred, to ascertain whether this corporation would acknowl- 
edge the claims resting against them, and make proper resti- 
tution. 

The proposition received from that Company in reply was 
a virtual waiver of immediate responsibility on their part. 
The Committee could not receive this reply as satisfactory, 
and so reported to the Board, with the further recommenda- 
tion that suits at law be immediately commenced against the 
Pennsylvania Eailroad in the United States Court for this 
District. 

The recommendations of the Committee were approved 
by the Board, and a new Committee appointed, with A. E. 
Orr, Esq., chairman, to prosecute such claims as should be 
entrusted to them for that purpose. Upwards of fifty thous- 
and dollars of claims have been handed in and placed in the 
hands of Wm. E. Foster, Jr., Counsel of the Board, as Attor- 
ney, with Ex-Judge E. L. Fancher as Associate Counsel. 

The canals of this State were oflScially closed on the 7tl] 
of December, with nothing of importance left along their 
line. The season has, on the whole, been a successful one, 
for notwithstanding the small amount of grain that came 
forward early in the year, the movement of the new crop 
was sufficiently ample to turn the scale, and the aggregate 
receipts have exceeded the expenditures by $3,031.33. To 
show the change for the better that has taken place in canal 
administration, it is but necessary to state that the average 
cost of their maintenance the past two years has been only ' 
about two-thirds of what it was during the twelve years im- 
mediately preceding. These facts show conclusively that, 
with a year of full grain receipts, and of prudent management, 
a still lower rate of toll would suffice for their proper support. 



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30 New York Produce Exchange. 

The activity of all matters connected with the Grain 
Trade has been very marked this year. The position of 
New York as the natural out-port of this great interest has 
been re-established, as will be clearly seen by comparing 
the relative receipts and exports of this and other cities 
with similar statistics for the preceding two years. The 
interest taken in the calls of Wheat and Corn has been very 
marked, the sales from the outset aggregating upwards of 
thirty million of bushels and sufficing to establish an open 
market for these leading articles. The stocks of grain 
afloat and in store at this port at the close of navigation 
was upwards of ten million bushels, or about five-twelfths 
of the visible supply of the whole country. Numerous 
changes have been made in the Grain Eules to meet the 
ever-varying requirements of that trade, and the Committee 
on Grain have been called on to hold almost daily sessions. 
The work of grading has proceeded very satisfactorily, and 
is now extended to grain brought by canal ; so that whereas 
last year sixty per cent, of the grain received here was graded, 
we now consider that fully ninety per cent, passes through 
the Inspector's hands. 

Several important changes have been recently made in the 
building. The entire floor of the first or main story has 
been renewed, and the main stairway to the upper floor has 
been relaid with black walnut steps. The ceilings, walls 
and fret-work of the upper floor have undergone a thorough 
renovation. The much needed work of ventilating the Ex- 
change has been undertaken with a fair prospect of success. 

These various improvements involve an expenditure of at 
least six thousand dollars, but it was felt that they could not 
longer be deferred without serious prejudice to the welfare 
of all who use the Exchange. 

During the past seven months, namely, from June to 
December, 1877, inclusive, there have been 30 sessions 
of the Board of Managers, 39 meetings of the Exchange 
or of Special Trades, and 348 meetings of Standing and 
Special Committees held. 15 cases have been heard by the 
Arbitration Committee ; 68 by the Complaint Committee ; 41 



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The Annual Report 31 

by the Committee on Grain ; 7 by the Committee on Provis- 
ions ; 6 by the Committee on Lard ; 3 by the Committee on 
Petroleum ; 1 by the Committee on Flour ; 1 by the Com- 
mittee on Naval Stores ; 1 by the Committee on Oils, and 23 
by Private Arbitration, making a total of 168 cases dis- 
posed of, and an aggregate of 440 meetings held in connec- 
tion with the Exchange. During this time one hundred and 
seventy-five new members have been received, and thirteen 
taken away by death. 

The action taken on the occasion of the decease of sev- 
eral of our late esteemed associates will be found recorded 
elsewhere in this volume, together with several other mat- 
ters of moment connected with the official action of the 
Board, and of the Exchange. 

EespectfuUy submitted. 

S. H. GEANT, Superintendent 



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RESOLUTIONS. 



SUPEEINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WOKKS. 

Preamble cund Resolutions adopted by the Board of Managers at a Meeting held 
October Slst^ W7Q, relative to the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
of tJie State of New York^ providing for the appointment of a Superintend- 
ent of Public Works. 

Whereas, It has come to our knowledge that efforts are being made to 
defeat the proposed amendments to the Constitution of this State, rela- 
tive to the management of the Canals, which amendments we believe to 
be eminently essential to their successful and efficient administration 
in the future ; therefore, 

Resolved^ That we heartily endorse the proposed amendments to Sec- 
tion Three, Article Five, of the Constitution, relative to the appointment 
of a Superintendent of Public Works, and the abolition of the office of 
Canal Commissioner, as passed by the last Legislature, on May 15, 1876, 
and earnestly commend its passage to the mercantile community of our 
city and State. 



CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Preamble and Resolutions passed at a Meeting of the Board of Managers of 
the New York Produce Exchange^ hdd November 2d, 1876, in recogni- 
tion of the successful results of the Centennial Exhibition and of the 
Reception given the Exchange by the Commercial Bodies of Philadelphia, 

Whereas, The New York Produce Exchange, wishing to- give suitable 
expression to its high estimate of the rare energy, wisdom and skill 
displayed by the citizens of Philadelphia, and especially by the Centen- 
nial Board of Trustees, in devising, carrying on and completing the 
Exhibition now about to close, did voluntarily set apart a day for visit- 
ing this Exhibition and extended invitations to other Commercial Asso- 
ciations to unite with them in celebrating this crowning work of the 
first century of our Republic ; and 

Whereas, The honors extended to these Commercial Associations by 
the Officers of the Exhibition, and the courtesies shown them by the 
several Exchanges of Philadelphia, tended to make this a day of peculiar 
and profitable enjoyment ; therefore. 



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34 Bew Yorlc Prodvxie Exchange. 

E^oUed, That the acknowledgments of the JSTew York Produce Ex- 
change be and are hereby tendered to President Welsh and his honorable 
associates, for their cordial welcome on that occasion, together with our 
congratulations to the Centennial Commissioners on the marked success 
which has uniformly attended their arduous and responsible labors. 

Eesohed, That the thanks of this Exchange be returned to President 
Mears, with the officers and members of the Philadelphia Commercial 
Exchange; to the President and members of the Philadelphia Board of 
Brokers ; of the Philadelphia Board of Trade ; of the Philadelphia Drug 
Exchange ; and of the Philadelphia WJiolesale Grocers' Association, for 
the arrangements made by them for the comfort and entertainment of 
their numerous guests. 

Resolved, That copies of these Resolutions, signed by the President and 
Secretary, be sent to the Centennial Commissioners and to each of the 
Commercial Associations of Philadelphia. 



CANAL TOLLS. 

Precmible and Resolutions adopted at a Meeting of the Board of Managers 
of the New York Produce Exchxinge, held February 1, 1877. 

Whe/reas, The New York Produce Exchange views with serious con- 
cern the change that has of late been taking place in the relations of 
Kew York City to the Grain Trade of the West, through the extraor- 
dinary efforts making by and in behalf of other ports whose natui'al 
advantages are in no respect equal to her own ; and 

Whereas, The City of New York has, in her State Canals, an auxiliary 
which, if properly availed of, is capable of maintaining her position as 
the great export and import city of the country ; and 

Whereas, It should ever be kept in mind that the Erie Canal was not 
designed for revenue merely, but rather to secure for our State those 
indirect but larger rewards which come from the control of commerce ; 
therefore. 

Resolved, That the Canal Board be requested to take such steps as shall, 
in their judgment, be deemed best calculated to enable the Erie Canal 
to carry out the purpose for which it was built, viz. : to bring the pro- 
duce of the West through to the seaboard at the lowest possible cost of 
transportation ; and to this end we heartily approve of the views ex- 
pressed by his Excellency Governor Robinson, in his annual message to 
the Legislature, wherein he says that " the question of high or low tolls, 
in the present condition and prospects of canal transportation, is one 
about which there would seem to be no difference of opinion." 

Resolved, That a copy of tlie foregoing be sent to the several members 
of the Canal Board and of the Legislature, to His Excellency Governor 
Robinson, and to the Buffalo Board of Trade. 



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Resolutions. 35 

NEW EXCHANGE BUILDINa 

PreamMe and Resolutions adopted hy the Board of Managers at a Meeting 
held February 8, 1877, r dative to the erection of a new Exchange Building. 

Whereas, The building now occupied by the New York Produce Ex- 
change has become inadequate to the wants of Its increased membership, 
furnishing insuflftcient accommodation for the varied business transacted 
on its floors, and affording little opportunity for enlargement on its 
present site ; and 

Whereas, The present structure allows of no appropriate place for 
holding General Meetings of the Exchange, and Rooms for the sessions 
of the Managers and of the several Standing and Special Committees 
have to be provided in a separate building on another block, whereby 
the official business of the Exchange is obstructed and prejudiced ; and 

Whereas, Proper provision has never been made for ventilating any 
portion of the building in which members now congregate in large 
numbers for the transaction of their daily business, for want of which 
provision their personal health and comfort are being affected to a 
serious degree ; and 

Wliereas^ On the one hand the present time is an exceptionally favor- 
able one for the erection of a new Exchange Building, material and 
labor being procurable at about one-half of former rates, and real estate 
being correspondingly low ; while on the other hand a longer continu- 
ance, in our present location will involve considerable outlay upon the 
present building in laying new floors, putting in ventilating apparatus, 
and in other essential repairs, besides the renewal of leases for offices 
outside, much of which will be unnecessary if a speedy renewal is con- 
templated; and 

Whereas, The Board of Managers desire to obtain the sense of the 
members as to what action shall be taken in the i>remises, it is, therefore, 

ResoUed, That the whole subject of erecting a new Exchange Building 
be laid before the members in pamphlet form, and that the question 
whether the members of the Produce Exchange desire a new building, 
be submitted to their decision by a vote to be taken by ballot, on such 
a day as the Board of Managers shall appoint for that purpose. 



Resolution parsed at a Meeting of the Board of Managers of the New York 
Produce Exchange, held March 29, 1877, relative to the erection of a 
neio Exchange Building. 

Resolved, That the question of taking measures to erect a new Ex- 
change Building be submitted to a vote by ballot, of the members of 
the New York Produce Exchange, on the 18th day of April, 1877, as 
follows : 



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36 Neio YorTc Prodw^e ExcTmnge. 

The Board of Managers of the Produce Exchange shall be authorized 
and empowered to take such measures, at their discretion, as they may 
deem best, to secure a proper site and erect thereon a suitable building 
having conveniences and accommodations adequate to the increased 
needs of the Exchange. For this purpose they are further empowered 
to dispose of the premises now occupied by the Exchange, to appro- 
priate the Surplus Fund, and to issue bonds to an amount not to exceed 
f500,000. 



USE OF THE BELT EAILEOAD FOE COMMEECIAL 
PUEPOSES. 

Resolution passed at a Meeting of tTie Board of Managers, held February 8, 
1877, relatim to the use of the Belt Railroad for Freight Purposes. 

Resolved^ That the Special Committee apppinted by this Board to con- 
fer with other Associations relative to the use of the Belt Railroad for 
commercial purposes, be authorized to co-operate with other Associa- 
tions in urging upon the City Government the passage of an ordinance 
permitting the use of dummy engines on said Railroad for freight pur- 
poses between sunset and sunrise. 



NATK^NAL BOAED OF TEADE. 

Recommendations made hy the Committee on Trade to the Board of Mana- 
gers., and by them, adopted^ March 2, 1877, relatim to certain Memorials 
of the National Boa/rd of Trade to the Congress of the United States , 
and to Communications of similar character from other Commercial 



To THE Board of Managers of the New York Produce Exchange : 

Gentlemen : Your Committee on Trade, having carefully considered 
the following Memorials of the National Board of Trade to the Congress 
of the United States, beg leave to report as follows : 

MJEMORiAii 1 Relates to BiUs of Lading and Railroad Receipts. 

This subject has already engaged the attention of the Board of Man- 
agers in connection vrith a State Law, and as tlie Memorial looks towards 
action by the General Government in the same direction, your Com- 
mittee recommend its approval by the Board. 

Memorial 2 Relates to Light Dues imposed by Great Britain on the Ship - 
ping of the United States. 
^This Memorial is strongly approved by your Committee, 



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Resolutions. 37 

Memorial 3 Relates to the appointment of Commissioners to prepare a Redp- 
rocal Treaty with Canada. 

This subject the Committee deem of great importance to the com- 
mercial interests of the country, and as the Produce Exchange has 
heretofore expressed its decided approval of such a measure, it is simply- 
reiterating its often expressed sentiments in again recommending the 
subject to the attention of Congress. 

Memorial 4: Bdates to a thorough revision of the Tariff on ImportSy a/nd 
suggests the appointment of a Commission by Congress to oonsid&r the subject. 

Your Committee approve of the Memorial. 
Memorial 5 Relates to the establishment of a Department of Commerce by 
the General QoDeniment. 

Without going fully into the reasons that have influenced its judg- 
ment, the Committee are of the opinion that such a measure would 
entail considerable expense on the Government without corresponding 
benefits to the commerce of the country, and, therefore, do not recom- 
mend that any action be taken on the subject. 

Memorial 6 Relates to the Amendments to the Bankrupt Law. 

The Committee, in considering this question, thought it desirable to 
have the views of the Counsel to the Board as to the merits of the pro- 
posed amendments. His opinion is herewith submitted, and while it 
does not give unqualified approval to the proposed amendments, he 
thinks them in the main just. The Committee, therefore, approve of the 
measure, particularly that portion which suggests the appointment of 
Commissioners to consider the whole subject with a view to its simplifi- 
cation and economy in working. * 
The communication from the Cincinnati Board of Trade, recom- 
mending the repeal of the Bankrupt Law, is in opposition to the Memo- 
rial of the National Board of Trade on the sapie subject. The Committee ' 
do not consider such action wise or in the interest of the mercantile 
community. 

The subjects of the communication from the Portland Board oe 
Trade, on Reciprocal Trade with Canada, and the proposed Law relating 
to Immigration, have already received the attention of the Committee, 
and no further action is deemed necessary. 

Referring to the communication from the American Bankers' Asso- 
ciation, the Committee recommend the Board to co-operate with the 
efforts now being made by the Chambers of Commerce and Boards of 
Trade in favor of relieving Banks from excessive taxation, with a view 
to prevent, so far as possible, a general reduction of Bank capital, which 
is threatened should the burden of taxation be continued. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Charles R. Hickox, Chairman, 
William H. Swan, 
Henry H. Rogers, 
William M. Grat, 
James L. Flint, 

Committee on Trade. 



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38 New York Froduce Exchange. 

MUNICIPAL EEFORM. 

Freamble and Besolutions adopted at a Meeting of the Board of Managers 
of the New York Produce Exchange, held March 28, 1877. 

Whereas, The evils and abuses connected with the government of 
large cities as now conducted— a notable example of which is found in 
the present financial condition of New York, overwhelmed as it is with 
debt and taxation— have become so enormous and intolerable that the 
only choice left is between speedy reform and bankruptcy ; and 

Whereas, The late Grovernor of this State appointed a Commission 
composed of eminent citizens, distinguished for their legal abilities and 
high personal character, to conceive and report a plan for the better 
government of large cities ; and 

Whereas, This Commission has given the result of its laborious study 
of this most important subject in a report recently laid before tlie Legis- 
lature, which report recommends certain Constitutional Amendments, 
as vital to the reforms contemplated ; and 

, Whereas, These Amendments must be approved by two successive 
Legislatures and one vote of the people ; and 

Whereas, The failure of the present Legislature to approve would 
postpone for three years, if it did not defeat the scheme; therefore, 

liesolved, That this Board respectfully urges the Representatives and 
Senators from this city, in the State Legislature, to lend their earnest 
efforts to secure the passage of the joint resolutions approving of the 
Constitutional Amendments recommended by tJie Commission on Muni- 
cipal Government, in their report recently submitted to the Legislature. 

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be transmitted by 
the Secretary of this Board to each of the Representatives and Senators 
in the Legislature from this city. 



BANKING, SILVER, &c. 

Action on tlie above subjects taken by the Board of Managerrs at a Meeting held 
Sex)tember 11, 1877. 



To the President of the Amej'ican Bankers^ Association, 

Rooms 247 Broadway. 

Dear Sir,— The Board of Managers of this Exchange beg to submit 
the following as the sense of tlieir body upon the several subjects sug- 
gested by your communication of the 20th of August last. 

In a commercial nation which ha^ to compete in the world's markets 
with other countries in the sale of its products, ecer^ immunity from direct 



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Resolutions. 39 

taxation which its Government can allow should he permitted to the 
people. 

A dear price for money is one of the worst forms of restriction upon 
trade. In a new and growing country like ours more capital is always 
needed, and should command a fair remuneration ; but if the profit on 
it has to he shared with, or is largely absorbed by the Government, it 
will seek other fields, and its increase for commercial uses will be im- 
peded. An evidence of the truth of this is to be found in the present 
great demand and high price of low interest-bearing Government bonds, 
which are exempt from all forms of taxation, both State and I^ational. 

No nation but ours imposes burdens on capital and deposits used in 
banking. 

The taxes paid by IS^ational Banks in the year 1876 amounted to 
$17,375,653, or 3.45 per cent, on their capital paid to the States and Gen- 
eral Government. Besides this, about thirteen milUons more was paid 
by State Banks, private bankers and Savings Institutions. If these im- 
posts are continued more capital will be driven from the business of 
banking, which will induce a ruinous price to be paid for the use of 
capital by the producers of goods and crops, thereby restricting the 
trade of the country, to the detriment of the whole people, as well as 
the Government. 

London retains her supremacy as the world's commercial and finan- 
cial centre, and the whole United Kingdom share in tlie benefits, and 
are able to undersell other nations in imports and manufactures, largely 
on account of the low rate at which money can be obtained in the 
metropolis on commercial security. 

The unrestricted issue of municipal bonds is to be deprecated ; already 
the legality of many is disputed; bonds already due are unpaid, and 
interest has been in default on many of them for along x^eriod. Consti- 
tutional provisions should be enacted in all the States, giving general 
powers to the tax payers to bond their municipaUties only in extreme 
cases and for short periods, but, as a general rule, public improvements 
should be paid for by immediate taxation. 

Under the operation of the law of January 14, 1875, the question of re- 
sumption seems to be fast settling itself. The prospect now is that the 
Treasury will be ready to resume before the time fixed by the act, 
namely, January 1st, 1879. 

The only legislation we would suggest would be to permit the Secre- 
tary to anticipate that date, if he finds himself in a position to do so, 
tlirough a reduction in the amount of outstanding' greenbacks, in his 
accumulations of gold, or both. 

We are also of the opinion that, as an economical measure, greenbacks 
should continue to be a legal tender, for say five years, after resump- 
tion, except at the United States Treasury. 

Much has been written and said on the silver question, but the best and 
most feasible plan would seem to us to be to allow no issues of green- 
baeks and National Bank notes below five dollars, and to replace the 
small notes by subsidiary silver coins of standard value to any amount 



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40 New York Produce Exchange. 

required by the wants of trade ; which §ilver coins should be a legal 
tender for ten dollars only. This would make a use for, say, two hun- 
dred millions of silver. 

The banks might also be permitted to keep a small percentage of their 
legal reserves in silver, which would relieve any locality which might 
have on hand more than its immediate needs required, as the banks 
would not hesitate to receive from their customers a reasonable amount 
on deposit. 

Thanking you for your courteous invitation to attend the approaching 
Annual Convention of your Association, whose deliberations we hope 
may be productive of much good, 

I have the honor to remain, 

on behalf of the Board, 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. I. PBILLIPS, 

New Yobk Produce Exchange, 

New York, September 11, 1877. 



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IN MEMORIAM. 



1876, U §mmbtV 31, 1877. 



WILLIAM BROOKS, 
THOMAS A BROWN, 
JEROME BRUMLEY, 
STEPHEN BRUSH, 
SlilON K BURKHOLDER. 
CARLOS COBB, 
SOLOMON DE CORDOVA, 
PATRICK DALY, 
SIMON C. DECKER, 
D. K. DUCKER, 
JAMES G. EMERY, 
W. H. A. FISCHER, 
JOHN GAMBLE, 
FREDERICK HOEFT, 
LOUIS KAUFMAN, 
CHARLES A. KEELER, 
JOHN H. KTMMEY, 



JAMES KINGAN, 
CHARLES LULING, 
DUNCAN R. MACKENZIE, 
JOSIAH MACY, Ji^., 
JOSIAH W. MILLER, 
TIMOTHY P. NORTON, 
F. S. PARSONS, 
LEWIS PERRINE, 
ROBERT J. RANDOLPH, 
A. L. RICHARDS, 
GEORGE W. SCOTT, 
STEPHEN G SEARLS, 
ROBERT S. TAIT, 
W. F. TOMPKINS, 
JAMES W. UNDERHILL, 
BARNEY VROMAN, 
JOHN S. WILLIAMS, 
AMERTON YALE. 



Preamble and Resolutions passed at a Meeting of the Members of the New York 
Produce Exchange, hdd June 14, 1876, on the occasion of the Death of 
Mr. Amefrton Yale. 

The President, L. J. N. Stabk, in the Chair. 

WhereaSy It has pleased Almighty God, in the exercise of His infinite 
wisdom, to remove by death our associate, Amerton Yai^e ; and 

Whereas, During all the years covering the existence of the New York 
Produce Exchange, the members have had abundant opportunities of 
estimating the character of the deceased ; therefore, 

Resolved— First : That while bowing submissively in presence of this, 
to us, mysterious dispensation, we think it right and fitting to express 



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42 New Torh Produce Exchange, 

in this public manner our unfeigned sorrow that one so coniparatively 
young, so eminently useful and so universally esteemed, has been so 
suddenly taken from us, and at the same time to record our deep sense 
of the loss which has thus fallen upon the interests of the Excliange. 

Second : That while it would be impossible for us to particularize the 
many virtues wliich adorned his life, we consider ourselves justified in 
saying that in tlie brief time allotted him, he succeeded in establishing 
for himself a character as nearly perfect as is permitted to humanity, 
and that he leaves behind him a record so unblemished as to form for 
us an example to be copied and a precious inheritance to be forever 
affectionately treasured. 

Third : That we respectfully tender to his bereaved widow and rela- 
tions the assurance of our heartfelt sympatliy intliis season of trial, and 
that as a token thereof the President be and is hereby requested to ap- 
point a Committee of ten members to represent the New York Produce 
Exchange at the funeral services. 

Fourth : That a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions, at- 
tested by the officers of the Exchange, be transmitted to the relatives 
of the deceased. 



Preamble and Resolutions passed at a Meeting of the Petroleum Trade^ held 
October 6, 1876, on the occasion of the Death of Mr. Josiah Macy, Jr. 

The President, L. J. N. Stark, in tlie Chair. 

Whereas^ It has pleased our Heavenly Father, in His wisdom and 
power, to take from among us an esteemed associate and fellow-member, 
JosiAH Macy, Jr. ; therefore, be it 

Resolved^ That while we endeavor, with becoming submission, to recog- 
nize the all-pervading justice of the Master's decrees, we desire to record 
the mournfulness of our thoughts, and in this feeble manner to pay a 
tribute to the memory of our departed friend. 

Resolved, That by this affiicting event we part with a prompt, decisive, 
honest man, one who was in counsels wise, in friendship firm, earnest 
in thought and speech, just and generous. 

Resolved, That as expressive of our esteem for the deceased, and our 
sympathy for the bereaved household and friends, a copy of these reso- 
lutions be engrossed and sent to his famil^^ 

Resolved, That a Committee of ten be appointed by the Chairman to 
represent this Exchange at the funeral, on Saturday morning, October 
7th, at ten o'clock. 



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In Blemoriam. 43 

PreamUe and Resolutions passed at a Meeting of the Members of tlie New York 
Produce Exchange, held JSFodemher 16, 1877, on the occasion of the Death 
of Mr. John S. Williams. 

The President, L. J. IST. Stark, in the Chair. 

Whereas, Through the dispensation of Divine Providence it has he- 
come our sorrowful duty, by the sudden death of our late friend and 
associate, John S. Welliams, to place upon our records the departure of 
another member from our midst, whose sterling integrity throughout 
a long business career, praiseworthy enterprise in advancing the com- 
mercial interests of this city at home and abroad, true patriotism during 
the dark days of this country's history, and uniform courtesy and genial- 
ity of character in his intercourse with us, had endeared him to us all ; 
therefore, 

Resolved, That the deatli of our affectionately esteemed friend John S. 
Williams imposes upon us the grateful duty of bearing willing testimony 
to his many noble qualities of mind and heart, his upright Christian 
character, and courageous, hopeful spirit. 

Resolved, That the record of his life is a proud inheritance to his sons, 
a source of encouragement and hope to his late associates in business, 
and to ourselves an example worthy of emulation and unbounded 
respect. 

Resolmd, That we, the members of the New York Produce Exchange, 
cause this tribute to the memory of our late friend to be placed on the 
minutes of the Exchange, and a copy thereof to be sent to his family, as 
a testimonial of our deep sympathy with them in their sudden bereave- 
ment. 

Resolved, That a Committee, especially appointed by the Chairman to 
represent the Exchange, attend the funeral services of our late friend. 



Minute passed at a Meeting of the Members of the New York Produce Exchange^ 
held September 18, 1877, on the occasion of the death of Mr. Carlos Cobb. 
The President, William A. Cole, in the Chair. 

Whereas, It has pleased God in His wisdom to remove from us our 
friend and associate, Carlos Cobb, we desire to place on record the 
following minute of our appreciation of liis exemplary character and 
many virtues. 

During the fifteen years that our deceased associate was a member of 
this Exchange he was tliree times called to serve as a member of the 
Board of Managers, and was for two years Chairman of the Committee 
on Grain, in both of which positions his wise counsels and efficient ad- 



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44 New York Produce Exchange. 

ministration, infused always with a quick sense of the vital object of our 
organization, enabled him to render invaluable service. 

Always active in the business which he so successfully established 
here, he was ever ready to give his time and his energies to the general 
interests of the Exchange, and when work of a public nature was to be 
done lie was seldom called upon in vain. 

His fine presence, genial qualities and manifest Christian virtues drew 
to him all with whom he came in contact. 

Our Exchange will long miss his pleasant face and his able counsels. 
Our young men will mourn the loss of a kind and judicious adviser, and 
those whose privilege it was to meet him in the more private walks of 
life will miss the intellectual and accomplished Christian gentleman. 

While we mingle our tears ovei our departed friend with those of his 
loved one whom his death has so sorely bereaved, and commend her to 
the care of the Father of the fatherless, we rejoice that he has ceased to 
bear the cross and shall hereafter wear the crown. 



Preamble and Resolutions 'parsed at a Meeting of the Members of the New York 
Fi'oduce Exchange^ held September 18, 1877, on the occasion of the death of 
Mr. Stephen Brush. 

The President, Wixliam A. Cole, in the Chair. 

Whereas, Th6 Members of the New York Produce Exchange are called 
upon to express the deep sorrow. they feel in the loss they have sustained 
by the death^i of their esteemed fellow member Stephen Brush, whose 
connection wjith the Exchange dates from its earliest day — 

Besohed, 1^ his death this Exchange has lost one of its oldest mem- 
bers, whose upright and honorable dealing, sterling integrity, kindness 
of heart and courteous bearing in all the positions of a busy life endeared 
him to his fellow members and won their esteem and respect. 

Eesolmd, That we tender to his mourning family our sincere sympathy 
in their bereavement. 

Besohed^ As a mark of respect to his memory the President be re- 
quested to appoint a Committee of Six to attend the funeral of the de- 
ceased, and that a copy of these resolutions, suitably engrossed, be for- 
warded to his family. 



Preamble and Resolutions passed at a Meeting of the New York Produce Ex- 
change, held October ISth, 1877, on the occasion of the death of Mr. Duncan 
R. Mackenzie, 

The President, Welloam A. Coije, in the Chair. 
Whereas, By Divine will, our associate and friend Duncan R. Mac- 
kenzie has been called from our midst dy death ; and 



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In Memoriam, 45 

Whereas y Mr. Mackenzie's sterling integrity, business qualifications 
and obliging disposition have endeared him to us, he it 

Beftdlved, That we, his fellow members of the New York Produce Ex- 
change, deeply deplore his loss and express our heartfelt sympathy to 
his wife and children in their sad bereavement. 

BesoUed, That a copy of the foregoing be engrossed and forwarded to 
the family. 



Preamble and Besolutums passed at a Meeting of the New York Produce Ex- 
change^ Tield November 8, 1877, on the occasion of the death of Mr. Robert 

8. Tait. 

The President, William A. Cole, in the Chair. 

Wh&reas^ It having pleased Almighty God to talje from our midst our 
much esteemed friend Robert S. Tait, who has been for so many years 
associated closely with us, and who had become endeared to us by his 
many acts of kindness and sympathy ; and. 

Whereas, We feel deeply this great bereavement that has so suddenly 
befallen us in the loss of one whose memory will not soon be forgotten, 

BesoUed, That as an evidence of our appreciation of his noble qualities 
we deem it a privilege to participate in the last earthly ceremony it will 
be in our power to render unto our beloved deceased friend. 
- Resolved, That a Committee from the New York Produce Exchange 
attend the f uneralj which takes place to-moirow, Friday evening, and 
that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the bereaved fatnily of our 
deceased brother. 



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DAILY AND WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 

On File in the Reading -Room, 



DAILY. 
Albany Argus. 
Albany Evening Journal. 
Baltimore American. 
Boston Daily Advertiser. 
Brooklyn Eagle. 
Buffalo Commercial Advertiser. 
Charleston News and Courier. 
Chicago Daily Tribune. 
Cincinnati Daily Gazette. 
Cleveland Daily Herald. 
Detroit Daily Post. 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 
Milwaukee Daily Sentinel. 
Mobile Register. 
Montreal Herald. 
New Orleans Picayune. 
New York Daily Bulletin. 

"■ Journal of Commerce. 

' ' Herald. 

* ' Times. 

'' Tribune. 

World. 

" Commercial Advertiser. 

" Evening Post. 

" The Indicator. 

Oswego Daily Times. 
Phi] a. North American Gazette. 
Pittsburgh Commercial. 
Portland Daily Eastern Argus. 
Richmond Daily Whig. 
San Francisco Daily Commercial 

News. 
Savannah Morning News. 
St. Louis Democrat. 
Titusville Morning Herald. 
Toledo Daily Blade. 
Toronto Globe 
Toronto Mail. 
Utica Morning Herald. 
Wilmington Morning Star. 

WEEKLY. 
Baltimore Journal of Commerce. 



Boston Shipping List (S. W.). 
Chicago Journal of Commerce. 
Cincinnati Price Current. 
German and American Brewers' Ga- 
zette. 
Kansas City Price Current. 
London Economist. 

*' Mark Lane Express. 
"■ Public Ledger. 
Montreal Journal of Commerce. 
New Orleans Price Current. 
New York Commercial and Finan- 
cial Chronicle. 
New York American Grocer. 

" Mackey's A. B. C Guide. 

" Maritime Register. 

•' Mercantile Journal. 

" Oil, Paint and Drug Re- 

porter. 
' * Public A ccounts. 

"■ Railroad Gazette. 

Shipping Gazette (S. M. ) 
Shipping List (S. W.) 
The Public. 
The South. 
'* Wine and Fruit Reporter. 

Paris American Register. 
Philadelphia Commercial List. 
San Francisco Journal of Commerce. 
San Francisco News Letter. 
Saint Louis Commercial Gazette. 
Utica Weekly Herald. 

MONTHLY. 

American Mail and Export Journal. 

American Miller. 

Applet on 's Railway Guide. 

British Trade Journal. 

Monthly Report of the Chief of the 

Bureau of Statistics. 
Stowell's Petroleum Reporter. 
Travelers' Official Railway Guide. 
U. S. Post Office Guide (Quarterly). 



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DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY OF THE NEW 
YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 



By Charles Fbancis Adams, Jr., and others, B. B. Gommissionei's^ Boston. 

Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners for 1876. 
By Thomas G. Alvord, Albany, N. Y. 

Speech on Canal Tolls. 
By George H. Andrews, New York City. 

Twelve Letters on the Future of New York. 
By George T. BAiiCH, Erie Bailway. 

Annual Report of Erie Railway Co. for the year 1875-76. 

Annual Report of H. J. Jewett, Receiver Erie Railway Co., for the 
year 1875-76. 
By the Baltimore Corn and Flour Exchange. 

Annual Report for the year 1876. 
By the Baltimore Merchants' Exchange. 

Charter and By-Laws of The Merchants' Exchange. 
By Messrs. Beling, Kiemeyer & Wessels, Neio York City. 

Exports of Petroleum from New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore 
for the year 1876. 
By Edward Bill, New Ycyrk City. 

New York Prices Current— Feb. 27, 1847, to Aug. 21, 1849, and Sept. 4, 
1855, to March 31, 1868. 
By the Boston Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1876. 
By the California State Board of Agriculture. 

Transactions for the years 1874 and 1875. 
By Messrs. Carrington & Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

Annual Report of the Trade and Commerce of Toledo for the year 
1876. 

By the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York. 

Annual Report for the year 1876. 
By the Chicago Board of Trade. 

Annual Reports for the years 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875 and 1876. 
By the Cincinnati Board of Trade. 

Annual and Statistical Report for the year 1874. 
By the Cincinnati Chamber of Co^vimerce. 

Annual Report for the year ending Aug. 31, 1876, 

Rules for the Government of the Provision Call Board. 



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48 New York Produce Exchange, 

By Messrs. Cowles & Dunklet, Chicago. 

Annual Packing Report for the season of 1876-7. 
By Messrs. F. W. Crane & Co., St. Louis. 

Report of Commissioners of Forest Park. 
By the Departjient op Agricultctre, Spring fidd, lU. 

Transactions for the year 1875. 

Monthly Reports, May to December, 1876. 
By the Department op the Interior, Washington. 

Congressional Decuments, 16 volumes. 
By the Detroit Board op Trade. 

Constitution, By-Laws and Rules. 
By the Dominion Board op Trade, Montreal, Canada. 

Proceedings at the Seventh Annual Meeting. 
By Messrs. Hugh Ferguson & Co., St. Louis. 

Trade and Commerce of St. Louis for the year 1876. 

Rules, Regulations and By-Laws of the Merchants' Exchange. 
By Messrs. Gapp, Flelschmann & Co., New York City. 

Two Framed Photo-Lithographs of the Vienna Market Bakery, In- 
ternational Exhibition, Philadelphia. 
By Hon. Edward Gali^gher, Albany. 

Financial Report of the Auditor of the Canal Department for the 
year 1876. 

Report of the Auditor of the Canal Department on Tolls, Trade and 
Tonnage for the year 1875. 

Speech on Low Tolls on the Canals. 
By John W. Garrett, President of the Baltimore and Chio Railroad Co. 

Annual Report to the Stockholders for the year 1875-76. 
By T. B. Hall, Baltimore. 

Annual Report of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Co. for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1876. 
By J. H. HiCKCox, Asst. Librarian of Congress. 

Speech by Hon. John P. Jones on Resumption and the Double 
Standard. 

The Optional Standard, a Speech by Hon. John P. Jones. 
By Messrs. Howard, White & Crowell, Chicago. 

Annual Packing Report for the Season of 1876-77. 
By the Importers' and Grocers' Board op Trade, New York City^ 

Charter and By-Laws. 
By the Indianapolis Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1875. 
By the Indiana State Board op Agriculture. 

Annual Reports for the years 1874 and 1875. 

Geological Survey of Indiana, 1874. 
By the Kansas State Board op Centennial Managers. 

Agricultural Report for the year 1875. 



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Donations to the Library, 49 

By Hon. John Jay Knox, Comptroller of Currency, Wmhington. 

Report to the Mth Congress of the United States, Second Session. 
By George W. Lane, New York. 

Charter and By-Laws of the Importers' and Grocers' Board of Trade. 

By L. W. Leeds, New York City. 

A Treatise on Ventilation. 
By W. D. Mangam's Sons. 

Variations in Western Mixed Corn and Western Oats. 
By Col. Sidney D. Maxwell, Cincinnati. 

Hog and Hog Product Statement for the years 1874-75 and 1875-76. 
By Hon. Edwin R. Meade, New York City. 

Speech on Administrative Reform. 

Congressional Documents, 9 vols. 
By the Milwaitkee Chamber of Commerce. 

Annual Statements of the Trade and Commerce of Milwaukee for 
the years 1859, 1860, 1863, 1868, 1865, 1838, 1867, 1868 and 1876. 

Milwaukee Directory, 1876. 
By the Minneapolis Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1876. 
By Charles B. Murray, Cindrvnati. 

Annual Report of Pork Packing in the West, 1876-77. 
By the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture. 

Journal of Proceedings, Sept. 4, 1873, to Jan. 26, 1876. 
By the Newark Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1875. 
By the New York Cheap Transportation Association. 

Proceedings at the Annual Meeting, Jan. 9, 1877. 
By Duncan R. Norvell, New York City. 

Congressional Record, 44th Congress, Second Session. 
By the Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 

Annual Report for the years 1874 and 1875. 
By the Paterson Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1875-76. 
By W. J. Patterson, Secretary, Montreal. 

Home and Foreign Trade of Canada for the year 1875. 

By the Peoria Board of Trade. 

Annual Report for the year 1876. 
By the Philadelphia Board of Trade. 

Annual Reports for the years 1874 and 1876. 
By the Philadelphia Commercial Exchange. 

Annual Record for the year 1875-76. 
By Messrs. Rand, McNally & Co., Chicago. 

The Bankers' Directory of the United States and Canada. 
By Hon. L^ Robinson, Governor of the State of New York, 

Annual Message transmitted Jan. 2, 1877. 
4 



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50 ATea; York Produce Exchange, 

By the St. Louis Mebchants' Exchange. 

Annual Statement of the Trade and Commerce of St. Louis for the 

year 1876. 
Rules, Regulations and By-Laws. 
Rules Governing the Inspection of Plour. 
By tlie St. Paul Chamber op Commerce. 

Annual Reports for the years 1867, 1868, 1873 and 1874. 
By the San Franclsco Chamber of Commerce. 

Review of the Commercial, Financial and Mining Interests of Cali- 
fornia for the year 1876. 
By Hon. Geo. W. Schuyler, Canal Auditor, Albany. 

Tolls, Trade and Tonnage of the Canals of the State of New York 
for 1875 and 1876. 
By J. C. Smith, Cldef Inspector of Grain, Chicago. 

Annual Report of the Trade and Commerce of Chicago for the yeiar 

1875. 
Annual Report of the Railroad and Warehouse Commission of the 

State of Illinois for the year ending Nov. 30, 1875. 
Annual Report of the Board of Public Works to the Common Coun- 
cil of Chicago for the year 1875. 
Annual Report of Packing of the West for the year 1875-76. 
Laws of the State of Blinois, 24th General Assembly, 1st Session, 1873. 
By the Southern Fertilizing Company, Riclimond, Va. 
Tobacco in Virginia and North Carolina. 
1877.— Cotton Prospects. 

Some Points relating to Grain and other Matters of Interest. 
By George H. Thurston, FUtsburg. 

Pittsburg and Allegheny in the Centennial year, by Geo. H. Thurston. 
By the Trustees of the Astor Library, Neio York City. 

Annual Report of the Trustees for the year 1876. 
By Hon. Eluah Ward, New York City. 

Si)eech on Commercial relations with Canada. 
SiDcech on Finances. 
By R. L. Williams, New York City. 

Remarks by Hon. E. C. Sprague on the Canal Question. 
By the Wilmington Produce Exchange. 

Annual Statement of Receipts, Stocks and Exports of Naval Stores. 
By the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society. 

Transactions for the year 1875-76. 
By S. B. Woolworth, Secretary, Albany. 

New York State Legislative Documents, 20 vols. 
By R. H. Wyman, U. S. Hydrographer, Wa^hingtoji. 

The Coasts of Chile, Bolivia and Peru. 
By Hon. Edward Young, Bureau of Statistics, WasJdngton. 

Treasury Department Monthly and Quarterly Reports, 1875 and 1876. 



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CHARTER AND BY-LAWS 

OF THE 

lEw York Produce Exchange, 



INCOEPORATED 1862. CHARTER AMENDED FEBRUARY 13, 1868, 

AND MAY 19, 1873. BY-LAWS, ADOPTED APRIL 8, 1873. 

WITH AJMENDMENTS TO MARCH 31, 1876. 



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CHARTER. 



Chaptek 359. — An Act to incorporate the ''New York Cmnmercial Asso- 
ciation.'*'' 

PASSED APRIL 19th, 1862, THREE-FIFTHS BEING PRESENT. 

The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate 
and Assembly, do ena^t as follows : 

Section 1. — The members of the Association known as the 
'' New York Commercial Association/' and all other per- 
sons who may hereafter become associated with them under 
the provisions of this act, are hereby created a body corporate 
by the name of the "New York Commercial Associa- 
tion/' with perpetual succession and power to use a common 
seal and alter the same at pleasure, to sue and be sued, to 
take and hold by grant, purchase, and devise, real and personal 
property, to an amount not exceeding three hundred thousand 
dollars, for the purposes of such Association, and to sell, con- 
vey, lease, and mortgage the same or any part thereof. 

Sec. 2. — The property, affairs, business, and concerns of the 
corporation hereby created shall be managed by a President, 
Vice-President, Treasurer, and Twelve Managers, who, to- 
gether, shall constitute a Board of Managers, to be elected 
annually, at such time and place as may be provided by the 
By-Laws ; and the present officers and managers of the said 
Association, as now constituted, shall be the officers and man- 
agers of the said corporation until their present term of office 
shall expire, and until others under the provisions of this Act 
shall be elected in their place. All vacancies which may occur 
in the said Board by death, resignation, or otherwise, shall be 
filled by the said Board. A majority of the members of such 
Board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness. 



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54 Neiv Tm^k Produce Exchange. 

Sec. 3. — The purposes of said corporation shall be to pro- 
vide and regulate a suitable room or rooms for a Produce 
Exchange in the city of New York, to inculcate just and 
equitable principles in trade, to establish and maintain uni- 
formity in commercial usages, to acquire, preserve, and dis- 
seminate valuable business information, and to adjust contro- 
versies and misunderstandings between persons engaged in 
business. The said corporation shall have power to make all 
proper and needful By-Laws, not contrary to the Constitu- 
tion and Laws of the State of New York or of the United 
States. 

Sec. 4. — The said corporation shall have power to admit 
new members, and expel any member, in such manner as may 
be provided by the By-Laws. 

Sec. 5. — The Board of Managers shall annually elect, by 
ballot, five members of the Association, who shall not be 
members of the Board, as a committee to be known and 
styled the Arbitration Committee of the New York Commer- 
cial Association. The Board of Managers may, at any time, 
fill any vacancy or vacancies that may occur in said Commit- 
tee for the remainder of the term in which the same shall 
happen. It shall be the duty of said Arbitration Committee 
to hear and decide any controversy which may arise between 
the members of the said Association, or any person claiming 
by, through, or under them, and as may be voluntarily sub- 
mitted to said Committee for arbitration ; and such members 
and persons may, by an instrument in writing, signed by them 
and attested by a subscribing witness, agree to submit to the 
decision of such Committee any such controversy which might 
be the subject of an action at law, or in equity, except claims 
of title to real estate or to any interest therein, and that a 
judgment of the Supreme Court shall be rendered upon the 
award made pursuant to such submission. 

Sec. 6. — Such Arbitration Committee, or a majority of 
them, shall have power to appoint a time and place of hearing 
of any such controversy, and adjourn the same from time to 
time as may be necessary, not beyond the day fixed in the 



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Charter, ' 55 

submission for rendering their award, except by consent of 
parties ; to issue subpoenas for the attendance of witnesses 
residing or being in the Metropolitan Police District. All the 
provisions contained in Title 14, Part 3d, Chapter 8, of the 
Revised Statutes, and all acts amendatory or in substitution 
thereof, relating to issuing attachments to compel the attend- 
ance of witnesses, shall apply to proceedings had before the 
said Arbitration Committee. Witnesses so subpoenaed as 
aforesaid shall be entitled to the fees prescribed by law for 
witnesses in the Courts of Justices ot the Peace. 

Sec. 7. — Any number not less than a majority of all the 
members of the Arbitration Committee shall be competent to 
meet together and hear the proofs and allegations of the par- 
ties, and an award by a majority of those who shall have been 
present at the hearing of the proofs and allegations shall be 
deemed the award of the Arbitration Committee, and shall be 
valid and binding on the parties thereto. Such award shall be 
made in writing, subscribed by the members of the Commit- 
tee concurring therein, and attested by a subscribing witness. 
Upon filing the submission and award in the office of the 
Clerk of the Supreme Court of the City and County of New 
York, both duly acknowledged or proved in the same manner 
as deeds are required to be acknowledged or proved in order to 
be recorded, a judgment may be entered therein according to 
the award, and shall be docketed, transcripts filed, and execu- 
tions issued thereon, the same as authorized by law in regard 
to judgments in the Supreme Court. Judgments entered in 
conformity with such award shall not be subject to be re- 
moved, reversed, modified, or in any manner appealed from by 
the parties thereto, except for frauds, collusion, or corruption 
of Baid Arbitration Committee, or some member thereof. 

Sec. 8. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



Chapter 30. — An Actio amend an act entitled an act to incaiym^ate the 
^^New York Commercial Association,^^ passed April 19, 1862. 

PASSED FEBRUARY 13th, 1868. 

The feajjle of the State of Neiu YorJc, re/presented in Senate and 
Assembly, do enact as folloios : 
Section 1. — The name of the New York Commercial 



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56 Neiv York Produce Exchange, 

Association is hereby changed to New York Produce Ex- 
change. 

Sec. 2. — Nothing in this Act contained shall effect any 
liability incurred by the said New York Commercial Associa- 
tion, nor any action or proceeding now pending. All actions 
hereafter commenced on account of any such liability shall be 
brought and prosecuted against the said corporation by the 
name of the New York Produce Exchange. 

Sec. 3. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



Chapter 543. — An act to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the 
^^ New York Commercial Association,'^'' x^cissed April Idt/i, 1862, amended 
hy a subsequent act, passed February \Wi, 1868, changing the name of 
said corporation to " New York Produce ExcJmnge,''^ 

PASSED MAY 19, 1873. 

The people of the State of Neiv York, represented in Senate 
and Assembly, do enact as follows : 

Section 1. — Section one of chapter three hundred and 
fifty-nine of the Laws of eighteen hundred and sixty-two, is 
hereby amended so as to read as follows : 

§ 1. — The members of the association known as the New 
York Produce Exchange, and all persons who hereafter may 
become associated with them under the provisions of this 
act, are hereby created a body corporate, under and by the 
name of the New York Produce Exchange, with perpetual 
succession and power to use a common seal, and alter the 
same at pleasure, to sue and be sued, to take and to hold 
by grant, purchase and devise, real and personal property to 
an amount not exceeding one million five hundred thousand 
dollars, for the purposes of such New York Produce Ex- 
change, and to sell, convey, lease, and mortgage the same, or 
any part thereof. 

Sec. 2. — This Act shall take effect immediately. 



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BY-LAWS 

OF THE 

New York Produce Exchange. 



Adopted April 8, 1873; and Amended March 3, April 6, April 7, 
May 19, September 23, 1874, and March 31, 1876. 



TITLE. 

Section 1. — The title of this Association shall be ^^^1^. 
the '^New York Produce Exchange/' 

OBJECTS. 

Sec. 2. — The objects of this Association are to pro- 
vide and regulate a suitable room or rooms for a 
Produce Exchange in the City of New York ; to incul- 
cate just and equitable principles in trade ; to establish objects, 
and maintain uniformity in commercial usages ; to 
acquire, preserve, and disseminate valuable business 
information, and to adjust controversies and misunder- 
standings between its members. 

MEMBERS. 

Sec. 3. — Any respectable person engaged in any who may be- 

■t 1 n ,-i -r\ 1 1 ' • !• come Mi mbers. 

branch oi the Produce busmess, or m any busmess 
directly connected therewith, on the proposal of one 
member, seconded by another, and on presenting a 
written application, stating the nature of his business, 
after ten days' notice of such application has been 
connpicuously posted upon the Exchange, shall be 
admitted to membership^ if approved by the Board 
of Managers, on the payment of an initiation fee initiation Fee. 
of one thousand dollars, or on .presentation of a 
certificate of .membership duly transferred to him, 
and the signing of an agreement to abide by the 



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58 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Cpftificateof 
Membership. 



Transfer Fee. 



Annual Election, 
when held. 



Who entitled to 
vote. 



What constitutes 
a choice. 



Inspectors of 
election. 



Charter, By-Laws and Eules of the Exchange, and all 
amendments that may be made thereto. 

Sec. 4. — Each member shall be entitled to receive a 
certificate of membership, bearing the corporate seal 
of the Exchange, and the signatures of the President 
and Secretary, which shall be transferable upon the 
books thereof, to any person eligible to membership, 
upon the payment of a transfer fee of five dollars, and 
any unpaid assessments due thereon. The certificate 
of membership of a deceased member may be trans- 
ferred by his legal representatives. 

ANNUAL ELECTION. 

Sec. 5. — There shall be an annual election by ballot 
held at th'e Exchange, on the first Monday in June, 
for the officers and managers of the Association pre- 
scribed in the Charter. The polls shall be opened at 
eleven o'clock a. m., and closed at three o'clock p. m., 
and surJi arrangements shall be made by the Inspectors 
of Election as shall best facilitate the prompt dispatch 
of the election, and allow every member to vote who 
may so desire. 

Sec. 6. — Every person who shall have been duly 
admitted a member of the Exchange, and who shall 
hold in his own name a certificate of membership, 
upon which all assessments have been paid, and who 
has performed all other obligations incumbent upon 
him as a member of the Exchange, shall be entitled 
to vote. 

Sec. 7. — A plurality of votes cast shall constitute 
a choice. No proxies shall be allowed. 

inspectors of election. 

Sec. 8. — The members of the Exchange, at their 
annual election, shall choose, by ballot, a Board of 
Inspectors of Election, to consist of five inspectors, 
who, upon their organization, and before entering 
upon the duties of their office, shall be required to 



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Oath, 



Duties of In- 
spectors. 



By-Laios. 59 

severally take or subscribe to the following oath or inspectors of 
affirmation : 

"I, A, B., do solemnly swear for affirm, as the case may he), that I will execute 
the duties of an In-pector of Election for the New York Produce Exchange with 
strict impartiality, and according to the best of my ability." 

Sec. 9. — It shall be the duty of the Inspectors of 
Election to receive the votes at each and every elec- 
tion held during their term; to canvass them immedi- 
ately after each election, and make a return thereof 
to the President, and a duplicate to the Secretary, 
who shall at once post it in the Exchange; and the 
Inspjectors shall send a certificate of election to each 
of those members who may be elected to office. 

Sec. 10. — The President shall have power to fill any 
vacancies that may occur among the Inspectors of 
Election by death, resis-nation, or failure to elect, or to ^^ 

J . . . Vacancies. 

appear at any election day; and in case of his absence, 
the vacancy shall be filled by the remaining Inspec- 
tors present. 

Sec. 11. — Each Inspector shall be entitled to re- f^cs. 
ceive from the Exchange ten dollars for service at 
each election. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

Sec. 12. — The proj)erty, affairs, business and con- Board of Man- 
cerns of the Exchange shall be vested in a '^ Board *^^^^' 
OF Managers,'' consisting of the President, Vice- 
President, Treasurer, and twelve Managers, who shall 
be elected in the manner provided in the Charter and 
By-Laws, and be subject only to the provisions thereof. 
The members of the said Board shall enter upon the 
performance of their duties on the first Thursday suc- 
•■ ceeding their election, and shall continue in office until 
the first Thuisday following the election of their suc- 
cessors. Any vacancies that may occur in the Board vacancies. 
by death, resignation or otherwise may be filled by 
themselves. They shall not receive pay for their ser- 
vices, except when acting as members of committees, 
or as hereinafter provided. 



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60 



New York Produce Exdiange. 



Duties and Pow- 
ers of the Board. 



Meetings of the 
Board. 



Quorum. 



Order of Busi- 



Sec. 13. — The Board of Managers shall provide and 
regulate suitable rooms for the Produce Exchange, 
and cause them to be supplied with newspapers, mar- 
ket reports, telegraphic and statistical information, 
and do such other proper and needful things as in 
their judgment will tend to promote the usefulness 
of the institution, and carry out the purposes of the 
Charter. They shall appoint such clerks, attorneys, 
counsel, and other agents as they shall deem neces- 
sary to protect the interests of the Association and 
of its members; shall fix the compensation for their 
services, and may, in their discretion, require from 
any such appointee a good and sufficient bond, to be 
executed and made payable to the President and his 
successors in office, for the faithful performance of 
his duties. 

MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 

Sec. 14. — Regular meetings of the Board of Man- 
agers shall be held on the first Thursday of each 
month ; except when the same shall fall upon a 
legal holiday, in which case the meeting shall be held 
on the following Thursday; but the President may, 
when he deems necessary, or at the request of three 
members of the Board shall, call special meetings of 
the Board. Eight members present at such meetings 
shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of busi- 
ness. 

Sec. 15. — The following Order of Business shall be 
observed at all meetings of the Board of Managers, 
and no business shall be taken up out of the regular 
order, except by unanimous consent, viz. : 

1. Calling the roll of members. 

2. Reading of the Minutes of the preceding meeting. 

3. Report of *the Treasurer. 

4. Reports of Standing Committees. 

5. Reports of Special Committees. 

6. Report of the Superintendent. 



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By-Laws, 61 

7. Unfinished business. 

8. Eesolutions, motions, and notices. 

9. Miscellaneous business. 

Any question as to priority of business shall be 
decided by the Chair, without debate. 

Sec. 16. — If any member of the Board of Managers Absence fiom 
shall absent himself from two (2) consecutive regular forfeits s^t.^ 
meetings of the Board, without having been pre- , 
viously* excused, or without sending a communication 
to the President stating his reasons for doing so, or 
communicating a resignation of his office, his seat in 
the Board may be declared vacant. 

Sec. 17. — No ofiicer or member of the Board of unauthorized 
Managers shall contract any debt on behalf of the ^on^acted!^ ''^ 
Exchange, or in any manner or to any extent render 
the corporation liable for the payment of any sum, 
unless the same shall first have been directed by the 
Board of Managers. 

COMMITTEES. 

Sec. 18. — At the first meeting of the members of Appointments. 
the Board of Managers after their election, the Presi- 
dent shall, subject to their approval, make the follow- 
ing appointments, viz. : 

1 . A Secretary, who shall also be Secretary of the 
Exchange, to hold office at the pleasure of the Board, 
and who shall be a member of the Board. 

2. A Superintendent of the Exchange, who shall superintendent, 
not be a member of the Board of Managers, and who 

shall also hold office at the pleasure of the Board. 

3. A Finance Committee, to consist of three mem- Finance commit- 
bers of the Board of Managers. 

4. A Committee on Booms and Fixtures, to con- committee on 

' Booms and Ftx- 

sist of three members of the Board of Managers. ta^s. 

5. A Law Committee, to consist of three members ^^w committee, 
of the Board^of Managers. 

6. A Floor Committee, to consist of three members . pioor committee. 
of the Board of Managers. 



Secretary. 



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62 



New York Produce JExchange. 



Complaint Com- 
mittee. 



Committee on 
Trade. 



Committee on 
Information 

& Statistics. 



Special Commit- 
tees. 



Reports of Com- 
mittees. 



Quorum, 



7. A Complaint Committee^ to consist of three 
members of the Board of Managers. One member 
of this Committee shall retire at each regular meeting 
of the Board, and the President shall thereupon ap- 
point another member of the Board in his place. 

8. A Committee on Trade, to consist of five mem- 
bers, two of whom, including the chairman, shall be 
members of the Board of Managers. The other 
three to be selected from among the members of the 
Exchange not being members of the Board. 

9. A Committee on Information and Statistics, to 
consist of five members, to be composed and appointed 
in the same manner as the Committee on Trade. 

These several Committees shall hold office at the 
pleasure of the Board, and perform such duties as 
may be necessarily incident to the purposes of their 
appointment, as hereinafter prescribed, and such as 
may be required of them from time to time by the 
Board of Managers. 

Sec. 19. — Special Committees, and all Committees 
required by the Kules and Eegulations made by the 
Board of Managers for the government of the differ- 
ent branches of ti-ade carried on by members of the 
Exchange, shall be appointed by the President, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Board, unless directed to 
be chosen by ballot, and shall consist of such number 
as may be ordered at the time of their appointment, 
or provided in the Eules and Eegulations before men- 
tioned, which Committees shall also hold office at the 
pleasure of the Board. 

Sec. 20. — Eeports of Committees shall be made in 
writing to the Board of Managers, and signed by a 
majority of the members thereof. Minority reports 
may, however, be submitted. A majority of any 
Standing or Special Committee shall constitute a 
quorum for the transaction of business, and a major- 
ity decision of such quorum shall be valid. Vacan- 



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By-Laws. 6S 

cies that occur in any of the Committees shall be vacancies. 
filled in the same manner that such Committee was 
originally appointed. 

ANNUAL ASSESSMENT. 

Sec. 21.— For the purpose of defraying the ex- Annual Assess- 
penses of the Exchange, the Board of Managers °'^''*'- 
shall annually assess upon each certificate of mem- 
bership such sum as it shall deem expedient or ne- 
cessary, not less than ten dollars nor more than 
thirty dollars. The amount of such assessment shall Amount. 
be payable at the office of the Exchange at such 
time as the Board of Managers shall designate ; and 
any person who shall neglect or refuse to pay the 
same after five (5) days' written notice by the Treas- 
urer so to do, shall be suspended from the privileges 
of the Exchange until the same shall have been paid ; 
and should such arrearage continue for the period of Penalties for 
SIX months, he shall cease to be a member of the Ex- ^^^*^°*^' 
change. 

SURPLUS FUND. 

Sec. 22. — The fund created by the assessment of surplus Fund, 

T 11111 !•! 1 -11 how constituted . 

two hundred dollars, levied upon and paid by mem- 
bers of the Exchange prior to July, 1872, together 
with all initiation fees of new members which have 
been or may hereafter be received, together with all 
interest thereon, shall be known as the '^ Surplus 
Fund,'' and no appropriations shall be made there- 
from to an amount greater than Five Thousand Dol- ^^"''^ "^^'^• 
lars in any one year, except by a majority vote of the 
members voting ; such vote to be taken by ballot, 
after twenty days' notice stating the object of such 
appropriation. 

PRESIDENT. 

Sec. 23. — The President shall preside at the meet- Presidents 
ings of the Exchange and of the Board of Managers, 
and shall be a member ex-officio of all standing Com- 
mittees (except the Arbitration Committee). He 
shall also, at the annual meeting of the members of 



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64 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Vice-President's 
Duties. 



Treasurer's 
Duties. 



Monthly and An- 
nual Reports. 



the Exchange, and at such other times as he shall 
deem proper, communicate to the Exchange, or to the 
Board of Managers, such matters, and make such 
suggestions as may, in his opinion, tend to promote 
the prosperity and welfare and increase the usefulness 
of the Exchange, and shall perform such other duties 
as are necessarily incident to the office of President of 
the Exchange. 

VICE-PRESIDENT. 

Sec. 24. — In case of the death or absence of the 
President, or of his inability from any cause to act, 
the Vice-President shall perform the duties of the 
President ; and in case of the absence of both Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, then the Board of Managers 
shall appoint one of their number to perform the 
duties of President for the time being. 

TREASURER. 

Sec. 25. — The Treasurer shall receive all sums due 
to the Exchange, and, under the direction of the 
Board of Managers, shall invest, deposit and disburse 
the same. He shall not pay out any of the funds of 
the Exchange unless authorized by the Board, and 
under the direction of the Finance Committee. All 
disbursements shall be made by checks signed by the 
Treasurer and countersigned by the President. He 
shall keep regular books of accounts, and carefully 
preserve all vouchers for the payment of money, and 
all bonds and securities of every kind belonging to 
this Association. He shall render a monthly account 
at each regular meeting of the Board of Managers, 
and an annual report to the Exchange at the annual 
meeting thereof, all of which reports shall be audited 
and approved by the Finance Committee before pre- 
sentation. The funds, books, vouchers and securities 
in his hands shall at all times be under the super- 
vision of the Board of Managers, and subject to its 
inspection and control. He shall have custody of the 



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JSy-Latvs. 65 

corporate seal, and sLall, with two sufBcient sureties ^^jps seai. 
. approved by the Board, execute a bond to the Ex- 
change in a penal sum, to be fixed by the Board of 
Managers, for the faithful performance of his duties ; ^°°'^' 
and at the expiration of his term of office shall 
transfer all funds, books, papers, and other property 
of the Exchange in his possession to his successor, 
and his compensation shall be fixed by the Board of compensation. 
Managers. 

SECRETARY. 

Sec. 26. — The Secretary shall keep a record of the secretary's du- 
proceedings of the Board of Managers, and of all *'^- 
meetings of the members of the Exchange, and shall 
immediately post conspicuously upon the bulletins of 
the Ex:change all reports from the Board of Inspectors 
of Election, and perform such other duties incident to 
his office as the Board of Managers may require of 
him. In case of his absence or disability, either body 
may appoint a Secretary pro tem, 

ARBITRATION COMMITTEE. 

Sec. 27.— As soon as practicable after its organiza- ^^T^eotlT 
tion, the Board of Managers shall elect, by ballot, an 
Arbitration Committee, which shall consist of five 
members of the Exchange, who shall not be mem- 
bers of the Board of Managers, and who shall hold 
office until the election of their successors. A ma- 
jority of the whole Board shall be necessary to con- 
stitute a choice. The various branches of business 
transacted on the Exchange shall, as far as practic- 
able, be represented in said Committee. 

Sec. 28. — As soon as practicable after the election organize. 
of the Arbitration Committee, the members thereof 
shall organize by the election of a chairman from 
among their own number. The Superintendent, eith- 
er in person or by substitute, shall act as clerk of the 
Committee. Before entering upon the duties of their 
office, the members of the said Committee shall be 



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66 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Arbitration Com- 
mittee, how 
availed of. 



Proceedings. 



Fees. 



required to take or subscribe to the following oatb or 
affirmation, viz.: 

"You do severally swear that you respectively will faithfully and fairly hear and 
examine the matters in controversy which may come before you during your tenure 
in office, and to make a just award therein, according- to the best of your under- 
standing, so help you Grod." 

Sec. 29. — All persons who may desire the services 
of the Arbitration Committee shall file with the Su- 
perintendent of the Exchange an agreement in writ- 
ing to submit their case to the Committee, and to be 
bound by its decision, which agreement shall be signed 
by the parties thereto, and attested by a subscribing 
witness. On the filing of such agreement the Super- 
intendent shall call a meeting of the Committee, to 
be held as soon thereafter as may be convenient to 
the parties concerned, to hear and decide such con- 
troversy. The Committee shall have power to ad- 
journ the hearing of any case from time to time, as 
circumstances may require. All awards by said Com- 
mittee shall be rendered in conformity with Sections 
5, 6, and 7 of the Charter. 

Sec. 30. — The proceedings of the Arbitration Com- 
mittee shall be recorded in a book to be kept for that 
purpose, in which shall be entered a summary of each 
controversy submitted for the decision of the Com- 
mittee, the award made thereon, and the grounds for 
such award. Said book shall be the property of the 
Exchange, and subject to the inspection of its mem- 
bers on application to the Superintendent. 

Sec. 31. — Each member of the Arbitration Com- 
mittee who shall be present at the hearing of any 
case shall be entitled to a fee of five dollars for each 
sitting ; to be paid by the party against whom the 
decision shall be rendered, except in such cases as 
the Committee, at their discretion, shall otherwise 
order. 

COMPLAINT committee. 

Sec. 32. — ^Any member of the Produce Exchange 



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By-Laws. 67 

who shall be accused of wilful violation of the Char- causes for Com- 
plaint, 
ter or By-Laws, or of fraudulent breach of contract, 

or of any proceeding inconsistent with just and 
equitable principles of trade, or of other misconduct, 
shall, on complaint, be summoned before the Com- 
plaint Committee, when, if he desire, he shall be heard 
in his defense. Should the Committee be unable to 
conciliate the disputants, or induce them to arbitrate, 
and the circumstances seem to warrant, the com- 
plaint shall be referred to the Board of Managers, 
when both plaintiff and defendant shall have an op- 
portunity to be heard again in person, prior to final 
action in the case ; and if, in the opinion of the 
Board, the charge or charges against said defendant 
be substantiated, it may, by a vote of not less than 
two-thirds of all the members present, either cen- 
sure, suspend or expel him from the Exchange. 

Sec. 33. — All complaints which may be made 
against members of the Exchange shall be made in ^^^e- 
writing, and addressed to the Chairman of the Com- 
plaint Committee, who shall cause a copy thereof to 
be transmitted to the member against whom the 
complaint shall have been entered, previous to his 
being summoned to appear before said Committee, 
as provided for in Section 32. 

Sec. 34. — Six dollars shall be paid to the Commit- 
tee by the complainant at the time of filing his com- 
plaint, which sum shall be equally divided among 
the members of the Committee who shall take part 
in the hearing. 

Sec. 35. — To reinstate an expelled member, it shall 
require the affirmative vote of three-fourths of all reinstated, 
the members of the Board of Managers present and 
voting at the meeting at which the application for 
such reinstatement shall be acted upon ; but a sus- 
pended member may be reinstated by a majority vote 
at any meeting of the Board of Managers, 



Complaints, how 



Fees. 



Members, how 



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68 



Neio York Produce Exchange, 



Duties of Mem- 
bers failing to 
meet their con- 
tracts. 



Notice to be 
posted. 



Contracts, how 
to be closerl. 



SETTLEMENTS BY AND "WITH MEMBERS WHO FAIL TO 
MEET THEIR CONTRACTS. 

Sec. 36. — It shall be the duty of any member fail- 
ing to meet his contracts with or to any other mem- 
ber of this Exchange^ to immediately notify the 
President in writing, of such failure, and the Presi- 
dent shall thereupon cause the following notice to be 
posted on the official Bulletin. 

NOTICE. 

Members of this Exchange are hereby notified of the inability of 

to meet his (or their) Mercantile obhgations. All contracts with him 

(or them) must therefore be closed as provided in Section 38 of the By-Laws. 

Sec. 37. — In case any member so failing shall not 
notify the President, as thus provided, it shall be the 
duty of the Complaint Committee, upon satisfactory 
proof of such failure being made to them, to notify 
the President in writing, and the President shall 
thereupon immediately call a meeting of the Board 
of Managers, who shall proceed to investigate the 
case in the same manner as provided in cases of 
Complaints in Sec. 32 of these By-Laws. In case of 
satisfactory proof of failure, the President shall be 
instructed by the Board of Managers to pcist the 
same notice as provided in Sec. 36 ; and such member 
may be suspended or expelled at this or any subse- 
quent meeting of the Board of Managers, by a vote 
of two-thirds of all the members present. 

Sec. 38. — All outstanding contracts between mem- 
bers so failing and other members of the Exchange, 
in cases where official notice of failure has been 
given, may be closed by settlement at the market 
price of any of the five business days next succeed- 
ing the day of such official notice of failure, upon at 
least one business day's notice in writing to said 
member so failing. In case no such notice is given 
to said member so failing, the settlement shall be 
made at the market price of the fifth business day 
succeeding the day of official notice of failure ; pro- 



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Floor Commit- 
tee's Duties. 



'By-Laws. 69 

vided, however, that no contract shall thereby be 
extended beyond its maturity. Disputes as to the 
market price of any of said days sh^l be finally de- 
termined by arbitration. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Sec. 39. — The Finance Committee shall audit all Finance commit- 
bills or claims against the Exchange ; shall direct all *^^ ^"^^^^ 
payments, deposits and investments authorized by the 
Board of Managers; shall audit the accounts of the 
Treasurer monthly, and also his annual account. 

FLOOR committee. 

Sec. 40. — The Floor Committee shall have general 
supervision over the rooms used by the Exchange 
during 'Change hours; see that proper order is kept, 
and that no unauthorized persons are admitted on 
the fl.oors of the Exchange. All applications for 
membership to the Exchange shall be referred to 
them, and they shall report On the same to the Board 
of Managers for their action. 

committee on information and statistics. 
Sec. 41. — The Committee on Information and Sta- ^ 

Committee on 

tistics shall, unless otherwise directed, have charge i^2f^**i2? f °^ 

' ^ ^ ^ o Statistics'Duties. 

of all matters pertaining to supply of newspapers, 
market reports, telegraphic and statistical informa- 
tion for the use of the Exchange ; and it shall be 
the duty of said Committee to organize plans for ob- 
taining regularly, and at the earliest moment, such 
reliable information as may affect the value of arti- 
cles dealt in by the members of the Exchange. They 
shall organize and maintain a system for recording, 
in books to be provided for the purpose, such statis- 
tics of the movement and prices of Produce at this 
and other points as may be of interest to the members 
of this Exchange, or may have any bearing on the 
question of transportation as identified with the inter- 
ests of our city and State. 



statistics. 



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70 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Law Committee't 
Duties, 



Legal Couiisel. 



To consider 
Amendments to 
By-Laws. 



BiiUding and 
Supplies. 



Committee on 
Tiade's Duties. 



Superintendent'^ 
Duties. 



LAW COMMITTEE. 

Sec. 42. — The Law Oommittee shall have charge 
of all Legislation that may be required by the Ex- 
change, including the presentation of memorials to 
the State Legislature, to the City, or to the General 
Grovernments. They shall nominate to the Board 
for their approval suitable Counsel to represent and 
protect the interests of the Exchange in any suits at 
law that may arise, or for the examination of titles to 
real estate of which the Produce Exchange may be- 
come possessed. Any amendment proposed to the 
Charter and By-Laws shall be submitted to them for 
their consideration, and they shall report on the same 
to the Board. 

committee on rooms and fixtures. 

Sec. 43. — The Committee on Eooms and Fixtures 
shall have supervision over the real estate of the Ex- 
change, see that the same is kept in proper repair and 
preservation, and attend to the purchase of all neces- 
sary supplies. 

committee on trade. 

Sec. 44. — The Committee on Trade shall consider, 
and from time to time report to the Board of Mana- 
gers, for its action, such rules and regulations as to 
the purchase, sale, transportation and custody of arti- 
cles of Produce as they may consider would be bene- 
ficial to the interests of the members of the Exchange. 
They shall, so far as practicable, establish relations 
with similar associations at leading commercial points 
in our own and other countries, to the end that uni- 
formity of practice and usage may be attained in all 
matters of common interest. 

superintendent. 

Sec 45. — The Superintendent shall, under the di- 
rection of the Board of Managers, take charge of the 
details of the work of the Board, and of the various 
standing and special committees thereof, keeping 



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By-Latvs, 71 

and preserving, in an orderly and systematic manner, 
all the books and documents of the Exchange, so that 
they shall at all times be accessible and convenient 
for reference- He shall collect and pay over to the couections. 
Treasurer all moneys due to the Exchange for assess- 
ments, fines, fees or otherwise. He shall have charge 
of the Exchange building, and all other buildings 

T 1 • t 1 £i. X. 'J Care of Building. 

and rooms which are or may hereaiter be occupied 
by the Exchange, and shall cause them to be supplied 
with the necessary stationery, and to be properly 
heated, cleaned, ventilated and kept in order and re- 
pair. He shall have charge of the bulletins of the 
Exchange, and shall cause all information, statistics ^^^^^^^ 
and notices pertaining to the business of the Exchange 
to be posted thereon in a correct, neat and orderly 
manner. He shall, with the advice and consent of 
the Board of Managers, appoint such assistants as he AppointsAssisL 
may deem requisite and necessary to aid him in the ^^^' 
performance of his duties; and, with a view to the 
greatest economy consistent with efficient service, sKall 
organize them in separate departments, for the proper 
working of each and all of which he shall be held re- 
sponsible.. He shall report fully in writing to the 
Board of Managers at each regular meeting thereof, ^^^q^**'*^^® 
. and shall perform such other duties incident to his 
office as may, from time to time, be required of him 
by the Board. 

MEETINGS OF THE EXCHANGE. 

Sec. 46. — The Annual Meeting of the members of Annual Meeting. 
the Exchange shall be held at their rooms, on the 
last Tuesday in May, at half-past one o'clock p. m., 
(of which at least one week's previous notice shall be 
given by the President), for the purpose of receiving 
the reports of the Board of Managers and the Treas- 
urer, and for the transaction of such other business 
connected with the affairs of the corporation as may 
be presented for consideration. 



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72 



Neio York Produce Exchange. 



Sec. 47. — The President may, and, upon the writ- 
ten request of a majority of the Board of Managers, 
or seventy-live members of the Exchange shall, call 
Special Meetings, gpccial meetings of the members of the Exchange for 
the transaction of business directly connected with the 
affairs of the corporation, of which at least twenty- 
four hours' notice shall be given by the President. 
Such notice shall state explicitly the object of such 
meeting, and at such meeting such business only shall 
be transacted as shall have been mentioned in the call. 
Meetings for other important purposes may be called 
by the President upon the written request of a majority 
of the Board of Managers, similar notice being given 
and observed. The Board of Managers may, in their 
discretion, upon like notice, submit to the members for 
their approval by ballot, any question directly con- 
nected with the affairs of the Corporation, not other- 
wise provided for in these By-Laws, and a majority of 
the votes cast shall determine such question. 

Sec. 48. — At all meetings of the members of the 
Exchange, seventy-five members present shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business, and a 
less number shall have power to adjourn to a future 
time, which time shall be stated. 

EXCHANGE OPEN. 

Sec. 49. — The Exchange shall be open for business 
daily, except Sundays and legal holidays, during such 
hours and under such rules and regulations as the 
Board of Managers may establish; but the Exchange 
may adjourn for one day at any one time, by a vote of 
three-fourths of the members present at a meeting of 
the Exchange called for that purpose, as provided for 
in Section 47. The Board of Managers may, however, 
order the vote upon the question of such adjournment 
to be taken by ballot, as provided for in Section 47. 

NOTICES. 

Sec. 50. — Notices of meetings of the Exchange, and 



Quorum. 



Booms, when to 
be open. 



Notices, how 
given. 



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By-Laws, 73 

of all other matters intended for tlie information of 
members, shall be given by posting the same conspicu- 
ously on the bulletin boards of the Exchange ; and no 
notices shall be posted upon the Exchange except 
such as relate to the affairs of the Association, unless 
by consent of the Floor Committee. 

VISITORS. 

Sec. 51. — No person except members shall be ad- ^. . 

^ ^ Visitors, how in- 

mitted on the floor of the Exchange for purposes of troduced. 
business. Members, however, may introduce their 
friends, as visitors, by entering their respective names 
in a book to be kept for that purpose, and may ob- 
tain for such visitors a card of admission for seven 
consecutive days in each current year. This privi- * 
lege shall not be extended, except with consent of 
the Floor Committee ; and shpuld any person so in- 
troduced violate the rules of the Exchange by the 
transactino^ of business, the member introducinsr such _ , 

^ ' ^ Penalty for Vio- 

person shall become liable to pay a fine of not less lating Rules. 
than twenty-five dollars, nor more than fifty dollars, 
for each offense, at the discretion of the Board of 
Managers, and be subject to the same penalty for non- 
payment as provided for in Section 21. 

KULES. 

Sec. 52. — All rules adopted by the Board of Man- 
agers shall, after having been posted on the bulletin 
of the Exchange ten days, be in force and binding when Rules be- 

1 Til./. in come binding, 

on the members ; and the rules m force shall govern 
all cases to which they may be applicable, provided 
they do not conflict with any specific provisions of a 
contract. 

PROHIBITED APPROPRIATIONS. 

Sec. 53. — There shall be no appropriation of money prohibited ap- 
voted, either by the Board of Managers or by the p^^p^^^^^^^- 
Exchange, except for strictly legitimate business of 
the Exchange. 



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74 New York Produce Exchange. 

AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS. 

Amendments to ^Ec. 54. — These Bj-Laws shall not be altered nor 
By-Laws. amended, unless the proposed alteration or amend- 
ment has been approved by a vote of two-thirds of 
the Board of Managers, and ratified by a majority 
vote of members voting by ballot, at an election held 
for the purpose, of which ten days' notice shall have 
been given, stating specifically the alteration or amend- 
ment proposed. 

Repeal of former Sec. 55. — All laws herctofore in existence . which 
^^^^' may be in conflict with the foregoing shall be con- 

sidered null and of no effect. 



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FLOOR RULES 

OF THE 

lEW York Produce Exchange. 



Adopted by the Boabd of Managers March 21, 1877, ajs^d Amended 
November 1, 1877. 



RULE one. 

The annual assessment on the members of the Exchange shall 
be due and payable at the Treasurer's desk on the first day of 
May in each year. Members must show their tickets on enter- 
ing, when so required. 

RULE TWO. 

The rooms shall be opened at nine o'clock a. m., and closed, ex- 
cept as hereinafter provided, at ^Ye o'clock p. m. Clerks and 
porters of members may have access to the rooms between the 
hours of nine a. m. and twelve m., for the purpose of arranging 
samples, but must withdraw on the completion of their duties. 

rule three. 

'Change hours shall be from 'eleven o'clock a. m. to two o'clock 
p. M. All communication with persons on the floors of the Ex- 
change during these hours must be made through the Messen- 
gers of the Exchange, and should be in writing when practicable. 

RULE FOUR. 

The tops of the Grain and Provision Tables shall be free, and 
may be occupied by those first in attendance ; but no person or 
firm can claim the right to occupy in the front line more than 
the space over one sample drawer, to the exclusion of the other 
members. Flour Stands and Grain and Provision Drawers may 
be rented on application to the Superintendent. 

RULE FIVE. 

The Exchange Kooms are designed exclusively for private 
trnnsactions, and all loud or boisterous conversation is prohib- 
ited. The throwing of dough, corn, or other articles is strictly 
forbidden, and any member who shall practice the same shall be 
deemed guilty of misconduct, as set forth in Section 32 of the 



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76 New York Traduce Exchange, 

By-Laws governing the Produce Exchange, and shall be liable to 
the penalties therein set forth. Smoking in any of the Booms 
of the Exchange before the hour of 2.15 p. m. is strictly prohib- 
ited. 

EULE SIX. 

Any stranger visiting the Exchange must be introduced by a 
member, who shall register his name in a book provided for that 
purpose. Such visitor shall receive a card of admission for seven 
consecutive days during one year, which can be renewed only at 
the discretion of the Floor Committee. Should any person so 
introduced violate the Bules of the Exchange by the transaction 
of business on the floor, the member introducing such visitor shall 
become liable to pay a fine of not less than twenty-five dollars 
nor more than fifty dollars for each offense, at the discretion of 
the Board of Managers, and be subject to the same penalty for 
non-payment as provided for assessments in Section 21 of the 
By-Laws. 

RULE , SEVEN. 

Any member who shall be incapacitated for attending to his 
business in consequence of illness, or who shall be temporarily 
absent from the city, may, on the approval of the Floor Commit- 
tee, be represented on 'Change during the time of such illness, 
or of such temporary absence from the city, by some one person 
whom he shall designate for that purpose, and for whose acts he 
shall be responsible. 

Such substitute shall receive a pass for a period not exceeding 
thirty days, which pass may be renewed by the Floor Committee 
in their discretion. Until such pass is returned and cancelled, 
the member himself shall not be admitted to the Exchange. 

RULE EIGHT. 

The courtesies of the Exchange shall be extended to duly ac- 
credited representatives of the Press, to report markets ; but 
they shall not be allowed to transact any other business. 

RULE NINE. 

The name of any member who may be suspended by the Board 
of Managers, shall be posted on the bulletins of the Exchange 
during the term of such suspension, and the name of any mem- 
ber who may be expelled shall be likewise posted for thirty days 
from the date of such expulsion. 



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Floor Bules. 77 

EULE TEN. 

Business on the Upper Floor of the Exchange shall close daily 
at 1.30 o'clock p. m., of which the following notice shall be given:- 

1. A be]l provided for that purpose shall be rung as a warning 
at 1.20 o'clock p. m. 

2. This bell shall be rung again at 1.30 o'clock p. m., to an- 
nounce that the hour for closing business has arrived. 

3. Twenty minutes later the bell shall be struck three times as 
a final warning to leave the floor. 

4. At 2 o'clock p. M. the business at the head of the stairway 
leading to the upper floor shall be closed, and a fine of fifty cents 
shall be imposed on all persons remaining on the floor at that 
time, which fine shall be collected in the same manner and under 
the same penalty for non-payment as provided for assessments 
in Section 20 of the By-Laws. 

EULE ELEVEN. 

Business on the Lower Floor of the Exchange shall close daily 
at 2 o'clock p. M., of which the following notice shall be given ; 

1. A bell provided for that purpose shall be rung as a warning 
at 1.50 o'clock p. m. 

2. This bell shall be rung again at 2 o'clock p. m., to announce 
that the hour for closing business has arrived. 

3. Ten minutes later the bell shall be struck three times as a 
final warning to leave the floor. 

4. At 2.15 o'clock p. m. the doors of the building shall be closed 
for five minutes, and a fine of fifty cents shall be imposed on all 
persons remaining on the floor at that time, which fine shall be 
collected in the same manner and under the same penalty for 
non-payment as provided for assessments in Section 21 of the 
By-Laws. 



The Floor Committee of the New York Produce Exchange are 
hereby authorized and dii^ected to enforce the foregoing Bules. 



KULE 
Adopted hy the Board of Managers, providing for the re-issue 

of Lost Certificates of Membership, 

In case of loss of any certificate, and of any claim that a 
new certificate be issued in place thereof, the claimant shall make 



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78 New York Produce Eocckange. 

an affidavit stating the fact of such loss. He shall cause an ad- 
vertisement to be published in one daily newspaper published in 
the city of New York, once a week for four weeks, describing the 
lost certificate, and notifying all persons interested in the matter 
to show cause, within two weeks after the time said advertise- 
ment is published, why a new certificate should not be issued in 
place of the one lost. The same notice shall be posted on the 
bulletins of the Exchange. He shall give such bond to the Ex- 
change, with a surety or sureties as shall be approved by the 
Managers, for the purpose of indemnifying the Exchange from all 
damages the Exchange may pay or sustain in conseqlience of the 
issuing of such new certificate. Upon compliance with these con- 
ditions (if no good reason shall exist why the same should not be 
be done) the Managers shall cause a certificate to be issued and 
delivered to such claimant, if he shall appear to be entitled to 
the same, in place of the certificate so lost. 



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RULES 



REGULATING TRANSACTIONS IN 



LARD AND PROVISIONS 



AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 



New York Produce ExchanCtE. 



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Appointed June 14, 1877. 

ALEXANDER E. ORR, Chairman. 
CHARLES G. FOSTER, - HERBERT TAYLOR, 

P. S. HALSTEAD, ASA STEVENS. 



Appointed June 14, 1877. 

JOHN H. POOL, Chairman. 
JOHN W. CLOSE, WILLIAM H. FOX, 

JOHN SINCLAIR, S. R. POST. 



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EXILES 

Regulating the Provision Trade 



AMONG MEMBERS OP THE 



New York Produce Exchange. 



ADOPTED DECEMBER 21, 1875, AND JANUARY 20, 1876, AND AMENDED 
OCTOBER 4, 1877. 



(See also " General Rales regulating Lard and Provision 
Dealings among Members of the New York Pro- 
duce Exchange,'' pages 93-99.^ 

EuLE 1. — At the first meeting of tlie Board of Managers after 
tlieir election, the President .sliall (subject to the approval of 
the Board) appoint as a Committee on Provisions five members 
of the New York Produce Exchange, who are known as mem- 
bers of the Provision Trade. To this Committee all cases of 
complaint against Inspectors shall be referred, and also any 
question or dispute in regard to the general good order of Pork 
and Beef between the Inspector and owner, or as to the inspec- 
tion, condition, quality, standard and weight of meats, includ- 
ing Pork and Beef in barrels or tierces. A majority of the 
Committee shall constitute a quorum ; but the Committee 
shall fill temporary vacancies, if requested by either party, by 
some person or persons representing the same interest as the 
absent member or members, and a decision of a majority pres- 
ent at any hearing shall be final and binding. They shall keep 
a record of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dollars shall 
be paid to the Committee for each reference case heard by 
them, to be paid by the party adjudged to be in fault, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Committee. 

Inspection of Beef and Pork. 
Rule 2. — No certificate of inspection or warehouse receipt 
for barrel or tierce Beef or Pork shall be recognized as 



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82 New York Produce Exchange. 

vaKd unless it is signed by an Inspector licensed by the 
Board of Managers of the New York Produce Exchange as an 
" Inspector of Beef and Pork, and Warehouseman/' Such 
Inspectors shall only be licensed upon written application, (en- 
dorsed by not less than five regular dealers in Beef and Pork, 
either on commission or on their own account, members of 
the Exchange,) stating the location of their place of business, 
which must be within the harbor of New York, or the cities 
connected therewith. 

Licenses may be given to firms or to individuals, mem- 
bers of the Exchange, but at least one member of the firm 
must be a practical and competent Inspector. 

EuLE 3. — The Inspector must store all Beef and Pork 
which shall be transferred from one party to another, while in 
his custody, at not exceeding six (6) cents per month per barrel, 
or the equivalent for tierces, free of charge for labor. The 
Inspector may charge a reasonable price for breaking down, 
retiering, opening, weighing, reheading or showing on the 
order of the owner. 

The Inspection Yards shall be so located that Beef and Pork, 
in lots of 100 barrels or more, may be delivered by lighters to 
any place in the harbor at customary rates (without expense of 
cartage to lighter). 

The Inspector shall guarantee that the rate of insurance 
on his buildings and contents shall not exceed first-class 
rates on warehouses in good insurance companies. He shall 
also guarantee the general good order of Beef (reserving de- 
cision on any special lot) repacked before May Ist, until that 
date. If delivered prior to May 1st, the guarantee ends with 
date of delivery. No guarantee follows Beef repacked after said 
date. The Inspector shall not be accountable for variations 
from standard weights beyond date of repacking. If Beef is 
held after May 1st, all expenses necessary for the proper pro- 
tection of same will be an extra charge to the owner. 

The general good order of Mess Pork of the season's pack- 
ing is guaranteed until November 1st. On other qualities the 
guarantee ceases July 1st. If delivered prior to above dates, 



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Rules of the Provision Trade, 83 

the guarantee ends with date of delivery. Limitations as to 
weight same as on Beef. 

Inspection of Meats. 

Rule 4. — No certificate of cured meats, other than barrel or 
tierce Beef and Pork, shall be recognized as valid, unless it is 
signed by an Inspector licensed by the Board of Managers of 
the New York Produce Exchange, as an ^^ Inspector of Meats/' 

Such Inspector shall only be licensed upon written applica- 
tion, indorsed by not less than five (5) regular dealers in cured 
meats, either on commission or on their own account, members 
of the Exchange. 

Inspectors may sign a firm name, but the certificate must 
be signed by a licensed Inspector, though the meat may have 
been inspected by an a-ssistant under his direction, the In- 
spector signing to be accountable to the same extent as if 
actually inspected by himself. 

Rule 5. — All Pork sold by the barrel must, unless otherwise 
stipulated, weigh out to average not less than 200 lbs. ; if 
short in weight, an allowance must be made by seller ; but 
this shall not apply to Mess Pork sold on contract, which must 
be weighed in 200 lbs. at time of inspection, without guarantee 
against shrinkage. 

In weighing Pork, it shall be free from salt, and an allow- 
ance shall be made of one per cent, for pickle. 

Rule 6. — Mess Pork, for delivery on contract, must (unless 
otherwise stipulated) have been inspected in accordance with 
the Rules of the New York Produce Exchange. Notice in 
writing must be given three days before delivery, which notice 
must be for 250 bbls. 

Warehouse receipts must be delivered to the First Receiver 
before 11 A. M., and may be transferred until 2.30 P. M. Each 
receipt must be for 250 bbls. at one place, and the Pork must 
have a distinguishing Inspector's mark (as a lot) in addition 
to the packer's brand, which mark must be noted in said receipt. 

Mess Pork sold on contract shall be payable cash on delivery 
of a warehouse receipt, signed by an inspector and warehouse- 
man, duly licensed by the Exchange. 



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84 New York Froduce Exchange. 

Barreled Pork. 

EuLB 7. — Mess Pork shall be cut and packed from sides 
of well-fatted Hogs, in strips ; the Hog to be first split 
through the backbone ; or if split on one side, then an equal 
proportion of hard and soft sides, as they are termed, must 
be packed, properly flanked, and not back-strapped. One 
hundred and ninety pounds of Q-reen Meat, numbering * 
not over sixteen pieces, including the regular proportion of 
Flank and Shoulder cuts, four layers, placed on edge, without 
excessive crowding or bruising, must be packed into each 
barrel, with not less than forty pounds of good foreign, or 
forty-five pounds of good domestic coarse salt, and filled up 
full with good clear brine, as strong as salt will make it ; the 
Pork to be cut reasonably uniform in width. The packer's 
name and location, the date of packing, and the number of 
pieces in each barrel must be branded on the head with a 
metallic brand, marking-iron or stencil brand, at the time of 
packing. 

Clear Pork, from Sides of extra heavy well-fatted* Hogs, 
cut, selected and packed in the same manner as Mess Pork ; 
the backbone and half the rib next the backbone to be taken 
out. 

Extra Clear Pork, same as " Clear,"' except that all the 
rib and backbone must be taken out. 

Mess Ordinary, or Thin Mess, from Hogs reasonably well- 
fatted, too light for Mess Pork, cut, selected and packed in 
the same manner as Mess, and the same requirements as to 
weight, &c., &c. ; the number of. pieces to the barrel not to 
exceed twenty-two. 

Prime Mess Pork shall be made of the Shoulders and Sides 
of nice, smooth, fat Hogs, weighing from 100 to 175 lbs. net, 
regularly cut into square pieces, as near four pounds each as 
possible ; the shank to be cut ofi" close to the breast. 

One hundred and ninety (190) pounds of Green Meat in the 
proportion of twenty (20) pieces of Shoulder cuts to thirty 
(30) pieces of Side cuts, shall be properly packed in each 
barrel, with not less than twenty (20) pounds of coarse salt, 



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Rules of the Provision Trarle.^ 85 

and barrel filled with brine of fall strength ; or, twenty (20) 
pounds of coarse salt ; and in addition thereto, fifteen (15) 
pounds of salt, and barrel filled with water. There sballalso 
be put into eacb barrel twelve (12) ounces of saltpetre. Bar- 
rels shall not be required to be iron-hooped, unless so stipu- 
lated at the time of sale. 

Extra Prime Pork shall be made from heavy, untrimmed 
shoulders, cut into three pieces, the leg to be cut off close to 
the breast ; to be packed two hundred pounds of green meat 
into each barrel, with the same quantity and quality of salt 
as Mess Pork. 

Eumps shall be trimmed with only enough taken off to 
make them neat and smooth, the tails cut off close ; each 
barrel to contain two hundred pounds of green meat, packed 
with the same quantity and quality of salt as Mess Pork, and 
the number of pieces to be similarly branded on each barrel 
at the time of packing. 

Cured Meats. 

Rule 8. — Where sales of Meats are made without other 
specification, it shall be considered that the sales contemplate 
merchantable Meats fully cured. 

In case of inspection for soundness, weight or quality, 
five (5) per cent, of the number of packages shall be inspected, 
and, if either party desire a further test, an additional num- 
ber of packages, not exceeding five (5) per cent., may be 
inspected at the expense of the party requesting it, who must 
give immediate notice of such request, and the average shall 
be made on the whole amount tested. 

No lot of Meats shall be considered suitable for delivery on 
contract if twenty (20) per cent, of it is unmerchantable ; but 
this shall not apply to Dry Salted Meat in boxes which shall 
not be considered suitable for delivery if ten (10) per cent, of 
the lot be unmerchantable. If less than ten (10) per cent, 
be unmerchantable the buyer may demand inspection of the 
whole lot at his expense ; and if ten (10) per cent, or over, 
but less than twenty (20) per cent., prove unmerchantable, 



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86 New York Produce Exchange, 

the seller may require inspection of the whole lot at his 
expense. 

On conlracts for delivery of Meats, three (3) days' written 
notice shall be given, exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays, 
and not less than one hundred (100) packages shall be deliv- 
ered at one time and in one place, except to complete a 
contract. 

On all packages of Meat sold on contract, there must be 
marked with brand or stencil plate, the packer's name and lo- 
cation, the number of pieces and the weight. 

Description of Meats. 

Rule 9. — Hams shall be cut short, well rounded at the 
butt, properly faced, and the shank cut off just above the 
hock joint. 

Rough Sides must be made by splitting the Hog through 
the backbone ; or if split on one side of the backbone, an 
equal proportion of hard and soft sides, as they are termed, 
must be delivered on sales, to make them '' Standard." 

Short Clear Sides : Backbone, breastbone and ribs all taken 
out, and henchbone sawed down smooth and even with the 
face of the side ; feather of the bladebone not to be taken out : 
edges to be left smooth ; sides not to be back-strapped oi' 
flanked. 

Short or Clear Rib Middles : Backbone taken out ; hench- 
bone sawed down even with the face of the side ; feather of 
bladebone not to be taken out ; edges to be left smooth ; 
sides not to be back-strapped or flanked. 

Cumberland Cut : a part of the neck, and all the shoulder 
and side left together in one piece ; leg cut off below the knee 
joint ; shoulder, ribs, and neckbone taken out ; henchbone sawed 
down even with the face of side, edges to be left smooth, and 
not to be back-strapped or flanked ; both ends to be properly 
trimmed. 

Long Rib Middles shall be cut same as Cumberland 
Cut, except that all shoulder bones must be taken out, and 
leg cut off close to the brisket. 



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Rules of the Provision Trade, 87 

Long Clear Middles shall be cut same as Long Eibs, 
except that all side ribs and breastbone must be taken out. 

Shoulders shall be cut as near through between the second 
and third ribs, and as close to the back part of the forearm joint 
as possible ; butted off square on top ; neckbone and short ribs 
taken out ; blood vein lifted and cut out ; breast flap to be 
trimmed off and foot to be cut off above the knee joint. 

Pickled Hams and Shoulders shall be sized when packed, 
and the green weights and date of packing shall also be marked 
on each package. 

English Meats : the pieces shall be classified, and the light, 
medium and heavy packed separately, as nearly as practicable, 
in boxes made to fit the different sizes. 

SALTAGE. 

Rule 10. — In case of no specific agreement, the Saltage al- 
lowed on Bulk Meats, shall be (1 pr. ct.) one per cent., from 
the first of November to the first of June ; but should the 
buyer or seller object^ the inspector shall sweep as many drafts 
as he may consider necessary, and the percentage thus ascer- 
tained shall be binding on both parties. But from the first 
of June to the first of November the tare may be ascertained 
by washing in cold water with a cloth, in case of no special 
agreement to the contrary. 

WEIGHTS OF MEATS. 

Ettle 11. — About four hundred to four hundred and fifty 
pounds net shall constitute a box of Cumberland Middles, 
and about four hundred and fifty, and not over five 
hundred and twenty-five pounds net shall constitute a box of 
; all other English cuts of Middles, Shoulders and Hams ; and 
all boxes containing over four hundred and fifty pounds of 
meat to have a third strap around the box, when such is 
required at time of purchase. 

All settlements of contracts shall be made on a basis of 
four hundred and twenty-five pounds per box net for Cumber- 
land cuts, and five hundred pounds per box net for all other 
English meats ; but the number of boxes called for in a con- 



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88 New York Produce Exchange, 

tract must be delivered ; and the difference, if any, settled 
for at the marl5;^t price of day of delivery. 

ALLOWANCE. 

Rule 12. — On all "Standard'' Box Meats the allowance 
for unmerchantable shall be twelve and one half per cent., 
except on Cumberlands and Shoulders, which shall be fifteen 
per cent., but when the market price ranges at eight cents per 
pound, or under, the allowance shall be one cent per pound, 
except on Cumberlands and Shoulders, which shall be one 
and one-quarter cents per pound. The allowance on un- 
merchantable hams is left subject to special agreement. 



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RULES 

Regulating Transactions in Lard 



AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 



Iew York Produce Exchange. 



ADOPTED DECEMBER 21, 1875, AND JANUARY 20, 1876, AND AMENDED 
OCTOBER 4, 1877. 



(See also " General Rules regulating Lard and Provision Deal- 
ings among members of the New York Prod/uce 
Exchange'' "pages 93-99J 

Rule 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Lard, five 
members of the New York Produce Exchange, who are 
known as members of the Lard Trade. It shall be the duty 
of this Committee to properly discharge the obligations 
imposed upon them by these rules, and also to consider and 
decide all disputes arising between members dealing in Lard 
as to condition, quality, weights, price^ tender, transfer of 
documents and delivery. A majority of the Committee shall 
constitute a quorum, but the Committee shall fill temporary 
vacancies if requested by either party with some person or 
persons representing the same interest as the absent mem- 
ber or members, and a decision of a majority present at any 
hearing shall be final and binding. They shall keep a record 
of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dollars shall be paid 
to the Committee for each reference case heard by them, 
to be paid by the party adjudged to be in fault, unless other- 
wise ordered by the Committee. 

EuLE 2. — Prime Lard shall be equal in quality to Lard 
made from hog round, say head, gut, leaf and trimmings, 



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90 Neio York Prodvce Exchavge. 

in the proportion in wliich the^ same come from the hog, 
and shall be properly rendered as to color, flavor and 
soundness for keeping. The renderer's name shall be dis- 
tinctly marked on each tierce at the time of packing, with 
metallic brand, marking-iron or stencil. 

EuLE 3. — Tierces shall contain not less than 290 lbs. of 
Lard, nor more than 350 lbs. The standard net weight 
of a tierce of Lard shall be 320 lbs., and any variation 
therefrom shall be settled for at the market price of day 
of delivery, but the number of packages the contract calls for 
must be delivered. All tierces must have weights and tares 
marked thereon. 

EuLE 4. — To determine the tare on Lard, a number of 
packages not exceeding four (4) per cent, shall be tested at 
the expense of the seller. The tare shall be ascertained by 
scraping the Lard from the packages, and not by removal by 
dry heat or steam. The empty package shall then be weighed, 
and the Lard replaced, and the weight of the refilled package 
shall be the gross weight. 

EuLE 5. — Payment for lard sold on contract shall be made 
on transfer of documents conveying title, before 2 P. M. of 
the third business day after notice, bill to be rendered before 
1 P. M. Seller must give buyer timely notice to attend to in- 
spection, weights and tares. If buyer fails to attend to the 
same, within a reasonable time, it shall be the duty of any two 
members of the Committee on Lard, upon proof of such 
notice and failure, without fees, to appoint a sampler to 
sample the Lard for delivery on that notice, and his inspec- 
tion shall be final on that dehvery. 

EuLE 6. — Dehveries must be made in New York, south of 
Thirty-third street, or in Brooklyn, at wharf store, or wharf 
south of the Navy Yard. Lard shall be delivered in lots of 
two hundred and fifty (250) tierces at one time and one 
place. There shall not be more than one lot of less than 
fifty (50 1 tierces of one brand. Every order must have the 
weigher's name and place of business endorsed thereon. 

EuLE 7. — On Lard contracts three (3) days' written notice 
shall be given, exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays. 



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Rules of the Lard Trade, 91 

Every transfer must be made promptly, and every person 
receiving a notice must endorse upon it the time at which he 
receives it. 

Mode of Tkansfek. 

B/ULE 8. — A Transferable Order, drawn and accepted by 
a member of the Exchange, the price being made within one- 
quarter of a cent per pound of the market price^ must be 
issued to the first receiver before 12 M. of the day the notice 
is given, in the form following : 

Transferable Order. 

New York, 187.. 

Messrs. A. B. & Co. : 

. On tlie 187 . . deliver to the order of 

C. D. & Co., in fulfillment of our contract sale to 

dated 187 . . , at cents per pound, Two hundred 

and fifty tierces of Lard, whicli is to be received by the last endorser hereon, 

who must pay us for the same at the rate of cents per pound. 

{Signed,) A. B. & Co. 

Which must be endorsed by the first receiver in the form 
following : 

Form of Endorsement. 
In consideration of one dollar paid to each receiver of the within 
order by A. B. & Co., the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, we 

will, before 1 p. M. on the 187. ., present the within 

order to A. B. & Co. and receive from them specific sampling orders, and 
will receive and pay A. B. & Co. for the Lard delivered thereon at the rate 

of cents per pound. 

It is further agreed that each receiver of this order shall continue 
his or their liability to each other for the fulfillment of the contracts . 
referred to, until the Lard is delivered and paid for. 

{Signed,) C. D. & Co. 

New York, 187.. 

Which may be transferred until 12 M. of the next business 
day after its issue, in the form following : 
Form of Transfer. 
We accept the within order from C. D. & Co., with all the conditions 
and obligations thereof, on account of contract purchase from them dated 

187 . . , at cents per jwund, paying 

dollars to make the price equal to cents per pound, the price to be 

paid to A. B. & Co. 

{Signed,) E. F. & Co. 

New York 187 



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92 Nexo York Produoe Exchange, 

This order must be promptly transferred, each party noting 
thereon the time of transfer. 

The transferable order must be presented by the last re- 
ceiver to the drawer, before 1 p. m. of the next business day 
after its issue, and the drawer must deliver to the last re- 
ceiver sampling orders of the specific lots tendered before 3 
p. M. of the same day. 

If the receiver decides to reject any lot, he must give no- 
tice of rejection to the drawer of the order before 10 a. m. of 
the next business day. 

If party making delivery desires to refer the rejection to 
the Committee on Lard, he must notify the receiver and the 
Committee before 11 a. m. of the same day. 

When the Committee on Lard are notified before 11 a. m. 
that their decision will be required in a case of rejection, said 
decision must be given before 1 P. M. of the same day. 

The Committee on Lard shall not be called upon to decide 
as to quality of any but the lots first tendered until after the 
delivery of quantity due on the contract is completed, when, 
if either party request it, the Committee shall decide as to 
the number of tierces improperly tendeied or improperly re- 
jected, and each party shall pay to the other twenty cents per 
tierce on the number so tendered or rejected improperly. 

The Committee shall decide by whom the fees are to be 
paid. The whole number of tierces in dispute on a contract 
to be included in one case. 



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GEli^ERAL EULES 

Eegulating Lard and Provision Dealings 

AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE. 



Adopted December 21, 1875, and January 20, 1876, and amended March 2, 1876, 
October 5, 1876, July 12, 1877, August 24, 1877, and October 4, 1877. 



(See also " Buhs Regulating Transactions in Lard " and " Rules 
Regulating tlie Provision Trade'' among members of tlie 
JSIew York Produce Exchange, pages 81 and 89 J 

Calls. 

BuLE 1. — There shall be two public calls each day, at 12 M. 
and 1:30 p. m., on Mess Pork, Lard, and Box Meats, to be con- 
ducted by the Superintendent of the Exchange, or in his 
absence, by a person to be selected by the majority of mem- 
bers present. The months shall be called in their order. 
No offer to buy or sell shall be entertained at a less differ- 
ence than two and a-half cents per hundred pounds on Lard 
or Meats, and five cents per barrel on Pork. 

The first offer to buy or sell at a price shall be accepted 
before subsequent offers at same figures may be placed. 
Subsequent offers to sell at a lower or buy at a higher price 
shall vacate prior offers to sell at higher or buy at lower 
prices. A transaction shall vacate all previous bids and 
offers. All disputes as to offers, acceptances or withdrawals 
(whether in time or not) shall be decided on the spot by the 
person presiding at the time, subject to an appeal to the 
members present. The appeal must be promptly taken, and 
a majority of the members present and voting shall settle the 
disputed point finally. No deahngs nor bids at the call 
shall be for a smaller quantity than 250 barrels Mess Pork, 
250 tierces Lard, 100 boxes dry Salt Meat. 

The Superintendent shall every day at 1 and 2J p. M. post 
on the bulletin of the Exchange the bidding price on the 



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94 New York Produce Exchange, 

call for each month and each article dealt in, and if there are 
no bids, then the last sale reported. These prices shall 
govern all calls for margins and variations. 

Maegins. 

EuLE 2. — Either party to a. contract, prior to or upon 
signing the same, shall have the right to call an original 
margin of two dollars per tierce on Lard, and one dollar per 
barrel on Pork, and one-half cent per pound on all other 
meats ; and either party may call for margins to meet varia- 
tions in the market. 

AU margins on contracts shall be deposited in one of such 
Trust Companies, Banks incorporated by the State, or 
National Banks, as may have been designated for this pur- 
pose by the Finance Committee of the New York Produce 
Exchange. 

When margins are called before 3' p. m., they must be de- 
posited before 11 o'clock A. M. of the next day. In case of 
failure of any Bank or Trust Company in which such margins 
have been deposited, it shaU be the loss of the party or par- 
ties to whom it may be found to be due, taking the average 
price of hke deliveries on the day such Bank or Trust Com- 
pany failed as a basis of settlement. 

When margins are called, original or for variations in the 
market, certified checks must be drawn to the order of the 
Bank or Trust Company in which they are to be deposited. 
Checks must be sent to the Superintendent of the New York 
Produce Exchange, who shall deposit them and get a certifi- 
cate of deposit, made payable on the order of the Superin- 
tendent of the New York Produce Exchange, and to the order 
of the buyer and seller. As soon as the Superintendent has 
received the certificate, he shall send it to the party making 
the deposit, and an abstract of the same to the party calling 
the margin. In settlement, the Superintendent shall ascer- 
tain the amount due each of the parties at interest, and shall 
endorse the amount due each on the certificate over his own 
signature, as instructed by both parties. In case the two 
parties do not agree as to the amount due on a margin re- 
ceipt, either of them may refer the matter to the Committee 



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General Provision and Lard Rules. 95 

on Lard or Provisions, as the case may be, for decision, which 
shall be final. On the decision of said Committee, the 
Superintendent of the Produce Exchange, on being informed 
thereof, shall promptly endorse to each party the amount 
each shall be entitled to by such decision. 

In case of the absence of the Superintendent, the Presi- 
dent of the New York Produce Exchange, or the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, shall act in his stead under this 
Eule. 

Payment. 

Eule 3. — Sales of Lard and Provisions other than under 
JRule 1, exceeding $1^000 in value, when not otherwise agreed 
upon, must he deemed for delivery at buyer's option within 
seven days, and payable cash on delivery of documents con- 
veying title to the goods. 

If buyer require it, seller must, when practicable^ transfer the 
goods to such vessel, lighter, railroad station, warehouse or 
place within the harbor of New York or the cities connected 
therewith as the buyer may designate, and under his direction 
— but the title and risk shall remain vested in the seller, until 
conveyed by delivery of the proper documents. Buyer must 
have proper opportunity to examine the quality, condition, 
weights, &c., before or during transfer, and must pay all cart- 
age and lighterage. 

If sale is from "dock'' or "to arrive," buyer shall have 
not less than 24 hours in which to remove, unless otherwise 
agreed upon. 

Form of Contracts. 

KuLE 4. — The following shall be the form of contract for 
Pork, Cut Meats and Lard sold for future deUvery : 

Mess Pork Contract. 

New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar in hand paid, the receipt of which is 

hereby acknowledged. have this day sold to (or bought from) 

, Two hundred and fifty barrels Mess Pork, 

at dollars per barrel, deliverable at seller's (or buyer's) 

option, 

This contract is made in view of, and in all respects subject to the By- 
Laws and Rules established by the New York Produce Exchange, in force 
at this date. 



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96 ' Neio York Produce Exchange. 

Cut Meat Contkact. 

New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar in Land i^aid, the receipt of which is 

hereby acknowledged have this day sold to (or buught from) 

boxes dry salted at cents per lb. 

deliverable at option 

This contract is made in view of, and in all respects subject to the By- 
Laws and Rules established by the New York Produce I^xchange, in force 
at this date. 

LaHD COisTRACT. 

New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar in hand j)aid, the receipt of which is 

hereby acknowledged, we have this day sold to (or bought from) 

, Two hundred and fifty tierces Prime Lard, at 

cents per lb., deliverable at seller's (or buyer's) option 

This contract is made in view of, and in all resx:>ects subject to the By- 
Laws and Rules established by the New York Produce Exchange, in force 
at this date. 

Settlement of Contracts. 

EuLE 5. — Contracts shall not be transferable, and any 
difference found to be due on settlement sball apply on ac- 
count between the parties to the contract. Any party holding 
a contract against another coiTesponding in all respects (except 
as to price) with one held by the other party against him, may 
close or cancel both, by giving notice in writing to said party, 
and where it appears that several parties have contracts 
between each other, corresponding in all respects (except as to 
price), and that a ^' ring settlement '' can be made, the party 
finding said '' ring '" shall notify all parties thereto, giving 
names, time of delivery, quantity and settlement price, (which 
price must be within one quarter of a cent of the market), 
and get their acknowledgement, from which time the said 
ring shall be in force, and cannot be broken by the failure of 
any of the parties therein, and all parties thereto shall be 
compelled to settle their differences on said contract with 
each other, on the basis of the settlement price. 

Where settlements of contracts for a specified month are 
made before maturity of said contracts, interest at the rate of 
seven per cent, per annum shall be allowed on the differences 
paid, up to the first day of the maturing month. 



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Gefnercd Provision and Lard Rules, 97 

All offers to buy or sell Lard or Provisions openly for 
future delivery on the floor of the Exchange, must be open 
to the member first accepting such offer. • 

Verbal contracts, when satisfactorily proven, shall have 
the same standing as written contracts ; but the claim under 
such contracts must be made on the day of the alleged trans- 
action, or on the next business day thereafter. 

Parties holding an option may, by giving the necessary 
notice or order, require the other party to receive or deliver 
on the first business day of the option, subject to the same 
conditions as on any other day covered by the contract. 

Eemoval and Eejection of Goods Sold on Contract. 

EuiiE 6. — Lard and Provisions sold on contract must be 
removed by buyer before 5 p. m. of day of delivery ; if not 
so removed, the warehouseman shall take charge of the same 
at the expense of the owner. 

When Lard or Provisions are rejected under final appeal, 
if tendered on a seller's option, all expenses shall be paid by 
the seller, and it shall be held that no tender has been made. 
If under a buyer's option, the seller shall, within 24 hours, 
tender another lot to the buyer, and pay all damages that 
the buyer has, in the opinion of the Committee, sustained. 
The foregoing rule shall apply to all Lard and Provisions 
sold by contract or to arrive. When specific lots are sold to 
arrive, however, rejections are not required to be replaced. 

In testing any articles for weights and tares, packages 
which are evidently mismarked shall be excluded from the 



Deliveries of provisions on contract must be of the packing 
of the standard season current at the time of delivery, 
unless otherwise stipulated in the contract. All Prime Lard 
made after November 1st, 1877, shall be deliverable on 
contract. 

Deliveries of Lard or Provisions shall not be required 
before 8 o'clock a. m. nor after 5 p. m. 

Notices for Delivery. 
Rule 7. — All notices for delivery of Lard and Mess Pork, 
or examination-order for Meats sold on contract, must be 

7 



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98 New York Produce Excharvge, 

given to the first receiver before 11 o'clock a. m., and to the 
last receiver before 4 p. m. of the same day, except on 
Saturdays from June 1 to September 30 inclusive, during 
which period transfers shall cease at 2 p. m. 

Pkivate Arbitbation. 

EuLE 8. — In cases of disputes arising under any contract 
which are not otherwise provided for under the rules, the 
parties thereto shall promptly agree to the appointment of 
two arbitrators, and these shall appoint a third ; the ques- 
tion in dispute shall be submitted to them, and their decision 
shall be final and binding. Said arbitrators shall be ap- 
pointed from the branch of trade out of which the dispute 
may have arisen, and shall declare before considering the 
question, that they know nothing of its merits from conver- 
sation with the principals or otherwise ; and they shall be 
paid $3 each for each hearing, by the party adjudged by them 
to be in default. 

Stand ABD. 

Rule 9. — Hog Products, excepting Lard, packed between 
November 1 and March 1 shall alone be classed as " Standard." 

The word " Western " shall not be included in any con- 
tract for hog products unless especially agreed upon. 

Inspectobs and Inspection. 

Rule 10. — All Inspectors and Weighers of Lard and Provi- 
sions for delivery on sale or contract under the rules of the Ex- 
change must be members thereof, and licensed by the Board of 
Managers, and must obHgate themselves not to buy or sell on their 
own account any article they are licensed to inspect or weigh. 

All licenses shall expire annually, at such time as the Board 
of Managers may designate, and they may revoke said licenses 
at any time for cause. Fees of Weighers and Inspectors must 
be paid by the party employing them. 

Rule 11. — The buyer of any article, except Beef and Pork in 
barrels an4 tierces, shall have the right to designate an Inspec- 
tor, but the seller shall have the right to appeal to the Com- 
mittee on Lard or Provisions, as the case may be, whose decision 
shall be final and binding. 



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General Provision and Lard Rules. 99 

All appeals from Inspection must be made before the prop- 
erty leaves tbe city, packing point, or place of delivery. 

Weights, tares and quality of Lard and Provisions must be 
settled at place of delivery, unless otherwise agreed upon. 

Cooperage. 

EuLE 12. — Barrels and tierces shall be new and made of 
well seasoned white or burr oak, free from objectionable 
sap. The dimensions of barrels shall be about as fol- 
lows : staves five-eighths inch thick and thirty inches 
long; heads eighteen inches, one inch thick in centre, 
and three-eighths at bevel ; hoops hickory or white oak, or 
other good wood; barrels not less than eleven-sixteenths 
hooped. Tierces for Hams, Beef or Lard, shall be as fol- 
lows : dimensions about thirty- two inches long ; twenty to 
to twenty-one inch heads ; staves chamfered at the head ; 
quahty of staves and hoops same as on barrels ; staves three- 
quarter inch thick ; heads same as barrels ; eleven-sixteenths 
hooped. 

Penalty for Fictitious Sales. 

Rule 13. — ^Fictitious sales, or false reports of sales, are 
positively forbidden, and will render the parties concerned 
liable to suspension or expulsion from the Produce Exchange. 

EuLE 14. — AU rules as to Lard and Provisions must be 
justly and liberally construed, and no property shall, be re- 
jected or condemned for merely technical reasons. 



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Appointed, in accordance with these Rules, June 14, 1877. 

LEONARD HAZELTINE, Chairman. 
PAUL WORTH, DAVID BINGHAM, 

S. K. LANE, / GEORGE C. MARTIN. 



Inspector-in- Chief, 
A. D. {STERLING. 

Office of New York Inspection, 

Nos. 36 & 38 WHITEHALL STREET, 

(Opposite the N. Y. Produce Exchange. ) 



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RULES 

EECTLATING THE GRAIN TEADE 



AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 



New Yom Phoduce Exchange. 



ADOPTED APRIL 6, 1876, AND AMENDED APRIL 5, MAY 25, JIFNB 19, 
AUGUST 2, NOVEMBER 1, NOVEMBER 7, AND DECEMBER 11, 1877. 



Rule 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board), appoint as a Committee on Grain, 
five members of the New York Produce Exchange, w];io are 
known as members of the G-rain Trade. It shall be the duty 
of this Committee to properly discharge the obligations im- 
posed upon them by these rules, and also to consider and 
decide all disputes arising between members dealing in Grain 
which may be submitted to them. A majority of the Com- 
mittee shall constitute a quorum ; but the Committee shall 
fill temporary vacancies, if requested by either party, by some 
person or persons representing the same interest as the absent 
member or members, and a decision of a majority present at 
any hearing shall be final and binding, subject to Rule 29. 
They shall keep a record of their proceedings, and a fee of 
fifteen dollars shall be paid to the Committee for each refer- 
ence case heard by them, to be paid by the party adjudged to 
be in fault, unless otherwise ordered by the Committee. 
Provided, however, that nothing herein shall prevent settle- 
ment of questions of difference by private abitration, or as 
provided for in the By-Laws. 

Rule 2. — The 'Committee on Grain shall, during the month 
of September of each year, establish the grades of Grain, ex- 
cept for Corn, the grade of which shall be established on or 
before the Ist of December. It shall also be the duty of the 



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102 New York Produce Eccchange. 

Committee on G-rain to report from time to time to the Trade 
for adoption such regulations as they may think necessary for 
the inspection of G-rain, and no change shall be made in such 
regulations, or in the grades so established, except at a meet- 
ing of the Trade to be called by the Committee on Grain, due 
notice of the changes proposed being posted on the Bulletin 
of the Exchange. 

EuLE 3. — Sales of Grain, made as prime, before 3 p. m., 
shall be considered confirmed (when the G-rain is so located 
that an examination may be had promptly), unless notice of 
rejection for cause is given before 5:30 p. m. Sales of G-rain 
represented as not prime, shall be deemed to be made on ex- 
amination of bulk, and rejection shall be reported before 5:30 
p. M. 

Rule 4. — On sales of Ungraded Grain afloat, made before 
3 p. M., in parcels of 5,000 bushels or over on one boat or 
barge, the day of sale and the two following working days 
(ending at 6 p. m. of last day), without regard to weather, 
shall be buyer's lay days, without charge ; on parcels less than 
5,000 bushels as above, buyer shall be allowed one lay day 
less. If allowed to remain beyond such term, buyer shall pay 
seller all charges and expenses incurred in consequence of such 
delay, including Insurance. 

Rule 5. — On sales of Graded Grain, the tender of Elevator 
Receipts of the grade sold, having a free delivery afloat, shall 
constitute a delivery of the grain as between sellers and buyers 
(except on the last business day of each month on time con- 
tracts) on the same terms which govern the delivery under 
Railroad Guaranteed Certificates ; but in addition to the lay 
days afloat, as provided in Rule 5 of ^^ Rules of the Railroad 
Companies for graded grain at the Port of New York," buyer 
shall be entitled to the day of tender, and in addition thereto, 
to any unexpired portion of a term of storage. 

Rule 6. — Ungraded Grain sold afloat, before 3 p. m., shall 
be deemed ready for delivery, unless stated to the contrary at 
the time of sale. If boat is prevented from towing to deliver 
promptly when ordered, buyer shall have the right to cancel 



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Rules of the Grain Trade. 103 

the sale on reasonable notice to seller, provided boat shall be 
ordered before 5:30 p. m. of the day of purchase. 

EuLE 7.-^0n sales of Grain in store, the day of sale and 
the three following work days, without regard to weather, shall 
be free of charge for storage to buyer. 

EuLE 8. — When G-rain is in store, and sold to be delivered 
afloat, buyer shall approve of quality before the cost of light- 
erage has been incurred. 

EuLE 9. — Sales of G-rain being made for cash, seller shall 
have the right to demand payment at the time of passing 
title. 

EuLE 10. — On Ungraded G-rain not received within the 
term of lay days or storage allowed, seller shall have the right 
to tender the delivery and demand payment. 

EuLE 11. — Ungraded Grain, to be in prime order, shall con- 
form in color, berry, and cleanliness with the standard samples 
of the crop sold. In condition it shall be cool, sweet and dry, 
suitable for shipment by sail vessel to European ports. 

EuLE 12. — Ungraded Grain, to be of the grade called 
Steamer, shall conform in color, berry, and cleanliness with 
the standard samples of the crop sold. In condition it shall 
be cool and sweet, but may be slightly soft or damp. 

, EuLE 13. — Ungraded Grain sold to arrive, or for future de- 
livery, other than on sample or certificate, must be delivered 
in prime order (unless otherwise specified at time of sale), and 
- be up to the average of the grade sold as known on this 
market. 

EuLE 14. — Ungraded Grain sold to arrive on sample must 
be delivered in prime condition (unless otherwise specified at 
time of sale). Any slight inferiority in quality to sample 
shall not vitiate the sale, but such difference shall be settled 
by arbitration. When specified loads are sold, a loss of cargo 
or rejection for cause shall cancel the sale. 



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104 New York Produce Exchange. 

Rule 15. — When Ungraded Grain is sold on Certificate of 
Inspection of the port from which the grain is shipped, it 
shall be delivered in prime condition (unless otherwise specified 
at the time of sale), and such certificate shall be received as 
evidence of the grade. If such Grain shall be transferred in 
transit, the seller must prove that the Grain tendered is that 
covered by the Certificate. 

Rule 16. — On sales of Ungraded Grain to arrive, if tendered 
for delivery before 3 p. m., the day of tender and the two 
following working days, without regard to weather (ending at 
6 p. M. of last day), shall be deemed buyer's lay days without 
charge. 

Rule 17. — On time contracts made between members where 
Grain is bought at ^^ buyer s option," time of delivery shall be 
as follows : When the call is made by the buyer before twelve 
o'clock M. the property shall be due and deliverable beforfe 
2.30 p. M. of the same day. When the call is made after 12 
o'clock M. the property shall be due and deliverable before 
12.30 p. M. of the following business day ; or the buyer may 
specify any particular future day during the term of the 
option upon which the property shall be due and deliverable, 
and the property shall be due at 12.30 p. m. on the day de- 
signated, (but no call shall be made before the beginning 
of the option) ; and if no call is made the property shall be 
deliverable before 2.30 p. m. on the day of maturity of con- 
tract. 

Rule 18. — Deliveries on contracts for eight thousand (8,000) 
bushels, or over, of Graded Grain, other than Oats and Bar- 
ley, shall be made in lots of eight thousand (8,000) bushels, 
except where a smaller quantity is necessary to complete. 
Deliveries on contracts for ten thousand (10,000) bushels, or 
over, of Graded Oats or Barley shall be made in lots of ten 
thousand (10,000) bushels, except where a smaller quantity 
is necessary to complete ; all within five (5) per cent., more 
or less, excess or deficiency to be settled for at the njarket 
price of the day of delivery, and all deliveries on such con- 
tracts shall be free of towage to the buyer. 



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Bules of the Grain Trade, 105 

Rule 19. — Sec. I. On deliveries of Graded Grain on time 
contracts, seller must issue a transferable order drawn on 
himself before 12.30 P. M., and such order maybe passed to 
subsequent buyers up to 2.30 p. M., except upon the day 
of the maturity of the contract, when such notice shall be a 
good delivery only up to 1.30 P. M., provided always that no one 
shall hold it over fifteen minutes. The time of delivery to. 
each party and the contract price shall be specified on the 
order. 

Sec. II. The transferable order must be presented by the 
last receiver to the drawer before 4 p. M. of the day issued, 
and the drawer must, on presentation, deliver to the last re- 
ceiver a specific order for the Grain named. 

If the receiver decides to reject any lot, he must give no- 
tice of rejection to the drawer of the order before 11 a. "M. 
of the next business day ; and if party making delivery desires 
to refer the rejection to the Committee on Grain, he must 
notify the receiver and the Committee before 11.30 A. M.- of 
the same day. 

Sec. III. If required by the buyer, seller must, when prac- 
ticable, transfer to vessel or warehouse in the harbor, as the 
buyer may designate, the Grain tendered to him, except in 
the case of Eailroad certificates, provided a satisfactory mar- 
gin, if required, be deposited with the Superintendent of the 
Exchange when the order for delivery of the Grain is given ; 
but the title shall remain vested in the seller until conveyed 
by delivery of the proper documents. 

Sec. IV. At the close of the Call Board each morning, the 
settling prices of Grain for that day shall be announced by the 
person conducting the Call, subject to appeal to the trade 
there assembled. These prices shall be used only for the 
settlement of differences on deliveries of contract Grain. 

Sec. Y. When a contract shall mature on Sunday, or a 
legal holiday, delivery on such contract shall be made on the 
preceding business day. No property shall be tendered on 
any day upon which the Produce Exchange does not hold a 
business session. 



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106 New York Produce Exchange, 

The following is the Form of Transferable Order referred 
to above : 

transferable order. 

New York, 187 

M 

Deliver to the order of M 

on Contract Sale to dated 187. . , 

at cents per bushel bushels 

which is to be received by the last endorser hereon, who must pay 

for the same at the rate of cents per bushel, cash, except as pro- 
vided in Rule 19 of the Grain Rules. 



New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar paid by the drawer of the above 
order to each receiver thereof, the receipt of which is hereby acknowl- 
edged, we will, before 4 P. M. this day, present the said order to the 
PARTY ISSUING THE SAME, and receive therefor a specific order, and pay 
for the grain delivered thereon at the rate of cents per bushel. 

It is further agreed that each receiver of this order shall continue his 
or their liability to each other for the fulfilment of the contracts referred 
to, until the above grain is delivered and paid for. 

Received M. 



New York, 187 

accept the above Order from M 

with all the conditions and obligations thereof, on account of Contract pur- 
chase from dated 187. ., at 

cents per bushel, paying Dollars, to make 

the price equal to cents per bushel, which is the price to be paid to 

the party issuing the order. 
Received M. 



KuLE 20. — On contracts for Grain, the tender of a higher 
grade of the same kind of Grain than the one contracted 
for shall be deemed sufficient ; provided the higher grade of 
Grain tendered shall not be of a color or quality that will 
depreciate the value of the other, if mixed with it. Sellers 
of Grain shall have the right to deliver in the customary 
manner afloat, any Grain in the port, provided the same 



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Bvles of the Grain Trade, 107 

shall grade in accordance with the contract on which the 
delivery is to be made ; subject to the following condi- 
tions, viz. : When Grain afloat is tendered, the Inspector 
shall inspect the G-rain on the boat, and also superintend the 
actual delivery of the same. When Grain tendered is in 
store, the Inspector shall inspect the Grain in store, and also 
superintend the delivery of the same from store into lighter 
or vessel. Th.e Inspector-in-Chief shall give a certificate of 
such inspection, which certificate shall be valid, the same as 
with Graded Grain arriving by railroad. 

Rule 21. — Sec. I. — In case any property, contracted for 
future delivery, be not delivered at maturity of contract, the 
purchaser shall notify, in writing, the Committee on Grain 
of the failure to deliver, and the Committee on Grain shall, 
at the next call, publicly read such notice, and buy in the 
Grain for account of the party directing the purchase, but 
no unreasonable price shall be paid, arising from manipulated 
or fictitious markets, or unusual detention in transportation. 
Any legitimate loss resulting to the buyer shall be paid by 
the party in default, and the Grain so bought in shall be a 
gogd delivery on defaulted contracts maturing that day. 

Sec. II. — In case any property contracted for delivery 
is not received and paid for when properly tendered, it shall 
be the duty of the seller — in order to establish any claim on 
the purchaser — to sell it on the market at any time during 
the next 24 hours, at his discretion, after such default shall 
have been made, notifying the purchaser within one hour of 
such sale, and any loss resulting to the seller shall be paid 
by the party in default. 

KuLE 22. — Any holder of a railroad certificate of graded 
Grain who shall be dissatisfied with the quality of any lot ten- 
dered, may call for a reinspection, subject to appeal to the 
Committee on Grain. If the decision of the Inspector shall 
be sustained, the cost of re-inspection shall be borne by the 
holder of the certificate, but if not sustained, by reason of 
error on the part of the Inspector, he shall be held liable for 
damage occasioned thereby. 



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108 New York Produce Exchange. 

Rule 23. — There shall be two public Calls of G-rain each 
day, at such hours and of such grades as the Committee on 
Grain may from time to time, with the approval- of the Grain 
Trade, and of the Floor Committee, direct. These calls shall 
be conducted by a person selected by the majority of the 
members present. The months shall be called in their 
respective order. The first offer to buy or sell at a price 
shall be accepted before subsequent offers at same fig- 
ures may be placed. Subsequent offers to sell at a lower or buy 
at a higher price shall vacate prior offers to sell at higher or 
buy at lower prices. A transaction shall vacate all previous 
bids and offers. All disputes as to offers, acceptances or with- • 
drawals (whether in time or not) shall be decided on the 
spot by the person presiding at the time, subject to an appeal 
to the members present. The appeal must be promptly taken, 
and a majority of the members present and voting shall 
settle the disputed point finally. 

EuLE 24. — The Calls of Grain shall be subject to the follow- 
ing regulations : 

1. Unless otherwise specified, all offers to buy or sell shall 
be understood to be in lots of eight thousand bushels, except 
Oats and Barley, which shall be in lots of ten thousand 
bushels. 

2. Price per bushel, and in fractions of not less than one- 
quarter of a cent. 

3. Deliveries on sales of cash Grain, on the afternoon 
Call, shall be made before 3 o'clock p. m. of the same 
day. 

4. The Eules governing the sales, deliveries, (except as 
provided in the preceding Regulation), margins and payments'* 
already existing shall govern all transactions under the Calls. 

Nothing in this rule shall be construed as interfering with 
transactions in towing lots, which shall be considered to 
mean not less than four thousand, nor more than five 
thousand bushels. 



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Bvks of the Grain Trade. 109 

KuLE 25. — The following shall be the form of Contract for 
Grain sold for future delivery : 

Grain Cont^iact. 

New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar in hand paid, tlie receipt of which is 

hereby acknowledged, have this day Sold to (or Bought from) 

bu^hel^ of New York Inspection, 

at cents per bushel deliverable at seller's (or buyer's) 

option 187 . 

This contract is made in view of, and in all respects subject to the By-Laws and Rules estab- 
lished by the New York Produce Exchange, in force at this date. 



Rule 26. — On all sales or purchases of Grain to arrive, or 
for future delivery, either party to the contract shall have the 
right to call an original margin of ten cents per bushel on 
Wheat, Rye and Barley, and five cents per bushel on Corn and 
Oats, and a further margin from time to time to the extent 
of any variation in the market value from the contract price, 
said margin to be deposited in such Bank or Trust Com- 
pany as may have been designated by the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Produce Exchange ; provided that such Bank 
or Trust Company shall not be expressly objected to at the 
time of making the call. In case of such objection, then the 
deposit to be made in some duly authorized Bank or Trust 
Company not objected to. When margins are called before 
3 P. M., they must be deposited before 12 o'clock m. the 
following day. In case of failure to deposit as above, then 
the party calling the margin shall have the right to cover 
his or their contract at discretion, for account of the party 
failing to respond to the call for margin. When margins 
are called (original or for variations in the markets) certified 
• checks must be drawn to the order of the Bank or Trust 
Company in which they are to be deposited, and sent to the 
Superintendent of the Exchange, who shall deposit the 
same, and receive a certificate of deposit, made payable on 
the order of the Superintendent of the Exchange, and to the 
order of the buyer and seller. The Superintendent shall 
promptly send such certificate- to the party making the de- 



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110 New Torh Produce Exchange, 

posit, and a copy of the same to the party calling the mar- 
gin; In settlement the Superintendent shall endorse the 
amount due on the certificate over his own signature, as in- 
structed by both parties to the contract. In case the two 
parties do not agree as to the amount due on the margin 
certificate, the same shall be submitted to arbitration for 
final adjustment. In case of the absence of the Superin- 
tendent, the President of the Produce Exchange, or the 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, shall act in his stead 
under this rule. This rule shall be governed in its privileges 
and restrictions by Kule 21. 

KuLE 27. — All Grain sold by any member of the Pro- 
duce Exchange shall be weighed or measured by a dis- 
interested party, whose authority as such weigher or measurer 
shall be conferred or revoked by the Committee on Grain, 
and all returns of weights and measures shall be promptly 
delivered to the owner of such Grain, and the title shall not be 
deemed as passed until such returns are endorsed by the owner 
to the buyer. 

EuLE 28. — On all deliveries of Grain afloat, sellers shall 
incur the customary expense of half weighing. Where Grain 
is measured or discharged, other than by elevators, and any in- 
creased expense is thereby incurred, the buyers of such Grain 
shall incur all additional expenses beyond the customary half 
weighing, as charged by elevators. Buyers shall pay any ad- 
ditional expense of harbor towing in excess of the customary 
towing as agreed upon by the Joint Committee of Grain 
Merchants, Transportation Agents and Tow Boat Men. 

EuLE 29. — Any party feeling himseK aggrieved by the de- 
cision of the Committee on Grain in the interpretation of 
these Eules, shall have the right of appeal to the Board of 
Managers of the Produce Exchange, and no change shall 
be made in these Eules by the Committee on Grain before 
submitting the same to a meeting of the Grain Trade prop- 
erly called, at which twenty shall constitute a quorum. 



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AETIOLES OF AGREEMENT 

BETWEEN THE 

NEV/ YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE 

AND TIIE 

NEW YORK CENTRALS HUDSON RIVER RAILROAD CO., 

ERIE RAIL^WAY COMPANY, 

AND PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY, 

lielating to the Inspection, Grading, Consolidation and Delivery of 
Grain arriving by rail at the Port of New York. 



Adopted September 1, 1875, axd amended April 8 and August 8, 1876. 



FiEST. — In order to facilitate deliveries of Grain arriving 
by rail at the port of New York, it is hereby mutually agreed 
by and between the parties hereto, in consideration of the 
adoption and enforcement of the following rules by the said 
parties respectively, in the manner and to the extent herein- 
after set forth, and also for other good and valuable consid- 
erations, as follows : 

Second. — The Eailroad Companies, parties hereto, may 
put together in warehouses, boats or other receptacles, pro- 
vided by themselves for that purpose, grain of the same kind 
and grade, without regard to ownership, after the same has 
been inspected, graded and weighed, in accordance with the 
rules of the Produce Exchange, as hereinafter set forth ; but 
nothing herein contained shall be construed as depriving 
shippers of the right of preserving the identity of grain con- 
signed to this market, if they shall so elect, subject only to 
such uniform conditions as may be made by the railroad 
companies parties hereto, for that purpose. 

Third. — It is hereby further agreed that all questions of 
difference between the New York Produce Exchange, or any 
member thereof, and the Railroad Companies, or either of 
them, growing out of the inspection and delivery of grain, 



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112 New York Produce Exchange, 

shall be settled by a private Arbitration Committee, consist- 
ing of three persons, one of whom shall be selected by the 
President of the New York Produce Exchange, subject to 
the approval of the Committee on Grain, one by the Railroad 
Companies, or the Company with which the controversy may 
arise, and these two to select a third ; and the decision of a 
majority of such Arbitration Committee shall be final as to 
the case presented. 

Fourth. — Any of the parties to this agreement desiring 
any alteration of or amendment to any of the following rules, 
may give notice in writing to each of the other parties here- 
to, which notice shall contain the substance of the proposed 
alteration or amendment, and shall designate the time and 
place (in the City of New York) for a meeting of the said 
parties to consider and act on the same, and which time 
shall be at least 30 days subsequent to the date of said 
notice. 

Fifth. — The New York Produce Exchange agrees to adopt 
and enforce, as far as it legally may, the following rules, to 
be known as 

"RULES OF THE NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE FOR GRADING 

, GRAIN." 

Rule 1. — The ''Committee on Grain" of the Produce Ex- 
change shall, upon the execution of this agreement, proceed 
to establish grades of all kinds of grain, and shall prepare 
and keep at the Produce Exchange standard samples of such 
grades ; and for the proper maintenance of the grades of 
grain, as established under the provisions of this rule, the 
Committee on Gfrain shall appoint an Inspector-in-Chief, 
whose term of office and those of his appointees shall be 
subject to the pleasure of said Committee, and who shall 
perform the duties as set forth in ihe following rules. The 
Committee on Grain shall also do such other proper and 
needful things as shall fi'om time to time be required for 
properly carrying out this system of grading grain. 

Rule 2. — The Inspector-in-Chief shall appoint such num- 



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Rules of tJw Grain Trade. 113 

ber of deputies, as, in his opinion, or in the opinion of the 
Committee on Grain, shall be sufficient to insure the prompt 
and reliable inspection of each car of grain upon its arrival 
at the Hudson Eiver terminus of the Railroads, and the per- 
formance of such other duties as may devolve upon him or 
them under these rules. The salaries or fees of these depu- 
ties shall be paid by the Inspector-in-Chief. 

Rule 3. — Immediately after their appointment, and before 
performing any of the duties of their office, the Inspector-in- 
Chief and his deputies shall be required to take or subscribe to 
the following 

OATH OK AFFIRMATION. 

I do solemnly swear (or aifirm, as tlie case may be) that I will execute 
the duties of an Inspector of Grain, under the rules of the New York 
Produce Exchange, with strict impartiality and according to the best of 
my ability 

BuLE 4. — It shall be the duty of the Inspector-in-Chief or 
his deputies, to inspect and determine the grades of grain (sub- 
ject to inspection) in the cars ; to supervise the weighing of 
the cars, loaded and light, upon the railroad track scales, and 
to see that such scales are in correct working order when in 
use. He shall keep,, or cause to be kept, in a book or books 
provided by him for that purpose, an accurate record of the 
number of each car ; the kind, grade and quantity of grain 
inspected, and weighed therein ; the date of such inspection, 
and the name of the consignee. He shall also furnish to the 
Railroad Companies returns in duplicate of grain so inspected 
and weighed at the Hudson River termini of their respective 
lines which returns shall be made upon the following form of 

inspector's return. 

