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Full text of "Report of the chief of engineers, U.S. Army"

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ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THS 



WAR DEPAETMENT 



VOK THB 



FISOAL TBAE ENDED JUlfE 80, 1897. 



REPORT OF THE 

CHIEF OF ENGINEERS. 

PART 4. 



WASHINGTON: 

GOVBKNMENT PRINTING OFFICE. 
1897. 



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C^Sl-i^ 



272969 



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CONTENTS. 

[Alphabetic*! index will be found at the end of each part, or Tolome.) 



PAET I. 

OFFICERS OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
Status, changes^ and dlBtribation of officers of corps, 3. 

THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS 4 

POST OF WILLETS POINT, NEW YORK.— U. S. ENGINEER SCHOOL.— BAT- 
TALION OF ENGINEERS.—ENGINEER DEPOT. 

Officer in coMMiiKD, Maj. John G. D. Knight, Corps of Enqinekrs — 

Poet of Willets Point, 4; U. S. Engineer School, 5; Battalion of Engineers, £ngi« 
neer Depot, 6; statement of funds, 7; estimates, 22. 

FORTIFICATIONS. 

Projects, sites, 7: sea walis and embankments, preservation and repair of fortifi- 
cations, new works, appropriations.S ; emplacements, continuing contacts, 9,10 ; sub- 
marine mines, defenses of coasts oi Maine and New Hampshire, 11; Boston, Mass., 
southeast coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, 12; eastern entrance to Long 
Island Sound at New York, N. Y.— eastern entrance to harbor, on islands in harbor, 
13; on Staten Island, southern entrance to New York Harbor, on Long Island and 
Sandy Hook, Delaware River, 14; Baltimore, Md., Washington, D. C, 15: Hamp- 
ton Roads, Va., coast of North Carolina, coast of South Carolina, 16 j coast or Georgia 
and Cumberland Sound, coast of Florida, 17 ; Pensaoola, Fla., Mobile, Ala., and Mis- 
sissippi Sound, New Orleans, La., 18: Galveston, Tex., 19 1 lake ports in New York, 
San Diego, Cal. ^ islands in San Francisco Bay, and north side of San Francisco Bay, 
Cal., San Francisco, Cal., on south side of bay, 20; mouth of Columbia River, Pnget 
Sound, 21; estimates for 1898-99, 22. 

RIVER AND HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS. 

General statement, 22; establishment of harbor lines, 28; examination of bills 
for bridges, Bartrand River, S. C, 24; obstruction of navigable Southern rivers by 
the aquatic plant known as the water hyacinth, engineer divisions, 25. 

ATLANTIC COAST AND GULF OF MEXICO. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. A. N. Damrell and Maj. R. L. Hoxis, Corps of 
Engineers— 

Lubec Channel, Me., 26; Moosabec Bar, Me., 27; Narraguagus River, Me., breakwa- 
ter from Mount Desert to Porcupine Island, Bar Harbor, Me.^ 28; harbor at Sulli- 
van Falls, Me., Union River, Me., 29; Bagaduce River, Me., Penobscot River, Mo., 
30; Belfast Harbor, Me., Camden Harbor, Me., 32; Rockland Harbor, Me., 33; Car- 
vers Harbor, Vinalhaven, Me., 34; Georges River, Me., Kennebec River, Me., 
85; Sasanoa River, Me., Portland Harbor, Me., 37; Saco River, Me., 39; Bellamy 
River, N. H., Cocheco River, N. H., 40; harbor of refuge at Little Harbor, N. H., 
41; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or eudangering navigation, ex- 
amiuations and surveys, 42. 

I 
ENG 97 1 

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II CONTENTS. 

In teob charge of Lieut. Col. S. M. Mansfield, Corps of Engineers^ 

Ne wbnry port Harbor, MasB., 45; Merriinao River, Mass., 46; Powow River, Mass./ 
47; Essex River, Mass., 48; harbor of refuge, Sandy Bay, Cape Ann, Mass., harbor 
at Gloucester, Mass., 49; harbor at Manchester, Mass., 51; harbor at Lynn, Mass., 
52; Mystic and Maiden rivers> Mass., 53; harbor at Boston, Mass., 55; Town River, 
Mass., 57; Weymouth River, Mass., 58; harbor at Scitaate, Mass., 59; harbor at 
Plymouth, Mass., 61 j harbor at Provincetown, Mass., harbor at Chatham, Mass., 
62; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, ex- 
aminations and surveys, 63. 

In tue charge of Maj. D. W. Lockwood, Corps of Engineers-- 

Harbor of refnge at Hyaunis, Mass., 66; harbor of refuge at Nantucket, Mass., 67; 
Marthas Vineyard inner harbor at Edgartown, Mass., 68 ; harbor at Vineyard Haven, 
Mass., Woods Hole Channel, Mass., 69; New Bedford Harbor, Mass., 70; Canapitsit 
Channel, Mass., Taunton River, Mass., 71; Sakonnet River, R. I., 72; Pawtuckei 
River, R. I., 73 ; Providence River and Narragansett Bay, R. I., 74; removal of Green 
Jacket Shoal, Providence, R. I., harbor at Wickford, R. I., 75; Newport Harbor, 
R. L. 76; harbor of refuge at Point Judith, R. I., 77; entrance to Point Judith 
Pond, R. I., harbor of refuge at Block Island, R. I., 78; Great Salt Pond, Block 
Island, R. I., 79; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering 
navigation, examination and snrveys, 80. 

In tub charge of Maj. Smith S. Leach, Corps of Engineers— 

Pawcatuck River, R. I. and Conn., 82; harbor of refuge at Stonington, Conn^ 83; 
MysticRiver, Conn., 84; Thames River, Conn., 85 ; Connecticut River below Hart- 
ford, Conn., S6 ; harbor of refuge at Duck Island Harbor, Conn., New Haven Harbor, 
Conn., 89; breakwaters at New Haven, Conn., 91; Hoosatonic River, Conn., 92; 
Bridgeport Harbor, Conn., 94; Saugatack River and Westport Harbor, Conn., 96; 
Norwalk Harbor, Conn., 98; Five Mile River Harbor, Conn., Stamford Harbor, 
Conn., 100; harbor at Coscob and Mianus River, Coun., 102; Greenwich Harbor, 
Conn., 103; surveys, 104. 

In the charge of Col. G. L. Gillespie and Lieut. Col. William Ludlow, 
Corps of Enginbeus— 

Hudson River, N. Y., 105; Saugerties Harbor, N. Y., 107; harbor at Rondo ut, N. Y., 
108; harbor at Peekskill, N. Y., 109; Harlem River, N. Y., 110; East River and Hell 
Gate, N. Y., Ill; New York Harbor, N. Y., 113; removing sunken vessels or craft 
obstructing or endangering navigation, examinations and survey, 114. 

In the charge of Maj. H. M. Adabis, Corps of Engineers^ 

Port Chester Harbor, N. Y., 116 ; Mamaroneck Harbor, N. Y., 117 ; East Chester Creek, 
N. Y., Bronx River, N. Y., 118; Mattituck Harbor, N. Y., 119; Port Jefferson Harbor, 
N. Y., 120; Huntington Harbor, N. Y., 121; Glencove Harbor, N. Y., 122; Flushing 
Bay, N. Y., Patchogue River, N. Y., 123; Browns Creek, Sayville, N. Y., 124; Can- 
arsie Bay, N. Y., Bay Ridge Channel, the triangular area between Bay Ridge and 
Red Hook channels, and Red Hook and Buttermilk channels, in the harbor of 
New York, 125; Gowanus Creek Channel, New York Harbor, 127; Newtown Creek, 
N. Y., 128; Passaic River, N. J., 129; channel between Staten Island and New Jersey, 
130; Elizabeth River, N. J., 131; Raritan River, N. J., 132; South River, N. J., Rar- 
it«n Bay, N. J., 133 ; Mattawan Creek, N. J.. 134 ; Keyport Harbor, N. J., 135 ; Shoal 
Harbor and Compton Creek, N. J., 136; Slirewsbury River, N. J., 137; removing 
sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, 138; examinations 
and surveys, 139. 

In the charge of Maj. C. W. Raymond, Corps of Engineers^ 

Delaware River, N. J. and Pa., 142; harbor between Philadelphia, Pa., and Camden, 
N. J., 144; Schuylkill River, Pa., 145; ice harbor at Maroushook, Pa., 146; con- 
struction of iron pier in Delaware Bay near Lewes, Del., 147 ; Delaware Breakwater, 
Del., 148; harbor of refnge, Delaware Bay, Del., 149; Rancocas River, N. J^ Allo- 
way Creek, N. J., 150; Dennis Creek, N. J., 151; Cooper Creek, N. J., 152; Goshen 
Creek, N. J., removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering naviga- 
tion, examinations and survey, 153. ' 



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CONTENTS. Ill 

In thb chargb of Wm. F. Smith, Unitsd States Agent, Major of ENGiNSEBa, 
U. 8. Aemt, retired^ 

WilmiDgton Harbor^ Del., 166; Nanticoke Biver, Del. and Md., 167; Appoquinimink 
River, Del., 158; Smyrna River, Del., 159; Mnrderkill River, DeL, 160; Mispillion 
River, Del., 161; Broadkiln River. Del., inland waterway from Chinooteatfue Bay. 
Ya., to Delaware Bay at or near Lewes, Del., 162*; Sasqaebanna River above ana 
below Havre de Grace, Md., 163; Chester River, Md., from Grumpton to Jonea 
Landing, Choptank River, Md., 164; La Trappe River, Md., 165; Warwick River, 
Md., 166; Broad Creek River, Del., 167; Wicomico River, Md., Manokin River, 
MQ., 168; Pooomoke River, Md., Qaeenstown Harbor. Md., 169; RockbaU Harbor 
and inner harbor at Rockhall, Md., removing snnken vessels or craft obstrnoting 
or andaugering navigation, 170; examinations and surveys, 171. 

In the charge of Col. Peter. C. Hains, Corps of Engineers— 

Patapsco River and channel to Baltimore, Md., 172; channel to Cnrtis Bay, in 
Patapsco River. Baltimore Harbor, Md., 173; harbor of southwest Baltimore 
(Spring Garden), Md., removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endanger- 
ing navigation, surveys, 174. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. Chas. J. Allen, Corps of Engineers — 

Potomac River at Washington, D. C, 175; Occoquan Creek, Ya., 177; Aqnia Creek, 
Va., Nomini Creek, Va., 179; Lower Machodoc Creek, Ya., Rappahannock lUver, 
Ya., 181^. UrbanaCreek,Va., 183; York River, Va., 184 ; Mattaponi River, Va., 186; 
Pamunkey River, Ya., James River, Va., 187; protection of Jamestown Island, Ya., 
survey, 189. 

In the charge of Capt. Thos. L. Casey, Corps of Engineers— 

Harbor at Norfolk and its approaches, Va., 190; Western Branck of Elizabeth 
River, Ya., 191; Nansemoud River, Ya., 192; Apjpomattox River, Ya., 193; harbor 
at Cape Charles City, Va., 194; Nandua Creek, va., inland water route ft'om Nor- 
folk Harbor, V a., to Albemarle Sound, N. C, through Currituck Sound, 195; North 
Landing River, Ya. and N. C. Roanoke River, N. C, 196; Pasquotank River, N. C, 
197; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation^ 
examinations, 198. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. D. P. Heap and Capt. W. E. Craighill, Corps 
of Engineers — 

Ocracoke Inlet, N. C, 199; Fishing Creek, N. C, 200; Pamlico and Tar rivers, N. C, 
201; Contentnia Creek, N. C, Trent River, N. C, 202; Nense River, N.C., 203; 
inland waterway between Newbem and Beaufort, N. C, harbor at Beaufort, N. C, 
204; inland waterway between Beaufort Harbor and New River, N. C, 205; New 
River, N. C, 206; North East (Cape Fear) River, N.C., Black River, N.C., 207; 
Cape Fear Kiver above Wilmington, N. C, 208; Cape Fear River at and below 
Wilmington, N. C, 209; Lockwoods Folly River, N. C.« examination and sur- 
veys, 211. 

In the charge of Capt. Frederic Y. Abbot, Corps of Engineers — 

Waccamaw River, N. C. and S. C, 213; Lnmber River, N. C. and 8. C, 214; Little 
Pedee River, S. C.,215; Great Pedee River, 8. C, 216; Mingo Creek, S. C, Winyah 
Bay, 8. C, 217; 8antee River, S. C, 219; Wateree River, 8. C, 220; Congaree 
River, 8. C., 221; Charleston Harbor, inclndiug Mount Pleasant and 8u]Iivan 
Island shore, 8. C, 222; Wappoo Cut, 8. C, 223; Beaufort River, 8. C.,224. 

In the charge of Capt. O. M. Carter, Corps of Engineers — 

Savannah Harbor, Ga., 224; Savannah River between Savannah and Augusta, Ga., 
227; Savannah River above Augusta, Ga , 228; Darien Harbor, Ga., 229; Altamaha 
River, Ga , 230; Oconee River, Ga., 231; Ocmulgee River, Ga., 232; Brunswick 
Harbor, Ga., 233; Cumberland Sound, Ga., 235; inside water route between 
Savannah, Ga., and Femandina, Fla., 236; removing sunken vessels or craft 
obstructing or endangering navigation, survey, 237. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. W. H. H. Benyaurd, Corps of Engineers^ 

St. Johns River, Fla., 238; Volusia Bar, Fla., 240; Ocklawaha River, Fla., 241; St. 
Augustine Harbor, Fla., Indian River, Fla., Negro Cut, Jupiter Inlet, Fla., 242; 
northwest entrance. Key West Harbor, Fla., 244 : Caloosahatchee River, Fla., 245; 
Charlotte Harbor and Pease Creek, Fla., 246; Sarasota Bay, Fla., 247; Manatee 
River, Fla., 248; Withlacoochee Kiver, Fla., Suwanee River, Fla., 249; removiujr 
snnken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, examinations and 
surveys, 251. 



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IV CONl'ENTS. 

In the charge of Maj. F. A. Mahan, Corps of Engineers — 

Carrabelle Bar and Harbor, Fla., 253; Apalachicola Bay, Fla., Apalaohicola Riyer, 
the Cut-off, and lower Chipola River, Fla , 254; Flint River, Ga., 256; C hatta- 
hoochee River, Ga. and Ala., below Colambus, 256: Cbattahooonee River, bet ween 
Westpoint and Franklin, Ga., Chootawbatcbee River, Fla. and Ala., 257; barbor 
at Pensacola, Fla., 258; Escambia and Conecub rivers, Fla. and Ala., 259; Alabama 
River, Ala., 260; improvement of, and operatlne and care of canals and other 
works of navigation on, Coosa River, Ga. and Ala., 261, 262; survey, 262. 

In the charge of Maj. Wm. T. Rossell, Corps of Engineers— - 

Mobile Harbor, Ala., 263; improvement of, and operation and care of locks and dams 
on, Black Warrior River, Ala., 264, 265; Warrior and Tombigbee rivers, Ala., 265; 
Tombigbee River from month to Demopolis, Ala., 266; Tombigbee River, from 
Demopolis, Ala., to Columbus, Miss., 267 ; Tombigbee River, from Fulton to Colum- 
bus, Miss,, and from Walkers Bridge to Fulton, Miss., 268; Noxubee River, Miss., 
Pascagoula River, Miss., 269: Chickasabay River, Miss., 271; Leaf River, Miss., 
Pearl Kiver. below JaokBon, Miss., 272; Pearl River between Carthage and Jack- 
son, Miss., 273; Pearl Kiver, between Edinburg and Carthage, Miss., Bogue Chitto, 
La., 274; survey of canal from Birmingham, Ala., to the Warrior River, Ala., 
examinations and surveys, 275. 

In the charge of Maj. James B. Quinn, Corps of Engineers— 

Inspection of the improvement of the South Pass of the Mississippi River, 277; 
ChofuDcte River and Bogue Falia, La., 278; Tickfaw River and tributaries, La., 
279 ; Amite River and Bayou Manchao, La., 280; Bayon Lafourche, La., 281 ; Bayou 
Plaqiiemiue, Grand River, and Pigeon bayous. La., 282; Bayou Courtableau, La., 
283; Bayou Teche, La., 284; Bayou Vermilion, La., Mermentau River and tribu- 
taries, La., 285; mouth and passes of Calcasieu River, La., 286; harbor at Sabine 
Pass, Tex., 288; Sablue River, Tex., 289; Neches River, Tex., 290; closing crevasse 
in Pass a Loutre, Mississippi River, removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing 
or endangering navigation, examinations and surveys, 291. 

In the charge of Maj. A. M. Miller, Corps of Engineers— 

Galveston Harbor, Tex., 292; ship channel in Galveston Bay, Tex., 294; channel in 
West Galveston Bay, Tex., 295; Trinity River, Tex., Buffalo Bayou, Tex., 296; 
Brazos River, Tex., 297; operatiug and care of Morgan Canal, Tex., examination 
and survey, 298. 

In' THE CHARGE OF A BOARD OF ENGINEERS, COL. HeNRY M. ROBERT, CORPS OF 

Engineers, Senior Memder— 

Ascertaining the character and value of the improvements made at the mouth of the 
Brazos River, Tex., by the Brazos River Channel and Dock Company, 298. 

WESTERN RIVERS. 

In the charge of Maj. J. H. Willard, Corps of Engineers— 

Red River, La. and Ark., 299; Red River, above Fulton, Ark., 300; Cypress Bayou, 
Tex. and La., 301; Ouachita and Black rivers. Ark. and La., 302; Bayou Bartholo- 
mew, La. and Ark., Boeuf River, Ln., 303; Tensas River and Bayou Ma^on, La., 
304; Yazoo River, Miss., 305 ; mouth of Yazoo River and harbor at Vicksburg, Miss., 
306; Tallahatchie River, Miss., Bi^ SunHower River, Miss., 308; water gauges on 
the Mississippi River and its principal tributaries, 309; examination, 310. 

In the charge of Capt. William L. Sibert, Corps of Engineers— 

Removing obstructions in Arkansas River, Ark. and Kaus., 310; Arkansas River, 
Ark., 311; White River, Ark., 312; Black River, Ark. and Mo., 313; Current River, 
Ark. and Mo., St. Francis River, Ark., 314; St. Francis River, Mo., 315; exami- 
nation and surveys, 316. 

In the charge of Maj. Thomas H. Handburt, Corps of Engineers — 

Removing snags and wrecks from Mississippi River, 317; Mississippi River between 
Ohio and Missouri rivers, 318; harbor at St. Louis, Mo., 320; preventing the Mis- 
sissippi River from breaking through into the Cache Kiver at or near a point 
known as Beach Ridge, a few miles above Cairo, 111., 321, 



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• CONTENTS. V 

Ik the chargk of Lraur. Col. W. R. King, Corps of Engineers — 

Operating snag boats and dredge boats on Upper Mississippi River, 321 ; Mississippi 
River between Missouri River and Minneapolis, Minn., 322; operating and care 
of Dee Moines Rapids Canal and Dry Dock, operating and oare of Galena River 
improvement. 111., Mississippi River between St. Panl and Minneapolis, Minn., 
(construction of Look and Dam No. 2), 323; surveys, 324. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. W. A. Jones, Corps of Engineers — 

Construction and operating and care of reservoirs at head waters of Mississippi 
River, 326, 328; Chippewa River, including Yellow Banks, Wis., 328; St. Croix, 
River, Wis. and Minn., 329; Minnesota River, Minn., Red River of the North, Minn, 
and N. Dak., 330; ganging Mississippi River at or near St. Paul, Minn., exam- 
inations, 332. 

In the charge of Lieut. CoL. W. A. Jones and Capt. J. C. Sanford, Corps of 
Engineers — 

Missouri River between Stnbbs Ferry^ Mont., and the lower limits of Sioux City, 
Iowa, 333; improving Upper Missouri River by snagging, 337 ; Yellowstone River, 
Mont, and N. Dak., ^. 

In the charge of Capt. John Biddle, Corps of Engineers— 

Obion River, Tenn., 339; Forked Deer River, Tenn., 340; North or Middle Fork, 
Forked Deer River, and Obion River, 341; Cumberland River, Tenn. and Ky. — 
below Nashville, 342; above Nashville, 344; surveys, 347. 

In the charge of Capt. Dan C. Kingman, Corps of Engineers— 

Tennessee River system, 348; Tennessee River above and below Chattanooga, Tenn., 
348, 349; operating and care of Muscle Shoals Canal, Tennessee River, Ala., 351; 
French Broad, and Little Pigeon rivers, Tenn., 352; Clinch River, Tenn., 353; 
surveys, 354. 

In the charge of Maj. W. H. Heuer, Corps of Engineers— 

Ohio River, 355; operating snag boat on the Ohio River, operating and care of Davis 
Island Dam, Ohio River^ near Pittsburg, construction of movable dams Nos. 2, 3, 
4, 5, and 6 in the Ohio River, 356 ; improvement of, and operating and oare of locks 
and dams on Muskingum River , Ohio, 358 ; examination, 359. 

In the charge of Maj. Charles F. Powell and Maj. R. L. Hoxie, Corps of 
Engineers — 

Improvement of, and operation and care of locks and dams Nos. 8 and 9, Mononga- 
hela River, W. Va, and Pa., 359, 360: purchase of locks and dams Nos. 6 and 7, 
Monongahela River, condemnation oi all the property and appurtenances of the 
Monongahela Navigation Companv, 361; Allegheny River, Pa., 362; construction 
of locks and dams at Uerr Island, above the head of Six Mile Island, and at Spring- 
dale, Allegheny River, 363. 

In the charge of Capt. J. G. Warren, Corps of Engineers— 

Falls of the Ohio River at Louisville, Ky., and Indiana Chute, Falls of the Ohio 
River, 364, 865; operating and care of Louisville and Portland Canal, Kv., Wabash 
River above and below Vincennes, Ind., 366; operating and care of lock and 
dam at Grand Rapids, Wabash River, White River, Ind., 368; Tradewater River, 
Ky., construction of Lock No. 2, Green River, at Rumsey, Ky., 369; Green River 
above mouth of Bi^ Barren River, Ky., operating and care of looks and dams on 
Green and Barren rivers, Ky., 370; Rough River, Ky., 371; examination and sur- 
veys, 372. 

In the charge of Maj. James F. Gregory, Corps of Engineers — 

Imjirovement of, and operating and care of locks and dams on, Kentucky River, Ky., 
373, 375; Tug Fork of Big Sandy River, W. Va. and Ky., 375; Levisa Fork of Big 
Sandy River, Ky., 376; Big Sandy River, W. Va. and Ky., 377; Guyandotte River, 
W. Va., 378; New River, Va. and W. Va., 379; Gauley River, W. Va., Elk 
River, W. Va., 380; improvement of, and operating and care of looks and dams on, 
Great Kanawha River, W. Va., 381, 383; improvement of, and operating and care 
of lock and dam on, Little Kanawha River, W. Va., 384. 



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VI CONTENTS. 

LAKE RIVERS AND HARBORS. 

In thb charge of Maj. Cuin'ON B. Sears, Corps of Enqimbers— 

Harbor at Grand Marais, Minn., 385; harbor at Aeate Bay, Minn., harbor at Dnlath, 
Minn., and Superior, Wis., 3o6; harbor at Ashland, Wis., 388; harbor at Ontona- 
gon, Mich., 3^; improyement of, and operating and oare of, waterway across 
Keweenaw Point from Keweenaw Bay to Lake Superior, Mich., 389, 390; harbor 
at Marquette, Mich., harbor of refage at Presque He Point, Marquette Bay, Mich., 
391; harbor of refuge at Grand Marais, Mich., 392; examination, 393. 

In the charge of Capt.-Geo. A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers— 

Menominee Harbor, Mich, and Wis., Menominee River, Mich, and Wis., 393: Oconto 
Harbor, Wis., 394 ; Pensaukee Harbor, Wis., Green Bay Harbor, Wis., 395 : improve- 
ment of, and operating and care of. Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Snip Canal, 
Wis., 396, 397; Sturgeon Bay Canal harbor of refuffe. Wis., 397; Ahnapee Har- 
bor, Wis., 398; Kewaunee Harbor, Wis., Two Rivers Harbor, Wis^ 399; Manitowoo 
Harbor, Wis., 400; Sheboygan Harbor, Wis., Port Washington Harbor, Wis., 401; 
harbor of refuge, Milwaukee, Wis., 402: Milwaukee Harbor, Wis., South Mil- 
waukee Harbor, Wis., 403; Racine Harbor, Wis., Kenosha Harbor, Wis., 404: 
Wankegan Harbor, IlL, 405; improvement of, and operating and care of locks ana 
dams on. Fox River, Wis., 406, 407; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing 
or endangering navigation, 407 ; surveys, 408. 

In the charge of Maj. W. L. Marshall, Corps of Engineers— 

Chicago Harbor, 111., 409; Chicago River, 111., 411; Calumet Harbor, 111., 412; Calu- 
met River, 111. and Ind., 414; Illinois River, 111., 415; operating and care of 
Lagrange and Kampsville locks, Illinois River, and approaches thereto, 417 ; Illi- 
nois and Mississippi Canal, 418; operating and care of Illinois and Mississippi 
Canal: canal around lower rapids of Rock River at Milan, 111., removing sunken 
vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, 420; examination and 
survey, 421. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. G. J. Lydeckbr and Capt. C. McD. Townsend, 
Corps of Engineers — 

Michigan City inner and outer harbors, Ind., 421 ; St. Joseph Harbor, Mich., 423; St. 
Joseph River, Mich., South Haven Harbor, Mich., 424; Sangatuck Harbor, Mich.. 
425; Kalamazoo River, Mich., Holland (Black Lake) Harbor, Mich., 426; Grand 
Haven Harbor, Mich.. 427; Grand River, Mich., Muskegon Harbor, Mich., 428; 
White Lake Harbor, Mich., 429; Pentwater Harbor, Mich., Ludington Harbor, 
Mioh., 430: Manistee Harbor. Mich., harbor of refuge at Portage Lake, Manistee 
County, Mich., 431; Frankfort Harbor, Mich., 432; Charlevoix Harbor, Mich., 
433; Petoskey Harbor, Mich., removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or 
endangering navigation, surveys, 434. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. G. J. Lydecker, Corps op Engineers — 

Ship channel connecting waters of the Great Lakes between Chicago, Duluth, and 
Buffalo, 435; St. Marys River at the falls, Mich., 437: operating and oare of St. 
Manrs Falls Canal, 438 ; Hay Lake Channel, St. Marys River, Mich., 439 ; Cheboygan 
Harbor, Mioh., 440; Alpena Harbor (Thunder Bay River), Mich., 441; Saginaw 
River, Mich., 442; Sebewaing River, Mich., 443; harbor of refuge at Sand Beach, 
Lake Huron, Mich., 444 ; improvement of, and operating and care of, St. Clair Flats 
Canal, Mich., 445 : mouth of Black River, Mich., Black River at Port Huron, Mich., 
446; Pine River, Mich., 447; Belle River, Mich., 448; Clinton River, Mich., Detroit 
River, Mioh., 449; Rou^e River, Mich., 450 j taming basin in Rouge River, Mich., 
removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, exami- 
nation, &1. 

In the charge of Col. Jared A. Smith, Corps of Engineers — 

Monroe Harbor, Mich., Toledo Harbor, Ohio, 452 ; Port Clinton Harbor, Ohio, San- 
dusky Harbor, Ohio, 454; Hnron Harbor, Ohio, 455; Vermilion Harbor, Ohio, 456; 
Black River (Lorain) Harbor, Ohio, 457; Cleveland Harbor, Ohio, 458; Fairport 
Harbor, Ohio, 459; Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio, 460; Conneaut Harbor, Ohio, 461; 
examination, 463. 



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CONTENTS. VII 

IV THE CHARGE OF MaJ. THOMAS W. SyMONS, CORPS OF ENGINEBRS — 

Erie Harbor, Pa., 468; harbor at Dnnkirk, N. Y., 464; Buffalo Harbor, N. Y., 466; 
Tonawanda Harbor and Niagara River, N, Y., 469; Niagara River from Tonawanda 
to Port Day, N. Y., 470; Wilson Harbor, N. Y., 471 ; removing sunken vessels or craft 
obstrncting or endangering navigation, examination and surveys^ 472. report apon 
House bill No. 7775, Mth Congress, first session, providing for widening the looks 
of Erie Canal, N.Y., 473. 

Iir THE CHARGE OF MaJ. W. S. St ANTON, CORPS OF ENGINEERS— 

Harbor at Charlotte, N. Y., harbor at Pultneyville, N. Y.,474; harbor at Great Sodns 
Bay, N. Y., harbor at Little Sodus Bay, N. Y., 476; harbor at Oswego, N. Y., 476; 
harbor at Sacketts Harbor, N. Y., harbor at Cape Vincent, N. Y., 477; shoals between 
Sister Islands and Crossover Light, and between Ogdensburg and the foot of Lake 
Ontario, St. Lawrence River, 478 ; harbor at Ogdensburg, N. x ., 479: harbor at Bur- 
lington, Vt., channel between North and Sonth Hero islands, Lake Champlain, Yt., 
480; Otter Creek, Vt., Narrows of Lake Champlain, N. Y. and Vt., 481; removing 
sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, examinations and 
surveys, 482 ; report upon House bill No. ^07^ 54th Congress, first session, provid- 
ing for widening the locks of Oswego Canal, N. Y., 483. 

PACIFIC COAST. 

Iir THX CHARGE OF COL. ChAS. R. SUTBR, CORPB OF ENGINRXRa^ 

Oakland Harbor, Cal., 484. 

In the CHARGE OF Maj. Cha8. £. L. B. Davis, Corps of Enginbbrs^ 

San Luis Obispo Harbor, Cal., 485; Wilmington Harbor, Cal., 486; San Diego Harbor, 
Cal., examinations and surveys, 487. 

Ik the charge of Capt. Cassius E. GirxEiTE, Corps of Enginbrrs— 

San Joaquin River, Cal., 488; Mokelumne River, Cal., 489; Sacramento and Feather 
rivers, Cal., 490; Napa River, Cal., 491; Petaluma Creek, Cal., Humboldt Harbor 
and Bay, Cal., 492, examinations, 494. 

Ik the charge of Capt. W. L. Fisk, Corps of Engineers— 

Port Orford Harbor, Oreg., 494; Coquille River, Oreg. (general improvement), 495; 
Coquille River, Oreg., between Coquille City and Myrtle Point, entrance to Coos 
Bay and Harbor, Oreg., 496; harbor at Coos Bay, Oreg. (dredging), 497; Coos River, 
Oreg., Umpqua River, Oreg., mouth of Siuslaw River, Oreg., 498; Alsea River, 
Oreg., Yaquma Bay, Oreg., 499; Nestugga River, Oreg., Tillamook Bay and Bar, 
Oreg., 501 ; mouth of Columbia River, Oreg. and Wash., Columbia River, Oreg., 
below Tongue Point, 502; Columbia and Lower Willamette rivers below Portland, 
Oreg., 503; Columbia River between Vancouver, Wash., and the mouth of Willa- 
mette River, canal at the Cascades, Columbia River, Oreg., 504 ; operating and care 
of canal and locks at the Cascades of the Columbia River, Oreg., Colnmbia River 
at Three Mile Rapids, and the construction and equipment of a boat railway from 
the foot of The Dalles Rapids to the head of Celilo Falls, Oreg. and Wash., 506; 
Willamette River above Portland and Yamhill River, Oreg., 506; gauging waters 
of Columbia River, Oreg. and Wash., 507. 

In TiiE charge of Capt. Harry Taylor, Corps of Engineers— 

Willapa River and Harbor, Wash., 508; Grave Harbor and bar entrance, Wash., 509; 
Chenalis River, Wash., 510; Pnget Sound and its tributary waters, Wash., 511; 
harbor at Olympia, Wash., 512; waterway connecting Pnget Sound with lakes 
Union and Washington. 513; Everett Harbor, Wash., 515; Swinomish Slough, 
Wash., 516; Columbia River from Rock Island Rapids to Foster Creek Rapids, 
Wash., 517; Upper Columbia and Snake rivers, Oreg. and Wash.. 518; Cowlitz 
River, Wash., 520; Clearwater River,. Idaho, Kootenai River, laaho, between 
Bonners Ferry and the international boundary line, 521; Flathead River, Mont., 
522 ; examinations and surveys, 523. 

EXAMINATIONS, SURVEYS, AND CONTINGENCIES OF RIVERS AND 

HARBORS 524 

SURVEY OF PORTLAND CHANNEL (CANAL), ALASKA. 
In the charge of Capt. D. D. Gaillard, Corps of Enginbers 524 



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VIII CONTENTS. 

SUPERVISION OF THE HARBOR OF NEW YORK. 

Lieut. Commander Daniel Delehanty and Lieut. John F. Parker, 
U. S. N., Supervisors 524 

MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMMISSION 525 

MISSOURI RIVER COMMISSION 527 

CALIFORNIA DEBRIS COMMISSION 528 

BRIDGING NAVIGABLE WATERS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Under authority of special acts of Congress, — (1) Bridge of tbe Boonville and Howard 
County Bridge Company across Missouri River at Boonville, Mo., (2) bridge of 
the Yankton Bridge Company across Missonri River at Yankton, S. Dak., (3) 
bridge of the Union Railroad Company across Monongahela River between Port 
Perry and Mifflin Township, Pa., (4) bridge of the city of Detroit, Mich., across 
west channel of Detroit River, 529; (5) bridge of the Braddock and Duquesne 
Bridge Company across Monongahela River between Braddock and Mifflin town- 
ships, Pa., (6) bridge of the Aransas Harbor Terminal Railway Company across 
Corpns Chiisti Channel (M<»rri8 and Cummings Ship Channel), Tex., (7) bridge of 
the Delta Cooperage Company and the Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad 
Company across Tallahatchie River at Pliilipp, Miss., (8) bridge of Roane County, 
across Clinch River at Kingston, Tenn., (9) bridge of the Mobile and Ohio Rail- 
road Company across Cahaba River, in Bibb County, Ala., (10) bridge of ths 
Mobile and Ohio Railroad Companj*^ across Alabama River, near Montgomery, Ala., 
(11) bridge of Marion County, Miss., across Pearl River, (12) bridge of the city of 
Monroe, La., across Ouachita River at l)e Siard street, (13) bridge of the Mobile 
and Ohio Railroad Company across Warrior River, in Tuscaloosa Connty, Ala., 
530; (14) bridge of the St. Francis Bridge and Turnpike Company across Lake St. 
Francis at or near Lake City, Ark., (15) bridg*^ of the Northern New York Rail- 
read Company across St. Lawrence River, near Hogansburg, N. Y., 531. 

Under authority of State law8.^(l) Bridge of the Texarkana and Fort Smith Railway 
Com]|)any cocross Neches River at Beaumont, Tex., (2) bridge of the Seattle and 
Rainier Beach Railway Company across Black River, Wash., (3; bridge of the 
Kansas City, Shreveporf. and Gulf Railway Company across Calcasieu River at 
Lake Charles, La., (4) bridge of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway 
Company across Swan Creek at Toledo, Ohio, (5) bridge of the Kansas City, 
Osceola and Sonthern Railway Company across Osage River at Osceola, Mo., (6) 
bridge of Bristol County, Mass., across Acushnet River between New Bedford and 
Fairbaven, 531; (7) bridge of the Queen Anne's Railroad Company across Chop- 
tank River at Denton, Md., (8) bridge of the city of New York across East River 
at Delanoey street, (9) bridge of the city of Appleton, Wis., across United States 
Fox River Canal at John street, (10) bridge of the city of Green Bay, Wis., across 
East River, (11) bridge of the city of Green Bay, Wis., across Fox River at Main 
street, (12) bridge of Monmouth and Ocean counties, N. J., across Manasquan 
River between Manasquan and Point Pleasant, (13) bridge of the town of Jeaner- 
ette, La., across Bayou Teche, (14) bridge of Essex County, Mass. (Essex Bridge), 
across Beverly Harbor between Salem and Beverly, 532; (15) bridge of the Superior 
Rapid Transit Railway Company and the Dnluth Street Railway Company across 
St. Louis River between Dnluth, Minn., and Superior, Wis., (16) bridge of Shasta 
County, Cal., across Sacramento River at Balls Ferry, (17) bridge of the New York, 
New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company across Pequonnock River at Bridge- 

{)ort. Conn., (18) bridge of the West Braddock Bridge Company across Mononga-- 
lela River at Rankin, Pa,, (19) bridge of the town of Hempstead, N. Y"., across 
Long Beach Channel from Barnuni Island to Inner Beach, (20) bridge of the city 
of Menasha, Wis., across Fox River, (21) bridge of the town of Oyster Bay, N. Y., 
across Mill Neck Creek Inlet from Aliens Point at Mill Neck to Pine Island at Bay- 
ville, (22) bridges of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway Company across 
Kinnickinick River at Milwaukee, Wis., (23) bridge of the New York, Philadel- 

Ehia and Norfolk Railroad Company across the Southern Branch of Elizabeth 
liver at Norfolk, Va., (24) bridge of the Astoria and Columbia River Railroad 
Company across Blind Slough, Oreg., (25) bridge of the St. Joseph Valley Railway 
Company across St. Joseph River, Mich., (26) bridge of Jefferson County, Tex., 
across Hillebrandt Bayou, (27) bridge of the Allegheny and Westmoreland liridffe 
Company across Youghiogheny River at Suterville, i*a., 533; (28) bridge of tne 
city of Philadelphia, Pa., across Schuylkill River, (29) bridge of the city of New 
Haven, Conn., across Mill River at Chapel street, (30) bridge of Mr. J. B. Levert 
across Bayon Teche, in St. Martin Parish, La., (31) bridge of the Houston, East 
and West Texas Railway Company across Trinity River above Marianna, Tex., 
(32) bridge of the town of Y^irmouth, Me., across Caseo Bay, between Cousins 



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CONTENTS. rX 

and Littlejobns islaDds, (33) bridfi^e of the Lake Shore and Michigan Sonthem 
Railway Company across Ashtabnla River at Asbtabnla, Ohio, (34) bridge of the 
city of Brooklyn, N. Y., across Coney Island Creek from West Seventeenth street 
to West Kijs^hteenth street, (35) bridge of the city of Manitowoc, Wis., across 
Manitowoc River at Main street, (36) bridge of the Portsmouth, Rittery and Tork 
Street Railway Company across Piscataqna River channel between Kittery and 
Kadgers Island, Me., (37) bridge of the Portsmontb, Kittery and York Street Rail- 
way Company across Brave Boat Harbor between Kittery and York, Me., (38] 
bridge of the city of Port Huron, Mich., across Black River at Tenth street, (39' 
bridges of the town of Bourne, Mass., across Monnment and Back rivers, liO[ 
bridge of St. Martin Parish. La., Across Bayou Teche at St. Martinville, (41) bridge 
of Walton County across Aleqna Creek near Portland, Fla., 5.^; (42) temporary 
bridge of the Union Street Railway Company across Acushnet River between 
Popes Island and Fisb Island, New Bedford Harbor, Mass.. (43) bridge of the Ver- 
mont and Province Line Railroad Company across Missisonoi Bay at Albnrgh 
Point, Vt., (44) bridge of Iben'ille Parish across Bayou Plaquemine at Plaque- 
mine, La., o35. 
Alterations. — (1) Bridge of the Sonthem Pacific Company across Oakland Harbor, 
Cal., at Alice street; (2) bridge of the city of Brooklyn and the county of Queens, 
N. Y., across Newtown Creek, at Vernon avenue, Long Island City; (3) bridge of the 
city of Portland (Tukeys Bridge), across Back Cove, Portland Harbor, Me., 636. 

BRIDGE OBSTRUCTING NAVIGATION, 

Bridge of the city of New York across Harlem River at One hundred and fifty-sixth 
street, 536. 

OCCUPANCY OP AND INJURY TO PUBLIC WORKS BY CORPORATIONS AND 

INDIVIDUALS B36 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

REPAIR OF THE AQUEDUCT BRIDGE ACROSS POTOMAC RIVER AT 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

In thr charge of Lirut. Col. Chas. J. Allen, Corps of Engineers 536 

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF WASHINGTON AQUEDUCT AND IN- 
CREASING THE WATER SUPPLY OP WASHINGTON, D. C. 

In the charge of Lieut. Col. Chas. J. Allen and Capt. D. D. Gaillard, Corps 
of Engineers— 

Washington Aqueduct, 537; increasing the water supply of Washington, D. C, 540. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROL^NDS AND WASHINGTON MONUMENT, Dlft- 

TRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

In the charge of Col. (now Brig. Gen.) John M. Wilson, Corps of Engineers, 
Col. Theo. A. Bingham, U. S. A., and Lieut. John S. Sewell, Corps of En- 
gineers 542 

NORTHERN AND NORTHWESTERN LAKES. 

Surveys, printing, and issuing of charts, 544, 545; correcting engraved plates^ esti- 
mates, preservation of bench marks along the Erie Canal, 546; examination of 
shoals in Lake Erie, water levels, 547. 

MAPS AND PLANS 547 

RECONNAISSANCES AND EXPLORATIONS. 

Officers on duty at headquarters of military departments, 547; operations in 
Department of the Missouri, Department of the Columbia, Department of Cali- 
fornia, 548; Department of the Colorado, 549. 

ESTIMATES FOR AMOUNTS REQUIRED FOR SURVEYS AND RECONNAIS- 
SANCES IN MILITARY DEPARTMENTS, AND FOR MAPS, INCLUSIVE OF 
WAR MAPS 549 

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS. 
Officers on duty, 550. 



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X CONTENTS. 

EOETIFIOATIONS, ETC. 

APPENDIX No. 1. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

Changes in personnel dnring the year, members, summary of reports, 553; inspec- 
tion of sites for defense of New Orleans, La., and the mouth of the Mississippi 
River^ additional duties of members, 556. 

APPENDIX No. 2. 

REPORT OF MAJ. JOHN G. D. KNIGHT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Post of Willets Point, N.T., 559; United States Engineer School, 562; Battalion of 
Engineers, 570; Engineer Depot, B74. 

APPENDIX No. 3. 

FORTIFICATIONS, FISCAL YEAR 1896-97. 

(A) Coasts of Mains akd Nbw Hampshire. (In the charge of Lieut. Col. A. N. 
Damrell and Maj. R. L.Hoxie, Corps of Engineers. )~Portrand Harbor, Me., 581; 
Portsmouth Harbor, N. H., 597. 

B) Boston Harbor, Mass. (In the charge of Lieut. Col. S. M. Mansfield, Corps of 
Engineers.)— 600. 

C) Southeast Coast of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. (In the charge of 
M^. D. W. Lockwood, Corps of Engineers.) — ^Narragansett Bay, 603. 

P) Eastern Entrance to Long Island Sound. (In the charge of Maj. Smith 
S. Leach, Corps of Engineers.)— 608. 

E) New York Harbor, N. Y.— At Eastern Entrance, on Islands in Harbor, 
and on Staten Island. (In the charge of Msy . H. M. Adams and Maj. John G. D. 
Knight, Corps of Engineers.) — 610; sea wall at Fort Schuyler, 611; Staten Island, 
613. 

F) New York Harbor, N. Y.— At Southern Entrance, on Long Island, and on 
Sandy Hook. (In the charge of Col. G. L. Gillespie and Lieut. Col. William 
Ludlow, Corps of Engineers.)— Long Island, 614; Sandy Hook, 618. 

G) Delaware River, N. J., Pa., and Del. (In the charge of Maj. C. W. Ray- 
mond, Corps of Engineers.)— 628; Fort Mifflin, Pa., 638; Red Bank, N. J., 639. 

H) Baltimore, Md. (In the charge of Col. Peter C. Hains, Corps of Engineers.)— 
Fort McHenry, Md., 639; Rock Point, Md., 649. 

I) Washington, D. C. (In the charge of Lieut. Col. Chas. J. Allen, Corps of Engi- 
neers.)— 650. 

J) Hampton Roads, Va. (In the charge of Capt. ITios. L. Casey, Corps of Engi- 
neers.) — 656; sewerage system, Fort Monroe, 663. 

K) Coast of North Carolina. (In the charge of Lieut. Col. D. P. Heap and 
Capt. W. E. Craighill, Corps of Engineers.)— 670. 

L) Coast of South Carouna. (In the charge of Capt. Frederic V. Ahbot, Corps 
of Engineers. )— 675. 

M) Coast OF Georgia and Cumberland Sound. (In the charge of Capt. O. M. 
Carter, Corps of Engineers. )— 700. 

N) Coast of Florida. (In the charge of Lieut. Col. W. H. H. Benyaurd, Corps of 
Engineers.)— Fort Marion, 702; Key West, 703. 

O) Pensacola, Fla. (In the charge of Maj. F. A. Mahan, Corps of Engineers. ) — 714. 

P) Mobile, Ala., and Mississippi Sound. (In the charge of Maj. Wm. T. RossoH, 
Corps of Engineers.)— 721. 

Q) New Orleans, La. (In the charge of Maj. James B. Quinn and Lieut. C. S. 
Rich<$, Corps of Engineers.)— 727. 

R) Galveston, Tex. (In the charge of Maj. A. M. Miller, Corps of Engineers.) —737. 

8) Lake Ports in New York.— (In the charge of Maj. W. S. Stanton, Corps of 
Engineers.)— Fort Niagara, 743; Fort Montgomery, 744. 

(T) San Diego, Islands in San Francisco Bay, and North Side of San Fran- 
cisco Bay, Cal. (In the charge of M^j. Chas. £. L. B. Davis, Corps of Engineers.) — 
San Francisco, 744 ; San Diego, 745. 

(IT) San Francisco, Cal., on South Side op San Francisco Bay. (In the charge 
of Col. Chas. R. Suter, Corps of Engineers.)— 748. 

Mouth of Columbia Kiver. (In the charge of Capt. W. L. Fisk, Corps of 
Snglneers.)- 766. 

(W) PUGBT Sound, Wash. (In the charge of Capt. Harry Taylor, Corps of Engi- 
neers.)— 763. 



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coNTEirrs. XI 

EIVERS AND HARBOES. 

APPENDIX A. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF LIEUT. COL. A. N. DAMRELL 
AND MAJ. R. L. HOXIE, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvkmkmts. — ^Lnbec Channel, Me., 770: Moosabeo Bar, Me., 771; Narraji^naguB 
River, Me., 773; breakwater from Mount Desert to Porcupine Island, Bar Harbor, 
Me., 775: harbor at Snllivan Falls, Me., 776; Union River, Me., 777; Bagadaee 
River, Me., 778: Penobscot River, Me., 779; Belfast Harbor, Me., 781: harbor at 
Camden, Me., 782; harbor at Rockland, Me., 783; Carvers Harbor, vinalhaven, 
Me., Georees River, Me., 785; Kennebec River, Me., 787; Sasanoa River, Me., 789; 
Portland Harbor, Me., 790; Saco River, Me., 792; Bellamy River, N. H., Cocheco 
River, N. H., 794; harbor of refnge at Little Harbor, N. H., 796; removing sunken 
vessels or craft obstructing or enuangerinff navigation, 798. 

Examinations and Subvets.— Chandlers River, Me., 798; Union River, near Ells- 
worth, Hancock County, Me., 800; south channel of branch of Penobscot River, 
in Frankfort^ Waldo County, Me., with a view of removing wreck, 801; Boothbay 
Harbor, Me., 802; Ovster River, N. H., 804; St. Croix River, below Calais, Me. 
and N. B., 805 ; Macnias River, Me., from Machias to Machiasport, 809 : Bangor 
Harbor and Penobscot River, including month of Kenduskeag River, Me., 811; 
Harraeeeket River, Me., 815; Royal River, Me., 816; Exeter River, N. H., 818. 

APPENDIX B. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. S» M. MANSFIELD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvemientb.— Newburvport Harbor, Mass., 824; Merrimac River, Mass., 827; 
Powow River, Mass., 829: Essex River, Mass., 830: harbor of refnge, Sandy Bay, 
Cape Ann, Mass., 832 ; haroor at Gloucester, Mass., 835 ; harbor at Manchester, Mass., 
887; harbor at Lynn, Mass., 839; Mystic and Maiden rivers, Mass., 841; harbor at 
Boston, Mass., 843; Town River, Mass., 848: Weymouth River, Mass., 849; barborat 
Seituate, Mass., 8ol ; harbor at Plvmoutli, Mass., 864 ; harbor at Provineetown, 
Mass., 856; harbor at Chatham, Mass., 858; removing sunken vessels or craft 
obstructing or endangering navigation, 859. 

Examinations and Surveys.— Duxbury Harbor, Mass., 800; Duxbury Beach, 
Mass., 862 ; Gurnet Rock and other rocks at mouth of Plymouth Harbor, Mass., 863 ; 
approaches of the Cape Cod Ship Canal, Mass., 864 ; Merrimac River, Mass., between 
Newburyport and Haverhill, 865; Manchester Harbor, Mass., with a view of secur- 
ing S-foot depth, 866; Manchester Harbor, Mass., for 6-foot depth, 869; Marblehead 
Harbor, Mass., for sea wall, 870; Lynn Harbor, Mass., 872; Weymouth (Back) 
River, Mass., 873; Neponset River, Mass., 875; harbor at Plymouth, Mass., 877; 
Provineetown Harbor, Mass., for dike to protect the same, 878. 

Habbor Linrs.— Charles River, at Cambridge, Mass., 881. 

APPENDIX 0. 

REPORT OF MAJ. D. W. LOCKWOOD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

IMPROVIBMEKTS.— Harbor of refuge at Hyannis, Mass., 884; harbor of refuge at Nan- 
tucket, Mass., 886 ; Marthas Vineyard inner harbor at Edgartown^Mass., §90 ; Vine- 
yard Haven Harbor, Mass., 892; Woods Hole Channel, Mass., o94; New Bedford 
Harbor, Mass., 897; Canapitsit Channel, Mass., 900; Taunton River, Mass., 901: 
Sakonnet River, R. I., 904; Pawtucket Riyer, R. L, 905; Providence River and 
Narragansett Bay, R. I., 908; Green Jacket ShoaL Providence River, R. I., 911; 
Wickford Harbor, R. I., 913; Newport Harbor, K. I., 915; harbor of refuge at 
Point Judith, R. I., 918; entrance to Point Judith Pond, R. I., 921; harbor of ref- 
uge at Block Island, R. L. 922; Great Salt Pond, Block Island, R. I., 925; remov- 
ing sunken vessels or crafx obstructing or endangering navigation, 927. 

Examination and SuRVSYS.—For obtaining a channel through Conanicut Island, 
Narragansett Bay, R. I., 928; channel in Isew Bedford Harbor, Mass., leading to 
the bridge between that city and Fairhaven, 930; Mount Hope Bay and Fall River 
Harbor^ Mass., 931; Sakonnet Point, R. I., 934; easterly breakwater to shore, Point 
Judith^ at Point Jndith harbor of refuge, R. I., 937. 



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XII CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX D. 

REPORT OF MAJ. SMITH S. LEACH, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Impkovkments.— Pawcatock River, R. I. and Conn., 940: harbor of refoge at Ston- 
ington. Conn., 942; Mystic River, Conn., 944; Thames lliver, Conn., 946; Connect- 
icut River below Hartford, Conn., 948; harbor of refuge at Duck Island, Conn., 
951; New Haven Harbor, Conn., 953; breakwaters at New Haven, Conn., 9B5; 
Housatonic River, Conn., 956; Bridgeport Harbor, Conn., 958; Saugatuck River 
and Westport Harbor, Conn.. 961; Norwalk Harbor, Conn., 963; Five Mile River 
Harbor, Conn., 965 ; Stamford Harbor, Conn., 967 ; harbor at Coscob and Mianus 
River, Conn., 969; Greenwich Harbor, Conn., 970. 

Surveys. — Niantic Harbor, Conn., 972; New Haven Harbor, Conn., 974; Housatonio 
River, Conn., 979; Southport Harbor, Conn., 986. 

Hakbor LiNES.—Bridgeport, Conn., 988. 

APPENDIX E. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF COL. G. L. GILLESPIE AND 
LIEUT. COL. WILLIAM LUDLOW, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Hudson River, N. Y., 996; harbor at Saugerties, N. Y., 1010: har- 
bor at Rondout, N. Y., 1013; harbor at Peekskill, N. Y., 1016; Harlem River, N. Y., 
1019; East River and Hell Gate,N. Y., 1026; New York Harbor, N. Y., 1031; remov- 
ing sunken vessels or craft obstnictiug or endangering navigation, 1039. 

Examinations and Survey.— -Catskill Creek, N. Y., 1041; Nyack Harbor, N. Y., 
1014; Wallabout Channel, N. Y., 1047; Coney Island Channel, N. Y., 1048; Coney 
Island Creek, N. Y., 1050; New York Harbor, N. Y., from the Narrows to the sea, 
with a view of obtaining a depth of 35 feet at mean low- water mark, 1053. 

Harbor Lines. — Hudson River from West Twenty- third street to West Eighty-first 
street, New York City, 1067; Hudson River, both sides, from Battery Place to West 
Twenty-third street, New York City, and from Morris Canal Basin to abreast Bulls 
Ferry, N. J., 1070'; Ellis Island, New York Harbor, 1075 ; Harlem River and Spuyten 
Duyvil Creek, New York City, 1077; East River, near the foot of East Eighty- 
eighth street, New York City, 1081. 

APPENDIX F. 

REPORT OF MAJ. H. M. ADAMS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Port Chester Harbor, N. Y., 1084; Mamaroneck Harbor, N. Y., 
1087; East Chester Creek, N. Y., 1089; Bronx River, N.Y., 1093; Mattituck Harbor, 
N. Y., 1095; Port Jefferson Harbor, N. Y., 1097; Huntington Harbor, N. Y., 1100; 
Glencove Harbor, N. Y., 1103; Flushing Bay, N. Y., 1106; Patchogue River, N. Y., 
1108; Browns Creek, Sayville, Long Island, N. Y., 1111; Canarsie Bay, N. Y., 1114; 
Bay Ridge Channel, the triangular area between Bay Ridge and Red Hook chan- 
nels, and Red Hook and Buttermilk channels, in the harbor of New York, 1117; 
Gowanns Creek Channel, N. Y., 1122; Newtown Creek, N. Y., 1125; Passaic River, 
N. J., 1128; channel between Staten Island and New Jersey, 1130; Elizabeth River, 
N. J., 1134; Raritan River, N. J., 1136; South River, N. J., 1139: Raritau Bay, N. 
J., 1142; Mattawan Creek, N. J., 1145; harbor at Keyport, N. J., 1147; Shoal 
Harbor and Compton Creek, N. J., 1150; Shrewsbury River, N. J., 1152; removing 
sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, 1156. 

Examinations and Surveys. — For channel connecting Flushing Bay and Newtown 
Creek, N. Y., 1159; Roslyn Harbor, N. Y., 1161; harbor at Oyster Bay, N. Y., 1163; 
Lloyds Harbor, with a view to its •connection with Cold Spring Bay, N. Y., 1165; 
Northport Harbor,N. Y., 1167; Smithtown Harbor, N. Y., 1168; channels to Far 
Rockawayand In wood, N. Y., 1170; Babylon Creek, N. Y., 1172; East Chester Creek, 
N. Y., 1175; Bay Ridge Channel, the triangular area between Bjiy Ridge and Red 
Hook channels, and Red Hook and Buttermilk channels, New York Harbor, for 
channels 30 ana 35 feet deep at mean low water, 1177; Gowanns Creek, N. Y., 1180; 
channel between the Battery and Governors Island, N. Y., 1182 ; Elizabeth River, 
N. J., 1185; Rahway River, N. J., 1187. 



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CONTENTS. Xni 

PAET II. 
APPENDIX G. 

REPORT OF MAJ. C. W. RAYMOND, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Delaware River, N. J. and Pa., 1192; harbor between Philadelphia, 
Pa., and Camden, N. J., 1205; Sohavlkill River, Pa., 1211; ice harbor at Marcns- 
hook, Pa., iron pier in Delaware Bay, near Lewes, Del., 1213: Delaware Break- 
water, Del.. 1214; harbor of refuge, Delaware Bay, Del., 1216; Bancocas River, N. 
J., 1219; AUoway Creek, N. J., 1220; Dennia Creek, N. J., 1222; Cooper Creek, N. J., 
1223; Goshen Creek,N. J., 1225; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or 
endangering navigation, 1227. 

Examinations and Survey.— Bamegat Bay, N. J., between Mantoling (Mantol- 
oking) and Bay Head, 1229: Tuckerton Creek, N. J,, and flats at mouth thereof, 
1230; Wading River, N. J., 1233; Beach Thoroughfare, N. J., at and near the meet- 
ing of tides from Abseoon and Egg Harbor Inlet, 1235; Oldmans Creek, N. J., 1238; 
Dividing Creek, N. J., 1242; Sa&m River, N. J., 1245. 

APPENDIX H. 

REPORT OF WM. F. SMITH, UNITED STATES AGENT, MAJOR OF ENGI- 
NEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY, RETIRED. 

Improvements.— Wilmington Harbor, Del., 1250; Nanticoke River, Del. and Md., 
1260; Appoqninimink River, Del., 1261; Smyrna River, Del., 1263: Murderkill 
River, Del^ 1266; Mispiilion River, Del., 1268; Broadkiln River, Del., inland water- 
way from Chiucoteague Bay, Va., to Delaware Bay, at or near Lewes, Del., 1270; 
Susquehanna River, above and below Havre de Grace, Md., 1272; Chester River, 
Md., from Crnmpton to Jones Landing, 1273; Choptank River, Md., 1275; La 
Trappe River, Md,, 1276; Warwick River, Md., 1277; Broad Creek River, Del., 
1278; Wicomico River, Md., 1280; Manokin River, Md., 1282; Pocomoke River. 
Md., below Snow Hill, 1284 ; Queenstown Harbor, Md., 1286; Rockhall Harbor ana 
inner harbor at Rockhall, Md., 1287; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing 
or endangering navigation, 1288. 

Examinations and Surveys.— St. Jones River, Del., 1290; Mispillion River, Del., 
1291; Cedar Creek, Del., 1293; La Trappe River, Md., 1295; Cambridge Harbor, 
Md., 1296. 

APPENDIX L 
REPORT OF COL. PETER C. HAINS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Patapsco River and channel to Baltimore, Md., 1299; channel to 
Curtis Bay, in Patapsco River, Baltimore Harbor, Md., 1306; harbor of southwest 
Baltimore (Spring Garden), Md., removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or 
endangering navigation, 1307. 

Surveys.— Baltimore Harbor, Md., with a view to securing a channel 30 feet in 
depths 1308; Annapolis Harbor, Md., 1309. 

APPENDIX J. 
REPORT OP LIEUT. COL. CHAS. J. ALLEN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Potomac River at Washington, D. C, 1313; Occoquan Creek, Va., 
1321; Aquia Creek, Va., 1324; Nomini Creek^ Va., 1326; Lower Machodoc Creek, 
Va., 1329; Rappahannock River, Va., 1331; tJrbana Creek, Va., 1335; York River, 
Va., 1837; Mattaponi River, Va., 1342; Pamunkey River, Va., 1344; James River, 
Va., 1346; protection of Jamestown Island, Va., 1349. 

Survey.— Chapel Point Harbor, Md., 1350. 

APPENDIX K. 
REPORT OF CAPT. THOS. L. CASEY, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Harbor at Norfolk and its approaches, Va., 1353; Western Branch 
of Elisabeth River, Va.,1365; Nansemond River, Va., 1367; Appomattox River, V a., 
1369; harbor at Cape Charles City, Va., 1370; Nandua Creek, Va., 1373; inland 
water route from Norfolk, Va., to Albemarle Sound, N. C, through Currituck 
Sound, 1374; North Landing River, Va. and N. C, 1376; Roanoke River, N. C, 
1377; Pasquotank River, N. C., 1378; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing 
or endangerii\g navigation, 1379. 

EXAMiNATiONB.— Cashie River, N. C, 1381; Potecasi Creek, N. C, 1383. 



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XIT CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX L. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF LIEUT. COL. D. P. HEAP AND 
CAPT. W. E. CRAIGHILL, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Ocraooke Inlet, N. C, 1385; Fishing Creek, N. C, 1387; Pamlico 
and Tar rivers, N. C, 1388; Contentnia Creek, N. C.,' 1389; Trent River, N. C, 
1391; Neuse River, N. C, 1393; inland waterway between Newbern and Beanfort, 
N. C.y via Clubfoot, Harlowe, and Newport fivers, 1395: harbor at Beaufort. N. C, 
1396; inland waterway between Beanfort Harbor and New River, N. C, 1398; New 
River, N. C, 1399; North East River, N. C, 140(); Black River, N. C, 1402; Cape 
Fear River above Wilmington, N. C, 1404; Cape Fear River, N. C, at and below 
Wilmington, 1406; Lockwoods Folly River, N. C, 1417. 

Examination and Surveys.— Bogue Inlet, N. C, 1418; Ocracoke Inlet, N. C, 1428: 
Pamlico River, N. C, and harbor at Washington, 1425; Neuse River, N. C, at ana 
below Newbern, 1427; Cape Lookout harbor of refuge, N. C, 1430; Town Creek, 
Brunswick County, N. C, 1434. 

APPENDIX M. 

REPORT OF CAPT. FREDERIC V. ABBOT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Waocamaw River, N. C. and S. C, 1439; Lumber Rive>, N. C. and 
S. C, 1442; Little Pedee River, S. C, 1444; Great Pedee River, S. C, 1447; Mingo 
Creek, S. C., 1450; Winyah Bay, S. C, 1452; Santee River, S. C, 1458; Wateree 
River, S. C, 1465; Congaree River, S. C, 1468; harbor at Charleston, including 
Sullivan Island and Mount Pleasant shore, S. C., 1471 ; Wappoo Cut, S. C, 1479 ; 
Beaufort River, S. C, 1482. 

Harbor Lines. — Ashley and Cooper rivers, at Charleston Harbor, S. C, 1487. 

APPENDIX ]sr. 
REPORT OF CAPT. O. M. CARTER, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Savannah Harbor. Ga., 1493: Savannah River, between Savannah 
and Augusta, Ga., 1503; Savannah River, above Augusta, Ga., 1506; Darien Har- 
bor, Ga., 1508; Altamaha River, Ga., 1513; Oconee River, Ga., 1516; Ocmulgee 
River, Ga., 1519; Brunswick Harbor, Ga., 1521; Cumberland Sound, Ga., 1526; 
inside water route between Savannah, Ga., and Femandina, Fla., 1535; removing 
sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, 1538. 

Survey.— Doboy Bar, Ga., 1538. 

APPENDIX O. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. W. H. H. BENYAURD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
Improvements.— St. Johns River, Fla.. 1547; Volusia Bar, Fla., 1650; Ooklawaha 



River, Fl 



[•la., 1552; St. Augustine Harbor, Kla., 1553; Indian River, Negro Cut, and 
Jupiter Inlet, Fla., 1554; northwest entrance. Key West Harbor, Fla., 1555; 
Caloosahatchee River, Fla., 1557; Charlotte Harbor and Pease Creek, Fla., 1559; 
Saranota Bay, Fla., 1560; Manatee River, Fla., 1562; Withlacoochee Kiver, Fla., 
Suwanee River, Fla., 1564; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endan- 
gering navigation, 1566. 
Examinations and JSurve vs.— Jupiter Inlet, Fla., 1568; Orange River, Fla., to its 
confluence with the Caloosahatchee River, and thence to the Gulf of Mexico, 1569; 
inside passage from Punta Rasa to Charlotte Harbor, Fla., 1572^ Hillsboro Bay, 
Fla., from Tampa Bay through Hillsboro Bay and River to the city of Tampa, 1574 ; 
Clearwater Harbor, Fla., 1578; Crystal River, Fla., 1580; harbor at Cedar Keys, 
Fla., 1583; Palmbeach, Fla., 1585; Biscayne Bay, Fla., 1588; Tampa Bay, 1596. 

APPENDIX P. 

REPORT OF MAJ. F. A. MAHAN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Carrabelle Bar and Harbor, Fla., 1603; Apalachicola Bay, Fla., 
1605; Apalacbicola River, the Cut-off, and lower Chipola River, Fla., 1609; Flint 
River, Ga., 1612; Chattahoochee River, Ga. and Ala., 1616; Choctawhatchee River, 
Fla. and Ala., 1621; Pensarola Harbor, Fla., 1625; Escambia and Conecuh rivers, 
Fla. and Ala., 1631; Alabama River, Ala., 1633; Coosa River, Ga. and Ala., 1642; 
operating and care of canals and other works of navigation on Coosa River, Ga. 
and Ala., 1654. 

fiuRVEY.—Apalachicola Bay, Fla., 1655. 



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CONTENTS. XV 

APPENDIX Q. 
REPORT OP MAJ. WM. T. ROSSELL, CORPS OP ENGINEERS. 

iMPROYEifBKTS.— Harbor at Mobile. Ala., 16G2; Black Warrior River, Ala., from 
Tuaoaloosa to Daniels Creek, 1667; operating and care of looks and dams on 
Black Warrior River, Ala., 1675; Warrior and Tombigbee rivers, Ala. and Mies., 
1678; Noxubee River, Miss., 1691; Pascagonla River, Miss., 1692; Chickasahay 
River, Miss., 1696; Leaf River, Miss., 1697; Pearl River below Jackson, Miss., 1698; 
Pearl River between Carthage and Jackson, Miss., 1700: Pearl River between Edin- 
burg and Carthage, Miss., 1702: Bogae Chitto, La., 1703; canal from Birmingham, 
Ala., to the Warrior River, 1704. 

Examinations and Subvbts.— Canal to connect Black Warrior River and Five Mile 
Creek, Ala., via Vallev Creek, 1704; Ship Island Pass, Miss., for channel between 
Gulf of Mexico and Ship Island Harbor, and for dredging channel to connect Ship 
Island Harbor with Gnlfjport, 1708; Horn Island Pass, Miss., and the passage lead- 
ing from said pass to the anchorage inside Horn Island, 1716; Pascagonla River, 
Miss., and np Dog River 8 miles, 1718; Ship Island Harbor, Mississippi Sound, for 
deep-water channel to the mainland, 1722; channel at mouuL of Pearl River, Miss., 
1727. 

APPENDIX E. 

REPORT OF MAJ. JAMES B. QUINN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
iNSPBcnoN of the improvement of the South Paes of the Mississippi River, 1781. 

APPENDIX S. 

REPORT OF MAJ. JAMES B. QUINN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

IMPBOVBMBNTS.— Chefuncte River and Bogue Falia, La., 1751 ; Tickfaw River and 
tributaries. La., 1753; Amite River and Bayou Manchac, La., 1756: Bayou La- 
fourche, La., 1757; Bayou Plaquemine, Grand River, and Pigeon bayous^ La.. 
1759; Bayou Courtableau, La., 1762; Bayou Teche, La., 1764 j channel, bay, and 
passes of Bayou Yermilion, La., 1766; Mermen tau River and tributaries. La., 1767; 
mouth and passes of CiJcasieu River, La., 1768; harbor at Sabine Pass, Tex., 
1771; Sabine River, Tex., 1773; Neches River, Tex., 1775; closing crevasse in Pass 
a Loutre^ Miflflissipjsi River, removing sunken vessels or cran obstructing or 
endangering navigation, 1776. 

Examinations and Surveys.— Homochitto River, Miss., 1777; channel through 
Atchafalaya Bay, La., 1779; Bayou Grossetete, La., 1781; Bayou Teche from St. 
MartinviUe to Port Barre, La., 1783; Sabine Lake, Tex., for ship channel, 1789. 

APPJ:5NDIX T. 

REPORT OF MAJ. A. M. MILLER, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvkments.— Galveston Harbor, Tex., 1793 ; ship channel in Galveston Bay, Tex., 
1808; channel in West Galveston Bay, Tex., 1804; Trinity River, Tex., 1805; Buf- 
falo Bayou, Tex., 1806; Brazos River, Tex., operating and care of Morgan Canal, 
Tex., 18C«. 

Examination and Survey. — Channel between Brazos River and Galveston Bay. 
Tex., 1809; for further determining the causes of the erosion of the easterly ena 
of Galveston Island, Tex., 1813; character and value of improvements made at the 
mouth of Brazos River by the Brazos River Channel and Dock Company, 1816. 

PART III. 

APPENDIX U. 
REPORT OF MAJ. J. H. WILLARD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

IMPROVXMRNTB.— Red Rlver, La. and Ark., 1877; Red River above Fulton, Ark.. 
1895; Cypress Bayou, Tex. and La., 1896; Ouachita and Black rivers. Ark. and 
La., 1904; Bayou Bartholomew, La. and Ark., 1914; BcBuf River, La., 1917; Tensas 
River and Bayou Ma^on, La., 1920; Yazoo River, Miss., 1922; mouth of Yazoo 
River and harbor at Vicksbarg, Miss., 1927; Tallahatchie River, Miss., 1932; Big 
Sunflower River, Miss., 1935; water gauges on the Mississippi River aud its prin- 
cipal tributaries, 1936. 

Examination. — Cold water River. Miss.. 1943. 



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XVI CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX V. 

REPORT OF CAPT. WM. L. SIBERT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Removing obstractions in Arkansas River, Ark. and Kans., 1949; 
improving Arkansas River, Ark., 1952: White River, Ark., 1971; Black River, 
Ark. and Mo., 1975; Current River, Ark. and Mo., 1978; St. Francis River, Ark., 
1980; St. Francis River, Mo., 1982. 

Examination and Surveys.— Neosho River, Kans., 1984; Arkansas River at Little 
Rock, Yanbnren, and Fort Smith, Ark., 1989; Arkansas River at Pinebluff, Ark., 
1990; White River from Batesville to Bnffalo Shoals, Ark., 1992; Buffalo Fork of 
White River, Ark., 1994; St. Fxanois River, Ark., and Mo., from the Sunk Lands 
to Poplin, Mo., 1999. 

APPENDIX W. 
REPORT OF MAJ. THOS. H. HANDBURY, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 



Improvements. — Removing snags and wrecks from Mississippi River, 2001 ; Missis- 
sippi River between Ohio and Missouri rivers, 2012; harbor at St. Louis, Mo., 
204S; preventing the Mississippi River from breaking through into the Cache 
River at or near a point known as Beach Ridge, a fpw miles above Cairo, 111., 2047. 

APPENDIX X. 

Report of lieut. col. w. r. king, corps of engineers. 

Improvements. — Operating snag boats and dredge boats on Upper Mississippi Ri 
~ ■ * "" 1 Minneapolis, 1^ 



2049; Mississippi River between mouth of Missouri Kiver aud Minneapolis, 2059; 
operation ana care of Des Moines Rapids Canal aud Dry Dock, 2104; operating 
and care of Galena River improvement, 111., 2109; Mississippi River between St. 
Paul and Minneapolis — construction of Lock and Dam No. 2, 2110. 
BURVEYS. — East bank of Mississippi River between Oquawka aud Dallas City, 111., 
2111; east side of Mississippi River, between Drurys Landing and New Boston, 
III., 2114: La Crosse Harbor, Wis., 2116; west side of Mississippi River, commenc- 
ing near Lagrange and running along the bank of the river to near the raib-oad 
bridge over Mississippi River above Hannibal, Mo., 2119; Egyptian Levee along 
the south bank of Des Moines River to or near Mississippi Kiver at Alexandria, 
Mo., thence along the west bank of said river to terminus of said Egyptian Levee, 
2124; west side of Mississippi River from the bluft' above the city of Fort Madi- 
son to the mouth of Skunk River, Iowa, 2130; west bank of Mississippi River 
from mouth of Iowa River to Muscatine, Iowa, 2133. 

APPENDIX Y. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. W. A. JONES, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Construction of reservoirs at head waters of Mississippi River, 
2137; operating and care of reservoirs at head waters of Mississippi River, 2142; 
Chippewa River, including Yellow Banks, Wis., 2152; St. Croix River, Wis. and 
Minn.. 2154: Minnesota River, Minn., 2156; Red River of the North, Minn, and 
N. Dak., 2158; ranging Mississippi River at or near St. Paul, Minn., 2164. 

Examinations.— Mille Lacs Lake, Minn., for reservoir, 2170; Otter Tail Lake and 
Otter Tail River, Minn., for reservoir, 2172; Red Lake and Red Lake River, Minn., 
for reservoir, 2173. 

APPENDIX Z. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF LIEUT. COL. W. A. JONES 
AND CAPT. J. C. SANFORD, CORPS OF ENGINEEKS. 

Improvements. — Missouri River, between Stubhs Ferry, Mont., and the lower limits 
of Sioux City, Iowa, 2177; improving l^pper Missouri Kiver by snagging, 2208; 
Yellowstone River, Mont, and N. Dak., 2211. 



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CONTENTS. XVn 

APPENDIX A A. 

REPORT OF CAPT. JOHN BIDDLE, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

IMPROVSMRMTB.— Obion River, Tomi.. 2215, 2219; Forked Deer Kiyer, Tenn., 2217; 

Caniberland River, Tenu. and Ky., 2220. 
SuJtvEYS. — North Fork of Forked Veer River, Tenn., main stream, and Obion River, 

witli a view to improving navigation from Dyersborg to the MiBsissippi River, 

2234; month of Cumberland River, 2242. 

APPENDIX B B. 

REPORT OF CAPT. DAN C. KINGMAN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Tennessee River system, 2247; Tennessee River, 2251; operating 
and care of Muscle Shoals Canal, Tennessee River, 2296; French Broad and Little 
Pigeon rivers, Tenn., 2308; Clinch River, Tenn., 2311. 

Surveys.— Mouth of Tennessee River, K^., 2314 ; Emory River, Tenn*, 2316. 

APPENDIX 0. 
REPORT OF MAJ. W. H. HEUER, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Ohio River, 2325; operating snag boat on Ohio River, 2349; oper- 
ating and care of Davis Island Dam, Ohio River, near Pittsburg, Pa., 2354; Mov- 
able Dams Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, Ohio River, 2358; Muskingum River, Ohio, 2363; 
operating and care of locks and dams on Muskingum River, Ohio, 2364; observa- 
tions on Muskingum River, Ohio, 2378. 

Examination.— Ohio River from Marietta, Ohio, to its mouth, 2379. 

APPENDIX D D. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF MAJ. CHAS. F. POWELL AND 
MAJ. R. L. HOXIE, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Monongahela Eiver, W. Va., and Pa., 2383; operating and care of 
liOcks and Dams Nos. 8 and 9, Monongahela River, 2409; purchase of Locks and 
Dnius Nos. 6 and 7, Monongahela River, condemnation of all the property and 
appurtenances of the Monongahela Navigation Company, 2411; Allegheny River, 
Pa., 2424; construction of locks and dams at Herr Island, above the head of Six 
Mile Island, and at Springdale, Allegheny River, 2428. 

APPENDIX E E. 

REPORT OF CAPT. J. G. WARREN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Impkovements.— Falls of Ohio River at Louisville, Ky., and Indiana Chute, Falls 
of Ohio River, 2441; operating and care of Louisville and Portland Canal, Ky., 
2444; Wab.'ish River, Ind. and 111., 2452; operating and care of look and dam at 
Grand Rapids, Wabash River, 2455; White River, Ind., Tradewater River, Ky., 
2456; reconstruction of Lock No. 2, Green River, at Rumsey, Ky., 2457: Green 
River, Ky., above mouth of Big Barren River (Lock No. 5), 2459; operating and 
care of looks and dams on Green and Barren rivers, Ky., 2462; Rough River, Ky., 
2471. 

Examination and Surveys.— Treadwater (Tradewater) River, Ky., 2476; White 
River, Ind., 2483; Green River, Ky., at or near its mouth, for new lock and dam, 
2504. 

APPENDIX FP. 

REPORT OF MAJ. JAMES F. GREGORY, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Impkovements. — Kentucky River, Ky., 2513; operating and keeping in repair the 
six locks and dams on Kentucky River, Ky., 2519: Tug Fork of Big Sandy River, 
W. Va. and Ky., 2528; Levisa Fork, of Big Sandy River, Ky., 2529; Big Sandy 
River, W. Va. and Ky.. 2530; Guyandotte Kiver, W. Va., 2562; New River, Va. 
and W. Va., 2663; Gauley River, W. Va., 2564; Elk River, W. Va., 2565; Great 
Kanawha River, W. Va., 2566; operating and care of locks and dams on Great 
Kanawha River, W. Va., 2575; Little Kanawha River, W. Va., operating and 
lock on Little Kanawha River, 2582. 



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XVIII CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX G Or. 
REPORT OF MAJ. CLINTON B. SEARS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Harbor at Grand Marais, Minn., 2585 ; harbor at Agate Bay, Minn., 
2588; harbor at Duluth, Minn, and Superior, Wis., 2592; harbor at Ashland, Wis., 
2603; harbor at Ontonagon, Mich., 2606; improvement and operating and care of 
waterway from Keweenaw Bay to Lake Superior, Mich., 2608; harbor at Mar- 
quette, Mich., 2615; harbor of refuge at Presque He Point, Marqnette Bay, Mich., 
2638; harbor of refuge at Grand Marais, Mich., 2640. 

Examination. — Harbor at Portwing, Wis., 2643. 

Hakbor Links. — Superior and AUoucz bays at Duluth and Superior Harbor, Minn, 
and Wis., 2647. 

PAET IV. 

APPENDIX H H. 

REPORT OF CAPT. GEO. A. ZINN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements. — Menominee Harbor, Mich, and Wis., 2650; Menominee River, 
Mich, and Wis., 2652: Oconto Harbor, Wis., 2653; Pensaukee Harbor, Wis., 2656; 
Green Bay Harbor, W is., 2657 ; Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal, Wis., 
2660; operating and care of Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal| 
Wis., 2666; Sturgeon Bay Canal harbor of refuge. Wis., 2671; Ahnapee Harbor, 
Wis., 2672; Kewaunee Harbor, Wis., 2675; Two Rivers Harbor, Wis., 2678; Mani- 
towoc Harbor, Wis., 2681 ; Slieboygan Harbor, Wis., 2685; Port Washington Har- 
bor, Wis., 2687; harbor of refuge at Milwaukee, Wis, 2689; Milwaukee Harbor, 
Wis., 2692; South Milwaukee Harbor, Wis., 2696; Racine Harbor, Wis., 2698; 
Kenosha Harbor, Wis., 2702; Waukegan Harbor, 111., 2706; Fox River, Wis., 2709; 
operating and care of locks and dnnis on Fox River, Wis., 2719; removing sunken 
vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation, 2751. 

Surveys. — Harbor at Menominee, Mich, and Wis., 2751; harbor at Ahnapee, Wis., 
2755; Sheboygan Harbor, Wis., 2761; Milwaukee Harbor, Wis., 2765; harbor at 
Racine, Wis., 2768; harbor at Kenosha, Wis., 2772. 

Harbor Lines. — Kewaunee, Wis., 2785; Waukegan, III., 2786. 

APPENDIX 11. 
REPORT OF MAJ. W. L. MARSHALL, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Chicago Harbor, 111., 2790; Chicago River, 111., 2793; Calnmet 
Harbor, HI., 2801; Calumet River, 111. and Ind., 2810; Illinois River, 111., 2815; 
operating and care of Lagrange and Kampsville locks, Illinois River, and approaches 
thereto, 2822; Illinois and Mississippi Canal, 111., 2825; operating and care of Illi- 
nois and Mississippi Canal — canal around lower rapids of Rock River at Milan, 
III., 2880; removing snnken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering naviga- 
tion, 2881. 

Examination and Survey.— Upper Illinois River and lower Des Plaiues River, III., 
with a view to extension of navigation from Illinois River to Lake Michigan at or 
near Chicago, 2882; Wolf Lake and River, 111. and Ind., with reference to their 
navigation in connection with the waters of Lake Michigan, 2887. 

APPENDIX J J. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF LIEUT. COL. G. J. LYDECKER 
AND CAPT. C. McD. TOWNSEND, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Michigan City Harbor, Ind., 2895; St. Joseph Harbor, Mich., 2905; 
St. Joseph River, Mich., 2909; South Haven Harbor, Mich., 2910; Saugatuck Har- 
bor, Mich., 2913; Kalamazoo River, Mich., 2915; Holland (Black Lake) Harbor, 
Mich., 2916; Grand Haven Harbor, Mich., 2918; Grand River, Mich., 2921; Muske- 
gon Harbor, Mich., 2923; Wliite Lake Harbor, Mich., 2926; Pentwater Harbor, Mich., 
2928; Ludington Harbor, Mich., 2930; Manistee Harbor, Mich., 2933; harbor of ref- 
uge at Portage Lake, Manistee County, Mich., 2936; Frankfort Harbor, Mich., 2939; 
Charlevoix Harbor, Mich., 2942; Petoskey Harbor, Mich., 2944; removing sunken 
vessels or craft obstmoting or endangering navigation, 2947. 

Surveys.— South Haven Harbor, Mich., 2948: harbor of Holland (Black Lake)^ 
Mich., 2950; Ludington Harbor, Mich., 2951 ; Charlevoix Harbor, Mich., 2953. 



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CONTENTS. XIX 

APPENDIX KK. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. G. J. LYDECKER, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvkmknts. — Ship channel connecting waters of the Great Lakes between 
Chicago, Dnliith, and Buft'alo, 2955; St. Marys River at the falls, Mich., 2963; 
operating and care of St. Marys Falls Canal, Mich., 2997; Hay Lake Channel, St. 
Marys River, Mich., 3C06; Cheboygan Harbor, Mich., 3009; Alpena Harbor (Thun- 
der Bay River), Mich., 3011; Saginsiw River, Mich., 3012; Sebewaiiig River, Mich., 
3014; harbor of refuge at Sand Heach, Lake Huron, Mich., 3015; improvement of 
St. Clair Flats Canal, Mich., 3018; operating and care of St. Clair Flats Canal, 
Mich., 3019; month of Black River, Mich., 3021 ; Black River at Port Huron, Mich., 
3022; Pine River, Mich., 3024; Belle River, Mich., 3025; Clinton River, Mich., 
3027; Detroit River, Mich., 3029; Rouge River, Mich., 3031; turning basin in 
Ronge River, Mich., 3032; removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or 
endajiji^ering navigation, 3033. 

