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1863. 



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i 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT 



AMERICAN 



OME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



I'RWMM" H\ TUT 



KXECUTI VK ( :OMMITTKE 



ANNIVERSARY M KETIKli , MAY l.'i, I8j!». { 



APPENDIX. 



Jlrto |lorh: 

HiHS A GRAY A GREEN, PRINTERS. STEREoTYTERS, AND BINDERS, j 

rilR'PROnK RDII.DI.NUti, £ 

(CORNER OF FRANKFORT AND JACOB CTRKRTO. ^h 



MISSIONARY BOXES. 



Boxes of clothing sent directly, and without any particular designation, to the office 
of the American Home Missionary Society, will be forwarded to such missionaries as are 
known to be most in need* of them, with request* from the Society to those who receive 
them to address letters of acknowledgment to the respective donors. 

Experience has shown us that when an individual or association, intending to pre- 
pare a box, writes to the Society to have a particular missionary designated, and a de- 
tailed account of the circumstances of Ms family given, the information is not always at 
hand, so that the letter can be promptly and satisfactorily answered ; and when it is, it 
not unfrequently happens that, while the box is preparing, the missionary remains 
for months un supplied, when, if it were not for this designation, he might be fur- 
nished with articles placed, in the mean time, at the disposal of the Society. In other 
cases, while the box is in preparation, supplies are sent to the missionary from other 
sources ; so that when the box is ready, this missionary is not so much in want as many 
others. 

It is preferred, therefore, when there is no objection on the jiiirt of the donors, that 
the special designation of the boxes of clothing, that are not put up for any individual in 
particular, should be left, to the discretion of the officers of the Society, after thq/ reach 
the office* It is believed they will in tliiB way airs wer the designs of those who gene- 
rously contribute them, better than in any other way in which the Society can have 
an agency. 

DIRECTIONS FOR FORWARDING. 

1. Put inside the box. where it will be readily seen when the box is opened, a paper 
or letter, containing a list of the articles in tile box. and the estimated value of the 
whole, with the name of the individual or association from whom it come?, and the ad- 
dress of the individual to whom a letter of acknowledgment may be sent. 

± A copy, in full, of the memorandum put inside of the box, should be sent in a 
letter to the office of the Society. In this letter it should be stated when, and by wliat 
conveyance, the box was forwarded ; in it should be inclosed, also, such money as is in- 
tended for the payment of freight. It is desirable that freight should be provided for 
in all cases, if practicable. The freight and expenses on a box vary from $3 to $6, 
according to its size and the distance, "it is sent. A barrtl can be forwarded at less ex- 
pense than a box of the same size. 

3. The box should be fully and plainly marked, and the place from whicti it comes 
should always appear on the outxide, so that there may be no necessity for opening it at 
the office. It should be strong, tight, well nailed, and. when large, should be hooped, 
or otherwise fully secured against the effects of hard usage on the way. 

4. Boxes* may be addressed to either of the Secretaries, or the Assistant Treasurer. 

NO PART OF A MISSIONARY'S SALART.fr 

Boxes of clothing form no part of a missionary's regular appropriation. The Society 
needs the same amount of money, therefore, in order to meet promptly its stipulations 
with its missionaries, as if no boxes were forwarded ; and it would bo no favor to a 
missionary to receive a box, if, as a consequence of it, the amount of money that would 
otherwise be sent him must be proportionally diminished. 

We trust the friends of the Home Missionary, therefore, will every where see to it 
that they give none the less money in consequence of their giving other things that 
are needful and convenient. We hope, on the contrary, their sympathies will be so 
awakened in the preparation of the lesser gift, that they will feel it to be their privilege 
not only to continue, but also to enlarge the greater. 

SUGGESTIONS AS TO THEIR CONTENTS. 

In regard to what is to be put into the box, while clothing of woolen or liuen 
fabrics, shoes, boots, writing paper, and books will bo specially valuable, scarcely any 
thing in the shape of plain, eubstantial wearing apparel or bedding, or which is of com- 
mon use in any form in a family, will come amiss. Knives and forks, spoons, a pair 
of scissor?, a spool of cotton, a skein of yarn or silk, a paper of needles or pins, a cake 
of wax, a dozen of buttons, a thimble* a tumbler, a tin cup. a skimmer, or a pepper 
box, need not be left out 

When articles of clothing are not fitted to the members of the families to which 
boxes are sent, missionaries are in the way of making such exchanges with each other 
that almost every thing which a box may contain is tamed to good account. 



THE 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT 



AMERICAN 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 



FBBE5TKD BT THE 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ANNIVERSARY MEETING, MAY 13, 1863. 



APPENDIX. 



£J<ttMB orfc : 

JOBS A. GRAY & GREEN, PRINTERS, STEREOTYPERS, AND BINDERS, 

rim-moor buildligs, 

CORNER OV FRANKFORT AND JACOB STREETS. 

1863. 






COXTEISTTS. 



Thirty Seventh Anniversary of the A. H. 
Officers, .... 

Executive Committee, 
Constitution, .... 



M. S., 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 
Introduction, ...... 

General Table of Missionaries and Congregations, . 
Summary op Results, • 

Number of Missionaries, their distribution, and the aggregate 
labors, *..... 

Number of Sabbath school scholars, 

Contributions to benevolent objects, 

Additions to the Churches — Revivals, 

Churches organized — Houses of worship completed, 
The Treasury — Resources — Liabilities — Payments, 

Progress of the year, ..... 
General Comparative Results, .... 

Table of Receipts, Expenditures, Number of Missionaries, 
additions, etc., ..... 

Remarks on the Table, ..... 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 1, 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 2, 

Table of Receipts, ..... 
Principal Auxiliaries, Agencies, and Missionary Fields, 

Maine Missionary Society, .... 

New Hampshire Missionary Society, 

Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, 

Rhode Island Home Missionary Society, 

Connecticut Missionary Society, 

New-York, ...... 

Ohio, ....... 

Illinois, ...... 

Michigan, ...... 

Wisconsin, ...... 

Iowa, ....... 







pAoa 


5 


6 


8 


9 


11 


13 


43 


egate of their 


48 


43 




43 


. 


43 


. . 


44 


. 


44 




44 


. 


45 


years of labor, 






46 




46 






47 






48 






40 






50 






50 






50 






51 






52 






53 






54 






54 






56 


. 




57 






59 






60 






62 



CONTENTS. 



Minnesota, 

Kansas, . 

Nebraska, 

Colorado, . 

Pacific Coast, 
Conclusion, 
The Treasurer's Report, 



64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
72 



APPENDIX. 

Names op Missionaries in Each State and Territory, 
Relation of Auxiliary Societies, etc., 

State and other large Auxiliaries, 

Agents, .... 

Committees of Missions, 

Applications for Aid, 
Addresses at the Thirty Seventh Anniversary, 

Address of Rev. Joseph E. Roy, . 
Do. Rev. Henry Ward Bcecher, 

Miscellaneous Selections, 
Directors for Life, . 
Members for Life, 



74 
78 
78 
78 
78 
79 
80 
80 
86 
93 
104 
105 



7\ 



THIRTY SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY. 



The American Home Missionary Society held its Thirty 
Seventh Anniversary in Irving Hall, New York, on Wednesday 
evening, May 13, 1863. 

Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D., of New Haven, Conn., one of 
the Vice-Presidents, occupied the chair, and the exercises were 
opened with prayer by Rev. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., of Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

The Treasurer's Report was read by Mr. Christopher R. Rob- 
ert, the Treasurer of the Society. 

An Attract of the Annual Report of the Executive Commit- 
tee was presented by Rev. Daniel P. Noyes, one of the Secre- 
taries. 

On motion of Rev. Isaac P. Langwortiiy, of Boston, Mass., 
Hvonded by Col. A. B. Eaton, of New York, 

Rewired, That the Reports now presented be adopted, and published under 
the dirt- ction of the Executive Committee. 

On motion of Rev. Joseph E. Roy, of Chicago, Illinois, sec- 
onded by Rev. John C. IIolbrook, of Dubuque, Iowa, 

R*M?ro1i That our de?out thanksgiving is due to Almighty God, for what 
the Gospel of his Son has accomplished at the West, through the agency of the 
American Home Missionary Society. 

Addresses were made by Rev. J. E. Roy, and Rev. Henry 
Waud Beecher, setting forth what the Society lias done for the 
West in the planting of churches, in the diffusion of New England 
Theology, in the assimilation of the population, and for the vig- 
orous prosecution of the war. The magnitude of the work yet 
to be done was also vividly and impressively portrayed, as well 



6 officers. [May, 

as the responsibility which rests upon the churches to meet the 
calls of God and their country, at this eventful hour, and give 
the blessings of the Gospel to all the inhabitants of the land. 

The singing by the Congregation was conducted by Mr. George 
Andrews. 

The exercises were closed with the benediction, by Rev. Ab- 
salom Peters, D. I)., of New York ; after which the Society pro- 
ceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 

The following officers were then chosen : 



PRESIDENT. 

Rev. THEODORE D. WOOLSEY, D. D., LL. D., of New Haven, Ct. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D., New Haven, Ct. 

Rev. Albert Barnes, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Nathan S. S. Beman, D. D., LL. D., Troy, N. Y. 

Hon. Marshall S. Bidwell, LL. D., New York. 

Rev. Nathaniel Bouton, D. D., Concord, N. H. 

His Excell. William A. Buckingham, Norwich, Ct. 

Rev. John P. Cleavcland, D. D., Lowell, Mass. 

Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D. D., LL. D., New York. 

Hon. William Darling, Reading, Pa. 

Rev. Jeremiah Day, D. D., LL. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. George Duffield, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. William T. Dwight, D. D., Portland, Me. 

Rev. Ralph Emerson, D. D., Rockford, 111. 

Hon. Erastus Fairbanks, St. Johnsbury, Vt 

William M. Halsted, Esq., New York. 

Rev. Joel Hawes, D. D., Hartford, Ct. 

Rev. Mark Hopkins, D. D., LL. D., President of Williams College, Mhs. 

Hon. Joseph C. Hornblower, LL. D., Newark, N. J. 

Hon. William Jessup, LL. D., Montrose, Pa. 

Rev. Harvey D. Kitchel, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D., President of Dartmouth College, N. II. 

Rev. Simeon North, D. D., LL. D., Clinton, N. Y. 

Rev. Eliphalet Nott, D. I)., LL. D., President of Union College, N. Y. 

William Curtis Noyes, LL. D., N. Y. 

Rev. Edwards A. Park, D. D., Theol. Sem., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Absalom Peters, D. D , New York. 

Rev. George E. Pierce, D. D., Hudson, Ohio. 

Rev. Enoch Pond, D. D., Bangor, Me. 

Douglas Putnam, Esq., Harmer, Ohio. 

Rev. Samuel S. Schmucker, D. D., Theol. Sem., Gettysburg, Pa. 

Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D. D., LL. D., New York. 

Rev. William A. Stearns, D. D., President of Amherst College, Mass. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D., Braintree, Mass. 

Hon. Lewis Strong, Northampton, Mass. 

Rev. Benjamin Tappan, D. D., Augusta, Me. 

John Tappan, Esq., Boston, Mass. 



1863.] 0FFICER8. 

Hon. Henry W. Taylor, Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Rev. Mark Tucker, D. D., Saybrook, Ct. 
S. V. S. Wilder, Esq., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Rev. Charles Walker, D. D., Pitteford, Yt 
Rev. William Wisner, D. D., Ithaca, N. Y. 
Hon. Bradford R. Wood, Albany, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS. 

Rev. William Adams, D. D., New York. 

Rev. William Allen, D. D., Northampton, Mass. 

Rev. ZedekUh S. Barstow, D. D., Keene, N. H. 

Rev. Flavel Basoom, Dover, I1L 

Rev. Alvan Bond, D. D., Norwich, Ct 

Rev. Edward Beecher, D. D., Galesburgb, HI. 

Rev. Constantine Blodgett, D. D., Pawtucket, R. I 

Rev. Thomas Brainerd, D. I)., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Horatio N. Brinsmadc, D. D., Beloit Wis. 

Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. William Carter, Pittsficld, I1L 

Rev. Aaron L. Chapin, D. D., President of Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. George B. Checver, D. 1)., New York. 

Rev. Elisha L. Cleaveland, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Oliver E. Daggett, D. D., Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Rev. Samuel W. S. Dutton, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Ansel D. Eddy, D. D., Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

Rev. Edward W. Gilman, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. Albert Hale, Springfield, III. 

Rev. Edwin Hall, D. D., Theol. Sem., Auburn, N. Y. 

Samuel Hamilton, Esq., Rochester, N. Y. 

Eurotas P. Hastings, Esq., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Henry L. Hitchcock, D. I)., President of Western Reserve College, 0. 

Rev. John C Holbrook, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Rev. Henrv B. Hooker, D. D., Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Ova P. Hovt D. D., Elkhart, Ind. 

Rev. Mancius S." Hutton, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Aratus Rent Galena, 111. 

William J. King, Esq., Providence, R. T. 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, D. D., President of Middlebury College, Vt. 

Rev. Joel H. Linsley, D. D., Greenwich, Ct 

George Merriam, Esq., Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. John J. Miter, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rev. Ray Palmer, D. D., Albany, N. Y. 

Rev. Joel Parker, D. D., Newark, N. J. 

Rev. William W. Patton, Chicago, III. 

Rev. Henry E. Peck, Oberlin College, 0. 

Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Albert H. Porter, Esq., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Rev. Truman M. Post D. D., St Louis, Mo. 

Rev. Henry Smith, D. D., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rev. Miles P. Squier, D. D., Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. Benjamin P. Stone, D. I)., Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Henry M. Storrs, Cincinnati, 0. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Julian M. Sturtevant D. D., President of Illinois College. 

Rev. Asa Turner, Denmark, Iowa. 

Rev. Robert G. Vennilye, D.D., Theolog. Inst, East Windsor, Ct 

Rev. Samuel HL Willey, San Francisco, Cal. 

Edward J. Woolsey, Esq., New York. 



OFFICERS. 



[May, 1863. 



Treasurer. 
Mr. CHRISTOPHER R. ROBERT. 

Auditor. 
Mr. GEORGE S. COE. 

Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. MILTON BADGER, D.D. 
Rev. DAVID B. COE, D. D. 
Rev. DANIEL P. NOYES. 

Recording Secretary. 
Mr. WILLIAM C. GILMAN. 



MEETING OF THE BOABD. 

The Board of Directors met on Thursday, May 14th, at the Society's Rooms, 
Bible House, Astbr Place, and appointed the members who, in connection with 
the officers designated by the Constitution, compose the 

Executive Committee. 

Mr. Abijah Fisher. 
Rev. William Patton, D. D. 
Charles Butler, Esq. 
Mr. Simeon B. Chittenden. 
Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D. 
Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, D. D. 
Rev. William I. Budington, D. D. 
Mr. William G. Lambert 
Rev. William R. Tompkins. 
Mr. Christopher R. Robert, Treasurer. 



Members 
Ex-Officio. 



Rev. Milton Badger, D. D., ) 

Rev. David B. Coe, D. D., > Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. Daniel P. Noyes, ) 

Mr. William C. Gilman, Recording Secretary. 



Assistant Treasurer. 
Mr. Benjamin G. Talbert 



CONSTITUTION 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Art. 1. This Society shall be denominated The Amebican Home 
Missionaby Society. 

Akt. 2. The object of this Society shall be, to assist congregations 
that are unable to support the Gospel ministry, and to send the Gospel 
to the destitute, within the United States ; also to cooperate with 
evangelical Christians in the support of Home Missions in nominally 
Christian countries, to such an extent as the funds of the Institution 
may justify. 

Art. 3. The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, an Auditor, one or more Secretaries for Cor- 
respondence, a Recording Secretary, and fifty Directors, who shall be 
annually appointed by the Society; and who, together with the 
Directors for Life, shall constitute a Board, seven of whom shall be a 
quorum, at any meeting regularly convened. 

Art. 4. The officers and Directors shall appoint an Executive Com- 
mittee of fourteen, (including the Treasurer, the Secretaries for Cor- 
respondence, and the Recording Secretary,) residing in the City of 
New York and its vicinity ; five of whom shall be a quorum, at any 
meeting regularly convened. The Committee shall have power to 
appoint its own meetings, form its own rules of business, and fill any 
vacancies in its own number which may occur during the year, and to 
convene special meetings of the Board or Society ; shall appoint mis- 
sionaries, and instruct them as to the field and manner of their labors ; 
shall have thte disposal of the funds ; shall create such agency or 
agencies for appointing missionaries, and for other purposes, as the 
interests of the Institution may require ; and shall make an Annual 
Report of their proceedings to the Society. 



10 constitution. [May, 1863. 

Art. 5. The Treasurer shall give bonds, annually, to such amount 
as the Executive Committee shall think proper. 

Art. 6. Any person may become a member of this Society, by con- 
tributing annually to its funds ; thirty dollars paid at one time shall 
constitute a Member for Life ; and one hundred dollars paid at one 
time shall constitute a Director for Life ; and any person on the pay- 
ment of a sum which, in addition to any previous contribution to the 
funds, shall amount to one hundred dollars, shall be a Director for 
Life. An executor, on paying a legacy of two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars to the funds of this Society, shall be a Member for Life ; and the 
payment of a legacy of one thousand dollars shall constitute a Director 
for Life. 

Art. 7. Any Missionary Society may become Auxiliary, by agree- 
ing to pay into the Treasury of this Society the whole of its surplus 
funds, and sending to the Secretaries for Correspondence a copy of its 
Constitution and Annual Reports, mentioning the names of its Mis- 
sionaries, and the fields of their operations. 

Art. 8. Every Auxiliary Society, which shall agree to pay the 
whole of its funds to this Society, shall be entitled to a missionary or 
missionaries to labor in such fields as it may designate ; at least to the 
amount of its contributions ; provided such designation be made at 
the time of payment. 

Art. 9. The officers of all Auxiliary Societies shall be, ex officio, 
Directors ; and annual contributors to their funds shall be members of 
the Society. 

Art. 10. This Society shall meet annually in the City of New York, 
on the Wednesday next preceding the second Thursday in May. 

Art. 11. No alteration shall be made in this Constitution without a 
vote of two thirds of the members present at an annual meeting ; nor 
unless the same shall have been proposed at a previous annual meeting, 
or recommended by the Executive Committee. 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



The Executive Committee of the American Home Missionary 
Society, in presenting their Thirty Seventh Annual Report, 
desire, first of all, to unite with its patrons and friends in devout 
thanksgiving and praise to the Father of Mercies, for the rich 
blessings — the gracious influences of his Spirit, vouchsafed unto 
them during a year of extreme anxiety and trial in every Christ- 
ian enterprise, as well as of unexampled national affliction and 
peril. The cause in which we are engaged is his, and he has sus- 
tained it. In our weakness he has given us strength. In our ig- 
norance, he has said, this is the way, walk ye in it. In our dark- 
ness, he has caused light to shine round about us above the 
brightness of the sun. And the glory of all that has been ac- 
complished, through our humble instrumentality, we would 
ascribe to his great name, forever. 

Two of the Vice-Presidents of the Society have been called to 
• their reward, since last we met, — Rev. Samuel Osgood, D. D., 
and Rev. Lyman Beech er, D. D. Dr. Osgood was one of the 
early friends of the Society, ever cheerful, earnest and steadfast 
in his advocacy of its claims, as he was in helping forward every 
enterprise in behalf of suffering humanity, or for the advance- 
ment of the Redeemer's Kingdom. Dr. Beeciier, by his Sermon 
on i¥ Building the Old "Wastes," and his subsequent labors in the 
missionary caiise in Connecticut, was an honored instrument of 
awakening the churches to the importance of this great Home 
work, and of preparing the way for the organization of this So. 
eiety. And no man, perhaps, has made larger contributions in 
furtherance of its aims than he has, by the eloquence of his 
tongue and his pen, by his appeals to patriotism and the love of 
souls, by his own example in leaving his home in the East for the 
toils of the West, and by his influence on the young men whom 
he trained in Sacred Science, for the self-denial and hardships of 
the new settlements. Dying in a good old age, his work done, 
and the opening heavens radiant with the glory into which he 



12 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. P^ay, 

was entering, we can not mourn for him. But every good institu- 
tion, the church of God every where, and the land, which felt his 
influence in all her vital interests, mourn their loss. 

Seven of the missionaries of the Society have also died during 
the year — Rev. James P. Richardson and Rev. Theodore Wells, 
in Maine; Rev. Winthrop Fifield, in New Hampshire; Rev. 
John Bowers, in Vermont ; Rev. Otis Lombard, in Massachu- 
setts ; Rev. George W. Adams, in Rhode Island ; and Rev. S. M. 
Elliott, in Minnesota. 

The operations of the Society in connection with its various 
Auxiliaries and Agencies, and in the different States and Territo- 
ries, are noticed under their appropriate heads, in the body of the 
Report ; such details as can be embraced in a compact form, are 
presented in the following 

GENERAL TABLE. 

Showing in parallel columns, 

1. An alphabetical list of Missionaries. 

2. The names of congregations and missionary districts aided. 

3. Dates of commissions or time of commencing labor. 

4. Length of commissions in months. 

5. Amount of aid pledged, for the time named in the preceding column. 

Where a full support is pledged to those who go out to be located 
under the direction of the Society, the pledge includes what can be 
raised by their people during the year. 

6. Months of labor performed, since the last Report 

7. Number of church members. 

8. Number of hopeful conversions. 

9. Additions to the churches on examination. 

10. Additions to the churches by letter. 

11. Number of Sabbath school and Bible class pupils. 

12. Amount of contributions to benevolent objects. 

13. Other particulars. 

EXPLANATION. 
In this table, the following abbreviations, appended to the names of Mission 
aries in the first column, designate the Auxiliary Societies by whose funds the 
congregations and missionary stations below which they are placed have been 
aided, viz. : 

M. M. S., Maine Missionary Society. 
N. H. M. S., New Hampshire Missionary Society. 
V. D. M. S., Vermont Domestic Missionary Society. 
Mass. II. M. S., Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
C. M. S., Connecticut Missionary Society. 
R. I. H. M. S., Rhode Island Ilome Missionary Society. 
The names of Missionaries who were not in commission last year are printed 
in Italics. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REFOBT. 



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14 



THIRTY BEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



i 

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THIRTY SEVENTH BEPOBT. 



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THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



2 



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THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



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THIRTY SEVENTH BEPORT. 



23 




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20 



THIRTY SEVENTH BERORT. 



[May, 



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THIRTT SEVENTH REPORT. 



21 





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26 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



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THIRTY SEVENTH BEPORT. 



23 



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24 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



1 






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1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



29 



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26 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



•a-re[oqog 
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1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



27 



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28 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



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3863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



83 



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32 



TniltTY SEVENTII BEPORT. 



[May, 



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THIRTY SEVENTH HEPORT. 



83 



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THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT, 



35 



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34 



THIRTY - SEVEKTH REPORT. 



[May, 



I 



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1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT, 



35 



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1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



87 



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88 



THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



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THIRTY SEVENTH RIPOBT. 



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40 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 




1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH KEPORT. 




41 



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U I I II 1 41 1 1 4JI II I 4 I II 14 4 II I I 



42 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



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1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH BEPORT. ' 48 



SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

The number of ministers of the Gospel in the service of the 
Society the last year, whose names are found in the preceding 
General Table, together with those engaged in superintending the 
work, and whose names are mentioned in connection with the 
respective Auxiliaries and Agencies, is 734. 

Of these, 579 were in commission at the date of the last Re- 
port, and 155 have since been appointed. 

They have been distributed in 21 different States and Territo- 
ries, as follows : in Maine, 82 ; New Hampshire, 39 ; Vermont, 
60 ; Massachusetts, 45 ; Rhode Island, 6 ; Connecticut, 49 ; New 
York, 43 ; New Jersey, 2 ; Pennsylvania, 3 ; Ohio, 38 ; Indiana, 
5 ; Illinois, 83 ; Missouri, 2 ; Michigan, 62 ; Wisconsin, 76 ; Iowa, 
81 ; Minnesota, 34 ; Kansas, 12 ; Nebraska, 3 ; California, 5 ; 
Oregon, 4. 

This distribution gives to the New England States, 281 ; Middle 
States, 48 ; Western States and Territories, including 9 on the 
Pacific coast, 405. 

Of the whole number in commission, 434 have been pastors or 
stated supplies of single congregations ; 221 have ministered to 
two or three congregations each ; and 79 have extended their 
labors over still wider fields. 

The aggregate of ministerial labor performed is 562 years. 

The number of congregations and missionary districts, which 
have been fully supplied, or where the Gospel has been preached 
at stated intervals, is 1,455. 

Six missionaries have been in commission as pastors or stated 
supplies of churches of colored people ; and 29 have preached in 
foreign languages — 15 to Welsh and 14 to German congregations. 

The number of Sabbath school scholars, connected with the mis- 
sionary churches and stations, is not far from 54,000. 

The contributiohs to benevolent objects, reported by 417 mission- 
aries, amount to $14,584.43. 

fifty seven missionaries make mention in their reports of revi- 
vals of religion during the year, in some of which there have been 
3ft, 35, 40 and 55 hopeful conversions. The number of conver- 
sions reported by 251 missionaries is 1,476. 

The additions to the churches, as nearly as can be ascertained, 
have been 3,108, viz. : 1,582 on profession of their faith, and 
1,526 by letters from other churches. 



44 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

Twenty three churches have been organized in connection with 
the labors of the missionaries during the year ; thirteen houses of 
worship have been completed ; twenty Jive repaired or improved ; 
and the building of ten others commenced. Twenty nine young 
men, in connection with the missionary churches, are reported as 
in different stages of preparation for the gospel ministry. 



THE TREASURY. 

. Resources. — The balance in the Treasury, April 1, 1862, was 
$5,536.71. The receipts, for the succeeding twelve months, have 
been $164,884.29 ; making the resources of the year $170,421.00. 

Liabilities. — There was due to missionaries, at the close of the 
last year, the sum of $7,248.34. There have since become due 
$133,843.39 ; making the total of liabilities $141,091,71. 

Payments. — Of this sum $134,991.08 have been paid ; leaving 
$6,100.15 still due to missionaries for labor performed. Towards 
canceling which and redeeming additional pledges on commissions 
already issued — amounting in all to $60,363.11 — there is a balance 
in the Treasury of $35,429.92 ; the greater portion of it received 
in payment of legacies the latter part of the year. 

The receipts exceed those of the preceding year, by $1,031.78. 
This result, so gratifying to the friends of the Society and so 
hopeful for the future^ no one anticipated at the beginning of the 
year. A portion of the churches, which had formerly contributed 
to this Society, were united in sustaining the missionary opera- 
tions of their own denomination through another Board ; and the 
distracted and embarrassed state of the country seemed to render 
it certain, that the contributions of those still recognizing the So- 
ciety as their missionary organ could not be kept up to former 
standards, much less carriea beyond them. The Committee did 
not feel authorized, in these circumstances, to make arrangements 
for the expansion of the missionary work, to urge new laborers 
into the field, or to grant in many cases the full amount asked 
for by feeble churches, and thus incur responsibilities, which there 
was not a reasonable prospect of their being able to meet. They 
felt compelled, on the other hand, to continue the cautious, per- 
haps rigid system of appropriations, which the embarrassments of 
the two preceding years had made necessary, that the laborers, 
who were worthy of their hire, might not continue to suffer from 
the delay of payments. 

It became obvious, however, as the year advanced, that many 
of the friends of Christ had become more deeply impressed, by 
our national afflictions, with the importance of their having in- 
creased investments, which no change or conflict or disaster could 
ever imperil ; that there was a growing conviction that our coun- 
try is to be saved and all that is dear to us in it handed down 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 45 

to the latest generations, only by the power of the Gospel over 
all hearts, ana that to sustain this cause of Home evangelization 
at least where it is, until these clouds of indignation are over- 
past, and to be in readiness then to advance, as the providence of 
God should call, to take possession of the whole land for Christ 
is the great duty of American Christians. Under the influence 
of these sentiments, the free will offerings of many individuals 
and many churches have not only not been diminished, but have 
greatly increased. And not the living only, but the dead also 
have praised the Lord through the care of his providence in bring- 
ing their pious Bequests into the Treasury. 

While, therefore, from some sources contributions have been 
le>s, the diminution has been more than supplied by the advance in 
others. From New England alone, the receipts of the last year 
exceed those of the preceding, by $10,485.99. The Society has 
been able, throughout the year, to make prompt payment to its 
missionaries of their dues — to return drafts immediately on the 
reception of their reports ; and in the latter part of the year, to 
lay plans for the enlargement of its work in new Territories and 
important centers of influence and for the more perfect supply of 
die destitute every where, which will gladden all hearts, we trust, 
as the results of tliein shall be reported at our next annual assem- 
blage. 

Large resources w r ill be indispensable for the accomplishment 
of these results. Not only must new fields, and important locali- 
ties at whatever cost, be occupied ; but many churches already 
assisted, enfeebled by the war, one eighth, one seventh, or one 
fifth of their number in the camp or on the battle field, or them- 
selves suffering from Indian depredations must have increased 
aid ; and the families of missionaries, where the expenses of liv- 
ing are so greatly enhanced, must have a more generous support. 
The work, in all its departments, must be sustained by the firm- 
ness and prosecuted with the energy imperiously demanded by 
the day and the hour, by patriotism and the love of souls, by the 
Saviour's dying command, and by his exceeding great and pre- 
cious promises ! 

The expenditures of the year have been $23,345.25 less than in 
the year preceding, and the years of missionary labor less by 50. 
The difference has arisen from the care of Presbyterian Churches 
having been assumed by the Committee of their own denomina- 
tion, and from the causes already stated which restricted the oper- 
ations of the Society in the early part of the year. 

GENERAL COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 

The following Table gives a comparative view of the amount of 
receipts, expenditures, number of missionaries, new appointments, 
congregations and missionary districts, years of labor performed, 
additions to the churches, pupils in Sabbath schools, etc., for each 
year since the organization or the Society. 



48 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Bmitely'a Ymt. 



ReoeipU. 



No. of 
. Expouditarri. Motion- 



Ooogivja 
lion* and 
:MiMi.«'.]r 
I DbtrieU. 



1—1826-27 $18,140. 
2 — 1827-28, 20,035. 
3—1828-29 26,997. 
4—1829-301 33,929 
5 — 1830-311 48,124 
6— 1831-32 1 49,422 
7—1832-33: 68,627. 
8—1833-34; 78,911. 
9—1834-35- 88,863 

10—1836-36101,565. 

H_1836-37' 85,701. 

12—1837-38; 86,522. 

13-1838-39, 82,564. 

14— 1839-40 : 78,345. 

15—1840-41J 85,413 

16—1841-42 92,463. 

17—1842-431 99,812. 

18— 1843-44'l01,904 t 

19— 1844-45 121,946. 

20—1845-461125,124, 

21—1846-47 1116,617. 

22— 1847-48|l40,197. 

23—1848-49 145,925. 

24—1849-50157,160. 

25— 1850-51 1 150,940. 

26— 1851-52 160,062. 

27— 1852-53 171,734. 

28— 1853-54 ! 191,209 

29— 1854-55 180,136 

30—1855-56.193,548 

31— 1856-57'178,060 

32—1857-58 175,971. 

33— 1858-59; 188, 139. 

34—1859-60185,216. 

35—1860-61,183,761. 

36— 1861-62 163,852. 

37—1862-63:164,884. 



70 $13,984.17 

78 17,849.22 

31 26,814.96 

44 42,429.50 

,73J 47,247.60 

12| 62,808.39 

66,277.96 

80,015.76 

83,394.28 

92,188.94 

99,529.72 

85,066.26 

82,655.64 

78,533.89 

84,864.06 

94,300.14 

98,215.11 i 

991104,276.471 

28| 118,360.12 

70)126,193.15, 

94 " — ~ 

,10 

91 



119,170.40. 
139,233.34' 
143,771.67| 
78,145,456.09 
25 153,817.90 
25 162,831.14; 
24 174,439.24' 
07ll84,025.76; 
69177,717.34; 
37,186,611.02. 
68 180,550.44; 
37190,735.70 
29 187,034.41; 
17192,737.69, 
80 ; 183,762.70i 
51 158,336.331 
29,133,843.39; 



169 
201 
3«>4; 
392 
463 
509, 
606j 
676! 

719: 

755 
810 
684 
665 
680: 
690 
791; 
848! 
907 
943 i 
97IJ 
972 
1,006, 

1,019: 

1,032 
1,065= 

1,065! 
1,087 
1,047 
1,032 
986 
974' 
1,012 
1,054: 

1,107; 

1,062 
863 
7341 



68 
89 
169 
166 
164 
158 
209 
200 
204 
249 
232 
123 
201 
194 
178 
248 
225 
237 
209 
223 
189 
205 
192 
205 
211 
204 
213 
167 
180 
187 
201 
242 
250 
260 
212 
153 
155 



196 

244 

401 

500 

577 

745 

801 

899 

1,050 

1,000 

1,025 

840 

794 

842 

862 

987 

1,047 

1,245 

1,285 

1,453 

1,470 

1,447 

1.510 

1,575 

1,820 

1,948 

2,160 

2,140 

2,124 

1,965 

1,985 

2,034 

2,125 

2,175 

2,025 

1,668 

1.455 



.• I aabtelb 1 Aror. 

Ye«n Addition* > School* oipoa. ' 

Of ! to aiwi ! " 

Labor. ;ChureW i 

. L 



RBd 
B!bl« 



, for a 
1 Mb- 



-I- 



110, not rcp not rep$127j $83 



133 

186| 

274i 

! 294| 

I 3G1 
1 417! 
463 
490 
545 
554 
438 
473 
486 
501 
594 
657 
665 
736 
760 
713 
773 
808] 
812! 
853] 
862. 
878 
870 
815 
775 
780 
795 
810 
868 
835 
612 
562| 



1,000; 
1,678! 
1,959 
2.532 



6,126, 
4,284 



306 

423. 

572, 

700 

783 
1,148; 
2,736, Pupils, j 
3,300 52,000; 
3,750! 65,000! 
3,752| 80,000; 
3,376j 67,000i 194 
3,920; 68,500 175 
4,750' 60,000 
4,6181 54,100 
6,514 64,800 
8,223! 63,400 
7,693j 60,300 
4,929 60,000 
6,311176,700 
4,40o; 73,000 
6,o20| 77,000 
6,550] 83,500 
6,682; 75,000 
6,678' 70,000 
6,820, 06,500 
6,079' 72,500| 
6,025| 65,400! 
5,634! 64,800i 
6,602; 6(»,000 
5,550 62,500 
6,784 65,500 
8,791; 67,300i 231 1 
6,287 72,200, 222 
5,600; 70,000 220 
4,007] 60,300' 259 
3.108| 54 OOOl 240| 



134 
144= 
156; 
160 
146 
169 
172 
170: 
169, 
180, 



162 
169 
159 
149! 
157! 
IGOi 
166 
167j 
180| 
178 
179 
180 
189 : 
199, 
212| 
218 
241. 
231 
240' 



88 
108 
102 
104 
109 
118 
116 
122 
123 
124 
124 
116 
123 
119 
116 
115 
126 
130 
123 
138 
141 
141 
144 
153 
160 
176 
171 
189 
185 
188 
178 
174 
173 
183 
184 



IZe?narfo. — 1. The total of receipts for thirty seven years, is 
^4,177,050.59. 

2. The total of years of lahor is 2*2,558. 

3. The whole numher of additions to the churches is 174,960. 
The largest additions were made in 1843, and in 1859. 

4. The average expenditure for a year of missionary lahor in- 
cludes the entire cost to the Society/ of obtaining the missionary, 
defraying his expenses to Ins field,* and sustaining him on it, as 
well as the average proportion of all the expenses in conducting 
the Institution, The increased average of recent years has been 
occasioned by the greater numljer of those who have held full 
commissions, the expend veness of more distant missions, and the 
larger appropriations that have become necessary as the expenses 
of living have increased, to secure to the missionary a comfortable 
support. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



47 



5. The difference between the annual average expenditure to a 
missionary and the average of a year's labor, is occasioned by the 
fact that a missionary is named and counted in a Report, though 
in some cases he may have labored but a fraction of a year. 

6. The fifth column — that of new appointments — shows how 
many have to be called in each year, to supply the places of those 
whose support is assumed by the people, the vacancies occasioned 
by death, sickness, removals, and other changes, and to make the 
increase, if there by any, over the number of the preceding year. 



1. 



DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES, Ho. 

The following Table gives the number of missionaries, each 
ear of the Socie*~' CT ~~~-«*'~~" -'- *i*~ ~~~~~«wu:^«i n:,r:o:^^o ~# 

Eastern, Middle, 



year of the Society's operations, in the geographical Divisions of 
e, /Southern and Western States ; and also in Canada. 



Gocirrr*8 Ykab. 


New England 
States. 


Middle 
States. 


Southern 
States. 


Western 
States & 
Terrlt's. 


Canada. 


Total. 


1—1826-27 


1 


129 


5 


33 


1 


169 


2—1827-28 


6 


130 


9 


56 




201 


3—1828-29 


72 


127 


23 


80 


2 


304 


4—1829-30 


107 


147 


13 


122 


3 


392 


5—1830-31 


144 


160 


12 


145 


2 


463 


6—1831-32 


163 


169 


10 


1G6 


1 


509 


7—1832-33 


239 


170 


9 


185 


3 


606 


8—1833-34 


287 


201 


13 


169 


6 


676 


9—1834-35 


289 


216 


18 


187 


9 


719 


10—1835-36 


319 


219 


11 


191 


15 


755 


11—1836-37 


331 


227 


11 


195 


22 


810* 


12—1837-38 


288 


198 


8 


166 


24 


684 


13—1838-39 


284 


198 


9 


160 


14 


G65 


14—1839-10 


290 


205 


6 


167 


12 


680 


15—1840-41 


292 


215 


5 


169 


9 


690 


16—1841-42 


305 


249 


5 


222 


10 


791 


17—1842-43 


288 


253 


7 


291 


9 


848 


18—1843-44 


268 


257 


10 


366 


7 


907 


19—1844-45 


285 


249 


6 


397 


6 


943 


20—1845-46 


274 


271 


9 


417 




971 


21—1846-47 


275 


254 


10 


433 




972 


22—1847-48 


295 


237 


18 


456 




1,006 


23—1848-49 


302 


239 


15 


463 




1,019 


24—1849-50 


301 


228 


15 


488 




1,032 


25—1850-51 


311 


224 


15 


615 




1,065 


26—1851-52 


305 


213 


14 


533 




1,065 


27—1852-53 


313 


215 


12 


647 




1,087 


28—1853-54 


292 


214 


11 


530 




1,047 


29—1854-55 


278 


207 


10 


537 




1,032 


30—1855-56 


276 


198 


8 


504 




986 


31— 185C-57 


271 


191 


6 


506 




974 


32—1857-58 


291 


197 


3 


521 




1,012 


33—1858-59 


319 


201 




534 




1,054 


34—1859-60 


327 


199 




581 




1,107 


35—1860-61 


308 


181 




573 




1,062 


35—1861-62 


295 


87 




481 




863 


37—1862-03 


281 


48 




405 




734 



•Of the**, M labored In France and Switaerland, under the direction of the Evangelical Societies o f 
Paris and Genera. 



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1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 49 



TABLE OF KECEIPTS. 

Exhibiting as far as known, the amount received from each 
State and Territory into the Treasury of the American Home 
Missionary Society during the year, and the amount expended 
by each farger Auxiliary within its bounds, constituting also a 
part of the receipts of the Parent Society. 

States and Territories. Bsoeipts. 

lUine, $1,034.52 

" Miss. Soc. expended,. . 10,902.63 $11,937.15 

New Hampshire, 2,681.79 

44 Miss. Soc. expended, 4,879.39 7,561.18 

Vermont, 4,155.95 

44 Dom. Miss. Soc. expended, 6,224.40 10,380.35 

Massachusetts, 39,520.76 

44 Home Miss. Soc. expended, 7,202.14 46,722.90 

Rhode Island, 33.41 

44 Home Miss. Soc expended, 933.00 966.41 

Connecticut, 22,181.23 

Miss. Soc expended, 7,047.44 29,228.67 

New York, 42,795.48 

Sew Jersey, 484.00 

Pennsylvania, 273.15 

Maryland, 25.00 

District of Columbia, 50.00 

Ohio 5,481.10 

Indiana, 192.24 

Illinois, 2,798.35 

Missouri, 20.50 

Michigan, 1,510.92 

Wisconsin, 1,619.54 

Iowa, ! 903.78 

Minnesota, 296.43 

Kansas, 243.60 

Nebraska, 27.50 

California, 857.75 

Oregon, 151.76 

Washington Territory, 54.00 

8sndwich Islands, 25.00 

Other sources, 777.53 

$164,884.29 



50 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT [May» 



PRINCIPAL AUXILIARIES, AGENCIES, AND MISSION- 
ARY FIELDS. 

MADTE MIS8I0NABY SOCIETY. 

Rev. George E. Adams, D.D., President; Hon. Asa Redington, Lewiston, Treasurer; 
Rev. Benjamin Tappan, D.D., Augusta, Secretary. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year endingMarch 1, were 
$10,876.89. There were also received into the Treasury of the 
American Home Missionary Society, during its financial year, 
from congregations and individuals in the State, $404.50, and in 
payments ot legacies, $630.02 — in all, $1,034.52 — making the 
total for the cause, $11,911.41 — exceeding the amount of the pre- 
vious year, by $437.33. The expenditures within the State were 
$10,902.63. ... • . 

Eighty two missionaries have been in commission, during some 
portion of the year, and have ministered to ninety four churches, 
and in twenty one places where no Congregational churches have 
been organized. The members of these churches number four 
thousand and twenty four. The aggregate average attendance on 
public worship is more than ten thousand, and the number in- 
structed in Sabbath schools and Bible classes is over six thousand. 
The additions to the churches number two hundred and forty two ; 
and the contributions to benevolent objects are equal to 18 per 
cent, of what they receive from the Society. 

The Trustees say : " "We do not regret that several thousands 
have been contributed among us for sending the Gospel to the 
heathen, and several hundreds for planting and sustaining its in- 
stitutions in the "Western States and Territories. But let it not 
be forgotten that a great missionary work is yet to be done in 
Maine, by the people of Maine. More than one hundred of our 
Congregational churches are still in need of charitable aid; and 
from many of nearly three hundred, out of 'more than five 
hundred cities, towns, and plantations, whose schoolg draw a por- 
tion of their support from State funds,' where are no Congrega- 
tional churches, comes the earnest cry — the cry of their neces- 
sities, if not of their desires — of thousands and tens of thousands 
of souls famishing in ignorance, perishing in sin, for the bread 
of life, for the glad tidings of salvation." 

HEW HAMPSHIRE MIS8I0HAEY SOCIETY. 

Hon. William Haile, President ; Rev. William Clarke, Secretary ; Rev. B. P. Stoke, 
D.D., Treasurer. Office at Concord. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$6,021.56 ; of which $767.14 were forwarded by designation of 
the donors to the parent Society. There were also received from 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 61 

the State, into the Treasury of the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, during its financial year, in payment of legacies, 
$1,208.96 ; from congregations and individuals, $705.69 — m all, 
$1,914.65. A legacy of $875, the bequest of Timothy Moors, of 
which the interest only is to be expended, has been paid during 
the year. The total, therefore, from the State, for the Home Mis- 
sionary cause, is $8,811.21 — exceeding the amount of the pre- 
vious year, by $1,316.49. The expenditures within the State were 
$4,879.39 ; and the amount put at the disposal of, and held in 
trust for, the National Institution, $3,556.79. 

Thirty nine missionaries have been in commission during the 

fear. Several of the churches to which they have ministered 
ave been visited with the special influences of the Spirit, and in 
fourteen of them there have oeen fifty seven hopeful conversions. 
There has been an increased interest in Sabbath schools, and the 
Sabbath congregations have been larger than in former years. 
Several houses of worship have been repaired ; and one, tasteful 
and convenient, has been erected. 

The Trustees, in their last Report say : " More than half of the 
two hundred and thirty three towns in the State must have mis- 
sionary aid in support of the institutions of the Gospel, if they 
shall enjoy those institutions at all. In at least sixty of these 
towns are feeble Congregational and Presbyterian churches, un- 
able themselves to support a stated christian ministry. In seventy 
of these towns are no churches of the orders above named, and 
in most of them no evangelical churches of any name, of much 
pecuniary or moral strength. In these one hundred and thirty 
three towns, is more than one third the population of the State. 
An imperious duty rests somewhere to look after the religious 
interests of these scores of thousands of our fellow citizens. I)oes 
not this duty devolve largely on our Congregational churches, an 
they have a larger membership, and more means than any other 
evangelical denomination in the State ? Was not our Missionary 
Society organized for the very purpose of affording our churches 
an efficient agency, through which to communicate the blessings 
of the Gospel to the thousands of the spiritually needy in our 
State ? Should not the churches, then, cordially and efficiently 
sustain the Society in its endeavors to impart these blessings to 
the religiously destitute within our State bounds ? " 

VERMOVT DOMESTIC XISSIOHABY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Erastus Faikbavu, President; 0. W. Stores, Esq., Treasurer; Rev. John F. 
Stoke, Secretary. Office at Montpelier. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$8,571.24, including a legacy of $2,000, to be invested and the 
interest only expended. There were, also, received from the 
State into tne Treasury of the American Home Missionary So- 
ciety, during its financial year, in payment of legacies, $3,294.76 \ 



52 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

from congregations and individuals, $861.19 — in all, $4,155.95 — 
making the total from the State to the Home Missionary cause, 
$12,727.19 — exceeding the amount of the preceding year by 
$5,232.47. The expenditures within the State were $6,224.40; 
and the amount expended out of the State, through the National 
Institution, $4,155.95. 

Sixty missionaries have been in commission. The number of 
churches and communities in which they have labored - is fifty 
eight. The average membership of the churches is forty one ; 
the smallest has but five members, the largest ninety. Not a few 
of the churches report special reviving influences and additions 
on profession of faith. One church nas been organized ; two 
have become independent of missionary aid ; and three mission- 
aries have been ordained as pastors. One faithful pastor, Rev. 
John Bowers, of St. Johnsbury East, has been called to his re- 
ward on high. The churches have sent forth large numbers of 
their mo§t efficient and valuable .members, of their most active 
and promising young men, to bear their part in vindicating their 
country's honor in this hour of her peril. 

The Directors, in view of the present national conflict say : 
" The work of Home Missions has been one powerful agency for 
preparing the nation successfully to resist and put down this 
wicked insurrection. While the friends of Home Missions have 
been prosecuting the work with a direct aim at the conversion 
and salvation of souls and the up-building of Christ's kingdom, 
and that, for the most part, without a thought of any political re- 
sult whatsoever, they have yet, at the same time, been using the 
most sure and effectual means of perpetuatingour civil institu- 
tions, and promoting our national well-being. They have labored 
to make men loyal to God, and one result of success in the effort 
has been loyalty to the 'powers which are ordained of God.' 
Had the work of Home Missions been prosecuted throughout the 
South, as thoroughly and as successfully as it has been at the North 
and Northwest, it is morally certain that this rebellion would not 
have occurred." 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIOHABY SOCIETY. 

Rev. William A. Stearns, D.D., President ; Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Treasurer ; Rer. 
Henry B. Hooker, D.D., Secretary. Office at Boston. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$32,977.13. The expenditures within the State were $7,202.14 ; 
and the amount forwarded from the Treasury to the American 
Home Missionary Society, during its financial year, was $26,000. 
There were also received from the State, into the Treasury of 
the Parent Society, in payment of legacies, $7,108.45 ; from the 
Hampshire Missionary Society, $1,208.53; from congregations 
and individuals, $5,203.78— in all, $13,520.76— making the total 
to the cause, $46,497.89— exceeding the amount of the preceding 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 53 

year by $5,629.78. The whole amount expended out of the 
State through the National Institution, was $39,520.76. 

Forty jive missionaries have been in commission. The last re- 
port of the Auxiliary gives the number of churches aided forty 
two, with a membership of one thousand eight hundred and fifty 
eighty one hundred and thirteeen of whom have been received 
within the year ; average attendance on public worship, three 
thousand eight hundred and thirteen, in the Sabbath schools, two 
thousand nine hundred and thirty one ; contributions for benevo- 
lent objects, $1,641.92. Special religious influences had been en- 
joyed in several of the churches, resulting in one hundred and 
two hopeful conversions. Two new churches had been organized 

The Executive Committee of the Society, in their annual Re- 
nort say: "We claim as one of the blessea results of our Home 
Missionary work, and as a most striking proof of its value, that 
it has so enlightened the men of the great West that not less than 
two hundred thousand of them are now fighting the battles of 
their country. But for such Gospel light as has been thrown 
upon their minds, such patriotic emotions would not have been 
theirs, and the country, in its perils, would not have them for its 
defenders. We have sown bountifully, and now bountifully are 
we reaping. We have it to say, therefore, that the strange and 
extraordinary state of things now existing in the land strongly 
encourages us, yea as with a trumpet call does summon us, to the 
peat work of giving to the niillions of the land the most effect- 
ive of all preparations for the greatest responsibilities and perils 
that can overtake a nation — its thorough evangelization by the 
great principles of the christian faith." 

BHODE ISLAND HOKE MISSIOtfABY SOCIETY. 

Hon. A. C. Babstow, President; Edwin Knight, Esq., Providence, Treasurer; Rev. 
Francis Horton, Barrington, Secretary. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$1,430.63. There were also received from the State into the 
Treasury of the American Home Missionary Society, during its 
financial year, $33.41 ; making the total to the cause $1,464.04. 
The expenditures within the State were $933. 

Six missionaries have been in the service of this Society during 
some portion of the year. One church has become independent 
of missionary aid ; and one pastor, Rev. G. W. Adams, of River 
Point, has borne testimony for Jesus, from a peaceful and joyous 
death bed, and gone to be with him above. 

The Directors, in their address to the friends of Home Mis- 
sions, say : " Patriotism pleads that the cause which has prepared 
«o many to offer -themselves a living sacrifice on the altar of 
liberty and the Union at their country's call, should not be al- 



54 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

lowed to anguish in this time which tests the heroism and endur- 
ance of the Lord's people. By the love we bear to those mission- 
aries and mission churches, whose sons have stood in the deadly 
breach, and withstood the very savagery of rebellion, hallowing 
memorable battle fields with their devotion to Heaven and good 
government, counting not their lives dear unto themselves; as 
well as by the love w r e cherish for Him whose blood was shed 
upon the cross for us all, let us do more this year than ever be- 
fore for this glorious object of Home evangelization." 

CONNECTICUT MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Horace Hooker, Secretary ; E. W. Parsons, Esq., Treasurer. Office at Hartford. 

The receipts of this Auxiliary, for the year ending March 1, 
were $5,448.40. There were also received from the State into 
the Treasury of the Parent Society, during its financial year, in 
pavment. of* legacies, $9,338.82 ; from congregations and indivi- 
duals, $12,842.41— in all $22,181.23— making the total to the 
cause, $27,629.63 — exceeding the amount of the preceding year, 
by $9.10. The expenditures within the State were $7,047.44 ; and 
the amount expended beyond its limits through the National In- 
stitution was $22,181.23. 

The Secretary says in his report, " The war draw r s heavily upon 
our feeble societies ; but I trust that eventually it will do them 
good, showing them not only their weakness, but their strength 
and ability for self-support, w r hen put to the test. A growing 
seriousness has prevailed in many of these churches, especially 
during the latter part of the year, which in some cases has 
amounted to a revival." 

Rev. William II. Moore entered upon the work of Agent and 
State Missionary, Oct. 1, and has 6ince been prosecuting his 
labors with great efficiency. He has been every where kindly 
received; the missionary churches have been encouraged and 
strengthened by his visits, and an interest has been awakened 
in the work of Home Evangelization, from which results, most 
important and lasting, are confidently anticipated. 

The total of receipts from New England is $106,796.66, — exceed- 
ing the amount of the previous vear by $10,485.99. Of this, 
$37,189.00 were expended within its bounds, and $69,607.66, for- 
warded to the National Institution for Western Missions. 

NEW YORK. 

Rev. L. Smith Hobart, Syracuse, Agent 

The number of missionaries in the service of the Society, in the 
State of New York, during the past year, is forty three. The 
amount received from the State, during this period, is $42,- 
.795AS. 



1863.] THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT. 56 

In consequence of the changes which have taken place in the 
relations of the Society, it has been found necessary to reorganize 
its system of operations in this State. Accordingly, the two 
Boards of Agency, through which it has hitherto conducted its 
work in Central and Western New York, have been discontinued, 
and their two Secretaries, Rev. John A. Murray and Rev. 
Theodore Spencer, have Retired from the service of the Society. 
The former had held his office twenty eight years, and the latter 
nine years. By their wise counsels and efficient labors, they have 
endeared themselves to the churches of this region, and will long 
be held in grateful remembrance, especially by those who have 
enjoyed their sympathy and encouragement in the work of sus- 
taining the ordinances of the Gospel. 

Rev. L. Smith Hobart, late Pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Hudson, Mich., has been appointed the Agent of the 
Society for Central and Western New York. Having been fa- 
miliar, for many years, with the principles and operations of 
the Society, ana having taken a leading part in the work of 
planting and training the churches of Michigan, he adds a valua- 
ble experience to his other eminent qualifications for the service 
he has undertaken. He entered upon his labors in October last, 
and has been diligently engaged in visiting the feeble churches 
on his field, and acquainting himself with their condition and 
needs. His visits have been gratefully welcomed, and the counsel 
and encouragement he has afforded them have served to strengthen 
the things that remain that are ready to die. He says, " The 
assistance most needed by the feeble churches in this State, is not 
always money. Their inability to sustain the Gospel, in some 
eases, arises not from the want of means in the community, so 
much as the want of means to draw them out. Sometimes the 
endeavor to get along in a cheap way, from the belief, perhaps, 
that nothing better is possible, is the chief obstacle in the way of 
self support. Sometimes the weakness is the result of variance 
among brethren, and other local causes, which a faithful effort 
could remove. Hence, though some pecuniary aid may continue 
to be received by such churches, they may be most benefited by 
judicious advice, timely encouragement, or the quickening influ- 
ence of an earnest christian appeal. It is my aim, therefore, to* 
gain such an acquaintance with all these churches, by a personal 
visitation, as will enable me to know what their necessities are, 
and to do at once what I can to relieve them. 

" The favor with which these aims are regarded by the Congre- 
gational churches and ministers of this State, is very encourag- 
ing. I find almost daily evidence that the Society holds a fore- 
most place in their esteem, and the relation which it has come to 
hold towards them, recently, will undoubtedly bring to its Treasury 
increased means of usefulness. This relation of the Society, its 
prospective ability to render all needed pecuniary help, and espe- 
cially this work of visitation — 'confirming the churches' — is 



56 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

already animating the strong with hopefulness in regard to the 
feeble, and inspiring with new life the feeble, in regard to them- 
selves." It is the confident belief of the Executive Committee 
that, by the continuance of these faithful labors, and the dispen- 
sation of pecuniary aid whenever it shall be required, many 
churches will be saved from threaten ed # extinction, the fire will be 
rekindled on many neglected altars, and many a desert will be 
made to rejoice and blossom as the rose. 

OHIO. 

Rev. James H. Newton, Cleveland. Agent for Northern Ohio. 
Rev. Ltsamder Kelsey, Columbus, Agent for Southern Ohio and Southern Indiana. 

In the State of Ohio, this Society has aided in the support of 
thirty eight ministers during the past year, and has received into 
its Treasury contributions to the amount of $5,481.10. The West- 
ern Keserve and Marietta Boards of Agency, which had been in 
existence for many years, w r ere not reappointed at the commence- 
ment of the past year. In Ohio, as in the other Western States, 
the Executive Committee are now brought into immediate com- 
munication with the churches they aid ; and it is believed that 
both the efficiency and economy of their operations will be pro- 
moted by this change. 

In Northern Ohio, the churches aided, in the midst of the most 
depressing circumstances, have made commendable efforts to re- 
lieve the Society of the burden of their support. Four that were 
on the list of its beneficiaries one year ago are now sustaining the 
public means of grace without foreign aid. One of them, the 
church of University Heights, voluntarily relinquished the grant 
of the Society, which had been already voted, and its minister 
surrendered his claim to that portion of it which had become due 
when his people assumed his support. The Agent states that " The 
Northwestern section of the State, which has hitherto been, to a 
great extent, a moral desolation, is assuming new interest as a 
field of missionary culture. It is now traversed in different direc- 
tions by three important railroads, and is advancing in material 
prosperity more rapidly than at any former time. Enterprising 
villages are springing up along these great thoroughfares, which, 
ere long, are to be important centers of influence. In one of them, 
a church has just been gathered, in the organization of which it 
was my privilege to assist. It is to be hoped that the others will 
not long remain without the institutions of the Gospel ; but if this 
great blessing is to be secured to them, it must be mainly through 
the instrumentality of Home Missions." 

In Southern Ohio and Southern Indiana, the results of the year's 
labors are such as to afford gratification and encouragement. Two 
revivals of religion have been reported. One church, nearly ex- 
tinct, has been resuscitated, and another has been gathered, in 



1863] THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT, 57 

Southern Indiana, in connection with missionary labor. " The 
missionaries," says the Agent, " have persevered in their divine 
calling, amid many distractions and discouragements, and have 
proved themselves faithful to the Master who has not left them to 
toil in vain, but has added to nearly all their churches such as 
shall be saved. We have not made the progress we hoped to 
make ; but it is sometimes & victory to maintain our ground ; ' hav- 
ing done all, to stand.' This we have done ; and in a few churches 
decided advancement has been made. With most of the churches 
on this field, now cooperating with this Society, it is a day of 
small things ; but we trust that, by the power of the Almighty 
Spirit, Jacob shall arise, though he be small. In this hope, the 
missionaries and their people are laboring together for Christ and 
their country, to build up the temple of righteousness and truth 
even in troublous times." 

mnrois. 

Rer. Joseph E. Rot, Chicago, Agent for Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana. 
Rer. Elisha Jennet, Galesburg, Agent for Central and Southern Illinois. 

This Society has contributed to the support of eighty three min- 
isters in Illinois, during the year covered by this Report, and has 
received into its Treasury, from that State, $2,798.35. This ex- 
ceeds, by $560, the amount received in the previous year, and is 
only $92 less than the average for the last five years, during which 
Presbyterian churches were in nominal cooperation with the 
Society. This fact, and others of a similar character in other 
States, warrant the expectation that the contributions of the 
churches will soon exceed the amount formerly furnished by both 
denominations. 

In Northern Illinois, seven of the assisted churches have en- 
joyed seasons of special religious interest, and six have provided 
themselves with houses of worship. Four churches have been 
organized on missionary fields, under promising auspices. Two 
of them are the only religious organizations in the communities 
where they are situated, and supply the only stated means of grace 
enjoyed by the inhabitants. The churches of this region nave 
been greatly weakened by their contributions to the ranks of the 
army. u 1 et," says the Agent, " in the midst of these troublous 
times, there has been an encouraging degree of hopefulness and 
resolution, with a strong desire to hasten the period of their self- 
support. The missionaries and their wives have borne themselves 
with commendable patience and courage, showing, often, a rare 
faculty for forcing comfort out of economy." 

" In Northern Illinois, many of the churches of the first growth, 
planted by the American Home Missionary Society, have become 
strong, and with gratifying cheerfulness are refunding to its Trea- 
sury the means of aiding other needy congregations ; but those of 
the second growth, in the new villages and the communities back 
from the thoroughfares, are in as real need of aid as those of thfc 



58 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

other class ever were, though, in most cases, they will be depend- 
ent for a shorter period. During the thirty seven years of the 
Society's existence, it has sustained, in Illinois, an average of sixty 
five missionaries, with an average annual appropriation, for the 
support of each, of $149 ;• making a total of $358,000 furnished 
for the support of the Gospel in this State. But this statement 
gives a very inadequate view of what an organized Christianity, 
with its teaching ministry, its ordinances of worship and fellow- 
ship, and its correlation to all the secular, social, educational, and 
reformatory interests of the community, can do for the well-being 
of the people and of the State." 

To the churches in Central and Southern Illinois, the past year 
has been one of severe trial. Owing to .their proximity to the 
seat of war, they have shared largely in its disastrous effects. Yet 
some progress has been made. Two churches have been organ- 
ized, one sanctuary has been erected, and three congregations, 
that were aided one year ago, have become self-sustaining. Pro- 
vision has also been made to supply several destitute churches 
with the ministrations of the Gospel. Two young men have en- 
tered upon the work of the ministry, with flattering prospects of 
usefulness, and several laborers from other States nave come to 
the help of those who have borne the burden and heat of the day 
in this neglected portion of the Lord's vineyard. Revivals of re- 
ligion, of limited extent, were enjoyed in two or three churches, 
early in the year, and at its close several others were receiving 
merciful visitations from on high. In view of these results, the 
Agent says : " There is cause tor gratitude and rejoicing. Our 
fears are being dissipated; our hopes are more than realized. 
So engrossed nave the minds of men been with the awful 
strife in which we are engaged, that we hardly dared to antici- 
pate what we are permitted to witness. In many instances the 
churches have been reduced twenty, and some of them fifty per 
cent, in respect both to membership and pecuniary resources. 
Many of those who yielded to the call for six hundred thousand 
recruits, were not only men of business and social position, but 
devoted, active Christians, iust such as we needed at home to 
sustain the ministry, and illustrate and enforce the religion of 
Christ. It gives me pleasure to state, however, that the war has 
not caused any of our dependent churches to disband ; nor has 
it, except in a few cases, necessitated larger appropriations from 
the Society. But it has obliged some to suspend operations, 
while others enjoy the preaching of the Gospel less frequently 
than heretofore. And tliis would have been more extensively 
done, had not individuals allowed themselves to be taxed beyond 
what they before thought they could bear. This experience, it 
is true, is not an unmixed evil. By showing them what can be 
accomplished in an emergency, it may hasten, to some churches, 
the period of self-support." 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 59 

MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Herbert A. Rkad, Marshall, Agent. 

Sixty two missionaries have labored in this State, under com- 
mission from this Society, during the past year. The amount re- 
ceived into the Treasury, from churcnes and individuals in the 
State, is $1,510.92. 

None of the laborers in this portion of the missionary field 
have been removed by death, since the last Report, and in many 
instances God has, in a signal manner, 6et his seal to their faith- 
ful labors. In several congregations revivals of religion have 
been enjoyed, which have greatly increased the strength and 
efficiency of the churches, and changed the tone of public senti- 
ment in regard to religion and religious institutions. " From 
nearly every section of this missionary field," says the Agent, <fc I 
hear of the gentle falling of the dews of divine grace, while, in 
some places, there have been remarkable displays of the wonders 
of God's mercy in the conversion of scores of sinners. The re- 
sults of the labors of this missionary year, in the building up of 
churches, the salvation of souls, and the enlargement of Hon, 
ought surely to encourage Eastern churches in their efforts to 
furnish the West with the institutions of the Gospel. Eight 
churches have been gathered, and an Association, with seven min- 
isters, has been formed, where until lately no minister of our 
denomination had ever preached the Gospel of Christ. In a few 
instances congregations, long embarrassed with debt, have thrown 
off the burden, and several houses of worship have been com- 
pleted and dedicated." 

The newly occupied stations, to which reference is here made, 
are on the northwestern border of the Lower Peninsula, in the 
neighborhood of Grand Traverse Bay. A tour of observation 
was made in that region, by the Agent, during the last summer, 
the results of which were given in the Home Missionary for 
October. His Report impifessed the Executive Committee with 
the importance of taking immediate possession of that new and 
most inviting field. Five laborers have already been commission- 
ed there, each of whom has gathered a church, and already God 
has graciously visited this vineyard which his right hand hath 
planted. The Agent says, in reference to this region : " These 
missionaries occupy points of great prospective importance. They 
are outlets of a fertile agricultural district, and must become cen- 
ters of commercial wealth and moral power. There are, on the 
eastern shore of Lake Michigan, other points of consequence, 
which should be immediately occupied by self-denying mission- 
aries. The country back from the Lake is fast being settled by 
farming communities. No less than one hundred and twenty 
eight entries were made, at the Land Office in Grand Traverse, 
under the Homestead Law, during the first twenty eight davs of 
January last. From the Muskegon river northward, to 6rand 



60 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

Traverse Bay, there are as fine agricultural lands as exist in the 
State — and are to he had for the asking. We may therefore ex- 
pect this region to be settled early. V ery many settlements will 
be formed there the present season, and many sheep will be scat- 
tered through the wilderness that should be gathered into the 
Shepherd's fold." Since the last Anniversary, an important 
missionary station has been occupied in the Upper Peninsula, at 
Hancock, on Portage Lake. This is a village of about three 
years' growth, and contains a population of more than two thou- 
sand souls. A church has been formed, a Sabbath school gather- 
ed, and already a marked improvement is visible in the morals 
and public sentiment of the community. This is the only post 
now occupied by this Society on the shore of Lake Superior. It 
is evident, therefore, that here, as w r ell as in the newly settled 
portions of the Lower Peninsula, " there remaineth yet very 
much land to be possessed." 

% WISCONSIN. 
Rev. Dexter Clary, Beloit, Agent. 

Seventy six missionaries have held commissions from this So- 
ciety, in Wisconsin, since the last Report, and $1,(>19.54 have 
been contributed to its funds. Six of these laborers are Welsh, 
and one is a Hollander. One hundred and twenty one churches, 
and not less than forty five out-stations, have been regularly sup- 
plied with the preaching of the Gospel. Six ministers have re- 
ceived ordination ; one nas been dismissed ; one has died ; four 
have gone from the State ; and seven have come from abroad to 
make their home in it. Of the eighty two missionaries of the 
preceding year, seven were connected with Presbyteries, and no 
longer seek the Society's aid. Four churches have been organiz- 
ed the past year ; four houses of worship have been completed, 
and several others are in process of erection. Revivals have been 
enjoved in all parts of the State. Their number it is impossible 
to give with accuracy, but they have been more numerous than 
for several years before. The general interest manifested in the 
various departments of benevolence, is highly encouraging. It 
is also gratifying to observe, in this State, a decided tendency 
to permanence in the ministerial relation. Four years ago, the 
average length of a minister's labor, in one and the same field, 
was but two years and eight months. Now it is about five years, 
or perhaps a little less. This indication is one of no inconsiderable 
significance, betokening a growing vigor, confidence, and stability. 

Home missionary operations in Wisconsin are deriving a fresh 
impulse from the more energetic cooperation of the Committees of 
Missions, appointed by the several District Conventions. These 
Committees are rendering most valuable assistance to the Agent, 
and are exerting a wholesome influence upon the missionary 
churches. The District Conventions are giving greater pro- 



1863.] THIKTY SEVENTH REPORT. 61 

minence, in their meetings, to the Home Missionary work. The 
Agent is ordinarily present, and, when unable to attend in per- 
son, forwards a written statement of destitutions, of changes, of 
successes and reverses, of appropriations and contributions; and 
the Conventions set apart certain seasons for the consideration of 
the important interests and duties suggested by these reports, or 
by their own knowledge of the condition of the work within their 
bounds. All this tends to promote an intelligent appreciation of 
the usefulness and of the methods of the Society, to facilitate its 
operations, and gradually to increase its resources. 

There are now, in Wisconsin, one hundred and ninety seven 
churches, in sympathy with this Society. Of these forty seven 
support their ministers without aid, and sixteen do so by unit- 
ing two churches in the maintenance of one minister. Thirteen 
churches, several of them quite small, and some almost extinct, 
are unsupplied with the preaching of the Gospel. This body of 
churches, nearly two hundred in number, is almost wholly the 
result of Home Missionary labors and contributions ; and em- 
braces a membership, at the present time, of about 10,200 souls. 
There is now but one waste region in the State that is not in the 
immediate vicinity of one of the Society's missionaries. 

u Wisconsin," observes the Agent, u in common with her 6ister 
States of the Northwest, feels deeply the effects of the war. There 
is no department of her interests which its influence does not 
reach. The churches are largely represented in the army. Their 
strong young men in great numbers have died, and stand ready 
to die, in defense of our country. Ihe principles inculcated in 
our pulpits, and the prayers which ascend from our altars, consti- 
tute a tower of strength in this time of peril. The Society has 
not a missionary in Wisconsin whose influence is not on the side 
of right in this conflict : and they encounter manfully the embar- 
rassments caused by it. Many young men who were known to 
have the ministry and the work of missions in view, have given 
their lives a sacrifice in this war ; christian parents have given 
their first born, and not unfrequently their only son, to God and 
the country ; and God is graciously accepting these sacrifices, and 
is blessing the churches, and converting the youth in large num- 
bers, and thus preparing the way for greater sacrifices, if need be, 
and for greater blessings. In spiritual things, our churches have 
never been more prosperous, nor has the work of Home Missions 
ever been more.hopetul. ' And while in temporal things, there is 
no less need of help than in former years, yet a cheerful trust in 
God prevails. His people in the older States whose munificence 
in our time of need has been so ample heretofore, are entitled 
to the continued confidence as well as the lasting gratitude 
of our churches and missionaries. There are resources in Wis- 
consin, both spiritual and temporal, which are susceptible of large 
development, and a christian leaven is working there, preparing 
results of great value to this land and to all lands." 



62 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

IOWA. 

Rev. Jesse Guernsey, Dubuque, Agent for Northern Iowa. Rev. Julius A. Reed, 
Davenport, Agent for Southern Iowa. 

The number of missionaries under commission in this State, 
during; the year, is eighty one. These have regularly furnished 
the ministrations of the Gospel to not less than one hundred and 
seventy five congregations, gathered, some in sanctuaries, some 
in " upper rooms," more of them in school houses and private 
dwellings, and varying in their attendance, from a score, or even 
less, to over a hundred. The contributions to the Treasury, for 
the same period, have been $903.78. This amount is somewhat 
smaller than that of the previous year, but coming as it does 
from the churches of a single denomination only, it exhibits an 
advance rather than a falling off, in Home Missionary zeal and 
liberality. Creditable contributions have also been made to the 
other standard objects of christian benevolence ; and most gener- 
ous and timely aid has been furnished, in various forms, by the 
members of these missionary churches and congregations, to the 
sick and wounded soldiers of our army. 

The \v T ide area of this State and the rapid increase of its popu- 
lation, have for a long time rendered the duties of the Agent ex- 
tremely burthensome ; and recently, the growing wants of the 
counties bordering on the Missouri river, have made it quite im- 
possible for one man, however abounding in industry, to meet the 
demand. We take pleasure, therefore, in announcing, that the 
Committee have secured, for the Southern and Southwestern 
portion of Iowa, the services of Rev. Julius A. Reed, for many 
years the Society's efficient Agent for the whole State, and who 
brings to the work the benefits of a large experience and the 
confidence of churches and ministers. 

The labors of the missionaries have been accompanied in many 
instances by the outpouring of the Holy Spirit ; and revivals of 
very considerable power have been enjoyed, or are now in progress, 
in not less than thirteen churches ; while hopeful signs of a 
special Divine work are apparent in several other communities. 
No minister has been installed as pastor of any missionary 
church, during the past year. The poverty of the churches and 
the uncertainties of the future, are most serious hindrances to per- 
manent settlements. In many instances, however, the Society's 
missionaries, though forming engagements for only a single year 
at a time, become so fully identified in feeling and sympathy 
with their people, that the ceremony of installation could add 
but little to the mutual tenderness and the sacredness of the rela- 
tion. 

The pecuniary condition of the congregations and of the com- 
^ tnunity at large has not favored enterprises of church building ; 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 68 

and we are unable to report the completion of even a single 
house of worship. Subscriptions, however, have been made 
which are likely to secure, the erection of several sanctuaries, 
during the coming season. 

It was not to be expected, that in times like these, when the 
State is drained of so considerable a portion of its young and en- 
terprising citizens, any large additions would be made to the 
number of its churches. Many who would have united in new 
organizations are in the army ; and those who remain are so 
much disheartened, in view of diminished numbers and resources, 
as rarely to have the courage to enter upon the risks of new en- 
terprises. Only two churches are reported as having been formed 
during the year. The same causes have prevented that removal 
of church debts which otherwise would undoubtedly have taken 
place. In one important particular, however, there has been en- 
couraging progress. A comparison instituted by the Agent of 
the Society between the pledges made by fifty one churches, the 
past year, toward the support of the Gospel, and those of the 
same churches for the year previous, gives the following results : 
tfc Fourteen churches pledged the same amount ; sixteen pledged 
an aggregate of $643 less than they did the year before ; and 
twenty one, an aggregate of $1,060 more than the year before ; 
showing a gain, on the whole, of $417. Measured by the christian 
zeal and liberality it betokens, and the sacrifices involved on the 
part of many a household connected with our struggling churches, 
this is no insignificant advance." And we may add that, taken 
in connection with the depletion of the churches by the war, the 
result is no less surprising than grateful. 

No considerable advance has been made, the past year, toward 
the occupation of waste places. Many counties remain without 
a minister in sympathy with the Society ; and there are numer- 
ous fields whicn a wise economy would require us to occupy at 
once, were the men and the means at hand. A considerable 
number of ministers could be furnished with immediate employ- 
ment, provided they were men " ready and fitted to enter upon 
fields whose chief attraction is their need of the Gospel." " 1 our 
or five such men," adds the Agent, " are greatly needed at once 
for churches already organized, some of them in very promising 
localities and languishing for lack of the bread of life." 

No report of the condition and prospects of the Home Mis- 
sionary work in Iowa, would do justice either to the Society or 
to the churches and ministry of the State, if it omitted to note 
the voluntary burdens and sacrifices for which the war has fur- 
nished an occasion. The twenty thousand volunteers, reported 
last year from Iowa, have since been increased to fifty thousand. 
They are the flower of her youth ; and their absence is felt in 
every hamlet and on every prairie ; but nowhere more than in the 
young and feeble missionary churches and the households of their 
congregations. The strength of many of these churches is, for 
the time, seriously impaired. They have contributed their best 



64 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

strength to the country. Let us believe that these precious offer- 
ings are recorded on high ; and that the churches shall find, in 
the result, that they have gained rather than lost, by this their 
readiness to lose, for God and their country. 

MIHNESOTA. 

Rev. RicnARD Hall, Point Douglas, Agent 

Thirty four misaionarus have labored in this State during the 
year ; and have ministered to forty live churches and twenty out- 
stations. The contributions to the Society have amounted to 
$200.43. Four laborers have entered the field ; four have left the 
State ; one has engaged in the service of the American Bible 
Society ; one has temporarily ceased from ministerial labor ; one 
has entered into rest. Two missionaries have been driven from 
their posts, and seven churches have been, for the time, broken 
up, and their members scattered, by the Indian ravages. Of the 
seven, only two have been re-gathered so as to be now enjoying 
the regular preaching of the Gospel. 

" From the year 1849," observes the Agent, " when the first 
missionaries of the Society entered the State, the missionary 
work, in common with all other interests, has experienced re- 
peated and remarkable reverses. First, there was a four years' 
diversion of the tide of emigration to California ; then came the 
visitation of the grasshoppers, laying waste a district of some 
2,000 square miles, during two successive seasons, with an inter- 
vening winter of great severity, an Indian massacre on the South- 
west border and a general panic ; then the financial embarass- 
ments of 1857 and 1858, aggravated by a season of short crops ; 
and this last year — in addition to the embarrassments of the war, 
for which Minnesota has furnished 12,000 men — there has been 
the massacre of 800 of our people by the savages, and the flight 
from their desolated homes of 10,000 men, whose necessities have 
been such aa to compel them to apply to the government and to 
private charity for relief in sickness, and from nakedness and 
starvation. This last misfortune has fallen with crushing weight 
upon every religious as well as every secular interest of the 
State. In the western counties it has very extensively disorgan- 
ized society ; and has every where laid a check upon immigration 
and general progress. And yet, all that is needed to enable the 
State to recover, almost instantly, from this depression, is, a sense 
of security from savage violence in the future. In its broad area 
of 86,000 square miles, in its fertile soil and rejuvenating climate, 
in its pineries, its extensive and unrivaled water power, its min- 
eral and manufacturing resources, and in the undaunted energies 
of an intelligent, enterprising population, is the 6ure prophecy of 
a speedy and wonderful growth ; which nothing but rampant 
wickedness, bringing upon us still other special judgments of 
God, (for those from which we have suffered must be viewed as 



1863.] THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT. 65 

' special ' judgments as related to frontier iniquities,) can pre- 
vent or long delay. The religious influences that have gone out from 
the seventy churches — now, one third of them, provided with 
houses of worship — that owe their origin and, most of them, their 
entire growth to labors sustained by Home Missionary funds, have 
already done much to mold society aright. But much remains to 
be done. Assuming, as we may, that our military defenses are ade- 
quate to the protection of our frontier from further violence, we 
may count eight missionary fields as vacant and needing to be oc- 
cupied by men who can endure hardness as good soldiers of the 
Cross. . It is hoped that military movements will soon remove all 
doubt about the safety of resuming missionary operations on the 
deserted frontiers." 

No Western State holds out stronger inducements to families in 
search of new homes than Minnesota ; and, sooner or later, it is 
destined to be tilled with an intelligent and enterprising popula- 
tion. The character of the beginnings already made leaves this 
no matter of doubt. The ministers and churches that have strug- 
gled through these early years of trial may, indeed, have further 
trials before them ; but " the morning cometh " when they shall 
rejoice in brightening prospects and life renewed. It is a privi- 
lege to be permitted to labor at the foundations of society in such 
a State. 

KANSAS. 

Rev. Lewis Bodwxll, Topeka, Agent. 

Twelve missionaries have held commissions to labor in this State 
during the past year, and have preached statedly to twenty three 
congregations. One church has been organized, another has com- 
pleted its house of worship and assumed the support of its pastor; 
and $243.60 have been contributed within the State to the Trea- 
sury of this Society. 

The church at liawrence, which has now assumed its independ* 
ence, was gathered by a missionary of this Society in October, 
1854, a few months after the settlement was formed, and was the 
earliest religious organization, among the whites, in the Territory. 
Its house of worship, commenced in 1856, was completed in No- 
vember last, and cost about $7,500. The congregation has in- 
creased to about 300, and has raised for religious uses, during the 
past year, about $1,750. As this is the first of the beneficiaries 
of tins Societv, in Kansas, which has been able to relinquish mis- 
sionary aid, tne Committee take peculiar pleasure in referring to 
these indications of a vigorous growth, in circumstances of extra- 
ordinary trial. A church, composed of colored people — fugitives 
from slavery — was organized at Lawrence about a year ago. A 
house of worship has been erected for them, and they are now 
enjoying the ministrations of a colored man, recently licensed by 
the Association; and they will depend mainly for his support 
upon the Treasury of this Society. He will spend a portion of 
5 



66 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

his time in laboring among the people of color in the neighboring 
towns, and the Committee nope that, in this and the other Border 
States, it may be their privilege to gather into folds, and provide 
with shepherds, many of these wandering sheep of Christ s flock. 
" A review of the year's work," says the Agent, u satisfies me 
that, as a community of missionary churches, we have made actual 
progress, and it has been done in the face of such obstacles as 
Eastern churches know little of. A State just out from a three 
years' war of its own, and just recovering from a fearful famine, 
with a population of not more than 80,000, has furnished her 
thirteen regiments to the war for the Union. Kansas has sent 
one seventh, while no other State has sent more than one eleventh, 
of its population to the seat of war. Other States have made 
great sacrifices, but, with their stored up capital, and a great re- 
served force of able bodied laborers, their factories, fields, and 
flocks have returned some portion of their pecuniary outlays. 
But for us, except in the neighborhood of one or two military 
posts, there are no returns. As I go from town to town, and from 
cabin to cabin, hearing the story and seeing the record of nine 
such years as Kansas has known, I can only feel that God has 
directly worked to bring, and now directly works to keep, these 
people here for some great purpose of his own. Rejoicing in the 

1>ast, and hoping in tlie future, we are in urgent need of more 
aborers. Had we the men ready to endure hardness, we could 
locate as many as eight in that number of county seats, now al- 
most wholly left to ignorance and Satan. As many more could 
be pointed to other settlements and villages, now centers of popu- 
lation and influence, which we should occupy and, as far as pos- 
sible, control by the dispensation of an intelligently taught and 
consistently exemplified Bible religion. For laborers to supply 
these vacancies, we know not where to look." 

NEBRASKA 

The state of the country has so checked emigration, that these 
remote frontiers have failed of their hoped for growth. Only 
three missionaries have been employed during the year, in Ne- 
braska ; and the contributions from within its limits have amount- 
ed to but $27.50. 

The estimated area of this Territory is 100,000 square miles. 
The population, in 1860, was nearly 29,000, exclusive of 5,000 In- 
dians, whose presence has kept at home the two regiments of 
volunteers raised for the national service. During the summer, 
a large emigration passed through the Southern portion of the 
Territory toward the mines of Colorado, Washington and Cali- 
fornia. Mormons, also, have been flocking in great numbers 
toward their " promised land " in the desert, brought through by 
their " church emigration fund ;" men, women, and children being 
compelled to travel the long way on foot. A few only, undeceived 
^ before it was too late, have remained behind in Nebraska. 



1863,] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 67 

The condition of the churches in the Territory is not, at present, 
very encouraging. Reverses, emigration to the gold mines in 
the* mountains, and the disturbed state of the country, in con- 
nection with the lack of ministers to instruct and encourage them, 
have almost ruined some of these small beginnings. Even the 
churches that are oldest and best established, and that have en- 
joyed the regular labors of faithful missionaries, find little in the 
experience of the past year to excite their hopes. They, with 
their ministers, are compelled to walk by faith. We are confident, 
however, that their faith will not be in vain. When Divine Pro- 
vidence shall grant to the nation a righteous peace, there is every 
probability that the youthful communities on this remote frontier 
will revive and grow. Already, the Territory begins to experience 
important benefits from the opening of the gold mines further 
West ; much of the surplus of its harvests being exchanged for 
the precious metal. New gold fields have also been discovered 
norm of the Platte river, and are likely to furnish another market 
to the frontier husbandman. There is a strong probability that, 
ultimately, one of the great railroads, destined to connect the 
valley of the Mississippi with the Pacific slope, will pass along 
the valley of the Platte ; and though Nebraska has thus far de- 
veloped but slowly, the time may not be distant when all this will 
be clianged. It is essential that the principles of the Gospel, and 
its faithful ministers, preside over the foundations of the commu- 
nities that are to line the Missouri and the Platte, those great 
highways of the people, and make them strong in a consecration 
to God. 

COLOEADO. 

The attention of the Executive Committee has been directed, 
during the past year, to the condition and claims of this new Ter- 
ritory. It was organized two years ago, at which time it contain- 
ed awhite population of more than 30,000, which has largely in- 
creased since that time. It lies between the 37th and the 41st 
parallels of latitude, and extends from the western boundary of 
Kansas across the Rocky Mountains to Utah, embracing an area 
of more than 100,000 square miles. Its deposits of gold are found 
to be of great extent and richness, and their value is much en- 
hanced by the recent discovery of quicksilver and coal. The Pa- 
cific railway, which will soon reach and ere long traverse the 
Territory, will bring it into easy communication with Eastern 
markets and hives or population, and will accelerate its settlement 
and material development. Its religious culture ought not to be 
overlooked or postponed. Appeals nave been made to the Com- 
mittee in behalf of several important towns, containing each from 
1,000 to 4,000 souls, and materials for the organization of Congre- 
gational churches, which, with proper nurture, would in a year or 
two snpport the ordinances of the Gospel without missionary aid. 
lie Committee, desiring to respond promptly and liberally to thi6 



68 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

appeal, have sought for suitable laborers to occupy this important 
but difficult field ; and they now have the prospect of being able 
to send forth two or three early in the present year. Thus we 
shall have added a new link to the chain of christian fortresses 
with which we are to gird the continent. 

PACIFIC C0A8T. 

Nine missionaries have labored in this interesting and important 
field during the past year, jive in California and jour in Oregon. 
Contributions have been received from churches and individuals 
in the first mentioned State, amounting to $357.75, and from the 
State last named, amounting to $151.76. One church has been 
organized, one missionary has been installed pastor, two houses of 
worship have been built, and a third nearly finished, and, in the 
face of many adverse circumstances, the missionary churches are 
generally moving forward prosperously. A degree of fortitude, 
enterprise, and devotion has been exhibited, which commands 
warm admiration, and furnishes grounds of encouragement for the 
future. 

Only one additional laborer has been dispatched to the Pacific 
coast during the year. In its earlier months, the funds of the 
Society were so reduced as to disable it for new movements of so 
costly a description ; and when this embarassment had ceased, the 
old difficulty of finding suitable men willing to meet the toils and 
pains of this remote and trying field still remained. The Society 
nas been able, in years gone by, to furnish to these shores a gooa- 
ly number of able and devoted ministers ; and it is hoped that, in 
time to come, its success will be no less encouraging. The war, 
indeed, which has drawn so many students and so many young 
ministers into the army, has drained the sources of supply, ana 
it would not be surprising if unusual difficulty should be found in 
meeting the demand. 

But, nowever successful we may be in furnishing the men im- 
mediately required on this field, no adequate supply of coming 
wants can possibly be furnished from abroad. A ministry for this 
distant region must be reared and trained on its own soil ; and the 
christian brethren, upon whom the responsibility rests, can not 
press too zealously tne work of founding and maturing such in- 
stitutions of learning as are necessary to the creation of a ministry 
thoroughly trained for all its work. Their success in this under- 
taking is essential to the vigorous prosecution of the Home Mis- 
sionary enterprise. They need colleges ably and completely 
manned, academies which shall be feeders for the colleges, facili- 
ties for indispensable theological study, and, ere many years have 
passed, a theological seminary animated with the spirit of missions. 
California is an old home of the Jesuits ; and, at the present hour, 
they are striving to secure to themselves the education of Protest- 
ant youth. Our Home Missionaries in this State need, therefore, 
v to be fitted, by their own individual training, to take their share 



1863.] THIBTY SEVENTH REPORT. 69 

in giving to its people a nobler education than is offered by Rome. 
These shores, moreover, are the resort of multitudes from the older 
States, who are characterized by superior energy and intellect, and 
who, accordingly, need and demand religious instructors that are 
able, and wise, and learned. No portion of the missionary field 
claims of its ministers a more exclusive devotedness to spiritual 
things, or a higher average of general ability and culture ; and 
when we estimate the natural resources of these States on the 
Pacific, and their relations with the islands and the empires be- 
yond, we are impressed with a sense of the importance of the 
work which has been there begun. All the world would mourn, 
were these central populations left to multiply and consolidate, 
without the sanctifying presence of the Gospel. The institutions 
that are already founded can not be sustained and perfected, ex- 
cept through the vigorous prosecution of Home Missionary labors. 
New churches must be organized, new communities invaded by 
the Gospel, additional missionaries must be sent from the East — 
with guarantees of needed aid in their support. The Pacific 
shores make an urgent appeal to the liberality of our churches and 
the zeal of the young men among our ministers. 

conclusion. 

The experience of the past year has been new. The nation has 
been called to endure the trial of protracted civil war. Burthens, 
perplexities, and griefs, unknown before, have pressed upon all its 
communities, at the East and at the West. What effect this unex- 
ampled condition of the country would have upon the operations 
of christian benevolence — how oppressive the weight of loss and 
embarrassment might prove to be — whether the East would be able 
to keep up the flow of its benefactions — whether Western mission- 
aries might not be wholly overborne — whether resources, whether 
fortitude might not fail, no man could with certainty foreknow. 
But all such doubts have been cleared. The East has not failed 
in its liberalities ; the West has not sunk beneath its burthens ; 
neither resourced nor fortitude show any beginnings of decay ; 
means have been abundant for every needed work, .and every 
where hope and determination are strong. 

The year has afforded peculiarly satisfactory illustration of the 
invigorating conservative influence of truly faithful churches, and 
has shown that in such churches is found a basis on which societv 
safely rests, a center round which public forces rally, and the hid- 
den power which gives them a right shape and direction. The 
Agents of the Societv report that, from Illinois and Wisconsin, 
one eighth of the male members of the churches have entered the 
national army ; from Minnesota, one seventh ; and from Iowa, 
nearly one fifth ; while, not only the congregations connected with 
these churches, but the entire communities which come under the 
influence of their spirit and doctrine, have manifested the same 
patriotic devotion. With the exception of a few localities — mofct- 



70 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

ly such as contain an infusion of Slave-state population — wher- 
ever you find a Home Missionary church, you also find a thoroughly 
loyal people. Nor is this to be wondered at. For, in the first place, 
every true christian church inculcates the fundamental principles of 
all well doing. The great truths concerning God and Christ, sin, 
penalty, and redemption, can not be faithfully taught without pro- 
moting morality in private life and a spirit of fidelity to all pub- . 
lie duties. But our Home Missionary churches, in addition to 
scriptural doctrines and the glad tidings of redemption, have not 
failed to inculcate and apply that second great law of Christ : 
u Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." IJut this law forbids 
the use of our neighbor, to his own hurt, for our benefit ; forbids 
the forcible taking of his property, or right of property, that an- 
other may be made rich ; the denial to him ot marriage and of 
family sanctities, that another household may be pecuniarily bene- 
fited ; the taking away of his wife and children, that other wives 
and sons may eat without labor ; the darkening of his mind and 
the breaking of his spirit, the abuse and crushing of his whole 
manhood, that another's ease or culture may be promoted. It for- 
bids the enforced degradation of one part of society, that another 
may be elevated — the creation of privileges by the destruction of 
riglits ; and thus, is opposed not only to such systems as American 
slavery, but to every social order that aims to exalt the few by a 
debasement of the multitude ; in Christ's own example, proclaim- 
ing the peculiar privilege of the lofty — that they can stoop for 
the lifting of the lowly. 

Now, it is obvious that such doctrines can not be faithfully 
preached, in their application to daily duties, public and private, 
without promoting a sense of the sacredness of essential human 
obligations and rights, and of that just authority which is their 
safeguard; thus laying deep in the soul's profoundest religious 
convictions, the foundations of truest loyalty to every just and 
equal government. No man thus educated could turn traitor to 
such a government, till he had been false to sacred hopes and be- 
liefs rooted in his soul. It is not strange, then, that Home Mis- 
sionary communities, in these days, give proof of patriotism. It 
is the natural fruit of righteous doctrine. And, more than this, 
we may expect that the patriotism will endure ; that sufferings, 
griefs, and imminent death will have no power over it ; but that 
it will outlive any long agony that God may send, and come out 
in the end pure and triumphant. 

With what solemnity, therefore, is God instructing us, that such 
churches as faithfully proclaim and apply the Gospel are the very 
roots and supports of our national being, giving life to its institu- 
tions, and at bottom sustaining its fabric against the storms. Our 
g£reat struggle has come, because such churches were not in opera- 
tion throughout all the land ; and when God has brought us to the 
end of it, our permanent safety can be insured only by planting 
Ithem everywhere. To this planting, the word of the Lord, in the 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 71 

very din of our terrible battle, is now calling us. With faith un- 
shaken by disaster, we cherish a devout conhdence that, after the 
present conflict is ended, the wholesome, conserving Puritan doc- 
trine and spirit — our most sacred inheritance from our fathers — 
shall be made to flow with new might over the people of all this 
land, bathing their souls in a renovating zeal ; and that a voice shall 
be heard throughout the continent, and even beyond the seas, say- 
ing : " Prepare ye the way of the People /" "l£ ft up a staitdard 
for the People!" "They shall call them The Kedeemed of the 
Lord !" 

In behalf of the Executive Committee, 

Milton Badger, 
David B. Coe, 
Daniel P. Koyes. 

Secretaries for Correspondence. 



72 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 



TREASUKER'S REPORT. 



Beceipts during the year ending April 1, 1863. 

From Auxiliaries, Agencies, Congregations, and Individuals, . $110,492 52 
From Legacies, ....... 54,180 77 

For Home Missionary, exclusive of copies furnished to Auxiliaries 

and Agencies, . . . . . . . 211 00 

Total amount of Receipts, . . . 164,884 29 

Balance from last year's account, . . 5,536 71 

$170,421 00 



Expenditures during the year ending April 1, 1863. 

Paid on commissions of local Missionaries,* exclusive of payments 

from the Treasuries of Auxiliaries, .... $65,267 44 
Paid by Auxiliaries! within their respective limits, . 87,189 00 

Salaries and traveling and incidental expenses of Agents and Gen- 
eral Missionaries for New York, Western Ohio, Western Re- 
serve, O., Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana, Central 
and Southern Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Northern Iowa, 
Southern Iowa, Minnesota, and Kansas, . 11,218 90 

Proportion of General Agency in Massachusetts, as by arrange- 
ment with that Auxiliary, ..... 1,600 00 
Salaries of Secretaries, Assistant Treasurer, and Clerks, . . 9,980 54 
Expenses of the Home Missionary (15,500) including copies fur- 
nished to Auxiliaries and Agencies, and sent without charge 
to Life Directors and Members, Missionaries, Contributors, 
and Friends of the Cause ; also paper purchased in advance 
for the coming year, . . . . . 6,528 61 

* For the amount pledged in support of each missionary, and other particulars, see 
the tabular statement commencing on page 13, column 5. 

f The principal Auxiliaries are those of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massa- 
chusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut For a summary of their receipts and expend* 
itures, see the notices of these Societies, as referred to in the Table of Contents ; for 
the amount appropriated in support of each missionary, see the tabular statement com- 
mencing on page 18 ; for further particulars, reference will be had to the published 
reports of these Societies. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



73 



Annual Report, (4,000,) ...... 

Printing Blank Commissions, Circulars, Drafts, Subscription Cards, 

Notices, Ac, .... 

Binding Home Missionary, and other Pamphlets, . 
Rent, furniture, warming rooms, light, Ac., 
Stationery, Books, Maps, Ac, 

Postage, 

Freight, cartage, boxes, wrapping paper, Ac, 

Anniversary expenses, 

Traveling expenses of Secretaries and Delegates to 

and Public Meetings, .... 
Legal counsel, and expenses of collecting legacies, 
Discounts and loss on uncurrent and counterfeit money, . 
Refunded, having been paid into the Treasury by mistake, 

Total amount of expenditures, 
Balance to new account, 



$499 58 



Anniversary 



94 25 
41 01 
1,208 18 
122 98 
290 99 
249 02 
188 00 

7 

867 50 

129 64 

110 57 

14 92 


. $184,991 08 
85,429 92 


$170,421 00 



This is to certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer of the 
American Home Missionary Society to April 1, 1868, and find the same correct 
and properly vouched ; and that there was in bis hands a balance of thirty five 
thousand four hundred and twenty nine dollars and ninety two cents. 



Nod York, May 7, 1868. 



GEORGE S. COE, Auditor. 



74 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



APPENDIX. 



Names of Missionaries ia each State and Territory. 

For their station* and other particulars, see the alphabetical list in the General Table. 



G. 



Maine. 

Bacheller, G. 
Baker, E. P. 
Baker, S. 
Bates, A. J. 
Bean, E. 
Beaubien, J. B. 
Boardman, J. 
Bowler, S. L. 
Burnham, J. 
Buzell, G. B. 
Carpenter, E. 
Chamberlain, J. P 
Chapman, C. 
Coan, L. S. 
Cressey, G. W. 
Dinsmore, J. 
Dodge, B. 
Eaton, J. 
Elliot, J. 
Ellis, T. L. 
Emerson, R. 
Farrer, H. 
Fobes, W. A. 
Forbush, J. 
Gould, S. L. 
Griswold, J. B. 
Guild, C. 
Hackett, S. 
Haskell, W. H. 
Hathaway. G. W. 
Hibbard, D. S. 
Higgins, S. C. 
Hoi man, M. 
Ilsley, H. 
Jordon, W. V. 
Keep, M. R. 
Knight, E. 
Kyte, J. 
Leayitt, W. 
Loring, A. 
Loring, H. S. 
Manwell B. F. 
Merrill, J. G. 



Merrill, T. A. 
Merrill, W. A. 
Mitchell, T. G. 
Nichols, C. L. 
Noble, T. K. 
Norcross, F. V. 
Norwood, F. 
Parsons, J. 
Partridge, S. H. 
Peirce, J. W. 
Perry, J. A. 
Pluiner, A. R. 
Ranney, T. E. 
Richardson, G. B. 
Richardson, H. 
Richardson, J. P. 
Richardson, M. L. 
Roberts, G. L. 
Rogers, G. W. 
Russell, R. C. 
Sanborn, B. F. 
Sewall, D. 
Sewall, W. S. 
Sleeper, W. T. 
Smith, F. P. 
Smith, J. 
Southworth, F. P. 
Thayer, P. B. 
Thurston, D. 
Titcomb, S. 
Tyler, A. H. 
Walker, J. 
Wells, J. 
Wells, T. 
Whitney, J. 
Wilcox, P. B. 
Willey, B. G. 
Wright, J. E. M. 

New Hampshire. 

Abbott, E. F. 
Adams, D. 
Amsden, S. H. 
Armes, J. L. 



Arnold, J. R. 
Benson, A. 
Bissell, 0. 
Bragg, J. K. 
Burnham, C. 
Caswell, E. H. 
Claggett,W. 
Coleman, L. 
Duncan, T. W. 
Eldridge, E. D. 
Fifield, W. 
Garland, J. 
Gerould, M. 
Gerould, S. L. 
Griswold, J. F. 
Hood, J. 
Jaquith, A. 
Le Bosquet, J. 
Leffingwell, M. 
Little, L. 
Lord, J. M. 
McClenning, D. 
Mellish, J. H. 
Rankin, A. 
Richards, A. 
Sawin, T. P. 
Stearns, J. H. 
Stimson, G. W. 
Tewksbury, G. F. 
Thompson, G. A. 
Thornton, J. B. 
Tufts, J. B. 
Warren, D. 
Wood, J. 

Vermont 

Alden, E. H. 
Bacon, W. N. 
Bailey, J. G. 
Bartlett, L. 
Bates, L. S. 
Bishop, N. 
Bonney, N. G. 
Bowers, J. 



Cady, C. B. 
Chapin, G. F. 
Chase, H. L. 
Clark, A. F. 
Clark, C. W. 
Clark, G. H. 
Coburn, L. S. 
Denning, A. T. 
Duren, C. 
Dwinell, J. E. 
Emerson, C. W. 
Ford, J. T. 
Fowler, J. 
Francis, D. D. 
Gardner, S. S. 
Gih\W. 
Gleason, G. L. 
Glines, J. 
Hall, R. V. 
Hazen, H. A. 
Hazen, W. & 
Hazzard, 0. H. 
Herrick, H. 
Johnson, T. H. 
Johnston, T. 
Kellogg, A. H. 
Kent, C. H 
Kingsbury, W. H. 
Ladd, A. 
Loring, L. 
Morgan, S. 
Newton, E. H. 
Perkins, K. B. 
Perry, I. S. 
Phoenix, S. 
Rustedt, H. F. 
Sanderson, H. H. 
Scott, C. 
Smith, G. 
Sparhawk, S. 
Spaulding, W. S. 
Stone, J. P. 
Tolman, G. B. 
Underwood, J. 
.Waterman, A. T. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



75 



Watts, L. S. 
White, P. H. 
Wild, A. W. 
Williams, S. 
Winch, C. M. 
Young, A. A. 

jfiwirhnmtti 

Ames, M. 
Babcock, D. H. 
Ballard, J 
Blanchard, EL H. 
Burgess, E. 
Burnham, A. 
Byington, S. 
Clapp, A. J, 
Clayes,D. 
Cole, S. 
Cushing, J. R. 
Deering, J. K. 
Dennen, S. R. 
Dodge, J. H. 
Dunham, I. 
Dyer, E. P. 
Fitts, J. H. 
Greene, EL S. 
Grotrian, A. 
Hall, O. 

Harrington, E. W. 
Harrison, S. 
Howard, H. L. 
Jones, T. N. 
Kent, G. S. 
Labaree, J. 0. 
Lasell, N. 
Leonard, W. 
Lombard, 0. 
Marden, G. N. 
M orgridge, C. 
Norton, T. S. 
Parker, H. 
Richardson, N. 
Rogan, D. H. 
Schwarz, L. B. 
Smith, J. D. 
Stone, C. 
Strong, E. E. 
Sturtevant, W. H. 
Tenney, E. P. 
Walker, J. B. R. 
Whitcomb, W. C. 
Whitmore, Z. 

Bhoda Island, 

Adams, G. W. 
Cook,*. 
Doe, W. P. 
Dow, J. M. H. 
Oti^O.F. 



Root, J. P. 

Gonntetiout. 

Alvord, T. 
Atwater, W. W. 
Ayer, C. L. 
Beals, D. 
Bentel, C. G. 
Bissell, C. H. 
Brooks, E. F. 
Burr, E. F. 
Catto, W. T. 
Chamberlain, C. 
Chapman, F. W. 
Clark, W. S. 
Curtis, S. I. 
Drennan, N. J. 
Dutton, T. 
Easton, T. 
Eaton, i. 
Edgar, J. 
Elliot, J. E. 
Fellows, S. H. 
Ford, H. T. 
Freeman, A. N. 
Goddard, C. G. 
Harrison, G. J. 
Hazen, T. A. 
Hine, S. 

Hopkinson, B. B. 
Howe, S. 
Jewett, S. D. 
Jones, C. M. 
Jones, H. W. 
Kinney, E. D. 
Klauss, F. A. 
Miller, A. 
Miller, G. A. 
Miner, N. 
Moore, W. H. 
Phelps, W. H. 
Piatt, D. 
Robertson, J. 
Rogers, S. 
Root, D. 
Schroeder, A. 
Sessions, J. W. 
Seymour, J. A. 
VaH, H. M. 
Wells, N. H. 
Wheeler, J. E. 

New York. 

Armstrong, R. S. 
Barstow, C. 
Bourne, S. 
Bronson, A. 
Garter, J. E. 
Chapman, E. D. 



Connell, D. 
Cowles, S. 
Deming, R. R. 
Dilley, A. B. 
Dodd, J. 
Downs, A. 
Entler, G. R 
Fisher, J. B. 
Frankfurtb, H. 
Gibbs, J. 
Hale, E. 
Hall, E N. 
Hall, W. 
Henry, W. D. 
Hudson, C. 
Jones, C. D. 
Judson, G. C. 
Ketchum, 0. 
Kyte, F. 
Lancashire, H. 
Le Vere, G. W. 
Lowing, H. D. 
Marvin, C. S. 
Miles, H. 
Newcomb, L. 
Norton, W. W. 
Porter, S. 
Powell, D. 
Scovill, E. 
Stevens, C. C. 
Stratton, R B. 
Traver, A. 
Watson, T. 
Woodhull, J. A. 
Youngs, C. 

Hew Jertey. 

Babbitt, W. H. 
Egbert, J. C. 

Penaiylvania. 

Frankfurth, H. 
Kane, S. K. 
Lyon, J. H. 
Newcomb, L. 
Porter, S. 

Ohio. 

Adams, T. 
Atkins, L. S. 
Atwater, H. C. 
Baker, E. II. 
Bartlett, F. 
Bridgman, W. 
Brinkerhoff; W. 
Brown, S. 
Clisbee, E. P. 
Cole, 8. 



Condit, W. C. 
Dana, G. 
Davies, E. 
Davies, J. A. 
Fay, L. L. 
Fenn, B. 
Fry, G. V. 
Hoi way, J. 
Hovenden, R 
Jenkins, J. D. 
Jones, A. F. 
Jones, E. D. 
Jones, H. 
Kelso, S. 
Kingsley, J. C. 
Lawrence, H. 
McCune, R. 
McLain, J. M. 
Montgomery, S. 
Parlin, J. B. 
Patton, J. L. 
Prentice, J. H. 
Root, E. W. 
Shipherd, J. R. 
Thomas, W. 
Tucker, E. R 
Wright, J. R. 

Indiana. 

Deming, F. A. 
Jones, J. H. 
Tucker, E. 
Wason, H. 
Wilson, L. 

niinoii. 

Adams, C. C. 
Amsden, B. M. 
Andrews, D. 
Armstrong, F. A. 
Atkinson, W. B. 
Avery, E. H. 
Baker, J. D. 
Barnard, L. E. 
Barnes, C. M. 
Bartlett, E. N. 
Barton, C. B. 
Beecher, F. W. 
Blakeman, P. 
Breed, C. C. 
Brewer, J. 
Brown, J. M. 
Buss, H. 
Cadwell, C. C. 
Cass, J. W. 
H. Chamberlin, Yf. A. 
Chapman, J. 
Church, B. C. 
Church, L. 



76 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Clark, N. C. 
Coltrin, N. P. 
Conrad, C. E. 
Dickerson, 0. C. 
Dill, J. H. 
Dilley, S. 
Eaton, C. H. 
Edwards, J. S. 
Eells, D. B. 
Forbes, S. B. 
Fuller, F. L. 
Gore, D. 
Hancock, C. 
Harper, A. 
Harrison, C. S. 
Harvey, C. A. 
Haskins, B. F. 
Hawley, Z. K. 
Higley, G. T. 
Hildreth, E. 
Hodges, J. 
Holmes, T. H. 
Hubbard, G. B. 
Johnson, J. A. 
Jones, D. J. 
Jones, L. 
Kellogg, S. H. 
Rilbourn, J. 
Lawson, F. 
Leonard, J. 
Lewis, E. N. 
Lloyd, W. A. 
Lyman, A. 
McCord, R. L. 
Miles, M. N. 
Morris, E. 
Morse, A. 
Nichols, W. A. 
Osinga, S. 
Penfield, S. 
Pennoyer, A. L. 
Piatt, H. D. 
Porter, S. F. 
Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. L. 
Roberts, J. G. 
Schlosser, G 
Selden, C. 
Snow, R. R. 
Tade, E. 0. 
Thrall, S. R. 
Veitz, C. F. 
Wainright, G. W. 
Wheeler, F. 
White, J. W. 
Williams, G. W. 
Winter, A. 
Worrell, B. F. 
Wright, W. B. 
^ Wyckoff, J. D. 



Mifsouri. 

Frowein, A. 
Sturtevant, J. M. 

Michigan. 

Allen, J. W. 
Anderson, J. 
Ballard, J. 
Berney, D. 
Bisbee, C. G. 
Bliss, T. E. 
Branch, E. T. 
Breed, S. D. 
Bross, H. 
Campbell, D. B. 
Campbell, W. M. 
Cherry, H. 
Comstock, D. W. 
Crane, I. C. 
Crosby, J. D. 
Crumb, J. H. 
Denton, J. 
Esler, W. P. 
Evarts, N. K. 
Glidden, N. D. 
Goodale, 0. M. 
Gridley, J. J. 
Groyer, N. 
Hall, W. 
Hitchen, G. 
Jones, L. H. 
Kedzie, A. S. 
Kidder, J. S. 
Kidder, J. W. 
Lucas, H. 
McCarthy, R. G. 
McKay, J. A. 
McLain, J. M. 
Miles, G. H. 
Millard, J. D. 
Myers, J. C. 
Norton, S. 
Osborn, C. 
Pattinson, W. 
Penfield, H. 
Piatt, W. 
Porter, M. M. 
Rice, E. H. 
Robson, W. W. 
Rose, W. F. 
Russell, W. P. 
St Clair, A. 
Scotford, J. 
Sessions, S. 
Spooner, C. 
Stevenson, J. R. 
Stewart, E. J. 
Strong, G. C. 



Sykes, L. R 
Temple, C. 
Thompson, G. 
Vetter, J. 
Warren, L. 
Whitney, E. 
Williams, W. B. 
Wirt,D. 

Wisconsin. 

Allen, A. S. 
Avery, H. 
Ball, J. N. 
Barteau, S. H. 
Baxter, B. S. 
Benson, H. H. 
Brown, E. 
Cadwell, C. C. 
Campbell, D. A. 
Canfleld, P.* 
Catlin, W. E. 
Chapin, H. M. 
Clinton, 0. P. 
Cobb, H. W. 
Conly, J. 
Davies, J. 
Davis, D. S. 
Dickinson, D. S. 
Dixon, A. M. 
Donaldson, J. W. 
Durham, B. 
Dwinnell, S. A. 
Everdell, R. 
Goddard, E. N. 
Griffiths, G. 
Hall, J. 
Harris, J. W. 
Hassell, R. 
Hayes, J. M. 
Healey, J. W. 
Hurlbut, T. B. 
§ lams, F. M. 
Jameson, J. 
Jenkins, J. S. 
Jones, D. 
Jones, J. P. 
Jones, W. W. 
Lathrop, A. C. 
Laughlin, A. D. 
McNeal, J. 
Marsh, J. T. 
Matthews, C. W. 
Mayne, N. 
Miller, J. W. 
Miner, H. A. 
Overton, A. A. 
Parker, A. 
Parker, L. 
Parmelee, H. M. 



Perkins, J. W. 
Pettibonc, P. C. 
Phillips, D. 
Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. P. 
Sabin, L. P. 
Scbroeck, F. 
Sedgwick, A. 
Seward, E. D. 
Sewell, R. 
Sherrill, F. G. 
Sherwin, J. C. 
Smith, 0. M. 
Soule, J. B. L. 
Southworth, T. D. 
Stevens, W. R. 
Stoddart, W. 
Strong, J. W. 
Thompson, C. W. 
Thompson, S. H. 
Thorpe, W. W. 
Todd, J. D. 
Tucker, G. L. 
Warner, J. K. 
Watts, J. 
Wells, M. 
Williams, R. 
Woodruff, L. N. 
Young, A. A. 

Iowa. 

Adams, E. 
Adams, H. 
Adams, W. A. 
Allen, W. W. 
Apthorp, W. P. 
Avery, W. P. 
Baldwin, A. V. 
Blakeman, P. 
Boardman, H. E. 
Bordwell, D. N. 
Bullen, H. L. 
Cady, C. S. 
Canfield, T. H. 
Clark, E. 
Cleveland, E. 
Coleman, W. L. 
Cross, M. K. 
Davis, I. S. 
Drake, A. J. : 
Emerson, 0. 
Evans, E. J. 
Fifield, L. B. 
French, 0. 
Gates, C. H. 
Gates, H. N. 
Gilbert, J. B. 
Goodenow, S. B. 
Graves, A. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



17 



Griffith*, E. 
Grout, S. N. 
Harper, A. 
Hayes, G. 
Hayes, H. H. 
Hemenway, S. 
Hill, J. J. 
Hitchcock, A. B. 
House, A. V. 
Hunter, R. 
Hurlbut, J. 
Jones, D. E. 
Jones, T. 
Judisch, F. W. 
Keith, W. A. 
Kennedy, J. R 
Kent, W. 
Kimball, E. P. 
King, H. D. 
Knowles, D. 
La Dow, S. P. 
Lane, D. 
Langpaap, U. 
Leonard, A. L. 
Littlefield, O. 
Loring, A. T. 
Manson, A. 
Mathews, L. P. 
Merrill, O. W. 
Mitchell, A. R. 
Nutting, I. H. 
Nutting, J. K. 



Osborn, W. H. 
Roberts, B. 
Russell, L 
Sands, J. D. 
Savage, D. F. 
Skinner, T. N. 
Smith, E. P. 
Smith, W. J. 
Spaulding, B. A. 
Stuart, R. 
Taylor, C. 
Tingley, M. 
Uhlfelder, S. 
Upton, J. R. 
Van Antwerp, J. 
Veitz, C. F. 
Wilkinson, R 
Windsor, J. H. 
Windsor, J. W. 
Windsor, W. 
Woodward, G. H. 

Minnesota. 

Barnes, J. R 
Beekman, J. C. 
Bent, G. 
Bigelow, W. 
Biscoe, G. S. 
Blumer, A. 
Burt,D. 
Clark, G. K. 



Cochran, J. 
Crawford, W. 
Dada, W. B. 
Doane, H. 
Elliot, S. M. 
Fox, A. K. 
Gilbert, L. C. 
Hall, S. 
Harrison, C. S. 
Hayiland, B. F. 
Humphrey, C. C. 
Newton, E 
Packard, A. K. 
Bounce, J. S. 
Seccombe, C. 
Shedd, C. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Snell, W. W. 
Sterry, D. C. 
Stevens, W. R 
Strong, J. C. 
Teele, E. 
Thomas, 0. A. 
Twichell, R. 
Whitman, J. S. 
Willard, H. 
Woodruff, L. M. 



Beckwith, G. A. 
Cordley, R 



Hooker, A. M. 
Liggett, J. D. 
Mc Vicar, P. 
Morse, G. C. 
Paine, R. 
Parker, R D. 
Rice, G. G. 
Robinson, H. P. 
Storrs, S. D. 

Nebraska. 

Gaylord, R 
Heaton, I. E. 
Hurlbut, E. B. 

California. 

Bartlett, W. C. 
Chamberlain, J. P. 
Cummings, H. 
Jones, W. L. 
Zelie, J. S. 

Oregon. 

Atkinson, G. H. 
Condon, T. 
Dickinson, 0. 
Starr, M. B. 



78 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

RELATIONS OF AUXILIARIES, AGENCIES, &c. 



State and other large Auxiliaries. 

Most of the State Missionary Societies were in existence before the formation 
of the National Society, and some of them were among the earliest organized 
efforts in our country for sending the Gospel to the destitute. They have vol- 
untarily connected themselves as Auxiliaries with the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, from a conviction, that greater unity of plan and efficiency in action 
would thereby be promoted. 

The terms by which such Auxiliaries — acting on the Principles of the Parent 
Society, undertaking the supply of the destitute within their own bounds, and 
paying over their surplus funds to the Parent Institution — are connected with 
the Parent Society, are such as to secure the following objects, viz. : 

First — The Auxiliary is not superseded or overshadowed by the National 
Institution, but, on the contrary, is invigorated and sustained by connection 
with it 

This is secured by the provision that the Auxiliary is the sole agency for 
this cause that operates on its field. It controls all appointments in the State 
to which it belongs. From it alone, so far as its means will allow, the feeble 
churches receive assistance. Thus a direct relation and strong attachment is 
cherished towards it, in the hearts of the ministers and churches. 

Again — while the local operations of the Auxiliary are thus encouraged and 
sustained, its connection with the Parent Society is such as to awaken an in- 
terest in the destitute beyond its own limits, and afford facilities for reaching 
them. It is not only a Society for local purposes, but it is also a branch of the 
National Society, and, as such, has the control of all agencies for the collection 
of funds within its own field, and can direct the manner in which its surplus 
resources shall be expended beyond its own limits. Thus, the State and other 
large Auxiliaries are not merely organizations to help the Parent Society ; they 
are integral parts of it, bound together in one whole by a common interest in 
and free access, through the Parent Society, to the great field to be occupied, 
and governed by the same general principles and rules in carrying on the work. 

Agents. 

Besides preaching to the destitute and taking up contributions for Home Mis- 
sions, the Agents of the American Home Missionary Society exercise a general 
superintendence of the operations of the Society within their respective fields. 
By correspondence and personal visitation they ascertain the wants of the des- 
titute ; assist them to obtain the preaching of the Gospel ; and instruct and 
encourage them to develop their own means for its support. They receive ap- 
plications for aid, and make such preliminary examination as may be necessary 
before submitting them for the action of the Executive Committee ; and in other 
ways labor to insure a judicious and economical application of the Society's 
funds. At present the Society has in its employ no merely collecting Agents, 
nor any whose services are not required for other purposes in the regions where 
they labor. The Secretaries of several of the larger Auxiliaries are also the 
Agents for this cause in their respective bounds. 

Committees of Missions.! 

The American Home Missionary Society has ever regarded the ecclesiastical 
bodies as the appropriate judges of the standing of their own ministers, and of 
the wants of the churches in their connection. Accordingly, the commission 
issued to every missionary requires* that his credentials be acceptable to the 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 79 

ministerial body of his denomination, within whose bounds he is appointed to 
labor. And the various ecclesiastical bodies are invited to appoint each a 
Committee of Missions from its own members, to receive application from its 
churches, and suggest to the Society the action proper in each case. Such a 
Committee constitutes the official source to which reference can be had for in- 
formation and advice, in all matters pertaining to missions in the connection to 
which it belongs. This mode of cooperation has been preferred by numerous 
ecclesiastical bodies, from the first formation of the Society. It guaranties to 
the churches, that their respective claims shall be fairly considered, with all 
the advantage of having the indorsement of the body to which they belong. 
The advice of such a Committee, acting in the name and by the direction of the 
ecclesiastical body to which they belong, is regarded as the highest authority in 
matters pertaining to the standing of ministers and churches in their connection, 
and has the same influence with the Society, as would that of the Board of 
Agency appointed by itself 

There is one limitation to this influence, however, which ought to be stated. 
Should any ecclesiastical body so far swerve from the principles of truth and 
gospel order, as not to retain the fellowship and confidence of the great body 
of the churches cooperating in this Society, that fact would cause its recom- 
mendations not to be respected, as a basis of action, by the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

As cases may occur in which the feeble churches may not be aware of the 
existence of any Committee of Missions, through whom to apply for aid, a gen- 
eral provision is made, that application may be vouched by any two ministers 
of known and approved standing, of their own denomination, who can certify 
to the facts of the case. If the information thus given is not sufficient, other 
facts are sought by the Executive Committee, with as little delay as practicable, 
from the most authentic sources from which they can be obtained. 

Such, briefly, are the relations of the American Home Missionary Society to 
the various organs, through which the community seeks to act out its mission- 
ary feeling. It will be seen that this plan secures the united action, in the mis- 
sionary work, of those whose views of doctrine and church order admit of co- 
operation, and whose interests in the great field arc essentially the same. This 
combination insures a homogeneous policy as to the manner and amount of ap- 
propriations, and the qualifications of missionaries ; it has discouraged sectional 
feelings, and diffused throughout each part an interest in all the rest ; and thus 
has formed ties between the West and East, along which has pas>ed from the 
latter to the former a silent and invisible current of moral influences more valu- 
able, if possible than all pecuniary grants. At the same time the connection 
of the Parent Society with the varioos associations that act with it, is such as 
to secure to them entire freedom in the missionary work, in their respective 
spheres, and an influence beyond them, in cultivating the waste places of our 
common country. 

Applications for Aid. 

Feeble congregations, applying for aid in supporting the Gospel, are requested 
to embody in their application the following particulars, viz. : 

The name of the church or congregation ; the number of communicants, and 
the average number of attendants on public worship ; the denomination and 
size of congregations immediately contiguous, with the distance to their places 
of worship ; the total amount of salary which the applicants propose to make 
up, the portion of that salary which they pledge for the given time, and the 
arrangements that are made for securing it ; whether aid is expected from any 
other source ; and the least amount that will suffice from this Society ; whether 
the minuter for whom a commission is desired, is the pastor of the church, or if 
not, whether any arrangements are made or contemplated in the course of the 
year, with reference to his installment These statements should be signed by 
the trustees and officers of the church, or by a committee of the congregation, 
and confirmed by the certificates of two or more clergymen acquainted with 
the fret* Also, 



80 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

The name and post office address of the minister whose services they desire 
to secure ; whether he is a resident of the place in which he preaches, and is 
engaged in any other calling than that of the ministry ; his credentials ; and 
the certificate of two or more ministers of known standing, as to his general 
character for piety, zeal, and acceptableness, as a minister of the Gospel. 

Where the ecclesiastical body with which a church is connected has a "Com- 
mittee of Missions," to act in their behalf; this Committee are the proper per- 
sons to certify the statements of the church, the standing of the minister, and 
his prospects of usefulness in the place where his services are desired ; and the 
application should be sent to them for their indorsement and recommendation. 

Applications, after being properly indorsed and recommended, should be ad- 
dressed to the care of the Agent (or Secretary of the Auxiliary) for the region 
where the applicants reside. 

As a general rule, the appropriations of the American Home Missionary 
Society are for twelve months from the date of the application; at the end of 
which, if further aid be needed, a new application must be made, containing all 
the particulars above stated, and indorsed and recommended in like manner. 
Ana each congregation applying for renewed aid, should furnish in addition 
to other testimonials, the certificate of the missionary, that they have fulfilled 
their previous pledges for his support. 

The address of the Society's Agents and the Secretaries of its Auxiliaries 
will be found on the cover of its Reports, and of the Home Missionary. Where 
no such medium of communication with the Society exists, applications may be 
sent directly to the Society's office in New York. 



ADDRESSES 
At the Thirty Seventh Anniversary. 



Address of Rev. Joseph E. Boy, of Chicago, Illinois, 

ON MOVING THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION. 

Resolved : That our devout thanksgiving is due to Almighty God for what 
the Gospel of His Son has accomplished at the West, through the agency of the 
American Home Missionary Society. 

In moving the adoption of this Resolution, and in what I may say, I shall 
but attempt a duty of filial gratitude. I appear among you a son of the West, 
a child of Home Missions. Born in Central Ohio, the years of my childhood, 
until the age of twelve, were passed under the ministerial care of a beloved 
Home Missionary, sent out from Andover by this Society to "blaze" his way 
through that unbroken forest. By him my mother was brought into personal 
fellowship with Christ ; and only last evening I was told, by relatives in this 
neighborhood, that at the time she expressed to them her gratitude to the 
American Home Missionary Society for sending out that man of God. Thence 
removing with my parents to the Northwestern part of Illinois, I was brought 
under the influence of another blessed Home Missionary, whom we found al- 
ready upon the ground, having preempted, in advance of all others, that beau- 
tiful tract of country on the north bank of Rock River for his Master, Christ 
Under his ministry I was led to the Savior, and started upon a course of pre- 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH BEPORT. 81 

paration to preach the Gospel. As I love those men for their personal excel- 
lence and for their self-denying devotement to their pioneer work, the one, 
Henry Shedd, who still abides in that first pastorate of thirty four years, and 
who has sent my playmate, his son, a missionary to the Nestor Ling, and the 
other, Eli>ha Hazard, now of sainted memory, so do I love that Society which 
sent them to set up the kingdom of God in those Western wilds. 

Up to the time of my coming, in 1850, to enter the Union Seminary in this 
city — alter a course of education in a Western college, and after two years of 
teaching in a Western Academy — I had not enjoyed the privilege of worship- 
ing statedly in a church edifice. But our unfinished dwellings, our half-story 
chambers, our rucfe school-houses were to us real sanctuaries, because of the 
presence of God in power unto the salvation of many souls. In the Seminary, 
when my room-mate, also from the West, and myself were prayerfully canvass- 
ing the duty of being missionaries, he was directed to the foreign field and his 
companion to the home, as the corrective departments of the same work. That 
service 1 entered under a Home Missionary commission, and am now officially 
engaged in caring for the destitute places and feeble churches of my district. 
With this occupation, having been baptized, convened, and educated under tho 
influence of Home Missions, may I not in this cause modestly use that phrase 
of our eirly classic, " Q lorum p.irs fui," or even that of Divine authority : u Wo 
speak that we do know, and testify that we have seen'* ? 

Yjt, in giving my testi.nony as to what Home Missions have done for the 
West, so vast and so varied is that influence that I can but indicate a few ap- 
proximate and suggestive specifications. As it is difficult to realize the growth 
of Mtir country in the birth of States and the pcop ing of the continent, together 
with the astounding development of its matt-rial and political power, so it is 
almost impossible to estimate the more occult, but no less potent, force of that 
missionary enterprise, which, pari pas*u y is following that wonderful progress 
across the land. 

I The most apparent item is that which the Report is able to put into figures 
— t'-ie consecration of $4,341,935.48 to the work, the perform mce of 22,558 
years of missionary labor, the preaching of the Gospel at 5,000 stations in 
twenty six States and Territories and the graduating into a slate of sclf-s ipport 
of m >re than 1,200 churches, which, if gathered as the alumni of this Institu- 
tion, at the present Anniversary, would crowd out this vast assembly and bring 
you * population of 178,008 souls gathered into their communion. But how 
little do such data indicate of the spiritual power of this evnngclistn ? The ex- 
tent of the view confuses the impression. One conversion fills heaven with 
joy. How much more tho salvation of these tens of thousands gathered by the 
humble missionaries to the praise of the glory of God's grace ! Yet this is not 
simply so many converts gained to Christ; but, scittcred as they «re in thou- 
sand* of places, they become so many nuclei of radiating influence, so much 
leaven to work upon the mass around them. 

Then how much of enterprise and toil and endurance, and also of blessing and 
promise, is incident to the establishment of one single church of Christ in our 
new countries. What trial of faith, and patience, and ^elf-denial ! And then 
this work is repeated as fast as new openings in the wilderness occur. My hon- 
ored College President, in a late number of his Chrutian Era, has finely s«id: 
u There is something inexpressibly beautiful in a church planting society, pene- 
trating all moral wastes and wilds. To set up churches of Christ, and then 
going on to leave them, thus keeping up a perpetual Spring-work,' as the 
faraiers call it, toward the setting sun." It is interesting and profitable to pass 
bick over the track of these sowers who "go forth to sow the good seed of the 
kingdom of God," to mark the growth and the harvests that have fo' lowed 
them. This Society, which has imitated the example of Jesus who " went 
about all the cities and villages teaching and preaching the Gospel" now fin* Is 
the monuments of its work in the prominent churches of nearly all the cities of 
the Went, not to speak of many such in the Middle and Eastern States. Cross- 
ing the State of Michigan, two years ago, on the Central R-iilway, in compmy 
with one of the Secretaries of this Society, as we passed thiougi those bcauti- 

6 



82 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

ful and flourishing cities of Ypsilanti, Ann Arbor, Jackson, Marshall, Kalamazoo, 
and Niles, I was surprised, although a Western man, to hear him say that the 
first churches of the cooperating denominations in all those places were once 
their beneficiaries. In Indiana nearly all of the large churches of the Coopera- 
tion were once recipients from this Treasury. In Illinois the first churches of 
Chicago, Galenn, Springfield, Quincy, Jacksonville, Ottawa, and so also those 
of Milwaukee, Dubuque, St Paul, and San Francisco, were of the same num- 
ber. Looking at one of these older churches, with its large and costly house of 
worship, with its extensive membership, with its able ministry of the Word, its 
appliances of home evangelization, its expanding benevolence, and its metro- 
politan influence, and comparing this with the missionary germ deposited in a 
stubborn soil, how strikingly does it illustrate the productive power of the Gos- 
pel and the profitableness of early sowing. And the seeds of such churches the 
Society has sown broadcast over the West. 

It has been a favorite principle of the Society to seek a permanent ministry 
instead of one itinerant and spasmodic. Incidental to the vicissitudes and the 
heterogeneousness of the new settlements there has been much of change ; but 
yet there is an improving disposition to prolong the period of pastoral service, 
the average length of which is quite perceptibly increasing, and this very much 
on account of the policy of this Society, while there are among former mission- 
aries not a few specimens of extended pastorates — such as that of my first pas- 
tor, Henry Shedd, of Mt. Gilead, 0., thirty three years; of M. M. Post, of Lo- 
gansport, Ind., thirty four years ; of M. A. Jewett, Terre Haute, twenty five 
years ; of Wm. Carter, Pittsficld, 111., twenty five years ; of J. C. Holbrook, 
Dubuque, twenty one years; W. Salter, Burlington, Iowa, seventeen years ; A. 
B. Bobbins, Muscatine, twenty years — an average of twenty five years. 

II. Another item : the American Home Missionary Society has poured a 
stream of New England theology across the West. 

In God's wisdom, at the time of the settlement of this country, Puritanism 
was assigned to New England and the Scotch-Irish theology to the Middle 
States. Each system went on its way developing its theories and its appliances. 
While they dwelt apart there was fraternal recognition, harmony of spirit in 
diversity of view. But when impelled by the aggressive element of the Gospel 
lodged in each, they followed the tide of emigration from their respective sec- 
tions of country to the newly discovered West ; and when their organizing 
tendencies were set to work, they found their doctrinal peculiarities confronting 
each other in no attitude of sympathy. But still there was personal christian 
love and a common evangelizing spirit. An expedient of union was tried. But 
still the two systems struggled together in the womb of this Charity. Mean- 
time arose the American Home Missionary Society, taking its life and character- 
istics, as well as its origin, from New England. Intent upon its catholic mis- 
sion, it did not espouse either side of the controversy, although it could but be 
true to the Lord's free spirit breathed into it at birth. The fact soon appeared 
that, by the process of affinity, the Society had become practically the repre- 
sentative of the New England theology, as it has now of the Pilgrim polity. 
This intensified and complicated the old antagonism, which, reaching up to a 
high judicatory, resulted in the excisiun of the said theology and the said So- 
ciety. 

Since then the Society has been sending out into every corner of the* West 
its hundreds of missionaries, who have propagated the Gospel through the im- 
proved and more efficient doctrinal system. This has been a work of great 
importance. Those views of Scriptural truth, as well as their attendant ideas 
of freedom in God's house and in the State, did not belong exclusively to New 
England any more than the Gospel belonged to the Covenant people. They 
belonged to mankind and to the world, and so to our whole country. The 
Lord had need of them for the West in its formative state, and so he raised up 
this agency to supply the demand. The efforts to keep them back within the 
limits of Byram River were over-matched by the purpose of God. 

The result has been just what you would expect from the nature of the sys- 
tem. The good seed produces the same fruit upon the prairies that it does 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 83 

upon the eastern shore, bringing forth strength, breadth, and independence of 
character wherever it grows, and permeating society with its spirit. This sys- 
tem has been a rational and effective antidote for the multitudinous "isms" of 
the new country. It has infiltrated strength into other communions. I have 
been solicited by Methodists to resuscitate preaching in churches where it had 
fallen into suspense, because, said they, when your church prospered, ours did ; 
and now that yours is down, ours droops. They assigned as a cause the gener- 
ous rivalry, and I, an additional one, the stimulus of another theology. 

It has been a grief to many of our friends that the earlier New England 
emigrants, going more by the affinity of doctrine than of polity, fell into the 
molds they found already prepared instead of setting up their own, and thus 
saving to the Puritan Brotherhood their entire family. But it is a compensa- 
tion that the science of theology has been so largely the gainer. By this affi- 
liation and the resultant conflict there was not only a gain to the Puritan the- 
ology of that large body of exscinded New Englandized Presbyterians, but the 
old system itself under the attrition of discussion has been materially modified 
and by so much empowered. And still the conquest is going on. As Western 
minds, though not of New England extraction, come into contact with this 
theology and with that church constitution, through which it naturally comes 
into organic life, they are drawn to its standard, not because it comes from 
Plymouth Rock, but from the Bible Rock. So that in the end Puritanism will 
be found to have gained more in the dissemination of its principles than it has 
lost in numerical strength, if indeed this also, by the reaction, is not more than 
made up. And is it not a gain to have filled an old form with a new spirit and 
power ? Of Scotch, New Jersey, Presbyterian stock, I suppose that I have a 
right to say these things. Perhaps, also, this leavening of doctrinal opinion 
among us may be something of an offset to that barbarism which was thought 
by some to be our first danger. In the strife of theologies and polities, we 
have been obliged to investigate for ourselves, and that, too, thoroughly and 
constantly — a process which has not only carried us back to New England but 
to the New Testament, so that, so far from our meriting the stigma of " loose- 
ness," we may not only have come to a more understanding view of some 
points held in common, but the Lord may have opened to us some new truth. 

III. Again, Home Missions have done much for the general welfare of the 
Wwt 

Humboldt has acknowledged the indebtedness of the literary and scientific 
world to the labors of foreign missionaries. Any patriot must appreciate the 
obligation of our country to the services of its Home Missionaries. In this 
carving of new Territories and States so rapidly that we can hardly keep pace 
with the new geography, there is an oppressive query started as to what will 
be their moral complexion. To just, this problem the Home Missionary ad- 
dresses himself. In the commotion of the newly forming society there is 
needed a central organizing mind, around which the elements may crystallize. 
Such a function docs our Home Evangelist perform, so that often he becomes, 
in his own person, a Missionary Society, a Tract Society, a Bible Society, a Tern 
perance Society, and an Education Society ; and from this center have many 
times started off all the movements of benevolence and public spirit in a com- 
munity. Recently, a citizen of one of the older towns in Illinois said to me 
that for the beautiful shade trees that now embowered their public square and 
their streets, for the fact of their early and persistent temperance character, 
and for the prosperity of their Academy, (where I myself had the privilege of 
preparing for college.) they were indebted to their first Home Missionary, who 
could also walk twelve miles over the wild prairie to meet his extra appoint- 
ment 

An amazing contrast between frontier villages is often apparent. One has 
schools and good society, a healthy public sentiment, with thrift and temper- 
ance. The other lacks all these, and lags and languishes except as a haunt of 
saloon-loungers, office-gamblers, and doubtful patriots. And what is the 
cause ? One has the Home Missionary, and the other has not 

Then the same spirit which induced the Pilgrims to found their Harvard atvd 



84 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

Yale inspires the Home Missionaries to establish the college for their new Terri- 
tory. Hudson, Marietta, Wabash, Illinois, and Beloit originated in this way. 
Scarcely had the "Andover Band " secured their preaching appointments, before 
they were praying and planning for their Iowa College In Kansas even, the Bor- 
der Ruffian anarchy could not repress the efforts of the missionaries for theirs. In 
California they are already rejoicing in their Pacific University, endowed and 
manned. Such institutions in these embryo empires educate the minds that 
are to mold the State. 

IV. Again, Home Missions have done much for the assimilation of our popu- 
lation. 

The elements that are to be wrought into the symmetry of one body are like 
those of the image which was of gold, silver, brass, iron, and clay. By the 
Report of the Public Schools of Chicago it appears that the more than 17,C00 
enrolled pupils were born in 34 different States and Territories and in 42 
foreign countries A Western settlement often reproduces the multiplicity 
of races that received^ the power of Pentecost Ai d there was exhibited, as 
it were, a specimen, by anticipation, of the true process of at sanitation, when 
each spoke a language different, yel blended into one unity by enthusiastic love. 
There is nothing like Christianity to harmonize the disc ot dan t material of new 
communities. No other principles of association are so powerful. The min- 
gling with equality in the assemblies both for social and spiritual purposes, the 
brotherhood principle of organization, and especially the fusing process of re- 
vivals of religion, all these tend to reconcile contrarieties of education and to 
form as a resultant the more versatile and efficient character. Then, outside of 
the circle of this fellowship, the same process, with less intensity, but with as 
great certainty, goe* on through those matters of education, reform, benevo- 
lence, and public spirit, which ordinarily hub themselves in the Home Mission- 
ary. In organizing our new churches we often find not only representatives 
of several denominations and States, but of several nationaliti ?s entering into 
christian covenant Children, whose parents were from the Old World, soon 
catch the spirit of the New, aspirii g to the sole use of our language and cus- 
toms ; and when educated and converted, they are brought into positions of 
influence and society regardless of former separation. By this dispersion and 
assimilation much of the terror of Romanism is taken away. 