New York, • 18. . 

This is to Certify, That on the day of 

18 I inspected bushels of No , con- 
signed to in car No , at the Hudson 

River terminus of the Railroad at 



Inspector in Chief, 

per Deputy. 



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114 New York Produce Exchange. 

Rule 5. — The compensation for inspection shall be at a 
rate per car to be determined and regulated by the Committee 
on Grain, and shall be payable weekly by the consignees to 
the Inspector-in-Chief. 

EuLE 6. — On all sales of graded grain, the tender of guar- 
anteed certificates, as described in Eule 1 of the Rules of the 
Railroad Companies, shall constitute a delivery of the grain as 
betwee^ sellers and buyers, except in the cases provided in 
Rules 7 and 9 of the Railroad Companies, when such certifi- 
cates shall cease to be a valid delivery as between sellers and 
buyers. Such deliveries shall be made between the hours of 
10 A. M. and 2 p. m. Deliveries shall be known as " regu- 
lar" when three working days, including the day of tender, 
are allowed by sellers. When the term 'Afresh" is used, it 
shall be understood to mean four days, as above. Sellers shall 
deduct from their invoices the customary half-weighing, ele- 
vation or cost of delivery of grain from boats, any accrued de- 
murrage, and also if necessary, sufficient unaccrued demurrage 
to give buyers "regular" time for delivery, as hereinbefore 
described, which charges shall then be assumed by buyers. 

Rule 7. — Inspectors shall furnish samples of grain inspected 
on arrival as out of conditio m or unmerchantable, or for which 
no grades are established, before noon on the day such grain is 
ready for delivery. 

Rule 8. — All grain delivered under these Rules shall be 
weighed or measured, as provided in Rule 23 [now Rule 27] 
of the " Rules regulating the Grain Trade in the City of New 
York," and the weigher or measurer shall promptly furnish 
to the Railroad Company from whose boat or boats such de- 
livery shall be made, a true and correct return of the weight 
(in bushels and pounds) of each lot of grain so delivered, 
upon the following form of 

CERTIFICATE. 

To the R. R. Co. 

This is to certify that I have weighed (or measured) from Boat 
for account of 

bush, of 



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Rules of the Grain Trade. 115 



and tliat the same has this day been delivered to. 

Boat ready for delivery 

Delivery completed 

• (Signed). 

New York, 



Weigher. 



The representatives of eacli Eailroad Company shall have 
the right to verify the correctness of such certificate of grain 
delivered from its boats, by examination of the weigher's 
books or scales, or both, either during or after such delivery. 

If any weigher or measurer shall refuse to permit such ex- 
amination and verification, or shall unreasonably impede the 
same, the party aggrieved may make complaint to the Com- 
mittee on Grain of the New York Produce Exchange, and if, 
after investigation by the said Committee, such complaint be 
deemed substantiated, the license of such weigher or meas- 
urer shall be revoked. 

KuLE 9. — Any grievances between members, growing out 
of the inspection of grain, shall be referred to the Committee 
on Grain of the New York Produce Exchange for adjudica- 
tion. 



Sixth. — The " Railroad Companies, parties 

hereto, agree that they will, for the purpose of carrying out 
this agreement, adopt and enforce, as far as they legally 
may, the following rules, to be known as 

"rules of the railroad companies for graded grain 
at the port of new york." 

Rule 1. — The Railroad Companies, parties hereto, will 
severally issue guaranteed certificates for grain consigned to 
New York, when consoHdated and graded under the provis- 
ions of this agreement, in the following form : 



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116 



New Y<yrh Produce Eocchange. 





\ 


cri 


s 1 !. ? t- f r 
1 1 S 1 f f J 

=5 S S ^ -^ <^ 


<5i 














^ i \ 1 "^ 1 r 

II \ 1 s: s- ! 




X 












and deliverable to 

s accrued subsequent to the da 


-- , a? 

'ade and quantity of Grain, 
Neio York Produce Exchang 
as the same have been agre 

[Insert quantity and grade.] 


> 

Hi 
> 


PI 

CO 

H 
w 

W 
7i 
H 

H 

X 


1 

1 

■ 

: 

; 

; 
: 








H 


p' 


1^ 




<s> i 


^ . ^ ;s" • S, o 


> 


: 


^ 




% 




$>■ 


a a 2? o 










f^ 


1 \ 




ompan: 

%ll delive 
ccofdanc 
nd of th 
to by th 
fo 




i 




• 


5 ; 




^' ^ '^ <s> <:?i "^ "H 
J^"T/ii» Certificfite is not 






• 




9 fe 




n. valid delivery without 




t— I 

00 




$ 




acconijtanyinf/ Coupons. 








<& 



[This Order is to be used only upon the surrender of the Certificate to the Railroad Co.] 



Hdilroiid Co, 

Please deliver on the Certificate hereto atta^ched 

bushels of. to for 

account. 

18 



The * RAILROAD 00. 

Has this day received Certificate No for 

bushels of with an order directing delivery of the 

Grain to 



New York, 



.18 



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Rvles of the Orain Trade, 117 

The quantity of grain represented by each certificate shall 
not exceed 8,000 bushels, except of oats, for which the certifi- 
cates shall not exceed 10,000 bushels each. These certificates 
shall be properly dated, and numbered consecutively, and shall 
state in detail the kind, grade and quantity of the grain repre- 
sented by them, and shall be furnished to the consignees be- 
fore noon of the dates thereof, accompanied by the freight 
bills and inspection returns. The Railroad Companies shall, 
however, have the right to withhold such certificates until the 
freight (computed upon the track scale weights, as verified bj> 
the Inspector) and all accrued charges upon the grain repre- 
sented by such certificates shall have been paid. 

Rule 2. — Consignees shall be allowed to hold grain in boats 
four days (exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays), iucluding* 
the dates of the certificates, free of expense. After that time 
demurrage shall accrue at one-eighth of one cent j)er bushel per 
day, or part thereof, whether orders for delivery have been 
given or not, which charge shall then continue until the de- 
murrage charge accrues, as provided in Eule 5. 

BuLE 3. — Upon surrender of Certificates to the Railroad 
Company issuing the same, with an order directing delivery 
of the grain, the said Company shall give proper receipts for 
the said certificates, and shall promptly deliver the grade and 
quantity of the grain specified therein at any customary place 
of delivery in the port of New York, as directed, except as 
provided for in Rule 9. 

Rule 4. — The Railroad Companies shall not be required to 
place, free of towage, less than 4,00u bushels of one grade or 
kind of grain at any one point in the harbor. 

Rule 5. — After grain is ordered, consignees or owners shall 
be allowed three days, at the rate of demurrage provided in 
Rule 2 (exclusive of Sundays and legal holidays), including 
that of its arrival at the specified point of destination, for 
unloading, and shall thereafter pay ten dollars ($10) demur- 
rage for each 24 hours, or parts thereof, on each order for the 
delivery of 10,000 bushels or less, of one grade of oats, or 
8,000 bushels, or less, of one grade of any other kind of grain , 



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118 New York Produce Exchange, 

until the same be discharged, whether such time be within 
the original four days or not, but the Eailroad Companies shall 
have the right to terminate their liability in the manner pro- 
vided in Kule 7. 

EuLE 6. — The Railroad Companies shall be liable as com- 
mon carriers for the safety of grain represented by their cer- 
tificates, until delivered in accordance with these rules, but 
they shall have the right to terminate their liability in the 
manner provided in Eule 7. 

EuLE 7.— If any certificate of graded grain be not surren- 
dered to the Eailroad Company issuing the same within five 
days from and including the date thereof, with an order 
directing the delivery of the grain, the said Company may 
thereafter give not less than 48 hours' notice on the bulletin 
of the New York Produce Exchange, of their intention to 
store in grain warehouses the grain represented by such certifi- 
cate ; and if such certificate be not surrendered within the 
time specified in such notice, with an order directing some 
other disposition of the property, said Company may there- 
after so store the grain at the expense and risk of the owner 
thereof. Upon the surrender of the certificate for grain so 
stored, and the payment of the accrued charges, the Eailroad 
Company shall furnish a customary warehouse receipt in ex- 
change therefor, and thereupon the liability of said Company 
under such guaranteed certificate shall terminate. 

Eule 8. — All grain for which no grades are established 
shall be kept separate, and delivered from track, or under such 
uniform conditions as may be made by the Eailroad Com panics 
parties hereto for that purpose. 

Eule 9. — The Eailroad Companies parties hereto, shall re- 
quire their employes in charge of grain held afloat under 
these rules, to exercise care and watchfulness respecting the 
condition of such grain, and to give notice to the Inspector- 
in-Chief, without unnecessary delaj^ of any change discovered 
by them in the condition of grain in their charge. Also, to 
give to the Inspector-in-Chief, or his deputies, at all times, 
every reasonable facility for the thorough examination of grain, 



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Rules of the Grain Trade. 119 

whether any report of its condition has been made by them 
or not. 

It shall be the duty of the Inspector-in-Ohief , from time to 
time, to cause examination to be made of the condition of 
grain in boats for which guaranteed certificates have been 
issued, and if any such grain shall be found to be out of 
condition, he shall promptly give notice of the fact to the 
Railroad Company having such grain in its possession, and 
shall state in such notice the kind and grade of grain, and as 
near as practicable, its actual condition ; also the name and 
location of the boat or boats containing the same. Whereupon 
the RaUroad Company receiving such notice shall, without 
unnecessary delay, certify thereon the certificates outstanding 
upon which such grain will be delivered, which certificates 
shall be those of the oldest numbers and dates then in circula- 
tion or uncancelled, also the quantity to be delivered under 
such certificates, and cause such notice to be posted upon the 
bulletin of the Produce Exchange, and thereafter the certifi- 
cates so posted shall cease to be a vaHd delivery of graded 
grain under these rules, as between sellers and buyers. If all 
the certificates of the grade out of condition should have 
been surrendered, or not enough be outstanding to cover the 
quantity out of condition, then the parties having surrendered 
the certificates on which such grain has been or shall be ten- 
dered, shall accept the same as good delivery on such certifi- 
cates, after deducting the quantity covered by such posted 
certificates, if any. 



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SUPPLEMENTARY AGREEMENT 

Respo'iidiny to the Resolutions of the Grain Trade of March 8^ ' 

1876, inviting the Railroad Companies to consider the 

request therein contained, to receive and deliver 

identical 'parcels of Graded Grain when 

in 20 car loads or more. 



It is mutually agreed between the New York Produce 
Exchauge and the Railroad Companies, parties to the 
foregoing agreement, as follows, viz. : 

First, — That it is to apply only to shipments first loaded 
in cars at Erie, Buffalo, Charlotte and Oswego, and then only 
when the bills of lading are issued for 8,000 bushels or its 
multiple of Corn, Wheat, Barley and Eye, or 10,000 bushels 
or its multiple of Oats, which quantities shall represent boat 
loads respectively, and further, only when the bills of lading 
therefor state "To be graded, bat identity preserved, if de- 
livered at New York in such entire boat load lots." 

Second, — That on arrival of such Grain it shall. be delivered 
to boats, without regard to its grade, and receipt issued for 
the same to the consigaee, in which shall be stated the name 
of the boat, the number of bushels of each grade, and the 
fact that the same has been mixed Delivery to be made on 
surrender of receipt. 

TJiird. — That boats so loaded shall be delivered entire at 
one place and time, and if otherwise ordered shall be deliv- 
ered subject to the rules and rates of the agreement between 
the Produce Exchange and the Railroad Companies. 

Fourth. — That the Eailroad Companies may cancel this by 
10 days' notice of any two of them, but it shall be reconsid- 
ered at the request of any party to it. 

New York, April 8, 1876. 



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GRADES OF GRAIN, 

ESTABLISHED BY THE COMMITTEE ON GRAIN 

OP THE 

New York Produce Exchange, 

In accordance with the foregoing Rules. 



WINTER WHEAT. 



ExTKA White Winter Wheat shall be bright, sound, dry, plump and 
well cleaned. 

State White Winter Wheat shall consist of White Wheat, grown 
in this State, unfit to grade ''Extra White," but better in quality than 
**No. 1 White." 

No. 1 White Winter Wheat shall be sound, dry and reasonably 
clean. 

No. 2 White Winter Wheat shall consist of sound white Winter 
Wheat unfit to grade No. 1. 

No. 3 White Winter Wheat shall consist of sound White Winter 
Wheat unfit to grade No. 2. 

Extra Amber Winter Wheat shall be bright, sound, dry, plump, 
well cleaned and pure amber. 

No. 1 AsdBER Winter Wheat, Long, shall be bright, soupd, dry, 
plump and well cleaned. 

No. 1 Amber Winter Wheat, Round, shall be bright, sound, dry, 
plump and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Amber Winter Wheat shall consist of sound Amber Winter 
Wheat unfit to grade No. 1. 

Note.— The grade of No. 2 Amber "Winter Wheat is intended to cover the style of Wheat 
received from Kansas and Nebraska. 

No. 1 Red Winter Wheat shall be sound, dry, plump and well 
cleaned. 

No. 2 Red Winter Wheat shall be sound, dry, and reasonably clean. 

NOTE.— This grade to include White and Red Winter Wheats that are mixed. 

No. 3 Red Winter Wheat shall consist of sound Red Winter Wheat 
unfit to grade No. 2. 

Rejected Winter Wheat shall include all merchantable Winter 
Wheat unfit to grade No. 3 Red. 



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122 New York Produce JExchange. 

SPRING WHEAT. 

No. 1 Hakd Spring Wheat shall be sound, plump and well cleaned, 
and composed mostly of the hard varieties of Spring Wheat. 

No. 1 Northwest Spring Wheat shall be sound and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Northwest Spring Wheat shall be sound and reasonably- 
clean . 

No. 3 Northwest Spring Wheat shall be sound and reasonably 
clean, unfit to grade No. 2. 

Note.— The grades of Northwest Wheat are to include the light colored, plump wheats, 
such as are grown in the Northwest, and to correspond as far as practicable, in color and general 
character, with the Milwaukee and Duluth grades. 

No. 1 Spring Wheat shall be sound and well cleaned. 
No. 2 Spring Wheat shall be sound and reasonably clean. 
No. 3 Spring Wheat shall be sound and reasonably clean, unfit to 
grade No. 2. 

Note. — These three grades are to include Wheats darker in color, and not as plump in 
berry as the Northwest grades, but which conform to the character of Chicago grades, as known 
in this market. 

Steamer Spring Wheat. — Wheat which shall be equal in all respects 
as to quality to the above grades, but which shall be slightly soft or damp, 
shall have the word " steamer " prefixed to the grade. 

Rejected Spring Wheat shall include all merchantable Spring 
Wheat unfit for No. 3. 

CORN. 

No. 1 White Corn shall be sound, dry, plump and well cleaned ; 
an occasional straw colored grain shall not deprive it of this grade. 

No. 2 White Corn shall be sound, dry, and reasonably clean, but 
in berry and color may be slightly inferior to ** No. 1 White Corn." 

Yellow Corn shall be sound, dry, plump and well cleaned ; an occa- 
sional white or red grain shall not deprive it of this grade. 

No. *1 Corn shall be mixed corn of choice quality, sound, dry and rea- 
sonably clean. 

No. 2 Corn shall be mixed corn, sound, dry and reasonably clean. 

Low Mixed Corn shall be sound, dry, reasonably clean, but in color 
unsuitable to grade *' No. 2 Corn." 

Steamer Corn shall include corn of the above named grades in 
quality ; in condition it may be slightly soft or damp, but must be cool. 

note. — The Steamer Grades are " Steamer White," " Steamer Yellow," and " Steamer 
Mixed," there being no grade. of '' Steamer Low Mixed" Com. 

No, 3 Corn shall include all mixed corn, soft, damp, not damaged, 
but inferior in quality to that described as ** Steamer Com." 

Round State White Corn shall be sound white Com grown in this 
State. 

Round State Yellow Corn shall be sound yellow Corn grown in 
this State. 

N. B. — It was ordered by the Committee on Grain that NEW CORN arriving on and after 
October 29, 1877. grading No. 2, or higher, should have the word " new " prefixed to the grade, 
and that there be no distinction between Old and New Com in the grades below No. 2. 



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Grades of Grain. 123 

OATS. 

Extra White Oats shall be bright, sound, reasonably clean, and free 
from oth^r Grain, weighing over 35 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 White Oats shall be bright, sound, reasonably clean, and free 
from other Grain, weighing over 32 lbs. to the measared bushel. 

No. 2 White Oats shall be seven- eighths white, and equal to No. 2 
Oats in all other respects, weighing over 29 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 White Oats shall be mainly White, and not equal to No. 2 
White in other respects. 

Extra Oats shall be bright, sound, reasonably clean, and free from 
other Grain, weighing over 35 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 1 Oats shall be bright, sound, reasonably clean, and free from 
other Grain, weighing over 32 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. '2 Oats shall be reasonably sound, reasonably clean, and reasona- 
bly free from other Grain, weighing over 29 lbs. to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Oats. — All merchantable Oats unfit for No. 2 shall be graded 
No. 3. 

Rejected Oats. — All Oats, damp, unsound, dirty or for any other 
cause unfit for No. 3, shall be graded Rejected. 



RYE. 

No. 1 Rye shall be sound, plump and well cleaned. 

No. 2 Rye shall be sound, reasonably clean, and reasonably free from 
other grain. 

Rejected Rye shall include all damp, musty or dirty rye, or which 
for any cause may be ujifit to grade No. 2. 



BARLEY. 

Extra Canada Barley shall be of a bright natural color, plump, 
sound and well cleaned, weighing not less than 49 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 1 Canada Barley shall be of a bright natural color, plump, 
sound and well cleaned, weighing not less than 48 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 2 Canada Barley may be slightly stained, otherwise sound, 
reasonably clean, weighing not less than 48 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Canada Barley may be stained, but shall be sound, reasonably 
clean, fit for malting, and weighing not less than 46 pounds to the. 
measured bushel. 

No. 1 State Barley, four- rowed, shall be of a bright natural color, 
plump, sound, and well cleaned, weighing not less than 48 pounds to the 
measured bushel. 

No. 2 State Barley, four-rowed, shall be plump, sound, reasonably 
clean, but may be slightly stained. 



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124 New York Produce Exchange. 

No. 3 State Barley, four-rowed, shall be sound, reasonably clean, fit 
for malting, otherwise unfit for No. 2. 

No. 1 State Barley, two-rowed, shall be of a bright natural color, 
plnmp, sound and well cleaned. 

No. 2 State Barley, two-rowed, shall be sound, reasonably clean, 
but in color not good enough for No. 1. 

No. 3 State Barley, two-rowed, shall be sound and fit for malting, 
but in color and cleanliness unfit for No. 2. 

Rejected Barley shall be such as is for any reason unfit for No. 3. 

No. 1 Western Barley shall be plump, bright, sound, clean and 
free from other grain, weighing not less than 48 pounds to the measured 
bushel. 

No. 2 Western Barley shall be sound, bright, not plump enough 
for No. 1, reasonably clean, and reasonably free from other grain, weighing 
not less than 46 pounds to the measured bushel. 

No. 3 Western Barley shall include shrunken, or otherwise slightly 
damaged Barley, weighing not less than 41 pounds to the measured bushel. 

Rejected Western. — All Western Barley which is damp, musty, or 
from any cause is badly damaged, or largely mixed with other grain, shall 
be graded Rejected Western. 

PEAS. 

No. 1 White Canada Peas shall be bright, sound, plump, well 
cleaned, and free from bugs, but may have a slight admixture of gray or 
green peas. 

No. 2 White Canada Peas shall be bright, sound, reasonably clean, 
and reasonably free from bugs, and may admit of a greater admixture of 
gray, green and dead peas than the grade No. 1. • 

No. 3 White Canada Peas shall include all peas inferior to the 
grade of No. 2. 



Note. — Canadian Grain should be graded in accordance with above standards, but in 
consequence of being in. bond, must be kept separate. 



NOTICE, 

No grades will he established for heated or unmerchantable grain, of any 
Jdnd ; therefore such^ grain, when inspected^ icill be treated as provided in 
'' RideS'' of the Rules of the Railroad Companies, as contained in thdr 
Agreement with the New York Produce Exchange. {Seepage 20.) 



New York, December 11, 1877. 



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REGULATIONS OF INSPECTION. 

Inspectors shall, wlien necessary, make their reasons for grading Grain 
fully known by notations on their books. 

All Wheat shall be weighed, and the weight entered on the Inspection 
Book. 

Any duly authorized Inspector of Grain who shall be guilty of neglect 
of duty, or who shall knowingly or carelessly inspect or grade any Grain 
improperly, or who shall accept any money or other consideration, directly 
or indirectly, for any neglect of duty or the improper performance of any 
duty as Inspector of Grain, and any person who shall improperly influence 
any Inspector of Grain in the performance of his duties as such Inspector, 
shall be immediately reported to the Committee on Grain, for its action. 

Each Assistant Inspector, when on duty, shall wear a badge furnished 
by the Inspector-in-Ohief, plainly designating his position. 

The Inspector-in-Chief, and all persons inspecting Grain under his 
direction, shall in no case make the grade of Grain above that of the poorest 
quality found in any lot of Grain, when it has evidently been mixed or doc- 
tored for the purposes of deception. 

All persons employed in the Inspection of Grain shall promptly report 
any attempts to defraud the system of Grain Inspection. They shall also 
report to the said Inspector-in-Chief, in writing, all instances where ware- 
housenien or the Railroad Companies shall deliver, or attempt to deliver. 
Grain of a lower grade than that called for by the certificate. They shall 
also report all attempts of receivers or shippers of Grain to instruct or in 
any way influence the action or opinion of the Inspector, and the Inspector- 
in-Ohief shall immediately report such cases to the Committee on Grain. 

The Inspector-in- Chief shall, for the information of members, cause to 
be exhibited daily in the Exchange fair average samples of inspected and 
consolidated Grain received by Rail, and when requested shall give any 
general information he may possess respecting the quantity, quality or con- 
dition of Grain arriving at any or all of the lines ; but neither the In- 
spector nor his Assistants shall give any information whatever respecting 
specific parcels or boat loads. 

The Inspector-in Chief may appeal to the Committee on Grain respecting 
the performance of his duties. In no case, however, shall he reveal to 
the Committee, or to any member thereof, the ownership of any Grain 
submitted to him for consultation. 

The said Inspector-in-Chief is hereby authorized to collect, until fur- 
ther notice, on all Grain inspected under his direction, as follows : 

For Inspection, and Verification of Track Weights — 40 cents per 
car load. 

For Inspection of Boat Loads of Canal Grain — Two dollars 
each. 

For Out Inspection and Superintending at place of delivery (when 
requested) — one dollar per 1,000 bushels. 

The Inspector-in-Chief shall issue an inspection certificate stating grade 
and quality. 



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TOWING 



RATES OF TOWING GRAIN CANAL BOATS, 

As agreed upon at a Meethig of Grain Merchants, Transporta- 
tion Men and Tow Boat Men. 



On and after December 12, 1876, it is agreed that the net charge for 

towing Grain Canal Boats shall be as follows, viz. : 

Loaded. Light. 
From Whitehall to Fulton Ferry, N. R. and E. R., Atlantic 

Dock, and Cunard Dock $5 $3 

* * '' " Pier 53, N. R. , Hoboken, 5th street, E. R. , 

and N. 5th street, Williamsburg 4 

" *' " 34th street, E. R. and N. R., and Hunter's 

Point 5 

" *' '* 63d street, E. R,, and the Hudson River 

Railroad Elevator, N. R 11 6 

New York Produce Exchange, December 12, 1876. 



LIGHTERAGE. 



The following Rules, relative to the delivery of Ungraded Grain, have 
been agreed to by the Railroad Companies and Lightermen : 

First. — On and after February 1st, 1876, all Ungraded Grain may be 
delivered afloat in railroad lighters, subject to the following rates of light- 
erage, which include elevation' from boats, viz.: 

On lots of 1,000 bushels, or less, 3 cents per bushel. 

On upwards of 1,000, and not exceeding 2,000 bushels, %\ cents per 
bushel. 

On upwards of 2,000, and not exceeding 5,000 bushels, 2 cents per 
bushel . 

On upwards of 5,000 bushels, 1^ cents per bushel. 

Second. — All Grain received for delivery from track must be removed 
from cars within twenty-four hours after receipt of notice of arrival. 
Otherwise the railroad company, upon whose track it is located, may put 
the same afloat for the purpose of lighterage to store, or for other delivery 
if so ordered by consignee, subject to the above charges and to Rules 4 and 
24 of the Grain Rules of the New York Produce Exchange relative to un- 
graded Grain. 



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RULES 

REGULATING THE FLOUR TRADE 



AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 



New Yori Produce Exchange. 



ADOPTED DECEMBER 5, 1872. 



Rule 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Flour, five 
members of the New York Produce Exchange, who are known 
as members of the Flour Trade. It shall be the duty of this 
Committee to properly discharge the obligations imposed upon 
them by these rules, and also to consider and decide all dis- 
putes arising between members dealing in Flour which may 
be submitted to them. A majority of the Committee shall 
constitute a quorum, and a decision of a majority of those 
present at any meeting shall be final. They shall keep a 
record of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dollars shall 
be paid to the Committee for each reference case heard by 
them, to be paid by the party adjudged to be in fault, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Committee. Provided, however, 
that nothing herein shall prevent settlement of questions of 
difference by private arbitration, as is provided for in the 
By-Laws. 

Rule 2. — The Committee on Flour shall appoint an In- 
spector-in-Chief (who must be a member of this Exchange), 
whose term of office, and that of the deputies he may appoint, 
shall be subject to their pleasure. They shall also adopt and 
keep for reference a standard sample of each of the various 



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128 New York Produce Exchange. 

grades of Flour and Meal, and furnish duplicate samples to 
the Inspector-in-Ohief, and see that these standards are 
strictly adhered to in classifying Flour and Meal. 

EuLE 3. — ^In order to establish a valid claim for a deduc- 
tion on account of light weight of Flour, such Flour must be 
weighed by the Inspectors, at the place of delivery (whether 
the same be '^ on the dock " or '^ in store"), and the Inspec- 
tors' certificate, under the following rules, shall be the basis of 
such claim. 

KuLE 4. — The barrel being required by law to contain 196 
lbs. of Flour, the Inspectors shall ascertain and certify to the 
weight of 25 barrels out of each parcel submitted to them for 
weighing with reference to that standard, using the tares 
marked on the barrels ; and shall also empty 5 of said bar- 
rels, and certify to the marked and actual weight or " tare" 
of each. Where no " tare" is marked upon the barrels, the 
Inspectors shall find the average weight of the 5 barrels emp- 
tied as above, and adopt it as the " tare" in ascertaining the 
net weight of the 25 barrels. 

Rule 5. — In collating the results of the weighing and tar- 
ing, light or over- weight indicated by taring shall offset an 
equal amount of over or light-weight shown by weighing ; 
but, beyond this extent, any over- weight shown by weighing 
shall not be allowed to offset any light-weight that may 
appear, but the remaining light-weight, if any be shown by 
the certificate, shall be taken as an average, by which the 
light-weight of the entire parcel of Flour, and the consequent 
claim upon the seller of the same, shall be determined. 

Rule 6. — Barrels of Flour which may be found largely 
deficient in weight, from bad order or other cause, shall not 
enter into the average, but their weight shall be separately 
ascertained and certified to by the Inspector. 

Rule 7. — Where a lot of Flour is very irregular in weight, 
either the buyer or the seller may require the entire parcel to 
be weighed. 



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Rules of tlie Flour Trade, 129 

Rule 8. — The expense of weighing shall be equally divided 
between the buyer and the seller of the Flour. 

Rule 9. — In the absence of special agreement^ all Flour 
purchased "in store"' shall be understood as being ready and 
designed for immediate delivery ; but the purchaser shall not 
be liable to any charge for storage or insurance if the Flour 
be removed within seven days. 

Rule 10. — Where Flour is purchased " on the dock/' or 
'^^to arrive/' the buyer shall assume the same relations to- 
wards the vessel or transportation line by which the Flour 
arrives that the seller previously held, as regards its removal 
from the place of delivery within the time granted by such 
lines for that purpose. 

Rule 11. — Where Flour sold remains in store longer than 
seven days, the seller shall not be liable to the expense of 
coopering the same on delivery, without a special agreement 
to that effect. 



Appointed, in accordance luitli these Rules, June 14, 1877 

R. B. LIVERMORE, Chairman. 
CONSIDER PARISH, JANVIER LE DUC, 

H. L. DANIELS, W. S. BRACKEN. 



Inspector-in-Ghief, THOMAS DOUGHERTY. 
Deputy Inspectors, ) ^hN ^^ACOBsS^ 



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Appointed, in accordance with these Bides, June 14, 1877. 

W. F.^SOREY, Chairman, 
a C. ABEL, F. R. ROUTH, 

R. W. PATERSON, Z. J. HALPIN. 



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RULES 

Regulating the Naval Store Trade 

am6ng members of the 

Iew York Produce Exchange. 



ADOPTED FEBRUARY 7, 1874, 
V^ith. A^EaendiiierLts of ISIsly ^o, 1S7'4, and Jial;^ SI, 1876. 



Rule 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- , 
proval of the Board) appoint as 'a Committee on Naval 
Stores, five members of the New York Produce Exchange, 
who are known as members of the Naval Store Trade, two of 
them being dealers exclusively for Export. The duty of this 
Committee shall be to properly discharge the obligations else- 
where imposed on them by these Rules, to decide the prices 
of Naval Stores at all the markets on any given day, or dur- 
ing any given period, as a basis fqr settlement between mem- 
bers of this Exchange, and to consider and decide all disputes 
arising between members dealing in Naval Stores, which may 
be submitted to them. A majority of the Committee shall 
constitute a quorum, and a decision of a majority of those 
present at any meeting shall be final. They shall keep a 
record of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dollars shall 
be paid to the Committee for each reference case heard by 
them; to be paid by the party adjudged to be in fault, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Committee. Provided, however, 
that nothing herein contained shall prevent settlement of 



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132 New Torh Produce Exchange, 

questions of difference by private arbitration, or as provided 
for in the By-Laws. 

SPIRITS TURPENTINE. 

KuLE 2. — Unless otherwise specified all contracts for 
Spirits Turpentine shall be by the gauged gallon, and all 
barrels shall have the gross contents distinctly marked in the 
usual manner. 

EuLE 3. — Buyers may examine and test, at their own ex- 
pense, the accuracy of marked gauges to the extent of ten 
(10) per cent, of any lot, and the average difference thus 
ascertained shall be accepted as that existing between the 
actual and marked gauges — buyer or seller, as the case 
may be, receiving credit for such difference, but any as- 
certained difference in gauges may be rectified by the re- 
gauging the entire lot by another Inspector, at seller's ex- 
pense, i 

Rule 4. — Gauges thus rectified shall be cut or branded, 
as above provided, in correction of the original brand or 
mark, which shall be erased. 

Rule 5. — Spirits Turpentine sold in shipping order shall 
be " white,'' and equal in color to a standard sample estab- 
lished by and held in the custody of the " Committee on 
Naval Stores." 

Rule 6. — Packages for "shipping order" must be well 
made, new or good second-hand barrels of well seasoned white 
oak, holding from 38 to 55 gallons. They shall have six (6) 
iron hoopSj and four quarter and bilge hoops, and have when 
new at least three good coats of glue : second-hand barrels to 
have two fresh coats of good glue. Each barrel shall have at 
least one good coat of Spanish bi"own paint on the heads; and 
when filled, the bungs shall be tight and well glued in. 

Rule 7. — Before delivery, the barrels having been filled to 
within one and three quarters or two inches of the bung, the 
packages and their contents shall be examined by an author- 
ized Inspector, who shall reject as unfit for " shipping order:'* 

a. All poor, misshapen and ill-made barrels, as well as 



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Rules of the Naval Store Trade. 133 

those which are not equal in all respects to the requirements 
of these rules. 

h. All barrels which are "sweating'' at time of exam- 
ination. 

c. All barrels which are leaking. 

d. All barrels found to contain water, dissolved glue, or 
any other foreign substance, or on which the glue-coating is 
found to have softened. 

e. Converted whiskey barrels, as well as all packages which 
have been used for other purposes than holding Spirits Tur- 
pentine, except first class refined Petroleum barrels in ship- 
ping order, properly steamed and glued, which shall be a 
good delivery on all contracts for both "shipping" and 
"merchantable'' order, said barrels to be subject to a deduc- 
tion of 50 cents each. 

Rule 8. — All sales of Spirits Turpentine not otherwise 
specified shall be understood as in merchantable order, in yard. 
Rule 9. — To constitute a good delivery on sales of Spirits 
Turpentine in "merchantable order," "spot," or "to arrive," 
there must not be in any parcel over ten (10) per cent, of 
colored and ten (10) per cent, of whiskey barrels. 

Rule 10. — New York barrels shall be a good delivery on a 
sale of southern barrels, but the buyer shall not be obliged to 
pay an increased price therefor. 

Rule 11. — Spirits sold on wharf, New York side, when 
weighed or gauged, and order delivered before 3 o'clock p. m., 
shall be at buyer's risk thereafter. 

Rule 12. — Deductions on Spirits Turpentine shall be al- 
lowed as follows : 

On whiskey barrels, 50 cents each barrel. 
On petroleum barrels, 50 cents each barrel. 
On broken staves, or chimes, 25 cents each. 
On broken heads, 50 cents each. 

On colored spirits, 1 cent per gallon for each " stroke " 
allowed by Ganger or Inspector up to five " strokes." 
Over five "strokes" is declared unmerchantable. 



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134 New York Produce Exchange. 

Rule 13. — Weigher, G-auger, or Inspector's returns shall 
correctly set forth as well the weights, tares and contents, as 
all deductions to which the buyer is entitled, and when ac- 
cepted shall be final between buyer and seller, except in case 
of fraud. They must be verified on oath or affirmation, when 
required by either party, and shall not be valid when more 
than three days old at time of delivery in yard or to vessel. 

KOSIN. 

Rule 14. — Rosin shall be bought and sold by the barrel of 
280 lbs. gross, shall be weighed by pounds, proper allowance 
being made for moisture and adhering dirt, and each barrel 
shall have its weight distinctly marked on one head. 

Rule 15. — Buyers may examine and test, at. their own 
expense, the accuracy of Aveights to extent of ten (10) per 
cent, of any lot, and any error thus ascertained shall be cor- 
rected by reweighing the lot by another weigher, at seller^s 
expense, or the average difference as ascertained may by 
mutual agreement be made basis of settlement ; provided 
that buyers shall have the privilege of examining and test- 
ing medium and fine Rosin to any extent they choose at their 
own expense ; provided further, that sellers shall tender only 
such grades as they have to deliver, and shall pay the inspec- 
tion charges on all rejections over ten per cent, in any parcel 
so tendered. 

Rule 16. — Weigher's returns more than thirty days old at 
time of delivery in yard or to ship shall not be valid. 

Rule 17. — Rosin in shipping order shall have two good 
heads, the top head well lined. Each barrel shall have eight 
wooden or four iron hoops, to say, two wooden or one iron 
hoop on each head, and two woeden or one iron hoop on each 
bilge. 

Rule 18. — Strained Rosin shall be free from black, and 
average equal to B and C of any approved standard. 

Rule 19. — Good strained shall consist of Rosin equal to 
standard D, or fair proportions of 0, D, E. 

Rule 20. — Standard samples shall be those of Hedenberg, 



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Rvles of the Naval Store Trade. 135 

Johnson & Hammond, and S. S. Haff & Co., which have 
been approved by the Supervising Inspector and the Com- 
mittee on Naval Stores. 

BuLE 21. — Buyers of sampled Edsin may examine the same, 
at their own expense, prior to removal, after which no claim 
will be allowed, except in case of fraud. 

Rule 22. — Sales by general sample shall be at buyer's risk, 
as to difference in quality, after removal from yard. 

Rule 23. — All sales of Rosin not otherwise specified shall 
be understood as in shipping order in yard, New York weights 
and samples, with privilege to buyer of unexpired storage then 
actually incurred by seller ; provided, however, that the buyer 
shall always be entitled to three days (including day of sale) 
free of all expense. 

Rule 24. — Buyers of cargoes afloat (spot, or to arrive) 
shall be entitled to delivery alougside one ship, one day for 
each five hundred (500) barrels. New Yark weights and sam- 
ples. If discharged at yard, at buyer's expense, they shall be 
entitled to allowance from seller for what the coopering and 
weighing would have cost alongside ship. Demurrage after 
specified time shall be paid by buyers as per bill of lading, or 
charter-party. 

TAR. 

Rule 25. — Tar shall be sold as in shipping order, inspected 
and filled in yard ; and all transactions shall be governed, as 
far as applicable, by the rules relating to Spirits Turpentine 
and Rosin. 

CONTRACTS FOR FUTURE DELIVERY. 

Rule 26. — Contracts for future delivery of Naval Stores 
other than sales to arrive, or for specific dates, shall be under- 
stood to require five (5) days' notice, for delivery ; but in the 
absence of such notice or call from buyer, it shall be the duty 
of the seller, on maturity of the contract (i, 6., the last day 
specified therein), to tender the goods between the hours of 
10 o'clock A. M. and 3 o'clock p. m., whereupon he shall be 
entitled to payment in full therefor before the last-named 



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136 New York Produce Exchange, 

hour. A proper tender will be the Weigher's or Inspector's 
return, together with an accepted order or a negotiable receipt 
for the goods, which need be surrendered only in exchange for 
cash or certified check ; 'pfovided^ however, in order to save 
unnecessary expense and delay, that for lots of over 500 bar- 
rels, Rosin may be estimated at 310 pounds gross weight per 
round barrel, and Spirits Turpentine at 43 gallons net, sub- 
ject to adjustment on or before removal. 

EuLE 27. — All settlements of contracts shall be on the 
basis of 310 pounds for a barrel of Eosin, and 43 gallons for a^ 
barrel of Spirits Turpentine. 

Rule 28. — Contracts for the delivery of Naval Stores may 
be assigned, and the assignee shall succeed to all the rights of 
the assignor ; provided, however, that neither of the original 
parties to a contract shall be released from their obligations to 
each other except by their mutual consent. 

Rule 29. — The^iflsolvency of either party to a contract 
shall forthwith work its maturity, and settlement shall be 
made or damages fixed at the prices current when the insol- 
vency is declared. 

Eule 30. — The question of such insolvency shall be deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers, from the voluntary state- 
ment of the insolvent party, or on complaint of alleged insol- 
vency, due notice, as far as practicable, being given to all 
concerned. 

Eule 31. — Cash margins may be called when provided for 
in contracts, and shall be deposited in any good city bank, or 
a Trust Company, in the usual manner, payable to the joint 
order of the parties. The broker, or if so agreed, the chair- 
man of the Committee on Naval Stores, hereinafter provided 
for, shall determine the title to such deposits ; and, in the 
event of any question arising respecting margins, which can- 
not be arranged by the parties themselves or the broker, the 
same shall be determined by the chairman aforesaid. 

Rule 32. — A failure or refusal to put up a cash margin per 
terms of contract shall work the forfeiture thereof, and be 
treated as an act of insolvency. 



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Rules of the Naval Store Trade, 137 

Rule 33. — The forms of contracts heretofore in use, marked 
A, B, 0, D, for Wilmington or Charleston deliveries, are ap- 
proved, and any disputes arising under such contracts shall be 
adjusted by these rules, and New York customs. 

GENERAL RULES. 

Rule 34. — In all transactions where quantity is not speci- 
fied, not less than twenty-five (25) barrels Spirits Turpentine, 
or one hundred (100) barrels Rosin or Tar, shall constitute a 
good delivery. 

Rule 35. — All sales are for prompt cash on delivery ; any 
deviation from which shall be understood as merely of 
courtesy. 

Rule 36. — A better article, or of superior quality, shall 
always constitute a good delivery on a contract for inferior 
goods. * 

Rule 37. — Goods to arrive shall be offered only : 

1. By vessel named. 

2. When Bill of Lading is in hand. 

3. On advices of actual shipment. 

Rule 38. — In case of sales to arrive by ship named, if it 
happens that the seller has not on board the goods which he 
sold, it shall be his duty, on discovery thereof, to immedia^tely 
notify the buyer, who shall thereupon have the option of 
cancelling the contract, or requiring the delivery of like goods 
in yard on arrival of the vessel. 

Rule 39.^Goods publicly offered for sale may be accepted 
by any member, if not immediately taken by the person to 
whom they had been first offered. So, also, in case of public 
bids, they are open for acceptance by any one, if not imme- 
diately accepted by the person to whom they were first made. 

Rule 40. — Washed or fictitious sales are positively forbid- 
den, and will render the parties concerned liable to suspension 
or expulsion from the Produce Exchange. 

Rule 41. — Unless otherwise provided in Bills of Lading, 
all Naval Stores by sail vessels shall be landed at one of the 



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138 New York Produce Exchange. 

regular Naval Store yards, when required by consignees, and 
free of expense to them. 

Rule 42. — The consignee of the greatest number of barrels 
of Naval Stores, including Spirits Turpentine, on any vessel 
going to yard, shall have selection of the yard at which to 
discharge. 

Rule 43. — The Scale Beam manufactured by the " Jour- 
neyman Scale-Makers,'' or Fairbanks & Co., shall be used to. 
test any disputed weights, or tares ; provided, however, that 
such Scale Beam must be tested at least once every six 
months at the shop of the manufacturers, or by the public 
authorities. 

Rule 44. — The Committee on Naval Stores may appoint 
(and for proper cause, suspend or remove,) Supervising In- 
spectors at New York, Wilmington, Charleston and ^Savan- 
nah, whose duty it shall be to examine and certify to the 
quantity, weights, gauges, and contents of such articles as 
may be sold subject to their supervision, and to superintend 
the proper stowage thereof on board ship, subject always to 
these rules, and such regulations, not in conflict therewith, 
as may be adopted, from time to time, by the Committee 
aforesaid, who shall also fix the compensation to be paid the 
Inspectors by the parties employing them. 

Rule 45. — Nothing herein shall be construed as interfering 
in any way with the right of members to make any special 
contracts or conditions they may wish. 

Rule 46. — All the foregoing rules must be justly and 
liberally construed, and no property shall be rejected or con- 
demned on a mere technicality. 



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RULES 

FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF 

SUPERVISING INSPECTORS 

ACTING AS BUYERS' AGENTS IN THE SHIPMENT OF NAVAli STORES AT THE PORTS OP 
NEW YORK, WILMINGTON, CHARLESTON AND SAVANNAH, ADOPTED BY 

THE COMMITTEE ON NA^AL STORES 

OP THE 

NEW YORK PRODUCE EXCHANGE, 

AS PROVIDED BY RULE 44 OP THE AMENDED RULES. 



Rule 1. — One person (or firm) shall be appointed as Chief 
Supervising Inspector for the four ports above named, with 
power to appoint a sufficient number of deputies to meet the 
demands of trade, for whose acts he shall be responsible, and 
who, before entering on the discharge of their duties, must be 
approved by and receive a license from this committee. 

Rule 2. — The compensation of said inspectors shall be as 
follows : 

On Rosin — 

For testing grades K, M «& N on 100 per cent, of parcels 10c. per bbl. 

" F, a, H (felon 100 per cent. '' 8c. 

" '* *' ** on 25 per cent. " 4c. " 

** Good Strained I ^A ^ cc ■< .. 

and Strained \ »'' !<> P®"^ <^«»*- !«• 

On Spirits Turpentine, for inspecting stowage 3 cents per barrel. 

*' " for inspecting cooperage 3 cents *' 

** ** for examining color 3 cents ** 

** *' for verifying gauges 1 cent " 

Total 9 cents 

On Tar, for inspecting and stowage 3 cents " 

which shall cover all ordinary charges for inspection of 
weights, tares, and contents, as well as stowage. 

Rule 3. — The inspector and his deputies are forbidden to 
receive from buyers or sellers extra compensation of any kind 
or nature for work done in the line of their duty, except such 



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140 New York Produce Exchange, 

as may be awarded by the inspection committees of Wilming- 
ton or Charleston for expenses properly incurred^ or which 
may be authorized by this committee. 

Rule 4. — Inspectors are forbidden to share or ia any way 
interfere with the business of local inspection, confining them- 
selves strictly to the examination of goods sold for delivery 
subject to their supervision, which must have been previously 
inspected by a local oflficer. 

Rule 5. — The chief supervising inspector shall take his 
orders in writing from the buyer or his agent, a copy of which 
he shall furnish to seller before the delivery commences, after 
iwhich he shall, in every possible way consistent with the 
proper discharge of his duty, consult the convenience of seller 
in delivering. 

Rule 6. — Disputes between sellers and inspectors shall be 
submitted at New York to the Committee on Naval Stores ; 
at Wilmington, Charleston and Savannah to the Inspection 
Committee of the Produce Exchange. The decision of either 
of these committees shall be final when rendered in accordance 
with the rules of the New York Produce Exchange. 

Rule 7. — Inspectors, besides furnishing buyers with a 
certificate in duplicate, showing inspection of goods and of 
stowage, shall also stamp on the returns in form as follows : 
'' The merchandise described herein has been examined by me 
and found correct in all respects," which he shall sign and 
promptly deliver to the seller or his agent free of charge. 

Rule 8. — In examining naval stores, inspectors shall be 
o"overned by the requirements of these rules, unless otherwise 
ao-reed to and directed by both parties to a contract. 

Rule 9. — In the event of disability from any cause of the 
supervising inspector or his deputies to promptly and properly 
discharge their duties at Wilmington or Charleston, the In- 
spection Committees at these ports may appoint inspectors /o?^ 
the emergency only, whose certificate shall be recognized and 
paid for by the buyer, as should be done if the appointment 
was made by this committee, and the same shall be valid and 
binding between all parties concerned. 



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Supervising Inspector's Rules. 141 

EuLE 10. — It shall be the duty of the supervising inspector 
to furnish this committee with monthly statements showing 
in detail the exports of naval stores from the three ports, and 
particulars of what portion thereof was inspected by him or 
his deputies. 

Rule 11. — Properly substantiated complaints against in- 
spectors or their deputies (made in writing) may be punished 
by a fine of from $5 to $20, or by removal, at the pleasure of 
the committee ; and deputy inspectors may be suspended for 
gross misconduct by the inspection committees of Wilmington 
and Charleston, but not for a longer period than three days, 
unless the cause of offense is submitted to this committee for 
adjudication. 



SUPERVISING IKSPEOTOES, 

Appointed in accordance with these Bides, and approved by the Naval 

Store Trade. 

Chief Supervising: Inspectors. 

MESSRS. BELING, NIEMEYER & WESSELS Mw York City, 

Deputy Supervising Inspectors. 
AARON WILLIAMS New York City. 



, Charleston, S. C. 

JULIUS LEE, (Stowage), J 

JAS. C. SMITH, ) ur'7 ' , AT n 

_ y Wilmington, N. C. 

CAPT. 0. SCHWARZ, (Stowage), j ^ 



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Appointed, in accordance vnth these Bules^ June 14, 1877. 

OTTO ARENS, Ghwhrman. 
THOMAS B. BOWRING, WILLIAM JAY IVES, 

THOMAS C. BUSHNELL, PAUL BABCOCK, Jr. 



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EXILES 
REGITLATING THE PETEOLETJM TRADE 



AMONa MEIilBERS 'OF THE 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Adopted July 10, 1873, and Amended February 3, 1876. 



Rule 1. — ^At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Petroleum 
five members of the New York Produce Exchange, who are 
known as members of the Petroleum Trade. It shall be the 
duty of this Committee to properly discharge the obligations 
imposed upon them by these rules, and also to consider and 
decide all disputes arising between members dealing in 
Petroleum which may be submitted to them. A majority of 
the Committee *shall constitute a quorum, but the Commit- 
tee shall fill temporary vacancies, if requested by either 
party, with some person or persons representing the same 
interest as the absent member or members, and a decision 
of a majority of those present at any hearing shall be final. 
They shall keep a record of their proceedings, and a fee of 
fifteen dollars shall be paid to the Committee for each refer- 
ence case heard by them, to be paid by the party adjudged 
to be in fault, unless otherwise ordered by the Committee. 
Provided^ however, that nothing herein shall prevent settle- 
ment of questions of diflference by private arbitration, or as 
provided for in the By-Laws. 

. Rule 2. — It shall be the duty of the Committee on Petro- 
leum to approve and license Petroleum Inspectors, or revoke 
their licenses for cause ; to decide the market prices of Petro- 



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144 New York Produce Exchange. 

leum and its products on any given day, or during any given 
period, and their decisions shall be the standard for settle- 
ments 

EuLE 3. — All deliveries and contracts for delivery of Pe- 
troleum or its products, under these rules, shall be of the 
production of the United States, unless otherwise specified. 

EuLE 4. — Crude Petroleum shall be understood to be pure, 
natural oil, neither steamed nor treated, and free from water, 
sediment, or any adulteration, and of the gravity of 44^ to 
48° Beaume. An allowance shall be made to the buyer of 
one-half of one per cent, for every quarter of a degree above 
48° gravity. 

EuLE 5.— Transactions in what is known as Parker's 
Landing Oil {i. e., from the district on the Alleghany Eiver 
at and below ^'Foster's Station"), when gravity is not stated, 
shall be regardless of gravity, if pure, natural oil. 

EuLE 6. — ^Eefined Petroleum shall be Standard White, or 
better, with a fire test of 110° Fahrenheit or upward. 

EuLE 7. — Naphtha shall be Prime White, and Sweet, and 
of gravity of from 68° to 73° Beaume. 

EuLE 8. — Eesiduum shall be understood to be the refuse 
from the distillation of Crude Petroleum, free from coke and 
water, and from any foreign impurities. 

EuLE 9. — Deliveries of Crude Oil, Eefined Oil, and Naph- 
tha, sold in bulk, shall be made in yard,- refinery, or ware- 
house, free of expense to lighter, quality to be approved in 
the tank at the time of delivery. 

EuLE 10. — When Crude Oil is sold in bulk, the quantity 
shall be ascertained by tank measurement, at the time of 
delivery. 

EuLE 11. — When Eefined Oil and Naphtha are sold in 
bulk, the quantity shall be ascertained by measurement on 
the decks of the tank boats. 

Exile 12. — All cooperage shall be in prime shipping 
order. Tar and pitch ' barrels shall be excluded, except for 
Eesiduum. 



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Rules of the Petroleum Trade. 14^ 

BuLE 13. — ^When contracts for Crude Oil call for second- 
hand Eefined Oil barrels {i, e,, barrels that have been pre- 
viously used for Eefined Oil or Naphtha) the sellers shall 
have the privilege of substituting new barrels, but they shall 
be glued. 

EuLE 14. — ^Refined Oil and Naphtha barrels shall be 
painted blue with white heads, and be well glued. 

EnLE 15. — All barrels shall be filled within one or two 
inches of the bung. 

Rule 16. — ^Crude and Eefined Oil and Naphtha in barrels 
shall be sold by weight ; Crude and Eefined Oil at the rate 
of six and one-half pounds net to the gallon ; Naphtha at the 
rate of five and three-quarters pounds net to the gallon. 
Residuum shall be sold by gauge. 

EuLE 17. — The gross average weight of packages for Ee- 
fined Oil shall not be less than 360 lbs., nor more than 390 
lbs. ; and no package shall weigh more than 410 lbs. 

EuLE 18. — Barrels and their contents shall be weighed by 
half-pounds, and gauged by half-gallons. 

EuLE 19. — Buyers may examine and test, at their own ex- 
pense, the weight or gauge of the whole or part of the lot 
delivered. 

EuLE 20. — The actual tare of each barrel shall be indelibly 
marked upon it before filHng. Buyers may test the accuracy 
of the tare so marked to the extent of five per cent, of the 
barrels composing the lot, and the average difference be- 
tween the tares thus ascertained, and the marked tare on 
the barrels tested shall be accepted as the difference between 
the marked tare and actual tare of each barrel in the entire 
lot. Any excess of actual tare over marked tare shall be 
allowed buyers. 

EuLE 21. — ^Deliveries of Crude Oil, Eefined Oil and Naph- 
tha, in barrels, shall be made in yard, at refinery or ware- 
house, where sea-going vessels can load, or, if not, sellers to 
pay Hgbterage to vessel. 

EuLE 22. — The words " yard where sea-going vessels can 
load " shall be understood to mean such yards as are acces- 

10 



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146 New TorJc Produce Exchange, 

sible, at low water, to vessels of at least three thonsand bar- 
rels capacity. 

EuLE 23. — The presentation of an invoice, Weigher's or 
Ganger's return, a certificate of inspection of the oil, together 
with an accepted order on the warehouse, yard, or refinery, 
shall constitute a delivery. 

Rule 24.— No Weigher's or Ganger's return or Certificate 
of Inspection dated more than four secular days previous to 
the time of delivery shall be valid ; and the said returns shall 
be verified on oath, or affirmation, when required. 

EuLE 25. — Buyers shall have the right of naming their 
Inspector, but shall do so at least five days before the matur- 
ity of the contract ; failing in which the sellers may employ, 
at buyer's expense, any regular Petroleum Inspector approved 
by the Committee on Petroleum, and his certificate that the 
Oil is in conformity with the contract shall be accepted. On 
a contract for prompt delivery, or where no notice is required, 
buyers shall name their Inspector when contract is executed; 
otherwise sellers may appoint the Inspector at buyer's ex- 
pense. 

EuLE 26. — Oil or Naphtha shall be held for three days from 
noon of the date of delivery order, free of storage and insur- 
ance. The party issuing the delivery order shall keep the 
goods covered by insurance during the three days ; it being 
understood that the responsibility of the said party shall 
only extend to due care in providing insurance, and not to 
any failure on the part of the underwriters to pay losses 
which may be sustained. 

EuLE 27. — Cargo contracts shall specify dates between 
which the vessel shall be ready for cargo, and also the num- 
ber of lay days vessel will have to load ; and the term " suit- 
able to vessel " is hereby declared to have no reference to the 
time when vessel shall be ready, but to imply that when ready 
sellers shall deliver and buyers receive in such quantities that 
the vessel may be loaded in the specified lay days. 

EuLE 28. — If a vessel is not ready to receive her cargo on 
or within specified dates, a written notice to the buyers from 



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Rules of the Petrdf^m Trade, 147 

the sellers on or before the latest-named date that they are 
prepared to deliver as per contract, shall be considered a 
delivery, so far as maintaining to the sellers all their rights 
in the contract, and the sellers may deliver daily thereafter in 
lots of 600 barrels or 2,500 cases, and buyers shall be obliged 
to receive and pay for the same. 

EuLE 29. — When the capacity of the vessel, exceeds or falls 
short of the amount * specified in the contract, including the 
margin, then the specified amount shall be delivered. 

BuLE 30. — A reasonable amount of Oil for a day's work of 
a vessel shall be calculated as follovrs : Vessels of 2,000 bar- 
rels capacity or under shall average 350 to 500 barrels, or 
2,000 to 2,500 cases per day ; those of 2,000 to 3,500 barrels 
capacity shall average 450 to 600 barrels, or 2,500 to 3,500 
cases per day; and vessels of over 3,500 barrels capacity 
shall average 500 to 700. barrels, or 3,000 to 4,000 cases per 
day. 

EuLE 31. — On option contracts, when not otherwise stipu- 
lated, it shall be understood that ten days' notice shall be 
given, five of which shall be within the delivery time specified. 
When the term " flat" is used, it shall be understood to mean 
^vithout notice. 

EuLE 32. — All deliveries shall be made before six o'clock 
p. M. on the day of maturity, and parties making original de- 
livery on option contracts from warehouse or refinery shall 
do so before 4^ o'clock p. m., and each party to whom deliv- 
ery is made shall note on the delivery order or memorandum 
attached the time when received, and shall deliver the same 
out within fifteen minutes. Payments on dehvery shall be 
made for all deliveries before three o'clock p. m. in Legal 
Tenders or Certified Checks, and parties making deliveries 
after 3 p. m. cannot demand Legal Tenders or Certified 
Checks ; such deliveries, however, will be good if made in 
conformity to Eule 23, but without dehvery order, and pay- 
ments may be extended and paid for before 12 o'clock at 
noon of the next business day ; provided, however, that when 
parties having Oil to receive on option contracts in the regu- 
lar order on delivery day, who are unable to complete their 



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148 New York Produce Exchange. 

deliveries on account of insuflGicient time after the original 
delivery to make the intermediate deliveries, then the party 
holding the delivery document shall make delivery by 10 A. M. 
the next business day, and each party receiving on the ex- 
tended delivery day shall note time of receiving, and deliver 
out within fifteen minutes, as specified. No dehveries shall 
be allowed beyond 12 M. on the delivery day so extended, and 
parties holding delivery orders or memorandums over fifteen 
minutes, except for cause acceptable to the Committee on 
Petroleum, shall be liable to the party injured by such unjust 
detention to the extent of the damage. 

EuLE 33. — "When calls are made on option contracts, the 
original call shall be made by ten o'clock in the mpming, and 
parties on whom the call is made shall note on the call the 
time it was received ; and if they recall on account of it, they 
shall do so within thbty minutes. 

BuLE 34. — All settlements of contracts shall be as follows : 
On Eefined Oil and Naphtha in barrels, on a basis of forty- 
eight gallons per barrel ; on Crude Oil in barrels, on a basis 
of forty-six gallons per barrel ; on Refined Oil, in bulk, on a 
basis of forty-five gallons per barrel ; on Crude Oil, in bulk, 
on a basis of forty gallons per barrel. 

Rule 35. — When contracts mature on a Sunday or legal 
holiday, deliveries shall be made on the preceding business 
day. 

Rule 36. — Contracts for the delivery of Petroleum or its 
products may be assigned, and the assignees shall succeed 
to all the rights of the assignor. 

Rule 37. — ^All assignees of such contracts shall be bound 
by the obligations of the original contracts. 

Rule 38. — In case any party holding a contract for Petro- 
leum or its products shall become insolvent, then all such 
contracts in the possession of such party shall become due 
immediately, and shall be settled by the parties in interest 
(under rules 36, 37 and 40) at the market price of the day 
when such insolvency occurs, for the dehveries stipulated in 
the contracts, less the customary brokerage. All assign- 



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Rules of the Petroleum Trade, 149 

ments of contracts made in contemplation of, or after insol- 
vency, shall be void. 

Rule 39. — The question of such insolvency may be deter- 
mined by the chairman of the Committee on Petroleum from 
the voluntary statements of the insolvent party ; or, in case 
complaint is made alleging such insolvency, the same shall 
be investigated and determined by the said Committee on 
Petroleum ; and in either case notice shall be given by the 
said Committee or their Chairman, so far as practicable, to all^ 
parties interested. 

BuLE 40. — ^Nothing contained in the foregoing Bules shall 
be construed to prevent either of the original contracting 
parties from making delivery to or claiming delivery from 
the other party to the contract, but such delivery shall in no 
way otherwise invalidate the rights of any assignee of such 
contract. In case, however, a contract has been assigned 
and either of the original contracting parties shall become 
insolvent, the other party to the contract may, at any time 
before the maturity of the contract, demand a sufficient mar- 
gin from the assignee to make the contract good at the 
market price of the day for the delivery'stipulated in the 
contract, and the party calling the margin shall put up an 
equal amount. Both margins shall be deposited in such 
Trust Company as shall be agreed upon, and such margins 
shall be kept good. If the demand for margin under this 
rule be not complied with within twenty-four hours after 
said demand, it shall then or thereafter be at the option of 
the aforesaid party to the contract to cancel the same, and 
settlement shall be made at the market price of the day for 
the delivery stipulated in the contract, less the customary 
brokerage. 

Btjle 41. — Washed or fictitious sales are positively for- 
bidden, and will render the parties concerned liable to sus- 
pension or expulsion from the Produce Exchange. 

BuLE 42. — Any disputes arising on contracts for Oil, 
Naphtha, or Besiduum delivered in Philadelphia or Balti- 
more, shall be adjusted by these Bules. 



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150 New York Produce Exchange, 

EuLE 43. — All transactions in Petrolenm and its products, 
among members of the New York Produce Exchange, shall 
be governed by the above Eules ; but nothing therein con- 
tained shall be construed as interfering in any way with the 
rights of members to make such special contracts or condi- 
tions as they may desire. 

EuLE 44. — All the foregoing rules shall be justly and hb- 
erally construed, and no property shall be rejected or con- 
demned on a mere technicality. 



INSPECTORS OF PETROLEUM 

APPOINTED BY THE 

Petroleum Committee 

OF THE 

Netv' York Pjroi>tjcje Exch a^jstg^k. 



I. H. ARCHER & CO., - New York. 

BELING, NIEMEYER & WESSELS, 

AUG. DEJONGE, - - 

GRAFF BROTHERS & TAYLOR ..--.- 
HENRY HALTERMANN, ------ 

EDW. HARRISON'S SONS, - - 

HARRISON & SULLIVAN, ------ Pliiladelpliia. 

LOCKWOOD BROS. & HOLLY, New York. 

LOCKWOODS & WHEELOCK, - - - Philadelphia and Baltimore. 

WILLIAM C. ROSE, - - New York. 

J. ADDISON SMITH. - Baltimore. 

WHITMAN & FISHER, - - -. . - - -, New York. 



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ETJLES 

Regulating the Trade in Distilled Spirits 



AMONG MEMBERS OF THE 



New York Produce Exchange. 



ADOPTED AUGUST 1, 1873. 



EcTLE 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board), appoint as a Committee on Distilled 
Spirits, five members of the New York Produce Exchange, 
who are known as members of the Distilled Spirits Trade. 
It shall be the duty of this Committee to properly discharge 
the obligations imposed upon them by these rules, and also 
to consider and decide all disputes arising between members 
dealing in Distilled Spirits which may be submitted to them. 
A majority of the Committee shall constitute a quorum, and 
a decision of a majority of those present at any meeting shall 
be final. They shall keep a record of their proceedings, and 
a fee of fifteen dollars shall- be paid to the Committee for 
each reference case heard by them, to be paid by the party 
adjudged to be in fault, unless otherwise ordered by the Com- 
mittee ; provided, however, that nothing herein shall prevent 
settlement of questions of difference by private arbitration, or 
as provided for in the By-Laws. 

Rule 2. — All transactions in Highwines, Spirits, etc., be- 
tween members of the New York Produce Exchange, shall 
be governed by the following rules ; but nothing herein shall 
be construed as interfering in any way with the rights of 



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152 Neio York Produce Exchanrje. 

members to make such special contracts or conditions as they 
may desire. 

KuLE 3. — Inspectors employed in transactions between 
members of tlie Exchange must be members of the Produce 
Exchange, and their returns of inspection must be made in 
exact accordance with the instruments customary to the 
trade, to wit : the straight gauge rod, the wantage rod, and 
Gender's hydrometer. 

Rule 4. — Inspectors shall make a detailed return (in du- 
plicate) of each lot inspected, showing the serial number of 
each barrel, the serial number of each stamp affixed thereto, 
the gauge, wantage, proof, and number of proof gallons. In 
case of measurement on account of complaint, he shall 
make a certificate, in duplicate, showing the serial num- 
bers of the barrels measured, and the result of such measure- 
ment. 

EuLE 5. — The seller shall have the right to designate the 
Inspector, who shall be entitled to receive ten (10) cents per 
barrel for inspection, to be paid by the seller. 

Rule 6. — All complaints relative to inspection must be 
made in writing, and addressed to the Inspector who inspected 
the goods, and he shall immediately notify the other party or 
parties in interest. 

Rule 7. — Complaints concerning inspection must be made 
within forty-eight hours after the delivery of the order for 
the goods. 

Rule 8. — No claim for error in gauge shall be allowed, 
unless all the barrels of the lot in question be submitted, and 
have not received any driving or oth^r cooperage subsequent 
to the inspection complained of. 

Rule 9. — In case of a complaint based upon an alleged 
error in gauge, the Inspector who made the original inspec- 
tion shall immediately measure the lot in question in con- 
formity with the following, viz. : the average gauge of a lot 
of twenty-five (25) barrels or more shall be estimated by the 
actual measurement, with a sealed measure, if not less than 



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Bvles of the Distilled Spirits Tra^e, 153 

one barrel in five of the lot, and the serial numbers of the 
barrels so measured shall, when lot sold runs serially, be in 
direct rotation. In lots of less than twenty-five barrels, 
either buyer or seller may insist upon the measurement of the 
whole lot, or of any portion thereof, greater than one barrel 
in five. If the complaint be ascertained to be not well 
founded, the Inspector shall be entitled to receive five (5) 
cents per barrel on the lot so measured, to be paid by the 
complainant. Should the error have arisen from the false 
shape or construction of the barrel, he shall be entitled to 
receive five (5) cents per barrel on the lot, to be paid by the 
seller. Should the fault have been his own, through the error 
of his instruments or otherwise, he shall not be entitled to 
receive any compensation for such measurement ; provided, 
no claim on account of barrel measurement shall be con- 
sidered adjustable unless made within forty-eight hours after 
purchase. 

KuLE 10.— Upon the receipt of an amended Inspector's 
return, or a certificate showing amendment, the seller shall 
alter his bill in accordance with said amendment, which bill, 
so altered, shall be paid by the buyer. 

EuLE 11. — When a sale is made, and order given before 2 
o'clock p. M., the buyer must present the order for acceptance 
on the same day. If it be not accepted, he must notify the 
seller of the fact before 12 o'clock noon oi;i the next succeed- 
ing business day. 

EuLE 12. — When a sale is made, and order given after 
2 o'clock p. M., the buyer must present the order for 
acceptance before 12 o'clock noon on the next succeeding busi- 
ness day. If it be not accepted, he shall notify the seller of 
the fact before 12:30 o'clock p. m. on that day. 

EuLE 13. — Highwine barrels must be new (not re-filled), 
and made of well-seasoned timber of the kind usually em- 
ployed in the manufacture of whiskey barrels. They must 
be soimd, in good cartage order, and bound with not less than 
six (6) iron hoops. * 



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Appointed, in accordance with the foregoing Rules, Junje 14, 1877. 

EDGAR P. HILL, Chairman. 
EPHRAIM HOWE, J. DOWS MAIRS, 

WILLIAM a. ROSS, GEORGE H. BURNS. 



HENRY T. WEBB, ZENAS H. SAYRE. 



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UTILES 

REGULATING LIGHTERAGE 



AMOMG MEMBERS OF THE 



New York Produce Exchange. 



A-CLopted. inebruary ^. IS^S. 



Rule 1. — ^At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Lighterage 
five members of the New York Produce Exchange. It shall 
be the duty of this Committee to properly discharge the ob- 
ligations imposed upon them by these rules, and also to 
consider and decide all disputes arising between members of 
the Produce Exchange with reference to lighterage, demur- 
rage, towing, &c., which may be referred to them. 

A majority of the Committee shall constitute a quorum, 
and a decision of a majority of those present at any meeting 
shall be final. 

They shall keep a record of their proceedings, and a fee of 
fifteen dollars shall be paid to the Committee for each refer- 
ence case heard by them, to be paid by the party adjudged 
to be in fault, unless otherwise ordered by the Committee ; 
provided, however, that nothing herein shall prevent settle- 
ment of questions of diJfference by private arbitration, or as 
provided for in the By-Laws. 

Rule 2. — On parcels of merchandise of one hundred and 
fifty tons and over, on any one lighter or barge, the day on 
which notice is given that the Hghter or barge is ready to 
deliver (provided said notice shall be given before 12:30 
o'clock P. M.), and the two following working days (ending 
at 6 o'clock p. M. of the last day) without regard to weather, 
shall be deemed lay days without charge. Parcels of mer- 
chandise under one hundred and fifty tons shall be allowed 
one day less. 



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156 New Yorh Produce Exchange. 

EuLE 3. — Demurrage at the rate of fifteen dollars per day 
may be charged on parcels of merchandise of fifty tons and 
under, on any one lighter or barge ; twenty dollars per day on 
parcels of over fifty tons and not exceeding one hundred 
tons ; and twenty-five dollars per day on parcels of over one 
hundred tons. 

BuLE 4. — All extra towing incurred by order of merchant 
or employers in making a change in destination, or in making 
more than one delivery, shall be at the expense of the party 
so ordering. 

KuLE 5. — In all cases where demurrage is being incurred 
it shall be the duty of the lighterman to give the employer 
notice by furnishing him with bill of demurrage not later 
than 12 o'clock m. on each day, in order that the employer 
in his turn may have early opportunity of claiming from the 
ship's agent or others who may be liable to him in the 
matter; and in case of the negJect of this duty by the Ught- 
erman, whereby the employer shall have lost his claim for 
demurrage, then such amount of demurrage so lost shall be 
borne by the lighterman. 

E.ULE 6. — The foregoing rules shall not be considered^ as 
applying in any manner to grain in bulk, or merchandise 
lightered in canal boats. 

EuLE 7. — ^Nothing herein shall be construed as interfering 
in any way with the right of members to make any special 
contracts or conditions they may wish. 



Appointed^ in accorda'oce with these Bides, June 14, 1877. 

GEORGE H. WEBSTER, Ghairinan. 
JOHN McCREERY, LANSON BOTER, 

D. M. MUNGER, A. R. GRAY. 



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RULES 

REGULATING THE CHEESE TRADE 



AMONG MEMBERS OP THE 



New York Produce Exchange. 



.A^dopted. J-ane 1, ISTG. 



Rule 1. — At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Cheese, 
fiye members of the New York Produce Exchange, who are 
known as members of the Cheese Trade. It shall be the duty 
of this Committee to properly discharge the obligations im- 
posed upon them by these rules, and also to consider and 
decide all disputes arising between members dealing in 
Cheese which may be submitted to them. A majority of the 
Committee shall constitute a quorum ; but the Committee 
shall fill temporary vacancies, if requested by either party, 
by some person or persons representing the same interest as 
the absent member or members, and a decision of a majority 
of those present at any meeting shall be final. They shall 
keep a record of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dol- 
lars shall be paid to the Committee for each reference case 
heard by them, to be paid by the party adjudged to be in 
fault, unless otherwise ordered by the Committee ; provided, 
however, that nothing herein shall prevent a settlement of 
questions of difference by private arbitration or as provided 
for in the By-Laws. 

E.ULE 2. — All transactions in Cheese between members of 
the Produce Exchange shall be governed by the following 
rules, but nothing herein shall be construed as interfering in 
any way with the rights of members to make such special 
contracts or conditions as they may desire. 



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158 New York Prodm^e Exchamje. 

EuLE 3. — On all sales of Cheese (when not otherwise 
agreed upon), the seller shall have the right to demand 
payment at the time of passing the title. If buyer re- 
quire it seller must, when practicable, transfer the prop- 
erty to such vessel, warehouse or other place within the 
harbor of New York or the cities connected therewith as the 
buyer may designate, and under his direction ; but the title 
shall remain vested in the seller until conveyed by delivery 
of the proper documents. The buyer must have ample op- 
portunity to examine the quality, condition, weights, <fec., 
before or during transfer, and must pay all cartages. 

EuLE 4. — If sale is from dock or platform, or " to arrive," 
the buyer shall assume the same relations toward the trans- 
portation line by which the Cheese arrives as the seller pre- 
viously held, as regards its removal from the place of delivery 
within the time granted by such lines for that purpose. 

Rule 5. — ^In the absence of special agreement, all Cheese 
purchased " in store " shall be understood as being ready and 
designed for immediate delivery, but the buyer shall have 
forty-eight hours in which to have such Cheese inspected and 
weights tested, and shall not be liable for storage or insur- 
ance if removed within five days ; but in all cases where 
Cheese are sold '' to arrive" or from dock, they must be ac- 
cepted or rejected within twenty-four hours. after notice of 
arrival to buyer, and tested within forty-eight hours after 
arrival. 

Rule 6. — The weights of all Cheese shall be tested by a 
regularly appointed city weigher, who shall be a member of 
the Produce Exchange, and his certificate shall accompany 
the document conveying the title to the property, said 
weigher to be appointed by the Committee on Cheese. 

Rule 7. — The weigher's fees shall be paid by the seller. 

Rule 8." — Unless otherwise agreed upon in testing weights 
of Cheese, not less than five boxes or more than ten per cent, 
of the whole lot shall be a test. 

Rule 9. — In testing weights, all overweights shall offset 
equal amounts of short weights on each particular factory or 



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Rules of the Cheese Trade, 159 

dairy, but overweiglits on one factory or dairy shall, not offset 
short weights on another. 

RxJiiE 10. — Where a lot of Cheese is very irregular in 
weight, either the buyer or seller may require the entire par- 
cel to be weighed. 

B.ULE 11. — Boxes of Cheese which may be found largely 
at variance from original weights shall not enter into the 
average, but their weight shall be separately ascertained and 
certified to by the weigher. 

Rule 12. — A charge of two cents per box shaU. be borne 
by the buyer, which shall cover the cost of cooperage and 
inspection. The buyer in all cases to name the inspector. 



Appointed, in accordance with these Bules^ June 14, 1877: 

JAMES F. JOYCE, Chairman. 
M. FOLSOM, THOMAS OSBORNE, 

THOMAS H. STEVENS, S. S. MARPLES. 



WILLIAM HARDY. 



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il;^ €101111 wittier m #ilt«,- 

Appointed, in accordance with these Rules, June 14, 1877. 

H. C. COOKE, Chairman. 
E. S. WHITMAN, WILLIAM J BOWER, 

WILLIAM H. KIMBALL, S. W. KNOWLES. 



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EULES 

REGULATING TRANSACTIONS IN OILS, 

(other than Refined Petroleum,) 

AMONG ME^IBEBS OF THE 

New York Produce Exchange. 



Adopted April 23 and May 3, 18T7, and Amended September 11 and November 

7, 1877. 



EuLE 1. — ^At the first meeting of the Board of Managers 
after their election, the President shall (subject to the ap- 
proval of the Board) appoint as a Committee on Oils, (other 
than Refined Petroleum), five members of the New York 
Produce Exchange, who are known as members of the Oil 
Trade. It shall be the duty of this Committee to properly 
discharge the obligations imposed upon them by these Kules, 
and also to consider and decide all disputes arising between 
members dealing in Oils, (other than Eefined Petroleum) 
which may be submitted to them. A majority of the Commit- 
tee shall constitute a quorum, and a decision of a majority of 
those present at the meeting shall be final. They shall keep a 
record of their proceedings, and a fee of fifteen dollars shall 
be paid to the Committee for each reference case heard by 
them, to be paid by the party adjudged to be in fault, unless 
otherwise ordered by the Committee. Provided, however, 
that .nothing herein shall prevent settlement *of questions of 
difference by private arbitration, or as provided for in the 
By-Laws. 

ANIMAL OILS. 

EuLE 2. — Prime Lard Oil shall be bright and sweet, and 
shall have the flavor of good sound Lard. Whiteness Tvdth 
lack of flavor, or any indication of rancidity, shall not con- 
stitute Prime or contract Oil. All Oil to be sold by weight, 
seven and one-half (7^) lbs. to the gallon. 
11 



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162 New York Prodiwe Exchange. 

Rule 3. — Tests. — The Winter test of Lard Oils of all grades 
sliall be 43° F. or under. The Spring and Fall test of Lard 
Oils of all grades shall be 55^ F. or under. The Summer test 
of Lard Oils of aU grades shall be 65° F. or under. 

EuLE 4. — Barbels. — All contract Oil must be in good, 
sound, iron-bound barrels, holding not less than forty-two or 
more than fifty gallons. In cancelling contracts without de- 
livery, forty-six gallons shall be the basis of settlement. 

EuLE 5. — Delivery. — ^When Oil is sold for future delivery 
not less than fifty barrels shall be delivered at any time, un- 
less agreed upon between buyer and seller ; and the same 
must be specified in the contract. One day's notice shall be 
given of intention to deliver. All Oil shall be paid for with- 
in seven days from the expiration- of the notice. DeHveries 
on contract may be made below 42d Street, N. E., and on 
E. E. at or below Harlem on lighter. 

EuLE 6. — ^All Lard Oil shall be tested by the following 
method. The oil to be tested shall be taken from at least 
one quarter of the barrels sold or delivered, and, when well 
mixed together, shall be placed in a glass bottle such as is 
now used to test the specific gravity of Paraffine and other 
oils, and shall not be over four or under two inches in diama- 
ter, nor over ten or under six inches in height. The thermo- 
meter shall be placed in the oil, and when it indicates the 
degree to be tested at, it must not be allowed to go more 
than one degree below or one degree above that point. 
After remaining four hours, if the oil shows no evidence of 
congealing, it shall constitute a good delivery. 

EuLE 7. — The Committee on Oils shall establish forms of 
contract for use by the trade, which, unless otherwise agreed 
upon at the time of sale, shall govern in all transactions 
between members. 

VEGETABLE OILS. 

EuLE 8. — On contracts for Cotton Seed Oil, one day's 
notice shall be given by seller, if the contract be a seller's 
option, or by buyer,*if it be a buyer's option, and no notice 



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Rvles of the Oil Trade. 163 

or order shall be valid wliicli is given on, or which calls for 
delivery on, a legal holiday. 

Rule 9. — Differences to be settled on crude Cotton Seed 
Oil at forty-four gallons per barrel, and on refined, at forty- 
six gallons. 

EuLE 10. — Deliveries of Cotton Seed Oil shall be made by 
weight at the rate of seven and one-half (7^) pounds net to 
the gallon, and in lots of not less than one hundred barrels, 
unless otherwise specified in contract. 

EuLE 11. — Settlements of contracts of Cotton Seed Oil 
shall be made at the mean between the closing prices bid 
and asked at the call on the day of settlement. 

EuLE 12. — Crude Cotton Seed Oil to pass as prime must 
be made from decorticated seed, and must be sweet in flavor 
and odor and free from water and settlings. 

EuLE 13. — Summer Yellow Cotton Seed Oil to pass as 
prime must be brilliant, free from water and settlings, sweet 
in flavor and odor, and of straw color, not reddish. 

EuLE 14 — Winter Yellow Cotton Seed Oil must be bril- 
liant, free from water and settlings, sweet in flavor and odor, 
of straw color, not reddish, and must stand limpid at a tem- 
perature of 32° F. for five hours. 

EuLE 15. — Summer White Cotton Seed Oil must be straw 
.white to white in color and free from water and settlings. 

EuLE 16. — Winter White Cotton Seed Oil must be straw 
white to white in color, free from water and settlings, and 
must stand limpid at a temperature of 32^ F. for five hours. 

EuLE 17. — Deliveries must be made in New York, south 
of 33d street, or in Brooklyn at Wharf store, or wharf south 
of the Navy Yard. 

EuLE 18. — Packages must be good iron bound barrels, un- 
less otherwise agreed at time of sale, and must be delivered 
in good carting order, unless terms of sale specify shipping 
order, and shall not be under forty gallons or over fifty 
gallons each in case of delivery. 

EuLE 19. — Tares shall be tested, if required by either buyer 



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164 New York Froditce Exchange, 

or seller, by emptying five barrels in each one hundred bar- 
rels, to be taken indiscriminately from the lot. 

EuLE 20. — The same method of testing as that used for 
Lard Oils shall be adopted for Cotton Seed Oils. (See 
EuleS.) 

BuLE 21. — Cotton Seed Oil must be paid for within seven 
days of the date of delivery, unless payment shall be de- 
manded at time of delivery. 

EuLE 22. — The Committee on Oils shall have power to 
decide all cases in dispute which may be submitted to them 
regarding Olive, Palm, Cocoanut and all other vegetable 
and fish oils. 

MINERAL OILS. 

EuLE 23. — The quality of ParaflBne Oil is in all cases to be 
subject to specific contracts as per sample or brands. 

EuLE 24. — Paraffine Oil, subjected to a temperature of 32^ 
r., and remaining limpid for the space of two hours in a 
glass, shall constitute a " Winter Oil." 

EuLE 25. — The quality of West Va., Franklin, Natural 
and Eeduced Lubricating Oils shall be subject to specific 
contracts as per sample, and shall be sold by gauge or weight. 
Winter Natural Oil shall be of a temperature of 10^ P., re- 
maining limpid in a four- ounce bottle two hours in ice ; Win- 
ter Eeduced Oil 20^ to 30^ P., and Summer Eeduced Oil 
35^ to 40^ P. 

EuLE 26. — All cooperage shall be in prime shipping order, 
and subject to inspection. 

EuLE 27. — On option contracts, not otherwise stipulated, it 
shall be understood that ten days' notice shall be given, five 
of which shall be in the delivery time specified, and all con- 
tracts shall be settled upon a basis of forty-six (46) gallons 
per barrel. Deliveries on contract on lighter may be at Eed 
Hook or Communipaw. 

EuLE 28. — Paraffine and Mineral Lubricating Oils are to 
be sold by weight, as per following table : 



eaum^. 


Actual Weight. 


Practical. 


2r 


7.57 


7i lbs. 


27'* 


7.43 


7| - 


30° 


7.29 


7i - 


33^^ 


7.15 


n - 


se** 


7.03 


7 *' 



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Bules of the Oil Trade, 165 

The actual tare of each barrel shall be indelibly marked 
upon it before filling. Buyers may test the accuracy of the 
tare so marked to the extent of five per cent, of the barrels 
composing the lot, and the average difterence between the 
tares thus ascertained, and the marked tare on the barrels 
tested, shall be accepted as the difference between the 
marked tare and the actual tare of each barrel in the entire 
lot. Any excess of actual tare over marked tare shall be 
allowed buyer. 

GENERAL EULES. 

BuuE 29. — ^Where a seller fails to notify before 3 o'clock 
p. M., one day before the expiration of the month, of his 
intention to deliver, it shall be deemed a failure of de- 
livery, and the buyer is privileged to buy to cover the con- 
tract at the market price on the day following, holding the 
seller for any difference. 

Rule 30. — When any dispute shall arise between buyer 
and seller as to the test, and they cannot agree upon a suit- 
able person to test, the Committee on Oils shall, without 
charge, appoint a person who shall be paid five dollars for 
testing by the party in default, and his decision shall be 
binding on all the parties interested. 

Rule 31. — Fictitious sales, or false reports of sales, are 
positively forbidden, and will render the parties concerned 
liable to suspension or expulsion from the Produce Ex- 
change. 

Rule 32. — All the foregoing rules shall be liberally con- 
strued, and no property shall be rejected on a mere techni- 
cality ; and nothing in the above rules shall be construed as 
interfering with the rights of members to make such special 
contracts and conditions as they desire. 

calls. 

Rule 33. — There shall be a public call on oils each day, 
at such time and of such products as the Committee on Oils 
may from time to time, with the approval of the Floor 
Committee, direct. The months shall be called in their 



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166 New York Prodvxie Exchange, 

order. The first offer to buy or sell at a price shall be 
accepted before subsequent offers at same figures may be 
placed. Subsequent offers to sell at a lower or buy at a 
higher price shall vacate prior offers to sell at higher or 
buy at lower prices. A transaction shall vacate all previous 
bids and offers. All disputes as to offers, acceptances or 
withdrawals (whether in time or not) shall be decided on the 
spot by the person presiding at the time, subject to an 
appeal to the members present. The appeal must be 
promptly taken, and a majority of the members present and 
voting shall settle the disputed point finally. 

EuLE 34— The Call on Oils shall be subject to the follow- 
ing regulations : 

1. Lots of one hundred barrels, Seller's option. 

2. Quality, Prime Contract Oil. 

3. Price named per gallon, and in fractions of not less than 
one half cent. 

MARGINS. 

Rule 35.— ; Either party to a contract, prior to or upon 
signing the same, shall have the right to call an original 
margin of one dollar per barrel ; and either party may call 
for margins to meet variations in the market of not less than 
2|^ cents per gallon, or one dollar per barrel. All margins 
on contracts shall be deposited in one of such Trust Com- 
panies, Banks incorporated by the State, or National Banks, 
as may have been designated for this purpose by the 
Finance Committee of the New York Produce Exchange. 

When margins are called before 3 P. M., they must be 
deposited before 12 o'clock M. of the next day. In case of 
failuie of any Bank or Trust Company in which such mar- 
gins have been deposited, it shall be the loss of the party or . 
parties to whom it may be found to be due, taking the aver- 
age price of like deliveries on the day such Bank or Trust 
Company failed as a basis of settlement. 

When margins are called, original or for variations in the 
market, certified checks must be drawn to the order of the 
Bank or Trust Company in which they are to be deposited. 
Checks must be sent to the Superintendent of the New Yor k 



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Rules of the Oil Trade. 167 

Produce Exchange, who shall deposit them and get a certifi- 
cate of deposit, made payable on the order of the Superin- 
tendent of the New York Produce Exchange, and to the 
order of the buyer and seller. As soon as the Superin- 
tendent has received the certificate, he shall send it to the 
party making the deposit, and an abstract of the same to the 
party calling the margin. In settlement, the Superintendent 
shall ascertain the amount due each of the parties at inter- 
est, and shall endorse the amount due each on the certifi- 
cate over his own signature, as instructed by both parties. 
In case the two parties do not agree as to the amount due 
on a margin receipt, either of them may refer the matter to 
the Committee on Oils for decision, which shall be final. On 
the decision of said Committee, the Superintendent of the 
Produce Exchange, on being informed thereof, shall 
promptly endorse to each party the amount each shall be 
entitled to by such decision. 

In case of the absence of the Superintendent, the Presi- 
dent of the New York Produce Exchange, or the Chairman 
of the Finance Committee, shall act ia his stead under this 
Eule. 

CONTRACTS. 

Rule 36. — The following shall be the form of Contract for 
Oils sold for future delivery : 

OIL CONTRACT. 

New York, 187 

In consideration of one dollar in hand paid, the receipt of which is 
hereby acknowledged, .... have this day Sold to (or bought from) 

One Hundred barrels Prime 

at =^ cents per 

gal., deliverable at seller^s (or buyer's) option 

This contract is made in view of, and in all respects subject to the By- 
Laws and Rules established by the New York Produce Exchange, in force 
at this date. 

EuLE 37. — No change shall be made in these Eules by the 
Committee on Oils before submitting the same to a meeting 
of the Oil Trade, properly called, at which ten shall consti- 
tute a quorum. 



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MEMBERS 

OF THE 

NEW YOM PEODUCE EXCHANGE. 



^^- Name. * Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1725 ABBEY, HENBY Stephen Abbey & Son Plour and Feed Eondout, N. Y. 

3 ABBOT, ABIBL AbielAbbot Ship Broker 53 South St. 

4 ABBOTT, JOSIAH H Abbott & Hemck Flour 13 State St. 

2 ABEL, CHRISTIAN C CO. Abel & Co Shipping and Com. . . 9 South William St. 

568 ABENHEIM, MAX Max Abenheim & Co Grain 62 Broad St. 

1 ABORN, CHAS. B C. B. Aborn Flour 7 State St. 

7 ACKER, DAVID D Acker, MerraU & Condit . . . Grocers 1.32 Chambers St. 

576 ACKERMANN", ALEX Meissuer, Ackermann & Co . Petroleum ^ Beaver St. 

ACKERMANN, CHAS. F . . . Meissner, Ackermann & Co .Petroleum 48 Beaver St. 

182 ADAMS, GEO. W Hughes. Hickox & Co Flour and Grain 36 Whitehall St. 

979 ADAMS, J. E., Jr J. E. Adams, Jr Grain 338 West 4th St. 

1606 ADAMS, SAMUEL G S. G.Adams Flour 26 Moore St. 

734 ADAMS, W. E W. E. Adams Provisions 14 Moore St. 

280 ADLER, CHARLES Charles Adler Commission 26 Broad St. 

2424 AGRESTA, A. P A. P. Agresta Ship Broker 126 Pearl St. 

1599 AHERN, MICHAEL J Ahem & Bentley Coopers 128 Broad St. 

12 AHLES, JOHN W J. W. Ahles Flour 12 Bridge St. 

13 AKIN, WM. H W. H. Akin & Son Hops and Malt 10 Water St. 

18 ALBERT, FANNING P F. P. Albert Flour 18 Moore St. 

19 , ALLAN, THOS. T Robt. Allan & Son Provisions .3f>0 Greenwich St. 

2013 ALLASON, WM. D D. W. Man waring Bags and Bagging ... 248 Front St. 

1506 ALLEN, D. C 1). C. AUen Baking 641 Newark Ave.; J. C. 

2119 ' ALLEN, ELISHA M Allen & Brother Woolens 143 Duane St. • 

15 ALLEN, FRANK H F. H. AUen & Co Flour . ." ; 38 Whitehall St. 

1746 ALLEN, G. C Cunard Line Shipping 4 Bowling Green. 

2439 ALLEN, HENRY J. H. Hebert & Co Flour and Grain 72 Broad St. 

14 ALLEN, JOSEPH Joseph Allen & Co Flour 11 South St. 

1940 ALLEN, SAMUEL B Sutherland & Allen Carmen 10 South St. 

2315 ALLEN, WM. L Wm. L. Allen & Co Produce 65 Broad St. 

17 ALSGOOD, PETER Alsgood, Rasch & Co Grocers 66 Fulton St. , Brooklyn. 

2290 ALTENBRAND, H Arnold & Bemheimer .... Maltsters 6th, cor. N. 7th, B'k'n, E. D. 

2084 AMBLER, THOMAS Thomas H. Stevens Provisions 3 State St. 

2122 AMELUNG, HENRY. J. A. Amelung Provision Inspector. .24 Whitehall St. 

20 AMELUNGf JOHN A J. A. Amelung Provision Inspector. . 24 WhitehaU St. 

2274 AMERMAN, ERASTUS P. . T. C. Nostrand & Co Grain and Feed 10 James SUp. 

1745 ANDERSON, HERBERT. . . . H. L. Rjuth & Sons Gram 44 Beaver St. 

12 



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170 New York Produce Exchange, 

No. Name. Firm. Business. ■ PlcLce o/Biuiness. 

21 ANDEBSON, JOHN H. Taylor & J. Anderson . . Cheese and Prov .... 7 Bowlinp Green. 

1647 ANDERSON, THOS. F T. F. Anderson Flour and Feed 211 Rutledge St., B^yn, E. D. 

765' ANDREW, F. S F. S. Andrew & Co Provisions New Haven, Conn. 

24 ANGEVINE, LEVI Levi Angevine & Son Flour 342 Greenwich St. 

22 ANNAN, EDWARD International Elevating As.Grain Elevating 31 Pearl St. 

23 ANTHONY, JAMES -.James Anthony Liquors 230 East 38th St. 

1063 ANTHONY, W. R Geo. Cecil, Jr Flour and Grain 17 South St. 

25 APPLETON, WM Wm. Appleton Maltster Albany, N. Y. 

1987 ARANGO, AURELIO. Aurelio Arango Shipping and Com . .35 Broadway. 

1767 ARCHBOLD, JOHN D Acme Oil Company Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

34 ARCHER, DANIEL 0.. Jr.. Archer & Close Lard Refiners 156 Franklin St. 

28 ARCHER, EDWIN A. PhiUips & Co Flour and Grain ... .31 Moore St. 

2168 ARCHER, ISAAC H I. H. Archer & Co Petroleum Weighers . 72 Beaver St. 

1980 ARCHER, SAMUEL Samuel Archer Salt : 194 Diiane St. 

137 ARCHIBALD, EDWARD B..Bowring & Archibald Com. Merchants . . .142 Pearl St. 

1737 ARBNS, OTTO Muller & Kruger Petroleum 20 Exchange Place. 

31 ARKELL, JAS Arkell, Tufts & Co Ship Brokers 15 Soath William St. 

507 ARKELL, W. H Arkell, Tufts & Co Ship Brokers 15 South WilUam St. 

27 ARMOUR, HERMAN ...Armour, Plankinton & Co. .Flour, Grain & Prov. 129 Broad St. 

1238 ARMS, NELSON L Nelson L. Arms Liquors 15 Beaver St. 

1893 ARMSTRONG, F. W., Jr. . .Munn & Jenkins Freight Brokers 61 Beaver St. 

1648 ARMSTRONG, JOHN John Armstrong Carman 95 Broad St. 

35 ARNOLD, FRED. W Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St. 

2118 ARNOLD, RICHARD W. H. Pophara & Co Lard Refiners 53 Front St. 

245 ARNOLD, S. W Arnold & Bernheimer Maltsters 6th, cor. N. 7th, B'kPn, E. D. 

2401 ASTEN, H. G. .'. Abbott & Herrick Flour 13 State St. 

1901 ATKINS, DAVID F Farmers' Protective Union . Commission Hunter's Point, L.I. 

2123 ATKINS, E DWIN J. Atkins & Co Shipping and Com. . . 38 South St. 

37 ATKINSON, THOS Atkinson & Co Flour and Prov 13 Whitehall St. 

1739 ATTERBURY, B. C Te Tt, Traesdell & Field . . .Flour and Grain Ill Broad St. 

1557 AT WATER, THERO S" S . . . T. S. Atwater Bags and Baggmg ... 33 Pearl St. 

1782 AUSTIN, A. E A. E. Austin Provisions. 199 Chambers St. 

1239 AYERS, S. M G. P. Trigg & Co Fish & Prov 182 Duane St. 

1968 AYRES, JAS. A The Grain Warehous'g Co. . Grain Storage 5 Moore St. 

2098 AYRES, MARSHALL, jR . . Lombard, Ayres & Co Petroleum 127 Pearl St. 

2022 BABBITT, B. T B. T. Babbitt Soap 69 Washington St. 

56 BABCOCK, PAUL, jR Devoe Manufacturing Co. . . Petroleum 80 Beaver St. 

318 BABCOCK, WRIGHT Babcock & Cox Petroleum 67 Beaver St. 

49 BADE, CLAUS Bade & Schluter Grocers 172 West St. 

1604 B AET JER, H ERM.US^N . . Funch, Edye & Co Ship Brokers 2T South William St. 

1961 BAILE i', EDWARD Phillips & Co Flour and Grain ... .31 Moore St. 

1997 BAILEY, H. B H. B. Bailey & Co Ship Brokers 51 South St. 

2397 BAIRD, JAMES A James A. Baird Provisions 26 Broadway. 

62 BAKER, BENJ. P B. P. Baker &; Co Grain and Cotton. . . .129 E. 34th St. 

53 BAKER, DANIEL K Baker & Clark Fish and Provisions. . 333 ani 337 Washington St. 

1535 BAKER, E.S E.S.Baker Provisions 11 Water St. 



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Names of Members. 171 

No. Name, Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

48 BAKER, JOSEPH H J. H. Baker & Co Lumber 46 10th Ave. 

42 BAKER, ORVILLE R B. P. Baker & Co Grain and Cotton. .. .129 E. 34th St. 

2375 BAKER, RICHARD Richard Baker Grain and Flour 19 William St. 

43 BALDWIN, BENJ. F Carrington & Co Grain Toledo, Ohio. 

1016 BALDWIN, C. M Carll & Gardner Flour 62 Broad St. 

1524 BALDWIN, HENRY Henry Baldwin Broker 4 State St. 

2281 BALDWIN, H. S J. H. Herrick & Co Flour and Grain 1 State St. 

46 BALDWIN, JAS. L James L. Baldwin Flour 77 Beach St. 

60 BALDWIN, JNO. S J. W, Moore, McCukhen & Co . Flour and Grain ... ,1 Stone St. 

2138 BALDWIN, RADCLIFFE . . State Line S. S Shipping 72 Broadway. 

1519 BALDWIN, SEARS Pierce & Baldwin Flour 13 Front St. 

2139 BALL, CONWAY W Conway W. Ball Grain BufEalo, N. Y. 

71 BALL, THOS. P Evans, BaU & Co Shipping 36 South St. 

'47 B ALLANTINE, PETER H .Peter Ballantine & Sons . . . .Brewers 134 Washington St. 

1516 BAMBER, ROGER Roger Bamber & Co Butter and Cheese . .77 Broad St. 

2132 BAMBER, THOS. , JR Roger Bamber & Co Butter and Cheese . . 77 Broad St. 

73 B AMFORD, C HARLES Bamf ord Bros Provisions 13 Broadway. 

55 B ARCELO, JUAN Barcelo & Vatable Bros Merch'dse. Brokers . . 72 Beaver St. 

1819 BARKER, GEO. G Geo. G. Barker Com. Merchant 45 Kilby St. Boston. 

67 BARNES, DANIEL R. P. Buck & Co Shipping 29 South St. 

69 BARNES, JOHN V R. P. Buck & Co Shipping 29 South St. 

64 BARNES, SETH S S.S.Barnes Provisions 52 Water St. 

58 BARNES, WM. E Carver & Barnes Shipping 30 South St. 

1419 BARNHART, JOHN G. F. Johnson Flour 38 Water St. 

2261 BARRQW, J. W Barrow, Wootton & Co Produce Commission 31 Broad St. 

1946 BARROW, WM. W Barrow, Wootten & Co Produce Commission.81 Broad St. 

1821 BARRY, HORACE M Horace M. Barry Com. Merchant 171 Pearl St. 

454 BARRY, J. W., JR W. M. Tilden & Co Hog Slaughtering . . . Foot W. 40th St. 

68 BARTHOLD, RAFAEL R. . R. R. Barthold Merchant 40 Stone St. 

2133 BARTLETT, BRYANT M. . G. V. Bartlett & Co Hog Slaughterers. . . .Jersey City, N. J. 

32 BARTLETT, E. B Bartlett & Greene Storage 106 Wall St. 

509 BARTLETT. C. T Bminard, Bartlett & Co Hog Slaughterers Jersey City, N. J. 

70 BARTLETT, G. A G. Y . Bartlett & Co Hog Slaughterers .... Jersey City, N. J. 

52 BARTLETT, GEORGE V. . . G. Y. Bartlett & Co Hog Slaughterers . . . .Jersey City, N. J. 

1867 BARTLETT, J. R Libby, Bartlett & Kimball .Oils 127 Water St. 

1881 BARTOW, CHAS. S Chas. S. Bartow Marine Insurance 54 Pine St. 

807 BARTOW, J. F Morrison & Bartow Export 29 WiUiam St. 

1562 BARTRAM, THOS. W Bartram Bros Butter 32 Water St. 

2289 B ASCOME, GEO. D G. D. Bascome Insurance 72 Beaver St. 

72 BATE, JOHN J Bate Refrigerating Co Refrigerators 53 Beaver St. 

54 BAUER, DIEDRICH D.Bauer Provisions 33 Front St. 

1657 BAUMANN, J A. Baumarw & Sons Provisions 64 Catharine St. 

1956 BAXTER, ARCHIBALD . . .Ira Olds h Co Commission 17 Broadway. 

1614 BAXTER, WARREN C Warren C. Baxter Flom- and Grain 30 WhitehaU St. 

1558 BAYARD/ C HAS. H T. S. Atwnter Bags and Bagging. . .33 Pearl St. 

88 BEADLESTON, ALF'D N . .Beadleston, Price & Woerz .Brewers 289 West 10th St. 



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172 New York Produce Exchange, 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Businesi. 

1577 BEARDSLEY, S. R J. W. Beardsley & Son Provisions 179 West St. 

95 BEATTIE, JAS. H Tupper & Beattie Shipping 116 Wall St. 

76 BECHSTEIN. AUG. C Beckstein & Co Provisions 100 Hudson St. 

91 BECHTEL, GEO. J , Jr. . . .G. J. Bechtel, Jr Provisions 109 Water St. 

1796 BEGKWITH, BENJ. S B. S. Beckwith Petroleum 130 Maiden Lane. 

1986 BEDELL, DANIEL E Bedell & Parcels Coopers 127 Broa<l St. 

77 BEDELL, WM. T W. T. Bedell Flour Miller 261 Water St., Brooklyn. 

191 BEDFORD, EDWD. T Thompson & Bedford Oil 134 Front St. 

2387 BEEBE, SILAS E S. E. Beebe Provisions 14 Water St. 

88 BELING, GEO. A Beling, Niemeyer & Wessels. Stowage Inspectors . . 72 Beaver St. 

74 BELL, JOSEPH Joseph Bell Provisions 150 Christopher St. 

2420 BELL, E. T W. J. Wilcox & Co Lard Refiners 41 Broad St. 

1822 BELL, WM. G W. G. Bell & Co Provisions 48 Commerce St., Boston. 

92 BELT, WASHINGTON Belt & Cilley Produce 154 Chambers St. 

85 BENEDICT, CHAS. H Stevens & Benedict Flour and Provisions. 86 Broad St. 

1718 . BENHAM, ISAAC Benham & Boyesen Ship Brokers 88 Wall St. 

78 BENHAM, JAS. M Thomas & Benham Flour, Batt€r and Cheese.. 108 Broad St. 

1943 BENLISA, DAVID D. Benlisa , Merchandise Broker .139 Pearl St. 

9 BE NNET, ROBERT John Thallon Provisions 17 Moore St. 

2082 BENNETT, AUGUSTUS . . . International Elevating As. Grain Elevating 31 Pearl St. 

93 BENNETT, P. M I. P. Bennett & Co Flourand Grain 2 South St. 

1884 BENNETT, DANIEL C . . . .Daniel C. Bennett Produce Com Albany, N. Y. 

2276 BENNETT, A. P A. P. Bennett Petroleum Titusville, Pa. 

94 BENNETT, IRVING P .... I . P. Bennett ife Co Flour and Grain 2 South St. 

477 BENNETT, 0.0 Gaff, Rush & Thomas Millers 1 Front St. 

1347 BENNING, HENRY H. Benning Grain 4 Front St. 

82 BENSEL, WM. P Wm. P. Bensel & Sons Coopers 550 Washington St. 

2004 BENSON, RICHARD H . . . . Isaac H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain 5 State St. 

1854 BENSON, SILAS D Davis & Benson Flour ; .192 Cherry St. 

2306 BENTLEY, THOS. H Ahern & Bentley Coopers 128 Broad St. 

559 BERGEN, HENRY L Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers 3 William St. 

1414 BERINGER, FRED L Fred. L. Beringer Hops and Malt 40 Whitehall St. 

75 BERNHEIMER, EMANUEL. Bemheimer & Schmid Brewers 110th St., near 8th Ave. 

2070 BERNHEIMER, ISAAC .... Oleophene Oil Co Petroleum 322 Broadway. 

2110 BERRALL, CHAS Breed & Allison Transportation 10 Old Slip. 

90 BERTAUX, CHAS. W C. W. Bei-taux Shipping 113 Pearl St. 

96 BERTHOLD, HUGO Hugo Berthold Petroleum 19 William St. 

84 BERTHOUD, FRED Fred. Berthoud Provisions Chicago, 111. 

172 BESANT, THOMAS Thos. Basant Freight Broker 45 Beaver St. 

1257 BETTMANN, J. M J. M. Bettman Commission 3 South St. 

86 BETZ, JOHN F Betz & Co Brewers 353 West 44th St. 

80 BEYER, GEO. H 205 Second Ave. 

81 BEYER, JOHN A Fellows & Beyer Grain and Feed Foot Taylor St., B^yn, E. D. 

101 BIDEN, EDWARD A Grain Storage 17 South St, 

98 BIGLOW, C. W C. W. Biglow Bags and Bagging. . .9 and 11 Bridge St. 

100 BILL, EDWARD 129 Broad St. 



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Names of Members, 173 



No. Name. Finn. Business. Place of Business. 

432 BILLLN", JOS. H Billin & Son Baking 291 Columbia St., Brooklyn. 

1932 BILLINGS, LUDOVIC F . . .Joyce & Billings Butter and Cheese. . .102 Broad St. 

272 BINGHAM, A. R Wm. Bingham & Co Exporters 45 Exchange Place. 

99 BINGBAM, DAVID Bingham Bros Grain 47 Exchange Place. 

103 BIRDSALL, ERNEST W. . .E. W. BirdsaU Flour 11 South St. 

2371 BIRDSALL, R. L Fellows & Beyer Grain and Feed Foot Taylor St. , Blyn, E. D. 

2451 BISHOP, J. M Copmann & Bishop Petroleum 5 William St. 

372 BISHOP, THOS. D Thos. D. Bishop Grain Measurer 8 Coenties Slip. 

1446 BLACK, ALEX. G Williams, Black & Co Commission 1 William St. 

110 BLACKMAN, JAS. J Pingle & Blackman Flour and Grain 37 Water St. 

114 BLAIR, LYMAN Lyman Blair Provisions 129 Broad St. 

1490 BLAICSLEE, HENRY A . . . . Blakslee & Caldwell Ship Brokers 62 Beaver St. 

36 BLANCH ARD, F. L Bradley, Kurtz & Co Bags and Bagging . . .25 Pearl St. 

107 BLANCHARD, WM Wm. Blanchard Grain 18 WiUiam St. 

112 BLANCKE, ROBERT Blancke Bros Flour 117 Broad St. 

1619 BL AUVELT, JAS. H Union Mutual Life Ins. Co . Insurance. ..." 151 Broadway. 

2403 BLEIER, LEOPOLD Gaff, Fleischman & Co . . . .Distillers 39 Broad St. 

1917 BLINN,' F. S .' Fairbanks & Co Scales 311 Broadway. 

113 BLOOM, PETER C Combs & Halsey Flour and Feed 117 West St. 

109 BLOOM,*WM. J E. A: Moore Grain and Feed 19 Broadway. 

2417 BLOSSOM, FRED. A Blossom, Hayne & Co Naval Stores 164 Front St. 

125 BOAG, THOS. H T. H. Boag Shipping and Com. . .33 Front St. 

129 BOARDMAN, GORHAM. . . . Gorham Boardman Lumber 115 Wall St. 

1713 BOCK, ADOLPH Max Abenheim & Co Grain 62 Broad St. 

1498 BOCKMANN, HANS F Bockmann, Oerlein & Co . . . Ship Brokers 6 South WiUiam St. 

2028 BODY, JOHN E John E. Body Shipping and Com. . 1 State St. 

1695 BOGERT, ALBERT A A. A. Bogert Prov. lasp. and Cartage . .3 Water St. 

1456 BOGERT, BENJAMIN C. . . B. 0. Bogert Flour and Feed 102 Barclay St. 

1528 BOGERT, WM. S W. S. Bogert .Provisions 23 Water St. 

126 BOHNET, JOHN John Bohnet Provisions 188 Monroe St. 

1838 BOHNET, JOHN, Jr John Bohnet Provisions 188 Monroe St. 

123 BOND, JOHN H John H. Bond& Co Flour 52 Front St. 

1759 BONHAM, JNO. L D. H. Sherman Hog Slaughterer .... Jersey City, N. J." 

139 BONNELL, ALEX A. Bonnell Flour and Feed 104 West St. 

1485 BONNELL, ALEX., jR A. Bonnell .^ Flour and Feed 104 West St. 

1870 BONNELL, JI7DS0N B R. S. Homan & Co Flour 219 West St. 

1593 BOORITM, J. L J. L. Boorum & Co Butter and Chefsse. . .82 Broad St. 

132 BOOTH, HEMAN D Deceased. 

135 BOOTH, HENRY P James E. Ward & Co Ship Brokers 113 Wall St. 

2048 BORGER, JOHN J J. J. Borger Flour and Grain 19 Broadway. 

116 BORLAND, ROBERT B . . . .Robt. B. Borland Shipping and Com . .70 WaU St. 

136 BORS, CHRISTLAN Christian Bors &Co Shipping and Com . .18 Exchange Place. 

118 BOSCHBN, JOHN H John H. Boschen & Bro. . . . Flour and Feed 98 Barclay St. 

2135 BOSCHEN, JOHN H., Jr. . John H. Boschen & Bro. . . .Flour and Feed 98 Barclay St. 

138 BOSHER, CHARLES H . . . . R. T. WUson & Co Com. Merchants .... 2 Exchange Court. 

1928 BOSTWICK, ANDREW W. . Bostwick & Day Petroleum 127 Pearl St. 



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174 New York Produce Exchange. 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Biun'nesa. 

1711 BOSTWICK, JOSEPHUS B .Goulard, Rouse & Bostwick.Provision Inspectors. 36 WhitehaU St. 

130 BOSTWICK, JABEZ A J. A. Bostwick & Co Petroleum 141 Pearl St. 

1503 BOUCK, JAS. B Jas. B. Bouck Provisions Ill Broad St. 

2333 BOWER, B. Wilson & Bower Merchandise 121 Front St. 

133 BOWER. WM. J Wm. J. Bower & Co Merchandise Brokers.55 William St. 

1339 BOWLER, GEO- T Marsh, White & Co Grain and Feed 104 Broad St. 

131 BOWMAN, ALBERT H . . . . A. H. Bowman Flour and Grain .... 129 Broad St. 

20S6 BOWMAN, L. S L. S. Bowman & Co Hay and Feed 34th St. and 11th Ave. 

2124 BOWNE. SAM'L W S. W. Bowne & Co Flour 673 3d Avenue, Brooklyn. 

1651 BOWRING, HENRY Henry Bowring Freight Broker .... 142 Pearl St. 

33 BOWRING, THOS. B Bowring & Archibald Com. Merchants .... 142 Pearl St. 

119 BOYCE, GEORGE A G«o. A. Boyce & Co Produce Com 84 Broad St. 

2398 BOYI>, DAVID W. P. McLaren & Co Commission 17 Moore St. 

1618 BOYD, D. I Cortelyou, Boyd & Co Flour and Feed Hamilton Ave., Brooklyn. 

121 BOYD, FRANCIS F. O.Boyd&Co Highwines 59 Broad St. 

127 BOYD, JAMES R Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers . . . .3 William St. 

117 BOYD, JOHN, JR John Boyd, Jr Flour 59 Front St. 

134 BOYD, WM. L Wm. L. Boyd Grain & Highwines . .39 Pearl St. 

122 BOYER, LANSON Lanson Boyer Lighterer 23 South St. 

1996 BOYESEN, B. C Benham & Boyesen Ship Brokers 88 Wall St. 

124 BOYNTON, JNO. H Jno. Boynton's Son Flour, Grain & Lumber. .32 Broadway. 

162 BRACKEN, WM. S Herman Stutzer Flour and Grain 52 Exchange PI. 

159 BRADSHAW, ANDREW . . . Andrew Bradshaw Flour 129 Broad St. 

2373 BRADY, P. J Andrew Brown Lumber 3 Bowling Green. 

1907 BRAIN ARD, FRANK Brainard, Bartlett & Co . . . .Hog Slaughterers .... Jersey City, N. J. 

497 BRAIN ERD, G. B J. L. Hasbrouck & Co Merchandise 75 Hudson St. 

168 BRAND, JAMES James Brand Grain and Prov 85 Beekman St. 

995 BRAND, WALTER C James Brand Grain and Prov . ... 85 Beekman St. 

1763 BRAUN, WILLIAM William Braun Provisions 48 Broad St 

155 BRAYTON, HEZ. A First National Bank Vice President FaU River, Mass. 

169 BREED, ORSON Breed & Allison Transportation 10 Old Slip. 

161 BRETT, GUST. A Brett, Son & Co Ship Brokers 43 South St. 

213 BRETT, PETER Peter Brett Pictures 721 6th Avenue. 

156 BREWSTER, AMOS H A. H. Brewster Provisions 335 and 337 Washington St. 

151 BREWSTER, JAS. D. . . . J. D. Brewster Freight Broker 72 Beaver St. 

2278 BREWSTER, JNO. L., jR Plainfield, N. J. 

1008 BREWSTER, MORTIMER . . Corn Exch. Elevator Co. . . . Grain Elevating 38 Pearl St. 

2131 BRIEN, HENRY H. & H. Brien Grocers 126 Avenue C. 

167 BRIEN,HI7GH H. & H. Brien Grocers 126 Avenue C. 

740 BRIGGS, ALANSON T A. T. Briggs Cooper 64 Rutgers SUp. 

1842 BRIGGS, B. F Briggs & Furey Coopers 129 Furman St., Brooklyn. 

166 BRIGGS, MARVIN A. T. Briggs Cooper 128 Peari St. 

645 BRISTOW, ISAAC 264 Henry St., Brooklyn. 

1702 BRITTON, J. LUTHER . . . . J. M. Fiske & Co Flour and Grain 18 South St. 

2021 BROCK, HERMANN Hermann Brock Com. Merchant 51 New St. 

1006 BROOKER, JAMES P E. M. Van Tassel & Co .... Grain Cor. Brevort& 12th Sts. J. C. 



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Names of Members. 175 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Btisiness, 

142 BROWN, AUGUSTUS Augustus Brown arain 102 Broad St. 

146 BROWN, CHAS. R C. R. & J. Brown Provisions 172 Grand St, B'k'n, B. D. 

144 BROWN, CHAS. S C. S. Brown & Co Butter and Cheese . .44 Pearl St. 

143 BROWN, FRANCIS G Francis Brown & Son Chemicals and Oil" . . 139 Front St. 

2454 BROWN, JOHN Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain ... .19 South St. 

2279 BROWN, J. B 1 ... J. B. Brown Shipping 47 South St. 

1729 BROWN, THOS. P F. E. Smith & Co Flour MiUers 20 Hamilton Ave., B'klyn. 

149 BROWN, YERNON H Vernon H. Brown & Co ... . Ship Brokers 84 Beaver St. 

1525 BROWN, WILLIAM Brown & Nordenholt Lighterers 7 South St. 

148 BROWN, WILLIAM J. S. «& W. Brown Maltsters 49 Broadway. 

145 BROWN, WM. A Brown, Rice & Quinby Flour and Gram 27 Pearl St. 

2125 BROWN, WM. F Crowell & Brown Flour and Grain ... .106 Broad St. 

16^3 BRUCE, WILLIAM W W. W. Bruce & Co Flour and Grain 11 WhitehaU St, 

589 BRUCE, W. WALLACE JR., W. W. Bruce & Co Flour and Grain ... .11 Whitehall St. 

215 BRUMLEY, H. L S. S. Brumley Flour 28i Front St. 

164 BRUMLEY, SANDFORD S . S. S. Brumley Flour 28i Front St. 

2007 BRUMLEY, WILLIS H. . . .Brumley & Hoffman Flour and Feed 705 3d Ave. 

2105 BRUNING, HENRY F D. D. Mangam Grain and Feed 94 Broad St. 

2415 BRUNING, JOHN L E, A. Kent & Co Grain and Provisions.89 Broad St. 

2134 BRUNN, J ULIUS W Hagemeyer &, Brunn Commission 41 Broadway. 

158 BRUSH, JAMES E E. A. Kent .& Co Grain and Provisions. 89 Broad St. 

157 BRUSH, STEPHEN Stephen Brush Freight Broker .58 Beaver St. 

153 BRUSH, WALTER F Walter F. Brush Lard 25 Pearl St. 

160 BRUSTLEIN, EMIL Fischer & Keller Grain, Petroleum, &C.46 Cedar St. 

512 BUERMANN, AUGUST August Buermann Flour and Bakery . . .91 Columbia St. 

1391 BUCKBEE, JACOB W Geo. B. Ferris & Co Gen^ Prod. Mers. . . .58 Pearl St. 

1927 BUCKMAN, ROBT. K Hulshizer & Buckman Flour and Feed 119 West St. 

186 BUELL, HENRY T Henry T. BueU Grain 129 Broad St. 

1368 BUGBEE, J. H Parsons, Cady & Co Provisions Providence, R. I. 

180 BULL,WMH W. K. Moore & Co Flour '5 South St. 

193 BULLARD, GEO. L S. & G. L. Bullard Grain 47 Pearl St. 

178 BULLARD, SILAS S. & G. L. Bullard Grain 47 Pearl St. 

174 BULLEY, GEO. F Geo. F. BuUey Ship Broker. 51 South St. 

1783 BULLEY, GEO. W Geo. W. BuUey Grain 68 Beaver St. 

1572 BUNKER, EDWD. H K H. Bunker Petroleum 64 Beaver St. 

1476 BURGER, GERARDUS 0. . .G. C. Burger Provision Inspector. .35 Water St. 

183 BURGESS, EDWD. G Floating Elevator Co Grain Elevating ... .35 Pearl St. 

1982 BURGESS, LEVI G Snow & Burgess Shipping 66 South St. 

Ill BURGESS, W. J W. P. Clyde & Co Shipping 6 Bowling Green. 

184 BURGESS, W. N Floating Elevator Co Grain Elevating .... 35 Pearl St. 

916 BURKAM, CHAS. B E. G. Burkam & Co Flour and Grain. . . .35 Water St. 

2060 BURKAM, ELZEY G E. G. Burkam & Co Flour and Grain ... .36 Water St. 

190 BURKE, CHAS. C Yenni & Burke Petroleum 125 Maiden Lane. 

179 BURLING, JOHN C S. & J. C. Burling Grocers Cor. Sands & Gold Ste., Bkn. 

962 BURNABY, GEO. R Bowripg & Archibald Com. Merchants .... 142 Peatl St. 

1963 BURNET, WILLIAM N. K. Fairbank & Co Lard Refiners 36 Whitehall St. 



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176 New York Produce Exchange, 

No. Name. Firm. BvMness. Place of Business. 

1507 BURNETT, BRYAN B B. B. Bumott Storage 14 Front St. 

188 BURNETT, JOEL B J.B.Burnett Flour 129 Broad St. 

1486 BURNS, GEO. H Geo. H. Bums Highwines ..ft3 Wall St. 

176 BURNS, THOS. E Thos. E. Burns. Flour 25 Broadway. 

287 BURRELL, E. J H. Burrell & Sons Butter and Cheese . .Little Falls, N. Y. 

187 BURROWS, C. D., JR C. D Burrows, Jr Provisions 196 Leonard St., Blcn., E. D. 

1431 BURT, AMOS 98 Broad St 

1433 BURT. OHAS. A C.A.Burt Lighterer .* ... 98 Broad St. 

147S BURT, JOHN M John M. Burt Insurance 13 Moore St. 

192 BUSBY, LEONARD J Holt & Co Flour 57 Water St. 

175 BUSCHMAN, HENRY J. F. Whitney & Co Shipping 26^^ Broadway. ■ 

1146 BUSH, RUFUS T Denslow & Bush Petroleum 123 Pearl St. 

1013 BUSHNELL, THOS. C Warden, Frew & Co Petroleum 125 Pearl St. 

1501 BUTLER, CARLOS A Carlos A. Butler Produce Com 330 Greenwich St. 

2107 BUTLER, J. C P. Mina Shipping and Com . .23 William St. 

2116 BUTLER, E. M E. M. Butler Produce Broker 44 E. 26th St. 

2001 BUXTON, C. F J. M. Fiske & Co Flour and Gram ....18 South St. 

1471 BYRNE, WM. V Wright & Byrne Weighers 24 Whitehall St. 

2269 BYRNES, E. G E. G. Byrnes Grocer 79 Catherine St. 

202 CACHARD, EDWARD MuUer & Brown Com. Merchants 42 Exchange Place. 

1469 CADWELL, CHAS. H C. H. Cadwell Provisions 115 Broad St. 

1554 CAHILL, JOHN Cahill & Reid Prov. Inspectors 3 State St. 

1615 CALDWELL, E Blakslee & Caldwell Ship Brokers 62 Beaver St. 

1411 CALDWELL, HENRY A. . . .Henry A Caldwell Produce Broker 39 Pearl St. 

197 CALEB, MADISON M Anchor Line Transportation 148 Pearl St. 

201 C ALEF, HORACE W Horace W. Calef Lard and TaUow .... 39 Broadway. 

1652 CALLAHAN, FRANCIS .... Callahan & Spillane Carmen 34 Water St. 

726 CALL AN AN, LAWR'NCE J.CaUanan & Kemp Grocers 41 Vesey St. 

207 CALLENDER, JAMES Callender & Hendei-son Gold and Foreign Ex . 42 Exchange Place. 

971 CALYOCORESSI, L. M Calvocoressi & Rodocanachi Shipping and Com. . .17 William St. 

2395 CAMERDEN, P. A Geo. G. Barker Com. Merchant 45 Kilby St., Boston. 

198 CAMERDEN, JOHN DoUner, Potter & Co Naval Stores 181 Front St. 

1809 CAMERDEN, JOHN E Jno. E. Camerden Naval Stores 150 Front St. 

209 CAMERON, DONALD Donald Cameron & Co Provisions 116 Broad St. 

2449 CAMP, E. B J. H. Herrick & Co Flour and Grain 1 State St. 

214 CAMPBELL, JAMES ; . .Martin & Campbell Grocers. 47 Vesey St. 

1595 C ARBERRY, J. B J. B. Carberry Grain and Prov*ns. . .71 Broad St. 

204 CARBREY, JOHN L J. L. Carbrey Flour 110 Broad St. 

127 CARDOZE, EMILE Thos. De Rivepa & Co Merohand'e Brokers. 140 Pearl St. 

206 CAREY, STEPHEN W Carey, Yale & Lambert .... Freight Brokers 60 Beaver St. 

1512 CARLILE, JAMES James Carlile .* Flour 528 5th Ave., Brooklyn. 

196 CARLL, SAM'L S Carll & Gardner Flour 62 Broad St. 

2301 CARNEY, JAMES S Geo. S. Hart & Howell .... Butter and Cheese ... 33 Pearl St. 

199 CARPENTER, E. D E. D. Carpenter Grain 39 Pearl St. 

1482 CARPENTER, F. W S. Freeman&Co Flour apd Grain 7 State St. 

2428 CARPENTER, GEO. L Geo. L. Carpenter Flom- 183 2d St., Brooklyn . E. D. 



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Names of Members. 177 

No. Ncmie. . Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

203 CARPENTEE, WM. B. C . . .W. B. C. Cai-penter & Co. .Flour 205 Duane St. 

205 CARR, DELWIN B Walter Carr & Co Butter, Cheese, &c . .37 Pearl St. 

1036 CARR, H. W Chesapeake & Ohio R. R. . Transportation 229 Broadway. 

211 CARR. "WALTER Walter Can- & Co Butter, Cheese, &c . .37 Pearl St. 

194 CARR, WM. R Wm. R. Carr Inspector 31 Peari St. 

2463 CARRmaTON, M. D Carrington & Co Grain Toledo, Ohio. 

210 CARSCALLEN, JOHN D . . .Warner & Carscallen Flour 18 Newark Ave., J. C. 

742 CARTER, ROBE RT A . . : . . Wm. H Power & Co Flour and Grain 1-34 Pearl St. 

208 C ARTWRIGHT, DAVID G..Cartwright & Harrison . . . .Butter and Cheese . . .12 Coenries Slip. 

1813 CASEY, JOHN A Jolm A. Casey Naval :; tores 142 Maiden Lane. 

200 C ASSID Y, JAMES Jas.. Cassidy & Co Grain and Peed 110 Pavonia Ave., J. C. 

1364 CATTERFIELD, WM. P . . . . Erastus Titus Baking 283 Washington St. 

217 CECIL, GEORGE, JR Geo. CecU, Jr Flour and Grain 17 South St. 

218 CHAMBERLAIN, J. A Chamberlain, Roe & Co. . . . Lard Refiners & Prov.25 Pearl St. 

219 CHAMBERLAIN, JOHN C. .Chamberlain, Roe & Co.. . .Lard Refiners & Prov.517 W. 33d St. 

224 CHAMBERLIN, JOHN M. . .HoUister & Chamberlin .... Grain and Feed 90 Broad St. 

1537 CHAMBERS, GEORGE T . . .Chambei-a Bros Lard and TaUow ... .30 Water St. 

2145 CHAMBERS, HENRY F. S.. Chambers Bros Lard and Tallow ... .30 Water St. 

220 CHAMPLIN, JOHN W John W. Champlin Butter and Cheese ... 104 Broad St. 

376 CHAPMAN, J. B . ; J. H. Drake & Co Grain and Provisions.Chicago, 111. 

2081 CHARLES, RICHARD P.. . .R. P. Charles Importer. 13 South Wm. St. 

641 CHASE, GEO. K Geo. K. Chase Grain 12 Bridge St. 

2260 CHASE, H. D Wm. I. Preston Grain 12 Bridge St. 

2020 CHASE, SAM'L R AUerton & Wilson Hog Slaughterers Jersey City, N. J. 

223 CHASE, THEO. B Chamberlin & Chase Flour and Grain 604 Greenwich Si. 

1923 CHATER, R. DUNDAS R. D. Chater Naval Stores 187 Pearl St. 

222 CHATTERLEY, F. P Stevens & Benedict Flour and Provisions .86 Broad St. 

1443 CHERTIZZ A, JOHN Maritime Grain Ceiling Co. . Ship Ceilers 5 South William St. 

1276 CHUBB, PERCY Wreaks & Chubb Insurance 18 William St. 

225 CHUBB, THOMAS C. . . . . . .Wreaks & Chubb Insurance 18 WilUam St. 

243 CHURCH, WM. S E. W. Coleman & Co Floiu- and Grain 10 Water St. 

221 CHURCHMAN, ALFRED. . . Alfred Churchman Provisions 17 Moore St. 

2092 CINNAMON, JOHN John Cinnamon Commission 115 Broad St. 

234 CLAPP, JOHN F Simpson, Clapp & Co Ship Brokers 118 Wall St. 

843 CLAPP, M. G Patterson, Clapp & Co Flour and Gram 316 Washington St. 

237 CLAPP, ROBT. P Patterson, Clapp & Co Flour and Grain 316 Washington St. 

233 CLARK, ADONIR AISI Clark & Alien Grain Foot East 28th St. 

230 CLARK, AMOS R Horton, Clark & Mangels . .Flour 204 West St. 

240 CLARK, AQUILA N E. W. Coleman & Co Flour and Grain . . .10 Water St. 

1104 CLARK, GEO. W W. 0. Labagh Salt 199 Duane St, 

1953 CLARK, JOS. F The Grain Warehousing Co. Grain Storage 5 Moore St. 

228 CLARK, MOSES E Welch, Holme & Clark Tallow and Grease. . .381 West St. • 

242 CLARK, WILLIAM Wm. Clark Mercantile 144 E. 26th St. 

236 CLARK, WM. E Wm. E. Clark & Bro Provisions 148 Elizabeth St. 

1971 CLARK, W. H Wm. E. Clark & Bro Provisions 148 Elizabeth St. 

2327 CLARKSON, FRED^K W. . .F. W. Clarkson & Co Produce Brokers 64 Pearl St. 



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178 New York Produce Exchange. 



No, Name. Firm. Business, PlcLce of Business. 

231 CLARKSON, WM. R W. R. Clarkson & Co Flour 27 Pearl St. 

235 CLAUSSBN, C. A C. A. Claussen Flour, Grain & Seed. 19 South William St. 

226 CLEVELAND, WM. H Wm. H. Cleveland Provisionn 49 First St. 

1840 CLODIUS, AUGUST Meissner, Ackermann & Co .Petroleum 48 Beaver St. 

2024 CLOSE, JOHN E J. E. CloBe Broker 156 Franklin St. 

241 CLOSE, JOHN W Archer & Close Lard Refiners 156 Franklin St. 

232 CLOSIUS, FRANZ Franz Closius Flour 646 Water St. 

263 COBB, CARLOS Deceased. 

1561 COBB, SYLVESTER R Produce Exchange Board. .Grain Measurer 7 State St. 

251 COBB, ^VILLIAM S E. H. Cobb & Son Provisions 499 Washington St. 

2104 COCHRANE, WM Wm. Cochrane Flour 545 Clinton St., Brooklyn. 

1611 COFFIN, ALFRED M A. M. Coffin Beans, Peas, &c 61 Pearl St. 

141 COGGER, B. F Cogger & Pierson Commission Newark, N.J. 

250 COHEN, PHILIP I Moses & Cohen Flour and Provisions.105 Water St. 

1592 COLE, H.E W. A. Cole & Co Oils 41 Broad St. 

5 COLE, RAMAH R. Cole & Son Carmen 13 State St. 

2429 COLE, THOMAS G Thos. G. Cole. Shipping and Com.. 45 Pearl St. 

253 COLE, WILLIAM A W. J. Wilcox & Co Lard Refiners 41 Broad St. 

262 COLEMAN, EDWARDS W. E. W. Coleman & Co Flour and Grain .... 10 Water St. 

252 . COLES, BARAK G Coles Brothers Provisions 100 Forsyth St. 

827 COLES, G. A Union Mills Milling Middletowu. Conn. 

2037 COLGATE, BOWLES Colgate & Co Soap .55 John St. 

249 COLGATE, SAMUEL Colgate & Co Soap 55 John St. 

2334 COLLIN, N PARK Roberts & Collin Floiu- 3 Front St. 

269 COLLINS, C. ELLIOTT .... Mann & Collins Salt 201 Washington St. 

244 COLTON, GEO. W Red Star Lme S. S Shipping 52 Broadway. 

266 COMBS, HENRY. Combs & Halsey Flour and Grain IIT West St. 

254 COMMISKEY, FRANK W.. .Decker & Condict Lard Refiners 56 Greenwich St. 

264 COMSTOCK, ISAAC T I. T. Comstock Produce Com 5 Coenties Slip. 

1704 CONDICT, S. A Decker & Condict Lard Refiners 56 Greenwich St. 

1620 CONKLIN, JOHN S Jno. S. Conklin Lighterer 105 Broad St. 

1591 CONNELL, DANIEL Daniel Connell Flour 23 Water St. 

2272 CONNOLLY, JNO. E Day & Connolly Hay and Grain Foot W. 34th St. 

248 COOK, ALEXANDER Cook & Betts Butter and Cheese . . .89 Broad St. 

2242 COOK, CYRUS A Red Star Line S. S Shipping 52 Broadway. 

246 COOK, GEORGE E Geo. E. Cook & Co Ship Brokers 49 Wall St. 

261 COOK, JOHN F John F. Cook & Co Provisions 115 Broad St. 

882 COOK, LEVI, JR Wm. I. Preston Grain 12 Bridge St. 

247 COOKE, HESHRY C Cooke Bros. & McCord Lard Oil 504 West 38th St. 

2054 COOKSE Y, GEO. B David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov , 20 South St. 

1886 COOLIDGE, W. H Howard & Coolidge Flour 36 Front St 

2146 COONEY, JNO. J Isaac Eppinger Naval Stores 160 Water St. 

1374 COOPER, JOHN A Jno. Lockitt & Co Provisions 184 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

255 COOPER. JOHN B Cooper & Co Provisions 138 Front St. 

268 COPLAND, PETER H P. H. Copland & Co Flour 9 Water St 

2374 COPMANN, J. W Copmann & Bishop Petroleum 5 WilUam St. 



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Names of Members, 179 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1672 CORMAC, P O.E.Richards Shipping and Com. . .39 Broad St. 

1724 CORN, CHABLES Chas. 0. Com Provisions 68 Beaver St 

2221 CORNELL, JAS. H Merchants' Board Grain Weigher 12 Bridge St. 

1655 CORNELL, SAM'L M Merchants' Board Grain Measurer 12 Bridge St. 

2144 CORNISH, W. W. M Gold & Stock Tel. Go Market Reporter . . . .195 Broadway. 

1616 CORSON, ALEX, D A. D. Corson Flour &; Provisions . . 7 Bowling Green. 

749 CORWIN, GEO. W Convin & Co Feed and Grain 133 Roosevelt St. 

1139 CORTIS, R. J White Star Line S. S Shipping 37 Broadway. 

1051 CORTELYOU, T. G. B Hughes, Hickox & Co. . .Flour and Grain 36 Whitehall St. 

1734 COSGROVE, JAMES J. & B. Cosgrove Coopers 2 Burhng SUp. 

762 COTTRELL, E E. CottreU Grain 13 Moore St 

2309 COUILLARD, JOS. H! Goulard,Rouse & Bostwick. Provision Inspectors. 38 WhitehaE St. 

2052 COWING, HERBERT W David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Piov.20 South St. 

256 COWING, JAMES R David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov.2U South St. 

869 COX, JAMES F Higgins «& Cox Insurance 50 Wall St. 

259 COX, JOHN V Babcock & Cox Petroleum 67 Beaver St. 

273 CRAGIN, WM. B Wm. B. Cragin Provisions 25 Pearl St. 

278 CRAMER, JOHN L Cramer & Darby Feed 78 Beach St 

281 CRAMER, LEONARD V . . . . Cramer & Sharp Grain and Feed 68 Vestry St. 

274 CRAMER, PETE R Peter Cramer Flour and Feed New Hampton, N. J. 

271 CRAN E, MUNROE Munroe Crane Hog Slaughterer. . . .Foot West 39th St 

282 CRENSHAW, WM. G., Jr. . .Chas. M. Fry Banker & Com 48 Wall St. 

341 CRICHTON, GEORGE H. . . . George H. Crichton Insurance 17 Moore St. 

1693 CRIST, S. B Republic Fire Ins. Co Insurance 153 Broadway. 

285 CRITTENDEN, D. B D. B. Crittenden Flour and Grain . . . .New Haven, Conn. 

1880 CROC HERON DAVID E . . . N. Y. Pressing Co Lard 374 Washington St 

276 CROHEN, HERMANN H. Crohen Grain 23 South William St 

270 CROMWELL, EDWARD . . . .Edward Cromwell & Son. . .Flour 16 Front St. 

288 CRONELLY, JOS. F J. F. Cronelly Provisions 14 Broadway. 

279 CROSBY, H.B H. B. Crosby & Son FlourandProv Paterson, N. J. 

275 CROSBY, SAMUEL D S. D. Crosby Seeds ^ Broad St 

1755 CROWELL, CALVIN S Calvin S. Crowell & Co ... . Fish 124 N. Delaware Ave., Phila. 

283 CROWELL, JEREMIAH. ... J. CroweU Petroleum 158 Pearl St 

1187 CROWELL, S. K Crowell & Brown Flour and Grain 106 Broad St 

1757 CRUC Y. ADRIAN E. Caylus, Bechet & Co. . . . Shipping and Com . .57 Beaver St. 

2282 CULVER, A. L Culver & Schaefer Flourand Feed 87 1st Ave. 

293 CULVER. TUTTLE Tuttle Culver Provisions 16 Leonard St 

429 CUNNINGHAM, ANDREW .A. Cunningham Flour 28 Moore St 

290 CURRIE, RICHARD P R. P. Ciime Flour and Grain 7 State St 

295 CURTIS, HENRY M Curtis & Weed Petroleum 158 Pearl St 

294 CURTISS, FRANK Griffith, Curtiss & Co Distillers & Rectifiers.l9 Beaver St 

1875 CURTISS, WILLIAM. ....... Da vies. Murphy & Curtiss .Petroleum 319 Walnut St, Phila. 

2476 GUSHING, EDW T Goodwm, Locke & Co . . . .Flour and Grain 13 Moore St. 

1741 CUSHMAN, P. A Comm'rs of Charities Supply Clerk 66 3d Ave. 

79 CUYAS, JOHN Rionda, Benjamin & Co . . . Shipping and Com . . 9 Old Slip. 

306 DAGGETT, TIMOTHY . . . .Thos. Dunham's Nephew & Co. . Shipping 68 South St 



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180 New York Produce Exchange, 

No. Name, Firm. Business. Place of Brisiness. 

305 DALE, JO"HN G Inman Line S. S Shipping 15 Broadway. 

108 DA.LLETT, JOHN Dallett, Boalton & Co ... .Shipping and Com . .135 Pearl St. 

309 DALLY, SAMUEL Samuel Dally Provisions 3 Bowling G-reen. 

1900 DALY, IVIICHAEL J Pottle & Jacoby Flour and Grain 17 WhitehaU St. 

695 DANTELS, C. If Daniels & Sweet Flour and Grain 5 South St. 

1638 DANIELS, HENRY L H. L. Daniels Flour 18 William St. 

301 DANIELS, JAMES C Daniels & Sweet Flour and Gmin 5 South St. 

909 DARE, F. V Armour, Plankinton & Co . Flour, Grain & Prov .129 Broad St. 

297 DARLING, LE ANDER Leander DarUng Flour 45 Front St. 

1625 D ARRELL, GEO. F Darrell & Co Grain and Staves . . .a3 Pearl St. 

1959 DAUSEY, WM G. Vandenhove Tallow 58 Pearl St. 

1622 DAVETT, JAMES James Davett & Co Flour and Grain ... .13 Water St. 

1794 DAVETT, J. TOWER C. B. Leigh Flour 13 Water St. 

304 DAVIES, JOHN T J. T Davies & Co Provisions 33 Broadway. 

1412 DAVIS, CHARLES H Davis & KInne Provisions Norwich, Conn. 

299 DAVIS, EDWARD W Davis & Atwood Hog Slaughterers . . . Foot West 39th St. 

2453 DAVIS, E. W., JR .Davis & Atwood Hog Slaughterers. . .Foot West 39th St. 

2332 DAVIS, FRANK L J . C. Davis & Co Teas and CofEees ... .89 Front St. 

2293 DAVIS, JAMES James Davis Provisions 821 First Ave. 

303 DAVIS, JAMES L James L. Davis & Son Grocers 184 South St. 

298 DAVIS, SILAS Davis & Benson Flour 192 Cherry St. 

2012 DAY, HENRY G Day, Sons & Co Grain Providence, R. I. 

57 DAY, MARTIN N Bostwick & Day Petroleum 127 Pearl St. 

317 DEARBORN, DAVID B D. B. Dearborn Cora. Merchant 64 Beaver St. 

29 DEARING, J. WM J-. Wm. Dearing Flour 14 Front St. 

2068 DE BEDTS, A. EMILE S. W. Rosenfels Shipping and Com . .29 Broad St. 

1993 DE BOW, SAM Sam . De Bow & Hau?hton . Freight Brokere 31 Broodway. 

767 DECKER, A. J Decker & Co Milling 549 W. 34th St. 

2065 DECKER, J. MILNOR Decker & Condict.. Lard Refiners 66 Greenwich St. 

319 DECKER, SIMON C Deceased. 

2277 DE JONGE, AUGUST Board Petroleum Weighers , Petroleum 18 William St. 

315 DEL CALVO, JOAQUIN. . . .Fernandez & Calvo. . . ^. . . . Com. Merchants ... .120 Front St. 

752 DELANO, S. C. L F. L. B. Mayhew & Co ... .Oil and Candles 140 Front St. 

2236 DE LEON, FRANK H F. H. De Leon Merchandise Broker.23 William St. 

2077 DE LONG, JULIUS Julius De Long Brokerage 159 Front St. 

1743 DE LONG, W. A Wm. Jex & Co Shipping and Com . .134 Water St. 

1442 DEM ARTIN t, FR.^NCIS .... Maritime Grain Ceiling Co. .Ship Ceilers 5 South Wm. St. 

1455 DENNET r, OREN Knickerbocker Ice Co Ice 432 Canal St. 

82:3 DENN^IS, WM. E Murray & Dennis Flour and Feed 274 Cherry St. 