ExAMiNATiON.—Hurou River, Mich., 3034. 

APPP]NDIX LL. 

REPORT OF COL. JARED A. SMITH, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvemknts. — Monroe Harbor, Mich., 3037; Toledo Harbor, Ohio, 3040; Port 
Clinton Harbor, Ohio, 3049; Sandusky Harbor, Ohio, 3052; Huron Harbor, Ohio, 
3061; Vermilion Harbor, (Miio, 3068; Black River (Lorain) Harbor, Ohio, 3072; 
Cleveland Harbor, Ohio, 3075; Fairport Harbor, Ohio, 3082; Ashtabula Harbor, 
Ohio, 3086; Conneaut Harbor, Ohio, 30iK). 

Examination.— Raisin River, Monroe County, Mich., 3094. 

APPENDIX MM. 

REPORT OF MAJ. THOMAS W. SYMONS, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

IMPROVEMENTS.—Erie Harbor, Pa., 3097; harbor at Dunkirk, N. Y., 3103; Buffalo 
Harbor, N. Y., 3107; Tonawanda Harbor and Niagara River, N. Y.,3116; Niagara 
River from Tonawanda to Port Day, N. Y., 3123; Wilson Harbor, N. Y., 3126. 

Examination and StTRVKVS.— For ship canal from the Great Lakes to the Hudson 
River, N. Y., 3128; Erie Harbor, Pa., 3237; Buffalo entrance to Erie Basin and Black 
Rock Harbor, N. Y., 3245; report on widening locks of Erie Canal, N. Y., 3250. 

Hakbor Links.— Bay of Presque Isle, Erie, Pa., 3265. 

APPENDIX N N. 

REPORT OF MAJ. W. S. STANTON, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

iMrROVKMENTS. — Harbor at Charlotte, N. Y., 3269; harbor at Pultneyvillo, N. Y., 
3272; harbor at Great Sodus Bay, N. Y., 3274; harbor at Little Sodus Bay, N. Y,, 
3276 ; harbor at Oswego, N. Y., 3278 ; harbor at Sackctts Harbor, N. Y., 3285 ; harbor 
at Cape Vincent, N. Y., 3286; shoals between Sister Islands and Crossover Light, 
and between Ogdensburg and the foot of Lake Ontario, St. Lawrence River, N. Y., 
3290; harbor at Ogdensburg, N.Y., 3292; harbor at Burlington, Vt., 3296; channel 
between North and South' Hero islands. Lake Chaniplain, Vt., Otter Creek, Vt., 
3299; Narrows of Lake Chaniplain, N. Y. and Vt.,3302; removing sunken vessels 
or craft obetrncting or endangering navigation, 3304. 

Examinations and Surveys.— Mohawk River, N. Y., between Rome and the town 
of Schuyler, 3304; Black River, N. Y., to harbor at Derter, 3306; harbor at Alex- 
dria Bay, N. Y., 3312; Oak Orchard Harbor, N. Y., 3314; Missisquoi River, Vt., from 
Swanton to Lake Cham plain, 3319; report upon widening locks of the Oswego 
Canal, N. Y., 3324. 

APPENDIX O O. 

REPORT OF COL. CHAS. R. SUTER, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Impbovement.— Oakland Harbor, Cal., 3327. 



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XX CONTENTS. 

APPENDIX P P. 
REPORT OF MAJ. CHAS. E. L. B. DAVIS, CORPS OP ENGINEERS. 

Improvemknts. — San Luis Obispo Harbor, Cal., 3333; Wilmington Harbor, Cal., 

3335; San Diego Harbor, Cal., 3337. 
Examinations and Survrys.— Colorado River, Ariz., 3339; Suisun Creek, Cal., 

3341; Alviso Creek, Cal., 3343; Redwood Creek, Cal., 3349; Mare Island Strait, 

Cal., 3352. 

APPENDIX Q Q. 

REPORT OF CAPT. CASSIUS E. GILLETTE, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvemknts. — San Joaqnin River, Cal., 3357; Mokelnmne River, Cal., 8359; 

Sacramento and Feather rivers, Cal., 3360; Napa River, Cal., 3364; Petaliinja 

Creek, Cal., 3365; Humboldt Harbor and Bay, Cal., 3366. 
Examinations.— Napa River, Cal., 3374: Petaluma Creek, Cal., 3375; Humboldt 

Harbor, Cal., for dredging at Eureka, 3377. 

APPENDIX EE. 
Report of capt. w. l. fisk, corps of engineers. 

Improvements. — PortOrford Harbor, Oreg., 3379; mouth of Coqnille River, Oreg., 
3380; Coqnille River, Oreg., between Coquille City and Myrtle Point, 3383; 
entrance to Coos Bay and Harbor, Oreg., 3384; dredging haVbor at Coos Bay, 
Oreg., 3387; Coos River, Oreg.. 3388; Umpqua River, Oreg., 3389; mouth of Sins- 
law River, Oreg., 3391; Alsea River, Oreg., 3393; Yaqnina Bay, Oreg., 3394; Nes- 
tugga River, Oreg., 3396; Tillamook Bay and Bar, Oreg., 3397; mouth of Columbia 
River, Ore.?, and Wash., 3404; Columbia River below Tongue Point, Oreg., 3406; 
Columbia and Lower Willamette rivers below Portland, Oreg., 3407; Columbia 
River between Vancouver, Wash., and mouth of Willamette River, 3414; construc- 
tion of canal at the Cascades, Columbia River, Oreg., 3416; operating and care of 
(juial and locks at the Cascades, Columbia River, Oreg., 3423; Columbia River at 
Three Mile Rapids, and boat railway from the foot of The Dalles Rapids to tlie 
head of Celilo Falls, 3425; Willamette River above Portland, and Yamhill River, 
Oreg., 3429; gauging waters of Columbia River, Oreg. and Wash., 3432. 

APPENDIX S S. 
REPORT OF CAPT. HARRY TAYLOR, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvements.— Willapa River and Harbor. Wash., 3434 ; Grays Harbor and bar 
entrance, Wash., 3436; Chehalis River, Wasli., 3437 ; Pugot Sound and its tributary 
waters, 3438; harbor at Olympia, Wash., 3443; waterway connectiujj Puget Sound 
with lakes Union and Wasliingtou, 3445; Everett Harbor, Wash., 3447; Swinomish 
Slough, Wash., 3450; Columbia River from Kock Island Rapids to Foster Creek 
Rapids, Wash., 3455; Upper Columbia and Snake rivers, Oreg. and Wash., 3456; 
Cowlitz River, Wash., 3463; Clearwater River, Idaho, 3465; Kootenai River, Idaho, 
between Bonners Ferry and the international bonndarv line, 3467; P'lathead River, 
Mont., 3468. 

Examinations and Surveys. — North Fork of Lewis River, Wash., to head of navi- 
gation, or Etna, 3469; North River, Wash., 3472; Lewis River, Wash., from Colum- 
bia River to Lacenter, 3473; Bellingham Bay, from deep water to the mouth of 
Whatcom Creek, at New Whatcom, Wash., 3478; Kootenai River, Mont., for removal 
of obstructions above .Jennings, 3482. 

Harbor Lines.— -Olympia Harbor, Wash., 3484. 

APPENDIX T T. 

REPORT OF CAPT. D. D. GAILLARD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 
Phetjminart examination of Portland Channel (oanal), Alaska, 3487. 

APPENDIX U U. 

REPORT UPON THE SUPERVISION OF THE HARBOR OF NEW YORK, N. Y.— 
LIEUT. COMMANDER DANIEL DELEHANTY AND LIEUT. JOHN F. PARKER, 
U.S.N., SUPERVISORS 3499 



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CONTENTS. XXI 

PART V. 

APPENDIX V V. 

REPORT OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMMISSION. 

G. L. GiLLRSPiKy colonel, Coips of Engineers, U. S. A., president; Amos Stickney, 
lienteuant-oolonel, Corps or Engineers, U. S. A. ; Tbos. H. Handbnry, major, Corps 
of Engineers, U. S. A. ; Mr. Henry L. Marindin, assistant, U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Survey; Mr. B. M. Harrod, Mr. Robert S. Taylor, and Mr. Henry Flad, 
Commigaian era. 

Annual Report for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 1897, 8505. 

Appendix 1. — Paper by Lientenant-Colonel Stiokney on plan of bank protection 
for the Mississippi River, 3536. 

Appendix 2. — Letter of Mr. H. N. Pharr, chief engineer St. Francis Levee Board, 
giving bis views as to the lessons of the flood of 1897, 3543. 

Appendix 3. — Letter of Mr. T. G. Dabney, chief engineer Tazoo-Mississippi Delta 
Levee district, giving his views as to the lessons of the flood of 1897, 3548. 

Appendix 4. — Letter of Mr. William Starling, chief engineer Mississippi Levee 
district, giving his views as to the lessons of the flood of 1897, 3.551. 

Appendix 5. — Letter of Mr. Henry B. Richardson, chief State engineer, Louisiana, 
giving his views as to the lessoas of the flood of 1897, 3558. 

Appendix 6. — ^Letter of Mr. C. H. Pnrvis, engineer Cotton Belt Levee district, giv- 
ing his views as to the lessons of the flood of 1897, 3562. 

Appendix 7.— Report of Capt. H. E. Waterman, Corps of Engineers, secretary 
Mississippi River Commission, npon operations dnring the year ending May 25, 
1897,3563; (A) laws affecting the Mississippi River Commission, 3572; (B) specifi- 
cations for hydraalic dredges Epailan and Zeta^ 3575: (C) report of Captain 
Watennan upon dredging operations on the Mississippi River between Cairo and 
Memphis during low-water season of 1896, 3588; (D) report of Assistant Engineer 
J. A. Ockerson on field work, office redaction and mapping, and on the oonbtrnction, 
operation, care, and repair of dredges, 3620; (£) report of Assistant Engineer 
C. W. Stnrtevant on location of dredge work, 3695. 

Appendix 8. — Report of Capt. Graham D. Fitch, Corps of Engineers, upon opera- 
tions in First and Second districts, 3696; report of Assistant Engineer A. J. Nolty 
on operations of construction parties at Plum Point Reach and New Madrid, Mo., 
3711; report of Assistant Engineer William Gerig on work of improving harbor 
at Memphis, Tenn., and construction work at Helena, Ark., 3717, 3718; report of 
Assistant Engineer Charles Levasseur on operations at Nonconnah Rock, 3720. 

Appendix 9.— Keport of Lieut, (now captain) H. C. Newcomer, Corps of Engineers, 
upon operations in Third district, 3725; report of Assistant Engineer A. Hider 
on revetment work and plant, 3733; report of Assistant Engineer H. St. L. 
Copp6e on levees in Arkansas above Greenville, Miss., 3742; report of Assistant 
Engineer E. C. Tollinger on levees in Arkansas and Mississippi below Greenville. 
Miss., 3747; report of Assistant Engineer J. D. Van Meter on levees in Mississippi 
above Greenville, Miss., 3750; report of Inspector h, Y. Kerr on levees in Missis- 
sippi below Greenville, 3752 ; tables of operations for high -water protection of 
levees, revetment work, 3753; labor statement of levee work, 3758; United States 
expenditures for leveea^ 3759. 

Appendix 10.— Report ot Capt. Geo. McC. Derby, Corps of Engineers, upon opera- 
tions in Fourth district, 3769; (A) value of plant, (B) commercial statistics. New 
Orleans, La., 3794; (C) list of civilian engineers, (D) report of Assistant Engineer 
H. S. Donglas on harbors at Natchez, Miss., and Vidalia, La., 3795; (E) report of 
Assistant Engineer H. S. Donglas on New Orleans Harbor, La., 3797; (F) report 
of Assistant Engineer H. S. Douglas on repairs to plant, 3806; (G) report of 
Assistant Engineer A. F. WooUey, Jr., on Atchafalaya and Red rivers, 3809; 
(H) report of Assistant Engineer A. P. Woolley, jr., on dredging Fords Crossing, 
3811; (I) report of Assistant Engineer W.J. Hardee on levees above New Orleans, 
La., 3812; (J) report of Surveyor H. B. Watson on levees below New Orleans, La., 
3823; (K) abstracts of proposah), 3829. 

PAET VI. 

APPENDIX W W. 

REPORT OF THE MISSOURI RIVER COMMISSION. 

Amos Stickney, lieutenant-colonel. Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., president: W. H. 
Heuer, major, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. ; Thoa. H. Handbury, major. Corps of 
Engineers, U. S. A. ; Mr. G. C. Broadhead and Mr. R. S. Berlin. CommissionerB, 



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XXII CONTENTS. 

Annual Rkpokt for Fiscal Year knding June 30, 1897, 3837. 

Appendix A. — AiiDual report of Assistaut Engineer F. B. Maltby on surveys, 3857. 

Appendix B. — Annual report of Assistaut Engineer A. H. Blaisdell on water gauges 
3859. 

Appendix C. — Annual report of Assistant Engineer A. H. Blaisdell on commercial 
statistics, 3860. 

Appendix D. — Keport of Capt. Hiram M. Chittenden, Corps of Engineers, secretary 
Missouri River Commission, on steamboat wrecks, 3870. 

Appendix E. — 'Report of Assistant Engineer A. H. Blaisdell on bridges, 3893. 

Appendixes F, G, and H. — Annual reports of Division Engineer Samuel H. Yonge 
on operations at ibe following localities: (F) vicinity of Omaha, Nebr., and Coun- 
cil Blufls, Iowa, 389-1; (G) vicinity of Nebraska City, Nebr., 3902; (H) Osage 
division of first reach, 3907. 

Appendixes I and J. — Annual reports of Division Engineer 8. Waters Fox on oper- 
ations at the following localities: (I) Osage division of first reach, 3908; (J) Gas- 
conade division, 3919. 

Appendix K. — Annual report of Captain Chittenden on construction of Lock No. 1^ 
Osage River, Mo., 3933. 

Appendix L. — Report of Assistant Engineer James A. Seddon on filling and empty- 
ing locks, 3936. 

Appendix M. — Report of Assistant Engineer F. B. Maltby on cement tests, 3941. 

Appendix N. — Annual report of Assistant Engineer L. P. Butler on improvement of 
Gasconade River, 3943. 

Project for construction of Lock and Dam No. 1 at Brennekes Shoal, Osage Rlver^ 
Mo., 3946. 

APPENDIX X X. 
REPORT OF THE CALIFORNIA DEBRIS COMMISSION. 

Chas. R. Sutkr, colonel, Corps of P^ngineers, U. S. A., president; CiiAS. E. L. B. 
Davis, major, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., and Cassius E. Gillette, captain,. 
Corps of Engineers, IT. S. A., Commission era. 

Annual Repokt for Fiscal Ykar ending June 30, 1897, 3961. 

Appendix A. — Svnopsis of applications for authority to mine, with action taken 
thereon, 3964. ' 

Appendix B. — Act of the legislature of California, approved March 17, 1897, appro- 
priating funds to be used in conjunction with appropriations made by the United 
States, 3979. 

APPENDIX Y Y. 

OCCUPANCY OF AND INJURY TO PUBLIC WORKS BY CORPORATIONS 

AND INDIVIDUALS. 

(1) Report of Lieut. Col. Chas. J. Allen, Corps of Engineers, 3981; (2) report of 
Maj. J. H. Willard, Corps of Engineers, (3) report of Capt. Dan C. Kingman, 
Corps of Engineers, 3982; (4) report of Maj. James F. Gregory, Corps of Engi- 
neers, 3983: (5) report of Capt. Geo. A. Zinu, Corps of Engineers, 3984; (6; report 
of Lieut. Col. G. J. Ly decker, Coi-ps of Engineers, (7) report of Maj. W. S. Stanton^ 
Corps of Engineers,* 3985. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

APPENDIX ZZ. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. CHAS. J. ALLEN, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Repair of the Aqueduct Bridge across Potomac River at Washington, D. C, 3987. 

APPENDIX AAA. 

REPORT UPON WORKS IN THE CHARGE OF LIEUT. COL. CHAS. J. ALLEN 
AND CAPT. D. D. GAILLARD, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Washington Aqueduct, 3991 ; increasing the water supply of Washington, D. C, 4018. 



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CONTENTS. XXIII 

• APPENDIX BBB. 

REPORT UPON WORK IN THE CHARGE OF COL. (NOW BRIG. GEN.) JOHN 
M. WILSON, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, COL. THEO. A. ^INGHAM, U. S. A., 
AND LIEUT. JOHN. S. SEWELL, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

Improvement and care of public baildings and grounds in the District of Columbia, 
4025; Washington Monument, 4032. 

APPENDIX 0. 

SURVEY OF NORTHERN AND NORTHWESTERN LAKES. 

Appendix 1. — Report of Lieut. Col. G. J. Lydecker, Corps of Engineers, upon sur- 
veys and issuing of charts, 4069; (A) report of Assistant Engineer E. E. Haskell 
on resurvey of St. Marys River, 4073; (B) report of Ansistant Engineer E. E. 
Haskell upon discharge measurements at Sanlt Ste. Marie. 4092; (C) report of 
Assistant Engineer Thomas Russell upon field work across ttie upper peninsnla of 
Michigan, 4104; (D) report of Assistant Engineer H. von Schon on resurvey of St. 
Marys River, 4115; (E) report of Assistant Engineer H. von Schon on completed 
extension of precise levels, St. Marys River, 4118. 

Appendix 2. — Report of Maj. W. S. Stanton, Corps of Engineers, on preservation of 
bench marks along the Erie Canal, 4122. 

Appendix 3. — Report of Col. Jared A. Smith, Corps of Engineers, on examination 
of shoal in Lake Erie, 4123; report of Assistant Engineer Wm. T. Blunt, 4125. 

Appkndix 4. — Water-level observations, 4127. 

APPENDIX D D D. 

EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS IN MILITARY DEPARTMENTS. 

Report of Maj. W. L. Marshall, Corps of Engineers, on operations in the Depart- 
ment of the Missouri, 4131; report of Maj. Thomas H. Barry, assistant adjutant- 
Seneral, on operations in the Department of the Columbia, 4132 ; report of Lieut. J. 
>. Miley, Fifth Artillery, on operations in the Department of California, 4133; 
report of Lieut. John L. Sehon, Twentieth Infantry, A. D. C, on operations in 
the Department of the Colorado, 4134. 

APPENDIX E E B. 

LAWS FOR PROTECTION OF NAVIGABLE WATERS 4137 

LAWS AFFECTING THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS, FIFTY-FOURTH CON- 
GRESS, SECOND SESSION. AND FIFTY-FIFTH CONGRESS, FIRST SES- 
SION, 189fr-97 4151,4197 



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APPENDIXES 



TO THE 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, 



UNITED STATES AEMY. 



(OONTrNUED.) 



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APPENDIX H H. 



IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS AND HARBORS ON WESTERN SHORE OF 

LAKE MICHIGAN. 



BBPOBT OF CAPT. GEO. A. Z1NN, CORPS OF ENGINEEBS, OFFICER IK 
CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL TEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1S97, WITH OTHER 
DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 



nCPROVBMKinV. 



"L Menominee Harbor, Michigan and 
Wisoonsin. 

2. Menominee River, Michigan and 

Wisconsin. 

3. Oconto Harbor, Wisconsin. 

4. Pensankee Harbor, Wisconsin. 
6. Qreen Bay Harbor, Wisconsin. 

6. Stnrfreon Bay and Lake Michigan 

Ship Canal, Wisconsin. 

7. Operating and eare of jStnrgeou Bar 

and Lake Michigan Ship Canal, 
Wisconsin. 

5. Harbor of refhge at entrance of Stnr- 

geon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship 
Canal, Wisconsin. 
9. Ahnapee Harbor, Wisconsin. 
10. Kewannee Harbor, Wisconsin. 



23. 



Two Rivers Harbor, Wisoonsin. 

Manitowoc Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Sheboygan Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Port Washington Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Harbor of refnfe at Milwaukee, Wis. 

Milwaukee HaAor, Wiseonsin. 

South Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Racine Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Kenosha Harbor, Wisconsin. 

Waukegan Harbor, Hlinois. 

Fox River, Wisoonsin. 

Operating and care of locks and 
dams on Fox River, Wisconsin. 

Removing sunken vessels or craft 
obstructing or endangering navi- 
gation. 



BTTBYKTB. 



24. Menominee Harbor, Michigan and 

Wisconsin. 

25. Ahnapee Harbor, Wisconsin. 

26. Sheboygan Harbor, Wisconsin. 



27. Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsiiu 

28. Racine Harbor, Wisconsin. 

29. Kenosha Harbor, Wisconsin. 



HABBOB LIHB8. 

80l Ktfwaanae Harbor, Wisconsin. | 31. Wankegan Harbor, lUinoit. 



nNTTBB States Enoinbeb Offiob, 

Milwaukee, Wis.^ July 15, 1897. 
Oeneral: I have the honor to transmit herewith annual rex>oi't for 
the works of river and harbor improvement in my charge for the fiscal 
year ending Jane 30, 1897. 

Yery respectfhllyy your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. ZiNNy 
Oaptainj Oarpe of Bngineere. 
Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, 

Ohief of EngweerBj U. B.A, 



2649 



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2660 REPORT OF Tfifi CfilE*' Ofr ENGINEERS, U. S. AkUf. 

• •• • J*^ n £1 z« 

■ • *• • . • • 

IMPROVEMENT- QV-JMTsNOMINEE HARBOR, MICHIGAN AND WISCONSIN. 

The oi:igiii9l';cbnditiou at the month of the MeDominee Biver, object 
of .-ttf^ improvement, projects, and present works were described in 
detaH In 'Annual Report Chief of Engineers for 1<S96, page 2459. 
: dondition- of the improvement — June 30, 1896, the channel had the 
required dimensions of 200 feet wide and 17 feet deep. Soundings 
taken February 19, 1897, show that the upper end of it has been 
reduced in depth 0.5 to 1 foot in places, but the shoals are not of suffi- 
cient extent to seriously impede navigation. 

The piers are built the full length contemplated. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — ^By hire of labor and purchase of 
materials in accordance with law, 300 linear feet of the superstructure 
of the north pier and 100 feet of the south pier were rebuilt, openings 
between the pile and crib piers were closed with plank shutters to 
prevent the passage of sand into the channel, and minor repairs were 
made to the outer end of the south pier. 

The work was begun July 15 and completed September 24, 1896. 

The materials used and cost of same in place were as follows: 

Pine timber and plank $1,488.16 

Iron bolts and spikes 24.79 

Stone 256.36 

Rent of scow 71.17 

Tools, freiffbt, cartage, etc 16.07 

Labor, inclnding pay of overseer 1,166.61 

Total 3,011.06 

Remarks. — In accordance with reqiiiremonts of river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1806, a survey was made and report, dated November 30, 189G, 
submitted for ^^ harbor at Menominee, Michigan and Wisconsin, with a 
view of obtaining a 20-foot depth of water.'' 

The report, with map, is published in House Doc. No. 86, Fifty-fourth 
Congress, second session. 

The estimated cost of the desired improvement is $18,920. 

The upper course of timbers of 1,060 linear feet of the piers require 
renewal and new decking, and the north pierhead and 130 linear feet of 
the waling to the protection piling should be renewed. In other respects 
the piers are in good order. 

For the maintenance of the channel and piers for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1899, the following estimate is submitted: 

For dredging $3,000 

For repairs 2,000 

For contingencies, 10 per cent 600 

Total 5,500 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance nnexpended $7,182.80 

June 30, 1897, amount expended daring fiscal year 3,285.28 

Jnly 1, 1897, balance nnexpended 3,897.62 

(Amonnt that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 
1899, for maintenance 6,500.00 
Submitted in compliance with reouirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acta of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 

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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINH. 



2651 



Aotof- 

MMrch3,1871 $25,000 

Jnne 10,1872 25,000 

March 3,1873 25,000 

Juiie23,1874 25,000 

March 3,1875 25.000 

Angust 14, 1876 8,000 

Jnne 18, 1878 10,000 

March 3, 1879 10,000 

June 14, 1880 10,000 

March 3, 1881 12,000 



APPSOPBIATTONS. 

Act of- 



Angn8t3,1882 $15,000 

July5,1884..-- 10,000 

ADgu«t5,1886 8,000 

August 11, 1888 9,000 

August 17, 1894 10,000 

June 3. 1896 7,160 

MiBcellaneons receipts cred- 
ited to appropriations 62 

Total 229,212 



COMMBRCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR TSAR BNDIKG DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

[Forniahed by Hr. Joseph Werner, deputy oolleotor of castoms.] 

Name of harbor, Menominee, Mich. ; collection district, Superior, Mich. ; nearest 
light-honse, Menominee, Mich. 

4rrivaU amd dtg^rturtB of ve$§eU. 





Arrivals. 




DsMriptioB. 


Number. 


TODDSfB. 


Number. 


Tonuses 


m^rnn.... ,---,„,,- 


400 
807 


186,826 
40,70* 


400 
818 


188,056 


Sail 


40,821 






Total 


707 


186^000 


718 


170,276 


/ 





Principal arHeles cf export and import, 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



Artidea. 



Botter. 
nah... 



Marebandlae (general). 
Shiasiaa 

woarr. 



Total. 



^aS!-.::::::: 

Butter 

Goal and eoka. 



Tone. 



2,4081 

250,827} 

88,806 

607| 

512 



802.8801 



4,616 



ArUclea. 



niPOBTB—contin lied. 



lour 

Hay 

Lime and oement 

Lumber 

Merehandise (geueral). 

MiUstoA..... 

Oata 

Salt 

Shinglea 

Stone 

Wood 



TMd. 



Tona. 



.^ 



107 
S| 

357 

0,710 

12 

105 

n 

140 



15,878| 



Kora.~The railroad oompaniea deoline to glTO statement of their bosineoa, hence the statiBtica by 
SO waya of traaaportatlon oonld not be given. 

OOMMERCnULL STATISTICfi FOR THE OALBKDAR TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 81, 1896. 

[Fumlahed by Mr. B. H. Anderly, deputy oolleotor of onstoma.] 

Name of harbor, Marinette, Wis. ; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis. ; nearest 
light-house, on north pierheaa, Menominee, Mich. 

Arri/vaU and departmret of vtiaeU. 



Deacriptlon. 


Arrivala. 


Departurea. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnaga. 


Steam 


826 
248 


07,410 
72,188 


828 

206 


07,647 
72.501 


Total 


660 


160,608 


684 


170,288 





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2652 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENQINEEB8, U. 8. ABICT. 



Frineipal ariieUi Of export and impart 
[Bj waj of the harbor only.] 



Articles. 



Tone. 



ArUolee. 



Tons. 



■XPOBT8. 

Apples 

Flour 

L«th 

Ume and cement 

Lmnber 

Merchandise (general) . . 

Paper 

Pease 

Salt 

Shingles 

Soap 

Wood 

Total 



82.6 
126 
600 
108.6 
252,752 

97 
120 

20 

12.6 
196 

4.6 
IM 



264,107 



IMPORTS. 

Apples 

Cattle 

Coal and coke 

Sr«» 

Floor 

Hay 

Lomber 

Merchandise (generul). 

Oats 

Salt 

Wheat 

Total 



210 
1 
4,922 
4.6 
40 
143 
202.6 
196 
.5 
1,612 
.6 



7,686.6 



HHa. 

IMPROVEMENT OF MENOMINEE RIVER, MICHIGAN AND WISCONSIN, 

The original condition of the Menominee Biver, the object of the 
improvement and the projects for carrying it oat, were fully described 
in the Annual Report Ohief of Engineers for 1896, p. 2463. 

Condition of the improvement — Theprojectsof 1890 and 1892 havebeen 
completed. Since completion a shoaling of from 1 to 2 feet has occurred 
in places. 

Dredging under the contract now in force will form the turning basin 
and extend the channel to Wells Street in accordance with the project 
of 1896, and also admit of redredging the channel where most needed. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — ^tinder the existing contract with 
William A. Starke for the removal of 111,000 cubic yards of material, 
more or less, dredging was begun April 27; 1897, and to June 30, 1897, 
60,837 cubic yards were excavated, resulting in the completion of the 
turning basin and dredging about 30 per cent of the amount required to 
extend the channel to the west side of Wells street. 

Bemarks. — ^The depth of water in the channel is reduced by materials 
brought down the river during heavy spring freshets rendering periodi- 
cal dredging necessary to maintain the required depth. 

For the maintenance of the channel an appropriation of $6,000 is 
recommended for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. 

Oriiriiial MtimAte (see House Ex. Doo. No. 84, Fifty-first Congress, first 

session) $109,609.80 

Revised estimate (see Report of Chief of Engineers, 1891, pp. 2529-2530) . 74, 600. 00 
Estimate for turning basin and extension of channel to Wells street, 
(see report of Ciiief of Engineers, 1896, page 2464) 13, 800. 00 

Money statement 

Jnly L1896. balance unexpended $15,014.47 

Jane 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 3, 890. 61 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 11,123.86 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $2, 620. 20 

July 1, 1897, amount coTered by uncompleted contracts 6, 190. 47 

8,810.67 

July 1, 1897, balance available 2, 313. 19 

(Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 
1899. for maintenance 5,000.00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 ana of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



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APPSNOIX H H — ^REPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZIMK. 



2653 



AFFBOPBIATIONS. 

Aotof- 

September 19,1890 $54,000.00 

July 13, 1892 20,600.00 

AuffiiBt 17, 1891 6^000.00 

Jnne.3 1896 16,000.00 

Misoellaneoas receipts credited to appropriations 80. 03 

Total 95,680.03 



Ahttraot of propo$aU far dndg{ng 70,000 oubio yards of maUrial at Monom{nee River, 
Michigan ana Wiaoomin, received in reeponee to advertisement dated September 1, 1896, 
and opened October 6, 1896, by Capt, George A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 



No. 



Kame and retidenM of bidder. 



Sand, 

clay.mudf 

etc. 



Prioeper onblo yaid. 



Bowlders 

and hard 

pan. 



Total for 
70,000 aon- 
bio yards. 



Arthur H. Yog^ Millrank6^ Wia . . 
Williain A. Starke, Hilwaokee, Wia 
Green's Dredging Co., Chioaffo, 111 . . 
Baolne Dredge Co., Raoine, Wis 



Genu. 
12.9 
9 
15 
9 



OenU. 
12.9 
25 
25 
27 



$0,030 
7.096 

11.560 
8,208 



•The oost being so low, a eoatraot was made for 111,000 oablo yards, man or lesa. 

Amonnt of approprifttion available for this work $13,000. 

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into October 
14, 1896, with William A. Starke, the lowest responsible bidder for this work. 



Coniraeiin fore$* 





Work. 


Approved. 


Work com- 
menoed. 


Work to be 
oompleted. 


Wnifam Afttarfce T... 


Dredcing 111,000 
oablo yards. 


Oot. 22,1896 


Apr. 27,1897 


Deo. 1,1897 





COMMBRCIAL STATISTICS FOB THB CALENDAR TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

The commercial statistics for the Menominee Biver are the same as for Menominee 
H«rbor, Michigan, and Marinette, Wis. 



HH3, 

IMPROVEMENT OF OCONTO HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the Oconto River, the object of its improve- 
ment, and the project for carrying it ont, and present works, were folly 
described in the Annual Beport Chief of Engineers for 1896, p. 2465. 

The original project was modified in 1897 by making Spies's mill the 
terminus of the improved channel, instead of Section Street Bridge, 
thereby abandoning 3,800 linear feetof the originally projected improve- 
ment. 

Conditionof theimprovement. — Soundings taken in April, 1897, showed 
the channel to have a width of 70 feet, and a depth of 9 feet from Green 
Bay to within about 300 feet of Spies's mill^ for the latter distance the 
governing depth was about 8 feetC 



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2654 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENOINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

Operaiiam during ihejiscal year. — Under contract dated Angnst 2d, 
18d6, with the Green Bay Dredge and Pile Driver Oompany for dredg- 
ing 45,000 cabic yards, more or less, work was began September 5, 1896, 
and completed Novemb^ 12; 48,060.4 cubic yards of material were 
removed nnder this contraet, resulting in an increase in depth from 7 
feet to 9 feet from Green Bay to Spies's mill, and a width of 70 feet. 

Remarks. — ^The channel should be widened 30 feet in order to obtain 
the required width of 100 feet. To give the north pier the length con- 
templated it should be extended 875 feet. Three hundred and twenty 
feet of the north pier (damaged by fire) and 300 feet of the south pier 
require repairs. The remainder of the piers are in fair condition. 

The estimate to complete the work before the modification of project 
was adopted was $72,000; the estimate to complete it as modified was 
$37,610, being a reduction of $34,390. The estimate for repairs needed 
to the piers, $3,100, and annual dredging for maintenance of the chan- 
nel, $6,000, added to $37,610 for completion, makes the aggregate esti- 
mate $46,710. 

The estimate, therefore, for fiscal year ending June 30, 1899, is — 

For completion of modified project $37,610 

For repairs topiem 3,100 

For mftintenance of channel 6,000 

Total 46,710 

Money statement. 

Jnlyl, 1896» balance unexpended $4,806.77 

Jane 30, 1897, amount expended daring fiscal year 4,741.89 

July 1,1887, balance onezpended 154.^ 

(Amoant (estimated) req aired for completion of existing project 37, 610. 00 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J ane 30, 1899 *46, 710. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



Act of— 

March 3, 1881 $10,000 

August 2, 1882 15,000 

July5,1884 15,000 

August 5, 1886 8,000 

August 11, 1888 20,000 



Act of— 

Julyl3,1892 $8,000 

August 17, 1894 3,000 

June 3, 1896 4,000 

Total 78,000 



Ah$triiei of prapwaU for dredging 37,000 ouhio yard9 of nmierial at Oeonto Harbor, 
WiaoonHnf received in reepouMe to advertieement dated Augu$t 1, 1896, and opened Anguei 
tOf 1896, by Capt. George A, Zinn, Corpe of Engineere, 



No. 



ITame and sddrmB of bidder. 



Price per 
oubfo 


Total for 


87,000 1 


yard. 


onbic yards. 


O0nU. 




20 


f7.400.00 


12| 


4,«25.00 


r 


2,080.00 


m 


4,095.00 
6,085.80 


10 


2,700.00 



Grean'BDredglDgCo., Chioago,I]l 

Racine Dredge Co., Saolne, wia 

Green Bay Dredjpe and Pile Driver Co., Green Bay, Wis 

C.£.MitoheU&Co.,Ladinf(ton.Mich 

George Cooper and Theodore Joeach, Manitowoc, Wis.. 
Ooonto Company, Oconto, Wis 



*|9,100 for maintenance. 
tXhs ooat being so low, a 



ooBtraot was made for 45,000 cubic yards, more or leas. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^EEPOET OP CAPTAIN ZIKK. 



2655 



Amount of appropriation available for this work $4,000. 

With the approval of the Chief of Enffineergy a contract was entered into An^st 
28, 1896, with Green Bay Dredge and Pile Driver Company, the lowest responsible 
bidder, for this work. 



COMMKRCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

[Furnished by the mayor of Ocooto, Wis.] 

Name of harbor, Oconto, Wis. ; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis. ; nearest light- 
honse, Sherwood Poiot, Wisconsin. 

Arrivals and departures of vessels. 



DeecriptioB. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 


Namber. 


Tonnagn. 


Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


1,060 
230 

182 


52,800 
22,620 
72,800 


1,045 
235 
182 


51,400 


Sail 


24,300 


Tow barge .-.- 


72.800 






Total 


1,462 


158,220 


1,462 


148,500 







Ftindpal ariioles of ea^ort and import, 
[By way of the hiurbor only.] 



Artioles. 



Tons. 



Articles. 



Tons. 



BXPOBT8. 

Flab 

Lumber 

Oats 

Pease 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence) 

Potatoea 

Saw logs , 

Shingles 

Ties (railroad) 

Wood 

Wool 

Total 

Total approximate value . 

IMPOBTB. 

Agricultnral implements 

Apples 

5«ney 

Beer 

Brick 

Batter 

Cattle 

Chairs 

Cheese 

CkMdandooke 



2.800 

330 

412^ 

12,000 

5,020 

25| 

36.975 

2,280 

1,890 

12,000 

3,060 

3,282 

31,750 

6| 



111.811 { 



$659,480 



Hi 

00 

84 

373| 

92? 

00 

810 

3 

36i 
1,230 



IMPOBTS— con tinned. 



Com 

5Kg« 

Floar 

Fomitore 

Hogs'!!I"'""I '.. 

Iron and steel 

Leather 

Lime and cement 

Marble 

Merchandise (general) . 

Millstaflb 

Oats 

Oil 

Plaster Hand) 

Pork ana beef. 

Provisions 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds. 

Saw logs 

Sheep 

Stone , 

Wagons and carriages. 

Wheat 

Wood , 

Woodenware 



Total 

Total approximate valae. . 



187i 

1.467J 

27j 

•60 

218 

700 

4| 

1,083 

16 

9,000 

1,600 

12,000 

474f 

110 

720 

900 

600 

30 

6,000 

40 

3,920 

85 

1,060 

8,750 

124 



49,280 



.81,277,395 



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2656 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARHT. 

Principal artMe$ of export €md import — Continned. 
[By all ways of tnnsportation.] 



ArtiolM. 



TOUB. 



ArUolea. 



Tons. 



BXPOBTB. 

Bark (tan) 

Beaaa 

Beer 

Com 

Fish 

Hay 

Hides 

Lath 

Lumber 

Millstofls 

Oats 

Peas 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posta (fence) 

Pototoes 

Saw logs 

Shingles 

Ties (railroad) 

Wool ii.'iiiiiiii.'iiriii;.* 

Total 

Total approximate ralne 

DIPOBTS. 

Agrienltaral implements 

^?lr.:::::::::::::;:;:: 

Beer 

Brick 

Batter 

Cattle 



^^ 

6,000 

1,450 
200 

8,850 

90,000 

480 

7,200 
281 
95,000 
23,660 

2,220 
12,000 

6,260 

4,228 
47,600 



838,7044 



f 2, 040, S 



SB 

S25 

180 

1.0961 

1,721 

120 

1,880 



DIPOBTS— contin ned. 

Ohalra 

Cheeae 

Coal and coke 

Com 

Eggs 

Floar 

Fornitore 

Hay 

Hogs 

Iron and steel 

Leather 

Limeandoement 

Marble 

Merchandise (general) 

Millstnib 

Oato 

Oil 

Plaster (land) 

Pork and beaf 

Provisions 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds 

Saw logs 

Sheep 

Stone 

Wagons and oarriagea 

Wheat 

Wood 

Woodenware 

Total 

Total approximate yaloe 



125 

8,600 

886 

**# 

12,000 

680 

1,160 

1,847 

84 

19,700 

14,200 

26,000 

837 

240 

1,128 

1.860 

1,060 

76 

13,800 

68 

4,480 

22S| 

2,010 

8,500 

10?| 



119,481 
$1,968,840 



HH4. 

mPROVEMENT OF PENSAUKEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the month of Pensaukee Biver, object of 
the improvement^ project, and present works were described in detail 
in Annual Report of Ohief of Engineers for 1896, page 2468. 

OwndiUon of the improvement — ^The harbor pier is in about the same 
condition as on June 30, 1896. A survey made in 1890 showed the 
governing depth at that time to be 3.8 feet, foundings taken in April, 
1897, showed a depth in channel varying from 3 to 10 feet below the 
datum plane of harbor improvements, the average being about 5 feet. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — ^There have been no operations by 
the United States at this harbor during the fiscal year. 

Bema/rks. — Some dredging was done by private parties in 1895. No 
dredging has ever been done at this harbor by the United States, 
except 5,698 cubic yards during fiscal year ending June 30, 1884. 

There appears to be no prospect of any new industries being located 
at this harbor, and there is no one there, except those engaged in or 
interested in fishing, to the number of twelve or fourteen persons, who 
seems to take any interest in the harbor. 

It is considered that the funds available wiU be sufficient to make 
any repairs and do any dredging that may be necessary during the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1899, and no further appropriation is recom- 
mended. 

No arrivals and departures of vessels were reported at this harbor 
for tiie calendar year ending December 31, 1896. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2657 

Money statement 

July 1,1896, baUnoe unexpended $1,000.00 

Jnly 1, 1897, bftUmoe unexpended 1, 000. 00 



APPBOPRIATIOllt. 

Act of— 

Angnst 3, 1882 $10,000 

Jnly5, 1884 5,000 

Jnne8,1896 1,000 

Total 16,000 



H H 5. 
mPBOVEMENT OF GBEEN BAT HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

Fox Eiver near its moath constitates the harbor of Green Bay. Its 
original condition, object of improvement, projects, and present works 
were described in detail in Annual Beport of Ghief of Engineers for 

1896, pages 2469, 2470. 

Ptqjects. — ^1896: The modification in the project for improving "Fox 
Biver below Depere,'' approved July 11, 1896, provided for increasing 
the depth of channel to 15 feet, as wide as available funds would admi^ 
the ultimate depth to be 17 feet. 

1897 : The modification in the project for improving "Green Bay Har- 
bor," approved March 9, 1897, provided for increasing the width of 
entrance at the northern end of the channel 300 feet, making its total 
width 500 feet. 

Condition of the improvement. — ^The revetments at Grassy Island are 
in fair condition. The channel, 15 feet deep, 200 feet wide, was com- 
pleted in 1892. The 17-foot channel has a minimum width of 100 feet. 
Dredging now in progress is to give it a least width of 200 feet. 

Fox Eiver below Depere. — A channel 150 feet wide, 13 feet deep, was 
completed in 1894. Dredging now in progress is for increasing the 
depth to 15 feet and as wide as available fimds will admit. 

(derations during the fiscal year. — Under conti*act with Bacine Dredge 
Company, dated October 14, 1896, for dredging 250,000 cubic yards, 
more or less, work was begun June 1, 1897, and is in progress at the 
dose of the fiscal year. 

The number of cubic yards of material removed under this contract 
to June 30, 1897, was 44,610. 

To comply with a provision in river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, 
appropriating (25,000 for improving Green Bay Harbor, viz, " of which 
sum five thousand dollars may, in the discretion of the Secretary of War, 
be expended on the Fox Biver below Depere," a contract, dated May 14, 

1897, was entered into with the lowest bidder, Mr. Arthur H, Vogel,for 
dredging 45,000 cubic yards, more or less. Under this contract dredg- 
ing was begun June 2, 1897, and at the close of the fiscal year 17,935 
cubic yards of material had been removed. 

Bemarhs. — It is deemed worthy of record that the price paid the 
Bacine Dredge Company for dredging under the existing contract, viz, 
BKO 97 167 



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2658 REPORT OF THE CmEP OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 



ceDts per cabic yard, scow measure, is the lowest ever paid for work 
of that character in this district. 

The first contract for dredging at this harbor was in 1866, and the 
price then paid was 60 cents per cnbic yard. 

Owing to the extremely low prices for dredging under the present and 
preceding contracts, the estimate to complete the work, as modified in 
1897, was reduced from $26,916 to $2,200. 

The estimate for completing the channel in Fox River below Depere 
to dimensions of 160 feet wide, 17 feet deep, was $35,000, of which sum 
$6,000 were appropriated by act of June 3, 1896. 



Estimate far flsoal year ending June SO, 1899, 

To complete GreoD Bay Harbor in accordance with modified project of 1897.. $2, 200 

For repairs to revetments at Grassy Island 1,000 

For dredging for maintenance of channel 6,000 

Contingencies 600 

8,800 
For completing channel in Fox River below Depere in accordance with modi- 
fied project of 1896 30,000 

Total 88»800 

Money statement 

Jnly 1,1896, balance unexpended $26,703.48 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 1,241.10 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 25.462.38 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $4,293.99 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 17, 306. 69 

21,600.68 

July 1, 1897, balance available 8,861.70 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 82, 200. 00 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1899 * 38» 800. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements or sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



APPROPRIATIONB. 



Act of— 

June 23, 1866 $30,600.00 

March 2, 1867 46,000.00 

July 26, 1868 (allotted) ... 17, 500. 00 

April 10, 1869 (aUotted) . . 44, 560. 00 

July 11, 1870 17,500.00 

March 3, 1871 17,500.00 

March 3, 1873 20,000.00 

June 23, 1874 10,000.00 

March 3, 1875 10,000.00 

August 14, 18T6 8,000.00 

June 18, 1878 5,000.00 

March 3, 1879 4,000.00 

June 14, 1880 6,000.00 

March 3, 1881 6,000.00 



Act of— 

August 3, 1882 $20,000.00 

July 5, 1884 10,000.00 

August 6, 1886 7,000.00 

August 11, 1888 10,000.00 

September 19, 1890 10, 000. 00 

July 13, 1892 25, 000.00 

August 17, 1894 25, 000. 00 

June 3,1896 25,000.00 

Miscellaneous receipts 
credited to appropria- 
tions 62.50 



Total 872,602.60 



* $6,600 for maintenance. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2659 



Jh$traei of propo9ala far dredging 900,000 eubie yards of material at Qroen Bay Harbor, 
Wiaeonein, reooivod in rotponee to advertisemeni dated September 1, 1896, aim oponed 
October 6, 1896, by Capt, Charge A. Zinn, Corpe of Engineer: 



Va 



B nd nild«no6 of Uddo; 



PriM 

peroutaio 

yard. 



Totdl 
ft»r900,000« 
onbioyards. 



Arfhnr H. Togel, HflwankM, Wis. 
Gresn Bay Dredce and Pile Drirer _ 
William A. Starke, Ifllwaakee. Wia. 



Grean Bay Dredie and Pile DrlTer Co., Green Bay, Wla. 



Green's Dredging Co., Chicago. HI. 
A.MoGiUis & Co., CleTelanl Ohio. 
Baoine Dredge Co., Baeine, wia 



I* 

10 
IS 

9 



$17,400.00 
10,000.00 
20,000.00 
20.000.00 
17,000.00 
18,250.00 



•The ooei being ao low, a oontraot waa made for 280,000 onbie yards, more or Iom. 

Amoant of appropriation available for this work, $18,000. 

With the approTal of the Chief of EDgineers, a contraot was entered into October 
14, 1886, with fiacine Dredge Company, the lowest responsible bidders for this work. 

Abetraet of prepoeaU for dredging 60,000 enMo yarde of material at Oreen Bay Harbor, 
in Fox Biter, below Depere, Wis., received in reeponee to adcertieement dated April 5, 
1897, and opened May 6, 1897, by Capt. €horge A. Zinn, Corpe of Engineere. 



So. 



Vame and residenoe of Uddar. 



Prioe 

per cnbio 

yard. 



Total for 

80,000 enbio 

yards. 



John Smith, Iffanlsteew Hioh 

Green Bay i>redge and Pile Driver Co., O reen Bay, Wis.. 

Bggen ft Simono, TwoBirers, Wis 

Wffliam A. Storke, Ifilwankee, Wis 

Chicago Dredging and Dock Co^ Chicago, HI 

Ar£vH.yogei,liUwankee,Wi8..^. 

Baoine Dredge Co., Baoine, Wis 



Oente, 
10 
10 
10 
10 



18.000.00 
8,000.00 
8,000.00 
8,000.00 
8,878.00 
4,760.00 
6,280.00 



Amount of appropriation available for this work, $4,800. 

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, a oon tract was entered into liay 14, 
1887, with Artnor H. Vogel, the lowest responsible bidder, for this work. 



Xff< of all contracte in force. 



Hameoroontraetor. 


Work. 


Approved. 


Work com- 
menced. 


Work to be 
completed. 


Baoine Dredge Co.... 
Arthur H.yogel 


Dredging 250,000 cnbic yards 

Dredging 46,000 cnbic yards in 
Fox BiTor below Depere. 


Nov. 2,1890 
June 1,1887 


June 1,1897 
Jane 2,1897 


Deo. 1,1897 
Nov. 1,1897 



COMMBBCIAL 8TATI0nC8 FOB THB OALBNDAB TBAB EITDING DECSMBXB 31, 1886. 

[Funished by Mr. M. J. HcCormiok, agent Lackawanna Transportation Company.] 

Name of harbor. Green Bay, Wis. ; collection district, Milwaokea, Wio. ; nearest 
llght-honse, Grassy Island, Wisconsin. 





Arrivdle «md departwree ofveeeeU, 












Arrivals. 


Departnrea. 




Knmber. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


888 
228 


181,806 
61,606 


888 
228 


182,497 


Sail 


61,702 








Total 


691 


288,008 


806 


04,199 







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2660 REPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABMT 
FrimelpaJ orfioldf of export mtd import 
[Sj wi^ of tho hubor mSj.} 



ArtifllM. 






Tons. 



Barley 

Brfok 

Batter 

Cattle 

Cheeae 

Com 

Flah 

Floor 

Hay 

Uidea 

Hoga 

Malt 

Merohandiae (general) 

Hillatoflli 

Oata 

OU 

Peaae 

Pork and beef 

Potatoea 

Bye 

Salt 

Wheat 

Wool 

Total 



18,900 
607 

J^ 

87 

000 

911| 

10.832 

4.788 

25 

6 

1.000 

92,428 

5.007 

85,312 

87* 

8.000 

1251 
14,000 

9,000 
82 



811,1951 



jigrloQltaral implementa 

Applea 

Beer 

Cattle 

Cement 

Cheeae 

Cool and ooke 

Fiah 

Pamitnre 

Hay 

Iron and ateel 

Marble 

Merohandiae (general) . . . . 

Oil 

Piaster (land) 

Pork and beef. 

Poata (fence) 

Rye 

Salt 

Shinglea 

Wa^ona and carriages... 
Wood 

Total 



246 

1,184 
17 



27X 
170,811 

15 

8,800 

120 

148,876 

463| 

180 

173i 
9,180 

14,600 



852,0961 



HH 6. 

IMPROVEMENT OF STURGEON BAY AND LAKE BflCHIGAN SHIP CANAL, 

WISCONSIN. 

The ori^nal condition, object of the improvement, project, and pres- 
ent works were described in detail in Annual Beport of Chief of Engi- 
neers for 1896, pages 2471 and 2472. 

Frajeet of 1896. — ^A modification of the original project, approved 
Angnst 4, 1896, provides for a width of 250 feet between revetments for 
the westerly 1,000 feet of the canal and the dredging and maintenance 
of a channel 200 feet wide and 15 feet deep below the datum plane of 
harbor improvements from the westerly end of canal to deep water in 
Sturgeon Bay. It is also provided that when the old revetments are 
replaced in the narrow part of the canal they shall be set back so as to 
give a width of 160 feet between them. 

Ofmdition of the improvement. — For a distance of 6,200 feet on the 
north side and 4,900 feet of the south side, measuring from the east 
or lake end, the canal banks are protected by revetments. Work now 
in progress will extend the revetment on south side 1,300 feet during 
the present working season, making its total length 6,200 feet. 

June 30, 1897, the governing depth in the channel was about 15 feet 
below the datum plane of harbor improvements, being the same as at 
the beginning of the fiscal year. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — By hire of labor, the use of a Gov- 
ernment dredge, and the purchase of materials in accordance with law 
the north revetment was extended 555^ linear feet and the south revet- 
ment 963 linear feet. Work on the extension of the south revetment 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2661 

was in progress at the close of the fiscal year. Thirty thousand four 
hundred and twenty cabic yards of material was excavated in widening 
for new revetment. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law 
150 linear feet of guide piling was built on the north side of the harbor 
entrance to the canaL The fender piling consists of two parallel rows 
of round piles driven at 2-feet centers each way, with upper and lower 
outsides wales of 12 by 12 inch white oak, inner wale of 12 by 12 inch 
white pine, and inside binder 8 by 12 inch white pine, all securely bolted 
together with screw bolts. The channel face of the oak wales is pro- 
tected with heavy railroad iron. 

EemarJa. — Since the purchase of the canal by the Government in 1893 
the tonnage passing through this important waterway has increased 
over 50 per cent, notwithstanding the commercial depression of the past 
three years. This rapidly increasing commerce plainly demonstrates 
the importance of the early completion of the present project for widen- 
ing both the canal and the channel in Sturgeon Bay. 

The estimated cost of project adopted m 1894 (see Report of Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1894, p. 2057) was $98,450 

Additional estimate, modified project of 1896— 

Xncreasing width of westerly 1,000 feet of canal to 250 feet $4, 750 

Increasing width of channel in Sturgeon Bay to 200 feet 10, 300 

Total additional estimate 15,050 

Total ., 113,600 

Totalappropriationsyexolnsiye of purchase 50,000 

Amount (estimated) to complete present proj ect 03, 500 

An appropriation of (63,500 is recommended for the fiscal year ending 
June SOj 1899. 

Money statement. 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $32,171.76 

June 30, 18^, amount expended during fiscal year 16,088.26 

July 1,1897, balance unexpended 16,083.50 

{Amount (estunated) required for completiou of existing project 63, 500. 00 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal vear ending June 30, 1899 63, 500. 00 
Submitted in compliance with reqnirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry ciyil act of June 4^ 1887. 



APPBOPiOATIOira. 

Act o^^ 

July 18, 1892 (for purchase) $81,833 

August 17, 1894 20,000 

June 3, 1896 30.000 

Total , 131,833 



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2662 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

COMMBBGIAL 8TA118TIC6 FOB THB CALXNDAB TBAB BNDINO DBCBMBBB 31, 1896. 

[Furniahed by Hr. Adam N. Dier, avpaintaDdnit Sturgeon Bay and Lake Miohigan Ship OaaaL] 

Name, Sturffeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal, Wisconsin; collection dis- 
triotf MiiwanSee, Wis. ; nearest light-honae, on north pier head, entrance to harbor. 

ArrivaU and deparlure$ of ve$9eU, 



Claaa. 


Bound down. 


Bound up. 


Total. 


No. 


Net tons. 


No. 


Net tona. 


No. 

2,063 

1,482 

486 


Net tona. 


Steam 


232 


441.163 
153,908 
233,425 


986 
689 
254 


872,448 
115.204 
242,000 


818,611 


Sail 


209.112 


Unriffffed.... 


475.425 






Total 


2,102 


828,496 


1.929 


729,652 


4,031 


1,568,148 







Navigation through the canal for the season of 1896 was resumed April 10, the date 
on which the car-ferry steamer Ann Arlfor No, 2 forced a passage through the ice in 
Green Bay, and was practically closed December 20, the active season being, there- 
fore, two hundred and fifty-fonr days long. 

Average number of vessels passing through the canal per day for the whole 

season (not including tngs) 15.92 

Average number of net tons passine through the canal per day for the whole 

season (not including tonnage of tugs) 6,158.68 

Average net tonnage of steam craft 394.33 

Average net tonnage of sail craft 181.58 

Average net tonnage of nnrigged crafb 978.24 

StaUmani offreigXi and pasBongorM carried through the oanalfor the calendar year ending 

December SI, 1896, 



Artiolea. 



Netl 



Artiolea. 



Net tona. 



BOUHD DOWV. 



Agricultoral implementa . 

Applea 

Beana 

Beef and pork 

Brick 

Coal and ooke 

Fiah 

Flour and grain 

Grindatonea 

Hay 

Iron (mannfoctured) 

IroMpig) 

Leather 

Lumber (hard wood) 

lierehandiae (general)...., 

Oila 

PUm , 

Polea (telegraph) 

Salt : 

Stone (building and orib). 



Total cargo. 



..number. 



Bark.. 

Briok. 



1,767 

784 

15 

888 

628 

29.887 

547 

2,178 

150 

280 

9,659 

699 

100 

1,090 

87,007 

1,508 

75 

10 

10,785 

250 



102,8 



CTO 
100 



BOUND UF— continued. 

Coal 

Dairy prodnofca 

Fiah 

Flour and grain 

Hay ? 

Hldea 

Ice 

Iron (manufactured) 

Iron (ore) 

Iron (pig) 

Logs 

Lumber , 

Merchandiae (general) 

Oila 

Pilea 

Polea (telegraph) , 

Poflta (fence and paving) 

Potatoes 

Stone (building and crib) 

Tiee (railroad) 

Treea (shade and Christmas) 

Wood 

Wool 

Total cargo • 

Paaaengen number 



248 

252 

17,209 

002 

151 

800 

750 

8,100 

5,826 

4,400 

519,436 

6,621 

214 

11,801 

14,889 

1,082 

776 

59.930 

28,421 

1,440 

45,607 

14 



728,544 



8,866 



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APPENDIX H H — REPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2663 



StaUmm^i showing tnumnt and eiHmaied value of ff tight oarriod through ihe oamalfor ihe 
calendar year ending December SI, 1896. 



Itemi. 


Qusntlty. 


Price per 
unit: 


Total rafais. 
tion. 


Aisrienltanl implements 

Ba""::;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


tons.. 

barrels.. 


1,767 

10,450 

609 

500 

3,230 

864 

80,162 

248 

799 

02,850 

60,000 

4,200 

82,579 

20.000 

120.646 

146,030 

160 

1,272 

151 

800 

10,409 

8,100 

6.626 

100 

740 

646 

346.291 

48,628 

7,650 

3,670 

84,946 

57.456 

10,350 

105,285 

60,189 

848,859 

48,000 

18,259 

14 


$160.00 

4.00 

6.00 

1.00 

10.00 

10.00 

8.50 

160.00 

80.00 

6.00 

.60 

.60 

.56 

.85 

.90 

.66 

80.00 

10.00 

100.00 

8.00 

60.00 

3.50 

17.00 

160.00 

12.00 

30.00 

16.00 

150.00 

7.00 

3.00 

LOO 

.10 

2.00 

.90 

.90 

.20 

.26 

4.00 

200.00 


$266,060.00 

41,800.00 

3,654.00 

600.00 

82,300.00 

3, 640. 00 


Beans 

Beef and pork 

Brick 


bushels.. 

barrels.. 

M.. 


Coal and coke 


tons.. 


105. 567. 00 


Dairy prodaota 


'.lII"llIIII'"'.do!!!! 


87,200.00 
63, 920. 00 


Sloar 

Grain: 

Barley 

Com 

Halt 

Gate 

Pease 


barrels.. 

bushels.. 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do 


461.750.00 

25,000.00 

2,100.00 

17.918.45 

7,000.00 

108, 580 50 


Wheat .-. 


do 


04, 269. 50 


Grindstones 


......tons.. 


4,500.00 


Fay 


do 


12, 720. 00 


Hides 


do.... 


15, 100. 00 


Ice 


do.... 


900.00 


Iron: 

Hannfactnred 

Oi« 


do.... 

do 


620,460.00 
28.350.00 


Piff 


do 


110, 925. 00 


Leathw 

Logs 

LnraberOiard wood) 

Lumber (all other kinds 1 


do.... 

MfeetB.M.. 

do .. 

do 


15,000.00 

8, 880. 00 

16, 850. 00 

6,194,365.00 


Merchandise (general) 


.........r-x .t^ns.. 


6, 644, 200. 00 


Oila 


....barrels.. 


63, 550. 00 


Piles (round) 


number.. 


11, 010. 00 


Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence and paTlng) 

Potatoes 


do.... 

do.... 

barrels.. 


84.946.00 
5,746.50 
20, 700. 00 


Salt 




94, 711. 00 


Stone (building and crib) 


tons.. 


64,170.10 


Ties (railroad) 

Trees (shade and Christmas) 

Wood 


number.. 

do 

...... «.••■.>. .cords . 


•9,771.80 
12,000.00 
73, 036. 00 


Wool 


tons.. 


2, 800. 00 








Total ralne of ft«lght 






14, 224, 429. 86 











ComparoHve statement of princi^l items of commerce through ike canal for the calendar 

years 1895 and 1896. 



Items. 



Year. 



1806. 



1896. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Vessels number.. 

Too nags tons.. 

Tonnage (freight) do.. 

Paasencers nnmber.. 

Agricnltoral implements tons. . 

Apples barrels.. 

Beef and pork do — 

Brick M.. 

Coal and coke tons.. 

Fish do... 

Flour barrels.. 

Grain (all kinds) bushels.. 

Hay tons.. 

Iron: 

KimnCActured do... 

Ore do... 

Pig do... 

Lumber MfsetB.M.. 

Merchandise (general) tons... 

Oils barrels.. 

Piles (round) number.. 

Poles (telegraph) do — 

Posti (fenoe and paving) do.... 

Potatoes barrels.. 

Salt do.... 

Stone (building and crib) tons.. 

Ties (railroad) number.. 

Trees (shade and Christmas) do 

Wood cords.. 



8.340 

1,804,816 

810,970 

10,989 

227 

U,340 



1,531 

99,644 

946 

93,683 

837,491 

4,338 

6,861 
1,926 
4,855 

886,880 
80,868 



1.089 
10,475 
92.812 

6,491 
83,964 
71, 212 
163,900 
22,000 
12,805 



4,031 

1,658,148 

831,370 

9.700 

1.767 

10, 450 

8,230 

364 

80,162 

709 

92,350 

872,454 

1.272 

10.400 

8,100 

6.525 

846,836 

43,628 

7,650 

3,670 

84,946 

67,455 

10,350 

105. 235 

60,180 

848,850 

48,000 

18,259 



253,333 
20,400 



1,540 
'8,"236' 



1,289 



618 
*34,'i63' 



890 
*i,'i67 



147 
1,833 



8,066 



4,648 
6,175 
1,670 



12.776 
7.650 
2,581 

74.471 



40,044 



8,859 
21,271 



184,959 
26,000 
6,464 



85,357 
"ii.'628 



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2664 BEPOBT OF THE CHIBF OF ENGINEEBS, U. S. ABMT. 

Estimated yalne of freight passing throngh oanal daring the calen- 
dar year ending December 31, 1895 $12,171,908.75 

Estimated valne of freight passing through the canal daring the cal- 
endar year ending December 31, 1896 14,224,429.85 

Increase of 1896 over 1895 2,052,526.10 

Statement showing number and net tonnage of tugs paesing ihrough the oanal during ike 
oalendar year ending Deoemher 31, 1896, and the number of vesseli and eeowe towed dur- 
ing that time. 





Bound down. 


Bound up. 


Month. 


Nombor. 


Kettons. 


VesaelB 
towed. 


Scows 
towed. 


NumlMr. 


Net tons. 


Yetsel* 
towed. 


Soowa 
towed. 


April 


89 
121 
140 
184 
104 
108 
156 
188 

U 


1.09» 
3,274 
4,140 
3.788 
8.117 
8,200 
4,544 
4,000 
758 


20 
66 
55 
64 
22 
88 
64 
44 
6 



80 
38 
82 
28 
27 
26 
88 

7 


40 
126 
151 
146 
107 
116 
150 
150 

22 


1,075 
8,407 
4,2M 

8,101 
8,661 
4,600 
4,411 
630 


94 
84 

72 
71 
46 
40 
60 
82 
8 


11 


fiky.." .. 


81 


j™,;:;::::::;::;:::::: 


88 


July 


88 




28 
84 


j^ovembctr .-•••- 


85 
88 


Deoomber 









Total 


055 


27,007 


850 


280 


1,016 


20,486 


882 


252 







Total namber of trips made throagh canal by tags for whole season 1, 971 

Total number of net tons 57,433 

Total number of vessels towed 741 

Total namber of scows towed 482 

Total namber of vessels and scows towed 1,223 

Average net tonnage of tags 29.13 

Average number passing throagh the oanal per day for the whole season .... 7. 79 

Namber of tugs stationed at canal for local towing 6 

Net tonnage of tugs stationed at canal for local towing 190 

Length of towing route fix>m harbor entrance to month of Sturgeon Bay, 

miles Si 

Statement of olaee and tonnage of teeeele coming in from the lake via the eandl during 
the season to seek.shelter in Sturgeon Bay from storms. 



Montli. 


Steam. 


San. 


Unrigged. 


TotaL 


Namber. 


Net tons. 


Nnmber. 


Net tons. 


Nnmber. 


Nettona. 


Namber. 


Nettona. 


April 


8 
18 
2 

11 
10 


5,665 

6,283 

505 

1,206 
1,110 
1,623 
4,039 
8.172 
8,878 


6 
12 
10 

9 
22 
17 
87 
18 

8 


1,508 
8,172 
8,752 
2,742 
6,068 
4,362 
6.881 
4,788 
177 




8,086 
1,100 
800 
6,107 
2,062 
4,726 
11.005 
3,334 
5,070 


17 
28 

14 
23 
20 
29 
56 
81 
16 


10,289 


mSv^ :;: : 


10,555 
6,067 


3nne!:".i;;;:::.. 


July 


10,146 
9,U4 
10,711 
21, 515 


August 


September 


October 


November ........ 


11,256 
9,620 


Deoembor ......... 




Total 


71 


27,075 


184 


81,002 


88 


80,004 


248 


06,161 



No record was kept of those craft bound oat detained at Sturgeon Bay bv stormy 
weather, though at times during the spring and fall months the outbound fleet thns 
sheltered numbered Arom 20 to 45 craft, not including those that came in firom the 
lake via the canal to seek a harbor of refuge in this bay. 

Craft hailing from nearly ever^ principal port on the chain of lakes could be found 
among those sheltered here during storms, the natural landlocked harbor of Stur- 
geon Bay affording ample room and perfect protection from all storms, whichever 
quarter the wind may blow from. 
Total number of steam craft sheltered daring the season (only those coming 

in from the lake via the canal being counted) 71 

Total namber of sail craft sheltered daring the season (oiUy those coming 

in fh>m the lake via the canal being counted) 134 

Total namber of unrigged craft sheltered daring the season (only those com- 
ing in firom the lake via the canal being counted) 88 

Average net tonnage of steam craft sheltered 881.33 

Average net tonnage of sail craft sheltered 238.74 

Average net tonnage of unrigged craft sheltered 1,028.78 



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APPENDIX H H — HEPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2665 



CZoM, qvumtUif, amd sitimated vdlite of oargoe* oarHed 5y veB9eU vdkiU Bheltered in Sturgeon 
Bajfy teaeon of 1896^ only ikoee wming in from the lake via the canal being included. 



Itema. 



Qnantity. 



Price 



ice per 
unit. 



Total TaloA* 



Anlonltiml impl« 



....tone, 
.barrels. 
...oorde. 
.M. 



Briek. 

Goal and coke tons. 

floor barrels. 

Grain (oata) bushels. 

lion: 

ICannfactnred.. 
Ore , 



Pig. 



•• tons. 

i do... 

LBBib5p.V....-..........llV.V.V.V."V."lV.V.V-"V.VMf«^ 

Merohandise (xeneral) tone. 

Pilea (round) number. 

Poles (telegraph) do... 

Pork barrels. 

Posts (fenoe and p»^g) number. 

Potatoes barrels. 

Salt do... 

Stone (building and orib) tons. 

Ties (rallnwd) number. 

Trees (shade) do... 

Wood ooids. 



51 

8,060 

430 

100 

4,28S 

6,900 

9,000 

288 

588 

550 

86 

12,870 

2,505 

100 

4,875 

1,560 

1,800 

2,000 

1,840 

11,854 

51,800 

8,000 

2,934 



$150.00 

4.00 

8.00 

10.00 

8.50 

5.00 

.86 

10.00 

50.00 

8.50 

17.00 

15.00 

150.00 

3.00 

LOO 

10.00 

.10 

2.00 

.90 

.90 

.20 

.25 

4.00 



17,860.08 

12,200.00 

2,520.00 

1,000.00 

14,815.50 

29,500.00 

700.00 

2,880.00 

29,800.00 

1,925.00 

1,105.00 

192,060.00 

888,250.00 

800.00 

4,875.08 

16,800.00 

180.00 

4,000.00 

1,478.00 

10.218.80 

10,200.00 

2,000.00 

11,788.00 



Total estimated Talus of eargoes 

Total approximate yalua of Tessels sheltered. . 

Approximate yalne of yessela and cargoes .—. 



746,041.10 
8, 709, OIL 00 



4,454,062.18 



The Yftlnation of veosel property seeking shelter in Sturgeon Bay via the canal 
dminff the past season, as given above, ia based on the valnation giyen in Lloyd's 
Vessel Register y and is approximate. 

Jhrineipal limee of trtmepcviation ming ike eamal during the poet gear amd number amd mei 
tonnage of hoate eomprieing each Une. 



I of line. 



Hoineport> 



Number 
ofboato. 



Net 
tonnage. 



Tsledo, ▲nn Arbor and Northern lOohigan B. R., freight 

and passenger. 
Lake Uiohigan Car Ferry Transportation <3o., freight. .. 

Goodrioh Transportation Co., frwght and passenger 

Kanistee Transportation Co., freight and passenger 

Btenhenson Transportation <jo., freight 

Spalding Lumber Co., freight 

Leathern ft Smith Towing and Wrecking Co., freight 



Toledo, Ohio.. 



Two Blyers Manofaotnring Co., freight.. 
Bamnton ft HenTman Co., freight 



ChioagcIU 

do , 

Manistee, Mioh 

Chicago, HI , 

.....do 

Sturgeon BaVtWis. . 
Two JEUvers, Wis . . . 
Marinette, Wis 



11 



2.992 

8,847 

6.128 

487 

2.134 

1,588 

8,801 

877 

966 



TotaL. 



44 



24,868 



In addition to the ahore regular lines of transportation a large number of steam 
bargeSi said vessels and scows engaged in the general fireighting bnsiness, use the 
canal oontinually going both ways dturing the season of navigation, and a large local 
business is done by tugs engaged in assisting sail vessels, scows, etc, through the 
canal. During the past year the Lake Michigan Car Ferry Transportation Company 
added two large barges to their line, which increased the tonnage through the eanal 
quite materially. 

Among the large elass of craft passine throurii the canal during the past season 
were the steamers W. H, Wolf, Florida, Jrgom4ng,Laekawinnaf Marquette, Bueeia, Cuba, 
the Ann Arbor car ferriccy and others, whose net tonnage waa 1,000 tons and more. 



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2666 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF BNQINEEBSy U. 8. AKMT 

H H 7. 

OPERATING AND CARE OF STURGEON BAT AND LAKE MICHIGAN SHIP 

CANAL, WISCONSIN. 

Operations have been confined to work incident to operating and 
care, examinations, keeping a record of vessels and tonnage through the 
canal, and such dredging and repairs as were necessary for maintenance. 

Mr. Adam N. Dier, saperintendent of the canal, reports as follows: 

The work accomplished daring the ^ear consisted priuoipally in completing the 
construction of the revetment of the slip on the north side 01 the canal near the lake 
end andhailding abont 518 linear feet of fender piling along the channel face of same ; 
rebnilding, above the water line, about 350 linear feet of the sonth revetment, adja- 
cent to the harbor front, and further strengthening this section of the works by driving 
an additional row of 3 by 12 inch by 16 feet white oak sheet piling in the rear of the 
old piling; dredging in the canal to maintain the required depth of water as the 
needs of navigation demanded ; replacing a large number of old and unserviceable 
water wale, cap timbers, and tie-rods with new materials : increasing the durability 
of the riprap and shore protection alone the harbor front by placing additional stone 
in the works; entire renewal of the pile driver: grading and otherwise improving 
the grounds adjacent to office building and dwelling house of assistant superintend- 
ent and clerk; painting the exterior of the buildings and papering the rooms in 
dwelling house; making a careful survey of the canal and the navigable channel in 
Sturgeon Bay east of the railway bridge; in collecting commercial statistics, etc. 

Revetment and fender piling of slip. — 3y hire of labor and purchase of materials in 
accordance with law work on revetment of the slip on north side of the canal, near 
lake end, which was in progress at the beginning of the present fiscal year was con- 
tinued, and the improvement completed July 23. As soon as the revetment was fin- 
ished work was commenced on construction of a line of fender piling along the chan- 
nel face of the new docking. Including the ends of the slip and connections with the 
old work, a total of 602^ linear feet of revetment and 530 linear feet of fender piling 
were constructed. This fender piling^ consists of round piles driven on a line 3 
feet out from the center of the dock piles, and at intervals of 5 feet from center to 
center; a 12 by 12 inch white pine lower wale bolted to the piles with l^-inch by 
2-foot 3-inch screw bolts, a 12 by 12 inch white pine upper wale, and 8 by 12 inch white 
pine binder securely fastened with H-inch by 2- foot 9-inch screw bolts. 

Repairs of canal recetmenta — About 350 linear feet of the south revetment, adjacent 
to the harbor front, built by the canal company in 1879-80, was in such dilapidated 
condition as to require entire renewal above the water line and an additional row 
of oak sheet piling below the water. The materials for this improvement were pur- 
chased in November, 1896, after inviting proposals as required by law, and by hire 
of labor work on the same was commenced April 1, 1897, and completed May 20, 
1897. The materials behind the revetment were removed with wheelbarrows, the 
old round and sheet piles cut down on a plane with the upper surface of the lower 
wale, new 6 by 12 inch white-pine backing sills put in between the upper ^nds of 
the round and sheet piling, and 345 white-oak sheet piles 3 by 12 inches by 16 feet 
driven in place and fastened at the top with 4 by 12 inch white-pine binders securely 
bolted to the round piles. Three hundred and fifty linear feet of new superstruc- 
ture, consisting of three courses of 12 by 12 inch white-pine timber securely bolted 
together with 1 by 24 inch round driftbolts, with cross-ties of similar dimensions at 
intervals of 6 feet bolted to anchor piles 6 feet apart driven on a line 8 feet back 
from the face of the revetment, was put in place. The new superstructure is further 
strengthened with a longitudinal wale of 6 by 12 inch white pine placed over the 
Joint between the first and second courses of timber and held in position with tie- 
rods fastened to the anchor piles. 

Minor repairs to canal revetments during the year consisted principally in replac- 
ing broken and unserviceable water wale, cap timbers, binders, tie-rods, etc., with 
new materials and refastening a number of the old caps and binders with new screw 
bolts. By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law the 
following-described repair work was accomplished during the year. 

North revetment. — One hundred and twenty-eight linear feet of new 12 by 12 inch 
white-pine water wale, 36 linear feet of new 12 by 12 inch white-pine cap timber, 
and 40 linear feet of new 3 by 12 inch white-pine binders were used in replacing 
broken and unserviceable materials between Stations 1 and 13. This timber was 
fastened in place with 24 iron tie-rods 1| inches by 17 feet and 18 new screw bolts 
li by 27i inches. Seventy linear feet of the old caps and binders between Stations 
22 and 26 were refastened with new screw bolts, and the comer of the works at the 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2667 

harbor eDtrancOy which was damaged by collision of Car Ferry No, 4 on the morn- 
ing of October 21. 1896, was entirely rebailt, the materials used being as follows: 
Twenty-two ronnd piles 20 feet long, S round piles 30 feet long, 40 linear feet of 12 
by 12 inch white pine, 36 linear feet of 8 by 12 inch white pine, 6 iron tie-rods 1\ 
inches by 17 feet, and 12 screw bolts li by 27i inches; also 60 linear feet of 16 by 16 
inch oak timber, formerly used as spuds on the dredges. 

South rwettMni, — Between stations 1 and 21, lf313 linear feet of new 12 by 12 inch 
white pine water wale, 80 linear feet of new 12 by 12 inch white pine cap timber, 
and 92 linear feet of new 4 by 12 inch white pine binders were used in replacing 
broken and uneervioeable materials. This timber was fastened in place with 237 iron 
tie-rods, each 17 feet lone by 1^ inches in diameter, and 47 screw bolts 1^ by 27i 
inches. One hundred and forty-seven linear feet of old caps and binders between 
stations 32 and 39 were refastened with 37 new screw bolts X\ by 27^ inches, and the 
cluster of protection piles near the comer of the harbor entrance farther strength- 
ened by driving 4 additional round piles and putting on two more turns of heavy 
binding chain. 

Dreeing operaUon». — During the fiscal year, by hire of labor and use of United 
States dredges Nos. 1 and 2, 28,202 cubic yards of material was removed from the 
canal for maintenance of channel. 

Improvements along harbor front. — The usefulness of the riprap and shore protection 
along the north and south harbor ftonts having become impaired to a considerable 
extent by the action of sea and drift ice, more hard stone was purchased after 
inviting proposals, as required bv law, and deposited in the works. Forty-one and 
one-half cords was deposited along the north harbor front during the month of 
8|eptember, 1896, and 60 cords along the south harbor front during the month of June, 
1897, the total cost of the additional stone in place being $363.7?. 

Benewal of United Siateepile driver. — By hire of labor and purchase of material, in 
aeeordance with law, the United States pile driver was entirely renewed during the 
months of January, February, and part of March, 1897. Work on renewal of the 
driver was commenced Januaiy 7 and completed March 5. 

Improvemente toarounde and buildings, — By hire of labor and purchase of material, 
in accordance with law, improvements were made to the grounds surrounding the 
office building and dwelling house, also to the buildings. The canal lands on the 
north side, between stations 33 and 72. were fenced in with a standard barb wire 
fence 5 strands high. The fence is 266 rods in length, and cost, completed, $98.42, 
•r at the rate of 37 cents per rod. The grounds adjacent to the office oailding and 
dwelling house occupied oy the assistant superintendent were graded and sodded. 
The terrace in fk'ont of the premises was extended westward 140 feet. The well on 
the grounds was enlarged and provided with a windmill, with water tank of 24 bar- 
rels capacity, at a total cost of $184. A small woodshed and outhouse, all under one 
roof, was constructed near the dwelling house for the convenience of the assistant 
superintendent's family. The office building, dwelling house, and watchhonse were 
painted on the outside with two coats of best prepared paint, and minor repairs 
made to the roof of the storage warehouse. The rooms in the dwelling house were 
papered at a cost of $33.10. 

Survevs and soundings. — ^During July and August, 1896, a topographical survey was 
made of the lands pertaining to the canal, and the limits of the riffiit of way on both 
sides of the canal were established. The survey was made under the immediate 
sopervision of Mr. James Whelan. 

During the month of December, 1896, soundings were taken in the canal. As here- 
tofore, uiese soundings were taken on transverse lines 100 feet apart, at regular 
intervals of 20 feet. February, 1897, soundings were taken through the ice, in the 
navigable channel in the easterly portion of Sturgeon Bay from the westerly end of 
the canal to the railroad bridge, a distance of about 23,100 feet. The soundings 
were taken on transverse lines 1(% feet apart, at regular intervals of 20 feet, there being 
16 soundings on each line between the westerly end of the canal and the ''Angle" in 
Sturgeon Bay; from the ''Angle" to the railroad bridge 16 and 18 soundings were 
taken alternately on the transverse lines. Very shoal water was found for about 
3,000 feet easterly from the bridge, but nearly the entire bottom is composed of very 
soft mud, through which craft could force their way without much difficulty when 
deeply laden and drawing more water than actually exists. 

General supervision, etc. — General supervision over the works and the different 
improvements in progress during the year was maintained as usaal. Complete and 
classified records of all craft passing through the canal during the year were care- 
talLj kept as usual. Also a classified record of those craft coming in from the lake, 
via the canal, to seek shelter in Sturgeon Bay from storms, together with a recora 
of the class, quantity, and approximate value of the cargoes carried by them at the 
time they were thus sheltered. The reports of commercial statistics received were 
properly entered on the canal register and the necessary reporting, correspondence, 



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2668 REPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEEBS, U. 8. ABICY. 

and all other clerical work connected with the office attended to. Dming the 
season the regular night senrice was maintained and day patrols made along the 
canal to see that the regulations governing the ose of the same were not violated. 
The engineer property received for storage firom various sources during the year was 
properly carea for. 

The rules and regulations governing the use of the canal were generally observed 
and carefully complied with oy those in charge of craft passing through the canal 
during the year, there being only two apparently willful violations, and these were 
promptly reported for prosecution by the United States district attorney. Collisions 
in the canal between craft in transit bound in opposite directions occurred on only 
two occasions, the damages in each case being nominal. The widening of the canu 
at the westerly end reduces the danger of collisions very materially, as it gives 
craft an opportunity to pass each other in comparative safety. Except in the case 
of the damage done the comer of the works at the harbor entrance of the canal 
October 21, 1896, by collision of Car Ferry No. 4^ of the Lake Michigan Car Ferry 
Transportation Company, damage to the works from this source has been very light 
during the past year. The car-ierry boats of this line are so large and unwieldy 
tiiat tne utmost skill and care in towing them through the narrow portion of the 
canal is required to prevent them from coming in contact with and damaging the 
works. Since the damage done to the northeast comer of the north revetment last 
fall by Car Ferry No. 4, the men in charge of the boats have been very careful in 
navigating the canal, and no damage has resulted to the works since then. With 
the canal widened to 160 feet for its entire length the chances of colliding with and 
damaginj^ the works by craft in transit would be reduced to the minimum. 

No serious groundings occurred in the canal during the year on account of an 
insufficient depth of water, a few deeply laden craft striking bottom quite hard, 
however, while passing out through the canal during the fall months. The water 
reached its lowest stage for the year at noon of November 27, 1896, when tiie tide 
gauge showed it to be 3.6 feet below the zero mark, or jB.66 feet below high-water 
mark of 1838, and its highest stage at noon of June 17, 1897, when the tide gauge 
showed it to be 0.2 foot below the zero mark, or 3.26 feet below the high- water mark 
of 1838. A permanent raise of about a loot has taken place since April 1, 1897. 

For commercial statistics for the calendar year ending December 31, 1896, see the 
statistics with report on Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan Ship Canal, Wisconsin, 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

Remarks andreoofumendaiions. — The north revetment from harbor entrance to west- 
erly end of the new slip is in good condition and will require no repairs unless dam- 
aged by craft in transit, or from some other now unknown cause. About 350 linear 
feet of this seotion of the works was rebuilt above the water line, and another row 
of 3 by 12 inch by 16 foot oak sheet piling driven in the rear of the old piling dur- 
ing the season of 1894, while the revetment of the slip was constructed last season. 
Immediately westerly from the slip the revetment is in a very advanced state of 
deca^ and badly out of line, and should be entirely rebuilt for a distance of about 
500 linear feet and the new work set back to conform to the line of the revetment of 
the slip and that at the westerly end of the canal where the canal has been widened. 