Then, in illustration of the blending power of Home Missions on a large 
scale, I have only to mention Iowa, where the u Andover Band " has given 
character to the State ; Kansas, where among the first and most sturdy defend- 
ers of freedom were the Home Missionaries, without whose influence that 
historic State would have been well nigh lost to l.berty ; and California, where 
the chaotic mass which floated in from every quarter of the globe has been 
assimilated into a society, which first threw off the viper of slavery that sought 
to fasten itself upon the golden commonwealth, and now abides in its loyalty, 
bound to its sister States across the mountains, by a telegraphic moral sympa- 
thy, and all very much beciusc of that Home Missionary enterprise, which 
vied with the hunters of gold in reaching first that shining shore. 

A vast deal of such woik will yet be required of us at the South, when 
the Rebellion shall have been subdued. What can weld that people back 
to us and make them of us but evangelism ? War and a standing army may 
compress us together, but they can not unite us in feeling. War may open 
that region, as it did China and Italy, to the preaching of the pure word, 
but this Gospel of freedom and of salvation must be cariied there by other 
instrumentalities, by warm hands and loving hearts, by christian churches 
and mission societies ; and this work will knit the bonds of fellowship. And 
may not Mormonism, twin sifter of slavery, already planted in the bosom of 
the continent, strive to^eclipse the barbarism of this rebellion, unlos fore- 
stalled by a christian evangelization, and so incorporated into the real heart- 
life of the nation? And so when those empires, yet to be formed upon 
the wild domain of our further Northwest, shall come into the TTLion, what 
will prevent them from wheeling off into another revolt, unless they shall be 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 85 

permeated with christianizing influence, and so fused into the national char- 
acter? 

How immensely important that now, when war is heaving and swaying the 
great mass of our nation's thought and feeling, the salt of the Gospel be cast 
in, that it may crystallize into the uniformity of virtue and patriotism. When 
God thus stirs deep the emotions of our people, we ought to improve the occa- 
sion to sow upon the furrows of this awakened sensibility that good seed which 
shall produce a sound moral and political Union. 

V. Let me also suggest to you what Home Missions have done for the war. 

In a popular government, where ballots must think, the production of such 
a vast amount of intelligence and virtue as is implied in the summary of results 
given by this Report must have had a mighty influence in strengthening and 
defending our civil fabric. Silently the water trickles into the crevice of the 
rock, silently the frost does its work, but as a result it heaves off the mountain 
side. So it is with these gentle moral forces deposited in the heart of the 
community; when once called forth they are irresistible. The propagation of 
the Gospel at the West by the East, and the consequent process of assimilation 
have bound the frontier to the coast in the spirit of patriotism even more firmly 
than do the parallels of railway and telegraph bind our commerce in one. 

When the rebels proposed to reconstruct the Union with New England left 
out,what they meant was to leave out the polity and the theology of the Puritans ; 
or, as Howell Cobb has recently said, to leave out Plymouth Rock and original 
sin. Little did they think that New England, according to the great patent of 
1620, had stretched itself across the continent in a zone of Puritanism, and 
that to join in alliance with the Northwest, which they affected to love so well, 
leaving out the hated element, would be but to marry the daughter of the 
mother they had divorced. Indeed, that worthy dame may rest assured that, 
in case of need, her Western sons, natural, adopted, and foster, will be ready 
to fight for her as against this sycophant monster. When, at the first clash of 
the rebellion, our besieged capital cried out for help, and the men of the Bay 
State responded instantly, " We are coming. Father Abram," and when still 
later that same commonwealth led the charge against our home traitors of pre- 
judice and caste, by arming the manhood of the black man, none shouted more 
lustily than we of the West, " God bless old Massachusetts ! M 

Who does not know that the loyalty of the West, which along with the 
East has gone down against the South as did the hordes of Northern Eu- 
rope, has been produced to a large extent by the sturdy influence of the pio- 
neer missionaries? Every where patriotic, every where rallying the people 
and using their pulpits for recruiting stations, they have but reaped the fruit 
of their former teachings in the enlistment-rolls that have often taken away 
their sons and the strength of their temporal support By response to a re- 
cent circular, we learn that the Congregational churches of Illinois have sent 
to the war one in eight of their male members ; Wisconsin, one in nine ; Min- 
nesota, one in seven; Iowa, one in Jive; making in all several Ironside regiments. 
All this besides their influence upon enlistment in the community generally. 
And now, as the war sickens our hearts by hope deferred, they are forem )st 
in inspiriting the people, in ministering moral and sanitary succor to the braves 
of the army, and in sustaining the hands of the Government 

If you would trace the practical effect of this evangelizing enterprise, you 
will find that the seam, along which our Government has cracked asunder, 
was the Southern line of our general Home Missionary operations. These labors 
were not welcomed, nor scarcely allowed at the South. Never over fifty of 
the regiment of a thousand missionaries were employed there, and these were 
rejected as soon as the Society, seven years ago, laid down the rule of " no more 
slaveholders in the missionary churches." And yet the Society is ready to 
reenter the field as soon as ponderous war shall have battered down the walls 
with which our Southern barbarism has encircled itself. 

Mr. President, 1 wish to close by expressing thanks in behalf of the West 
for what this Society has done there, thanks for the gift of those hundreds of 
men who came from the East to endure deprivation beyond that of the for- 



86 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

eign missionaries, so far as temporal comforts are concerned, and without the 
stimulus of romance and of enthusiastic remembrance at home, which those 
of the other field enjoy — and all to plant the Gospel in our wide, wide wastes, 
to organize society, to train our gigantic growth, to cement our grand domain 
into the fabric of our national Union, and to build it into the kingdom of 
God on earth ! 

Whatever we may now claim of the advantage of educating men at the 
West for the West, this is evident, that nearly all that has yet been accom- 
plished there has been by the hand of those who came from the East with 
an earnest, self-denying, cheerful spirit that made its way to our hearts, and 
caused the wilderness to be glad for them and the desert to rejoice and blossom 
as the rose. Some of them in their u thirty years' war," while their armor is as 
bright as ever, have grown old a little, so that we, their sons in the Gospel, begin 
to take to ourselves the boast, " Whose are the fathers/' But may their sun 
go tardily down and their twilight long abide upon the horizons they had 
blessed, while we, who are the " native preachers," will watch for the falling 
of their mantles, and, as the best return of our gratitude, endeavor to be true 
to the inheritance of their mission of Christianizing our whole country. 



Address of Eev. Henry Ward Beecher, of Brooklyn, TH. Y.* 

My friend, Mr. Roy, alluded, in opening his speech, to my appearance — I 
suppose he meant me — twelve years ago on this platform. It was more than 
fifteen years ago, not twelve only. You, sir, (addressing the Senior Secretary,) 
were then a young man. You have grown up to be an old man since, and 
some of us perhaps would have grown old if we had had time to attend to it ! 
These fifteen years rise like a dream ; and yet, unlike a dream, how substantial 
have they been ! How powerful in pulling down ! How potent in buildinz up I 
How wonderful in their occult labors, and in their open and apparent develop- 
ments! Fifteen years ago, if I mistake not, Louis Philippe sat upon the throne 
of France. Then came Republicanism, though born without feet, and then base 
usurpation, and the imperial reign exists still. Italy has been born since then, 
and now she stands a compact nation, with a hopeful future. War has thun- 
dered against the sides of Russia since then. And in our own day Russia has 
emancipated her serfs. And although this great and glorious work would 
seem to rebuke us for our tardiness and hesitancy, yet we ourselves, in the last 
fifteen years, have not been without our tendencies and our labors in the same 
direction. Fifteen years ago it had just begun to be not distasteful to avow 
one's self an anti-slavery man. 

Allusion has been made to the fact that the missionaries of this Society car- 
ried with them Puritan ideas of human rights to the West I am witness of 
that fact The Synod of Indiana was, almost to a man, an anti-slavery Synod. 
Among the earliest votes that I remember ever to have cast were those which 
I cast, with large majorities, refusing to license any man that was a slaveholder, 
or to receive any licentiate into the bounds of the Presbytery, unless he could 
show that he would do all that lay in his power to prepare slaves that might 
providentially come to him for their freedom. And I know that, in their coun- 
sels and in their prayers, those men, not in that State alone, but in adjacent States, 
for more than twenty years together, were heart and soul for human liberty. 
They preached the doctrine of man's rights as given him of God, and as guar- 
anteed in the Word of God. They preached it in season and out of season, in 
obscure places that now are towns, in hamlets that now are cities, among hand- 
fuls of men that now have increased, so that they are great multitudes. They 
knew not what they did. They were reviled, they were opposed, they were de- 
rided, they were persecuted, and yet, after all, they were the men that were 

* Reported by J. T. EllinwoocL 



I 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 87 

preparing this people for their great trial and for their forthcoming victory— for 
we are now going to Jerusalem to be mocked with a trial ; the nation is on the 
eve apparently of its great suffering, and, it may be, of its seeming burial ; but 
after these there will be the three day*, and then the resurrection. Wo owe 
our preparation for gre it patience and endurance, in behalf of future generations, 
under God, to the fidelity of those christian ministers who, in the Western 
States, from the beginning of those States, preached a Gospel that was a Gospel 
for the poor and for the poorest, for the weak and for the weakest, for the op- 
pressed and against the oppressor. We reap the benefit of their fidelity ; for it 
is true, as has been said, that you may almost mark the line of rebellion by the 
line of the American Home Missionaries. Where they labored most, there is 
the strength of patriotism ; but where they were not found, there slavery and 
ignorance and the want of patriotism, which is treason, have been found. It is 
the Gospel that has saved the West and the Northwest to this nation. It is to 
the power of the Lord Jesus Christ, through the ministration of his word, at 
the hand of bis servants, that we owe the perpetuation of this Government in 
all our Western and Northwestern Territory. 

While these great events have been transpiring outwardly, and these leaven- 
ing* have been going on inwardly, God, in his providence, has been leading us 
in a way that we knew not of. 

It is customary to speak of the times in which we are living as dark times ; 
and in many respects they are very dark, d«rk according to our moods, however, 
dark as used to be the forests through which, when I was a missionary in the 
West, I traveled at night If I looked parallelly or horizontally with my eyes, 
it was so dark that I could not see the road to steer by ; but if I looked up 
where the trees had been cut away, so that I could sec the sky, I could steer 
by that And if wo look upon the events of our own lives, the times are so 
dark that one knows not how to go ; but if we look up toward God Almighty's 
throne with faith in the promises of God, in the truths of the Gospel, and in 
Gods fidelity to his own word and pledges, there is a whole heaven full of light 
to guide our way to the future. 

Are these times of sorrow, because so many die? No more die now than 
die in every generation, for each generation has to die ; and now the grave 
is dug by the bayonet instead of by the sexton. Men that die from off their 
beds die with only that general testimony to truth and principle which all 
christian men must needs give, but men that sacrifice their lives by scores and 
hundreds now, sacrifice them with the witness and testimony of martyrs. Not 
only do they avow their general faith in Christ Jesus, but, by their express 
deeds, they bear witness to this practical, concrete Gospel, the Gospel of truth, 
of humanity, of human rights, of patriotism, and of liberty. 

Because there is so much suffering are these dark times? Then it would 
seem as if that was the darkest time the world ever saw when Christ had been 
seized, and condemned, and slain, and hidden in the rock, and his disciples 
were scattered as sheep without a shepherd. They thought that it had been 
he who should have redeemed Israel, and behold he was taken from them, and 
they felt that the midnight of ages was upon them ; but we look back and see 
that it was morning and sunrise for the world, and that the Lord was the 
exemplar of this great truth, that suffering is the right hand of God for righte- 
ousness. Suffering? It is the power by which God hath saved the world. It 
is G«hTs ordinance. And he that will be good must suffer. The nation that 
is to lead a high and triumphal career of christian achievement, God will pre- 
pare for its mission by suffering. The baptism of suffering is upon us, and our 
only concern is, not that we bear it, but that it shall be remedial. 

Dark are these times ? Well, it is not safe for this nation to live in too much 
light We are too independent we are too self-confident, we are too material, 
we are too enthusiastic, we are too enterprising. The earth is too kind, and 
the heavens are too benign. Wealth comes too easily, the growth of the nation 
u without a parallel, and with the growth of the nation in material strength 
and in intellectual developments come the temptations of spiritual pride, and, 
what is worse, the temptations of material and affluent pride — the pride of 



88 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

wealth. And we need to be in dnrk hours to bear the yoke, to wear the cross, 
to be restrained, and to be held back in our path, or made to triumph by such 
sacrifices as shall temper the pride of our victories. 

For myself, while I have sympathy with all those great movements which have 
regard for the conversion of the world, while I am in favor of missions to the 
islands and missions to foreign continents, while I would not sound one note 
less or hold back one penny, while I feel that it is a legitimate portion of the 
duty of every church and every christian man to take part and lot in the evan- 
gelization of the whole world, yet I can not but marvel when I look upon that 
part of the work which is specially committed to our charge. On this continent 
there is more to be done, I had almost said, that is perishinjr for the want of 
laborers, than in all the rest of the world put together. There is a great work 
for the Gospel in Italy, there is a great work for the Gospel in France, there is 
a great work for the Gospel before England shall be christian to the bottom, 
there is a great work for the Gospel in Russia, and, when we look upon the 
heathen nations that arc as yet scarcely touched by the irradiating light, we can 
form no estimate of what that work is to be that yet one day shall be developed 
in them. But when I look at the conflict that is going on for this continent, 
and reflect that there has been formed by ambitious men, with long circum- 
spection and foresight, and that there is an attt mpt to carry out a plan to es- 
tablish through Mexico, and all along the Pacific coast, a gigantic empire of 
oppression, in which again the Gospel shall become the sanction of infernal 
wickedness, and in which it shall be held to be authority for men to tread down 
their weaker brethren, then that conflict impresses me as being'a most astound- 
ing evolution of God's providence, which shows that the work we have to do 
' here is even greater than that which is waiting for our hands in any other part 
of the whole globe. And it becomes a serious question whether the religion, 
which has been developed in the hearts of God's people, is able to bear the test 
of the exigencies of the times in which we live. You have no doubt, and I 
have no doubt, that the great truths of God's word are adequate to the conver- 
sion of the entire world, to the destruction of every evil, and to the exaltation 
of every thing that is to become predominant in the counsels of God ; but it may 
admit of a question whether in any particular age the church, or the members 
of the church, are themselves able to bear the test of the times in which they 
live. Thank God, we have been proved, and, although delinquent, we have 
not been found altogether wanting. There has been raised up a barrier of 
conscience, and there has been raised tip a barrier of christian hearts, against 
which the waves of ambitious oppression have dashed, and it has been said : 
44 Thus far, but no further !" The enemies of liberty have attempted to draw 
from us the West and the Northwest. Why have they not done it ? It looked 
as if they might accomplish their foul purpose. The superficial aspect of the 
population of those regions would have led one to suppose that they were ready 
to go with the South. What saved them to the North ? It has been the secret 
working of the truth of Christ's Gospel that has thus far held them back from 
going over to the side of those who a-e striving to put down freedom in this 
country. We have not been altogether delinquent ; but are we adequate to 
the exigencies of the future ? Are we prepared deliberately to undertake the 
work which God is unrolling before us ? 

States, one after another, are rising. They come by emigration, circling into 
the brotherhood ; and for years to come their labor and their means are to be 
absorbed in their agriculture and material structures. Their ministers, as well 
as the teachers of their schools, are largely imported. And their churches 
must be built for them. All the institutions of the Gospel must be supplied 
to them. And is the East prepared to take charge of these new States? Be- 
fore they are born, wo make provision for our children's dressing, and the 
drawer contains the robes for the precious incomer long ere it comes. Has the 
Church of the East laid by the raiment that is to clothe with the robes of 
righteousness those yet unborn States that are coming into being one after 
another ? Is it a part of the educated faith and purpose of Eastern churches 
to take care of every State until the band, passing the mountain through 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 89 

its gorges, shall touch the Pacific, and until, across the whole continent, the 
nation shall he provided with schools and churches and an educated ministry ? 
Is this a part of our covenant with God ? If it is not, then we are not pre- 
pared to meet the exigency of the day in which we live. 

But see how wonderfully, just at this time, God, in his good providence, is 
preparing us for the work. While the South is draining itself dry of ife* re- 
sources, while it is impoverishing itself while its means of self-support, which 
are always far less than those of the free-labor North, are being rapidly con- 
sumed by war, to the amazement of every one the Northern States are crowing 
rich by war. One almost shudders to see it ; one almost dreads to think that 
by war and blood should come prosperity in commerce and in manufactures ; and 
yet I apprehend that never was every part of the great North enriched so 
much as in the last two years. And what does it mean but this — that God 
is storing us with that wealth by which we are to be prepared to meet the 
exigencies which war shall bring upon us ? 

We are to have the charge of this continent. The South has been proved, 
and has been found wanting. She is not worthy to bear rule. She has lost 
the scepter in our national Government ; she is to lose the scepter in the States 
themselves ; and this continent is to bo from this time forth governed by 
Northern men, with Northern ideas, and with a Northern gospel. 

Is this sectional ? Just as much was Christ secthnal because he was born 
in the Orient He was not born all over the world. There must be a nest 
somewhere from out of which the bird, the eagle, can fly. And this continent 
is to be cared for by the North simply because the North has been true to the 
cause of Christ in a measure, in a sufficient measure to secure her own safety ; 
and now, thank God, she is being warned for the safety of the rest of the na- 
tion. It is not the Northerners, it is not the sectional and geographic idea of 
the North, that gives us this future, but simply our remove from slavery. We 
hold the vitalizing principles of national life ; and the nation is to be given to 
os because we have the bosom by which to nourish it. As a child feeds at the 
breast of its mother, so the nation is to feed upon us. Never were we more 
abundantly prepared by material resources for the work than now. Are we 
prepared with hope and with faith to enter upon it ? Let as suppose that the 
war shall end disastrously, and that this great nation shall be disrupted. Then 
certainly there will be demanded of us such efforts to build this antagonistic 
republican Government over against that military despotism as we have never 
before put forth. But suppose, as will be the case, that this war shall rain con- 
fusion on the South, that they shall be defeated, and that the territory of this 
nation shall remain one and undivided from the Lakes to the Gulf, then what 
will be our work? Not only the West and the Northwest and the extreme 
Pacific States, but all the vast Southwestern region, and the debris of the great 
Southern empire^ will be under our jurisdiction. Our diocese will be little less 
than the whole continent. And are we prepared to take care of the whole 
South ? Brethren, they can not take care of themselves. They have set up 
schools, and they have set up churches, and what has it all come to but this — 
that, reading the Bible according to Southern theology, they have learned that 
Jesus Christ died to give white men a right to be men, and to give black men 
a right to be, not men, but only cattle ! And to their understandings the 
Gospel is a charter of oppression. And what schools have they? What in- 
telligence is there among them ? If you leave the seaboard, throughout tho 
rest of their territory, with the exception of here and there a small district, the 
condition in which the great mass of the people live is savage. And if the 
nation is to be maintained, one of the first duties of Northern Christians will 
be to provide for the education and evangelization of Southern men. Nor is 
this all Do you believe that a separation can be prevented, and that peace 
can be brought again, on any other basis than that of the liberation of the 
slaves upon this continent ? As for myself, I say boldly, that rather than have 
the States resume their places under the Constitution, with the system of 
slavery in them, just as it was before, I would rather give every child that I 
hare ; I would rather embark upon a war of twenty years, with all its suffer- 



90 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. L^ajT, 

ing and all its blood — and a war of twenty years, much as its misery would be, 
would be cheap compared with the untold wretchedness that would be entailed 
upon this nation if we should consent to have again a Union with slavery 
flourishing and rampant 

It is easy for us, in a Northern city, to cheer generous sentiments ; it is easy 
for us to round periods upon the rights of man ; it is easy for us to declare 
that the swarthy sons of Africa have the same rights under the cross of 
Christ that we have, and that as, with us, children of God, they have a right 
to look us in the face and call us brethren. But when they take the same 
rights that we have, and when they look us in the face and call us brethren, it 
is not so easy for us to recognize those rights as theirs, and to acknowledge the 
brotherhood which they claim to exist between them and us. It is one thing 
to express generous sentiments, and it is quite another thing to lay the founda- 
tion of christian philanthropy. And is the North prepared to take these men, 
when they shall have been emancipated, and give them an education, and preach 
the Gospel of intelligence to them ? Are we prepared, throughout the North, 
to accept this onerous responsibility with regard to the schools of the West 
and the South, and with regard to the churches of the West and the South ? 
How glorious is the task, how magnificent is the work, to which we are invited 
by the providence of God ! Surely, never before upon any nation did there 
dawn such opportunities for heroic and self-denying labor, for spending and 
being spent for him that gave his life for us. Are we prepared for it? That is 
yet to be seen. I believe that, notwithstanding the degree of infirmity which 
belongs to all great communities, notwithstanding the many fluctuations of our 
affairs and the many disturbances of the times, in the main the christian pub- 
lic of the North will accept at the hand of God the great mission of our nation 
and day, and will be prepared to take the charge of education and christianiza- 
tion which God shall roll upon them. 

And now let me say two things in this immediate relation. The first is 
this — that if any thing is demonstrated, it is that the Puritan idea of carry- 
ing emancipation with religion is the true idea. There has been a develop- 
ment of the Puritan spirit in many directions. It is a peculiarity of Puritan 
preiching that it is second to no other in religious enthusiasm and devotional 
sentiment. It tends to institution. It inaugurates, wherever it goes, means 
of education. We have had it shown that without education there can not be 
patriotism, and there can not be union. The fact is, that New England is 
patriotic because she has had intelligence, while Tennessee has been wanting 
in patriotism because she has lacked intelligence. Make yourself familiar with 
the condition of these two regions, and you will find it to be so. The statisti- 
cal tables will tell the story. Those States that have the most men who can 
not read and write are the most stubbornly rebellious, while those States that 
have the most men who can read and write cling the most tenaciously to the 
Union. All that we have had by which to save the country has been religion 
and popular intelligence ; and we have come near losing half of our territory 
simply because the masses of the people at the South have lived in such pro- 
found ignorance. The reason of this ignorance has been that the ruling classes 
there could not afford to allow education to have free course in the midst of 
them. Their interests required that they should even withhold it from the 
poor whites. For you can not hold a lantern that shall show you how to 
walk, and prevent its showing others how to walk. And any system of edu- 
cation that should enlighten the common white people of the South, would 
also enlighten the slaves in the South. Whatever in the South promotes 
the mental growth of the poor whites inevitably promotes the growth of the 
poor blacks. And you can not educate slaves without making them burden- 
some. You can have your dwarf oak in a flower-pot ; but if you take acorns 
and put them in the soil, and develop trees according to the pattern of what 
God meant that an oak should be, you will find that your flower-pots will 
crack, and that the trees will occupy so much room that you can not afford to 
have a great many in a single pot ! The only way that you can have an oak 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTn REPORT. 91 

tree in a pot is to keep down the top and stint the root till it is a mere 
minikin tree. 

Now, the mind of mao has a hundred branches where a tree has one ; and 
the moment you begin to educate man, he expands, and his boughs seek the 
North, the South, the East, and the West, and he grows toward the heavens, 
and spreads under the ground, and eats up the soil, and consumes the air and 
sunlight Man, in a rude, uncultured state, wants but very little in this world. 
He wants to eat and drink and sleep, and that is all. But the moment he he- 
gins to be touched with celestial fire, he begins to need to think ; and thinking 
is expensive. He begins to have taste v and the food that satisfies taste is ex- 
pensive. He begins to have socinl affections ; and they demand for their 
gratification things that are expensive. And if you take a slave and educate 
him, the more you educate him, the more mouths he has. He not only has a 
physical mouth, but he has a dozen moral-sentiment mouths, a dozen affec- 
tional mouths, and a dozen intellectual mouths. And if a muster's slaves 
were educated, and he had to provide food for all their mouths, he could 
take care of but three or four. That is the reason why you can 'not edu- 
cate slaves and keep them in bondage ; for although when educated they may 
submit to bondage, it will be under conditions that will bankrupt the owner. 
And if the South will not have her slaves educated, she shall not have their 
neighbors, the poor whites, educated ; for any system that would educate the 
poor common whites, would educate the poor common blacks. More or less 
the spirit of intelligence would extend to both classes if it were brought to one. 

Can you heat a box-stove so that it shall warm all that are on this side of the 
room, and not warm those who are on that side of the room ? Can you teach 
white children in schools, and not to a greater or less degree have the know- 
ledge which you impart to them communicated to the black children with whom 
they play and associate? Education for the degraded whites will be more or 
less education for the slaves. It is not because the education of slaves makes 
them untractable and indocile, that their masters are unwilling that they should 
be educated. It makes them more tractable and more docile. It makes them 
easier to be managed. But it makes them more expensive. And there is where 
the burden galls. There is where slavery will break down, unless the slaves 
are kept ignorant It costs but little to support ignorance, while of education 
the reverse is true. 

Where you can not have free ideas, you can not have republicanism. You 
can not have republicanism among an unreading and unthinking people. And 
as long as the ignorance of the South continues, there will be guns loaded ready 
to be discharged at our institutions, and rebellions will be as common as cotton 
itself in the Southern States. 

There is but one way of maintaining the safety of this country, and that is 
by declaring that Slavery shall cease within its borders, and that the ignorance 
which Slavery has necessitated shall give way to education. And it is in this 
direction that our work lies. I know not what new instrumentalities may be 
developed ; but this I know : that instead of regarding this day as a dark day, 
and our immediate future as a perilous future, I — at least in the morning, when 
the sweet restoration of sleep has left me clearheaded ; in the un fatigued hours 
of the day — look forward with hope and with cheer. For, although the way is 
great, greater is he that has appointed us to walk in it ; though the work is 
herculean, there is One that is not weary, though he has rolled the burden of 
this world around for ages. God has brought us to this exigency. His own 
nam*, and the honor of the Church and of his cause, are involved in this great 
conflict ; and having given his Son, with him ho will also freely give all things 
that are necessary to make the redemption of the world universal, and its re- 
mits in education and in intelligence perfect. I, therefore, do not distrust the 
future. I hope, and hope on. 

The other thing that I meant to suggest is this : that while we are laboring 
for the enfranchisement of our country, while we are laboring directly for liber- 
ty, it is a consolation to believe that the indirect result of all faithful preaching 
which leads to the conversion of men, is their preparation for liberty. Liberty 



92 THIRTY" SEVENTH REPORT. L^ a 7» 

must always be developed from within outward. It is not a blessing that can 
safely descend upon men fro.n the outside. Liberty ! you can not withhold 
it from men who give evidence of being men. Slavery ! it is of the nature of 
that gift which we bestow upon cattle. And the nearer human beings stand 
to the animal creation, the less scruple men have of treating them as animals. 
On the other hand, in proportion as you make much of men, it becomes abhor- 
rent, even to tyrants, to treat them as if they were other than men. It is by 
exerting the power of religion on the souls of men, giving new life to their un- 
derstanding and to their conscience, new beauty and richness to their affections, 
and new developments to their taste ; it is by making men so large and so 
beautiful, that there shall be every where a revulsion from the idea of their 
being slaves, that liberty can be the best and the quickest promoted. Prepare 
men for being free by christianizing them. The Gospel of the Lord Jesus 
Christ is a charter of liberty, and its effects upon the whole man are to build 
him up in those proportions which, according to the natural laws of the human 
mind, sooner or later enforce the need, not only of redemption inward, but also 
of redemption outward. 

Now that those embarrassments are removed which aforetime divided the 
counsels of the Church ; now that the churches of the North see eye to eye, to 
an extent that was not known to the past stormy ages, in which good men have 
found themselves obliged to oppose each other ; now that we have seen how 
much has been done, and how much there is to do, — may we not believe that 
the next fifteen years will more than parallel the last fifteen years ? 

If it phase God to spare your life, sir, and mine, for another period of fifteen 
years, and I should stand, blossomed white, upon this platform, and speak for 
the next fifteen years, as I have now spoken for the last fifteen years, I believe 
that we could look back upon a period of greater labor, greater suffering, greater 
faith and hope, and greater achievement, than the world lias ever seen. The 
last fifteen years and the next fifteen years, which together will measure the 
life of our Master when he entered upon his ministry, will be the redemption 
years of this American nation. 

I thank God that I have been permitted to live in this day. Let every young 
man who is entering the christian ministry thank God that he has been per- 
mitted to begin his work in such an auspicious time. The question for us. to 
ask ourselves is not, " What is easy ?" but " What does the cause need f It 
never needed so much. There never was so much to do. There never was so 
large a field. There never was the promise of such abundant fruit for so little 
labor. 

It is ours, then, sir, taking encouragement from the future, to consecrate our- 
selves again to that Savior who never forsook his people, and never will for- 
sake them, and to go forward to the very end of our lives ; and if we do not see 
the triumph of this great christian movement on earth, assuredly we shall hear 
the glad notes and behold the glory of its victory in heaven. 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 93 

MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS, 

FROM THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Among the Lake Superior Mines. 

It used to be said by the Indians, that the Great Spirit never came up toward 
these Lake Superior regions any further than the Falls of St. Mary. For a time 
many things seemed to confitm that idea. It is stated, on credible authority, 
that i wo years ago there were more barrels of *' liquid fire" from the distiller- 
ies of Boston, New York, and Cincinnati, brought into this upper country, than 
there were barrels of flour ! Two years ago, an ambassador for Christ who 
first stood up to preach the Gospel in this village, was stoned while delivering 
his message. It is astonishing how soon all the elements and forces of heathen- 
ism will be found operating in a community where the sound of the glorious 
Gospel of the blessed God is not often heard. Individual Christians there may 
be in the place ; but unless they are brought together, and the regular institu- 
tions of the Gospel set in order among them, their feeble voices are soon lost in 
the din and uproar of a wicked and godU ss world. Without such an organized 
christian movement, it is shown that there can be no such thing as a hialthy, 
moral public tentiment ; the passions and vices of the wicked are, in great 
measure, uni estrained, and men of Eastern origin and training arc found doing 
things, the very mention of which, in the homes of their childhood, would cause 
them to blush. 

It is but a little more than three years since the first houses were erected in 
the village of Hancock. It now has a population of something like 2,000. 
Over fifty houses have been erected during the past sen son. Not until 
within the past year have any regular evangelical efforts been made in this 
place. Now we have a Methodist and a Congregational church, each with its 
Sabttath school, and also its house of worship nearly completed. The Congre- 
gational Sabbath school was first organized, and now numbers over 100 
scholars, and is steadily increasing in numbers and influence. Our audiences 
on the Sabbath have averaged about 100. 

Frontier Work. 

My field covers three counties. I live in the middle of it, and it spreads from 
twenty five to thirty five miles each way. I shall meet the wants of the new 
settlements so far as my Master gives me strength ; but it is of the highest im- 
portance that good men be stationed at a number of the principal points as soon 
as possible, which would still leave me all the work I can do. I feel it to be 
especially my work to search out the destitute, and break unto them the bread 
of life ; to hunt up Christ's scattered ones, and feed them, and to preach salva- 
tion to those who have no other preaching, and thus to be a u forerunner," to 
"prepare the way of the Lord ;" forming centers of interest where others may 
enter and reap a golden harvest 

I have an appointment twenty four miles up Manistee River, among the lum- 
bermen. They seem greatly pleased at having preaching, and generally turn 
out and give excellent attention. Many come four miles in their canoes, bring- 
ing old and young ; and one man came ten miles in a canoe, and was obliged to 
spend an hour in catting through a drift-pile. Such cases show an interest 
which is truly encouraging. I expect soon to have an appointment in still an- 



94 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

other county, when we get roads open ; for, remember, in getting to my ap- 
pointments, I ride twenty and twenty four miles, through heavy forests, without 
a house. To get " trails " through the woods to some of these places I wag 
obliged to work, last winter, in the deep snow, seven days, camping out, and 
this spring three days and nights, in the woods. 

A Hard Problem. 

I have been compelled to assume an air of competence and comfort, while at 
the same time I have never been more sorely pressed. If I were to cast myself 
upon the people as destitute, it would invite an opposition, and encourage some 
to withhold, under the idea of being able to starve out the minister. If I com- 
plained of suffering, my own brethren, struggling like good men, would say, 
41 It is of no use ; we can't make him comfortable ;" it would discourage them. 
So, with my suffering wife, I have endured— leaving it with God to supply our 
need in his own good time. Our interests here are like a candle in the wind ; 
we need great wisdom, caution, and spiritual sagacity, to conduct our affairs 
successfully. My own desire, if the Lord will, is to spend and be spent for his 
glory in his service on this field ; but at times it seems almost impossible. 
The salary for the past year has been too small by $100. My clothes are 
too poor to allow of exchanging with any minister, especially with* any of 
our more respectable parishes, and I have pledged my faithful horse, to meet an 
obligation for bread, contracted some year and a half ago. My wife's health, 
under our privation, has been steadily declining ; and yet, against all these 
clouds and darkness, I feel willing, with her, to trust God and work on. 

Missionary Barter. 

Our contribution to the cause of Home Missions was $12. Knowing 
that it would be idle to ask for money, I announced to the congregation, 
that where money could not be had, grain, store goods, or such articles as could 
be used in a family, or in some way converted into what mipht be made avail- 
able for that purpose, would be accepted instead. Accordingly, I obtained 
25c. in silver, $1.80 in shinplasters, and the balance in grain and other useful 
articles. I may get more than I have now reported. If so, I will report in my 
next letter. The people are as much as ever interested in the cause of Home 
Missions and wish to do as heretofore ; but where there is no water in the well 
none can be pumped out. We all think the times are getting better. People 
are obtaining better prices for their grain and produce. 

A House and Home. 

In the Home Missionary, for April, 1861, was published a brief description 
of " The Minuter' » Howe." That was where we staid nearly two years. 
When I read the description, I thought it looked quite as bad as the reality ; 
but subsequent experience proved the tenement to be a great deal worse than 
it was described to be ; especially as a large share of it leaked like a sieve, to 
the great discomfort of its inmates, and the detriment of furniture and clothing. 
In copious rains, our bed was often wet, sometimes to that degree, that a pool 
of water stood upon it. Our things were much damaged. I had often heard 
of the evils of a leaky house ; but it was all Greek to me, till experience ex- 
plained it. But a good friend of mine — a New England clergyman — wrote to 
me to persuade Mrs. S. to be contented in that miserable hut ; for he had seen 
habitations of man, far worse, and into which they had to crawl on all fours 
like dogs ! But that tnsk I would not attempt. While lying sick in that un- 
comfortable place, my brother visited me, and bargained for the place where we 
now lite. Although not equal to the one in Franklin, where I was colleague 
with the revered and greatly beloved Dr. Emmons — the oasis of my life, almost 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 95 

the land of Beulah — yet it is pleasant and comfortable, and so superior to the 
one we left, that it seems a palace. May I have grace to be thankful and labor 
with redoubled diligence and faithfulness in this little portion of the Lord's 
vineyard. 

The Wants of a Hew Community. 

This field has been counted an unpromising one by ministers of other de- 
nominations, as well as those of our own, and I had many forbidding things 
told me by members of this community before undertaking this work ; but I 
continue to be treated with uniform kindness and courtesy by all whom I have 
met, and know, by the kindling and sometimes tearful eye and attentive atti- 
tude, on our Sabbath day services, that these labors are not altogether lost I 
am painfully conscious the greatest drawbacks to success in the work are in 
my own insufficient preparation for it, in the want of a deeper and more fervent 
piety, a more vigorous intellectual culture and mastery of the word of God, 
which is the sword of the Spirit The Church wants, indeed, every where, 
fir$t rate men, but peculiarly so in these new fields, as any intelligent person 
would comprehend if they would give the subject a little reflection. They must 
have some of the characteristics of a creator, and an immense bump of common 
sense — two things not always united — to shape and mold these new communi- 
ties. There must be positive power, or there can be no leadership ; and yet 
leadership is imperatively demanded by their position, as it often is not in older 
communities, where the habits of generations past have made a highway for 
generations to come. 

May the Lord put it into the hearts of such laborers to deny themselves, and 
come into these inviting fields, while we wait to welcome them. 

The Missionary Box. 

Hay the Lord bless those who are willing to help his ministering servants to 
live. Surely they pray for us, and pray acceptably too. I am no£ and trust I 
never shall be, ungrateful to your Society for its valuable aid, without which I 
could not minister to this church and people, but yet I must confess this gift 
of some of the necessaries of life brought as much cheer as your commission. 
The thought that we are not forgotten — that there are warm hearts interested 
for us and willing to lighten our Durdens and aid us in laboring in hard places 
in the Lord's vineyard, is of itself worth much. It is a real pleasure— a bless- 
ing. This gift is the first I have received since I commenced preparing for the 
ministry— except your grant to our church. Without any funds, to commence 
with, or any aid .whatever, all through my preparatory collegiate and theological 
course, the Lord enabled me to secure the preparation of the schools in the 
regular time, and to graduate free from debt 

I have not been able to buy a single book since I commenced my labors here, 
nearly two years ago. I feel this loss very sensibly. The first thing that I 
put my hand on. when I had opened the trunk you sent me, was a book of 228 
pages, Modern Unkertalum. I must give especial thanks for this book. 1 
value it very highly. I care more for good books than for almost any thing 
eke ; they are valuable aids in my work. 

A Necessity of Missionary Life. 

We missionaries of the West sometimes say, " We could not live without 
your Society ; M and this is true. But many of us could not live with your 
Society, were it not for the box or barrel of clothing from the kind ladies who 
so generously provide for our needv families. And I wish these christian sis- 
ters to know, if any body could tell them, how much toil they save the care- 
worn missionary's wife, through the livelong day and by the midnight lamp, 
duary burning. It is our once beautiful and delicate wives who have the hard- 



96 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

est time in the missionary work. With no means wherewith to procure do- 
mestic help, the drudgery falls too heavily on them. With all that we can help 
them, they often grow prematurely old and sink beneath their U o heavy bur- 
dens. Let me* assure you, however, that they love the work of the Lord, no 
less than their husbands ; which makes it all the more sad to see them going 
down to a premature grave. 

Fruits of Twenty Yean. 

Permit me to offer you my christian greetings in assuming my old relation- 
ship to the Home Missionary Society. Twenty one years ago, I started for 
Iowa, under its commission bearing your signature. I commenced my labors 
at Davenport in 1841; and from that time to the present year, I have been 
preaching the Gospel there and in its immediate vicinity. Iowa was then in 
its infancy. It has now become a large and growing State— strong in material 
and moral resources. Its patriotism and the heroic military daring of its sons, 
are acknowledged by the whole land. When 1 first entered upon my labors in 
this State, there were in it but three Congregational ministers. Two of them 
still remain as honored pioneers of the gnat work accomplished by your So- 
ciety, west of the great river. What a great and cheering change has taken 
place since you he'd forth the word of life in a garret in Front street in Daven- 
port, the only meeting place which the church could then afford;- that, they 
did not own, but soon bad to leave it, and move down to " Brimstone Corner. 
Then there were but seven Congregational churches in the State; now, there 
arc over 150; then, there were but three ministers, constituting the Association 
of Iowa ; now, the General Association embraces nine local bodies, numbering 
over 113 ministers. 

Church Resuscitated. 

Three months ago, when you appointed me your missionary to publish the 
Gospel to the Congregational church of Genoa Bluffs, this church seemed to 
be undergoing Paul's paradoxical experience, when he said : " We are troubled 
on every side, yet not distressed ; we are perplexed, but not in despair ; perse- 
cuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed." Not having enjoyed 
preaching for more than a year,. the church and congregation had been gradu- 
ally diminishing in numbers, graces, and influence, and had become dishearten- 
ed ; and the former had gone so far as to contemplate disbanding, and uniting 
with the N. S. Presbyterian church at Marengo. But your noble Society, in 
giving them a minister, just at this particular juncture, gave them also hope 
and tieart The church were so eiiger to secure the Gospel, that five of its 
male members, in moderate circumstances, subscribed twenty five dollars, each, 
for my support one half of the time, which would be fifty dollars apiece lor all 
my time, or, on the average, twenty dollars for each male and female member. 

Accommodations and Accompaniments. 

My commission for another year, was thankfully received by my people, as 
well as myself. As the children of a hungry family watch the return of the 
mother, bringing bread, so do many of our feeble churches wait the answer of 
the American Home Missionary Society to their applications for aid. In rude 
wagons and on foot they come, three, lour, often five miles, to hear the preaching 
of the Gospel. This attendance, and the earnestness of attention to the word 
spoken, is a rich compensation for the lack of garnished houses and ornamented 
pulpits. The people and their children are there, even to the six month, playful 
and (sometimes) crying infant. The mother must bring all her charge, or stay 
at home ; and I have not the sin to repent of, of noticing any of the little an- 
noyance* from the little prattlers. I once preached a sermon to a very crowded 
house, having a rude, light stand and splint chair, for my pulpit and sofa ; and 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 97 

the creeping children were so thick around me, that when I commenced the 
sermon I was obliged to keep my feet entirely still upon the floor, lest I should 
crush some tiny fingers or toes ; and often during that sermon, three little fel- 
lows at once were holding on to my pantaloons, to get themselves erect upon 
their feet. I have almost forgotten how a sleepy congregation appears. I have 
seen none for years, nor felt any annoyance from disorderly persons. 

In Labors Oft. 

My congregations have increased in numbers. Our Sunday school has more 
than doubled. Our increase of both has been from among those who had no 
sympathy for us. This is progress. I do not see that we have, as yet, made 
tny money. Men must have the Gospel a long time before they will want it 
enough to pay for it. We can make a man pay for meat and bread by with- 
holding it ; but the reverse has to be done with the Gospel. I go ten miles to 
preach every alternate Sabbath, and preach also in the evening to the young peo- 
ple and children, making three exercises in the same day, besides the drive. 
Sometimes I get no invitation to stop, and return after the evening service. 
There is no chance to " rust out " here. Many poor men and women contribute 
to the Home Missionary Treasury, and I feel that we should meet their expecta- 
tions. Many missionary boxes are filled with the prayer that the garments 
may be worn out in the vineyard, not sitting by the fire, on winter evenings. 
I shall meet their expectations as far as God gives me health. 

Winter looks frightful when we have no winter boots, no overcoat, no gloves, 
no buffalo robe for a ten miles winter ride in a fierce, cold wind. But God 
will provide. 

Last week, when returning from my appointment, my horse took fright, ran, 
broke my buggy into splinters, and injured his leg so badly that he is useless, 
and will be for weeks, if not months. But I may just as well laugh about it as 
cry. It is done, and can not be helped. 

Seven Years at Kiver Falls. 

Perhaps it would not be inappropriate for me to say a few words of the re- 
sults of my seven years 1 labors at River Falls, Wis. During this time, the 
church has increased from sixteen to eighty. Some thirty five members have 
been added, on profession of faith. The people have received from the Home 
Missionary Society $1,000, or perhaps a little over. They have received of the 
American Congregational Union three hundred dollars, toward building their 
house of worship ; and eight hundred have been paid by people at River Falls 
who do not cooperate with the Congregational churches in sustaining the insti- 
tutions of religion, toward building the Academy. But while they have been 
assisted, they have also exhibited a commendable disposition to help themselves. 
With the aid mentioned, they have erected and furnished an Academy at an 
expense of three thousand dollars. The subscription for this building was 
drawn up and started by myself; and when the building was finished, Pro- 
fessor B. Wilcox, a college friend and classmate of mine, was employed to take 
charge of the school, and has had the care of it for five years, and made it 
a school of a higher order than any other within a hundred miles of it. In addi- 
tion to this, they built a parsonage, at a cost of hundred dollars, and a house 
of worship costing sixteen hundred dollars; making in all an investment of 
not less than $5,400 for religious and educational purposes. If the people 
there shall prove faithful to their own best interests, this place will, by the 
; of God, be an important center of influence, in education, morals, and 



98 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 



Enduring Hardness. 

TY"e are yet very uncomfortably situated ; having only one small room in 
which t<» pack every thing, and do our sleeping, eating, studying, and entertain 
our visitors. II. w we are to meet the storms and frosts of winter I know not; 
for our room is not only small but it is cold. Our church promised to put us up 
a house before this time, and I know they are disposed to fu fill their promise, 
but owing to the change in their circumstances it is impossible for them to do 
so. They have, it i3 true, good crops ; but for the want of help in securing 
them, a large portion must be lost ; and even if secured, they are worth but 
little. I am persuaded, however, that the people will do what they can. But 
every man is tired and weary. There is not a man within the circle of myac- 
quaintance who has not gone far beyond his strength in his efforts to raise and 
to secure the crops rai>ed. 

"Were it not for the Divine promises on which I earnestly strive to lean, I should 
sink in despair. Hut I have a Good Shepherd, and he has told me that he 
44 will not leave nor forsake me," and that I 4i shall not want ;'• and I will not 
grieve him by a want of trust in those gracious words. 

Surrounding Destitution. 

I have supplied four other places with regular and stated preaching — sowing 
the good seed of divine truth beside all waters — giving 44 line upon line, pre- 
cept upon precept, here a little and there a little." In this way I am very 
busily engaged in cultivating a large field. The inhabitants of one village and 
neighborhood attend the meetings of the other ; some of them coming six or 
seven miles to church, so that most of them hear the glad tidings of pardon and 
salvation, as proclaimed by your missionary, every Sabbath. This interchange 
— these social and Sabbath reunions, are centralizing, inspiring, and grateful. 
I have a whole county for a parish, as there is no other Congregat onal or Pres- 
byterian Home Mi>sionary in it. I feel that I am doing a great work, giving 
myself wholly to it, and 1 can not, must not come down. And we are laboring 
and praying for, and expecting, * 4 greater things than these, that ye may mar- 
vel." The church members often say that they can not feel or express too 
much gratitude and obligation to your noble and generous charity for behold- 
ing, pitying, and helping them in their low estate. This place might have 
stranded had it not been for your proffered and timely assistance. 

Massacre and Fires. 

Every thing, to my own mind, was propitious for a good work on my field 
till the outbreak of Indian hostilities on the l7ih of August, and since" then 
every one of the five towns where I have preached has been depopulated, and 
two of them, Kingston and Forest City, are now garrisoned forts. Four of my 
hearers in Manannah have been massacred, and the whole land is made deso- 
late. J staid on the ground till August 25th, and arrived at Anoka on Saturday 
evening, the 30th, having come from Clear Water, forty miles, in a boat, alone, 
bringing all my library but one box of my books, which was at my last board- 
ing place. That house is now in ashes, together with' the one I occupied in 
Forest City. 

Bearing Heavy Burdens. 

To show the spirit with which the people take hold of the work, I may refer to 
one case. One of our kindest and most liberal men has been obliged to give up 
house and land, and will soon be reduced from the comforts of a pleasant home 
to 4 *a shanty, which is all I can expect to build at present" He is not dis- 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 99 

couraged, and has signed for my support the coming: year twenty five dollars ; 
and he will pay it. Perhaps I ought not to refer to this — it might appear almost 
like a breach of confidence — but I mention it, feeling that if the members of the 
church can struggle so hard to sustain the Gospel among them, the least the 
minister of Christ can do, is willingly to bear with them a share of their trials 

The "Drafts" and the "Boxes." 

It is not strange that the claims of the missionaries should be thrust upon 
the background, and that many should suffer from this neglect. And suffer they 
will, many of them, except for the forethought and care of Eastern friends. The 
Home Missionary Society supplies them with about all the money they see in 
the course of the year. This enables them, w ith close economy, to get through 
with the expenses that must be met in money ; the " box" supplies them with 
about all the clothing they have; and but for this supply \ the question, " Where- 
withal shall we be clothed ?" would be a problem indeed. But when " the box' 
comes, oh I how they smile through their tears, as they repeat to themselves the 
words of the blessed Saviour : " Your heavenly Father knoweth ye have need 
of all these things." 

Then, dear christian friends, do not forget to send on " the box" for cold win- 
ter will soon again visit the missionary's home. I say this, of course, with ref- 
erence to the need of others, and who can't do without it As for me, I am 
used to it and don't mind it so much — it has become easy by practice. I have 
passed three winters without nn overcoat ; and if I can get an vnder-co&t for 
next winter, I will be contented to pass the fourth winter without the overcoat 
And besides, during the five years I have been in the field, I have been almost 
entirely clothed from the " boxes." 



Home Missions Indispensable. 

The more I observe the practical workings of our Society on missionary 
ground, and become conversant with the situation and necessities of our pioneer 
churches, the more am I struck with the wisdom and foroight that devised the 
plan of action and provided for the needs of these churches. I can see no possi- 
ble way by which the means of grace could bo provided for them without the 
aid furnished by this Society. This is emphatically true of the churches to 
which, in the providence of God, I have been called to minister. Scattered and 
poor, weak in numbers, and some of them disheartened by the trials through 
which they have had to pass, their waning faith has been revived, their hopes 
brightened, their courage renewed, and their determination to persevere inten- 
sified. Though not permitted to rejoice over new born souls, to any great ex- 
tent, I have yet had good, and, to my mind, satisfactory evidence that my labors 
have not been in vain in the Lord. 



Freedom of Speech in Missouri 

The progress of the public mind, and the facts which, under the providence 
of God, have transpired, have enabled me to advance much in the thoroughness 
of my preaching in respect to the influence of slavery in producing this war ; 
especially in respect to the influence of the suppression of free speech in pro- 
ducing misunderstanding and passion, and promoting all the interests of tyran- 
ny. It has done me g«»od to tell the people that the very same spirit which 
baa cried M Abolition," in Missouri, for years — the very same spirit which 
drove that noble teacher of religious truth, Dr. Nelson, (the author of The 
Cause and Cure of Infidelity \) from this country, which he had so long blessed 
wit h hs labors, merely for not believing in slavery — this very same spirit, to 



100 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May, 

day, makes secession. And no man can know but we are suffering, this day, 
the consequences of that hour when he fled t panting for his life, to Illinois for 
safety. This war, in its direct influence, is fearfully demoralizing ; but indi- 
rectly it is a wonderful teacher of truth. 

Escape from Savages. 

Together with my family I have just fled from my field of labor in Little 
Falls, in consequence of the imminent peril of our lives from the Indians. 
Within ten days past the Sioux and Chippewa tribes have shown marked indi- 
cations of hostility toward the whites. Not less than a thousand have already 
been cruelly slaughtered by the Sioux. 

We greatly feared an attack on our village the night before we left. The 
Indians were only a few miles above us, gathering in large bands at a point on 
the Mississippi River. We did not learn the facts in the case till near night, 
when it was too late and too dangerous to travel through the intervening roads 
to a safe place southward. Hence we decided to remain till the next morning. 
We were armed with rifles, * shot guns, pistols, pitchforks, cobble stones, and 
clubs. The families of the town gathered in large buildings, near together, so 
as to do better execution with our weapons in case of an attack. But God pre- 
served us through that dark, sleepless night. Early the next morning we left 
with many others, and are now with our good friend, Rev. Mr. Packard, of 
Anoka, eighty miles down the river. 

A Model Doctor. 

I may be allowed to say that the man who is the life of this singing, and, in- 
deed, of the whole Sunday school work, is a physician more than sixty years 
old, with an extensive country practice. You may, perhaps, think his presence 
in the morning quite uncertain, but he has been absent only three or four times 
during the past year, either from the morning singing, or the Sabbath school 
exercise after the sermon. People know his Sabbath habits, and I suppose do 
not send for him except in case of real necessity. Moreover, with a strong will 
he makes his arrangements to be in the house of God. I have known him to 
ride ten or twelve miles to see patients on Sabbath morning, and yet be back in 
time to sing with the children at half-past nine. His son, who is also a physi- 
cian, is a man of similar Sabbath habits. It does one's heart good to see how 
the young ladies crowd into the Bible classes taught by this father and son. 
And the elder doctor is conducting another Sabbath school, three miles or more 
from his residence, at three o'clock Sabbath afternoon. Last Sabbath, p.m., I 
went with him to this school, and found about seventy children and youth 
crowded into a school house built for the accommodation of forty or fifty 
scholars. 

A Five Tears' Work. 

With this missionary year, closes the fifth of my labors in this place. In the 
me|n time some changes of a pleasing character have occurred. Five years 
ago, there was no meeting house ; now, we have a good one free of debts — the 
best, we are told, that is paid for, of any church of our denomination in the 
State. For this we would be thankful to God first, second to those friends 
abroad who have aided us, nnd thirdly to the people who have been encouraged 
to u rise up and build." Five years ago, this church had no prayer meeting, 
its members being few, with no resident minister to lead them. The first prayer 
meeting was held at my house soon after my coming, at which four were pres- 
ent, besides members of my family, two of the four only being professed Christ- 
ians. Now, at our weekly prayer meeting we have thirty or forty present regu- 
larly. It is indeed a prayer meeting, the best attended, best loved, of all our 



1863] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 101 

meetings. The last almost always seems the best. Always a bright spot, in 
the past, may this weekly gathering never be less so, in time to come. Five 
years ago, we had no distinct Sabbath school ; now, we have one of steady in- 
terest, growth and profit Then, there was no distinct congregation ; now have 
we one, constant and reliable, with a slow but steady growth. In church mem- 
bers, we have increased from eighteen to over sixty. This increase has been 
from hopeful conversions at home, quite as much as from additions from abroad. 
Other changes have occurred in the place, favoring good order and morals, in 
which we as church and peopje are interested, but which need not here be 
named. 

Contraband Congregational Church. 

On Sabbath evening, March 16, a church was organized among the " contra- 
bands" at Lawrence, as the "Second Congregational Church." Eight persons 
covenanted together, and others are expected to unite. Only one of these per- 
sons had a letter of dismission from the church from which he came. His letter 
was made out for himself and wife. We asked him where his wife was. He 
replied : — " They sold my wife aud children down South before I got away. 
But I got a letter for both, hoping I might find her some time." We have sel- 
dom seen slavery in so odious an aspect All the rest united by profession. 
Their experiences were distinct and very satisfactory. They seemed to under- 
stand clearly the ground of their hope. Their experience in most cases had 
been deep, and their conversion very clear. One said that he had always 
thought that if he experienced religion he should keep it to himself, and not 
make a fool of himself by telling of it. He was long under conviction, and 
came almost to despair. At last he was able to surrender himself to Christ, 
and instead of keeping it to himself, " he went right in among the white folks, 
praising God. They said I was drunk, but I thanked God for such drunken- 
ness as that" We could not help thinking of the cry of the multitude, on the 
day of Pentecost, " These men are full of new wine." 

An Outpost. 

In January T assumed another preaching station. I first preached therr 
during a fierce snow storm, and much questioned whether we should have any 
congregation. But as I drew nigh to the school house, I was surprised to see 
the vacant space around (it stood in a little grove) alive with teams. Among 
them were four or five ox sleighs, some of which had come four or five miles. 
The house was so full that upwards of twenty men stood, the whole time. I 
found standing, but scarcely moving room, and was surrounded by as attentive 
an audience as any one could ask for. There were mothers, who had brought 
their little babes with them, varying from two to six months old, not deterred 
by the storm. It was a scerie that amply repaid the labor, and I can but hope 
it was a profitable season. At its close, one of the congregation rose, thanked 
me for coming so far through the storm, and then inquired if I would not soon 
come again. I could not refuse. Since then, I have been pressed to occupy 
another point, and I am not sure, but it may be desirable, that I give up one of 
my evening appointments in the village, to enable me to meet these pressing 
calls in the neighborhood. 

The Freed People. 

We have in the school some twelve or fifteen " contrabands," most of them 
adnhs. They are all learning to read, are deeply interested, and make rapid 
progress. I take great pleasure in teaching a class of these each Sabbath. By 
the way, the Freed people in Kansas, so far as I see, show themselves worthy 
of their freedom, being well behaved, anxious to learn, and willing and able to 
take care of themselves. 



102 THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. [May 

I was much interested in talking with one of them, whom we call Aunt Han- 
nah. She seems not to feel that she is a Christian, yet has thought very much 
on the subject of religion. In relating her experience, at a certain time, she 
said : " I knew nothing that was in the book, for I couldn't read ; and it 'pearcd 
like all I knew I must learn from my own breast I tried to find Jesus ; and 
one night I dreamed I was reaching up through a dark cloud trying to take 
hold of his hand." Ah, how many poor sinners, white and black, have 
"reached through a dark cloud " to take bold of the hand of Jesus ! 

The Meeting in the Woods. 

A little out of this village, about five miles in the wilderness, there is a neigh- 
borhood of pioneers. Here is a little tavern and post office. The same has 
been the resort, for a long time, of gamblers and tipplers and profane men gen- 
erally. The place had become somewhat noted for irreligion. Not far from 
the tavern there is a log school house, and, what is more, in the neighborhood 
there are a few Christians. In some way they began to hold meetings for 
prayer, this winter, and also for preaching. The result has been, quite a revival 
there in the woods. A Free Will Baptist minister has preached there occasion- 
ally, and also a Methodist minister ; and, this week, I visited them and preached 
to them. After the sermon it was quite a sight to see eight or ten men and wo- 
men rise up, one after another, and testify of their love for Christ and their de- 
termination to honor their profession of religion. I have not seen so many at 
one time engaged in bearing witnefcs to the truth, since I have been upon this 
field. 

The Lord will Provide. 

When teaching an academy, twenty years ago, I was making from eight to ten 
hundred dollars a year, a minister and deacon came twelve miles and remained 
with me two days and three nights, trying to induce me to give up the academy 
and devote myself to preaching. I said to them, " I can hardly live on $1,000 
per annum, and how shall I live on $400 or $500 V" They said : 4< Trust God." 
I finally yielded, and have trusted God ever since. Sometimes my faith has 
been tried. A year and a half ago, when you sent me unexpectedly $25, which 
just paid a pressing demand, I saw Jesus' hand in it so plainly that I thought, 
then, that I would never fear nor distrust again. But oh, how feeble is flesh 
and blood ! My son, who is at college studying for the ministry, was com- 
pelled, during the last term, to do chores for defraying a part of his expenses ; 
and he said : •' Father, why do I have to chore around for my board, when 
other boys do not ?" Parental feeling ilushed to the full. I confess, I remem- 
bered the academy where I made $1,000 a year. Could I say : u Because you 
are the son of a Home Missionary ?" 

Enduring Hardness. 

My people are united and do for me all they can ; and the Home Missionary 
Society have pledged us all that we asked ; but the sum total is not much over 
$350 a year ; with which, were it not for assistance sent us in clothing, we 
could not get along at all ; for our family numbers ten persons, including my 
widowed sister and her little daughter. When I think of my toiling wife, I 
question whether, indeed, I have a right to tax her so greatly. And yet, each 
year, wo fondly hope the next will bring relief; but it does not, and so she goes 
on, patiently and uncomplainingly, with her toil, an unceasing, ever recurring 
round. We both love this great work, so fraught with love and blessedness 
and joy. And our hearts are filled with gratitude to the great Giver of all good, 
for the dear friends that he has raised up in New England. Without their as- 
sistance our continuance here were impossible. 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 103 



Frontier Exposures, 

There is a dark shadow over our pathway. I have heen unwilling to refer to 
it, hoping it might pass away ; each successive winter that we have resided up 
so far north, it has pressed for a hearing ; but we have refused to listen. The 
present season it has been more peremptory in its language, and we are com- 
pelled to ponder the question in sober earnestness. It is this : We removed 
here in the summer of 1856. The following winter was that memorable stormy 
and cold one, that will be remembered for long time to come. It found us 
feebly prepared to resist it. A thin partition of boards, alone shielding us from 
the wintry elements without, a constant supply of fuel to the stove, during 
those Ions *nd severe nights, failed to resist or ward off the intense cold. My 
own health was rugged ; not so, however, with my dear wife. During one of 
those coldest spells, she was seized with spasmodic croup and asthma. She has 
struggled against it ; but each succeeding winter, it seems to return with re- 
newed violence. It has now assumed a chronic bronchial affection ; and after 
the past winter had set in, she was unable to leave the house for four or five 
weeks. Thus we are unwillingly constrained to ponder the question of duty to 
her : whether it is right for us to remain so far north. We feel a strong at- 
tachment to our people. This has induced us to resist the thought of being 
obliged to leave them ; and even now, we would put it away from us if possi- 
ble. It may however be stern duty to break away. On two occasions the 
class has stood here at 40° below zero. I trust our heavenly Father will 
direct us. 

The Bight Spirit 

This church has never formally withdrawn from the patronage of your So- 
ciety ; yet, being aware of the embarrassed condition of its Treasury, and feel- 
ing that if we drew any thing from it we might be robbing other churches whose 
necessities were greater than ours, we did not make application for aid, either 
last year or this. I do not know that we are pecuniarily any stronger than we 
were in former years, but feeling deeply that we have been too long dependent 
on you, and ashamed to ask for aid when your funds are so inadequate to the 
calls you receive, we are trying, by relinquishment on the part of the minister 
and increased exertions on the part of the people, to go alone. We hope thus, 
by the use of our limbs so to gain strength as not to fall, or be under the neces- 
sity of again grasping your hand. True, we go somewhat tottering and fearful, 
but that must needs be in our first attempts to walk without help. We have 
come to the conclusion that we must venture into the water if we would ever 
learn to swim. Whether we shall go under or not remains to bo seen. Rather 
than sec us drown, we trust you will be ready to extend to us again the help- 
ing hand. 

But, we do not design to part company with you, unmindful of favors re- 
ceived. Somewhat proud of our independence, we can not rest exactly easy 
under the remembrance of our indebtedness without an endeavor to liquidate 
it With this feeling, I presented the claims of your Society to the people, tak- 
ing the words of Paul to the Romans : ** I commend unto you Phebe our sister, 
which is a servant of t)ie church which is at Cenchrea ; that ye receive her in 
the Lord as becometh sainte, and that ye assist her in whatsoever business she 
hath need of you ; for she hath been a succorer of many, and of myself also." 
As the fruit of the appeal I herewith send you ten dollars, as our first liquidat- 
ing remittance. We could wish the sum greater, but such as it is, we cheer- 
fully give it, with many thanks for all that we have received. 



104 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



DIRECTORS FOR LIFE, 

CONSTITUTED SINCE APRIL 1, 1861. 

The number of Directors and Members for life has become so large that the annual 
publication of their names is a serious tax upon the Treasury. As those who receive 
the Annual Reports arc supposed to preserve them for reference, it is thought expedient 
to publish the list only once in five years. The names of those constituted Directors 
or Members for Life previous to April 1st, 1801, were printed in the Report for that 
rear, and the entire list will be republished in the Report for 1865, and thence-forward 
at intervals of five yeara. 



Alden, Rev. E. K., Boston, Mass. 
Andrews, Horace, Jr., New York. 
Averill, Rev. James, Plymouth Hollow, Ct 
Ayer, Mrs. Betsy S. f Bradford, Vt 

Bacon, Rev. George B., Orange, N. J. 
Bardwell, Alonzo, South Hadley, Mass. 
Bliss, Theodore, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boardmao, Rev. George M., Blnghamton, N. Y. 
Bray ton, Edward S., Utlca, X. Y. 
Brewster, Rev. Cyrus, Haydenvllle, Mass. 
Bronson, Dr. 0., New York. 

Camp, Davll N„ New Britain, Ct. 
Chester, (i F., New York. 
Clark, William H., New York. 
Coleman, Rev. Lyman, D.D., Easton, Pa. 
Crawford, Rev. Archibald. Smyrna, N. Y. 
Curtias, Rev. George C, Eliuira, N. Y. 

De Forest, John, M.D., Watertown, Ct. 
Douglas, Rev. James, Watertown, N. Y. 
Duren, Rev. Charles, West Charleston, Vt. 

Goodwin, Daniel B., Watervllle, N. Y. 
Graves, Dea. Elam, Haydenvllle, Mass. 
Guernsey, Rev. Jesse, Dubuque, Iowa. 

Iladsell, Ira, Farmington, Ct 

Hulton, Hon. Edward D., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hough, Rev. J. W., Wllliston, Vt. 

Jones, Rev. Franklin C, Southlngton, Ct. 

Kellogg, George, Rockville, Ct. 
Ke'.logg, Allyn, do. 

Kimball, Rrv. Mosea, Weathersfleld, Yt. 
King, Rufus 8., New York. 

Learned, Ebenezer. Norwich, Ct. 
Learned, William L., Albany, N. Y. 



Little, Rev. Charles, Cheshire, Ct. 
Lumbard, Philip, Waterville, N. Y. 

McKeen, Rev. Silas, Bradford, Vt 
Mc Williams, Daniel W., Peoria, 111. 
Magoun, Rev. George F., Lyon*, Iowa. 
Murden, Rev. A. L., Piermont, N. H. 
Marsh, Rev. Frederick, Winchester, Ct 
Martin, Rev. Solon, Corinth, Vt 
Monteith, Rev. John, Jr., Jackson, Mich. 

Oviatt, Rev. George A., Somers, Ct. 

Palmer, Rev. Charles R., Salem, Mass. 
Parish, Ariel, Springfield, Mass. 
Parke, James H. II., Whitehall, N. Y. 
Parsons, Edward W., Hartford, Ct 
Pilchard, Dea George W., Bradford, Vt 
Punderson, Dea. Lemuel S., New Haven, Ct. 

Reynolds, James, West Haven, Ct. 
Richards, Rev. J. D. F., Weatherefield, Vt 
Root, George W., Hartford, Ct. 

Schleffelin, Miss Fanny K., Yonkers. N. Y. 
Scoville, Mrs. Elizabeth, Olean, N. Y. 
Sharp, James C, Dorchester, Mass. 
Shaw, Dea. Thomas C, Bradford, Vt. 
Small, Samuel A., West Mlllburv, Mass. 
Smith, Oliver, Plymouth, Ct 
Spencer, Sherman, Gasport, N. Y. 
Stanley, Henry, New Britain, Ct 
Stuart, George H., Beaver Dam, Wia. 

Thayer, Rev. J. H., Salem, Mass. 
Ticichell, Joseph H., Soutldngton, Ct. 

Upson, Andrew, Southlngton, Ct. 
U|«on, Milea H., do. 
Williams, George W., Hartford, Ct 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



105 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE, 



CONSTITUTED SINCE APRIL 1st, 1861. 



The names of those constituted Members for Life previous to April 1st, 1861, will be 
(bund in the Report for that year. 



Abbott. Austin, New York. 

Abbott. Miss Dorcas, Andover, Maw. 

Abbott, Rev. Lyman, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Aberoethy, Charles, New York. 

Adam*. Horace O., Plain vllle, Ct. 

Alden. Mrs Maria H, Boston, Mass. 

AMen, Miss Mary, Windsor* Vt. 

Alien, Mrs. Esther, North Granville, N. Y. 

Alien, George W., Amherst, Mass. 

Allen, Mrs. Mercy D., Sterling, Ct. 

Allen, Dea. R. D. H., Terry ville, Ct 

Allen, R. J , Hotchklssville, a. 

Alien, William E., Hartford, Ct. 

Allen. William E,, West WUliamsfield, O. 

Alroy, William T., Norwich, Ot. 

Amory, Miss Frances. E., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Ames, Charles E.,HaverhnT, Mass.* 

Anderson, John, Boston, Mass. 

Anderson, Rev. Joseph, Norwalk, Ct. 

Anderson, Mrs. Annie 8., do.- 

Andrews, E. A., New York. 

Atxlrus, Frances M. .Hartford, Ct. 

Andnis, Mrs. Julia B., do. 

Anthony, Marcas, Hancock, N. H. 

Anthony, Mrs. Marcus, do. 

Arm*. Rev. William F., Newtown, Ct. 

Arnold, George 8' .Angelica, N. V. 

Arnold, Mrs. William- R., South Woodstock, Ct 

At* in*, Mrs. S. A., Say brook, 0. 

At water, Dea. Lyman, Bennington, Vt. 

Atwater. Miss Nancy, New Haven, Ct 

Atw.iod. Mrs. Betiey C, Pelham, N. H. 

Austin, Mrs. Anson, Samel d, Ct. 

Avery, Mrs. Maria, Waterville, N. Y. 

Aver. Rev. F. D., Milford, N. H. 

Ayer, Mrs. M. E., do. 

Ayer. ML*s Mary E.. Bradford, Vt. 

Ayrault, Mrs. HuMah, Falrport, N. Y. 

Ayres, Miss Mary E., Romeo, Mich. 

Baker, Albert C, Ciikopee, Mass. 
Baker. Levi W. f Marlborough, Mass. 
Baldwin. Chauncey E,, North Cornwall, Ct 
Bancroft, A. N., Galesburg, III. 
Bangs. William F.,-Chicopee, Mass. 
Barber, Augustus K , Concord, III. 
Barber, C. H.^ Torringford, Ct 
Barber, J. II., Windsor, Ct 
Barber, Mrs. Maria, Hartford, Ct 
Bantoi. Mrs. Charlotte M , Sippican, Mass. 
Bardwrll, Mrs. Ante pan, Belchertown, Maps. 
Bard well. Carlos, South DeerfieUt Mass. 
Barker. George W., Bridgeport, Ct 
Barlow, Joseph W., Lee, Mam. 
Barnard, Cecelia, Hartford, Ct 
Barrows, Mrs. A. M., WilHmantlc, Ct 
BarHow, Mrs. Elisabeth R, Smyrna, N. Y. 
Bartholomew, Mrs. Abigail, Thetford, Vt. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Henry, Hartley, Mass. 
BartleU, Mrs. Sarah, Newton, Mass. 
Birtiett, Mrs. Sarah E., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Bartlett, William. Derby, Ct 
Barton, Sarah J., Athol, Mass. 
Basnet, Austin B., Lee, Mats. 
Basaett, Miss E11zat>eth, Nevtmrrport Mass. 
Bassets, Miss Elisabeth P., Birmingham, Ct 
Basset, George P., Housatoalc, Mass. 
Baybst, Mrs. Sarah. Brooklyn, Ct 
Beach, Mrs. Harriet E., Stratford. Ct. 
Beadle, Mrs. Mlrancy, Waluugfbrd, Ct 



Beardsley, Frederick J., Stratford, Ct. 

Beardsley, Miss Marcia, Bridgeport, Ct. 

Beardslev, Miss Maria, do. 

Beebe, Miss Mary R., Ellington, Ct 

Belden, Mrs. Mary E., Newington, Ct. 

Bell, Charles, New York. 

Beman, Mrs. Jonas, Hadley, Mass. 

Beinent, John, Beloit, Wis. 

Benedict, Alfred F., Brockport, N. Y. 

Benedict, Miss Betsy, Sherburne, N. Y. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Everard, New Haven, Ct. 

Bennttt, Dea. George C, Bridgewater, Ct. 

Berry, Miss Anna D., Concord, N. H. 

Berry, Leonora Kunxler, New York. 

Berry, Thomas S., do. 

Bigelow, Sarah A., Hartford, Ct. 

Bigelow, Mrs. William, Lincoln, Mass. 

Billings, Miss Ann, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Billings, Noyes, New London, Ct. 

Bishop, George S., Ensthampton, Mass. 

Blackinton, Mrs. P. P , Attlehorough. Mass. 

Blake, Mrs. Emeline. West Roxbury, Mass. 

Blakeslee, JotanC.,. Coventry, N. Y. 

Blanchard, Mrs. Carrie A., Griswold, Ct. 

Blanchard, Hiram W., Watertown, Wis. 

Blass, Mrs. Julln, Durham, N. Y. 

Blatchley, William, Hartford, Ct 

Bliss, Henry, Springfield, Mass. 

Boardman, N. C, Falrhaven, Ct 

Bodwell, Charles A., Topeka, Kan. 

Bodwell, Emeline, do. 

Bodwell, Mary E., do. 

Bodwell, Sherman B., do. 

Boles, Jarvis, Chester, Ct 

Boland, Mrs. Julia, Homer, N. Y. 

Boltwood, Henry L., Lawrence, Mass. 

Bond, Mrs. Thomas, Wilmington, Mass. 

Booth, Mrs. Mary, Candor, N. Y. 

Borden, John, Cooper, Mich. 

Bosworth, Rev. Nathan, Fairport, N. Y. 

Bovey, Dea. John, Bath, Me. 

Bowker, Rev. J. It. Philllpston, Mass. 

Boyd, Frederic S., New York. 

Boyd, Fainuel, Marlborough, Mass. 

Boyle, Mrs. Ellen 8., Oswego, N. Y. 

Boynton, Rev. Charles, Watertown, Wis. 

Boynton, Mrs. Sarah L.. do. 

Bradlee, Mary L., Boston, Mass. 

Bradley, Dwlght P., Lee, Mass. 

Bradley, Edward A., do. 

Bradley, George II., do. 

Bradley, James W., do. 

Bradley, Frederick, Derby, Ct 

Brainard. Lucy A., Hartford, Ct 

Brewer, Cyrus, Dorchester, Mass. 

Bridgman, Mrs. Jerusha, South Amherst, Mass. 

Bridgman, William H., New York. 

Rriggs, Edwin, Boston, Mass. 

Bristol, Mrs. Isaac, New Milford, Ct. 

Bronson, Miss Mary, Stratford, Ct 

Brooks, Augustus T., Salem, Mass. 

Brooks. Henry, Plymouth Hollow, Ct 

Broubeck, Mrs. Abigail, Newbury, Mass. 

Brown, Asa H., Ballardvale, Mass. 

Brown, Dearborn 8., Raymond, N. R 

Brown, Horace, New Britain, Ct. 

Brown, Mrs. Jacob, 2d, Fltchburg, Mass. 

Brown, Mrs. Mary B., Grafton, 0. 

Brown, Saroantha C, Elyria, 0. 

Brown, Dea. William A., Cheshire, Ct 



106 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Brown, Rev. William B., Newark, N. J. 
Browning. John B., New Haven, Ct 
Buffuin, Mary E., Manchester, N. II. 
Bulkley, Mhs Mary A., New London, Ct. 
Burgess, Samuel P., Morris, Ct 
Burnham, Harriet P., New Preston, Ct 
Burrell, David, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Burroughs Mrs. Caroline S., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Burt, E.lward, East Longmeadow, Mass. 
Burton, Rev. H. N M Newbury, Vt 
Burtt, Kirk D., Lawrence, Masa 
Bush, John L., Sf>encer, Mass. 
Bushuell, Rev. Horace, Jr., Allenivllle, Ind. 
Butler, Albert L.. Hartford, C't 
Butler, Mrs. Catharine C, Vernon, Ct 
Butler, Mrs. E., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Butler, Roman M., New Hartford Center, Ct. 
Buxton, Miss Elizabeth M., Webster, N. II. 
Buxton, Joel, Phillipstou, Mass. 

Calm, Edward O., Newburgh, O. 

Calhoun, Dea. Jede liah, Cornwall Bridge, Ct. 

Campfield, Elizabeth W., Newark, N. J. 

Capron. Mrs. C. D., Uxbridge, Mass. 

Card, Mrs Lydia M., Norwich, N. Y. 

Carleton, Henry B., Lawrence, Mass. 

Carpenter, Mrs. H. G., Barre, Vt 

Carpenter, Rev. Henry W., Dauby, N. Y. 

Carj>enter, James P., Hartford, Ct 

Carruth, Cortland, Vernon, N. Y. 

Carruth, Uri, Berlin, Wis. 

Carruth, I?aac, West Andover, Mass. 

Carter, Burrell, Plaluvllle, Ct. 

Cary, Henry. Scotland, Ct 

Cary, Mrs. Mary I)., Foxborough, Mass. 

Caswell, Mrs. Mary, Edwardsvllle, III. 

Cate, Mrs. Abigail W., Northwood, N. 11. 

Champlln, Elmund L., New York. 

Champlin, Oliver P., Stafford Springs, Ct 

Chandler, Dea. James, do. 

Chandler, Rev. John, North Woodstock, Ct. 

Chandler, Miss Kate F., Lawrence, Mass. 

Chandler, Myron S., Lunenbur^h, Vt. 

Chanev, Miss Mary P., New London, Ct 

♦Chapin, Japhet, Chicopee, Mass. 

Chapln, Miss Julia A., do. 

Chapman, Silas, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Chapman, William P., Norwich, N. Y. 

Chase, Mrs. Mary M., Full River, Mass. 

Chew, Alice, New London, Ct 

Child, Mrs. Bela, Thetford, Ct. 

Child, Mrs. Ellen M., South Woodstock, Ct. 

Chittenden, Mrs. 8. H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cboate, Dr. David, Salem, Mass. 

Churchill, George, Galesburg, 111. 

Clapp, Charles, Jr., Bath. Me. 

Clapp, Miss Harriet, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Clapp, Rev. Luther, Wauwatos i, Wis. 

Clark, Allen G., Canterbury, Ct 

Clark, Charles Enfield, Ct. 

Clark, Edward L., Orange, Ct. 

Clark, Henry 0., Westfield, Mass. 

Clark, Miss Jane C, New London, Ct. 

Clark, John II., North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Clark, Dea. William L., Akron, 0. 

Clary. Cephas, Deerfield. Mass. 

Cleavland, Luther, Reeling, N. Y. 
Cleveland, Kufus, Illtchcockville, Ct 
Clifford, Afar-tin, Fitchbur*, Mass. . 
' Cluff, Mrs. Chloe, North Granville, N. Y. 
Cobh, Rev. H. W., Prairie As ChUm, Wis. 
Cobb, Mttfutn, Syracuse, N. Y 

Coe f Mh8 J^tfc ■ | " h - dl, F ' ^ r 
Coe, ThommS^i k. ** w Y fi tk * 

b % &. ~X* 1 v* U N'e w I »« ry port, Mass. 

^S^V; inrfer, Ocrfumbua, O. 
t ^\T^ I , iUrtfonl, Ct. 



Condit, Jennie M., Lee, Masa 

Conklin, Dea. John J., New MUford, Ct 

Conrad, Rev. C. E., Quincy, III 

Cook, Charles, 2d, Halley, Mass. 

Cook, Miss C. C, Norwalk, Ct 

Cook, E. E., Hadley, Mass. 

Cook, Rev. Joseph T., Genesen, 111. 

Cook, Miss Mary E., Waterbury, Ct. 

Copeland, Mrs. L. A., Katt Douglas, Mass. 

Corbin, Philip, New Britain, Ct. 

Cordley. Rev. Richard, Lawrence, Kan. 

Corliss, Arad. S., East Corinth, Vt 

Corliss, Francis A., New York. 

Cotton, Miss M. S., Buffalo, N. Y. 

(Bowles. Ezeklel, Plainvllle, Ct 

Crart, Miss Ellen, West Roxbury, Mass. 

CraO, G-, do. 

Crandall, Miss Jane E., Stonington, Ct 

Crane, Robert F., Waterbury, Ct 

Crittenden, Mrs. Rel>ecca, Mid-lletown. Ct 

Crittenden. Rev. Richard, North Guilford, Ct 

Crosby, Otis, Pepperell, Mass. 

Culver, H. L., Chicago, III. 

Cummings, Charle.*, Me. 1 for ', Masa 

Cunningham. John V. Naperville, 111. 

Currier, William, Newburyport, Mass. 

Curtis, Miss Cornelia I., Stratford, Ct. 

Curtis, Mrs. Harriet E., Sherburne, N. Y. 

Curtis, John E., Marlborough, Mass. 

Cushman, William P., Marshfield, Mass. 

Cutler, Dr. William W., New London, Ct 

Dame, Henry A., Orford, N. H. 
Dame, Miss Lucy E., do. 
Dame, Mra Lucy 8., do. 
Dame, Miss Martha T., do. 
Dame, Theodore S., Boston, Masa 
Darling, Mrs. Clara B., Warsaw, N. Y. 
Dart, Miss Emma, New Loudon, Ct. 
Dascomb, lira. P., West Andover, Masa. 
Da vies, Rev. James, Delphos, 0. 
Davi*, Abby, New London, Ct 
Davis, George W., Whltlnsville, Mass. 
Davis, Mrs. Julia E. M., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Day, Mrs. E. C. Bristol, Ct 
Day, John C, Hartford, Ct. 
Day, Mra. P. B., Hollla, N. H. 
Dean, Asahel, Foxborough, Mass. 
Dean, Philander W., Taunton, Mass. 
Deane, Rev. James, East Canaan, Ct 
* Denlson, Mrs. A. C, Portland, Ct 
Denlson, John C, Hartford, Wis. 
Dlckerman, Mrs. Caroline, Kockfor 1, I1L 
Dickerman, Rev. Isaac, Westville, Ct. 
Dickerman, J. P., New Haven, Ct. 
Dickinson, Lieut Euos, South Amherst, Mass. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Levi, Hadley, Mass. 
Dickinson, Quartus L., Haydenvllle, Mass. 
Dlrnoml, Ezeklel, Concord, N. U. 
Dickinson, Mrs. E. M., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Dodge, Vienna, Webster, N. H. 
Douglas, Amos, Franklin, N. Y. 
Douglass, Mrs. Laura, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Downe, Mrs. Louisa H., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Dra|xr, Miss Emma L., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Drew, Rev. S. F., Cobat, Vt. 
Drown, Elizabeth, Keene, N. H. 
Dunning, Charlex, West Meriden, Ct 
Dunning, I/ovell, Charaplaln, N. Y. 
Durfee, Miss Annie G., Fall River, Mats. 
Durfee, Mis* Hattie M., do. 
Durham, Miss Sophia, Betolt, Wia 
Dwi-ht, Miss Francis E., Stockbridge, Mass. 
Dwight, Rev. H. E., Randolph, Mass. 
Dwlght, Norman, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Earnshaw, John B., Walnut Hills, O. 

Ea*land, Allen, Bridgeport, Ct 

Eastman, Mrs. Orpha L. C, Hennllnr, N. H, 

Edmond, Henry v., Norwich, Ct 

Eells, 8tephen b., Walton, N. Y. 

Eldred, Miss Caroline W., North Falmouth, 

Billot, Asahel N. f Barre, Mssa 

Elliott Mist Betsey M., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Elliott Henry G.. Bridgeport, Ct 

Kills, Oliver, Fitchburg, Mass. 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



107 



Ellsworth. Mary A., Plymouth. Ct 
Elmore, .Samuel, East Hartford, Ct 
Elton. T., East Canaan, Ct. 
Ely. Mrs. Ethan C, Longmeadow, Mass. 
Ely. Ileman, KIyrii,0. 

Ely, M.'kson W., Lougmeadow, Moss. 

Ely, WillLim B. t Newton, Mum. 

Emery. Joseph W., Quincy, 111 

Evans, Edwarl B., Rarre, Vt 

Evans, Ira H., tin. 

Irani*, Ret-. L. J., Walnut Illtln, 0. 

Evarta, Nathan 11., Killingwurtli, Ct. 

Fairhank. Mrs. Sarah E., Newton, Man. 
Farley, Mr*. Polly, Went Creek, Iml. 
Farnham, Knswell, Bradford, Vt. 
Farnham, Mr*. Susan, North Ad ms, Mass. 
Famsworth, Mrs. Sarah W., Fitchburg, Mans. 
Parnum, Mrs. Juilith A., Wot Concord, N. II. 
Farrar, Mrs. Aileline. Linruln. Mau. 
Prtrrar, Mist II. . Pepperell. Mass. 
Pay, Rer. Prescott, l>ancaster. N. H. 
Feldi, Ge »rge W., Newburyport, Mass. 
Fellows, Rev. F. E , Kennebunk, Me. 
Fish, Grorge W., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Fish. Mrs. Harriet E., do. 
Fisher, Jabez O., Westborougb, Mass. 
Fisk. L M., Sturhrldge, Mats. 
Fi*k, Mr*. Ruth C, Upton, Man. 

Fitch, Mrs. C. C, Conewango, N. Y. 

Pitt*. Mrs. Charles II.. Medway, Mau. 

Flagg. Mils Sarah, Springfield, Mat*. 

F.*bes, S. P., LindeiiYille, 0. 

Voote, Danl-l E., Belvldere. 111. 

Foot*, I*aac, Norwich, N. Y. 

Foote. Samuel I., Sweden, N. Y. 

Forbes, Charles, East Hartford, Ct 

Fowler. George A., Guilford, Ct. 

Fnwler. RlcharJ, do. 

Fox. Mrs. M. L.. West Roxbury, Mass. 

Fraser, James B., Parkman, 0. 

Fraser, John G., do. 

Freeman. Robert, Hartf<r 1, Wis. 

French. L\ sin ler, Montague, Mass. 

FrI*).I-, Miss Sirah C , Mention, III. 

Fuller, Mrs. A. R., Way land, Mass. 

FoILt, Charles I)., Hartfurl, Ct. 

Falter. De*. George, Suffield, Ct. 

Fulkr. Miss Jane, West R >xbury, Mass. 

Fuller, Mrs. Mary L., Granby, Mass. 

Gsnett. Mrs. Sarah, New London. Ct 

Gate*, Her. L. M . Hillslale, N. Y. 

Gate*. Sophii C, Hartford, Ct. 

Gay, William II., Sharon, Mass. 

dylonl, llenrv, Cheshire, Ct. 

Gaylor.l. Dei. John, South Hadley Palls, Mass. 

Gibb«, Miss R-, Sturbridge, Mass. 

Gibson. Smiuel A., Fitchburg, Ma«». 

Gilbert, Miss Emily F., Ware Village, Mass. 

Gilbert. Mrs. Harriet T., Portland, Ct. 
Gilbert, Mr*. Warehaw C, Kelchertown, Mass. 
Giles, ML* Elizalieth, Gloucester, Mass. 
Gillett, Garlanii, Fon.1 du Lac, \\ is. 
Oilman, Zeeh, Piernumt, N. 11. 
GUmore, Mr*. Polly, West Rut'. and, Vt. 
Gladwin. Selden, Hlgganum, Ct 
Gleason, Mn>. Abel, Weston, Mass. 
Gleason, FJbridge, New-Bralntree, Mass. 
GUdileo, K. B., Enfield. Ct. 
Goddard, Rev. E. N., Markesan, Wis. 
Goffe, E. W., MUIbury. Mhm. 
Goodwin, Charles, Blnghamton, N. Y. 
Goodwin, Mrs. Daniel B., Watervllle, N. Y. 
Good wis, William B., do. 

Goodwin. Miss Maria L., do. 
Goodwin, Rer. Edward P., Columbus, 0. 
Goodwin, Mir. Ellen M., do. 

•, WOIls, Mt Camel, Ct. 



iranm, Dea. A. P., k »v mw », m, 

Gould, Daniel, Salem, Mass. 
Gould, E lward, Portland, Ma 
Gould, Mis* Isabella. Stratford, Ct 
Gould. Mrs. P. P., Pbillipston, Mass. 
GooldUgt James L, AthoL Mats. 
Ctarlng, Mrs. James, Wilmington, Mass. 



Grave, Miss Snrah K, Madison, Ct. 
Gravei*, llollls D.. Sunderland. Mau. 
Graves, Rev. N. D.. Beloit, Wis. 
Gretman, Deborah K., Athene, N. Y. 
Gridley, John, Fanulngtuii, It 
Griggs. Mrs. Charlotte, Bristol, Ct. 
Grosvenor, Louisa, Pomfret, Ct. 
Gmut, Dea. Joel, Spencer. Mass. 
(irover, Mrs. Melita C, Koium, Mich. 
Guernsey, Mrs Fuuny W., Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Hallo, Hon. William, Hlns.lale, N. If. 

Halbert, Mrs. N. A., Buffalo, N Y. 

Hale, Benjamin W., Hanover, N. H. 

Hale, Phlletus C, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hall, Henry C, N. Y. 

Hall, Joel, Walllngfnrd, Ct. 

Hall, Mr*. Marv K.. Point Dontrlas, Minn. 

Hall, Mrs. Mary J., Lafsivett-, N. Y. 

Haini:t>n, Miss Mnrv K., Lyme, N. H. 

llanohett. Misi Maria, Suflleld, <t. 

Harlow, Mrs. Mnrv K., Sprhigfield, Vt. 

Harrison, Mrs. Ellen M., North Adnm-, Mass. 

IlHirison, Miss Marin, Waterlmry. Ct. 

Hart, Harriet Lavin'a. (Jullford, Ct. 

Hart, Miss Lvdia Griinn, do. 

Hart, J. Henry, New Britain, Ct 

Hart, Timothy E., Candor, N. Y 

Harvey, Mrs. Catharine, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Haskell, Mrs. Orinda, Tear ham, Vt. 

Hatch, W. E., Dexter, Mich. 

Hawks, William A., WlltUmsburgh, Mass. 

Hawley, Dea. I,ewis. Union City, Mich. 

Hawley, William 11.. Bridgepoit, Ct. 

Hawley, William, Ridge field, Ct 

Hawley, Catharine, do. 

Hawley, Mary A., do. 

Hay den, Samuel R., Windsor, Ct. 

Hayes, Mrs. Sarah B., Hnrwlntmi, Ct. 

Hayse, Walter, Townsend, Mus*. 

Hayward, Mrs. Charles, Bralntree, Ma«s. 

Hayward, Joseph K., Whltinsville, Mas-i. 

Hayward. Mrs. Martha W., Ashby, Ma^. 

Haywanl, L. A., Warsaw, N. Y. 

Heard, Mrs. Abel, Weston, Muss. 

Henion. Davil I., Lyndonville, N. Y. 

Herbert, Mrs. Sarah A., Newbury, Mass. 

Hill, JohnC, Saugatuek, Ct. 

Hill, Mrs. Maria, Rosendalc, Wis. 

Hill, Thomas B., do. 

Hill, Henry M., do. 

Hill, George C, d<i. 

Hills, Burritt, Plalnville, Ct. 

Hinckley, Reuben K., Klllingworth, Ct. 

lline, Daniel, Tallmadge, <>. 

lllue, Elliott P., Southbury. Ct 

Hitchcock, Abel. Homer, N. Y. 

Hitchcock, Charles, Dccrfleld, Mass. 

Hitchcock, llenrv E., Sturbridge, Mrs*. 

Hitchcock, Mrs. Martha R., Norwich, Ct. 

Hoadley, Robert L.. Plymouth, Ct. 

1 load ley, Mrs. Martha A., do. 

Hobart, Mrs. Betsey. Berlin, Vt 

Hobart, Mrs. Charlotte P., Beloit, Wis. 

Hobart, William, Braiutree, Mass. 

Hodges, Wlllard, Brighton, N. Y. 

Holden, Mrs. M. L., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Hollister, George, Hartford. Ct. 

Hohnari, Mrs. George W., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Holmes, Miss Ellen L.. East Hsrtfi rl, Ct 

Holmes, Mrs. James M., Waterbury, Ct. 

Holmes, William B., New York. 

Holt, Miss B. E.. West Andover, Mass. 

Hooker, Rev. Edward P., Medford, Mass. 

Hopkins, Charles, Norwich, N. Y. 

Hotchkim. John II , Yorkville, Wis. 

Hough, Miss Harriet W., New Haven, Ct 

Hovenden, Rey. Rt.bert, ttnrrettsville. 0. 

Hovey, George I fc , Deer Held, Mass. 

Howe, Charles M., Marlborough, Mass. 

Howe, Dea. Rufus, do. 

Ilowland, Dr. Asa, Barre, Mass. 

Hoyt, Mrs. Lucretia, Norwalk, Ct 

Hubbard, Edward I)., Clinton, Ct 

Hubbard, Rev. James M., Boston, Mass. 

Hubbard, Prof. Oliver P., Hanover, N. II. 



108 



THIRTY SEVENTH BEPORT. 



[May, 



Hubbard, Mr§. Sarah, Durham. N. Y. 
Hubbnrrl, Miss Elizabeth J., do. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Harriet T., North Stonington, Ct. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Lucina, Fitcliburg, Maw. 
Hull, Mm. Mercy, nomer, N. Y. 
Humphrey, Mn Mary E., Winchester, N. II. 
Hunt, Mrs. Nancy C, East Douglas, Mass. 
Hunt, Mlra Surah II., Auburn, N. Y. 
Hunter, Mm. William, 8pring*ater, N. Y. 
Hutchinson, Miss Almira, Mansfield, Mass. 
Hutch Ins, Miss Mary, Canterbury. Ct. 
Hyde, Mrs. A. B., Vernon Depot,* Ct 

Ide, Rev. Alexia W., Stafford Springs, Ct 
Isley, Miss Elizabeth, Newbury, Mum. 
Ingersoll, Mrs. Eliza II., Greenfield, Ma«. 
Irwin, Theodore, Oswego* N. Y. 
Ives, Mrs. Elizabeth, Bristol, Ct. 

Jackson. Dea. John, Anaemia, Ct. 
Jacobs, W. W.. Hartford, Ct. 
James, N. N., Newton Center, Mass. 
Jefferds, Rev. C. D., Chester, Vt. 
Jenney, Mrs. A. M., Galesburg, I1L 
Jenney, K. W. do. 

Jenney, Mrs. S. P., Fairhaven, Mass. 
Jennings, Dea. James B., Easton, Ct. 
Jennings. Mrs. Maria A., Southport. Ct 
Jessup, Rev. Henry G., Stanwlch, Ct. 
Jessup, Willie, Bridgewater, Ct 
Jewell, Mrs. Susan B., Concord, N. n. 
Jewett, Miss C.vutlila A., Fitchburg. Mass. 
Jewett, Mr*. Elisabeth, Whately, Mass. 
Johnson. Benjamin S , Haydenville, Mass. 
Johnson, Rev. T. II., Bethel. Vt. 
Johnson, Mrs. Sarah J., North Andover, Mass. 
Jones, John C, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Keeler, Miss Sarah A., Ridgefleld, Ct 

Kellogg, Mrs. N. O., Vernon, Ct. 

Kelsey, Dea. Ezra, Higganum, Ct, 

Kelsey, Francis I) , Columbus, O. 

Kendrick, Mrs. Abigail, Clinton, Mass. 

Ketchuni, Miss Susan, Harlem, N. Y. 

Ketchura. Edgar. Jr., do. 

Kilbourne, Russell, Paris Hill, N. Y. 

Kimball, Mrs. Eliza C. We<t Haven, Ct 

Kimball, Mrs. Fanny W., Enfield, Mass. 

Klmbsll, Mrs Philna, Madison, O. 

Kimball, Mrs. Sarah. Dunbarton, N. II. 

King, Rev. Beriah, Milton, Wi< 

King, Miss Emma, Amherst, Mass. 

King, Rufus, New York. 

Kingsbury, Albert, Keene, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Charles, do. 

Kingsbury, George, do. 

Kingsbury, Abijah W., Gilsum, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Joseph, Francestown, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Josiah, Surry, N. 11. 

Kingsbury, William, do. 

Kingsley, Austin, Haydenville, Mass. 

Kinney, Hcnrv C, New York. 

Knapp, Mrs. Levi S., New Mllford,Ct 

Knevals, Caleb B., New York. 

Kuouse, Rev. William n., North Greenwich, Ct. 

Laid. N. D., Sturbrldge, Mass. 
Lamb, Mrs. Lucv A , Greenfield, Mass. 
Lambert, William G., New York. 
Lane, Alice W., Nashua, N. II. 
Lane, Charles A., Centerville, N. Y. 
Lane, Mrs. Elvira, do. 

Lane, Joseph P., Killlugworth, Ct. 
Lane, Mrs. Mary E., do., 
Lane, Rev. J. W., Whately, Mass. 
Lane, Mrs. Marian II , Norwich, Ct. 
Lane, Thomas, New York. 
Lansing, Mrs. E. B., Auburn. N. Y. 
Lathrop, Mrs. Martha. Hartford, Ct. 
Laurie, J., Jr., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Hannah M., Hollls, N. H. 
Lawrence, Otis W„ Haydenville, Mass. 
Lawton, Mrs. Sarah, South Egremont, Mass. 
Learned, Mrs. Edward, New London, Ct 
Lemven worth. Miss Elizabeth, Newtown, Ct 
Lefurour, Mn. I, Beverly, Mass. 



Leonard, Rev. Edwin, Rochester, Mass. 

Leonard, Howard, Grlswold, Ct. 

Leonard, Lucy Ei, do. 

LewU, Rev. Thomas A., Ware, Mass. 

Lllllngton. Mrs. Marlila, Stratford, Ct. 

Lincoln, Hon. Abraham, Washington, D. C. 

Lincoln, Charles O./Chicopec, Mass. 

Lindslev, Alice II., Southport, a. 

Lindsley, Emily E., do. 

Lockwood, Miss Deborah A , Bridgeport, Ct 

Lockwood, Samuel C, Springfield, Mass. 

Loomis, F. B., New London, Ct 

Loomis, James S. : , Bridgeport, Ct. 

Loomis, Mrs. Janettc S., Georgia, Vt, 

Loomis, Dea. Z. W., Suffield, Ct 

Loomis. Mrs Neeland, do. 

Lord, Mrs. Jennett, Chester, Ct 

Lord,. Mrs. Marv E., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Ix>rd, Rev. William H , Montpelier, Vt 

luring, J. F., Newton Center, Mass. 

Love, Rev. William I)e Loss, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lovejov, Albert, North Andover, Ma*s. 

Lovell.'Mra. Almira H., Springfield, Vt. 

Lovett, John, Beverly, Mass. 

Lyman, Mrs. Harriet, Tallmadge, 0. 

McCaw, James, Norwlchj N. Y. 
McCoy, Rev.* Jamefc, Indianapolis, Ind. 
McKeen, Miss Phllena, Bradford, Vt. 
McLeod, Rev. Hugh, Brentwood, N. II. 
McMurphy, Miss Mary, Hanover, N. H. 
McVlcar, Rev. Peter, Topeka, Kan. 
Mallory, James H.', Willlamsburgh. N. Y. 
Manwaring, Mrs. R. A., New London, €t 
Manlove, James G., Rockford, 111. 
Mapes, Dea. Daniel, Otisville, N. Y. 
Marsh, Ed ward W., Bridgeport, Ct 
Alarsh, Miss Frances A.; Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marsh, Samuel C, Spencer. Mass. 
Martin, Rev. Charles F., Peru, III. 
Martindale, Theodore, Greenfield, Mass. 
Marvin, William E., Norwalk, Ct 
Mason, Mrs. Betsey H , Newton, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. C. A. S., Wlnchendon, Mass. 
Mason, Charles D., Sturbrldge, Mass. 
Mason, Col. DariuB, Sheffield, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. F. H., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Mead, Miss Julia A. K., Greenwich, Ct. 
Mead, Roswell R., West Rutland, Vt. 
Merriam, Miss Amelia A., Westlwrough, Mass. 
Merrick, Samuel , Chicopee, Mass. 
Merrill, Barzilla, Chicago, III. 
Merrill, Moses, Methuen, Mass. 
Messlnger, Mrs. Daniel, Fitchburgh, Mass. 
Miles, Thomas M., Marlborough, Mass. 
Miller, Mrs. Daniel P., Beloit, Wis. 
Miller, Mrs, Sarah C, Chicago, 111. 

Mlllerd, A. D., , N. Y. 

Mills, John, Windsor, Ct. 
Mills, Miss Laura, West Hartford, Ct 
Mitchell, Frances E.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mitchell, Miss Lucretla, Hanover, N. n. 
Mix, James E., Terryvllle, Ct. 
Monroe, Rev. Thomas E., Mount Vernon, 0. 
Monson, Mary J., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Montague, Mrs Sovier P., Granby, Mass. 
Moody, James, Whltlnsville, Mass. 
Moore, Miss Harriet SL, Barnct Vt. 
Moore, Mrs. Sophia, Weston, Mass. 
Morris, Edward F., Monson, Mass. 
Morris, Mrs. Emeline W., West Hartford, Ct. 
Morrison, Samuel W.. Henniker, N. H. 
Morrow, Miss Ann, Suffield, Ct 
Morse, Dea. Oliver, Spencer, Mass. 
Morton, Daniel F., Haydenville, Mass. 
Moulton, Curtis R.. Beverly, Mass. 
Munyan, Emery, Haydenville, Mass. 
Murray, Mrs. John A., Geneva, N. Y. 
Muzzey, William G., Spencer, Mass. 

Neuman, Mrs. Vteabeth G., Torringford, Ct 
Newell, Nelson C, Longmeadow, Mass. 
Newman, Miss Phebe, Newburypm, Mass. 
Newton, Mrs. Eliza M , Henniker, N. H. 
Newton, Mrs. Ezra. High Forest, Minn. 
Newton, Thomas H., Plymouth Hollow, Ct 



1863.] 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



109 



Nichols, Miss Ella J., Wilmington, Mass. 
Nichols, Ezra, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
North, Mr*. Aim, Elmlra, N. Y. 
North, Mrs. Jane II., New Britain, Ct. 
North, Orin S., do. 

North. Phlneus, Torrington, Ct 
N-.-rthrop. Martha E., Griswold, Ct 
Nutting, Prut Rufus, Concord, 111. 



Olmstead, Mr*. Mary J., Norwalk Ct. 
Orton, Rev. James, Thomaston, Me. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah, North Audover, Mass. 
Oxnard, Rev. Frederick, MoUne, IU. 



Packard, Mm. Emily. Newton, Maw. 

Page, J. A., Montpeller, Vt 

Pag*. Mrs. J. A., do. 

Pa*e, Frank, Candia, N. H. 

Paige, Mrs. Ann M., Wentworth, N. II. 

Paine, Rev. J. A., Ut'ca, N. Y. 

Paine. Rcy. J. B., Westport, Ct. 

Paine. Rev. Levi L., Farmiugton, Ct. . 

Palmer, Mrs Chnriotte, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Par-Ice, Frank W. f New Haven, Ct. 

Parker, Mary, Keene, N. H. 

Parmelee. William II., Morris, 111. 

Parens, Rev. R. Windsor, Ct. 

Parsons, Charles II. Hartford, Ct 

Parana. Edith, Byfield, Man. 

Patch, Rev. R., Concord, IU. 

Patt"n, John, Derry, N. H. 

PraUxly. Rev. Alhert B., Kast Longmeadow, Mais. 

Pease, Mrs. Josephine 0., Granny, Mas.**. 

Pease, Mr*. Sarah C, da 

Peck, Miss Elizabeth G., Bristol, Ct. 

Peck, Mr*. Ellzal>eth M., Stratford, Ct. 

Peckham, Rev. J.. Kingston, Mum. 

Peloubet, Rev. A. O., Cairo, N. Y. 

Perkins, Rev. F. T., Galesbur,:, I1L 

Perrin, Mrs. Mary A. 8., Vernon, Ct, 

Pcrrin. Mrs. Mary D., Orford, X. H. 

Perry, II. II., Conway, Mass. 

Phillip, Mrs. Franklin, Fltcbburg, Mass. 

Phillip*, Mrs. Harriet C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Phillip-, Mrs. Oliver, East Medway, Mass. 

Pierce, Mrs. Mary J., West Roxbury, Mas*. 

Pierson. Rcy. Arthur T., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Pitkin. Ml** Emily, East Hartford, Ct 

Pitkin. Miss Maria F., Hartford, Ct. 

Piatt, Mrs. Sarah E, Chesterfield, 111. 

Pomer.»y, Tlie More, PittsAeld, Mass. 

Porneroy, William M., Springfield, Mass. 

Porter, Mrs. Clementine, Granville, III. 

Porter, Mrs. Sar.ih. Willlmantic, Ct. 

Porter. Thomas. Binghamton, N. Y. 

Potwln, Rev. Lemuel S., Bridgwater, Ct. 

p.*win, Rev. T. S., Franklin, N. Y. 

powers. Lyman A., Spencer. Ma»s. 

Powers Pniletus, Phillipston, Mas*. 

Prichard, Mrs. Mary 8., Bradford, Vt. 

Pride. Dr. William, Middletown, Ct. 

Proctor, Edward, Spencer, Mass. 

Proctor, Mrs. Lois, Audover, Mass. 

Prouty, Lucy, Spencer, Mass. 

Puuder«on, Miss Harriet, New Haven, Ct. 



Rand, Julia A., Keenc, N. n. 
Handle, Henry C, Norwalk, Ct. 
Rankin, Rev. 8. O. W., Westchester, Ct. 
Ranney, Mrs. 0. D., Chicago, III. 
Raymond, Miss Harriet, Norwalk, Ct 
Raviuond, Mrs. Martha E., Cleveland, 0. 
Real, Albert M., Attleborough, Ma-?. 
Read, Mrs. Helen, East Pembroke, N. Y. 
Redfcrn, Mrs. Lucy J., Winchester, Mass. 
Reed, Hodges, Taunton, Mass. 
Reeve, Jeremiah, New York. 
Reeves, Mrs. Caroline, Wayland, Mass. 
Bewegute, Miss Annie M., BJdgetteld, Ct. 
Rice, Mrs. Anna, Winthrop, Ct 
Richards, Mist A., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Richardson, Mis* Adeline, Booth Boston, Man. 



Richardson, Rev. Henry J., Lincoln, Mas*. 
Richmond, Ezra, Slnclearvllle, N. Y. 
Ring, Mrs. Eliza, Gloucester, Mass. 
Rising, Sarah, Shennanville, Kan. 
Robbins, Mrs. Eliza C. West Haven, Ct. 
Robert*. MLm Fanny, Mildletown, Ct. 
Robert*, William, New Milford, Ct 
Rock wood, Samuel C, Springfield, Mars. 
Rogers, C. N., Derby, Ct. 
Rogers, II. I)., Grafton, O. 
Root, Rev. Edward W., Springfield, 0. 
Root. Judson H., Hartford, Ct. 
RoftniW. Rev. F. L., Huron, 0. 
Rouse, Frances ()., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Rowell, MIkh Marv, Hartford, Ct. 
Rowell, Wlllhiu K., West Concord, N. II. 
Rowland, 8. S., Weston, Ct 
Roy, John, Lyndon. III. 
Rovs, Mrs. Abi P., S mth Norfolk, Ct. 
Rusoell, Alvan 8., Downievlll'e, C:il. 
Russell. John W., M.D., Mount Vernon, 0. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary A., Kit eh burp, Mar*. 
Russell. Mrs. Philenn, Granhy, Mais. 
Runt, Miss Harriet, Cluster, 0. 

Saflbrd, Mrs. Daniel, BoFton, Mass. 

Safford, Mrs. John, Beverly, Mass. 

SafTord, Mrs. Mary E., Corfu, N. Y. 

St John, George R., Norwalk, Ct. 

Sanders, Miss C. Elmlra. New Ipswich', N. 11. 

Sanderson, Lemuel C, A si i Held, Mass. 

Sanderson, Lucy 8., Whately, Maps. 

Sargent Mr*. Elizabeth, West Ame-bury, Mass. 

Sargent, Mrs. Jane, ' do. 

Sargent, Mrs. Louisa, Newton, Mass. 

Sargent, Nathan B., Mcthiicn, Mass. 

Saunders, Mr*. Lavinia, North Andover, Mass. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Alrira, Chester, Vt 

Scarborough, Daniel E., Paysou, III. 

Scarborough, Mary II., do. 

Scarlet, Miss Caroline B., Norwich, Ct.' 

Schofield, Samuel, West Ameshurv, Mass. 

Scofleld, Miss Abigail, Stamford, Ct. 

Scofleld, Rev. William C, Altoonu, 111. 

Scott Miss Matilda, Wluchoter, N. II. 

Scribner. Mrs. Mary E.", R< sendale. Wis. 

Sears, Mrs. Turmr, Greenwich, Mass. 

Seelev, John M., Ilousatonic, Mass. 

Seelye, Mrs. Abigail, Bethel, Ct. 

Solleck, George W., 2d, Norwalk, Ct. 

Sellew, Philip II., Portland, Ct 

Sessions, F. C, Columbus, 0. 

Seymour, Edward. Payson, 111. 

Seymour, E. W., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Seymour, Walter, Hartford. Ct. 

Sharpe, Mrs. Elizabeth A., Brooklyn. N. Y 

Shattuck, Dea. E. C, Wa^aw, N. V. 

Shedd, Mrs. Lydia, Hollls N. H. 

Shedd, Milton A., Farmiugton, HI. 

Sl»eIdon, Horace, Suflleld, Ct 

Sheldon, Samuel D., Fltchburg. Mass. 

Shepard, Azubah, Canton Center. Ct. 

Shepard, Mrs. G. T., New London, Ct. 

Shepard, Mrs. Hannah, Newtown, Ct. 

Shepard, Miss Mary, New London, Ct 

Sherman, William W., Bethel, Ct. 

Slmonds, Mrs. AbUe II., Ellington, Ct. 

Simonds, Miss Sarah M., do. 

Skeele, Otis Chic.opee, Mass. 

Skinner, Justin P., Plvinouth, Ct. 

Skinner. L. C, Plain v'llle, Ct. 

Slater, Mta M. II., Norwich, Ct. 

Smart, Rev. William 8., Benson, Vt. 

Smith, Adon, New York. 

Smith, James, do. 

Smith, Albert W., Brookllne, Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy J., do. 

Smith, Rev. Charles, Andover, Mass. 

Smith, David F., Scotland, Ct. 

Smith, Mrs. Delia, Eufleld, Mass. 

Smith, Edward P do. 

Smith, Mrs. Dorothy, Newton Center, Mass. ' 

Smith, Edgar M., Candor, N. Y. 

Smith, George B., Had ley, Mass. 

Smith, Rev. George M., Rocky ll\l\, Ot. 



110 



THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Smith, James, Southfnrd, Ct. 

Smith, Dea. J nine*, Decorali, Iowa, 

Smith, Mm. Jane, Maiden, III. 

Smith, John, Ka.-t Hartford, Ct 

Smith, Dea. Marcus D. P., South Cornwall, Ct. 

Smith, Miss Marion, Scotland, Ct. 

Smith, Norman, Plainville, Lt. 

Smith, Mr*. Orplui, Mt Vernon, 0. 

Smith. Peter D., West Andover, Mass. 

Smith, Rev. Wilder, Berlin, Ct. 

Snider, Mrs. Ann S., Tallmadge, O. 

Snow, Mary L. C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snow, Manly S., Enfield, Ct 

Snciw, William, Chlcopee, Maw. 

Spaulding, ML* Lucia, Athene N. T. 

Spencer, Mrs. Ann, East Hartford. Ct 

Spring, Mrs. Adela, Whitlnsvllle, Mass. 

Stanley, Anthony D., Jefferson City, Mo. 

Stanton, Mrs. Lucy J., Hrooklyn, N. Y. 

Stearns, John, Newton. Mass. 

Stebhins, Mrs. Kllza, Bradlord, Vt 

Stebbins, E. G., Deerfield, Mass. 

Stebhins, Randolph, Longmeadow, Mass. 

Steele, Charles F., Auburn, N. Y. 

Sterling, Henrietta D , Bridgeport, Ct. 

Stetson, Mrs. Susan, Weymouth, Mass. 

Stevens, Samuel, Gloucester, Mass. 

Stillman, Miss Emily, Bridgeport, Ct 

Stone, John P., Cornwall, Ct. 

8tone, Mrs. Sophia, Newton Center, Mass. 

Storrs, Rev. Sylvester D., Quindaro, Kan. 

8tranahan, Mrs, Sarah A., Lysander, N. Y. 

St rat ton, L. P., Brighton, III. 

Strattou. Mrs. Sarah B., do. 

Strong, Anson S., South Deerfield, Mass. 

Strong, Mm. Frinces W., Oxford, Ct 

Strong, Mrs. Sarah P., Beloit, Wis. 

Sturges, Mrs. Clara B., Woodbum, 111. 

Sturtevant, Mrs, II. II., Tallmadge, O. 

Sykcs, F. A., Hartford, Ct 



Taft, Mrs. A. A., Uxbridpe, Mass. 

Taft, Dea. Merrick L., Northhridge, Mass, 

Talcott C D., Vernon Depot, Ct 

Talcott, II. W. f do. 

Talcott, Mrs Cynthia, Portland, Ct. 

Talcott, S. L., North Coventry, Ct. 

Tallmadge, William H., West Haven, Ct 

Tate, George C, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Taylor, Rev. Ja nes F., Chelsea, Mich. 

Taylor, John, Crown Point, N. Y. 

Taylor, John L., Hudson, Mich. 

Temple, Mrs. Calvin. Reading, Mass. 

Temple, Lafayette, Chlcopee, Mass. 

Terry, James*. Terry vllle, Ct 

Thayer, Jess e K., New York. 

Thayer, Dea. Oliver, Salem, Mass. 

Thayer, S. ()., West Roxbury. Muss. 

Thompson, David. Auburn, N. Y. 

Thompson, Miss Elizabeth M., Ellington, Ct. 

Thompson, Miss Jane, Farraington, Ct 

Thompson. Rev. John C, Goshen, Mass. 

Thomson, Sumner, Lawrence. Maw. 

Thomson, Asahel, Farmlngton, Ct. 

Thurston, William, Newburyport, Mass. 

Tldd, Joseph S., Warren, Mass. 

Tolman, Cyrus S.. F.tchburir, Mass. 

Tolman, Mr*. J. M., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Tompkins, John II., Paris Hill, N. Y. 

Torrey, Mis* E. C, South Weymouth, Mass. 

Towle, Miss Cordelia, Newton, Mass. 

Townsend, Aaron V., Crown Point, N. Y. 

Townsend, Mis* Elizabeth A., Newburyport, Mass. 

Tripp, Joseph, Fairhaven, Mass, 

Trow, Dr. William M., Haydenvllle, Mass. 

Tucker Miss Catharine J., Stratford, Ct. 

Tully, Mis< Sarah, Springfield, Mass. 

Turner, Sarah, New London, Ct. 

Turney, Dea. Albert, Kaston, Ct. 

Tyler, F.. Brattleborough, Vt 

Trier, Miss Phebe, Kent, Ct 



U/Tonf, MIm Csthtirioe, Stratford, CI 
Uaderhill, Jerewimh, H&rerhill, Mmm. 



Underwood, Piatt. Auburn, N. Y. 
Upham, William, Spencer, Man?. 
Upton, Dea. Moses T., Salem, Mass. 



Vaas, Ilarrlette E., Auburn, N. Y. 

Van Valkenburg, Miss Estella J , Mendon, III. 

Vinton, Mrs. Lauriuda R., Soutli Boston, Mass. 



Walker, Rev. George L., Portland, Me. 

Walker, Robert G., Haverhill, Mats. 

Walker, Theodore L., Oakland, Oil. 

Walton, Rev. Jeremiah E., Rockford, III. 

Ward, Mrs. Elizabeth A., Hitchcock vllle, Ct 

Ward, Mrs Harriet 8., Plymouth, N. U. 

Ward, John S., Bridgeport. Ct 

Ward, Mrs. Mary, HotehklssvIUe, Ct 

Warner, Bennett, New Preston, Ct 

Warner, Rev. Calvin, Elk Grove, Wis. 

Waruer, Henry A., New Haven, Ct. 

Wason, Rev. Hiram, Lake Prairie. Ind. 

Waterbury, Mrs. Charles, Bridgeport, Ct 

Waterman, A. T., Fitch ville, Ct. 

Waters, 0. II., Mllbury, Mass. 

Way, Harvey, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Webb, Mm. P , New York. 

Webber, William A., Beverly, Mass. 

Wte.1, Mrs. William H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wellman. Mrs. Phebe W., Cornish, N. II. 

Welles, Henry, Bridgeport, Ct. 

Wells, Mrs. ME., H insdale, N. II. 

Wells, Miss Frances B., Chicago, 111. 

Wenzell, Mrs. Mary F., Brook line, Mass. 

Wheaton, Mrs. Charlotte A., North Falmouth, Moss. 

Wheaton, Samuel II., do. 

Wheeler, Dr. Alvln, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Wheeler, C. II., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Delia A., North Stonington, Ct 

Wheeler, Miss Elizabeth, Stratford, Ct. 

Wheeler, Henry G., do. 

Wheeler, John, Merrimack, N. II. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Mary B., Medwav, Mass. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Mary II., Noitli Stonington, Ct. 

Wheeler, Mrs. Rel>ecca, do. 

Wheeler, W. R., West Roxbury, Ma«s. 

Whipple. Dea. Jos" ah, Chesterfield, HI. 

White. Mrs. Constant, Yorktown, N. Y. 

White, Henry, do. 

White, Ebenezer C, New York. 

White, George H., do. 

White, Miss Martha, Portland, Ct. 

White, Mason, Bridgeiwrt, Ct, 

Whitin, Addle C, Whitinsvillc, Mass. 

Whiting, Mrs. Nancy, Norwich, Ct 

Whitman, Miss Eliza, We*t Hartford, Ct 

Whitmarsh, Thomas C, Chirac*. III. 

Whitney, Mrs. Jona«. Fitchburg, Mass. 

Whlton, James M., New Haven, Ct. 

Whiton, Mary Kartlett, do. 

Whlttemqre, Mrs. L. B., Brldgewater, N. 11. 

Whittemore. Mb-a Lucy G., New York. 

Whittemore, Thomas W\, do 

Whittlesey, Sheldon, New Preston, Ct 

Wler, A. A., Newton Center, Mass. 

Wilcox, Mrs. Marv J., Stratford, Ct. 

Wilcott, L. W., West Roxburv, Mass. 

Williams, Charles E., Hartford, ( t 

Williams, Mrs. Cynthia, Stmiiiigton, Ct. 

Williams, Mrs. II., West Amesburv, Mass. 

"Williams, Mrs. Harriet A., Stoniujit »n, Ct. 

Williams, Miss Msiry E.. Norwich. Ct. 

Williams, Simeon II., Foxbrrmgh, Mass. 

Willis, Mrs. Alfred, Manchester, N. II. 

Willlston, Mrs. Sarah T., Florence, Mass. 

Wlllson, Sirs. Mary, Ka'ainazoo, Mich. 

Wilson, Mrs. Daniel, Black Rock. Ct. 

Wilson, Mra. Julia V., Norwalk, Ct. 

Winchester, Martha A,. Keene, N. II. 

Winshlp, Mrs. William, Hartford, Ct 

Wis well, John C, Chicago, ill. 

Woleott, Miss Ursula, South Windsor. Ct 

Wood, Mrs, Eunices., Whlttnsville. Mass. 

Wood, Mrs. Samuel F., Middlesex Village. Mass. 

Woodbury, Mrs. II. M., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Woodbury, Mrs. I. B., Norwalk, Ct 



1863.] THIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. Ill 

Woodcock, Rer. IT. E., Riga, N. T. Wright, Ira B., South Hartley Fallp, lftM. 

Woodford, Elbert C West • andor, N. T. Wright, Miss Julia A., Torrinjrton, It 

Woodhull, Mbs Elizabeth a, Norwich, Ct Wright, Peth, West Medway, Mm 

Woodhull, Rer. John A , Comack, N. Y. Wyman, Hannah C, Pel ham, N. II. 

Woodman, Amos, Bethel, Ct Wyman, Mrs. Sarah M., New London, Ct. 
Woodruff, Mm Harriet. Brooklyn, N. T. 
Woodruff, Richard K., Hlchford. N. Y. J 

Woods, Miss Mary P., Enfleid, Mass. Yale, Miss Esther A., Mcriden. Ct. 

Woods, Robert M., do. York, Mrs. J., West Koxbury, Mass. 

Woodward, Samuel N., Hewton, Mass. 



108 



TIIIRTY SEVENTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Hubbard, Mr*. Sarah, Durham, N. Y. 
Hubbard, Miss Elizabeth J., do. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Harriet T., North Stontngton, Ct. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Lucina, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Hull, Mrs. Mercy, Homer, N. Y. 
Humphrey, Mrs Mary >]., Winchester, N. H. 
Hunt, Mrs. Nancy 0., East Douglas, Mass. 
Hunt, Miss Sarah H., Auburn, N. Y. 
Hunter, Mrs. William, Springwater, N. Y. 
Uutchtngson, Miss Almira, Mansfield, Mass. 
nutchlns, Miss Mary, Canterbury, Ct. 
Hyde, Mrs. A. B., Vernon Depot, Ct. 

Ide, Rev. Alexis W., Stafford Springs. Ct 
Isley, Miss Elizabeth, Newbury, Mass. 
Ingeraoll, Mrs. Rika If., Greenfield, Mass. 
Irwin, Theodore, Oswe.'oj N. Y. 
Ives, Mrs. Elizabeth, Bristol, Ct. 

Jackson. Den. John, Ansonia, Ct. 
Jacobs, W. W., Hartford, Ct. 
James, N. N., Newton Center, Mass. 
Jefferds, Rev. C. D., Chester, Vt. 
Jenney, Mrs. A. M., Galesburg, III. 
Jenney, E. W. do. 

Jenney, Mrs. S. P., Falrhaven, Mass. 
Jennings, Dea. James B., Easton, Ct. 
Jennings, Mrs. Maria A., Southport. Ct. 
Jessup, Rev. Henry G., Stanwich, Ct. 
Jessup, Willie, Bridgewater, Ct. 
Jewell, Mrs. Susan B., Concord, N. H. 
Jewett, Miss Cynthia A., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Jewett, Mrs. Elizabeth, Whately, Mass. 
Johnson, Benjamin S, Haydenville, Mass. 
Johnson, Rev. T. 11., Bethel, Vt. 
Johnson, Mrs. Sarah J., North Andover, Mass. 
Jones, John C, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Keeler, Miss Sarah A., Ridgefield, Ct. 

Kellogg, Mrs. N. O., Vernon, Ct. 

Kelsey, Dea. Ezra, Higganum, Ct, 

Kelsey, Francis D , Columbus, O. 

Kendrick, Mrs. Abigail, Clinton, Mass. 

Ketchum, Miss Susan, Harlem, N. Y. 

Ketchum. Edgar. Jr., do. 

Kllbourne, Russell, Paris Hill, N. Y. 

Kimball, Mrs. Eliza C, West Haven, Ct. 

Kimball, Mrs. Fanny W., Enfield, Mass. 

Kimball, Mrs Philna, Madison, O. 

Kimball, Mrs. Sarah. Dunbarton, N. H. 

King, Rev. Beriah, Milton, Wis. 

King, Miss Emma, Amherst, Mass. 

King. Rufus, New York. 

Kingsbury, Albert, Keene, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Charles, do. 

Kingsbury, George, do. 

Kingsbury, Abijah W.. Gilsum, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Joseph, Francestown, N. II. 

Kingsbury, Josiah, Surry, N. H. 

Kingsbury, William, do. 

Kingslcy, Austin. Haydenville, Mass. 

Kinney, Henrv C, New York. 

Knapp, Mrs. Levi S., New Mllford, Ct. 

Kuevals, Caleb B., New York. 

Ktiouse, Rev. William H., North Greenwich, Ct. 

Laid, N. D., Sturbridge, Mass. 
Lamb, Mrs. Lucv A , Greenfield, Mass. 
Lambert, William G., New York. 
Lane, Alice W., Nashua, N. II. 
Lane, Charles A., Centerville, N. Y. 
Lane, Mrs. Elvira, do. 

Lane, Joseph P., Kllllngworth, Ct. 
Lane, Mrs. Mary E., do., 
Lane, Rev. J. W., Whatelv, Mass. 
Lane, Mrs. Marian II., Norwich, Ct. 
Lane, Thomas, New York. 
Lansing, Mrs. E. B., Auburn, N. Y. 
Lathrop, Mrs. Martha, Hartford, Ct. 
Laurie, J., Jr., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Hannah M., Mollis, N. H. 
Lawrence, Otis W., naydenvllle, Mass. 
Lawton, Mrs. Sarah, South Egremont, Mass. 
Learned, Mrs. Edward, New London, Ct 
Leavenworth, Miss Elizabeth, Newtown, Ct 
Lefavour, Mrs. 1., Beverly, Mass. 



Leonard, Rev. Edwin, Rochester, Mass. 

Leonard, Howard, Griswold, Ct. 

Leonard, Lucy E, do. 

Lewis, Rev. Thomas A., Ware, Mass. 

Lillington, Mrs Marllla, Stratford, Ct 

Lincoln, Hon. Abraham, Washington, D. C. 

Lincoln, Charles 0.. Chicopee, Mass. 

Lindsley, Alice H, Southport, a. 

Llndsley, Emily E., do. 

Lock wood, Miss Deborah A , Bridgeport, Ct. 

Lock wood, 8amuel C, Springfield, Mass. 

Loomis, F. B. f New London, Ct • 

Loo mis, James S. : , Bridgeport, Ct 

Loomis, Mrs. Janette S. r Georgia, Vt, 

Loomis, Dea. Z. W., Suffield, Ct 

Loomis, Mrs Neeland, do. 

Lord, Mrs. Jennett, Chester, Ct 

Lord,. Mrs. Marv E., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Lord, Rev. William H . Montpelier, Vt 

Loring, J. F., Newton Center, Mass. 

Love, Rev. William De Loss, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lovejov, Albert, North Andover, Mass. 

Lovell,\Mrs. Almira H., Springfield, Vt 

Lovett, John, Beverly, Mass. 

Lyman, Mrs. Harriet, Tallmadge, 0. 

McCaw, James, Norwich, N. Y. 
McCoy, Rev. James, Indianapolis, Ind. 
McKeen, MIsb Philena, Bradford, Vt. • 
McLeod, Rev. Hugh, Brentwood, N. H. 
McMurphy, Miss Mary, Hanover, N. H. 
McVlcar, Rev. Peter, Topeka, Kan. 
Mallory, James H.; Williamsburgh, N. Y. 
Manwarlng, Mrs. R. A:, New I^>ndon, Ct 
Manlove, James G.", Rdckford, 111. 
Mapes, Dea. Daniel, Otisville, N. Y. 
Marsh, Edward W., Bridgeport, Ct 
Marsh, Miss Frances A.; Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marsh, Samuel C, Spencer. Mass. 
Martin, Rev. Charles F., Peru, III. 
Marti ml ale, Theodore, Greenfield, Mass. 
Marvin, William E., Norwalk, Ct. 
Mason, Mrs. Betsey H , Newton, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. C. A. S., Wlnchendon, Mass. 
Mason, Charles D., Sturbridpe, Mass. 
Mason, Col. Darius, Sheffield, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. F. H., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Mead, Miss Julia A. K., Greenwich, Ct. 
Mead, Roswell R., West Kut'anil, Vt 
Merriam, Miss Amelia A., Westlwrough, Mjw. 
Merrick, Samuel O , Chicopee, Mass. 
Merrill, Barzilla, Chicago, 111. 
Merrill, Moses, Methuen, Mass. 
Messinger, Mrs. Daniel, Fitchburgh, Mass. 
Miles, Thomas M., Marlborough, Mass. 
Miller, Mrs. Daniel P., Belolt, Wis. 
Miller, Mrs, Sarah C, Chicago, 111. 

Mlllerd, A. D., , N. Y. 

Mills, John, Windsor, Ct. 
Mills, Miss Laura, West Hartford, Ct 
Mitchell, Frances E.. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Mitchell, Miss Lucretia, Hanover, N. n. 
Mix, James E., Terry vllle. Ct. 
Monroe, Rev. Thomas K., Mount Vernon, O. 
Monson, Mary J., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Montague, Mrs Sovier P., Grauby, Mass. 
Moody, James, Whitinsvllle, Mass. 
Moore, Miss Harriet S., Barnet Vt. 
Moore, Mrs. Sophia. Weston. Mass. 
Morris, Edward F., Monson, Mass. 
Morris, Mrs. Emeline W., West Hartford, Ct. 
Morrison, Samuel W.. Hennlker, N. H. 
Morrow. Miss Ann, Suffield, Ct 
Morse, Dea. Oliver, Spencer, Mass. 
Morton, Daniel F., Haydenville, Mass. 
Moulton, Curtis R., Beverly, Mass. 
Munyan, Emery, Haydenville, Mass. 
Murray, Mrs. John A., Geneva, N. Y. 
Muzzey, William G., Spencer, Mass. 

Neuman, Mrs. Elizabeth G., Torringford, Ct 
Newell, Nelson C, Longmeadow, Mass. 
Newman, Miss Phebe, Newburyp» rt. Mass. 
Newton, Mrs. Eliza M , Henniker N. H. 
Newton, Mrs. Ezra. Hisjh Forest, Minn. 
Newton, Thomas H., Plymouth Hollow, Ct 



STATISTICS OF TIIK rXITED STATICS. 



*T.\r»:* mm. TKKIUTOKIKS. 



in 



M.iiii- \H'2(\ :;i,7«»»; .v.w.j.m aui/ritf r»H:i. !•;•• ri2s,27 , .< 

# Nv\v Hampshire list* l».2s»» 2ti , .».:i2 v - 281..YT4 :•: IT.*.»7*"» ."2*i.<>7:{ 

Vermont, 17 1 . 1 ! '.ni.V. 2N«».»i.V2 2'.»J. , .»4s .*«| I. !'_'•• Hla.iwn 

•Massachusetts 17n*» 7,n«m» i.lojn.s 7:;T,*'.*.*'.» in* I. Ml 1.2.'tl, <><',»; 

Mtho.i..' 1-laml 17'.««» l.'»l»» «.»7, !'.»•.• ln^.-.iM M7."»i:» 174.02" 

•i'«»iiiit.'Cti«Mit 17*** 4,7o«) 2*. , 7,« i 7*» ::«»«.». «.»7s :;7«».7'.»'j 4i»h.I47 

'New York 17*> . r »»».r»l , .» l.iHv;^ •j.|-j.*»."J-.»1 :«," , .«7.3 , .»l X*«*i«».7:;a 

•Nt w .Kr.-.-y 17*7 x»2<> :$•«»•». «*■-':; :-7."5.-"i--f. |.v.».;,;,;, r.7 2.11:4:1 

•IVtiTi^ylvai'iia 17*7 4«'..»>ih> 1.:; Is.j:;:: 1.72l.«»:*:i 2.:;il7*r. 2, i . , «»«;.i 1:, 

•IMuwaiv 17*7 2.1-iii 7X7 Is 7*."*;, •»1,;,:jj 1 12,21 •; 

*Mu»-vl:i!nl 17vs 11.121 1 17,*»i»» 47".«»r.» r^.j.njil (*h7,ii4'.< 

Dl-tn.-t «»f Columbia. .. 47 , .•■ , <"»'> :;•.»>:: I 4X712 ;»l.r.s7 



»M» 



*Viriiinia 17hn r.i,:r»2 l,2ll.4«»:» 1.2:s".\7'.»7 i.42l.r.di L.Wi.ais 

* North Carolina 178' 1 4."» •»■•<» 7:;7, «.is7 7 ."»:;,-! 1 •.• m;«.i,m;;;i , .» , .«2,«122 

*S uith Carolina 17* s tf'»,2l:: .ikIJh.-, .v.H, :;«»*» rnis.f.n7 7«>X7«»* 

17s* fi.s.iHMi ."ilti.N'j:; »»'.il.:. , .«i* *»«m'i,1n;, l.«»:»7.2sti 



Korida, l.sl.'i ;V.»,2»',* :il.7-<> .VI. 17,* *7.l C 1 l«\42a 

Alabama, 1*1'.» r»«»,722 ::•»••, 52 7 .V.M1.7.V. 771.«i2:s l»ill,2"l 

Mi — i^sippi 1*17 47.1."»»» l:>t'.,r.2l :>7 r».t.r» 1 r,«» ( ; f ;,'j,; 7 , .»l.aoa 

Louisiana Isl2 41.2.VT* 2l.\7X» X'.2.411 M7.7«i2 7«»»*,« M, 2 

Texa* 1*4."» 2:*.7>«1 212..V.»2 «>"4,2K» 

Arkansas 1 s:"j»; . r i2,l'.«s aii t :;>* «#7.. r i7 1 2«> , .«.* ,, 7 4.'fa.4."»ii 

Tt-i.n. •*.*.*■ I7ini -f ."».«;• m 1 liNl. '.••>! H2X2l»> l.n«»2.717 l.lnp.HMl 

Kvii # .uck\ 1 7t»2 :i7.«'»so r»s7, , .»17 77'.'.*2* i»*2. 1«»r» I.I.Vi/tM 

• »liit. f . . *. \s{y* S'.t. 1 .*!; !■ , .»o7.'.'«»:; 1 ri 1 •.». 1«*.7 1 /.***• •,::2'.' 2jM , i , .»,f>n2 

Michisraii 1s:j7 fni.2l:: :i !,»»;;'.» 2l2,2r»7 ::'.»7. ••.:»! 74i»,l la 

Indiana l*ii*. :s:;.80'.» :j|o,««:j1 »;sr».*r.r. «i^,ti<i l,X">n.42* 

IUiuoi* IslH f»5,lu:» i;.7.N"» 47X1*"- *M,I7<» 1,71 l/.tftl 

WiM'uii>in iS4s r»»/.»24 :;• »,'.» ir» :;• »."».:>•.» 1 77.\sM 

M\titi»<ota " ls.Vs M.2.V.1 •».'»77 17X H f»5 

h'wa IMrt :»0,<U4 4X112 l'.»2.21 1 «*.7I,«.Mjs 

Mi^ouri l*2l t>7.:.i*<» 14«>.1.V» :;*X7"2 t*.82.0|l 1,1*2,012 

Karwis, \m\\ 78,4lS 1«»7,2"»» 

Californiai Is5«» lriX.Vi 1 I .»2,ft , .»7 ".7X'.M'4 . 