1776 DENSMOllE, FRED Clint Roudeba:,h Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

2258 DENTZ, LEONARD Leonard Dentz Grain Com 9 South William St. 

2000 DENTON, D. H D. H. Denton & Co Commission Chicago, lU. 

2017 DEVERALL, WM. M Wm. 11. Power & Co Flour and Grain .... 134 Pearl St. 

313 DEWELL, JAMES D James D. Dewell Grocer New Haven, Ct. P.O. Box906. 

320 DE WOLF, DAVID R 103 Broad St. 

278 DEYO, PHILIP A PhUip A. Deyo & Son Flour, Feed & Grain. Yonkers, N. Y. 



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Names of Members, 181 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1564 DILL, HEBMANN. Dill & Radmann Ship Brokers 5 William St. 

291 DILLON, HENRY A. Cunningham Flom- 28 Moore St. 

322 DIMON, CHARLES Chas. Dimon Shipping and Com . .115 Liberty St. 

1656 DIMOND, WM. H Dimond & Green Carmen&Lighterers..99 Broad St. 

321 DISTURNELL, CHAS B. N. Fox & Co Grain 4 Bow Ung Green. 

2257 DIXON, DANIEL McD D. MoD. DLxon Grain 

1694 DODDS, E. H Chas. Whiter Co Hog Slaughterers . . . .Foot West 40th St. 

1965 DOLLARD, JOHN P. DoUard Screenings 30 and 32 Moore St. 

324 DOLLARD, PATRICK P. Dollard Screenings 30 and 32 Moore St. 

885 DOLLNER, HAROLD Dolhier, Potter & Co Naval Stores 181 Front St. 

308 DOLTON, WM Wm. Dolton & Co Grocers Trenton, N. J. 

89 DONALD, JAMES James Donald & Co Petroleum 124 Maiden Lane. 

1477 DONALD, THOMAS W. J. Donald & Co Stevedores 157 South St. 

333 DONOHUE, JHCHAEL, Jr .M. Donohue & Co Fat Rendering 613 West 38th St. 

1190 DONNER, A Gossler & Co Commission 124 Pearl St. 

2180 DOTY, S. W S. W. Doty Brokerage 38 Pearl St. 

327 DORAN, JAMES James Doran Export 17 Broadway. 

326 DOUGHERTY, EDWD. H. . .E. H. Dougherty Provisions 3 Front St. 

1010 DOUGHERTY, JOHN John Dougherty Lard 156 Franklin St. 

2435 DOUGBCBRTY, THOS Association Inspection Flour Inspector 138 Broad St. 

1336 DOUGLAS, G. B Douglas & Zinn Produce Com 86 Warren St. 

1641 DOUGLAS, JOHN G J. H. Hebert & Co Flour and Grain 72 Broad St. 

334 DOUGLASS, JOHN P 89 Broad St. 

2389 DOUGLASS, ROBT. J Weeks, Douglass & Co Flour 4 State St. 

329 DOWDEN, CHA|ILES H . . . . Dowden &, Bro Flour 223 Market St.. Newark. 

332 DO WLING, JAMES W. W. Bruce &l Go Flour and Grain 11 Whitehall St. 

921 DOWNING, A. B Paterson, Downing & Co . . . Naval Stores 154 Front St. 

323 DO WS, DAVID David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov . 20 South St. 

2422 DOWS, DAVID, jR David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov . 20 South St. 

1544 DOYLE, JAMES James Doyle Flour 28^ Front St. 

339 DRAJtE, JAMES H J. H. Drake & Co Grain & Provisions . . Chicago, 111. 

1371 DRAPER, J. K C. F. Tietjen Lard Refiner & Prov .523 West 32d St. 

340 DREW, JAMES James Drew Provisions 14 Front St. 

2354 DROGE, WM. E H. C. FLsher Fish 42 Water St. 

1664 DRU YFF, WILLIAM Wm. Druyffi Provisions 17 Moore St. 

345 DUFOURCQ, LEONCE F . . . C. Ludmann & Co Com. Merchants ... .4 South WiUiam St. 

2240 DUER, J. B Whittemore & Co Gold &. Ex. Bri)kge. .37 Exchange PI. 

2:367 DUNKERLEY, W. A Dunkerley, Carter & Co . . . Provisions 3 Bowlmg Green. 

344 . DUNN, SAMUEL P Sutphen & Dunn Flour and Grain 53 WhitehaU St. 

2053 DUNNE, WM. H David Dow.s & Co Flour, Grain & Prov . 20 South St. 

2064 DURYEA, C. H H. E. Hicks & Co Flour and Grain .... 15 Whitehall St. 

346 DURYEA, WILLIAM Glen Cove Starch Co Starch 29 Park Place. 

2456 DUSENBERRY, E E. R. & R. B. Livermore . . Flour & Grain 119 Broad St. 

1689 DUSENBERRY, G. N L. H. Schoonmaker Provisions Ill Broad St. 

343 DUSENBER Y, HENRY Dusenbery Bros Grain and Feed 105 West St. 

1849 DUSENBERY, JOS. W Dusenbery Bros Grain and Feed 105 West St. 



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182 New York Produce Exchange, 

No. Name, , Firm, Btisiness. Place of Buxiv ess. 

1938 DUSENBERY, JOS. W., jR.Dusenbery Bros Grain and Feed 105 West St. 

2408 DUVAL, H. R Great Western Despatch . .R. R. Freight 317 Broadway. 

347 DTJ VIVIER, EDWARD , . . . Du Vi vier & Co Wines and Liquors . . 9 Whitehall St. 

2090 DU TIVIER, 0. A Du Vivier & Co Wines and Liquors . . 9 WhitehaU St. 

1764 DWIGHT, FRED. A Dwight & Piatt Shipping 28 South St. 

1984 DYER, CALEB A ^ . Wm. J. Bower & Co Merch'dise Brokers .55 WiUiam St. 

2156 FAMES, E. W E. W. Fames Comuiission 20 Central Wharf, Buffalo. 

1966 EASSIE, PETER B Plumer & Co Flour 129 Broad St. 

1497 EASTMAN, T. C T.C.Eastman Beef Shipper Foot 60 th St., N. R. 

905 EBLING, PHILIP Ph. & W. Ebling Brewers Morrisania, N. Y. 

2458 ECKMEYER, GUSTAV Eckmeyer & Co Gen. Commission . . .48 Broad St. 

351 EDEN, DEDERICK H Eden, Figge & Bro Provisions 285 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. 

1388 EDMISTON, JAMES James Edmiston Freight Broker 52 Exchange Place. 

2441 EDSON, ALEX Franklin Edson & Co Grain 23 Whitehall St. 

349 EDSON, FRANKLIN Frankhn Edson & Co Grain 23 WhitehaU St. 

350 EDSON, STARKS Fiunklin Edson & Co. ... Grain 23 WhitehaU St. 

2076 EDWARDS, CHAS. H Howland & AspinwaU Shipping 54 South St. 

353 ED YE, HENRY W. O Punch, Edye & Co Ship Brokers 27 South William St. 

354 EGE, HORATIO N Ege & Otis Produce 168 W. Washmgton Market. 

2154 EGE, JACOB W Ege & Otis Produce 168 W. Washington Market. 

2165 EICHLER, JOHN John Eichler Brewer 3d Ave. and 16lH;h St. 

355 EISING, EMANUEL E. Eising & Co Rectifiers 49 Front St. . 

361 ELDRIDGE, DAN'L A Geo. V. Hecker & Co Flour MUlers 201 Cheiry St. 

2399 ELIAS, HENRY EUas & Betz Brewers 403 E. 54th St. 

2025 E LLIM ANN, H. B Henry Bowring Freight Broker 142 Pearl St. 

356 ELLIOT, EDWARD C Goodeve Si ElUot Flour and Grain 45 Broadway. 

357 ELLIOTT, ANDREW W.. ..A. W. EUiott Flour 38 WhitehaU St. 

362 ELLIS, CHAS. W C. W. EUis & Co Bankers 40 Broad St. 

1513 ELLIS, THOMAS Thomas EUis Flour 15 Front St. 

1402 ELLIS,WM. A Wm. A Ellis Insurance 51 WaU St. 

1514 ELLSWORTH, JOS. W Jos. W. Ellsworth Gram and Feed 12 Bridge St. 

1926 ELMORE, C. H. H. S. Elmore Produce Com 17 Moore St. 

2093 ELMORE, H. S H. S Elmore Produce Com 17 Moore St. 

359 ELWELL, CHAS. F J. W. EhveU & Co Ship Brokers 57 South St. 

358 ELWELL, JAMES W J. W. ElweU & Co Ship Brokers 57 South St. 

360 ELWELL, JOHN P John P. ElweU Freight Broker 57 South St. 

545 ELY, HENRY C Dudley P. Ely's Nephews . . Recti fiers 143 Front St. 

2152 ELY, JOHN R Bayport, L. I. 

1747 EMANUEL, JOHN H Baumann & Co Provisions, &c 131 Pearl St. 

1532 EMERSON, CH AS. F C. F. Emerson & Co Provisions 31 Water St. 

1531 EMERSON, E DWARD Edw'd Emerson Provi.sions 31 Water St. 

2460 EMERSON, H. D H. D. Emerson ....Provisions 31 Water St. 

2329 EMERSON, R. W R. W. Emerson Provisions 31 Water St. 

730 EMERSON, WM. B Babcock & Cox Petroleum 67 Beaver St. 

1827 EMMENS, GEO. W Manhattan Board Grain Measurer 42 WhitehaU St. 

1550 EMMENS, JAMES WilUam R. Carr Weigher and Meas'r . .31 Pearl St. 



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Names of Members, 183 

No, Name. Firm. Bvsiness. Place of Business. 

2014 ENGLER, AD Kremelberg & Co Com. Merchants 160 Pearl St. 

364 ENGS, RUSSELL L Walker Bros. & Wy Id Flour and Grain ..... 45 Exchange Place. 

2232 ENNIS, A. J J. C. Seager Freight Broker 17 WiUiam St. 

2388 ENOS, H. K H. K. Enos Stock Brokerage 52 Broadway. 

2455 EPPI NGER, ISAAC Isaac Eppinger Naval Stores 160 Water St. 

312 ESCORIAZA, L. DB J. M. & L. De Escoriaza. , . Commission 35 Broadway. 

1623 EVANS, GEO. P McKillop& Sprague Co.. ..Comm'l Agency. ...109 Worth S:. 

1845 EVANS, JAMES Thomas & Benham Flour, Butter and Cheese. .108 Broad St. 

1132 EVANS, JOHN H Wmg & Evans Chemicals 92 William St 

371 FALVEY, JEROME T J. T. Falvey Flonr 62 Pearl St. 

1629 FARGO, ELISHA W E. W. Fargo Grain 38 Pearl St. 

552 FARGUSSON, OWEN E. B. Stevens & Co Grain Chicago, 111. 

2431 FARNUM, A. H Baldwin, Farnum & Shapleigh. . .Provisions Boston, Mass. 

629 FARRELL, M. J Cecil Rowson Prov. and Cheese. . 35 Broadway. 

1193 FATMAN, SOLOMON J Fatman & Co Export Broad St., cor Beaver. 

1709 FAUBEL, FRED'CK, Jr. . . . Roux & Faubel Beans and Peas 75 Pearl St. 

881 FAVILL, JOSIAH M J. M. Favill Transportation 1 State St. 

2159 FAY, PATRICK H Fay Brothers Soap 60 Broad St. 

1955 FAYE, JAS. J Jas. J. Faye Flour and Grain 10 Front St. 

1643 FEIGELSTOCK, A A. Feigelstock Grain, Malt, &c 12 Bridge St. 

538 FELLOWS, JAMES FeUows & Beyer Gram and Feed Ft. Taylor St. Br'klyn, E. D. 

558 FELTER, GARRET Garret Falter Produce Broker 99 Park Piaice. 

1163 FBLTMANN, H R. & C. Degener Commission 50 WaU St. 

1658 FENBY, JOSEPH B Brown, Rice & Quinby Flour and Gram ... 27 Pearl St. 

2345 FENTON, S., JR New York Oil Co OU 163 Maiden Lane. 

1415 FERGUSON, JOHN John Ferguson Flour & Grain 102 Broad St. 

377 FERGUSON, WILLIAM E . . International Ceiling Co . . . Ship Ceiling 23 South WiUiam St. 

374 FERRIS, EDWIN Edwin Ferris & Co Salt 185 Washington St. 

373 FERRIS, FRANK A F. A. Ferris & Co Provisions 264 Mott St. 

380 FERRIS, GEORGE B Greo. B. Ferris & Co Genl Prod. Mers 58 Pearl St. 

2402 FERRIS, JAMES L W. S. Miller & Co Grain 51 Broad St. 

1526 FERRIS, JOHN J John J. Ferris Grain 5 South St. 

375 FERRIS, SAMUEL S Edwin Ferris & Co Salt 185 Washington St. 

2157 FERRIS, WM. LEE Geo. B. Fenis & Co Genl Prod. Mer.s. . 58 Peari St. 

381 FERRY, EBENEZER L E. L. Feriy Hops and Malt 3 Water St. 

379 FEURBACH, JOHN Fem-bach Bros Provisions 271 Seventh Avenue. 

2191 FIELD, E. M Tefft, Truesdell & Field . . . Flour and Grain Ill Broad St. 

2365 FIELD, J. B J. P. & G. C. Robinson ... Storage, &c 14 Coenties Slip. 

2284 FIERZ, CHARLES A Wakeman & Fierz Paraffine, Wax & Candles . 143 Front St. 

387 FIGGE, CHARLES Eden, Figge & Bro Provisions 287 Atlantic St., B'lyn. 

1795 FIGGE, FREDERICK Eden, Figge & Bro Provisions 287 Atiantic St.. B'lyn. 

385 FINCH, EDWARD L L. R Fmch & Sons Flour and Grain 11 State St. 

1600 FINCH, ELLIS C Ellis C. Finch Carman 79 Broad St. 

386 FINCH, HENRY T L. R. Finch & Sons Flour and Grain 11 State St. 

384 PINCH, LUCIUS R L. R. Finch & Sons Flour and Grain 11 State St. 

388 FINCH, WELLS Wells Finch Flour 129Broad St. 



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184 New York Produce Exchange. 

^^- Name. Firm. Business. Place of Bunness. 

388 FINCK, JOHN H Finck & Son Flour and Feed 600 11th Ave. 

390 FINK, JOHN ,. ... John Fink & Son Provisions 334 W. 39th St. 

393 FISH, A. W A. W. Fish Grain 38 WhitehaU St 

1659 FISH, EBER ^ PearsaU Bros. & Fish Flour and Grain 32 Front St. 

1174 FISH, HENRY H Intemational ElevatingAss. Grain Elevating 31 Pearl St. 

1960 FISH, ROBERT L Carey, Yale & Lambert. . .Freight Brokers 60 Beaver St. 

316 FISH, ROSWELL P C. W. DeBride Hay and Grain 312 W. 16th St. 

1271 FISHER, F. A F. A. Fisher .Provisions 114 Broad St. 

389 FISHER, HERMANN C H. C. Fisher Fish 42 Water St. 

392 FISKE, ARTHUR D J. M . Fiske & Co Flour and Grain ... .18 South St. 

391 FISKE, JOSIAH M J. M. Fiske & Co Flour and Grain 18 Sduth St. 

415 FITZSIMONS, J. W Jed Frye & Co Lumber, Fish & Oil. 47 Water St. 

1906 FLAGG, NEWTON Newton Flagg Grain 38 Whitehall St. 

2.338 FLAGLER, H. M Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St. 

1871 FLAMMER, W. G Wm . G. Flammer Provisions 573 & 575 HudFon St. 

396 FLANAGAN, JAMES Flanagan & WaUace Brewers 450 W. 26th St. 

397 FLEEMAN, WM. H W. H. Fleeman Flour 7 & 9 Water St. 

115 FLEISCHMANN, MAX Gaff, Fleischmann & Co . . . Distillers 39 Broad St. 

1817 FLEMING, HENRY Sone & Fleming Mfg Co. . . .Petroleum 126 Pearl St. 

ia36 FLEMING, WALTER Sone & Fleming Mfg Co. . . Petroleum 126 Pearl St. 

2462 FLETCHER, WM. E N. Y. Produce Exchange . .Committee Clerk ... .37 WhitehaU St. 

467 FLINT, CHARLES R Wm. R. Grace & Co Shipping and Com . . 66 Pine St. 

395 FLINT, JAMES L Flint& Co Merchants 33 Broadway. 

394 FLOYD, BENJ. W B.W.Floyd Provisions 33 Front St. 

1496 FLOYD, EDWIN Edwin Floyd Butter and Cheese ... 102 Broad St. 

550 FOLLETT, JOS. W Jos. W. FoUett Provisions 38 Whitehall St. 

406 FOLSOM, MANCELI A M. Folsom Butter and Cheese. . . 70 WaiTen St. 

409 FOOTE, WARREN Warren Foote & Son Flour 9 South St. 

502 FORCE, SILAS C I. & C. Moore & Co Oil Cake, Grain, &c . .159 Front St. 

2046 FORD, SAMUEL I Whitney & Twombly j ^- Y- C,-^* H^. R. R. 1 43 Whitehall St. 

16:^0 FORD, SAMUEL R Samuel R. Ford Grain 39 Pearl St. 

410 FORD, THOMAS J Thomas J. Ford Flour 33 Fulton St. , Newark. 

879 FORTMANN. F Funeh, Edye & Co Ship Brokers 27 South William St. 

407 FOSTER, CHAS. G Ward & Foster Provisions 42 Pearl St. 

412 FOSTER, DANIEL Deceased. 

2002 FOSTER, J. H I. H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain. ... 5 State St. 

1397 FOSTER, WM. M William M. Foster Provisions 27 Front St. 

401 FOSTER, WM. R Wm. R. Foster & Co Grocers 25 Canal St. 

400 FOWLER, ANDERSON Fowler Brothers Provisions 17 Broadway. 

2363 FOWLER, J. S J. S. Fowler Grain 38 Pearl St. 

402 FOX. BALDWINN B. N. Fox & Co Grain 4 Bowling Green. 

411 FOX, S. K Lane & Son Grain 90 Broad St. 

1420 FOX, SETH W J. J. Faye Flour 10 Front St. 

403 FOX, WILLIAM H Wm. H. Fox & Son Com. Merchant 20 Piatt St. 

422 FRAME, CHAS. P Frame & Hare Insurance 206 Broadway. 

420 FRANGICLYN, CHAS. G. .. .Gunard Line Shipping 4 Bowling Green. 



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Names qf Members, 185 



No. Name. Firm. Bttsiness. Place of Busineti. 

1551 FRA.NK:, EMIL H Irving, Prank & Dubois. . .Insurance 47 William St. 

1045 FRANKE, JOHAN Burlage & Co Shipping and Com. . . 45 Exchange PI. 

2148 FRANKE, L L. Franke Hops and Malt 104 Broad St. 

1916 FRANICFELD, EMAJS^UEL. .Emanuel Frankfeld Provisions 251 Third Ave. 

1356 FREDERICK, NELSON .... Young & Frederick Flour and Feed 117 West St. 

414 FREEMAN, ALFRED A Chas. Haight & Co Flour and Grain 27 Pearl St. 

2158 FREEMAN, A. IRVING .... Chas. Haight & Co Flour and Grain 27 Pearl St. 

2383 FREEMAN, CHAS. B Chas. Haight & Co Flour and Grain 27 Pearl St. 

1140 FREEMAN, NORMAN Norman Freeman Exchange Broker .... 37 Pine St. 

421 FREEMAN, SAMUEL S. Freeman & Co .Flour and Grain 7 State St. 

1578 FREESE, ISAAC Isaac Freese Provisions Foot 34th St., N. R. 

425 FREUDENBERG, ED WD . Edward Freudenberg Provisions 1&3 Rivington St. 

418 FROST, ISAAC T I. T. & J. G. Frost & Co. . .Flom- 234 Front St. 

419 FROST, ISAAC T., JR I. T. & J. G. Frost & Co. . .Flour 234 Front St. 

2446 FULLER, J. M J. M. Fuller Commission 12 Bridge St.- 

1899 PULLER, LOUIS C Vanderveer & Holmes Biscuit Co. Crackers 56 Vesey St. 

428 FU LLER, WM. H Deceased. 

430 FUNCH, CHRISTIAN P. . . .Punch, Edye & Co Ship Brokers 27 South Wm. St. 

438 GAGE. CHAS. H Chas. H. Gage & Co Transportation 105 Broad St. 

1874 GAGE, ROYAL W Royal W. Gage Provisions 163 7th St.,Brooklyn, E. D. 

1009 GAGNEUX, A C. Heydecker Shipping and Com. . 15 South WilKam St. 

1418 GALACAR, CHAS. E National Insurance Co Insurance 52 Wall St. 

434 GAMBLE, JOHN John Gamble Shipping 174 Front St. 

335 GAMBRILL, L Mainland & Gambrill Flour and Meal 45 Front St. 

440 GANS, ARTHUR Gans Brothers Petroleum 52 Exchange Place. 

441 G ANS, FREDERICK A Gans Brothers Petroleum 52 Exchange Place. 

503 GARDNER, AUGUSTUS V . Caril & Gardner Flour 62 Broad St. 

435 GARRISON, WM. R Wm. R. Garrison Shipping 5 Bowling Green. 

1808 GARTH, DAVID J D. J. Garth, Son&Co Tobacco 44 Broad St. 

437 GASPER, MARCUS C Howland & AspinwaU Shipping 54 South St. 

436 G ASTEN, ROBERT Holbrook Manuf actur'g Co . Soaps 44 West Broadway. 

4':J3 GATJE, JOHN C. C J, C. C. Gatje Provisions 145 2d St., Brooklyn, E. D. 

518 GAYNOR, JOHN John Gaynor Grocer 554 Grand St. 

1057 GENNERICH, H. W Gennerich & Hillsmann .... Flour and Grain 254 Washington St. 

442 GEORGIADES, CHRIS. D . . C. D. Georgiades & Co Ship Brokers 19 Cotton Exchange. 

736 GERDES, MARTIN Gerdes & Mangels Flour and Peed 308 Washington St. 

1492 GERHARD, PAUL P Gerhard & Brewer Ship Brokers 36 Beaver St. 

1582 GERRISH, W. L Dun, Barlow & Co Mercantile Agency . . 335 Broadway. " 

1719 GIBBS, ALBERT B A. B. Gibbs & Co Linseed Oil 172 Peari St. 

446 GIBBS, BTJSHROD W Metcalf & Gibbs Hog Slaughterers Foot West 41st St. 

1510 GEES, JACOB Lang & Robinson Flour 1 Front St. 

61 GIFFORD, J. P. S J. P. S. Gifford Commission 102 Broad St. 

450 GILBERTSON, JOHN John Gilbertson Flour 57 Front St. 

447 GILDEMEISTER, AUG Simmonds & Gildemeister. Shipping and Com. . . 53 Beaver St. 

451 GILL, HENRYL Henry L. GiU Flour and Meal 45 Front St. • 

2378 GILL,",T. LEE Brown, Rice & Qoinby . . . .Flour and Grain 27 Pearl St. 

13 



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186 New York Produce ExcMnge^ 

No. Name. Firm. Busirmss. Place of Business. 

449 GILLESPIE, JOHN M Gillespie & AUen Insurance 63 Beaver St. 

448 GILLETT, FRAN'CIS M . . . .M. H. Gillett & Co Hog Slaughterers . . . Communipaw, N. J. 

445 GILLETT, JEROME D . . . .M. H. Gillett & Co Hog Slaughterers . . .Communipaw, N. J. 

1970 GILLETT, MORILLO H M. H. GiUett & Co Hog Slaughterers . . .Communipaw, N. J, 

1465 GILLETTE, CHAS. F Chas. F. Gillette DistiUed Spirits 43 Beaver St. 

1856 GILLIG, JNO. GEO Jessup & Gillig Miiltsters ^35 East 45th St. 

2247 GITJNIO, PETER G Ship Broker Genoa, Italy. 

1634 GLEDHILL, JOHN j ^^et^tTrMlcTesS! Eng^°' [ Provisions 14 Broadway. 

453 - GLIMM, CHRISTIAN GUmm, Korner & Co Grocers 157 Park Place. 

536 GLOVER, ALEXANDER. . . . Henderson Bros Shipping 7 BowUng Green. 

2188 GODILLOT, ALEXIS H.K. & F.B. Thurber & Co. Wholesale Grocers . ..W.Bdwy,Reade ^Hudson Sts 

1559 GODWIN, JOSEPH Henry Welsh Grocer 347 Washington St. 

1837 GOEPEL, ADOLPH Goepel & Trube Commission 64 Beaver St. 

2130 GOGGIN, JOHN John Goggin Provisions 82 Broad St. 

456 GOING, CHARLES H Chas. H. Going Grain 45 Broadway. 

464 GOLDSMITH, GEO. S Goldsmith Bros Flour and Grain 5 James Shp. 

455 GOODEVE, JAMES Goodeve & Elliot Flour and Grain 45 Broadway. 

1523 GOODHUE, SAML Saml. Goodhue ...Flour 13 Water St. 

656 GOODRICH, CH AS. E Horton & Goodrich Flour, Grain, &c 66 Dey St. 

461 GOODWIN, CHAS. T Chas. T. Goodwin & Sons . . Crackers 228 Front St. 

1590 GOODWIN, CHAS. T., Jr. . .Chas. T. Goodwin & Sons. .Crackers 228 Front St. 

462 GOODWIN, EBE N W Chas. T. Goodwin & Sons . . Crackers 228 Front St. 

1176 GORHAM, HENRY. . .'. Lawrence & Co Storage 3 Stone St. 

460 GORMAN, JOHN Gorman & Co ... , Provisions 150 Columbia St., Brooklyn. 

465 GOSSLER, GUST G. Amsinck & Co Importing and Com. .150 Pearl St. 

2328 GOTTSCHAK, FELIX Wm. Braun Grain, Petroleum, &C.48 Broad St. 

458 GOULARD, THOMAS Goulard,Rouse & Bost wick. Pro vision Inspectors. 36 Whitehall St. 

472 GR AHLFS, HERMAN Herman Grahlf s Provisions 59 Prospect St. , Brooklyn. 

1661 GRAINGER, JOHN E. I . . . . Grainger & Welman Grain and Provis'ns . 48 Broad St. 

1662 GRANT, EDWARD B Edwd. B. Grant Provisions 1 Water St. 

2459 GRANT, S. HASTINGS JST. Y. Produce Exchange. . Superintendent 37 Whitehall St. 

1800 GRAPEL, J. C J. C. Grapel Petroleum Bbls 11 South Wm. St. 

475 GRAVES, EDWIN A Edwin A. Graves Cotton 6 Old Slip. 

469 GRAY. ADAM R A. R. Gray & Co Transportation 110 Broad St. 

1635 GRAY, MORGAN Morgan Gray Flour 35 Front St. 

473 GRAY, WM. M E. W. Coleman & Co Flour and Grain 10 Water St. 

816 GREEN, GEORGE B Geo. B. Green Flour and Meal ... .12 Whitehall St. 

1522 GREENE, JAMES James Greene Grain 2 Broadway. 

417 GREENVAULT, H. V H. V. Greenvault Grain Broker 312 W. 16th St. 

1862 GREGORY, GEO. F W. & G. F. Gregory Petroleum 126 Maiden Lane. 

2252 GREGORY, WILLARD W. & G. F. Gregory Petroleum 126 Maiden Lane. 

468 GRIEVES, JOHN John Grieves Petroleum 3 Hanover St. 

1945 GRIFFEN, CHARLES S. Valentir^e's Sons Flour 169 Cherry St. 

1663 GRIFFIN, CHAS. R C. R. Griffin !.. Flour 142 Pearl St. 

2163 GRIFFITH, JOHN Griffith, Cm tiss & Co DistiUers & Rectifiers . 19 Beaver St. 

2161 GRIFFITH, NICHS. J John Orpe Cheese 3 Broadway. 



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Names of Members. 187 

iVo. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

470 GRIGGS, DAVID A Plumer & Co Flour 129 Broad St. 

2410 GRIGGS, J. B 0. Stahlnecker & Son Hog Slaughterers . . . Foot West 41st St. 

474 GRIGGS, JAS. M Griggs & Co Grain and Feed 21 Jackson St. 

1488 GROH, MATTHIAS Matthias Groh Provisions 80 Beaver St. 

1452 GROTE, FRED. R F. R. Grote Grain 64BeaverSt. 

1841 GROUT, THOS. J Old Board Measurers Grain Measurer 3 Water St. 

471 GRUPE, WILLIAM Wm. Grupe Lard Refiner 428 Washington St. 

2165 GRUPE, WTLLIAM, Jr. . . . William Grupe Lard Refiner 428 Wuphington St. 

1588 GUINN, GEO. H Carey, Yale & Lambert .... Freight Brokers 60 Beaver St. 

2366 GURNET, RICHARD Ruger Bros. & Co Ship Brokers 99 Pearl St. 

2102 GUTTZEIT, PAUL Hermann Brock. Commission Mercht . 51 New St. 

476 GUTIERREZ, ENRIQUE. . . . E. Gutierrez Shipping and Com . . 1 81 Pearl St. 

478 GWATHMEY, ARCHIE B. .Gwathmey & Co Grain & Provisions. .122 Pearl St. 

51 GWYER, J. C Butchers' Hide & Melting Ass'n . .Hides and Tallow Foot E. 45th St. 

1483 HADDOCK, ARBA R Haddock & Langdon Brewers 408 East 14th St. 

1082 HAG AN, HENRY W Walter J. Smith Flour and Gram 52 Exchange PI. 

479 H AIGHT, CHARLES ....... Chas. Haight & Co Flour and Gram 27 Pearl St. 

483 HAINES, JOB Job Haines Flour and Gram Newark, N. J. 

1981 HALE, EDGAR F 27 Jay St. 

1502 HALL, CHA.S. G Chas. G. Hall Provisions 86 Broad St. 

2026 HALL, GEORGE O George O. Hall Produce Broker 180 West St. 

439 HALL, WILLI A^VI E Frederick H. Wills Insurance 72 Beaver St. 

2062 HALL ADA Y, MARCUS R . .M. R. Halladay & Co Flour and Grain 129 Broad St. . 

1536 HALLADAY, S M. R. Halladay & Co .... .Flour and Grain 129 Broad St. 

1021 H ALLOCK, CHAS. H C. H. Hallock Commission 7 Water St. 

517 HALPIN, Z ACHARIAH J . . Halpm & Judge Naval Stores 66 Beaver St. 

2409 HALSEY, E. C Sawyer, Wallace & Co Commission Merchts.47 Broad St. 

693 HALSTED, N. 27 Pearl St. 

1708 HALSTEAD, PEARSON. . . .Halstead & Co Provisions 13 Moore St. 

493 HALSTEAD, PEARSON S.. .Halstead & Co Provisions 13 Moore St. 

2127 HALSTEAD, T. J Halstead & Co Provisions 13 Moore St. 

2472 HALSTED, E. S Centennial Bag Co Bagging 69 Pearl St. 

2331 HALTERMANN, HENRY. . H. Haltermann Petroleum Inspector . 18 William St. 

480 HAMBLIN, ANDREW H. . . . International CeiUng Co. . . . Ship CeiUng 23 South Wm. St. 

1060 HAMEL, JAMES E Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers 3 William St. 

504 HAMILTON, A. J Butchers' Hide & Melting Asso. . . Hides and Tallow. . .Foot East 45th St. 

1011 HAMILTON, CHARLES .... Geo. Oliver & Co Produce 27 W. Washmgton Market. 

325 HAMILTON, WM E. H. Dougherty Provisions •... .3 Front St. 

1381 HAMMICK, WM 52 WaU St. 

514 HAMMOND, EDWIN R G. V. Hecker & Co Feed 267 Cherry St. 

1895 HANAUER, MOSES G Mayer Bros. & Co Export 79 WaU St. 

506 HANCOCK, CHAUNCEY B.C. B. Hancock Produce Com 115 Broad St. 

405 HANNON, T.J T. J. Hannon Provisions 426 Washington Market. 

8 BARBERS, C ..J. T. Davies & Co Provisions 31 Broadway. 

1589 HARDY, R. B The J. M. Bradstreet & Son Co.. . Com»l Reporting ... 279 Broadway. 

1586 HARDY, WTLLIAM WiUiamHardy Weigher 51 Pearl St. 



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188 New York Produce Mcchange. 

No. Name. Firm. Busineis. Place of Btmness. 

1883 HARKNESS, N. W N. W. Harkness Petroleum 302 Walnut St., Phila. 

1645 HARLOW, F. A Harlow, Kirkeby & Co MiUers 85 Water St., Brooklyn. 

498 HAEMAN, HENRY Henry Hannan • . . Provisions 285 Broadway, B^yn, E. D. 

489 HARMAN, JACOB Andrew Harman Provisions 285 BVay, Brook! jti, E. D. 

511 HARRIOT, E. A Watren Harriot & Son Flour .124 Charles St. 

481 ELARRIS, ARCHIBALD . . . .Archibald Harris Shipping and Com . .13 Moore St. 

583 HARRIS, C. J E. Tre^dwelts Son Crackers .265 Water St. 

1826 HARRIS, T. R Thos. R. Harris Crackers 110 Beekman St. 

1890 HARRIS, THOMPSOX S . . . . Hyatt & Mount Flour and Grain 180 West St. 

490 HARRIS, WM. H Wm. H. Harris & Co Grain 114 Broad St. 

2369 HARRISON, JOHN Harrison & Brother Grocers 585 Wash. Ave., Brooklyn. 

495 HARRISON, STEPHEN D . . JeweU, Harrison & Co Lard Refiners 27 Water St. 

496 HARRISON, THOMAS D . . . . JeweU, Harrison & Co Lard Refiners 27 Water St. 

1925 HARRISON, TOSSWELL E.Edward Harrison's Sons. .. Petroleum Inspects. 4 Hanover St. 

484 HARRISON, WM. H Harrison & Brother Grocers 585 Washington Ave. , B'kl'n . 

500 HART, BENJ. P Hart & Brother Produce 191 Chambers St. 

1877 HART, FREDERICK A Geo. S. Hart & HoweU Butter and Cheese. . . 35 Pearl St. 

515 HART, GEORGE S Geo. S. Hart & HoweU . . . .Butter and Cheese. . . 35 Pearl St. 

494 HART, THOMAS T. Hart Fish , . . . .321 Washmgton St. 

2079 HARTSHORNE, WM. S Geo. A. Boyce & Co Butter and Cheese. . . 84 Broad St. 

1668 HASBROUCK, J. C J. C. Hasbrouck & Co Grain 131 st St. and 12th Ave. 

1814 HASTINGS, GEORGE D. . , Milo H. Parsons & Co OU and Commission. . 141 Maiden Lane. 

1175 HASTINGS, F. S Fabbri & Chauncey Shipping & Com .... 48 South St. 

2416 HATCH, ALBERT H Hatch, Nieland & Co Provisions 400 Greenwich St. 

2319 HATTON, EDWARD Hatton. Watson & Co Shipping and Com. .27 South St. 

1903 HATZFELD, EDWARD G. . E. G. Hatzfeld Grain and Prov'ns . . .25 Murray St. 

2171 HAUCK, JOHN J. Hauck & Sons Provisions 103 Eldridge St. 

488 HAUCK, JOSEPH J. Hauck & Sons Provisions 103 Eldridge St. 

2234 HAXJGHTON, JAMES Sam De Bow & Haughton. .Freight Brokers 31 Broadway. 

487 HAVENS, ASHER C A. C. Havens Floiur and Grain .... 107 West St. 

510 HAVENS, SILAS F Silas F. Havens Lighterer 115 Broad St. 

485 H AVILAND, ABI JAH Haviland, White & Co Grocers 118 Bridge St., Brooklyn . 

2172 HAVILAND, HOWARD .... Haviland & Pressey Grain 7 Coenties SUp. 

505 HAVILAND. JAS. V HavUand & Pressey Grain 7 Coenties SUp. 

492 HAVILAND. SAM'L C S. C. Haviland & Son Flour and Grain ... .219 West St. 

1778 HAVILAND. WM. F S. C. Haviland & Son Flour and Grain ... .219 West St. 

486 HAWES, JOHN John Hawes. Baker 368 Greenwich St. 

1714 HAWKINS, WM. B '. . . . Wm. B. Hawkins Hops and Malt 12 Water St. 

1858 HAYS, I L Hays & Co Liquors 40 Dey St 

513 HAYN, JOHN John Hayn Grocer 80 Dey St. 

1801 HAYNE, GEO. R Blossom, Hayne «S;; Co Naval Stores 164 Front St. 

508 HAYNE, HENRY J Blossom, Hayne & Co Naval Stores 164 Front St. 

499 HAYNES, CYRUS Spring & Haynes Hog Slaughterers . . . Foot West 40th St. 

2370 HAYNES, GEORGE A W. Spring Haj-nes Produce 26 Vesey Pier, W. Wash. M'kt. 

2101 HAYNES, WM. S W. Spring Haynes Produce 26 Vesey Pier, W. Wash. M'kt. 

2471 HAYWARD, JNO. H Hayward & Spear Butter and Cheese. . .60 Pearl St. 



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Names of Memhers, 189 



ifo. Name. Firm. Bttsiness. Place of Business. 

S174 HAZAED, W- A Francis D. Moulton &Co..Salt 105 Water St. 

482 HAZELTINE, JOS. M. Hazeltine & Co Grain Storage '61 Pearl St. 

491 HAZELTINE, LEONARD . . Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain ... .19 South St. 

2073 HAZELTINE, ROBT. H Hazeltine & Co Grain Storage 31 Pearl St. 

539 HE AL Y, S AML. V Spring & Haynes Hog Slaughterers .... Foot West 40th St. 

525 HEBERT, HENRY B H. B. Hebert & Co Grain 14 Moore St. 

2413 HEBERT, J. HARVEY H. B. Hebert & Co Grain 14 Moore St. 

2330 HEBERT, JOHN H J. H. Hebert «& Co Flour and Grain 72 Broad St. 

2137 HECKER, GEORGE F George V. Hecker & Co . . . .Flour MiUers 201 Cherry St. 

533 HECKER, GEORGE V George V. Hecker & Co ... . Flour Millers 201 Cherry St. 

534 HECKER, JOHN V George V. Hecker «& Co Flour MiUers 201 Cherry St. 

528 HEERMANGE, WM. L Heermance &, Dickinson . . .Butter and Cheese. . .313 Greenwich St. 

2386 HEGEiMAN, J. M Jones & Co Flour Millers 45 Broome St. 

973 HEGEMAN, THOMAS T. E. F. Randolph & Co. . . Flour and Grain 196 West St. 

524 HEISSENBUTTEL, J. F. . . .Heissenbuttel & Wiese Flour and Grain. . . .17 Atlantic St., Brooklyn. 

1450 HELD, HENRY M Henry Wallace & Co Grain 61 Beaver St. 

537 HELLER, ABM A. Heller & Bro Liquors 39 1st Ave. 

651 HELLMERS, H C. Tobias & Co Ship Brokers 49 Beaver St. 

1463 HENCKEN, GEO. D Geo. D. Hencken, Provisions 214 1st Ave. 

2177 HENDERSON, CHAS OaUender & Henderson .... Gold & Foreign Ex. . 42 Exchange Place. 

41 HENDERSON, DAVID Henderson Bros Shipping 7 Bowling Green. 

2023 HENDERSON, EDWARD . . Edward Henderson Com. Brokerage 20 Piatt St. 

551 HENDERSON, R Henderson Bros Shipping 7 Bowling Green, 

2032 HENDERSON, THOS., Jr. . Henderson Bros Shipping 7 Bowling Green. 

522 HENDRICKSON, JOHN B. . J. B. Hendrickson Saltpetre 58 Cedar St. 

521 HENEY, ARCffD T A. T, Heney Shipping 23 Coenties Slip. 

260 HENRY, H. S S. De Cordova & Co Commission 36 New St. 

519 HENRY, JAMES James Henry Ship Broker 70 Beaver St. 

V06 HENSCHEL, M New Ulm City Mill Co Flom- 36 Water St. 

1915 HENTZ, HENRY H. Hentz & Co Cotton 174 Pearl St. 

532 HERKIMER, GEO Geo. Herkimer Flour 37 Pearl St. 

183iD HERKLOTZ, JOHN D Harjes & Herklotz Forwarding & Com . .42 Broad St. 

824 HERMAN, G. G Hewett & Herman Flour 28 Moore St. 

426 HERMAN, GEO. G., Jr. . . .Hewett & Herman Flour 28 Moore St. 

173 HERMANN, HENRY B. T. Babbitt Soap 69 Washington St. 

1949 HEROLD, EMIL Emil Herold Shipping and Com. . . 25 William St. 

1423 HERRICK, EUGENE L Abbott & Hernck Flour 13 State St. 

530 HERRICK, JACOB H J. H. Herrick & Co Flour and Grain 1 State St. 

540 HERRMANN, NATHAN . : . . Herrmann Bros. & Co Com. Merchants 67 Pine St. 

2385 HERSEMAN, WM J H. Shultz Baker Harrison Ave. &Rutledge St., 

2248 HERZOG, E. N Hewett & Herman Flour 28 Moore St. LB'lyn, E. D. 

520 HESS, JULIUS J. Hess & Co Petrolenm&Naval stores . 17 South Wm. St. 

342 HETFIELD, C. R D. K. Ducker & Co Crackers 42 Fulton Street, Brooklyn. 

526 HEUBERER, CHAS. E Heuberer & Ketcham Grain Foot E. 23d St. 

531 HEUBNER, JOHN N John N. Heubner Flour 168 W. 25th St. 

541 HEWER, WM., JR. Walter T. Marvin.... Flour 23 South St. 



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190 New York Produce Exchange. 

No. Name. * Firm. Business. Place of Bvsiness. 

529 HEWETT, HENRY B Hewett & Herman Flour 28 Moore St. 

527 HEWITT, WM. H W. H. Hewdtt Provisions 3 Bowling Green. 

2034 HEYE, GUST Gust. Heye Petroleum 57 Pine St. 

1486 HIBBARD, LESTER D L. D. Hibbard Oil Presser 150 Front St. 

544 HICKOX, CHAS. R Hughes, Hickox & Co Flotu- and Grain 36 ^yllilehaU St. 

549 HICKS, HARVEY E H. E. Hicks & Co Flour and Grain 1 5 & 17 WhitehaU St. 

546 HIGGINS, W. B Chas. S. Higgius & Co Soap Hmlf n St & Park Av., B'kln 

120 HILDEBRAND, C. P C. P. Hildebrand Brokerage 185 Elliott Place, Brooklyn. 

1844 HILL, EDGAR P F. O. Boyd & Co Highwines 59 Broad St. 

1865 HILL, JOSEPH F C. J. Kershaw & Co Grain and Prov Milwaukee, Wis. 

786 HILLERY, JAS. M Wheeler & Hillery Grain and Flour .... 33d St. and 11th Ave. 

1628 HILMERS, KARL Hilmers, McGowan & Co. . Com. Merchants 63 Wall St. 

459 • HINCKEN, CORT. R Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers 3 William St. 

543 HINCKEN, EDWARD Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers 3 William St. 

2351 HINCKEN, EDWARD B . . . . Boyd & Hincken Ship Brokers 3 William St. 

1686 HINSON, J. W Hinson, Parker & Co Naval Stores 135 Pearl St. 

1346 HIRTLER, WILLIAM C . Hirtler & Sons Provisions 63 Wash'n St. , Hoboken, N. J . 

547 HISCOX, SAMPLE W. J. Wilcox & Co Lard Refiners 41 Broad St. 

1665 HOBART, JAMES T Jas. T. Hobart Liquors 26^ Broadway, 

560 HOBBY, JOHN B Jno. B. Hobby, Son & Co. . Storage . . . ' 112 Washington St. 

2069 HODGSON, JOHN H Abram Hodgson & Sons. . . . Cheese & Prov 22 WhitehaU St. 

2376 HODGSON, THOS. H Abram Hodgson & Sons . . . Cheese & Prov 22 WhitehaU St. 

2231 HOFFMAN, GUSTAVO John C. Seager Ship Broker 17 WiUiam. St. 

2297 HOGAN, CHARLES Hogan & Bro Coopers 428 Water St. 

368 HOGAN, C. W Timothy Hogan Stevedore 167 Maiden Lane. 

1460 HOGAN, TIMOTHY Timothy Hogan Stevedore 167 Maiden Lane. 

171 HOGEBOOM, P. P W. W. Bruce & Co Flour and Grain 11 WhitehaU St. 

2150 HOGG, CHARLES B James Donald & Co Petroleum 124 Maiden Lane. 

2322 HOGINS, HENRY H Taft, Lee & Co Petroleum 78 WiUiam St. 

675 HOLLISTER, GEO HoUister & Chamberlin Flour and Grain 90 Broad St. 

1464 HOLLY, JOHN I Lockwood Bros. & HoUy. . . Petroleum Insp'rs 62 Beaver St. 

1999 HOLMAN, A. D Miles & Holman MUlers 25 WhitehaU St. 

572 HOLMAN, LYMAN F Miles & Holman MiUers 25 WhitehaU St. 

1583 HOLMES, ALVIN L F. H. Leggett & Co Grocers 97 Reode St. 

2377 HOLMES, JOHN Holmes & UUne Cracker Bakers 219 Fulton St. 

570 HOLMES, JOHN A W. & A. Holmes & Co Hay and Grain Foot Broome St., E. R. 

1534 HOLMES, JOHN A John A. Holmes Flour 16 Front St. 

1426 HOLMES, JOSEPH M Journal of Commerce Commercial Editor . . 76 Beaver St. 

554 HOLT, ROBERT S Holt & Co Flour 57 Water St. 

553 HOLZDERBER, JOHN 313 West 2Sth St. 

565 HOLZDERBER, PHIL. J . . .P. J. Holzderber & Bro Provisions 575 Hudson St. 

956 HOOGLAND, F H. M. Reed Hog Slaughterer Foot West 40th St. 

1186 HOPKINS, E. T Erie Railway Foreign Freight Agt . 3 BowUng Green . 

564 HORSEY, .TOST AH A J. A. Horsey Com. Merchant 68 Beaver St. 

569 HORSMAN, JOHN John Horsman Flour and Grain 241 Washington St. 

2175 HOUGHTON, WARREN. . . . CarU & Gardner Flour 62 Broad St. 



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Names of Memhers* 191 



^0, iTwiM, Firm, Bitsiness. Mace of Business. 

2300 HOWARD, A. W Howard & Coolidge Flour 36 Front St. 

431 HOWARD, C. C. . . , H. W. Sliotwell & Co Flour and Grain. 4 South St. 

750 HOWARD, C. N C. N. Howard & Co Produce Com 82 Warren 8t 

567 HOWE, EPHRAIM Ephraim Howe Rectifier 118 Elm St. 

563 HOWE, EDWARD T E. T Howe Oils 159 Front St. 

571 HOWE, NORMAN F N. F. Howe Hops and Malt 27 Pearl St. 

557 HOWE, THOMAS Thomas Howe Baker 112 Smith St., Brooklyn. 

556 HOWELL, FRANK B Flint & Co Merchants 33 Broadway. 

580 HOWELL, HENRY C Geo. S. Hart & HoweU Butter and Cheese. . . 35 Pearl St. 

566 HOWLAND, G. G Howland & Aspmwall Shipping 54 South St. 

555 HOWLAND, JOS. T ! ... .85 Liberty St. 

562 HOYT, ALFRED M Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain 19 South St. 

561 HOYT, JESSE Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain. . . . .19 South St. 

1855 HOYT, ROBERT B. W. Floyd Provisions ..263 Broome St. 

2038 HXJCH, PHIL Phil. Huch Petroleum 43 Exchange Place. 

.590 HUDSON, JAS. D Bamford Bros Provisions 13 Broadway. 

830 HUDSON, W. J Henderson Bros Shipping 7 Bowling Green. 

582 HUGHES, JNO. M Hughes, Hickox & Co Flour and Grain ..... 36 WhitehaU St. 

2167 HUGHES, WM. H. T Hughes & Ayres Shipping and Cora ... 74 Wall St. 

2270 HULL, H. D H.D.Hull Produce Com 129 Broad St. 

587 HULSHIZER, JAMES B . . .Hulshizer & Buckman Flour and Feed 120 West St. 

585 HUNT, THOMAS G Thos. G. Hunt Oils 137 Front St; 

2372 HUNTER, J. D Hunter, Walton & Co Butter and Cheese . . .164 Chambers St. 

586 HURD, EBENEZER Halstead & Co Provisions 13 Moore St. 

2173 HURD, JOHN Crane & Hurd Flour and Grain Bridgeport, Conn. 

588 HURST, FRANCIS W. J. . . .National Line S. S Shippmg 69 Broadway. 

1920 HURTZIG, E A. Nones & Co Shipping 138 Pearl St. 

584 HUSTED, THEO. I Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain 19 South St. 

591 HYATT, EDGAR Hyatt & Mount Flour and Grain 180 West St. 

858 IBBOTSON, EDWARD National Line S. S Shipping 69 Broadway. 

592 IKEN, LOUIS Louis Iken Grain 52 Exchange Place. 

594 INGERSOLL, HORACE .... Horace Ingersoll Grain Foot West 34th St. 

593 INSLEE, CHAS. T 104 Broad St. 

595 IRWIN, WM. H Franklin Edson & Co Grain 23 Whitehall St. 

1478 IVES, EDWARD Edward Ives Provisions 15 Water St. 

1597 IVES, WM. JAY Wm. Jay Ives & Co Petroleum 12 Old Slip. 

2043 JACKSON, JAS. W Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain 19 South St. 

1574 JACOBS, ERNEST Eme.st Jacobs Naval Stores 197 Pearl St. 

597 JACOB Y, SAMUEL Pottle & Jacoby Flour and Grain 17 Whitehall St. 

1863 JAMBS, E. H E. H. James Freight&Provision Broker.. 49 Broadway. 

1646 JAMES, MORRIS P M. F. James & Co Transportation 105 Broad St. 

1908 JANSSEN, J. A J. A. Janssen Ship Broker 62 Beaver St. 

598 JARVIS, JAMES L Jas. L. Jarvis Flour 16 Water St. 

606 JEPPERY. GEO. M Floating Elevator Co Grain Elevating 35 Pearl St. 

2241 JEPPERY, WM. T Jeffery & Manllin Flour Brokers 17 Moore St. 

2325 JELLEOKER, PRANK F. JeUecker Cooper 117Broad St. 



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192 New Tork^Froduce Exchange. 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

599 JENKINS, JAS. B Mann & Jenkins Freight Brokers 61 Beaver St. 

2129, JENKINS, M F. W. Jenkins & Bro Flonr 149 Chambers St. 

2310 JENNINGS, E.J E. J. Jennings Baking 261 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn. 

lOOT JESPERSEN, J . B Louis Tetens Ship Broker 19 South William St. 

600 JESSUP, SILAS H S. H. Jessup & Son Maltsters 327 West 40th St. 

2016 JESSUP, WM, H Jessup & GilUg Maltsters 335 East 45th St. 

602 JEVONS, THOMAS E Busk & Jevons Grain 74 Beaver St. 

603 JEWELL, ABRAM S Jewell, Harrison & Co ... . Lard Refiners 27 Water St. 

1889 JEWELL, DITMAS D. JeweU & Son Flour and Feed B'way & Fulton St., E. N. Y . 

605 JEWELL, EDWARD M JeweU Bros Flour Millers 2 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

604 JEWELL, HERBERT S.... Jewell Bros Flour Millers 2 Pulton St., Brooklyn. 

601 JEWELL, JOHN V D. JeweU & Son Flour and Feed B'way & Fulton St., E. N. Y. 

1178 JEK, WILLIAM WiUiam Jex & Co Shipping and Com. . .134 Water St. 

1666 JOHNSON, CHAS'. H Chas. H. Johnson Provisions 27 Front St. 

1425 JOHNSON, D WIGHT Fireraidn'.s Trust Ins. Co. . . President 204 Broadway, 

1667 JOHNSON, EDW'D. A Wm. A. Cole & Co Oils 41 Broad St. 

2264 JOHNSON, F. E Flint & Co Merchants ,.33 Broadway. 

615 JOHNSON, GEO. F G«o. F. Johnson Flour 38 Water St. 

1762 JOHNSON, H. J H. J. Johnson Provisions Hartford, Conn. 

1314 JOHNSON, LEE Lee & Edwin H. Johnson . . Maltsters North River and 49th St. 

1930 JOHNSON, RUSSELL RusseU Johnson & Co Packing Boxes 178 Kent A v., B'klyn, E. D. 

614 JOHNSON, BT] SSELL C . . . .Pitt, Eagles & Johnson .... Flour 17 Water St. 

2178 JOHNSON, SILAS W Whittier, Fuller & Co Paints and Us 55 Pine St. 

1093 JOHNSON, THEO Theo. Johnson Provisions 25 Broad St. 

616 JOHNSTON, WILLI AM.... Wm. Johnston & Co Grocers Fulton & Bond Sts.. Bklyn. 

1738 JONES, ALANSON A A. A. Jones Provisions Ill Broad St. 

1715 JONES, A. C James Keeler & Co Commission 15 WhitehaU St- 

105 JONES, ALBERT G D. S. & A. G. Jones Flour 29 Moore St. 

1429 JONES, BENJAMIN B. Jones Flour and Grain 23 Whitehall St. 

611 JONES, DAVID David Jones Brewer 638 Sixth St. 

610 JONES, DAVID S D. S. & A. G. Jones Flour .29 Moore St. 

609 JONES, EUGENE Jones & Co Flour Millers 47 Broome St. 

608 JONES, FREDERICK Jones & Co Flour MUlers 47 Broome St. 

1430 JONES, HIRAM B H. B. Jones Flour and Grain 23 WhitehaU St. 

2075 JONES, JACOB Jacoh Jones Provision Broker. . . .21 Spring St. 

2181 JONES, JOHN M Gantz, Jones & Co Drugs and Chem'ls . . 176 Duane St. 

607 JONES, PETER Peter Jones Commission 1 Water St. 

1584 JONES, R. McKEAN Peter Jones Commission 1 Water St. 

. 2049 JONES, WM. C Jones & Lough Shipping and Com . .52 Exchange Place. 

1633 JORGENSEN, FRED. R....F. R. Jorgensen Flour 163 Read St., B'klyn, E. D. 

1692 JOSEPH, STEPHEN B F.P.Albert Flour 13 Moore St. 

754 JOY, EDMUND L Edmimd L. Joy Provisions Newark, N. J. 

617 JOYCE, JAMBS F Joyce & BiUings Butter and Cheese.. .102 Broad St. 

1818 JUDGE, JOHN Halpin & Judge Naval Stores 66 Beaver St. 

618 JUDSON, CHAS. B Judson Brothers Provisions New Haven, Ct. 

2253 JUBGBNS, WM. B. A. W. B. A. Jurgens Grocer 179 Boerum St., B'klyn, B, D 



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Names of Members. 193 

No, Name. Firm. Business. Place of Btisiness. 

1807 iLANE, H. E H. E. Kane & Co Importing 48 Broad St. 

2058 KANENBLBY, AUGUST . . .August Kanenbley Provisions 35 Columbia St. 

620 iCANEN'BLEY, HERMAN F.August Kanenbley Provisions 35 Columbia St. 

756 KARSTENS, H. H Karstens & Co Commiss on 18 Exchange Place. 

1335 KAUFALANN, B Max Abenheim &'Co Grain 62 Broad St. 

1244 KEANY, PATRICK F Leavy & Keany Brewers & Distillers. Cor. Jay & Front Sts., B'kln. 

622 KECK, GEORGE G^eorge Keck Flour and Meal 11 Water St. 

621 KECK, JOHN John Keck & Son Flour 506 East 16tli St. 

1705 KEENEY, GEORGE M . ... Keeney & Huffman Flour and Meal 139 Hudson St., J . C. 

632 ElEHOE, JOHN Lister Brothers Fertilizers 159 Front St. 

646 KEIL, HENRY Kaupper, Keil & Schoeller . Flour 64 Front St. 

635 KEIM, JOHN Krone & KeLm Flour 44 Harrison St. 

2245 KELLER, FRED G. F. Keller & Son Provisions 90 Ninth Avenue. 

631 KELLER, GEO. F G. F. KeUer & Son Provisions 90 Ninth Avenue. 

627 KELLER, JOHN J Fischer &, KeUer Grain, Petroleum, &c .... 46 Cedar St. 

2442 KELLEY, EDWARD L E. L. Kelley Grain 165 W. 49th St. 

296 KELLEY, FRANK M John H. Starin Transportation 125 Broad St. 

16 KELLEY, THOS. E T. E KeUey Shipping 3 William St. 

1475 KEMP, HENRY Henry Kemp Cheese 6 South WiUiam St. 

2364 KEMP, W. H W. H. Kemp Sausage Casings 176 Hudson St. 

630 KENT, B. A E. A. Kent & Co Grain and Prov 89 Broad St. 

953 KER, JAMES F. . .. : J. A. Bostwick & Co Petroleum 141 Pearl St. 

633 KERN, RUDOLPH Rudolph Kern Baker 180 Spring St. 

1545 KERSHAW, THOMAS Thos. Kershaw Grain Com Montreal. 

623 KETCHAM, EDWY B E, B. Ketcham Provisions 33 Front St. 

2220 KETCHAM, GEO. E Ketcham & Morgan Grain 62d St. and 11th Ave. 

624 KETCHAM, IRA U. S. Warehouse Co Grain Storage 6 Front St. 

625 KETCHUM, JOSEPH Joseph Ketchum Grain 44 Pearl St. 

1424 KEYES, JESSE G Jesse G. Keyes Cooper 268 Cherry St. 

959 KILDUFF, J. E W. R. Preston & Co Flour and Grain 66 Pearl St. 

1566 KIMBALL, CHAS. A C. A. Kimball Oils 336 W. 18th St. 

1897 KIMBALL, FRANK Geo. H. Lincoki Petroleum 64 Beaver St. 

1468 KIMBALL, PHILANDER. . . P. Kimball Provisions 306 Washington St. 

1567 ilMBALL, WM. H Libby , Bartlett & Kimball . Oils 127 Water St. 

640 KING, AMOS P InternatU Grain Ceiling Co . Ship Ceiling 23 South Wm. St. 

642 KING, CHAS. A John A. King & Son Provisions 33 Avenue C. 

1195 KING, HUGH Hugh King & Co Grocers 448 Greenwich St. 

1992 KING, JOHN Chas. White & Co Hog Slaughterers .... Ft. West 40th St. 

2313 KING, OSCAR Oscar King Distilling Cor.Kent& Divis'nAv.,B'kln, 

1820 KING, ULRIC Sibley, French & King .... Commission Chicago, 111. [E. D. 

636 KINGAN, JAMES Deceased 

181 KINGON, JAMES James Kmgon & Co Foreign E.xchange ... 53 Exchange Place. 

913 EJ:NGSBURY, H. a Lack. Iron & Coal Co MercantUe Scranton, Pa. 

2111 KINKEL, ALBERT Chas. L. Wright & Co Ship Brokers 56 SoUth St. 

1527 KINNER, JO HN D Jno. D. Kinner Provisions 52 Center Market. 

612 KIOBBOE, F OsbomeBros Cheese and Prov.... 12 Whitehall St. 



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194 New York Produce Exchange. 

Hfo. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

2286 KIRBY, EUGENE E Philip D. Nash Lard Refinet 44Wat.erSt. 

643 KIRBY, WILBUR E P. H. Van Riper & Co Butter 5 Front St. 

6«0 KIRKLAND, R. McD A. H. Solomon & Co Commission 22 Beaver St. 

647 KISSAM, GEORGE George Kissam Flour 29 Front St. 

689 KITCH ING, GEO. E G. E. & J. D. Kitching. . . .Maltsters 726 East 11th St. 

1422 KLTSON, JOHN C David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov..20 South St. 

2324 KLAPP, LYMAN Union Oil Co Oil Providence, R. L 

1472 KLATZL, JOHN C John C. Klatzl Flour 11 Water St. 

1912 KLOECKNER, LOUIS Recknagel & Co Export 45 Beaver St. 

1653 KLUPFEL, CHAS OeMchs & Co Shipping 2 Bowling Green. 

654 KNAPP, GEO. C Knapp & Co Provisions Ill Broad St. 

649 KNAPP, MILTON Knapp & McCord Grain and Feed 94 Broad St. 

655 KNAPP, ROBT. M R. M, Knapp Provisions Ill Broad St. 

650 KNAPP, SAML.P S. P. Knapp Barley and Malt . . ..IStateSt. 

652 KNEELAND, FRANK E . . . Henry T. Kneeland & Co. . Flour and Grain 30 WhitehaU St. 

653 KNEELAND, HENRY T . . . Henry T. Kneeland & Co . . Flour and Grain . . . . 30 Whitehall St. 

2183 KNIGHT, CHARLES H. Knight Commission 46 East 9th St. 

2182 KNIGHT, EMANUEL H. Knight Commission .46 East 9th St. 

2349 KNIGHT, F. A H. Knight Commission 46 East 9th St. 

2185 KNIGHT, HENRY H. Knight Commission 46 East 9th St. 

2184 KNIGHT, JACOB .'. .H. Knight CommLssion 46 East 9th St. 

2348 KNIGHT, J. N H. Knight Commission 46 East 9ch St. 

2293 KNOWLES, SIDNEY W. . . S. W. Knowles. Oils 181 Front St. 

2003 KNOX, GEORGE G. & J. Knox & Co Grain 13 William St 

2318 KOBBE, B. F Inman Line S. S Shipping 15 Broadway. 

1983 KOCH, J. OTTO J. Otto Koch Freight Broker 19 William St. 

993 KOCH, WILLIAM Chas. Unger & Co Foreign Exchange. . . 46 Exchange Place. 

659 KOEHLER, HERMAN H. Koehler Brewer 345 East 29th St 

2202 KOLB, HENRY S. Freeman & Co Flour 7 State St. 

1125 KOOP, JOHANNES Hermann, Koop & Co Shipping and Com. . . 23 William St 

1014 KRAETZER, A. G. JR . . . .Kraetzer & Behan Flour 60 Dey St 

443 KRETCHMAR, CHAS. P. . .Jed, Fryc & Co Lumber, Fish & Oil. .47 Water St 

1860 KRIEGE, FRED. W F. W. Kriege & Meier General Brokers 12 Old SUp. 

1850 KRIEGER, CHARLES Philip Krieger Provisions 167 1st Avenue. 

660 KRIEGER, PHILIP Phihp Krieger Provisions 167 1st Avenue. 

39 KROETER, F. W Kroeter & Dies Provision Brokers. . .69 Pearl St. 

662 KRONE, CHRISTIAN A. . . Krone & Keim Flour 44 Harrison St. 

663 KRONETHAL, WM Kronethal & Co Flour 267 E. Houston St 

1319 KROTEL, M. L Chamberlain, Roe & Co. . .Lard Refiners & Prov.25 Pearl St 

661 KRUGER, GEO. W MuUer & Kruger Provisions 20 Exchange Place. 

658 KUPFER, B B. Kupfer Liquors 41 South William St. 

664 , KURTZ, CHAS. W Bradley, Kurtz & Co Bags and Bagging ... 25 Pearl St. 

678 LABAGH, WILLIAM 0. ...W. O. Labagh Salt 199 Duane St 

679 LACEY, RICHARD Richard Lacey & Co Linseed Cake, &c . . .133 Pearl St, 

686 LADD, THOS. W T. W. Ladd Provisions 115 Broad St 

668 L AIMBEER, RICHARD H. . Th^ Grain Warehousing Co. Grain Storage. 5 Moore St 



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Names of Members. 195 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of BvMneaa. 

2308 LAKEMAIT, OLIVEE. J Gotilard, Eouse & Bostvvick. Provision Insp'rs 36 Whitehall St. 

687 LAMBERT, EPHM. L D. H. Sherman Hog Slaughterer Jersey City, N. J . 

680 LAMBERT, WM. S Care^-, Yale k Lambert Freight Brokers 60 Beaver St. 

667 L AMSON, CHARLES C. H. Marshall & Co Shipping 38 Bm-ling SUp. 

1894 LAMSON, CHAS. M C. H. MarshaU & Co Shipping 38 Burling Slip. 

681 LAMSON, EDWARD E. O. Lamson Provisions Ill Broad St. 

688 LAMSON, W. Gk>uld H. Thorp & Co Provisions Ill Broad St. 

671 LANCE Y, ROBERT C . .... Grinnell, Mintum & Co ... . Shipping 78 South St. 

1205 LANDSBERG, ALBERT . . Albert Landsberg Shipping and Com. . . 18 William St. 

682 LANE, JOS. M.. . . . : J. M. Lane Grain 69 Broad St. 

685 LANE, STEPHEN K Lane & Son Grain 90 Broad St. 

676 LANE, THEODORE B Intemational Elevating Ass Grain Elevating 31 Pearl St. 

674 LANG, PETER Lang & Robinson Flour 1 Front St. 

887 LANGE, J. A J, M. Precht Ship Broker 1 WDUam St. 

1022 LARABEE, E. T H. P. Low Provisions 31 Water St. 

2213 LARENDON, M. W M. W. Larendon Naval Stores 150 Front St. 

1942 LATHROP, CHAS. B J. Lathrop <& Co Flour 4 Front St. 

683 LATHROP, JOSHUA J. Lathrop & Co Flour 4 Front St. 

677 LAUX, LUDWJG Ludwig Laux Provisions .307 East 48th St. 

2255 LA VERY, DANIEL J Grorman & Co Provisions 150 Columbia St. , Brooklyn. 

1751 LAVIN, EDWARD Kingan & Co. (Limited). . .Provisions 35 Broadway. 

1398- LAW, GEORGE Eighth Ave. R. R President 50th St. and 8th Avenue. 

669 LAWRENCE, E. N Lawrence & Co Storage 3 Stone St. 

673 LAWRENCE, GEO. P Lawrence, Giles & Co Shipping and Com . .11 South William St. 

619 LAWRENCE, W. A W. A. Lawrence Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

675 LAWRENCE, WM. S W. S. Lawrence Flour 92 Broad St. 

666 LAWTON, JOSEPH H Petty, Lawton & Co Flour and Prov FaU River, Mass. 

689 LEA, RICHARD M R. M. Lea Flour and Grain 38 WhitehaU St. 

691 LEACH, AUGUSTUS M H. J. Leach & Bro Maltsters Lyons, N. Y. 

1731 LEACH, F. A P. E. Smith & Co Millers 20 Hamilton Av., Brooklyn. 

1236 LEAYCRAFT, CHAS. R Leay craft & Co Shipping and Com . .40 Broadway. 

692 LEAYCRAFT, JEREMIAH. .Leay craft & Co Shipping and Com. . 40 Broadway. 

1766 LEBER, EDWARD F Karstens & Co Commission 18 Exchange Place. 

2418 LE BOUTILLIER, JOHN . .Geo. S. Scott Com. Merchant 66 Pine St. 

699 LE DUC, JAI^ VIER W. R. Preston & Co Flour and Grain 66 Pearl St. 

1421 LEE, JOHN White Star Line Shipping 37 Broadway. 

1857 LEECH, JOHN E James Lee & Co importers and Exporters. . 72 Pine St. 

581 LEECH, WM. E James Lee & Co Importers & Exporters. . .72 Pine St. 

1361 LEEDS, CHAS. W D. P. Forst & Co Grocery & Prov Trenton, N. J. 

690 LEGGETT, FRED'K W A. W. & F. W. Leggett. . . .Butter and Cheese. . .39 Pearl St. 

701 LEGGETT, RICH'D. L R. L. Leggett Grocer 49 Park Place. 

694 LEGGETT, WM. A Wm. A. Leggett Wholesale Grocer. ... 205 Front St. 

2250 LE GRAS, NELSON S N. S. Le Gras Brokerage 100 Hudson St. 

1670 LEIGH, CHAS. B C. B, Leigh Flour and Grain .,,.13 Water St, 

2162 LEIGH, C. J Chas. M. Fry Banking & Com 48 Wall St. 

1480 LEIGH, SAM^L W Samuel W. Leigh Flourand Grain.... 6 South St. 



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196 New^Yorh Produce Exchange. 

No. Name. Firm. Bicsiness. Place of Businest. 

1520 LELAiJD, HASTINGS Hastings Leland Flour 102 Broad St. 

702 LEMBECK, HENBY Lembeck & Betz Brewers 164 North 'ith St., J. C. 

2323 LENANE, P P. Lenane & Bro Grain and Feed 206 West St. 

1390 LENT, LOUIS M. N. Y. Floating Elevator Co . Grain Elevating 47 Pearl St. 

634 LENTILHON, E E. LentQhon Brokerage 24 Exchange Place. 

2443 LEONARD, LEWIS H J. P. & G. C. Robinson Storage, &c 14 Coenties Slip. 

1403 LEONARD, T. W T. W. Leonard & Co Oils 14 Cedar St. 

1649 LETHBRIDGE, GEO Letbbridge, Gallaher & CornweU.Insurance 15 William St. 

1975 LEVY, JULIUS, JR Julius Levy, Jr Export 26 Broad St. 

948 LEWIN, R. S. C R. S. C. Lewin Ship Broker 34 Warren St. 

697 LEWIS, JOHN F John F. Lewis Provisions 115 Broad St. 

705 LIBBY, WM- H Libby, Bartlett & Kimball. Oils 127 Water St. 

700 LIEBMANN, JOSEPH S. Liebmann's Sons Brewers Bushwick, L. I. 

1201 LILIENTHAL. J. E Lilienthal Bros. & Stem . . . Commission 34 Broadway. 

2440 LIMA, D. A., DE D. A. De Lima & Co Shipping and Com... 23 William St. 

1742 LINCOLN, GEO. H Geo. H. Lmcoln Petroleum 64 Beaver St. 

1479 LINDAHL, E. P Intemat'l Grain CeiUng Co . Ship Ceilmg 23 South William St. 

709 LINK, CHAS. W .,F. Link & Bro Provisions 502 Hudson St. 

1413 LINTON, H. G. M F. W. Clarkson & Co Produce Brokers 64 Pearl St- 

708 LIPPINCOTT, WM. H Lippincott & Co Hog Slaughterers .... Ft. West 39th St. 

873 LIPPINCOTT, W. H., JK. . . Lippincott & Co Provisions 7 W. Washington Market. 

707 LITTELL, THEO. S.'. E. B. Littf>ll & Co Flour 122 Warren St. 

1003 LITTLEJOHN, FRANK B. .F. B. Littlejohn Insurance 39 Pearl St. 

704 LIVERMORE, EDWIN R. . .E. R. & R. B. Livermore. . .Flour and Grain 119 Broad St. 

1546 LIVERMORE, JOHN R Salter & Livermore Ship Brokers 65 Beaver St. 

703 LIVERMORE, R. B E. R. «fe R. B. Livermore . . .Flour and Grain 119 Broad St. 

2050 LOCKE, J. H Goodwm Locke & Co Flour and Grain 13 Moore St. 

1824 LOCKITT, CLEMENT Geo. Lockitt & Sons Grocers 559 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

719 LOCKITT, JOHN John Lockitt & Co Provision'* 184 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

1885 LOCKITT, JOSEPH John Lockitt & Co Provisions 184 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

718 LOCKWOOD, CALVIN B . . . C. B. Lockwood & Co Storage 129 Broad St. 

2192 LOCKWOOD, FRED. F .Lockwood & Lowe Insurance 31 Pearl St. 

715 LOCKWOOD, FRED. W Lockwood Bros. & Holly . . .Petroleum Insp'rs. . . .62 Beaver St. 

710 LOGAN, BENJAMIN Logan «& Preston Grain 17 William St. 

720 LOGAN, JAMES McCartan & Logan Lighterers 47 Pearl St 

1487 LOHMAN, JOHN H. Offerman Grocer. 240 Washington St. 

1991 LOHRKE, OTTO E Otto E. Lohrke Grain 160 Pearl St. 

2469 LOINES, STEPHEN Wreaks & Chubb Insurance 18 WiUiam St. 

2099 LOMBARD, JOSIAH, Jr. . . .Lombard, Ayers & Co Petroleum 127 Pearl St. 

713 LORD, CHAS.W Chas. W. Lord & Co Shipping and Com ... 7 State St. 

2189 LORD, JOSEPH L Jos, L. Lord Insurance 75 Liberty St 

741 LORD, WM. G Wm. G. Lord Grain 12 Bridge St. 

717 LOUGH, GEO. F Jones & Lough Shipping and Com. . .52 Exchange Place. 

1703 LOUNSBERRY, JAS. H Deceased. 

712 LOURIE, JULIUS J. Lourie Com, Merchant ... 25 William St. 

721 LOVE, JOSEPH Munroe Crane Hog Slaughterer. .. .Ft. West 39th St. 



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Names of Members, 197 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1493 LOW, HOVEY P H. P. Low Provisions .31 Water St 

348 LOWDEN, W. H James Davett & Co Flour and Grain 13 Water St. 

714 LOWE, JAS. M Lockwood & Lowe Insurance 31 Pearl St. 

716 LOWE, JOHN John Lowe Insurance 37 Pearl St. 

195 LUBAU, HENRY Henry Lubau Naval Stores 5 William St. 

1835 LUCE, A. J A. J. Luce & Co Hops and Malt 10 Broadway. 

2265 LTJDERS, 0. B A. G. Luders & Co Shipping & Com ... .48 Broad St. 

724 LUDMANN, C C. Ludmann & Co Shipping and Com . .4 South William St. 

722 LUEBBERS, ERNEST H.. . .E. H. Luebbers Insurance 60 William St. 

725 LULING, CHARLES Deceased. 

723 LTJNT, GEO. D Lunt Brothers Com. Merchants 28 South St 

1750 LUZUN ARIZ, M Luzunariz & Malga Brokerage 40 Broadway. 

1833 LYON, EDWARD Lyon & Co Commission 19 South William St 

832 McBRIDE, HENRY McBride & Co Produce 74 Warren St 

831 McBRIDE, JAMES 25 Broad St. 

836 McCALMAN, ARCH'D. H. . .A. H. McCalfitian Provisions 3 Bowling Green. 

837 McCARTAN, PAT. 0. H McCartan & Logan Lighterers 47 Pearl St. 

1575 Mccarty. T. E Jewell Bros Elour Millers 2 Fulton St , Brooklyn. 

839 McCHESNE Y, JAMES Jas. McChesney Merchant " 193 Clinton St, Brooklyn, 

833 McCOMB, JAMES Jas. McComb Car-man 7 Bowling Green. 

2200 McCOMB, JAMES, JR Jas. McComb Carman 7 Bowling Green. 

1868 McCORD, CHAS. Cooke Bros. & McCord . . . .Lard OU 504 West 38th St 

834 McCORD, HENRY D '. .Knapp & McCord Grain and Feed 94 Broad St 

1609 McCOSKER, WM. P Wm. P. McCosker Flour 11 Whitehall St 

2426 McCOUN, HENRY T., Jr. . .Francis H. Leggett & Co. . .Grocers 97 Reade St. 

1491 MCCREERY, JOHN John McCreery Lighterer 95 Broad St. 

2317 McCREER Y, ROBERT John McCreery Lighterer 95 Broad St. 

1 084 McCTJE, JNO. B International Elevating Ass. Grain Elevating. .... 31 Pearl St. 

637 McCULLOH, GEO. S Leaycraft & Co Shipping and Com. . . 40 Broadway. 

&35 McCULLOH, JAS. W N. J. Midland R. R Receiver 93 Liberty St 

838 McCUTCHEN, CHAs. W. . . . J. W. Moore & McCutchen. . Flour and Grain 1 State St. 

841 Mcdonald, O wen T. W. . McDonald & Co Grocers 258 Newark Avenue, J. C. 

1439 McEWAN, JAS. W J. W. McEwan TaUo w and Grease . . 2 Broadway. 

1350 McEWEN, GEORGE C Geo. C. McEwen Hominy, Samp, &c. . 124 Warren St. 

2312 McGEE, HENR Y A Livingston Roe Petroleum 125 Pearl St. 

844 McGEE, JAMES Devoe Manufacturing Co. .Petroleum 80 Beaver St 

2041 McGOEY, THOMAS McGoey & King Petroleum 76 Beaver St. 

847 MCGRATH, PATRICK Deceased. 

2294 McGRATH, THOS. J Nash & Whiton Salt ,172 Reade St 

2350 McGUIRE, JOHN John McGuire Brokerage 12 Bridge St. 

1447 McILVAlNE. A. E A. E. McHvame Provisions 

2447 McILHANNEY. W. H N. Y. C. & H. R. R Foreign Freight 30 Broadway. 

848 McINERNY, JOS H. Punchard & Co Grocers 65 New Chambers St. 

2438 McINTYRE, T. A David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov,20 South St 

463 McKENDRICK, Q. K Q. K. McKendrick Grain 7 Bowling Green. 

2266 McLAURIN, CHAS. E C. E. Heuberer Pacific Millfi 38 Columbia St, Brooklyn. 



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198 New York Produce Excliange. 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Bttsiness. 

2434 McLE A.N, THOMAS F. Woodrafe & McLean .... Storage and Salt .... 103 Water St. 

853 McMAHON, JiJMES 87 McDonough St., Brooklyn. 

1515 McMANNTJS, JNO. H Jno. H, McMannns Produce Com 76 Broad St. 

850 McMURTRY, GEO. A G. A. & J. McMurtry Grocers 277 8th Avenue. 

'854 MCNEIL, WM. H Wm. H. McNeil Provisions 639 West 38th St. 

1360 MCNEELL, ORISON 0. McNeill & Co Casings Jersey City, N. J. 

855 McTAVISH, DUNCAN A . . Bank of B. N. America .... Banking 52 Wall St. 

748 MACAULAY, AND"W J Macaulay & Co Com. Merchants. 22 William St. 

857 MACDONALD, FRANCIS . . Henderson Bros Shipping 7 Bowling Green. 

2061 MACDOUGALL, ALEX R. Hunter, Craig & Co ... . Shipping 14 Moore St. 

257 MACFARLANE, VIC. W. . .V. W. Macfarlane & Co. . . .Lard Refiners 138 Pearl St. 

2063 MACKAY, ALEX Great Western Ins. Co Insurance 50 WaU St. 

2222 MACKAY. JOHN John Mackay Foreign Exchange ... 53 Exchange Place. 

1466 MACKELVIE, WM Thos. Richardson Shipping and Com. . .45 Exchange Place. 

856 MACKENZIE, ALEX Mackenzie, Newman & Co. Flour, Butter and Cheese. .92 Warren St. 

1775 MACKIE, ALEX. L. A A. L. A. Mackie Brokerage 24 Beaver St. 

758 MACKIE, ROBERT Barclay & Livingston Com. Merchants 24 Beaver St. 

761 MACLAY, M. W J. P. & G. C. Robinson .... Salt, Fish, &c 14 Coenties SHp. 

1769 MACY, W. H., 2d Josiah Macy's Sons Petroleum 189 Front St. 

729 MACY, WM, H., Jr." John H. Pool & Macy Lard 33 Water St. 

842 MAGOUN, GEO. C Kidder, Peabody & Co . . .Bankers 33 Wall St. 

1790 MAHLSTADT, FRED T. J. O" Conner Flour 127 Avenue B. 

759 MAHNXEN, CORD Mahnken & Morehouse Grocers 174 Duane St. 

763 MAILLER, ^VM. O Wm. O. MaDler & Co Transportation Ft. FranMm St. 

1617 MiilNLAND. WM. C Mainland & Gambrill Flour and Meal 45 Front St. 

2423 MAIRS, E. H David DowS^fe Co Gram, Flour & Prov.20 South St. 

728 MAIRS, JOHN D David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov.20 Sonth St. 

727 MAITLAND, ALEX Robt. L. Maitland & Co ... . Com. Merchants 43 Broad St. 

753 MALCOM, GEO George Malcom Brewer Skilhnan St. & Flushing Av., 

2:39 MALGA, VICTOR Luzunariz & Malga Brokerage 40 Broadway. [B'klyn. 

747 MANGAM, DAN'L D D. D. Mangam Grain and Feed 92 Broad St. 

731 MANGAJkt, EDGAR B W. D. Mangam's Son Grain and Feed 92 Broad St. 

363 MANGAM, WM. L D. D. Mangam Grain and Feed 94 Broad St. 

2196 MANGELS, WM. C. F Gerdes & Mangels Flour and Feed 308 Washington St. 

737 MANN, GEO. W Mann & CoUins Salt 201 Washington St. 

1521 MANNING, F. R Ward & Co Provision Inspect'n . . Ward's Stores, Brooklyn. 

382 MANTON, D. E D. E. Manton & Co Produce 76 Broad St. 

1716 MANWARING, D. W., jR. . D. W. Mamvaring BauS and Bagging. . .248 Front St. 

44 MANWARING, W. M D. W. Man waring. Bags and Bagging. . . 248 Front St. 

744 MARC. THEOPHILUS M. . . T. M. Marc Provisiojis 43 E.Kchange Place. 

1786 MARESCA, L Benham Si'^ Boyesen Ship Brokers 88 Wall Sc. 

760 MARBLES, SAMUEL S. ... Marples & Shaw Provisions 30 Whitehall St. 

2072 MARSH. THOS. E .Marsh, White & Co Grain and Feed 104 Broad St. 

732 MARSHALL. CHAS. H C. H. Marshall & Co Shipping 38 Burling Slip. 

2384 MARSHALL, FRANK G .... P. I. Nevius & Son Ship Brokers 11 South St . 

1013 MARSHALL, JOHN Woodhouse & Rudd Shipping and Com. . . 134 Water St. 



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Names of Members. 199 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

745 MARSHALL, WM. C W. C. MarshaU Provisions 12 Second Ave. 

2243 MARSILY, F. A Chas. Witthoff & Co ..Petroleum 15 William St. 

738 MARTHEUS, EMIL E. Martheus Provisions 65BeaverSt. 

733 MARTIN, EDWARD E. Martin Provisions 114 Broad St. 

746 MARTIN, GEO. C David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov . 20 South St. 

1846 MARTIN, JAMES James Martin R-ovisions 196 Greenwich St. 

1910 MARTIN, JOHN S John S. Martin & Co Butter and Cheese. . .168 Chambers St. 

1937 MARTIN, P. H P. H. Martin Broker Newark, N. J. 

739 MARTIN, WILBUR F Rood & Martin Hog Slaughterers . . .Ft. West 391^ St. 

751 MARYIN, WALTER T Walter T. Marvin Flour 23 South St. 

1825 MASCORD, EDWARD W . .E. W. Mascord Grain 2 State St. 

735 MASON, JOHN W Jno. W. Mason & Co Cordage, &c 43 Broadway. 

801 MASTERS, AUG. E A. E. Masters Merchant 129 Broad St. 

1596 MATHEWS, DeWITT DeWitt Mathews Provisions 6 Front St. 

1608 MATHEWS, EDWIN A . . . . Watts & Mathews Provisions 56 Van Brunt St., B^kln. 

1549 MATHEWS, EBRD. S U. S. Warehouse Co Storage 6 Front St. 

755 MATHEWS, T. G T. G. Mathews & Co Flour 246 Fulton St. 

1405 MATTHEWS, JAS. M Lamar Ins. Co Insurance 18 i Broadway. 

743 MATTLAGE, CHAS. F C. F. Mattlage Fish and Provisions. . 276 Greenwich St. 

1785 MAULLIN, FRED. W Jeffery & Maullin Fiour Brokers 17 Moore St. 

1905 MAZIERE, HENRY DE . . . .Christian Bors & Co Shipping and Com. .18 Exchange Place. 

1308 MEAD, J. K J. K. Mead Produce Com 331 Washington St. 

777 MEAKIM, ALEX Ward & Foster Provisions 42 Pearl St. 

770 MEGRATH, GEO George Megrath Provisions 11 Front St. 

2341 MEHLEN, NIC Nic, Mehlen Petroleum Broker . . 15 William St. 

1859 MEIER, OSCAR F. W. Ea-iege & Meier. General Brokers 12 Old Slip. 

766 MEISSNER, FRED'K Meissner, Ackermann & Co . Petroleum 48 Beaver St. 

773 MEISTERLEIN, HENRY. . . Doscher & Meisterlein Flour and Feed 166 Wc st St. 

764 MELLOR, THOMAS Care R. B. Borland Shipping and Com . .70 Wall St. 

648 MEMORY, HENRY Henry Memory Foreign Shipping ... .35 Broadway. 

404 MERIAN, ALFRED Alfred Merian Commisrsion 54 Exchange Place. 

1671 MERRILL, F. B Dole Bros Hops and Malt 28 Broadway. 

1922 MERRILL, WM. WILLIS . .Jno. Boynton's Son Flour, Grain and Lumber.32 Broadway. 

1712 MERWIN, S. E., Jr S. E. Mer\vin & Son Provisions New Haven, Conn. 

1530 MESHURUL, A. R A. R. Meshurul Flour 3 South St. 

1602 METCALF, BENJ. F B. F. MetcalE & Co Ship Brokers 120 Front St. 

2186 METCALF, F. A B. F. Metcalf & Co Ship Brokers 120 Front St. 

772 METTLER, SAMUE L A. Bonnell Flour and Grain ... .104 West St. 

771 METTLER, SAMUEL, Jr. . E. Mottlcr's Sons Flour and Grain 2 and 3 South St. 

2382 METTLER, WM. E E. Mettler's Sons Flonr dnd Grain ... .2 and 3 South St. 

776 MEYER, AUGUST C. L. . . . A. C. L. &, O. Meyer Com. Merchants ... .42 Beaver St. 

778 MEYER, FRED Kunhardt & Co Shipping 61 Broad St, 

336 MEYER, WILLIAM Lockwood Bros. & Holly . . . Petroleum Insp'rs . . .62 Beaver St. 

793 MICHEL, FRED Fred. Michel & Co Flour 10 Front St. 

1553 MtCHELENA, SANTIAGO.. S. Michelena Shipping and Com . . 24 South St. 



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200 New York Prodvjce Exchange, 

,No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business, 

790 MIDDLETON, AUSTIN D . .Middleton & Co Com. Merchants .... 40 Exchange Place. 

2193 MIDDLETON, JOHN N. B. .Middleton & Co Com. Merchants ... .40 Exchange Place. 

199S MILES, SWEETING Miles & Hohnan Millers 25 Whitehall St. 

2153 MILLEMANN, J. P J. F. Millemann & Co Provdsions 211 Washington St. 

2326 MILLER, C. F Isaac H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain 5 State St. 

2201 MILLER, CHAS. N W. S. Miller & Co Grain 51 Broad St. 

1043 MILLER, EDWARD L Lang & Robinson Flour 1 Front St. 

785 MILLER, FRED^K Fred'k MiUer Pi-ovisiona 195 Broome St. 

97 MILLER, GEORGE George Miller Insurance 10 Water St. 

1631 MILLER, HIRAM W. D. Mangam's Son ... Grain and Feed 92 Broad St. 

781 MILLER, JOHN E Miller & Houghton Shipping and Com . .32 South St. 

1673 MILLER, JOHN T John T. MiUer Grain 27 Pearl St. 

2412 MILLER, J. W Deceased. 

1967 MILLER, ROBERT B J. M. Requa & Co Flour and Grain 23 South St. 

783 MILLER, WILL]^I Wm . MOler Shipping and Com . . 57 Exchange Place. 

1730 MILLER, WM. D. W MiUer & Houghton Shipping and Com. . 32 South St. 

782 MILLER, WM. S W. S. Miller & Co Grain SlTBroad St. 

1710 MILLER, W. W W. W. Miller & Bro Petroleum 140 Pearl St. 

791 MILLS, CLARK W C. W. Mills Grain 60 Beaver St. 

1989 MILLS, L. J. C. W L. Roberts & Co Flour and Grain 17 South St. 

1407 MILLSPAUGH, P. M Manhattan Oil Co OUs 16 Broadway. 

1723 MINA, PIETRO Pietro Mina Shipping and Com. .23 William St. 

38 MINER, A. T Gould H. Thorp & Co Provisions Ill Broad St. 

789 MIRRIELEES, GEO. M . . . G. M. Mirrielees Provisions Ill Broad St. 

2056 MITCHELL, J. L David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov.20 South St. 

1789 MITCHELL, WILLIAM, jR.Chamberlain, Roe & Co. . . .Lard Refiners & Prov.25 Pearl St. 

862 MOGG, JAMES D A C. Pulling Maltsters 6 Broome St. 

2194 MOLLER, C. GERHARD. . . Tonjes, Moller & Co Flour Millers 31 Broadway, B'kl'n, E. D. 

457 MONJO, LOUIS, JR Louis Monjo, Jr. & Co . . . .Commission 140 Pearl St. 

1882 MONTELL, FRANCIS T . . . F. T MonteU & Son Commission 54 Pine St. 

794 MONTGOMERY, ARCH'D . .Montgomery Bros Grain 1 State St. 

2215 MONTGOMERY, ARCH, jR.Brown, Rice & Quinby . . . Flour and Grain ... .27 Pearl St. 

2467 MONTGOMERY, A. G., Jr. .Mercantile Ins. Co Insurance 35 Wall St. 

1891 MONTGOMERY, C. A C. A. & J. M. Montgomery . Freight & Ins. Bk^rs . 1 State St. 

2368 MONTGOMERY, JAS. M. . . C. A. «fc J. M. Montgomery . Freight & Ins. Bk'rs.l State St 

1977 MOOK, THOS J. F. Cook & Co Provisions 115 Broad St. 

802 MOORE, EDWARD A E. A. Moore Grain and Feed 19 Broadway. 

189 MOORE, H. H j. w. Moore, McCutchen & Co . . Flour and Grain 1 Stone St. 

806 MOORE, JOHN W .t. w. Moore, McCutchen & Co . . Flour and Grain 1 Stone St. 

768 MOORE, ROBERT Robt. Moore & Co Commission 92 Pearl St. 

804 MOORE. SAM?L S., Jr S. S. Moore, Jr Cooper Py2 Little 12th St 

2006 MOORE, W. A Deceased. 

2425 MOORE, W. B Wallace & Moore Weighers C<> Water St 

1219 MOORE, W. E Erastus Titus Baking 283 Washington St. 

2352 MORFORD, T. P A. 0. & T. P. Morford Butchers Portchester, N. Y. 



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Names of Members, 201 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1995 MORGAN, CHAS. L W.D.Morgan Shipping 70 South St. 

1802 MORGAN, HENRY S. ... ..Jas. K. Morgan Flour 83 Dey St. 

799 MORGAN, JAS. K Jas. K. Morgan Flour 83 Dey St. 

813 MORGAN, JOHN W Enoch Morgan's Sons Co . . . Soap 440 West St. 

1682 MORGAN, THOS Ketcham & Morgan Grain and Feed 62d St. & 11 th Avenue. 

1768 MORGAN, THOS. N Thomas N. Morgan Petroleum 15 William St. 

795 MORGAN, WM. D W. D. Morgan Shipping 70 South St. 

1941 MORICE, HENRY P Morice & Preston Insurance 17 William St. 

2005 MORRIS, JOHN T Isaac H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain 5 State St. 

444 MORRISON, FRANK H . . . .Morrison & Bartow Export 29 William St. 

796 MORSE, CHAS. A L. Roberts & Co Flour and Grain .... 17 South St. 

1467 MORTON, ROBERT Morton & Bros Brewers 534 High St., Newark. 

2142 MOSER, JISTO. M Moser & Naser Hops & Malt 7 Beaver St. . 

803 MOSES, AARON A. & J. M. Moses Lard Refiners 402 Greenwich St. 

800 MOSES, ISAAC H i.. .Moses & Cohen Flour and Prov 105 Water St. 

797 MOSES, WM Wm. Moses Provisions 17 Moore St. 

2267 MOSETTER, F F. Mosetter Provisions 122 Harrison Ave., Brooklyn, 

1400 MOTLEY, JAMES M Manhattan Oil Co Oil 16 Broadway. [E. D. 

2346 MOULTON, CLARENCE F..A. F. Roberts & Co .Flour and Grain 3 State St. 

805 MOULTON, FRANCIS D. . .Francis D. Moulton & Co. . Salt 105 Water St. 

811 MOUNT, JAMES B Hyatt & Mount Flour and Grain ... .180 West St. 

818 MUIR, DAVID David Muir Provisions 2 Broadway. 

2474 MULLANE, A.J Mullane & Co Grain Cincinnati, Ohio. 

822 MULLER, CHAS. 0. C MuUer & Kruger Provisions 20 Exchange Place. 

1948 MULLER, RULEMAN McCoy & Co Cigars 101 Bowery. 

1552 MUMBY, GEO. W Geo. W. Mumby Flour 49 Liberty St., Brooklyn. 

821 MUMBY, JOS. H Jos. H. Mumby Flour 18 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

825 MUNGER, DE VINE M Nat. Freight & Light'ge Co . Lighterers 102 Broad St. 

814 MUNN, ALEX Munn & Jenkins Freight Brokers 61 Beaver St. 

696 MUNN, ALEX., JR David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov.^ South St. 

820 MUNN, CHAS. A David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov. 20 South St. 

819 MURCHISON, K. M Murchison & Co Naval Stores 74 Wall St. 

817 MURRAY, CHARLES Chas. Murray's Son Liquors 72 Roosevelt St. 

2195 MURRAY, JAMES T J. T. Murray Naval Stores 180 Pearl St. 

1495 MURTHA. TERENCE J . . . Terence J. Murtha Floiu- MUler 119 Hamilton Ave., Brooklyn. 

826 MYERS, MASON Myers & Underhill Flour and Grain ... .78 Dey SL 

828 MYERS, M. C M. C. Myers Flour and Grain ... .107 West St. 

829 MYHAN, ROBERT Myhan & Schenck Fish and Provisions.. 85 Dey St. 

2400 NASER, JAMES Moser & Naser Hops and Malt 7 Beaver St. 

859 NASH, JAMES H Nash & Whiton Salt .• 174 Reade St. 

1278 NASH, PHILIP D Philip D. Nash Lard Refiner 44 Water St. 

1542 NELSON, G. P V. W. Macfarlane & Co....Lard Refiners 138 Pearl St. 

864 NELSON, WM., JR Wm. Nelson, Jr Shipping 24 Old Slip. 

861 NESMITH, HENRY E . . . .Nesmith & Sons Shipping 28 South St. 

986 NESTBR, S. K Betz^& Nester Maltsters Gteneva,lN. Y. 

14 



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202 New York Produce Exchange. 

JUTo, Name, Firm, Bttsiness. Place of Busitiess. 

1896 ITBUHAUS, A. Mayer Bros. & Co Export 148 Pearl St. 

860 NEVIUS, PETER I P. I. Nevius & Son Ship Brokers 11 South St. 

2203 NEVIUS, WILLIAM H . . . . P. L Nevius & Son Ship Brokers 11 South ' St . 

1508 NEWLIN, EDWARD Edward Newlin Tea 133 Front St. 

1555 NEWLIN, HOWARD Howard Newlin Flour 334 Madison St., Brooklyn. ^ 

863 NEWMAN, JOHN John Newman Insurance 7 Water St. 

1610 NEWMAN, SAMUEL C H. E. Hicks & Co Flour and Grain 15 and 17 WhitehaU St . 

152 NEWMAN, WM. H W. H. Newman Auction 106 Broadway. 

1784 NEYHART, ADNAH Deceased. 

1861 NICHOLS, BRADLEY Franklin Edson & Co Grain 23 WhitehaU St . 

2473 NICHOLS, F. P J. Otto Koch Freight Broker 19 William St. 

1872 NICHOLS, tJEORGB E International Elevat'g Ass. Grain Elevating 1 Moore St. 

867 NICHOLS, GEO. H Ira Olds & Co Commission 17 Broadway. 

2114 NIEME YER, HERMAN Beling, Niemeyer & Wessels. Stowage Inspectors . . 72 Beaver St. 

128 NIGHTINGALE, J. W J. W. Nightingale Commission 140 Pearl St. 

868 NIMMONS, SAMUEL Samuel Nimmons Grain 60 Stone St. 

937 NORDENHOLT, GEO Brown & Nordenholt Lighterers 7 South St. 

870 NORMAN, ROBERT Robert Norman & Co Fiour and Grain 7 Bowling Green. 

871 NORRIS, JONATHAN W. . J. W. Norris & Co Provisions 237 Front St . 

2470 NORTON, EX Ex. Norton Com. Merchant 41 Broad St. 

1579 NORTON, E. N John Norton & Sons Ship Brokers 90 Wall St. 

2263 NORTON, THOMAS Thos. Norton & Co Shipping and Com . . 82 WaU St. 

1735 NORTON, T. P Deceased. 

1828 NORVELL, DUNCAN R . . . D. R. NorveU Freight Broker 113 Pearl St. 

872 NOSTRAND, THOS. C Thos. C. Nosti-and & Co . . . Grain and Feed 10 James Slip. 

2273 NOSTRAND, WM. H Thos. C. Nostrand & Co. . .Grain and Feed 10 James Slip. 

1875 NO YES, JOS. C J. H. Winchester «fe Co . . . . Ship Brokers 52 South" St. 

2381 NO YES, S. ST. JOHN Chas. Haight & Co Flour and Grain 27 Pearl St. 

874 OAKLEY, GILBERT Gilbert Oakley Flour 115 West St. 

876 OAKLEY, JESSE Jesse Oakley & Co Soap 5 White St. 

877 OAKLEY, M. B M. B. Oakley Provisions 86 Union Avenue, B'lyn, E D. 

875 OAKLEY, WM. H W. H.Oakley Provisions 19 4th Place, Brooklyn, 

596 OBBRMEYER, DAVID Obermeyer & Liebmann. . .Brewere 71 Bremen St., Brooklyn. 

684 O'BRION, E. A E. A. O'Brion Milling Milwaukee, Wis. 

1605 ODELL, LYMAN L. Odell Flour and Grain . . . . 38 Water St. 

1985 ODIO, B Odio & Perozo Shipping and Com. , . 140 Pearl St. 

2235 O^DONNELL, HUGH W. & H. O'Donnell Cooperage 3 Gouvemeur Slip. 

1448 OEHLERS, EMIL Oehlers & Cetera Provisions ..102 Thompson St. 

2427 OERLEIN, ROBERT Bockmann, Oerlein & Co . .Ship Brokers 6 South William St 

878 OERTEL, ALBERT C Oertel & Co Shipping and Com. . .29 Broadway. 

2207 OEST, WILLIAM LjTnan Blair Provisions 129 Broad St. 

2344 OFFLEY, D. REMSEN D. R. Offley Petroleum 126 Pearl St. 

1435 OGG, THADDEUS F Comm'l Elevating Asso'n. . Grain Elevating 5 Water St. 

1756 OHLEN, HENRY C H. C. Ohlen Petroleum 126 Maiden Lane. 

2404 OHLIGER, PHILIP J P. J. Ohliger Provisions 862 Second Avenue. 



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Names of Members, • 203 

^o. Name. Firm, BiLsiness. Place of Business, 

2205 OHX.SBN, HERMAN Herman Olilsen Flour B5 Front St. 

884 OLDS, IRA Ira Olds & Co Commission 17 Broadway. 

SaS OLIVER, GEORGE Gteo. Oliver & Co Produce 2 W. Washington Market. 

1571 ONDERDONK, WM. M W. M. Onderdonk & Co Insurance 32 WhitehaU St. 

1978 OPPENHEIMER, JULIUS . S. Oppenheimer Importing 14S Eldridge St. 

1389 OPPENHEIMER, S S. Oppenheimer Importing 143 Eldridge St. 

1878 O'REILEY, HUGH O'Reiley, Skelly & Fogarty .Rectifiers 205 West 19th St. 

967 ORPE, JOHN John Orpe Cheese 3 Broadway. 

886 ORR, ALEX. E David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov. .20 South St. 

1454 ORR, WM. B Munn & Jenkins Freight Brokers 61 Beaver St. 

2379 OS BORG, ADOLPH Adolph Osborg Cooper { ^'"'^S^/^ekuetB^J^oS^^ ^""^ 

888 OSBORN, ABNER Abner Osbom & Son Provisions 192 Greenwich St. 

889 OSBORN, EDW'D M '. .Reeve, Osbom & Co Grocers 132 Front St. 

891 OSBORNE, THOMAS Osborne Bros Cheese & Prov 12 Whitehall St. 

2299 O'SHAUGHNESSY, J. F. . . .J. F. O'Shaughnessy ..Commission 142 Pearl St. 

2206 OTIS, BENJ. W Ege & Otis Produce 168 W. Washington Market. 

890 OUTERBRIDGE, A. E A. EmiliusOuterbridge& Co. Shipping 29 Broadway. 

2478 OWENS, WM. F Wm. F. Owens Brokerage 7 Exchange Court. 

1165 PAGE, G. H ; . . A. BonneU Grain 104 West St. 

523 PAGENSTECHER, A Recknagel & Co Export 45 Cedar St. 

897 PALMER, DAVID David Palmer Flour 129 Broad St. 

2010 PALMER, W. A. F. H. Allen & Co Flour 38 Whitehall St. 

911 PALMETBR, CHAS. F S. Roberson & Co Flour 180 West St. 

908 PARISH, GONSIDE R E. W. Coleman & Co Flour and Grain 10 Water St. 

966 PARK, JOSEPH, Jr Park & Tilford Grocers 921 Broadway. 

2027 PARKER, ALFRED A Alfred A. Parker ..Lumber 115 WaU St. 

1761 PARKER, CHARLES Chas. Parker Provision Inspector. .15 Degraw St., Brooklyn. 

909 PARKER, CHARLES T . . . .Charles T. Parker Flour and Grain ... .13 Moore St. 

2437 PARKER, DE WITT H . . . . Watts, Parker & Co Provisions 75 Front St . 

902 PARKER, EDWARD F. H. Allen & Co Flour .. , 38 Whitehall St. 

896 PARKER, FORREST H Watts, Parker & Co Provisions 75 Front St. 

1793 PARKER, GEORGE C . . . . Geo. C. Parker Fish and Prov 257 Washington St. 

898 PARKER, H. C Chas. Parker. Provision Inspector . 15 Degraw St., Brooklyn. 

910 PARKER, HIRAM M H. M. Parker Provisions 27 Pearl St. 

1968 PARKER, JOHN W J. W. Parker & Co Ship Brokers 122 Pearl St. 

901 PARKER, THEO. S Parker & Gemmel. Ship Chandlers 150 West St. 

1866 PARKINSON, ROBE RT . . . . Robert Parkinson Wholesale Liquors ... 46 Whitehall St. 

907 PARR, BENJ Weeks, Douglass & Co! Flour 4 State St. 

2031 PARSONS, MILO H Milo H. Parsons & Co Oil and Commission.. 141 Maiden Lane. 

1.358 PABSONS, BOBT. W Murray, Ferris & Co Shipping 62 South St. 

1919 PARSONS, W. G. , Jb Slocovich & Co Ship Brokers 109 Pearl St. 

2036 PARTRICK, GEO. F Geo. Megrath Provisions 11 Front St. 

903 PARTRIDGE, CHAS Partridge & Smith Flour 129 Broad St. 

1777 PARTRIDGE, C. F Partridge & Smith Flour 129 Broad St. 

894 PASPATI, GEORGE N Ralli Brothers Import and Export . .101 Pearl St. 



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204 New York Produce Exchange. 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

Z21X PATCHKE, O. A E. Sanchez y Dolz Ship & Freight Bk'rs . 114 Pearl St. 

1798 PATERSON, ROBT. W Paterson, Downing & Co. . . Naval Storas 154 Front St. 

1706 PATRICK, ROBERT Robt. Patrick & Co Provisions .^ . . 20 Exchange Place. 

1573 PATTERSON, JAMES A. . . J. & J. A. Patterson & Co. .Com. Merchants . . . .Newbem, N. C. 

1511 PATTERSON, LUKE Luke Patterson Provisions 24 Whitehall St. 

892 PATTISON, WALWORTH ..Walworth Pattison Grain 102 Broad St. 

899 PAXSON, WILLIAM Wm. Paxson Flour and Grain 48 Whitehall St. 

893 PAYNE. 0. H Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St 

900 PAYNE, WM. H W. H. Payne Flour and Grain Foot E. 129th St. 

904 P AYSON , SAMUEL T Payson, Paul & Co Crackers 33 Courtlandt St. 

923 PEARSALL, EDWARD B. . . Pearsall Bros. & Fish Flour and Grain 32 Front St. 

1675 PEARSALL, WILLIAM. . . . Pearsall Bros. & Fish Flour and Grain 32 Front St. 

914 PEASE, WALTER A Joseph AUen & Co Flour 11 South St. 

1427 PECK, HENRY D American Exchange Co Insurance 61 Liberty St. 

927 PEEK, C. W P. F. Peek MiUer Yonkers, N. Y. 

918 PEGRAM, BEN J. R., Jii. . . . Benj. R. Pegram, Jr Flour and Grain 29 Moore St. 

915 PENDLETON, SAM'L H. . . . E. H. Skinker & Co Flour and Grain 97 Pearl St. 

922 PENDREIGH, GEO G. Pendreigh & Co Grain 18 William St. 

920 PENFIELD, JOSIAH Sherwood & Penfield Flour 21 South St. 

787 PENFIELD, W. A Whitney & Twombly N-.Y.C.& H.R.R.Elevator.43 WhitehaU St. 

1580 PENISTON, GEO. F Peniston & Co Flour and Grain 17 South St 

924 PEPPARD, JOHN P John F. Peppard Flour 30 Front St. 

54 PERKINS, JAS. D Perkins & Job General Com 27 South St. 

925 PERRIN, GRENVILLE Gren ville Perrin Storage 13 West St. 

2143 PERRY, C. T S. R. Post Provisions 115 Broad St. 

1892 PERRY, EDWARD Edward Periy Foreign Freight 52 Exchange P4ace. 

926 PERRY, THEODORE Theodore Perry Provisions 3 Water St. 

1284 PETTUS, STEPHEN Pollard, Pettus & Co Commission 54 Broad St. 

1779 PFARRIUS, ERNEST Burlage & Co Shipping & Com. . . .45 Exchange Place. 

809 PFEFFERLE, HENRY C. . .John F. Pfefferle Iron and Metals 526 Wash'gton St., Hoboken . 

929 PFEIPFER, ANDREW Andrew PfeifEer Baker 39th St. and Ninth Ave. 

928 PFEIFFER, GEORGE Geo. Pfeiffer Flour 142 Essex St. 

698 PFEIFFER, GEORGE Geo. Pfeiffer Baker Myrtle Ave. and Skillman St. , 

1306 PFINGSTHORN, A. W A. W. Pfing.sthorn Petroleum 5 William St. [Brooklyn. 

1437 PHELAN, THOMAS Thomas Phelan , Carman 128 Broad St. 

934 PHILIPS, WM. H 101 Front St. . 

930 P HILLIPS, AARON H PhiUips & Co Flour and Grain 31 Moore St. 

935 PHILLIPS, EDWARD Edward PhiUips Freight Broker 6 South WilUam St. 

932 PHILLIPS, FRED. W Phillips & Co Flour and Grain 31 Moore St. 

1760 PHILLIPS, JOHN V Wm. M. Tilden & Co Hog Slaughterers . . ..Ft. West 40th St. 

933 PHILLIPS, LAWRENCE . . . Lawrence Phillips Insurance 85 Beaver St. 

2210 PHILLIPS, MILTON B . . . .M. B. Phillips & Co Flour 29 Moore St. 

1957 PHILLIPS, ROBT. R Edward Phillips Freight Broker 6 South William St. 

1404 PHILLIPS, S. L President 3d Ave. R. R . . . . Transportation 3d Ave. & 65th St. 

936 PHILLIPS, SIMEON W.... PhiUips & Co Flour and Grain 31 Moore St. 



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Names of Members. 205 

No, Name, Firm. Btisinesg, Place of Business. 

931 , PHILLIPS, WM. I Phillips & Co Flour and Grain 31 Moore St. 

2394 PIATTI, ATTILIO B G. Pendreigh & Co G-rain 35 Broadway. 

2421 PIDGEON", PR A.NK, JR.^. . . . Prank Pidgeon, Jr Ship Broker 6 Coenties Slip. 

212 PIERCE, W. G W. G. Pierce Produce Watertown, N. Y. 

1791 PIERSON, LEWIS Lewis Pierson Flour and Grain South Orange, N. J. 

940 PIM, GEORGE F Pirn, Forward & Co Shipping and Com . . .56 WaU St. 

938 PINGLE, JAMES E Pingle & Blackman Flour and Grain 37 Water St. 

939 PINTO, FRANCIS E F.E.Pinto.... Storage 37 Pearl St. 

2170 PINTO, FRANCIS E., JR...F. E. Pinto Storage 37Pearl St 

378 PINTO, WM. A F. E. Pinto Storage 37 Pearl St. 

1754 PITOU, EUGENE Eugene Pitou Petroleum 9 South William St. 

229 PITOU, GEO. W Geo. W. Pitou Petroleum 9 South William St. 

2198 PLATT, CLAYTON CatUn & Satterthwaite . . . .Marine Insurance ... 45 Wall St. 

2362 PLATT, J. D Dwight & Piatt Shipping 28 South St. 

1636 PLATT, W. H Foote & Piatt Hops and Malt 12 Water St. 

1843 PLUMMER, ROSWELL . . . .George Tait Grain 25 South William St. 

1831 PLUYGERS, HENRY . . . : .C. C. Abel & Co Shipping & Com .... 9 South William St. 

941 POHLE, THEODORE C....Brinkerhoff & Co Crackers 229 Grand St. 

40 POHS, E Meissner, Ackermann & Co. Petroleum 48 Beaver St. 

942 POMEROY, J. B Pomeroy & Karcher Provisions 104 Grand St., B'klyn, E. D. 

1969 POOL, CHA.S. A Whitney & Twombly isr.Y. C. & l-l. R. R. Elev'r.43 Whitehall St. 

949 POOL, JOHN H Jno. H. Pool & Macy Lard .33 Water St. 

2187 POPHAM, M. S Wm. H. Popham & Co Lard Refiners 53 Front St. 

947 POPHAM, WILLIAM H . . . . Wm. H. Popham & Co ... . Lard Refiners 53 Front St. 

2208 PORTEOUS, JAMES Andrew Stuart & Co Bankers 34 Pine St. 

951 PORTER, THOS. E Porter & Wetmore Butter and Cheese . . .69 Broad Pt. 

2211 POST, EDWARD P Post & Ghmm Butter and Cheese ... 71 Broad St. 

943 POST, STEPHEN R S. R. Post Provisions 115 Broad St. 

1517 POTTER, ELISHAL E. L. Potter Flour 16 Front St. 

945 POTTER, JONATHAN W. . .J. W. Potter Flour and Grain .... .Bloomfield, N. J. 

1366 POTTSR, W. E W. E. Potter Cooper 26 Water St. 

950 POTTLE, JONATHAN W. . .Pottle & Jacoby Flour and Grain 17 Whitehall St. 

944 POUCH, ALFRED J J. A. Bostwick & Co Petroleum 141 Pearl St. 

1393 POWELL, HENRY Henry PoweU Grain 18 William St. 

2249 POWELL, B. V. W Powell & Co Flour and Feed f44 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn. 

952 POWELL, WM., Jr Wm. PoweU & Co Lard 3 Bowling Green. 

946 POWER, WM. H Wm. H. Power & Co Flour and Grain 134 Pearl St. 

1774 PRATT, CHARLES Charles Pratt & Co Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

370 PRATT, EDWARD Thomas H. Stevens Provisions 3 State St. 

2214 PRESSE Y, ANDREW Haviland & Pressey Grain 7 Coenties Slip. 

959 PRESTON, C HAS. P W. S. Preston Flour and Grain 6 Front St. 

955 PRESTON, FRED'K Morice & Preston Insurance 17 William St. 

954 PRESTON, WM. I Wm. I. Preston Grain 12 Bridge St. 

958 PRESTON, WM. R W. R. Preston & Co Flour and Grain 66 Pearl St. 

1462 PRESTON, WM. S W. S. Preston Flour and Grain 6 Front St. 



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206 New Tafk Produce Exchange. 

Xfo. Name. Firm. Bvsiness. Place of Bv^ness. 

1799 PRICE, NATHAIT Thomas & Benham Flour, Butter & Cheese. . . 108 Broad St. 

1732 PRICE, WALTER J Beadleston, Price & Woerz. . B;rewers 29l West 10th St. 

957 PRICE, WM. H March, Price & Co Com. Merchants 91 Water St. 

1474 PRIOR, JAMES James Prior Baker 486 Pearl St. 

150 PRITCHARD, EMILIO Hughes, Hickox & Co Flour and Grain 36 Whitehall St. 

1921 PRYER, JASPER Jed Prye & Co Lumber, Pish, Oil, &c.47 Water St. 

963 PUFFER, GEO. D N. Y. Floating Elevator Co.. Grain Elevating 47 Pearl St". 

'960 PULLING, ABM. C A. C. Pulling Maltster 6 Broome St. 

961 PURTON, HENRY J H. J. Purton Flour and Grain 25 William St. 

964 PYLE, JAMES James Pyle Soap 350 Washington St. 

2433 QUINAN, H. J Wm. Bingham & Co Exporters 47 Exchange Place. 

965 QUINB Y, FRANEXIN Brown, Rice & Quinby Flour and Grain 35 Pearl St. 

2396 RADCLIFFE, JACOB I The Grain Warehous-g Cc . Grain Storage 5 Moore St. 

2029 RADCLIFFE, W. H LP. Bennett & Co Flour and Grain 3 South St. 

2088 RAE, G. BENTHAM G. Bentham Rae Export and Import , . 20 Exchange Place. 

2204 RAFTER, EDWARD.* Edward Rafter Grocer 179 First Avenue. 

416 RALLI, LUCAS E RaUi Bros Import and Export . . 101 Pearl St. 

981 RALSTON, DUNCAN C . . . . D. C. Ralston Commission 18 WilUam St. 

968 RAMSAY, CHAS. G C. G. Ramsay & Co General Merchants . .87 Wall St. 

1781 RAMSAY, MALCOM A. R. Gray & Co Transportation 110 Broad St. 

1951 RANDEBROCK, OTTO Herman Stursberg & Co. . .Exponting 35 Broad St. 

975 RANDOLPH, EDWD F. ...E. F. Randolph Seed 64 Peari St. 

2218 RANDOLPH, JOHN J. F. . . T. E. F. Randolph & Co. . . .Flour and Grain 196 West St. 

974 RANDOLPH, T. E. F T. E. F. Randolph & Co. . . .Flour and Grain 196 West St. 

574 RANGER, SOLOMON Fatman & Co Export Broad St., cor. Beaver. 

2259 RASMUS, WILLIAM Rasmus & Lissignolo Stocks, Bonds & Gold 49 Exchange Place. 

1804 RATHBONE, ROBT. C Rathbone & Satterlee Insurance 176 Broadway. 

177 RATHBONE, W. G Busk & Jevons Merchants 74 Beaver St. 

657 RAY, W. AUGUSTUS Ray & Chambers Grain and Prov Chicago, 111. 

976 RAYMOND, GEORGE George Raymond Grain Measurer 108 West St. 

1539 RAYNOR, GEO. B Geo. B. Raynor Flour 129 Broad St. 

977 RAYNOR, JAS. W 110 Warren St. 

1484 READ, EDWARD Edward Read Provisions 115 Broad St. 

984 REAMER, J. EDGAR E. T. Swezey & Co Commission 7 State St. 

1934 REBOUL, H. W .* H. W. Reboul Furs. ., 33 Howard St. 

985 REED, HORATIO Chas. White &Co Hog Slaughterers . . . Foot West 40th St. 

991 REED, HORATIO M H. M. Reed Hog Slaughterer .... Foot West 40th St. 

938 REED, ISAAC H Isaac H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain 5 State St. 

992 REED, PHILANDER Philander Reed Potatoes, &c 22 Old SUp. 

990 REEVES, GEO. H Reeves & Church Packing Boxes 132 Front St. 

2103 REID, JAMES Cahill & Reid Prov. Insi)ectors . . . . 3 State St, 

798 REILAY, A. P A. P. Reilay Weigher 57 Grove St. 

982 REQUA, HENRY M A. F. Roberts & Co Flour and Grain ... .3 State St. 

983 REQUA, JAMES M J. M. Requa & Co Flour and Grain ... .23 South St, 

989 RBTON, GEORGE George Reton Cooper 585 Washington St. 



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Names of Members, 207 

No, Name. Firm. Business. Place of Biisiness. 

2411 RBYCRAFT, S. S S. S. Reycraft Cooper 5 State St. • 

1383 REYNOLDS, WILLIAM .... Wm. Reynolds Provisions 109 Leff erts Place, Brooklyn. 

996 RICE, EDWARD C Brown, Rice & Quinby . . Flour and Grain ... 27 Pearl St 

998 RICE, LUTHER J Luther J. Rice Produce Commission. 105 Broad St. 

1117 RICHARDS, J. J J. J. Richards Provisions & Grain . . 1 State St. 

999 RICHARDSON, ASA B A. B. Richardson Hops and Malt 1 Water St. 

1000 RICHARDSON, FRED. C. . .Fred. C. Richardson & Co. Shipping and Com. . .60 Stone St. 

1020 RICHARDSON, JAMES Richardson & Co Grocers 53 Vesey St . 

1019 RICHARDSON, P. C Foster, Richardson & Co. . .Produce Com 38 Pearl St. 

286 RICHARDSON, T. C Fred. C. Richardson & Co. . . Shipping and Com. . .60 Stone St. 

997 RICHARDSON, THOS Thos. Richardson Shipping and Com. . . 45 Exchange Place. 

1018' RICKER, SAMUfiL A S. A. Ricker Packer Union Stock Yards, Chicago. 

994 RIEGELMANN, JNO., JR. . . Riegelmann & Riehle ...... Flour 48 Front St. 

2305 RIESS, LEO Leo Riess Stocks, Bonds, &c. . .26 Broad St. 

2237 RIGNE Y, THOMAS Thomas Rigney & Co Produce Com 121 Pearl St 

1017 RIKER, WILLIAM J J. L. & D. S. Riker Import'g and Com. . .45 Cedar St 

2307 RINGE, H Wreden, Ringe & Co Wholesale Grocers . . .37 Broadway, Brooklyn. 

1612 RIONDA, JOAQUIN Rionda, Benjamin & Co. .Shipping & Com. . . .9 Old Slip. 

548 RIVERA, H. C De. : J. De Rivera & Co Import'g and Com. . .114 Pearl St 

2380 RIVERA, JOHN DE •. . Thos. De Rivera & Co Merch'dise Brokers . . 140 Pearl St. 

314 RIVERA, THOS. De Thos. De Rivera & Co Merch'dise Brokers. . 140 Pearl St. 

1792 RIVERA, WM. De Wm. De Rivera Insurance Broker ... 115 Pearl St 

1023 ROBB, JOS. W I. H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain 5 State St 

1054" ROBBINS, CHAS. F R. W. Ropes & Co Flour and Grain 73 Pearl St 

1048 ROBBINS, SILAS T S. T. Robbins , Grain and Feed 1 Broome St. 

1869 ROBBINS, WM. H S. T. Robbins Grain and Feed 1 Broome St. 

1044 ROBE, HENRY C Henry C. Robe Transportation 7 South St 

1064 ROBERSON, WM. H S. Roberson & Co Flour 180 West St. 

1026 ROBERTS, ADDISON F A. F. Roberts & Co Flour and Grain 3 State St. 

1037 ROBERTS, EDWARD M. . . .Roberts Bros Grain 13 Broadway. 

1040 ROBERTS, FRED. E Hughes, Hickox & Co Flour and Grain ... 36 WhitehaU St. 

1052 ROBERTS, GEO. H Roberts, Collin & Co Flour 3 Front St. 

1025 ROBERTS, LEWIS L. Roberts & Co Flour and Grain .... 17 South St . 

1035 ROBERTS, WILLIAM L. . . .Roberts Bros Grain 13 Broadway. 

2340 ROBERTSON, HENRY Lancashire'lns. Co Insurance 187 Broadway. 

2448 ROBERTSON, J. P H. C. Derby & Co Provisions Foot West 39th St 

1603 ROBINSON, EDWARD D. . .E. D. Robinson Seeds 5 Coenties Slip . 

1050 ROBINSON, GEO. B G. B. Robinson Flour 7 Water St. 

1787 ROBINSON, H.J Lang & Robinson Flour 1 Front St 

2359 ROBINSON, J. P J. P. & G. C. Robinson .... Storage, &c 14 Coenties SUp . 

2360 ROBINSON, J. P., JR J. P. & G. C. Robinson .... Storage, &c.' 14 Coenties Slip. 

2280 ROBY, BEN J. P Western Union Tel. Co. ... Telegraph Produce Exchange. 

2337 ROCKEFELLER, JNO. D . . Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St . 

1 046 ROCKEFELLER, WM Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St. 

1024 ROE, ALBERT S Chamberlain, Roe & Co. . . . Lard Refiners & Prov.25 Peaii St . 

1059 ROE, LIVINGSTON Livingston Roe Petroleum 125 Pearl St. 



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208 New York Produce Exchange, 

No, NaTne. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

2430 BODOCAN ACHI, J. M Calvocoressi & Rodocanachi .... Shipping and Com. . .17 William St. 

2216 EOE, RICHARD R Richard R. Roe Pish and Provisions . 262 Greenwich St . 

1038 ROGERS, GOUVERNEUR . . Tripp, Rogers & Co Grain Foot West .34th St. 

1720 ROGERS, HENRY H Chas. Pratt & Co Petroleum 128 Pearl St . 

1027 ROHE, CHARLES Rohe & Brother Lard Ref rs &, Prov . . 268 West 33d St . 

1028 ROHE, JOSEPH Jos. Rohe Provisions 899 8th Avenue . 

970 ROMAINE, L. T Romaine & Rait Staves 63 Beaver St. 

1042 ROMER, ALFRED Romer & See Flour 183 West St. 

1047 ROMER, JOHN J. Romer & Co Flour 174 West St. 

1696 ROOD, ALBERT W Rood & Martin Hog Slaughterers . . .Foot West 39th St . 

1062 ROOD, L. W Tobey & Booth Hog Slaughterers . . .Foot West 39th St. 

2342 ROOS, B. C B. C. Roos & Co Commission 20 State St. 

757 ROPES, W. H R. W. Ropes & Co Flour and Grain ... .73 Pearl St. 

2219 ROSE, C. WILLIAM C. William Rose Petroleum 4 Hanover St. 

1056 ROSE, THEODORE Oelrichs & Co Shipping 2 Bowling Green. 

2466 ROSE, W. C Board Petroleum Weighers . Petroleum 18 William St. 

1058 ROSENBACK, SAMUEL. . . .Rosenback & Co TaUow 44th St. & 1st Ave. 

1593 ROSENFELS, S. W S. W. Rosenf els Shipping and Com . . 29 Broad St. 

338 ROSENHEIM, MORITZ M. Rosenheim & Co Maltsters 308 E. 61st St. 

292 ROSS, WILLIAM G Wm. G. Ross Rectifier 64 Water St. 

2432 ROSSITER, F. P Rossiter & Skidmore Provisions Ill Broad St . 

1445 ROSSITER, WALTER K. . .Walter K. Rossiter Insurance 3 Bowling Green. 

1032 ROSSITER, WILLIAM W. . . Rossiter & Skidmore Provisions Ill Broad St . 

1041 ROUDEBUSH, CLINT Clint Roudebush Petroleum 128 Pearl St . 

1401 ROUNDE Y, BENJ. B B. B. Roundey Provisions 115 Broad St . 

1972 ROUNTREE, ROBT. H Rountree & Co Com. Merchants 72 Water St. 

1033 ROUSE, MARTIN (ioulard, Rouse & Bostwick Prov. Inspectors 36 Whitehall St. 

2112 ROUSSEAUX, JULES Fenaille, Chatilion & Despeaiix . . Com. Merchants 64 Beaver St. 

1039 ROUTH, FRED^K R F. R. & S. D. Routh Grain 48 Exchange Place. 

1034 ROUTH, HENRY De B H. L. Routh & Sons Gram 44 Beaver St. 

2302 ROWAN, JAMES M Jas. M.Rowan ProduceCom 61 Park Place. 

1676 ROWAN, JESSE C J. C. Rowan & Co Grain 38 Whitehall St. 

1053 ROWAN, JOHN R J. T. Davies & Co Provisions 33 Broadway 

1031 ROWLAND, SAMUEL Rowland & Co Flom- and Grain 67 Front St . 

2136 ROWSON, CECIL Cecil Rowson Cheese and Prov 35 Broadway. 

1061 RUDD, JOSEPH, JR Woodhouse & Rudd Shipping and Com. . .134 Water St. 

1576 RUGER, EMIL Ruger Bros. & Co Ship Brokers 99 Pearl St. 

2227 RUGER, THEODORE Theodore Ruger Ship Broker 5 Wniiam St. 

1066 RUIZ, JUAN Juan Ruiz Shipping and Com. . .Ibl Pearl St. 

1065 RUPRECHT, C. W C. W. Ruprecht Broker 42 Beaver St. 

2414 RUPRECHT, PHILIP Gust Heye Petroleum 5 » l^e St. 

2320 RYAN, CHAS. H Simpson, Clapp & Co Ship Brokers 118 Wall St . 

2461 RYCKMAN, P. OBERT N. Y. Produce Exchange.. .Cashier 37 Whitehall St. 

2217 RYDER, ALFRED V A V. Ryder Flom- 66 Front St. 

1068 RYDER, S, OSCAR S. Oscar Ryder Flour 66 Front St. 

1451 BYER, THOMAS J Thos. J. Ryer Insurance 27 Pearl St. 



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Names of Members. 209 

J^o, Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

452 SABATIER, ERNEST E.^Sabatier Brokerage 39 Beaver St, 

1069 SABIN", CHAS. D Chas. D, Sabin Provisions 25 Water St. 

311 SABIN, N. H Chas. D. Sabin Provisions 25 Water St. 

2164 SAGE, R. E Deceased. 

1070 SAGER, RICHARD Richard Sager Provisions 49FirstAve. 

2224 SAGER, THOS. R Richard Sager Provisions 49 Eirst Ave. 

147 SALMON, H. H H. H. Salmon Commission 85 West St. 

2405 SALTER, THOS. P Salter & Livermore Ship Brokers 65 Beaver St. 

1307 SAND AY, SAMUEL Wm. Bingham & Co Exporters 45 Exchange PI. 

1071 SANDERSON, SIDNEY Sidney Sanderson Grain 1 State St. 

1073 SANFORD, CARL Carl Sanford Provisions 466 Clermont Ave., B'klyn. 

2335 SANFORD, JOHN R Carl Sanford Provisions 466 Clermont Ave . , B'klyn . 

2080 SANFORD, WM. H Wm. H. Sanford Provisions 466 Clermont Ave., B'klyn . 

1074 SAUERBRITNN, JACOB. . . .Jacob Sauerbrunn & Co. . .Flour 995 Broadway, B'klyn. 

1627 SAUNBY, J. D J. D. Samiby Milling London, Canada. 

2457 SAWYER, E. G Sawyer, WaUace & Co . . . . Commission Merchts.47 Broad St . 

1072 SAWYER, SAMUEL A Sawyer, Wallace & Co Commission Merchtfi.47 Broad St. 

1812 SAWYER, T. MITCHELL. . . T. Mitchell Sawyer Naval Stx)res 138 Maiden Lane. 

2140 SAllERS, DAVID Thomas & Benham Flour, Butter & Cheese . . 108 Broad St. 

1842 SAYRE, T. S T. S. Sayre Brokerage 12 Bridge St. 

613 SCAMMELL, F. E Scammell Bros ShipJ^Brokers 31 South St. 

1075 SCHAEPER, FRED'K ! F. & M. Schaefer Brewers 112 East 51st St . 

2275 SCHAEFER, HENRY C . . . .Culver & Schaefer Flour and Feed 321 5th St. 

1086 SCHAFF, ANSELM Van Winkle & Schaff Ship Chandlers 205 West St. 

845 SCHALK, RUDOLPH Emil Schalk & Co Petroleum 50 Beaver St. 

2225 SGHEDLER, FRANCIS X . . .F. X. Schedler & Co Restaurant 32 Pearl St. 

1083 SCHEFFLER, ALBERT Albert Scheffler Provisions 19 William St. 

1548 SCHEIDE, W. T Adnah Ney hart's Executor . Petroleum Tideoute, Pa. 

2033 SGHELLER, HUGO J. Lourie Com. Merchant 25 William St. 

1079 SCHEUER, SIMON Simon Scheuer Grocer 736 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 

1568 SCHICICHAUS, ED WD Schickhaus & Pruden Provisions 9 Commerce St., Newark, N.J. 

2452 SGHIEDT, W. F W. F. Schiedt Foreign Broker 49 Broadway. 

1598 SCHILLING, EMIL E. Schilling Petroleum 42 Exchange Place. 

1076 SCHMIDT, HENRY W Neidlinger, Schmidt & Co. .Maltsters 406 East 47th St. 

1565 SCHMIDT, JACOB W J. M. Precht Ship Broker 1 WiUiam St. 

1626 SCHMITT, CHAS Chas. Schmitt Petroleum 72 Beaver St. 

2296 SCHMITT, EDMUND Chas. O. Corn Provisions 63 Beaver St. 

1518 SGHNITZSPAHN, FERD . . .Ferd. Schnitzspahn Provisions .'27 Front St. 

1087 SGHOE LLER, JACOB Kupper, Keil &, SchoeUer . . Flour 64 Front St . 

lOSO SCH0LE3, IRVINE Scholes Brothers Grocers 357 East Houston St . 

1035 SCHOONMAKER, L. H L. H. Schoonmaker Provisions Ill Broad St. 

846 SGHRAMME, CHRIS. F .... J. Hess & Co Petroleum & Naval Stores.17 South William St. 

1 677 SGHREINER, EDWARD . . . Edward Schreiner Provisions 76 Broad St. 

1803 SCHROEDER, CHRIST'R D.Weber & Schroeder Provisions 137 Division St . 

2030 SOHULTHEIS, JNO Schultheis & Stutz Provisions 695 Broadway, Brooklyn. 

987 SOHULTZ, 0. H H. Becker & Go Shipping and Coai. . .23 South Wm. Sfc. 



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210 New York Produce ExcJiange. 

No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business, 

21 66 SCHULTZ, CH AS. H Hoffman Fire Ins. Co Fire Insurance » . 130 Broadway. 

2071 SCHULTZ, GEO. B Schultz & Acker MiUers Stuyvesant, N. Y. 

895 SCHULTZ, JUSTUS H. Becker & Co Shipping and Com . 23 South WiUiam St. 

1924 SCHWAB, GUSTAV Oebrichs & Co Shipping 2 Bowling Green. 

1081 SCHWEGLER, JOHN Jno. Schwegler Baker 1443 Third Ave . 

1078 SCHWEYER, EDWARD ... .A. & E. Schweyer Maltsters 10th Ave . and 43d St . 

1083 SCOTT, GEORGE S Geo. S. Scott Com. Merchant 66 Pine St. 

2149 SCHOTT, W. H Gen'l Transatlantic Co French Line S. S 55 Broadway. 

1533 SCRIPTURE, P. E F. E. Scripture Grain 13 Moore St. 

2141 SC R YMSER, W. LESLIE. . . Chas. Pratt & Co rPetroleum 128 Pearl St. 

1094 SEAGER, JOHN C Jno. C. Seager Ship Broker 17 WilUam St. 

1067 SEAMAN, EGBERT B Seaman & Rynus Trucking 118 Broad St. 

1864 SEAMAN. SAMUEL H Clark & Seaman Freight 86 West St. 

1096 SEARLES, JNO. E., JR L. W. & P. Armstrong .... Grocers New Haven, Conn . 

1089 SEARLES, STEPHEN G Deceased. 

1091 SEARS, CHAS. E Jed. Frye & Co Fish, Lumber and OlI.47 Water St . 

2283 SECKEL, THOMAS Walter Carr & Co Butter, Cheese, &c. .37 Pearl St. 

1964 SEE, JOSEPH B Romer & See Flour 183 West St. 

1092 SEE, WILLIAM H A. Bonnell Flour and Feed 104 West St. 

227 SEELY, G. W Seely & Sweeney Seed, Hay, Grain, &C.86 Market Slip. 

50 SEGUINE, COLUMBUS . . . . C. Seguine Provisions Ill Broad St. 

1788 SEIFERD, LOUIS, jR Seiferd & Bro Provisions 212 East 86th St. 

1090 SELBY, WM Wm. Selby Provisions 367 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 

1717 SELIGSBERG, JULIUS .... Julius Seligsberg Flour 1 Front St. 

626 SELVAGE, EDWIN* Floating Elevator Co Grain Elevating 35 Pearl St. 

1097 SERGEANT, ALFRED J. . .A. J. Sergeant Lighterer 31 Pearl St. 

2045 SERVER, EDWARD A Rhodes & Server Butter and Cheese . . 26 WhitehaU St. 

1944 SEWALL, HENRY F Giinnell, Minturn & Co ... . Shipping 78 South St . 

1409 SEYMOUR, C. ST. JOHN. . C. St. John Seymour Insui'ance 23 Whitehall St. 

1103 SH AFER, NATHAN B Shaf er & Wesselhoefft Produce 10, 12 and 1 3 W. W. Market . 

63 SHAILER, H H. Shailer Commission Baltimore, Md. 

779 SHARP, B. P B. P. & T. K. Sharp Hops and Malt 89 Broad St. 

2393 SHAW, G. E The Gram Warehousing Co . Grain Storage 5 Moore St . 

1099 SHAW, LEANDER B The Grain Warehousing Co . Grain Storage 5 Moore St . 

1683 SHAW, MARK Simpson & Shaw Ship Chandlers 27 Coenties Slip. 

1107 SHAW, WILLIAM G Marples & Shaw Provisions 30 Whitehall St. 

2229 SHAY, DANIEL J Daniel J. Shay Carman 17 Coenties SHp. 

1327 SHEPARD, C. N J. M. & Hy. Webb Cheese. . . ; 7 State St. 

1581 SHEPHERD, CALEB W. . . .C. W. Shepherd Broker 39 Pearl St. 

2357 SHEPPARD, D. V. L McCartan & Logan Lighterers 47 Pearl St. 

1098 SHERMAN, DAVID H Sherman L Gillett Ship'rs of Fresh Beef .Jersey City, N. J . 

1101 SHERMAN, JOHN John Sherman Flour 5 South St. 

1102 SHERWOOD, FRED'K Sherwood & Penfield Flour 21 South St. 

1494 SHERWOOD, IRVING Irving Sherwood Oils 140 Maiden Lane. 

1563 SHERWOOD, R. R. 0. Sherwood Flour and Grain ....21 South St. 

265 SHIELDS, E. N B. N. Shields Prodace Com 30 Falton St., W. W. M'ket. 



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Names of Members, 211 

No. Name, Firm. Business. Fleece of Business. 