Between stations 15 and 33 the old revetments on both sides of the canal are in a 
very advanced state of decay above the water line, and will require extensive repairs 
to put them in good order. The cap timbers, binders, and top ends of the round 
and sheet piles are badly rotted, and new caps and binders will be neosssary in 
many places to prevent more extensive damage to the works. The lower or water 
wales, which were originallv only 10 by 10 inch white pine timber, have been so 
badly worn by the action of the elements and by craft in transit chafing against 
them that they have been very much reduced in size, and nearly or quite 50 per 
cent of the old' wales have thus been rendered unserviceable. This also applies to 
the old tie-rods, the greater portion of which have been rendered unserviceable by 
rust and the wearing away of the button heads on the channel face of the wales. 
It will therefore be necessary to take up nearly all the old water wales and tie- 
rods and replace them with new materials. It is very essential that the revetments 
be at all times provided with good water wales and tie-rods, so that the dock may be 
held in line and prevent that portion above the water, which has been very much 
weakened by progress of decay, from going to pieces. 

Beyond station 33 on each side of the canal the revetments are in excellent condi- 
tion and will require no repairs unless damaged by craft in transit, or by some other 
now unknown cause. 

Of the materials required for extension of revetment of the slip on the north side, 
near the lake end of canal, and for repairs as above outlined, the round piles and all 
the iron have been purchased in accordance with the requirements of law, and the 
materials have been delivered on the works. 

For placing a stone foundation under the office bnilding, further improvement of 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2669 



the gronndSy and keoping the bnildings in f^ood condition, an appropriation of $800 
Ib reoommended. as that amoant can be very profitably expended for those porposes 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1898. 

Navigation through the canal was maintained until December 22, 1896, when ice 
closed Sturgeon Bay, and was reopened for the season March 27, 1897. Between the 
foregoing dates the harbor and easterly portion of the canal were usually fne 
enough urom ice to admit of nayigation, but Sturgeon Bay and Green Bay were 
entirely frozen over and the ice so thick as to make navigation impracticable. 
However, during the early part of Februarv the car-ferry steamer Ann Arhw No, i 
made an attempt to force a passage through the ice from the canal to Menominee, 
Mich., distant about 27 miles. The steamer encountered but little difficulty in mak- 
ing its way as far as the mouth of Sturgeon Bay, but when that point was reached 
it was found the huge windrows of ice had formed from shore to shore, making it 
impossible for the craft to proceed farther. Dynamite was used to raise these bar- 
riers of ice, but this too was abandoned as impracticable, and after seventy-two 
hours of steady bucking, the Ann Arbor was compelled to return to the lake, via the 
canal. This is the second attempt at maintaining winter navigation over the route 
covered by this oar-ferry line, and each attempt having proved futile, it is probable 
that the project will be abandoned. 

The expenditures during the year ending June 30, 1897, amounted to 
(169280.12, from an allotment from the indefinite appropriation for 
*< operating and care of canals and other works of navigation," pro- 
vided by section 4 of river and harbor act of July 5, 1884. 

In accordance with this section an itemized statement of the expen- 
ditores is appended hereto. 

Money BtatemenU 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $1,310.88 

Amount aUotted for fiscal year ending June 30, 1897 17,613.84 

18,824.72 
June 90, 1887, amount expended during fiscal year 16, 280. 12 

Julyl, 1897, balance unexpended 2,544.60 

July 1, 1897, outstanding Uabilities 1,118.37 

July 1, 1897, balance available 1,426.23 

{Amonnt (estimated) for expenditure in fiscal year ending June 30, 1898. * 12^ 873. 77 
Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1898 14, 300. 00 



lUmUsed Miaiement of expense* made from appropriation for operating and eare of eanaU 
and other works of navigation, indefinite, act of July 6, 1884, applied to Sturgeon Bay 
and Lake Michigan Ship Canal, Wieoonein. 



Date. 



ITo. of 
voveber. 



To whom peid. 



For wh«t paid. 



Amounl 



July 8 
16 
16 

Aug. 4 

4 
S 
S 
S 
S 
14 
81 
81 
81 



A.L. Lewi* & Co , 

Baworth, Sohodde&Co 

W.D.Hakted 

Hired mon 

.....do 

The Laurie Stone Co 

J. S. Hay 

A. Henaon 

Danliem Towioe end Wrecking Co. 

Leathern dt Smiui , 

JameeWheian... 

Hired men 

JameeWheian , 

Hiiedmen 



Round piles , 

Soap 

OU 

Servioea, July, 1896. , 

.....do 

Freight 

Paint 

Wood 

Hire of tng 

Coal, eto , 

Traveling expense* . . 

Services 

do 

....do 



$1,2S4.7S 

6.90 

18.54 

1,126.40 

644.00 

7.50 

10.60 

800.63 

130.00 

880.01 

4.18 

805.00 

150.00 

688.34 



•Amonnt aUotted If estimate i* approred* 



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2670 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 



Itemized etatement of expenses made from appropriation for operation and care of canaJe 
and other works of navigation, indefinite, act of July 5, 1884, eto, — Continaed. 



Date. 



No. of 
Touoher. 



To whom paid. 



For wliat paid. 



Amount. 



18M. 

Sept. 2 

10 

10 

12 

25 

30 

Oct 1 

2 

2 

9 

10 

18 

17 

31 

81 

Nov. 2 

14 

17 

19 

25 

Deo. 2 

2 

8 

2 

9 

19 

81 

31 

1897. 

Jan. 28 

81 

2 

2 

2 

11 

24 

24 

28 

5 

5 

10 

10 

27 

27 

81 

81 

8 

5 

9 

80 

80 

00 

6 

« 

11 

20 

81 

81 

81 

81 

81 

31 

June 2 

9 

9 

9 

26 

20 

80 

30 

80 

80 

80 

80 

80 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Apr. 



May 



Soofleld ft Co 

M.J.Schraitt 

Western Union Telegraph Co 

G.K. Kendall 

Chas. Crosman 

Con tinental Bolt and Iron Worka 

Hired men 

F. A. Ha^en 

WakeOeld Sheet Piling Co 

WeeterD Union Telegraph Co 

H. Niedecken Co 

N. S. Waahbum & Co 

Swain & Tate Co 

£. A. Cannon 

....do 

Hired men , 

Rleboldt, Welter & Co 

Bacyrua Steam Shovel and Dredge Co.. 

Parkhanit St Wilkinnon 

LoniaFldler 

Hired men 

Leathern & Smith 

N. S. Waahbum Si Co 

J-S-Hay 

TheMarah ft Bingham Co , 

BifthopftBrooka 

A. Ross Honaton , 

Hired men 



Manitowoc Steam Boiler Works 

HughGiUen 

Hired men 

J.S.Hay 

Rieboldt, Wolter ft Co 

Hugh Gillen 

Scnleld ft Co 

E.Gilien 

Hired man 

J. 8. Hay 

do.. 

H.B.ftG.B. Bnrger 

E. Gillen 

B. A. Cannon 

Ives Brothers 

£. A. Cannon , 

Hired men 

HughGiUen 

John M. Bergman 

M.J. Schraitt 

Chas. Crosman 

Hired men .^ 

J.S.Hay 

Soofleld ft Co 

Leathem ft Smith Lumber Co 

M.J.Schmitt 

G.D.Greely 

Chas.Croaroan 

Rieboldt, Wolter ft Co 

N. S. Washburn ft Co 

J.S.Hay 

E.G.Karker 

Termansen ft Jensen 

Hired men 

E. A. Cannon 

DesForgea ft Co 

W.D.Hjilsted 

Continental Bolt ft Iron Works 

TheC.ReisaCoalCo 

E. A. Cannon 

Hired men 

....do 

J.S.Hay 

E.G.Karker 

Soofleld ft Co 

....do 

The P. Hayden Saddlery Hardware Co. 



Iron atrapa, ate 

Blueprinta, etc 

Telegrams 

Paper, etc 

Traveling exi>ensea 

Tie-rods, etc , 

Servioea, September, 1896. , 

Stone 

Rovalty on aheet piling... 

Teieerams 

Stationerv 

Pine lumber, etc 

Books 

Services 

Traveling expenses 

Services, October, 1896 . . . . 

Pine timber, etc 

Hoisting engine 

Tie-rods, etc 

Barb- wire fence 

Services. November, 1806. . 

Coal 

Wood 

Storm sashes, etc 

Timber, etc 

Round piles 

Services 

.....do , 



Steam dome 

Services 

Services, Janoary, 1897. 

Bolta, etc 

Pine timber, etc 

Traveling expenses 

Iron bolts, etc 

Maple rollers, etc 

Services 

Globe valvea, etc 

Steel, etc 

Calking, etc 

Sheaves, etc 

Traveling expenses 

Pnmp rods, etc 

Services 

do 

Traveling expenses 

Screw bolts, etc 

Blue prints, etc 

Services 

do 

Tallow.eto 

Iron, etc , 

Coal 

Blueprinta, etc 

Letter paper 

Services.. 

Pine timber 

Pine plank 

Iron, etc 

Wall paper, etc 

Stone 

Services, May, 1897 

Traveling expenses 

Stationery 

Oil 

Bolto,etc 

Coal 

Servioea 

do 

do 

Hawaerlina, etc 

Paint, etc 

Enlarging well, etc 

Packing, etc , 

Dredge chain 



$6.70 

8.58 

.62 

15.10 

15.26 

238.87 

410.73 

165.17 

150.66 

L85 

42.48 

64.60 

52.00 

150.00 

9.25 

492.47 

806.76 

675.00 

96.10 

98.42 

893.33 

88.75 

9.00 

24.48 

280.21 

126.76 

200.00 

808.14 

19.00 

150.00 

844.83 

8L84 

57.32 

7.60 

145.72 

179.50 

540.58 

63.42 

81.24 

413.72 

17.15 

17.27 

14.90 

150.00 

218.08 

7.47 

104.73 

14.51 

200.00 

732.84 

108.24 

83.06 

189.00 

11.05 

4.40 

200.00 

77.88 

87.84 

17.26 

33.10 

198.60 

870.10 

10.82 

17.85 

17.51 

114.88 

192.50 

150.00 

840.00 

428.71 

21.45 

34.20 

184.00 

27.16 

64.60 



Total. 



16,280.12 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2671 

H H8. 

IMPROVEMENT OF STURGEON BAY CANAL, HARBOR OF REFUOE, 

WISCONSIN. 

The original condition at this harbor, object of the improvement, proj- 
ect8y and present works, were described in detail in Annual Keport 
Chief of Engineers for 1896, pages 248 L and 2482. 

Oimdition of the improvement. — ^The main and detached piers are of 
the full length contemplated. Sonndings taken in April, 1897, showed 
a channel 16 feet deep below the datum plane of harbor improvements, 
with a width at entrance of about 190 feet, and a minimum width at 
entrance to canal of about 90 feet. The dredging now in progress has 
restored a channel 17 feet deep and about 100 feet wide, and this width 
wiU be increased to about 180 feet during the present working season. 
Operations during the fiscal year, — By hire of labor, and the use of 
n. S. dredge No. 1, dredging was in progress at the beginning of 
the fiscal year and was continued until July 9, 1896, resulting in the 
removal of 3,793 cubic yards since the beginning of the fis(^ year. 
Dredging was resumed by IT. S. dredge No. 2 on May 14, 1897, and 
was in progress at the close of the fiscal year, 10,741 cubic yards 
having been removed, or a total of 14,534 cubic yards during the fiscal 
year. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials, in accordance with law, 
repairs were made to the outer end of the detached south pier, which 
had been damaged by the action of drift ice and by collisions. The 
work consisted in cutting down the damaged i)ortion of the crib to 
about 1 foot below the water surface and rebuilding same. The repairs 
have been completed with the exception of redriving a line of fender ^ 
piling along the outer face of the pier, and which will be done during ' 
the present working season with the funds now available. 

Remarks. — ^The project for the improvement of this harbor is com- 
pleted, and the only expenditures now necessary are for maintenance 
of channel and repairs to existing works. 
Annual dredging will be necessary to remove the deposit of material 
^ brought in by the canal, by waves from the lake, and by other causes, 
^ but the amount of this deposit will probably be less in the future than 
-^ in the past. Much of the shoaling in the harbor has been caused by 
^ the erosion of the unrevetted portions of the canal banks, the eroded 
n9 material being carried out and deposited in the harbor by currents set- 
ting through the canal to tiie lake. 1 )uring the present working sea- 
son, those portions of the canal banks from which erosion takes place, 
will be revetted, and it is believed the amount of shoaling in the har- 
bor will be greatly decreased. It is impossible to estimate the exact 
amount of dredging required, but it is thought that the removal of 
10,000 cubic yards annually will maintain the channel. 

The fender piling built in 1881, that connects the main and detached 
piers, is in an advanced state of decay, and has been materially weak- 
ened at and near the water surface by the action of ice and by vessels 
colliding with it. It should be entirely rebuilt as soon as fonds are 
provided. Bepairs to the harbor piers are also necessary. 

Estimaie of fundi required far flsoal year ending Jwne 30, 1899, 

Renewal of 830 linear feet of fender piling $3,600 

Repairs of piore 500 

Dred^ng 10,000 cnbio yards, at 10 cents 1,000 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 600 

Total 1^600 

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2672 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEEBSy U. 8. ABICT. 

For the maintenance of the channel and existing works an appropria- 
tion of t5,500 is recommended for the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1899. 

Money itatemmU 

July 1, 1896. balaDce unexpended $6,388.08 

Jnne 30, 1887, amount expended daring fifloalyettr • 3,804.73 

Jnlj 1, 1887, balanoe nnexpended 8»983.30 

July 1, 1897, oatstanding UabiUtiee 35.33 

Jnly 1, 1887, halanoe arailable 8,947.97 

(Amoont that can be profitably expended in flacal year ending Jnne 30, 
1899, for maintenance 6^600.00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry oiyil act of Jane 4, 1887. 



APPBOPBIATIOm. 



Act of— 

March 3, 1873 $40,000.00 

March 23, 1874 10,000.00 

June 18, 1878 30,000.00 

March 3^1879 30,000.00 

June 14, 1880 10,000.00 

March 3, 1881 - 10,000.00 

August 2,1882 20,000.00 

July 5, 1884 10,000.00 

August 6^ 1886 6^000.00 



Act of— 

September 19, 1890 $3,000.60 

July 13, 1892 5,000.00 

August 17, 1894 5,000.00 

June 3, 1896 6^000.00 

Miscellaneous receipts 
credited to appropria- 
tions 182.60 



Total 183»182.60 



OOimSBOIAL BTAIISnCS FOB TRB GAIJEin>AB TBAB BNDIHO DBOBMBBB 31, 1806. 

See the statistics with the report on Sturgeon Bay and Lake Miohigan Ship Canal, 
Wisconsin. 



HH9. 
mPROVEMENT OP AHNAPEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the month of Wolf Biver, object of fhe^ 
improvement, projects, and present works, were described in detail in' 
Annual Beport, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, pp. 2483, 2484. 

Condition of the improvement, — To complete the original project the 
extension of each pier 50 feet would be required. By a modification of 
this project, approved March 6, 1897, further extension of the piers was 
abandoned, such extension not being deemed necessary for the mainte- 
nance of the projected depth. 

Soundings taken in May, 1896, showed a depth of water of about 16^ 
feet below the datum plane of harbor improvements at the entrance 
between the piers, decreasing to about 11 feet at the shore end of the 
piers. Soundings taken in April, 1897, showed a channel between the 
piers 12 feet deep, with a least width of about 75 feet, the depth at 
entrance between the piers being about 16^ feet, and an average depth 
of from 10 to 11 feet in the basin immediately inside the shore line. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — By hire of labor and the purchase 
of materials in accordance with law, repairs were made to the Gtovem- 
ment dredging plant. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2673 

BemarJcs, — ^In accordance with requirement of river and harbor act 
of Jane 3, 1896, a survey was made and report dated December 31, 1896, 
submitted for <^ Harbor of Ahnapee." The report is published in House 
Document No. 172, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session, and fully 
covers the condition and needs of the harbor. 

The estimated cost of completing the project now in force is $18,000. 
Various plans were submitted for increasing the harbor facilities, the 
estimated cost of the plan that was considered to be the most desirable 
being $19,000 in addition to the $18,000 for completing the present 
project, making a total of $37,000 as the estimate for the work. 

To obtain the projected depth in the harbor it is necessary to remove 
about 5,060 cubic yards of rock, and to dredge about 24,500 cubic yards 
of sand, which will cost as follows: 

5,060 oubio yards of rocky at $2.75 $13,915 

24,500 cnbio yards of sand, at 10 cents 2,450 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 1,635 

Total 18,000 

There has been appropriated for improving this harbor a total of 
$183,220, of which amount about $7,000 was on hand June 30, 1897. It is 
estimated that $4,000 of the funds available will be required to main- 
tain the channel until June 30, 1899, leaving the net amount of $3,000 
available for completion of present project. There will then be needed 
to complete the present project ($18,000 less $3,000), $15,000 in addi- 
tion to the amount now available. 

The original estimated cost of the present project (see Report of Chief of 

Engineers, 1876, Part II, pp. 346 and 359, and 1880, p. 1910), was $175,000 

Additional estimate (see Report of Chief of Engineers, 1891. p. 2539) 10, 000 

Additional estimate (see Report of Chief of Engineers, 1893, pp. 850 and 

Total 193,000 

Less total appropriations 183,220 

Balance of estimate, unappropriated 9,780 

Estimated amount required for completion of present project, in addition 

tofnnds now ayailable 15,000 

Lees unappropriated balance of estimate 9, 780 

Increase in estimate 5,220 

Total estimated cost of present projeot 198, 220 

The increase in the estimate is due to the cost of maintenance of 
channel. 

An appropriation of $15,000 for completion of present project is 
recommended for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. 

Money statement. 

July 1.1896, balance unexpended $8,357.59 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 1,377.77 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 6,979.82 

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 15, 000. 00 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal vear ending June 30, 1899 15, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acU of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry ciyil act of June 4, 1897. 

BHG 97 168 



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2674 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF £NGIN£EB8| U. 8. ARMY. 



APPBOPBIATIOHa 



Act of— 

March 3, 1871 $25,000 

Jnnel0,l872 25,000 

March 3, 1875 25,000 

Angnst 14, 1876 8,000 

June 18,1878 8,000 

March 3, 1879 7,000 

June 14,1880 7,000 

March 3, 1881 8,000 

August 2, 1882 12,000 

July 6, 1884 15,000 



Act of— 

AQgu8t5,1886 $15,000 

Augast 11, 1888 5,000 

September 19, 1890 6,000 

July 13, 1892 7, 000 

August 17. 1894 5,000 

Jane3,1896 5,000 

Miscellaneous receipts cred- 
ited to appropriations 220 

Total 183,220 



OOMMBBGKAL STATTBTICS TOB THS CAUBNDAB TSAR ENDING BBCBMBSB $1, 1896. 

[Vonilahed by Mr. George £. Wilbur, mftyor.] 

Kame of harbor, Ahnapee, Wis. ; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis. ; nearest 
light-house, on north pierhead, Ahnapee, Wis. 

ArrivaU amd departun$ of vcBseU. 





Desoription. 


Arrival*. 


Departures. 




Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Bimm 


MO 
224 


205.809 
22,397 


540 
125 


205,809 
22,007 


e»fi 






Total 


7«4 


227.700 


765 


227,910 





JMmoipal ariioU$ of export and imporU 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



Artldles. 



Tona. 



Artiolea. 



Tons. 



Agrioultund Implementa. 

Bark (tan) 

Beana 

Butter 

Cheese 

Bggs 

Furniture 

Hay 

Hideo 

Lumber 

Mmrble 

Merohandiae (general)... 
OaU 

oa 

Peaae 

Potatoes 

Bye , 

Shinglea 

Tiea (railroad) 

Wagonaand canlagea... 

Wheat 

Wooden ware , 

Wool 

Ttttal , 

Total approximate Talne. . 



12 



1.860 

85 

60 

20 

200.000 

427 

225 

7,542 

812 

2721 

120 

1,680 

26 

206 

280 

1^ 



218,5091 



XMPOBTB. 

Agrioultund implementa. 

Applee 

Chaira , 

Cheeee 

Goal and eoke 

Fiah 

Furniture 

Iron and ateel 

Leather 

Lime and oement , 

Lumber 

Marble 

Merchandise (general) 

MiU stufb 

OU 

Pork and beef 

Provisiona 

SaJt , 

Sash, doors, and blinds . . . , 

Shinglea 

Wagons and carriages. . . . 
Wooden ware , 

Total 

Total approximate value. . 



015 



124 

28^ 
84 
180 

2.744^ 

31 

8,000 

68 

1851 

2l{ 

800 

845 

lOi 

48 



8,25^ 

$718,380.27 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 

Priiio»j»aI crfielet of ojspiMrt imd iiiijNw^— Oontinaed. 

[By all ways of tnnaportatioii.] 



2675 



■ZPOBIB. 

Agrienltaral implements 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beans 

Botter 

Cattle 

Cheese 

fP.?::::::::::::;:::;;::: 

Floor 

Fnrniture 

Hay 

Hiaes 

Lnniber ■ 

Marble 

Hercbandise (general) ... 

Oafis , 

Oil 

Pease 

Potatoes 

Bye 

Sheep 

Bbinf^les 

Ties (railroad) 

Wagons and oarrlaees... 

Wheat 

Wood 

Woodemirare 

Wool 

Total 

Tbtal approximate Talne. . 



409, 728^ 



|8M,M0.0O 



Afrienltofal implements. 

Apples 

Bark (tanj 

Beer and liqnor 

Chairs 

Cheese 

Coal and ooke 

FUh , 

Floor 

Famitnre ••*... 

Iron and steel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and oement 

Lnmber 

Marble 

Merchandise (fensnl).... 

MiU staflb...^ 

Oil 

Pork sad bsef 

ProTisions 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds. . . 

Saw logs 

Shinglss 

Stone 

Wagons and curiages 

Wooden wars , 

Total , 

Total approximate Talne. 



97S 

1.0U1 

1:; 

m 

09 

.I* 

S,745 

440 

t»600 

08 

810 
845 

iH 

240^ 

48 

1,010 

98 

6 



126,0811 



$837,380.08 



HHxo. 
niPROVEMENT OF KEWAUNEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the mouth of the Eewannee Biver, object 
of the improyement, projects, and present works were described in 
detail in Annual Report, Chief of Engineers for 1896, page 2486. 

Oondition of the improvement — Under the contract now in force the 
piers will be completed to their projected length. Soundings taken in 
May, 1897, on the completion of dredging showed a channel between 
the piers 15 feet deep below the datum plane of harbor improvements, 
with a width of 200 feet at entrance and a minimum width of about 95 
feet. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract, dated December 
11, 1896, with Thomas J. McGrath for the constmction of 425 linear 
feet, more or less, of' pile pier for the extension of the north pier 200 
feet and the south pier 225 feet, work was begun May 10, 1897^ and was 
in progress at the close of the fiscal year. The details of coDstruction 
are the same as for the extension bnilt in 1895, except that Wakefield 
triple-lap sheet piling, of 2 by 12-inch pine planks, was used instead 
of the ordinary double-sheet piling of 3 by 12-inch planks. 

By hire of labor, the use of United States dredges Kos. 1 and 2, 
and the purchase of materials in accordance with law, dredging was 
begun August 1, 1896, suspended September 15, resumed November 
17, and closed for the season November 30; resumed March 25, 1897, 
and completed May 11, resulting in the removal of 74,825 cubic yards 
of material 



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2676 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. B. ARMT. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law, 
a frame warehoase 24 by 50 feet was bnilt on land donated to the 
United States by the city of Kewaanee, and the property was partially 
docked, 135 linear feet of dock having been boilt daring the fiscal year; 
minor repairs were also made to the piers. 

Remarks. — ^The city of Kewaanee has donated to the United States 
a piece of land, 120 feet by 265 feet, to be nsed for laying ap the Ooy- 
ernment dredging plant daring the winter, and also as a yard for the 
storage, handling, and framing of materials required for constraction 
and repair of piers. The location of this land, and of the warehoase 
bailt thereon by the United States, is shown on the map accompanying 
this report. The warehoase and dock along the front of this property 
were bailt oat of the appropriations fbr the improvement of Kewaunee, 
Manitowoc, and Waakegan harbors. 

The estimated cost of the project for improving Kewaanee Harbor 
was $200,000 (see Eeport of Chief of Engineers, 1881, p. 2084), and 
$150,014 has been appropriated for carrying it oat. The funds avail- 
able will complete the piers to the present 19-foot contour, which is 
about 200 feet in advance of this contour in 1880, when the original 
estimate was made, and dredge the channel and turning basin to the 
required depth, thereby completing the project of 1881 as modified in 
1892, at a saving of nearly $50,000 over the original estimate. 

The channel is subject to constant deterioration by the deposit of 
sediment brought in by the river, waves from the lake, and other causes. 
It is impossible to estimate the exact quantity deposited each year, but 
it is believed that about 30,000 cubic yards will have to be removed 
during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. Part of the superstructure 
is now in a decayed condition, and should be renewed at once. The 
snperstructure is constantly sabjeot to decay and requires renewal 
from time to time. 

BsHmaUfcrJUcal year ending Jwm SO, 1899, 

Dredging, 30.000 onbio yards, at 10 eents $3,000 

Repairs to piers 3,000 

Contingenoies, 10 per oent 600 

Total e,600 

An appropriation of $6,600 for maintenance of existing works is 
recommended for fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. 

Money statemevii. 

July 1, 1S96, balanoe unexpended $27,970.79 

JaneSO, 1897, amoont expended daring fiscal year 7,639.46 

• 

Jolyl, 1897, balanoe unexpended 20,831.33 

July 1, 1897, ontstanding liabilities $295.59 

July 1, 1897, amount oovered by uncompleted contracts 18, 000. 00 

18,295.59 

Jolyl, 1897, balanoe ayaOable 2,035.74 

fAmonnt that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 
1899, for maintenance 6^600.00 
Sabmitted in compliance with reqnirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry dyil act of June 4, 1897. 



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APPENDIX H H — BBPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2677 



▲PPBOPRIATIONB. 



Act Of— 

March 3, 1881 $5,000 

Angniftt 2, 1882 12,000 

Jnly5, 1884 18,000 

Augusts, 1886 10,000 

August 11, 1888 10,000 

September 19, 1890 20,000 

July 13, 1892 80,000 

Appropriated by local authorities in 1881 and expended by the United Statea 
under the direction of the engineer officer in charge, $8,042.72. 



Aetof— 

August 17,1894 $20,000 

Junes, 1896 25,000 

Miscellaneous receipts cred- 
ited to appropriations ... 14 

Total 160,014 



AhHract of propo$€kh fwr hMding 4M6 Unear feti, mor« or Im#, of oiar oxtwMUm at 
Kewaunee Harbor^ fFMooiMin, received in reeponee to advertieemeni dated October j97, 
1896, and opened JTovemher f7, 1896, hy Capt. €horge A, Zinn, Corpe of Engineere. 



No. 



Name and residenoe of 



12 

H 



II 



a 



l§ 



II 



If! 

1%^ 






Total for 
426 linear 



P. W. Galloway, Baoine. 
Wle 

HcArtbar Broibera Co., 
Cbicago,Ill 

QreiliDg Brothers, Qiaen 
Bay, Wia 

Adolph Green and W. B. 
Anderson, Green Bay, 
Wis 

Jas. A. BeAuvaia, Charle- 
voix, Hlob 

James A. Bslow and John 
Hnnroe, Charleyoix, 
Mich 

Chicago Star Constmction 
and Dredging Co., Chi- 
cago, HI 

Joseph Wolter, Sheboygan, 

Hansler k Lots Towing 
andl>ookCo., ChicM;o, lU. 

Donald A. McLeoiT and 
William MoLeod, Mania- 
tee, Mich 

John M. Bergman, Kewan- 
nee, Wia 

Matthews dt Keith. Mani- 
towoc, Wis, 



to woe. Wis 

George Cooper, Manitowoo» 
Wfi 



Thos. J. MoGrath, Green 
Bay, Wis 



0«fKt. 
IH 

ao 

22 

17 
17 

l«i 

19 
10 
17 

24 

17 
18 
18 
18 



$25.00 
25.00 
27.25 

24.00 
28.00 

25.00 

28.00 
80.00 
26.00 

27.75 
26.00 
28.50 
28.00 
28.00 



886.00 
28.00 
42.50 

88.80 
80.00 

88.00 

60.00 
84.00 
40.00 

88.00 
88.00 
86.00 
86.00 
88.00 



$17.00 
18.50 
28.00 

26.80 
2L00 

23.00 

26L00 
22.00 
26.00 

21.00 
22.00 
20.00 
18.90 
24.00 



$16.00 
19.00 
82.00 

21.00 
16.00 

18.00 

20.00 
16.00 
17.00 

18.00 
18.00 
17.00 
20.00 
20.00 



$4.70 
6.00 
6.26 

6.16 
8.76 

6.60 

6.68 
4.60 
4.76 

8.26 
4.86 

6.50 
4.96 
4.76 



8 

H 

4 
«i 

S| 
8 

8 

8 
8| 
S| 

3^ 

H 



4 

8i 

8| 

8| 

4 



H 

8 
4 

4 
8| 

4 

4 



$16,146.26 
16,872.60 
18,211.66 

16,826.08 
18,456.80 

16,806.82 

17,910.10 
16,064.50 
16.664.40 

19,789.76 
16,408.80 
14,178.80 
16,666.68 
U, 118. 20 



Amount of appropriation available for tbis work, $18,000. 

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into Decem- 
ber 11, 1896, with Thomas J. MoQrath, the lowest responsible bidder for this work. 



Contract in force. 



VHMofaontraotor. 


Work. 


Approred. 


Work com- 
menced. 


Work to be 
completed. 


Thflt J MfiGnfeh 


426 feet pile pier 


Jan. 14,1897 


May 17.1887 


ir«T. 80^1807 







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2678 BEPOBT OF THB CHIBF OP SNGINEBSSy U. 8. ABlfT. 

COmUBBdAL 8TATI8TI08 FOB THB GALBNDAB TSAB BMDINO DBCBM BBB 31, 1896. 

[Fnnlshtd hf Ih* BAjor of KawMinee, Wis.] 

Name of harbor, Kewaunee. Wis.; ooUection distriet, Milwaakee, Wit.; nearest 
light-house, on north pierheaOi Kewaunee, Wis. 















BoMTiplleii. 


▲XTiTlIS. 


DopartiirM. 




Knmber. 


Toiuiafe. 


Niunbw. 


TcmiiAge. 


Steun 


eoo 

100 


451,687 
It. 020 


too 

900 


451,587 


Bail 


18,030 








Total 


too 


4t6,B07 


800 


4t5,607 







PriMlpdl mrticle$ of esq^rt amd im^forL 
[By way of hazbor only.] 



Artidfls. 



▲rtiolot. 



Ton*. 



■ZPOBTB. 

▲trionltunl implemeiiti. 

▲ppleo , 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beana 

Beer , 

Brick 

Botter 

Cattle 

Cheeae. 

Com 

far.::::::::::::::::::::: 

Floar 

Famltara ••••••..••....., 

Hiiei;r.'.iii;ii;iiir.\*iii; 

Hoga , 

Lumber 

Herohandiae (general).... 

Mill etaiBi..... 

Oata 

Peaa • 

Pork and beef. 

Poat8(fenoe) 

Potatoea 

Sheep !...II! 

Tiea (railroad) 

Wheat. 

Wood , 

Wool 

Tbtal 

Totid ^pprozlmata Talne. . 



f7.5 

It 

486 

728.6 

t 

t 

S,400 

1,400 

1,600 

800 

38 

160 

40 

10,312.6 

5.6 

«,000 

26 

100 

1,500 

85,000 

88.500 

400 

«,800 

120 

880 

81 

1,300 

180 

1,400 

1,060 

750 

U 



108,567 



|4|366,860 



^SSlsr.:::::::::::::::: 

Beana 

Beer 

Cattle 

Chaira 

Cheeae 

Coal and ooke 

Com 

Famltare • 

Iron and ateal 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and oement 

Lnmber •••... 

Malt 

Marble 

Merehandiao (general). 

MiU atofb..... 

Oata 

OU 

Plaster (land) 

Pork and beef 

Potatoes 

ProTislona 

Bye 

Salt 

Saab, doora, and bUnda 

Shinglea 

Stone 

Wagona and carriagea. 

Wheat 

Wood 

Woodenwaro 

Total 



326 
47 
8.5 
43 

t 

31 

1 

1,200 

960 

17 

360 

87.6 

18.6 

317.6 

647.6 

8 

26 

8. 500 

800 

2.680 

875 

3,500 

80 



78 

88 

1,860 

80 

80 

11,300 

875 

880 

1,000 



88.064.5 



H H zz. 

ZMPROVEMENT OF TWO BIVEK8 HABBOB, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the mouth of Twin Bivers, object of the 
improyement, original project, and present works were described in 
detail in Annual Bej[)orty Chief of Engineers, for 1896, page 2489. 

Ttkt modification of the project adopted in 1897 was, in subBtance, 



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APPENDIX U H — REPORT OF CAPTAIH ZINN. 2679 

that no farther extension is necessary; that as now bnilt the require- 
ments of commerce involved are snfficieiitly provided for. 

Oonditionof the improveme^it. — June 30, 1896, the governing depth 
of water in the channel was about 12 feet. The dredging that was 
completed June 9, 1897, restored the channel to a depth of 13 feet for 
a width of 150 feet. 

The piers are built the frill length contemplated. The crib piers are 
in good condition. The superstructure of the pile piers is in a dilapi- 
dated condition, being very much decayed; the sheet piling to the pile 
piers is very imperfect and does not prevent the passage of sand 
through the piers into the channel. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated August 28, 
1896, with Eggers & Simono, for dredging 40,000 cubic yards, more or 
less, work was begun September 10, 1896, suspended November 28, 
1896, resumed April 24, 1897, and completed June 9, 1897, resulting in 
restoring the channel to a depth of 13 feet and width of 150 feet by 
the removal of 39,554.9 cubic yards of material. 

The original estimate for oompleting this work was $266, 588. 80 

There has beeniHPPropii*ted to date 214,500.00 

Differenoe 51,088.80 



The modifieation of the project, approved Febmary 27, 1897, caused a 

reduction in the estimate of the foreeoing difference. 
For the fiscal year ending June 90, 1^, the foUowing estimate is sub- 
mitted for maintenance of channel and piers: 

2,000 feet of snpentmctare and repairs to sheet piling, at $7 14, 000. 00 

Dredffing 40,000 cable yards, at 10 cents 4,000.00 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 1,800.00 

Total 19,800.00 

M(mey statement. 

Jnly 1« 1896, balance nnezpended $5,122.43 

Jane 30, 1897, amount exi>ended daring fiscal year 4,859.92 

July ly 1897, balance nnezpended 262. 51 

{Amonnt that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending Jane 30, 
1899, for maintenance 19,800.00 
Sobmitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of snnd^ civil act of Jane 4, 1897. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



Act of-- 

March3,1871 $25,000 

June 10,1872 25,000 

March 8, 1873 25,000 

June 23,1874 15,000 

March 3, 1875 15,000 

August 14, 1876 5,000 

June 18,1878 10,000 

March 3. 1879 20,000 

June 14,1880 20,000 

Maroh8,1881 :VI^,000 



Act of— 

August 2, 1882 $15,000 

July 5, 1884 8, 000 

August 11. 1888 2,500 

September 19, 1890 3,000 

July 13,1892 8,0(X) 

August 17, 1894 3,000 

June 8,1896 5,000 

Total 214,600 



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2680 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGIKEERSy U. 8. ARMT. 

Ah$iraot of propoiali for dredging 30,000 eMe yardi of nuaorial at ISoo Biver$ Hair^or, 
Wiiooniin, received in reepcme to adrertieement dated Auguat 1, 1896, and opened Angmet 
go, 1S96, by CapU George A, Zinn, Corpe ofEngineere, 



Vo. 



Kame ud realdflOM of bidder. 



Pileepv 
oabio 
jard. 



Total fiw 
W.000aoa- 
Moyaxda. 



ArtbnrH.Yogel,Milwaakee, Wis 

(ireen'a Dredging Co., Chicago, lU 

Bggen & Siuiono, Two Rivera.Wl8 

Goorge Cooper and Theodore Joeeoh, Manitowoo, Wis. 






$8, no. 00 

ft, 100. 00 
1.812.80 
S,OM.0O 



a The eoat being so low, a oontraei waa made for 40,000 cnbie yards, mors or Isaa. 

Ainoant of appropriation available for this work, $4,000. 

With the approYal of the Chief of Engineers, a contraot was entered into Angosl 
28, 1896, with Eggers &, Simono, the lowest responsible bidders, for this work. 



OOHMBBdAL STATISTICS FOR THS OAUENDAB TSAR BNDINO DBCBMBXB 81, 1898. 

[Famished by fhe piayor of Two Birers, Wis.] 

Name of harbor, Two Rivers, Wis.; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis.; nearest 
light-house, on north pierhead, Two Rivers, Wis. 

Arrivdle and departwree of vetMli. 



Description. 


Arrivals. 


Departozes. 


Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


200 
54 

400 


208,000 
10.600 
20,800 


200 
64 

400 


208,000 
10,000 


Sail 


Tan ....^.......^.*.T'rr^.^-rr^.Trr^T.---r-««......,.->«r**T..«. 


20.800 




Total 


714 


230,400 


714 


238,400 





Principal articles of export and imporim 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



Artiolea. 



Tons. 



Artidfls. 



■ZPOBTB. 

Batter 

Chairs 

Cheese 

Eggs 

PTsl 

Hay 

Hides 

Merchandise (general) . . 

Uats 

Ott 

Pease 

Pototoes 

Wagons and carriages . . 

Wooden ware 

Wool 

Total 



P 



18 

1^ 

000 

8 

036 

144 

80 



2.6021 



UPOBTS. 

Agrioaltaral implementa 

Apples 

Beer 

Cheese 

Famitare 

Iron and steel 

Lumber 

Merchandise (general)... 

Oil • 

Salt 

Saw logs 

TetA. ...... ....... 



20 



1,200 

2,000 

67» 

180 

46,000 



47.60ift 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 

iVieflifNri oHMrn of wpinri and i«porl— Oontinaed. 
[9y an mijs of tnuisportatioii.] 



2681 



ArtlolM. 


Ttes. 


Artlolaa. 


Tona. 


Bntlw 


«,567J 


OfPOBIV. 
AvplM 


e 


Chain 


1/^4 m>4 Mmoiii. 


11.400 


Cll68§6..... ....--.- 


LninlMr 


iSo 






sso 


ifqittvib 


T«4al**4.^*xxxa^* — .*. xa 




on 


18.150 


Sm^::::;::::;:::::::::::;:::::::::::; 














Total 


9,17^ 









HH 12. 
mPROYEMENT OP MANITOWOC HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the mouth of Manitowoc Bivery object of 
the improyement, projects and present works, werie described in detail 
in Annual Eeport, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, page 2491. 

The present project was approved July 9, 1896, and provides for an 
extension of the south pier to the 20-foot contour, a distance of 500 feet, 
at an estimated cost of $44,440. If it should be found necessary to 
extend the piers to the 22-foot contour, the cost would be $36,900 addi- 
tional, or an aggregate of $81,400. 

The project, with map, is published in House Document No. 300, 
Fifty-fourth Congress, first session. 

Condition of the improvement. — ^The piers are in fair condition, minor 
repairs to the decking being the only repairs n eeded. The work in prog- 
ress will extend the south pier 500 feet; it will then terminate in 20 feet 
depth of water. 

June, 1896, the channel was 17 feet deep for a width of 70 feet. May, 
1897, it was 18 feet deep and 110 feet wide, these depths being below 
the datum plane of harbor improvements, giving at the present stage 
of the lake an actual depth of 17 feet. 

Operations during the fiscal ^^r.— Under contract dated December 
11, 1896, with the Hausler & Lutz Towing and Dock Company for the 
extension of the south pier 500 feet, more or less, with cribs 100 feet 
long, 24 feet wide, and 22^ feet high, including the superstructure, work 
was begun May 25^ 1897, and was in progress at the close of the fiscal 
year. The first cnb was sunk June 12, the second crib was sunk June 
21, and the remainder of the work is well under way. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law, 
and the use of United States Dredge No. 2, dredging was begun July 
3, 1896, and completed September 12, resulting in restoring the channel 
to a depth of 19 feet for a width of 130 feet, by the removal of 37,493 
cubic yards of material. Bepairs were also made to the dredging plant. 

Remarks. — ^The proposed new lines of transportation between the 
West and the East, of which mention was made in the last annual 
report, to be formed by the Wisconsin Central Bailroad Company, the 
Chicago and Northwestern Bailway Company, car ferries across Lake 
Michi^n and Eastern railroads already built are in successful 
operation. 



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Qoo^^ 



2682 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. & ARMT. 

Under date of May 5. 1896, the Secretory of Wsr granted {permission 
to the Chicago and Northwestern Bail way Company to remove 320 
linear feet of the shore end of the south pier to construct a car-ferry 
sh'p about %5 feet long and to construct 2,000 linear feet of protection 
cribs along the shore of Lake Michigan to afford protection to the ferry 
slip and car tracks in that vicinity. This work has been completed in 
accordance with the approved plans. The portion of the harbor pier 
tiiat was removed afibrds entrance to and exit from the ferry slip. 

The city of Manitowoc dredged the Manitowoc Biver to 20 feet depth 
from the inner end of the harbor piers up the river for a distance of 
about 5,500 feet. The mayor of the city states that 273,400 cubic yards 
were removed, at a cost of $25,940.46. The Manitowoc Terminal Com- 
pany dredged a strip of 30 feet width alongside of its docks, removing 
about 60,000 cubic yards. 

Owing to the extremely low prices for materials and labor under the 
present and preceding contracts a large saving of the original esti- 
mates was msule, and it is believed, as shown by the following state- 
ment, that the ^nds now available will be sufficient to complete the 
20-foot channel and to maintain the channel and piers until June 30, 
1809; therefore no estimate for that purpose is submitted: 

Funds available $45^600 

Estimated expenditnreb ' 

Present contract $28,000 

Dredging to complete the 20-foot channel 5,000 

Minor repairs to piers * 1,000 

Contingencies ^600 

87,600 

Estimated balance 8,000 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended $51,020.11 

Jane SO, 1897, amount expended daring flsoiU year 5,921.54 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 45,098.57 

July 1, 1^, outstanding UabiUties $406.08 

July 1, 1897, amount oovered by uncompleted contracts 80, 000. 00 

80,406.08 

Jnly 1, 1897, baUuLoeavailftble 14^692.49 



APPBOPBIATIOm. 



Act of— 

August 80, 1862 $8,000.00 

June23,1866 62,000.00 

March2, 1867 45,000.00 

July 25, 1868 (allotted) . . 17, 500. 00 

April 10, 1869 (allotted) . . 17, 820. 00 

July 11, 1870 20,000.00 

March 3, 1871 11,000.00 

March 8, 1873 20,000.00 

June 23,1874 10,000.00 

March 3, 1875 10,000.00 

August 14,1876 8,000.00 

June 18, 1878 15,000.00 

March 8,1879 6,500.00 

June 14, 1880 7,000.00 



Act of— 

March 8, 1881 $4^000.00 

August 2, 1882 10, 000. 00 

July 5, 1884 15,000.00 

August 5, 1886 15,000.00 

August 11, 1888 8,000.00 

September 19, 1890 8, 000.00 

July 13, 1892 28,000.00 

August 17, 1894 20,000.00 

June3. 1896 44,440.00 

Miscellaneous receipts 
credited to appropria- 
tions 220.50 



Total 400^48a60 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



APPENDIX H H — ^BIPOBT OF OAPTAIN ZIKN. 



2683 



AMraei €f pntp9$aU for ImMimg 600 UmMrfett, morv or le$s, of pier exteiuion at Mani- 
Uwoe SarhoTj TFtfotmain, received in reepome to adverUeemetit dated Oeteher 27, 1896^ 
and opened Noveedber t7, 1896, ftjf Capt, George A. Zmn^ Corpe of Engineere, 



Ko. 



ludnaldtt 
bidder. 



»4 



a 



P 



I' 
J 

e 

■49 

00 






u 






a 
II 



I 

9h 



Te/Uifet 
SOOUbmt 



Thot. jr. UoGnttli, Oreen 
Bfty.Wia 

licArthar BroUiers Oo., 
Chicago, HI 

Hatthewa A Eaith, liani- 
towoo«Wia 



6«om Cooper,]Caaitowoo, 



▲dolph Green and W.B. 
AnderaoB, Oreen Bay, 
Wla ... 

I>oiiald A. HcLeod and 
William McLeod. Mani*. 
tee,Mioh 

Nelaon J. GaylordfLadinff- 
*on,liloh 

Jamea A. Ealow and John 
Hnnroe,CharleToix, 
Mich 

Ghieago Star ConatmeUon 
and Dredging Co^ Chi- 
oago,Ill 

Haoaler A Lnto Towing 
and Dook Co^ Chicago, 
m 

Knapp A Qillen, Baelne, 

Joeeph Woltar, Sheboy- 
gan, Wis , 



190.00 
20.00 

hqo 
ia.00 

90.M 

IV 00 
21.00 

23.00 

28.00 

laoo 

2L00 
22.00 



$18.00 
17.00 
10.00 
14.00 

16.00 

10.00 
l&OO 

14. TO 

17.00 

15.00 
16.25 
14.00 



120.00 
10.00 
17.60 
15.00 

10.20 

18.00 
U.00 

17.00 

10.00 

17.00 
10.60 
10.00 



10.00 
5.40 
5.00 
5.45 

5.40 

5.00 
5w85 

8.00 

5.75 

5.00 
5.40 
5.20 



H 

8 

1AM 



SMI 

21 

2 



(knU 
8 

H 

8| 

1 



4 
8| 
4 
tM 

H 

4 
H 

8 

S| 

5 
H 

8 



$8.60 
0.88 
0.26 
8.76 

0.00 

10.25 
8.60 

8.00 

0.00 

8.00 
8.60 

12.00 



$80,004.00 
28,810.20 
81,648.00 
27,028.02 

28,004.08 

81,200.00 
28,787.87 

85,407.60 

81,412.71 

27,088.60 

28,028.25 
28,400.50 



Amount of ap^ropriatton aTailablo for this work, $36,000. With the approTal of 
the Chief of Engineen a contract was entered into December 11, 1886, with Uansler A 
Lnts Towing and Dock Company, the lowest responsible bidders for this work. 





Canira4ft in force. 






Kame of contractor. 


Work. 


Approred. 


Work com- 
menoed. 


Work to be 
completed. 


Haoalar A Lnts Towing and Dock 
Go. 


600 fteterfb pier 


Jaa. 0,1807 


May 26,1807 


Not. 80,1807 



COMMXSdAL STATISTICS VOB THB GALXICDAB TKAB XNDIHa DSOBMBBR 31, 1896. 

[Fomlahed by Mr. Thomaa B. Torrlaon, mayor.] 

Name of harbor, Manitowoc, Wis. ; collection district, Milwankee, Wis. ; nearest 
light-hoQse, on north pierhead, Manitowoc, Wis. 















DeMTiption. 


ArriTala. 


Bepartoree. 




Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


701 
818 


608,128 
48.128 


788 
818 


607,482 


Sail 


48.818 








Total 


1,104 


810,251 


1,101 


000,811 







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2684 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEEBB, U. 8. ABMT. 



Principal artieiet of export amd importm 
[By way of fha harbor only.] 



ArticlM. 






Taos. 



JLcriealtand implemento . 



iSS^:. 



Briok 

Bottor 

CatU* 

CheiBM 

Coal and ooke.. 



Bf£a.. 

TB1A.. 



Floor. 
Fumitnro . 
Hay 



Hilea.*: 



HOM . 

Loatdier 

Halt 

Herchandiae (general). 



Plaater Hand).. 
Pork and beef. . 

Potatoea 

Bye 



Waffona and oarriacea. 

wBat .7^.... 

Wool 



L050 
90 
98 
80 



90 

S,000 

40«000 

225 

5 

M.«82i 

600 

9,000 

4,000 

H 

750 

7,000 

8.000 

9,600 

12,000 

400 

24 

4,120 

1,092 

1,600 

12 

100 



Agrieultoral implementa. 

▲pplea 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Coal and ooke 

Com 

PUh 

Pumitoie , 

Hides 

Iron and ateel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and oement 

Lumber 

Marble 

Merchandiae (general)... 

HillatoA 

OU 

Plaater (land) 

Pork and beef 

Salt 

Shinglea 

Stone 

Wagona and oarriagei . . . 
Wood 



890 

1,680 

229,000 

42 

6 

7,000 

100 

6,000 

81 

666 

9,000 

90 

96.000 

200 

225 

8,800 

24 

8,450 

600 

4,900 

15,000 



TMal 

Total asFraztmata Ttlna... 



801,6971 



$2,769,009 



TMal 

Sotil ^proximate rain 



121,6781 



$2,170,C 



BY ALL WAYS OF TBAKSPOBTATIOV. 



Artioleo. 



Tone. 



Artlolea. 



Afrlenltnral implementa 

t£S.lr.::::::::::::::::: 

Beaaa 

Beer , 

Briok 

Butter 

Cattle 

Cheeee , 

Coal and ooke 

aS:::::::::::::::::::: 

Floor 

Fomitnre 

Hilei""ir.i""'.i;;.'r. 

Hogs 

Leather 

Halt 

Herohaadiae (general).. 

HllletuiBi...-^ 

Data 

Peaae 

Plaater (land) 

Pork and beef. 
Peta 

SSt 

Sheep.......... 

Wagona andoarrlagea..., 

Wheat 

Wool 

Total 

TMal Appmimale Tain*, 



4,600 

54 

456 

86 

2,625 

8,400 

806 

660 

1,600 

210,000 

27,960 

1,100 

18,000 

7* 

800 

150 

660 

18,000 

4,700 

12,800 

17,100 

610 

4,960 
8,248 
2,560 

60 

800 

8,450 

60 



834,816 



16,000,000 



Agrienltnral implementa 

Apples 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beana 

Beer 

Coal and ooke 

Com 

Fiah 

Flour 

Furniture 

Hidea 

Iron and ateel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and oement 

Lumber 

Marble 

Merchandiae (general) ... 

MiUatolIli 

oa 

Plaater (land) 

Pork and beef 

Polea (telegraph) 

Salt 

Saab, doora, and blinda... 

Shinglea 

Stone 

Tiee (railroad) 

Wagona and oarriagee 

Wheat .77. 

Wood 

Total 

Total approximate ralne. 



1,150 

172| 

1,820 

^1? 

86 

20,400 
1.680 

•I 

u,7n 

«,600 
2,475 
26 
712| 
16.000 
200 
40,000 
4,000 
742| 
8,900 
74» 

6a 

406 

70 

765 

7,700 

680 

150 

060 

16,760 



156,9841 



94,909.909 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CiPTAIN ZINN. 2685 

H H 13. 

nCPBOVEMENT OP SHEBOYGAN HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the mouth of Sheboygan ftiver, object of the 
improvement, projects, and present works, were described in detail in 
Annual Report, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, page 2495. 

Oondition of the improvement — ^To complete the present project each 
pier should be extended 100 feet. Soundings taken in May, 1897, 
showed a channel between the piers 19 feet deep below the datum 
plane of harbor improvements, with a minimum width of about 70 feet, 
except at its inner end, where it was obstructed by a shoal lying nearly 
in mid-channel. This shoal has since been removed by dredging. 

O^^ations during the fiscal year. — By hire of labor and the use of 
United States dredge No. 2, dredging for deepening and widening the 
channel, and for removal of the shore end of the original south pier, 
was begun September 21, 1896, suspended December 2, resumed March 
25, 1897, and was in progress at the close of the fiscal year; 44,239 
cubic yards of material and about 1,200 linear feet of old pier were 
removed during the fiscal year. 

By hire of labor and purchase of material in accordance with law, 
work on the pile pier to connect the old pier with the new pier built in 
1895 and the construction of a warehouse has been in progress during 
the fiscal -year. Work on the pile pier was begun May 20, 1897, and 
at the close of the fiscal year about 100 linear feet had been finished, 
leaving about 229 linear feet to be built. The pile pier is of the same 
construction as that built in 1895. 

The warehouse is a onestory frame building of outside dimensions 
24 by 32 feet, located on United States land a^oining the life-saving 
station on the north side of the harbor under authority granted by the 
Secretary of the Treasury February 18, 1897. It was completed June 
25, 1897. 

Remarks. — ^The land needed for the widening of the channel was trans- 
ferred by the city of Sheboygan to the United States and was dredged 
away in November, 1896. The owners of the adjacent property have 
put in an excellent revetment 935 feet long on the line of the new pier. 

In accordance with requirements of river and harbor act of June 3, 
1896, a survey was made and report dated January 27, 1897, submitted 
for harbor at << Sheboygan, with a view of obtaining 21 feet." The 
report, with map, is published in House Document No. 327, Fifty-fourth 
Congress, second session, and fully covers the condition and needs of 
tiie harbor. The estimated cost of the desired improvement is $75,000. 

A revised estimate, approved March 6, 1897, for the completion of the 
present project was submitted February 17, 1897, and is as follows: 

200 feet pier extension, at $65 $13,000 

Work on south pier 10,000 

1,000 feet sheet pil e revetment along north pier, at $15 15, 000 

Dredffing 60,000 cnbic yards, at lOcents 6,000 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 4,400 

Total 4 8,400 

Eflrfeimated amount required to complete the present proj eot 48, 400 

Fonda available February 1, 1897 21,800 

Estimated amount to oomplete 26,600 

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project, in Annual 

Report for June 90, 1«96, was 55,900 

Revised estimate herewith submitted 26,600 

Raduotion 29^800 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



2686 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF BNGINEEBS, U. S. ARMY. 

An appropriation of $26,600 for completion of present project is recom- 
mended for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899. 

Money statemenU 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended $36,393.57 

June 30, 1897, amount expended daring fincal year 13,994.09 

Jnly 1, 1897, balance unexpended 12,399.48 

July 1, 1897, outetandingliabiUties 168.35 

July 1, 1897, balance available s 12,231.13 

f Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 26, 600. 00 
Amount that can be profi tably expended in fiscal vear ending June30, 1899 26^ 600. 00 
Submitted in compliance witb requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



APPBOPRIATIONS. 



Act of— 

August 30, 1862 $10,000.00 

June 28, 1864 (allotted) ... 10, 000. 00 

Jane 23, 1866 47,598.91 

March 2, 1867 8,000.00 

April 10,1869 (allotted).. . 14,850.00 

July 11, 1870 15,000.00 

March 3,1871 15,000.00 

June 10,1872 18,000.00 

March 3,1873 10,000.00 

June 23,1874 10,000.00 

March 3, 1875 12,000.00 

August 14,1876 6,000.00 

June 18, 1878 4,000.00 



Act of— 

March 8,1879 ,. $3,000.00 

June 14,1880 7,000.00 

March 3,1881 25,000.00 

August 2,1882 30,000.00 

July5,1884 28,000.00 

August 5,1886 16,000.00 

August 11,1888 16,000.00 

September 19, 1890 16, 000. 00 

Julyl3,1892 25,000.00 

August 17, 1894 26,000.00 

June 3,1896 26,000.00 

Total 394,448.91 



COMMKBCIAL 8TATIS1108 FOB THS CALBITDAB TSAR SNDINO DECSMBBR 31, 1896. 

[Farniahed by Mr. & P. Ever.] 

Name of harbor, Sheboygan, Wis. ; collection district, MilwaukeCy Wis. ; nearest 
light-house, Sheboygan, Wis. 

ArHvaU and departur$8 of veueU. 





Descriptiaii. 


ArriTslt. 


Departaree. 




Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


BtMRI ... ,,T-r.r r ^— „,,,^,, -,,,, 


750 
292 


608,870 
44,404 


753 
800 


608,810 


g|m ,,...,^_-- 


47,206 






Total 


1.042 


013,340 


1,060 


01&,576 





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APPEITDIX H H — ^SEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZIMN. 



2687 



FHmcipdl arii6le$ of export and impork 
[^7 an ways of tnaaporUtlon.] 



Artiolea. 



Tons. 



ArtidM. 



Tons. 



A}r^<m1timd impleineiita. 

Apples 

Beer 

Chain 

CbeeM 

Coal 

^:::::::::;:::;:::::::: 

Fnroiture 

Ironasdateel 

Leather 

Lime and cement 

Halt 

Merchandise (general) — 

Peas 

Potatoes 

Salt 

Stone 

Woodenvare , 

Total 

Agrkmltaral implements. 

Bark (taiiVir.'.'."IIIII"iri 
Barley 



8S0 

90 

945 

49,050 

9,201 

165,000 

435 
8,000 
S.00O 
8,150 
1,150 
9.400 
4,085 

960 

256 
1,660 
2.400 

8171 



286,749 



600 

160 

16,840 

9»720 



mpoRTB^contlnaed. 

Cheese 

Coal and coke 

Com 

Flonr 

Famitore 

Hav 

Hides 

Iron and steel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and cement 

Lnmher 

Malt 

Marble 

Merchandise (seneral) 

MiUstuHii...^ 

Oats 

OU 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence) 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds 

Shingles 

Stone 

Ties (railroad) 

Wood 

Total 



200,000 

1,860 

646 

1,160 

350 

4,950 

8,000 

1,800 

200 

1804 

72,000 

2621 

800 

16,228 

825 

1,120 

2,4071 

680 

648 

2.176 

200 

1,600 

292| 

700 

80,000 



862,817 



H H Z4. 

IMPB07EMBNT OP POBT WASHINGTON HABBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the month of Sank Eiver, object of the 
improvementy projects, and present works, were described in detail in 
Annual Report Chief of Engineers, for 1896, page 2499. 

Oimdition of the improvement — ^The piers were completed in 1893; the 
rebuilding of snperstrnctnre over the inshore ends of the piers, built in 
1871, is now in progress. Soundings taken in May, 1896, showed that, 
with minor exceptions, the channel and basins had a depth of 13 feet, 
and that the object of the improvement had been practically obtained. 
The soundings taken in May, 1897, showed that shoaling had occurred 
in places, and that the governing depth was about 12 feet. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — By hire of labor and purchase of 
materials in accordance with law, the rebuilding of decayed superstruc- 
ture of the north and south piers was begun May 17, 1897, and is in 
progress at the close of the fiscal year. The funds available will prob- 
ably admit of rebuilding about (>70 linear feet, of which 320 linear feet 
are completed, and the remainder is well under way. About 33 cords 
of stone were transferred from the shore ends of the piers where they 
were no longer needed, and used as refilling and riprap to the outer 
ends of the piers. 

Bemarks. — ^The most urgently needed repairs to the piers are in prog- 
ress, and will be continued to the extent of available funds; they will 
probably be completed during the month of August. 



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2688 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF BNGINEEBS, U. 8. ARMT. 
EHUnatefarfiieal fwt mdHmg Jwm SO, 1999. 

For dredging for restoration and maintenance of channel $3, 600 

For minor repairs to pier 600 

Contingencies 400 

Total 4^400 

Miyney statement. 

Jnlj 1,1806, balance unexpended $6,978.17 

June 30, 1897, amount expended dnring fiscal year 2,814. 28 

Jnly 1,1897, balance unexpended 8,168.02 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 849.77 

July 1, 1897, balance arailable 2,809.16 

{Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 
1899, for maintenance 4^400.00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acta of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry dyil act of June ^ 1897. 



APPBOPBIATIOim. 



Act of— 

Jnly 11, 1870 $16,000.00 

March 3, 1871 16. 000. 00 

JunelO, 1872 16,000.00 

March3,1873 16,000.00 

June 23, 1874 10,000.00 

March 3,1876 10,000.00 

August 14, 1876 8,000.00 

June 18, 1878 6,000.00 

March 3, 1879 7,600.00 

June 14, 1880 20,000.00 

March 3, 1881 17,000.00 

August 2, 1882 17,000.00 



Act of— 

Jnly 6, 1884 

August 6, 1886 

September 11, 1888 

September 19, 1890 

July 13, 1892 

August 17, 1894 

June 3, 1896 - 

Miscellaneous receipts 
credited to appropria- 
tions 



$10,000.00 
6,000.00 
6,000.00 
8,000.00 
6,600.00 
6,000.00 
6,600.00 



86.60 



Total 19^686.60 



OOMMBBCIAL STATISTICS VOB THE OALBNDAB TSAB Xin>INO DXGBMBBR 81, 1896. * 

[Fundsbed by the migror of Port Wsahington, Wik] 

Name of harbor. Port Washington, Wis. ; collection district, Milwaukee, Wis. ; 
nearest light-house on outer end of north pier. Port Washington, Wis. 

Arri^aU mid d^^ari%re9 ofve$$eU. 



Description. 


AnlTsls. 


Bepartnreo. 


Knmber. 


ToDiuife. 


Knmber. 


Toniuifo. 


8tMm . . , .. 


•1 
67S 
1C3 


11.600 
86,900 
15.800 


tl 
009 

108 


11,000 
85,060 
16.800 


Fliliiiiff tan 


ST^ ^ '*; "■V';r'''""";";:;;";;;'"vr"' 




Total ...••• 


9» 


•S.600 


888 


•8.460 





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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 

Frinoipal artiolet of export and import, 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



2689 



ArtidM. 


Tons. 


Articles. 


Tons. 


EXPORTS. 

A Ales 


224 

'•IS 

87* 

2,000 

274 

8,200 

116 

194 

450 

19,360 

2,600 
290 

1,900 

600 

160 

9 

120 

^1* 


IMPOBTS. 

Asricnltnral implements 


120 


BiJKJ^ ::::::::;;::::::::::::::::;::::: 


Bark (tan) 


1,210 


Beantf .••..... > 


Beer 


*? 


Beer 


Chairs 


Brick 


Coal and coke 


6,200 


Butter 


Oom 


1734 
172 


Chaim 


Pionr - 


Clieeee 


Famitnre -. 


124 
425 


KffffB 


Hides 


^ "":::::::::::::;;;:::::::::::::;:: 


Iron anA steel 


2,600 


]noiir -. 


Lath 


276 




Lime and cement. 


114 


Hay 


Lumber - 


17, 230 


HIdee 


Malt 


40 


Hogs 


Marble 


2U0 


Iron and steel 


M^rch An<liAn (crminral) 


2,200 


Loaiher 


Oil 


810 




Pork and beef 


12 


Millstoffs . .t. 


Posts (fence) 


95 


Oats 


Provisions 


105 


Pmua 


Salt 


300 


Potatoes 


Shingles 


300 




Wheat 


1,560 


Sash, doors, and blinds 


Wooden ware 


9 


Wood 


Total 




Wool 


33,2314 




Total approximate valae 


Tf>tal 


38,1954 


$1, 045, 000 








Total approximate Talae... ...a 


1975.000 









H H 15. 
IMPROVEMENT OP HARBOR OF REFUGE AT MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of Milwaukee Bay, object of the improvement, 
projects, and present works, were described in detail in Annaal Report, 
Chief of Engineers, for 1896, page 2502. 

Condition 0/ the improvement. — The depth of water along main arm 
varies from 30 feet at the angle to 36 feet at southerly end. Area 
covered by present works, outside 13-foot contour, 228 acres; outside 
19-foot contour, 147 acres; omitting the 500 feet of pier without super- 
structure, the area covered by completed works, outside 13-foot con- 
tour, is 191 acres; outside 19 foot contour is 119 acres. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated January 13, 
1897, with Enapp & Gillen, of Bacine, Wis., for the extension of the 
breakwater 1,600 feet, more or less, work was commenced April 24, and is 
in progress at the close of the fiscal year. The extension will consist of 
timber cribs, each 100 feet long by 30 feet wide, and 25^ feet high, without 
superstructure, placed on a stone foundation. At the close of the fiscal 
year 2,931.9 cords of stone had been placed in the foundation and crib 
construction was in progress, but no cribs had yet been sunk under 
this contract. The contractors have built, by authority of the Secre- 
tary of War, a temporaiy wharf in the harbor of refuge near the shore 
end of the breakwater, and have made extensive preparations to com- 
plete the entire contract during the present working season. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law, 
repairs were made to the shore arm of breakwater, and the gap between 
the inner end of breakwater and the shore was closed. 
KNa 97 169 



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2690 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

The repairs consisted chiefly in providing 24 intervals with plank 
shutters, and filling them with stone, 602.7 cords being used for this 
purpose. This stone was furnished in the work, at the remarkably low 
price of $4.40 per cord. 

The gap between the inner end of breakwater and the shore was 
closed by building a continuous plank crib, at right angles to the shore 
arm of the breakwater, beginning at a point about 125 feet southerly 
from the inner end of breakwater and extending for a distance of 2t5 
feet. The crib is 6 feet wide, and of a height varying from 11 feet 4 
inches at the breakwater to 2 feet 8 inches at its inner end, its top sur- 
face being nearly level. It was built of 2 by G inch pine planks, spiked 
together with cross walls 8 feet C inches apart, center to center. The 
crib rests on three G by 6 inck mud sills, has a solid plank bottom, is 
filled with sand, gravel, and stone, and riprapped on both sides. The 
location of the crib, and soundings taken May 14, 1897, are shown on 
the accompanying map. 

The scow Dunham has been reengaged to serve as a light-ship at the 
south end of the breakwater under a new agreement with her owner. 

Remarks, — At the beginning of the fiscal yeaf there remained of the 
'original project yet to be built 2,()00 feet of breakwater and 500 feet of 
superstructure to be placed on work already built. The accepted bid 
for the construction of work authorized by the river and harbor act of 
June 3, 189G, was so low that it has been found possible to build 1,700 
feet of breakwater without superstructure and 300 feet of superstruc- 
ture. There remains, therefore, of the original project 900 feet of break- 
water and 1,900 feet of superstructure. The exact cost can not be 
foretold and it is not safe to use the present contract price in estimat- 
ing it, because this price is unusually low. It is believed that $115 per 
foot is a safe estimate. 

Eitimate of coat of conipleting breakwater at Harbor of Befuge, Milwaukee, Wi$, 

900 feet of crib work on stone foundation, complete, at $115 per foot $103,500 

1,900 feet of superetructuro, at $20 38,000 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 14,150 

Total 155,650 

In the annual report upon this improvement for 1896 it was explained 
in detail why its tiual cost has exceeded the original estimate. 1'he 
principal items not included in the original estimate and paid for from 
appropriations for the work, are (1) maintenance of light-ship for thir- 
teen years (1884 to 1896, inclusive), $18,740.94, and (2) repairs to bi*eak- 
water, $77,163.20, after damage by severe storms. 

Money statement, 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $22,415.11 

Amount appropriated by sundry civil act approved June 4, 1897 168, 737. 91 

191, 153. 02 
June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 17,467.46 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 173,685.56 

July 1, 1897, outstandiug liabilities $4,908.55 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 163, 829. 36 

168, 737. 91 

July 1, 1897, balance available 4,947.65 

r Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 155, 650. 00 

I Amountthatcanbeprofitably expended in fiscal year ending June30, 1899 155, 650.00 
) Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
i^ harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June i, 1897. 



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APPKNDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2691 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Act of— 

March 3, 1881 $100,000.00 

AugnatS, 1882 100,000.00 

Julys, 1884 85,000.00 

August 5, 1886 ^60,000.00 

From which allotted to Milwaukee llnrbor 4, 737. 91 

55, 262. 09 

August 11, 1888 70,000.00 

September 19, 1890 80,000.00 

July 13, 1892 75,000.00 

August 17, 1894 45,000.00 

June 3, 1896 20,000.00 

June 4, 1897 168,737.91 

Miscellaneous receipts credited to appropriations 1, 000. 00 

Total 800,000.00 



Abstract of proposals for hnilding 1^600 linear feet of breakwater extension atHarhcrof 
Refuge, Milwaukee Bay, Wisconsin, received in response to adrertisement dated Decem- 
ber 17 f 1896, and opened January 9, 1807, by Capt, George A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 



Ko. 



Kame and rpsidooce of 
bidder. 



I'l 

Is 



IS 



I 



16.00 
16.50 



Chicago Star ConHtrnction and 
Dredfl:ing Co., Cliicafro, 111 ... . 922. 00 $15. 00 

Mo Arthur Brothers Co., Chi- 
cago, 111 

Carkin. Stickney & Cniin, De- 
troit, Mich 

Haasler Sl Lutz Towing and 
Dock Co., Chicago. Ill 

Adolph Qreen and W . B. Ander- 
son, Green Bay. Wis 

Knapp & Gilleu, Racine, Win 

William A. Starke, Milwankeo, 
Wis 

Joseph Wolter, Sheboygan, Wis. . 



24.70 

22.50 

21.50 

23.80 
20.75 

35.00 ; 

21.90 






i* 



$18. 00 

18.00 

I 
21.00 ! 



16.80 
14.75 



20.00 ; 
15.50 I 



15. 50 ; 21. 00 



17.50 
16.50 



20.00 
15.00 



1 


•i 


«f 


SJ 


"^ 


«S 


"E • 


-^ 


H 






bo. a 


<r 


p ij = 


s 


SS.& 


tn 


? 



16.00 


2 


6.06 


2 


5.50 


2* 


6.00 


n 


6.25 
5.Uo 


\^ 


6.00 
6.25 


3 



I 

2- 



Gilts. 
3 

2 

n 

3 

8 
2 



II 



2a 



OenU. 
3 

2 

2i 

4 

li 

3 
3 



Total for 

1,60U linear 

ieet. 



$158,112.00 

158, 208. 50 

154,036.75 

150,285.00 

168.576.00 
149, 770. 00 

171,874.00 
164,993.00 



Amount of appropriation available for this work, $178,737.91. 
With the approval of the Chief of Enj^ineers, a contract was entered into January 
13, 1897, with Knapp &. Gilleu, the lowest responsible bidders, for this work. 



Contract in force. 



Name of contractor. 


Work. 


Appro vetl. 


Work com- 
menced. 


Work to be 
completed. 


Knann & Gillen 


l,600feet breakwater .. 


Jan. 27,1897 Anr'oi lasn 


Dec 31 1897 











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2692 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR TEAR ENDIWa DECEMBER 31^ 1896. 

Name of harbor, Harbor of Refuge, Milwaakee, Wis. ; collection district, Milwau- 
kee, Wie. ; amount of revenue collected at nearest port of entry, $329,398.87. 
(See the commeroial statistics for Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsin.) 



H H x6. 

IMPROVEMENT OF MILWAUKEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original coDdition at the mouth of the Milwaakee^ Biver, the 
object of the improvement, projects, and present works were described 
in detail on page 2506, part 4, Annaal Report of the Chief of Engi- 
neers, United States Army, for 1896. 

Condition of the improvement. — The harbor piers were completed to 
their projected length in 1872. Soundings taken in April, 1897, showed 
a channel midway between the piers with a least width of 130 feet and 
19 feet deep below plane of reference of coast survey charts of Lake 
Michigan, viz, 3.06 feet below high water of 1838. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract with Mr. William 
A. Starke, dated August 28, 1896, for dredging 12,000 cubic yards, 
more or less, work was begun September 21 and completed October 20, 
1896. The amount of material removed under this contract was 14,271.5 
cubic yards, resulting in the restoration of the 19-foot channel for a 
width of 150 feet. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law, 
407 linear feet of the superstructure of the south pier were rebuilt. 
The work was begun August 3 and completed September 20, 1896. 
The materials used and cost of same in place were as follows: 

Pine timber and plank $1,166.08 

Iron bolts and spikes 125.26 

Tools, cartage, etc 43.43 

Labor, including pay of OTerseer 941.06 

Total 2,275.82 

Cost per linear foot 5.59 

Tridaily observations of water levels of Lake Michigan were made 
and recorded. 

Remarks. — In accordance with requirements of river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1896, a survey was made, and report, dated November 23, 
1896, sabmitted for <^ harbor at Milwaukee, Wis., with a view of obtain- 
ing a channel 21 feet deep." The report is published in House Doc 
;No. 61, Fifty-fourth Gongress, second session. The estimated cost of the 
desired improvement is $12,000. 

About 600 linear feet of the superstructure of the south pier is in a 
very dilapidated condition and should be rebuilt at once. The cross- 
ties are entirely rotted out, and there is constant danger of that portion 
of the pier above the water surface caving into the channel. 

A new pile protection should also be built at once along the channel 
face of the south pier for a distance of about 1,100 feet. 

These repairs to the south pier are most urgently needed and have 
already been too long deferred. 

Eepairs to the north pier are also needed. The upper face of the 
stone superstructure is broken in places, and for a distance of about 390 
feet should be filled with crushed stone and covered with heavy dimen- 
sion stone. 



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APPENDIX H H — BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2693 

Biiimaie for fUoal year ending June SO, 1899. 

Rebuilding 600 feet superstractare (Bonth pier), at $5.59 $3, 354 

RecoDBtnicting 1,100 linear feet protection piling (south pier), at $3.50 3, 850 

Sepairs to north pier stone superstrnctore .*.. 1,000 

Dredging for maintenance of channel 4,000 

Contingenoiea 1,196 

Total 14,000 

An appropriation of $14,000 for maintennnce of existing works is 
nrgently recommended for fiscal year ending June 30, 1891). 

Money statement 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance nnezpended $7,053.89 

June 90, 1897, amount expended daring fiscal year 5,236.02 

Joly 1> 1897, balance unexpended 1,816.87 

fAmonnt that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 
18y9, for maintenance 14,000.00 
Submitted in compliance with reqnirisments of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Ea^^ded on former mouth of Milwaukee Biver. 
Act of— 

July 4, 1836 $400.00 

March 3, 1843 30,000.00 

June 11, 1844 ;. 20,000.00 

Straight cut. 
Act of— 

Angust 30, 1852 15,000.00 

March 3, 1863 163.94 

June 23, 1866 48,283.51 

April l6, 1869 (allotted) 35,640.00 

Jnly 11, 1870 40,000.00 

March 3, 1871 38,000.00 

March 3, 1873 10,000.00 

March 23, 1874 10,000.00 

March 3, 1875 25,000.00 

August 14. 1876 26,000.00 

June 18, 1878 15,000.00 

March 3, 1879 7,500.00 

June 14, 1880 10,000.00 

March 3, 1881 8,000.00 

August 2, 1882 10,000.00 

August 5, 1886 (from appropriatiuu for harbor of refiigo) 4, 737. 91 

August 11, 1888 10,000.00 

March 17, 1890 (special act) 6,100.00 

September 19, 1890 6,000.00 

July 13,1892 14,000.00 

August 17, 1894 7,000.00 

June 3, 1896 7,000.00 

Total expended at old river month and straight cut 403, 825. 36 

Expended at former mouth of Milwaukee River 50, 400. 00 

Total expended at straight out (present harbor) 353, 425. 36 

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2694 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

AbBlrad of propoaaU for dredging IS^OOO cubic yards of material at AfilwattJcee Harbor, 
Wiaconntif receired in response to adrertisemetit dated Augvat 1, 1896, and opened Auguet 
SO, 1896, by Capt, George A, Zinn, Corps of Engineere. 



No. 



Name and renidonce of bidder. 



Price 

per cnbio 

yard. 



Total 

for 12,000 

cubic yards. 



1 NorriB G. Dn<1f;e & Son, Chicago, 111 . 

2 William A. Starke. Milwaukee. Wia . 
8 Arthur H. Vo^l, Milwaukee, Wis... 



Genu. 
21 

18 



♦2,630 
1,710 
2.160 



Amount of appropriation available for this work, $2,000. With the approyal of 
the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into August 28, 1896, witn William 
A. Starke, the lowest responsible bidder for this work. 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

[Pumiahcd by Mr. W. J. Langnon, aeoretiury Chamber of Commerce.] 

Name of harbor, Milwaukee, Wis.; collection district. Milwaukee, Wis.; amount 
of revenue collected during the year, $329,398.87. 

ArrivaU and departures of reeaeU. 





Description. 


Arrivala. 


Departnrea. 




Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Stoam 


4,100 
1,372 


8,523.087 
342,807 


4,306 
1,378 


8,761,220 


Sail . .. -. - - 


832,408 








Total 


S,481 


3,866,884 


5,683 


a4, 006, 628 







a Registered tonnage of the vessels. Tonnage of freight carried was approximately 8,446,492 tons. 

Principal articles of export and import, 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



Articles. 



EXPORTS. 

Barley 

Beans 

Beer 

Butter 

Cement 

Chair stock 

Cheese 

Coal 

Com 

Eggs 

Plour 

Hay 

Hides 

Iron 

Leather 

Lime 

Lumber 

Malt 

Mill stuffs 

Gate 

Peas 

Pork, beef, and lard 

Provisions 

Rye 

Wheat 

Wool 

Wisconsin tobacco 

Total 

1MPOBT8. 

Bark(Un) 



Tons. 



115, 304 

177 

381 

6 

12, 633 

75 

218 

306 

8,380 

102 

444,062 

3,028 

145 

7,788 

5,205 

51 

45,000 

30,978 

136,917 

156.660 

10,506 

41.465 

621 

32,306 

35,047 

486 

615 



1, 096. 350 



30,942 



Articles. 



1VPOBT8— continued. 

Barley...* 

Boans 

Brifk 

Butter 

Cement 

Cheese 

Coal 

Eggs 

Flour 

Fruit 

Hay 

Hides 

Iron 

Lath 

Leather 

Lumbi^r 

Oil 

Peas 

Plaster (land) 

Posts (fence; 

Potatoes 

Rye 

Salt 

Shingles 

Stone 

Sugar 

TioH (railroad) 

Wheat 

Wood 

Wool 

Total 



Tona. 



06 

1,830 

1,372 

48 

4,046 

8 

1,487,483 

lU 

431 

354 

89 

1,037 

119,829 

2,606 

215 

178,538 

206 

10.001 

8.985 

2.119 

1,649 

846 

94.089 

2.032 

5,489 

2,926 

1,116 

3,326 

157, 327 

251 



2,122,878 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZlNN. 



2695 



Principal artiolea of export and import^Con tinned. 
[By all ways of transportatiozi.] 



EXPOBTS. 

Barley 

Beans 

Beer 

Brick 

Butter 

Cattle 

Chair stock 

Cheese 

Coal 

Com 

EgR* 

Flour 

Hay 

Hides 

Hogs 

Iron 

Lath 

Lime and cement 

Lnmber 

^alt 

Millstoffs 

Oats 

Peas 

Pork, beef, and lard 

Potatoes 

Provisions 

Rye 

Salt 

Sheep 

Shingles 

Wheat :. 

Wooden ware 

Wool 

Wisconsin tobacco 

Total 

DCPORTB. 

Bark (tan) 

Barley , 

Beans 



150. 

7, 
1, 



446, 
11. 



491. 
5, 



30. 
124, 



31, 
69, 
160, 
201), 
10, 
16, 

44, 
35. 
92, 



741 

386. 5 

895 

176 

181.5 

484 

155 

669 

683 

917.5 

45 

061.5 
053 
736 
609 
441 

82 

076.6 
056 
068.5 
250 
763.5 
422 
400 
150 
695.5 
495.5 
660.5 
849 



76,115 
826 
66 
108.5 



1, 



2,041,026.5 



48.338 

279,145.6 

1.605 



IMPORTS —continued. 

Brfck 

Bntter 

Cattle 

Ceinoiit 

Chair stock 

Cheese 

Coal 

Com 

Egff» 

Flour 

Fruit 

Hay 

HiAes 

H«g8 

Iron 

Lath 

leather 

Lime 

Lnmber 

Malt 

Mill stuffs 

Oats 

Oil •. 

Peas 

Plaster (land) 

Post s (fence) 

Potatoes 

Rve 

Salt 

Shwp 

Shingles 

Sugar 

Stone 

Ties (railroad) 

Wheat 

Wood 

Wooden ware 

Wool 

Wisconsin tobacco 

Total 



17,122 

2, 424 

16,879 

37. :i43 

1,290 

1,919 

1,687,795 

58,033 

3,197 

343. 672 

355 

22, 264 

8.866 

75,323.6 

218,183 

3.255 

2,043 

12.604 

245.263 

28, 249 

31,049 

222. 048 

42, 509 

10, 018 

4.347 

2, 153 

70. 579 

49,881 

95, 267 

2,487 

2,243 

335, 333 

202. 057 

1,722 

280.081 

172, 088 

2,040 

1,253 

2,382 



4, 645, 606 



The railroads decllue to furnish tonnage of freight carried. 

Comparative statement of commercial statistics from 1890 to 1896, 



Tear. 


In freight. 


Cat freight. 


Total. 


1896 


6.668,473 
2,238.404 
2,160.706 
1, 926, 604 
2.181,730 
2.155.313 
1, 706, 978 


8,187,375.6 
828.651 
718.899 
735,233 
838,741 
761, 167 
656,149 


9, 805, 848. 5 


1885 


3, 096. 055 


1894 


2, 879, 605 


1893 


2, 661, 827 


1892 


3. 020. 471 


1891 


2, 916, 478 


1890 


2, 362, 052 







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2696 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

H H 17. 

IMPROVEMENT OF SOUTH MILWAUKEE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The orifjlnal colidition of the mouth of Oak Creek, object of the 
improvement, project, and present works, were described in detail in 
Annual Report, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, pp. 2509, 2510. 

Candition of the improvement — ^There has been no change in the con- 
dition of the improvement, other than a shoaling between the piers, 
since the survey of October, 1894, a report of which survey, accom- 
panied by a map of the harbor, was published in Annual Report, Chief 
of Engineers, for 1895, pp. 2642, 2643. 