^r^iron isflu hi 1,1 Miu IX 2m .*>2,4r,. r i 

Wa^iinjjtori Territory.. . . 1HH8 17«i,141 .... 1 1,.V.»4 

N»vail:iTeTiifi>ry.. . '. lftfil 45.S12 *Wt 

I'tah Territory,! l.srm l:U,:.i2«» 1 1,::nii 4",27» 

N. Mvxio«.. Territory lS."»o 220,(»oii ill,. VI 7 V*:!,510 

Colorado Territory, 18rtl l«i.1.8ls * 84.277 

Xehrufka Territory lsni 122,«»07 2H t »*4 1 

Hwotah Tmitury.' 1861 318,12s 4 t X37 

Totai 2,811#,81 1 l2,siirt,O2n | 17,06 l .», ir>:i*23,l 91,87«» :U,44. r >,M80 

''^"'iflntltblrtcenBUMk 

THE HOME MISSIONARY. 

Termk--To those \rho prefer K> pay for the Home Missionary, ami thus perhaps feel 
a «le*|K?r interest in its perusal, it will be sent for ftO cent* a year. 

I'MTuiTors Distribution. — It will be sent gratuitously to the following individual*, 
unless they prefer to take it as subseriber* : To Life Director* and Life Members of the 

j Hv. To Millenaries of the Society and its Auxiliaries. To every clergyman in 
*"*'* I congregation a collection i« taken up every year for the Society, or one of its 
Auxiliaries. To every individual who contributes ten dollars, or upwards, during the 
y«ir. To every Auxiliary Association or congregation, one copy for every ten dollars 
vmIJmH ami paid into the Treasury of the Society, or of any Auxiliary Society. 

• • • 

FORM OP A BEQUEST. 

I bequeath tu my executors the sum of dollars, in trvst, to pny over 

tnetaioe in alter ray decease, to the person who, when the same is pay- 

2** *h«ll act as Treasurer of the American Home Missionary Society, formed in the 
W.tf Hew York, in the year eighteen hundred and twenty* six, to be applied to the 
cn *nubleuie8 and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 




AMERICAS HOME MlSSlONAin 

UIDLI; IlOU OS FLfcUB, »IW YUQJt, 



i 
) 



Rt» ¥1) 



lt|Q bO: 



COMMUNICATIONS 



DONATIONS AND M7BSCHIPIION3 

IrwJini 

A i 

• • * 

ffECBITARIIS ASD TBEA5URBRS 



1 



1 




TIIE 



THIRTY EIGHTH EEPOKT 



AMERICAN 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 



FUSUTID BT TOB 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



AHKIVEBSARY MEETING, MAY 11, 1864, 



APPENDIX. 



Skbgorh: 
A. GRAY k. GREEN, PRINTERS, 8TEREOTYPERS, AND BINDERS, 

rill-PEOOr BDILDIRQ8, 

OF nUNKTORT AND JACOB STREETS. 



p 18 64. 



THE 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT 



AMERICAN 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 



PIBIITID BT TBI 



. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



AHKIVEBSARY MEETING, MAY 11, 1864, 



APPENDIX. 



SJMDgorh: 
A. GRAY *. GREEN, PRINTERS, STEREOTYPERS, AND BINDERS, 

rm-Pioor BHILDIHOB, 

ooms or frankfort and jacob streets. 



V 18 64. 



CONTENTS 



Thirty Eighth Anniversary or the A. H. M. 
Officers, • • 

Executive Committee, 
Constitution, ..... 



of their 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 
Introduction, ....... 

General Table of Missionaries tad Congregations, . 
Summary or Results, ...... 

Number of Missionaries, their distribution, and the aggregate 
labors, ....... 

Number of Sabbath school scholars, 

Contributions to benevolent objects, .... 

Additions to the Churches — Revivals, 

Churches organized— Houses of worship completed, 
The Treasury— Resources — Liabilities— Payments, 

Progress of the year, ...... 

General Comparative Results, ..... 

Table of Receipts, Expenditures, Number of Missionaries, years of labor, 
additions, etc., ..... 

Remarks on the Table, ..... 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 1, 

Table— Distribution of Missionaries, No. 2, 

Table of Receipts, ...... 

Principal Auxiliaries, Agencies, and Missionary Fields, 

Maine Missionary Society, ..... 

New Hampshire Missionary Society, 

Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, 

Rhode Island Home Missionary Society, 

Connecticut Home Missionary Society, . 

New York, 

Ohio, 

Illinois, ....... 

Missouri, 

Michigan, . + . 

Wiawmain, 



5 
6 
8 
9 

11 
IS 
44 

44 
44 
44 
44 
45 
45 
45 
46 

A1 
41 

48 
49 
50 
51 
51 
52 
52 
53 
54 
64 
55 
56 
57 
59 



>* 



CONTENTS. 



PAO» 

Thirty Eighth Anniversary or the A. H. M. 8., . .5 

Officers, ..••••... 6 

Executive Committee, ........ 8 

Constitution, ......... 9 

THIBTY EIGHTH REPORT. 
Introduction, ......... 11 

Gxxxrax Tabu of Missionaries and Congregations, . 18 

Summary of Results, ........ 44 

Number of Missionaries, their distribution, and the aggregate of their 

labors, 44 

Number of Sabbath school scholars, .44 

Contributions to benevolent objects, ..... 44 

Additions to the Churches — Revivals, . .44 

Churches organized— Houses of worship completed, ... 45 

The Treasury— Resources — Liabilities— Payments, .45 

Progress of the year, ....... 45 

Gexzral Comparative Results, ....... 46 

Table of Receipts, Expenditures, Number of Missionaries, years of labor, 

additions, etc., . . . . . .47 

Remarks on the Table, ....... 47 

Table— Distribution of Missionaries, No. 1, 48 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 2, 49 

Table of Receipts, ........ 50 

Principal Auxiliaries, Agencies, and Missionary Fields, 51 

Maine Missionary Society, . .51 

New Hampshire Missionary Society, ..... 52 

Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, . .52 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, .... 53 

Rhode Island Home Missionary Society, .54 

Connecticut Home Missionary Society, ..... 64 

New York, 55 

Ohio, ......... 56 

Illinois, 57 

Missouri, 59 

i . . . . *. . . . W 
til 



CONTENTS, 



Iowa, 

Minnesota, 

Kansas, 

Nebraska, 

Colorado, . 

Idaho, . 

California and Oregon, 
Conclusion, 
The Treasurer's Report, 



64 
65 
66 
67 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 



APPENDIX. 

Names or Missionaries in Each State and Territory, 
Relation or Auxiliary Societies, etc., 

State and other Large Auxiliaries, 

Agents, . . . 

Committees of Missions, 

Applications for Aid, 
Addresses at the Thirty Eighth Anniversary, 

Address of Rer. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., 
Do. Rev. William W. Patton, D. D., 
Miscellaneous Selections, 
Directors for Lirs, .... 
Members for Lite, .... 



73 
77 
77 
77 
77 
78 
79 
79 
83 
87 
95 
96 



THIRTY EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY. 



The American Home Missionary Society held its Thirty 
Eighth Anniversary in Irving Hall, New York, on Wednesday 
evening, May 11, 1864. 

Rev. Theodore D. Woolsey, D. D.j LL. D., of New Haven, 
Conn., President of the Society, occupied the chair, and the exer- 
cises were opened with prayer by Rev. John Marsh, D. D., of 
New York. 

The Treasurer's Report was read by Mr, Christopher R. Rob- 
ert, the Treasurer of the Society. 

An Abstract of the Annual Report of the Executive Commit- 
tee was presented by Rev. Milton Badger, D. D., one of the 
Secretaries. 

On motion of Rev. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., of Boston, Mass., 
seconded by Rev. J. S. Zelie of Redwood City, California, 

Reached, That the Reports now presented be adopted, and published under 
the direction of the Executive Committee. 

On motion of Rev. Edward Taylor, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
seconded by Rev. S. W. Hanks, of Lowell, Mass., 

Beeolved, That the Home Missionary work is absolutely essential to the 
political and moral salvation of our country. 

On motion of Rev. William W. Patton, D. D., of Chicago, 
Illinois, seconded by Gen. William Williams, of Norwich, Ct., 

Reeolved, That the marked loyalty of the West, in our present national con- 
flict, is largely due to moral causes connected with the influence of Home 



Addresses were made by Rev. Dr. Hooker, Rev. Mr. Taylob, 
and Rev. Dr. Patton, in support of the resolutions, which they 
respectively offered. 



6 officers. [May, 

The singing by the Congregation was conducted by Mr. George 
Andrews. 

The exercises were closed with the benediction, by Rev. Joseph 
Holdich, D. D., of New York ; after which the Society proceeded 
to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 

The following officers were then chosen : 



PRESIDENT. 

Rev. THEODORE D. WOOLSEY, D. D., LL. D., of New Haven, Ct 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, 

Rev. George E. Adams, D. D., Brunswick, Me. 
Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D., New Haven, Ct 
Rev. Albert Barnes, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rev. Nathan S. S. Beman, D. D., LL. D., Troy, N. Y. 
Hon. Marshall S. Bidwell, LL. D., New York. 
Rev. Nathaniel Bouton, D. D., Concord, N. H. 
His Excell. William A. Buckingham, Norwich, Ct 
Hon. Jacob Butler, Muscatine, Iowa. 
Rev. John P. Cleaveland, D. D., Lowell, Mass. 
Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D. D., LL. D., New York. 
Hon. William Darling, Reading, Pa. 
Rev. Jeremiah Day, D. D., LL. D., New Haven, Ct 
Rev. George Duffield, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 
Rev. William T. Dwight, D. D., Portland, Me. 
Hon. Erastus Fairbanks, St Johnsbury, Yt 
Hon. Charles G. Hammond, Chicago, III. 
Rev. Joel Hawes, D. D., Hartford, Ct 

Rev. Mark Hopkins, D. D., LL. D., President of Williams College, Mass. 
Hon. Joseph C. Hornblower, LL. D., Newark, N. J. 
Hon. William Jessup, LL. D., Montrose, Pa. 
Rev. Harvey D. Kitchel, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 
Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D., Hanover, N. H. 
Rev. Simeon North, D. D., LL. D., Clinton, N. Y. 
Rev. Eliphalet Nott, D. D., LL. D., President of Union College, N. Y. 
William Curtis Noyes, LL. D., New York. 
Rev. Edwards A. Park, D. D., Theol. Sem., Andover, Mass. 
Rev. Absalom Peters, D. D., New York. 
Rev. George E. Pierce, D. D., Hudson, Ohio. 
Rev. Enoch Pond, D. D., Bangor, Me. 
Douglas Putnam, Esq., Harmer, Ohio. 

Rev. Samuel S. Schmucker, D. D., Theol. Sem., Getty sburgh, Pa. 
Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D. D., LL. D., Ne* York. 
Rev. Asa D. Smith, D. D., President of Dartmouth College, N. H 
Rev. William A. Stearns, D. D., President of Amherst College, Mass. 
Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D., Braintree, Mass. 
Rev. Seth Sweetser, D. D., Worcester, Mass. 
John Tappan, Esq., Boston, Mass. 
Hon. Henry W. Taylor, Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Her. Mark Tucker, D. P., Saybrook, Ct. 



1864.] OFFICERS. 

S. V. S. Wflder, Esq., Elizabeth, N. J. 
Rev. Charles Walker, D. D., Pittsford, Vt 
Gen. William Williams, Norwich, Ct 
J. Parson Williston, Esq., Northampton, Mass. 
Key. William Wisner, D. D., Ithaca, N. Y. 
Hon. Bradford R. Wood, Albany, N. Y. 



DIRICTOBS. 

Rev. William Adams, D. D., New York. 

Rev. William Allen, D. D., Northampton, 

Rev. Israel W. Andrews, D. D., President of Marietta College, 0. 

Rev. Zedekiah S. Barstow, D. D., Keene, N. H. 

Rev. Flavel Bascom, Dover, 111. 

Rev. Alvan Bond, D. D., Norwich, Ct 

Rev. Edward Beecher, D. D., Galesburgh, 111. 

Rev. Constantine Blodgett, D. D., Pawtucket, R. L 

Rev. Thomas Brainerd, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Horatio N. Brinsmade, D. D., Beloit, Wis. 

Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. William Carter, Pittsfleld, 111. 

Rev. Aaron L. Chapin, D. D., President of Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. George B. Cheever, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Elisha L. Cleaveland, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Oliver E. Daggett, D. D., Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Rev. Samuel W. S. Dutton, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Edward W. Gilman, New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Albert Hale, Springfield, III. 

Rev. Edwin Hall, D. D., Theol. Sem., Auburn, N. Y. 

Samuel Hamilton, Esq., Rochester, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry L. Hitchcock, D. D., President of Western Reserve College, 0. 

Rev. John C. Holbrook, D. D., Dubuque, Iowa. 

Rev. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., Boston, Mass. 

Rev. Mancius S. Hutton, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Aratus Kent, Galena, 111. 

William J. King, Esq., Providence, R. I. 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, D. D., President of Middlebury College, Vt 

Rev. Joel H. Linsley, D. D., Greenwich, Ct 

George Merriam, Esq., Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. John J. Miter, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rev. Ray Palmer, D. D., Albany, N. Y. 

Rev. Joel Parker, D. D., Newark, N. J. 

Rev. William W. Patton, D. D., Chicago, HI. 

Rev. Henry E. Peck, Oberlin College, 0. 

Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Albert H. Porter, Esq., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Rev. Truman M PostD. D., St Louis, Mo. 

Rev. William Salter, Burlington, Iowa. 

Rev. Henry Smith, D. D., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rev. Miles P. Squier, D. D., Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. Benjamin P. Stone, D. D., Concord, N. H. 

Rev Henry M. Storrs, Cincinnati, 0. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Julian M. Sturtevant, D. D., President of Illinois College. 

Rev. Asa Turner, Denmark, Iowa. 

Rev. Robert G. Vermflye, D. D., Theolog. Inst, East Windsor, Ct. 

Charles I. Walker, Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Samuel H. Witter, San Francisco, Cal. 

Edward J. Woolsey, Esq., New York 



OFFICERS. 



[May, 1864. 



Treasurer. 
Mr. CHRISTOPHER R. ROBERT. 

Auditor. 
Mr. GEORGE S. COE. 

Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rey. MILTON BADGER, D. D. 
Rev. DAVID B. COE, D. D. 
Rey. DANIEL P. NOYES. 

Recording Secretary. 
AUSTIN ABBOTT, Esq. 



MEETING OF THE BOARD. 

The Board of Directors met on Thursday, May 12th, at the Society's Rooms, 
Bible House, Astor Place, and appointed the members who, in connection with 
the officers designated by the Constitution, compose the 

Executive Committee. 

Mr. Abijah Fisher. 
Rey. William Patton, D. D. 
Charles Butler, Esq. 
Mr. Simeon B. Chittenden. 
Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D. 
Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, D. D. 
Rev. William I. Budington, D. D. 
Mr. William G. Lambert 
Rev. William R. Tompkins. 
' Mr. Christopher R. Robert, Treasurer. 



Members 
Ex-OfELcio. 



Rey. Milton Badger, D. D., ) 

Rev. David B. Coe, D. D., > Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rey. Daniel P. Noyes, ) 

.Austin Abbott, Esq., Recording Secretary. 



Assistant Treasurer. 
Mr. Benjamin G. Talbert 



CONSTITUTION 



or TBS 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Art. 1. This Society shall be denominated The Amsbican Home 
Missionary Society. 

Art. 2. The object of this Society stall be, to assist congregations 
that are unable to support the Gospel ministry, and to send the Gos- 
pel to the destitute, within the United States : also to cooperate with 
evangelical Christians in the support of Home Missions in nominally 
Christian countries, to such an extent as the funds of the Institution 
may justify. 

Abt. 3. The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice- 
Presidents, a Treasurer, an Auditor, one or more Secretaries for Cor- 
respondence, a Recording Secretary, and fifty Directors, who shall be 
annually appointed by the Society ; and who, together with the 
Directors for Life, shall constitute a Board, seven of whom shall be a 
quorum, at any meeting regularly convened. 

Abt. 4. The officers and Directors shall appoint an Executive Com- 
mittee of fourteen, (including the Treasurer, the Secretaries for Cor- 
respondence, and the Recording Secretary,) residing in the City of 
New York and its vicinity ; five of whom shall be a quorum, at any 
meeting regularly convened. The Committee shall have power to 
appoint its own meetings, form its own rules of business, and fill any 
vacancies in its own number which may occur during the year, and to 
convene special meetings of the Board or Society ; shall appoint mis- 
sionaries, and instruct them as to the field and manner of their labors ; 
shall have the disposal of the funds ; t shall create such agency or 
agencies for appointing missionaries, and for other purposes, as the 
interests of the Institution may require ; and shall make an Annual 
Report of their proceedings to the Society. 



10 constitution. [May, 1864. 

Abt. 5 The Treasurer shall give bonds, annually, to such amount 
as the Executive Committee shall think proper. 

Abt. 6. Any person may become a member of this Society, by con- 
tributing annually to its funds ; thirty dollars paid at one time shall 
constitute a Member for Life ; and one hundred dollars paid at one 
time shall constitute a Director for Life : and any person on the pay- 
ment of a sum which, in addition to any previous contribution to the 
funds, shall amount to one hundred dollars, shall be a Director for 
Life. An executor, on paying a legacy of two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars to the funds of this Society, shall be a Member for Life ; and the 
payment of a legacy of one thousand dollars shall constitute a Direc- 
tor for Life. 

Art. 7. Any Missionary Society may become Auxiliary, by agree- 
ing to pay into the Treasury of this Society the whole of its surplus 
funds, and sending to the Secretaries for Correspondence a copy of its 
Constitution and Annual Reports, mentioning the names of its Mis- 
sionaries, and the fields of theit opperations. 

Art. 8. Every Auxiliary Society, which shall agree to pay the 
whole of its funds to this Society, shall be entitled to a missionary or 
missionaries to labor in such fields as it may designate ; at least to the 
amount of its contributions ; provided such designation be made at 
the time of payment. 

Art. 9. The officers of all Auxiliary Societies shall be, ex officio, 
Directors ; and annual contributors to their funds shall be members 
of the Society. 

Art. 10. This Society shall meet annually in the City of New York, 
on the Wednesday next preceding the second Thursday in May. 

Art. 11. No alteration shall be made in this Constitution without a 
vote of two thirds of the members present at an annual meeting ; nor 
unless the same shall have been proposed at a previous annual meet- 
ing, or recommended by the Executive Committee. 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



We pause, as we enter upon the review of another missionary 
year, to offer a word of tribute to the memory of the dead. Many 
of our associates and patrons have, since the year commenced!, 
ceased from their labors and entered upon their reward. Among 
them, are four of the Vice-Presidents of the Society — Hon. Lewis 
Strong, Eev. Ralph Emerson, D. D, Mr. William M. Halsted, 
and Rev. Benjamin Tappan, D. D. 

Mr. Strong had sustained official relations to the Society for 
twenty four years, and given to it his counsels, his influence, and 
his generous benefactions. Dr. Emerson will be remembered 
with special affection as the devoted Teacher of Sacred Science, 
inspiring his pupils with missionary zeal, bestowing upon them 
his benediction, and following them with his sympathies and his 
prayers, as thev went forth to plant in the wilderness the banner 
of the cross. Mr. Halsted's official relations to the Society com- 
menced in 1828. He was for seventeen years a member of its 
Executive Committee, and for seven its Recording Secretary. How 
faithfully he watched over its interests, how promptly and kindly 
he discharged every duty, how bland and courteous he was in his 
demeanor, and how sincere and deep was his interest in the diffu- 
sion of Gospel influences every where, those who were so long 
and so bappriy associated with him can never forget. Dr. Tappan 
was not only one of the Vice-Presidents of this Society, rejoicing 
in its prosperity and in the progress of every humane and christ- 
ian enterprise, out he had been for fourteen years the Secretary of 
the Maine Missionary Society Auxiliary to this, conducting its 
affairs with great wisdom and energy, honored and revered by the 
churches which he encouraged and strengthened, and by the 
churches as well, of whose bounty he was the almoner to the 
needy. The missionaries and the ministry throughout the State 
looked up to him as to a father, and mourned, as they carried him 
to his burial, a loss which they felt could never be repaired. 

But another stroke of the Divine hand has come still nearer to 
the Executive Officers of the Society. We had scarcely entered 
upon the duties of a new year, when it pleased God, by a death 
most serene and peaceful, to take from us our honored and belov- 
ed fellow-laborer— Mr. William C. Gilman. He had been for 
ten years in the Executive Committee of the Society, and for the 
last eight its Recording Secretary. Seldom absent from a meeting 



12 THIBTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

of the Committee, intimately acquainted with its principles of 
action, patient and exact in the details of business, as well as 
deeply interested in the greatness of the work, sagacious in coun- 
sel, kind and gentle in his intercourse with his brethren, seeking 
ever to lighten their burdens and diminish their cares, hopeful in 
discouragements and unwavering in faith, he could not but be 
greatly endeared to the hearts of all. But the Master had need 
of him in a higher sphere, and it was but for us to say : " Even 
so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight." 

Four of the missionaries of the Society have also died during 
the year — Eev. Josiah Ballard, Rev. Andrew J. Clapp, and Rev. 
John H. Dodge, in Massachusetts ; and Enoch H. Caswell in New 
Hampshire. 

The various operations of the Sbciety are noticed in the body 
of the Report, under their appropriate heads and in connection 
with their respective localities : such details as can be presented 
in a compact form are embraced in the following 

GENERAL TABLE, 

Showing in parallel columns, 

1. An alphabetical list of Missionaries. 

2. The names of congregations and missionary districts aided. 
8. Dates of commissions or time of commencing labor. 

4. Length of commissions in months. 

5. Amount of aid pledged, for the time named in the proceeding column. 

6. Months of labor performed, since the last Report 

7. Number of church members. 

8. Number of hopeful conversions. 

9. Additions to the churches on examination. 

10. Additions to the churches by letter. 

11. Number of Sabbath school and Bible class pupils. 

12. Amount of contributions to benevolent objects. 
18. Other particulars. 

EXPLANATION. 

In this table, the following abbreviations, appended to the names of Mission- 
aries in the first column, designate the Auxiliary Societies and Agencies by 
whose funds the congregations and missionary stations below which they are 
placed have been aided, viz. : 

M. M. S., Maine Missionary Society . 
N. H. M. S., New Hampshire Missionary Society. 
V. D. M. S., Vermont Domestic Missionary Society. 
Mass. H. M. S., Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
G. H. M. S., Connecticut Home Missionary Society. 
R. L H. M. S., Rhode Island Home Missionary Society. 
The names of Missionaries who were not in commission last year are .printed 
in Italics. 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH BKPOBT. 



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THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



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ill 



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THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



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THIBTT EIGHTH REPORT. 



87 



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1364.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



89 




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40 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



0\ EUD|)nq]Xldu3 



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1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



41 



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42 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



s 
8 




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3 S1VI 


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1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH BEPOBT. 



48 




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44 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 



SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

The number of ministers of the Gospel in the service of the 
Society the last year, whose names are found in the preceding 
General Table, together with those engaged in superintending the 
work, and whose names are mentioned in connection with the 
respective Auxiliaries and Agencies, is 756. 

Of these, 580 were in commission at the date of the last Report, 
and 176 have since been appointed. 

They have been distributed in 21 different States and Territo- 
ries, as follows: in Maine, 77 ; New Hampshire, 34; Vermont, 58 
Massachusetts, 60 ; Rhode Island, 6 ; Connecticut, 54 ; New York, 
42 ; Pennsylvania, 2 ; Ohio, 38 ; Indiana, 5 ; Illinois, 94 ; Mis 
souri, 2 ; Michigan, 62 ; Wisconsin, 73 ; Iowa, 79 ; Minnesota, 38 
Kansas, 15 ; Nebraska, 5 ; Colorado, 1 ; California, 8 ; Oregon, 3, 

This distribution gives to the New England States, 289 ; Mid- 
dle States, 44; Western States and Territories, including 11 on 
the Pacific coast, 423. 

Of the whole number in commission, 444 have been pastors or 
stated supplies of single congregations ; 230 have ministered to two 
or three congregations each ; and 82 have extended their labors 
over still wider fields. 

The aggregate of ministerial labor performed is 603 years. 

The number of congregations and missionary districts, which have 
been fully supplied, or where the Gospel has been preached at 
stated intervals, is 1,518. 

Seven missionaries have been in commission as pastors or stated 
supplies of churches of colored people ; and 30 nave preached in 
foreign languages — 11 to Welsh congregations, 16 to Uerman con- 
gregations, and 3 to congregations of Hollanders and Frenc/imen. 

The number of Sabbath school and Bible class scholars, connected 
with the missionary churches, is not far from 55,200. 

The contributions to benevolent objects, reported by 462 mission- 
aries, amount to $22,914.58. 

Sixty Jour missionaries make mention in their reports of revivals 
of religion during the year, in some of which there have been 50, 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 45 

40, and 35 hopeful conversions. The number of conversions 
reported by 292 missionaries is 1,£~~ 



The additions to the churches, as nearly as can be ascertained, 
have been #,902 ; namely, 2,221 on profession of their faith, and 
1,681 by letters from other churches. 

Twenty seven churches have been organized in connection with 
the labors of the missionaries during the year ; and twenty have 
become self-supporting. Ttiirty houses of worship have been com- 
pleted ; forty three repaired or improved; and twenty six others are 
in the process of erection. 

THE TREASURY. 

Resources. — The balance in the Treasury, April 1, 1863, was 
$35,429.92. The receipts, for the succeeding twelve months, have 
been $195,537.89 ; making the resources of the year $230,967.81. 

Liabilities. — There was due to missionaries, at the close of the 
last year, the sum of $6,100.15. There have since become due 
$152,039.68 ; making the total of liabilities $158,139.83. 

Payments. — Of this sum, $149,325.58 have been paid; leaving 
$8,814.25 still due to missionaries for labor performed. In addi- 
tion to these past dues, appropriations already made and daily be- 
coming due, amount to $68,178.35, making the total of pledges 
$76,992.60. To redeem which, and to apply on other appropri- 
ations, there is a balance in the Treasury or $81,642.23. 

The receipts exceed those of the previous year by $30,653.60, 
and those of any other year since the organization of the Society 
by $1,989.52. Of this increase, the sum of $17,446.94 is from 
legacies, and $13,206.66 from the contributions of churches and 
individuals. The expenditures of the year exceed those of the 
preceding by $14,334.50. The number of missionaries is greater 
by 22, and the years of labor performed by 41. The numoer of 
additions to the churches exceeds that reported at the last Anni- 
versary bv 794, and the number of Sabbath school and Bible class 
scholars by 1,200. In other particulars — in the organization of 
churches ; in the number and power of revivals of religion ; in the 
erection, completion, and improvement of houses of worship ; in the 
building of parsonages ; in the settlement of pastors, and in the 
transfer of churches from the list of beneficiaries to that of bene- 
factors — the reports of the missionaries indicate substantial progress 
and spiritual prosperity. It is with devout gratitude to Almighty 
God, that we record these evidences of his favor upon the mission- 
ary work in our own land, during a year of such deep national 
conflict and peril. 

The number of missionaries would have been greatly increas- 
ed, if suitable men could have been obtained, in the earlier part of 
the year especially, for the important posts where their &emce& 



46 THIRTT EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

were needed. But the war has made large drafts on our mission- 
ary supplies. As chaplains in the field and in hospitals, in serv- 
ices connected with Sanitary and Christian Commissions, and in 
the care and instruction of i reedmen, many have been employed, 
who, in other times, would have been our efficient co-workers in 
the missionary field. Pastors of churches in the older settlements 
are beginning, however, to listen to the calls of Providence in our 
new Territories, and at centers of moral influence which are fast 
opening upon us ; and the number of appointments recently made, 
as well as the spirit of inquiry and of missionary enterprise that 
seems to be kindling up anew," encourages the hope that the calls 
for men to go forth, even in these troublous times, to reclaim the 
old wastes and build up the desolation of many generations, will 
not be unheeded. And when those now connected with the army 
shall, in the good providence of God, be relieved, and our young 
men shall hear the increasing earnestness of the cries of the desti- 
tute, and the fruits of the outpouring of the Spirit upon our 
literary institutions shall be gathered into the ministry, and the 
prayer to the Lord of the harvest to send forth laborers into his 
harvest shall become the importunate prayer of the Church uni- 
versal, we can not doubt the hosts of Immanuel will be found ad- 
equate in numbers, in spirit, and in power, for the great work 
which God has for them here to do. 

The large receipts of the year, accompanied as they have been 
by so many testimonies to the magnitude of our work, give us the 
assurance that the interest involved in bringing this whole land 
under the power of the world to come, never had such a hold on 
christian hearts as now. Multitudes are looking, with earnest de- 
sire and with confident expectation, to this Institution as an ap- 
pointed instrumentality of Heaven for our country's salvation. 
They bring their offerings ; they utter words of encouragement 
and hope ; they intercede for the residue of the Spirit And what 
shall hinder our going forward, as the tide of emigration — for a 
season checked — shall again sweep over the land, and cities and 
villages and wide districts of desolation from which we have hith- 
erto been excluded shall invite our coming — what shall hinder our 
foing forward, in the name and at the bidding of our Divine 
[aster, with redoubled ardor and strength, and with triumphant 
success also in the accomplishment of our important mission ? 

GENERAL COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 

The following Table gives a comparative view of the amount of 
receipts, expenditures, number of missionaries, new appointments, 
congregations, and missionary districts, years of labor performed, 
additions to the churches, and pupils in Sabbath schools, for each 
year since the organization of the Society. It also exhibits, in the 
tenth column, the average expenditure, each year, for a year of 
missionary labor, obtained by dividing the sum total of the expen- 
ditures for the year by the number of years of labor performed. 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



47 



Society** Tmt. 



I I !*«( i» N*. Of 

No, of ' roMb. TMUfl 

Ispctdltarw. MEtHH- > iia , Um m* 



__ 



*,UirUi,. 

to 



.'■<,i*ii* I Atot. Atot. 

SLrk-n>U upas. .«i|*«. 

•utJ I for • ' for a 

FLu.* labor. j«toa*f7. 



1—1826-27 $18,140.76 $13,984.17- 
2—1827-28 20,035.78, 17,849.22; 
3—1828-29 26,997.31 1 26,814.96 
4—1829-30 33,929.44 42,429.50 ! 
5_1830-31 48,124.73] 47,247.60' 
6—1831-32 49,422.12; 62,808.39 
7—1832-33 68,627.17 
8—1833-34 78,911.44 
9—1834-35 88,863 22 

10—1835-36101,565.16 

11—1836-37| 85,701.59 

12—1837-38 86,522.45; 

13-1838-391 82,564.63' 

14—1839-40 78,345.20 



66,277.96 
80,015.76 
83,394.28 
92,188.94 
99,529.72 
85,066.26 
82,655.64 
78,533.89 



15—1840-41 85,413.34; 84,864.06 
16—1841-42, 92,463.64| 94,300.14 
17—1842-43! 99,812.24 98,215.11 
18—1843-44101,904.99104,276.47 
19—1844-45121,946.281118,360.12, 
20— 1846-46 125,124.70 126,193.15) 
21—1846-47 116,617.94'll9,170.40i 
22—1847-18 140,197.10 139,233.34 
23—1848-49 145,925.91 143,771.67 
24—1849-50 157,160.78 145,456.09* 
25 — 1850-51 150,940.25 163,817.90 
26—1851-52 160,062.25 162,831.1^ 
27—1852-53 171,734.24*174,439.24 
28—185^-54 191,209.07:184,025.76' 
29—1854-55 180,136.69 177,717.34 
30—1855-56 193,548.37 186,611.02! 
31—1856-57 178,060.68 1 80,550.44* 
32—1857-58 175,971.37.190,735.70 
33—1858-59 188,139.29 187,034.41 
34—1859-60 185,216.17 192,737.60! 
35—1860-61 183,761.80; 183,762.7ft 
30— 1861-62 168,852.61jl58,336.33 
37—1862-63 164,884.29 133,843.39 
38— 1863-64jl95,537.89J149 t 325.5a 



Hi!' 

201 

304, 

392 

463; 

509 1 

606! 

67 6 

710 ! 

755' 

810 ! 

684 

6Gb 

680 

690 

7911 

848i 

907 

943| 

971, 

972 

1,006 

1,019 

1.032 

1,065 

1,0G5 

1,087' 

1,047 

\ v:\-i 

986 

974 

1,012 

1,054! 

1,101 

1,062 

8G3| 

734; 

7bg; 



68 

too 

166 
164 
158 
209 
200 
204 
249 
232 
123 
201 
194 
178 
248 
225 
237 
209 
223 
189 
206 
192 
205 
211 
2^4 
213 
167 
180 
1ST 
201 
242 
350 
2G0 
212 
153 
166 



190 
244 
401 

500 
677 

745 
801 

899 
1,050 
1,000 
1,026 
840 
794 
842 
8G2 
987 
1,041 
1,245 
1,285 
1,463 
1,470 
1,447 
1,510 
1,576 
1,820 
1,948 
2,160 
2,140 
2,124 
1,946 
1,385 
2,034 
2,125 
2,175 
2,025 
1,668 
1,456 
1,618 



110 
133 
180 
274 
294 
361 
417 
4G3 
43l» 
646 
5 .VI 
438 
473 
486 
601 
694 
657 
665 
736 
760 
713 
773 
808 
312 
161 
862 
8T8' 
870 
815 
775 
780 
795 
8)0 
888 
836 
612 
662 
003 



not rep'not rep $127 $83 



1,000 
1,G7B 
1,950 
2,532 
6,136 
4,284 1 



134 



89 
144| 88 
156, 108 
160' 102 
146! 104 



306 
423; 

672, 
700' 
783, 

1,148: 

2,73C'PiipilF P | 
3,300 52,000 170! 116 
3,750 66,000 
3,752 80,000 
3,376-67,000 
3,1*20; 68,600 175 
4,760 60,000! 162 
4,016' 54, 100| 169 
5,614' G4,*00 169 
8,223; GB, 400 
7,693*60,300' 
4,929 60,000! 
5,311! 76,700- 
4,400 73,000] _ 
6,n20 77,000 180 138 
0,560' 83,501V 1781 141 
6,882) 75,000 179 
6,678,70,000! 180 
6,820' 66,500 189 
B, 079 72,5O0i 109 
6,026,65,400 212 
6,634 64,800 
6, G02 ! 60,000 
6,550 62,500 231 
6,784,65,600' 240 
8,791,67,300 231 
6,287 72,200 221 
5,600 70 T 0O0J 220 
4,007] 6 0,300 1 259 



159. 
172 

>! 

169 
180 
104 



149 
167, 
1G0 

ice; 



218 
241 



109 
118 



122 
123 
124 
124 
115 
123 
119 
116 
115 
126 
130 
123 



141 
144 
153 
160 
176 
171 
189 
185 
188 
178 
174 
173 
183 



3,108 64,000 240 184 
3,0O2| 65,200, 2J8| 198 



Remarks. — 1. The total of receipts for thirty eight years, is 
$4,372,588.48. 

2. The total of years of labor is 23,161. 

3. The whole number of additions to the churches is 178,882. 

4. The average expenditure for a year of missionary labor in- 
cludes the entire cost to the Society, of obtaining the missionary, 
defraying his expenses to his field, and sustaining him on it, as 
well as the average proportion of all the expenses in conducting 
the Institution. The increased average of recent years has been 
occasioned by the greater number of those who nave held full 
commissions, the expensiveness of more distant missions, and the 
larger appropriations that have become necessary, as the expenses 
of living have increased, to secure to the missionary a comfortable 
support. 



48 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



5. The difference between the annual average expenditure to a 
missionary and the average of a year's labor, is occasioned by the 
fact that a missionary is named and counted in a Keport, though 
in some cases he may have labored but a fraction of a year. 

6. The fifth column — that of new appointments — shows how 
many have to be called in each year, to supply the places of those 
whose support is assumed by the people, the vacancies occasioned 
by death, sickness, removals, and other changes, and to make the 
increase, if there be any, over the number of the preceding year. 



DISTRIBUTION OF MISSIONARIES, No. 1. 

The following Table gives the number of missionaries, each 
year of the Society's operations, in the geographical Divisions of 
Eastern, Middle, Southern and Western States ; and also in Canada. 



SOCKTT'B YlUL 


New England 
States. 


Middle 
States. 


Southern 
States. 

5 


Western 
States A 
Terrlt's. 


Canada. 


Total. 


1—1826-27 


1 


129 


33 


1 


169 


2—1827-28 


6 


130 


9 


56 




201 


3—1828-29 


72 


127 


23 


80 


2 


304 


4—1829-30 


107 


147 


13 


122 


3 


392 


5—1830-31 


144 


160 


12 


145 


2 


463 


6—1831-32 


163 


169 


10 


166 


1 


509 


•y—1832-33 


239 


170 


9 


185 


3 


606 


8—1833-34 


287 


201 


13 


169 


6 


676 


9—1834-35 


289 


216 


18 


187 


9 


719 


10—1835-36 


319 


219 


11 


191 


15 


755 


11—1836-37 


331 


227 


11 


195 


22 


810* 


12—1837-38 


288 


198 


8 


166 


24 


684 


13—1838-39 


284 


198 


9 


160 


14 


665 


14—1839-40 


290 


205 


6 


167 


12 


680 


15—1840-41 


292 


215 


5 


169 


9 


690 


16—1841-42 


305 


249 


5 


222 


10 


791 


17—1842-43 


288 


253 


7 


291 


9 


848 


18—1843-44 


268 


257 


10 


365 


7 


907 


19—1844-45 


285 


249 


6 


397 


6 


943 


20—1845-46 


274 


271 


9 


417 




971 


21—1846-47 


275 


254 


10 


433 




972 


22—1847-48 


295 


237 


18 


456 




1,006 


23—1848-49 


302 


239 


15 


463 




1,019 


24—1849-50 


301 


228 


15 


488 




1,032 


25—1850-51 


311 


224 


15 


515 




1,065 


26—1851-52 


305 


213 


14 


633 




1,065 


27—1852-53 


313 


215 


12 


647 




1,087 


28—1853-54 


292 


214 


11 


530 




1,047 


29—1854-55 


278 


207 


10 


537 




1,032 


30—1855-56 


276 


198 


8 


5<»4 




986 


31—1856-57 


271 


191 


6 


606 




974 


32—1857-58 


291 


197 


3 


521 




1,012 


33—1858-59 


319 


201 




634 




1,054 


34—1859-60 


327 


199 




681 




1,107 


36—1860-61 


308 


181 




573 




1,062 


36—1861-62 


295 


87 




481 




863 


37—1862-63 


281 


48 




405 




734 


88—1863-64 


289 


44 




428 




?56 



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50 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 



TABLE OF RECEIPTS. 

Exhibiting as fer as known, the amount received from each 
State and Territory into the Treasury of the American Home 
Missionary Society during the year, and the amount expended 
by each larger Auxiliary within its bounds, constituting also a 
part of the receipts of the Parent Society. 

States and Territories. Receipts. 

Maine, $504.19 

" Miss. Soc. expended, 10,668.56 $1 1,167.75 

New Hampshire, 2,213.42 

41 Miss. Soc expended, # 4,685.55 7,098.97 

Vermont, 1,636.63 

" Dom. Miss. Soc. expended, 7,299.40 8,936.03 

Massachusetts, f 54,871.86 

" Home Miss. Soc. expended, 8,070.10 62,941.96 

Rhode Island, 148.55 

41 Home Miss. Soc. expended, 1,596.63 1,745.18 

Connecticut, 20,596.51 

" Miss. Soc. expended, 7,804.86 2X401.87 

New York, » 43,978.22 

New Jersey, 6,828.45 

Pennsylvania, 8,660.80 

Maryland, 120.00 

District of Columbia, '. 1,000.00 

Virginia, 2.00 

North Carolina, 10.00 

Arkansas, 40.00 

Tennessee, 1.00 

Kentucky, 5.00 

Ohio, 6,033.89 

Indiana, 1,888.55 

Illinois, 4,850.61 

Missouri, 181.00 

Michigan, 1,685.43 

Wisconsin, 1,898.93 

Iowa, 1,246.97 

Minnesota, 821.50 

Kansas, 222.85 

Nebraska, 69.25 

California, 801.01 

Oregon, 94.00 

Washington Territory, 22.00 

Sandwich Islands, 25.00 

Japan, 60.00 

India, 80.00 

Other sources, 1,790.67 

$195,537.89 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 51 



PRINCIPAL AUXILIARIES, AGEN&ES, AND MISSION- 

ARY FIELDS. 

MAINE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rct. George E. Adams, D.D., President ; Hon. Asa Ridington, Lewiston, Treasurer ; 
Rev. David Shipley, Yarmouth, Secretary. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$935.12. There were also received into the Treasury of the 
American Home Missionary Society, during its financial year, 
from congregations and individuals in the State, $287.69, and in 
payment of legacies, $216.50 — in all, $504.19 — making a total for 
the cause of $9,855.31 ; which is less than the amount of the pre- 
vious year by $2,056.10. The expenditures within the State were 
$10,663.56. 

The number of missionaries in commission is seventy seven — ten 
of whom are licentiates and sixty seven ordained ministers ; forty 
seven were employed through the year; eleven for six months and 
upwards, and the remainder for a shorter period; they have 
ministered to ninety four churches, and in eleven places wnere no 
Congregational church has been organized. The last report of 
the Society gives the number of additions to the churches for the 
year, one hundred and sixty two ; the amount of contributions to 
benevolent objects, $1,586.99 ; and the number of hopeful con- 
versions, two hundred and sixty three. 

The Trustees say, in their Report : " This work of faith, this 
labor of love is only begun, and still needs for its successful pros- 
ecution, the patience of nope and the spirit of unfaltering zeal and 
determined perseverance. In our sphere, we are to do our part in 
giving to our beloved country, what it never more needed than it 
now needs, the ministry and ordinances of the blessed Gospel. 
Amidst the perils and alarms, the tears and blood of which our 
land is full, now can our nation, how can our commonwealth, dis- 
pense with its heavenly light and life, its divine strength and conso- 
lation ? — how be content with that limited measure of christian 
influence with which it is now blessed?" 

Tlie Society has been called, during the year, to mourn the de- 
cease of its venerable Secretary, Rev. Benjamin Tappan, D. D., 
who had long, arduously, and successfully labored for its prosperity.. 
His sympathies were with the feeble churches and with the breth- 
ren who ministered to them ; the friends of the cause confided in 
his wisdom, admired his efficiency, and rejoiced to cooperate with 
him in extending, through all their borders, the institutions of the 
Gospel He enjoyed and exemplified, in an eminent degree, the- 
religion which he oommended to others, and he has left with. tkos& 



52 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

who loved him the full assurance that his is now the recompense 
of those who turn many to righteousness. 

Rev. David Shepley* of Yarmouth, has, since Dr. Tappan's de- 
cease, acted as the Secretary of the Society. 

HEW HAMPSHIRE MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Nathaniel Bouton, D.D., President ; Rev. William Clarke, Secretary ; Rev. B. 
Pi Stone, D.D., Treasurer. Office at Concord. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$6,931.41 ; of which $421.86 were forwarded by designation of 
the donors to the Parent Society. There were also received from 
the State into the Treasury of the American Home Missionary 
Society, during its financial year, in payment of legacies, $1,317.- 
97 ; from congregations and individuals, $±73.59 — in all, $1.791.- 
56 — making the total for the cause $8,722.97 ; which is less than 
in the previous year by $88.24. The expenditures within the State 
were $4,885.55; and the amount put at the disposal of the Na- 
tional Institution, $2,213.42. 

Thirty four missionaries have been in commission during the 
year, preaching to thirty five churches, and in two places where 
churches have not yet been organized. The aggregrate average 
attendance on public worship in thirty three of these congregations 
is two thousana seven hundred and seventy three. The contribu- 
tions of the churches to benevolent objects are nearly equal to twenty 
per cent of their receipts firom the Society. Eighteen Congregational 
churches still remain destitute of the preached word. 

In reference to the national work, the Trustees say in their Re- 
port: "It is the testimony of well-informed witnesses that the 
great West and North- West have maintained their loyalty to the 
Union and to the Government more through the influence of our 
missionaries and the churches they have planted, than through the 
agency of any other, perhaps of all other causes combined. Had 
the vast West never felt any of these countless benign Home Mis- 
sionary influences, could it have been safely relied on to sustain our 
Government and Nation in the terrible crisis now upon us ? Would 
we hope that our bleeding country will come safely out of the iron 
furnace, and its government ana the invaluable institutions that 
have grown out of it be securely, permanently established, we 
must, by our prayers, our sympathies, our benefactions, sustain the 
Home Missionary enterprise. 

VEBMOHT DOMESTIC MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. Erastus Fairbanks, President; C. W. Storks, Esq., Treasurer ; Rev. C. S. Smith, 
Secretary. Office at Montpelier. 

The receipts of this Society, for the vear ending March 1, were 
$7,647.75. There were also received from the -State into the 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 53 

Treasury of the American Home Missionary Society, during its 
financial year, in payment of legacies, $912; from congregations 
and individuals, $724.63— in all, $1,636.63— making the total 
from the State $9,284.38 ; which is less than in the previous year 
by $3,442.81. The expenditures within the State were $7,299.40. 
Fifty eight missionaries have been in commission during some 
portion of the year. The Secretary in his report says : " These mis- 
sionaries have labored in fifty churches and missionary districts, per- 
forming thirty one years of service. One church has been organ- 
ized, two pastors ordained, and two houses of worship built Three 
churches have become self-sustaining, and two others will probably 
call for no more aid. No extensive work of grace has prevailed, 
but several of the churches have been quickened and tneir num- 
bers increased. Our work, in its general character and results, has 
been much as in previous years. Labor has been performed, and 
good accomplished, but less than we hoped. A sad feature in 
many of our churches is a lack of young men. As the result of 
emigration, war, and the absence of the converting grace of God, 
several of our churches have not a resident male member under 
forty years of age. Some of our self-sustaining churches are be- 
coming feeble, for the want of aggressive missionary efforts on 
their part, in the region immediately around them. Their influ- 
ence is becoming circumscribed, and no earnest effort is put forth 
to regain the lost ground. More active missionary labor, by the 
members of the churches, in seeking to build up Christ's kingdom 
around them, is greatly needed." 

Rev. John F. Stone, who, for many years, had served the Soci- 
ety as its Secretary with great fidelity and acceptance, on account 
oi impaired health, declined, at the last Anniversary, a reelection, 
but consented to remain until another could be obtained to fill the 
place. The duties of the office have been performed, since Mr. 
Stone's withdrawal, by Rev. C. S. Smith, of Montpelier. 

MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. William A. Stearns, D.D., President; Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Treasurer; Rev. 
Henry B. Hooker, D.D., Secretary. Office at Boston. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$39,646.63. The expenditures within the State were $6,770.10; 
and the amount forwarded from the Treasury to the American 
Home Missionary Society, during its financial year, was $31,000. 
There were also received from the State into the Treasury of the 
Parent Society, in payment of legacies, $14,664.02; from the 
Hampshire Missionary Society $2,270.29 ; from congregations and 
individuals, $6,937.55— in all, $23,871.86— making the total to 
the cause, $63.518.49 — exceeding the amount of the preceding 
year, by $17,020.60. The whole amount expended out of the 
State, through the National Institution, was $o4,871.36. 

Sixty missionaries have been in commission. The churcftiea to 



54 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

which they have ministered contain a'membership of one thousand 
seven hundred and eighty eight, with an average Sabbath attend- 
ance of about four thousand. The number of Sabbath school schol- 
ars reported is over three thousand ; and of hopeful conversions, 
one hundred and fourteen. Sixty eight have been added to the 
churches by profession. 

" We go forward," say the Executive Committee in their An- 
nual Eeport, "with the Parent Institution amid the perils and 
trials, the tears and blood of civil war. But the grandeur of our 
work — our country's evangelization — gives us powerful and de- 
lightful inspiration. The hearts of the friends of Home Missions 
have not fainted during these years of danger and sorrow ; and 
they are stronger now than ever, we believe, for this great enterprise. 
Our augmented receipts, our opening and enlarging fields, the 
Spirit's power and grace among so many missionary churches, and 
our beloved country's dependence on the Christianity we spread 
over it for the permanence and prosperity of its noble institutions — 
all these voices pour on our ears the powerful appeal to prosecute, 
with augmented diligence and fidelity, the great work before us. 
' The God of heaven, he will prosper us ; therefore we his servants 
will arise and build.' " 

RHODE ISLAND HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Hon. A. C. Barstow, President ; Edwin Knight, Esq., Providence, Treasurer ; Rev. 
Francis IIorton, Barrington, Secretary. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$1,250.79. There were also received from the State, into the 
Treasury of the American Home Missionary Society, during its 
financial year, $148.55 ; making the total to the cause, $1,399.84 — 
which is less than in the preceding year by $64.70. The expendi- 
tures within the State were $1,596.63. 

Six missionaries have been in commission, laboring amidst many 
difficulties and with much encouragement in building up the old 
wastes and in laying the foundations of many generations. 

CONNECTICUT HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Rev. Horace Hooker, Secretary ; E. W. Parsons, Esq., Treasurer. Office at Hartford. 

The receipts of this Society, for the year ending March 1, were 
$6,849.74. There were also received from the State, into the 
Treasury- of the American Home Missionary Society, during its 
financial year, in payment of legacies, $6,868.06; from congrega- 
tions and individuals, $13,728.45 — in all, $20,596.51 — making the 
total to the cause, $27,446.25 — which is $183.38 less than the 
amount of the preceding year. The expenditures within the State 
were $7,804.86; and the amount expended beyond its limits, 
through the National Institution, was $20,596.51. 



1864.] THIBTT EIGHTH BEPOBT. 56 

Fifty four missionaries have been in commission. " The churches 
to whicn they have ministered," says the Secretary of the Society, 
" do not differ in any essential respect from the other churches of 
our denomination in this State, except in their ability to sustain 
unaided the institutions of the Gospel. The war presses on them 
heavily, but its demands are cheerfully met ; and additional aid to 
their ministers is not unusual. There is an increased sense of ob- 
ligation in our churches to extend the institutions of the Gospel 
among those around them, and new places for preaching are often 
attended by congregations almost as large as at the center. To 
impart to old and decayed churches the vigor and hopefulness of 
new institutions is neither an easy nor rapid work, but with faith 
and determination and the blessing of heaven it can be done." 

Rev. William H. Moobe has prosecuted his work as Agent 
and State Missionary with great fidelity, visiting and encouraging 
the missionary churches, addressing ecclesiastical gatherings and 
Sabbath schools, conferring with ministers and laymen, and " dwell- 
ing in private and public on such topics as these — the best means 
of securing contributions to charitable objects, the baptism of child- 
ren, the duties of churches to their absent members, pastoral visita- 
tion, the management of Sabbath schools, lay activity, mission 
schools, the care of the neglected population, and the conversion 
of souls and their admission to church fellowship." 



The total of receipts from New England is $118,774.76 — exceed- 
ing the amount of the preceding year by $11,978.10; of this, $39,- 
020,10 were expended within its bounds, and $79,754.66 forward- 
ed to the National Institution for its general work. 

HEW YORK 
Bev. L. Smith IIobart, Syracuse, Agent. 

The number of missionaries in the service of the Society, within 
this State, during the past year, is forty two. Thev have minister- 
ed statedly to not less than sixty six churches ana congregations ; 
and have labored with fidelity and zeal. The contributions to the 
Home Missionary Treasury, for the same period, amount to $43,- 
978.22. 

About thirty five Congregational churches are now without 
ministers. These churches are able to raise only from $200 to 
$350 a year toward a pastor's salary. " They remain unsupplied," 
observes the Agent, " not because they have been refused mission- 
ary aid sufficient to make up an adequate support, or because there 
is not a sufficient number of clergymen seeking parishes." It is 
possible that ministers may sometimes be lacking in zeal and self- 
denial ; and churches may be fastidious and exacting. "Whatever 
the cause, this double destitution — of pastors and of parishes — 
continues. 
The missionary churches in New York, as in the States fiiYtW 



68 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

west, are almost wholly composed of persons whose loyalty to 
their country is beyond question. " They not only hate rebellion, 
but, even more intensely, the slavery which is its root. They pray 
and vote, and numbers of them are fighting for the extermination 
of both. This fruit of our Home Missionary work is legitimate, 
commendable, and deserving of conspicuous record." 

" It is an encouraging fact that among these churches the re- 
ligious instruction of the young is receiving much attention. The 
relation of the Sabbath school to the church is better understood 
and appreciated ; a larger proportion of the older and more ex- 
perienced church members are becoming teachers ; the schools are 
more generally continued through the winter ; and their true end 
is more distinctly and prayerfully held in view." 

41 Moreover, the vice of intemperance, now so alarmingly preva- 
lent, is beginning to arouse new efforts for its suppression. In 
many communities, the majoritv of the young people, for a long 
time, have been accustomed to liear but little of argument or in- 
struction upon this subject, and have thus too often been left un- 
forewarned and unfortified against the destroyer; but ministers 
have begun again to deliver addresses, after the style of twenty five 
years ago ; and children and youth are encouraged to sign the 
pledge." 

On the whole, therefore, we may regard the present aspect of 
the missionary work in this State as very hopeful. A new vigor 
appears in many churches ; a new hope has been awakened in 
congregations that had begun to despair; a fresh warmth of at- 
tachment to christian and to puritan principles is making itself man- 
ifest; everywhere the Society's Agent is cordially welcomed; 
everywhere he is urging upon the churches an earnest and system- 
atic benevolence, and the importance of their development and 
growth through union with Christ in methodical working with 
him, regarding themselves as " divinely constituted for the evan- 
gelization of the surrounding communities ;". while the tokens of 
interest in the Home Missionary cause are always marked and 
abundant. We can not but feel that the Lord is speaking unto his 
people herfc, and bidding them, " Go forward." 

OHIO. 

Rev. James H. Newton, Cleveland, Agent for Northern Ohio. Rev. Ltsamdkr Eelsev, 
Columbus, Agent for Southern Ohio and Southern Indiana. 

In Ohio, the Society has had thirty eight missionaries under com- 
mission during the past year ; and has received into its Treasury 
contributions from the State amounting to $5,033.89. 

In Northern Ohio, twenty one ministers have labored with twen- 
ty four churches and at a considerable number of out stations. 
The receipts into the Treasury from this part of the State are in 
advance of those of last year ; although the great majority of the 
givers are persons of limited means, wnile the calls of charity were 
probably never before so numerous. But the people have been 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPOKT. 57 

learning to be generous ; and their spirit has risen with the demands 
made upjon them. " Many congregations," observes the Agent, 
" which in times of peace felt unable to support the Gospel with- 
out foreign aid, now, in the midst of a civil war, and when pecu- 
niarily weakened, are sustaining their ministers with salaries from 
one fifth to one third larger than they were wont to furnish in 
former years. 1 ' None of these missionary churches secure an aver- 
age attendance of more than one hundred and seventy five, while 
the smallest averages but forty five. 

Six ministers are now needed in this portion of the State to sup- 
ply its destitutions. They should be men of large faith and pa- 
tience, apt to teach. But its great want, He only can meet who 
bestows the baptism of the Holy Ghost Nothing short of a gen- 
eral and powerful revival can make these churches truly vigorous, 
or deliver these intelligent and enterprising communities from dis- 
tractions of opinion and from spiritual lukewarmness. 

V 

In Southern Ohio and Southern Indiana, the Society has aided 
seventeen missionaries, who have preached regularly to twenty one 
churches and at six out stations, and have held frequent services in 
numerous other localities scattered over wide districts. A large 
amount of labor has thus been performed. Four of the churches 
have been blessed with revivals. 

"High prices," observes the Agent, "have occasioned great em- 
barrassment ; and the missionaries have found it difficult to live 
on their small salaries. No class in the loyal States has suffered 
so much in their pecuniary affairs. During the year, a rebel force, 
about five thousand in number, invaded Southern Ohio and swept 
through the State for a distance of about three hundred miles. 
Their raid was of brief continuance, and interrupted but few of 
the missionary churches. Some of the missionaries, with many of 
their people, were amopg those who rallied for the pursuit and 
capture of the invaders." 

" The churches are feeble ; but they are very generally united 
and harmonious, self-denying, earnest, active, and loyal. Scarcely 
one can be found that has not some of its best men in the Union 
army ; and the influence of none could be spared, without serious 
loss to the communities where they exist. Southern Ohio and 
Indiana still present large fields for missionary culture. Scores of 
self-sustaining churches here are monuments of the Society's use- 
fulness in the past, and pledges of future success." The harvests 
are waiting — the laborers are few. 

ILLINOIS. 

Rev. Joseph E. Rot, Chicago, Agent for Northern niinoia and Northern Indiana. 
Rev. Elisha Jennet, Galesburgh, Agent for Central and Southern Illinois. 

This Society-has aided in the support of ninety four missionaries 
in Illinois, during the year covered by the present Report, and has 
received into its Treasury, from that State, $4,850.61. 



58 THIBTY EIGHTH KEPORT. [May, 

In Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana three churches have 
been organized, six houses of worship have been built and four 
others commenced. Twelve congregations have been blessed with 
revivals of religion. Despite the peculiar burdens and hindrances 
of the times, the missionaries have been prosecuting their work 
with encouraging success; and we are not without convincing 
proof that their influence tells effectively upon the moral tone or 
society as well as upon the multiplication and growth of the 
churches. 

The Theological Seminary at Chicago has begun to make addi- 
tions to the number of laborers in the missionary field, and gives 
promise of being a most effective agency for the advancement of 
the kingdom of our Lord. Its help is greatly needed in every 
"Western State. In Illinois itself more than thirty congregations 
were but recently destitute of ministers, and multitudes still suffer 
for lack of pastors and teachers fitted for the Gospel work. 

To the churches of Central and Southern Illinois the year just 
closed has been one of at least ordinary prosperity. In the midst 
of war they have had peace ; one new church, has been organ- 
ized, two houses of worsnip have been finished and dedicated, not 
less than fourteen congregations — and perhaps more — have enjoyed 
revivals of religion, one of which resulted in the hopeful conversion 
of fifty souls, and the amount of benevolent contributions, not- 
withstanding the great advance in the cost of living, has been 
increased. Ten of the churches are without ministers. 

The missionaries sustained by the Society in this part of the 
State, settled to so large an extent by persons of Southern origin, 
are, " without an exception," observes the Agent, " loyal to the 
Government and ready for any sacrifices and hardships in the 
cause of religion and humanity." " Some of them have given 
their sons, first to the Savior, then to their country, and all are 
contributing, in one way or another, to the great ends for which 
we ought to live in times like these." > 

A thorough inquiry into the efficiency of the churches has re- 
newedly and deeply impressed the Society's Agent with the con- 
viction that, few and feeble as they are, they are truly deserving 
of encouragement and support. Although some of them are not 
now making advances, the progress of others i& such as to awaken 
our gratitude; and instances or this sort would obviously be more 
numerous were it not for the drain of men and of money occasioned 
by the war. " Those of us," to use his words, " who have oppor- 
tunities of knowing the obstacles to success, and the progress 
really made amid so many hindrances, are forced to exclaim: 
* What hath God wrought I' Though all has not been accom- 
plished that we aimed at, and that we hoped ere this to witness, 
yet much has been done, in view of which angels must rejoice." 

Illinois occupies a central and commanding position. Stretching 
from about the latitude of Fortress Monroe to that of Boston, and 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 69 

touching upon the Mississippi, the Ohio, and the lakes, she unites 
distant States, and is connected by great highways with them and 
with all the world. Her population, gathered from diverse parts 
of the country and from many lands, numbered in I860 over 
1,700,000. Scattered throughout this great multitude — and princi- 
pally where the population is least sparse, best educated, ana most 
enterprising — there are now over two hundred churches cooper- 
ating in this Society. A way of access is fairly open, therefore, 
to the whole State. May we not hope that these churches will 
grow and multiply, until e^ry township shall be reached by their 
immediate influence? The Society has a great field before it in 
this State, and, we trust, a blessed work for Christ and for souls, 
for the country and the world. 

MEWOTOL 

At the beginning of the year the Society had no missionary in 
this State — except one, ministering to a congregation of Germans — 
and there were but two (American) churches within the bounds of 
Missouri disposed to yield it their sympathy and support. While 
the general aspect of affairs is not strikingly changed, there are 
indications of a very encouraging character. In the fall of 1863, 
Rev. Thomas E. Bliss was commissioned for general missionary 
labor in the northern part of the State, and more especially along 
the line of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. He there met 
with a very cordial reception, has succeeded in reorganizing a 
church that had been broken up by the rebellion, and has gathered 
several congregations that give good promise for the future. Mul- 
titudes of the best citizens of the State appear to have become 
dissatisfied with religious teachers who deserted the cause of their 
country in her hour of trial, and to be no longer willing to ac- 
knowledge their leadership or even attend upon their ministrations 
in the sanctuary. The door is apparently open, therefore, for the 
formation of loyal churches, under the care of a ministry faithful 
to Christ, to freedom, and to " the poor." We should probably 
have been able at this time to report additional results had not a 
pressing call from Tennessee made it necessary for the Society's 
Agent to transfer his labors, for a season, to the city of Memphis, 
where his efforts were promptly rewarded with the organization of 
a loyal Union church of twenty five members and the securing of 
very liberal subscriptionJfcoward the support of the Gospel. We 
trust that this church will be able from the first to maintain the 
regular ministrations of the word without assistance. The congre- 
gation accepted temporarily the use of a house of worship whose 
owners had been excluded for disloyalty, but now assembles in its 
own hired hall. Its prospects are highly encouraging. All loyal 
churches and Christians throughout the land can not but view it 
with emotions of peculiar interest and sympathy, as one of the first 
fruits of the new and better harvest which the nation hopes to 
gather in a redeemed and regenerated South. We trust the 'year 



60 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

to come will witness the prosecution of the work thus auspiciously 
begun with fresh vigor and enlarged success. 

On the western frontiers of Missouri, also, in the center of that 
border district which has been the source of such deeds of vio- 
lence, at Kansas City, still another congregation and Sunday 
school have been gathered; and a missionary is there laboring 
with zeal and self denial at what, it is hoped, will prove founda- 
tions for many generations. 

Missouri is apparently destined, under the benign and inspiring 
influences of the Gospel and of liberty, to become one of the most 
populous and prosperous States of the Union. For the salvation 
of the millions who, in ages to come, are to dwell within its bor- 
ders, every Christian and patriot must deem it a privilege to labor. 

MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Herbert A. Read, Marshall, Agent. 

Sixty two missionaries have labored in this State, under commis- 
sion from the Society, during the past year. The contributions to 
the Treasury have amounted to $1,585.43. Of the one hundred 
and fifty Congregational churches of Michigan, ninety are so feeble 
as to require missionary aid, while some of the remainder are en- 
abled to dispense with it, only by uniting two or more churches in 
the support of the same pastor, and a few are now so reduced, by 
emigration and other causes, as to give little promise for the future. 
Six churches have been organized during the year ; five houses of 
worship have been completed, or are near completion, and several 
missionary congregations have erected parsonages. A new Asso- 
ciation has been formed, in the valley 01 the Muskegon. Twenty 
churches are still without stated preachers ; and no less than fif- 
teen faithful ministers are needed, to break unto them the bread of 
life. Although the year ha3 not been characterized by remarkable 
religious awakenings, quite a number of revivals have been en- 
joyed, resulting, in some instances, in the formation of churches. 

u To many of the missionary churches, the past year," observes 
the Agent, " has brought severe trials. With one fourth of their 
male members — and these the younger and more active — in the 
army of the Union, a failure of crops, through frost and drought, 
and a great increase of taxes and of demands upon their liberality, 
it is with difficulty that they have achieved their part toward sus- 
taining the institutions of the Gospel. This, in most instances, 
they have done in a manner worthy of praise. The missionaries, 
with their wives, have met their trials with christian fortitude, 
laboring on courageously, amid frequent privations and self-de- 
nials." Early in the year, apprehensions were felt lest the minds 
of the people should be so taken up with efforts and excitements 
connected with our national struggle, as to forbid all advance, and 
even imperil the holding of ground already occupied. Such fears 
have not been realized. A general survey of the field reveals, on 



1861.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 61 

the whole, an encouraging progress. New churches have been 
formed, older ones have added to their numbers, and nearly all 
have increased in strength. There are signs of spiritual growth as 
well as of pecuniary improvement; and probably the cause of 
Home Missions never stood better in this State than at the present 
time. 

The particular aspect of the Home Missionary work in Michi- 
gan, of greatest interest, at the present moment, is that exhibited 
in the rapid occupation of the northwestern portion of the State, 
in the neighborhood of Grand Traverse Bay, along the shore of 
Lake Michigan and the banks of the Manistee and Muskegon. 
The Grand Traverse region until recently has been little known. 
It had been generally supposed to be one vast " pinery," and un- 
fitted for tillage. This impression is very far from the truth. The 
pine lands are only found in strips, varying in width from one to 
three miles, along the courses of the larger streams. The rest of 
the country is heavily wooded with the maple, the elm, ash, and 
hemlock — the sugar maple largely predominating, and developing 
luxuriant dimensions. The region abounds in lakes, brooks, and 
springs ; the soil is of excellent quality, and yields abundant re- 
turns of wheat and other agricultural staples, together with the 
most valued fruits. The population of this district in 1860 was 
about 3,600 ; but so rapidly have settlements been made, that at 
the present time the inhabitants are believed to number nearly 
10,000 souls. 

The physical character of the region lying to the south of the 
Manistee River, and between that and the Muskegon, in all essen- . 
tial particulars, resembles the one just described. Its villages, 
however, are more numerous, distributed mostly upon the lake 
shore, and its population is much larger. 

These northwestern counties now form a missionary field of 
gTeat interest and importance. The tide of emigration is setting 
strongly in that direction, and numerous villages are springing into 
being, with every promise of prosperity. Some of them must soon 
become important centers of trade ana commerce. At Benzonia, 
the county seat of Benzie County, and situated about half way 
between Grand Traverse Bay and the Manistee, a settlement has 
been formed, which " is designed to develop in harmony the inter- 
ests of agriculture, education, and piety — a christian colony. 
Some forty families have already established themselves near its 
center ; an institution of learning, which is expected to become a 
college, has been in operation for a year ; and cordial invitations 
are now extended to Christian families, " willing to set examples 
of industry, frugality, and benevolence, and to assume understand- 
ingly the labors and self-denials of a new settlement," to unite in 
this effort to lay broad and deep in this wilderness the foundations 
of christian society. 

The Society has been prompt in entering this new and important 
field, which already contains over fifteen churches, twelve ministers, 
and two Association* Its missionaries have, done a good woi^y 



62 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

and their work is rapidly growing upon their hands. More labor- 
ers are needed for this "harvest. We invite the attention of all 
who are interested in the progress of the Redeemer's Kingdom to 
the demands of this important State. 

WISCONSIN. 

Rev. Dexter Clary, Beloit, Agent for Eastern Wisconsin ; Rev. John C. Sherwix, 
La Crosse, Agent for Western Wisconsin. 

The number of missionaries employed within the bounds of this 
State, during the past year, is seventy three; of whom four have 
ministered to congregations of Hollanders and "Welsh, in their 
native tongues. Not less than one hundred and eleven churches 
and over forty out-stations have thus been supplied with the regu- 
* lar ministrations of the Gospel. Contributions nave been made to 
the cause of Home Missions amounting to $1,898.93. The churches 
in Wisconsin that cooperate in this Society number two hundred, 
embracing a membership of over eleven thousand. Of these, how- 
ever, less than fifty are able to sustain preaching without assist 
ance ; and more than twenty are destitute of pastors. Three have 
become self-supporting during the year; ana five new churches 
have been organized. Waste places, in which it is possible to form 
churches, are not numerous. A vast number of neighborhoods 
and school districts, however, are to be found, in which congrega- 
tions could be gathered ; but which, being too small to constitute 
missionary fielas of themselves, and inconveniently situated for 
connection with existing parishes, remain destitute. 

" The missionaries of this State," observes the Agent, " are pros- 
ecuting their work with diligence, encountering difficulties and dis- 
couragements with christian manliness, walking by faith amid the 
darkness of the times, encouraging the churches to steadfastness in 

Erayer and every good work, and holding up gospel truth as their 
ght and their salvation. Christians of different denominations, 
also, appear to be more and more drawn toward each other, both 
by christian affinity and by their common interest in our national 
struggle." "The steady progress of our churches has shown the 
vitalizing power of the Gospel, and furnishes encouragement for 
continued effort. The Master of the Vineyard has graciously pre- 
served the lives of all the laborers in this portion of it, and per- 
mitted many of them to rejoice in the ingathering of fruits. The 
precious revivals of the preceding year extended to the early part 
of the one just ended, and evidences of their genuineness are by no 
means wanting. The number now, or recently, in progress is not 
so great" 

" The churches are generally in a prosperous condition, though 
much affected by the war. One fifth of their male members, it is 
believed, and about the same proportion from among their sup- 
porters in the congregations, have enlisted in their country's serv- 
ice. From some of the churches, all the young men have gone." 
"The members of the missionary congregations, in oommon with 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH BEPORT. 68 

other inhabitants of the State, have been put to great expense." 
The 42,000 men furnished by Wisconsin, previous to the recent 
call for 500,000, were placed at the disposal of the Government 
equipped for the field ; $50,000 have been contributed for the relief 
ot sick and wounded soldiers, in addition to large sums for local 
Aid Societies and the Sanitary and Christian Commissions ; more 
than $1,000,000 have been paid, in local bounties, to volunteers ; 
and $2,500,000 to their femilies. 

" These offerings of men and money greatly diminish the ability 
of the churches to support the institutions of the Gospel, and 
create a necessity for continued missionary aid." " It is gratifying 
to witness, in the readiness with which sucn demands have been met, 
the developments of Christian principle ; and to be able to trace 
the existence of this, in no small measure, to the early and contin- 
ued influence of Home Missions." 

This influence reveals itself in another form, calculated to awaken 
our deepest gratitude ; for we are assured that the demoralizing 
effect of the war is far less than was anticipated. Large numbers 
have gone into the army who had their education in churches, 
Sunday schools, Bible classes, and christian homes ; and this fact, 
in connection with the influence of the great and sacred principles 
underlying our national struggle and of the momentous issues de- 
pendent on its result, have awakened a spirit of prayer and christ- 
ian activity that has been blest of God, in the protection of young 
men amid the temptations of a soldier's life and to the conversion 
of many souls r Thus doth godliness prove itself " profitable unto 
all things." 

Wisconsin is a noble State. Its area measures 60,000 square 
miles, and not less than 17,000,000 of acres are now under assess- 
ment ; its real estate, under taxation, is valued at $122,000,000, 
and its personal property at $30,000,000 ; the grain harvests of 
1863 measured 60,000,000 bushels, and the lumber from its pine- 
ries, 900,000,000 feei ; its mineral resources, of iron, lead, and cop- 
per, are exhaustless ; its water-power is immense, beyond all possi- 
bility of present use ; one thousand miles of railroad are already 
built within its borders. The population of the State is now es- 
timated at 800,000 ; its children and youth, between the ages of 
four and twenty, at 321,000 — of whom over 215,000 were, last 
year, members of common schools ; the school fund on interest 
amounts to $2,675,000 ; its school houses number 4,168 ; their cost 
was $1,327,000, and the wages paid to teachers, in 1863, were 
$334,400. The State contains twenty academies and colleges, and 
owns 250,000 acres of land, appropriated to the support of a School of 
Agriculture. The leading elements of its population are most largely 
drawn from New York and New England ; but great numbers of 
Europeans, especially of Germans, have also found a home within 
its borders. The task of bringing the Gospel to bear upon so great 
a multitude of souls — all of them our neighbors and most of them 
our kindred— ia one that maj well stir enthusiasm. 



64 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

IOWA. 

Rev. Jesse Guernsey, Dubuque, Agent for Northern Iowa; Rev. Julius A. Reed, 
Davenport, Agent for Southern Iowa. 

The aid of this Society has been afforded, the past year, in the 
support of seventy nine ministers in this State, who have supplied 
more than one hundred and fifty congregations with the stated 
ministrations of the Gospel. The amount contributed to the cause 
of Home Missions from Iowa, during the year, is $1,246.97. 

In Northern Iowa the number of missionaries has been forty 
three, and the amount of ministerial labor performed by them has 
been equal to thirty six years. One church has been Organized ; 
one has become self-sustaining; three have completed, ana six are 
now erecting houses of worship ; and several others have made 
liberal expenditures for the improvement of their church edifices, 
or the removal of debts incurred in their erection. A considerable 
advance has also been made in the amount raised for the support 
of the ministry. If, in connection with these facts, we take into 
view the large contributions of men and money made by these 
feeble congregations to sustain the army of the Union, we must 
regard the past year as one of unusual prosperity in respect to the 
material interests of the churches. It has not been characterized 
by general or powerful revivals of religion, though five or six 
churches have been graciously visited with the quickening influ- 
ences of the Spirit, and one has more than doubled its member- 
ship. 

u The coming year," says the Agent, "promises to do much for 
the development of Northern Iowa. The railroads that are in pro- 
cess of construction across the State will be pushed rapidly for- 
ward. On all these roads little villages are already found, and 
others will soon spring up, in which, at an early day, missionaries 
should be located Moreover, the newer and more vacant portions 
of my field, in which are located nearly all the lands in the State 
now belonging to the Government, are now attracting, in consider- 
able numbers, that class of immigrants whose circumstances make 
it desirable for them to take advantage of the provisions of the 
Homestead Act. At the close of the war these regions will be 
sought by large numbers of returned soldiers and immigrants 
from foreign lands. If these new fields could be made to appear, 
in the eyes of young men about entering the ministry, as they are, 
in their relations to the great future — with all the possibilities of 
far reaching influence which they present, with all the possibilities 
of glorious harvests gathered for God and humanity which they 
involve — they would seem more inviting and inspiring, a thousand 
fold, than the stereotyped parishes of the older States." 

In Southern Iowa, the number of laborers in commission the 

past year is thirty six, ministering statedly to seventy five congre- 

gatiom. The labors of these missionaries have not been in vain. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 65 

Revivals of much power have been enjoyed by several churches, 
and others have been materially strengthened and confirmed. One 
has installed its minister as pastor, and has resolved to dispense 
with missionary aid ; two have completed houses of worship, and 
twentjr five have made an advance of twenty per cent in their 
subscriptions for the support of their ministers. One church has 
been organized in a new and promising field. Several missionary 
stations that had been abandoned, for want of laborers, have been 
reoccupied, within the year, though as many others, from various 
causes, have become vacant Indeed, the destitutions of this por- 
tion of the State are probably greater than at any former time. 
The Agent states that nineteen coiftities are entirelv unoccupied by 
the denomination for which this Society acts. All out four of these 
counties have, each, from 1,000 to 10,000 inhabitants. Their ag- 
gregate population is not less than 100,000, and they embrace some 
of the best portions of the State. Of the thirty counties occupied 
by this denomination, and containing, each, an average of 11,000 
inhabitants, about one half enjoy the services of only a single min- 
ister, and in some cases enjoy those services only once or twice a 
month. The multitude in Southern Iowa, for whom adequate 
spiritual provision is not made, is increasing from year to year. 
Two lines of railwaj are steadily advancing westward, which will 
soon unite the Mississippi to the Missouri, and ere long will unite 
the latter to the Atlantic and Pacific seaboard, opening a western, 
as well as an eastern, market to the teeming prairies of this impe- 
rial State. To us God has given no small measure of responsi- 
bility for the decision of the question whether this broad domain 
shall become and remain a moral waste, or rejoice and blossom as 
the rose. 

MDTlfESOTA. 

Rev. Richard Hall, St Paul, Agent 

Thirty eight missionaries have labored in this State during the 
year, ministering to forty seven churches and at eighteen out sta- 
tions. The contributions to the Society from the State have amount- 
ed to $821.50. 

Seven laborers have entered the field since the last Eeport, and 
three have removed to other States. Seventeen of the churches 
aided by this Society have secured houses of worship, three of 
which b!ave been completed within the past year. Four churches 
have been organized; one has become independent; two have 
settled their ministers as pastors; three missionaries have been or- 
dained to the work of the ministry ; two congregations have been 
favored with powerful revivals of religion, and several others have 
been refreshed in different degrees with the visits of the Spirit 

To the long catalogue of remarkable reverses which the mis- 
sionary work, in common with all other interests, has expe- 
rienced in this State once 1849, we have now to add a drought 
6 



66 THIRTY EIGHTH BEPORT. [May? 

of great severity. In consequence of this visitation, the last 
years crop was only about two thirds the usual average; the 
navigation of the Upper Mississippi, by all classes of steamers, 
was rendered difficult, and by those of the larger class im- 
possible; while the lumber trade, one of the most important 
branches of industry in the State, was completely paralyzed. The 
Indian raid, which depopulated the western counties in 1862, was 
repeated, though on a much smaller scale, in the summer of 1863. 
Oi course new churches could not be formed, nor old ones re- 
gathered in those counties. Nevertheless, there has been decided 
progress, both in the churches and in the material development of 
the State, during the past year. The Governor says in his recent 
message: "Though more than one fifteenth of our population, by 
the census of 1860, has been sent to reenforce the armies of the 
republic, and several counties have been depopulated by the Indian 
raid, there is good reason to believe that the number thus tempora- 
rily withdrawn from the State has been more than made up by 
immigration and natural increase ; and that our population, which 
in 1860 numbered 172,022, is now not less than 225,000." The 
construction of railroads has commenced in Minnesota, creating 
new centers of influence, where the institutions of the Gospel 
should be early planted. Six important churches and several 
fields where churches have not yet been gathered are now await- 
ing laborers, whom the Committee will endeavor to furnish at an 
early day. 

KANSAS. 
Rev. Lewis Bodwell, Topeka, Agent 

Two additions have been made to the missionary force in this 
State since the last Report, making the whole number of laborers 
fifteen. They have ministered statedly to twenty nine congrega- 
tions, two of which are composed of freedmen. One congregation 
has assumed the entire support of its minister, and another, having 
completed its house of worship, after seven years of labor, is ex- 

?ected, after the present year, to make no further drafts upon the 
'reasury of this Society. Three of the missionary churches have 
been blessed during the year with the reviving influences of the 
Holy Spirit. The contributions from Kansas to the funds of the 
Society, since the last Report, have been $222.85. 

This State has received scarcely any accession to its permanent 
population during the year, while the drain occasioned by the 
war, though it was previously greater, in proportion to the num- 
ber of inhabitants, than in any other State, nas continued until 
thousands of acres, once fenced and cultivated, have, for want of 
laborers, been left untilled, to be harvested by prairie fires. Never- 
theless, the demand for missionary labor is still far beyond the 
supply. "At least nineteen counties," says the Agent, "each 
peopled by from 500 to 5,400 of our brethren and kinsmen ac- 
cording to the flesh, are almost wholly destitute of the minis- 
trationa of a pious and intelligently taught Gospel. To push 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 67 

forward the work which, we thankfully believe, has not gone 
backward, even amid the heavy sorrows, the daily and nightly 
terrors of the past year ; to rebuke and smite political corruption ; 
to aid in building up the common school ; to point and help the 
freedman to his rights ; to fix a great State upon foundations which 
alone are truly safe ; to build her walls and pave her streets with 
the 'jasper* and the 'gold 7 of God's own truth, we need strong, 
brave, earnest men, who have the will and the ability to ' make 
places ' for themselves wherever men are living, sinning, and dying 
without Jesus and the Word." 

HEBBASKA. 

Owing to the scarcity of laborers, the operations of the Society 
in this Territory have not been extended as its necessities demand- 
ed and as the Committee desired. Only five missionaries have been 
under commission the past year, two of whom have commenced 
their labors, within a few months, at points of much importance 
and promise. The contributions to the Society's Treasury for this 
Territory, during the year, were $59.25. 

Of the stream of immigration that entered Nebraska during the 
last summer, the largest portion passed through it to the gold 
fields of Colorado, Nevada, and Iaaho. Many families, however, 
remained, and have bee» added to a population previously suffi- 
cient to claim the attention of this Society. In the " South Platte 
District," lying on the southern side of the Platte River, are 
four counties, containing each a population of from 2,500 to 
5,000, for which two laborers will be needed in the course of the 
present year. In the "North Platte District" are nine counties, 
Dordering on the Missouri River, and five counties stretching 175 
miles along the valley of the Platte, the great thoroughfare of 
emigration to the gold mines in the mountains, in which are many 
thousands of souls yet unreached by gospel ministrations. 

A new element of prosperity, furnishing a fresh argument for 
missionary activity, is now entering this region. The branch of 
the Pacific Railway which was to start from the Missouri River, 
opposite Iowa, will run the entire length of Nebraska, uniting 
with the main branch at the one hundredth line of longitude. 
Its initial point is fixed at Omaha, and its route through the fertile 
valley of the Platte. This great work, which is already begun, 
will stimulate emigration, attract capital and enterprise, furnish 
a market for agricultural products, and constitute a new highway 
on which the chariot of salvation should speed its glorious course 
toward the setting sun. 

COLORADO. 

In the last Report the Committee referred to the rapid settle- 
ment of this new Territory, and stated their purpose to occupy it 
without delay. One missionary, Rev. William Crawford, was 
appointed in April, and proceeded to the field early in the sum? 
men He met a hearty welcome, and commenced labor under eu- 



hi 



68 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

couraging auspices at Central City. A church was organized 
there, consisting of twenty one members, and the labors of the 
missionary have been extended to several other points in that 
neighborhood. He has also made several exploring tours in the 
mountains, to ascertain the spiritual condition and' needs of the 
opulation, and much valuable information, communicated by him, 
as been given to the public through the Home Missionary. 
The representations nitherto made respecting the mineral wealth 
of this Territory have been fully justified by recent explorations. 
Its mines of gold are of great extent and richness. Labor and 
capital are increasing; extensive deposits are frequently coming 
to light; villages are springing up, and pressing calls are made 
for religious teachers. " It is plain," says a correspondent, " that 
a country possessing such resources, lyingj upon the most feasible 
route, by rail, across the continent, and within two weeks, by rail- 
road and stage, of New York, producing already more than 
$12,000,000 in a single year, having been settled but four years — 
in which time a whole system of mining had to be discovered and 
applied — such a country, I say, must soon become the seat of a 
large population, and a source of abounding wealth. Why should 
not Christians who are able to make it a matter of duty, see that 
as large a share as possible of this wealth is made to contribute to 
the advancement of Christ's kingdom ?" 

The Committee fully sympathize with*fche spirit of these repre- 
sentations and appeals, and regret their inability to respond 
to them at an earlier period. One missionary has been com- 
missioned for this field, since the close of the financial year covered 
by this Beport, and they hope soon to send forth other laborers 
who shall aid in gathering among these sterile mountains a better 
than golden harvest. 

IDAHO. 

Idaho was constituted a Territory of the United States by an 
act of the last Congress, and already appeals to the benevolence of 
the churches sustaining this Institution. This new Territory is 
situated on both sides of the Rocky Mountains, extending from the 
eastern boundary of Oregon and Washington to the twenty seventh 
line of longitude, and from the forty first to the forty ninth parallel 
of latitude. It covers an area of about 333,200 square miles. Its 
mines of gold are reported to equal in richness those of any other sec- 
tion of our western border. There was a large emigration thither 
during the last summer, and three or four villages are already de- 
scribed as of sufficient size and promise to claim the attention of 
this Society. It is not known to the Committee that any steps 
have been taken to erect there the gospel standard. A correspond- 
ent of a secular journal says : " The thing most needed here now 
seems to me to be a minister of Hie Gospel, for I do not think there 
is one in the country. There are no religious meetings of any 
sort ; and the Sabbath, of course, is the grand day for amusement, 
trade, and every kind of business." The Executive Committee 
have already taken measures to secure the thorough exploration of 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 69 

the Territory, and hope, in course of the year, to be able to send 
thither such permanent laborers as its necessities may seem to 
require. 

CAUFOBNIAtAHD OBEGON. 

The Committee have not been able to add to the missionary 
force in these States, as they contemplated a year ago. The urgent 
demand for additional laborers, which was referred to in the 
last Report, and which has since been repeatedly presented in the 
periodical of the Society, continues unsupplied. Eight laborers only 
nave been in commission in California, and tfiree in Oregon ; and 
$301.01 from the former State, and $94 from the latter, have been 
contributed to the funds of the Society. One church edifice in each 
State has been erected, and nearly all the churches aided are ad- 
vancing toward a condition of independence. 

In California the aspects ofthe missionary work are full of inter- 
est and promise ; and our fellow laborers there are importunate for 
reinforcements. A recent communication says : " In our State, 
now more prosperous than ever, undisturbed by war, the gold pro- 
ducing region for the whole world, the steady place of anchorage, 
in these times of gigantic revolutions — a country facing the greatest 
ocean of the globe and the most populous nations, are wanted 
men of God, to take the strongholds in his name, and hold them 
for his kingdom. We have now but about twenty men to do this 
great work, in the interest of the American Home Missionary So- 
ciety. The hearts of God's people ought to be filled with the 
importance of this great duty — to possess this land, our native 
land, that it may be a glory to God and a * light to the Gentiles,' 
that the kingdom of our Ix>rd may be crowded against the conti- 
nent of heathenism. Let the young men of the Seminaries know 
of our want, and for the love of God and men start forth from 
home to lay foundations on which coming generations shall build 
through all time." 

The Committee are happy to report that they now have the pros- 
pect of being able to supply, in part at least, this urgent demand. 
Four additional laborers are already under appointment, and meas- 
ures have been taken which, we hope, will soon enable us to 
strengthen still further the weakened garrison on this remote 
frontier. 

The causes which have hitherto retarded the growth of Oregon, 
and hindered the establishment of religious institutions, are still in 
force. Almost every year has witnessed the discovery, within or 
near its borders, oi new deposits of mineral wealth, which have 
diverted from it the currents of immigration, and withdrawn from it 
large numbers of its settled inhabitants. During the past year, the 
set of this tumultuous tide has been toward the gold fields of 
Idaho ; and some of the churches of Oregon have been greatly 
weakened by this movement. The ultimate effect, however, o? l\\s 
opening of these rich mines mast be to furnish a market lot 



70 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

the products of the soil, and thus to promote the permanent pros- 
perity of the agricultural districts of the State. It is important, 
therefore, that, amid present difficulties and discouragements, we 
hold the ground we nave already occupied, and stand ready to 
enter the doors of usefulness which Providence will surely open 
before us in the approaching prosperous future of this magnificent 
State. 

CONCLUSION. 

Amid the congratulations of this hour, over the harvests already 
gathered, we are called to lift up our eyes and behold the widening 
and whitening fields that still await our toil. Every year adds to 
the vastness of the work remaining to be done. Though every 
loyal State has been drained of its best strength to sustain the 
armies of the Republic ; though the whole nation has been bowed 
beneath the burdens of an exhausting war ; yet the peaceful army 
of emigration has steadily pursued iff march upon the retreating 
wilderness, pushing its conquests across river and forest and prairie, 
lining the shores of Lake Superior with its northern outposts, and 
erecting its standards amid the fastnesses of the Sierra Nevada and 
on the crests of the Rocky Mountains. The recent Congressional 
enactment, giving a free homestead to every settler on the pub- 
lic domain is attracting multitudes to the Mississippi valley, to 
take possession of this noble dowry ; while the act for the construc- 
tion of a railway to the Pacific coast, and the recent discovery of 
exhaustless mines of gold in the slopes of the Rocky Mountains, 
are swelling the tide of emigration to the Territories of the remoter 
West. Meanwhile, too, our armies are advancing, slowly but 
surely, we trust, to the subjugation of the Great Rebellion ; and 
soon the States that have been swept and scathed by its infernal 
fires, will need our help in rearing again their prostrate altars, and 
in giving the oracles and ministry of the Word, for the first time, to 
four millions of disenthralled and enfranchised negroes. Never 
before have we been so oppressed with the magnitude and urgency 
of the work before us. Let us see to it that the victories of truth and 
right keep pace with our industrial and military conquests. So may 
we expect that God will crown our country's cause with complete 
success. So shall the blood of our fallen heroes be no useless sacri- 
fice. So shall the purpose of our national chastisement be accom- 
plished. So shall we bind together all sections and all races in 
ties of brotherhood which treason can never again sunder. So shall 
we inherit the promise : "Violence shall no more be heard 
in thy land, wasting nor destruction within thy bor- m 
ders; bcjt thou shalt call thy walls salvation, and thy ' 
gates Praise." 

In behalf of the Executive Committee, 

Milton Badger, 
David B. Coe, 
Daniel P. Noyes, 
Secretaries /or Oorrwpondence. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH BEPOBT. 71 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Receipts during the year ending April 1, 1864. 

From Auxiliaries, Agencies, Congregations, and Individuals, . $123,620 88 
From Legacies, ..... . 71,627 71 

For Home Missionary, exclusive of copies furnished to Auxiliaries 

and Agencies, . . . 289 80 

Total amount of Receipts, . $195,587 89 

Balance from last years account, . 85,429 92 

$280,967 81 



Expenditures during the year ending April 1, 1864. 

Paid on commissions of local Missionaries,* exclusive of payments 

from the Treasuries of Auxiliaries, .... $75,287 12 

Paid by Auxiliariesf within their respective limits. . . 40,820 10 

Salaries and traveling and incidental expenses of Agents and Gen- 
eral Missionaries for New York, Western Ohio, Western Re- 
serve, O., Northern Illinois and Northern Indiana, Central 
and Southern Illinois, Missouri, Michigan, Eastern and West- 
ern Wisconsin, Northern and Southern Iowa, Minnesota and 
Kansas, ........ 18,400 18 

Proportion of General Agency in Massachusetts, as by arrangement 

with that Auxiliary, ...... 1,600 00 

Salaries of Secretaries, Assistant Treasurer, and Clerks, . 10,853 77 

Expenses of the Home Missionary, (15,500,) including copies fur- 
nished to Auxiliaries and Agencies, and sent without charge 
to Life Directors and Members, Missionaries, Contributors, 
and Friends of the Cause ; also paper purchased in advance 
for the coming year, ...... 4,857 61 

Annual Report, (8,000,) ..... 687 85 

* For the amount pledged in support of each missionary, and other particulars, see 
the tabular statement commencing on page 18, column 5. 

f The principal Auxiliaries are those of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut For a summary of their receipts and expendi- 
tures, see the notices of these Societies, as referred to in the Table of Contents ; for the 
amount appropriated in support of each missionary, see the tabular statement com- 
mencing on page 18 ; lor further particulars, reference will be had to the published 
reports of these Socktit* 



72 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Printing Blank Commissions, Circulars, Drafts, Subscription Cards, 

Notices, Ac, ....... 87 44 

Binding Home Missionary, and other Pamphlets, . . 81 25 

Rent, furniture, warming rooms, light, &c, . . . 1,180 46 

Stationery, Books, Maps, &c, ..... 104 92 

Postage and Revenue Stamps, ..... 887 61 

Freight, cartage, boxes, wrapping paper, &c, . . . 245 25 

Anniversary expenses, . . . . . . 86 60 

Traveling expenses of Secretaries and Delegates to Anniversary 

and Public Meetings, . . . . . 164 86 

Legal counsel, and expenses of collecting legacies, . . 89 73 

Discounts and loss en uncurrent and counterfeit money, . 91 38 



Total amount of expenditures, 
Balance to new account, . 



. $149,825 58 
81,642 23 

$230,967 81 



This is to certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer of the 
American Home Missionary Society to April 1, 1864, and find the same correct 
and properly vouched ; and that there was in his hands a balance of eighty one 
thousand six hundred and forty two dollars and twenty three cents. 



New-York, May 11, 1864. 



GEORGE S. COE, Auditor. 



1864.] 



THIBTT EIGHTH REPORT. 



73 



APPENDIX. 



Haines of Missionaries in each State and Territory. 

For their stations and other particulars, see the alphabetical list in the General Table. 



Adams, T. 
Bacheller, G. 
Baker, S. 
Bates, A. J. 
Bean, E. 
Boardman, J. 
Braston, E. T. 
Burnham, J. 
Carpenter, E. G. 
Chapman, C. 
Coan, A. S. 
Cressey, G. W. 
Deering, J. K. 
Dinsmore, J. 
Dodge, B. 
Dow, W. W. 
Eaton, J. 
Elliott, J. 
Ellis, T. L. 
Emerson, C. H. 
Emerson, R. 
' Fairer, H. 
Fobes, W. A. 
Forbush, J. 
Garland, B. 
Gould, N. 
Gould, a L. 
Griswold, J. B. 
Guild, C. 
Hackett, S. 
Haskell, W. H. 
Hathaway, G. W. 
Hibbard, D. S. 
Higgins, S. C. 
Jordan, W. V. 
Kyte, J. 
Lawrence, J. 
Leavitt, W. 
Loring, H. S. 
Loring, J. 
Merrill, T. A. 
Merrill, W. A. 
Mitchell, T. G. 
Moore, J. P. 
Nichols, C. N. 



Norcross, F. V. 
Norwood, F. 
Parsons, J. 
Partridge, S. H. 
Peirce, J. W. 
Perry, J. A. 
Pierce, J. W. 
Pike, P. B. 
Plumer, A. R. 
Piatt, J. L. 
Ranney, T. E. 
Richardson, G. B. 
Richardson, H. 
Richardson, M. L. 
Roberts, G. L. 
Robie, T. S. 
Russell, R. C. 
Sanborn, B. F. 
Sewall, D. 
Sewall, W. S. 
Sleeper, W. T. 
Smith, E. 
Smith, T. B. 
Smith, J. 
Southworth, F. 
Tarrer, P. B. 
Thurston, D. 
Titcomb, S. 
Tyler, A. H. 
Wells, J. 
Wilcox, P. V. 
Willey, B. G. 
Wiswall, L. 
Wright, J. E. N. 

Vow Hampshire. 

Abbot, E. F. 
Adams, D. 
Armes. J. L. 
Arnold, J. R. 
Bissell, 0. 
Bowker, S. D. 
Burnham, C. 
Caswell, E. H. 
Chapmaa, E. 
Oaggett>W. 



Conant, L. 
Eldridge, E. D. 
Fiske, A. W. 
Gerould, M. 
Goodnough, E. G. 
Griswold, J. F. 
Healey, F. 
Holman, M. 
Hood, J. 
Kimball, R. 
Le Bosquet J. 
Leffingwell, N. 
Little, L. 
McClenning, B. 
Richards, A. 
Shattuck, A. F. 
Stearns, J. H. 
Stinson, G. W. 
Tewksbury, G. F. 
Thompson, G. W. 
Thornton, J. D. 
Tufts, J. B. 
Wood, H. 
Wood, J. 

Vermont. 

Anderson, A. 
Bacon, W. N. 
Bailey, J. G. 
Baker, H. A 
Bartlett, L. 
Bates, S. L. 
Bayne, T. 
Birge, E. C. 
Blake, L. S. 
Clark, C. W. 
Coburn, L. S. 
Doming, A. P. 
Duren, C. 
Ford, J. T. 
Francis, D. B. 
Gardner, S. S. 
Gleason, J. L. 
G lines, J. 
Hall, R. V. 
Hartehora, V. J. 



Herrick, H. 
Holliday, W. A. 
Houghton, J. C. 
Johnston, T. H. 
Kemp, C. H. 
Kingsbury, W. H. 
Ladd, A. 
Loring, L. 
Martin, M. M. 
Perkins, S. K. B. 
Phillips, G. W. 
Pollock, G. C. 
Rockwood, G. A. 
Rustedt, H. F. 
Sanderson, H. H. 
Scott, C. 
Smith, A. 
Smith, G. 
Sparhawk, F. 
Spaulding, W. S. 
Squier, E. H. 
Steele, J. J. 
Stone, E. P. 
Stone, J. F. 
Stone, J. P. 
Stone, L. H. 
Thompson, E. C. 
Tolman, G. B. 
Underwood, J. 
Watts, L. 
Wild, A. W. 
Williams, H. R. 
Williams, S. 
Winch, C. B. 
Wyllie, J. S. 



Ballard, J. 
Bancroft, D. 
Bean, D. M. 
Bechthold, A. H. 
Black, W. R. 
Blake, G. S. 
Blanchard, E. H. 
Boardman, M. B. 
Brown, 0. 



74 

Burnham, A. 
Carleton, H. 
Chase, H. L. 
Clapp, A. J. 
Clark, S. 
Clayes, B. 
Cole, S. 
Cushing, J. R. 
Deering, J. K. 
Dodge, J. H. 
Dowden, W. H. 
Dunham, I. 
Dutton, A. I. 
Dyer, E. P. 
Eastman, D. 
Foster, A. B. 
Greene, S. H. 
Grotrian, A. 
Hall, 0. 

Harrington, E. W. 
Harrison, S. 
Howard, H. S. 
Jones, T. N. 
Labaree, J. C. 
Lasalle, N. 
Leonard, W. 
Longley, G. 
Marden, G. N. 
Merrill, S. 
Merrill, T. A. 
Miller, W. 
Morgridge, C. 
Morong, P. 
Norton, T. S. 
Parker, H/ 
Perkins, G. G. 
Richardson, N. 
Rogan, D. H. 
Schwarz, L. B. 
Sessions, A. J. 
Smith, J. D. 
Stinson, G. W. 
Stone, C. 
Strong, E. E. 
Sturtevant, W. H. 
Swallow, J. E. 
Tenney, E. P. 
Walker, J. B. R. 
Whitcomb, W. C. 
Whitmore, Z. 

Bhode Island. 

Aldrich, J. K. 
Cook, T. 
Dow, J. M. H. 
Fobes, W. A. 
Otis, 0. F. 
Root, J. P. 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



Connecticut. 

Arms, W. F. 
Atwater, W. W. 
Ayer, C. L, 
Beals, D. 
Beutel, C. G. 
Bissell, C. H. 
Brooks, E. F. 
Burr, E. F. 
Chamberlain, C. 
Chapman, F. W. 
Cross, L 
Curtis, S. J. 
Drennan, M. J. 
Dutton, T. 
Easton, T. 
Eaton, J. 
Edgar, J. 
Elliott, J. E. 
Fellowes, S. H. 
Freeman, A. N. 
Frost, D. D. 
Gates, H. N. 
Goddard, C. G. 
Harrison, J. 
Holley, P. T. 
Hopkmson, B. B. 
Hopley, S. 
Hough, L. S. 
Howe, S. 
Hyde, H. F. 
Jewett, S. B. 
Jones, C. M. 
Jones, H. W. 
Jones, W. G. 
Kinney, E. D. 
Klauss, F. A. 
Knight, M. 
Mallory, W. W. 
Miller, A. 
Mills, J. L. 
Miner, N. 
Phelps, W. H. 
Rice, W. H. 
Robertson, J. 
Rogers, S. 
Rood, L. 
Schroeder, A. 
Sessions, J. W. 
Smith, H. B. 
Timlow, G. W. 
Vail, H. M. 
Wells, N. H. 
Wheeler, J. E. 



Hew York, 
Armstrong, R. S. 



Barrows, G. W. 
Barstow, C. 
Beckwith, J. H. 
Bourne, S. 
Bronson, A. 
Carter, J. E. 
Chapman, E. D. 
Coles, S. 
Dewey, W. 
Dilley, A. B. 
Dodd, J. 
Downes, A. 
Entler, G. R. 
Fisher, J. B. 
Frankfurth, H. 
Gibbs, J. 
Hale, E. 
Hall, E. N. 
Hall, W. Jr. 
Hardy, G. 
Henry, W. D. 
Jewell, J. 
Judson, G. C. 
Ketchum, 0. 
Kyte, F. 
Le Vere, G. W. 
Miles, H. 
Montague, P. 
Newcomb, L. 
Norton, W. W. 
Porter, S. 
Redfield, C. 
Richardson, J. C 
Rowland, S. 
Stevens, C. C. 
Stratton, R. B. 
Watson, T. 
Woodhull, J. A. 
Young, S. 
Youngs, C. 

Pennsylvania. 

Chamberlain, U. 
Frankfurth, H. 
Lyon, J. H. 

Ohio. 

Atwater, H. 0. 
Baker, E. H. 
Bartlett, F. 
Brinkerhoff; W. 
Brown, A. H. 
Brown, S. 
Condh\ W. C. 
Crane, I. C. 
Dana, G. 
Davies, J. A. 



. [May, 

Davis, E. S. 
Diggs, M. W. 
Fay, L. L. 
Fenn, B. 
Fraser, J. M. 
Fry, G. V. 
Hart, J. C. 
Holway, J. 
Hovenden, R. 
Jenkins, J. D. 
Jones, A. F. 
Jones, D. I. 
Jones, E. B. 
Jones, H. 
Kelso, S. 
Kingsley, J. C. 
Lawrence, H. 
Montgomery, S. 
Patton, J. L 
Root, E. W. 
Stiles, E. R. 
Terry, P. 
Thomas, W. 
Tucker, E. R. 
Whitmore, A. A. 

Indiana. 

Jenkins, J. L. 
Jones, J. H. 
Tucker, E. 
Wason, H. 
Wilson, L. 

Illinoii. 

Adams, C. C. 

Amsden, B. M. 

Armstrong, F. A. 

Atkinson, W. B. 

Avery, E. H. 

Baker, J. D. 
« Barnes, C. M. 
^Bartlett, E. N. 

Barton, C. B. 

Beecher, F. W. 

Benedict, L. 

Blakeman, P. 

Brewer, J. 

Brown, R. 

Buss, H. 

Cadwell, C. C. 
H.Cass, J. W. 

Champlin, S. W. 

Chapman, J. 

Church, B. C. 

Church, L. 

Clark, N. C. 

Coltrin, N. P. 



1864] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



75 



Conrad, C. E. 
Conville, C. L. 
Cooley, 0. W. 
Dada, E. P. 
Dickerson, H. A. 
Dickerson, 0. C. 
Dickinson, C. E. 
Dilley, S. 
Dixon, J. J. A. T. 
Dole, S. R. 
Drake, A. J. 
Dunn, R. C. 
Eaton, 0. H. 
Eells, D. D. 
Emerson, O. Jr. 
Fuller, F. L. 
Gore, D. 
Hancock, G. 
Harper, A. 
Harrison, 0. S. 
Haivey, C. A. 
Hawkins, B. F. 
Hildreth, E. 
Hodges, J. % 
Holmes, T. H. 
Hubbard, G. B. 
Johnson, J. A. 
Jones, B. J. 
Jones, L. 
Kellogg, S. H. 
Kilbourn, J. 
Lane, L. B. 
Law son, F. 
Lewis, E. N. 
Lorriaux, T. 
Loughead, J. 
Lyman, A. 
McCord, R. L. 
Miles, M. N. 
Morris, E. 
Morse, A. 
Nichols, W. A. 
Parker, J. D. 
Penfield, S. 
Pennoyer, A. L. 
Peterson, W. S. 
Piatt, H. D. 
Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. L. 
Roberts, G. L. 
Roberts, J. G. 
Schlosser, G. 
Selden, C. 
Smith, M. H. 
Smith, S. S. Jr. 
Snow, R. R. 
Stoddart, J. P. 
Tade, E. O. 
Thrall, S. R. 
Wainwright, G. W 
Watson, 0. L. 



Westervelt, W. A. 
Wheeler, F. 
White, J. W. 
Williams, G. W. 
Winter, A. 
Worrell, B. F. 
Wright, S. G. 
Wright, W. B. 
Wyckofl^ J. D. 

XiaMuri. 

Bliss, T. E. 
Frowein, A. 
Harlow, E. A. 



Michigan. 

Apthorp, R. 
Ballard, J. 
Berney, D. 
Bisbee, C. G. 
Bliss, T. E. 
Bonney, J. R. 
Branch, E. T. 
Breed, S. D. 
Bross, H. 
Campbell, D. B. 
Campbell, W. 
Comstock, D. W. 
Crumb, J. H. 
Danforth, C. 
Denton, J. 
Esler, W. P. 
Evarts, N. K. 
Fox, G. C. 
Glidden, N. D. 
Gridley, J. J. 
Hall, W. 
Hatch, R. 
Hitchen, G. 
Hurd, F. 
Jones, L. H. 
Jones, T. W. 
Kedzie, A. S. 
Kidder, J. W. 
Kidder, J. S. 
Lucas, H. 
McCarthy, R. G. 
McKay, J. A. 
McLain, J. M 
Miles, G. H. 
Millard, J. D. 
Myers, J. C. 
Norton, S. 
Osborn, C. 
Pattinson, W. 
Phillips, S. 
Matt, W. 
. Porter, M. M. 



Robson, W. W. 
Rose, W. F. 
Russell, W. P. 
St Clair, A. 
Scotford, J. 
Sessions, S. 
Shaw, E. W. 
Spooner, C. 
Stevenson, J. R. 
Strong, G. C. 
Temple, C. 
Thomas, 0. A. 
Thompson, G. 
Van Frank, P. R. 
Vetter, J. 
Walker, G. W. 
Warren, L. 
Wilhelm, J. H. 
Williams, W. B. 
Wirt, D. 

WiiooniixL 

Allen, A. S. 
Avery, H. 
Ball, J. N. 
Baxter, B. S. 
Benson, H. H. 
Bridgman, L. 
Brown, E. 
Cadwell, C. C. 
Campbell, D. A. 
Canfield, P. 
Carpenter, H. W. 
Catlin, W. E. 
Chapin, H. M. 
Clark, H. S. 
Cobb, H. W. 
Conly, J. 
Curtiss, D. 0. 
Davies, J. 
Davies, D. S. 
Dickinson, D. S. 
Dixon, A. M. 
Donaldson, J. W. 
Dwinell, S. A. 
Everdell, R. 
Griffiths, G. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J. Q. 
Harris, J. W. 
Hassell, R. 
Hayes, J. M. 
Healey, J. W. 
Hurlbut, T. B. 
lams, F. M 
Jones, D. 
Lathrop, A. 0. 
Laughlin, A. D. 
Mayne, N. 
Melvin, C. T. 



Miller, J. W. 
Miner, H. A. 
Morehouse, 0. M. 
Parker, A. 
Parker, L. 
Parmelee, H. M. 
Perkins, J. W. 
Pettibone, P. C. 
Radcliff, L. L. 
Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. P. 
Sabin, L P. 
Sawyer, L. J. 
Schroeck, F. 
Seward, E. D. 
Sewell, R. 
Sherrill, F. G. 
Sherwin, J. C. 
Smith, G. M. 
Smith, 0. M. 
Soule, J. B. L. 
Southworth, T. D. 
Spaulding, B. A. 
Stoddart, W. 
Strong, J. W. 
Thorpe, W. W. 
Todd, J. D. 
Tucker, G. L. 
Wadsworth, T. A. 
Watts, J. 
Wells, J. A. 
Williams, R. 
Young, A. A. 

Iowa. 

Adams, E. 
Adams, H. 
Adams, W. A. 
Allen, W. W. 
Allert, F. 
Apthorp, W. P. 
Avery, W. P. 
Baldwin, A. V. 
Beecher, G. H. 
Bent, G. 
Benton, S. A. 
Blake, G. H. 
Boardman, H. E. 
Bullen, H. L. 
Cady, C. S. 
Canfield, T. H. 
Clark, E. 
Coleman, W. L. 
Cross, M. K. 
Davis, L S. 
Drake, A. J. 
Emerson, 0. Jr. 
Evans, E. J. 
Fifield, L. B. 
French, 0. 



76 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Gates, 0. H. 
Gilbert, J. B. 
Graves, A. 
Griffiths, E. 
Grout, S. N. 
Harlow, L. 
Harper, A. 
Hayes, G. 
Hemenway, S. 
HeudeBourck,W. 
Hill, J. J. 
Hitchcock, A. B. 
Hitchcock, G. B. 
House, A. V. 
Humphrey, C. 0. 
Hunter, R 
Hurlbut, J. 
Jones, T. 
Judiesch, F. W. 
Keith, W. A. 
Kennedy, J. R. 
Kimball, E. P. 
King, H. D. 
Knowles, D. 
La Dow, S. P. 
Lane, D. 
Langpaap, H. 
Littlefield, 0. 
Loring, A. T. 
Manson, A. 
Matthews, L. P. 
Merrill, 0. W. 
Mitchell, A. R. 
Nutting, I. H. 
Nutting, J. K. 
Osborn, W. H. 



Pickett, J. W. 
Porter, G. M. 
Roberts, B. 
Russell, I. 
Sands, J. D. 
Savage, D. F. 
Skinner, T. N. 
Smith, E. P. 
Smith, W. J. 
H.Stuart, R. 
Taylor, C. 
Tingley, M. 
Upton, J. R. 
Van Antwerp, J. 
Veitz, C. F. 
Wilkinson, R. 
Windsor, J. H. 
Windsor, J. W. 
Windsor, W. 
Woodward, G. H. 
Wright, A. 

Minnesota. 

Barnes, J. R. 
Beekman, J. 0. 
Bent, G. 
• Bigelow, W. 
Biscoe, G. S. 
Blumer, A. 
Burt, D. 
Clark, G. K. 
Clark, W. S. 
Dada, W. B. 
Fox, A. K. 
Gilbert, L. C. 



GUI, W. 
Griggs, L. S. 
Hall, C. 
Hall, S. 

Haselton, W. A. 
Haviland, B. F. 
Joth, J. F. 
Newton, E. 
Packard, A. EL 
Porteus, W. 
Putnam, S. 
Bounce, J. S. 
Seccombe, C. 
Shedd, C. 
Sheldon, C. B. 
Snell, W. W. 
Sterry, D. W. C. 
Stevens, W. R. 
Strong, J. C. 
Tappan, C. L. 
Teele, E. 
Thomas, 0. A. 
Willard, H. 
Williams, J. N. 
Woodruff; L. N. 



Beckwith, G. A. 
Copeland, J. 
Cordley, R. 
Ellex, D. 
Guild, C. 
Hooker, A. M. 
Liggett, J. D. 
Mc Vicar, P. 



Morse, G. C. 
Payne, R. 
Parker, R. D. 
Rice, G. G. 
Robinson, H. P. 
Starrs, S. D. 

Vebraika. 

Gaylord, R. 
Heaton, I. E. 
Hurlbut, E. B. 
Lewis, E. M. 
Piatt, M. F. 

Colorado. 
Crawford, W. 

California. 

Bartlett, W. 0. 
Chamberlain, J. P. 
Cumming8, H. 
Finney, G. W. 
Jones, W. L. 
Starr, M. B. 
Warren, J. H. 
Zelie, J. S. 

Oregon. 

Atkinson, G. H. 
Condon, T. 
Gray, B. B. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH BEPORT. 77 

RELATIONS OF AUXILIARIES, AGENTS, &C. 



State and other large Auxiliaries 

Most of the State Missionary Societies were in existence before the formation 
of the National Society, and some of them were among the earliest organised 
efforts in our country for sending the Gospel to the destitute. They hare vol- 
untarily connected themselves as Auxiliaries with the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, from a conviction that greater unity of plan and efficiency in action 
would thereby be promoted. 

The terms by which such Auxiliaries — acting on the Principles of the Parent 
Society, undertaking the supply of the destitute within their own bounds, and 
paying over their surplus funds to the Parent Institution — are connected with 
the Parent Society, are such as to secure the following objects, viz : 

First — The Auxiliary is not superseded or overshadowed by the National 
Institution, but, on the contrary, is invigorated and sustained by connection 
with it. 

This is secured by the provision that the Auxiliary is the sole agency for 
this cause that operates on its field. It controls all appointments in the State 
to which it belongs. From it alone, so far as its means will allow, the feeble 
churches receive assistance. Thus a direct relation and strong attachment is 
cherished toward it, in the hearts of the ministers and churches. 

Again — while the local operations of the Auxiliary are thus encouraged and 
sustained, its connection with the Parent Society is such as to awaken an in- 
terest in the destitute beyond its own limits, and afford facilities for reaching 
them. It is not only a society for local purposes, but it is also a branch of the 
National Society, and, as such, has the control of all agencies for the collection 
of funds within its own field, and can direct the manner in which its surplus 
resources shall be expended beyond its own limits. Thus, the State and other 
large Auxiliaries are not merely organizations to help the Parent Society ; they 
are integral parts of it, bound together in one whole by a common interest in 
and free access, through the Parent Society, to the great field to be occupied, 
and governed by the same general principles and rules in carrying on the work. 

Agents. 

" Besides preaching to the destitute and taking up contributions for Home Mis- 
sions, the Agents of the American Home Missionary Society exercise a general 
superintendence of the operations of the Society within their respective fields. 
By correspondence and personal visitation they ascertain the wants of the des- 
titute ; assist them to obtain the preaching of the Gospel ; and instruct and 
encourage them to develop their own means for its support They receive ap- 
plications for aid, and make such preliminary examination as may be necessary 
before submitting them for the action of the Executive Committee ; and in other 
ways labor to insure a judicious and economical application of the Society's 
funds. At present the Society has in its employ no merely collecting Agents, 
nor any whose services are not required for other purposes in the regions where 
they labor. The Secretaries of several of the larger Auxiliaries are also the 
Agents for this cause in their respective bounds. 

Committees of Missions. 

The American Home Missionary Society has ever regarded the ecclesiastical 
bodies as the appropriate judges of the standing of their own ministers, and of 
the wants of the churches in their connection. Accordingly, the commission 
issued to every missionary requires that his credentials be axeptabfo to tta 



78 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

ministerial body of his denomination, within whose bound he is appointed to 
labor. And the various ecclesiastical bodies are invited to appoint each a 
Committee of Minions from its own members, to receive application from its 
churches, and suggest to the Society the action proper in each case. Such a 
committee constitutes the official source to which reference can be had for in- 
formation and advice, in all matters pertaining to missions in the connection to 
which it belongs. This mode of cooperation has been preferred by numerous 
ecclesiastical bodies, from the first formation of the Society. It guaranties to 
the churches, that their respective claims shall be fairly considered, with all 
the advantage of having the indorsement of the body to which they belong. 
The advice of such a Committee, acting in the name and by the direction of the 
ecclesiastical body to which they belong, is regarded as the highest authority in 
matters pertaining to the standing of ministers and churches in their connection, 
and has the same influence with the Society, as would that of the Board of 
Agency appointed by itself 

There is one limitation to this influence, however, which ought to be stated. 
Should any ecclesiastical body so far swerve from the principles of truth and 
gospel order, as not to retain the fellowship and confidence of the great body 
of the churches cooperating in this Society, that fact would cause its recom- 
mendations not to be respected, as a basis of action, by the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

As cases may occur in which the feeble churches may not be aware of the 
existence of any Committee of Missions, through whom to apply for aid, a gen- 
eral provision is made, that application may be vouched by any two ministers 
of known and approved standing, of their own denomination, who can certify 
to the facts of the case. If the information thus given is not sufficient, other 
facts are sought by the Executive Committee, with as little delay as practicable, 
from the most authentic sources from which they can be obtained. 

Such, briefly, are the relations of the American Home Missionary Society to 
the various organs, through which the community seeks to act out its mission- 
ary feeling. It will be seen that this plan secures the united action, in the mis- 
sionary work, of those whose views of doctrine and church order admit of co- 
operation, and whose interests in the great field are essentially the same. This 
combination insures a homogeneous policy as to the manner and amount of ap- 
propriations, and the qualifications of missionaries ; it has discouraged sectional 
feelings, and diffused throughout each part an interest in all the rest ; and thus 
has formed ties between the West and East, along which has passed from the 
latter to the former a silent and invisible current of moral influences more valu- 
able, if possible, than all pecuniary grants. At the same time the connection 
of the Parent Society with the various associations that act with it, is such as 
to secure to them entire freedom in the missionary work, in their respective 
spheres, and an influence beyond them, in cultivating the waste places of our 
common country. 

Applications for Aid. 

Feeble congregations, applying for aid in supporting the Gospel, are requested 
to embody in their application the following particulars, viz. : 

The name of the church or congregation ; the number of communicants, and 
the average number of attendants on public worship ; the denomination and 
size of congregations immediately contiguous, with the distance to their places 
of worship ; the total amount of salary which the applicants propose to make 
up, the portion of that salary which they pledge for the given time, and the 
arrangements that are made for securing it ; whether aid is expected from any 
other source ; and the least amount that will suffice from this Society ; whether 
the minister for whom a commission is desired, is the pastor of the church, or if 
not, whether any arrangements are made or contemplated in the course of the 
year, with reference to nis installment. These statements should be signed by 
the trustees and officers of the church, or by a committee of the congregation, 
and confirmed by the certificates of two or more clergymen acquainted with 
the facts. Also, 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 79 

The name and post office address of the minister whose services they desire 
to secure ; whether he is a resident of the place in which he preaches, and is 
engaged in any other calling than that of the ministry ; his credentials ; and 
the certificate of two or more ministers of known standing, as to his general 
character for piety, zeal, and acceptableness, as a minister of the Gospel 

Where the ecclesiastical body with which a church is connected has a " Com- 
mittee of Missions," to act in their behalf; this Committee are the proper per- 
sons to certify the statements of the church, the standing of the minister, and 
his prospects of usefulness in the place where his service are desired ; and the 
applications should be sent to them for their indorsement and recommendation. 

Applications, after being properly indorsed and recommended, should be ad- 
dressed to the care of the Agent (or Secretary of the Auxiliary) for the region 
where the applicants reside. 

As a general rule, the appropriations of the American Home Missionary 
Society are for twelve months from the date of the application ; at the end 01 
which, if further aid be needed, a new application must be made, containing all 
the particulars above stated, and indorsed and recommended in like manner. 
And each congregation applying for renewed aid, should furnish, in addition 
to other testimonials, the certificate of the missionary, that they have fulfilled 
their previous pledges for his support. 

The address of the Society's Agents and the Secretaries of its Auxiliaries 
will be found on the cover of its Reports, and of the Home Missionary. Where 
no such medium of communication with the Society exists, applications may be 
sent directly to the Society's office in New York. 



ADDRESSES 
At the Thirty Eighth Anniversary. 

Address of Bev. Henry B. Hooker, D.D., of Boston, Mass., 

ON MOVING THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION. 

Resolved : That the Reports now presented be adopted and published under 
the direction of the Executive Committee. 

I regard this occasion as a sort of family gathering of the friends of Home 
Missions. The far off draw nigh to greet and be greeted ; the out-posts con- 
verge to the center ; and we are all in one place, of one accord, to tell what 
has been done, and to stir each other up for the future. 

I come, sir, with the greetings of one of your oldest Auxiliaries, and salute 
you this evening in the name of the old Bay State. We greet this Society as the 
mother of us all, though the Massachusetts daughter was a well-grown and 
well-behaved daughter of seven and twenty before the mother was born. We 
began our Home Missionary life in 1799, and the mother we greet to-night in 
1826. 

We have been cheered to-night with the report of the general transactions of 
the Society. But I have thought it would not be inopportune to this occasion 



80 THIRTY EIGHTH BEPOBT. [May, 

to let this family gathering hear a few particulars about a quite respectable 
member of the household residing in central New-England. Massachusetts 
loves Home Missions ; and if she has borne an important part in this good work 
in the land, she has good reasons to give for her course. 

1. She is herself an example and illustration of the value of such labors of 
love. 

The Puritan fathers landed on our shores with the fire burning in their hearts, 
which gathers us here to-night The old John Robinson of 1620 let the world 
know what sort of motives inspired the Pilgrim fathers. u They were influ- 
enced/' said he, " by a zeal for the propagating and advancing of the Gospel of 
Christ," And no sooner had the primitive Plymouth Church gained strength 
enough to pierce the surrounding wilderness, subdue and populate it, than the 
work of church extension began. The older churches sent out their members 
to colonize and erect new ones. This depletion of the stronger churches was 
sorrowfully alluded to by the chronicler of the Plymouth Church : " Thus," 
said he, u was this true church, like an ancient mother, grown old and forsaken 
of her children in regard to their bodily presence and helpfulness. Thus she, 
that had made many rich, has become poor." Home Missions were pushed 
with such vigor that cases are related of the erection of meeting-houses, 
" where the entire population of the place could sit together on the sills at the 
raising." 

In thirty years from the arrival of the Pilgrims, five churches had expanded 
into more than forty, and were actually supporting fifty five ministers. And 
when the hand of savage violence had made a great desolation in our Zion, 
the civil government of the colony came to the rescue. Legislators became 
nursing fathers to the Church. Not less than fifty applications for help were 
made to the General Court from 1693 to 1711 — eighteen years — and above 
$5,000 were granted. 

At a later period — sixty-five years ago — thirty-nine good men met in a parlor 
in Boston to consult about Home Missionary work, and the $2 per annum then 
paid for membership began the history of the Massachusetts Home Missionary 
Society. For the last thirty years this missionary work has been carried on 
with great vigor ; about two hundred missionary fields have been occupied, and 
two fifths of the Congregational churches of the State have had a missionary 
origin. Many of these are now among the strongest and most liberal in the 
State. We love to go round this portion of our Zion and tell the towers 
thereof. We can not traverse many square miles without finding the most 
precious fruit of missionary labor. With grateful exultation we contemplate 
these blessed results. 

Massachusetts Christians could easily meet all the moral wants of that little 
State, and do it amply ; but there was power to go further. But we have 
learned a great and interesting fact in christian philosophy, that the benevolent 
mind rises in vigor and expands with the greatness and value of the objects 
pressed on its attention. A small object only in view, insures small and narrow 
views and corresponding efforts. An object of vast proportions and looming up 
in grandeur before the mind, lifts it up out of its previous contracted dimen- 
sions and compels its expansion. The fishermen of Galilee were lifted at once 
from their necessary narrowness of mind, as simple fishermen, when there 
opened before them the grand enterprise of becoming fishers of men. The 
power of christian love and the fervor of christian zeal rise with the fairly 
seen greatness and value of a vast and noble enterprise. 

Massachusetts Christians did but little more than supply the wants of their 
own little State, till, through the American Home Missionary Society, the vast 
West lifted up its voice and spread out its claims. Then it was that we looked 
out from the hill-tops of our own Canaan upon the vast realms that spread 
themselves toward the setting sun. Then we began to feel something of the 
inspiration that so glorious a work as Western evangelization was suited to 
give us. 

Those young, thrifty-growing kingdoms 1 Never had the Church of God on 

earth a fairer field, a more noble, more exciting enterprise for works of faith 

sad labor of lore. Our little State began to seem as a single acre to an empire. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 81 

Instead of a territory of one hundred and fifty miles by fifty, we had a whole 
continent for our operations. Christian love expanded with the vision, and ten 
times all former offerings were poured into your treasury. 

We confess, sir, (as all people do not think alike,) to a difference in motives 
of action among us, in regard to the West For there are various kinds of in- 
vestments that we have been making there. 

Prominent among them are those of a pecuniary character. You need not 
be informed that the Massachusetts portion of the sons of the Pilgrims are a 
very compassionate people, and are so sad at the idea that any dollar in their 
possession should have the sorrow of loneliness, that they hasten to give the 
sufferer as many companions as possible. The little one has got to become a 
thousand, if any human skill can bring it to pass. We find silver in the mouths 
of our fishes ; for, from the herring to the whale, we lay our hands on all we 
can reach, sweeping all the seas with our enterprise. And when our sterile 
soil refuses us gold from its surface by the plow, we scrape it off, and turn the 
abundant granite we find there into the precious metals ; while one of the best 
of our harvests is given us by winter, when other harvests are gone by, in the 
ice by which we cool most of the tropical nations of the globe. And the song 
of our spindles is the music of gain all the year round. 

And when men have made money, they are fond of good investments. And 
in the West we have made them. The iron-horse flies over the prairies because 
fifty millions of New-England capital aids in furnishing the track, and this 
mostly from Massachusetts. Fifty millions more are invested in land, manufac- 
tures, and loans ; while twenty five millions more are employed in mining 
operations. 

Now, Sir, the men that are shrewd enough to make the money are shrewd 
enough to see that they had better create a good moral atmosphere in the com- 
munities where they have made investments. They know that bonds and 
stocks and mortgages are all the more valuable for being within the sound of the 
eh are A-going bell. Well do they know that the greater the intelligence and the 
higher the moral principle of the people, the more sure they can be that all 
their obligations will be fulfilled. Well do they know that an enlightened, liv- 
ing, powerful conscience is a better guardian of silver and gold than any system 
of vengeance to the evil-doer that the sagacity of man has ever invented. And 
also, well do they know that such intelligence, such christian principles, and 
such power of conscience is created by and only by the blessed Gospel. 
Wherever it goes in its power, it creates a moral atmosphere which men can 
not breathe without being faithful to all their obligations. 

And I suppose, sir, that there are some among us who, for reasons no higher, 
freely aid us in our great Home Missionary work. Well, sir, we welcome their 
offerings, though the scales have not fallen from their eyes, and they see not 
the spiritual glory of the Gospel 

2. But the great body of our people know Home Missions for a far higher 
reason, and in view of an investment of a higher character than that just 
named. We have social ties that powerfully bind us to the West It is the 
home of vast numbers of the sons and daughters of Massachusetts. Our com- 
paratively sterile field, the fertile soil and vast resources of the West, with the 
irrepressible love of enterprise common to New England men, has depleted 
multitudes of our pleasant homes, and robbed many a fireside of loved ones. 
Our State has 19,000 of her children in Illinois; 16,000 in Ohio; 12,000 in 
Wisconsin; 9000 in Michigan; 5000 in Iowa; 4000 in Indiana; 2000 in 
Minnesota ; 1200 in Kansas. More than 170,000 are scattered through these 
Sates. 

Our hearts must go with those so dear to us. As we loved them while they 
were the honor and joy of our firesides, we certainly love them not the less 
now that they have gone to encounter the dangers, hardships, and temptations 
of new regions and frontier life. They were worth looking after and being 
cared for when they were with us, and we are anxious that they shall not be 
harmed amid the new scenes and influences of Western life. And, sir, aa nt* 
can not all of us go and look after them, and as we had heard of an insAitviUon 
in New York tbsi cared Jot sll the best interests of the people of the YTemV— tn 
6 



82 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

institution which sent out the wisest and best of men on this errand — we felt 
bound to give it our patronage ; and for these seven and thirty years we have 
done so. And such has been the effect upon our hearts of the love and care of 
your missionaries for those we love, that during the whole of our relation to 
you not less than $850,000 have been put into your treasury by the churches 
of Massachusetts. For the year just closed our contributions have sustained, 
according to the average cost as given in the Annual Report, not less than two 
hundred of your missionaries. 

The Massachusetts churches take the highest pleasure in expressing their 
confidence that the richest of all the blessings, their loved ones in the great 
West have enjoyed, have been provided by the precious christian privileges 
furnished through the ability and faithfulness of your honored missionaries. 

8. Suffer me to speak of only one other investment that we have made in the 
West— -faith, hope, and prayer. 

In a late Western journey I had occasion to tarry for a season at a point on 
the western bank of the Mississippi. I strolled up to the top of a high bluff 
which commanded a grand view of that noble river and the adjoining region. 
I sat down upon a grassy knoll to muse upon themes pressed upon me by the 
river before me. Before me, across the river, lay the great State of Illinois. 
As I gazed, facts in its marvelous history came up. Thirty years ago it had 
100,000 people. It has to-day not less than 1,700,000. It was a cheering 
thought that more than three hundred churches had been planted or fostered 
in their feebleness by this Society, and that eighty three missionaries are now 
breaking there the bread of life. And an exulting fact, too, that so powerful 
had been the love of country and the love of freedom, that more than 100,000 
of her sons were in the armies of the United States. 

From my point of observation I could see the groves and prairies of Wis- 
consin. In thirty years it had gone up from 10,000 to 800,000 people. Your 
Society had done a noble work there ; for nearly two hundred churches had 
shared in its benefactions, and enjoy to-day the labors of seventy six of your 
missionaries. And her patriotism was declared in the fact that she had sent 
40,000 of her sons to the war. 

The warm-hearted greeting of the Minnesota brethren, I had just enjoyed 
In fifteen years that State had risen from 4,000 to 172,000 inhabitants. Forty- 
five of our missionaries were serving seventy churches, and were driving the 
spiritual plowshares through that fertile soil ; and her loyalty had sent 15,000 
of her sons to preserve the national life. 

The noble State of Iowa owned the soil on which I was sitting, and had 
taken her place among these Western kingdoms. And so highly had men prized 
a home upon her fertile soil, that from the few hundreds of 1883, it had now 
a population of 674,000. Home Missions had planted two hundred churches 
here, and eighty one of the missionaries of this Society were building Zion's 
walls with great success. She has sent 50,000 men to the war. 

How could a man but muse upon the .facts that these four States pressed 
upon him? From less than 200,000, they had risen in thirty years to three 
and a quarter millions of people. Not less than seven hundred churches had 
been planted and nourished by this Society, and more than three hundred of 
our missionaries were now laying broad and deep the foundations of Zion. 
More than 200,000 men were in the war. Could a Massachusetts man, could 
any christian man, have such scenery and such facts before him without having 
his soul stirred to its deepest depths ? 

I have said that Massachusetts churches had made investments of faith, hope, 
and prayer in this great valley of the West Has there ever been a grander 
inspiration of faith ? Has there ever been more blessed fruits ? The growth 
of these young empires ! Why, sir, it reminded me of that river rolling at my 
feet as I gazed on the valley through which it flowed. " Little fountains " and 
44 little rills " described it in its early stages of progress, a thousand miles above 
where I stood. But accumulation all the way was its history ; and below me, 
mil the fifteen hundred more miles of its progress is accumulation, till the ooeao 
welcomes it as one of the most magnificent of all its tributaries. 
So this young West God has provided aRttw <tam«&to of growth, shaped 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 83 

all his providences to favor growth. And while he lets us wonder over these 
marvels of progress, bids us see that nothing on our part shall be wanting to 
make all its growth that of his spiritual kingdom. 



Address of Rev. William W. Pattern, D.D., of Chicago, Illinois. 

Mr. President : A native of New York City, educated in its literary and 
theological institutions, and a pastor, for the first fourteen years of my ministry, 
in New England, it is my privilege to stand here to-night as a representative of 
the West In that noble section of our land it has been my good providence to 
live and labor for over seven years. Stationed in that distant metropolis, whose 
rapid growth has been one of the greatest marvels in this age of wonders, having 
learned something of Western character, and been brought into sympathy with 
the ministers and churches of the vast region to which Chicago is the gateway, 
I may be allowed a few words in their behalf. Permit me, then, to offer, as a 
basis of remark, the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the marked loyalty of the West in our present national con- 
flict is largely due to moral causes connected with the influence of Home 
Missions. 

The East and the West are no strangers. They have been long, if not inti- 
mately, acquainted. In fact, the West has been the favorite, though not, I 
trust, the spoiled, child of the East. And if the relationship were wanting, the 
West has not been backward at self-introduction and frequent visitation. 
Hitherto, indeed, it has usually visited the East to solicit aid, conducting itself 
humbly, passing from door to door with head inclined and hat in hand. When 
I was a pastor in New England, if the front gate opened, and a somewhat farmer- 
like man with a carpet bag entered, I knew at once whence he came and what 
he wished. If, on the Sabbath, the people gathered in the sanctuary saw rw 
minister with bronzed face, and a coat a little out of fashion, pass down the 
aisle, deposit a soft hat on the communion table, and ascend the pulpit stairs, 
they knew, instinctively, that a Western brother was about to make an appeal 
for a new college on the prairies or in the woods, or to ask aid in building a 
house of worship in some settlement that promised to be a place of great 
importance. And had Western men believed that they were advocating simply 
their own cause, their feelings would have been humiliated by this process. 
But they knew then, as we all know still better now, that the interests of the 
East and of the West are one, and that what they asked was for you as well 
as for themselves. For the West came not as some thriftless and imbecile son 
that, having failed in his life work, falls back for shelter and support on his 
early home ; nor yet as a prodigal returns, in rags and poverty, with the marks 
of vice in every feature, hoping to die under the roof that gave him birth. But 
it came rather as a noble and enterprising son, who has found afar off a place 
in which to make for himself a home, but has wherewith to hew his way to fortune 
only his keen wits and strong arm — as such a son comes to his father and asks 
an advance of money, promising ample interest from the first, and a speedy re- 
payment of the principal. And, sir, it is with a proud step that son enters the 
old homestead in after years, bringing with him the first thousand dollars of 
that debt So come I, sir, in the behalf of the noble States which on this occasion 
I represent. 

Yea, sir, the West greets the East to-night with honest pride. It claims,, 
since this bloody conflict has been upon us, to have justified the oft-repeated, 
title, " The Great West," by new demonstrations of its truth ; to have proved, 
itself great, not only in territorial extent, in rapidly augmenting population, in- 
political power and in physical resources, but also in character and in deeds. 
It has given to the country a President, Abraham Lincoln* who, deficient it may 
be in beauty, in grace, in dignity, and even in some of the important qua\\t\a& 
of statesmanship, has y«t such proverbial honesty and rugged sense, is so com- 



84 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

pletely a man of and for the people, and has so clear a vision of the main issues 
of the war, that he has won the confidence of all loyal citizens, gathered about 
him more of the blessings of the poor and the prayers of the good, than any 
leader known to history, and is at this moment the most popular ruler in the 
world. 

The West has also supplied what was so long sought in vain, a fit head to 
the army, Ulysses S. Grant, a soldier at once capable and modest, who by sheer 
force of merit and success has risen from the rank of Colonel to that of Lieu- 
tenant-General, and has so combined plan and execution, prudence and daring, 
courage and pertinacity, as to make his name a passport to victory, and to center 
in his person the hopes of the country. The West has furnished troops, as well 
as a commanding General, and in this respect has surpassed the patriotism of 
all other sections. The last call of the President found it with a credit on 
the army rolls of forty one thousand surplus men, against a deficit in New 
England of eight thousand, and in the Middle States of one hundred thousand ! 
Under that call there was but one State in the Union entirely exempt, not only 
as a whole, but in every district That proud position was held by Illinois, 
within whose bounds the draft is unknown but by reports from distant States, 
and which to-day stands credited against any future call with a surplus of over 
twelve thousand men ! But although these facts were insufficient to manifest 
Western patriotism, the land has just been electrified by the joint offer of the 
Western Governors to furnish eighty five thousand additional troops, to serve 
one hundred days, upon two conditions — that no bounties should be paid, and that 
these men should not be credited on any future draft ! And with its army of 
volunteers, the West has, by God's blessing, supplied its full proportion of vic- 
tories also. It has opened to navigation the Mississippi River, cut in twain the 
rebel territory, reduced its area one third, and made historic the names of 
Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Iuka, Pea Ridge, Stone River, Vicksburgh, Knoxville, 
and Chattanooga. And to crown these deeds of blood by a commensurate 
work of mercy, the West conceived and successfully inaugurated, at Chicago, 
the series of gigantic Sanitary Fairs which have presented to the world such a 
sublime spectacle of philanthropy and patriotism. 