2304 SHIELDS, WM. H Wm. H. Shields Flour and Grain ... .129 Broad St. 

2287 SHORTLAND, STEPH. F. . S. F. Shortland & Bro Lighterers 106 WaU St. 

1106 SHOTWELL, THEO Vail, ShotweU & Co Flour Millers 52 Greenwich St . 

1105 SHOTWELL, HUGH W . . . . H. W. Shotwell & Co Grain and Feed 4 South St . f B'klyn, E. D 

1100 SHTJLTZ, JOHN H Jno. H. Shultz Baker Harrison Ave. & Rutledge St. 

2468 SILBERHORN", JOHN J . . . . Wm. H. SHberhom & Bro , Provisions 92 Chrystie St. 

1108 SILBERHORN, WM. H Wm. H Silberhom & Bro . Provisions 92 Chrystie St . 

1543 SILKMAN, THOMAS H....A. F Roberts «& Co Flour 3StateSt. 

1459 SILLS, E. K Chas. E. Heuberer Grain ' 30 Columbia St., Brooklyn. 

1113 SILLS, JOHN S Smith & SiUs Flour and Feed 7508th Ave. 

665 SIMM, ABRAHAM Simm Bros. & Co Distilling & Refining . 307 E. 54th St. 

1109 SIMMONDS, ALEX. H Stmmonds & Gildemeister. Shipping and Com. .63 Beaver St. 

1114 SIMONDS, FRED'K W F. W. Simonds Flour, Grain, &c. . . . 18 South Wm. St. 

1112 SIMONS, AUGUSTUS H. . . A. H. Simons Provisions 27 Front St. 

2256 SIMPSON, E. L Joshua S. Tucker & Co. ...Shippmg 54 Pine St. 

1613 SINCLAIR, ARTHUR A. Sinclair Provisions 14 Moore St. 

2251 SINCLAIRE, F. S A. B. Gibbs&Co Commission 172 Pearl St. * 

1110 SINCLAIR, JOHN John Sinclair & Co Provisions 35 Broadway. 

1111 SINCLAIR, THOMAS M. . . , T. M. Sinclair & Co Provisions Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

1973 SKIDMORE, CHAS. H Rossiter & Skidmore Provisions Ill Broad St. . 

1115 SEINKER, EDWD. H E. H. Skinker & Co Flour and Grain 97 Pearl St . 

1116 SLADE, GEO. W Allen, Slade &; Co Flour and Prov FaH River, Mass . 

1118 SLEDGE, GEO. C Geo. C. Sledge Provisions 115 Broad St. 

1441 SLOCOVICH, GEO Slocovich & Co Ship Brokers 109 Pearl St. . 

1601 SMITH, A. E : S. Roberson & Co Flour 180 West St. 

2087 SMITH, ALMERIN M F P.Woodbury Provisions 14 Water St. 

2117 SMITH, BERNARD Bernard Smith Wholesale Grocery . .690 Fifth Ave., Brooklyn. 

1128 SMITH, CHAS. H Chas. H. Smith Provisions 115 Broad St. 

1124 SMITH, CORNELIUS Cornelius Smith Provisions 115 Broad St . 

1127 SMITH, DAN. B Dan. B. Smith Beans, Peas, &c 74 Warren St. 

1120 SMITH, E. CLARK Smith & CauDdns Grocers NeWLondon, Conn. 

1873 SMITH, EDWD. P Van Valer, Warner & Co . .Flour 9 South St. 

2226 SMITH, FRANK. Frank Smith Produce , 

1121 SMITH, FRANK E F. E. Smith & Co Flour Millers 20 HamHton Ave., B'klyn. 

1607 SMITH, FRED. W Fred. W. Smith Flour. 3SouthSt. 

1129 SMITH, GEORGE W J. M. Fiske & Co Flour and Grain 18 South St. 

1122 SMITH, H. EUGENE P . E. Smith & Co Flour MiUers 20 HamUton Av . , Brooklyn . 

1119 SMITH, HENRY W 9 South St. 

65 SMITH, J. ADDISOJ^ Harrison & Smith InspY Petroleum, &c.61 So. Gay St., Baltimore, Md . 

1644 SMITH, JAMES B Jas. B. Smith Grocer New Ha ven, Conn . 

1678 SMITH, JAMES H Equity Board of Meas'rs . . Grain Measurer 40 WhitehaU St . 

1556 SMITH, JULIUS J Bicgelmann & Riehle Flour 48 Front St. 

2176 SMITH, J. M W. O. Smith & Co Shipi)ing and Com. . . 53 Exchange Place. 

. 1015 SMITH, KINGSL AND F. E. Smith & Co MiUers 18 Hamilton Ave., Brooklyn . 

1772 SMITH, PHILETUS, Jr.. . .Partridge & Smith Flour 129 Broad St . 

2106 SMITH, EUSSELL Alex. Smith Grain 62 Comhill Chambers, London. 



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212 New York Produce Exchange. 



No. Name. Firm. Business. = Place of Business. 

2047 SMITH, R. O R. 0. Smith Grain Broker 11 Moore St. 

1902 SMITH, THOMAS Thomas Smith Grain Clyde, N. Y. 

1131 SMITH, W. E., JR Smith L UnderhiU Butter and Cheese. . 74 Broad St . 

1123 SMITH, W. E Smith &; Armfield Provisions 13 Fulton St., Brooklyn. 

-11 SMITH, WM. H . Jesse Hoyt & Co Flour and Grain 19 South St. 

1130 SMITH. WALTER J Walter J . Smith Flour, Grain and Seed. ..52 Exchange Place. 

1133 SMTJLL, JACOB B Inman Lme S. S Shipping 15 Broadway. 

1974 SMYTH, GEO. B Geo. B. Smyth Pork Packing Keokuk, Iowa. 

1136 SNECKNER, WM. H Walter Carr & Co Butter, Cheese, &c. . .37 Pearl St. 

1134 SNELL, LANSING D L. D . SneU & Co Butter and Cheese.. . .13 ^VhitehaU St . 

1135 SNOW, ALFRED D Snow & Burgess Shippin* 66 South St. 

2095 SOHNS, E E. Sohns Shipping 44 Beaver St. 

1816 SONE, LOUIS V Sone & Flemmg Mfg Co.. Petroleum 126 Pearl St. 

1947. SONN, HYMAN Sonn Brothers Salt and Fish 365 Washington St. 

2115 SONNEBORN, JONAS Guggenheim & Co Petroleum 15 Beaver St. 

87 SOREY, W. F Murchison & Co Naval Stores 74 WaU St. 

1137 SOUTTER, CHAS. B Jno. Sinclair & Co Provisions 35 Broadway. 

1141 SPAULDING, ALBERT S . . A. S. Spaulding Provisions 370 8th Ave. 

2230 SPEAR, ALFRED W A. W Spear & Co Gold and Silver Assayers. . 121 Fulton St, 

1144 SPEAR, CHARLES Charles Spear Hay and Grain 85 West St. 

2223 SPEAR, HOWARD Charles Spear Hay and Grain 85 West St. 

1029 SPECKEL, GUST AVE F . . . . Burlage L Go Commission Merchts.45 Exchange Place. 

1148 SPENCE, ALEX Todd & Co Salt 77 Front St. 

1004 SPENCE, WM. H G^eo. F. Johnson Flour 38 Water St. 

2094 SPENCER, WM. H Spencer & Woodward Com . Merchants Ill Water St . 

1147 SPERRY, JOEL A Sperry & Barnes Provisions New Haven, Conn . 

1145 SPICER, ELIHU, Ju C. H. Mallory & Co Shipping 153 Maiden Lane . 

2011 SPRAGUE, CHAS. H S. S. Sprague & Co Grain Providence, R. I. 

1138 SPRAGUE, HENRY E Henry E.. Sprague Shipping and Com . .87 Pearl St . 

1453' SPRAGUE, J. B. C Henry E. Sprague Shipping 87 Pearl St. 

1142 SPRING , AMASA Spring L Haynes Hog Slaughterers. ... Ft . West 40th St . 

852 SPRING, ANDREW Andrew Spring Dressed Stock 414 W. Washington Market. 

1898 SPRING, JOHN B M. & J. B. Spring Meat 114 W. Washington Market. 

1143 SPRING, MARSHALL M. &J.B. Spring Meat 114 W. Washington Market. 

2311 SQUIER L. B L. B. Squier Oil 150 Front St. 

1444 STABB, NICHOLAS S Hewlett &; Torrance Shippmg and Com . .69 WaU St. 

1117 gTADLMAIR, H G . Amsinck & Co Importing and Com.. 150 Pearl St. 

310 STAFFORD, JAMES James Stafford Shipping 27 Coenties Slip. 

424 STAFFORD, J. E J. W. Parker & Co Ship Brokers 122 Pearl St. 

1168 STAHLNECKER, OLIVER. .0. StaWnecker & Son Hog Slaughterers.. . .Ft. West 41st St. 

1171 STAHLNECKER, ^^^M. G. . .0. Stahlnecker & Son Hog Slaughterers.. . .Ft. West 41st St. 

1852 STAND ART, CHAS. W . ... Brewers & Maltsters' Co . . . Insurance 139 Broadway . 

1680 STAPLES, CHAS. F Chas. F. Staples &; Bro Tallow, Grease, &c. .34 Water St. 

1173 STARACE, GIOVANNI.' Punch, Edye &Co Ship Brokers 27 South William St, 

1749 STARIN, JOHN H Jno. H. Starin Transportation 125BroadSt, 

1150 STARK, LUCIUS J, N National Tramportation Co Transportation 33 Coeatiea Slip , 



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Names of Members. 213 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business, 

770 STEFPENS, GEO. W Steffens & Weiner Grocery and Prov .... Charleston, S. C. 

1153 STEARS, WM. L. B Barrow, "Wootton & Co Produce Com 31 Broad St. 

1161 STENSQjSf, SAilUEL H. B. Hebert & Co Grain 14MooreSt. 

1458 STEPHEN, THOS. C Thos. C. Stephen Carman 44 Pearl St. 

1529 STEPHENSON, FRED Fred . Stephenson Pro\isions 31 Front St . 

1847 STEELING, A. D N. Y. Produce Exchange. . Grain Inspection 36 WhitehaU St. 

2298 STERLING, CH AS. A National Storage Co Storage 170 Broadway . 

912 STERN, HENRY Lilienthal, Bros & Stern. . .Commission 34 Broadway. 

1151 STEVENS, ASA Stevens & Benedict Provisions 86 Broad St. 

1164 STEVENS, THOS. H Thos. H. Stevens Provisions 3 State St. 

1172 STEVENSON, DAVID David Stevenson Brewer 501 West 39th St. 

1904 STEVENSON, D., JR David Stevenson Brewer. . , 501 West 39th St. 

1170 STEWARD, JONATHAN . . . Jonathan Steward Grocer Trenton, N.J. 

2120 STIEHL, H. . : Stiehl & Sons Flour 389 First Avenue. 

2009 STILLMAN, ALBERT E 45 Wall St. 

769 STILL WELL, GEO. G Barrow, Wootton & Co ... . Produce Com 31 Broad St. 

1152 STILWELL, WM . M Stil well, Winslow & Co ... . Flour and Grain 8 Front St . 

1155 ST. JOHN, SAM'L R S. R. St. John Salt 103 Broad St. 

413 STOBO, ROBERT Fowler Bros Provisions 17 Broadway. 

980 STOLPP, ALBERT L . . . . Albert L. Stoipp Provisions 17 Front St . 

1157 STONE, GEORGE C George C . Stone Provisions 1 Water St. 

644 STOREY, EDWARD Lauro, Storey & Scarpati. . . Ship Brokers 126 Pearl St. 

1156 STORY, T^. H Story & Ward Grain 115 Broad St 

1806 STOUGHTON, A. C A. C. Stoughton & Co Provisions 62 PeBrl St . 

1681 STRACHAN, CHAS. W . . .Chas. W. Strachan Provisions 82 Broad St. 

1939 STRAEHLE, CHAS C. Straehle Ship Broker 5 WiUiam St. 

1417 STRANAHAN, FITCH J . . . C . B . Lockwood & Co Storage 129 Broad St . 

284 STRANAHAN, JAS. S. T. . . Atlantic Dpck Co President 1 Atlantic Dock, Brooklyn . 

1160 STRATTON, AMOS B W. R. Clarkson & Co Flour 27 Pearl St. 

1149 STRAUSS, JOSEPH M. Ferst & Co Com. Merchants 53 Leonard St. 

2008 STREAT, GEO. H Tefft, Truesdell & Field. . .Flour and Grain! .. . .111 Broad St. 

1839 STRONG, SAMUEL F S. F. Strong Petroleum 84 Beaver St. 

1159 STROUT, ALLEN C Strout Bros Flour and Grain 15 Broadway . 

2067 STRUBLE, ISAAC J I. J. Struble Hog Slaughterer .... Jersey City, N. J. 

1166 STUART, ANDREW Andrew Stuart & Co B.-mkers 34 Pine St . 

1169 STURCKE, GEO. H Geo. H . Sturcke Flour 177 Chambers St. 

1162 STUTZER, FERDINAND . . Herman Stutzer Flour and Grain ... .52 Exchange Place . 

1154 STUTZER, HERMAN Hf rmm Stutzer Flour and Grain ... .52 Exchange Place. 

1182 SUAU, HENRY F : . Henry A . Suau & Co Com. Merchants 18 South WiUiam St . 

1180 SUMNER, CHAS. P Warren & Co Shipping and Com . .5 South William St. 

2336 SUNDSTROM, J. Lauro, Storey & Scarpati . . Ship Brokers 126 Pearl St . 

2291 SUTHERLAND, J. H Haines & Sutherland Provisions Albany, N. Y. 

1179 SUTPHEN, JOHN S Sutphen & Dunn Floiir and Grain 53 WhitehaU St . 

154 SUYDAM, J. V. N H. & J. V. N. Dorr & Co. . Fire Insurance 128 Broadway. 

1181 SUYDAM, WALTER L Walter L. Suydam Flour and Grain 12 Bridge St. 

1188 SWAN, GEO.M Geo. M. Swan Com. Merchant 6SouthSt. 



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214 New Torh Produce Exchange, 

No. Name, Firm. Business, Place of Business. 

1183 SWAN, WM. H Grmnell, Minturn & Co. . . .Shipping 78 Soutt St. 

1570 SWAYZE, ROBT. H W. M. Onderdonk & Co. . . .Insurance 32 WhitehaU St. 

865 SWEET, W. L Daniels & Sweet Flour and Grain 5 South St. 

1684 SWEETLAND, HENRY . . . Henry Sweetland & Co Ship Brokers 74^ Beaver St. 

1185 SWEZE Y, CHRISTOPHER . .N. T. Swezey's Son & Co . .Flour 176 South St. 

1184 SWEZEY, E. T E. T. Swezey & Co Commissien. 7 State St. 

1489 SWEZEY, N. T N. T. Swezey's Son & Co. .Flour 176 South St. 

1194 TABOR, E. W Halstead & Co Provisions 13 Moore St. 

1189 TAIT, GEORGE George Tait Grain 25 South William St. 

1192 TAIT, ROBT. S ' Deceased. 

2015 TAIT, WM. J W. J. Tait Rectifier '. P. O. Box 80, Jersey City. 

1196 TALCOTT, W. S Roberts, Collin&Co Flour 3 Front St. 

2085 TALLMAN, J. H Hulshizer & Buckman Grain and Feed 120 West St. 

1197 TAPSCOTT, GEO. L Tapscott, Bros. & Co. .... . Shipping 86 South St. 

1198 TAPSCOTT, J. JOHN Tapscott, Bros. & Co Shipping 86 South St. 

2262 TAYLOR, GEO. F Jas. Lister Produce 6 South WilUam St. 

423 TAYLOR, HENRY Henry Taylor Provisions 249 Newark Ave., J. G. 

1191 TAYLOR, HERBERT H. Taylor & J. Anderson . . Cheese and Prov. . . .7 Bowling Green. 

1199 TAYLOR, JOHN John Taylor Provisions Trenton, N. J. 

2147 TAYLOR, SAMUEL Graff Bros. & Taylor Petroleum rnfepectors,64 Broad St. 

1541 TEDCASTLE, CHAS. B . . . .C. B. Tedcastle Petroleum 64 Beaver St. 

1202 TEFFT, POPE C Tefft, TruesdeU & Field . . . Flour and Grain Ill Broad St. 

1621 TEN BROEGK, R. H Ten Broeck & Co Lighterer 108 Broad St. 

2361 TERHUNB, FREDERICK. .J. D. Green & Co Cooperage 11 Water S?t. 

1499 TETENS, LOUIS Louis Tetens Ship Broker 19 South Wm. St. 

1203 THALLON, JOHN John Thallon Provisions ..17 Moore St. 

1935 THALLON, ROBERT John Thallon Provisions 17 Moore St. 

1214 THAYER, JOS. S Armour, PlanMnton & Co . . Flour, Grain & Prov . . 129 Broad St. 

1208 THOMAS, EVAN Evan & P. E. Thomas Flour and Meal .... 24 Broadway. 

1976 THOMAS, JNO Thomas & Co Shipping & Com ... .12 WhitehaU St. 

1701 THOMAS, HENRY A W. T. Coleman & Co Shipping 180 I»earl St. 

1211 THOMAS. LEWIS Le^vis Thomas Feed Long Dock, J. C. 

2233 THOMAS, WETHERED B . . Evan & P. E. Thomas Flour and Meal 24 Broadway. 

2190 THOMAS, WM. H Carey, Yale & Lambert Freight Brokei s 60 Beaver St. 

2465 THOMAS, WM. H. R Wm. M. Foster Provisions 27 Front St. 

1206 THOMAS, WM. W Thomas & Benham Flour, Butter & Cheese. . . 108 Broad St. 

1685 THOMPSON, JOSEPH Jos. Thompson Cooper 43 Sackett St., Brooklyn . 

30 THOMPSON, J. W J . W. Thompson Prov!' Brokerage .... 86 Broad St. 

1212 THOMPSON, RICH'D J. . . . Thompson & Bedford OUs 134 Front St. 

1851 ^ THOMPSON, WILLIAM . . .N. Y. Pie Baking Co Bakers 82 Sullivan St. 

1209 THOMSON, DAVID David Thomson & Co Pro\nsions 215 Water St. 

1207 THORNE. JOHN W John W. Thome Flour 12 Bridge St. 

258 THORON, C ASIMIR Cazade, Crooks & Reynaud.Importers 25 South Wm. St. 

1213 THORP, GOULD H Gould H. Thorp & Co Provisional Ill Broad St. 

1204 THRALL, WM. H A. T. Briggs. Cooper 64 Rutgers Slip. [Sts. 

1210 THURBER, I. E H. K. & F. B. Thurber & Co.Wholesale Grocers. . . W, Br'dway, Reade & Hudflon 



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Names of Members, 215 

No, Nwmt. Firm. Btisiness. Place of Business. 

2065 THURIES, A. N A. N. Thunes Brokerage 17 William St. 

1217 TIETJEN, CHRIS. F ChriB. F. Tietjen Lard Refiner & Prov. . 523 West 32d St. 

1200 TILFORD, JOHN B., JR. . . . J. B. Tilford, Jr., & Co Petroleum 80 Beaver St. 

1218 TIMKEN, HERMAN L Timken & Jacobson Flour 234 Washington St. 

2212 TDSTNEY, W. E D. H. Denton & Co Grain Com Chicago, 111. 

1753 TISDALE, ROBERT B R. B. Tisdale Flour and Grain . .' . .4 Front St. 

2197 TITTERINGTON, T.. jR . . S. De Bow & Haughton . . . Freight Brokers 31 Broadway. 

1216 TITUS, EDMUND Titus & Co Flour and Feed. . . .7 James Slip. 

1224 TOBE Y, JOHN A Jno. A. Tobey & Co Provisions 579 10th Avenue. 

1232 TOBEY, LEONARD W Deceased. 

1231 TOBEY, ORVILLE H Tobey & Booth Hog Slaughterers . . .Foot West 39th St. 

2078 TOBEY, 'WM. W Jno. A. Tofcey «&; Co Provisions 577 10th Avenue. 

1225 TOBIAS, CHRISTIAN C. Tobias & Co Ship Brokers 49 Beaver St. 

1221 TOBIN, WILLIAM Commercl Warehouse Co. , Storage 71 Broadway. 

1223 TODD, WM. J Todd & Co Salt 77 Front St. 

780 ^TOEGEL, JOHN G Miessner,Ackermann & Co.. Petroleum 48 Beaver St. 

1810 TOLAR, JOHNR Tolar & Hart Naval Stores 150 Front St. 

1228 TOMPKINS, ELIAB H Tompkins & Co Flortr and Grain ... .45 Pearl St. 

1394 TOMPKINS, GILBERT Tompkins & Co Flour and Grain ... .45 Pearl St. 

1227 TOMPKINS, HARRY W. . . . Tompkius & Co Flour and Grain ... .45 Pearl St. 

1233 TOMPKINS, R. C Spring & Haynes Hog Slaughterers . . .Foot West 40th St. 

2407 ^ TOMPKINS, T. S Lewis Roberts & Co ....:. . Flour and Grain.,. ... 19 South St. 

1226 TONJES, C. F Tonjes, Moller & Co Flour Millers 31 Broadway. Brooklyn, E. D. 

1229 TORRANCE, HENRY Hewlett & Torrance Shipping and Com. . . 69 WaU St. 

1988 TOWN, A. W Clint Roudebush Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

1918 TOWNSEND, CHAS. H Dutton & Townsend Staves 70 Beaver St. 

2097 TOWNSEND, F. E N. Y. C. «& H. R. R Foreign Freight 30 Broadway. 

792 TOWNSEND, F. M .F. M. Townsend Grain 134 Reade St. 

1222 TOWNSEND, GEO. W Homer Ramsdell & Co Grocei-s Newburgh, N. Y. 

1220 TOWNSEND, JOHN P Dutton & Townsend Staves 70 Beaver St. 

1736 TOWNSEND, M *. . .National Line Freight Pier 4, N. R. 

1234 TRACY, EDWARD Tracy & Russell Brewers Lansingburgh, N. Y. 

1660 TRASK, CHAS. H W. Ropes & Co Prov. Merchants ... .70 WaU St. 

1355 TRASK, EVERETT Fairfield & Trask Produce 70 Warren St. 

1438 TRAUBE, E E. Traube, Jr., & Bro Flour and Grain. . . .6 Front St. 

1235 TRAVA, ANTONIO A. Trava Com. Merchant Havana, Cuba. 

1687 TRAVIS, MORTIMER W. . .Merchants' Board Grain Measurer 12 Bridge St. 

1246 TRAVIS, WRIGHT S Wright S. Travis Grain and Feed 18 Front St. 

1240 TREAD WELL, wnvi. E E. Treadwell's Son Crackers 104 Warren St. 

1241 TREMPER, THOS. H T. H. Tremper & Bro Flour and Prov Rondout, N. Y. 

1245 TRIPP, S. VINCENT Tripp, Rogers & Co Grain .*Foot West 34th St. 

1780 TROTT, J. T Meigs & Trott Bakers Waterbury, Conn. 

1247 TROWBRIDGE, DANIEL . . D. Trowbridge Shipper New Haven, Conn. 

1237 TROWBRIDGE, E. H H. Trowbridge's Sons Shipping New Haven, Conn. 

1728 TROWBRIDGE. E. H.. Tri. . .H. Trowbridge's Sons Shipping New Haven, Conn. 

1726 TROWBRIDGE, H., 2d H. Trowbridge's Sons Shipping New Haven, ConQ. 



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216 New TorJc Produce Exchange, 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1727 TROWBRIDGE, T, R., Jr. . . H. Trowbridge's Sons Shipping New Haven, Conn. 

1243 TRUBE, CHARLES Goepel & Trube Comnussion 64 Beaver St. 

1242 TRTJESDELL, JOHN P Tefft, TruesdeU & Field . . . Flour and Grain .... Ill Broad St. 

1005 TRTJESDELL, W. E E. M. Van Tassel Grain Pier 39, N. R. 

1688 TUCKER, GEORGE George Tucker. . . . ., Flour and Grain ... .7 State St. 

1248 TUCKER, ROBERT A Tucker & Lightbourn Shipping and Com. . . 25 South St. 

2040 TURLE, R. H R. H. Turle Commission 26 Whitehall St. 

1249 TURNER, AUSTIN H A. H. Turner.- Cheese 12 Bridge St. 

1440 TURNER, DAVID L S. B. Turner Shipping and Com. . . 39 Beaver St. 

1250 TURNER, JAMES R Isaac H. Reed & Co Flour and Grain ... .5 State St. 

216ff TURNER, WILLIAM J David Thomson & Co Provisions 21,5 Water St. 

1931 TURTON, JOHN John Tuiix)n Naval Stores 133 Maiden Lane. 

1251 TUSKA, PHILIP H P. H. Tuska Liquors 171 Front St. 

1722 TUTHILL, DANIEL E Jno. F. Tyrrell & Co Flour & Oatmeal . . . .113 Broad St. 

1252 TWEDDLE, THOS. B Thomas B. Tweddle Maltster Ft. East 48fch St. 

1253 TYRRELL, JOHN F John F. Tyrrell &Co Flour and Oatmeal . .113 Broad Si. 

2089 TWEDDLE, W. D Thomas B. Tweddle Maltster Ft. East 48th St. 

1624 TWOMBLY, H. MCK Whitney & Twombly \^'- ^-^'.^ttoJ; ^- ^- } 43 Whitehall St. 

815 T YSOX FREDERICK Tyson & Bro MiUing. 71 South St. , Baltimore. 

2151 UHLMANN, SIMON S. & F. Uhlmann Hops 69 Broad St. 

1002 ULRICH, EMIL Emil Ulrioh Freight Broker 83 Beaver St. 

1258 UNDERBILL, ANDW. M. . . WilUams & Guion Shipping 29 Broadway. 

2321 UNDBRHILL, H. I Munn & Jenkins Freight Brokers 61 Beaver St. 

1254 UNDERHILL, JAMES W Deceased. 

1255 UNDERHILL, JOHN W . . . . W. K. Hinman & Co Ship Chandlers 169 South St. 

2199 UNDERHILL, R. T E. 0. Stanard & Co Flour 3 State St. 

1256 UNDERHILL, STEPHEN . . Smith & Underbill Butter and Cheese . .74 Broad St. 

1077 UN DERWOOD, L. A Bingham Bros Grain 47 E.xchange Place. 

1909 VAIL, CHARLES M John S. Martin & Co Butter and Cheese ... 168 Chambers St. 

2285 VAIL, DANIEL S. Vail, ShotweU & Co Flour Millers 52 Greenwich St. 

2035 VALENTINE, FRED. F. . . .Robe & Bro Lard Ref . & Prov . . .268 W. 33d St. 

1428 VALENTINE, SAM'L T. . . .S. Valentine's Sons Flour 169 Cherry St. 

1259 VALENTINE, STEPHEN. . . S. Valentine's Sons Flour 169 Cherry St. 

1505 VAN ALSTYNE, WM Van Alstyne & Co Flour and Grain 3 South St. 

302 VAN BILLIARD, M H. G. Tombler Grocery and Prov . . . Easton, Pa. 

1880 VAN BOKKELEN, S. D. C S. D. C. Van Bokkelen. . . Merchant 29 Front St. 

1269 VAN BOSKERCK, G. W. . . .E. G. Burkam & Co Flour and Grain 35 Water St . 

1270 VAN BRUNT, STEPHEN . . S. Van Bnmt Pro^-isions 59 Beaver St. 

2254 VAN BRUNT, W. H W. H. Van Brunt Ship Brokerage 1 65 Maiden Lane. 

1481 VAN BUREN, SAM'L S. Van Baren Carman 24 Whitehall St. 

106 VAN DYKE, ARTHUR . . . .Burleson & Van Dyke Commission Milwaukee, Wis. 

1274 VAN IDERSTINE, F. A . . . .F. A. Van Iderstine Tallow 272 Hudson Ave., B'klyn. 

1273 VAN IDERSTINE, P., JR . . Van Iderstine & Bro Tallow 522 10th Ave. 

1740 VAN INGEN, RICH'D F. . . W. J. Wilcox & Co Lard Refiners 41 Broad St. 

577 VAN LIMBECK, A A. Van Limbeck Shipping and Cum. . .58 Beaver St. 

2018 VAN RIPER, PETER E . . . .P. E. Van Riper & Co Butter and Cheese . . ..67 Broad St. 



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Names of Members. 217 



No. Name. Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

1275 VAN RIPER, PETER H. . . . P. H. Van Riper & Co Butter 5 Front St. 

1979 VAN TASSEL, A. G Rohe & Bro Lard Ref . & Prov . . .268 West 33d St. 

1277 VAN TASSEL, EMORY M. .E. M. Van Tassel Grain and Feed Pier 39, N. R. 

1876 VAN VALER, CORNEL'S. .Van Valer, Waroer & Co. . .Flour 9 South St. 

1279 VAN VLIET, FRED. G. . . . .F. G. & I. N. Van Vliet. . . .Maltsters 19 WMteliall St. 

1281 VAN WAGENEN, CD Jewell, Harrison & Co Lard Refiners 27 Water St. 

1280 VAN WAGONER, P. H P. H. Van Wagoner Grain and Feed 106 West St. 

1272 VANDENHOVE, G G. Vandenhove Tallow and Grease. . . 58 Pearl St. 

1914 VANDERCOOK, M. . : M. Vandercook Insurance 32 Whitehall St. 

1952 VARRELMANN, GEO Herman Koop & Co Shippmg and Com. . .23 WiUiam St. 

1263 VAT ABLE, AMEDEE H. A. Vatable & Son Com. Merchants 11 South William St. 

1262 VATABLE, ATJGTJSTE . .' . . .Barcelo & Vatable Bros Merch'dise Brokers . .72 Beaver St. 

1 758 VATABLE, JULES Barcelo &, Vatable Bros Merch'dise Brokers. . 72 Beaver St. 

1261 VAUGHAN, RICH'D H Com Exchange Elevat'r Co. . Grain Elevating 38 Pearl St. 

1990 VEILLER, P. B Kings Co. Refinery Sugar 101 Wall St. 

352 VEIT, RICITD C Standard Oil Co Petroleum 140 Pearl St. 

1406 VEITCH, JAMES N. Y. Floatinp Elevator Co Grain Elevating 47 Pearl St. 

1848 VIETOR, A Chas. Luling & Co Gen'l Merchants 70 Broad St. 

1266 VINCEN T, J. COLLINGB'N.I. & C. Moore & Co Oil Cake, Grain, &c. . 159 Front St. 

2444 VINING, H. S Bureau Grain Insp'n Inspector 130 Pearl St. 

1268 VOLCKENS, WILLIAM Punch, Edye & Co Ship Brokers 27 South William St. 

1267 VOORHEES, WM. K Wm. K. Voorhees Feed 103 Flatbush Ave., B'klyn. 

2059 VORBACH, H Vorbach Bros Provisions 969 1st Ave. 

972 VOUROS, A. Z RaUi Bros Import, and Export. .101 Pearl St. 

1167 WADDY, JNO. R Waddy & Co Produce Com 107 Murray St. 

1287 WADE, DANIEL T Plumer & Co Flour 129 Broad St. 

1640 WAGNER, WM Wm. Wagner Provisions 629 3d Ave. 

1470 WAITE, W. H W. H. Waite Flour, Feed, &c 141 Pavonia Ave., J. C. 

1297 WAKEMAN, JOHN John Wakeman & Co Beans and Peas 28 Water St. 

774 WALBRAN, C. J John Thallon Provisions 17 Moore St. " 

1283 WALCOTT, ALFRED F A. F. Walcott Shipping and Com. . . 419 California St., San Francisco. 

1304 WALCOTT, BENJ. S Hanover Fire Ins. Co Insurance 120 Broadway. 

1305 WALDRON. N. B Waldron, Wightman & Co. . . Grocers Providence, R. I. 

2019 WALKER, D. H Walker & Hughes Average Adjusting & Ins . .65 Wall St. 

2353 WALKER, ELMORE H N. Y. Produce Exchange. . Statistician 36 Whitehall St. 

2339 WALEZER, R. F Walker Bros. & Wyld Flom- and Grain 45 Exchange Place. 

1288 WALL, JACOB J. WaU & Son Bakers 338 6th Ave. 

1449 WALLACE, CHAS. K N. Y. Warehousing Co .^ Storage 56 Broadway. 

1282 WALLACE, HENRY Henry Wallace & Co Grain 61 Beaver St. 

788 WALLACE, JAMES Jas. Wallace Brewer and Maltster .70 Madison St. 

365 WALLACE, JOHN P Benj. R. Pegram, Jr Flour and Grain 29 Moore St. 

1654 WALLACE. SAMUEL WaUace & Moore Provision Insp'rs .... 26 Water St. 

165 WALLACE, WILFRED, Jr. Sawyer, Wallace & Co Commission Merch'ts .47 Broad St. 

1300 WALLACE, WM. H Wm.H. Wallace Grain 129 Broad St. 

1290 WALLACE, WM. S Sawyer, WaUace & Co Commission Merchts.47 Broad St. 

1379 WALLIS, B. A Colgate & Co Soap 55 John St. 

15 



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218 New York Produce Exchange, 

^0. Name, Firm. Business, Place of Businesi, 

1292 WALSH, CHAS. A Wm. H. Power & Co Flourand Grain 134 Pearl St. 

128» WALTHER, AUGUST A. Walther Provisions 80 Beaver St. 

466 WALTHER, GEO A. Walther Provisions 80 Beaver St. 

1126 WARD, CHAS. E Ward & Co Oils 172 Front St. 

1286 WARD, FRANKLIN FrankMn Ward Provisions 172 Front St. 

1296 WARD, HENRY C Ward & Foster Provisions 42 Pearl St. 

1295 ' WARD, JOHN S 42 Pearl St. 

366 WARD, JONATHAN Jonathan Ward Merchandise Broker . 155 Maiden Lane. 

1303 WARD, JOS. M Story & Ward Grain 115 Broad St. 

1285 WARD, JOSIAH O J. 0. Ward & Co Com. Merchants..... 47 South St. 

2109 WARD, RAYMOND L R. L.Ward Grain 59 Broad St. 

2268 WARD, RODNEY C Phoenix Insurance Co In surance 193 Broadway. 

2419 WARD, SYLVANTJS S Ward & Foster Provisions 42 Pearl St. 

2128 WARDEN, WM Wm. Warden Com. Merchant 88 Wall St. 

1302 WARDEN, WM. G Warden, Frew & Co Petroleum Philadelphia, Pa. 

2055 WARDWELL, HENRY L . . . E. G. Burkam & Co Flour and Grain 35 Water St. 

1309 WARE, JAMES Wm. Ware & Sons Cheese & Provisions . 2 Broadway. 

2121 WARE, RICHARD Wm. Ware & Sons Cheese & Provisions . 2 Broadway. 

1291 WARE, WILLIAM Wm. Ware & Sons Cheese & Provisions. 2 Broadway. 

711 WARING, ORVILLE T Waring Bros. & Co Petroleum 150 Front St. 

1547 WARNE, M. T M. T. Wame Grain Philipsburg, N. J. 

1298 WARNER, ALEX 270 Lexington Ave. 

1594 WARNER, C. D CD. Warner Brokerage 4 Hanover St 

1587 WARNER, CHAS. H L. R. Finch & Sons Flour and Grain 11 State St. 

1805 WARNER, DANIEL W Van Valer, Warner & Co. . .Flour 9 South St. 

1301 WARNER, EBENEZER Charles Warner & Co Provisions Troy, N. Y. 

2450 WARREN, C. J Wm. R. Clarkson & Co. . . .Flour 27 Pearl St. 

2091 WARREN, F Warren & Co Shipping & Com 5 South WiUiam St. 

289 WARWICK, DAVID Webber & Warwick Provisions 210 East 120th St. 

2436 WATSON, J. C E. G. Burkam & Co Flour and Grain 35 Water St. 

1650 WATSON, JOS. S E. W. Coleman & Co Flour and Grain 10 Water St. 

1432 WASHBURN, JOHN H Home Fire Ins. Co Insurance 135 Broadway. 

1399 WATSON, WILLIAM Hatton, Watson & Co Shipping and Com. . . 27 South St. 

] 294 WATTENBERG, ERNEST . .E. Wattenberg. Provisions 32 South William St. 

1911 WATTS, CHAS. H Watts, Parker & Co Provisions 75 Front St. 

1293 WATTS, SIMEON Simeon Watts Baker 555 Grand St. 

1299 WAYDELL, JOHN H Waydell & Co Shipping 21 Old Slip. 

1317 WEBB, HENRY J. M. & Hy. Webb Shipping 7 State St. 

1328 WEBB, HENRY T H. T. Webb & Bro Gaugers 98 Water St. 

1323 WEBB, JAMES A James A. Webb Alcohol .165 Pearl St. 

2303 WEBB, J. M J. M. & Hy. Webb Shipping 7 State St. 

1540 WEBER, B Knoblauch & Lichtenstein. Bankers 29 William St. 

1395 "WEBSTER, GEO. H Armour, PlanMnton & Co . .Flour, Grain & Prov.129 Broad St. 

672 WEBSTER. JOHN P C. White & Co Hog Slaughterers. . . .Foot West 40th St. 

1312 WEBSTER, THOMAS s. Thompson's Nephew & Co. . . . Importers 130 Duane St. 

1954 WEED, HEN. M Curtis & Weed Petroleum 158PearlSt. 



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Names of Members. 219 

^ .. . ' 

No. Nanu. Firm. Business. Place of Bicsiness. 

1639 WEEEZES, HALSALL Stilwell, Winslow & Co Flonr and Grain. . . : .8 Front St. 

1322 WEEKS, CHAS. L ".Weeks, Douglass & Co Flour 4 State St. 

1320 WEEK^FOBSTER J Pitt, Eagles & Johnson ....Flour 17 Water St. 

1310 WEEKS, SILAS B S.B.Weeks... Grocer. 152 Hamilton Ave., Br'klyn, 

1316 WEILBACHER, PAUL Weilbacher & Loewi Hops and Malt 44 Pearl St. 

1230 WEDSTFELD, MORITZ Wm. I. Preston Grain 12 Bridge St. 

1313 WELCH, PETER A Welch, Holme & Clark Tallow and Grease. . . 381 West St. 

2042 WELCH, WM. C Welch, Holme & Clark Tallow and Grease. . .381 West St. ' 

1936 WELLS, D. F Corwin & Co Feed & Grain 183 Roosevelt St. 

1318 WELLS, EDWIN F Sawyer, Wallace & Co Flour and Grain 47 Broad St. 

10 WELLS, W. T V. W. Macfarlane & Co Lard Refiners 138 Pearl St. 

2244 WELSH, HENRY Henry Welsh Grocer 347 Washington St. 

1325 WENTWORTH, J. W Geo. V. Hecker & Co Flour MiUers 201 Cherry St. 

1585 WESSELLS, CHAS. H G. H. Wessells Provisions 13 Moore St. 

1321 WESSELS, GERHARD G. Wessels Shipping and Com . . 74 Front St 

2126 WESSELS, J. P Beling, Niemeyer & Wessels. Stowage Inspectors. 72 Beaver St. 

1315 WEST, CHAS. Chas. 0. West Provisions 654 Washington St. 

1933 WEST, JOHN C Henry T. Kneeland & Co. . Flour and Grain 30 Whitehall St. 

1326 WESTFALL, OLIVER A. . . Gardner & Westfall Grain and Feed 29th St., near 9th Ave. 

1324 WETMORE, ABR AM B Porter & Wetmore Butter and Cheese. . . 69 Broad St. 

^100 WHEELER, ALBERT G... .Wheeler & Hillery Feed 402 West St. 

1337 WHEELER, BILLINGS Billings, Wheeler & Co Flour and Grain 186 South St. 

1829 WHEELER, JEROME B. . . .Holt & Co Flour 57 Water St. 

1797 WHITE, CHARLES Chas. White & Co Hog Slaughterers . . . Foot West 40th St. 

1334 WHITE, CROMWELL T. ...C. T. White Provisions 7 Worth St. 

331 WHITE, J. J Josiah J. White Shipping and Com. . . 118 WaU St. 

1329 WHITE, MATTHEW White's N. Y. Malt House . .Maltster 471 West St. 

399 WHITE, THOS. P Metcalf & Gibbs Hog Slaughterers . . .Foot West 41st St. 

1338 WHITLOCK, GEO Mangam & Bonnell Grain and Feed 92 Broad St. 

775 WHITLOCK, HENRY H . ... Swiss Lloyd Ins. Co Insurance 63 William St, 

1538 WHITLOCK, URIAH C . . . .Armour, Plankinton & Co . .Flour, Grain & Prov.129 Broad St. 

1962 WHITLOCK, WM. S 117 Wall St. 

2355 WHITMAN, ALFRED Whitman Brothers Oils 159 Front St. 

2179 WHITMAN, EDMUND S.. . .Whitman Brothers Oils 159 Front St. 

1834 WHITMAN, STEPHEN Whitman & Fisher Stowage Inspectors . 67 Beaver St. 

1330 WHITNEY, GEO. J Whitney & Twombly {^'^- Elevator. ^' ^' } ^^ WhitehaU St. 

1333 WHITNEY, JAMES F J. F. Whitney & Co Shipping 26>^ Broadway. 

2239 WHITON, SYLVESTER G. .Nash & ^Vhiton Salt 174 Reade St. 

1264 WHITTAKBR, JOHN Empire Transportation Co . Transportation Pier 38, N. R. 

1332 WHITTEMORE, F. L J. M. Whittemore & Sons . . Flour 4 State St. 

1434 WHITTEMORE, JOHN M. . . J. M. Whittemore & Sons. . . Flour 4 State St. 

1331 WHITTEMORE, J. M., Jr. . J. M. Whittemore & Sons. . .Flour i State St. 

1343 WICKES, WM. W Rossiter & Skidmore Provisions Ill Broad St. 

1352 WICKS, ISAAC C Doughty, CoweU & Co Grain Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

2292 WILEY, GEORGE G. & S. WUey Coopers 511 West 39th St. 

1345 WILKINSON, E. A WiUdnsoa, Gaddis & Co . . Flour and Feed Newark, N. J. 



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220 New York Produce Exchange. 



No. Name, Firm. Business. Place of Business. 

828 WILLCOMB, JOHN W..' J. W. Willcomb Insurance 115 Broad St. 

1349 WILLBTS, ANDREW J Titus & Co Grain and Feed 7 James Slip. 

1353 WILLIAMS, FRANCIS W. .Williams, Black & Co Commission 1 WiUiara St. 

2039 WILLIAMS, GEO. H Thos. G. Hunt Oils 137 Front St. 

2238 WILLIAMS, JAMES P Libby, Bartlett & Kimball . Oils 127 Water St. 

1055 WILLIAMS, JOHN T Rafferty & WilUams Tallow Foot E. 44th St., E. R. 

1340 WILLIAMS, P. P Williams & Guion Shipping 29 Broadway. 

1569 WILLIAMS, ROSWELL C . . Williams & Potter Grocers 229 Front St. 

2445 WILLIAMS, R. L R. L. Williams Transportation 108 Broad St. 

1001 WILLIAMS, WM. J W. J. Williams Wheat 15 Stone St. 

1823 WILLIAMS, WILMOT Wihnot Williams Insurance 161 Broadway. 

849 WILLIAMSON, G. H Wm. Williamson Bags and Bagging. . .63 Pearl St. 

1351 WILLIAMSON, JAS. T J. T. Williamson Provisions 296 Columbia St., Br'klyn. 

866 WILLIAMSON, S. S S. S. Williamson Brokerage 39 Pearl St. 

1396 WILLIAMSON, WILLIAM. . Wm. Williamson Bags and Bagging . . 63 Pearl St. 

1342 WILLIS, GEORGE H Peabody, Willis & Co Ship Brokers 122 Front St. 

1560 WILLS, FRED. H Frederick H. Wills Insurance 72 Beaver St. 

2314 WILLS, J.Q J. Q. Wills Grain and Prov'ns .. 13 Moore St. 

2392 WILMOT, C. S John Wilmot Grain 37 Pearl St. • 

1348 WILMOT, JOHN John Wihnot Grain 37 Pearl St. 

2160 WILSON, B. G West Va. Lub. Oil Co Oil 26 Cedar St. 

1707 WILSON, GEORGE B Allerton & Wilson Hog Slaughterers Jersey City, N. J. 

2288 WILSON, JOHN John Wilson Flour 11 WhitehaU St. 

919 WILSON, J. T^ J. T. Wilson & Co Crackers 73 Fulton St. 

1929 WILSON, S. C Wilson & Anderson Petroleum 128 Pearl St. 

1690 WILSON, THOMAS Thomas Wilson Grain 19 South William St. 

1344 WINCHESTER, JAS. H . . . . J. H. Wmchester & Go ... . Ship Brokers 52 South St. 

2108 WINSHIP, JAS. H. . . , Van Iderstine & Bro TaUow 522 10th Ave. 

1341 WIN SLOW, I. STAYNER. .Stilwell, Winslow & Co Flour and Grain 8 Front St. 

1354 WINTON, A. L A. L. Winton Grain and Feed Bridgeport, Conn. 

1887 WISSMANN, J. F Slocovich & Co Ship Brokerage 60 Beaver St. 

880 WITTE, CHRISTOPH Christoph Witte & Co Commission 200 Greenwich St. 

2343 WITTBRDINK, E E. Witterdink Commission 77 Adams St., Brooklyn. 

2074 WITTHOFF, CH AS Chas. Witthoff Petroleum 15 WilUam St. 

ir33 WOERZ, ERNEST G. W. . . Beadleston, Price & Woerz .Brewers 291 West 10th St. 

1363 WOLFE, NATH'L H N. H. Wolfe & Co Flour and Grain 1 State St. 

1815 WOOD, ABIEL Abiel Wood Petroleum 154 Front St. 

1359 WOOD, HENRY H. Wood & Son Provisions 126 Pavonia Ave., J. C. 

1832 WOOD, MILES Franklin & Wood Weighers 85 Beaver St. 

1365 WOOD, J . WALTER J. Walter Wood Foreign Ex. & Gold. .42 Pine St. 

1357 WOODBURY, F. P F. P. Woodbury Provisions 14 Water St. 

59 WOODRUFF, A. C Bartlett & Greene Storage 106 Wall St. 

1367 WOODRUFF, FRANKLIN F.WoodrufE & McLean Storage and Salt 103 Water St. 

1765 WOODWARD, E. B Spencer & Woodward Commission Merchts..lll Water St. 

810 WOOLF, THOMAS O Thomas 0. Woolf Milling West Farms, N. Y. 

1362 WOOLSEY, THEO. B T. B. Woolsey Flour. 26 Front St. 



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Names of Members, 221 

No. Naint. Firm. Business. • Place of Business. 

1369 WOOSTEB, BENJAMTtT. . . .E. & O. Ward Flour 279 Washington St. 

1158 WOOTTON, E. H : . . Barrow, Wootton & Co Produce Com 31 Broad St. 

2083 WORKMAN, J. HENRY Workman & Co Ship Brokers 123 Wahiut St., Philadelphia. 

ISll WORTH, ARCH'DC A. C. Worth & Co Naval Stores 248 Washington St. 

1691 WORTH, PAUL Paul Worth Grain 18 William St. 

1416 WORTH, P. H David Dows & Co Flour, Grain & Prov.20 South St. 

1674 WORTHEN, G. S. B Worthen & Co Flour 40 Water St. 

1370 WOTHERSPOON", D. O D. O. Wotherspoon Exch'ge Gold & Notes. 48 Pine St. 

1372 WRIGHT, CHAS. L Chas. L. Wright & Co. i . . .Ship Brokers 56 South St. 

1373 WRIGHT, EDW. M Edw. M. Wright & Co Com. Merchants 39 Broad St. 

1408 WRIGHT, FRED. W F. W. Wright Grain Measurer 31 Pearl St. 

1049 WRIGHT, J. F J. F. Wright Grain 14 Moore St. 

1030 WRIGHT, JOHN J J. J. Wright Broker 159 Front St. 

1888 WRIGHT, S. F Peter Wright & Sons Shipping and Com . . 52 Broadway. 

1913 WYLD, JAMES Walker Brothers & Wyld . . Flour and Grain 45 Exchange Place . 

1376 WYMAN, ISAAC Van Valer, Warner & Co . . Flour .,. .9 South St. 

1375 WYNKOOP, JAS. D '. Appleton & Wynkoop Grain Ft. Jay St. 

1377 YALE, AMERTON Deceased. 

1378 YELLO.WLEE, ROBT. A R. A. Yellowlee Butter and Cheese . . .45 Pearl St. 

1509 YENNI, FRED. A Yenni & Burke Petroleum 125 Maiden Lane. 

1500 YORK, STEPHEN P Stephen P. York Dressed llogs Communipaw, N. J. 

1265 YOUNG, CHAS. E Henry WaUace & Co Grain 61 Beaver St. 

2390 YOUNG, DAVID B., JR Young Bros Coopers 134 Broad St. 

2356 YOUNG, JESSE B Tripp, Rogers & Co Grayi and Feed Foot 34th St., N. R. 

1380 YOUNG, JOHN S Young & Frederick Grain and Feed 119 West St. 

307 YOUNG, JOHN W Young, Tripp & Co Grain and Flour White Plains, N. Y. 

2391 YOUNG, THOMAS B Young Bros Coopers 134 Broad St. 

1504 YOUNG, THOMAS S T. S. Young & Co Flour and Grain 3 South St. 

1382 YOUNGS, HENRY Henry Youngs Mercantile 13 Moore St. 

1721 YOUNGS, SELAH, Jr E. A. Kent & Co Grain and Prov 89 Broad St. 

1384 YUENGLING, D. G., Jr. . . Ryerson & Yuengling Brewers 4th Ave., 128 & 129th Sts. 

398 ZAUN, H. C Allerton & Wilson Hog Slaughterers .... Jersey City, N. J. 

1385 ZEREGA, THEODORE Theodore Zerega Freight Broker 1 William St. 

1637 ZITTLOSEN, JOHN John Zittlosen Shipping and Com. . . 3 WiUiam St. 

1386 ZIZINIA, THOS T. Zizinia Cotton Broker 89 Pearl St. 



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TRADE AND COMMERCE 

OF THE 

CITY OF NEW YORK, 



-') 



JANUARY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1877; 

ALSO, 

COMPARISONS WITH PRECEDING YEARS. 

PBEPAHED BY 

E. H. W^ALKEJR, Statistician of the Eocchange. 



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TRAM AND TRANSPORTATION. 

The City of New York is the commercial and financial centre of the 
North American continent. Her geographical position has done much 
to secure this proud pre-eminence. Here centre all the varied pro- 
ducts of the country, from Maine to Texas, and from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. In and out of her capacious harbor pass daily the products of 
this and other countries, valued by millions, carried in fleets of ships 
and steamers bearing the flags of all commercial nations. The ex- 
changes of this country, both in money and products, are much the 
larger share made here. The imports from foreign countries at this 
port largely exceed those of all other ports. These foreign commodities 
and our various domestic manufactures are distributed from here over 
our widely extended country by the numerous routes of transit, to sup- 
ply the varied wants of a nation, now of about forty-six millions 
population. 

CAJSTAL TRANSPORTATION 

The share the Erie Canal has had in promoting the commercial 
prosperity of New York City and State will be indicated by the follow- 
ing 

Comparative Tonnage Statement, 

Showing the Measurement Tonnage of all Vessels, American and For- 
eign, from all Foreign Countries, that have entered the Port of New 
York, and that have entered all United States Ports, as- compared with 
number of tons of property carried on the New York Canals for the 
period of twenty-seven years : 



Years. 


Entered at 

New York. 

Tons. 


Entered at 

AllU.S. Ports. 

Tons. 


New York 

Canals. 

Tons Carried. 


1850 to 1854 — 5 Years 


8.315,869 
9.697,844 
11,845,042 
13.673.829 
19.185.248 
8,778,572 


26,801.241 
34,417,988 
36,672.359 
36.513.214 
54.979,213 
24,407,255 


18.936.505 


1855 to 1859 — 5 " 


18,930.141 


1860 to 1864 5 " 


25.167.267 


1865 to 1 86. ^ — 5 " 


28,494,504 


1870 to 1874— 5 " 


31,493,397 


1875 to 1876—2 " , 


9,031.987 






Total 27 Years 


71,496,404 


213,791,270 


132,053,801 





The ownership of the Erie Canal is, by the Constitution, vested in 
the State of New York, and so long as it shall remain the property of 
the State, it can never become a monopoly, and can never be controlled 
by combinations. It has, since 1855, during seven months of each year, 
been the great regulator of the rates of through transportation by rail- 
way in this and the neighboring States and Provinces. 

As a general rule, all other things being equal, that route which can 
carry at a profit the cheapest, will secure the carrying of a large propor- 
tion of the property to be transported, and in this respect the water 

16 



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226 New Yorh Produce Exchange. 

route, via the Lakes and the Erie Canal, has, so far, occupied an 
eminent position. 

There have been transported on the Kew York canals since their 
opening, in 1825, more than one hundred and seventy million tons of prop- 
erty, chiefly the products of the Western and N"orthwestern States ; 
and this large tonnage has been an important factor in promoting the 
growth of New York City. The results, direct and indirect, pecuniary 
and otherwise, that have come from this vast tonnage, are incom- 
putable. It has invited to New York City the commerce of the world ; 
it has augmented its population from 123,706 in 1820, to 1,046,037 in 1875 ; 
it has swelled the aggregate valuation of the real and personal property 
of the city from $69,530,753 in 1820, to $1,234,191,178 in 1877. The State at 
large has bountifully shared in the benefits resulting from this com- 
merce, giving it a population of 4,705,208 in 1875, against 1,372,812 in 1820, 
with an aggregate valuation of real and personal property in 1877, of 
$2,755,740,318, against $256,021,494 in 1820. 

The State has received from toUs on boats and property, passed 
over the State canals, the munificent sum of $130,034,897 09, and the 
canal carriers have received an additional sum, during the last forty 
years, of $146,868,964, exclusive of tolls, or a grand aggregate of 
$276,903,861. The collateral benefits resulting from the employment of 
a large number of the population of the State in the navigation and 
maintenance of the canals, as well as in their construction ; the num- 
ber of canal boats that have been built and used on the canals during 
the last fifty years ; the large number of horses and other domestic 
animals that have been used in their navigation ; the large fleets of 
vessels that have been built for transportation on the Lakes, during the 
same period, for bringing business to the State canals ; the numerous 
grain and other storage warehouses that have been built in the princi- 
pal commercial cities in this and other States ; the hundreds of millions 
of dollars that have resulted from the storage, handling and commis- 
sions on sales of so vast an amount of property, aggregating nearly 
seven thousand millions in value ; the results to insurance companies, 
bankers, ship and boat builders ; to the owners of the timber lands that 
have furnished the lumber and timber for vessels, boats and warehouses ; 
to all the iron mines and iron-mongers that have furnished the iron nails 
and spikes in their construction ; to the naval stores and sailmakers' 
interest that has supplied these vast fleets of lake and canal vessels for a 
period of fifty years ; and last, but not least, to the Western and North- 
western States, which were, by the completion of the Erie Canal, reclaimed 
from a wilderness to be the abodes of civilization, wealth and power. 

Prior to the opening of the Erie Canal, the trade upon the lakes was 
of little moment, and can scarcely be dignified with the name of com- 
merce. No record is known to exist of the amount of trade prior to 
1815. In that year the number of arrivals and departures of vessels at 
and from Buffalo was sixty-four. From that time up to 1824, a period 
of nine years, the average annual increase of arrivals and departures 
w^as about eighteen per cent., those of the last mentioned year being 



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Trade and Transportation, 227 

two hundred and eighty-six. In 1825, the year of the opening of the 
Erie Canal, the increase over the previous year was sixty per cent., and 
from that year to 1830, inclusive, the average annual increase was about 
forty-nine per cent. In the latter year the number of arrivals and de- 
partures of vessels was two thousand and fifty-two. The Erie Canal 
had been completed, and— like the blood flowing through the great ar- 
tery from the heart of the living being to the extremities of the body, 
giving growth and communicating activity and strength— trade was 
coursing tlirough its whole length, imparting a vital energy to the new- 
born commerce of the West, and to every interest in the State, that 
had projected and constructed this new channel for commerce. 

It was not till 1839 that Chicago shipped her first cargo of less than 
two thousand bushels of wheat. The first cargo of wheat received at 
Buffalo from Lake Michigan was in 1836. The benefits of the Erie Canal 
to the North Western States from 1836 to 1854 are incomputable. 
Through it and over the great lakes passed all the surplus products of 
the West, as well as all merchandise for its consumption from the East. 
It was the great highway of emigration that peopled her wilderness 
wilds ; and in return for all these benefits the Western and Northwest- 
ern States have paid the State of New York in tolls on property going 
to and coming from the West at a low estimate seventy-five million dol- 
lars. If the Erie Canal shall be made what it can be and should be as 
a channel for commerce, it still has a mission in tlie future around 
which will cluster more important results than have been attained 
in the past. 

It will stiU continue to be the route for a large commerce between 
the States. It will still continue to be the regulator of transportation 
charges over all the routes of transit between the East and the West, 
whether by rail or water. It will still share largely with the other 
methods of transportation in buUding up and promoting the prosperity 
of the City and State of New York. It will then be cheaper than any 
other route, and by its greater cheapness attracting business to its lake 
terminus, to divide with the rail routes in the movement Eastward to 
the seaboard; the railways sharing in the results of the attractive 
power of this greater cheapness. 

The New York railways having their termini on Lake Erie have an 
interest in making the canal transportation through the State the low- 
est possible to hold the bulk of the commerce between the East and the 
West. With the bulk of the movement secured through the State of 
New York, the New York railways wiU have an opportunity to divide a 
large business, instead of a small one, with the water route. The con- 
dition of grain is frequently such as to make it necessary to move it by 
rail. The state of the markets frequently invites rail shipments. A 
break in the line of the water route makes the railways at times a neces- 
sity. Passenger traffic usually follows the line of freight traffic, which, 
if large, has its influence on the passenger traffic. The lowest water 
rates of transportation possible, through this State, cannot but largely 
benefit, directly and indirectly, the New York trunk lines of railway* 



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228 



New York Produce ETxhange. 



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Trade and Transportation. 



229 



The outstanding canal debt on Sept. 30, 1878, was $9,020,240. The 
mterest to be paid on the debt from the 1st of October, 1878, to 1893, 
when the last payment shall mature, will amount to $6,930,709.50, or 
principal and interest together, will aggregate $15,950,909.50, which 
Auditor Schuyler says, "from present appearances must be paid by 
taxation. A tax of 36-100 of a mill annually for sixteen years would 
pay the debt and interest ; also one of three and three-fourth mills tax 
per dollar on the present valuation, in a single levy, would pay the entire 
principal of the debt redeemed at a premium of fifteen per cent. 

An annual tax of one-third of a mill per dollar, of the present val- 
uation, would be sufficient to pay all the running expenses of, and keep 
in good repair (except, perhaps, in cases of great disasters), aU the 
canals, which the constitution declares shall not be disposed of, and in- 
cluding therewith the Black River Canal." 

Constitutional Canals. 
Separating the Constitutional Canals from tTwse which may he sold, leased^ or 
otherwise disposed of, as provided for in 8ectwn 6 of the Constitution^ as 
amended, the Auditor of the Canal Department, tlie Ron. George W, 
Schuyler, gives the following results of their operating during the fiscal year 
ended September 30, 1877.- 



CANALS. 


Receipts. 


Cost of 

Collection and 

Ordinary 

Repairs. 


Surplus. 


Deficiency. 


Brie 


$922,562 81 

63,161 77 

20,473 40 

6,632 80 


$692,472 19 
139,216 52 
45,549 24 
19,307 97 


$230,090 62 




f!hamt>lain 


$76,054 75 
25,075 84 


Oswego 




navTiera and. Seneca 




12,675 17 








$1,012,830 78 


$896,545 92 


$230,090 62 
113,805 76 


$113,806 76 


Deduct Deficiency from Snrp 


us 














$116,284 86 









The Lateral OanaijS, which may be Disposed of. 



CANALS. 



Chemung 

Chenango 

Black River 

Genessee Valley 

Oneida Lake 

Baldwinsville 

Oneida River Improvement. , 
Seneca River Towing-path . . 

Cayuga Inlet 

Crooked Lake 



Receipts. 



$3,211 64 

1,159 18 

15,711 00 

19,533 79 



525 26 
186 92 
166 44 
36 00 



$40,530 23 



Cost of 

Collection and 

Ordinary 

Repairs. 



$21,706 45 
7,722 88 
54,222 24 
70,048 97 



83 22 



$153,783 76 



Surplus. 



$525 26 
186 92 
83 22 
36 00 



$831 40 



Deduct Surplus from Deficiency . 
Net loss of operating 



Deficiency. 



$18,494 81 

6,563 70 

38,511 24 

50,515 18 



$114,084 93 
83140 



$118,253 53 



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230 



New York Produce Eocchmge. 



RAILWAY TRANSPORTATION. 



There was very little through transportation by the railways pre- 
vious to 1854 ; but since that time there has been a marvelous increase 
in the railway freight traffic over the great through lines between the 
East and the West, especially over those lines terminating at the sea- 
board cities of New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Boston and Montreal. 
During the years 1876 and 1877, the competition between these rival 
lines has been more marked than at any previous period^ and at rates 
of freight far below what was thought possible five to seven years ago. 
This competition has, to a very considerable extent, changed the 
course of trade. It has prevailed between 'the several railways as well 
as between all the through lines of railway and the water routes during 
the season of lake and canal navigation from May to November. The 
railways are the carriers of all the live stock, the deliveries of which at 
the cities of New York, Boston, Philadelphi«i and Baltimore, aggregated 
in 1877, 5,464,675 head, against 5,547,153 head in 1876. There are also large 
deliveries of live stock by rail at the more important interior cities. 
The rail traffic in live stock is a very large per cent of the entire rail 
tonnage, and has been generally at very remunerative rates of freight. 
While there have been frequent reductions in the rates of freight on 
grain, provisions and general merchandise, the changes have been in- 
frequent on live stock. The railway classification of freight has also 
been an important element in railway transportation ; the competition 
resting generally on fourth class, leaving all other classes, with few 
exceptions, undisturbed. This enables the railways to present at 
the close of their fiscal year a fairly remunerative balance sheet 
of their freight transportation account. The several through lines of 
railway terminating in New York city have largely promoted its wel- 
fare, and during the last ten years have nearly equally divided the 
honors with the canals. 

The following tables show the relative proportion of receipts, at New 
York, of Grain and Flour, respectively, during the past two years : 

Receipts of Grain, FiiOUR and MsAii at New York, Montitly, 
During the Tear ended December 31^^, 1877. 



May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Total, 7 months., 
Total, 5 months . 

Grand total, year 



By Canal. 



Bushels. 
1,984,4S4 
4,092,917 
4,248,385 
6,796,128 
7,415,125 
10,578,406 
12,132,820 



By Vessels 
Coastwise. 



Bushels. 
495,122 



248,569 
418,702 
256,976 
264.060 
267,397 



47,248,265 
1,107,911 



2,185,218 
1,879,421 



48,356,176 



4,064,639 



By Rail. 



Bushels. 
3,894,244 
2,321,906 
1,733,095 
4,885,909 
5,107,004 
6,781,114 
5,833,134 



30,526.406 
20,366,561 



50,892,967 



Total. 



Bushels. 

6,373,850 

6,649,215 

6,230,049 

12,070.739 

12, 779; 105 

17,623,580 

18,233,351 



79,959,889 
23,353,893 



103,313,782 
r~ 



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Trade and Transportation. 



231 



Also during 1876. 



May 

June 

July 


4,263,029 
4,258,334 
4,766,763 
2,715,577 
3,502,140 
6,885,115 
5,704,437 


410,619 
205,008 
207,624 
331,375 
268,475 
211,828 
240,312 


6,756,325 
6,505,756 
5,083,439 
3,153,319 
4,723,719 
5,175,182 
5,433,146 


11,429,973 
10,969,098 
10,057,826 


August 

September 


6,200,271 
8,494,334 


October 


12,272,125 


November 


11,377,895 


Total, 7 months 


32,095,395 
640,378 


1,875,241 
2,290,285 


36,830,886 
22,217,067 


70,801,522 


Total, 5 months 


25,147,730 


Grand total, year 


32,735,773 


4,165,526 


59,047,953 


95,949,252 


Recejli'ts 


AT New Yq] 


RK OP Grain 


ALONE IN 1877. 


GRAIN ONLY. 


By Canals. 


By Vessels 
Coastwise. 


By Raa. 


Total. 


Mav 


Bushels. 
1,948,413 
4,064,785 
4,230,661 
6,762,921 
7,391,454 
10,517,316 
12,024,939 


Bushels. 

274,944 

58,457 

47,281 

155,847 

17,571 

12,676 

5,795 


Bushels. 
2,788,781 
1,440,119 
931,450 
3,285,348 
3,678,857 
4,521^727 
3,719,929 


Bushels. 
5,012,138 


June 

July 


5,563,361 
5,209,392 


August 


10,204,116 


September 


11,087,882 


October 


15,051,718 


November 


15,750,663 






Total 7 months 


46,940,488 
1,971,266 


572,571 
1,242,507 


20,366,211 
- 13,715,375 


67,879,270 


Total, 5 months 


15,929,148 






Grand total, 12 months. . . 


47,911,754 


1,815,078 


34,081,586 


83,808,418 


Also during 1876. 


May 

June 


4,173,890 
4,194,542 
4,716,370 
2,658,700 
3,444,254 
6,813,987 
5,653,001 


234,349 
52,470 
45,794 
44,891 
27,405 
27,312 
51,739 


5,409,998 
4,891,997 
3,786,668 
1,686,137 
3,135,900 
3,387,837 
3,363,683 


9,818,237 
9,139,009 


July 


8,548,832 


August 


4,389,728 




6,607,559 


October 


10,229,136 


November 


9,068,423 








31,654,744 
612,530 


483,960 
1,582,015 


25,662,220 
15,010,316 


57,800,924 


Total, 5 months 


17,204,861 






Grand total, year 


32,267,274 


2,065,975 


40,672,536 


75,005,785 



Receipts op Flotjb and Meal alone at IN^ew York during 1877, at 
THEIR Equivalent in Bushels. 



FLOUR AND MEAL. 


By Canal. 


By Vessels, 
Coastwise. 


By RaU. 


Total by Rail 
and Water. 


Mav 


Bushels. 
36,071 
28,132 
17,724 
aS,207 
23,671 
61,091 
107,881 


Bushels. 
220,178 
175,935 
201,288 
262,855 
239,405 
251,384 
261,602 


Bushels. 
1,105,463 
881,787 
801,645 
1,570,561 
1,428,147 
2,259,387 
2,113,205 


Bushels. 
1,361,712 




1,085,854 


July 


1,020,657 


August 


1,866,623 


September 


1,691,623 


October 


1,571,862 


November 


2,482,688 






Total, 7 months 


307,777 
136,645 


1,612,647 
636,914 


10,160,195 
6,651,186 


12,080,619 


Total 5 months 


7,424,745 






Grand total, year 


444,422 


2,249,561 


16,811,381 


19,505,364 



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232 



New York Produce Exchange, 
Also during 1876. 



May 

June 

July 

August 

September. , 

October 

November.. 



Total, 7 months. . . 
Total, 5 months . . , 

Grand total, year., 



89,139 
63.792 
50,393 
56.677 
57,886 
71,128 
51.436 



440,651 

27,848 



468,499 



176,270 
152,538 
161,830 
286,484 
241.070 
184,516 
188,573 



1,391,281 
708,270 



2,099,551 



1,346,327 
1,613.759 
1,296,771 
1,467,182 
1,587.819 
1,787,345 
2,069,463 



11,163.666 

7,206.751 



18,375,417 



1,611,736 
1,830.089 
1,508,994 
1,810,543 
1.886.543 
2,042,989 
2,309,472 



13,300.598 
7,942,869 



20,943,467 



COMPABATIVE AGGKEaATE RECEIPTS. 



Grain, Flour & Meal. 


BY Canal. 


By Yessbls, 
Coastwise. 


By Hail. 


Total. 


1877—12 Months 


Bushels. 
48,356,176 
32,735,773 


Bushels. 
4,064.639 
4.165,526 


Bushels. 
50,S92.967 
59,047,953 


Bushels. 
103.313,732 


1876—12 Months 


95,949,252 








15,620,403 


"'i00",887 




7,364,530 


Decrease . 


8,154,986 









During Seven Months of Canal Navigation^ May to November Inclusive. 


1877 


47,248,265 
32,095,395 


2,185.218 
1,875,241 


30,526,406 
36,830,886 


79,959.889 


1876 


70.801,522 








15,152,870 


309,977 




9,158,367 


Decrease 


6,304,480 













During Five Months of Winter Bail Transportation — January, Februa/ry, 
March, April and December, 



1877 


1,107,911 
640,378 


1,879,421 
2,290,285 


20,366,561 
22,217,067 


23,353,893 


1876 


25,147,730 




467,533 








Decrease 


410,864 


1,850,506 


1,793,837 









The deliveries of grain at the seven seaboard ports are very con- 
siderably more than the receipts at the eight principal Western lake 
and river ports, indicating a large movement Eastward, from interior 
points in the Northwestern States outside of the eight ports. 



YEARS. 


Receipts at Eight 

Western Lake 
and River Ports. 


Receipts at Seven 

Atlantic 
Seaboard Ports. 


Exports from Five 

Atlantic 

Seaboard Ports. 


1877 


Bushels. 
194,969,393 
200,464,113 
176,192,041 
229,446,985 
196,167,876 


Bushels. 

221,795,040 

227,752,173 

194,209,846 

206,4{)7,4S6 

189,099,703 


Bushels. 
124,582,116 


1876 


125,771,730 


1875 


90,213,244 


1874 


104,994.100 


1873 


87,407,846 






Total five years 


997,240,408 
199,448,082 


1,039,354,248 
207,870,849 


533,069,086 


Averaare. five years 


106,613,807 







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Trade and Transportation. 



233 



The movement from interior points is much larger than the 
foregoing figures would seem to indicate. Pennsylvania and Western 
:N"ew York are large consumers of Western grain, and large shipments 
are made from Western ports for consumption in the province of 
Ontario. Besides, there is a large harley movement from Ontario to 
the seal>oard, which is not included in the receipts at lake ports. There 
is a prohahle movement outside of the eight principal Western lake and 
river ports of forty-five to fifty million hushels of grain. 

The comparative receipts of grain at the five competing seaboard 
ports from 1866 to 1877, inclusive, twelve years, is as follows : 



Years. 


Total Receipts, 
*5 Ports. 


Total Receipts. 
New York. 


Total Receipts. 
Philadelphia. 


Total Receipts. 
Baltimore, 


1866 

1867 


Bushels. 
97,522.166 
87,112,779 
106.769,295 
118,268.926 
124,461,841 
158.805.433 
166.429 653 
174,525.321 
192.452,353 
179,875,321 
212,013,864 
205,420,o66 


Bushels. 

58,352,367 

50,256.208 

61,234.620 

65.241,404 

69.921,175 

89,543,673 

90.930.336 

92.137,971 

107.273.158 
93.895,082 
95,949,252 

103,313,782 


Bushels. 
7,260.515 
8.056,872 
12.151,207 
14.679.515 
15.307,011 
20.102,425 
24,117.150 
24.949,157 
24,625,591 
28.195,330 
35,546,»45 
25,727,260 


Bushels. 
8,197,130 
12,728,905 


18H8 . 


12,235.558 


1869 


13,«18.483 


1870 


13,819,101 


1871 


17.389,443 


1872 


20,571,499 


1873 


19,099,517 


1874 


24,936.208 


1875 , 


22,043.569 


1876 


35,310.276 


1877 


34,590,303 







* Including New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Montreal. 



The percentages of receipts at these points compare as follows : 








J 


1 ALL BUT 


Years 


Montreal. 


BOSTON. 


New York. 


Philadelphia. 


Baltimore. 


New York. 


1866.;. 


10.9 


11.6 


61.2 


7.7 


8.6 


38.8 


1867. . . 


10.3 


12.5 


55.3 


8.8 


13.1 


44.7 


1868... 


7.8 


11.0 


57.9 


11.7 


11.6 


42.1 


1869. . . 


11.0 


10.0 


55.0 


12.3 


11.7 


45.0 


1870... 


9.7 


10.4 


55.7 


12.3 


11.9 


44.3 


1871... 


10.8 


9.6 


57.0 


12.9 


10.2 


43.0 


1872:.. 


10.2 


10.0 


53.4 


14.2 


12.2 


46.6 


1873... 


11.4 


10.3 


52.8 


14.3 


11.2 


47.2 


1874 .. 


9.2 


9.3 


55.8 


12.8 


12.9 


44.2 


1875... 


9.6 


10.2 


52.3 


15.7 


12.2 


47.7 


1876... 


9.0 


10.7 


45.8 


16.8 


17.7 


54.2 


1877... 


9.0 


11.3 


50.3 


12.5 


16.8 


49.6 



Comparing the receipts of grain at Ave of the principal seaboard 
ports, including New York, Boston, Montreal, Philadelphia and Balti- 
more, the four ports competing with New York, had, in 1866, 38 8-10 of 
the grain receipts, and New York 61 2-10 per cent. In 1876 New York 
had 45 8-10 per cent., and the four ports 54 2-10 per cent., while in 1877, 
following the reduction in the tolls on the New York canals. New York 
had 50 3-10 per cent, against 49 7-10 per cent, at the four competing 
ports. 

The supply of cereals at interior points in the Western and North- 
western States is, with increased population and augmented production, 
nearly every year growing larger, but New York has not retained her 
usual relative proportion of the increase in the delivery at seaboard ports 



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234 



New Torh Produce Exchange, 



or in the exports. The local consumption of cereals at New York from 
her larger population, with several large cities in her immediate 
vicinity, must necessarily be more than any other seaboard port of 
North America. The decrease is in the deliveries for export. Her 
situation has, however, during the season of canal navigation, in 1877, 
been improved, in consequence of the lower tolls on property carried on 
the Erie Canal. 

The comparative exports of cereals from the five principal seaboard 
ports for the last five years, have been : 



From 



1873. 



1874. 



1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



New York 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Montreal 

Total 

Total except N.Y. 



Bush. 

54,278,072 
4,807,620 
9,049,545 
2,145,364 

17,127,245 



87,407,846 



33,129,774 



Bush. 
66,088,650 

6,671,334 
12,555,090 

3,186,318 
16,492,708 



Bush. 
50,686,401 

8,846,515 
11,407,489 

3,987,959 
15,384,880 



Bush. 
55,500,158 
22,016,515 
24,761,307 
6,043,298 
17,450,452 



104,994,100 



90,313,244 



125,771,730 



38,905,450 



39,626,843 



70,271,572 



Bush. 
62,418,317 
13,473,965 
25,842,450 
5,974,621 
16,872,763 



124,582,116 



62,163,799 



The percentages of exports from these ports compare as follows : 



From 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


New York 


Per cent. 
62.10 

5.50 
10.35 

2.45 
19.60 


Per cent. 
62.94 
6.35 
11.96 
3.05 
15.72 


Per cent. 
56.12 

9.80 
12.63 

4,42 
17.03 


Per cent. 
44 14 
17.50 
19.68 
4.80 
13.88 


Per cent. 
50.10 
10.82 
20.74 
4.79 
13.55 


Philadelphia 


Baltimore 


Boston 


Montreal 




Total 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 




Total except New York 


37.90 


37.06 


43.88 


55.86 


49.90 





There has been a change, also, in the direction of the export movement 
from seaboard ports. The four competing ports had, in 1873, 37 90-100 
per cent, against New York 63 10-100 per cent., and in 1877 the four com- 
peting ports had 49 90-100, and New York 50 10-100 per cent. The ratio 
in 1876 was 44 14-100 per cent, for New York, against 55 86-100 for the four 
competiQg ports, with 5,494,720 bushels less of grain received at the 
eJight principal Western lake and river ports, and 5,957,133 bushels less 
delivered at the seven principal seaboard ports. The deliveries at tide 
water by the Erie and Champlain canals were, in 1877, 16,402,800 bushels 
more than in 1876, and from these the deliveries at New York by 
canal and river, in 1877, were 15,620,403 bushels. At New York the 
deliveries of grain by rail in 1877, were 8,154,986 bushels less than in 1876, 
and the receipts at Philadelphia were, in 1877, 9,819,585 bushels less than 
in 1876. There was a small decrease at Montreal and Boston, while 
Baltimore maintained her position. 



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Trade and Transportation. 



235 



Average Freight ox Wheat to New York in 1877. 



All Water Rotjtb. 



Per bush. 
60 lbs. 



Per ton 
2,000 lbs. 
with tolls. 



Per ton 
2,000 lbs. 
toll out. 



Per ton 

per mile 

with tolls. 



Per ton 
per mile 
tolls out. 



Chicago to 
N. York 
per ton 
per mile. 



Chicago to Buffalo Lake 

Buffalo to New York CanaL. 

Total Chicago to N. York. . . 



c. m. 
3 72 

7 52 



$ c. m. 

1 24 — 

2 50 66 



$ c. m. 
1 24 — 
1 81 66 



m. frac. 
1 377 
5 001 



m. frac. 
1 377 
3 633 



m. frac. 



3 74 66 



3 05 66 



2 675 



Chicago to Buffalo, 900 miles, Buffalo to New York, 500 miles. Total, 1,400 miles. 

Average Freight on Corn to New York in 1877. 



A r.Ti water Route. 


Per bush. 
56 lbs. 


Per ton 
2,000 lbs. 
with tolls. 


Per ton of 
2,000 lbs. 
toU out. 


Per ton 
per mile 
with toUs. 


Per ton 
per mUe 
toU out. 


Chicago to 
N. York 
per ton 

per mile. 


Chicago to Buffalo Lake 

Buffalo to New York Canal . . 


Cts. m. 
3 22 
6 61 


$ c. m. 

1 15 - 

2 36 07 


% c. m. 
1 15 — 
1 67 07 


m. frac. 
1 277 
4 721 


m. frac. 
1 277 
3 341 


m. frac. 


Total Chicago to New York, 


9 83 


3 51 07 


2 82 07 


— — 


— — 


2 508 



Average Freight on Wheat and Corn to Montreal in 1877. 





WHEAT. 


CORN. 


All Water Route. 


Per Bush. 
60 lbs. 


Per Ton, 
2000 lbs. 


Per Ton, 
per mile. 


Per Bush. 
56 lbs. 


Per Ton, 
2000 lbs. 


Per Ton, 
per mile. 


Chicago to Kingston 

Kngston to Montreal 


cts. m. 
7 88 
3 50 


$ c. m. 
2 62 6 
1 16 6 


m. fr. 
2 46 
60 


cts. m. 
6 70 
3 00 


$ c. m. 
2 39 6 
1 07 1 


m. fr. 
2 24 
55 


Total Chicago to Montreal. . . 


11 38 


3 79 2 


3 06 


9 70 


3 46 7 


2 79 



Including Tolls and Towing on Welland and St. Lawrence Canals. 

Distance from Chicago to Port Colburne 880 miles. 

'* *' Port Colburne to Port Dalhousie 28 " 

'* " Port Dalhousie to Kingston 160 *' 

" Kingston to Montreal 193 " 

Total distance from Chicago to Montreal 1,261 miles. 

Comparison op Freight Rates from Chicago to New York 
AND Montreal. 



Alt, Water Route. 


Wheat. 


Corn. 


RATE PER Ton per Mile. 


Chicago to New York 

Chicago to Montreal 


Per Ton, 

2,000 lbs. 

#3 74.66 

3 79.20 


Per Ton, 

2,000 lbs. 

$3 51.07 

3 46.07 


Wheat, 
Mills fraction. 

2 675 

3 060 


Corn, 

MiUs firaction, 

2 508 

2 790 


Chicago to New York. more. 




5.00 






Chicago to New York, less . . 


4.54 





.0 385 


.0 282 



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236 



New York Produce Exchange. 



The New York Central, the Erie, the Pennsylvania Road and the 
Baltimore and Ohio, all have transportation connection at Lake Erie 
ports, the two former at Buffalo, the Pennsylvania at Buffalo and Erie, 
and the latter at Sandusky. The distance from Erie to Philadelpliia is 
452 miles ; from Buffalo to New York via the New York Central and 
H, R. Railway is 450 miles, and via Erie Railway 445 miles. The net 
cost for these distances at four mills per ton per mile is about $1.80 per 
ton, and at six mUls per ton per mile, $2.70 per ton. The winter all-rail 
rate from Chicago to New YorI<: on grain is now $4 per ton of 2,000 lbs- 
distance 988 miles, which at 4 mills per ton per mile is $3 95.2, which, it 
is claimed will pay the net cost for long distances by rail. It is also 
claimed that six mills per ton per mile will pay a fair profit, which, on 
the distance from Chicago to New York, would give $5 92.8 per ton. 
With exceptional contracts, the tariff rates from Chicago to New York 
on grata and fourth-class freight during the larger portion of 1877 were 
six dollars per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

These railways have all of them— with the exception of the Balti- 
more and Ohio, lines of screw steamers, either owned or controlled by 
them or their representatives— making the cheap lake transportation 
available to promote their interests by increasing their power for com- 
petition. They have several new ones now building, said to be of 2,000 
to 2,500 tons measurement, whicli are expected to considerably 
diminish the cost of lake transportation. 

What can the railways do in the way of competition, having the 
lakes as business feeders at their Western termini ? 

The following is what may have befen done : 



All Watek Route Avekages of Freight Pald, 
From CTdcago to New York, 



1877. 


Lake. 


Canal. 


Total. 


Wheat, per ton 


$1 24 
115 


$2 51 
236 


$3 75 
3 61 


Corn, per ton 






Freight, Water Averages, and Rail Possible. 
Lake Gliicago to Buffalo; Rail Buffalo to New York or PMladelpMa. 


Lake and Rail, at Four Mills. 


Lake. 


Rail, at 4 

Mills per Ton 

per Mi'e. 


Total. 


Wheat, per ton of 2,000 lbs 


SI 24 
1 15 


I$l 80 
1 «0 


$3 04 
2 95 


Corn per ton of 2 000 lbs. . . . 









Lake and Rail, at Five Mills. 



Wheat, per ton of 2.000 lbs. . 
Com, per ton of 2,000 lbs. . . 



Lake. 



%i 24 
1 15 



Rail, at 5 

Mills per Ton 

per Mile. 



$2 25 
2 25 



Total. 



$3 49 
340 



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Trade and Transportation. 



237 



Lake and Bail, at Six Mills. 



Wheat, per ton of 2.000 lbs. . 
Corn, per ton of 2,000 lbs . . 



Lake. 



$1 24 
1 15 



Rail, at 6 

Mills per Ton 

per Mile. 



$2 70 
2 70 



$3 94 
3 85 



Lake and Rail, at Seven Mills. 



Wheat, per ton of 2,000 lbs. . 
Corn, per ton of 2,000 lbs. . . 



$1 24 
1 15 



Rail, at 7 

Mills per Ton 

per Mile. 



$3 15 
3 15 



$4 39 
4 30 



These figures indicate that at last year's tolls and canal freights the 
railways having their termini on Lake Erie can charge six mills per 
ton per mile, which is said to be a remunerative rail rate from Buffalo 
to New York, at $3.94 for wheat, and $3.85 for corn from Chicago to New 
York, leaving the rail charge at $2.70, as against a lake and canal rate 
of $3.75, and $3.51 respectively for wheat and corn Time and the risk of 
condition of grain will he full equivalent for the small difference in the 
aggregate charges. 

ALL RAIL FREIGHTS. 

It has been, in the past, frequently stated by experts in railway 
transportation, that the cost of transporting freight by rail was about 
one cent per ton per mile. It is now claimed by experts that with the 
more general use of steel rails, improved road-beds, more economical 
operating in the use of fuel, oil, waste, repairing and maintenance, that 
the cost of rail transportation has been reduced. Before the war the 
cost of movement on the leading main lines was about a cent and one- 
third per ton per mile. From 1860 to 1870 it was a cent and a half. In 
view of the advance of labor and materials, this was practically a reduc- 
tion. Since that date the cost has gradually decreased. In 1875, on the 
trunk lines, the rate averaged about eight mills, and in 1876 only six— 
the Pennsylvania road reporting under six, and the Pliiladelpliia and 
Erie five, the New York Central being stated at seven, and the Lake 
Shore at five and one-half . These averages applied to the whole tonnage, 
through and way— and the transportation by all methods for long dis- 
tances costs less than for short distances, being exempt from large 
terminal expenses— cars not fully loaded, trains not filled up, and other 
unfavorable conditions that affect the purely local traffic. It is the 
opinion of the more prominent managers of the trunk lines between 
the East and the West that the net cost per ton per mUe for long dis- 
tances will not much exceed four mills. The cost on the more northerly 
trunk lines is greater in winter than in summer. In the published 
tariffs of rail freights from Chicago to the seaboard for grain in 1877, the 
rate to New York was thirty cents per hundred pounds, or six dollars per 
ton, to Philadelphia five dollars sixty, and to Baltimore five dollars forty 
per ton of two thousand pounds. But there were special contracts over 



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238 New York Prodiice Eaxhange. 

all these routes during the season of 1877, at lower figures than the pub- 
lished tariffs of rates, also at lower figures than the lowest rates by the 
water routes. There were also short periods in January, September and 
October when the tariff rates were higher than those hereinbefore men- 
tioned. The rail rates from western points to Baltimore are sixty cents 
per ton, and to Philadelphia forty cents per ton less than to New York^ 
these lesser prices being on the basis of the shorter mileage of these two 
roads. 

In considering the question of rail transportation, New York has 
been subjected to discriminations against and in favor of other sea- 
board cities, not only in the extra mileage and higher rate charged 
heretofore, but in the matter of expense of delivering grain afloat in 
New York harbor. At the competing seaboard cities, where the grain 
receipts are wholly by rail, elevators at the termini of the roads meet 
fully the requirements of traffic. The ships go to elevators to load, and 
no expenses for lighterage are incurred. At New York, on the other 
hand, owing to her large commerce and the competition of the Erie 
Canal during the season of navigation, the custom of delivery to ships 
has been esteemed necessary, and a charge of three and one-half 
cents per hundred pounds is made by tlie New York roads for lighter- 
age expenses for tlie delivery of grain. Upon this basis, a rate say of 
twenty-five cents per hundred pounds from Chicago to New York is 
pro-rated on the basis of 21J^c.— the additional expense of 3)^ cents 
being for delivery afloat— and as a result, a rate of say twenty-three 
cents from Chicago to Baltimore or Philadelphia is, therefore, better 
for the connecting roads than a twenty-five cent rate to New York. 

An effort is now being made to utilize for trading upon this market 
all the grain in the port, and to that end a plan has recently been 
adopted to ** call " grain in store. 

The results, however, liave so far been meagre, but tlie action of the 
trade would seem to be in the right direction, and if handled with 
wisdom and prudence, there need be little doubt of the ultimate 
effect upon the grain trade in giving popularity to sales ex- store. 

If the system of inspection of grain shaU be applied generally to 
receipts of grain into Brooklyn warehouses, the expenses of holding at 
a moderate cost, and of ability to sell grain in store at its relative 
value, would, doubtless, tend to largely increase the trade at the " Call 
Boards," for one of the great drawbacks to the speculative purchases 
of grain has been the fact of the large exijense for demurrage and the 
consequent necessity for prompt sale of all such purchases, when de- 
livered to other than exporters. The maturing and adoption of some 
plan by which sales could be made ex-store, will tend to cheapen 
canal transportation, as very much of the grain received by canal 
would, on arrival, be sent directly to store, thereby avoiding the pay- 
ment of onerous expenses for demurrage to canal boats. Should the 
plan prove to be a success, the several railways could, by building ele- 
vators at their termini, end their liability on the delivery of the grain 
into elevators, and the charge of three and one-half cents lighterage 



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Trade and Transportation, 239 

would then cease to be a source of irritation on the part of the Western 
connecting roads. The terminal changes here would then be placed on 
the same basis as at the competing seaboard cities. 

Comparative Practical Results from Large and Small Vessels 
Navigating the Lakes. 

There has been a large and important reduction in the cost of trans- 
portation on the lakes, consequent upon the employment of large ves- 
sels instead of small ones. The sailing vessels on the lakes in 1842 
carried five to eight thousand bushels of grain, and in 1844 a capacity 
of 10,000 bushels was reached, and in 1848, 12,000 bushels capacity was 
attained, which reached 15,000 bushels in 1852, was 25,000 bushels capa- 
city in 1857, to be further increased in 1863 to 30,000 bushels, in 1868 to 
40,000, in 1870 to 50,000 bushels, in 1873 to 70,000 bushels, and in 1877 to 
80,000 bushels, being an increase in the capacity of lake craft, in thirty- 
five years, of 1,500 per cent, on like class. 

In 1850 the largest screw steamers navigating the lakes had a carry- 
ing capacity for six hundred tons of freight ; in 1853 it was increased to 
eight hundred tons, and the capacity has been augmented in the new 
screw steamers built from year to year, till in 1877 screw steamers have 
been built having a carrying capacity of from 2,200 to 2,500 tons. 
There are being built during the winter of 1877-8 six screw steamers for 
the lakes, with a carrying capacity for two thousand five hundred 
tons of freight. 

For illustration, a sailing vessel on the lakes, running between 
Chicago and Buffalo, distance either way 900 miles, carrying a down 
cargo of 588 tons of corn, and an up cargo of 600 tons of coal, at a cost 
of $696 70, actual expenses paid, not including insurance and wear and 
tear of vessel, received for freight charges $420 on the down cargo, and 
$360 on the up cargo, or an aggregate of $780, against expenses $696 70, 
leaving a profit of $83 30 for the round trip. The two cargoes up and 
down were carried at an actual cost of $696 70, which, being divided, 
allotting one-half of the expenses to the down cargo and one-half to the 
up cargo, made the rate per ton per mile on 588 tons down 658-1000 of a 
mill, and on the up cargo of 600 tons 645-1000 of a mill per ton per mile, 
and for round trip 651-1000 of a mill was the cost per ton per mile, equal 
to 58.59 cents per ton. 

With a larger class sailing vessel, carrying 1,680 tons of com from 
Chicago to Buffalo, with a return cargo of 1,500 tons of coal from 
Buffalo to Chicago at actual expenses paid of $1,360 for the round trip, 
exclusive of insurance on hull of vessel and ordinary wear and tear, the 
cost per ton on down cargo was 40.47-100 cents, and on the up cargo 45.33-100 
cents— or 449-1000 mills per ton per mile on the down cargo, and 504-1000 
of one mill on the up cargo. The cost per ton per mile for the round 
trip was 47^1000 of a mill ; but this larger vessel received the same rates 
of freights as the smaller vessel, giving $1,200 on the down cargo and 
$900 on the up cargo, or an aggregate receipt for freight for the round 
trip of $2,100, against $1,360 expenses, resulting in a profit of $740, against 



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240 New YorJc Produce Exchange. 



a profit of $83 30 on the smaller vessel. With a small decrease in the 
cost per ton per mile, there was a large increase in the net profit of the 
larger over the smaller vessel. The difference, however, is much more 
marked m the net results. The smaller vessel, with the same expenses 
as before, and the same number of tons cargo, but receiving #840 for 
the 588 tons down cargo, which is four cents per bushel for corn and $1 
per ton for the six hundred tons of coal up, would give a profit of 
$743 30, while the larger vessel with expenses the same as in first state- 
ment, but receiving $2,400 for the 1,680 tons down cargo, which is four 
cents per bushel for corn, and $1,500 for the 1,500 tons up cargo, or an 
aggregate freight for the round trip of $3,900, against $1,360 expenses, 
would give a net profit of $2,540. 

The results obtained from the larger class of steamers and sailing 
vessels invite the investment of capital in the building of this class of 
vessels. Tlie ratio of expenses to results is much more favorable to the 
larger than the smaller class of vessels. 

The comparative practical results obtained from the trip-sheet of a 
small and a large screw steamer, are thus stated : The smaller takes a 
cargo from Chicago to Buffalo of 40,000 bushels of corn, equal to 1,120 
tons, and an up cargo oC coal of 900 tons, while the larger takes a cargo 
of 90,000 bushels of corn, equal to 2,520 tons down cargo, and 2,200 tons 
of up cargo. 

The smaller steamer receives freight on the 40,000 bushels of corn, 2 
cents per bushel, or $800, and on the 900 tons of up cargo, 60 cents per 
ton, or $540, making the aggregate freight, for t!ie round trip, $1,340, 
against $1,167 actual expenses paid, but excluding insurance on steamer's 
hull and ordinary wear and tear, giving a profit on the trip of $173. 

The larger steamer received for freight on 2,520 tons, or 90,000 bush- 
els of corn, at 2 cents per bushel, $1,800, and on the up cargo of 2,200 
tons of freight, at 60 cents per ton, $1,320, giving an aggregate freight 
list for the round trip of $3,120, against $1,722.50 expenses for the round 
trip, resulting in a net profit of $1,397 50, against $173 profit by the 
smaller steamer. 

The expenses charged against the trip earnings do not include the 
insurance on steamers' hulls or the wear and tear or depreciation to 
keep stock good. Tlie actual cost per ton, as per expenses charged, 
dividing expenses equally between up and down cargoes, was on the 
small steamer, on the down cargo, 52 1-10 cents, equal, on 900 miles dis- 
tance, to 579-1000 of a mill per ton per mile, and on the up cargo of 900 
tons, 62 cents and 61-100 of a cent per ton, equal to 695-1000 of a mill per 
ton per mile, vs. the larger steamer, with 2,590 tons of down cargo, at 
34 18-100 cents per ton, cost equal to 3799-10000 of a mill per ton per 
mile, and on the up cargo of 2,200 tons, cost 39 14-100 cents per ton, equal 
to 434-1000 of a mill per ton per mile for 900 miles. The cost per ton per 
mile, for the round tTip, was on the smaller steamer 642-1000 of a mill, 
vs. 405-1000 of a mill on the larger steamer. 

The difference between the results of the trip of the smaller steamer 
and the larger one will be more marked with higher rates of freight on 



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Trade and Transportation, 233* 

same cargoes. The smaller steamer, with a down cargo of 40,000 bushels 
of corn, at 4 cents per bushel, would give an aggregate freight of $1,600, 
and 900 tons of up cargo, at $1 per ton, would give $900, or $2,500 re- 
ceipts for freight for round trip, against $1,167 expenses, resulting in a 
net profit of $1,433. 

The larger steamer, with a down cargo of 90,000 bushels of corn, 
would give a round sum of $3,600, and 2,200 tons of up cargo, at $1 per 
ton, would give a freight list for the round trip of $5,800, vs. expenses 
for the round trip, $1,722 50, giving a net profit of $4,077 50. 

The sailing vessels on the Lakes will make a round trip between 
Buffalo and Chicago in about a month, while screw .steamers will make 
an average of two trips per month and a fraction moi'e. 

Comparative Practical RESuiiTS prom Small and Large Canal Boats 
Navigating the Erie Canal. 

The tonnage carried in canal boats previous to 1840 was 35 to 40 
tons. In 1847 the average cargo from Buffalo to New York was about 
2,500 bushels of wheat, or seventy-five tons. In 1852 cargoes were in- 
creased to 90 tons. The first boats passed tlirough the enlarged locks 
in about 1854, when the cargoes were increased to 200 tons and 210 tons. 
The canal was after this made deeper, giving theoretically seven feet 
of water, of which the draught permitted to boats was about six feet, 
increasing the carrying capacity of . canal boats from 200 tons to 240 
tons, which is about the average carrying capacity of the class of boats 
now navigatrag the Erie Canal. Previous to the enlargement of the 
Erie Canal, it was asserted as an engineering theory that the effect 
would be to reduce tlie cost of transportation fifty per cent. A tabular 
statement on page 124 of the State Engineer's Report for 1863, of the 
actdal cost of canal transportation from 1835 to 1863, shows a reduction 
in practice of fifty-one and one-half per cent. 

In the same report it is estimated by the State Engineer that the 
relative cost of transportation has been, and will be, with a re-enlarge- 
ment of the Erie Canal, as follows : 

Old Erie Canal, 4 feet of water, boat 76 tons, cost 4,14 mills ; En- 
larged Erie Canal, 7 feet of water, boat 210 tons, cost 2.16 mills ; Re- 
enlarged Erie Canal, 8 feet of water, boat 690 tons, will cost 1.04 mills 
per ton per mUe. 

It costs to move property on the Hudson River, so says the State 
Engineer in Appendix to his Report of 1863, as follows : 

In canal boats drawing four feet of water and 90 tons burthen, 75c. 
per ton. In canal boats drawing 6^ feet of water and 240 tons bur- 
then, 42 cents per ton. In barges drawing 1% f^^* <>f water and 500 
tons burthen, 30 cents per ton. In vessels drawing 12 feet of water and 
1,000 tons burthen, 19 cents per ton. 

The calculated capacity of boats for the re-enlarged locks is as fol- 
lows : (per State Engineer's Report.) 



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234* 



New Yorh Produce Exchmge. 



Boat 210x25x6J^ feet, draught 690 tons. 

Boat 210x25x73^ " " 765 tons. 

Boat 210x30x7>| " " 950 tons. 

There has been a new and improved mode of transportation tried on 
the !New York canals during the season of navigation in 1877. This 
comprises a steamer, which is a boat of the usual dimensions for navi- 
gating the canals, and a barge or consort of similar dimensions, ninety- 
six and one-half feet long by seventeen and one-half feet beam, carry- 
ing each about two hundred and thirty-five to two hundred and forty 
tons, or the barge and steamer together, 470 to 471 tons from Buffalo to 
New York, and two hundred tons from New York to Buffalo. This 
steamer and barge are coupled together, making them practically a 
steamer 193 feet in length, which can be uncoupled to pass through 
the locks. This steamer, the Rapid, and her barge Consort, came out 
new in the summer of 1877, and commenced business on the 21st of July, 
and closed for the season, November 20th, a period of 122 days, during 
which time they made four round trips between New York and 
Buffalo, making the average time for each trip 30j^ days, including 
running time and time in port at New York and Buffalo, loading and 
unloading. They together carried in the four trips as follows : 



First Trip 

Second Trip , 

Third Trip , 

Fourth Trip , 

Total 4 Trips 



Down, Tons. 



471 
470 
470>^ 
471 



Up, Tons. 



200 
198 
200 



798 



Total, Tons. 



671 
670 



671 



2,681>^ 





Total cost 
per trip. 

Down. 


Total cost 
per trip, 

Up. 


Aggregate 

cost per 

Round Trip, 


Aggregate 

Freight 

Receipts per 

Round Trip. 


Net Receipts 
over Cost 
per Trip. 


1st Trip 


487.15 
486.12 
487.15 
486.12 


116.97 
150.30 
198.12 
207.46 


604.12 
636.42 
685.27 
693.58 


1,039.50 
1,445.73 
1,512.64 
2,141.00 


435.38 


2d Trip. 


809.31 


3<i T ip 


827.37 


4ihTrip 


1,447.48 




Totals 


$1,946.54 


$672.85 


$2,619.39 


$6,138.87 


$3,519.48 







The down movement from Buffalo to New York for the four trips 
was at a cost of $1.0334 per ton, and the up movement from New York 
to Buffalo at a cost of . 8431 cents per ton, or two mills .067 fraction of a 
mill per ton per mile on the down movement, and one mill and .686 
fraction of a mill per ton per mUe on the up movement. 

The Rapid and her consort were new, and the question of their cost, 
their repairs and their depreciation is not in the foregoing figures taken 
into the account. * 

The cost of such a steamer and her consort would be about ten 
thousand dollars. They will be in condition for use for some purpose 
on the canals for a period of about ten years. The interest on the in- 



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Trade and Tran8portati<m, 235* 

vestment for ten years would be about ten thousand dollars, and the 
expenses of repairing and maintaining in navigable condition for a 
period of ten years would not be less than five thousand dollars. These 
steamers would make about seven round trips in each canal naviga- 
tion season, running seven thousand miles, and in ten years seventy 
thousand miles, and to re-imburse this twenty-five thousand dollars ex^ 
penditure would give 35 cents and .71 fraction of a cent per mile for the 
seventy thousand miles traversed, which, being divided by the number 
of tons carried in one trip by the steamer and her consort, would give 
532-1000 mills charge on each ton carried, to make and keep the stock and 
investment good. The cost, therefore, for running expenses, repairs 
and maintenance, keeping the stock good, would be 2 mills .599 fraction 
of a mill per ton per mile on the down movement, and 2 mills .218 frac- 
tion of a mill per ton per mile on the up movement, or an aggregate 
cost per ton from Buffalo to New York of one dollar .2995 fraction of a 
dollar, and on the up movement from Kew York to Buffalo one doUar, 
and .1090 fraction of a dollar. 

In the four trips made by the steamer Rapid and her consort there 
were 2,681 V^ tons carried five hundred miles, giving 13,407,500 tons 
carried one mile, at a cost of $2,619 39, equal to one mill and nine hun- 
dred and fifty-three thousands of a mill per ton per mile, exclusive of 
all charges for keeping the investment good, repairs and mainten- 
ance. 

The expenses of a boat, towing in the line, carrying 232 40-100 tons 
or 8,300 bushels of corn from Buffalo to New York, with a return cargo of 
100 gross tons of coal, or an aggregate in 344.40 net tons received freight 
for corn down, 4 cents per bushel, "amounting to $332, and one dollar 
per ton on one hundred gross tons of coal up, giving an aggregate freight 
list for the round trip of $392. The expenses of the round trip, tolls in- 
cluded, were $407 59. 344 40-100 tons carried five hundred miles, equals 
172,200 tons carried one mile, which gives the cost per ton per mile at 2 
mills and 369-1000 of a mill. 

A canal boat, towed by horses owned by the boatman or his em- 
ployer, with a cargo of corn of 8,400 bushels from Buffalo to New York, 
at a freight of four cents per bushel received for freight on down cargo, 
$336, and on 100 gross tons of coal on up cargo from New York to Buf- 
falo, at sixty cents per ton, free of toll, $60— total freight for round 
trip $396. The expenses for the round trip were, including tolls, $324 87. 
There were carried both ways 347 20-100 tons net 500 miles, equal to 
173,600 tons carried one mile, at a cost of $324 87, or an average one mill 
and 8 71-1000 mill per ton per mile, including tolls. The cost of horses 
and boat, and allowance for depreciation of property, are not included in 
this calculation. 

The foregoing statements show quite conclusively that the state- 
ment of the cost of transportation on the Erie Canal and Hudson River, 
between New York and Buffalo, as made by the State Engineer in re- 
port for 1863, at 2 16-100 mills per ton per mile, is about mathematically 
correct. This cost, 2 16-^100 mDls, includes the maintenance of the canal 



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236* New York Prodicce Exchange. 

stock, including interest on investment, repairs and maintenance de- 
preciation, &c. 

They also show the superiority of the use of steamers with harge 
consorts, making practically a steamer for the canals 193 feet long by 
173^ feet beam, carrying together 480 tons, with one crew, no larger, 
with the exception of an engineer, than that required for a single boat. 

Terminal Charges at the Seaboard Ports of Export. 

At Montreal there are seven grain elevators connected with ware- 
housiug facilities for transferring grain from vessels, and four from 
railway cars, making eleven in all, each with a transfer capacity for 
handling three to four thousand bushels of grain per hour. These 
elevators and their connecting warehouses have a storage capacity 
for two million bushels of graia, besides which the Montreal Elevating 
Company have eleven floating harbor elevators, each with a capacity 
for handling four thousand bushels of grain per hour, or an aggregate 
of 44,003 bushels per hour. Furthermore, the St. Lawrence Grain Com- 
pany has one elevator with a transfer capacity of seven thousand 
bushels per hour. The storage capacity for flour equals two hundred 
thousand barrels. The freight paid to the lake vessel or river barge 
includes all costs and dues en route, and delivers the grain free on board 
of ocean craft in the harbor of Montreal— full delivery weight being 
guaranteed by the carriers ; no tonnage nor harbor dues, 
towage nor pilotage dues being chargeable on grain or other 
cargo of vessels ; all such are payable by the vessel as a part of her 
current expenses, and are included in the freight charge paid to her. 
The export wharfage dues and Port Warden's fees on grain are merely 
nominal, and do not exceed thirty cents per one hundred bushels. The 
facilities for handling grain at Kingston are provided for by flve floating 
elevators, with a transfer capacity of two hundred and fifty thousand 
bushels per day of twelve working hours. The standard barge capacity 
for transporting the same from Kingston to Montreal is equal to one 
million three hundred and seventy thousand bushels. Therefore, in one 
trip downward very nearly one million and a half of bushels of grain 
can be moved, and if it shall be computed that on an average each 
barge could make thirteen trips on tlie average of 219 V^ days of 
navigation on the St. Lawrence River and the St. Lawrence 
Canals, there is shown a capacity for moving in a season over 
nineteen million busliels of grain. There are also storage and 
transfer elevators at Port Colbome and Port Dalhousie, at each 
end of the Welland Canal. There is also a railway on the line of the 
Welland Canal twenty-eight miles long, which carries grain from Port 
Colborne to Port Dalhousie, elevating at both ends of its route, at a 
charge of one and one-quarter to one and one-half cents per bushel. 
This railway is used for lightering vessels of a portion of their cargo, by 
which means a vessel can take on a cargo for any draught of water 
suited to her full loading capacity, passing it from Lake Erie to Lake 



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Trade and Transportation, 237* 

Ontario, partly through the canal and partly over the Welland Railway, 
reloading it at the terminus of the railway on Lake Ontario. 

At Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore, the ocean steamer or sail- 
ing ship loads grain from the grain elevators direct. At these cities the 
terminal charges are small, with no expense for lighterage. 

At Nevr York the terminal charges on rail grain delivered afloat in 
New York harbor are three and one-half cents per hundred pounds, 
which is 2 1-10 cents on wheat per bushel of sixty pounds, and one 
cent and ninety-six hundreds of a cent per bushel of fifty-six pounds. 
This charge of seventy cents per ton is pro-rated with the western con- 
necting railways, on the basis of the mileage over each, being on a 
through rate of say twenty-five cents per hundred pounds from Chi- 
cago to New York, pro-rated on the basis of twenty-one and one-half 
cents per hundred pounds. At Baltimore, Philadelphia and Boston, 
there is no such charge to be pro-rated with western connecting roads, 
which, whenever opportunity offers, will favor these cities and save this 
pro-rating charge. This charge made by New York is against her trade, 
favoring that of the competing seaboard cities. The tariffs of freight 
rates in 1877 for grain from competing western points of rail shipment 
were to Philadelphia and Baltimore respectively forty and sixty cents 
per ton less than from the same points to New York. Baltimore has by 
these combined charges one dollar and thirty cents per ton, and Phila- 
delphia one dollar and ten cents per ton, in their favor. The result is 
that these two competing cities have, during the year 1877 received only 
134,033 bushels less corn than New York, and have exported 2,864,055 
bushels more corn than New York, but during the portion of the year 
when navigation on the Lakes and Erie Canal has been closed the re- 
ceipts and exports of corn at Philadelphia and Baltimore have been 
more than three times that of New York. There have already been con- 
siderable revisions and abatements in the terminal charges on grain and 
other freight at New York. The success of New York's competitors, in 
securing the grain trade, would seem to indicate the necessity of a 
still further revision of the terminal charges. 

Grain Transfer and other Charges at Western Lake and River 
Ports, and at Interpoints en route to the Seaboard. 
The tolls on property on the New York Canals have been, by 
the necessities of trade, reduced from four mills to one mill per 
1,000 lbs. per mile, the latter being the present rate on grain, or sixty- 
nine cents per ton for tolls through the Erie Canal. A movement is 
being made by the State Legislature to so amend the Constitution of the 
State as to make the State Canals practically free to commerce by abol- 
ishing tolls. Western commercial cities have made loud complaint of 
New York Canal tolls, when at the same time their charges for passing 
grain through one Western elevator and one intermediate elevator en 
route^ including the shovelling and trimming charges in loading and un- 
loading Lake vessels and loading canal boats, was more than the far from 
onerous tolls collected by the State for passing grain through the Erie Cau al 



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238* New York Produce Exchange, 

three hundred and forty-five miles, locking it en route through seventy- 
two locks. These charges were in the aggregate frequently more than 
the Lake freight, nine hundred miles from Chicago to Buffalo. They 
have had the effect of driving tlie trade from the water route to the rail 
routes. These charges have been somewhat modified from what they 
were, hut still there are now annually delivered at the seaboard cities 
about fifty million bushels of grain that have gone around and not 
through Western Lake elevators, which, perhaps, at a less charge than 
now made by them, might be invited to do so, giving a better financial 
result than the present charges give. It is at least worth the considera- 
tion of all those interested in Western grain elevators at ports of trans- 
fer on the water route, as well as all those having an interest in the 
success of this route. 

The Lake and St. Lawrence River Route.— The Canadian CANAiiS. 

The Welland Canal, 28 miles long, extends from Port Colborne, on 
Lake Erie, about 20 miles West of Buffalo, to Port Dalhousie, on Lake 
Ontario. It had on its original construction 27 locks, with a lockage 
lift of 330 feet. The locks previous to the enlargement now being made 
were 150 by 26)^ feet in the chambers, with ten feet of water over the 
mitre siUs, and could pass vessels of 400 to 450 tons measurement, carry- 
ing about 600 to 650 tons cargo. The locks now being constructed are 
270 feet long by 45 feet wide, and are designed for 14 feet draught of 
water, making them navigable for vessels of 1,500 to 1,800 tons. The 
prism of the canal is being enlarged to dimensions corresponding with 
the enlarged locks. The enlarged canal, when completed, will have 
three times the capacity it had before enlargement. 

The St. Lawrence Canals are comprised in seven divisions, viz. : 
The Laohine, %% miles long, with five locks, having a lift of 44f feet ; 
the Beauharnois Canal, 11 *^ miles long, with 9 locks, having a lift of 
823^ feet ; the Cornwall Canal, 11!^ miles long, with 7 locks, having a 
lift of 48 feet ; the Farrand's Point Canal, with 1 lock of four feet lift ; 
the Rapid Plat Canal, with two locks, having a lift of 11 !^ feet; the 
Galops and Point Iroquois, with three locks, having 15^ feet lift. The 
last four canals are 93^ miles long. These seven canals are 41 miles 
long, with 27 locks, having an aggregate lift of 206}^ feet. The locks, 
before the enlargement now in progress, were 200 feet long by 45 feet 
wide, adapted to vessels with a draught of ten feet of water. The re- 
constructing locKs are 270 feet long by 45 feet wide, and adapted to ves- 
sels drawing 14 feet of water. The aggregate of the length of the Wel- 
land and St. Lawrence Canals is 69 miles, with lockage lift of 536]^ feet. 
Lake Ontario is the feeder of the St. Lawrence Canals, and Lake Erie 
the feeder of the Welland Canal. The great bulk of the trade over this 
route will be downward, and with the current in its favor the entire dis- 
tance. 

The Erie Canal is 350 miles long from Buffalo to Albany, and 345 miles 
to the Hudson River at Troy. It has 72 locks, 110 feet long by 18 feet 
wide, with the present lock gates admitting boats only 963^ feet in 
length, drawing six and one-half feet of water, and carrying about 240 
tons. The lockage lift of the 72 locks on the Erie Canal is 654 feet. 
From Buffalo to Montezuma the Erie Canal is fed from the waters of 
Lake Erie, and from thence to Albany from various sources, natural and 
artificial. 



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Trade and Transportation. 239* 

The average lengths of the navigation season, for a period of 25 
years, have been 219 1^ days for the St. Lawrence Canals, 234 days for the 
Welland Canal, and 215 days for the Erie Canal. 

The distance from Chicago to Montreal, ?;j« the Lakes, the Welland 
and St. Lawrence Canals, is 1,261 miles, while from Chicago to New York, 
ma the Lakes, Buffalo, the Erie Canal and the Hudson River, it is 1,400 
miles, a difference of 139 miles in favor of the St. Lawrence route. The 
distance from Montreal to Liverpool, ma Belle Isle Straits, is 2,790 miles, 
and 2,990 miles ma Cape Race, against 3,040 miles from JS'ew York to 
Liverpool. The distance from Chicago to Liverpool, ma Montreal and 
the Straits of Belle Isle, is 4,051 miles, and ma Montreal and Cape Race, 
4,251 miles, against 4,459 miles ma Xew York, a difference in favor of 
the St. Lawrence route of 208 to 408 raiiles. 

The course of inland transportation, ma the Provinces of Ontario and 
Quebec, has been usually from Chicago, Milwaukee and Toledo, in 
schooners carrying 18,000 to 20,000 bushels, to Kingston direct, passing 
through the Welland Canal. 

Another route is from western lake ports and Lake Erie ports by 
vessels of larger size, carrying 30,000 to 35,000 bushels (mostly steam 
propellers), to Port Colborne, at the foot of Lake Erie, thence by Wel- 
land Railway on the line of the Welland Canal to Port Dalhousie, at the 
head of Lake Ontario, where it is again transferred into vessels for 
Kingston. When freight charges are too dear by this route, shipments 
are made from Chicago and Milwaukee to CoUingwood, on the Easterly 
side of Lake Huron, and from thence by the ]S"orthern Railway to 
Toronto, and thence by vessels to Kingston. 

At Kingston grain is transferred into standard barges, carrying 
18,000 to 20,000 bushels, which are towed to Montreal. 

Shipments are also made from Milwaukee and Chicago to Montreal 
direct, sometimes in small schooners, but much more frequently in 
steam propellers, carrying 16,000 to 17,000 bushels of grain to Kingston, 
and 10,000 to 12,000 bushels thence to Montreal ; also, by large vessels 
from Chicago and Milwaukee to Goderich, on Lake Huron, and thence 
by Grand Trunk Railway to Montreal. The freight charges from Lake 
Michigan ports to Montreal are, by either route, about the same. 
Neither steamers or railways can command higher rates of freight than 
charged by sailing schooners and barges. 

The rates of freights from Chicago and Montreal to Kingston, in 
1876, were from 6 to 1% cents per bushel, with 3 to S% cents additional 
charges for the barge transportation from thence to Montreal, or an 
aggregate of 9 to 11 cents per bushel, equal to 13 00 @ |3 67 per 
ton from Chicago to Montreal. The rate in 1877, "including freight from 
Chicago to Kingston and barge charges of 3 to ^% cents per bushel 
from thence to Montreal, was f 3.626 on wheat and $3,396 per ton on 
corn, including all charges. The rate per ton per mile in 1877 was 2.875 
mills on wheat and 2.693 mills on corn, against 2.379 mills on corn and 
2.81 mills per ton per mile, including all tolls and charges. 

There have been practical experiments made with small anci large ves- 
sels, sail and steam, on the lakes, and witli small and large class canal 
boats, and the results of these experiments have been to diminish largely 
the cost of transportation by water. On the Erie Canal the changes have 
been from 55 to 76 tons, from 76 to 90 tons, and from 90 to 210 tons, and from 
210 to 240 tons. All of these cheapened the carriage of property, the 
cost of it being, with 240 ton boats, 2.16-100 mills per ton per mile against 
4.14-100 mills per ton per mile, with 76 ton boats. The State Engineer, in 
his report on canal enlargement, makes the cost of transport on 690 ton 
canal boats 1.04-100 mills per ton per mile. The reduction in the cost of 
transport on the lakes from the use of very large class vessels in place 
of the small ones in use in 1845, is much more marked than the reduc- 
tion on the canals, as the lake vessels of the largest class have fifteen 



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240* New Y(yrk Produce Exchange. 

hundred times the capacity of the largest vessels in use in 1845. The 
cost now from Chicago to Buffalo per ton on these largest vessels is 
about half a mill per ton per mile, or 45 cents per ton for freight 
nine hundred miles. 

The vessels now navigating the lakes through the Canadian canals carry 
from seventeen to twenty thousand bushels of grain, but on the com- 
pletion of their enlargement vessels carrying sixty thousand bushels 
will load at Chicago for Kingston, or Montreal direct at about one-third 
the present cost by small vessels. As compared with the water route 
through I^ew Tork, there is a saving of one hundred and thirty-nine 
miles in the distance, and two hundred and seventy-eight miles on the 
round trip. The rates the past year and the year before from Chicago 
to Montreal were about the same as from Chicago to New York. 

It is proposed to make the canals free to commerce, charging no 
tolls for their use. This would diminish the cost sixty-nine cents per 
ton, but this will not meet the reduction in cost made by the use of 
vessels on the St. Lawrence route of sixty thousand bUshels carriage 
capacity. 

The steamer, with her barge consort, has been for several years in 
use on the lakes, with very practical financial results. The experiment 
of a steamer and barge consort on the canals last season shows this 
method to be cheaper than single boats towed m the line, or with their 
own hoi;ses. One crew is saved, and better time made than with boats 
towed by animal power. As a temporary expedient, from the smaller 
cost of improving the canals by deepening them one to one and one- 
half feet, where it shall be required, and no alteration of the mechani- 
cal structures or walls of the canal, and of the ability to utilize the 
boats now in use in their navigation, tliis plan might be resorted to 
with very good practical results, and perhaps would accomplish the 
desired object, the cheapening of the cost of transportation sufSciently 
to secure and hold the trade. 

In 1862 there was a plan of enlarging the Erie Canal, for a long time 
under consideration. The surveys and estimates of such enlargement 
were made for steamers two hundred and ten feet long and of 690 tons 
burthen. All the necessary legislation is now on the statute books look- 
ing to such enla];gement by the general Grovernment. If this State shall 
free the Erie Canal from all tolls, the Northwestern States, all of them, 
would, probably urge upon the general Government this appropriation 
of about eight and one-half million of dollars for such work. This esti- 
mate was made on war prices. At present prices for labor and materials 
the sum now required would be much less than 8)^ million dollars. This 
improvement, it is estimated, will diminish the cost of transportation to 
one-half of what it is, and with no tolls the reduction would be much 
more than one-half the present cost. Such an improvement would 
make the Lake and Erie Canal route rival all others in cheapness, taken 
as they now are, or when the St. Lawrence route shall have been im- 
proved. It, however, is not improbable that some improvements may 
be made fa railways to meet such lower water transportation. The 
railways of this State having connection with the lakes have an ad- 
vantage over the Southern railway lines during the season of naviga- 
tion^ but with an all-rail movement for five months of the year, the 
Southern lines have a conceded advantage of forty to sixty cents per 
ton, besides their winter working expenses are less in their milder winter 
cUmate than in the colder winter temperature of the Northern lines. 

The rates of Ocean Freights from the several Atlantic seaboard 
ports will be seen by reference to special tables hereinafter given. The 
Marine Insurance from these ports is about the same, excepting Mon- 
treal, which is higher during the spring and fall months. 

E. H. WAIiKER, 

StaMatician. 



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Receipts of Domestic Produce at New YorTc, 



241 



Receipts of Domestic Produce at New York, Monthly 

For the Year 1877. 



MONTH. 


Flour, 
Bbls. 


Wheat, 
Bush, 


Corn, 
Bush. 


Oats, 
Bush. 


Barley, 
Bush. 


MALT, 
Bush. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


205,846 
248,972 
188,631 
235,505 
246,590 
201,994 
193,561 
356,816 
319,471 
498,950 
478,384 
512,341 


326,506 

191,300 

56,522 

264,620 

500.640 

1,179,099 

427.071 

2,217,225 

3,615,996 

7,862,861 

6,241,55:3 

1,971,506 


897,630 
1,300,298 
1,681,061 
2,178,958 
2,644,791 
2,816,725 
3,716,051 
6,286,210 
5,134,998 
2,515,351 
4,183,766 
1,607,593 


554,110 

453,671 

553,679 

631,515 

1,352,230 

1,085,231 

665,977 

1,148,115 

1,490,463 

2,369,238 

1,259,160 

837,707 


184,318 

160,648 

99,264 

59,000 

132.142 

255,093 

120,060 » 

52,325 

183,017 

1,574,855 

3,327,151 

806,56:3 


110,760 
114,460 
118,015 
156,150 
227,138 
176,696 
181,383 
236,703 
140,310 
115,663 
204,747 
112,296 


May 


June 


July 


August 

September .... 

October 

November : . . . 
December 


Total 1877. 
Total 1876. 


3,687,060 
3,982,707 


24,854,899 
26,411,296 


34,96:3,432 
26,645,599 


12,401,096 
12,168,809 


6,954,436 
4.840,095 


1,894,321 
2,009,824 



' MONTH. 


BYE, 
Bush. 


Buck- 
wheat, 
Bush. 


Peas, 
Bush. 


B. E. 
Peas, 
Bags. 


BEANS, 

Bbls. 


Oat- 
Meal, 

Bbl8<fcSks 


Corn 
Meal, 

Bbls. & Sks. 


BUCK'T 

Flour, 
Sks. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


59,719 
43,282 
27,100 
53,040 

139,953 
26,392 
81,941 

255,223 

510.906 
* 449,786 

296.206 
85,352 


1,600 
4,175 

400 
12 

100 

2:30 
1,006 

925 

" 8,666 

400 
400 


51.:334 

48,709 

20,9:34 

^0,6:33 

15,244 

24,125 

16,909 

9,315 

12,198 

16:3,964 

238,080 

80,895 


419 
938 
1,809 
733 
11 

"*46i 

1,974 

898 

819 


12,267 

16,378 

8.409 

4,486 

5,873 

2,415 

2,045 

1,591 

11,518 

9,227 

12,851 

10,a36 


4,401 

4,264 

3,224 

2,807 

3,730 

2,798 

774 

l,Ot^ 

4,731 

9,628 

22,107 

29,192 


24,735 
:^5,336 
28,608 
22,299 
37,216 
21,066 
14,585 
21,910 
25,263 
21,246 
26,600 
32,273 


6,863 

2,5s!6 

605 


May 




June 

July 




August 

September — 
October . . .... 

November 

December.. . . 


'""64 
6,982 
11,423 
10,594 


Total 1877. 
Total 1876. 


2.027,894 
1,753,032 


17,248 
18,347 


712,340 
1,177,120 


8,062 
5,378 


97,895 
111,253 


88.743 
92,999 


311,137 
336,821 


39,057 
30,383 



MONTH. 


Hominy 
Pigs. 


Hominy 
Chop, 
Tons. 


Peed, 
Tons. 


Grass 
Seed, 
Bags. 


Flax 
Seed, 
Bags. 


Hops, 
Bales. 


Whis- 
key, 
Bbls. 


High- 
Wines, 
Bbls. 


Alco- 
hol, 
Bbls. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


1,952 
3,121 
3,013 
3,376 
3,271 
1,673 
1,322 
2,538 
1,753 
3,298 
1,793 
3,301 


;374 
572 
264 
187 
242 
260 
126 
422 
415 
401 
446 
793 


744 
1,183 
1,232 

495 
1,471 
1,131 
1,161 
2,256 
1,532 
1,570 
1,595 
1,268 


35,781 
26,759 
10,763 
4,867 
2,403 
1,310 
1,573 
5,a38 
17,968 
30,253 
18,369 
12,655 


117 

191 

99 

109 

21 

371 

12 

18,357 

122,947 

60,682 

16,740 

4,629 


8,621 
7,845 
6,083 
4,405 
4,281 
4,314 
2,108 
2,664 
6,513 
28,793 
31.183 
19,127 


3,595 
5,507 
5,330 
5,166 
6,193 
4,120 
2,551 
4,167 
3,531 
6,217 
4,896 
4,352 


6,460 
6.500 
5,200 
5,150 
5,550 
4,250 
2,538 
4,393 
6,400 
8.190 
6,701 
7,177 


7,.130 
4,585 
4,335 
3,853 
3,902 
3,344 
1,423 
a,630 
2,876 
2,960 
2.616 
4,735 


June 

July 


August 

September 

October....*. . 

November 

December .... 


Total 1877. 
Total 1876. 


30,311 


4,502 


15,638 


168,039 
208,497 


224,276 
110,885 


125,937 
86,910 


55,525 
51,434 


68,509 
74,229 


45,687 
25,784 



17 



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242 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Receipts of Domestic Pkoduce at New York, Monthly, for the 
Trar Wll .— {Continued.) 



month. 


Beep, 
Bbls. 

1,436" 
1,705 
1.585 
2,344 
1,155 
1,022 
1,207 
1,:^69 
1,739 
4,000 
2,631 
2,628 


BEEP, 
Tcs. 


BEEF, 
Cases. 


Beef 
Hams, 
Bbls. 


PORK, 

Bbls. 


Cut 

Meats, 

Tcs. 


Boxed 
Mf^ts, 
Boxes. 


Hams, 

I'cs. and 

bbls. 


Tongues, 
Bbls. 


January 

February 

March 


4,169 
2,638 
2.547 
2;882 
2,237 
675 


44.384 
45,403 
35,844 
16.577 
20,200 
97ii97 


2.919 

2,866 
559 
360 
170 
450 
402 
740 
650 

1,145 
855 

1,094 


26,735 

20.763 

18,737 

18,942 

10,807 

6,851" 

14,805 

19,094 

«.466 

3;843 

14,928 

31,943 


2,157 
1,195 
869 
798 
1,55H 
1.251 
1.27(1 
1,512 
1,921 
1,272 
1.584 
3,357 


63,685 
40,189 
3(),947 
30.213 
28,(i75 
20.699 
15.229 
30,911 
22,752 
23.8.-.0 
41.886 
79,063 


8,732 

5.180 
3,046 
3,452 
4,109 
3,304 
4,260 
5,142 
2,644 
1.209 
2,358 
3,959 


3.262 

1,999 

501 


April 

May 

June 


972 

520 
368 


July 


411 38.S22 


349 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


679 

9a5 

3,317 

7,084 

3,097 


69.049 
76.869 
94,475 
55.573 
29,702 


528 

613 

649 

1,277 

2,179 


Total 1877.. 
Total 1876... 


22,821 
37,627 


30,671 
52,097 


554,195 
108,115 


12,210 
10,671 


195,919 
200,91)4 


18,774 
16,311 


439.079 
459,837 


42,395 
36.141 


13,117 
12,701 



MONTH. 



Lard. 



Cases. 



Hhds. 6 
casks. 



Stearinb. 



Tcs. and 
bbls. 



Hhds. & 
casks. 



Tallow. 



Tcs. and 
bbls. 



Hhds 
& cks. 



Tcs. and 
bbls. 



January 

February — 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November . . 
December . . 

Total 1877 
Total 1876 



40,355 
23,995 
47,776 
47,779 
17.192 
16,-67 
17,702 

4;iiio 

a3.58'4 

30,503 

42,660 

118,674 



480,202 
397,245 



5,064 
1,776 
5,191 
2,175 
1,644 
2,1&3 
3.978 
2,115 
2,8% 
3,952 
3,200 



1,902 
1,192 
1,812 
1,797 
1,351 
1,318 
1,639 
3,047 
2,318 
2,179 
3,191 
2,289 



73 

91 

81 

229 

144 

4 

23 

65 

210 

87 

15 

63 



2.273 

1,601 
2,606 
2,089 
2,174 
903 
1,023 
1,526 
1,325 
1.506 
1,114 
2,413 



40,770 
27,427 



24.035 
19,997 



1,085 
1,362 



20,453 
23,390 



1,080 

815 

6e2 

l,07f) 

1.020 

1,338 

1,072 

982 

952 

1,160 

2,2 ;2 

1,147 



13,356 
15,596 



5,990 
4,207 
7,149 
7,163 
4.486 
3,162 
4,789 
7,169 
5,003 
6,497 
6,559 
6,460 



68,639 
64,241 



152 
41 
108 
126 
44 
99 



171 
161 
58 



2,664 
4,758 
2,611 
2,129 

774 
1,407 

974 
1,283 
1,548 
1,557 
1,670 
3,033 



24,408 
30,858 



MONTH. 


liARD 

Oil, 
Bbls. 


Lubricat- 
ing Oil, 

Bbls. 


Cotton 

Seed Oil, 

Bbls. 


Oil Cake, 
Bags. 


Buttkr, 
Pkgs. 


Cheese, 
Pkgs. 


Eggs, 
Pkgs. 


January 

February 

March 


1,190 
1,320 
1,112 
1,440 
1,072 
2,0!5 
1,997 
l,a39 
1,305 
1,192 
l,4s5 
1,279 


305 

329 
66 

649 
1,301 
1,080 

969 
1,141 
1,767 
1,275 
1,386 
1,147 


450 
1,814 
1.863 
2,935 
3.096 
1,616 
3.398 
2,143 
1,786 

618 

1,951 

88 


28,709 
26,633 
16,055 
38,606 
26.063 
26,185 
19,098 
26.621 
45.(MiO 
50,561 
51,025 
41,558 


' 79.060 

74,789 

87,022 

83,343 

112.875 

131,082 

111,103 

156,067 

137.474 

132,742 

115.436 

82,662 


18,JH>3 

32.628 

17,601 

19,187 

184.122 

405,518 

406,653 

42.5,657 

243,855 

195,300 

304,340 

187,771 


12,012 
42,266 
96 726 


April 


74,395 
60,822 
38,964 
23,608 
25,167 
25,635 
2r,121 
42,150 
19,506 


Mav 


June 


July 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


Total 1877.. . . 
Total 1876.... 


17,246 
11,785 


11,415 


21,758 


396.779 
460,303 


1,303.660 
1,289,889 


2,438,595 
2,178,989 


488,422 
500,072 



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Exports of Produce from New York, 
ExpoETS OF Produce from New York, Monthly, 

F(yr the Year 1877. 



243 



MONTH. 


Wheat, 
Bush. 


Corn, 
Bush. 


FLOUR, 
Bbls. 


Ryr 
Flour, 
Bbls. 


Corn 
meal, 
Bbls. 


Oat 
Meal, 
Bbls. 


Oats, 
Bush. 


Barley, 
'Bush. 


January 

February . . . 

March 

Aptil 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November . . 
December. . . 


1,121.014 

488,231 

270,333 

959,574 

889.003 

635,721 

649,590 

1,561,1:^^^ 

3.022.592 

4,852.182 

5,0:36,876 

2,311,444 


1,366.022 
1,473; 180 
1,650,578 
1..583,972 
2,134.701 
2,148,220 
2.537,618 
3,653,518 
2.5*i4,770 
1.877,250 
3,622,450 
2,213,357 


111,769 

90,272 

118.286 

87.342 

78,656 

105,051 

84,776 

117,757 

162,939 

169,643 

206,853 

237,929 


275 
393 
836 
380 
894 
775 
424 
510 
423 
704 
3,532 
1,453 


9.899 
23,462 
25.761 
19,730 
22.829 
2:^,182 
13.397 
20.553 
13.199 
13,250 
24,267 
20,160 


" 3,i60 

'1,639 
100 
1,400 
700 
1,500 
2,639 
13.221 
16,748 


6,959 
13,700 
17.863 
17,426 

7,637 
20.394 
10,919 
11,861 
51,446 
48.101 
38,836 
13,157 


68,893 
25,988 
21,150 

8i',489 
260.400 
144.644 
119.887 

81,049 
246,800 
703 838 
733,648 


Total 1877. 
Total 1876. 


21,795,693 
24,9^5,715 


26.759,636 
16,470,935 


1,571.273 
1,947,272 


10.599 
7,634 


229.689 
174,608 


40.507 
26,724 


258,299 
683,616 


2,437,786 
117,815 





Rye, 


Peas, 


Beans, 


Grass 


HOPS, 


Beep, 


PORK, 


BACON 


MONTH. 








Seed, 








AND Hams, 




Bush. 


Biish. 


Bush. 


Bags. 


Bales. 


Bbls) 


Bbls. 


Lbs. 


January 


26,004 


39,127 


18,603 


23.063 


6,815 


16.011 


24,200 


34,242,669 


February 


.53.284 


74.640 


13,277 


25,995 


4,245 


12,107 


16,610 


27.670,978 


March 


196.521 


16.431 


17.905 


5,872 


4,345 


9,826 


16,753 


23,799,321 


Ap.U 


118.648 


14.314 


14,199 


764 


1,792 


10,028 


17.(104 


19,54'>.412 


May 


84.892 


7.336 


9,205 




1,804 


13,339 


20.413 


15.601.502 


June 


216,419 


7,756 


6,020 


21 


2.820 


6,453 


16,814 


13,054,146 


July 


85,086 


18,329 


5.248 


25 


990 


6.660 


12,091 


8.412,009 


August 


222,783 


9,876 


12.931 


171 


1,804 


6,360 


15,916 


16,641,742 


September. . 


507,225 


8,008 


16,778 


5.470 


2.5-27 


6,504 


14,200 


13,;^,862 


October 


328,994 


77,713 


11,368 


21,136 


11,767 


8,606 


13,087 


10.824,126 


November .. 


180.623 


246,120 


24.438 


11,896 


19.931 


13,533 


18.306 


22.672,347 


December. . . 


127,929 


120,812 


16,692 


10,549 


10,225 


10,078 


19,511 


. 31,408,008 


Total 1877. 


2,148,408 


640.462 


166,664 


104.9<)2 


69,065 


119,505 


204,905 


288,211,122 


Total 1876. 


1,412,673 


1,149,970 


222,400 


135,475 


41,865 


157,844 


201,302 


225,945,955 



MONTH. 


Lard, 
Lbs. 


Lard 
Oil, 
Gals. 


Stearine 
Lbs. 


TAIjLOW, 

Lbs. 


Grease, 
Lbs. 


Oil 

Meal, 
Lbs. 


Oil 

Cake, 

Lbs. 


January 

February — 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August... . 
September. 

October 

November.. 
December. . . 


22,797,517 
7,247,061 
14.509 612 
16,720,669 
12,181,245 
9,121,556 
10,064,465 
14,J»92,349 
16,325.800 
11,878,814 
16,078,919 
24,911,828 


5,637 
916 
21,053 
37,905 
44,876 
48,741 
40,082 
49,21)0 
58,604 

8,768 
19,685 
28,277 


22,000 
11,400 
20,842 

56",726 

121,791 

7,400 

12,454 
12,100 
58,278 


3,524,807 
5.590,268 
4,719,961 
5,737,017 
5,022,452 
5,977,429 
3,751,429 
4,699,302 
3,795,582 
3,244,857 
4,8v^5.427 
4,571,557 


929,392 
689,700 
339,818 
342,252 
450,728 
663,294 
432,043 
465,340 
232,481 
136,776 
148,988 
431,161 


34,500 
235.276 
506.171 
4:^0,000 
272,960 
490,616 
397,400 
544,500 
467.581 
278,930 
547,750 
201,111 


10,417,905 
11,JK)2.850 
7,111.641 
11,151.805 
13,703.366 
6,724,585 
9,385,216 
10.866,500 
12,199,651 
18^20,120 
16,607.257 
10,211,495 


Total 1877. 
Total 1876. 


176,829,835 
155,662,971 


363,804 
100,621 


322,985 
307,716 


55,520,088 
60,660,315 


5.261,973 
3,706,934 


4,406.795 
2,949,320 


138,201,891 
177,005,666 



Also, 202 babels of whiskey and 30,621 of alcohol, against 3,550 barrela of alcohol in 1876. 



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Ui 



New York Produce Exchange. 



RECEIPTS OF GRAIN AND BREADSTUFFS AT NEW YORK 

BY ROUTES, 

For the Month of January, 1877. 





N. Y. 
Central & 
H. R. B. 


Brie 
Railway. 


Penn. 
Railroad. 


By other 
Roads. 


Total by 
RaU. 


By Water. 


Total Rail 

an& 

Water. 


Flour, barn 
Meal, barre 
Meal, bags 


ilS.. 

Is.. 




53,653 

1.900 

240 


68,295 
4,965 


88,690 
8,659 
3,419 


322 

10 

3,756 


200,960 
15,534 
7,415 


4,886 

170 

1,616 


205.846 

15,704 

9,031 








Wheat, bus 

Com. 

Oats, 

Barley, 

Bye, 

Peas, 

Malt, 


hel6 


111,600 
146,784 
168,455 , 
37,180 
21,200 
12.456 
88,170 


160,000 

349,600 

240,100 

7,000 

4,000 

36,941 

9,150 


54,030 
252,176 
139,380 
58,330 
30,660 

' 5;66o 


700 

494 

5,800 

* 3,589 
55 

7,840 


326,330 
749,054 
553,735 
102,510 
59,449 
49,452 
110,760 


176 
148,576 

375 
'81,808 

270 
1,882 


326,506 
897,630 
554.110 
184,318 
59,719 
51,334 
110,760 


Total Grain. 
Flour to busheh 
Meal to bushels- 


585,845 

268,265 

8,080 


806,791 
291.475 
19,860 


540.176 
443,450 
41,474 


18,478 
1,610 
7,552 


1,951.290 

1,004.800 

76,966 


233,087 

24,430 

3,912 


2,184,377 

1,029,230 

80,878 


Total bushels 


862,190 


1,118,126 


1,025,100 


27,610 


3,033,056 


261,429 


3,294,485 



For the Month of Feiyrumy, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 

Meal, barrels.... 
Meal, bags 


116,522 
3,903 


65,797 
5,013 


46,794 
12,0a3 
4,889 


2,773 
'4;299 


231,886 

20,949 

9,188 


17,086 
3,571 
1,628 


248,972 
24,520 
10,816 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, " 

Oats, '* .... 
Barley, " .... 
Rye, " .... 