The present piers, built by private parties, are of such inferior con-' 
struction as to be unfit to form any portion of the permanent improve- 
ment. 

Soundings taken April 28, 1897, showed a depth of channel between 
the piers varying from about 9 feet at the end of north pier to nearly . 
absolute closure at the mouth of Oak Creek at the inner end of the 
piers. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — ^There have been no operations at 
this harbor. 

Rennarks. — A contract, entered into December 9, 1896, with Mr. P. W. 
Galloway, of Racine, Wis., for the extension of the north pier 180 
linear feet, more or less, provided that the work on the extension should 
commence on or before May 1, 1897. The work, however, has not yet 
been commenced, as the contractor has been engaged on repairs to the 
harbor piers at Kenosha and Racine, these repairs being urgently 
needed, and their early completion considered to be of more importance 
than the pier extension at South Milwaukee. 

With the present depth of water, and length and condition of piers, 
the harbor of South Milwaukee is of no benefit whatever to general 
commerce. It is not considered advisable to do any dredging until the 
piers shall have been rebuilt and extended. Considerable dredging 
between the piers has been done by private parties, and a depth of 
about 12 feet was secured. This depth has now decreased to an aver- 
age of about 6 feet, with but 9 feet depth at entrance, thus plainly 
demonstrating the utter futility of attempting to maintain a navigable 
channel between piers of their present length. 

The estimated cost of completion of present project (see Report of 
Chief of Engineers, 1895, p. 2643) is $133,000. 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance nnexpended $5,000.00 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 35. 89 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 4,964.11 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 4, 500. 00 

July 1, 1897, balance available 464.11 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 133, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Act of June 3, 1896 $5,000.00 



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AFPENVIX H H — ^BEPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN 



2697 



AMraet ofpropo$aUfor building 180 linear feet, fnore cr 1e$i, of pier exiention a< South 
Milwaukee aarhor^ Wieeoneinj received in response to advertieement dated October t7, 
1896, and opened November 27, 1896, by Capt, George A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 



Ko. 



K«D«s and reafdenee of 
bidden. 



II 

it 






as. 



J§No •«§ 



Is 



55- 



8 



00 



II 

•all 

g-eS 



Si 

II 



4i 



§ 

^ 



P. W. Galloway, Kaoioe, 
Wia 

James Cape & Sons, Ea- 
ciiie.WiN 

P. F. KeUy, Milwaukee, 
^jg .,.....,., 

Knapp 4c Gilien, Racine, 

James A. Eslow and John 
Monroe, Cbarlevoix, 
Mich 

Chicago Star Construction 
&, Dredxing Co.. Chioa- 

TO.1U. 

John M.Sorgman, Kewau- 
nee, Wis 



CmU. 
20 

21 

20 

21 



$27.00 
30.00 
26.00 
24.50 

27.00 

30.00 
36.00 



$18.00 
30.00 
17.60 
16.50 

19.00 

22.00 
16.00 



136.00 
40.00 
40.00 
42.00 

35.00 

50.00 
38.00 



$20.00 
30.00 
23.00 
21.00 

33.00 

28.00 
24.00 



$5.50 
8.00 
5.50 
7.50 

7.25 

6.75 
6.25 



Omts. 
8 

4 



4 
5 
H 

81 

H 
H 



$4,500.48 
5,564.88 
4,512.60 
6.268.84 

5,310.52 

5, 160. 53 
4.788.90 



Amount of appropriation ayailable for this work, $4,500. 

With the approTul of the Chief of Engineers a contract was entered into, Decem- 
ber 9, 1896, with P. W. Galloway, the lowest responsible bidder for this work. 



Contract in force. 





Work. 


Approved. 


Work oonSmenced. 


Work to be 
completed. 


P. W. Galloway 


180 feet pUe pier 


Dec 16, 1886 


Will probably begin 


Ang.31.1897. 





COMMSRCIAL STATISTICS FOR THK CALENDAR TKAR KNDIKO DECBMBER 81, 1896. 

[Famished by Mr. Fred. W. Rogers, secretary South Milwaukee Company.] 

Name of harbor, 8onth Milwaukee, Wis. : collection district, Milwaukee, Wis.; 
nearest light-hoose, north pier, Milwaukee, ^¥is• 



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2698 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 



Principal ariicle8 of export and import, 
[By all ways of tnmtporUtion.] 



Articlofl. 



Tons. 



Articles. 



Tons. 



Cattle 

Iron and steel 

Merohandise (general). 
Mineral wool 



Total. 



Total approximate valae . 

IB1POBT8. 

Agricaltaral implomenta . 

Beer 

Brick 

Cattle 

Coal and coke 

Com 

Flour 

iFarnitare 

Hay 

Horses 

Iron and steel 

Lath 



180 
13,500 
11, 738. 5 
1,200 



26, 618. 5 



$1, 680, 100 



29 " 

1,022 

3,400 

180 

15,595 

5,850 

6221 

33 

700 

60 

16,050 

51 



I1IPOBT9— continaed. 

Lime and cement 

Lumber 

Malt :.. 

Merchandise (general) 

Mill stuffs 

Oats 

Oil, petroleum 

Fork and beef 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence; 

Rye 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and bli nds 

Sower pipe and drain tile . . . . 

Shingles 

Ties (railroad) 

Wood 

Total 

Total approximate value . . . . 



799 
2.410 
130 
27,805 
120 
771 

204 

52 

2681 

240 

12* 

400 

90 

21,000 

3,000 



109,062^ 



f 1, 138, 228 



H H x8. 

IMPROVEMENT OP RACINE HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The origiDal conditioii of the moath of Root River, object of the 
improvement, projects, and present works were described in detail in 
Anunal Report, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, pages 2511 and 2512. 

A modification of project approved March 9, 1897, provides for the 
construction of 900 linear feet of sheet piling and dredging for main- 
tenance of channel. 

Condition of the improvement — Both piers are now of the full length 
contemplated under the revised project of 1889. 

Soundings taken in December, 1890, on the completion of dredging, 
showed a channel 17 feet deep, having a width at entrance of about 140 
feet and a least width of about 00 feet. An extensive bar, with a least 
de])th of about 13^ feet on it, had formed around the outer end of the 
south pier south of the navigable channel. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated August 28, 
1890, with the Racine Dredge Company for dredging 30,000 cubic yards, 
more or less, work was begun September 9, 1890, and completed Decem- 
ber 4, 1890. The amount of material removed uuder this contract was 
29,639 cubic yards, resulting in the restoration of a channel of navigable 
width and with a least depth of 17 feet. 

Under contract dated December 11, 1896, with Knapp & Gillen, of 
Bacine, Wis., for the extension of the south pier 250 linear feet, work 
was begun April 12, 1897. 

The extension consists of two cribs, each 100 feet long, and one crib 
50 feet long, the width of all the cribs being 20 feet and their height 
18J feet, including the superstructure. The cribs were placed upon a 
pile foundation and were filled with stone and riprapped. A row of 
protection piles was driven at the end of the pier. The 50-foot crib and 
one 100-foot crib were made continuous above the eleventh course of 
timber and sunk as one crib. 

The work was completed June 26, 1897. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^EEPOET OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2699 



LUi of materials and cost of same in place for building 250 linear feet of crih pier at 
EaoinCf Wis,, under contract %oith Knapp ^. Gillen. 



Materials. 



Pine timber feetB.M.. 

Hemlock timber do.... 

Pine plank do.... 

Stone cords.. 

Foundation and protection piles nnmber.. 

Wronght-iron drift bolts pounds.. 

Wrought-iron screw bolts do 

Wroctght-iron apikes do.... 



Total. 



Quantity. 



152. 006 

120, 408 

1», 269 

693.7 

114 

22,732 

3,712 

810 



Unit 
price. 



$20.00 

15.00 

16. 50 

6.00 

8.00 

.02i 

.03 

.02^ 



Amount. 



$3, 040. 12 

1, 806. 12 

218.94 

4,162.20 

912.00 

568.30 

111.36 

20.25 



10,839.29 



South pier extension, 250 by 20 feet; cost per running foot, $43.36. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law 
281 lineal feet of Wakefield triple-lap sheet pile revetment, to prevent 
the passage of sand through the north pier, was constructed along the 
channel face of the pier. A total length of 550 feet of this revetment 
is to be constructed. Of the remaining 269 linear feet the materials 
are all purchased find the work partially done, the round piles having 
been driven for the entire distance. An agreement was entered into 
April 17, 1897, with Mr. l\ W. Galloway, of Eacine, Wis., to furnish all 
machinery, tools, and labor necessary for the completion of the revet- 
ment, the work to be completed on or before August 1, 1897. Sixty-two 
cords of stone have been used in refilling the piers and for riprap where 
undue settlements had occurred. 

Remarks.— ^In accordance with requirement of river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1896, a survey was made and report, dated January, 27, 1897, 
submitted for *' Harbor at Bacine, with a view to obtaining a channel 
21 feet deep." The report is published in House Doc. No. 326, Fifty- 
fourth Congress, second session, and fully covers the condition and 
needs of the harbor. The estimated cost of the desired improvement 
is $51,650. 

Estimate for fiscal year ending June SO, 1899, 

900 linear feet sheet piling, at $15 $13,500.00 

Dredj^ing for maintenance of channel 6, 000. 00 

Rebuilding saperHtracture, 300 by 30 feet, north pier 2, 400. 00 

Contingencies 2,100.00 

Total : 24,000.00 

An appropriation of $24,000 for completion of existing project and 
maintenance of existing works for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1899, 
is recommended. 

Money statement, 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $27,418.20 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 12, 447. 21 

July 1,1897, balance unexpended 14,970.99 

July 1,1897, outstanding liabilities 11,211.29 

July 1, 1897, balance available 3, 759. 70 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 13, 500. 00 
Amount that can be protitably expended in fiscal yearendin^June30, 1899 * 24, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor aots of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4. 1897. 

* $10,600 for maintenance. 



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2700 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

I 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



Act of— 

June 15, 1844 $12,500 

August 30, 1852 10,000 

June28,1864 3,600 

June 23, 1866 23,910 

March2,18^>7 45,000 

April 10, 1869 (allotted) 22, 275 

July 11,1870 10,000 

March 3, 1871 10,000 

March 3, 1873 20,000 

June 23, 1874 10,000 

March 3, 1875 10,000 

August 14, 1876 8,000 

June 18, 1878 10,000 



Act of— 

March 3, 1879 

June 14, 1880 

March 3, 1881 

August 2, 1882 

July 5, 1884 

August 5, 1886 

August 11,1888.... 
September 19,1890. 

July 13, 1892 

August 17,1894.... 
June 3, 1896 



$6,000 

6,000 

6,000 

7,000 

7,000 

10,000 

10,000 

17,500 

25,000 

20,000 

27,000 



Total 336,785 



Abstract of proposals for dredging £5,000 cubic yards of nuiterial at Baeine Harbor, 
Wisconsin, received in response to advertisement dated August 2, 1896, and cponea 
August go, 1896, by Capt, George A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers. 



No. 



Name and residenoe of bidder. 



Price per 
cubio 
yard. 



Total for 

35,000 a 

oubio 

yardtf. 



Arthur H. Yoeel, Milwaakee, Wla. 
Raoine Dredge Co., Racine, Wia... 
Edward Gillen, Racine, Wis. 



Cents. 



Green*a Dredj^ng Co., Chicago, 111 % 

Norria 6. Dodged Son, Chicago, 111 

George Cooper and Theodore Joeaoh, Manitowoc, Wia. 



17 



18,073.00 
2,812.60 
2,087.60 
8.125.00 
8,825.00 
4,250.00 



a The oost being ao low, a'oontract waa made for 30,000 cnbic yards, more or leaa. 

Amount of appropriation available for this work, $3,500. 

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into Angost 
28, 1896, with Kacine Dredge Company, the lowest responsible bidders for this work. 

Abstract of proposals for building £50 linear feet, more or less, of pier extension at Raoine 
Harbor, Wisconsin, received in response to advertisement dated October £7, 1896, and 
opened November £7, 1896, by Capt. George A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers. 



Ko. 



Name and residence of 
bidder. 



^5 

89 



If 



Sfe* 

n 



it 
0.1 

04 



I 

CO 



It 



S s 
S n « 



hi 
lie 



l§ 



M 





|5. 






Total for 

250 linear 

feet. 



P. W. Galloway. Baolne, 
Wia 

Jas. Cape A Sons, Baeine, 
Wis 

Knapp St Glllen. Baeine, 

He Arthur Broi.* Co.'Chi* 
cage, HI 

George Cooper, Manito- 
woc, Wis 

Chicago Star Construction 
and Dredging Co., Chi- 
cago, Hi 

Hansler & Lnts Towing 
and Dock Co., Chicago, 



$20.00 

80.00 
20.00 
20.00 
21.00 

23.00 

20.50 



$10.00 
25.00 
15.00 
17.00 
14.75 

17.00 

16.00 



$10.00 
20.00 
16.50 
10.00 
17.00 

19.00 



$5.60 
6.00 
6.00 
5.65 
6.75 

6.76 



18.00 6.00 



$10.00 
8.40 
8.00 
9.00 
8.50 

9.00 

0.50 



Cents. 
3 

21 
2i 
2i 
2 



Ctntt. 
8 

3 

2i 

2 

8| 



Cents. 
3 

5 

2i 
8 

2| 

81 



$11, 566. 80 
14.240.20 
11,434.20 
11,532.70 
12,009.00 

12,900.20 

11,833.90 



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APPENDIX H H REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINH. 



2701 



Amonnt of appropriation available for this work, $12^000. 

With the approval of the Chief of Eogineers, a contract was entered into Decem- 
ber 11, 1896, with Knapp & Gillen, the lowest responsible bidders for this work. 



C<mtr<Kit in force. 



Name of coniraotor. 


Work. 


f 

Approved. 


Work com. 
iiience<l. 


Work to be 
completed. 


Knain) Sc Gillen ................... 


250 feet crib pier 


Dec. 22, 1896 


Maj 6,1897 


Not. 80,1897 







COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

IPnmiBhed by the mayor of Baoine, Wis.] 

Name of harbor, Raoine, Wis. ; collection district, Milwankee, Wis. ; nearest port 
of entry, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Arrivals and departures ofwaseU, 





Deacription. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 




Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Namber. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


1,2U 
256 


1,783,792 
30,008 


1,214 
265 


1, 735. 945 


Sail _ 


41,737 






Tnfftl 


1.470 


1,772,796 


1,479 


1,777,682 






Principal artiolee of export and import. 
(By way of the harbor only.] 



Articles. 



Tons. 



Articles. 



Tons. 



Exports. 

Agrieoltnral implements. 

Beer 

Pish 

Flour 

Hides 

IroD and steel 

Leather 

Lumber 

Marble 

Merchandise (general).... 

MiUsfeofb 

Oats 

Posts (fence; 

Shinglea 

WsfEons and carriagos — 
Wool 



Totai 

Total approximate value. 

mPOBTB. 

Agricultural implements. 

Apples 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beans 

Beer 

Butter 

Csttle 

Chairs 



815 

I 

8.9264 

293 

16,540 

15 

89,408 

76 

281 

266 

6,250 

610 



56,418 



$4,280,460 



16 
188 
704 
120 

'i 

12 



mpoBTS— continued. 

Cheese 

Coal and coke 

Furniture 

Hay 

Hides 

Iron and steel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and cement 

Lumber 

Merchandise (general) 

Mill stuffs 

Oil 

Posts (fence) 

Potatoes 

Provisions 

Rye 

Salt 

Savlogs 

Shingles 

Stone 

Ties (railroad) 

Wagons and carriages 

Wheat 

Wood 

Wooden ware 

Wool 

Total 

Total approximate value.., 



64,140 

52| 

30 

193 

362i 

650 

192 

86 

108,402 

78,925 

68 

153 

6,092 

64 

820 

36| 

240 

174 

2,6ll| 

9,100 

476 

86 

30 

36.800 



808,4001 



18,410,208 



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2702 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 



Principal articles of export and import — Continued. 
[liy all ways of transportation.] 



EXPORTS. 

Agricultural implenients. 

Beer 

Brick 

Coal and coke 

Fi«h 

Flour 

Furniture 

Hide* 

Iron ami steel 

Leather 

Lirno and ccniout 

Lumber 

Marble 

Merchandise (general) 

Mill stuffs 

Oats 

Oil 

Posts (fence) 

Provisittns 

Sash, doors, and blindn . .. 

Shingles 

Wagons and carriages 

WoSl 



48.123 
287 
1.5«0 
,8.400 
790 
132 
1.626 
19 
5,420| 
293 
8U7i 
25. 2.i0 
15 
79. 657 
176 
441 
618J 
342 
555i 
108 
525 
5.900 
25 



Total 180,653J 

Total approximate value $32, 2C0, 140 



Agricultural implement h . 

Apples 

Bark(t*u) 

Barley 

Beans 

li«Mr 

Briik 

Butter 



61i 

138 

2,178 

144 

H 

1.624 

174 

105 



mpoBTS— continued. 



Cattle , 

Chairs 

Cheesw 

Coal and coke , 

Com 

Flour , 

Furniture 

Hav 

Hities 

Iron and steel 

Lath 

Leather 

Lime and cement 

Lumber 

Merchandise (genertU) . , 

Mill stuffs 

Oats 

Oil 

Pork and beef , 

Posts (fence) 

Potatoes 

ProviHions , 

Rve 

sAlt 

Saw logs 

Shingles 

Stone 

TicB (railroad) 

Wagons and can'iages. 

Wheat , 

Woo<l 

Wooden ware , 

Wool 



Tot;»l . 



Total approximate value. 



12 

185.840 

60 

1,182^ 

200 

75 

• 850 

69,000 

550 

192 

190 

117.000 

156,445 

2.240 

704 

2,025 

846 

2.470 

54 

1,7024 

H 

570 

192 

2,6114 

9.1U0 

826 

50 

OOO 

30,000 

1 

50 



570,065 



$36, 240, 102 



H H ig. 

IMPROVEMENT OF KENOSHA HARBOR, WISCONSIN. 

The original condition of the mouth of Pike Creek, object of the 
improvement, projects, and present works, were described in detail in 
Annual Report Chief of Engineers, for 189G, page L^51(). 

Condition of the improvemenU — Under the present proj*'ct the north 
pier is to be extended 150 feet. The pier extension now in progress 
will complete the south pier to the full length contemplated under the- 
existing project. Soundings taken on tbe completion of dredging in 
April, 1897, showed a channel between the piers 16 feet deep with a 
width of entrance of about 140 feet, and a least width of about 100 feet. 
There was a depth of 15 feet over an area of about 3 acres in the basin. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated August 28, 
1896, with the Rjicine Dredge Company, for dredging 50,000 cubic 
yards, more or less, work was begun September 24, 1896, suspended 
December 5, resumed April 5, 1897, and completed April 21. The 
amount of material removed under this contract was 68,350 cubic yards, 
of which 32,700 cubic yards were from the channel and 35,650 cubic 
yards were from the basin. 

The river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, required that "four thou- 
sand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be expended 
in dredging in the harbor basin, and removing wreck therefrom." 

In accordance with these requirements, proposals were invited for 
the removal of the wreck of schooner Horace Greeley and of a small 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2703 



flat scow from tbe basin. The bid of the Eacine Dredge Company, 
amounting to $547, it being the only proposal reeeived, was accepted, 
and the wrecks were entirely removed, the work being completed 
November 14, 1896. 

Under contract dated December 11, 1896, with McArthur Brothers 
Company, of Chicago, 111,, for extension of south pier 250 linear feet, 
more or less, work was begun June 3, 1897, and was in progress at the 
close of the fiscal year. The extension consists of two cribs, each 100 
feet long, and 1 crib 50 feet long; the width of all the cribs being 20 
feet, and their height 20^ feet, including the superstructure. 

Under special agreement, dated May 8, 1897, with Mr. P. W. Gallo- 
way, of Kacine, Wis., 300 linear feet of Wakefield triple-lap sheet pile 
revetment were constructed along the channel face of the south pier, 
and near the inner end of same, to prevent the passage of sand through 
the pier. 

The work consists, first, of a row of close, round piling, driven as near 
the face of pier as possible. Outside of the round piles, Wakefield 
sheet piling was driven, each sheet pile being made of three 2 by 12 
inch pine planks, spiked together with ten or twelve 7-inch wire spikes 
clinched in the rear side, and so as to form a 4-inch tongue and groove. 
The sheet piles and round piles are held together by white oak wales, 
and secured to the i>ier by 1 J-inch round screw bolts. Before driving 
the piles all the riprap along that portion of the pier to be revetted 
was removed by dredging done by the Eacine Dredge Company under 
a special agreement. The entire work was completed June 30, 1897. 

Cost of maioriaU and labor for 300 linear feet of sheet pile revetment. 



Materials. 



Quantity. 



Unit 
price. 



Amount. 



I>redein« 

Bound piles, linear feet ... 

Wakefield sheet piling 

White oak timlier 

White pine timber 

Wrougnt-iron screw bolts. 
Wire spikes 



.feetB.M. 

do... 

do... 

...pounds. 
do 



6,880 
47,U08 
5,536 
3,»48 
3,335 
600 



10.20 
27.00 
36.00 
20.00 
.05 
.04 



$393.75 
1, 272. 00 
1, 209. 22 
199. 30 
78.96 
J 66. 75 
24.00 



Total. 



3,403.98 



Cost per linear foot of revetment, $11.34. 

Remarks. — In accordance with requirements of river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1896, a survey was made, and report, dated January 26, 1897, 
submitted, for ''harbor at Kenosha, with a view of obtaining a channel 
21 feet deep, and basin 20 feet deep." The report is published in IJouso 
Doc No. 328, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session, and fully covers the 
condition and needs of the harbor. The estimated cost of the desired 
improvement is $125,000. 

To complete the present project requires that the north pier should 
be extended 150 feet beyond its present length. On the completion of 
the contract now in force the south pier will be of its full projected 
length. Extensive repairs to the older portions of the piers are greatly 
ne^ed. The west end of the north pier is in an extremely dilapidated 
condition, the extreme 60 feet of it having been carried away in 1885, 
and never having been restored. Erosion of the adjacent bank com- 
menced at once and has continued ever since; large quantities of 
material are thus washed into the channel by the action of every storm. 
The inner portions of both the harbor piers are in such condition as to 
readily permit the passage of sand through them. It is believed that 
1^500 feet of sheet piling will remedy this defect. 



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2704 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. B. ARMY. 

Bitimate for fiawl year ending June SO, 1899. 

To extend the north piift to the fall length contemplated hy the modified 

project of 1889^150 feet, at $65 $9,750 

Making old piers sand tight— 1.500 linear feet of sheet piling, at $10 15, 000 

Protecting shore at inner end of north pier— 140 linear feet sheet piling, at $8 1, 120 

Dredging for maintenance of channel 5, 000 

Contingencies 3,130 

Total 34,000 

An appropriation of $34,000 for completion of project and main- 
tenance of existing works for tbe fiscal year ending Jaue 30, 1809, is 
recommended. 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance nnexjiended $26,597.91 

Jnne 30, 189T, atnonnt expended dnring fiscal year 8, 307. 40 

July 1, 1897, halance uncKpended 18,290.51 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted con tracts 13, 000. 00 

July 1, 1897, balance available 5,290.51 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project •. 9, 750. 00 
Amonntthatcan be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J une30, 1899 *34, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June A, 1897. 



JpprapriationB, 



Act of— 

March 16, 1844 $12,500.00 

March 3, 1845 15,000.00 

August 13,1852 10,000.00 

June 23,1866 75,461.41 

April 10, 1869 (allotted). . 5, 346. 00 

July 11, 1870 10,000.00 

March 3, 1871 10,000.00 

June 10,1872 10,000.00 

June 23,1874 10,000.00 

March 3, 1875 15,000.00 

Angust 14,1876 8,000.00 

June 18,1878 8,000.00 

March 3, 1879 5,000.00 



Act of— 

June 14,1880 $5,000.00 

March 3,1881 5,000.00 

August 2, 1882 6,000.00 

July 5. 1884 5,000.00 

August 5, 1886 5,000.00 

August 11, 1888 7,500.00 

September 19, 1890 17, 500. 00 

July 13, 1892 15,000.00 

Angust 17.1894 15,000.00 

June 3,1896 24,000.00 



Total 299,307.41 



Ahatract of propoaale for dredging 46,000 cubic yarde of material at Kenoeha Harhort 
WiecomiKf receired in response to adrertisement dated August 1, 1896, and opened August 
to, 1896, hy Capt. George A, Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 



Ko. 



Name and residence of bidder. 



Price 

percabic 

jard. 



T0t4kl 

for 45,000 1 
cabicyards. 



Arthur KYogel, Milwaukee, Wis 

William A. Starke, Milwaukee. Wis 

Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, HI 

Racine Dreflge Co., Kacine, Wis 

Edward GiUen, Racine, Wis 

NoTTis G.Dodge & Son, Chicago, 111 

Lj'don & Drews Co., Chicago,III 

George Cooper and Theodore Joesch, Manitowoc, Wis 



Cents. 
10 

17 



$5,205.00 
4.050.00 
4.600.00 
3,015.00 
4,050.00 
5,175.00 
8,550.00 
7,860.00 



* ^,250 for maintenwnce. 

t The oost heing so low, a oontraot was made for 50,000 cnbic yards, more or less. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2705 



Amount of appropriation available for this work, $5,000. With the approval of 
the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into August 28, 1896, with Racine 
Dredge Company, the lowest responsible bidders for this work. 

Abstraei of propotals for building £60 linear feet, more or less, of pier exteneion at Keno- 
8ha Harbor, Wieconsin, received in response to adcertisement dated Octobers?, 1896, and 
opened November 27, 1896, by Capi. George A, Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 



Ko. 



Name and rMldence of 
bidder. 



as 









S4 

II 



1- 






'S4 



1^- 



si 



■7 p.© 



so 

5fe S 



Total 

for 250 

linear 

feet. 



P. W. Galloway, Sadne, 
Wta $21.00 

Jas. Cape ft Sons, Kacine, 
Wia 80.00 

MeAribnr BroUiers Co., 
Chloaso,Ill 30.00 

Knapp & Gillen, Bacine, 
Wia 21.00 

George Cooper, Manito- 
woc, Wis 22.70 

James A. SbIow and John ' 
Monroe, Cbarlevoix, i 
Mieh ' 23.00 

Chieai^ Star Coaatraotion 
and Dredging Co., Chi- 
eago, ni 23.00 

Haoaler A Lots Towing 
and Dock Co., Chicago^ 
Dl 20.60 



$16.00 
25.00 
17.00 
16.50 
14.90 

16.00 

17.00 

16.00 



$17.00 
20.00 
10. OO 
16.50 
17.00 

17.00 

19.00 

18.00 



$7.00 
6.00 
6.00 
6.15 
6.35 

6.76 

6.75 

6.00 



$10.00 
8.40 
9.00 
0.00 
8.60 

9.00 

9.00 

0.60 



Cents. 
8 

2* 

2i 

24 

24 



(knts, 
3 

2* 

2| 

S 

84 

31 
3 



Omts. 
8 

6 

8 

H 

2A"o 
8 
3i 
6 



$13,418.00 
15,007.10 
12,375.50 
12,417.50 
12,468.15 

13, 221. 75 

13,479.00 

13, 380. 50 



Amount of appropriation available for this work $13,000. 

With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into Decem- 
ber 11, 1886, With McArthur Brothers Company ^ the lowest responsible bidders for 
this work. 



Contract in force. 



Name of contractor. 


Work. 


Approved. 


Work oom- 
menoed. 


Work to be 
oomploted. 


MeArthnr Brothers Co 


260 feet crib pier 


Dec. 31, 1896 


June 1,1897 


Nov. 80,1897 





COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

[Fomiahed by Mr. H. & Van Ingen.] 

Name of harbor, Kenosha. Wis.; collection district, Milwaukee^ Wis.; nearest 
port of entry; Milwaukee, Wis. ; nearest light-house, Kenosha, Wis. 

Arrivals and departures of vessels. 





Description. 


Arrivals. 


Departures. 




Number. 1 Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Steam 


72 
149 


10,911 72 
27,856 1 148 


10,911 


fti*» ... 


27,335 




i - _ _ - - _. 




Total...... 


221 


38,267 


220 


38,246 







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2706 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Principal ariiclea of export and import, 
[By way of the harbor only.] 



Articles. 


Tons. 


Articles. 


Tons. 


EXPORTS. 


160 

1 

21.000 


Lath 


190 




Lumber 


16,975 


Sand and irra vol ... 


Merchandise (j^Mieral) 


1,000 




Poaia f fence) ... 


lU 


Total 


21, 151 


Potat^>eB 


30 




Khiui/lea 


600 


Total approximate value 


$125, 000 


Wood 


3,000 




Total 




IMPORTS. 


7i 
18,700 
11,000 


50,546i 




Total approximate value 


Apple* -.. 


$800,000 


Bark (tan) 

Coal and coke. 











[By all ways of transportation.] 



EXPORTS. 

Brass ■ 

Coal and coke 

Copper 

Merchandise (general) . . . 

Provisions 

Sand and gravel 

Wagons and carriages. . . 
Woodenware 

Total 

Total approximate value. 

IMPORTS. 

Agricultural implements 

Apples 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beans 

Beer 

Brick 

Butter , 

Cattle 

Chairs 

Cheese 

Coal and coke 

Copper 



$12,000,000 



625 
150 
750 

16. 212 
250 

25,000 
2,750 
3741 



47. lllj 



65 

60 

18,700 

600 

81 

1.050 

6,000 

15 

90 

6 

7* 

84,000 

1,000 



IMPOSTS— conttnueil, 

fgS':;:::::::::::::;:;:::::: 

Flour 

Furniture 

Hides 

Iron and steel 

Lath 

Lime and cement 

L umber 

Merchandise (general) 

Mill stuffs 

Oil 

Pork and beef 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence) 

Potatoes 

Provisions 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds 

Shingles 

Stone 

Wagons and carriages 

Wood 

Total 

Total approximate value 



12* 

700 

9,250 
5,500 
275 
950 
24,000 
60,341^ 

700 

2,025 

360 

17 

114 

120 

150 

225 

16 

600 

7.000 

25 

6,000 



169,995^ 



$8,000,000 



H H 20. 

IMPROVEMENT OF WAUKEGAN HARBOR, ILLINOIS. 

The original condition at Waukegan Harbor, object of the improve- 
ment, projects, and present works were described in detail in Annual 
Report, Chief of Engineers, for 1896, pages 2519, 2520. 

Froject of 1896.^The modification of original projects of 1880 and 
1882, as approved Jaly 28, 1896, is as follows: The north-and-south 
arm of the north pier to be connected by a revetment with the Ameri- 
can Mortar Company's revetment; the entrance to the harbor to be 
dredged to a depth of 13 feet below the plane of reference of the coast 
charts of Lake Michigan, viz, 3.06 feet below high water of 1838, with a 
width of 200 feet, and the harbor itself to be dredged to the same 
depth, and with a width of 300 feet, beginning at the northern bound- 
ary line of the Government land ; and the new shore line in the harbor 
to be riprapped with heavy blocks of stone for a length of about 400 
feet, beginning at the south pier. 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2707 

Condition of the improvement — Both piers are now of the fall pro- 
jected length. Under the project of 1896, a section of about 35 linear 
feet of revetment is to be bailt to connect the north-andsouth arm of 
north pier with the American Mortar Company's revetment. It is 
expected to construct this revetment during the present season. 

Soundings taken April, 1897, showed a channel between the piers 
13 feet deep and with a least width of about 160 feet, and the same 
depth in the harbor or basin over about three-fourths of its area. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — Under contract dated September 
23y 1896, with Illinois Dredging Company, for dredging 122,000 cubic 
yardSy more or less, from the entrance channel and basin, work was 
begun October 5, 1896, suspended December 23, and resumed June 18, 
1897. At the close of the fiscal year 128,862 cubic yards had been 
removed. By agreement with the contractors the amount to be dredged 
was increased 47,000 cubic yards, making a total amount to be dredged 
of 169,000 cubic yards, of which amount 40,138 cubic yards are yet to 
be removed. 

By hire of labor and purchase of materials in accordance with law, 
repairs to the north-and-south arm of the north pier were begun June 
1, 1897, and are in progress at the close of the fiscal year. The work 
consists chiefly in cutting down the old pile pier to the water surface, 
and in building on the remaining portion a superstructure of 12 by 12 
inch white-pine timbers to a height of about 6 feet. At the close of 
the fiscal year 100 linear feet of this superstructure had been built two 
courses in height; the remainder is well under way, and it is expected 
will be completed about August 15, 1897. 

Remarks. — On August 24, 1880, a strip of land about 100 feet wide 
and 2,294 feet long was donated to the United States by the city of 
Waukegan for harbor purposes. The advance of the shore, especially 
to the north of the harbor entrance, has greatly added to this land 
until at the present time there is a tract about 350 by 580 feet lying to 
the east of the harbor basin and to the north of the harbor entrance. 
This tract and also a narrow strip of land 50 feet wide inclosing the 
shore end of the south pier and extending from the shore line west- 
ward to the boundary of the Government land will always be useful 
to the United States. Under the modified project of 1896, the rest of 
the Government land is no longer of use for harbor purposes. It has 
therefore been recommended that the same be transferred to the city 
of Waukegan, under the following conditions : 

First. The right to be reserved to the United States to maintain a 
suitable riprap slope along the southern 400 feet of the westerly harbor 
line, the foot of the slope to be on the harbor line and at the depth called 
for in the project of 1896, and the slope to be such as can be main- 
tained with riprap; and if any structure is set over this riprap, it shall 
rest upon piles and be of such form as may be approved by the War 
Department. 

Second. The city of Waukegan shall build and maintain a dock 
revetment of the usual construction along the westerly harbor line, 
the revetment to begin at the northern boundary of the Government 
land and extend southerly about 567 feet until it reaches the riprap 
revetment to be put in by the United States as provided for in the 
project. 

It is understood that, in accordance with these recommendations, a 
bill has been introduced in Congress to authorize the Secretary of War 
to make the transfer to the city of Waukegan, and that a favorable 
report on said bill has been made by the Chief of Engineers. 



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2708 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

The present contract for dredging, the repairs now in progress and 
to be made, and the riprapping of the harbor front will be finished this 
season, thns completing the modified project of 1898. No farther 
extension of either pier is considered necessary. Dredging will, how- 
ever, be required from time to time to maintain the projected depth in 
channel and basin, and occasional repairs to piers will be necessary. 

An appropriation of $3,000, for maintenance of channel and existing 
works, is recommended for the fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1899. 

Money statement. 

Jaly 1, 1896, balance imexpended $90,497.28 

June 90, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 14, 021. 52 

Jnly 1,1897, balance unexpended .' 16,475.76 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $1,045.65 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 5, 721. 88 

6,767.68 

July 1, 1897, balance available 9,708.23 

{Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 90, 
1899, for maintenance 3,000.00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acto of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of Jane 4, 1897. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

Act of— 

Angnst 30, 1862, for breakwater (outer) $15,000 

June 14, 1880 15,000 

March3,1881 15,000 

Angust2,1882 20,000 

Jnly 5, 1884 20,000 

August 16, 1886 20,000 

August 11, 1888 25,000 

September 19, 1890 85,000 

July 18, 1892 26,000 

August 17, 1894.... 20,000 

June 8, 1896 20,000 

Total appropriation for harbor 230,000 

Appropriation for outer breakwater (1852) 15,000 

Total for present harbor 215,000 



AbBiraoi ofpropo^aU for dredging XgX,000 cuhio yards of maieriaU at Waukegan Harbor, 
Illinois^ received in response to adverUsement dated August 17, 1896, and opened Sep- 
temher 16, 1896, hy Capt, OeorgeA. Zinn, Corps of Engineers. 



Vo. 



Name «id residence of bidder. 



Price p«r T»«*' 




Green's Dredging Co., Chiosgo, III... 

Charles Bemer, Green Bay, Wis 

William A. SUrke, Milwaukee Wia., 

Racine Dredee Co.. Racine, Wis 

Illinois Dredging Co., Chicago, 111... 
Arthur H. Yogel, Milwaukee, Wis. . 



Amoaut of appropriation available for this work, $15,000. 

With the app»roval of the Chief of Engineers, a contract was entered into Septem- 
ber 23, 1896, with Illinois Dredging Company, the lowest responsible bidders for 
thi«work« 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2709 

Contract in force. 



Name of contnotor. 


Work. 


Approved. 


Work oom- 
menced. 


Work to be 
completed. 


llliuois DradiriDff Co 


Dredi^Dg 122,000cubio yards 


Oct 81.1AM 


Oct. 6^1806 


Oct 81, 1887 







COMMKRCIAL STATISTICS FOR THR CALRVDAR TRAR RNDINQ DRCXMBRR 31, 1896. 

[Famished by Mr. W. W. Pearoe, lui^or.] 

Name of harbor, Waukegan, 111.; collection district, Chicago, HI.; nearest light- 
house, Wankegan, 111. 

Principal articlc$ of oxport and import* 

[By way of the harbor only.] 



Articles. 


Tons. 


Lath 


tifPOETS. 


110 


Jioinber .^ 


1,126 
450 


Sbinides - --- 








Total 


1,885 





[By all ways of transportation.] 



Ardclea. 



Beer 

Brick 

CatUe 

g?::::::;:::;::::;::::: 

ffi/ei*.'.".'!.''."'.'.*.""."!.'.'.' 

Iron and steel 

Leather 

Herchandise (p'nernl)... 

0« 

8ash. doors, and blimls .. 

Sheep 

Stone 

Wood... 

Total 

IMPOBTS. 

Agricnltnral implements 

Bark (tan) 

Barley 

Beans 

Brick 

Batter 

Cattle 

Chairs 

Cheese 

Coal and ooke 

Com 



Tons. 



1,400 
10 



^?!| 



18 

10 

10 

53,000 

225 

33,810 

675 

500 

00 

840 

8,750 



Articles. 



09,4471 



25 

826 

240 

1,880 

1,320 

10 

210 

50 

10 

99,224 

150 



IMPOBTS— continned. 

Rirgs 

FSh 

Flour 

Furniture '.., 

Hay 

Hides 

Iron and steel 

Leather.... 

Lime and cement 

Lumber 

Malt 

Marble 

Merchandise (genenil) 

Millstulfs 

Oats 

Oil 

Pork and beef 

Poles (telegraph) 

Posts (fence) 

PoUtoes 

Salt 

Sash, doors, and blinds 

Sheep 

Stono 

Ties (railroad) 

Wfigous and carriages 

Wheat 

Wood 

Total 



Tons. 



350 

240 

01,779 

10 

1,938 

15,40<9 

270 

100 

68,296 

1,000 

400 

1,7154 

240 

323 

50 

900 

150 

200 

60 

14,805 

7,000 

125 

30 

600 



279,957 



H H 21. 

IMPROVEMENT OF FOX RIVER, WISCONSIN. 

Original condition. — Tlie Fox Eiver rises in Oolumbia Connty, Wis., 
and flows generally westward. Near Portage City it turns northward, 
tben eastward into Lake Winnebago, the latter being about 28 miles 
long and 10 to 12 miles wide. From Lake Winnebago the Fox flows 
northward into Green Bay, an arm of Lake Michigan. 



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2710 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ABMT. 

The Fox and Wisconsin rivers, separated at Portage City by a dis- 
tance of only 2 miles, were the early means of communication between 
the Great Lakes and the Mississippi. 

The fall in the river from Portage City to Lake Winnebago, 110 miles, 
is aboat 30 feet, and from Lake Winnebago to Green Bay, 35 miles, is 
about 170 feet. From mouth of Fox Eiver (Oshkosh) to Menasha is 
18 miles. 

The upper Fox has a small discharge and flows through extensive 
marshes and lakes; near Lake Butte des Morts it unites with the Wolf 
Eiver, the latter having a mucl> larger discharge than the Fox. The 
lower Fox carries off all the water brought down by the upper Fox, the 
Wolf, and other small streams; a discharge of 900,000 cubic feet per 
minute having been known. The average low and high water dis- 
charges have not been accurately determined. A low-water discharge 
of 2,320 cubic feet per minute is given. 

From Lake Winnebago to De Pere the river was obstructed by rap- 
ids^ and at places portages had to be made. 

In 1846 Congress granted to the State of Wisconsin, on its admission 
to the Union, a quantity of land for the purpose of improving the nav- 
igation of the Fox and Wisconsin rivers in the Territory of Wisconsin, 
and of constructing the canal to unite the said rivers at or near the 
portage. 

To carry out the object of this act, the State of Wisconsin estab- 
lished in 1848, by act of legislature, a board of public works, which 
began the work of improvement and carried it on until 1853, when all 
the property and franchises were transferred to the Fox and Wisconsin 
Improvement Company. After various vicissitudes, financial and other- 
wise, the entire property was sold in 1866 to the Green Bay and Missis- 
sippi Canal Company, and finaUy by this company in 1872 to the United 
States for $145,000, with the exception of personal property, water- 
power privileges, and the lots or parcels of land belonging to the water 
powers. The deed of transfer was indefinite in its terms, and so many 
questions have arisen concerning property and franchises that it is 
impossible to tell at this time without considerable research what the 
deed actually conveyed. 

At the time of transfer in 1872, there were on the upper Fox 4 locks, 
4 dams, 1 canal; on the lower Fox 18 locks, 9 dams, 8 canals. The 
project of the board of public works. State of Wisconsin, recommended 
the construction of canals, 40 feet wide at bottom, with 4 feet depth at 
usual low water, and locks 125 feet long between gates and 30 feet wide 
in the chamber. 

The plan to be carried out by the Fox and Wisconsin Improvement 
Company was to make the lower Fox of sufficient capacity to allow the 
free passage of boats drawing 4 feet of water, and the upper Fox of 
boats drawing 2 feet at ordinary low water. This plan required the 
enlargement of the locks to 160 feet long, 35 feet wide, with 6 feet depth 
on the miter sills. 

Object — The improvement of the Wisconsin Eiver having been 
abandoned, the present object is to obtain a navigable channel from 
Portage on the Wisconsin Eiver, to the harbor of Green Bay, 160 
miles. 

Project. — The original project of 1872 was a continuation of the proj- 
ect to be carried out by the Fox and Wisconsin Improvement Com- 
pany. The present project is that recommended by the Board of 
Engineers of May 14, 1886, and is to deepen the Fox River by rock 



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APPENDIX HH — ^EEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2711 

excavation and dredging from Portage to Montello to 4 feet depth, and 
from Montello to Green Bay to 6 feet depth; to widen the river chan- 
nels to 100 feet throughout; to dredge the channel in the Neenah 
River, and to remove the bar at the moath of the Fond du Lac Kiver. 
Present works. — The present works are as follows: 



Upper 
Fox. 



Lower 
Fox. 



Total. 



Locks .. 
Dams . . 
Canals . 



27 
18 
12 



Total. 



20 



55 



Of the Ic^kfl, 15 are of stone; 14 built by the United States and 1 by 
the canal company, but repaired by the United States in 1878. The 
remaining 12 are wooden locks, which have been rebuilt and repaired 
from time to time. 

Of the dams, 1 is of masonry, 11 of cribs, 1 of piles and cribs with 
movable weir, and 2 of brush and stone. 

Of the canals, the one at Portage, 2 miles long, is revetted its entire 
length on both sides with a timber revetment. At Appleton, above 
the first lock, there is a cement-laid stone revetment wall about 800 
feet long and from 16 to 20 feet high. It was built by the United States 
in 1879-80. Below the guard gate Kaukauna is a dry-stone revetment 
wall about 1,200 feet long. It was built by the canal company and may 
have to be rebuilt in places, as it shows signs of yielding. Also, in the 
left bank of the fourth level at Kaukauna there is a core wall of cement 
masonry 77 feet long, built in 1893-94 ; in the right bank of the same 
level, two core walls, one 600 feet long, built in 1892-93, and one 143 
feet long, built in 1893-94; and in the right bank of the flCth level, one 
376 feet long, built in 1893-94. 

Dry masonry retaining walls were bailt along right bank of canal 
above the "combined locks,'' 621 feet long, 11 feet high, built in 1895 
and 1896, and below Kaukauna first lock, 123 feet long, 12 to 14 feet 
high, built in 1897. 

Masonry waste weirs in the second, third, and fourth levels at 
Kaukauna were built in 1894-95 to regulate the water in the Kaukauna 
system. 

Depth of water. — ^The fall from Menasha to Green Bay is about 170 
feet, and on the upper Fox, from Portage to Lake Winnebago, about 
30 feet. Previous to any improvements the river was obstructed by 
rapids and at places ]K)rtages had to be made. 

As stated above, the project contemplates a channel 6 feet deep from 
Green Bay to Montello and 4 feet deep from MonteUo to Portage; these 
channels to have a minimum width of 100 feet. 

On the lower Fox, which is thoroughly canalized, the crests of the 
dams are uniformly 6 feet above the breast walls of the locks immediately 
below, and where rapids are passed by means of several locks the breast 
wall of any one is about the same elevation as the lower miter sill of the 
lock above. The exception is the lower miter sill of the Menasha Lock, 
which is 1.5 feet higher than the breast wall of the next lock below, the 
Appleton First Lock. This condition gives only 4.6 feet of water at the 
lower miter sill, Menasha Lock, when the river is at a low stage. When 
the river i« at a high stage, with a surplus of 1 foot or more flowing 
over the Appleton Dam, there is 6 feet over the sill. It is impossible 



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2712 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. »• ARMY. 

to raise the crest of the Appleton Dam, so that it will be necessary to 
lower this sill when the Menasha Lock is rebuilt. 

Daring the last year the water in the lower Fox and Lake Winnebago 
has been well maintained at the crest of the dams thronghoat the year, 
with few exceptions. This is the first fall year this has occnrred, and 
was brought aboat by the enforcement of Rale 12. The rule was not 
strictly enforced against the water users at Neenah and Menasha, but 
they were allowed certain privileges by the authority of the Secretary 
of War. For the exceptions thus made attention is invited to the 
history in the report of Mr. L. M. Mann, assistant engineer, appended 
to report upon Operating and Care of Locks and Dams on Fox River, 
Wisconsin; also accompanying hydrographs, etc., showing stages of 
water, etc. 

The violators of Rule 12, Rules and Regulations for the Navigation 
and Use of Locks and Canals on Fox River, were prosecuted by the 
United States attorney, Mr. M. 0. Phillips, in whose report, herewith 
apj»ended, further details are given. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, navigation closed No- 
vember 14, 1896, on the Fox and Wolf rivers, and was again opened 
April 10, 1897, excepting at Depere, on the 16th, and in Portage Canal, 
on the 23d of April, 1897. 

Operations during the fiscal year. — ^The work done during the year 
consisted principally in rebuilding the outlet of the wasteweir at Kau- 
kauna Second Lock, the construction of a roadway npon United States 
property from the warehouse at the Appleton First Lock to Lake street, 
the construction of fishways in the Eureka, Berlin, and White River 
dams, a small amount of dredging on the lower Fox near Appleton and 
Menasha. A survey and plan for harbor of refuge at Stockbridge 
Landing, on the east shore of Lake Winnebago, and an examination of 
the Wolf River were also made. The timber shed at Appleton First 
Lock, under construction at the date of the last annual report-, was 
completed. 

Preparations have been made to build a new crib dam with masonry 
abutments and to remove the old brush and stone dam at Princeton. 

The dredging along the lower Fox consisted (1) in removing about 
640 cubic yards of rock from a cut 1,830 feet long, varying from 20 to 40 
feet in width and from 3 inches to 2 feet in depth, between Appleton 
First Lock and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Bridge 
and (2) in widening the Menasha Canal between the Wisconsin Central 
and Tayce Street bridges. 

The river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, provided for a "harbor of 
refuge on the east shore of Lake Winnebago, at one of the several land- 
ings on said shore, the location of which harbor of refuge shall be deter- 
mined by the Government engineer." In accordance with this provision, 
surveys were made at three places, Stockbridge Landing, Mud Creek, 
and Calumet Harbor (Pike Creek), the first of which was selected as the 
best location for the harbor. The citizens of Stockbridge have donated 
to the United States 3.09 acres of land for the harbor and set aside a 
strip of land for public use as a highway from the harbor to the existing 
highway leading to Stockbridge. It is expected to begin the dredging 
at this harbor as soon as the land has been accepted by the War 
Department. 

The river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, appropriated $1,500 for 
removing bars and snags from the Wolf River below Shawano, Wis. 
An examination was made in August and project submitted for doing 
the work called for between Lake Poygan and l^ew London, 47 miles — 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OF CAPTAm ZINN. 2713 

all tbat the fands would permit. It is expected to commence this work 
dariug July, 1897. Farther details will be found in the appended report 
of Mr. L. M. Mann, assistant engineer. 

Remarks and recommendations. — The river and harbor act of June 3, 
1696, appropriated $3,000 for a thorough investigation of the character, 
limitations, and description of the property and rights of the United 
States in connection with the improvement of the Fox and Wisconsin 
rivers. This investigation was intrusted by the Secretary of War to 
the Hon. Edward S. Bragg, of Fond du Lac, Wis., and the information 
when obtained will be of great value. 

Ko action has yet been taken upon the matter of the use of flush 
boards or other means of making avail of all the natural flow of water 
and preventing the waste thereof to the height to which the right of 
the United States to hold the same has been established and without 
interfering with private rights, as directed by the river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1896. it appears from an investigation of the subject that 
the United States can not legally place flush boards upon the Govern- 
ment dams without interfering with private rights. A special report 
was made upon this subject, dated July 7, 1896. 

By the courtesy of water-power owners a table has been made by 
Mr. L. M. Mann, assistant engineer, of all water powers on the lower 
Fox, which shows clearly the great value of this improvement. 

The repairs to boats and dredges belonging to the Fox River improve- 
ment are now made at a private shipyard in Oshkosh, Wis. The cost 
of hauling these boats out of the water is so large as to justify the con- 
struction of a dry dock on Government land along the lower Fox. 

The rebuilding of the Princeton and Grand River dams, for which 
the necessary funds are now on hand, will complete the replacement of 
all temporary structures in the improvement by permanent ones. The 
only work left, therefore, to complete the existing project is to dredge 
the upper Fox to the required depth and to rebuild the Menasha Lock 
so as to give 6 feet of water over the lower miter sill at all stages of 
water in the river. This is a wooden lock nine years old, and will 
require rebuilding within two years in order to be absolutely safe. To 
give the required depth and to make a better structure than the present 
one slightly increases the estimate for rebuilding. It can be rebuilt 
properly for $16,000. 

Soundings taken last winter upon the ice from Oshkosh to Fort Win- 
nebago Lock show that there remains 2,060,831 cubic yards of material 
to be removed to give the required depth, which will cost $164,860.48. 
The banks of the river are eroded by floods and rains and the channels 
gradually obliterated. The quantity of material brought into the chan- 
nels can not be accurately estimated at this time. After the projected 
depth has been secured, proper observations will give this amount. 
At the worst places the banks have been revetted, and this revetment 
may have to be continued, not only to protect the banks against fresh- 
ets, but also in the narrow parts against the wash of passing vessels. 
The dredges in present use can not cast material very far from the 
channel, so that it has to be rehandled. By means of another kind of 
dredge the material could be deposited at such distance that it would 
not need rehandling and would not be brought back into the channel 
by wave wash, etc. It will be more economical to obtain such a dredge 
at once, not only for the purpose of completing the project, but also for 
future use in maintaining the channel depth, than to continue using the 
present dipper dredges. The material to be removed could not well be 
handled by a rotary pump dredge. A chain bucket dredge is weU 
suited to the work to be done and can be bought for about $35,000. 



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2714 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Estimate of cott of oompleUmg prof od for improving Fox Biver, 

Rebuilding MeDasha Lock $16,000.00 

Dredging 2,060,831 cable yards in npper Fox, at 8 cents 164, 866. 48 

Total 180,866.48 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended $41,770.90 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 6, 174. 47 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 35,596.43 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 1,799.59 

July 1, 1897, balance available 33,796.84 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existiujj project 180, 866. 48 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending Jiine30,1899 100,000.00 
Submitted iu compliance with reauirements .of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



List of appropriations made by Congress for the improvement of the Fox and Wisoonsin 

rivers, Wisoonsin, 

Act of— 

March 2, 1867, for snag boat on Wisconsin River.... $40,000 

July 10, 1870, for improving Wisconsin River 100,000 

June 10, 1872, for purchase of works on Fox River from Green Bay and 

Mississippi Canal Company 145,000 

March 3, 1873, for improving Fox and Wisconsin rivers 300, 000 

June 23, 1874 300,000 

March 3,1875 500,000 

August 14, 1876 270,000 

June 18, 1878 250,000 

March3,1879 150,000 

June 14, 1880 125,000 

March3,1881 125,000 

August 2, 1882 200,000 

July 5, 1884 160,000 

Augu8t5, 1886, for improving Fox River 56,250 

August 11, 1888, for improving Fox River 100, 000 

September 19, 1890, for improving Fox River 100,000 

July 13, 1892, for improving Fox River 75,000 

August 17, 1894, for improving Fox River 37,500 

June 3, 1896, for improving Fox River 87,500 

Total 3,071,250 



REPORT OF MR. M. C. PHILLIPS, UNITKD STATES ATTORNBT. 

OsiiKOSH, Wis., July ISj 1897, 
Captain : The suits referred to in the report of my predecessor, under date of June 
30, 1896, relating to the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, are still pendiug in the United 
States circuit court, and none of them have been moved since the date of his report. 
No new civil cases have been commenced relatiug to the same subject during they ear. 
There have been several criminal oases brought during the year for drawing water 
from the Government canal below the level established by the Secretary of War, in 
which indictments have been found by the grand jury. 

My term of office covering only two months, viz, May and June of the year, no 
action in any of these matters was taken during that time. They are all pending 
for trial, and will be brought on for hearing at the October term, 1897. 
Yours, truly, 

\f /^ Phillips 
United States Diikiet Attorney, Eastern JHstrist of WiseonHn. 
Capt. Obobob a. Zinn, 

Milwaukee, Wi$. 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2715 

BKPOBT OF MR. L. M. MAKN, ASSISTAITT BNOINBKR, FOX RIVKR IMPROVEMENT. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Oakkoah, Wis,, June SO, 1897. 

Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations on 
"Improving Fox River, Wisconsin," from Portage to Green Bay, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1897: 

The work done during the year consisted principally in rebuilding outlet to waste 
weir at Kaukauna Second Lock; construction of roadway at Appleton First Lock; 
construction of fishways in Eureka, Berlin, and White River dams; commencing 
construction of Princeton Crib Dam ; dredging rock channel below Chicago, Mil- 
waukee and St. Paul Railroad Bridge, Appleton; widening canal above Menasha 
Lock: making survey and plan for narbor at Stockbridge Landing, and making 
examination of Wolf River. 

construction of locks, etc. 

WaaU weir at Kaukauna Second Look, (Rebuilding outlet of weir.) — The work of 
rebuilding this outlet of the waste weir was commenced October 9, 1896. The vit- 
rified pii>e was replaced by a stone culvert laid in cement, 3i by 4 feet in cross sec- 
tion, connected with the weir wall in a stone arch. It runs 282 feet from weir to 
below draw bridge along left side of lock, emptying into third level. 

One thousand three hundred cubic yaras of earth was excavated from the trench 
and all the serviceable sewer pipe was removed from the old outlet. Two hundred 
and sixty-nine cubic yards of cement masonry was laid for the sides and bottom and 
56ieabic yards of fla^ stone was placed in cement for the top. One thousand two 
hundred and fifty cubic yards of earth excavated from the trench was replaced, and 
material left over was hauled by team to Kaukauna warehouse and stored, complet- 
ing the rebuilding of the outlet November 20, 1896. 

Timher shed at Appleton First Lock. — This shed, which was under construction at the 
close of last fiscal year, was given three coats of No. 20 paint on the outside, com- 
pleting the construction of same. 

Boadwag at Appleton First Lock. — For the purpose of giving access by team from 
Lake street to the United States buildings at the lock, this roadway was built on 
United States property. The construction was commenced May 20 and completed 
June 5, 1897. 

One thousand two hundred and sixty-five cubic yards of earth was excavated by 
plow and scraper from cut side of roadway and placed in fill side. Three lines of 
24-inch old sewer pipe were nlaced for culverts under roadway. 

This roadway is 1,080 feet long and 15 feet wide, and runs along hillside on right 
side of canal from Lake street to warehouse. The road was well ditched on the 
inside. 

lUhways on Eureka, Berlin, and White River dams. — ^In accordance with the require- 
ments of the State law, fishways were placed in these dams last fall. They are all 
of the same construction, and consist of a riffle trough 4 feet 10 inches by 24 inches 
and 24 feet long, covered. Riffles are 14 inches apart and openings are 10 inches 
wide. The trough is fastened at the crest of the dam and runs to low water, with a 
gate at the upper end to regulate the water or shut it off. 

The construction of fishways on these dams was commenced on October 6 in the 
order named. The material was transported from Oshkosh to the dams in conjunc- 
tion with the trip of inspection on tlie Upper Fox. 

Fishwaif on Eureka Dam. — One thousand five hundred and seventy-nine feet B. M. 
pine lumber was framed and secured in place, forming the trough, gate, supports, 
etc. The trough was connected with the navigable pass between the third and 
fourth valves. Nine pieces 12 by 12 inches by 6 feet to 8 feet were driftbolted to the 
apron timbers of dam for supports of lower end of the trough, to which it was 
securely fastened. 

The best opening of the head gate was determined by experiment to be 12 by 18 
inches, which fills the trough with water completely, and but little water passes 
through the openings in top. 

Flskwag on Berlin Dam.^Oae 30-foot rock-elm pile was driven for support of lower 
end of trough, and 5 22-foot piles were driven at upper end above the dam to protect 
it from ice and drift. A pine bent was securely placed to support middle of trough. 
Experiments determined that opening the gate 18 inches the trough is completely 
filled with water with a minimnm current and without forcing the water through the 
openings on the top. 

Fishwajf on White River Dam.— The upper end of this fish way was let into the crest 
of the dam 12 inches. Experiment determined that when the gate is raised 18 inches 
and flnshboards are removed from the crest the trough fills within 2 inches of the 
top. The construction of this fishway was completed on November 10, 1896. 



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2716 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF EKQINESRS, U. 8. ARMT. 

The pile driver which was need in driving the piles was towed to Berlin hy the 
steam tug Fox and her machinery laid up for the winter. 

Princ^UM Dam. — ^The old brush and stone dam at this place is worn, and is to be 
replaced by a timber-crib dam with masonry abutments. Land is about to be pur- 
chased for the right abutment, the left abutment resting on United States property. 
Materia] is being purchased and received and all preparation* are being made to 
commence construction this month (June, 1897). 

DRBDOINO LOWBR FOX. 

Canal helow ChicagOf Milwaukee and St. Paul Railrottd Bridge, Appleion, WU. — On May 
21, 1897, dredge No. 2 was towed by steam tng Boscohel from Cedars to Appleton, and ' 
cleaned the channel between the bridge and Appleton First Look. Cuts were made 
io rock, 1,880 feet by 20 feet to 40 feet by 3 inches to 2 feet, and 540 cubic yards of 
large flat stones excavated, which were of such size and shape that they could not be 
lifted by the dipper bui were shoved side wise, making the work slow and expensive. 
The work was completed June 7, 1897. 

Total amount dredged, 540 cubic yards; total amount rehandled, 184 cubic yards. 

Widening canal above Mena$ha Lock. — ^June 8, 1897, dredge No. 2 was towed by steam 
tug Boscoiel from Appleton to M^nasha Canal, where cuts 310 feet bv 20 feet by 3 feet 
to 4 feet were made, excavating 774 cubic yards of hardpan, which was banked on 
the left. The intention is to widen the canal about 20 feet between the Wisconsin 
Central Railroad and Tayco Street bridges. 

8URVET8. 

For a harhcr of refuge^ east shore of Lake Winnebago. — ^In accordance with yonr 
authority of July 20, 1896, surveys were made at Stookbridffe Landing, Mud Creek, 
and Calumet Harbor (Pike Creek), on the east shore of Lake Winnebago, to deter- 
mine the best location for a harbor of refuge, as provided for in the river and harbor 
act of June 3, 1896. • • • 

A project was submitted, and approved by the Secretary of War November 4, 1896, 
as follows: "That the harbor be located at Stockbridge Landing, on land donated 
by citizens of the town of Stockbridge." The plan contemplates an entrance chan- 
nel 6 feet deep and 100 feet wide, extending from the 6-foot contour in Lake Winne* 
bago to a point 100 feet inside the shore line, protected on the south side by a single 
pier 250 feet long and an interior basin about *2i acres in area. As the appropriation 
available is not sufficient to do the entire work, it is proposed to excavate the 
entrance channel and basin and drive a few guide piles at the entrance, omitting 
the protection pier for the present. 

The citizens of Stockbridge have transferred to the United States, free of coet^ 
3.09 acres of land for the harbor, and also a strip of land for public use as a roadway 
connecting the harbor with the present highway leading to Stockbridge. As soon 
as tliis land is accepted the work of making the harbor can commence. 

Examination of Wolf Biver. — In compliance with the authority of July 22, 1896, a 
preliminary examination was made of the Wolf River, Wisconsin, August 11 to 13, 
inclusive, on the steam tug Fox for the purpose of determining a project for the 
expenditure of the amount appropriated by the river and harbor act of Jnne 3, 1896, 
viz, '* $1,500 appropriated for removing bars and snags from the Wolf River below 
Shawano." • • ^ 

A project was submitted and approved by the Secretary of War, November 5, 1896, 
to the effect, to remove all snags and leaning trees obstructing navigation between 
New London and Lake Poygan, a distance of 47 miles, and to dredge a channel 80 
feet wide and 4^ feet deep at medium stage through the following bars : New Lon- 
don Bar, 600 feet long with 2^ feet of water; Little Wolf Bar, 400 feet long with 3i 
feet of water; Upper Muckwa Bar, 300 feet long with 3^ feet of water; Lower 
Muckwa Bar, 400 feet long with 3^ feet of water; Tom Wall Bar, 300 feet long with 
3 feet of water; and removal of wreck of steamer Tom Wall. 

The dredging is estimated at 11,000 cubic yards and 477 snags and deadheads and 
225 leaning trees to be removed. It is expected to commence this work during the 
month of July. 

For Princeton Dam. — As the United States does not own any land on the right bank 
af the Fox River adjacent to the site of the proposed new dam at Princeton Lock, a 
snrvey was made to determine the land needed for the right abutment of the new 
dam. A map and tracing of the survey were made, showing the land needed to be 
1 acre, sitnated in Lot 2, Sec. 35, T. 16 N., R. 11 K., and belonging to Mr. Franz 
ZUlke, with whom negotiations have been entered upon for its transfer. 

General remarke. — "Die dredges on the Upper Fox, for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1807, completed between Berlin and Eureka locks a navigable channel 100 feet 
wide and 6 feet deepi and removed bars from other portions of the Upper River. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2717 



Data in tabular form accompanies this report, showing the amount of work and cost, 
in diJSerent relations, of dredging done by all of the dredges on Fox Biyer during 
the year 1896. 

As the result of last winter's survey of the Upper Fox, a complete estimate of the 
amount of dredging necessary to complete the project is herewith given in tabular 
form. 



Milepost 12 to Eureka Look. 


Berlin to White River Lock. 


White River to Princeton Look. 


Mllepoetb. 


Cubic 
yards. 


ICileposta. 


Cubic 
yards. 


Hilepoflta. 


Cubic 
yards. 


12iol3 


3,664 
2,334 
2,540 
8.936 
13.941 
21, 464 
18,464 
20, 181 
18,806 
14. 187 
17.284 
29,075 
16,743 


Berlin T^«t to 33 




White River to 43.... 
43 to 44 


4.647 
28,193 


13tol4 


33 to 

34 to 

35 to 

36 to 
87 to 

38 to 

39 to 

40 to 

41 to 

42 to 


34 




28,380 
22.624 
24,608 
36, 781 
27,532 
32,900 
26,995 
82,189 
25,017 
21,541 


14 to 15 


35 


44 to 45 


29.823 
80 901 


15tol6 


36 


45 to 46 


16tol7 


37 


46 to 47 


89,430 
37, 151 


17 to 18 


38 


47 to 48 


]8tol9 


39 


48 to 49 


27,843 
83,788 


19 to 20 


40 


49 to 50 


20to21 


41 


50to51 


81,454 
87 643 


31 to 22 


42 


51 to 52 


22 to 23 


White RivnrLofllr 


52 to Princeton Look. 


16,295 


23 to 24 




S4toKiii«kaLock 




Total 


186.619 


278,578 


817, 169 








Princeton to Grand River Lock. 


Grand River to MontelJo Lock. 


Mllnposta. 


Cable 
yards. 


MUeposta. 


Cubic 
yards. 


Prin«»t(ni Lock to 63 - 


24,269 
33,270 
45,828 
21,959 
500 


GrandPivftp T.nftk*o7i.. ... . ^ 


29,218 
27,452 
80,692 
25.422 


5Sto54 


74 to 75 

75 to 70 
76toM 




^ .............. 


5ito5& 




56 to 66 


nntAlln T^aaIt _ 


Uto67 






OTioSS 






68 to 59 


6.160 
5,618 
10,913 
17,804 
42,682 
68,081 
47,436 
84,850 
86.276 
123 
968 
40,170 
46,949 
81^300 
37,325 




69 to 60 




00 to 61 




61 to 62 




6Sto63 




C8to64 




64 to 66 




e6to66 




66 to 67 




f7to68 




66 to 69 




09 to 70 




70 to 71 




71 to 72 




71to73=:6randRWer 


Look 








Total 


541,481 


162,780 






MonteUo to Governor Bend Lock. 


Governor Bend to Port Winnebago ] 


Look. 


MileposU. 


Cable 
yaxda. 


Milepoflte. 


Cubic 
yards. 


08 to 81 


791 
261 


Governor BAnd Lock tn 101 


24.972 
51 209 


g4to86 


101 to 1 

102 to 1 
108 tol 
1(Ut0l 


02' **.... 


0to86 


03 


70,162 


96 to 87 




04 


73,554 


87to88 


4,948 
2,647 
3,154 
17,215 
24,206 
38,081 
23,944 
17.884 
12, 519 
29,865 
81,820 
22,372 
44,608 
29,292 




50,706 


88 to 89 






89 to 90 






90 to 91 




81to92 




92 to 93 




83 to 94 




84 to 95 




96 to 96 i 




98 to 97 




97to96 .. 




96 to 99 




99 to 100 




160 to Governor Bend 1 


,,ook 








^4ij 


803,606 


270,608 









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2718 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

CnUo yaxdB. 

Total between Oshkosh and Montello Lock 1,486,622 

Total between Montello Jjock and Fort Win nebago Lock ••.. 574, 209 

Total between Oshkosh and Fort Winnebago Lock 2, 000, 881 

This can be red need 296,515 cnbic yards by leaving channel 75 feet wide between 
high banks, from Section Post 90 to Fort Winnebago Lock. 

No dredging required between Oshkosh and Section Post 12, between Enreka and 
Berlin Locks, and between Montello and Section Post 83. 

This estimate is based on 6-feet dredging to Montello and 4 feet from Montello to 
Fort Winnebago Lock below mean low water, a grade haviog been established in 
each section between locks. From Lake Bntte dee Morts to Enreka Lock, the grade 
was taken i^om the crest of the Menasha dam to mean low-water mark on lower 
Eureka gauge. An allowance of 38^ per cent was made for dipper measurement. 

Eiiimate of oott. 

1,486,622 cubic yards, at 8 cents $118,929.76 

574,209 cubic yards, at 8 cents 45,936.72 

2,060,831 cubic yards, at 8 cents 164,866.48 

In estimating the cost it is based on 6 cents per cubic yard, and if the old method 
of dredging is used, another 33^ per cent must be added for rehandling, which 
practically makes the cost 8 cents per cubic yard. 

As the principal work remaining to complete the project of the Fox River 
improvement is the dredging on the Upper Fox, I would again respectfully draw 
attention to my special report of October 30, 1896, in regard to the improvement of 
the dredging plant on the Fox River. As stated therein, I believe a plant can be 
built for $35,000 (a liberal estimate), adaptable to the conditions on the Upper Fox, 
that could handle 250 cubic yards per hour, or as much as the four present dredges. 
Such a dredge would avoid rehandling the material, place it where wanted, and gen- 
erally eliminate the cost of dumping privileges, and remove it from the attack of 
high water and channel currents. Such a plant should dredge for one-qnarter the 
cost or less, say 2 cents per yard. If only one-half the amount estimated to be 
dredged, or 1,000,000 cubic yards were handled by the new plant, a saving of $60,000 
would be gained or about double the cost of the plant aside from the general 
advantages of the method before enumerated. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. M. Mann, Asmtant Engineer. 

Gapt. George A. Zinn, 

Corp$ oj Engineers, U» 8, A. 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS. 

Liit of artiolee traneported on Fox Biver, Wieoonein, during season of 1896. 



Articles. 



Beer 

Brick 

Cedar pofttB 

Coal 

Cord wood 

Drain tile 

Flour 

Gravel 

Grain, floor, and mill staffe 

Land plaster 

Lath 

Lime , 

Logs 



Quantity 
in tons. 



249.5 
7,424 
150 
25,531.5 
15,772 
100 
66.5 
2,»40 
5,096 
75 
326 
259 
66,159 



Articles. 



Lumber 

Merchandise (general) 

Oil 

Paper 

Pnlpwood , 

Salt 

Sand 

Sewer pipe 

Shingles 

Slabs 

Stone 

Total 



5,672.5 
8,478 
113.5 
52.5 
2,906 
2,181 
7,845 



80 
8,108 



148,110 



ngers, 22,576b 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2719 



Idst 0/ boats namgating Fox Bivor hHween Portage and Groen Bay, Wi$., 1896. 



Name of boat. 



Kind. 



Draft 
in feet. 



Tonnage. 



Class. 



XTalyii 

J. H. Crawford... 

B.F.Carter 

08sl«a.Cook 

Fashion , 

J.H.Marston 

John Lynch 

D.A.Cad7 

IC. D.Moore ...2. 

Hnstler 

John Deneesen... 
NetUe Denesaen. 

AgnesC 

Yoliuiteer 

]>.L.Ubbe7 

Homing Bell 

Eolipee 

Venture 

Georgia 



J.Portor 

Nellie Chnroh . 

Long Tom 

Jamoo 

Hastier 

Hustler 

Sandy 

Anna M 

Theresa 

Cambria 

Gaselle 

Irma 

Nia 

Swallow 



Tug 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

Scow 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Barge 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Scow , 

Pleasure yacht. 

....do... 

....do , 

....do , 

....do 

....do 

....do 



150 
100 
210 
210 

50 

75.25 

50 

50 

50 

50 

15 

22 

15.64 

17 

17 


70 

01 

78 

45 
143 
123 
145 

07 

00 

80 
150 



Steam. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Sail. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Tow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Steam. 

Do. 

Do. 

1)0. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Kon.— There are quite a number of small pleasure yachts besides those mentioned. 

Xumber of lockages on Fox Biver^ Wisconsin, for the calendar year 1896, 



Ko. 



Lock. 



Depere. ............... 

Little Kauhauna 

BapideCroche 

Kankauna, fifth 

Kaukauna, fourth 

Kankauna, third 

Kaukauna, second..., 

Kankauna, first 

Little Chute, fourth* 
Little Cbnte, third*.. 
Little Chute, second. . 
Little Chute, first.... 

Cedars 

Appleton, fourth 

Appleton, third 



Lock> 
ages. 



801 
808 
220 
803 
800 
302 
302 
802 



287 
294 



807 
810 



No. 



Lock. 



Appleton, second 
Appleton, first... 

Menasha 

Kureka 

Berlin 

White Biver 

Princeton 

Grand Riyer 

Montello 

Governor Bend. . 
Fort Winnebago. 
Portage 

Total 



Lock- 
ages. 



206 

884 

402 

424 

376 

123 

141 

105 

80 

61 

05 

71 



6,063 



• Combined. 



H H 2a. 

OPERATING AND CARE OP LOCKS AND DAMS ON FOX RIVER, WISCONSIN. 

The expenditares for maintaining the existing depth of navigation 
thioaghoat the Fox Biver and canals; for repairs to mechanical con- 
Btmctions that have been completed and in use, bnt afterwards injured 
by flood or otherwise; for current repairs to old locks and dams and 



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2720 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

lock houses, and for lock tenders' services, have been paid from the 
indefinite appropriation for ^'operating and care of canals and other 
works of navigation," provided for by section 4 of river and harbor act 
of July 5, 1884. 

In accordance with this section an itemized statement of the expend- 
itures is ai)peuded hereto. 

The work during the fiscal year has consisted principally in dredging 
the channels of the river and canals and in making repairs of locks, 
dams, canal banks, lock houses, dredges, and boats. 

For details of work done during the year see the report of Mr. L. M. 
Mann, assistant engineer, appended to this report. His report is accom- 
panied by: 1 tracing, hydrograph Lake Winnebago, discharge of Fox 
Kiver, and rainfall; 1 tracing, statistics, etc., of water powers on Gov- 
ernment dams. Lower Fox; I tracing, statistics, etc., of water powers 
on private dams, Lower Fox, and 1 blue print, dredging data for year 
1896. 

It is particularly to be noted that this is the first year in the history 
of this improvement that the water in the Lower Fox and Lake Win- 
nebago has been maintained at or near the crests of the dams, a condi- 
tion brought about by the enforcement of the rules and regulations for 
the navigation and use of the locks and canals on Fox Biver, approved 
by the Secretary of War February 15, 1895, under the river and harbor 
act of August 17, 1894. 

Money statement. 

Jaly 1, 1896, balance unexpended $11,426.96 

Amount allotted for fisoal year ending June 30, 1897 62,666.03 

74,091.99 
June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 66, 317. 49 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 7,774.50 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 2,687.12 

July 1,1897, balance avaUable 6,087.38 

{Amount (estimated) for expenditure in fiscal year ending June 30, 1898. . " 60, 009. 62 
Amount avaUable for fisoal yearending June 30, 1898 65,097.00 



report of mr. l. m. mann, assistant bnootsbb. 

opebatinq and care of locks and dams on fox river, wisconsin. 

United States Engineer Office, 

OshkotK WU,, June 30, 1897. 

Captain : I have the honor to submit the following report of operations upon 
'' operating and care of canals and other works of navigation on Fox Kiver, Wis- 
consin," from Portage to Green bay, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

The work done during the vear consisted, principally, in rebuilding the Depere 
Lock; repairing and reenforcing Little Kaukauna Dam; building retaining wall 
below right abutment of Depere Dam; building retaining wall below Kaukauna 
First Lock : building protection above and below Kaukauna Guard Lock; repairs 
of Little Cnute Com Dined Locks; building retaining wall above Combined Locks; 
repairs of Appleton Second Lock and Menasha sluice gates; building shore protec- 
tion below Eureka Dam; repairs to Eureka Lock, Dam, lock house, and roadway; 
repairs to Montello Lock ; repairs to boats and dredges ; removing bars of Upper Pox 
River by dredging, and making incidental repairs to looks, dams, and oaniu banks. 

•Amount allotted if estimate is approved. 

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APPENDIX H H — RBPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2721 

MAIKTBNAMGB OF KAYIQATION. 

Navigation was closed formally November 14, 1896, on the Fox River and Wolf 
River. Flnshboards at Berlin and White Rirer dams were removed and valves in 
the navieable pass of Eureka Dam opened. Water was drawn from the Kaukanna 
and Little Chute canal systems preparatory for the winter. Navigation was again 
opened April 10, excepting at Depere, on the 16th, and in Portage Canal on the 23d. 

The water in the Lower Fox and Lake Winnebago has been well maintained at the 
crest of the dams throughout the year with few exceptions. This is the first full 
year this has occurred, and was brought about by the enforcement of Rule 12. The 
stages of Lake Winnebago are shown on hydrograph accompanying this report, with 
discharges as observed at Rapide Croche Dam and precipitation of the upper valleys. 
Hydrograph shows — 

Water b«low crest of dam days.. 154 

Water above crest of dam do.... 211 

Maximnm height of water April 17, 1897 feet.. +3.19 

Lowest point reached, August 26, 1897 feet below crest.. . 7 

Of the one hundred and fifty-four days below crest, water was less than one-tenth 
foot below crest during twenty -four days. 
Maximnm discharge, April 23, 1897, 523,703 cubic feet per minute. 
Mean monthly discharges at Rapide Croche for year are as follows : 

^orvT Cubic feet 

lovf I per minate. 

January 165,795 

February 165,913 

March 162,506 

AprU 367,891 

May 240,756 

June(lto27) 195,752 



Cubic feet 
lo86 : per minute. 

July 167,244 

August 87,177 

September 8,431 

October 63,833 

November 120,428 

December 142,071 

Mean for year, 157, 316. 

In comparing the three curves of last year with this it will be noticed that, 
although the rainfall was far greater in 1896, the discharges in 1897 are much the 
greater. This was due to the fact that during the winter and spring of 1896 the 
lakes and a^ioining marshes were very low ana took up much of the surplus water, 
while this spring they were nearly full, having been kept so by the enforcement of 
Rule 12. The lake also, althon^h its maximum stage was slightly higher than last 
year, did not go as high as the discharge curve might indicate, because the water was 
sluiced at Menasha. 

In continuance of the history of the water regulation, I would state that the Osh- 
kosh gauge reached its maximum June 8, 18S6, at +2.92, after which the waters 
commenced to recede rapidly, due to heavy evaporation and a meager supply. Con- 
trary to all warning to the mill men, tne water continued to go down, and on 
Aogust 21 all the muls were obliged to close down. The water continued to fall, and 
at this time it was apparent that the flow of the river but slightly exceeded the 
evaporation of the lakes. The mills on the Lower Fox ran by steam with few 
exceptions. All leakages were repaired as much as possible and the water hus- 
banded, although some water had to be sluiced at Menasha Lock to keep the lower 
levels full for navigation. The water commenced to rise^ and the mean for the 
montii of September was +1.42, the highest for this month m eleven years. 

On September 30 the Secretary of War rescinded the order of August 21, and 
issued a new order permitting the mills at Neenah and Menasha to gradually draw 
the level of Lake Winnebago down 6 inches below the crest of the Menasha Dam. 

A new company, called the Neenah and Menasha Water Power Company, was 
organized, which comprises all the water powers on Fox River from Neenah and 
Menasha to Depere. Its committee controls and divides the water within certain 
limits, thereby giving a more uniform and just distribution. Many of the conten- 
tions have been done away with, and during last fall, when water was generally low, 
it was kept up beyond expectations. In accordance with the last order the mills 
continued to slowly draw the lake down until it reached a point below the level 
prescribed by the Secretary of War, between the 8th and 10th of March, and the mills 
were verballv requested on the lOtn to stop drawing water. This order was, how- 
ever, suspended on the same day awaiting mrther oraers from the Secretary of War. 
On March Hf by order of the Secretary of War, the mills were permitted to draw 
the water in Lake Winnebago to 12 inches below the crest. The mills did not take 
advantage of this order until the 19th, when the committee allowed all << first water'' 
to be drawn, and on the 31st they commenced drawing ''second water.'' The lake 
continued to rise until it reached its flood height, April 17, 1897. 

BN0 97 171 



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2722 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 



The very high water was kept down by slaicing at the MenaHha Dam, but the 
heavy sluiciDe at one side only caused backwater in the Menasha River and reduced 
the head of the mills on that side very materially. Althoagh the regulation has 
been successful in many respects, it is again apparent that the United States should 
have absolute coutrol, so that all can be treated alike. 

By order of the Secretary of War, March 17, 1897, the authority given the mills at 
Neenah and Menasha to draw the water below the crest of the Menasha Dam was to 
cease upon the opening of navigation (April 10, 1897). 

The means of all gauge readings were calculated and tabulated for niueteen 
years. Daily discharge computations were made, tabulated, and plotted. 

In order to show the importance of the great water power in the Lower Fox Val- 
ley, I have taken great pains to obtain an accurate and complete tabulation of these 
powers, which is appeuded hereto. The data to base calculations on was kindly 
furnished by the mill men themselves and is therefore supposed to be correct. 

A recapitulation below gives the horsepower for each dam individually, and also 
the steam power, as follows : 

GOVERNMENT DAMS. 



Dams. 



Horsepower of wheels. 



Theoret- 
ical, com- 
Siitedf!roni 
ischsrfcesi 
of the 
wheels. 



Practical 
wheel ca- 
pacity. 



Amoant of 
water re- 
quired for 
the wheels 
(cubic feet 
per min- 
ute). 



Theoretical. 



Horsepower of dams, 

computed for aflowage 

of 170,000 cubic feel 

per minute. 



Practical 
(75 per 
cent 01 the- 
oretical). 



Steam 
power 
(norse- 
power). 



Neenah (private) . 

Menasha 

Appleton, upper . . 
Apploton, lower .. 

Cedars 

LitUe Chute 

Kankauna 

B*pide Croche. . . . 
Little Kaukauna. . 
Depere 



Total. 



5,163 
2,797 
7,329 
1,877 
5,227 
3,950 
6, 402 



4,176 
2,234 
5,903 
1,528 
4,217 
3,152 
5,144 



342,898 
248,806 
298, 809 
144,475 
250,888 
172,624 
239,514 



2,(r72 



2,130 



201,539 



2,646 
4,508 
2,721 
8,142 
8,864 
4,508 
2,748 
2,548 
2,694 



1,984 

8,381 
2,041 
2,356 
2,898 
3.881 
2,059 
1,911 
2,021 



35,417 



28,484 



29,877 



22,032 



1,732 

8,005 

975 

200 

150 



1.445 
*i,'833 



8,840 



PRIVATE BAMa 



Appleton 


5,715 
5,336 
2,169 


4,597 
4,438 
1,735 


304.556 
152, 287 
76,199 


2,367 
5.957 
4,830 


1,775 
4,468 


2,205 


Combined locks 




Xaukanna 


3,623 








Total 


13,220 


10, 770 




13,154 


9,866 1 2,205 






Totals for Govemment and 
private dams 


48,637 


39,254 




42.531 


81,898 


11,045 







The power of the dams is based on a mean flowage of the river of 170,000 onbic feet 
per minnte, which was abont the mean flowage as observed for the past year and as 
has been estimated in previous years. The above table shows that the pract i cal wheel 
capacity at Neenah and Menasha is 6,410 horsepower, with a possible consumption of 
591,204 onbic feet of wat<er per minnte, or abont three times the mean flowage of 170,000 
cubic feet per minute, with an estimated practical power of 1,984 horsepower. 