These, sir, cure the touchers for the loyalty of the West. 

But now comes the question : To what is this loyalty due ? Doubtless, to 
many causes, geographic, ethnic, commercial, political, and historic It is 
appropriate to-night to notice those of a moral nature ; and I assert boldly that 
this loyalty of the West is due in no small degree to influences which have ema- 
nated from the East, that it is but the first installment of the debt of gratitude due 
for a generation of benevolent aid, the first fruits of a boundless harvest, whoso 
seeds were scattered by Home Missionary hands. And what have your mission- 
aries done that tended to such a result? 

First, they carried a religion based on intelligence. They were themselves 
educated men. They taught that religion was not superstition, but the right 
use of reason, under divine guidance. They claimed for the masses an open 
Bible, and such training as would enable them to read it understandingly. 
They consequently favored free public schools as necessary to republican insti- 
tutions and Protestant Christianity. Where they planted churches you find 
schools, academies, and colleges, newspapers, periodicals, and libraries. They 
trained a community that knew its rights and its duties, for whom to vote, and 
when and for what to fight Hence, the people under their influence understood 
the issues of this war, undeceived by leaders, unblinded by sectional or party 
passion. The Superintendent of Public Instruction at Louisville stated that 
he could trace loyalty and treason in the counties of Kentucky by the presence 
or absence of free schools. The same may be said of all the Western States. 
Eastern emigration and an Eastern ministry have made an intelligent and loyalty 
population everywhere. 

Secondly, your missionaries have laid the foundation of loyalty deep in the 

consciences of men, by teaching the scriptural doctrine of government Slavery 

was the inspiration of the rebellion, its moving cause ; but false doctrines of 

government and of States rights was the instrumentality without, which it 

would never have led the people into revolt Tta Idea that a supposed social 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 85 

compact is the basis of government, that it is binding because we have agreed 
to submit to it for our greater good, tends only and always to disintegration and 
is fatal to unity. It has no hold on the conscience, and leaves the citizen free to 
secede at will from his town, the town from the county, the county from the State, 
and the State from the Union. Hence you find so little conscience at the South 
against the rebellion. Have not a people a right to change allegiance when and 
as they please? But your ministers taught the old Puritan doctrine, that 
civil government is not a dream of philosophers, or a creation of genius, or an 
invention of necessity, but a divine organism to perpetuate justice in the world ; 
that, though shaped and enforced by human compacts, it rests upon no such 
quicksand for its obligation on the conscience, but is built on the granite rock of 
divine command. "The powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever, 
therefore, resisteth the power, rcsistcth the ordinance of God." That doctrine 
makes rebellion not the allowable instrument of ambition, pride, jealousy, 
or revenge, but a deadly sin, unless justified by gross oppression that can surely 
and only be remedied by a resort to arms. Your missionaries have therefore 
aided to form a public conscience which ranks such a rebellion as the present 
as among the highest crimes possible to man ; it being nothing less than a revolt 
in favor of slavery and against legitimate authority, constitutional obligations, 
free institutions, and the providential progress of freedom and justice. 

Thirdly, your missionaries have prepared the people for the present crisis by 
teaching them the true dangers of the country. They believed that religion 
should manifest itself in all things, and should govern a man's politics, as well 
as his ecclesiastical action, and that disregard of this truth leads to civil 
corruption and death. They believed and taught also that slavery was the 
crying sin of this nation, rendering it continually liable to divine judgments, and 
constituting a perpetual element of discord. In this they carried out the prin- 
ciples of your Society, which years ago decided that no slaveholding minister 
could be supported, nor slaveholding church aided by your funds. Your 
missionaries were a leaven of righteousness on this subject all through the 
West, moulding public opinion, and shaping even the policy of political parties, 
so that the people understood the merits of the slaveholders rebellion, and 
were prompt to furnish an army for its suppression, and to sustain the measures 
which struck directly at its cause. And the rebels and their sympathizers long 
since perceived and resented this influence originating in New England, and 
carried by her sons into every Northern locality, and pointed to Plymouth Hock 
as " the stone of stumbling and rock of offense. 11 And doubtless the Scripture 
shall be verified, " Whosoever shall fall on this stone shall be broken ; but on 
whomsoever it shall fall, it shall grind him to powder." 

Lastly, your missionaries promoted loyalty by their very connection with 
your Society, whose object and name implied national and perpetual Union. For 
your work bases itself on the identity of interests in all parts of the land, while 
your name proclaims the oneness of all sections. You are not the New York, 
nor the New England, nor the Eastern, nor the Northern, but the American 
Home Missionary Society, looking on our country as a unit, and upon the people 
as a nation, with one nag of beauty and name of glory. Your missionaries 
went wherever the people would receive them, and your funds were collected 
from the country at large. But whether they were sent to Maine, to Minnesota, 
or to Oregon, to Virginia, to Missouri, or to California ; they were always u Home," 
and not " Foreign, missionaries. Whether they were one, or two, or three thou- 
sand miles distant from your office, they felt that they were in their own country, 
their native land, bequeathed to them by their fathers, consecrated by prayers, 
and tears, and blood, and baptized unto God by the spray of its two oceans. - 
And when they entered the cabins of the far West, and said they were sent by 
the American Home Missionary Society at New York, it touched many a heart 
that first beat under a New England roof, or in a mansion in the Middle States, 
and the thought came up, u Ah 1 they think of us yet ! They own us as 
sons and daughters still They feel that we are within reach, in the same land, 
within the domain of that noble Society which calls all the States * Home. 1 " 
Yes, and thus the foreign immigrants gained a new idea of the fact and \*\uq 
of the Union, as ihejmwbow this idea of one vast home for the natocm, ot 



86 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

one grand family of Americans, pervaded Church and State, and carried the 
choicest blessings to the remotest hamlet 

Think, then, Mr. President, with what indignation and scorn, communities, 
trained in such an association of ideas, would receive the traitorous proposition 
that the West should join the South to preserve the navigation of the Mississippi, 
leaving New England and the East out in the cold ! Imagine, if you can, States 
whose population and institutions have been derived in large part from the 
East, whose principal exchange of commodities is with the East, whose schools 
and colleges are conducted by Eastern teachers and professors, whose literature 
is from the same quarter, whose churches, composed of members of Eastern birth 
or descent, and planted by Eastern Home Missionaries, are even yet ministered 
to by Eastern pastors. Imagine, I say, if you can, such States listening 
to offers of Southern alliance, and accepting bribes to betray New England and 
the nation. 

If any doubt remain as to the correctness of these views, simply notice the 
corroboration given by the contrast of those portions of the West which have 
not enjoyed Home Missionary influence, and in which there has been neither a 
Puritan emigration nor a Puritan ministry. Even amid the loyalty of the West 
treason lifts its serpent head and utters its serpent hiss. There are portions 
of the West where men cheer for Jeff. Davis, hide deserters, and murder our re- 
turned veterans. But they are in the vicinity of the Ohio River, and the 
people were poor whites, from the South. They still wear the butternut 
uniform, use the Southern dialect, are unable to read and write, hate negroes 
and abolitionists, and have either had no religious training, or have been under 
the instruction of denominations affiliated with the slaveholding, treason-breeding 
churches of the South. Scarcely a church of either of the two denominations 
for which your Society has acted exists among them. A broad belt across the 
continent marks the field of your labors, where for nearly forty years you have 
kept pace with the progress of the new settlements. All within that belt U 
loyal. All south of it is either openly treasonable, or largely In sympathy 
with the rebellion. Had the other portions of the Western States been similarly 
neglected, the West would either have joined the South or have refused to 
join in a war to maintain the national Union. In either case, the Union would 
have perished, and the hopes of the world for freedom in Church and State 
have been buried for a century to come, in the same grave. Among the means 
used by a kind Providence to avert such a catastrophe was the American Home 
Missionary Society, and kindred organizations of other denominations, by which 
the West has been preserved to evangelical religion, to freedom, and to loyalty, 
and the West, in turn, has made common cause with the East and saved the 
country. 

Thus, sir, has God rewarded Christian beneficence. Thus has the Church, 
unaided and untrammeled by the State, been the life of patriotism and a 
bulwark to the land. Thus has the standing army of Home Missionaries 
guarded for freedom and the Union the choicest part of the national domain, 
which once lost, no legions from the East could possibly reconquer. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 87 



MISCELLANEOUS SELECTIONS, 



FROM THE PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY. 



Twenty Five Years Ago. 

Twenty five years ago I was under commission from your Society to go to 
Iowa, then a Territory of eighteen thousand inhabitants, with one Congrega- 
tional church and one minister. Since that time Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, 
Kansas, California, and Oregon have been added to the number of States in this 
Union, and Nebraska, Colorado, Idaho, Dacotah, New Mexico, Nevada, and 
Washington Territories have been organized. 

When I look back over this quarter of a century and see what has been done, 
in the work of settlement, in founding churches, literary institutions, and all the 
appliances of a well ordered State or Territory, it seems almost a dream. But 
when I look forward, and ask what another quarter of a century will bring forth, 
I am constrained to feel that our largest anticipations will fall quite below the 
reality. One thing is true, if the church of this generation will come up to the 
measure of her responsibility, . she must gird on anew the gospel armor, and 
show a spirit of liberality and self denying benevolence corresponding to the 
magnitude of the work to be done. Never was such a work laid to the hands of 
any people as now prospectively invites the American church. 

Twenty Years Ago. 

Several of us, ministers in this State, have just passed a period which to us is 
memorable — the twentieth anniversary of our arrival in Iowa. Those of us who 
came without wives, reached the east bank of the Mississippi, opposite Burling- 
ton, October 23, 1843, after sunset. We came from Chicago, 218 miles, in two 
two- horse wagons. When we arrived at the river, the steam ferry had just left 
the east bank for the last time, that night The ferrymen were deaf to our call. 
The only cover on the east side was a log cabin, roofed, partly floored, but 
wanting windows, doors, chinking, and chimney. There was no dwelling near. 
But the owner of this (future) dwelling was still there, and had a " dug-out," or 
log canoe, with which he offered to take six of us over the river safely, provided 
we would "sit down on the bottom, and sit still." Accordingly, six of us 
embarked, and were safely landed on the Iowa soil that night, after dark. The 
other brethren with the teamsters, occupied that cabin, sleeping in their buffalo 
robes, after partaking of the supper we sent them from Iowa. We six sought 
the residence of Mr. Edwards, then editor of the Hawk Eye. We all there 
eujoyed genuine hospitality. At family worship that night, Mrs. Edwards read 
the 531st hymn from the Village Hymns, commencing: 

"Brethren, beloved for Jesus' sake, 
A hearty welcome here receive," etc. 

It was sung amid many tears. Such was our introduction to Iowa. What a 
change in twenty years ! 

Fifteen Years in Oregon. 

It is fifteen years to-day since I arrived in Oregon City. The first of the corps 
of Home Missionaries for the Pacific coast, coming necessarily- by way oC * 
Foreign Missionary field, viz., the Sandwich Islands, our mission seemed Yfea 



88 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

one to a foreign land. California was not ours, by full possession, when wc left 
Boston. The gold had not been discovered. Only a small population was on 
the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. Now the country is all our own, 
from the Gulf of California to De Fuca Straits, comprised in two States and four 
Territories, with portions of two other Territories — the Rocky Mountains 
dividing New Mexico and Arizona. Vast gold fields have been discovered, and 
new ones are found every year, extending from Mexico even to the Russian pos- 
sessions. 

We feel that we have but one country and one people, from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific. We feel that it must not, and that it shall not be divided ; but, 
on the other hand, that the bonds of Union must be made stronger, by the iron 
rail as well as by the iron wire. God indicates this by his Providence. It is 
amazing to see the movement of the emigrations. One wave is coming from the 
West across the Plains, into Idaho and Washoe; while another reflex wave 
from California and Oregon, is flowing eastward to Washoe and Idaho. It is a 
daily occurrence to visit the Upper Columbia on steamboats, where was seen 
only the Indian canoe ten years ago. Soon the line of States from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific will be continuous and complete. 

Grand Traverse Association. 

About three weeks ago, I rode on horseback ninety miles, through the woods, 
to attend the meeting of the Grand Traverse Association, which convened with 
the church in Manistee, near our southern boundary. Our Association is the 
daughter of the Home Missionary Society, and you will no doubt be interested 
in its prosperity. Our meeting was pleasant and impressive. The retrospect 
of the six months, during which the Association has been in existence, is gratify- 
ing and encouraging. When we organized, last winter, there were two churches, 
with a total membership of eighty. We now have within our bounds nine 
churches, with a total membership of one hundred and seventy. Instead of 
seventy children in the Sabbath schools, we now have three hundred. The 
church membership has more than doubled, and the number in Sabbath schools 
more than quadrupled. There have been about forty conversions. This 
summary statement, when presented to the brethren of the Association, seemed 
to afford such cause for gratitude, that, in view of it, we had a special session 
of thanksgiving and prayer. 

The Woman at the WelL 

When I was journeying, a few days ago, about twenty miles, I stopped to 
water my horse at a little log house on the road side, one mile beyond a regular 

E reaching station. A poor woman, barefooted and otherwise poorly clad, 
rought a pail to water my horse. While I was in the act of drawing a bucket 
of water, she handed me a dollar, and urged upon me the necessity of taking it 
At first I refused ; but she urged me, assuring me that she had been greatly 
benefited by preaching, and would not, for any thing, have it relinquished — 
would rather spend the midnight hour in hard labor than not be able to give 
something to the support of the cause of Christ ; and finished it all by praying 
that God's good blessings might ever attend me in all my labors. Here was a 
poor woman, her husband in the army, in very poor circumstances, and with a 
family of seven children to clothe, and educate, and feed; and yet out of her 
heart giving to the great work of God ! Often, as I rode along, I was compelled 
to drop the lines, and clasping my hands, implore God to look down and bless 
that woman, her children, and her far off husband. Think of this, ye who are 
hoarding up treasures needed to promote God's cause, and learn from the meek 
and lowly in heart 

Freedmen's Church at Lawrence, Kansas. . 

The church now contains twenty three members. They will not be able to do 
much the present year, as most of them are trying to get homes and have 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 89 

nothing but their own labor to depend upon. They can certainly raise fifty 
dollars, perhaps more. Brother Ellex will preach also at Topeka. There are 
about 1,000 colored people here and in this vicinity. They have three churches 
—Methodist, Baptist and Congregational. All have regular services. The Con- 
gregational church alone has a house of worship, a brick structure twenty 
seven feet by thirty five feet, well built. For these they are indebted largely 
to the Congregational Union. They have services every Sabbath morning and 
evening, with congregations varying from one hundred to one hundred and 
fifty; prayer meetings every Friday evening, also well attended; and a Sunday 
school every Sabbath, immediately after morning service. The school averages 
over a hundred scholars. They have some of the best teachers from our con- 
gregation. The superintendent, Mr. S. N. Simpson, meets the scholars also at 
five o'clock in the afternoon, to sing. The house is always full. The city also 
provides a free day school for them, nine months in the year, just the same as 
for white children. Last winter there were over one hundred scholars in this 
school. They learn very rapidly ; as fast as any scholars. 

A Three Hours 1 Meeting. 

I must mention one day's work there. The Sabbath morning was clear and 
pleasant, and the people turned out well. But we had only fairly collected 
when it began to rain. It continued to rain nearly all day. We began by 
receiving three mothers to the church — an interesting scene. Next, I preached 
a sermon. As it was raining hard still, I gave opportunity for others to speak, 
and about a dozen spoke, with interest and much feeling, most of them telling 
what God had done for them and how happy they were in finding such unex- 
pected privileges here in the woods, others confessing sins and promising to 
serve God in future. These exercises were interspersed with singing, and 
questions and remarks by myself; and all felt that it was good to be there. 
It was, indeed, a most blessed and memorable occasion. No one seemed to get 
weary, though sitting on rough boards, holding children or otherwise incom- 
moded. Next, as it was still raining, at my suggestion, the church elected one 
of their number (a "licensed exhorter") as their local pastor, to preach to them 
on the vacant Sabbath, another, as their deacon, and another, as their clerk. 
Then they voted to begin a Sunday school ; and chose a superintendent and 
Bible class leader. It was a good day's work. 

Destitution. 

The following communication relates to one of the oldest and most populous 
counties in Iowa. It is better supplied with religious privileges than many, 
perhaps than most other portions of the State, £et the facts stated show that 
the work of evangelizing these communities has but just begun. 

Full one half of this county, of 15,030 inhabitants, is destitute of the stated 
means of grace. In rather more than half of the county there is a partial sup- 
ply of preaching of some kind ; but not more than one fourth have preaching 
every Sabbath. The county has twelve townships, all well settled. 

There are three townships in which there is no regular or stated preaching of 
any kind. I suppose I am safe in saying that not more than half of the adult 
population are subjected to any direct influence of the Gospel. I feel sad when 
I think of this destitution, and the question will arise, How few of these people 
will ever be converted to God, and how dark the prospect that they will be fit- 
ted to act well their part as citizens of this Republic of ours ? 

Can not the men and the means be found to cultivate these fields ? At pres- 
ent, our efforts to evangelize the people of the West are limited almost entirely 
to the towns and villages, while more than two thirds of the population live on 
farms, and do not come to the towns to meeting. Scarcely any thing can be 
raised in these destitute places to support preachers, and yet these souls are 
precious, and the influence of their rotes on the destiny of our nation is g?eaA» 



£0 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 



Frontier Traveling. 

At my last appointment, in that place, people walked, some of them four and 
some more than six miles, through the deep snow, to get to meeting. One old 
man walked over six miles, and enjoyed the feast much, and spoke well. When 
I witness such interest I feel encouraged, and can rejoice in my long and cold 
rides, assured that my labors are not in vain. I do love to feed the scattered 
sheep and lambs of Christ's flock. 

I have long desired to commence appointments at Glen Arbor, an important 
wooding post for propellers, on Lake Michigan, some twenty three miles north- 
east of this place, but with no road, and an almost impassable quicksand river 
to cross, for years I dared not venture. But the past fall, I resolved to make the 
attempt I made my first visit there on the second of October, the crossing 
of Piatt river was dreadful for my poor horse. She plunged, and groaned, and 
struggled in the mire, and among the logs and sticks, till it was distressing to 
see her ; (I walked a log, and held a rope attached to my horse.) But she came 
out, and we wended our way through the vast forest, by compass and blind 
44 blazes," to Glen Lake, two miles and a half this side of Glen Arbor. Here we 
had to cross 44 The Narrows," some two hundred rods across. I rode in a boat, 
and led my horse behind. She waded in the water from knee deep to over her 
back most of the way, and had to swim about fifteen rods in the middle. Thus 
I crossed there six times, till I came near losing my horse the last time, on ac- 
count of the heavy winds and high waves. 



The Harm of Poverty. 

But do not think I am complaining. I am very happy in my work, and am 
well satisfied with what I am receiving. I only mention my circumstances, be- 
cause I know that you wish to know them. A good brother said at our last 
Convention : u If our friends at the East only knew our circumstances and our 
labors, we should not want as we now do." And yet wo know that you are 
very faithful in trying to make them know. 

The only real affliction I have found in my poverty is, that it hinders me in 
my work ; I have to serve tables so much. It is not unfrequently the case 
that, for want of moans to hire a girl, to take care of my family whtfn sick, I 
must stay with them myself, not only to the neglect of my books, but to the 
neglect of the sick and dying, who may also be perishing for the bread of life. 

Not" in consequence of being poor, abstractly considered, do I lament, but 
that, in consequence of poverty, I am obliged to neglect the work that my Mas- 
ter has given me to do. 

A Slave Self-Taught 

This teacher is a character whose history would almost make a romance. He 
is twenty four years old — almost white — well formed — with fine features and 
well developed brain. He was a slave in Brunswick, Missouri. He was owned 
by a Massachusetts man, who retained enough of his puritan principles to feel 
that it was wrong to keep a soul in ignorance. He taught his slaves all that he 
dared to teach them. This young man thus learned to read. He had few books, 
but read all he could, secretly. I was astonished at the accuracy of his speech, 
until he told me that the chief book he had, while in slavery, was a dictionary, 
which he read through and through, carefully noting each word. He has thus 
acquired an accuracy of speech seldom attained even by whites, in Missouri. 
To learn to write was more difficult than to learn to read. Very few of the slaves, 
who have learned to read, have been able to learn to write. But he mastered the 
difficulties even in this. He learned to write by copying the notices posted up 
on fences and along the streets, using for pen and ink pieces of charcoal, and 
fence-boards for paper. He has thus acquired a very good hand. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGIITH REPORT. 91 

Too Long Neglected 

In some points of view the field is not the most encouraging one, especially as 
regards awakening the consciences of the members of the church. I find little 
difficulty about interesting the people here in the externals of religion ; but I 
would be glad to see more of them acting from love to the Master and a sense 
of duty, rather than a spirit of conformity to the common wage of other churches 
and their members. Though coming, most of them, from New England, they 
felt the want of New England institutions, and perhaps quite as soon as in the 
majority of places, set themselves about securing them. Yet the three or four 
years, during which they were without the preaching of the Gospel, and without 
its ordinances, had the effect of dampening their piety, and, perhaps, blunting 
their religious sensibility, and this to such a degree that it will take the training 
of years, besides that best of all remedies, the melting power of the Holy Ghost, 
to bring them up to any thing like the true standard of christian duty. And 
this suggests the thought that the immigrants in our western towns can not be 
looked after too early. We all need every means of grace that we can secure, 
in order to the healthy development of an earnest piety, and certainly do those 
who, on leaving their homes at the East, are peculiarly liable to leave behind 
their former habits of piety. 

The Kingdom Coming. 

As the county increases in inhabitants and settlements, so churches also in- 
crease. Another Congregational church will be organized next Saturday, some 
five miles southwest from Cedar Rapids, and will greatly assist in the support 
of a minister for the two churches. When this is organized, there will be four 
Congregational churches in Linn county, and no two nearer than five miles of 
each other. Our dependence upon the Parent Society may seem long ; but 
there is progress with our feeble churches, and there will be a day when the pa- 
tience and zeal, the privations and toil of your humble missionaries will, under 
the divine blessing, be manifested to the world, to the joy of every friend of mis- 
sions. The prairie plow moves slowly, and casts but a single furrow at a time ; 
but after days or weeks we see the advancement of the work. So, too, may we 
see the progress of the kingdom of Jesus moving slowly but steadily onward to 
its grand triumph ; and none will rejoice more than those friends at the East 
who have patiently continued in this benevolence and well-doing. 

Benefits of Permanency. 

To-day I complete six years of labor with this people ; and I see more and 
more the benefits of a permanent residence of a minister among his people. It 
takes five or six years for minister and people to get acquainted with each other. 
A man needs to know them in their families, that they may feel confidence to 
tell him of their sorrows. They must find also that he has a character, that he 
is in his home what he professes to be in his pulpit, and that he is in all his 
dealings honest He must also get the love of the little ones, drawing them to 
him as a friend and adviser. They see him in the day-school as well as the Sun- 
day-school, they learn to look up to him as one who feels an interest in their 
welfare, they hail him on the road with gladness, they see him bury their little 
friends, and hear his words of tenderness, to lead them to Jesus. When these 
influences continue year after year they are sure to win young hearts ; and 
to such wo must look with the strongest hope as the future members of our 
churches. * 

The Eight Spirit. 

We have encountered opposition in a form unlike any previously experienced ; 
and which, for a time, seemed likely to hedge up our way for future progress. 
Some of our wealthiest patrons withdrew themselves and their families from th* 
congregation, and exerted all their influence against us, endeavoring to dmta 



92 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

the church by the cry of "abolition," "political preaching and praying. You 
may not be aware of the dread that many people in Illinois have of being called 
an " abolitionist" A man may survive the epithets, liar, rogue, rebel, but who 
may live, when once the epithet abolitionist is well settled upon him ? When 
wicked men assail me in such a manner, I pay no attention to it But when my 
good but fearful deacon came to me, and suggested that politics had better 
not be noticed in the pulpit, I told him firmly that my commission from the 
Head of the Church required me to rebuke sin, private or public, unfashionable 
or fashionable ; and that wicked men could not dictate to me how I should 
either preach or pray. But in all our new trials God has been more for us than 
all our enemies could do against us. The church-members now seem all agreed 
and willing that I should ever pray for the poor slave. Our congregation has 
not suffered; the places vacated were promptly filled. The war has drawn 
heavily on us : we have so few men in our congregation. 

A Pledge. 

In the early part of the year, to forestall the adversary, and to break up an 
incipient wicked habit among our boys, the following pledge was introduced, 
namely : "We, whose names are appended to this paper, wishing to do some- 
thing in our early years to benefit this community, have decided to abstain from 
the use of all profane language, and will use our influence to induce as many as 
possible to unite with us in this pledge." 

This pledge was readily signed by every member of the school, ninety two in 
number. And now, for six months, we do not know of a single breach of it. 
We have good evidence that these little missionaries are doing a good work, in 
this matter, outside of this school. This wicked practice of using profane lan- 
guage was introduced among us by a young lad, who came here, some years 
ago, to join the Academy. And he inoculated quite a number with the pesti- 
lent virus. So apt is the little village, and especially its little citizens, to think 
that whatever comes from a great city is right or good. 

A Contrast 

We have raised $50, which you will place to our credit You may recollect 
the statement of a brother, at the Sabbath morning meeting at Cleveland, in 
June last One of his members, owning some 1,200 acres of land, paid " from 
$3 to $5 toward his support" Our society will present quite a contrast to that 
One of my members owns a farm, some four miles from town, of 198 acres, with 
every thing convenient around him ; this is his whole fortune ; and yet he pays 
to my support $100 a year, and his family several dollars more. Others of my 
church pay $50 and $20 and so on. We have only forty four members and a 
congregation of about eighty on an average ; but they are a noble, liberal set of 
men. Being in quite comfortable circumstances myself, I am preaching to the 
people here for at least $200 less than would be a fair support ; a thing I would 
not do, did I not feel they were doing all that justice required, under their cir- 
cumstances. 

The Little Comforter. 

Last evening, as I was going to make a call, I was thinking over my last quar- 
ter's work ; and was somewhat discouraged : I could not see much fruit of my 
labors. When I reached the house to which I was going, a little five-year old 
girl came out to meet me, threw her arms around me, and, after I had gone into 
the house, laid her head in my lap, and said : " Mr. A., I do love you so 1 I 
think you are such a good man. I love to hear you preach !" It was like a 
gleam of sunshine amid the darkness. I felt that I had not worked for nothing. 
The little innocent child removed a load from my heart ; for if I can gain the 
confidence of the little ones, and be the means, under God, of leading them to 
Him who said, u Suffer the little children to come unto me," I shall feel that I 
bare accomplished a great work. 



1864.] THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. \ 93 

Little Crow and Shakspeare. 

Little Crow is a strange man. He has been a great lover of music and a great 
lover of murder. Shakspeare says that he that hath no music in his soul is fit 
for treasons and stratagems. I wonder what he would think of Little Crow. 
Only fifteen months ago this Indian used to visit the house of a white man, a 
few miles west of us, whose wife had a piano, and would often request her to 
play and sing for him. She did so, and often he has sat there and been perfectly 
delighted and overcome by the simple power of music. He evidently had an 
ear and a soul that feasted on the " concord of sweet sounds." And yet this 
very music-loving chief, only a few weeks afterwards, sent marauding bands of 
his warriors into that same region to massacre innocent women and children in 
cold blood. 

The American Ambition. 

The South has had its dream of empire, of an empire founded on slavery, and 
dictating terms to the world. England exults in her dominion over the seas, 
and Napoleon in being the leader and umpire among all the powers of the earth. 
The American ambition is of another kind. It aspires to fill this continent with 
a free and christian people ; and desires no domain other than of example, and 
no leadership other than such as the nations freely concede to her who walks 
before them in paths of liberty. It is the American ambition to be free and 
good and happy, and that on a scale so magnificent, that the great lesson of po- 
litical prosperity shall proclaim itself without ceasing to all nations, and sink, of 
its own force, into the depths of their hearts. We are determined that here, at 
last, there shall be a christian people — free, because it is christian. This was 
our father's hope; it remains the most cherished aspiration of their descendants. 
As slavery stands in the way of its realization, slavery must perish. Whatever 
else lifts up its head to oppose it, must take itself out of the way or be crushed. 
There is no power that God will prosper in opposition to this holy endeavor. 
Our country is to be a free country and a christian country, let who will 
oppose. 

The Ministry the Successful Calling. 

" Of a class of twenty one graduates at one of our colleges, eight entered the 
ministry, and all were successful ; most of them very largely so. Of nine, of 
the same class, who entered other professions, only three were partially success- 
ful, while six were failures ; and mostly bad failures." 

" Of thirty five young men, graduates of a theological seminary, and who 
were in the institution at the same time, and whose after history is known, 
thirty one were successful in the ministry — eighteen of them very largely so. 
Only four of the thirty five were failures, and only two of these were total fail- 
ures. " 

44 Of ten young men, who, about the same time became merchants, two only 
were partially successful, while eight of the ten made a total failure." 

44 Of fourteen aged ministers in Ohio, who have reared fifty fine children, sons 
and daughters, who are now grown up, not one has become intemperate, nor in 
any way positively vicious and wicked. While all of them who are settled in 
life, are among the intelligent, useful, and respected members of the community 
where they live." 

* 4 Of fourteen grown up families, whose fathers were lawyers, physicians, and 
merchants, six had one son each, who filled a drunkard's grave ; and two others 
have, each, two intemperate sons. Is it true that minister's children are worse 
than others f» 

Biz Years' Missionary Work. 

44 Ten years ago, a minister went into as wicked a village as could well be 
found. There were but few, if any, praying persons for miles around. He 
bought a house to live in, that they might know he had come to stay. He g*A\v- 
ered a Sunday-school in his own upper chamber, invited the people tYnttat to 



94 THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. [May, 

hear preaching on the Sabbath, and established a weekly prayer-meeting. He 
and his wife and a pious son were all, at first, who were willing to pray. He- 
lectured on temperance in their streets, started a day-school of a higher order 
for the youth, and for a time taught it himself. In many ways, the elevating 
influences of the Gospel were brought to bear on the community. Ere long, a 
church of twenty members was organized, and a meeting-house built in the vil- 
lage. Five miles distant, another church was gathered and a meeting-house 
built After six years of labor, these places had become as quiet, intelligent, 
and christian communities as you would ordinarily meet with in the State." 

Those Four Hundred Soldiers. 

They are beyond the Alleghany Mountains. They are in the employ of a 
great benevolent Institution, the American Home Missionary Society. The little 
army is well worth looking at, and looking after. See 

1. The character of these soldiers. They are educated men — of vigorous 
minds — large views, glowing with the largest christian benevolence, and the 
noblest patriotism — ready for any sacrifice called for by Zion or their country — 
all of which elements combine to make them a body of men not surpassed in 
moral and spiritual vigor and power by any in the service of the Great Captain 
of salvation on earth. 

2. These soldiers are well stationed. The great battle-field has been carefully 
surveyed — its strong positions known — and a wise and far-seeing discretion has 
already caused many to be occupied. The soldiers are not quite near enough 
yet to each other " to see eye to eye," but they can, and do often meet, and stir 
up each other to valiant deeds in the glorious strife. 

3. These soldiers have already gained signal advantages. They have power- 
fully succored the cause of education. The purest morality flourishes under 
their influence, and the piety which makes men happy in God and fits them for 
eternity, has resulted from their labors in every community where they have 
set up their banners. Many of the strongholds of the great enemy have beet 
wrested from him, and men are invited to go round about the Zion they have 
set up in the great West, and " mark well her bulwarks and tell the towers 
thereof." Many a Vicksburgh and Port Hudson are already in their possession, 
and not a man of them doubts their ultimate and universal triumph. 

4. These soldiers are all officers. They enlisted as privates when they first 
came to the Great Captain ; but in consequence of their careful culture and 
eminent devotion to his service, they have been taken from the ranks, and 
are now captains in the Lord's hosts, having soldiers under them, whom they 
are successfully training for service in the great army of ImmanueL These 
leaders aim to make every church under their care a spiritual fortress, a glory 
and beauty and defence for Zion. 

5. These soldiers are never complained of for violence, rapine, or outrage. In 
every territory they invade they find a hearty welcome from most of the people. 
They shed no blood — burn no dwellings— waste no fields. Homes are made 
happy by them. Law is honored — government sustained — all rights respected, 
and all are made happy whom they can persuade to submit to and welcome the 
great Leader whose kingdom they labor to set up. There can not be any such 
thing as rebellion, lawlessness, vice, or crime wherever they gain a complete 
conquest for their Master. u The wilderness and the solitary place is glad for 
them — the desert rejoices and blossoms as the rose." 

Now we have more than four hundred such soldiers as these — some of them 
are veterans — others in the full vigor of joyful activity, and the younger ones 
u stand firm" and "endure hardship," and hold on with inflexible tenacity in 
conquering the kingdom for their Master. Our sympathy, prayers, cheering 
words, and pecuniary aid are vital to their success. We are the reserves, and 
must send to the front every needed succor. We shall lose the battle if we do 
not — and offend the Great Captain, and bring shame on our own professions of 
loyalty. 

Who Trill help the four hundred? and who, beat a cowardly retreat I 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPOR?. 



95 



DIEECTOES FOE LIFE. 

CONSTITUTED SINCE APRIL 1, 1861. 

The number of Directors and Members for Life has beeorae so large that the annual 
publication of their names is a serious tax upon the Treasury. As those who receive 
the Annual Reports are supposed to preserve them for reference, it is thought expedient 
to publish the list only once in five years. The names of those constituted Directors 
or Members for Life previous to April 1st, 1861, were printed in the Report for that 
year, and the entire list will be republished in the Report for 1865, and thenceforward 
at intervals of five years. 



Alden. Rev. E. K., Boston, Mass. 
Andrews, Horace, Jr., New York. 
AverfU, Rev. James, Plymouth Hollow, Ct. 
Ayer, Mrs. Betsey 8., Bradford, Vt. 

Bacon, Rer. George B.. Orange, N. J. 
Bardwell, Alonso, South Hadtoy, Mass. 
Bemla, William L., Springfield, Mass. 
Bliss, Theodore, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Boardman, Rer. George M., Blnghamton, N. T. 
Brayton, Edward 8., Utica, N. Y. 
Brewster, Rev. Cyrus, Haydenville, Mass. 
Branson, Dr. O., New York. 
Bock, Richard P., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bnahnell, Rev. George, Waterbnry, Ct. 

Camp, David N.,*New Britain, Ct. 
Carpenter, Rev. Bber, Southbridge, Mass. 
Chester. G. F., New York. 
Clark, William H., New York. 
Coleman, Rer. Lyman, D.D., Easton, Pa. 
Crawford, Rev. Archibald, Smyrna, N. Y. 
Corliss, Rev. George C, Bmira, N. Y. 

De Forest, John, M.D., Watertown, Ct 
Douglas, Rev. James, Watertown, N. Y. 
Daren, Rev. Charles, West Charleston, Vt. 
Button, Rev. Thomas, Ashford, Ct. 

Goodwin, Daniel B., Watervllle, N. Y. 
Goodwin, Rev. Edward P., Columbus, 0. 
Graves, Dea. Elam, Haydenville, Mass. 
Guernsey, Rev. Jesse, Dubuque, Iowa. 

HadseU, Ira, Farmington, Ct 

Holton, Hon. Edward D., Milwaukee, WU. 

Hough, Rev. J. W., Williston, Yt. 

Jones, Rev. Franklin C, 8outhington, Ct 

Kellogg, George, Rockville, Ct 

Kellogg, Allyn, do. 

Kimball, Rev. Moses, Weatbersfield, Yt. 

King, Rufus 8., New York. 

Knevab, Caleb B., New York City. 

Learned, Ebeneser, Norwich, Ct 
Learned, William L., Albany, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Hon. Abraham, Washington, D. C. 
Little, Rev. Charles, Cheshire, Ct. 
Lombard, Philip, Watervllle, N. Y. 

McKeen, Rev. Silas, Bradford, Vt. 
McWnUaros, Daniel W., Peoria, 111. 
Magoun, Rev. George F., Lyons, Iowa. 



Marden, Rev. A. L., Plermont, N. H. 
Marsh, Rev. Frederick, Winchester, Ct. 
Martin, Rev. Solon, Corinth, Vt. 
Monteith, Rev. John, Jr.. Jackson, Mich. 
Morey, Henry M., Livonia, N. Y. 

North, Mrs. Frederick H., New Britain, Ct 

Oviatt, Rev. George A., Somen, Ct. 

Palmer, Rev. Charles R„ Salem, Mass. 
Parish, Ariel, Springfield, Mats. 
Parke, James H. H., Whitehall, N. Y. 
Parmelee, Rev. florace M., Oak Grove, Wis. 
Parsons, Edward W., Hartford, Ct. 
Pearsou, Rev. James B., Plymouth Hollow, Ct. 
Perkins, Rev. Ariel E. P., Ware, Mass. 
Phillips, Daniel, Hartford, Ct. 
Prichard, Dea. George W.. Bradford, Vt 
Punderson, Dea. Lemuel 8., New Haven, Ct. 

Reynolds, James, West Haven, Ct. 
Richards, Rev. J. D. F., Weathersfield, Vt. 
Ripley, Daniel C, New York City. 
Ripley, Joseph, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Root, George W., Hartford, Ct. 

Safford, Rev. Geo. B., Burlington, Vt 
SchiefTelin, Miss Fanny K., Yonkers, N. Y. 
Scoville, Mrs. Elizabeth, Olean, N. Y. 
Scoville, Rev. Samuel, Norwich, N. Y. 
Seeley, Rev. R. H, Haverhill, Mass. 
Seymour, Rev. John A., Enfield, Mass. 
Sharp, James C, Dorchester, Mass. 
Shaw, Dea. Thomas C, Bradford, Vt. 
Small, Samuel A., West Millbury, Mass. 
8mith, Oliver, Plymouth, Ct 
Spencer, Sherman, Gasport, N. Y. 
Stanley, Henry, New Britain, Ct 
Stuart, George H., Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Talcott, James, New York City. 
Taylor, II. W., Hartford, Ct, 
Thayer, Rev. J. H., Andover, Mass. 
Thomas, Marquis D., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Twltchell, Joseph H., Bouthington, Ct 

Upson, Andrew, Southlngton, Ct 
Upson, Miles H., do. 

Van Auken, Rev. Edwin B., Honeoye Falls, N. Y. 

Williams, George W., Hartford, Ct. 
Woods, Rufus D., Enfield, Mass. 



96 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



MEMBEES FOE LIFE. 

CONSTITUTED SINCE APRIL 1st, 1861. 

The names of those constituted Members for Life previous to April 1st, 1861, will be 
• found in the Report for that year. 



Abbott, Austin, New York. 

Abbott, Miss Dorcas, Andover, Mass. 

Abbott, Rev. Lyman, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Abbott, Nathan B., Andover, Mass. 

Abby, Miss Betsey, South Windsor, CI 

Abernethy, Charles, New York. 

Adams, Horace 0., Plainville, Ct 

Adams, Calvin, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Aiken, William A., Norwich, Ct 

Aiklu, Dea. J., Andover, Muss. 

Alden, Mrs. Maria H.. Boston, Mass. 

Alden, Miss Mary, Windsor, Vt 

Aldrich, Edwin R., Brookljn, N. Y. 

Allen, Elara 0., Enfield, Ct. 

Allen, Charles R., Hartford, Ct 

Allen, Mrs. Esther, North Granville, N. Y. 

Allen, George W., Amherst. Mass. 

Allen, Mrs. Mercy D., Sterling, Ct. 

Allen, Dea. R. D. H.. Terry vllle, Ct 

Allen, R. J., Uotchkissvllie, Ct 

Allen, William E., Hartford, Ct. 

Allen, William E, West Wllllamsfield, 0. 

Allender, Charlotte M., New London, Ct. 

Allender, Thomas, do. 

Allender, William, do. 

Almy, William T., Norwich, Ct. 

Alvord, Rev. Frederick, Newton, Mass. 

Alvord, Mrs. Sarah E., Shelburne, Mass. 

Amory, Miss Frances E., Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Ame?, Charles E., Haverhill, Mass. 

Anderson, John, Boston, Mass. 

Anderson, Rev. Joseph, Norwalk, Ct. 

Anderson, Mrs. Annie 8., do. 

Andrews, Catherine P., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Andrews, E. A., New York. 

Andrews, Mrs. Wilson, Petersham, Mass. 

Andrus, Frances M., Hartford, Ct 

Andrus Mrs. Julia B., do. 

Anthony, Dea. John L., Westport, Mass. 

Anthony, Marcus, Hancock, N. H. 

Anthony, Mrs. Marcus, do. 

Arms, Rev. William F., Newtown, Ct 

Arnold, George S., Angelica, N. Y. 

Arnold, Mrs. William R., South Woodstock, Ct 

Atkins, Mrs. S. A., Paybrook, 0. 

Atwater, Mrs. I. C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Atwater, Dea. Lyman, Bennington, Yt 

Atwater, Miss Nancy, New Haven, Ct 

Atwood, Mrs. Betsey C, Pelham, N. H. 

Austin, Alvin, Wheaton, HI. 

Austin, Mrs. Anson, Suffield, Ct 

Avery. Mrs. Maria. Watrrville, N. Y. 

Ayer, Rev. F. D., Mllford, N. H. 

Ayer, Mrs. M. E., da 

Ayer, Miss Mary E., Bradford, Vt 

Ayrault, Mrs, Huldah, Fairport N. Y. 

Ay res, Miss Mary E., Romeo, Mich. 

Bacon, Jane, New London, Ct 

Bacon, Mrs. Lucy A.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Baker, Albert C, Chicopee, Mass. 

Baker, Miss H. N.. Boston, Mass. 

Baker, Levi W., Marlborough, Mass. 

Bailey, George H., Lawrence, Masa 

Baldwin, Chauncey E., North Cornwall, Ct 

Bancroft, A. N., Galetburg, III 

Bangs, William F., Chicopee, Mass. 

Barber, Augustus K., Concord, 111. 

Barber, C. H., Torrinjrford, Ct 
Barber, J. H. Windsor, Ct 
Barber, Mr*. Maria, Hartford, Ct 



Barden, Mrs. Charlotte M., Sipplcan, Mass. 
Bardwell, Mrs. Antepas, Belcbertown, Maas. 
Bardwell, Carlos, South Deerfleld, Mass. 
Barker, George W., Bridgeport, Ct 
Barlow, Joseph W., Lee, Mast. 
Barnard, Cecelia, Hartford, Ct 
Barney, Mrs. Sarah N., Farmington, Ct 
Barnum, Nathaniel, Danbury, Ct 
Barrel!, James 8., New Bedford. Mass. 
Barrows, Mrs. A. M., Wlllimantic, Ct 
Barstow, Mrs. Elisabeth B., Smyrna, N. Y. 
Bartholomew, Mrs. Abigail, Thetford, Yt 
Bartlett, Mrs. Henry, Hadley, Mass, 
Bartlett, Mrs. Sarah, Newton, Mass. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Sarah E., Newton Centre, Mass. 
Bartlett William, Derby, Ct 
Barton, Sarah J., Athol, Mass. 
Bass, Waterman C, Scotland, Ct 
Bassett, Austin B., Lee, Masa. 
Bassett, M]*s Elisabeth, Newburvport, Masa. 
Bassett, Miss Elisabeth P., Birmingham, Ct 
Basset, George F., Housatonic, Mass. 
Bates, Frederick, Pawtucket, R. L 
Bateham, Dea. M. B.. Columbus, 0. 
Battles, Miss Lucy, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Bayllss, Mrs. Sarah, Brooklyn, Ct 
Beach, Mrs. Harriet E., Stratford, Ct 
Beach, Mrs. Lorintha A., Stratford, Ct 
Beach, Alexander R., Vernon, Ct 
Beadle, Mrs. Mirancy, WalUngford, Ct 
Beardsley, Frederick J., Stratford, Ct 
Beardsley, Miss Marcla, Bridgeport, Ct 
Beardsley, Miss Maria, do. 

Beebe, Miss Mary R., Ellington, Ct 
Beers, Moses W., Has ton, Ct 
Belden, Mrs. Mary E., Newlngton, Ct 
Bell, Charles, New York. 
Beman, Mrs. Jonas, Hadley, Mats. 
Bement John, BeloK, Wis. 
Bemis, Miss Julia, Lincoln, Mass. 
Benedict Alfred K, Brockport, N. Y. 
Benedict, Miss Betsey, Sherburne, N. Y. 
Benjamin, Mrs. Everard, New Haven, Ct 
Bennltt, Dea. George C, Bridgwater, Ct 
Berry, Miss Anna D., Concord, N. H. 
Berry, Leonora Kunsler. New York. 
Berry, Thomas S. do. 

Betta, Hattie C, Stamford, Ct 
Betts, Mary A. do. 

Bigelow, Sarah A., Hartford, Ct 
Bigelow, Mrs. William, Lincoln, Mass. 
Billings, Miss Ann, West Roxbury, Masa. 
Billings, Mrs. D. P., Palmer, Mass. 
Billings, Noyes, New London, Ct 
Birdseye, Lucia C, Middletown, Ct 
Biscoe, William, Leicester, Mass. 
Bishop, George 8., Easthampton, Mass. 
Blackinton, Mrs. P. F., AtUeborough, * 
Blake, Mrs. Emeline, West Roxbury, ' 
Blakeslee, John a, Coventry, N. Y. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Carrie A, Griswold, Ct 
Blanchard, Mrs. Charlotte, Wilmington, 
Blanchard, Hiram W., Watertown, Wia. 
Blass, Mrs. Julia, Durhun, N. Y. 
Blatchley, William, Hartford, Ct 
Bliss, Henry, Springfield, Mass. 
Bloodgood, Rev. A. L., N. Hartford, Ct 
Bly, Albert, Whitlnsvllle. Mass. 
Boardman, Dea. Benjamin, Lawrence, Man. 
Boardraan, N. C, Falrhaven, Ct 
BodweU, Anson G., Topeka, JUn. 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



97 



BodweU, Charles A., Topeka, Kan. 
Bodwell, Elisabeth, do. 

Bodwell, Emeline, do. 

Bodwell, Mary E., do. 

Bodwell, Sherman B., do. 
Bole*, Jarrls, Chester, Ct 
Boland, Mrs. Julia, Homer, N. T. 
Boltwood, Henry L., Lawrence, Mas*. 
Bond, Mrs. Thomas, Wilmington, Mass. 
Boon, James, Oswego, N. T. 
Booth, Mrs. Mary, Candor, N. T. 
Borden, John, Cooper, Mich. 
Boexwick, George, Southbury, Ct. 
Bonrell, Mrs. Charles, West Hartford, Ct. 
Boaworth, Ber. Nathan, Falrport, N. Y. 
BoTey, Dea. John, Bath, Me. 
Bowker, Ber. J. B., Phlllipston, Mass. 
Boyd, Frederic 8., New York. 
Boyd, Samuel, Marlborough, Mass. 
Boyle, Mrs. Ellen 8., Oswego, N. Y. 
Boynton, Rer. Charles, Watertown, Wis. 
Boynton, Mrs. Sarah L., do. 

Bradlee, Mary L., Boston, Mass. 

Bradley, Dwlght P., Lee. Mass. 

Bradley, Edward A., do. 

Bradley, George H., do. 

Bradley, James W., do. 

Bradley, Frederick, Derby, Ct 

Bradley, Hanover, Warsaw, N. Y. 

Bradley, James W., Batavla, III. 

Bradnack, Rer. Isaac R., Cambria, N. Y. 

Brainard, Lucy A., Hartford, Ct 

Brewer, Cyrus, Dorchester, Mats. 

Bridgman, Mrs. Jernaha, 8outh Amherst, Mass. 

Bridgman, William H., New York. 

Bridgman, W. S., Hartford, Ct 

Brigga, Edwin, Boston, Mats. 

Brigham, Lorlman 8., Marlborough. Maw. 

Bristol, Mrs. Isaac, New Mllford, Ct 

Branson, Miss Mary, Stratford, Ct 

Brooks, Augustus T., Salem, Mass. 

Brooks, Miss Emilia A., Stratford, Ct 

Brooks, Henry, Plymouth Hollow, Ct. 

Brooks, Dea. Samuel, Chicago, III. 

Broubeck, Mrs. Abigail, Newbury, Mass. 

Brown, Asa H., Ballardrale, Mass. 

Brown, Dearborn 8., Raymond, N. H. 

Brown, Horace, New Britain, Ct. 

Brown, Mrs. Jacob, 2d, Fltchburg, Mass. 

Brown, Mrs. Mary B., Grafton, 0. 

Brown, Mary &, Plalnrllle, Ct 

Brown, Samantha C, Elyria, 0. 

Brown, Miss 8. E., Andorer, Mass. 

Brown, T. B. , Bos ton, Mass. 

Brown, Dea. William A., Cheshire, Ct. 

Brown. Rer. WllUam R, Newark, N. J. 

Browning, John B., New Haven, Ct 

Brush, Jarrls, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brush, Mrs. Jarrls, do. 

Buckingham, D. w., New Haren, Ct 

Buffum. Mary E., Manchester, N. II. 

Bulkky, Miss Mary A., New London, Ct. 

Barge, Edward A.. Holtts. N. H. 

Burgese, Samuel F., Morris, Ct 

Burrap, Edwin 8., FHchborg, Mass. 

Burnham, Harriet P., New Preston, Ct 

Burhanti Peter, Lowell, Ind. 

BarreU, David, Kalamaaoo, Mich. 

Burrlu, Dea. H. B., East AMngton, Mass. 

Burroughs, Mrs. Carolina 8., Bridgeport, Ct 

Burt, Edward, East Loogmcadow, Mass. 

Burt, Marshall, do. 

Burton, Rer. H. N., Newbury, Yt 

Burtt, Kirk D., Lawrence, Mast. 

Bum, Miss M., Kalamaaoo, Mich. 

Bush, John L., Spencer, Mass. 

BushneU, Rer. Horace, Jr., Allensrllie, Ind. 

Butler, Albert L., Hartford. Ct 

Butler, Augusta, New London, Ct 

Butler, Mrs. Catharine 0., Vernon, Ct 

Butler, Charles W. t Hartford. Ct 

" * -.MraK.FHchbtirtMasa. 

», Roman M. , New Hertford Center, Ct 
**HHam F. f New Bedftcd, Mass. 
Mte Bttaabeth M^wBttr, N. H. 



Calm, Edward 0.. Newburgh, 0. 
Caldwell, Mrs. Minerva, East Durham, N. Y. 
Calhoun, Dea. Jededlah, Cornwall Bridge, Ct 
Camp, Isabella P., Hartford, Ct 
Camp, Mrs. Cella, Tallmadge, O. 
Camp, Miss Sarah P., Oxford, Ct 
Camp, J. W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Campbell, Mrs. R., Xewburyport, Mass. 
Campfield, Elisabeth W., Newark, N, J. 
Capron. Mrs. C. D., Cx bridge, Mass. 
Card, Mrs. Lydia M., Norwich, N. Y. 
Carleton, Henry B., Lawrence, Mass. 
Carpenter, Mrs. II. «., Barre, Vt 
Carpenter, Rev. Henry W., Danby, N. Y. 
Carpenter, James P., Hartford, Ct 
Carpenter, Mrs. J. P., Hartford, Ct 
Carruth, Cortland, Vernon, N. Y. 
Carruth, Url, Berlin, Wis. 
Carruth, Isaac, West Andorer, Mass. 
Carter, Burwell, Plainvllle, Ct. 
Cary, Henry. Scotland, Ct 
Cary, Mrs. Mary D., Foxborough, Mm*. 
♦Caswell, Mrs. Mary, Edwanlsvllle, III. 
Cate, Mrs. Abigail W., Northwood, N. H. 
Champlln, Edmund L., New York. 
Champlln, Oliver P., Stafford Springs, Ct 
Chandler, Dea. James, do. 

Chandler, Rer. John, North Woodstock, Ct 
Chandler, Miss Kate P., Lawrence, Msss. 
Chandler, Myron 8., Lunenburgh, Vt 
Chaney, Miss Mary P., New London, Ct 
♦Chapln, Japhet, Chlcopee, Mass. 
Cbapln; Miss Julia A., do. 
Chapman, Francis A., Portland, Ct 
Chapman, Silas, Milwsukee, Wis. 
Chapman, William P., Norwich, N. Y. 
Chappell, William 8., New London, Ct 
Chase, Adna. Piermont N. H. 
Chase, Mrs. Mary M., Fall River, Mass. 
Chase, Mrs. Sarah G., Hanover, N. U. 
Cheater, Mary, New London, Ct 
Chew, Alice, do. 

Child, Mrs. Bela, Thetford, Ct 
ChUd, Mrs. Ellen M., South Woodstock, Ct 
Chipman, Miss Delia A.. Wllllrosntlc, Ct 
Chittenden, Mrs. S. B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Choate, Dr. David, Salem, Mass. 

Churchill, George, Galesburg, 111. 

Clapp, Charles, Jr., Bath, Me. 

Clapp, Miss Harriet, West Roxbury. Mass. 

Clapp, Rev. Luther, Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Clapp, Mrs. Nancy E., Bath, Me. 

Clark, Allen O., Canterbury, Ct 

Clark, Charles, Enfield, Ct. 

Clark, Eber F., Fltchburg, Mass. 

Clark, Edward L.. Orange, Ct 

Clark, Henry 0. , Westfield, Mass. 

Clark, Dea. Israel, Plymouth, Mass, 

Clark, Mary, A., Woodbridge, Ct 

Clark, Sarah £., do. 

Clark, James P., East Medway, Mass. 

Clark, Mrs. James P., do. 

Clark, J. Warren, do. 

Clark, Miss Jane 0., New London, Ct 

Clark, John H., North Chelmsford, Mass. 

Clark, Joshua, Medford, Mass. 

Clark, Dea. William L., Akron, 0. 

Clarke, Stephen, East Whately, Mass. 

Clary, Cephas, Deerfleld, Mass. 

Cleavland, Luther, Reading, N. Y. 

Cleveland, Rufus, HitchcockvlUe, Ct 

Clifford. Martin, Fltchburg, Mass. 

Cluff, Mrs. Chloe, North Granville, N. Y. 

Cobb, Henry E., Newton, Mass. 

Cobb, Rer. II. W., North Andorer, Mass. 

Cobb, Nathan, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Cobb. Solon, Westport, Meat. 

Coe, Miss Harriet L., Newark, N. J. 

Coe, Mrs. Frederick A., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Coe, George &, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Coe, Israel, do. 

Coe, Mrs. Huldab, do. 

Coe, Miss Mary L., New York. 

Coe. Thomas U., Bangor, Me. _ 

Coffin, Charles H., Newburyport. Mass. 

Coffin, 0. Y., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



98 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Colby, Mrs. Levi, Weston, Ct 
Cole, Henry R Lafayette, N. Y. 
Collord, Mm. Hester, Columbus, 0. 
Colt, William H., Hartford, Ct. 
Colton, Horatio, Chicopee, Mats. 
Conant, Mrs. Amos, Nashua, N. n. 
Condlt, Jennie M., Lee. Mass. 
Conklin, Dea. John J., New Milford, Ct. 
Connell, Key. Darld, West Hawley, Mass. 
Conrad, Rev. C. E., Quincy, 111. 
Cook, Charles, Jr., Hadley, Mass. 
Cook, Charles, 2d, do. 

Cook, Miss C. C, Norwalk, Ct. 
Cook, E. E., Hadley, Mass. 
Cook, John L., Lawrence, Mass. 
Cook, Rev. Joseph T., Geneseo, III 
Cook, Miss Mary E., Waterbury, Ct. 
Cook, Samuel J., Lunenburg, Mass. 
Cooley, Mrs. Clarissa A., New York. 
Cooley, Henry A., Hartford, Ct. 
Cooledge, Miss Mary E, Leicester, Mara. 
Coomes, Mrs. H. B M E. Longmeadow, Mass. 
Cooper, Miss A., Boston, Mass. 
Cooper, Rev. Alvin P., West Durham, N. Y. 
Copeland. Mrs. L. A., East Douglas, Mass. 
Cor bin, Mrs. Franclna T., New Britain, CI 
Corbln, Philip, do. 

Cordley, Rev. Richard, Lawrence, Kan. 
Cordley, Mrs. Mary, do. 

Corliss, Arad. 8., East Corinth, Vt 
Corliss, Francis A., New York. 
Cornish, Ivory 8., New Bedford, Mass. 
Cotton, Miss M. 8., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Cowlea, Eseklel, Plalnvllle, CI 
Craft, Miss Ellen, West Roxbury, Mass. 
Craft, G., do. 

Crandall, Miss Jane E., Stonington, Ct 
Crane, Robert F., Waterbury, Cl 
Crittenden, Mrs. Rebecca, Mlddletown, Ct 
Crittenden, Rev. Richard, North Guilford, Ct. 
Cromwell, Henry, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Crosby, Abel C, Milford. N H. 
Crosby, Otis, Pepperell, Mass. 
Crosby, Dea. 8. 8., West Amesbury, Mass. 
Culver, Mrs. Emma F., Chicago, I1L 
Culver, H. L^. Chicago, 111. 
Cummings, Charles, Medford, Mass. 
Cunningham. John v.. Naperville, 111. 
Currier, William, Newburyport, Mass. 
Curtis, Miss Cornelia L, Stratford, Ct. 
Curtis, Mrs. Harriet E,, Sherburne, N. Y. 
Curtis, John E., Marlborough, Mass. 
Cushraan, William P., Marshfleld, Mass. 
Cutler, Dr. William W., New London, Ct. 

Dame, Henry A M Orford, N. H. 

Dame, Miss Lucy E., do. 

Dame, Mrs. Lucy 8., do. 

Dame, Miss Martha T., do. 

Dame, Theodore 8.. Boston. Mass. 

Danforth. Miss Emily, Mlddletown, Conn. 

Darling, Mrs. Clara B., Warsaw, N. Y. 

Dart, Miss Emma, New London, Ct. 

Dascomb, Mrs. P., West Andover, Mass. 

Davies, Rev. James. Delpbos, 0. 

Davis, Abby, New London, Ct 

Davis, Fanny W. Weston, Mass. 

Davis, George W., Whitlnsville, Mass. 

Davis, Mrs. Julia E. M.. West Roxbury, 

Day, Mrs. E. C, Bristol, Ct 

Day, John C, Hartford, Ct. 

Day, Mrs. P. B., Hollls, N. H. 

Day, Miss Sarah E., East Woodstock, Ct 

Dean, Asahel, Foxborough. Mass. 

Dean, Philander W., Taunton, Mass. 

Deane, Rev. James, East Canaan, Ct 

De Forest, Andrew W., New Haven, Ct 

"Denlson, Mrs. A. C, Portland. Ct 

Denlson, John 0., Hartford, Wis. 

Dewey, James R., Chicago. I1L 

Dewey, Miss Mary 0., Northampton, Mass. 

Dibble, William F., Bridgeport, Ct. 

Dlckerman, Mrs. Caroline. Rockibrd, DX 

2>J<*erman, Rev. Isaac^Westville, Ct 
Dickamaa, J. P., New Haven, Ct 
DtckitiBon, Lieut. Enot, South Amherst, 



Dickinson, Mrs. Levi, Iladley, Mass, 
Dickinson, Quartus L., Haydenvllle, Mass. 
Dickinson, Miss Mary, Whately, Mass. 
Dickinson, Mrs. E. M., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Susan 11., Hadley, Mass. 
Dimond, Eseklel, Concord, N. EL 
Dixon, Courtland P., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dixon, Mrs. Charlotte C, Belolt, ^ia. 
Dodge, Vienna, Webster, N. EL 
Dodge, Mrs. Mary 8., Boston, Mass. 
Doherty, Hugh, do. 

Doten, Bartlett, Bridgeport Ct 
Douglas, Amos, Franklin, N. Y. 
Douglass, Mrs. Laura, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Downe, Mrs. Louisa 11., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Drake, Mrs. Eunice, Boston, Mass. 
Draper, Miss Emma L., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Drew, Samuel, Birmingham, Ct 
Drew, Rev. a F., Cobat, Vt 
Drown, Elizabeth. Keene, N. H. 
Dunbar, Mrs. Julia, Bristol, Ct 
Dudley, Mrs. Frances 8., New York. 
Dunham, Mrs. Harriet L., New York. 
Dunning, Charles, West Meriden, Ct 
Dunning, Lovell, Champlain, N. Y. 
Durfee, Miss Annie G., Fall River, Mass. 
Durfee, Miss Hattie M., do. 
Durham, Miss Sophia, Belolt, Wis. 
Dwight, Miss Francis E., Stockbridge, Masa. 
Dwight, Rev. U. E. 
Dwight Norman, Ann Arbor. Mich. 
Dyer, Rev. 8. 0., Torringford, Ct 

Barnes, Mrs. Rachel U., Wilmington, Mass. 

Earnshaw, John B., Walnut Hills, 0. 

Easland, Allen, Bridgeport, Ct 

Eastman, Mrs. Orpha L. C, Hennlker, N. H. 

Eaton, Miss E. L.. Salem. Mats. 

Eaton, Ebeneser N., Andover, Masa. 

Eaton, William, Boston, Mass. 

Edmond, Henry V M Norwich, Ct 

Edwards, Mrs. Fanny, Mlddletown, N. Y. 

Bella, Stephen D., Walton, N. Y. 

Eldred, Miss Caroline W., North Falmouth, Mai 

Eldridge, Benjamin, Springfield, Mass. 

Eldridge, Mrs. Eliza, do. 

Elliot, Asahel N., Barre, Mass. 

Elliott, Miss Betsey M., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Elliott, Henry G., Bridgeport, Ct 

Elliott, Rev. John E., Rldgebury, Ct 

Ellis, Mrs. Annie M.. Decatur, HL 

Ellis, Mrs. 8tephen, Newton Center, Mass, 

Ellis, Oliver, Fitchburg, Masa. 

Ells, Mrs. James, Oswego, N. Y. 

Ellsworth, Mary A., Plymouth, Ct 

Elmore, Samuel, East Hartford, Ct 

Elton, T., East Canaan, Ct 

ElwelL James W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ely, Mrs. Ethan 0., Longmeadow, Mass. 

Ely, Mrs. Harriet E., Newton, Masa. 

Ely, Heman. Elyrla, 0. 

Ely, Mason W., Longmeadow, Mass. 

Ely, William B., Newton, Masa. 

Emery, Joseph W., Quincy, HL 

Emerson, Rev. 0., Jr., Sabula, Iowa. 

Evans, Edward R, Barre, Vt, 

Evans, Ira H., do. 

Evans, Rev. L, J., Walnut Hills, 0. 

Evarte, Nathan H., KJlllngworth, Ct 

Everett, Miss Uuldah, Plalnvllle, Ct 

Everett, J. D., South Deerfleld, Mass. 

Fairbank, Mrs. 8arah E., Newton, Mass. 
Fairbanks, Rev. John B., Monroe, Wla. 
Falrchild, Mrs. Susan A.. Stratford, Ct ' 
Fairfield, J. R,, Boston, Mass. 
Farley, Mrs. Polly, West Creek. Ind. 
Farnham, Roswell, Bradford, Vt 
Farnham, Mrs. Susan, North Adams, Mass. 
Farnsworth, Mrs. Sarah W., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Faraum, Mrs. Judith A. . West Concord, N. H. 
Farrar, Mrs. Adeline. Lincoln, Mass. 
Farrar, Francis, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Farrar, Miss EL, Pepperell, Mass. 
Fay. Rev. Preecott Lancaster, N. H. 
Fclch, George W., Nei " 



Newburyport, Mass. 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



99 



Mow*, Mta C. R, Salem, Mm. 

Fellows, Rev. F. E., Kennebunk, Me. 

Fenn, William R, Plymouth, Ct. 

Fish, George W., Kaiamasoo, Mich. 

Pish, Mrs. Harriet E., do. 

fisher, Fbher A., Brooklyn, N. T. 

Fisher, Jabes O., Westborough, Mass. • 

Flsk, L. M., Sturbridge, Mass. 

Fbk, Mrs. Roth 0., Upton, Mass. 

Flake, John D., Brookfield, Mass. 

Fitch, Mrs. 0. 0., Connewango, N. T. 

Fitch, George W., Walton, N. T. 

Fists, Mrs. Charles H., Medway, Mass. 

Flagg, Miss Sarah, Springfield, Mats. 

Flanders, Joseph, Haverhill, Mass. 

Fletcher, Mrs. H. 0., Manchester, Mass. . 

Fobes, 8. P., Lindenville, 0. 

Foot*, Arthur W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Foote, Daniel E., Belvidere, IlL 

Foote, Isaac, Norwich. N. Y. 

Foote, Samuel I., Sweden, N. T. 

Forbes, Charles, East Hartford, Ct. 

Ford, Charles R, N. Brldgewater, Mass. 

Ford, Horace, East Olereland, 0. 

Foster, Isaac, North Andorer, Mass. 

Foster, Mrs. Elba A., Hennlker, N. H. 

Fountain, Mrs. Sarah A., Watertown, Wis. 

Fbwler, Oeorge A., Guilford, Ct 

Fowler, Richard, do. 

Fowler, Wallace G., Stafford Springs, Ct 

Fox, Mrs. M. L., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Fraser, James R, Parkman, 0. 

Fraser, John G., do. 

Freeman, Isaac, New Bedford, Mass. 

Freeman. Robert, Hartford, wis. 

French, Lysander, Montague, Mass. 

Friable, Miss Sarah C, Mendon, I1L 

Fuller, Mrs. A. R, Wayland, Mass. 

Fuller, Charles D., Hartford, Ct 

Fuller, Dea. George, Suffleld, Ct 

Fuller, Miss Jane, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Folic/, Mrs. Mary L. f Granby, Mass. 

Gage, B. F., Haverhill, Mass. 

Ganett, Mrs. Sarah, New London, Ct 

Gardner, Maria, East Woodstock, Ct. 

Gates, Rer. L. M., Hillsdale, N. Y. 

Gates, Sophia C, Hartford, Ct 

Gay, Miss Selina, Stoughton, Mass. 

Gay, William H., Sharon, Mass. 

Gaylord, Henry, Cheshire, Ct 

Gaylord, Dea. John, South Hadley Falls, Mass. 

Geer, Rer. Heman, Warme, 0. 

Gerould, Mrs. Elisabeth D., Worcester, Mass. 

Glbbs, George L., Whltlnsrille, Mass. 

Glbbs, Miss R, Sturbrtdge, Mass. 

Gibson, Samuel A., Fitchburg, Mass. 

GMdings, Henry A., Hartford, Ct 

Gilford, Fulton, Elgin, 111. 

Gilbert, Miss Emily F., Ware Tillage, Mass. 

Gilbert, Mrs. Harriet T., Portland, Ct 

Gilbert, Joseph, Pomfret, Ct 

Gilbert, Joseph, Ware, Mass. 

Gilbert, Mrs. Warebam C, Belchertown. Mass. 

Giles, Miss Elisabeth, Gloucester. Mass. ' 

Gfllett, Garland, Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Gillette, Mbs Kate, Hartford, Ct 

Oilman, Zeeb, Plermont, N. H. 

GDmore, Mrs. Polly, West Rutland, Vt 

GUmore, Mrs. Thomas, Greenwich, Mass. 

Gladwin, Selden, Higganum, Ct 

Gieason, Mrs. Abel, Weston. Mass. 

Gieason, Elbridge, New Braintree, 

Gfidden, R. B., Enfield, Ct 

Goddard, Rer. E. N., Markesan, Wis. 

Goddard, Timothy R, 8. Londonderry, Yt 

Gofle, B. W., MiUbury, Mass. 

Goodale, Jane E., Plainrilk, Ct 

Goodwin, Charles, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Goodwin, Charles 8., Hartford, Ct 

Goodwin, Mrs. Daniel R, Watenille, N. Y. 



Goodwin, William B., do. 

Goodwin, Miss Maria L., do. 
Goodwin, Rer. Edward P~ Oohm 
Goodwin, Mrs. BDen M., do. 

Goodwin, MksJosia, do. 



0. 



Goodyear, Willis, Mt Carmel, Ct 
Gould, Dea. A., Andorer, Msss. 
Gould, Dea. A. P., Plermont, N. H. 
Gould, Daniel, Salem, Mass. 
Gould, Edward, Portland, Me. 
Gould, Miss Isabella, Stratford, Ct 
Gould. Mrs. P. P., Phillipston, Mass. 
Goulding, James I., Athol, Mass. 
Gowing, Mrs. James, Wilmington, Mass. 
Grant, Rer. Henry M., East Canaan, Ct 
Grare, Miss Sarah E., Madison, Ct. 
Graves, Hollis D., Sunderland, Mass. 
Graves, Rev. N. D., Beloit, Wis. 
Green, Sydney, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Gretman, Deborah K., Athens, N. Y. 
Grldley, John, Farmington, Ct 
Griggs, Mrs. Charlotte, Bristol, Ct 
Grosvenor, Louisa, Pomfret, Ct 
Grout, Dea. Joel. Spencer, Mass. 
G rover, Mrs. Mellta C, Romeo, Mich. 
Guernsey, Mrs. Fanny W., Kalamasoo, Mich. 
Guild, Miss Clarissa, Walpole, Mass. 

Halle, Hon. William, Hinsdale, N. H. 

Halbert, Mrs. N. A., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Hale, Benjamin W., Hanover, N. H. 

Hale, Miss Mary 8., Salem, Mass. 

Hale, Miss Sarah E., do. 

Hale, Rev. John G., East Poultney, Vt. 

Hale, Philetus C, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Hall, Dea. Harvey 8., Walllngford, Ct. 

Hall, Miss C. E.. Ashtabula, 0. 

Hall, Henry C, New York. 

Hall, Joel, Walllngford. Ct 

Hall, Mrs. Mary &, Point Douglas, Minn. 

Hall, Mrs. Mary J., Lafayette, N. Y. 

Halsey, Rev. Samuel P., Rockaway, N. J. 

Ham, 8. L., , N. Y. 

Hamilton, Alfred K., Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Hamilton, Mre.THary L., do. 
Hamilton, Miss Mary E., Lyme, N. H. 
Hammond, Charles G., Chicago, 111. 
Hammond, Rev. Henry L., Chicago, III. 
Hanchett, Miss Maria, Suffleld, Ct. 
Hanmer, Miss Lucy, Wethersfleld, Ct. 
Harlow, Mrs. Mary K., Springfield, Vt. 
Harris, Dea. William P., Groton, Ct 
Harris, William H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Harris, Windsor, South Amherst, Mass. 
Harrison, Mrs. Ellen M., North Adams, Mass. 
Harrison, Miss Maria, Waterbury, Ct 
Hart, Harriet Lavinia, Guilford, Ct 
Hart, Miss Lydia Griffin, do. 
Hart, J. Henry, New Britain, Ct 
Hart, Jane E., Plalnville, Ct 
Hart, Timothy E., Candor, N. Y. 
Harvey, Mrs. Catharine, West Roxbury, Mas?. 
Haskell, John G., West Amesbury, Mass. 
Haskell, Mrs. Orinda, Peacham, Vt. 
Hatch, Dea. Joseph E., New Preston, Ct 
Hatch, W. E., Dexter, Mich. 
Hatch, William R, Lawrence, Mass. 
Hathaway, James L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hawks, William A., WllUamsburgh, Masa 
Hawley, Edmond S., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Hawley, Mrs. F. E., do. 

Hawley, Dea. Lewis, Union City, Mich. 
Hawley, William H., Bridgeport, Ct 
Hawley, William, Rid gen eld, Ct 
Hawley, Catharine, do. 
Hawley, Mary A., do. 
Hayden, Samuel B., Windsor, Ct 
Hayes, Mrs. Sarah B., Harwinton, Ct 
Hayse, Walter, Townsend, Mass. 
Hay ward, Mrs. Charles, Braintree, Mass. 
Hay ward, Joseph E., Whltinsville, Mass. 
Hayward, Mrs. Martha W., Ashby, Mass. 
Hayward, L. A., Warsaw, N. Y. 
Heard, Mrs. Abel, Weston, Mass. 
Henlon, David I., Lyndonville, N. Y. 
Henry, Rev. W. D., Jamestown, N. Y. 
Herbert, Mrs. Sarah A., Newbury, Mass. 
Hill, John C, Saugatuck, Ct 
Hill, Mrs. Martha E. K' Vernon, Ct. 
Hill, Mrs. Maria, Rosendale, Wis. 
BJU, Thomas B., do. 



100 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Hill, Henry M., RosendaJe, Win. 

Hill, George C, do. 

Hills, Burritt, Plainvllle, Ct. 

Hills, Mrs. Harriet B., Torrlngton, Ct 

Hinckley, Reuben K., Killlngworth, Ct. 

Hlne, Daniel, Tallmadge, 0. 

Hine, EMott P., Southbury, Ct. 

Hlne, Dea. Stephen, Franklin, N. Y. 

Hlnsdill, Miss Celestla R., Morris, 111. 

Hitchcock, Abel, Homer, N. Y. 

nitchcock, Charles, Deerfleld, Mass. 

Hitchcock, Henry E., Sturbrldge, Mass. 

Hitchcock, Mrs. Martha R., Norwich, Ct 

Hoadley, Robert L.. Plymouth, Ct. 

HoadJey, Mrs. Martha A., do. 

Hobart, Mrs. Betsey, Berlin, Yt. 

Hobart, Mrs. Charlotte P., Belolt, Wis. 

Hobart, William, Bralntree, Mass. 

Hodges, Wlllard, Brighton, N. Y. 

Holden, Mrs. M. L., Fltchburg, Mass. 

HolUster, George, Hartford, Ct 

Holman, Mrs. George W., Fltchburg, Mass. 

Holmes, Dea. Branch, Plymouth, Mass. 

Holmes, Miss Ellen L., East Hartford, Ct. 

Holmes, Mrs. James M., Waterbury, Ct. 

Holmes, Mary G., New York. 

Holmes, William B., do. 

Holt, Miss B. EL, West Andover, Mass. 

Holt, E. Frances, Andover, Mass. 

Hooker, Rer. Asahel M., Grasshopper Falls, Kan. 

Hooker, Mrs. Mary, do. 

Hooker, Rev. Edward P., Medford, Mass. 

Hopkins, Charles, Norwich, N. Y. 

Hopklnson, A. G., Cleveland, 0. 

Hotchkiss. John H., Yorkville, Wis. 

Hough, Miss Harriet W., New Haven, Ct. 

Hovenden, Rev. Robert, Garrettsville, 0. 

Hovey, George L., Deerfleld, Mass. 

Howard, Mrs. Loulsa-Pompey, N. Y., 

Howard, Sarah, East Woodstock, CV 

Howe, Charles M., Marlborough, Mass. 

Howe, Oliver C, Brookfleld, Mass. 

Howe, Dea. Rufus, Marlborough, Mass. 

Howe, William G., ' do. 

Howland, Dr. Asa. Barre, Mass. 

Hoyt, Mrs. Lucretla, Nor walk, Ct 

Hubbard, Edward D., Clinton, Ct 

Hubbard, James B., Hlgganum, Ct 

Hubbard, Rev. James M., Boston, Mass. 

Hubbard, Miss Maria, Hadley, Mass. 

Hubbard, Prof. OUver P., Hanover, N. H. 

Hubbard, Mrs. Sarah, Durham, N. Y. 

Hubbard, Miss Sarah, New Haven, Ct 

Hubbard, Miss Elizabeth J., Durham, N. Y. 

Hubbell, Mrs. Harriet T., North Stonlngton, Ct 

Hubbell, Mrs. Luclna, Fltchburg, Mass. 

Hull, Mrs. Mercy, Homer, N. Y. 

Humiston, Lyman, Wallingford, Ct. 

Humphrey, John E., Chicago. 11L 

Humphrey, Mrs. Mary E., Winchester, N. H. 

Humphrey, Mrs. Mary R., Jamaica Plains, Mais. 

Hunt, Mrs. Nancy C, East Douglass, Mass. 

Hunt, Miss Sarah H., Auburn, N. Y. 

Hunter, Mrs. WHliam.Springwater, N. Y., 

Hurd, Dea. Stephen, Warsaw, N. Y. 

Huse, Samuel, Lawrence, Mass. 

Husted, William, Granville. I1L 

Hutchingson, Miss Almlra, Mansfield, Mass. 

Hutchlns, Mrs. Ezra T., Newton Center, Mass. 

Hutchins, Miss Mary, Canterbury, Ct 

Hutchinson, Freeman, Mllford, N. H. 

Hutchinson, Dr. Joseph C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hyatt, Mrs. Sarah, Lunenburg, Mass. 

Hyde, Albert, Greenwich, Ct. 

Hyde, Mrs. A. B., Vernon Depot, Ct 

Ide, Rev. Alexis W., Stafford Springs, Ct 
Hsley, Miss Elizabeth, Newbury, Mass. 
Ingersoll, Mrs. Eliza H., Greenfield, " 
Irwin, Theodore, Oswego, N. Y. 
Ives, Mrs. Elisabeth, Bristol, Ct 

Jackson, Dea. John, Ansonla, Ct 

Jacobs, W. W., Hartford, Ok 
Jmrnea, N. N. t Newton Center, Mam 
"— -^ Ber. a R, Cheater, Vt 



Jenkins, Jerome B., Winchester, Mass. 
Jenney, Mrs. A. M., Galesburg, 111. 
Jenney, E. W., do. 

Jenney, Miss M. L., da 

Jenney, Mrs. 8. P., Fsirhaven, Mass. 
Jennings, Dea. Calvin, Brookfleld, Mass. 
Jennings, Dea. James B., Easton, Ct. 
Jennings, Mrs. Maria A., South port, Ct 
Jessup, Rev. Henry G., Westport, Ct 
Jessup, Willie, Bridgewater, Ct 
Jewell, Mrs. Susan B., Concord, N. H. 
Jewett, Miss Cynthia A., Fltchburg, Mass. 
Jewett, Mrs. Elizabeth, Whately, Mass. 
Johnson, Benjamin 8. .Haydenville, Mass. 
Johnson, Charles W., Muscatine, Iowa. 
Johnson, Anna Chase, do. 

Johnson, Sarah V., do. 

Johnson, Mrs. George E., Fltchburg, Mass. 
Johnson, Rev. T. H., Bethel, Vt 
Johnson. Mrs. Sarah J., North Andover, Mass. 
Jones, Hannah H., Hartford, Ct. 
Jones, John C, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Jones, Mrs. Julia M., Hinsdale, N. H. 
Judson, Dea. Silas P., Cornwall, Ct 

Keeler, Miss Sarah A., Ridgefield, Ct 

Kellogg, Mrs. N. 0., Vernon, Ct 

Kellogg, William, Hartford, Ct 

Kelsey, Dea. Ezra, Hlgganum, Ct 

Kelsey, Charles D., Columbus, 0. 

Kelsey, Francis D., do. 

Kendall, Albert, Whitewater, Wis. 

Kendall, Sarah H., East Concord, N. H. 

Kendrick. Mrs. Abigail, Clinton, Mass. 

Kenney, Mrs. Henry F., Fltchburg, Mass. 

Kent, Julia, New York City. 

Ketchum, Miss Susan, Harlem, N. Y. 

Ketchum, Edgar, Jr., do. 

Kilbourne, Russell, Paris Hill, N. Y. 

Kimball, Mm. Kllza C, West Haven, Ct 

Kimball, Mrs. Fanny W., Enfield, Mass. 

Kimball, Mrs. Philna, Madison, O. 

Kimball, Mrs. Sarah, Dunbarton, N. H. 

King, Rev. Berlah, Milton, Wis. 

King, Miss Emma, Amherst, Mass. 

King, Rufus, New York. 

Kingsbury, Albert, Keene, N. H. 

Kingsbury, Charles, do. 

Kingsbury, George, do. 

Kingsbury, Abljah W., Gllsam, N. H. 

Kingsbury, Joseph, Francestown, N. H. 

Kingsbury, Josiah, Surry, N. H. 

Kingsbury, William, do. 

Kingsley, Austin, Haydenville, Mass. 

Kingsley, Rev. David H., Elk Grove, DX 

Kinney, Charles N., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kinney, Henry C. New York. 

Kinney, Mrs. Louisa, Candor, N. Y. 

Knapp, Mrs. Levi 8., New Mllford, Ct 

Knevals, Caleb B., New York. 

Knight, Rebecca A., Mllford, N. H. 

Knouse, Rev. William H., North Greenwich, Ct 

Kyle, Miss M., Boston, Mass. 

Ladd, N. D., Sturbrldge, Mass. 
Lamb, Mrs. Lucy A., Greenfield, Mass. 
Lambert, William G., New York. 
Lane, Alice W.. Nashua, N. H. 
Lane, Charles A., Centervllle, N. Y. 
Lane, Mrs. Elvira, do. 
Lane, Joseph P., Killlngworth, Ct 
Lane, Mrs. Mary E., do. 
Lane, Rev. J. W., Whately, Mass. 
Lane, Mrs. Marian H., Norwich, Ct. 
Lane, R. J., East Ablngton, Mass. 
Lane, Thomas, New York. 
Lang, Mrs. E. V M Litchfield, Mich. 
Lansing, Mrs. E. B., Auburn, N. Y. 
Laskey, Mrs. Ann C, Wilmington, Mass. 
Lathrop, Mrs. Martha, Hartford, Ct 
* Laurie, Inglis, Owatonna, Minn. 
Laurie, J., Jr.,West Roxbury, Mass. 
Law, George, fltchburg, Mass. 



Lawrence, lira. Hannah M., Hollia. N. H. 
Lawrence, Otis W.. Haydenville, Mass. 
Lawton, Mrs. Sarah, South 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



101 



Leake, Dea. Elijah, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Learned, Dwight W., Plymouth, Ct 
Learned, Mrs. Edward, New London, Ct. 
Learenworth, Hits Elizabeth, Newtown, Ct 
Lee, Dea. Morris, Chesterfield. 111. 
Lee, Rev. Samuel H., No. Bridgewater, Mass. 
Lee, Miss Sarah, Newton Center, Mass. 
Lefavour, Mrs. L, Beverly, Mass. 
Lefarour, Miss Elizabeth, do. 
Leonard, Rer. Edwin, Rochester, Mass. 
Leonard, Howard, Griswold, Ct 
Leonard, Lucy E., do. 
Letts, James C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lewis, Mrs. H. M., Bristol, Ct. 
Lewis, Rer. Thomas A., Ware, Mass. 
Liggett, Rer. James D., Learenworth, Kan. 
Lillington, Mrs. Marilla, Stratford, Ct. 
Lincoln, Hon. Abraham. Washington, D. C. 
Lincoln, Charles 0., Chicopee, Mass. 
Lindsley, Alice H., Souihport, Ct 
Lindsley, Emily E., do. 

Lloyd, Rer. William A., St Charles, 111. 
Lock wood, Miss Deborah A., Bridgeport, Ct 
Lockwood, Samuel C, Springfield, Mass. 
Long, M. C., Boston, Mass. 
Loomis, F. B., New London, Ct 
Loomis, James S., Bridgeport, Ct. 
Loomis, Mrs. Janette S., Georgia, Vt 
Loomis, Dea. Z. W., Suffield, Ct 
Loomis, Mrs. Neeland, do. 
Lord, Rer. Charles, Buckland, Mass. 
Lord, Mrs. Jennett, Chester, Ct 
Lord, Mrs. Mary E., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Lord, Rev. Wm. H., MontpeUer, Vt 
Loring, J. P., Newton Center, Mass. 
Love, Rev. Wm. De Loss, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Lovejoy, Albert, North Andover, Mass. 
Lovell, Mrs. Almlra H., Springfield, Vt 
Lovett, John, Bererly, Mass. 
Luce, Augustus, Haydenrllle, Mass. 
Lyman, Mrs. Ella, Winchester, N. H. 
Lyman, Mrs. Harriet, Tallmadge, 0. 

McCaw, James, Norwich, N. Y. 
McCoy, Ker. James, Indianapolis, Ind. 
McCoy, John F., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McDonald, Eliza M., Ashtabula, 0. 
McDonald, Lyman M., do. 
McEwen, Harriet N., Buffalo, N. Y. 
McEwen, Wm. C, do. 
McEwen, Robert, do. 
McKeen, Miss Philena, Bradford, Vt 
McLaury, James 8., M.D., Walton, N. Y. 
McLeod, Rer. Hugh, Brentwood, N. H. 
McMurphy, Miss Mary, Hanover, N. H. 
Mc Vicar, Rer. Peter, Topeka, Kan. 
Mallory, James H., Williamsburgh, N. Y. 
Manwaring, Mrs. K. A., New London, Ct 
Manlore, James G., Rockford, 111. 
Mapes, Dea. Daniel, OtlsriUe, N. Y. 
Marsh, Edward H., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marsh, Edward W., Bridgeport, Ct 
Marsh, Miss Frances A, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Marsh, Samuel C, Spencer, Mass. 
Martin, Rer. Charles F.. Peru, IIL 
Martindale, Theodore, Greenfield, Mass. 
Marvin, Wm. E., Norwalk, Ct 
Mason, Mrs. Betsey H., Newton, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. C. A. 8., Wlnchendon, Mass. 
Mason, Charles D., Sturbridge, Mass. 
Mason, CoL Darius, Sheffield, Mass. 
Mason, Mrs. F. H., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Mason, Wm. H., Salem, IU. 
Mead, Mrs. Cornelius. Greenwich, Ct 
Mead, Miss Julia A. K., do. 
Mead, Roswell R., West Rutland, Vt 
Meeker, Miss Elisabeth W., Union, N. J. 
Merriam, Miss Amelia A., Westbo rough, Mass. 
Merrick, Samuel 0., CbJoopee, Mass. 
Merrill, Barzilla, Chicago, IIL 
Merrill, Moses, Methuen, Mass. 
Messlnger, Mrs. Daniel, FHchburg, Mass. 
Miles, Thomas M., Marlboioos^ Mass. 
Miller, Mrs. Daniel P., Btlou\Wis. 
Miller, Mrs. Sarah C., CWoajo,IlL 
Mlllerd, A. D. t >H.f. 



Mills, John, Windsor, Ct 
Mills, Miss Laura, West Hartford, Ct. 
Mills, Mrs. W. 8., Kalamazoo, Mich. . 
Mitchell, Frances E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Mitchell, Miss Lucretla, Hanover, N. II. 
Mix, James E., Tmyrille, Ct 
Moak, Mrs. Eliza U., Watertown, Wis. 
Monroe, Rev. Thomas E., Mount Vernon, 0. 
Monson, Mary J., Bridgeport, Ct 
Montague, Mrs. Sorter P., Gran by, Mass. 
Moody, James, WhhMnsvllle, Mass. 
Moore, Frances H., Hartford, Ct 
Moore, Dea. G. W., Warwick, Mass. 
Moore, Miss Harriet 8., Barnet, Vt 
Moore, Mrs. Sophia, Weston, Mass. 
Morris, Edward F., Monson, Mass. 
Morris, Mrs. Emeline W., West Hartford, Ct 
Morrison, Samuel W., Henniker, N. H. 
Morrow, Miss Ann, Suffield, Ct. 
Morse, Dea. C. N., Foxborough, Mass. 
Morse, Dea. Oliver, Spencer, Mass. 
Morton. Daniel F., Haydenville, Mass. 
Moses, Mrs. 8. A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Moseley, Mary E., Hartford, Ct. 
Mossman, Mrs. Harriet, Chicopee, Msss. 
Moulton, Curtis R., Beverly, Mass. 
Moulton, Joseph C, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Munyan, Emery, Haydenville, Mass. 
Murray, James K., Ballard vale, Mass. 
Murray, Miss Jsne, Norwich, Ct 
Murray, Miss Jennett, do. 
Murray, Mrs. John A., Geneva, N. Y. 
Muszey, Wm. Q., Spencer, Mass. 

Nash, Mrs. Colton G., Hadley, Mass. 
Neuman, Mrs. Elizabeth G., Torringford, Ct 
Newell, Nelson C, Longmeadow, Mass. 
Newman, Miss Phebe, Newbury port, Mats. 
Newton, David, Marlborough, Mass. 
Newton, Mrs. Eliza M., Henniker. N. U. 
Newton, Mrs. Ezra, High Forest, Minn. 
Newton, Philo 8., Hartford, Ct. 
Newton, Thomas H., Plymouth Hollow, Ct 
Nichols, Edward K., Hartford, Ct 
Nichols, Miss Ella J., WUmington, Mass. 
Nichols, Ezra, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Nichols, Joseph W., West Amesbury, Msss. 
Nichols, Rev. Starr H., Chicago, 111. 
Norris, Miss E. K., Salem, Mass. 
North, Mrs. Ann, Elmira, N. Y. 
North, Mrs. Jane H., New Britain, Ct 
North, Orin 8., do. 

North, Phineas, Torrington, Ct 
Northrop, Martha E., Griswold, Ct 
Norton, George T., Lisbon, 111. 
Noyes, E. M., Newark, N. J. 
Nutting, Prof. Rufus, Concord, 111. 

Ober, Miss Mary E., Beverly, Mass. 
Olmstead, Mrs. Mary J., Norwalk, Ct 
Orton, Rer. James, Thomaston, Me. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah, North Andorer, Msss. 
Owen, Miss Annette, Belchertown, Ct 
Oxnard, Rer. Frederick, Moline, IU. 

Packard, Mrs. Emily. Newton, Mass. 
Page, J. A., Montpelier, Vt 
Page, Mrs. J. A., do. 
Page, Frank, Candia, N. H. 
Paige, Mrs. Ann M., Wentworth, N. II. 
Paige, Dea. Paul W., Brimfield, Mass. 
Paine, Rer. J. A., Utica, N. Y. 
Paine, Rer. J. B., Westport, Ct 
Paine, Rer. Levi L., Famington, Ct 
Palmer, Mrs. Charlotte, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Palmer, Miss P. F, Boston, Msss. 
Pardee, Frank W., New Haven, Ct 
Parish, Ella E., Hartford, Ct 
Parker, Mary, Keene, N. H. 
Parker, Rev. Roswell D., Wyandotte, Kan. 
Parker, Mrs. Catharine B. M., do. 
Parks, Mrs. Elvira D., Springfield, Vt 
Parmelee, Wm. H., Morris, IIL 
Parsons, Rer. B., Windsor, Ct 
Parsons, Charles H., Hartford, Ct. 
Parsons, Edith, Byfiekl, Matt. 



102 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Parsons, Mrs. Margaret I., Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Parsons, Samuel L., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Partridge, Allen, Boston, Mass. 

Patch, Rev. R., Concord, III. 

Patton, John, Derry, N. H. 

Payne, Reuben, Portland. Ct 

Payson, Mrs. Susan. Foxborough, Mass. 

Payson, W. L., Houston, Mass. 

Peabody, Rev. Albert B., East Longmeadoir, Mass. 

Pease, Mrs. Josephine 0., Granby, Mass. 

Pease, Mrs. Sarah C, do. 

Peck, Miss Elisabeth O., Bristol, Ct 

Peck, Mrs. Elisabeth M., Stratford, Ct 

Peck, Dea, Willys, Michigan City, Ind. 

Peckham, Rev. J., Kingston, Mass. 

Peloubet, Rev. A. 0., Cairo, N. Y. 

Pepper, Mrs. Louisa W., Chicopee, Mass. 

Perkins, Rev. F. T., Galesburg, 111. 

Perly, Mrs. Hannah K., Pecatonlca, 111. 

Perrin, Mrs. Mary A. 8., Vernon, Ct 

Perrin, Mrs. Mary D., Orford, N. H. 

Perry, II. H., Coniray, Mass. 

Phelps, Dea. David B., Southampton, Mass. 

Phelps, Mrs. E. B., Andover, Mass. 

Phillips, Mrs. Franklin, Fitohburg, Mass. 

Phillips, Mrs. Harriet C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Phillips, Mrs. Oliver, East Medway, Mass. 

Phraner, Stanley K., Sing Sing, N. Y. 

Pierce, Mrs. Mary J., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Pierce, Mrs. Nathan, West Townshend, Vt 

Pierson, Rev. Arthur T., Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Plngry, Mrs. D., Newburyport, Mass. 

Pitkin, Miss Emily, East Hartford, Ct. 

Pitkin. Mrs. Maria F., Hartford, Ct. 

Piatt, Mrs. Sarah E., Chesterfield, 111. 

Pluuimer, Mrs. Lucy G., Boscawen, N. H. 

Pomeroy, Theodore, Pittsfieid. Mass. 

Pomeroy. Wm. M., Springfield, Mass. 

Porter, Mrs. Clementine, Granville, 111. 

Porter, Mrs. Sarah, WlUlmantic, Ct 

Porter, Thomas, Blnghamton, N. Y. 

Post, Rev. Aurelian H., Peru, 111. 

Post, Jeremiah K., Wlnthrop, Ct 

Potter, Mrs. Ephraim, Hadley, Mass. 

Potter, Mrs. Mary, Rockford, 111. 

Potter, Samuel H., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Potwin, Rev. Lemuel 8., Bridgewater, Ct 

Potwin, Rev. T. a, Franklin, N. Y. 

Powers, Rev. Henry, Mlttlneague, Mass. 

Powers, Lyman A., Spencer, Mass. 

Powers, Phlletos, Phillipston, Mass. 

Pratt, Rev. Charles H., Lisbon, 111. 

Pratt, Mrs. Henry, Dudley, Mass. 

Pratt, Mrs. Rachel, Chester, Ct. 

Prichard, Mrs. Mary &, Bradford, Vt 

Pride, Dr. William, Middletown, Ct 

Proctor, Edward. Spencer, Mass. 

Proctor, Mrs. Lois, Andover, Mass. 

Prouty, Lucy, Spencer, Mass. 

Punderson, Miss Harriet New Haven, Ct 

Putnam, Mrs. James P., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Ramsdell, Mrs. William, Mllford, N. H. 

Rand, Julia A., Keene, N. H. 

Randall, Mrs. Abby P., No. Stonlngton, Ct 

Randle, Henry C, Norwalk, Ct, 

Rankin, Rev. 8. G. W., Westchester, Ct. 

Ranney, Mrs. 0. D., Chicago, 111. 

Rau, Rahel, New Haven, Ct 

Raymond, Miss Harriet, Norwalk, Ct 

Raymond, Mrs. Martha E., Cleveland, 0. 

Read, Albert M., Attleborough, Mass. 

Read, Mrs. Helen, East Pembroke, N. Y. 

Keade, H. L., Jewett City. Ct 

Redfern, Mrs. Lucy J., Winchester, Mass. 

Reed, Hodges, Taunton, Mass. 

Reed, Washington, East Abington, Mass. 

Reeve, Jeremiah, New York. 

Reeves, Mrs. Caroline, Wayland, Mass. 

Resseguie, Miss Annie M., Ridgefleld, Ct 

Rice, Mrs. Anna, Wlnthrop, Ct 

Rich, Mrs. Alice, Candor, N. Y. 

Richards, Miss A., West Roxbury, Mass. 

.Richards, Lucas, Unionville, Ct 
Richardson, Mlm Adeline, South Boston, Mass. 
BicbardMon, Rev. Henry /., lincoln, Man. 



Richmond, Ezra, 8lnclearville, N. Y. 
Ring, Mrs. Eliza, Gloucester, Mass. 
Rising, Sarah, Shermanville, Kan. 
Robbing, Mrs. Eliza C, West Haven, Ct 
Roberts, Miss Fanny, Middletown, Ct 
Roberts, William, New Mllford, Ct 
Robinson, Rev. Charles E., Woodbury, Ct 
Robinson, Miss Lucy T., Salem, Mass. 
Rockwell, George P., New Britain, Ct 
Rockwood, B. A,, Holllston, Mass. 
Rockwood, Samuel C, Springfield, Mass. 
Rogers, C. N., Derby, Ct 
Rogers, H. D., Grafton, 0. 
Rolfe, Mrs. Henry C, Townsend, Mass. 
Root Rev. Edward W., Springfield, 0. 
Root, Judson H., Hartford, Ct 
Ross. William, Jr., Pittsfleld, HI. 
Rosslter. Rev. F. L., Huron, 0. * 
Rouse, Frances O., Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Rowell, Miss Mary, Hartford, Ct 
Rowell, William K., West Concord, N. H. 
Rowland, 8. S., Weston, Ct 
Roy, John, Lyndon. 111. 
Roys, Mrs. Abi P., South Norfolk, Ct 
Rugg, Samuel F., Northboro, Mass. 
Russell, Alvan S., Downleville, Cal. 
Russell, Mrs. C. N., Leicester, Mass. 
Russell, John, Medford, Mass. 
Russell, John W., M.D., Mount Vernon, 0. 
Russell, Mrs. Louisa B., Randolph, Mass. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary, Lincoln, Mass. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary A., Fitchburg, Mass. 
Russell, Mrs. Philena, Granby, Mass. 
Rust, Miss Harriet, Chester, 0. 

Sabln, Mary Payson, Fall River, Mass. 

Safford, Mrs. Daniel, Boston, Mass. 

Safford, Mrs. John, Beverly, Mass. 

Safford, Mrs. Mary K, Corfu, N. Y. 

8t John, George B. t Norwalk, Ct 

Sanders, Miss a Elmlra, New Ipswich, N. H. 

Sanderson, Lemuel C, Ashfield. Mass. 

Sanderson. Lucy 8., Whately, Mass. 

Sargent, Mrs. Elizabeth, West Ameabnry, Mass. 

Sargent, Mrs. Jane, do. 

Sargent, Mrs. Louisa. Newton, Mass. 

Sargent, Nathan B., Methuen, Mass. 

Sargent, Sally G., West Amesbury, Mass. 

Saunders, Helen, East Woodstock, Ct 

Saunders, Mrs. Lavinia, North Andover, Mass. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Alvira, Chester, Vt 

Sayles, Mrs. Stella, Tallmadge, 0. 

Scarborough, Daniel E., Payson, 111. 

Scarborough, Mary H., do. 

Scarlet Miss Caroline B., Norwich, Ct 

Schofield. Samuel, West Amesbury, Mats. 

Scofield, Miss Abigail, Stamford, Ct 

Bcofleld, Rev. William C, Altoona, 111. 

Scott, Miss Matilda, Winchester, N. H, 

Scranton, Miss Lucy, Madison, Ct 

Scribner, Mrs. Harriet A., Hennlker, N. H. 

8crlbner, Mrs. Mary E., Rosendale, Wis. 

Searles, William, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sears, Mrs. Turner, Greenwich, Mass. 

Seeley, Mrs. W. E., Bridgeport, Ct 

Seeley, John M.. Housatonic, Mass. 

Seelye, Mrs. Abigail, Bethel, Ct. 

Seelye, Ezra N., Bridgeport, Ct 

Segur, Rev. 8. W.. Tallmadge, O. 

Belleck, George W., 2d, Norwalk, Ct 

Sellew, Philip n., Portland, Ct 

Sessions, F. C, Columbus, 0. 

Seymour, C. W., Payson, I1L 

Seymour, Edward, do. 

Seymour, E. W., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Seymour, Walter, Hartford, Ct 

Sharpe, Mrs. Elizabeth A., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Shattuck, Dea. E. C, Warsaw, N. Y. 

Shaw, Mrs. Hannah G., Thompson. Ct 

Shedd, Mrs. Lydla, Hollls, N. H. 

Sbedd, Milton A., Fannlngton, UL 

Sheldon, Horace, Suffleld, Ct 

Sheldon. Samuel IX, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Sbepard, Azubah, Canton Center, Ct 

Shepard, Mrs. G. T., New London, Ct 

Shepard, Mrs, Hannah, Newtown, Ct 



1864.] 



THIRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



1C8 



Shepard, Miss Mary, New London, Ct. 

Sherman, William W., Bethel, Ct. 

Silliman, Lewb B., Bridgeport, Ct 

SUliman, Mm Mary E., Chester, Ct. 

Simondi, Mrs. Abble B., Ellington. Ct. 

Sfanonds, Miss Sarah M., do. 

Skeele, Oils, Chkopee, Man. 

Skinner, Dee. Ebeneser, 8inclearville, N. Y. 

Skinner, Justin P., Plymouth, Ct 

Skinner, L. C, Plainville, Ct. 

Skinner, Dea. Samuel, East Hampton, Ct 

Slater, Miss M. H., Norwich, Ct 

Small, Mrs. Reliance, Chatham, Mass. 

Smart, Rev. William 8., Benton, Vt 

Smith, Miss Abby P., Chicago, 111. 

Smith Adon, New York. 

Smith, James, do. 

Smith, Miss A. L., AndoTer, Maw. 

Smith, Albert W., BrookUne, Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy J., do. 

Smith, Alfred, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, Mrs. Calrin, iladley, Mass. 

Smith, Rev. Charles, Andover, Mass. 

Smith, David P., Scotland, Ct. 

Smith, Mrs. Delia, Enfield, Mass. 

Smith, Edward P., do. 

Smith, Mrs. Dorothy, Newton Center, Mass. 

Smith, Edgar M., Candor, N. Y. 

Smith, George B„ Hadley, Mass. 

Smith, Rev. George M., Rocky Hill, Ct 

Smith, Henry M., Enfield, Mass. 

Smith, James, Southford, Ct 

Smith, Dea. James, Decorah, Iowa. 

Smith, Mrs. Jane, Maiden, I1L 

Smith, John, East Hartford, Ct 

Smith, Le Roy T., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smith, Dea. Marcos D. P., South'CornwalL Ct 

Smith, Miss Marion, Scotland, Ct. 

Smith, Mrs. Martha C, Stockbrldge, Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Mary 0., Stratford, Ct 

Smith, Miss M. H., Salem, Mass. 

Smith, Mrs. Nathaniel. Mlddletown, Ct 

Smith, Nathan P., Williamstown, Mass. 

Smith, Norman, Plainville, Ct 

Smith, Mrs. Orpha, Mt Yernon, O. 

Smith, Peter D., West Andover, Mass. 

Smith, Dea. Simon P., Franklin, N. Y. 

Snath, Rev. Wilder, Berlin, Ct 

Smlthers, John, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snider, Mrs. Ann 8., TaUmadge, O. 

Snow, George W., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Snow, Lorenxo, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snow, Manly S., Enfield, Ct 

Snow, Mary L. C., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snow, William, Chlcopee, Mass. 

Snow, William EL, Kalamasoo, Mich. 

Spalding, Miss Louisa D., Hollls, N. H. 

SpauMing, Dea. John, Townsend, Mass. 

Spaulding, John, Jr.. Groton, Mass. 

Spanlding, Miss Lucia, Athens, N. Y. 

Spencer, Mrs. Ann, East Hartford, Ct 

Spoflbrd, Mrs. Hannah, North Andover, Mass. 

Spring, Mrs. Adela, Whltlnsville, Mass. 

Spring, Mrs. Adeline C, do. 

Stanley, Anthony D., Jefferson City, Mo. 

Stanton, Mrs. Lucy J., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Stearns, John, Newton, Mass. 

Stebbina, Mrs. EUsa, Bradford, Vt 

Stebbina, E. G., Deerfleld, Mass. 

Stebbina, Randolph, Longmeadow, Mass. 

Steel, Joseph, Auburn, N. Y. 

Steele, Charles P., Auburn, N. Y. 

Sterling, Henrietta D., Bridgeport, Ct 

Stetson, John, Medford, Mass. 

Stetson, Mrs. Susan, Weymouth, Mass. 

Stevens, Mrs. James R., Hartford, Ct 

Sevens, Samuel, Gloucester. Mass. 

Stiles, Dea. Charles, Pelham, N. H. 

Stflhnan, Miss Emily, Bridgeport, Ct 

Stone, Daniel, Newton Center, Mast. 

Stone, Mrs. EUaa, Swanton, Vt 

Stone, John P., Cornwall, Ct 

Stone, Mrs. Lucy P., Newtoo Center, Mast. 

Stone, Mrs. Sophia, do. 

Stem, Rev. Sylvester D., ferindaro, Kan. 

ftranahan, Mn. Sarah A., Inlander, JV. r. 



Stratton, L. P., Brighton, 111. 
Stratton, Nathan J., do. 
Stratum, Mrs. Sarah B., do. 
Strong, Anson 8., South Deerfleld, Mats. 
Strong, Mrs. Prances W., Oxford, Ct 
Strong, Mrs. Sarah P., Belolt, Wis. 
Sturges, Mrs. Clara B., Woodburn, III. 
SturtevantMrs. H. H., TaUmadge, O. 
Sweetser, Henry P., Andover, Mass. 
Swift, George H., Cornwall Bridge, Ct 
Sykes, P. A., Hartford, Ct 

Taft, Mrs. A. A.. Uxbridge, Mass. 

Taft, Dea. Merrick L., Northbridge, Mass. 

Talcott, C. D., Vernon Depot Ct 

Talcott, H. W., do. 

Talcott, Charles, Coventry, Ct 

Talcott, Charles T., New Britain, Ct. 

Talcott, Mrs. Cynthia, Portland, Ct 

Talcott, 8. L., North Coventry, Ct 

TaUmadge, William H., West Haven, Ct 

Tate, George C, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Taylor, Dea. Abel 8.. Brook field, Ct 

Taylor, Rev. James P., Chelsea, Mich. 

Taylor, John, Crown Point, N. Y. 

Taylor, John L., Hudson, Mich. 

Taylor, Leddra W.. Kalamasoo, Mich. 

Telford, Mrs. Martha, Decorah, Iowa. 

Temple, Mrs. Calvin, Reading. Mass. 

Temple, Lafayette, Chlcopee, Mass. 

Terry, James, Terry vllle, Ct. 

Terry, Mrs. L. 0., Hartford, Ct 

Terry, William B.. do. 

Thayer, Jesse E., New York. 

Thayer, Dea. Oliver, Salem, Mass. 

Thayer, & O., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Thompson, David, Auburn. N. Y. 

Thompson, Miss Elisabeth M., Ellington, Ct 

Thompson, Miss Jane, Parmlngton. Ct 

Thompson, Rev. John C, Goshen,Maei. 

Thompson, Sumner, Lawrence, Mass. 

Thompson, Rev. a H., Elk Grove, Wis. 

Thomson, Asahel, Parmlngton. Ct. 

Thorpe, Thomas 8., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Thurston, William, Newburyport, Mass. 

Tidd, Joseph S., Warren, Mass. 

Tolman, Cyrus & Pitchburg, Mass. 

Tolman, Mrs. J. M., West Roxbury, Mass. 

Tomlinson, Lydla J., Birmingham, Ct 

Tompkins, John B., Paris HM, N. Y. 

Torrey, Miss E. C, South Weymouth, Mass. 

Towle, Miss Cordelia, Newton, Mass. 

Towne, Mrs. Esther, Chlcopee, Mass. 

Townsend, Aaron V., Crown Point, N. Y. 

Townsend, Miss Elisabeth A., Newburyport, Mass. 

Townsend, John, Walton, N. Y. 

Townsend, Mrs. Melissa H., New Haven, Ct. 

Tracy, Dr. Stephen, Andover, Mass. 

Treadwell, Henry. Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Tripp, Joseph, Palrhaven, Mass. 

Trow, Dr. William M., Haydenville, Mass. 

Tucker, Miss Catharine J., Stratford, Ct 

Tucker, Dea. Russell, Leominster, Mass. ' 

Tuffer, Rev. H. M., Waverly, III 

Tufts, Charles, Andover, Mass. 

Tully, Miss Sarah, Springfield, Mass. 

Turner, Rev. Joslah W., Andover, Mass. 

Turner, Sarah, New London, Ct 

Turney, Dea. Albert, Easton, Ct 

Tyler, Mrs. E. W., Pelham, N. H. 

Tyler, P., Brattleborough, Vt 

Tyler, Miss Phebe, Kent, Ct 

Ufford. Miss Catharine, Stratford, Ct. 
Underbill, Jeremiah, Haverhill, Mass 
Underwood, Piatt, Auburn, N. Y. 
Upham, William, Spencer, Mass. 
Upton, Dea. Moses T., Salem, Mass. 

Vaas, Harriett* E., Auburn, N. Y. 
Van Deusen, Mrs. E. H., Kalamasoo, Mich. 
Van Duesen. James, Sheffield, Mass. 
Van Ness, Mrs. Mary &. Pairport, N. Y. 
Van Valkenburg. Miss Estella J., Mendon, 111 
Vlcory, Mrs. Catharine, Kalamasoo, Mich. 
Vinton, Mrs. Lorinda R., South BoaAon, UatA. 
Voje, iajinoiid H., New York, 



104 



TniRTY EIGHTH REPORT. 



[May, 



Walte, Rev. Clarendon, Rutland, Mam. 
Walker. Mrs. Charles, Dorchester, Mass. 
Walker, Rev. George L., Portland, Me. 
Walker. Robert G., Haverhill, Man*. 
Walker, Theodore L.. Oakland, CaL 
Walton, Rev. Jeremiah K., Hock ford, 111. 
Walworth, Joseph, Lawrence, Mass. 
Ward, Mrs. Elizabeth A., Hitchcuckvllle, Ct. 
Ward, Giles F., Brooklyn, N. V. 
Ward, Mrs. Harriet 8., Plymouth, N. II. 
Ward, John 8.. Bridgeport. Ct 
Ward, Mrs. Mary, llotchklssville, Ct. 
Warner, Bennett, New Preston. Ct. 
Warner, Rcr. Culvin, Klk Grove, Win. 
Warner, Henry A., New Haven. Ct. 
Warner, Samuel E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Warren, C. II., Boston, Mass. 
Warren, Mr*. Jane, Leicester, Maw. 
Wason, Rev. Hiram, Lake I*rairle, Ind. 
Waterbury, Urn. Charles, Bridgeport, Ct. 
Waterman, A. T., Fitchville. CI 
Waters, O. H., Mllhury, Mas*. 
Way, Harvey, Blnghamton, N. Y. 
Webb, Mrs. P., New York. 
Webber, William A., Beverly, Mast. 
Webster, Helen E., Plalnville, Ct 
Weed, Mrs. William II., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Weir, A. A., Newton Center, Mass. 
Welles, Henry. Bridgeport, Ct. 
Welles, MUs Mnry C, Hartford. Ct. 
Wellman, Mrs. Phcbe W., Cornish. N. II. 
Wells. Miss Frances B., Chicago, 111. 
Wells, Levi W., New Britain, Ct. 
Wells, Mrs. M. K., Hinsdale, N. H. 
Wells, 8. M., Hartford, Ct. 
Wenzell, Mrs. Mary F., Brookllne, Mass. 
West, Robert S., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Wheadon, Abram R., North Branford, Ct. 
Wheaton, Airs. Charlotte A., North Falmouth, 
Whcaton, Catharine C, do. 

Wheaton, Frederick D., do. 

Wheaton, Samuel II., do. 

Wheeler, Dr. Alvin, Bingham ton. N. Y. 
Wheeler, C. H., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Delhi A., North Stonlngton, Ct. 
Wheeler, Miss Elizabeth, Stratford, Ct. 
Wheeler, Henry G., do. 

Wheeler, John, Merrimack, N. II. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Maria II., Groton, Mass. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Mary B., Med way, Mass. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Mary II., North Stonlngton, Ct. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Rebecca, do. 
Wheeler, W. R., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Whllton, Samuel I., North Adams, Mass. 
Whipple, Dea. Joslah, Chesterfield. I1L 
White, Mrs. Constant, Yorktown, N. Y. 
White, Henry, do. 

White, Ebcnezer C, New York. 
White, George H., do. 
White, Rev. John, North Woodstock, Ct. 
White, Miss Martha, Portland, Ct. 
White, Mason, Bridgeport, Ct. 
Whitehouse, John O., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Whltin, Addie C., W hltlnsvllle, Mass. 
Wliltin, Edward, do. 

Whiting, Francis A., Leominster, Mass. 
Whiting, Mrs. Nancy, Norwich. Conn. 
Whitman, Miss Eliza, West Hartford, Ct. 
Whitmarsh, Thomas C, Chicago, 111. 



Whitney, Mrs. Jonas, Fitchburg, Mass. 
Whit on, James M., New Haven, Ct. 
Whiton, James, do. 

Whiton, Mary Bartlett, do. 
Whittemore, Mrs. L. B.. Brldgewater, X. H. 
Whittemore, Miss Lucy G., New York. 
Whittemore, Thomas W., do. 

Whltten, Samuel I., Coleralnc, Mjiss. 
Whittlesey, Sheldon, New-Preston, Ct. 
Wler, A. A., Newton Center, Mass. 
Wllcott, L. W., West Roxbury, Mass. 
Wilcox, Horace B., Portland, Ct 
Wilcox, Joslah N., Port Chester, N. Y. 
Wilcox, Mrs. Mary J., Stratford, Ct 
Wllklns, Rev. Jesse A., Woodstock, Ct 
Williams, Charles E., Hartford, Ct 
Williams, Charles 8., do. 
Williams, Mrs. Cynthia, Stonlngton, Ct 
Williams, Mrs. II., West Amrshury, Mass. 
Williams, Mrs. Harriet A., Stonlngton, Ct 
Williams, Miss Mary E., Norwich, Ct 
Williams, Mrs. Polly, Aulehorough, Mass. 
Williams, Blmeon II., Foxborough, Mass. 
Williamson, Mrs. Charlotte L., Fond dn Lac, Wis. 
Willis, Mrs. Alfred, Manchester, N. II. 
Williston, Mrs. Sarah T., Florence. Mass. 
Wlllson, Mrs. Mary, Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Wilson, Mrs. Daniel, Black Rock, Ct 
Wilson, Mrs. Julia V., Norwalk. Ct 
Winchester, Martha A., Keene, N. H. 
Wlnshlp, Mrs. William, Hartford, Ct 
Winslow, Emily B., Easthampton, Mass. 
Wlswcll, John C, Chicago, I1L 
Wolcott, Laurens W., Bat* via, HI. 
Wolcott, Miss Ursula, South Windsor, Ct. 
Wolsey, Ezra W., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wood, Ablel, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wood, Alphonso, do. 
Mass. Wood, Mrs. Eunice 8., Whitlnsvllle, Mass. 
Wood, Joseph W., do. 

Wood, Mrs. Samuel F., Middlesex Tillage, Mas*. 
Woodbury, Mrs. H. M., West Roxbury, Mast. 
Woodbury, Mrs. I. B M Norwalk, Ct. 
Woodcock, Rev. II. E., Riga, N. Y. 
Woodford, Elbert C, West Candor, N. Y. 
Woodhull, Miss Elizabeth R., Norwich, Ct. 
Woodhull, Rev. John A., Coniack, N. Y. 
Woodman, Amos, Bethel, Ct. 
Woodman, Mrs. A., Newhuryport, Mass. 
Woodnell, Mrs. Sarah A., Newbury. Mass. 
Woodruff, Mrs. Harriet, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Woodruff, Richard K., Kichford, N. Y. 
Woods, Miss Mary P., Enfield, Mass. 
Woods, Robert M., do. 

Woodward, Samuel N., Newton, Mass. 
Woolley, Rev. J. J., Merlden, Ct 
Woolworth, C. C, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Worcester, Mrs, Ezeklel, Weymouth, Mats. 
Wright, A. A., M.D., East Canaan, Ct 
Wright, Ira B., South Iladley Falls, Mais. 
Wright, Miss Julia A., Torrlngton, Ct 
Wright, Seth, West Medway, Mass. 
Wrisley, Nathan C, Haydenrllle, Mass. 
Wyman, Hannah C, Pelhain, N. H. 
Wyman, Mrs. Sarah M., New London, Ct. 

Yale, Miss Esther A., Merlden, Ct 
York, Mrs. J., West Roxbury, Mass. 



1 I . 






if r* i, a j I I 


I J Ol 










■ 
• 












' 


)i:fc 


i 

UUDiT. 













MISSIONARY BOXES. 



Knxi> of clothing sent directly, and without any particular designation, to the office 
of tin* American Home Missionary Society, will be tbrwarded to such TnisMonari<-P a> un- 
known to lie most in nerd of them, with requests from the Society to those who receive 
them to add res* letter.-* of acknowledgment to the respective donor?. 

Experience ha.-* shown us that when an individual or association, intending to pre- 
pare a hox, writes to the Society to have a particular missionary designated, and a de- 
tailed account of the circumstance** of his family given, the information is not always at 
hand, so that the letter can be promptly and satisfactorily answered; and when it'is. it 
not unfrcquently happens that, while the box is preparing, the missionary remains 
for month* un supplied, when, if it were not for tins designation, he might be fur- 
nished with articles placed, in the mean time, at the disposal of the Society. In other 
eases, while the box is in preparation, supplies are sent to the missionary from other 
sources ; so that when the box is ready, this missionary is not so much in want as many 
other*. * . 

It is preferred, therefore, when there is no objection on the part of the donors, that 
the r-pecial designation of the I oxesof clothing, that are not put up for any individual in 
particular, should be left to the discretion of the officers of the Soeietv, aftir thee reach 
the ojh'cr. It is believed they will in this way answer the designs of those who gene- 
rously contribute them, better than in any other way in which the Society can have 
an agency. 

DIRECTIONS FOR FORWARDING. 

1. Put inside the box, where it will be readily seen when the box is opened, a paper 
or letter, containing a list of the articles in the box, and the estimated value of the 
whole, with the name of the individual or association from whom it comes and the ad- 
dress of the individual to whom a letter of acknowledgment may be sent. 

2. A copy, in full, of the memorandum put inside of the box, should he sent in a 
letter to the office of the Society. In this letter* it. should be stated when, and by what 
conveyance, the box was forwarded : in it should be inclosed, also, such mom*}' as isin- 
t ended for the payment of freight. It is desirable that freight, should be provided for 
in all casc«, if practicable. The freight and exj ernes on a box vary from $:{ to $6, 
according to its si/.c and the distance it is sent. A barrel can be forwarded at less ex- 
pense than a hox of the same size. 

3. The box should be fully and plainly marked, a»d the place, from vhich it comes 
should ai.w \ys appear on the. nut side, so that, there may be no necessity for opening; it at 
the office. It should be strong, tight, well nailed, and, when large, should be hooped, 
or otherwise fully secured against, the effects of hard usage on the way. 

4. Boxes may be addrtssed to either of the Secretaries, or the Treasurer. 

NO PART OF A MISSIONARY'S SALART. 

Boxes of clothing form no part of a missionary's regular appropriation. The Society 
need* the same amount of money, therefore, in order to meet promptly its stipulations 
with its missionaries, as if no boxes were forwarded; ami it would be no favor to a 
missionary to receive a box, if. as a consequence of it, the amount, of money that would 
otherwise be sent him must be proportionally diminished. 

\Votrie*t the friends of the Home Missionary, therefore, will cveiy where <ee to it 
that they give none the less money in consequence, of their giving other things that 
are needful and convenient. We nope, on the contrary, their sympathies will be so 
awakened in the preparation of the lesser gift, that they will feel it to be their privilege 
not only to continue, but also to enlarge the greater. 

SUGGESTIONS AS TO THEIR CONTENTS. 

In regard to what is to be put into the box, while clothii g of woolen or linen 
fabrics, shoe*, boots, writing paper, and books will be specially valuable, scarcely any 
thing in the shape of plain, substantial wearing apparel or bedding, or which is ot com- 
mon use in any form in a family, will come amiss. Knives and forks, spoons, a pair 
of scissort, a spool of cotton, a sk«in of yarn or silk, a paper of needles or pins, a cake 
of wax. a dozen of buttons, a thimble, - a tumbler, a tin cup, a skimmer, or a pepper 
box, need not be left out. 

When articles of clothing are not fitted to the members of the families to which 
boxen are tent, j/uVsioJiurics are in the way of making such exchanges with each other 
thut almost every thing which a box may contain \& tow\\e& V© ^gpod actount. 



mi 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT 



AMERICAN 



HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 



PRESKXTKD BY Till 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ANNIVERSARY MEETING, MAY 10, 1805. 



APPENDIX. 



gM> goih : 
JOHN X. GRAY * GREEN, PRINTERS, STERE0TYFER8, & BINDERS, 

rill'FIOOl lUILDIHOft, 

OP FRANKFORT t JACOB STREETS. 

J 866. 



CONTENTS. 



PAOJI 

Thirty Ninth Anniversary or the A. H. M. S., . . . . 5 

Officers, ......... 6 

Executive Committee, ..*..... 8 

Constitution, ......... 9 

THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 
Introduction, . . . . . . .11 

General Table of Missionaries and Congregations, .... 13 

Summary or Results, ........ 45 

Number of Missionaries, their distribution, and the aggregate of their 

labors, ........ 45 

Number of Sabbath school scholars, .45 

Contributions to benevolent objects, ..... 45 

Additions to the Churches — Revivals, .45 

Churches organized — Houses of worship completed, ... 45 

The Treasury — Resources — Liabilities — Payments, . .46 

Progress of the year, ....... 46 

Ghiral Comparative Results, ....... 47 

Table of Receipts, Expenditures, Number of Missionaries, years of labor, 

additions, etc., ...... 48 

Remarks on the Table, ....... 48 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 1, .49 

Table — Distribution of Missionaries, No. 2, .... 50 

Table of Receipts, ........ 51 

Principal Auxiliaries, Agencies, and Missionary Fields, 52 

Maine Missionary Society, . 52 

New Hampshire Missionary Society, ..... 58 

Vermont Domestic Missionary Society, . .54 

Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, .... 55 

Rhode Island Home Missionary Society, .56 

Connecticut Home Missionary Society, ..... 56 

New York, .57 

Ohio, . W 

Illinois, 59 

Missouri, ........ 61 

Michigan, ......... *A 

Wisconsin, ....... QA 



CONTENTS. 



Iowa, 

Minnesota, 

Kansas, 

Nebraska, and Western Iowa, 

Colorado, and Utah, 

California, 

Oregon, 
Conclusion, 
The Treasurer's Report. 



now 
65 
67 
68 
69 
71 
72 
74 
74 
76 



APPENDIX. 

Names or Missionaries in Each State and Territory, 
Relation op Auxiliary Societies, etc., 

State and other Large Auxiliaries, 

Agents, ..... 

Committees of Missions, 

Applications for Aid, 
Addresses at the Thirty Nintii Anniversary, 

Address of Rev. George H. Atkinson, 
Do. Rev. William T. Eustis, . 
Do. Rev. Lyman Abbott, 
Our Trial and Opportunity, 
Directors for Life, .... 
Members for Life, . 



78 
82 
82 
82 
83 
83 
84 
84 
86 
90 
96 
97 
104 



THIRTY NINTH ANNIVERSARY. 



The Amebican Home Missionary Society held its Thirty 
Ninth Anniversary in Irving Hall, New York, on Wednesday 
evening, May 10, 1865. 

Hon. Charles G. Hammond, of Chicago, Illinois, one of the 
Vice Presidents of the Society, occupied the chair, and the exer- 
cises were opened with prayer by Rev. John S. C. Abbott, of 
New Haven, Ct. 

The Treasurer's Report was read by Rev. A. Huntington 
Olapp, one of the Secretaries. 

An Abstract of the Annual Report of the Executive Commit- 
tee was presented by Rev. David B. Coe, D. D., one of the 
Secretaries. 

On motion of Rev. George H. Atkinson, of Portland, Or- 
egon, seconded by Rev. Charles Seccombe, of St. Anthony, 
Minn., 

Beaohed, That the Reports now presented be adopted, and published under 
the direction of the Executive Committee. 

Rev. William T. Eustis, of New Haven, Ct., moved the fol- 
lowing resolution, which was seconded by Rev. Simeon S. Jo- 
cklyn, of Brooklyn, N. Y., and adopted : 

Whereas, the destruction of the slaveholders 1 rebellion involves the necessity 
of reorganizing society in the Southern States in accordance with the ideas of 
justice, freedom and morality ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the establishment of local churches, with a God-fearing and 
untrammelled ministry, and with a truth-loving, devoted, and pious member- 
ship, should be a main instrumentality in this great work of reconstruction, 
and deserves the cooperation of all who love their country, and the cause of our 
holy religion. 

On motion of Rev. Lyman Abbott, late of Terre Haute, Jnd., 
seconded by Rev. Theron Baldwin, D. D., of New York, 

Betohed, That the work of religious reconstruction in the South marks a 
new era in the cause of Missions, requires the adoption of a new policy Vy \ta 



CONTENTS. 



Iowa, 

Minnesota, 

Kansas, 

Nebraska, and Western Iowa, 

Colorado, and Utah, 

California, 

Oregon, 
Conclusion, 
The Treasurer's Report, 



now 
65 
67 
68 
69 
71 
72 
74 
74 
76 



APPENDIX 

Names or Missionaries in Each State and Territory, 
Relation or Auxiliary Societies, etc., 

State and other Large Auxiliaries, 

Agents, .... 

Committees of Missions, 

Applications for Aid, 
Addresses at the Thirty Ninth Anniversary, 

Address of Rev. George H. Atkinson, 
Do. Rev. William T. Eustis, . 
Do. Rev. Lyman Abbott, 
Our Trial and Opportunity, 
Directors for Life, 
Members for Life, 



7K 
82 
82 
82 
83 
83 
84 
84 
86 
90 
96 
97 
104 



THIRTY NINTH ANNIVERSARY. 



The American Home Missionary Society held its Thirty 
Ninth Anniversary in Irving Hall, New York, on Wednesday 
evening, May 10, 1865. 

Hon. Charles G. Hammond, of Chicago, Illinois, one of the 
Vice Presidents of the Society, occupied the chair, and the exer- 
cises were opened with prayer by Rev. John S. C. Abbott, of 
New Haven, Ct. 

The Treasurer's Report was read by Rev. A. Huntington 
Clapp, one of the Secretaries. 

An Abstract of the Annual Report of the Executive Commit- 
tee was presented by Rev. David B. Coe, D. D., one of the 
Secretaries. 

On motion of Rev. George H. Atkinson, of Portland, Or- 
egon, seconded by Rev. Charles Seocombe, of St. Anthony, 
Minn., 

Revolted, That the Reports now presented be adopted, and published under 
the direction of the Executive Committee. 

Rev. William T. Eustis, of New Haven, Ct., moved the fol- 
lowing resolution, which was seconded by Rev. Simeon S. Jo- 
gelyn, of Brooklyn, N. Y., and adopted : 

Whereat, the destruction of the slaveholders' rebellion involves the necessity 
of reorganizing society in the Southern States in accordance with the ideas of 
justice, freedom and morality ; therefore, 

Resolved, That the establishment of local churches, with a God-fearing and 
untrammelled ministry, and with a truth-loving, devoted, and pious member- 
ship, should be a main instrumentality in this great work of reconstruction, 
and deserves the cooperation of all who love their country, and the cause of our 
holy religion. 

On motion of Rev. Lyman Abbott, late of Terre Haute, Jnd., 
seconded by Rev. Thebon Baldwin, D. D., of New York, 

Re$ohea\ That the work of religious reconstruction in the South marks a 
new era in the cause of Missions, requires the adoption of a new policy Vy \ta 



CONTENTS. 



Iowa, 

Minnesota, 

Kansas, 

Nebraska, and Western Iowa, 

Colorado, and Utah, 

California, 

Oregon, 
Conclusion, 
The Treasurer's Report, 



now 
65 
67 
68 
69 
71 
72 
74 
74 
76 



APPENDIX. 

Names or Missionaries in Each State and Territory, 
Relation or Auxiliary Societies, etc., 

State and other Large Auxiliaries, 

Agents, ..... 

Committees of Missions, 

Applications for Aid, 
Addresses at the Thirty Ninth Anniversary, 

Address of Roy. George H. Atkinson, 
Do. Rev. William T. Eustis, . 
Do. Rev. Lyman Abbott, 
Our Trial and Opportunity, 
Directors for Life, .... 
Members for Life, 



78 
82 
82 
82 
83 
83 
84 
84 
86 
90 
96 
97 
104 



1865.. OFFICERS. 

Hon. Henry W. Taylor, Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Rev. Mark Tucker, D. D., Wethersfield, Ct. 
Rev. Charles Walker, D. D., Pittsford, Vt 
Gen. William Williams, Norwich, Ct 
J. Payson Williston, Esq.-, Northampton, Mass. 
Rev. William Wisner, D. D., Ithaca, N. Y. 
Hon. Bradford R. Wood, Albany, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS. 

Rev. William Adams, D. D., New York. 

Rev. William Allen, D. D., Northampton, Mass. 

Rev. Israel W. Andrews, D. D., President of Marietta College, O. 

Rev. Zedekiah S. Barstow, D. D., Keene, N. H. 

Rev. Flavel Bascom, Dover, UL 

Rev. Alvan Bond, D. D., Norwich, Ct 

Rev. Edward Beech er, D. D., Galesburg, HI. 

Rev. Constantino Blodgett, D. D M Pawtucket, R. I. 

Rev. Thomas Brainerd, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Horatio N. Brinsmade, D. D., Beloit, Wis. 

Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. William Carter, Pittsfield, ill. 

Rev. Aaron L. Chapin, D. D., President of Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. George B. Cheever, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Elisha L. Cleaveland, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Oliver E. Daggett, D. D., Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Rev. Samuel W. S. Dutton, D. D., New Haven, Ct. 

Rev. Edward W. Gilman, Stonington Ct 

Rev. Albert Hale, Springfield, 111. 

Rev. Edwin Hall, D. D., TheoL Sem., Auburn, N. Y. 

Samuel Hamilton, Esq., Rochester, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry L. Hitchcock, D. D., President of Western Reserve College, O. 

Rev. John C. Holbrook, D. D., Homer, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., Boston, Mass. 

Rev Mancius S. Hutton, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Aratus Kent, Galena, 111. 

William J. King, Esq., Providence, R. I. 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, D. D., LL. D., President of Middlebury College, Vt. 

Rev. Joel H. Linsley, D. D., Greenwich, Ct. 

George Merriam, Esq., Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. John J. Miter, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rev. Ray Palmer, D. D., Albany, N. Y. 

Rev. Joel Parker, D. D., Newark, N. J. 

Rev. William W. Patton, D. D., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Henry E. Peck, Oberlin College, O. 

Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Albert H. Porter, Esq., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Rev. Truman M. Post, D. D., St Louis, Mo. 

Rev. William Salter, D. D., Burlington, Iowa. 

Rev. Henry Smith, D. D., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rev. Miles P. Squier, D. D., Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. Benjamin P. Stone, D. D., Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Henry M. Storrs, D. D., Cincinnati, O. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrg, Jr., D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Julian M. Sturtevant, D. D., President of Illinois College. 

Rev. Asa Turner, Denmark, Iowa. 

Rev. Robert G. Vermflye, D. D., Theolog. Inst, East Windsor, Ct 

Charles L Walker, Esq., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Samuel H. Willey, San Francisco, Cal. 

Edward J. Woolsey, Eap^ New York. 



6 officers. May, 

churches, and by ife combined difficulty and importance, demands that they 
cheerfully relinquish for this peculiar service, their tried, experienced and most 
successful pastors. 

Addresses were made by Rev. Messrs. Atkinson, Eustis, and 
Abbott, in support of the resolutions, which they respectively 
offered. 

The singing by the Congregation was conducted by Mr. George 
E. Aiken, leader of the Broadway Tabernacle Choir. 

The exercises were closed with the benediction, by Eev. Absa- 
lom Peters, D. D., of New York ; after which the Society pro- 
ceeded to the election of officers for the ensuing year. 

The following officers were then chosen : 

PRESIDENT. 

Rev. THEODORE D. WOOLSEY, D. D., LL. D., of New Haven, Ct 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

Rev. George E. Adams, D. D., Brunswick, Me. 

Rev. Leonard Bacon, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Albert Barnes, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Nathan S. S. Beman, D. D., LL. D., Carbondale, 111. 

Hon. Marshall S. Bidwell, LL. D., New York. 

Rev. Nathaniel Bouton, D. D., Concord, N. H. 

His Excell. William A. Buckingham, Norwich, Ct. 

Hon. Jacob Butler, Muscatine, Iowa. 

Rev. John P. Cleaveland, D. D., Matfapoisett, Mass. 

Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D. D., LL. D., New York. 

Hon. William Darling, Reading, Pa. 

Rev. Jeremiah Day, D. D, LL. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. George Duffield, D. D., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. William T. Dwight, D. D., Andover, Mass. 

Hon. Charles G. Hammond, Chicago. 111. 

Rev. Joel Hawes, D. D., Hartford, Ct. 

Rev. Mark Hopkins, D. D., LL. D., President of Williams College, Mass. 

Hon. William Jessup, LL. D., Montrose, Pa. 

Rev. Harvey D. Kitchel, D. D., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D., Hanover, N. H. 

Rev. Simeon North, D. D., LL. D , Clinton, N. Y. 

Rev. Eliphalet Nott, D. D., LL. D., President of Union College, N. Y. 

Rev. Edwards A. Park, D. D., Theol. Sem., Andover, Mass. 

Rev. Absalom Peters, D. D., New York. 

Rev. George E. Pierce, D. D, Hudson, Ohio. 

Rev. Enoch Pond, D. D., Theol. Sem., Bangor, Me. 

Douglas Putnam, Esq., Harmer, Ohio. 

Rev. Samuel S. Schmucker, D. D., Theol. Sem., Gettysburg!), Pa. 

Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D. D., LL. D., New York. 

Rev. Asa D. Smith, D. D., LL. D., President of Dartmouth College, N. H. 

Rev. William A. Stearns, D. D., LL. D., President of Amherst College, Mass. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D., Braintree, Mass. 

Rev. Seth Sweetser, D. D , Worcester, Mass. 

John Tappan, Esq., Boston, Mass. 



1866.* OFFICERS. 