Peas, " 

Malt, *' .... 


94,000 
349,362 
137,554 
58,750 
16,800 
21,908 
85,765 


72,500 

328,780 

195,500 

12,940 

3,970 

25,150 

8,540 


22,000 
298,800 
113,984 
20,540 
20,176 

'14,456 


800 

216 

5,535 

' 2,306 

125 

5,705 


189,300 

977,158 

452,573 

92,230 

43,252 

47,183 

114,460 


2,000 

323,140 

1,098 

68,418 

30 

1,526 


191,300 
1,300,298 

45:3,671 

160.648 
43,282 
48,709 

114,460 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels... 


764,139 

582,610 

15,612 


647,380 
328,985 
20.052 


489,950 
233,970 
57,910 


14,687 

13,8(55 

8.598 


1,916,156 

1,159,430 

102,172 


396,212 
85.430 
17,540 


2,312,368 
1,244,860 
■ 119,712 


Total bushels 


1,862,361 


996,417 


781,830 


37,150 


3,177,758 


499,182 


3,676,940 



F(yr the Mmth of March, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


77,982 
830 


47,004 

1,900 

5 


41,528 
5.079 
4,565 


1,437* 
' 2,365 


167,951 
7,809 
6,9:35 


20,680 
11,626 
2,238 


188,631 

19,435 

9,173 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, " 

Oats, " .... 
Barley, " 
Rye, " .... 
Peas, ** . .. 
Malt, " .... 


22,690 
840.702 
232,952 

36,500 
1,600 

11,468 

79,785 


33,568 

453,200 

202,040 

1,500 

400 

6,540 

15,985 


194,124 
116,955 
7,110 
21,666 
1,145 
5,325 


194 

80 

1,170 

. ' 2,282 

"6,226 


56,452 

1,488,106 

55:3,117 

45,110 

25,948 

19,153 

107,315 


70 

192,955 

562 

54,154 

1,152 

1.781 

10,700 


56.522 

1,681,061 
553,679 
99,264 
27.100 
20,a34 
118,015 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels... 
Meal to bushels.... 


1,225,697 

389,910 

3,320 


713,233 

235,020 

7,610 


346,-325 
207.640 
29,446 


9,946 
7,185 
4,730 


2,2**5,201 

839,755 

45,106 


261,374 
10:3,400 
50,980 


2,556,575 
943,155 
96,086 


Total bushels 


1,618,927 


955,863 


583,411 


21,861 


3,180,062 


415,754 


3,595,816 



* At the rate of 5 bushels to the barrel. 

t At the rate of 4 bushels to the barrel and 2 bushels to the bag. 



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Becetpts of Grain and Breodstuffs at New York. 246 



Receipts op GtRain and Breadstuffs at New York by RouTEa 

(Continued.) 
For the Month of April, 1877, 





N. Y. 
Central & 
H. R. R. 


Erie 
RaUway. 


Penn. 
Railroad. 


By other 
Roads. 


Total by 
Rail. 


By Water. 


Total EaU 

and 

Water. 


PJour, ban-els 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


103,272 
1,400 


58,548 
2,700 


a3,249 
2,0;i5 
2,348 


1,690 
"i',646 


196,759 
6,135 
3,988 


38,746 
10,6^10 
1,546 


235,505 
16,765 
5,584 




Wheat, bushels 

Com, " 

Oats, " .... 

BarJey, *' 

Bye, " .... 

Peas, , " 

Malt, " .... 


172,800 
1,419,400 
402,730 
16,500 
2,800 
18,593 
60,600 


91,250 
356,000 
147,430 
2,000 
8.000 
16,560 
2,200 


66,600 
40,075 

* i;772 

360 

7,600 


'1,314 

's.ioo 


263,550 
1,842,000 

595,;i20 
18,500 
13,886 
30.513 
78,500 


1,070 
336,958 
36.195 
40.500 
39,154 
120 
77,650 


264,620 
2,178,958 

631,515 
59,000 
53,040 
3C.633 

156,150 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels... 


2,087.923 

516,360 

5,600 


62.3.440 

292,740 

10,800 


116.407 
166,245 
12,836 


14,499 
8,450 
3,280 


2,842,269 
983,795 
32,516 


531,647 
193,730 
45.612 


3,373.916 

1,177,525 

78.128 


Total bushels 


2,609,883 


926,980 


295,488 


26,229 


3,858,580 


770,989 


4,629,569 



Fm- the Month of May, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 


110,933 


57,004 


41,510 


2,016 


211,493 


35,097 


246,590 


Meal, barrels 


1,500 


4,860 


1,670 




8,030 


19,135 


27^165 


Meal, bags, 






4,896 


3,043 


7,939 


2,112 


10,051 


Wfieat, bushels 


87,100 


96,800 


2,400 




186,300 


314,340 


500.640 


Com, " 


882,400 


248.1-65 


148,479 




1,278,944 


1,365.847 


2,644,791 


Oats, " . . 


762.000 


266,840 


122.595 


3,075 


1,154.510 


197,720 


1;352,23G 


Barley, " . .. 


23,500 


900 


1,000 




25,400 


106,742 


132,142 


Rye, " .... 


5,264 




1,330 


i,692 


7,686 


132.267 


139,953 


Peas, ** 


5.686 


8,930 


360 




14,876 


368 


15,244 


Malt, " ... 


101,890 


7,200 


3,925 


8,050 


121,065 


106,073 


227,138 


Total Grain 


1,867,740 


628.735 


280,089 


12,217 


2,788,781 


2,223,357 


5,012,138 


Flour to bushels... 


554,665 


285,020 


207,700 


10,080 


1,057,465 


175,485 


1,232,950 


Meal to bushels. . . 


' 6,000 


19,440 


16,472 


6,086 


47,998 


80,764 


125,762 


Total bushels 


2,428,405 


9a3,195 


504,261 


28,383 


3,894,244 


2,479,606 


6,373,850 



For the Mmth of June, 1877. 



Flour, barrc 
Meal, barrel 
Meal, bags. 


Jls.... 

s 


95,868 
1,000 


46,109 
2,310 


27,846 
2,726 
1,532 


466 
■i;567 


170,289 
6,036 
3,099 


31,705 

10,840 

1,091 


201,994 

16,876 

4,190 




Wheat, bnsl 
Com, ' 
Oats, ' 
Barley, * 
Rye, 

Peas, ' 
Malt, 


lels.... 


15,850 

118 000 

423,975 

19,000 

2,800 

4,156 

97,991 


144,600 

256,400 

151,200 

665 

"i^eoo 

7,420 


125 
78,736 
98,415 
60 
1,732 
544 
3,500 


'2,466 
2,940 

■"716 

■3,366 


160,575 
455,536 
676,530 

19,725 
5,242 

10,300 
112,211 

1,440,119 
851,445 
30,342 


1,018,524 
2,361,189 
408,701 
235,368 
21,150 
13,825 
64,485 

4,123,242 
158,525 
45,542 


1,179,099 
2,816,725 
1,0«),281 
256,093 
26,392 
24.125 
176,696 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels 


681,772 

479,340 

4,0J0 


565,885 

230,545 

9,240 


183,112 
139,230 
13,968 


9,350 
2,330 
3,134 


5,563,361 

1,009,970 

75,884 


Total bushe 


Is 


1,165,112 


805,670 


336,310 


14,814 


2,321,906 


4,327,309 


6,649,215 



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246 



}few York Produce Exchange. 



Receipts of Grain and Brbadstxjpps at New York by Routes. 

(Continued,) 

For the Month of July, 1877. 





N. Y. Erie 
Central & 
H. R. R. Railway. 


Penn. 
RaUroad. 


By other 
Roads. 

933 

* i,4ic 

"'*372 
341 

"'8i4 

i",56o 

3,027 
4,665 
2,8-20 


Total by 
Rail. 


By Water. 


Total Rail 

and 

Water. 


Flour, barrels . ... 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


90,447 
2,000 


46,518 
800 


18,815 

1,005 

20 


150,713 
3,805 
1,430 


36,848 
8.036 
1,314 


193,561 
11,841 

2,744 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, •' .... 
Oats, " .... 

Barley, *' 

Rye, '* .... 
Peas, «' .... 
Malt, " 


114,020 

111,990 

264,168 

1,000 

400 

4,609 

57,841 


27,992 
122,400 
76,800 
30,500 
16.500 
4,400 
11,900 


32,827 
42',484 
' 5,092 

' V,66o 

84,403 
94,075 
4,060 


174,839 

234,762 

383,293 

31.500 

22,806 

9,009 

75,241 


252,232 

3,481,289 

282.684 

88,560 

59,185 

7,900 

106,142 


427,071 
3,716,051 

665,977 

120,060 
81,941 
16,909 

181,383 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels. . . 


554,028 

452,235 

8,000 


289,992 

232,590 

3,200 


931,450 

783,565 

18,080 


4,277,942 
18^,240 
34,772 


5,209,392 
967,805 
52,852 


9 

Total bushels 


1,014,263 


525,782 


182,538 


10,512 


1,733,095 


4,496,964 


6,230.049 



For the Month of Augmt, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


167,928 
4,337 


84,607 
4,680 


51,465 

1,691 

137 


. 887 
* l,5i6 


304,837 
10,708 
1,647 


61,928 

8,666 

899 


356,815 
19,364 
2,546 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, " 

Oats, « .... 
Barley, " . 

Rye, . ;; .... 

Peas, " 
Malt, " .... 


865,636 
286,900 
478,385 

42",666 
2,760 
70,208 


549,300 

202,400 

254,050 

7,500 

85,742 

1,600 

8,314 


225,979 
45.865 
131,755 

2i",944 

"■766 


803 

' ' '575 

' 1*682 

*1,2^ 

4,310 
4,435 
3,020 


1,641,718 

5;i5,165 

864.765 

7,500 

151,363 

4,860 

80,472 


575,507 

5,751,045 

283,350 

44,825 

102,855 

4,95i 

156,231 


2,217,225 

6,286,210 

1,148.115 

52,325 

254,223 

9,315 

236,703 


Total Grain... . 
Flour to bushels. . 
Meal to bushels . 


1,745.889 
839,640 
17,348 


1,108.906 

423,035 

* 18,720 


426.243 
257,325 

7,038 


3,285,348 
1,524,435 , 
46,126 


6,918,768 

259,640 

36,422 


10,204,116 

1,784,075 

^,548 


Total bushels 


2,602,877 


1,550,661 


690,606 


11,765 


4,855,909 


7,214,830 


12,070,739 



For the Month of September, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


144,574 
5,998 




82,098 
6,440 


46,178 

1,101 

175 


883 

'2,488 


273,733 
13,539 
2,663 


45,738 

8,182 

929 


319.471 

21,671 

3,592 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, " 

Oats, " .... 

Barley, " 

Rye, ;• .... 

Peas, 

Malt, " .... 


939,254 

208 410 

625,188 

16,000 

41,210 

5,574 

50,450 


921,600 

72,400 

242,200 

1,61K) 

54,154 

5,80U 

23,412 


334,679 

3,600 

110,^98 

i4;7si 

420 
700 


316 
"'564 

3,486 


2,195,849 

284.400 

978,850 

17,690 

112,198 

11,822 

78,048 


1,420,147 

4,850,598 

511,613 

165.327 

398,702 

376 

62,262 


3,(515,996 

5,134.998 

1,490,463 

183,017 

510,900 

12,198 

140,310 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels. . . 


1,886,076 1,321,256 
722,870 410,490 
23,992 25,760 


465,081 

230,890 

4,754 


6,444 
4,415 
4,976 


3,678,857 

1,368,665 

59,482 


7,409,025 
228,690 
34,3S6 


11,037,882 

1,597.355 

93,868 


Total bushels 


2,6.32,988 1,757,606 


700,725 


15,886 


6,107,004 


7,672,101 


12,779,105 



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Receipts of Grain and Breadstuffs at New York, 247 



Beceipts op Grain and Breadstuffs at New York by RouTBa 

(Continued.) 
Fm^ the Month of Octoher, 1877. 





N. Y. 
Central & 
H. R. R. 


Erie 
Railway. 


Penn. 
Railroad. 


By other 
Roads. 


Total 
by Rail. 


By Water. 


Total Rail 

and 

Water. 


Flour, barrels 

Meal, barrels 

Meal, bags 


238.298 
2,510 . 


136,996 
3,229 


68,684 

1,525 

65 


1,001 
* 2,653 


444,979 
7,264 
2,718 


53,971 

10,046 

1,218 


498,950 
17,310 
3,936 


Wheat, btishels.... 
Corn, " .... 
Oats, " .... 

Barley, " 

Rye, - .... 
Peas, " .... 
Malt, " .... 


1,633,715 
129,--i00 
653,924 
118.500 

10.000 
112,992 

44 554 


1,046.000 
39,200 
347,200 
48 218 
14,000 
35,414 
14,000 


155,512 
8,000 
88,9u0 
5,400 
9,626 
160 


358 
'"270 
' i',228 
'5,356 


2,835.5f5 
176.400 
1,090,294 
172,118 
34.854 
148.566 
63,910 


5.027.276 

2,338,951 

1,278.944 

1,402,737 

414,932 

15.398 

51,753 


7,862.861 

2,515,351 

2,369 238 

1,574,855 

449.786 

163.964 

115.663 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels... 
Meal to bushels 


2.70-3,835 

1,191.490 

10,040 


1,544,032 

684,930 

12,916 


267,598 

343.420 

6,280 


7,212 
5.005 
5.306 


4.521,727 

2,224,895 

34,492 


10,529,991 

269.855 

42.620 


15,051,718 

2,494,750 

.77,112 


Total bushels. . . . 


3,904,415 


2,241,928 


617,248 


17,523 


6,781,114 


10,842,466 


17,623,580 



For the Month of November, 1877. 



Flour, barrels 


236.513 


119,289 


60,755 


1,230 


417,787 


60,597 


478,3s4 


Meal, barrels 


1,278 


830 


982 


115 


3,205 


15,579 


18;784 


Meal, bags 






182 


5,543 


5,725 


2,091 


7,816 


Wheat, bushels 


1 253.400 


6 16.230 


83.406 




l,9a3,006 


4.258,547 


6,241.553 


Con, " .... 


"u-im^ 


191,200 


60.060 


4,844 


478.901 


3,704.8()2 


4,183.766 


Oat?, '* .... 


231018 


174,080 


56.572 


670 


463,340 


795,820 


1,259.160. 


Barley, " 


302.503 


133.668 


98.400 




534,568 


2,792,583 


3,327,151 


Rye, " .... 


3.(14) 


3,200 


2,8i»2 


610 


10,342 


285.8(54 


296,206 


Peas, " 


105.8^)0 


79,184 


857 




185,881 


52,199 


238,080 


Malt, ' " .... 


53,754 


2.294 


15f5 


2,684 


63,888 


140,859 


204,747 


Total Grain 


2,179.002 


1,229.776 


302.343 


8 808 


3.719,929 


12,030,734 


15.750,663 


Flour to bushels. . . 


1,182,565 


596.445 


303.775 


6.150 


2,08^.9:^ 


302.985 


2,391,920 


Meal to bushels . . . 


5112 


3,320 


4,292 


11,546 


24,270 


66,498 


90,768 


Total bushels.... 


3,366,679 


1,829,541 


610,410 


26,504 


5,833,134 


12,400,217 


18,233,351 







For the Month of December, 


1877. 






Flonr. barr( 
Me il, barrel 
Meal, bags. 


;ls 

s 


253,034 
1,125 


145,430 

1,629 

50 


71.517 

■-^1.622 

560 


1,675 471,706 

15 4.391 

14,66iJ 15,276 


40,635 
10.069 
2,537 


612,341 
14,466 
17,813 




Wheat, bust 

Com, 

Oats, ' 

Barley, * 

Rye, 

Peas, ' 

Malt, 


lels.... 


1,276,8*^0 
807,094 
239,972 
420,500 
4,070 
35,358 
77,186 


493,8^0 
447,930 
269.2.20 
154,6:6 

2,800 
11.394 

8,6.j2 


77,406 
17.S.540 
60,776 
95.760 
2S,476 
686 
2,400 


26 
4,619 
5,188 

' " '502 

'6,498 


1,848,142 
1,438,183 
575.156 
670,956 
35,848 
47,438 
94,7S6 


123.364 
169,410 
Ji62,551 
135,eM)7 
49,504 
33,467 
17,560 


1,971.506 

1,607,693 

837,707 

806,563 

86.352 

80.895 

112,296 


Total Grain 

Flour to bushels. . . 
Meal to bushels 


2,861,010 

1,265.420 

4,600 


1,388.572 

727.150 

6,616 


444,044 

357,585 

7,608 


16.8:^3 
8,375 
29,392 


4,710,459 

2,358.530 

48,116 


791,453 
203,175 
45,350 


5.501,912 

2,561,705 

93,466 


Total bushels.... 


4,130,930 


2,122,338 


809,237 


54,600 1 7,117,105 


1,039,978 


8,167,083 


Grand total 
Annual pero 


, bnsh. 
entage. 


27,698.980 
26.81 


15,761,007 
16.26 


7,137,164 
6.91 


292,816 50,892,967 
.28 1 49.26 


52,420,815 
60.74 


103,313,782 



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248 



New Torlc Produce Exchange. 



Geain in Stobe in New York and Brooklyn 
Warehouses, Weekly. 

1877. 



DATE. 



Wheat, 
Bush, 



Corn, 
Bush. 


Oats, 
Bush. 


Rye, 
Bush. 


Barley, 
Bush. 


Malt, 
Bush. 


3,077,504 
2,952,194 
2,781,017 
2,544,669 


1,088,104 

1,050,495 

996,622 

956,578 


341,759 
343,298 
353,877 
382,579 


905.615 
830,106 
782,044 
708,785 


425,406 
420,884 

410, no 

402,985 


2,302.260 
2,114,245 
2.148,508 
1,990,922 


950.617 
956.696 
938.480 
894,174 


374.142 
374,142 
397,789 
366,794 


677,114 
642,578 
600,379 
580,590 


383,605 
363,928 
355,078 
348,563 


1.711,095 
1,517,208 
1,384,147 
1,243,257 
1,177,784 


822,655 

769,451 
765,734 
719,784 
701,7.36 


288,895 
284,607 
274,414 
264,427 

277,782 


513,828 
475,671 
437.563 
395,220 
395,239 


3a5,208 
327,659 
323.204 
326,534 
256,423 


1,035,654 
800,150 
650,121 
513,428 


606.639 
475,229 
491,941 
a33,825 


240,423 

252.095 

24,706 

208,757 


320,331 
267,119 
221,537 
203,189 


311,09-2 
300,798 
310,289 
3^)0,822 


468,809 
403,2.37 
336,373 
402,090 


347,881 
503,226 
784,036 
877,133 


193,046 
196,824 
206,600 
194,884 


174,875 
143,827 
85,015 
28,837 


291,654 
272,967 
259,377 
261,310 


433,863 
520,643 
412,188 
353,932 
3tJ9,966 


955,712 
826,054 
899,708 
8.50,837 
886,863 


210,715 
206,845 
182,126 
98.536 
53,429 


63,656 
91,846 
102,719 

78,775 
89,818 


296,090 
296,129 
281,643 
268,435 
252,042 


868,858 
331,968 
380,949 
267,935 


925,153 
869,970 
7&3,826 
680,330 


39,828 
23,159 
20,899 
26,707 


92,434 
85,841 
76,620 
30,633 


245.032 
245,644 
246,499 
253,405 


320,094 
400,757 
551,564 
943,307 


576,090 
548,551 
589,181 
592,542 


22,615 
18,212 
11,378 
13,040 


11,595 
4,493 

'4;877 


252,861 
259,434 
272,639 
320,794 


1,709,529 
2,049,885 
2,558,148 
2,704,898 
3,106,182 


681,571 
723,478 
797,257 
83U,411 
949,808 


21,739 
37,201 
87,513 
96,445 
11,082 


4,877 
24,409 
24,419 
17,947 
21,330 


366,871 
. 359,189 
384,439 
376,815 
371,309 


2,795,828 
2,956,084 
3,039,423 
2,963,681 


881,326 
l,0ie,232 
1,316,276 
1,629,231 


28,526 
80,342 
66,641 
143,672 


69,046 

91,203 

222,353 

331,116 


370,166 
341,054 
339,924 
339,081 


2,643,502 
2,164,395 
2,274,249 
2,211,459 


1,770,759 
1,848,293 
1,863,246 
1,^62,017 


166,949 
184,163 
178,401 
194.934 


368,429 
527.189 
768,709 
862,220 


328,388 
314,754 
307,308 
299,749 


1,952,452 
1,723,229 
1,481,942 
1,317,262 
1,109,555 


1,912,890 
1,879,052 
1,894,157 
1,831,682 
1,778,532 


232,776 
309,077 
306,942 
317,411 
279,743 


925,935 
864,787 
960,074 
884,954 
881,118 


323,171 
358,849 
354,030 
349,200 
329,310 



Peas, 
Bush. 



isrr. 

Jamiary 6 

" 13 

'* 20 

'* 27 

February 3 

10. ... 

17 

" 24 

March 3 

" 10 

" 17 

" 24 

'» 31 

AprU 7 

" 14 

i' 21 

" 28 

May 5 

" 12 

« 19 

" 26 

June 2 

" 9 

" 16 

" 23 

" 30 

July 7 

"14 

" 21 

*' 28 

August 4 

*♦ 11 

« 18 

" 25 

September 1 .. 

8... 

" 15... 

22... 

« 29... 

October 6 

*' 13 

♦' 20 

" 27 

November 3. . 
10.. 
17.. 
24.. 

December 1 . 

8... 

" 15... 



3.668,010 
3,464,645 
3,269,556 
3,125,849 

3,083,910 
3.047,666 
2,991,705 
2,828,150 

2,730,641 
2,646.287 
2,503,511 
2,-327,818 
2,166,426 

1,782,901 

1,517,276 

1,332.705 

964,076 

761,686 
606,968 
465,744 
465,937 

431.070 
521,308 
465,227 
412,929 
410,933 

418 655 
4a5,927 
.388,802 
207,263 

162,305 
193,349 
276,908 
372,822 

314,622 
247,808 
205,201 
227,437 
163,096 



374,188 
620,149 



984,374 
1,613,801 
1,75.5,500 



23,172 
13,304 
11,073 
11,073 

13,427 
9.632 
9,388 



9,238 

9,188 

9,188 

10,154 

10,154 

10,054 
9,847 
9,656 
2,397 

9,261 



8,242 

7,611 
6,522 
6.166 
13,662 
17,626 

17,626 

13,169 

12,709 

7,871 

6,472 
5,572 
5,392 
3,760 

2,585 
798 
798 
100 



2,735,214 
2,844,982 
2,834,018 
2,669,745 
2,573,758 



8,069 
9,368 
11,443 

11,444 
8,151 
9,ldl 
9,560 

7,997 
6,558 
5,393 
4,793 
6,091 



Hosted by 



Google 



Weekly Visible Supply of Grain, 



249 



WEEKLY VISIBLE SUPPLY OF GEAIN. 

1877. 



DATE. 



18T7. 

January 6 

'• 13 



February 3.. 

" 10.. 

17. 

*' 24. 



March 3. 
*' 10. 
" 17. 
" 24. 
" 31. 



April 7. 
" 14. 
" 21. 



May 5. 
•' 12. 
«' 19. 



June 2. 
'• 9. 
•' 16. 
« 23. 
«' 30., 

July 7. 
*' 14. 
*' 21. 
" 28. 



August 4. 
" 11. 
♦* 18. 



September 1. 

'* 8.. 

15. 

22. 

29., 



October 6. 
«« 13. 



27. 



November 3. 

10. 

«' 17. 

'« 24. 



December 1., 

'* 8. 

" 15. 

22., 

«' 29. 



Wheat, 
Bush. 



Corn, 
Bush. 



12,867,638 
12,433,077 
12,238,989 
11,921,143 

11,892,067 
11,400,090 
ll,0a8,6-27 
10,823,124 

10,779,145 

10,511,866 

10,141,070 

9,687,450 

9,351,582 

8,641-036 
8,661,621 
7,490,275 
6,786,507 

5,969,105 
5,208,622 
5,123,337 
5,184,000 

4,374,007 
4,431,922 
4,044,691 
3,242,146 
2,924,795 

2,331,860 
2,069,842 
1,982; 039 
1,975,455 

2,000,262 
2,296,881 
2,997,149 
3,867,726 

4,346,537 
5,142,958 
6,315,205 
7,592,163 

8,488,949 

10,180,758 
10,974,544 
11,322,164 
10,364,287 

9,513,205 

9,815,765 

11,412,235 

12,813,752 

11,563,573 
10,397,158 
10,279,269 
10.540,117 
10,191,121 



10,491,993 
11,350,585 
ll,7a3,068 
12,359,483 

12,818,353 
11,496,796 
11,077,124 
11,470,713 

12,208,880 
11,920,020 
11,499,854 
10,495,885 
8,912,334 

10,044,089 
9,847.676 
8,739,957 
8,879.144 

9,677,806 

9,386,807 

10,419,483 

10,426,924 

9,447,500 
10,376,74; 
10,775,026 
10,410,176 

9,845,173 

9,189,468 
8,172,069 
9,556,541 



9,626,216 
10,352,283 
10,904,629 
11,634,034 

12,0:38,370 
10,516,488 
11,084,248 
10,853,172 
11,238,438 

11,362,559 

10,558.764 

10,439,577 

9,563,035 

8,560,343 
8,260,919 
7,920,243 
7,535,463 

6,751,792 
5,424,171 
5,388,651 
5,952,763 
6,009,796 



Oats, 
Bush. 



3,535,275 
3,566,668 
3,404,087 
3,158,806 

3,222,241 
3,067,030 
3,073,460 
2,825,991 

2,902,144 
3,012,211 
2,950,0iK) 
2,825,399 
2,771,564 

2,570,306 
2,336,713 
2,157,565 
1,919,956 

1,961,677 
1,905,656 
2,192,778 
2,302,046 

2,339,862 
2,212,546 
2,414,833 
2,409,510 
2,437,443 

2,334,897 
2,141,303 
1,880,756 
1,812,092 

1,531,339 
1,629,385 
2,101,909 
2,341,265 

2.625,721 
2,632,815 
2,680,981 
3,368,966 
3,802,968 

4,082,663 
4,150,341 
3,850,969 

3,727,077 

3,543,860 
3,698,933 
3,579,044 
3,982,207 

4,054.379 
3,573,267 
3,705,473 
3,535,366 
3,851,462 



Barley, 
Bush. 



5,243,128 
4,984,428 
4,782,851 
4,482,738 

4,229,010 
3,997,446 
3,865,435 
3,885,918 

3,478,162 
3,163,414 
3,00^,998 
2,700,125 
2,543,829 

2,22:^,865 
1,8:^8,476 
1,475,261 
1,300,536 

1,199^492 

1,042,431 

899,806 

849,696 

740,595 
694,625 
535,073 
461,049 
470,663 

458,906 
392,703 
360,416 
343,243 



233,418 
246,562 
265,411 

330,045 
533,784 
744,635 
993,851 
1,489,853 

2,114,639 
2,403,731 
2,622,437 
2,591,634 

3,042,739 
3,243,364 
3,804,627 
4,764,035 

5,262,009 
4,704,757 
4,665,710 
4.656,669 
4;648,000 



Eye, 
Bush. 



1,002,442 
1,047,485 
1,027,715 
1,087,149 

1,046,468 
1,066,224 
1,073,022 
, 968,339 

915,686 
900,269 
783,052 
766,516 

752,888 

798,626 
795,156 
683,230 
663,427 

708,262 
686,406 
746,981 
664,560 

610,747 
586,428 
536,709 
402,513 
342,675 



256,070 
179,754 
195,745 



453,220 
449,952 
619,100 

636,216 
556,606 
586,006 
597,695 
579,440 



673,969 
644,889 
585,211 

674,228 
653,444 
992,391 
751,928 

705,933 
608,072 
6:^0,649 
660.S99 
678,867 



Hosted by 



Google 



250 



New York Produce Hocchange. 



EXPORTS OF WHEAT FROM NEW YORK, 

Far tJie undermentioned Crop Yeara^ with destination. 



DESTINATION. 



GREAT BRITAIN. 

Liverpool 

London 

Glasgow 

Bristol 

Hull 

Qneenstown 

Cork 

Cardiff 

Penarth Roads 

Bedfast 

Dublin 

Gloucester 

Newry 

Lame 

Limerick 

Newcastle 

Leith 

Galway 

Waterf ord , 

Other British Ports. . .' 



GERMANY. 

Antwerp 

Hamburg 

Bremen 

Rotterdam 

Amsterdam 

Other German Ports. 



FRANCE. 

Havre 

Marseilles 

Bordeaux 

Other French Ports 

SPAIN AND PORTUGAL. 

Gibraltar .* 

Lisbon 

Oporto 

Other Ports 



West Indies 

.British N. American Colonies. 



SOUTH AMERICA. 

Brazil 

Venezuela 



Canary Isles . 
Madeira 



Totals. 



From Sept. 1, 1876, 
to Sept. 1, 1877. 



TSS!- ■^<^- 



3,702,031 
1,591.575 
1,316,672 

846,789 
37,829 

447.968 
1,754,226 



214,873 

192,048 

73.847 

216,565 

55,697 

30,800 



73,226 
32,8i8 
122',46i 



- 10,-7G9,365 



467,181 
8.649 

40.101 
273.520 

30,545 



820,596 



4,797 
404,838 
156,3:3:3 
43,720 



609,188 
32,640 
16,806 



80 



6,430 



12,259,478 



From Sept. 1, 1875, 
to Sept. 1, 1876. 



^': Totals. 



4.719.712 

3,116.506 

2.irr8,105 

1,:367,672 

345,517 

856.124 

5,454,090 

]02,J564 

456.564 

219,564 

312,940 

898,490 

72,451 

35,:^.59 

300,542 

45,«42 

200.438 

2(),043 

174.417 

381,613 



- 22,064,853 



1,646,179 
42S,6i)6 
162,019 

l,4ai,655 

2^7,067 

23,904 



3,992,520 



293,542 



21,718 
248,637 



563,897 



1,028,441 

461,205 

1,294 



1,490,940 
25,105 



40 
200 



8,004 



28,145,559 



From Sept. 1, 1874, 
to Sept. 1, 1875. 



^^ ^o*-^- 



5,795,755 

3,524,421 

2,731.586 

1,454,791 

2:33.933 

623,320 

4,032,840 

293,758 

557.5-15 

358,264 

484,774 

663.250 

198,739 

20,641 

258,394 



27,7 
357,058 
251,365 



- 21,871,264 



1,286.285 

129,820 

7.795 

1,660:087 

65,227 



3,146,514 



7,700 
74,874 



24,589 



107,163 



1,051.110 

317.553 

1,500 



1,370,163 
27,242 



4,00c 



26,526,846 



Hosted by 



Google 



Exports of Corn from New Torh 



251 



EXPOETS OF COEN FEOM NEW YOEK, 

For the undermentioned Crop Years, with destination. 



DESTINATION. 


From Sept. 1, 1876, 
to Sept. 1, 1877. 


From Sept 
to Sept. 1 


1, 1875, 
, 1876. 


From Sept. 1, 1874, 
to Sept. 1, 1875. 




Com, 
bush. 


Totals. 


Com, 
bush. 


Totals. 


Com, 
bush. 


Totals. 


GREAT BEITAIN. 

Liverpool 

liOndon. 


3,866,681 
2,359.015 
3,1)15:495 

822,284 
73.469 

180,260 
2,313,030 
3,5ti6,121 

209,123 

171,581 

15,252 

1,001,575 

42,9i9 
726,953 


8,393,758 

2,385,653 
515,430 

217,935 

306,542 

350,399 
100,912 

159,268 
'4,163 


3,941,873 

1,863,288 

2,061,964 

512,687 

*85'.965 

457,995 

1,903,529 

96,998 

199,216 

74,026 

1,351,124 

87,094 
112,855 

59,323 
858,089 


3,665,966 

857 822 


4,642,634 

1,176.471 

1,992,152 

208,723 

105,214 

105,127 

213,195 

958,189 

67,733 

20,437 

75,939 

457.036 

110,316 

202.116 

38,713 

115,448 

1 




Glasgow 

Bristol 




Cardiff 

Newry 




Qneenstown 




Cork 




Penarth Hoads 




Gloucester 

Londonderry 




Hull 




Waterford 




Belfast 




Sligo 




Whitehaven 




Other British Ports 






0,488,993 


GERMANY. 
Antwerp 


112,765 
738.9:35 
488,607 
81,411 
963,935 


2,500 
227,756 
485,949 
66,483 
75, IM 


134,659 

111,739 

19,394 


Hamburg 




Bremen 




Rotterdam 




Other Grcrman Ports 






265,792 


FRANCE. 
Havre 


369,031 
68,443 
77,956 


54,609 

'"m 


55,409 
316 432 


19,8T5 
32,919 


Dunkirk 




Other French Ports 






52,794 


SPAIN AND PORTUGAL. 
Gibraltar 


80,560 
20,732 
73,101 
33,542 


65,078 
224,805 
26,549 


15,577 
16,Q64 


Lisbon 




Opoiix) 




Other Ports 






31,641 


ITALY. 
L^hom 


75,966 
230,576 




489,164 
75,050 

108,654 

8,762 
960 




Naples 








West Indies 


24,922 
102,145 

28',285 
3,916 


17,702 

33,400 

1,214 

6,426 

49,912 


21,650 
7,714 
1,062 

12,144 
8,629 


338,249 


British N. American Colonies. . 

SOUTH AMERICA. 
British Guiana 


89,590 


Venezuela 








BrazU 

Other Ports 


61,069 


Canary Islands 

Madeira 


1 


4,752 

4,000 






Other Countries 




990 






TotaJfl -. . . 


2,434,060 


16,578,209 


1 


1,319,118 







Hosted by 



Google 



252 



New York Produce Exchange. 



EXPOETS OF FLOUR FROM NEW YORK, 

Far the undermentioned Crop Tears, with destination. 



DESTINATION. 


From Sept 
to Sept. 1 


1, 1876, 

,1877. 


From Sept. 1, 1875, 
to Sept. 1, 1876. 


From Sept. 
to Sept 1 


1,1874, 
,1875. 




Flour, 
bbls. 


Totals. 


Flour, 
bbls. 


Totals. 


Flour, 
bbls. 


Totals. 


GREAT BRITAIN. 
Liverpool 


48,261 
153,892 
153,707 

54,719 
1,112 

"m 

3,804 


416 195 


120,419 
304,558 
374 716 
58,648 

1,225 
365 

1,910 
10.307 
16,527 

8,893 


897,568 
28,026 

13,421 
621,708 
251,174 

244,493 

6,830 
3 


113,648 

283,765 

350,430 

23,972 

5,552 

141 

360 

' 9,328 
9,900 




London 




G-lasgow 




Bristol 




flardiflP .....,, .,..., 




CJork 




Hoyle 




Londonderry 




Dundee 




Belfast 




Other British Ports 






797,006 


GERMANY. 
Bremen 


563 

7,806 

5,766 

753 

506 


15,394 

40 

6,643 
515.281 
209,748 

245,916 
60 

* * 'lib 

2,927 


5,533 
12,169 
7,694 
2,630 


900 

12,383 

5,666 

727 


Antwerp 

Hamburg 




Rotterdam 




Other German Ports 






19,676 


FRANCE. 
Havre 


40 

3,410 
551 
370 

*2,3i2 











SPAIN AND PORTUGAL. 
Oporto 


8,901 
970 

3,150 
400 


7,285 
1,257 
1,135 
» 




Gibraltar 




Lisbon 




Cadiz 




Other Ports 






9,677 
545,508 


West Indies 


52,932 
90,151 
669 
5,919 
72,889 
11,533 

il',823 


48,121 

83,806 

525 

18,303 

59,141 

9,375 

2,450 

1,950 

20,822 


57,313 

88,058 

610 

20,590 

54,560 

10,713 

63,601 

1,900 

4,576 


British N. American Colonies . . 

SOUTH AMERICA. 
British Guiana , . . . 


248,956 


BrazU 

Mexico .' 




New Granada 




British Honduras 




Cisplatine Republic 




Argentine Republic 




Other South American Ports , . 


301,921 


Canary Isles 


- 


1,462 

" ' 'm 

3,291 
1,377 


1,611 
100 

* 2,184 


Malta 




Madeira 




Africa 




British East Indies . 






3,895 
20 


Other Countries 










Totals 


1,412,354 


2,063,223 


1,926,659 





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Google 



Receipts of Flour and Grain. 253 

RECEIPTS OF FLOUR AND GRAIN 



At the Undermentioned Ports. 
CHICAGO. 



m YEARS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


.1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls :... 


1,532,014 


2,487,376 


2,666,679 


2,625,883 


2,955,197 


2,691,142 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


12,724,141 

47,366.087 

15,06i;715 

5,251,750 

1,129,086 


26.266,562 ' 29,764.622 

38,157,232 , 35,799,638 

17,888,724 13,901,2.35 

4,240,239 1 3,354,981 

1,199,464 ; 791.182 


24,206,370 

28,341,150 

12,916,428 

3,107.2{y7 

699,583 


16,574,058 
48,668,640 
13,030.121 
4,716,360 
1,447,917 


14,164,515 
47,915,728 
13,506,773 
4,990,379 
1,728,865 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


81,532,779 
7,660,070 


87,752,221 > 8:3,611,658 
12,436,880 , 13,33:3,395 


69,270,828 
13,129,415 


84,437,096 
14,775,985 


82,306,260 
13,455,710 


Grand Total, bush. 


89.192.849 


100.189.101 96,945.053 


82.400,243 


99,213,081 


95,761,970 



MILWAUKEE. 



Flour, bbls 


a34,202 


1,254,821 


1,616,338 


1,443.801 


2,0i^,688 


1,889,420 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush. .! 


13,618,959 

2,140,178 

1,608,048 

1,447,569 

409,573 


28,457,937 

921,391 

1,602,129 

1,209,474 

376,634 


25,628,143 

1,31:3,642 

1,403,893 

1,083,472 

284,572 


27,878,727 

749,605 

1,643,132 

1,675,716 

230,834 


18,174,817 

798,458 

1,745,673 

2,029.819 

354;859 


19,303,709 

934.687 

1,518,463 

2,439,404 

324,625 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


19,224,327 
4,171,010 


32,567,565 
6,274,105 


29,713,722 
8,081,690 


32,178,014 
7,219,005 


23,103,626 
10,413,440 


24,520,788 
9,497,100 


Grand Total, bush. 


23,395.337 


38,841,670 


37,795,412 


39,397,019 


33.517,066 


34,017,888 



TOLEDO. 



Flour, bbls 


336,260 


545,082 


971,268 


67,240 


60,550 


457,445 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


3,162,575 
13,748,369 

3,990,514 
96,581 
22,416 


5,509,322 

11,672,207 

3,899,780 

251,724 

23,148 


10,476,473 

17,20:3,676 

6,558,991 

194,176 

15,235 


5,797,142 

7,293,:328 

569,101 

199.579 

7,261 


6,904,992 

10,118,562 

909,969 

134,689 

23,439 


7,326,557 
16,538,479 
2,291,745 

95,801 
94,838 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


21,020,455 
1,681,300 


21,a56,181 
2,725,410 


34,448,551 
4,856,:340 


13,866,411 
336,200 


18,151,651 
302,750 


26,347,420 
2,287,225 


Grand Total, bush. 


22,701,755 


24,081,591 


39,304,891 


14.202.611 


18.454.401 


28,624,646 



BUFFALO. 



Flour, bbls 


2,029,602 


2,966,306 


2,897,884 


2,446,202 


2,019,010 


1,793,444 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Barley Malt, bush. 
Rye, bush 


15,707,742 

48,620,387 

13,726,645 

3,494,325 

18,404 

301,809 

58,914 


34.656,469 

38,218.860 

15,773,810 

1,996.750 

2,600 

952,537 

58,667 


35,.529,592 
32,403,028 
15,228,047 
1,384,548 
1,044.940 
1,029,587 
146,957 


35,901,486 

26,343,291 

10.495,224 

1,191,689 

28,337 

305,726 

183,894 


22,647,612 

26,8:36.053 

6,250,077 

1,650,481 

61.487 

1,127,395 

12,917 


27,504,305 

39.502,066 

7,939,329 

2,232,168 

1,970,603 


Peas, bush 


67,460 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


82,328,126 
10,148,010 


91,659,693 
14,831,530 


85,726,679 
14,489,420 


74,449,647 
12,231.010 


58,586,022 
10,095,050 


79,305,921 
8,967,220 


Grand Total, bush. 


92,476,136 


106,491,223 


100,216,099 


86,680,657 


1 68,681,072 


88,273,141 



Hosted by 



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254 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Receipts op Flouk and Grain at the Undekmentioned Ports, 

(Continued.) 

PEORIA. 



IN YEAES 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 1 1877. 


Flour, bbls 


38,219 


50,808 


45,025 


97,734 


129,331| 108,063 






Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush • 

Rye, bush 


990,902 

5,791,448 

2,532.695 

777.575 

612,714 


911,453 

4,167.802 

4,359,741 

443,335 

708,458 


631.156 

5,100.222 

3,533.924 

39(}.650 

609,675 


981,039 

6,206,:J00 

4,781,215 

449,338 

729,985 


798,147, 379,707 

7,662,695 5,099.100 

3,630.310, 3.091.565 

724;0W; '600,910 

915,735' 472,000 




f 


Total Grain, bush . . 
Flour to bush 


10,735,^^34 
191,095 


10,590,789 
254,040 


10,271,627 
225.125 


13,147.877 
488,670 


13,730,977,' 9,643,282 
646,(»5| 540,315 


Grand Total, buah. . 


10,926,429 


10,844,829 


10,496,762 


13,636,547 


14,377,632 10,183,597 



CINCIMNATI. 



In Crop years, Sept. 
to Aug. 


1871-2. 


1872-3. 


1873-4. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 1876-77. 


Flour, bbls 


582,i»30 


765,469 


774.916 


697,578 


636,504i 540,128 




1 


Wheat, bush 


762.144 
1,829.866 
1.16i),05::J 
1,177,306 

357,309 




1,221.176 
3,457,164 
1,372,464 
1,084.500 
385,934 


1,135,388 
3.695,561 
1,323,380 
1,109,693 
3:36,410 


1.052.952 
4415,564 
1,441,158 
1,151.944 
500,515 


1,436,851 


Com, bush 


4.559.506 


Oats, bush 

Barley bush. 


1,096,916 
1,2.58,163 


Rye, bush 


427,145 






Total Grain, bush.. 
Flour to bush 


5,286.678 
2,914,650 


6.295,882 
3,827,345 


7,521,238 
3,874,580 


7,600,432 
3,487,890 


8,662,133 
3,182,520 


8.718,581 
2,700,640 


Grand Total, bush.. 


8,201,328 


10,123,227 


11,395,818 


11,088,322 


11,844,653 


11,479,221 



PITTSBURG. 



IN YEARS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


313,382 

534.535 
609.562 
973,117 
260,960 
134,497 


396,605 


467,176 


399,608 


503,267 


338.976 




' 


Wheat, bush ......... 


5in,042 
445,228 
1,364.582 
492,455 
162,645 


712,268 
537,564 
1,627,046 
42(),442 
139,374 


374,762 
352,039 
958,598 
316,834 
70,961 


426.665 
413,1:33 
1,008,495 
a33,203 
83.001 


250.915 


Com, bush 

Oats, bush 


321,553- 
632,321 


Barley, bush 


.3:3,282 


Rve bush 


196,801 






Total Grain, bush.. 
Flour to bush 


2,512,671 
1,566,910 


3,035,952 
1,983,025 


3,442.694 
2,335,880 


2,073.194 
1,998,040 


2.264,497 
2,516.335 


1,434,872 
1,694,880 


Grand Total, bush. 


4,079,581 


5,018,977 


5,778,574 


4,071,234 


4,780,832 3,029,752 







KANSAS CITY 


■ 






IN YEARS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. . 


Flour bbls 












*104,370 






Wheat, bush 


289,726 
601,864 
93,705 


750,400 
681,000 
105,200 


913,64*i 
778.800 
631,200 


1,256,3,37 

1.258.700 

282,850 


1,094,615 

4,646.871 

95,3:37 


1,762,703 


Com, bush 

Oats, bush 


4,405,:388 
59,719 






Total Grain, bush.. 
Flour to bush 


985,295 



1,536,600 


2,32:3,646 


2,797,887 


5,836,82-: 


6,227,810 
521,850 


Grand Total, bush.. 


985,295 


1,536,600 


2,323,640 


2,797,887 


5,836,827 


6,749,660 



• 172,634 sacks, and 28,028 barrels, equal to 104,370 barrels. Receipts of Barlev for 1877 
were 13,260 bushels Rye, 133,833 bushels. Grand total, Grain, bushels, 6,896,753. 



Hosted by 



Google 



Beceipts of Flour and Grain. 



255 



Receipts of Flour and Grain at the Undermentioned Ports, 

(Continued.) 
DETROIT. 



in YEARS 


. 1872. 


1873. 


1874. . 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


667,906 


495,809 


667,906 


415,129 


338,522 


337,497 


Wheat, bush 

Corn, bnsh 

Oats bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


3,381.274 

1,616,725 

1,040.303 

363.652 

24,435 


2,553,561 

2,246.888 

1,419.009 

415,994 

27.531 


5,276, 6'>9 

621,986 

694.847 

307.147 

30,295 


4,659,304 

461.463 

814.748 

482.352 

17,609 


4,693,324 
376,470 

1,272.549 

672.207 

14.891 


4,934.901 

1,385.732 

1,236,409 

311,?80 

38,659 




Total arain, bu.sh. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


6.456,439 
3,339.5:^ 


6.663.033 
2,479.045 


6.930.9-14 
3,339:530 


6,435,476 
2.075,615 


7,029.441 
1.692,610 


7,907.081 
1,687.485 


Grand Total, bush. 


9,795,969 


9,147,078 


10,270,474 


8,511,121 


8,722,051 


9,594,566 







EPIF. 


(By Lake only.) 






Flour, bbls 


178,763 


218,309 


295,647 


320,996 


185,300 


85,720 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barlej\ bu.sh 

Rye, bush 

Peas, bush 


937.374 
621.113 
947.895 
140,750 


2.511,756 

1,341,478 

a51.393 

202.599 

14,181 

756 


3,598.007 

1,500.481 

594.889 

206,435 

9.050 

77,846 


3,132.258 

859.053 

187 945 

492,459 

11.717 

34,507 


1,822.478 

2,941,710 

305,936 

334.490 

100,097 

32,371 


2.507.086 

3,022.606 

• 32.723 

256,276 

78,113 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


2,647,132 
893,815 


4.422.163 
1,091,545 


5,986,638 
1,478,235 


4,717,939 
1,604,980 


5,537,082 
926,500 


5,896.804 
428,600 


Grand Total, bush. 


3,540,947 


5,513,703 


7,464,873 


6,322,919 


6,463.582 


6,325,404 



OSWECO. 



OCDENSBURC. 



Flour, bbls.' 


110 




182 








Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bash. 

Peas, bush 


4,153,484 

1,921.901 

89,801 

2,791,038 

81.773 

86,367 


4,284,461 

1,450.800 

43,193 

2,377,348 

254.459 

137.369 


6,821,723 

2,72:^,575 

59,985 

2.794,109 

281,500 

291,014 


3,072.400 
947,700 
217,200 

3,817,900 
223,500 
291,000 


2,641,300 

830,600 

31,600 

3,269,900 
200,200 
151,200 


3,165,153 

1,120.255 

71,141 

► 4,343,852 

261,381 

184,090 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


9,124,364 
550 


8,547,630 


12,271,906 
910 


8,569,700 


7,151,800 


9,145,872 


Grand Total, bush. 


9,124,914 


8,547,630 


12,272,816 


8,569,700 


7,151,800 


9,145,872 



Flour, bbls 


178,763 


107,303 


66,928 


3,443 


28,951 


60,000 


Wheat, bnsh 

Com. bush 

Oats,' bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 

Peas, bush 


937,374 
621,113 
947,895 
140,030 


. 1,134,309 

1,827.251 

70,425 

77,039 


1,300.527 

2,078,722 

219,532 

225,309 


482,272 

916 

15,565 

107,149 

"58482 


559,290 
4,369 

* 125,343 

*25;i86 


1,101,073 
1,792,250 

122,355 . 

112,671 
22 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


2,646.412 
893,815 


3,109,024 
536,515 


3,824,090 
334,640 


664.084 
17,215 


714,182 
144,755 


3,128,371 
300,000 


Grand Total, bush . 


3,540,227 


3,645,539 


4,158,730 


681,299 


858,937 


3,428,371 



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256 



Nevj York Prodtuie Exchange, 



Receipts op Ploub and Gbain at the Undekmentioned Pobts. 

{Continued.) 
PHILADELPHIA. 



IN YEARS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


987,450 


954,680 


915,636 


9^2,190 


970,781 


740,330 


Wheat, bush 

Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


4,160,800 

8,137,380 

5,&30,400 

730,380 

320,940 


4,372,800 
8,2:^3,400 
5,980,565 
1,056,892 
270,600 


5.471.700 
5,954,700 
4,705,000 
1,236,900 
210,191 


5,550,800 
7,1:30,000 
3,820,400 
1,652,700 
187,550 


4,485,000 

20,261,675 

4-484,000 

1,361.850 

679,100 

185,035 


4,011,400 
13,886,300 

2,505,300 
764,400 
334,570 


Malt, bush 


216,925 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


19,179.900 
4,937.250 


19,914,257 
4,773,400 


17,578,491 
4,578,180 


18,341,4.50 
4,610,950 


31,456,660 
4,853,905 


21,718,895 
3,701,650 


Grand Total, bush. 


24,117.150 


24,687,657 


22,156,671 


22,952,400 


36,310,565 


25,420,545 



Baltimore. 



Floor, bbls 


1,170,967 


1,312,612 


1,560,997 


1,391,843 


1,127,666 


1,157,932 


Wheat, bush 

Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 

Rye, bush 


2,456,100 

9,045,465 

1,059,161 

90,938 

40,000 


2,810,617 

8,830,449 

1,255,072 

100,519 

4b',66o 


6,457,834 

9,;355,567 

1,149,188 

118,634 

50,000 


4,409,670 

9,567,141 

977,514 

74,529 

60,566 


3,945,274 

24,684,230 

810.282 

42,160 

65',666 


8,274,151 

11,847,771 

3,124,721 

1,326,490 


Barley, bush 

Peas, bush 


472,969 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


14,691,664 
5,789,835 


12,5:36,657 
6,56:3,060 


17,131,22:3 
7,804,985 


15,089,354 
6,959,215 


29,616,846 
5,6:38,330 


25,046,042 
5,789,660 


Grand Total, bush. 


20,571,499 


19,099,517 


24,936,208 


22,048,569 


35,255,176 1 30,835,702 







ST. 


LOUIS. 








Flour, bbls 


1,259,9:33 


1,294,938 


1,638,898 


1,300,381 


1,071,430 ' 


1,092,173 


Wheat, bush 

Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


6,007,987 
9,479,387 
5,467,800 
1,263,486 
377,587 


6,116,088 
7,6:33,275 
5,346,402 
1,148,574 
347,145 


8,255,221 
6,991,677 
5,296,967 
1.421,406 
288,743 


7,604,265 

6,710,264 

, 5,006,850 

1,171,337 

275,199 


8,037,574 

15,249,909 

3,660,912 

1,492,985 

399,826 


7,698.912 
11,705,631 
3,074,720 
1,326,500 
461,043 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


22,596,247 
6,299,665 


20,591,484 
6,474,690 


22,254,014 
8,194,490 


.20,967,915 
6,501,905 


28,841,206 
5,357,170 


24,266,806 
5,460,865 


Grand Total, bush. 


28,895,912 ' 27,066,174 


30,448,504 


27,469,820 


34,198,376 


29,727,671 



NEW ORLEANS. 



InYr8.eiidedAag.3l. 


1871-72. 


1872-73. 


1873-74. 


1874-75. 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


Flour, bbls 


1,087,488 


1,046,024 


1,001,504 


864,242 


791,701 


631,602 


Wheat, bush 

Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 

Beans, bush 


461 

6,800,908 

3,001,308 

16,688 


896 

6,097,522 

2,267,596 

18,092 


325,287 

5,080,402 

1,868,840 

13,284 


145,485 

3,46.5.909 

1,727,2.32 

9,460 


82,812 

4,202,022 

1.166,432 

ia5,423 


110,5<'.l 

5,580,150 

1,169,5^ 

7,136 


Total Grain, bush . 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


9,819,365 
5,437,440 


8,334,106 
5,230,120 


7,287,813 
5,007,520 


5,348,086 
4,321,210 


5,585,689 
3,958;505 


6,867,371 
3,158,010 


Grand Total, bush. 


15,256,805 


13,214,226 


12,295,833 


9,669,296 


9,544,194 


10,025,381 



Hosted by 



Google 



Beceipts of Flour and Grain, 



257 



Receipts of Flour aio> Grain at the Undermbistioned Ports. 

{Gontinued,) 
TORONTO. 



IN YEARS. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


64,185 


118,670 


183,346 


159,035 


68,259 


♦ 


Wheat, bush.. .. 

Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


792,869 
53,704 
68,195 

921,469 
8,-453 

154,893 
69,868 


1,262,995 

"55;58i 
1,002,895 

"73;365 

100,070 


1,450,739 

2,435 

50,908 

1,240,958 

2,182 

31,091 

249,920 


2,193,594 

8,993 

159,765 

2,121,666 

3,680 

267,850 

4,600 


2,351,876 

10,070 

43,843 

2,014,952 

515 

221,640 

61,865 




Malt, bush 

Peas, bush 




Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


2,069,451 
320,925 


2,494,906 
593,350 


3,028,283 
916,730 


4,759,651 
795,175 


4,704,764 
341,295 




Grand Total, bush. 


2,390,376 


3,088,256 


3,945,013 


5,554,826 


5,046,059 





MONTREAL. 



Flour, bbls 


921,973 


1,130,666 


1,075,353 


1,023,551 


915,331 


823,873 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Rye, bush 


4,665,314 

7,651,671 

53,453 

105,576 

8,900 

452,649 


9,788,730 

3,544,514 

102,816 

380 

167,916 

455,799 


7,192,284 

* 2,803,284 

283,004 

' i75',652 
1,144,739 


8,615,238 
1,804,010 

258,098 
101 

181,935 
1,157,040 


6,388,130 
3,932,031 
2,616,174 

'27b;677 
1,030,043 


7,218,092 
4,617,015 

323,075 

39,200 

1,230,486 

810,901 


Barley, bush 

Peas, bush 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


12,937,563 
4,609,865 


14,060,199 
5,653,330 


11,598,963 
5,376,765 


12,016,422 
5,117,755 


14,237,055 
4,576,655 


14,238,769 
4,119,365 


Grand Total, bosh. 


17,547,428 


19,713,529 


16,975,728 


17,134,177 


18,813,710 


18,358,134 







PORTLAND, M 


e. 






Flour, bbls 


488,764 


552,227 


668,777 


536,761 


286,149 


t 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Peas, bush 

Rye, bush 


280,686 
806,437 
322,173 
59.764 
168,019 
803 


135,340 

474,847 

255,451 

36,893 

65,946 


401,745 
670,538 
242,316 
34,479 
250,2^30 
305 


475,521 
899,969 
384,277 
49,630 
343,432 


1,147,040 
184,318 

1,004,470 

91,201 

142,407 








Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


1,643,882 
2,443,820 


968,477 
2,761,135 


1,599,613 
3,343,885 


2,152,829 
2,683,805 


2,569,436 
1,430,745 




Grand Total, bush. 


4,087,702 


3,729,612 


4,943,498 


4,836,634 


4,000,181 





BOSTON. 



Flour, bbls 

Com meal, bbls 


1,586,017 
91,538 


1,795,272 
120,296 


1,890,487 
97,938 


1,637,972 
89,484 


1,836,985 
81,265 


1,860,223 
128,436 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Bye, bush 


402,426 
5,090,755 
2,725,641 

539,038 
13,989 


880,747 
3,558,263 
3,663,364 

332,849 
33,335 


1,362,617 

3,303,041 

3,037,269 

418,615 

34,273 


1,035,109 

5,346,340 

2,833,544 

530.396 

27,878 


504,767 

9,005,375 

2,622,150 

798,689 

312,732 


2,061,579 

7,362,718 

3,108,128 

829,402 

38,771 




Total Grain, bush. 
Floui" to Wheat, bu 
Meal to Com, bush 


8,771,849 

7,930,085 

366,152 


8,468,658 

8,976,360 

481,184 


8,155,815 

9,452,435 

391,752 


9,773,267 

8,lb9,860 

357,936 


13,243,713 

9,184,925 

325,060 


13,400,598 

9,801,115 

513,744 


Grand Total, bush. 


17,068,086 


17,926,202 


18,000,002 


18,821,063 


22,753,698 


23,215,457 



* No retuma. 
18 



t No returns. 



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258 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Receipts of Flotjk axd Grain at the Undermbntiois^ed Ports. 
{Goniinued,) 





CLEVELAND. 


INDIANAPOLIS. 


DULUTH. 


in years. 


1876.* 


1877.* 


1876. 


1877. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, barrels 


15,972 


4,354 


1,113,232 


907,950 


349,700 


347,864 


Wheat, bushels ... 

Cora, bushels 

Oatfi, bushels 

Barley, bushels . . 
Rye, bushels 


605.122 

49,656 

7,600 

190,904 


380.652 
50.805 
59.748 

257.738 
8,828 


1.166.311 
16,086.240 

1.763 400 
340.100 
556.580 


2.094.405 
12,351.112 

2,107.800 
329.100 
473,000 


1,357,509 


1,417,250 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


a53,282 
79,860 


757.771' 
21,770 


19.912,631 
5.566,160 


17.355,417 
4,539,750 


l.a57.509 
1,748,600 


1.417,250 ' 
1,739,320 


Grand Total, bush. 


933,142 


779,541 


25,478,791 


21,895,167 


3.106,009 


3,156,570 



* Receipts by Lake only. 

Canal Shipments from the Undermentioned Places. 

BUFFALO. 



IN YEARS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


5,172 


113,616 


49,182 


54,251 


2,137 


4,216 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bush 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 

Rye, bush 


11,001,069 

30,0:M,606 

4,598,237 

1,729,972 

210,715 

261,036 

25 


24,569,088 

21,768,053 

3,225,926 

358,764 

801,481 

130,764 

10,026 


21,672,048 

16,418,841 

2,754,945 

133,000 

8,000 

104,754 

208 


23,177,151 

9,750,199 

2,283,037 

58,163 

80,071 

153,853 

3,844 


12,577,243 

12,720,138 

1,655,530 

263,965 

4:^5,900 

215,233 

826 


13,270,420 

25,348,207 

3,407,280 

1,078,368 

977,234 

205,986 

544 


Malt, bush 

Peas and Beans, bu 


Total Grain, bush. 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


47,835,660 
25,860 


50,864,102 
568,080 


41,091,796 
^910 


35,511,308 
271,255 


27,868, &35 
10,685 


44,287,039 
21,080 


Grand Total, bush. 


47,861,530 


51,432,182 


41,337,706 


35,782,503 


27,879,520 


44,308,119 



OSWECO. 



Flour, bbls 


44,202 


37,911 


41,802 


16,101 


8,923 


8,839 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bash 

Oats, bush 

Barley, bush . . 

Rye, bush 


l,928,a^0 
969,587 
42,":50 
2,590,500 
241.125 
87,795 
119,897 


1,775,308 

377,729 

41,5K)6 

1,930,734 
214,998 
115,587 


3.699,627 

1,650,393 

68,941 

2,324,386 

251.908 

216,354 

24,586 


996,037 
108,;374 
206,761 
3,108.82:^ 
188,182 
123,057 


689.653 

47,344 

11.050 

2,938,984 

203.684 

151,722 


965,169 

118,116 

19,714 

3,346,088 

235 810 


Peas, bush 

Malt, bush 


146,861 


Total Grain, bush . 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


5,980,504 
221,010 


4,456.262 
189,555 


8,236.195 
209,010 


4,731,2:34 
80,505 


5,042,437 
44,615 


4,831,758 
44,195 


Grand Total, bush. 


6,201,514 


4,645,817 


8,445,205 


4,811,739 


5,087,052 


4,875,953 


MiUFeed, lbs 


11,367,650 


9,488,285 


3,475,734 


3,566,000 


3,875,000 





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Receipts of Flour and Grain, 



259 



Eeoeipts of Flour and Grain at New York, 

For the Years 



m YEAKS 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbis 


3,038,364 
160,587 
92,336 


3,513.887 
155,744 
151,652 


4.047,117 
114,941 
113,273 


3,997 526 
88,618 
105,332 


3,982.707 
178445 
158,676 


3,687.060 

223,895 

87,242 


Com Meal, bbls 

Com Meal, sacks 


Wheat, bushels 

Com, bushels 

Oats, bushels 

Barley, bushels 

Rye, bushels 


16,221.907 
40,757,115 
12,264,226 
3,973,303 
491.851 
192,560 
1,124,953 


34,624.931 

24.630.831 

li:012 924 

1,820,576 

849.073 

172,345 

571,494 


41,863.837 

29,661.443 

10.917,142 

2,035,838 

606,035 

532,500 

704,468 


34,369.517 
22,183,077 
10.795,738 
3,799,356 
296.450 
783,860 
1,114,318 


26,411,296 
26,645,599 
12,163,809 
4,840,095 
1,753,032 
1.177,120 
2,009,824 


24,854,899 
34,963,432 
12,401,096 
6,954,436 
2,027,894 


Peas, bushels 

Malt, bushels 


712,340 
1,894,321 


Total arain, bushels 

Flour to bushels 

Meal to bushels 


75,025,915 

15,191.820 

712,601 


73,732.174 

17,569.435 

846,362 


86.321.263 

20,235,585 

636,310 


73.342,316 

19,987,630 

565,136 


75,005,775 
19,913,535 
1,029,932 


83,808.418 
18,4a5,300 
1,070,064 


Grand total, bushels 


90,930,336 


92,137,971 


107,243.158 


93,895,082 


95,949,242 


103,313,782 



Receipts of Flour and Grain at Western Lake and River Ports. 

August to July^ inclusive. 



In Crop yeare, ended 
July 31. 


1871-2. 


1872-3. 


1873-4. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 


1876-77. 


Flour, bbls 


5,043,864 


5,781,225 


6,309,895 


5,327,843 


5,343,669 


4,892,534 






Wheat, bushels 

Com, bushels 

Oats bushels 


39.725.674 
69,585,706 
28,919,490 
6,385,563 
2.760,027 


54,833,138 
62.423,240 
29,143,324 
9.129,913 
1,901,338 


82.947,396 
62,818,017 
25.a36,164 
7,002.673 
1,761,216 


65,820,727 
46,966,218 
22,591,127 
5;472.498 
1.227,649 


66,287,202 
62.903,020 
28,489,340 
7,657,037 
2,227,166 


39,684,510 
81.646,506 
21,691 654 


Barley, bushels 

Rye, bushels . .... 


8,492,082 
2,897,878 




Total G-rain. bushels 
Flour to bushels 


147.376.460 
25,219,320 


157.430.953 
28,926,125 


180,365,466 
31,549,475 


142,078,219 
26,639,215 


167,563.765 
26,718.345 


154,412.580 
24,462,670 


Grand total, bushels 


172,595,780 


186,337,078 


212,904,941 


168,717,434 


194,282,110 


178,875,250 



Deliveries ,op Flour, and Grain at Tide Water, by the Erie and 
Champlain Canals. 



IN YEARS 


1872. 


1873. ' 1874. 

1 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 

Meal, bbls 


145,431 
202 


100,027 , 177,500 
213 


102,064 
1,000 


37,100 


29,500 




"* 


Wheat, bush 

Com, bushels 

Oats, bushels 


11,373.666 

29,914,321 

5,634.625 

4,478.289 

476,431 

104,900 

1,103,714 


22,400.799 23,734,299 
18,598.789 17,592.610 
3,428,563 4,711374 
2,245,083 2,927;833 
- 934,822 850.679 
130,600 . 237.000 
821,429 1 521,714 


22,.522,866 
8.415.903 
3,186,638 
3,802.958 

230,t>()7 
1 159,466 

698,686 


11,798.800 
11,386.600 
3.150.600 
3,746.600 
762,600 

735',666 


12,739,600 

23,623,100 

4,208,900 


Barley, bushels 

Rye bushels 


5,473,700 
1,282,700 


Peas ;md Beans, bush. 
Malt, bushels ...,,,,,, 


607,566 






Total Grain, bushels 
Flour & Meal to bush. 


53,135.946 
727,963 


48,560,045 50,575,509 
500,135 888,352 


39.017.174 
514,320 


31,580,900 
185,500 


47,935,500 
147,500 


Grand total, bushels 


53,863,909 


49,060,180 51,463,861 


39,531,494 


31,766,400 


48,083,000 


Equal tons 


1,428,777 


1,356,809 1,370,291 


1,087,889 


852,163 1 1.292.603 









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260 New York Produce Exchange. 

Exports of Flour and Grain from New York, 

For the Teo/rs 





1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


1,182,240 
194,040 


1,661,606 
181,446 


2,185,969 
174,304 


1,968,874 
181,894 


1,954,906 
174,608 


1,571,273 
^ 229,689 


Com Meal, bbls 


Wheat, bush 

Ck>m, bush 


13,263,604 

25,332,416 

32,243 

17,402 

607,165 

155,343 


27,753,714 

16,168,152 

49,536 

40,120 

1,018,038 

138,122 


34,771,602 

18,647,114 

125,149 

3,200 

639,062 

460,768 


26,232,309 

12,980,670 

132,351 

120 

186,570 

4^,744 


24,945,715 
16,470,936 
683,616 
117,815 
1,412,673 
1,149,970 


21,795,693 
26,759,636 

258,299 
2,437,786 
. 2,148,408 

640,462 


Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 


Rye, bush 

Feus, bush 




Total Gram, bush... 

Flour to bushels 

Com Meal to bushels. . 


39,408,173 

5,911,200 

682,120 


45,167,691 

8,308,030 

5^4,336 


54,636,885 

10,929,846 

697,216 


40,027,764 

9,844,370 

727,676 


44,780,724 

9,774,530 

698,432 


54,040,284 

7,856,365 

918,766 


Grand Total, bush.. 


45,901,493 


54,020,056 


66,263,946 


50,599,710 


55,253,686 


62,816,405 



Exports of Wheat and Flour, Monthly, from all United 
States Ports to all Foreign Countries, 

For the CropYea/rs S&pt, 1 to August 31, inclusive^ from 1871 to 1877, inclusive : 

WHEAT, BUSHELS. 



MONTH. 


1871-2. 


1872-3. 


1873-4. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 


September." 

October 


5,203,050 

4,558,074 

2,302,767 

1,144,921 

1,037,599 

1,176,670 

542,553 

641,805 

991,562 

1,303,767 

2,579,155 

3,456,777 


4,283,800 
4,942,529 
4,437,334 
2,976,868 
3,118,307 
, 1,921,840 
1,681,157 
1,384,407 
3,003,281 
6,276,834 
4,898,730 
5,986,353 


7,372,379 
10,116,418 
6,444,036 
5,080,824 
5,924,792 
3,403,789 
2,599,767 
3,489,173 
6,809,558 
8,914,102 
4,723,932 
5,470,915 


7,910,341 
5,395,633 
4,122,214 
6,370,544 
2,939,060 
2,474,175 
3,452,622 
3,551 796 
1,841,317 
5,764,636 
6,971,206 
6,220,401 


4,988,614 
5,972,161 
4,178,710 
3,564,309 
2,786,511 
2,577,950 
2,835,967 
3,729,383 
4,909,200 
6,338,710 
3,903,922 
4,267,341 


5,266,166 
6,973,497 
4,924,905 
4,188,847 
2,745,655 
1,926,831 
1,540,361 
1,755,392 
1,257,187 
1,581,647 
1,497,043 
4,670,189 


November 

January 

February 

March 


April 


May 

June , 

July 

August 




Total 

Flour to Wheat. . 


24,938,690 
14,350,350 


43,913,430 
13,291.865 


70,349,684 
21,033,655 


56,013,936 
19,946,215 


50,052,778 
19,408,690 


38,226,620 
15,664,370 


Grand Total, bu. 


39,289,040 


57,306,295 


91,383,339 


76,959,150 


69,561,368 


63,890,990 



FtOUR, BABREI.S. 



September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

Febraary 

March 


627,281 
394,593 
2781866 
203,132 
170,456 
151,040 
128,659 
160,008 
162,876 
172,228 
198;365 
222,566 


211,640 
^ 252,944 
267,231 
208,204 
195,070 
153,333 
191,549 
199,780 
205,975 
265,439 
262,407 
253,801 


358,825 
357,631 
351,970 
412,194 
345,659 
345,797 
361,707 
311,059 
357,960 
391,094 
307,278 
321,567 


329,623 
369,440 
854,954 
406,690 
357,971 
281,564 
316,253 
325,242 
283,242 
307,965 
339,448 
317,681 


251,746 
363,659 
325,636 
416,649 
344,146 
254,525 
294,160 
366,482 
349,583 
331,579 
282,093 
339,462 


362,866 
379,190 
347,397 
334,686 
259,176 
214,968 
221,401 
221,871 
204,372 
176,170 
168,052 
242,725 


^f-:::::::::. 




July 






Total 


2,870,070 


2,658,373 


4,206,731 


3,989,043 


3,899,718 


3,132,874 



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Exports of Flour and Orain. 261 

ExpoBTs OF Flour and Grain from New Orleans, 



For the Years 





1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


62,841 


176,745 


74,219 


93,792 


34,208 


Wheat, bush 

Coru. bush 


14*19,073 


265,788 
1,244,963 


206,399 
197,433 


37,102 
1,639,756 


105,271 
2,824,921 


Total grain, bush — 
Flour to grain, bush. 


1,119,073 
314,205' 


1,510,751 

883,725 


403,832 
371,095 


1,676,858 
468,960 


2,980,192 
171,040 


Grand total, bush.. 


1,433,278 


2,394,476 


774,927 


2,145,818 


8,101,232 



Exports of Indian Corn and Meal from all United 
States Ports, 

For the Tears 



MONTH. 


1872. 
Bushels. 


1873. 
Bushels. 


' 1874. 
Bushels. 


1875. 
Bushels. 


1876. 
Bushels. 


1877. 
Bushels. 


January 

February 

March 


2,330,777 
2,559,165 
1,360,385 
1,846,629 
4,488.720 
7,946,150 
5,527,298 
4,691,553 
5,384,153 
4,214,076 
3,250,583 
1,308,544 


2,22.3,356 
1,812,261 
1,261,915 
2,469,750 
3,443,525 
2,845,916 
3,038,968 
3,780,073 
3,073,419 
2,403,163 
2,583,845 
1,628,886 


1,728,740 
1,780,558 
2,125,638 
4,184,532 
3,321,574 
4,773,210 
5,640,675 
3,211,972 
960,395 
1,471,986 
1,186,914 
4,048,512 


2,677,315 
2,550,939 
1,919,800 
2,539,971 
3,272,475 
1,485,751 
2,437,493 
2,329,121 
3,425,557 
2,891,895 
1,565,348 
1,864,660 


4,393,372 
4,824,841 
5,950,188 
3,786,125 
7,152,340 
8,873,232 
6,460.027 
6,062,501 
7,258,701 
5,780,908 
3,465,652 
3,336,039 


4,045,899 
6,486,779 
7,175,611 
7,225,641 
8,039,736 
5,522,489 
5,302,911 
7,296,170 
5,235,832 
4,388,427 
6,a31,386 
5,538,295 


April 

May 


June 


July 


August 


September 

October 

November 

December 


Total bushels.. 

Total, Com & \ 

Meal, bush, f 


44,908,033 
46,459,037 


30,574,077 
32,158,285 


34,433,606 
35,984,834 


28,960,325 
30,233,677 


67,343,926 
68,775,266 


72,639,176 
74,538,256 



Exports of Iin)iAN Corn Meal from all United States Ports. 



MONTH. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


25,480 
26,361 
25,342 
32,499 
30,514 
41,495 
35,351 
39,724 
35,610 
38,614 
28,080 
28,681 


26,000 
19,642 
34,859 
37,407 
36,303 
42,640 
43,545 
40,885 
33,183 
25,580 
20,902 
35,106 


22,234 
15,881 
28,567 
33,085 
39,182 
48,687 
29,684 
23,866 
22,888 
16,586 
25,083 
82,194 


18,178 
16,304 
20,519 
33,296 
32,640 
24,183 
35,215 
33,152 
34,357 
82,726 
24,183 
23,585 


27,151 
25,082 
27,314 
27,916 
86,758 
36,801 
30,550 
24,861 
31,710 
23,677 
88,174 
32,841 


17,061 
48,472 
45,226 
42,382 


May 


74,124 


June 


48,057 


July 


37,619 
86,687 


August 


September 

October 


28,426 
33,714 


November 

December 


81,048 
87,054 


Total bbls 


887,751 


396,052 


887,807 


318,338 


857,835 


474,770 



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262 



New York Produce Exchange. 



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Exports of Flour and Grain. 



263 



Exports of Flour and Grain from the Undermentioned 
Atlantic Seaboard Ports. 

MONTREAL. 





1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


858,872 
18,844 


831,256 
15 3Yr 
24,688 


843,599 
5.499 
19;814 


738,075 

9,986 

23,406 


749 247 


Com Meal, bbls 

Oat Meal, bbls 


40.020 
46,759 




Wbeat, bush 


8,083,4.50 

3,520,918 

299,991 

30,053 

168 

822,629 


7,556,576 

2,561..375 

261,277 

45,426 

93 

1,763,306 


7,173,589 

1,724,220 

3<)4,557 

187,456 

l,576;i83 


5,0{yr,694 

3,834,602 

3,022,874 

201,726 

l,362;73i 


5.848,363 
4,226,296 
400,142 
1,091,473 
39,134 
1,127,245 


Com, busti 


Oats, bush 


Barley, bnsh. 

Rye, bush 


Peas, bush. 






Total Grain, bush .... 
Flour to bush. 


12,757,509 

4,294,360 

75,376 


12,188,053 

4,151,280 

153,370 


11,026,005 

4,217,995 

140,»80 


13,519,627 

3,690,375 

240,380 


12,732,653 
3,746,2.35 


Meal to bush 


393,875 




Grand total, bush 


17,127,245 


16,492,708 


15,384,880 


17,450,452 


16,-72,763 




B 


altimore 


• 






Flour, bbls 


359,556 


479,758 
30,533 


453,107 
24,292 


426,094 
33,170 


364 381 


Com Meal, bbls 


31,601 


Wheat bush .... .... 


1,158,097 
6,093,618 


3,985.219 
5,959,767 

2,824 
61,038 

2,240 


2,064,344 
6,980,442 


1,701,801 

20,7.51,343 

27,535 

13,137 

4,341 


4,519,753 
19,051,327 


Com, bush 


Oats, bush. 


8,810 
51,598 


Rye, bush 


Peas, bush 






Total Grain, bush 

Flour to bush .*. 


7,251,217 
1,797,830 




10,010,838 

2,398,790 

145,412 


9.044,786 

2,265,535 

97,178 


22,498,157 

2,130,420 

132,660 


23,631,518 

1,821,905 

126,404 


Meal to bush 




Grand total, bushels. . 


9,049,047 


12,555,090 


11,407,499 


24,761,307 


25,579,827 


PHILADELPHIA, 


Flour bbls 


143,029 
30,185 


186,663 
27,403 


161,291 
26,367 


188,845 
22,358 


99,694 
30,720 


Cora Meal, bbls 


Wheat, bush 


1,938,870 

2,202.368 

25:997 

5;ooo 


1,289.632 

2,203.588 

30,671 

104,616 


3,302,0.54 

4,601,586 

33,810 


2,981,849 

16,754.718 

842,217 

404,074 


2 548 301 


Com, bush 


10,190,685 

10,650 

224,359 


Oats, bush 

Rye, bush 




Total Grain, bush 

Flour to bush 


3,971,735 
715,145 
120,740 


5,628,407 
933,316 
109,612 


7,937.450 
803,740 
105,463 


20,982,857 
944,225 
89,432 


12,973,995 
498,470 


Meal to bush 


122 880 






Grand total, bush 


4,807,620 


6,671,334 


8,846,658 


22,016,515 


13,595,345 


BOSTON. 


Flour bbls 


231.361 
84,926 


287,718 
76,277 


271.090 
73,848 


268,093 
90,106 


221, 21y 
98,643 


Corn Meal, bbls 




Wheat, bush. 


486.128 
162,727 


1,062,366 
380,254 


784,491 
1,551,576 


116,^05 

4,160 817 

39,938 

45,249 


1,548.837 

3,095,084 

33,592 


Corn, bush 

Oats, bush 


Peas, bush .*. . . 






Total Grain, bush 

Flour to bu.-h 

Meal to bush 


643,855 

1,15'),805 

339,704 


1,442,620 

1,438,590 

305,108 


2,336.717 

1,355,850 

295,392 


4,342.409 

1,3J0,465 

360,424 


4.677.513 

1,106.060 

394, .572 






Grand total, bush 


2,145,364 


3,186,318 


3,987,959 


6,043,298 


6,178,145 



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264 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Eeceipts of Floub and Geain at San Francisco, 

For the Yea/r 1877. 



MONTH. 


FLOUB, 

J^ Sacks. 
25 lbs. 


Wheat, 
Centals. 


Corn, 
Centals. 


Oats, 
Centals. 


BARLEY, 

Centals. 


RYE, 

Centals. 


BEANS, 
Centals. 


January 

February 

March.... 

April 


170,712 
226,649 
184,154 
145,493 
124,326 
107,756 
138,515 
140,595 
148,285 
242,479 
219,826 
219,913 


459,829 
365.322 
651,924 
701,957 
467,821 
323,944 
119,271 
220,683 
. 233,411 
548,355 
669,680 
715,773 


23,528 
12,004 
10,813 
4,491 
15,480 
11,590 
10,685 
16,316 
10,345 
16,732 
10,103 
13,796 


31,951 
42,131 
66,226 
26,901 
24,952 
15,199 
16,310 
" 19,154 
23,986 
17,258 
24.074 
17,836 


38,987 

58,048 

115,089 

105,295 

141,721 

80,369 

34,390 

45,974 

45,192 

40,355 

27,001 

48,004 


591 

1,274 

2,331 

484 

514 

410 

50 

1,221 

590 

1,652 

164 

1,559 


5,511 
5,771 
19,679 
11,651 


May 

June 


3,109 
5,054 


Jnly 


3,147 


August 


6,893 


September 

October 


2,338 
6,547 


Noyember 

December 


4,089 
6,798 


Totall877. ... 

" 1876 

" 1875 


2,068,703 i 5,477,970 
2,243,524 10,736 846 
2,054,346 7,994,453 


155,883 
214,215 
161,213 


324,978 
344,977 
346,898 


780,425 
1,907,058 
1,023,471 


10,840 
20,184 
16,425 


80,587 
116,037 
110,836 



EXPOBTS OF Flour and Grain from San Francisco. 



MONTH. 


Flour— Bbls. 


Wheat— Centals. 


Barley- Centals. 


Oats— Centals. 




1876. 


1877. 


1876. 


1877. 


1876. 


1877. 


1876. 


1877. 


January. 


47,649 
30,632 
33,485 
43,736 
27,046 
23,412 
33,032 
45,114 
13,839 
45,328 
39,345 
50,022 


44,24Ci 
31,355 
64,743 
32,123 
22,846 
31,942 
21,581 
45,546 
30,447 
37.604 
37,914 
33,7871 


711,108 

981,906 

Wr,578 

394,274 

319,480 

343,379 

671,153 

1,443,188 

2,732,369 

3,384,361 

2,486,385 

1,886,053 


739,024 
809,071 
551,108 
237,418 
1,989 
142,352 
155,410 
219,373 
382,092 
597,587 
448,506 
645,761 


• 26,522 

15,110 

1,761 

52,512 

"2,836 
41,097 
80,240 

'3,153 

29,822 

3,942 


•••••' 


1,515 

1,030 

201 

""69 

"*569 

"'495 
528 
333 




February 

March 




April 




]!i£ay 




June 




July 




August 




September 

October 




November 

December 




Totals 


483,944 


434,129 


15,761,234 


4,929,691 


266,995 


90,330 


4,740 


4,544 





Exports of Wheat and Flour from Portland and Astoria, Oregon 
TO THE United Kingdom. 



Wheat. 


1870-71. 
Centals. 


1871-2. 
Centals. 


1872-3. 
Centals. 


1873-4. 
Centals. 


1874-5. 
Centals. 


1875-6. 
Centals. 


1876-7. 
Centals. 


August 


11,468 
17,100 
14,340 
12,867 
13,414 
38,419 
13,599 
13,269 
14,102 
16,693 
23,622 


23*495 
71,262 
14,699 
38,621 
19,456 
34.721 
10,258 

30',238 


76*694 
102,747 
29,974 
61,259 
132,905 
71,978 
33,973 


68,386 
103,654 

32,765 
187,978 
101,139 
222,980 

64,976 
110,213 

39,407 

67,756 

' 9;75i 


77,817 
203,036 
250,069 
366,796 
101,799 

64,762 

51,801 
173,982 

28,604 

is^sso 


1(^*625 
310,933 
243,580 
263,366 
285.142 
172,924 
206,738 
137.211 
18,519 
17,704 




September 

October 


93,256 
96,048 


November 

December 

January 


398,997 
344,255 
276,003 


February 

March 

April 

May 


87,807 
127,299 


June 

July 




Total Centals... 


188,893 


242,750 


509,330 


1,009,005 


l,333,8f)6 


1,758,742 


1,423,665 


Flour, bbls 


195,624 


167,908 


145,293 


230,211 


205,109 


203,597 


127,647 


Total Flour & 
Wheat, bush. 


1,292,241 


1,244,123 


1.575,348 j 2.832,730 


3,248.705 


3,949,221 


3,011.010 



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Google 



Beceipts of Flour and Grain at Ban Francisco. 265' 
Eeceipts of Flour and Grain at San Francisco, 

For Crop Tears Jvly 1 to June 30. 



CROP YEARS. 


FLOUR, 
U Sacks, 
(25 lbs.) 


WHEAT, 
Centals. 


Oats, 

Centals. 


Barley, 
Centals. 


Beans, 
Sacks. 


1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 


152,509 

141,825 

274,216 

365,628 

455,115 

426,260 

638,353 

402,408 

538,941 

725.993 

1,202:995 

804,744 

893,400 

746,066 

494.051 

559,926 

889,116 

1,878,132 

1,847,380 

1,829,460 

2,057.192 

765,723 


340,030 
243,052 
4:^3,002 
985,026 
2,160,723 
1.361.218 
1,864,652 
1,846,118 
527,881 
2,207,158 
4.999,346 
5,031,966 
6,046,350 
6,172,635 
4,422,729 
2,391,666 
10,780,895 
7,829,821 
9,807,776 
6,597,288 
10,803,776 
2,753,769 


157,344 
186,039 
320,248 
216,898 
315,078 
351,633 
177,105 
304,044 
273,973 
343,042 
328,478 
221,811 
234,498 
299,143 
304,153 
358,531 
200,545 
243.400 
305:844 
233.960 
210,257 
102,107 


455,823 

637,568 

779,870 

549,293 

677,455 

611,227 

432,203 

611,143 

438,432 

1,037,209 

730,112 

638,920 

608.988 

752,418 

701,639 

792,198 

981.028 

1,127:390 

1,243,657 

1,142,154 

1,522,765 

557,248 


55,268 
65,076 
69,682 


1859-60 


38,714 


1860-61 


34,188 


1861-62 


58.294 


1862-63 


59,620 


1863-64 ... 


83,568 


1864-65 


47,822 


1865-66 


45,717 


1866-67 


50.678 


1867-68 


50,638 


1868-69 


53.711 


1869-70 


99,585 


1870-71 


85,618 


1871-72 


56,390 


1872-73 


70,048 


1673-74 


89,091 


1874 75 


113,577 


1875-76 


115,128 


1876-77 

1877 to Dec. 31 


117,860 
50,654 







Exports of Flour and Grain from San Francisco, 

F(yr Crop Yea/rs July 1 to June 30. 



CROP YEAJRS. 


Plour, 
Bbls. 


Wheat, 
Centals. 


Oats, 
Centals. 


BARLEY, 
Centals. 


Beans, 
Sacks. 


1856-57 


36,541 
5,387 
20,577 
58,926 
197,181 
101,652 
144,883 
152,633 
91,479 
279,554 
465,337 
423,189 
453,920 
352,962 
196,219 
270,079 
263,645 
644,710 
.482,551 
445,143 
524,885 
206,428 


22,257 

3,801 

123 

381,766 

1,529,924 

851,844 

1.043,652 

1,071.292 

25,369 

1,039,515 

3,636,190 

8,803,778 

4,374,524 

4,863,891 

3,571,846 

1,404.382 

9,822.688 

7,273,241 

8,793,354 

6,136,469 

10,513,104 

2,449,457 


8,370 

107,659 

218.647 

90,682 

116,467 

154,585 

39,896 

91,086 

3,366 

113,966 

89,331 

5,685 

21,934 

13,957 

' 13,227' 

11,707 

5,437 

27,640 

57,023 

3,101 

4,479 

1,947 


66.368 

142,612 

295,836 

69,246 

339.536 

188,617 

49,809 

40.329 

13,920 

349,990 

142,154 

31,347 

91,202 

300,522 

138.008 

16,708 

226,927 

243,758 

182,142 

204,186 

282,871 

77,839 


688 


1857-58 


6,721 

22,953 

8,300 

4,675 


1858-59 

1859-60 


1860-61 


1861-62 


11,789 


1862-63 

1863-64 


2,863 
21,619 


1864-65 


4:244 


1865-66 

1866-67 


6,662 
2,921 


1867-68 


12,917 


1868-69 


1,899 


1869-70 


7,890 


1870-71 


21,800 


•1871-72 


7,479 


187^-73 


5,997 


1873-74 


5,739 


1874-75 

1875-76 

1876-77 


8,156 
17,296 
10,512 

6,944 


1877 to Dec. 31 







Hosted by 



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266 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Impobts of Flour and Grain into the United States 
FROM ALL Foreign Countries, 

For the Tears 





1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


FloTir, bbls 


129.824 
649,111 


80,759 
561,459 


61,230 
375,065 


12.916 
267,146 


82,415 
199,101 


7 351 


Bread, lbs 


136,122 




"Wheat, bush 


168,591 
56,982 
463.939 
4,425:575 
168,591 
289,196 
296,089 


1,76'5,879 
. 56,824 
192,517 
4,092,554 
245,565 
295,839 
258,057 


997,0ri8 
68.159 

353.181 
6,746,564 

287,548 

958,513 
- 140,332 


558,123 

47.431 

1,401,302 

9,010,100 

203,2:^9 

651,617 

203,914 


1,412,255 

40,064 

30,202 

7,930,241 

191,261 

793,870 

349,140 


829,191 

17,128 

49,046 

6,511,597 

267,162 

670,238 

346,635 


Com, bush 


Oats, bush 


Barley, bush 


Rye, bush 


Peas, bush 


Barley Malt, bush 


Total Grain, bush.. 


5,868,963 


6,908,235 . 


9,551,365 


12,075,726 


10,747,033 


8,690,997 



E;eports of Flour and Grain, the product op other countries, 

From all United States Ports to all Foreign Countries, 

For the Years 





1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, bbls 


41,000 


20,590 
200 


36,678 
150 


3,900 
95 


10,201 
334 


38,811 


Bread, lbs 






Wheat, bush 


496,294 

201,361 
115,408 


275,058 

* i8;939 
204,312 
95,598 


798,092 

' " '265 

254;779 

487,246 

2,008 


408,607 

'i;266 

259;422 
424,122 


1,460,208 

"14,375 

25.354 

234;567 

613,179 


582,141 


Com, bush 


Oats, bush 

Barley, bush 


23,933 
289 436 


Rye, bush 

Peas, bush . . . 


124,018 
3(J2,427 


Barley Malt, bush.... 


Total Grain, bush.. 


813,003 


593,907 


1,542,390 


1,093,351 


2,347,683 


1,321,955 



Exports of Flour and Grain from all United States Ports to 

ALL Foreign Countries, 

For the Tears 





1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, Wheat, bbls. .. 

Flour, Rye, bbls 

Corn Meal, bbls 

Bread, lbs 


2,298,217 

7,586 

387,751 

11,550,002 

28,509,405 

45.018,033 

382,349 

369,125 

646,023 


3,201,974 

38,498 

397,252 

10,703,365 


4,182,818 

30,575 

334,130 

12,008,064 


3,898,487 

8,641 

318,348 

11,906,001 


3,975.188 

7.309 

357,8i35 

11,958,185 


3,070,624 

8,138 

474,770 

12,485,671 




Wheat, bush. 


56,287.483 

30,586,077 

9-26.613 

450; 077 

1,107.486 


64,164,7.50 

32,326,421 

649,884 

111,121 

822,265 


51,918,999 

28,959,725 

392,186 

209,147 

160,407 


52,697,399 
67.339,756 

3,767,842 
381,885 

1,772,719 


48,626,672 

72.639,176 

1,648,571 

3 223 «)n7 


Com, bush 


Oats bush 


Barley, bush ......... 


Rye, bush 


2,455,988 




Total Grain, bush.. 
Flour and Meal to bush 


74.924,935 89.357.736 
13,000,019 17,791,298 


98,074.441 1 81.640.464 
22,403,485 \ 20,809,032 


125,959,601 
21,343,825 


128,594,314 
17,292,890 


Grand Total, Grain. . . 


87,'.i24,954 107,149,034 ;120,477,926 102,449,496 


147,303,420 


145,887,204 



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Exports of Wheat and Flour, 



267 



Exports of Wheat and Flour from all United States Ports, with 
VAiiUEs Thereof, 
From 1825 to 1877. 



Five Years Ende^g ju2?e 30. 


WHEAT. 


flour. 


Wheat, 

including 

Flour reduced. 


Per cent, of 
Flour in the 
total quan- 
tity. 


1830 


Bushels. 

125,547 

614.145 

1,842,841 

2,946.861 

10,184.645 

16,446.i)55 

38,808.573 

138,306.907 

81.808,364 

224,019,376 


Barrels. 
4.651,^^40 
5,241.964 
4.092,932 
6.274.697 
12,884,828 
13,149,518 
15,778.268 
" 19,757,733 
11.4.->4,785 
16,797,684 


Bushels. 
2:1385,247 
, 26,823,965 
22,;507,501 
34,320.346 
71,608,785 
82,194,545 
117,699.913 
237,095,572 
139.082,289 
308,007,796 


99.46 


1835 


97 2 


1840 


91.7 


1845 . 


91 1 


1850 

1855 


85.77 
79.9 


1860 


67. 


1865 


42.09 


187U 


4f.2 


1875 


27.2 






Total for fifty years 

1875-76 


515,104,214 
55,073.122 
40,32,5.611 


109,484,349 
3,^35,512 
3,34:^.665 


1,062.625.959 
74,750,682 
57,043,936 


51.5 
26.32 


1876-77 


29.30 



The declared value of these exports was as follows : 



Five Years 
Ending 
June 30. 


WHEAT. 


FLOUR. 


Wheat and Flour, 
Reduced. 




Aggregate 
value. 


Average 
value per 
bushel. 


Aggregate 
value. 


Average 

value per 

barrel. 


Aggregate 
value 


Average 

value per 

bushel. 




1830 

1835 

1840 

1845 . 

1850 

1855 

1860 

1865 


fll2,754 

737,365 

1,817,067 

2,900,785 

12.801,093 

21,864,762 

53,343,918 

178,470,444 

117,527,424 

296,510,060 


$0 89.8 . 
1 20 
98.6 
98.4 
1 25.7 
1 32.9 
1 37.4 
1 29 
1 43.7 
1 32.2 


$24,708,090 
29,347,649 
27,231,952 
31,056,156 
69,375,741 
75,775,220 

104.36:-5,446 

133,356,875 
92,071,717 

114,401,066 


$5 311 

5 59 9 

6 65.3 

4 94.9 

5 647 

5 76.2 

6 615 
6 74.8 
8 03.9 
6 86.9 


$24,830,844 
30,085,014 
29,049,019 
33,9561)41 
82,176,834 
97,639,982 
157,712,364 
311,827,319 
209,599,141 
410,JM1,126 


$1 061 
1 13.7 
1 30.2 
98.8 
1 18.8 
1 18.8 
1 34 
1 31.6 
1 50 8 
1 33.2 


99.5 

97.55 

93.7 

91.5 

84.4 

77.6 

66.2 

42.8 


1870 

1875 


43.9 

27.8 


Total for ) 
50 years. ) 

1875-76 

1876-77 .... 


686,115,672 

68,382,899 
47,135,562 


1 33.1 

1 24.1 
1 16.9 


701,692,912 

24,433.470 
21,663,947 


6 40.9 

6 20.8 
6 47 8 


1,387,808,584 

92,816,369 
68,799,509 


1 30.6 

1 24.2 

1 20 6 


50.6^ 

26.32 
29.30 



Exports op Corn and Corn Meal from all United States Ports, 
WITH Values Thereof, 





Frmi 1825 to 1877 










CORN. 


CORN MEAL. 


Five Years Ending 
JUNE 30. 


Bushels. 


Aggregate 
value. 


, Average 

value per 

bu.shpl. 


Barrels, 


Aggregate 
value. 


Average 
value per 
barrel. 


1830. 


3,530,710 

2,568,946 

1,184,9T3 

3,474,109 

43,822,153 

23,905,1% 

27,597,896 

52,612,023 

47,993,276 

146,162,915 


$2,019,926 

1,801,711 

873,104 

1,755,602 

31,277,i»23 

17,712,6i)9 

19,789,181 

34,90:i,3«:5 

47,143,817 

104,46 1,944 


$0 57.5 
70.1 
73.7 
50.5 
71.1 
74.1 
71.7 
66 3 
98.2 
71.5 


783.408 
817,383 
843,930 
1,132,749 
2,493,700 
1,121,456 
1,291,342 
1,176.637 
1,355,024 
1,604,05:^ 


$2,404,371 
2,731,077 
2,471,215 
2,0 .7,021 
8,984,252 
4,147,:-]13 
4,917,515 
5,323,270 
7,:345,'1'18 
6,461,588 


$3 07 


1835 

1840 


3 S4.1 

4 113 


1845 

1850 


2 63.1 

3 60.3 


1855 

1660 


3 69.8 
3 80.8 


1865 


4 52.4 


1870 


5 42 


1875 


4 02.8 






' Total for 50 years. - 
1875-76 


352,842,202 
4.),493,572 
70,860,983 


261,742 269 
3:^,265,280 
41,621.245 


74.2 
67 2 
58.7 


12,619,652 
354,240 
447,907 


48,853,075 
l,:m-),0i7 
1.511.152 


3 87 
8 59.9 


1876-77 


3 37.4 



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268 



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Freights from Chicago. 



273 



LAKE (SAIL) AND CANAL FEEIGHTS. 

Chicago to New York, via Buffalo. 

For the Season of Namgation in 1877. 



WEEK 


TO BUFFALO. 


TO KINGSTON. 


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'' 21 




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— @5 


— ©53^ 


- ©4K 


'* 28 




3 @4 













August 4 




3 @33^ 








- ©6^ 


— ©5^ 


- 11 




3^@3X 










— ©6X 


" 18 


4K@4k 


3X@4 






- ®6k 




— ©6X 


" 25 




3 @4 


- @3ir 


- @9 


— @7 


- m% 


— ©7 


September 1 


~ '(mi 


2X@3 


- @2K 


- @'J'3^ 


63€@6)5r 


— ©'TK 


— ©7 


8.... 


SM®m 


2M@3 




- @1X 


- @6^ 


- @QK 


— ©6 


15.... 


3K@4 


3 @3)^ 


- ©23^ 


7>^@8 


- @'rM 


- ©6M 


— ©6 


22.... 




3M@4 


3 @^U 


8>^@9 


8%@8>^ 


- @6M 


— ©6 


29.... 


- @^y. 


— @43^ 


- @33^ 




— ©73^ 


- ©65^ 


— ©6 


October 6 


- @5X 


4X@5 


3>4^@3X 


8ii@9 


- ©7% 


— ©10 


— ©9 


13 


5^@6 


5 @5X 


— @4 


9 @10 




— ©12 


- ©9>sr 


20 


5 @5^ 


— @4>^ 





— @9 




— ©12 


— ©9>5^ 


27 


- m 


— @BM 









9^@10 


- ©8X 


November 3 


- mu 


3^@33^ 








9i<r©10 


- ®8j4 


10 


4 mu 


3><^@3^8 








9K@10 


- @S)4 


17 


- @5 


— @43^ 








9M©10 


- @By, 


« 24 


— @4X 


- @4 








9K@10 


- ©8X 



Mekchant Shipping of the Wokld in 1876. 

{From the London Economisfs Oommerdal History and Review y 1877.) 



COUNTRIES. 



British 

United States 

Norwegian 

Italian 

German 

French 

Spanish 

Greek 

Dutch 

Swedish 

Russian 

Austrian 

Danish . i 

Portuguese 

South American 

Central American 

Turkish and Egyptian 

Belgian 

Asiatic 

Siberian 



Sailing 
Vessels. 



20,265 

7,288 

4,749 

4,601 

3.456 

3,858 

2,915 

2,121 

1,432 

2,121 

1,785 

983 

1,348 

456 

273 

153 

305 

54 

42 



Toimage. 



5,807,365 

2,390,521 

1,410,903 

1,292,076 

875,995 

725,048 

557,320 

426,905 

399;993 

399,128 

391,952 

338,684 

188,953 

107,016 

95,459 

57,944 

48,289 

23,344 

16,019 

454 



Steam 
Vessels. 



5,299 

605 

122 

114 

226 

314 

230 

11 

126 

219 

151 

78 

87 

26 

81 

6 

30 

35 

11 



Tonnage. 



3,362,992 

789,728 

55,874 

97,582 

226,888 

334.334 

176,250 

7,133 

134,600 

88,660 

105,962 

81,269 

60,697 

22,277 

59,263 

3,132 

28,264 

40,700 

10,877 



Total 
Tonnage. 



9,170,357 

3,180,249 

1,466,777 

1,389,658 

1,102,853 

1,059,382 

733,570 

434,038 

534,593 

487,788 

497,914 

419,953 

249,650 

129,293 

154,722 

61,076 

76,553 

64,044 

26,996 

454 



19 



Hosted by 



Google 



274 New York Produce Exchange, 

OCEAN FEEIGHTS FEOM NEW TOEK FOE 1877. 

As furnished by Messrs. Ca/rey <fe Tale, of New York City. 



FLOUR. 

Per barrel. 



AS PEE 




TO Liverpool. 


TO LONDON. 


1 


To Bristol. 


pi 

1 


CIRCU- 












^ 






liAR 


i 

1^ 










g 






O 
H 


DATED 




















Steam. 


Sail. 


Steam. 


San. 


Steam. 


Steam. 


Sail. 


a 
1 






8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 




Jan, 6.. 


DuU. 


36 


2 9 


30 


2 73^ 


36 


29 


2 9 




" 12.. 


do. 


3 6 


2 9 


3 


2 6 


3 3 


.... 


2 9 




" 19.. 


do. 


30 


2 9 


23 


2 


33 




2 6 




" 26.. 


do. 


26 


2 6 


26 


2 


26 


3*6 


2 6 




Feb. 2.. 


do. 


2 6 




2 


2 


26 




2 6 




" 9.. 


do. 


26 




20 


1 6 


26 


2*6* 


2 6 




« 16.. 


do. 


26 


2 "6 


2 6 


1 9 


26 


2 6 


2 6 




" 23.. 


do. 


26 


2 6 


20 


1 9 


26 


26 


2 




March 2.. 


do. 






2 


1 9 


26 


20 


2 




" 9.. 


do. 






2 


1 6 


26 




2 




" 16.. 


do. 


2 


i"9 


20 


1 6 


26 




2 


. .. . 


" 23.. 


do. 


20 


1 9 


2 


1 6 


26 




2 6 




" 30.. 


do. 


2 




2 


1 6 


26 


2*6* 


2 




AprU 6.. 


do. 


2 




20 


1 6 


26 


2 6 


2 




'* 13.. 


do. 


2 


.... 


2 


4 6 


20 


26 


2 




*' 20.. 


do. 




.... 


20 


1 9 


20 


26 






*' 27.. 


Firm. 






2 


1 9 


26 








May 4.. 


Steady. 




2**0 


2 9 


2 


29 








" 11.. 


Quiet. 




2 


29 


2 


29 


3*0* 






" 18.. 


Steady. 




2 




2 


29 


2 6 






" 25. . 


do. 




2 




2 


26 


26 




.... 


June 1 . . 


do. 




2 




2 


26 


2 6 






" 8.. 


do. 




2 




2 


26 


33 






" 15.. 


Quiet. 


2 3 


2 




1 9 


20 








«( 22 


do. 


, 20 


2 




1 9 


20 








" 29.*.* 


do. 


2 


2 




1 9 


20 


2*6* 






July 6.. 


do. 


20 


2 




1 6 


20 


2 






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do. 


20 


1 9@-) 


2*6* 


1 6 


20 


20 






*• 20.! 


do. 


23 


1 9@2 


2 6 


2 


2 6 


2 4X 






" 27.. 


do. 


23 


2 


2 3 


2 


20 


26 






Aug. 3. . 


Steady. 


2 3 


2 


2 3 


2 3 


2 


2 6 






" 10.. 


do. 


2 6 


2 3 


2 6 


2 6 


26 


3 






** 17.. 


do. 


3 


2 6 


30 


2 6 


3 0@3 3 


33 


2**9 




" 24.. 


Firm. 


39 


2 6 


36 




40 


3 9 


2 9 


. . . . 


" 31.. 


Steady. 


40 


3 


36 


3"6 


40 


4 


3 




Sept. 7.. 


Quiet. 


36 


3 


3 6 


3 


4 


40 


3 




" 14.. 


Steady. 


36 


3 


36 


3 


40 


3 9 






" 21.. 


do. 


36 


3 


3 3 


3 


40 


4 


3*3 




" 28.. 


do. 


3 6 


2 9 


3 3 


3 


40 


3 9 


3 3 




Oct. 5. . 


do. 


36 


2 9 


33 


3 


39 


3 9 






" 12.. 


Quiet. 


36 


2 9 


3 


3 


3 9 


3 6 






" 19.. 


Strong. 


3 6 


2 9 


3 


2 9 


39 


3 6 






" 26.. 


Steady. 


39 


2 9 


3 6 


2 9 


40 


36 






Nov. 2.. 


do. 


40 


2 6 


3 6 


2 6 


4 


36 


.'' .. 




*' 9.. 


Quiet. 


30 


2 6 


2 9 


2 3 


39 


3 






" 16. . 


do. 


26 


2 


2 9 


2 3 


36 


3 






" 23.. 


do. 


30 


2 0@2 3 


29 


2 4.% 


36 


3 


2**3 




'* 30.. 


do. 


33 


2 6 


3 


2 6 


3 9 


3 


2 43^ 




D«c. 7.. 


do. 


33 


2 6 


2 9 


2 6 


3 9 


29 


2 IM 




" 14.. 


do. 


3 3 


2 6 


26 


2 6 


3 9 


3 3 


2 3 




« 21.. 


do. 


39 




26 


2 6 


3 9@4 


33 


2 6 




" 28.. 


Steady. 


3 9 


2**9 


2 9 


2 t}i 


39 


3 0@3 3 







Hosted by 



Google 



Ocean Freights from New York. 



275 



Ocean Freights from New York for ISlflf— (Continued,) 
As furnished hy Messrs. Carey <& Yale, of New York City. ' 



WHEAT. 

Per bushel. 



tf 

d 










^ 


hi 




TO 


TO 


i 


t3 


TO 


To 


1 


3 
w 


To Cork. 


Direct 


Penarth 


£ 


§ Q 


Liverpool. 


London. 






Port. 


Roads. 


< 


^ H 










o 


c 








o 


P3 <t 










H 


H 








H 


1 


•1 


1 




as 


1 


Per qr. 


Per qr. 


Per qr. 


1 




M 


CQ 


M 


tjj 


CQ 


m 








CQ 




d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


s. d. 8. d. 


s.d. s. d. 


s.d. s.d. 


d. 


Jan. 5. 


7 


•T)^ 


8 


8 


T)^ 




6 6 @6 9 


6 3 @6 6 


63 


.... 


" VZ. 


7 


7 


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7 


6>< 




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5 9 @6 3 


6 




" 19. 


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7 


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7 


6 




5 6 @6 


5 3 @5 9 


5 6@5 9 


.... 


" 26. 


6 


7 


7 


7 


^Y 




5 6 @6 


5 3 @5 9 


5 6@5 9 




Feb. 2. 


4X 




6 


6 


^Y 




50 


4 6 @4 9 


4 9 


.... 


" 9, 


5>^ 




5/^ 




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5 (a5 3 


4 6 @5 


49 


... . 


" 16. 


5 


5** 


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6>^ 


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4 6 @5 


4 9 


.... 


" 23. 


4^ 


5 


4^ 




4 


e3< 


4 9 @5 3 


4 6 @5 


4 9 




Mch. 2. 


43<r 


.... 


6 


.... 


5 




4 9 @5 3 


4 6 @5 


4 9 




" 9. 


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4 6 


. ... 


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4 6 




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4 


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5 


AX 




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43 




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4 


^Vi 


6 


5 


4X 




4 6 @5 


4 3 @4 9 


4 3@4 6 




Ap'l 6. 


4 


4 


6 


5% 


6 




4 6 


4 @4 3 


4 0@4 3 




•' 13. 


6 


6 


f^y 


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4 3 @4 6 


4 3@4 6 


.... 


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5 


... 


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8 


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5 6 @5 9 


56 


. .. . 


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6 




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'ly 


7 




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5 9 @6 


5 9 


. . .. 


" 11. 


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4Y 




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5 6 @5 9 


56 




" 18. 


6 


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5 




5 6 @5 9 


5 3 @5 6 


5 3 




" 25. 


7 


6 


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63^ 


7 




56 


5 @5 3 


4 9@5 




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6 


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6X 


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5 l>s^@5 4>^ 


4 10^@5 lY 




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5 


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6 


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4 9@5 




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4 


4 


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5 




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4 9 




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43€ 


4 


6 


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4 3 @4 6 


4 3 




" 29. 


5 


4 


6 


5^ 


5 


6 


46 


4 @4 3 


40 


.... 


July 6. 


4% 


4 




5 


4X 


5% 


4 3 @4 6 


4 @4 3 


40 


.... 


*' 13. 


5 


4 


'6*' 


5 


5 


5X 


46 


4 3 


43 


.... 


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6 




6 


5>^ 


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53 


4 9 @5 


4 9@5 




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6 


4><^ 


4 


7 


53 


4 9 @5 


50 


.... 


Aug. 3. 


6 




6 


^Vz 


4^ 


7 


59 


5 3 @5 6 


5 3@5 6 


.... 


- 10. 


8M 


i* 


9 


7 


6 


9X 


5 9 @6 


^AY®^ 9 


5 43^@5 6 


.... 


*' 17. 


8 


7 


^Vz 


7M 


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6 6 @6 9 


6 @6 3 


6 0@6 IX 


.... 


"24. 


11 


10 


11 




10 


'9X 


6 9 @7 


6 3 @6 6 


63 




" 31. 


ll^lT 


9 


11 


'^Yz 


10 




7 1^@7 3 


6 6 @6 9 


6 6@6 9 


.... 


Sep. 7. 


10 


9 


9 


9 


9 


'^Y 


7 @7 3 


6 6 @6 9 


69 


.... 


" 14. 


10>sr 


^y. 


10^ 


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9Y 


12 


6 9 @7 1>^ 


6 6 @6 9 


69 


.... 


'' 21. 


9 


9 


10 


9 


9 


11 


7 6 @7 9 


7 3 @7 6 


7 




"28. 


9 


9 


103<r 


9^ 


9 


10>cr 


7 3 @7 6 


7 @7 3 


7 




Oct. 5. 


SM 


m 


9 


9 


9 


io>5r 


7 @7 3 


6 9 @7 


6 9@7 




« 12. 


9K 


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9 


9 


9 


10>5^ 


6 9 ^IIY 


6 6 @6 9 


69 


.... 


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^H 


9 


^Y 


10 


lOX 


7 3 @7 6 


6 10>^@7 l)<r 


7 




" 26. 


lOK 


8K 


9 


m 


103^ 


11 


6 6 @7 3 


6 6 @7 


6 9@7 




Nov. 2. 


9H 


8H 


^Vz 


8H 


10 


103^ 


6 6 @7 


6 6 @6 9 


6 6@6 9 




" 9. 


SM 


8K 


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8K 


9 


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6 6 @7 


6 6 @6 9 


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« 16. 


8 


8 


SM 


8 


8 


10 


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6 3 @6 6 


6 3(^6 6 




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sx 


8 


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6 3 ®&AY 


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60 




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8 


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9 


9 


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60 




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7 


9 


8 


83^ 


9 


6 @6 3 


5 9 @6 


6 


.... 


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8 


7>ir 


8>cr 


7>sr 


SY 


9 


6 


5 6 @5 9 


59 




** 21. 


8>ir 


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8^ 


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9 


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5 9 




" 28. 


9y^ 


83^ 


9¥ 


8 


SY 




6 @6 3 


5 9 @6 


5 9@6 


.... 



Hosted by 



Google 



276 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Ocean Fbeights from New York for 1877, 

f Messrs. Carey & Yale, of New York City. 



CORN. 

Per Bushel. 













i 






i 












S 




PQ 


> 




To LIVERPOOL. 


To LONDON. 




To Bristol. 




^ 


AS PER 















tq 


<5 


circut^ar 

DATED. 










8 




e 


g' 




Steam. 


Sail. 


Steam. 


Sail 


steam. 


Steam. 


Sail 


Steam. 


1 




d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


d. 


Januarv 5 


6^ 


7 


lyz 


8 


7 






.... 




" 12 


QX 


7 


1 


7 


63€ 










" 19 


6K 


7 


7 


7 


5)^ 










♦' 26 


6 


6^ 


6^ 


6)^ 


4^ 










February 2 


4K 




6 


6 


43^ 










" 9.... 


5^ 


.... 


5^ 




^Xz 


'ey 








" 16.-.. 


5 


5 


6 


e" 


5X 


^H 








" 23... 


4^ 


5 


4?^ 




4 


ex 








March 2 


4^ 




6 


. '. . . 


5 




. . . > 






" 9 


5H 




^y 


5* 


5>^ 










" 16 


4^ 


'^)i 


^}i 


5 












" 23 


4 


^M 


6 


6 


'4X 










" 30 


4 


4^ 


6 


5 


4X 










Apriie 


4 


4 


6 


5% 


6 










" 13 


6 


6 


m 


5)., 


i 






.... 




"20 


5K 


5 


7 


6>sr 










" 27 


8 


QXz 


8 


6X 


'3'>^ 










May4 


6 




4^ 


?« 


7 










"11 


5K 


. 


4H 











"18 


6 

ex 


6 
6 
6 


*7" 


6 
6 


5 

7 











"25 


Jnne 1 *. . 


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5 


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" 15 


4 


4 


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5 










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4 


6 


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43^ 


7 








" 29. . 


5 


4 


6 


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5 


6 








July6 


4 


4 




5 


4 


5% 








*' 13 


5% 


.... 


'e" 


5 


5 


6>4 








"20 


5^ 




6 


5 


5X 


^X 








"27 ,. 


5^ 


.... 


6 


4X 


4 


GX 








Augusts 


6 




6 




43<^ 


7 








" 10 


8 


'7" 


9 


7" 


6 


9 








" 17 


8 


7 


9 


'J'><^ 


7 


.... 








" 24 ... 


11 


10 


11 




10 


9X 








" 31 


11 


9 


11 


*9>^ 


10 










September 7. . . 


10 


9 


9 . 


9 


9 


*9^ 








" 14... 


9^ 


9>^ 


10 


9 


9 


12 








" 21... 


9 


9 


10 


9 


9 


11 








" 28... 


9 


9 


10^ 


^% 


9 


lOX 








Octobers 


8^ 


sy. 


9 


9 


9 


lOX 








'• 12 


9K 


8^ 


9 


9 


9 


^ox 








" 19 


10 


9p 


9 


8>^ 


10 


10^ 








" 26 


103^ 




9 


8>^ 


103^ 


11 








November 2. . . 


SM 


B}^ ■ 


BK 


8^=^ 


10 


103<^ 








9... 


^Yz 


SM 


m 


83»r 


8>; 


10 








16... 






m 


8i€ 




10 








23... 


'8H 


'sli 


8^ 


83^ 


«... 


10 








" 30... 


8 


'^Vz 


9 




8 


9 








December? 


7 


7 


9 


8" 


8 


9 


*& 






*' 14.... 


8 


7^ 


8^ 


7>5r 


8 


9 


8 






" 21.... 


8 


7>^ 


8^ 


7>5^ 


8 


9 


SX 






" 28.... 


9 


8>r 


9X 


8 . 


8 












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Ocean Freights from Philadelphia, 



277 



Ocean Freights from Philadelphia 
ON Flour and Grain, 

Far the Year 1877. 



WEEK ENDING 



January 5 . . 

'' 12.. 

" 19.. 

'^ 26 . 

February IsJ . . 

9.. 

" 16.. 

." iJS.., 

March 2 

9.... 
" 16... 
'■ 23... 
" 80.... 

April 6 

'' 13 

" 20... . 

'' 27 

May 4 

'• 11 

" 18 

" 25 

June 1 

*' 8 

'• 15 

" 22 

" 29 

July 6 

'• 13 

" 2U...N . 

" 27 

August 4 . . 

'• 11'... 

" 17.... 

'• 24.... 

" 31 ... 

September 7 

14 

21 

28 

Octobers.. , . 

•• 12.... 

•' 19.... 

" 26.... 

November 2 

9 

16 

23 

30 

December 7 

14 

21 



TO Liverpool. 



Steam. 



Flour, per Bbl. 



s. d. 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



3 0@3 6 
3 0@3 6 
3 3@3 6 
3 3@3 6 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3"6 
3 
3 
3 
3 



3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 U 

3 U 

3 

3 

3 6 

3 6 



G-rain, per Bush. 



d. 

10 

9 



6;^® 7 

5^ 
b^@ 6 

6y,@ 6 

6 

'5" 

4 @ 4i*^ 
4 @ 4X 

7 

8 @ 8><^ 
8 @ ^)i 
QVi® 7 
QVz® 7 
6>4@ 7 

6 

6 

5 

5 

5 

5 



11 
11 
11 

ii" 

11 

11 

10 ®\m 
10 @io;^ 
10 (^10 3< 

10 i^lOVi 

10 @10>cf 

9>^ 

9^ 
10 @11 
10 @11 



Cork, for Orders. 



SaU. 



Grain, per Qr. 



5 9 



s. d. 

6 6 

6 6 

6 
@ 6 

5 9 

5 6 
@ 5 3 
@ 5 3 
3 @ 5 6 

5 3 



4 9 @ 5 

4 9 @ 4 10^ 

4 10>^@ 5 



4 
5 
5 
6 

5 3 



® 6 
@ 6 

; 

@ 5 
5 
9 @ 5 
6 @ 4 
4 3 
4 
4 
3 9 



6 

6 
9 @ 6 
~ - 6 6 

7 3 

_ 7 3 

@ 7 3 

(f^ 7 3 

@ 7 3 

7 3 

_ 7 

7 

6 6 @ 6 9 

6 6 @ 6 9 

6 6 @ 6 9 

~ 6 @ 6 9 
"-^66 

_ 6 3 

® 6 3 
5 9 

5 6 

6 
6 



6 3 
6 
6 



Direct Ports, TT. K. 



Grain, i)er Qr. 



@ 5 3 



d. 8. d 

9 @6 

5 9 

5 6 

3 @ 5 6 

5 3 

@ 5 

6 @ 4 

6 @ 4 9 

5 

5 

3'*® 4 6 
3 ® 4 6 
4 6 



4 3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



4 6 



9 

9 



6 ® 4 9 

4 6 

4 3 

3 9 @ 4 

3 6 @ 3 9 

3 6 @ 3 9 

3 6 

5**0 

5 9 
5 6 

5 6 

6 



6 9 
6 9 
6 6 



5 3 



7 
7 
6 9 
6 @ 6 9 
6 @ 6 9 
6 @ 6 9 
6 3 

6 @ 6 9 
6 3 
6 3 

@ 6 3 
@ 6 3 
5 9 
5 9 
9 

^ 5 
3 
9 
9 



6 



Hosted by 



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278 



New York Produce Exchange. 



OCEAN FEEIGHTS FKOM BALTIMOEE, 

For the year 1877. 
Lowest and Highest Rates— Weekly. 



FOB 

WEEK 


To 
Liverpool. 


To Cork, 
For orders. 


To Direct 
PORTS, U. K. 


Bremen & 
Antwerp. 


To 
Continent. 


To Baltic. 


Steam. 


Sail. 


Sail. 


Sail. 




Grain per 
Bush. 


Grain per 
Quarter. 


Grain per 
Quarter. 


Petroleum per bbl. 


January 5.. 

" 13.. 

19.. 


d. d. 
11 @11X 

11 

10^ 

10 @10>5r 

T>^@8 

Y^ 

8K®9 

SH 

7 

6 

6 
5^@6 
4^@5 

4M 

9 
9X 

9 @m 
9>sr@io^ 

11 @ll>s^ 

10>5r 

10 

10 
9^ 
9X 

9y, 

9>^ 

10 @10>sr 
lOi^ 
9^ 

9 @9M 
9 @9>^ 

9X 
10 @10>^ 

12 @12>5^ 


B. d. 

66 

60 

66 

6 3 

60 

5 10>^ 

56 

50 


8. d. 


8.d. 

50 
50 

4 6@4 9 

'*3'9'*' 

3 9 
37 

"h'h"' 

36 
36 
36 

4 0)^ 

2 10^5^ 

3 113^ 
43 
39 

3 9 

4 OX 
40 

3 9 
39 
3 8% 

••4*6*'* 
3 7)^ 
3 7X 
3 11 

3 11X 
39 

"44" 

"43^' 

4 5M 
4 6X 
46 

"4*6**" 

49 

4 7X 

46 

46 

4 6 
4 3@4 9 

46 
40^(|4 7X 

'*4'3 " 


s d. 
"'4'9" 

"3*6" 

"s'iox 
"*4 e" 

"*6'3"' 
53 

*"56'" 
50 
4 9 
49 


p. d. 


" *26.. 
February *2. 


6 1>^ 




" *9.. 
" *16 . . 






" *23.. 




4 9 


March *2... 






" *9.... 
*' *16.... 


5 11^. 
57 
5 6K 
5 53=^ 
53 
4 9 
5 94 5 

5 8 4-7 

6 5 5-6 
5 9 9-11 

57 
53 

5 1 3-10 

53 
4 10>j^ 
4 4 6-7 
4 5^ 
45 

4 IX 

5 3^3 
53 

5 S^ 

5 9 

6 9 5-16 

69 

6 10 
6 81-6 

68 
72 
6 10 
6 9 3-7 
69 
6 0% 
6 9 @7 3 
6 6 @6 9 
6 6 @7 6 
6 @6 3 
6 @6 3 
6 @6 3 
5 9 @6 

5 9 @6 

6 @6 3 


5 4>c^ 


50 


« ♦23.... 

" *30.... 

April 6 

;; 13 

" ^!'.!!!'. 

May 4 

" »11 


5 OX 
5 0J^ 

5 11-7 
4 6 
53 
52 

6 3 


*"4*6" 

46 

'**5'4X 
5 3 


" 18 




" 25 




5 3 


June *1 






" 8 

" 15 

" 22 

"*29 

July *6 

- 13 

" 20 

" 27 


4 11^ 

3 6 
3 9 


50 
5 3 
49 
4 9 
4 9 
4 7X 
46 
4 6 


August 3.... 
" *10.... 
" 17.... 
" 24.... 


5 
51 
5 1H 


5 3 

"six" 

6 3 


" 31.... 

September 7. 

14. 

21. 

" 28. 


6 3 
69 

68 


'"h's" 


October *5.. 

" *12. . 

" *19.. 

'* *26. . 

November *2 

*9. 

" 16. 


6 7 

6 3 

6 3 

67 
6 @7 
6 @6 9 




" 23. 

30. 

December 7. 

" 14, 

" 21. 

28. 


*5*9 @6'6 

66 

59 
5 9 @6 1 
5 6 @6 





* In Ship's bags to Liverpool. 



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Ocean freights from Montreal. 



279 



OCEAN FREIGHTS FROM MONTREAL, 

Vcr the year 1877. Lowest and highest rates, weekly. 





To LONDON. 


To Liverpool. 


To GLASGOW. 


To Cork, 
For orders. 


FOR 
WEEK 


Steamer 
and Iron 


steamer & Iron Clippers. 


Steamer & Iron Clippers. 


Vessels. 


ENDING 


Clippers. 










Heavy Grain 
per 480 lbs. 


Heavy Grain 
per 480 lbs. 


Flour, 
per bbl. 


Heavy Grain 
per 480 lbs. 


Flour, 
per bbl. 


Heavy Grain 
per 480 lbs. 


January 5 

" 12 

" 19 

'' 26 


s. d. 


8. d. 
7 6 
7 6 
7 6 
7 6 


8. d. 
46 
46 
46 
46 


8. d. s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. s. d. 


February 2 

9... 
" 16.... 
" 23... 




7 6 
7 6 
63 
63 


4 6 
46 
4 
4 









March 2 

" 9 

" le 

" 23 

" 30 




6 3 
6 3 
63 
6 3 
6 3 


4 
4 
4 
40 
40 








April 6 

•' 13 

" 20 

*• 27 




63 
6 3 


40 
40 




:::::::: 




May 4 

" 11 

" 18 

*' 25 




3*9@4'0 
3 9@4 




3"9@4'6 
3 9(^4 






Junel 

" 8 

" 15 

'' 22 

" 29 




3 9@4 

4 0@4 6 
3 9@4 
3 6@4 6 
3 30^4 




3 9@4 

4 0@4 6 
3 9@4 
3^6@4 6 
3 3®4 




'..::.: 


julv 6 




2 6@3 3 

2 6@3 3 

3 9@4 3 

4 3@4 9 

4 6@5 
4 6@5 3 
4 3@5 3 
4 0@5 9 
4 9(^5 3 




2 6@3 3 

2 6@3 3 

3 9@4 3 

4 3@4 9 

4 6@5 
4 6@5 3 
4 3@5 3 
4 0@5 9 
4 9@5 3 






-13...;::::: 




♦* jiO 




" 27 





August 3 

'* 10 

" 17 

" 24 

" 31 










September 1 ... 

14... 

" 21 ... 

'* 38... 




6 6@7G 

7 0@7 6 
7 0@7 6 
7 9@8 3 




6 6@7 

7 0@7 6 

7 0@7 6 " 
7 9@8 3 




7 6@7 9 


October 5 

" 12 

" 19 

" 26 




8 3@8 6 
8 6@8 9 

8 3 
7 6@8 


3 6@3 9 

3 9@4 
3 9(^4 


'"s's" 


*'"4"6** 
4 3@4 6 




November 2 . . . . 

9.... 

" 16.... 




8 0@8 6 


3 9@4 
■'4*6'* 









^' 23.... 
" 30.... 







Hosted by 



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280 



l^ew Tork Produce Exchange. 



Pbices of Extra Common State Flour at New York, 

F(yr the Year 1877- 



DAY. 



January. February. March. 



May. 



JU2v^. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14. 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

Range. 



5 75@5 85 
5 80@5 90 
5 80@5 95 
5 80@6 00 
5 80@6 00 



5 80?76 00 
5 80@6 00 
5 85@6 00 
5 85@6 00 
5 95@6 10 
5 95@6 10 



6 00@6 25 
6 00@6 25 
6 00@6 25 
6 00@6 25 
6 00@6 35 
6 00@6 35 



6 10@6 35 
6 10@6 35 
6 10@6 35 
6 10@6 35 
6 05@6 30 



5 90@0 25 
5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 



5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 



5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 10 
5 75@6 15 



5 75@6 15 
5 85@6 15 
5 90@6 25 

5 90@6 25 

6 00@6 35 
6 00@6 35 



6 00@6 40 



6 00@6 35 



5 90@6 30 
5 90@6 30 



5 85@6 25 
5 85@6 20 
5 75@6 15 



5 75@6 15 
5 75@6 15 
5 70@6 10 



5 .70@6 10 
5 65@6 05 
5 75@6 00 
5 65@6 UO 
5 65@6 00 
5 80@6 10 



5 80@6 25 
5 75@6 25 
5 75@6 25 
5 75@6 25 
5 75(a;6 25 
5 75@6 25 



5 75@6 25 
5 85@6 25 
5 90@6 35 

5 90@6 35 

6 00@6 35 
6 00@6 40 



6 00@6 40" 
6 10@6 50 
6 10@6 50 
6 15@6 50 
6 2U@6 65 
6 20@6 65 



6 20@6 65 
6 25@6 75 
6 30@6 80 
6 50@7 00 
6 60@7 CO 
6 70@7 00 



6 75@7 00 
6 75ra7 00 
6 85@7 00 
6 85@7 00 

6 85@7 00 

7 00@7 25 



7 00@7 35 
7 00@7 a5 
7 00@7 35 
7 00@7 35 
7 10@7 40 
7 25@7 40 



7 50@7 65 

7 75@8 25 

8 25@8 50 
8 25 8 50 
8 25@8 50 



8 00@8 60 
8 00@8 60 



8 00@8 40 
8 15@8 50 



8 25@8 50 

8 20@8 45 

8 15@8 40 

P 00@8 30 

7 85@8 30 
^ 



I 6 50@7 00 
I -6 50@7 00 

' 6 65@7'00 
' 6 65@7 00 
6 50(^6 i)0 
6 50@6 90 
6 40ra6 75 
6 50@7 00 



7 80@8 30 
7 50@8 00 
7 45@7 85 
7 50(«;8 GO 
7 5U@8 00 



6 50@7 00 
6 50@7 00 
6 50@6 90 

, 6 50@« 90 
6 50(S6 90 

; 6 50@6 90 



7 50@7 tlO 
7 25<^7 75 
7 00@7 40 
7 00@7 40 
6 75@7 25 
6 75@7 25 



6 50@7 00 
6 50@7 00 



6 50@7 00 



! 6 50(§6 90 
I 6 50(26 90 
6 50@6 90 
6 40@6 90 
6 40@6 J^O 
6 40@6 90 

6 46@6 90 
6 40@6 90 
6 40@6 90 
6 40@6 90 
6 25@6 90 
6 25@6 90 



5 75@6 35 



5 75@6 40 5 65@6 65 



6 20@8 60 



6 50@8 60 6 25@7 00 



DAY. 



August. September. October. November. December. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31... 

Range, 



6 25@6 90 
6 25@6 90 



6 25@6 90 
6 25@6 90 
6 35@7 00 



6 40@7 00 
6 40@7 00 
6 40@7 00 
6 40@7 00 
6 '40@7 15 
6 40@7 15 



6 40@7 15 
6 40@7 15 
6 00@7 00 
6 00(g7 00 
6 00@7 00 
6 00@7 00 



6 00@7 00 
6 00@7 00 
6 10@7 UO 
6 05@7 00 
6 00@7 00 
6 00@6 75 



5 85@6 65 
5 85@6 65 



5 85@6 65 
5 85@6 65 
5 85@6 60 
5 85@6 60 

5 85@6'60 
5 75@6 60 
5 65@6 40 
5 65@6 40 
5 65@6 40 
5 60@6 40 



5 50@6 30 
5 50@6 00 
5 50@6 00 
5 00@6 00 
5 25@6 00 
5 25@6 00 

5 25@6 00 
4 85^0^5 85 
4 85@5 85 
4 85(^5 85 
4 85@5 85 

4 85@5 85 

5 00@5 45 
5 00@5 45 
5 00@5 45 
5 15@5 45 
5 25@5 50 



5 35@5 50 



5 40@5 60 
5 60@5 75 
5 60(^5 75 
5 60@5 80 
5 {)0@5 90 
5 60@5 90 



5 60@5 90 
5 60@5 90 
5 60@5 90 
5 60@5 90 
5 70@5 90 
5 75@5 90 

5 8^@5*95 
5 85(a;6 00 
5 85(|6 00 
5 85@6 00 
5 95@6 00 
5 90@6 00 



5 90@6 00 
5 90@6 10 
5 85@6 10 
5 85@.6 00 
5 85@6 00 
5 85@6 00 



5 85@6 00 
5 75@5 90 
5 75(^5 90 
5 75@5 90 
5 75@5 90 
5 75@6 00 



5 60@5 85 
5 30@5 75 
5 30@5 75 



5 30@5 75 



5 85@6 10 
5 85@6 10 
5 85@6 10 
5 85@6 10 
5 85(c$6 10 
5 75(^6 00 



5 bO@5 75 
5 30(1^5 75 
5, 30@5 75 
5 40@5 75 



5 75@6 00 
5 75@5 90 
5 60@5 85 
5 60@5 85 
5 60(0^5 85 
5 60(1^5 85 

5 60@5'85 
5 60@5 a5 
5 60@5 85 
5 60@5 85 
5 60(1^5 85 
5 60@5 85 

5 66@5 85 
5 60@5 85 
5 60@5 85 



5 40®5 75 
5 50@5 75 
5 50@5 75 
5 50@5 75 
5 50@5 75 
5 50@5 75 



5 50@5 75 
5 50@5 75 
5 47(a)5 75 
5 4.5(^5 75 
5 45@5 75 
5 45(^5 75 



5 45@5 75 
5 45@5 75 
5 45@.^ 35 



5 85@7 15 



5 85@6 10 



5 45@5 60 



5 45@5 60 



5 45@5 60 
5 45@5 60 
5 50@5 60 
5 50(^5 60 
5 55@5 65 
5 55(i^5 75 



5 55@5 75 
5 55@5 75 
5 52@5 75 
5 45@5 65 
5 45@5 65 
5 45(0,5 60 

5 40@5 50 
5 40(^5 50 
5 40(g5 50 
5 40(d5 50 
5 45(0,5 50 
5 50(^5 60 

5 50@5 60 



5 50@5 60 
5 50@5 60 
5 50(3.5 60 
5 50®5 60 

5 56@5 60 



5 60(g6 10 5 30@5 85 



5 40@5 75 



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Prices of Wheat and Qom at New York Oity. 281 
Peices of Wheat and Coen at New Yobk City, 

For tJie Tear 1877. 



JANUARY. 



FEBRUABY. 



• 


WHKAT. 


CORN. 


DATE. 


WHEAT. 


CORN. 


1877. 


No. 2 Milwaukee 

Spi-ing, 

New to old. 


No. 2 

Western Mixed, 

New to old. 


No. 2 Milwaukee 
Spring. 


No. 2 Western 

Mix'd, newtoold, 

Ungraded. 


January 2.. 
3.. 

" 4 


^1 45 @1 60 
1 42 @1 42 
1 43 @1 44 
1 43 @1 44 
1 43 @1 43 
1 40 @1 42 
1 43 @1 44 
1 44 @1 44 
1 42 @1 44 
1 44 @1 45 
1 42 @1 43 
1 47 @1 48 
1 47 @1 48 
1 47 @1 48 
1 48 @1 48 
1 47 @1 50 
1 47 @1 50 
1 47 @1 50 
1 48 @1 48 
1 46 (^1 48 
1 46 @1 48 
1 46 @1 48 


673^ @65 
57 @64 

my®u 

56>sr@59 
57 @58^ 


Feb. 1 

^' 2 

'' 3 


f 1 42 @1 44 
1 36 @1 44 


60 @62 
60 @(50y . 
60 @60><^ 
59 (^60 

56 @59 
59 @62 
59 @6l 
64 @55 

55 (^57 

58 @61 

56 @59 
56>5^@59 

,57y.®59y 

59 @61 

56 @61 
59 @61 
59 @61 

57 @58 


5.. 
6 . 
8.. 
9,. 
** 10. 


" 5 

" 6 

" 7 

'' 8 

" 9 

" 10 

" 12 

^'13 

''14 

'•15 

"16 

"17 

"19 

-20 .... 

•'21 

'•23 

•' 24 

"26 

" 27 

"28 


1 35 @1 43 
1 43 @1 43 
1 44 @1 45 
1 37 @1 45 
1 44 @1 44 
1 4.1 (^1 45 
1 48 @1 49 
1 mA®x 4Sy, 
1 47j^(ajl 50 
1 50 @1 .50 
1 48 @1 61 
1 48 @1 50 
1 48 @1 50 
1 48 @1 50 
1 45 (^1 48 
1 45 @1 48 
1 45 @1 48 
1 45 @1 48 
1 45 @1 45 
1 40 @1 43 


11.. 




" 12.. 
" 13.. 
" 15.. 
'' 16.. 
" 17.. 
" 18.. 
19.. 
'' 20.. 
«' 22.. 
" 23.. 
" 24.. 
" 25.. 
'' 26.. 
" 27.. 


62 @64 
61 @63 
60 @60;^ 

""■63"@63"" 

59 @61 

60 @62 
60 @63 

60 ®^2% 

61 @m 
60 @62 
60 @62 

60 @62 
59>,@62i<r 

61 @62 
60 (S^-Z 
60 @62 


" 29. 
" 30.. 
- 31.. 


'i'42 *@i"44" 




Range 


1 40 @1 50 


56^@65 


Range 


1 35 @1 51 


54 @6i 


MARCH. 


APRIX. 


March 1.... 
" 2.... 
" 3.... 
" 5 .. 
" 6.... 
'• 7..:. 
" 8.... 
" 9.... 
'* 10.... 
'' 12.... 
" 13.... 
** 14.... 
" 15.... 
" 16.... 
" 17.... 


$1 40 @1 43 
1 43 @1 43 
1 43 @1 43 
1 40 @1 43 
1 42 @1 45 
1 48 @1 48 
1 42 @1 42 
1 43 @1 45 
1 42 utl 43 
1 42 @1 43 
1 44 ®1 45 
1 42 @1 43 
1 42>^@1 44 
1 42><^@1 4SIX 


m ®m% 

56 @57 
66^@58 

55 @56 
58^@58X 

54 @58J< 
56>s^@57 
54i^@55 
54X@58^.i 

56 @58 
54X@55><r 
54^@55 

55 @57>^ 
55;<@58 
65 @56 

55 ®m 

55><$@56 
55 @55>^ 
55 @55 

55 @57^ 

56 @56 
55 @5T 
53><^@56 
54 @56 


AprU 2 

'• 3 

" 4 

" 5 

'J 6 

" 7 

". 9 

" 10 

" 11 

" 12 

" 13.... 

" 14 

- 16 

" 17 

" 18 

'^ 19,... 

" 20 

'• 21 

" 23 

" 24... . 

" 25 

" 26.... 

" 27 

" 28 

" 30 


1 49 @1 49 
1 48 @1 48M 
1 49 (Si 50 
1 49 @1 50 
1 52 @1 53 
1 54 t^l 54 
1 58 (sl 58 
1 60 (Oil 60 
1 60 @1 60 
1 60 @1 60 

1 61 @i my 

1 62 (rt^l 63 
1 65 @1 65 
1 65 @1 65 
1 66 ®1 66 
1 65 @1 68 
1 68 (^1 68 
1 70 @1 70 
1 75 @1 78 
1 80 @1 85 
1 90 @1 95 
1 93 @2 00 
1 95 @2 00 
1 98 @2 00 
1 95 @2 00 


55 @55 
55 @57ir 
53>sr@55 

54 . @57 
54>^@55 
54%@56 

55 (Bmy 

gif9^ 
59- @59 
58i^®61 
62 @65 

65 @66 

66 @67^ 


" 19.... 
" 20.... 


1 43 @1 45 
1 46 @1 493^ 
1 45 @1 45 


' ;: i - 


61 ®63 


*' 23.... 
" 24.... 
•' 26.... 
" 27.... 

'•• 28.... 
" 29.... 
" 30.... 
" 31.... 


1 45><r@l 46 
1 46 @1 46 
1 48 @1 48 
1 49 @1 50 
1 49 @1 50 
1 49 @1 49 
1 48 @1 48 
1 48 @1 48 


63 @64 

68 @68 

Q8}^@my 

69 @69 

713^@72 
72X@72i^ 


Range 


1 40 @1 50 


533^@58>^ 


Range ' 1 48 @2 00 


my®i2y 



Hosted by 



Google 



282 



New York Produce Exehange, - 



Pbices op Wheat and Ooen at New Tobk City, 

F(yr the Tea/r 1877. 

MAY. 