The total practical power offered by Government dams is estimated at 22,032 horse- 
power, of which 3,970 horsepower at Rapide Croche and Little Kaukauna is not now 
and little of it ever has been utilized. The reason is because the wat-er rights and 
the adjoining property rights belong to different parties and they can not be har- 
monized, causing a very large yearly loss. The total practical horsepower of the Fox, 
from Neenah and Menasha to Depere, is estimated at 31,898 horsepower and an addi- 
tional steam power connected with the different manufactories of 11,045 horsepower. 

The following table shows the water power owned by the Green Bay and Missis- 
sippi Canal Company, on the Lower Fox^ as estimated from data given by Mr. A. L. 
Smith. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPOET OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2723 



GOYXBNMENT DAH8. 



Praotioal 
horsepower, 

capacity. 



Praotioal 

boreepower 

dnetoflowof 

170,000 cable 

feet per 

mlnnte 

<75 per cent of 

theoietioal 

horsepower). 



Per cent of 

flow of 

river 

entitled to. 



Bemarka. 



A^ppleton, npper .. 
A.pp)eton, lower .. 

Little Chute 

Eankanna 

I>o 

Rapide Croche 

Little Kankauna . 



a, 600 
1,871 
8,152 
2,307 
2,837 



1.183 
024 
2,837 
1,518 
1,865 
2,050 
1,911 



86.00 
18.45 
100.00 
44.85 
55.15 
100.00 
100.00 



(Owned Jointly by Green Bay 
and Miftsissippi Canal Com- 
pany and Kan Kaaua Water 
Power Company. 



Total. 



11,096 



PBIYATE DAMEL 



B^aokaana 

Do 

Do 

Combined looks 



667 
852 

Small power. 
4.488 



1.184 
736 



4,468 



32.68 
20.29 



f Ownedjointly by Green Bay 
and Mississippi Canal Com- 
pany and Fatten Company. 



100.00 



Owned jointly by Green Bay 
and Hissisfllppi Canal Conip 
[ pany and Edwards. 



The arerage cost of steam power per horsepower per year I would place between 
|50 and $75, or $62.50 per horsepower. 

The cost of water power per horsepower per year, includiDg 10 per cent for inter- 
est on original cost of dams, canals, etc., and sinking fuDd, repairs, taxes, etc., or 
water rent in lien thereof, at the rate of $5 to $7 per horsepower, and 75 cents for oil 
and attendance, wonld ayeraee $10 per horsepower per year. The gaiu. therefore, of 
water ]power over steam is at least $52.50. On the Fox River, however, tne dams, etc., 
are maintained hy the United States, excepting the Neenah Dam, and the water users 
have only to pay for the water wheels, pits, foundation, head gates, and wasteweirs, 
which would amount to about $20 per horsepower. The annual cost per horsepower 
does probably not exceed $3, and $50 per year per horsepower would therefore be a 
low estimate for the gain of water over steam power. This can be considered an 
income, and amounts for the total horsepower furnished by Government dams from 
Menasha to Depere, equal to 22,032 practical horsepower, at $50, to $1,101,600. This 
includes Rapide Croche and Little Kaulcaun% not now utilized, as stated above. 

RRPATR8 OF LOCKS, BTC. 

Depere Look, — This- lock, which was found in a very weak and leaky condition, 
was entirely rebuilt during the last winter. It was last (partly) rebuilt in the year 
1886-87, but the lower pa^ of the lock was not renewed at that time and it was 
left in bad condition. 

With several improvements this lock is now the best wooden lock on the river. 
The lock was lengthened from 166 to 170 feet to make it conform to other locks. 
Rock was blasted from under the lock walls along both sides, and the mud sills 
placed on the bottom in cement. The space between the breast wall and upper 
gates was also blasted to a level with bottom of the lock, and a platform with a new 
system of valves constructed. The upper gates were cut off ana the old valve open- 
ings closed. The head walls and upper wing walls were built up in good cement 
masonry ; the lower wins crib walls were also reconstructed. The entire lock walls 
of dry masonry were rdaid. As these walls were composed principally of small 
rubblestone, many large ones were added, and good walls built up. Middle girts 
were placed so as to P^nnit repairs of the upper work without disturbing the lower 
part under water. The old crib breast wall was removed and a good cement 
masonry wall built in its place. 

The work of rebnildine the lock was commenced November 2, 1896. Old cribs, 
pump engine, timber, ana tools were towed by steam tug Boeoobel and Dredge No, IS 
from Appleton, Kankauna^ and Little Kaukauna to this lock. 



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2724 REPOKT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEBR8, U. S. AEMY. 

Five hundred and sixty-six cubic yards of gravel were excavated for shore con- 
nections of coifer dams above and below the lock, 8,725 feet B. M. of pine timber 
were used in constructing 4 cribs, which were floated to place and filled with 15 
cords of stone. Eleven thousand and eighty-six feet B. M. new and old plank were 
used for planking. One thousand and ninety- four cubic yards of clay were exca- 
vated from the bed of the river, and 616 cubic yards were purchased in bank, loaded, 
scowed, and placed on back of the coffer dams. One hundred and fifty cubic yards 
of earth were also placed for strengthening the same. Dredge Xo. 2 was employed in 
dredging and sinking cribs, and steam tug Bo9e6hel in towing dredged material. 

Ninety-three thousand three hundred feet B. M. of old girts, i>osi)8, mud and miter 
sills, hollow quoins, miter sill platform,^lank, and timber in coping, breast wall, and 
in wing walls were removed ; 2,564 cubic yards of stone were removed from the lock 
and wing walls and from the wing- wall cribs — this stone was used in rebnilding the 
lock ; 1,^ cubic yards of earth, gravel, and stone wms excavated for the foundation 
of the cross, breast, wing, head, and lock walls and wing-wall cribs and for site of 
pumping engine ; 315 cubic yards of stone was quarried from the site of the new 
valve puktform and from the sides — this stone was used in the construction and was 
profitable ; 1,644 cubic yards of dry masonry was laid in the cross wing, head, and 
lock walls; 947 cubic yards of concrete masonry was laid in the cross, breast, wing, 
and lock walls, pier under platform, behind mud sills, and between chord and cheek 

Eieces of lower miter sill; 20 cubic yards of concrete was placed between front and 
ack coping timbers of lock walls; 1^ cords of stone was placed for a riprap wall at 
upper end of right wing wall ; 1,676 square feet of head, breast, lock, and wing 
walls was pointMl with cement; 16 holes were drilled in coping of head and br^Mt 
walls, and 16 iron dowels were placed for securing coping. The solid rock along the 
sides was dressed to receive the mud sills and lower miter sill, which were framed, 
bedded in cement, and bolted with l^-inch bolts to the solid rock. New framework 
of oak, consisting of posts and girts, were built and secured in place with l^inch 
anchor bolts through the walls. Two thicknesses of 2-inch pine plank, dressed and 
jointed, were spiked to the framework. Hollow quoins and recess corner posts were 
framed and bolted in position. New oopiujpf timbers were framed and placed. 

A new valve platform was built, having for its supports a cement masonry pier in 
the middle and 31 gas-pipe supports properly distributed. The base plates of the 
pipes were secured by means of split bolts to the solid rock, which waa dressed to 
receive them, and the top plates were fastened to the timber with lag screws. The 
upper miter sill was framed and securely bolted to the new platform. Six oak snub- 
bing posts were framed and secured by anchor rods to the lock walls. New plat- 
forms were built and the maneuvering system overhauled. 

The gates were removed; top timbers placed on them to raise them to the neces- 
sary height; the valves in upper gates removed and openings closed; gate posts 
were repaired and gates replaced; 4 new heel-post caps with yokes and back straps 
and 4 galvanized caps for hollow quoin posts were fitted and secured in place. The 
valves and valve-maneuvering geap for lower gates were repaired. 

Two hundred and thirty -lour cubic yards of earth, stone spalls, and ice was 
removed from the recesses and chamber of the lock ; 26 cords of stone, the cribs, and 
4,129 cubic yards of earth and clay were removed £rom the cofferdams and from the 
bank where earth had been placed from the excavations of the lock walls, of which 
3,416 cubic yards was excavated and 680 cubic yards was rehandled by Dredge 
No, £, oompleting the removal of the cofferdams on the 22d of April, 1897. The lock 
was filled with water on the 15th of April. 

Three hundred and six cubic yards of earth were wheeled and placed for filling in 
back of lock walls. 

In connection with this lock a masonry cross wall was built 9 feet 4 inches high, 3 
feet on top and 4 feet on the bottom, extending from the upper left head wall of 
lock about 43 feet up to the left canal bank and reaching to a point beyond the 
entrance of the old lock. This makes the bank on this side permanently safe. It 
was on an old fill, composed principally of mill refuse. 

Metaining wall above Depere Loch, — ^A cross wall 8 feet wide on top, 4 feet wide at 
bottom, 9 feet 1 inch high, and 54 feet long was built, extending from the upper end 
of the head wall on the right bank of the canal above the lock to the wall of the 
electric-light flume. Twenty-six and one-third cubic yards of cement masonry wan 
laid in constructing the same. Twelve cubic yards of earth was placed, filling over 
this cross wall. 

The joints in 826 square feet of the retaining wall were raked out and repointed 
with cement. 

The wall permanently stops all leakage through the embankment and prevents 
further washouts. 

Depere Dam — Retaining wall below right abutment, — A wall 3 feet wide on top, 6.5 
feet wide at bottom, 14 feet high, and 18.5 feet long was built, connecting the right 
abutment of the dam with pier of highway bridge. A low cofferdam was necesHary 
to keep out the water while the foundation was laid. The old crib was removed 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2725 

and part of the stone used in the wall. Forty-nine oabio yards of cement masonry 
and 25 cnbic yards of dry masonry were laid in the oonstmction of the wall. 
Forty-six oubic yards of clay was placed in back of wall for filling. 

The joints and seams in 1,100 square feet of the abutments were raked oat and 
repointed with oement. 

This wall was also required to insnre the safety of the cuial bank, which was 
always leaking and in daneer of washing ont. 

LitlU Kakkauna Dam.— The work of build inc the submerged cribs 16 feet wide and 
4 feet high for the total length of thf dam and sinking same below the apron was 
eontinn^Ml. 

Twenty-seven thousand three hundred and twelve feet B. M. pine timber was 
framed and bolted for seven cribs. These, with the six cribs built last year, were 
. towed to foundation prepared for them below apron of dam and sunk with 211^ cords 
of stone. Two thousand four hundred feet B. M. pine timber for stringers and 11,812 
feet B. M. oak plank for decking were placed and secured on top of the submerged 
cribs opposite the sluiceway. 

Fifty-nine piles, for keepine the cribs in place, were driven on lower side from 13 
feet to 19 feet into the around. 

New abutments and horses were built and replaced the old ones in the sluiceway. 
New needles were framed and placed and the walk over the sluiceway was repaired. 
For these repairs in the sluiceway 3,738 feet B. M. pine and 11,480 feet B. M. oak tim- 
ber and plank were used. 

One hundred and five linear feet of old apron plank and 373 linear feet of old crest 
timbers were removed. The t-ops of 123 piles were reframed and 9,906 feet B. M. 
pine timber and 880 feet B. M. oak plank were framed and bolted for the new crest. 
The apron plank on the crib at the right abutment of the dam was removed; 860 
feet B. if. of pine and oak timber and plank was framed and placed for leveling 
the top stringers of this crib for apron plank and for sheer timbers, to prevent the 
river from undermining the abutment. One hundred and sixty-eight and thirty- 
three one hundred and twenty-eighths cords was filled between the piles of the dam 
in place of that washed out. 

Dredge No. 2 was employed in preparing the foundation for the submerged cribs, for 
which purpose there were removed 1 pile, 5 snags, 43 larf^e stones, and 190 cubic yards 
of small stone, and excavated 4,890 cubic yards of material, of which 610 cubic yards, 
not being suitable, was dumped on the bank and in deep water; 4,280 cubic yards 
was pla<^ for the foundation. The dredge was also employed in excavating 2,555 
cubic yards of clay and gravel for the backing of the dam, which was loaded in 
dump scows and towed by the steam- tug Boseobel to the dam and dumped in place. 
Rapide Croehe Lock, — ^The joints and seams in 3,000 square feet of the lock walls 
were raked out and repointed with oement. 

Koukauna Fifth Lock, — Six lar^^e dimension stones were towed Arom Rapide Croehe 
and Kaukauna Third Look to this lock, where 205 cubic yards of cement masonry in 
the head walls was removed and relaid. Five stones were also cut and placed in 
repairing the upper slope walls of the lock. 

Kaukauna Fifth Look House. — Seven storm windows were placed for use on the lock 
house. Under agreement with Peter Feller 106 linear feet of gal vani zed-iron eaves 
trough and 35 linear feet of galvanized conductor pipe were furnished and placed on 
lock tionse. 

Kaukauna Fir$i, Second, Third, and Fourth Locks, — Joints and seams were raked out 
and repointed with cement. 

Kaukauna Second Lock House. — Sixty linear feet of 6-inch sewer pipe was laid from 
the rear of the house to the outlet of the waste weir. 

Retaining wall beUno Kaukauna First Lock . — A wall resting on bed rock, and extend- 
ing in a straight line from the end of the lower left wing wall of Kaukauna First 
Lock a distance of 123 feet, was constructed of dry rubble masonry. The wall is 
14 feet high at upper and 12 feet at lower end and 5 feet in width at the bottom and 
3 feet on top. At lower end a wall 11 feet long extends into canal bank at right 
angles, but rests on the canal bank. 

Three hundred and ninety cubic yards of earth was excavated for the foundation, 
24019 cubic yards of dry masonry wall was laid, and 471 oubic yards of earth was 
wheeled from canal bed and bank and placed for filling back of same. 

Kaukauna Dam, — ^The joints and seams in 930 square feet of the abutments were 
raked out and repointed with cement. 

Kaukauna Guard Lock. — Sixteen protection piles were driven above and below the 
guard lock. One thousand five hundred and ninety-nine feet B. M. of pine timber 
was towed from Applotou to the lock, framed, and bolted for waling timbers to the 
piles. 

The joints and seams in 400 square feet of the walls were raked out and repointed 
with cement. 

Little Chute Combined Xocii:».— The upper gates were rebuilt ; 1,600 feet B. M. of old 
pine was removed from the old gates; 6,734 feet B. M. pine and 136 feet B. M. oak 



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2726 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

lumber wae hauled by team from Kankaona, framed, and bolted for the new gates, 
and hand rails for the same; one steel T bar and 6 steel plates were bolted to each 
gate. New heel -poet caps were fitted to place, straps and yokes were repaired and 
placed, and the gates hung with 12 weignt. irons. 

The old valye system in the upper platform, which was worn out and had become 
troublesome, was removed and the new system put in ; 1,488 feet B. M. old pine 
plank and timber was removed ; 5,236 feet B. M. pine timber and plank was framed 
and secured for stringers, posts, bed timbers for valve seats, plank on platforms, cov- 
ering for miter gears, hand- wheel frames, and for closing old valve openings; 94 feet 
B. M. oak plank was placed for valve stops. 'Checks were cut in recess walls for 
the miter gears; the valves, miter gears, shaffcs, and purchase gearing were secured 
inplace. 

Two thousand one hundred and thirty-six feet B. M. pine timber and plank was 
framed and placed for the upper tripod platform, and the middle and lower tripod 
platforms were rebuilt, and all platiorms placed on a level with the lock walls. Two 
tripods, complete, for maneuvering the upper gates, replaced the old system, which 
haa become obsolete and worn out. 

Two spars were framed and the rack irons were moved from the old spar and 
secured on the new ones, which were placed in position. 

Checks and holes were drilled in the lock walls and 12 new oast-iron snubbing 
posts were bolted in place. Seventy-live cubic yards of earth was excavated from 
Dack of lock walls for securing anchor rods and then replaced. Seventy -one cubic 
yards of earth was excavated, wheeled, and placed for filling behind look walls. 

Wa$te weir at Little Chute Combined Locke. — Twenty-four ciibic yards of earth was 
excavated from the upper sides of the waste weir and 19.3 cubic yards of dry masonry 
were laid in constructing the wing walls of the waste weir. 

Betaining wall above Combined Locke — The old wall at this place was a riprap wall, 
which had been pushed into the canal by the adjscent bill. 

The work of replacing this wall with one of dry masonry was commenced Novem- 
ber 14, 1896; 25 cords of stone were removed from the old wall; 320 cubic yards of 
dry masonry wall were laid; 1,301 cubic yards of earth were excavated from the site, 
wheeled to, and placed behind the lock walls and on both sides of the retaining wall. 
This wall connects the head wall of the lock with the retaining wall built last year 
and is in extension of the latter. It has a 5-foot base, 3 feet on top, 11^ feet high, 
and 192 feet long. This work was completed in April, 1897. 

LAtile Chute Second Look,— The joints and seams in 2,300 square feet of the lock walls 
were raked out and repointed with cement. 

Cedare Dam. — This aam having settled unevenlv and crest worn by ice and water, 
642 linear feet of the crest was leveled and dressed to receive new crest timber. Two 
thousand nine hundred and seventy*three feet B. M. oak timber was framed, bolted, 
and then dressed to a level 6 feet above breast wall at Cedars Lock. This work was 
commenced November 16 and completed December 8, 1896. 

Appleton Fourth Lock, — The 4 tripod platforms were rebuilt on a level with the 
top of the lock and the snubbing posts were sawed off to a height of 12 inches above 
the top of the lock. A leak through the fill back of upper wing wall of the lock 
was stopped by driving sheet piling. The hole washed out by tne leak was filled 
with 23 cubic yards of earth, puddled. 

Appleton Lower Dam.— Eighteen feet B. M. oak timber and 3 wrought-iron plates 
were used in replacing the Tost and broken stmts of the truss beams of the sluice 
gates. Material is also being purchased for new truss beams, saddles, and trunnions 
for the sluice gates, the work to be commenced this month (June). 

Appleton Third Lock. — Two thousand six hundred and forty-one feet B. M. of new 
and old timber and plank were framed and fastened in place for a diamond block, 3 
snubbing posts, in repairing the upper left capstan platform, in replacing a part of 
the walk on the right lock wall ana the coping timbers, which were damaged last 
year by fire communicated from the burning of the ad^jacent mill. One hundred 
and thirty linear feet of the back coping of the lock walls was leveled. 

Appleton Third Lock House. — Two hundred and thirty feet B. M. pine lumber was 
framed and fastened in place for a storm house on the front of the lock house. 

Appleton Second Look. — ^The wing- wall cribs below the lock and the 4 tripod plat- 
forms were rebuilt. For this purpose, 7,947 feet B. M. pine timber which was on 
hand at Appleton First Lock and Kaukauna was transported by steam tug Boscobel 
to this locK. The old timber and stone were removed. Ten thousand five hundred 
and seventy-one feet B. M. of old and new pine timber and plank was framed and 
secured in place for the cribs and platforms. The platforms were lowered to the 
level of the top of the lock. Seven cubic yards of stone was laid in drv founda- 
tion wall of the right crib, and 986 cubic yards was placed in the cribs. New spar 
rollers were placed for the upper and lower right gate spars. Fifteen cubic yards of 
earth was placed in back of left crib. 

Appleton First Lock. — The upper timbers and planking on the protection crib above 
the upper left-hand wall of the lock being rotten were removed, and 1,656 feet B. M. 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2727 

of old pine timber was framed and bolted in replacing same. The npx»eT left tripod 
platform was rebuilt on a le^el with the top of the lock. Five handred and sixteen 
feet B. M. of timber was used for posts, braces, and plank for same. 

Mettasha look houae. — One 35-barrel 4-hoop pine cistern was set np in the cellar of 
the lock honse under agreement with John Lenz, sr. The eaves trough was changed 
and conductor pipe lengthened and connected with cistern ; new gutter and iron cis- 
tern pump were put in place under agreement with Mr. George Loescher. 

Mentuka Dam {aluioe gate*), — The truss beam of one of the sluice gates being 
decayed and unsafe, a cofferdam was built of 984 feet B. M. of timber, shutting off 
the water from this part of the dam, in October, 1896. On account of the delay of. 
arrival of oak timber, the repairs to the sluice gates were not commenced until 
March 21, 1897. All the old truss beams, trunnions, struts, and some of the gate 
arms were replaced with new, using for this purpose 4,099 feet B. M. of pine and 
oak timber. The ends of the trunnions were turned to fit the bands. The old serv- 
iceable iron was used again in the repairs, which were completed March 26, 1897. 

£ureka lock. — ^The 4 tripod platforms were rebuilt and replaced on a level with 
the top of the lock, and 8 spar-plates were fastened to the bottom of the spars. To 
prevent the valve rods from being broken by boats during high water, blocks were 
framed and bolted on top of the u]9per gates. 

Eureka lock house. — The front, side, and back steps were rebuilt; 7 windows and 
a door of the old lock house, used as a tool shed, were boarded up ; 1,404 square feet 
of tin roof of the lock house was painted two coats, and 3,774 square feet of the 
sides of the lock house, shed, and fountain house, one coat of No. 20 asphaltum 
paint. 

Eureka Dam. — One hundred and seven cubic jards of gravel was towed by steam tug 
Foxftom section post 28 to thedam. Ninety -eight cubic yards was placed on the back- 
ing level with the crest, and 9 cubic yards was placed in back of navigable pass by 
the crew. For the purpose of lowering the water so the gravel could be placed, the 
. valves in the navigable pass were removed and then replaced. The superstructure 
of the navigable pass was painted one coat by the lock tender and crew. Repairs to 
the woodwork of this dam were commenced October 7,1896. Five thousand five 
hundred and twenty feet B. M. pine plank was transported firom Oshkosh by the 
steam tug Fox, framed and spiked for replacing the planking on lower apron and on 
rear of dam. One thousand five hundred feet B. M. of oak timber and plank was 
hauled by team from Berlin for building a float for use in making the repairs. 

Shore proieetion below Eureka Dam, — October 12, 1896, the building of the shore pro- 
tection just below the left abutment of the dam was commenced. Twenty rock-elm 
piles were driven 10 feet apart. Brush and 2,000 mat poles were cut, and 2,300 
fascines were made and hauled to the river. Four hundred brush mats were scowed 
to the site of the shore protection, and weighted down by 27^ cords of stone, com- 
pleting the building of a shore protection 2(X) feet long. The pile driver was towed 
from Berlin Lock by the steam tug Fox, the machinery put together, and piles driven 
by the crew. 

Eureka lock cut. — In conjunction with building the shore protection below the 
left abutment of the dam, 60 brush mats were sunk with 8 cords of stone around the 
point of land at head of lock cut to prevent the water from cutting away the point. 
Roadway at Eureka Lock. — The roadway from the highway to the lock having 
become in bad repair, the old bridge was removed and a new one built 10 feet wide 
by 10 feet long in place; also two culverts 8 by 12 inches by 14 feet were constructed 
in place. The material used was surplus and old timber on hand taken from Berlin 
and Eureka locks. Two hundred ana eighty cubic yards of earth was placed on the 
roadway, building it 6 feet wide and raising it 1 foot for 1,175 feet. 

White Biver Look. — The upper and lower gates were removed by the crew of the 
steam tug Fox, and 2 inches nrom bottom of toe post were sawed off to prevent it 
from striking the bottom of the lock. The gates were replaced. Eight spar plates 
and hard-wood strips were fastened to the spars. 

Shore protection below White Biver Dam. — Brush and mat poles were cut, 725 fascines 
and 145 orush mats were made, placed, and weighted down with 8 cords of stone, 
which had been soowed by the steam tug Fox from Section Post 42 and from the lock, 
raising the shore protection 3 feet on right side below the dam. 

Montello XocI;.— -Repairs to this lock were commenced August 8, 1896. Material for 
the repairs was transported from Oshkosh and Berlin Lock by the steam tugs Fox 
and Boecobel and the crews, together with one carpenter, were employed in making 
the repairs. Eighteen thousand five hundred and fifty-six feet B. M. of old plank 
and coping timbers and 3 diamond blocks were removed; 20,539 feet B. M. or pine 
plank and timber was framed and secured in place for posts, wall plank, coping, 
and diamond blocks; hand rails were framed and placed on all gates: 7,850 square 
feet of the lock walls and gates was painted one coat and 948 square feet two coats 
with No. 20 asphaltum paint; the tripods and other ironwork with one coat No. 31 
asphaltnm paint. 
Montello Vam. — On account of high water the brush and stone backing next to 



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2728 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

left abutment and back of old waste wier had settled 2 feet, cansinff a leak, which 
was stopped with a cord of mbbleetone and 15 cubio'yards of gravel. 

laSCKLLAKBOUS. 

Painting, — Two hundred and eleven gallons of No. 30 asphaltum paint and 25 gal- 
lons of No 31 asphaltum paint were purchased and distributed among the lock tend- 
ersy etc., for painting wood and iron work of looks, sluiceways of dams, lock houses, 
warehouses, tool houses, etc., for the purpose of preserving and improving their 
appearance. 

Different kinds of grass seed were purchased and distributed for use of the lock 
tenders in improving United States property around the locks, look houses, etc. 

REPAIRS OF BOATS AKD DREDG1E8. 

Steam tug General Q. K. Warren.— This tug was laid up all last year at Appleton, 
where she was repaired this spring by the crew of the steam tug Bosoohel. A new 
floor was placed in the boiler room. A new ii^ector was purchased and connected. 
The machinery was adjusted and tested. The vessel was painted inside and outside, 
fitted out, and went into commission June 11, 1897. . 

Steam tug BosoobeL— This tug was laid up at Depere last fall where a new ffroueer 
was built and put in place of the old one which had become unserviceable; the 
machinery was overhauled and tested. The boat went into commission April 16, 
1897. May 1, 1897, the repairs were resumed at Appleton. Eighty-six linear feet of 
new guard frame was built on the starboard bow and around the stern and new 
decking was laid on the same. The paddle wheels, paddle boxes, and cabin windows 
were repaired and the deck calked. The boat was fitted out and painted. The 
repairs were made by the crew and hired labor. 

Steam tug Fox, — This tug was hauled out and blocked up last fall in Oshkosh* 
boat yard for general repairs, which were commenced January 18, 1897. This work 
was done by hired labor and under agreement with J. A. Barnes, Oshkosh. Both 
ends of the hull and part of one side were replanked with oak plank; a st-eam boiler 
was used for steaming the plank. The stem, fenders, plank-sheer, chocks, anchor 
chocks, facia, jackstatf, and part of the deck plank were replaced. A truss beam 
was made of oak and two 1-inch hog rods and placed to support rear end of boiler 
which was raised to the right height. Two strips of galvanized iron were nailed 
to bow of hull to protect same against ice. Both ends of the boiler deck were 
extended 4 feet aft and 7 feet forward and the cabin was cut across 7 feet from the 
rear end, the rear end moved back 8 feet, and the intervening space closed in for 
another stateroom. Under agreement witfi Williams & Williams the new tin roof- 
ing and scupper pipes were placed and secured on boiler deck and cabin. The hull 
and deck were calked and pitched. The machinery was overhauled and tested. 
The boat was cleaned, fitted out, and painted inside and outside. She was launched 
April 16 and went into commission May 4, 1897. 

Quarter boat No. 1. — The outside of this boat was painted. 

Dredge No. ;?.— Last fall two new forward grousers were made and put in place of 
the old ones which had become unserviceable. The old purchase-sheave shaft, being 
broken, was replaced by a new one. The dredge was laid up for the winter at Depere, 
where the general repairs were made by the crew and under agreement with C. A. 
Lawton & Co. A new leader-sheave frame was made. The dipper handle and turn- 
table were repaired. The machinery was generally overhauled and tested. The 
cabin was cleaned and painted. The dredge went into commission April 13, 1897. 

Dredge No. 4, — After minor repairs were made the dredge was put in commission 
April 27, 1897. With the new crane and hoisting engines of No. 8 this dredge is in 
excellent condition, better than she has ever been. 

Dredge No. 7. — This dredge was laid up last fall at Oshkosh boat yard, where she 
was hauled out and blocked up. The repairs were done by hired labor and under 
agreement with H. C. Doman. The repairs were commenced January 18, 1897. The 
old material was removed and all the gunwales were built of new timber and thor- 
oughly bolted iu place, the bolts running through the gunwales and riveted at both 
ends. New grouser frames were built of oak timber and connected transversely to 
strengthen the forward part of the dredge and take up the transverse strains. Two 
new forward grousers and a new dipper handle were also built of oak timber and 
put in place. The A-frame was reenforced at its base under the deck. New stanch- 
ion braces, chocks, dead wood, fenders, cleats, deck plank, etc., were framed and 
secured in place. A new floor was put in the kitchen and dining room. All the old 
iron that was removed and was serviceable was used agaiu in the repairs. 

On account of weak teeth in the hoisting gear, the hoisting and backing gears 
were exchanged. The holler and machinery were generally overhauled and tested. 
The grouser frame was oiled, and the new work, the boom and A-frame, were 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOET OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2729 

painted.. Tbe hull and deck were oftlked and pitched. The dredge waa lannched 
May 30 and went into commission Jnne 11, 1897. 

llie hull of this dredge was too weak for its machinery and caused much tronble 
aod expense durine the past two years. It is supposed to be greatly strengthened 
now, and that the dredge will show far better service this year. 
Barge Prineeton, — Minor repairs were made. 

Ninety-foot (drill) »oow, — This scow, having been sunk at Cedars for the past two 
yeara, ^was siphoned out bv the crew of steam tug Botcobel, The seams were 
calked enough for towing, the small building was removed, and the scow was towed 
by steam tug Boscobel to Oshkosh boat yard, where she was hauled out and blocked 
np October 14, 1886, by George Ryan under verbal agreement. She was repaired by 
hired labor. February 6, 1897, the repairs were commenced. The old material was 
removed. New rake plank for bow and stem^ bumper, plank-sheer, and fender were 
framed of oak and fastened in place. New pine plank was placed for decking. The 
scow was calked and pitched, and lannchea May 21, 18S7. 

Wood acow for dredge No, 7. — A new wood scow, 5^ by 18 feet, was built at Oshkosh 
for nae of dredge No. 7. She was calked and painted, and launched May 7, 1897. 

General remark; — ^The cost of hauling out boats for repairs and launching at Osh- 
koBb boat yard is considered very expensive, aside firom the rent paid for the yard, 
and it is proposed to recommend the construction of a suitable dry dock on Oovem> 
ment property, probably at Kaukanna. Such a dock would cost less to construct 
than the expense of hauling and launching the boats during the past year amounted 
to. The docks could be emptied by gravity and the expense of handling boats would 
be very slight. 

DRBDGIKG LOWER FOX. 

JBy iredge No, $, channel "below Kaakauna F^ih Lock, — ^Dredge No. 2 was towed to 
Kankauna Fifth Lock, after completing work at Depere Lock. Dredging was com- 
menced Anril 26, 1897. Cute were made 320 by 25 by 4 to 9 feet, excavating 1,731 
cubic yards of earth, which was banked on the left, completing the cleaning of the 
channel. The dredge was towed April 28, 1897, to— 

Channel below Cedare Xocfc.— Cuts were made, 1,580 by 5 to 21 by 2 to 6 feet, e3Lcava- 
ting 3,415 cubic yards of stone, hardpau, and gravel, of which 3,120 cubic yards was 
banked on the left and 295 cubic yaras on the right, completing the work. The 
dredge was towed May 21, 1897, to— 

Cluinnel below Chicago, Milwaukee and 3U Paul Eailrottd Bridge. — (See improve- 
ment report.) 

DREDGING UPPER FOX. 

The work of dredging Upper Fox River was continued by dredges Kos. 2, 4, 5, and 
7, for the purpose of providing a navigable channel 100 feet wide and 6 feet aeep. 

Bjf dredge No, £, between Section Poets 5S and 50, — ^Work was continued after July 
1, 1896. Cuts were made 8.179 by 15 to 35 by 1.5 to 8 feet, excavating 34,548 cubic 
yards of sand, clay, gravel, and stone, which was dumped to the left and right. 
Fifteen thousand seven hundred and thirty- three cubic yards was rehandled and 
17,703 cubic yards is to be rehandled. The dredge stopped work September 4, 1896, 
and was towed to Little Kaukanna Dam. 

Bji dredge No, 4, between Section Poets St and £6, — Work was continued in this 
section. Cuts were made 1,466 by 45 to 70 by 1 to 3 feet, excavating 8,580 cubic 
yards of sand, gravel, and stone, which was dumped to the left and right. One 
thousand and eighty-six cubic yards is to be rehandled. 

Between Section Posts 41 and ^.— July 22, 1896, the dredge was towed to 1,540 feet 
above Section Post 40. Cuts were made 2,303 by 36 to 70 by 1.5 to 7.5 feet, excava- 
ting 21,151 cubic yards of clay, which was dumped to the left and on land owned by 
Frank Hopp, from, whom i^ee dumping privileges were obtained. Nine thousand 
three hunarod and forty-five cubic yards was rehandled and 10,003 cubic yards is to 
be rehandled. 

Between Section Posts 54 and 52, — September 3, 1896, the dredge was towed below 
Berlin Lock. Cuts were made 2,550 by liS to 75 by 2 to 2.5 feet, excavating 12,174 
cubic yards of sand and clay, which was dumped to the left and right. Ten tliousand 
six hundred and eighty cubic yards was rehandled. 

Between Section PosU £8 and ;e7.— October 1, 1896. the dredge was towed to 1,660 
feet below Section Post 28. Cuts were made 2,215 by 70 to 75 by 1.5 to 2 feet, exca- 
vating 11,970 cubic yards of sand and gravel, which was dumped to the left. 

Between Section Post £6 and ;?^.— October 27, 1896, the dredge was towed above 
Eureka Lock. Cuts were made 1,820 bv 15 to 75 by 1 to 2.5 feet, excavating 7,890 
cubic yards of sand, which was dumped to the left and rig^ht. One thousand five 
hundred and thirty cubic yards was rehandled and 1,725 cubic yards is to be rehan- 
dled. November 10, 1896, work was suspended for the season and the dredge was 
towed to Berlin Lock. 



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2730 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Between Section Potts fS6 and U.—kpT\\ 27, 1897, the dredge went into commiBUon 
and commenced dredging 3,700 feet below Section Post 26, where work had been die- 
continued last aeasoD. Cuts were made 3,720 by 36 to 75 by 1 to 6 feet, exoavatine 
21,162 cubic yards of sand, which was dumped to the left and right and on land 
owned by Mr. Hart and Mr. Ehrlich, from whom free dumping privileges were 
obtained. Eight thousand and forty cubic yards was rdiandled and 6,096 cubic 
yards is to be rehandled. 

By dredge No. 7, between tectum pottt SS and g6, — ^Work was continued. Cuts were 
made 17,350 by 15 to 37 by 2 to 7 feet, excavating 77,181 cubic yards of sand, clay, 
gravel, and hardpan, which was dumped to the left and right and on land owned by 
L. C. Bassett, Rupers Hodgkins, D. C. Palmeter, H. G. Pierce, H. Stedman, and 
William Stewart, from whom free dumping privileges were obtained, and also on 
land owned by Dayton R. Burr and D. C. Palmeter. Thirty-eight thousand and 
iifty-two cubic yards was rehandied and 4,094 cubic yards is to be rehandled. 
November 3, 1896, work was suspended for the season and the dredge was towed to 
Oshkosh boat yard for repairs. 

Between teotion posit ^ and 26. — May 11, 1897, the dredge went into commission 
and commenced dredging 4,600 feet below section post 27. Cuts 3,201 by 30 to 40 by 
1.5 to 4.5 feet were made, excavating 14,512 cubic yards of sand, which was dumped 
to the left and rif ht and on land owned by Mr. Ehrlioh, from whom free dumping 
privileges were obtained. Five thousand six hundred and twenty-seven cubic yards 
was rehandled. 

Between section pottt 51 and SO, — June 3, 1897, the dredge was towed to 1,600 feet 
below section post 31, where she excavated 406 cubic yards of olay and stone from 
combings, which were dumped to the right on dredge bank. 

Between section pottt 48 and 46. — June 6, 1897, the dredge was towed to 70 feet below 
section post 47. A cut 789 by 42 by 2 to 3 feet was made, excavating 2,662 cubic 
yards of sand, which was dumped on Government land. 

Care ofworis and property — Property at Appleton First Look. — The timber stored in 
the old material sheds was transferred to the new timber shed and the old material 
sheds were taken down. The coal bin at the upper end of the lock was removed and 
rebuilt back of the lower right wing wall of the lock, and a shed 24 feet long was 
built of old lumber next the coal bin for the purpose of storing old materi^ and 
scrap iron. One hundred and sixty cubic yards of earth was excavated from the 
bank above the look house, wheeled, and placed for filling holes in the ground where 
the old material sheds stood. 

Two scow loads of old iron, old and new timber, and plank, cribs, engine, pump, 
derrick, winch, and tools left over from the repairs of Depere Look were towed by 
steam tug Boscohel to Kankauna, where the tools and old material were stored, and 
the old iron and new timber and plank were towed to Appleton and stored in the 
warehouse. 

The portable material was removed from dredge No. 8 and transported by steam 
tus Boscohel from Kaukauna to Appleton warehouse, where the materiid was stored. 

Signboards, as a warning to trespassers, were made and placed as follows : One at 
Depere Dam, one at Eureka Dam, one at Berlin Dam, one at White River Dam, and 
5 at intervals along Portage Levee. 

BURYBTB. 

A survey of Combined Locks and vicinity, to determine the location of wasteweir 
and outflow of same, and one of Kaukauna Canal and vicinity from First Lock to 
Guard Lock, were made. Maps and tracings of surveys and of Kankauna Canal 
system were also made. 

The boundary lines of the United States property at Appleton First Lock were 
run out and the roadway from Lake Street Bridge to the lock was cross-sectioned. 
A map of the United States property at the lock was commenced. 

A survey was made of the property adjacent to Main Street Bridge, Oshkosh, and 
measnrements were taken of the bridge of the Wisconsin Central and Chicago. Mil- 
waukee and St. Paul railways at Oshkosh, and sketches made showing location of 
same. 

The east boundary line between the United States and George Zuhl's property at 
White River Lock was rnn out. The fence line was found to be about 10 feet too 
far east and about parallel to the correct line; the fence will be moved to the correct 
line. 

A complete survey was made of the United States property near Fort Winnebago 
Lock, October 12 to 15, 1896. A map and tracing of the survey were also made. 

Survey of Upper Fox.— A survey was made of the Upper Fox River from Oshkosh 
to Fort Winnobngo Lock and soundings taken throu{^ the ice to determine the 
correct location of mile poste and the amount of dredging necessary to complete the 
project. The party consisted of Mr. Grover, in charge: Mr. Woodworth, transit- 
man, and five men with team. The work was commenced January 27, 1897, at West 
Algoma Street Bridge, Oshkosh, and a transit line, with zero of distance at center of 



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APPENDIX H H ^REPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2731 

Maiii Street Bridge, was nm alons the steamboat channel. Soundings were taken 
as follows: On Lakes Bntte des Morts. Apockawa, and Buffalo one sounding was 
taken every 100 feet on transit line, ana at intervals of 500 feet on transit line cross 
soundings 25 feet apart on Lake Butte des Morts, and 20 feet apart on Lakes Apuck- 
awa and Buffalo, and covering a channel from 200 to 900 feet in width, were also 
taken. In the river proper one sounding was taken every 100 feet on transit line, 
and at intervals of 200 feet on transit line cross soundinss 20 feet apart and extend- 
ing far enough on either side to fully cover the channel, were also taken. Where 
bars were encountered, cross soundings were taken at intervals of 100 feet pn transit 
line; 104.62 miles were chained and 85.32 miles sounded. In various parts of the 
river were found unsafe ice and open watei\ in all about 10^ miles, where no sound- 
ings were taken, nor were any soundings tacen in that portion of the river sounded 
after dredging last year. 

Holes were made with a boring machine througti ice varying from 3 to 20 inches 
in thickness, and through these 18,983 soundings were taken. The boring machine 
was of the same pattern as the one used by Col. O. M. Poe. Corps of Engineers, and 
described by him in Annual Report of 1893. part 4, page 2964. 

During the proness of the work the following changes were made in the equip- 
ment of the machines. A small windlass was attached to the frame, and a wire 
cable, three-eighths inch diameter, substituted for the manila rope fastened to top of 
anger, thus makine the feed more uniform and greatly facilitating the withdrawal 
of the auger from tne ice. Narrow and high, instead of wide and low, runners were 
added to make the passage through deep and wet snow easier. A short wooden 
platform, provided with small steel dogs to prevent machine from sliding on smooth 
ice when auger was being used, was attached to frame with strap hinges under the 
crank, in order to give the operator more power. Lastly, and perhaps, the greatest 
improvement, was the placing of an iron balance wheel, 125 pounds in weight, on 
the crank shaft, this insuring a steady, regular motion to the auger. 

Together with the work of sounding, measurements were taken from transit line 
to shore lines, generally \iith chain or stadia; otherwise, with transit, by intersection. 
Also good substantial stakes were driven on shore at the end of each mile, to be 
replaced later by regular mileposts. 

On March 15, 1897, Fort Winnebago Lock was reached, where survey was ended 
and party disbanded. The work of platting the soundings and making maps of the 
survey Is nearly completed. 

MIBCELULNROUS. 

In conjunction with inspection trips, permanent bench marks were set at all the 
locks or at the head and foot of a system. These consist of heavy flat stones with a 
copper bolt let in the center, and the stone buried 4 feet below the surface of the 
ground with a 3-inch gas pipe placed over the bolt, projecting Just above the surface, 
a cast-iron cap marked '' U. 8. B. M.'' was placed on the top end. 

New gauges were placed and old ones readjusted in accordance with breast walls 
and miter sills, and levels taken te the new permanent bench marks. 

Measurements were taken of all the locks, dams, and buildings for tabulation. 
Experimente were also made at most of the looks to determine the time, etc., in 
filling and emptyinjz them and tabulated. 

A map of Lake Winnebago and one of Lake Poygan and vicinity were compiled, 
and tracings made of same. A chart of the present aud proposed lighting of bridges 
on Fox River aud tabulations of water power on lower Fox River, United States 
buildings, locks, dams and other works were made and discharges of different locks 
were computed. Plans, bills of material, and estimates for proposed works were 
made. 

Bounding for progress map of upper Fox dredging, gauge readings, and discharges 
of dams were platted. 

The steam tug Fox was employed in towing dredges Nos 2, 4, 5, and 7 on the 
upper Fox from place to place, in supplying them with fuel, et<c., in towing scow 
loads of material for repairs of locks, dams^ etc., in taking soundings and ou inspec- 
tion trips. The crew assisted on repairs and other construction when not otherwise 
engagea. 

The steam tug BoBccibel was employed in towing dredge No. 2 on the lower Fox 
from place to place, in supplying her with fuel, ete., in towing scow loads of material 
for repairs of locks, dams, etc., in taking soundings and on inspection trips. The 
orew assisted on repairs and other construction when not otherwise engaged. 

All the boato and dredges, excepting dredge No. 3 and steam tug General G, K, 
Warren were iospected by the United States inspectors, aud found to be in good 
condition. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. M. Mann, AeBisiani Engineer, 

Capt. George A. Zinn, 

Carpe of Engineers, U, 3, A. 



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2732 EEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 



Siatistici of witer power on 
FURNISHED BT 



Place. 



Hanufiiotoren. 



Amoant of water power 
entitled to. 



Preeent capaoity. 



Keenah . 



Do. 



Do., 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do.... 
lieoBBha . 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do.. 
Do. 



Do.. 

Do.. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Menosha Dam . 
Appleton 



Do. 
Do. 



Robert Jamison. 



Kimberly &. Clark Co. 



2M square inches llrstHslnss 
water. 221 square inches 
seoond-olass water. 



Erenger Sc Lachmann. 



Nrcnah Boot & Shoe Manu- 

faciurine Co. 
Keenah &. Memtflha Gas and 

Electric Light Plant. 
Neenah Paper Co 



Original ownership, 2,340 
square inches. 

118 square inches first-class 

water. 
470 square inches first-class 

water. 



1, 180 square inches 



Winnebago Paper Mills . . . 



Wulfi", Clausen & Co... 
Banner Flouring Mills. 



2,646 square inches first- 
class water, 1,308 second 
class. 

470 square inches first-class 

water, 355 second class. 
500 square inches 



4,532 square inches 

815 square inches. . 
200 square inches. . . 



Gilbert Paper Co ... 
W. P. Hewitt & Co.. 



4, 484 square inches . 
476 square inches... 



536 square inches. 



Howard Paper Co . 



2,217 square inches. 



MacKinnon Excelsior Co. . 
MacKinnon Pulley Co 



1,500 square inches. 
300 square inches.. 



Menasha Wooden Ware Co 



2,500 square inches. 



John Schneider. 



1,000 square inches. . 



Chas. B.Smith 

John Strange Paper Co . 
Geo. A. Whiting 



2,217 square inches first- 
class water. 



Appleton Boot and Shoe 
Co., upper dam. 



Appleton Chair Co., upper 

dam. 
Appleton Electric Light 

and Power Co., upper dam . 



10 horsepower . 



25 horsepower 

300 horsepower or 9, 500 cu- 
bic feet per minute. 



2,500 square inches. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2733 



Lofmw Fox Biver, fTttoeHMUi. 
QOYSBHTMBNT DAMS. 



Number, size, and name of 
wheels. 


1 


Av- 
erage 
head. 


Total 
vent- 
age. 


Theo- 
ret- 
ical 

horse- 


Prac- 
tical 
horse- 


ll'ii 


Bemarks. 




I'S 






power. 


1^0 wer. 


power. 








Fe0t. 


Sq.in. 










Two 46-inoh Houston 


2 


8 




117 


94 


10 




Two 68-inch Old American; 


20 


74 




1,916 


1,560 


660 




two 65-inch, foor 60-inch, 
















one 40-inch Houston ; one 
















66-inch, one S6-inch, one 
















44-inch Leffel ; six 56-inoh, 
















two 48-inr.h Victor. 
















fOne 54-inoh, two 66-inoh^ 












I Z 




1 American Turbine (old 




8 




688 


460 




y style); one 72.inoh John- 
One 4i>.inch Honaton 


4 


*"""•** 


\ x% 




1 


8 




48 


30 


12 


Use steam only whbn water is 
















cut off. 


One 00-inch and one 66-ineh 


2 


n 




249 


199 


126 




Eclipse. 
One 42-inoh Hercules, one 
61-inoh LeflU, one45inch. 


18 1 8 


7,276 


1,034 


888 


376 


















one 50-inch, one 60.inch, 
















one 66-inch, and one 70- 
















inoh Page, and six 48-inch 
Ylctor. 
One 72.inch Klmer, two 86- 
















9 


9 




1,000 


854 


460 




inoh Herculee, one50-inoh 
















and four 60-inch Houston, 
















and one 4B-inoh Victor. 
















One 44-inch and one 66-inch 


2 


8 




142 


128 


60 




Leifel. 
















One48-inoh and one 60-innh, 


2 


5 




01 


72 


60 


T. W. Orbison'B report of Feb- 


name not given. 














ruary 27, 1806, gives two 48- 
Inch Leffel. 


Foar66>i]ich Kew American . 


4 


5 




304 


248 


;8ooto 
ti.ooo 

50 




One 60-inch Blaokstone 


1 


5 




60 


47 


T. W. Orbison's report of Feb- 
ruary 27, 1896, gives one 60- 






























inohPage. 


One 54-inch, one 56inch, 


7 


5 




411 


331 


200 




three 66-liich Aloott; one 
















35-inchBeloit; one48-inch 
















Leifel. 
















Two 60-inch Monitor 


2 


6 


f 


156 


124 


226 




One 40-ineh American 


1 


6 





81 


25 


25 


T. W. Orbison's report of Feb- 
ruary 27, 1896, gives one 48- 
inch Old Amertoan. 


Two56-inchBeloit; 4other8 


6 


5 




610 


414 


1,000 


T. W. Orbison's report of Feb- 


have not been used for 












ruary 27, 1896, gfves two 65- 


years. 














Inch, two 65-incb Houston; 
one60-inoh Page; one 72-inch 
Elmer Special. 


Two 60-inch Johnson, re- 


2 


6 




156 


124. 


....... 


Using about 500 inches. 


ported as one 66-inch and 
















one TWnoh by T. W. Orbl- 
















son February 27, 1896. 














Two 72-inch Johnson 


2 


6 




244 


195 




Transferred to Menasha Wood- 
en Ware Co. two years ago. 


One 54inoh and three 66- 


4 


4 




106 


156 


300 


inohBlmer (Berlin, Wis). 














Three 66-inch, one 46-iDoh, 


6 


8 


2,405 


631 


603 


265 


The oomblued book measure- 


and one 50-inch Houston, 














mento of the wheels is 2.496 


and one 42-inch Kew 














inches, which is 278 inches 
more than the lease calls for. 


American. 


















8.218 




2,646 


1,984 




For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 
















per minute. 




.... 












Leased firom Green Bay and 
















Mississippi Canal Co. To 
















be leased by the Apnleton 
Electric Light and Power 
Co. 
Leased from Green Bay and 
















One 36-inoh Kew American. 


1 


74 




88 


26 


35 
















Mississippi Canal Co. 


One 45inoh Elmer, one 


4 14 




468 


888 






double 25.inch horizontal 














Humphrey, one 48-inch 
Leffelone46-ineh Victor. 
















1 













Digitized by 



Google 



2734 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 



StatUtia of water power on Lower 
FURNISHED BY GOV 



Place. 



Appleion. 
Do.... 
Do.... 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Do. 

Do- 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Menasha, upper 

dam. 
Menasha, lower 

dam. 
Cedars , 



Cedaradam.. 
Little Chute. 



Do. 



Little Chute i 
Eaukauna.... 



Do.. 

Do.. 

Do., 
Do., 



Mana/actixrerB. 



Appleton Electric Lieht 
and Power Co., lower dam. 

Appleton Knitting Mill, 
lower dam. 

Appleton Paper and Pulp 
Co., upper aam. 

Appleton Water Works Co., 

upper dam. 
Atlas Paper Co., upper dam. 



Banm Floaring Mill, lower 
dam. 



Kimborly ft Clark Co., ap- 
per dam. ^ 



Manufacturing Investment 
Co., lower dam. 

Pettibone, Mulliken & Co., 
lower dam. 

Union Toy and Furniture 
Co., upper dam. 

Upper Atlas Pulp Mill, up- 
per dam. 

Lower Atlas Pulp Mill, up- 
per dam. 



Eimberly & Clark Co., 



Amount of water power 
entiUed to. 



200 horsepower 

10 horsepower 

800 to 1,000 horsepower . 



M horsepower .. 
600 horsepower . 

100 horsepower . 



All of one-half of the flow of 
FoxRlverontheupperGoT- 
emment dam, except 500 
horsepower to the Atlas Pa- 
per Co. and an unknown 
quantity, claimed to be 600 
to 800 horsepower, of A p- 
pleton Paper and Pulp Co. 

050 horsepower 



88,1KM cubic feet per minute, 

700 horsepower. 
25 horsepower 



All tlic power developed, 
less the amount needed 
for purposes of navigation. 



Little Chut« Pulp Co. 
Arnold Verstegen...., 



Total flow Fox River, less 
100 horsepower. 

100 horsepower 



Badger Paper Co ' Power lessed from Eau- 
kauna Water Power Co. 



BrokawPuIpCo 

C. & N. W. Rwy. shops 



Eaukauna Electric Light 

Co. 
Eaukauna Fiber Co 



.do. 



75 horsepower. Power 
leased from Eaukauna 
Water Power Co. 

100 horsepower 



100 horsepower. Power 
leased nrom Eaukauna 
Water Power Co. 



Present oapaeity. 



900 horsepower . 



60, 000 to70,000 cubic 
feet per minute. 



55 horsepower.., 
130 horsepower. 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



APPENDIX H H — BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2735 



Fax Biver, 7Ft«xm«ifi— ContiiiTied. 
BRNMENT DAMS-Contbiaod. 



Number, aise, and name of 
wheels. 


o o 
H 


Av. 


1 

Thco- 
Total ret- 
vent- f al 
age. horse- 
power. 

1 


Prac- 
tical 
horse- 
power. 


Steam 
power, 
horse 
power. 


Bemarlca. 






Fe€L 


8q.in. 










rFwo 0D*iiMli KiinitiHroT .... 




7 




197 


157 


200 


Appleton Electric Street Kail. 

way. 
Leaaed from Green Bay and 


One M-inch Elmer 


1 


7 




27 


22 


















Missisippi Cauol Co. 


One 48-hich, two 06-inch 


5 


84 




671 


552 






Amerioan, and two74-lnch 
LefiTeL 
One 25-inGh and one 80-inch 


1 












2 10 




«2 


60 


160 




Victor turbine. 
















Two 66-inch, one 42-inch, 


6 


14 




959 


766 


250 




and three 25-inch Kew 
















American. 
















Two ao-inoh. one 40 inch El- 


4 


6 




84 


69 




Dow 


mer andone40-inch LeflTel. 
















(TnlcanMill^one iO-iuch,two 
66-lnch Kew American, 


5 


121 




881 


711 




















one 89-inoh Heronlea, one 












500 




36-inch Victor. 
















Tioga MiU, two 66-inch New 


5 


12 




058 


772 






American, one 60 -inch, 
















one 45-inch, one 35-inch 
















I Hontton. 
















Nine 66-inch New American, 


11 


7 




1,251 


1.006 




Do. 


one 44-inch, and one 66- 
















inch Old Style Leffel. 

Fonr 68-iuch Sfunpaon (Lef- 
fel). 

One 48-inch Elmer. 
















4 


64 





313 


274 




Do. 


1 


8 




63 


50 


30 




Three 66-inoh New Ameri- 


5 


15 




1.710 


1.362 




Do. 


can, one 66 inch Old Amer- 
















ican, one 40-inch Beloiu 














One 66-inch New American, 


6 


15 




1,504 


1,212 




Do. 


two 66-inch Old American, 
















two 25-inch Beloit, one 61- 
















Inch Leffel. 




















14 




4,508 


3,381 




For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 
por minute. 
















8.451 




2,721 
5,227 


2,041 




Do. 


One 56-inch Leffel; seven- 


83 


11 




4,217 


150 




teen 56-inch, tWG 4«-inch. 
















four 44-inch, five 60-inch, 
















three 40-inch, one 35-inch 
















Victor. 


















.... 


9.758 




8, 142 2. 356 




Do. 


One 27-inoh, three 48-ineh, 


24" 


12 




3,780 


3,016 




Leased from Green Bay and 


and twenty 54-inch Mc- 
Cormick. 
One 35-inch Elmer; one 30- 














Mississippi Canal Co. 


% 


9.8 




170 


136 




Do. 


inch, and four 48-inch old 
















wooden paddle wheels. 




















1.2 




8,864 


2,898 




For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 
















per minute. 


Seventeen 20-inch and fonr 


25 


16 




1,544 


1.230 


450 


Owned jointly by Green Bay 


45-inch Elmer ; one 25-inch 














and Mississippi Canal Co. 
and Eaukauna Water Power 


Hnmphrev; two 18-inch 
and one 33-inoh S. Mor- 


























Co. 


gan Smith. 
















Two 66-inch American Tur- 


8 


14 




862 


687 




Do. 


bine and one 36-inch Spe- 
















cial American Turbine. 
















One 50-inch Improyed El- 
mer. 


1 


7 




59 47 


110 


Da 


One 45-inch Leffel and one 


2 


14 




233 194 


160 


Leased fYt)m Green Bay and 


4i6-inoh, name not given. 
One 15-inch and one 45-lnch 












MiseiRsippi Canal Co. 
Owned Jointly by Green Bay 
and Mississippi Canal Co. 
and Kaukanna water Power 


2 


14 




838 190 


200 


New American Turbine. 








1 












1 












1 




Co. 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



2736 EEPOKT OF THE CH.EF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

8tatiBtic$ of waier power on Lower 
FUBNISHED BT GOT 



Place. 


Manofacturen. 


Amount of water power 
entitied to. 


Present capacity. 


ICankfinna 


Eatikaiina Lamber and 
Manufacturing Co. 

KaakauDa Machine Co 

Co. 

Kleins Mill 

Rnssell Bros 


60 horsepower.. ...... ...... 


200 to 250 horse- 
power. 


Do 


75 horsepower. Power 

Water Power Co. 
0,500 


Do 


2,600 


Do 


Power leased from -.Kan- 
kauna Water Power Co. 

60 horsepower.............. 




Do 


54 horsepower 


Do 


Thilmany Pulp and Paper 
Co. 

Western Paper Bag Co 


275 horsepower. ........ ...t 


Do 


400 horsepower ............. 


1,400 horsepower ... 


Kankwnna dam r . . . 




Rapide Croohe dam 
Little Kaukaiina 














dam. 
Depere ............ 


Depere Electric Light and 
Power Co. 

The John P.Doneman Mill- 
ing Co. 

Dnuham &. Smith. .......... 


100 horsepower 


60 horsepower 


Do 


300 horsepower 


Do 






Do 


Shattuck & Babcook Co ... . 


Total flow of Fox River, 
leas 200 horsepower. 




"Dffpen dam 













Digitized by 



Google 



APPENDIX H H — ^EEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2737 



Fox Rirer, WUconain — CoDtinaecL 
EKNMBKT DAMS-Ck>ntina«d. 



Namber, sise, and 
wheels. 



of 



ef eni£c 
Tj ^ beaa, 



Total 
vent- 
age. 



Theo- 
ret- 
ical 
horse- 
power. 



Prao- 1 Steam 
tical power, 
horse- horse- 
power, power. 



Remarks. 



One 61-inch Special Leffel. . . 



One 48-iDch and one M-inch, 
uam«) not given. 



JVel. 
16 



14 



Sq.ifn. 



Foar 45-lnch Elmer. . 



One 36-inch and one 40-inch 
Elmer. 

Two30-inoh and two 35-inch 
Elmer: one 30-inch and 
one 44-inch New Ameri- 
can. 

One 25-ineh American ; one 
36-inch New Ameriean; 
one 40-inoh Elmer; two 
27-inch Hercoles; one 66- 
inch LelfeL 



One 66- inch New American. 

One 66-inch American Tur- 
bine and tWo 44-iuch 
Elmer. 

Two 84-inoh Johnson 



Two 60-inch and foorteen 
60-inch New American. 



14 

11 
14 

15 

14 
8.529 

7.015 

7 

7 

7 
7 

8.360 



314 



217 
250 



643 

136 
487 

1,734 

4,508 
2,746 

2,518 

126 
220 

364 
1,062 

2,004 



483 

108 
389 

1,399 

3,381 
2,060 

1,011 

101 
175 

280 
1,565 

2,021 



IS 



175 



810 



1,333 



Leased fh>m Green Bay and 

Missisflippi Canal Co. Use 

only 50 burHcpower of wnter. 
Owned Jointly by Green Bay 

and Mississippi Canal Co. 

and Kankaona Water Power 

Co. 
Owned Jointly by Green Bay 

and Mississippi Canal Co. 

and Kaukauna Water Power 

Co. Canal closed dnrine 

last 18 months by order or 

court. 
Owned Jointly by Green Bay 

and Mississippi Canal Co. 

and Kaukaana Water Power 

Co. 
Leased from Green Bay and 

Mississippi Canal Ca 
Do. 



Do. 



For a flow of 170,000 cnbio feet 
per minute. 

Owned bv Green Bay and Mis- 
sissi ppi Canal Co. For a flow 
of 170.000 cubic feet per min- 
ute. Not used. 

For a flow of 170,000 oobic feet 
per minute. Owned bv Green 
Bay and Mississippi Canal 
Co. 



Mill burned October, 1896, and 
wheels not in use. 

Shattuok and fiabcock esti- 
mate that Depere Dam. at 
an ordinary flow, is equiva- 
lent to 2,500 horsepower. 

For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 
per minute. 



Compiled and computed from < 
—if. 



30, 189 



Bwa 97- 



-172 



k received i^m the mill owners, to accompany my report of June 
L. M. Mamv, AtkUtatU EngintMr. 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



2738 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 



SiatisUoa of water power on Lower 
FUBNISHRD BY 



Place. 



Appleton . 
Do.... 
Do.... 
Do.... 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Appleton dam... 
Cojnbineil look«. 



Corobioeddam. 
Kaukaana 



Do. 

Do. 



Do 

Kankauna dam. 



Mauuracturera. 



Appleton Machine Co. . . . 
Appleton Woolen Mill . . . 
Fairbanks & Swallow .... 



Amount of water power 
entitled to. 



500 square inches. 
90 horsepower ..... 
Ohorsepower 



Fourth Ward Plaining Mill . 80 horsepower 



Fox Birer Paper Co. 



Manser, Renner & Co. < 
Marston & Beveridge., 
Patten Paper Co 



A. Spiering. 



Telnlah Paper Co.. 



The Eagle Manufacturing Ci 
Valley Iron Works Manu- 
facturing Co. 



I flow Fox Riyer, less 25 
horsepower. 



75 horsepower 

1, 250 horsepower . 



Kone . 



8, 000 square inches a. 



Combined Looks Paper Co. . 



Outagamie Paper Co. . 



Robert Pride... 
Reese Pulp Co.. 



Thilroany Pulp and Paper 
Co. 



25 horsepower . 
40 horsepower . 



6,000 horsepower. 



1,500 horsepower. , 



300 horsepower . 
475 horsepower . 



Present capacity. 



35 horsepower . . . . 
67. 02 horsepower . 



40 horsepower . 



With an 18-foot 
head. 151,392 cubic 
feet per minute. 



300 horsepower . 



d Also control all surplus obtained after the other deeds and leases are filled. 



Digitized by 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 
Fox Birer, Wi80onsin-~CoTitin\ied. 
PRIVATE DAMS. 



2739 



Number, sise, and nmnber of 



i' 



Av. 
erage 
head, 



Total 
Tent- 
age. 



Theo- 
ret- 
ical 
hone- 
power. 



Prae- Steam 

tical power, 

horse- ,' liorse- 

power. power. 



Bemarks. 



One 85-inch Taylor 

One eo-inch American Tur- 
bine. 



Fe€t, 
5 



Sq.in. 



One 35-inch 
[BaTine Mill— One 06inch, 
two 01-inoh, one 40-hich 
LefTel; one 85-inoh and 
one 55-inoh Victor. 

Lincoln Mill— Four 56-inch, 
oneaO-inch Victor; one36- 
inch, one 42-inch New 
American; one 20-inch 
Ehner. 

Fox Hirer Mill— Three Cl- 
inch, one 88-inoh, one 44- 
inch Special Leffel ; one 80- 
inoh, one 66-inch, one 26^- 
inch, two4a-inch Standard 

. Leflbl. 

One 85-inch New Elmer. ... , 

One 55-inch Beloit 

One 80-inch and one 83-inch 
Hercnies, three 44-inch 
and ten 48-inch Victor. 

One 42-inch 

Paper Mill— Two 66-inoh, 
three 42-inch New Ameri- 
can; one 2S-inch Elmer. 

Tehilah Paper Mttl-One66- 
inch. three 00-inoh New 
American ; one 25-inoh El- 



One 80-inch Turbine... 
One 50-inch American . 



24 



Pne 2S-incli, one 30-inch, 
four 86-inch, and one 48- 
inoh American ; thirty 25- 
inch, one 27-inoh, four 80- 
Inch, two 82-ineh, fonr 85- 
inch, and one 48-inch 
Victor. 



49 



Two 18-inch, one 27-inch, 
two 86-inch Hercules ; 
one 20-inch New Ameri- 
can; one 25- inch, two 85- 
inch Victor. 



U 





8 

n 

5 

14 



H 



8 
7 

7.85 

18i 



18i 
21 



Two 60-inch Elmer. 



One 60-inoh American and 
three 42-inch Victor. 



12 



...16 



60 



2,623 



41 

96 

1,018 



27 



2,126 



33 

n 

814 



21 



1,130 ! 903 



76 
'566' 



20 
500 



582 i 



28 j 
59 



465 



2, 367 , 1, 775 
5,836 I 4,438 



5,957 
1,020 



700 
4,830 



4,468 
816 



567 



One 25-horeepower electrio 
motor. 

Consumes 52.52 horsepower un- 
der ordinary mnnine. 

Included in report of Patten 
Paper Co. 



For a ilow of 170,000 cubic feet 

per minnte. 
Leased from Green Bay and 

Mississippi Canal Co. 



For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 
per minute. 



Small power leased flrmn Green 

Bay and Mississippi Canal 

Co. and Edwards. 
Leased firom Green Bay and 

Mississippi Canal Co. and 

Patten Co. 
Leases the Fox BiverPuIp Mill 

from the Patten Paper Co. 
For a flow of 170,000 cubic feet 

per minute. 



Compiled and computed tnm dAta reoeiyed from the mill owners, to accompany my report of June 

L. M. MANif, A$Hstmnt Bnginter. 



Digitized by 



Google 



2740 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 
Data resecting dredging done on Fox Biver, Wisconsin, for the year 1896. 



Dredge. 


Location of 
dredging. 


1 




^2 


Depth of mate- 
rial dredged. 


Character of material 
dredged. 


1 

1 


1 

s 


& 


8 

■M bfi 

1^ 


No 2 . 


Lower Fox a.. 
Upper Fox 6 .. 
Upper Fox a.. 
Upper Fox a.. 
Upper Fox a.. 

Total... 


Cu.yd9. i 
4,158 

c 47, 878 

92,680 

71,080 

93.112 


D.ydi. 




Feet. 
lito6 

1 to7 

1 to3 

1 to7.C 

2 to7 


Clay, gravel, and bowl- 
ders. 

Loam, sand, elay, grav- 
el, and stone. 

Sand, clay, gravel, and 
stone. 

Loam, sand, clay, grav- 
el, and atone. 

Sand, clay, gravel, and 
hardpan. 


21 131 
103 601 
1581,0041 
1581,004 

15o' 967 

1 


18 

96 

611 

52 

87 




No. 2... 
No. 4... 
No.6... 
No.7-.. 


15,733 
18,357 
20,035 
47.221 


83.21 
19.81 
28.20 
60.72 


$39.49 

54.48 
6.72 

2&a9 




308, 358 101, 34« 










.3,7071248^1129.08 

1 1 1 












Dredge. 


Location of 
dredging. 


Cost of 
general 
repairs. 


Cost of 
fuel. 


Coat of 
sundries. 


Coat of 
crew. 


Cost of 
towing. 


Cost of 
super- 
intend- 
ence. 


Total 
cost. 


Kate- 
rial 
handled 
per day 
ofeigh» 

hoars. 


No.2... 
No. 2... 
No.4... 
No.6... 
No.7 .. 


Lower Fox a.. 
Upper Fox 6.. 
Upper Fox a.. 
Upper Fox a.. 
Upper Fox a.. 

Total... 


$132. 7( 

d2,270.»J 

606.8] 

0l,624.K 

l,162.r 


) $58.20 
I 263.74 
L 705.25 
I 437.94 
r 920.56 


$2.62 
12.02, 
20.00, 
22.64' 
48.18 


$233.33 
1, 178. 31 
1,822.32 
1.524.15 
1.741.15 


$87.78 
773.11 
352.56 
284.26 
376. »J 


$48.84 
97.73 
150.24 
155.17 
165.63 


$562.92 
4,636.22 
8,720.66 
4,055.70 
4,437.51 


Ou,yd». 
253.9 
680.5 
738.1 
666 
770.8 




5,797.9J 


2,385.69 


100.46 6,499.26 


1,878.49 


626.11 


17,412.01 










Loc4»tion of 
dredging. 


Cost per cabic yard. 


Dredge. 


Running 
repairs. 


General 
repairs. 


Fuel. 


Sundries. 


Crew. 


Towing. *;5S?»-. 


Total. 


No.2-.. 


Lower Fox a.. 




$0.0319 
) .0470 
i .0065 
L .0220 
J .0125 


$0. 0140 
.0056 
.0076 
.0062 
.0099 


$0.0006 
.0003 
. 0002 
.0003 
.0005 


$0.0562 $0. 02111 $0.0116 
. 0249, . 0163 . 0020 
.0196 .00:{8 .0017 
.0214 .0040 .0022 
.0187 .0040| .0017 


$0.1364 
.0978 
.0400 
.0671 
.0476 


No.2... 
No.4..- 
No.5-.. 
No.7... 


Upi)erFox6.. 
Upper Fox a.. 
Upper Fox c. 
Upper Fox a.. 

Averages. 


$0.000i 
.OOW 
.000 

.ooo; 




.0004 .0188 


.0078 


.0003 


.0211 


.00611 .0020! .0565 



a Appropriation for operating and care. 

b A ppropriation fur improvement, operating, and care. 

e 9,035 cubic yards of tnis quantity was dredging done in Fond du Lac Harbor. 

d $1,662. 28 of this amount Includes cost of repairs of dump scows Nos. 3 and 4. 

•$592. 11 of this amount includes coat of constructing pontoon and wood scow. 



Digitized by 



Google 



APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2741 



The following data are not included in the above: 



Dredge. 


Location of 
dredging. 


1 


i 

11 


Per cent of 
material re- 
_ handled. 

Depth of mate- 
rial dredged. 


Character of material 
dredged. 


1 

• 

1 


1 


1 
c 

1 


II 


No. 2... 
No. 2... 


Little Kan- 

lcaana.a b 
Deperelockae 

Total... 


Ou.ydt. 
10. 119 

' 2,e75 


<7.yd#. i Feet. 
1,013 18.90 1 tol4 

1,189 44.45 jl4 


Clay, gravel, and atone . 
Clay and gravel 


G5 
12 


853 
76 


1 
79 $23.30 
4 4.99 




12,794 


3,102 


1 


1 


. 429 


83 


28 29 




1 




of 
Br- 
ad- 
e. 




Dredge. 


dredging. 


Coat of 
general 
repairs. 


Cost of 
faeL 


Cost of 
sundries. 


Cost of 
crew. 


Cost of 
towing. 


Cost 
sup 

inte 
enc 


Totel 
cost. 


Mate- 
rial 
handled 
per day 
of eight 

hoars. 


No.2... 
No. 2... 


Little Kaa- 

lcuuna.a b 
Depereloekae 


1357.59 
7«.99 


$160.20 
33.80 


$7.06 
1.51 


$70L63 
168.83 


$132.74 
97.60 


$152.18 $1,534.70 
27.61 405.83 


€u.y<h. 
229.3 

281.6 


1 Total. . . 


434.58 


194.00 


8.57 


864.96 


230.84 ' 179.79 


1,040.53 










Location of 
dredging. 


Cost per cubic yard. 


Dredge. 


Running 
repairs. 


General 
rtfpairs. 


Fuel. 


Sundries. Crew. 

1 


Towing. 1 


Sonerin- 
tendence. 


i 


Total. 


No.2... 
No.2... 


Little Kan. 

kaiinA.a b 
Deperelockae 

Averages. 


$0.0022 
.0019 


$0.0354 
.0288 


$0.0158 
.0128 


1 
$0.0007 $0.0693 

.0005 j .0610 


$0.0182 
.0364 


$0.0150 
.0103 


«. 1516 
. 1517 




.0021 


.0339 


.0152 


.0006 


.0076 


.0180 


.0141 


.1516 



OPERATING AND CARE OF CANALS AND OTHER WORKS OF NAVIGATION, APPLIED TO 
FOX RIVER, WISCONSIN, SECTION 4 OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT OF JULY 5, 1884. 

Detailed atalement of expenditure$ for fiscal year ending June SO, 1897, with itemized state- 
ment of expeneea attach^, ae required by the above act of July 6, 1884, 



Character of work, etc. 


Item of expense. 


Amount. 


TotaL 


Repairs of Depere lock 


Materials 


$4, 115. 47 




Do 


Labor and transportation 

Materials 


9, 679. 93 






$13,795.40 


Repairs of retaining wall ahove Depere lock 

Do 


110. 75 


Labor «... 


10.25 




Materials 




12L00 


RApaf Tfi of Pflper^ dam r a 


13.40 


'Do r. 


Labor 


204.97 




Materials 




218.37 


Repairs of Little Kaukauna dam 


4. 444. 39 


"Do 


Labor and transportation 

Labor 


2, 929. 12 ' 






7,373.51 
126. 09 


Repoira of Rapide Croohe lock 




Repairs of Rapido Crocho dam 


Materials 




2.17 


Repairs of Kaakanna fifth lock 


do 


25.44 
36.66 




Do 


Labor 






Mat^riftH 




62.10 
14.86 


Repairs of lock house at Kaukauna fifth lock 




Repairs of Kankauna fourth lock 


do 


IL80 


"Do 


Labor 


140.07 1 








15L87 



a Appropriation for operating and care. 

b work at Little Eaukauoa consisted of removing oofferdama, excavating and placing material for 
submerged cribs, and for backing of dam. 
« Work'at Depere lock consisted of excavating and placing material for oofferdama. 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



2742 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 
Detailed siaiement of expendituree far fiecal year ending June 30, 1897, etc, — ContiniiecL 



Chanctar of work, ote. 


Item of expense. 


Ainoant. 


Total. 




Labor 




106.00 




do 




3.00 


Ropain of lock hoaso, Kaukamia Moond lock . . 
RoiMkiniof KftnkMinA flrai lock 


Materials 




20 86 


do 


263.60 
540.40 




Do 


Labor 






Mat4^ria1s 


804.08 


RftDidn Af irAnirtt.tiiiA a nard lock 


55.07 
64.12 


Do 


Labor 






do 


110.10 
21.06 






RoDaira of Little Chuta combined locks 


Materials 


785.75 
860.35 




*Do .'.. 


Labor 






Materials 


1,646.10 


Botaiiiing wall above LitUe Chntooombinod looks 


214.50 
804.44 


Labor 




•■ ■ 




1,018.04 
41.50 


Waste weira at Little Chute combined looka 


do 




Repairs of Little Chnte second lock 


do 


30.66 


Cross wall at head of Little Chute flrat lock.... 


\r At j^rials 




47.60 


Repairs of Little Chote dam 


do 




2.17 


Repairs of Cedars dam 


do ; 


02.14 
128.70 




'Do 


Labor 






do 


220 83 


Renairs of Annleton fonrthlock 




23.46 


Renairs of AoDleton third lock 


Materfsls 


0.16 
36.68 




Do 


Labor 






M<^tf>ri4^is ,. 


45.84 


Repairs of look boose, Appletoa third look 

Do 


7.22 
6.25 


Labor 






Materials 


18.47 




15.40 
135.35 


'Do " 


Labor 






do 


150.76 
13.41 


Repairs of Appleton first lock 




Renairs of warehouse. Anoleton first lock 


do 




6.75 


Repairs of Appleton upper dam - 


do 




5.63 


Renairs of A nnleton lower dam 


. do . 




7.00 


Repairs of Menashadam 


Materials 


106.41 
283.53 




'Do * 


Labor 






Materials 


478 04 


Repairs of lock house at Menasha lock 




18.31 


Repairs of Eureka lock 


Lalrar 




86.83 


Repairs of lock house, Eureka lock 


Materials 


0.63 
53.37 




Do 


Labor .' 






.....do ........................ 


63 00 


Repairs of roadway at Eureka look............. 




12.38 


Eureka lock out 


Materials 


56.00 
16.33 




Do 


Labor 






Materials 


72 88 




260.71 
257.74 




Do* 


Labor and transportation 

Materials 






527.45 


Renidrs of Eureka dam 


110.73 
173.45 


Do 


Labor and transportation 

Labor 






284.18 
136.08 


Renairs of White River look 




Repairs of White Riyer dam 


Materials 




4.40 


Repairs of lock bouse at Princeton lock 


do 




11.64 


ReiMiirs of Montello lock 


do 


416.40 
505.17 




Do 


Labor and transportation 

Materials 






021 57 


Renairs of Montello dam 


16.25 
6.00 




Do 


Labor 






Materials 


22.25 


Renairs of PortaffS Canal. 


1.75 
13.16 


Do 


Labor 






Materials 


14.01 


General repairs of locks, dams, and canal banks. 
Do 


686.21 
2,688.72 




Labor 






FneL sonnlies. etOr ..r..,^..^,-. 


3,374.08 


Dredfftnff bars. Lower Fox............ 


287.81 
405.48 


iS;....!»..T:^...:.......:i::.... ...; 


l4ii>or 






Fuel, supplies, etc............. 


602.70 


Dredging bars. Upper Fox 


3,013,28 
0.076.88 




"So 


lAbor 






Rent of boat yiud at Oshkosh. . 

Repairs of dredge No. 2 

Repairs of dredge No. 3 

Repairs of dredge No. 4 

Repairs of dredge No. 5 

Repairs of dredge No. 7 


12,080.66 


Repairs of boats and dredges 


100.00 
627.28 
56.50 

i,m.7i 

248.47 
8,140.70 


'Do r. 




jyo 




Do 




Do 




Do 





Digitized by 



Qoo^<z 



APPENDIX H H REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2743 

Detailed §iatement of expenditure$ for fiscal year ending June SO, 1897, etc. — Continaed. 



Charmoter of work, etc. 


Itemofexpenso. 


Amount 


Total. 


Kopairft of Irantfl and drwli^M. ................... 


Ropairs of eteamer Fox 

Repairs of steamer Bosoobel. . . 
Kepairs of steamer Gen. 6. K. 

Warren. 
Repairs of iMirge Princeton. . . . 

Repairs of quarter boat 

Repairs of drill scow (UO feet) . . 
Repairs of scow (48 feet) 

Lock tenders' services 

Gate keepers' services 

Watchmen, labor, etc 


$1,424.54 

467.65 

93.34 

361.62 
15.50 

587.73 
99.55 

6,930.00 
170.00 
607.18 
110.34 




Do 




I>o 




Do 




Do 




I>o 




Do 




Jfaintenance of navigation 


$8,403.68 


Do 




Do 




Do 


Buoying onannel opposite 
Graenhagena Point. Lake 
WinnetM^. 

Watchmen, labor, and trans- 
portation. 

Traveling expenses of assist- 
antengineers, overseers, etc. 

clerks, et«. 
Rent of office atOshkosh, Wis. 
Mileage 






7,817.62 


Care of works and nroDortv 


915.89 
378.46 


Do 






1,294.86 


Continffoneifift 


2,150.00 

298.47 
57,79 

107.96 

208.83 
19.50 

• 8.00 

4.42 
15.00 


Do 




Do 




Do 


St«,tionery 




Do 






Do.' 


Job printing.... 




Do 


Rent of post-office box at Osh- 

kosh, Wis. 
Telegrams .................... 




Do 




Do 


Map case. 








2,924.07 






Total 


66,317.49 









Itemized statement of expenses made from appropriation for operating and care of canals 
and other works of navigation, indefinite, act of July 6, 1884, applied to Fox River^ 
Wisconsin, 



Date. 


No. of 
voucher. 


To whom paid. 


For what paid. 


Amount 


1896. 
July 8 


1 
2 
8 
4 
1 
2 
8 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

10 

11 

12 
18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
10 
20 
21 
23 
23 
84 
25 
26 
27 
28 
28 
80 


Priest it, Gorrow 


Wood and coal 


$493.11 


H. 0, Doman 


Bronze ninion. etc ............ 


37.24 




M, J. Rounds 


Services 


12.00 




James £. Fatten Co 


Oil, etc 


31.40 


Aug. 4 


L.M.Mann 


Services 


175.00 


John M.Paige 


do 


35.00 




Alexander Suns 


do 


35.00 




John Baeten 


do 


25.00 




George T. Allauson 


do 


30.00 




George Giflbrd 


do 


25.00 




Gabriel Wick 


do 


25.00 




Gottlieb Jahnke 


do 


23. OU 




Jerry Parkinson 


do '. 


25.00 




John Lewis 


do 


25.00 




Richard E. Rice 


do 


25.00 




James Clear 


do 


80.00 




A. H. Pane 


do 


5.00 




Eenffel & Esser Co 


Tracing cloth 


7.88 




Henry A. Foster 


Glass 


L80 


4 


Hay Hardware Co 


Water gauge, glasses, etc 

Screws, etc. .- 


1.91 


4 


n.C.'n^nnan x...... 


3.56 




Strond & Thomson 

The Cook &, Brown Lime Co 


Paintlbrushes. ...............r 


4.20 




Coal 7 


5.85 




Robert Brand & Sons 


Pigeonhole cabinet, eto 

Rent of office 


15.65 




WilHuin Piohmfliin 


24.83 




BattisBroe 


Patch bolts, eto • 


26.84 






TaiinbeTr -.r--^x...t.....T 


25.44 




do 


Oak lumber, eto. 


733. 12 




do 


Pine lumber 


L 745. 42 




Niels Johnson 


Iron, eto 


17.50 




Chas.&Morris 


Coal 


41.46 




Priest & Gorrow 


Wood and coal 


823.15 




Wisconsin Telephone Go 


Rent of telephones 


10.50 




do \ 




10.08 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



2744 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Itemized statement of expenses made from appropriation for operating and care of eanaU 
and other works of narigationf indsjinils, act of July 5, 1884, etc, — Continoed. 



D»te. 



No. of 
vouchor. 



To wbom paid. 



For what paid. 