Hon. Henry W. Taylor, Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Rev. Mark Tucker, D. D., Wethersfield, Ct 
Rev. Charles Walker, D. D., Pittsford, Vt 
(Jen. William Williams, Norwich, Ct 
J. Payson Williston, Esq., Northampton, Mass. 
Rev. William Wisner, D. D., Ithaca, N. Y. 
Hon. Bradford R. Wood, Albany, N. Y. 



DIRECTORS. 

Rev. William Adams, D. D., New York. 

Rev. William Allen, D. D., Northampton, Mass. 

Rev. Israel W. Andrews, D. D., President of Marietta College, O. 

Rev. Zedekiah S. Barstow, D. D., Keene, N. H. 

Rev. Flavel Bascom, Dover, I1L 

Rev. Alvan Bond, D. D., Norwich, Ct 

Rev. Edward Beecher, D. D., Galesburg, 111. 

Rev. Constantine Blodgett, D. D., Pawtucket, R. I. 

Rev. Thomas Bra i nerd, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Horatio N. Brinsmade, D. D., Beloit, Wis. 

Rev. Samuel G. Buckingham, Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. William Carter, Pittsfield, 111. 

Rev. Aaron L. Chapin, D. D., President of Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. George B. Cheever, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Elisha L. Cleaveland, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Oliver E. Daggett, D. D., Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Rev. Samuel W. S. Dutton, D. D., New Haven, Ct 

Rev. Edward W. Gilman, Stonington Ct 

Rev. Albert Hale, Springfield, 111. 

Rev. Edwin Hall, D. D., TheoL Sem., Auburn, N. Y. 

Samuel Hamilton, Esq., Rochester, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry L. Hitchcock, D. D M President of Western Reserve College, O. 

Rev. John C. Holbrook, D. D., Homer, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry B. Hooker, D. D., Boston, Mass. 

Rev Mancius S. Hutton, D. D., New York. 

Rev. Aratus Kent, Galena, HI. 

William J. King, Esq., Providence, R. I. 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, D. D., LL. D., President of Middlebury College, Vt. 

Rev. Joel H. Linsley, D. D., Greenwich, Ct 

George Merriam, Esq., Springfield, Mass. 

Rev. John J. Miter, Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Rev. Ray Palmer, D. D., Albany, N. Y. 

Rev. Joel Parker, D. D., Newark, N. J. 

Rev. William W. Patton, D. D., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Henry E. Peck, Oberlin College, O. 

Benjamin Perkins, Esq., Boston, Mass. 

Albert H. Porter, Esq., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Rev. Truman M. Post, D. D., St Louis, Mo. 

Rev. William Salter, D. D., Burlington, Iowa. 

Rev. Henry Smith, D. D., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Rev. Miles P. Squier, D. D., Beloit College, Wis. 

Rev. Benjamin P. Stone, D. D., Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Henry M. Storrs, D. D., Cincinnati, 0. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rev. Julian M. Sturtevant, D. D., President of Illinois College. 

Rev. Asa Turner, Denmark, Iowa. 

Rev. Robert G. Vennflye, D. D., Theolog. Inst, East Windsor, Ct 

Charles L Walker, Esq., Detroit, Mich. 

Rev. Samuel H. Willey, 8an Francisco, Cal. 

Edward J. Woolsey, Egq^ New York. 



OFFICERS. May, I860. 



Treasurer. 
Mr. CHRISTOPHER R. ROBERT. 

Auditor. 
Mr. GEORGE S. COE. 

Secretaries for Correspondence. 

Rev. MILTON BADGER, D. D. 
Rev. DAVID B. COE, D. D. 
Rev. A. HUNTINGTON CLAPP. 

Recording Secretary. 
AUSTIN ABBOTT, Esq. 



MEETING OF THE BOARD. 

The Board of Directors met on Thursday, May 11th, at the Society's Rooms, 
Bible House, Astor Place, and appointed the members who, in connection with 
the officers designated by the Constitution, compose the 

Executive Committee. 

Mr. William G. Lambert, Chairman. 
Rev. William Patton, D. D. 
Mr. Simeon B. Chittenden. 
Rev. Richard S. Storrs, Jr., D. D. 
Rev. Joseph P. Thompson, D. D. 
Rev. William I. Budington, D. D. 
Rev. William R. Tompkins. 
Mr. William H. Smith. 
Mr. Calvin C. Woolworth. 
I Mr. Christopher R. Robert, Treasurer. 



Members 
Ex-Officio. 



Rev. Milton Badger, D. D., ) 

Rev. David B. Coe, D. D., > Secretaries for Correspond™ 

Rev. A. Huntington Clapp, ) 

Austin Abbott, Esq:, Recording Secretary. 



CONSTITUTION 



or rai 



AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Art. 1. This Society shall be denominated The American Home 
Missionary Society. 

Art. 2. The object of this Society shall be, to assist congregations 
that are unable to support the Gospel ministry, and to send the 
Gospel to the destitute, within the United States : also to cooperate 
with evangelical Christians in the support of Home Missions in nom- 
inally christian countries, to such an extent as the funds of the Insti- 
tution may justify. 

Art. 3. The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice-Presi- 
dents, a Treasurer, an Auditor, one or more Secretaries for Corre- 
spondence, a Recording Secretary, and fifty Directors, who shall be 
annually appointed by the Society; and who, together with the 
Directors for Life, shall constitute a Board, seven of whom shall be a 
quorum, at any meeting regularly convinced. 

Art. 4. The officers and Directors shall appoint an Executive Com- 
mittee of fourteen, (including the Treasurer, the Secretaries for Cor- 
respondence, and the Recording Secretary,) residing in the City of 
New York and its vicinity ; five of whom shall be a quorum, at any 
meeting regularly convened. The Committee shall have power to 
appoint its own meetings, form its own rules of business, and fill any 
vacancies in its own number which may occur during the year, and to 
convene special meetings of the Board or Society ; shall appoint mis- 
sionaries, and instruct them as to the field and manner of their labors \ 
shall have the disposal of the funds; shall create such agency or 
agencies for appointing missionaries, and for other purposes, as the 
interests of the Institution may require ; and shall make an Annual 
Report of their proceedings to the Society. 



10 constitution. May, 1865. 

Art. 5. The Treasurer shall give bonds, annually, tp such amount 
as the Executive Committee 6hall think proper. 

Art. 6. Any person may become a member of this Society, by con- 
tributing annually to its funds ; thirty dollars paid at one time shall 
constitute a Member for Life ; and one hundred dollars paid at one 
time shall constitute a Director for Life : and any person on the pay- 
ment of a sum which, in addition to any previous contribution to the 
funds, shall amount to one hundred dollars, shall be a Director for 
Life. An executor, on paying a legacy of two hundred and fifty dol- 
lars to the funds of this Society, shall be a Member for Life ; and the 
payment of a legacy of one thousand dollars shall constitute a Direc- 
tor for Life. 

Art. 7. Any Missionary Society may become Auxiliary, by agree- 
ing to pay into the Treasury of this Society the whole of its surplus 
funds, and sending to the Secretaries for Correspondence a copy of its 
Constitution and Annual Reports, mentioning the names of its Mis- 
sionaries, and the fields of their operations. 

Art. 8. Every Auxiliary Society, which shall agree to pay the 
whole of its funds to this Society, shall be entitled to a missionary or 
missionaries to labor in such fields as it may designate ; at least to the 
amount of its contributions ; provided such designation be made at 
the time of payment. 

Art. 9. The officers of all Auxiliary Societies shall be, ex officio, 
Directors ; and annual contributors to their funds shall be members 
of the Society. 

Art. 10. This Society shall meet annually in the City of New York, 
on the Wednesday next preceding the second Thursday in May. 

Art. 11. No alteration shall be made in this Constitution without a 
vote of two thirds of the members present at an annual meeting ; nor 
unless the same shall have been proposed at a previous annual meet- 
ing, or recommended by the Executive Committee. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



We are admonished, by every returning Anniversary, to do 
with our might whatever our hands find to do for Christ and for 
the souls of men. 

Four of the Vice-Presidents of the Society, since last we met, 
have been removed by death — Hon. Erastus Fairbanks, Hon. 
Joseph C. Hornblower, LL. D., "William Curtis Notes, LL. D., 
and S. V. S. Wilder, Esq. — men honored in their professions and 
in civil life, the earnest advocates and the generous patrons of 
all philanthropic and christian enterprises, — their country, the 
church of God and institutions of benevolence, far and wide, 
mourn their departure. 

Six of the Missionaries of the Society have also been called to 

five account of their stewardship : Rev. Edmund Burt in New 
[ampshire ; Rev, John Dodd, in New York ; Rev. Abner F. 
Jimes, in Ohio ; Rev. John Reynard, in Wisconsin ; Rev. Increase 
S. Davis, in Iowa ; and Rev. Asahd M. Hooker, in Kansas. 

The year, so fraught with our nation's destinies, so crowded 
with great events, has been one of anxiety and trial not only to 
the friends and patrons of the Society, but especially to the fee- 
ble churches in our new States, to the destitute and scattered 
population on our borders, and to the self-denying missionary, 
seeking, amidst increased privations and hardships, to teach the 
dying the way of life. But the cry of the needy has not been 
unheard, nor has the trust of the faithful in their Divine Helper 
been disappointed. Notwithstanding the urgent and touching 
appeals to the benevolent in behalf of our suffering soldiers and 
ot Weeding humanity everywhere, the year has been distinguish- 
ed by the generous benefactions of the friends of Christ and of 
their country in aid of the missionary work, as well as by the 
increase of laborers in the vineyard. The Spirit has also been 
poured out upon the churches in increased measure, and the over- 
ruling proviaence of God has opened broad and inviting fields, 
hitherto unoccupied by the Society, for the establishment of gos- 
pel institutions. 
With devout gratitude and praise to Him who baa \ie\ped \» 



12 THIRTT NINTH REPORT. May, 

hitherto, would we gird ourselves anew and go forward in his 
strength, to the accomplishment of the work before us. 

Sketches of the operations of the Society, in the respective 
States and Territories where it has labored, will be founa under 
their appropriate heads in the body of the Keport ; such details 
as can be presented in a compact form are embraced in the 
following 

GENERAL TABLE, 

Showing in parallel columns, 

1. An alphabetical list of Missionaries. 

2. The names of congregations and missionary districts aided. 

3. Dates of commissions or time of commencing labor. 

4. Length of commissions in months. 

5. Amount of aid pledged, for the time named in the pre- 

ceding column. 

6. Months of labor performed, since the last Report. 

7. Number of church members. 

8. Number of hopeful conversions. 

9. Additions to the churches on examination. 

10. Additions to the churches by letter. 

11. Number of Sabbath school and Bible class pupils. 

12. Amount of contributions to benevolent objects. 

13. Other particulars. 



EXPLANATION. 

In this table, the following abbreviations, appended to the names of Mission- 
aries in the first column, designate the Auxiliary Societies and Agencies by 
whose funds the congregations and missionary stations below which they are 
placed have been aided, viz. : 

M. M. S., Maine Missionary Society. 
N. H. M. S., New Hampshire Missionary Society. 
V. D. M. S., Vermont Domestic Missionary Society. 
Mass. H. M. S., Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
C. H. M. S., Connecticut Home Missionary Society. 
R. I. H. M. S., Rhode Island Home Missionary Society. 
The names of Missionaries who were not in commission last year are printed 
in Italics. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BKPOBT. 



13 




i 

S 



I i 

o o 

B « 



3 



v 

1J 

-n 

1 1 2 



TT 

• c a 

~F~i — 



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<n taonnqpiaoo 



"if — B - 



$ 2 
S | 

~r~s~ 



-u«|oqog 
I«>qog q»g |ojo>i 



8 8 2 



8 8 



M^pqia 



ao 



'•nop 

-j»A ao3 injadoH 

*uaqa»ff 

qamqp jo -o^ 



88 5 



SS88K 8 3 352:53 S 



IT 



'poauojjad 
joq^I jo «naon 
'paJpdfd 
PIV jo sxviioa 



-moo jo mJtad'i 2 



O06H COS 



« «* Ot«D Ot rl 



ssrs* r 



3*8§SSSSff88 



etatat o*e< 


9« 


et 9* oteo « ©i « « « « oo 


« 


a* 


SsS ss 


ao 36 a5 ao ao ao ao ao ao 35 ao 


1 


i 




li in ii i iimuu&ii v * 



14 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 






09 inoiniqi4iaot> 






I t- 



! 



I 

I 

J 



II 

* - ■ 



■ 

f 

fl 

u 



IS S3 
3* 38 



£ £ $ 8 

3 - « g 



Si 



as g 



If 1 £ S 



liiif 

■--•-_ 

B ■ • fi 

ifi*! 

f_So 

• -1- 



a § 



ia«jq £fr 



«o 



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leqinaff 



a 



5" 3 



SSJS s s 



5 $ 



I 1 II 




E^*; >■ > & £ > ^ * ^ + fc^ £ ^ *^fr ** ff * 

«A* £ £ « - £ * & <8 MA &* $ AS 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



15 




f S3S3 



88 S 8 s a 



/ f ~* -1 t- 



— ^ 




S 


7i 


CD JUS *t r* ** t- ** 


— ^ 4* WOJ 


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B S 8 

^ ^ ^ 


?* S !S ? 5 S 3 5 3 S 


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SS3 8SSSB6B8BB 

41*54 « WQ1 41 41 H fl 5» K « 


H z 35 * * 


1 


i 


35 * ao 55 3s 


if i it iiiiiiii 



- 00 tit* t-T rf f-Tj9 *-T r-VT 




ii i i J ilUiaU 



16 



thimt nikth rbpokt. 



May, 




i 

I 
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s 



1 
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5 - 1 

5 8. 1 

s £ . 

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09 suonnqja^aoQ 

•sa^oqog ~ 
looqog qgg jo om 



8 8 



98 e 



8 & 9 8 5 S 



"8 3 £ 8 8~ £ 89 88" 



-jowi Ifl 



•nrexaao 



'uaqmajf 
qoanqo jo on 



8 



$ss s 



8 8 S 8 $ S 83 S3 



'pduuojjad 
joq«q jo «q}u<>H 


CN 


at 


oet ot 


©t !■* 


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« «eoo» ^ « o«io »*■ 


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P1V jo wtinoa 


8 


8 


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8 8 


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« cm « e» 


3 S88 s § 88 8 


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co 


at 




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I II i I 14 <S 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



17 




— .-—:■ — 



*srs ^ i aa * s ss3 sasassassss 



^ N5» 9 «^<* W» 9 » *J ^ 



» fl J T » m 

S S S S S S" 



si at » c* 



rg~§TTT§f i ii g i i§ § §§i 851 g § 

j ni h IP til I II I III II i 1 IIII 1 1 

■*■■ '-* -*-» * ^- r - r - * -* ^ g* i4 ~ p? »f A 




-lis J * a «fc^ 

U* I III 4 ill 1 14 1 



14 



5 fi 4 3 8 B 

zl & & & & & & 



& & 



18 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 










'i^|.ri .Vti 



-Ull'V'j UQ 



vaoja 



3 



't>JtH|ll|,>K 



:!:i^ £« £* S 



$35 a I £IS 



Kit 



joqgl ja ■qwtift 



1 8 IS 1 § I II I il» § II M* li 






tuc^j jo qiMn^i 



h 



S * *3 S 4 4 So* « *:?* ? Sdi 3 SgB S* 



1* 

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i a i i j 









II I" II jj 







tt .d-d 

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Mi 






sm 






3a 



idSi-i; 



1 1 



1 1 



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a i:s 



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a»«T 



5 P ^£ K S R S4 

^ it £ * 5* ^ s» »•' ^ 

s & $& $ & £ && 



KM sa I^t4=* 

g ggt & Mm 9 



III I ll I ll II 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPORT. 



19 



5 

•g 
X 

M 

3 



I 



*<S 



c2 



5 3 -5 a s 

I-sp «S a 



lilii 



11 



1$ £ 



I 



5 3 



J. 



1 M 




£ 8 3 5 i~ST»* 

♦H r-i Si- 





TH 




■ 






x 


:-■ 




:•» 


60 


MMi 


3£ 2 


S^ 


S 


S i 


3 5 


£ ssss 



gfi! § sse grrr^ra n~s s §i • is § i _ rii~ 

222 2 222 22 2 2 *H 2 w 2 2 2 2 S3 2 w 2 2 *■ « **« 



ill I ill II I 1 II l I 1 1 I i II I ii | i i ii 


lit I lit tl 1 1 ft 1 III I ! 41 i" Ii i S t II 




3 i 



3 i 

I 5 4 -I * 

fe r r .MS 

f s ews 

S * *$Zi 

0_p 0,3 B 



Is 9 

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. k S MM)!! 



1 i§ a) I 



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»ii -I s a j I s &£ 




a - 3 III II 5 - III II I 5 a ii I II 4 a a ai 



12 THIRTT NINTH REPORT. May, 

hitherto, would we gird ourselves anew and go forward in his 
strength, to the accomplishment of the work before us. 

Sketches of the operations of the Society, in the respective 
States and Territories where it has labored, will be founa under 
their appropriate heads in the body of the Report ; such details 
as can be presented in a compact form are embraced in the 
following 

GENERAL TABLE, 

Showing in parallel columns, 

1. An alphabetical list of Missionaries. 

2. The names of congregations and missionary districts aided. 

3. Dates of commissions or time of commencing labor. 

4. Length of commissions in months. 

5. Amount of aid pledged, for the time named in the pre- 

ceding column. 

6. Months of labor performed, since the last Report. 

7. Number of church members. 

8. Number of hopeful conversions. 

9. Additions to the churches on examination. 

10. Additions to the churches by letter. 

11. Number of Sabbath school and Bible class pupils. 

12. Amount of contributions to benevolent objects. 

13. Other particulars. 



EXPLANATION. 

In this table, the following abbreviations, appended to the names of Mission- 
aries in the first column, designate the Auxiliary Societies and Agencies by 
whose funds the congregations and missionary stations below which they are 
placed have been aided, viz. : 

M. M. S., Maine Missionary Society. 
N. H. M. S., New Hampshire Missionary Society. 
V. D. M. S., Vermont Domestic Missionary Society. 
Mass. H. M. S., Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
C. H. M. S., Connecticut Home Missionary Society. 
R. I. H. M. S., Rhode Island Home Missionary Society. 
The names of Missionaries who were not in commission last year are printed 
in Italics. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPORT. 



21 



1! 

m 

i I 3 * 

Hi* 



3 £ 




S $ 



28 



8 
g 

s sis » s i" 



S 8382 
• S8S5 



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00 00 




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£ 




iHrH ri 00 n« WO 


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C8SS * 8 35 3* 58 9 


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04 ©0404 

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04 99 04 0*10 0404 04 ©0004 ^*04 t* oo e* io o *-n^t 04 

rlilrirl rlrl n ri ri n r-« ri 


i !i i i 


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04 0*9* *- 04 
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0404040404 0404 04 Oil 04 04 04 04 04 00 C4 04 04 04 04 04 04 

ririr*rHi<4 ri r* ri r* r* ri r(r( n ri ri ri r«rlH ri 


i || i | | ii 


0006000000 35 ao 00 000006 aooo 35 35 ao ao oo coaoao ao 


~ ofr-T ^ ,-T 


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T-Ti-Tri'ri'rl' r-Trl" ^.f f-T^^J" £j t-T ri" ri" ri* t-^ ^ r-T»cfrl' ri" 



« I i i 

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4 i4 4 i ^ lil Jimi ll I ill 41 1 III 



In 

™ *• ff • I' 

1*1 I^K"|3 






14 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



i 

i 



1'J "JU'ii Jli. l | 1 lJTJ*. i i 



-fjv[aq3g 



i £ 



E 3 



tf 





3 
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11 


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1 



33 83 
3* 33 



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II 

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11 



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«*§ 



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33 g S 8 



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raBxa ao 






s 3 £ 5 






ss k a s~ 



9 s 



"[haauajjfrl 
ioqvi j.n fqineff 




4 r^^f 9* 


7' 


01 


7* 


a 


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KJfrfl 


C * *i 


05 


pty jo uifloa 


^..Mi 


Si» i 


s 


§ 


g 


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— 

77 


§ § 


l§5 


Si § 


8S 


*nioQ jo qtBira'X 


-• 7' 7' 7> ' 


W«4 « 


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T-f 


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7' 71 


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333 

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82 

14 



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1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



15 



1 * a 

2 • 2 

2 g> * 

ill « 

111 B 

iS 1 

t le e 



ssi s 

5 S3? 8_ 

~§"§S~8'I~ 



II 
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it 
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ill 

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- - -f 

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1 

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8 is 






2 

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SUSS £ g 
i~8~ 8~8 ~8888 



0D9» «« t- 



00 «ti -* 



8 8 8 S 3 88 SJS 8 8 8S 8S28 8 



^W 91 9191 



«D91 04 91 



O*-— 91 «« 919)C99li-l919t9t 



g? I §§ g § g_lg_§_8 §gg §§§§881888 

909 91 0*91 91 O* *9 91» 9» 91 9(9) 9) 9191 9)9>9t9t9t9t919l 

jcqd 35 3535 35 35 35 3535 35 35 9£a5 35 3535 3535353535353535 

8* * i* i 




I! 1 !! 1 r I ■ 



il i' i% i i j ir // # *' ii i' 1 4 %\ 1 11 



16 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 






! 

a 

Ij 
*\ 

% 8 

3 3 



$1 i a* 



I 



hi 

-eg 

Sis 



•c 
S 



8 i~g S P 8 £ s s 5* s B~ 

S S S ? 8 ' 8 M g S S 5 

5 g~M~~S & 58 8~3~&~S~8~g~W8S * 



•ipaftO 'Aanag 
o* «nonnqjj^aoo 



looqog qtig jo on 






•j^yi Ig 



urexano 



•Bnojs 



'Udqmajf 
qwnqOjojoN 



'pduuopad 
joquq jo gg^oow 



S 5 28 S" 



5 8 S 



s s ^ ;s: 



ot otcooa 



§ a is s rrTTTTTiir^Tio 



'ptfpaid 
P1V jo MBnoq 

*moQ jo q^Saaq 



/ 




f* ri 5$ 5 *q © ^ 

a 4' ii 14 n 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



17 




to 


io on^ oo -0 eo to anon *« 


to 


»■*© O* 0<« riOO rl an HO OOOn 00 00 00 r* r* 0* t-4 


on 1010 en oooo co on ooto io ao 


2 


28 »• 3 53 § Set $ S 883 Sa838S;SS8S£ 


en 


to eo an ao onan c* tooton ■* iogo an eo^co woo ononenon«oiononon 


i b 88 g s 88 s II s 8 Si 3 S8! 8S 8 § S * S I S S 


„ 


an onan an an o»« o» o«onto a* «o» « a«toan anon onotantoanononon 




1 


QD w 35 do 00 do do 00 OD OD do do do do 00 do 00 do 00 do 00 oo do o5 00 do 00 OD 

^ *^_r - - -_r -i *"l_r_r _r -r-f _r -\-f_r _/r ~r _r to* * - *"1 *"1 1 



i | 






S«5* S3 | 



•« £ s & « »? 






I* 

1 1 



I s 

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u 

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■sfe *0&O * * a 

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= I ir 

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I* 

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1 13 






1 1 15 1 1 II £ HI I » I il II I l I I * 1 1 1 
I U4 1 4 & IHIiili'i'4i4ilJiH&a\i 

2 



16 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 




1 



p 

fi 

M 

! J 

i 1 

3 * 
I 5 
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/ ' W V i -r V 

8 P 3 £ 3 £; 



I 

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l 5 & g & tr~ss~g* 



unrxa no 



-j»4aoj |tij?do|| 






£ = ££ £ 



3 3 



sl s ss ss 



h paniJQjtfd 



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17* 7**4 ^ 



§ 2 3S » ! 1 § § * § § m ^§11 



*1»Spa|rJ 

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S 3> 5S 06 as V; cc W 3 6D X 3> 3a cm tn (/> 5 CT UP 3S 

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c.l 



ill 



55 = 



1 1 



S S I 



s S32J 



5 £ 









II 



"ij 



■s ic.^s a = ^ 

a oC g h q 5 



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MS- 

fr 3 .! 

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a &a II' 14 4 



1865. 



THIBTT NINTH BEPOBT. 



17 





-3 ^£ =U*^ c S = i 



5 88 a 8 SS 8 S8 




8 SS 




I %WS~1 88 5 



S~S 8~8~g~7 



«o 


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04 <* 




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no ooo4 


06 


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at 0O 


04 




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04 COW 








lO 


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2 


28 8* 3 


cs 


s 


35 


$ 


s 


289 S3 


s 


2 


8 


S 


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8 85 55 


91 


<D CO) 04 00 


04 04 


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««9I 


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04 


oe^ao e4oo 


04 


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r* f-» 51 


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o5 35 3535 95 ao 3535 oo obooob 35 3535 o5 ododoo 3535 S535S53>S5353>3> 

~ 1 11 - 1 ** 11 =i "*11 1 11 1 111 11 1 1 3- 1 1 *"* 1 1 



1 3 






s! I 



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_ P'C ** ™ *" ££ -"- * ^ 






liiSlllliillllillillsilillil 
iimiMtttJiMJiJiiUi ihuu 



18 



THIRTT NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



01 tiU'.-|!Mi^JlUi \ I 



t 

w 



-I 






I 111! 

~8 SI 



1~^- 



I 

i 
g 



J 5 * 

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9 



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gg 



8 ? S^S 






is ^ 



j^wi^h 



« . 1H 



un 



-jmuqj (?y*doH 



>Ji"HJIII?»K 



:£9 Mis *« S 



213 IS S S£ S 



gs 



■|« ill! J- J. "I 

Jtoqs^f ju sqinojg 






1 § II I i I 9! 1 §S S § II ! 15 SI 



TH&3 j» ntfosq 



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18 



THIRTT NINTH REPORT. 



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THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



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THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



21 




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22 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



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THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



28 




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24 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



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1865. 



THIBTY NINTH REPORT. 



25 




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26 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



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THIRTY NINTH RKPOBT. 



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THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



29 



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30 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



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THIRTY NTNTH REPORT. 



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9 3 * 


o» - « « 


5" 


TO <* 




« 


S* P 3 


•^ / 


S 1 ^ SS Jgg S3 § 9 133 




i i 


« mi «* ■! 


9 ff9t 

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Jfc-ift « 4 ■?*>*?* flV fl SI V IQ (I 

,-* ^* F-t — | ^4 V* ftf 


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8 2 8 1 

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e 


III » 1 


tt « II H 


2 m 


as 9 a ssa as a a s a a 


1 




S S ¥ * S <£« S3 * X X$S «/*• 35 * * M * 


? 


ii? i i 


rf «- r4* _T 


July 24, 

June 16, 
April 1/ 


1-iVT ^» 1-4" irfV-Tl-T vfaf T+ 1-4 1-4 T? Y+ 

II £ 1' lit fcji i i s £ g 




Jan. 1,{ 
May 1,J 
April 1, 1 

June 1,3 

June 8, 1 




1 1 ri'3 !i I s I 



Kl^-W sa Waft;; 

i • a P"-s|' s ^ j-1 Jill "lai 

4fc If I H 3 4 £ 8 tfuR S , 

jffli ii 141111 Itt I ^ 



32 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 












I IV j"*wi|og_ 



*wmO jo qi^uBi 



fli 



1 

i? - 






c pa 
3 =5 a 

nwr 



i i 

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Pi 

-~ : 
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III 
fjli 

-<_■? 

ari 



1 I 



if 

El 

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HI. 
E«5J1 

is "I 



si 
P 

si 

■ ° 

13 



S 
Si 



n 

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si 

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I if 

9 11 eg 

fflfll 

nS5 S£ 



II 



«4 



23, 



ll 

-? a 



»^*3 Jill 



^ — - — 



= ij 



.Mis iPs 

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fi4y fli 



■ WML 



8§3S 5 
8^3 S 



5* S 8 3£ f 



>:s^z':i i 



2-c i 


r? 


tfh 


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n n « 


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t 


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« 


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ipjuip JO 'fljl 


^ 
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*- 


S 


* *-< 5! 


4 m 


*Hfi 


3 


£ 


3 IS SS5 33 S 


G3?3£ 59 






h ri ri ict-tfl 94 9*** ei««* 






"S!-: n s 



s igi § e s sis i n nn § §§§§§ § § 






I 



xT' J? X J6 3& oc dB 3? Sa gB ?> * TS 35 * 35 on K J*i7 ' " 7 T 

! SS i i i ft! i ii i!i 

T":~: ; :^T^S : : : : : : 



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/i 4i'4 III I i i ii HI t Uka i 4 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH. REPORT. 



38 



5 

El 



£2 



S *3 

iL £•= — 



CO* 



a 



a J « 
1 * - 



S SS 8 8 8 

g ss ess 
g"gs e s es 




i 

II 

li 

II 



8 P 

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"8 
Si 



I 

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ii 

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8 
£ 



"?" 8 "3~ 



28 S 



as S^9$ KS8S $ s 



58 ~ * 

"83 ~S 3T 



» *•* ©woo «*7» «i^ 



1 13 g § § § §s 


i § as i g § ii| is §§ as' § § 


« OT9t Ot « « Ot ©»3* 


2 2 22 2 2 2 22® 22 22 22 2 °° 2 


» §Z jo § q6 8 ** 


36 od 35 x 35 3d" 35 353535 3535 3535 3535 35 35 ot 




:. eS ais e , s^ (a ;-i-= si lis i at** 



I I 213 I If li 



ell 



# i' 4 i 4ii' ii u li i * * 



34 



THIRTY NINTH BEPORT. 



May, 







tl 



11 



1- 

fi 






of moiinqVUDOO 



illii & 

s s s s — 5" 
»l$ g B 

£ £ I"" ITS - 5" 



n 

P 



i s 

f s 



WW 






g (SEE 2 $3 



i 



□ twig UQ 



-gjaqmjM 



W 



III 



£2 S 

30 ~r 



ITs" 



~B« s s 



5 $85 g S3" 



5 a s s a a si 



3"3BS3338333 






§51 3 



s- 


£ 


2 


2 


«* 


V. 


7> 

— 1 


7? 


« 44 A 

*^ «4 «4 


Si- 


Tl V. 7^ 


2 


SS9 


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II 


7 


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1 


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s 


3d H aft 


ll 


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■- 


fill 


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£ c « ► * d 

= - U O 9 3 






/ 




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i ? i"s sis 



? 4H * 



-U-> 
Si 1 

** fc * ^ t fc f •"" * * £ ^ £ * * E s 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



85 




I 



s 



"8" 



8 88 88 

r-» 




a 


8 82 ?8 




IS 8 88 8 8 8 


88 


r-< »0 « 




co 


A © 00 




ot «o iO 0* Ot 


<* 


*■« iH 






00 ri 




tH 00 t- i-i 00 f 

iH 1-* 


~ 


CO t- 






T-l *-l « 




iH 00 00 © 




a 82? gg* 


« 


<eae*o 


8 88 8S 




U 85 S 28 


s§ 


« ot*# aoot 9to*eo* 


0* 049* 090* 


^0* 


ODOt 


§ IS §S §1 


£ 


lis 


§ 8S I s 


SS 


§s § n s s« s § 


IS 


o* e» «« otetoo" 


Ot 


0*0* 09 


ot etot ©*o* 


9*0t 


0*99 99 0999 99 «^T 0*99 


9»W 


35 oo 35 35 95 3535 


35 do 35 35 35 Sod 3535 3535 3535 35 3535 35 352 3535 


II 



"«f 0»0 i-Tr-Tg r-T 



ill I II 



o»"2 *"^ * "'»^" ^ '"'*" r °* '"'jf *"•*'■ 



r^"«T 




g*g;SS3 



II 



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«1 «fe"-gg«: a j£i I Il a ij 3a <*i I Is &■** %£ If 

« 4 c iim 3 ^4 1 5l II si *J I II *« U %\ 

Mi J Mt j M j M fji ft ti 4 as 44 ft tt 



36 



THIRTY KINTH BEPOBT. 



May, 



4 
1 



£ 



! I 



B 

I 











i^nvixa 


fj 


H^ 


* 


« 


99 


SI 


«s 


■imixa no 




« 


^ 


» 


« 


00 i-i 


HljQ|f 






«M* 


THJ 


1- 


1-1 




3 8 


333$ 


SM 


89 3 


s 


£ 3 



'pauuojjad 



t maQ j" mau..q 






s 

3 



11 



= s 



If 

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SS 35 3 



8 S 



&2? 



S3 ss s s 



8 8 



£-2 



ACHtgst t- EM -* M <* 31 



* sass §iiia § §s~ gg's H § s si §- § 



C*ff*>7*Wtfr W tfl« ■5»3"7* Oi« 



¥~Hll fin IT* 3 ?^ £« * 1 §1 II r 









III 



1 






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: .2 



53 5 



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fl 



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/ 



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/4 Hii 



^ ^ ^. 



:itjUg»3 






I ta 



iliii i it tti ii i t £ 



ll I 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



87 



t 

1 

e 

6 



i 



i 



i I 



l 

-= -• 



1 

91 



iifi! 



= ^ t - 
■= - ^ i * 



83 



a 3 

SJ 



1 

1 
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SI S3 




£88 8 
8£S g 



$ gs g 




SI I** 8gs |, 88 s e * 


9i e* 




• 91 91 *9 91 IO 91 *9 


o» a> 




«o« «* *h th *« eo 


« $ 




coo to <d ot ao 

r-» 


el 8£ § 






00 00 9191 91 *H 


91 


Ot r-i 9191 *9 91 9191^9 <09t91 «DlO 91 0» 00* lO «D 91 t- 


8 9 81 3 

9) 9t 91» 91 «0 

t* t-i ^*tH r-» 


s 

91 


1 § 88 8 8 §88 888 §* 8 §8 8 8 8 3 

91 91 9191 91 91 919191 919191 9191 91 9191 91 91 91 « 


2 35 35 oo ao 35 


3 

ao 


ao qo 3535 35 co 35 353535 353535 3535 35 3535 35 35 35352 



rf «©~ 



rf ^ « ^ £~* r*'gf » ^-oo^ g- 



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•*•*%*" 



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~ ?f ^«~ 




* * a f f J J jjijijif j ffi tii II I U & \%t 



38 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



c 
i 



Si 



£ 
3 



i f 



i 



•9 



e 

<3 | 



I 

! 



it t 



si 
si 

pi 



S£5 

I** 



I 









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1 3 1* ^ 






sssss £ — r~r 



l 1 g^i 
— t^ 



Oil Buojinqmaoj 



3 



s - jjTfS 






3^83 -5 



£ iS 



I 



M*»»l *g 



- ~s 









* Sot ^» 



■ 



^Ht? 



Ul 






F1V J« *n[\°q 



ST 



§811 



"ISC" 8 " 



t- ^igtfle^ 



01 ?* 91 IS kO*t^ Pi 



S S 8S8S § § I * 118 I 



'PHJ3 ja i|tf iwq 



t- ir*9*$*9* *w 



R4 lgf <?' 1 



*S3 . 
55" 



?i5 3 3^ * So u5 -x 35 uh K do se- gb 35 S5 jj 3> ■:» 3 * -5- •* '-*;• 



& s & g* 



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I 

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fit s 












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si 

ml 



1) d 

3£ 



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! j 5J dd! 1 

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! I ffi 

1 ! Ill 

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ill 

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*h* W *-*► > > |S *; ^ iS v*f^t ^ If fit f ^^^ Sr 



1865. 



THIBTY NINTH REPORT. 



89 



hi 

*9 Of 

£ £4 



|tl5 I 

I fill - 

--§111 5 
IIJ'JJ 

S 88 



S 58 SS 8 8 a 




8 £8 e 



I-* cw ew 



8 3 33 SSS@ 



8 $& 3f£ 5" 



3 8 *9 



e» »«« etevco 



* si 8 i i i s s a a §§i §8i 


§§ § g§ 8 §§§§ § § 


^ nH v* r4 *4 iH ^4 ** t4 v+v*t+ t+t*t+ 


W« « «« CD ««(N9I Ot 6* 


35 9535 aoooaooDaBoDaDw a&3>a5 aoaooo 


«S 8 88 8 8888 8 8 


V -f- f j" ~ - ~ ~ •" ~ - - -" &"2 3f 


Jan. 1,1 
May 11, 

April 1,1 

Sept 1,1 
Jan. 1,1 

July 11,1 

Oct 12, 1 
July 1,1 
Aug. 1, 
June 16, 

Sept 5, 1 

Not., I 



si 



ill 

:w a M « 

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£1 I u 



r- 
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jjflj 

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in; .* fi - 



*tiMjj*jj£Jiti' tit 



1 S a i 3 J II 




11 gl«S 



, 14* • 

Ss & * a 



40 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



r 
5 



o% faoiiiiq|jjiiija 






*S 



-jail*! *a 



■nrexg uq 



ipjuqn jo "Ofi 





M » 


IQ atattse* M « 


44 


« « (j 


to 7* 


«W « -si e» *t « 


~patfpd|d 


§ 8 


8S»S S 8 


8 


§ 8 § 


88 


1 8 9 8 1 


TDoft jo MV3 q *l 


v* at 


~t ri Ci r? <?l ?i 


-i 


:> :i 


9< » 


atot at da at r» « 



1!' 




| f 1 I l 

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J J i I 1 

I I f I I 

£ * L ? - 



*B **£ ■! £ e h* 

s ffflBi 



| £ £ 






1 fit! 

8 "S S S 8 

s a s g « 



2 88S" 



£0 £S | JS £ 



8*rnjr 



S eft 3 5 $9 3 *»««*• 



7. 7 7 j * 7 7 /: 7 r 7 7. x 7 / 7 * 7 x S 7 >7> 



■^ r* r^ .JS^r*** wm 



9 i-T rt" 



"s jf •* 



vr * /;-, ~ ^ 



1 J J 















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, 



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d 1 1 Girl I ri ■**! ^1 3 &i i rrl 3 



«4 

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1865. 



THIRTY NINTH HKP0B1. 



41 



H 



If 
in 



t 

3 



i! 
i> 

a s> 

-SI 






S3 £5 98 8 



i 111 i 



88 38 Si g 



e 
e 

•'IP 

iiilt 
tthl 

i = - " i 

ri 5 i_ 

* 8 

8" " 






5*1 

5 8*^ 



i|ii 

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I 

! 



< it 

III 

HI 
I [i 

ill 

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I -1 



•rs = 



r- £R 



- - 

s s 

J' 

l s" 

S 8 
8 — 8" 






! 1 

I i 

II bi 

M B 1 



Si 



R 


?T 


<*■ flO 


91 


•- 


1 


X 


- i 


49 


8 




* 


• 


•= 


sa £§ 


H8 8 


SSI * £ 


8~T:S 


a e 


Pi 


8 5 



#*& *-» FtWJO 



s§ i5 no s § i "ii i 



+ *l Tt ■« M 






II Si IIS I 2 I i II I ~ 2 2i II J" 2 2 SIS 12 2 



•1 : : : i : ! i : 






SS 






^tf Of- ~ 




s fi 

I I ! i 

1 = 



I I 



fc S o 

n*if in 1 1 1 iwa 






^ da gStsg 

S s? gg«s 





uanjf jf'jji 



42 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 




•«j«|oip8 
jooqogq« gjoo M 



ni«xa uo 



88 8 S3 8 £ 8 88 388 88 



•gaojg 



© t- ^ 



'uaqaiajg 

qajnqp j o -QM 

-pauuojjdd 

aoqgq jo gqiaoK 



819 58888 J3 £ 



322 23 853 S 



9 8 



0t OtCN r-i « OIOC4 «»©»« 



« « -*>o 



§ S 83 8 8 II g § if § 88S * § § I SS 



PIV jo gJBnoq 



•moo jo qtf a^q 



« 00 « MM 



« 099I « 0» (N«« C4(N<N 94 



« ®» e»« 



co S * coS S S SS S S SSS coSS S co S S Sao 



as 

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4 

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life 3$ 
<§ III &gi 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



43 



Ui 



in 



S 

* is 8 

i i 



Co 

§1 

Si 



3 8 8 

8 8* 



a 

1 

"a" 






I 1 ! 



1 



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i MS 

I e e_< 

"B'S 8 

sag 



II* 

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8" J9 



1 



3 g~g r~sr 




8 8 8 8 



8 8 38 



— f * 



0* "* •» ri 


on «o 


-* i-i «* eo 


8 15 8 5: 88 5 558 8 


s^ss 


*- 9 S2 9 8 88 5 8 


00 O* C* 0»» O*««ei0O*e4O*f 


04 «0 0» 


m « at « n ^ o* <*» ■* » « 


3S§§S§e§ii38| 


i i s 


§ § % § S 8881* | 


940 «• W» 0*«D0909O*O40>IO* 


91 04 91 


<N 04 « 0» O* 0*9*0«9t.9* « 


35 35 3d oo co ooaoaDaDuooDaoco 


SII 


S a5 S 8 ao 8cn$xa5 w 


h- ^ T-r»-r v-r «-r v^r ** r-r i-r **" »■« 

U 1 1* i * j ! f ! s 1 


AprU 1,1 
Oct 1,1 
Dec. 21, 1 


g S * 1 £ ^^o'J $ 

as " «< £ fc <£««fcS * 




?l! 



5 Mb-. 8 . 

Sog||J2 






bibig 60M9 be 
c a lj g g£ g 



:i_£SS63^6_ 



f'Jlji* 






3 SS$<^ 



itiUtiiifJiJii £4 4* I U £ & ittfti 



42 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 




! j x :* « g n i 4 ii! !!U 1 1 i M 

i" i 4 14 I S is & I U& U& U I £ IS 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH RKPORT. 



48 




3 



i 



i 

l 

V 

8 



88 49 

60 00 

800 


8 

S3 


i 
62 00 

32 00 

684 80 

200 00 

1 


to 

8 


8 8 8 8 3 S 
8 S 8 8 S 2 


8 8 8 


8 


2 8 8 


3 8 


8 8 S38 8 * 




:fi a s 



^ »- rl 



i-i ^o» 



»• «o »-i 00 04 ^h 


00 


r-l 04 


00 


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•* i-i «* 


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8 S 8 £ 88 S 558 8 


2«»s* 


*- 9 32 3 8 


83 5 8 


km 9» 0409 o404«Dioo>io*o*t~ 


04 «D 0» 


04 04 OS 04 00 


^•0404^*91 04. 


23iisie§igsgi 


ll§ 


§ § § § § 


§g§§3 8 


»0 04 0404 O4C0O4O4O4Q494Q4 


C4 04 04 


9* 04 04 04 04 


04 9* <M 94.Q4 04 


i5 35 35 ao 35 aDaoaDOooSaoaDS 


2 11 


oo do 3d SB oo 


aExSxx 8 


June 1, 
Jan. 1, 

Oct. 1, 

Oct 1, 
July 1, 

Mar. 1, 

Oct. 1,1 

Oct 1,1 

April 1,1 

8ept 1, 1 

July 1,1 

Feb. 1,1 

Not. 1,1 


April 1, 1 
Oct 1,1 
Dec. 21, 1 


Not. 18, 
Jan. 1,1 
Aug. 1, 
June 1, 1 
Not. 12, 1 


< £ < r. a * 







fa | f| a J a j * | 1 r i 

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i 4 j i I 4 S I tt&ft i 



42 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



e 



5- 
- 

c 






'■UH1iMl.li; 
. £ I J5IW1 *« 



mnxa wo 






- 



3 

I 

-5 
I 



It 1 
II J 

g l 

a* 

Pi 



3 § 

ll 



I 3 

C_SJ 



= s 



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* 5 a 



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s s 



I 

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S 8S£ S3 



1 

f 



Si 



8 SS 3 £ S 



Si «Sn 



S3 ' 

ii fi 



fig 



> 
g a 



"IJUOjS 



:8B&3 J2 5 



SJ3! 3« S* SJS5 3 U 9 » 



o«aa j*Nii 



PE Y ji> miinq 



nrnnrnmi §§§ « § & r §§ 







\u 



%£& ^ ^ & i ill 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BBPOBT. 



43 




eo^ ^ ~4 



^ "* •» rl 


04(0 -<* i-l ^ 


CO 


8 s a e ss s 38 g 


3*SS *- $ 32 9 8 


is S 8 


009t 9« O400 <H«fO«00»©»0»fc- 


we»9i«0)«« 


fO^O*-*** « 


8* I IS 1 M I g 8 8 | 


88SSS883 


§g§|s 8 


»« 9« 0»ff» O««00)9«O*OIO*O* 


9*9«e<*0*<NO*04Q<l 


9»9*<N9lO* 0* 


22 3b 2 oo ODaDaDdDuDaDaoao 


iiUHH 


81332 i 




** H H jf ,f ^ ^ Of 


**^ t* ir t 8t 




tf 



u 

f 1 



s^ 



g-fgVfcJ] 

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a a w a c© fl 

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s 

■ | | : I 



M 1 33 =1 



1"J«J*I 

a ^ a c a a j 



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jf J i i * ( * & &&&& i 



44 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



May> 



i 
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S 



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1 

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S 8 8 
8 S S 




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311 S fcSSS £ aoS 3 


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8 8 8 § 


8 8 S S 8 § 888188 8 s2 1 § 8 



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M M U ttl& 1 1 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 45 



SUMMARY OF RESULTS. 

The number of ministers of the Gospel in the service of the 
Society the last year, whose names are found in the preceding 
General Table, together with those engaged in superintending the 
work, and whose names are mentioned in connection with the 
respective Auxiliaries and Agencies, is 802. 

Of these, 603 were in commission at the date of the last Report, 
and 199 have since been appointed. 

They have been distributed in 21 different States and Territo- 
ries, as follows : in Maine, 77 ; New Hampshire, 39 ; Vermont, 
61 ; Massachusetts, 59 ; Rhode Island, 5 ; Connecticut, 52 ; New 
York, 53 ; Pennsylvania, 5 ; Ohio, 37 ; Indiana, 7 ; Illinois, 95 ; 
Missouri, 4 ; Michigan, 70 ; Wisconsin, 78 : Iowa, 98 ; Minneso- 
ta, 35 ; Kansas, 15 ; Nebraska, 7 ; Colorado, 2 ; California, 10 ; 
Oregon, 3. 

This distribution gives to the New England States, 293 ; Mid- 
dle States, 58 ; Western States and Territories, including 13 on 
the Pacific coast, 451. 

Of the whole number in commission, 503 have been pastors or 
stated supplies of single congregations ; 239 have ministered to 
two or three congregations each ; and 60 have extended their 
labors over still wider fields. 

The aggregate of ministerial labor performed is 635 years. 

The number of congregations and missionary districts, which 
have been fully supplied, or where the Gospel has been preached 
at stated intervals, is 1,575. 

Four missionaries have been in commission as pastors or stated 
supplies of congregations of colored people ; and 29 have preached 
in foreign languages — 10 to Welsh, congregations, 17 to German 
congregations, and 2 to congregations of IfoUanders and Frenchmen. 

The number of Sabbath school and Bible class scholars, connected 
with the missionary churches, is not far from 58,600. 

The contributions to benevolent objects, reported by 460 mission- 
aries, amount to $35,437.71. 

Seventy five missionaries make mention of revivals of religion 
during the year, in some of which there have been 40, 50, 70 and 
75 hopeful conversions. The number of conversions reported by 
278 missionaries is 2,200. 

The additions to the churches, as nearlv as can be ascertained, 
We been, 3,820 ; namely, 2,112 on profession of their faith, &n& 
1*708 by letters from other churches. 



46 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

Twenty eight churches have been organized in connection with 
the labors of the missionaries during the year ; and twenty jive 
have become self -sustaining. Twenty six nouses of worship have 
been completed : forty five repaired or improved / and twenty five 
others are in tne process oj erection. Forty five young ?nen, in 
connection with the missionary churches, are reported as in dif- 
ferent stages of preparation for the gospel ministry. 

THE TREASURY. 

Resources. — The balance in the Treasury, April 1, 1864, was 
$81,642.23. The receipts, for the succeeding twelve months, have 
been $186,897.50 ; making the resources of the year $268,539.73. 

Liabilities. — There was due to missionaries, at the close of the 
last year, the sum of $8,814.25. There have since become due 
$188,901.60 ; making the total of liabilities $197,715.85. 

Payments. — Of this sum, $189,965.39 have been paid; leaving 
$7,750.46 still due to missionaries for labor performed. In addi- 
tion to these past dues, appropriations already made and daily 
becoming due, amount to $75,220.15, making the total of pledges 
$82,970.61 ; towards canceling which there is a balance in the 
Treasury of $78,574.34. 

The total of receipts is less than in the preceding year, by 
$8,640.39. But the diminution has been occasioned by the 
smaller amount received from legacies. The contributions of the 
churches and of individuals have been $17,342.89 — or 14 per 
cent — greater. The expenditures exceed those of the preceding 
year, by $40,639.81. The number of missionaries in commission 
is greater by 461, and the years of labor performed by 32. Fifty 
seven more congregations nave received the regular ministrations 
of the Gospel, and 3,400 more children and youth have been in- 
structed in Bible classes and Sabbath schools. There has been a 
corresponding increase, also, in the number of churches that have 
reached the condition of self-support, in the contributions to 
benevolent objects, in the number of young men preparing for 
the ministry, and — what is cause for special thanksgiving to 
God — in the number and power of revivals of religion and the 
hopeful conversion of souls to Christ. 

Notwithstanding the embarrassments on our borders — in the 
new States and Territories — thirty eight of the additional laborers 
have found there the fields of their culture. Three have been 
sent to California, whose support, on their arrival, was at once 
assumed by the people to whom they were called to minister ; 
and three others are now under appointment for that State. One 
missionary has visited Salt Lake CJity in Utah, and been cordially 
welcomed by the " Gentile" population. He has been the first 
to erect the gospel banner, and lias organized the first christian 
church in the Territory ; and the church has a fair prospect of 
soon being able to sustain its own mn\starj «&& Warning the 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 47 

center of light and salvation to many thousands of souls. An 
able minister is now in New Orleans in the service of the Society, 
from whose labors great and lasting good is confidently expectecl. 
Beginnings have been made at other important points, and ex- 
plorations, of great value in our future operations, of new States 
and Territories and sections of country nitherto inaccessible to 
the Society, where we hope, by the blessing of God, soon to see 
the institutions of the Gospel permanently established. 

The Committee have felt a deep sympathy with their mission- 
ary brethren, who have found themselves taxed so heavily for 
the support of their families by the increased cost of the neces- 
saries of life. They have encouraged their churches to make 
special efforts in their behalf, and have rendered essential relief 
by the enlargement of appropriations. They would have rejoiced 
to be able to answer many more urgent demands for heralds of 
the Cross to be sent into regions where Christ is not known. 
But their great embarrassment has been that the men were not 
at their command. We cherish the hope that, on the return of 
peace, able and experienced ministers, now connected with the- 
army, will be relieved, and will rejoice to go forth, under the 
great Captain of their salvation, to lay in Zion the foundations of 
many generations. And may we not hope that the churches in 
our older settlements — the more favored of them — will be ready 
to relinquish their pastors for the high places of Zion far off upon 
the sea, or for the more self-denying work in the fastnesses of 
the wilderness, that our Theological Seminaries will be crowded 
with young men of promise, saying, " Woe is me if I preach not 
the Gospel," and that prayer will everywhere be offered to God, 
unceasingly, that he would crown our efforts thoroughly to sub- 
due this great rebellion, and to establish our beneficent govern- 
ment on everlasting foundations, with such an outpouring of his 
Spirit upon all institutions, all churches, and all souls as shall make 
our land evermore the dwelling place of the blessed of the Lord ? 

SECRETARIES FOR CORRESPONDENCE. 

Rev. Daniel P. Noyes, one of the Secretaries for Correspond- 
• ence, resigned his office, on the first of January last, to accept the 
Secretaryship of the Massachusetts Conference of Congregational 
Churches. The Committee elected in his place Rev. A. Hunt- 
ington Clapp, Pastor of the Beneficent Congregational Church, 
in Providence, Rhode Island. The church kindly consented to the 
dissolution of his pastoral relation, February 8th, that he might 
enter upon the duties of the office. 

GENERAL COMPARATIVE RESULTS. 

•The following Table gives a comparative view of the amount of 
receipts, expenditures, number of missionaries, new appointments, 
congregations, and missionary districts, years of labor performed, 
additions to the churches, pupils in Sabbath schools, etc, f ot e&cta 
year since the organization ot the Society. 



48 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Soeioty't Y—s. 



R+etipU, IrpajjJJtai^ T 



1—1826-27 

2—1827-281 

3 — 1828-29; 

4— 1829-3U 

6—1830-31 

6—1831-32 

7—1832-33 

8— 1833-34fj 

9—1834-35 

10—1835-36 

11 — 1836-37] 

12 — 1837-38J 

13—1838-39 

14—1839-40! 

15— 1840-41 1 

16—1841-42 

17—1842-43 

18— 1843-44 

19—1844-45 

20—1845-46 

21—1846-47 

22—1847-48 

23—1848-49 

24—1849-50 

25 — 185*»-6l 

26—1851-52 

27—1852-53 

28—1863-54 

29—1854-55 

30—1855-56 

31—1856-57 

32—1857-58 

33—1858-59 

34— 18MJ-60 

3fi— 1HG0-61 

36—186J-62 

37— 1862-63 

SB— 1B63-04 



No, cr 



I Not in I No. oi | 
eommte. Congrefa I Ytun 

th« tiono ami i of 
precod. Ml«lon'.y Labor. 

iogyew. DfetrieU. 



$18, 140,70 $13,984, 17 
20.-O35.78' 17 5 849.22 
26,9S7,3l| 30,814.96. 
33,929.44! 42,429.50 
48 s 124.73i 47,347.40 
411,422,12' 52,80839 
68 T 627.17t 66,277,96 



78,911.44 
68,803 13 



83,394,28 



101,506.15 92,188.94 



85,701.59 
6G P 522,45 
82,504.63 
78,345,20 
85.4 1 3.34 
92,40X64 



99,529.72 
66,066.26 
82,056.04 
76,533,89 
84,864.06 
94,300,14 



Sabboth 
Addition ' School* 



Churchoa. Biblo 



99,8l2 t 24; 98,215.11 
101,904,99104,276.47 
121,946.28:118,360.12 
125,124.70 126,193,15 
11 Ml 7,94 119,170.40 
140,197.10,139,233.34. 
145,925.9l'l43,771.67| 
157,16o.78il45,456.(i9 
15(),940.25!l53,817.90! 
160,062.25 102,831.14' 
171,734.24174,439.24 
191,209.071184,025.701 
180.136.69,177,717.34| 
193,548.37)186,611.02: 
178,060.68180,550.441 
175,971.37J190,735.70 
188,139.29,187,034.41 
185,216.17 392. 737 69, 
1 83, 7 U 1.80183,702.701 
1 C3. 852.5 1|1 58,336.33 
164,884.29 1 33,843.39 
lBft t fia7 l 8tfjI4fl 1 325.58l 
18fi t 8P7.5»i. 189,066.391 



109 
201 
304 
302 
403 
509 

606: 

676! 

7191 

755 

786 

084 

GGD 

080 

090 

791 

848: 

907, 

943 

971 

972 

1,006. 

1,0191 

1,032 

1,065 

1,065 

1,087 

1,047 

1,032! 

986, 

974 

1,012! 

1,054| 

1,107 

1,062 ( 

863 

734 
756 
802 ! 



68 
89 
169 
166 
164 
158 
209 
200 
204 
249 
232 
123 
201 
194 
178 
248 
225 
237 
209 
223 
189 
205 
192 
205 
211 
204 
213 
167 
180 
187 
201 
242 
250 
260 
212 
153 
155 
176 
199 



196 

244 

401 

500 

577 

745 

801 

899 

1,050 

1,000 

1,025 

840 

794 

842 

862 

987 

1,047 

1,245 

1,285 

1,453 

1,470 

1,447 

1,510 

1,575 

1,820 

1,948 

2,160 

2,140 

2,124 

1,965 

1,985 

2,034 

2,125 

2,175 

2,025 

1,668 

1,455 

1,518 

1,575 



110 
133 
186 
274 
294 
361 



417 4,284, 1,148 169 109 



463 
490 
545 
554 
438 
473 
486 
601 
594 
657 
665 
736 
760 
713 
773 
808 
812 
853 
862 
878 
870 
815 
775 
780 
795: 
810 



not rep 
1,000 
1,678 
1,959 
2,532 
6,126 



Avor. 

«*UO". 

for* 

Mio- 



not rep $12 7 $83 
306| 134 89 
423! 144| 88 
572 155 108 
700 j 160> 102 
783 146: 104 



2,736 Pupils. | 172; 118 

3,300*52,000, 170 116 

3,750! 65,000, 169 122 

3,752l 80,000! 180, 123 

3,376' 67,000| 194 124 

3,920,58,500 175i 124 

4,750' 60,000 162 115 

4,618 54,100 169 123 

6,614,64,800 159 119 

8,223,68,400 149 116 

7,693-60,300 157 115 

4,929 60,000 160| 126 

5,311i 76,700: 166| 130 

4,40d| 73,000 I67j 123 

6,020 77,000! 180! 138 

6,550183,500! 1781 141 

6,682176,0001 179J 141 

6,678 70,000| 180! 144 

6,820,66,500 189 153 

6,079 72,500 199 160 

6,025! 65,400 212J 176 

5,634 64,800 218| 171 

6,602) 60,000, 241: 189 

5,550162,500' 23l' 185 

6,784 65,500' 240| 188 

8,791 67,300: 23l| 178 

868' 6,287! 72,200j 222 174 

5,600 70,000 220 173 

4,0071 60.300 1 259J 183 

3,108164,000; 240| 184 

8,902| 65,200 248; 198 



835 
612 
562 
608 



635i 8,820158,000! 299l 237 



Remarks,* — 1, The total of receipts for thirty nine years, is 
$4,559,485.98. 

2. The total of years of labor is 23,796. 

3. The whole number of additions to the churches is 182,702. 

4. The average expenditure for a year of missionary labor in- 
cludes the entire cost of the Society, of obtaining the missionary, 
defraying hie expenses to his field, and sustaining him on it, as 
Well fta the average proportion of all tlie expenses in conducting 
the Institution, The increased average of recent years has been 
occasioned by the greater number of those who have held full 
commissions, the expeuaiveness of more distant missions, and the 
larger appropriations that have become necessary, as the expenses 
of living have increased, to secure to the missionary a comfort- 

able support 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



40 



5. The difference between the annual average expenditure to a 
missionary and the average of a year's labor, is occasioned by the 
fact that a missionary is named and counted in a Report, though 
in some cases he may have labored but a fraction of a year. 

6. The fifth column — that of new appointments — shows how 
many have to be called in each year, to supply the places of those 
whose support is assumed by the people, the vacancies occasioned 
by death, sickness, removals, and other changes, and to make the 
increase, if there be any, over the number or the preceding year. 



DISTEEBUTION OF MISBIONABIES, No. 1. 

The following Table gives the number of missionaries, each 
year of the Society's operations, in the geographical Divisions 
of Eastern, Middle, Southern and Western States ; and also in 
Canada. 



SocirrT'B Teas. 


New England 
States. 


Middle 
States. 


Southern 
States. 


Western 
States A 
Terrlt's. 


Canada. 


Total. 


1—1826-27 


1 


129 


5 


33 


1 


169 


2—1827-28 


5 


130 


9 


56 




201 


3—1828-29 


72 


127 


23 


80 


2 


304 


4—1829-30 


107 


147 


13 


122 


3 


392 


6—1830-31 


144 


160 


12 


145 


2 


463 


6—1831-32 


163 


169 


10 


166 


1 


509 


7—1832-33 


239 


170 


9 


185 


3 


606 


8—1833-34 


287 


201 


13 


169 


6 


676 


9—1834-35 


289 


216 


18 


187 


9 


719 


10—1835-36 


319 


219 


11 


191 


15 


755 


11—1836-37 


331 


227 


11 


195 


22 


786 


12—1837-38 


288 


198 


8 


166 


24 


684 


13—1838-39 


284 


198 


9 


160 


14 


665 


14—1839-40 


290 


205 


6 


167 


12 


680 


15—1840-41 


292 


215 


5 


169 


9 


690 


16—1841-42 


305 


249 


5 


222 


10 


791 


17—1842-43 


288 


253 


7 


291 


9 


848 


18—1843-44 


268 


257 


10 


365 


7 


907 


19—1844-45 


285 


249 


6 


397 


6 


943 


20—1845-46 


274 


271 


9 


417 




971 


21—1846-47 


275 


254 


10 


433 




972 


22—1847-48 


295 


237 


18 


456 




1,006 


23—1848-49 


302 


239 


15 


463 




1,019 


24—1849-50 


301 


228 


15 


488 




1,032 


25—1850-51 


311 


224 


15 


515 




1,065 


26—1851-52 


305 


213 


14 


533 




1,066 


27—1852-53 


313 


215 


12 


547 




1,087 


28—1853-54 


292 


214 


11 


530 




1,047 


29—1854-55 


278 


207 


10 


537 




1,032 


30—1855-56 


276 


198 


8 


504 




986 


31—1856-57 


271 


191 


6 


506 




974 


32—1857-58 


291 


197 


3 


521 




1,012 


33—1858-59 


319 


201 




534 




1,054' 


. 34—1859-60 


327 


199 




581 




1,107 


35—1860-61 


308 


181 




573 




1,062 


36—1861-62 


295 


87 




481 




863 


37—1862-63 


281 


48 




405 




734 


88—1863-64 


289 


44 




423 
1 451 




15ft 


39^-1864-65 


298 


68 






B0* 



40 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 







5 



2 
4 



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I ° 

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5 






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1865. 



THIRTY NINTH RKP0B1. 



41 



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40 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 




'3 



♦Jan;*! Xfl 



-tittnca «0 









■* # p-l ^35* * 


T *H*^ ft ofl 


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15 «*3 S «S S 3 


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■36 06 3i Ie (» 2« *35 i i> oE q> $ x ^ '3 35 ■qd ^c -3i go 2 2 



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if" 4' 4 133* la iiiu^&uu 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH RKP0B1. 



41 



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I 5 

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88 88 S3 8 



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1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REP0B1. 



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THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



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1865. 



THIBTY NINTH BKPORT. 



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60 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

vival in the course of the year. Nine missionaries have been 
installed pastors of the churches they serve ; two churches have 
been organized ; three have become independent of missionary 
aid ; nine have erected houses of worship, and four others — one 
of which is in Northern Indiana — were engaged in building at the 
close of the year. 

The Agent refers to these extraordinary efforts to secure houses 
of worship as among the most important and encouraging fea- 
tures of tne missionarywork on tliis field. He says : " In this 
older portion of the West, the necessity for securing church- 
homes is more apparent than upon the immediate frontier. 
With many of the churches, not to build is to die. To build, 
gives them new life and strength, and hastens, if it does not bring 
at once, the day of self-support. Two churches have, by this 
means, come into a condition of independence the past year, while 
all the others have greatly increased their congregations, their 
influence, and their resources. Your Agent shared with all of 
these churches in the joy of their dedicatory services. Of so 
much importance does he consider this work, that he has endea- 
vored to impart stimulus to the initiation and the prosecution of 
such enterprises. Only two of these churches came to the day of 
dedication without the incumbrance of debt ; all the others raised 
on that occasion, in sums ranging from $200 to $600, the amount 
needed to leave them free from aebt. Of those thirteen congre- 
gations, all but one have been, or are to be, aided in building, by 
tne American Congregational Union, and most of them would 
not have undertaken to build without the encouragement of that 
promised assistance. I consider that enterprise but the left hand 
of our great home evangelizing scheme." 

In Central and Southern Illinois, forty two missionaries have 
held commissions from this Society during the year, eight of whom 
report seasons of special religious interest among the people to 
whom they minister. One house of worship has been completed, 
several others have been repaired, and at least three were m pro- 
cess of erection when the year expired. Here, as in other por- 
tions of the missionary field, the churches have contributed their 
best strength to the cause of the country, and now mourn the loss 
of those to whom they looked for pecuniary and moral support. 
" To a great extent," says the Agent, " they were the flower of 
the churches to which they belonged, and bid fair not only to 
supply the places of the aged and infirm, but to more than make 
their places good. But tneir career is ended. Our churches, 
feeble enough before, can not well endure such depletions. Yet 
none have become extinct. Distressed, they are not in despair ; 
cast down, they are not destroyed. Great as their loss has been, 
their gain has, in some cases, been greater still. They have gain- 
ed, not in wealth, nor membership, but in that which is above all 
price, the graces of the Spirit — in the sense of dependence upon 
God, which diminished material atrengjta \ia& taught them— in 



1865. THIBTY NINTH REPORT. 61 

that spirit of agonizing prayer which brings and binds them to 
the mercy-seat, and assimilates them to Him whom they love and 
serve." 

Only about one third of the Congregational churches of Illi- 
nois are situated in the field of Mr. Jenney's agency, although it 
embraces about three fourths of the territory of the State. The 
people, to a great extent, have come from the South, or from other 
sections of the country where the religious systems of New Eng- 
land are but little known. The establishment of Puritan churches, 
among such a population, is a slow and difficult work. Not only 
the force of depravity, which is everywhere prevalent, but a 
Btrong current ot sectional and denominational prejudice must be 
encountered and overcome. Most of the laborers sent forth by 
this Society prefer to sow the seed of the kingdom in a more 
congenial and fruitful soil. But as the great thoroughfares that 
now traverse this region have made it more accessible and better 
known, it is hoped that these difficulties will gradually lose their 
force, and that the labors of this Society, in tliis section of the 
State, will meet with greater encouragement, and be crowned 
with richer rewards. 

MSSOTOL 

Rer. Edwin B. Turner, Hannibal, Agent 

It was stated in the last Report that the Executive Committee 
had appointed an Agent for this State, and that, after commenc- 
ing his labors under encouraging auspices, he had been detailed 
for important temporary service in Memphis, Tennessee. Find- 
ing the door open for laying gospel foundations anew in that 
city, he gathered a congregation, organized a church, and was in- 
vited to remain and minister to it, on an ample salary provided 
by the people. Thus has this episode in the o]>eratioii8 of the 
Society, in Missouri, resulted in the establishment of a self-sustain- 
ing church in the chief commercial emporium of Tennessee, wliich 
is not only a bright and shining light in that community, but is 
hailed as the harbinger of the coming dawn to the surrounding 
region. 

During the larger portion of the year now reported, the Society 
was without an Agent in Missouri, and the condition of things 
was such that the two missionaries who had been laboring there 
left the State. In the autumn of 1864, the Committee appoint- 
ed, as Agent of the Society for Missouri, Eev. Edwin B. Turner, 
Eastor (A the Congregational church in Morris, Illinois. Having 
ad much experience as a pioneer missionary in Iowa, and as 
pastor of an important church in Illinois, he was regarded as 
possessing a peculiar fitness for the work of reconstruction to be 
performed in Missouri. His people generously relinquished him 
at the call of this Society, and he entered upon his labors in De- 
cember last. He has ymted all the important towns oil the Vme 



62 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, and extended his ob- 
servations, to some extent, into the country on either side of that 
thoroughfare. Most of the churches that existed in this region 
before the war are now extinct. Their ministers, who did more 
to promote the rebellion than all others, have absconded ; their 
sanctuaries are closed or burned ; most of the members are scat- 
tered or dead, and only a feeble remnant remain. Of these, a 
portion are still sympathizers with the rebellion, and can not be 
gathered into new organizations till their prejudices are somewhat 
softened, and their wounds and bruises mollified with the oint- 
ment of christian kindness and love. By others, the Agent is 
received with tears of joy, and assurances of hearty cooperation. 
The tide of immigration is also bringing in, from the East, mate- 
rials which will be readily wrought into Puritan churches. At 
several points, congregations have been gathered ; two ministers 
have already been introduced, and have commenced their labors ; 
and several others are making preparations jto enter the field in 
the course of the present spring. With the return of peace, and 
under the reign of freedom, Missouri must enter upon a career of 
material prosperity equal to that of any other portion of the West 
As the new order of things emerges from the existing chaos, it is 
of vital importance that social and religious reconstruction go 
hand in hand. In no other way can we direct the forces which 
are to determine the great future of this imperial State. 

MICHIGAN. 

Rev. Herbert A. Read, Marshall, Agent 

The Society has had under commission in Michigan, during the 
past year, seventy missionaries, and has received, from the State, 
contributions to the amount of $2,122.06. One missionary has 
been installed as pastor ; four sanctuaries have been erected, and 
several others repaired and beautified ; six churches have been 
organized ; three have passed from a condition of dependence to 
self-support ; and near the close of the year, a large number en- 
joyed times of refreshing from the presence of me Lord. A 
larger amount than usual has been expended by the missionary 
churches, in providing parsonages for their ministers, and in re- 
lieving themselves from the burthen of debt. It is stated that 
one fourth of the male members of these churches have been in 
the service of their country in the army, and several of the mis- 
sionaries have mourned the loss of sons who have fallen on the 
battle-field ; yet a larger number have attended upon th6 minis- 
trations of the sanctuary than ever before, and the churches have 
advanced in all the elements of prosperity. 

Of the one hundred and two associated churches of Michigan, 

that depend upon this Society for aid in sustaining gospel insti- 

tutions, thirty two are destitute of the stated preaching of the 



1865. • THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 63 

"Word. " The demand for spiritual laborers," says the Agent, " is 
urgent. We need them not only for those places where churches 
are organized, but for the rapidly-forming communities in the 
newer portions of the State. The superior advantages of this 
State for commercial, manufacturing, and agricultural pursuits 
have never been fully realized by the communities of the East. 
It is believed that none of the North-western States are as well 
provided with all the elements of material wealth as is this. 
With an area only a little less than the whole of New England, 
and while only about one third of the State is as yet settled, it 
has a population exceeding that of New Hampshire, Vermont, 
and Rhode Island combined ; and the annual surplus of its pro- 
ducts, over and above consumption by the people, will reach at 
least $70,000,000. Our educational institutions are probably 
more richly endowed than those of any other State with an 
equal population ; and the people are taxed less, in the same 
proportion. Our mountains of iron and copper on Lake Superior 
contain a sufficient quantity of those important metals to 6upply 
the wants of the world for centuries. The exports from Lake 
Superior in 1862 exceeded $12,000,000, and in 1864, notwith- 
standing the unhappy condition of our country, they were about 
fifty per cent, above that sum. Yet the trade of that region is in 
its infancy. The saline waters of the State, exceeding both in 
quality and quantity those of any other State, its immense re- 
sources of lumber, its exhaustless beds of gypsum, and deposits of 
coal, are among its elements of material wealth." 

" That portion of the State known as the northern portion of 
the Lower reninsula, which has been considered an irreclaimable 
wilderness, after careful examination and tests, is found to be a 
rich agricultural district. Although it is as yet hardly settled 
by white men, all agree that it abounds with magnificent forests, 
and is watered by numerous springs, lakes, creeks, and rivers, 
furnishing an abundance of water-power. While that portion of 
the country bordering upon the lakes is being now rapidly settled, 
the interior, through the facilities offered by the Homestead Law 
and soldiers' land warrants, must soon attract attention. The 
communities already formed and forming imperiously demand the 
preached Gospel. They need it that they may withstand the de- 
moralizing influences attendant upon new settlements. m They need 
it that its gentle influences may soothe the bad passions engender- 
ed in the conflicts and strife incident to their situation. They 
need it to create a correct public sentiment which will frown upon 
vice and encourage virtue. They need it to prevent a cheerless 
and heartless infidelity, with the whole brood of kindred errors 
and isms, from settling down like night upon the community. We 
want a score or two of laborers, ready to endure hardness as good 
soldiers, who are willing, after a life of toil and cross-bearing, to 
lay their bones on their field of labor, and to rise from these now 
desolate places, with those whom they have won to Christ, at tW 
voice of the archangel and the trump of God." 



64 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



WISCONSIN. 

Rer. Dxxtkr Clart, Beloit, Agent fop Eastern Wisconsin. Rer. John C. Shxrwix, 
La Crosse, Agent for Western Wisconsin. 

The number of missionaries who have labored under the aus- 
pices of this Society in Wisconsin, during the past year, is sixty 
eight. They have supplied one hundred and eight cnurclies witn 
the stated ministrations of the Gospel, and have ministered, re- 
gularly or occasionally, to nearly as many congregations where 
churches have not yet been gathered. The contributions to Home 
Missions, in this State, during the year, have amounted to 
$1,923.65. 



In Eastern Wisconsin, the number of laborers is fifty, of whom 
three are Welshmen, and one is a Hollander. They have preach- 
ed statedly to seventy six churches, and at thirty seven out-sta- 
tions, at one of which a church has been organized since the last 
Report, Near the close of the year, a large number of churches 
were visited by the gracious effusions of the Spirit, but it is too 
early to ascertain and make record of the rich ingatherings that 
have resulted from them. " The missionaries," says the Agent, 
" are pursuing their work with an earnest faith and a sustaining 
hope, which are the sure elements of success. And when we 
consider the obstacles to be encountered, the great excitement 
and diversion of the public mind caused by the state of the 
country, the numbers that have gone into the army, the many 
claims of benevolence and patriotism, the extensive failure of 
crops the past season, and the great increase in the cost of living, 
we find increased occasion for gratitude for the measure of pros- 
perity, both temporal and spiritual, that is enjoyed." 

Eighteen missionaries have labored, the whole or a part of the 
year now reported, in Western Wisconsin, preaching statedly to 
thirty two churches, and at several out-stations. One church has 
been organized, one minister installed as pastor, and two houses 
of worship were in process of erection at the close of the year. 
Nine churches in this section of the State, are destitute of the 

E reaching of the Gospel, and extensive tracts of country which 
ave never yet been occupied, should be supplied with laborers 
without delay. The Agent says : " In the whole territory ex- 
tending from the prairie of the St. Croix valley to the La Crosse 
and Lemonweir valleys, a distance of one hundred and thirty 
miles, we have only five churches, though it embraces 6,480 
square miles within the boundaries already formed by new settle- 
ments. Only two of these churches are supplied with ministers. 
In the prairie region lying between the St. LJroix and Red Cedar 
Rivers, are seven Congregational churches, all but one of which 
are supplied with an earnest ministry. They were recently, with 
their ministers, organized into the St, Croix Valley Convention, 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 65 

and will soon exert a wider influence among the weaker settle- 
ments of the woods. Several of them have attained, or are near 
the point of self-support." 

Tnere are now in Wisconsin one hundred and 6ixty six churches 
in missionary sympathy with this Society, containing about ten 
thousand members. Of these churches, twenty are composed of 
Welshmen, and one of Hollanders. One hundred and thirty have 
provided themselves with hottses of worship ; . forty five support 
their ministers without assistance, and fourteen others are enabled 
to dispense with missionary aid by consenting to share with neigh- 
boring churches the services of the ministry. These churches 
have all come into being in less than thirty years, and, with scarce- 
ly an exception, owe their existence to Ifome Missionary effort 
They will stand, to the end of time, with all the social, education- 
al, and charitable institutions that have sprung from them, an 
irrefutable argument for the efficiency of the system which planted 
and nurtured them. 

IOWA. 

Her. Jesse Guernsey, Dubuque, Agent for Northern Iowa. Re*. Julius A. Reed, 
Davenport, Agent for Southern Iowa. 

The number of missionaries who labored in this State during 
the past year, under the direction of this Society, is ninety eight. 
They have preached statedly to one hundred and seventy two 
congregations, and have performed much occasional service in 
settlements where permanent congregations have not been gath- 
ered. The amount contributed to the Treasury of the Society 
from Iowa, during the last financial year, is $1,860.97. 

In Northern Iowa, the number of laborers is forty nint. They 
have ministered to ninety four congregations, and the amount of 
ministerial service performed is equal to thirty eight years. This 
is a larger amount of labor than has been performed on this field 
in any previous year. Seven houses of worship have been com- 
pleted, and several others commenced ; five churches have been 
organized; two have become self-sustaining, and twelve have 
been favored with revivals of religion. In one case, a revival has 
resulted in the organization of a church, and in a surprising 
change of the whole moral aspect of the community. The mis- 
sionary churches have made a gratifying advance in their contri- 
butions to objects of benevolence, and m their subscriptions for 
the support of the ministry. A comparison of the sums secured 
for the latter purpose in thirty churches with those raised in the 
previous year shows an aggregate increase of $706 ; and the 
amounfcreceived from this Society by the same churches was less 
than in the previous year by $390 ; yet the small advance in the 
salary of the ministers thus secured is far from equivalent to the 
enhanced cost of living. In many cases, great privation l\aa \>efc\\ 
endured. 



66 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

The Agent calls attention to the destitutions that yet remain 
in this portion of the State. He says : " There are eighteen coun- 
ties in my field, in which we have neither minister nor church. 
Four of them have a population of over four thousand each ; 
three have each between one and two thousand ; and in the re- 
mainder the population ranges from a little over one hundred to 
nearly nine hundred. In every one of these counties, not except- 
ing tliosc whose numbers are fewest, a missionary, willing to en- 
counter the privations and trials of pioneer service, and having 
the requisite strength for it, could be wisely and well employed. 
Ten counties, with a population ranging between fourteen hun- 
dred and twelve thousand each, have but one missionary to each ; 
five counties, whose population ranges between three and eighteen 
thousand, have two missionaries each ; six counties, with a popu- 
lation each of from three to nineteen thousand, have three mis- 
sionaries each ; and two counties, with an aggregate population 
of fifty one thousand, have four to a county. If these iigures are 
scanned, and the extent of the territory and population they re- 
present is appreciated, a want will be seen still to exist in North- 
ern Iowa, whose prompt and adequate supply would require a 
generous appropriation of men and means. The demand which 
is so great now is every day becoming greater. The indications 
are that, with the possible exception of the years 1856 and 1857, 
the coming season will witness a greater immigration to Iowa 
than any previous one. Our railroads will be extended, and by 
their extension will give birth to new villages, and invite to the 
settlement of the choice lands through which they pass. How 
are the men to be provided for the coming exigency ? 

In Southern Iowa, forty missionaries have been under com- 
mission, ministering statedly to sixty eight congregations. Thirty 
four of these congregations have provided themselves with houses 
of worship. One church edifice has been erected within the year, 
several others improved or repaired, and the few remaining debts 
hitherto resting upon missionary churches, have been removed. 
The congregations aided have made an advance of thirty two per 
cent, since the previous year, in their subscriptions for the sup- 
port of the ministry. Nearly all the missionaries have been 
cheered by tokens of spiritual progress, and six churches are re- 
ported as having enjoyed special outpourings of the Holy Spirit. 
One laborer has been removed bv death since the last report. 

There is still an extensive region in Southern Iowa, containing 
a large population, for whose spiritual necessities scarcely any 
provision has been made. " Beyond the Des Moines," says the 
Agent, " there are fifteen counties in my field, with a population 
of more than one hundred thousand, in which we have neither a 
church nor a minister. The soil is excellent, wood, coal, and 
stone are plenty in many places, and are cheap, and the climate is 
good. This region offers many inducements to the settler ; and 
those who do not wait for the railroads will find it easy to get 



1866. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 67 

good homes at low prices. Wherever I go, notwithstanding the 
drain occasioned by the war, the houses are full, immigration is 
increasing, our cities are growing, and our prairies are tilling up. 
Two railroads are slowly working westward through Southern 
Iowa ; another, up the Des Moines, is approaching tlie capital of 
the State, while the North Missouri Railroad is expected at no dis- 
tant day to reach Ottumwa, on its way to Minneapolis. This 
expectation is begetting various railroad projects, which bid fair 
to increase materially the railroad facilities of this part of the 
State, and thus add to its wealth and population." It will be the 
duty of this Society, so far as the laborers and the pecuniary 
means are at its disposal, to take early possession of the helds that 
are opening before them along all these lines of travel and traffic, 
and to lay there the foundations of many generations. 

MINNESOTA, 

Rev. Richard Hall, St Paul, Agent 

Thirty five missionaries have labored in this State, during the 
year, ministering to forty seven churches and at twenty nine out 
stations. The contributions to the Society have amounted to 
$656.25, being more than double the amount contributed in the 
previous year. 

Seven laborers have entered the field since the last Report, and 
four have removed from it. Two churches have been organ- 
ized, one has become independent, two have been favored with 
powerful revivals of religion, and in several others there has been 
more or less religious interest. Two churches are now engaged 
in the erection or church edifices, eighteen of the churches aided 
by this Society have already accomplished this work, and three 
will build the present year. Five only of the missionaries sus- 
tain the relation of pastor to the churches to which they minister, 
and ten churches are without the stated ministrations of the Gos- 
pel. The scattered condition and isolated position of many of 
the churches are serious impediments to their growth, and a great 
detriment to their spiritual vitality. They are as yet unable to 
maintain a weekly prayer meeting. They that fear God do not 
speak often one to another, and seldom hear each other's voices 
in supplication. The local Conferences, in some parts of the 
State, nave been enabled to bring neighboring churches together 
for social and christian communion, and the great spiritual ben- 
efits of this frequent intercourse are already apparent. 

In regard to the material condition and prospects of the State, 
the Agent speaks as follows : " The protracted and severe drought 
reported in 1863, was continued even through the year 1864. 
Every crop except corn was much below the usual average. All 
the industrial interests of the State have suffered severely. Navi- 
gation on the Wmmppi, for the smallest steamers, was dVtfrexAx 



68 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

through the season ; and the lumber trade, one of our chief 
sources of income, remains completely paralyzed. Yet it is sur- 
prising that, in the second year of such a drought, more than half 
a crop was realized. It shows great excellence and enduring 
power in our soil. Minnesota has 84,000 square miles, and more 
than 8,000,000 acres are now under assessment. About 10,000,000 
acres have been granted by Congress for school and railroad pur- 
poses ; and there still remain 36,000,000 acres, an area more than 
three fourths as large as New England, open for settlement under 
the Homestead Act. Nearly 20,000,000 acres in the surveyed 

{>ortion are yet unoccupied. The drought and the war have de- 
ayed the construction of our railroads, by withdrawing laborers 
and preventing the importation of iron ; but about 100 miles of 
railroad are now in operation, and nearly 200 additional miles are 
graded. The present year must witness a rapid extension on at 
least three important lines. Our present population is estimated 
at 230,000 or 240,000, of whom about one fourth are Romanists, 
and nearly 64 per cent are from New England, the Middle and 
North-western States. The American Home Missionary Society 
has a vast work before it in Minnesota." 



KANSAS. 
Rev. Lewis Bodwell, Wyandotte, Agent 

Fifteen missionaries have been employed in Kansas, by this 
Society, during the past year, one of whom has deceased since 
the year commenced. Twenty five congregations have been sup- 
plied with the stated means of grace, and four have been blessed 
with the reviving influences ot the Spirit. Two houses of wor- 
ship, destroyed during Quantrell's raid in 1863, have been rebuilt ; 
and a third was nearly completed at the close of the year. One 
church has assumed, for the first time, the support of its pastor, 
find another which had been thrown, a second time, upon the 
bounty of the Society, in consequence of the losses resulting 
from the invasion, has a second time declared its independence. 
The churches have adopted a system of benevolent contributions 
by which their gifts have been greatly increased ; and within the 
past year they have commenced, under encouraging auspices, the 
work of founding a college at the capital of the State. The re- 
ceipts of this Society from Kansas, since the last Report, have 
amounted to $232.85. 

The number of missionaries sustained by the Society, in this 
State, is no greater now than it was five vears ago ; and there 
are many important and growing villages in which the founda- 
tions of Gospel institutions have not yet been laid. The demand 
for additional laborers is therefore imperative. The Agent says : 
" We wont men of activity and energy, devoted to their work ; 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 69 

men with hearts filled with love for souls, prepared not only to 
4 plant' and ' water,' but to wait with unwavering faith for God 
to give the increase.' Within and along our borders, are towns 
and villages, of from three hundred to two thousand inhabitants, 
where such men are needed to lay the foundations of good society. 
There are saloons, but no churches — ball and billiard and gambling 
halls, but no prayer meetings. For their worldliness and wicked- 
ness Christians seem to have shunned them ; or else, amid their 
evil influences, have sunk from sight, and left not a plank to 
mark the spot where they went down. Ignorance, drunkenness, 
and profanity are the prominent traits in their daily history as 
communities. Forty miles of the Pacific Railroad are completed, 
and daily trains are running upon it. The second section of forty 
miles is under contract, and workmen are upon it. As fast as 
they can procure the material, the Company is building its station 
houses ; and around them will spring up villages, some of which 
will no doubt rival or exceed in importance many that we now 
occupy in less favored localities. Every ten miles along this line, 
running through the finest portion of our State, we must be ready 
to occupy and hold a railroad town or village, with the school, 
the Church, and the ministry of the Word." 

Ten years have now elapsed since the first missionary of this 
Society to Kansas entered upon his labors. Not a christian con- 
gregation had then been gathered in the Territory. Now, after 
ten years of heavier and more varied misfortunes than have be- 
fallen any other portion of the missionary field, there are, in con- 
nection with the denomination sustaining this Society, seventeen 
ministers^engaged in active service, thirty two churches, contain- 
ing 798 members, with 1222 children in Sabbath schools. Says 
the Agent : " Save by God's blessing upon such loving care and 
unwearied encouragement as the American Home Missionary 
Society has afforded us, we can not see how we could have lived 
through ten such years of excitement, famine, and war. To have 
thus grown and prospered, to have come forth thus strong — a 
power for good, and against evil, with a respect and regard second 
to that which is the lot of no other body of Christians in the 
State, is a matter of profound gratitude to God, to the American 
Home Missionary Society, and to the many friends whom the 
Master has raisea up for us. Looking back at the dangers en- 
countered, the difficulties conquered, the labors accomplished, the 
victories won, we can say, ' What hath God wrought ; ' and look- 
ing to the future, we can thank him and * take courage.' " 

NEBRASKA A1TD WESTERN IOWA. 

Rev. Reuben Gaylord, Omaha City, Agent. 

As the settled portion of Nebraska and of the Missouri &\o\>e, m 
Iowa now constitute a sufficient and convenient field for an AjgjS&t 



70 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

of this Society, it was intrusted, in November last, to the super- 
vision of Rev. Reuben Gaylord, of Omaha City. Mr. Gaylord, 
after a ministry of seventeen years in Iowa, was the first to erect 
the Gospel standard in Nebraska, in 1855. He has been familiar 
with the entire religious history of both these regions, and is thor- 
oughly furnished for the work assigned him. 

In the portion of Iowa committed to Mr. Gaylord, there are 
eighteen counties, containing a population of from 30,000 to 
40,000. Six of these counties lie along the east side of the Mis- 
souri River. Most of the population is at present found in ten of 
the eighteen counties. There is a large amount of rich bottom 
land very desirable for cultivation, and having a fair supply of 
timber. Two railroads from the Mississippi River are now com- 
pleted nearly half across the State, and will be built to the Mis- 
souri as soon as practicable. These, with one from St. Joseph up 
the valley of the Missouri, will greatly add to the importance of 
this section of country, and powerfully stimulate settlement. 
There are, in this portion of tlie State, eight missionaries and 
ten churches. Two of these churches have been organized in the 
past year, and two ministers not previously employed have been 
commissioned as missionaries of this Society. All the churches 
in Western Iowa, except one, are yet in need of missionary aid. 
Four only have as yet been able to provide houses of worship. 
The remainder worship either in school houses, or in sanctuaries 
belonging to other denominations. In three of the fields occu- 
pied by missionaries, precious seasons of refreshing have been en- 
joyed the past year, resulting, in one instance, in the organization 
ot a promising church. 

In Nebraska, seven ministers have labored, during the past 
year, under the commission of this Society, and $63.30 have been 
contributed to its Treasury. Of these laborers, two have entered 
the Home Missionary work, in this Territory, within the year. 
They minister regularly to eleven congregations. The churches 
are yet in their infancy. Only one has over forty members. One 
was organized in November, 1864, and has since been favored 
with the outpouring of the Spirit, and the conversion of souls. 

There are forty counties in Nebraska, eleven of which lie along 
the Missouri River, and are rapidly increasing in population. 
Settlements also extend westward, along the Irlatte River, 200 
miles. The present population of the Territory is probably not 
less than 40,000. There are eight counties along the Missouri 
River in which no missionary has been stationed, and there is 
but one in all the Valley of the Platte ; while the newer and 
more sparsely settled counties have not yet been visited. 
More laborers are imperiously needed if we would do our part 
in laying aright the foundations of the future State. The import- 
ance of the present moment can not Tae overroasted. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 71 

The Agent states the following facts in respect to the prospect- 
ive growth and importance of this Territory : " From deep de- 
pression, we are emerging into a state of great business pros- 
perity. The mineral treasures furnished to toil and energy by 
the mountain Territories, are here stimulating agriculture and 
opening new and profitable avenues of business. The great 
thoroughfare of travel from the Missouri River to the mountains 
and the Pacific States, is up the valley of the Platte ; and all 
the business from Missouri and Kansas to the Western Terri- 
tories, enters that valley at Fort Kearney. The main branch of 
the Pacific Railroad is to start from Omaha City, and it is ex- 
pected that 100 miles of it will be completed and in operation 
within the present year. The amount of business and travel 
going westward from Omaha, Plattsmouth, and Nebraska City is 
immense, and every year swells the mighty tide. With the facili- 
ties furnished by the Pacific Railroad, and the market opened for 
our products by the population of the mountains, we can not be 
mistaken in the conviction that Nebraska is entering upon a career 
of prosperity hitherto unknown to us. Now is the time to sow 
the seed which, with the divine blessing, shall make this vast re- 
gion blossom as the garden of the Lord." 



COLORADO AND UTAH. 

At the date of the last Report, one missionary was laboring in 
Colorado, and another was preparing to go to his assistance. The 
support of the former was assumed, early in the year, by the 
people to whom he ministers.' Thus a single year of missionary 
labor and expenditure has resulted in the establishment of a self- 
sustaining church at Central City, one of the most important 
points in the Territory. The other missionary, Rev. Norman 
McLeod, arrived in the Territory in August, and commenced 
labor at Denver, the capital. A church of twelve members was 
organized, and he was prosecuting his work, with encouraging 
prospects, when he was instructed to proceed to Utah, and seize 
the opportunity offered to erect the gospel standard at Great 
Salt Lake City. His place at Denver remains unsupplied, and 
the Committee have not found suitable laborers for other import 
ant fields, now awaiting occupancy, in that Territory. 

During the last summer, the Committee took measures to ascer- 
tain the practicability of establishing a mission in Great Salt 
Lake City. They learned that, of the 20,000 inhabitants of that 
city, about 500, exclusive of United States troops, were not of 
the Mormon faith ; and that this " Gentile" population was 
rapidly increasing. Yet aside from the profane mummeries of 
Mormonism, no religious worship existed in the Territory, con- 
taining now a population of nearly 100,000 souls. Aw eamesX, 
desire was expressed, both by officers of the army and cvviW&m, 



72 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

that a missionary should be stationed there at once. General 
Conner, commander of the Federal forces in that Department, 
in a letter proffering his protection and hearty cooperation, says : 
" The great want which has long been sorely felt by the Gentiles 
in this Territory, has been and still is, an Orthodox christian 
ministry. Now, they have no place to attend on the Sabbath for 
public worship, nor are the restraining and humanizing influences 
of the Christian religion thrown around the community. To me 
it has long been a source of no little surprise that, while the sev- 
eral denominations of the Church send their missionaries to the 
4 uttermost parts of the earth ' to redeem mankind, it has never 
been seriously thought that here is to be found the grandest field 
for missionary labor. Leaving out of view, entirely, the religious 
necessities of the soldiers of this command, and Gentiles congre- 
gated here, the Mormon people themselves have greater need of 
missionary labor than any other people or commumty on the face 
of the earth." 

In view of these representations, Mr. McLeod was instructed 
to proceed at once to Great Salt Lake City. He arrived there in 
January last > and was received with great cordiality. A congre- 
gation has been gathered, filling to overflowing the largest hall in 
tne city ; a Sabbath school has been established, comprising 250 
children ; a church has been organized, containing eighteen mem- 
bers ; and steps have been taken to erect a house of worship. 
The first results, therefore, of this experiment are of the most en- 
couraging character. Its ultimate success is, of course, uncertain. 
The headquarters of that military department have recently been 
removed to Denver ; and it* the army should be withdrawn — 
which, however, we do not anticipate — the missionary might be 
hindered in his work by the fanatical violence of the Mormons ; 
but it is confidently believed that freedom of speech and worship 
will never again be trampled under foot in Utah ; and that the 
day is not distant when that monstrous system of corruption and 
delusion, which has found shelter there, will, with its " twin relic 
of barbarism" in the South, be utterly destroyed, or again driven 
into exile from our shores. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Rev. James H. Warren, San Francisco, Agent. 

Ten missionaries have been in commission in this State during 
the past year ; three of them have been sent to the field since the 
last report ; and their support being immediately assumed by the 

. people, their names will no longer appear on the list of the So- 
ciety's missionaries. Five churches nave been organized within 
the year, three church edifices have been erected, two congrega- 
tions have become self-sustaining, and two have been visited with 
the reviving influences of the Spirit. The contributions of the 
churches of California to the Treasury of the Society have been, 

in coin, $345.75. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 78 

For several years, the Society has employed no Agent to super- 
intend its operations in this State. The importance of such super- 
intendence had, indeed, been greatly diminished by the imprac- 
ticability of finding suitable laborers for this field. But as this 
difficulty is now partially removed, and the work of the Society 
is likely to be enlarged from year to year, the Committee have 
appointed, as Agent for California, Rev. James II. Warren, re- 
cently of San Mateo, in that State. Mr. Warren was among the 
earliest missionaries sent by this Society to the Pacific Coast, and 
has had a prominent part in the conduct of its religious affairs 
during the last fifteen years. He entered upon his labors as 
Agent in September last, visited and confirmed the churches, ex- 
plored several destitute sections, and prepared the way for other 
laborers who are expected soon to enter this field. In January 
last, he made a tour of exploration in the southern portion of the 
State, and makes the following statement respecting its destitu- 
tions and claims : " If you draw a line on the map from Monte- 
rev to the Sierra Nevada Mountains, south of that line is a dis- 
trict comprising about one half of the entire State, in which there 
is but one Protestant minister and one Protestant house of wor- 
ship. The country in that region is given up to darkness, Popery^ 
Mormonism, and the almost perfect destitution of religious privi- 
leges ; and yet it is the best country on which the sun shines. In 
January, the oranges and the lemons hang full and rich upon the 
trees. It abounds in mineral wealth ; hundreds of acres are be- 
ing seeded down in cotton ; and from present indications I judge 
that there is no richer coal oil country on the continent. The 
soil for horticultural and agricultural purposes is unsurpassed, be- 
ing most easily excited to bountiful production. I came. away 
impressed with the conviction that the land belongs to Christ, and 
Christians have a duty to perform in converting it to him. And 
no time should be lost." 

There are now in California twenty four Congregational 
churches, of which seven are without the stated ministrations of 
the Gospel. " We feel," says the Agent, u as hardly any others 
can feel, the disadvantage of being so far from the sources of 
ministerial supply, and our prospects in this respect are far from 
encouraging. Of the twenty four Congregational ministers' in 
California, twenty are in active service, preaching the Gospel ; 
two are in the College of California ; one is doinjj an important 
work as editor of our religious newspaper ; and the other, while 
he works with his hands during the week, preaches on the Sab- 
bath most of the time. Thus we have not much waste material, 
and not many idlers in the vineyard." The industry and effi- 
ciency with which 'the laborers hitlierto employed have prosecuted 
their appointed work, the liberality of the churches in providing 
for their support, and the success with which their ministry has 
been crownea, justify the Committee, as they think, in sending 
out a Isrge reinforcement. Three additional laborers are tvo^j 



74 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

under appointment, and several others are expected to enter this 
field in the course of the current year. 

OREGON. 

No additions have been made, since the last report, to the mis- 
sionary force in this State. Three ministers only have held com- 
missions from this Society ; and $253.45 have been contributed to 
its Treasury. These missionaries occupy positions of great and 
increasing importance, and, though so few in number, are exerting 
a commanding influence upon all the higher interests of the State. 
One church has undertaken the entire support of its minister, 
since the last Anniversary. 

Additional laborers are urgently needed in this portion of the 
missionary field. The population has already extended, in all 
directions, to the extreme limits of the State, with a large over- 
flow into Washington and Idaho Territories. " Lines of habita- 
tions extend through the Willamette* valley to the California 
boundary. Scattered hamlets extend northward, from the Colum- 
bia to the British possessions. Population moves eastward, up 
the Columbia, occupying every fertile valley, almost to the base 
of the Rocky Mountains. The settlements are sparse and widely 
separated, yet they are becoming permanent, and the germs of 
future villages, cities, and farming communities." In the Ump- 
qua and Roque River valleys is a large mining population, very 
inadequately supplied with religious privileges. In behalf of 
these destitute fields, and of others where the flocks gathered, in 
former years, by the missionaries of this Society, are scattered as 
sheep having no shepherd, our brethren earnestly appeal for help. 
Rev. Mr. Atkinson of Portland speaks on this subject as follows : 
" We are sending you all our gold, in coin or bullion, at the rate 
of $2,000,000 a month. Can you not send a small percentage 
back in currency, to conserve the moral and religious interests of 
our miners, traders, farmers, and mechanics ? Shall we pour our 
millions into your great emporium, and will your merchants and 
manufacturers turn the back to us ? Shall a few of us stand on 
these outposts, to do the common work and duty of patriots and 
Christians, and be left without helpers ? We believe that the 
American Home Missionary Society has labored too faithfully and 
too patiently in other Western States, now to neglect any needy 
field because it is so far off. We have our infant churches and 
infant colleges, less advanced, yet surely established. We have 
had an experience of labor and its reward, and have had such 
tokens of divine favor that we feel encouraged to go forward, and 
never abandon our ground. We confidently look to you to lead 
on in this cause, and send new laborers into this harvest." 

CONCLUSION. 

With devout gratitude to God, we clo&e thia record of the labors 
tnd successes of the year past, and Vifla. fr^k wnw%* %3oA.ta^* 



1866, THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 75 

we turn to contemplate the work to be accomplished in the year 
to come. The Great Rebellion, which during the last four years 
has tasked the energies and imperiled the life of the nation, is at 
length subdued ; and we look out upon a reunited and renovated 
country as the field of our future labors. The mightiest obstacle 
to evangelical effort on this continent has been taken out of the 
way, and one third of the States of this Union, which have hith- 
erto repelled, are henceforth to welcome our christian overtures. 
For the first time since this Institution was founded, the whole 
country is accessible to its messengers. Those vast regions won 
to our flag by the valor, and consecrated by the graves of our 
martyred heroes, are now to be won and held for Christ. The 
strongholds of oppression and treason in the South are to become 
the strongholds of truth and freedom. Not only the institutions 
of learning and religion, swept away by the hurricane of war, but 
the whole structure of society is to be rebuilt on better founda- 
tions. Those whom we have conquered by the sword are to be 
subdued by Christian truth and love. Those from whom we have 
stricken the fetters of civil bondage are to be raised to the nobler 
freedom wherewith the truth makes free. And, as the peaceful 
army of immigration, following in the track of our victorious 
hosts, shall commence its march over those desolated States, we 
must send in its front rank the ministry and the Word of God. 
In this way only can we secure for the South, and for the whole 
country, the ends of our military conquests, solve aright the mo- 
mentous problems that are now before us, avoid the new perils 
that will spring up in the path of peace, and cause the regions 
long cursed with slavery, and now devastated by the storm of 
war, to smile as the garden of the Lord. These are the new 
achievements to which God is summoning his Church in trumpet 
tones. He demands for this work her liberal pecuniary offerings, 
and the most gifted of her sons. By gratitude to him for the 
great deliverance he hath wrought in answer to her prayers — by 
every consideration of piety and patriotism, she is urged to the 
task. And no small share of this new responsibility will devolve 
upon the patrons and conductors of this Institution. 

Standing, therefore, as we do, by the grave of our country's sec- 
ond father, and by the cradle of its second birth, let us consecrate 
ourselves afresh to the work of .its evangelization, resolved never 
to withdraw our hand, nor to relax our efforts till, from the Lakes 
to the Gulf, and from sea to sea, it shall be said : " How beauti- 
ful UPON THE MOUNTAINS ARE THE FEET OF HIM THAT BRINGETH 
GOOD TIDINGS, THAT PUBLI8HETH PEACE" ! 

In behalf of the Executive Committee, 

Milton Badger, 
David B. Coe, 
A. Huntington Ciapp, 
Secretaries for Correspondence. 



76 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Receipts during the year ending April 1, 1885. 

From Auxiliaries, Agencies, Individuals, and Congregations, . $140,954 92 
From Legacies, ...... 45,644 43 

For Home Missionary, exclusive of copies furnished to Auxiliaries 

and Agencies, ...... 298 15 

Total amount of Receipts, . . $186,897 50 

Balance from last year s account, 81,642 23 

$268,539 73 



Expenditures during the year ending April 1, 1885. 

Paid on commissions of local Missionaries,* exclusive of payments 

from the Treasuries of Auxiliaries, .... $90,525 21 
Expended by Auxiliaries! within their respective fields, . 53,205 06 

Salaries and traveling and incidental expenses of Agents and Gen- 
eral Missionaries for New York, Ohio, Northern Illinois, Cen- 
tral Illinois, Missouri, Michigan, Eastern Wisconsin, Western 
Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska, and California, 20,014 22 
Proportion of General Agency in Massachusetts, as by arrangement 

with that Auxiliary, 1,700 00 

Salaries of Secretaries, Assistant Treasurer, and Clerks, . . 11,831 00 

Expenses of the Home Missionary, (15,750,) including copies fur- 
nished to Auxiliaries, and sent without charge to Life Directors 
and Members, Missionaries, Contributors, and Friends of the 
Cause, ........ 7,984 54 

Annual Report ( ) 1,214 30 

Printing Blank Commissions, Circulars, Drafts, Subscription papers, 

Notices, &a, 885 20 

* For the amount pledged in support of each missionary, and other particulars, see 
the tabular statement commencing on page 13, column 5. 

f The principal auxiliaries are those of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut For a summary of their receipts and expendi- 
tures, see the notices of these Societies, as referred to in the Table of Contents ; for 
the amount appropriated in support of each missionary, see the tabular statement cora- 
mencing on page IS ; for further particulars, reference will be had to the published 
reports of these Societies. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 77 

Binding Home Missionary, and other Pamphlets, . 

Rent, furniture, warming rooms, light, Ac., 

Stationery, Books, Maps, Ac., 

Postage and Revenue Stamps, ..... 

Freight, cartage, boxes, wrapping paper, Ac, 

Anniversary expenses, ...... 

Traveling expenses of Secretaries and Delegates to Anniversary 
and other Public Meetings, ..... 

Legal counsel and expenses of collecting legacies, 

Discounts and loss on uncurrent money, .... 

Refunded, paid into the treasury by mistake, . 

Total amount of expenditures, 
Balance to new account, 



$16 25 
1,854 88 
215 70 
861 15 
248 98 
188 62 

469 87 
84 25 

118 66 
98 00 


189,965 89 
78,574 84 


$268,589 73 



This is to certify that I have examined the accounts of the Treasurer of the 
American Home Missionary Society, and find the same correct and properly 
Touched ; and that there is in his hands a balance of seventy eight thousand 
five hundred and seventy four dollars and thirty four cents. 

GEORGE S. COE, Auditor. 
New York, May 10, 1865. M 



78 



THIBTB NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



APPENDIX 



Names of Missionaries in each State and Territory. 

For their stations and other particulars, see the alphabetical list in the General Table. 



Maine. 

Bacheller, G. 

Baker, S. 

Bates, A. J. 

Bean, E. 

Board man, J. 

Burnham J. 

Carpenter, E. G. 

Chapman, C. 

Coan, L. S. 

Cressey, G. W. 

Cross, W. R. 

Daggett, 0. R. 

Danielson, J. 

Darling, W. E. 

Deering, J. K. 

Dinsmore, J. 

Dodge, B. 

Dow, W. W. 

Eaton, J. 

Elliott, J. 

Ellis, T. L. 

Emerson, C. H. 

Farrar, H. 

Fowler, 8. 

Gould, M. 

Gould, 8. L. 

Hackett, 8. 

Haskell, W. H. 

Hibbard, D. S. 

Ilsley, H. 

Johnson, A. H. 

Jordan, W. V. 

Kemp, G. S. 

Kyte, J. 

Lawrence, J. 

Leavitt, W. 

Lewis^C. 

Loring, H. S. 

Loring, J. 

Merrill, W. A. 

Merry, T. T. 

Mitchell, T. G. 

Morrison, S. 

Nichols, O. L. 

NorcroBB, F. V. 



Norwood, F. 
Packard, C. 
Parsons, J. 
Perry, J. A. 
Pike, E. B. 
Plumer, A. R. 
Pope, C. H. 
Pratt, G. H. 
Raymond, E. M. 
Richardson, G. B. 
Robie, T. S. . 
Robie, B. A. 

ssell, R. C. 

nborn, B. T. 
Sewall, D. 
Sewall, W. 8. 
Sheldon, N. W. 
Sleeper, W. T. 
Smith, F. P. 
Smith, J. P. 
Smith, J. 
Southworth, F. 
Tewksbury, G. F. 
Thayer, P. B. 
Thurston, D. 
Titcomb, 8. 
Tyler, A. H. 
Wells, J. 
Wilcox, P. B. 
WiUey, B. G. 
Wiswall, L. 
Wright, J. E. M. 

New Hampshire. 

Abbott, E. F. 
Amsden, S. H. 
Bissell, O. 
Bowker, 8. D. 
Burnham, C. 
Burt, E. 
Chapman, E. 
Claggett, W. 
Clark, 8. 
Conant, L. 
Pavis, F. . 



Eldridge, E. D. 
Fiske, A. W. 
Fosdick, A. J. 
Gerould, M. 
Griswold, J. F. 
Haines, T. V. 
Haley, F. 
Holman, M. 
Holmes, 0. 
Hood, J. 
Johnson, A. P. 
Kimball, R. 
Le Bosquet, J. 
Leffingwell, M. 
McOlenning, D. 
Morey, I. 
Pike, E. B. 
Richards, A. 
Saunderson, H. H 
Shattuck, A. F. 
Spence, E. A. 
Stearns, J. H. 
Tewksbury, G. F. 
Thyng, J. H. 
Tufts, J. B. 
Wood, H. 
Wood, J. 

Vermont. 

Alcott, W. P. 
Alden, E. H. 
Anderson, A. 
Bacon, W. N. 
Bailey, J. G. 
Baker, J. W. H. 
Bartlett, L. 
Bates, 8. L. 
Bayne, T. 
Birge, E. C. 
Blake, L. H. 
Clizbe, J. 
Coburn, L. S. 
Doming, A. T. 
Durant, 0. 



Ford, J. T. 
Fox, D. W. 
Francis, D. D. 
Gardner, 8. S. 
Gerry, E. 
Gleason, G. L. 
Glines, J. 
Goodrich, C. 
Granger, 0. 
Griswold, J. B. 
Hall, R. V. 
Hemstrut, O. 
Herrick, H. 
Hubbard, T. B. 
Hyde, E. 
Jennings, P. 8. 
Johnson, T. H. 
Kent, C. H. 
Kimball, M. 
Kingsbury, J. W. 
Kingsbury, W. H. 
Ladd, A. 
Loring, L. 
Morey, H. M. 
Morrison, W. J. P. 
Page, B. G. 
Parsons, E. P. 
Perkins, 8. K. B. 
Pratt, J. L. 
Richards, C. H. 
Richardson, A. M. 
Rustedt, H. F. 
Saunderson, H. H. 
Scott, C. 
Smith, A. A. 
Snowden, R. B. 
Sparhawk, 8. 
Stephens, A. 
Stevens, M. A. 
Stone, J. F. 
Tolman, G. B. 
Torrey, H. A. P. 
Tracy, 0. B. 
Underwood, J. 
Williams, S. H. 
Winch, 0. M. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



Cooke, T. 
Dow, J. M. II. 
Fobes, W. A. 
Root, J. P. 



XamofcoMttt. 

Bancroft, I>. 
Bean, D. M. 
Bechthold, A- H. 
Besaouu W. II. 

Black, W. R. 

Boardmao, M. B 
Brigham, W. 
Burgess, E. 
Barn ham, A. 
Carlton, H. 
Chase, H. L. 
Chipman, S. M. 
Clayes, D. 

Cole, S. 

Cashing, J. R. 

Dawes, E. 

Dowden, W. H. 

Dunham, I. 

Button, A- J. 

Eastman, D. 

Foster, A. & 

Greene, H. 8. 

Grotrian, A. 

Hal1 ' °" t, w Frosti D. D. 
Harrington, E. W. Gateg? H j^ 

Haskell, J. Goddard, C. 



Connecticut. 

Anns, W. F. 
Atwater, W. W. 
Beals, D. 
Bentel, C. G. 
Birchard, W. M. 
Bissel, C. H. 

Brooks, E. F. 

Burr, E. F. 

Cardoza, F. L. 

Chamberlain, C. 

Chapman, F. H. 

Curtis, 8. J. 

Dickerman, G. A. 

Drennan, M. J. 

Dutton, T. 

Eaton, J. 

Edgar, J. 

Elliott, J. E. 

Fellows, 8. H. 



Goddard, C. G. 
Harrison, G. J. 
Holley, P. T. 
Hopkinson, B. B. 
Hopley, S. 
Hough, L. 8. 
Howe, S. 
Hull, J. D. 
Hyde, H. F. 
Hyde, W. A. 

Jones, C. M. 

Jones, H. W. 

Jones, W. G. 

Kinney, E. D. 

Knight, M. 

Mill, J. L. 

Miner, N. 

Osborn, F. W. 

Piatt, D. 

Rice, W. H. 

Robertson, J. 

Rood, L. 

Schrueder, A. 

Sessions, J* W. 
Smith, 11. B. 
Snauldini?, L. T 
Strong, &. *. Vail, H. M. 

Sturtevant, W. U. ^^^^ J. E. 
Swallow, J. E. 



Hobba, S. L 
Jones, T. H. 
Labaree, J. C. 
Leonard, W. 
Lewis, T. A. 
Longley, M. M. 
Marden, G. N. 
Merrill, T. A. 
Miller, R. D- 
Miller, W. 
Mills, J. 
Morgridge, 0. 
Morong, T. 
Norton, T. S. 
Parker, H. W. 
Perkins, G. G. 
Ritchie, G. 
Schwarz, L. B. 
Sessions, A. J. 
Smith, E. 
Smith, J. D. 
Stebbins, M. 0. 
Stinson, G. W. 
Stone, C. 
Stone, T. D. P. 
Strong, E. E. 



Barstow, C. 
Beckwith, J. H. 
Benedict, T. N. 
Blake, L. H. 
Bourne, 8. 
Bradford, B. F. 
Bronson, A. 
Carter, J. £. 
Chapman, E. D. 
Cordwell, J. G. 
Cowles, 8. 
Cushman, M. R. 
Dewey, W. 
Dilley, A. B. 
Dodd, J. 
Doe, W. P. 
Entler, G. R. 
Fisher, J. B. 
Frankfurth, H. 
Gibbs, J. 
Grush, J. W. 
Hall, E. N. 
Hall, W. 
Henry, W. D. 
Hunt, W. I. 
Jewell, J. 
Jones, 8. 
Judson, G. C. 
Knapp, N. B. 
Kyte, F. 
Lee, II. W. 
Miles, H. 
Miller, G. A. 
Montague, P. 
New comb, L. 
Norton, W. W. 
Powell, D. 
Redfield, 0. 
Richardson, J. C 
Rowland, 8. 
Sharp, C. W. 
Sloat, A. II. 
Stevens, 0. C. 
Watson, T. 
Wilder, M. H. 
Woodhull, J. A, 
Yale, A. 8. 
Young, S. 
Youngs, 0. 



79 

Atwater, IT. 0. 
Barnes, L. (\ 
Harriett, F. 
Houghton, G. F. 
Briflkerhoff, W. n. 
lirown, A, H. 
Brown, 8. 
Crane, I. C. 
Dana, C. G. 
Davies, J. A. 
Diggs, M. W. 
Dye, H. B. 
Fay, L. L. 
Fraser, J. M. 
Fry, G. V. 
Hart, J. 0. 
Hitchcock, II. C. 
Hovenden, R. 
Hurd, A. 0. 
Jones, A. F. 
Jones, I). I. 
Jones, E. D. 
Jones, II. 
Kelso, 8. 
Kingsley, J. 0. 
Lawrence, II. 
Maltby, B. K. 
Matson, II. 
Mitchell, W. 
Patton, J. L. 
Phinney, G. W. 
Pike, J. W. 0. 
Root, E. W. 
Russell, W. 
Stiles, E. R. 
Terry, P. 



Whitmore, Z. 
White, D. 

Bbode Island. 
Aldrich,J, X. 



Vow York. 

Armstrong, R. S. 
Barnes, H. H. 
Bsrrows, Q. W. 



Pennsylvania. 

Chamberlain, U. T 
Frankfurth, H. 
Irons, W. 
Lyon, J. H. 
Porter, S. 
Taylor, 8. D. 

Ohio. 

Arnold, F. L. 



Connet, A. 
Day, W. F. 
Jenkins, J. L. 
Jones, J. H. 
Tucker, E. 
Welles, B. 
Wilson, L. 

Illinois. 

Adam, C. C. 
Am ad en B. M. 
Andrews, D. 
Armstrong, F. A. 
'Aurand, II. 
Avery, E. II. 
Baker, E. II. 
Baker, J. D. 
Baldwin, D. J. 
Barnes, C. M. 
Barnes, H. E. 
Bart\ett,E.^. 
Beec\ier,¥.^. 



80 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Beecher, G. II. 

Benedict, L. 

Breed, 0. 0. 

Brown, R. 

Bull, R. B. 

Buss, 11. 

Oadwell, 0. 0. 

Cass, J. W. 

Charaplin, 8. W. 

Chapman, D. 

Chapman, J. 

Church, B. C. . 

Church, L. 

Clark, N. C. 

Coltrin, N. P. 

Conrad, C. E. 

Cooler, O. W. 

Dada, E. P. 

Dickerson, O. C. 

Dickinson, C. E. 

Dickinson, H. A. 

Dilley, S. 

Dixon, J. J. A. T. 

Dole, S. R. 

Drake, A. J. 

Dunn, R. C. 

Eaton, C. II. 

Fuller, F. L. 

Gates, L. M. 

Gore, D. 

Guild, R. B. 

Hancock, C. 

Hardy, G. 

Harper, A. 

Harrison, C. 8. 

Harvey, 0. A. 

Haskins, B. F. 

Hildreth, E. 

Hodges, J. 

Holmes, T. H. 

Johnson, J. A. 

Johnson, L. H. 

Jones, D. J. 

Kellogg, 8. H. 

Kilbourn, J. 

Lane, L. B. 

Lawson, F. 

Leonard, L. 

Lewis, E. N. 

Lorriaux, T. E. 

Longhead, J. 

Lyman, A. 

McCord, R. L. 

Morris, E. 

Morse, A. 

Ordway, 8. 

Penfield, 8. 

Pennoyer, A. L. 

Perkins, W. 
Peterson, W. S. 
"latt, K D. 



Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. P. 
Richards, J. L. 
Roberts, G. L. 
Schlosser, G. 
Selden, 0. 
Smith, E. G. 
Smith, 8. S. 
Snow, R. R. 
Stevens, J. D. 
Stoddard, J. P. 
Thrall, 8. R. 
Tutfrill, E. B. 
Wainwright, G. W 
Watson, C. L. 
Westervelt, W. A. 
Wheeler, F. 
White, J. W. 
Whitmore, A. A. 
Williams, G. W. 
Winter, A. 
Worrell, B. F. 
Wright, W. B. 
Wyckoli; J. D. 

Missouri. 

Harlow, E. A. 
Jones, G. M. 
Pratt, C. H. 

Michigan. 

Apthorp, R. 
Ashley, J. M. 
Berney, D. 
Bisbee, C. G. 
Bonney, J. R. 
Branch, E. T. 
Breed, 8. D. 
Broas, H. 
Campbell, W. M. 
Crane, J. L. 
Crumb, J. II. 
Danforth, C. 
Denton, J. 
Emmons, J. 
Esler, W. P. 
Evarts, N. K. 
Fiske, J. B. 
Fletcher, A. H. 
Fox, A. K. 
Fox, G. C. 
Glidden, N. D. 
Gridley, J. J. 
Hall, W. 
Hatch, R. 
Hitchen, G. 
Hurd, F. 
Hyde, S. S. 
Jones, L. H. 



Jones, T. W. 
Kedsie, A. S. 
Kidder, J. S. 
Kidder, J. W. 
Kimball, E. E. 
Kirkland, E. E. 
Lightbody, T. 
Lucas, H. 
McKay, J. A. 
Machin, C. 
Miles, G. H. 
Millard, J. D. 
Myers, J. C. 
. Osborn, C. 
Patchin, J. 
Pattinson, W. 
Phillips, S. 
Piatt, W. 
Porter, M. M. 
Pratt, A. B. 
Rose, W. F. 
Russell, W. P. 
St. Clair, A. 
Scotford, J. 
Spooner, C. 
Stevenson, J. R. 
Strong, G. C. 
Temple, 0. 
Thomas, O. A. 
Thompson, G. 
Van Auken, H. H. 
Van Frank, P. R. 
Vetter, J. 
Warren, L. 
Wilhelm, J. H. 
Williams, W. B. 
Williston, T. 
Winter, G. 
Wirt, D. 

Woodbury, F. P. 
Woodruff; L. N. 

Wisconsin. 

Allen, A. S. 
Avery, H. 
Barteau, 8. H. 
Baxter, B. S. 
Bridgeman, L. 
Cadwell, C. C. 
Campbell, D. A. 
Carpenter, H. W. 
Oatlin, W. E. 
Chapin, H. M. 
Clark, H. S. 
Oomstook, D. W. 
Conly, J. 
Curtiss, D. C. 
Davies, D. S. 
Dixon, A. M. 
Donaldjftot^ J-W. 



Dwinndl, 8. A. 
Everdell, R. 
Hall, J. 
Hall, J. Q. 
Harris, J. W. 
Hassell, R. 
Hayes, J. M. 
Healey, J. W. 
Hurlbut, T. B. 
lams, F. M. 
Jameson, J. 
Jones, D. 
King, B. 
Lathrop, A. C. 
Laughlin, A. D. 
Lord, J. S. 
Mayne, N. 
Miller, J. W. 
Miner, E. B. 
Miner, H. A. 
Morehouse, 0. W. 
Parker, A. 
Parker, L. 
Perkins, J. W. 
Radcliff, L. L. 
Reynard, J. 
Richards, J. P. 
Sabin, J. G. 
Sabin, L. P. 
Salmon, E. P. 
Sawyer, L. J. 
Seward, E. D. 
Sewell, R. 
Sherril, F. G. 
Smith, A. W. 
Smith, G. M. 
Smith, O. A. - 
Soule, J. B. L. 
Spaulding, G. 
Stoddart, W. W. 
Thorpe, W. W. 
Todd, J. D. 
Tucker, G. L. 
Valentine, P. 
Wadsworth, T. A. 
Wait, R. 
Watts, J. 
Wells, J. A. 
Wells, M. 
Williams, R. 
Young, A. A. 

Iowa. 

Adam, E. 
Adams, H. 
Adams, W. A. 
Allen, W. W. 
Allert, F. 
Apthorp, W. P. 
Avery, W. P. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPORT. 



81 



Baldwin, A. V. 
Bent, G. 
Black, W. R. 
Blake, G. H. 
Boardnoao, H. E. 
Burdwell, D.N. 
Boynton, 0. F. 
Brown, 8. 
Bullen, H. L. 
Cady, C. S. 
Canfield, T. H. 
Clark, E. 
Coleman, W. L. 
Cooper, J. 0. 
Craig, D. 
Cross, M. K. 
Davidson, D. B. 
Davis, I. 8. 
Eells, D. B. 
Emerson, O. 
Evans, E. J. 
Evans, T. W. 
Fifield, L. B. 
French, O. 
Gates, C. H. 
Gilbert, J. B. 
Graf, T. F. 
Graves, A. 
Griffiths, E. 
Grout, 8. N. 
Harlow, L. 
Harper, A. 
Harvey, W. F. 
Hayes, G. 
Hemenway, 8. 
Heaa, IL 
HendeBoarc^W 

nui, j. J. 

Hitchcock, G, B. 
HoDsev A. V. 
Humphrey, C. C. 
IIuDter, K 
Hurlbu't, J. 
Jones, B. T. 
Jones, J. A. 

6 



Jones, T. 

Judiesch, F. W. 

Keitb, W. A. 

Kennedy, J. R. 

Knowles, D. 

La Dow, 8. P. 

Lane, D. 

Langpaap, J. II. 

Littlefield, O. 

Loring, A. T. 

Manson, A. 

Mat how 9, L. P. 

Merrill, 0. W. 

Mitchell, A. R. 

Nutting, J. K. 

Osborn, W. U. 

Palmer, E. 8. 

Parker, A. 

Pickett, J. W. 

Porter, G. M. 

Reed, G. 0. 

Roberts, B. 

Ross, J. A. 

Russell, I. 

Savage, D. F. 

Shaerer, J. 

Skinner, T. N. 

Smith, E. P. 

Stuart, R. 

Tade, E. O. 

Taylor, C. 

Teele, E. 

Tingley, M. 

Upton, J. R. 

Van Antwerp, J. 

Veitz, C. F. 
H.Warner, L. 

Weidmann, P. 

Williams, J. M. 

Williams, L. 8. 
. Windsor, J. H. 

Windsor, J. W. 

Windsor, W. 

Woodward, J. H. 

Wright, A. 



Minnesota. 

Beekman, J. C. 
Bent, G. 
Bigelow, W. 
Biscoe, G. S. 
Blumer, A. 
Brown, E. 
Canfield, P. 
Clark, G. K. 
Clark, W. S. 
Dada, W. B. 
Gilbert, L. C. 
Gridley, J. J. 
Griggs, L. S. 
Hall, 0. 
Hall, 8. 

Haviland, B. F. 
Hunt, K A. 
Jotb, J. F. 
Merrill, E. W. 
Morse, A. 
Newton, E. 
Packard, A. K. 
Porteus, W. 
Bounce, J. S. 
Seccombe, C. 
Shedd, C. 
Sheldon, C, B. 
Smith, W, J 

Sofia, w. w 

Stevens, W, R. 
Strong, J, O. 
Tappan, 0. L. 
Willard, H. 
Williams, J. N. 



Beckwith, G. A. 
Cordley, R. 
Ellex, D. 
Guild, 0. 
Harlow, E. A. 
Hooker, A. M. 



Jones, II. 
Mc Vicar, P. 
Morse, G. C. 
Paine, R. 
Parker, R. D. 
Rice, G. C. 
Robinson, H. P. 
Storrs, 8. D. 

» 
Nebraska. 

Gaylord, R. 
Heaton, I. E. 
Hurlbut, E. B. 
Jones, L. H. 
Lewis, E. M. 
Piatt, M. F. 
Stowell, A. D. 

Colorado. 

Crawford, W. 
McLeod, N. 

Utah. 

McLeod, N. 

California. 

Bissell, E. C. 
Cummings, H. 
Finney, G. W. 
Johnson, J. A. 
Jones, W. L. 
Powell, J. J. 
Savage, W. J. 
Starr, M. B. 
Tenney, W. A. 
Warren, J. H. 

Oregon. 

Atkinson, G. H. 
Condon, T. 
Gray, D. B. 



82 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



RELATIONS OF AUXILIARIES, AGENTS, &C. 



State and other large Auxiliaries. 

Most of the State Missionary Societies were in existence before the formation 
of the National Society, and some of them were among the earliest organized 
efforts in our country for sending the Gospel to the destitute. They have vol- 
untarily connected themselves as Auxiliaries with the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, from a conviction that greater unity of plan and efficiency in action 
would thereby be promoted. 

The terms by which such Auxiliaries — acting on the Principles of the Parent 
Society, undertaking the supply of the destitute within their own bounds, and 
paying over their surplus funds to the Parent Institution — are connected with 
the Parent Society, are such as to secure the following objects, viz : 

First — The Auxiliary is not superseded or overshadowed by the National 
Institution, but, on the contrary, is invigorated and sustained by connection 
with it. 

This is secured by the provision that the Auxiliary is the sole agency for this 
cause that operates on its field. It controls all appointments in the State to 
which it belongs. From it alone, so far as its means will allow, the feeble 
•churches receive assistance. Thus a direct relation and strong attachment is 
cherished toward it, in the hearts of the ministers and churches. 

Again — while the local operations of the Auxiliary are thus encouraged and 
sustained, its connection with the Parent Society is such as to awaken an in- 
terest in the destitute beyond its own limits, and afford facilities for reaching 
them. It is not only a society for local purposes, but it is also a branch of the 
National Society, and, as such, has the control of all agencies for the collection 
-of funds within its own field, and can direct the manner in which its surplus 
resources shall be expended beyond its own limits. Thus, the State and other 
large Auxiliaries are not merely organizations to help the Parent Society ; they 
are integral parts of it, bound together in one whole by a common interest in 
and free access, through the Parent Society, to the great field to be occupied, 
■and governed by the same general principles and rules in carrying on the work. 

Agents. 

Besides preaching to the destitute and taking: up contributions for Home 
Missions, the Agents of the American Home Missionary Society exercise a 
general superintendence of the operations of the Society within their respective 
fields. By correspondence and personal visitation they ascertain the wants of 
the destitute ; assist them to obtain the preaching of the Gospel ; and instruct 
and encourage them to develop their own means for its support They receive 
applications for aid, and make such preliminary examination as may be neces- 
sary before submitting them for the action of the Executive Committee ; and in 
other ways labor to insure a judicious and economical application of the Socie- 
ty's funds. At present the Society has in its employ no merely collecting 
Agents, nor any whose services are not required for other purposes in the re- 
gion where they labor. The Secretaries of several of the larger Auxiliaries 
v also the Agents for this cause in their respecting Yw\mta. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 83 



Committees of Minions. 

The American Home Missionary Society has ever regarded the ecclesiastical 
bodies as the appropriate judges of the standing of their own ministers, and of 
the wants of the churches in their connection. Accordingly, the commission 
issued to every missionary requires that his credentials be acceptable to the 
ministerial body of his denomination, within whose bound he is appointed to 
labor. And the various ecclesiastical bodies are invited to appoint each a 
Committee of Missions from its own members, to receive application from its 
churches, and suggest to the Society the action proper in each case. Such a 
committee constitutes the official source to which reference can be bad for in- 
formation and advice, in all matters pertaining to missions in the connection to 
which it belongs. This mode of cooperation has been preferred by numerous 
ecclesiastical bodies, from the first formation of the Society. It guarantees to 
the churches, that their respective claims shall be fairly considered, with all 
the advantage of having the indorsement of the body to which they belong. 
The advice of such a Committee, acting in the name and by the direction of the 
ecclesiastical body to which they belong, is regarded as the highest authority in 
matters pertaining to the standing of ministers and churches in their connection, 
and has the same influence with the Society, as would that of the Board of 
Agency appointed by itself. 

There is one limitation to this influence, however, which ought to be stated. 
Should any ecclesiastical body so far swerve from the principles of truth and 
gospel order, as not to retain the fellowship and confldence of the great body 
of the churches cooperating in this Society, that fact would cause its recom- 
mendations not to be respected, as a basis of action, by the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

As cases may occur in which the feeble churches may not be aware of the 
existence of any Committee of Missions, through whom to apply for aid, a 
general provision is made, that application may be vouched by any two minis- 
ters of known and approved standing, of their own denomination, who can 
certify to the facts of the case. If the information thus given is not sufficient, 
other facts are sought by the Executive Committee, with as little delay as 
practicable, from the most authentic sources from which they can be obtained. 

Such, briefly, are the relations of the American Home Missionary Society to 
the various organs, through which the community seeks to act out its mission- 
ary feeling, ft will be seen that this plan secures the united action, in the 
missionary work, of those whose views of doctrine and church order admit of 
cooperation, and whose interests in the great field are essentially the same. 
This combination insures a homogeneous policy as to the manner and amount 
of appropriations, and the qualifications of missionaries ; it has discouraged 
sectional feelings, and diffused throughout each part an interest in all the rest : 
and thus has formed ties between the West and East, along which has passed 
from the latter to the former a silent and invisible current of moral influences 
more valuable, if possible, than all pecuniary grants. At the same time the 
connection of the Parent Society with the various associations, that act with it, 
is such as to secure to them entire freedom in the missionary work, in their 
respective spheres, and an influence beyond them, in cultivating the waste 
places of our common country. 

Applications for Aid. 

Feeble congregations, desiring aid in supporting the Gospel, are requested, in 
their applications, to make full statements of their condition and prospects, and 
of the reasons for granting their requests. They are desired, also, to furnish 
the following particulars, viz : 

The name of the church or congregation. 

The number of cemmanicants, and the average number of attendant* on 
public worship. 



82 THIRTY NINTH RETORT. May, 



RELATIONS OF AUXILIARIES, AGENTS, &C. 



State and other large Auxiliaries. 

Most of the State Missionary Societies were in existence before the formation 
of the National Society, and some of them were among the earliest organized 
efforts in our country for sending the Gospel to the destitute. They have vol- 
untarily connected themselves as Auxiliaries with the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, from a conviction that greater unity of plan and efficiency in action 
would thereby be promoted. 

The terms by which such Auxiliaries — acting on the Principles of the Parent 
Society, undertaking the supply of the destitute within their own bounds, and 
paying over their surplus funds to the Parent Institution — are connected with 
the Parent Society, are such as to secure the following objects, viz : 

First — The Auxiliary is not superseded or overshadowed by the National 
Institution, but, on the contrary, is invigorated and sustained by connection 
with it. 

This is secured by the provision that the Auxiliary is the sole agency for this 
cause that operates on its field. It controls all appointments in the State to 
which it belongs. From it alone, so far as its means will allow, the feeble 
•churches receive assistance. Thus a direct relation and strong attachment is 
cherished toward it, in the hearts of the ministers and churches. 

Again — while the local operations of the Auxiliary are thus encouraged and 
sustained, its connection with the Parent Society is such as to awaken an in- 
terest in the destitute beyond its own limits, and afford facilities for reaching 
them. It is not only a society for local purposes, but it is also a branch of the 
National Society, and, as such, has the control of all agencies for the collection 
of funds within its own field, and can direct the manner in which its surplus 
resources shall be expended beyond its own limits. Thus, the State and other 
large Auxiliaries are not merely organizations to Titlp the Parent Society ; they 
are integral parts of it, bound together in one whole by a common interest in 
and free access, through the Parent Society, to the great field to be occupied, 
•and governed by the same general principles and rules in carrying on the work. 

Agents. 

Besides preaching to the destitute and taking up contributions for Home 
Missions, the Agents of the American Home Missionary Society exercise a 
general superintendence of the operations of the Society within their respective 
fields. By correspondence and personal visitation they ascertain the wants of 
the destitute ; assist them to obtain the preaching of the Gospel ; and instruct 
and encourage them to develop their own means for its support. They receive 
applications for aid, and make such preliminary examination as may be neces- 
sary before submitting them for the action of the Executive Committee ; and in 
other ways labor to insure a judicious and economical application of the Socie- 
ty's funds. At present the Society has in its employ no merely collecting 
Agents, nor any whose services are not required for other purposes in the re- 
\gtoa where they labor. The Secretaries of several of the larger Auxiliaries 
* also the Agents for this cause in their raptttm \w\xufo. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 83 



Committees of Missions. 

The American Home Missionary Society has ever regarded the ecclesiastical 
bodies as the appropriate judges of the standing of their own ministers, and of 
the wants of the churches in their connection. Accordingly, the commission 
issued to every missionary requires that his credentials be acceptable to the 
ministerial body of his denomination, within whose bound he is appointed to 
labor. And the various ecclesiastical bodies are invited to appoint each a 
Committee of Missions from its own members, to receive application from its 
churches, and suggest to the Society the action proper in each case. Such a 
committee constitutes the official source to which reference can be had for in- 
formation and advice, in all matters pertaining to missions in the connection to 
which it belongs. This mode of cooperation has been preferred by numerous 
ecclesiastical bodies, from the first formation of the Society. It guarantees to 
the churches, that their respective claims shall be fairly considered, with all 
the advantage of having the indorsement of the body to which they belong. 
The advice of such a Committee, acting in the name and by the direction of the 
ecclesiastical body to which they belong, is regarded as the highest authority in 
matters pertaining to the standing of ministers and churches in their connection, 
and has the same influence with the Society, as would that of the Board of 
Agency appointed by itself. 

There is one limitation to this influence, however, which ought to be stated. 
Should any ecclesiastical body so far swerve from the principles of truth and 
gospel order, as not to retain the fellowship and confidence of the great body 
of the churches cooperating in this Society, that fact would cause its recom- 
mendations not to be respected, as a basis of action, by the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

As cases may occur in which the feeble churches may not be aware of the 
existence of any Committee of Missions, through whom to apply for aid, a 
general provision is made, that application may be vouched by any two minis- 
ters of known and approved standing, of their own denomination, who can 
certify to the facts of the case. If the information thus given is not sufficient, 
other facts are sought by the Executive Committee, with as little delay as 
practicable, from the most authentic sources from which they can be obtained. 

Such, briefly, are the relations of the American Home Missionary Society to 
the various organs, through which the community seeks to act out its mission- 
ary feeling. It will be seen that this plan secures the united action, in the 
missionary work, of those whose views of doctrine and church order admit of 
cooperation, and whose interests in the great field are essentially the same. 
This combination insures a homogeneous policy as to the manner and amount 
of appropriations, and the qualifications of missionaries ; it has discouraged 
sectional feelings, and diffused throughout each part an interest in all the rest ; 
and thus has formed ties between the West and East, along which has passed 
from the latter to the former a silent and invisible current of moral influences 
more valuable, if possible, than all pecuniary grants. At the same time the 
connection of the Parent Society with the various associations, that act with it, 
is such as to secure to them entire freedom in the missionary work, in their 
respective spheres, and an influence beyond them, in cultivating the waste 
places of our common country. 