JUNE. 







WHEAT. 


CORN. 


DATE. 


No. 2 
MUwaukee Spring. 


No. 2 
Chicago Spring. 


Steamer Mixed. 


No. 2 
Western Mixed. 


Mav 1 


$i*88@i'96 

i'96@i*95 
1 98®1 98 
1 97@1 97 
1 97@1 97 
1 97@1 98 
1 95@1 98 
1 95@1 95 
1 95@1 95 




67^@69^ 
67 @68 

67^1^8 

71 @fl>^ 

68%@70 

69i<@70 

693^@70 

703^@71 

7l3<r@72 

71 @72 

69 @70X 

67 @68 

67^@68 

68>^@68>^ 

66>5^@67 

65 m^y, 

60X@63 
59 ®61 

57 @573^ 
55 @56 
54)^@55 

55 ®mH 

55 @55^ 


71 @71 




' 2 

' 3 








673<r@68 




' 4 




68 @68>^ 




' 5 




70 @71>^ 




' 7 




70 @72 




' 8 




66 @77 




'' 9 




68 @mH 




' 10 


70 @71 




• 11 




70 @70 




' 12 




71 @72 




* 14 

' 15 


71 @72i^ 




1 95@1 95 
1 85@1 90 
1 90@1 90 
1 90@1 90 
1 90@1 90 
1 85@1 90 
1 85@1 85 




69 @69X 




' 16 


67 @68 




* 17 




68 @70 




♦ 18 








* 19 




67 @68)5^ 




' 21 

' 22 




65><^@67 






62 @63 




' 23 




62 @63 




' 24 






60M@62 




' 25 


1 75®1 75 




593^ @60 




* 26 




57X@59% 




4 28 










' 29 


1 75@1 75 
1 75®1 75 




57 @58>5^ 




'31 .... 








Il,ange 






1 75@1 98 




54>s^®72 


54 @77 









Jane 1 

" 2 


$1 75@1 75 
1 77®1 77 
1 77@1 77 
1 77@1 77 
1 77@1 77 


%1 65@1 65 


543^@55 

54>i®55>^ 

543<^®55 

54^@55 
65 @55 
65 ®56 

56 ®56X 
56>^®56>< 
57><j@58 
59 @59 
57^@59 

57 @58 

58 @58 
56>c^@57 
68 @58^ 

59 @60 
583^@59 
58>^®58i^ 


58 @59^ 
58^@69 
58 @59J^ 

57 ®m% 

57 @58 


" 4 


" 5 




" 6 


1 66@1 66 
1 66@1 67 


" 7 


57 @58 


" 8 




57 ®58 


'* 9 


i 76@i 75 
1 70®1 70 
1 75@1 75 
1 76@1 75 
1 70@1 75 
1 68®1 70 
1 68@1 70 
1 65@1 67 




57?,@58 
58 @58X 


" 11 




'« 12 




59 @59^ 

60 ®60 
58 @60 


'■' 13 

»' 14 


1 66@1 66 . 
1 65®1 65 
1 62@1 62 
1 60@1 63 
1 60@1 62 
1 61@1 61 
• 1 60@1 60 
1 60®1 60 
1 60@1 60 


" 15 


'i^l^ 


'' 16 


" 18 


57 @57><^ 
60 @60X 


" 19 


•' 20 


i*65@i'67 


60 @60^ 


" 21 


" 22 


61 (ai61 


" 23 





b^l^&M^ 


" 25 






*' 26 


1 60@1 70 


1 62@1 63 


57 ®58 
67 @57)<^ 
57 @57^ 
56V.@57 
56>{r@57 


6O3^(a603^ 


" 27 




" 28 


i 64@i 64 
1 60®1 70 
1 61@1 61 




69 @59 


" 29 


1 57@1 60 
1 57@1 57 




« 30 


58 @59i^ 






RanKe 


160@1 77 


1 57@1 67 


54X@60 


57 @61 







Hosted by 



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Prices of Wheat and Com at New Torh City. 283 
Pbices of Wheat and Cokn at New York City, 

F(yr the Tea/r 1877. 

JULY. 





WHEAT. 


CORN. 


DATE. 


No. 2 
Red Winter. 


No. 2 

Milwaukee 

Spring. 


No. 2 
Chicago 
Spring. 


Steamer 
Mixed. 


No. 2. 


July 2.- 




$1 60 @1 65 


#1 54 @1 54 

i'55 "@i'57 
1 60 @1 63 


57 @58 
57^(^59 
57 @58 
57K(ffi58>^ 

58i^@59 
58^@59 

59 (ft59 

59 @60 
59i^@60 
60>^@61 

60 @61 
60 @603^ 
59X@60 
59 @60 
60>^@61 
62 @,^il% 
64 ©641*^ 
64^@65;^ 


58K@58X 

59 @61 
58 @59 

60 @60 
60^@60>^ 
60 @60 
59><^®61 
59^@59^ 
60 @60 
60 (aj60 

60 @60X 

61 @61 
60 @61i^ 
60>^@61 
60 @60^ 

63 @63^ 


*« 3 




•' 5.;.... 




1 60 @1 61 
1 63 @1 63 


* 6 




*• 7 




♦* 9 




♦' 10 






1 60 @1 62X 


*• 11 




1 63 @1 65 
1 68 @1 68 


«« 12 




1 58 @1 58 
1 58 @1 58 


«• 13 




« 14 




i'T6"'@i"72 


" 16 

" 17 


'•••• 




" 18 




•• 19 






♦• 20 




1 63 @1 63 




" 21 






«• 23 






♦• 24 




1 64 @1 67 




*' 25 




•' 26 




65>s^@65>5r 
64 @65ii 
62 @63% 
62 (^63 
62 @63 


" 27 








'♦ 28 






61>c^@62 
61^@62><^ 
62 @62X 


*« 30 








" 81 












Kange 




1 60 @1 72 


1 54 (^1 63 


57 @65^ 


58 ©653=^ 







AUGUST. 






August 1... 


$1 41 @1 42 






60i^@61 
59)^@60^ 
60 @60i<^ 
59^^(0,60 
59J<@60 
59><^@60 
59 (^59>^ 
59 @59 
59 (^59 
59 @59 

58 ®m)4 

57X(«^58 

67 @57^ 

56 @56i^ 

55^@55>5r 

5b><^(^53X 

63><r@54X 

54 @54^ 

53>^(^54 

523^@53 

63>^@53^ 


61 @61 
60>^@61 
60i^@61 

60 ®my, 

60 @60>5r 

60 (^mx 

59>^@60>6 
59>sj@60 


" 2... 






3... 






4.. 


1 42 @1 42 






6... 






• 7... 
8 .. 




$1 50 


$1 46 


•♦ 9... 


1 42 @1 43 
1 42 @1 43 
1 42 @1 43 
1 42 @1 43 
1 41 @1 41 
1 40 @1 40^^ 
1 39 @1 40 
1 37i^@l 38 
1 35 @1 40 
1 34 @1 37 
1 38 @1 38^ 
1 40j^@l 40K 
1 38 @1 38 
1 37 @1 37 






'* 10... 




60 @60 
59>s^@60 

59 igmy^ 

59 @59;54 

58 @58>sr 
61X(S58y 
57^ @57>^ 


•• 11... 






" ]3... 




♦' 14... 




* 


" 15... 






'• 16... 






" 17... 




" 18... 






V 20... 






65>$@56 


* 21... 




56 @56 


*• 22... 




1 23 @1 23^ 


5bHCa)MM 


•• 23... 


*"*i*24""* 


56 @56 


" 24... 




54 @54 


•* 25... 




543!^@55 


"• 27... 


i 40 @i 42 
1 40 @1 40><r 
1 37 @1 40 
1 38K@1 ^^Vz 
1 37 @1 37^ 




1 24><^@1 25 




** 28... 
** 29... 




53i^@54 

53 ®53 

54 @54X 

55 @55 


54K@55 

55 @55>^ 

56 @56 


" 30.^. 






" 31... 






56 @66 










Range.... 


1 37 @1 43 


1 24 @1 50 


1 23 @1 45 


52>^@61 


54 @61 



Hosted by 



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284 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Prices of Wheat and Corn at New York City, 

F(yr the Tear 1877. 

SEPTElttBER. 





WHEAT. 


COEN. 


DATE. 


No. 2 

Bed Winter. 


No. 2 

Milwaukee 
Spring. 


No. 2 
Chicago 
Spring. 


Steamer 
Mixed. 


No. 2. 


Sept. 1 

" 3 


$1 38 @1 39 
1 37 @1 40^ 
1 40 @1 40>$ 
1 39X@1 40 
1 41 @1 A'iH 
1 40 @1 40 
1 40 @1 40 


$1 31 @1 35 


$1 34 @1 34 
1 35 @1 35 

1 35 @i my, 
1 36>^@i my, 

1 37>^@1 38 
1 38 @1 38 
1 38 @1 38 

1 37 @i m% 

1 35 @1 37 
1 36 @1 36 


55^@55>^ 
56i@56X 


my@mK 
57 @j6iy, 

57 @57 
57 @58 


'' 4.... 
" 5 


i*37"@i"37 
1 37>^@1 38 
1 40 @1 40 


'' 6 




58 @58% 

58 @my 

59 @59>^ 
50 @59X 
58y@69 
58^@58X 
573^@57% 
57^@57X 
57^8@59% 
58 @58J< 
58 @58^ 
58^@58% 
58 @5Sy 
bly@5Hk{ 
57 @57X 

my®57 

56X@56X 
56 @56^ 
56^@57i^ 
57>c^@57^ 


'* 7 

'* 8 


58i^@59 
57>^@57X 

58 ®m% 
my@m 

57><^@58 
58 @58 
57 @57K 
57 @57 
57 ®57 
57k@57i^ 
57^@57^ 
57^@57M 


" 10 


1 38 @1 38 
1 39 @1 39 
1 35 @1 36)^ 
1 37i^@l 38 
1 38 @1 39 
1 39 @1 40 
1 40 @1 41 
1 40 @1 40 
1 40 @1 41 
1 43 @1 43 
1 41 @1 41 
1 40 @1 40 
1 39 @1 40 
1 38 @1 38 
1 39 @1 39 
1 39 @1 39 
1 39 @1 39 
1 37 @1 39 


" 11 

" 12 

*' 13 


' 1 45 @1 45 
1 43 @1 44 
1 44 @1 44 
1 44 @1 45 
1 46 @1 48 
1 40 @1 41 
1 45 @1 48>5r 
1 48 @1 49 
1 50 @1 52 
1 60 @1 60 
1 55 @1 58 
1 51 @1 57>$ 
1 51 @1 51i^ 
1 52 @1 52 
1 53 @1 53 
1 53 @1 hiy^ 
1 58 @1 60 


" 14 

'' 15 

*' 17 

*' 18 

'* 19 

'^ 20 

*' 21... . 


i'3i"@i'3i 

1 39 @1 39^^ 
1 38 @1 38 
1 38i^®l ZS,% 
1 40>5^@1 40^ 
1 40 @1 40 
1 ^38 @1 39 
1 38 @1 39 
1 myiikl 37 
1 37 @1 37 
1 3a @1 37^ 


" 22 

" 24 

*' 26 

*' 26 

•' 27 


573<@57^ 
66M@56K 


« 28 




" 29 


1 36 @1 39 


57 @57 


Eange.. .. 


1 37 @1 60 


1 31 @1 43 


1 31 @1 40><r 


55 ®59 


56 @59X 



OCTOBER. 



October 1 . 



4. 

5. 

6. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
22. 



26, 
27. 
29. 



31. 
Range.. 



$1 55 
1 44 
1 43 
1 44 
1 47 
1 49 
1 53 
1 50 
1 48 
1 A5 
1 46 
1 47 
1 45 



@1 55 
@1 50 
@1 44 
@1 44 
@1 47 
@1 51 
@1 55 
C^l 51 
@1 48 
@1 47 
@1 48 
(^1 48 
@1 45 
1 45i<<®l 473^ 
1 46 @1 45>^ 
1 42 @1 44 
1 403<r®l 42y 
1 43i<r@l 44 
1 4Sy@l 4Sy 

• 4Siy@i 42y 
1 42 @i 4sy 

i'4i'"@i'42 

1 42 @1 42 
1 42 @1 42 

1 41^®1 42^ 
1 40 @1 40X 



1 40 @1 55 



$1 36 
1 33 
1 33 
1 33 
1 



@1 38, 
@1 35 



@1 33 
@1 35 
1 35^@1 37 
1 39 @1 39 



@1 38 
@1 37 
@1 37)^ 
@1 373^ 
@1 35 

@1 34 

1 31)<r@l 32 

1 29 '©1 29>s^ 

@1 30 

@1 32 

@1 30;^ 

@1 32 



1 37 
1 37 
'1 37 
1 37 
1 35 
1 



1 

1 32 
1 30 
1 31 



@1 31 
@1 31 
.-_ @1 31 
29^@1 29^ 
" @1 30 



29 



1 29 @1 



$1 36^@1 36i^ 

i'3i"@i'33 
1 3lJ^@l 31><^ 
1 33 @1 35 

i'39".'@i'39 

i'34"@i'35 
1 36 @1 36 
1 37 @1 37 
1 34 @1 34 

1 S'Zy^m S2y 
1 32 @i m% 

1 31 @1 32;«^ 
1 29 @1 29 
1 29>s^@l 29;^^ 
1 30 @1 32 
1 30 @1 30 
1 31 @1 32 
1 31 @1 31 
1 30X@1 32 
1 31 @1 31>c^ 
1 31 @1 31 
1 30 @1 31 
1 29>^@1 29^ 
1 29 @1 30i<^ 



1 29 



5'ry@h7y 

58 @58 

57>^@57K 

57>s^@57X 

58 @583^ 

58>^@58>^ 

59i4@593^ 

59>4"@59>^ 

59>i@59ii 
59K®59i=^ 

my@my 

59^@59i^ 
59><j@59><J 
59>^@59^ 
61 @61 
61^@61> 



GiM@Qiy 

61 @61^ 
«1^@61^ 
61K®Q2 



57 )^@esi^ 



58 @58X 
58)^®58y 

59 @59 

58 ®58y 
58y@59 

59 @59K 
59XS59K 

59y@m" 



59><^@593^ 

59%@6U 

59y@59H 

59^@59X 

59j^@59j<r 

59j^@59K 

59>^@60;<^ 

62 @62 



62%@63i^ 
63 @63 
62><@63 
61K@62 



61%@62 
61>5^@62 



58 @63>^ 



Hosted by 



Google 



Prices of Wheat and Corn at New York City. 285 
Pbices of Wheat and Coen at New Yokk City, 

For the Tea/r 1877. 

NOVEMBER. 





WHEAT. 


CORN. 


DATE. 


No. 2 
Red Winter. 


No. 2 

Milwaukee 

Spring. 


No. 2 

Chicago . 
Spring. 


Steamer 
Mixed. 


No. 2. 


Nov.l 

'^ 2 


$1 36 @1 38 


$1 29 @1 29 
1 29 @1 29 
1 29 @1 29 
1 29 @1 30 


$1 27 @1 27 
1 27>4^@1 273^ 
1 27 @1 28 
1 29 @1 29 


61 @62 


60%@61% 
603^@613^ 
603^@60% 
613^@62 


'* 3 


1 37 @1 38 

1 39 @1 4Qh 

Holiday. ' 




" 5 

" 6 


60 @61 


«' 7 


i 29 @i 29>sr 
1 29%@1 29^ 
1 29 @1 29 
1 293^@1 293^ 
1 29 @1 30^ 
1 32 @1 32 
1 323<r@l 33>s^ 
1 33 (^1 33 
1 ^VA®1 Z\H 
1 32 @1 32 


1 273^@1 29 


62 @62 
61 @6ljs^ 


62 @62 
61 @62 
61 @623^ 
62><^@62% 
613^@63^ 
62j^@63% 

63 @63i^ 
623<@63 
62)^'@623< 
62>cr!@62>5r 

63)^@64 
6335r@64 
63>^@63^ 

mM@My, 

64 @65 
64 @64><^ 


" 8 


1 38 @1 38 


" 9 


1 27;^@1 27>^ 
1 28 @1 28 
1 28 (SI 29 
1 30>^r^l 30>5^ 
1 32 (oil 32 
1 31K@1 31X 


'* 10 

^ *' 12 

" 13 


1 40 @1 40 
1 40 @1 4SIX 


61 @61 

«1>^@613^ 

623<^@623^ 


"14 

" 15 


1 43 @1 45 


"16 


1 40 @1 40 


62 @62 


"17 


i'3i"@i*32 
1 30 @1 30 


"19 


1 40 @1 40 




"20 


1 313^@1 32 
1 32 (^1 32 
1 31K@1 313^ 
1 32 @1 32 
1 32 @1 32 
1 323^®! 32% 
1 323^ @1 323^ 




"21... . 


1 41 @1 41 
1 42 @1 42 
1 43K(al 433^ 
1 44 @1 44 




" 22 

" 23 


1 31 @1 31 


623^@623^ 


" 24 


1 31 @1 31 
1 32 @1 32 
1 313^@1 313^ 
1 30 @1 30 

i'29=^@i'36 




" 26 


62i^@623< 
62X@62X 
633<^@63>^ 

62" @62" 


"27 

" 28 . 


1 45 @1 45 
1 43^@1 44^ 

Holiday. 
1 42 @1 43 


" 29 




"30 


1 31 @1 31 


63^@63X 


Range 


1 36 @1 45 


1 29 @1 33>^ 


1 27 @1 32 


60 @63M 


603^ @65 



DECEMBER. 



Dec. 1.. 
" 3.. 
" 4.. 
" 5.. 
" 6.. 
" 7.. 
*' 8.. 
" 10.. 
" 11.. 
" 12.. 
"13.. 
"14.. 
" 15.. 
" 17.. 
" 18.. 
" 19.. 
" 20.. 
" 21.. 
"22.. 
" 24.. 
"26.. 
" 27.. 
" 28.. 
" 29.. 
" 31.. 

Range 



$1 42 @.l 43 
*'*'i'42>cj" 

""i'45"*' 

1473^ 

""i'45"" 

144% 

1 45 

1 45^^ 

1 45 

1433<r 
1 43X@1 4iy, 

1453<r 

1453^ 

1 45 

1 45 

1 45 

1 46 

1 47 

145X 

1 45 

1 45K 



1 42 @1 47;<^ 



$1 30 @1 31 
1 31 @1 3l3i^ 
1 31 @1 31>5^ 
1 32X@1 33 

*"*i'333i*" 

1 35 
1 36 @1 363^ 

1 35 

1 343^ 
1 34 @1 35 

1 33 
1 31 @1 32 

1 32 

1 34 

1 3434' 
1 343<^@1 35 



1 363^ 

1 36 
1 353^@1 36 
1 35 @1 36 



1 30 @1 363<^ 



$1 29 @1 293^ 

1 30 

1 293^ 
1 30 @1 31 

1 30 
1 32 @1 32^ 
1 33 @1 34 
1 343^@1 343^ 
1 32 @1 343<^ 

1 32 

1 32^ 

1 31% 

1 30 
1 29 @1 30 

1 30 

1 313<r 
1 32 @1 32>4 

1 32j^ 

i'33'*@i'34 

1343<^ 

1 34 
1 333<f@l 34 
1 32 @l 33 

1 323^ 



1 29 @1 343^ 



62 
61%@62 

63i@63i^ 
62 

633^@63% 
63 
62% 
633^ 
613^ 

""62"" 
61 

603<^@61 
60 
633^ 
61% 
613<^ 

59%@613^ 

59 @60 
58 
59 
58 

583^@59% 



58 @63% 



63 
633<@63'% 



64 

64 @65 
62 @643sr 

65 @653sr 

64% 
643s^ 
643^ 
643^ 
633^@64 

643^ 

65 

653<f 

663^ 

66'^^ 

65% 

66H 

65 

643=^@643^ 

63%@643^ 

64 - 



62 @663^ 



Hosted by 



Google 



286 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Peices of Westebn No. 2 Mixed Oats at New Tore City, 

For the Year 1877. 



January. February. March. 



June. 



3. 

4.. 

5., 

6.. 

7 . 

8.. 

9.. 
10 
11. 
12.. 
13. 
14., 
15 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 



21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



@ 40 

@ 45 

38 @ 40i<r 

38 @ 41^ 

44 @ 47 



45 @ 

39 (cbj 



38 @ 



50 
41 

^% 

44 
45>^ 



47 @ 4n% 

46X 



40 @ 44 

40 @ 43 

40>^@ 47 

A^Yi® 45 

44 ® 49 

42 @ 49 



39 @ 



44 ® 44V 

44^ 
44 @ 45 
44 @ 44>^ 
44 



43 
43 

^% 

^%® ^Yi 

44 @ 45 

45 

46^ 



56 ® 57 

"~ @ 61 



48^@ 49 
48>sr@ 49 



55 @ 61 



39 @ 
39 ® 



@ 48 

®. 47 

@ 47 

@ 48 

47 ® 48 

43 @ 47 



^IH@ 



44 
44 
42 

47 



44 

44 

44 

44 

44 @ 44U 
44 ® 44}^ 



43%® 44 

43 @ 45 

45 @ 45 

43%@ 44 



43 ® 41 

42 ® 47 

42 @ 48>^ 

41 @ 45 

41 @ 47 

40 @ 46)c^ 



413^@ 
42 @ 
42>5^@ 



47 

49>^ 

47 



44 @ 



50 



40 @ 

41 ® 



44X@ 45 
44>5f 
44)^ 
44 



49>cr@ 50 
45 ® 49 



48 @ 50 
50 



40 @ 46^*^ 
40 ® 45 
45 ® 50 



41 @ 
41 ® 
41 @ 



43% 

43V 

43 

43 



54 @ 55 
@"54 

55 '®**61 



57 
56 @ 60 

54 @ 55 
55 

55 @ 56 



49 
49 
49 
48 
48 @ 49 



51 @ 51X 
51 



50 

50 ® 501^ 
50>^@ 52 
50 @ 51 



51 ® 



50 @ 51 
45 @ 47 

52 

47 ® 49 

"50 

45K@ 51 



50 @ 50>sJ 
49><^" 



48 

47 



.48>c^ 



47 

46>^ 

46% 

46%@ 46^ 

46 

45 



Range.... 38 @ 50 38 @ 50 43 @ 47><^ 43 @ 61 



45 @ 57 



45 @ 



DAY. 


July. 


August. 


September 


October. 


November. 


December. 


1 


**46"' 

*43>^' 
43^ 
44K 

'44%' 

44;^® 45 

44 

44 

44 

"43" 
40 

"39" 

40 

40 ® 4\Y2 

42X@ 43 

'37%* 
40 


364®* '37 

"37" 
37 ® ^y^ 
37 ® 2nYz 

"35* 

"34" 
34 

ir 

33 

32 @ 34 

33 '@'*34 

34 @ 35 
34 @ 35.V5 

34 @ 34% 
34 @ 34>^ 

"34"' 
33 @ 34 
32 ® 33 
31;*^® 32 
32 @ 32% 


33 

33)^^**34 

...... 

U)i® 35 
34 @ 34>5r 

34 (a' '35% 

35 @ 353^ 

35 

34% 

34 @ 34% 

34 @ 34X 

'33>i^' 
33^® 33% 

34 

34 
34 ® 34% 
34 @ 34% 

83%®' "34 

34 ® 34% 
34 @ 34% 

34 
34 ® 34% 


34% 
34%® 34% 
34%® 35 
34%® 34% 
34%® 34% 

34% 

34%®'*34% 
34%® 35 
.34 ® 35 
34 ® 34% 
34%®^ 35 

*35%* 
35% • 
85% 
35% 
35>^® 35% 

37 '@ '37% 

37% 
36%® 37 
36>^® 36% 

36% 

'36%* 
36% 
36% 


37 
86% 

37 @**37% 

'W 

38 j^ 
38% 

"39" 
39% 
39 
39 
38% 

38 @ 38% 

"39* 
39% 

39% 
40 
40% 
40% 

39%@"39% 
39%® 39% 

*39%* 


39 


2 




3 

4 

5 

6 


39% 
38%® 38% 


7 

8 


1^ 


9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 


39%' 
38%® 39 

••38" 

38 @ 38% 


16 

17 

18 

19 


**38" 
37 ® 37% 


20 

21 




22....*. 




23 

24 

25 


"39" 


26 

L7 

28 

29 

30 


37%® 39 
39 
39 
39 


31 




Range 


37%® 45 


31X® 383(rl33 ® 351^ 


34 (^ 37% 


36%® 40^ 


37 @ 39% 



Hosted by 



Google 



Prices of Barley and Barley Malt 



287 



Pbices of Babley and Bablet Malt at New Tobk 

Far the Year 1877. 

(Those dates only are given on which Transactions were Reported.) 





BARLEY. 


BARLEY MALT. 


1877, 


No. 1 


No. 2 


State 


State 


Canada 


State 


State 




Canada, 


Canada, 


2-Rowed, 


4&6-Rowed, 


Prime, 


2^ Rowed, 


4 & 6-Rowed, 




Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Fer Bush. 


Jany. 2 


111^ 


1 02)^ 


66 










" 4.... 










1 25 


72 J^ 


85 


" 5.... 


iiii^ 




69 




1 25 


'T^)^ 


85 


" 6..,. 


lllK 




69 


77X 









" 8.... 
" 9.... 


1 11 
1 11 






79 


1 25 


'T^X 


82X 


« 10.... 


1 11 














" 11.... 


1 11 






75 


1 20 






« 12.... 


1 11 






75 








*' 13.... 










1 22^ 






" 15.... 


i 12 




70 










" 16.... 


112 








1 27J^ 




95 


•* IT.... 


1 12 


1 02;^ 






1 27^ 




95 


« 18.... 




1 05 




85 


130 




95 


" 19 ... 








85 


1 27>^ 




95 


" 25.... 






70 


85 








" 29.... 









'^7M 


i 27v; 


75 


92;^ 


*' 30.... 










1 27>^ 


75 


- 92>^ - 


*' 31.... 










1 27^ 


75 


m 


Feby. 2.... 






70 




l^VA 


75 


^M 


" 5.. 








78 








" 6.... 








82>sr 








, " 14.... 


1 05X 


65 












'* 16.... 






70 










« 21.... 








85 








" 24.... 






65 










" 27.... 






62^ 










Mch. 6.... 







61% 










" 9.... 






62>^ 


70 








" 10.... 










1 15 


80 




" 14.... 








70 








'* 19... 


97^ 














* 22.... 






65 










" 23.... 


95 














" 24.... 












85 




" 29.... 






63 




' 






•'* 30.... 










1 25 


85 




April 3.... 








» ei7}4 








" 6.... 


95 




65 


66 




80 




" 10.:.. 






62 










" 16... 




90 












" 23.... 










1 15 






" 24.... 










1 30 






May 9 ... 
















*' 11.... 


i 12 






1 00 








" 12.... 




1 05 












" 17.... 












90 


^Vz 


*' 18.... 












90 


st2 


«* 19 












90 


97 >^ 


'* 21.... 












90 


^yz 


" 22... 












90 


1 00 


" 23.... 













90 


97>5r 


" 24.... 












90 


97)^ 


« 25 












90 


97X 


" 26.... 












91J^ 




«' 29.... 












91^ 




June 13.... 












92X 




" 23.... 










1 32X 




105 


" 2T.... 












91 




" 28.... 












90 




" 29.... 














100 


July 6.... 














1 06 


*' 17.... 














1 00 


" 27.... 












92>^ 




Aug. 1.... 














ioo 



Hosted by 



Google 



288 



New TorJc Produce Exchange, 



Pkices of Barley and Barley Malt, for the Year 1877. — {Continued.) 





BARLEY. 1 


BARLEY MALT. 


18T7. 


No. 1 


No. 2 


State 


State 


Canada 


• State 


State 




Canada, 


Canada, 


2-Rowed, 


4&6-Rowed, 


Prime, 


2-Rowed, 


4 & 6-Rowed, 




Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Per Bush. 


Sept. 15.... 








85 








'* 21.... 








83% 








" 24.. . 








813^ 









" 28.... 


95 






80 








" 29.... 








83 








Octr. 2.... 






74 










*' 3.... 








82;«^ 








'' 4.... 


92>5^ 




74 










" 6.... 










1 05 




87>5r 


" 10 ... 




87 






... .. 






" 11.... 




87 




78 


1 05 






*' 12.... 


95 


87 


71 


76 


1 05 






" 13.... 










1 05 






*' 18.... 




82 




78 








*' 19.... 


89 


80 












" 20.... 




82X 












*' 23.... 








76 








" 27.... 


95 






80 








*' 30... 






70 


82 








" 31.... 




87 


71 










Novr. 5.... 








80 








. *' 7. .. 


94 






79% 








'* 12.... 


95 




76>5r 










" 13.... 








8i 






H 


" 14.... 


95 






78 








" 15.... 






78 










" 16.... 






78^ 


85 








" 19.... 










i 12 






" 20.... 






78 


85 








•• 21.... 











1 12 






" 22.... 






75 


85 








'' 23.... 


i 66 




77 


85 


112 






*' 26.... 


99 















♦* 27.... 








82^ 








" 28.... 




■ 


75^ 











" 30...; 






75><^ 










Deer. 4 




90 


75@77 










" 5.... 






69@77 











" 6.... 


99 















*' 7. .. 




-94% 


75@77 










" 8.... 


i 66 




70@77 


83 








" 10.... 


1 00 




73(^77 








85 


" 11.... 






75 










" 12.... 


i 66 




70@75 










" 13.... 


1 00 




75@78 . 


79 








" 14.... 






T6x^ 











" 15.... 


1 03 




73@77 










" 20.... 




66 












" 21.... 







78 






75 




" 27.... 













80 


85 



Monthly and Yearly Average Prices op Barley and Barley Malt, 
for 1877, as per above table. 



Januaiy 

February. . . 

March 

April 

May 

June ... . 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November.. 
December. . 



Average 1 00 .54 



1 11.34 
1 05.5 

96.25 

95 
1 12 



05 

92.87 

96.6 

1 00.33 



1 03.J 
65 



90 
1 05 



'9i".62 



89.95 



66.88 
63.06 
63.5 



72 

76.78 
74. W 



79.87 
81.83 
70 

66.75 
. 00 



78.96 
82.33 
81 



80.30 



1 26 04 
1 27.5 
1 20 
1 22.5 



1 32.5 



1 05 
1 12 



1 20.79 



73.75 
75 



90.33 
91.17 
92.5 



77.5 

74 

77.5 



81.51 



90.5 

87.5 



97.69 
1 02.5 
1 03 
1 00 



87.5 
*85" 



94.21 



Hosted by 



Google 



Prices of Rye and Peas at New York. 



289 



PEIOES OF EYE AND PEAS AT NEW YORK, 

iW the yeoA- 1877. 





(Those dates only are given on which transactions were reported.) 






EYE. 


PEAS. 


DATE. 


RYE. 


PEAS. 


DATE. 


Canada 
in Bond. 


State. 


Canada 

Field 
in Bond. 


Canada 
in Bond. 


State. 


Canada 

Field 

in Bond. 


January 5.. 




93 




July 18 






^M 


9.. 




92>^ 




" 19 






" 92>jr 


10.. 




90@93 




" 20 






90 


17.. 




90@94 


915^ 


" 24 


89>^ 






19.. 





97 




" 25 






90 


" 23.. 




91 




" 26 


89><r 






30.. 




92 




August 3 




82 




« 31 . . 





92 




9.... 




82@84 


83 


Feb. 2 




92 




" 16... 


...... 


78@80 




" 7 






913^ 


" 17.... 




78 




" 8 






92 


" 18.... 




76)^ 




*' 9 





85 


92 


" 22.... 




76@81 




*' 13 






94 


" 24 ... 




76@78 




" 15 




87^ 




" 27.... 




75 




" 19 




85 




" 28.... 





77@78 




'' 21 




85 




" 30 




80 




"26 ... 




90 




Sept. 1 . . .. 




80 




" 28 




91 


92 


" 6 




78 




March 1 






92 


" 10 '. 





82@83 




" 7.... 


90 






" 17 




79 




" 8.... 




84@88 




" 19 




83 


..%... 


" 10.... 




88@90 




" 24 




80 




" 23.... 




88 




" 26 




78 




" 24.... 




^K 




October 5 




81 




" 28... 


84 


■ , 




" 6... 




QIX 




April 12.... 




98 




" 9.... 




, 


86 


■" 13.... 




95@98 




" 10.... 


79 


79 




*' 25.... 




110 




" 11.... 




78 




" 26... 




126 




" 12.,.. 




78 




" 27.... 




120 




" 13.... 




79 


84 


May 4 




115 




" 15.... 




75 


85 


" 8 






1125^ 


" 16.... 






85 


" 9 






112>5r 


" 17.... 




75^ 




" 10 




1123^ 


112>sr 


" 18.... 




74 >« 


86®85 


*' 11 




112^ 


117>^ 


" 22... 




73X@77 




" 12 




110 


117j*^ 


" fiS.... 




75 




*' 14 






ii7>; 


" 24.... 


75 


78 




" 15 




iio 


115 


" 25.... 





78 




" 16 






115 


" 27.... 






82@83 


'* 18 




110 




" 29.... 






83 


" 21 






110@115 


" 30.... 




78 




" 22 




i03 


110@115 


Nov. 1 


78 , 


83 




" 23 






110@115 


" 7 






84 


" 24 






110@115 


" 13 




77 




" 29 




97>c^@98 




" 14 







84 


Junel 




97 




" 17 




77 




" 2 






100 


" 19 


•••»•• 


77 




" 4 




98M 




" 20 


77 




" 5 




98)^ 




" 21 




78 




" 6 




98>k 




" 22 






85 


"18 






96^ 


" 26 






m 


" 19 






96X 


" 27 







85>i^ 


"20 






95 


" 28 






85>5r 


*' 21 






96H 


Dec. 1 




73^^ 


86 


"22 






m)4 


" 4 






86 


"23 






965^ 


•' 5 




. 76)^ 




" 25 







96 J^ 


" 6 


76 


76@77 


86 


"26 






96^ 


" 7 




77 


86 


« 27 




93 




" 8 




77 




"28 




93 




" 11 




77>^ 




July 6 




88 


97^ 


" 13 





77%@78 




'*• 9 






97>5r 


" 18 


77@78 


77 




"10 






^>6 


" 22 


77@78 


74(^77 




"11 




93 


97^ 


" 24 


77@78 


74@77 


86 


"13 






95 


" 27 




77 




"16 






97^ 


" 28 




76)^ 





20 



Hosted by 



Google 



290 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Average Prices of Wheat, Monthly and Yearly, at New York, 
Fen- the Year 1877. 



MONTH. 


" No 2 
Red Winter, 
per bush. 


No. 2 

Milwaukee Spring, 

per bush. 


No. 2 

Chicago Spring, 
per bush. 


January 




1 44^ @1 46 2-9 
1 44 3-7@l 46 8-9 
1 44 W @1 45^ 
1 67% ®1 69 
1 89% ®1 iK) 2-5 
1 69% @1 71 7-9 
1 63% @1 65^ 

1 37 
1 38% @1 39 1-6 
1 32% @1 33% 
1 30% @1 31% 
1 33 4-5®l 34 1-7 




February 

March 










April 

May 








June 

July 




1 61 4~5@1 62% 
1 57% @1 68 4-9 


August 

September . : 


1 39 1-5@1 40% 
1 47% ®1 47% 
1 45 @1 45% 
1 40% @1 41>^, 
1 45 


1 30 5-6@l 31 1-6 
1 86% @1 37% 
1 '32 @1 32% 


October 


November 


1 293;^ @1 30 

1 31% ®1 32 1-19 


December 






Range of Daily Prices.. . . 
Yearly average 


1 36 ®1 60 
1 4SX @1 44 1-6 


1 29 @2 00 • 
1 495;^ ®1 505^ 


1 23 @1 67 - 
1 40 ®1 40 7-12 









Average Prices of Flotjr and Corn, Monthly and Yearly,, at 
New York.— i?br tJie Year 1877. 





FLOUR. 


CORN. 


month. 


Common State, 
per barrel. 


Steamer Mixed, 
-. per bushel. 


No. 2 . 
per bushel. 


January 


5 92% @6 16 
5 84% @6 22 1-6 

5 85% @6 27 




59 4-9® 62% 


February 




58 ® 60 


Mar^h 




55 K (a)y 56% 


April 


7 13 4-5®7 43 




61 1-5® 62% 


May 


7 m^ ®7 97% 
6 46 4-5@6 92 1-9 
6 17 3-5@6 97 
5 36 6-7@6 08 
5 72 l-5@5 91 
5 70 ®5 92 
5 43 @5 74% 
5 48 @5 61 


64 5^6® 65 '4r-5 
56% ' @ 57^ 
59 4-5® 60% 
56 5-9® 57 
57% @ 57;^ 
59% @ 59 4-5 
61% @ 62 
61 1-6® 61% 


65 2-5® 66 5-6 


June 


58X @ 59 1-6 


July 

Augu^ 

September 


60% ® 61H 
57% ® 58 1-9 
58% (a 58% 


October 


60}^ (cbj 60% 


November 


62% ® 63 


December ,. 


64 3-5® 64 8-9 


Range. 


4 85 ®8 60 
6 05% @6 43 3-7 


52% @ 72 
595^- @ 60 1-6 


53% ® 77 


Yearly Average 


60 1-6® 61 1-6 



Average Prices op Oats, Rye and Peas, Monthly and Yearly, at 
New York. —i^br the Year 1877. 





OATS. 


RYE. 


PEAS. 


MONTH. 


Western 

No. 2, Mixed, 

per bush. 


Canada 
in bond. 


State. 


Canada Field 
in bond. 


January'' - . . . 


41% @46 1-lC 
40 l-6@45% 
44?:f @44% 
46% @48 
52 @53 4-9 
48% @48% 

34% @34% 
34% @34% 
35% ®35% 

38 5-9®38X 


■"87"* 

"ki"' 

76%@77% 


92% @ 93 

87 5-9® 89 

1 09 3-5@l 10 1-5 

1 08 7-9®l 08% 

96 3-7 

90% 

78 @ 79 1-5 

80 @ 80 1-7 

77 3-7®^ '77 5-7 

77% 
76 1-7® 76% 


91% 


February 


92 3-10 


March 


92 


April 




May 


1 13% ®1 15 


June 

July 


96% 
95% 


August 


83 






October 

November 


83 4^7® 84 3-7 
84 4^ 




86 






Yearly Average 


41% @42% 


82% 


m% @ 88 1-15 


91 15-16 



Hosted by 



Google 



Average Prices of Extra State Flour at N, Y, 291 

AVEEAGE PbICES OF EXTRA BtATE FlOUR AT NeW YoRK, 

Monthly, 

From 1862 to 1877, inclusive. 



MONTH. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


January 


5.783^ 


6.80 


6.95 


9.96 


7.98 


11.53X 


10.37X 


February. . . 


5.91 


7.45 


6.70 


10.00 


7.85 


10.92% 


10.24 


March 


5.533^ 


7.05 


6.81 


9.75 


7.50 


11.21 


10.33 


AprU 


5.12 


6.841^ 


7.55 


7.95 


7.87 


12.33% 


10.32 


May 


4.81^ 


6.10 


7.30 


6.62^ 


8.66 


13.03 


9.69 


June 


4.54 


5.65 


8.41 


6.37>^ 


8.73 


10.50 


8.54 


July 


5.16 


5.26 


10.85 


6.40 


8.53 


9.01 


8.25 


August 


5.22 


4,90 


10.15 


6.60 


8.32 


9.84 


9.15^ 


September . . 


5.45 


5.00 


9.96 


7.94 


9.14 


10.14 


8.59>^ 


October 


6.22 


5.95 


8.50 


• 8.45 


10.51 


10.49 


9.78>i^ 


November. . . 


6.06 


6.25 


10.08 


8.38 


11.30 


9.85 


6:90 


December.*. - 


6.09 


6.52 


10.23 


8-30 


10.83 


10.121*^ 


7.38>^ 


Yearly Av'e. 


5.49 7-48 


6.14 37-48 


8.62 5-12 


8.05 1M2 


8.93^ 


10.74 23-24 


9.13 1-24 



MONTH. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


January 


7.22 

6.94>^ 

6.60 

6.31 

6.39% 

6.22% 

6.72;^ 

9.11>^ 

6.55% 

6.083^ 

5.71% 

5.53% 


5.44 

5.22 

5.03 

5.01 

5.19% 

5.79 

6.07 

6.11 

5.28 

5.62 

5.77% 

6.04% 


6.68 
6.98 
6.99 
6.72 
6.45 
6.45 
6.04 
5.73 
6.54 
7.25 
6.90 
6.79 


6.64 11.16©6.93X 
6.74 ©6.96 
6.65% ©6.92 
6.92 ©7.29 
7.40 ©7.75 
6.92% ©7.25 5-6 
6.30 ©6.73 
6.82% ©7.20 1-3 
7.231-5 ©7.53 4-5 
6.92% ©7.30 1-3 
6.911-3 ©7.25 
6.93% ©7.25 


7.30 ©7.49% 


February 


7.31 1-6©7.69% 


March 


7.01% ©7.50 


April 


7.00 ©7.44 2-5 


May 


7.05 l-5©7.40 2-5 


June 


6.45 ©6.91 4-5 


July 


6.16 3-5©6.61 1-5 


August 

September 


6.19% ©6.601-6 
6.65 2-5©7.06% 


October 

November 


6.33 ©6.73 3-5 
6.42 1.6©6.72 1-6 


December 


6.70 2-5©7.02 


Yearly Average.. 


, 6.61 31-32 


5.55 


6.62% 


6.86 5-6 ©7.19 11-12 


6.71% ©7.10^ 



MONTH. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March 

April. . 
May 


6.83% ©7.10 2-5 
6.55% ©6.84 1-3 
6.42% ©6.67% 
6.43 2-5 ©6.66 1-5 
6.15 1-5 ©6.46 3-5 
5.93% ©6.25 45 
5.71% ©6.00 3-5 
5.32% ©5,67% 
5.08% ©5.37% 
4.99% ©5.19 3-5 
4.81% ©5.06 1-10 
5.00 * ©5.11% 


4.773^ ©5.01 M 
4.72% ©4.97% 
4.95 @5.08>^ 
5.03% ©5.28% 
5.07% ©5.31% 
4.971-3©5.16% 
5.59 ©5.80% 
5.89 ©6.20% 
5.68 ©5.94 
5.72% ©5.96% 
5.46 2.5@5.73 4-5 
5.02% ©5.49 


5.00 3-5 ©5.33 2-5 
5.02 2-5 ©5:26 3-5 
5.05 ©5.32% 
5.08 ©5.29% 
5.02 ©5.22 7-10 
5.00 ©5.18 
4.65^ ©4.83% 
4.52 9-10©4.73 
4.87 ©5.11% 
5.23 ©5.46 
5.30% ©5.48% 
5.56% ©5.68% 


5.92% ©6.16 
5.84 l-3@6.22 1-6 
5.85% ©6.27 
7.13 4-5@7.43 
7.5:3% ©7.97% 


June... 

July 


6.46 4-5@6.92 1 9 
6.17 3 5@6.97 


August 

September. .. 

October 

November. .. 
December 


5.36 6 7@6.08 
5.72 1-5©5.91 
5.70 ©5.92 
5.43 ©5.74% 
5.48 ©5.61 


Yearly Av'e. 


5.77 1-10@6.03 11-16 


5.24 4-5@5.49% 


5.02 5-6 ©5.24% 


6.051-3@6.43% 



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292 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Ayebage Prices of Western Mixed Corn at New York, 

Monthly, 

From 1862 to 1877, inclusive. 



MONTH. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


January 

February 

March 


64^ 

64 

593=^ 

49>^ 

54 

58>5^ 

59% 

65i^ 

69 

763^ 


86 

^^ 
76K 

69 

78 

98 
1.12 
1.26 


1.26^ 
1.2734 
l.n2>^ 

i.a3 

1.43K 
1.54 

1.60X 
1.54 
1.78 
1.91M' 


1.88 
1.87 
1.81 
1.39 
1.08^ 
• 86 

89 

94 
93 


2j;^ 

79 
76 
82X 

1.01^ 
1.27><^ 
1.13 


1.18 

1.10% 

1.163^ 

1.30X 

1.35 

1.15 

1.04 

1.10 

1.23 

1.39 

1.35 

1..38 


1.40 
1.36 
1.25 


AorU 


1.19 


^s 

June 

July 


1.14 
1.07 
1.07 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December. 


1.20 
1.21 
1.15 
1.15 


Yearly Av'e. . 


60% 


88 31-48 


.1.51 17-48 


1.19 1-12 


90 43-48 


1.22 6-7 


1.19% 



MONTH. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


January. 

February 

March 


1.083i^ 

1.02^ 
95 
85 
85% 
80% 
97 J^ 

IMy 

IMK 

1.07 

1.09% 

1.12 


98 
1.053^ 
1.03% 
1.11% 
l.llX 
1.07^ 
1.10 
1.05 

91^ 

92^ 

91 

76% 


81^ 

84 

851-3 

771-9 

77 5-6 

74 

66 i3 
71 1-16 
773^ 


75 

72 8-11 
68% 
727-10 
74 2-3 
653^ 
613-5 
62 2-3 

65% 


65% 

651-5 

65 

65 4-5 

661-7 

641-3 

58 

56 2-5 

65% 

617-9 

64 9-11 

7913 


84.89@90.33 
79.42@86.69 
85.60@89.00 


April 


86.80@89.11 


May 


85 @b6.20 


June 

July 


81.58 
78.04 


August 

September 

October. 

November 

December 


81.13 

94.28 
79.50@92.25 
87.67@92.75 
89.50@94.83 


Yearly Av'e. 


1.01 17-96 


1.00 17-48 


76 2-3 


67 7-12 


64 11-12 


87 6-6@89 7-12 



MONTH.' 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March 


86.25 @95.27 

82.84 
85.22 @89.12 
90.83 @92.04 
83.60 ©90.67 
80.86 @85.14 
82% @85% 
79 4-5 @83 2-5 
71 2-5 @74 2-5 
69 @71 3-5 
733^ @75 
633^ @^)4 


64 2^@65% 
63% @63% 
mx ®643^ 
67>^ @67^« 
61 ©61% 
59^ ©59% 
55^ ©56 2-5 
571-10©573^ 
56X ©563^ 
57^ ©67% 
58% ©58% 
Srx ©57 7-10 


59 4-9©621-3 
58 ©60 
55 1-3@56 2-3 


April 


61 1-5©62 1-3 
65 2-5@66 5-6 


Mav 


June 

Jllly 


56% ©573^ 
59 4 5©60% 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


56 5-9©57 
57% @57X 
59% ©69 4-5 
61% ©62 
61 1-6©61 1-3 


Yearly Av'e.. 


81 3-lO@84>^ 


60 1-16©60 5-12 


591.3©601-3 



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Average Prices of Western Mixed Oats at N. T. 293 

AVEBAGE PkICES OF WeSTEEN MiXED OaTS AT NeW ToBK, 

Monthly, 

From 1862 to 1877, inclume. 



MONTH. 



1862. 



1863. 



1864. 



1865. 



1866. 



1867. 



January 

February 

March. 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December. 

Yearly Average 



40 
43 
46 



53 32-33 



71 

75^ 

83 

87 

74^ 

78^ 

76 

57 



85 
90 



90 

88 
87X 



90 



1.04 



1.06 • 
1.10^ 
1.02 
84>^ 

70 



60^ 

60>sr 



56^ 

533^ 

57^ 

59 

59 

50 

44 

46 

59 

67 



77 1-12 



J 26-48 



74 13-24 



561-16 



64 
60 
68 
72 

85 

80 
79 

85 



75 5.48 



MONTH. 



1868. 


1869. 


87^ 


77^ 


84X 


"^^Vz 


84 


75X 


86 


773^ 


86>5r 


81>^ 


84 >^ 


78% 


84j^ 


81 


82>sr 


71;J^ 


82 


65X 


73>5r 


63>4^ 


72X 


65 


78 


64 


82 5-32 


73 17-96 



1870. 



1871. 



1872. 



1873. 



January 

February 

Marcb 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Yearly Average 



59% 

oiJX 

56 

60% 

65^ 

643<r 

623^ 

53 

50% 

533^ 

58% 

60% 



6i><r 

683^ 

673^ 

671-5 

65 2-3 

(53% 

50 

50 

52 

52% 

551-3 



58 9-16 



60 



55 

53 

53 5-12 

521-3 

52 1-3 

501-5 

431-5 

43 

42 5-9 

43% 

46 5-9 

49rz 



4812-15 



51 

53 5-7 

493i 

523^ 

516-6 

44 

42 2-5 

i« 

503^ 
503^ 
571-6 



491-3 



MONTH. 



1874. 



* 1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

M^y 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Yearly Average 



61^ 
61% 

62 2.5 
68 1-5 
62K 
65 4-5 
53 

62 4-5 
613^ 
65 3-10 
69 



62>sr 



69 2-25 

68 4-5 

69 3-5 
74% 
75% 
68 3-5 

63 @68% 
61?^ @62% 
52% @54% 
46 @,iT4 
46 2-5@47 3-10 
46% @48 9-10 



47^^ 

47M 

46% 

45-2 

40 

39 

35% 

36M 

44 



@47 9-10 
@49 
@473^ 
- '" 7-10 
@41% 



@37X 
@44X 
37% 



38% 



61 7-15@62 4-5 



41 5.18@42X 



41% @461-10 
40 l-6@45% 
44% @44% 
46 2-3@48 
52 @53 4-9 
48% @48% 
42 1.3@42 1-3 
34% @34% 
34% @34% 
35% @35 2-3 
38?i @38^ 
38 5.9@38X 



411-3@42% 



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294 New York Produce Exchange. 

AVEEAGE PeICES OF BeANS, WeEKLY, AT NeW ToEK, 
F<yr ike Tea/r 1877. 

PER BUSHEL. 



For Week 

. ENDING 



Mediums. 



Pea. 



Marrows. 



Red Kidney. 



White Kidney. 



January 6 . . . 
" 13... 

" 20... 
" 27... 

February 3.. 
- 10.. 
" 17.. 
** 24.. 

March 3.... 
" 10.... 
" 17.... 

*' 24.... 
" 31.... 

April 7 

■" 14 

" 21 

'^ 28 

May 5 

'' 12 

*' 19 

" 26 

June 2 

" 9 

" 16 

'* 23 

'' 30 

July 7 

*• 14 

•* 21 

" 28 

August 4 — 
" 11.... 
*' 18.... 
'^ 25..., 

September 1 
8 
15 
22 

*' 29 

October 6.. 
'• 13.. 
" 20.. 
" 27. 

November 3 
10 
17 
24 

December 1 

8. 

15. 

" 22 



1 95 @2 40 

2 05 ®2 35 
2 05 @2 30 
2 05 @2 30 

05 @2 40 

2 05 (^2 40 

2 05 @2 40 

2 00 @2 25 



2 00 
1 90 
1 90 
1 90 
1 90 



2 15 
2 15 



2 50 
2 75 
2 75 



2 65 
2 65 
2 60 
2 60 
2 60 



@2 25 
@2 20 
@2 20 
@,2 20 
@2 25 



1 90 @2 25 
1 95 @2 30 
@2 50 
@2 55 



@2 75 
@3 00 
@3 00 



2 75 @3 00 



@2 90 
@2 90 
@2 85 
@2 85 
@2 85 



2 60 @2 85 

2 60 @2 85 

2 60 @2 85 

2 60 @2 85 

2 60 @2 85' 

i 40 ®2 80 

2 40 (^2 85 

2 40 @2 85 



2 30 
2 2^0 
2 00 
1 50 
1 50 



@2 75 
m 80 
@2 35 
@2 00 
@1 90 



2 70 ®2 75 

2 80 

2 75 
2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 35 @2 75 



2 30 
2 30 
2*30 
2 30 
2 30 



1 65 @2 10 

I 65 @2 10 

1 65 @2 10 

1 75 @2 15 

1 75 @2 15 

1 80 @2 20 

1 80 @2 20 

1 95 @2 25 

1 85 @2 nyi 

1 85 fa 2 12 W> 

1 70 @2 00 
1 643<^'itl 94 J< 

1 60 @1 92X 



@2 70 
@2 65 
@2 65 
@2 65 
@2 65 



2 20 @2 55 

2 20 @2 55 

2 25 @2 60 

2 25 @2 60 

30 @2 65 

60 @3 05 

2 60 @3 05 

2 60 @3 05 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 (^3 00 

2 55 @8 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 55 @3 00 

2 50 ®2 90 

2 50 @2 90 

2 50 @2 90 



2 50 
2 50 
2 30 
2 15 
2 00 



@2 90 
@2 80 
®2 75 
@2 50 
@2 20 



1 95 @2 50 

1 95 @2 50 

1 95 @2 50 

1 95 @2 50 

2 05 @2 55 
2 05 @2 60 
2 05 ®2 60 
2 15 @2 60 



2 15 
2 15 
2 15 
2 15 
2 15 

2 20 
2 20 
2 40 

2 80 

3 10 
3 50 
3 50 

50 



2 10 @2 40 

2 10 @2 40 

2 10 @2 35 

2 00 @2 30 

2 00 @2 30 

2 00 @2 30 

1 90 ®2 25 

1 90 @2 25 

1 90 m 35 

1 90 ®2 15 

1 85 @2 10 
1 84;^ -.2 09>^ 

1 80 @2 05 



2 00 
00 
200 
2 00 
2 00 



@2 60 
@2 55 
®2 55 
®2 60 
@2 60 

@2 60 
@2 70 
@2 85 
®3 10 

@3 50 
@3 80 
®3 90 
@3 90 



2 85 

2 85 

2 75 @2^ 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 75 @2 80 

2 30 @2 80 

2 30 @2 75 

2 30 @2 70 

2 30 @2 70 . 

2 30 @2 70 

2 30 @2 65 



3 50 @3 90 

3 60 @3 85 

50 @3 75 

3 50 @3 75 

3 50 @3 75 

3 pO @3 m}4 

3 50 @3 67}^ 

3 40 @3 Gl% 

3 40 ®3 67 

3 4^ @3 60 

" 40 @3 60 

3 40 @3 60 

3 40 @3 55 

3 30 @3 55 

3 30 @3 60 

3 15 @3 40 

2 45 @3 00 

2 45 ®2 75 

2 45 @2 70 

2 15 ®2 45 

10 r«.2 35 

1 90 ®2 25 

1 90 @2 'H-ly. 

1 90 @2 25 * 

1 90 ®2 22>^ 

1 90 @2 3 



2 30 
2 30 
2 30 
2 50 

2 50 
2 70 
2 70 
2 70 

2 70 
2 70 
2 70 
2 70 
2 To 



2 80 
2 80 
2 70 
2 70 
2 70 



2 30 
230 



@2 35 
(a 2 a5 
fr 2 30 
ta2 28>^ 
^2 27;^ 



@2 55 
@2 65 
@2 65 
@2 75 

®2 75 
@3 10 
®3 10 
@3 00 

@3 00 
®3 00 
@3 10 
®3 10 
®3 10 



2 70 @3 15 

2 70 @3 20 

2 70 ®3 20 

2 70 @3 20 

2 70 ®3 20 

2 80 @3 15 

2 80 @3 10 

2 80 @3 10 



@3 10 
®3 10 
@2 !K) 
@3 00 
®3 00 



2 50 ®2 80 

2 40 @2 65 

2 40 ®2 6U 

2 40 @2 60 



®2 55 
®-> 55 
@2 45 
2 25 ®2 45 



2 25 
2 20 
2 20 
>25 
2 29 



®2 35 
ia>i 45 
(?r.2 50 
@2 50 
(0 2 58)^ 



2 10 @2 85 

2 10 ®2 85 

2 10 @2 75 

2 10 ®2 75 

2 25 @2 75 

2 25 @2 75 

2 25 ®2 75 

2 30 @2 75 



2 30 
2 10 
2 10 
2 10 
2 10 



2 80 
2 80 
2 80 
2 80 



2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 10 
2 10 



®2 70 
@2 60 
@2 60 
@2 60 
®2 55 



2 10 @2 50 

2 10 ®2 60 

2 10 @2 65 

2 50 ®2 75 

2 50 @2 75 

2 70 ®3 10 

2 80 (^3 20 

2 bO (^3 15 



@3 15 
®3 15 
®3 15 
®3 10 
@3 10 



2 80 @3 15 

2 80 @3 15 

2 80 ®3 15 

2 25 ®2 75 

2 25 @2 75 

2 25 @2 75 

1 25 @2 75 

2 25 ®2 75 



■@2 50 
@2 50 
®2 50 
®2 50 
@2 50 



2 10 @2 75 

2 10 @2 75 

2 10 @2 70 

2 20 @2 65 

2 25 @2 70 

2 25 ®2 70 

2 25 (^2 65 

2 25 @2 65 

2 15 @2 55 

2 20 (fii2 45 

2 20 ("^ 45 

2 15 @2 40 
2 lO^sT^a 35X 



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Average Prices of Beans. 



295 



Average Prices of Beans, Monthly and Yearly, 
AT New York, 

For the Tear 1877. 



MOKTH. 


Mediums, 


Pea, 


MarrowB, 


Red Kidney, 


White Kidney, 




Per bush. 


Per bush. 


Per bush. 


Per bush. 


Per bush. 


January 


2 02>^@2 33^ 


2 75 @2 77>^ 


1 95 @2 50 


2 80 @2 82)< 


2 10 @2 80 


Febr'y.. 


2 0::JX@2 363^ 


I 65 @2 78X 


2 07>^@2 58% 


2 633^ @2 80 


2 265i @2 75 


March .. 


1 92 @2 22 


l 30 @2 66 


2 15 @2 58 


2 30 @2 70 


2 14 @2 61 


April... 


2 03%@2 40 


2 22X@2 57^ 


2 40 @2 811^ 


2 27>^ @2 H5 


2 20 (a2 623?^ 


May.... 


2 6SK@2 933^ 


i mx®'^ 95 


3 40 @3 77^ 


2 65 @2 98)^ 2 70 @3 05 


June:.. .12 62 @2 87 
July... .12 60 @2 85 


2 55 @3 00 


3 50 @3 80 


2 70 @3 06 12 80 @3 13 


2 55 @3 00 


3 45 @3 67% 


2 70 @3 18% 2 66% @3 05 


August. 


2 45 @2 83^ 


2 513^@2 92,V 


3 40 @3 58jJ^ 


2 771^ ©3 33% 2 25 @2 75 


Sept.... 


1 92 @2 36 


2 29 @2 63 


2 93 @3 26 


2 74 @3 02 12 04 @2 50 


October. 


1 673^@2 111^ 


2 07X@'2 36 J^ 


2 15 @2 43X 


2 42X @2 66J^ 2 12 J^ @2 71% 


Nov .... 


1 82>5^@2 20 


1 % @2 27^ 


1 90 @2 263^ 


2 27>^ @2 50 (2 25 @2 67><^ 


Dec.... 


1 73 @2 02^ 


1 86 @2 15' 


2 00 @2 31 1-6 


2 23 5-6@2 47% S 16 l-6@2 45 1-6 


Range . . 


1 50 @3 00 


1 80 @3 05 


1 90 @3 90 


2 20 ®3 20 2 00 @3 20 


Yearly 










Average 


2 12%@2 46 


2 355S®2 67 5-12 


2 60%@2 96 4-7 


2 54%@2 83 3-7 2 30% @2 75% 



Average Prices of Cottonseed Oil, Weekly, 
AT New York, 

F(xr the Tear 1877. 



For Week 
Ending 



Crude, 
Per Gallon. 



January 6.. 

" 13 . 

" 20 . . 

'' 27.. 

February 3 

" * 10 

17 

*' 24 

March 3. ., 

'' 10... 

" 17..., 

" 24... 

" 31 . . . 

April 7 

" 14.. . 

" 21 

" 28...., 

May 5 

'^ 12 

*' 19 

" 26 

June 2 

« 9 

" If. 

" 23. ... 
" 80 



Cents. 

42 
43 

473^ @48% 
49 4 5 

48 @50 1-3 
50 @52 

49 2 3@50 2-3 
48 @4S 2-3 

48% 
4Q @47 
46j<r @471-6 
4A}4 @45 5 6 
42 @43 1 6 

40 

40 5 6 

43% 

46% 
48 -- 
48 
48 
47>5^ @491-6 

45 

45 

45% 

45% 



Summer 
Yellow, 
Per Gallon. 



@50 



55 



Cents. 

49 @50 
512-3@52 2-3 

55 

55 

55 1-6 

@56 

.54 1-5 

52% @531-5 

52 5-6@54 1-3 

52 @531-3 

50 5-6@52 5 6 
50 @51 5-6 
50 @51% 

48% 

48% 

49 1-5 . 

50% 

51% 

50 1-3 

50% 

49 2-3 

49 3-8 

49 5-6 

50 

50 

50% 



• For Week 
Ending 



July 7.. .. 

" 14 .. 

" 21... 

" 23. . . 

August 4 . 

" 11. 

" 18. 

" 25. 

September 



October 6. 
" 13. 



" 27... 

November 3. 

10. 

'* 17. 

24. 

December 1. 

8. 

« 15. 

" 22. 

27. 



Crude, 
Per Gallon. 



Cents. 

46% 
46% 

S^ 

44 
45J5r 
4T% 
47% 

• 11^ 
47% 

47% 

47% 

48>^ 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

Old 50: New 53 

53% 

@54 

@54 
50 
50 
50 
501-5 



Summer 

Yellow, 

Per Gallon. 



Cents. 

501-5 

49% 

49% 

50% 

51% 

631-6 

53% 

53% 

53 5-6 

54 

53 

53 

53 

53 

53% 

54 

55 

55% 

64 3-5 
541-3 
56% 
661-7 
55 

65 1.10 
55 
651^ 



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296 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Cash Prices of G-rain, Pork and Lard at Chicago, 

Monthly, 

For the Tear 1877. 

As reported by the Chicago Commercial Bulletin. 



MONTH. 

NAifE OF Price. 

JANUARY. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

FEBRUARY. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

MARCH. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

APRIL. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

MAY. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing , 

JUNE. 

Opening 

JiUghest , 

Lowest 

Closing 

JULY. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

AUGUST. 

Opening 

Highest , 

Lowest , 

Closing , 

SEPTEMBER. 

Opening 

EUghest , 

Lowcbt , 

Closing 

OCTOBER. 

Opening 

Highest. 

Lowest 

Closing 

NOVEMBER. 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Cl<»ing , 

DECEMBER. 

Opening 

ffighest 

Lowest 

Closing 



Wheat, 

No. !!? 

Spring. 



Corn, 
No. 2 
Mixed. 



Oats, 
No. 2. 



Rye, 
No. 2. 



Barley, 
No. 2. 



Mess 
Pork. 



$1 25% 
1 31 
1 23% 
1 25>^ 

1255^ 
132>^ 
1 21% 

1 ^y^ 
1 ^y, 

1 20% 
125% 

1 26 

1 75 
1 26 
162>{r- 

1 54 
1765< 
1 43 
1 49 

150X 
1 54 
1 41 
1 41 

1 4A% 
1483^ 
1 21 
1 21 

1 23 
1 23 

1 01^ 
1 09 

1 11 
1 18 
1 09 
1 18 

1 12 
1 14>^ 
106^ 
1 14 

1 08 
111% 
1 053^ 
1 06 

1 063^ 
110% 
1 06X 
109% 



Cents. 

44>«r 

41% 



423^ 
45 

40 

2,Viy 
42% 
38j^ 
38% 

38% 
h'Xy 

^y 

5sy 
5iy 

42,1^ 
43 Ji 

44% 
47><^ 
43% 
45% 

46y 
49X 



Aly 

47% 
41 

42>i 

43 

4^y 
4iy 

42% 

4Siy 

45% 
41% 

44% 

44% 
50 
42% 
50 

41% 
46% 
41% 
42% 



Cents. 
34>^ 
35^^ 
34 >^ 
35% 

35% 
36% 
32% 



33% 
30-^ 
31% 

31 

41% 
30% 
41% 

40^ 
45% 
36^ 
37 



37% 
38% 
33. 
33% 



2T% 
27% 

27% 
28 
22 
23% 

23% 
24% 
23% 



23% 
24% 
22 'i. 

24% 

24% 
26% 
24% 

24% 

24% 
26% 

24H' 



Cents. 
72 

72% 
70 
70 

70 
'.0 
60 
61 

'61 
68% 
61 
64% 

64% 

95 

55 



90 
91 
70 
70 

70 
70 
60 



65 
52 

57 

55% 
56 
51% 
52% 

53% 
56 

53% 
53% 

53% 
54 
51% 
54 

54 
56 

53% 
55% 

^^ 



Cents. 
66 
67% 



55% 
85 
55 
85 

75 
80 
60 
65 

65 



65 

65 
67 
65 
67 

65 

71 
65 
67% 

66 

68% 
60% 
60% 

60 
61 

58 
60% 



64 

58 



56% 
57% 



$17 20 
17 95 
16 37%* 
16 37% 

16 00 



65 

47 
47% 


16 42% 
14 25 
14 37% 


47 
56 
47 
56 


14 52% 
14 75 
13 15 
13 85 



14 00 
16 75 

13 90 

15 87% 

14 75 

15 40 
13 45 
13 70 

13 75 
13 75 
12 50 
12 90 

12 50 

13 90 

12 50 

13 17% 

13 20 
13 50 
12 00 
12 30 

12 40 

13 90 

12 25 

13 75 

13 75 
15 25 
13 75 
15 00 

13 50 
13 50 
11 65 
11 65 

11 75 

12 05 
11 40 
11 55 



$11 20 
11 55 
10 65 
10 75 

10 60 

11 12% 
9 50 ' 

9 72% 

9 75 
9 82% 
« 95 
9 25 



10 25 
9 30 
10 00 

9 75 
9 87% 
9 17% 
9 25 ' 

9 30 
9 30 
8 50 
8 62% 

8 45 

9 15 
8 45 
8 65 

8 75 

8 90 
8 10 
8 20 



9 05 
8 35 
8 62% 

8 70 
8 87% 
8 15 
8 15 

8 12% 
8 12% 
7 72% 
7 77% 

7 87% 
7 97% 
755 
7 60 



Hosted by 



Google 



Acreage devoted to Cereal Crops in the U. S. 297 

AcBEAGE Devoted to Cebeal Ceops in the United States, 

In the Tear 1876. 

As per Returns of the U. S. Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 



Wheat, 
Acres. 



CORX, 
Acres. 



Oats, 
Acres. 



Rye, 
Acres. 



Barley, 
Acres. 



Arpa of States. 
Acres. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. . . 
Rhode Island , . . 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania . . . 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina.. 
South Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Florida 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Tennessee 

"West Virginia. . . 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnetota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

California 

Oregon. . J9. ..... . 

Nevada 

The Territories*, 

Total 1876 .... 

•* 1875 

"• 1874 

" 1873 

" 1872 



24,666 
12.800 



45,161 



972 



2,413 
650,000 
160,000 
1,419,696 
57,500 
480, <'0^ 
926,470 
410,958 
106,250 
473,330 



175,384 
42,207 



365,38^1 

170,731 
1,356,626 

307,000 

8.'23,700 
1,843,220 
1,264,166 
1,818,181 
2,520,430 
1,866,666 
1,882,352 
2,885,245 
1,229,032 
1,130,821 

376,521 
2,307,692 

275,000 
21,428 

211,538 



48,512 

32,857 

8,285 

56,923 

700,000 

261,111 

1,207,142 

128,3.S3 

475,172 

1,030,000 

1,575,342 

1,182,926 

2,147,272 

250,000 

2,016,538 

1,333,! 

697,674 

1,920,000 

895,833 

2,224,489 

376,063 

1,889,552 

3,133,514 

736,206 

3,300,000 

8,920,000 

794,117 

291,338 

4,750,000 

3,687,050 

1,904,275 

850,000 

48,484 

4,000 

553 

63,000 



102,260 

37,030 

122,000 

16,333 

3,33:5 

43,750 

1,404,385 

156,60^3 

1,159,090 

14,423 

206,976 

484,177 

261,481 

75,862 

491,379 

9,77? 

127,659 

47,852 



2,400 

2,611 

4,324 

21,618 

1,541 

30,000 

230,000 

38,518 

231,428 

923 

23,3a3 

49,479 

42,857 

6,666 



35,837 
4,354 
5,377 
2,200 
473 
1,100 
300,000 



20,330,240 
5,939,200 
6,535,ti80 
4,992,000 



25,454 



117,741 
45,121 
306,818 
124,444 
311,363 
924,528 
366,242 
584,581 
2,400,000 
700,000 
480,000 
836,614 
650,990 
390,820 
138,339 
70,000 
72,368 
2,903 
71,666 



4,545 

39,444 

23,809 

103,603 

35,937 

18,666 

42.622 

161,250 

95,000 

6,937 

25,000 

45,945 

165,865 

5,575 

'5,131 

247 



2,758 



4,324 
3,333 
12,790 
40,000 
47,750 
26,315 

124,293 
81,818 
09,406 

241,666 
25,588 
69,406 
21,363 

536,363 
18,620 
21,568 
30,357 



2,991,360 
30,080,000 

5,324,800 
29,440,000 

1,356,800 

7,119,360 
39,265,280 
32,450,560 
18,806,400 
33,285,760 
37,931,520 
32,462,080 
30,179,840 
29,715,840 
152,002,560 
33,406,720 
29,184,000 
13,146,240 
24,115,200 
25,576,960 
35,995,520 
21,637,776 
35,459,200 
34,511,360 
53,459,840 
35,228,800 
43,123,200 
50,187,620 
49,233,920 
120,948,480 
60,975,360 
54,690,560 



27,627,021 
26.381,512 
24;967,027 
22,171,676 
20,858,359 



49,033,364 
44,841,371 
41,036,918 
39,197,148 
36,526,836 



13,358,908 
11,915,075 
10,897,412 
9,751,700 
9,000,769 



1,468.374 
1,359,788 
1,116,716 
1,150,355 
1,048,654 



1,766,511 
1,789,902 
1,580,626 
1,387,106 
1,397,082 



1,909,023,056 



*Not including Alaska. 

Average Yieuj and Cash VAiiUE per Acre, and Price per Bushel, 
Pound, or Ton of Farm Products.— /i^(?7' t7ie Tear 1876. 



PRODUCT. 


Average Yield 
per Acre. 


Average Price 
per Bushel. 


Average Value 
per Acre. 


Indian Com 

Wheat 


bushels 


26.1 
10.4 
13.8 
24.0 
21.9 
14.5 
71.6 
1.22 

705 

178.6 


$0 37.0 
1 03.7 
66.9 
35.1 
66.4 
72.6 
65.5 
9 74 
07.4 
11 


$9 69 
10 86 


Rye 

Oats 


ik 


928 
844 


Barley 

Buckwheat 


it 


14 56 
10 58 


Potatoes 

Hay 

Tobacco 


(( 
tons 

-noTinds 


48 14 
11 90 
52 83 


Cotton " .... 


19 64 







Hosted by 



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298 



l^ew York Produce Exchange. 



Cebeal Pboduction of the United States, 

F</r the Tea/r 1876. 

* As per Returns of the TJ. S. Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 


Wheat, 
Bush. 


Corn, 
Bush. 


Oats, 
Bush. 


Rye, 
Bush. 


BARIiEY. 
Bush. 


TOTAL. 


Maine 


296,000 

192,< 00 

421,000 

17,500 

35',666 

9,750,000 

2,176,000 

18,740.000 

920,000 

6,000,000 

7,875,000 

3,000,000 

850,000 

. 2,840,000 

1,140,666 
325,000 

4,75a666 

1,400.000 
11,260,000 

3.377,000 

8.237,000 
21,750,000 
15,170.000 
20,000.000 
23,440,000 
16.800,000 
16,000,000 
17.600,000 
15.240,000 
16,510,000 

4,330,000 
30.000,000 

4,675,000 
390,000 

3,850,000 


1,400,000 

2,029,000- 

1,892,000 

1,150,000 
290,000 

l.&50,000 
21,000,000 

9,400,000 
42,250,000 

3,850,000 
13,780.000 
20,600,000 
2^3,000,000 

9,700,000 
23,620,000 

2,500,000 
26,215,000 
20,000,000 
12,000,000 
48,000,000 
21.500,000 
84,500,000 
10,605,000 
63,300,000 
115,000,000 
21,350,000 
99,000,000 
223,000.000 
27,000,000 

7,400,000 
142.500,000 
102,500.000 
82,836,00'0 
25,500.000 

1,600,000 
120,000 
15,500 

1,575,000 


2,352,000 
1,222,000 
4,514,000 

4<K).00O 
90,000 
1,050,000 
40,025,000 
4,150,000 
33,151,000 

375,000 
4,450,000 
7,650.000 
3,530,000 
1,100,000 
5,700,000 

132,000 
1,800,000 

780,000 

3,65b;666 

925,000 

5,400.000 

2.800.000 

6.S50.000 

24,500.000 

11.500.000 

13,270,000 

48,000,000 

21,700.000 

12.000,000 

21.250,000 

13,150,000 

12,389,000 

3,500,000 

2,450.000 

2,750.000 

9o:ooo 

2,150,000 


33,600 

47,000 

80,000 

290,500 

18,500 

360,000 

2,760,000 

520,000 

3,240,000 

12,000 

315,000 

475,000 

360,000 

44,000 

56,666 

50.000 

355,000 

300,000 

1,150,000 

460,000 

252,000 

520,000 

2,580 000 

1,330,000 

111,000 

a^o.ooo 

680,000 

3,450.000 

92,000 

78,000 

5,200 


663,000 

108,000 

121,000 

55,000 

9,000 

27,500 

6,600,000 

' 56b;666 

8b;666 
80,666 

52,000 

275.000 

800,000 

955,000 

400.000 

2,200,000 

1,800,000 

1.520.000 

5,800,000 

435,000 

1,960,000 

470.000 

11,800,000 

540,000 

550.000 

850,000 


4,744,600 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


3,598,000 
7,028,000 


MaRsachusetts 

Bhodc Island 

Connecticut 

New York 


2,003,000 

407,500 

3.322,500 

80,135.000 


New Jersey 


16,246,000 


Pennsylvania 

Delaware 


97,940,000 
5,157,000 


Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Greorgia 


24,545,000 
36,600,000 
2W,890,000 
11,694,000 
32,160,000 


Florida 

Alabama 


2,6:J2,000 
29,155,000 
21,105,000 
12,000,000 
56,5^6,000 


Mississippi 

Louisiana..'. 

Texas 


Arkansas 


23,875,000 


Tennessee 


71,595.000 


West Virgniia 

Kentucky 


17,120,000 
79,812,000 


Ohio 


162.510.000 


Michigan 


49,2;J7,000 


Indiana 


133.190,000 
299,220,000 
68,630,000 
37,031,000 


Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 


Iowa 

Missouri 


187.500,000 
132,010,000 


Xansns 


117,145,000 


Nebraska 


33.892,000 


California 


45,928,000 


Oregon '. 


8,090,200 


Nevada : 


1,045,500 


The Territories 


8,425,000 


Total 1876 

" 1875 • 

" 1874 

" 1873 


239,a';6.500 
292,136,000 
309,102.700 
231,254,700 
249,997,100 


1,283827,500 

l,32i;069,000 

850.148.500 

932,274,000 

1,092,719,000 


320,884,000 
354,317,.500 
240,360,000 
270,340.000 
271,747,000 


20.374.800 
17.722.100 
14,990,900 
15.14,2,000 
14,888,000 


38,710,500 
3'),903,600 
32.552,500 
32,044,491 
26,846,400 


1,953,153,300 
2,022,153,200 
1,447,163,600 
1, 531,055,191 
1,6j6»19T,500 


" 1872 







Estimated Quantities, Number of Acres, and Aggregate Value of 
THE Principal Crops of the Farm in 1876. 



product. 


Number of. 
Bushels, &c. 


Number of 
Acres. 


Value. 


Indian Com 


1,283,827,500 
289.356,500 
20.374,800 
320.884,000 
38,710.500 
9,663.800 
124,82 r,000 


49,033 364 
27.627,021 

1,468.374 
13,a>8,9u8 

1,766,511 
666,-141 

1,741,983 


$475,491,210 
30 1 259 300 


Wheat - 


Rve 

Oatrt 

Barley 


13,635,826 
112,863.900 
25,735,110 
7,021,498 
83,861,390 


Buckwheat 






Total 


2,087,649,100 

30,K)7.100 

381,002.000 

4,438,000 


95,662,602 


1,018,870.234 




Hay tons 

Tobacco pounds 

Cotton bales .... 


25,282,797 

540,457 

11.677,250 


.300,901,252 
28.282.968 
229,444,600 




Total 




133,163,106 


1,577,499,054 



Hosted by 



Google 



The Wheat Orop in the United States, . 299 



The Wheat Crop in the United States, 

For the Tear 1876. 

As per Betums of the TJ. S. Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 


Aggregate 

Product, 

Bush. 


Acreage. 


Average 

Yield per 

Acre, 


Average 

Value per 

Bush. 


Average 

Value per 

Acre. 


Total 
Value. 


Maine 


296,000 

192,000 

421,000 

17,600 

35',66o 
9,750,000 
2,176,000 
18,740,0 

920,000 
6,000,000 
7,875,000 
3,000,000 

850,000 
2,840,000 

1,140,666 
325,000 

4,750',666 

1,400,000 

11,260,000 

3,377,000 

8,237,001 

21,750,000 

15,170,000 

20,000,000 

23,440,000 

16,800,000 

i6;ooo,ooo 

17,600,000 
15,240,000 
16,510,000 

4,330,000 
30,000,000 

4,675,000 
390,000 

3,850,000 


24,666 

12,800 

28,639 

972 

"2!4i3 
650,000 
160,000 
1,419,696 
57,500 
480,000 
926,470 
410,958 
106,250 
473,333 

*i75;384 
42,207 

'363;384 

170,731 

1,356,626 

307,009 

823,700 

1,843,220 

1,264,166 

1,818,181 

2,520,430 

l,8t)6,6(J6 

1,882,352 

2,885,245 

1,229,032 

1,130,821 

376,521 

2,307,69 1 

275,000 

21,428 

211,538 


12 
15 
14.7 
18 

14:5 

15 

13.6 

13.2 

16 

12.5 

8.5 

7.3 

8 

6 

'6.5 

7.7 

13" 
8.2 
8.3 

11 

10 

11.8 

12 

11 
9.3 
9 

8.5 
6.1 

12.4 

14.6 

11.5 

13 

17 

18.2 

18.2 


$1 58 
155 
1 43 
1 30 

i"36 
1 31 
1 32 
125 
1 27 
1 27 
1 13 
1 20 
1 66 
1 34 

i*23 
1 38 

i*68 

95 

92 

1 11 

1 00 

1 14 

1 16 

1 02 

93 

1 01 

90 

90 

89 

86 

73 

1 14 

70 

1 10 

1 00 


$18 96 
23 25 
21 02 
23 40 

i8'85 

19 65 

17 95 
16 50 

20 32 
15 87 

9 60 
8 76 
13 28 
8 04 

'7'99 
10 62 

i4*64 
7 79 

7 71 

12 21 

10 00 

13 45 

13 92 

11 22 

8 64 

9 09 

7 65 
5 49 

11 03 

12 55 

8 39 

14 82 
11 90 
20 02 

18 20 


$467,680 

297,600 

602,030 

22,750 

"Aim 

12,772,500 
2,872,320 

23,425,000 
1,168,400 
7,620,000 
8,898,750 
3,600,000 
1,411,000 
3,805,600 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island." 

Connecticut 


New York 


New Jer?ey 


Pennsylvania 

Delaware 


Mftryland. 


Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 


Florida 


Alabama 

Mississippi 


1,402,200 
448,500 

5,130,666 

1,330,000 
10,471,800 

3,748,470 

8,237,000 
24,795,000 
17,597,200 
20,400,000 
21,74)9,200 
16,96S,000 
14,400,000 
15,840,000 
iy,563,600 
14,198,600 

1, 6^^,100 
34,200,000 

3,272,500 
429,000 

3,850,000 


liOuisiana 

Texas 


Arkansas .... . . 


Tennessee 


West Virginia 

Kentucky 


Ohio 

Michigan 


Indiana 


Illinois 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 

Iowa 


Missouri 


Kansas 

Nebraska 


California ...... 

Oregon 


Nevada 


The Territories 


Total 1876 

" 1875 

" 1874 

" 1873 

" 1872 


289,a56,500 
29^136,000 
'309,102,700 
281,254.700 
249,997,100 


27,627,021 
26,331,512 
24.967,027 
22,171,676 
20,858,359 








$300,259,300 
294,580,990 
291,107,895 
323,594,805 
310,180,375 



Summary by Geographical Divisions, 
For the Tear 1876. 





Aggregate 
Product. 


Acreage. 


New Enprland States 


961.500 
31,586;000 
51,054,000 
167,2-^0,000 
34,675,000 
3,850,000 


69,490 


Middle States 


2,287,196 


Southern States 


5,638,043 


Western States 


16,838,062 


Pacific States 


2,582,692 


Territories... 


21i;538 







Hosted by Google 



300 



New York Produce Exchange, 



The Coen Crop in the United States, 

F(yr the Tea/r 1876, 

As per Returns of the U. S. Agricnltural Department. 



STATE. 


Aggregate 
Product, 
Bush. 


Acreage. 


Average 

Yield per 

Acre. 


Average 

Value per 

Bush. 


Average 

Value per 

Acre. 


Total 
Value. 


Main** 


1,400,000 

2,029.000 

1,892,000 

1,150,000 
290,000 

1,850.000 
21,000,000 

9,400,000 
42,250,000 

3,^0,000 
13,780,000 
20,600,000 
23;000,000 

9,700,000 
23,620,000 

2,500,000 
26,215,000 
20,000,000 
12,000,000 
48,000,000 
21,500,000 
54,500,000 
10,605,000 
63,300,000 
115,000,000 
21,350,000 
99,000,000 
223,000,000 
27,000,000 

7,400,000 

142,600,000 

102,500.000 

82,836,000 

25,500,000 

1,600,000 

120,000 

15,500 

1,575,000 


45,161 

48,309 

48.512 

32,857 

8,285 

56,923 

700,000 

261,111 

1,2P7,142 

128,333 

476,172 

1,030,000 

1,575,342 

1,182,926 

2,147,272 

250.000 

2,016;538 

l,3a3,333 

697,674 

1,920,000 

895,833 

2,224,489 

376.063 

1,889,552 

3,133,514 

736,206 

3,300,000 

8,920.000 

794,117 

291,338 

4,750,000 

3,687,050 

1,904.275 

850,000 

48,484 

4,000 

553 

63,000 


31 
42 
39 
35 
35 
32.5 
30 
36 
35 
30 
29 
20 
14.6 
8.2 
11 
10 
13 
15 
17.2 
25 
24 

24.5 
28.2 
33.5 
36.7 
29 
30 
25 
34 
25.4 
30 
27.8 
43.5 
30 
33 
30 
28 
25 


$0 79 

79 

78 

75 

75 

74 

68 

56 

55 

50 

49 , 

46 

54 

78 

60 

86 

48 

55 

70 

50 

39 

32 

45 

30 

38 

52 

34 

31 

41 

40 

25 

28 

24 

27 
1 07 

90 
1 00 

95 


$24 49 
33 18 
30 42 
26 25 

26 25 
24 05 
20 41 
20 16 
19 26 
15 00 

14 21 
9 20 

7 88 
6 39 

6 60 

8 60 
624 
825 

12 04 
12 50 
936 

7 84 

12 69 
10 05 

13 94 

15 08 
10 20 

7 75 

13 94 

10 16 

• 7 50 

7 78 
10 44 

8 10 
35 31 

27 00 

28 00 
23 75 


$1,106,000 

1,602,910 

1,475,760 

862,500 

217,500 

1,369.000 

14,280,000 
5,264,f00 

23,237,500 
1,925,000 
6,752,200 
9,476,000 

12,420,000 
7,566,000 

14,172,000 
2,150,000 

12,583,200 

11,000,000 
8,400,000 

24,000,000 
8,385,000 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


Kassachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 


New York 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 

Delaware 


Mftrylarid 


Virginia . .; 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 


Florida 


Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 


Arkansas 


Tennessee 


17,440,000 
4,772,250 
18,990,000 
43,700,000 
11,102,000 
33.660.000 


West Virginia 

Kentucky 


Ohio ....*.,. 

Michigan...- 


Indiana 


Illinois 


69,130,000 
11,070,000 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 


2,960,000 


Iowa 


35,625,000 


Missouri 


28,700,000 


Kansas 


19,880,640 


Nebraska 

California 


6.885,000 
1,712,000 


Or^on 


108,000 


Nevada 


15,500 


The Territories 


1,496,250 


Total 1876 

" 1875 

" 1874 

" 1873 

" 1872 


1,283,827.500 

1,321,069,000 

850,148.500 

932,274.000 

1,092,719,000 


49,033.364 . 

44,841.371 

41,036,918 

39,197,148 

35,526,836 








$475,491,210 
555,445.930 
650,043,080 
447,183,020 
435,149,290 



Summary by GtEOGRAPHical Divisions, 
For the Year 1876. 



Aggregate 
Produce. 



Acreage. 



New England States 

Middle States 

Southern States 

Western States 

Pacific States 

Temtones 



8,611,000 

76,500,(100 

349,320,000 

846,lnl,500 

1,720,000 

1,575,000 



240,047 

2,296,586 

18,014,194 

28,867,053 

52 484 

63,000 



Hosted by 



Google 



The Oat Crop of the United States. ■ 
The Oat Ckop of the United States, 

F(yr the Tear 1876, 

As per Returns of the IT. S. Agricultural Department. 



301 



STATE. 


Aggregate 

Product, 

bush. 


Acreage. 


Averag? 

Yield per 

'Acre. 


Average 

Value per 

Bush. 


Average 

Value per 

Acre. 


Total 
Value. 


Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 


2,352,000 

1,222,000 

4,514,000 

490,000 

90,000 

1,050,000 

40,025,000 

4,150,000 

33,150,000 

375,000 

4,450,000 

7,650,000 

3,530,000 

1,100,000 

■ 5,700,000 

132,000 

1,800,000 

780,000 

3,66o;666 

925,000 

5,400,000 

2,800,000 

6,850,009 

24,500,000 

11,500,000 

13,270,000 

48,000,000 

21,700,000 

12,000,000 

21,250,000 

13,150,000 

12,389,000 

3,500,000 

2,450,000 

2,750,000 

90,000 

2,150,000 


102,260 
37,030 
122.000 

16;3;^ 

3,333 

43,750 

1,404,385 

156,603 

1,159,000 

14,423 

206,976 

484,177 

261,481 

75,862 

491,879 

9,777 

127,659 

47,852 

' 117,741 
45,121 
306,818 
124,444 
311,363 
924,528 
366,242 
584,581 
2,400,000 
700,000 
480,000 
836,614 
650,990 
390,820 
138,339 
70,000 
72,368 
2,903 
71,666 


23 

33 

37 

30 

27 

24 

28.5 

26.5 

28.6 

26 

21.5 

15.8 

13.5 

14.5 

11.6 

13.5 

14.1 

16.3 

si*" 

20.5 
17.6 
22.5 
22 
26.5 
31.4 
22.7 
20 
' 31 
25 
25.4 
20.2 
31.7 
25.3 
35 
38 
31 
30 


$0 49 
49' 
42 
51 
60 
48 
42 
42 
35 
34 
34 
40 
54 
82 
68 
99 
67 
69 

"58 
50 
39 
35 
36 
31 
45 
31 
26 
30 
37 
23 
26 
22 
23 
74 
50 
70 
68 


$11 27 
16 17 
15 54 

15 30 

16 20 
11 52 
11 97 
11 13 

10 01 
884 
7 31 

6 32 

7 29 

11 89 
7 88 

13 36 
9 44 

11 24 

17' 98 
10 25 

6 86 

7 87 

7 92 

8 21 

14 13 
7 03 
5 20 

9 30 
9 25 
584 

5 25 

6 97 
5 81 

25 90 

19 00 
21 70 

20 40 


$1,162,480 

598,780 

1,895,880 

249,900 

54,000 

604,000 

16,810,500 

1,748,000 

11,60-2,500 

127,600 

1,513,000 

3,060,000 

1,906,200 

902,000 

3,876,000 

130,680 

1,206,000 

538,200 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 


New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

Delaware 


Maryland 


Virginia 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 

G-eorgia 


Florida 


Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 


2,117,000 

462,50Ct 

2,106,000 

980,000 

2,466,000 

7,595,000 

5,175,000 

4,113,700 

12,480,000 

6,510,000 

4,440,000 

4,887,600 

3,419,000 

2,725,580 

805,000 

1,813,000 

1,375,000 

63,000 

1,462,000 


ArkftTIRAR ........... 


Tennessee 


West Virginia 

Kentucky 


Chip 

Michigan 

Indiana 


Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 


Iowa 

Missouri ..... 


Kansas 

Nebraska 


California 

Oregon 

Nevada 


The Territories 


Total 1876 

" 1875 

" 1874 

" 1873 

" 1872 


320,884,000 
354,317,500 
240,369,000 
270,340,000 
271,747,000 


13,358,908 
11,915,075 
10,897,412 
9,751,700 
9,000,769 








$112,865,900 

129,490,930 

125,047,530 

101,175,760 

91,315,710 



Summary by Geographical Divisions, 

For the Tear 1876. 





Aggregate 
Product. 


Acreage. 


New England States 


9,718,000 

77,700,000 

44,767,000 

181,349,000 

6.200,000 

2,150,000 


324,706 


Middle States 


2,734,601 


Southern States 


2,610,650 


Western States 


7,475,017 


Pacific States 


142,368 


Territories 


• 71,666 * 







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302 New York Produce Exchange. 

The Bye Cbop in the Ignited States, 

For the Year 1876, 

As per Returcs of the TJ. S. Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 



Aggregate 

Product, 

Bush. 



Acreage. 



Average 

Yield per 

Acre. 



Average 

Value per 

Bush. 



Average 

Value per 

Acre. 



Total 
Value. 



Maine 

Kew Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts . . 
Rhode Island. .. 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania . . , 

Delaware , 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina . , 
South Carolina . , 

Georgia 

Florida , 

Alabama 

Mis"*is8ippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Tennessee , 

West Virginia. . , 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois , 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa , 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

California 

Oregon , 

Nevada 

The Territories 

Total 1876 .. 

" 1875... 

" 1874..., 

" 1873..., 

" 1872... 



33,600 

47,000 

80,000 

290,500 

18,5110 

360.0U0 

2,760:000 

520,000 

3,240.000 

12,000 

315,000 

475.000 

360.000 

44,000 



56,000 

50,000. 

355,000 

300,000 

1,150,000 

460,000 

252.000 

520,000 

2,580,000 

1,830,000 

111,000 

350,000 

680,000 

3,450,000 

92.000 

78,000 

5,200 



2,400 

2,611 

4,324 

21,518 

1,541 

30,000 

230,000 

38,518 

231,428 

923 

23,333 

49,479 

42,857 

6,666 



3,200 
4,545 
39,444 
23,809 
103,603 
35,937 
.18,666 



161,250 
95,000 
6,937 
25,000 
45,945 
165,865 
5,575 
5,131 
247 



14 

18 

18.5 

13.5 

12 

12 

12 

13.5 

14 

13 

13.5 
9.6 
8.4 
6.6 



17.5 
11 
9 

12.6 
11.1 
12.8 
13.5 
12 2 
16 
14 
' 16 
14 
14.8 



20,374,800 
17,722,100 
14,990,900 
15,142,000 
14,888,600 



1,468,374 
1,359,788 
1,116,716 
1,150,355 
1,048,654 



$1 11 
1 00 
96 
90 
90 
H6 
82 
81 
74 
80 
76 
64 
88 
47 



95 
79 
92 
74 
70 
68 
67 
71 
58 
63 
61 
53 
57 
43 
40 
95 
75 



$15 M 

l'^ 00 

17 76 
12 15 
10 80 
10 32 
9 84 
10 93 
10 36 
10 40 
10 26 

6 14 

7 39 
9 70 



16 62 

8 69 
828 

9 32 
■ 777 

' 8 70 
9 04 
866 
928 

8 82 

9 76 

7 42 

8 43 
894 
6 60 

14 44 

15 75 



$37,296 

47,000 

76,800 

261,450 

16,650 

309,600 

2,263,200 

421,200 

2,397,600 

9,600 

239,400 

304,000 

316,800 

64,680 



53,200 

39,500 

326,600 

222.000 

805,000 

31*2,800 

168,840 

369,200 

1,496,400 

837,900 

67,710 

185,500 

387,600 

1,483,500 

. 36,800 

74.100 

3,900 



1^16,635,826 
13,631,900 
12,870,411 
11,548,126 
11,363,693 



Summary by GtEographical Divisions, 
For 1876. 





Aggregate 
Product. 


Acreage. 


New England State<? 


829,600 

6,532,000 

3,105,000 

9,825.000 

83.200 


62,394 

600,869 

296,936 

602.797 

5,878 


MiddleStates 

Southern States.' 


Western States 


Pacific States 

Territories 









Hosted by 



Google 



The Barley Crop in the United States, 



303 



The Babley Cbop in the United States, 

For the Tear 1876, 

As per Returns of the United States Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 



Maine. 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts.. 
Rhode Island . . 

Connecticut 

New York. 

Pennsylvania. . . 

Texas 

Tennessee 

West Virginia. . 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesot:\. . 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Kansas 

Nebraska 

California 

Or^on 

Nevada 

The Territories. 

Total, 1876.. 

" 1875.. 

■ " 1874.. 

" 1873 . 

" 1872.. 



Aggregate 

Product, 

Bush. 



663,000 

108,000 

121,000 

55,000 

9,000 

27,500 

6,600.000 

560,000 

80,000 

80,000 

52.000 

275.000 

800,000 

955,000 

400,000 

2,200 000 

' 1,800,000 

1,520,000 

5,800,000 

435,000 

1,960,000 

470,000 

11,800,000 

540,000 

550,000 

850,000 



38,710,500 
36,908,600 
32,552,500 
32,044,-191 
26,846,400 



Acreage. 



35,837 

4,354 

5,377 

2,200 

473 

1,100 

300,000 

25,454 

2,758 

4,324 

3,333 

12,790 

40,000 

47,750 

26,315 

124,293 

81,818 

69,406 

241,666 

25,588 

69,406 

21,363 

536,363 

18,620 

21,568 

30,357 



1,766,513 
1,789,902 
1,580,026 
1,387,106 
1,397,082 



Averaee 

Yield 
per Acre. 



18.5 

24.8 

22.5 

25 

19 

25 

22 

22 

29 

18.5 

15.6 

21.5 

20 

20 

15.2 

17.7 

22 

21.9 

24 

17 

23.5 

22 

22 

29 

25.5 

28 



Average 

value 
per Bush. 



$0 75 



90 
90 
92 
83 
85 
82 
90 
85 
84 
78 
77 
79 
50 
65 
63 
45 
65 
45 
32 
69 
68 
90 



Average 

value 
per Acre. 



$13 87 

21 32 
19 80 

22 60 

17 10 
2;^ 00 

18 26 
18 70 

23 78 
16 65 

13 26 

18 06 
15 60 
15 40 

12 00 
8 85 

14 30 

13 79 

10 80 

11 05 
10 57 

7 04 

15 18 

19 72 
22 95 

24 92 



Total 
Value. 



$497,250 

92,880 

106,480 

49,500 

8,100 

25,300 

5,478,000 

476,000 

65,600 

72,000 

44,200 

231,000 

624,000 

735,350 

316,000 

1,100,000 

1,170,000 

957,600 

2,610,000 

282,750 

882,000 

150,400 

8,J42,000 

367,200 

495,000 

756,500 



25,735,110 
29,952,082 
29,983,769 
29,333,529 
19,837,773 



The Buckwheat Crop in the United States, 

For the Tear 1876, 

As per Returns of the United States Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 



Aggregate 

Product, 

Bush. 



Acreage. 



Average 

Yield 
per Acre. 



Average 

value 
per Bush. 



Average 

value 
per Acre. 



Total 
Value. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

CJonnecticut , 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . 

Maryland 

Virginia. , 



West Virginia 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa \. 

louri 



397,000 

97,000 

399,000 

54,000 

130,000 

,750,000 

330,000 

,100,000 

75,000 

48,000 

97,000 

83,000 

390,000 

620,000 

160,000 

175,000 

425,000 

47,800 

140,000 

55,000 

96,000 



17,644 
5,105 

19,368 

4,153 

8,666 

267,857 

28,695 
154,411 
3,846 
3,582 
5,914 
4,715 

31,967 

43,971 
9,302 

11,824 

23,611 
3,296 
9,459 
3,055 
6,000 



22.5 

19 

20.6 

13 

15 

14 

11.5 

13.6 

19.5 

13.4 

16.4 

17.6 

12.2 

14.1 

17.2 

14.8 

38 

14.5 

14.8 

18 

16 



f 62 
65 
64 
65 

80 
74 
83 
74 
61 
58 
83 
65 



76 
81 
61 
66 
78 
67 
90 



$13 95 

12 35 

13 18 

8 45 

12 00 
10 36 

9 54 

10 06 

11 89 
7 77 

13 61 
11 44 

9 15 
9 72 

13 07- 
11 98 

10 98 
9 57 

11 54 

12 06 

14 40 



$246,140 

63,050 

255,300 

35,100 

104,000 

2,775,000 

273,900 

1,554,000 

46,750 

27,840 

80,510 

53,960 

292,500 

427,800 

121,600 

141,750 

259,250 

31,548 

109,230 

36,850 

86,400 



Total 1876 9,668,800 



666,441 



7,021,498 



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304 



New York JProdiiee Exchange. 



MILCH COWS IN THE UNITED STATES, 

For the Tears 





1870. 


1871. 
February. 


1875. 
January. 


1876. 
January. 




STATE. 


Population. 


Milch Cows 
per 100 In- 
habitants. 


Total 
Milch CowB 


1877. 
January. 


Maine 


626,915 

318,800 

330,551 

1,457,351 

217,353 

537,454 

. 4,382,759 

906,096 

3,521,951 

125,015 

780,894 

1,225,163 

1,071,361 

705,696 

1,184,109 

187,748 

996,992 

■ 827,922 

726,915 

818,579 

484,471 

1,258,520 

442,014 

1,321,011 

2,665,260 

1,184,059 

1,680,637 

2,539,891 

1,054,670 

439,706 

1,194.020 

1,721.295 

364,399 

122,993 

560,247 

90,923 

42,491 

216,796 


22 

28 
54 
7 
8 

18 
30 
13 
20 
19 
12 
15 
18 
13 
19 
32 
17 
21 
14 
52 
26 
19 
23 
18 
24 
21 
29 
25 
29 
27 
30 
23 
33 
23 
29 
53 
14 
34 


137,900 

89,100 
178,500 
102,000 

17,400 

9t),700 

1,314,800 

117,800 

704,400 

23,750 

93,700 
183,750 
192,850 

95,000 
225,000 

60,100 
169,500 
173,900 
101,700 
425.650 
126,000 
239,100 
101,700 
237,800 
639,700 
. 248,600 
487,300 
634,950 
305,900 
118,850 
358,200 
395,900 
120,250 

28,300 
161,500 

48,200 
6,000 

73,700 


141,300 

95,000 
193,900 
139,300 

21,900 
110,200 
1,411,100 
145,000 
788.900 

26,000 

96,000 
229,500 
203,400 
147,500 
252,500 

73,500 
177,200 
182,000 

90,000 
596,500 
132,600 
233,600 
117,300 
227,200 
734,400 
333,900 
435,500 
683,400 
386,200 
153,600 
465,300 
371,200 
162,000 

34,800 
186,800 

62,400 

7,100 

175,000 


162,000 

95,400 
201,500 
139,000 

20,400 

113,200 

1,467,000 

147,900 

828,800 

22,400 

99,800 
229,300 
197,100 
159,300 
257,400 

66,200 
169.900 
180,100 

87,000 
526,500 
151,800 
242,700 
124,300 
222,500 
778,500 
357,600 
448,400 
725,100 
464,800 
222,400 
592,200 
421,400 
335,700 

53,800 
340,000 

76,400 

9,300 

269,000 


164,300 

98,200 
209,500 
140,300 

20,400 

110,900 

1,496,300 

144,900 

837,000 

23,000 
100,700 
227,000 
201,000 
159,300 
265.100 

66,800 
168,200 
174,600 

89,600 
600,100 
160,900 
225,700 
125,500 
244,700 
809,600 
361,100 
434,900 
717,800 
474,000 
233,500 
621,800 
438,200 
235,700 

59,700 
363,800 

80,900 

9,900 

290,500 


167,500 

98,200 

215,700 

148,700 

20,500 

112,000 

1,526,200 

146,300 

845,300 

23,00C 

99,60C 

229,200 

203,000 

162,400 

270,400 

67,400 

171,500 

178,000 

89,600 

505,100 

165,700 

225,700 

125,500 

247,100 

700,000 

368,300 

439,200 

724,900 


Now Hampshire . 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. . . 
Rhode Island.. . 
Connecticut. ; . . . 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania.. . . 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina.. 
South Carolina , . 
Greorgia 


Florida 


Alabama 

Mississippi ...,,.. 

l^uisiana 

Texas 


Ark<insas 

Tennessee 

West Virginia. . . 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Michigan 

Indiana 


Illinois 


Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 


474,000 
249,800 
665,300 


Missouri 

Kansas 


460,100 

273,400 
86,200 

381,900 
88,900 
:0,000 

296,300 


Nebraska 

California. .... 
Oregon 


Nevada 

Territories 


Total 


38,332,527 


23 


8,835,450 


10,023,000 


10,906,800 


11,085,400 


11,260,800 



The aggregate number of Milch Cows in the United States for the year 1860 was 8,585,735. 
Population, 31,443,322. 

Losses of Hogs by Disease, &c., 

l^or the Year ending April 1, 1877, 

As per Returns of the TJ. S. Agricultural Department. 



STATE. 


Per 

cent. 


Number 


Value. 


STATE. 


Per 
cent. 


Number 


Value. 


Virginia 

North Carolina.. 
South Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Florida 


4 
10 
10 
10 
20 
24 
18 
14 
12 
16 
16 


24,296 
73,650 
28,410 
148,310 
33,320 
190,464 
214,074 
a3,964 
137,340 
160,048 
174,064 


$111,275 68 
308,910 00 
118,753 80 
532,432 90 
90,630 40 
660,910 08 
783,510 84 
127,025 36 
565,840 80 
571,371 36 
750,215 84 


West Virginia 

Kentucky 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois . . : . . 
Iowa 


4 
21 

7 

18.6 
22 
13.6 
30 
14 

G 


10,828 
333.522 
122,899 
441,750 
605,000 
443,795 
768,000 
50,372 
10,230 


$51,324 72 
1,821,030 12 

930,345 43 
2,893,462 50 
4,840,000 00 
3,235,265 55 
4,185,600 00 

398,946 24 
73,451 40 


Mississippi 


Missouri 


Kansas 


Texas 


NebrasJca 

Total 


ArlranraiR 

Tennessee 




4,004,236 


$23,050,303 02 



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Receipts of Flour and Grrain. 



305 



Eeceipts of Flour and Grain 

At Seven Atlantic Seaboard Ports. 



IN YEARS 



1872. 



1873. 



1874. 



1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



Flour, bbls 

Com Meal, bbls. 



Wheat, bush. 
Com, bush. . . 
Oats, bush . . . 
Barley, bush. 

Rye, bush 

ppn-<«. bush . . , 
Malt, bush.. 



9,239,559 
316,682 



10,300,848 
377,341 



11,476,184 
347,046 



10,889,544 



10,889,306 



8,546,349 
614,973 



28,188,129 

77,586,345 

24,522,650 

5,309,385 

1,023,897 

871,320 

1,124,593 



52,938,252 

54,407,806 

24,144,032 

2,415,126 

1,305,902 

681,428 

571,494 



63,308,229 

54,857,006 

21,906,211 

3,941,718 

987,743 

2,025,346 

702,153 



54,938,667 

51,961,559 

21,236,003 

6,214,017 

659,4^8 

2,344.832 

1,114,318 



43,074,032 
88,758,838 
25,669,813 
8,121,878 
2,640,024 
1,384,527 
2,194,959 



46,508,000 
87,804,025 
20,638,892 
9,698,072 
2,586,672 
1.556,943 
2,112,144 



Total Grain, bush. 138,626,319 136,464,040 147,728,406 138,768,^34 171,844,071 170,904,748 
Flour & Meal to bu 47,147,841 52,635,663 58,769,080 55,441,012 55,908,102 45,096,385 

Grand Total, bush. 185,774,160 189,099,703 206,497,486 194,209,846 '227,752,173 216,096,385 



The foregoing includes the deliyeries in each year at New York, Boston, Portland, Montreal, 
Philadelphia. Baltimore and New Orleans. For the year 1877, the receipts at Portland are esti- 
mated, no ofl&cial retiuns having been received. 

Receipts op Flour and GtRain at Eight Principal Western Lake 
AND River Ports. 



in years. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Flour, barrels 


. 4,812,80*^ 


6,226,523 


7,924,451 


5,097,722 


5,627,729 


5,107,531 


Wheat, bushels . . . 

Com, bushels 

Oats, bushels 

Barley, bushels 

Rye, bushels 


40,274,042 

51,988,477 

25,472,900 

7,876,475 

1,827,709 


66,469,997 

60,750,930 

29,857,778 

6,238,949 

1,722,607 


81,968,746 
67,263.920 
31,594,652 
6,977,618 
2,019,802 


69,780,642 

48,155.224 

25,110,620 

6,025,104 

1,631,841 


55,423,a38 

80,361,719 

24,764,610 

8,938,291 

2,837,510 


53,776,909 
77,995,208 
23,337,031 
9,342,646 
4,979,944 


Total Grain, bush . 
Flour to Wheat, bu 


127,439.603 
24,064,035 


165,035,261 
31.132,615 


189,824,730 
39,622,255 


150,703,431 
25,488,610 


172,325,468' 169,431,738 
28,138,645 25,437,655 


Grand Total, bush. 


151,503,638 


196,167,876 


229,446,985 


176.192,041 


200,464,113 194,969,393 



Imports op Barley into the United States prom Canada 

During the Years 



1877. 
Bush. 



1876. 
Bush. 



1875. 
Bush. 



1874. 
Bush. 



Chicago 

Milwaukee 

Port Hiu-on 

Detroit 

Toledo 

Cleveland 

Erie 

Buffalo 

Suspension Bridge . 

Charlotte 

Fair Haven 

Oswego 

Cape Vincent 

Ogdensburg 



112,829 

25,500 

642,290 

58,420 

32,172 

150,740 

108,678 

911,152 

663,512 

20,950 

124,015 

3,912,153 

62,67i 



141,667 

18.503 

954,947 

407,010 

91,722 

166,095 

239,926 

1,402.332 

845,812 

76,991 

3,i22',6i6 
19,038 



272,616 
49,654 
789,158 
350,020 
158,002 
426,870 
492,459 
1,021,384 
646,919 
141,460 

3,725,579 
59,144 
103,017 



45,907 
82,971 
130,304 
155,036 
201,333 
567,876 
620,171 
80,159 

2,776,678 

24,218 

217,559 



Total bush . 



7,521,382 



8,236,282 



4,997,427 





1877. 


1876. 


1875. 


1874. 


Shipi)ed Eastward 


5,803,131 
1,021,951 


5,741,438 
1,779,944 


6,189,962 
2,046,320 


4,494,900 


Shipped Westward 


592,527 






Total bushels 


6,825,082 


7,521,382 


8,236,282 


5,087,427 



21 



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306 New York Produce Exchange, 

Population and Aeeas of European Countries, 



As per OflBcial Returns from the several Countries. 



COUNTRIES. 


Date of 
Official 
Data. 


Population . 


Total' 
National Area. 


Land under 
Tillage. 


Other 

Productive 

Lands. 


Total 

Productive 

Lands. 


Gnat Britain 

Ireland 


1873 
1873 
1871 
1873 
1872 
1870 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1868 
1867 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1865 
1857 

i867 
1868 
1868 
1873 


26,787,337 
5,337,261 
1,784,741 
1,763.000 
4,297,972 

71,730,980 
1,832,000 

20,394,980 

15,509,445 
2,669,147 

24,656,078 

4,852,026 

2,556,244 

1,818,539 

1,461,562 

852,894 

286,183 

141,122 

3,716.002 

5,253,821 

36,102,921 
4,011,908 

16,262,422 

26,801,154 
1,457,894 
8,700,000 
1,338,500 
4,500,000 


Acres. 

57,623,333 

20,811,357 

9,448,691 

78,663,021 

110,629,417 

1,268,890,822 

93,371,255 

74,180,173 

80,027,559 

10,234,802 

85,788,437 

19,360,648 

3,704,070 

4,803.571 

3,774,358 

2,072,512 

880,700 

326,558 

8,123,200 

7,278,872 

130,733,581 

22,508,508 

125,223,666 

64,080,565 

11,766,143 

89,957,183 

10,762,876 

29,893,638 


Acres. 
18,317,276 
5,283,928 
3,434,925 
1,570,631 
6,20^,567 

' l,93i',659 
22,273,312 
27,966,121 


Acres. 
15,281,530 
10,742,811 

3,013,274 
20,015,910 
47,996,670 


Acres. 
33,598,806 
16,026,739 

6,448,199 
21,586,541 
54,254,236 


Denmark 

Norway 


Sweden 

Russia 


Finland 


55,797,438 
43,892,694 
41,935,140 


57,729,097 
66,166,006 
69,901,261 


Austria 


Hungary 

Switzerland 


Prussia 








Bavaria 


7,666,407 

1,863,328 

2;093,593 

1,498,969 

1,043,620 

498,665 

190,579 

2,437,033 

3,926,704 

64,984,190 

4,551,400 


9,524,886 

1,561,560 

2,481,978 

1,984,293 

889,012 

312,315 

120,241 

3,263,053 

2,007,087 

45,209,091 

6,449,571 


17,191,293 

3,424,888 

4,575,571 

3,483,262 

1,932,632 

810,980 

310,820 

5,700,086 

5,933,791 

110,193,281 

11,000,971 


Saxony 


Wiirtemberg 

Baden . . 

Hesse- Darmstadt 

Saxe- Weimar 

Saxe- Altenburg 

Holland .... 


Belgium 


France 


Portugal 


Spain 


Italy 


•• • * 






Greece 






Turkey 








Servia 








Rnprnania . , . . 


8,656,770 


11,518,343 


20,175,113 





Area Devoted to Cereals, 

In the Tears above stated. 



COUNTRIES. 



Great Britain 

Ireland 

Denmark 

Norway 

Sweden 

Finland 

Austria 

Hungary 

Prus.sia 

Bavaria 

Saxony 

Wiirtemberg 

Baden 

Hesse- Darmstadt 
Saxe- Weimar. . . 
Saxe- Altenburg. 

Holland 

Belgium 

France 

Portugal 

Spain 

Greece 

Roumania , 



Wheat 
and Spelt. 



Acres. 

3,502,043 

168,529 

140,522 

11,861 



4,942 

2,301,368 

5,520,470 

4,196,034 

1,043.513 

197,809 

536,011 

274,292 

120,745 

46,009 

14,234 

214,837 

859,656 

17,214,718 

618,721 

7,311,760 

376,541 

2,451,593 



Rye. 



Acres. 

51,646 

8,402 

612.4:30 

32,866 



654,842 

4,908,178 

3,508,2,55 

10,070,486 

1,454,193 

466,722 

100,91)6 

103,786 

145.743 

84,908 

44,514 

487.803 

714,113 

4,726,228 

987,982 

2,961,811 

10,814 

256,277 



Barley. 



Acres. 

2,343,591 
231,048 
752,148 
123,555 



271,821 

2,648,476 

2,314,697 

3,356,819 

837,364 

176,298 

240.510 

153,208 

134,408 

68,230 

22.062 

112;512 

107.784 

2,762,865 

172.895 

3,182,040 

117,713 

874,826 



Oats. 



Acres. 

2,688,557 

1,510,089 

916,350 

222,399 

' 222*399 

4,631,360 

2,905,294 

6,712,946 

1,116.326 

86,202 

321,579 

130,968 

90,699 

73,688 

36,029 

257,410 

567,720 

7,864,167 



10,235 



Maize. 



Acres. 



732,740 
4,474,394 



4,' 

7,413 

447 



1,497,469 
769,392 

1,531,659 
181,006 

3,158,293 



Buckwheat 

and 
Small Grains 



129,878 
49,422 

13,344 
721,264 
959,194 



11,923 
17,137 
49,502 
75,714 
12,526 



163,829 

141.550 

3,041,400 



151,794 
235,309 



Acres. 

8,585,&37 

1,918,068 

2,551,329 

440,103 

3,078.497 

1,167,348 

15,943,386 

19,682,304 

24,336,285 

4,465,217 

944,168 

1,253,006 

745,381 

504,568 

272.925 

116,839 

1,236,390 

2,389,784 

37,106,847 

2,578,628 

14,987,270 

848,113 

7,221,663 



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Agricultural Distribution of Land in Europe, 307 



Agbicultubal Disteibution of Land inEubopean Countbees, 

In the Tears stated on preceding page. 





LANDS Under Tillage. 


Other Prodoctive Lands. 


COUNTRIES. 


Cereafs. 


Other 
Crops. 


Meadow 
and Annual 
Forage Crops. 


Fallow 
Lands. 


Natural 
Meadows. 
Pastures, Or- 
chids, &c. 


Vines. 


Woods and 
Forests. 


Great Britain . . . 

Ireland 

Denmark 

Norway ......... 


Acres. 

8,585,837 

1,918,068 

2,551,329 

440,103 

3,078,497 

1,167,348 

15,943,386 

19,682,304 

24,3:36,285 

4,465,217 

944,168 

1,253,006 

745,381 

504,568 

272,925 

116,839 

1,236,390 

2,389,784 

37,106,847 

2,578,628 

7,311,760 

376,541 

7,221,563 


Acres. 

1,545,179 

1,046,168 

231,269 

91,866 

636,408 

121,825 

3,001,851 

1,827,286 

1,V47",360 

2^38,214 

319,279 

296,435 

147,946 

60,943 

42,817 

691,233 

995,982 

8,224,225 

341,847 

501,118 

400 

940,987 


Acres. 

7,478,784 

2,306,772 

65,249 

988,440 

1,729,770 

24,711 

3,213,905 

786,929 

■ 88i;394 

482,102 

302,912 

422,558 

265.503 

68;323 

27,29;-. 

454,312 

482,282 

7,635,610 

24,711 


Acres. 

707,476 

13,319 

587,078 

49,422 

812,992 

617,775 

114,170 

5,669,602 

1,172,436 

98,844 

215,396 

:5}.595 

-rj,603 

96,474 

3,630 

55,093 

133,173 

12,017,508 

1,606,215 

* 4H220 


Acres. 
13,094,359 
10,421,370 
2,578,301 
1,482,660 
4,908,099 
4,645,668 
20,121,839 
19,782,754 

3,"595*,252 

524,113 

942,710 

598,006 

271,821 

83,790 

26,421 

2,733,059 

903,938 

18,175,796 

4,388,674 

6,*287;607 


Acres. 

' 553,302 
1,050,469 

54,769 
4,221 
44,455 
51,893 
24,155 
400 

717 

6,382,150 
504,104 

* 252,260 


Acres. 

2,187,171 

321,441 

434,973 

18,533,250 


Sweden 


43,088,571 


Finland 


51,151,770 


Austria 

Hungary 

Prussia 

Bavaria 


23,217,554 
21,101,916 

5,874;865 


Saxony 

Wurtemberg .... 
Baden 


1,033,226 
1,493,813 
1,334,394 


Hesse-Darmstadt 
Saxe- Weimar. , . . 
Saxe-Altenburg. . 

Holland 

Belgium 

France 


594,037 
228,125 
93,820 
529,994 
1,102,432 
20,651,146 


Portugal 

Spain 


1,556,793 


Greece •.. 




Koumania 

• 


4,979,076 



Fabm Animals in Eubopean Countbies, 

In the Tears stated on preceding page. 



COUNTRIES. 



Cattle.* 



' Cows. 



Sheep. 



Goats. 



Great Britain . . . 

Ireland 

Denmark . 

Norway 

Sweden 

Russia 

Finland 

Austria 

Hungary.. 

Switzerland 

Prussia 

Bavaria 

Saxony 

Wurtemberg .... 

Badon 

Hesse-Darmstad t 
Saxe- Weimar... 
Saxe-Altenburg 

Holland 

Belgium 

Prance 

Portugal 

Spain 

Italy 

Greece 

Turkey 

Roumania. ..... 



2.201,100 

532,100 

316,670 

149,167 

438,090 

16,160.000 

251,820 

1,337,023 

^,158.819 

105,792 

2,278,721 

351,639 

115,792 

• 96,970 

70,220 

40,813 

13,167 

8,892 

253,393 

283,163 

2.742.708 

■ 79,716 

680,373 

477,906 

69,787 



426,859 



42,976 
33,746 



9,708 

228 

112 

199 

170 

468 

32 

4 

3,466 

11,849 

705,943 

188,640 

2,319,846 

718,222 

90,688 



6,734 



6,002,100 

4,142,400 

1,238,898 

953,036 

2,026,330 

22,770,000 

997,960 

7,425,212 

5,279,193 

992,895 

8,612.150 

3,066,263 

647,972 

946,228 

660,405 

284,049 

112,296 

57,428 

1,469,937 

1,242,445 

11,721,459 

520,474 

2,967,303 

3,473,934 

109,904 



1,842,786 



2,253,800 

1,526,500 

807,513 

675,006 

1,265,387 



686,896 
3,831,136 

2,052,488 

5V057i446 

1,557,286 

424,785 

460,092 

376,821 

169,588 

59,307 

34,406 

908,4^3 

738,732 

5,938,818 

162,538 



1,374,696 



555,060 



29,495,900 

4,482,000 

1,842,481 

1,705,394 

1,636,201 

46,432,000 

921,745 

5,026,398 

15,076,997 

445,400 

19,624,758 

1,342,190 

206,833 

577,290 

170,556 

130,410 

212,874 

30,771 

898,715 

586,097 

25,035,114 

2,706,777 

22,468,969 



1,200,000 
4,786,3i7 



2,519,300 

1,042,244 

442,421 

96,166 

382,811 

9,800,000 
190,326 

2,551,473 

4,443,279 
304,191 

4,278,531 
872,098 
301,369 
267,350 
371,389 
133,987 
78,141 

. 37,550 
611,004 
632,301 

5,755,656 
776,868 

4,351,736 

1,553,582 
55,776 



836,944 



290,985 
124.673 

i,7oo;ooo 

30,639 

979,104 

572,951 

374,481 

1,477,336 

193,881 

105,847 

38,305 

82,074 

78,670 

40,282 

11,362 

146,169 

1{)7,138 

1,794,837 

936,869 

4,531,228 

1,690,478 

1,339,538 

" i94',i88 



* Including Cows. 



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308 



New Yorle Produce Exchange. 



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11 2 
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320 New York Produce Exchange, 

Monthly Avebage Gazette Prices of English Wheat, 
Baeley and Oats, per Impl. Qr. 



WHEAT. 



MONTH. 


1860. 


1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 




s. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


8, d. 


B, d. 


s. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


January 


43 11 


.56 9 


61 4 


47 4 


40 6 


38 6 


45 10 


61 4 


70 3 


February 


43 10 


54 6 


59 11 


46 11 


40 7 


38 3 


45 6 


60 10 


73 00 


March 


45 4 


54 2 


59 2 


45 5 


39 11 


38 6 


45 3 


59 9 


73 00 


April 


49 4 
52 4 
55 6 


56 4 
54 11 
53 5 


57 11 

57 5 
54 5 


45 7 

46 4 
46 8 


39 9 
39 3 
39 8 


39 8 
41 00 
41 5 


44 10 
46 2 
48 3 


61 6 

64 8 

65 4 


73 3 


May..:::.. .. 


73 9 


June 


67 11 


July 


57 2 


50 7 


• 57 00 


46 6 


42 4 


42 7 


54 1 


65 00 


65 5 


August 


59 5 


51 00 


57 9 


46 00 


43 1 


43 3 


50 6 


67 8 


57 7 


September 


60 4 


65 00 


55 6 


44 2 


41 10 


44 00 


48 11 


62 8 


54 7 


October 


59 11 


56 9 


49 5 


40 8 


38 9 


41 10 


52 4 


66 6 


53 8 


November 


58 2 


59 11 


48 8 


40 00 


38 9 


45 7 


56 6 


69 5 


51 8 


December 


53 00 


60 11 


46 4 


40 10 


38 1 


46 7 


60 3 


67 4 


49 11 


Ann'l average. 


53 3 


55 4 


55 5 


44 9 


40 2 


41 10 


49 11 


64 5 


63 9 


Highest 


60 4 


60 11 


61 4 


47 4 


43 1 


46 7 


60 3 


69 5 


73 9 


Lowest t. 


43 10 


50 7 


46 4 


40 00 


38 1 


38 3 


44 10 


59 9 


49 11 


Bange 


16 6 


10 4 


15 00 


7 4 


5 00 


8 4 


15 9 


9 8 


23 10 



BABI^JBT. 



Jai^uary 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.... 

October 

November . . ^ 
December .... 

A iml average. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Range 



34 5 

35 00 

36 7 

37 2 
36 11 
34 8 
33 2 
33 7 
36 9 

40 2 

41 00 
39 00 



36 6 
41 00 
33 2 

7 10 



40 5 
39 5 
38 7 
37 6 
36 00 
32 11 

30 9 

31 00 

36 7 

37 00 
37 4 
36 5 



40 5 

30 9 

9 8 



36 4 

35 10 

36 6 
36 7 

33 3 

31 11 

32 11 
36 5 

34 8 

35 8 
34 6 



35 1 

36 9 
31 11 

4 10 



35 00 

36 3 
36 7 
35 8 

34 1 
31 6 

30 00 

31 9 

35 00 
34 4 
33 11 

32 8 



33 11 

36 7 

30 00 

6 7 



81 11 
81 11 
31 3 

30 10 

29 7 
28 2 

27 6 

28 6 

31 8 

30 3 

29 10 



29 11 
31 11 
27 6 
4 5 



28 5 

29 1 

28 10 

29 7 
29 6 
28 1 
27 14 



30 9 

32 10 

33 00 



29 9 
33 00 
27 11 
5 1 



.32 9 



35 11 

36 10 



35 
34 



1 
5 

34 1 
37 2 
42 00 

44 10 

45 2 



37 4 
45 2 



12 5 



44 3 
44 4 
41 00 
39 6 

38 10 

36 2 
35 2 

37 3 

39 11 

41 3 

42 2 

40 11 



40 1 

44 4 

35 2 

9 2 



41 10 

42 6 

43 3 
43 11 
43 8 

40 3 
37 5 

41 1 
43 8 

45 6 

46 10 
45 10 



43 00 

46 10 

37 5 

9 5 



OATS. 



January .- 

February 

March 

April 


21 4 

21 10 

23 2 

24 1 

25 9 

26 9 
26 2 
26 11 
26 8 
24 2 
23 5 

22 3 


22 9 

22 11 

23 5 

24 00 

25 2 
25 4 
25 9 
25 4 
23 00 

21 11 

22 9 
22 5 


21 11 

22 00 

22 00 
21 5 

23 00 

23 6 

24 3 

25 2 
24 00 
21 8 
21 3 
20 6 


20 6 

21 4 
21 5 

21 6 

22 1 

22 10 

23 2 
23 00 
21 1 
19 00 
19 2 
19 2 


18 9 

19 2 
19 5 
19 3 

19 8 

20 2 

21 6 

22 5 
21 6 
20 1 
19 10 
19 6 


19 2 

19 7 

20 9 

22 00 

23 M 
23 2 
23 1 
23 10 

21 8 
20 10 

22 3 
22 10 


23 00 
23 4 

23 10 

24 6 

25 1 

25 11 
27 1 

26 2 
24 8 

22 11 

23 6 

24 10 


24 00 
24 3 
24 7 

24 9 

26 00 

27 5 

28 00 
28 8 
26 11 

25 8 
25 11 

. 25 2 


25 7 

26 1 

27 1 

28 00 


May 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 

December 


28 10 

29 10 

30 4 
29 9 
28 00 

27 8 

28 00 
27 8 


Ann'l average. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Raage 


24 4 
26 11 
21 4 

5 7 


23 9 

25 9 

21 11 

3 10 


22 7 
25 2 
20 6 
4 8 


21 2 

23 2 

19 00 

4 2 


20 1 

22 5 

18 9 

3 8 


21 10 

23 10 

19 2 

4 8 


24 7 

27 1 

22 11 

4 2 


25 11 

28 8 

24 00 

4 8 


28 1 

30 4 

25 7 

4 9 



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Prices of English Wheat, Barley and Oats. 321 

MoNTHiiT Average Gazette Prices of Engubh Wheat, BARiiST and 
Oats, per Impl. Qb,— (Continued.) 



WHEAT, 



MONTH. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March . 

April 

May 


8. d. 

51 9 
50 4 

48 1 

46 4 

44 9 

45 11 

49 10 

52 8 

50 8 

47 4 

46 6 
43 9 


s. d. 

43 8 
41 3 

41 5 

42 7 

44 6 
47 5 
50 10 
53 10 
47 3 
47 00 
50 1 
52 4 


s. d- 

52 8 

53 6 

54 1 

57 8 
59 00 
59 9 

58 8 
57 10 
57 00 
36 5 
56 2 
56 2 


s. d. 
55 4 

55 8 

56 1 
54 3 
56 3 
59 00 

58 9 

59 8 
58 4 
58 4 
56 11 
56 6 


s. d. 

55 9 

56 4 

55 6 
54 10 

56 00 

58 7 

59 6 

60 6 
64 2 
60 10 

60 9 

61 8 


s. d. 
62 7 
62 11 
60 11 

60 00 
62 2 

61 00 
60 8 
57 6 
47 7 
44 6 

43 9 

44 9 


s. d. 
44 1 
41 9 

41 3 
43 00 

42 4 
41 10 
46 5 
52 10 
48 5 

46 4 

47 2 
46 3 


. s. d. 
44 9 
43 1 

43 00 

44 11 

45 1 

47 9 

48 3 

46 1 
46 9 
46 7 
48'00 

49 9 


8. d. 
51 8 
51 6 

51 2 
53 4 
06 1 
64 6 
62 9 
64 11 
59 1 
53 7 

52 2 
51 6 


June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


Ann- 1 average. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Kange 


48 2 
52 8 
43 9 
8 11 


46 10 
53 10 
41 3 
12 7 


56 8 
59 9 
52 8 

7 1 


57 00 
59 8 
54 3 
5 5 


58 8 

64 2 

54 10 

9 4 


55 8 
62 11 
43 9 
19 2 


45 2 
52 10 
41 3 
11 7 


46 2 

49 9 

43 00 

6 9 


56 10 
66 1 
51 2 
14 11 



BARNEY. 



January 

February 

March 

April 


48 6 
47 2 
45 00' 
44 1 
39 5 
34 9 

31 11 

32 4 

37 6 

38 1 
38 5 
36 3 


35 11 
34 5 
34 00 

34 7 
33 3 

32 8 
31 7 

33 8 

36 4 
36 7 
36 7 

35 4 


35 3 
35 7 

35 11 

36 8 

37 2 
37 00 
35 3 
35 2 

35 5 

36 6 

37 00 
36 10 


37 2 

38 7 
37 4 
36 3 

36 2 
34 2 
32 5 
32 3 

37 4 
42 6 

42 4 

43 10 


40 1 
40 4 
39 10 
39 1 
38 4 
37 2 

36 6 

37 7 
43 11 

43 9 

44 00 
44 9 


45 8 
48 11 
48 4 
48 11 

46 11 
42 9 
40 9 
44 6 
42 10 
42 8 
42 7 
44 2 


45 00 
43 11 
42 1 
40 6 
38 5 
35 10 

34 7 

35 00 
35 6 

37 5 

38 00 
35 4 


34 6 

35 5 

32 8 

33 10 

34 7 
33 3 
32 9 
32 2 

38 1 

39 5 
39 3 
38 9 


39 4 

40 4 
40 9 
40 11 
38 9 
37 7 
35 4 
34 1 
40 3 
43 1 
43 6 
43 7 


May .. . 


June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


Ann'l average. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Range 


39 5 
48 6 
31 11 
16 7 


34 7 

36 7 

31 7 

500 


36 2 

37 2 
35 2 

200 


37 6 
43 10 
32 S 
11 7 


40 5 

44 9 

36 6 

8 3 


44 11 

48 11 

42 7 

6 4 


38 6 
45 00 
34 7 
10 5 


35 3 
39 5 
32 2 

7 3 


39 10 
43 7 
34 1 
9 6 



OATS. 



January .... 

February 

March 

April — 

May 

June 

July , 

August 

September.. . 

October 

November . . . 
December . . . 

Ann'I average 

Highest 

Lowest , 

Bange 



27 10 
27 7 
26 10 

26 11 

27 4 

26 10 

27 2 
25 10 
24 1 
23 4 
22 2 



26 00 

27 10 



5 8 



20 8 
20 2 

20 11 

21 2 
23 00 
23 9 
26 1 
26 9 
23 5 

22 3 

23 5 
23 4 



22 11 

26 9 

20 2 

6 7 



22 11 

23 11 

25 2 

27 00 
27 2 
27 00 
27 6 

26 11 

24 10 
23 2 
23 5 
23 00 



25 2 

27 6 
22 11 

4 7 



22 6 
22 9 
22 8 

22 4 

23 6 

23 5 

24 4 

25 1 

23 00 

24 2 
22 7 
22 10 



25 1 
22 4 
2 9 



22 2 

21 11 



28 10 



25 
26 
28 
28 
27 
25 
25 
26 



25 5 

28 9 

21 11 

6 10 



26 11 



28 



29 
30 
30 

30 10 
28 1 

27 7 

28 00 

29 1 



28 10 

30 10 

26 11 

3 11 



29 5 

29 8 
29 11 

29 11 

30 3 

31 6 
30 2 
30 11 
28 3 

24 10 

25 7 
24 6 



26 3 
31 6 
24 10 



24 3 

24 5 

25 1 

25 8 

26 9 

28 4 

29 10 
29 00 
26 4 
25 3 
25 7 
25 1 



26 .4 

29 10 

24 3 

5 7 



25 4 
25 5 

25 2 
27 9 

27 2 

28 4 
28 00 

26 10 

23 10 

24 6 



25 11 
28 4 
23 9 
4 7 



Hosted by 



Google 



322 



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Movement of the Wheat Trade in the U. K. 



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324 



New York Produce Exchange. 



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Imports of G^rain and Flour into the U. K. 



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United St 
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Hosted by 



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326 



New YorJc Produce Exchange. 



Gbain on Passage foe the United Kingdom. 



1876. 



ON 



Wheat. 



Maize. 



Beans. 



January 4... 
" .11... 
" 18... 
" 25... 

February 1.. 
" 8. 
" 15., 
" 22. 

March. 1 

" 8 

" 15.... 
" 23 ... 
'* 30 

April 5 

" 12 , 

" 20 

" 27 

May 4 

*' 11 

" 18 

" 25 

June 1 

'^ 8 

" 15 

" 22 

" 29 

July 6 

" 13 

" 20 

" 27 

August 3 

»* 10... 
" 17... 
" -24... 
" 31... 

September 8 

15 

" 22 

29 

October 6... 
" 13... 
" 20... 
'* 27... 

' November 3. 

10. 

" 17. 

24. 

December 1 . 

8. 

" 15. 

" 22. 

" 29., 



Qrs. 
1,538,000 
1,462,000 
1,545,000 
1,518,000 

1,342,000 
1,301,000 
1,209,000 
1,083,000 

910,887 
1,162,000 

955,227 
1,006,579 
1,114,000 

1,185,000 
1,224,000 
1,036,037 
1,036,297 

1,179,753 
1,325,500 
1,459,000 
1,385,019 

1,327,506 
1,295,875 
1,302,561 
1,350,554 
1,412,426 

1,491,000 
1,297,000 
1,211,305 
1,233,720 

1,261,239 
1,176,109 
1,287,000 
1.094,000 
1,054,190 

1,029,064 
1,007,505 
1,004,000 
1,177,670 

1,179,935 
1,306,861 
1,404,953 
1,607,056 

1,739,148 
1,896,409 
2,018,342 
1,994,813 

1.923,412 
1,970,397 
1,945,511 
2,193,424 
2,270,498 



Equal Qrs. 
70,000 
66,000 
80,000 
81,000 

78,000 
90.000 
72,000 
55,000 

52,000 
54,000 
60,000 
56,000 
61,000 

61,000 
55,000 
55,000 
43,000 

57,252 
50,000 
96,000 
47,250 

44,000 
39,500 
33,081 
42,030 
46,000 

50,000 
47,000. 
50,528 
38,448 

35,198 
40,204 
29,000 
31,000 



44,082 
«3,422 
37,000 
47,328 

48.832 
48.805 
65,092 
66,990 

64,678 
80,532 
78,174 
53,222 

55,917 
53,485 
65,750 
&3,075 



Qrs. 

109,000 

171,000 

239,000 

239,000 

302,000 
372,000 
371,000 
408,000 

244,556 
407.000 
181,332 
296,226 
545,000 

500,000 
424,000 
317,a32 
295,360 

456,171 ' 
498,510 
537,000 
693,975 

687,843 
751,702 
825,286 
856,195 
996,396 

1,040,000 

976,000 

1,069,615 

1,065,757 

959,874 
802.433 
715,000 
827,000 
782,213 

. 819,5,59 
728,738 
701,000 
839,824 

893,320 
824,.583 
751,025 
637,445 

630,641 
608,188 
588,714 
424,317 

370,323 
339,319 
373,708 
347,211 
340,821 



Qrs. 
131,000 
116,000 
110,000 
110,000 

67,000 
71,000 
48,500 
53,000 

56,850 
56,500 
50,480 
63,910 
123,000 

140,000 

129,000 

94,080 

121,510 

147,700 

137,870 

117,000 

94,060 

79,420. 
74,740 
70,408 
88,102 
69,649 

75,000 

81,000 

100,295 

112,370 

74,885 

71.663 

96,000 

146,000 

110,934 

135,509 
195,304 
264,000 
311,056 

388,305 
365,005 
402,015 
423,513 

376,623 
404,226 
382,212 
309,939 

' 265.789 
276.513 
299;618 
290,739 
347,926 



Qrs. 

15,000 

17,000 

27,000 

16,700 

9,500 
13,000 
16,000 
13,000 

16,500 
20,000 
19,200 
19,0C0 
23,000 

15,000 
13,000 
15,800 
11,000 

8,000 
7,920 
28,000 
7,920 

5,600 
5,600 
14,200 
13,300 
29,625 

59,000 
59,000 
44,058 



43,228 
63,017 
85,000 
77,000 
81,536 

83,136 
86,984 
89,000 



68,730 
55,748 
54,426 
54,594 

53,894 
49,538 
19,746 
14,991 

28,857 
17,697 
29,092 
30,831 
46,821 



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G-rain on Passage for the United Sjingdom. 327 

Grain on Passage for the United Kingdom. 



ON 



January 4 . . . 
" 11... 
•* 18... 
" 25... 

February 1 . . 
'* 8.. 
" 15. . 
" 22 . 

March 1 

" 8.... 
'* 15.... 
" 22... 
" 29.... 

April 5 

'* 12 

'' 19 

'* 26 

May 3 

'• 10 

" 17 

" 24 

*' 31 

June 7 

«• 14 

" 21 

" 28 

Julys 

"12 

"19 

" 26 

August 2 . . . 
" It).... 
" 17.... 
" 24.... 
" 31.... 

September 7 

14 

21 

*' 28 

October 5 . , . 
" 12... 
" 19... 
" 26... 

November 2 . 
" 9. 

16. 

23. 
" 30. 

December 7, 
14. 
21. 



Wheat. 



Qrs. 
2,204,000 
2,012,000 
2,043,000 
2,041,000 

2,031,000 
1,895,000 
1,845,000 
L812,000 

1,769,892 
1,566,626 
1,560,738 
1,583,772 
1,602,607 

1,432,654 
1.743,771 
1,489,613 
1,205,324 

1,212,565 
1,178,067 
1,218,211 
1,129,977 
1,002,340 

942,135 

954,531 

1,028,385 

943,126 

826,062 
854,632 
766,114 
728,462 - 

656,000 
607,616 
'590.040 
696,070 
734,943 



925,100 
1,057,639 
1,182,755 

1,307,614 
1,225 118 
1,382,275 
1,422,599 

1,501,571 
1.595,101 
1,555,125 
1,513.990 
1,337,380 

1,291,972 
1,184,825 
1,149,992 
1,097,927 



Flour. 



Equal Qrs. 