Amoanl 



18M. 
Aug. 4 
4 

4 
4 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
14 
31 
81 
31 
31 
81 
31 
31 
81 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
81 
81 
31 
81 
81 
81 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
81 
31 
31 
Sept. 2 

10 

10 

10 

25 

30 

30 

80 

30 

80 

30 

30 

30 , 

30 ' 

80 

30 

30 

80 

80 

30 

80 

80 

30 

30 



30 



National Paint ^'orka 

Frank B.Fargo 

National Faint Works 

J obn A . Banker 

Hired men 

Frank Smith 

Q. L. & D. W. Thomas 

Dos Forges & Co 

Elwin Bauter 

JohnC. Beye 

Charles M.Cole 

L.M.Mann 

Dayton K. Burr 

Fred. J. Anger 

L.M.Maun 

John M. Paige 

Alexander Sims 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Gifford 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb J ahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard E. Rice 

James Clear , 

A.H.Piipe 

Keuffel & Enser Co 

F. Cortez Wilson & Co 

H.C.Doman , 

Jamea Gillingbam & Son 

do 7 , 

Hay Hardware Co 

William Dicbmaun , 

OrviUe Beach 

Conlee Lumber Co 

do 

The Cook Sc Brown Lime Co. 
Campbell & Cameron Co , 



Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do 

Chas. S. Morris 

Priest & Gorrow 

L.M. Mann 

Hired men 

John Arft 

Charles M. Cole 

Elwin Bauter 

John Yueuger 

Fred. J. Anger 

Burdiok, Armitage A, Allen . 

L.M. Mann 

John M. Pai^e 

AlexandiT Sims 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George G i fford 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard B. Rioe 

Jamos Clear 

A.H.Pape 

Schlafer & Barrett 

Joseph Kloeckner, postmaster.. 

Stroud & Thomson , 

Wisconsin Telephone Co , 

do , 

William Dichmann 

.....do , 

do 

H.C.Doman , 

Campbell Sc Cameron Co 

Hay Hard warp Co 

John H. Crawford , 



Paint 

Calcimining, etc 

Paint 

Serrices 

Services. July, 18»0 

Services 

Brooms, etc 

Stationery 

Traveling expenses 

do 

do 

do 

De]M)siting dredged material . 

Services 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Notebooks 

Tank 

Globe valve 

Iron bands 

Driftbolts 

Chain, etc 

Rent of office 

Rent of land 

Pine lumber 

do 

Coal 

Oak timber 

Pinelnmber 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages 

Coal 

Wood and coal 

Traveling expenses 

Services, August, 1806 

Services 

Traveling expenses 

do 

Services 

.. .do 

Job j^rinting 

Services 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Scythe, etc 

Rent of post-offlce box 

Glass, etc 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages 

Meat, etc 

Flour, butter, etc 

Rent of office 

Gas pipe, etc 

Pine lumber 

Spikes, etc 

Coal 



$50.00 

9.00 

242.50 

25.00 

,t,899.21 

L25 

l.»4 

21.55 

2.68 

7.30 

2.52 

7.48 

11.28 

60.00 

175.00 

35.00 

35.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

5.00 

9.00 

10.00 

LOO 

6.00 

6.42 

6.30 

24.83 

25.00 

24.00 

193.71 

35.10 

66 24 

224.38 

7.50 

8.25 

40.50 

564.73 

6.06 

3,401.13 

9.00 

2.92 

2.68 

6.09 

60.00 

13.50 

176.00 

85.00 

35.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25. UO 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

5.00 

L48 

.76 

3.61 

7.50 

9.60 

2.91 

15.87 

24.83 

29.67 

31.20 

48.20 

50.40 



Digitized by 



Google 



APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN, 



2746 



Itemized statemeui oferpen$e8 madejram appropriation for operating and eare of canals 
and other works of navigation, indefinite, <iet of July 5, 1884, etc, — Con tinned. 



Dftte. 



yo.of 
▼oncher. 



To whom pftid. 



For what paid. 



Amonnt. 



1896. 

Sept 30 

30 

30 

30 



Oct. 



"Say. 



The Cook 4& Brown Lime Co 

G. L. & D. W. Thomas 

Niels Johnson 

Chas.S. Morris 

Priest Sc Gorrow 

L.M. Mann 

Thomas Malone 

Gerry Lumber Co 

Western Union Telpjiraph Co 

Western Lime and Cement Co 

fiadf[er Tj'pewriter and Stationery Co. 

The Chas. Baumbach Co 

Hired Men 

Elwin Banter 

Charles M. Cole 

John Arft 

M. J.Sohmitt 

Bucyms Steam Shovel and Dredge Co. 

Western Union Teli*erapb Co 

Albert BelK 

Wensel Bronchek 

CA.Lawton & Co 

L.Lindaner 

Thomas Malone 

Gerry Lumber Co 

J.C.&oelsch 

Stroud & Thomson 

Western Union Telegraph Co 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do. 



Coal 

Lye, etc , 

Boiler rlvetn, etc 

Coal 

Wool and coal 

Traveling expenses 

Stone 

Lnmber 

Telegrams , 

Cement 

Stationery 

Oil 

Services, September, 1896. 

Traveling expenses 

....do , 

Servicea 

Blueprints, etc 

Dipper lips 

Telegrams 

Services 

....do 

Steel, ete 

Stone 

do 

Lnmber 

Shovel, etc , 

Oakum , 

Telegrams 

Kent of telephones , 

Telephone mensages 

Spikes, etc 



Hay Hardware Co , 

The Cook &. Brown Lime Co ' Coal 

William Dichmann j Rent of office 

George Ryan Unuling out drill scow 

Campbell & Cameron Co Lumber and piles 

Conlee Lnmber Co Pine lnmber 

J.H.Crawford Coal and wood , 

G. L. & D. W. Thomas Soap 

C.A. Peck I Iron , 

Priest dtGorrow i Coal and wood 

A. J. Wler ...I Coal 

L. M. Mann ' Servioos 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



John M.Paige 

Alexander Smis 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Gi fford 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard B.Rice 

James Clear 

A.H.Pai)e 

John A. Banker 

H ired men , 

J. Wm. Worm , 

Chas. S. Morris , 

MacKinnon Excelnior Co , 

Kmiflcl AEsHer 

William Dichmann 

Charles M. Cole , 

Elwin Banter 

John O. Beye , 

John Arft 

William Biggs 

R. Booth 

Clarence L. Neif 

Badger Typewriter and Stationery Co 

Frea. J. Anger , 

L.M.Mann 

John M.Paige j do 

Alexander Sims do 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Glfford 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke 



Services, October, 1896 . 

Lumber, etc 

Coal 

Excelsior waste 

Tracing cloth 

Flour, sugar, etc 

Traveling expenses. . . . 

do 

....do 

Servicea 

....do 

Driving piles 

Services 

Paper 

Services 

do 






do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



$68.88 
5.43 

10.08 

46.7V 
452.67 

10.28 
184.43 

12.33 
1.63 

10.80 
0.87 
4.76 
8,247.41 
2.81 
7.05 

45.00 
6.06 

82.08 
1.21 
3.12 

10.00 

207.01 

485.87 

12.78 

1.85 

4.25 

.30 

7.60 

12.47 

n.36 

10.50 

24.83 

60.00 

181.24 

108.62 

346.00 

.60 

1.41 

410. U 

11.00 

175.00 

35.00 

35. Oo 

25.00 

80.00 

25.00 

2.'>.Oo 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

30. Oo 

6.0o 

26.00 

3. 427. 83 

11.64 

43. Oo 

I.O5 

7.88 

10.37 

0.3i 

2.81 

2.O4 

M.5o 

1.87 

200. Oo 

O.O0 

6.48 

60. Oo 

175. Oo 

35. Oo 

35. Oo 

25. Oo 

30.00 

25.00 

25. Oo 

25.00 

25. Oo 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



2746 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

JtemUed statement of expen$e9 made from appropriation for operating and care of oanaU 
and other works of navigation, indefinite, act of July 5, 1884, etc.— Coutinned. 



Bate. 


No. of 
Toucher. 


1896. 




Nov. 30 


26 


30 


26 


30 


27 


30 


28 


30 


20 


30 


30 


30 


81 


30 


32 


30 


83 


30 


84 


80 


85 


80 


86 


•30 


37 


30 


38 


30 


89 


80 


40 


80 


41 


30 


42 


30 


48 


80 


44 


80 


45 


30 


46 


30 


47 


30 


48 


30 


• 49 


80 


60 


Dec 1 


1 


2 


2 


5 


8 


7 


4 


7 


6 


9 


6 


12 


7 


14 


8 


17 


9 


31 


10 


31 


11 


81 


12 


81 


13 


31 


14 


31 


16 


81 


16 


81 


17 


31 


18 


31 


19 


81 


20 


31 


21 


31 


22 


31 


28 


31 


24 


81 


26 


31 


26 


81 


27 


31 


28 


31 


29 


31 


30 


31 


31 


31 


82 


81 


33 


31 


84 


31 


36 


31 


86 


31 


87 


1897. 




Jan. 5 




5 




5 




5 




5 




IG 




16 




16 




10 




16 




16 




26 




28 




28 




28 


16 



To whom paid. 



For what paid. 



Amoant. 



Jerry ParkiDSon < 

Jolm Lewis 

James Clear 

A.H.Pape 

Richard E.IUce 

The Marsh &. Bingham Co 

...do .T 

KankanDa Lumber and Mfg. Co 

Thomas Ma lone 

Gerry Lumber Co 

Valley Iron Works Manufacturing Co 

Scblafer & Barrett 

...do 

Western Union Telegraph Go 

M.A.Searl '. 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do 

Stroud &. Thompson .....< 

Hay Hardware Co 

The Cook &. Brown Lime Co , 

Band erob- Cb ase Co 

William Dichmann 

Orville Beach 

Chas. S. Morris 

Prient & Gorrow 

do 

L.M.Mann 

JohnC. Beye 

Hired men , 

Eugene Dietzgen Co 

Elwin Banter , 

Charles M. Cole 

MathiasHelf 

Des Forges ScCo 

G.K.KendaU 

John Smith , 

L. Lindaner 

Schlafer Hardware Co 

Joseph Kloeckner, postmaster 

The Morgan Co , 

Wisconsin Telephone Co , 

do 

Robert Brand &. Sons , 

William Dichmann 

George Ryan 

Mann Bros , 

The Marsh & Bingham Co 

L. M.Mann 

John M.Paige 

Alexander Sims 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Gifford 

John A.Bauker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis , 

Richard E. Rice 

James Clear 



A.H.Pape 

Badger TjpewTiteraad Stationery Co. 



L. M.Mann 

JohnC. Beye , 

Butler Bros 

Jones Sc Laughlins, Limited.... 

Hired men , 

Burdick, Armitage Sc Allen , 

Charles M.Cole , 

Fulton Iron and Engine Works. 

J.W.Bhiok 

Mann Bros 

do 

Capt. George A. Zinn 

Charles W.Day 

Jones & Laugluins, Limited 

Bailey Grover 



Services 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Oak lumber , 

....do 

Pine lumber 

Stone 

Pine lumber 

Pinions, etc 

Nails and bolts 

Spikes and bolts 

Telegrams 

Ice.T. 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages 

Axle grease 

Spikes, etc , 

Oak lumber 

Rentof office , 

Rent of land , 

Coal 

Wood 

Stone , 

Traveling expenses , 

do , 

Services, November, 1886.. 

Transit books, etc , 

Traveling expenses 

do 

Services 

Stationery 

Paper 

Clay 

Stone 

Stone wheelbarrows, etc . 
Rentof postoflloo box.... 

Storm sash , 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages 

Map case , 

Rentof office 

Oak lumber, ete 

...do 

Lumber 

Services 

....do 

....do , 

do , 

....do , 

do 

do 

...do 

....do 

do 

do 

do , 

....do 

do 

Stationery 

do 



Traveling expenses 

do 

Nails, etc 

Tie rods, etc 

Services, Deoember, 1896 . 

Job printing 

Traveling expenses 

Ice-boring machines 

Stone 

Oak lumber 

do 

Mileage 

Pine lumber 

Boat spikes, etc 

Traveling expenses 



$25.00 

25.00 

30.00 

5.00 

25.00 

138.24 

189.26 

6.46 

159.66 

23.07 

23.52 

29.36 

9.79 

.60 

6.00 

7.60 

6.90 

4.00 

4.08 

11.70 

12.00 

24.83 

25.00 

71.61 

160.87 

215.87 

4.21 

3.31 

8,861.99 

9.20 

2.22 

9.60 

12.18 

4.10 

1.88 

30.80 

214.50 

47.11 

.75 

5.95 

7.50 

6.96 

15.00 

24. K) 

66.80 

82.35 

158,37 

175.00 

35.00 

35.00 

23.00 

30.00 

26.00 

25.00 

25.00 

26.00 

25.00 

26.00 

25.00 

30.00 

6.00 

7.01 

10.60 

6.33 

3.07 

1.70 

41.02 

8,045.70 

6.00 

13.81 

121.64 

260.00 

853.11 

701. 10 

16.79 

700.22 

116.86 

13.11 



Digitized by 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZMW. 



2747 



Itemized eiaiement of expeneee made from appropriation for operating and care of canale 
and other worke o/^naviaation, indejinitey act of July 6, 1884, etc. — Continued. 



Date. 


No. of 
voucher. 


1897. 




Jan. 30 


18 


30 


17 


30 


18 


80 


19 


30 


20 


80 


21 


80 


22 


30 


23 


90 


24 


30 


25 


81 


28 


81 


27 


31 


28 


81 


29 


81 


30 


81 


31 


81 


32 


81 


83 


81 


84 


81 


35 


31 


36 


31 


87 


31 


88 


81 


39 


31 


40 


31 


41 


Feb. 2 


1 


4 


2 


6 


8 


6 


4 


11 


5 


11 


6 


11 


7 


13 


8 


13 


9 


15 


10 


20 


11 


20 


12 


28 


18 


28 


14 


28 


15 


28 


16 


28 


17 


28 


18 


28 


19 


28 


20 


28 


21 


28 


22 


28 


28 


28 


24 


28 


25 


28 


26 


28 


27 


28 


28 


28 


20 


28 


80 


28 


81 


28 


82 


28 


88 


28 


84 


28 


85 


28 


36 


Mar. 4 


1 




2 




8 




4 




5 




6 




7 




8 




9 




10 


10 


11 


15 


12 


U 


18 


81 


14 


81 


15 


81 


16 


81 


17 



To whom ^d. 



For what paid. 



Amomit. 



Ben Jaoobwn 

John Van Yonderen 

Ramsay & Jones 

Appleton Maohine Co 

do 

American Bxpress Co , 

H.CDoman 

Hay Hardware Co 

William Dichmann 

The A. G. Wells Co 

Fred. J. Anger , 

L. M.Mann 

JohnM.P^ee 

Alexander Sins 

John Baeten 

Oeorgo T. Allanson 

George Gifford , 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wlok 

GoUlieb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard E. Kice 

James Clear , , 

A^H.Pape 

L. M.Mann , 

Western Lime and Cement Co. . 

Hired men 

El win Banter , 

Des Forges & Co , 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

....do 

Charles M. Cole 

Joseph Rabedien 

Henry Hahner ..•.., 

Capt. George A. Zinn 

Wniiam Doberstein 

John Yan Yonderen 

C. A. Lawton &. Co 

Charles W.Day 

Western Union Telegraph Co. . . 

Wisconsin Telephone Co , 

do 

H.CDoman 

William Dichmann 

Orville Beach 

Hay Hardware Co 

L.M.Mann 

John M. Paige 

Alexander Sims 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Gifford ^ 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottileb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard E. Rioe 

James Clear 

A.H.PaT>e 

John A. Banker 

L.M.Mann 

Joys Bros. & Co 

Western Lime and Cement Co. . 

Keufi'el& EsserCo 

H. Channon Co 

Depere Lumber Sc Fuel Co 

1. H.Battin 

Appleton Machine Co 

Hired men 

Charles M. Cole 

Elwin Banter 

Bailey Grover 

Capt. George A. Zinn 

W. S. Woodworth 

Fred. J. Anger 

L.M.l£ann" 

John M.Paige 

Alexander Sims 



Tamarack knees 

Sand 

Pine lumber 

Heel post caps, etc 

Anchor rods, etc 

Bxpress charges 

Labor 

Rope, etc 

Rent of office 

Bla*;k8mith coal 

Services 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

...do 

.....do 

do 

do 

....do 

do 

do 

....do 

.....do 

do 

Trareling expenses 

Cement 

Services, January, 1897. . . 

Traveling expenses , 

Stationery 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages 

Trareling expenses 

Services 

.....do 

MUeage , 

Services 

Sand 

Bolts, etc 

Pine lumber 

Telegrams 

Telephone messages 

Rent of telephones 

Bolte, etc , 

Rent of office , 

Rent of land 

Spikes, bolts, etc 

Services 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do , 

....do , 

.....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

do 

,....do 

.....do 

.....do 

Traveling expenses , 

Oakum, etc 

Cement 

Drawing paper, etc , 

Chain block, etc , 

Lumber , 

Boiler oil^ ete 

Iron castings, etc , 

Services, February, 1897. 

Traveling expenses 

do , 

do 



Mileage 

Traveling expenses . 

Services 

....do , 

do , 

....do... 



$24.00 

33.06 

3.22 

22.02 

112. 72 

.35 

1.70 

2.45 

24.83 

3.00 

60.00 

175.00 

85.00 

85.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

30.00 

5.00 

11.66 

285.00 

1,006.68 

2.23 

5.56 

7.50 

8.50 

21.61 

6.25 

15.00 

n.24 

14.21 

65.82 

74.17 

264.21 

.84 

6.00 

7.50 

15.27 

24.83 

26.00 

126.54 

175.00 

35.00 

35.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

30.00 

5.00 

25.00 

5.46 

70.75 

190.00 

11.78 

62.85 

1.56 

13.53 

2.72 

i, 698. 38 

22.01 

2.10 

13.47 

17.71 

25.22 

60.00 

175.00 

35.00 

85.00 



Digitized by 



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2748 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Itemized $taiement of expemes made from appropriation for operating and care of canah 
and other works of natigatum, indefinite, act of July 6, 1884^ etc, — Continned. 





No. of 


J mte. 


vouober. 


1897. 




[ar. 81 


18 


31 


19 


31 


20 


31 


21 


81 


22 


81 


23 


31 


24 


81 


25 


81 


20 


81 


27 


81 


28 


81 


29 


31 


80 


81 


81 


81 


32 


81 


83 


81 


84 


81 


86 


81 


86 


31 


87 


81 


36 


31 


80 


81 


40 


81 


41 


81 


42 


31 


43 


81 


44 


81 


46 


81 


46 


31 


47 


81 


48 


31 


40 


81 


50 


81 


61 


31 


62 


31 


63 


Lpr. 3 


1 


3 


2 


3 


8 


5 


4 


6 


6 


6 


6 


9 


7 


9 


8 


16 


9 


22 


10 


22 


11 


24 


12 


80 


13 


80 


14 


30 


15 


30 


16 


30 


17 


80 


18 


80 


19 


80 


20 


80 


ai 


30 


22 


80 


23 


80 


24 


30 


25 


80 


26 


30 


27 


30 


28 


80 


39 


80 


30 


30 


31 


80 


82 


80 


33 


30 


34 


80 


35 


80 


36 


80 


37 


30 


88 


80 


89 


80 


40 


80 


41 


80 


42 



To whom paid. 




Amomit. 



John BMton 

George T. Allanson 

George Gifford 

Jbhn A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jabnke 

Jerr>' Parkinaon 

John Lewis 

Richanl K. Rice 

Janica Cloar 

A.H. Pape 

Kouffel & Kaser Co 

do 

The Marsh &, Bingham Co 

Mann Bros 

Frederick C. Pealin 

John Van Vonderen 

Thiele &. Handeyside 

Gerry LnmberCo 

Appleton Machine Co 

do 

Hay Hardware Co 

Joseph Kloeckner, poatmaater. . 

Strond & Thomson 

H. C.Doroan 

Western Union Telegraph Co... 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do 

J. A. Barnes 

The Medberry-Bemis Co 

William Dichmann , 

C. A. Peck 

D. W.Thomas , 

Mann Bros 

do 

do 

do 

Western Lime and Cement Co.. 

Elwin Bauter , 

Hired men 

W. S. Woodwortb , 

Western Union Telegraph Co. . 

Bailey Grover , 

L. M.'Mann 

Charles M. Cole 

H.H.WestCo 

David O'Mallev 

John H. Crawford & Co 

L. M.Mann , 

John M. Paige , 

Alexander Sima , 

John Baeten , 

George T. Allanson 

George Gifford , 

John A. Banker , 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jabnke , 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard B. Kloe , 

James Clear , 

A. H. Pape 

Keufl'el it, Esser Co 

Lee &, DiebelsCo 

C.A.Lawton & Co 

do 

do 

do 

do 

JameaR. Sbepard , 

Gerry Lnmber Co 

Schlafer Hardware Co 

MacKinnon Pulley Co 

American Express Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co.., 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do , 

The Cook Sc Brown Lime Co. . . 



Services. 

do. 

do. 
....do. 
....do. 
....do. 
....do. 
...do. 
....do. 

....do 

...do 

Paragon leads , 

Blue-print paper 

Oak lumber 

...do 

Stone , 

Sand 

Stone 

Pine lumber 

Iron castings, etc 

Tripods, etc 

Tin funnel 

Rent of post-oflBce box 

Glass, ete 

Washers, etc , 

Telegrams 

Rsnfof telephones 

Telephone messages 

Rent of engine and boiler. 

Index boolu, etc 

Rent of office 

Spikes and iron 

Services , 

Pine lumber 

do 

Oak lumber 

Pine lumber 

Cement , 

Traveling expenses , 

Services, March, 1897 , 

Traveling expenses 

Telegrams 

Traveling expenaea 

do 

.....do 

Figuring blooks, etc 

Services 

Blacksmith ooal 

Services 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Drawing paper 

Blacksmith coal, etc 

Grate bars 

Valve boxes, etc 

Steel sprocket, etc 

Steel gear, etc 

Valves, etc 

Stone 

Lumber , 

Linseed oil, etc 

Steel, iron, etc 

Express charges 

Telegrams 

Rent of tolepliones 

Telephone messagea 

Coal 



$25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

26.00 

25 00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

5.00 

.53 

.90 

119.80 

156.83 

25.50 

58.17 

08.62 

67.98 

68.44 

83.65 

.40 

.75 

L14 

4.11 

.40 

7. SO 

9.45 

14.50 

14.60 

24.83 

19.84 

9.00 

14.60 

272.04 

415.21 

82.50 

90.00 

2.10 

4,051.01 

17.02 

.02 

96.29 

18.87 

19.87 

18.16 

10.00 

L57 

175.00 

85.00 

35.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

5.00 

8.70 

16.30 

14.75 

35.06 

67.96 

242.76 

816.95 

63.25 

25.18 

88.00 

87.60 

.80 

.89 

7.60 

16.79 

8.60 



Digitized by 



Google 



APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOKT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2749 



ItemUed $tatement of expeMee made from appropriation for oporaiiMf and oare oj canals 
and other worie oj navigation, indefinite^ act of July S, 1884, etc, — Contlnaed. 



No. of 
▼oncber. 



To whom paid. 



For what paid. 



AiDonnt. 



May 



1887. 
Apr.- 30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 

ao 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
6 
6 
« 

e 

6 

6 
6 
7 
8 

14 
14 
14 
20 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
31 
81 
81 
81 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
81 
81 
31 
81 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
81 
31 
31 
81 
31 
31 
31 
81 
81 
31 
31 
31 
81 
81 



Frank Leaoh Hardware Co 

The Morgan Co 

Stroud &. Thomson 

C. E. Angell & Co 

Battis Broa 

William Dichmann 

H. C. Doman 

.....do 

do 1 

.....do 

John W. Slater 

Niels Johnson 

Bruest Eastman 

Valley Iron Works Hanufacturing Co. 

do 

Hay Hardware Co 

J. ueorge Kuelier 

Hired men 

Des Forges & Co 

Randle-Spence Manafacturing Co. . . . . 

Joys Bros. & Co 

...do 

L. M.Mann 

Bailey Grover 

Capt. George A. Zinn 

Western Lime and Cement Co 

Eiwin Banter 

Charles M. Cole 

George H. Jenkins 

Des Forges & Co 

Fred. J. Anger 

L.M.Mann 

John M. Paige 

Alexander Sims 

John Baeten 

George T. Allanson 

George Glfford 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke 

Jerry Parkinson 

John Lewis 

Richard E. Rice 

James Clear 

A. H. Pane 

Charles Rogers 

Axel Fahlstrom 

John Kilawee 

AlexanderG. Grignon 

Cornelius Romsom 

Henry G.Bongers 

National Paint Works 

Charles Schroeder 

F.H. Blood 

Sohlafer BLardware Co 

do 

Gerry Lumber Co 

G.A.Loesoher 

JohnLenz. sr 

Western union Telegraph Co- 

American Express Co 

Gillen Bros 

BL C.Johnson ScCo 

H.C. Doman 

do 

do 

Wm. R. Williams 

.....do 

Hay Hardware Co 

...Tdo 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do 

The Morgan Co 

Conlee Lumber Co 

.....do 

H.M. Harmon 

Stroud & Thomson 

S. E. MoPartlin 

Or^-ille Beach 

William Dichmann 



Wire nails, etc 

Pine lumber, etc 

Axle grease, eto 

Seeds. 

Hand-holeplates, etc . 

Rent of oflBioe 

Iron, etc 

Iron rods, etc 

Carrying sheaves, etc. 

Chain, etc 

Linseeod oil 

Gas pipe, etc 

Gravel, etc 

Snubbing posts, etc . . . 

Valves, shafts, ete 

Deck plugs, etc 

Soil pipe 

Services, April, 1887.. 

Stationery 

Injector 

Hawsing beetle 

Oakum, etc 

Traveling expenses . . . 

do 

Mileage 

Cement 

Traveling expenses. . . 

do 

Services 

Stationery 

Services ■ 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Asphaltnm paint 

Woo<l 

Sewer pipe 

Iron, etc 

Rope, etc 

Lumber 

Iron pipe, etc 

Cistern 

Telegram 

Express charges 

Laundry 

Storing awnings, etc. . 

Brass, etc 

Steam cocks, eto 

Dredge chain, etc 

Chimney hood 

Tin roofing, eto 

Iron, etc 

Rope, etc 

Telephone messages... 
Ren t of telephones .... 

Pine lumber, etc 

Lumber, eto 



Labor 

Tallow, etc 

Asbestos covering. 

Rent of land 

Rent of office 



$4.06 

48.55 

11.44 

15.55 

10.98 

25.00 

5.13 

62.33 

118.06 

128.98 

3.42 

8.25 

16.25 

78.20 

343.47 

6.47 

.55 

3, 046. 14 

3.85 

14.85 

2.50 

51.75 

10.87 

8.62 

12.05 

14.40 

2.68 

8.80 

24.75 

8.15 

60.00 

200.00 

35.00 

85.00 

25.00 

30.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

5.00 

25.00 

25.00 

80.00 

30.00 

30.00 

25.00 

198.50 

26.00 

4.20 

3.30 

16.73 

72.88 

7.31 

n.00 

.20 

.25 

1.22 

1.75 

2.22 

7.74 

256.07 

8.00 

32.00 

3.60 

163.18 

5.15 

7.50 

6.40 

6.63 

24.56 

6.10 

8.12 

- 10.88 

25.00 

35.00 



Digitized by 



Google 



2750 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

Itemized statement of expenses made from appropriation for operating and care of canals 
and other toorks of navigation, indefinite, act of July 6, 1884, etc. — Continned. 



Date. 



No. of 
voucher. 



To whom paid. 



For what paid. 



Amonnt. 



1897- 
May 31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
81 
31 
June 4 
6 
6 
5 
5 
6 
5 
9 
9 
9 
12 
16 
16 
16 
10 
80 
30 
80 
80 
30 
30 
30 
80 
80 
80 
30 
30 
30 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
80 
80 
80 
30 
80 
80 
80 
80 
80 
30 
30 
30 
80 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 



87 



WiUiain Dichmami 

I.H.Battln 

O. McCJorlBon 

The Cook & Brown Lime Co 

John H. Crawford & Co 

Hiram Stedman 

Prieat & (borrow 

A.. J. Weir , 

Hired men 

Joyg Bros. & Co 

Western Lime uid Cement Co , 

Rundle-Spence Manufacturing Co. 

J. A. Bamea 

Peter Feller 

John C. Beye 

Jamei E.Patton Co 

Charlea M. Cole 

L.M. Mann 

Baoine Yacht and Boat W;orlu 

Abraham Hibbard , 

Bella Fuller 

Wenael Steidl 

O. D. Qreely 

L. M.Mann 

JohnM. Paiee 

Alexander Sima 

John Baeten 

George T. A Hanson 

George Gifford 

John A. Banker 

Gabriel Wick 

Gottlieb Jahnke , 

Jerry Parkinson , 

John Lewis 

Richard £. Rice 

James Clear 

A. H. Pane 

Charles Rogers. 



Axel Fahlstrom 

JohnKilawee 

Alexander G. Grignon 

Cornelius Romsom 

Henry C. Bongers 

Kenifel Sc Esser Co 

....do 

F. Cortez Wilson & Co 

John Van Vonderen 

John Shea 

do 

Stark &Te8oh , 

Schlafer Hardware Co 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Joseph Kloeckner, postmaster. 

The Casket Hardware Co 

Battis Bros 

Gillingham & Son , 

William Dichmann 

....do 

...do 

H.C. Johnson St. Son 

August Sohroeder 

Wisconsin Telephone Co 

do , 

Conlee Lumber Co 

LH.Battin 

The Cook and Brown Lime Co. . 

Hay Hardware Co 

H.C. Doroan 

John H. Crawford ScCo 

Hiram Stedman 

Priest Sc Gorrow , 

A. J. Weir 

L.M.Mann 



Soap, etc 

Oil.. 

Linoleum, etc 

Coal 

Coal and wood 

Coal 

Wood 

Lumber 

Services, May, 1897...., 

Oakum, etc 

Cement 

Cutter block, eto 

Steel cas tines, etc 

Galvanised iron 

Traveling expenses .... 

White lead, etc 

Traveling expenses .... 

. do 

Rowboat 

Services 

do 

do 

Paper 

Services 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

.....do 

do 

do 

do 

do , 

do 

Blue- print paper 

Tracing cloth 

Oil tank 

Sand 

Clay 

Gravel 

Nails, etc 

Cotton waste, etc 

Quilts, etc 

Manila rope, etc 

Cotton waste, etc 

Rentof post-offlce box. 

Use of Jackscrews 

Labor 

Cold chisels, etc 

Pillowcases 

Flour, et« 

Rent of oflBce , 

Canvas 

Use of Jackscrews 

Rent of telephones 

Telephone messages... 

Lumoer 

Oil 

Coal 

Scales, etc 

Chain, etc 

Wood and coal , 

Coal , 

Wood and coal 

Coal 

Traveling expenses. . . . 



$60.13 

41.88 

81.74 

67.60 

148.77 

28.44 

880.85 

LIS 

8, 303. 14 

12.50 

06.00 

.48 

64.48 

8.46 

9.35 

38.03 

8.06 

9.14 

39.00 

L25 

1.25 

13.90 

6.60 

200.00 

35.00 

35.00 

25.00 

80.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

25.00 

30.00 

5.00 

25.00 

25.00 

30.00 

30.00 

80.00 

25.00 

.90 

7.88 

5.60 

6.50 

6.90 

18.50 

8.34 

8.15 

8.50 

14.80 

26.47 

.75 

.90 

1.00 

8.15 

L50 

4.52 

25.00 

4.00 

7.20 

7.50 

12.43 

8.71 

18.36 

26.10 

20.64 

06.59 

168.01 

48.43 

292.73 

7.50 

9.65 



Total. 



66,317.49 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2751 

H H23. 

REMOVING SUNKEN VESSELS OR CRAJ^T OBSTRUCTING OR ENDANGERING 

NAVIGATION. 

Wreck of barge Sumatra in Milwaukee Bay. — The barge Sumatra^ 
loaded with railroad rails, in tow of the Bteaui barge Arnold,, foundered 
in 33 feet depth of water September 30, 1896, about three-fourths of a 
mile east by south of the entrance to Milwaukee Harbor, Wisconsin, 
and formed a dangerous obstruction to navigation. All of the cargo 
except 40 rails was removed by December 10, 1896, and the wreck 
abandoned by the wreckers and owners. 

A recommendation dated December 26, 1896, that an allotment of 
$500 from the permanent indefinite appropriation for removing sunken 
vessels, etc., act of June 14, 1880, was approved January 4, 1897, for 
the removal of the remaining portions of the wreck, which consisted 
chiefly of the bow, bowsprit, centerboard box, and one pair of sheet 
posts, over which the depth of water was from 18 to 22 feet, so that there 
should be a clear depth of 28 feet over all parts of the wreck. 

An examination of the wreck was made by a diver and proposals 
invited for the removal of the obstruction. 

Proposals were received January 29, 1897, from the Milwaukee Tug 
Company and the Independent Tug Gompany, each being for the sum 
of $300. The latter company undertook to do the work and to fur- 
nish all necessnry appliances. 

The removal was accomplished February 18, 1897, the site of the 
wreck swept by an iron bar suspended at a depth of 28 feet, and no 
obstruction encountered. 

Dynamite was used for blowing up the wreck. The bowsprit, which 
was afloat, was towed into the Milwaukee Biver. 

The cost of removal was as follows : 

Examination by div^er $50.00 

Removal of wreck 300.00 

Total 350.00 



H H 24. 

SURVEY OF HARBOR AT MENOMINEE, MICHIGAN AND WISCONSIN, WITH 
A VIEW OF OBTAINING A 20-FOOT DEPTH OF WATER. 

[Printed in Honse Doc. No. 80, Fifty •foarth CongreM, second gCMion.] 

Office of the Chief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washington^ D. 0., December 7, 1896. 
Sib : I have the honor to submit the accompanylDg copy of report of 
^November 30, 1896, with map,* by Capt. George A. Zinn, Corps of Engi- 
neers, of results of a survey of harbor at Menominee, Michigan and 
Wisconsin, with a view of obtaining a 20foot depth of water, made to 
comply "with requirements of the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 
Two plans of improvement are presented by Captain Zinn, one by 

*Not reprinted. Printed in Hoase Doo. No. 86, Fifty-fonrth Congress, second 
session. 



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2752 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY, 

pier extension and dredging, and the other by dredging only. Bat he'is 
of opinion that the better method of obtaining a 20-foot channel at Me- 
nominee Harbor is to dredge the channel to that depth from the river 
to the 20-foot contour in Green Bay without extension of the piers. He 
further states that in case this plan should be adopted the open chan- 
nel should be widened, requiring for the entire work the removal of 
172,000 cubic yards of material at an estimated cost, including contin- 
gencies, of $18,920. 

Ool. H. M. Bobert, Oorps of Engineers, the division engineer, in for- 
warding this report says: 

I concar with Captain Zinn in recommending the adoption of the second, or dredg- 
ing, plan for the farther improvement of this harbor, at a cost of abont $19,000. Only 
about $7,000 of this will be expended outside the present pierheads. After the 
20-foot onaniiel has been obtained it will probably cost about $3,000 annually to 
maintain it. Should it be found to much exceed this amount then this cost should be 
compared with that of constructing and maintaining piers, and if the latter method 
is proven to be cheaper it could at any time be adopted. At present I think dredg* 
ing should be tried. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. P. Craighill, 
Brig. Gen.y Chief of Engineers. 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 



bepobt of oapt. gbo. a. zinn, ooeps of enainebes. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Milwaukee^ TTt*., November 30j 1896. 

Genebal: I have the honor to submit, in compliance with instruc- 
tions contained in printed letter from office of the Chief of Engineers, 
United States Army, dated Washington, D. 0., September 5, 1896, the 
following report upon a survey of harbor at Menominee, Michigan and 
Wisconsin, and an estimate of the cost of improvement, with a view to 
obtaining a channel 20 feet deep. 

The harbor of Menominee is situated at the mouth of the river of the 
same name on the western shore of Green Bay, and has already been 
successfully improved by the construction of two approximately parallel 
piers, from 370 to 400 feet apart, and by dredging between them under 
a project whose object is to maintain a channel 200 feet wide and 17 
feet deep below a plane which is 3.06 feet below the plane of reference 
of the Lake Survey, from Green Bay into the Menominee River. These 
piers project about 1,000 feet on the north side and 1^400 feet on the 
south side beyond the present shore line, and terminate in 18 feet of 
water on the north side of the channel and 13 feet on the south side. 
The south pier projects about 100 feet beyond the north pier. 

Inasmuch as separate appropriations have been made for the improve- 
ment of the Menominee Biver and of Menominee Harbor, and since the 
word ^'harbor" has heretofore been interpreted in this district to mean 
the channel connecting deep water in the lake with deep water in the 
river to which it usually gives entrance, the project proposed herein for 
obtaining a 20foot depth of water under the act of June 3, 1896, will 
be limited to the entrance channel, as indicated by red lines upon the 
inclosed tracing. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2753 

The Menominee Biver is one of the largest streams emptying into 
Lake Michigan, the area of its watershed being abont 4,400 square 
miles. It is subject to severe annual freshets, and, as a large portion 
of the banks of the riyer proper between its mouth and the dam situ- 
ated abont 3 miles back from the shore, as well as the banks of the 
numerous artificial channels dredged to the various log pockets, are 
unprotected by docks, large quantities of material eroded from these 
unprotected banks are brought down and deposited in Green Bay, thus 
tending to form a bar opposite the month of the river. 

An examination of the Lake Survey chart shows that to the northward 
of the mouth of the Menominee Biver the 18-foot contour is about one- 
half mile from the shore, leaving a narrow strip of shoal water; while 
commencing immediately at the mouth of the river and continuing 
southwardly to the head of Green Bay, the 18 foot contour recedes from 
the shore to a distance of about a mile and a half, forming an extensive 
shoal area. This recession of the 18-foot contour is undoubtedly caused 
by the material brought down and deposited by the Menominee Biver 
and other rivers to the south of it emptying into Green Bay. 

The littoral currents set to the southward along the western shore of 
Green Bay. At the mouth of the Menominee the river current heavily 
charged at times of ireshet with sand is encountered. The river cur- 
rent is deflected to the southward and checked, and a deposit of sand 
commences. 

No deposits of sand occur to the north of Menominee Harbor; they 
occur exclusively to the southward. A bar is thus formed to the south- 
ward of the harbor entrance, and unless removed by dredging will 
gradually extend across the harbor entrance. 

Such a bar existed in 1892, as is shown by a plat of soundings taken 
through the ice in January of that year. It was removed during the 
following summer, and has not yet re-formed to such an extent as to be 
an obstruction to navigation. The formation of this bar between July, 
1889, and January, 1892, a period of two and one-half years, was rapid, 
over 52,000 cubic yards being deposited in the channel in that time. 
(See Annual Beport Chief of Engineers for 1892, part 3, p. 2174.) The 
improvement of Menominee Biver was commenced in 1891. The con- 
sequent disturbance of the river bed undoubtedly contributed largely 
to these deposits. 

The present condition of the harbor of Menominee permits the choice 
of one of two plans of improvement: 

First. The extension of the present harbor piers to the depth sought 
and dredging between them to the same depth. 

Second. Dredging to the required depth between the present piers 
and beyond them to the 20-foot contour in Green Bay without extend- 
ing the piers. 

In the first plan the channel will be maintained at the proper depth 
by the protecting effect of the piers and by a certain amount of annual 
dredging. In the second plan the channel will be maintained entirely 
by dredging. In order to compare the value of the two plans it is only 
necessary to compare the annual dredging required by the first plan 
plus the annual interest on the cost of the pier extension with the 
annual dredging required by the second plan, because the dredging 
originally required to obtain the proposed depth will be about the same 
in both plans. 

The distance from the present end of the south pier to the 20-foot 
contour is about 850 feet; at the north pier this distance is 150 feet. 
BNa 97 ^173 



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2754 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY, 

To extend the piers will cost — 

Bonthpier: 

350 linear feet crib pier, 20 by ISi feet, at $42 $14,700 

300 linear feet crib pier, 20 by 20i feet, at $45 13,500 

200 linear feet crib pier, 24 by 22^ feet, at $59 11,800 

8501inearfeet crib pier 40,000 

North pier: 

150 liuearfeet crib pier, 24 by 22i feet, at $59 8,850 

Total cost 48,850 

But tbis woTild leave the soath pier 800 feet in advance of tbe north 
pier. It is considered necessary in the case of piers of unequal length 
that the pierhead light shall be upon the longer pier. While the present 
south pier is 100 feet longer than the north pier, the width of opening 
being 400 feet, this difference in length is not inat.erial. Were the 
difference in length, however, 800 feet, it would be very objectionable to 
maintain the light on the shorter pier. And further, at all harbors on 
the west shore of Lake Michigan, without exception, the pierhead light 
is carried by the north pier. That Menominee Harbor may form no 
exception to this general rule, it would therefore be necessary to extend 
the north pier an additional 800 feet, or a total extension of 950 feet. 
This additional extension would cost, at $59 per linear foot, $47,200. 
The interest on this amount at 3^ per cent would be $1,652. To 
maintain an additional light on the south pier would cost probably 
about $1,000 annually. Considering rhe question of lights then alone, 
it would be more economical to maintain two pier lights than to extend 
the pier. 

But it is believed that if the south pier were to be extended 800 feet 
in advance of the north pier the tendency would be to arrest the river 
current, and thereby cause a large deposit in the channel that would 
otherwise be deflected to the southward and away from the harbor 
entrance. Experience shows that, generally speaking, piers should be 
of approximately equal length. 

The estimate for pier extension will then stand as follows s 

850 feet south pier extension $40,000 

950 feet north pier extension 56,050 

Total 96,050 

At 3J per cent per annum, the interest on $96,050 is $3,361.75. 

It is impossible to calculate from the available data the exact amount 
of annual dredging required after the piers are extended. 

It is equally impossible to determine the amount of dredging required 
to maintain the proposed depth if the piers are not extended under the 
second plan, but on the basis of the 52,000 cubic yards removed from 
in front of the piers in two years and a half, between July 1889, and 
January, 1892, it would cost about $3,300, or about as much as the 
annual cost of the first plan without the dredging. 

I am therefore of the opinion that the best method of obtaining a 
20-foot channel at Menominee Harbor is to dredge the channel to that 
depth from the river to the 20-foot contour in Green Bay without 
extension of the piers. 

The present channel is somewhat narrow for large vessels, and espe- 
cially at the angles near the inner ends of the piers, where numerous 
cases of grounding have occurred. A project for a deeper channel 
should, therefore, tJso provide for a wider one. 

To obtain a channel 300 feet wide and 20 feet deep, extending from 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2755 

the 20-foot contour in Green Bay to the second angle in the channel as 
indicated on the map, a distance of 3,145 feet, wifi. require the removal 
of about 98,000 cubic yards of material. To dredge the triangular area 
indicated will require the reuioval of about 37,000 cubic yards of mate- 
rial, or a total of 135,000 cubic yards, which at 10 cents will cost 
$13,500. The material to be removed is believed to be all sand, and 
about 30,000 cubic yards are outside the present pierheads. 

In case the second plan is adopted, the open channel should be 
widened to about 600 fee4; in order to guard against an early formation 
of a bar across the entrance, requiring the removal of about 37,000 
cubic yards of material in addition to the 135^000 cubic yards above 
mentioned, making in all 172,000 cubic yards, which at 10 cents per 
cubic yard will cost $17,200, or adding 10 per cent for contingencies, 
$18,920. 

I am of the opinion that the proposed imY>rovement is a worthy one 
and justified by the interests of commerce involved. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a, Zinn, 
Captain^ Corps of Engineers. 

Brig. Gen. W. P. Gbaighill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. A. 

(Through the Division Engineer.) 

[First mdorsement.] 

TJ. S. Engineeb Office, Northwest Division, 

New York, December 5, 1696. 
Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States 
Army. I concur with Captain Zinn in recommending the adoption of 
the second, or dredging, plan for the further improvement of this har- 
bor, at a cost of about $19,000. Only about $7,000 of this will be 
expended outside the present pierheads. After the 20-foot channel 
has been obtained, it will probably cost about $3,000 annually to main- 
tain it. Should it be found to much exceed this amount, then this cost 
should be compared with that of constructing and maintaining piers, 
and if the latter method is proven to be cheaper it could at any time 
be adopted. At present I think dredging should be tried. 

Hbnby M. Bobebt^ 
Oolonelj Corps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 



H H 25. 

8UBVEY OP HAEBOE AT AHNAPEE, WIS. 

(Flinted in House Doc. No. 172, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session.] 

Office op the Ohiep of Engineebs, 

United States Abmt, 
Wiishingtonj D. (7., January 8, 1897. 
Sib : I have the honor to submit the accompanying copy of report, 
dated December 31, 1896, with map,* by Capt. George A. Zinn, Corps 
of Engineers, concerning survey of harbor at Ahuapee, Wis., provided 
for by terms of the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

* Not reprinted. Printed in Hoaae Doc. No. 172, Fiffcy-foorth Congress, second 
session. 



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2756 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

Oaptain Zinn states that the harbor facilities at Ahnapee may be in- 
creased at three places, indicated on map, in the following manner, viz: 

A. Extending the 13-foot channel above the bridge, bnt reducing its 
width to 50 feet. This work involves drilling, blasting, and dredging, 
and is estimated to cost $19,266. 

B. Dredging between the piers, removing 260 linear feet of dock, and 
excavating a basin 200 by 250 feet and 13 feet deep. Two sides of 
the basin will be available for shipping purposes, and should tbere- 
fore be revetted by the owner of the property. The title to the site 
for the basin should be obtained without cost to the United States and 
conveyed to the Government before work is commenced. The cost of 
the basin is estimated at $11,594. 

O. Constructing a basin in the lake, having an area of about 6| acres, 
south of the present harbor entrance, by pier construction, dredging, 
and the removal of a portion of the south pier. The estimated cost of 
this basin is $33,203. This plan contemplates that 600 linear feet of 
dock, to connect the present south pier with the proposed pier, should 
be built by the owners of the adjacent property. 

Captain Zinn states that the property at the sites of plans B and O 
is probably owned by a single individual, and that these plans would, 
therefore, afford no relief to the public or destroy the owner's monopoly. 

Captain Zinn is of opinion, after considering the benefit to be derived 
by the public irom the plans above proposed, together with the cost of 
maintenance, which can not be estimated with exactness, that plan A, 
although the most expensive, involving as it does completion of the 
present project estimated to cost $18,000, is preferable to the others; 
would be the least expensive to maintain, and, besides, would permit 
a greater number of landowners to use their property for shipping 
purposes. 

For the reasons mentioned in his report he is of the opinion that 
nothing more than the completion of the present project and its main- 
tenance should be undertaken by the United States, as this, when com- 
pleted, will, in his judgment, fulfill all the requirements of a harbor at 
Ahnapee. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. MAOKENZm, 

Acting Chief of Engineers. 
Hon. Daniel S. Lahont, 

8ecreta/ry of Wa/r. 



bbpobt of gapt. geo. a. zinn, oobps of engineers. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Milwaukee^ Ww., December 31^ 1896. 

Oenerax: I have the honor to submit the following report and 
estimate for a harbor at Ahnapee, Wis., as requked by section 9 of the 
river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. The tracing herewith shows the 
condition of this harbor in 1870 before any improvement was made by 
the United States Government, its condition above the drawbridge in 
November, 1876, and below the drawbridge in May, 1896. 

The natural features of this harbor are such that it is unnecessary to 
make more extended or elaborate surveys than those above mentioned 
in order to determine the cost of improvement. The bed of the river 
is shown by the survey of 1875 to be rock overlaid with sand and mud 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2757 

for a distance of 2^800 feet from its moath, and, inasmach as but little 
work of improvement has been done since that date above the bridge, 
its condition may be assmned as unchanged. 

The act of June 3, 1896, is indefinite in regard to this harbor, because 
it requires only that the cost of improvement shall be estimated at 
^'harbor at Ahnapee" without stating what sort of harbor shall be pro- 
Tided. On account of this indefiniteness it may therefore not be out 
of place, before discussing the general question of tbe proper kind of 
harbor, to give an account of what has already been done at this place 
by the United States Government. 

The present harbor of Ahnapee is situated at the mouth of the Wolf 
or Ahnapee Biver on the Lake Michigan or eastern side of the peninsula 
that projects between the waters of 6re6n Bay and Lake Michigan, 
and is about 120 miles northward of Milwaukee. Its present relation to 
the nearest harbors north and south of it is quite different from that 
when its improvement was begun, and consequently the conditions gov- 
erning its improvement are changed. 

By direction of the Ohief of Engineers, in 1870, an examination and 
survey was made of the mouth of Wolf feiver, with a view to a harbor 
at that point; in fact, the chief incentive to 'the undertaking was the 
desire to establish a harbor of refuge, because at that date the nearest 
available shelter for vessels was at Baileys Harbor, 40 miles north, and 
at Manitowoc, 43 miles south of Ahnapee. 

It was found by this survey that at a distance of about 450 feet inside 
the mouth of the river an outcropping of limestone existed, with only 
about 4 feet of water over it at low stages of the lake. It was estimated 
that an excavation of more than 30,0^ cubic yards of this rock would 
be necessary, in order to provide a channel 12 feet in depth, 150 feet in 
width, and 700 feet in length. Since this obstruction precluded the prac- 
ticability of constructing a harbor of refuge inside the river, a project 
was formed for the construction of an outer harbor by means of a break- 
water parallel to, and piers at right angles to, the shore, at an estimated 
cost of $370,000. 

On the 3d of March, 1871, an appropriation of $25,000 was made for 
the improvement of Ahnapee Harbor, and on the 10th of June, 1872, 
another ai)propriation of $25,000, both of which were expended in con- 
structing two parallel piers 230 feet apart at the river mouth, with a 
view to making a small harbor preparatory to the construction of the 
outer harbor. In 1873 and 1874 no appropriations were made for this 
harbor. In 1874 the citizens of Ahnapee, by permission of the Govern- 
ment authority, constructed a temporary pier between the piers proper 
to coufine the river current within the limits of a channel but 50 feet in 
width, with a view to its assistance in removing the accumulation of 
sand forming the bar at the mouth by an anticipated acceleration in its 
velocity. 

The act of Congress approved March 3, 1875, appropriated $25,000 
for this harbor. At this date the north pier was 353 feet long, the south 
pier 620 feet long, and 15,390 cubic yards of material had been removed 
from the entrance channel by dredging, at a cost of $1,621.80. 

Maj. p. 0. Houston submitted a project, dated March 25, 1875, for the 
expenditure of the funds last appropriated, in which he recommended 
the modification of the project then in force by substituting for the outer 
harbor an inner harbor, which would be adequate to all local wants. He 
proposed to extend the south pier 50 feet and the north pier 300 feet, 
and to dredge a channel into the river. He states that ''the existence 
of a ledge of rock in the river bed precludes the improvement of the 



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2758 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENQINEERSy U. S. ARMT. 

river for any except local needs." A contract was made June 1, 1875, 
for the construction of the proposed pier extension. The United States 
dredge excavated 30,403 cubic yards of material from the channel 
between June and November, 1875. 

On July 31, 1875, Maj. Henry M. Bobert proposed a change in the 
plan of improving this harbor, in which he contemplated Masting a 
channel in the river through the rocky ledge. He says: 

If a ohannel 50 feet wide and 12 feet deep were cat throngh this rock for a distance 
of abont 700 or 800 feet yessels coald mn into the river, which forms a deep, large 
basin, the water being about 18 feet deep a half mile above, I understand. • • • 
If this ledge is out through there will be a larger harbor available than there is any 
use for. 

A Board of Engineers was convened by Special Orders, No. 131, Head- 
quarters Corps of Engineers, October 7, 1875, to consider and report 
thereon. The Board met at Milwaukee, October 13, and directed Msyor 
Kobert to make such a survey and examination by drilling, blasting, 
and dredging, as would afford data for an estimate of the cost of remov- 
ing the rock. 

This examination was carried on during October and November, and 
on the reassembling of the Board, December 15, the result was placed 
before it, accompanied by a project and estimate for the completion of 
an inner harbor by excavating the rock to 12 feet at low water for a 
length of about 750 feet, and extending the piers to 18 feet of water, 
with a breakwater across the widest part between the piers to within 90 
feet of the south pier. This plan was reported upon favorably by the 
Board in its report of December 16, 1875. The Board states that — 

The project sabmitted by Major Robert is entirely for local purposes. * * • 
But if Congress should continue to make small appropriations for this work, as 
heretofore^ it would indicate an intention to improve the harbor for local purposes. 

Major Bobert states in his report to the Board, dated December 
15,1875: 

The survey extends above the bridge to a distance of nearly a mile above the 
mouth of the harbor. The depth of water in the upper part is less than I was led 
to believe by common report. 

The survey above mentioned is shown on the accompanying tracing. 

Work was begun under this new project in the spring of 1876 and 
continued with some slight modifications to the present time. 

In 1879 the citizens of Ahnapee raised by subscription an amount 
necessary to drill, blast, and dredge a channel from the channel below 
the bridge to deep water above the bridge. 

Msyor Eobert states in his annual report for 1882: 

The accompanying letter from the mayor of Ahnapee shows that the Government 
is expected not only to construct a harbor, but also to preserve it against the results 
of local neglect and even direct local injury. In my reply • * * i declined to 
admit this theory. * * * In the above-mentioned case the work was finally done 
by the local authorities. 

Captain Davis states in his annual report for 1887: 

From the commencement mnch trouble has been experienced in carrying on the 
work at this place, owing to the .fact that a private party claims to own the entire 
site of the harbor ftom the piers up to the highway bridge. This man was the owner 
of a landing pier, from which he derived a handsome revenue before the Government 
undertook the improvement of the harbor. He has built a warehouse just in rear of 
the south pier and has continued to make his own charges for all goods shipped by 
the steamer which stops there three times a week. As Ahni^ee has no railroad com- 
munication, and as this man claims to own the land on both sides of the river, no one 
can reach tlie piers except as he may direct. 

This has been the subject of various official reports (see House Ex. Doc. No. 259, 
Forty-eighth Congress, second session ; also Annual Report of Chief of Engineers for 
1877, 1878, and 1885). 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 



2769 



It was doubtless dae to those reports that the rirer and harbor act of August 5, 
1886, appropriating $15,000 for continuing the improyement of Ahnapee Harbor, con- 
tained a proviso that none of the money as appropriated should be expended until 
wharfage over the Qovemment piers should be made free. 

The effort of the citizens for free wharfage has been unsuccessful, and consequently 
there have been no operations carried on at this harbor during the past fiscal year. 

It is very desirable that work at this harbor should be resumed, and it is recom- 
mended that the proviso about free wharfage be omitted frt>m future appropriations, 
as, after the channel has been excavated above the present site of the bridge, steamers 
can land above the limits of the land now claimed by the owner of the warehouse, 
and his monopoly will then be ended. 

The present project is for the removal of rock up to the bridge only. The citizens 
have continued rock excavation some 200 feet farther up the river, making a channel 
about 30 feet wide and 7 feet deep. 

Whenever work is resumed at this harbor, a modification of the project is recom- 
mended, with a view of making the channel above the bridge 50 feet wide and 12 
feet deep, and that drilling and blasting at first be eonfined to the improvement of 
the channel begun by the citizens. 

The condition above outlined continues to the present time, although 
the property in question has changed owners. The present owner has 
built a railroad from Ahnapee to connect with the railroad from Green 
Bay to Kewaunee. 

The following appropriations have been made for this harbor: 



1884 $15,000 

1886 15,000 

1888 6,000 

1890 6,000 

1892 7,000 

1894 6,000 

1896 6,000 

Total 183,000 



1871 $25,000 

1872 26,000 

1876 26,000 

1876 8,000 

1878 8,000 

1879 7,000 

1880 7,000 

1881 8,000 

1882 12,000 

by the expenditure of which 2,227 linear feet of pier has been built, 
30,528 cubic yards of rock excavated, and 147,773 cubic yards of other 
material removed from the channel, both for original work and main- 
tenance. 

The present condition of the harbor, as shown by the survey of 1896, 
is as follows : The north pier is 1,102 feet long and projects 1,070 feet 
beyond the present shore line; the south pier, 1,125 feet long and pro- 
jects 980 feet beyond the shore line. To complete the original project 
requires the extension of each pier an additional distance of 50 feet. 
The distance between the piers at entrance to harbor is 205 feet, and the 
minimum distance between them is 125 feet. The depth of water at the 
outer end of the piers is about 17 feet, which gradually diminishes, 
going inward, to 12 feet at the place where the rock excavation begins. 
Over the site of the rock excavation the depth varies from 15.6 feet to 
2.9 feet. The rock excavation as proposed was not entirely completed. 
About 5,060 cubic yards in place remains to be removed, out of the 
original total of 18,000 cubic yards. 

It was stated above that the present relation of this harbor to others 
in the vicinity had changed since the improvement was begun. The 
nearest harbor to Ahnapee on the north is the Sturgeon Bay harbor of 
refuge and Sturgeon Bay Canal, 15 miles distant; on the south is 
Kewaunee, 11 miles distant. Green Bay Harbor is 30 miles to the 
southwest, in Green Bay. These harbors are all better than Ahnapee, 
and give through transportation facilities, while the harbor at Ahnapee 
will never be used except to supply the local needs of an area of about 
170 square miles of territory immediately in its vicinity. The existence 
of the rock bottom in Ahnapee Harbor will require an undue expenditure 
to provide it with harbor facilities even equal to those of neighboring 
cities. It would seem, therefore, that the Government has already 



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2760 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENQINEER8, U. 8. ARMT. 

provided a harbor amply large enongh for the present trade of Ahna- 
pee, provided the present project is completed by removing the sand 
overlying the rock and by removing the 6,060 cnbic yards of rock 
referred to, for it is unnecessary to further extend the piers, now ter- 
minating in 17 feet of water, in order to maintain a depth of 12 feet in 
the entrance channel. To complete the present project will cost for 
drilling, t>lasting, and dredging — 

5,000 cubic yards of rock, at $2.75 $13,915 

For dredging 21,500 cubic yards of sand, at 10 cents 2,450 

10 per cent for contingencies 1,635 

Total 18,000 

The harbor facilities at Ahnapee may be increased at three places 
indicated on the tracing by the letters A, B, and O, the cost at each 
being as follows : 

A. By extending the 13foot channel above the bridge, but reducing 
its width to 60 feet— 

For driUing, blasting, and dredging 6,140 cubic yards of rock, at $2.75 $16,885 

For dredging 6,300 cubic yards of mud, etc., at 10 cents 630 

10 per cent for contingencies 1,751 

Total 19,266 

B. By dredging between the piers, removing 260 linear feet of the 
dock built by the city in 1889, and excavating a basin 200 feet by 250 
feet and 13 feet deep. Two sides of the basin will be available for ship- 
ping purposes, and should therefore be revetted by the owner of the 
property. The title to the site for the basin should be obtained without 
cost to the United States and conveyed to the Government before the 
work is commeuced. The cost of the basin will be as follows: 

200 linear feet of pile pier, at $15 $3,000 

Hemoving 260 linear feet of city dock, at $4 1,040 

Dredging 65,000 cubic yards of sand, etc., at 10 cents 6,500 

10 percent for contingencies 1,054 

Total 11,594 

0. By constructing a basin in the lake, having an area of about 6^ 
acres, south of the present harbor entrance, by pier construction, 
dredging, and the removal of a portion of the south pier. The esti- 
mate for this basin is as follows: 

For taking up 350 feet of south pier and resetting the seven cribs on the east- 
erly side ot the proposed basin, at $15 $5,250 

For 625 linear feet of pile pier, at $25 15,625 

For 350 feet pile revetment^ at $7 2,460 

For removing 200 feet of pile pier, at $4 800 

For dredging 60,600 cubic yards, at 10 cents 6,060 

10 per cent K>r contingencies 3,018 

Total 33,203 

The 600 linear feet of dock to connect the present south pier with the 
proposed pier should be built by the owners of the adjacent property, 
and would, with the proper filling between it and the shore line, afford 
dock facilities during fair weather. 

It is believed that the property to be occupied by plans B and is 
owned by a single individual, and these plans would therefore afford 
neither relief to the public nor destroy the owner's monopoly. 

Plan B will give but little additional wharf space; plan O is open to 
the objection that it will be more expensive to maintain the depth by 
dredging and the longer piers in good repair; plan A is the most expen- 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2761 

sive, because it involves also the completion of the present project, but 
will be less expensive to maintain, and will permit other landowners to 
use their property for shipping purposes. 

The exact cost of maintenance can not be estimated for any of these 
plans, and it may occur that the rock can be removed for less than the 
estimate given above. 

Taking into consideration the benefit to be derived by the public from 
the plans above proi>o8ed, and the cost of maintenance, it appears that 
plan A is the best of the three. Oonsidering only the local character 
of the commerce of this harbor, its natural disadvantages and close 
proximity to other harbors, it appears that nothing more than the com- 
pletion of the present project and its maintenance should be undertaken 
by the United States, and I am of the opinion that the present project 
when completed will fulfill all the requirements of a harbor at Ahnapee. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
Oaptainf Carps of Engineeru. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. OBAiamLL, 

Ohitf of JEngineerSf U. B. A. 



H H 26. 



SURVEY OP SHEBOYGAN HARBOR, WISCONSIN, WITH A VIEW OP 
OBTAINING 21 FEET. 

[Pilntod in Hoiue Doo. No. 827, Ilfty-fbiirth CongreM, Moond •easlon.] 

Office of the Ohiep op Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washington^ D. 0., February 2€j 1897. 
81B: I have the honor to submit the accompanying copy of report, 
dated January 27, 1897, with two maps,* by Gapt. George A. Zinn, 
Corps of Engineers, giving the results of survey of harbor at Sheboygan, 
Wis., with a view of obtaining 21 feet, provided for by the river and 
harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

The harbor of Sheboygan has been under improvement by the United 
States since 1852, the present project providing for securing and main- 
taining a channel depth of 19 feet. The plan of improvement presented 
by Captain Zinn for securing a depth of 21 feet includes the completion 
of the present project and a continuation of the means of improvement 
heretofore employed at this place, i. e., pier construction and dredging. 
The estimated cost of the work required is $75,000 in addition to the 
funds now available. 

Captain Zinn, for reasons stated, is inclined to believe that the inter- 
ests of commerce justify the proposed improvement at Sheboygan, and 
his views are concurred in by the division engineer, CoL Henry M. 
Bobert, Corps of Engineers. 

Y ery respectftdly, your obedient servant, 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Oen.^ Chief of Engineers^ U. B. Army. 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 

* Not reprinted. Printed in House Due. No. 327, Fifty-fonrth Congreea; seoond 
■eeeion. 



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2762 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARHT. 

report of oapt. geo. a. zinn, oorps op enoineers. 

XJniisd States Engineer Office, 

MilwauJceej Wm., Janudry 27 j 1897. 

General: I have the honor to submit the following report of a sur- 
vey and estimate of the cost of improvement of "Sheboygan, with a 
view of obtaining twenty-one feet," in accordance with the reqairements 
of section 9, river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

The harbor of Sheboygan is situated at the mouth of the river of the 
same name, on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The present project 
for its improvement provides for securing and maintaining a channel 19 
feet deep below the plane of reference of coast charts of Lake Michigan, 
which plane is 3.06 feet below the high water of 1838, extending ftom 
deep water in Lake Michigan to deep water in Sheboygan Biver. In 
furtherance of this project there have been built two approximately 
parallel pile and crib piers, the distance between them varying from a 
minimum of 238 feet to a maximum of 275 feet at entrance. 

The north pier is 2,370 feet long and projects about 1,600 feet beyond 
the present shore line; and the south pier, when the gap of about 260 
feet is closed between the old and the new work now in process of con- 
struction, as indicated on the map, will be 2,160 feet long, and will pro- 
ject the same distance beyond the present shore line. From 1880 to 1896, 
inclusive, 266,984 cubic yards of material have been removed from the 
channel between and beyond the piers in furtherance of the project and 
for maintenance of depth. 

From August 30, 1852, to June 3, 1896, inclusive, there has been 
appropriated for this harbor $394,448.91, and there remained on hand 
July 1, 1896, $26,393.57, which is to be expended in removing the old 
south pier, in connecting the old and new work, and in dredging. 

A survey required to determine the cost of improvement to obtain a 
channel 21 feet deep was made October 7 to 12, 1896, at the close of the 
dredging for the season, and consisted in taking soundings between and 
around the piers. 

The depth at the outer end of the north pier was about 18 feet, and 
at the outer end of the south pier about 17 feet. The depth between 
the piers varies from 10 to 21^ feet, there being a 19-foot channel with 
a least width of 90 feet, and a 15-foot channel with a least width of 135 
feet. 

The rebuilding of a portion of the south pier, on the rectified line, 
will undoubtedly make that pier practically sand tight. Large quanti- 
ties of sand pass through the older portion of the north pier. The most 
eflEective way .of making this pier sand tight will be the construction of 
a sheet-pile revetment close to the pier on the channel side. About 
1,000 feet of revetment will be required, the cost of which may be esti- 
mated at about $15 per linear foot, as determined by experience at 
Eacine Harbor. 

To complete the present project, therefore, requires the extension of 
the north pier 100 feet; the extension of the south pier 100 feet; the 
completion of the work now in progress at the south pier; 1,000 feet of 
sheet-pile revetment along the north pier, and about 60,000 cubic yards 
of dredging in the channel. 

Annual dredging will be required to maintain the channel, and repairs 
from time to time will be required to maintain the piers. 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2768 

The estimate for the completioii of the present project is as follows: 

Extending north pier 100 feet $6,500 

Extending Bonth pier 100 feet 6,500 

Work now in progrees at sonth pier 10,000 

1,000 feet of aneet-pile revetment alons north piur 15,000 

Dredging in channel, 60,000 onbic yards 6,000 

Contingencien, 10 per cent 4,400 

Total 48,400 

There was on hand January 15, 1897, for this work, $21,500. 

In order to study the changes which have taken place in the lake bot- 
tom in and around this harbor from year to year, to determine what 
efiect pier construction has upon the forces at work along the lake 
shore, I have had a sketch prepared (copy herewith) showing the dates 
of pier extension and the contours from 1880 to 1896, inclusive, as deter- 
mined by the surveys of July, 1880, June, 1885, July, 1889, April, 1891, 
March, 1893, April, 1895, and May, 1896. This sketch exhibits, as well 
as the incomplete data permit, the character of these changes. 

It is unfortunate that so few of the surveys cover the territory beyond 
the influence of the piers. 

These surveys show that as the piers were extended the contours 
advanced until 1890, at which time the 17-foot contour had retreated 
to the north pier head, and has since advanced with it; the 19-foot con- 
tour was in advance of the pier until 1892, since which time it has fol- 
lowed the pier head; the 21-foot curve has fluctuated, touching the 
pier head in 1894 and advancing afterwards. 

This harbor is subject to constant deterioration, the forms and causes 
of which are discussed in my report* of January 26, 1897, on the survey 
of harbor at Kenosha. 

A channel 21 feet deep may be obtained either by (1) dredging to the 
required depth an open, unprotected channel from the present pier 
heads to the 21-foot curve, or (2) extending the piers to the 21 -foot 
curve or other points found to be necessary, and dredging between them 
to the required depth. 

The average amount dredged annually for maintenance of channel 
from 1891 to 1896, inclusive, was about 27,000 cubic yards, which 
includes dredging done beyond as well as between the piers. The chan- 
nel has been fairly but not thoroughly maintained during the period 
mentioned. It may be assumed that a 21-foot channel will require 
much more annual dredging than a 16 foot channel; it would be impos- 
sible to predict the amount. 

Major Bobert stated in his annual report for 1881 : 

Until the piers are pushed oat to deep water annual dredgiug will be required to 
maintain a channel, as the cut opened one season is nearly obliterated by the effects 
of the succeeding winter and spring storms. 

It is certain that a 21-foot unprotected channel at this place would 
have to be redredged every spring. It is possible that it would be 
obliterated by a single storm, and could therefore not be depended 
upon for safe navigation. 

On the other hand, it is not certain that the amount of annual dredg- 
ing in the channel will be materially reduced by a mere extension of 
the piers, but on account of the uncertainty attending an open channel 
at this place it is necessary to extend the piers. 

* Printed in House Doc. No. 328^ Fifty-fourth Congress, second session. 



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2764 REPOBT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGIKEBES, U. S. ARMY. 

Adopting the plan proposed at Kenosha for the improvement of 
Sheboygan Harbor, there will be required (1) the completion of the 
present project; (2) the further extension of the north pier 100 feet to 
reach the 21-foot contour; (3) the further extension of the south pier 
500 feet; (4) dredging in channel, 23,000 cubic yards; the estimate of 
cost being as follows: 

1) Completion of present projeot, oyer and ftboye the fnnds on hand $26^900 

2) Extension of north pier 100 feet 6,500 

3) Extension of Bonth pier 500 feet 82,500 

4) Dredging 23,000 onbic yardB, at 10 cents 2,300 

'Contingencies 6,800 

Total 75,000 

The interest upon the amount required to extend the piers, at 3^ per 
cent, is $1,365, which is much less tiian the annual dredging would cost 
if the channel were unprotected, as in the first plan mentioned. 

The south pier should be extended first, in order to determine the 
efi'ect upon the bar and the proper final length of the two piers. 

Sheboygan Harbor is situated 50 miles north of Milwaukee. The 
nearest harbor on the north, at a distance of 25 miles, is Manitowoc, 
with a projected depth of 20 feet, which will be available during the 
latter part of the season of 1897; on the south, at a distance of 25 
miles, is Port Washington, a very small harbor with little trade and a 
projected depth of 13 feet. 

The population of Sheboygan is about 22,000, of Manitowoc about 
10,000. Sheboygan, as well as Manitowoc, has rail communication to 
the north, south, and west. 

The commerce of Sheboygan in 1895 placed it fourth in the list of 
harbors north of Chicago, and it was somewhat greater than that of 
Manitowoc, although the building of car ferry ships and an elevator 
in 1896 at the latter place will stimulate navigation to a great extent 
One of the principal imports at Sheboygan is coal carried in deep-draft 
vessels and forwarded west by rail. An increase in depth will be of 
value to the commerce at this place. 

It may seem unnecessary to have two deep lake harbors so near 
together as the two places mentioned, but it is impossible to predict 
the line which commerce will follow in rature, so that while it could not 
be said that commerce absolutely requires 21 feet at Sheboygan, I am 
inclined to believe that the interests of commerce justify the proposed 
improvement. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
Oaptainj Corps of Engineers. 

Brig. Gen. W. P. Obaighill, 

Chief of Engineers U. B, A. 

(Through the Divison Engineer.) 

[First Indanemoni.] 

U. 8. Engineer Oppicb, Northwest Divtsion, 

New York, February 20, 1897. 
Bespectfnlly forwarded to the Ohief of Engineers, United States 
Army. 

1 concur with Captain Zinn in the view that the harbor of Sheboy- 
gan, Wis.,is worthy of the proposed improvement by the United States 
Government. 

Henry M. Robert, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2765 

H H27. 

BUBYET OF MILWAUKEE HABBOB, WISCONSIN. 

(Frintfld in House Boo. Ko. 61, Fifly-ftrartli Congress, second session.] 

Office of the Ohief of Engineebs, 

United States Abmy, 
Washingtanj D. 0., December 4, 1896. 
Sib: I have the hoBor to submit the accompanying copy of report, 
dated November 23, 1896, by Capt. Geo. A. Zinn, Corps of Engineers, 
giving the results of a survey of harbor at Milwaukee, Wis., " with a 
view to obtaining a channel twenty one feet deep," made to comply with 
provisions of the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

The proposed method for obtaining a 21-foot channel at the harbor 
of Milwaukee is to dredge the present channel to the width of 225 feet 
between the piers and 600 feet wide from the pierheads to the 21-foot 
contour in Lake Michigan. 

It is estimated that this plan of improvement will cost $12,000 for 
original work and about $3,000 per year for maintenance. 
Yery respectfally, your obedient servant, 

W. P. Obaighill, 
Brig. Oen.j Ohief of Engineere. 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of Wmr. 



cobps of engineebs. 

United States Engineeb Office, 

Milwaukee^ Wis.j November 23 j 1896. 

Genebal: I have the honor to submit, in compliance with instruc- 
tions contained in printed letter from office of the Chief of Engineers, 
United States Army, dated Washington, D. C, S^tember 5, 1896, the 
fo2iowing report upon a survey of harbor at Milwaukee, Wis., and an 
estimate of the cost of improvement with a view to obtaining a channel 
21 feet deep: 

The Milwaukee Biver empties into Milwaukee Bay through an arti- 
ficial channel cut through the point which overlapped the original river 
mouth. Milwaukee Bay is an indentation of the western shore of Lake 
Michigan, about 2 miles deep and 7^ miles long between headlands. 

The entrance is protected by approximately parallel piers 1,720 feet 
long, 284 feet apart at the outer end and 258 feet at the inner ends, 
projecting about 1,600 feet beyond the present shore line. The present 
southerly end of the breakwater inclosing the Milwaukee harbor of 
refuge is now distant in a north-northeasterly direction about 6,400 feet 
from the outer ends of the piers, and when completed to its projected 
length its southerly end will be 4,200 feet from the pierheads. Measur- 
ing on a line in the direction of the harbor piers, the distance to a line 
in prolongation of the breakwater is about 2,700 feet. 

The meaning of the word << harbor'' in the acts of Congress is not 
defined, but it has been assumed in this district to be the artificial 
channel, together with the piers built for its protection, extending from 
deep water in the lake to deep water in the river, to which the artificial 
channel gives entrance. 

The harbor of Milwaukee is naturally sheltered by the headlands, 



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2766 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF SNOINEEBS, U. fl. ABMT. 

and the breakwater affords additional shelter firom northeasterly storms, 
which are the most severe in this part of the lake. 

A survey was made September 14-22, 1896, of the harbor, the results 
of which are shown on the inclosed tracing,* the figures representing 
depths below a plane 3.06 feet below the plane of reference of the 
United States Lake Survey. It is to be noted that just before the date 
of the survey a dredging contract had been completed, restoring the 
channel to a depth of 19 feet for a width of about 160 feel^ from the 
river to the lake. 

The present project calls for a channel 19 feet deep below the above- 
mentioned plane. The piers have been completed to their projected 
length, and now terminate in 18 feet of water. 

The material of the bottom, to a depth of 21 feet, is believed to be 
chiefly clay overlaid with from 1 to 2 feet of sand. 

There is no appreciable littoral drift at Milwaukee Harbor, judging 
from the facts (1) that there is no bar formation at the outer end of 
either pier, and (2) that there are no shore accretions on either side of 
the harbor to any great extent. The Milwaukee Biver is not of great 
extent and the discharge is not large. The city sewers empty into it, 
however, and there is always more or less sediment brought down and 
deposited in the channel. 

From 1890 to 1896, inclusive, a x>eriod of seven years, and character- 
ized by being a period of the lowest water in the history of this harbor, 
there has been dredged from the channel, in maintaining the above 
project, 95,800 cubic yards, an average of about 13,700 cubic yards per 
annum. This amount covers the dredging both within and beyond the 
pierheads, but the necessary data is lacking to determine just how 
much of this was removed from either place. It is also imi>ossible to 
determine the source from which these deposits have come, sJthough 
storms from the northeast, east, and southeast, the littoral current, and 
the river sediment all contribute a certain amount. 

In order to obtain a permanent channel 21 feet deep at the harbor of 
Milwaukee, it will be necessary, first, to dredge to that depth in the 
present channel from the river to the 21-foot contour in the lake; sec- 
ond, to maintain this channel either by annual dredging, by protecting 
it on both sides by piers, or by both these means. It is estimated that 
to obtain a channel 21 feet deep and 225 feet wide will require the 
removal of 58,000 cubic yards of material, of which 10,000 cubic yards 
are beyond the present pierheads. Six hundred feet of this channel 
will be unprotected by the present piers, and therefore subject to 
destruction by littonJ drift and wave action along the bottom. To 
prevent this by extending the present piers wiU require an addition of 
600 feet to each pier, at an estimated cost of $78,000, being at the rate 
of $65 per foot. 

It is impossible to determine without a series of annual observatioiis 
the rate at which the channel would shoal if unprotected by piers, but 
it would not be much greater than the average annual amount given 
above, of 13,700 cubic yards. To determine, therefore, which method 
should be adopted, it seems only necessary to compare the cost of 
building the piers and maintaining them and that of the annual dredg- 
ing required. 

The interest on the cost of pier extension — 978,000, at 3^ per cent per 
annum-— would be $2,730. An annual expenditure oi this amount, 

•Kot printed. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BSPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2767 

based upon the last contract price of 14^ cents per cubic yard, would 
pay for the removal of about 18,800 cubic yards of material, or 5,100 
cabic yards more than the above-mentioned average amount removed 
to maintain the channel from 1890 to 1896, inclusive. In case this 
improvement is undertaken it is therefore advisable to maintain the 
channel for a few years by dredging rather than to extend the piers, 
at least until the rate of channel obliteration can be reasonably well 
determined by proper observations. If the rate is greater than has 
been assumed, then another comparison may be made in which the 
annuid deterioration of the piers should also be taken into account. 
' Even if the piers should be extended, a certain amount of shoaling 
between them would still take place, and the cost of its removal would 
have to be added to the above. 

If the channel should be deepened to 21 feet without extending the 
piers another &ct must be taken into consideration. Washing in from 
the sides of the dredged channel would undoubtedly occur immediately 
and continue until the slope became quite flat, perhaps equal to the 
natural slope of the lake bottom, and consequently the channel would 
be injured to some extent. To provide against this immediate danger 
the channel beyond the pierheads should be made much wider than 
between the piers; an exact calculation would be useless, but a width 
of 600 feet will be ample. The extra dredging required by this increased 
width will be about 30,000 cubic yards, in addition to the 58,000 cubic 
yards previously mentioned, or a total of 88,000 cubic yards for the 
entire channel, which, at 12 cents x>er cubic yard, with contingent 
expenses added, will cost $12,000. The reduced price of 12 cents is 
assumed, as it is believed the larger amount of dredging will invite com- 
petition that can not be expected for the smaller amount of annual 
dredging. I am therefore of the opinion that the proi)er method to 
obtain a 21-foot channel at the harbor of Milwaukee is to dredge the 
present channel to the width of 225 feet between the piers and 600 feet 
wide from the pierheads to the 21-foot contour, a distance of about 600 
. feet. 

It is estimated that this plan will cost $12,000 for original work and 
about $3,000 per year for maintenance. 

The commerce of the harbor of Milwaukee is large and second on 
Lake Michigan in importance to Chicago alone. The interests of com- 
merce involved justify the proi)Osed improvement, and it is my opinion 
that it is a worthy one. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Oeo. a. ZmnXj 
Oaptainj OarpM of JEngineeri. 

Brig. Gen. W. P. Obaigheul, 

Chief of Engineers^ XT. S. A^ 
(Throagh the Division Engineer.) 

[Flnt indorMnMntk] 

U. S. Bnoinbbb Office, Fobthwbst Drvisiow, 

Ifew Yarky November J27j 1896. 
Bespectfnlly forwarded to the Ohief of Engineers, United States 
Army, recommended for approval. 

Henby M. Bobebt, 
OoUmelj Oorp9 of JSngineera^ IHviHon Engineer, 



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2768 REPORT OF THK CHIEF OP ENGIlTEERSy U. 8. ARMY. 

H H a8. 

SURVEY OF HARBOR AT RACINE. WISCONSIN, WITH A VIEW TO OBTAJOr- 
ING A CHANNEL 21 FEET DEEP. 

[Printed in House Boo. Ko. 8M, FUty-fonrth Oongreae, oeoond eeeeion.] 

Office of the Chief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
W€L8h%ngtanj D. 0., February J2€j 1897. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the accompanying copy of report 
dated January 27, 1897, with two maps,* by Oapt. George A. Zinn, Oorps 
of Engineers, of the results of a survey of harbor at Bacine, Wis., with 
a view to obtaining a channel 21 feet deep, made to comply witli the 
requirements of the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

The harbor of Eacine is now being improved by the United States 
under a project providing for securing and maintaining a chann^ 17 
feet deep. To complete this project requires that the piers shall be 
made sand tight, that 3,500 cubic yards of material shall be removed 
from the channel, and that the south pier be extended 250 feet The 
last item is now under contract. 

The plan of improvement now proposed by Oaptain Zinn under the 
act of 1896 contemplates securing a depth of 21 feet, and its estimated 
cost is as follows: 

Completion of present project oyer and abore the funds now on hand $19, 435 

Extension of south pier 300 feet 16,300 

Dredging 10,600 

Contingencies 4,165 

Total 44,500 

In connection with the further improvement of the harbor at Racine, 
Oaptain Zinn suggests the removal of a part of the present north pier 
and of the docks a^acent thereto, building new docks, and dredging 
the area outside this new line. This additional work, exclusive of 
building new docks, which should be done by private individuals or by 
the city, will, it is estimated, cost (7,150, and this amount should be 
added to the estimate given above, making a total of (51,650 for secur- I 
ing a 21-foot channel in the manner proposed. 

Oaptain Zinn states that the commerce of Bacine is large, and justifies, 
in his opinion, the proposed improvement. This opinion is concurred in 
by Ool. Henry M. Bobert, Oorps of Engineers, division engineer. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Gen.y Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. Army. . 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 



BBPOBT OF oapt. GEO. A. ZINN, OOBPS OF BNGINEEBS. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Milwaukee^ TTw., Ja/nuary J27, 1897. 
Oenebal: I have the honor to submit the following report of a 
survey and estimate of the cost of improvement of <^ harbor at Bacine 
with view to obtaining a channel 21 feet deep," in accordance with 

* Not reprinted. Printed in Hoom Doo. No. 826, Fifty-fourth Congress, second 
session. 