Applications for Aid. 

Feeble congregations, desiring aid in supporting the Gospel, are requested, in 
their applications, to make full statements of their condition and prospects, and 
of the reasons for granting their requests. They are desired, also, to furnish 
the following particulars, viz : 

The name of the church or congregation. 

The number of oommaDicants, and the average number of attendant on 
public wonbip. 



82 THIRTY NINTH RETORT. May, 



RELATIONS OF AUXILIARIES, AGENTS, &C. 



State and other large Auxiliaries. 

Most of the State Missionary Societies were in existence before the formation 
of the National Society, and some of them were among the earliest organized 
efforts in our country for sending the Gospel to the destitute. They have vol- 
untarily connected themselves as Auxiliaries with the American Home Mission- 
ary Society, from a conviction that greater unity of plan and efficiency in action 
would thereby be promoted. 

The terms by which such Auxiliaries — acting on the Principles of the Parent 
Society, undertaking the supply of the destitute within their own bounds, and 
paying over their surplus funds to the Parent Institution — are connected with 
the Parent Society, are such as to secure the following objects, viz : 

First — The Auxiliary is not superseded or overshadowed by the National 
Institution, but, on the contrary, is invigorated and sustained by connection 
with it. 

This is secured by the provision that the Auxiliary is the sole agency for this 
cause that operates on its field. It controls all appointments in the State to 
which it belongs. From it alone, so far as its means will allow, the feeble 
•churches receive assistance. Thus a direct relation and strong attachment is 
cherished toward it, in the hearts of the ministers and churches. 

Again — while the local operations of the Auxiliary are thus encouraged and 
sustained, its connection with the Parent Society is such as to awaken an in- 
terest in the destitute beyond its own limits, and afford facilities for reaching 
them. It is not only a society for local purposes, but it is also a branch of the 
National Society, and, as such, has the control of all agencies for the collection 
•of funds within its own field, and can direct the manner in which its surplus 
resources shall be expended beyond its own limits. Thus, the State and other 
large Auxiliaries are not merely organizations to help the Parent Society ; they 
are integral parts of it, bound together in one whole by a common interest in 
and free access, through the Parent Society, to the great field to be occupied, 
•and governed by the same general principles and rules in carrying on the work. 

Agents. 

Besides preaching to the destitute and taking up contributions for Home 
Missions, the Agents of the American Home Missionary Society exercise a 
general superintendence of the operations of the Society within their respective 
fields. By correspondence and personal visitation they ascertain the wants of 
the destitute ; assist them to obtain the preaching of the Gospel ; and instruct 
and encourage them to develop their own means for its support They receive 
applications for aid, and make such preliminary examination as may be neces- 
sary before submitting them for the action of the Executive Committee ; and in 
other ways labor to insure a judicious and economical application of the Socie- 
ty's funds. At present the Society has in its employ no merely collecting 
Agents, nor any whose services are not required for other purposes in the re- 
gJon where they labor. The Secretaries of (several of the larger Auxiliaries 
v also the Agents for this cause in their raptttm \wixufo. 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 83 



Committees of Missions. 

The American Home Missionary Society has ever regarded the ecclesiastical 
bodies as the appropriate judges of the standing of their own ministers, and of 
the wants of the churches in their connection. Accordingly, the commission 
issued to every missionary requires that his credentials be acceptable to the 
ministerial body of his denomination, within whose bound he is appointed to 
labor. And the various ecclesiastical bodies are invited to appoint each a 
Committee of Missions from its own members, to receive application from its 
churches, and suggest to the Society the action proper in each case. Such a 
committee constitutes the official source to which reference can be had for in- 
formation and advice, in all matters pertaining to missions in the connection to 
which it belongs. This mode of cooperation has been preferred by numerous 
ecclesiastical bodies, from the first formation of the Society. It guarantees to 
the churches, that their respective claims shall be fairly considered, with all 
the advantage of having the indorsement of the body to which they belong. 
The advice of such a Committee, acting in the name and by the direction of the 
ecclesiastical body to which they belong, is regarded as the highest authority in 
matters pertaining to the standing of ministers and churches in their connection, 
and has the same influence with the Society, as would that of the Board of 
Agency appointed by itself. 

There is one limitation to this influence, however, which ought to be stated. 
Should any ecclesiastical body so far swerve from the principles of truth and 
gospel order, as not to retain the fellowship and confidence of the great body 
of the churches cooperating in this Society, that fact would cause its recom- 
mendations not to be respected, as a basis of action, by the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

As cases may occur in which the feeble churches may not be aware of the 
existence of any Committee of Missions, through whom to apply for aid, a 
general provision is made, that application may be vouched by any two minis- 
ters of known and approved standing, of their own denomination, who can 
certify to the facts of the case. If the information thus given is not sufficient, 
other facts are sought by the Executive Committee, with as little delay as 
practicable, from the most authentic sources from which they can be obtained. 

Such, briefly, are the relations of the American Home Missionary Society to 
the various organs, through which the community seeks to act out its mission- 
ary feeling. It will be seen that this plan secures the united action, in the 
missionary work, of those whose views of doctrine and church order admit of 
cooperation, and whose interests in the great field are essentially the same. 
This combination insures a homogeneous policy as to the manner and amount 
of appropriations, and the qualifications of missionaries ; it has discouraged 
sectional feelings, and diffused throughout each part an interest in all the rest : 
and thus has formed ties between the West and East, along which has passed 
from the latter to the former a silent and invisible current of moral influences 
more valuable, if possible, than all pecuniary grants. At the same time the 
connection of the Parent Society with the various associations, that act with it, 
is such as to secure to them entire freedom in the missionary work, in their 
respective spheres, and an influence beyond them, in cultivating the waste 
places of our common country. 

Applications for Aid. 

Feeble congregations, desiring aid in supporting the Gospel, are requested, in 
their applications, to make full statements of their condition and prospects, and 
of the reasons for granting their requests. They are desired, also, to furnish 
the following particulars, viz : 

The name of the church or congregation. 

The number of communicants, and the average number of attendant on 
public worship. 



84 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

The denomination and size of congregations immediately contiguous, with 
the distance to their pfaces of worship. 

The total amount of salary which the applicants propose to make up. 

The portion of that salary which they pledge for the given time, and the 
arrangements that are made for securing it. 

Whether aid is expected from any other source. 

The least amount that will suffice from this Society. 

The name in full and post-office address of the minister for whom a commis- 
sion is desired. 

His credentials. 

Whether he is a resident of the place in which he preaches, and is engaged 
in any other calling than that of the ministry. 

Whether he is the pastor of the church, or if not, whether any arrangements 
are made or contemplated for his installment in the course of the year. 

The applications should be signed by the officers of the church, and by the 
trustees or a committee of the congregation. 

If the ecclesiastical body with which the church is connected have a " Com- 
mittee of Missions " to act in their behalf the members of this Committee are 
the proper persons to certify the statements of the church, the standing of the 
minister, and his prospects of usefulness in the place where his services are de- 
sired ; and the application should be sent to them for their indorsement and 
recommendation. Where no such " Committee of Missions " exists, the appli- 
cation should receive the indorsement of two or more neighboring clergymen 
of the same denomination, acquainted with the facts. 

Applications, after being properly indorsed and recommended, should be sent 
to the Agent (or Secretary of the Auxiliary) for the region where the applicants 
reside. 

As a general rule, appropriations are for twelve months from the date of the 
application ; at the end of which, if further aid be needed, a new application 
must be made, containing all the particulars above stated, and indorsed and 
recommended in like manner. Each congregation applying for renewed aid, 
should furnish, also, the certificate of the missionary, that they have fulfilled 
their previous pledges for his support 

The address of the Society's Agents and the Secretaries of its Auxiliaries 
will be found on the cover of its Reports and of the Home Missionary. 



ADDRESSES 
At the Thirty Ninth Anniversary. 



Address of Rev. George H. Atkinson, of Portland, Oregon, 

ON MOVING THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION. 

Resolved : That the Reports now presented he adopted and published under 
the direction of the Executive Committee, 

Mr. President: To adopt and publish this Report, as I understand it, is to 
adopt the policy of the American Home Missionary Society, and to heartily 
wish the same course of action to be pursued in the future. It is more than 
such a wish. It is a virtual promise of the friends of the Society to vigorously 
sustain the Executive Committee in their comprehensive plans of Home Evan- 
gelization. It is to weld another link of that living chain by which this Society, 
as an instrument under God, is binding together our grand republic of States. 
By every year of service ^rou form one of those links. At every Anniversary yon 
strike the final blow which firmly holds the paat «M ^ktoojk wrciftctiou for 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 85 

the future. I have called this a living chain. It is a bond full of vital power. 
Look along the zone of your home missionary work, from the Atlantic west- 
ward, and there you will find the loyal hosts who have breasted the rebellion 
and upheld the nation. From New England to the Mississippi, north of thirty 
six degrees, thirty minutes, your missionaries have labored for forty years ; 
and there are our mightiest and most loyal States. From the Mississippi to 
the Rocky Mountains, your servants have labored: and there, too, has been 
unswerving loyalty. From the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, wherever your 
missionaries have toiled, there, also, a love for the Union has been cherished, 
and traitors have been compelled to hide their heads. This claim is not exclus- 
ive. Others have labored also for this end. But your missionaries have all 
and always been loyal. I speak now of the Pacific coast. Every one there has 
been true to our flag. Every church has been true to it Every congregation 
has been true to it When the news of defeat or disaster was flashed across 
the continent, the flags along the Pacific fell to half mast When victory came, 
they waved proudly from the peak. We have felt the same heart-beat for lib- 
erty which has thrilled your own souls. We were higher law men when it 
cost reproach to be so. We have not shunned to preach the whole Gospel of 
liberty. Gladly would many have come and shared with you in the struggle ; 
but it has been impossible. 

Your missionaries on the •Pacific have endeavored to do the same work as 
those have done on the Atlantic. They have been true to Christ, teaching men 
to be loyal to him. Your policy has been aggressive. When, eighteen years 
ago, you commissioned the speaker to commence a mission in Oregon, you bid 
him use all means of good to the people — Bibles, tracts, school books, and all 
agencies of reform. You bid him, also, seek a center of population and establish 
a church. The work was peculiar. He went to Oregon by way of Cape Horn 
and the Sandwich Islands, requiring eight months for the journey, and his com- 
panions followed by the Cape for several years afterwards. When I inspected 
the Willamette valley, in 1848, making known my mission to the few settlers, 
widely scattered in their log cabins, and inquiring for Presbyterians or Congre- 
gationalists, I found only two or three, in a journey of a hundred and fifty miles, 
southward and northward, except two or three very small churches, collected by 
some missionaries to the Indians, who had settled in the valley. I was often asked : 
44 What's a Congregationalist ? We never heard of that sect We thought all 
christian people were either Presbyterians, Baptists, Methodists, Episcopalians, 
or Catholics." I had to explain that a Congregationalist is a Presbyterian in 
doctrine and a democrat in church government ; that he is orthodox, and free 
to govern himself by the law of Christ Now we need make no such explana- 
tion. We have nine or ten Congregational churches, and six or seven houses 
of worship, erected and paid for at a cost of $3,000. We have the stated minis- 
try of the Word in about twenty places. We have Sabbath schools, prayer 
meetings, and social gatherings, much as you have them. Our people are lib- 
eral. Keeping a careful record of gifts for religious purposes, at Oregon City, 
for fifteen years, I found that when your Society gave us one dollar, we raised 
two dollars for the cause of Christ. On reporting the fact to you, your Secre- 
tary replied that this is the law of Home Missions, on the eastern slope of the 
continent I was very glad to find it so, and thus to be assured that your law 
had passed over the mountains. Your missionaries have done what they could 
to promote education. Oregon and California have a free school system, and 
free schools in every county ; and we have not been behind any persons in their 
support. We have also a college in each State, which, though imperfect, is 
growing and extending its influence, and gaining the confidence and aid of 
the people. 

Our brethren are working steadily and faithfully, yet they are becoming 
weary in their work, not of it; and they look to you for more helpers and 
more help. We have gained vantage ground, and we feel the duty to profit by 
the position. Few can tell the struggles of pioneer missionaries in a country 
so distant, and where the population is floating. Often has the word of the 
prophet come to mind, u Their strength is to ait still ;" and often, loo, Ytaa V\& 



86 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

missionary needed the apostolic exhortation: " Haying done all things to 
stand." 

Our fields are extending eastward and northward and southward. The mines 
of gold and silver in Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, are already pouring out 
their $2,000,000 every month, which pass through our business emporium. 
The seekers of wealth are coming to our region. New towns and cities are 
springing up, and the demand is urgent that the friends of Christ be on the 
alert to open to men the treasures of eternal life. It is true now, as it was 
eighteen hundred years ago, that we must go to men and preach the Gospel to 
them. They will neglect it, and fail of the great salvation, if we neglect this 
duty. The honor of our Lord demands our attention and our consecration to 
his kingdom in that part of our national domain. The civil, social, and relig- 
ious elements there are now in a state of fusion. You can mold them as you 
please. Soon they will be hardened into fixed forms, such as you would not 
prefer, but even such as you would deplore. This will be the case if left to 
themselves, or to imperfect organizing forces. You know that you must have 

Eerfect molds to insure perfect castings. By as much as the one is imperfect, 
y so much will the other be. 

You, as a Home Missionary Society, stand responsible for the shape which 
our social, educational, and religious, and even our civil forces shall take. Upon 
you rests the duty, as you love our country, and a% you love our Lord Jesus 
Christ, to send out more men — men of piety, of intelligence, of thorough train- 
ing, of enlarged experience — men of patient industry and unwavering faith. 
And you must send such men now. Every day of delay is a day lost You 
can never be too quick to turn a mountain stream in a particular direction. 
Every rod of its course onward increases the difficulty. You must pour the 
molten mass into the matrices while it is red hot. If you wait till it is cooled, 
you can do nothing till you remelt it But you can not remelt our social struc- 
tures. It is only once in an age that God applies his furnace fires and reduces 
society to its elements. We are in that state of fusion now. God has broken 
us up into an elementary state, and we must especially watch how we re-form, 
and around what centers we re-crystal ize. 

For these, and many other such reasons, sir, I move the adoption and publi- 
cation of the Reports, and the further vigorous prosecution of the Home Mis- 
sionary work. 



Address of Rev. William T. Zkutis, of New Haven, Ot, 

ON MOVING THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION. 

Whereas, the destruction of the slaveholders' rebellion involves the necessity of reorgan- 
izing society in the Southern States in the accordance with the ideas of justice, freedom and 
morality ; tlierefore, 

Resolved : That the establishment of local churches, with a Godfearing and untrammded 
ministry, and with a truth-loving, devoted and pious membership, should be a main in- 
strumentality in this great work of reconstruction, and deserves tlw cooperation of all who 
love tlieir country, and the cause of our holy religion. 

Mr. President : After a long sea voyage, the first days on shore are those of 
giddiness and uncertainty. We reel still from the motion of the wave-tossed 
vessel, and do not immediately regain the steadiness which pertains to the solid 
land. So after these years of terrible conflict, of severe sorrow, of bitter dis- 
appointment, we can not appreciate the change, which happened during one 
short month by the virtual termination of the war, in that grand succession of 
victories, when the Army of the Potomac drove the enemy from their thirty 
miles of intrenchments, and then pursuing the sullen foe, with a tireless rapid- 
ity and a fearless vigilance, brought him at last to his knees. 

We can not make it real that there are no newspapers in Richmond to brag 
for the South, and defy the loyal authority ; that the American flag floats over 
the capital of Virginia ; that the officers who have fought against us, have do 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 87 

refuge except beneath our banner ; that the leaders of the conspiracy are vaga- 
bonds, and outlaws with a price on their heads ; that Libby Prison is crowded 
with rebel soldiers, guarded by a negro regiment ; that the last bulletins of the 
war are being posted ; that soon the march of great armies over our soil will be 
only a record ; that the nation must gird itself to the repairing of waste places, 
rebuilding railways and cities, and reopening harbors ; that commerce and trade, 
and manufacturing must fill new channels ; that peace, an honorable, a right- 
eous, a stable peace is at hand, not a compromise with treason, but the conquest 
of rebellion. When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion, we were 
tike them that dreamed. 

Yet if we do not, and can not fully appreciate the change, we perceive abund- 
ant cause for thanksgiving : no enemy to dread, no draft to be enforced, no sad 
tidings from sons and brothers in captivity, no starvation of loyal men in South- 
ern slave pens, no persecution unto death of those who remain true to their 
country, no disgrace to be a citizen of the United States anywhere, no more 
foreign alliance with rebellion, no pirates fitted out to prey upon our commerce ; 
but, instead, a sense of security and dignity, a grand and glorious enterprise 
of renovation and recuperation, in evolving the immense resources of our land, 
whose mountains and valleys have been made historic by mighty achievements 
and the rich anointing of the choicest blood, while the kings who took counsel 
together over our expected demolition, and the aristocracies who exulted in the 
prospect of our ruin, stand aghast at the manifest destiny of constitutional 
liberty, and hasten, with trembling eagerness, to pay obeisance before the majes- 
ty of the emancipated republic. 

Who can restrain thanksgiving ? Let the cannon's throat swell the praise 
for the end of the conflict ; let the bells ring out jubilant peals for the return of 
the plowman to the field, and of the artisan to the bench ; let the aged bow 
in adoration that they have been spared to the end of the struggle, which has 
reunited the land in law and liberty ; let us all thank God that the excitement and 
anxiety is over, that we shall not again cover our faces at a shameful rout, that 
we shall not be stirred into fierce revenge, by the spectacle of our brothers 
lean, haggard, idiotic, stripped, and starved by the fiendish cruelty of this ac- 
cursed treason ; let the workman bless God, that he can lift his head with the 
proud consciousness that the sneer at his rough hands is forever hushed, and 
the mockery of his cowardice has vanished with the flight of Southern cavaliers 
before greasy Northern mechanics ; let the sailors shout cheerily that the ships 
of the Republic need not lower their flag in any sea, and that our harbors are 
safe against the navies of the world ; let the scholar rejoice that he may pur- 
sue his studies without interruption from the terrors and demands of civil war ; 
let maidens sing their welcome to the returning heroes, who join the chorus for 
the good time coming ; let the children and babes clap their hands in the uni- 
versal joy ; while nature laughs at the rescue, since the grass of the meadow 
and the beast of the field share the relief from waste and slaughter. Wave 
banners, and sing psalms, for the Lord hath done gloriously 1 Yet in this 
universal jubilee, how instantaneous was the hush, when, at the ve/y climax 
of triumph, and in the wildness of joy, the gleeful ring of victory became 
the solemn toll of sorrow. The ferocity of the expiring rebellion struck its 
viperous fang into the great heart of the merciful President, whose generous soul 
delighted to forgive. His eulogy is echoing yet around the globe, while his body 
has been carried to its modest tomb with honors no monarch could obtain ; but 
his fame, identified with the salvation of the Republic, and with the liberation 
of the enslaved, shall expand as time sinks the lesser characters, while in him 
goodness is exalted, and the love and gratitude of a nation widen into the ad- 
miration and homage of a world. 

God however has touched the nation by this event, and bidden them pause 
in their triumph to remember him, and the responsibilities which they are to 
assume. The end of the war is the assignment of a task calling for rarer states- 
manship and a wiser legislation than the exigencies of the conflict We are to 
engage in building a structure which shall exceed the glory of the old — where 
industry shall replace indolence, intelligence and morality ignorance *u4 tax- 



88 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

barism, and the immense difficulties of the enterprise are not easily discerned, 
even by the far-seeing. Yet although the English, in their .chagrin over their 
false prophecies, console themselves by the hope that our troubles are but com- 
mencing, we may be confident that the God who has guided us safely in the 
past, will not forsake us in the future. 

Look for a moment, sir, at the problems of the hour, to discover if you can 
their solution. The old can never be restored — the shadow on the dial will not 
go back. The institutions which have been uprooted by this civil hurricane can 
not be planted again, any more than when a tempest has twisted and torn up a 
forest tree, and tossed it over the hills, you can carry it back and hope to make 
it bud and grow and bring forth fruit on its former site. The change in our 
national currency, the system of taxation, the destruction of slavery and the 
aristocracy which it upheld, require a reorganization of our social and political 
conditions. 

The termination of the war unlocks the gate to an arable country of immense 
extent, already partially subdued for a people who have acquired capital during 
the conflict by the vast sums disbursed ; which is an experience unparalleled in 
history, but which threatens an adventurous speculation, that would demoralize 
society. Then the parole of the rebel armies has scattered an impoverished 
soldiery, accustomed to carnage, preferring plunder to toil, throughout a region 
where the civil order is paralyzed, and therefore exposed to predatory violence, 
before the strong arm of the government can interpose, and which is the immi- 
nent danger in Lynchburgh to-day. Moreover, the ignorant masses just emerged 
from slavery afford a tempting bait for rapacity and avarice. 

Although the ancient political issues have perished, other grave questions 
are undecided, involving serious peril to the commonwealth. The centralization 
of power in the Executive, essential to so terrible a struggle for the very exist- 
ence of the government, must be restrained to the limits of peace, while the 
due relations of each department are adjusted and defined, and the rights of the 
several States clearly explained and defended. If suffrage is extended to the 
freedmen, care must be taken that the privilege shall not furnish another ele- 
ment by which crafty demagogues may control elections. 

We are thus in danger of an excessive stimulus by business prosperity, after 
the adjustment of temporary embarrassment, of social demoralization, and of 
political corruption. The hazard of the reorganization exceeds that of the 
strife, and will exhaust the resources of philanthropy and statesmanship. The 
terrors of the evacuation surpass those of the siege. 

Whoever imagines that a proclamation will lull these antagonisms into har- 
mony is mistaken. Whoever dreams that the surrender of the armies will 
reinstate order and liberty and prosperity, had better visit Savannah and study 
the disposition of the citizens, who have been considered the most loyal to the 
old flag within the so called Confederacy, who have not been exposed to a bom- 
bardment, where every commercial interest urges a speedy settlement of the 
quarrel, where the leniency of the Executive has been cheerfully exercised, and 
the generous contributions of Northern liberality have been freely distributed. 

Yet, notwithstanding,* a sullen hostility, unaffected by the prospect of gain, 
unmoved by offers of amnesty, and unroelted by kindness, attests the difficulty 
of reconciliation, while woman, malignant and bitter, refuses every courtesy, and 
evinces a venom of hate that seems likely to last for the life of this generation, 
if it does not taint the blood. 

Who can account it an easy task, to reendow these with the qualifications of 
loyal subjects, in the free Republic of the United States ? Now go to the 
thronging multitude of freedmen in that neighborhood, destitute, degraded 
and imbecile; and estimate the patience and training which is requisite to 
place them in a position, where they can be left to care for themselves. 

Was ever a people summoned to a more perplexing, a more arduous, and yet 
a grander undertaking ? The maxims of political economy do not apply to this 
anomalous condition, and history sheds no light on our pathway. Politicians 
have their schemes of reconciliation and reconstruction. Generals have tried 
their skill in treaties of amity, and Cabinets sit in council upon the methods of 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 89 

reorganization. On these measures I would pass no judgment, only insisting 
that the chief conspirators, whose atrocity exceeds that of the murderer and 
the parricide, do not escape the punishment due to their crimes. Clemency to 
them is not mercy hut cruelty, intimidating loyalty and rewarding treason. 
Spare, feed, forgive, conciliate the masses, but visit with a just penalty the reck- 
less, audacious, and intelligent leaders against whom the blood of our brethren 
cries from every battle-field, the officers who forswore their allegiance to the 
government that educated them, and trampled on the Hag which had brought 
them protection, wealth, and honor. Let them drink the cup of blood and tire 
which they mingled for the nation ; let them become outcasts and beggars, their 
names a hissing, their memory a shame, and their graves without a token. 

Nevertheless, the good providence of God which has brought their devices 
to naught, made their wealth poverty, and driven them forth to infamy, has 
also torn the old sod with a terrible plowshare, Raveled social distinctions, 
and prepared the soil for a new and better growth. The great plantations 
will be divided, the school house will be open to children of every shade, the 
Gospel is unfettered, and New England is still in the Union. 

Among the methods of a true, and thorough, and permanent renovation of 
Southern society, nothing excels that proposed by this resolution, namely, 
the establishment of local churches with a God-fearing and untrammeled 
ministry; a truth-loving, devoted, and pious membership. The Southern 
preachers are greatly responsible for this conspiracy, and can not be trnsted. 
They began by maintaining that slavery was a christian institution, and ended 
with justifying rebellion and treason, meanwhile denouncing any allusion to 
political matters in the pulpit, whence they fulminated these harangues in 
behalf of a murderous conspiracy. You, in New York, were blessed with one 
of these pastors, who afterward ministered to a small church in the city 
where I am settled, and who having proved to his own satisfaction that the 
slaveholders were better Christians than the Northern republicans, followed 
his two sons, who had enlisted in the rebel army at Richmond, where he 
published a sermon assuring the inhabitants that the Lord would never per- 
mit that town to be taken by the Yankees ; and the lost that I heard of him 
was firing the heart of the soldiers in the rebel encampments. It 'would not 
be strange if that man should return, and attempt to bear himself with his 
former arrogance, but he ought to be obliged to humble himself before God 
and the government, and spend the remainder of his life in seclusion. We 
must not allow these men to remain the sole instructors of that section in 
religious duty, and the loyal people will be glad of another style of preaching, 
and will hail a new order of ministry. 

Nor is it sufficient to occupy the pulpit ; we must gather congregations of 
christian disciples, who are united in their love of freedom and humanity. 
The regular assembly of devout persons in the sanctuary to worship God, and 
ascertain duty from religious teachers who are well instructed, and fear not 
to declare the whole Gospal of Christ, in simplicity and with power, is 
demanded in this exigency to leaven the seditious districts with loyalty, and 
liberty, and Christianity. 

Such congregations will reorganize society, for they are the true method of 
purifying and distributing the arterial blood of a nation. The popular 
assemblies constitute the political character and the civil institutions of a 
people. The gladiatorial show, exhibited by a patron to a vast multitude, 
consists with an imperial despotism ; the free discussion of the gymnasium is 
the vesicle of a pure democracy. Papacy, with its cathedrals and hierarchy, 
its waiting crowds and latin liturgies, demands a monarchy. The local 
church, with its cluster of households, its conference and communion, its 
elections and individual responsibilities, is the natural organ of republicanism. 
The early churches of New England taught men the rights of citizenship, and 
how to exercise and guard those rights, and thus became the formative forces 
of the Republic. I have not time to dwell upon their aid in stimulating in- 
tellectual activity, and in imparting information. They are the source* oi 
public virtue, the inculoators of a true morality, and the producers ot or 



90 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

heroic faith and piety. They would establish peace in righteousness, and 
renew while they harmonized. 

The object of this Society in encouraging and aiding the formation of these 
churches is, therefore, essential to the reconstruction of Southern society, 
and deserves the hearty cooperation of all who love their country, and the 
kingdom of the Redeemer. 

No other instrumentality also excels this in elevating and training the 
freedmen. The African slaves have exhibited their religious capacity in a 
simple faith which deserves admiration, and they need now that education in 
morality, and in the exercise of personal responsibility, which is best attained 
in the free exercises of the local church, where already they manifest their 
intelligence and their loyalty in connection with their piety. 

The true christian Church, promoting godliness, deepening religious prin- 
ciple, would do much to ^ert the perils of the hour, by staying demoraliza- 
tion, and rendering reconstruction a regeneration, by substituting intelligence 
for ignorance, and virtue for barbarism. The tribes, during their wanderings 
through the wilderness, were accustomed to carry the ark in the center of 
their host, but when they reached the promised land, and were about to enter 
and possess Canaan, they were commanded to let the priests go before, bear- 
ing that sacred casket containing the law, and which was the symbol of the 
Divine presence, into the midst of Jordan. We have reached that entrance 
upon a nobler destiny as a people, where the ark of God should be carried 
forward. 

The principles which the South attempted to crush, have conquered — Law, 
Liberty, and Justice ; and, through the long, long future, our children's children 
shall garner rich sheaves from these precious lives which have been sown 
broadcast over the States. We have a country, consecrated by the blood of its 
sons, rendering its soil sacred and historic, and its flag a symbol of patriotic 
devotion ; a land free in every nook and dell, from the Northern lakes to the 
sluggish rivers that flow into the Southern gulf, where the rights of every 
child are guarded by a power that can confront the world in arras. We have 
not only a # sacred soil, a free people, and a mighty government, but we shall 
be one; fused in the furnace of affliction, so that there will be everywhere 
but one policy, that of liberty; one rule, that of justice; one aim, that of 
humanity ; the strongest, the freest, and, may God grant, the holiest, and so 
the happiest people on the face of the globe. 



Address of Rev. Lyman Abbott, late of Terre Haute, Ind., 

ON MOVING THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION. 

Resolved : That the work of religious reconstruction in the South, marks a 
new era in the cause of Missions requires the adoption of a new policy by 
the churches, and by its combined difficulty and importance demands that they 
cheerfully relinquish to this peculiar service their tried, experienced and most 
successful pastors. 

If age renders venerable, then no organization can be more worthy of our 
veneration than that before which I have the honor to speak to-night. For of 
all christian institutions, the Home Missionary Societies are the oldest. They 
are older than the Church itself. Their charter is to be found in the New Tes- 
tament. It is as follows : 

" And when he had called unto him his twelve disciples, he sent them forth 
and commanded them, saying, Go not into the way of the Gentiles, and into 
any city of the Samaritans enter ye not : But go rather to the lost sheep of the 
house of Israel. And as ye go, preach, saying, The kingdom of heaven is at 
hand. 17 
Observe 1 When Christ had gathered taeATO disciples about him, he did Dot 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 91 

concentrate them in a church, with a local habitation and a name, to be minis- 
tered unto by him. He dispersed them as missionaries to minister unto others. 
The first christian organization was a Missionary Society. And it was a Home 
Missionary Society. Go ye not into the way of the Gentiles. For Christ re- 
cognized the fundamental truth that home missionary operations must always 
precede and prepare for the foreign work. The fold increased to seventy. He 
sent them again upon a like mission. He died and rose again. And his part- 
ing words before his glorious ascension were — " Go ye into all the world, and 
preach the Gospel to every creature." The providence of God repeated the 
commands of Christ. It did not permit the early disciples to rest at case in 
local churches, but by fiery persecutions drove them forth to preach the Gospel. 
Every convert became a minister, every minister a missionary, every church a 
Missionary Society. The only disciples whose biography is preserved to us 
were missionaries. The only historical book the New Testament contains is a 
history of missionary operations. 

Thus our New Testament teaches us that even in ordinary times the great 
work of the churches is the missionary work, to which even in their infantile 
feebleness God called on them to devote their best energies, and consecrate their 
best men. But these are no ordinary times. The present is peculiarly a mis- 
sionary era. The voice of God's Providence, with peculiar significance, calls 
the churches to this work today. Already the harsh clangor of war gives way 
to the echoes of the sweet-toned bell of peace. Already the tramp of returning 
armies reaches our listening ears. Peace and victory are inscribed on their 
well-worn banners. Half a million brave boys return to their homes. And the 
Church which has prayed for them must stand ready to welcome them. For 
over three years the Christian Commission, noble almoner of a noble charity, 
has carried to every camp fire, to every hospital, the glorious Gospel of the 
blessed Lord. The Home Missionary Societies of the North must henceforth 
be Christian Commissions to this immense army of returned soldiers, who will 
resume their ordinary life among us. 

Returning peace will invite to our shores an emigration from abroad the like 
of which even America has never witnessed. Westward and southward its 
waves will flow. The growth of the past will appear insignificant when com- 
pared with the growth of the future. The population will be one ignorant of 
our institutions, unaccustomed to freedom. Upon the Home Missionary Soci- 
eties America must depend to preserve her from the dangers which always 
attend such sudden growths. Four millions of slaves, now slaves no longer, 
require not only that temporal provision and secular education which the Frced- 
meo'S organizations afford, but that Gospel provision which the churches alone 
can send them. But more important than all is that call for a full, free Gospel 
which comes up to us from the desolated South. While its hungry people must 
be fed, its wasted fields sown, its neglected children taught, more important its 
quondam churches, hot-beds of treason and supporters of slavery, mast be sup- 
planted by pulpits consecrated to a Gospel of industry, education, liberty, and 
christian love. 

Grand as is the work in the christian churches of the free States, God has 
organized a host equal to the exigency. An immense host, of picked men, 
officered by an intelligent, patriotic, and pious clergy, formed in organizations 
more perfect than any Masonic order or Fenian brotherhood, possessing the 
power of wealth, of position, of character, and the invincible weapon of God's 
truth, stretches across the continent, and needs only to arouse itself, and go 
forth to its battle, in strength invincible. 

Three years ago a magnificent army lay in the intrenchments about Wash- 
ington. Millions of dollars were spent in perfecting its organization. But the 
drill of the review was not enough. Only the drill of the battle field makes 
veterans. Through the smoke and carnage of the two Bull Runs, of Getty s- 
trargh and Antietam, of Fredericksburgh and Chancellorsville, and the seven 
days in the Chickahominy, God led the army. Then it graduated a host of 
veterans. Then, with General Grant its leader, it pressed back its Tcfoel foe 
step by step, step by steft closed with it in that mortal struggle before Petetv 



92 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

burgh and Richmond, and throttled and destroyed it there. And to-day we 
reap the fruits of those long days of delay and disaster. 

Now another host, more glorious, stretches from the Atlantic coast to the 
Rocky Mountains, yea, to the Pacific shores. A sublimer christian army the 
world never saw. For years God has been preparing it for the work of to-day. 
He has perfected its organization. By many a theological warfare he has 
taught it to know accurately the truth by which it is to conquer — its well se- 
lected ammunition. He has given it noble officers. The last four years has 
finished its education ; has taught it that justice, humanity, and patriotism are 
essential elements in true religion. Now it only needs a General Grant to lead 
this nobler host to grander conflicts and to sublimer victories. The era of 
preparation has passed. The era of action has begun. 

It is not, however, the importance of this missionary work alone which de- 
mands our attention. Its peculiarity demands our careful study. It is so 
delicate, so difficult, so unlike all previous missionary work, that it becomes 
necessary for the churches to adopt a new policy for its prosecution, and as a 
part of that policy, no longer to send its youths alone to the missionary posts, 
but its best, most experienced, most successful clergy. Some reasons for the 
adoption of such a policy I wish briefly to lay before the churches. 

I. The country is new, and yet not new. The villages, towns, cities remain. 
Their population remains. The rural regions alone are depopulated. The 
cities are overcrowded. At Nashville, a few weeks since, Gov. Brownlow told 
me that into a city of originally twenty thousand inhabitants, there are now 
crowded, including soldiers, one hundred and twenty thousand. Entering a 
first class boarding house, I found three double beds in the hall, and shared 
my room with six or seven companions, and could easily believe the Governor's 
statement Yet, in the city of Nashville, now occupied over two years by the 
Federal army, there is not a single self-sustaining loyal church. There are 
loyal ministers ; but they are sent there by the Christians of the North, in 
obedience to that very call of God's Providence which I am endeavoring to in- 
terpret and reiterate to-night But if there is a church, the influence of whose 
membership is even favorable to freedom, humanity, and the Union, it certainly 
is not as a city set on a hill For it is so effectually hid that I could not learn 
from any citizen of its existence. Into these great cities a free Gospel must be 
sent. The military campaign must be followed by a religious campaign. The 
great strategic points of the South, Nashville, Richmond, Charleston, Savannah, 
New Orleans, must be occupied by churches fully in sympathy with the new 
order, with liberty, humanity, education, industry, and one nationality. We have 
to plant our churches, not in a backwoods, not in a new and sparsely populated 
community, to grow with its growth and strengthen with its strength : we have 
to plant them in cities densely populated ; we have to send our missionaries to 
a people of culture and refinement, long accustomed to listen to men whose 
learning and powers of persuasive eloquence had given them a national rep- 
utation. 

II. Such a people, even if they were ready to welcome the Gospel which we 
send them, would demand men of no ordinary ability. But they are not The 
Northern missionary has to undo all that the Southern clergy have been doing 
for half a century. He has to overcome prejudices life long, and passions bit- 
terly inflamed by war. He has to preach loyalty where treason has been 
preached a heroic virtue, liberty where slavery has been preached an ordinance 
of God, and humanity where the unity of the race has been declared an infidel 
imagination. 

We have conquered the armies of the rebellion ; but the rebellion still lives 
in the hearts of the people. Like a fire in a confined room, stifled, but not ex- 
tinguished, it needs only the air of liberty to flame forth again hotter than 
before. I am told on good authority, by a loyal resident of Nashville, that 89 
per cent of the population is unconcealedly rebel Out of over four millions of 
dollars of claims presented in that city against the United States government, 
only 120,000 were approved, as presented by loyal men. In the city of New 
Orleans, the children, instructed by their parents, cross and recross the street, 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 93 

to avoid passing under the Union flag. The entire South is like an immense 
clearing, as I have seen it among the hills of Maine. The great trees of rebel- 
lion have been cut down by the sword of war. The stumps of treason still 
remain, rooted in the hearts of the people. And these must be taken away 
before we shall obtain the fruits of a permanent peace. 

III. Thus a new battle begins, where the former ends. A battle of thoughts, 
ideas, of truth against falsehood, of civilization against barbarism. Lee has 
capitulated ; but the devil has not And in this new battle, the old ideas will 
have leaders of power and of genius. There will be Lees, and Johnstons, and 
Jacksons in the Southern pulpit. And we must send there Grants, and Sher- 
mans, and Sheridans to wield our sword of God's truth. 

For the Southern clergy are neither conquered nor converted. They will 
resume their pulpits. They will demand a religious amnesty. They will not 
penitently 6eek, but audaciously require their accustomed seats and privileges. 
Their synods and conferences, and bishops, and associations, will demand 
Northern recognition. And there may be many ready to accord it to them. 
But as for me, I would far rather trust the Southern soldier^ and as readily 
receive the Southern politician, as reinstate the Southern clergy. We cannot 
trust the cause of Christ to the Judas who has betrayed it We cannot intrust 
the Gospel of liberty and humanity to Dr. Hoge in Virginia, or Dr. Palmer in 
New Orleans. We might better intrust the civil government with Vance in 
North Carolina. 

The Sabbath after the fall of Richmond, the newspaper correspondents 
told us that nearly every church* was opened, nearly every pulpit occupied ; 
bat they further told us that no Southern minister made any reference to 
passing events, but all prayed in general terms for the " powers that be," 
leaving the Lord to pass upon the uncertain question between the conflicting 
authorities — the United States and the Confederate Government. We want a 
different kind of loyalty in Southern pulpits from that 

IV. Consider also the difficulty of those questions which the Northern 
missionary must be able wisely to discuss. It is not enough that he be loyal 
and anti-slavery. That is easy now. Those are questions of the past. The 
questions of the future will be new, but they will be quite as important and 
more perplexing. Old things are passed away. But all things are not yet 
become new. The foundations of Southern society are broken up. The old 
relations between labor and capital, employer and employed, are destroyed. 
New relations have to be established on the basis of justice, liberty, and equal 
rights. Shall slavery be followed by a quasi serfdom, by a regulated appren- 
ticeship, or by a community of absolutely equal rights ? Shall Southern 
prejudice pardon treason and proscribe color ? Shall the negro rise through 
freedom, to a perfect manhood, or sink, through licentiousness unrestrained, 
into idleness and anarchy ? Innumberable problems cluster about the ques- 
tion of reconstruction. And the prejudices of the people must be removed, 
and their passions assuaged, and their consciences quickened, and their judg- 
ments enlightened. To deal with such issues, we must send into the South 
not only loyal men, anti-slavery men, but men consecrated to the cause of 
universal humanity — men of prophetio vision and comprehensive minds — 
men able to precede and prepare public opinion — men able to comprehend 
the issues of the day as they arise, and courageous to grapple with them ; in 
a word, to use an expressive Western phrase, " live men." 

The learning of the schools, a knowledge of all theological mysteries, can 
not prepare men for this work. Only the school of an actual and successful 
experience in the conflicts of the past can graduate them. The churches, not 
the seminaries, must give them their diploma. 

V. Consider, too, the fact that preaching will be for years the least difficult 
work of the clergyman, He must be the grand organizer of a new society. 
He must plant churches, form benevolent associations and religious organiza- 
tions, establish Sabbath schools and day schools, assist in forming free ftctaooV 
systems, call into being um&emiea and colleges, and revive industry among a 
people who do not know bow to work. He most oare for the poor, for t»ta 



94 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 

oppressed, for the ignorant, for the idle. He mast he the leader of the people. 
For this purpose, he must have a thorough practical familiarity with the school 
systems, the labor systems, and the benevolent organizations of the North. 
He must be something else than a theological disputant, something more than 
an impetuous orator. He must possess that organizing, executive power 
which experience alone can give. There is no place on all the continent — 
there has been none in all past time — so sublime, requiring such comprehen- 
sive genius, as will be the Southern pulpits during the next quarter of a 
century. 

God forbid that I should say aught to discourage the young and inexpe- 
rienced from entering this field. There is room, and more than room, for all. 
The South, hitherto barren of villages, will yet be populous with them ; and 
in every village the church, the school house, and the parish clergy. But 
into the great centers, as leaders of these churches, must be sent men whom 
the providence of God, by the successes of the past, has appointed to this 
glorious work. And that appointment they must stand ready to accept. 

VI. Nor is it ministers alone the South will need. A colonel without a 
regiment, a general without a brigade, is not more helpless than a pastor 
without a people. The nucleus of enlightened, liberty loving churches must 
he largely provided by Northern settlers. The churches must encourage a 
christian emigration for christian purposes. There are men who think that 
this Northern emigration will itself provide redemption for the wasted South. 
Perhaps. But that depends upon the kind of emigration. 

Fifteen years ago, the discovery of the gold-fields of California crazed the 
nation. A tide of emigration set westward such as the world never before 
witnessed. Did it evangelize the Pacific coast? For years, California was 
the scene of unparalleled turbulence, violence, disorder. And it is to-day a 
true missionary field. Two centuries ago, a little band of Pilgrims were 
floated, by God's providence, from England and Holland, to these then inhos- 
pitable shores. They brought with them the church and the school house. 
They came not for wealth, but for civil and religious liberty. And they 
founded an empire of ideas, which has already carried its conquests through- 
out the nation, and promises yet to overspread the world. Whether the South 
shall be a gigantic California, or a sublime New England, in its early history, 
depends upon whether the emigration which goes thither is attracted by 
mammon or inspired by christian love. 

The work of the army is over. The work of the Churches just begins. 
The Nation has thundered Mount Sinai. The Churches must whisper Cal- 
vary. The Nation has conquered. The Churches must redeem. When Christ 
cast the devil out of the deaf and dumb lunatic, he fell upon the ground, and 
lay as dead ; inasmuch that some said : He is dead. Then Christ put forth 
his arm, and took him by the hand, and raised him up, and restored him to 
his rejoicing father. And then, and not till then, did the people give God 
thanks. Out of the Southern country, God has cast the devil. Torn by the 
terrible conflict, it lies as dead — insomuch that the London Times says it is 
dead. Now must the Church, which is the arm of Christ, be stretched forth 
to take it by the hand and lift it up, that it may live, and restore it to the 
rejoicing nation. Then all the people, seeing what God hath done, will give 
God glory. 

We call, then, upon the churches to recognize the new era and their new 
duties. We call upon them to consecrate to God's great work their best 
men. We call upon christian mothers who welcome home their son from a 
four years 1 war, after the first baptism of tears is over, to consecrate him 
anew to this work of God. We call upon all christian artisans, merchants, 
farmers, to turn their thoughts toward the Southern States — not to make 
money from them, but to make therein a christian state. We call upon the 
great West to be recipient no longer, but to share with the Eastern States 
the labors, the self-sacrifices, and the honors of this sublime work. But, 
above all, we call upon the churches cheerfully to relinquish to this service 
of the Master the pastors whom they love audi \iouot tmmX. When a new 



1865. THIRTY NINTH REPORT 95 

campaign commences, the veterans are ordered to the front. The raw re- 
cruits hold the dep6ts of supplies and posts of observation in the far rear. 
God's dram-beat summons us to an arduous campaign. Let the veterans go 
to the front. Let the raw recruits take their places in the rear. 

It is not easy, indeed, for a pastor to sever the ties which bind him to his 
home, leave his much-loved people, and enter on a new experience in a new 
land. I have reason to know the difficulties of that trial. For I have but 
just left a home than which none could be dearer, a people than whom none 
could be kinder, to enter on this very work of Southern regeneration. But my 
Testament reads : u He that takcth not vp his crot* and followeth after me, is 
not worthy of me." Nor church nor pastor is worthy of the name of Christian 
cthat refuses to answer to the call of God, simply because it involves a personal 
sacrifice of comfort or of feeling. Suppose Peter and James and John had 
settled down in Jerusalem and the villages of Judea and Gallilee, preaching the 
same Gospel to the same congregations, how long before the world would have 
been converted ? America would have been an undiscovered, untrodden con- 
tinent to-day. 

And you churches, that cling with such tenacity to your pastors, do you 
remember the history of the church at Antioch? Feeble, just planted, barely 
living, when the voice of God spake, it cheerfully relinquished to the mission- 
ary work its ablest man, whom already it must have learned to love and 
honor — with its own hands consecrated Paul to missionary work, and bade him 
God-Bpeed in it " He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it." The 
church of Antioch shall be known wherever the cross of Christ is known, not 
only so lone as time shall last, but in heaven above, so long as eternity shall 
endure. What church will be a second Antioch to-day ? It is not the cause of 
any denomination I plead, but the cause of Christ, In the grand review, every 
regiment carries two banners — one the national ensign, the Stars and Stripes ; 
the other, the regimental banner, with its name and number inscribed upon it 
But when actual conflict comes, these regimental distinctions are forgotten, the 
regimental banner is left; behind, and only the Stars and Stripes are borne into 
the smoke and carnage of the battle. 

The different churches are only different regiments in Christ's great army. 
Each has its banner, and loves and honors it But now that the trump of God 
calls us to the battle front, all regimental banners may be forgotten, and in 
fraternal sympathy and kindly emulation, we will fight the conflict out, under 
the one ensign from whose folds there shines resplendent the cross of Christ, 
and underneath the motto : u In hoc signo vinces." 

Four years ago, God called on the nation to attest its patriotism. Nobly it 
responded. From the hill-sides of New England, the mountains of Pennsyl- 
vania, and the prairies of the West, there poured forth a host the like of which 
the world has never seen. The farmer left his plow, the merchant his count- 
ing-room, railroads gave up their presidents, schools their principals, and even 
churches their pastors. For men rightly accounted that no post of peace was 
so important as the demands of such a war. 

Again God speaks. He calls now upon the churches. He puts our Christ- 
ianity in the crucial test He demands volunteers for another and sublimer 
warfare. There is no post of peace so important but that the claims of this 
sacred warfare are more imperious. God grant to inspire the churches with 
the same spirit of self-sacrifice which has robed the* nation with such glory ! 
God grant that our religion may be proved as pure and powerful as our patriot- 
ism ! Then shall God crown the banner of Christ with victories more re- 
splendent than any which now illume the banner of our country. 



96 THIRTY NINTH REPORT. May, 



OUR TRIAL AND OPPORTUNITY. 

It is said, frequently and truly, that Republican institutions are now under- 
going, in this country, their severest and final trial The verdict is soon to be 
given for this and for all lands — for this and for all time. Has a popular govern- 
ment the strength and efficiency requisite for conducting successfully a protracted 
civil war ? Will a free people voluntarily lay their sons and their property upon 
their country's altar ; and when the conflict is protracted, and unexpected disas- 
ters are experienced, will they retain in power the administration by which 
enormous burdens have been imposed, and thus decree the continuance of the 
struggle, at every sacrifice, until a triumphant issue is reached ? The conflict? 
has continued already through four years, and on a scale unparalleled in the 
history of modern wars. Armies, such as the conscriptions of European despots 
never gathered, have volunteered to fight their country's battles. Tens of 
thousands of its noblest sons sleep in bloody graves, and almost every dwelling 
has been made a house of mourning. The enormous burdens of taxation have 
been cheerfully borne, nay, eagerly assumed. And now, by a majority almost 
unparalleled in the nation s history, the administration pledged to prosecute the 
war to the utter extinction of the rebellion, is again placed in power. The prob- 
lem is solved. Popular government in the State ia equal to all the exigencies of 
civil war. 

Popular government and the voluntary principle in the Church are also on trial. 
It is the chief peculiarity and glory of our American Christianity, that the Church 
is divorced from the State. The former depends upon the latter only for protec- 
tion — the same protection which is extended to all institutions. It does not ask, 
it will not receive the patronage of the civil power. Not only the erection of 
houses of worship, and the sustenance of the ministry, but all the agencies of 
attraction and propagation which Christianity employs, are here supplied by the 
spontaneous gifts of individuals. 

The efficiency of this system has challenged the admiration of Christendom. 
It has borne the strain of commercial revulsions. It has resisted the strongest 
currents of infidelity and error. It has upborne the ark in times of spiritual 
languor and decay. It has not only kept alive the flame on the old altar, but has 
kindled it anew wherever the tides of the population have flowed. It has sent 
forth evangelizing agencies in the van of emigration, as it moved toward the setting 
sun. In all times of prosperity, and even of ordinary adversity, it has displayed 
an energy equal to all demands upon it But now it is subjected to a new and 
unlooked-for test The war has drained the churches of a large portion of their 
strength, and its manifold burdens bear heavily upon those who remain. Mean- 
while, new objects of benevolence are making their appeal to the churches, and old 
ones demand larger outlays than ever before. The necessary cost of printing a 
Bible, or of sustaining a missionary in the foreign field, has been nearly doubled 
since the war began ; and if the Home Missionary is kept at his post without a 
corresponding advance, it is done, let it be remembered, at the cost to him of 
severe privation and hardship. To carry forward the Home Missionary enter- 
prise even on the scale of former years, without largely increased expenditures, 
is impossible. But if the highest and best results of our victories are to be 
realized ; if the reconstruction that will follow is to be based upon the principles 
of truth and righteousness ; if the new and momentous problems presented 
to us are to reach a right solution ; if all sections and races are at length to be 
blended into a harmonious brotherhood ; if our restored nationality is to be 
consecrated anew to the God of our fathers, then must the churches of the land 
gird themselves to the work of the nation's evangelization with a courage and 
devotion and large hearted liberality such as they have never exhibited before. 
Where are the volunteers t This is now the all-engrossing question. We have 
repeated it often and earnestly, in these pages, during the past year. We re- 
peat again, and with increased earnestness : Whom shall we send, and who will 
go for us f We wait to hear from scores ot tta ^o\k\^sc tiUKdari-bearera of 
the Lord's host, the response : " Hrare a* I, mm ra." -Hmw ttuavmorv 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



97 



DIRECTORS FOR LIFE. 

The number of Directors and Members for Life has become so large that tho annual 
publication of their names is a serious tax upon the Treasury. As those who receive 
the Annual Reports are supposed to preserve them for reference, it is deemed sufficient 
to publish the entire list once in five years, and the list for the intervening period 
with each Annual Report. The following are the names, arranged by States, of those 
who were constituted Directors or Members for Life previous to March 1st, 1865. No 
attempt has been made to distinguish those who have deceased. 



Back, Ranis. 
Crommett, J. L. 
Harris, Samuel, D.D. 
Johnson, Rev. Edwin. 
Ledyard, William. 
Nilea, Rev. M. A. U. 
Norton, Edwin A. 
Poor, Rev. Daniel J. 

XKW HAMPSHIRE. 

Alexander, L. H. 
Barstow, Zedekiah S., D.D. 
Boaton, Nathaniel, D.D. 
Boylston, Richard. 
Burnham, Abraham, D.D. 
Bornhatn, Amos W., D.D. 
Child*, Horace. 
Cummings, Rev. Jacob. 
Fbk, Hon. Francis N. 
French, Jonathan, D.D. 
Qerriah, Mrs. Ellaabeth M. 
Humphrey, Rev. John P. 
Jewett, Bphralm. 
Lambert, Mrs. Abigail. 
Lamsotn, William. 
Marden, Rev. A. L. 
Marshall, Dr. T. H. 
Noyes, Daniel J., D.D. 
Parker, E. 
Parker, Edmund. 
Richards, John, D.D. 
Riddel, Rev. Samuel H. 
Sanborn, Mrs. Abigail. 
Shackford, John. 
Shackford, Mrs. Jane. 
Smith, Asa D., D.D., LL.D. 
Smith, Mrs. Asa D. 
Stone, Benjamin P., D.D. 
Taylor, Dea. James. 
Tenner, Rev. Asa P. 
Tenney, Rev. Erdix. 
Vernon, Rev. Thomas. 
Wiley, Rev. Isaac. 



Ayer, Mrs. Betsey P. 
Bradiee, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Chamberlain, ficra'O. 
Chandler, 8amuel A. » 
Chandler, 8. W. 
Child, WUlard, D.D. 
Clement, Jonathan, D.D. 
Colby, James K. 
Delano, Lewis H. 
Daren, Rev. Charles. 
Eastman, Rev. John. 



Fairbanks, Henry . 
fftiiteaka t XF. 



Fairbanks, Mrs. Almlra T. 
Fairbanks, Edward T. 
Fairbanks, William. 
Fairbanks, Thaddeus. 
Francis, Mrs. Rebecca W. 
Hickok, Rev. Ilenry P. 
Hoadley, Rev. Loamml Ives. 
Hough, Rev. J. W. 
Kimball, Rev. Moses. 
Low, Rev. Isaac P. 
McKeen, Rev. HI as. 
Martin, Rev. Solon. 
Nltchle, Ilenry A. 
Parker, Edward P. 
Perry, Kev. John B. 
Prlchard, Dea. George W. 
Richards, Rev. J. D. F. 
Safford, Kev. George B. 
Sanborne, William. 
Hhaw, Dea. Thomas C. 
Shedd, Josiah. 
Shedd, Mrs. Lydia C. 
Sparhawk, Rev. 8. 
Stimson, J. G. 
Taylor, Caroline P. 
Worcester, Rev. John H. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Alden, Rev. E. K. 

Albro, John A., D.D. 

Ames, David. 

Armstrong, lion. Samuel T. 
' Ay res, Rev. Rowland. 

Baldwin, L. 

Banister, Mrs. Z. P. G. 

Bardwell, Alonzo. 

Barney, Rev. James 0. 

Bartlett, Hon. William. 

Bates, Rev. James. 

Bemls, William L. 

Blsbee, Kev. John H. 

Brewer, Ilenry, Jr. 

Brewster, Rev. Cyrus. 

Brown, John, D.D. 

Buckingham, Rev. Samuel G. 

Bullard, Rev. Ebenezer W. 

Bullard, Rev. Henry. 

Burbank, Daniel 

Byington, Rev. Swift. 

Carleton, Rev. Hiram. 

Carpenter, Rev. Eber. 

Chapin, Miss Mary W. 

Chase, S. Angler. 

Clapp, Rev. Stunner G. 

Clark, Hon. Uobart. 

Clark, Rev. Lewis F. 

Cleveland, Rev. Charles. 

Cleverly, Joseph. 

Oodman, John, D.D. 
• Cooley, Timothy M.,D.D. 

Cornelia*, Ellas, D.D. 

Crane, Ber. /onaibao. 



Curtis, David. 
Curtis, Rev. Joseph W. 
Cushing, Rev. Christopher. 
Cushman, Rev. John P. 
Dickinson, Caleb. 
Dickinson, Rev. Joel L. 
Dimmick, Luther F., D.D. 
Dodd, Rev. Stephen G. 
Drummond, Rev. James. 
Dunn, James. 
Durfee, N., M.D. 
Eastman, Rev. David. 
Edwards, J. Wiley. 
Elmes, Thomas. 
Ely, Alfred B. 
Ely, Alfred. 
Ely, E. 

Emerson, Rev. Alfred. 
Emerson, Brown, D. D. 
Emerson, Rev. Reuben. 
Emery, Rev. Joshua. 
Farrar, Samuel. 
Field, John. 
Fisk, Rev. Kllsha. 
Flske, Rev. Daniel T. 
Fiske, John, D.D. 
Flower, Alfred. 
Flynt, Jonathan R. 
Godden, Mrs. D. G. 
Goffe, Rev. Joseph. 
Goodell, Lyman. 
Good sell, Rev. Dana. 
Graves, Dea. Elam. 
Greenleaf, Mrs. Jacob. 
Greenleaf, Mrs. Mary. 
Greenwood, Ira. 
Hale, Josiah L. 
Hall, I. D. 

Harding, Rev. John W. 
Harding, Rev. WUlard M. 
Harrison, Rev. Samuel. 
Hazen. Kev. Norman. 
Herrick, Rev. Osgood. 
Hinsdale, Rev. Charles B. 
Hitchcock, Edward, D.D., LL.D. 
Holmes, Rev. Franklin. 
Hooker, Rev. E. 0. 
Hooker, Henry 13., D.D. 
Hooper, William R. 
Uopkins, Hon. Erastus. 
Hopkins, Dr. Lewis S. 
-^Jlopkins, Rev. Samuel. 
' Hosford, Rev. Benjamin F. 
Hovey, Rev. H. C. 
Hubbard, Rev. Ochus G. 
Hubbard, Hon. Samuel, LL.D. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Louisa R. 
Hunnewell, James. 
Hunnewell, James H. 
Jackson, Samuel 0., D.D. ' 
Johnson, Joseph. 
Judd, John. 
Kelly, Rev. G, Y7. 



98 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Kingman, Abner. 
Kirk land, Harvey. 

Knapp, George E. 
Langstroth, Rev. Lorenzo L. 

Lathrop, Rev. Charles D. 

Laurie, Rev. Thomas. 

Lawrence, Rev. Amos E. 

Lawrence, James. 

Lawrence, John B. 

Leavitt, David. 

Lee, Henry 8. 

Lincoln, Hon. John W. 

Lincoln, Hon. Levi, LL.D. 

Lord, Louisa 0. 

Hack, David, 

M'Oollum, Rev. James T. 

M'Ewen, Robert, D.D. 

Merrlam, Charles. 

Merriam, Mrs. Charles. 

Merrlam, George. 

Merriam, George 8. 

Merrlam, Hannah L. 

Merrlam, Homer. 

Merriam, James F. 

Merriam, Lewis. 

Merriam, William. 

Merriam, William. 

Merriam, William M. 

Merrftt, Rev. D. M. 

Merwin, Rev. Sam. J. M. 

Mills, Charles L. 

Mills, Rev. James B. 

Mixter, Jason. 

Moody, John. 

Morgan, A. 

Morgan, Mrs. A. 

Munro, Rev. Nathan. 

Newcomb, Jonathan. 

"Newcorab, Richard F. 

Newman, Mark. 

Newton, Edward A. 

Noyes, Rev. Daniel P. 

•OHphant, Rev. David. 

Paine, William P., D.D. 

Palmer, Rev. Charles R. 

Parish, Ariel 

'Parsons, Rev. Henry M. 

Tease, Rev. Giles. 

Perkins, Rev. Ariel B. P. 

.'Perkins, Benjamin. 

Phelps, William H. 

Phillips, Mrs. Elizabeth, 

Phillips, Rev. John C. 

Phillips, Hon. William. 

Porter, A. W. 

Porter, John 0. 

Putnam, Israel W., DJ>. 

Quint, Rev. Alonso H. 

Rice, Rev. Charles B. 

'Rice, George T. 

Richardson, Mrs. Lucretla, 

Ripley, George. 

Ropes, Joseph 8. 

8abin, Lewis, D.D. 

Sage, Orrin. 

Sage. Hon. Orrln. 

Small. Samuel A. 

St John, Charles. 

Salisbury, Mrs. B. 

Salisbury, Stephen. 

Salisbury, Miss . 

-Sawyer, Rev. Leicester A. 

Sandford, Rev. William H. 

Sears, Rev. 0. M. 

8eely, Rev. R. H. 
-Seymour, Rev. John A. 

Sharp, James 0. 

Shaw, E. 

Snedd, John H. 

Sheldon, Luther, D.D. 

Smith, Rev. Charles. 

Smith, Nathaniel. 
Sniitb. Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Spmaldlng, John, Jr. 
dpsuldln*, Hon. Thnddem. 
Opting, Helen. 



Spring, Henrietta L. 
Stebblns, Rev. M. C. 
Stetson, Martin 8. 
Stoddard, W. H. 
Stone, Rev. Rollin & 
Strong, Hon. Lewi*. 
Sweetser, Seth, D.D. 
Swift, Rev. EliphaletT. 
Tappan, John. 
Tarbox, Rev. Increase N. 
Taylor, Rev. John L. 
Thayer, Rev. J. H. 
Thompson, Rev. Leander 8. 
Thurston, Rev. Ell 
Todd, John, D.D. 
Tracy, Jedediah. 
Treat, Rev. Selah B. 
Tuck, Rev. Jeremy W. 
Tucker, Nathan. 
Tall, Joseph, D.D. 
Vinton, Josiah. 
Vote, Rev. James G. 
Wakefield, Caleb. 
Waldo, Hon. Daniel. 
Waldo, Miss Elizabeth. 
Waldo, Miss Sarah. 
Walker, James H. 
Walker, Mrs. Mary. 
Walker, Peres. 
Warner, Aaron, D.D. 
Warner, Miss L. W. 
Warrlner, Col. Solomon. 
Washburn, Hon. Emory. 
Washburn, Ichabod. 
Washburn, Dea. J. 
Webster, Rev. JohnO. 
Wellman, Rev. Joshua W. 
Wetmore, William. 
Whitcomb, David. 
White, Nathaniel 
Whitney, D. 8. 
Wilkins, Samuel C. 
Williams, D. R. 
Williams, Mrs. Deborah & 
Williams, P. & 
Williams, Rev. Samuel P. 
Wllliston, J. Payson. 
WiUlston, Hon. Samuel. 
Wills. Mrs. Sarah. 
Winslow, Rev. Horace. 
Wlthlngton, Leonard, D.D. 
Wolcott, J. Huntington. 
Woods, Rufus D. 
Woodbrldge, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Worcester, Samuel M., D.D. 
Wright, Luther. 
Tale, Barrage. 
Yale, B. B. 

RHODE ffiUJTD. 

Dyer, Benjamin. 
Gilbert, Dea. Solomon. 
Glezen, Ebeneser K. 
Green, Warren 8. 
Hoppin, Benjamin. 
Hoppin, Rev. James Mason. 
Hoppin, Mrs. Mary D. 
Horton, Rev. Francis. 
King, William J. 
Kingsbury, John, LL.D. 
Pitcher, ElUs B. 
Head, A. M. 
Reid, Rev. Jared. 
Sheldon, William. 
Swain, Leonard, D.D. 

00HUCT1CUT. 

Allen, Olcott. 
Alvord, N. B. 
Andrews, Horace. 
Atkinson, Rev. Timothy. 
Austin, Rev. David B, 
Averill, Rev. Jtunca, 
Bacon, Leonard, D.I>. 



Baldwin, Rev. E. C. 
Bale, J. B. 
Barnes, Jonathan. 
Beach, Dr. Samuel. 
Bennett, Charles. 
Bentley, Rev. Charles. 
Bigelow. John D. 
Bissell, Hon. Clark, LL.D. 
Bond, Alvan, D.D. 
Bostwlck, Charles. 
Brace, Jonathan, D.D. 
Brainerd, Rev. Davis S. 
Bronson, Edward L. 
Bronson, William B. 
Brown, H. W. 
Brownell, Stephen C. 
Buckingham, Hon. W. A. 
Bulkley, Chester. 
Bunce, James M. 
Burr, Rev. Enoch F. 
Burr, Rev. Zalmon B. 
Bushnell, Horace, D.D. 
Butler, A. W. 
Butterfleld, Rev. Oliver B. 
Calhoun, George A., D.D. 
Camp, David N. 
Chapman, Rev. Frederick W. 
Carter, P. W. 
Case, Thomas. 
Chittenden, Henry W. 
Churchill Rev. John. 
Clark, C. L. 
Clark, Rev. Henry. 
Cleveland, Ellsha L., D.D. 
Colt, Alfred. 
Colt, Rev. Joshua. 
Colt, Robert. 
Colt, Robert, Jr. 
Coleman, Lemuel. 
Collins, Rev. Augustus B. 
Collins, Amos M. 
Cone, J. E. 
Cowles, Timothy. 
Crane, John R., D.D. 
Crump, William 0. . 
Curtis, Rev. Lucius. 
Davenport, John A. 
Day, Henry N., D.D., LL.D. 
Day, Thomas M. 
De Forest, John, M.D. 
Dickinson, Rev. Charles. 
Dutton,S. W. 8., D.D. 
Dutton, Rev. Thomas. 
Dwighk John W. 
Edwards, Tryon, D.D. 
Hdredge, John B. 
Elliott, John A. 
Ely, Benjamin. 
Ely, Rev. James. 
Ely, William D. 
Eustis, Rev. William T. 
Everest, Rev. Cornelius B. 
Fessenden, Rev. Thomas K. 
Field, Thomas P., D.D. 
Fiske, Rev. Samuel 
Fitch, John W. 
Fitch, Lewis. 
Gillet, Rev. Timothy P. 
Goodell, Rev. 0. L. 
Goodman, James. 
Goodrich, Chauncey A., D.D. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Chauncey A. 
Goodrich, Rev. Chauncey. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Chauncey. 
Gould, David. 
Gould, Mrs..Beulah H. 
Grant, C. H. 
Green, William P. 
Gregory, Ezra. 
Gridley, Rev. Frederick. 
Griswold, 0. 0. 
Gulliver, Rev. John P. 
Hadsell, Ira. 
Hall, Rev. E. 1. 
HaUoak, Gerard. 
HamiSVi^zUv. Sk?U H. 



1866. 



THIRTT NINTH REPORT. 



99 



Hart, James P. 
Harvey, Rer. Wheelock N. 
Hayes, Mr*. Harriet Emily. 
Hayes, Miss Anne 0. 
Hempstead, Rer. John A. 
Hewit, Nathaniel, D.D. 
Uigglns, Edward. 
Higglns, Hattie. 
fflggins, Lucius H. 
Uoadley, George. 
HoUister, Nelson. 
Hotchklss, Lucius. 
Hough, Rev. Lent & 
Hoyt, Ell T. 
Hoyt, Henry T. 
Hubbard, Hon. Samuel D. 
Humphrey, Rer. Chester. 
Hungerford, Joel 
Hurlbut, Rer. Joseph. 
Johnson, Charles. 
Johnson, Beth W. 
Johnson, William. 
Jones, Rer. Franklin C. 
Kellogg, Allyn. 
Kellogg, Daniel 0. 
Kellogg, George. 
Kellogg, Nathaniel 0. 
King, Christopher. 
Kingsbury, John K. 
Kinney, Rer. Esra D. 
Lathrop, Mrs. Hannah. 
Lathrop, Leonard E., D.D. 
Lawton. Mrs. Sarah. 
Learned, Ebeneser. 
Learned, Ebenezer, Jr. 
Learned, Frank C. 
Leete, Rer. Theodore A. 
Linsley, Joel a, D.D. 
Little, Rev. Charles. 
Loomis, Cot Gustavus. 
Loomis, Simeon L. 
Lyman, C. C. 
Marsh, Rev. Frederick. 
M'Ewen, Abel, D.D. 
M'Lean, Rer. Alexander. 
Maltby, A. Holmes. 
Maltby, Mrs. A. Holmes. 
Maltby, Jonathan. 
Marshall, Samuel A. 
Mead, Mrs. Sarah. 
Mead, Miss Sarah. 
Mead, Silas D. 
Mead,Zophar. 
Metcal/, Daniel. 
Miller, Rer. J. B, 
Morris, Dwight 
Nettleton, AsaheL D.D. 
Nettleton, Miss Mary. 
Nichols, Rer. John 0. 
Nichols, 8. A. 
North, F. H. 
North, Mrs. Frederick H. 
North, John. 
North, Mrs. Laura. 
Norton, CH. 
Noyes, J. F. 
Olmstead, Hawley. 
Olmstead, Solomon. 
Otis, Joseph. 
Oriatt, Rev. George A. 
Parmelee, Rev. David L. 
Parsons, E. W. 
Parsons, Francis. 
Pearson, Rev. James B. 
PeriL Pelatiah. 
Perkins, George. 
Pettlngffl, Rev. John H. 
Phillips, Daniel. 
Porter, Isaac G. 
Porter, Noah, D.D. 
Punderson, Dea. Lemuel 8L 
Reynolds, James. 
Robbins, Rev. Silas W. 
Rockwell Hon. John A. 
Roger s^Calrf B. 
Root, Qsxbjsjb w; 



Root, James. 
Rowe, Mrs. Mary. 
Salisbury, Mrs. Abby. 
Salter, Rer. John W. 
Savage, Selah. 
Seelye, Isaac H. 
Seymour, Jeremiah. 
Smith, Alfred. 
Smith, E. A. 
8mith, Henry D. 
Smith, John 0. 
Smith, Oliver. 
Smith, Thomas. 
Smith, Rev. William 8. 
Spring, Samuel, D.D. 
Stanley, Henry. 
Starr, fiurgis P. 
Stedman, Charles J. 
Stedman, James. 
Sterling, George. 
Stlckney, J. N. 
8trong, Edward, D.D. 
Swan, Rev. Benjamin L. 
Tappan, Arthur. 
Taylor, H. W. 
Taylor, Jeremiah, D.D. 
Terry, Hon. Seth. 
Thompson. Rev. A. R. 
Tillotson, Rev. George J. 
Tomlinson, Gideon, LL.D. 
Tomllnson, Mrs. Lydia A. 
Tracy, Calvin L. 
Trowbridge, Esekiel H. 
Trowbridge, Henry. 
Trowbridge, Henry, Jr. 
Trowbridge, T. R. 
Trowbridge, W. J. 
Tucker, Mark, D. D. 
Turner, Rev. W. W. 
Twichell, Edward. 
TwitcheU, Joseph H. 
Twining, Prof. Alexander C. 
Upson, Andrew. 
Upson, Miles H. 
Valll, Rev. Herman L. 
Wakeman, Z. B. 
Walker, Alfred. 
Ward, H. 8. 
Weed, Rev. William B. 
Weld, Lewis. 
White, Henry. 
Wickes, Rev. Henry. 
Wickes, Mrs. Henry. 
Wilcox, Averitt. 
Wilcox, Loyal. 
Wilcox, Rev. Giles B. 
Willard, Rev. Samuel G. 
Williams, George W. 
Williams, Job. 
Williams, Lewis, M.D. 
Williams, Solomon. 
Williams, Hon. T. W. 
Woodward. Dr. Ashbel. 
Woolsey, T. D., D.D., LL.D. 
Wright, Rev. Edward. 



Adams, Rev. James. 
Adams, John. 
Adams, John W., D.D. 
Adams, William, D.D. 
Agnew, John Holmes, D.D. 
Allen, Miss Mary B. 
Allen, Moses. 
Allen, Otis. 
Ailing, William. 
Ailing, Mrs. Martha a 
Amerman, P. 
Andrews David. 
Andrews, Horace, Jr. 
Andrews, William H. 
Antis, Dea. Robert. 
Arbuckle, Rev. James. 
Arms, Rer. Clifford & 
AratgtroDg, Iter. Robert Q. 



Aspinwall, William H. 
Atwater, Henry Day. 
Atwater, Joshua. 
Austin, Daniel. 
Austin, Mrs. Sarah EL 
Austin, S. G. 
Austin, Mrs. & G. 
Axtell, Henry, D.D. 
Ayrault, Allen. 
Ayrault, Mrs. 
Badger, Milton, D.D. 
Baird, Robert, D.D. 
Baldwin, John C. 
Baldwin, Gordon. 
Baldwin, Loren. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Louis. 
Baldwin, Samuel 
Baldwin, Samuel C. 
Ballard. William. 
Barnard, John, D.D. 
Barnes, Joseph C. 
Bartholomew, Rev. 0. 
Bartlett, Charles. 
Bates, Daniel. 
Beadle, Rev. Ellas B. 
Beal, Matthew. 
Beach, Bloomfleld L. 
Beach, Ceorge 8. 
Beebe, Ueman. 
Beecher, Lyman, D.D. 
Beecher, Rev. Thomas K. 
Beers, Rev. Daniel 
Beers, Hon. George D. 
Beers, Henry N. 
Beers, Mrs. Martha II. 
Beers, Lucy Ann. 
Beers, Miss Susan H. 
Beers, Miss Sarah L. 
Belden, Rev. William. 
Bellamy, Mrs. Mehetabel. 
Bellamy, Samuel. 
Bement, John. 
Bement, Rev. William. 
Bemia. J. D. 
Benedict, J. W. 
Benedict, Mrs. Francis A. 
Benjamin, 8. 
Bidwell, Rev. Oliver B. 
Bldwell, Rev. Walter H. 
Bidwell, Mrs. Susan M. 
Bigelow, Richard. 
Bingham, Joel F. 
Bissell, Josiah, Jr. 
Boardman, Rev. George M. 
Boardman, George S., D.D. 
Bogue, Rev. Horace P. 
Bonney, Rev. Elijah H. 
Boorman, James. 
Boorman, Mrs. James. 
Boorman, Robert. 
Booth, Robert R., D.D. 
Booth, William A. 
Booth, William T. 
Booth, Frederick A* 
Bourne, Rev. 8. 
Bowen, Henry C. 
Bowers, William C. 
Brackett, Mrs. C. A. 
Bradhurat, Rev. Samuel 
Bradley, John N. 
Brayton, Edward 8. 
Drayton, Isaac, D.D. 
Brewster, Celeste A. 
Brewster, Henry. 
Brewster, Henry A. 
Brewster, Joseph. 
Brewster, Lemuel 
Bridges, Benjamin. 
Bridges, Elam. 

Brinkerhoff, Rer. Abraham D. 
Bristol, Dr. Moses. 
Brent, Leonard. 
Bronson, Arthur. 
Bronson, Mist Mary. 
Bronson, Anna Eiika, 
Bronson, Dr. 0. 



100 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Bronson, Theodore B. 

Brown, Horace J. 

Brown, Dr. J. K. 

Brown, James. 

Brown, Rev. Joseph. 

Brown, Rev. J. S. 

Bruen, Alexander M. 

Bruen, Mrs. Mary Ann. 

Bruen, Miss Alexandrine L. 

Bruen, Miss Augusta McV. 

Bruen, Rev. Matthias. 

Bryan, Rev. Edward D. 

Buck, Richard P. 

Buckingham, B. H. 

Buel, R. N. 

Buel, George C. 

Budington, William L.D.D. 

Bull, Norris, D.D. 

BuU, William O. 

Burchard, Rev. EU. 

Burchard, Samuel D., D.D. 

Burnap, G. C. 

Burr, C. A. 

Burr, Henry L. 

Bush, Rev. Charles P. 

Bushnell, William. 

Butler, Hon. Benjamin F., LL D. 

Bufler, Charles. 

Cahoone, Rev. William. 

Callender, Dea. Amos. 

Camp, Herman. 

Campbell, Alfred E., D.D. 

Campbell, Benjamin. 

Campbell, Rev. Charles. 

Canfield, Sherman B , D.D. 

Cannon, Frederick E., D.D. 

Carpenter, George. 

Carr, Edson. 

Chandler, Winthrop II. 

Chapln, Edward C. 

Chapln, Edward D. 

Chapin, Miss Betsey. 

Chapln, Miss Eliza. 

Chapin, Thaddeus. 

Chapln, Louis. 

Chapin, Louis 8. 

Chapin, Mrs. Rachel. 

Carryl, Nathan T. 

Carle, Rev. John H. 

Champion, Aristarchus. 

Chandler, J. 8. 

Cheever, George B..D.D. 

Chester, Albert T., D.D. 

Chester, Rev. Edward. 

Chester, Ellsha W. 

Cheater, G. F. 

Chester, William W. 

Chllds, 8. Russell, M.D. 

Chittenden, Simeon B. 

Church, Charles. 

Church, Samuel P. 

Clancy, Rev. John. 

Clapp, Rev. A. Huntington. 

Clark, Rev. Azariah. 

Clark, Rev. A. P. 

Clark, Frederick G., D.D. 

Clark, Rev. Rufus W. 

Clark, WiUiam H. 

Clarke, Freeman. 

Clarke, Walter, D.D. 

Cllft, Rev. William. 

Cobb, Sandford. 

Codwise, David. 

Coe, David B., D.D. 

Colt, George. 

Colt, Rev. John T. 

Cole, Almeron H. 

Collins, W. P. 

Cotton, Calvin. 

Comstock, Rev. Gyrus. 

Condlt, Jonathan B., D.D. 
Condlt, Robert W., D.D. 
Cook, Charles A. 
Cook, Mrs. A. M. 
Cook, Ekm D. 
Cook, m D. 



Cook, Thomas B. 
Corning, Mrs. Emma B. 
Corning, Kphraim L. 
Corning, Gurdon. 
Corning, H. K. 
Corning, Mrs. Jane. 
Corning, Jasper. 
Corning, Rev. William H. 
Cox, Samuel H.. D.D., LL.D. 
Crane, Rev. AbUah. 
Crane, Cargo. 
Crane, Rev. E. W. 
Crawford, Rev. Archibald. 
Crawford, Rev. Gilbert. 
Crocker, James. 
Curtis, Rev. Eleroy. 
Curtis, John C. 
Curtis, Rev. George C. 
Daggett, Oliver E., D.D. 
Dalzell, R. M. 
Dana, Stephen W. 
Danforth, Mrs. Eliza R. 
Dan forth, Lorlng. 
Dart, Joseph.* 
Dart, Mrs. Joseph. 
Davenport, Francis L. 
Davis, Miss Mary E. 
Day, Charles H. 
Day, Edgar B. 
Day, Orrin. 
Day, Samuel S. 
Day, Walter De Forest 
Day, Rev. Samuel M. 
De Forest, Alfred. 
De Forest, Benjamin. 
De Forest, G. B. 
De Forest, C. If. 
De Forest, Charles. 
Dewing, Rev. Jared. 
De Witt, Thomas, D.D. 
Dodge, William E. 
Dolg, Peter. 
Donaghe, James. 
Donnelly, John M. 
Dorrance, Mrs. Sarah. 
Dougail, Rev. A. M. 
Douglas, George. 
Douglas, Rev. James. 
Downer, Rev. David R. 
Downes, Edwin H. 
Downes, Miss Sarah. 
Downs, William G. 
Downs, Mrs. W411Iara G. 
Dunning, Rev. Homer. 
Dwight, Henry. 
Dwight, Mrs. Henry. 
Dwight, Henry. 
Dwight, Edmond. 
Earle, Abraham L. 
Eastman, Dr. L. L. 
Eastman, Rev. Ornan. 
Eaton, Rev. Sylvester. 
Eddy, Ansel D., D.D. 
Edwards, Alfred. 
Edwards, Mrs. Electa. 
Eggleston, Silas. 
Elliot, Jacob. 
Elliot, Mrs. Mehetabel. 
Elmore, H. W\ 
Elmore, Z. W. 
Ely, Abner L. 
Ely, E. 
Ely, Harvey. 
Ely, Zebulon S. 
Esty, Joseph. 
Fairchild, Ellas R., D.D. 
Farnham, Thomas. 
Fennel, Rev. A. J. 
Ferry, W. H. 
Field. Abner B. 
Field, Rev. Pindar. 
Fisher, Abljab. 
Fitch, AbUah. 
Fitch, Mrs. Mercy. 
Fletcher, T. G. 
Poote, William. C. 



Ford, Rev. Henry. 
Forman, D. W. 
Fowler, John W. 
Fowler, Philemon If., D.D. 
Fowler, William. 
Francis, Rev. James H. 
Gale, Samuel. 
Gallagher, George. 
Gardiner, Hon. A. 
Gardiner, Nathaniel. 
Gardiner, Noah If. 
Gay, Sanford. 
Gilbert, John. 
Gillet, Rev. Moses. 
Oil let, Solomon L. 
Gilman, William C. 
Oilman, Winthrop S. 
Goertner, Nicholas W., D.D. 
Goodell, Jabez. 
Good ell, Mrs. Jabez. 
Goodrich, Rev. Clark H. 
Goodwin, Daniel B. 
Gosman, Robert. 
Gould, Charles. 
Gould, Herman D. 
Gould, William. 
Graham. James Edward. 
Grant, Gurdon. 
Graves, J. B. 
Graves, R. R, 
Green, Orrln. 
Green, Mrs, Orrin. 
Greenleaf, Joseph. 
Gregg, Mrs. John. 
Gregg, Rebecca M. 
Griffin, George. 
Haff, James I). 
Hall, Abraham B. 
Hall, Mrs. A. B. 
Hall, A. G., D.D. 
Hall, Charles, D.D. 
Hall, Edwin, D.D. 
Hall, Rev. Samuel 11. 
Halsey, John C. 
Halsted, Caleb 0. 
Halsted, James M. 
Halsted, William M. 
Halsted, William M„ Jr. 
Halsted, Thaddeus >J. 
Ham, Samuel L. 
Hamilton, Samuel. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Sarah. 
Hamilton, Charles C. 
Hamilton, Henry G. 
Hamilton, Arthur 8. 
Hamilton, Julia A. 
Hamilton, Lewis M. 
Hardenburgh, J. II. 
Hardy, Charles E. 
Hardy, Mrs. Louisa. 
Hart, Abel. 
Hart, Daniel. 
Hart. Seth. 
Hastings, Orlando. 
HastlngB, Rev. Seth P. M. 
Hastings, Rev. Thomas 8. 
Haswell, H. B. 
Hawes, Peter. 
Hawley, Rev. Charles. 
Hawley, Ezra. 
Heacock, H. B. 
Hedges, Miss C. M. 
Herrlck, Rev. John R. 
Herrick, Mrs. Mary. 
Herrick, William H. 
Herring. Mrs. Lucy. 
Hills, E. 

Hltchens, Francis. 
Holbrook, John C, D.D. 
Holbrook, Lowell. 
Holly, Rev. Ebeneter. 
Holmes, Oliver. 
Holmes, Silas. 
Holt, Joseph S. 
Hopkins, Am T., D.B. 
Uov*taa,)Ira. ttnbeth W. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



101 



Hopkins, Josiah, D.D. 

Hopkins, Lucius. 

Hopkins, Hon. Samuel M., LL D. 

Hopkins, Samuel M., D.D. 

Hotchkiaa, C. R 

Hovey, Rev. Jonathan. 

Howe, Fisher. 

Howe, Rev. Franklin 8. 

Howell, Alexander. 

Howell, Rev. Louis D. 

Howell, Nathaniel W., LL.D. 

Howell, T. M. 

Howell, Mrs. Louisa Y. 

Howland, a 8. 

Hoyt, James P. 

Hoyt, James 8. 

Hubbard, Richard W. 

Hubbard, Samuel T. 

Hubbell, H. R. 

Hubbell, W. 

Hughes, Edward. 

Hull, Rev. Joseph D. 

Humphrey, Mrs. Abby. 

Humphrey, Rev. John. 

Hunt, Rer. T. Dwight. 

Hurlbut, Edwin II. 

Hurlbut, J. D. 

Hutchinson, Richard J. 

Hyde, Simeon. 

Isliam, Charles. 

1 5 ham, Giles. 

Ivisou, Henry. 

J one*, E. B. 

Jones, Dennis. 

Joy, Arad. 

Judson, Rev. Aaron. 

Judson, Alanson. 

Jud*on, Mrs. Jane. 

Keese, John D. 

Kellogg, David H. 

Kellogg, David H.. Jr. 

Kellogg, Rer. Lewis. 

Kemboll, Rev. John. 

Kendall, Henry, D.D. 

Keicharo, Tread well 

King, Henry A. 

King, Rufus 8. 

King, William IL 

Klngsley, Silas. 

Kingsbury, Ephraim. 

Knevals, Caleb B. 

Knox, John J. 

Knox, Rev. William E. 

Kreb*, John M., D.D. 

Lamar. G. B. 

Lamb, John. 

Lambert, A. B., D.D. 

Lansing, Dirck C, D.D. 

I*ach, Mrs. Clarissa. 

Learned, William L. 

Leavitt, Jonathan. 

Leavitt, John W. 

Leavitt, Rufu.«. 

Leavitt, Joshua, D.D. 

Leavitt. Rev. William a 

I*e, C. G. 

Lee, Charles M. 

Lee, Mr*. Elizabeth. 

Lee, William E. 

Lee, John R. 

Letter, Joseph W. 

Leveridge, J. W. C. 

Lcwb, Rer. William B. 

Lewis, Zachariah. 

Little, Rev. James A. 

Little, Jonathan. 

little, Norman. 

Livingstone, James K. 

Livingston, Van Brugh. 

Lockwood, Roe. 

Lombard, H. F. 

Lord, Eleaaer. 

Lord,' John C, D.D. 

Lounsberry, Thomas, D.D. 

Ludlow, Rer. Henry G. 

Lombard, Pbiapw 



Lyon, E<1mund. 

Lyon, Harvey. 

M'Auley, Thomas, D.D., LL D. 

M'Cal), Rev. Alexander. 

M'Comb, John. 

M'Cord, Rev. William J. 

M'Coun, J. T. 

M'Dougall, Rev. A. 

M'Harg, Rev. Charles K. 

M'Harg, Rev. William N. 

M'Kinney, James. 

M'Lane, James W., D.D. 

M'Laren, Hev. M. 

M'Namee. Theodore, 

M'Neil, David. 

Magie, David. 

Mann, Rev. Joel. 

Marquand, F. 

Marsh, John, D.D. 

Marsh, Nathaniel. 

Martin, Benjamin N., D.D. 

Martin, Reuben. 

Mason, Cyrus, D.D. 

Mason, John M., I). a 

Mathews, James M., D.D. 

Mattoon, Amos. 

Maurice, C. F. 

Maxwell, Henry E. 

Maxwell, J. 1. 

MaxweU, T. C. 

Merrill, Albert S. 

Miller, Dr. A. S. 

Miller, Hon. SamueL 

Miller, Mr*. Samuel. 

Miller, Mrs. Sarah. 

Mills, Rev. Charles. 

Mills, T. H. 

Moore, Ransom B. 

Morey, Henry M. 

Morgan, Hon. Edwin D. 

Morgan, Mrs. H. T. 

Morrl?, Rev. Henry. 

Morse, Richard C. 

M< ree, Sidney E. 

Morton, John A. • 

Mumford, Miss F. E. 

Munroe, Nathan. 

Murdock, David. D.D. 

Murdock, Mrs. E. B. 

Murray, Rev. John A. 

Murray, Mrs. Anna Chapman. 

Myers, M. J. 

Nelson, T. 8. 

Nevins, D. H. 

Nevins, Russell IL 

Nevins, Rufus L. 

Newell, William W., D.D. 

Newell, Mrs. Edinah Shaw. 

Newman, Mark H. 

Nlmms, Henry B. 

Noble, Mrs. E. 

Norton, Rev. Herman. 

Norton, AsahelS., D.D. 

Nott,E., D.D., LL.D. 

Oliver, William M. 

Oliver, Andrew. 

Oliver, Mrs. W. M. 

Olmstead, F. 

Olyphant, D. W. C. 

Orton, Azarlah G., D.D. 

Ostrora, Rev. James I. 

Pardee, Richard G. 

Parke, James H. H. 

Parker, Mrs. Elmlra E. 

Parmelee, Rev. A. H. 

Parsons, Lewis B. 

Packer, W. S. 

Packer, Mrs. W. 8. 

Patton, William, D.D. 

Payson, Rev. Elliott II. 

Peck, Everard. 

Peet, Edward. 

Perrlne, M. L. R., D.D. 

Peters, Absalom, D.D. 

Peters, John R. 

Phelps, Ajjbod O. 



Phelps, Anson O., Jr. 

Phelps, George D. 

Phelps, George D., Jr. 

Phelps, Alvah. 

Phelps, Rev. Charles E. 

Phelps, Jason. 

Phel|», Oliver. 

Phelps, Mrs. Phebe. 

Phelps, Samuel F. 

Phelps, Rev. Z. M. 

Phillips, William W., D.D. 

Pierson, Rev. George. 

Place, I. V. 

Place, Uriah M. 

Pomcroy, Rev. Augustus. 

Porter, Albert A. 

Porter, Albert II. 

Porter, Augustus 8. 

Porter, David, D.D. 

Porter, Jane II. 

Porter, Hon. John. 

Porter, Josiah. 

Porter, Mrs. Juii%. 

Porter, Miss Julia, 

Porter, Rev. Lansing. 

Porter, Miss Lavinia E. 

Porter, Peter 11. 

Porter, Miss Sarah E. 

Porter, Rev. Stephen. 

Porter, Vincent M. 

Post, Dr. Alfred C. 

Post, Mrs. Harriet 

Post, Rev. Henry A. 

Post, Joel. 

Potter, Mrs. Amelia. 

Potter, Charles L. 

Potter, Harvey. 

Potter, Howard. 

Potter, II. B. 

Potter, John Dyer. 

Pratt, Rev. B. F. 

Pratt, Chauncey. 

Pratt, lllram. 

I»rentl»MS Oeorge L., D.D. 

Price, Rev. E. 

Proudfit, A., D.D. 

Quincy, J. W. 

Rand. Rev. W. W. 

Rankin, John. 

Reed, Eliaklm. 

Reed, Josiah II . 

Remsen, Peter. 

Rice, Mrs, Anna. 

Rice, Hun-age. 

Rich, G. B. 

Richards, Guy. 

Richards, James, D.D. 

Rlker, James. 

Ripley, Daniel 0. 

Ripley, Joseph. 

Ripley, Hesekiah W. 

Hitter, Dr. Thomas. 

Kobert, Christopher R. 

Robinson, Edward, D.D., LL.D. 

Rockwell, Rev. J. E. 

Rogers, Charles S. 

Roosevelt, James. 

Rob?, WUliam 11. 

Rosslter, William W. 

Russell, 0. II. 

St. John, Ansel. 

St. John, Mrs. Isabella. 

Sampson, Ashley. 

Sandford, Amos 0. 

8andford, Rev. Joseph. 

Sandford, Rev. N. W. 

Saunders, Rer. Stephen. 

Sawyer, Rev. James D. 

Schermerhorn, J. M. 

Schermerhorn, Mrs. J. M. 

Schieffelin, Miss Fanny K. 

Schieffelin, II. II. 

Schieffelin, H. M. 

Schieffelin, Mrs. Sarah ML. 

Schoals, Francis P. 

ScoTiile, Mrs. SUnbtta. 



102 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



ScoviUe, Rev. Samuel. 

Seelye, George 0. 

Seelye, Hiram H. 

Seelye, Seth. 

Seward, Dwlght M., D.D. 

Seymour, H. R. 

Seymour, J. S. 

Shaw, James B M D.D. 

Shaw, Mrs. Laura R. 

Sheffield, Joseph B. 

Shlpman, George P. 

Shumway, H. 

Sickle*, Rev. Jacob. 

Sill, William E. 

Skinner, Thomas H., D.D., LL.D. 

Skinner, Rev. Thomas H., Jr. 

Slade, John. 

Sluyter, Rev. Richard. 

Smalley, Elam, D.D. 

Smith, Rev. B. C. 
. Smith, Rev. Charles A. 

Smith, Hon. Gerrit. 

Smith, Gilbert. 

gmlth, Rev. John. 

Smith, Peter. 

Smith, Rev. Seth. 

Smith, Thomas E. 

8mlth, W. H. 

Snow, George W. 

Snyder, Henry W. 

Southmayd, Horace. 

Southworth, Rev. James. 

Spear, Samuel T., D.D. 

8pencer, Ichabod 8., D.D. 

Spencer, Matthew Henry. 

Spencer, Sherman. 

Sprague, William R, D.D. 

Spring, Gardiner, D.D., LL.D. 

Sprole, William T., D.D. 

Stanley, Seth. 

Stanton, Rev. Benjamin F. 

Staples, Joseph. 

Starr, Charles. 

Starr, 0. 8. 

Steele, 0. R. 

Steele, Richard. 

Stocking, Joseph. 

Stocking, SamueL 

Stockton, Rev. Benjamin B. 

Stoddard, Rev. Elijah W. 

Stone, S. H. 

Stone, William W. 

Stone, Squire. % 

. Storm, Stephen. 

Storrs, Richard 8., Jr., D.D. 

Strong, Austin. 

Strong, Mrs. £. E. 

Strong, Miss Louisa. 

Sutherland, Hon. Jacob, LL.D. 

Swan, E. H. 

Sweetser, Joseph A. 

Bweetser, Henry E. 

Sweesy, Rev. 8y1vester. 

Talbert, Benjamin G. 

Talbot, Charles N. 

Talcott, James. 

Taylor, Dennis. 

Taylor, Hon. Henry W. 

Taylor, Mrs. Sally. 

Taylor, Knowles. 

Terbell, Jeremiah. 

Thacher, Rev. Washington. 

Thayer, B. C. 

Thomas, Marquis D. 
-Thompson, Joseph P., D.D. 

Thompson, Thomas L. 

Thorp, Curtis. 

Thurston, Stephen B. 

TUson, John. 

Tlmlow, Rev. William. 

Tinker, Rev. Reuben. 

Tomb, Rev. Samuel. 

Tompkins, Rev. William B. 
. Tompkins, Key. William R. 
l&trtej~L. B. 
*»+naend, Mr*, fifubeth. 



Townsend, Mrs. Jane 8. 
Townsend, William. 
Tracy, G. Manning. 
Tracy, P. L. 
Underwood, H. A. 
Van Auken, Rev. Edwin B. 
Van Benschoten, J. 
Van Rensselaer, Hon. 8., LL.D. 
Van Rensselaer, Stephen, Jr. 
Van Rensselaer, Miss Cornelia. 
Van Rensselaer, Miss Euphemla. 
Van Vechten, J., D.D. 
Varick, Hon. Richard. 
Veder, Miss Adeline. 
Walnwright, E. 
Walcott, W. D. 
Waldo, Rev. DanleL 
Wallace, James P. 
Wallace, William. 
Ward, L. B. 
Washburn, Horace B. 
Waterbury, Rev. Calvin. 
Webster, Prof. Horace, LL.D. 
Webster, Thomas. 
Welton, Rev. Alonzo. 
West, Mrs. Elba. 
Wetmore, Apollos R. 
Wheeler, J. W. 
Wheeler, 8. G. 
Whelpley, Rev. Philip M. 
White, Henry, D.D. 
White, Dr. Henry. 
White, Isaac D. 
White, Norman. 
White, Rev. Theodore F. 
Whitlock, Benjamin M. 
Whitiock, William. 
Whitmore, L C. 
Wickes, Eliphalet. 
Wickes, James. 
Wickes, Rev. Thomas 8. 
Wickes, William W. 
Wickes, Mrs. Rebecca. 
Wilcox, Rev. Samuel C. 
Wilbur, Jeremiah. 
Willard, Henry. 
Willard, Lorin. 
Williams, Rev. F.T. 
Williams, Charles M. 
Williams, George H. 
Williams, Harriet N. 
Williams, Howard C. 
Williams, Timothy D. 
Williams, Hon. J. B. 
Williams, Mary E. 
Williams, Mrs. T. 8. 
Williams, Hon. Timothy 8. 
Williams, Walter R. 
Williston, Seth, D.D. 
Wilson, Rev. Robert E. 
Winslow, Hubbard, D.D. 
Wisner, William, D.D. 
Wlsner, William C, D.D. 
Wolcott, Frederick H. 
Wolcott, Gardiner H. 
Wood, Augustus A., D.D. 
Wood, George W., D.D. 
Wood, Rev. J. W. 
Wood, Silas. 
Woolsey, Edward J. 
Worth, Joshua F. 
Wyckoff, Isaac N., D.D. 
Wynkoop, Rev. Peter 8. 
Tale, EUsha, D.D. 
Young, Henry. 
Young, Mrs. Mary E. 
Young, Hon. SamueL 

Hrw jsBsrr. 

Adams, Rev. Frederick A. 
Alexander A., D.D., LL.D. 
Allen, Jabes L. 
Arden, Mrs. G. B. 
Atwater, Lyman II., D.D. 
Bacon, Rev. George B. 



Baker, Cornelius. 
Baldwin, Isaac. 
Baldwin, Tberon, D.D. 
Bradley, Rev. William. 
Bruen, Matthias. 
Camp, William. 
Cheever, Rev. Ebenexer. 
Chester, Rev. Alfred. 
Chester, Rev. William. 
CogBwell, Jonathan, D.D. 
Oondlt, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Crane, Israel. 
Dodd, Moses W. 
Frelinghuysen, Hon. T., LL.D. 
Gallagher, Rev. Joseph & 
Glldersleeve, Rev. Cyrus. 
Green, WUllam, Jr. 
Haines, C. S. 
Haines, Job. 
Haines. Richard T. 
Halsted, Job a 
Halsted, Matthias 0. 
Hay, Philip C, D.D. 
Hayes, David. 
Hayes, Mrs. Mary. 
Hayes, David A. 
Johnson, Rev. Daniel H. 
Judd, Gideon N., D.D. 
Kanouse, Rev. Peter. 
King, John 8. 
Kirtland, Rev. Orlando L. 
Kirtland, Mrs. Louisa J. 
Lucas, Rev. George G. 
M'Hlvaine, J. H., D.D. 
M'lllvaine. Mrs. J. H. 
Macdonald, James M., D.D. 
Meeker, Rev. D. C. 
Miller, Samuel, D.D., LD.D. 
Osborn, Rev. Ethan. 
Pinneo, William W. 
Priest, Rev. J. A. 
Parker, Joel, D.D. 
Rankin, William. 
Rundell, James H. 
Searle, Rev. Jeremiah. 
Seymour, Rev. Ebenexer. 
Stearns, Jonathan F., D.D. 
Street, Rev. Robert. 
Taylor, John. 
Thomas, Frederick 8. 
TutUe, J. N. 

Weeks, William R., D.D. 
White, Rev. WUllam C. 
Wilson, James P., D.D. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Allen, Solomon. 
Barnes, Rev. Albert. 
Bayard, G. P. 
Bliss, Theodore. 
Brown, Rev. Charles. 
Brown, John A. 
Bushnell, James 0. 
Caldwell, Mrs. David. 
Carroll, David L., D.D. 
Coleman, Lyman, D.D. 
Cross, Rev. Marcus E. 
Curling, R. B. 
Darling, Hon. William. 
Dungan, Charles B. 
Earp, Robert. 
Eckle, John. 
Ely, Ezra Stiles, D.D. 
Fahnestock, George W. 
Fair. John C. 
Fasslt, James. 
Fleming, Thomas. 
Fobes, G. W. 
Fullerton, Alexander. 
Glldersleeve, W. C. 
Grant, Rev. John L. 
Grler, Rev. Thomas, 
Hlckok. Rev. MUo J. 
Irvine, Mist Ruth. 
IrvVne^ Dr. James R. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



103 



Irvine, 8amueL 
Johnson, James. 
Johnson, Rev. Thorns* 8. 
Klrkpatrick, WUllam. 
Lapsley, David. 
Lapsley, Joseph B. 
Lapsley, P. 

Livingston, G. R., D.D. 
Ludlow, John, D.D. 
Lyon, George A., D.D. 
M'Clelland, Qeorge W. 
M'Goffin, Rev. John. 
M'Intyre, Charles. 
Marks, Rev. John J. 
Moore, Rer. William E. 
Sett, John R. 
Fatten, Rev. John. 
Paul. Miss 8. 
Perkins, A. R. 
Ralston, Robert. 
Smith, James. 
Smith, Rer. R. A. 
Swarts, C. 

Templeton, Rev. B. F. 
Tolman, SamueL 
Torrey, John. 
Turner, Rev. D. K. 
Wadsworth, Charles. 
Ward, Rer. Thomas 8. 
White, Ambrose. 
Wing, Conway P., D.D. 
Wurts, Charles. 



Graff, Rer. J. J. 
Hitchcock, Rev. R. & 

oiSTBicr or ooluybu. 

Gideon, Jacob. 
Hall, Daniel W. 
Lincoln, Hon. Abraham. 
Larned.Col. Benjamin F. 
Sobie, Rer. Mason. 



Godfrey, Charles. 
Graham, Rev. James M. 
Read, Charles H., D.D. 
Rice, Benjamin H.. D.D. 
Woe, John H., D.D. 
Stiles, Joseph C., D.D. 
Torrey, Rev. William. 

KOETH CABOLOIA. 

Adams, Mrs. Mary. 

BOCTH CAROLIHA. 

Leland, Aaron W., D.D. 
Osborn, Rer. Freeman. 
Rice, Rev. Thomas O. 
Snowden, Gilbert T. 



CatUn, Willis. 
Hard, William 8. 



Mandeville, Henry, D.D. 
Russell, D. M. 
Woodbridge, 8ylvester, D.D. 



Keese, L. 



Caldwell, William W. 
Cornhlf, Leonard. 



Axtel, Rev. Henry. 



Mack, Rev. WUllam. 
Wells, Rev. Rufus P. 



Mills, Rev. Benjamin. 
Smith, Mrs. Mary Jane. 



Adams, Rev Eli. 
Aiken, Samuel C, D.D. 
Baker, Mrs. Sarah. 
Beebe, Artemaa. 
Blrge, Rer. Chester. 
Bittlnger, Rev. Joseph B. 
Bittinger, Mrs. J. B. 
Chldlaw, Rev. Benjamin W. 
Clark, Dillingham. 
Clark, Rev. WUllam 0. 
Day, George B. 
Eames, Rev. M. H. 
Fisher, Rev. Nathaniel W. 
Goodrich, WUllam H., D.D. 
Goodwin, Rer. Edward P. 
Gould, John F. 
Hail, William. 
Hart, Rev. John C. 
Hitchcock, Henry L., D.D. 
Hough, Rev. John. 
Hubbard, Abner. 
Keep, Rev. John. 
Kingsbury, Addison, D.D. 
Messenger, Rev. Benoni Y. 
Maginnls, Rev. Franklin. 
Oviat, Heman. 
Pomeroy, Rev. Lemuel. 
Potter, Rev. Samuel S. 
Putnam, David. 
Putnam, Douglas. 
Root, James. 
Shaw, Mrs. Sarah. 
8mith, Thomas M.. D.D. 
Storrs, Henry M., D.D. 
Sturges, Solomon. 
Taylor, Eliaha. 
Taylor, Mro. F. E. 
Taylor, Miss Anna Louisa. 
Thompson, M. L. R. P., D.D. 
Thompson, Mrs. Sarah. 
Tichenor, George. 
Tracy, Rev. Hiram A. 
Vail, Rev. Franklin Y. 
WeddeU, P. M. 
Weed, Dr. George L. 
Wickes, Rev. Thomas. 
Wilson, Rev. Levi B. 
Wolcott, Guy 
Wolcott, James O. 
Wolcott, L. P. 
Wolcott, Samuel, D.D. 
Wood, Nathan. 



Atterbury, Rev. W. W. 
Baldwin, Ellhu W., D.D. 
Baldwin, Moses H. 
Brooks, Rev. Asahel L. 
Cunningham, Rev. John. 
Harmon, Jacob. 
Tyrrell, Dr. C. C. 
Yandes, J. W. 

ILLINOIS. 

Adams, B. F. 
Avery, Oscar R. 
Ball, Mrs. Fanny. 
Bancroft, Jo&eph H. 



Barnes, Rev. William. 

Beman, Nathan 8., D.D., LL.D, 

Brewster, William. 

Brown, Dr. Reuben S. 

Brown, S. L. 

Brown, WUllam H. 

Carter, Thomas B. 

Case, Rev. Rufus. 

Christopher, Rev. WUllam B. 

Clark, Rev. N. C. 

Coltrln, Nathaniel P. 

Curtis, WUllam 8., D.D. 

Dickinson, Baxter, D.D. 

Dunham, Rev. Hercules R. 

Dunham, James H. 

Ely, David J. 

Emery, Rev. Samuel Hopkins. 

Fairbanks, John B. 

Ferry, James 11. 

Fisber, W. 

Foote, Rev. Horatio. 

Gano, Rev. L. 

Godfrey, Benjamin. 

Grant, Rer. JoeL 

Haven, Joseph, D.D. 

Haven, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Hempstead, 0. 8. 

Holt, D. R. 

Hunter, Charles W. 

Jenney, Rev. Klisha. 

Jones, Daniel 0. 

Kent, Rer. Aratus. 

Lord, George P. 

Lord, WylUs, D.D. 

Lyons, Rev. Luke. 

Miner, Rev. Ovid. 

McWUliams, Daniel W. 

Marshall, Rev. Charles H. 

Parsons, J. A. 

Patterson, Robert W., D.D. 

Patton, William W., D.D. 

Pearson, Rev. Ruel M. 

Perkins, Rev. George W. 

Phelps, W.J. 

Porter, Rev. Jeremiah. 

Prince, Daniel. 

Purlnton, Rer. N. B. 

Raymond, B. W. 

Reynolds, James L. 

Roy, Rev. Joseph E. 

Scofleld, Rer. William 0. 

Sherman, B. F. 

8mlth, Rev. Albert. 

Spencer, Rev. William H. 

Trowbridge, Rev. James H. 

Ware, Ralph. 

Wight, Rev. J. A. 

WUliams, Rev. Charles A. 

Williams, John C. 

WUliams, Rev. Melancthon B. 

Woodbridge, John, D.D. 



Beebe, Rev. Samuel J. M. 
Emerson, Rev. Daniel. 
Goodrich, Hiram P., D.D. 
Nelson, Henry A., D.D. 
Post, Truman M., D.D. 
Tucker, Hon. N. B. 



Allen, John. 
Bingham, Edward. 
Brown, Cullen. 
Conant, Shubael. 
Curtenius, F. W. 
Davis, P., Jr. 
Duffleld, George, D.D. 
Duffieid, Rer. George, Jr. 
Gekton, Rev. Maltby. 
HaUock, Horace. 
Hastings, Eurotaa P. 
Hoga^WUUam^.D. 
Hulburt, Job*. 



104 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Ingersoll, D. W. 
Johnson, Oliver. 
Jones, D. G. 
Joy, Ira. 

Knapen, Rev. Mason. 
Lamson, Darius. 
McCorkle. Rev. William A. 
M'Elroy, Rev. H. 8. 
Mattocks, Rev. John. 
Monteith, Rev. John, Jr. 
Nlles, Johnson. 
Page, Rev. William. 
Rice, Samuel. 
St Clair, Rev. Alan son. 
Seymour, James. 
Tappan, II. P., D.D., LL.D. 
Tillman, J. W. 
Trowbridge, 8. V. R. 
Tuttle, Rev. Amos C. 



Anderson, Mrs. E. 8. 
Brinsmade, Horatio N., D.D. 
Burrell, Edward. 
Rushnell, Rev. George. 
Camp, Rev. Charles W. 



Clary, Rev. Dexter. 
Cook, Erastus. 
Dwight, Timothy. 
Eddy, Rev. Chauncey. 
Helmer, Rev. Charles D. 
Holton, Hon. Edward D. 
Kurd, A. M. 
Jones, Harvey. 
Knapp, A. B. 
Parmelee, Rev. Horace M. 
Pood, Rev. Jeremiah E. 
Squier, Miles P., D.D. 
Squier, Mrs. M. 
Stuart, George II. 

IOWA. 

Butler, Jacob. 
Clark, Rev. Daniel. 
Cobb, Alfrei. 
Edwards, Richard. 
Guernsey, Rev. Jesse. 
Knox, James. 
Magoun, Rev. George F. 
Robblos, Rev. Alden B. 
Searle, Rev. Moses G. 
Thacher, Rev. George. 



Turner, Rev. Asa. 
Whiting, Rev. Lyman. 



Doane, Rev. Hiram. 
Emery, Levi 



CALIFOBKIA. 



Fisher, L. P. 



Matheson, James, D.D. 
Reed, Andrew, D.D. 
Thompson, Thomas. 
Thornton, A. 8. 



Douglas, James. 

INDIA. 

Capron, Rev. W. B. 
Lawrence, Rev. John J. 
Munger, Rev. Sendol B. 



MEMBERS FOR LIFE 



OF THE AMERICAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Adams, Rev. Aaron C. 

Adams, Rev. John R. 

Adams, Samuel. 

Arnold, Miss Elizabeth U. 

Barstow, Mrs. C. H. 

Bartley, Rev. John M. 0. 

Bartley, Mrs. S. 

Blake, Rev. Joseph. 

Bovey, Dea. John. 

Chapman, T. J. 

Cl&pp, Charles, Jr. 

•app, Mrs. Nancy E. 

Closson, Nehemiah. 

Coe, Thomas U. 

Colby, Joseph. 

Crosby, Timothy. 

Dana, W. 8. 

Davidson, Henry. 

Dickson, Rev. William T. 

Dole, Isaiah. 

Drummond, Alexander. 

Dyer, Mrs. Lois. 

Elllngwood, Mrs. Harriet. 

Fellows, Rev. F. E. 

Fiske, Rev. John 0. 

Fleming, Henry. 

Gould, Edward. 

Hale, Mrs. Lois W. 

Ilersey, Mrs. Betsey. 

Hopkins, Rev. Ellphalet 8. 

Howell, Mrs. Eleanor. 

Hurd, Carleton, D.D. 

Hyde, Mrs. Jonathan. 

Ives, Rev. Alfred B. 

Jenkins, Rev. Abraham. 

Jenkins, Charles W. 

Keeler, Rev. Seth U. 

Keith, Jairus 8. 

Kingman, William. 

Lewis, Rev. Wales. 

Xockwood, Amos D. 
Xord f O.A. 
lord, Mrs. Phoebe. 



Maltby, Rev. John. 
Mitchell, William C. 
Moore, Rev. Henry D. 
Morse, Elisha. 
Norton, Miss Elizabeth. 
Norton, Miss Sarah. 
Orton, Rev. James. 
Patten, Mrs. George F. 
Perry, Rev. Clark. 
Pierce, Rev. John W. 
Putnam, George A. 
Shepley, Rev. David. 
Tenney, Rev. Charles. 
Walker, Rev. George L. 
Wilde, Rev. John. 

KBW HAMPSHIRX. • 

Abbott, Mrs. Joshua. 
Abbott, Mrs. Joseph. 
Abbott, Moses. 
Abbott, Mrs. Amos. 
Abbott, Rev. Sereno T. 
Abrams, Mrs. Ruth F. 
Adams, Daniel. 
Adams, Daniel E. 
Alexander, Edward P. 
Alexander, Mrs. Elijah. 
Alexander, L. C. 
Alexander, L. H. 
Anderson, Mrs. Polly C. 
Angler, Rev. Marshal B. 
Anthony, Marcus. 
Anthony, Mrs. Marcus. 
Arnold, Mrs. Margaret. 
Arnold, Mrs. Mary. 
Arnold, Mrs. Mary. 
Ash, Rev. G. W. 
Atherton. Mrs. Avelina G. 
Atwood, Mrs. Betsey C. 
Ayer, Rev. F. D. 
Ayer, Mrs. M. E. 
Bacon, Mrs. Louisa. 
Bailey, Miss Mary. 
Bailey, Oliver. 



Baker, Abej. 
Balch, Sylvanus. 
Baldwin, Isaac. 
Baldwin, Jesse. 
Baldwin, Jesse, Jr. 
Ball, Mrs. David, 
Barker^ Mrs. Stephen. 
Barnes, Mrs. Zilpha. 
Barstow, Mrs. E. F. 
Bartlett, Abner. 
Bartlett, M. 
Baxter, Mrs. Abigail. 
Beane, Mrs. Sophronia. 
Beebe, Mrs. Achsah. 
Bennett, Mrs. C. E. 
Benson, Mrs. R. A. 
Berry, Mrs. A. C. 
Berrj', Miss Anna D. 
Blxby, Oliver, 
Blancnard,*Rev. Amos. 
Blanchard, Rev. S. M. 
Blunt, John C. 
Board man, Miss L. Y. 
Bodwell, Rev. Abraham. 
Boutwell, Rev. James. 
Bowers, Gardner. 
Bowers, Mrs. Sarah. 
Boylston, Edward D. 
Boylston, Mrs. Mary. 
Bradford, Rev. Dana B. 
Bradley, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Bradley, John. 
Bradley, Mrs. John. 
Breed, Mrs. Mary A. 
Brickett, Dea. B. 
Briggs, .WllliamS. 
Briggs, E. 
Brown, Charles. 
Brown, Dearborn 8. 
Brown, Lucretla B. 
Brown, Prentice P. 
Buffum, Miss Elizabeth. 
Buffum, Mrs. Mary E. T. 
Buffum, G. H. T. 
Buffum, Mary & 



1865. 



THIBTY XINTH KEPOBT. 



105 



Boutin, William E. 
BunUn, William, 2d. 
Burge, Edward A. 
Burnap, Mrs. Calvin. 
Burnham, Kev. Charles. 
Borne, Daniel. 
Butterfield, Miss Caroline S. 
Buxton, Miss Elizabeth M. 
Campbell, Rev. O. W. 
Campbell, Mrs. Lucy. 
Carter, George C. 
Case, Kev. Ira. 
Cate, Mrs. Abigail W. 
Cavis, George M. 
Cavis, Miss Harriet M. 
Cavi*, Joseph M. 
Cavbi, Miss M. 
Cavis, Mrs. Nancy M. 
Chandler, Mrs. Jane. 
Chapin, N. C. 
Chase, Adna. 
Chase, Frederick. 
Chase, Mm. Sarah G. 
Child*, Carlos. 
ChUds, Warren S. 
Church, John H., D.D. 
Church, Mrs, Sarah. 
Church, Miss Sarah. 
Claggett, Rev. E. B. 
Claggett, Mrs. A. P. 
Clark, Dea J. C. 
Clarke, Ezekiel W. 
Clarke, George J. 
Clarke, Frederick W. 
Clarke, Henry K. W. 
Clarke, Nathaniel J. 
Coffin, Moses. 
Cogswell, Miss Sarah M. 
Cogswell, William, D.D. 
Colby, Mrs. Elsy A. 
Colby, Mrs. Lydia If. 
Colby, Merit F. 
Conant, Mrs, Amos. 
Conant, Mrs. Mary. 
Connor, Abel. 
Connor, A. D. L. F. 
Connor, Mrs. Harriet N. 
Connor, J. K. 
Connor, Mrs. M. N. L. 
Converse, Mrs. Abigail 
Cower, William C. 
Crosby, Abel C. 
Crosby, Jesse A. 
Crosby, Mrs. Fanny. 
Cross, Jeremy L. 
Crowell, Mr*. Mary. 
Cammings, Daniel. 
Cummings, Rev. Henry, 
dimming*. Mrs. Harriet. 
Curtice, Rev. Corban. 
Cushlng, Peter. 
Cutler, Mrs. Amos. 
Carter, MUs Abiah. 
•Cutter, Seth. 
Dame, Henry A. 
Dame, Mis* Lucy E. 
Dame, Mrs. Lucy S. 
Dame, Miss Martha T. 
Darling, Joshua. 
David, Barnabas. 
Davis, Rev. Josiah G. 
Davis, Mrs. Robert. 
Day, Mrs. P. B. 
Day, Rev. Pliny B. 
Dean, Michael. 
Dewey, Miss L. R. 
Dickinson, Luther. 
Dickinson, Miss Mary. 
Dimond, Ecekiel. 
Dodge, George J. 
Dodge, Mrs. Jane. 
Dodge, John R. 
Dodge, PauL 
Dodge, Mrs. Sally U. 
Dodge, Vienna. 
DonnelL, Albert J. 



Donnell, E. G. 
Douglas, Mrs. Betsey. 
Dow, Ml*s Susan. 
Dow, William W. 
Drown, Elizabeth. 
Duncan, Rev. B. 
Duncan, R. 
Duncan, Mrs. Ruth. 
Duncan, Kev. Thomas W. 
Dutton, Jeremiah. 
Eastman, Cyrus. 
Eastman, Juhn. 
Eastman, Dea. John. 
Eastman, Mrs. Luciuda B. 
Eastman, Jonathan A. 
Eastman, Mcllen C. 
Eastman, Mr*. Orpha L. C. 
Eaton, Mr*. Abigail B. 
Eaton, Mrs. H. D. 
Eaton, Rev. Joseph M. 11. 
Eaton, Mrs. Sarah. 
Eaton, Thomas. 
Ela, Miss Abigail E. 
Elli*, Kev. John M. 
Ellis, Mr*. J. M. 
Emerson, Benjamin F. 
Emerson, Mr*. Eilzat>eth B. 
Emerson, Rev. John D. 
Emerson, Joseph, Jr. 
Evans, Nathaniel. 
Evans, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Everett, Mrs. Dolly, 
Fairbanks, Rev. D. 
Farley, Noah. 
Farley, Mrs. Ruth. 
Farmer, Mrs. Z. A. 
Farnham, Benjamin. 
Farnum, Mrs. Judith A. 
Farrington, S. 
Farrar, Mrs. Z. M. 
Fay, Rev. Prescott 
Fisher, Rev. George E. 
Fisher, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Fisher, Miss E. 
Fisk, David. 
Fitts, Jene R. 
Flanders, Mrs. Hunnah C. 
Fletcher, John. 
Fletcher, Samuel. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Sarah. 
Follett, Rev. Walter. 
Follet, Mrs. Maria. 
Folsora, Samuel, 
Foster, Mrs. Eliza A. 
Fox, George. 
Frauklin, Miss Eunice. 
French, J. 0. 
Freuch, Mrs. 8. C. 
French, Stephen. 
Frof t, Lorin C. 
Fuller, Mrs. Persis R. 
Fuller, Rev. Robert W. 
Gage, John H. 
Gage, Mrs. John H. 
Gardner, Jacob. 
Gerrish, Abigail. 
Gerrish, Mrs. Elizabeth M. 
Gerrish, Enoch. 
Gerrish, Mrs. 'Mary. 
Gerrish, Newell. 
Gerrish, Mr*. Sarah C. 
Gibson, Mary F. 
Oilman, Zeeb. 
Goff, Mr*. Sarah. 
Goodall, Ira. 
Goodrich, John C. 
Gordon, Jacob. 
Goss, Mr*. Ruth. 
Goss, Mrs. Sarah. 
Gould, Dea. A. P. 
Gould, Mrs. Thomas. 
Grant, Clarissa. 
Greenwood, Cyrus. 
Griffin, C. H. 
Halle, Hon. William. 
Bile, Benjamin W. 



Hale, Robert C. 
Hale, Mrs. Sarah T. 
Hall, Lucius Henry. 
Hamilton, Francis. 
Hamilton, Mis* Mary E. 
Hardy, Dea. John B. 
Harri*, Mrs. Jane. 
Harris, Mrs. Jane. 
Harri* Milan. 
Harris, William. 
Hartshorn, James. 
Hartshorn. W. 
Hastings, Mrs. Stewart. 
Hatch, Alvln. 
Hatch, Mrs. M. A. 
Hawley, Mrs. S. C. 
Hawthorne, Dea. Wooster. 
Heald, William P. 
Herrick, Moses A. 
Herrick, Mrs. Jaue. 
Herrick, Rev. William T. 
Herrick, Mrs. Laura C. 
Hildreth, Jothatn. 
Hill, Rev. James D. 
Hills, Joseph. 
Holman, Relief. 
Holmes, Mrs. Eunice. 
Holmes, Rev. James. 
Holmes, Mrs. Joanna R. 
Holmes, John. 
Hood, Rev. Jacob A. 
House, Rev. A. H. 
Howe, N. 

Howland, Rev. H. O. 
Howland, Mrs. H. 0. 
Hoyt, Mrs. Daniel. 
Hoyt, Stephen K. 
Hubbard, Prof. Oliver P. 
Hume, Mrs. Mary D. 
Humphrey, Mrs. A. F. 
Humphrey, Mrs. J. P. 
Humphrey, Mrs. Mary E. 
Hurd, Isaac, D.D. 
Hutchinson, Freeman. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Joshua. 
Ireland, Mrs. Hannah W. 
Ireland, Jonathan. 
Ireland, Mary E. 
James, William. 
Jameson, Mrs. Mary T. 
Jennison, Rev. E. 
Jennlson, William. 
Jewell, Mrs. Asahel. 
Jewell, Mrs. Susan B. 
Jewett, Mrs. U. A. C. 
Jewett, Mrs. Sally R. 
Jewett, Rev. William R. 
Johnson, Mrs. Sarah W. 
Jones, Mrs. Julia M. 
Jones, William. 
Jordan, Rev. Ebenezer 8. 
Kellogg, Rev. Erastus M. 
Kelly, Miss Caroline. 
Kellx, Kev. John. 
Kendall, Sarah H. 
Kendall, Mrs. Asa. 
Kimball, Rev. David. 
Kimball, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Kimball, Rev. Reuben. 
Kimball, Samuel. 
Kimball, Mrs. Sarah. 
Kimball, Miss Sarah. 
Kimball, William P. 
King, Mrs. Hannah. 
Kingman, Mrs. Lucy. 
Kingman, Mrs. Mary. 
Kingsbury, Mrs. AbigaU. 
Kingsbury, Abijah W. 
Kingsbury, Albert 
Kingsbury, Charles. 
Kingsbury, George. 
Kingsbury, George, Jr. 
Kingsbury, Joseph, 
Kingsbury, Josiah. 
Kingsbury. Rev. fcamvrcL 
Kingsbury, William. 



106 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



Knight, Daniel. 

Knight, Rev. Isaac. 

Knight, Mn. Phoebe. 

Knight, Rebecca A. 

Lamson, Margaret 

Lamson, Miss Margaret. 

Lamson, William. 

Lane, Alice W. 

Lane, Mrs. Elizabeth. 

Lane, E. J. 

Lane, Rev. Joseph. 

Lane, Julia E. 

Lane, R. W. , 

Lane, Mrs. R. W. 

Lasell, Rey. Nathaniel. 

Lawrence, Aaron. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Aaron. 

Lawrence, Miss Annie M. 

Lawrence, Miss Cornelia M. 

Lawrence, Mrs. Hannah M. 

Lawrence, Miss E. G-. 

Lawrence, Rev. Robert F. 

Lawrence, Mrs. R. H. 

Lawrence, Sarah L. 

Lawton, C. fi. 

Leach. Mrs. Eunice G. C. 

Leland, Miss Dorcas K. 

Little, Mrs. Apphla. 

Little, Rev. Valentine. 

Livingston, David. 

Lock, Miss Sarah D. 

Long, Clement, D.D. 

Lord, Rev. Charles E. 

Lovejoy, Ralph. 

Low, Mrs. Elizabeth. 

Lowe, Miss Georgia. 

Lund, Oliver. 

Lyman, Mrs. Asahel. 

Lyman, Mrs. Ella. 

Lyman, Mrs. L. W. 

Lyman, Mrs. Tertius A. 

Mack, Mrs. A. C. 

M'Curdy, M. a 

M'Donald. Erie. 

M'Gow, Mrs. Sarah. 

McLeod, Rev. Hugh. 

M'Mlllan, Gilbert 

McMurphy, Miss Mary. 

M'Question, Miss M. E. 

Mann. Rev. Asa. 

Manning, Rev. Abel. 

Manning, Mrs. Mary. 

Mansfield, Mrs. Charles. 

Marsh, Mrs. Phoebe H. 

Marshall, Benjamin. 

Marston, Mrs. Betsey. 

Mason, Edward. 

Melvin, T. J. 

Merrick, Joshua M. 

Merrill, Mrs. Anne G. 

Merrill, A. K. 

Merrill, Rev. Horatio. 

Merrill. Mrs. Sarah W. 

Metcalf, Eli. 

Mitchell. Miss Lucretia. 

Moore, Humphrey, D.D. 

Morgan, Farnum J. 

Morrill, Joel S. 

Morrill, SamueL 

Morrison, George. 

Morrison, James. 

Morrison, SamueL 

Morrison, Samuel W. 

Morrison, Worcester. 

Morse, Rev. Joslah. 

Morton, Rev. D. 0. 

Murdock, Mrs. Caroline, 

Mnrdock, Lucia I. 

Murdock, Rev. William. 

Mussey, John. 

Nesmlth Miss Mary. 

Newcomb, Hannah D. 

NeweU, Mrs. Betsey D. 

NewelJ. Miss Helen M. 
NewhMll, Bar. Ebeoeser. 
Newton, Mn. Jffisa M. 



Nichols, Blanchard. 
Noyes, L. W. 
Noyes, Mrs. L. W. 
Noyes, Parker. 
Noyes, Wm. Atkinson. 
Orcutt, Miss Sarah. 
Ordway, Rev. Jarius. 
Ordway, Nelson. 
Otis, Rev. Israel T. 
Page, Frank. 
Page, Rev. Jesse. 
Page, Moses P. 
Paige, Mrs. Ann M. 
Parker, Charles C. 
Parker, Daniel H. 
Parker, Hon. Edmund. 
Parker, Edward. 
Parker, Jesse. 
Parker, Mary. 
Parker, Nancy B. 
Parker, Nathaniel 
Parsons, Rev. E. G. 
Patrick, Rev. William. 
Patten, Mrs. Mary J. 
Patton, John. 
Paul, Moses. 
Peabody, Rev. David. 
Peabody, Mrs. Nancy L. 
Pearson, Thomas. 
PeflTers, Rev. Aaron B. 
Peffers, Mrs. Cornelia P. 
Perkins, C. G. 
Perkins, Charles P. 
Perkins, Charles B. 
Perrin, Mrs. Mary D. 
Perry, John A. 
Perry, Simeon N. 
Perry, Rev. Talman C. 
Peters, John. 
Pierce, Andrew. 
Pierce, Hon. Franklin, LL.D. 
Patten, Mrs. Mary J. 
PiUsbury, Oliver. 
Place, Mrs. Polly. 
Plumer, A. G. 
Plummer. Mrs. Lucy G. 
Porter, Charles Henry. 
Porter, Miss Rebecca W. 
Porter, Rev. William H. 
Pratt, Mrs. Jeremiah. 
Price, Rev. Ebeneser. 
Proctor, HieL 
Putnam, Rev. John M. 
Putnam, George. 
Putnam, Prot John N. 
Ramsdell, William. 
Rand, Julia A. 
Rand, Lyman F. 
Ray, Rev. John W. 
Richardson, Rev. William. 
Rider, Mrs. Mary A. 
Ripley, James. 
Robinson, Miss Harriet. 
Rockwood, Mrs. Emily. 
Rogers, Mrs. L. 
Rolfe, Henry. 
Rowe, Rev. Elihu T. 
Rowell, Mrs. Caroline W. 
Rowell, Mrs. Hannah. 
Rowell, William K. 
Russell, Dawson. 
Russell, M. 
Russell, W. W. 
Babin, Mrs. Daniel 0. 
8abln, Mrs. Mary. 
Sabin, Mowry. 
Sanborn, Elvira M. 
Sanborn, Dr. N. 
Sanders, Miss C. Elmlra. 
Sargent, James. 
Sargeut, Hon. J. Everett. 
Sargent, S. 
Sawyer, H. A. 
Sawyer, Tristram. 
Scott, Miss Matilda. 
Scribner, Mrs. Hanta Jl 



Severance, Rev. L. M. 
Shaw, Mrs. Mary. 
Shedd, Miss Emily T. 
Shedd, John 0. 
Shedd, Mrs. Lydla. 
Sibley, Jonathan. 
Sllsby, Mrs. Betsey. 
Simmons, Tiitou. 
Smith, Dudley. 
Smith, Ellsha. 
Smith, Mrs. Elisa Ann. 
Smith, Mrs. E. B. 
Smith, Dr. James A. 
Snow, Mrs. Sally. 
Southerland, Rev. D. 
Spalding, Miss Louisa I>. 
Spalding, Rev. W. S. 
Spofford, Chandler. 
Stanley, Richard C. 
Stearns, Joseph. 
Steele, David. 
Stevens, Mrs. F. J. 
Stewart, Charles F. 
Stickney, Nathan. 
Stiles, Dea. Charles. 
Stone, Mrs. Apphla F. 
Stratton, Charles. 
Swain, Miss Julia M. 
8 wain, George. 
Talbot, Rev. William K. 
Taylor, N. 
Tenney, Allen. 
Tenney, Benjamin. 
Tenney, Jonathan. 
'Tenney, Mrs. Leonard. 
Thayer, J. P. 
Thompson, Rev. John. 
Thompson, Susan B. 
Thorndyke, J. L. 
Thorndyke, Sarah. 
Thorndyke, Miss Sarah. 
Thurston. Mrs. Eliza H. 
Thyng, Mrs. Anna. 
Tlbbals, Stephen. 
Town, Mrs. Mary. 
Tuttle, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Twiss. Page. 
TwitcheU, Miss Sylvia. 
Tyler, Mrs. B. W. 
Tyler, Jeremiah. 
Tyler, Mrs. T. C. 
Upham, Mrs. Eliza. 
Utley, Rev. Samuel. 
Vernon, Mrs. A. A. 
Walker, AbieL 
Walker, Mrs. Mary G. 
Wallace, Rev. Cyrus W. 
Wallace, Mary D. 
Ward, Mrs. Harriet S. 
Ware, Mrs. Hannah. 
Webster, D. C. 
Webster. William G. 
Weeks, Mrs. Sarah C. C 
Wellman, Mrs. Phoebe W. 
Wells, Anna M. 
Wells, Miss Clara C. 
Wells, Mrs. M. E. 
Wells, Rev. Moses H. 
Wheat, J. A. 
Wheat, Emma S. 
Wheeler, John. 
Wheelock, Mrs. John. 
Whldden, P. 
Wbltcombe, Simeon. 
White, Mrs. Emily 8. 
White, Mrs. Eml'y. 
White, Rev. Seneca. 
Whitney, Mrs. Betbia. 
Whiton, Rev. Otis 0. 
Whittemore, C. P. 
Whittemore, Dexter. 
Whittemore, Mrs. Betsey. 
Whittemore, Mrs. Caroline. 
Whittemore, Mrs. L. B. 
Whittemorel L 0. 
Wldden, G. P. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



107 



Wiggta, Mrs. Abigail. 
Wilder, Miss Martha. 
Wilkin*, James. 
Willard. Steadman. 
Willis, Mn. Alfred. 
Wilson, Am I. 
Winchester, Martha A. 
Wood, Mrs. Achsah. 
Wood, Rev. Ilorace. 
Wood, Mra. Martha A. 
Woodford, Thomas. 
Woodman, Mrs. H. 0. 
Woodman, Prof. John S. 
Woodman, William. 
Woodman, W. M. 
Woodward, Edmund. 
Woodward, Daniel A. 
Wright, Jonathan F. 
W jinan, Hannah C. 
Wyman, SauL 



Abbot, Rev. Benjamin. 
Adams, Miss Fidelia. 
Adams, James. 
Aiken, Edward R. 
Aiken, Caroline B. 
Alden, Miss Mary. 
Aiden, Mrs. P. A. 
Allen, Erasius. 
Arms, Mrs. Eliza. 
Atkinson, Mrs. Anna. 
Atwater, Dea, Lyman. 
Ayer, Miss Mary E. 
Ayer, Nicholas. 
Ayer, Mrs. B. 8. 
Bachelor, Mrs. A. R. 
Bailey, Rer. Phlneas. 
Bailey, Mrs. Hannah E. 
Baker, Mrs. Lydla. 
Baker, Samuel. 
Barber, Bradford N. 
Barber, Zerah G. 

Barnard, . 

Barrows, Experience. 
Bartholomew, Mrs. Abigail. 
Bartholomew, T. P. 
Bascom, Samuel H. 
Bass, Dr. William. 
Bennett, Mrs. Adaline H. 
Benton, Mrs. Lucretia. 
Bigelow, Abel. 
Billings, Noyes. 
Bingham, Ira. 
Bingham, Mrs. Charles. 
Btrchard, Miss L O. 
BIrchard, Levi 0. 
Bixby, Lorenzo. 
Bixly, W. R. 
Blackman, Mrs. Lucia E. 
Blake, Henry. 
Blachley, Miss PoUy. 
Boardman, Miss Charlotte L. 
Boardman, Miss Mary L. 
Boardman, Miss Sarah A. 
Boardman, Elijah. 
Boardman, Samuel 
Bogue, Sarah Ann. 
Boutelle, Rev. Asaph. 
Boutelle, Mrs. Fidelia. 
Boutelle, James. 
Bowers, Rer. John. 
Brainerd, Mrs. Hannah. 
Brainerd, Lawrence. 
Buel, Mrs. Eliza W. 
Bullard, Charles H. 
Burnap, Mrs. C. 
Burnap, Harvey. 
BurneU, Mrs. Ann 0. 
Burnham, Miss M. A. 
Burt, Henry. 

Burton, Rer. H. N. • 

Butler, Rer. Franklin. 
Butler, Miss Mary C. 
Carpentar, Rer. K. 



Carpenter, Mrs. 11. O. 
Chamberlain, Ezra C. 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Deborah 8. 
Chamberlain, Rev. E. B. 
Chandler, David. 
Chandler, G. B. 
Chandler, Rev. Joseph. 
Chandler, Myron 8. 
Chapin, Mrs. Hannah. 
Chapln, Jacob. 
Chapin, Miss Thankful. 
Chllds, Joslah. 
Chipman. .Mrs. Grace A. 
Church. Mrs. Wealthy. 
Clapp, Mrs. Pamela. 
Clark, Mrs. Amanda C. 
Clark, Rev. Asa F. 
Clark, Miss Clara A. 
Clark, Rev. L. W. 
Clark, Mrs. Mary B. 
Clark, Philo. 
Clark, Hon. Samuel. 
Cleaveland, Ephraim. 
Clement, Miss Phebe Y. 
Cleveland, Ephraim. 
Closson, Mrs. Emily W. 
Closson, Sylvanua Y. 
Conant, Edward. 
Converse, Rev. J. K. 
Converse, Mrs. Sarah. 
Corliss, Arad 8. 
Cook Charles. 
Cook, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Coolidge, Hon. Carlos. 
Cowles, Martin. 
Coszens, Rev. Samuel W. 
Cozzens, Mrs. A. B. 
Cubley, Mrs. Wealthy. 
Currier, Mrs. Lydia W. 
Cushing, Nathan. 
Damon, Miss Lucia A. 
Delano, Rev. Samuel 
Dobie, Rev. David. 
Dole, 8. W. 