102,000 

104,000 

99,000 

93,000 

100,000 

97,000 

105,000 

.104,000 

142,209 
125,551 
121,598 
115,966 
111,511 

104,407 
101,422 
89,232 
75,298 

70,126 
68,141 
58,791 
41.422 
40,872 

36,430 
38,680 
39,330 
34,259 

31,709 
24.727 
22,477 
31,980 

28,405 
27,784 
28,934 
34,124 
31,387 

21.057 
35,562 
30,406 
35,177 

35,889 
35,039 
45,363 
40,768 

43.088 
47,735 
55,256 
46,856 
49,088 

46.331 
44,612 
56,430 
51,831 



Qrs. 

309,000 

291,000 

277,000 

a37,000 

389,000 
472,000 
538,000 
612,000 

761,311 
686,371 
553,151 
505,854 
621,885 

500,003 
523,117 
552,400 
509,871 

559,159 
674,486 
641,374 
.596,896 



582,652 
533, 8H3 
559.771 
538,817 

317,940 
301,606 
226,411 
246,757 

310,783 
382,649 
376,117 
485,789 
471,740 

526,191 
544.188 
553,461 

488,891 

481,807 
440,406 
367,854 



245,281 
297,069 
378,225 
481,517 

480,340 
565,140 
532,086 
453,670 



Qrs. 

285,000 

296,000 

236,000 

203,500 

222,600 
188,500 
224,500 
284,000 



270,503 
266,637 
360,882 
335,916 

258,509 
215,584 
223,884 
238,584 

202,340 
191,751 
164,721 
166,608 
180,800 

118,646 
100,155 
119,590 
86,922 

80.679 
64,055 
51,912 
45,093 

28,513 
21.393 
29,604 
26,604 
20,524 

16,290 
19,420 
18,193 

27,727 

35,752 
39,851 
38,429 
21,829 

30,790 
43,440 
62,382 
60,212 
77,062 

86,301 
92,255 
91,507 
86,812 



Beans. 



Qrs. 

64,000 

63,000 

68,000 

57,500 

63,500 
37,000 
46,000 
44,500 

60,341 
42,137 
39,484 
37,478 
31,224 



31,232 

17,340 

16,065 
25,325 
21,183 
37,027 
42,198 

45,821 
35,061 
47,047 
54,270 

67,518 
78,534 
84,310 
69,179 



43,877 
48,234 
47,111 
66,114 

55,606 • 
72.836 
67,041 
84,475 

84,735 
84,759 
77,260 
64,595 

63,114 ' 

65,070 

64,929 

50,230 

57,169 

44,139 
39,789 
40,094 
41,385 



Hosted by 



Google 



328 



New Tork Produce Exchange. 



Home Grown Wheat Sold Weekly in England and Wales, 

Or 150 Towns thereof^ in the underrrbentioned Tea/rs, and the Weekly Average 
Price thereof^ from Returns made under Special Act of Parliament, 



For 
Week 
Ending 



1874-5. 



Qrs. 



Price. 



1875-6. 



Qrs. 



Price. 



1876-7. 



Qrs. 



Price. 



1877-8. 



Qrs. 



Price. 



September 5. 

12. 

19. 

" 26. 

October 3 

" 10.... 
" 17-... 
" 24.... 
« 31.... 

November 7. 
14. 
21. 
28. 

December 5. 

12. 

" 19. 

26. 

January 2... 

9... 

" 16... 



February 6.. 
'' 13.. 
" 20.. 
" 27.. 

March 6.... 
" 13.... 
** 20.... 
" 27.... 

April 3 

" 10 

" 17 

'^ 24 

May 1 

8 

" 15 

'* 22 

" 29 

June 5 . . . . 

" 12 

" 19 

" 26 

July 3 

" 10 

" 17 

" 24 

" 31 

August 7 . . . 
" 14... 
" 21... 



64,693 
70,269 
72,524 
71,768 

71,502 
64,349 
56,188 
56,945 
54,414 

54,695 
57,398 
58,655 
63,653 

64,783 
78,895 
66,345 
61,663 

37,921 
42,873 
67,082 
62,785 
54,524 

51,374 
58,982 
58,094 
53,654 

53,167 
60,719 
67,153 
57,479 

46,699 
54,283 
64,244 
68,744 

58,799 
62,236 
62,370 
51,278 
48,711 

43,309 
37.634 
43;253 
43,109 

30,097 
28,464 
30,542 
28,581 

35,483 
30,819 
31.175 
37,979 
29,713 



s. d. 

49 9 

47 2 

46 8 

46 9 

46 1 
44 8 

43 10 

44 1 
44 1 

44 5 

43 9 

43 5 

43 6 

44 8 

44 10 

45 1 
44 8 

44 2 

45 1 

46 6 
43 9 
43 

42 7 
41 11 
41 6 
40 11 

40 1 

41 4 
41 9 

41 10 

42 5 

43 1 
43 4 
43 4 

42 10 
42 8 
42 2 
42 
41 10 

41 11 

41 11 

42 3 

42 11 

43 6 

44 4 

46 

47 5 

51 
53 10 

51 9 
53 

52 9 



31,917 
36.063 
49,791 
51,830 

59,122 
59,497 
53,654 
54,330 
52,392 

45,921 
48,011 
40,283 
45,049 

42,297 
46,828 
50,736 
49,125 

34,557 
29,862 
43,412 
46,536 
52,325 

45,139 
46,361 
44,714 
46,278 

38,920 
36,677 
45,049 
41,445 

41,348 
41,226 
37,396 
40,900 

41.916 
45,291 
41,986 
41,957 
40,672 

42,594 
40,330 
35,120 
29,895 

29.126 
21,780 
21,566 
18,154 

18,279 
21,163 
27,290 
21.298 



8. d. 

49 0* 

^ 8 

48 7 

47 1 

45 11 

45 10 

46 

46 8 

47 4 

47 6 

47 8 

47 

46 8 



45 3 

45 1 

44 7 

44 9 

44 2 

43 7 

43 

42 8 

43 3 

43 
42 11 

42 9 

43 4 

44 4 

45 2 
45 1 
45 3 

44 11 

45 2 
45 1 

44 11 

45 3 

46 4 

47 4 

47 11 

48 4 

48 10 
48 6 
48 5 
48' 2 

47 5 
46 8 
45 10 

45 5 

46 4 



42,587 
49,137 
61,054 
65,758 

67,158 
63,330 
53,721 
48,270 
51,067 

44,078 
48,063 
49,586 
50,713 

48,745 
48,550 
47,103 
41,546 

39,316 
34,239 
34,068 
40,789 
23,459 

44,805 
44,764 
41,440 
42,722 

46,268 
42,371 
44,717 
42,565 

37,798 
34,215 



33.550 
32,775 
32,690 
37,197 
29,573 

26,376 
26,779 
22,914 
24,738 

21,584 
17,974 
16.785 

21,782 

21,135 
23,286 
22,854 
24,436 
19,183 



8. d. 

45 11 

46 8 

45 11 

47 

47 1 

46 3 
46 2 

46 9 

47 1 



48 1 

47 5 

48 4 

49 1 

50 4 
50 8 

50 6 

51 2 
51 3 

51 2 

52 3 

52 7 

51 2 

51 

50 1 

50 11 

51 4 
51 3 
51 2 

51 1 

51 5 

52 6 

53 9 

55 10 

60 6 

65 7 
68 9 
68 6 

66 11 
65 
64 1 

64 

62 6 

61 5 

62 3 

63 

64 6 

65 6 

65 8 
64 9 

63 10 



19,334 
36,958 
49,084 
57.140 

63,144 
61,437 
55,318 
51,995 
48,299 

48,566 
46,203 
40,970 
39,524 

40,029 
47,211 
43,670 
42,759 



s. d. 

62 

60 6 

59 

57 6 

56 5 

55 11 

52 2 

52 9 

53 7 

53 8 

52 5 

51 8 

51 5 

51 7 

51 4 

51 7 

51 4 



Total.. 



2,782,068 



2,095,942 



2,011,863 



Hosted by 



Google 



/Stocks of Flour and Q-rain at Liverpool. 



329 



Stocks of Floue and Gbain ai 


' LrVEBPOOL. 




ONT 


FLOUK. 


Wheat. 


MAIZE, 


Oats. 


Barley 


Malt. 


PEAS. 


Beans 




Bbls. 


Sks. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


March 31, 1871 


150,954 


46,636 


383,932 


19,236 


11,755 


11,716 




575 


26,631 


June 30, " 


109,817 


34,713 


478,781 


54,054 


9,181 


1,397 




5,725 


12,894 


December 31, " 


82,949 


41,154 


513,451 


152,491 


15,315 


6,458 




8,438 


53,101 


March 31, 1872 


66.053 


62,746 


392,144 


127,570 


6,689 


4,093 


3,011 


5,007 


57,209 


June 30, ** 


29,302 


52,267 


267,480 


93,454 


32,067 


388 


3,163 


12,013 


40,237 


August 31, " 


24,249 


26,695 


191,793 


231,174 


22,333 


2,000 


1,261 


13,177 


33,443 


December 31, " 


36,144 


23,206 


381,370 


332,775 


8,654 


6'?2 


1,337 


18,166 


22,364 


March 31, 1873 


36,158 


86,410 


336,619 


174,746 


5,^94 


5,308 


2,653 


11,226 


11,832 


June 30, 


24,652 


81,136 


351,555 


84,365 


10.643 


500 


3,839 


14,677 


1,121 


August 31, " 


kl9,541 


44,507 


302,105 


46,536 


3,342 


^'52S 


2,443 


5,802 


29,418 


December 31, " 


39,691 


36,666 


166,898 


52,738 


2,100 


2,100 





3,050 


1,946 


March 31, 1874 


156,816 


123,901 


342,013 


61,623 


4,656 


2,050 


2,24i:i 


2,200 


5,047 


June 30, 


129,922 


251,423 


347,583 


44,829 


3,313 


4,212 


2,705 


3,080 


4,635 


August 31, " 


94,511 


230,863 


291,298 


129,4^38 


2,203 


3,150 


2,866 


2,857 


1,872 


December 31, " 


59,140 


158,670 


144,211 


50,901 


6,923 


9,339 


1,334 


10,704 


4,192 


March 31, 1875 


67,008 


140,856 


122,780 


94,495 


8,837 


14,727 


2,536 


9,826 


1,611 


June 30, 


33,407 


174,351 


408,481 


67,447 


6,993 


26,405 


1,366 


17,524 


14,388 


August 31, " 


34,344 


205,063 


525,716 


85,025 


5,455 


17,203 


2,946 


13,713 


4,826 


December 31, " 


52,068 


192,652 


793,613 


32,687 


9,518 


8,910 


1,638 


17,296 


7,791 


March 31, 1876 


57,889 


154,628 


855,533 


55,456 


4,683 


9,346 


1,129 


14,782 


3,197 


June 30 " 


31,5S6 


128,271 


729,353 


47,356 


5,232 


5,^28 


1,835 


11,684 


9,010 


August 31, " 
October 31, " 


18,330 


86,938 


677,926 


69,674 


11,855 


1,390 


1,898 


8,352 


11,521 


16,315 


59.951 


472,800 


102,519 


7,056 


1,000 


2,025 


6,725 


22,853 


December 31, " 


38,467 


71,243 


311,930 


139,723 


17,773 


22,846 


1,846 


16,488 


30,744 


March 31, 1877 


30,556 


89.614 


402,789 


143,779 


10,876 


16,870 


2,657 


6,240 


51,681 


June 30, " 


6,913 


145,092 


501,653 . 


214,810 


6,176 


22,657 


1,659 


2,367 


59,674 


August 31, 


8,113 


78,303 


479,662 


161,009 


6,291 


22,791 


1,056 


2,550 


63,998 


October 31, " 


23,102 


53,470 


*376,364 


129,155 


9.858 


15,207 


1,275 


6,323 


77,035 


December 31, " 


43,117 


45,137 


353,243 


50,199 


14,181 


16,129 


853 


37,703 


75,894 



* White, (including Australian, Oregon, California, Chilian, Bombay, American, Canadian, 
Spanish and other fine qualities,) 159,826 quarters. Red, (including American, Canadian, French 
and other good qualities, ) 102,593 quarters. Lower qualities, (including Egyptian, Calcutta, Kur- 
rachee, Syrian, Danubian and all common grades,) 113,994 quarters. Total, 376,364. 



• Stocks of Flour and Grain at Glasgow. 


Scotland. 


ON 


Flour. 


Wheat. 


MAIZE. 


Oats. 


Barley 


Rye. 


Peas. 


Beans 




Bbls. 


. Sks. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 




(196 lbs) 


(280 lbs) 
















March 31, 1871 



















... .. 


June 30, " 


65,921 


50,400 


237,309 


4,469 


22,542 


13,579 




2,556 


16,353 


December 31, " 


71,762 


43,419 


259,685 


108,066 


40,861 


24,174 


58 


4,353 


24,051 


March 31, 1872 


38,720 


28,611 


251,239 


97,073 












June 30, 


11,881 


17,917 


158,856 


95,634 


37,216 


17,580 




2,378 


21,888 


September 30, " 


53,000 


38,000 


166,000 


90,000 


47,000 






12,000 


9,000 


December 31, " 


55,085 


54,553 


314,717 


180,969 


35,0 iO 


9,"996 


876 


2,036 


23,964 


March 31, 1873 


40,000 


79,000 


300,000 


139,000 












June 30, " 


38,412 


65,632 


177,318 


86,791 


21,478 


9,261 




9,834 


13,080 


September 30, " 


27.054 


17,979 


177,608 


178,012 


27,004 


8,450 




7,359 


27,748 


December 31, " 


44,967 


47,966 


164,999 


54,420 


38,238 


13,998 


18 


10,920 


20,009 


March 31, 1874 


70,866 


53,633 


219,562 


4,136 


20,233 


35,184 


7,212 


7,760 


6,304 


June 30, '* 


82,924 


48,748 


154,556 


13,163 


33,328 


28,302 




3,807 


10,036 


September 30, " 


79,459 


31,767 


197,071 


48,320 


19,947 


20,620 




3,777 


781 


December 31, " 


70,867 


53,633 


216,562 


4,136 


20,233 


35,184 




7,760 


6,304 


March 31, 1875 


95,822 


107,244 


167,915 


18,260 


28,386 


26,579 


6,197 


4,877 


6,092 


June 30, " 


67,914 


94,915 


147,885 


14,158 


17,912 


18,948 


3,704 


2,033 


.10,189 


August 31, •' 


49,852 


75,046 


143,840 


4,681 


15,056 


12,808 


2,335 


3,834 


4,073 


December 31, " 


71.125 


78,194 


260,412 


17,069 


13,763 


40,166 


477 


1,999 


14,606 


March 31, 1876 


90,709 


93,213 


267,844 


14,517 


21,042 


49,111 


391 


3,402 


24,456 


June 30, 
August 31, «* 


70,311 


70,678 


265,068 


21,199 


8,700 


13,000 


99 


3,262 


11,248 


63,058 


5:3,174 


301,711 


81,513 


22,935 


15 679 


213 


2,305 


^^^^ 


October 31, " 


57,394 


58,995 


284,434 


140,364 


24,927 


13,257 


254 


3,702 


10,421 


December 31, '^ 


6:^,105 


87,200 


264,813 


149,776 


30,824 


78,632 


263 


9,016 


24,976 


March 31, 1877 


69,727 


115,026 


167,924 


154,178 


36,977 


58,115 


225 


13,889 


21,516 


June 30, 


28,114 


166,262 


137,968 


205,878 


34,555 


36,082 


16 


11,196 


34,996 


August 31, " 


17,753 


151,002 


137,257 


256,703 


27,536 


34,586 


12 


'^^^l 


^'?1!i 


October 31, 


10,089 


116,656 


98,799 


238,993 


29,505 


30,767 


50 


2,297 


35,220 


December 31, " 


44,076 


100,952 


158,944 


198,465 36,555 


25,097 1 ' 16,800 ' 44,446 



Hosted by 



Google 



330 



New TorJc Produce Exchange. 



Stocks of Gbain and Floub at 

I.ONI>ON. 



ON 


FLOUR. 


Wheat. 


Maize. 


Oats. 


BARLEY. 


Peas. 


BEAN'S. 




Cwts. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Q'lo. 


March 31, 1871 


a37,000 


232,707 


7,030 


174,674 


41,941 


7,030 


l^T. 


June 30, 


575,000 


203,136 


18,477 


206,588 


42.046 


^'?K 


9,664 


September 30, *' 


400,500 


367,491 


38,655 


364,049 


49,356 


2,412 


6,991 


October 31, " 


431,000 


438.722 


30,856 


442,302 


50,476 


2,808 


8,918 


December 31, " 


462,983 


483,524 


15,066 


481,976 


49,036 


3,780 


&?S 


March 31, 1872 


296,000 


379,876 


51,182 


359,782 


70,748 


5,684 


9,138 


June 30, 


237.000 


195,120 


34,014 


294,206 


54,258 


10,406 


9,721 


September 30, *' 


189,000 


252,725 


96,088 


303,209 


23,189 


8,943 


7,802 


October 31, 


260.000 


292,591 


98,737 


364,642 


19,495 


8,870 


11,347 


December 31, " 


520,755 


309,985 


118,800 


396,820 


56,094 


11.157 


12,986 


March 31, 1873 


389,000 


177,860 


98,984 


215,692 


48,679 


11,853 


7,725 


June 30, 


263,438 


135,159 


22.894 


68.479 


13,978 


6,002 


4,550 


August 31, " 


290,455 


244,418 


72;616 


188,776 


9,936 


6,007 


4,673 


October 31, " 


344,350 


290,910 


63,136 


121,013 


18,531 


5,425 


5,251 


December 31, " 


458,220 


314,168 


28,297 


198,493 


18.448 


5,733 


4,387 


March 31, 1874 


367,076 


241,507 


21,976 


243,536 


17,025 


4,799 


l^iB 


June 30, " 


245,997 


117,878 


14,063 


102,318 


26,905 


1,125 


2,695 


August 31, " 


208,926 


197,363 


69,993 


147.159 


17,330 


3,409 


2,970 


October 31, " 


254,817 


188.152 


64,023 


186,244 


97,071 


4.707 


4,176 


December 31, " 


421,051 


122,922 


21,461 


192,794 


73,472 


12,418 


^'2E 


March 31, 1875 


310,499 


43,872 


26,122 


51,765 


79,897 


1,616 


2,888 


June 30, " 


250,527 


70,979 


21,229 


148,929 


46,892 


3,751 


7,258 


August 31, " 


309,843 


200,846 


46,429 


312,196 


97,622 


9,515 


?'gi 


October 31, "■ 


423,171 


540,797 


71,190 


247,499 


61,159 


5,092 


3,850 


December 31, ** 


501,908 


557,922 


56,940 


273,(582 


65,013 


17,077 


13.303 


March 31, 1876 


450,000 


402,148 


18,121 


119,408 


41,702 


14,199 


13,251 


* June 30, '' 


330,000 


290,000 


70,000 


100.000 


18,000 


2,100 


7,200 


August 31, " 


3:^2,796 


491,378 


266,4:i7 


211,868 


21,896 


12,519 


12,343 


September 30, " 


189,948 


427,192 


202,305 


132,361 


17,618 


11,131 


11,812 


December 31, " 


255,495 


.310.616 


194,083 


291,878 


63,764 


16,249 


18,058 


March 31, 1877 


320,000 


150,000 


120,000 


380,000 


. 110,000- 


12,000 


25,000 


June 30, " 


373,061 


219,956 


93,141 


322.054 


131,136 


15,231 


37,275 


September 30, " 




840,000 


75,000 


440,000 


95,000 


10,000 


26,000 


December 31, " 


324^701 


561,777 


47,620 


•600,154 


58,942 


17,532 


32,436 



GLOUCESTER, 



GRAIN. 



Wheat, qrs 

Maize, qrs.'. 

Oats, qrs 

Barley, qrs 

Peas, qrs 

Beans, qrs 

Peas and Beans, qrs 

Total, qrs 



1875. 



DEC. 31. 



109,724 

19,480 

17,557 

29,472 

312 

1,225 



1876. 



Dec. 31, 



53,900 
46,300 
28,400 
22.100 
100 
18,300 



I' 



177,770 ' 169,100 



MAncii31. Ju^^E 30. Sept 30. 



1877. 



70,900 
29.300 
35:100 
31,800 

21*,366 



188,400 



86,300 
46.700 
30,600 
69,900 



35,900 



269,400 



41,400 
33,900 
21.600 
54,900 
■ 200 
18,800 



170,800 



Dec. 31. 



96,800 
26,8(10 
22,700 
25,900 
. 4,700 
13,400 



190,300 



BRISTOI.. 



Flour, bbls 

Flour, sks , 

Wheat, qrs , 

Maize, qrs 

Oats, qrs 

Barley, qrs 

Peas, qrs 

Beans, qrs 

Peas and Beans, qrs 

Total, qrs 



2,561 



89,436 
6.790 
8,156 

21.346 

2,157 

559 



128,444 



2,519 



34,181 
44,459 

5,515 
28,960 

6,941 



120,056 



33,924 
18,378 

2,973 

41,819 

199 

6,743 



104,036 



1,570 
200 



37.826 
22.091 
18,051 
86,701 

7,0i3 



171,682 



41,641 
14,916 
13,458 
26,478 

6",666 



102,493 



5,989 



60,510 

14,815 

13,767 

7,529 

1,447 

2,945 



101,073 



Hosted by 



Google 



Stocks of Grrain. 



331 



Stocks of Gbain at the Principal Importing Ports op the 
United Kingdom, 

On December 31, 1877. 



PORT. 




Flour, 


Wheat, 


Maize, 


Oats, 


BARLEY, 


Peas, 


Beans, 






Cwts. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


Qrs. 


London 


324,701 


561,777 


47,620 


600,154 


58,942 
16,129 


17,532 
37,703 


32 436 


Liverpool 


188,297 


353,243 


50,199 


14.181 


75:894 
44,445 
10,933 
32,000 
13,400 
3,817 
2,945 
1,624 


Glasgow 


329,513 


158,944 


198,465 


36,555 


25,097 


16,800 
3,674 


Leith 


83,682 


*64,959 


22,961 


60,301 


28,856 


Hull 




120,000 


30,000 


36.000 


50,000 


5,000 


Gloucester 




96,800 


26,800 


22,700 


25.900 


4 700 


Newcastie 


58,920 


15,915 


2,900 


15,230 


4,586 


3,714 

1,447 

337 


Bristol 


10,481 


60,510 


14,875 


13,767 


7 529 


West Hartlepool. 




16,977 


9,282 


15,168 


11,262 


Dublin 






162,a37 


27,141 










■Rplfju^t , . ... 


11,922 


25,635 


55,860 










Londonderry 


54,000 


7,100 


11,600 










Waterford 




12,000 


25,000 










SUgo 


28,000 


8,100 


35,000 


5,600 








Snnderland. . . - 


15,443 


11,059 


3,094 


1,269 


508 


1,822 




1877 


Total, Dec. 31, 


1,089,516 


1,679,740 


563,762 


822,750 


229,570 


91,415 


219,316 


" t< 


'76 


1,012,889 


1,457,155 


1,146,615 


454,095 


282,490 


56,015 


124,531 


(( (( 


'75 


1,501,554 


2,471,758 


195,814 


424,733 


243,826 


40,989 


43,984 


u '* 


'74 


1,128,292 


848,837 


103,740 


292,717 


255,914 


39,198 


23,542 




'73 


924,600 


1,071,656 


217,354 


137,936 


93,096 


24,{)69 


35,203 


" " 


'72 


960,360 


1,498,715 


980,730 


473.111 


173,081 


39,845 


78,370 


tt n 


'71 


1,043,714 


1,839,254 


456,289 


661,009 


170,981 


23,138 


120,391 


*' " 


'70 


958,531 


1,299,564 


261,909 


705,979 


123,004 


64,448 


38,606 


u tt 


'69 


797,773 


2,026,351 


298,804 


554,687 


173,914 


24,387 


31,975 


" " 


'68 


507,890 


771,265 


83,633 


465,709 


192,053 


50,255 


61,626 



* Stocks in millers' hands, estimated at 80,000 qrs., are not included in this. 

i 

imports of maize into the united kingdom. 

And the Principal Souhces of Supply, 
For the Years 



from 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1-874, 


, 1875. 


1876. 


Russia 

France 


Bush. 
4,174,976 

193,246 

312,098 
2,556,102 
8,540,440 

151,810 
27,330,630 

392,744 


Bush. 

847,702 

21,804 

311,312 

1,896,826 

3,279,230 

744,002 

41,077,158 

886,136 


Bush. 

2,708,790 

11,406 

268,656 

2,540,928 

5,566,200 

77.900 

25,047;056 

1,425,926 


Bush. 

1,017,122 

180,840 

193,534 

714,100 

2,345,430 

25,498 

29,549,690 

1,361,036 


Bush. 
1,008,230 

537,062 
2,377,414 
1,157,004 
7,740,106 

126,980 
24,117,212 
3,812,952 

40,876,960 


Bush., 

1,659,212. 

i;i'?4 

131,498 

4,^23,096 

13,957,464 

264,542 

54,130,920 

5,158,832 


Italy, Venetia, &c... 
Wallachia &Moldana 
Turkish Provinces.. 


IT. S. America 

Other Countries 


Total Bushels 


43,652,046 


49,064,170 


37,646,862 


35,387,250 


79,926,738 



Export of Grain and Seed from the Ports of Riga and LabAu 

During 1877. 





Riga. 


Labau. 


Total, 1877. 


Wheat . . . , 


Qrs. 

193,952 
856,648 
395,719 

59,163 

1,628,890 

277,568 

51,838 


Qrs. 

1,757 

292,596 

259,324 

3,777 

448,363 

24,618 

11,631 


Qrs. 
195,709 


Rye 

Barley , 


1,149,244 

655,043 

62,940 


Buckwheat. 


Oats 


2,077,253 


Linseed 


302,186 


Hemp-seed 


63,619 






Total qrs 


3,463,778 


1,042,116 


4,505,894 



Hosted by 



Google 



332 New York Prodvxie Tlxchange. 

Stocks of Floub and Grain at 

HUIX. 



GRAIN. 



Wheat, qrs.. 
Maize, qrs , . . 

Oats, qrs 

Barley, qrs.. 
Peas, qrs . , . 
Beans, qrs... 

Total, qrs. 



1875. 



Dec. 31. 



130.000 
15,000 
33,000 
38,000 
285 
3,000 



219,285 



1876. 



Dec. 31. 



100,000 
45,000 
23,000 
42.000 
1,600 
20,000 



231,600 



1877. 



March 31. June 30. Sept. 80. Dec. 31 



70,000 
45,000 
20,000 
60,000 

3i',o66 



226,000 



110,000 
60,000 



50,000 

4,000 

33,000 



300,000 



120,000 
40,000 
30,000 
35,000 

40*,666 



265,000 



120,000 
30,000 
36,000 
50,000 
5,000 
32,000 



273,000 



DUBLIN. 



Wheat, qrs 


210,000 
15,000 


137,812 
116,739 




140,000 
70,000 


27;666 


162,337 




27,141 






Total, qrs 


225,000 


254,551 




210,000 




189,478 







NEWCASTIiE. 



WEST HARIXEPOOI.. 





1877. 
Dec. 31. 


1876. 
Dec. 31. 


1875. 
Dec. 31. 


1877. 
June 80. 


1877. 
Sept. 30. 


1877. 
Dec. 30. 


Flour, bbls., 196 lbs 

Flour, sks., 280 lbs 


^,568 


^',768 


* i",6i4 








Wheat, qrs 


15,915 
2,900 

15,230 
4,586 
3,714 
3,817 


14,741 
8,363 

18,217 
6,624 


25,850 
2,420 

23,480 

2,690 

1,130 

730 


7.666 

4lt625 

14,349 

500 

650 


7,322 

30,213 

6,522 

1,800 
537 


16,977 


Maizes (Irs 


9,282 


Oats, qrs 


15,168 


Barley, qrs 

Peas, qrs 


11,262 
337 


Beans qrs 


1,624 






Total Grrain, qrs 


46,162 


47,945 


56,300 


70,790 


46,394 


54,650 







I.ONDONI>ERItY. 



BEIiFAST. 



1877. 
Dec. 31. 



1876. 
Dec. 31. 



1875. 
Dec. 31, 



1877. 
Dec. 31. 



1876. 
Dec. 81. 



1875. 
Dec. 81. 



Flour, bbla., 196 lbs 
Flour, sks,, 280 lbs.. 

Wheat, qrs 

Maize, qrs 



7,100 
11,600 



9,000 
72,000 



3,750 

9,850 

18,250 

17,600 



56,860 



5,087 

25,092 

128,987 



11,184 
6,240 

63,900 
4,804 



Hosted by 



Google 



Stocks of Grrain. 333 

Stocks of Gbain and Seed in Holland. 



GRAJN. 



Wheat, qrs — 

Rye, qrs 

Barley, qrs 

Buckwheat, qrs 
Bape Seed, qrs. 
Linseed, qrs — 

Total, qrs 



At Amsterdam. 



1877. 
Dec. 31. 



21,770 

196,140 

1,700 

412 

10,060 



295,012 



1876. 
Dec. 31. 



28,880 

110,590 

5,000 

920 

34,870 

85,270 



265,530 



1875. 
Dec. 31. 



28,570 

166,150 

1,160 



65,200 
77,630 



338,710 



At Rotterdam. 



1877. 
Dec. 31. 



43,700 

133,120 

51,230 

1,720 

6,600 

37,730 



274,100 



1876. 
Dec. 31. 



42,600 
66,200 
93.000 
1,490 
16,680 
31,660 



251,630 



1875. 
Dec. 31. 



55,000 
117,200 
45,550 
1,360 
11,920 
13,640 



244,670 



Stocks of Graik and Seed at Odessa. 



GRAIN. 


1877. 
Dec. 31. 


1876. 
Dec. 31. 


1875. 
. Dec. 31. 


1874. 
Dec. 31. 


1873. 
Dec. 31. 


1872. 
Dec. 31. 


Wheat, qrs 

Maize, qrs 

Oats, qrs 

Barley, qrs 

Rye, qrs 

Linseed, qrs 

Rape Seed, qrs. . . 


408,600 
60,000 
12,580 

153,560 
64,010 
19,920 
17,015 


35,640 

3,400 

20,000 

16,560 

6,600 

580 

2,000 


1,004,904 

36,288 

4,82,0 

17,352 

97,162 

332 

220 


704,520 
2,880 
2,520 
18,720 
20,160 
2,520 
4,680 


573,840 
7,920 
7,920 
9,360 
78,800 
7.920 
14,400 


635,040 
38,520 
10,790 
40,480 

126,540 

10,790 

9,180 


Total, qrs 


735,685 


84,780 


1,161,078 1 756,000 


700,160 


871,290 



Grain Movement at Konigsburg, Germany. 



GRAIN. 


Imports prom Russia. 


Exports, Seawards. 


1877. 


1876. 


1877. 


1876. 


WTieat ■ 


Tons. 

218,135 
170,284 
64,461 
93,563 
22,645 
251 
1,620 
25,074 
10,705 
12,860 


Tons. 

75,213 

138,322 

9,934 

49,291 

6,525 

136 

1,391 

25,272 

7,244 


Tons. 

237,889 

167,808 

86,477 

101,55-i 

36,828 

3,245 

8,572 

31,184 

6,667 

14,048 


Tons. 
116,752 


Bye. .. 


122,745 


Barley 

Oats 


12,879 
39,478 


Peas .. . 


11,167 


Beans 


3,678 


Tares 


9,507 


Linseed 


17,088 


Rnbsen, &c 


7,655 


Buckwheat 


2,860 






Total, Tons 


619,598 


313,328 


694,270 


343,744 







Hosted by 



Google 



334 



New York Produce ^Exchange. 



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Stocks of Flour^ Wheat, Bye and Oats at Paris. 335 



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Hosted by 



Googk 



336 New York Produce Exchange. 

AvEEAGE Monthly Pbices of Eight Maeks Floub at 

Paris, 

In franca and centimes per 159 kilos, sacks included, and sterling per 280 pounds. 



MONTH. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


fr. c. 

60 25 

61 83 
63 OU 
63 00 

63 50 

64 33 
60 62 
56 50 
53 50 

49 83 

50 50 
52 25 


8. d. 

38 6 

39 6 

40 3 
40 3 

40 6 

41 1 
38 9 
36 1 
34 2 

31 9 

32 2 

33 4 


fr. c. 

52 00 
52 75 

52 75 
54 25 
56 25 
56 50 
56 16 

53 25 
50 25 
50 41 
50 12 
50 25 


s. d. 

as 2 

33 8 

33 8 

34 8 

35 11 

36 1 
35 10 
34 
32 
32 1 

31 11 

32 


fr. c. 

49 25 

48 50 

49 25 

50 50 

52 00 

50 75 
49 25 

51 16 
51 50 
54 37 
54 50 

53 50 


8. d. 

31 6 

30 11 

31 6 

32 2 
32 2 
32 4 

31 6 

32 7 
32 10 
34 9 
34 10 
34 2 


fr. c. 

53 50 
52 75 

51 16 

52 25 

54 12 
58 80 
60 25 
64 62 
69 62 

71 30 

72 75 
77 75 


s. 

34 
33 
32 
33 
34 
37 
38 
41 
44 
45 
46 
49 


d. 

I 
7 
4 

I 

9 
3 
5 
6 
5 
8 


fr. c. 

82 09 

76 63 
74 00 

77 28 
73 77 
70 93 
76 09 
81 73 
87 00 
90 00 
93 02 
93 94 


8. d. 

52 5 

48 11 
47 3 

49 4 


May 


47 1 


^ ^ 

June 


45 3 


July 


48 7 


August 


52 2 


September 

October 

November 

December 


55 6 
57 6 
59 4 
59 11 






Yearly Average . . 


58 26 


37 2 


52 91 


33 9 


51 21 


32 8 


61 61 


39 


4 


81 36 


52 



MONTH. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


January 


fr. c. 

90 00 

93 22 

94 13 
94 88 
90 82 
81 38 
83 00 
77 45 
75 48 
68 81 
68 36 
64 08 


8. d. 

57 6 

59 6 

60 1 
60 7 

58 

52 

53 
49 6 
48 2 
43 11 
43 8 
40 11 


fr. c. 

61 85 

58 69 
55 29 

54 53 
57 12 

59 25 

60 00 
63 06 
60 98 
57 98 
66 00 

55 20 


P. d. 

39 6 
37 5 

35 3 

34 2 

36 6 

37 10 

38 4 

40 3 

39 
37 

35 9 
35 3 


fr. 0. 

54 56 
54 72 
56 29 
67 29 
60 10 
70 08 

70 66 

71 13 
71 00 


s. d. 

34 10 

35 

35 11 

36 7 
38 5 

44 9 

45 1 
45 5 
45 4 


fr. c. s. d. 

81 56"* 52 
85 19 54 5 
87 58 55 11 
87 31 55 9 
85 98 54 11 


fr. c. 

80 87 
75 67 

68 38 

69 13 

73 38 

74 25 
73 83 
67 19 

70 09 

71 05 
71 41 
73 30 


s. d. 
51 8 


February 

March 

April 


48 3 

43 8 

44 2 


Mav 


46 10 




47 5 


July 

August 


47. 2 
42 10 


September 

October 


44 9 

45 4 


November 




45 7 

46 9 








Yearly Average.. 


81 80 


52 3 


58 33 


37 3 






72 38 


46 2 







MONTH. 


1873. 


1874. 


. 1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 


fr. c. 

72 46 

69 36 

70 79 

71 19 

73 55 
76 24 
76 60 
84 57 
88 04 

86 32 

87 48 
86 19 


8. d. 

46 3 

44 3 

45 2 

45 6 

46 11 
48 8 
48 11 

54 
56 2 

55 2 
55 10 
55 


fr. c. 

85 02 
79 30 
75 81 
77 15 

79 49 
y2 57 

80 02 
63 62 
58 69 
55 43 
54 22 
54 15 


s. 

54 
50 
48 
49 
50 
52 
51 
40 
37 
35 
34 
34 


d. 


7 
5 
3 
9 
8 
1 
7 
6 
4 
8 
7 


fr. c. 

53 53 
52 00 

52 16 

53 18 
53 42 
55 90 

59 90 
62 30 

60 42 
59 93 
58 83 
58 65 


8. d. 

34 2 
33 2 

m 3 

33 11 

34 1 

35 8 

38 3 

39 9 
38 7 
38 3 
37 7 
37 5 


fr. c. 

56 69 

57 34 

59 00 
64 20 
62 80 

62 77 

57 50 

58 20 
58 75 

60 10 
60 75 

63 55 


8. d. 

36 2 

36 8 

37 8 
41 
40 1 
40 1 

36 9 

37 2 

37 6 

38 5 
38 10 
40 6 


fr. c. 

63 40 
60 34 
58 76 

64 88 

69 08 
73 50 

70 86 

68 61 

71 10 

69 60 
69 50 
69 21 


8. d. 
40 5 


February 

March 


38 6 
37 6 


April 


41 5 


May 


44 1 




46 11 


July 


45 3 


August 


43 10 


September 

October 

November 

December 


45 5 
44 4 
44 4 
44 3 






Yearly Average. . 


78 57 


50 2 


70 46 


45 





56 67 


36 2 


60 14 


38 5 


67 40 


43 



Hosted by 



Google 



Imports of Wheat into Marseilles, 



337 



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Hosted by 



Google 



338 



New Yorh Trodiice Exchange. 



DAILY, AND MONTHLY AVERAGE, PRICES OF BACON, URD 
AND TALLOW, AT NEW YORK, 

For the Year 1877. 





BACON. 


LARD. 


TAL- 
LOW. 


flSBi 


BACON. 


LABD. 




JAN. 


Long 
Clear. 


Short 
Clear. 


Prime 
Con- 
tract. 


Long 
Clear. 


Short 
Clear. 

• 


Prime 
Con- 
tract. 


TAL- 
LOW. 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

8 

9 


Cents. 
9^ 
9^ 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
QVz 
9M 
9^ 
9M 
9M 
9% 
^Yz 
9% 
9^ 
9^ 
9X 
9 7-16 
9 3-16 
^Vz 
9X 
9X 


Cents. 

9% 

9% 

9^ 
10 
10 

i6"* 
i6"' 

9% 
9% 
9% 
9X 
9X 
9% 

irs 

9% 
9^ 
9^ 
9^ 
9% 
9X 
9% 
9X 


Cents. 

11-40 

11-423^ 

11-38% 

ll-57><^ 

11-70 

11-46 

ll-62>sr 

11-45 

ll-37>^ 

11-273^ 

ll-22>sr 

11-42^ 

11-25 

11 15 

ii-i7>5r 

11-25 

11-25 

11-32 

11-27^ 

ll-:^7i<r 

11-20 

11-17>^ 

11 -22^ 

11-22X 

11-15 


Cents. 
8 7-16 
8% 

8 7-16 
8 9-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 7-16 
8 13-32 
8% 

8 5-16 
8% 
8% 

8 lS-32 
8% 
b 7-16 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 

8 11-32 
8 9-32 


1 

2 

3 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13....... 

14 

15 

16 

17 

19 

20 

21 

23 

24 

26 

27 

28 

Average.. 


Cents.' 
9K 
9K 
9H 

91-16 

91-16 

9% 

9% 

91-16 

91-16 

91-16 

91-16 

91-16 

91-16 

91-16 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% 


Cents. 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9% 
9^ 
9K 
9% 
9H 
9M 
9K 
9U 
9K 

9" 
9 

9'' 


Ce 
11 
11 
10 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
lU 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


QtS. 

10 
00 

97>sr 

05 

31 
35 

20 
17>^ 

nVz 

97j< 

80 

82X 

83% 

82^ 

45 

25 

25 

50 

15 

nu 

13% 

15 


Cents. 
8 7-32 
81-16 
81-16 
8% 
8 5-32 
8% 
81-16 


10 

11 

12 

13 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

29 

30 

31 


8 3-32 

8}i 

8% 

81-16 

8 

8 

7 15-16 

7 15-16 

71516 

715-16 

7 15-16 

7 15-16 

7 15-16 

7 29-32 

n% 
1% 


Average . 


9-58 


9-75 


11-34 


8-40 


9 


9-26 


10-77 


8-02 



MAS. 

1 

2 

3 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

Average 



8 9-16 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 5-16 
8 5-16 
8 516 
8 5-16 
8 516 
8 3-16 
81-16 
81-16 
81-16 
81-16 
81-16 
81-16 
7% 
8 
7^ 



8 

81-16 
81-16 
8 3-16 
8 316 
81-16 



8-12 



813-16 
8)4 



8 3-16 

8X 
8X 



8M 
8^ 
8}i 
8% 
8)4 
8X 
8% 



•42^ 
•22 

•13% 

•12>^ 

-10 

•90 

1-85 

83% 
•63% 
•45 
•513^ 
•62><r 
•58% 
•55 
•70 

70 
•75 
•00 
'•96% 
-85 
•85 
•70 
•60 
•65 
•6^2i^ 
•72>sf 



41 9-81 



7 11-16 
7 13-16 
7 27-32 
7% 
7% 
7 29-32 
7 15-16 



7 15-16 
8 

7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 31-32 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
8 

7 15-16 
7 31-32 
7 31 32 
7 31-32 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 



APRII.. 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

30 



Average.. 



81-16 
8% 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 3 16 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 316 
8 5-16 
8 5-16 
8 5-16 
8% 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8.9-16 
811-16 
811-16 
811-16 
811-16 
811-16 



8-39 



8 7-16 
8% 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8% 
8% 
8 5-16 
8}^ 

8y, 

8}^ 
8 9-16 



8% 

8/8 

8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
9% 
9)i 
9% 
9% 
9% 



85 

88^ 

00 

77)^ 

82j^ 

85 

85 

77;^ 

83% 

8lyz 

97X 

50 

16 

22 i^ 

22% 

^Vz 

25 

25 

31 Ji 

413^ 

28% 

26 

31^ 



8-72 10-08 8-31 



7 15-16 
7 31-32 

7 15-16 

8 1-32 
8 1-32 
8 1-32 
8 1-32 
81-32 
81-32 
81-32 
,8 

8 1-32 
8 3-32 
8 3-16 
8 5-16 
8 7-16 
8 9-16 
8 11-16 
8% 

8 11-16 
8% 
8% 
8% 

8 29-32 
8 15-16 



Hosted by 



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Priees of Bacon, Lard and Tallow. 



339 



Dah^t, and Monteclt Atebage, Prices of Bacon, Lard antd Taixow, 
AT iN'EW York, for the Year 1877.— (Continued.) 





BACON. 


LAUD. 


TAL- 
LOW. 


JUNE. 


BACON. 


LABD. 




MAY.* 


Long 
Clear. 


Short 
Clear. 


Prime 
Con- 
tact. 


Long 
Clear. 


Short. 
Clear. 


Prime 
Con- 

ti-act. 


TAL- 
LOW. 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

28 

29 

31 


Cents. 
8 11-16 
8 11-16 
8 11-16 
8 11-16 
8 916 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 

Vru 

8 7-16 

7 11-16 
7 7-16 

^y 
'ry 
'ry 
^y 
^y 
"^y 
'^yz 
"^y 
^y 


Cents. 

9 

9 

8 13-16 

813-16 

8% 

8% 

8 11-16 

8 11-16 

8% 

8% 

8 11-16 

8 11-16 

8y 

8X 

8K 

8 

8 

8% 

8% 

8y 

8% 

8y 

8% 
8% 

8y^ 

8>^ 


C 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 


ents. 
20 
13% 
18% 
QG% 
041-6 
163^ 
09 
02X 
841-6 
841-6 
85 
67^ 
60 

52y 
47y 

50 

60 

55 

46 

60 

50 

55 

50 

53 

61^ 

51X 


Cents. ' 
8 13-16 
8 13-16 
8 13-16 
8 11-16 
8X 
8% 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 
8 9-16 

8y 
8y 

8 9-16 

8ys 

8 9-16 
8 9-J16 
8 9-16 

817-32 
8 7-16 
8 5-16 
8 5-16 
8 5-16 

8y 

8K 
8 3-16 


1 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

Average.. 


Cents. 

7 9-16 
7 7-16 

't% 

7^ • 

'^y 

7 

TX 

8% 

^% 

1% 

73^ 


Cents. 
8% 
8 
8 

7% 
^% 
7% 
1% 


Cents. 

9-55 

9-55 

9-50 

9-42>^ 

9-30 

9-271^ 

9- 04 1-6 

9-00 

9-10 

8-98 

8-87>^ 

8'8ly 

8-82X 

8-93X 

9-01^ 

9-05 

9-10 

9-42>^ 

9-20X 

9-22>^ 

9'^y 

9'lly 

9-15 

9-10 

9-05 

9-qo 


Cents. 

8 3-16 

81-16 

81-32 

81.32 

715-16 

8 

8 

8 

8 

715-16 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

7 31-32 

8 

8 

8. 

715-16 

8 

8 

81-32 

81-16 

8% 


Average. 


8-02 


8-43 


9-75 


8-56 


7-39 


7-94 


915 


8 01 



JULY. 

2 

8 

5....;.. 

6 

7 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 , 

21 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28....... 

30 

31 



Average. 7*: 



m 
'ry 

?¥ 

m 

7y 

7 
7 
7 
7 

^y 
'ry 

71-16 
71-16 
71-16 
7 1-16 
7 3-16 
7% 

7% 
7K 
7% 
7% 
7% 



05 

10 

113^ 

18X 

23 

163^ 

15 

20 

20 

31 

35 



22X 
30 



463^ 

^7y 

55 
55 

463^ 

^y 

35% 

i7y 



9-29 



81-16 
81-16 
83-32 

8y 

8% 

8% 

8% 

81-16 

8 1-16 

8 1-16 

81-16 

8/8 

8 3-16 
8% 

8y 

8% 

8y 

8X 
8% 
8X 
8% 
8% 

8y 

8 5-32 
8K 



8-11 



AUG. 

1.... 

2 

3 

4 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 .... 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



Average. 7 '84 



7% 
7% 

7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 15-16 
7 9-16 
7% 

7y 
7y 
'ry 
7y 
7y 
7y 



8y 

8}i 
8X 

8ys 
8y 

8H 

8y 

8U 
8H 
8X 
8H 
8U 
8K 
■ V4 
7% 
7M 
7% 
7% 
7% 
7% 
7% 



103 



263^ 

273^ 

30% 

243=^ 

25 

14 

07>^ 

03% 

05 

00 
95 
90 

^y 

95 

673^ 

623^ 

70 

68% 

58>^ 

60 

70 

7iy 

70 
70 
«0 



8% 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 7-32 
8 3-16 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 7-32 
8 7-32 
8 7-32 
8 7-32 
8 3-16 
8 3-16 
8 7-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5.;32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-;32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 



8-17 



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340 



New TorJc Produce Exchange. 



Daily, and MoNTHiiY Average, Pkices op Bacon, Labd and Tali:x)w, 
AT New York, for the Year l%Ti .—(Continued.) 





BACON. 


LARD. 


TAL- 
LOW. 


OCT. 


BACON. 


LABD. 


TAL- 


SEPT. 


Long 
Clear. 


Short 
Clear. 


Prime 
Con- 
tract. 


Long 
Clear. 


Short 
Clear. 


Prime 
Con- 
tract. 


LOW. 


1 

3 

4........ 

5 

6 

7 

8 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

17 

18 

19 


Cents. 

7>^ 

7^ 

7% 

7% 

7% 

t% 

75^ 

7>sr 

7^ 

7>^ 

7X 

7M 

75i 

7% 

7 9-16 

7 13-16 

7 13-16 

713-16 

7 13-16 

715-16 

8>^ 

B% 

8% 

8% 


Cents. 
7^ 
7^ 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

^% 

8% 

8X 

83^ 

83^ 

8i^ 

83^ 

8K 


C 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 


ents. 

863^ 

863^ 

85 

^Vz 

^Yz 

05 

11^ 

15 

25 

18X 

02 >^ 

993^ 

02>s^ 

00 

00 

25 
25 

173< 


Cents. 
8 5-32 
8 5-32 
8 3-16 
8^ 

sy, 

8H 

8 3-32 

81-16 

81-16 

8 

81-32 

8*1-32 

81-32 

7 15-16 

71516 

715-16 

7 29 32 

7 17-32 

713-16 

713-16 

7 27-^ 

7 25-32 

7 27-32 

7 26-32 


1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

8 

9 

It:::: 

12 

13 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

29 

30 

31 


Cents. 

sye 

8% 
8% 
8M 
8 11-16 

II 

sx 

8K 
SK 
SK 
UK 

s% 

8X 

sx 

8K 

8X 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8% ' 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8^ 

8yz 


Cents. 

8K 

8% 

8M 

8M 

8% 

8% 

8K 

8% 

8% 

8X 

8%. 

8% 

8% 

8% 

8y> 

8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 
8% 

8y, 

8% 


Cents. 

9-28X 

9-26M 

9-20 

9-213^ 

9-23^^ 

9-22)^ 

9-18>^ 

9-20 

9-21 

9-13K 

9-133;^ 

9-10 

9-00 

8-971^ 

8'^% 

8.813^ 

8-83 

8-863^ 

8-85 

8-87>cr 

8-95 

8-95 

8-90 

8-90 

8-873^ 

8-77 

8-723<r 


Cents. 
7 13-16 
7 13-16 
713-16 
7 25-32 
7 27-32 
713-16 
7 13-16 
7 25-32 
7 25-32 
7 25-32 
7 26-32 
7 25-32 
7 25-32 
7 2:3-32 
7 11-16 
7 13-16 


20 

21 

22 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 


7X 
7 23-32 

7X 
75^ 
7% 
1% 
7X 

V^ 

7 11-16 
7 23-32 


Average . . 


7-69 


8-24 


9 


09 


8-00 


Average. 


8-66 


8-82 


9-02 


7-77 



NOV. 

1 

2 

3 

5 

7 

8...... 

9 

10 

12 

ly 

14 

15 

16 

17 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 : 

26 

27 



Average . . 



8% 

8% 

8U 

8H 

8H 

8H 

8% 

8 3-16 

8 1-16 

81-16 

8116 

81-16 



7% 
7% 
7^^ 
7X 
7% 
7X 
7X 
73^ 
73^ 
73^ 



7-97 



8X 
83^ 
83^ 
8}i 
8M 
8M 
8yz 



83^ 



8-673^ 
623^ 
623< 
65 
633^ 
63% 
58% 
55 
523< 
55 
57>^ 
613^ 
55 
53>^ 
50 
50 
473<r 
423*r 
40 
38% 
45 
413^ 
40 
373^ 



8-53 



7 11-16 
.7 11-16 
7 11-16 
7 11-16 
7 11-16 
7 11-16 
7 19-32 
7 11-16 
7% 
7 9-16 
7 19-32 
719 32 
7 19-32 
7 21-32 
7 19-32 
7 21 32 I 
7 11-16 
7 21-32 
7 19-32 
7 19-32 I 
7 11-16 
7 2132 
7 21-32 
7^ 



7-64 



DEC. 

1 

3 

4 .... 

5 

6 

7 

8 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 .... 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 .... 

24 

26 

27 

28 

29 

31 



Average. 6*: 



7 3-16 

73^ 

7>i 

73^ 

7X 



71-16 

71-16 

6% 

6% 

6% 

6% 

6% 

6 11-16 

6% 

6% 

63^ 

6^ 

eye 

6% 
6% 



6% 



613-16 



6-91 



40 

43% 

38% 

40 

43% 

45 

60 

513€ 

38% 

35 



323<< 

25 

173<r 

22>^ 

15 

13% 

15 

133^ 

15 

15 

10 



8 123^ 



7 19-32 
7 11-16 
7 19-16 

7^ 

7 19-32 

717-32 

7 9-16 

7 9-16 

7 9-16 

7>^ 

7 17-32 

73< 

73<r 

7y 

73^ 

73<r 

73< 

73^ 

73^ 

73^ 

73^ 

73^ 

7.^ 



7-56 



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Prices of Bac(m and Cut Meats at New York. 341 

Pkices of Bacon and Cut Meats at New Yobk, 
Semi-Monthly, 

For the Tea/r 1877. 



DATE. 



January 2 

15 

February 1 

15 

March 1 

" 1^ 

April 2 

" 16 

May 1 

" 15 

June 1 

" 15 

July 2 

" 16 

August 1 

" 15 

September 1 

15.... 

October 1 

" 15 

November 1 

15.... 

December 1 , . . . 

15.... 



Bacon, 

City Long 
Clear, 
per lb. 



Cents. 
9>^@ 9K 

9 @ 9>^ 
8^@ 8% 
8 @ 8>^ 
8 @ 8^' 
S%@ S% 
8^@8X 
1%® 8 

7K 
7^ 

7 @73^ 
8 

7%@,8 

7>^ 
7X@ 8 

8^ 

8^ 

8^ 

8 @ 8>^ 
7^ 

6>8 



Pickled 
Shoulders, 

per lb. 



Cents. 
63^® 65^ 

7 

1% 
7 @7^ 

^Vz 

6K 

6;^ 
6K@7 

7 

7 
7 @7^ 

7 @7j:^ 

7j^@ 7><r 
7 @7^ 
7>sr@7X 
83^® 83ir 
83^® 8>g 
8^® 8% 
83^® 8i^ 
r^i® 8 

7^ 
6^® 7M 

6 

6 



Pickled 
Bellies, 

per lb. 



Cents. 
9H®10M 
8;^@103^ 
8%@10 
8'4@10 
7K@93^ 
7X@93^ 
7X@9>^ 
7X@ 9>^ 
73^® 9M 
7X@ 8^8 
73<^@8X 
7J^@ 8K 
6%@ 73^ 
6X@73^ 
73<^@8 
7H® 8 
7M® 8 
7>sr® 83^ 
8 @ 9 
8 @ 9 
8 @ 9 
73^® 8K 
63^® 7 
63^® 7 



Fresh 
Bellies, 

per lb. 



Cents. 
8%®103^ 
8%®10K 
83i^@ 9>cr 
8>^@ 9^ 
73^® 9>5r 
7>^® 9;^ 
73^® 9>^ 
73<@ 9K 
73<^® 9>ir 
7 @8>^ 
7 @83^. 
7 ® 8^ 
7 ® 8 
7 @ 8 
7 ® 8 
7X® 8 
7 ® 8 
7 ® 8 
7 ® 8 
7 ® 8 
7X . 
7 ® 7X 
6 @ 6^ 
6 ® 6% 



Pickled 
Hams, 

per lb. 



Cents. 
ll>cf@12 
10i^@113^ 
10 ®11^ 

10 @113< 
9 ®10 

9 ®103^ 
9 ®10^ 
9 @10;< 
9 ®10>< 
9%@10 
9><r®10 
95^®10 

11 ®iiir 

11 ©113=^ 
113^@113^ 
12J<®12^ 
123^®12% 
123^@12% 

12 ®123^ 
12 ®12X 

12 
11X®12 
10 ®11 
10 ®11 



Fresh 
Hams, 

per lb. 



Cents. 
934@11 
93!i@ll 
10 @10X 
10 @10X 
SH® 9K 
8K® ^X 
8K® 95^ 
8K® 9>j^ 
8X@9^ 
9^@10 ■ 



10 @1Q}4 
10 @10^ 

10 @10>^ 
IW 

11 ®ii^ 
11 @ii3^ 
11 @ii^ 

9 @iox 

8>5^@10 
8 @ 9 
8 @ 9 



Ayerage Prices of Smoked Meats, Stearine, Dressed 
Hogs and Grease, Monthly and Yearly, at New York, 



For the Tear 1877. 



MONTH 


Smoked Meats. 


Stearine, 

Western & City, 

per lb. 


Dressed Hogs, 
City, 
per lb. ' 


Grease, 




Hams. Loose, 
per lb. 


Sh'ldrs, Loose, 
per lb. 


White, 
per lb. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


Cents. 
12 1-17®12 7-10 

11 7-12®12 

11 ®113^ 

11 4-7®12 3-16 

113€®11X 
11.^®113^ 

12 3-lH®12% 
13 1-12@13 2-5 

13K®133^ 
13 @13>^ 
123<^®18 1-16 
11 2-5®123^ 


Cents. 

8 l-20®8 9-20 

81-5 

¥' 

8 6-ll®8 5 7 

9 7-12®9 2-3 

8'2-3®8 6.7 
7 l-12®7i^ 
6 1-3®6X 


Cents. 
11 1-13®11J^ 
10 2.3®11 
10 3-16@l<!>^ 
10%@10 6-7 
10 3 5@10 9-10 
10 3-32@10X 
10 1 21®10 7-16 
10 1-3U@10 2 5 
103^@10>i 
9^@ 9X 
8«^@811-12 
8^@ 8 4-5 


Cents. 

8 1-3®S 2-3 

7^@7% 

7 ®7>^ 

1%®! 3-7 

63i@7 1-5 

^%®^% 

6 5-6®7 5-12 

6 9-10@7 7-10 

6 15-16@7 5-7 

6 7-:c@7% 

5K@6 1-3 
5%®5% 


Cents. 
5^@9^ 
5K®9^ 
5 @8^ 
5 @85^ 
5>^@8 2^ 
5K@8 
53^@8 
5>c^@8 
5>6®8 
5^®8>^ 


May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


Av'ge,1877.. 


12 1-32@12^ 


8 1-12@8^ 


10 1.29@10 1-3 


6 5.6®7 1-3 


5 7-24@8 1-3 



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342 



New Yorh Produce Exchange, 



Prices of Mess Pork at New York, Weekly, 

For the Tea/r 1877. 



DAY 


January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


MAY. 


June. 


1... 




17 00 


16 00 




16 00 


14 65@14 75 


2... 


17 12 


16 62@16 90 


15 90@16 00 


14 96@i5 00 


15 87046 00 


14 65@14 75 


3... 


17 90 


16 90@17 12 


15 75^16 00 


15 00 


15 87@16 00 




4... 


17 90 






15 00@15 25 


16 00®16 12 


14 50@14 55 


5... 


18 00@18 25 


16 i'^'irt 00 


15 50 


14 90@15 00 


16 00®16 12 


14 35@14 45 


6... 


18 50 


16 75® 17 00 


15 50@15 75 


14 90@15 00 




14 25 


7... 




17 25 


15 50 


14 90@15 00 


16 00 


14 20@14 25 


8... 


17 06@i8 75 


17 25 


15 35 




15 90@16 00 


14 00@14 20 


9... 


18 50 


17 00 


15 25 


15 05@15 10 


15 90(^16 00 


14 00@14 15 


10... 


18 25@18 75 


16 75@16 80 


15 37@15 50 


15 00®15 50 


15 50@15 75 




11... 


17 25@18 25 






15 15 


15 50ra)15 90 


14 OO'T'14 15 


12... 


18 25 


16 56@i6 62 


14 75@15 00 


15 00 


15 40@15 65 


14 00 


13... 


17 75 


16 25@16 50 


14 50@14 75 


15 00 




13 80@13 90 


14. .. 




16 2.5®16 50 


14 50®14 75 


15 00@15 50 


15 25@15 50 


13 80@13 90 


15... 


17 90@i8 00 


16 25@16 25 


14 60@14 60 




15 00®15 25 


13 90@13 95 


16... 


17 75@18 00 


16 00@16 50 


14 50@14 62 


15 75@i6 00 


15 00 


13 90 


17... 


17 75@17 90 


16 00®16 25 


14 70@14 76 


16 00@16 25 


14 90@15 00 




18... 


17 62@17 75 






15 90@16 00 


14 90@15 00 


13 90 


19... 


17 50 


16 00 


14 75@i4 85 


16 00@16 40 


14 90@15 00 


13 90@13 95 


20... 


17 75 


15 75@15 95 


14 75 


16 00@16 25 




14 25@14 40 


21... 




16 00 


15 00 


16 00@16 12 


14 90 


14 50:^14 60 


22... 


17 75 




14 87®15 00 




14 80@14 90 


14 30® 14 35 


23... 


17 75 


16 66®i6 25 


15 00 


16 00@16 12 


14 75 


14 25@14 25 


24... 


17 75 


16 00 


14 90 


16 20@16 35 


14 65@14 70 




25... 


17 50@17 75 







16 50@16 90 


. 14 65 


14 25@14 60 


26... 


17 50@17 75 


15 75 . 


14 62@i4 75 


16 50@16 75 


14 65@14 70 


14 25@14 50 


27... 


17 25@17 50 


15 75@16 00 


14 50@14 75 


16 25@16 50 




14 25@14 40 


28... 




15 75@16 00 


14 50®14 75 


16 50 


14 60@14 65 


14 25@14 30 


29... 


17 25 




14 50@14 75 




14 65@14 70 


14 25 


30... 


17 40@17 50 




14 50@14 75 


16 50 




14 25 


31... 


17 50@17 80 




14 50@14 75 




14 65@14 70 




Range 


17 00@18 75 


15 75@17 25 


14 50@16 00 


14 90@16 90 


l4 60@16 12 


13 80@14 75 



DAY 


July. 


August. 


SEPTEaiBER. 


October. 


November. 


December. 


1... 





14 25@14 30 


12 90@13 12 


14 15@14 20 


14 30@14 50 




2... 


14 20@14 25 


14 25®14 35 




14 25®14 35 


14 25@14 35 




3... 


14 20@14 25 


14 30@14 35 


13 05@13 15 


14 40@14 50 


14 25@14 50 


13 25®13 60 


4... 




14 25@14 30 


13 00 


14 40®14 50 




13 25@14 00 


6... 


14 26@i4 25 




12 90@13 00 


14 40@14 50 


14 25 




6... 

7... 


14 25@14 35 
14 25 


14 26@i4 25 
14 15@14 20 


12 95@13 15 

13 00@13 10 


14 40@14 50 


14 25 


13 25@13 76 


8... 
9... 


i4'25 


14 10@14 15 
14 05®14 10 


13 00@13 15 


14 40 
14 35 


14 25 
14 25@14 30 


13 25@13 76 


10. . 


14 30®14 35 


14 00 


13 15@13 35 


14 40@14 50 


14 25 


13 12@13 75 


11... 


14 35®14 40 


13 90®14 00 


13 40@13 50 


14 40@14 45 




13 12@13 50 


12... 


14 35@14 40 




13 20@13 25 


14 40@14 50 


14 25®14 50 


13 00@13 50 


13... 


14 40 ajl4 50 


13 80@i3 90 


13 20@13 25 


14 40 


14 25 


12 75®13 25 
12 75@13 25 


14... 


14 50®14 60 


13 75@13 80 


13 20@13 25 




14 25 


16... 
16... 


14 46@i4 50 


13 60®13 75 
13 60 


13 20@13 25 


i4 36 
14 30@14 35 


14 25 
14 25 


12 75®13 25 


17... 


14 40@14 50 


13 50®13 60 


^ 13 25@i3 30 


14 30@14 40 


14 20 


12 75@13 25 


18... 


14 25@14 30 


13 25@13 30 


13 25^13 30 


14 20@14 25 




12 75@13 25 


19... 


14 35® 14 40 




1^ 30:s.l3 37 


14 20@14 25 


14 15@14 25 




20... 
21... 


14 35@14 40 
14 35@14 40 


13 25@i3 .30 
13 15®13 20 


13 40@13 50 
13 40@13 45 


14 20@14 25 


14 00®14 15 
14 00 


12 62@13 12 
12 62@13 12 


22... 
23... 


14 35®i4 40 


13 20@13 25 
13 10- 


13 50®13 60 


14 20@14 25 
14 20® 14 25 


14 00 
14 00 


12 75®13 25 


24... 


14 25®14 30 


13 00@13 10 


13 85@13 90 


14 25®14 35 


13 90 


12 75@13 25 


25... 


14 30®14 35 


13 00@13 10 


33 90®14 00 


14 30(^14 40 




26... 


14 30@14 40 




13 90@14 00 


14 30@14 40 


13 90 


12 75r5il3 25 


2/... 


14 30®14 35 


13 l6@13 25 


13 90@14 00 


14 35@14 50 


13 75 


12 62'a!l3 12 


28... 


14 30@14 35 


13 10®13 15 


14 15@14 25 




13 50®13 60 


12 50®13 10 


29... 




13 00®13 10 


14 15®14 25 


14 35®14 50 




12 37@12 87 


30... 


14 36@i4 a5 


13 00@13 10 




14 50@.15 00 


13 40@13 50 


31... 


14 25@14 30 


13 00@13 10 




15 00 




12 25@12 75 


Rang 


14 20@14 60 


13 00@14 35 


12 90@14 25 


14 15@15 00 


13 40@14 50 12 25@14 00 



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Prices of Porh at New York. 



343 



Peices of Prime Mess and Extea Prime Poek at New 

YOEK, 

For the Tear 1877. 

(Those dates only are given on which transactions were reported.) 



DATE. 


PRIME Mess. 


Extra Prime. 


DATE. 


Prime Mess. 


Extra Prime. 


January 3 




14 50 


May 4 


17 00 


15 00 


'' ^ 5 




14 00 


" 5 




12 50 


9 




14 25 


" 8 




12 50 


February 8 


13 50 




June 7 


14 50 




" 10 


14 25 




July 3 


14 00 


10 50 


March 20 


13 50 




" 6 




10 2!1[% 


" 22 


13 75 


11 50@11 75 


" 16 




10 50 


" 23 


13 50 


11 50@12 00 


August 1 




10 50 @10 75 


April 13 




11 75 


" 3 


13 50 




" 14 


17 50 


12 00 


7 


13 75 




" 16 


17 50 


12 00@12 50 


" 10 




10 37^@10 50 


" 17 


17 00@17 50 


12 50@13 00 


" 14 


13 00 


lOiJO 


" 20 


17 00 


12 50@13 00 


" 15 


13 00 


10 00 


" 21 


17 50 


12 50@13 00 


October 5.. 


13 50 




" 24.. 


17 00 


12 25 


24.. 


12 75 




*' 25 


17 00 




November 12., 


11 00 


9 00 @11 00 


" 26 




12 50 


December 3.. 


10 00@11 00 




" 28 




12 50@12 65 


21 . . 


10 00 


8 00 



Average Peices of Mess Poek, Monthly and Yeaely, at 

New York, 

From 1862 to 1877, Inclusive. 



MONTH. 


1862. 


1863, 


. 1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


• 1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


12 00 

13 25 
13 75 

13 00. 
12 60 
11 12 

10 75 

11 12 

11 63 

12 75 
12 75 

14 00 


14 62 
14 88 
14 12 

13 06 
11 87 
11 50 
11 75 
11 75 
11 87 

14 00 

16 25 

17 75 


19 00 

20 00 
22 00 
24 75 
27 00 
35 50 
47 00 

39 75 

41 75 

42 25 

40 7S 
38 50 


38 75 
34 50 
28 75 
25 00 
22 50 

24 25 

25 75 
28 75 

30 75 

31 m 
31 50 
28 62 


29 37 
28 50* 
26 38 
26 12 

30 00 

31 75 

31 75 

32 25 

32 62 

33 51 
25 75 
20 50 


20 75 

20 75 

21 88 
23 00 
23 00 

21 50 

22 75 

23 25 

24 13 
22 50 

20 87 

21 25 


21 87 

23 50 

24 63 

27 12 

28 75 
28 25 
28 00 
28 63 
28 87 
28 25 
27 75 
26 25 


29 62 
32 38 
31 50 
31 00 

31 25 

32 25 
32 50 
32 87 
31 25 
31 50 

31 38 

32 25 


28 75 
26 38 

26 00 

27 25 

29 25 
29 38 
29 87 
29 00 
26 25 
25 85 
24 12 
20 50 


21 43 

22 62 
21 62 
18 63 
16 63 


June 

July 


15 06 
14 70 


August 

September 

October 

N ovember 

December 


13 28 
13 09 
13 21 
13 36 
13 94 


Yearly Average. 


12 38 


13 62 


33 19 


29 13 


29 04 


22 13 


26 82 


31 65 


26 88 


16 49 



MONTH. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


13 00 

14 00 

12 50 

13 33 
13 50 

12 50 

13 66 
13 50 

13 66 

14 50 

15 50 
13 72 


13 78@14 09 

14 55@14 69 

15 75@15 87 
17 65@17 92 
17 T5@18 00 

16 67@17 00 

17 00@17 15 
17 85@18 01 
17 60@17 74 
16 19@16 5S 

14 81@15 12 

15 40@15 65 


15 97@16 35 
15 94@16 06 
16 18 
16 94 
17 30@17 57 
17 80@17 90 

20 27@20 55 

23 31 
23 04@23 23 

21 48@il 84 

20 44 
20 39 


19 68@20 03 

19 38 

20 02@20 44 

22 33 
21 69 

20 08 

20 76@21 01 

21 30@21 33 

20 93@21 4-2 

22 17@22 47 

21 97@22 73 
21 48@21 60 


20 75@20 97 

21 78@22 06 

22 87@23 03 
22 65@22 85 
20 83@21 04 
19 28@19 40 
19 94@20 07 
18 42@18 70 
16 94@17 14 

16 86@17 04 

17 00@17 36 
16 87@17 07 


17 76>^ @17 96 4-5 
16 37 @16 51K 

14 83 2-3@15 08 2-3 

15 59 3-5@15 76 3 5 


Mav 


14 70 @15 34 3-7 


June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December.. .. . 


14 17 2-3@14 26 1-6 
14 30 4 5@14 36 3-5 
13 58 2 3@13 65 5-9 

13 36 2-5@13 46 

14 34 4-9@14 43 1-7 
14 08?^ @14 14 1-6 
12 82 1-7@13 32 3-5 


Yearly Average.. 


13 61 


16 25@16 48 


19 09@19 23 


20 97@21 29 


19 52@19 73 


14 661-3@14 861-24 



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344 



New York Produce Exchange. 



PEICES OF BEEF AT NEW YOEK, WEEKLY, 

For the Tmr 1877. 



1877. 


BARRELS. 


TIERCES. 




Plain Mess, 
Old to New. 


Extra Mess, 
Old to New. 


Packet Beef. 


City Extra 
India Mess. 


JANUARY. 
1st week 


$10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 

•10^0@11 50 
10 50@11 50 

10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 

10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 

10 50@11 50 
10 50@11 50 

10 50@11 50 

11 50@13 00 

11 50@13 00 

12 00@13 50 
12 00@13 50 
12 00@13 50 
12 50@13 50 

12 00@13 50 
12 00®13 00 
12 00@13 00 
12 00@13 00 

11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 

11 50@12 50 

12 00@12 50 

11 50@12 00 
11 50@12 00 
11 50@12 00 

- @ — 
_ @ _ 

- @ - 

- ® - 
_ @ _ 

_ @ _ 

- ® _ 
_ @ - 

- @ - 

- @ - 

- @ - 

11 00@12 50 

11 00@12 50 
11 50@12 00 
11 00@12 50 
11 00@12 50 


#11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50®12 50 
11 50@12 50 

11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 

11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 

11 50@12 50 
11 50@12 50 

11 50@12 84 

12 50@13 75 

13 50@14 50 
13 50@14 50 
13 50@14 50 
13 50@14 50 
13 50@14 50 

13 50@14 17 
13 50®14 00 
13 50@14 00 
13 50@14 00 

13 10®14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 

13 00@13 50 

13 00@13 50 

14 33@14 50 
15 00 

15 00 

14 00@14 50 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 

13 00@14 00 
13 00®14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 

13 00@14 00 
13 00@14 00 
13 00@13 92 
13 00@13 50 

13 00@13 50 
13 00@13 50 
13 00@13 50 
13 00@13 50 


$15 00@16 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 

14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 

14 00®15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 
14 00@15 00 

14 00@15 00 

14 00@15 00 

14 00@15 00 

15 00 

, 15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 
14 50@15 00 

14 50@15 00 
14 00@14 50 
14 00@14 50 
14 00@14 50 

13 50@14 00 
13 50@14 00 

13 50@14 00 

14 00@14 50 

14 50 

14 50 

15 00 

15 00®15 50 
15 00@15 50 

14 50@15 00 
14 50@15 GO 
14 50@15 00 
14 50@15 00 

14 50@15 00 
14 50@15 00 
14 .50@15 00 
14 50OJ5 00 
14 50@15 00 

14 50@15 00 
14 50®15 00 
14 .50@15 00 
14 50@15 00 

14 50@15 00 
14 50@15 00 
14 50@15 00 
14 50®15 00 


$26 00 
26 00 


2d " 


3d '* 


26 00 
26 00 


4th " 


5th " 


26 00 
26 00 


FEBRUARY. 
1st week 


2d " 


26 00 


3d " 


26 00 
26 00 

26 00 

24 00@25 00 
23 00@24 00 
23 00@24 00 

22 00@e2 50 

22 00@22 50 

23 00@23 50 

25 00@26 00 

26 00 

26 00@28 00 
26 00®28 00 
^5 00®26 00 
25 00®26 00 

25 00@26 00 
23 00@24 00 
23 00®24 00 
23 00@24 00 

23 00@24 00 
23 00@24 00 
23 00®24 00 

23 00@24 00 

24 00@25 00 

25 00@26 00 
25 00@26 00 

25 00 
25 00 

25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 

25 CO 
25 00 

24 00@25 00 

25 00@2H 00 
25 00@26 00 

24 00@25 00 

25 00®26 00 
25 00@25 50 
25 50@26 00 

25 50@26 00 
25 50@26 00 
25 50@26 00 
25 50®26 00 


4th " 


MARCH. 
Ist week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 


APRIL. 
1st week 


2d " 

3d " 


4th " 


MAY. 
Ist week 


2d *' 


3d " 


4th " 


5th " 


JUNE. 
1st week 


2d " 


3d « 


4th " 


JULY. 
1st week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 


AUGUST. 
1st week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 


5th " 


SEPTEMBER. 
Ist week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 

OCTOBER. 
1st week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 


5th " 


NOVEMBER. 
Ist week 


2d " 


3d " 


4th " 


DECEMBER. 
1st week 


2d '* 


3d " , 


4th " 


1 



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Prices of Beef at New York, 



345 



Ayerage Prices of Beef, Monthly and Yearly, at New 

York, 

For the Tear 1877. 



MONTH. 


Barrels. 


Tierces. 


Plain Mess, 
Old to New. 


Extra Mess, 
Old to New. 


Packet. 


City Extra 
India Mess. 


January, 

February 


10 50 @11 50 
10 50 @11 50 
10 50 @11 50 

10 75 ®11 87>^ 
12 00 @13 40 
12 00 @13 Viy, 

11 mVi @i2 50 

11 50 @12 00 
11 12>^*@12 37>^ 


11 50 @12 50 
11 50 @12 50 
11 50 @12 50 
11 75 @12 90 
13 50 @14 50 
13 50 @14 043^^ 

13 Q2)4@U GO 

14 06 @14 30 
13 25 @14 121^ 
13 00 @14 00 
13 00 @13 85><^ 
13 00 ®13 50 


14 20 @15 20 
14 00 @15 00 
14 00 @15 00 
14 25 @15 00 
14 90 @15 00 
14 12^@14 62% 

13 63>^@14 12)^ 

14 80 @15 00 
14 50 ©15 00 
14 50 @15 00 
14 50 @15 00 
14 50 @15 00 


26 00 
26 00 


March 

April 

May. 


24 00 @24-75 
23 (10 @23 62% 

25 60 @26 80 
2:i 50 @24 50 

23 00 @24 00 

24 80 @25 40 

25 00 


June 


July 


August 


September 


October 


24 80 @25 40 

24 87%@25 62% 

25 50 @26 00 


November 


December 


Range 


10 50 @13 50 

11 17 4.9@12 19K 


11 50 @15 00 

12 71><r@13 56K 


13 50 @16 00 

14 S2X@U 91K 


22 00 @28 00 
24 67X@26 25 5-6 


Yearly Av'ge Prices... 



Average Prices of Mess Beef Monthly and Yearly at 

New York, 

From 1862 to 1877, inclusive. 



MONTH. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


January 

February 

Marr-b , _ 


11 75 

12 25 
12 25 
12 75 
12 75 
12 25 

12 75 

13 50 
13 37 
12 75 
12 62 
12 13 


11 87 

12 06 

11 87 
10 50 

12 75 

10 63 

11 00 
11 87 
11 87 

11 25 

12 75 

13 07 


13 25 

13 25 

14 07 

15 87 

16 62 

18 75 
21 75 

19 75 

17 37 
17 75 

20 50 

21 62 


20 62 
20 25 
17 00 
14 50 
13 37 

12 00 
10 GO 
10 50 
10 25 

13 25 
12 50 
12 50 


12 60 
12 50 

17 00 

15 17 

18 62 
18 25 
18 50 
18 00 

16 50 
16 50 
15 12 
14 13 


14 12 
14 00 

14 75 

16 88 

17 00 

18 50 
20 50 
20 00 

19 75 
18 12 
16 50 

15 50 


15 37 

14 75 

16 50 

17 13 
17 75 

17 88 

18 00 
18 00 
17 00 

15 75 
13 25 
13 00 


12 37 

12 50 
11 88 
11 37 
11 50 
11 60 
11 50 

9 87 
8 50 
7 75 
14 50 

13 75 


13 50 
12 63 
12 50 

12 50 

13 00 

14 50 

14 75 

15 00 
15 00 
15 00 
14 75 
14 00 


15 00 

15 50 

16 50 


April 


16 50 


Mav 


13 78 


June 

July 


12 35 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 


12 85 
12 85 

12 85 

13 60 

14 85 


Yearly Average. 


12 59 


11 79 


17 55 


13 89 


16 15 


17 13 


14 53 


11 42 


13 93 


14 24 



MONTH. 

January.... 
February . . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November... 
December.. . 



1872. 



1873. 



1874. 



1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



Yearly Average.. 



10 75 
10 25 
10 25 
10 25 
10 25 
10 12 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 14 
10 80 



; 8 0G@13 
'l2 00@13 
12 00@13 
,11 50@13 
11 00@13 

II 31@12 

III 25@12 
111 25^12 
11 25@12 
10 00@12 

10 50@12 

11 80@12 



10 23 



75 11 
50 12 
25;i2 
00 12 
0011 
7511 
30 14 
U0J14 
50,14 
00 1 13 
3711 
8011 



50@13 
50@13 



00@14 
37@14 
00@15 
0u@15 
0f>@15 
02@14 
67@12 
50@12 



2510 

00 1 10 

37110 

70 1 11 

00! 

37 1 10 

00 

0010 

0010 

6211 

42112 

3112 



60@11 
75@11 
81@11 
00@11 

11 00 
50@11 

10 62 
40:^10 
62@11 
40@12 
00@13 
00@13 



00 



75@12 
50@12 
40@13 
12@13 
90@13 
18@11 
00@13 
00@12 
12@11 
00@11 



50 @12 50 

50 @12 50 

50 @12 50 

75 @12 90 

50 ®14 50 

50 @14 04K 
02%@14 00 

06 @14 30 

25 @14 12% 

00 @14 00 

00 @13 85% 

00 @13 50 



10 99@12 93 12 46@14 00 10 97@11 70 



11 46@12 46 



12 71%@13 56 



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346 



New York Produce ExeJiange. 



Pkices of Westeen Beep Hams at New York, Weekly, 

F(yr the Tear 1877. 



DAY January. 



February. 



March. 



MAY. 



3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13.. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



21 00 
20 50@21 00 
20 50@21 00 
20 50(^21 00 

21 00 



21 00 
22 00@23 00 
22 00@23 00 
22 00@23 00 
22 00@23 00 
22 00@23 00 



22 00C^^23 00 
24 00 
24 00 
24 50@25 00 
24 50®25 00 
24 50@25 00 



24 50@25 00 
24 50@25 00 

25 00 

25 00 
24 50@25 00 
24 50@25 00 



24 50@25 00 
24 50@25 00 
24 50@25 00 



24 50@25 00 

25 00@26 00 
24 50.c^ 00 



24 50@25 00 
24 50@25 00 

24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 



24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 
24 00@24 50 



24 00@24 50 
24 00 
24 00 



24 00 
24 00 



24 00 
22 50@23 00 
22 50@23 00 



22 50@23 00 
22 m:cb,%i 00 
22 50@23 00 



22 50@23 00 
22 50^i23 00 
22 00(g;,2;3 00 
22 00®22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00(^22 50 



21 50@22 00 
21 00@22 00 
21 00@22 00 
21 00@22 00 
21 00(^22 50 
21 00®21 50 



21 00@21 50 
21 00@21 50 
2i 00@21 50 
21 00@21 50 

21 50@22 00 

22 00@22 50 



22 00@22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00®22 50 
22 00@22 50 



22 00@22 50 
22 00v^22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00:^22 50 
22 00@22 50 
22 00(^22 50 



22 00(5)22 50 
22 00@22 25 
22 00(^22 25 
22 00@22 26 
22 00@22 25 
22 00(^,22 25 



22 00@22 25 
22 00;^22 25 
22 00@22 25 
22 00@22 25 

21 75 ^22 00 

22 00@22 25 



21 75@22 00 
21 75@^2 00 
21 T5@22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75@22 00 



21 75@22 00 



21 75@22 00 
21 75(0)22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75@22 00 



21 75@22 00 
21 75(«}22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 75(^22 OU 



21 75(g22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 75@22 00 



21 75@22 00 
21 75(^22 00 
21 75@22 00 
21 50(^21 75 
21 50(^21 75 
21 50@21 75 

21 50(^21 75 
21 50(^21 75 



21 50(^21 75 



21 50(^21 75 
21 25@21 50 

21 25(^21 50 
21 25(^21 50 
21 25-^21 50 
21 25(^21 50 
21 25(^21 50 
21 OOa.21 50 



21 00@21 50 
21 00@21 50 
21 00@21 25 
21 00^21 25 
21 00(^21 25 
21 00@21 25 



21 00@21 25 
21 00@21 25 

21 00 

21 00 

21 00 
21 00@21 25 



21 00(^21 25 
21 0()@21 25 
21 00(^21 25 
21 00(^21 50 
21 0"@21 50 
21 00(^21 50 



20 50®25 00 



22 50(^26 00 



21 00@23 00 



21 75(^22 50 



21 50@22 00 21 00(^21 76 



DAY 



4... 
5... 
6... 

7... 

8... 

9... 
10... 
11... 
12.. 
13... 
14... 
15... 
16... 
17... 
18... 
19... 
20... 
21.. 
22... 
23.. 
24.. 



31... 
Range 



July. 



August. 



September. 



October. 



November. December. 



00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 



00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00@21 50 



00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 

66@2i 50 
00@21 50 
00(^21 50 
00(i^21 50 
00@21 50 
00@21 50 



00(»21 50 
00.^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00:^21 50 
00(^21 50 
00(^21 50 



00(0^21 50 
00@21 60 



21 00@21 50 
U.1 00(^21 50 
21 00(^21 50 
21 00(^21 50 



21 00(^21 50 
21 00(^21 50 
21 00@21 50 
21 00(^21 50 
21 00(^21 50 
21 00@21 50 



20 00@21 00 
20 00@21 00 
18 00@20 00 
18 00.^20 00 
18 00@20 00 
18 00(^20 00 

18 00@20 00 
18 00ia),20 00 
18 00(^,20 00 
IS 00@20 00 
18 00(^20 00 
18 00(^20 00 



18 00,0,20 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00^19 00 
18 00@19 00 



18 00(^19 00 



18 00@19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00(^19 00 



18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00(^19 00 



18 00@19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00^19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00c^l9 00 

18 m®Vd 00 
18 00.^19 00 
18 00;^19 00 
18 00.S19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 



18 00@19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00(gl9 00 



18 00@19 00 
18 00®19 00 
18 00(^19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00(gl9 00 
18 00(^19 00 



18 00@19 00 
18 00@19 00 
18 00@19 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00 it 18 00 
17 00^18 00 



17 00(^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00@18 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 

17 00^18 00 
17 00®18 00 
17 00@18 00 



17 00(5^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 



17 00@18 00 



17 00(^18 00 
17 00(^18 00 
17 00@18 00 
17 00@18 00 



17 00@17 60 
17 00@17 50 
17 00@17 60 
17 00(^17 50 
17 00@17 50 
17 00@17 50 



17 00(^17 50 
17 00(^17 50 
17 00(^17 50 
17 00@17 50 
17 00^17 50 
17 00@17 50 



17 00® 17 50 
17 00(5)17 50 
17 00^17 50 



17 OOv^n 50 



16 60(^17 00 
16 50@17 00 
16 50(3,17 00 
16 60(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 



16 50(^17 00 
16 50@17 00 
16 50:^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 60@17 00 
16 50(^17 00 



16 50(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50@17 00 
16 50@17 00 

16 m®n 00 



16 50(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50@.17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50(^17 00 
16 50;417 00 



16 50(^17 00 



21 00(^21 50 



18 00@21 pO 



18 00@19 00 



17 00(^19 00 



17 00@18 00 16 50@17 00 



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Prices of JPorJc and Beef Harm at New York. 347 



Average Prices of Pork and Beef Hams, Monthly and 
' • Yearly, at New York, 

Fo7^ the Year 1877. 



MONTH. 



PORK, Mess, 

Old to New, 

Bbls. 



PORK, 

Prime Mess, 
Bbls. 



PORK, 

Extra Prime. 
Bbls. 



Beep Hams, 

Western. 

Bbls. 



January.. 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. 
November 
December. 

Range 

Y'rly Ave . 



17 76^ @17 
16 37 @16 

14 83% @15 

15 59 3-5@15 
14 70 @15 
14 17 2-3@14 
14 30 4-5®14 
13 58 2-3@13 

13 36 2-5@13 

14 34 4-9@14 
14 08X @14 
12 82 1.7@13 



96 4-5 

08 2-3 
76 3-5 
34 3-7 
261-6 
36 3-5 
65 5-9 
46 

13 1-7 
141-6 
32 3-5 



13 871^ 

13 58K 

17 21 3-7@17 28 4-'i 
17 00 

14 50 
14 00 
13 3lK 

""13 12^"" 
11 00 
10 00 @10 50 



14 25 



11 50 @,11 m}4 

12 27 7-9@l2 51 2-3 

13 33% 

"" 10 45 5-6" 
10 21% @10 31 J^ 



9 00 
8 75 



@11 00 
@ 8 873^ 



23 05 

24 193^ 
21 72 2 
21 90 
21 69 2 
21 07 2 
21 00 
19 26 
18 00 
17 55 5- 
17 00 
16 50 



@r24 

l@22 

@22 

■9@21 



@20 
@19 



@1T 
@1T 



537-9 

41% 

29 2 3 

24 

942-9 

35 3-5 

50 

481-7 

00 

55 5-9 

62^ 

00 



12 25 @18 75 
14 661-3@14 861-24 



10 00 @17 50 8 00 @15 00 

13 76% @13 81 5-6 11 22% @11 57^ 



16 50 @26 00 
20 24 2-3@20 83 



Average Prices of Oil Cake, Weekly and Monthly, at New York, 
F(y)^ tlie Tea/r 1877. 



DATE. 


Western 

Bag. 
Per Ton. 


DATE. 


Western 

Bag. 
Per Ton. 


DATE. 


Western 

BAG. 
Per Ton. 


January. 
1st Week 


36 83 

36 71 

37 42 


MAY. 
1st Week 


36 70 

37 50 
37 00 
36 83% 
36 50 


September. 

Ist Week 

2d " 


33 50 


2d " 


2d " 

3d " 


33 66% 
33 37^ 
33 00 


3d " 


3d " 


4tli " 


4th " 


4th " 




5th " 

May Average 








Sept. Average 




January Average 


36 99 


36 90% 


33 38X 






June. 
Ist Week 








February. 
1st Week 


36 43% 
35 66% 
34 83 1-3 
34 16% 


36 00 
36 00 
35 50 
35 00 


October. 
1st Week 


33 00 


2d " 


2d " 


2d " 


33 25 


3d "■ 


3d " .. .. 


3d " 


33 00 


4th " 


4th " '. 


4th " 


33 08 1-3 






5th " 

October Average.. 


33 70 5-6 




June Averasre 




Feb. Average 


35 37 3-5 


35 62i<r 


33 20 5-6 




March. 
1st Week 


, 33 95 5-6 
34 CO 
33 25 
33 00 
33 29 1-6 


July. 

Isfc Week 

2d " 


34 87^ 
34 75 
34 50 
34 50 


November. 
1st Week. . ; 


34 00 


2d " 


2d " 

3d '* 


34 623^ 
34 50 


3d " 


3d " 


4tli " 


4th " 


4th " 


34 50 


5th " 


July Average 








Nov. Average 




March Average . . 


33 50 


•34 65% 


34 40% 




April. 
Ist Week 


33 15% 

33 00 

34 25 
36 16% 


August. 
1st Week 


34 16% 
34 00 
36 00 
34 75 
34 313^ 


DECEMBER. 
1st Week 


35 00 


2d " 


2d " 


2d " 


34 00 


3d " 


3d " 

4th " 


3d " 


34 34% 


4th " 


4th " 


34 12X 




5th " 






August Average . . 


Dec. Average 




April Average. . . 


34 14% 


34 64 3-5 


34 36% 



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348 



New Torh Produce Exchange, 



Cash Peices of Mess Poek, Hogs and Laed at Cincinnati, 

Monthly. 

For the Tea/r ending August diet, 1877. 

As Reported by Sidney D. MaxweU, Superintendent Cincinnati Merchants' Exchange. 



MONTH. 



1876. 

September— 
Opening. .. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

October— 
Opening... 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing.... 

NOVEMBER - 
Opening... 
Highest. . 

Lowest 

Closing.. ^. 

DECEMBER— 
Opening . 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

1877. 

JAKUARY— 
Opening... 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

February— 
Opening. .. 
Highest. . . . 
Lowest .... 
Closing 

MARCH— 

Opening... 

Highest 

Low^t 

Closing 

April— 

Opening . . . 

Highest 

Lowest . . . 
Clo.«dng 

MAY— 

Opening. .. 
Highest. . . . 

Lowest 

Closing 

JUNE— 

Opening... 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

July— 

Opening. .. 

Highest 

Lowest — 
Closing 

AUGUbT — 

Opening... 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 



Pork. 



$16 00 

17 50 

16 00 

16 25@16 60 

16 50 

17 00 
16 00 

16 50 

16 75@17 00 

17 00 
16 00 

16 00 

17 00 
17 00 
16 50 
16 75 



17 60 

18 00 
17 00 
17 00 

16 62^@16 75 

16 75 

15 25 

15 25@15 50 

15 00@15 12 

15 l^y. 
14 00 
14 00 

14 76@15 00 

16 00 
14 75 

15 75@16 00 

15 50@15 75 
16 00 
14 50 
14 50 

14 00 

14 00 

13 25 

13 87>i@14 00- 



13 50@13 75 
14 00 

13 50 

14 00 


14 00 

14 00 

12 75 

12 75@13 00 



Hogs. 



$5 85@6 00 
6 35 

5 85 

6 00@6 25 

5 90@6 25 

6 25 
5 30 

5 30@5 50 

5 30@5 50 
5 85 

5 25 

5 60@5 75 

5 65@5 85 

6 65 
5 20 

6 35@6 65 



6 95 

6 00 

6 05@6 30 

6 05@6 25 

6 45 

5 60 
5 60@5 80 

5 55@5 75 

5 75 

5 15 
5 15@5 40 

5 00@5 25 

5 35 

5 00 
5 00@5 25 

5 10@5 35 

■5 40 

4 80 
4 85@5 05 

4 65@4 85 
4 a5 

4 40 

4 50@4 70 

4 65@4 80 

5 15 

4 65 

4 90@5 15 

5 00@6 25 

5 25 
480 

4 90@6 10 



Lard. 



Prime St. Winter. Kettle Winter. 



i 



Cents. 
10 
11 
10 
10>^ 

lOX 
10>^ 

9>^ 

9.85@9;:^ 

lOX 

9% 

9X@9.8 

9.9@9 95 

9.9 



ii®ii^ 

10 1%y, 

10.6 

9^@9 65 

9^ 

9 

9@9.1 

9.42^ 

9^@10 
10 
9X 



9.15 
9 
9 



Cents. 
12@12>^ 

llX 
llj^@12 

10>^@11 

lOM 

10 
10@10>5^ 

iox@iox 

11 

10^ 
10>^@11 

10>c^@ll 

11^ 

lOX 

11@113^ 



11@11V 

12^5^ 

11 
ll5<@ll>sr 

nx 

10 V, 
10i<^@ll 

10i^@10>^ 

9X 
9>5^@10 

10@10i<^ 
10% 

9K 
103^@10K 

9X 
9>^@10 

9>;@10 

10 

93^ 
9i<^@10 

9>^@10 

10 

9y, 
9%@10 

10 
9 



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Prices of Bulk Meats and Bacon at Cincinnati. 349 



Cash Pbices of Bulk Meats and Bacon at Cincinnati, 

Monthly, 

For tlie Tear Ending August 3l5^, 1877. 

As Reported by Sidney D. Maxwell, Superintendent Cincinnati Merchants' Exchange. 



MONTH. 



1876. 
September — 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

October — 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Cl'-singj 

NOVEMBER— 

Opening.. . . 
Highest.. .. 

Lowest 

Closing 

DECEMBETir— 

Opening 

Btighest. . . . 

Lowest 

Closing 

1877. 

JANUARY — 

Opening.. .. 
Highest. . . . 

Lowest 

Closing 

February— 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest . . . . 
Closing 

MARCH- 

Opening.. . . 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

April— 

Opening.. .. 

Highest 

Lowest . . . 

Closing 

MAY— 

Opening. . . . 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

June— 

Opening . . . 

Highest. . . . 

Lowest 

Closing 

JULY— 

Opening.. .. 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 

August— 

Opening 

Highest 

Lowest 

Closing 



BULK MEATS. 




BACON. 




Shoulders. 


Clear Hib 
Sides. 


Clear 
Sides. 


Shoulders. 


Clear Rib 
Sides. 


Clear 
Sides. 


Cents. 

7>^ 

7 @7>^ 


Cents. 
7.85@8.00 

8% 
8i^@8.7 


Cents. 
8^®8^ 

8X 
9 @9>^ 


Cents. 

7K@7K 

8% 


Cents. 

8^@9 

103^ 

8% 

8%@9X 


Cents.. 

9%@10 

10>^ 

9S 

10 @10K 


7>^@7^ 
6X 


• 7% 
7% 


93^ 
9^ 

8^@8>^ 


% 

7X 


9X 

8% 
83^@9 


9K® 9>< 


63<r@6% 
6 @6K 


8 @8^- 
8 @8^ 


m®^yz 

8J^@8% 


7X@7X 
7X • 
73€ 

7^@7>^ 


9@9K 

9 
9>^@9K 




6 

6i4 


8 


8K 
8^ 


73€@7><^ 

7>^ 

73^ 
7i€@7>5^ 


9>^@9% 
9^ • 
9X 

93^@9>sr 


10 @103^ 
10^ 

9%@10 


7 
7 

m 


9 
9 

8^ 


^Vz 
8 @9 


8 
8 

73^@7>^ 


10 
10 

93^@9^ 


^^Vz 
lOX 
9K 
9j:^@l0 . 




8 
8 @8K 


8^@8% 

8% 

8X 
8%@8X 


73^@7% 
7 


9K@93^ 
9 @9^ 


9X®10 

9% 
9%@9^ 


5 


8 
8 

7 
7>^@7^ 


8J4'@8X 

8% 

1% 
7^@7X 


6><^@6^ 
6K 
63€ 

6X@6K 


9 
9 

8% 

8%@sy 


9%@9>c^ 

^Vz 

8X 
8K®8% 




7^ 
8>i 

8 @8>^ 


7%@8 
^Vz 

8%@8)^ 


6j^@6>^ 

6^1 
6>c^@6^ 


8>^@8^ 

8^ 
8^@8X 


8ys®9 

8% 
9 @9>i: 


4.85 
4.85@5 


8 

8 

7 

7 @7.1 


8^ 
8^ 
7% 
7% 


5^@6 


8K@8% 
8% 
7X 

7%@8 


8>r 
83^® 8K 


4^(^4.85 
5 

4^ 
5 


7 
7>^ 

7.1@7i^ 


7>^ 
7>^ 
7 
7^ 


' 6 
6 


7>^ 
8 


8 @8K 
8% 


5 

5K 


7 
7.2®7K 


7i4:@7% 

7^ 
7.^ 
7><^ 


5%@6 

5% 
6 


7>4@7% 
8>^ 
7K 


8>i@8K 

83? 
8%@8>^ 


4% 
4%@4.9 


6.65 

6.65@6X 


7% 
7^ 

7 @7>^, 


5%@6 
6 

5y@6ys 


7%@7% 

7% 

75^ 
7>^@7X 


8U®8y, 
8% 

7K@8 



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350 ISTew York Produce Exchange, 

Pbices of Live and Dbessed Hogs in Chicago. 



DATE. 



1875. 



Bacon Hogs. 
Per 100 lbs 



Medium to 
Heavy Hogs. 

Per 100 lbs. 



1876. 



Medium to 
Heavy Hogs, 

Per 100 lbs. 



Dressed 
Hogs. 



Per 100 lbs 



1877. 



Light to 
Mixed Pack- 
ing Hogs. 
Per 100 lbs. 



Per 100 lbs. 



January 8. . . 
" 15... 
" 22... 
" 29... 

February 5... 
" , 12... 
" 19. . . 
" 26... 

March 4 

" 11.... 
" 18.... 
" 25.... 

April 1.... 

" 8 

'' 15 

" 22 

" 29 .... 

May 6 

" 13 

" 20 

*• 27 

June 3 

'' 10 

" 17 

" 24 

July 1 

" 8 

" 15 

" 22 

" 29 

August 5 

" 12.... 
" 19.... 
" 26.... 

September 2. 

9. 

16. 

23. 

30. 

October 7... 
" 14... 
" 21... 
" 28... 

November 4. 
11. 
18. 
25. 



December 2. 

9. 

16. 



5 65@5 75 
5 25@7 10 
5 50@7 00 
5 50@6 80 

5 75@7 10 
5 90@7 00 
5 90@7 00 
5 60@7 00 

5 75@7 15 

5 60®7 35 

6 25@8 50 
6 25@8 25 

6 40®8 50 

7 00@9 25 
6 80@9 40 
6 75@8 50 



6 50@8 25 
6 500^8 80 
6 75®8 10 
6 00@7 80 

6 00@7 35 
6 00@7 50 
6 25®7 45 
6 60@7 40 

6 25®7 25 
6 50@7 45 

6 25@7 50 

7 00@8 00 

6 80@8 00 

7 30@8 10 

6 75@8 40 

7 40@8 25 
7 40@8 05 

6 50@8 10 
6 00@7 95 
6 37(^,8 00 
6 50®8 10 
6 50@8 50 

6 50@8 30 
6 60®7 90 
6 50®7 90 
6 60@7 70 

6 50@7 70 
6 20@7 50 
6 00®7 30 
6 00@7 25 

6 40(^7 25 
6 50i^7 .30 
6 50@7 25 
6 50@7 05 
6 50@7 10 



6 10@7 45 
6 00@7 55 
5 80@7 15 

5 50@7 25 

6 50@7 65 
6 25(^7 40 
6 45@7 60 
6-12@7 60 

6 25@8 00 

6 20@8 25 

7 00@8 80 

6 50@8 80 

7 00@8 80 
7 35@9 50 
7 40@9 50 
7 15@9 30 
7 00@9 00 

7 20@9 00 

6 90@9 00 

7 00®9 00 
6 50@8 60 

6 40@7 75 
6 30@7 75 
6 40@7 50 
6 25@7 60 

6 00@7 30 
6 50@7 30 
6 25®7 40 
6 75@7 90 

6 75@8 10 

7 00@8 25 
7 00(^8 40 
7 40@8 50 
7 00@8 75 

6 75@8 25 
6 75@9 00 

6 30@10 00 

7 00;^9 25 
7 25@9 50 

7 25@9 25 
7 25@8 60 
6 90®8 50 

6 75@8 25 

7 000,8 25 

6 eor^s 00 

6 50@7 65 
6 50@7 75 

6 50@7 55 
6 55:^7 50 
6 60®7 50 
6 :i5'».7 10 
6 40@7 25 



6 75@7 50 
6 50@7 50 

6 75@7 50 

7 00@7 70 

7 50®8 20 
7 40@8 25 
7 50@8 30 
7 50@9 00 

7 70®9 50 
7 80@10 00 
7 90@9 25 

7 



7 ao@9 00 

7 75®8 75 
7 60®8 00 
7 70®8 25 
7 55@8 00 

7 20®7 75 
7 00@7 60 
7 00@7 30 
6 40®6 75 

6 00@6 30 
5 80@6 25 
5 90®6 25 

5 70@6 00 

6 00®6 30 
6 20@6 70 
6 20@6 70 
6 00@6 50 
6 00@6 60 

6 10@6 75 
5 80@6 40 
5 65@6 20 
5 ' 



5 60@6 20 
5 75®6 25 
5 90@6 40 
5 70@6 00 
5 80@6 25 

5 80:S),6 30 
5 75®6 25 
5 65@6 25 
5 40@5 85 

5 5U@6 00 
5 50@5 95 
5 50@6 00 
5 65@6 10 

5 60@6 10 
5 65rS)6 25 
5 50®6 15 
5 60®6 25 
5 80@6 25 



7 75@8 10 

8 00@8 35 

7 75@8 30 

8 10@8 45 

8 50@9 05 

8 75@9 10 

9 00@9 75 
9 30@9 75 

9 25@10 00 
9 00@9 75 
9 50@9 75 
9 50@9 75 



6 50@7 00 

6 25@6 75 
6 75®7 20 
G 60@7 00 
6 60@7 00 
6 75@7. 35 



6 15@6 75 
6 10®6 55 

5 95@6 15 

6 00@6 25 

5 70®6 60 

6 10®6 85 
5 65@6 15 
5 40@5 85 

5 40@6 10 
4 80@5 30 

4 95@5 25 

5 10@5 35 

5 25®5 70 
5 15@5 20 
5 40@5 60 
5 30@5 75 
5 35@5 70 

5 35@5 60 
5 15@5 65 
5 00@5 50 
4 85@5 30 

4 70@.4 80 
4 60®4 65 
4 50@4 75 
4 55®4 65 

4 60@4 65 

4 70®4 85 

5 15@5 20 
5 00®5 15 
5 00®5 05 

4 90@5 20 
4 75@5 30 
4 50@5 35 
4 65@5 40 

4 75@5 40 

4 75@5 50 

5 05® 5 65 
5 25@5 60 
5 50@5 60 

5 15®5 60 
5 00®5 25 
4 S0@5 10 
4 90@5 15 

4 50®5 00 
4 60®4 75 
4 50@4 60 
4 25@4 35 

4 ,35@4 40 
4 15@4 45 
4 20®4 40 
4 00@4 20 
4 05@4 25 



7 50®7 80 
7 25@7 5C 
7 10@7 35 
7 00@7 25 

6 85@7 10 

7 00®7 25 



6 15@6 50 

6 00®6 15 
5 75@6 00 

5 75@5 80 

6 00@6 15 



4 50®4 75 
4 40@4 50 
3 50@4 35 



Hosted by 



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Ocean Freights from New York. 



351 



OCEAN FEEIGHTS FKOM NEW YOEK FOB 1877. 

As furnished by Messrs. Carey & Tale, of New Tork City. 



PROVISIONS. 

Per ton. 



Jan. 5. 

" 12. 

" 19. 

« 26. 
Feb. 2. 

" 9. 

*' 16. 

" 23. 
Mch 2. 

*' 9. 

" 16. 

-23, 

.'' 30. 
Apn 6. 

'• 13 

" 20. 

"27. 
May 4. 

*' 11. 

" 18. 

" 25. 
June 1 . 

" 8. 

'' 15. 

" 22. 

" 29. 
July 6. 

•' 13. 

" 20. 

" 27. 
Aug 3. 

" 10. 

" 17. 

<■' 24. 

'^ 31. 
. Sep. 7 

'^ 14. 

" 21. 

" 28. 
Oct 5. 

'• 12. 

*' 19. 

" 26. 
Nov 2. 

" 9. 

" 16. 

*' 23. 

" 30. 
Dec. 7. 

" 14. 

" 21. 



s. d. s. d 
40 0@42 6 
40 
40 
35 0@37 6 
30 0@35 
~" 
-_ 
27 6@30 
25 
25 




To Liverpool. 



Steam. Sail. 



17 
15 
15 

20 . 
20 0@22 6 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
35 0@40 

40 
25 0@30 
25 0@30 
25 
20 
20 
20 0@22 6 

25 
25 0@30 
40 
40 
40 0@50 
40 0@50 
45 0@50 
40 0C445 
35 0@40 
35 0@37 6 
35 0@40 
35 0@37 6 
35 0@37 6 
37 6@42 6 
35 0@40 
32 0@36 
32 0@32 6 
32 6@35 
30 0@35 
30 0@35 
35 
40 
40 



32 6 
30 
30 
25 
25 
20 0@25 
20 0@25 
20 
20- 
20 
17 6 



30 

30 

30 

27 6 



20 
20 



20 
20 
20 



25 

25 

27 6 

27 6 

30 



To LONDON. 



Steam. Sail. 



30 



s. d. 
40 
40 
0@40 
35 
35 
35 
0@35 




30 
30 



35 



35 



30 
30 
i 0@30 
' 6@30 
■ 6@30 
30 
40 
40 
0@40 
0(^40 
40 
40 
40 
0@40 
35 




30 



0@40 
45 
0(450 
50 
45 
45 
40 



35 



40 
40 



35 



0@40 
40 
40 
35 
0@40 
0@40 
0(a:.40 
0(^40 
35 
35 
0@37 



s. d. 

30 

30 

30 

30 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 

25 

20 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

20 

25 



25 
25 
25 



25 

25 

30 

25 
i 0@27 

25 

25 

25 

25 

22 6 

25 

27 6 

27 6 

30 

30 



30 
30 







30 
30 
30 



30 
30 
27 



27 6 

27 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 



TO 
Glasgow, 



steam.' 



30 
30 
25 0@27 
25 0@27 
25 
20 
20 
20 



!5 



22 6 

35 

35 

35 0@40 

35 0@40 

35 0@40 

35 0(^40 

30 

30 

25 0(i^27 

25 

25 

25 

25 

20 

25 

30 

30 0@35 

40 

40 

40 

40 

40 

35 

32 6 

32 6 

32 6 

35 0(iJ.37 

35 0@37 

:i5 0@37 ' 

32 6 

32 6 

32 6 

32 6@35 

32 6@35 

;35 

37 6 



To Bristol, 



steam. Sail. 



s. d. 
45 



40 
40 



40 
40 



40 
30 



30 



30 



40 
50 
45 



45 

45 

40 0@45 

40 00.45 

40 

35 

35 

30 

35 

40 

40 

50 

45 0@50 

45 0@50 

50 
45 0@50 

40 
40 0@45 
40 0@45 
40 0@45 C 
40 0@45 
45 
45 
40 0@45 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



30 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 



30 
30 
30 



s. d. 
62 6 
62 6 
62 6 
62 6 
52 6 
52 6 
52 6 
47 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
32 6 
32 6 
32 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
37 6 
45 
45 
45 
47 6 
47 6 
47 6 
47 6 
47 6 
52 6 
52 6 
52 6 
52 6 
52 6 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
47 6 
47 6 



Steam. 



40 

35 

35 

30 



30 

30 
30 0@32 6 

35 
35 0@37 6 
35 0@37 6 
35 0@37 6 
35 0@37 6 

35 . 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

45 



45 








50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50. 
50 

46 
45 
45 

47 6 
47 6 
47 6 
45 



Hosted by 



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352 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Ocean Fkeights fkom New Yobk for 'i^ll.— {Continued.) 
As furnished hy Messrs. Carey & Tale^ of New York City, 



BEEF. 

Per tierce. 











TO 


3 


5 






To Liverpool. 


TO LONDON. 




s 


s 




AS PER 








Glasgow. 


S 


w 


< 


CIRCULAR 










g 


g 


g 


DATED 


















Steam. 


Sail. 


steam. 


Sail. 


steam. 


steam. 


steam. 


1 




8. d. 


s. d. 


8. d. 


8. d 


s. d. 


s. d. 


8. d. 


8. d. 


January 5.. 


7 




7 


5 6 


7 


8 


12 


10 


- 12.. 


7 




7 


5 6 


7 




12 


9 


" 19.. 


6 6 . 




6 3 


5 6 


6 6 




12 


9 


*' 26.. 


6 0@6 6 




6 3 


5 6 


6 0@6 6 


8 


9 6 


9 


Febrnary 2. 


5 6 


: 


5 6@6 


4 6 


6 


8 


9 6 


9 


9. 


5 




5 


4 


5 


7 


9 6 


9 


" 16. 


5 




5 


4 


5 


7 


9 6 


8 


" 23. 


5 




5 


4 


5 


7 


9 


8 


March 2.... 


4 6 


1 5 


4 


5 


6 


7 6 


7 6 


" 9.... 


4 


6 


4 


5 




7 6 


7 6 


" 16.... 


3 9 




5 


4 


5 


7 


7 6 


7 6 


" 23.... 


3 




5 


3 6 


4 


6 


7 6 


7 6 


" 30.... 


3 




4 6 


3 


4 


6 


7 6 


7 6 


April 6.... 


3 




4 6 


3 


3 9 


6 


7*6 


7 6 


" 13.... 


3 6 




6 


3 


4 


6 


7 6 


7 6 


" 20.... 


3 6@4 




5 


3 6 


4 0- 


6 


7 6 


7 6 


" 27.... 


7 




6 


4 


6 




7 6 


7 6 


May 4 


7 




8 


4 


6 6 


7 6 


7 6 


8 6 


- 11 


7 


7 


4 


7 


8 


7 6 


8 6 


" 18 


7 


7 


4 


6 6 


7 


7 6 


8 6 


" 25 


7 6 


7 


4 


7 




7 6 


8 6 


Jnne 1 


7 


7 . 


4 


7 




7 6 


8 6 


" 8 


6 6 


7 


5 


6 


7 


. 7 6 


8 6 


'' 15.... 


5 


n 


5 


6 


"i 


7 6 


8 6 


" 22 


4 0@4 6 


i 6 


5 


5 


\% 


7 6 


8 6 


" 29 


5 


6 


5 


5 


7 6 


8 6 


July 6 


4 0@4 6 


6 


5 


5 


6 6 


7 6 


8 6 


'* 13... 


3 6 


6 


5 


4 


6 


7 6 


8 6 


" 20.... 


3 6@4 


6 


5 


4 


6 


7 6 


8 6 


" 27 


4 


6 


4 6 


4 


6 


7 6 


8 6 


August 3.. 


4 6 


6 


4 6 


4 6 


?8 

7 


7 6 


8 6 


" 10.. 


6 
5 9 




5 
5 


5 6 
5 6 


7 6 

8 6 


8 6 


** 17.. 


7 


9 


" 24.. 


7 0@7 6 


8 


6 


6 6 


8 


8 6 


9 


" 31.. 


7 6 


8 


6 


7 6 


8 


9 


9 


Sept. 7 


7 8 


8 


6 


7 


8 


8 6 


9 


'' 14 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


" 21 


6 6 


7 6 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


" 28.,... 


6 


7 6 


6 


6 6 


8 


9 


9 


Oct. 5 


6 
6 




7 
7 


6 
6 


6 
6 


8 
8 


9 
9 


9 


" 12.... 




9 


" 19.... 


6 


1 6 6 


6 


6 


7 6 


9 


9 .0 


'-' 26.... 


7 




7 


6 


6 6 


7 6 


9 


9 


Nov. 2 ... 


6 9 




6 6 


5 


6 6 


7 6 


9 


9 


" 9.... 


6 




6 6 




6 6 


7 6 


9 


9 


" 16.... 


5 6 




6 




6 


7 6 


9 


9 


*' 23.... 


5 6 




6 




6 


7 6 


9 


9 


•' 30.... 


5 « 




6 




6 


7 6 


9 


9 


Dec. 7.... 


5 6 




6 




6 


7 


9 


9 


" 14.... 


6 




6 




6 


7 


9 


9 


" 21.... 


6 




6 




6 


7 


9 


9 


" 28.... 


7 ' 


6 6 




6 6 


7 


9 


9 



Hosted by 



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Ocean Freights from New York, 353 

OCEAN FREIGHTS FROM NEW YORK FOR 1877, 

As furnished by Messrs. Carey & Tale, of JVew Tork City, 



PORK. 

Per barrel. 



AS PER 

CmCULAB 

DATED 



Tjo Liverpool. 



Steam. 



Sail. 



To London. 



Steam. 



SaU. 



To 
GLASGOW. 



Steam. 



Steam. 



M 



Jan'y 5... 

" 12... 

" 19... 

" 26... 
Feb'y 2... 

" 9... 

" 16... 

" 23... 
lilarch 2... 

" 9... 

" 16... 

" 23... 

" 30... 
April 6... 

" 13... 

" 20... 

*' 27. . . 
May 4... 

'^ 11... 

" 18... 

" 25 .. 
Jime 1 . . . 

" 8... 

" 15... 



July .6. 

'» 13.. 

" 20.. 

" 27. 
Aug. 3. 

" 10. 

" 17. 

" 24. 

'* 31.. 
Sept. 7. 
14.. 



Oct. 



21. 
28. 
5. 
12. 
19. 



Nov. 2. 

*' 9. 

" 16. 

" 23. 

'* 30. 

Dec. 7. 

" 14. 

" 21. 



8. d. 
5 
5 

4 6 

4 0@4 6 
3 9@4 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 3 

3 

2 9 

2 3 

2 

2 3 

2 6 
2 9@3 

5 



s. d. 




6 
3 6 
3 0@3 3 

3 6 

3 0®3 3 

2 6 

2 6 

3 

3 3 

4 
3 6 

5 0@5 3 
5 0@5 6 

5 3 





3 

3 

3 



9 

4 6 

3 9 

3 9@4 

3 9 

3 9 

4 

4 

5 



3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 3 

3 3 



4 3 



5 

4 
4 9 



2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 3 

3 3 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 

3 6 



3 
3 
3 6 



s. d. - 
5 
5 
4 6 
4 0@4 6 
4 
3 6 
3 6 
3 6 
3 6 
3 6 

6 





9 







3 



9 





3 



6 

6 
•6 









3 6 



6 
6 



5 6 

6 
5 



5 

4 3 

5 
4 9 
4 3 
4 3 
4 3 

4 3 

5 

5 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 





s. d. 

9 





6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 



8. d. 

7 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 
6 



6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 

6 6 



Hosted by 



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354 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Ocean Freights from New York for Wtl— {Continued.) 
As furnished ly Messrs, Carey & Yale, of New YorJc City. 



OIL CAKE. 

Per ton. 



AS PER 

OmCTJLAB 

DATED 



To Liverpool. 



SaU. 



To London, 



Steam. 



San. 



TO Bristol. 



Steam. 





ftry o 

12 


(( 


19 


" 


26 


February 2 1 

(( Q 1 




» 16..:: 


' 


' 23.... 


March 2 


" 


9 


" 


16 


*' 


23 


(( 


30 


April 6 


" 


13 


(( 


20 


(( 


27 


May 


4 




n 


" 


18 \. 


(i 


25 


June 


1 


" 


8 


*' 


15 


" 


22 


u 


29 


July 


6 


" 


13 


'* 


20 


(( 


27 


Auprust 3 


' 


' 10 


(. 


17 


' 


' 24 


k 


' 31 


Sept 


. 7 


" 


14 


»' 


21 


" 


28 


Oct. 


5 


" 


12 


(( 


19 


i' 


26 


Nov 


. 2 


" 


9 


4i 


16 


" 


23 


" 


30 


Dec. 


7 


*' 


14 


" 


21......... 


♦* 


28 



s. d. 
25 
25 
25 
22 6 
20 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
15 
15 

15 0@17 6 
12 6 
12 6 
15 

15 0(^17 6 
17 6 
27 6 

25 0@27 6 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 

15 0@17 6 

15 0@17 6 
17 6 

15 0@,17 6 

17 6v^20 
25 
25 
30 
30 
30 
32 6 
30 
27 6 
30 
27 6 
27 6 
30 
30 
25 
25 
25 . 
25 
25 
25 
27 6 

27 6@300 



s. d, 

20 

20 

20 

20 
17 6@20 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

15 

15 

15 



10 



17 6 



20 
17 6 
15 



15 
15 
15 
12 
12 
11 
11 3 
11 3 
11 3 
11 3 



17 6 

17 6 

25 

25 

25 
2ft 



27 6 

26 3 

26 3 

26 3 
25 

27 6 

25 
23 9 

20 

22 6 

21 3 

21 3 

23 3 

22 6 

26 



s. d. 
27 6 





25 

20 

20 

20 

20 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 



15 

20 

25 

30 



25 
25 



25 

25 

25 

25 

20 

20 

20 

12 6 

12 6 

15 



26 

25 

a5 

35 

35 

30 



30 
30 
30 

30 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

27 6 

26 

25 

26 
25 0®27 6 

27 6 



s. d. 

25 

22 6 

22 6 

22 6 

20 

•17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 



17 6 

20 

20 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6, 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

17 6 

11 3 

11 3 

11 3 

12 6 
20 
20 
25 
25 

25 
27 6 
27 6 
27 6 

26 3 
26 3 
25 
25 
25 
22 6 
22 6 
24 
24 

24 
22 6 
22 6 

25 



s. d. 
27 6 



25 

27 6 



25 

25 

25 

20 



22 6 

20 



25 

27 6 

20 

25 

25 

22 6 

23 6 
22 6 



20 


b 



20 





20 





20 





22 


6 


25 





25 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





30 





27 


6 


27 


6 


27 


6 


27 


6 


27 


6 


27 


6 


27 


6 



27 6 
26 3 



25 
25 
25 

'25' "0 



Hosted by 



Google 



Receipts of Live Stock at Seaboard Cities. 



355 



Receipts of Live Stock at the Unepermentioned Sea- 
board Cities, 

For tlie 'Years 1872 to 1877, inclusive. 



isra 


Cattle. 


Sheep. 


Hogs. 


Veals. 


Total. 


New York 


Number. 

433,664 

157,a36 

148,152 

91,764 


Number. 

1,179.518 
412,217 
749.500 
155,558 


Number, 

1,923,727 

602,625 

210.276 

314;269 


Number. 

115,130 

17,852 


Number. 
3,652,039 


Boston 


1,190,030 


PhiladelDtiia . 


1,107,928 




561,591 






Total 


830,916 

447,441) 

167,730 

84,265 

84,664 


2,496,793 

1,206,715 
414,076 
753,750 
160,000 


3,050,897 

1,958,389 
854,507 
344.300 
392,734 


132,982 

116,015 
69,358, 


6,511,588 


1873 

New York 


3,728,564 


Boston 

Philadelnhia 


1,505,671 
1,182,315 


Baltimore 


637,398 






Total 


784,104 

457,709 
163,300 
185.140 
130;946 


2,534,541 

1,165.565 
364,281 
757.040 
120,000 


3,549,930 

1.774,221 
587,721 
339.590 
357,547 


185,373 

104,719 
17,670 


7,053,948 


isr* 

New York 


3,502,302 


Boston 


1,132,972 


Philadelohia 


1,281,770 


Baltimore 


608,493 






Total 


937,095 

457,057 
145,285 
152,830- 
112,679 


2,406,974 

1,233.968 
372,370 
491,500 
191,485 


3,059,079 

1,388,517 
331,989 
243,300 
279,631 


122,389 . 

118,78J:J 
16,781 


6,525,537 


New York 


3,198,325 




866,425 


Philadelpliia 


887,630 




58:3,795 






Total 


867,851 

467,722 
189,989 
190,550 
110,366 


2,289,373 

1,211,086 
348.510 
548,850 
223,267 


2,243,437 

1,222,657 
361,317 
289,900 
259,064 


135,564 

110,848 
13,027 


5,536,175 


1876 

New York 


3,012,313 


Boston 


912,843 


Philadelphia 


1,029,300 




592,697 






Total 


958,627 

507,832 
155.907 
203;470 
112,862 


2,331,713 

1,184,687 

;^6,647 

545,870 

96,786 


2,132,938 

1,268,596 
330,604 
242,400 
322,945 


123,875 

130,088 
15,981 


5,547,153 


1877 
New York 


3,091,203 


Boston 


849,139 


Philadelphia 


991,940 




532.593 






Total, 1877 


980,071 

958,627 
867,851 
937,095 
784,104 
830,916 
745,802 
701,427 


2,173,990 

2,331,713 
2,289.263 
2,406.974 
2,534,541 
2,496,793 
2,793,673 
2,771,875 


2,164,545 

2.132,933 
2.243,437 
3,059,079 
3,549,930 
3,050,897 
2.211,197 
1,568,455 


146,069 

123,875 
135,564 
122,389 
185,373 
132,982 
134,401 
132,457 


5,464,675 


Total 1876 

Total 1875 


5,547,153 
5,536.115 


Total 1874 


6,525,537 


Total 1873 


7,053,948 


Total 1872 


6,511,588 


Total 1871 


5,885.073 


Total 1870 


5,174,214 


Yearly average 8 years 


853,237 


2,474,853 


2,497,560 


139,139 


5,964,789 ^ 



Hosted by 



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356 



Ne w York Produce Exchange, 



Weekly Eeceipts of Lite Stock and Deissed Hogs at 
NEtv T0BK5 BY ALL Routes. 

For the Tear 1877. 



WEEK 
ENDING. 



January 8 

15.... 

'* 22.... 

29.... 

February 5... 
12... 
19... 



March. 5 , 

" 12 

" 19 

" 26 

AprU 2 

'^ 9 

** 16 

*' 23 

' *' 30 

May 7 

" 14 

" 21 

" 28 

June 4 

" 11 

'' 18 

" 25 

July 2 

" 9 

" 16 

'* 23 

" 30 

August 6 

" 13 

*' 20 

" 27 

September 3 . 

" 10.. 

17.. 

24., 

October 1 . 

8 

" 15.... 

" 22 

" 29 

November 5.. 
12. . 
19. . 
26.. 

December 3.. 

10. . 

'* 17.. 

24.. 

31.. 

Total Year 



Beeves. 



8,978 
7,606 
9,763 
11,138 

9,180 
8,882 
8,532 
8,480 

9,044 
7,896 
10,'628 
11,540 

9,038 

9,209 

10,497 

11,779 

10,142 

12,770 
9,853 
9,718 

9,554 
10,083 

9,520 
12,173 

9,156 

9,518 
9,551 
8,535 
8,254 
7,741 

12,819 
7,570 
9,730 



9,012 
10,154 

9,789 
10,982 

11,405 
8,931 

12,260 
8,984 

10,145 

8,192 
10,109 
8,540 
9,595 

7,319 
11,579 
8,058 
8,728 
6,314 



497,833 



Cows. 



102 

78 

155 

87 

144 
98 

154 
71 

140 
130 
76 

75 

108 
59 
46 
67 
19 

56 
62 
24 



46 
70 
76 



71 
32 
106 



95 
51 
54 



125 
41 

75 

54 

70 
44 



101 
80 
63 



73 

91 
91 

58 
72 



3,999 



Calves. 



710 



752 

659 

718 
730 
918 

772 

881 

1,184 

1,170 

1,456 
1,874 
4,600 
2,674 



5,710 
4,717 
4,320 
3,997 



3,052 
2,938 
2,903 



2,823 
2.504 
2,704 
2,603 

2,008 
1,900 
1,970 
1,302 

1.146 
1,419 • 
1,448 
1,428 



130,088 



Sheep. 



25,155 
16,611 
16,591 
33,219 

20,605 
24,554 
16,811 
24,107 

16,998 
15,027 
19,332 
24,745 

16.951 

22,978 
18,500 
21,151 
17,235 

17,015 
20,336 
18,727 
23,510 



3,540, 
4,297 
4,481 
3,750 


19,754 
18,492 
24,142 
23,197 


4.826 
3,250 
3,646 
3,429 
3,851 


25,600 
21,524 
21,920 
18,279 
20,100 


3,050 
3,134 
3,378 


22,048 
28,965 
21,480 



20,686 

22,497 
32,851 
29,648 
25.925 



31,618 
32,850 
26,816 
31,921 

29,173 
27,542 
22,625 

27,807 

11,214 
31,726 
31,185 
17,1^2 
11,937 



1,184,687 



Hogs. 



19,451 
19,428 

21,100 
20,184 
19,257 
20,255 

16,829 
13,658 
^2,152 
19,482 

18,703 
22,663 
25,598 
29,481 
26,001 

31,120 
26,627 
2l;913 
20,754 

18,835 
19,882 
23,231 
19,075 

24,322 
18,108 
20,141 
16.696 
7;236 

17,626 
21,053 
21,473 
18,602 

19,484 
20,608 
24,442 
28,190 

21,173 
24,828 
32,971 
31,231 

30,363 
37,744 
33,736 
38,537 
32,321 

31,667 
45125 
47,133 
29,377 
31,953 



1,268,596 



Dressed 
Hogs. 



5,952 
2,417 
9,536 

13,321 
9,657 
2,719 

4,688 
3,889 
3,100 
1,792 
2,243 

1,455 
. 523 

178 
309 
342 

720 
512 
699 

127 



157 



414 
12 



268 
215 

672 
154 

777 
466 



351 

625 

1,299 

962 

874 

993 

3,595 

4,594 

1,990 



86,273 



Hosted by 



Google 



M(yvement of Hogs at QMcago. 



357 



Movement of Hogs, Live and Dressed, at CnTOAao, Monthly, 

For the Tea/r 1877. 





RECEIPTS. 


SHIPMENTS 




Month. 


Live. 


Dressed. 


Total. 


Live. 


Dressed. 


Total. 


Jamiarv 


359,695 
243,932 
255,381 
316,816 
272,304 
391,492 
255,584 
249,431 
242,538 
334,657 
499,800 
681,970 


82,171 

50,923 

22,173 

668 

135 

18 

* ' '133 
1,709 
7,521 


441,866 
294,855 
277,554 
317,484 
272,439 
321,510 
255,584 
242,431 
242,538 
a34,790 
501,509 
689,491 


46,473 
79,020 
109,487 
101,593 
78,602 
82,442 
85,060 
96,236 
87,172 
79,843 
48,834 
58,150 


53,102 

27,333 

6,894 

316 

440 

157 

' i*,379 
2,165 
2,323 
3,643 


99,575 


February 


106,353 


March 


116,381 


April 

Mav 


101,909 
79,642 


June 

July 


82,599 
85,060 




96,236 


September 


88,551 


October 

November 

December 


82,008 
51,157 
61,7^3 


Total, year 


4,026.600 


165,451 


4,192.051 


952,912 


97,752 


1,050,664 



For the Tear 1876. 



January 


446,061 
360,444 
211,389 
226,602 
307,950 
369,581 
261,564 
224,006 
278,5^99 
392,946 
569,195 
541,969 


66,785 

33,994 

9,952 

1,383 

171 

14 

*""60 
. 128 
2,515 

33,620 


512,846 
394,438 
221,;341 
227,985 
307,421 
369,595 
261,564 
224,006 
279,059 
393,074 
571,710 
575,589 


48,294 
74,959 
105,756 
94,026 
127,890 
125,188 
125,529 
111,736 
106,833 
100,800 
71,218 
39,406 


34,172 
26,710 
5,077 

'"314 
13,381 


82,466 


February 


101,669 


March 


110,833 


April 

May 


94,026 
127,890 


June 


125,188 


July 


125,529 


August 


111,736 


September 


106,833 


October 


100,800 


November 


71,532 


December 


52,787 


Total, year 


4,190,006 


148,622 


4,338,628 


1,131,635 


79,654 


1,211,289 



Monthly Movement of L 


ivE Hogs 


AT St. Louis. 


Month. 


RECEIPTS. 


SHIPMENTS. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 


October 

November 

December 


8,884 

23,204 

47,633 

129,167 

55,951 


55,259 
132,519 
203,215 
133,690 

50,698 


4,606 

7,007 

22,500 

23,783' 

16,217 


16,801 
6,625 
11,610 




34,256 


February 


16,632 


Total 

March 


264,839 

40,092 
39,443 
50,955 
50,400 
39.689 
23,423 
44,047 


575,381 

38,482 
63,340 
75,066 
71,595 
44,603 
44,449 
42,796 


74,113 

15,033 
24,421 
24,930 
28,061 
20,236 
22,568 
22,043 


86,924 
15,057 


April 


82,306 


May 

June •••• 


52,139 
43,403 


July 

Aupru.st 

September 


22,496 
28,418 
19,385 


Total 


288,049 


380,331 


157,292 213,204 








552,888 


955,712 


231,405 299,128 









Hosted by 



Google 



358 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Monthly Keceipts of Live Hogs at Chicago, 



From l^overaher 1st to October 'S\st 


, for the last five crop years. 


MONTH. 


1872-73. 


1873-74. 


1874-75. 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


November 

December 


375,941 
510,284 
561,245 
378,760 


616.301 
665,771 
457,088 
303,341 


727,497 
531.705 
508:347 
421,a33 


491,393 
470,134 
446,061 
360,444 


569,195 
541,969 


January 


359,695 


February 


243,942 






Total 4 months. . 


l.&56,230 


2,042,501 


2,189.382 


1,768.032 


1,714.801 


March 


^1,626 
292,903 
261,361 
245,860 
244,550 
234,115 
239,512 
325,716 


238,728 
311,945 
328.838 
310;072 
231,416 
205,904 
261,123 
350,812 


240,797 
259.569 
272,887 
299,051 
290,137 
190,788 
283,023 
437,207 


211,389 
226,602 
307,250 
369,581 
261,564 
223,979 
278,999 
393,046 


255,381 


April 


316,816 


May 


272,304 


Jane 

July 


321,492 
255,584 


August 


242,431 


September 

October 


242,538 
334,657 






Total 8 months. . 


2,116,643 


2,238,838 


2,273.459 


2,272,410 


2,241,203 


Grand total 


3,971,873 


4,281,339 


4,462,841 


4,040,442 


3,956,004 



Monthly Shipments op Live Hogs from Chicago. 



MONTH. 


1872-73. 


1873-74. 


1874-75. 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


November 

December. 


134,348 

126,027 

95,237 

163,140 


156,229 
146,577 
146,435 
163,890 


203,437 

122,928 

ia5,509 

. 127,532 


94,428 
53,2.14 
48,294 
74,959 


71,213 
39,406 


January 

February 


46,473 
79,020 






Total 4 months, . 


518,752 


613,131 


589,406 


270,885 


236,116 


March 


224.124 
275,715 
217,914 
189,586 
201,682 
188,776 
191,241 
196,569 


202,317 
245,945 
265,140 
238,396 
183,450 
147,335 
168,628 
242,350 


147,778 
171,505 
164,090 
165,184 
157,781 
111,378 
123,944 
90,503 


105,756 
94,026 
137,890 
125,188 
125,529 
111,736 
106,833 
100,800 


109,487 


April 

Mav 


101,593 
78,602 


June 


82,442 


July 


85,060 




96,236 


September 

October 


87,172 
79,843 






Total 8 months. . 


1,635,607 


1,693,561 


1,132,163 


907,758 


720,432 


Grand total 


2.154.359 


2.306,692 


1,721.569 


1,178,643 


956,548 



Receipts and Shipments op Live Stock at Buffalo. 





RECEIPTS, 1877. 


SHIPMENTS, 1877 


* 


month. 














Cattle. 


Sheep. 


Hogs. 


Cattle. 


Sheep. ' 


Ho;!S. 




No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 


No. 1 


No. ' 


January 


35,428 
35,156 


72,900 
75,000 


63,659 
55,800 


33.235 
35,309 


68,000 , 
68,200 ' 


46,300 


February 


49,600 


March 


49.878 


68.200 


71,850 


47,617 


66,400 


67,100 


April 


63,465 


62,000 


91,800 


61,961 


56,800 1 


79.b00 


May 


59,194 


56,100 


75.250 


59.058 


51,000 ' 


60,300 


June - 


5:1280 


67.600 


76.550 


51,731 


64,400 ' 


(i6,100 


July.. . 


43.095 


53,800 


64,450 


:38,029 


46,400 ' 


51,300 


August 


43.520 


59.700 


76,250 


42,585 


55,}^00 , 


73,600 


September 


53.261 


63,600 


94,900 


47,940 


52,000 


79,600 


October 


47,566 


68,800 


123,800 


45,849 


65,800 i 


104,400 


November 


41,154 


49,800 


119,650 


36,210 


47,800 


99,100 


December 


44,618 


66,100 


145,850 


39,863 


61,300 ! 


105,800 


Totals 1877 


569,615 


763,600 


1.059,809 


539,387 


703,900 ! 


883,000 


" 1876 


615,790 


871,928 


1,150,210 


590,139 


768,250 1 


941,650 


" 1875 


513,5:30 


841,000 


1,067,300 


493,574 


722,800 1 


907,800 



* These are by the N. Y. C. & H. R. and Erie Railroads, and do not include 10,370 cattle ; 
12,200 sheep ; and 5,800 hogs shipped by other routes. Making a grand total of 569,757 cattle ; 
716,100 sheep ; and 888,800 hogs. 



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Shipment of Hgg Product from Chicago. 



359 



Shipment of Hog -Pkoduct from Chicago, Weekly. 

From the Chicago Daily B&poit and Market Remew. 



POB 
WEEK ENDING 



Pork, 
Bbls. 



Lard, 
Tcs. 



Hams, 
Tcs. 



Shoulders, 
Poundfe. 



Middles, 
Pounds. 



Green 

Hams, 

Pounds. 



1876. 
October 28 . . 



November 2 , 

9. 

16. 



30. 

December 7 . . 
" 14.. 
'* 21 . 



1877. 

January 4 . . 

" 11.: 

." 18.. 

" 25.. 

. February 1 . 



15. 
22. 



March 1. 
" 8. 
" 15. 



29. 



April 5 
" 12 
19 



" 26 


May 4 


"ii::::::::::: 


" 13 


"26 


■ • • *r 


June 1 


" 7 



July 6. 
" 12. 
" 19. 



August 4. 
'* 9. 



" 23 

" 30 


September 
October 6. 


8 

15 

22 

29 


" 13 

" 20 


" 27 


Total 



7,030 

10,886 
7,218 
8,317 

13,318 

7,784 

7,093 
4,890 
9,131 
4,305 

5,782 
1,459 
3,261 
3,773 

3,427 

5,694 

5,705 

10,949 

12,882 
12,795 

8,176 
11,787 

5,419 

10.906 
8,969 
7,613 
2,539 

5,665 
5,417 
3,657 



6,119 
5.601 
7,357 
5,000 
8,564 

1,984 
4,287 
12,061 
1,509 

1,551 
19,344 
4,043 
2,553 
3,906 

7,180 
5,040 
4,463 
4,749 

4,076' 
5,993 
5,296 
3,073 

342,261 



5,568 

5,938 

9,489 

30,12;^ 

14,428 

17,775 

18,189 

14,999 

13,486 

9,557 

5,045 
1,245 
1,840 
1,536 



2,579 
2,897 
2,646 

3.068 
11,845 
20,933 
10,078 

8,744 

10,146 
15,258 
5,328 
1,795 

11,695 
2,614 
9,250 
6,433 

3,954 
4,308 
3,250 
10,739 
2,586 

3,137 
6.187 
6;009 
1,760 

4,772 
12,410 

97,24 
10,041 

5,302 

10,572 
4,035 
2.675 
2,741 

6,382 
7,272 
6,125 
3,505 



382,949 



1,156 

755 
1,362 
1,455 
1,272 

601 

2,171 
2,269 
3,055 
2,686 

1,458 
2,197 
1,321 
1,451 

874 

789 

662 

1,386 

1,234 
1,450 
1,363 
1,533 
1,629 

874 
1,189 
2,895 
3,155 

1,951 

3,022 

992 

564 

285 

1,409 

793 

892 

1,804 

1,573 
2,011 
1,226 



557 
2,160 
1,425 
1,070 
1,905 

1,537 
1,096 
1,366 
1,568 

1,096 
373 

1,217 
449 



630,168 

611,543 
856,670 
658,863 
650,636 
776,357 

720,963 
373,328 
792,782 
849,675 

1,037,680 

966,910 

297,591 

' 1,348,329 

-929,612 
1,240,884 
1,017,133 
1,310,830 

1,582,983 
1,900,326 
1,535,140 
1,724,233 
1,160,815 

1,148,585 
576.835 
499,510 
877,160 

879,909 

1,000,938 

535,778 

402,504 

430,327 
519,200 
447,030 
395,790 
462,690 

373,759 
523,470 
457,143 
253,451 

145,433 
1,158,532 
816,908 
607,976 
906,509 

348,067 
836,230 
555,130 

457,748 

796,587 
437,830 
582,741 
978,870 



74,946 



41,386,121 



7,780,320 



7,593,890 

9,763,548 

12,345,4:33 

15,23^,090 

16,064,134 

* 20,126,005 

15.080,301 

10,919,510 

9,078,534 
10,493,843 

7,013,025 
10,004,777 

7,666,796 
5,220,181 
7,460,090 
6,961,589 

9,297,431 
7,977,103 
9,873,966 
7,519,770 
7,439,531 

5,920,704 
4,560,656 
3,893,780 
4,948,736 

5,911,282 
5,163.643 
5,634,650 
5,749,897 

6,490,953 
5,140,971 
5,325,960 
4,777,221 
4,516,273 

4,901,760 
5,751,281 
7,580,390 
2,721,451 

7,627,365 
10,065,210 
7,920,365 
8,365,832 
8,767,088 

5,563,280 
8,428,773 
6,881,288 
7,350,189 

5,508,681 
6,872,181 
7,226,843 
8,607,801 



417,951,216 



1,334 

1,260 

22,373 

75,774 
131,839 

133,604 

97,066 

112,531 

108,702 

15,037 
51,420 
23,944 
18,668 

16,796 

5,926 

11,375 

12,094 



839,733 



Hosted by 



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360 



New York Produce Exchange. 