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APPENDIX H H BBPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2769 

the requirements of section 9, river and harbor act, approved June 3, 
1896: 

The harbor at Bacine is situated at the mouth of the Boot Biver, on 
the western shore of Lake Michigan, and is understood to mean the 
channel leading from deep water in the lake to deep water in the river. 

The present project for the improvement of this harbor provides for 
securing and maintaining a channel 17 feet deep below the plane of refer- 
ence of the United States lake survey coast charts, which plane is 3.06 
feet below the high water of 1838. In furtherance of this project there 
have been built two approximately parallel crib piers. The distance 
between the piers at the entrance is 250 feet; at a point 600 feet west 
of the outer end of the nortii pier it is 270 feet, and at the inner end of 
the harbor it is 160 feet. The north pier is 1,760 feet long and pro- 
jects about 1,150 feet beyond the present shore line. The south pier, 
when the extension of 250 feet now under contract shall have been com- 
pleted, will be 1,720 feet long and will project about 1,600 feet beyond 
the present shore line. 

From 1880 to 1896, inclusive, 184,249 cubic yards of material were 
removed from the channel between and beyond the piers in furtherance 
of the project and for maintenance. 

From June 15, 1844, to June 3, 1896, there has been appropriated for 
this harbor (336,785, of which there remained on hand unexpended 
July 1, 1896, (27,418.20, which is to be used for extending the south 
pier by contract, for dredging in the channel, and for repairs to piers. 

The survey required to determine the cost of improvement to obtain 
a channel 21 feet deep was made September 24 to October 2, 1896, at 
tiae close of the dredging for the season, and consisted in taking sound- 
ings between and around the piers. The results are shown on the 
tracing herewith. 

The depth of water at the outer end of the north pier is about 19 
feet, and at the outer end of the south pier is about 14 feet. When the 
extension now under contract is completed the outer end will rest in a 
depth of about 15^ feet. 

The depth between the piers varies from 9 feet to 21.3 feet, there 
being a 17-foot channel, with a least width of 60 feet, and a 15-foot 
channel, with a least width of 110 feet. 

The older portions of both piers are in a dilapidated condition, and 
have permitted the almost unobstructed passage of sand through the 
intervals between the cribs and even through holes in the cribs them- 
selves. It is thought that the repairs now in progress on the north pier 
will render it practically sand tight. Similar repairs should be made 
to about 900 feet of the south pier, and from exx>erience with the north 
pier the cost is estimated at about (15 per linear foot. 

In 1888 the original 13-foot channel was deepened to 17 feet for the 
full width of channel. (See Annual Beport Chief of Engineers, 1889, 
Part III, p. 2076.) The following shows the amounts dredged annu- 
ally since 1889 for maintenance of this channel, and also the condition 
of the channel. 

1889. — ^o dredging done during year. In May there was a channel 
16 feet deep with a minimum width of 85 feet. 

1890. — In April there was a channel 14 feet deep with a minimum 
width of 70 feet. Later in the year 9,627 cubic yards were dredged, 
forming a channel 17 feet deep and 50 feet wide. 

1891. — In April, channel 14 feet deep, minimum width 46 feet; 14,273 
cubic yards of material dredged during year, forming channel 16 feet 
deep and 80 feet wide. 
BNO 97 ^174 



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2770 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

1892, — In April, channel 14 feet deep, minimam width 60 feet 
Entrance about one-half closed by a bar with a maximum depth of 15 
feet over it. No dredging done in 1892. 

1893.— In April, channel 13 feet deep, minimum width of 60 feet; 
15,047 cubic yards dredged, forming a channel 16 feet deep and 80 feet 
wide. 

1894. — In March, channel 14 feet deep, minimum width of 55 feet 
Entrance two-thirdfs closed by a bar with a maximum depth of 15 feet 
over it; 8,964 cnbic yards dredged, forming a channel 15^ feet deep and 
60 feet wide. 

1895.— In April, channel 14 feet deep, minimum width 45 feet 
Entrance two-thirds closed by a bar with a maximum depth of 15 feet 
over it; 21,372 cubic yards dredged, and in August, on completion of 
dredging, a channel 14 feet deep, minimum width of 100 feet, and a 
channel 17 feet deep and a minimum width of 35 feet In October the 
minimum widths of channels were as follows: 

V%et 

14-foot chaunel 100 

15-foot cliaDnet 95 

16-foot channel 55 

17-foot channel A 18 

1896. — In April the 15-foot channel had a minimum width of 20 feet 
and the 14-foot channel had a minimum width of 50 feet; entrance 
about one-third closed by the bar, with a maximum depth of 15 feet 
over it; 29,639 cubic yards dredged, and at close of dredging there was 
a channel 17 feet deep with a minimum width of 60 feet. 

To complete the present projei^t requires that the piers shall be made 
sand tight, that 3,500 cubic yards of material shall be removed from 
the channel, and that the south pier shall be extended 250 feet. The 
last item is now under contract. 

To maintain the depth will require annual dredging, and the piors 
will need repairs from time to time. 

The estimated cost of completing the present project is as follows: 

(1) 900 feet of sheet piling, at $15 $13,500 

(2) Extending south pier 250 feet 12,000 

(3) Dredging 3,500 cubic yards, at 10 cents 350 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 2,585 

Total 28,435 

There was on hand January 15, 1897, for this work, $15,000. 

In order to study the changes which have taken place in the lake 
bottom in and around this harbor from year to year, and thus deter- 
mine, if possible, the effect of pier construction upon the forces at work 
along the shore in this vicinity, I have had a sketch prepared (copy 
herewith) showing the dates of pier extension and the contours from 
1870 to 1896, inclusive, as determined by the surveys of May, 1870, 
May, 1877, May, 1879, April, 1890, April, 1892, March, 1894, April, 1895, 
April, 1896; and inasmuch as these surveys give as much information 
as those of other dates, the sketch exhibits, as well as the incomplete 
data permits, the character of the movement of the lake bottom. 

These surveys show that the contQurs advanced with the piers, the 
13-foot contour being always in rear of the north pierhead. In 1893 
the 17-foot contour is in rear of it, and in 1895 the 21-foot contour is 
also in its rear. The total advance of the shore line on the north side 
of the harbor since the work of improvement was begun in 1845 is 
about 725 feet. To the south of the harbor erosion takes place, and 
which it has been necessary to prevent by the construction of protec- 
tion works put in by the ci^ of Baciue. 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BBPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. S771 

Deterioration at this harbor consists in (1) the advance of the fore- 
shore, (2) the formation of a bar in front of the entrance, (3) shoaling 
between the piers, the causes of which are discussed in my report* of 
January 26, 1897, ou the survey of harbor at Kenosho. 

Two plans of improvement are possble: (1) Dredging and maintain- 
ing an open unprotected channel from the river to the 21 -foot contour 
in the lake; (2) extending the piers to the proper point and dredging 
between them to the required depth. 

The dredging at this harbor from 1880 to 1896, inclusive, was 184,249 
cubic yards removed from the channel between and beyond the piers. 
The channel has been insufficiently maintained, and at numerous times 
vessels have been prevented from entering the harbor on this account. 
The lar at the outer end forms rapidly and unless removed annually 
forms an obstruction which at times reduces the width of entrance 
two-thirds. It would be unsafe for vessels to use a channel which 
might be obliterated by a single storm, and it is therefore necessary to 
extend the piers. 

Adopting the plan of improvement proi>osed for Kenosha Harbor, 
it will be necessary in order to obtain a channel 21 feet deep, (1) to 
complete the present project, (2) to extend the south pier 300 feet, (3) to 
dredge to 21 feet between the piers. The estimate of cost is as follows: 

(1) To complete present project over and above the funds on hand $13, 435 

'2) To extend south pier 300 feet 16,300 

[S) To dredge 106,000 cubic yards, at 10 cents 10,600 

Contingencies 4, 165 

Total 44,500 

The funnel-shaped entrance to this harbor has always been a serious 
defect, and its correction should be included in any plan for further 
improvement. This correction may be accomplished, as shown on the 
accompanying tracing, by removing a portion of the present north pier 
and of the docks adjacent thereto, rebuilding new docks on a line com- 
mencing at a point on the channel face of the pier, about 100 feet west 
of the west face of the light-house crib, and extending westward to a 
point on face of dock about 50 feet west of the west line of North Mich- 
igan street extended to the face of the present dock, and dredging the 
area left outside of this line to 21 feet. The land to be removed should 
be given to the United States by the city of Bacine, and the new dock 
should be built by private individuals or the city, as the city of Sheboy- 
gan has recently done at that harbor. The dredging and removal of 
the old pier should be done by the United States. 

The estimated cost of this improvement is as follows: 

Tearing out old pier and dock $2,000 

I>redpng 45,000 cubic yards, at 10 cents 4,500 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 650 

Total 7,150 

This amount should be added to the estimate above, (44,500, making 
a total of (51,650 for obtaining a 21-foot channel. 

The harbor of Racine is situated 62 miles north of Chicago and 23 
miles south of Milwaukee. The nearest harbor on the north is Milwau- 
kee and on the south Kenosha. Bacine has a population of 22,000, and 
is quite a manufacturing place. In commerce by all ways of transpor- 
tation it ranks next to Menominee or next but one to Milwaukee, and 
is connected by rail with the North, South, and West. Situated as it is, 
"between Milwaukee and Chicago, each having much greater facilities 

* Fxinted in Honse Doo. No. S28, Fifty-fonrth CongrMs, second leaaion. 

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2772 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. B. ARMY. 

for transacting throngh business, it may not be so important to have a 
deep-water harbor at this place, yet its present commerce is large, and 
jastifies, in my opinion, the proposed improvement. 
Very respectfnlly, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
Captain^ Corps of Engineer. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. Obaighill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. A. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 

[First iiidoneinont.1 

U. S. Engineer Office, Northwest Division, 

New TorJcj February J20, 1897. 
Eespectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, 
I concur in the views of Captain Zinn, that the harbor of Racine, 
Wis., is worthy of improvement by the United States Government as 
proposed. 

Henry M. Egbert, 
Colonel^ Corps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 



HH29. 



SURVEY OF harbor AT KENOSHA, WIS.. WITH A VIEW TO OBTAINING 
A CHANNEL 21 FEET DEEP AND BASIN 20 FEET DEEP. 

[Printed in House Doo. No. 328, Fifty-foortb Congress, second seMion.] 

Ofpioe OP THE Chief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washington^ D. (7., February 26^ 1897. 

Sir: I have the honor to submit the accompanying copy of report, 
dated January 26, 1897, with two maps,* by Oapt. Geo. A. Zinn, Oorps 
of Engineers, giving the results of a survey of harbor at Kenosha, 
Wis,, with a view to obtaining a channel 21 feet deep and basin 20 feet 
deep, made to comply with the provisions of the river and harbor act 
of June 3, 1896. 

The harbor at Kenosha is now in course of improvement by the 
United States under a project which provides for securing and main- 
taining a channel depth of 16 feet. Captain Zinn states that the sim- 
plest plan for obtaining the increased channel depths contemplated 
in the act of 1896 would consist in completing the present project, in 
extending north and south piers, and in dredging. The cost of the 
work, in addition to the funds already on hand (about $20,000), is esti- 
mated at (87,000. Under this plan, however, the distance between the 
piers would be entirely inadequate, and Captain Zinn expresses the opin- 
ion that should a plan for a 21-foot channel depth be adopted the pres- 
ent project should be abandoned, so as to avoid further extension of the 
existing piers on the present lines, and to apply the funds thus saved 
to rebuilding the north pier in its proper position, as shown upon map. 

In conformity with these views there is presented an alternate plan 
of improvement, which contemplates the completion of the present 
project (omitting repairs and extension of north pier), extension of south 



*Not reprinted. Printed in House Doo. No. 328, Fifty-fourth Congress, second 



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APPENDIX H H — REPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2773 

pier, removal and rebuilding of north pier, and dredging. The cost is 
estimated at (125,000. The work of dredging in the channel includes 
the remoYsJ of a strip of land for the purpose of widening the channel 
west of the shore line. This land is private property, and should be 
donated to the United States* After its removal the work of revetment 
thereat should be done by the city authorities or by property owners. 
Captain Zinn, in closing his report, states as follows: 

The area of the interior harbor at Eenoeha is small; and any enlargement of it 
wonld be expensive. The present harbor facilities are by no means all in nse, and 
it appears that a depth of 16 feet at the entrance will be ample for some years. 
It woold be more advisable, consequently, for the General Government to complete 
the present project, and then wait for several years to see whether commerce will 
make use of the present facilities or demand a greater depth before entering upon a 
new project which is not now clearly seen to be necessary. 

I am of the opinion that the present interests of the commerce involved do not 
Justify the proposed improvement. 

This opinion is concurred in by the division engineer, Ool. Henry M. 
Eobert, Corps of Engineers. 

Very respectfWly, your obedient servant 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Gen., Chief of Engineers^ U. S. Army, 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War, 



b£pobt of oapt. geo. a. zinn, gobps of engineebs. 

United States Enginbeb Office, 

Milwaukee^ TFw., January 26^ 1897. 

Genbbal: I have the honor to submit the following report of a sur- 
vey and estimate of the cost of improvement of <^ harbor at Kenosha, 
with a view to obtaining a channel 21 feet deep and basin 20 feet deep," 
in accordance with the requirements of section 9, river and harbor act 
approved June 3, 1890. 

The harbor at Kenosha is situated at the month of Pike Greek, on 
the western shore of Lake Michigan, and is understood to be the chan- 
nel leading from deep water in the lake to deep water in the creek, or, 
to speak more accurately, to deep water in the basin, which is the 
southern section of an extensive bayou, separated from the lake by a 
point of sand and into which the creek discharges. 

The present project for the improvement of this harbor provides for 
secnring and maintaining a channel 16 feet deep below the plane of 
reference of coast charts of Lake Michigan, and which plane is 3.06 
feet, below the high water of 1838, and for dredging in the basin to 
provide a turn around for vessels about 4 acres in area. In further- 
ance of this project there have been built two approximately parallel 
crib piers, the distance between them varying from 142 feet to 165 feet. 
The north pier is 1,750 feet long and prctjects about 800 feet beyond the 
present shore line; the south pier will be 1,366 feet long when the 
extension of 250 feet now under contract shall have been completed, 
and will then project about 1,170 feet beyond the present shore line. 
From 1880 to 1896, inclusive, 111,256 cubic yards of material were 
removed from the channel and 40,848 cubic yards from the basin in 
furtherance of the project and for maintenance of depth. 

From March 15, 1844, to June 3, 1896, there has been appropriated 
for this harbor $299,307.41, and there remained on hand June 30, 1896, 



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2774 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

a balance of $26,597.91, which is to be expended for extending the 
south pier under the present contract, for dredging, and for repairs to 
piers. 

The survey required to determine the cost of improvement to obtain 
the depths of 21 and 20 feet was made December 7-8, 1896 after the 
dredging in progress during the season of 1896 was completed, and con- 
sisted mainly in taking soundings to determine the depth in the entrance 
channel and the basin and in making five test holes to a depth of 23 
feet to determine the character of the material to be dredged in the 
basin. The location of the holes is shown on the map. The material 
found in them was all mud, and it is a fair assumption that such will 
be the material to be removed from the basin to give 20 feet in depth. 
The material in the channel between the piers is chiefly sand, and it is 
therefore expected that no hard material will be encountered in dredg- 
ing to a depth of 21 feet either in channel or basin. The depth 
between the piers varies from 8^ to 20^ feet, there being a 16-foot chan- 
nel with a least width of 90 feet and a 15-foot channel with a least 
width of 110 feet. The depth of water at the outer end of the north 
pier is about 20 feet and at the south pier about 15 feet, but the outer 
end of the extension now under contract will rest in a depth of 16 feet. 

The depth in the basin over an area of 4 acres, inclosed by the broken 
red lines, will be not less than 16 feet after the completion of the exist- 
ing dredging contract. 

The inner portions of both piers are in such condition as to readily 
permit the passage of sand through them, and to this cause may be 
ascribed in a large measure the constant shoaling in the channel. The 
cribs composing this portion of thiB piers have no foundation of stone 
or piles, but rest upon the original bottom. The piers at this point are 
less than 150 feet apart. 

On December 8, 1885, a section of the westerly end of the north pier 
about 60 feet long was carried away during a severe storm and has 
never been restored. Erosion of the adjacent bank commenced imme- 
diately and has continued until in April, 1896, the bank had been 
washed away for a distance of 75 feet back from the shore line of 1885, 
the eroded mat.erial settling in the basin and channel. This bank is 
clay and rises from 8 to 10 feet above datum. 

From the inner end of the north pier as originally constructed there 
is a line of sheet piling extending in a northwesterly direction for a 
distance of about 350 feet, built for the protection of the adjacent bank, 
now in an extremely dilapidated state and utterly worthless for its 
original purpose. 

To complete the present project requires that the piers should be made 
sand tight ; that the shore line at the inner end of the north pier should be 
protected, and that the north pier should be extended 150 feet, in addition 
to the extension of the south pier 250 feet and a small amount of dredg- 
ing, both of the latter being now under contract. The estimate for this 
work is as follows: Making the old piers sand tight, 1,800 feet of sheet 
piling, at a total estimated cost of $18,000; protecting the shore line 
at the inner end of the north pier, 140 feet of sheet piling, at a total 
estimated cost of $1,120; extending the north pier 150 feet, at $9,760; 
extending the south pier 250 feet, at $13,000; dredging, $2,000; office 
expenses, $2,000; making a total of $45,870. There is on hand, Janu- 
ary 15, 1897, for this work $20,800, and a contract has been made for 
the south pier extension. 

Besides keeping the piers in good repair, annual dredging will be 
required to maintain the projected depth between them and in the 



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APPENDIX H H — ^EEPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2775 

basin, the exact anionnt of which can not be estimated, although from 
1887 to 1896 the removal of 111,256 cubic yards (11,126 cubic yards per 
, annum) resulted in the maintenance of a fairly good chauneL 

In order to form a project for further improvement at this harbor or 
for obtaining an increased depth in the entrance channel, it is necessary 
to know what forces are at work in this vicinity upon the lake bottom 
and to understand how they act For the purpose of making a study of 
this question I have had a sketch prepared from surveys of this har- 
bor showing the shore line and the contours, representing 13, 17, and 21 
foot depths in the years 1870, 1877, 1879, 1890, 1892, 1894, 1896, and 1896, 
these years having been selected because the surveys are more com- 
plete than those of other years. It will be seen from this drawing how 
imperfect and incomplete even this data is tor the formulation of a clear 
theory and a simple project of improvement. The surveys were limited 
to the immediate vicinity of the piers, and show, therefore, the charac- 
teristics of the bottom at that place and not its relation to the general 
shore line to the north, south, or east of the harbor. No observations 
have ever been taken by the Engineer Department to determine the 
presence of lake currents, the general direction of the wind, the amount 
of material carried in suspension, or any other physical data except 
the changes in level of the lake surface. Some of this information has 
been obtained by the Weather Bureau, affording a means, in connec- 
tion with the surveys by the Engineer Department at all the harbors 
on the west shore of Lake Michigan, of forming a theory which I desire 
to give for what it is worth,leaving to future observations its overthrow 
or establishment. The importance of securing better and deeper chan- 
nels at all lake harbors amply justifies the cost of observations required 
to verify this theory. 

The first surveys of harbors in this district were made in 1836 at 
Milwaukee, Sheboygan, Manitowoc, and Kewaunee by Lieutenants 
Center and Bose. Corps of Engineers. The mouths of these harbors 
were shown to oe obstructed by bars having in general a direction 
parallel to the shore line, or protruding outward very slightly. No 
further surveys were made until after improvements had been begun, 
so that it is imx>ossible to say positively whether the configuration 
above described was permanent or not. It is known, however, that 
the river currents were and are very weak at all times except occa- 
sionally during a freshet or storm, and that the river mouths were 
at times almost, closed by the bars. Another fact which may be of 
importance is thart at several harbors the peninsula which separates 
the river in the last part of its course from the lake is attached to the 
main land at its southern end, except at Milwaukee, where the case is 
reversed. While the evidence is seen to be very scant, I believe that 
those conditions were more or less permanent, and indicate the presence 
of forces constant in direction, but variable in force. The shape of the 
bars indicates that these forces are almost solely the waves and currents 
in the lake. 

The plan of improvement adopted at all the harbors, and begun in 
nearly every instance at a very early date, consisted in constructing 
two approximately parallel piers of equal length from the shore line at 
or near the river mouth to deep water in the lake, usually also on the 
shortest line between the two, and dredging a channel to the proper 
depth between them. By comparing surveys of different dates the 
effects of pier construction are readily seen, and consist in general (1) 
of an advance of the foreshore in the vicinity of the piers, (2) of a decided 
change in the shape of the contours about the ends of the piers, and (3) 



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2776 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENOINEBRSy U. 8. ARMT. 

of tbe formation of a bar at their outer ends. There is also a constant 
shoaling in tbe channel between the piers. The same forces are still at 
work, changed slightly in direction and energy, thoagh still more or less • 
constant, a condition which should have been expected. The problem 
of improvement, which in tbe beginning appeared to be simply the main- 
tenance of a channel from the river to the lake, consists now in prevent- 
ing (1) a further advance of the foreshore, (2) the formation of the bar 
at the outer end of the piers, and (3) the shoaling between the piers. 
We are prepared, therefore, to question both the proper direction and 
relative positions of the piers. 

It is easily seen that an open channel through the bar from the river 
to the lake would soon be obliterated by the waves and currents; that 
the next step is to construct piers for its protection, and that inasmuch 
as the contours are approximately parallel to the shore line, the shortest 
piers will be at right angles to the shore line and of equal length. Tbe 
custom has been followed, however, of making additions to the north 
pier first, so it has happened for many years that the north pier was 
considerably longer tban the south pier. In fact, at only a few periods 
have they been of equal length, and only once has the south pier been 
the longer one. 

The adopted plan has never been entirely sucoessfhl, for the reasons 
previously given, and whether a more successful plan can be devised is 
a question which can not be definitely decided until our knowledge of 
the forces at work is much more complete. 

The Weather Bureau made an investigation of the currents of the 
Great Lakes in 1892, 1893, and 1894, the results of which were published 
in 1895. The observations establ ished conclusively the existence of con- 
stant currents in Lake Michigan, varying only in velocity and occasion- 
ally in direction. The main current passes south along the western 
shore and north along the eastern shore, with secondary currents across 
the lake and in reverse directions at various places. An eddy near 
Manitowoc is of interest in this connection. The following quoto^tions 
from the report mentioned will show the opinions of the Weather Bureau 
in regard to the currents and their causes: 

The preyalence of westerly and especially southwesterly winds would also favor 
the persistence of the currents, and also the body current would favor it. When the 
surface of water is set in motion by a current of air, this motion is gradually com- 
municated to the strata below, if the wind persists. Havine been communicated to 
the strata below, a change of wind of briefer duration womd not easily check the 
motion below the surface. 

It appears probable, therefore, that while the primary ourrehts have good persiat- 
ence in direction, they do not have very much ccmstancy in velocity, while the sec- 
ondary may fluctuate greatly in velocity and some in direction. * • * 

It appears, therefore, that here, as in so many other places in the northern hemi- 
sphere, the deflection toward the right hand, due to the earth's rotation, gives form 
to the current system. 

I am inclined to believe, however, that these currents are directly due 
to winds accompanying storms of low or high barometer. The Great 
Lakes are of sufficient area to be acted upon by different parts of a storm 
at the same time, and it is therefore possible to set up the whirls 
directly in them, the motion of which might be temporarily checked by 
contrary winds, but would again be renewed by succeeding storms or 
cyclonic motions of the atmosphere. The relation of storm centers or 
points of lowest atmospheric pressure to the direction of the winds 
would also result in the same currents in the lake. 

The average storm track as given in the Special Notice to Mariners, 
published monthly by the Hydrograi)hic Office for September, 1896, 
passes across Lake Michigan just north of Sturgeon Bay. Storms 
approaching at Kenosha, or in fact any harbor on the west shore, there- 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2777 

fore, generally begin with a sonthwest wind, changing to west and then 
to northwest. None of these winds would produce much sea on that 
«bore. When a storm approaches with its center nearer to the middle 
part of the lake, the west shore would feel the effect of the southeast, 
east, and then the northeast winds. Kow, the last wind adds its 
intensity to that of the current already in existence, and has in addi- 
tion a greater reach across the lake at the southernmost harbors, so 
that the gn^eatest disturbance may be expected from that direction. In 
other words, the beach around the harbor entrance will conform to the 
influence of northeast storms, and will show a more or less constant 
configuration. The comparison of surveys shows this to be actually 
the case. The only exception being at Manitowoc and Two Biyers, 
where the eddy previously mentioned exerts a contrary influence. 

We may therefore expect sand to be brought from the north by 
both waves and currents, or rather by both combined, for it can hardly 
be believed that the general cnrreuts are sufBciently rapid to carry 
much material in susx)ension. 

The surface of Lake Michigan, in whole or in part, is subject to flue- 
taations in surface level, arising from a variety of causes, such as vari- 
ation in rainfiftll, and surface evaporation, in atmospheric pressure, and 
the direction and velocity of the wind. From 1880 to 1886 the general 
surface rose from 3.98 feet below the datum plane to 1.16 feet below, 
and fell after that to 5.39 feet below the datum plane in December, 
1896, with minor fluctuations every year according to season and rain- 
fall. Variations of from 3 to 7 feet have been known to occur at various 
places from changes in atmospheric pressure and direction of wind. 
These changes of depth along the shore modify the effect of waves and 
currents upon the bottom. 

The relative eflect upon the surface of the lake or its waters pro- 
doced by winds and by atmospheric pressure has not been determined. 
The effect upon the surface level of changes in pressure alone are 
enormous, reaching in some cases as much as 6 feet. The currents 
produced by these changes probably permeate the entire mass. The 
changes of level product by winds are great in extent, and are the 
direct result of the motion of surface particles gradually carried down- 
ward until a well-deflned current results. 

There is another factor in this problem which may be of greater 
importance than is now realized; that is, the river current during or 
immediately after a storm. The river discharge is small throughout 
the year, except for a short period in the freshet season. It has been 
noted that easterly storms cause a rapid rise in the river at some dis- 
tance from its mouth. The* river acts as a reservoir for water carried 
in by the rise in the lake. Now, whether an undercurrent is produced 
immediately or ui>on the cessation of the storm is not known. It is cer- 
tain that this water is loaded with sand or has brought material with 
it which would as readily be carried out with a slight current, and it 
may be expected that when the lake falls a currAt arises in the river 
which, in meeting the general lake current, produces quieter water at 
the harbor entrance and creates a deposit at that point, or, at least, a 
modification of the form of the bar. 

The forces acting upon the entrance to a lake harbor are, therefore, 
the constant current to the southward, the waves and currents produced 
by storms, and the river current For harbor-improvement purposes 
observations should be taken in the vicinity of each harbor during 
calm and stormy weather to determine their direction, exact location, 
and velocity. The depth to which these forces disturb the bottom has 
not been accurately determined, although certain observations made at 



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2778 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF BNQINEERSy U. 8. ABMT. 

Milwaukee by the city engineer in connection with recent waterworks 
construction in 1895 show that it is at least 42 feet. We may assaiue 
without question that the bottom in 21 feet of water will be readily 
moved by a heavy storm, and any obstruction like a pier in that depth 
will produce a modification of the forces and of the bottom around its 
outer end. This modification is shown by all the surveys made at the 
harbor of Kenosha. 

The material of the lake bottom in 21 feet and lesser depths on the 
western shore of the lake is sand and silt^ with some gravel, and 
is readily rolled or carried in suspension from one place to another. 
Great quantities of sand are transported — ^in fact, are in constant 
motion. Accessions are also constantly being made by erosion along 
the bluffs, which in some places recede at the rate of from 12 feet to 
16 feet per year. 

Air- l^et 

Kenoaha • 12 

Baoine Point 16 

Ba<sine 6 

Oak Creek 2 

Milwaukee 6.25 

Port Washington 2.80 

Sheboygan 6.25 

Manitowoc 5 

The surveys of the harbor entrances show where this material has a 
tendency to deposit, although the exact action of the waves and car- 
rents or obstructions in producing it are undetermined. 

An examination of the tracing shows the following facts: In 1870 the 
south pier was longer than the north pier; in 1871, 1872, 1874, 1875, 1878, 
1879, 1880, and 1881 additions were made to the north pier, making it 
longer than the south pier, and this condition has continued to the 
present time. The shore line north of the piers has advanced from 1860 
to 1875 and but little since; south of the piers it advanced in the same 
way, but not to so great an extent. The 13-foot contour advanced from 
1871 to 1880 and since that time has fluctuated forward and backward. 
From 1870 to 1890 the 17 and 21 foot contours gradually advanced, and 
have fluctuated since. There has been a bar across the entrance pro- 
jecting northward from 1875 to 1896, its position varying from year to 
year, always in the lee of the north pier, having less than 13 feet of 
water over it and in advance of the south pier. There has generally 
been deeper water about the ends of both piers, always a recession ot 
the contours behind the north pier, and generally behind both. There 
has always been deeper water close to the north pier on its north side 
than at a little distance from it. The general direction of the contours at 
some distance north of the piers is northwest and southeast, and to the 
eastward it is approximately parallel to the general shore line, and 
the latter contours are nearly straight, showing that the influence of the 
piers does not extend more than 500 or 600 feet beyond their outer end& 
It may be stated in this connection that nearly all the harbors on the 
western shore of Lake Michigan present the same peculiarities. 

In 1889 M%jor Davis reported as follows: 

A plat of soundings taken at this harbor on May 8, 18S9, shows that the bar to 
the westward of the extremities of the piers which was removed by the dred^ to the 
depth of 15 feet in October and November, 1888, has re-formed across the entire front 
of the harbor entrance, the depth of the water upon it being from 9.8 feet to 13 feet 
Between the piers the deposit lias not been as large during the past winter as it has 
been in some former years. « • * The shore line now extends beyond the extrem- 
ity of the north pier as it was built under the original projoot for improvemeiit. 
[See Annual Keport Chief of Engineers, 1889, Part Ul^p. 2080.] 



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APPENDIX H H — ^EEPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2779 

Since that report was made a channel has been cut through the bar 
several times, bat in the spring is not to be found. The consent shoal- 
ing between the piers has previously been mentioned. 

The forces at work produce three forms of deterioration : (1) Shoaling 
between the piers, (2) a general advance of the foreshore to and beyond 
the ends of the piers, and (3) a bar across the entrance. 

The problem of lake harbor improvement is therefore to maintain a 
uniform depth at the channel entrance and a uniform depth in the 
channel. 

Tbe material producing the first form of deterioration comes from 
several sources: (1) Sediment brought down by the river, (2) sand 
brought over the piers by wind, (3) sand carried through the piers by 
waves, and (4) sand carried in suspension from the lake through the 
entrance by winds and currents. The current of the river is so gentle 
that the scour on the bottom is comparatively little; in fact, the sedi- 
ment carried by the river finds a resting place at that point where still 
water is created by the meeting of the river and the lake. There is no 
practicable method of preventing this deposit. The material brought 
in from the lake through the entrance also finds a resting place at the 
same point as that just mentioned. A further extension of the piers 
may diminish the amount of material brought in, but to prevent it 
altogether would require their extension beyond the reach of sand- 
bearing currents, and be far more exi)ensive than to remove the deposit 
by dredging. By making the piers tight another source of deteriora- 
tion is cut off, and the only practicable method of preventing sand 
from coming over the piers is the erection of sand fences, which are, 
after all, only temporary expedients. It is easily seen, therefore, that 
dredging between the piers will be required annually to maintain the 
channel. It is impossible to say from the data on hand what the 
amount will be, and it wiU vary considerably from year to year on 
account of changing weather conditions. 

The advance of the foreshore and the formation of the bar in front 
of the entrance are much more difficult to deal with. In fact, it can 
not be shown from the imperfect data just why they take place or just 
what methods should be employed to prevent their occurrence. I am 
of the opinion that they are connected by being the results of the same 
cause acting at different places. In order to determine the proper direc- 
tion, length, and relative position of the piers it is necessary that 
this information should be at hand, and it can only be supplied by 
extended surveys and observations upon winds, waves, and currents, 
^hile the north pier has constantly been in advance of the south pier, 
it can not be stated positively that the bar would not be formed if the 
conditions had been reversed. In extending the piers the additions 
have been made to the north pier first, probably in order to afford shel- 
ter for vessels entering the harbor during northeast gales. Whether 
the harbor would be as easy of entrance with a longer south pier, I can 
not say, but it seems that if the object of pier construction be to pro- 
vide and maintain a navigable channel it should not be made to include 
the additional purpose of providing shelter, especiaUy when it may be 
true that both objects can not be fulfilled at the same time. 

The questions to be solved in order to decide how to maintain a con- 
stant depth at the entrance are the following : What causes the advance 
of the foreshore t Can a point ever be reached by extending the north 
pier where no further accumulations will take place about its outer end, 
or will there be a constant advancet What causes the formation of 
the bar in front of the entrance? Oan it be prevented by extension of 



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2780 EEPOBT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

the piers, or mast the piers be arranged in a different manner from the 
present system, i. e., parallel and of equal lengtht 

There are almost no facts at hand to assist in the solation of these 
questions, beyond a knowledge of the existence of the before-mentioned 
general currents, the meteorological data, and the few and very incom- 
plete surveys. 

Inasmuch as the heaviest seas and strongest currents come fh>m the 
north we may expect to find a deposit of material, rolled or pushed 
along the bottom, on the north side of the piers^ and this accumulation 
will continue, not only as long as the piers remain of a constant length, 
bat while they are being extended. In fact, it may be expected to con- 
tinue forever unless there should be such a current at all times around 
the ends of the piers, and even to the north of them, as will prevent 
the deposit of sand in that vicinity. An advance of the foreshore will 
push the currents farther and farther from the original shore line, and 
it would appear as if the process would not slop. If the general car- 
rents in the lake increase in velocity as the distance from the shore 
increases and if they are so persistent in direction as not to be affected 
by an advance of the piers, we would in time reach the desired point 
and frirther advance be prevented. Even if the currents created by 
storms showed the same characteristics, we should expect this result. 
(Tufortunately the observations of the Weather Bureau and the surveys 
of the Engineer Department have not determined these points posi- 
tively. We have only the very general knowledge, as previously stated, 
of the directions of the main currents and form of the lake bottom near 
the piers at one epoch in each year to guide us in this study. Nor are 
the general surveys of the lake made by that branch of the War 
Department known as the Lake Survey detailed enough to show the 
effect of the advancement of the shore into the lake upon the form of 
the bottom. I am inclined to believe, however, that a constant depth 
can be obtained at the outer ends of the piers by extending them to the 
proper distance from the original shore line. Judging from the shape 
and position of the contours. 

At Sheboygan Harbor, as the piers were extended, the contours 
advanced until 1890, at which time the 17-foot contour had retreated 
to the north pierhead and since has advanced with it. The 19-foot 
contour was in advance of the pier until 1892, since which time it has 
followed the pierhead. The 21-foot contour has fluctuated, touching 
the pierhead in 1894 and advancing afterwards. It would seem, there- 
fore, that we may expect a constant depth of 19 feet at that place, and 
that if the same process continued we might expect a constant depth 
of 21 feet by the proper extension of the pier. 

At Kenosha the contours advanced until 1890, when the 13-foot contour 
is found in rear of the north pierhead, and in 1895 the 17-foot contour 
is in rear, while since 1892 the 21 -foot curve has fluctuated. Equilibrium 
seems, therefore, to have been reached for the 13 and 17 foot depths. 

At Racine the contours advanced with the pier, the 13-foot contour 
being always in rear of the north pierhead. In 1893 the 17- foot con- 
tour is in rear of it, and in 1895 the 21-foot contour is also in its rear. 
Equilibrium seems to have been reached for the 17-foot curve and 
perhaps for the 21 -foot curve. 

It would be unsafe to say positively, however, that no further advance 
may be expected of the carves now at or behind the pierheads, for the 
reason that there was an actuul recession at ea(;h period when the curves 
are first found in rear of the pier, and we may expect them to regain 
what they lost; but the fluctuations backward and forward since 1890 
and 1892, with almost no general advance on the line of the north pier, 



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APPENDIX H H — ^BEPORT OF CAPTAIN ZINH. 2781 

lend Bup]M>rt to the idea that we may hope to secure the desiied con- 
stant depth at the outer end. 

These facts may be given in another way — although the data are 
quite iusnfBcient for ai)08itiye statement — as follows: Since the rate 
of advance of the contours has constantly diminished, we may hope, if 
this effect continues, to finally reach a point where it will stop for every 
contour. 

The original data are also too meager to determine what the original 
depths were at the places in which the pierheads stood at the times 
when the contours are first found in rear of them; and even if we knew 
those depths it would be imi)ossible to predict the depths to which the 
piers should be extended to maintain 21 feet. This point can be found 
by gradual extension of the pier accompanied by careful surveys and 
other observations. 

Another argument in this direction is the following: As the minimum 
depth on the bar is much greater than originally, and as each extension 
of the piers has pushed the bar into deeper w^ter with a consequent 
greater minimum depth, it is probable that at some point a minimum 
depth over the bar may be obtained which will never be less than the 
depth sought, and the bar will then cease to be an obstruction. 

While it api>ears quite certain that the bars originally obstructing 
the mouths of lake rivers are formed by the combined action of waves 
and currents, with very little modification by the river currents, it is 
not quite so clear how the bars existing at the present harbor entrances 
are formed, although undoubtedly the result of the same forces, changed 
by the restraint imposed upon them by the piers projecting out from 
the shore and nearly at right angles to it. 

Again, these bars are neither so constant in position nor in shape as 
to show the action of forces constant either in direction or velocity. 
The surveys have only in a few instances been so extended as to cover 
their whole extent or to pass beyond the evident influence of the piers, 
and it is difficult to determine tiie exact shape. It appears, however, 
that they are in general V-shaped, with the point to the north, and 
extending, occasionally, north of the line of the north pier They are 
separated from the piers by deeper water, and the depth at the north 
pier is always greater than at the south pier. The depth over the bar 
is greater at its north end than at its south end, and its axis if extended 
southward would meet the shore line. It can not be stated whether the 
bar is connected with the shore to the southward or separated from it 
by deeper water. 

The shape of the contours to the south of each pier is to be noted. 
Many of the surveys show that the deep water around the pierheads 
extends back along the south sides of the piers; in other words, there 
is a deep pocket to the south of each pierhead. It is also to be noted 
that, with very few exceptions, a portion of the bar is west of the east 
end of the north pier, and that' the exceptions occur at times when the 
north pier was not longer than the south pier. 

Out of 10 harbors on the west shore of Lake Michigan, 8 have piers 
of equal length and 2 have the north pier longer than the south. At 
3 of them, Ahnapee, Manitowoc, and Milwaukee, there is an absence of 
bar formation; at all the others are bars, partially or entirely across 
the channel, extending from the southward in every case with the 
exception of Two Ilivers. 

The effect of building the piers is simply to put the river mouth that 
much farther out into the lake, and the forces that caused closure or 
bar formation before pier construction was begun are still in operation, 
but with decreased effect, owing to increased depth of water. The 



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2782 REPORT OF THE OHIEF OF EKGINEER8, U. 8. ARMT. 

waves and currents will roll heavy material along the bottom until it 
comes under the shelter of the piers or into a place where there is a 
less degree of motion in the water. The material carried in suspension 
will seek still quieter places, their location being shown by the contoars 
of the bottom. Absolutely still water is found only in the river or 
where the river body brings the waves to rest, which will be in the chan- 
nel approximately at the inner ends of the piers. There appears to be 
no tendency to a bar formation just within the outer ends of the piers. 

Now, it is evident that some condition of affairs brings about a quieter 
condition of the water to the eastward of the piers and just south of 
the north pier when it happens to be longer than the south pier, and it 
appears to me that this can only be due to the deflection of the current 
by the north pier. It is certain that nothing exists to check the incom- 
ing waves at that point, and whether waves of translation or of oscUla- 
tion, they would keep up the same motion at this place as at any other 
place situated at the same distance from shore, unless it be modified 
or prevented by the existence of a cross current, the presence of which 
is also shown by the deeper water along the north side of the north 
pier. The resultant of the primary southerly current and the secondary 
easterly current would lie toward the southeast, leaving quieter watc^ 
to the south of it, where a portion of the moving material will be 
deposited. The deflection of the current at the end of the pier and the 
deflection of the waves will maintain the pocket at that place. 

If this be the true explanation of the movements of the water abont 
the pierheads, then to prevent the formation of the bar we must con- 
form the piers to this condition — that is to say, so arrange them that 
the resultant current will sweep directly across the opening. The way 
to do this is -simply to extend the south pier beyond the north pier to 
the proper point, the position of which can be found, however, only by 
experiment. A permanent depth should, then, always be found at the 
entrance. 

It is probable that a greater deposit would occur in the channel under 
this new condition than now takes place, but we must choose this as a 
lesser evil than the danger to entering vessels created by the existence 
of a bar. 

An extension of both piers equally to the proper x)oint will undoubt- 
edly accomplish the same result; but if it is probable that it can be 
brought about by the extension of only one, it is certainly worthy of a 
trial. 

It may be mentioned^ incidentally, that the theory above set forth 
requires that the material deposited in the channel should be lighter 
and finer than that found on the bar. It is known that the material 
in the channel is extremely fine, but no notice seems to have been taken 
of the quality of material dredged from the bar, although no very heavy 
gravel has been found. 

A project for obtaining a 21-foot entrance channel involves primarily 
the completion of the present project. 

The simplest method of obtaining an increased depth in the channel 
is to dredge to that depth from the basin to the lake. Part of the 
channel would be beyond the protection of the piers, and therefore sub- 
ject to obliteration^ in fact, it might be obliterated in a single storm. 
Experience has shown that it would be unsafe to depend upon such a 
channel, and it is therefore necessary to extend the piers for its pro- 
tection. The exact point to which the north pier should be extended 
can not be accurately determined, but it must be extended at the least 
to the 21-foot contour of 1896, requiring the addition of 225 feet to the 
present pier, or 75 feet more than the present project calls for. The 



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APPENDIX H H — ^REPOBT OF CAPTAIN ZINN. 2783 

soatli pier will have to be extended somewhat farther than the north, 
in order to prevent the formation of the bar, if the reasoning above 
outlined ie correct. Its outer end should be on a line following approxi- 
mately the contour of the bar, which will be at a distance of about 775 
feet from the present end of the pier, or 525 feet from where the end 
will be when the work now under contract is completed. 

The south pier should also be extended first in sections and proper 
observations taken after each extension to determine the exact effect 
npon the bar and the ultimate length required; also whether there is 
any greater difficulty in entering the harbor than when the north pier 
is the longer. 

To provide 21 feet in depth between the piers will require the removal 
of about 46,000 cubic yards. To obtain a depth of 20 feet in the basin 
over an area of about 4 acres will require the removal of 105,000 cabic 
yards of material. 

The following is, then, the estimate for obtaining a channel 21 feet 
deep and basin 20 feet deep, by the simplest possible plan : 

To complete present project, in addition to the funds now on hand $25, 870 

To eiLtend north pier 75 feet 4,876 

To extend south pier 525 feet 34,125 

Dredi^ingin channel, 46,000 cubic yards, at 10 cents 4, (KX) 

Dred^ng in basin, 105,000 cubic yards, at 10 cents 10,500 

Contingencies 7,030 

Total 87,000 

The distance between the piers at the entrance is only 166 feet — 
entirely inadequate for the safe entrance of the larger class of lake 
vessels. Therefore a complete plan for a 21-foot channel should include 
the widening of the entrance at least, but preferably the whole chan- 
nel. The entrance could be widened by extending the present piers on 
divergent lines, producing, however, a very objectionable funnel shape; 
or by building two detached piers, parallel or convergent, beyond the 
present piers; or by extending the south pier and building a detached 
pier on the north side parallel to it and at the proper distance; or by 
taking up the entire north pier and rebuilding it parallel to the south 
pier and at the proper distance from it. The latter method is the 
proper one. 

If a project should be adopted for a 21-foot channel the present proj- 
ect should be abandoned, so as to avoid any further extension of the 
piers on the present lines and to apply the ^nds thus saved to rebuild- 
ing the north pier in its proper position, as shown upon the inclosed 
tracing. 

The following is the estimated cost, based upon the removal of the 
present north pier, of a channel 21 feet deep and a basin 20 feet deep: 

Completing present pK^ect, omitting repairs and extension of north pier. . . $8, 700 

Extending south pier 5fe feet, at $65 34,126 

Bemoving and rebuilding north pier from shore to 21-foot contour, 
moTing 3 cribs, each 50 bv 24 b;^ 22i feet on pile foundation, driving 
new foundation piles, and refilling and riprapping cribs with stone. $6, 500 

Tearing out 1,550 linear feet old pier, at $6 per linear foot 9, 300 

450 linear feet 18-foot pile pier, at $36 16,200 

475 Unear feet 14-foot pUe pier, at $26 12,850 

44,850 

Cnblo yards. 

Dndging in channel, including removal of strip of land. 211, 000 
I>redging in basin 105,000 

316, 000, at 10 cents, 31, 600 
Contingencies 11,225 

Total 125,000 

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2784 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF EKGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

The land to be removed in widening the channel west of the shore 
line is private property and should be donated to the United States, 
and after being removed should be revetted by the city authorities or 
property owners. 

If this plan is carried out the south pier should be kept ahead of the 
north, and careful observations taken in order to determine the effect 
upon the bar and the ultimate length of piers required. 

It is difficult to estimate the importance to oommeroe of providing a 
21-foot channel at Kenosha. Kenosha is a city of about 8,500 inhabit- 
ants, situated on the western shore of Lake Michigan, 52 miles north of 
Chicago, 10 miles south of Bacine, with 25,000 inhabitants, and 33 miles 
south of Milwaukee, 280,000 inhabitants. Obicago and Milwaukee 
have excellent harbors, as well as harbors of refuge. A branch of the 
Chicago and Northwestern Bailway runs directly west from Kenosha, 
and the main line of the same railway runs through it north and south, 
furnishing facilities for through shipments west, north, and south. It 
would certainly, therefore, be of great advantage to commerce to have 
as great a depth at Kenosha as at other points on the lake, but it is 
doubtful in my mind whether commerce would make use of these facili- 
ties when better ones exist at points so near as Chicago and Milwaukee. 
The commercial statistics for the calendar year ending December 31, 
1895, show the arrival and departure of 185 vessels from this x)ort, the 
approximate value of exports and imports by way of the harbor 
91,131,000, and approximate value of same by all ways of transporta- 
tion $31,200,000. This commerce is probably entirely local or confined 1 
to the immediate vicinity. j 

While but little reliance can be placed upon the commercial statistics 
of the various lake harbors, they form the means of obtaining a concep- 
tion of their relative amounts of business. The commercial statistics 
for the year ending December 31, 1895, place Kenosha at number thirteen 
in the Ust of harbors along the west shore of Lake Michigan. 

The area of the interior harbor at Kenosha is small, and any enlarge- 
ment of it would be expensive. The present harbor facilities are by nojl 
means all in use, and it appears that a depth of 16 feet at the entrancel 
will be*ample for some years. It would be more advisable, consequently,! 
for the General Government to complete the present project, and theiu 
wait for several years to see whether commerce will make use of thi 
present facilities or demand a greater depth, before entering upon a ne^ 
project which is not now clearly seen to be necessary. 

I am of the opinion that the present interests of the commerce involvec 
do not justify the proposed improvement. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
Captain^ Corps of Engineers 

Brig. Gen. W. P. CBAiaHiLL, 

Chief of JBngineerBf TJ. B. A» 

(Throagh the Division Bngineer.) 

[lint indonemeBt.] 

XT. 8. ENGhiNEBB Oppiob, Nobthwbst Drvisiow, 

JUrew JorJcj February J20, 1897. 
Bespectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United Statefl^ 
Army. 
I concur in the views of Captain Zinn, that the present interests ot 



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APPENDIX H H — BEPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2785 

commerce involved do not justify the proposed improvement to give a 
21-foot channel and 20-lbot basin to the harbor of Kenosha, Wis. 
• • • • • • • 

Henrt M. Egbert, 
OoUmelj Carps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 



H H30. 
ESTABLISHMENT OP HARBOR LINES AT KEWAUNEE. WISCONSIN. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Milwaukee, Wis., March 2, 1897. 

General: I have the honor to forward herewith map of harbor at 
Kewaunee, Wis., made by George M. Mashek, city engineer, and show- 
ing dock lines as established by the city council of Kewaunee on 
December 21, 1896. 

I would respectfully recommend that the dock lines as laid down be 
made the harbor lines at Kewaunee, Wis., under the approval of the 
Secretary of War. 

The description of the proposed harbor lines is as follows: 

Beginning at the westerly end of the south harbor pier, and on the channel face 
thereof; thence north 67^ 36' west, 156 feet; thence north 72^ 11' 30" west, 394.1 feet; 
thence north 80^ 56' 30" west, 39.8 feet to a point on the section line between sees. 
17 and 18, T. 23 N., R. 25 £., said point being 511.3 feet north of the southwest comer 
of said sec. 17; thence north 80<^ 56' 30 " west, 233.7 feet; thence north 37° 12' west, 
265 feet; thence north 1^ 46' west, 709.6 feet; thence north 34^ 23' west, 219.5 feet; 
thence north 75^ 59' west, 810 feet; theuce north 60^ 00' west, 307 feet; thence north 
250 02' west, 497.2 feet; thence north 0^ 07' west, 195 feet to a point on the north 
boundary line of the S. £. i of sec. 18 aforesaid, said point being 1,795 feet west of 
the northeast comer of said S. £. i of sec. 18. 

Beginning at the westerly end of the north harbor pier, and on the channel face 
thereof; thence north 67"^ 36' west, 250 feet; thence north 5<^ 40' 15" west, 230.3 feet; 
thence north 17^ 46' east, 1,065.2 feet ; thence north 40^ 04' 30" east, 595.6 feet^ thence 
north 0° 07' west, 235 feet; thence south 89^ 53' west, 750 feet; thence south 0° 07' 
east, 425 feet; thence north 89^ 53' east, 170 feet; thence south (P 07' east, 265 feet; 
thence south 17^ 46' west, 1,153.3 feet; thence north 85^ 08' west, 161.6 feet to a point 
on the section line between sees. 17 and 18 aforesaid, said point being 760.4 feet north 
of tiie southwest comer of said sec. 17 ; thence north 85^ 08' west, 100.8 feet : thence 
north 36° 50' west, 80 feet; thence north 2P 32' west, 692.4 feet; thence north 34^ 23' 
west, 389.5 feet; thence north 75" 59' west, 864 feet; thence north 60" 00' west, 204.8 
feet; thence north 25" 02' west, 376.8 feet; thence north 0" 07' west, 145.3 feet to a 
point on the north boundary line of the S. £. i of sec. 18 aforesaid, said point being 
1,570 feet west of the northeast comer of said S. £. i of sec. 18. 

All courses are referred to the true meridian. 
A tracing and two black prints of the map are inclosed.* 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
Captain, Corps of Engineers. 
Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, 

Ohirf of Engineers^ U.S. Army. 

[First indorsement.] 

Office Chief of Engineers, 

U. S. AB3nr, 
March 6, 1897. 
SespectfuUy referred to Col. Henry M. Bobert, Corps of Engineers, 

• * Not printed. 

EK0 97 175 



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2786 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Division Eugineer, Northwest Division, for bis views and recommenda- 
tions. 
To be returned. 
By command of Brig, Gen. Wilson: 

A. Mackenzie, 
lAeuU CoLj Carps of Engineers, 

[Seoond iodonement.] 

U. S. Engineer Office, Northwest Division, 

New York, March 9j 1897. 
Bespectfally returned to the Ohief of Engineers, U. S. Army, recom- 
mended for approval. 

Henry M. Robert, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer. 

[Third indorsement.] 

Office Chief of Engineers, 

U. 8. Army, 
March 13, 1897. 
Bespectfally submitted to the Secretary of War. 
OaptaiQ Zinn forwards the accompanying map of the harbor at 
Kewaunee, Wis., showing harbor lines established by the city council 
of Kewaunee on December 21, 1896, and recommends that the lines as 
laid down upon the map be approved. 

Concurring in the views of Captain Zinn, I recommend that the lines 
selected be approved, and that the Secretary place his approval both 
upon the tracing, which has been prepared for his signature, and upon 
this paper. 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Gen., Chief of Engineers, U. 8. Army. 

[Sixth indorsement.] 

Wab Department, April 8, 1897. 
Approved as recommended by the Chief of Engineers in the third 
indorsement hereon. 

E. A. Algeb, 

Secretary of War. 



H H 31. 
ESTABLISHMENT OF HARBOR LINES AT WAUKEGAN HARBOB, ILLINOIS. 

United States Enginbeb Office, 

Milwaukee, Wis,, December 11, 1896. 

Oenebal : I have the honor to recommend that harbor lines be estab- 
lished as follows at the harbor of Waukegan, III. They conform 
exactly to the boundaries of the harbor as proposed by the present 
project for improvement, approved July 28, 1896 (E. D. ^^^^): 

Beginning at the point where the north boundary line of United 
States property intersects the channel face of the present revetment 
on east side of harbor basin; thence west along said north boundary 
line^ 302 feet^ more or less; thence southerly parallel to and 300 feet 



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APPENDIX H H REPORT OP CAPTAIN ZINN. 2787 

distant from the north and soath arm of the north harbor pier, 962 feet, 
more or less, to the channel face of the south harbor pier. 
Very respectfdlly, your obedient servant, 

Geo. a. Zinn, 
CaptaiUj Corps of Engineers. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. Gbaighill, 
Chief of Engineers, U. S. A. 

[First Indonement.] 

Offiob Ohiep of Engineees, 

U. S. Aemy, 
December 16, 1896. 
Respectfully referred to GoL Henry M. Eobert, Gorps of Engineers, 
Division Engineer, Northwest Division, for his views and recommen- 
dations. 
To be returned* 

W. P. Gbaighill, 
Brig, Oen.y Chief of Engineers. 

[Second indonement.] 

XT. S. Engineer Office, Northwest Division, 

Nei€ YorJCj December 17, 1896. 
Respectfully returned to the Ghief of Engineers, D. S. Army, recom- 
mended for approval. 

Henry M. Robert, ' 
Oolonely Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer. 

[Third indorsement.] 

Office Chief of Engineers, 

U. 8. Army, 
December 19, 1896. 
Resi>ectfully submitted to the Secretary of War with recommendation 
that the harbor lines described within, and shown in red on the accom- 
panying map^ be approved, and that the Secretary place his approval 
both upon this paper and upon the map. 

W. P. Oraighill, 
Brig. Oen., Chief of Engineers. 

[Foarth indorsement.] 

War Department, December 21, 1896. 
Approved. 

Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 



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APPENDIX I I. 



IMPROVEMENT OF CHICAGO AND CALUMET HARBORS AND CHICAGO 
AND ILLINOIS RIVERS, ILLINOIS, AND CALUMET RIVER, ILLINOIS AND 
INDIANA; ILLINOIS AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL. 



REPORT OF MAJ. W, L, MARSHALL, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. OFFICER IN 
CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE SO, 1897, WITH OTHER 
DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 



1. Chicaf?o Harbor, Illinois. 

2. Chica<]^o River, Illinois. 

3. Calumet Harbor, Illinois. 

4. Calumet River, Illinois and Indiana. 

5. Illinois River, Illinois. 

6. OperatiDji: and care of Lagrange and 

Kampsville locks and dams, Illinois 
River. 



7. Illinois and Mississippi Canal. 

8. Operating and oare of Illinois and 

Mississippi Canal. (Canal aroand 
lower rapids of Rock River, Illinois.) 

9. Removing sunken vessels or craft 

obstmcting or endangering naviga- 
tion. 



EXAMINATION. 

10. Upper Illinois River and Lower Des Plaines River, Hlinoii. 

8UBVET. 

U. Wolf Lake and River, lUinois and Indiana. 



United States Engineer Office, 

Chicagoj IlLj July 16, 1897. 
General : I have the honor to transmit herewith annual reports 
upon the works in my charge for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, 
as follows: 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. Marshall, 
MajoTy Corps of Engineers. 

Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, 

Oh^f of Engineers^ U. B. A. 

2789 



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2790 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARHT. 

II X. 

IMPROVEMENT OF CHICAGO HARBOR, ILLINOIS. 

The project for this harbor was adopted in 1870, and modified in 1878. 
By act ef Jnly 3, 1896, the project was ag^aJn modified to include dredg- 
ing Chicago Eiver, or the inner harbor, to admit passage by vessels 
drawing 16 feet of water. 

The project of 1870 as modified in 1878 contemplated — 

(a) The formation of an outer harbor or basin by inclosing a portion 
of Lake Michigan, just south of and adjoining the entrance to the river 
for the purpose of increasing tlie harbor facilities of Chicago, and to 
give relief to the overcrowded river. 

(h) The construction of an exterior breakwater of crib work filled with 
stone, in deep water in Lake Michigan and wholly detached from the 
shore, north of the entrance to Chicago River, to shelter the entrance 
to the river, and the outer harbor from northerly storms, and to forma 
harborof refuge at the southern end of Lake Michigan. Theproject also 
included the maintenance, by dredging, of the channel atl^he entrance 
to Chicago Kiver as far west as to Pine streets, and the piers so far as 
they project beyond the existing shore line. All of this project has 
been completed, except dredging the outer harbor. 

(c) (Jnder the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, the Chicago River, 
which is the inner harbor, has been directed improved for vessels draw- 
ing 16 feet of water. This work is reported upon separately as ^^ Improv- 
ing Chicago River, Illinois." 

CONDITION OF THE WORK JUNE 30, 1897, 

Outer BaMn. — This basin originally covered 455 acres of the area of 
Lake Michigan, of which 270 acres lie seaward of the dock line estab- 
lished by the Secretary of War September 22, 1890, and 185 acres west 
of this dock line. The dock line is about 1,300 feet east of the right of 
way of the Illinois Central Railroad and 2,000 feet distant from, and 
parallel to, the easterly breakwater of the basin. 

A portion of the outer basin was dredged prior to 1887 to a depth of 
16 feet, by the United States, but work was suspended due the litiga- 
tion over the ownership of the submerged lauds, and because the har- 
bor was not and could not be used for its intended purposes. 

The basin beyond the dock line is gradually filling up with sand and 
sediment, until its available depth does not exceed from 12 to 13 feet 

The litigation is now practically ended as far as the ownership of 
lands is concerned, and it would be well to dredge this basin to 20 feet 
depth. 

Under authority granted by the Secretary of War July 24, 1895, a 
bulkhead has been constructed along the dock line, and the area 
shoreward of the dock line is now being filled in for a public park. 

At the northern end of the basin are several slips and docks now in 
possession of the Dlinois Central Railroad Company, but title is in 
litigation. In view of the restricted capacity of Chicago River, these 
outer slips and docks become more important to the commerce of the 
city, and the wisdom of dredging the outer basin to 20 feet depth 
becomes apparent. The northern part is now in use for commercial 
purposes, and the entire basin would be useful as a safe roadstead for 



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Al>Pl2Nt)nt T I — ^REPORT OP ilAJOR MARSHALt. 2791 

larfre vessels if dredged. The cost of tins dredging is estimated at 
t501),960. 

The piers of this basin are now in good condition. 

No work has been done during the yeaf by the United States Gov- 
ernment in this basin nor on tlie breakwater limiting it. 

EXTEBIOB BREAKWATER. 

This work is situated about 1 mile north of the entrance to Chicago 
Kiver, which it shelters against northerly storms. The breakwater is 
5,413 feet in length, 30 feet wide, and constructed in water varying 
from 18 to 32 feat in depth. All of it, except 1,200 linear feet, which is 
on a foundation of riprap stone, has been built upon the natural sand 
and clay bottom. 

This work has been successful and well subserves its object. It 
.was begun in 1880 and completed in 1890. This breakwater has been 
slightly damaged by a vessel running into it, but otherwise is in good 
condition. 

No work has been done upon it during the year, and probably none 
will be required for several years. 

ENTBANOE TO OHIOAOG BIVEB. 

It has been customary for the United States to maintain the channel 
between the ])iers and docks at the entrance of Chicago River by 
dredging to the extent required by vessels of the dimensions navi- 
gating Chicago River as far as to Rush Street Bridge, and the improve- 
ment of Chicago Harbor has been limited inshore by this bridge. 

During the past fiscal year no work has been done at the entrance to 
Chicago River, and none will probably be necessary during the year 
ending June 30, 1898. 

PBOPOSED APPLICATION OF FUNDS NOW ON HAND. 

It is proposed to apply the funds on hand to the maintenance of 
existing work. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



By act of— 

July 11,1870 $100,000.00 

March 3, 1871 100, 000. 00 

Juno 10, 1872 90.000.00 

March 3, 1873 90,000.00 

June 23, 1874 75, 000. 00 

March 3, 1875 78, 000. 00 

August 3, 1876 5,000.00 

June 18, 1878 75, 000. 00 

March 3, 1879 75,000.00 

June 14, 1880 145, 000.00 

March 8, 1881 150, 000. 00 

August 2, 1882 200, 000. 00 

July5,1884 100,000.00 

August 5, 1886 • 75, 000. 00 

August 11, 1888 200,000.00 



By act of— 

September 19, 1890 .... $100, 000. 00 

July 13,1892 72,000.00 

August 17, 1894 80,000.00 

Total appronriated . * 1, 810, 000. 00 
Received from all other 
sources since 1870 (trans- 
fer of tug, sales, etc. ) 630. 16 



Total 1,810,630.16 

Expenditures to June SO, 
1897 1,800,571.77 

Balance unexpended 
June 30, 1897 10,058.39 



♦ $60,000 appropriated by act June 3, 1896, for " improving Chicago River," and 
which was included in statement for Chicago Harbor in last annual report, has been 
deducted from amounts reported June 30, 1896. 



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2792 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

Money statement. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance nnexpended * $33, 602. 52 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 23, 544. 13 

July 1,1897, balance unexpended 10,058.39 



fiSPORT OF MR. O. A. M. ULJBNCRANTZ, ASSISTANT BK6INBBR« 

UmrsD Statrs Engineer Office, 

Chicago, III,, July /, 1897. 
Major: I have the honor to snbmit herewith a report on operations in Chicago 
Harbor, Illinois, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

At the beginning of the year there was no contract in force for any work to be 
done in improving this harbor. No work was done, and none is contemplated for I 
the ensuing year. 

PRESENT CONDITION OF THE HARBOR. 

The harbor entrance was dredged in the spring of 1896 to a depth of 18 feet below 
low water of 1847, and is now in good condition. 

The north and south piers and the exterior breakwater are in very good condition. 
The easterly and southerly breakwaters are also in very good repair, except that the 
stone filling has settled considerably in some places, especially in tne westerly part 
of the latter, where it is below the water surface, and in case of a severe southeast- 
erly storm might endanger the overturning of a portion of this very narrow break- 
water, as happened to a part of its outer or easterly portion in 1888. An estimate 
of the cost, amounting to $1,907.40, of the needed repairs, including three clumps of 
piles, was submitted on the 13th of June, 1896, but no work has so far been authorized. 

The rough element, fishermen and disreputable characters, that have for vears past 
infested the piers and breakwaters in this harbor, erecting shanties and derricks 
thereon, particularly on the north pier, as has been complained of in former reports, 
were finally removed on the 10th of May, this year, by the United States revenue 
cutter Calumet^ Capt. W. H. Gushing commanding, printed notices having been posted 
ten days previously at several places on each of the piers. 

The United States life-saving station, located at the outer end of the South Pier, 
has heretofore had a communication with the city by a road running across the 
Illinois Central Kailroad Company's land, which adjoins this pier. This was of 
much importance, partly for the transportation of the life boat to some point along 
the lake shore and partly for transportation of supplies, but new warehouses were 
planned for during the year, which would entirelv shut off this communicatxou. 
Application for authority to construct a road on and along the South Pier was then 
made to the Secretary of War. The owners of the warehouses offered to build the 
said road, free of any cost to the Government, if they should be allowed to use it for 
the passage of fire engines in case of fire on their property. This advantage being 
equally applicable to the life-saving station, under like circumstances, a revocable 
license was granted by the Secretary of War on the 24th of April, 1897, with pro- 
visions that the road shonld be built under the supervision of the engineer officer in 
charge of this district, and that it shall not be used by any private parties, except 
in case of fire. The road has been constructed. 

With last year's report was submitted certain diagrams, designed to facilitate the 
preparation of estimates for proposed pier work. I have since noticed that, nnless 
the formulte contained therein are used frequently, so as to insure familiarity, there 
are chances for making errors, and also that it becomes cumbersome to pick otit the 
proper constants for use in the different formulie, and more especially in the '' com- 
posite formula.'^ I have therefore arranged all the formulsB in tabular form, which 
IS respectfully submitted herewith. With the aid of this I believe that an eatimate 
with close approximation to accuracy can be obtained, with but slight familiarity 
with the diagrams, with very little work, in a very short time, and with but mini- 
mum chances for errors. The strictest attention should, however, be given to the 
note concerning the value given to X, as this is about the only place where an error 
is liable to occur, in case proper care is not exercised. 

•$60,000 apnropriated by act June 3, 1896, for ''improving Chicago River,'* and 
which was included in statement for Chicago Harbor in last annual report, has been 
deducted firom amounts reported June 30, 1896. 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2793 



A table, showing the means of tridaily readings on the water gauge, is also sub- 
mitted herewith. 

I am, migor, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. A. M. LlUKNCRANTZ, 

Assistant Engineer. 
Mi^. W. L. Marshall, 

Corps of Engineers, U. 8. A. 



Means of (tridaily) readings of the gauge at Chicago Rarhor, Illinois, 1896, 
[Plane of reforenoe: Low water of 1847.] 



Day. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


Jane. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nor. 


Dec. 


1 


—1.30 
-1.23 
-1.00 
-1.37 
—0.60 
—1.23 
—0.63 
—1.47 
-1.30 
—0.87 
-1.27 
—1.40 
—1.27 
—1.17 
—1.20 
—1.13 
—1.13 
—1.30 
—1.03 
—1.50 
—1.00 
—0.70 
—0.40 

—O.eo 

—0.90 
—0.63 
—0.87 
—1.23 
—1.13 
u-0.90 
—0.70 


-0.93 
-1. 10 
—0.17 
—0.00 
-1.07 
-1.07 
—1.06 
— L03 
-1.13 
-1.70 
-1.33 
-1.13 
—0.57 
—0.70 
-^.50 
—0.53 
—1,20 
-1.40 
-0.53 
-0.07 
—0.97 
—1.53 
-1.23 
-1.07 
-1.23 
-1.17 
—1.00 
-0.80 
—0.30 


-0.63 
—0.03 
-^.87 
—0.80 
—1.00 
-1.03 
—1.30 
—0.83 
—1.10 
—0.50 
-0.53 
—0.70 
—1.03 
—1.04 
-0.97 
—1.00 
—1.20 
— 1. 13 
—0.30 
—1.20 
-1.77 
-1.23 
—0.93 
-1.57 
—1.93 
-0.87 
-1.20 
-0.93 
—1.00 
-1.20 
—0.70 


-0.93 
—1.00 
-1.00 
-1.17 
—1.10 
-1.13 
-1. 03 
-1.10 
-0.97 
-0.83 
—0.67 
-0.07 
-1.13 
-1.03 
—1.13 
—1.03 
-0.80 
-0.77 
-0.70 
-0.70 
—0.73 
-0.83 
-0.70 
-0.73 
—0.90 
—0.80 
-^.53 
—0.47 
-0.60 
-0.47 


-0.50 
-0.77 
—0.80 
—0.70 
-4). 47 
—0.60 
-0.67 
—0.68 
—0.57 
-0.63 
—0.60 
-0.53 
-0.30 
—0.33 
-0.43 
-0.50 
-1.43 
-0.77 
-0.23 
—0.37 
-0.47 
-0.43 
—0.23 
—0.60 
—0.27 
—0.20 
-0.40 
—0.07 
—0.67 
-0.87 
—0.40 


—0.23 
-0.10 
-0.17 
—0.13 
—0.43 
—0.83 
+0.07 
—0.30 
—0.23 
-0.10 
—0.17 
—0.20 
-0.13 
—0.10 
-0.03 
-0.10 
±0.00 

-ai3 

—0.30 
— O.IO 
+0.10 
-0.13 
±0.00 
—0.13 
-0.20 
-0.27 
-0.43 
—0.07 
—0.30 
—0.87 


—0.33 
-0.20 
—0.23 
±0.00 
-0.30 
+0.04 
-0.03 
-^.07 
±0.00 
-0.23 
—0.43 
—0.43 
-0.23 
—0.13 
+0.20 
—0.10 
—0.23 
—0.43 
-0.10 
—0.23 
^0.17 
—0.23 
-0.40 
-0.37 
—0.17 
—0.50 
—0.10 
—0.07 
-0.30 
—0.07 
—0.17 


-0.13 
—0.07 
-0.40 
-0.70 
-0.53 
-0.23 
—0.20 
—0.27 
+ 0.17 
+0.17 
—0.30 
—0.10 
+0.18 
-0.27 
-0.27 
+0.27 
-0.17 
+0.03 
—0.03 
—0.03 
—0.20 
-0.13 
-0.20 
^.23 
—0.63 
—0.27 
-0.37 
—0.43 
—0.83 
-0.63 
—0.37 


-0.37 
—0.87 
—0.40 
-0.40 
—0.30 
-0.38 
—0.53 
—0.43 
-0.40 
-0.37 
—0.27 
+0.23 
-4). 07 
—0.30 
±0.00 
—0.13 
—0.20 
-0.30 
-4). 03 
-0.43 
-0.63 
^.20 
-0.57 
-4). 80 
—0.87 
-0.43 
-0.17 
—0.40 
-0.30 
+0.60 


—0.07 
-0.07 
—0.17 
-0.10 
—0.20 
—0.17 
-0.30 
—0.23 
—0.27 
—0.37 
—0.23 
—0.17 
-0.37 
—0.37 
—0.30 
-0.57 
-0.27 
—0.40 
-0.87 
-0.57 
-0.70 
—0.87 
-0.80 
—0.70 
-0.93 
-0.77 
-0.67 
-0.50 
—0.83 
-1.10 
—0.93 


-0.60 
-0.60 
—0.30 
-0.57 
-^0.03 
—0.53 
-0.83 
-0.80 
—0.90 
-0.80 
—0.73 
—0.73 
—0.67 
-0.67 
—0.93 
—0.87 
—0.67 
-0.50 
-0.50 
-0.57 
—0.70 
-4). 67 
-1.07 
-0.53 
-0.63 
—0.77 
—0.27 
—1.17 
—0.80 
-0.87 


-1.07 
63 


2 


3 

4 


-0.87 
—1. 07 


5 


—0 80 


6 

7 

8 


-0.57 
—0.77 
—0 80 


9 


1.10 


10 

11 


-1.00 
00 


12 


—0.77 


13 


—0.47 


14 


--0 47 


15 


—0.30 


18 


—0.68 


17 


—LOT 


18 


—0.63 


19 


—1.08 


20 

21 


-0.67 
—0.70 


23 


—0.60 


23 

U 


—0.37 
—0.77 


25 


—1.67 


26 


—0.97 


27 


—0.93 


SB 


—1.27 


29 


—1.20 


10 


—1.10 


81 


—0.87 






Ifeaoa. 


—1.06 


-0.98 


—1.01 


-0.86 


-0.60 


—0.17 


-0.19 


-0.23 


-0.81 


-0.48 


—0.67 


—0.84 



I I 2. 

IMPROVEMENT OF CHICAGO RIVER, ILLINOIS. ' 

The Chicago River constitutes the inner harbor of Ohicago. In 
its uatural condition it was navigable for such vessels as could pass 
the bar at its mouth. It has been improved, docked, dredged, and 
bridged by the city of Chicago and by the riparian owners, as the city 
grew to keep pace with their requirements for commerce primarily and 
for sewage disposed for convenience incidentally, without aid from the 
Federal Government, until it has grown to be a great artificial water- 
way, without public landings or docks, defiled and putrescent with 
sewage and filth, but one of the most important waterways (measured 
by its commerce) on the globe. The adoption by Congress of the proj- 
ect for a comparatively deep waterway, 20 to 21 feet, to replace the 
15-foot channel between Duluth, Chicago, and Buffalo, has been fol- 
lowed by such a revolution in the lake marine as to make the Chicago 
Eiver, as limited by docks, by bridges, and by tunnels, utterly inade- 
quate in capacity to accommodate the great vessels of to-day, and at 
once make necessary either (1) a complete remodeling of the river, (2> 



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2794 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, tf. S. ARMt. 

a new harbor at Ohicago for larfj^est vessels, or (3) a loss of coramorce 
as far as may relate to heavy commodities "in transit" at Chicago, 
which require the lowest rates of transportation and, therefore, the 
most capacious vessels and commodious channels. 

Prior to 1892 it had been the custom of Congress in the construction 
of lake harbors to coniine the work done by the United States Govern- 
ment under river and harbor acts to piers, breakwaters, and dredging, 
or to work required lying lakeward or beyond the natural shore lines of 
the lake, and to such works as were found to be necessary to protect 
the jetties or piers at the shore ends thereof against cutting out by the 
waves in storms* 

The act of July 13, 1892, contained a provision directing the oflScer 
in charge at Chicago to report " what, if any, improvement should be 
made by the General Government in Chicago River," which report was 
submitted under date August 9, 1893, and will be found in the Annual 
Beport of the Chief of Engineers for 1893, page 2974 and following. 

In accord with long-established precedents, the opinion of the officer 
in charge was adverse to the expenditure of money by tbe General Gov- 
ernment on the river within the old shore line of the lake as long as it 
may be used as a dumping ground for filth and sewage, and therefore 
involving scavenger work for the city, but certain work of dredging 
and rectification was suggested for the information of Congress, as in 
the interest of commerce and navigation. The limit in depth of the 
suggested improvement, 16 feet, was determined by the depths over the 
Washington Street and La Salle Street tunnels, and the improvement 
suggested is to the limit of the present capacity of Chicago River, with- 
out embarking in a scheme of indefinite cost, in remodeling or rebuild- 
ing an artificial waterway, with all its bridges, tunnels, wharves, and. 
accessories, which are owned, built, and controlled by municipal, cor- 
porate, or private parties. 

This suggestion as to the capacity of the river for improvement seems 
to have been accepted as just and proper. Congress, which in the river 
and harbor aclrof August 17, 1894, in making provision for Chicago 
Harbor authorized the Secretary of War to expend not exceeding 
$25,000 out of the $80,000 appropriated "in the improvement of Chicago 
Biver up to the forks of said river," and later, in the river and harbor 
act of June 3, 1896, wherein it is provided — 

For improving Chicago River in Illinoie, from its mouth to the Stock Yards on the 
South Branch and to Belmont avenue on the North Branch, as far as may be per- 
mitted by ezistine docks and wharves, to be dredged to admit passage by vesaels 
drawine sixteen teet of water, according to the recommendation of Capt. W. L. 
Marshal], of the Corps of Engineers of the United States Army, in his report under 
date of August ninth, eighteen hundred and ninety-three: Continuing improvement, 
fifty thousand dollars : I*rovided, That contracts may be entered into by the Secre- 
tary of War for such materials and work as may be necessary to complete the said 
project of improvement, to be paid for as appropriations may from time to time be 
made by law, not to exceed in the aggregate six hundred and fifty thousand doUan, 
exclusive of the amount herein and neretofore appropriated. 

And again, in the sundry civil act of June 4, 1897, it is provided — 

Improving Chicago River, Illinois: For continnhig improvement from its month 
to the Stock Yards on the South Branch and to Belmont avenue on the North Branch, 
one hundred and thirteen thoasand dollars, in pursuance of the provisions of an act 
making appropriations for the construction, repair, and improvement of certain 
public works on rivers and harbors and for other purposes, approved June third, 
eighteen hundred and ninety-six ; and it is hereby declared to be the true intent and 
meaning of the said provisions of said act relating to the improvement of said Chi- 
cago River that all of the work in the improvement of said river which was recom- 
mended or suggested to be done in the interest of commerce by Captain William L. 
Marshall, of the Corps of Kngineers of the United States Army, in his report of 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2795 

August ninth, eighteen hnndxad and ninetv-thiee, may be done: Provided. That the 
total cost of such improvement or work shall not exceed the limit provided for in 
said act. 

The conclusion was also accepted by local bodies interested in the 
improvement of the river, as shown by their actions in pressing upon 
Congress the necessity of adopting the suggestions made in this report 
of August 9, 1893, and by their failure in any manner to controvert 
either the statement of facts or conclusions deduced therefrom. 

In accord with the act of June 3, 1896, a project for dredging was 
submitted by the officer in charge, and approved by the Chief of 
Engineers and Secretary of War. The work was advertised under 
date September 25, 1896; proposals received October 24, 1896, and 
with the approval of the Chief of Engineers contracts were entered 
into November 5,1896, with the lowest responsible bidders, viz, Oreen^s 
Dredging Company, for dredging 468,427 cubic yards of material from 
the main river and South Branch at 10.9 cents per cubic yard, meas- 
ured in scows, and with The Lydon & Drews Company for dredging 
848,794 cubic yards of material from the North Branch at 9.7 cents per 
cubic yard, and in each case for certain unimportant and contingent 
work of small extent. 

The contractors began work promptly, and up to the close of the fiscal 
year had removed from the main river and South Branch 258,966 cubic 
yards and from the North Branch 248,610 cubic yards of material. 
The dredging of the North Branch was suspended in June, 1897, await- 
ing further appropriations, but will be resumed in July and continued 
to completion. 

It is expected that the work of dredging as far as may be done 
under the existing contracts will be completed by the close of the 
calendar year 1898. 

The sundry civil act of June 4, 1897, permits the slight work of rec- 
tification and widening suggested in the report of August 9, 1893, to 
be done, and a project is now being prepared to be submitted to the 
Secretary of War for action at as early a date as practicable. 

The fact that Chicago Biver can accommodate vessels of 16 feet draft 
only, and for but a small part of its length can admit vessels not exceed- 
ing 325 feet length and 42 feet beam, when large modem vessels now 
being rapidly added to the fleets of the Great Lakes are 432 feet in 
length, 48 feet beam, and designed for a draft of water of 19 to 20 feet, 
is disquieting and hampering to all interests at Chicago dependent 
upon commerce by water, and the demand for better accommodations 
in Chicago Biver is growing in intensity. 

No practical method of procedure to remove the obstructions to navi- 
gation has been proposed. The authorities of the sanitary district 
have contracted for dredging the main river and South Branch from 
Lake Michigan to the connection with the drainage canal to a depth of 
20 feet (or more in places), and propose some increase in the ('capacity 
of the channel for discharge by widening between docks at a few narrow 
X)oints, and some more important aids to navigation in Widening at a 
few bridge draws; but these changes, as well as those proposed in the 
Beport of 1893, and allowed to be made by the sundry civil act of June 
4, 1897, are not in accord with the radical improvements demanded for 
the accommodation of the largest modern vessels. 

The tunnels absolutely limit the draft of vessels; the bridge draws, 
docks, and bends absolutely limit the length and beam. 

If the tundels could be lowered to allow a draft of 20 feet, and the 
river dredged to that depth, vessels of the same horizontal dimensions 



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2796 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARIfT. 

as DOW navigate the river could load 4 feet deei)er, or their carrying 
capacity be increased from 33 to 75 per cent. A vessel 325 feet long, 
42 feet beam, deducting 20 feet in length for run or model, would have 
its capacity increased about 400 tons for each foot of additional draft, 
or 1,600 tons, an increase of 50 per cent over 16 feet draft. 

The tunnels alone, however, represent some $2,500,000, and are used 
for the cable lines of street railway connecting the north and west sides 
with the business center of the city. Ko practical method has been 
proposed for removing or altering these tunnels, nor any suggestion 
made as to the source of the necessary money to pay the cost of modi- 
fication in tunnels, bridges, and other artificial obstructions, which are 
costly and much used property. 

I submit herewith a series of maps showing the profiles of the crowns 
of the La Salle Street and Washington Street tunnels as ascertained 
by sounding, and of all bridges over Chicago River which prohibit 
passage by the largest lake vessels; also of such short bends in the 
river as may be impassable by such vessels. 

The most obvious fact shown by these maps is that while the river, 
even without bridges, is too narrow for such boats to tie to the docks 
while similar boats are passing each other in the channel, yet it would 
be navigable by such vessels even with its present shore lines were the 
bridges above the forks of the river removed or constructed with cen- 
tral draws of from 110 to 120 feet span. 

The bridges and tunnels therefore may be said to be the obstructions 
to navigation by large vessels, although the stream itself is too narrow 
for easy navigation by such vessels, were such obstructions removed. 

A list of steam vessels of the larger class navigating Chicago River, 
to a greater or less extent of its course, is submitted. 

List, dimentionSf and tannage of the average steamers, navigating the CKioago River {not 
inoludi^g sfMM^wised lumber vessels). 



Steamer. 



Groee 
tonnage. 


Net 
tonnage. 


Length. 