Dorman, Rev. Ebenezer H. 
Dorman, Mrs. Lucretia. 
Dougherty, Rev. James. 
Drake, Cyrus B., D.D. 
Drew, Rev. 8. F. 
Duren, Rev. Charles. 
Dutcher, Mrs. M. H. 
Dutton, John. 
Eastman, Miss Miriam. 
Ensworth, Miss Annette. 
Evans, Mrs. A. 
Evans, Edward B. 
Evans, Ira H. 
Farnham, Roswell. 
Farr, Dea. Jonathan. 
Farrar, A. 8. 
Fisher, Francis A. 
Fisk, Rev. Joel. 
Fitch, Henry C. 
Foster, Rev. Andrew B. 
Francis, Miss Amelia. 
Francis, George. 
Francis, Miss Julia. 
Francis, John. 
Francis, Lewis. 
Freeman, Mrs. F. E. 
French, DanieL 
French, Mrs. Daniel. 
French, Darius. 
French, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Frost, Benjamin. 
Fuller, Rev. Joseph. 
Giddings, Mrs. C. 
Gilkey, Walter R. 
Gilmore, Mrs. Polly. 
Goddard, Timothy R 
Goodrich, Henry B. 
Goodrich, Phlletus. 
Goodrich, Simeon. 
Goodyear, Dea. D. 
Gorbam, Mrs. Hannah. 
Greeny Mra. H. A. B. 



Greene, Miss Anna E. 
Grout, Rev. Henry M. 
Hale, Edward. 
Hale, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Hale, Ebenezer Thomas. 
Hale, Rev. John G. 
Hale, Lucy Balch. 
Hall, Edmund. 
HalL John. 
Hall, Rer. Robert V. 
Hallett, Edmund. 
Hallock, Rev. Edward J. 
Harlow, Mrs. Mary K. 
Haskell, Mrs. Orlnda. 
Haskell, Mra. Paulina R. N. 
Ilazen, Rev. Austin. 
Henry, Mrs. Oilman. 
Herbert, Benjamin F. 
Herrick, RusselL 
Herrlck, Mrs. Maria T. 
Hickok, James W. 
nickok, William. 
Hill, Mrs. Lois M. 
Hobart, Mrs. Betsey. 
Hobart, Rev. James. 
Hobart, James, Jr. 
Holyoke, 8. G. 
Hooker, Edward W., D.D. 
Hooker, Mrs. F. T. 
Hooker, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Hosford, Jared. 
Hosford, N. E. 
Houghton, Rev. James C. 
Howard, K. 8. 
Howard, E. 8., Jr. 
Hoyt, Rev. Otto 8. 
Hubbard, Rev. 0. H. 
Huntington, F. 
Hurlbut, Mrs. Caroline. 
Hyde, Rev. Axariah. 
Hyde, Mrs. Adaline R. 
Jefferds, Rev. C. D. 
Jennings, Rev. Isaac. 
Jennlson, Betsey. 
Jennlson, G. H. 
Jennlson, Miss H. E. 
Jennison, W. H. 
Jewett, Mrs. Martha. 
Johnson, Moses D. 
Johnson, Rev. T. H. 
Kellogg, & H. 
Kent, Mrs. Juliette, 
Kimball, Joseph P. 
Kimball, Rev. Moses. 
Kimball, Mrs. Abby B. 
Kimball, Zlmri. 
Knight, Joseph. 
Latham, W. H. 
Lawrence, Chester F. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Lucy L. 
Lawrence, Miss Sarah 8. 
Leach, Andrew. 
Leavitt, Rev. Harvey F. 
Leavitt, Mrs. Nancy M. 
Lee, Albert. 
Loomls, Mrs. Janette 8. 
Loomls. Roger E. 
Lord, Mrs. Laura. 
Lord. Rev. William H. 
Lovell, Mrs. Almira H. 
Lyman, Mrs. Catharine G. 
Lyman, Julius. 
Lyon, Miss Mary. 
Lyon, Mrs. Mary. 
M'Clary, Ira L. 
McKeen, Miss Philena. 
McKeen, Mrs. Sarah P. 
Manley, Joseph E. 
Marsh, Mrs. E. K. 
Marsh, Rev. Joseph. 
Marshall, Matthew. 
Martin, Moses. 
Martin, Theodore. 
MarUndale, Rev. ft. 
Mason, Mrs. Aretbns* k. 
Mather, Mrs, Almlrv 



108 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Mather, Moses. 

Matthews, Rev. Lyman. 

Maynard, Rev. Ulric. 

Mead, Roswcll R. 

Merrill, Gyles, Jr. 

Merrill, Mrs. Lydla B. 

Merrill, Thomas A., D.D. 

Mescroe, Dea. James. 

Miner, Miss Martha S. 

Mitchell, Rev. William. 

Montgomery, David M. 

Moore, Miss Harriet S. 

Morris, Almon. 

Munson, Elizur. 

Murdock, Mrs. 8. B. 

Nash, Rev. Ansel. 

Nash, William P. 

Nelson, B. B. 

Nichols. Mrs. Lucy H. 

Noble, Rev. Calvin D. 

Noyes, Dea. Moses. 

Noyes, Miss Sally. 

Orvis, Mrs. 8. M. W. 

Page, J. A. 

Page, Mrs. J. A. 

Palmer, Jared. 

Parker, Rev. Charles C. 

Parkinson, Rev. Roy.al. 

Parks, Mrs. Elvira D. 

Partridge, Charles. 

Patchin, Lyman. 

Patchin, Mrs. 8. M. 

Pearson, Rev. Ora. 

Pierce, Dana 

Pierce, Dea. Nathan. 

Pierce, Mrs. Nathan. 

Finney, Mrs. Sophia D. 

Plimpton, Rev. Salem M. 

Porter, Susan Ida. 

Pratt, J. C. 

Pratt, Noah. 

Pratt, Miss Sarah. 

Prichard, Mrs. Mary 8. 

Rand, Nathan. 

Rankin, Rev. James E. 

Reed, Levi 

Reed, Mrs. M. A. 

Roberts, Mrs. C. D. M. 

Robinson, Gen. David. 

Robinson, Miss Elizabeth. 

Rood, Rev. Heman. 

Root. George B. 

Rossiter, Cldttenden 

Rugg, Phlneas. 

Sampson, Ellphalet 

Samson, Mrs. C. L. 

Sanderson, Rev. II. II. 

Sanford, Clark. 

Sawyer, Mrs. Alvira. 

Scott, Asa. 

Sewall, Rev. William. 

Sheldon, Lorenzo. 

Skeels, Mrs. Amos. 

Smart, Rev. William 8. 

Smith, Mrs. Ann E. 

Smith, Rev. Charles & 

Smith, Rev. Ebenezer. 

Smith, Hart. 

Smith, Sarah T. B. 

Sparhawk, Mrs. Laura F. 

Spaulding, Mrs. Jane P. 

Spauldlng, Mrs. S D. 

Sprague, Mrs. Rosalinda. 

Stebhins, Mrs. Eliza. 

Steele, Jason. 

Stevens, Henry. 

Stevens, Miss Ursula. 

Stoddard, Charles. 

Stoddard, James G. 

Stoddard, Prof. Solomon. 

Stoddard, Solomon P. 

Stone, Mrs. Alma. 

Stone, Mrs. Eliza. 
Stone, Her. James P. 
Wtooe, Rev. John F. 
*oae, Mrs. Nmncy B. 



Stone, Mrs. Nancy K. 
Stone, Samuel. 
Storrs, Dea. J. S. 
Stowell, David. 
Stowell, Leander H. 
Strickland, Mies Helen. 
8trong, S. P. 
Swift, William. 
Swift, Mrs. Jennett. 
Swift, Nodiah. 
Taylor, Mrs. II. T. 
Thayer, Rev. William W. 
Thayer, Mrs. C. B. 
Thomson, A. 
Thrall, RolUn C. 
Tllden, Rev. Lucius L. 
Tolman, Henry S. 
Tracy, Rev. Calel) B. 
Tracy, Mrs. Caleb & 
Tracy, E. C. 
Tuxburv, Dwight. 
Tyler, Mrs. Elizabeth A. 
Tyler, P. 

Wainwright, Rufus. 
Walker, Rev. Aldace. 
Walker, Aldace F. 
Walker, Mrs. Mary A. 
Walker, Miss Mary M. 
Ward, Luke. 
Warn, Mrs. Fanny. 
Wardwell, Rev. Granville. 
Warren, Erasmus D. 
Warren, Rev. Waters. 
Warrriner, Rev. Francis. 
Washburn, Mrs. Ahnira U. 
Warren, Mrs. P. S. 
Wells, David. 
WhlU, Miss Eliza C. 
White, E. 

White, Miss Eliza C. 
White, Mrs. Emma. 
Whiting, Rev. Charles. 
Whiting, Dexter. 
Whitteinore, John. 
Wickham, Rev. Joseph D. 
Wilcox, A. 
Wilcox, Henry. 
Willard, Israel. 
Williams, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wilson, Miss Adallne. 
Winch, Rev. Caleb M. 
Wood, Rev. John. 
W T ood, N. 8. 
Woods, A. B. 
Woodward, Alden. 
Woodward, Rev. John H. 
Woodward, Josiah. 
Woolson, Mrs. Mary L. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Abbott, Mrs. A. H. 
Abbott, Dea. Albert. 
Abbott, Hon. Amos. 
Abbott, Charles. 
Abbott, Miss Dorcas. 
Abbott, H. B. 
Abbott, Mrs. Joel. 
Abbott, J. J. 
Abbott, Joseph, D.D. 
Abbott, Mrs. Mary B. 
Abbott, Mrs. M. F. W. 
Abbott, Nathan B. 
Abbott, N. 
Abbott, Z. 
Adam, Mrs. Mary. 
Adams, Mrs. Adah F. 
Adams, Alpheus. 
Adams, Mrs. Betsey. 
Adams, Mrs. Betsey L. 
Adams, Mrs. Catharine H. 
Adams, Mrs. Charles. 
Adams, Prof. Charles B. 
Adams, Miss C. 
Adams, Rev. Darwin. 
Adams, Mrs. Harriet 0. 



Adams, Isaac. 
Adams, Mrs. Isaac. 
Adams, Joel P. 
Adams, John R. 
Adams, Mrs. J. S. 
Adams, Dr. L. S. 
Adams, Nehemiah, D.D. 
Adams, Oliver E. 
Adams, Mrs. Rebecca. 
Adams, Mrs. Sarah. 
Adams, Mrs. Sarah. 
Adams, William W. 
Alkin, Dea. J. 
Albro, Miss Anna E. 
Alden, Ebenezer, M.D. 
Alden, Rev. Edmund K. 
Alden, Rev. Ebenezer, Jr. 
Alden, Edward K. 
Alden, Jefferson. 
Alden, Mrs. Maria II. 
Alden, Mrs. Maria II. 
Alden, Maria L. 
Alden, Mrs. 8. Almira. 
Alden, William V. 
Allen, Mrs. Anna E. 
Allen, Mrs. 0. 
Allen, Charles G. 
Allen, C. J. F. 
Allen, Ezra. 

Allen, Rev. Ephralm W. 
Allen, Rev. George. 
Allen, George, Jr. 
Allen, George W. 
Allen, Mrs. Harriet J. 
Allen, Rev. H. F. 
Allen, James. 
Allen, Mrs. J. W. 
Allen, Mrs. L. 
Allen, Levi W. 
Allen, Luke F. 
Allen, Mrs. Mehetabcl. 
Allen, Miss M. M. 
Allen, Miss R. L. 
Allen, Perley. 
Allen, Mrs. Persia. 
Allen, Peter. 
Allen, Henry. 
Alvord, Adolphus. 
Alvord, Mrs. Caroline B. 
Alvord, Rev. Frederick. 
Alvord, Rev. John W. 
Alvord, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Ames, Benjamin F. 
Ames, Charles E. 
Ames, Ebenezer. 
Ame?, Elijah. 
Ammidon, John P. 
Anderson, John. 
Andrews, Artemus T. 
Andrews, Catharine F. 
Andrews, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Andrews, Mrs. Jane W. 
Andrews, N. 
Andrews, Miss N. M. 
Andrews, Mrs. Wilson. 
Angier, Rev. Luther H. 
Angler, Mrs. Anna L, 
Anthony, Rev. George N. 
Anthony, James H. 
Anthony, Dea. John L. 
Apthorpe, Rufus. 
Arms, Dennis. 
Arms, Mrs. Dorothy. 
Arms, William. 
Armsby, Lewis. 
Arnold, Mrs. A. 
Arnold, Mrs. Eunice H. 
Arnold, Rev. Joel R, 
Arnold, Mrs. Nancy. 
Arnold, Miss Rhoda. 
Arnold, Richard. 
Arnold, William H. 
Arnott, John. 
Ashley, Moses. 
Ashley, Rev. 8, & 
Aihtot^ John. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



109 



Atkins, Mrs. John. 
Atkins, Mis* W. 
Atkinson, Benjamin. 
Atkinson, Kev. Charles. 
Atkinson, J. L. 
Atkinson, Mrs. L. M. 
At wood, George B. 
Atwood, Mrs. Eliza A. 
At wood, Dr. Joseph. 
At wood, Mrs. Levi. 
Atwood, Thomas. 
Austin, Rev. David. 
Averill, Andrew P. 
Averill, John P. 
Avery, Beulah B. 
Avery, William. 
Ayer, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Ayer, Mrs. Johu. 
Ayers, Miss Caroline. 
Ayer*, Mrs. E. J. 
Ayres, Miss Elona M. 
Ayres, Moses O. 
Ayres, Langdon, 
Ayres, Mrs. Rhoda. 
Babcock, Mrs. Charles. 
Bafccock, Rev. Daniel If. 
Babcock, Mrs. Minda. 
Babson, Miss M. R. 
Bachelder, Mrs. Almira. 
Bachelder, George. 
Bachelder, Joel. 
Bachelder, Mrs. M. A. 
Bachelder, S. F. 
Bachelder, Mrs. Sophronia. 
Bachelder, W. S. . 
Bachelor, Miss Sally. 
Bacon, Andrew. 
Bacon, Jacob. 
Bacon, Josiah. 
Bacon, Rufus F. 
Bagg, Aaron. 
Bagg, Mrs. Amanda. 
Bagg, J. N. 
Bagley, John. 
Bailey, Mrs. Abigail. 
Bailey, Charles M. 
Bailey, Clarissa C. 
Bailey, Eliphalet. 
Bailey, George II. 
Bailey, James. 
Bailey, John, Jr. 
Bailey, Joseph. 
Bailey, J. A. 
Bailey, Rev. J. M. B. 
Bailey, Simeon. 
Baker, Albert C. 
Baker, George M. 
Baker, Miss II. N. 
Baker, Mrs. Lois. 
Baker, Levi W. 
Baker, Orrin. 
Baker, Otis. 
Baker, Mrs. 8. A. J. 
Batch, William. 
Balcom, Mrs. Eunice. 
Balcom, Mrs. Tryphena. 
Baldwin, George L. 
Baldwin, Rev. Joseph B. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Mary C. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Nabby. 
Balkam, William H. 
Ball, Mrs. M. A. 
Ball, Moses. 
Ballard, Eleazer. 
Ballard, Rev. Joseph. 
Bancroft, Bernadotte. 
Bancroft, H. L. 
Bancroft, Samuel 
Banfleld, Mrs. E. C. 
Bangs, William F. 
Banister, Miss Francis B. 
Banister, Rev. Seth W. 
Banister, W. A. 
Banister. Hon. W. B. 
Barber, Jerttah. 
Barden, Mrs. Charlotte M. 



Bardwell, Alonzo. 
Kardwell, Mrs. Antepas. 
Hard well Carlos. 
Bardwell, Mrs. Eda L. 
Bardwell, Horatio, D.D 
Barker, Charles T. 
Barker, J. II. 
Barlow, Joseph W. 
Barnes, Amos. 
Barnes, F. G. 
Barnes, G. 
Barnes*. J. 
Barnes, 8. L. 
Barnes, William II. 
Barnes, William L. 
Barnum, Mrs. Charlotte B. 
Barnum, Rev. Samuel W. 
Barrell, James 8. 
Barrett, Dr. Benjamin. 
Barrett, Edward B. 
Barrett, James. 
Barrett, Mrs. Mary W. 
Barrett, Miss Mary W. 
Barrett, Mrs. Mary. 
Barrett, Philander G. 
Barrows, Rev, William. 
Bars tow, Miss Abby W. 
Barstow, Rev. E. H. 
Barstow, Luther. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Betsey. 
Bartlett, Charles. 
Bartlett, Charles L. 
Bartlett, Mrs. C. II. 
Bartlett, Eliza 11. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Henry. 
Bartlett, Levi. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Mary Jane, 
Bartlett, Phineas. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Sarah. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Bartlett, Sumner. 
Bartlett, Zilpha. 
Bartlit, Miss Jerusha. 
Barton, Rev. Frederick A. 
Barton, Sarah J. 
Barton, Walter. 
Bassett, Abiel. 
Bassett, Austin B. 
Bassett, Ellas. 
Bassett, George F. 
Bassett, C. J. H. 
Bassett, Miss Elizabeth. 
Bassett, Mrs. Ephraim. 
Batchelder, Mrs. Jonathan. 
Batchelder, Mrs. Sophronia. 
Batcheller, Mrs. Abigail J. N. 
Bates, Mrs. C. F. L. 
Bates, Miss Elizabeth. 
Bates, Isaac. 
Bates, Mrs. Jerusha. 
Bates, Joshua, D.D. 
Bates*, Mrs. Emily. 
Bates, Miss Lucy. 
Bates, Mrs. Mary. 
Bates, Mrs. Susan M. 
Bates, Dea. Timothy P. 
Bates, Rev. William. 
Bates*. William A. 
Battles, David. 
Baxter Charlotte. 
Baxter, Edwin W. 
Baxter, Mrs. M. N. 
Baxter, Mrs. Sarah. 
Reals, Ellas. 
Beals, Dea. Leavitt. 
Beaman, Ephraim. 
Beaman, Frederick. 
Beaman. Rev. Warren II. 
Beckwith, George C, D.D. 
Beckwith, Miss Martha M. 
Beebe, Ferdinand. 
Beebe, Lucius. 
Beecher, Rev. William H. 
Beecher, Mrs. W. H. 
■ Belcher, Mrs. Harvey. 
Belcher, Mra. Lois A. 



Belden, Rev. Pomeroy. 

Bell, Rev. James M. 

Bell, Miss Maria. 

Bellamy, Rev. R. R. 

Beman, Mrs. Jonas. 

Remis, Miss Julia. 

Bemis, W. L. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Eliza A. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Lucy. 

Benjamin, Nathan. 

Benjamin, Mrs. S. 

Bennett, Rev. Joseph. 

Bennett, N. 

Bennett, Samuel. 

Bigelow, Rev. Andrew. 

Blgelow, Charles H. 

Bigelow, Edward B. 

Bigelow, Mrs. Mary A. II. 

Bigelow, Mm. Martha II. 

Bigelow, Mrs. Surah. 

Bigelow, Mrs. William. 

Bills, Mrs. Huldab. 

Bills, Norman K. 

Billings, Miss Ann. 

Billings. Mrs. D. P. 

Billings, Francis. 

Billings, Ira. 

Billings, Thoma*. 

Bingham, Rev. Joel S. 

Bingham, Silas. 

Birchard, Rev. William M. 

Bird, George II. 

Bird, Lewis J. 

Bisbee, Mrs. Mary Ann. 

Biscoe, Rev. Thomas C. 

Biscoe, William. 

Bishop, George S. 

Bishop, Harrison. 

Bishop, Mrs. Sophia. 

Blackinton, Mrs. P. F. 

Blacklngton, Willard. 

Blackler, Miss M. H. 

Blackler, Mrs. Mary J. 

Blackler, Miss Mary R. 

Blagden. George W., D.D. 

Blair, Alvah. 

Blair, Rev. Gardiner Spring. 

Blake, Charles S. 

Blake, Mrs. Emeline. 

Blake, Mrs. Henry B. 

Blake, Mrs. Lucy. 

Blake, Rev. Mortimer. 

Blake, Mrs. Sarah. 

Blanchard, Amos, D.D. 

Blanchard, Mrs. Caroline R. D. 

Blanchard, Mrs. Charlotte. 

Blanchard, Mrs. B. 

Blanchard, Dexter. 

Blanchard, Mrs. Mehetabel. 

Blanchard, Mrs. M. C. 

Blanchard, Miss Nancy. 

Blanchard, Miss Priscllla N. 

Bliss, Aaron. 

Bliss, A. B. 

Bliss, Miss Betsey. 

Bliss, Dea. Ehenezer. 

Bliss, Edward A. 

Bliss, Mrs. Harvey. 

Bliss, Henry. 

Bliss, Rev. Isaac 0. 

Bliss, Joel. 

Bliss, Miss Persis. 

Bliss, Mrs. Sophia. 

Bliss, Rev. Thomas E. 

Blodgett, Henry. 

Blodgett, Mrs. Mary 0. 

Blodgett, Miss Sarah D. 

Blodgett, Simeon. 

Blood, Mrs. E. 

Blood, Mrs. Nabby. 

Bly, Albert. 

Boardman, Dea. Benjamin 8. 

Boardman, Dea. Benjamin. 

Boardman, Rev. Fi. 

Boardman, Miss LocreV\a &. 

Boardman, Mlaa Oftfta O. 



110 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Boardman, Miss Ruth A. 

Boles, Reuben. 

Boies, Mrs. Sally. 

Boles, Miss L. S. 

Boles, William. 

Boies, Rev. William E. 

Boles, Mrs. W. E. 

Boltwood, Henry L. 

Bond, Estes. 

Bond, Miss Joanna. 

Bond, Mrs. Thomas. 

Bonney, Oliver E, 

Borden, Caroline. 

Borden, Edward P. 

Borden, Matthew C. D. 

Borden, Richard B. 

Borden, Sarah W. 

Borden, Thomas J. 

Borden, William H. 

Bos worth, Rev. Byron. 

Bourne, J. H. 

Bourne, Proctor. 

Boutelle, David. 

Boutelle, Miss L. M. 

Boutelle, Rev. Thomas. 

Boutelle. Mrs. M. E. 

Bowditch, Mrs. Ann W. 

Bowdoin, W. H. 

Bowen, Mrs. Georgia A. 

Bowers, Mrs. Maria. 

Bowers, L. K. 

Bowker, Rev. J. B. 

Bowker, Mrs. James. 

Boyd, Miss Ellen 8. 

Boyd, Mrs. J. R. 

Boyd, Samuel. 

Boyle, Henry. 

Boynton, Benjamin. 

Boynton, Mrs. Julia A. 

Brace, Mrs. Elizabeth J. 

Brace, Joab, D.D. 

Brackett, Charles. 

Bradford, James. 

Bradlee, Mary L. 

Bradley, A. M. 

Bradley, Alonzo. 

Bradley, Charles. 

Bradley, Dwight P. 

Bradley, Daniel H. 

Bradley, Edward A. 

Bradley, G. P. 

Bradley, George H. 

Bradley, George P. 

Bradley, James W. 

Bradley, John. 

Bradley, Mrs. Susan. 

Bradshaw, Mrs. Anna. 

Bragg, Rev. Jesse K. 

Brainerd, Timothy. 

Brainerd, Rev. Timothy G. 

Brainerd, Wilson. 

Braman, H. B. 

Braman, Mrs. Mary P. 

Braman, Mrs. Sarah. 

Brandon, Mrs. Mary. 

Breckenrldge, J. M. 

Brewer, Adele. 

Brewer, Cyrus. 

Brewer, Mrs. Henry. 

Brewer, Mrs. James. 

Brewer, James M. 

Brewer, Rev. Josiah. 

Brewer, Mrs. Bally. 

Brewster, Rev. Cyrus. 

Brewster, Mrs. Sarah E. If. 

Brewster, Mrs. Mary A. 

Briant, Dea. Benjamin. 

Briant, Mrs. Benjamin. 

Briant, Mrs. James. 

Bridge, Rev. Henry M. 

Bridgeman, Edward. 

Bridgeman, Richard B. 

Bridges, Miss Alice. 

Bridge^ Miss C. 
Bridget, Mrs. Prudence. 
Bridgmsn, Mrs, /crush*. J 



Briggs, Mrs. Abby L. 
Brlggs, Mrs. Anna. 
Briggs, Miss Clarissa. 
Briggs, Miss C. A. 
Briggs, Mrs. C. M. 
Briggs, Edwin. 
Briggs, Mrs. H. 
Briggs, Rev. Isaac. 
Briggs, James L. 
Briggs, Mrs. Sophia M. 
Briggs, Rev. William T. 
Brigham, Mrs. Eliza II. 
Brigham, Dea. Elmer. 
Brigham, Mrs. Hannah A. 
Brigham, James B. 
Brigham, Lorlman S. 
Brigham, Moses. 
Brigham, Mrs. Moses. 
Brigham, Oliver M. 
Brigham, Mrs. Sarah. 
Brockway, Miss Mary. 
Brooks, Augustus T. 
Brooks, John H. 
Brooks, Miss Mary. 
Brooks, Mrs. Reuben. 
Brooks, Dr. S. H. 
Broubeck, Mrs. Abigail. 
Brown, Mrs. Abigail. 
Brown, Asa H. 
Brown, Prof. A. H. 
Brown, Mrs. A. R. 
Brown, Alpheus. 
Brown, Mrs. Catharine. 
Brown, Dea. Dauphine. 
Brown, Mrs. Harriet 
Brown, Mrs. Hopestlll. 
Brown, Horatio. 
Brown, Rev. J. R. 
Brown, Josiah. 
Brown, Mrs. Jacob, 2d. 
Brown, Mrs. Mary A. 
Brown, Miss Mary I. 
Brown, Mrs. Matilda. 
Brown, Moses. 
Brown, Mrs. Olive. 
Brown, Miss 8. E. 
Brown, Mrs. Sally H. 
Brown, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Brown, T. L. 
Brown, Mrs. Walter. 
Bryant, Aaron. 
Bryant, Mrs. Lavinia. 
Buck, Mrs. Moses Lb 
Buck Mrs. Sally. 
Buckingham, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Buckingham, Miss H. T. 
Buckman, T. L. 
Bulkley, Rev. Edwin A. 
Bulkley, Mrs. C. P. 
Bullard, Rev. Asa. 
Bullard, Mrs. Harriet N. 
Bullard, Mrs. M. P. 
Bullock, Rufus. 
Burbank, George. 
Burbank, Miss L. P. 
Burdette, Mrs. Maria H. 
Burgess, Ebenezer, D.D. 
Burnap, George S. 
Burnap, Daniel. 
Burnap, SamueL • 

Burnap, Mrs. Samuel. 
Burnell, Mrs. Wealthy. 
Burrap, Edwin 8. 
Burrage, Miss Joan. 
Burridge, Q. A. 
Burrill, Dea. H. B. 
Burroughs, A. T. 
Burt, Mrs. Betsey. 
Burt, Mrs. Caroline. 
Burt, Edward. 
Burt, Heseklah. 
Burt, Marshall 
Burt, Rev. Sylvester. 
Burtt, Mrs. Ellen H. 
Burti, Kirk D. 
Both, JonnL. 



Bushnell, Rev. William. 

Butler, Mrs. E. 

Butler, James H. 

Butler, Miss Mary. 

Butler, Miss Sarah B. 

Butler, Mrs. Sarah H. 

Butler, William F. 

Buxton, Joel. 

Byington. Henry C. 

Cady, Ablel. 

Cady, Rev. Daniel R, 

Cady, Mrs. H. S. 

Caldwell, Rev. James. 

Calhoun, Miss Martha. 

Calhoun, Hon. William B. 

Campbell, Martha. 

Campbell, Mrs. R. 

Canning, E. W. B. 

Capen, Mrs. Mary. 

Capen, Samuel C. 

Capron, Mrs. C. D. 

Capron, Mrs. Deborah. 

Capron, Mrs. Lydia, 

Capron, Mrs. Uriah. 

Capron, Dea. W. C. 

Carleton, Henry B. 

Carleton. Phinehas. 

Carlton, Edward. 

Carlton, Mrs. Israel. 

Carey, Mrs. Eliza. 

Carey, Miss Ellen. 

Carey, Ezra. 

Carpenter, Charles. 

Carpenter, Daniel. 

Carpenter, Mrs. D. W. 

Carpenter, Hiram. 

Carpenter, Miss M. E. 

Carpenter, Mrs. M. P. 

Carpenter, Miss S. 

Carr, George W. 

Carr. J. C. 

Carrier, Mrs. Eunice A. 

Carruth, Mrs. Charles. 

Carruth, Daniel G. 

Carruth, Isaac. 

Carruth, Mrs. Lucy. 

Carruth, Mrs. Mary H. 

Carter, Charles W. 

Carter, Ellas. 

Carter, Mrs. Elias. 

Carter, Mrs. Hannah L. 

Carter, Thomas H. 

Carter, Villnder. 

Cary, James. 

Cary, Mrs. Mary D. 

Case, Moses P. 

Caswell, Mrs. E. L. 

Caswell, Mrs. Laura P. 

Chadwick, Mary Ann. 

Chamberlain, Albert. 

Chamberlain, D. H. 

Chamberlain, Miss Henrietta A. 

Chamberlain, Miss L. A. 

Chandler, A., D.D. 

Chandler, J. 

Chandler, Miss Kate F. 

Chandler, Mrs. Lavinia W. 

Chandler, P. 

Chandler, Ralph H. 

Chapin, Miss Abla. 

Chapln, Adolphus. 

Chapin, Dr. A. 

Chapln, Caleb T. 

Chapin, Edward L. 

Chapin, Mrs. Edward W. 

Chapin, Rev. H. B. 

Chapin, James. 

Chapln, Japhet. 

Chapin, Miss Julia A. 

Chapin, Julia C. 

Chapln JohnO. 

Chapin, Moses. 

Chapin, Dea. Orange. 

Chapin, T. L. 

Chapin, Wm. D. 

CStAVT&a^Qalrla* 



1865. 



TH1BTY NINTH REPORT. 



Ill 



Chapman, Rev. James D. 
Chapman, Rev. W. R. 
Chapman, Mrs. Emily B, 
Chase, Rev. Benjamin 0. 
Chase, Miss C. C. 
Chase, Edward & 
Chase, Enoch P. 
Chase, Miss Esther M. 
Chase, Mrs. Graves. 
Chase, Mrs. Jerusha. 
Chase, John. 
Chase, Moses. 
Chase, Mrs. Mary M. 
Chase, Robert. 
Chase, Robert, Jr. 
Chase, 8. Angler. 
Chase, Silas E. 
Chase, Dea. 
Chase, Phineas. 
Chase, Sprague. 
Cbenery, J. D. 
Chenery, Mrs. Electa. 
Cbickering, Henry. 
Chickering, Rev. Joseph. 
Child, Rev. Alexander C. 
Child, David W. 
Child, Miss Elizabeth. 
Child, Miss Mary. 
Child, Horace B. 
Child, Phineas. 
Child*, D. W. 
Child*, Mrs. Franklin. 
Child*, Ira O. 
Childs, Israel. 
Childs, Mrs. Otis. 
Childs, Samuel 
Chiison, Mrs. Catharine 8. 
Choate, Dr. David. 
Church, Daniel 
Church. Levi. 
Chute, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Claflin, Mrs. Hannah. 
Claflln, Mrs. Polly. 
Claflin, William. 
Clapp, Dea. E. 
Clapp, Miss Harriet. 
Clapp, Dea. James. 
Clapp, Mrs. Jason. 
Clapp, John C. 
Clapp, Levi. 
Clapp, Dea. Richard. 
Clark, Mrs. Angeline. 
Clark, Miss Anna. 
Clark, Dea. Anson B. 
Clark, Rev. Benjamin F. 
Clark, Charles C. 
Clark, Charles F. 
Clark, Rev. Edson L. 
Clark, Edward. 
Clark, Elbridge. 
Clark, Rev. Eli B. 
Clark, Mrs. E. & 
Clark, Mrs. Elijah. 
Clark, Mrs. EUphalet 
Clark, EberF. 
Clark, Eplphras. 
Clark, Henry 0. 
Clark Dea. Israel. 
Clark, Mrs. James A. 
Clark, James P. 
Clark, Mrs. James P. 
Clark, J. Warren. 
Clark, John A. 
Clark, John H. 
Clark, Joshua. 
Clark, Mrs. Julia P. 
Clark, Mrs. Jason. 
Clark, Joseph. 
Clark, Joseph ft, D.D. 
Clark, Rev. Joslah. 
Clark, L. 

Clark, Miss Lodemia. 
Clark, Mrs. Lacy. 
Clark, Mary J. 
Clark, Mortimer. 
Clark, Mote*. 



Clark, Nathaniel 
Clark, Oliver. 
Clark, Oliver R. 
Clark, Rev. Perkins K. 
Clark, Mrs. W. 8. 
Clark, Rouse R. 
Clark, Mrs. S. T. 8. 
Clark, Titus. 
Clark, Rev. Sereno D. 
Clark, Rev. Theodore J. 
Clark, William. 
Clark, William. 
Clarke, Dr. A. 
Clarke, Rev. Dorus. 
Clarke, Rev. Edward. 
Clarke, Stephen. 
Clary, Cephas. 
CUry, John. 
Clary, Samuel H. 
Clayes. Miss Ellen A. 
Cleaveland, Rev. James B. 
Cleaves, Calvin II. 
Clemens, Horace. 
Cleveland, Mrs. Rosette. 
Clifford, Martin. 
Clisby, Lorenzo. 
Clough, Mrs. Pamela. 
Cobb, Rev. Alvan. 
Cobb, Charles K. 
Cobb, Henry E. 
Cobb, Rev. H. W. 
Cobb, John R. 
Cobb, Rev. Leander. 
Cobb, Rev. L. II. 
Cobb, Rev. Nathaniel. 
Cobb, Solon. 
Cob urn, Mrs. Augustus. 
Coburn, II. R. 
Coburn, Mrs. Simeon. 
Codman, C. R. 
Codman, R. 
Coe. Laura E. 
Coffin, Miss Abigail. 
Coffin, Mrs. Clara A. 
Coffin, Charles H. 
Coffin, Dea. Charles. 
Coffin, Mrs. Hannah. 
Coffin, Joseph D. 
Coffin, Mrs. Joseph. 
Coffin, Miss Lucy. 
Coggin, Mrs. C. T. 
Coggin, Rev. David. 
Coggin, Mrs. Ellen K. 
Coggin, Rev. Jacob. 
Coggin, Mrs. Mary. 
Coggin, Rev. William 8. 
Coggshall, Mrs. 8. L. 
Cogswell, Rev. Nathaniel 
Colby, Mrs. EUsa S. 
Colby, Mary A. 
Cole, Mrs. Hannah. 
Cole, Miss Hannah D. 
Cole, Mrs. Mary E. M. 
Coleman, Miss Ann M. 
Coleman, Mrs. Minerva. 
Collins, Mrs. Dolly. 
Collins, George S. 
Collins, Mrs. Ruth. 
Collins, Sanford. 
Collins, Seth. 
Collins, Mrs. Mary. 
Col man, Mrs. Mary. 
Colt, Ezekiel R. 
Colt, Oliver P. 
Colt, Samuel D. 
Colt, Thomas. 
Colton, Rev. Aaron M. 
Colton, Mrs. A. M. 
Colton, David. 
Colton, Mrs. Eunice C. 
Colton, Rev. George. 
Colton, Horatio. 
Colton, Jacob. 
Colton, Mrs. Marian P. 
ColtoD, Her. Theron G. 
Coltoa, Mn. Theron G. 



Colton, Mrs. Wareham. 
Comstock, John C. 
Conant, Francis. 
Conant, Mrs. M. C. 
Conant. William. 
Condit, Jennie M. 
Cone, Rev. L. H. 
Coney, John. 
Connell, Rev. David. 
Converse, Benjamin. 
Cook, Mrs. Aaron. 
Cook, Asa. 
Cook, Mrs. Charles. 
Cook, Miss Charlotte. 
Cook, Mrs. Catharine. 
Cook, Miss Catharine. 
Cook, Charles, Jr. 
Cook, Charles, 2d. 
Cook, E. E. 
Cook, Edmund. 
Cook, Mrs. Harriet. 
Cook, Henry. 
Cook, Horace. 
Cook, Mrs. James. 
Cook. Mm. JoeL 
Cook, Josiah. 
Cook, Mrs. Judith. 
Cook, John L. 
Cook, Mrs. Mary D. 
Cook, Peres. 
Cook, Rebecca. 
Cook, Mrs. Samuel. 
Cook, Shubael 
Cook, Silas B. 
Cook, Samuel J. 
Cook, Mrs. Zenas. 
Cooke, Parsons, D.D. 
Cooke, Samuel P. 
Cooledge, Calvin. 
Cooledge, Miss Mary E. 
Cooledge, Nathaniel, Jr. 
Cooledge, Mrs. & Isabella. 
Cooley, Alfred. 
Cooley, Dea. Judah. 
Cooley, Mrs. L. G. B. 
Coolidge, Rev. Amos II. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Harriet. 
Coolidge, Benjamin. 
Coolidge, Thomas B. 
Coomes, Mrs. H. B. F. 
Cooper, Miss A. 
Cooper, Francis. 
Cooper, Samuel T. 
Copeland, Mrs. L. A. 
Copeland, MelviUe. 
Copp, Joseph A., D.D. 
Corbln, Miss P. 
Cordley, Rev. 0. M. 
Cornell, Rev. William M. 
Cornish, Ivory S. 
Couch, Miss Eliza. 
Couch, Rev. PauL 
Coverly, Miss Sarah. 
Cowden, Miss Charlotte. 
Cowden, Mrs. Deborah. 
Cowdery, Robert 
Cowles, David 8. 
Cowles, Mrs. Oliver. 
Craft, Caleb. 
Craft, Miss Ellen. 
Craft, G. 

Cragin, Miss Sophronia & 
Craig, Rev. Wheelock. 
Crane, Mrs. Abijah. 
Crane, Asa. 
Crane, Mrs. Anna H. 
Crane, Edward. 
Crane, Mrs. Edward. 
Crane, Hosea. 
Crane, J. W. 
Crane, Mrs. Mary F. 
Crane, Rev. Oliver. 
Crane, Mrs. Pamela. 
Crawford, R, 
Crawford, Robert, D.D. 
Crittenden, MedaA. 



112 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May 



Crocker, Mrs. A. P. 

Crocker, Mrs. E. 

Crocker, Mrs. K. II. F. 

Crocker, Mrs. H. N. 

Crocker, Moses C. 

Crockett, G. W. 

Crosby, Dea. C. 

Crosby, Mrs. Sarah B. 

Crosby, Austin. 

Crosby, Rev. Daniel. 

Crosby, Otis. 

Crosby, Mrs. Rebecca. 

Crosby, Samuel D. 

Crosby, Dea. 8. 8, 

Cross, Rev. Ab\jab. 

Cross, Dr. Enoch. 

Cross, Mrs. E. P. 

Cross, Mrs. M. B. 

Cross, Miss Mary A. 

Cross, Mrs. P. S. 

Crowcll, E. P. 

Crowell, Dr. John, Jr. 

Cruikshank, Rev. James. 

Cuminings, Charles. 

Cummings, Haskel. 

Cuminings, Dea. Joseph. 

Currier, Mrs. Charlotte F. 

Currier, Mrs. Eunice A. 

Currier, George E. 

Currier, Moses A. 

Currier, William. 

Currier, William I. 

Curtis, Mrs. Caroline. 

Curtis, Epaphras. 

Curtis, Rev. Erastus. 

Curtis, Mrs. Erastus. 

Curtis, II. C. 

Curtis, Henry C. 

Curtis, Rev. Jared. 

Curtis, John E. 

Curtis, Mrs. Lucy W. 

Cushing, Rev. James R. 

Cushing, Mrs. Mary F. 

Cushmau, Rev. Job. 

Cushman, Rev. Martin. 

Cushman, N. 

Cushman, William P. 

Cutler, Mrs. Betsey. 

Cutler, Caroline P. 

Cutler, George. 

Cutter, Mrs. Adeline W. 

Cutter, Mrs. Eliza J. 

Cutter, Mrs. Lucy. 

Cutter, Mrs. Mary. 

Cutting, Mrs. Catharine. 

Cutting, N. H. 

Daggett, Mrs. C. 

Daggett, Ellphalet. 

Dakln, Levi. 

Dakin, Mrs. Mary. 

Dakln, T. L. 

Dalzell, Mrs. Ann. 

Dalzell, Mrs. Sarah. 

Dame, Theodore 8, 

Dana, Daniel, D.D. 

Dana, Joseph. 

Dana, Louisa Lord. 

Dana, Rev. Samuel. 

Dana, Mrs. Sarah E. 

Dan forth, Mrs. Frances. 

Danforth, Mrs. Sarah. 

Daniels, David. 

Daniels, Lewis. 

Daniels, Milton. 

Daniels, Miss M. 

Daniels, Mrs. Mary. 

Daniels, Mrs. Polly. 

Daniels, Timothy. 

Darling, Benjamin C. 

Darling, Henry J. 

Dascomb, Mrs. P. 

Dashlel, Rev. Alfred H. 

Davenport, C. F. 
Dure a port, Jesse R. 
Davenport. W. R. 
Davidson, John J. 



Davis, Emerson, D.D. 
Davis, Fanny W. 
Davis, Dea. George. 
Davis, George L. 
Davis, George W. 
Davis, Harriet K. 
Davis, John. 
Davis, Mrs. Josephine. 
Davis, Mrs. Julia E. M. 
Davis, Miss Lucy. 
Davis, Mrs. Mary M. 
Davis, Miss M. E. 
Davis, Moses. 
Davis, Mrs. N. 
Davis, Mrs. Rachel. 
Davis, Mrs. Susan. 
Davis, William. 
Davis, Mrs. William. 
Day, Mrs. Aaron. 
Day, Ileury. 
Day, Miss Luclnda. 
Day, Miss Lucretia S. 
Dean, Asahel. 
Dean, J. H. 
Dean, Philander W. 
Deane, Mrs. A. F. 
Dearborn, Miss Anna E. 
Delano, Mrs. Ansel C. 
Delano, Mrs. Mary 0. 
Demond, Edmund. 
Demond, Mrs. Lucy. 
Demond, Thomas D. 
Denham, Rev. George. 
Denham, Mrs. Clarissa. 
Denham, Mrs. Matilda. 
Denham, Samuel. 
Denlson, Mrs. C. M. 
Dennis, E. P. 
Dennis, Rev. John. 
Dennis, Mrs. Rebecca. 
Denny, C. C. 
Denny, Mrs. Ann S. 
Denny, Miss E. M. 
Denny, George. 
Denny, Joseph A. 
Densmore, Summer. 
Dewey, Hon. Charles A. 
Dewey, Daniel N. 
Dewey, Mrs. Haddassah. 
Dewey, Joel N. 
Dewey, Miss Mary C. 
Dewing, Edward, Jr. 
De Witt, Archibald. 
De Witt, William. 
De Wolf, Mrs. Hannah. 
Dexter, Mrs. Alathea. 
Dexter, Rev. Henry M. 
Dickennan, Rev. L. 
Dickinson, Miss Caroline. 
Dickinson, D. 
Dickinson, Hon. Edward. 
Dickiuson, Lieut Enos. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Elijah. 
Dickinson, Mrs. E. M. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Eliza 8. 
Dickinson, Edward. 
Dickinson, Mrs. E. W.' 
Dickinson, Mrs. Harriet N. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Eliza. 
Dickinson, Emily C. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Erastus. 
Dickinson, Lavinia N. 
Dickinson, Miss H. 8. 
Dickinson, Joseph. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Levi. 
Dickinson, Miss Mary. 
Dickinson, Miles. 
Dickinson, N. C. 
Dickinson, Noadiah 8. 
Dickiuson, Mrs. N. 8. 
Dickinson, Oliver. 
Dickinson, Quartus L. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Susan H. 
Dickinson, Mrs. Simeon. 
Dickinson, Dea. WUU&m. 
Dickinson, W.' A. 



Dimock, Dea. Lyman. 
Dix, Miss Jane. 
Dixon, Samuel. 
Doane, Joshua, 
Doane, Mrs. Mercy. 
Dodd, Mrs. E. 8. 
Dodge, Mrs. Andrew. 
Dodge, Mrs. A. 
Dodge, Mrs. Elizabeth P. 
Dodge, Mrs. Eunice W. 
Dodge, Joseph E. 
Dodge, Mrs. Mary S. 
Dodge, Mrs. Polly. 
Dodge, Mrs. Sophia. 
Dodge, Mrs. Robert. 
Dodge, R. A. 
Dohertv, Hugh. 
Dole, Mrs. C. H. 
Dole, Rev. George T. 
Dole, Mrs. George T. 
Dole, Mrs. Martha B. 
Dole, Mrs. Patience. 
Dole, S. J. 
Dole, Mrs. Sarah. 
Dole, S. W. 
Dole, Mrs. S. W. 
Dole, Sophronla L. 
Donklv, B. F. 
Dorset, S. K. 
Dow, Rev. Ezeklel. 
Dow, Mrs. M. A. 
Downe, Mrs. Louisa II. 
Downs, Levi. 
Doyle, Abraham T. 
Doyle, Mrs. A. T. 
Drake, Mrs. Eunice. 
Drake, Dea. Ebenezer. 
Drake, 8. A. 
Draper, Miss Emma L. 
Draper, Miss Hannah M. 
Draper, Mrs. Lavinia. 
Draper, Paul. 
Drury, Mrs. Abby. 
Drury, Mrs. 8. 
Dudley, Mrs. Ann. 
Dudley, Mrs. Jane. 
Dunbar, G. B. 
Dudley, P. W. 
Dudley, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Ihinakin, Mrs. Walter. 
Dunham, Rev. Isaac. 
Dunlap, John W. 
Dunlap, Mrs. Mary L. 
Dun ton, Zenas. 
Durfee, Miss Annie G. 
Durfee, Rev. Calvin. 
Durfee, Mrs. D. B. 
Durfee, Miss Hattle M. 
Durfee, Holden B. 
Durfee, Mrs. Lucinda T. 
Durfee, Dea. Richard. 
Durgan, Dea. James. 
Dutton, George D. 
Dutton, Hubbard. 
Dwight, Miss Frances E. 
Dwight, Rev. H. E. 
Dwight, Mrs. Sally A. 
Dwight, Miss Sarah. 
Dwight, Mrs. Sophia C. 
Dyer, Samuel. 
Eager, Mrs. Mary 0. 
Eager, Winslow. 
Eames, Caleb. 
Eames, John. 
Eames, Luther. 
Eames, Miss Harriet L. 
Eames, Mrs. Rachel U. 
Estabrook, Mrs. U.M. 
Eafctman, Joseph. 
Eastman, Mrs, Joseph. 
Eastman, Reuben R. 
Eastman, Samuel F. 
Eastman, Mrs. Sanfbrd. 
Eaton, Aaron. 
Eaton, Benjamin. 
"Eaton, Utv Benjamin. 



THIBTT NINTH BEPOBT. 



113 



Dea. Benjamin L. 
Mrs. Catharine E. 
Darius. 
Ebeneser N. 
Miss E. L. 
Mra Blbridge a. 
Mia Elisabeth, 
fames H. 
Mrs. Lucy B. 
Mrs. Martha W. 
Miss P. R. 
Thomas. 
William. 
lenry N. 

Rev. John Q. A. 

Miss Elisa. 

s, Justin, D.D. 

s, Mrs. Lydia B. 

a, Rev. J. E. 

s, Rev. Henry L. 

s, Lather H. 

s, Miss Nancy. 

s, Worcester F. 

>n, Rev. Nathaniel H. 

us, Mrs. 8. A. 

Miss Caroline W. 

P. A. 

&, Benjamin. 

e. Mrs. Elisa, 

unhelN. 

Iss Abbie W. 

axter. 

larles. 

varies. 

rs. David. 

iright 

lwin. 

issEttza. 

-anclsD. 

rs.L. 

iver. 

rs. Rufus. 

n. Stephen. 

red, D.D. 

l Ethan. 

lanC. 

a Ethan C. 

bs Hannah. 

a Harriet E. 

mer. 

rtlnW. 

ss Maria. 

son W. 

111am B. 

n, Benjamin. 

a, Miss Catharine T. 

a, Mrs. Hester & 

n. Jacob. 

n, Mrs. Martha E. 

d, R. R. 

0, Simeon. 

a, Thomas, 
q, Thomas A. 
David. 
Mrs. Nancy. 

s, Nathaniel, D.D. 

b, Noah D. 

ok, Mrs. Amanda, 
unoa 
rs. E. 
Henry P. 
,J. D. 
k, Mrs, Sarah E. 

1, J. R. 

s\ Rev. L. 
.Nathaniel. 
m,Mlss Catharine. 
do, Miss Susan, 
m, Mrs. Susan, 
orth, Mm. C. 
orth, Rev. James D. 
orth, Mrs. Sarah W. 



1& 



Francis. 



Farrar, Miss H. 
Farrar, Hon. Timothy. 
Farrar. William K. 
Farwell, Asa. 
Farwell, Miss Abigail. 
Farwell, Mrs. Jane. 
Farwell, Dea. John. 
Farwell, Mrs. Lydia. 
Farwell, Mrs. M. F. 
Farwell, Mrs. Mira W. 
Farwell, Mrs. Nancy & 
Faunce, Nathaniel. 
Fay, Benjamin B. 
Fay, Rev. B. M. 
Fay, Cyrus. 
Fay, Ellsha. 
Fay, Gilbert 0. 
Fay, John B. 
Fay, Nathan. 
Fay, a T. 

Fayerweather, J. A. 
Felch, George W. 
Fellows, Miss C. E. 
Fenn. Curtis T. 
Fennlmore, Mra n. T. 
Ferguson, Rev. James. 
Fettyplace, Miss Catharine. 
Field, Charles B. 
Field, J. 
Field, John W. 
Field, Rev. Levi A. 
Field, Mrs. Maria B. 
Field, Mrs. Nancy M. 
Fish, Rodolphus D. 
Fisher, Miss Ann. 
Fisher, Dea. Charles F. 
Fisher, Eleanor M. 
Fisher, George. 
Fisher, Jabes G. 
Fisher, Mrs. M. A. 
Fisher, Mrs. Nancy. 
Fisher, Nathaniel, Jr. 
Fisk, Mrs. D. D. 
Flsk,Rev. Ellsha. 
Fisk, H. H. 
Flsk, John, D.D. 
Fisk, L. M. 
Fisk, Rev. P. 
Flsk, Miss Rebecca. 
Fisk, Mrs. Ruth C. 
Flsk, Dr. Timothy. 
Flake, George D. 
Flake, Miss Mary F. 
Flske, John D. 
Fiske, Rev. Warren. 
Flske, Mrs. Harriet M. 
Fitch, Etijah. 
Pitts, Mrs. Charles H. 
Pitts, Mrs. Delia. 
PiUs, D. B. 
Pitts, George W. 
Fltts, Mrs. S. W. A. 
FUs, Rev. Daniel 
Plagg, Abijah. 
Plagg, Mrs. Mary Jane. 
Plagg, Miss Sarah. 
Flanders, Joseph. 
Fletcher, Ephralm. 
Fletcher, Ezra W. 
Fletcher, Mrs. H. C. 
Fletcher, Mra Hannah C. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Hannah C. 
Fletcher, Rev. James. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Lydia. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Lydia M. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Margaret. 
Fletcher, Samuel. 

Fletcher, Mrs. 

Flint, Mrs. Catharine D. 
Flint, Kendall. 
Flint, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Plynt, William N. 
Plynt. Mrs. Eudocia C. # 
Pobes, Daniel If. 
Pobes, Henry. 
IW*», Mha Susan 11. 



Fogg, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Folger, Edward R. 
Folger, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Forbes, Arthur. 
Forbes, Mary J. 
Forbnsh, Rev. Charles. 
Forbush, Mrs. Susan B. 
Force, Samuel. 
Ford, Charles R. 
Ford, Ephralm. 
Ford, Ephralm. 
Ford, Jefferson. 
Ford, Miss Mary C. 
Ford, T. A. 
Foster, Rev. Aaron. 
Foster, Rev. Davis. 
Foster, Iben B. 
Foster, Isaac. 
Foster, John. 
Foster, John. 
Foster, Joseph H. 
Foster, Thomas C, Jr. 
Foster, W. P. 
Foster, William. 
Fowler, Rev. Bancroft. 
Fowler, Mrs. Mary Anna. 
Fowler, Rev. Orrin. 
Fox, Mrs. M. L. 
Francis, Festus. 
Francis, Samuel P. 
Freeland, Mrs. Arina A. 
Freeland, Mrs. Catharine M. 
Freeman, Mrs. D. P. 
Freeman, Rev. George E. 
Freeman, Isaac 
French, Alanson A. 
French, Catharine L. 
French, Mrs. C. S. 
French, Mrs. Hannah. 
French, Mrs. Harriet 
French, Miss Helen M. 
French, Joslah. 
French, Leander. 
French, Lysander. 
French, R. W. 
Friend. Mrs. Juliet. 
Frost, Mrs. Abby T. 
Frost, Mrs. Ann. 
Frost, Mrs. Damarls. 
Frost, Rev. Daniel D. 
Frothingham, James. 
Prye, Miss J. H. 
Fuller, Mra. A. R. 
Fuller, Mrs. A. R. 
Puller, Charles. 
Puller, Mrs. Henry. 
Puller, Dea. Hesekiah. 
Fuller, Miss Jane. 
Fuller, Levi A.. 
Puller, Mrs. Mary L. 
Puller, Richard P. 
Purber, Rev. Daniel L. 
Gage, B. F. 
Gale, Mra Mary L. 
Gale, Nahum, D.D. 
Gallup, David R. 
Gardner, Mra Benjamin. 
Garfield, Mrs. II. W. 
Garrette, Rev. Edmund Y. 
Garrison, Mrs. Harriet 
Gates, Miss Julia. 
Gates, Mra Mary. 
Gay, Rev. Samuel 
Gaylord, Mra. Edward. 
Gaylord, Eleaser. 
Gaylord^Mra Jerusha* 
Gaylord, Dea. John. 
Gaylord. Mrs. Susan. 
Gay, Miss Selina. 
Gay, William H. 
Gailey, Rev. Sayres. 
Gerould, Mra Elisabeth D. 
Gibbs, George L. 
Olbbs, Miss Hannah. 
Gibbs, Mrs. Hannah riL 
Glbbs, Mra. Mary. 



114 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May 



Gibbs, Miss Polly. 
Gibbs, Miss R. 
Gibson, Mrs. Delia F. 
Gibson, Harrlette P. 
' Gibson, Mrs. Harriet 
Gibson, Mrs. Mary. 
Gibson, Samuel A. 
Gibson, Mrs. Tryphena. 
Giddings, Rev. Edward. 
Gilbert, Miss Emily F. 
Gilbert, Mrs. E. J. 
Gilbert, G. H. 
Gilbert, Miss Jerusha. 
Gilbert, Joseph. 
Gilbert, P. B. 
Gilbert, Miss Snsan H. 
Gilbert, Mrs. Wareham C. 
Gilbert, William. 
GUes, Miss Elisabeth. 
Gilmore, Mrs. Thomas. 
GUson, Mrs. A. 
Gleason, Mrs. Abel. 
Gleason, Elbridge. 
Gleason, Lewis P. 
Gleason, Russell F. 
Glecen, Levi. 
Glover, Mrs. Elijah. 
Goddard, Joseph. 
Goddard, N. 
Goddard, Samuel 
Goffe, E. W. 

Golding, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Goldsbary, James. 
Goldsmith, Abraham. 
Goldthwalt, Elijah. 
Goodale, David. 
Goodale, David B. 
Goodale, Mrs. Esther C. 
Goodale, Mrs. Sophia. 
Goodbridge, Israel. 
Goodell, H. A. 
Goodell, Marcos L. 
Goodhue, Mrs. Sophia. 
Goodman, Joslah W. 
Goodman, Titus. 
Goodnougb, Mrs. J. D. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Goodrich, Dr. Horace. 
Goodrich, Mrs. Horace. 
Goodrich, J. £ 
Goodrich, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Goodwin, Mbs Abby P. 
Goodwin, Mrs. Martha B. 
Goodwin, Miss M. 
Goodwin, William. 
Gorham, Mrs. Clarissa C. 
Gott, Mrs. Hannah B. 
Gould, Dea. A. 
Gould, Mrs. Aaron. 
Gould, Mrs. Angelina. 
Gould, Daniel 
Gould, Mrs. Esther. 
Gould, Mrs. P. P. 
Gould, Mrs. Ruth K. 
Gould, Miss Sarah K. 
Gouldlng, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Gouldlng. James I. 
Gowing, Mrs. James. 
Graves, Aaron. 
Graves, Elam. 
Graves, Elnathan. 
Graves, Henry. 
Graves, Hollia D. 
Graves, J. L. 
Graves, Jotham. 
Graves, Samuel W. 
Graves, Dea. Zebedlah. 
Gray, Mrs. Betsey. 
Gray, Mrs. 8. 
Greeley, Rev. Edward H. 
Greeley, Mrs. Louisa M. 
Green, Mrs. Elba. 
Green, Gardner. 
Green, LA H. 
Qreen, Linug. 
Green, Mrs. 8*11 j. . 



Green, Mrs. Sally. 
Greene, Rev. David. 
Greene, Mrs. Charlotte E. 
Greene, Henry M. 
Greene, Rev. John M. 
Greene, Mrs. Louisa D. 
Greene, Mrs. Mary P. 
Greene, Miss 8. T. 
Greenleaf, Mrs. Mary E> 
Greenwood, Mrs. Ira. 
Greenwood, Thomas. 
Grennell, Mrs, E. S. 
Gridley, Addison. 
Griggs, Mrs. Catharine. 
Grosvenor, Edwin P. 
Grout, Dea. Joel. 
Grout, Miss R, 0. 
Grout, Miss Susan. 
Grover, Ephralm. 
Grover, Krantus. 
Guild, Miss Clarissa. 
Guilford. George W. 
Gunn, Charles W. 
Gurney, Rev. John H. 
Gurney, 0. 

Hadley, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Hadley, Mrs. Laura. 
Hadley, Mrs. Louisa. 
Hale, Miss Alice Little. 
Hale, Mrs. Ann L. 
Hale, Miss Betsey. 
Hale, Ebeneser. 
Hale, Ebeneser. 
Hale, Mrs. Ebeneser, Jr. 
Hale, Joshua. 
Hale, Lemuel F. 
Hale, Miss Mary. 
Hale, Miss Mary & 
Hale, Mrs. Oliver. 
Hale, SamueL 
Hale, Miss Sarah E. 
Hale, Mrs. Sophia. 
Hale, Thomas, 
Hale, Thomas. 
Hale, William B. 
Hall, Mrs. Emily. 
Hall, Mrs. Emily B. 
Hall, Rev. Gordon. 
Hall, Mrs. Gordon. 
Hall, Mrs. I. F. 
Hall, Joseph. 
Hall, Moses. 
Hallett, Mrs. Mary E. 
Hammond, Mrs. J. 
Hammond, Mrs. Joslah H. 
Hammond, Mrs. L. M. 
Hanks, Mrs. William. 
Hanners, Mrs. M. A. 
Harding, Mrs. J. M. 
Harding, Rev. John W. 
Harding, Mrs. John W. 
Harding, Smith. 
Harding, William G. 
Hardy, O. 
Harlow, Alden. 
Harlow, Branch. 
Harlow, Sarah R. 
Harper, Mrs. Mary A. 
Harriman, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Harrington, Mrs. Ebeneser. 
Harrington, Rev. Ell W. 
Harrington, Mrs. Levi. 
Harrington, William. 
Harris, John H. 
Harris, Runts. 
Harris, Mrs. Sarah F. 
Harris, Windsor. 
Harrison, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Hartshorn, Mrs. H. B. 
Hartshorne, Mrs. L. 
Hartshorne, Mrs. L. J. 
Hartwell E. E. 
Hartwesi Rev. J. 
Hartwell, Joseph. 
Hartwell, Mrs. Joseph. 
Hartwell, Mary M. 



Hartwell, Nathan. 
Harvey, Mrs. Catharine. 
Harwood, Mrs. AbeL 
Haskell, Mrs. Charles. 
Haskell, Mrs. Eunice. 
Haskell, Miss Hope. 
Haskell, Jacob. 
Haskell, John G. 
Haskell, Mrs. L. 
Haskell, Mrs. Mary L. 
Haskell, Miss M. L. 
Haskell, William. 
Hastings, Dr. John N. 
Hastings, Joseph W. 
Hastings, Mrs. Mary P. 
Hatch, B. C. 
Hatch, Cheney. 
Hatch, D. 
Hatch, Isaac 
Hatch, Luther. 
Hatch, William R. 
Hatfield, Miss Lucy A. 
Haven, Rev. John. 
Haven, Rev. Joseph. 
Haven, Mrs. Martha. 
Hawes, Miss Anna. 
Hawes, Miss Julia C. 
Hawes, Miss Julia. 
Hawes, Charles. 
Hawes, Mrs. Cynthia L. 
Hawkes, Dr. Elihua 
Hawkes, Rev. Roswell. 
Hawkes, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Hawkes, T. W. 
Hawkes, Mrs. Sarah W. 
Hawks, Henry A. 
Hawks, William A. 
Hawley, Rev. W. A. 
Hayden, Mrs. A. M. 
Hayden, Mrs. Charles D. 
Hayden, Samuel W. 
Hayes, Erastus. 
Hayes, Mrs. Erastus. 
Haynes, Dea. H. 
Haynes, Henry, Jr. 
Haynes, Mrs. Laura D. 
Hayse, Walter. 
Hayward, Mrs. Betsey. 
Hayward, Mrs. Charles. 
Hayward, Charles F. 
Hayward, Mbs Elizabeth. 
Hayward, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Hayward, G. 
Hayward, James. 
Hayward, Joel. 
Hayward, John. 
Hayward, Joseph E. 
Hayward, Mrs. Martha W. 
Hayward, PauL 
Hayward, Samuel. 
Hayward, Mrs. Sarah. 
Hayward, Stevens, 
Haslewood, Francis W. 
Haaen, Mrs. Minerva S. 
Ussen, Rev. Timothy A. 
Headley, Rev. Phineas C. 
Heard, Mrs. AbeL 
Heard, George W. 
Heath, Mrs. C. 0. 
Heath, Charles. 
Heath, Mrs. G. L. 
Heath, Miss Sarah Tale. 
Heath, Mrs. & A. Y. 
Heath, William 8towe. 
Herbert, Rev. Charles D. 
Herbert, Mrs. C. D. 
Herbert, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Hersey, Ira. 
Hewins, Dea. D. L. 
Hewing, L. R. 
Hewitt, Joseph. 
Hlbbard, Isaac L. 
Hidden, Miss Mary E. 
Hlgglns, Sylvester. 
HHdreth, Mr* Sophia. 
Hill, Re v. George E, 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



115 



Hill, Mrs. Emily O. 
H11L Henry. 
HOI, Lewis. 
Hill, Mrs. Sally. 
Hlllman, George. 
Hills, Mrs. Caroline P. 
Hinckley, Miss EUsabeth B. 
Hinckley, 8. H. 
HJnekley, Mrs. 8. L. 
Rlne, Sylvester. 
Hinsdale. Mrs. Catharine B. 
Hitchcock, Amelia P. 
Hitchcock, Dr. A. 
Hitchcock, Abner. 
Hitchcock, Amos. 
Hitchcock, Charles. 
Hitchcock, Edward, Jr. 
Hitchcock, G. L. 
Hitchcock, Mrs. G. L. 
Hitchcock, Henry E. 
Hitchcock, Joseph H. 
Hitchcock, Mrs. J. W. 
Hitchcock, Mrs. Sarah. 
Hitchcock, Sylvester. 
Hoadley, H. H. 
Host, Bodolphus. 
Hobart, William. 
Hobbs, B. M. 
Hobert, Mrs. A. L. 
Hodge, Mrs. George. 
Hodge, Mrs. Lydla. 
Hodge, Mrs. William. 
Hodges, Mrs. P. W. 
Holsfagton.Bev. Henry R. 
Holbrook, Ellas. 
Holbrook, Elisha. 
Holbrook, Ellsworth C. 
Holbrook, W. 
Holden, Abiel. 
Holden, Mrs. M. L. 
Holden, Miss Nancy. 
Holland, E. H. 
Holland, Miss Sarah E. 
Hoilis, Miss Caroline. 
Hollis, Mrs. Mary. 
Hollis, Mrs. Susan. 
Holman, Mrs. E. R. 
Holman, Mrs. George W. 
Holman, Mrs. Mary. 
Holman, Sarah C. 
Holman, Sydney. 
Holmes, Dea. Branch. 
Holmes, Mrs. Samuel. 
Holt, Miss B. E. 
Holt, E. P. 
Holt, E. Frances. 
Holt, Lemuel. 
Holt, Miss Martha. 
Holt, Dea. Solomon. 
Holt, Miss Sophia. 
Holt, Ber. Stephen A. 
Homan, Miss Elisabeth, 
Homan, Peter. 
Homer, C. W. 
Homes, Ber. Francis. 
Homes, Mrs. Sarah. 
Hooker, Bey. Edward P. 
Hooker, Ber. Francis. 
Hooker, Henry. 
Hooker, Henry B., D.D. 
Hooker, Mrs. Mary A. 
Hooper, Benjamin F. 
Hooper, Mrs. E. 8. 
Hooper, Henry. 
Hopkins, Miss Catharine. 
Hopkins, Mark, D.D., LL.D. 
Horton, W. L. B. 
Hose, Miss Martha K. 
Hosford, Ber. Henry B. 
Hotford, Mrs. Mary E. 
Houghton, Abel. 
Houghton, E. W. 
Hovey, George L. 
Horey, Mrs. Helen L. 
Horey, James M. 
Howard, Joel M. 



Howard, Mrs. Louisa. 
Howard, Mrs. Mary. 
Howard, Ber. M. 8. 
Howard, Mrs. Phebe. 
Howard, Ransom. 
Howard, W. L. 
Howe, Mrs. Caroline. 
Howe, Mrs. Charles. 
Howe, Charles M. 
Howe, Elijah. 
Howe, Elijah, Jr. 
Howe, Mrs. Esther. 
Howe, Francis. 
Howe, Dr. Francis A. 
Howe, Henry. 
Howe, Mrs. Isaac R, 
Howe, Joseph 8. 
Howe, Mrs. Lydla. 
Howe, Miss Maria E. 
Howe, Moses. 
Howe, Mrs. Olive P. 
Howe, Oliver C. 
Howe, Miss Persia. 
Howe, Dea. Rufus. 
Howe, Mrs. Sally T. 
Howe, Willard. 
Howe, William G. 
Howes, J. C. 
Howes, Mrs. Lydla. 
Howland, Dea. Asa. 
How land, Dr. Asa. 
Howland, Ber. W. W. 
Hoyt, Fanny E. 
Hoyt, Isaac. 
Hoyt, Dea. Moses. 
Hoyt, BusseU M. 
Hubbard, Bey. Anson. 
Hubbard, Cyras. 
Hubbard, E. A. 
Hubbard, Bey. James M. 
Hubbard, Louisa M. 
Hubbard, N. S. 
Hubbard, Gardiner G. 
Hubbard, K. 
Hubbard, Miss Lucy N. 
Hubbard, Mrs. M. 8. 
Hubbard, Miss Maria. 
Hubbard, Martin. 
Hubbell, Mrs. Lucina. 
Hull, Mrs. Charlotte C. 
Hume, Mrs. Hannah D. 
Humphrey, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Humphrey, Heman, D.D. 
Humphrey, Mrs. Mary B. 
Hunnewell, Joseph. 
Hunt, Addison A. 
Hunt, Mrs. Alice H. 
Hunt, Mrs. Benjamin G. 
Hunt, Mrs. Betsey. 
Hunt, Mrs. Experience. 
Hunt, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Hunt, Mrs. Henry. 
Hunt, Mrs. H. F. 
Hunt, Mrs. Nancy 0. 
Hunt, OUver. 
Hunt, Mrs. Persia G. 
Hunt, Mrs. Rachel A. 
Hunt, Ber. Samuel 
Hunt, Mrs. Sophia, 
Hunt, Warren. 
Hunt, Bev. W. W. 
Hunter, Miss Elisabeth. 
Huntington, Mrs. Alethea. 
Huntington, Mrs. G. P. 
Huntington, Mrs. Mehetabel. 
Hard, Edward P. 
Hard, Ellen A. 
Hurd, J. a 
Hurd, Jeremiah, 
Hurd, Otis W. 
Hurd, Mrs. R. A. 
Hard, W. K. 
Hurlbut, Mary P. 
Huse, Joseph. 
Huse, Samuel 
Bate, Mra. M*rj K. 



Hutchlns, E. C. 
Hutchlns, Ezra C. 
Hutchlns, Mrs. Esra T. 
Hutchlns, Miss M. 0. 
Hutchlns, Mrs. M. 
Hutchlns, Mrs. B. 
Hutchlngson, Miss Almira. 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Amos. 
HyaU, Mrs. Sarah. 
Hyde, Alexander. 
Hyde, Mrs. Charles. 
Hyde, Charles M'Ewen. 
Hyde, George. 
Hyde, Mrs. H. W. 
Hyde, Irs, 

Hyde, John M'Ewen. 
Hyde, Mrs. Lucy. 
Hyde, William. 
Ide, Jacob, D.D. 
Ide, Mrs. Mary B. 
Ilsley, Miss Elisabeth. 
Imjall*, MraEllxaT. 
Ingalls, J. T. 
Ingalls, Mrs. Mary. 
Ingersoll, Mrs. Enxa H. 
Ives, Dr. A. W. 
lyes, Henry. 
Ives, Bey. Thomas H. 
Jackson, Ephraim. 
Jackson, Miss Mary A. 
Jackson, Bev. William C. 
Jacobs, Roland. 
Jacobs, Warren M. 
James, Bey. Horace. 
James, N. N. 
Janes, Mrs. Lydla. 
Jaques, Miss Ann. 
Jaques, John. 
Jaqueth, Mrs. Eunice. 
Jefferds, Bey. Forrest. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Catharine A. H, 
Jenkins, Jerome B. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Olive. 
Jenkins, Dea. Prince. 
Jenney, Mrs. & P. 
Jennings, C. 
Jennings, Dea. Calvin. 
Jennings, Samuel. 
Jennlscnl G. C. 
Jerome, Dea. Horace. 
Jeasup, Miss Emily. 
Jewell, Mrs. Harriet, 
Jewell, Mrs. Susan. 
Jewett, David B. 
Jewett, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Jewett, George A. 
Jewett, Mrs. Lydla M. 
Jewett, Mrs. Rebecca, 
Johnson, Mrs. Abby H. 
Johnson, Amos. 
Johnson, Bev. Amos H. 
Johnson, Chester. 
Johnson, Mrs. Diantha. 
Johnson, Earl. 
Johnson, Mrs. George E. 
Johnson, Mrs. Hannah. 
Johnson, Mrs. Hannah S. 
Johnson, James H. 
Johnson, Joseph. 
Johnson, Miss Julia D. 
Johnson, Lemuel S. 
Johnson, Luther. 
Johnson, Miss Mary A. 
Johnson, Mrs. Nancy. 
Johnson, Mrs. Rebecca A. 
Johnson, Mrs. Samuel 
Johnson, Miss Sarah. 
Johnson, Mrs. 8arah J. 
Johnson, Miss Sarah B. 
Johnson, Mrs. Stephen. 
Johnson, Warren. 
Johnson, Mrs. Warren B. 
Johnson, William W. 
Johnston, Miss Sarah, 
Jones, Miss EmlW. 
Jones, Mrs. Frederick. 



116 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



Maj 



Jones, Henry. 

Jones, Joseph. 

Jones, Mrs. J. S. 

Jones, Mrs. Reuben. 

Jones, Samuel. 

Jones, Mrs. Sarah. 

Jordan, David. 

Jordan, Mrs. Sarah. 

Joslln, Mrs. Lucretia. 

Jourdan, Mrs. Susan. 

Judd, Alfred. 

Judd, Henry. 

Judson, William. 

Karner, Mrs. Adelaide B. 

Keep, Mrs. Catharine. 

Keep, Miss H. U. 

Keith, Dea. H. W. 

Keith, P. 

Kelley, David. 

Kelley, Ezra. 

Kelley, QUI M. 

Kelley, Mrs. Lydla. 

Kelley, Sarah. 

Kelley, Miss Sarah W. 

Kelley, Stephen. 

Kellogg, Dwight H. 

Kellogg, Miss Elizabeth. 

Kellogg, Horace. 

Kellogg, John. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Martha B. 

Kellogg, Mrs. Mary. 

Kelly, Dea. 

Kelly, Joseph B. 

Kendall, Edward. 

Kendall, Jacob. 

Kendall, Mrs. Martha A. 

Kendall, R. P. 

Kendall, Miss Susan. 

Kendall, 8. M. 

Kendrick, Mrs. Anna. 

Kendrick, Mrs. Abigail. 

Kenney, Mrs. Henry F. 

Kenny, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Kent, Mrs. Achsah. 

Kent, Daniel W. 

Kent, George. 

Kerr, R. W. 

Klbbe, Mrs. Chloe. 

Kibbe, Mrs. H. 0. 

Kllburn, Cyrus. 
Kilburn, Mrs. Eunice. 
Klllow, Mrs. Frances. 
Kimball, Aaron. 
Kimball, Mrs. Alfred. 
Kimball, Benjamin, 2d. 
Kimball, B. M. 
Kimball, Daniel. 
Kimball, David B. 
Kimball, D. A. 
Kimball, Miss Dorothy. 
Kimball, Mrs. Emily P. 
Kimball, Mrs. Fanny W. 
Kimball, George, 
Kimball, Gilbert. 
Kimball, Rer. James. 
Kimball, James W. 
Kimball, Jane. 
Kimball, Rer. J. P. 
Kimball, Mrs. Martha. 
Kimball, Mrs. Mary B. 
Kimball, Miss Mary P. 
Kimball, M. W. 
Kimball, N. W. 
Kimball, Samuel. 
Kimball, Mrs. Sarah. 
Kimball, Miss Sarah; 
Kimball, William B. 
King, Gen. Benjamin. 
King, Mrs. Eveline E. 
King, Miss Emma. 
King, Mist Frances. 
King, Isaac 
King, Rev. Jonathan. 
King, Mr*. Mary & 
Ring, SamueL 
Kingman, Mum Lucy K. 



Kingman, Rev. Matthew. 

Kingsbury, Benjamin W. 

Kingsbury, Miss Catharine. 

Kingsbury, Eliza A. 

Kingsbury, Isaac. 

Kingsbury, Jesse F. 

Kingsley, Austin. 

Kingsley, Edwin. 

Kingsley, Mr*. E. 

Kingsley, John C. 

Kinney, G. M. 

Kirby, Miss Lucy R. 

Kirk, Edward N., D.D. 

Kittredge, Alfred. 

Kittredge, B. F. 

Kittredge, Rev. Charles B. 

Kittredge, Mrs. 8. B. 

Kittredge, Mrs. S. B. B. 

Knapp, Rev. Isaac. 

Knapp, Miss Mary M. 

Kniffin, Mrs. Charles W. 

Knight, B. 

Knight, Mrs. Jane K. 

Knight, Milo. 

Knight, Rev. Richard. 

Knight, S. H. 

Knowles, Lucius J. 

Knox, Curtis. 

Knox, Elijah. 

Knox, Justus. 

Kyle, Miss M. 

Lackey, Warren. 

Ladd, James. 

Ladd, N. D. 

Lamb, Charles. 

Lamb, Mrs. Lucy A. 

Lamson, Edwin. 

LamBon, Mrs. Edwin. 

Lane, Calvin. 

Lane, Charles. 

Lane, Rev. J. W. 

Lane, Mrs. Otis. 
Lane, R. J. 
Lane, Miss Sally. 
Langstroth, James T. 
Laselle, Joslah. 
Laskey, Mrs. Ann C. 
Lathrop, Charles. 
Lathrop, Miss Mary S. 
Laurie, Mrs. Ellen A. 
Laurie, J., Jr. 
Law, George. 
Law, Mrs. Mary L. 
Lawrence, Hon. Abbott, 
Lawrence, Mrs. Amos. 
Lawrence, Charles. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Ethalinda. 
Lawrence, Mrs. E. A. 
Lawrence, J. B. 
Lawrence, James P. 
Lawrence, Miss Mary W. 
Lawrence, Otis W. 
Lawrence, W. R. 
Lawton, Mrs. Sarah. 
Leadbeater, Increase. 
Learned, James H. 
Lee, Miss Betsey. 
Lee, Miss Lucy Ann. 
Lee, Miss Phebe W. 
Lee, SamueL 
Lee, Rev. Samuel H. 
Lee, Miss Sarah. 
Lefavour, Mrs. L 
Lefavour, Miss Elisabeth. 
Leland, John. 
Leland, Mrs. Mary. 
Leonard, Rev. Edwin. 
Lethbridge, W. F. 
Lewis, Miss Eunice M. 
Lewis, Miss M. E. 
Lewis, Rev. Thomas A. 
Lewis, Rer. W. T. 
Lincoln, Charles 0. 
Lincoln, Nehemlah. 
Lincoln, Sidney P. 
Lincoln, MAaa Bonn. 



Linnell, W. L. 

Little, Abbott. 

Little, Rev. Elbrldge G. 

Little, Josiah. 

Little, Mrs. Sarah. 

Little, Mrs. Bophronla. 

Little, Stephen, Jr. 

Little, Mrs. Stephen W. 

Livermore, D. 

Locke, Mrs. M. 0. 

Lockwood, Samuel 0. 

Lombard, Rev. Horatio J. 

Lombard, Rev. Otis. 

Long, M. 0. 

Loomis, Rev. Elihu. 

Lord, Rev. Charles. 

Lord, George R. 

Lord, John B. 

Lord, Miss L. C. 

Lord, Miss Louisa C. 

Lord, Mrs. Mary E. 

Lord, Mrs. Mary H. 

Lord, Mrs. Mary T. 

Lord, Nathaniel. 

Loring, Mrs. A. 

Loring, Mrs. Betsey. 

Loring, Miss Elizabeth. 

Loring, J. F. 

Loring, Miss M. A. 

Lovejoy, Albert 

Lovell, John. 
Lovell, Mrs. John. 

Lovell, Mrs. Laura A. 
Lovett. John. 
Lowe, D. F. 
Lowe, John. 
Lowe, Mrs. Betsey. 
Lowe, Mrs. Louisa A. 
Lowe, Mrs. Mary L. 
Lowe, Mrs. Ruth B. 
Luce, Augustus. 
Luce, Rev. Leonard. 
Lunt, Miss Mary. 
Lunt, Paul, Jr. 
Lyman, Alpheut J. 
Lyman, ArabeL 
Lyman, Rev. George. 
Lyman, James. 
Lyman, Dea. Samuel. 
Lyman, Samuel J. 
Lyman, William. 
Lyman, William B. 
Lynch, Reuben. 
Lynde, William. 
Lyon, Ephralm M. 
Lyon, Miss Lucy F. 
Lyon, Miss Mary Smith. 
Mace, Charlotte. 
Mack, Mrs. Harriet. 
M'Clean, Dr. A. 8. 
M'Clellan, R. W. 
M'Cloud, Mrs, Isabella. 
M'Collom, Rev. James T. 
M'Collom, Mrs. Louisa. 
M'Connell, Robert 
M'Elwaine, Dea. George. 
M'Ewen, Robert, D.D. 
M'Hose, M. 
Mclntlre, Miss Mary. 
McKay, Miss Maria. 
McKeen, Miss Catharine. 
McKenney, Frank 8. 
Maltby, Almlra. 
Maltby, Rev. Krastus. 
Mandell, Rev. William A. 
Mandell, Mrs. A. 
Manley, G. B. 
Mann, Mrs. Harriet 
Mann, John W. 
Mann, Miss Margaret 
Manning, A. W. 
Manning, J. H. 
March, Rev. John 0. 
March, Mrs. AUea L, 
MMch^Tvrua. 
ttaxtOtet.1.?. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



117 



.iH. 

iTbavid. 
*B. 

naliel. 

. Harriet B. 

tea. 

i. Jonathan. 

. Joseph. 

boa. 

as. 

. Moms. 

hanleL 

hanlel, Jr. 

. Pamela. 

• Rebecca. 

inel.Sd. 

>uelC. 

.' Zelinda. 
ames E. 
UssM. 

Theodore. 
v. Kllhu P. 
a. Julia. 
i. Betaey H. 
i. C. A. 8. 
irlesD. 
. Darius. 
Ll.H. 
l Sarah T. 
k 

Juth H. 
Mrs. M. A. 
re. Lorell B. 
[rs. Martin, 
flat Anna, 
ley. Joshua L. 

Hiram. 
Hiram. 
thallL. 

Mary P. 

. Charlotte A. 

lea. 

'. James H. 

•. John 0. 

I.M.B. 

[1st Amelia A. 

«eph. 

anson 0. 

len P. 



larieiH. 

rrua. 

inieL 

ra. Dorcas W. 

laabeth. 

rs. Emma. 

iss Esther. 

deon. 

rs. narrlet. 

las Henrietta M. 

jv. James L. 

ra.L. 

rs. MarlaS. 

rs. Mary A. 

muel 0. 

issSaraha 

OS. 

is Caroline. 
>ch, Jr. 



imu, Jr. 
*masP. 
Mrs. Daniel 
Mrs. Ellas, 



a Mary 0. 
r.N. 

Daniel H. 
R.B. 
ard. 



Miles, Thomas M. 
Miller, Daniel. 
Miller, Mrs. Delia Ann. 
Miller, E. C. 
Miller, James. 
Miller, Mrs. Sally F. 
Miller, Her. Simeon. 
Miller, Dr. W. 
Mills, Rev. Henry. 
Mills, Mrs. John. 
Miltlmore, Mrs. Andrew. 
Mlltimore, Miss E. J. 
Milton, Rev. C. W. 
Miner, Dr. D. W. 
Minot, Miss Rachel. 
Montague, C. N. 
Montague, Elijah. 
Montague, Mrs. Ephraim. 
Montague, Joseph. 
Montague, Dr. Moses. 
Montague, Mrs. 
Montague, Obed. 
Montague, Miss Sabra. 
Montague, William L. 
Moody, Alvan. 
Moody, Augustus. 
Moody, Mrs. C. K. 
Moody, D.D. 
Moody, Rev. Eli. 
Moody, James. 
Moody, John. 
Moody, Loman A. 
Moody, Samuel. 
Moody, Spencer. 
Moore, Mrs. Abigail. 
Moore, Alfred L. 
Moore, Dee, G. W. 
Moore, Mrs. Sophia. 
Moore, William G. 
Mordaugh, Mrs. A. C. 
Mordaugh, Rev. John H. 
More, Mrs. Sophronia. 
Moreau, Miss Hannah. 
Morgan, Mrs. Albert. 
Morgan, Dea. T. A. 
Morgan, Mrs. T. A. 
Morong, Mrs. Mary L. 
Morrill, Cadwalader. 
Morris, Edward F. 
Morris, Samuel, Jr. 
Morrison, Dea. George R. 
Morse, Mrs. Abigail. 
Morse, Dea. C. N. 
Morse, Fisher. 
Morse, Francis. 
Morse, Israel A. 
Morse, James M. 
Morse, Rev. Jason. 
Morse, John. 
Morse, Lovett. 
Morse, Dea. Oliver. 
Morse, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Morse, Samuel. 
Morse, Samuel. 
Morse, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Morse, Sylvester F. 
Morton, Daniel F. 
Morton, Mrs. John A. 
Mosman, Nathan. 
Mosman, Silas. 
Mossman, Mrs. Harriet. 
Moulton, Curtis R. 
Moulton, Mrs. Cynthia. 
Moulton, Joseph C. 
Moulton, William. 
Munger, Rev. Theodore F. 
Munn, Elisha. 
Munroe, Dr. A. L. B. 
Munroe, Miss Lucelia S. 
Munroe, Miss L. T. 
Munroe, Mrs. L. T. Y. 
Munroe, Miss Sarah S. 
Mnnyan, Emery. 
Murdock, Joseph. 
Murray, James R. 
Mwmy, Rer. James 0. 



Murray, Mrs. Julia F. 
Mussey, Wm. G. 
Nash, Mrs. Colton G. 
Nash, Edward T. 
Nash, Erastus. 
Nash, Mrs. John P. 
Nash, L. a 
Nash, Miss Lepha. 
Nash, Lonson D. 
Nash, Lucius. 
Nash, Mrs. Pamela. 
Nason, Ellas. 
Needham, Mrs. Sally. 
Negus, Mrs. Sarah. 
Nelson, Miss Jane. 
Nelson, Mrs. M. 
Nevins, William. 
Neweomb, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Newcomb, Elisabeth M. 
Neweomb, G. B. 
Newcomb, J. 
Neweomb, Mrs. Jane. 
Newcomb, L. C. 
Newcomb, Mrs. Richard F. 
Newcombe, John 0. 
Newell, Mrs. Elba. 
NeweU, Nelson C. 
Newhall, Mist Eveline A. 
NewhaU, Rer. G. H. 
Newman, Mies Phebe. 
Newton, Miss Caroline. 
Newton, David. 
Newton, Obed. 
Newton, Otis. 
Nichols, C. R. 
Nichols, Calvin. 
Nichols, Mrs. Emily G. 
Nichols, Miss Ella J. 
Nichols, Mrs. George. 
Nichols, Isaac 
Nichols, Mrs. James P. 
Nichols, Joseph W. 
Nichols, Mrs. Laura. 
Nichols, Mrs. Sally. 
Nichols, Stephen. 
Nickels, Edmund. 
Nlckerson, Mrs. Susan H. 
Nims, William. 
Nlms, W. M. 
Nixon, Warren. 
Noble, Mrs. Lester. 
Noble, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Norcross, Albert. 
Norcross, Mrs. Augusta. 
Norcross, Mrs. Ellen & B. 
Norcross, Dr. Josiab, 
Norcross, Olive C. 
Norcutt, A. H. 
Norcutt, Mrs. A. L. 
Norris, Miss E. K. 
Norris, Mrs. Ellxe M. 
Northern, Miss Elba. 
Northern, Mrs. J. 
Northrop, Rev. Blrdsey G. 
Northrop, H. M. 
Northrop, Mrs. Henrietta. 
Northrop, Mrs. Lucy. 
Norton, Rev. C. H. 
Norton, Rev. John F. 
Norton, Philo. 
Norton, Tertius. 
Noyes, Mrs. Jonathan. 
Noyes, Mrs. Maria S. 
Noyes, Mrs. Mary H. 
Noyes, William. 
Noyes, William p. 
Nutting, Calvin. 
Nye, Mrs. Jonathan. 
Nye, Mrs. Lucy. 
Nye, Mrs. M. A. 
Obear, Mrs. A. B. 
Ober, Mrs. Ann M. 
Ober, Miss Mary. 
Ober, Miss Mary £. 
Olds, George H. 
OUphant, Mrs, Mary. 



118 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



Ma 



Orcutt, M. F. L. 
Ordway, Carver F. 
Ordway, Miss Martha. 
Ordway, Mlta Mary E. 
Osborn, Abraham, 2d. 
Osborn, Charles P. 
Osborn, O. F. 
Oaborn, Mra. 8. A. 
Osborne, James W. 
Osgood, Miss Asenath. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah. 
Osgood, Mr* Samuel 
Owen, Mrs. & B. 
Packard, Mrs. David. 
Packard, Mrs. Emily. 
Packard, James. W. 
Packard, Luther M_ 
Packard, Mrs. W. 
Packard, L. M. 
Packard, Zlbeoa. 
Packer, Gilmer. 
Packer, J. D. 
Page, Mrs. 0. M. 
Page, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Page, Joel S. 
Page, Mrs. Laura H. 
Palge r Dea. Paul W. 
Paine, Rev. Albert. 
Paine, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Paine, Mrs. Sarah 8. 
Palmer,. A. H. 
Palmer, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Palmer, Miss P. F. 
Parish, Ariel. 
Park, Rev. Calvin & 
Park, Francis E. 
Park, Mrs. Luctada H. 
Park, William, Jr. 
Parker, Dea. Andrew. 
Parker, Miss Ellen. 
Parker, Mrs. Harrison. 
Parker, Rev. Henry W. 
Parker, J. & 
Parker r Jabex D. 
Parker, Rer. Leonard S. 
Parker, Levi M. 
Parker, Mrs. Mary. 
Parker, Milo. 
Parker, Mrs. Sarah* 
Parker, Stephen H. 
Parker, StUlman E. 
Parker, Miss Susan. 
Parkhurst, Benalah. 
Parkhurst, C. F. W. 
Parlin, Miss Rebecca. 
Parmenter, J. S. 
Parmenter, Thaddeus. 
Parsons, Mrs. Ann M. 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte. 
Parsons, Edith. 
Parsons, Edward. 
Parsons, Lemuel 
Parsons, Miss Roxana T. 
Partridge, Allen. 
Partridge, Charles. 
Partridge, David S. 
Partridge, George J* 
Partridge, Joseph. 
Pasco, Mrs. Theodore. 
Patrick, Mrs. A. D. 
Patrick, Asa. 
Patrick, John. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J. 
Patrick, Rev. Joseph. 
Patten, George P. 
Patten, Thomas B. 
Paul, Henry. 
Paul, Luther. 
Pmj-bod, 8as*n. 
PajBan,Mn. Sunn. 
Psyion, W. L. 
*e»bod7, Rer. Albert B. 

****>ody t Mr*. Mmnirt 
***odr,Hrw.S£!?w: 



Pearson, Mrs. Ellphalet. 

Pearson, Mrs. John P. 

Pearson, Mrs. L. G. 

Pearson, Mrs. Nancy. 

Pease, Asa. 

Pease, Mrs. Cynthia. 

Pease, EJL : 

Pease, Franklin W. 

Pease, Rev. Giles. 

Pease, J. 

Pease, Mrs. Jesephlne O. 

Pease, Mrs. Mary C. 

Pease, Mrs. R. 

Pease, Mrs. Sarah 0. 

Pease, William E. 

Peck, Miss Sarah E. 

Peckham, Rev. J. 

Pedrick, Miss E. 8. 

Pelrce, Mrs. Lydia W. 

Pelrce, Mrs. Fanny. 

Pelrce, 8. G. 

Pendegast, Mrs. Nancy. 

Pepper, Charles L. 

Pepper, Freeman. 

Pepper, Mrs. Louisa W. 

Pepper, Nathaniel C. 

Perkins, Rev. Ariel E. P. 

Perkins, Rev. F. B. 

Perkins, George C. 

Perkins, J. L. 

Perkins, Rev. Jonas. 

Perkins, Robert & 

Perkins, Mrs. Mary. 

Perley, Jacob. 

Perley, Miss Susan A. 

Perry, Albert D. 

Perry, Mrs. Harriet. 

Perry, H. H. 

Perry, Mrs. Nancy M. 

Perry, Rer. Ralph. 

Perry, Mrs. Sarah M, 

Perry, William. 

Peterson. L B. 

Pettlngill, Mrs. Amoa 

Pettlngill, John. 

Phelps, Dea. David B. 

Phelps, Rev. Dudley. 

Phelps, Mrs. E. B. 

Phelps, Lorin. 

Phelps, Mrs. Mary J. 

Phelps, Martm. 

Phelps, Rev. W. H. 

Phillips, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Phillips, Mrs. Franklin. 

Phillips, Mrs. Oliver. 

Phlpps, Abner J. 

Picket, Rev. Aaron. 

Pierce, Andrus. 

Pierce, C. F. 

Pierce, Erastus. 

Pierce, Miss Hannah 8. 

Pierce, Mrs. Mary J. 

Pierce, Mrs. H. B. 

Pierce, Isaac T. 

Pierce, John W. 

Pierce, Marshall. 

Pierce, Mrs. Sarah H. 

Pierce, Rev. 8ylvester G. 

Plerson, A. L. 

Pike, Rev. John. 

Pike, Mrs. Deborah. 

Pike, Mrs. Joseph 8. 

Pillsbury, Mrs. Josiah. 

Pingry, Mrs. D. 
Pitkins, Mrs. Minerva. 
Platner, Mrs. G. W. 
Plimpton, Oliver P. 
Plimpton, Penuet 
Plimpton, Silas. 
Plumer, Ebeneser. 
Plummer, Miss Ann. 
Plummer, Miss EUenC. 
Plummer, Mis* XHaan«Vhl>. 
Plummer, Israel W. 
Plummer, J. L». 
Phuket, C. H. 



Plunket, W. 0. 
Poland, Mrs. Emily C. 
Poland, Mrs. Sarah F. 
Pomeroy, Erastus. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Hart. 
Pomeroy, Lemuel 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Martha. 
Pomeroy, Mra Persia. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Thomas. 
Pomeroy, Wm. M. 
Pool, Mrs. Mary. 
Pool, Leonard. 
Poole, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Poor, Henry. 
Poor, Mrs. Mary 0. 
Poor, N. H. 
Poor, Mrs. Susan T. 
Pope, MissAbbyJ. 
Porter, Miss Caroline W. 
Porter, Mrs. C. & 
Porter, D. K. 
Porter, Ebeneser, D.D. 
Porter, Mrs. Eda. 
Porter, Edward P. 
Porter, Eleazer. 
Porter, Mrs. Emily. 
Porter, Enos. 
Porter, E. W. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, J. E. 
Porter, Dr. Jacob, 
Porter, Levi P. 
Porter, Louisa C. 
Porter, Hon. William. 
Porter, Dr. William. 
Porter, William P. 
Post, Mrs. Nancy F. 
Post, Thomas. 
Potter, Mrs. Ephraim. 
Potter, Henry. 
Potter, Henry A. 
Powers, Mrs. Francis. 
Powers, Rer. Henry. 
Powers, Lyman A. 
Powers, Phlletus. 
Powers, Samuel. 
Pratt, Mrs. Armenia F. 
Pratt, Benjamin G. 
Pratt, Cornelius. 
Pratt, Emmons. 
Pratt, George. 
Pratt, Mrs. Harriet J. 
Pratt, Rev. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Julia, 
Pratt, Mrs. Mary B. 
Pratt, Miss Sarah. 
Pratt, Zebulon. 
Prentice, James A. 
Prentiss, Miss Mary E. 
Price, Ebeneser. 
Price, H. 
Price, John. 
Prince, Clark. 
Prince, Rev. John M. 
Prince, Rev. N. A. 
Prior, Mrs. Mary. 
Proctor, Mrs. A. P. 
Proctor, Edward. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Mrs. Lois. 
Proctor, Thorndyke. 
Prouty, Lucy. 
Putnam, Mrs. Abby 8. 
Putnam, Miss Betsey F. 
Putnam, John. 
Putnam, Mrs. James P. 
Putnam, Mrs. Lacy. 
?uV&Km,Uxi. Mary P. G. 

Yxxtaaxn^TV "total B.. fe. 

Y\iVx\an^tti%.%asasx 
tuVaam, Itoa. %isbiii 



1865. 



THIBTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



119 



Qulncy, M1m A. A. 

Qulncy, Mrs. Hannah H. 

Qulncy, Mrs. Jalia a 

Qulncy, Miss Martha A. 

Qoincy, Thomas D. 

Race, Gordon. 

Rand, Charles V. 

Randall, Oslaa. 

Raymond, Mra. Elisabeth. 
.Read, Mra. A. H. 

Read, Albert M. 

Redfern, Mrs. Lucy J. 

Reed, Mra. Abigail H. 

Reed, Rer. Augustus B. 

Reed, Mrs. Catharine. 

Reed, Mrs. C. A. 

Reed, Rer. Charles E. 

Reed, Rer. Frederick A. 

Reed, Mn. Hannah. 

Reed, Hanson L. 

Reed, Hodges. 

Reed, Mrs. Mary. 

Reed, Mrs. Susan. 

Reed, Thomas. 

Reed, Washington. 

Reeves, Mrs. Caroline. 

RdtL Miss L. D. 

Remington, Miss Mary B. 

Reynolds, Mrs. Frederick. 

Reynolds, Thomas B. 

Rice, Abner. 

Rke, Mrs. Almira. 

Rlee, Mrs. C. A. 

Rice, Mrs. Charlotte. 

Rice, Mrs. Charlotte B. 

Rice, Mrs. Clarissa. 

Rke, Mrs. Edward. 

Rice, Mra. Eleanor. 

Rice, Mrs. N. Georgians, 

Rice, Leonard. 

Rice, Mra. Lucy W. 

Rich, Mrs. A. B. 

Rich, Rev. A. J. 

Rich, Alexander G. 

Rich, Rer. Alonso B. 

Rich, Charles B. 

Rich, Mrs. Harriet L. 

Richards, Miss A. 

Richards, C. 

Richards, Mrs. Joseph. 

Richards, Mrs. Rachel. 

Richardson, Miss Adeline. 

Richardson, Dr. EL C. 

Richardson, Mrs. Edwin. 

Richardson, Mrs. Eliza. 

Richardson, Mrs. Henry. 

Rkhardson, Rev. Henry J. 

Richardson, Mrs. Martha. 

Richardson, Rer. Merrill. 

Richardson, Mrs. Nancy. 

Richardson, Sumner. 

Richardson W. F. 

Richmond, Charles 0. 

Richmond, Horatio W. 

Richmond, Joshua. 

Richmond, Miss Lucia. 

Richmond, Mrs. R. H. 

Richmond, Rev. Thomas T. 

Richmond, William B. 

Richmond, Z. 

Bicker, James 0. 

Bicker, Mark M. 

RiddelL Henry. 

RIddell, Rev. WUliam. 

Ring, Mrs. Ellxa. 

Ripley. Henry. 

Ripley, Mrs. Mary E. 

Bitter, Miss Adeline, 

Bobbins, John F. 

Bobbins, Hon. Joriah. 

Roberts, Rer. Jacob. 

Robfte, Sarah J. 

JtoMnswa, Mn. C. B. 
MethHoa, Mm Htuuuth ML 
Mobttmm, Mttm Lucy T. 
M*by,Mn.B*ma. 



Bock, Mrs. Maria. 

Rockwell, J. 

Bockwood, B. A. 

Rock wood, Dea. D. B. 

Bockwood, Mrs. Emellne I. 

Bockwood, Rer. Lubin B. 

Bockwood, Lucretia. 

Bockwood, Samuel C. 

Bockwood, Rev. Samuel L. 

Bogers, Mrs. Adeline. 

Bogers, D. 

Roger*, Mrs. Emily. 

Bogers, Mrs. Lydla G. B. 

Bogers, Dea. Moses. 

Bogers, Mn. Walter. 

Roger son, Mn. C. A. 

Bolfe, Mrs. Henry C. 

Bollins, Mn. & W. 

Boot, Mrs. George. 

Boot, Harrison. 

Boot, Harvey. 

Boot, Mrs. Joseph. 

Boot, Washington M. 

Ropes, WUliam. 

Bose, Rev. Israel G. 

Bose, Mrs. Percy. 

Boss, Galen. 

Boss, Sidney. 

Boss, Willard N. 

Bosseau, Mrs. D. M. 

Boasiter, Frank P. 

Both, Mrs. Harriet B. 

Bowe, Mn. Phebe L. 

Rowland, Dea. Levi P. 

Rowland, Lyman 8. 

Budd, Rev. John W. 

Rugg, Samuel F. 

Russell, Mn. A. H. 

Bussell, Miss Catharine. 

Russell, Mrs. C. N. 

Russell, Emmons. 

Bussell, F. A. 

Bussell, George. 

Bussell, John. 

Bussell, John W. 

Bussell, Mrs. Louisa B. 

Bussell, Mn. Mary. 

Russell, Mrs. Mary A. 

Bussell, Peter. 

Bussell, Mrs. Phllena. 

Bussell, Bev. SamueL 

Russell, Miss Sarah. 

Butter, Mrs. Elvira J. 

Byder. James. 

Sabin, Lewis, D.D. 

Sabin, Mary Payson. 

Sabin, Mn. Maria P. 

Sabin, Lyman. 

Sabin, Sherman. 

Sackett, Miss Ann E. 

Sackman, Mrs. G. W. 

Safford, Mrs. Daniel 

Sftfford, Rev. George B. 

Safford, John. 

Safford, Mn. John. 

Safford, Miss M. J. 

Sage, Miss Sarah A. 

Sage, Mrs. Ruth P. 

Sahler, Rer. D. D. 

Saltonstall, Miss A. W. 

Sampson, Charles. 

Sanders, A. D. 

Sanderson, Apollos. 

Sanderson, Miss C. G. 

Sanderson, Mrs. 0. R. 

Sanderson, Edmund. 

Sanderson, Miss Elisabeth P. 

Sanderson, George. 

Sanderson, Harvey. 

Sanderson, Homer G. 

Stadenon, Lemuel C. 
Smadenon, Lacjr 8. 
Btmdenoa, Mn R. 
Bradford, Rev. John, 
too ford, Mn. E. H. 
Btaxford, Ich&bocL 



Sands, Mrs. M. A. 
Sargent, Abner. 
Sargent, Edmund. 
Sargent, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Sargent, Mn. Jane. 
Sargent, John. 
Sargent, Jonathan. 
Sargent, Mrs. Louisa. 
Sargent, Mn. M. 
Sargent, Nathan B. 
Sargent, Otis. 
Sargent, Richard. . 
Sargent, Richard W. i 
Sargent, Sally G. 
Sargent, Samuel G. 
Sargent, Stephen. 
Saunden, Mrs. Lavinia. 
Savory, Ebeneser. 
Savory, Miss E. B. 
Savory, Miss Harriet 
Sawln, Bev. T. L. 
Sawtell, Miss Emily. 
Sawtell, Mn. Sarah. 
Sawyer, Alvln M. 
Sawyer, Mn. Charlotte. 
Sawyer, Esra. 
Scammon, Dea. & F. 
Scammon, Mrs. Ann 8. 
Bchofleld, SamueL 
Scott, Miss A. A. 
Scott, Mrs. J. 
Scott, Miss Martha C. 
Scudder, Samuel H. 
Seabury, Miss Sarah. 
Seagrave, E. F. 
Searle, Mrs. Emily A. 
Sean, Mrs. Turner. 
Beaver. Mrs. Lucy. 
Sean, Mrs. S. G. 
Beaver, Mrs. Lucy. 
Seeley, Miss Jennette D. 
Seeley, John M. 
Begur, Mn. 8. W. 
Sessions, Rer. Alexander J. 
Sessions, Miss Harriet K. 
Sessions, William H. 
Bewail, Bev. Jonathan B. 
Sewall, Bev. SamueL 
Sexton, Edson. 
Seymour, Rev. Charles N. 
Seymour, SamueL 
Shapleigh, Mn. H. N. 
Bhattuck, G. W. 
Bhattuck, Horace B. 
Bhattuck, Ira. 
Bhattuck, Joseph. 
Bhattuck, Miss Lydla W. 
Shaw, A. L. 
Shaw, Dea. Absalom. 
Bhaw, George. 
Shaw, Margaret P. 
Shaw, SamueL 
Shaw, Theron Y. 
Shearer, Mn. D. P. D. 
Shedd, Mn. Susan F. 
Sheldon, Miss Martha. 
Sheldon, Samuel. 
Sheldon, Samuel D. 
Sheldon, Wallace C. 
Shepard, Anson. 
Shepard, Nathaniel F. 
Shepherd, Chauncey. 
Shepley, Mrs. Stephen. 
Sherburn, Miss Harriet. 
Sherman, Asahel. 
Sherman, Mrs. AsaheL 
Sherman, James. 
Sherman, John N. 
Shlpman, Mrs. Samuel. 
Shipman, Mrs. Y?Mam. 
Bhorey, John. 
Bhumway, lAvtnsj^taflaV 
Shumway, Peter. 
Sibley, Naihan^. 
Sibley, flamon H. 
Bikes, Mra. 1. H. 



118 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



Maj 



Orcutt, M. F. L. 
Ordway, Carver P. 
Ordway, Miss Martha. 
Ordway, Miss Mary E. 
Osborn, Abraham, 2d. 
Osborn, Charles P. 
Osborn, O. F. 
Osborn, Mrs, S. A. 
Osborne, James W. 
Osgood, Miss Asenash. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah. 
Osgood, Miss Hannah. 
Osgood, Mr*. Samuel. 
Owen, Mrs. S. B. 
Packard, Mrs. David. 
Packard, Mrs. Emily. 
Packard, James. W. 
Packard, Luther M.. 
Packard, Mrs. W. 
Packard, L. M. 
Packard, Zlbeoa. 
Packer, Gilmer. 
Packer, J. D. 
Page, Mrs. 0. M. 
Page, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Page, Joel S. 
Page, Mrs. Laura H. 
Paige r Dea. Paul W. 
Paine, Rev. Albert. 
Paine, Mrs. Sarah U. 
Paine, Mrs. Sarah a 
Palmer, A. H. 
Palmer, Mis. Charlotte. 
Palmer, Miss P. F. 
Parish, Ariel. 
Pack, Rev. Calvin & 
Park, Francis E. 
Parle, Mrs. Luclnda H, 
Park, William, Jr. 
Parker, Dea. Andrew. 
Parker, Miss Ellen. 
Parker, Mrs. Harrison. 
Parker, Rev. Henry W. 
Parker, J. B. 
Parker,. Jabex D. 
Parker, Rev: Leonard S. 
Parker, Levi M. 
Parker, Mrs. Mary. 
Parker, Mllo. 
Parker, Mrs. Sarah* 
Parker* Stephen H. 
Parker, Stillman E. 
Parker, Miss Susan. 
Parkhurst, Benalah. 
Parkhurst, CF. W. 
Parlln, Miss Rebecca. 
Parmenter, J. S. 
Parmenter, Thaddeus. 
Parsons, Mrs. Ann M. 
Parsons, Miss Charlotte. 
Parsons, Edith. 
Parsons, Edward. 
Parsons, Lemuel 
Parsons, Miss Rozana T. 
Partridge, Allen. 
Partridge, Charles. 
Partridge, David S. 
Partridge, George Jv 
Partridge, Joseph. 
Pasco, Mrs. Theodore. 
Patrick, Mrs. A. D. 
Patrick, Asa. 
Patrick, John. 
Patrick, Rev. Henry J. 
Patrick, Rev. Joseph. 
Patten, George P. 
Patten, Thomas B. 
Paul, Henry. 
Paul, Luther. 
Pmxbod, Saaan. 
Pasmm,Mn. Sunn. 
Psyion, W. L. 
Jpembodf, Rer. Albert B. 
***bodj, tin. Betsey. 
£Z**°*r> Mn. MmrgireL 



Pearson, Mrs. Eliphalet. 

Pearson, Mrs. John P. 

Pearson, Mrs. L. G. 

Pearson, Mrs. Nancy. 

Pease, Asa. 

Pease, Mrs. Cynthia. 

Pease, E1L <! 

Pease, Franklin W. 

Pease, Rev. Giles. 

Pease, J. 

Pease, Mrs. Jesephine O. 

Pease, Mrs. Mary C. 

Pease, Mrs. R. 

Pease, Mrs. Sarah C. 

Pease, William E. 

Peck, Miss Sarah E. 

Peckham, Rev. J. 

Pedrick, Miss E. a 

Pelrce, Mrs. Lydla W. 

Pelrce, Mrs. Fanny. 

Pelrce, a G. 

Pendegast, Mrs. Nancy. 

Pepper, Charles L. 

Pepper, Freeman. 

Pepper, Mrs. Louisa W. 

Pepper, Nathaniel C. 

Perkins, Rer. Ariel E. P. 

Perkins, Rev. F. B. 

Perkins, George C. 

Perkins, J. L. 

Perkins, Rev. Jonas. 

Perkins, Robert a 

Perkins, Mrs. Mary. 

Perley, Jacob. 

Perley, Miss Susan A, 

Perry, Albert D. 

Perry, Mrs. Harriet. 

Perry, H. H. 

Perry, Mrs. Nancy M. 

Perry, Rev. Ralph. 

Perry, Mrs. Sarah M, 

Perry, William. 

Peterson. I. B. 

PeUingill, Mrs. Amoa 

PettlngUl, John. 

Phelps, Dea. David 3. 

Phelps, Rev. Dudley. 

Phelps, Mrs. E. B. 

Phelps, Lorln. 

Phelps, Mrs. Mary J. 

Phelps, Martm. 

Phelps, Rev. W. H. 

Phillips, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Phillips, Mrs. Franklin. 

Phillips, Mrs. Oliver. 

Phipps, Abner J. 

Picket, Rev. Aaron. 

Pierce, Andrus. 

Pierce, C. F. 

Pierce, Erastus. 

Pierce, Miss Hannah a 

Pierce, Mrs. Mary J. 

Pierce, Mrs. H. B. 

Pierce, Isaac T. 

Pierce, John W. 

Pierce, Marshall. 

Pierce, Mrs. 8arah H. 

Pierce, Rev. Sylvester G. 

Pierson, A. L. 

Pike, Rev. John. 

Pike, Mrs. Deborah. 

Pike, Mrs. Joseph a 

PiUsbury, Mrs. Joslah. 
Pingry, Mrs. D. 
Pitklns, Mrs. Minerva. 
Platner, Mrs. G. W. 
Plimpton, Oliver P. 
Plimpton, FenueL 
Plimpton, Silas. 
Plumer, Ebeneser. 
Plummer, Miss Ann. 
Flummer, Miss EuenO. 
Plummer, Mis* XnaabeUiD. 
Plummer, Israel W. 
Plummer, J. L». 
Phuket, 0. H. 



Plunket, W. C. 
Poland, Mrs. Emily C. 
Poland, Mrs. Sarah F. 
Pomeroy, Erastus. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Hart. 
Pomeroy, Lemuel. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Martha. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Persis. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Thomas. 
Pomeroy, Wm. M. 
Pool, Mrs. Mary. 
Pool, Leonard. 
Poole, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Poor, Henry. 
Poor, Mrs. Mary 0. 
Poor, N. H. 
Poor, Mrs. Susan T. 
Pope, Miss Abby J. 
Porter, Miss Caroline W. 
Porter, Mrs. C. a 
Porter, D. K. 
Porter, Ebeneser, D.D. 
Porter, Mrs. Eda. 
Porter, Edward P. 
Porter, Eleaser. 
Porter, Mrs. Emily. 
Porter, Enos. 
Porter, E. W. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, J. E. 
Porter, Dr. Jacob, 
Porter, Levi P. 
Porter, Louisa C. 
Porter, Hon. William. 
Porter, Dr. William. 
Porter, William P. 
Post, Mrs. Nancy F. 
Post, Thomas. 
Potter, Mrs. Ephralm. 
Potter, Henry. 
Potter, Henry A. 
Powers, Mrs. Francis. 
Powers, Rev. Henry. 
Powers, Lyman A. 
Powers, Phlletus. 
Powers, Samuel. 
Pratt, Mrs. Armenia F. 
Pratt, Benjamin G. 
Pratt, Cornelius. 
Pratt, Emmons. 
Pratt, George. 
Pratt, Mrs. Harriet J. 
Pratt, Rev. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Julia. 
Pratt, Mrs. Mary B. 
Pratt, Miss Sarah. 
Pratt, Zebulon. 
Prentice, James A. 
Prentiss, Miss Mary E. 
Price, Ebenezer. 
Price, H. 
Price, John. 
Prince, Clark. 
Prince, Rev. John M. 
Prince, Rev. N. A. 
Prior, Mrs. Mary. 
Proctor, Mrs. A. P. 
Proctor, Edward. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Mrs. Lola. 
Proctor, Thorndyke. 
Prouty, Lucy. 
Putnam, Mrs. Abby a 
Putnam, Miss Betsey F. 
Putnam, John. 
Putnam, Mrs. James P. 
Putnam, Mrs. Lucy. 
P^Vaam^Uxft. Msxy P. G. 
^taam.i'VtoMalt « 
P^taam^'ttxi.'fc&l'fe. fe. 
PuVnam^axa.^ - 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



119 



Qoincy, MIm A. A. 
Qulncy, Mrs. Hannah H. 
Qoincy, Mrs. Julia a 
Qalncy, MIm Martha A. 
Qoincy, Thomas D. 
Race, Gordon. 
Band, Charles F. 
Randall, Odaa. 
Raymond, Mra. Elizabeth. 
Read, Mrs. A. H. 
Read, Albert M. 
Redfern, Mrs. Lucy J. 
Reed, Mrs. Abigail H. 
Reed, Rev. Augustas B. 
Reed, Mrs. Catharine. 
Reed, Mrs. C. A. 
Reed, Rer. Charles E. 
Reed, Rer. Frederick A. 
Reed, Mrs. Hannah. 
Reed, Hanson L. 
Reed, Hodges. 
Reed, Mrs. Mary. 
Reed, Mrs. Susan. 
Reed, Thomas. 
Reed, Washington. 
Reeves, Mrs. Caroline. 
Rdd, Miss L. D. 
Remington, Mist Mary B. 
Reynolds, Mra. Frederick. 
Reynolds, Thomas B. 
Rice, Abner. 
Rice, Mrs. Almlra. 
Riee, Mrs. C. A. 
Rice, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Rfce, Mrs. Charlotte B. 
Rice, Mrs. Clarissa, 
Rice, Mn. Edward. 
Rice, Mrs. Eleanor. 
Rice, Mrs. N. Georgians, 
Rice, Leonard. 
Rice, Mrs. Lucy W. 
Rich, Mrs. A. a 
Rich, Rev. A. J. 
Rich, Alexander G. 
Rich, Rer. Alonso B. 
Rich, Charles B. 
Rich, Mrs. Harriet L. 
Richards, Miss A. 
Richards, C. 
Richards, Mrs. Joseph. 
Richards, Mrs. Rachel. 
Richardson, Mist Adeline. 
Richardson, Dr. E. C. 
Richardson, Hn. Edwin. 
Richardson, Mrs. Efts*. 
Richardson, Mrs. Henry. 
Richardson, Rev. Henry J. 
Richardson, Mrs. Martha. 
Richardson, Rer. Merrill. 
Richardson, Mrs. Nancy. 
Richardson, Sumner. 
Richardson W. F. 
Richmond, Charles 0. 
Richmond, Horatio W. 
Richmond, Joshua. 
Richmond, Miss Lucia. 
Richmond, Mrs. R. H. 
Richmond, Rer. Thomas T. 
Richmond, William B. 
Richmond, Z. 
Rieker, James 0. 
Bicker, Mark M. 
Ridden, Henry. 
Riddell, Rev. William. 
Ring, Mrs. Eliza. 
Ripley, Henry. 
Ripley, Mrs. Mary B. 
Bitter, Miss Adeline, 
Bobbins, John F. 
Bobbins, Hon. Josiah. 
Roberts, Rer. Jacob. 
Robie, Sarah J. 



,Mn. C. B, 

MethnoB,MaL HtuuuthML 

Mcbhmm, MOm Lucy T. 

M*br,Mtn.*ma. 



Rock, Mrs. Maria. 

Rockwell, J. 

Rockwood, B. A. 

Rockwood, Dea. D. B. 

Rockwood, Mrs. Eraellne I . 

Rockwood, Rer. Lubin B. 

Rockwood, Lucretia. 

Rockwood, Samuel C. 

Rockwood, Rev. Samuel L. 

Rogers, Mrs. Adeline. 

Rogers, D. 

Rogers, Mrs. Emily. 

Rogers, Mrs. Lydia G. B. 

Rogers, Dea. Moses. 

Rogers, Mrs. Walter. 

Rogerson, Mrs. C. A. 

Rolfe, Mrs. Henry C. 

Rollins, Mrs. S. W. 

Root, Mrs. George. 

Root, Harrison. 

Root, Harvey. 

Root, Mrs. Joseph. 

Root, Washington M. 

Ropes, William. 

Rose, Rev. Israel G. 

Rose, Mrs. Percy. 

Ross, Galen. 

Ross, Sidney. 

Ross, Willard N. 

Rosseau, Mrs. D. M. 

Rossiter, Frank P. 

Roth, Mrs. Harriet R. 

Rowe, Mrs. Phebe L. 

Rowland, Dea. Levi P. 

Rowland, Lyman 8. 

Rudd, Rev. John W. 

Rugg, Samuel F. 

Russell, Mrs. A. H. 

Russell, Miss Catharine. 

Russell, Mrs. C. N. 

Russell, Emmons. 

Russell, F. A. 

Russell, George, 

Russell, John. 

Russell, John W. 

Russell, Mrs. Louisa B. 

Russell, Mrs. Mary. 

Russell, Mrs. Mary A. 

Russell, Peter. 

Russell, Mrs. Pbilena, 

Russell, Rev. Samuel. 

Russell, Miss Sarah. 

Rutter, Mrs. Elvira J. 

Ryder, James. 

Babin, Lewis, D.D. 

Babln, Mary Payson. 

Babin, Mrs. Maria P. 

Sabin, Lyman. 

Babin, Sherman. 

Backett, Miss Ann E. 

Sackman, Mrs. G. W. 

Bafford, Mrs. Daniel. 

8afford, Rev. George B. 

Bafford, John. 

Bafford, Mrs. John. 

Bafford, Miss M. J. 

Sage, Miss Sarah A. 

Sage, Mrs. Ruth P. 

Bahler, Rev. D. D. 

Baltonstall, Miss A. W. 

Sampson, Charles. 

Banders, A. D. 

Sanderson, Apollo*. 

Sanderson, Miss C. G. 

Sanderson, Mrs. 0. R. 

Sanderson, Edmund. 

Sanderson, Miss Elisabeth P. 

Sanderson, George. 

Sanderson, Harvey. 

Sanderson, Homer G. 

Btaderson, Lemuel C. 

Sanderson, Lucy 8. 

Sanderson, Mn R. 

Baodford, Rer. John, 

B*n ford, Mn. E. H. 

BMnford, Ich&bod. 



Sands, Mrs. M. A. 
Sargent, Abner. 
Sargent, Edmund. 
Sargent, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Sargent, Mrs. Jane. 
Sargent, John. 
Sargent, Jonathan. 
Sargent, Mrs. Louisa, 
Sargent, Mrs. M. 
Sargent, Nathan B. 
Sargent, Otis. 
Sargent, Richard. . 
Sargent, Richard W. | 
Sargent, Sally G. 
Sargent, Samuel G. 
Sargent, Stephen. 
Saunders, Mrs. Lavlnia. 
Savory, Ebeneser. 
Savory, Miss E. R 
Savory, Miss Harriet. 
Sawln, Rev. T. L. 
Sawtell, Miss Emily. 
Bawtell, Mrs. Sarah. 
Sawyer, Alvln M. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Bawyer, Esra. 
Scammon, Dea. S. F. 
Bcammon, Mrs Ann 8, 
Bchofleld, Samuel 
Scott, Miss A. A. 
Scott, Mrs. J. 
Scott, Miss Martha C. 
Scudder, Samuel H. 
Seabury, Miss Sarah. 
Beagrave, E. F. 
Bearle, Mrs. Emily A. 
Bears, Mrs. Turner. 
Beaver, Mrs. Lucy. 
Bears, Mrs. S. G. 
Beaver, Mrs. Lucy. 
Seeley, Miss Jennette D. 
Beeley, John M. 
Segur, Mrs. S. W. 
Sessions, Rev. Alexander J. 
Sessions, Miss Harriet E. 
Sessions, William H. 
Bewail, Rev. Jonathan B. 
Bewail, Rev. SamueL 
Sexton, Edson. 
Seymour, Rev. Charles N. 
Seymour, Samuel. 
Shaplelgh, Mrs. H. N. 
Bhattuck, G. W. 
Bhattuck, Horace B. 
Bhattuck, Ira. 
Bhattuck, Joseph. 
Bhattuck, Miss Lydia W. 
Shaw, A. L. 
Bhaw, Dea. Absalom. 
Bhaw, George. 
Shaw, Margaret P. 
Shaw, Samuel. 
Shaw, Theron V. 
Shearer, Mrs. D. P. D. 
Shedd, Mrs. Susan F. 
Sheldon, Miss Martha. 
Sheldon, Samuel. 
Sheldon, Samuel D. 
Sheldon, Wallace C. 
Shepard, Anson. 
Bhepard, Nathaniel F. 
Shepherd, Chauncey. 
Shepley, Mrs. Stephen. 
Sherburn, Miss Harriet. 
Sherman, AsaheL 
Sherman, Mrs. AsaheL 
Sherman, James. 
8herman, John N. 
Shipman, Mrs. Samuel. 
Shipman, Mrs. WUutm. 
Bhorey, John. 
Shumway , Liv\nggUssw 
Shumway, PeAet. 
Sibley, NsAhtnUL 
Sibley, flamoA H. 
Bikes, Mrv 1. 1L. 



118 



THIETT NINTH REPORT. 



Ma 



Orcutt, M. F. L. 

Ordway, Carver F. 

Ordway, Miss Martha. 

Ordway, Miss Mary E. 

Oaborn, Abraham, 2d. 

Osborn, Charles P. 

Oaborn, G. V. 

Oaborn, Mrs. 8. A. 

Osborne, James W. 

Osgood, Miss Asenath. 

Osgood, Miss Hannah. 

Osgood, Miss Hannah. 

Osgood, Mrs, SamueL 

Owen, Mrs. & B. 

Packard, Mrs. David. 

Packard,, Mrs. Emily. 

Packard, James. W. 

Packard, Luther M*. 

Packard, Mrs. W. 

Packard, L. M. 

Packard, Zlbeon. 

Packer, Gilmer. 

Packer, J. D. 

Page, Mrs. 0. M. 

Page, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Page, Joel 8. 

Page, Mrs. Laura H. 

Palge r Dea. Paul W. 

Paine, ReT. Albert 

Paine, Mrs. Sarah M. 

Paine, Mrs. Sarah 8. 

Palmer, A. H. 

Palmer, Mrs. Charlotte. 

Palmer, Miss P. F. 

Parish. Ariel. 

Pack, Rev. Calvin & 

Park, Francis E. 

Park, Mrs. Lucinda H. 

Park, William, Jr. 

Parker, Dea. Andrew. 

Parker, Miss Ellen. 

Parker, Mrs. Harrison. 

Parker, Rev. Henry W. 

Parker, J. B. 

Parker, Jabex D. 

Parker, Rev: Leonard S. 

Parker, Levi M. 

Parker, Mrs. Mary. 

Parker, Mllo. 

Parker, Mrs. Sarah* 

Parker. 8tephea H. 

Parker, Stillman E. 

Parker, Miss Susan. 

Parkhurst, Benaiah. 

Parkhurst, C. F. W. 

Parlin, Miss Rebecca. 

Parmenter, J. S. 

Parmenter, Thaddeus. 

Parsons, Mrs. Ann M. 

Parsons, Miss Charlotte. 

Parsons, Edith. 

Parsons, Edward. 

Parsons, Lemuel 

Parsons, Miss Roxana T. 

Partridge, Allen. 

Partridge, Charles. 

Partridge, David S. 

Partridge, George J* 

Partridge, Joseph. 

Pasco, Mrs. Theodore. 

Patrick, Mrs. A. D. 

Patrick, Asa. 

Patrick, John. 

Patrick, Rev. Henry J. 
Patrick, Rev. Joseph. 
Patten, George P. 
Patten, Thomas B. 
Paul, Henry. 
Paul, Luther. 
PajrBOD, Susan. 
Pajraon, Mra. Susan. 
Payaon, W. L. 
Petbody, Xer. Albert B. 
Peabodj, Hn. Betaey. 
****ody, Mn. AUrgirt 
**»fr,Mn,MmryW. 



Pearson, Mrs. Ellphalet. 
Pearson, Mrs. John P. 
Pearson, Mrs. L. G. 
Pearson, Mrs. Nancy. 
Pease, Asm. 
Pease, Mrs. Cynthia. 
Pease, Ell.: 
Pease, Franklin W. 
Pease, Rev. Giles. 
Pease, J. 

Pease, Mrs. Jesephlne O. 
Pease, Mrs. Mary C. 
Pease, Mrs. R. 
Pease, Mrs. Sarah C. 
Pease, William E. 
Peck. Miss 8arah E. 
Peckham, Rev. J. 
Pedrlck, Miss E. a 
Peirce, Mrs. Lydia W. 
Peirce, Mrs. Fanny. 
Peirce, 8. G. 
Pendegast, Mrs. Nancy. 
Pepper, Charles L. 
Pepper, Freeman. 
Pepper, Mrs. Louisa W. 
Pepper, Nathaniel C. 
Perkins, Rev. Ariel E. P. 
Perkins, Rev. F. B. 
Perkins, George C. 
Perkins, J. L. 
Perkins, Rev. Jonas. 
Perkins, Robert S. 
Perkins, Mrs. Mary. 
Perley, Jacob. 
Perley, Miss Susan A. 
Perry, Albert D. 
Perry, Mrs. Harriet. 
Perry, H. H. 
Perry, Mrs. Nancy M. 
Perry, Rev. Ralph, 
Perry, Mrs. Sarah M, 
Perry, William. 
Peterson,. I. B. 
Pettingill, Mrs. Amos. 
Pettlngill, John. 
Phelps, Dea. David 3. 
Phelps, Rev. Dudley. 
Phelps, Mrs. E. B. 
Phelps, Lorin. 
Phelps, Mrs. Mary J, 
Phelps, Martm. 
Phelps, Rev. W. H. 
Phillips, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Phillips, Mrs. Franklin. 
Phillips, Mrs. Oliver. 
Phlpps, Abner J. 
Picket, Rev. Aaron. 
Pierce, Andrus. 
Pierce, C. F. 
Pierce, Erastus. 
Pierce, Miss Hannah & 
Pierce, Mrs. Mary J. 
Pierce, Mrs. H. B. 
Pierce, Isaac T. 
Pierce, John W. 
Pierce, Marshall. 
Pierce, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Pierce, Rev. Sylvester G. 
Plerson, A. L. 
Pike, Rev. John. 
Pike, Mrs. Deborah. 
Pike, Mrs. Joseph 8. 
Plllsbury, Mrs. Joslah. 
Plngry, Mrs. D. 
Pltkins, Mrs. Minerva. 
Platner, Mrs. G. W. 
Plimpton, Oliver P. 
Plimpton, FenueL 
Plimpton, Silas. 
Plumer, Ebeneser. 
Plummer, Miss Ann. 
Piummer, Miss EttenC. 
Plummer, Mis* TAVaabeUiD. 
Plummer, Israel W. 
Plummer, J. I*. 
Phuket, C. U. 



Flunket, W. C. 
Poland, Mrs. Emily C. 
Poland, Mrs. Sarah F. 
Pomeroy, Erastus. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Hart. 
Pomeroy, Lemuel. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Martha. 
Pomeroy, Mrs. Perats. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Theodore. 
Pomeroy, Thomas. 
Pomeroy, Wm. M. 
Pool, Mrs. Mary. 
Pool, Leonard. 
Poole, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Poor, Henry. 
Poor, Mrs. Mary 0. 
Poor, N H. 
Poor, Mrs. Susan T. 
Pope, Miss Abby J. 
Porter, Miss Caroline W. 
Porter, Mrs. C. 8. 
Porter, D. K. 
Porter, Ebeneser, D.D. 
Porter, Mrs. Eda. 
Porter, Edward P. 
Porter, Eleaser. 
Porter, Mrs. Emily. 
Porter, Enos. 
Porter, E. W. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, Mrs. Hannah. 
Porter, J. E. 
Porter, Dr. Jacob. 
Porter, Levi P. 
Porter, Louisa C. 
Porter, Hon. William. 
Porter, Dr. William. 
Porter, William P. 
Post, Mrs. Nancy F. 
Post, Thomas. 
Potter, Mrs. Epbraim. 
Potter, Henry. 
Potter, Henry A. 
Powers, Mrs. Francis. 
Powers, Rev. Henry. 
Powers, Lyman A. 
Powers, Philetus. 
Powers, SamueL 
Pratt, Mrs. Armenia F. 
Pratt, Benjamin G. 
Pratt, Cornelius. 
Pratt, Emmons. 
Pratt, George. 
Pratt, Mrs. Harriet J. 
Pratt, Rev. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Henry. 
Pratt, Mrs. Julia, 
Pratt, Mrs. Mary B. 
Pratt, Miss Sarah. 
Pratt, Zebulon. 
Prentice, James A. 
Prentiss, Miss Mary E. 
Price, Ebenezer. 
Price, H. 
Price, John. 
Prince, Clark. 
Prince, Rev. John M. 
Prince, Rev. N. A. 
Prior, Mrs. Mary. 
Proctor, Mrs. A. P. 
Proctor, Edward. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Mrs. Lois. 
Proctor, Thorndyke. 
Prouty, Lucy. 
Putnam, Mrs. Abby 8. 
Putnam, Miss Betsey F. 
Putnam, John. 
Putnam, Mrs. James P. 
Putnam, Mrs. Lucy. 
Yutawa^Uxt. Mary P. G. 

Yxxlufcm^TV "total U. fe. 
Yutasx^ls^fesjsjn. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



119 



•flssA. A. 

tfrs. Hannah H. 

irt. Julia 0. 

>Um Martha A. 

rhomai D. 

rdon. 

Aries P. 

Oalas. 

I, Mrs. Elizabeth. 

s. A. H. 

>crtM. 

Mm Lacy J. 

s. Abigail H. 

r. Augustus B. 

a, Catharine. 

s.0. A. 

r. Charles E. 

r. Frederick A. 

a. Hannah. 

tnson L. 

dges. 

s. Mary. 

a. Susan. 



ishington. 

in. Caroline. 

■ L.D. 

►n. Miss Mary E. 

i, Mrs. Frederick. 

i, Thomas B. 

ner. 

k Almira, 

lO. A. 

■. Charlotte. 

ft. Charlotte B. 

•.Clarissa. 

i. Edward. 

l Eleanor. 

». N. Georgian*. 

>nard. 

i. Lucy W. 

s. A.B. 

r. A. J. 

»xander G. 

r. Alonso B. 

tries B. 

s. Harriet L. 

, Miss A. 

,0. 

, Mrs. Joseph. 

, Mrs. Rachel. 

on, Miss Adeline. 

on. Dr. E. C. 

on, Mrs. Edwin. 

on, Mrs. Eliza, 

on, Mrs. Henry. 

on, Rev. Henry J. 

on, Mrs. Martha. 

on, Rev. Merrill. 

on, Mrs. Nancy. 

on, Sumner. 

on W. F. 

d, Charles C. 

d, Horatio W. 

d, Joshua. 

d, Miss Lucia, 

d, Mrs. R. H. 

d, Rev. Thomas T. 

d, William B. 

d,Z. 

amesC. 

farkM. 

Elenry. 

Rer. William. 

■.Eliza. 

lenry. 

Irs. Mary E. 

Us* Adeline, 

JohnF. 

Hon. Josiah. 

Rer. Jacob. 

irah J. 

a, Mrs. C. B. 

i, Mrs. Hannah M. 

i, Mbs Lucy T. 



Rock, Mrs. Maria. 
Rockwell, J. 
Rockwood, B. A. 
Rockwood, Dea. D. B. 
Rockwood, Mrs. Emeline I. 
Rockwood, Rer. Lubin B. 
Rockwood, Lucretla. 
Rockwood, Samuel C. 
Rockwood, Rev. Samuel L. 
Rogers, Mrs. Adeline. 
Rogers, D. 
Rogers, Mrs. Emily. 
Rogers, Mrs. Lydla G. B. 
Rogers, Dea. Moses. 
Rogers, Mrs. Walter. 
Rogerson, Mrs. C. A. 
Rolfe, Mrs. Henry C. 
Rollins, Mrs. S. W. 
Root, Mrs. George. 
Root, Harrison. 
Root, Harvey. 
Root, Mrs. Joseph. 
Root, Washington M. 
Ropes, William. 
Rose, Rer. Israel G. 
Rose, Mrs. Percy. 
Ross, Galen. 
Ross, Sidney. 
Ross, WMard N. 
Rosseau, Mrs. D. M. 
Rossiter, Frank P. 
Roth, Mrs. Harriet R. 
Rowe, Mrs. Phebe L. 
Rowland, Dea. Levi P. 
Rowland, Lyman 8. 
Rudd, Rev. John W. 
Rugg, Samuel F. 
Russell, Mrs. A. H. 
Russell, Miss Catharine. 
Russell, Mrs. C. N. 
Russell, Emmons. 
Russell, F. A. 
Russell, George. 
Russell, John. 
Russell, John W. 
Russell, Mrs. Louisa B. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary A. 
Russell, Peter. 
Russell, Mrs. Philena. 
Russell, Rev. Samuel. 
Russell, Miss Sarah. 
Rutter, Mrs. Elvira J. 
Ryder, James. 
Sabin, Lewis, D.D. 
Sabln, Mary Payson. 
Sabin, Mrs. Maria P. 
Sabin, Lyman. 
Sabin, Sherman. 
Sackett, Miss Ann E. 
Sackman, Mrs. G. W. 
Safford, Mrs. Daniel. 
8afford, Rer. George B. 
Safford, John. 
Safford, Mrs. John. 
Safford, Miss M. J. 
Sage, Miss Sarah A. 
Sage, Mrs. Ruth P. 
Sahler, Rer. D. D. 
Saltonstail, Miss A. W. 
Sampson, Charles. 
Sanders, A. D. 
Sanderson, Apollos. 
Sanderson, Miss C. G. 
Sanderson, Mrs. a R. 
Sanderson, Edmund. 
Sanderson, Miss Elisabeth P. 
Sanderson, George. 
Sanderson, Harvey. 
Sanderson, Homer G. 
Sanderson, Lemuel C. 
Sanderson, Lucy 8. 
Sanderson, Mrs R. 
Sandford, Rev. John. 
Sanford, Mrs. E. H. 
Sanford, Ichabod. 