HOG PACKING BY STATES, 

Witli Average Gross Weight of Hogs, Frice per Hundred Pounds, and At&rage 

Tidd of Lard, 

As per Reports of Sidney D. Maxwell, Supt. Cincinnati Merchants' Exchange. 



STATE. 


Number of Hogs. 


Average 
Gross Weight. 


Average 
Yield of Lard. 


Average Price 
per 100 lbs. gross. 




1876-77. * 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


1875-76. 


1876-77. 


1875-76. 


Ohio 


^3,709 
1,905,219 

530,286 

419,442 
31,775 

255,986 
88,689 
24,235 

644,699 
46,190 
50,770 

266,861 

10,947 

10,000 

2,500 


822,935 

1,913,895 

568,367 

351,406 

34,276 

260,156 

49,542 

24,630 

555,319 

21,825 

21,599 

209,255 

5,787 

4,000 

7,200 


272.68 
272.61 
249.26 
259.68 
300.51 
278 15 
290.43 
312.42 
267.41 
275.48 
260.05 
283.33 

> 266.11 


272.536 

•277.207 

263.035 

271 .325 

291.336 

•268.989 

293.309 

300.8:^7 

270.104 

273.073 

269.546 

268.542 

259.165 

319 

250 


36.49 

35.19 

29.69 

33.26 

37.16 

33.1 

32.9 

29.3 

33.88 

38.1 

31.48 

30.73 

(-32.39 


36.94 

37.009 

32.952 

36.419 

38.83 

32.644 

38.046 

39.471 

37.803 

41 .344 

33.416 

32.188 

33.371 

39 

30 


1576 
5 93.6 
5 616 
5 45.6 
5 28.8 
5 59.2 
5 53.6 
519.2 
5 64 
5 42.4 
5 39 2 
5 68.8 

t 5 72.8 


$7 19.128 


Illinois 


7 14.3-22 


Indiana 


7 01.308 


Iowa 


6 66.556 


Kansas' 


6 47.828 


Kentucky 


7 27.146 


Michigan 


7 09.967 


Minnesota 

Missouri 


6 34.178 
6 99.101 


Nebraska 


6 35.351 


Tennessee 

Wisconsin. .... 


6 68.541 
6 87.543 


West Virginia.. ,. 
Pittsburgh, Pa.... 
Atlanta, Ga 


7 00 
725 
7 50 


Total 1876-77... 
'' 1875-76... 
" 18T4-75... 
" 1873-74. . . 
" 1872-73... 
" 1871-72... 
« 1870-71. . . 


5,101,308 
4,850,192 
5,537,124 
5,383,810 
5,456,004 
4,782,403 
3,623,404 


4,850,192 


.269.9 
272.61 
262.475 
268.269 
289.51 
282.207 
285.124 


272.61 


34.08 

36.04 

34.933 

35.502 

40.076 

38.589 

37.714 


36.04 • 



15 74.06 
7 06.56 
6 65.693 
4 38.758 

3 78.844 

4 13.585 
6 34.177 


7 06.56 



* The year 1876-77 is from the Report of , the " Cincinnati Price Current." 

Eeceipts and Average Gboss Weight of Live Hogs 
AT Chicago, 

As per Report of B. Frank Howard, Esq., Chicago. 



MONTH. 


1877. 


1876. 


1875. 


1874. 


Number. 


Av. W't. 


Number. JAv. W't. 


Number. 


Av. W't. 


Number. 


Av.Wt. 


January 

February 

March 

April 


359,695 
243,932 
255,3bl 
316,816 
272,304 
321.492 
255;584 
242,431 
242,538 
334,657 
499,800 
681,340 


253 

257.05 

239 

231 

223 

231 

237 

238 

243 

252 

265 

270 


446,061 281 
360,414 , 262 
211,389 220.67 
236,602 1 216 
307,250 , 228 
369,581 233 
261,594 1 234 
2-23,W9 : 242 
278,999 '2.16.50 
393,046 1 256 
569,195 > 262 
541,969 2rO 


446,061 
360,414 
240,797 
259.560 
272,88? 
299.051 
290,137 
190,788 
165,919 
301,255 
491,493 
470,134 


281 

262 

217 

206.50 

310 ■ 

218 

22:^ 

222 

230 

239 

256.50 

271 


508,347 
421,833 
238,728 
311,045 
328,838 
310,072 
231,416 
205,904 
261,123 
350,812 
727.407 
531,705 


260.50 
251 

201.75 
197.75 


May 

June 


199.75 
206.14 


July . .. . 


207.11 


August 

September — 

October 

November 

December 


208.25 

209.33 

2^21.75 

244 

253.50 


Total 


4,025,970 




4,200,079 


3,788,496 




4,427,230 






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Shipments of Provisions from St Louis. 361 

Monthly Shipment of Pkovisions feom St. Louis, 

M-om November 1st, 1876, to October ^\st, 1877. 



MONTH. 


*Bacon. 


Lard. 


Pork. 


Grease. 


Hogs. 


1876. 

November 

December 

1877. 
January 


Lbs. 
7,316 913 
8,067,078 

9,673,628 
13,657,615 
15,0-11,662 
9,362,985 
6,246,145 
8,859,527 
5,151,610 
12,430,188 
11,221,290 
8,898,689 


Lbs. 
2,740,760 
4,214,060 

2,571,801 
2,957,526 
2,fK)3,110 
1,945,482 
1,537.058 
2,452.640 
1,406,085 
2,175.582 
2,596,290 
4,192,341 


Bbls. 
3,159 
6,120 

5,132 
9,093 
19.400 
10,410 
6,834 
7,819 
5,166 
10,725 
6,580 
7,520 


Bbls. 
606 
628 

684 
650 
805 
316 
538 
499 
341 
"- 340 
742 
807 


No. 
8,151 
13,082 

29,615 


February 


21,487 


March 


15,652 


April 

May 


29,970 
48,889 


June .... 


45.999 . 


July 


22,757 


August 

September 

October 


26,959 
2i;944 

27,748 






Total year 


115,927,330 ' 31,692,735 


97,958 


6,956 


312,253 



Includes Hams and other Cut Meats. 



Monthly Exports of Alcohol from New York. 



MONTH. 



1877. 



1876. 



1875. 



1874. 



1873. 



January 

February . . . 

March 

April . 

May 

Jime 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . 
December 

Total 



Bbls. 
3,450 
5,910 
2,825 
1,050 
1,600 
5,150 
226 
1,850 
2,250 
1,050 
1,950 
2,950 



30,261 



Bbls. 

50 

52 

254 

1,450 

150 

4 

150 

102 

226 

104 

600 

408 



3,550 



Bbls. 
100 



300 
150 
200 
20 
152 



110 
150 
110 



1,292 



Bbls. 

6,458 

4,000 

2,950 

3,199 

2,400 

200 

420 

530 

231 

511 



100 



20,999 



Bbls. 
1,589 
2,350 
2,310 
649 
750 
1,575 
3,476 
2,199 
1,595 
3,700 
8,642 
3,155 



31,990 



Population of States according to State Censuses since 1870. 



Iowa 

Kansas 

Louisiana , 

Massachusetts . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Jersey.. — 

New York 

Oregon , 

Rhode Island.. 
South Carolina. 
Wisconsin , 

Total., 



United States 
Census 1870. 


State Censuses. 


Increase. 


Per Cent. 
Increase. 


1,194,020 


1875 


1,350,544 


156,524 


13 


364,399 


<( 


528,437 


164,038 


45 


726,915 


•* 


857,039 


130,124 


18 


1,457,351 


" 


1,651,912 


194,561 


13 


1,184,059 


1874 


1,334,031 


149,972 


. 13 


439,706 


1875 


597,407 


157,701 


36 


1,721,295 


1876 


2,085,537 


364,242 


21 


122,993 


" 


257,747 


134,754 


109 


42,491 


1875 


52,540 


10,049 


24 


906,096 


" 


1,019,413 


113,317 


13 


4,382,759 


" 


4,705,208 


322,449 


7 


90,923 


" 


104,920 


13,997 


15 


217,353 


u 


258,239 


40,886 


19 


705,606 


It 


923,447 


217,841 


31 


1,054,670 


.... 


1,236,599^ 


181,929 


17 


14,610,636 


16,963,020 


2,352,384 


16 average 
of 15 States. 



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362 



New Torh Vrodnce Exchange. 



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Stocks of Hog Product at Indianapolis, 363 

Stocks of Hog Product at Indianapolis. 



1877. 

January 29 

February 8 

Februarj"- 15 

March 1 

March 15 

April 1 , 

April 15 

May 1 

May 15 , 

June 1 

June 15 

Julyl 

July 15 

August 1 , 

August 15 



Lard. S. P. Hams. D. S. Shoulders. S. R. Sides. 



Tcs. 



Tcs. 



4,500 


8.900 


3,200 


9,300 


4,489 


9,780 


4.110 


10,002 


3.378 


10,050 


2,884 


8,935 


3,153 


8,831 


2,423 


8,631 


2,066 


7,700 


1,863 


7,481 


1,793 


7,006 


1,578 


6,580 


1,678 


4,305 


1,836 


4,156 


1,540 


1,900 



Lbs. 

1,950,000 
1,850.000 
2,428,000 
2,100.000 
2,090,000 
1,910,000 
1,415,000 
1,275,000 
1,335,000 
1,425,000 
1,385,000 
1,115,000 

985,000 
1,015,000 

690,000 



Lbs. 

4,900,000 
4,400,000 
4,262,000 
4,240,000 
4,650,000 
3,830.000 
3,650,000 
3,300,000 
3,020,000 



2,820,000 
2,570,000 
2,610,000 
2,800,000 
2,220,000 



Stocks op Peoyisions at Various Western Cities, 

In February, 1877. 



AT 


Mess 
Pork, 
Bbls. 


Other 
Pork, 
Bbls. 


Lard, 
Tcs. 


Hams, 
Tcs. 


Hams, 
Pes. 


S. C. 
Sides, 
Lbs. 


S. R. 
Sides, 
Lbs. 


Shoulders, 
Lbs. 


Chicago 

*Cmcinnati (est^d.) 
St. Louis 


194,949 

25,000 

14,000 

6,106 

800 

8,000 

2,500 

8,200 

2,500 

500 

2,500 

1,500 

1,947 

* 2,000 
1,993 

""750 
1,000 

' 3,820 


13,773 

3,000 

7,000 

675 

" 5,600 

"1,575 

""ibo 

1,000 

' 2,813 

" " 200 
50 

'"286 

' * ' 217 

..... 

449 


71,221 
25,000 
13,100 

7,277 

3,200 

8,000 
150 

1,275 
500 
150 

1,600 
500 
.127 
250 
600 
900 

1,700 
870 
200 
125 
250 
650 

1,200 
535 

7,875 


25,907 

' 6,000 

' 9,300 
3,5U0 

' 1,500 
1,000 

' 2,000 

200 

300 

1,10Q 

1,061 

* ' 200 
11,034 


'42.000 
15,000 
74,000 
75,000 
50,000 
2,000 

'27",bob 
i3Vo'ob 

20,000 

'i2,bbb 

6.000 

4,000 

20,000 

2:3,500 

12,000 
103,370 


6,250,000 

8,*odb,bbb 

574,000 
1,388,000 

■ "350,000 

700,000 
700,000 

' 160,000 

*" 5,000 

' 400,000 
1,383,998 


17,000,000 

9,5dd,oob 

7,557,000 
4,400,000 
2,382,913 

' 'im^m 

900,000 

300,000 

89,500 

400,000 

i,'2oo,bbb 

750,000 

1,345,000 

600,000 

' 'm^m 

1,057,500 

80,000 

7,689,400 


7,250,000 

"dboojoob 


Louisville 

Indianapolis 

Milwaukee 

St. Paul 


5,370,328 

1,850,000 

2,009,143 

192,000 


Detroit 


345,000 


Cleveland 


300,000 


Peoria 


350,000 
550,000 
300 000 


Keokuk 


Toledo 


Cedar Rapids 

Omaha 

Leavenworth 

Davenport 

Barry, 111 


37,000 
450,000 
300,000 
320,000 
480,000 


Des Moines 

Pekin, 111.: 

E. Saginaw, Mich. 
Ft. Madison, Iowa. 
Bowling Green, Ky 
Shelbyville, Tenn. 

Hannibal, Mo 

fMisceUaneous p'ts 


1,095,000 
200,000 
160,000 
44,500 
225.000 
352,000 
170,000 

3,149,872 


Total 


278,065 


36,738 


147,255 


63,102 


498,870 


19,956,197 


56,001,313 


30,499,843 







* Estimated to have 40,000,000 pounds of all kinds of meats on hand. 

t Including the following point-s : Sabula, Waterloo, Sioux City, Iowa ; Springfield, Blooming- 
ton, 111. ; Newcastle, Wabash, Franklin, Muncie, Richmond, Terre Haute, Gosport, Columbus, 
Martinsville, Marion, Vincennes, Noblesville, Ind. ; Wilmington, Lima, Dayton, Fremont, Piqua, 
Ohio Lawrence, Troy, Kansas; Bolckow, Mo. 



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364 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Stocks of Provisions at Louisville, 

On the following dates. 



1877. 


Mess Pork. 


Other Pork. 


Lard. 


D. S. 
Shoulders. 


S. C. Sides. 


S. R. 
Sides. 


February 8th 

April 9th 

July 1st 


bbis. 
6,106 
3,874 


bbls. 
675 


tcs. 

7,277 
5,745 
2,500 


lbs. 
5,370,328 
4,492,813 


lbs. 
574,000 


lbs. 
7,557,000 
8,293,206 



Stocks of Provisions at Milwaukee, 

On the following dates. 



1877. 


Mess 
Fork. 


Other 
Pork. 


Lard. 


Hams. 


Hams. 


s. c. 

Sides. 


S. R. 

Sides. 


Shoulders. 


Japuary 6th 

February 8th. . . . 


bbls. 
5,372 
8,000 


bbls. 
6,025 
5,600 


tcs. 
5,400 
8,000 


tcs. 
1,220 
3,500 


PCS. 

42;666 


lbs. 
1,222,483 
1,388,199 


lbs. 
2,105,139 
2,382,913 


lbs. 
1,951,791 
2,009,143 



Stocks of Provisions at St. Louis, 

On the following dates. 



1877. 


Mess 
Pork. 


Other 
Pork. 


Lard. 


S. P. 
Hams. 


D. S. 
Shoulders. 


S.C. 
Sides. 


s. n. 

Sides. 


Other 
Sides, 


February 8 

September l5.. 


bbls. 
14.000 


Ill 


tcs. 

13,100 

4,000 


tcs. 
6,000 


lbs. 
5,000,000 
700,000 


lbs. 
8,000,000 


lbs. 
9,500,000 




lbs. 
1,000,000 



Stocks of Provisions at New Orleans, 

On the following dates. 



1877. 


Pork. 


Lard. 


Hams. 


S.C. 
Hams. 


S. P. 
Hams. 


Bacon. 


D. S. 
Meats. 


Clcur 
Ribs. 


April 1 


bbls. 
7,000 
7,016 
5,367 
5,133 
3,500 


tcs. 
3,140 
2,031 
2,160 
3,081 
1,025 


tcs. 
1,300 

950 


lbs. 
120,000 


casks. 
490 
490 
910 


casks. 
422 
475 
625 
629 
57 


casks. 
450 
509 
275 

;35i 

1,000 


lbs. 


May 1 

June 1 




July 1 




December 29 


167,000 





Stocks of Provisions at Cincinnati, 

On the following dates. 



1877. 



February 8 . , 

March 1 

April 1 ... 

May 1 

June 12 

August 8.. , 
Septemb^6 



Pork. 


Lard 


Sides, Shoulders 






and Hams. 


bbls. 


tcs. 


lbs. 


28,000 


25,000 




17,000 


28,000 


41,000,000 


13,700 


19,350 


35,950,000 


12,000 


12,400 


30,985,000 


7,780 


9,000 


25,230.000 


8,500 


5,000 . 


13,500,000 
5,750,000 



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Stocks of Pork, Beef and Lard at Nep) York, 
Stock of Poek at New Toek. 



365 



ON 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 1st 

February Ist 

March 1st 

April 1st 

May 1st 


Bbls. 
30,242 
56,672 
76,547 
109,246 
124,826 
118.883 
104,776 
94,661 
80,410 
65,858 
49,940 
36,070 


Bbls. 
40,772 
47,009 
58,572 
65,753 
77,665 
81,471 
78,178 
66,922 
50,963 
36,365 
18,985 
7,748 


Bbls. 
35,843 
48,538 
50,478 
57,308 
60,700 
70,753 
60,744 
53,586 
48,807 
47,288 
36,686 
29,324 


Bbls. 
53,469 
71,947 
64,954 
61,239 
74,926 
71,881 
57,758 
43,855 
33,736 
18,768 
16,405 
15,687 


Bbls. 
43,620 
50,366 
62,455 
63,424 
66,942 
61,420 
49,859 
44,429 
37,752 
23,437 
9,415 
5,175 


Bbls. 
28,345 
25,292 
27,645 
34,362 
36,841 
42,937 
32,899 
27,186 
23,373 
16,636 

9,998 
14,559 


Bbls. 

32,689 

46,623 

49,522 

51,744 

56,312 

50,372 

39,804 - 

41,499 

43,934 

35,506 

24,046 

19,734 


June 1st 

July 1st ! .. 

August 1st 

September 1st. . . 

October 1st 

November Ist. .. 
December 1st. .. 



Stock of Beef at New Yoek. 



ON 



1871. 



1872. 



1873. 



1874. 



1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



January 1st . . , 
February 1st . . 
March 1st. . . . 

April Ist 

May 1st 

June 1st 

July 1st 

August 1st 

September 1st 
October 1st. . . 
November 1st 
December 1st. 



Bbls. & tcs 
33,995 
26,851 
32,069 
25,564 
27,359 
24,048 
20,681 
19,199 
17,094 
14,603 
18,932 
53,765 



Bbls. & tcs. 
64,286 
62,748 
61,212 
58,071 
56,303 
45,939 
42,360 
39,678 
35,603 
31,246 
28,029 
43,054 



Bbls. & tcs. 
50,150 
43,074 
39,393 
35,213 
31,335 
27,940 
25.822 
23;821 
20.771 
18,058 
15,488 
17,340 



Bbls.& tcs. 

28,819 

12,228 

10,857 

11,170 

8,232 

7,341 

5,201 

4,081 

3,227 

3,613 

2,180 

1,986 



Bbls.& tcs. 

18,307 

16,171 

18,537 

13,288 

11,429 

7,197 

4,754 

3,076 

1,681 

665 

3,133 

2,999 



Bbls. & tcs. 
4,053 
4,898 
9,768 
8,785 
8,672 
7,506 
5,048 
5,617 
3,714 
2,064 
3,133 
7,754 



i 



Bbls. & tcs. 

8,115 

2,183 

6,113 

6,285 

1,533 

943 

343 

150 

145 

328 

2,902 

6,126 



Stock of Laed and Steaeine at New Toek. 





1876. 


1877. 


ON 


Lard. 


Stearine 


Total. 


Lard. 


Stearine 






Prime 
Steam. 


Off 
Grade. 


Prime 
Steam. 


Off 
Grade. 


Total. 


January 1st 

February 1st 

March 1st 

April 1st 

.May 1st 


Tcs. 

46,435 
42,136 
32,000 
22,007 
12,829 
4,339 
35,919 


Tcs. 

5*,59i 

3,632 

2,920 

50 

608 

145 

2,920 


Tcs. 

2,374 

1,333 

835 

'618 
424 
835 


Tcs. 

54!406 
47.101 
35,755 
22,057 
14,055 
4,908 
39,674 


Tcs. 
28,243 
32,779 
44,791 
45,181 
49,525 
41,604 
35,469 
29,066 
27,4M 
17.971 
11,762 
10,894 


Tcs, 
66 
387 
1,765 
1,877 
1,450 
1,021 

391 
186 
331 
554 
800 


Tcs. 

734 

541 

664 

1,421 

2,243 

1,678 

1,035 

642 

713 

80 

1,860 

1,400 


Tcs. 
29,043 
33.707 
47,220 
48,479 
63,118 
44,403 
37,380 


June 1st 

July 1st 


August 1st 

September 1st. .. 

October 1st 

November 1st . . . 
December 1st ... 


30,099 
28,393 
18,382 
14,176 
13,094 



Hosted by 



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366 'New YorJe Produce Exchange, 

WEEKLY EXPOETS OF POEK 

From New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, New 
Orleans and Montreal. 

For tJie Crop Yea/r N<yo. 1, 1876, to Oct. 31, 1877, witli Distribution. 



FOR 


United 


Con- 


South & 


West 


B. N. Am- 


Other 




Week Ending 


Kingdom. 


tinent. 


Ceptral 
America. 


Indies. 


Colonies. 


Countries 


Total. 


1876. 


Bbls. 


BblR. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


November 4 


2,729 


220 


201 


4,130 


1,127 


54 


8,461 


. *' 11 


1,460 


85 


167 


2,008 


949 


106 


4,775 


" 18 


2,808 


210 




2,197 


1,23;:J 


173 


6,621 


25 


3,779 


25 


18 


3,275 


1,190 


776 


9,063 


December 2 


3,266 


185 


392 


1,964 


157 


15 


5,979 


9 


5,318 


106 


40 


1,744 


880 


731 


8,819 


" 16 


2,512 


116 


926 


2.849 


661 




7,064 


" 23 


5,166 


88 


269 


1,223 


1,107 


106 


7,959 


" SO 


2,596 


84 


163 


2,381 


843 


11 


6,078 


1877. 
January 6 


4,180 
1,118 
3,676 
1,100 
2,403 


501 

"ioo 

80 
385 


318 

2 

446 

962 

148 


665 
2,398 
1,151 
1,868 
3,434 


57 

1,180 

3,107 

120 

125 


1,366 
479 
188 
26 
87 


7,087 




5,177 


" 20 .!!.*.!!. . 


, 8,668 


" 27 


4,156 


February 3 


S'S? 


- 10 


3,310 


27 


338 


1.970 


1,432 


44 


7,091 


" 17 


2,699 


45 


321 


2,164 


2 


21 


5,252 


" 24 


2,886 


12 


54 


1,298 


1,014 


55 


5,319 


March 3 


1,321 
2,446 
1,347 
2,444 


15 

"25 
362 


224 
354 
321 
370 


2.029 
1,667 
3.764 
3,179 


858 

328 

1,539 

94 


105 
51 
37 
38 


4,552 


" 10 


4,846 


« 17 


7,oas 


" 24 


6,487 


'* 31 


1,988 
1,574 
1.791 
2,616 
2,587 
4,125 


95 

'130 
177 
132 
111 


100 
969 
50 
86 
90 
360 


1,825 
1,664 
2,6.^7 
584 
982 
1,763 


1,780 
2,443 

358 
1,295 
1.556 

304 


"89 
107 
126 
25 
171 


5.788 


April 7 


6,739 


-' 14 


5,073 


" 21 


4.884 


" 28 


5,372 


Mav 5 


S'??1 


"'12 


2,965 


37 


9 


1,263 


945 


215 


5,434 


" 19 


1,741 
1,641 
1,208 
1,543 


250 

50 

100 

118 


4 

8 

274 

107 


2,087 
3,360 
2,451 
1,399 


271 
3,912 
1,101 
2,192 


364 
37 
275 
114 


4,717 


« 26 


9,008 




5,409 


" 9 


^'^S 


" 16 


2,375 
751 


150 


299 
100 


4,063 
2,027 


444 
932 


m 

236 


7,628 


'' 23 


4,046 


" 30 


1,781 
664 
510 
iK)6 
678 

1,023 
440 
557 
561 


121 
• 100 

240 

50 

s 12 

' 29 

16 

301 


192 
275 
59 
63 
247 
282 
204 
355 
216 


2,489 
1,939 
3,140 
1,258 
2,164 
716 
3.172 
3,400 
1,554 


496 

574 

1,785 

i,o:^ 

1,01U 

1,322 

709 

440 

597 


112 

77 

221 

289 

26 

"*6 

40 

165 


5,091 


July 7 


3,629 


•' 14 


5,955 


" 21 


3,692 


" 28 


4,197 


August 4 


3,343 


♦' 11 


4,560 


" 18 


4,808 


" 25 


3,394 


September 1 


1,087 




157 


3,837 


381 


20 


5,482 


8 


748 




'202 


1,021 


131 


2U0 


2,392 


10 


684 


250 


374 


3,354 


616 


220 


5,498 


22 


507 


25 


105 


3,082 


1.100 


60 


4,879 


29 


615 


65 


162 


2,948 


584 


7 


4,381 


October 6 


603 
666 


l;58 
15 


2;i5 
15S 


1,613 
3,207 


420 
339 


188 
340 


3,197 


" 13 


4,725 


" 20 


750 
733 

99,0'i2 


• 15 
65 

5,5la 


179 
166 


1.580 
2,367 


1,344 
776 

49,196 


93 
42 


3,961 


'' 27 


4,149 






Total 


12,121 


116,a34 


8,591 


2fK),802 







Hosted by 



Google 



Weekly Exports of Pork. 367 

Aggregate of Weekly Exports of Pork 

Fkom New York, Boston, Pheladelphta, Baltoiore, Portland, New 
Orleans and Montreal. 

F(yr the Crop Year, Nov. 1, 1876, to Oct. 31, 1877, with distribution. 



From October i 
1876, 

TO 



1876. 
November 4.. 
" 11., 
*' 18.. 
" 25.. 
December 2 . . 
9.. 
" 16.. 
" '23.. 
" 30 
1877. 

January 6 

" 18... 

" 20.:. 

" 27... 

February 3. 

" 10. 

'* 17. 

«' 24. 

March 3 

" 10 

" 17 

" 24.... 
" 31 ... . 
April 7.... 

" 14 

" 21 

" 28 

May 5 

" 12 

" 19 

" 26 

June 2 

'^ 9 

" 16 

" 23 

" 30 

July 7 

- 14 

'^ 21 

" 28 

August 4 — 

" 11... 

" 18... 

'' 25... 

September 1 

8 

15 

22 

29 

October 6 . . . , 

'' 13..., 

'♦ 20.... 

" 27... 







South & 


United 


Con- 


Central 


Kingdom. 


tinent. 


America. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


2,729 


220 


201 


4,189 


305 


368 


6,997 


515 


368 


10,776 


540 


386 


14,042 


725 


778 


19,360 


831 


818 


21,872 


947 


1,744 


27,038 


1,035 


2,013 


29,634 


1,119 


2,176 


33,814 


1,620 


2.494 


34,932 


1,620 


2,496 


38,608 


1,720 


2,942 


39,708 


1,800 


3,904 


42,111 


2,185 


4.052 


45,421 


2,212 


4,390 


48,120 


2,257 


4,711 


51,006 


2,269 


4,765 


52.327 


2.284 


4,989 


54,773 


2,284 


5,343 


56.120 


2,309 


5.664 


58,564 


2,671 


6,034 


60,552 


2,766 


6,134 


62,126 


2,7n6 


7,103 


63,917 


2,896 


7,153 


66,533 


3,073 


7,239 


69.120 


3,205 


7,329 


73,245 


3,316 


7,689 


76,210 


3,353 


7,698 


77,951 


3,603 


7.702 


79,592 


3,653 


7,710 


80,800 


3,753 


7,984 


82,343 


3,b66 


8,091 


84,718 


4,016 


8,390 


85,469 


4,016 


8,490 


87,250 


4,137 


8,682 


87,914 


4,237 


8,957 


88,424 


4,477 


9,016 


89,390 


4,527 


9,079 


90,068 


4,599 


9.326 


91,091 


4,599 


9,608 


91.531 


4,62.s 


9,812 


92,088 


4,644 


10.167 


92,649 


4.945 


10,383 


93,736 


4,945 


10,540 


94,484 


4,945 


10,742 


95,168 


5.195 


11,116 


95,675 


5.220^ 


11,221 


96,290 


5.285 


11.38::J 


96,893 


5,423 


11,618 


97,559 


5,438 


11,776 


98,309 


5,453 


11.955 


99,042 


5,518 


12,121 



West 
Indies. 



B. N. Am- 
erican 
Colonies. 



Bbls. 
4,130 
6,138 
8,335 
ll.filO 
13,074 
15,318 
18,167 
19,390 
21,771 

22,436 
• 24,a34 
25,985 
27,853 
31,287 
33.257 
35,421 
36,719 
38,748 
40,415 
44,179 
47,358 
49,183 
50,847 
53,484 
54,068 
55,050 
56,813 
58,076 
60,163. 
63,523 
■65,974 
67,373 
71,436 
73,4H3 
75,952 
77,891 
81.031 
82,319 
84,483 
85,199 
88,371 
91.771 
93,325 
97,162 
98.183 
101.5:^7 
104,619 
107,567 
109480 
112,387 
113,967 
116,334 



Other 
Countries 



Bbls. 
1,127 
2,076 
3,309 
4,499 
4,656 
5,536 
6,197 
7,304 
8,147 

8,204 
9,384 
12.491 
12;611 
12,736 
14,168 
14,170 
15,184 
16,042 
16,370 
17,909 
18,003 
19,7a3 
22,226 
22,584 
23,879 
25,435 
. 25,739 
26,684 
26,955 
30,867 
31,968 
34,160 
34,604 
35.5:-:6 
36;032 
36,606 
38,391 
39,427 
40,437 
41,759 
42.468 
42,908 
43,505 
43,886 
44,017 
44,633 
45,733 
46,317 
46,737 
47,076 
48,240 
49,196 



Bbls. 

54 

160 

333 

1,109 

1,124 

1,855 

1,855 

1,961 

1,972 



3,817 
4,005 
4,031 
4,118 
4,132 
4,153 
4,208 
4,313 
4,364 
4,401 
4,439 
4.439 
4,528 
4,635 
4,761 
4,786 
4,957 
5,172 
5,536 
5,573 
5,848 
5,962 
6,259 
6,495 
6,507 
6.584 
6,805 
7,094 
7,120 
7,l^i0 
7,126 
7,166 
7,331 
7,351 
7,641 
7,861 
7,921 
7,928 
'8,116 
8,456 
8,549 
8,591 



Total. 



Bbls. 
8,461 
13,236 
19,857 
28,920 
34,8h9 
43,718 
50,782 
58,741 
64,819 

71,906 
77,083 
85,761 
89.907 
96,489 
103,580 
108,832 
114,151 
118,703 
123,549 
130,582 
137,069 
142,857 
149,596 
154,669 
159,553 
164,925 
171,759 
177,193 
181,910 
190,918 
196,327 
201,795 
209,423 
213,469 
218,560 
222,189 
228,144 
231,836 
236,033' 
239,376 



248,744 
252,138 
257,620 
260,012 
265,510 
270,389 
274,770 
277,967 



Hosted by 



Google 



368 New Yorh Produce Exchange, 

WEEKLY EXPORTS OF BACON AND HAMS 

From New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, New 
Orleans and Montreal, 

For the Crop Tear Nov, 1, 1876, to Oct, 31, 1877, with Distribution. 









South & 




B.N. Am- 






FOR 


TTuited 


Con- 


Central 


West 


erican 


Other 






Kingdom, 


tinent, 


America. 


Indies. 


Colonies. 


Countries 


Total. 


WEEK Ending 
















1876. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


November 4.. 


8,534,483 


770,950 


10,723 


271,857 


13,100 


7,580 


9,608,693 


11.. 


7,417,279 


2,542,640 


416 


436,063 


7,225 


7,000 


10,410,623 


18.. 


9,396,787 


1,905,225 


17,509 


99,184 


8,500 


28,298 


11,455,503 


25.. 


8,949,770 


919,600 


3,913 


247,247 


13,908 


8,236 


10,142,674 


December 2... 


8,700,721 


2,237,925 


9,046 


514,159 


3,320 




11,465,171 


9... 


10,412,775 


3,101,650 


1,231 


370,096 


14,800 


53,'493 


13,954.045 


" 16... 


10,489,645 


1,403,925 


10,286 


470,687 


2,000 




12,376,543 


" 23... 


7,248,666 


2,285;775 


19,311 


410,858 


14,300 


l',787 


9,980,691 


" 30... 
1877. 
Jamiary 6 


6,676,771 


2,895,675 


34,193 


248,133 




436,685 


10,291,457 


11,296,868 


4,583,237 


1,357 


391,741 




44,480 


16,317,683 


" 13.... 


11,989,786 


3,025,894 


5,054 


626,351 


4,*519 


23,591 


15,675,195 


*' 20.... 


10,951,315 


4,816,330 


8,398 


188,835 


400 


14,000 


15,979,278 


" 27.... 


9,231,523 


1,534,525 


69,683 


216,622 


400 


5,283 


11,058,036 


February 3 


15,308,961 


4,641,675 


9,447 


195,213 




10,425 


20,165,721 


'* 10.... 


9,311,350 


1,979,600 


8,846 


191,652 


3',629 


18,000 


11,512,477 


" 17.... 


8,797,738 


1,911,922 


21,684 


164,806 




4,000 


10,900.150 


" 24.... 


6,736,453 


1,066,588 


10,774 


81,111 


*406 


1,392 


7,896.718 


Marcli 3 


6,278,640 


4,6(n,400 


16,045 


2.37,682 


294 


1,000 


11,231,061 


" 10 


5,997,416 


924,000 


9,740 


462,290 




8,800 


7,402,246 


" 17 


4,070,446 


1,208.314 


8,101 


123,874 




1,000 


5.411,735 


" 24 


8,692,848 


1,590,800 


12,392 


232,536 




9.000 


10,537,576 


" 31 


7,934,940 


2,362.655 


2,013 


338,432 


1*,944 




10,639,984 


April 7 


5,088,587 


2,939,180 


23,554 


286,224 


541,498 




8,879,043 


" 14 


6,967,291 


2,133,477 


•^'^JS 


420,966 


3,000 


15458 


9,545,862 


" 21 


6,038,348 


658,999 


1,100 


384,811 


.... 


1,000 


7,084,258 


" 28 


4,123,871 


1,787,500 


9,456 


257,479 


4,800 


1,800 


6,184,906 


May 5 


4,226,613 


2,253,725 


12,605 


267,097 


^'^? 


5,580 


6,770,449 


" 12 


4,203,115 


1,345,275 


3,227 


108,857 


2,400 


5,140 


5,668,014 


*' 19 . ..." 


3,515,123 
4,451,956 


723,300 


2,988 


104,671 


8,923 


39,196 


4,394,201 


'' 26 


2,908,200 


3,287 


330,066 


3,931 


5,895 


7,703,335 


June 2 


3,957,610 


464,301 


12,150 


78,279 


4,177 


2,000 


4,518,517 


" 9 


4,769,795 


1,;350,590 


8,187 


923,903 


8,082 




7,070,557 


" 16 


6,032,671 


281,450 


16,452 


116,786 


4,800 


10*,626 


6,462,779 


" 2:3 


2,333,295 


2,313,675 


6,029 


55,201 


2,100 


17,822 


4.728,122 


"30 


4,50Si,438 


465,696 


10,729 


198,638 


6,942 


440,291 


5,624,734 


July 7 


4,609,961 


1,549,030 


2,942 


100,880 


8,042 


7.530 


6,278,435 


" 14 


2,105,065 


328,700 


15,982 


110,243 


4,882 


6,200 


2,571,072 


*' 21 


3,021,039 


532,475 


1,421 


244,851 


6,764 


27,016 


3,8a3,566 


*' 28 


3.432,923 


1,096,275 


29,0.34 


39,215 


500 


1,947 


4,599,894 


August 4 


3,116,990 


3(54,825 


9,137 


136,103 


1,872 




3,628,927 


" 11 


8,095.395 


677,000 


8,002 


670,irro 


4,968 


319'.833 


9,776,168 


♦' 18 


6,315,580 


1,753,800 


21,760 


490,028 


7,000 




8,588.168 


" 25 


7,417,531 


1.120,450 


12,,538 


585.942 


24,423 


1*,200 


9,162,139 


September 1 . . 


6,609,195 


845.200 


4,931 


242.791 


10,765 


554,001 


8,266,883 


8.. 


3,883, :3:33 


1,318.725 


9,126 


295,813 


2,400 


19,652 


5.534,049 


15.. 


5,700,912 


773:475 


31,049 


160,105 


2,700 


1,800 


6,670,041 


22. 


5,699,856 


1.162,025 


2.140 


305,148 


8,523 




7,177,692 


29.. 


6,078,882 


858,950 


6,616 


224,727 






7,168,675 


October 6 


4..547,100 


678.650 


18,305 


90.619 


8,806 


I'.OOO 


5,344,474 


'■' 13 


3,659.620 


483;875 


13.584 


67.438 


9,000 


557:400 


4,790,917 


" 20.... 


4,849.953 


424,595 


4,25:J 


236,269 


7,325 


3,020 


5,575,420 


" 27 


3,071,630 


623,450 


14,181 


280,819 


2,900 




3,992,980 


Total 


a36,855,a58 


86,623,223 


610,947 


14,394,368 


794,490 


2,729,151 


442,007,537 



Hosted by 



Google 



Weekly Exports of Bacon and Hams, 369 

Aggbegate op Weekly Expobts of Bacon and Hams 

Fbom New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, New 
Orleans and Montreal, 

Far tJie Crop Tea/r Ncm, 1, 1876, to Oct. 31, 1877, with IHstributim. 



From Octo- 
ber 28, 18T6, 
To 



United 
Kingdom. 



Con- 
tinent. 



South & 
Central 
America. 



West 
Indies. 



B.N. Am- 
erican 
Colonies. 



Other 
Countries 



Total. 



1876. 

November 4. 

11. 

" 18. 

" 25. 

December 2. 

9. 

16. 

" 23. 

30. 

1877. 

January 6... 

" 13... 

" 20... 

" 27... 

Februarys... 

** 10... 

" 17... 

" 24... 

March 3 

" 10 

" 17 

*' 24 

'* 31 

April 7 

" 14 

*' 21 

" 28 

May 5 

'' 12 

" 19 

" 26 

June 2 

'• 9 

" 16 

" 23 

" 30 

July7 

" 14 

'' 21 

" 28 

August 4... 

" 11... 

" 18... 

" 25... 

September 1. 

" ' 8. 

" 15- 



October 6 

" 13... 



27. 



. Lbs. 
8,534,483 
15,951,762 
25,348,549 
34,298,319 
42,999,040 
53,411,815 
63,901,460 
71,150,120 
77,826,891 

89,123,759 
101,113,545 
112,064,860 
121,296,383 
136,605,344 
145,916,694 
154,714,432 
161,450,885 
167,729,526 
173,726.941 
177,797,387 
186,490,235 
194,425,175 
199,513,762 
206,481,053 
212,519,401 
216,643,272 
220,869,885 
225,073,000 
228,588,123 
233,040,079 
236,997,689 
241,767,484 
247,800,155 
250,133,450 
254,6:^5,888 
259,245,849 
261,350,914 
264,371,953 
267,804,876 
270,921,866 
279,017.261 
285,332,841 
292,750,372 
299,359,567 
303,247,900 
308,948,812 
314,648,668 
320,727,050 
325,274,150 
328,933,770 
333,783,728 
336,855,358 



Lbs. 

770,950 

3,313,590 

5,218,815 

6,138,415 

8,376,340 

11,477,990 

12,881,915 

15,167,690 

18,063,365 

22,646,602 
25,672,496 
30,488,826 
32,023,351 
36,665,026 
38,644,626 
40,556,548 
41,623,136 
46,320,536 
47,244,536 
48,452,850 
50,043,650 
52,406,305 
55,345,485 
57,478,962 
58,137,961 
59,925,461 
62,179,186 
63,524,461 
64,247,761 
67,155,961 
67,620,262 
68,970.852 
69.252,302 
71,565,977 
72,031,673 
73,580,753 
73,909.453 
74,441,928 
75,538,203 
75,903,028 
76.580,028 
78,333,828 
79,454,278 
80,299,478 
81,618,203 
82,391,678 
a3,553,703 
84,412,653 
85,091,303 
85.575,178 
85,999,773 
86,623,223 



Lbs. 
10,723 
11,139 
28,648 
32,561 
41,607 
42,838 
53,124 
72,435 
106,628 

107.985 
113,039 
121,437 
191,120 
200,567 
209,413 
231,097 
240,871 
257,916 
267,656 
275,757 
288,149 
290,162 
313,716 
319,686 
320,786 
330,242 
342,847 
346,074 
349,062 
352,349 
364,499 
372.686 
389,138 
395,167 
405,896 



426,241 
455,275 
464,412 
472,414 
494,174 
506,762 
511,693 
520,819 
551,868 
554,008 
560,624 
578,929 
592,513 
596,766 
610,947 



Lbs. 

271,857 

707,920 

807,104 

1,054,351 

1,568,510 

1.938,606 

2,409,293 

2,820,151 

3,068,284 

3,460,025 

4,086,376 

4,275,211 

4,491,833 

4,687,046 

4,878,698 

5,043,504 

5,124,615 

5,362,297 

5,824,587 

5,948,461 

6,180,997 

6,519,429 

6,805,653 

7,226,619 

7,611,430 

7,868,909 

8,136,006 

8,244,863 

8,349,534 

8,679.600 

8,757,879 

9,691,782 

9,808.568 

9.863,769 

10;062,407 

10,163,287 

10,273,530 

10,518,381 

10,557,596 

10,693,699 

11,364,669 

11,854,697 

12,440.639 

12,683,430 

12,979,243 

13,139,348 

13,444,496 

13,669,22:3 

13,759,842 

18,827,280 

14,113,549 

14,394,368 



Lbs. 

13,100 

20,325 

28,825 

42,733 

46,053 

60,853 

62,853 

77,153 

77,153 

77,153 
81,672 
82,072 



82,472 

85,501 

85,501 

85,901 

86,195 

86,195 

86,195 

86,195 

88,139 

629,637 

632,637 

632,637 

a37,437 

642,266 

644,666 

65:^,589 

657,520 

661,697 

669,779 

674.579 

676,679 

683,621 

691,663 

696,545 

703,309 

703,809 

705,681 

710,649 

717,649 

742,077 

752,842 

755,242 

757,942 

766,465 

766,465 

775,265 

784,265 

791,590 

794,490 



Lbs. 

7,580 

14,580 

42,878 

51,114 

51,114 

104,607 

104,607 

106,394 

643,079 

587,559 

611,150 

625,150 

630,433 

640,858 

658,858 

662,858 

664,250 

665,250 

674,050 

675,050 

684,050 

684,050 

684,050 

699,208 

700,208 

702,008 

707,588 

712,728 

751,924 

757,819 

759,819 

759,819 

770,430 

788,261 

1,228,552 

1,236,082 

1,242,282 

1,969,298 

1,271.245 

1,271,245 

1,591,078 

1,591,078 

1.592.278 

2,146,279 

2,165,931 

2,167,731 

2,167,731 

2,167,731 

2,168,731 

2,726,131 

2,729,151 

2,729,151 



Lbs. 
9,608,693 
20,019,316 
31,474,819 
41,617,493 
53,082,664 
67,036,709 
79,413,252 
89,393,943 
99,685,400 

116,003,083 
131,678,278 
147,657,556 
158,715,592 
178,881,313 
190,393,790 
201,293,940 
209,190,658 
220,421,719 
227,823,965 
233,235,700 
243,773,276 
254,413,260 



272,838,165 
279,922,423 
286,107,329 
292.877,778 
298,545,792 
302,939,993 
310.643,328 
315,161,845 



328,695,181 
333,423.303 
339,048,037 
345,326,472 
347,897,544 
351,731,110 
356,331,004 
359,959,931 
369,736,099 
378,324,267 
387,486,406 
395,753,289 
401,287,338 
407,957.:i79 
415,135,071 
422,303,746 
427,648,220 
432,439,137 
438,014,557 
442,007,537 



Hosted by 



Google 



370 New Torh Produce Eocchange. " 

WEEKLY EXPORTS OF LAED. 

From New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, New 
Orleans and Montreal, 

For the Crop Tear Nov. 1, 1876, to Oct. 31, 1877, mth DistrihuUmi. 



For 
Week Ending 


United 
Kingdom. 


Con- 
tinent. 


South & 
Central 
America. 


West 
Indies. 


B.N. 

American 
Colonies. 


Other 
Comi tries 


Total. 


1876. 


Lbs. 


Lbs, 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Lbs. 


.Lbs. 


Lbs. 


November 4 


760,388 


1,731,795 


309,660 


355,503 


13,300 


4,835 


3,175,481 


" 11.... 


814,118 


2,893,440 


52,645 


593,208 


;3,100 


22,100 


4,378.611 


" 18.... 


1,095.395 


3.799,551 


394,404 


368,293 


16,a31 


22,600 


5,697,074 


" 25.... 


l,340,a32 


2;634,080 


128,205 


381.219 


4,487 


29,100 


4,517,923 




1,290,401 


4,729,672 


218,212 


614,327 


6,380 




6,858,992 


9.... 


3,512,358 


3,231,426 


257,441 


507,515 


40,750 


165:675 


7,714,565 


" lb.... 


1,756,266 


2,611,587 


247,715 


590,434 


17,642 




5,223.644 


'- 23.... 


767,381 


5,901,760 


80,623 


463,908 


5,870 


i:666 


7,220,542 


" 30.... 
1877. 


1,424,281 


2,258,480 


639,437 


393,231 


1,070 


33,920 


4,650,419 


January 6 


1,448,792 


7,262,391 


2,432 


557,448 


2,500 


45,625 


9,319,188 


*' 13 


624,485 


2,556,688 


36,614 


681,821 


1,707 


3,585 


3,904,900 


" 20 


732,299 


4,796,590 


447,148 


380,699 




13,675 


6.370,411 


" 27 


249,235 


1,330,319 


224,474 


646,998 


6:666 


4,100 


2,361,126 


February 3 


346,402 


3,346,660 


426,734 


656,860 





200 


4,776,856 


" 10.... 


882,560 


1,026,816 


352,328 


333,836 


1,291 


16,320 


2,613,151 


17.... 


1,012,235 


513,400 


352,134 


466,090 






2,343,859 


" 24.... 


941,376 


187,920 


234.364 


231,494 


*4,766 


2:856 


1,602,704 


March 3 


260.213 


1,498,020 


650,942 


285,349 


5,466 




2,699,990 


" 10 


9*)3,032 


905,213 


67,202 


323,085 


17,822 


"846 


2,307,194 


*' 17 


1,517,423 


2.992,781 


330,750 


586.556 


2,030 


16,000 


5,445,540 


" 24....... 


4,056,755 


1,569,243 


295,219 


335,772 


2.270 


176,000 


6,435,259 


'' 31 


4,806,300 


2,803,000 


176,802 


401.606 


6,600 




8,194,308 


April 7 


1,921,362 


2,522.802 


132,642 


367,654 


23,804 


"756 


4.969,014 


'' 14 


1,702,692 


3,136,737 


329,006 


850,760 


4,156 


500 


6,02:3,851 


" 21 


2,817,901 


3,574.654 


333,832. 


2:30,557 


567 


6,745 


6,964,256 


" 28 


1,615,380 


1,698,057 


259,459 


712,2a5 


22,681 




4,307,812 


May 5 


1,588.640 


621,830 


482,139 
91,360 

322,302 
69.577 


a39,29() 
627 602 


1,625 
9.000 


1:626 


3 .53.5 000 


-12.:.:.:... 


909,153 
1,389,113 
1,431,6.38 


973,100 

442,849 

2,526,979 


2 8.30 


2,61:3,045 
2.367,277 
4,763,843 


" 19 


108:733 
717,153 


1:390 
15,941 


102:890 
2,555 


"24 :. 


June 2 


2,969,797 


1.042,400 


382,115 


645,440 


1,802 


1,020 


5.042,574 


'* 9 


2,435,350 


1,340.205 


43.653 


439,211 


2,291 


620 


4,261,330 


" 16 


1,194,352 


658,000 


466,973 


561,848 


13,972 


10,001 


2.905,146 


" 23 


79a,218 


1,281,016 


146,14s 


750,429 




1.315 


2,<i71.126 


'• 30 


1,681,030 


1,293,618 


231,111 


628,347 


14:395 


1,870 


3,850.321 


July 7 


1,686,925 


1,347,720 


81,045 


392,347 


1,713 


1,960 


3,511,710 


" 14 


2,257,830 
1,537.143 


1,212 479 


161,498 
146,730 


565.146 
4:35,780 


8,000 
7,875 


32,000 
250 


4,136,953 
3.ia5,388 


" 21 


1.057:660 


" 28 


1,553.262 


3,074,904 


47.249 


297,903 
378.359 


3,82:3 
5,427 


2,000 


4,979,141 
3,574.606 


August 4 


500,295 


2,259,380 


43i;i45 


" 11 


664,837 


1,729.518 


87,342 


713,475 


5,715 


61:566 


3,262,387 


" 18 


78,387 


1,837.640 


205,857 


739,995 


2,440 


3,540 


2,867,859 


" 25 


639.859 


1,957.544 


487.862 


473,788 


1,850 


500 


3,611,403 


September 1... 


801,982 


1,782,333 


263,2^32 


641,577 


4,740 




3,493.864 


8..; 


1,045.653 


4,5&4,500 


,43.662 


521,014 


3,090 


26:666 


6.1M.519 


15... 


305.940 


3,199,540 


413:514 


476,839 


381 


l.OiiO 


4,397,214 


*' 22. 


1,363,760 


4,239.644 


14,000 


807,1:37 


10,122 


1,000 


«. 435,663 


" 29... 


120,625 


1,426,528 


622.089 


629,067 


3,925 




2,802,234 


October 6 


1,053,010 


2,119,260 


188,2fi3 


423,480 


17,158 




3,801,171 


" 13 


505, 2T0 


1,258,540 


100,454 


55:3,120 


5,767 


7.7i6 


2.430,867 


'^ 20 


1,516,113 


1,333,520 


330.346 


677,933 


4,994 


2,310 


3,870,266 


" 27 


750,278 


2,200,350 


315,423 


309,175 


10,065 




3,585,291 


Total 


69,512,^2 


118,288,689 


12,955,513 


26,570,702 


368,475 


831,167 


223,526,86b 



Hosted by 



Google 



Weekly Exports of Lard. 



371 



Aggregate of Weekly Exports of Lard 

From New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Portland, -New 
Orleans and Montreal, 

For the Crop Year Nov. 1, 1876, to Oct. 31, 1877, with Distribution. 



From 

October 28, 

1876, TO 



1876. 

November 4 

11 

" 18 

" 25 

December 2 

" 9 

16 



1877. 

January 6 . . 

" 13.. 

" 20.. 

" 27.. 

February 3 

10 

17 

24 

March 3... 

" 10... 

'' 17... 

'^ 24... 

" 31... 

April 7 

*' 14.... 

'' 21 

•' 28.... 

May 5 

" 12 

" 19 



June 2 . 
•' 9. 
*' 16. 



July 7 

" 14 

*' 21... . 

^' 28 

August 4. .. 

^' 11... 

" IS... 

" 25 .. 

September 1 

8 

15 



October 6.. 
" 13.. 
" 20.. 
" 27.. 



United 
Kingdom. 



Lbs. 

760,388 

1,574,506 

2,669,901 

4.010,733 

5,301,134 

8,813,492 

10.56w,758 

11,337,139 

12,761,420 

14,210,212 
14,834,697 
15,566,996 
15,816,231 
16,162,633 
17,045,193 
18,057,428 
18.998,804 
19,259,017 
20,252,049 
21.769,472 
25,826,227 
30.632.527 
32,553,889 
34,256,581 
37,074,482 
38,689,862 
40,278,502 
41,187,655 
42,576,768 
44,008,406 
46,978,203 
49,413,553 
50,607,605 
51,400,123 
53.081,153 
54.768,078 
57,025,908 
58,563,051 
60,116.313 
60,610,608 
61.281,445 
61,359,832 
62.049,691 
62,851,673 
63,897,326 
64,203,266 
65,567,026 
65.687,651 
66,740,661 
67,245,931 
68,762,044 
69,512,322 



Con- 
tinent. 



Lbs. 
1,731,795 
4,625,235 
8,424,786 
11,058.866 
15,788,538 
19,019,964 
21,631,551 
27.533,311 
29,791,791 

37,054.182 
39,610.870 
44,407,460 
45.737.779 
49,084,439 
50.111,255 
50.624.655 
50,812,575 
52,310,595 
53.215,808 
56,208,589 
57,777.832 
60,580,832 
63,103.634 
66,240,371 
69,815,025 
71,513,1 
72,134.462 
73,107,562 
73,550,411 
76,077.390 
77,119;790 
78,459,995 
79.117,995 
80.399,011 
81,692,629 
83,040,349 
84,252,828 
85.310,488 
88.385,392 
90.644.772 
92,374.290 
94,211.930 
96,169,474 
97 951.807 
102.506:307 
105.705.847 
109,945,491 
111,372,019 
113,491,279 
114,749,819 
116,088.339 
118,288,689 



Soutb & 
Central 
America. 



Lbs. 

309,660 

362.305 

756,709 

884,914 

1,103.126 

1,360,567 

1,608.282 

1.688,-905 

2,228,342 

2,230.774 

2,267,388 

2,714,536 

2,939,010 

3.365,744 

3,718,072 

4,070,206 

4,304,570 

4,955,512 

5,022,714 

5,353,464 

5,648.683 

5,825,485 

5,958,127 

6,287,1.33 

6,620,965 

6,880,424 

7,362,563 

7,453,92:^ 

7,776,225 

7,845,802 

8,227,917 

8,271,570 

8,738,543 

8,884,691 

9.115,802 

9,196,847 

9,2.58,345 

9,405,075 

9,452.324 

9,883,469 

9,970,811 

10,176,663 

10,664,530 

10,927,762 

10,971,424 

11,384,938 

11,398,938 

12,021,027 

12,209 290 

12,309,744 

12,640,090 

12,955,513 



West 
Indies. 



Lbs. 
355,503 
948,711 
1,317,004 
1,698.223 
2,312.550 
2.820.065 
3,410,499 
3,874,407 
4,267,638 

4,825,086 

5.506,907 

5,887,606 

6,434,604 

7,091,464 

7,42.5,300 

7.891.390 

8,122,884 

8,408,233 

8,731.318 

9,317,874 

9,653,f)46 

10,055,252 

10,422,906 

11.273,666 

11,504,223 

12,216,458 

13,055.754 

13,683,356 

13,792,089 

14,509.242 

15,154,682 

15.593,893 

16.155,741 

16,906,170 

17,534,517 

17,926,864 

18.492.010 

18,927,790' 

19,225,693 

19,6( 4.052 

20.317,.527 

21,057,522 

21.531.310 

22,172,887 

22,693,901 

23,170,740 

23,97^7,877 

24,606.944 

25.030,424 

25,58:^.544 

26,26i;527 

26,570,702 



B. N. 
Ameri- 
can 
Colonies 



Lbs. 

13.300 

16,400 

33,231 

37.718 

44,098 

84,848 

102,490 

108,360 

109,430 

111,930 
113,637 
113,637 
119,637 
119,637 
120,928 
120,928 
125,628 
131,094 
148.916 
150,946 
153.216 
159,816 
183,620 
187,776 
188,343 
211,024 
212,649 
221,649 
223,039 
238,980 
240,782 
243,073 
257,045 
257,045 
271,440 
273,153 
281,153 
288.978 
292.801 
298,228 
303.943 
S06,;383 
308.23:^ 
312,973 
316.063 
316,444 
326.566 
330.491 
347,649 
35S,416 
358,410 
368,475 



Other 
Coun- 
tries. 



Lbs. 

4,835 

26.935 

49,535 

78,635 

78,635 

243,710 

243,710 

244,710 

278,630 

324,255 
327,840 
341,515 
345,615 
345,815 
362,135 
362,135 
364,985 
364,985 
365,825 
381,825 
557,825 
557,825 
558.575 
559,075 
565.820 
565,820 
567.740 
570,570 
673.460 
676,015 
677.035 
677,655 
687,656 
688,<»71 
690.791 
692,751 
724,751 
72.5,001 
727.001 
727,001 
788,501 
792,041 
792,541 
792.541 
819,141 
820,141 
821,141 
821,141 
821,141 
828,857 
831,167 
831,167 



Total. 



Lbs. 
3,175,481 
7,654,092 
13,251,169 
17,769,089 
24,628.081 
32,342,646 
37,566,290 
44,786.832 
49,437,251 

58,756,439 

62,661,339 

69,031,750 

71,392,876 

76,169,732 

78,782,8a3 

81,126,742 

82,729,446 

85,429,436 

87,736,630 

93,lb2,170 

99.617,429 

107.811,737 

112.780,751 

118,804,602 

125,768,858 

130,076.670 

133.611:670 

136.224,715 

138,591,992 

14:^,355,a35 

148,398,409 

152,659,739 

155,564885 

158.536,011 

162,386, a32 

16-),898.042 

170,034.995 

173,220.383 

178,199.524 

181,774.130 

185,036.517 

187,904,376 

191.515.779 

195,009.643 

201,204.162 

205,601,376 

212.037.039 

214,839,273 

218,640,444 

221,071,311 

224,941.577 

228,526,868 



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372 



New YorTe Produce Exchange. 



EXPOKTS OF PkOVISIONS FKOM AliL UNITED STATES POBTS TO ALL FOKEIGN 

Countries, Monthly, foe Three Crop Seasons. 



PORK. 


BEEF. 


MONTH: 


1874-5. 


.1875-6. 


1876-7. 


1874-5. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 




Pounds. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 


Pounds. 














Fresh. 


Salted or cured. 


November.. 


8,713,984 


3,962,288 


6,500,893 


6,304,302 


3,320.342 




*8,709,984 


December. . 


5,153,510 


5,935.397 


8,207,240 


1 4.674,025 


3,039,624 




6,346,237 


January.... 


6,268,162 


5,657,400 


7,657,796 


1 5,291,516 


4,061,246 


1,796,000 


6,118,608 


February. . . 


5,968,407 


4,414,626 


5,469,316 


1 5,305,949 


3,163,438 


4,953,610 


3,206,340 


March 


6,179,571 


5,595,270 


6,125,947 


7,318,285 


4,883,164 


6,707,855 


2,932,939 


April. 


5,524,673 


4,800,844 


7,012,615 


2,026,875 


4,689,709 


8,412,500 


4,002,905 


May 


5,415,057 


4,865,444 


5,472,870 


2,638,290 


3,141,917 


7,266,200 


2,939,981 


June 


4,364,863 


4.204,195 


4,802,897 


3,043,875 


3,770,275 


3,62:5,480 


2,266,803 


July 


4,405,974 


3,684,623 


3.908,312 


1,783,076 


3.700,991 


3,120,015 


1,742,981 


August 


3,588,610 


3,867,512 


4,305,761 


1,501,003 


3,971,854 


1,920,441 


1,304,881 


September.. 


3,365,590 


5,566,553 


4,907,900 


1,333,193 


5,485,971 


3,368,369 


1,879,679 


October 


3,399,480 


5,284,032 


4,448,327 


1,909,103 


5,927,593 


3,878,853 


2,357,147 


Total lbs. 


62,427,881 


57,838,184 


68,819,874 


43,129,492 


49,156,184 


45,047,32:3 


43,808,485 








* Nov. and Dec. include Fresh and Salted. 




LARD. 




TALLOW. 


November.. 


9,371,156 


10,290,177 


22,471,373 


4,209,382 


4,410,446 


6,218,158 


December.. 


22,618,588 


17,816,746 


30,790,066 


5,127,793 


6,595,747 


6,564,462 


January.... 


24,215,043 


15,353,267 


23,233,991 


5,897,070 


6,087,375 


4,166,628 


February .. . 


16,831.545 


15,295,937 


8,235,501 


4,801,212 


5,076,736 


5,778,634 ' 


March 


17,810,065 


17,954,908 


24,274,475 


4,237,104 


6,445.994 


7,884,095 


April 


17,552,221 


12,519,407 


23,242,205 


5,223,838 


6,844,236 


9,251,500 


May 


7,942,513 


19,574,856 


18,017,782 


6,123,358 


7,173,273 


7,784,421 


June 


13,499,391 


21,873,405 


17,094,572 


6,271,238 


10,055,138 


10,456,537 


July 


9,621,959 


19,571, las 


17,173,359 


5,492,759 


9,884,057 


6,887,860 


August 


7.879,268 


12.602,782 


16,050,663 


3,945,623 


7.462,922 


4,773,125 


September.. 


11,544,431 


19:540,599 


20,772,806 


4,760,414 


8,863,479 


4,550,807 


October 


8,681,478 


15,614,945 


16,324,866 


5,537,034 


7,157,510 


4,309,958 


Total lbs. 


167,567,568 


198,008,212 


237,681,659 


61,664,825 


86,056,913 


78,626,185 


BUTTER. 


CHEESE. 


May 


287,759 


474,219 


246,095 


2,907,521 


6,347,182 


3,616,042 


June 


655,887 


229,303 


653,403 


14,772,614 


15,711,330 


11,942,092 


July 


661,101 


352,994 


715,311 


21,734,583 


23,297,790 


20,120,941 


August 


1,051,580 


244,342 


2,210,761 


20,312,580 


15,791,561 


. 16,622,429 


September.. 


750,100 


468,282 


4,672,861 


11,783,136 


10,416,706 


13,976,589 


October 


685,979 


958.040 


2,108,525 


7,087,075 


8.813,909 


4,655,994 


November.. 


403.140 


377,706 


1,263,550 


2,677,073 


3,182,194 


6,677,081 


December . . 


328,890 


406,170 


1,029,282 


3,052,907 


2,710,028 


4,664,046 


January .... 


461,625 


258,189 


993,038 


2,036,718 


4,097,185 


3,539,780 


February .. , 


259,028 


268,109 


1,605,581 


1,287,734 


3,911,852 


3,886,854 


March 


444,290 


273,876 


2,380,922 


4,406,542 


6,079,992 


2,048,001 


April 


616,572 


137,688 


1,424,066 


4,573,993 


3,816,933 


1,250,384 


Total lbs. 


6,605,951 


4,448,918 


19,303,395 


96,632,476 


104,176,662 


92,999,2a3 



BACON AND HAMS. 



MONTH. 



November. . 
December. . 
January.. . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . 
October 



A871-2. 



Pounds. 
13.180,135 
22,065.006 
3:1454.164 
:35,535,926 
45,011.8f}6 
27,444,850 
21,951,174 
17,205,751 
14,927,965 
11,593,333 
11,322.437 
10,247,356 



1872-3. 



Pounds. 
15,760,763 
31.972,686 
60,290,636 
64,283.731 
69,359,961 
65,270,119 
32,246,143 
18,106,103 
16,293,755 
16.376,524 
16.514,806 
18,753,356 



1873-4. 



Pounds. 
28,514,036 
43,924,306 
47,152,816 
43,862,513 
40.212,360 
32466.700 
21,761,165 
21,954.018 
15,348,874 
14,544,100 

9,204,754 
13,894,805 



Total Pounds 263,939,539 415,228,587 332,540,447 264,219,647 :388,23S,246 444,129, 642 



1874-5. 



Pounds. 
14.418,360 
a3.326,019 
38,914,105 
34.165,160 
28,558,811 
17.204.134 
17,69fi.2fi0 
13.10.5,56S 
18,666,204 
18,867,821 
15,524,139 
13,873,066 



1875-6. 



Pounds. 
22,990,368 
42,923,537 
39,769,993 
43,910.823 
36.058,762 
20,714.709 
26,836,076 
27,594,674 
34.917,507 
28,564,795 
33,440, :369 
30,516,633 



1876-7. 



Pounds, 
44,348,576 
63,915,012 
64.300,687 
40,847,946 
39,487,781 
32,348,512 
29,203,054 
28,165,271 
21,515,873 
35,213,261 
"30,341,321 
24 442,348 



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Exports of Pork^ Bacon^ Lard^ etc. 



373 



EXPORTS OF PORK. 



YEAE. 


From New York. 
Lbs. 


From all Other 

U. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


Total from all 

U. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


1868 


17,977,400 
13,708,200 
18,561,600 
32,698,800 
31,859,200 
39,911,600 
36,001,000 
33,817,800 
40,260,400 
40,981,000 


9,273.276 
10,419,461 
10,694,613 
16,972.737 
27,039,531 
27,663,291 
24,642,448 
24,460,362 
22,388,232 
24,832,741 


27.250,676 


1869... 

1870 


24,127,661 
29,256,213 


1871 


49,671,53'i 


1872...: 


58,898,731 


1873 


67,574,891 


1874 


60,643,448 


1875 


58,278,162 


1876 


62,648,632 


1877. 


65,813,741 






Total, 10 years 


305,777,000 


198,386,692 


504,163,692 







EXPORTS OF BACON AND HAMS. 


^ 


YEAR. 


From New York. 
Lbs. 


From all Other 

U. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


Total from all 

TJ. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


1868 


36,336,799 

41,424,400 

31,507,300 

92,144,591 

208,373,391 

307,044,288 

221,173,155 

179,532,946 

225,945,955 

237,966,041 


4,694,645 

10,634,138 

3,138,219 

31,311,168 

68,054,885 

132,899,737 

86,582.329 

102,86i;826 

194,621,751 

198,086,708 


41,031,444 


1869 


52,058,538 


1870 


34,645,519 


1871 .. 

1872 

1873 * 


123,455,759 
276,428,276 
439,944,025 


1874 


307,755,484 


1875 


282,394,772 


1876 

1877 


420,567,706 
436,057,120 






Total, 10 years .-.. . 


1,581,448,866 


832,885,406 


2,414,338,643 





EXPORTS OF LARD. 




YEAB,. 


-, ,x ^^ , From all Other 

From New York. ^^ g^ ^^^^^ 

^bs- Lbs. 


Total from aU 

TJ. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


1868 

1869 


44,490,487 
30,383,538 
31,591,000 
121,914,203 
173,616,695 
183,683,441 
140,048,927 
118,968,574 
155,662,971 
176,829,835 


5,631,657 
4,704,180 
8,601,997 
17,524,940 
39,681,006 
50,099,794 
37,985,532 
44,727,982 
67,338,186 
60,207,858 


50,122,144 
35,087,718 


1870 


40,192,997 


1871 


139,439,143 


1872 

1873 


213,297,701 
233,783,235 


1874 


178,034,459 


1875 


163,696,556 


1876 


223,001,157 


1877 


237,069,523 






Total, 10 years 


1,177,189,671 ! 336,503,132 


1,513,724,633 



EXPORTS OF BEEF. 



YEAB. 


From New York. 
Lbs. 


From all Other 

XJ. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


Total from all 

U. S. Ports. 

Lbs. 


1867-68 


7,616,100 ' 
15,321,600 
21,708,300 
41,574,600 
27,057,600 
20,993,100 
32,631,900 
31,662,300 
43,964,100 
24,881,800 


14,236,252 

14,038,379 
5,494,500 
2,241,989 
2,214,306 

11,424,426 
7,012,186 
4,374,237 
5,192,084 

12,067,940 


21,852,352 


1868-69 


29,359,979 


1869-70 


27,202,800 


1870-71 


43,816,589 


1871-72 


29,271,906 


1872-73 


32,417,526 


1873-74 


39,644,086 


1874-75 


36,036,537 


1875-76 


49,156,184 


1876-77 


36,949,740 






TotaL 10 years 


267,411,400 


I 78,296,299 


345,707,699 



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374 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Exports of Protisions from New York, 

For the Tears 



articles. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Pork,bbLs ... 
Beef, bbls & tcs. 

Lard, lbs 

Bacon, lbs 

TaUow, lbs 

Butter, lbs 

Cheese, lbs 

Stearine, lbs 


159,296 

90,018 

173,616.695 

208,373,391 

54,907,403 

4.817,937 

67,004,563 


199,558 

102,416 

183,633,441 

307,044.288 

6l,80i;282 

3,587,376 

87,477,483 

2,426,683 

6,845,;384 


180,005 

99,308 

139.933,028 

221.221.511 

56,328,930 

4,636,662 

93,460.269 

1,483,413 

3,641,922 


169,089 

110,978 

118,968,574 

179,532.946 

39,943,711 

4,250,409 

88,385,052 

259,413 

3.792,328 


201,302 

154,844 

155.662,971 

225,945,955 

60,660,315 

14.254,615 

106,194,063 

307,716 

3,706,934 


.204,905 

119,505 

176,829,835 

238,211,117 

55,520,088 

24,249,145 

118,355,868 

322,985 


Grease, lbs .... 




5,261.973 



Imports and Exports of Provisions into and from the United 
Kingdom, for Six Years. 

IMPORTS. 



ARTICLES. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Pork, Fresh 

Pork. Salted 

Beef, Salted 

Beef, Fresh 

Bacon . « 


Cwts. 

6,001 

212,382 

193,215 

35,593 

1,841,293 

155,353 

55,526 

598,676 

1,138,435 

1,060,130 

1,326,850 


Cwts. 

24,367 

266,084 

218,563 

44,891 

2,773,537 

200,377 

340,921 

644,014 

1,277,729 

1,355,267 

1,521,031 


Cwte. 

• 35,737 

287,235 

231,532 

34,831 

2,355,112 

186,569 

172,007 

374,582 

1,620,674 

1,488,22:3 

1,054,799 


Cwts. 

35,610 

232,782 

181,604 

35,012 

2,407,751 

222,150 

316,733 

533,341 

1,467,183 

1,626,413 

■ 983,212 


Cwts. 

26,539 

350,151 

243,342 

170,741 

2,809,990 

349,455 

376.259 

558,983 

1,659,357 

1,538,175 

1,342,781 


Cwts. 

8,725 

295,524 

208,364 

4^5,319 

2,381,725 


Hams.... 

Meats 

Lard 

Butter 

Cheese 


423,869 

605,962 

592,944 

1,637,939 

1,651.088 


Tallow and Stearine.. 


1,224,605 



EXPORTS. 



Butter 

Cheese 

Tallow and Stearine . 
Candles, lbs 



54,768 

19,876 

113,973 

6,809,110 



45,122 

18,929 

41,499 

6,584,765 



42,470 

18,590 

147,537 

5,458,308 



39,281 

21,428 

. 62,176 

5,315,696 



17,409 

71,200 

4,724,980 



37,263 

17,554 

93,693 

6,182,497 



Stocks of American Provisions *at Liyerpool. 





1876 






ISTT 






ARTICLES. 




1 
















Jan. 1. 


April 1. 


July 1. 


Oct. 1. 


Jan. 1. 


April 1. 


July 1. 


Oct. 1. 


Dec. 31. 


Beef, tcs 


7,550 


11,850 


6,700 


3,750 


6,694 


4,359 


3,741 


8,300 


5,255 


Pork, bbls .. 


2,520 


3,400 


1,530 


1,815 


6,357 


8,906 


9,565 


1,350 


6,625 


Bacon, boxes. 


20.000 


25,000 


22,750 


21,500 


31,991 


31,265 


42,291 


20,578 


26,000 


Hams, *' 


4,050 


3,200 


2,950 


2,450 


7,589 


7,379 


4,637 


2,573 


3,650 


Shoulders " 


1,350 


915 


1,2C0 


390 


1,061 


1,209 


1,163 


261 


985 


Lard, tons . . . 


930 


910 


2,350 


2,750 


1,712 


796 


3,350 


1.834 


1,300 


Cheese, boxes 


140,000 


48,000 


15,000 


120,000 


102.625 


50,238 


21,500 


66.4^6 


39,000 


Butter, pkgB.. 


15,553 






9,536 


31,757 


17,911 




18,312 















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Stocks of Provisions at Liverpool. 



375 



Stocks op Peovisions at Liveepool, 

On September SOth of each Year. 



Year. 


Beef. 


PORK. 


BACON. 


Hams. 


Lard. 


Cheese. 


Butter. 


1866. 


Tcs. 

5,177 

1,181 

13.087 

16,647 

7,079 

6,700 

8,101 

8,104 

6,823 

12,478 

3,750 

1,366 


Bbls. 
5.937 
4,125 
1,399 
476 
2,483 
9,650. 
6,086 
1,050 
3,388 
1,940 
1,815 
8,306 


Boxes. 
12.614* 
2,071* 
2.766* 
4.907* 
5,626* 
6,054* 
21,094* 
21,514* 
17,706 
10,461 
21,500 
20,578 


'Boxes. 

'4;853 
2,369 
2,450 
2,573 


Tons.. 

1,550 

200 

550 

200 

100 

3,500 

12,300 

8,500 

1,249 

2,878 

2,750 

1,834 


Tons. 
1,014 

900 
2,026 

548 
2,282 

590 
1,473 
1.533 
3,900 
2,800 • 
3,600 
1,660 


Pkgs. 


1867 




1868 




1869 




1870 

1871 

1872 




1873...: . 


3109 


1874 


12^116 


1875 , 

1876 


8,078 
9,536 
18,312 


1877 







♦Bacon and Hams. 



1874-5. . . . Shoulders, 1,276 boxes. 
1875-6 ...Shoulders, 390 boxes. 



Peices of Peoyisions at Liyeepool, 

On September 30^A of each Tear. 



Year. 



1866 
1867 
1868. 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877. 



Per Tierce. 



s. d. 8. d, 
107 6@120 
110 0@160 
35 0@125 
157 0@175 
40 0@147 6 
30 0@107 6 
25 0@115 
40 0@107 6 
45 0@112 6 



70 0@100 
85 0@112 6 



PORK, 
Per Bbl. 



8. d. s. d. 
75 0@ 87 6 
67 6® 75 
84 0® 90 
105 0@112 6 
110 0@112 6 
47 6® 60 
53 6® 67 6 
70 0® 90 
55 0® 95 
75 0® 95 
77 6® 87 6 
50 0® 70 



BACON, 
Per awt. 



8. d. 8. d. 

36 0® 52 
44 0® 51 
56 0® 61 

52 0® 67 
34 4® 42 6 
34 0® 43 6 
;34 0® 43 6 

37 0® 430 

38 0® 58 

53 0® 68 
42 0® 54 
40 0® 59 



Lard, 
Per Cwt. 



s. d. 8. d. 
52 0® 58 6 
50 0® 55 
35 0® 72 
35 0® 75 
67 0® 73 6 

45 0® 48 

39 6® 41 6 

40 0® 42 6 
63 0® 66 6 
57 6® 59 
49 0® 51 

46 6® 47 



Cheese, 
Per Cwt. 



8. d. s. d. 
28 '0® 65 
25 0® 55 
25 0® 60 
28 0® 64 
28 0® 65 
25 0® 57 
40 0® 62 
40 0® 63 
40 0® 66 
25 0® 57 
20 0® 56 
40 0® 62 



Hams, 
Per Cwt. 



s. d. s. d. 



54 0® 66 
50 6@*57'6 



Impoets of Ameeigan Peovisions into Liyeepool, 

For Twelve Yea/rs, ending September Z^th. 



Crop Years. 


Beep. 


Pork. 


BACON. 


Hams. 


Lard. 


Cheese. 


Butter. 


1865-6 


Equal 
Tcs. 

36,915 
53,301 
54,693 
51,159 
38,685 
61,481 
37,611 
41,919 
38,141 
56,866 
36,847 
34,719 


Bbls. 

20,057 
19,812 
23,755 
28,997 
32,685 
63,215 
35,109 
31,062 
40,542 
39,235 
54,775 
60,874 


Boxes. 

96.109 
65,928 
101,113 
128,725 
89,499 
140,643 
342,067 
442,619 
418,420 
397,009 
463,620 
463,629 


Boxes. 

8,300 
6,233 
7,530 
7,878 
5,745 
5,566 
22,897 
29,246 
35,420 
41.014 
56,887 
90,927 


Tons. 

4,002 
6,503 
8,584 
6,956 
3,736 

20,864 
15,634 
22,579 
18,991 
23,405 


Boxes. 

387.001 

812;i40 

888,386 

772,281 

978,970 

1,085,940 

1,061,190 

1,299,734 

1,418,084 

1,637,648 

1,778,734 

1,639,399 


Pkgs. 


1866-7 




1867-8 




1868-9 




1869-70 




1870-71 

1871-2 




1872-5 




1873-4..' 

1874-5 


148,307 
116,378 


1875-6 


208,714 


1876-7 


306,984 







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376 New York Produce Exchange. 

Receipts op Butter and Cheese at New York, Monthly. 

For the Yea/rs 



MONTH. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 


1877-8. 


BUTTER, 

Pkgs. 


Cheese, 
Boxes. 


BUTTEB, 
Pkgs. 


Cheese, 
Boxes. 


Butter, 
Pkgs. 


Cheese, 
Boxes. 


May 


69,970 
82,314 
76,813 
86,843 
104,729 
145,027 
128,865 
97,449 
74,512 
73,462 
66,699 
84,467 


115,744 

352,433 

461,278 

345,342 

306,865 

275,024 

189,652 

144,335 

36,692 

56,917 

79,172 

35,928 


115,071 
116,441 
83,891 
120,^98 
174,824 
139,653 
. 130,653 
109,418 
79,060 
74,789 
87,022 
83,343 


84,752 

317,723 

338,546 

346,161 

302,465 

175,417 

272,241 

132,975 

18,963 

32,628 

17,601 

19,187 


112,875 
131,082 
111,108 
156.067 
137,474 
132,742 
115,436 
82,66-i 


184,122 


.Tmie 


405,518 


July 

August 


406,6^ 
422,657 


September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

Febmary ... 


243,855 
195,300 
304,340 
187,771 


TWarnh.. 






April 












Total. 


1,091,150 


2,399,382 


1,314,963 


2,058,759 













Exports of Butter and Cheese from New York, Monthly, 



MONTH. 


1875-6. 


1876-7. 


1877-8. 


Butter, 
Lbs. 


Lbs. 


Butter, 
Lbs. 


CUEESE, 
Lbs. 


Butter, 
Lbs. 


Cheese, 
Lbs. 


May 

June ..." 


359,016 
141,634 
266,040 
251,940 
370,183 
755,248 
425,748 
323,798 
190,913 
407,814 
252,768 
88,919 


6,701,526 

14,103,092 

18,351,501 

18,057,947 

9,465,610 

7,989,772 

3,000,565 

2,489,487 

4,915,859 

4,508,248 

4,764,146 

6,977,067 


290,788 

630,943 

1,006,211 

2,285,394 

5,257,794 

1,498,691 

1,421,351 

923,023 

885,851 

1,580,356 

2,297,806 

1,056,937 


4,313,074 

15,698,597 

19,242,110 

16,498,423 

13,898,442 

4,147,099 

7,685,142 

3,545,856 

4,902,415 

4,277,512 

2,006,122 

1,390,593 


802,574 
2,219,435 
3,031,881 
3,586,706 
5,126,102 
1,949,765 
993,785 
718,947 


8,997,982 
20,899,781 
21,788,294 
21,003,433 
10,667,094 
7,226,190 
8,334,659 
6,861,795 


July 


Ai^ust 


September 

October 

November 

December 

January 


February 






March 






April. 










Total 


3,834,021 


101,324,820 


19,135,145 


97,605,385 











Hog Packing at St. Louis for Sixteen Seasons, 

As reported by George H. Morgan, Secretary St. Louis Merchants' Exchange. 



Season. 


Number 
of Hogs. 


Average Weight. 


Average 

Yield of 

Lard, 

all kinds. 


Season. 


Number 
of Hogs. 


Average 
Weight. 


1876-77... 


414,747 


255 gross. 


32.55 


1868-69... 


231,937 


189.27 net. 


1875-76... 


329,895 


268.47 " 


36.56 


1867-68... 


237,160 


193.91 " 


1874-75... 


462,246 


240 " 


30 


1866-67... 


183,543 


222.34 '* 


1873-74... 


463,793 


261.53 " 


34.18 


1865-66... 


123,aS5 


208 91 " 


1872-73... 


538,000 


260- 


34.50 


1864-65... 


191,890 


178.50 " 


1871-72... 


419,032 


263.15 " 


35.17 


1863-64... 


244,600 


179 


1870-71... 


305,600 


216 net. 




1862-63. . 


178,750 


207 " 


1861^70... 


241,316 


190.50 " 




1861-62... 


89,093 


224.50 « 



In 1875-6 the average price per 100 lbs. gross for season was $7.17 ; in 1876-7 it was \ 



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Exports of Cheese from the United States. 



377 



ExpoBTS OF Cheese from the United States, 

Frmi 1790 to 1877 indusive. 

As per Returns of the U. S. Igureau of Statistics. 



YEAR. 


Pounds. 


YEAR. 


Pounds. 


YEAR. 


Pounds. 


YEAR. 


Pounds. 


1790..... 


144,734 


1812.... 


707,787 


1834.... 


819.567 


1856.... 


8,737,029 


1791 


120,901 


1813... 


276,552 


1835.... 


887,000 


1857.... 


6,463,072 


1792 


125,925 


1814.... 


184,827 


1836.... 


486.234 


1858.... 


8,098,527 


1793 


146,269 


1815.... 


468,609 


1837.... 


411,338 


1859.... 


7,103,323 


1794 


576,957 


1816.... 


678,064 


1838.... 


664,660 


I860.. 


15,515,799 


1795 .... 


2,343,093 
1,794,536 


1817.... 


394,903 


1839.... 


519,017 


1861.... 


32,361,428 


1T96 


1818.... 


536,0i)7 


1840.... 


723,217 


1862 ... 


34,052,678 


1797 


1,256,109 


1819.... 


1,148,380 


1841.... 


1,848.471 


1863.... 


42,045,054 


1798 


1,183,234 


1820.... 


828,434 


1842.... 


2,456.607 


1864.... 


47,751,329 


1799 


1,164,590 , 


1821.... 


766,431 


1843.... 


3,440,144 


1865.... 


53,089,468 


1800 


913,843 


1822.... 


722,548 


1844.... 


7,343,145 


1866.... 


36,411,985 


1801 


1,674,834 


1823.... 


591,689 


1845.... 


7,941,187 


1867.... 


52,352,127 


1802.... 


1,332,224 


1824.... 


933,158 


1846.... 


8,675,390 


1868... 


51,097.203 


1803 


1,190,867 


1825.... 


1,230,104 


1847.... 


15,637,600 


1869.... 


39,960,367 


1804 


1,299,872 


1826.... 


735,399 


1848.... 


12,913,305 


1870.... 


57,296,327 


1805 


843,005 


1827.... 


641,385 


1849.... 


17,433.682 


1871.... 


63,698,864 


1806 


683,163 


1828.... 


688,548 


1850.... 


13,020,817 


1872.... 


66,204,025 


1807 


879,697 


1829.... 


916,695 


1851 ... . 


10,631,189 


1873.... 


80,366,540 


1808 


316,876 


laso... 


688,241 


1852.... 


6,650,420 


1874,... 


90,611,077 


1809 


588,907 


1831.... 


1,131,817 


1853.... 


3,763,932 


1875.,.. 


101,010,853 


1810 


741,878 


ia32.... 


198,709 


1854.... 


7,003,974 


1876.... 


97,676,264 


1811 


944,116 


1833.... 


1,213,092 


1855.... 


4,846,568 


1877 ... 
Total.. 


107,364,666 




1,262,952,571 



Ay'ge Prices op Butter Monthly and Yearly at New York, 

From 1862 to- 1877, 

State Dairy. 



MONTH. 



1862. 



January | 19@21 

February "" ^ 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



Average. . 



18@20 
18@20 
16@17 
15@16 
15@16 
16@17 
17@19 



19@20 



1863. 1864, 



25@27 



19@21 
19@20 



23@24 
26@27 
27@29 



47@48 
34@43 



48@51 



48@50 
50@55 



1865. 1866. 



45@50 



28@29 
27@30 
29@31 
33@34 
40@42 



47@52 



1867. 



35@50 35@38 



50@58 , 24@28 
40@50 28@30 



42@45 
41@45 



40@47 



24@26 



1868. 



45@50 
32@35 
28@32 
32@37 
37@40 



1869. 



47@50 
43@50 



MONTH. 



1870. 



1871. 



1872. 



1873. 



1874. 



1875. 



1876. 



1877. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 

October 

November... 
December. .. 

Average 



37@40 



39@45 
42@46 
43@47 



37@40 



25@27 
25@27 



15@20 
19@23 
18@21 



25@27 



30@32 



33@35 



41@44 



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378 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Semi- Weekly and Monthly Average Prices of 
Butter at New York, 

For the Tear 1877. 



JANUARY. 


FSBRUART. 


MARCH. 


DATE. 


State Dairy. 
Groodtoclioice. 


1 

DATE. 


State Dairy. 
Good to choice. 


DATE. 


State Dairy. ^ 
Good to choice.* 


January 2 

5 

9 

'' 12 

" 16 

" 19 

" 23 

" 26 

*' 30 


27@31 
27@31 
26@30 

26@30 

25@30 


Febi 


'uary2 ... 

6. .. 

9.... 
\ 13.... 
' 16...'. 
' 20.... 
* 24.... 
' 27.... 


25@29 
23@28 
22@26 
21@25 
21(0^25 
21@25 
21@25 
21@25 


March 2.... 
" 6.... 
" 9.... 
" 13.... 
" 16... 
" 20 .. 
" 23.... 
" 27....' 
'' 30.... 

Aver, for Mar. 


21@25 

20@25 

20@25 

20@25 

20@25 

18@24 

18@253^ 

20@25>sr 

20@24 


Aver, for Jan. . . 


26 l-9@30 2-9 


Aver. 


for Feb.. 


22@26 


19%@25 



APRIL.. 



JUNE. 



AprU 3 


17@22 
16@21 
15@21 
14@19 
13@18 
13@18 
18@22 
18@22 


May 1 

" ^V.'.'.'.'.V. 
" 11 

" 15 

" 18 

" 22 

" 25 

" 29 

Aver, for May . . 


18@22 
18@22 

21@24 
22@25 
al@24 
18@21 
18@21 


June 1 

" 5 

" 8 

" 12 

" 15 

" 19 

" 22 

"26 

" 29 

Aver, for June 


18@20)^ 

18@20 

18@21 

18@21 

18@21 

18@21 

17@20 

17@20 

17@20 


" 6 


" 10 


" 13 


*' 17 


" 20 


" 24 


" 27 


Aver, for AprE. . 


15>s^@20% 


19>^@23 


17%@21 



JUIiY. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTBMBKR. 


julv 3 


17@20 
17@20 
17@20 
18@21 

18@21 
20@24 
20@24 


August 3 

7 

■'' 10 

" 14 

" 17 

" 21 

" 24 

" 28 

" 31 

Aver, for Aug. 


20@23 
20@23 
20@24 
21@24 
21@24 
21@23 
21@23 
21@24 
23@26 


September 4.. 

7,. 

11.. 

" 14.. 

" 18.. 

" 21.. 

25.. 

*' 28.. 

Aver, for Sept. 


23@26 
23@26 
22@24 
22@26 

21@25 
25@27 


" 6 :. 

" 10 


" 13 

" 17 


" 20 


" 24 


« 27 :. 


" 31 






Aver, for July . . 


18@21 


20 8-9@23 7-9 


22><r@25i^ 



OCTOBER. 


NOVEMBER. 


DECEMBER. 


October 2 


24@26 Nov 


3mber 2.. 


23@26 


December 4.. 


21@26 


'* 5 


24@26 


5.. 


^@26 


7.. 


22@26 


9 


22@25 


9.. 


23@26 


" 11.. 


22@26 


" 12 


22(^25 


13.. 


22@26 


" 14.. 


22@26 


" 16 


22@25 


16. 


22@26 


" 18.. 


22@26 


" 19. 


22@26 


20.. 


22@26 


" ^i.. 


22@26 


" 23 


23@25 


23.. 


22@26 


" 24.. 


22@26 


" 26 


23@25 


27.. 


21@26 


" 28.. 


22@27 


" 30 


23@26 


30.. 
for Nov.. 


21@26 


Aver, for Dec. 




Aver, for Oct.... 


22 7-9@25 4-9 Aver. 


22 l-9@26 


21J^@26>^ 



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Plaices of Cheese at New Tork, 



379 



Weekly Average Prices of Cheese at New York, 

For tJie Tear 1877. 



1877. 



JAlSrUARY. 

1st week 

2d " 

3d " 

4tli '' 

FEBRUARY. 

Ist week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

MARCH. 

Ist week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

5th " 

APRIL. 

Ist week 

2d '' 

3d " 

4th " 

MAY. 

Ist week 

2d *' •., (New Cheese) 

3d " 

4th " 

5th *' 

JUNK 

1st week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

JULY. 

1st week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

AU(^ST. 

Ist week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

5th " 

SEPTEMBER. 

1st week 

2d " 

3d " 

4th " 

OCTOBER. 

1st week 

2d " 

3d '* 

4th " 

5th " 

NOVEMBER. 

1st week 

2d ** 

3d " 

4th " 

DECEMBER. 

Ist week 

2d *' 

3d '* 

4th « 



State Factory. 



Good to Fancy. 
Per lb.* 



Cents. 

13><^@15 

13 5-12@15 

13 @15 

13 @15 

135S@15^ 

14 @\by2 

14 @15^ 
143^@16 

14>^@16 

15 @16 
15 @16 
15 @16 

im@i5K 

13J^@15% 
13^@15 1-5 
13 @14:J^ 
13 ®U}^ 

13 @UX 
13%@15)i 
13;^®14% 
12 @1Z% 
11 3-10(^13 

10 5-6@12>^ 

10 @11K 

9 @10i^ 

9% 



9K@l(i^ 

10 @10^ 

9^@103<r 

9 1-5@10 1-6 

9 1-12@10 1-6 

10%@11 1-5 

10>sf@ll>5r 

11 @12 2-7 
12J^@133^ 
12><^@13^ 

12 3-7@13K 
Prime to Fancy 
12X@13j^ 
12X@13% 
12%@13i^ 
12^@13X 
12>s^@13 

12 @129-10 
12 @12% 
12 @123^ 
12 @12% 

12;^@13 
12>^@13 
12 @13 
12 @13 



Fair. 
Per lb. 



Cents. 
11 @12^ 
11 @123^ 

11 @1''^}4 
11 1-6@12X 

12 @12^ 



12J^@135^ 

i2y,@isy3 

1134@12X 
103-10@113-10 

9 5.6@10% 
9 1-6® 9^ 
8 @ 85^ 
m® 8 1-6 



7^® SM 
8M@ 9 



8^® 9 
8 2-7® 9 
81-12® 91-12 
9%@10 
9X®103^ 

10 1-6®10K 
113^®11M 
11%®12 
11%®12 
Good. 
11X@12 
1-2^^®12% 
12K@12X 
12 ®123^ 
12 ®12K 

ll>s^@113^ 

11K®113^ 
11^@11K 

11 1-6@11^ 

11X@11X 



State Farm 
Dairy. 



Fair to Prime, 
Per lb. 



Cents. 
11 @13X 
10 5-6@135-12 
10 @13 

10 @13 

11 @13^ 

— @14 

— @14 

— @14 

— ®14 

— @14>^ 

— @14>^ 

— @14>^ 

— @14>^ 

— ®13K 

— @135-12 

— @13 

— ®13 

— @13 

11%@143^ 
10 3-7@12X 
9 7-10@12 

9 ®10 4-7 
8 @ 9 5-6 
.6%® 8% 
6>^@8>^ 

6^@ 8X 

7 @8K 

8 ® 9X 
8 ® 9% 

8 ® 9.^ 

8 @ 9 

81-12® 95-12 

9^®10^ 

10 @ll>sr 
10X®12 4-7 

11 ®12X 
11 ®12% 

11 @12X 

11 @13 

11 ®13 

11 @12M 

11 @12% 

10^@12^ 
10^@123^ 
10>^®12X 
10><^®12K 

10 ®12X 

10 @12>5^ 

10 @12>^ 

10 @12X 



Western 
Factory. 



Gk>od& Prime. 
Per lb. 



Cents. 
12^@13K 
lWz®V6% 
12^@13>$ 
12>^@13X 

12 5-6@13 5-6 
13 @14 

13 @14 

13 @14 

13 1-6@14 16 

14 @15 
14 @14^ 
14 @14X 

13 5-6@14>^ 

12Ji@133^ 
12^@13% 
12>^@13>5r 

12^®1.3^ 
13^i®14X 
133^ ®14 1-6 
11 ?i ©12 47 
10^@11 4-5 

9 @10 4-7 
7 5-6®10 
65S® 8 
QH@ 8 

6>{r@ 8 
6 4-7® 8M 

7^® 9i^ 

T>^® 9K 
7^® 91-12 
7 7-12® 91-12 
8X®10 
9 ®10^ 

9>^®10K 
11 ®123^ 
11^@12^ 
llJ€@12i^ 

1W@123^ 
113^®123^ 
11^@12V 
11M®12^ 
113^®12>< 

10^@12 • 
10J^@12 
10 1-6® 11^ 
10 @11X 

10 @11>^ 

10 ®n)4 

10 @11>^ 
10 @11>^ 



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380 



New York Produce Exchange, 



Monthly and Teably Avebage Prices of Cheese at 
New York, 

From 1874 to 1877, indmive. 



STATE FACTORY. 



MONTH. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 


Cents. 

12 1-16®15 1-16 
11J^®16% 
12%@17 1-16 
12%@17 
11 ®16% 
11 @141316 
8%@12 7-10 

11 3-16@13 9-16 
11%®14% 
13>i@16% 
15 ©1515-16 
15 @16 


Cents. 
15%@16% 
15%@16 9-16 
15%@16% 

15 1-5@16 3-5 
13 @14i-16 

11 1-6@12% 
10«<@12 1-6 

10 @11% 

8 13-16®11 11-16 
11 1-10®13% 
11 3-16@13% 

11 @13% 


Cents. 

10%@13% 

10%@13% 

10 31-32@13 31-32 

10%@13% 

9 7 12@12% 

10%®10% 

7%®9 5-6 

7 l-6@9% 

10 ®12 

10 5-16@13% 

10%®13% 

11%®14% 


Cents. 
11 @15 


February 

March 


12 @15% 
12 @16 


April 

May 


12 ®15 
11%®14 1-5 


June 


■8%@11 


July 


8 ®10% 


August.. 


8 4-5®107-10 


September 


11 1-7@13 


October 


12 @13>S 


November 


11%@12 4-5 


December. 


11 1-5@13 






Yearly Average . . . 


12 5^@157-16 


12 7-16@14 1-24 


10 1-18@12 5-9 


10 5-6@135^ 



EGGS. 

Monthly Receipts at New York. 



MONTH 


Receipts. 




1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March 


Bbls. 
19,352 
16,848 
53,773 
65,883 
69,630 
46,064 
34,630 
19,377 

26',031 
31,333 
93,316 


•Bbls. 
8,387 
10,585 
47,751 
91,471 
66,793 
49,929 
32,331 
27,674 
29,600 
35,885 
40,561 
29,494 


Bbls. 

15,158 

23,850 

70,719 

76,245 

69,903 

45,141 

27,137 

29,446 

31,453 

31,480 

42,392 

22,199 


Bbls. 
15,048 
11,126 
28,969 
76,127 
66,597 
63,214 
30,029 
25,066 
31,918 
34,607 
44,410 
28,023 


Bbls. 
28,194 
41,343 
73,783 
58,111 
74,076 
47,931 
25,425 
26,745 
29,643 
34,543 
38,856 
21,412 


Bbls. 
12,012 
42,266 
96,726 


April 


74,395 


Mav 


60,822 


June 


38,964 


July 

August 

September. ... 

October 

November 

December 


23,608 
25,167 
25,685 
27,121 
42,150 
19,506 


Total 


498,236 


472,461 


485,123 


445,134 


500,062 , 


488,422 



Average Prices at New York. 





State. 


WKS3TBRN. 


MONTH. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 




32% ® 84 27% ® 29 2-3 
38% ® 40 20% 
32 2-3® 33 2-3 18% ® 20% 
23 2-3® 24 1-3 17'^ csi. 1 S^ur 


36 4-7 

22% 

16 2-3 

15 5-9 

13J^ 

171-7 

17^ 

vt% 

21 
221-5 

1^.9 


30% @32 
30 @35% 
34% @34 3-5 
24% @25 
16% @17% 
19% @19% 
19% @20% 
19% @20% 
22% ®23% 
26% @27% 

^% @29% 


25% @26% 
17% @19 
16% @17% 
16% @17% 
13 @13% 
14% @16 
15% @16^ 
16% @17% 
22 @23% 
24% @25% 
27% @28% 
28% @29% 


351-3 


February 

March 


211-5 
161-9 


April 


16 2-3 

17 2-9 


May 

June. 

July 


17% ®17% 
20 @ 21% 
22 ® 22% 
22% ®22% 
23% ® 24 
28 1-5® 30 
30% ®31 
30 2-3® 32 


15% ® 16% 

16 @ 17% 

17 @ ll}i 

18 @ 18% 
23 2-5® 24 
25% ® 27 

29% 
29 2-5® 80 


August 


211-3 

23% 

23% 


September 

October 

November 

December 



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Movement and Prices of Hops, 381 

Movement and Prices of Hops at New York. 



MONTH. 


EECEIPTS. 


Exports. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 

February 

March 


Bales. 
2,484 

13,071 
1,089 
702 
525 
1,490 
1,029 
1,108 
2,894 

11,515 
6,344 
5,337 


Bales. 

2,789 

746 

1,580 

554 

613 

350 

826 

694 

3,912 

13,700 

14,102 

7,877 


Bales. 

10,657 

11,253 
8,342 
3,742 
1,489 
1,6H6 
2,438 
2,160 
7,812 

17,333 
9,118 

10,850 


Bales. 
8,621 
7,845 
6,083 
4,405 
4,281 
4,314 
2,108 
2,664 
6,513 
28,793 
31,283 
19,127 


Bales. 

61 

11 

78 

114 

85 

15 

5 

1,318 

1,446 

4,499 

2,402 

2,810 


Bales. 

1,377 

640 

641 

272 

10 

16 

3 

393 

688 

4,769 

11,371 

1,726 


Bales. 
5,519 
4,767- 
5,482 
2,429 
1,507 
1,507 
1,876 
1,312 
3,718 
6,987 
3,305 
3,456 


Bales. 
6,815 
4,245 
4,345 
1,792 
1,8D4 
2,820 
990 


April 


May 


June 

July 


August 

September 

October. 

November 

December 


1,804 
2,527 
11,767 
19,931 
10,225 


Total 


47,788 


47,743 


86,910 


126,037 


12,844 


22,266 


41,865 


69,065 





Exports fkom all United States Ports. 



MONTH. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 


Bales. 

717 

2,915 

31 

1,469 

1,865 

921 

193 

' 25 

169 

149 

178 

5 


Bales. ' 

726 

11 

78 

114 

85 

20 

269 

1,318 

1,446 

4,899 

2.769 

3,380 


Bales. 

1,522 

941 

764 

76 

39 

17 

68 

679 

642 

6,942 

16,052 

2,724 


Bales. 

8,103 

5,553 

4,899 

3,776 

1,497 

1,588 

2,184 

1,625 

3,936 

7,375 

4,606 

5,932 


Bales. 

10,024 

4,314 

5,420 

2,780 

3,450 

3,238 

1,068 

1,732 

2,944 

14,926 

20,854 

16,864 


February 


March 

April 


Mav.. 


June 

July 

August 

September 

October 


November 

December 




Total 


8,637 


15,115 


30,466 


51,074 


87,613 





The average of a bale of Hops is about 175 lbs. 



Ranges op the Prices op Hops at New York. 



MONTH. 



January.. 
February . , 
March. . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October. . . 
November. 
Dwjember. 



•"New, 



1876. 



state, 
per lb. 



Cents. 
10@15 
12@17 
12@18 
12(0)18 
12@18 
11®18 
10@17 



10@20 
*26@37 
*25@37 
*20@30 



Eastern 

'z Western 

per lb. 



Cents. 

10®15 

10@15 

11@17 

10r<^16 

10@16 

8@15 

8@15 

8@15 



*25@33 
*17@26 



Califor- 
nia, 
per lb. 



Cents. 
17@20 
17@20 
17@20 
15@19 
15@18 
15@18 
15@18 
15@18 
15@18 



*32@38 



1877. 



State, 
per lb. 



Cents. 



*15@20 

10@16 

10@17 

10@18 

9@.16 

6@13 



*10@14 
*7@13 
5@13 
5@13 



Eastern 

& Western 

per lb. 



Cents. 

*12@23 

*10@18 

8@14 

8($13 



6@10 

6® 9 

*10@12 



CaUfor- 

nia, 
per lb. 



Cents. 



14@19 
12@17 
12@17 
11@16 



15@16 
14@16 



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382 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Pbices of Highwines at New Toek, 

Far the Yean- 1877. 



DAY. 



January. February. 



March. 



April. 



MAY. 



June. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6..... 
7 

8..;.. 

9... . 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 .... 

29 

30 

31 

Range, 



1 13 
1 13 
1 14 
1 14 
1 14 



1 09 
1 08 
1 07X@1 08 



1 ll>5r@l 12 

1 11 

1 11 



1 14 
1 \^%@X 
1 14>^@1 
1 15 
1 15 
1 15 



135^ 
15 



1 15 
t 15 
1 15 

1 14 @1 
1 14 

1 12* @1 



1 07^ 
m%@X 08 
07^@1 OS 
07><^@1 08 
07>£®1 08 
07 @1 07>^ 



10 @1 11 
10>^@1 11 

11 @1 11^ 
lllJ^ 

11 @1 11^ 
11 @1 ll>s^ 



1 07@1 mYi 

1 07^ 

107K 

107>5^ 
07X@1 08 

1 08 



1 11 
1 10 
1 09 @1 
1 08 @1 
1 08 @1 
1 08>sr@l 



1 08i^@l 
1 09 
1 08><^@1 



15 

13^ 

09><r 
081^ 
09 
09 

09 

10 



1 08 

my,@x 08 

107>^ 
07 @1 07X 
07 @l 07^ 

1 07 



085^@1 09 
1 mVi 
llO^sT 



1 12 
1 12 

i'i2" 
1 11 
111^ 



1 10 
1073^ 
1 07X 
1 ^% 
1 08 
07>^@1 08 

07"@i'08 
07 • @1 08 

1 my, 

1 07% 
1 07>^ 
1 07X 



08 @1 08 >^ 

1 08 
08 @1 083^ 
08 @1 08>$ 

1 08 
07><r @1 08 



1 13 

1 13 
12 @1 Vil% 
123^@1 13 

1 12^ 



12 @1 12X 
12 @1 12^ 

1 12X 

1 12 

11 @i uy, 

10^@l 11 



io7>cr 

1 07^,^ 
07 04 073^ 

1 071^ 
07 @1 073^ 
07 @1 07>c^ 



1 09^ 
1 09 
093!^@1 093^ 
1 10 
1103<r 

ioi<r@i 11 



103<r@l 10. 
1 11 

12>^@1 131^ 

1 13 
13 %\ 14 
13 @1 14 



iio>5r 

10 @1 10^ 

1 10)^ 
10 @1 11 

1113<^ 

ink 

ny,®i 12 

1 ii>^ 

1 ny, 

1 12 

ii>sr@i 12 



11>S^@1 12 
11>^@1 12 



1 11 

io><r@i 11 
1 11 
1 ny 
1 115^ 

11>^@1 12 



ii3<r@i 12 
1 ii>5^ 

1 12 
11>^@1 12 



11 



11^ 
@1 113^ 



11 @1 113^ 

11 @1 11^5^ 

11 @i n}i 

11 @i ii>^ 

11 @1 12 



1 13 @1 13^ 



1 11>^ 
111>5^ 



1 ll3<f@l 12 



1 12>^ 
1 133<r 
113^ 
1 14 
1 14 
1 14 



1 08 @1 15 1 07 



12 1 07 @1 12 1 07 



14 1 10 @1 13 1 10>5^@1 14 



DAY. 



9. 

10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16.. 

17., 

18. 

19 

20. 

21. 

22. 



24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 



2 ! 114 

3 H 13 @1 13J^ 

4 1 

1 13 @1 133^ 
1 13 

1 113^@1 12^ 



Range. 



1 12 ®1 13 

1 12 
1 lli<r@l I'iy 

1 12 

1 12 
1 11 @1 12 



113^@1 12 

1 12 

1 12 

1 12 
11 @1 12 
11 @1 lli<^ 



1 133^(^1 14 

1 15 

1 153^ 
1 15 @1 16 

1 15 

1 15 



1 15 
1 15 



1 11 @1 16 



August. 



1 15 
13 (ai i^y, 
12 @1 13>^ 

112>^ 



1 ny 
ll2y 

12 @1 12>^ 
1 12 
1 12 
1 12 



1 12 

1 12 

1 12 

1 ll'^ 
11>^@1 12 
12 @1 12>5^ 



1 nn 

1 13 
14^*@1 15 
1 15 
1 16 
1 17 



15 (a)! 17 
14K-^1 15?^ 

ri4 

IZ^m 14 

iisy 



1 ii><r@i 17 



September. 



113^5^ 



123<@1 133*^ 
12>^@1 isy 

1 13 

1 13 

1 13 

1 13 



1 13 
1 13 
1 13 
1 12 
1 12 
12^@1 13 



1 13 

1 13 

12 @l 13 

1 12>^ 
1 18 
113>^ 



13^, @1 14 

1 i^y 

1 isy 
1 13,^ 

13 @i v^>y 

1 13>i 



October. 



1 13^, 
13 0.1 13X 
1 13X 
1 13j^ 
1 13>5r 

1 isy - 



133<r@l 14 

1 i3>5r 
1 tm 

1 i3><r 

13 @1 14 



1 10 @1 11 



13>.<@1 14 
13 (^113>^ 

1 13K 

1 13 

1 133<r 

1 13>i 



1 ISy 
1 m' 
1 11 
1 11 
1 11 
1 11 



1 09>5^ 
1 09 
1 09^ 



10 @1 11 
10 @1 11 
10 @1 11 
10j^@l 11 



10 @1 11 
10 @1 11 
09K@1 11 
09i^@l 11 

o^yi^i 11 

09 @1 11 



09}^@1 10 
09K@1 10 
09K(«^1 10 

1 10 

1 10 

1 10 



10 @1 11 
1 10 
1093^ 



1 10 
09li@l 10 

1 loy 



1 103<^ 



1 12 @1 14 {1 093^@1 14 |1 09 @1 11 



December. 



1 10 @1 11 



1 103^ 
1 10 @1 10^ 

1 103^ 
1 10 @1 10>^ 

1 10 

1 10 



1 10 
1 10 
1 10 
1 10 
1 10 
1 10 

i"i5** 

1 10 
1 10 
1 10 
1 10 

1 Ody 



1 10 



1 10 

1 10 

1 09>$r@i 10 

1 10 



1 10 



1 09i<r@l 11 



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Prices of Highwines at New Torh. 



383 



AVEEAGE PeICES OF HiGHWINES, MONTHLY AND TeABLY, 

AT New York. 



From 1862,^ 1877, inclusive. 



M02STn. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


. 1869. 


January 
Febr'y. . 
March . 
April... 
May.... 
June . . . 
July.... 
August . 
Sept.... 
October. 
Nov. . . . 
Dec. . . . 


mi 

29X 
31 

32^ 
36K 

37 >^ 

38 >^ 


45 

56K 

463^ 

45 

44^ 

443^ 

45K 

45K 

51 

59 

65)^ 

86^ 


943^ 

87 

86 
1 13K 
1 24 
1 44 
1 71 
1 80 
1 80 
173 
1 72 
1 98 


2 28M 
2 283^ 
2 20 
2 13M 
2 07 
2 03 
2 10 
2 19J^ 
2 27^- 
2 30>^ 
2 37M 
2 32>^ 


2 27 
223 

2 28 
2 26X 
2 26 
2 263^ 

2 23% 
2 253^ 
2 37% 
2 413^ 
2 413^ 
2 12><^ 


2 30 
2 313^ 
2 32% 
2 34 
2 32K 
2 353<r 
2 38;<^ 
2 37 
2 37^ 
2 37>sr 
2 31 
2 30>^ 


2 29>c^ 
2"22" 

"53* 

67 ,V 

74 
1 22 
1 06 
1 02 


99% 
102^ 
116)^ 

ii8ir 
1213^ 

108% 
103 


Yearly 
Average 


31 55-64 


52 5-6 


1 43 13-24 


2 21 11-24 


2 28 25-96 


2 23 31-32 


1 21 31-3 


1 11 85-96 



Month. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. ■ 


1877. 


January 
Febr'y.. 
March.. 
April... 
May.... 
June . . . 
July.... 
August . 
Sept.... 
October. 
Nov..,. 
Dec.... 


1 00% 

1 04 

1 08K 
1 04% 
1 OlJi 

973^ 
89^ 

^^ 

93^ 


93 

93 

92 

913^ 

91% 

95% 

92 6-6 
953^ 


92 3-16 

92 9-32 

89 1-5 

88 

89 a-10 

90% 

92 1-16 

93 1-5 
92% 

92 11-16 
92 1-5 
95 11-16 


95% 

92 7-16 
91 9-16 
91 1-7 

93 17-40 
93 7-16 
94 
97% 

1 003^ 
95 11-20 
92!^ 
95% 


99 1-11 
99^ 

96 9-10 

97 1-5 
97 4-5 
993^ 
99% 

1 02 

1 06 1-11 
1 04 3-11 
1 01 1-10 
1 01 4-11 


' 97 7-10 
1 14% 
1 12 4-9 
1 14 1-7 
1 19 7-68 
1 19 7-9 
1 21% 
1 28% 
1 253^ 
1 18 
1 163^ 
1 16 


111% 
1 123^ 
110% 

1 11% 
1 12 

1 11% 
1 13 
1 13% 
1 11% 
1 14 
I 10% 
111>^ . 


1 12% 
1 08% 
1 08% 
1 09 3-20 
111% 
1 11 9-10 
1 12 19-20 
1 13 2-7 
1 13 

1 12 13-40 
1 10 1-12 
1 10 1-20 


Yearly 
Average 


98 


93% 


91 11-14 


94JS 


1 00 2-5 


1 16 11-20 


1 11 23-34 


1 11 21-80 



Receipts of Highwines at New York for 13 Years. 



YEARS. 


Barrels. 


YEARS. 


Barrels. 


1877* 


169,721 
151,447 
158,013 
184,169 
209,289 
177,096 
166,825 


1870 


177,671 


1876 


1869 . 


183,482 


1875 


1863 


47,694 


1874 


1867 


147,210 


1873 


1866 . . 


101,375 


1872 


1865 


62,280 


1871 









* Including 45,587 bbls. Alcohol. 



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384 



New York Produce Exchange. 



Exports of Oloveb and Timothy Seed from New York, 

September 1st to December BUt. 



TO 


1872. 
Bags. 


1873. 
Bags. 


1874. 
Bags. 


1875. 
Bags. 


1876. 
Bags. 


1877. 
Bags. 


London 

Liverpool 

Glasgow 

Rotterdam 

Antwerp 

Bremen 

Hamburg 

Bristol 

Havre., ,, 


3,060 

1,288 

291 

i;^ 

'854 
2,382 


42 


1,188 

698 

2,083 

"280 
910 
428 

"56 

'719 


5,938 

2,360 

1,599 

850 

200 

600 

2,995 

1,207 


1,130 
463 

1,747 

**64 
361 

'809 

li729 


17,505 

3,695 

3,426 

2,659 

1,349 

650 

7,357 

800 

• 5,386 

"624 


1,822 

6,372 

3,300 

3,584 

1,468 

3,514 

22,504 

280 

670 


Copenhagen.... 
Stettin 




St. John 

Hull 


3*257 






Total bags... 


7,929 


6,356 


15,749 


6,303 


43,451 


46,771 



Monthly Ayerage Ranges of Clover, Timothy and Domestic Flax 
Seed at New York. 





1876. 


1877. 


month. 


Clover, 
Per lb. 


Timothy, 
Per bush. 


Domestic 
Flax Seed, 
Per bush. 


Clover, 
Per lb. 


Timothy, 
Per bush. 


Domestic . 
Flax Seed, 
Per bush. 


January 

February . . . 
March...... 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 


Cents. 
13^@143^ 
12K@14>^ 

14 @17 
16 @17 
16 @17 
16 ®16^ 
16 @165^ 
16 @16j^ 
14>^@16 
133^@15i^ 

15 @15)i 
14^@15^ 


2 50@2 75 
2 50@2 75 
2 50@2 75 
2 55@2 75 
2 75@2 85 
2 76@2 85 
2 6o@2 85 
2 65@2 80 


i"55@i'70 

1 60®1 70 

1 50®1 55 
1 50®.... 
1 46C31.... 


Cents. 
153ir@16^ 
15^®16^ 

14K@15% 
15 @15X 
15 @15>sr 


1 91 @1 93 
1 97 @2 09 
1 91^@1 96^ 

1 87>|@1 99 

2 00 @2 01>^ 

1 90 @2 00 
1 58 new. 
1 503^@1 mvs 
1 40 ®1 41 
1 40 ®1 45 
1 40 


1 66 

1 71 
1 68 ®1 75 
1 60 @1 70 
1 65J^@1 IBX 
1 73 @1 83 
1 64 @1 76 

150^ 
1 47^@1 48}^ 
144 @145 
1 48 m 51^ 
1 50 @1 52X 


September . , 


1 75@2 00 1 4Q(S>1 45 




October 

November . . 
December... 


1 95®2 10 
1 95@2 05 
1 90@1 95 


1 44®1 55 
....®1 60 
....@1 65 


8^@8% 
BM®8% 
8M@SX 



Exports of Clover Seed for the Months of January and February, 

In the Yea/ra 



to 


1877. 


1876. 


1875. 




January. 


February. 


January. 


February. 


January. 


February. 


London 


Bags. 
6,809 
2,959 
2,525 

2^843 

i;649 

1,750 

100 


Bags. 

11,640 
1,870 
7,286 

3,086 
2,095 
1,220 

i,*i35 
250 


Bags. 
4,331 
4,085 
1,638 

'444 

250 

5,297 

'156 


Bags. 
3,981 

2,748 
2,184 

"476 

3,585 

650 

50 

'ioo 


Bags. 

1,654 

2,268 

490 

7!696 

3,637 

52 

300 

200 


Bags. 
7,833 
1,853 
1,190 
300 


Liverpool 


Glasgow 


Bristol 


Hull 




7,745 

1,148 

50 


Bremen 


Havre 


Antwerp 




Rotterdam 


800 






Total bags 


18,635 


28,582 


16,195 


13,774 


15,691 


20,919 





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Receipts of Naval Stores at New York. 
Keceipts of Naval Stobes at New Toek, 

For the Tear 1877. 



385 



MONTH. 



Turpentine, 
Crude. 



Turpentine, 
Spirits. 



Pitch. . 



Tar. 



Rosin. 



January 

February... 

March 

Apnl 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 
OcLober, ... 
November.. 
December . , . 

Total... 



Bbls. 
150 
190 
225 
175 
125 
373 
580 
545 
300 
311 
340 



Bbls. 
3,411 
3,741 
4,757 
3,810 
7.421 
9,629 
11.302 
8,814 
9,917 
7,178 
3,024 
5.529 



Bbls. 
41 

'360 
1,014 
520 
470 
182 
235 
241 
' 600 
669 
818 



Bbls. 

1,876 

1,962 

4,245 

3,231 

1,846 

615 

865 

1,232 

3,564 

1,458 

451 

971 



Bbls. 
21,804 
27,043 
18,143 
20.738 
32,118 
34,022 
59,489 
48,096 
41.269 
42:825 
19,398 
21.198 



3,681 



78,033 



5,150 



22,316 



386,143 



Average Prices of Naval Stores at New York, for the Year 1877. 





Spirits 


ROSIN, PER BARREL. 




Tur- 
pen 
tine, 




Month. 


Str'd, 


Good 
Str'd, 




















per gal. 


B. C. 


c.d.e. 


B. 


P. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


K. 


M. 


N. 




Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Cents. 


Jan 


4Q14 


246;^ 


251 


2563^ 


26-'^ 


271)<r 


283>^ 


302 


336 


383!^ 


483^ 


Feb 


41'^ 


207 


214 


220^1^ 


229^4 


242 


256 


273 


suiy,. 


351 J^ 


445J^ 


March.. 


40 


203X 


209 1-6 


215 5 9 


224 1-6 


236 2-3 


248% 


271 1-9 


297 1-9 


345 2-3 


4222-9 


April... 


34% 


19^X 


203 ^ 


2»'9 1-6 


219% 


231 3.5 


244 ^/« 


263 '-^8- 


290 


343^ 


409% 


May.... 


S3K 


188 


193 5 6 


207 J^ 


216 J< 


228% 


243^ 


264% 


2S2M 


312 i^ 


387% 


June . . 


31^ 


18^ 


193 V 


2013^ 


203;^ 


2223^ 


222y, 


245 


my. 


316% 


382 


July ... 


31 1-M 


183M 


183>5^ 


202 


202 


220 5-9 


220 5-9 


2411.9 


265 2-9 


330 5-6 


3SS% 


August . 


S4M 


179 


187 


193X 


205% 


217>^ 


228-^ 


242 1-5 


212% 


328 >^ 


393K 


Sept.... 


351-7 


175% 


183 1-5 


195 


205 


215 


226 2-3 


2:^5 


270% 


320 5-6 


385V 


October. 


34 5-9 


16 * 3-5 


177^ 


ISSJi 


193% 


2112-3 


225 


2323^ 


268-^ 


318^ 


381^ 


Nov.... 


35% 


170 1-3 


175 5-6 


185 


192J< 


205 


222X 


23W 


271% 


321% 


378% 


Dec.... 


311415 


109 2-5 


176 1-6 


185 


190 


200 


220 


2301-5 2771-5 


330 


377 


Avenge ) 
for yr. f 


3529-30 


189 1-6 


1961-30 


204 5-6 


2125-12 


225^ 


286 2-3 


1 
252 4-5 |283 3-7 


333% 


02:4 



Average Prices of Naval Stores at Wilmington and Charleston, 
F(yr the Yea/r 1876. 



WILMINGTON. 



Spirits 
Turpen- 
tine, 
Per gal. 



Rosin pbr Bbl. 



Str'd. 



Good Str'd. 



Spirits Tur- 
pentine, 
Per gal. 



CHARLESTON. 



Rosin per Bbl. 



str'd. 



Good 
str'd. 



January 

February 

March.. 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August , 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Average for year. 
26 



Cents. 
43% 
40% 
34% 
31 

301-5 
28% 
28% 
316-7 
32% 
31% 
80% 
29^ 



Cents. 
213 
163 
1733^ 
155% 
143% 
144% 
135 1-5 
144% 
1451-6 
143% 
143% 
140 5-6 



Cents. 
2143^ 
109% 
178% 
160% 
148 a-5 
148% 
140 2-5 
149% 
151% 
148% 
148 3-5 
161 2-3 



Cents. 
42% 
39 1-12 
35 3 32 
31?^ 
29% 
27 9-10 
27 13-20 
30 7-16 
32 9-16 
Zl% 
30% 
292-5 



82% 



153% 



15913-60 



Cents. 
215 
178% 
173% 
167 
161% 
155 
152 
156% 
156 
144 
141% 
142% 



161% 



Cents. 
215 
178% 
1T6% 
168 
162% 
160 
156 
1565^ 
155 
145 
141% 
152% 



16310-17 



Hosted by 



Google 



386 



New York Produce Exchange. 



' Stocks op IS'aval Stoees at New Yobk, Monthly. 

CRUDE TUBPENTINE. 



ON 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 1. ... 

February 1 

March 1 

April 1 

Mayl 

June 1 

July 1 

August 1 

September 1... 

October 1 

November 1 . . . 
December 1.... 


Bbls. 
881 
600 

1,076 
927 
940 
431 
94 
379 
855 
212 
84 
193 


Bbls. 
52 
476 
605 
652 
389 
245 
249 
149 
519 
312 
229 
212 


Bbls. 

477 

297 

543 

69 

91 

"m 

50 
330 


Bbls. 

'boo 

346 
240 

"200 

400 

9 

"m 

340 


Bbls. 

*457 

80 

532 

568 

'529 


Bbls. 
226 
832 
342 
500 
101 
568 


Bbls. 

'153 
253 


Bbls 




Bbls. 

"i92 
100 
150 



SPrBITS OF TURPENTINE. 



ON 



1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


3,686 


5,677 


6,809 


8,013 


7,248 


5,954 


9,512 


3,535 


3,864 


5,134 


6,749 


5,185 


7,183 


5,933 


7,403 


4,679 


6,493 


5,736 


5,011 


3,671 


7,449 


7,840 


6,944 


3,713 


5,874 


3,811 


3,047 


• 3,052 


6,007 


6,661 


6,784 


2,112 


3,876 


1,712 


953 


2,923 


4,230 


6,699 


4,609 


812 


1,491 


1,798 


734 


492 


2,702 


5,795 


3,889 


2,356 


1,648 


489 


424 


900 


2,740 


4,398 


4,519 


2,983 


1,000 


1,321 


134 


1,017 


1,457 


7,309 


3,466 


3,876 


2,502 


1,546 


594 


2,764 


3,145 


9,517 


3,698 


2.560 


7a3 


2,324 


1,650 


3,933 


4,086 


9,220 


3,298 


3,026 


2,339 


4,242 


3,629 


4,306 


4,678 


7,517 


3,457 


2,848 


4,811 


6,528 


5,286 


6,871 


4,320 


7,904 


5,280 


5,535 



1877. 



January 1... 
February 1.. 
Marcli 1.... 

April 1 

May 1 

June 1 

Julyl 

August 1 — 
September 1, 
October 1 . - . 
November 1 . 
December 1., 



Bbls. 
3,783 
4,328 
5,071 
2,783 

538 
1,781 

841 
4,021 
3,079 
6,800 
6,893 
6,773 



ROSIN. 



ON 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877*. 


January 1 

February 1.... 

Marcli 1 

April 1 

Mayl 

Junel 

Julyl 

August 1 

September 1... 

October 1 

November 1 . . . 
December 1 . . 


Bbls. 
94,919 
114,109 
113,018 
82,638 
50,942 
37,349 
38,995 
32,600 
40,538 
41,274 
51,128 
70,843 


Bbls. 
51,025 
46,157 
47,554 
55,595 
29,878 
26,358 
37,179 
45.844 
30,478 
51,925 
36,100 
34,439 


Bbls. 
31,961 
26,961 
28,399 
31,085 
34,709 
29,600 
20,343 
26,072 
20,045 
31,669 
37,856 
22,906 


BbK 
40,555 
35,238 
54,094 
71,022 
17,81S 
17,986 
16.156 
27,288 
29,427 
48,463 
46,475 
52,034 


Bbls. 
46,436 
49,289 
&4,338 
72.256 
35,040 
35,144 
44,381 
44,906 
39,727 
69,156 
63,211 
71,236 


Bbls. 

74,851 

76,641 

69,788 

47,967 

27,959 

49,109 

60,388 

65,700 

57,810 

60,285 

60,678 

74,354 


Bbls. 
92,077 
92,077 
97,765 
94,773 
79,702 
61,981 
61,233 
65.606 
65,374 
67,694 
69,725 
71,779 


Bbls. 
78,649 
89,417 
80 345 
71,213 
44,940 
46,378 
4,998 
56,808 
61,603 
47,584 
37,167 
37,498 


Bbls. 
47,070 
26,210 
17,094 
14,056 
32,662 
32,331 
20,851 
38,645 
46,131 
49,712 
51,185 
40,605 



Hosted by 



Google 



Stocks of Naval Stores at New York. 



387 



Stocks of Natal Stores at New York, Mo^h^o^y— {Continued.) 

TAR. 



on 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


January 1 

February 1 

March 1 

Aprni 

Mayl 

June 1 

Julyl 

August 1 

September 1 . . 

October 1 

November 1 .. 
December 1. .. 


Bbls. 
5,877 
7,889 
8,698 
10,926 
12,020 
8,045 
6,776 
8,750 
6.610 
4,424 
5,242 
8,512 


Bbl8. 
9,065 
10.101 
15,860 
25,763 
33,823 
29,240 
27,859 
25,656 
23.612 
22,519 
19,308 
12,671 


Bbls. 

11,825 

11,096 

10,135 

11.263 

11,022 

9,027 

6,045 

4,889 

5,795 

4,598 

3,209 

1,982 


Bbls. 

2,014 

3,456 

5,251 

10.170 

4;328 

4,472 

3,104 

685 

373 

956 

895 

535 


Bbls. 
1,250 
1,172 
2,071 
5,429 
6,172 
3,035 
1,902 
917 
174 
1,820 
2,232 
1,458 


Bbls. 
3,a<)5 
5,721 

10,653 
8,686 
8,536 
3,636 
4,381 
2,722 
1,684 
2,979 
3,734 
2,761 


Bbls. 
552 
2,835 
2,739 
3,392 
3.274 
7,065 
4,381 
4,936 
3,904 
5,295 


Bbls. 
S,641 
4,679 
2,063 
2.587 
2,327 
ai32 
1,3^:56 

432 
1,020 
1,850 
1,195 

569 


Bbls. 
1,174 
1,838 
4,134 
1,811 
3,694 
2,855 
1,855 
1,240 
1,305 
2,804 
1,843 
1,490 



Eeceepts of Naval Stores at, and Exports from, New York. 







BECEIPTS. 




Exports. 


Year. 












Turpentine, 
Crude. 


Turpentine, 
Spirits. 


Rosin. 


Tar. 


Turpentine, 
Crude. 


Turpentine, 
Spirits. 


Rosin. 


Tar. 




Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


1866.. 


32,248 


63,022 


379,541 


45,412 


13,596 


22,113 


234,367' 


20,461 


1867.. 


11,428 


62,644 


395,505 


24,238 


827 


31,125 


312,441 


4,633 


1868.. 


11,119 


64,078 


448.694 


37,008 


704 


17,635 


367,421 


9,977 


1869.. 


12,303 


64,994 


550,600 


71,016 


812 


17,810 


458,357 


35,555 


1870.. 


7,299 


70,969 


477,238 


47,188 


422 


16,496 


392,649 


13,957 


1871.. 


8,551 


65,842 


486,882 


' 18,823 


• 412 


12,789 


357,532 


10,451 


1872.. 


11,087. 


87,223 


611,434 


33,907 


504 


217,292 


402,023 


17,178 


1S73.. 


10,915 


83,094 


608,565 


39,935 


492 


18,620 


398,513 


22,297 


1874.. 


12,641 


77,593 


529,544 


46,465 


822 


10,102 


381,787 


27,138 


1875.. 


7,181 


64,932 


482,193 


22,944 




14,102 


375,269 


6,858 


1876.. 


3,962 


74,795 


386,242 


18,561 


232 


20.564 


256,774 


6,634 


1877.. 


3,681 


78,033 


386,143 


22,316 


190 


30;230 


228,044 


7,367 



Exports of Naval Stores from all United States Ports, 
TO ALL Foreign Countries, 

For Years ending June 30. 



YEAR. 


ROSIN A^'D Turpentine. 


Spirits op Turpentine. 1 


TAR AND Pitch. 




Bbls. 


Yalue. 


Gals. 


Value. 


Bbls. 


Value. 


1865-66 


11,232 


$157,662 


42,518 


$95,747 


11,529 


$76,034 


1866-67 


250,452 


1,504,058 


349,325 


313.086 


37,835 


147,528 


1867-68 


334 104 


1,984.865 


1,513,225 


980.699 


21,559 


, 84,552 


1868-69 


443,501 


2,028,514 


3,068,629 


1,627,577 


26,751 


110,641 


1869-70 


586,032 


2,021,155 


3,183,665 


1,444,3:32 


51,241 


195,025 


1870-71 


583,185 


1,776,214 


3,246,702 


1.357,302 


47,532 


143,87i 


1871-72 


511,909 


1,600,551 


2,453,554 


1,009,503 


32,584 


93,884 


187^73 


845,162 


3,6^31,996 


5,104,653 


2,667,386 


43,535 


177,435 


1873-74 


929.342 


3,046,421 


6,804,173 


2,758,933 


71,920 


238,779 


1874-75 


937,522 


2,774,419 


5.599,734 


1,924,544 1 


54,905 


127,206 


1875-76 


824,256 


2,188,623 


5,178,934 


1,672,068 1 


69,138 


164,647 


1876-77 


900,056 


2,384,378 


6,796,927 


2,274,639 | 


'?^,189 


160,410 



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388 New York Produce Exchange, 

ExpoETS OF Naval Stobes from New York, 

For the Year 1877. 



MONTH. 


Spirits 

turpentine, 

Bbls. 


EOSIN, 
Bbls. 


Pitch, 
Bbls. 


Tar, 
Bbls. 


Coal Tab 
Pitch, 
Tons. 


January 


4,324 
1,059 
2,258 
941 
837 
5,000 
6,593 
3,311 
1,425 
1,464 
1,366 
1,652 


10,202 

14,095 

18,784 

18,158 

11,650 

37,772 

28,330 

28,211 

12,212 

15,866 

20,564 . 

12,200 


390 
262 
728 
743 
634 
617 
931 
773 
412 
372 
703 
249 


513 

450 
li38 
886 
246 
1,006 
363 
915 
469 
478 
693 
410 ' 


503 


February 


1,479 


March 


1,225 


April. 


2,857 


May 


538 


June 

July 


158 
228 


Augufct 

September 


619 
313 


October 

November 

December 


572 






Total 


30,230 


228,044 


6,814 


7,367 


7,992 







Exports of Naval Stores from New York, and Distribution. 

SPIRITS ANI> CRUDE TURPENTINE. 



DESTINATION. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Great Britain 


Bbls- 
7,034 


Bbls. 
6,661 

"'585 
492 

5,463 


Bbls 
5,295. 

' 6;778 
362 

9,798 


Bbls. 
3,584 
30 
2,314 
2,046 ■ 

11,138 


Bbls. 

4,106 
51 
156 
130 

7,847 


Bbls. 
5,969 

"262 
450 

6,045 


Bbls. 
7,590 
20 
1,025 
5,970 

5,959 


Bbls. 

9,186 

1 


France 


North of Europe 

Europe, other Parts . , . 

China, Pacific Islands \ 

and other countries. \ 

South America, West { 

Indies and B. Col. . J 


4,869 
1,175 

3,840 


3,468 
4,555 

6,056 
6,964 


Total 


16,496 


13,201 


22,233 


19,112 


12,290 


12,726 


20,564, 


30,230 





ROSIN. 



DESTINATION. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Great Britain 


Bbls. 
158,290 
4,365 
156,168 

44,809 

29,017 
392,649 


Bbls. 
120,161 

167,440 
47,737 

22,214 
357,552 


Bbls. 
171,018 
3,397 
182,884 

91,893 

42,831 
492,023 


Bbls. 
139,397 
541 
145,103 

62,814 

50,658 


Bbls. 

96,880 

3,873 

159,952 

50,576 

56,624 


Bbls. 
126,670 
6,014 
143,719 

60,951 

40,305 


Bbls. 
103,381 
13,820 
51,758 
48,534 

39,281 


Bbls. 
82,549 
3,365 
36,277 
40,831 

16,550 

48,472 


Prance 

North of Europe 

Europe, other Parts.. , . 

China, Pacific Islands ) 

and other countries. \ 

South America, West ) 

Indies and B. Col., i 


Total 


398,513 


367,905 


377,659 


256,774 


228,044 







TAR. 



DESTINATION. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Great Britain' 

France 


BbLs. 
9,872 


Bbls. 
3,500 

""ib 

11 
6,930 


Bbls. 
11,097 

*"i2b 

5,961 


Bbls. 
14,560 

"'710 
7,027 


Bbls. 
19,004 
100 

6,928 


Bbls. 
1,755 

"'5b'o 

5,423 


Bbls. 
2,044 

360 
507 

3,970 


Bbls. 
172 


North of Europe 

Europe, other Parts. . . 
China, Pacific Islands ) 
and other countries. ( 
South America, West r 
Indies and B. Col.. ) 


1 
4,084 


110 

507 
6,578 


Total 


13,957 


10,451 


17,178 


22,297 


26,032 


7,678 


6,871 


7,367 





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Movement of Spirits of Turpentine at London. 389 



Movement of Spirits of Turpentine at London, 

Dunng the Tears 



PARTICTJLAJRS. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Stock, American, Dec. 31, bbls 


8,851 


9,302 
3,490 


18.574 
2,661 


31,124 


32,170 
1,912 


24,543 
1,800 


Landing, American, Dec. 31, bbls 


Total American, bbls 


8,851 


12,792 


21,208- 


31,124 


34,082 


26,343 




Total American, equal tons 

Total French, Dec. 31, tons 


1,106 
171 


1,529 


2,651 


3,890 
184 


4,260 


3,293 






Aggregate American and Frencli, tons 


1,277 


1,529 


2,651 


4,074 


4,260 


3,293 


i American, bis 

Imports, Jan, 1 to Dec. 31, ■< French, casks 

j French, bbls. 


41,372 
2,754 
1,176 


45,954 

2,046 

280 


56,211 
3,479 
•329 


56,843 

1,753 

745 


59,450 
""50 


51,988 


Highest price paid for American, per ton . 
Lowest " '* " " 


608. 
32s. 


5l8. 

30s. 


388. 
23s. 3d. 


27s. 
21s. 6d. 


35s. 6d. 

2l8. 


368. Od. 
23s. Od. 


Delivered Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, American, bbls 


32,948 


39,183 


42.809 


44,820 


55,664 


59,727 


" " " " equal tons 
" " *' French, tons. . . 


4,994 
669 


4,898 
653 


5,351 

757 


5,603 
421 


6,958 

202 


7,466 


Total tons delivered for the year 


6,693 


5,551 


6,108 


6,024 


7,160 


7,466 



Movement of Rosin at London. 



PARTICULARS. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Stock, American, Dec. 31, bbls 


10,379 


17,623 


24,928 


23,171 


14,512 


15,292 




Including Strained, about, bbls 


1,010 


12,000 
300 


9,000 
9,500 


15,000 


8,000 


3,000 


Including No. 2, about, bbls 








French tons ......... k . 


273 


315 


80 


104 


17 


38 






I American, bis 

Imported, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 < French, casks 

f French, bbls. 


26,862 

3,261 

275 


109,140 

2,716 

52 


116,563 

2,750 

95 


112,580 
2,546 


112,647 
274 


101,764 
380 


Highest price paid,* Spot Strained 

Lowest price paid. Spot Strained 


128. 6d. 
7s. 6d. 


lis. 
7s. 7^d. 


7s. 9d. 
5s. 9d. 


6s. 3d. 
5s. 


7s. 
48. 6d. 


7s. 4>^d 
OS. 4>^d 


Deliveries during December, French, tons. 
" '* " . American, bis 


25 
3,044 


49 
2,990 


14 
2,244 


48. 
2,447 


' 2,074 


' 2;547 



Movement and Prices of Naval Stores at 


Boston. 






RECEIPTS. 


EXPORTS. 




1877. 


1876. 


1875. 


1877. 


1876. 


1875. 


Rosin, bbls 


33,482 
6,027 
6,684 
1.527 
9,638 


23,764 
5,769 
l,i)75 
6.892 
1,654 


22,401 
6,259 
3,447 

10,633 
1,496 


2,988 

* 2,63i 

'2,631 

4,469 


3,513 
1,558 
1 
1,468 
3,601 


2,943 


Spirits, Turpentine, bbLs 

Crude Turpentine, bbls 

Tar, bbls 


1,223 

9 

1,916 


Pitch,bbls 


3,671 



YEAR. 


HIGHEST & lowest PRICES. 


YEAR, 


RECEIPTS OF NAVAL STORES. 


Spirits Turpentine. 


Tar. 


Tar. 


Turp'ntine 


Spt's Tur'tine. 


1877 

1876 

1875 

1874 

1873 

1872 

1871 ;. 

1870 


Per gal. 
31 @47 
28X@49 
31 @45 
25 @51 

m^ 

50 @70 
38 @52 


Per bbl. 
2 75®3 25 
2 37@3 50 
2 25@S 50 

2 70@4 00 

3 50@5 25 
3 50@6 00 
2 75@4 50 
2 50@3 75 


1874.... 
1873.... 
1872.... 
1871.... 
1870.... 
186