Sands, Mrs. M. A. 
Sargent, Abner. 
Sargent, Edmund. 
Sargent, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Sargent, Mrs. Jane. 
Sargent, John. 
Sargent, Jonathan. 
Sargent, Mrs. Louisa. 
Sargent, Mrs. M. 
Sargent, Nathan B. 
Sargent, Oils. 
Sargent, Richard. 
Sargent, Richard W. * 
Sargent, Sally G. 
Sargent, Samuel G. 
Sargent, Stephen. 
Saunders, Mrs. Lavlnia. 
Savory, Ebeneser. 
Savory, Miss E. R. 
Savory, Miss Harriet 
Sawin, Rev. T. L. 
SawteU, Miss Emily. 
SawteU, Mrs. Sarah. 
Sawyer, Alvln M. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Sawyer, Ezra. 
Scammon, Dea. 8. F. 
Seammon, Mrs. Ann 8. 
Bchofleld, Samuel 
Scott, Miss A. A. 
Scott, Mrs. J. 
Scott, Miss Martha 0. 
Scudder, Samuel H. 
Beabury, Miss Sarah. 
Seagrave, E. F. 
Searle, Mrs. Emily A. 
Sears, Mrs. Turner. 
Beaver. Mrs. Lucy. 
Sears, Mrs. & G. 
Beaver, Mrs, Lucy. 
Seeley, Miss Jennette D. 
Seeley, John M. 
Begur, Mrs. 8. W. 
Sessions, Rer. Alexander J. 
Sessions, Miss Harriet E. 
Sessions, William H. 
Bewail, Rev. Jonathan B. 
8ewall, Rev. Samuel. 
Sexton, Edson. 
Seymour, Rev. Charles N. 
Seymour, Samuel. 
Shapleigh, Mrs. H. N. 
Shattuck, G. W. 
Shattuck, Horace B. 
Shattuck, Ira, 
Shattuck, Joseph. 
Shattuck, Miss Lydla W. 
Shaw, A. L. 
Shaw, Dea, Absalom. 
Bhaw, George. 
Shaw, Margaret P. 
Shaw, Samuel. 
Shaw, Theron V. 
Shearer, Mrs. D. P. D. 
8hedd, Mrs. Susan F. 
Sheldon, Miss Martha. 
Sheldon, Samuel. 
Sheldon, Samuel D. 
Sheldon, Wallace C. 
Shepard, Anson. 
Shepard, Nathaniel F. 
Shepherd, Chauncey. 
Shepley, Mrs. Stephen. 
Sherburn, Miss Harriet. 
Sherman, Asahel. 
Sherman, Mrs. Asahel. 
Sherman, James. 
Sherman, John N. 
Shipman, Mrs. Samuel. 
Shlpman, Mrs. William. 
Shorey, John. 
Bhumway, LlvingstoiL 
Shumway. Peter. 
Sibley, Nathaniel. 
Sibley, Bunon H. 
8tkes t Mra.l.BU 



120 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May 



Siket, Rev. Oren. 

Silsbee, Mia* Emily. 

Simmons, Artemas. 

Simmons, Rev. Charles. 

Simmons, Lewis. 

Simmons, Mrs. N. 8. 

Simonds, Alvan. 

Simonds, Dea. Alvan. 

Simonds, Kdwln A. 

Simonds, Miss Jane. 

Simonds, Joseph H. 

Slmonds, Mrs. LevL 

Simonds, Miss Lucy F. 

Simonds, Mrs. Lucy W. 

Simonds, Mrs. Mary B. 

8lmpson, Capt Paul 

Skeele, Otis. 

Skeele, Otis. 

Skerry, Mrs. Content 

Skinner, Jairua, 

Slate. Miss Catharine 8. 

Small, Amos. 

Small, Mrs. Reliance. 

Small, Samuel A. 

Smead, Dowinda. 

Smedley, Dea. James 8. 

Smiley, Francis. 

Smith, Mrs. Abigail. 

Smith, Mrs. Adetta 0. 

Smith, Miss A. L. 

Smith, Albert. 

Smith, Albert W. 

Smith, Alvan. 

8mith, Alvanus. 

Smith, Byron. 

8mith, Mrs. Calvin. 

Smith, Rev. Charles. 

8mlth, Mrs. Cynthia. 

Smith, Mrs. Dorothy. 

Smith, Mrs. Delia. 

Smith, Edmund M. 

Smith, Edward. 

Smith, Rev. Edward P. 

Smith, Mrs. Edwin. 

Smith. Mrs. Elijah. 

Smith, Mrs. Elkaa, 

Smith, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Smith, Mrs. Elisabeth E. 

Smith, Miss Elisabeth M. 

Smith, Miss Ellen B. 

Smith, Enos. 

Smith, Enos D. 

Smith, Ephraim. 

Smith, Erastus T. 

Smith, Edward P. 

Smith, Mrs. Esther. 

Smith, Mrs. Esther. 

Smith, Mra F. 

Smith, George. 

Smith, George B. 

Smith, George P. 

Smith, Gilbert A. 

Smith, Mrs. Hannah. • 

Smith, Miss Harriet. 

Smith, Henry H. 

Smith, Henry M. 

Smith, Rev. Henrey. 

Smith, Rev. Herrey. 

Smith, Hiram. 

Smith, Horace. 

Smith, Dr. Horace, 

Smith, Humphrey. 

Smith, Mrs. James G. 

Smith, Miss Jane. 

Smith, Joel. 

Smith, John. 

Smith, Levi. 

Smith, Mrs. Lacy. 

Smith, Mrs. Lucy J. 

Smith, Miss MaMdM. 
Smith, Mlm M. Q. 
Smith, Mh* M. H. 
Smith, M. H. 

Smith, Mr*. . 

Smith, Mmry. 

XxUth, Mm. MmrthM C. 



Smith, Mrs. M. E. 
Smith, Mrs. Mehetabel. 
8mlth, Nathan F. 
Smith, Miss Octavia Tale. 
Smith, Oliver E. 
Smith, Mrs. Pamela. 
Smith, Dea. Peter. 
Smith, Peter D. 
Smith, Mrs. PoUy. 
Smith, Reuben. 
8mith, Richard. 
Smith, Mrs. Rodney. 
8mith, Samuel. 
Smith, Miss Sophronla. 
Smith, Rev. Stephen S. 
Smith, Susan W. 
Smith, Mrs. Sybil. 
Smith, Miss Thankful. 
Smith, Warren N. 
Smith, Mrs. Wyman. 
Snell, Melvin. 
Snell, Dea. Thomas. 
Snell, Thomas, D.D. 
Snell, Mrs. Tiraah. 
8nell, M. Porter. 
Snow, Miss Deborah. 
Snow, Josiah. 
Snow, Mrs. Mary L. 
Snow, Sanford. 
Snow, Spencer. 
Snow, William. 
Somerby, Mrs. Nancy A. 
Soule, Thomas H. 
Southgate, Rev. Robert 
Southwltch, Miss Irene. 
Southworth, John. 
Spaulding, J. C. 
Spauldlng, Dea. John. 
8pauidlng, John, Jr. 
8paulding, Josiah. 
Spauldlng, Mrs. Julia B. 
Spaulding, Leonard. 
Spaulding, Mrs. Luclnda. 
Spauldlng, Mrs. Mary J. 
Spaulding, Rev. 8. J. 
Spear, Mrs. Relief L. 
Splller, H. 

8pofford, Mrs. Hannah. 
Spofford, Mrs. Sophia. 
Spooner, Festus. 
Spooner, William. 
8prague, Joseph G. 
Spring, Mrs. Adela. 
8pring, Mrs. Adeline 0. 
Spring-, Mra G. R, 
Sproat, Mrs. P. F. 
Stanton, Mrs. Comfort 
Stanwood, Miss Betsey. 
Staples, Samuel 
Start, Sarah A. 
Stearns, Rev. Jesse G. D. 
Stearns, John. 
Steams, Mrs. Mary B. 
Stearns, Mrs. Sarah. 
Stebbins, Cyrus. 
8tebbins, E. G. 
Stebbins, Rev. M. C. 
Stebbins, Randolph. 
Stebbins, Mrs. Sally. 
Stedman, Francis D. 
Stetson, Miss E. J. • 
Stetson, John. 
8tetson, Mrs, Laura. 
Stetson, Mrs. Rhoda W. 
8tetson, Mrs. Susan. 
Stetson, William. 
Stetson, William. 
Stevens, Charles Emery. 
Stevens, Mrs. E. 
Stevens, George H. 
Stevens, Miss Hannah. 
Stevens, Mrs. Maria, 
Stevens, Mrs. Mary 3. Q. 
Stevens, Norman. 
Stevens, Samuel 
Stickney.Mra. Ana***. 



Stickney, Mrs, Jane. 
Stickney, Mrs. M. 
Stickney, Peter L. B. 
Stickney, Miss Ruth. 
Stickney, 8. W. 
8tilson, Dea. Everett 
Stinson, Mrs. John. 
Stockbrldge, Mrs. A. 
Stockbridge, Mrs. J. W. 
Stockman, Mrs. 8. B. 
Stockwell, Mrs. Daniel. 
Stockwell, L. 
Stoddard, Mrs. Sarah. 
Stoddard, Solomon. 
Stone, Andrew L., D.D. 
Stone, Miss Amy 8. 
Stone, B. F. 
Stone, Rev. Cyrus. 
Stone, Daniel. 
Stone, Jacob. 
Stone, Levi 
Stone, Lewis. 
Stone, Mrs. Lucy F. 
Stone, Luther. 
Stone, Mrs. Phebe C. 
Stone, Mrs. Phebe P. 
Stone, a E. 
Stone, Sarah. 
Stone, Mrs. Sophia. 
8tone, Rev. Timothy D. P. 
Storrs, Miss Eunice. 
Stover, Henry. 
Stover, Mrs. Jane. 
Stowell, Cyrus A. 
Stowell, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Stowell, James C 
Stowell, Milo. 
Stowell, William M. 
Street, Rev. Owen. 
Streeter, Miss Calista A. 
Strong, Anson 8. 
Strong, Mrs. Lewis. 
Strong, Mrs. Martha P. 
Strong, Moses. 
Strong, Mrs. Myra P. 
Strong, Stephen. 
Sturtevant, Mrs. Emily F. 
Styles, Mrs. Phineas. 
8umner, Mrs. Hannah M. 
8unstead, Mrs. Hannah. 
8walIow, Joseph. 
8wallow, Rev. Joseph E. 
Swain, Samuel. 
Swan, Caleb. 
Swan, Joseph 0. 
8wan, Mrs. Julia. 

Swan, Mrs. * 

Sweet, L. 

Sweet, Miss Lauretta. 
Sweetser, Mrs. Ellxa P. 
Sweetser, Henry P. 
Sweetser, Howard. 
Sweetser, Luke. 
Sweetser, Samuel 8. 
Sweetser, Miss Sally. 
Sweetser, Mrs. Sarah. 
Swift, Mrs. Catharine 8. 
Swift, Mrs. Mary. 
Swift, Richard L. 
Symmis, Caleb T. 
Taft, Mrs. A. A. 
Taft, Mrs. Amanda. 
Taft, Chandler. 
Taft Dea. Merrick L. 
Tappan, Mrs. Cornelia. 
Tappan, Mrs. John. 
Tar box, RoswelL 
Tate, George C. 
Taylor, Mrs. Abigail. 
Taylor, Edward. 
Taylor, Miss EUsa. 
l U^oT,UT%. , Bstt*r W. 

<£*S\qt , "B*v QNsttt a. 



THIETY NINTH RBPOKT. 



121 



n Rebecca. 

muel H., LL.D. 

muel S. 

UUara. 

. Albert K. 

. Cornelia C. 

ahrin. 

rs. Calvin. 

ev. Josiah H. 

ifayette. 

ark M. 

rs. Mary A. 

lfredE. 

• J. 

[In Jane. 

oger M. 

ubyT. 

i. Esther. 

lev. Isaiah C. 
dn. Sarah E. 
L 

annuel, 
las Adeline. 
bt. Foster. 
in Lydla W. 
ea. Olirer. 
rs. Rebecca. 
O. 

er. William M. 
Faterman. 
, Augustus C , D.D. 
, Mrs. Abigail H. 
, Mrs. A.E. 
t Min Clara. 
, Rer. John C. 
,L 

, Mrs. Martha C. 
, Sumner. 
.Sumner. 
Rer. John C. 
ler. Edward O. 
tamueL 
A. 

Daniel. 

Mrs. Ebenezer. 
Mrs. Frances G. 
Rer. John R. 
Miss Maria S. 
Rev. Richard B. 
Mrs. Roxanna, 
William. 



ph& 

ad. 

lA. 

lend. 

SdmundO. 

ameafl. 

ron. 

y. 

. John E. 

. M. 8. B. 

liamC. 

ynuS. 

ev. Richard. 

actaaO. 

Irs. J. M. 

[in Julia M. 

rs. Rebecca 0. 

on. 

jra, Jerusha. 

u 

lira. John. 

Aries W. 

BJJE.C. 

hnE. 

bsM. 

ta.N. 



fettneD. 
ory L. 

i. AhniraE. 
■ Cordelia. 



Towle, M. C. 
Town, Dea. Joseph. 
Towne, Dea. Ainasa. 
Towne, Mrs. Esther. 
Towne, Mrs. Otis. 
Townsend, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Townsend, Mrs. James J. 
Townsend, Mrs. M. 
Tracy, Charles K. 
Tracy, Joseph, D.D. 
Tracy, Mrs. 8. C. 
Tracy, Mrs. Sarah C. P. 
Tracy, Dr. Stephen. 
Train, Nathaniel. 
Train, Mrs. Samuel. 
Trask, Mrs. Abby H. 
Trask, Daniel. 
Trask, Israel M. 
Trask, Mrs. L. A. 
Trask, Miss L. R. 
Trask, Mrs. Mary. 
Trask, Richard. 
Trask, Mrs. Ruth. 
Tremlett, Mrs. Thomas. 
Tripp, Joseph. 
Trow, Josiah. 
Trow, N. T. 
Trow, Dr. William M. 
Trowbridge. Dea. 0. 
Trumbull, Ezra. 
Tucker, Abner. 
Tucker, Mrs. Catharine. 
Tucker, Ephraim. 
Tucker, Rev. Joshua T. 
Tucker, Mrs. L. 
Tucker, Mrs. Lewis. 
Tucker, Nathan. 
Tucker, Mrs. Nathan. 
Tucker, Dea. Russell. 
Tufts, Charles. 
Tufts, Charles O. 
Tufts, Mrs. Eliza. 
Tufts, Mrs. Sarah T. 
TuUy, Miss Sarah. 
Tupper, Rev. Martin. 
TurbeU, Mrs. Martha A. 
Turner, Mrs. A. N. 
Turner, Mrs. A. W. 
Turner, Helen. 
Turner, Rev. Josiah W. 
Turner, Kate. 
Turner, N. D. 
Turner, R. W. 
Tuttle, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Tuttle, Miss Sarah. 
Tuttle, T. 8. 
Twining, Thomas. 
Twitchell, Mrs. Nancy M. 
Tyler, Rev. Charles M. 
Tyler, Min Hannah F. 
Tyler, Miss Jemima M. 
Tyler, Mrs. Nancy W. 
Tyler, Varnum. 
Tyler, Rev. William. 
Underhlll, Jeremiah. 
Underwood, Mrs. Abel. 
Underwood, A. G. 
Underwood, Mrs. E. A. 
Underwood, Min M. 
Upham, Otis. 
Upham, William 
Upton, Joseph. 
Upton, Dea. Moses T. 
Upton, Mrs. Sophia M. 
Talentine, Mrs. Joseph. 
Valentine, Mrs. J. O. 
Tan Duesen, James. 
Van Home, Horace. 
Van Home, Mrs. Horace. 
Varnum, Martha. 
Varnum, Samuel. 
Vermllye, Mrs. H. L. 
Vlnlng, Spencer. 
Vlnlng, W. O. 
Vinton, Ellsa A. 
Vinton, Mrs. Lorinda R. 



Vinton, Mrs. Thomas B, 
Vlrgen, Miss Hannah. 
Voorhes, Jacob N. 
Vose, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Vose, George. 
Vose, W. H. 
Wadsworth, Mrs. Lucy. 
Waite, Rev. Clarendon. 
Waitt, Miss Rebecca. 
Waldo, Mrs. E. 
Waldo, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wales, Mrs. William. 
Walker, Min Betaey. 
Walker, Rev. C. 
Walker, Mrs. Charles. 
Walker, Fanny. 
Walker, Miss K. M. 
Walker, Mrs. Elizabeth M. 
Walker, Mrs. Hannah. 
Walker, Rev. Horace D. 
Walker, J. 8. 
Walker, Mrs. Lovett 
Walker, Moses. 
Walker, Min Mary. 
Walker, Orramel. 
Walker, Richmond. 
Walker, Robert G. 
Walker, Dea. Samuel W. 
Walker, Rev. Townsend. 
Walker, Mrs. VaahU. 
Wallace, Mrs. Emily. 
Wallace, Mrs. Rodney. 
Walley, Hon. Samuel H. 
Walton, Min Sarah B. 
Walworth, Joseph. 
Ward, Miss Ann M. W. 
Ward, Mrs. Betsey. 
Ward, Mrs. B. 
Ward, Mrs. C. P. 
Ward, George R. 
Ward, Rev. James W. 
Ward, Mrs. John. 
Ward, Jonathan. 
Ward, Min Julia E. 
Ward, Langdon 8. 
Ward, Min Mary Ann. 
Ward, Mrs. Mary L. 
Ward, Rev. 8tephen D. 
Ware, Mrs. Lydla P. 
Warner, E. L. 
Warner, L Z. 
Warner, Jane P. 
Warner, Levi B. 
Warner, Miss L. N. 
Warner, Oliver. 
Warner, Moses. 
Warner, Mrs. Nancy. 
Warner, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Warner, Mrs. Sheldon. 
Warner, Mrs. S. 8. 
Warner, Wallis R. 
Warner, William. 
Warner, William A. 
Warner, William P. 
Warren, C. H. 
Warren, Rev. Israel P. 
Warren, Mrs. Jane. 
Warren, Mrs. Jane S. 
Warren, Jonas. 
Warren, Leander. 
Warren, Mrs. Sarah. 
Warriner, Min Elisabeth. 
Warriner, Min E. B. 
Warriner, Louis. 
Washburn, Rev. Royal. 
Waahburn, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wason, Mrs. C. T. 
Wason, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Waterman, Asa. 
Waters, Min Eliza. 
Waters, J. E. 
Waters, 0. H. 
Webb, Mrs. Susan. 
Webber, Jonathan. 
Webber, Mn. N. 
Webber, W\\tt»m A, 



122 



THIRTY NINTH REPOBT. 



May, 



Webster, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Webster, Mrs. E. R. 
Webster, Mrs. Rebecca E. 
Weir, A. A. 
Welch. Miss Jane K. 
Welch, 8ally. 
Welch, Simon. 
Wellington, Miss A. H. 
Wfll* T Mn, AhuaC. 
Welts, Tin liiLiis 
Writs, Willi. ■mi H. 
Weniell Mm Mary F. 
West, Mr*. Harriet 
Weal, Mn. t. 
W«IM*J| Si>[.f.eu. 
Weston, Mn. LucJnds. 
Westuo, Mr< Mary Asm & 
Wrtlohj Sumner 
Wettjernee, Alfred. 
We(herb*e, Jo»i&h. 
Wetlicrbcv, M. 
WiftiTifjre, William. 
Wheaton, Mrs. Charlotte A. 
Wlu-alnu, Catharine C. 
Wheaton, Frederick D. 
Wheaton, Rev. Levi. 
Wheaton, Samuel 1L 
Wheeler, Mrs. 
Wheeler, C. H. 
Wheeler, Mrs. E. W. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Marl* H. 
Wherlcr, Sir*. Miry a 
Wheeler. W. R, 

V\ til -l.-k. El Lag, 

Wheelwright, Mrs. Aon. 

Wheelwright, George 8. 

Whldden, Mis* C. F. 

Whlit^n, Samuel I, 

Whipple, Charles. 

Whipple, Mrs. Mary. 

Whipple, J. B. 

Whipple, Lucretla P. 

Whipple. M K. 

Whipple, Miss Olive W. 

Whltcomb, Mrs. Abby B. 

Whltcomb, Miss Ellen M. 

Whltcomb, Mrs. M. A. 

Whltcomb, Mrs. Mary A. 

Whltcomb, Reuben, Jr. 

White. Andrew. 

White, Alfred. 

White, Benjamin. 

White, Mrs. Elba A. R. 

White, Miss E. K. F. 

White, Mrs. Eunice 8. 

White, Gardner. 

White, Jonas. 

White, Joseph. 

White, Joseph. 

White, Levi. 

White, Mrs. L. P. 0. 

White, Rev. Morris E. 

White, Nicholas. 

White, Mrs. R. R. 

White, Sedgewlck. 

White, Stephen. 

White, Miss 8. H. 

White, Washington. 

Whitemore, Dea. M. 

Whltln, Addle 0. 

Whitln, Anna L. 

Whltln, Mrs. Betsey. 

Whitln, Charles E. 

Whltln, Edward. 

WhitLn, James F. 

Whiting Francis A. 

"Wiililnif, Lemuel, 

Whitman, Jonathan. 

Whitman, Mrs. Lucy. 

Whitman, Mrs. Maria. 

Whitman, Seymour. 

Whitman, Rodna P. 

Whitman, A. D. 
Whltmore, Cbaiiea. 
WhHmore. Ber. ZoItk 
Whitney, ton. a U. 



Whitney, David J. 
Whitney, Edmund 0. 
Whitney, Edward P. 
Whitney, Joslah. 
Whitney, Mrs. L. 0. 
Whitney, Mrs. Jonas. 
Whitney, Joslah D. 
Whitney, Mrs. Susan. 
Whitney, Mr*. S>|khronla 
Whlttaker, Mrs. Hannah. 
WhUtemore, R. P t 
Wliltteinore, Mi*. Louisa M. 
Wldttett, Samuel 1. 
Whit tier, Un. Ann. 
Wier, A A. 

Wlirjrln, Miss Ann M*a» 
Wig-pin, mv* Mm-yC. 
Wight, Rev. Daniel 
Wight, David. 
Wilbur, Mrs, Allvla, 
Wilbur, Joseph. 
Wilbur, J««tV 
Wileott, t. W. 
Wilcox, Mrt. Anna G. 
Wllciur, Mrs. Miry J. 
Wilcox. Rev. William H. 
Wlhl t Mrs. John A, 
WU Lie, Harriet E. 
Wilder, C. W. 
Wilder, George G. 
Wilder, Rev. John. 
Wilder, J. D. 
Wilder, Miss Sarah. 
Wilder, Mi-* Tmuah. 
WUey, Mrs. Susan. 
Wilkinson, Henry, 
Wlllard, *'r* r Lucy. 
Williams, Mrs. Abby. 
Williams, Miss D. 
Williams, Mrs. C. K. 
Williams, EUphalet. 
Williams, Mrs. Francis B. 
Williams, Mrs. tt 
Williams, James. 
Williams, Mrs. Martha A. 
Williams, Mrs. Mary H. 
Williams, Miriam. 
Williams, Mosley H. 
Williams, Rev. Nathan W. 
Williams, Owen. 
Williams, Mrs. Polly. 
Williams, Samuel. 
Williams, Simeon If. 
Williams, Rev. William. 
Willis, Mrs. Abigail A. 
Willis, Nathaniel. 
Wllllston, Mrs. C. L. 
Williston, Lyman R. 
Wllllston, Mrs. Sarah T. 
Wllllston, Mrs. a 
Wlllson, Mrs. B F. 

Wilmarth, . 

Wilson, John. 
Wilson, Rev. Thomas. 
WtUnji, Mrs. Thomas. 
Wilt, lira John A. 
Winn. Mm, Nancy, 
Wins-low, Daniel R, 
Wlnslov, Emily R, 
Wlnlhroj\ linn, ThocnnaL. 
WUwiill, Artemaa, * 
Whrwal!, Pea. William. 
Wlewall, Mrs, Ruth. 
W1twa.ll, William, ad, 
Whherly, Mr*. CM. W. 

win..- 1 . ii. a ii. 
Withlugtwi, Mrs. C, 
Wimingtnn, Mrs. L. 
WRhlnjctou, Mn, Mary N. 
W T ltt, linrac*, 
WH[*r, Mr*. Mary K, 
Wolcott, Mr*, P. R. 
Wolcott William. 
Wood* Aaron, 
Wood, Mt« t Abhj M, 
Wood, MA** Aim, 



Wood, Mrs. Catharine 8. 
Wood, Mrs. Eunice S. 
Wood, Miss Fanny G. 
Wood, Horatio G. 
Wood, Joseph W. 
Wood, Mrs. Martha W. 
Wood, Moses. 
Wood, Mrs. Polly. 
Wood, Miss PoUy. 
Wood, Mrs, Samuel F. 
Wood, p. F, 
Woorilirldg*, Mfss H 
W,, ..ji.urv, Ml^Klisa. 
Woodbury, Mrs. Eliza, 
Woodbury, Mrs. H. M. 
Woodbury, John. 
Woodbury, Mrs. Phebe, 
Woodford, P. R. 
Woodford, Mrs. Harriet H. 
Woodman, Mrs. A. 
W T oodman, II. A. 
Woodman, Joicph* 
Woodnell, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Wooda, Dea, Aaron, 
Woods, Leonard. 
Woods, Leonard, D.D. 
Weeds, Mrs. Leonard. 
Woods, Joseph W. 
Woods, Mrs. Mary. 
Woods, Miss Mary P. 
Woods, Robert M. 
Woods, Mrs. 8. B 
Woods, Mrs, Zenas. 
Wuodvard, Georpe M. 
Woodward, Mrs, Harriet. 
Woodward, Samuel N. 
Wood worth, Iter. Clutrle* L. 
Wood worth, John. 
Worcester, Mrs. Exeklel, 
Worcester, Jonalhnu P. 
Wright, Alfred. 
Wright, IraB. 
Wright, Mil.. 
Wright, R, M. 
Wright. K-th. 
W Haley t Nathan C. 
Wyman, Mrs. Anna P. 
Wyman, W. 
Tale, John. 
Tale, Lucius. 
Tale, Mrs. Mary. 
Tale, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Tork, Mrs. J. 

MODI ttLAHD. 

Arnold, Mrs. Abby P. 
Arnold, Miss Abby P. 
Arnold, Miss Caroline. 
Arm Ii. Mi - Mjit* P. 
BArtlvtt, MIps Minerva. 
Hates, Frederick. 
Bench, Rev. Natliaateh 
Billing*, Samuel. 
Ifoiiworth, Mr*. CetlmUu 
Boweti, William M. 
Buck, Rev Kduin A. 
fls4y, Isaac T, 
OaTfUSjion. 'f>lirnrd. 
Chapln, Amory. 
Cbapln, Mrs. Kllsa C. 
Cbapin, John F. 
Cbapin, Joslah. 
Chapln, Mrs. Sarah Dunn. 
Chaplti, Walter B\ 
Clark, John ih 
Clarke, Bavbl R. 
Cooke, Rev. Theodore. 
Cra|Ht, Cornelia W. 
Cuniher, John T, 
Dabney, 0. H. 
Dyer, Miss Amelia, 
Dyer, Mrs. Chariea. 
Dyer, Miss Harriet Adit, 
T^w, Miss Harriet. 
T>^«c % ¥&sa%ar%1aV 



1805. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



128 



Eaton, John E. * 

Elwood, Rev. David M. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Lorinda. 
Gladdln, N. B. 
Gleason, E. K. 
Granger, Rev. Arthur. 
Hewitt, John L. 
Holt, Mrs. Joseph. 
Hopptn, Mn. Hannah P. 
Horton, Mrs. Abb/ H. 
Horton, Martha M. 
Howard, Mrs. Polly. 
Hani, Richard. 
Hyde, Mra. N. F. 
Hyer, Albert. 
Kendall, MIm Prance*. 
Kendall, William H. 
King, Charles G. 
King, Edward G. 
King, Miss Elisabeth G. 
King, Frederick A. 
King, Miss Lydia G. 
King, Theodore G. 
King. William J., Jr. 
Leavftt, Mrs. Charlotte E. 
Leavitt, Jonathan, D.D. 
Llttlefield, Mrs. Penelope G 
Lyman, Mrs. C. 
Lyman, Mrs. J. H. 
Manton, Amasa. 
Manton, Ann Frances. 
Manton, Eliza T. 
Manton, Harriet Adie. 
Manton, Joseph. 
Manton, Joseph B. 
Manton, Walter B. 
Manton, Miss Mary W. 
Manton, Robert. 
Manton, Miss Sarah. 
Nichols, J. B. 
Noyes, Joshua. 
Peck, Abby A. 
Porter, Emery N. 
Pratt, Miss L. G. 
Rathbone, Mrs. Esther D. 
Held, Mrs. Jared. 
Richmond, Abby E. 
Richmond, Henry I. 
Richmond, Isaac B. 
Richmond, Preston B. 
Seagrave, William. 
Seagur, Rev. Schuyler. 
Simmons, Alden 8. 
Slater, William S. 
Smith, Lewis B. 
Smith, Welcome. 
Stead, T.J. 
8waJn, Mrs. Julia M. 
Swain, Edward A. 
Swain, Sarah Howe. 
Swain, Miss Susan H. 
Sweetaer, Charles. 
Taylor, Rev. T. A. 
Thomas, Mrs. 8arah D. 
Thompson, Hiram. 
Thompson, John C. 
Thompson, Samuel K. 
Tiffany, Hezeklah. 
Tracy, Lewis. 
Tucker, Mrs. Harriet 8. 
Wardwell, Stephen 8. 
Waterman, Miss Sarah. 
Wells, Rev. John H. 
Wells, Thomas R. 
Wheelock, Mrs. Amelia A. 
Wheelock, Joseph. 
Wolcott, Mrs. H. A. 
Young, Hiram. 

COfTBTBCTlCUT. 

Abbott, Rev. John 8. 0. 
Abbott, T.M. 
Abby, Miss Betsey. 
Adasoa, Rev. Charles & 
▲dam*, KB. 



Adsms, G. R. 
Adams, Horace 0. 
Adams, N. T. 
Adams, Dea. William. 
Aiken, William A. 
Aiken, Rev. William P. 
Alden, Mrs. Abel. 
Alden, Mrs. Eliza G. 
Aldrich, Lucy. 
Alford, Arba. 
Alford, Giles H. 
Allen, Alanson. 
Allen, Amos. 
Allen, Charles R. 
Allen, Denlson E, 
Allen, Edward. 
Allen, Edward P. 
Allen, Elam 0. 
Allen, F. 0. 
Allen, Harriet S. 
Allen, Hetekiah. 
Allen, Mrs. J nlia G. 
Allen, Mrs. Mercy D. 
Allen, Roderick. 
Allen, R. D. H. 
Allen, R. J. 
Allen, Samuel. 
Allen, Rev. Samuel II. 
Allen, William E. 
Allender, Charlotte M. 
Allender, Thomas. 
Allender, William. 
Ailing. Miss Mary C. 
Allis, George C. 
AUis, Mrs. 8. W. 
Almy, Humphrey. 
Almy, John H. 
Almy, William T. 
Ames, Mrs. Caroline. 
Ames, Mary E. 
Anderson, Rev. Joseph. 
Anderson, Mrs. Annie S. 
Andreas, J. I. 
Andrews, Benajah. 
Andrews, Horace, Jr. 
Andrews, Mrs. Sarah. 
Andrews, Rev. William. 
Andros, John S. 
Andrus, Francis M. 
Andrus, Mrs. Julia B. 
Andrus, William Henry. 
Anketell, Edward A. 
Arms, Hiram P., D.D. 
Arms, Rev. William F. 
Armstrong, Emily S. 
Arnold, Mrs. William R. 
Atwater, Charles. 
Atwater, Charles, Jr. 
Atwater, Charles, 8d. 
Atwater, Mrs. Charles. 
Atwater, Cornelia C. 
Atwater, Rev. Edward E. 
Atwater, Eleanor. 
Atwater, Ellhu. 
Atwater, Harriet M. 
Atwater, Henry. 
Atwater, Henry. 
Atwater, Henry J. 
Atwater, Howell. 
Atwater, Mrs. Ira. 
Atwater, James. 
Atwater, Rev. Jason. 
Atwater, Montgomery. 
Atwater, Miss Nancy. 
Atwater, Theodore. 
Atwater, William. 
Atwater, Rev. William W. 
Atwood, Hobart. 
Austin, Mrs. Anson. 
Austin, Mrs. A. A. 
Averill, Rev. James. 
Averill, Sarah E. 
Averill, Samuel J. 
Avery, Rev. Jared R. 
Avery, Rev. John. 
Avery, MIbb Locretia. 



Avery, Mrs. Lucy. 
Avery, Mrs. Mary. 
Avery, Mrs. Nancy A. 
Ayer, Deborah M. 
Ayer, Mrs. M. A. 
Ayers, Miss Ann. 
Ayres, Jared. 
Ayres, Jared A. 
Babcock, Mrs. Abby C. 
Babcock, A. M. 
Backus, 0. 
Bacon, Mrs. Curtis. 
Bacon, David B. 
Bacon, Mrs. E C. 
Bacon, Jane. 
Bacon, Lewis. 
Bacon, Mrs. Lucy J. 
Badger, William, M.D. 
Bailey, Samuel M. 
Balrd, Elizabeth H. 
Baker, William A. 
Baldwin, Rev. Abraham C. 
Baldwin, Chauncey E 
Baldwin, Mrs. Emily F. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Esther 8. 
Baldwin, Harvey. 
Baldwin, Judah. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Mary P. 
Ball, Rev. Charles B. 
Bancroft, Rev. David. 
Bancroft, Mrs. R. P. 
Bancroft. Mrs. D. A. 
Banks, John. 
Barber, a H. 
Barber, John C. 
Barber, J. H. 
Barber, Rev. Luther H. 
Barber, Mrs. Maria. 
Barbour, James G. 
Barker, George W. 
Barnard, Cecelia. 
Barnes, Asabel. 
Barnes, Dea. Byard. 
Barnes, Mrs. Catharine G. 
Barnes, Miss Emily T. 
Barnes, Dea. F. L. 
Barnes, Rev. Jonathan E. 
Barney, Mrs. Sarah N. 
Barnum, George. 
Barnum, Nathaniel. 
Barnum, Noah 8. 
Barrows, Mrs. A. M. 
Barrows, Dr. A. W. 
Bartlett, Rev. John. 
Bartlett, Lydia. 
Bartlett, Rev. Shubael. 
Bartlett, William. 
Bartram, Joseph. 
Bartram, Mrs. Thomas B. 
Bass, Mrs. Jerusha. 
Bass, Nathan. 
Bass, Mrs. Ruth. 
Bass, Waldo. 
Bass, Waterman C. 
Bassett, M. B. 
Bassett, Mrs. C. E. 
Bassett, David. 
Bassett, Miss Elisabeth P. 
Bassett, Mrs. Mary D. 
Bassett, Rebecca. 
Bates, Samuel 8. 
Batterson, Mrs. Emma. 
Battles, Miss Lucy. 
Bayllss, Mrs. Sarah. 
Beach, Rev. Aaron C. 
Beach, Albert H. 
Beach, Alexander R. 
Beach, Mrs. Harriet E. 
Beach, Mrs. Lormtha A. 
Beach, Miss Phebe. 
Beadle, Mrs. Hannah. 
Beadle, Mrs. Mlrancy. 
Beard, Algernon E. 
Beard, A. F. 
Beard, Mis* Itabtufc. 
Bt*rd,WttUam. 



124' 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Beardslee, JTeman. 

Beardsdey, Augur. 

Beardsley, B. R. Jr. 

Beardsley, Charles. 

Beardsley, Frederick J. 

Beardsley, Miss Marcia. 

Beardsley, Miss Maria. 

Seattle, Mrs. James. 

Beebe, Miss Ann. 

Beebe, Anna M. 

Beebe, Rev. Hubbard. 

Beebe, Miss Mary R. 

Beecher, David. 

Beecher, Reuben M. 

Beecher, Mrs. Susan J. 

Beers, Edwin. 

Beers, Mrs, Lewis. 

Beers, Lyman. 

Beers, Moses W. 

Belcher, Mrs. Ann P. 

Belcher, Mrs. Lydla. 

Belden, Mrs. Catharine. 

Belden, Frederick. 

Belden, Mrs. Mary EL 

Bell, Rev. Hiram. 

Bell, Mrs. Mary E. 

Bellamy, Joseph. 

Benedict, Aaron. 

Benedict, Mrs. Aaron. 

Benedict, Miss Catharine. 

Benedict, Dea. Charles. 

Benedict, Oliver 8. 

Benedict, Thomas. 

Benham, Mrs. Elisha. 

Benjamin, Everard. 

Benjamin, Mrs. Everard. 

Bennett, Mrs. Anna, 

Bennltt, Dea. George C 

Bentley, Mrs. Lucia A. 

Betts, Mrs. Antoinette. 

Betts, Charles C. 

Betts, Hattie C. 

Betts, James. 

Betts, Mary A. 

Betts, Mrs. Amelia D. 

Betta, Mrs. 

Betts, Miss Julia, 

Betts, Hon. Thaddeus. 

Betta, Moses O. 

Bibbins, Anson. 

Blbbins, Dea. Elijah. 

Bidwell, Charles. 

Bldwell, Sidney. 

Blgeiow, Mrs. Emily. 

Bigelow, Sarah A. 

Billings, W. W. 

Bingham, George. 

Bingham, Rev. Hiram. 

Bird, Rev. Isaac. 

Birdseye, E. 

Blrdseye, Lucia C. 

Birdseye. Mrs. Mary E. 

Birge, Miss Lucy M. 

Birge, Roswell. 

Bishop, Miss Flora E. 

Bishop, Mrs. H. M. 

Bishop, Mrs. Louis. 

Bishop, Timothy. 

Bishop, Jonathan M. 

Bissell, Edward C. 

Biasell, Mrs. B. H. 

Biased, Mrs. F. M. 

Bisaell, George A. 

Bisaell, George P. 

Bissell, Mrs. H.G. 

Biasell, Luman P. 

Blaaell, Mrs. Mary H. 

Blake. Mrs. Sarah P. 

Blakelee, Mrs, Mary. 

Blakely, Curtis. 

Blakely, Mllo. 

Blakeman, Mrs. Betsey A. 

Blakem&n, Ells*. 

BJakeman, Ocald. 
Blakeman, Jamm. 
Blakeman, Leander. 



Blakeslee, Arthur T. 
Blakeslee, Krastus. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Carrie A. 
Blanchard, Homer. 
Blanchard, Mrs. L. A. 
Blanchard, Sarah L. 
Blatchlev, William. 
Bliss, William. 
Blood, Rev. John. 
Bloodgood, Rev. A. L. 
Boardman, N. C. 
Boardman, Timothy. 
Boardman, William F. 
Boies, Rev. Arte mas. 
Boies, Jarvls. 
Bolles, Pblneas. 
Bond, Mrs. S. A. 
Bonevlllc, Mills. 
Bonney, Rev. William. 
Bordwell, Mills. 
Booth, Daniel. 
Booth, Mrs. Catharine. 
Booth, Ely M. 
Booth, Elisha. 
Booth, Miss Hannah. 
Booth, Joseph, Jr. 
Boss, Charles D. 
Boss, Mrs. Isabel. 
Boatwick, Cyrus. 
Bostwick, George. 
Boswell, Charles. 
Boswell, Mrs. Charles. 
Bowen, Mrs. George. 
Bowles, Mrs. Mary. 
Boy n ton, Miss Alice. 
Brace, John T. 
Brace, Thomas. 
Brace, T. K., Jr. 
Bradford, James H. 
Bradley, Miss Caroline. 
Bradley, Charlea E. 
Bradley, Ellas E. 
Bradley, F. DeW. 
Bradley, Edward. 
Bradley, David. 
Bradley, Frederick. 
Bradley, Mrs. Sarah B. 
Bradley, Henry M. 
Bradley, Hull. 
Bradley, Joseph W. 
Bradley, Lewis. 
Bradley, Lewis 8. 
Bradley, J. W. 
Bradley, Otis B. 
Bradley, William. 
Brainard, Lucy A. 
Brainerd, William. 
Braman, Daniel. 
Brant, Mrs. RacheL 
Brewer, Ashbel. 
Brewer, Miss Mary. 
Brewer, Selden. 
Brewster, E. M. 
Brewster, Jasper P. 
Brewster, Miss Sarah. 
Bridgeman, E. M. 
Brldgman, W. 8. 
Brigham, C. C. A. 
Brlgham, Frederick B. 
Brigham, Mrs. Harriet. 
Bristol, Mrs. Isaac 
Bristol, Mrs. Sarah. 
Brockway, Hon. John H. 
Bronson, Mlaa Mary. 
Bronson, Mrs. Oliver H. 
Bronson, Stillman. 
Brooks, Miss Emilia A. 
Brooks, Rev. Edward F. 
Brooks, Mrs. Frederick. 
Brooks, Henry. 
Brooks, Miss Mary R. 
Brown, Mlaa Ann. 
Brown, Charlotte. 
Brown, Cornelia A. 
Brown, Edwin. 
Brown, Miss Ettiabffta.'W. 



Brown, Esther I. 
Brown, Mrs. Frances. 
Brown, Horace. 
Brown, H. W. 
Brown, Mrs. Laura W. 
Brown, Mary 8. 
Brown, Dea. N. W. 
Brown, Rev. O. 
Brown, Dea. William A. 
Brown, William E. 
Brown, William H. 
Brown. W. 8. 
Browning, John B. 
Browning, Mrs. Phebe. 
Browson, Mrs. Abigail H. 
Brush, Miss E. 8. 
Brush, Joseph E. 
Brush, Miss Julia E. 
Brush, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Bryan, Rev. George A. 
Bryan, Mrs. Mary E. 
Buckham, H. B. 
Buckingham, Miss Abby. 
Buckingham, D. W. 
Buckingham, Ebeneser. 
Buckingham, Israel M. 
Buckingham, Mrs. I. M. 
Buckingham, Mrs. G. 
Buckingham, Mrs. L. C. 
Buckingham, Mrs. Elixa. 
Buckingham, Miss Eliza C. 
Buckingham, Miss Sarah. 
Buckingham, William, 2d. 
Buckingham, Samuel. 
Buel, David. 
Buel, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Buel, Miss Sarah. 
Buell, Julius. 
Buell, Miss Martha A. 
Buell, Mrs. Mary H. 
Buell, Norman B. 
Buell, W. E. 
Buffett, Edwin L. 
Buffett, Rev. Piatt. 
Bugbee, Mrs. Mary. 
Bulkley, Miss Esther. 
Bulkley, Miss Mary A. 
Bulkley, Zalmon. 
Bull, David S. 
Bull, Rev. Edward. 
Bull, John C. 
Bull, Mrs. Mary H. 
Bullard, Rev. Charlea H. 
Bullard, Mrs. 8. A. 
Bunce, Mrs. Mira. 
Bunce, Russell. 
Bunnell, Mrs. Dlantha. 
Bunnell, Miss Nancy W. 
Burdette, Rev. Michael. 
Burgess, Asa. 
Burgess, Samuel F. 
Burnap, Mary D. 
Burnap, Mrs. Mary K. 
Burnett, James. 
Burnett, Mrs. James. 
Burnham, Harriet P. 
Burr, E. T. 
Burr, William H. 
Burr, Mrs. Q. B. 
Burrltt, Mrs. Albert 
Burritt, Mrs. Alice. 
Burrltt, Lewis. 
Burrltt, Mrs. Ransom. 
Burrltt, Mrs. Robert. 
Burroughs, Mrs. Caroline S 
Burt, Mrs. B. C. 
Burt, Rev. Jairus. 
Burton, Miss Mary. 
Bushnell, Ellas. 
Bushnell, William 0. 
BuUer, Albert L. 
Butler, Augusta. 
Butler, Mrs. Catharine C. 
Butler, Charles W. 
Butler, Mrs. J~ 



1865. 



THIRTY NTNTH REPORT. 



125 



Butler, Mrs. Harriet, 
Butler, Mr*. Mary P. C. 
Butler, Mrs. Olivia. 
Butler, Roman M. 
Butler, T. B. 
Butterfleld, Mrs. C. A. 
Button, Dea. Joel. 
Button, Mrs. Julia A. 
Button, Mrs. Rachel R. 
Calhoun, Dea. Jededlah. 
Calhoun, Mrs. Mary. 
Califf, Mrs. Caroline. 
Camp, Dennis. 
Camp, Miss Prances M. 
Camp, Rev. Henry B. 
Camp, Isabella F. 
Camp, Miss Sarah F. 
Camp, Dea. Sheldon. 
Camp, William. 
Campbell, Robert M. 
Carpenter, Rev. Charles C. 
Carpenter, James P. 
Carpenter, Mrs. J. P. 
Carrier, Mrs. Harriet. 
Carrington, Edward. 
Carter, Burwell. 
Carter, Calvin H. 
Carter, Franklin. 
Carter, Oilman. 
Carter, Josiah M. 
Carter, L. H. 
Carter, Miss Louisa. 
Carter, Mrs. Ruth W. 
Carver, Mrs. Mary. 
Cary, Henry. 
Case, Ellen. 
Case, Miss Mary Ann. 
Case, Mrs. Samuel. 
Cat*, Mrs. Stephen M. 
Oatlin, Eliza M. 
Chamberlain, Rev. Charles E. 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Mary N. 
Chamberlain, R. B. 
Champion, Henry G. 
Champion, Mrs. Mary A. 
Champlin, Oliver P. 
Chandler, Dea. James. 
Chandler, Rev. John. 
Chandler. Mrs. Sarilla. 
Chaney, Miss Mary P. 
Chaney, Rial. 
Chapman, Mrs. Ann 8. 
Chapman, Caroline. 
Chapman, James L. 
Chapman, Mrs. Emily E. 
Chapman, Francis A. 
Chapman, William H. 
Chappell, Ezra. 
Chappell, Mrs. Hannah 8. 
Chappell, Miss Fanny. 
Chappell, Miss Hannah L. 
Chappell, Mrs. W. 
Chappell, William 8. 
Charnley, James. 
Charnley, Susan F. 
Charnley, Walter H. 
Charnley, William. 
Chatfteld, n. W. 
Chatfield, P. 
Cheever, Rev. Henry T. 
Cheever, Mrs. Jane T. 
Cheseborough, Joseph, Jr. 
Cheseborough, Miss Ellen L. 
Cheseborough, Miss Lucretia. 
Cheater, Mary. 
Chew, Alice. 
Chew, Mrs. Frances. 
Chichester, R V. 
Child, Mrs. Bela. 
Child, Mrs. Ellen 11 
Child, Peleg C. 
Child, Mrs. Roxana. 
Child, Susan R 
Chlpman, Miss Delia A. 
Chlpman, Mrs. Lydia A. 
Clapp, Mrs. Clarissa ft 



Clark, Aaron. 
Clark, Mrs. Albert. 
Clark, Alice C. 
Clark, Rev. Allen. 
Clark, Allen O. 
Clark, Bryan. 
Clark, Charles. 
Clark, Charles. 
Clark, Rev. Clinton. 
Clark, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Clark, Edward L. 
Clark, (Jeorge T. 
Clark, Mm. Harriet T. 
Clark, Miss Jane C. 
Clark, Mary A. 
Clark, Mortimer. 
Clark, Moses. 
Clark, Oliver S. 
Clark, Sarah E. 
Clark, Thomas O. 
Clark, Rev. William B. 
Clark, Rev. William 8. 
Clark, 8. H. 
Clarke, S. W. 
Clarke, Mrs. Teresa A. 
Cleaveland, Alexander. 
C lea v eland, Ellsha L., D.D. 
Cleaveland, Miss F. A. 
Cleaveland, Mrs. Jennet R. 
Cleaveland, W. P. 
Cleaveland, Mrs. Mary. 
Cleaveland, Alexander P. 
Cleaveland, Rufus. 
Clift, Mrs. Harriet P. 
Cllfl, William, Jr. 
Clute, Frederick N. 
Cobb, Henry. 
Coe, Horace W. 
Coe, Rev. Noah. 
Coe, Robert. 
Coe, Rev. Samuel G. 
Coe, Miss Sarah A. 
Colt, Mrs. Ann B. 
Colt, Miss Ann B. 
Coit, Miss Betsey. 
Coit, Miss Charlotte. 
Coit, Charles. 
Colt, Miss Fanny L. 
Coit, Francis. 
Colt, Samuel. 
Coit, Samuel. 
Colby, Levi. 
Colby, Mrs. Levi. 
Colebrook, Mrs. Mary. 
Colegrove, Mrs. Sarah H. B. 
Coleman, Lemuel. 
Coleman, Lyman, D.D. 
Coleman, Miss Nancy. 
'Collins, Mrs. Benjamin F. 
Collins, Mrs. Eveline. 
Colt, Henry. 
Colt, William H. 
Colton, George. 
Colton, Rev. Henry M. 
Colton, Mrs. Lucy T. 
Colton, Mrs. M. L. 
Colton, Roderick. 
Comstock, L. F. 
Comstock, Miss Jemima. 
Cone, Mrs. Hannah W. 
Cone, Joseph E. 
Cone, Laura W. 
Cone, Mrs. Mehetabel. 
Conklin, I. M. 
Conklln, Dea. John J. 
Converse, J. P. 
Cook, Miss C. C. 
Cook, Ephralm. 
Cook, Miss Mary. 
Cook, Mrs. Mary P. 
Cook, Mrs. Nathan. ' 
Cook, Rev. Nehemiah B. 
Cooley, Mrs. Eleanor. 
Cooley, Henry A. 
Cooley, Her. Henry. 
Cooley, Mrs. Lucy. 



Copeland, Melvin B. 
Corbln, Aaron. 
Corbin, Mrs. Francina T. 
Corbln Philip. 
Copp, Mrs. Samuel. 
Corning, Mm. L. A. 
Corning, O. W. 
Cornish, Joseph. 
Cotton, Mi*s Elisa J. 
Couch, Mrs. Betsey. 
Couch, Miss Mary L. 
Couch, William. 
Cowles, Anna L. 
Cowles, Chandler. 
Cowles, Rev. Chauncey D. 
Cowles, Miss Dotha A. 
Cowles, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Cowles, Emily J. 
Cowles, Kxeklel. 
Cowles, Francis W. 
Cowles, Mrs. Harriet 8. 
Cowles, Mrs. Jane. 
Cowles, John M. 
Cowles, Mrs. Julius D. 
Cowles, Mrs. Martin. 
Cowles, Rev. Orson. 
Cowles, Robert H. 
Cowles, Samuel. 
Cowles, S. Ellen. 
Cowles, Susan C. 
Cowles, Rev. Sylvester. 
Cvampton, Mrs. Ruth B. 
Crandall, Mrs. Fanny L. 
Crandall, Miss Jane E. 
Crane, Rev. James B. 
Crane, Robert F. 
Crane, Mrs. Harriet. 
Crane, William W. 
Crittenden, David. 
Crittenden, Mrs. Rebecca. 
Crittenden, Rev. Richard. 
Crocker, Rev. Zebu Ion. 
Crocker, Mrs. Elizabeth P. 
Crosby, Mrs. A. E. 
Crossman, Rev. E. N. 
Crossman, John. 
Crump, Mrs. Mary C. 
Cummlngs, Mrs. Jane D. 
Cunningham, Mrs. Sophia. 
Currier, Mrs. Anna R. 
Curtis, Mrs. Alma. 
Curtis, Mrs. Ann C. 
Curtis, Mrs. A. T. 
Curtis, Miss Cornelia I. 
Curtis, Elbert. 
Curtis, Mrs. Elisha. 
Curtis, George W. 
Curtis, Henry A. 
Curtis, Henry 8. 
Curtis, Hermon. 
Curtis, Mrs. Jabe*. 
Curtis, Mrs. Jane. 
Curtis, Jason. 
Curtis, Rev. Jonathan. 
Curtis, Miss Julia. 
Curtis, J. J. 
Curtis, Lewis J. 
Curtis, Miss Mary T. 
Curtis, Mrs. Peter. 
Curtis, Roderick. 
Curtis, Stiles. 
Curtis, Truman. 
Curtis, Rev. William B. 
Curtis, Mrs. Mary E. H. 
Cushman, Mrs. Delia 8. 
Cushman, J. E. 
Cutler, Dr. William W. 
Daggett, Miss Grace Ann. 
Danforth, Mrs. D. 
Dan forth, Miss Emily. 
Daniels, Rev. Joseph L. 
Danielson, A. B. 
Danlelson, Mrs. George. 
Dart, Charles. 
Dart, Miss Emma. 
Davenport, Mr*. Vary C. 



126 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



May, 



Davenport, Miss Tryphosa. 

Davles, Rev. Thomas F. 

Davies, Mrs. Abigail. 

Davis, Abby. 

Davis, Miss Cynthia F. 

Davis, Evan. 

Davis, William. 

Dawes, Mrs. Harriet, 

Day, Calvin. 

Day, Daniel E. 

Day, Mrs. E. C. 

Day, Rev. O. B. 

Day, Jeremiah, D.D., LL.D. 

Day, Miss Sarah E. 

Day, John C. 

Day, Rev. Hiram. 

Dean, Rev. Oliver 8. 

Dean, Rev. Sydney. 

Deane, Rev. James. 

De Forest, Mrs. Alma. 

De Forest, Andrew W. 

De Forest, Benjamin. 

De Forest, Benjamin, Jr. 

De Forest, Mrs. Benjamin. 

De Forest, Miss Elizabeth. 

De Forest, Erastus L. 

De Forest, Ezra. 

De Forest, George. 

De Forest, William. 

Deming, Catharine H. 

Deming, James W. 

Deming, Julius W. 

Deming, Jared 

Deming, Mrs. Phoebe. 

Denison, Mrs. A. 0. 

Denison, Rev. Andrew 0. 

Denison, Mrs. Esther J. 

Denison, Miss Lucy G. 

Denison, Miss Mary EL 

Dennis, Rodney. 

Dennison, Dr. Jeremiah F. 

Dexter, Charles H. 

Dibble, William F. 

Dlckerman, Miss Chloe. 

Dickerman, Miss Elisabeth EL 

Dlckerman, George 8. 

Dlckerman, Rev. Isaac. 

Dlckerman, J. P. 

Dlckerman, Mrs. 8arah, 

Dickinson, David. 

Dimmick, J. D. 

Dlmock, Rev. Edwin. 

Dimon, Samuel F. 

Disbrow, Charles E. 

Dlsbrow, Miss Emily E. 

Dodd, Rev. Stephen. 

Dolbeare, E. M. 

Doibeare, Miss Mary A. 

Doollttle, Ezra. 

Doten, Bartlett, 

Douglas, A. G. 

Douglass, Rev. Solomon J. 

Dow, Daniel, D.D. 

Dowd, Dea. Martin L. 

Dowd, David. 

Dowd, Thomas. 

Downe, Mrs. Mary Ann* 

Downs, William E. 

Downs, Henry. 

Drake, Miss Eliza, 

Drew, Samuel. 

Drowne, Mrs. Mary. 

Dudley, Rev. John L. 

Dudley, Joseph W. 

Dudley, Rev. Martin. 

Dunbar, Mrs. Julia. 

Dunham, Miss Sarah. 

Dunning, Rev. Andrew. 

Dunning, Charles. 

Dunning, Rev. Edward 0. 

Duron d, Mrs. Lucia. 

Dutton, Rev. Aaron. 

Dutton, Hubbard. 

Itotton, Mrs. S. W. 8. 
Jhrigbt, Mrs. Clarissa* 
Dwlght, Her. Edward & 



Dwlght, Mrs. Lucy E. 
Dwlght, Mrs. Lucy. 
Dyer, Rev. S. 0. 
Easland, Allen. 
Eastman, Miss Amorilla. 
Eddy, Rev. Hiram. 
Edgar, John. 
Edgerton, Miss C. M. 
Edgerton, Miss Ellen. 
Edgerton, Miss E. H. 
Edmond, Henry V. 
Edmonds, Mrs. Charles. 
Edson, Rev. Ambrose. 
Edwards, Mrs. C. II. 
Edwards, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Edwards, Miss Mary A. 
Eells, Mrs. Dorcas. 
Eells, Robert. 
Elliott, Rev. Andrew. 
Elliott, Mrs. Anna C. 
Elliott, Anna G. 
Elliott, Frances Amelia. 
Elliott, Henry G. 
Elliott, Rev. John E. 
Elliott, Henry A. 
Elliott, Mary A. 
Elliott, Rev. Samuel H. 
Ellsworth, Mrs. Emily Webster. 
Ellsworth, Mary A. 
Elmes, Mrs. Lucy R. 
Elmes, William F. 
Elmore, Samuel. 
Elmore, T. 
Elton, T. 

Ely, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Ely, William N. 
Emerson, Rev. Edward B. 
Emmons, Aaron E. 
Ensign, Timothy. 
Ensign, Mrs. Maria. 
Eustis, Mrs. W. T. 
Evarts, Mrs. Amanda T. 
Evarts, Nathan H. 
Everett, Miss Huldah. 
Fabrique, Benjamin. 
Fabrique, Rev. Charles. 
Fairchild, Chauncey M. 
Fairchild, Henry. 
Fairchild, Mrs. Susan A. 
Farnsworth, Frederic 
Farnsworth, H. W. 
Faxon, Elisha. 
Fellows, John. 
Fellows, Rev. S. H. 
Fenn, Dea. Aaron W. 
. Fenn, A polios. 
Fenn, Dan, Jr. 
Fenn, Horace. 
Fenn, Julius. 
Fenn, Rev. Stephen. 
Fenn, William B. 
Ferris, Abel. 
Ferris, James 0. 
Ferris, Mrs. Esther. 
Ferris, Mrs. Peter. 
Ferris, Ransford A. 
Ferry, Orris S. 
Fessenden, Mrs. Nancy C. 
Field, Mrs. Thomas P. 
Fisher, Rev. Jesse. 
Fisher, Mrs. Nathan. 
Fisher, William 0. 
Fitch, Miss Fanny M. 
Fitch, Harden H. 
Fitch, Ttfrs. Henry. 
Fitch, Mrs. John W. 
Fitch, Miss Maria. 
Fitch, Mrs. Martin. 
Foote, Mrs. Abigail R. 
Foote, Ellal T. 
Foote, Josephine R. 
Forbes, Charles. 
Forbes, Giles. 
Forbes, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Ford, Lyman. 
Foster,*. R, 



Foster, Rev. Lewis. 
Foster, Stephen. 
Fowler, Charles M. 
Fowler, George A. 
Fowler, Richard. 
Fowler, Mrs. Sally Amelia. 
Fowler, Samuel. 
Fowler, Wallace G. 
Fox, Daniel W. 
Francis, Dea. Elijah. 
Francis, Mrs. Elizabeth G. 
Francis, J. A. 
Francis, J. M. 
Freeman, 0. 
Frlsbee, L. T. 
Fry, D. C. 
Fuller, Charles D. 
Fuller, Dea. George. 
Fuller, Henry L. 
Fuller, Miss Lydla. 
Fuller, Mrs. Mary. 
Fuller, Nathan. 
Fuller, Simeon. 
Gallup, Rev. James A. 
Galpln, Cyprian. 
Galpin G. 

Ganett, Mrs. Sarah. 
Gardner, Rev. Robert D. 
Gardner, Mrs. Louisa J. 
Gardner, Maria. 
Gates, Dea. Henry B. 
Gates, Sophia C. 
Gay, Miss Aimira. 
Gay, William. 
Gay, Joseph B. 
Gay, Fisher. 
Gay, Miss Hope B. 
Gay, Mrs. Ruth. 
Gaylord, Henry. 
Geer, John. 

Gelkie, Rev. Archibald. 
Gelston, Hugh. 
Giddings, Henry A. 
Giddings, Mrs. P. 
Gilbert, George W. 
Gilbert, Gershom C. H., M.D. 
Gilbert, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Gilbert, Joseph. 
Gilbert, Mrs. 8. D. 
Gilbert, Samuel D. 
Gilbert, Rev. William H. 
Glllett, Mrs. Abbie E. 
Gillett, Mrs. Ada. 
Glllett, Mrs. Sally. 
Gillett, Mrs. Sophronla. 
Glllett, Mrs. S. B. 
Glllett, Dea. W. A. 
Gillette, Miss Kate. 
•Oilman, Rev. Edward W. 
Oilman, Mrs. Edward W. 
Gladding, Henry. 
Gladwin, James. 
Gladwin, Selden. 
Gleason, Rev. H. 
Gleason, Sarah E. 
Glennes, Samuel C. 
Glldden. R. B. 
Goddard, Miss Juliette R. 
Godfrey, Daniel. 
Godfrey, Simeon. 
Goodale, Jane E. 
Goodall, Francis 0. 
Goodman, Sarah M. 
Goodman, James. 
Goodrich, Rev. Charles A. 
Goodrich, Edward EL 
Goodrich, Miss Elizabeth. 
Goodrich, Hon. EUsur, LL.D. 
Goodrich, Hannah D. 
Goodrich, Joshua. 
Goodrich, J. B. 
Goodrich, Miss Prudence, 
Goodrich, Seba. 
Goodwin, Alice H. 
Goodwin, Charles & 
Goodwin, Edwin. 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



127 



Goodwin, George H. 
Goodwin, Rev. Barley. 
Goodwin, Hiram. 
Goodwin, Mrs. Maria. 
Goodwin, Warren. 
Goodyear, Dea. Marcus. 
Goodyear, Willi*. 
Gookin, Matilda. 
Gorham, Miss Ann. 
Gorham, Mrs. Judson. 
Gould, Miss Abigail. 
Gould, David R. 
Gould, Miss Isabella. 
Gould, Mrs. Mary. 
Gould, Morris. 
Gould, William M. 
Graham, C. J. 
Graham, Isaac H. 
Grant, Rev. Henry M. 
Grant, Mrs. Juliana. 
Grave, Miss Sarah E. 
Greenwood, Rev. John. 
Greenwood, Mrs. John. 
Gregory, Giles. 
Gregory, Ira. 
Gregory, Miss Jane E. 
Grldley, John. 
Gridley, Mary. 
Griffing, Mrs. Sarah. 
Griggs, Mrs. Charlotte, 
Griggs, Rev. Leverett. 
Griswold, Mrs. Amelia A 

Griswold, Mrs. Hannah. 

Griswold, Mrs. Harris. 

Griswold, Dea. Leverett. 

Griswold, Rev. Levi. 

Griswold, Martin R. 

Griswold, Rev. Samuel 

Grosvenor, Rev. Charles P. 

Grosvenor, Mrs. Elisabeth E. 

Grosvenor, Mrs. H. J. 

Grosvenor, Louisa. 

Gruman, C. J. 

Gruman, Mrs. N. L. 

Gulliver, Mrs. Frances. 

Gulliver, Frank. 

Gulliver, William. 

Gurley, Miss Ann E. 

Gurley, Jacob B. 

Hadley, Mrs. James. 

Hale, Mrs. A. 

Hale, Mrs. Irene T. 

Hale, Henry D. 

Hale, Oliver. 

Hale, Mrs. Nathan W. 

Hall, Alfred R. 

Hall, Edward. 

Hall, Rev. Edwin, Jr. , 

Hall, Dr. EIL 

Hall, Mrs. Fanny. 

Hall, Dea. Harvey 8. 

Hall, Joel. 

Hall, Knox. 

Hall, Mrs. Mary D. 

Hall, Robert A. 

Hall, Sophia. 

Hall, Mrs.Seth. 

Hall, Storrs. 

Hall, William. 

Hall, Dea. William. 

Hall, William B. 

Hallaro, Miss Mary F. 



Hamilton, Ellen & 
Hamlen, B. L. 
Hamlen, Mrs. Abigail. 
Hamlin, Angelina M. 
Hamlin, Dr. C. 
Hamlin, Hesekdah. 
Hammond, Allen. 
Hammond, Mrs. Allen. 
Hammond, Joelah. 

.Dea. Julius & 



Hamner, Francis. 
T.Harriet. 



Hancbett, Miss Maria. 
Hanford, T. C. 
Hanford, Miss Sarah E. 
Hanraer, Miss Lucy. 
Harman, Osias. 
Harman, S. 

Harrington, Miss Abhy F. 
Harrington, Miss Emily. 
Harris, Mrs. John W. 
Harris, Mrs. Mary E. 
Harris, Mrs. Maria F. 
Harris, Dea. William P. 
Harrison, Ellzur. 
Harrison, Rev. Fosdick. 
Harrison, Rev. George J. 
Harrison, Miss Maria. 
Harrison, Mr*. Susan K. 
Hart, Col. William. 
Hart, Mrs. Catharine. 
Hart, Harriet Lavinla. 
Hart, Mrs. Catharine E. 
Hart, William Henry. 
Hart, Edward L. 
Hart, J. Henry. 
Hart, Jane K. 
Hart, Rev. Luther. 
Hart, Miss Lydia. 
Hart, Mrs. Maria. 
Hart, Nathan, Jr. 
Hart, Jonathan T. 
Hart, Noah R. 
Hart, Mrs. Orpha. 
Hart, Titus L. 
Haskell, N. Elisabeth. 
Hastings, a 8. 
Hatch, D. 

Hatch, Dea. Joseph E. 
Haughton, Mrs. Julia. 
Haven, Mrs. E. L. 
Haven, Mrs. Fanny. 
Hawes, Mrs. Mary. 
Hawley, Mrs. Charity. 
Uawley, Catharine. 
Hawley, Mary A. 
Hawley, Elisha. 
Hawley, Edmond 8. 
Hawley, Mrs. F. E. 
Hawley, Mary W. 
Hawley, Oliver. 
Hawley, William H. 
Hawley, William. 
Hayden, Edward G. 
Hayden, Rev. Hiram C. 
Hayden, J. H. 
Hayden, Miss Lucinda. 
Hayden, 8. 8. 
Hayden, Samuel B. 
Hayes, Mrs. Sarah B, 
Heath, Miss Ann E. 
Hebard, Miss Lucretla. 
Hemenway, Rev. Daniel. 
Hemlnway, Mrs. Sarah A N. 
HemlnwaV, Willis. 
Hempeted Mrs. Grace. 
Hendrie, Charles. 
Henshaw, Mary C. 
Herrick, Charles C. 
Herrick, Rev. William D. 
Hlckok, William. 
Hlggins, Miss Harriet. 
Hlggins, Mrs. Janette. 
Higgins, Mrs. Laura. 
Hlggins, Lewis. 
Higgins, Mrs. L. T. 
Hoggins, Miss Mary. 



Hill, John C. 
Hill! Mrs. Julia. 
Hill, Mrs. Martha E. K. 
HllL Mrs. Mary E. 
Hill, Mrs. P. 
Bills, Burrltt 
HUU, R. Lewis. 
Hills, Mrs. Harriet B. 
HlUard, Ber. £ B. 



Hlllyer, Appleton R. 
Hinckley, Charles. 
Hinckley, Reuben K. 
Hlne, Elliott P. 
Hlne, Rev. Orlo D. 
Hlne, Mrs. Ellen E. 
Hlne, Mrs. James. 
Hlne, Mrs. William H. 
Hlnman, Mrs. Betty. 
Hinsdale, Abel. 
Hinsdale, L. 
Hitchcock, George. 
Hitchcock, Henry P. 
Hitchcock, Mrs. Martha R. 
Hoadley, Horace P. 
Hoadley, Mrs. Martha A. 
Hoadley, Robert L. 
Hoadley. Selden. 
Hobby, George T. 
Hodges, Miss Laura M. 
Holley, Mrs. A. H. 
Holley, Miss Elisabeth M. 
Holley, Miss Elizat>eth. 
Holley, Mrs. Emellne. 
Hollister, George. 
Holmes, Miss Ellen L. 
Holmes, Mrs. James M. 
Holmes, L. L. 
Holmes, Sarah J. 
Holmes, Thomas J. 
Holt, Henry C. 
Holt, Mrs. Robert. 
Holt, Sanford. 
Hooker, William G. 
Hopkins, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Hopkins, Samuel. 
Hotchklss, Charles. 
Hotchkiss, Rev. F. W. 
Hotchklss, Mrs. F. W. 
Hotchklss, Lucius. 
Hotchklss, Mrs. Mary A 
Hotchkiss, R. II. 
Hough, Mrs. Harriet W. 
House, Mrs. Otis. 
Howard, Mrs. Eliza. 
Howard, Miss Maria. 
Howard, Sarah. 
Howe, Rev. Samuel. 
Howe, Mrs. Samuel. 
Howe, Mrs. Semanths. 
Hoyt, Edward 8. 
Hoyt, Ezra. 
Hoyt, Henry I. 
Hoyt, Ira. 

Hoyt, James Henry. 
Hoyt, Louis C. 
Hoyt, Mrs. Lucretla 
Hoxle, Benjamin F. 
Hubbard, Charles H. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Charlotte 
Hubbard, Mrs. David. 
Hubbard, Miss Elisabeth. 
Hublmrd, Mrs. Ira G. 
Hubbard, James I. 
Hubbard, Richard. 
Hubbard, Dr. Dennison H. 
Hubbard, Charles H. 
Hubbard, Edward D. 
Hubbard, Mrs. George. 
Hubbard, Isaac L. 
Hubbard, James B. 
Hubbard, John 8. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Russel'. 
Hubbard, Miss Sarah. 
Hubbell, E. E. 
HubbeU, Mrs. Harriet T 
Hubbell, Lorenzo. 
Hubbell, Rev. Stephen. 
Hull, Andrew J. 
Hull, Henry. 
Hull. William. 
Humiston, Lyman. 
Hungerford, Joel. 
Huntington, Miss C. F. 
Huntington, Rev. Enoeh &» 
Huntington, Joseph U. 



128 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Huntington, Miss L. M. 
Huntington, Mrs. P. B. 
Huntington, Miss Sarah L. 

nuntington, Selden. 

nurd, Henry. 

Hurd, Horace. 

Hurd, Oliver. 

Hurd, Mrs. Mary W. 

Hurd, Mrs. Polly. 

Hurlbut, Henry 8. 

Husted, Mrs. K. B. 

II us ted, Mrs. Mary A. 

Husted, Miles H. 

Husted, Silas. 

Hutchlns, Dea. Jeremiah. 

Uutchins, Miss Mary. 

Hutchinson, N. W. 

Hutchinson, Israel E. 

Hyatt, Lancelot. 

Hyde, Albert. 

Hyde, Mrs. A. B. 

Hyde, Rev. Charles. 

Hyde, Mrs. Eleanor. 

nyde, Rev. E1L 

Hyde, Elijah. 

nyde, Joel. 

Hyde, Miss Isabella. 

Hyde, Dea. Joseph. 

Hyde, Rev. Lavlus. 

Hyde, Rev. Nathaniel 

Hyde, Rev. William A. 

Ide, Rev. Alexis W. 

Ingersoll, Mrs. Hannah. 

Ives, Miss Ellen A. 

Ives, Mrs. Elisabeth. 

Ives, Mrs. Lucius. 

Ives, Mrs. Lucy. 

Ives, Silllman L. 

Jackpon, Dea. John. 

Jacobs, W. W. 

Jagger, James W. 

Janes, Mrs. Phoebe. 

Jarman, Mrs. Catharine W. 

Jennings, Mrs. £. B. 

Jennings, Dea. James B. 

Jennings, Mrs. Maria A. 

Jennings, Mrs. M. E. 

Jennings, Dea. Seth. 

Jennings, William J. 

Jerome, Miss Lucy T. 

Jessup, Rev. Henry G. 

Jessup, Willie. 

Jewett, Miss Cynthia A. 

Jewett, Mrs. Elizabeth. 

Jewett, Rev. Spofford D. 

Johnson, Benjamin 8. 

Johnson, Mrs. Catharine W. 

Johnson, Charles C. 

Johnson, George. 

Johnson, Dea. Henry L. 

Johnson, James. 

Johnson, Miss Julia R, 

Johnson, Miss Mary A. 

Johnson, Mrs. Mary E. 

Johnson, Miss Mary E. 

Johnson, Miss Mary M. 

Johnson, Mrs. Mary M. 

Johnson, Stephen. 

Johnson, William C. 

Jones, Rev. Ellsha C. 

Jones, Edwin B. 

Jones, F. J. 

Jones, Hannah H. 

Jones, Isaac W. 

Jones, Mrs. Jane R. 

Jones, Mrs. Julia. 

Jones, Miss Julia A. 

Jones, Mrs. Marian C. 

Jones, Miss Mary S. 

Jones, Rev. Warren G. 

Jordan, Miss Augusta. 

Judd, Mrs. Emily. 

Judd, Rev. Jonathan 8. 

Judd, William A. 
Judson, Charles A. 
Judson, Mn. George. 



Judson, James, Jr. 
Judson, Dea. Silas P. 
Judson, Truman H. 
Kain. Dr. John H. 
Reach, Dea. Jason C. 
Keeler, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Heeler, Ellzur. 
Keeler, David C. 
Keeler, Rufus. 
Keeler, Miss Sarah A. 
Kelley, Henry R. 
Kellogg, Aaron. 
Kellogg, Allyn. 
Kellogg, Eliza W. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Anna H. 
Kellogg, George. 
Kellogg, Mrs. George. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Addle A. 
Kellogg, Mrs. H. C. 
Kellogg. Mrs. H. E. W. 
Kellogg, Mrs. Lucy A. 
KeUogg, Mary H. 
Kellogg, N. 0. 
Kellogg, Mrs. N. 0. 
Kellogg, Dr. 0. W. 
Kellogg, Thomas W. 
Kellogg, William. 
Kelsey, Courtland. 
Kelsey, Dea. Ezra. 
Kelsey, Nathan. 
Kendall, Calvin H. 
Kendall, R. K. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Emily G. 
Kilbourn, Mary J. 
Kimball, Miss Ann. 
Kimball, Mrs. Charles. 
Kimball, Mrs. Eliza C. 
Kimball, Jane T. 
Kimberly, N. 
King, Rev. Asa. 
King, Mrs. Asaph. 
King, Mrs. Betsey. 
King, Charles. 
King, Miss Elizabeth. 
King, John. 
King, Theodore. 
King, William H. 
Kingsbury. Miss H. B. 
Kinney, Miss Arimitea. 
Klnnle, Erastus. 
Klrtland, Charles W. 
Knapp, Miss Emma B. 
Knapp, Mrs. Susan E. 
Knapp, Mrs. Levi. S. 
Knight, Rev. Joseph. 
Knight, Rev. Merrick. 
Knouse, Rev. William H. 
Knudson, A. A. 
Lacey, Dea. R. B. 
Ladd, J. L. 
Ladd, Miss Nancy. 
Lam ph ear, Mrs. 0. T. 
Landfear, Rev. Rodolphus. 
Lane, Joseph P. 
Lane, Mrs. Mary E. 
Lane, Mrs. Marian U. 
Lane, Harvey J. 
Langdon, Edward. 
Langdon, George. 
Lathrop, Rev. Daniel W. 
Lathrop, Mrs. A. W. 
Lathrop, Mrs. George H. 
Lathrop, Miss Harriet W. 
Lathrop, Arthur D. 
Lathrop, Mrs. L. E. 
Lathrop, Mrs. Martha. 
Lathrop, Miss Mary. 
Law, Miss Eunice A. 
Law, Miss E. E. 
Law, William. 
Law, Mrs. Ruth. 
Lawrence, Edward A., D.D. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Margaret* 
Lawrence, Mrs. U. B. 
Lay, William H. 
Learned, BeU?. 



Learned, Dwight W. 
Learned, Mrs. Edward. 
Learned, Ebeneser. 
Learned, E. II . 
Learned, Miss Harriet M. 
Learned, Jane E. 
Learned, Mrs. Joshua C. 
Learned, Mrs. Lydla. 
Learned, Rev. Robert C. 
Learned, Sarah B. 
Leavens, Frank. 
Leavenworth, Miss Elizabeth. 
Ledyard, Miss Fanny. 
Lee, Mrs. Abigail. 
Lee, Henry. 
Lee, Henry B. 
Lee, Dea. Jonathan T. 
Lee, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Leete, Dea. Albert A. 
Leete, Dea. Edward L. 
Leete, Mrs. Mary C. 
Leonard, Howard. 
Leonard, Lucy E. 
Lester, Erastus. 
Lester, Mrs. Lydla C. 
Lester, Mrs. 8arah E. 
Lewis, Abraham. 
Lewi*, Alfred E. 
Lewis, Miss Ella. 
Lewis, Mrs. Ellas. 
Lewis, Mrs. H. M. 
Lewis, Isaac, D.D. 
Lewis, Joseph. 
Lewis, Kate. 
Lewis, Miss Maria C. 
Lewis, Martha G. 
Lewis, Morgan. 
Lewis, Samuel A. 
Lewis, Miss Sarah. 
Lewis, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Lewis, William K. 
Lillington, Mrs. Marilla. 
Lincoln, C. L. 
Llndsley, Alice H. 
Llndsley, Emily E. 
Llndsley, James F. 
Llndsley. James II. 
Linsley, Miss Abigail. 
Linsley, Rev. Charles E. 
Llnsley, Charles M. 
Llnsley, Dr. Jacob. 
Llnsley, James M. 
Llnsley, Mrs. Esther B. 
Llnsley, Harvey 8. 
Llnsley, Levi. 
Llnsley, Mrs. A. F. 
Linsley, Mrs. Polly F. 
Llnsley, Mrs. Phebe H. 
Llnsley, Miss Mary. 
Linsley, Mrs. 8arah. 
Lobdell, Rev. Francis. 
Lockwood, CoL Buckingham. 
Lockwood, B. B. 
Lockwood, Charles. 
Lockwood, Charles S. 
Lockwood, Miss Deborah A. 
Lockwood, Miss Elizabeth. 
Lockwood, F. St. John. 
Lockwood, Miss Julia A. 
Lockwood, Joseph. 
Lockwood, Mrs. Polly. 
Lockwood, Mrs. S. R. 
Lockwood, William B. 
Lockwood, William 8. 
Long, Rev. Walter R. 
Long, Mrs. Harriet M. 
Loomis, -Anson. 
Loom is, Mrs. A. 
Loomis, Rev. Aretas G. 
Loomis, Mrs. Charlotte B. 
Loomis, Mrs. Clara. 
Loomis, H. B. 
Loomis, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Loomis, F. B. 
Loomis, James 8. 
Loomis, J. W. 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH BEPOBT. 



129 



Loomis, Miss Louisa, 
Loomis, Mn. Neelaad. 
Loomis, Roman W. 
Loomis, Dea. Z. W. 
Loper, Rev. Stephen A. 
Lord, George II. 
Lord, Mrs. Jennett 
Lord, Miss Julia. 
Lord, Sherman CL 
Lord, Miss Sophia, 
Loundsbury, Miss Sarah A. 
Loveland, John. 
Lyman, Miss Abigail. 
Lyman, Benjamin. 
Lyman, Mrs. Cecilia, 
Lyman, Rev. Chester S. 
Lyman, Edward H. 
Lyman, Rev. Ephralm. 
Lyman, Mrs. Frances Mary. 
Lyman, Mrs. Hannah D. 
Lyman, Helen M. 
Lyman, James D. 
Lyman, Mrs. Julia L. G. 
Lyman, Mrs. Juliette T. 
Lyman, Dr. 0. B. 
Lyman, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Lyman, W. W. 
Lyon, Asa. 
Lyon, Mrs. Harriet. 
Lyon, Mrs. Harriet. 
Lyon, Miss Lydla 8. 

Lyon. Mrs. Sarah. 

Mackie, Mrs. Mary Rebecca. 

M'Call, Rev. Salmon. 

M'Cau, Mrs. Emily. 

M'Bwen, Abljah. 

M'Ewen, Mrs. Betsey. 

McParland, Rev. R H. 

Mclntire, Rev. a a 

Mclntire, Mrs. J. M, 

M'Klnstry, Rev. J. A. 

M'Kinstry, Mrs. Mary B. 

M'Laughlin, Rev. D. D. T. 

M'Lean, Rev. Allen. 

M'Lellan, Edward. 

M'Queen, Miss Lucy. 

Maddox, Dr. Joseph. 

Magill, Rev. Seagrove W. 

MaUory, Alfred. 

Mallory, Charles. 

MaUory, Mrs. Elisabeth, 

Mallory, Harvey. 

Mallory, Isaac. 

Mallory, James. 

Mallory, Mrs. SaUy. 

Maltby, Amoret. 

Maltby, Ellen W. 

Maltby, Ellsworth. 

Maltby, George. 

Maltby, George E. 

Maltby, Grace A. 

Maltby, Harriet G. 

Maltby, Jane A. 

Maltby, Jonathan. 

Maltby, Joseph HL 

Maltby, Lucius. 

Maltby, Lucius U. 

Maltby, Mrs. & 

Manwaring, Mrs. R. A. 

Marsh, Mrs. E. D. 

Marsh, Edward W. 

Harsh, Egbert 

Marsh, Rev. EsetieL 

Marsh, Rev. Frederick. 

Marsh, William L. 

Martyn, Miss 8. M. 

Marvin, Hon. Charles. * 

Marvin, Miss M. B. 

Marvin, William. 

Marvin, William R 

Mason, Aurora P. 

Mason, Jane. 

Mason, Miss Sarah a 
Mason, W. H., Jr. 
MaUon,W.N. 
Mattbewson,Mrs,f.W. 

9 



Maynard, Mrs. Abigail 
Mead, Aaron B. 
Mead, AbigaU J. 
Mead, Miss Caroline R. 
Mead, Mrs. Clarinda, 
Mead, Miss Clarissa. 
Mead, Miss Cornelia G. 
Mead, Mrs. Cornelius. 
Mead, Rev. Darius. 
Mead, Rev. Eheneser. 
Mead, Miss Elisabeth L. 
Mead, Ephralm. 
Mead, Miss Hannah, 
Mead, Miss Hannah & 
Mead, Mrs. Hannah. 
Mead, Mrs. Huldah. 
Mead, Miss Julia A. K. 
Mead, Miss Julia B. 
Mead, Miss Laura. 
Mead, Rev. Mark. 
Mead, Mrs. Mary Ann. 
Mead, Miss Mary H. 
Mead, Mrs. Rachel E. S. 
Mead, Mrs. Susan. 
Meech, Ephralm. 
Meeker, George R, 
Meeker, W. a, Jr. 
Meigs, Mrs. P. W. 
Meigs, T. V. 
Merriam, Alanson H. 
Merritt, Mrs. A. H. 
Merrow, Mrs. Mary B. 
Merwin, Alpheus N. 
Merwln, Joseph B. 
Merwin, Marcus B. 
Merwin, Miss Miranda a 
Merwin, Mrs. Orria A. G. 
Merwin, Rev. Samuel. 
Merwin, Smith. 
Merwin, Timothy D. 
Merwin. Walter 0. 
Miller, Rev. Alpha. 
Miller, Rev. Jacob G. 
Miller, T. A. 
Mills, Miss Amanda H. 
MUls, Charles a 
Mills, Mrs. Isaac. 
Mills, Jedediah W. 
Mills, John. 
Mills, Miss Laura. 
MUls, Miss Mary. 
Milne, Alexander. 
Miner, Charles W. 
Miner, Darius D. 
Miner, Mrs. Lydia J. B. 
Miner, Miss Mary F. 
Miner, Rev. Nathaniel. 
Miner, T. 

Minor, Solomon B. 
Mitchell, Abner W. 
Mitchell, Asahel W. 
Mitchell, Nancy P. 
Mitchell, Nathan. 
Mitchell, Dea. Nelson W. 
Mix, James E. 
Mix, Lyman. 
Monroe, Mrs. Hannah M. 
Monson, Mary J. 
Moody, George A. 
Moore, Frances H. 
Moore, Henry S. 
Moore, Rev. James D. 
Moore, Mrs. James D. 
Moore, Rev. William H. 
Morehouse, Mary Augusta, 
Morehouse, William. 
Morehouse, W. B. 
Morgan, Mrs. EUsa M. 
Morgan, Mrs. Frances A. 
Morgan, Jasper. 
Morgan, S. 0. 
Morgan, Miss Wealthy A. 
Morris, Dwight. 
Morris, Mrs. Bmeline W. 
Morris, Rev. Myron N. 
Morrow, Miss Ann, 



Morse, Rev. Benjamin. 
Morse, Chauncey. 
Morse, Mrs. Sylvia C. 
Moseley, Mary E. 
Moseley, Rev. Samuel 
Mosely, Miss Emily. 
Mowry, Mrs. A. G. 
Moxley, Samuel. 
Munger, George N. 
Munger, George W. 
Munger, Dea. Walter P. 
Munger, Walter &, M.D. 
Munson, Rev. Frederick. 
Munson, Harriet N. 
Munson, M. CL 
Murdock, Miss Mary E. 
Murphy, Rev. Elijah D. 
Murray, Miss Jane, 
Murray, Miss Jennett 
Naramore, Frank J. 
Nelson, Rev. Levi. 
Nettleton, L. N. 
Neuman, Mrs. Elisabeth G. 
Newbury, Edwin. 
Newman, Rev. Charles. 
Newton, Dea. Gaylord. 
Newton, J. C. 
Newton, Rev. John H. 
Newton, Mrs. Martha B. 
Newton, Phllo 8, 
Newton, Dea. Samuel. 
Newton, Thomas H. 
Nichols, Rev. Charles, 
Nichols, Edward K. 
Nichols, Mrs. Louisa. 
Nichols, Ward. 
Nile., Mrs. Charles. 
Norcross, H. F. 
North, Alfred. 
North, Miss Antoinette* 
North, Miss EUsa. 
North, Mrs. F. A. 
North, Henry M. 
North, Mrs. James. 
North, James H. 
North, Mrs. Jane H. 
North, Orin & 
North, Phlneas. 
Northrop, Rev. Bennett F. 
Northrop, B. K. 
Northrop, C. 8. 
Northrop, Mrs. Elisabeth CL 
Northrop, Martha E. 
Northrop, Miss Sarah. 
Norton, John W. 
Noyes, Miss Hannah IX 
Noyes, Rev. James. 
Noyes, Rev. John. 
Noyes, William. 
Noyes, William P. 
Ogden, Miss Angeline. 
Ogden, Rev. David L. 
Ogden, Hesekiah. 
Ogden, Huldah E. 
Olcott, Mrs. EUsa A. 
Olmstead, Mrs. Amelia. 
Olmstead, Miss Fanny. 
Olmstead, Mrs. Mary J. 
Olmsted, Ashbel. 
Olmsted, Charles. 
Olney, Amos A. 
Osborn, Miss Elisabeth. 
Osborn, Louisa. 
Osborn, Lyman. 
Osgood, Miss Jane B. 
Ot&,B.R. 

Oviatt, Rev. George A. 
Oviatt, Mrs. Isabella G. 
Owen, Miss Annette. 
Page, Andrew 8. 
Page, Rev. Benjamin 8. J. 
Page, Harvey. 
Paine, Daniel 
Paine, Rev. J. B. 
Paine, Rev. Levi L. 
Palnc, Miss Mar y A, 



180 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Painter, Elisabeth W. 

Painter, Henry W. 

Palmer, Alfred. 

Palmer, Alvln B. 

Palmer, Dr. O. E. 

Palmer, Mrs. Mary a 

Palmer, Joseph, M.D. 

Palmer, Mrs. Lucy B. 

Palmer, Mrs. Lucy U. 

Palmer, Mrs. Luke. 

Palmer, Mrs. Priscilla D. 

Pardee, Frank W. 

Parish, Ella E. 

Parker, Edward P. 

Parker, Edwin E. 

Parmelee, Dea. EH. 

Parmelee, Hiram. 

Parsons, Rev. B. 

Parsons, Mrs. Caroline. 

Parsons, Charles H. 

Parsons, Rer. Isaac 

Parsons, Mrs. Sarah B. 

Partridge, Miss Eliia M. 

Patterson. James W. 

Patton, William L. 

Payne, Dea. Franklin. 

Payne, Reuben. 

Pease, Mrs. Aaron. 

Pease, Henrietta M. 

Pease, Rev. Lumas H. 

Pease, Dea. Noah. 

Pease, Mrs. Sarah R. 

Peck, Mrs. Abigail 8. 

Peck, Miss Anna M. 

Peck, Miss Caroline E. 

Peck, Rer. David. 

Peck, Miss Elisabeth G. 

Peck, Mrs. Elisabeth M. 

Peck, George A. 

Peck, Miss Harriet 

Peck, Miss Harriet E. 

Peck, Horace. 

Peck, Miss Jane. 

Peck, Jeremiah. 

Peck, John. 

Peck, Mrs. Julia M. 

Peck, Miss Lisetta. 

Peck, Miss Mary. 

Peck, Miss Mary M. 

Peck, Silas J. 

Peck, Rev. Whitman. 

Peck. William. 

Peckham, Oliver. 

Peete, Miss Caroline. 

Pelton, George A. 

Pelton, Dea. Ralph. 

Pendleton, Miss Caroline. 

Penfleld, Benjamin. 

Perkins, Ellas. 

Perkins, Rev. George. 

Perkins, Major Joseph. 

Perkins, Leonard. 

Perkins,N. 8. 

Perrin, Rev. Lavelette. 

Perrin, Mrs. Mary A. 8. 

Perry, Mrs. C. A. 

Perry, Mrs. Edward 8. 

Perry, Frederick. 

Perry, Henry Hoyt 

Perry, John Hoyt. 

Perry, Miss Jane. 

Perry, Miss Louisa C. 

Perry, Miss Maria G. 

Perry, Mrs. Sally C. 

Perry, Mrs. Sally. 

Pettee, William J. 

Phelps, ElUklm, D.D. 

Phelps, Mrs. EL 

Phelps, Henry A. 

Phelps, Mrs. Martha. 

Phelps, Mm Martha. 

Phelps, Rev. Roger. 

Phelps, Dea. Roger. 
Phelps WlWjun. 
PbMp*,M*ry L. 
Pierce, Rer, Am C. 



Pierce, John. 
Pinneo, Henry 0. 
Pinneo, Mrs. Henry 0. 
Pitkin, Mrs. Catharine L. 
Pitkin, Mrs. Emily N. 
Pitkin, Miss Emily. 
Pitkin, John. 
Pitkin, Joseph. 
Pitkin, Mrs. Louisa W. 
Pitkin, Mrs. Maria F. 
Pitkin, Walter. 
Pitkin, Walter S. 
Piatt, Dea. Simeon. 
Plimpton, Miss H. Louisa. 
Plumley, Henry. 
Plummer, Isaac W. 
Pool, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Pool, Mrs. Elisabeth H. 
Porter, H. L. 
Porter, H. 8. 
Porter, Mrs. H. 8. 
Porter, Rev. James. 
Porter, Job. 
Porter, Noah, Jr., D.D. 
Porter, Norman. 
Porter, Mrs. Sarah. 
Post, Mrs. Augusta I. 
Post, Mrs. Christopher C. 
Post, Jeremiah K. 
Potter, Ephraim. 
Potter, Rev. John D. 
Potter, MehatabeL 
Potter, Tertlus D. 
Potter, Theodore B. 
Potwln, Rev. Lemuel 8. 
Potwin, Mrs. Julia H. 
Pratt, Mrs. Anna. 
Pratt, Mrs. Ann A. 
Pratt, Rev. Edward H. 
Pratt, Edwin. 
Pratt, Esra D. 
Pratt, Mrs. Rachel 
Pratt, Mrs. Richard 8. 
Prescott, Miss Rebecca. 
Preston, E. B. 
Preston, Mrs. Mary C. 
Pride, Dr. William. 
Pritchard, Elisur E. 
Prudden, Rev. G. P. 
Prudden, Henry. 
Punderson, David. 
Punderson, Miss Harriet. 
Putnam, Rev. Austin. 
Quintard, Evart 
Quintard, W. L. 
Rainey, Miss Catharine E. 
Rand, Dea. Richard. 
Rand, Robert P. 
Randall, Mrs. Abby P. 
Randall, Mrs. Ichabod. 
Handle, G. H. 
Handle, Henry C. 
Handle, Mrs. & 
Rankin, Rev. 8. G. W. 
Rau, RabeL 
Rawson, Mrs. Lucretia. 
Raymond, Albert C. 
Raymond, Rev. Alfred C. 
Raymond, Mrs. Fanny. 
Raymond, Miss Harriet. 
Reade, H. L. 
Reed, EUjah F. 
Reld, Adam, D.D. 
Reid, Mrs. Adam. 
Resseguie, Miss Anna M. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Deborah. 
Reynolds, Mrs. F. 0. 
Reynolds, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Reynolds, Samuel 
Reynolds, Valentine. 
Rice, Mrs. Anna. 
Rice, Mrs. Parnella 8. 
Rice, Richard B. 
Richards, Miss Annie N. 
Richards, Mlsa Caroline. 
Richards, Ray. QtOTfo. 



Richards, James, D.D. 

Richards, Lucas. 

Richards, Mrs. Susan M. 

Richmond, Gilbert 8. 

Ripley, Miss Emily L. 

Ripley, George C. 

Ripley, Miss Hannah L. 

Ripley, Miss Harriet 

Ripley, Mrs. Hannah G. 

Ripley, Harriet A. 

Ripley, Miss Jane. 

Ritch Miss Ellsa H. 

Bobbins, Mrs. Eliza C. 

Robblns, Rev. Francis L. 

Robbing, Richard A. 

Robblns, Thomas, D.D. 

Roberts, Miss Elisabeth. 

Roberts, Elisabeth B. 

Roberts, Miss Fanny. 

Roberts, Mary H. 

Roberts, Nelson. 

Roberts, William. 

Robertson, Thomas A. 

Robinson, Arthur. 

Robinson, Calvin. 

Robinson, Charles. 

Robinson, Rev. Charles E. 

Robinson, Miss Cornelia. 

Robinson, Edwin. 

Robinson, Miss Elisabeth. 

Robinson, Mrs. Elisabeth 8. 

Robinson, Ernest 

Robinson, Isaac N. 

Robinson, Mrs. Nancy M. 

Robinson, Mrs. Sarah T. 

Rockwell, George P. 

Rockwell, Rev. Samuel. 

Rockwood, Frank B. 

Rodman, Mrs. J. P. 

Rodman, Rev. Daniel 8. 

Rodman, Mrs. Lucy 8. 

Rogers, Ambrose 8. 

Rogers, C. 

Rogers, Mrs. C. B. 

Rogers, Daniel M. 

Rogers, E. F. 

Rogers, Jonathan. 
Rogers, Mrs. M. 

Rogers, Noah. 
Rogers, Mrs. Samuel A. 
Rood, Harvey L. 
Root, Barnabas W. 
Root, Edward C. 
Root, Rev. David. 
Root, Mrs. Eleanor. 
Root, James. 

Root, Rev. Judson A. 

Root, Judson H. 

Root, Louisa. 
Root, Mrs. Lucia. 
Root, Mrs. M. H. 
Root, Nathaniel, Jr. 
Root, Mrs. Samuel H. 
Rowell, Miss Mary. 
Rowland, Rev. Henry A. 
Rowland, 8. 8. 
Royce, Franklin. 
Roys, Mrs. Abi P. 
Rudd, Mrs. Eunice. 
Russell, Israel. 
Russell, Joseph. 
Russell, Miss Julia A. 
Russell, Rev. William. 
Sackett, Cordelia F. 
Safford, Seth S. 
Sage, Isaac. 
Sage, Henry E. 
8t John, Benjamin. 
St. John, Mrs. Benjamin. 
St. John, George. 
St. John, George B. 
St John, Mrs, Mary. 
Salisbury, Prof. Edward E. 
Sandford, Abraham. 
Sandford, EUjah. 
tafwM 



1866. 



THIRTY NINTH KEPOBT. 



181 



Sanford, Ellhu, Jr. 
Sanford, Emily. 
Sanford, Mrs. H. 
Sanford, Harvey. 
Sanford, Stephen. 
Sanford, Mrs. David. 
Saunders, Helen. 
Saunders, Mrs. Ruth. 
Sarage, B. O. 
Sawtell, A. W. 
Saxton, Rev. Joseph A. 
Scarlet, Miss Caroline B. 
Scofield, Miss AbigaU. 
Scott, Miss Emily A. 
8coviUe, Clinton 0. 
8coville, Henry. 
Scranton, Erastus C. 
Scranton, Mrs. Hubbard. 
Scranton, Miss Lucy. 
Scranton, Miss Roxana R. 
Scudder, Rev. Evarta. 
Searie, Rev. Richard T. 
Sears, Dr. John. 
Sedgwick, Miss Emily. 
Sedgwick, Frederick. 
Seeley, Edwin G. 
Seeley, Mrs. W. E. 
Seelye, Mrs. Abigail. 
8eelye, Ezra N. 
Seelye, Harry. 
Seelye, Seth. 
Selden, Hesekiah. 
Selleck, Mrs. E. D. 
Selleck, George W. 
Selleck, Henry. 
Selleck, Warren W. 
Seignior, Mrs. Caroline. 
Sellew, Philip H. 
Sessions, Rev. Joseph W. 
Seward, Mrs. Lydia. 
Seward, Seth. 
Sexton, Mrs. C. W. 
Seymour, Miss Jerusha. 
Seymour, Rev. John A. 
Seymour, Dea. O. H. 
Seymour, Samuel. 
Seymour, Walter. 
Seymour, William 0. 
Seymour, William W. 
Sharp, William a 
Shaw, Mrs. Hannah G. 
Sheffield, Miss Lucy Ann. 
Sheldon, Dr. D. 
Sheldon, George. 
Sheldon, Horace. 
Sheldon, John. 
Sheldon, John 0. 
Sheldon, Mrs. Mary L. 
Shelton, George. 
Shelton, George E. 
Shelton, George W. 
Shelton. Mrs. G. W. 
Shepard, Azubah. 
Shepard, Mrs. G. T. 
Shepard, Mrs. Hannah. 
Shepard, Mrs. Martha. 
Shepard, Mbs Mary. 
Shepard, MaryB. 
Shepard, Rev. Samuel N. 
Sherman, Rev. Charles 8. 
Sherman, EUjah. 
Sherman, Ira. 
Sherman, Isaac 
Sherman, Monroe 0. 
Sherman, Roger M., LL.D. 
Sherman, Thaddeus. 
Sherman, William W. 
Sherwood, Cyrus. 
Sherwood, Dea. Daniel. 
Sherwood, Edwin. 
Sherwood, Emeline. 
Sherwood, Oliver B. 
Shipman, Miss Mary. 
Shipman, Nathaniel. 



Sill, Mrs. Clarissa. 
Sill. Dea. Isaac W. 
Silliman, Mrs. Benjamin. 
Silliman, Lewis R 
8illiman, Mrs. Mary E. 
Silliman, Samuel. 
Simmons, Mrs. Rhoda. 
Slmonds, Mrs. Abbie B. 
Simonds, Miss Mary. 
Slmonds, Mbs Sarah M. 
81sson, Miss E. G. 
Skiff, Gilbert W. 
Skinner, Dwight T. 
Skinner, Justin P. 
Skinner, L. C. 
Skinner, P. P. 
Skinner, Dea. Samuel. 
8kinner, 8. W. 
Skinner, Mrs. Ursula. 
Skinner, Warren A. 
Slater, Miss M. H. 
Smith, Mrs. Abby D. 
Smith, Abby L. 
Smith, Miss Asenath A. 
Smith, Mrs. Amelia. 
Smith, Rev. Asa B. 
Smith, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Smith Mrs. Clarissa. 
Smith, David F. 
Smith, Edgar M. 
Smith, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Smith, Miss Emily G. 
Smith, Emma A. 
Smith, Mrs. Esther. 
Smith, Mrs. Evelina. 
Smith, Mrs. E. M. 
Smith, Miss Fanny L. 
Smith, Dea. George F. 
Smith, Rev. George M. 
Smith, Mrs. Giles. 
Smith, Mrs. Harriet F. 
Smith, Miss Helen A. 
Smith, Dea. Henry. 
Smith, Rev. Henry B. 
Smith, Hervey. 
Smith, Mrs. James A. 
Smith, Jeremiah, 2d. 
Smith, John. 
Smith, Miss J. E. B. 
Smith, James. 
Smith, Miss Julia A. 
Smith, Lauren. 
Smith, Luclna. 
Smith, Mrs. Lucy. 
Smith, Mrs. Maria. 
8mith, Mrs. Martha. 
Smith, Mrs. Mary C. 
Smith, Dea. Marcus D. F. 
Smith, Miss Marion. 
Smith, Matson M., D.D. 
Smith, Minerva 8. 
Smith, Rev. Moses. 
Smith, Nathan R. 
Smith, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Smith, N. B. 
Smith, Norman. 
Smith, Paul. 
Smith, Rev. Rufus. 
Smith, Rufus. 
Smith, Mrs. Sarah A. R. P. 
Smith, Sarah E. 
Smith, Miss Sarah J. 
Smith, Mrs. Sarah. 
Smith, Simeon. 
Smith, Spencer. 
Smith, Miss Susan. 
Smith, 8ydney. 
Smith, Rev. Theophilus. 
Smith, Rev. Wilder. 
Smith, William. 
Smith, William. 
Smith, William R. 
Sniffln, Mrs. Huldah. 
Snow, Manly 8. 
Women, Mn. RebeccM. 
,Bufug. 



Soule, Rev. George. 
Southmayd, Rebecca B. 
South worth, Mrs. Sarah. 
Spalding, Mrs. George. 
Spalding, Mrs. Juliet H. 
Spalding, Sarah T. 
Spauldlng, Mrs. Caroline. 
Spauldlng, Reuben. 
Spauldlng, Reuben. 
Spencer, Amasa. 
Spencer, Ellen A. 
Spencer, Mrs. Ann. 
Spencer, E. C. 
Spencer, Mrs. E. C. 
Spencer, Miss Elisabeth P. 
Spencer, Rev. Franklin A. 
Spencer, George. 
Spencer, Miss Martha. 
Spencer, Sarah E. 
Spooner, C. 
Sprague, Samuel. 
Sprague. W. B. 
Spring, Mrs. Lydia. 
Squire, Lyman L. 
Squire, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Squire, Miss Jeanette M. 
Squire, W. L. 
Stagg, Mrs. J. 8. 
Stanley, Mrs. William M. 
Stannard: Mrs. Polly C. 
Stanton, Mrs. Abby W. 
Stanton, Charles T. 
Stanton, Miss Hannah P. 
Stanton, Henry & 
Stanton, Mrs. Mary I. 
Stanton, Miss Nancy. 
Stanton, Rev. Robert P. 
Stanton, Stiles. 
Staples, George L. 
Starr, Mrs. Abby. 
Starr, Comfort. 
Starr, Mrs. Elisabeth H. 
Qtarr, Miss Eunice. 
Starr, George. 
Stearns, Dea. Nathan. 
Stebblns, Rev. Stephen W. 
Stedman, Annie A. 
Stedman, Mrs. James. 
Stedman, Mary C. 
Stedman, Samuel A. U. 
Steele, Sherman. 
Sterling, Mrs. Catharine. 
Sterling, Cornelius. 
Sterling, Edmund. 
Sterling, Frederick. 
Sterling Henrietta D. 
Sterling, John W. 
Sterling, Sherwood. 
Sterling, Miss Susan H. 
Stevens, Mrs. Cordelia. 
Stevens, David R. 
Stevens, Harvey. 
Stevens, James H. 
Stevens, Mrs. James R. 
Stevens, John. 
Stevens, Samuel L. 
Stevens, Verennes, 
Stewart, James. 
Stlckney, J. N. 
Stlllman, Ebeneser. 
Silliman, Miss Emily. 
Stirling, Mrs. Rebecca A. 
Stoddard, Rev. Judson B. 
Stoddard, Miss Julia. 
Stone, Alonso. 
Stone, John P. 
Stone, Mrs. Maria E. 
Stone, Miss Mary L. 
Stone, Oliver. 
Btorrs, Miss Harriet M. 
Storm, Miss Lucy E. 
Storrs, Richard 8. 
Stoughton, George. 
Stoughton, Horace. 
Street Titus. 
8trickland,Jo«ephD. 



132 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



May, 



Strong, Mrs. Frances W. 

Strong, Hon. Henry, LL.D. 

Strong, Ira. 

Strong, Mrs. Lucretla. 

Strong, Rev. Lyman. 

Strong, Seth. 

Stuart, Dea. Levi. 

Stuart, Edward W. 

Stuart, Miss Mary E. 

Stuart, Mm. S. 

Sturgl*, Mist) Lucretla. 

8tut«on, Mary A. 

8ummer, John. 

8ummeni, Chauncey. 

Summers, David. 

Summers, E1L 

8ummers, Henry. 

Summers, Henry P. 

Summers, Sheldon. 

Sumner, W. H. 

Swan, Mm. Rachel. 

Swan, Mrs. Sarah G. 

Swift, George H. 

Swift, Henry. 

Swift, R. 

Swift, Rev. Zephanlah. 

Sykes, F. A. 

Sykes, Miss Gertrude. 

Talcott, Miss Abigail. 

Talcott, Mrs. Allyn. 

Talcott, A Ivan, M.D. 

Talcott, C. D. 

Talcott, Charles. 

Talcott, Charles C. 

Talcott, Chester. 

Talcott, Mrs. Cynthia. 

Talcott, Flavell. 

Talcott, II. W. 

Talcott, Rev. Hervey. 

Talcott, James H. 

Talcott, Dea. Joseph. 

Talcott, Nathaniel. 

Talcott, Ralph. 

Talcott, Mrs. Ralph. 

Talcott, 8. L. 

Tallmadge, William H. 

Tallman, Mrs. Francis M. 

Tallman, Harriet 

Tallman, James H. 

Tallman, Rev. Thomas. 

Tallman, Walter. 

Taylor, Dea. Abel 8. 

Taylor, Rev. Jeremiah. 

Taylor, Nathaniel W., D.D. 

Taylor, Mrs. Olive. 

Taylor, Oliver B. 

Terry, Kll. 

Terry, Mrs. Eli. 

Terry, Mrs. Harriet 

Terry, James. 

Terry, Miss Julia M. 

Terry, Mrs. L. C. 

Terry, Mrs. Mary C. 

Terry, Roderick. 

Terry, Silas B. 

Terry, William B. 

Thacher, Mrs. Sally. 

Thacher, S. P. 

Thacher, Prof. Thomas A. 

Thare, B. C. 

Thayer, B. C. 

Thayer, Julia. 

Thayer, Mrs. Matilda W. 

Thomas, Mrs. Catharine B. 

Thomas, Edward. 

Thomas, Mrs. Henry. 

Thomas, Seth. 

Thomas, Seth, Jr. 

Thompson, Curtis. 

Thompson, Miss Ellen, 

Thompson, Miss Elisabeth M. 

Thompson, Miss Jane. 

Thompson, Isaac 

Thompson, Mrs. Marietta. 
Thompson, Mrs. Susan 0, JBL 
Thomson, Asahel. 



Thomson, William, D.D. 
Thorp, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Throop, Miss Lucretla. 
Thurber, M. Helen. 
Ticknor, Miss Eliza. 
Tiffany, Rev. Charles C. 
Tiffany, Miss Naomi H. 
Toles, James. 
Toinllnson, Rev. George, 
Tomllnson, Hon. Gideon, LL.D. 
Tomlinson, Gideon. 
Tomllnson, Joseph, Jr. 
Tomlinson, Mrs. Lydla A. 
Tomlinson, Lydla J. 
Tomlinson, Miss Sarah. 
Topliff, Rev. Stephen. 
Topliff, W. 
Torrey, Rev. Calvin. 
Town, Miss Sally. 
Townsend, Amos. 
Townsend, Mrs. Melissa H. 
Tracy, John. 
Tracy, Mrs. Mary. 
Tracy, Miss Mary Ann. 
Tracy, Miss Susan. 
Tracy, Rev. William. 
Tread way, Mrs. Harvey. 
Treat, Alfred. 
Trowbridge, T. R. 
Trowbridge, William. 
Trumbull, Rev. H. Clay. 
Trumbull, James H. 
Trumbull, Miss 8. A. 
Tryon, Rev. John 8. 
Tucker, Miss Catharine J. 
Tucker, Mrs. Klin D. 
Tucker, Miss Elisabeth. 
Tucker, Rev. Elijah W. 
Tucker, Samuel B. 
Turner, John. 
Turner, Sarah. 
Turney, Dea. Albert 
Turney, Dea. RoswelL 
Turrill, Catharine. 
Tuttle, Mrs. Amelia 0. 
Tuttle, Sherman. 
Tuttle, Rev. Timothy. 
Twichell, Edward. 
Tyler, Rev. Edward R, 
Tyler, Miss Ellen. 
Tyler, Rev. John E. 
Tyler, Morris. 
Tyler, Miss Phebe. 
Tympany, Miss Delia. 
Tympany. Miss Eliza. 
Ufford, Miss Catharine. 
Ufford, Miss Frances E. 
Ufford, Mrs. Henry. 
Ufford, Miss Mary Ann. 
Underwood, Rev. Alvan. 
Underwood, Mrs. Laura. 
Upson, Rev. nenry. 
Upson, Miss Nancy M. 
Vail, Mrs. Nancy P. 
Vermilye, Robert O., D.D. 
Vermllye, Miss M. L. 
Wadharcs. Mrs. Dothea. 
Wad 8 worth, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Wakely, Mrs. Sophia. 
Wakeraan, Cornelia C. 
Wakeman, Delia M. 
Wake man, Eliza H. 
Wakeman, Francis. 
Wakeman, Mary F. 
Walker, Alfred E. 
W T alker, Edward. 
Walker, Miss Eunice. 
Walker, Frederick K. 
Walker, James. 
Walker, William. 
Wallace, Miss Mary M. 
Walton, Rev. William C. 
War burton, Mrs. John. 
Ward, Mrs. Elisabeth A. 
Ward, John 8. 
Ward, Mrs, Mary. 



Ware, Edmund A. 
Warner, Bennett 
Warner, Gaius F. 
Warner, Miss Helen L. 
Warner, Mrs. Electa. 
Warner, Mrs. Fanny. J 
Warner, Henry A. 
Warner, Mrs. Wooster. 
Waterbury, Mrs. Charles. 
Waterbury, James. 
Waterman, A. T. 
Waterman, Rev. Thomas T. 
Waterman, Mrs. Thomas T. 
Watson, Harvey. 
Watson, Thomas. 
Watson, Thomas. 
Watson, William. 
Webb, Washington. 
Webster, C. T. 
Webster, Helen E. 
Weed, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Weeks, Dea. William. 
Welch, Mrs. F. L. 
Welch, Henry K. W. 
Welles, Miss Mary C. 
Wellman, Mrs. Lucy. 
Wells, Mrs. Caroline M. 
Wells, Miss Elisabeth B. 
Wells, Mrs. Frances M. 
Wells, Miss Harriet A. 
Wells, Helen L. 
Wells, I. H. 
Wells, Lewis. 
Wells, Mrs. Lewis. 
Wells, Levi W. 
Wells, Miss Lucy. 
Wells, 8. M. 
Wells, Dr. Thomas. 
West, Miss Caroline. 
Wetherby, Rev. Charles. 
Wheadon, Abram R. 
Wheaton, George. 
Whedon, Miss M. 
Wheeler, Charles. 
Wheeler Daniel. 
Wheeler, David. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Delia A. 
Wheeler, Dudley R. 
Wheeler, Edgar H. 
Wheeler, Miss Elisabeth. 
Wheeler, Henry G. 
Wheeler, Miss Lucy. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Mary H. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Rebecca. 
Wheeler, Richard H. 
Wheeler, Samuel B. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Wheeler, Sarah Jane. 
WTieeler, William. 
Wheelock, Rev. 8. B, 
White, Charles B. 
White, Ebenezer B. 
White, Rev. John. 
White, Miss Martha. 
White, Mason. 
White, Rev. Orlando H. 
Whiting, Edmund. 
Whiting, Mrs. Emma A. 
Whiting, Mrs. Nancy. 
Whltlock, Miss EUsa P. 
Whltlock, P. 
Whitman, Miss Ellsa. 
Whitmore, Rev. RoswelL 
Whltmore, Mrs. RoswelL 
Whitney, Mrs. Harriet 
Whitney, Mrs. H. F. 
Whitney, Lizzie. 
Whitney, Walter. 
Whitney, Prof. William D. 
Whiton, James M. 
Whiton, James M. 
Walton, James, 
Whiton, Mary Dai We ll . 
Whiton, Mr*. Mary & 
Whiton, Mrs. Ljdsa B. B. 

"wwftwm.t — * 



1865. 



THIRTY NINTH REPORT. 



188 



Whlttemore, Rev. W. H. 
Whittlesey, Mrs. Anne EL 
Whittlesey, Mrs. Caroline B. 
Whittlesey, Charles. 
Whittlesey, Charles B. 
Whittiesey, Gen. C. 
Whittlesey, Dea. David. 
Whittlesey, E. Chappell 
Whittlesey, Rer. Elisha. 
Whittlesey, Mrs. Elisha. 
Whittiesey, Frederick. 
Whittlesey, George William. 
Whittlesey, Rev. Joseph. 
Whittlesey, Mrs. Maria A. 
Whittlesey, Miss Mary C. 
Whittlesey, Sheldon. 
Wlard, John. 
Wlckes, Rev. Jlenry. 
Wlckes, William K. 
Wilcox, AbeL 
Wilcox, Rev. Chauncey. 
Wilcox, Elias. 
Wilcox, Mrs. Hannah M. 
Wilcox, Horace B. 
Wilcox, Jedediah. 
Wilcox, J. 8. 
Wilcox, Mrs. Mary J. 
Wilcox, Samuel 
Wilcox, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Wilcox, Mrs. Susan A. 
Wilcox, William. 
Wilder, Horace. 
Wilkins, Rev. Jesse A. 
Willard, Mrs. C. B. 
Willard, Rev. James L. 
Willard, Rev. Samuel G. 
Willcox, Rev. Giles B. 
Willea, Joseph H. 
Wlllet, Rev. Marinas. 
Williams, Mrs. Alice. 
Williams, Abraham. 
Williams, Miss Anne M. 
Williams, Austin F. 
Williams, Mrs. Catharine D. 
Williams, Mrs. Charity. 
Williams, Charles E. 
Williams, Charles 8. 
Williams, Mrs. Cynthia. 
Williams, David L. 
Williams, Mrs. Eliza Ann. 
Williams, Miss Eunice. 
Williams, Rev. Francis. 
Williams, G. W. 
Williams, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Williams, Mrs. If. P. 
Williams, Henry F. 
Williams, Rev. J. 
Williams, Josiah. 
Williams, Maria. 
Williams, Miss Mary E. 
Williams, Pauline. 
Williams, Thomas D. 
Williams, Hon. T. &. LL.D. 
Williams, T. W. 
Williams, Gen. William, 
Wilson, Mrs. Daniel 
Wilson, Increase. 
Wilson, Mrs. Julia V. 
Wilson, W. 

Winship, Mrs. William. 
Winton, Ebeneaer 8. 
Witter, Dr. Asa. 
Wolcott, Rev. John M. 
WolcotL Miss Ursula. 
Wood, Rev. George I. 
Wood, Rev. Luke. 
Wood, Mrs. Susan. 
Woodbury, Mrs. I. B. 
Woodford, J. B. 
WoodhuU, Miss EUnbetk B. 
Woodman, Amos. 
Woodruff, Erastus. 
Woodruff, Henry E. 
Woodruff, Lucius. 
Woodruff, Dr. Lochia. 
WoodraftT, J* &j. 



Woodruff, Selah. 
Woodruff, Dr. William. 
Woodruff, William R. 
Woo<lward, Andrew E. 
Woodward, Mrs. Lydla. 
Woodward. William U. 
Woodworth, Oliver. 
Woolley, Rev. J. J. 
Woolsey, D. 8. 
Wooster, Julia E. 
Wordln, Ann B. 
Wordln, N. 8. 
Wordin, Thomas C. 
Worthlngton, Mrs. Sophia. 
Wright, A. A., M.D. 
Wright, Rev. James L. 
Wright, Joseph. 
Wright, Miss Julia A. 
Wright, Mrs. Susan P. 
Wright, Rev. William. 
Wright, Rev. William & 
Wyman. Mrs. Sarah M. 
Yale, Miss Esther A. 
Yergasen, Henry C. 
Young, Mrs. John. 

NEW-TOSS. 

Abbey, William. 
Abbott, Austin. 
Abbott, Rev. Gorham D. 
Abbott, Mrs. Mary D. 
Abbot, 8. Adeline. 
Abel, Rev. James. 
Abernethy, Charles. 
Acer, John. 
Acker, Rev. Henry J. 
Ackley, Mr. Cornelia. 
Adam, Rev. M. T. 
Adams, Abner. 
Adams, Mrs. Abner. 
Adams, Calvin. 
Adams, Charles Henry. 
Adams, Daniel L. 
Adams, Rev. E. H. 
Adams, Mrs. Emily R. 
Adams, James. 
Adams, James. 
Adams, John G., M.D. 
Adams, Mrs. John W. 
Adams, Mrs. L. A. 
Adams, Mrs. Lucinda J. 
Adams, Miss Mary E. 
Adams, Myron, Jr. 
Adams, William. 
Adams, Mrs. W. A. 
Adriance, Miss Blandena T. 
Aikman, Hugh. 
Aldrich. Edwin R. 
Allen, Rev. Aaron P. 
Allen, Abbe C. 
Allen, Mrs. Amanda C. 
Allen, Mrs. Anna. 
Allen, Mrs. Elvira. 
Allen, Mrs. Esther. 
AUen, John K. 
Allen, Mrs. Lucy W. 
Allen, Mrs. Martha. 
AUen, Mary. 
Allen, Rev. Nathan. 
Allen, Hon. W. F. 
Ailing, David C. 
Ailing. Miss Frances J. 
Ailing, F. D. 
Ailing, Job. 
Ailing, Job. 
Ailing, Lewis H. 
Ailing, Mrs. L. H. 
Ailing, Louisa Jane. 
Ailing, Prudence L. 
Ailing, Samuel Y. 
Ailing, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Ailing, Stephen Y. 
Ailing, William & 
AlUa, Cheater D. 
Almy, Henry A. 



Ambler, Rev. John L. 
Ames, Rev. Daniel 
Ames, Henry R. 
Ames, Marcus. 
Anderson, Rev. Charles. 
Anderson, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Andrew, E. P. 
Andrew, Henry. 
Andrew, Mrs. Henry. 
Andrew, J. E. 
Andrew, M. H. 
Andrew, M. P. 
Andrews, E. A. 
Andrews, Merritt 
Andrews, Rev. W. W. 
Andrews, Rev. W. L. 
Andrus, R. C. 
Andrus, Mrs. Fanny R. 
Antls, William. 
Antis, Mrs. William. 
Ardles, Thomas A. 
Arms, Mrs. Cynthia. 
Arms, Mrs. 8. 
Arms, Rev. Selah R. 
Armstrong, Francis. ' 
Armstrong, Mrs. Huldah. 
Armstrong, William J., D.D. 
Arnold, George 8. 
Arnold, Philip. 
Arnold, Mrs. Philip. 
Arnot, Silas W. 
Atwater, Emily A. 
Atwater, Mrs. I. 0. 
Atwater, J. C. 
Atwater, Joshua. 
Atwater, Miss Mary I. 
Atwater, Samuel 
Atwood, E. G. 
Atwood, Mrs. Jane A. 
Atwood, Mrs. Rachel. 
Austin, Miss Delia S. 
Austin, Mrs. Lavlnla. 
Austin, Miss Lavlnla H. 
Austin, Russell 
Austin, Thomas H. 
Averill, Augustin. 
Averill, Augustin, Jr. 
Averill, Mrs. A. 
Averill, Heman. 
Averill, Joseph Otis. 
Averill, Miss Louisa E. 
Averill, Mrs. Lucy 0. 
Averill, Miss Margaret F. 
Averill, Miss Mary Frances. 
Avery, Amasa. 
Avery, Miss Isabel 
Avery, Mrs. Maria. 
Avery, Mrs. Mary Jane. 
Avery, Mrs. 
Avery, William. 
Axtell, Rev. Anthony D. 
Axtell, Rev. D. C. 
Axtell, Henry. 
AxtelL Mrs. H. 0. 
Ayrault, Mrs. Huldah. 
Ayers, Abraham. 
Ayres, William P. 
Babcock, E. H. 
Babcock, George D. 
Babcock, Louis B. 
Bachman, Jacob. 
Backus, J. T., D.D. 
Backus, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Bacon, Mrs. E. K. 
Bacon, Mrs. Francis. 
Bacon, Mrs. Lucy A. 
Bacon, Reuben E. 
Bacon, SamueL 
Bacon, Mrs. William J. 
Badger, George, M.D. 
Badger, Mrs. Milton. 
Badger, William, BID. 
Bagley, Bernard. 
Bailey, Amos, 
Bailey, Mrs. Ansoak* 0. 
Bailey, Mrs. KiOuxAftl 



134 



THIRTY NINTH KEPOKT. 



Maj, 



Baker, Mrs. Charles. 
Baker, Mrs. Dellna. 
Baker, Mrs. Dellnda. 
Baker, E. Burdett. 
Baker, Mrs. Fanny. 
Baker, Mrs. Lois. 
Baker, Mrs. Parthenia. 
Baker, Samuel. 
Baker. William. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Anne E. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Anna W. 
Baldwin, 0. H. 
Baldwin, Mrs. D. 
Baldwin, David. 
Baldwin, Dennis. 
Baldwin, EUcur M. 
Baldwin, Mrs. II. 
Baldwin, Miss Helen P. 
Baldwin, Henry Dwight. 
Baldwin, Heseklah. 
Baldwin, J. J. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Lois. 
Baldwin, Lucina. 
Baldwin, Rev. M. 
Baldwin, Mrs. M. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Mary. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Rachel. 
Baldwin, Samuel. 
Baldwin, Samuel 0. 
Ball, Mrs. Amanda. 
Ball, Asa. 
Ball, Mrs. Sophia. 
Ballard, Mrs. Elisabeth. 
Ballard Mrs. Lydla. 
Ballentine, Rev. James. 
Bame, Mrs. Christiana. 
Bangs, Adolphus. 
Bangs, Sylvester W. 
Bangs, William F. 
Barber, Matilda. 
Barber, Paris. 
Barber, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Barbour, Rev. Isaac R. 
Barbour, James. 
Barbour, Rev. Philander. 
Barker, Nathan B. 
Barker, William P. 
Barnard, Miss Abby. 
Barnard, Mrs. Anna. 
Barnard, Annie L. 
Barnard, Henry D. 
Barnard, John. 
Barnard, M. R. 
Barnard, Rev. 8. A. 
Barnard, T. 
Barnes, A. & 
Barnes, Grace H. 
Barnes, John H. 
Barnes, L. D. 
Barnes, Newcomb C. 
Barnes, Wm. H. L. 
Barnet, Mrs. Catharine. 
Barnett, Wm. D. 
Barnum, Mrs. W. J. 
Barr, Phineas. 
Barrows, Mrs. Lydla. 
Barry, Mrs. Antoinette. 
Barry, Samuel 8. 
Barstow, Mrs. Elisabeth B. 
Bartlett, Miss Martha. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Mary C. 
Bartlett, Rev. P. Mason. 
Bartlett, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Barton, David. 
Barton, John B. 
Barton, Joseph. 
Barton, Rev. Morris. 
Barton, Mrs. Morris. 
Barton, Samuel. 
Barton, Mrs. Susan. 
Bassett, Rev. Archibald. 
Bassett Joseph. 
A»Mettf Dr. Philip. 

mE,J*meg. 



Bates, John. 

Bates, L. M. 

Bates, Mrs. Sally. 

Bates, Samuel B. 

Battel, Joseph. 

Bayne, Mrs. N. J. L. 

Beach, Mrs. Anna. 

Beach, Dr. C. 

Beach, Rev. Charles F. 

Beach, Ebenecer II. 

Beach, Rev. Ebenezer C. 

Beach, John C. 

Beach, Mrs. Julia B. 

Beach, Uri. 

Beadle, Mrs. Mary. 

Beal, Matthew. 

Beal, Phebe. 

Reals, George. 

Bear, Rev. John M. 

Beardsley, Rev. 0. C. 

Beattle, Rev. John. 

Beckwith, Rev. Baruch B. 

Beckwith, Mrs. E. S. 

Beckwith, George. 

Beckwith, Mrs. M. B. & 

Beckwith, Mrs. Ruth M. 

Beckwith, Miss Ruth Emelia. 

Beebe, Albert G. 

Beebe, Rev. A. P. 

Beebe, Clemanda. 

Beebe, Daniel. 

Beebe, Mrs. Eleanor F. 
Beebe, Lewis A. 
Beebe, Miss Martha. 
Beekman, Dr. J. P. 
Beeman, Thomas. 
Beers, Miss A. M. 
Beers, Cyrenius. 
Beers, Edward Augustus. 
Beers, Edwin C. 
Beers, George F. 
Beers, Miss Harriet. 
Beers, John H. 
Beers, Miss Julia. 
Beers, Miss Margaret E. 
Beers, Mrs. Phebe. 
Beers, William Henry. 
Belcher, Mrs. Frances. 
Belden, Mrs. Abigail. 
Belden, Mrs. Caroline. 
Belden, Miss Caroline. 
Belden, Mrs. Caroline W. 
Belden, Charles W. 
Belden, Daniel. 
Belden, Rev. Henry. 
Belden, Ira. 
Belden, Mrs. Maria. 
Belden, Rev. William. 
Belden, William H. 
Bell, Charles. 
Bell, John. 
Bell, Thomas. 
Bellows, Dr. Daniel. 
Bellows, Mrs. Margaret H. 

Bement, Mrs. 

Bement, Miss Elisa C. 
Bement, Mrs. Frances H. 
Bement, John. 
Bement, W. B. 
Bement, Mrs. W. B. 
Benchly, Leonldas B. 
Benedict, Alfred F. 
Benedict, Asa. 
Benedict, Miss Betsey. 
Benedict, Rev. Edwin. 
Benedict, Miss Elisabeth. 
Benedict, Rev. E. p. 
Benedict, Rev. Henry. 
Benedict, L G. 
Benedict, William C. 
Benjamin, C. L. 
Bennett, Emily. 
Bennett, Henry. 
Bennett, Henry B. 
Bennett, John V. 
Bennett, Rev. Joseph L. 



Benson, Arthur W. 
Benson, John. 
Benson, Mrs. Sarah. 
Bentley, Rev. Edward W. 
Benton, Henry. 
Benton, Mrs. Sarah. 
Bergen, David. 
Bernard, Miss Mary A. 
Berry, Mrs. Anna E. 
Berry, Leonora Kunsler. 
Berry, Samuel J. 
Berry, Thomas 8. 
Besley, Mrs. Isabella. 
Bethune, DIvie. 
Bethune, George W., D.D. 
Bethune, Mrs. Joanna. 
Rett*, Mrs. Caroline F. 
Rett*, George. 
Rett*, John A. 
Beveridge, Rev. A. M. 
Biddell, James. 
Bicknell, Rev. Simeon. 
Bielfleld, Rev. Herman. 
Bigelow, Rev. Albert 
Bigelow, Asa. 
Bigelow, David. 
Bigelow, Mrs. David. 
Bigelow, Edward. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Edward. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Lucy. 
Bigelow, Mrs. Maria Storrs. 
Bigelow, R. H. 
Rill, Miss Caroline. 
Bill. Miss Rosalinda. 
Billington, Rev. Linus W. 
Bingham, Rev. Luther G. 
Birchard, Rev. J. 
Birkley, Rev. John, 
Bissell, Mrs. Betsey. 
Bissell, C. B. 
Bissell, Miss Ellen A. 
Bissell, Joslah W. 
Bissell, Rev. Samuel B. a 
Bissell, Sherwood C. 
Blackfan, Mrs. D. 
Blackmore, E. 
Blair, Rev. Allen. 
Blair, Mrs. Sarah M. 
Blake, A. 
Blake, Robert 
Blakely, Mrs. Quincy. 
Blakeslee, Clement R. 
Blakeslee, John C. 
Blanchard, Abljah, D.D. 
Blass. Mrs. Julia. 
Blatchford, Edgecomb H. 
Blatchford, Miss G. V. 
Blatchford, Miss Mary Ann. 
Blatchford, Samuel, D.D. 
Blatchford, Samuel M. 
Bliss, Dr. James C. 
Bliss, Jonathan. 
Bilss, Rev. John F. 
Bliss, Mrs. Martha. 
Bliss, Rev. Beth. 
Bliss, Solomon. 
Bliss, Sylvester. 
Bloomfleld, Joseph. 
Blossom, Mrs. Thomas. 
Boak, Mary E. 
Boak, Miss Pamela. 
Boardman, Daniel. 
Boardman, Miss Isabella D. 
Boardman, Mrs. Mary. 
Boardman, Mary N. 
Boardman, Mrs. Phebe. 
Boardman, Rev. Samuel W. 
Boardman, Mrs. Sarah. 
Boardman, Miss Sarah. 
Bogardus, Stephen P. 
Bogart, James. 
Bogne, Anson. 
Boles, Lytlla. 
Boies, Rufus. 
Boles, Mrs. Sarah. 
ttoVui^BjOT. l&aa U 



THIBTT NINTH REPORT. 



186 



Mrs. Julia. 
Dr. Alfred. 
fllllamH. 



tlssAlidaR. 
Sdwin A. 
lira. Eunice. 
LM. 

frs. Mary. 
In. Spencer. 
, W. H. 
Daniel B. 
h, Harvey, 
h, Rev. Nathan. 
«LMr*. A. 
Rev. George. 
Nathan. 
Mrs. Mary B. 
Mrs. Polly. 
Mrs. Edward E. 
Mrs. Lucy M. 
Dea.Beriah. 
Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Miss Catharine. 
Miss Josephine 0. 
Miss Martha G. 
Miss M. P. 
i-O. M. 
James. 

Eter. William C. 
>avid. 
rederick S. 
amuel. 
Irs. Ellen S. 
i, Mrs. P. B. 
)r. Abel, 
drs. Betsey. 
>avld. 

tfrs. Harriet K. 
lev. Samuel W. 
d, G. W. 
d, Mrs. M. A. 
d, Miss Mary E. 
, John. 

, Mrs. Eliza B. 
, Hanover. 
, Henry. 
, Joseph. 
, Mrs. J. T. 
, William W. 
:k, Rev. Isaac R. 
Mrs. Eliza L. 
rdt, Miss Mary A. 
er. John E. 
n, Mrs. Henry. 
i } Edward S. 
i, Mrs. E. 
, Milton. 
., Mrs. Milton. 
., Miss Sarah B. 
, Miss Sarah W. 
Mrs. A. 
EaraR. 
r, Edwin H. 
r, Miss Eliza M. 
r, Emma H. 
r, Mrs. H. A. 
r, Henry P. 
r, Isaac. 

r, Josephine Otis. 
r, Rev. Loring. 
r, Robert E. 
r, 8. W. 
r, Stephen. 
r, Mrs. Trlphenla. 
Mrs. E. 
m, Erastus C. 
in, William H. 
tioff, Albert A. 
Dr. A. 0. 
Edward. 
Mrs. Moses. 
LMrs. L. M. 
Rer. Ephralm. 
iy,Mrs.B. 
V,*JL 



Brockway. Mrs. Z. R. 
Bronk, John L. 
Bronson, Rev. Edwin. 
Bronson, Mrs. Harriet E. 
Bronson, Mrs. Isaac. 
Browers, Miss Martha S. 
Brown, Mrs. Ann B. 
Brown, Miss Charlotte. 
Brown, Rev. Daniel. 
Brown, David. 
Brown, Mrs. Eliza. 
Brown, Mrs. Eliza M. 
Brown, Elliot W. 
Brown, Miss Frances C. 
Brown, John. 
Brown, John E. 
Brown, La Fayette. 
Brown, Mrs. P. H. 
Brown, Rev. Sidney. 
Brown, Rev. Silas C. 
Brown, Mrs. Susan. 
Brown, William R. 
Bruce, Franklin J. 
Bruen, Miss Frances. 
Bruen, George W. 
Bruen, Herman. 
Branson, Edward. 
Brush, Jarvis. 
Brush, Mrs. Jarvis. 
Bryant, Abner. 
Bryant, Miss Nancy. 
Bryant, Samuel. 
Buchanan, Sarah II. 
Buck, Mrs. Amelia. 
Buck, Rev. Charles D. 
Buck, Mrs. Charlotte. 
Buck, Edward Henry. 
Buck, Rev. J. Judson. 
Buel, Mrs. B. 
Buel, Mrs. Caroline. 
Buel, Timothy. 
Buffet, W. P. 
Bulkley, Charles A. 
Bulkley, Mrs. Mary. 
Bull, Mrs. Emily. 
Bull, Mrs. Eunice. 
Bull, Mary T. 
Bullock, F. 0. 
Bullock, V. V. 
Bulold, Robert. 
Bunce, Joseph. 
Burchard, Miss Eliza. 
Burchard, Mrs. Lucena. 
Burger, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Burger, Mrs. Mary B. 
Burger, Mrs. Rebecca C. 
Burgess, Rev. Chalon. 
Burgess, Mrs. Emma I. 
Burke, Frederick W. 
Burke, William. 
Burnap, John Alonzo. 
Burnham, Ezra. 
Burnham, George W. 
Burnham, J. H. 
Burnham, Rev. M. 
Burr, Mrs. C. A. 
Burr, Charlotte L. 
Burr, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Burr, MUs Louisa M. 
Burrall, F. A. 
Burritt, Mrs. Arminda. 
Burt, Mrs. Mary. 
Burt, Wa