Fs0L 


2.781 


2,847 


827 


2,165 


1,802 


296 


2,189 


1,744 


292 


2,205 


1,819 


298 


1,711 


1.518 


258 


1,704 


1.503 


256 


1,72« 


1,562 


270 


1,619 


1.423 


256 


1,731 


1,526 


271 


1,708 


1,474 


270 


1.609 


1,423 


209 


1.609 


1,423 


269 


2.944 


2,891 


292 


1,611 


945 


880 


2.857 


1,616 


312 


2,299 


1,858 


806 


2,294 


1.853 


806 


1.017 


1,677 


296 


2,082 


1,927 


283 


1,829 


1,669 


281 


1,762 


1,662 


276 


1,847 


1,721 


288 


1.770 


1,571 


282 


2.086 


1,744 


808 


2,611 


1,940 


843 


8,045 


2,484 


888 


1,053 


1,722 


288 


2,615 


1,948 


845 


1,921 


1,751 


286 


2,220 


2.046 


284 


2,044 


1,647 


258 


2,048 


1,662 


258 


2.046 


1,552 


868 


2.044 


1,560 


268 



Width. 



Snsqnehanna 

CodoruB 

Mahoning 

Schnylkin 

Clarion 

Lehigh 

Coneetoga 

Wissahiokon 

Delaware 

Janiata 

Oonemaagh 

Lt coming 

Maniton 

Christopher Columbne 

Mohawk 

Harlem 

Hudson 

SyracuBO 

Commodore 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Milwaukee .* 

Tioga 

Owego 

Ramapo 

H. J. Jowett 

Chemang 

l?ewYoi1c 

Rochester 

OoT. Smith 

H . R. James 

A.MoVlttie 

J.R. Langdon 



PetL 
40 
4D 
40 
40 
M 
86 
86 
86 
36 
86 



42 
4S 
41 
41 
41 
S8 
43 
86 
85 
M 
86 
S8 
41 
44 
8» 
41 

Si 

48 
48 

42 
42 
42 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2797 



List, dhiteiuioiM, and tonnage of the average $teamer$, navigating the Chicago Eiver (not 
including the small-iized lumker veMels)— Continaed. 



Ste«mer. 



Gross 
tonnage. 



Net 
tonnage. 



Length. 



Width. 



P. H. Prince.. , 
W. A. Haskell 
W.J.Averill. 
JE. P. Wilbur.. 

Sarinac 

Seneca 

Tnscarora.... 

Taoom* 

Oeeanica 

Clyde 

H.£. Packer.. 
FredMercnr.. 
JLaokawanna. . 

Scranton 

Wyoming 

Florida 

J. W. Moore . . 

Braiil 

Azthor Oir... 

Arerage 



2,017 
1,630 
1.603 
2,633 
2,069 
2,660 
2,660 
1,870 
1,400 
1.806 
1,142 
1,224 
2,015 
2,015 
1,952 
2,103 
1,961 
2,186 
2,320 



1,547 
1,440 
1,425 
1,902 
1,930 
1,960 
1.939 
1,009 
1,241 
1,158 
962 
966 
1,505 
1,595 
1,739 
1,834 
1,689 
1,655 
1,972 



Ftet. 
258 
260 
260 
808 
308 
308 
808 
278 
280 
274 
243 
250 
278 
278 



274 

294 
304 



Feet. 
42 
87 
37 
40 
40 
40 
40 
38 
37 
36 
35 
35 
39 



40 
40 
40 
41 



2.014 



1,663 



287 



89 



An examination of the elaborate and accnrate maps of Ohicago River 
made under direction of the trustees of the sanitary district at 'Chicago, 
which embody results Irom the only careful survey that has been made 
of the river, show the navigable capacity of the river (irrespective of 
draft of vessels) as determined by the limiting docks or bulkheads, and 
by the piers, abutments, and guards of the bridges. In preparing the 
table below a paper model of the horizontal dimensions stated cut to 
the same scale as the maps was applied, and if it was found that such 
model, without apparent wedging or binding, could be passed through 
the representation of the bridge, the bridge has been denominated as 
passable by a vessel of such horizontal dimensions. The results given 
in the table are considered extreme — or in favor of the navigability of 
the river. 

The table follows: 

TaJfle showing how far vessels of dimensions given earn navigate Chicago River and its 

IranxiMS, 



Dfmeitsions 
of Tessels. 



Limits which can be reached by vessels. 



In South Branch. 



In North Branch. In North Branch Canal. 



FeeL 
48 by 482... 



43 by 340.. 
43 by 825.. 
42 by 805., 



40 by 806. 



88 by 800., 



Might possibly sgneexe throngh 
Madison Street Bridge if it can 
pass orer La Salle straet tunnel; 
then to Taylor street. 

To Xighteenth street 



.do., 



Might possibly sqneese tnroagh 
Sighteenth street and Falter 
street. If so, can so to Indiana 
State Line Rwy. Bridge, west arm 
of South Fork. 

To IndlanaStateLineBwy. Bridge in 
west arm «f South Fork of South 
Branoh. 



To Indiana State Line Swy. Bridge 
in west arm of Sontb Fork of 
South Bnmch. 



Onlv to the first, the 
Coioago and North- 
western Rwy. 
Bridge. 

To Dillon street ... 

....do 

....do , 



To Chieag<o, Milwau- 
kee and^St. Paul 
Rwy. Bridge. 
(Norih of North 
are.) 

do 



Can not reach the 
canal. 



To Halsted street. 

.....do 

do 



To Chicago, Milwau- 
keeand SLPaul Rwy. 
Bridge. 



Mightpossiblysqueese 
tn rough St. Paul 
Kwy. Bridge and go 
to tne main channel 
in the North Branch. 



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2798 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

Boats 325 feet length, 42 feet beam, can navigate Chicago River to the elevators, 
drawing, after dredging is oompleted, barely 16 feet at present stage of water (0.5 
foot above Chicago city datom). 

The orown of Washimj^ton Street Tunnel now limits the draft, as stated. 

Over La SaUe Street Tnnnel 17 feet is now barely possible over central part. 

Over Van Bnren Street Tnnnel 18 feet is practicable at present stage. 

(1) Each foot additional draft in vessels of the dimensions named (allowing 20 
feet off for rnn or mold at bow and stern, or of rectangular horizontal dimensions, 
305 feet bv 42 feet), corresponds in round numbers to ifK> tons cargo, or about 13,300 
bushels of wheat. 

(2) If available draft were 20 feet, then carjroes carried by same vessels oould be 
increased 1,600 tons, or about 53,000 bushels of wheat. 

This would result, simply^ by the removal of tunnels and deepening of the river 
channel, and minor changes in docks, now contemplated, or the capacity of boats of 
same beam and length could be increased from 33 to 50 per cent. 

(3) To adapt Chicago River for boats 432 feet length, 48 feet beam, 20 feet draft, 
will require not only removal of tunnels and strengthening of bulkheads or docks, 
but also the reconstruction or remodeling of bridges, as shown herewith; the cut- 
ting away of much wharf property to straighten the river; and, in general, a com- 
plete remodeling of Chicago Kiver, if such boats are to load at wharves and pass 
each other in chEuinels. 

These faets and maps are sabmitted as data bearing upon the ques- 
tion of the improvement of Chicago Biver, for the information of 
Congress. 

PROPOSI9) APPLICATION OF FUNDS NOW ON HAND AND AVAILABLE. 

It is proposed to apply these funds to the completion of the dredg- 
ing now contracted for. 

PBOPOSED APPLICATION OF FITNDS ASKED FOB, FOB THE FISCAL 
YEAB BNDINO JUNE 30, 1899. 

It is proposed to apply the funds asked for, contingent upon the 
adoption of a project for minor widening of the river or rectification of 
the dock line, to describing the necessary lands and acquiring title 
thereto, and to dredging and removing the necessary material, and 
recoDStructing the docks or bulkheads along the changed sections. 

Since the Chicago Kiver constitutes the inner harbor at Chicago, 
reference is made to the report on Chicago Harbor for commercial 
statistics. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Act June 3, 1896 $50,000.00 

Sundry civn act, June 4, 1897 113,000.00 

Total 163,000.00 

Expenditures to June 30, 1897 (exolnsiye of $25,000 allotted from appro- 
priation for Chicago Harbor of August 17, 1894) 24, 475. 21 

Balance unexpended June 30, 1897 138,524.79 

Money statement. 

July 1,1896, balance unexpended (act June 3, 1896) $50,000.00 

Amount appropriated by sundry civil act approved June 4, 1897 113, 000. 00 

163,000.00 
June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 24, 475. 21 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 138,524.79 

July 1,1897, outstanding liabiliUes $100.00 

July 1, 1897, amount oovered by uncompleted contracts 118, 598. 49 

118,698.49 

July 1, 1897, balanee available 19,826.30 

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existin^i^ project 537, 000. 00 
Amount tnat can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J une 30, 1899 400, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliaaoe with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harb«rao«iaf 1866 anil 1S67 and of sundry civil act of June 4^ 1897. 



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APPENDIX 1 I REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2799 



Abstract of propoMals for remomng wreck of steam eanal barge Chinas received in reMonte 
to advertisement of November SS, 1896, and opened December SS, 1896, by Maj, W, L, 
Marehall, Corps of Engineers. 



So. 


Name of bidder. 


AddreM. 


Price. 


Manner in which work is to 
be done. 


Bemarka. 


1 


DaDham Towing 


210 South Water 


$496.00 


Remove boiler and parts 


Lowest bid. 




And Wracking Co. 


Btroet, Chicago, 




of engine to make wreck 
lighter and then tow it out 
in lake and sink in deep 
water. Failing in this will 






















tear wreck to pieces with 
dredge and put pieces on 






















scows and sink them in 












lake. 




2 


Lydon Sc Drews Co. 


Unity Building. 


500.00 


By means of steam dredge 






• 


Chicago, 111. 




and drivers. 





Absiracft of proposals for dredging Chicago River, Illinois j received in response to adver- 
tisement of September £6^ 1896, and opened at 12 m. October 24, 1896, by Maj, W. L, 
Marshall, Corps of Engineers, 



I^ame and address of bidder. 






'5.2 3 



Main river and Sonth Branch. 



Coat. 






Cost. 



® CS O 

HI 



Coat 



Total main 

river and 

South 

Branch. 



8.0. Dixon, Kacine, Wis..: 

Carkin, Stickney dc. Cram, Detroit, 

Mich , 

Chicago Dredging and Dock Co., 

Cliicago, ni 



Cents. 



Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, Ill.a. 

Lvdon & Drews Co., Cliicago, 111 

FitzSimons & Connell Co., Chicago, 
111 



151 

14 

10.0 

12i 

154 



$72, 202. 25 

64, 179. 78 
49,968.54 
56, 157. 31 

71, 056. 18 



$2.50 $250.00 $3.00 



1 50 
1.00 
1.00 

1.76 



I 



150.00 
100.00 
100.00 

175.00 



$750.00 

62.50 
125.00 
32.50 

75.00 



$73,202.25 

64, 392. 28 
50, 193. 54 
56, 289. 81 

71, 306. 18 



Name and address of bidder. 



S.O. Dixon, Badne, Wis 

Carkin, Stickney & Cram, Detroit, 

Mich 

Chicago Dredging and Dock Co., 

Chicago. Ill 

Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, 111. 
Lydon ic Drews Co., Cliicago, I11.&. . . 
FitzSimons &. Connell Co., Chicago, 

111 



North Branch. 



in o 

he's 



Coat. 



Cents. 
12^ ,$103,943.09 



131 
12 

9.r< 

9.7 
14 



116,670.81 

101, 821. 80 
84, 002. 99 
82, 305. 95 

118,792.10 



2 

o . 



$2.60 

2.50 

1.50 
1.00 
1.00 

1.76 



Cost. 



ill 



$250.00 

250.00 

150.00 
100.00 
100.00 

175.00 



$3.00 
8.00 



.50 
.13 



.80 



Cost. 



Total North 
Branch. 



$750.00 

750.00 

62.50 
125.00 
82.50 

76.00 



$104,048.09 

117,670.81 

102, 034. 30 
84, 227. 99 
82,438.45 

U9, 042. 10 



a Lowest bid for main rivar and South Braaolk 



h Lowest bid for North Braaoh. 



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2800 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 



JA$t of eantracts for improving Chicago Bivery Illinois, in force during fiscal year ending 

June SO, 1897. 



Name and addreas of contractor. 



Nature of oontraot. 



Date. 



To expire. 



Green's I>redging Co., Chicago, HI . 
Lydon & Drews Co., Chicago, 111... 



Dredging main river and South 

Branch. 
Dredging North Branch 



Not. 5,1896 
do 



Not. 90,18W 
Do. 



report 07 mr. g. a. m. liljencrantz, assistant knginssr. 

United States Engineer Officx, 

Chicago, IlL, July g, 1897. 

Major: I have the honor to sabmit herewith a report on operations in Chicago 
River, Illinois, daring the fiscal year ending Jnne 30, 1897. 

There was no contract in force for the improvement of this river at the beginning 
of the year. Money having been appropriated nnder act of Congress of Jane 3, 
1896, to wit, $50,000, bids for dredgiag according to project approved were adver- 
tised for and opened on the 24th of October, 1896. The said act aathorized contracts 
to be entered into for the whole work of improving the main river and its branches 
between certain specified limits, bat made only the above-mentioned amount avail- 
able for immediate use. The specifications, used as a basis for bids, and designed to 
govern work under the 'contract, provided for separate bids if desired for work in 
the Main and Soath branches and for work in the North Branch, respectively, three- 
fifths of the available funds to be applied to the former and the other two-fifths to 
the latter, and also gave the contractors the option of suspending operations when 
available funds were exhausted or of continuing the work in anticipation of addi- 
tional appropriation, before which no farther payments could be made. 

Contracts were entered into on the 5th of November, 1896, with the Green's Dredg- 
ing Company for work in the Main and South branches to the stock yards, and wiui 
the Lydon & Drews Company for work in the North Branch to Belmont avenue. The 
terms of the former contract were for the removal of 458,427 cubic yards, more or 
less, of dredged material, at the rate of 10.9 cents per cubic yard; of 100 piles, more 
or less, at $1 each, and of 250 cubic yards, more or less, of old docks and piers, at 50 
cents per cubic yard. Those of the latter were for the removal of 848,704 cubio 
yards, more or less, by dredging, at the rate of 9.7 cents per cubic yard ; of 100 piles, 
more or less, at $1 each, and of 250 cubic yards, more or less, of old docks and pierSy 
at 13 cents per cubic yard. Both firms are of Chicago, 111. 



WORK DONE DURING THE TEAR. 

(A) In the Main and South branches : 

Work in the Main Branch was commenced west of Rush Street Bridge on the 12ih 
of November, 1896. On the 13th of January, 1897, work was closed for the season 
on account of the inclemency of the weather. At that time the channel was com- 
pleted through the Main Branch and to the Twenty-second Street Bridge in the South 
Branch, with the exception of a number of bridf^e draws. Work was resumed on 
the 21st of March, 1897. All the bridge draws, heretofore omitted, were deepened, 
and at the close of the fiscal year the channel was completed to Ashland avenue, in 
the west fork of the South Branch (the terminal point in that fork), and to opposite 
Thirty-third street extended, in the south fork of the South Branch, a total distance 
of about 5i miles, by the removal of 258,966.7 cubic yards of dredged material and 
11 piles. The last portion of the dredging has been in exceptionally hard mate- 
rial, which has considerably delayed tlie progress. A number of accidents have 
also been met with, the most remarkable of which was the explosion of a loaded dump 
scow near the mouth of the river, while on its way to the dumping ^ound, and 
which was accompanied by extensive damages to numerous adjacent buildings. No 
convincing theory has been ofifered in explanation of the cause. From and ailerthe 
28th of March, 1897, the work has been carried on continuously by day and hj night, 
which was found necessary to comply with the clause in the contract requiring the 
removal of not less than 60,000 cubic yards per calendar month. 

(B) In the North Branch: 

Work in the North Branch was begun at the junction of the two branches near 
Lake Street Bridge on the 19th of November, 1896, and was suspended for the season 
on the 24th of December^ at which time the channel had been unproved to Chicago 



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PENDIX H KEPOBT OF MAJTqR. MARSHALL. 



2801 



ce of abont seven-eighths of a mile. Wotk.<f6r 4;&e season of 1897 
the 15th of March and coutinaed until the 9th> or Jnqe^ ^jan the 
iliug themselves of the privilege contained in paragraph ^^of t^ie 
ected to suspend operations until additional funds shobl^.DAc^rce 
portion of the available funds ($20,000) allotted to this cohtr^ust 
id on the 19th of May. when the contractors were paid for the work 
ncluding that day. Work was, however, continued until the 9th of 
itated, with the understanding, in writing, that further payments 
upon a subsequent appropriation. 

int of work done up to the end of the fiscal year consisted in deepen- 
kunel to North avenue and about three-quarters of the length of the 
anal, which is about 1 mile in length, a total distance of, approxi- 
, by the removal of 248,610.3 cubic yards of dredged material and 2 
ractors have generally worked from 14 to 16 hours per day. This 
l^e is an exceptionally powerfhl machine, with a 4i-yard dipper and 
v^ing about 200 cubic yards per hour. 

'as dredged, under both contracts, to a depth of 17 feet below low 
d to 15 feet from existing docks. No old docks have been removed 
I so far under either of the contracts. 

rge China, which sank in the North Branch near Chicago Avenue 
h of November, 1896, and was abandoned by the owner, was removed 
nth the Dunham Towing and Wrecking Company in January, 1897, 
Lcles saved that were of any appreciable value, a tubular boiler and 
, wore sold at public auction. 

WORK PROPOSED FOR THE ENSUING TEAR. 

to continue during the ensuing year and complete all the work under 
[ging Company's contract to tne established limits in the south fork 
anch at ttie stock yards. The Lydon & Drews Company have been 
ne work under their contract on the 2d of July. It is proposed to 
>rk northward, and it is confidently expected that the cnannel wUl 
Belmont avenue, the northerly limit ot the work contracted for, by 
iSf and under especially favorable circumstances it might be done 
he ensuing fiscal year. 

of 8traig:htening and widening the river in the most obstructive 
[> visions in the act of Congress of June 4, 1897, will be taken up for 
d action during the year. Maps have been prepared and are sub- 
showing the most obstructive places in both branches of the river, 
le selectiou of these places those were chosen where a vessel of 48 
12 feet in length could not pass, and this is illustrated on the maps 
at of said dimensions in a position where further progress would be 

>r, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. A. M. LiLJENCRANTZ, 

Au%$tani Engineer. 

ARSHALL, 

ngin€er9t U, 8, A, 



II3. 

PROVEMENT OP CALUMET HARBOR, ILLINOIS. 

)f the work is to provide a deep entrance to the Calumet 
B port at South Chicago, which object is effected in the 
by first protecting the proposed channel against drift by 
of jetties — in this case 300 feet apart, projecting into the 
shore at the river's mouth — and by dredging between 
roper depth. 

CONDITION OP THE WORK JUNE 30, 1896. 

>egun on this harbor in 1870, and prior to June 30, 1806, 
^t of the south pier, and 3,640 linear feet of the north 
176 



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2802 BEPOBT OF THS\ck]3SrF OF EN0INEEB8, U. B. AKMT. 

• • • * 

pier had t>een' odUSpleied, and a channel 16 feet in depth between the 
piers.h^ been Beared and maintained, which completed the old project 
for'-tiyB 'improvement. 



OONDITION OF THE WOEK JUNE 30, 1897. 

The river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, adopted for this harbor 
a project submitted Jane 30, 1895, which provided for a channel depth 
of 20 feet, a prolongation of the south pier 1,200 linear feet and the 
north pier 500 linear feet. 

Prior to the adoption of this project by Congress, by authority of the 
Chief of Engineers, a narrow channel, 20 feet in depth, barely practi- 
cable, had been begun under contract, leading from deep water in Lake 
Michigan as far as to the Illinois Steel Company's slip. Work under 
this contract was under way at the beginning of the fiscal year and 
was completed soon thereafter. 

In February, 1896, a project supplementary to that of June 30, 1895, 
was submitted and published as House Executive Document No. 277 
(see also Eeport of Chief of Engineers, U. S. A., 1896, p. 2584), which 
covered not only the requirements of the entrance to Calumet River, 
or the present harbor, but all the present needs of this locality. This 
extended project contemplated an outer breakwater, in continuation of 
the north pier of the Illinois Steel Company's harbor, to shelter the 
entrance to Calumet Eiver and the Steel Company's harbor, and to 
form a sheltered roadstead to be dredged to 20 feet deep; the extension 
of the south pier 800 linear feet, and dredging the entrance to the 
river, and the river itself for a distance of two miles, for a width of 
200 feet and to a depth of 20 feet. 

Congress in making appropriations for Calumet Harbor adopted the 
project of June 30, 1895, but in appropriating for the river adopted 
that part of the later project relating to the 20-foot channel in Calumet 
Biver. 

The outer breakwater is an urgent necessity, and if it be built the 
north pier of Calumet Harbor g^iould not be extended, and the exten- 
sion of 800 feet is sufficient for the south pier. 

From the movement of sands in this vicinity it is very apparent that 
one of these projects should be more definitely swiopted. The drift into 
the channel can only be stopped by the intervention of a solid obstruc- 
tion or pier, and it is apparent that any material extension of the piers 
of the United States harbor will result in closing the approaches to the 
Illinois Steel Company's harbor by the sand caught and held against 
the United States piers. 

Such a result should be avoided, and the harbors can both be pro- 
tected by extending the north pier of the Illinois Steel Company's pier, 
as proposed in the report of February 26, 1896, while at the same time 
such a construction would make access to the docks at South Chicago 
IK)S8ible at all conditions of weather. At present the entrance to the 
harbor can not be safely made by vessels during high winds or gales, 
and continuous dredging will soon be required to keep the channels 
navigable. 

By authority of the Chief of Engineers the appropriation made by 
the act of June 3, 1896, has been applied to the execution of the work 
common to both projects named above, i. e., to the extension of the south 
pier 800 linear feet, and to dredging the channel between the piers and 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2803 

to a similar depth in Lake Michigan, to 20 feet depth below the low 
water of 1847. This work has been done during the year by contract 
with the lowest responsible bidders, after pablic advertisement, under 
which contracts {including the contract with Norris G. Dodge & Son, in 
effect at the beginning of the year) 223,006 cubic yards of material was 
dredged from the 20-foot channel, 808,966.6 feet B. M. hemlock timber, 
281,688 feet pine timber, 20,917 feet oak plank, 320 pine piles, 13 white- 
oak pUes, 82,056 pounds driftbolts, 64,804 pounds screw bolts, 2,205 
pounds spikes, 222 pounds chain, 819 pounds boiler-plate iron, 2,326.12 
cords of stone, and 4,219.1 cubic yards dredging for foundations of cribs 
were placed in the work or done in extending the south pier 800 linear 
feet. 

This work was accomplished at considerably less cost than estimated 
and by authority of the Chief of Engineers a contract with the lowest 
responsible bidder, Mr. George Cooper, Manitowoc, Wis., was entered 
into June 14, 1897, for rebuilding superstructure over 500 linear feet of 
the north pier near its outer extremity. Work under this contract has 
begun, and about 80 feet of the old superstructure had been removed on 
June 30, 1897. 

At present, then, there is a channel 20 feet in depth between the piers, 
but storms have somewhat filled in the channel seaward of the piers. 
On the completion of the present contract for rebuilding superstructure 
the work will be in good condition, except the revetment west of the 
Illinois Steel Company's slip, which is very much broken up, and needs 
rebuilding. 

The Illinois Steel Company from time to time has done some dredg- 
ing, especially outside of the piers of the two harbors. 

The expenditure of the appropriation made for this harbor in the act 
of June 3, 1896, in connection with the 20-foot channel in Calumet Eiver, 
now approaching completion, has provided Chicago with the finest har- 
bor on Lake Michigan, capable of receiving and accommodating the 
largest vessels yet afloat on the Great Lakes, as long as the bar at the 
mouth of the river can be kept dredged. With an exterior breakwater 
to prevent formation of this bar there could be little to be desired at 
the present stage of development of wharfage at South Chicago. 
■ The freights here consist almost entirely of heavy, bulky articles, such 
as iron ore, salt, coal, grain, and timber, which require the largest vessels, 
the cheapest freight rates, and the most commodious channels. The 
iron ore in great part comes from natural harbors of great depth, and 
cargoes have been limited by the depth of water at South Chicago, con- 
sequently the increased channels have been at once availed of; also in 
the grain, coal, and salt trade the value of this harbor has become 
apparent, and is evidenced by the doubling of the output from the ele- 
vators at South Chicago in one year. The steamer Queen City took out 
in 1896 a cargo of 208,000 bushels of corn from this port to Buffalo, or 
5,800 tons of 2,000 pounds that established a new record in size of car- 
goes that can now be carried between Chicago and Buffalo. 

The arrivals and departures of steam vessels at South Chicago during 
the past year were 1,454, the registered tonnage 2,116,482 tons, showing 
the average steam vessel to be of 1,456 tons register. 

At Chicago the average registered tonnage of steam vessels arriving 
and departing was 790 tons. 

The average steam vessel trading at South Chicago is larger than at 
any port on the globe, the reason for which, however, is seen in what 



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2804 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

has been stated above, L e., the trade is almost entirely in the balky, 
heavy freights, the more valuable freights, merchandise, package freight, 
etc., as well as pleasure, passenger, and excorsion traffic go to Chicago 
Eiver and Harbor, and the smaller vessels are in snfflcient number to 
reduce the average tonnage. 

PROPOSED APPLICATION OP FUNDS VOW AYAIIiABLB. 

It is proposed to apply these funds to the prosecution of the vrork 
under contract, of rebuilding 500 linear feet superstructure over the 
north pier, and to such work of maintenance as may seem necessary 
from time to time. 

PROPOSED APPLICATION OF FUNDS ASKED FOR FOR THE FISCAL 
YEAR ENDINO JUNE 30, 1899. 

The fact that there are two projects tor this locality, parts of each of 
which have been adopted by Congress, make it necessary to state the 
facts again explicitly. There remains to be done under the projec*.t of 
June 30, 1895, 400 linear feet in extension of the south pier and 500 
linear feet in extension of the north pier, and some minor work, at an 
estimated cost of $79,550. 

Under the supplementary project of February 21, 1896, there remains 
to be done the construction of the outer harbor, and if this latter proj- 
ect be adopted the 900 linear feet of pier extension in the former proj- 
ect is entirely unnecessary. The outer harbor sooner or later must be 
built as a necessity, and it would result in a saving of $79,550 if future 
appropriations went toward the construction of the works demanded 
by the later projects and no further work be done under the project of 
June 30, 1895. 

The estimate submitted is therefore to be considered as for the con- 
struction of the outer harbor under the project or report of February 
21,1896. 

It is proposed to apply such funds as may be granted under this proj- 
ect to extending the outer breakwater on the same line as the shore 
end of the north pier of the Illinois Steel Company's harbor, and to 
dredging the bar at the mouth of Calumet Harbor. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



By act of— 

July 11,1870 $50,000.00 

March 3,1871 50,000.00 

Jnn© 10,1872 40,000.00 

March 3, 1873 40,000.00 

Jnne23,1874 25,000.00 

March 3, 1875 25,000.00 

August 3, 1876 20,000.00 

June 18, 1878 15,000.00 

March 3, 1879 12,000.00 

June 14, 1880 20,000.00 

March 8, 1881 30,000.00 

August 2, 1882 35, 000. 00 

July 5, 1884 20,000.00 



By act of— 

August 5, 1886 flO,000.00 

August 11, 1888 20,000.00 

September 19, 1890. 20, 000. 00 

July 13, 1892 15,000.00 

August 17, 1894 15,000.00 

June 3, 1896 75, 000. 00 

Total 637,400.00 

Expended to June 30, 1897 . . . 512, 731. 28 

Balance unexpended 
June 30, 1897 24^668.72 



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U'PBNDIX I I — ^REPORT OF HAJOB MARSHALL. 28(^ 

Money statement 

balance anexpended $82,911.47 

f amonnt expended daring fiscal year 58,242.75 

balance unexpended 2M,668.72 

ontotanding liabilities $56.81 

amount covered by uncompleted contracts 9, 153. 93 

9,210.74 

balance available 15,457.98 

itimated) required for completion of existing project, Feb> 

1896 1,009,830.00 

itimated) required for completion of existing project, June 

79,550.00 

^t can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 

8oo,ooaoo 

in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
its of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



rapoBaU for dredging in Calumet Harbor. Ulinoie (160,000 oMe yardif 
), received in response to <idveriiemnent of August S, 1896, and opened at It 
£4, 1896, hjf Maj. W. L, Marshall, Corps of JSngimeers. 



B of bidder. 


Address. 


Price 

per 

cubic 

yard. 


Amount. 


Bemarks. 


lell & Co 


Ladington, Mich . 

Milwaukee, Wis.. 
Chicago, Ili 

.... do 


OenU. 
•A 

13 

17 

23 

9 

U 
12 


$16,620 

20,800 
27,200 

21,440 
16,640 

86,aoo 

14,400 

22,400 
10,200 


Plant with which they pro- 
pose tooommenoe work not 
specilied. 
Do. 


Vogel 


LatB Towing and 
Hills &Co 


Do. 
Do. 


ckney&Cnun... 

redging and Dock 
>rewa Go... 


Detroit, Mich 

Chicago, 111 

do 


Plant with which they pnv 
pose to commence work not 
specified. Justification of 
guarantors irregular. 

P&ntwith which they pro- 

specifled. 
Plant with which they pro- 
pose to commence work not 
specified. Lowest bid. 

Plant with which they pro- 
pose to commence work n ot 
specified. 


BdffingCo 

redJKingCo 


Racine, Wis 

Chicago, lU 



roposals for pier extension, Calumet Harbor, Illinois (800 linear feet, more 
^ced in response to €Ulvertisement of August S, 1896, and opened at Ig m., 
1896, by Maj, W, L, Marshall, Corps of Engineers. 



le and address of bidder. 



Hemlock timber 

(788,448 feet 

B.M.). 



PerM 
feet 

B.M. 



Amount 



Pine timber 

(278,080 feet 

B.M.). 



PerM 
feet 
B.M. 



Amonnl 



Pine piles (13). 



Each. 



Amounts 



>od and Donald A. McLeod, 

e». Mich 

a & Toung, Chicago, lU — 

tar Construction and Dredging 

sago. 111 

i Luta Towing and Dock Co., 

IS Si. Conndl Co.',Chicafl;oj ui! ' ! '. 

lonroe, (TharleToix, Mien 

3rewsCo., Chicago, 111 

redglngCo.,Chiiigo,IU 



$16.00 
18.60 

16.60 

16.26 
19.00 
15.00 
16.26 
16.00 



$12, 615. 17 
14,586.29 

12,220.94 

12,028.83 
14, 980. 51 
11,826.72 
12,812.28 
11,826.72 



$21.60 
24.60 

20.00 

10.60 
M.00 
21.00 
21.00 
10.60 



078.72 
812.06 



6,561.60 



422.66 
230.08 



L66 



$1L00 
8.26 

7.60 

8.60 
7.50 
9.00 
6.00 
9.10 



$143.00 
107.25 

07.60 

110.60 
97.60 

117.00 
78.00 

118.80 



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2806 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 
Ahttract of propasaU for pier exteiman, Calumet Harbor, IllinoUf etc, — Continned. 



No. 



iTame tnd address of Udder. 



Oak piles (320). 



Each. Amount. 



Oak planks 

(16,280 feet 

B.M.). 



PerM 

feet 

B.M. 



Amonnt 



Per 
pound. 



Driftbdlts 
(81,504 ponnds). 



Amoiint 



Wm. MoLeod and Donald A. McLeod.Man- 
istee,Mioh 

Blcbardson & Yoang, Chicago, 111 

Chicago Star Construction and Dredging 
Co., Chicago. HI 

Hausler & Luis Towing and Dock Co., 
(niicago,Ill.a 

Fits Simons & Connell Co., Chicago, 111..., 

Eslow & Monroe, Charlevoix, Mien 

L jdon & Drews Co., Chicago, HI , 

Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, HI 



$14. OD 
10.40 

&86 

8.50 
9.50 
10.50 
8.00 
0.10 



$4,480.00 $30.00 



3,828.00 

2,832.00 

2,720.00 
3,040.00 
3, 360. 00 
2,560.00 
2,012.00 



26.80 

28.76 

28.00 
35.00 
31.00 
80.00 
80.00 



$488.40 
436.30 

435.40 

455.84 
569.80 
501.68 
488.40 
488.40 



OentM, 

il 

2.5 

2.5 
3 

4 
2 
2.51 



$2,037.60 
1.833.84 

2,037.60 

2,037.00 
2,445.12 
8,260.10 
1,630.06 
1,087.60 



No. 



Kame and address of bidder. 



Per 
pound. 



Spikes (2,000 
pounds). 



Amt. 



Per 
pound. 



Screw holts 
(5,500 pounds) 



Amt. 



Per 
pound. 



Ulster chain 
(130 ponnd^. 



Ami. 



Stone (2,416 
cords). 



Per 
cord. 



Amount 



Wm. McLeod and Donald A. 

McLeod, Manistee, Mich 

Richardson Sc Young, Chicago, 

ni 

Chicago Star Construction and 

Dredging Co., Chicago, 111 ... 
Hansler & Lnts Towing and 

Dock Co., Chicago, lU.a 

Fits Simons St C<mnell Co.t 

Chicago, ni 

Eslow & Monroe, Charlevoix, 

Mich 

Lydon & Drews CcChicaso, 111 . 
Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, 



Oenta. 
8 

2i 

4 

4 

8 

4 
8 



$60.00 

'50.00 

80.00 

80.00 

60.00 

80.00 
60.00 

60.00 



OenU. 

2. 8 $154. 00 



137.50 

165.00 

165.00 

220.00 

802.50 
165.00 

165.00 



OenU. 
50 

7 

6 

10 

5 

10 
7 

10 



$65.00 

9.10 

7.80 

13.00 

6.50 

13.00 
9.10 

13.00 



$6.00 

6.68 

6.60 

5.00 

6.00 

6.00 
6.10 

5.50 



$14,496.00 

13.722.88 

13,629.60 

12,060.00 

14,496.00 

14,496.00 
14,737.60 

18,288.00 



Ko. 



Name and address of bidder. 



Boiler iron (920 
pounds). 



Per 
pound. 



Amount. 



Dredging (6,880 
cubic yards). 



Per 
cubic 
yard. 



TotaL 



Amount. 



Wm. McLeod and Donald A. McLeod. Manistee, 
Mich 

Richardson &. Young, Chicago, 111 

Chicago Star Ckinstruction and Dredging Co., 
Chicago, ni 

Hausler & Luts Towing and Dock Co., Chicago, 
HI.* 

Fits Simons & Connell (3o., Chicago, HI 

Eslow 6l Monroe, Charlevoix, Mich 

Lydon St Drews Co., Chicago, 111 , 

Green's Dredging Co., Chicago, lU 



OenU. 
30 
3.5 



10 
6 
6 
8 
6 



$276.00 
32.20 

27.60 

02.00 
46.00 
46.00 
27.60 
55.20 



OenU. 
35 
12 

16 

18 
20 
20 
12 
9 



$2,408.00 
825.60 

1,032.00 

1,238.40 

1,376.00 

1,376.00 

825.60 

619. 20 



$48,20L89 
41,88L92 

88.027.13 

86,438.73 
44,567.51 
41,221.74 
89.233.34 
37,006.98 



a Lowest bid. Irregular. Proposal not signed in ooiporation's name; guarantee made in coipora* 
tlon'sname. 



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APPENDIX I I REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2807 



proposaUfor rebuilding superstructure over north pier, Calumet Harbor ^ Illi- 
red in response to advertisement of Man ^^t ^SQT, and opened at 12 m., June 8, 
\£aj, W, L, Marshall, Corps of Engineers, 



d address 
dder. 



Whito-pino 
timber, framed 
and secnred in 
work (146. 400 

feetQ.M.). 



Wronght- 
iron drift- 

iMiltoin 

work (16,806 

ponnds). 



Stone in 

work (30 

cordn of 128 

cubic feet 

each). 



White-oak 
pilen, driven, 

Hawed off, 
and necured 
in place (13). 



Dredge 
chain, se- 
cured in 
place (130 
pounds). 



TotiJ. 



aier & 
Chicago, 

&. Lntz 
ig and 
Co., Chi- 

HI 

J. Gay- 
Lndiug- 
[ich.a... 

Cooper, 
itowoc, 

& Peter 
ion. Chi- 
lli 

Dredg. 
Jo., Chi- 
lli , 

Star Con- 
ion and 
rfng Co., 
go. 111... 
fc l>rews 
CHiicago, 



$38.!i0 

23.00 
28.00 
28.00 
24.75 
25.00 

26.50 
24.50 



$5,636.40 

3,367.20 
4, 090. 20 
3,367.20 
8,633.40 
3.660.00 

3,879.60 
3,586.80 



GtM. 
3 



^ 
n 

2.8| 

2 
2| 



$506.88 

422.40 
422.40 
422.40 
464.64 
478.00 

337.92 
422.40 



$8.00 

6.00 
6.00 
6.00 
6.60 
7.00 

6.00 
6.00 



$240. 00 $15. 00 $196. 00 



180.00 
180.00 
180.00 
196.00 
210.00 

180.00 
180.00 



14.00 
13.00 
11.00 
13.50 
10.80 

12.60 
9.00 



r 



182.00 
160.00 
148.00 
175.50 
140.40 

163.80 
117.00 



Oti. 
20 



10 
7 
12 

8* 
10 



$26.00 

13.00 
9.10 
16.60 
11.05 
13.00 

0.10 
7.80 



$6,604.28 

4.164.00 
4, 879. 70 
4,128.20 
4,460.50 
4,406.40 

4,670.42 
4,314.00 



a Justification before notary public. 



h Lowest bid. 



ontractsfor improving Calumet Harbor, Illinois, in force during fiscal year 
ending June SO, 1897, 



!fjt^' **'***'*' Nature of contract. Date. 



To expire— 



Remarks. 



age & Son, Chi- 



its Towing and 
Chicago, lU. 
■ews Co., Chi- 

er, Manitowoc, 



Dredging at en- 
trance to harbor. 



Pier extension. 
Dredging 



Rebuilding super- 
structure. 



June 12, 1806 

Sept 1,1886 

do 

June 14, 1897 



July 81. 1896 

June 30, 1897 
July 81, 1807 
Aug. 31, 1807 



Extended to and 
completed Aug. 90, 
1806. 

Completed. 

Completed Nor. SI, 



etbport of mr. o. a. m. uljencraih^; assistant enoinebr. 

United States Enqineer Office, 

Chicago, 111,, Julg 1, 1897. 
I have the honor to snbmit herewith a report on operations in Calumet 
inois, during the fiscal year ending June 30^ 18()7. 

sginnine of the year there was one contract in force with Messrs. Norris G. 
Son, of Chicago, 111., dated June 12, 1896, for deepening the channel 
le piers and through the bar at the harbor entrance, to a width consistent 
mailable amonnt of funds and the price bid, and to a depth of 2^ feet 
water of 1847, by the removal of 27,500 cubic yards, more or les^, of materiid, 
of 17i cents per cubic yard. Work under this contract commenced dnrinff 
18 year, on the 18th of June, 1896, and at the end of that month (the end 
d year) 5,200 cubic yards had been removed. The Illinois Steel Company 
,0 the beginning of the work under this contract, dredged a channel from the 
lir slip. This was 100 feet in width, with its northerly limit 70 feet south 
ih pier. Work nnder the contract waft therefore done north and south of 
el, until the slip was reached, after which the channel was dredged to 



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2808 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMt. 

withiD 50 feet of each of the piers. This work was done under a special anthority, 
and with fands from an unexpended halauce of the appropriation of An^ust 17, 1894. 

In the act of Congress of Jane 3, 1896, an appropriation of $75,000 was made for 
the improvement of this harhor. Bids were accordingly advertised for, and opened 
on the 24th of August, 1896, for, first, completing the dredging of the channel 
farther up the river, and to within 25 feet of the piers, and to a depth of 20 feet 
below low wat«r of 1847; and second, the extension of the south pier 800 linear feet. 

These contracts were awarded to the lowest bidders, respectively, viz: The first to 
the Lydon & Di*ews Company, of Chicago, 111., for dredging 160,000 cubic yards, 
more or less, of material, at the rat« of 9 cents per cubic yard — the lowest price ever 
received in this harbor. The second to the Uausler & Lutz Towing and Dock 
Company, of South Chicago, 111., for pier extension, 800 linear feet, at the rates for 
work done and materials secured in place, as given hereafter in the copy of the lost 
estimate. 

Both these contracts were entered into on the Ist of September, 1896. 

On the 8th of June, 1897, bids were opened for the rebuilding of the superstmo- 
ture, six courses high, over the outer 500 linear feet of the North Pier, and for a 
* clump of piles at the end thereof. A contract for this work was awarded on the 
14th of the same month to Mr. George Cooper, of Manitowoc, Wis., the lowest 
bidder, at the following rates, viz: For pine timber, $23 per M feet B. M. ; for 
wronght-iron drift bolts, 2^ cents per pound; for stone, $6 per cord of 128 on bio 
feet; for white-oak piles, $11 each; and for Ulster iron chain, 12 cent<s per pound. 

The prices bid were for all materials secured in place, and included also the 
removal of the old work and the replacing of the old stone, and the elevated walk; 
if required. 

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR. 

Work under contract with Messrs. Norris G. Dodge & Son was completed on the 
26th of Angnst, 1896, after a total of 27,537.2 cubic yards of material had been 
removed (including the amount dredged during the previous fiscal year, 5,200 cubic 
yards). The time originally fixed for the expiration of the contract was July 31, 
bat, owing to the very unfavorable weather prevailing during that season, an exten- 
sion of time was granted to the 20th of August. Owing further to some special, 
necessary work in the draws of the Ninety-second Street bridfi[e, done under a 
special written agreement, the completion of the contract was delayed until the 
date given above. The contractors received the final payment and the contract was 
closed. 

Dredging operations under contract with The Lydon & Drews Compaay com- 
menced on the 7th of September, with three dredges and eight dump scows. In 
consideration of the very low price for this work, the contractors were allowed to 
extend their operations some distance beyond what has been considered as the 
boundary between the river and the harbor (the intersection with the original shore 
line), and thus the material removed exceeded that contracted for by 40,669.4 cubic 
yards, amounting in all to 2(X),669.4 cubic yards. The contract was completed on the 
18th of November, 1896; the contractors received the final payment on the 20th of 
that month, and the contract was closed. The channel dredged under this contract 
extended from deep water in the lake to the Car Ferry Company's slip. 

The work of extending the south pier 800 linear feet, under contract with the 
Hausler & Lutz Towine and Dock Company, was commenced on the 23d of Septem- 
ber, 1896, and completed on the 30th of June, 1897. The contractors deserve special 
mention for the class of work done under this contract. The alignment and level of 
the work are exceptionally good, and the materials used were of exceptionally good 
quality. The last estimate was submitted for payment and the contract closed, and 
as this estimate gives a full account of all the materials used under the contract, 
and also the prices paid, it is submitted herewith. It is as follows : 

808,966.6 feet B. M. hemlock timber, at $15.25 $12,336.74 

281,686 feet B. M. pine timber, at $19.50 5,492.88 

20,917 feet B. M. oak plank, at $28 585. 68 

320 pine piles, at $8.50 each 2,720.00 

13 white-oak piles, at $8.50 each 110.60 

82,056 pounds wrought-iron driftbolts, at 2^ cents 2, 051. 40 

6,480.4 pounds wrought-iron screw bolts, at 3 cents 194. 41 

2,205 pounds wrouj^ht-iron spikes, at 4 cents 88.20 

222 pounds Ulster iron chain, at 10 cents 22.10 

819 pounds boiler iron, at 10 cents 81.90 

2,326.12 cords of stone, at $5 per cord 11,630.60 

4^19. 1 cubic yards of dredging, at 18 cents per cubic yard 759. 44 

Total 36,073.95 

The payments previoosly made aggregated 31,048.22 

And the contractors were paid 6,025.73 

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Appendix i i — ^report op major Marshall. 2809 

The cribs in tliis work were 8 in nnmber, 100 ^t each in length, 20 feet in width, 
and 16 courses (16i feet) in height. 

The first crib was sank on the 22d of October, 1896, the last on the 11th of May, 
1897. They were covered by a snperstrnctare 6 feet high, similar in construction to 
that of the crib. Some new innovations were adopted for this work. Experience 
bfls shown that in pier work of this kind the coursers at or near the water level 
become in time very seriously affected by the action of ice, which in many cases has 
worn away the otherwise sound timbers to abnost half of their width, leaving a 
very poor support for a new superstructure, when needed. To protect these timbers 
an ice guard was constructed along the new work. This consists of 2 by 12 inch oak 
pladk, 5 feet in length, spiked on to the work perpendicularly, so that the bottom 
would reach 2 feet below low water and the top 3 feet above. A 3 by 12 inch oak wale 
was afterwards bolted on to bind the whole together. Another deviation from the 
usual modes of construction was the strengthening of the comers at the end of the 
pier by surrounding them with a covering of boiler iron, in a similar manner to that 
used in Chicago Harbor a few years ago. For further protection of the end of the 
pier, a clump of 13 oak piles was placed there, with its center about 15 feet there- 
from and in line with the channel-side longitudinals. Riprap was placed along 
both sides of the pier and around the clump. 

A walk, consisting of two 3 by 12 inch hemlock plank laid side by side, was laid 
along the middle of the pier and throughout its whole length. 

The outer 500 linear feet of the north pier have for some time been in need of 
repair. On account of the exceptionally low prices at which the work of the south 
pier extension was made, there was an unexpended balance available, sufficient in 
amount to have this work done, which was the more needed on account of a pro- 
posed new iron light-house, as substitute for the old frame beacon located at the 
end of. that pier. Authority was obtained for rebuilding the superstructure. Bids 
were opened on the 8th of June, 1897. Mr. George Cooper, of Manitowoc, Wis., was 
the lowest bidder and he was awarded the contract on the 14th of the same month. 
The removal of the old work under this contract was commenced on the 25th of June. 
About 80 linear feet were removed, but no new work was done. 

TOTAL WORK DONB UNDER THE C0KTRACT8. 

The contract with Messrs. NoiTis G. Dodge & Son was completed on the 26th of 
August, 1896. The total amount of work done was the removal of 27,537.2 cubic 
yards of material. 

The contract with the Lydon & Drews Company was begun on the 7th of Septem- 
ber, 1896, and completed on the 18th of November of the same year. The total 
amount dredged under this contract was 200,669.4 cubic yards. 

The contract with the Hausler & Lutz Towing and Dock Company was begun on 
the 23d of September, 1896, and completed on the 30th of June, 1897. Eight hun- 
dred linear feet of new pier extension was completed, and one clump of piles, under 
this contract. Under contract with Mr. George Cooper, 80 linear feet of the old 
superstructure over the North Pier was removed, but no new work was done. Work 
under this contract commenced on the 25th of June, 1897. 

PRESEin' CONDITION OP THE HARBOR. 

The harbor channel between the piers has now a depth of 20 feet, but through the 
outside bar it has filled in more or less, since the dredging operations were completed, 
by the numerous storms of this year. This will undoubtedly recur regularly until 
the proposed northerly breakwater has been built to protect this area. The North 
Pier, east of the Illinois Steel Company's Slip, is in good condition, except the super- 
structure, which is just about to be rebuilt. The revetment west of the slip is very 
much broken up. The adjoining land belongs to the Steel Company. The South 
Pier is in good condition, with the exception of about 500 linear feet, which is in 
need of new superstructure. 

llie Illinois Steel Company has done some dredging at their own expense in the 
channel, through the outer bar, and in their own harbor during the past year. 

A map showing work done during the year and work proposed to be done during 
the ensuing year is respectfully submitted herewith. 

I am, M^jor, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. A. M. LiLJENCRANTZ, 

A$9%8tant Engineer. 

M^}. W. L. Marshall, 

CarpB of Engineeri, U, 8, A* 



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2810 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

I I 4. 

IMPROVEMENT OF CALUMET RIVER, ILLINOIS AND INDIANA. 

The object of this work as originally projected was to secure a chan- 
nel 16 feet in depth, 200 feet wide, from the mouth of the river to one- 
half mile east of Hammond, Ind., to increase the facilities for handling 
the commerce of this region and to give relief to the overcrowded port 
of Chicago. 

The history of the work, especially as regards the conditions imposed 
by various river and harbor acts of Congress, maybe found in the Annual 
Keports of the Chief of Engineers prior to 1890, especial attention being 
invited to the Report of 1889, page 2142. 

The United States have acquired the right of way and releases from 
claims for damages by reason of the improvement of Calumet River 
over the stretch from the mouth of the river to the outlet from Lake 
Calumet, the limits of the improved channel to be dock lines 200 feet 
apart, which have been established by authority of the Secretary of War. 

The improvement above the forks, or from the forks to one-half mile 
east of Hammond, Ind., can not be made of the full width of 200 feet 
until the right of way and releases from damages have been acquired 
by the United States. In view of this fact, under provisions of various 
acts of Congress, the work has been subdivided into two sections — 

(1) From the mouth of the river to the forks of the Calumet ("Below 
the Forks"). 

(2) From the forks to one-half mile east of Hammond, Ind. 

No steps have been authorized by Congress or undertaken by parties 
interested to secure rights of way and releases from damage claims for 
the improvement above the forks, and consequently work has been car- 
ried on in desultory fashion over that section in an attempt to secure a 
channel 60 feet wide and 10 feet deep. This section is part of an old 
river, now dead, or without current to carry off the filth cast into it from 
slaughter houses and manufactories near Hammond and from the sew- 
ers of the town. The dredged channels were filled up with filthy deposits 
as fast as excavated, and after repeated attempts to secure the depths 
sought the work was abandoned in 1896, for reasons more fully given 
in the Report of the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, for that 
year. 

On the lower section of the river, or from its mouth to the forks of the 
Calumet — this section lies wholly within the State of Illinois — system- 
atic work has been carried on since 1888 up to the close of the fiscal 
year 1896 to secure a channel 200 feet wide and 16 feet deep, and prior 
to that date the work had been extended as far as to One hundred and 
eighteenth street crossing, a distance of 3J miles, with the exception of 
a short stretch of rock and hardpan, involving the future excavation 
of about 9,000 cubic yards of rock in place, over which stretch the full- 
depth channel is only 80 feet wide. The work deteriorated rapidly in 
depth near the upstream limit and much of it had been dredged the 
second time. 

In view of the rapid increase in size and draft of vessels on the Great 
Lakes, due the near completion of an enlarged channel between Duluth, 
Chicago, and Buffalo, and of the impracticability of speedily providing 
elsewhere at Chicago a channel of sufficient capacity for such large 
vessels. Congress provided in the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, 
that the Calumet River may be dredged to a depth of 20 feet for 2 miles 
southward from the mouth. The elevators, coal and salt docks, and 
principal establishments along the river are within this 2-mile limit. 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2811 

CONDITION OP THE WORK JUNE 30, 1897, 

There have been remoyed by dred^ng between the month of the 
river and One hundred and eighteenth street, in making the 16-foot 
channel, 1,436,358 cubic yards, and in maintaining this channel by 
redredging 330,862 cabic yards, or in all on this 16-foot project 1,767,220 
cubic yards. 

In dredging the 20-foot channel, about 1^ miles have been completed 
to full dimensions, from which 222,400 cubic yards have been removed. 

In the attempt to make and maintain a channel 60 feet wide and 10 
feet deep from the forks to one-half mile east of Hammond, Ind., there 
has been done in primary dre<lging to make the channel 150,094 cubic 
yards, and in redredging 98,422 cubic yards. The channel is now in 
much worse condition than when the work begun. 

The channel below the forks fills in at the rate of about 22,340 cubic 
yards per mile per annum, and there remains about 240,000 cubic yards 
of redredging to restore the channel to its full depth between the end 
of the 20-foot channel, near One hundred and sixth street, and the end 
of the dredged 16-foot channel, at One hundred and eighteenth street. 
Above One hundred and eighteenth street boats caMrying more than 7 
feet can not pass, and in the vicinity of Hammond, Ind., it will be 
difficult for boats to navigate drawing as much as 5 feet. 

WORE DONE DXTRING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1897. 

The river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, appropriated $50,000, and 
therein Congress adopted the project contained in the report of Feb- 
ruary 21, 1896, as far as to authorize the.Oalumet Eiver to be dredged 
to a depth of 20 feet from the mouth of the river a distance of 2 miles 
southward therefipom. With the approval of the Chief of Engineers, 
United States Army, a contract was entered into with 0. E. Mitchell 
& Co., Ludington, Mich., the lowest responsible bidders for the work, 
September 1, 1896, for dredging 320,000 cubic yards, more or less, at 13| 
cents per cubic yard, measured in place. Work began under the con- 
tract September 15, 1896, and at the close of the year, June 30, 1896, 
there had been removed 222,400 cubic yards, carrying the 20-foot chan- 
nel from the mouth of the river, at Calumet Harbor, a distance of 1^ 
miles southward. 

The estimate for the work was $51,700, and the amount appropriated 
will barely accomplish it. 

The want of a turning or winding basin in Calumet Eiver was so 
evident and urgent that one was laid out in the old channel at the cut- 
off, opposite the Counselman Elevators slip, giving sufficient room for 
turning or winding the largest vessels trading on the Great Lakes. 
Similar basins should be constructed at intervals of 1 mile in any waters 
under control of the United States for purposes of navigation. Such 
places exist in the old beds of the river where cut-offs have been made 
in straightening the channel, and tiie dock lines should be changed to 
pre-empt such basins. 

Kow that a sufficient channel has been made in the lower part of the 
Calumet Biver, this harbor is one of the best on Lake Michigan. Large 
vessels can enter and reach their berths with little or no aid from tugs, 
and the bridges, with the exception of the three bridges nearly in con- 
tact of the Baltimore and Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Lake Shore rail- 
roads, are not obstructive for the largest vessels. The three bridges 
named require removal or material modification. 



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2812 REPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF BKGtNEEBS, U. 8. ARMY. 

PBOPOSED USES OF FUNDS NOW ON HAND AND THOSE ASKED FOB 
FOB THE FISCAL 1?BAB ENDING JUNE 30, 1899. 

It is proposed to expend the fands now on band in carr3^ng on and 
completing the work on the 20-foot channel. 

It is proposed to apply tbe funds asked for to redredging the 16-foot 
channel from One hundred and sixth street to One hundr^ and eight- 
eenth street and to extending this channel southward from One hun- 
dred and eighteenth street. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 



By act of— 

July5,1884 $50,000.00 

Augusts, 1886 30,000.00 

August 11, 1888 50,000.00 

September 19, 1890 50, 000. 00 

July 13, 1892 75,000.00 

AagOBt 17, 1894 45,000.00 



By act of— 

Jane 3, 1896 $60,000.00 

Total*. 350,000.00 

Expended to June 30, 1896. . . 317, 336. 28 

Balance unexpended June 80, 
1896 32,668.72 



Money stai-ement. 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $58,157.98 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year.... 25,494.21 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 32,663.72 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $100.00 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 22, 433. 03 

22,683.03 

July 1, 1897, balance available 10, ISO. 69 



{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 700, 000. 00 
Amount that can be probtably expended in fiscal year endi ng J une 30, 1899 250, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirement-s of sections 2 of river an<* 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



Abstract of propoMoU for dredging in Calumet Biver, IlUnois {StO,000 oubie yards, more 
or less), received in response to advertisement of August S, 1896, and opened at 1$ m,, 
August 24, 1896, ly Maj, W. L, Marshall, Corps of Engineers, 



No. 



ITame of bidder. 



AddraM. 



Price 

pep 

onbio 

yard. 



Amonnt. 



G. E. Mitchell & Co.a 

Arthnr H. Voeel 

W.A.McGilli8&Co 

Carkin, Stickney &. Cram h 

GhicaKo Dredging and Dock Co. , 

Raoine Dredge Co , 

Lydon & Drews Co 

Oreen'a Dredging Co 



Lndington, Mich . 
Hilwaokee. Wia.. 

Chicago, HI 

Detroit, Mich 

ChicagOjIU 

Racine, wia 

Chicago, HI 

do 



Omtt. 
13i 

16« 

13i 

16 

24 

17 

14 



$42, 400. 00 
49,000,00 
52,480.00 
42, 800. 00 
51,200.00 
76,800.00 
64,400.00 
44,800.00 



aLoweetbid. 



6 Jnstifloation of gnarantorB irregular. 



Contract for improving Calumet Biver, Illinois, in force during fiscal year ending June 30, 

1897. 



Kama and addreas of contractor. 


Katore of contract. 


Date. 


To expire. 


CS-Mitohea A Co., Lndington, liloh 


Died ffinir ................... 


Sept 1,1806 


Sept 1.1897 





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APPENDIX I I — ^BEPOBT OF MAJOB MABSHALL. 



2813 



bport of mb. o. ▲. m. liljbngrantz, assistant ek6inebs. 

United States Engineer Office, 

CUoago, III, July S, 1897, 
have the honor to Babmit herewith a report on operations in Calamet 
ns and Indiana, for the fiscal year ending Jane 30, 1897. 
Qrinning of the year there was no contract in force for any work to be done 
^TOTement of this river, bat, money having been appropriated for this 
the act of Congress of June 3, 1896, bids were advertised for and opened 
of Angnst following. A contract was entered into with the lowest bid- 
I.C. E.Mitchell & Co., of Lndington, Mich., on the Ist of September of 
ar for dredging the channel from the month of the river to One hnndred 
breet Bridge, a distance of 2 miles, to a depth of 20 feet below low- water 
the removal of 320,000 cubic yards, more or less, of material, at the rate 
I per cnbio yard 

WORK DONE DURING THE TEAR. 

der the contract commenced on the 15th of September, 1896, with one 
nglng to Messrs. Norris G. Dodg:e A Son. Later the plant was increased 
he contractors' own dredges, which had been delayed on their way to this 
» prevailing severe storms of the season. The progress was quite slow 
ae. On the 30th of November the channel was completed for a distance 
t, or up to the Counselman Elevators slip. 

of a basin for large vessels to turn around in had been apparent for some 
he old channel opposite the just-mentioned slip offering a favorable 
ich a basin, it was then decided to construct one at that place with the 
as that given to the river, and this was done. It was completed on the 
ember, 1896, after which operations were closed for the season. Work 
d on the 30th of March, 1897, but, the progress continuing slow and below 
ments of the contract (60,OKX) cubic yards per month), the contractors 
led that no payments would be made until the terms of the contract were 
ith, and accordingly no payment was made in the month of April. Ilie 
secured then, on the 8th of May following, the services of an additional 
onging to the Sheboygan Dredging and Dock Company, and the results 
ially improved. 

t amount of material removed up to the end of the fiscal year can not be 
he payments are made according to measurement in place, and the work 
g the month of June, though practically completed, has not yet been 
The channel completed prior to June 1, and paid for, was 4,726 feet in 
contained, including the turning basin, 167,4^ cubic yards. The chan- 
was about completed at the close of the month of June, is 2,060 feet in 
will contain about 55,000 cubic yards of material. On this basis there 
tmoved up to the end of the year about 222,400 cubic yards, completing 
1 for a distance of 6,786 feet, or slightly in excess of 1^ miles. Large 
lavs occasionally been found in the channel. On the 30th of June last 
1 of one of these occupied four and three-fourths hours, 
was done daring the year in the river above the forks. 

PRESENT OONDITION OF THE RIVER. 

%t present a 20-foot channel from deep water in the lake to the Chicago 
ing CompauVs dry dock. Thence to One hundred and sixth street there 
bge deptn of from 16 to 17 feet, which, however, is to be increased to 20 
^ the present working season. No soundings have been taken above One 
id sixth Strest Bridge since the writing of last year's report. 

PROGRESS OF THE RIVER IMPROVEMENT. 

bowing the total amount of work done in this river since the beginning 
rovement is respectfully submitted herewith. This shows the various 
mder which work has been done with results and details pertaining to 



WORK PROPOSED FOR THE ENSUING YEAR. 

>osed to continue and complete the work provided for under the existing 
D wit, the deepening of the channel to 20 feet below low water of 1847 
) One hnndred and sixth Street Bridge. The available funds will be suf- 
bhis work but not for any work beyond this place, wherefore the redredg- 
}hannel between One hundred and seventh and One hundred and eleventh 
>vided for in the specifications in case the available funds shoold permit, 
I done under this contract. 



I; 



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2814 BEPOUT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

According to the terms of the contract the work mast be completed on or before 
the Ist of September; 1897. It probably will if the plant in use at present is main- 
tained at work. 

I am, M^or, very respeotfaUj; your obedient servant, 

O. A. M. LUJBNCBANTZ, 

AsiUtant Engineer. 
M%j. W. L, Marshall^ 

Corpa of JEngineere, U. 8, A. 



ACCOUNT OF UIPBOYEMENT OF CALUMET RIVER, ILLINOIS AND INDIANA. 

A.Selow the forks; channel 200 feet toide. 
[Contraota 1 to 5, 16 feet deep ; oontraot 6, 20 feet deep.] 



Contract. 








Period of work. 






No. 


t>ate. 


Contractor. 


Beginning. 


Ending. 


New 
channel. 


Re- 

dredg. 

ing. 


TotaL 


1 


Nov. 5,1888 
Dec. 10,1890 
Oct. 28.1892 

a May, 1894 
Oct. 1, 1894 
Sept. 1,1896 


W.A.McGffli»&Co.... 

Wheeler Sl Purcell 

Shebovean Dredge and 

W.A.McGillia&Co.... 
do 


May 4,1889 
Apr. 6,1891 
May 30,1893 

May 24,1894 
Oct. 1, 1894 
Sept. 15, 1896 


Deo. 21, 1890 
June 30, 1892 
May 9,1894 

Aug. 22, 1894 
Aug. 20, 1895 
In force 


OvMeydt. 
365.710 


0u.yd9. 


Oubieydt. 
771,737 


) 




365, 719 


8 

4 




298,902 


101,632 

50,035 
179,195 


400.534 
50,035 


5 




179. 195 
222,400 





C.E. Mitchell A Co 

Total to end of fla* 
calyear. 


5222,400 










1,658,758 


330,862 


1,989,620 








No. 


Contractor. 


Price per 
cubic yard. 


Cost of— 


Length of channel 
improved. 




New channeL 


Redredging. 


New. 


Redredged. 


\ 


W.A.McGilli8&0o.... 

Wheeler APurcell 

Sheboygan Di^ge and 
Dock Co 


Genu. 
11.75 
12.25 

10.7 
10.7 
16.5 
13.25 


190,679.10 
44,800.58 

81,982.52 




Feet. 
12,165 
4,020 

3,333 


Fe9L 


2 






8 


$10,874.62 
5, 353. 74 
29,567.16 


2,300 


4 


W. A. Gillie & Co 

do 


e8,700 


5 






11,820 


9 


C.B. Mitchell & Co 


29,468.00 


d6,786 












Total t( 
caly< 


)endof fis- 
)iir 




IM. 030. 90 


45, 795. 52 


26,304 


14.128 

























a A special agreement. 
* ' 'nately.' 

nnt being only 
not included in total length dredged. 



b Approzimali 
eThist 



amount being only for "half width " and other half being done under following contract, la 

ided in total length dredged. 

dNew as a 20-foot channel but where dredging had been previously done to 16 feet. 

B,^Jbove theforke; channel 60 to 70 feet wide, 10 feet deep. 



Contract. 


Contractor. 


Period of work. 


Amounts dredged. 




No. 


Date. 


Beginning. 


Ending. 


New 
channel. 


Re- 
dredg- 
ing. 


Total. 


1 


Aug. 11, 1887 
Oct. 31,1888 
Oct 28,1892 

Oct 1,1894 


S.O. Dixon 


Sept., 1887 
May 7,1889 
May 15,1893 

Oct. 11,1894 


May 5,1888 
Aug. 12, 1889 
June 5,1^94 

a Dec. 6,1894 


Cubieyde. 
76,804 
54,100 
19,190 


Cu^yd*. 

*i6,'728 
72, 772 

14.924 


CvJbicydM. 
76,804 


2 
8 

4 


Bnrdick&McMahon.... 

Wisconsin Dredge and 
Dock Co. 

McMahon & Montgom- 
ery Co. 

rCotal to end of fis- 
cal year. 


64,826 
91,962 

14,924 










150,094 


98,422 


248,516 









a The contract was canceled at the request of contractors March 18, 1895. 



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Jtu^ 



r 



r56 2 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2815 





B,—Ah<n}e the forks; ehannel 60 to 70 feet wide, 10 feet dMp~Oontinaed. 


T7i> 


Contractor. 


Price per 
cubic yard. 


Cost of— 


liCngth of channel 
improTed. 




New ohanneL 


Bedredging. 


New. 


Kedreaged. 


I 


R.O INxon 


OentM, 
11 
22 

13.7 

12.9 


$8,448.44 
11,902.00 

2,629.03 




Feet. 
4,900 
5,600 

2.900 


FeeL 


2 
3 


Bardick 6t. McMahon . . . 

WiftOOQBln Dredg and 

Dock Co 


$2,959.72 
9,909.76 
1,925.20 


2,200 
4.900 


4 


MoMahon Sc Montgom- 
0ry Co 


1,500 




Total to end of fla- 
caI vear. ........ 












22,979.47 


14,254.68 


13,400 


8,600 











lis. 

IMPROVEMENT OP ILLINOIS EIVEB, ILLINOIS. 

The object of this improvement is to secure ultimately, iu Connection 
with an enlargement of the Illinois and Mississippi Canal, or an equiv- 
alent enlarged channel, a waterway from the southern end of Lake 
Michigan to the Mississippi Eiver of sufficient capacity for large-sized 
Mississippi Eiver steamboats, and for military and naval purposes. 

The present project was adopted in 1880, and contemplates the exten- 
sion of the slack- water improvement begun by the State of Illinois, 
from the mouth of Copperas Creek to the Mississippi Eiver at Grafton, 
111., a distance of 135 miles. The project includes the construction of 
two locks, each 350 feet in length of chamber, 75 feet in width, and 
with 7 feet depth at low water over sills, and dredging the channel 
where necessary to secure that depth of water at low water throughout 
the pools created by the dams. 

The locks and dams have been completed and have been in use since 
1889 and 1893, respectively. One is situated at Lagrange, 79 miles 
above the mouth of the Illinois, the other at Kampsville^31 miles from 
the Mississippi. 

The State of Illinois, aided by the United States, has executed part 
of the general project by the construction of locks and dams at Henry 
and Copperas Creek, completing, except dredging, that part of the proj- 
ect between Lasalle and the mouth of Copperas Creek, a distance of 
about 90 miles, over which section the State of Illinois collects tolls. 

In executing this work the United States has expended prior to June 
30, 1897, $1,344,090.62, including $25,000 from appropriation of August 
11, 1888, for surveys, and exclusive of $62,359.80 expended upon a foun- 
dation for Copperas Creek Lock, afterwards completed by the State of 
Illinois. 

An additional amount of $747,747 was expended by the State of 
Illinois at Henry and Copperas Creek. 

CONDITION OF THE WORK JUNE 30, 1897. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, the following work was 
done: 

The condition of the dredging plant as reported in the last annual 
report was such that it was necessary to practically rebuild the dredges 
and tenders. Consequently, two new dredge tenders were constructed 



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2816 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP EKGINEKRS, U. 8. ARMY. 

by hired labor at the United States yards at Keokuk, Iowa. A new 
hnll was constructed for dredge Ko. 1 and new cranes for both dredges, 
a new hull for a quarter- boat fbr the dredge crews was constructed, and 
a general overhauling and repair of the other plant made. 

On account of the litigation over the Moliue Bridge across Eock 
Eiver, the dredging plant constructed the preceding year for the Illi- 
nois and Mississippi Canal could not be used and was transferred to the 
Elinois River, awaiting the removal of that obstruction. 

The repairs and renewals were not completed until the spring of 1897, 
and work was further delayed awaiting the subsidence of the flood in 
the Illinois River. 

Work began May 17, 1897, and at the close of the year 61,631 cubic 
yards of material had been dredged from the bars at Devils Elbow, 
Grand Island, Sugar Greek, and Macoupin Creek. Work was still in 
progress at the close of the year at Macoupin Greek Bar. The bars are 
being dredged to allow the full depth to be attained at low water over 
a ] practicable width of channel. 

With few exceptions the dredged channels are reasonably permanent, 
the exceptions being at mouths of certain creeks and tributaries which 
bring in detritus from the bluffs. Such places will require redredging 
at intervals of from two to three years. 

The expenditures during the year were mainly for renovating the 
plant. There are now available in good working order on the Illinois 
River 3 dredges, 3 steam tenders, 2 quarter boats, 6 dump scows, and 
several coal barges, and good progress may be expected. 

The shallow wat^r outside of channels at low water limits the capacity 
of scow loads and restricts the output of the dredges. It would be 
economy to construct one powerful hydraulic dredge, with means for 
transporting the spoil through pipes, to supplement the dipper dredges 
now employed. 

The annual report of the Chief of Engineers for 1896, page 2597, 
contains a concise r(^Rum6 of this improvement and remarks to which 
attention is again invited. 

During the past fiscal year a good stage of water existed in the 
Illinois River throughout the season of navigation. Low water was 
not reached in any of the pools, or below the Kampsville Dam. The 
tonnage passiug Lagrange and Kampsville locks increased from 294,983 
to 342,266 tons. No report has been received from the State works 
at Henry and Copperas Creek, but the United States records show an 
increase of about 15 per cent over the preceding year, although one 
of the most important boats making triweekly trips from St. Louis to 
Kampsville, destroyed by the cyclone at St. Louis, was not replaced. 
The year marked a diminution of lockages at Kampsville lock and a 
considerable increase at Lagrange lock. This has arisen from the fact 
that local traffic is directed to Peoria and is carried on in large part by 
small steamers with barges carrying farm produce. 

The clearing and use of bottom lands and the leveeing of the same 
to protect them against overflow is rapidly increasing, and the wisdom 
oj improving this natural waterway will become more and more apparent 
by the uses made of it as the channel is improved, 

PROPOSED APPLICATION OF FUNDS NOW AVAILABLE AND THOSE 
ASKED FOE FOB THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1899. 

It is proposed to apply the funds now available to continuing the 
dredging in the pools to attain the full depth over a practicable width 



i 



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APPENDIX I I — ^KEPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2817 

b1, to be afterwards widened, and to the care and preservation 
operty pertaining to the improvement. 

*oposed to apply the fnnds asked for to the purchase of an 
1 dredge and outfit and to the completion of the channel 
at from Copperas Greek to the Mississippi. 

DUhurgemenU, fiscal year 1897, 

: $200.01 

2,992.67 

dence and offloe 5,242.46 

Qd -plant 13,494.06 

»pair of property and plant 1,914.06 

1 23,843.16 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

80, available from previous appropriations •• $38, 337. 81 

1,1880 110,000.00 

3,1881 250,000.00 

i 2,1882 175,000.00 

1884 100.000.00 

i 5,1886 112,500.00 

i 11,1888 200,000.00 

29, 1890, joint resolution 200,000.00 

J, 1892 100,000.00 

b 17,1894 35,000.00 

,1896 40,000.00 

1,360,837.81 
rom all other BonroeB 535.40 

1 1,361,373.21 

to June30,1897 1,344,096.62 

nee unexpended June 30, 1897 17,282.59 

Money statement 

>, balance unexpended $41, 125.74 

97, amount expended during fiscal year 23, 843. 15 

r, balance unexpended 17,282.59 

r, outstanding liabilities 3,101.58 

7, balance available 14,181.01 

(estimated) required for completion of existing project 357, 000. 00 

bhat can be profitably expendedin fiscal year ending June 30, 1899 357, 000. 00 
5d in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4^ 1897. 



BBPOBT OF MB. O. Y. BBAINARDy AB8IBTANT BNGINSBB. 

Kampsvillb, III., June SO, 1897. 

I have the honor to submit the foUowing report of operations upon 

Illinois River for the fiscal ^ear ending June 30, 1897: 
k done during the year consisted in building a new huU for dredge No. 1, 
Inor repairs to the other floating property, and dredging the channel of 

[G 97 ^177 



)l 




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2818 UEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABMT. 

the riyer at the following points: Devils Elbow, head of Grand Island, month of 
Sngar Creek, and at moutn of Macoupin Creek. Two steam tenders were built at 
the Des Moines Rapids Canal dry dock by Mr. M. Meigs, U. S. C. £. 

BBPAIB8 TO PLANT. 

Dredge No, i. — ^A new hull was built for this dredge, using the' iron truss for sup- 
porting the crane from the old hull. The hull is 80 feet long by 90 feet wide and 7 
feet 4 inches deep. The timber used was principally Oregon fir, of such lengths as 
to need no splices^ even in the gunwales or fore-and-aft Keelsons. The macninery 
oif this dredge being good, it was used on the new hull, only a new boiler being 
purchased. The woodwork of the crane was renewed, new spuds and new dipper 
arms provided, the dippers were changed, a 2^cubic-yard dipper beine put on in 
place of the l^ubic-yard dipper formerly used, the friction blocks of &e hoisting 
drum were set out, and a new cone for backing motion put in. 

Dredge No. $. — This dredge was ftimished with six new spuds, a new pair of dip- 
per arms, and the Mction of the backing drum was set out. 

Dredge Apaeke. — This dredge was famished with a new set of dipper arms, new 
brass bushing put in spider frame, one of the spider-frame arms welded, a switch 
for turning the exhaust steam into the smokestack was connected with the exhaust 
pipe, and friction of both hoisting and backing drums was set out. 

Steam-tender Mmrion, — ^The hog chains were adjusted, the engines Uned up, the 
buckets on the wheel made larger by increasing their depth 4 inches, and a new 
6-inch lap- welded flue put in for a heater in place of the rlveted-Joint heater which 
\ witn the boat. 



Office boat— A lot of pigeonholes for stationery were made, a few plank put in the 
eok and guards, and new combing made for the hatches. 
Launch n, M. Childs. — ^This boat was painted during the winter after it was 



hauled out on the bank and housed. 

Dump 8COW8. — ^New nosing was pat around three of the scows, five rake plank and 
two rake timbers being put in one scow. 

AUJ>t.~Made six skiffs. 

DBBDOINO. 

Work began at Devils Elbow, 5 miles below Havana, May 17. This bar was 1,800 
feet long, with about 3 feet of water at low water in the shoalest place. A channel 
156 feet wide was dug through the bar, making 7 feet of water at low water, with 
flashboards on the Lagrange Dam. The channel was completed June 1 by the 
removal of 17,740 oubio yards of sand. 

Head of Grand Island. — A bar about 7 miles below Havana, below the head of 
Grand Island in the West Point Chute, which was a slight obstruction, was dredged, 
giving a channel 105 feet wide and 7 feet deep at low water, with flashboards on the 
Lagrange Dam. The channel through this bar was completed June 3 by the 
removu of 3,219 cubic yards of sand. 

Sugar Cretic. — ^At this point, which is 25 miles below Havana, there are two chan- 
nels, one on each side of Sugar Island. The one on the east side is used by small 
boats only. When the west channel was dredged in former vears a dike was bnilt 
across the east channel. This dike was removed for one-half of the width of the 
ehannel and the west channel dredeed, a total of 4,211 cubic yards being removed 
from both channels. Work here began June 4 and was completed June 8. The 
dredges and outfit were then towed to the mouth of Macoupin Creek, arriving there 
June 10, in the evening. 

Macoupin Creek, — Work began at this bar, 12i miles below Kampsville Lock, June 
11. A cut 2,200 feet long, 130 feet wide, with from 7 feet to 1\ feet at low water, was 
made to Jane 30. There were 26,761 cubic yards of sand removed and dumped on 
the east side of the river, with a view of contracting the channel and forcing the 
water through the dredged channel. This bar was dredged in the fall of 1894, but 
heavy rains about the head of Macoupin Creek, when the water in the river was at 
a comparatively low stage, caused a shoaling until there was less than 3 feet of 
water in parts of the dredged channel. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C. y. Brainabd, Anietant Engineer. 

MiJ. W. L. Marshaix, 

Corpe of Engineere. 



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APPENDIX I I — REPOKT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2819 



Means of {iridaily) readings of the upprr gauge at Copperas Creek Lock, 1896, 
IFlane of reference: Lower miter aill.] 



©•y. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


1 


18.40 
18.80 
18.20 
17.90 
17.70 
17.80 
17.47 
17.30 
17.18 
18.97 
18.87 
18.80 
18.70 
18.80 
18.30 
18.13 
15.80 
16.47 
16.88 
15.08 
14.77 
14.67 
14.40 
14.80 
14.20 
14.18 
14.08 
13.90 
13.80 
13.80 
13.93 


14.07 
14.17 
14.38 
14.40 
14.40 
14.60 
14.60 
14.68 
14.73 
14.80 
14.80 
14.80 
14.80 
14.70 
14.80 
14.80 
14.80 
14.60 
14.40 
14.40 
14.40 
14.30 
14.40 
14.68 
14.80 
14.93 
16.07 
15.80 
15.47 




16.68 
16.83 
18.00 
18.07 
16.00 
15.97 
15.90 
15.77 
15.70 
15.83 
15.80 
15.60 
16.47 
16. 4« 
16.40 
16.83 
16.28 
16.17 
16.03 
14.93 
14.77 
14.83 
14.67 
14.48 
14.27 
14.07 
14.00 
18.93 
18.90 
13.77 
13.63 


13.80 
13.80 
13.50 
13.60 
13.47 
13.33 
13.33 
13.23 
13.23 
13.60 
13.50 
13.43 
13.37 
13.30 
13.30 
13.27 
13.20 
13.17 
13.17 
13.17 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.00 
13.10 
13.10 
13.10 
18.43 
13.50 
13.48 


18.60 
18.47 
18.37 
13.80 
18.27 
13.20 
13.08 
12.93 
12.80 
12.73 
12.83 
12.47 
12.46 
12.30 
12.20 
12.13 
12.17 
12.30 
12.77 
12.97 
13.30 
13.57 
13.73 
13.87 
13.80 
13.80 
13.90 
14.07 
14.28 
14.43 
14.47 


14.47 
14.67 
14.47 
14.40 
14.40 
14.30 
14.20 
14.07 
14.00 
13.80 
13.67 
13.60 
13.60 
13.67 
13.43 
13.30 
13.17 
13.10 
13.10 
13.00 
13.00 
12.03 
12.90 
12.77 
12.67 
12.40 
12.33 
12.30 
12.30 
12.30 


12.17 
12.03 
12.00 
12.33 
12.37 
12.03 
11.97 
11.80 
11.70 
11.60 
11.80 
11.60 
11.50 
11.47 
11.40 
11.27 
11.20 
1L23 
11.48 
11.74 
12.07 
12.30 
12.43 
12.63 
12.84 
13.10 
13.50 
18.88 
14.03 
14.23 
14.43 


14.57 
14.83 
14.80 
14.80 
14.80 
14.70 
14.70 
14.70 
14.70 
14.70 
14.60 
14.50 
14.37 
14.27 
14.08 
18.97 
14.00 
13.00 
13.90 
13.80 
18.77 
13.70 
13.70 
13.63 
13.60 
13.60 
13.60 
13.60 
13.40 
13.40 
13.30 


13.17 
13.07 
13.00 
13.00 
12.90 
12.87 
12.80 
12.80 
12.80 
12.70 
12.70 
12.67 
12.67 
12.77 
12.80 
12.80 
12.90 
13.03 
12.97 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.90 
12.80 


12.93 
18.10 
13.80 
13.60 
13.90 
14.08 
14.10 
14.13 
14.20 
14.20 
14.20 
14.17 
14.10 
14.07 
13.90 
13.80 
13.70 
13.70 
13.60 
13.60 
13.50 
13.40 
13.40 
13.30 
13.27 
13.13 
12.97 
12.90 
12.83 
12.77 
12.70 


12.80 
12.90 
12.90 
13.00 
13.03 
18.10 
13.20 
18.28 
13.40 
13.30 
18.40 
18.50 
18.60 
13.60 
18.60 
13.50 
13.60 
13.88 
18.70 
18.80 
13.97 
13.97 
13.83 
13.78 
13.70 
13.67 
13.60 
18.50 
18.60 
13.60 


13.40 


3 


13.40 


8 


18.40 


4 


13.30 


6 


13.80 


8 


18.80 


7 


18. M 


8 


13.88 


9 


13.20 


10 


18.20 


11 


13.20 


12 


13.20 


13 


13.20 


14 


13.20 


16 


18.20 


18 


13.20 


17 


13.20 


18 


18.18 


19 


13.10 


90 


13.10 


21 


13.10 


22 


13.00 


28 


12.98 


24 

25 


12.90 
12.90 


S;:::;::;;..: 


12.90 


27 


12.90 


28 


12.90 


20 

80 


12.80 
12.80 


81 


12.80 






Hmdb. 


15.93 


14.84 


16.08 


13.30 


13.20 


13.40 


12.26 


14.11 


12.87 


18.56 


18.46 


13.12 



Mean9 of (JhidaQ/ji) readings of ike lower gauge at Copperas Creek Lock, 1896, 
[Plane of reference: Lower miter till.] 



Day. . 


Jtt. 


Veb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


M»J. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 


1 


18.10 
18.00 
17.90 
17.60 
17.40 
17.30 
17.20 
17.10 
16.97 
16.87 
16.73 
16.60 
16.50 
16.80 
16.10 
15.87 
15.60 
15.20 
».03 
14.80 
14.47 
14.27 
14.10 
14.00 
18.00 
18.83 
18.87 
13.63 
13.40 
13.40 
18.60 


18.68 
13.70 
13.90 
14.00 
14.00 
14.03 
14.13 
14.20 
14.30 
14.80 
14.40 
14.40 
14.40 
14.80 
14.20 
14.20 
14.20 
14.10 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.10 
14.23 
14.47 
14.67 
14.73 
16.00 
15.20 


16.47 
16.63 
16.67 
15.60 
16.63 
16.50 
16.50 
16.40 
16.30 
16.30 
16.30 
16.30 
16.23 
15.20 
16.17 
16.07 
14.90 
14.77 
14.70 
14.67 
14.47 
14.37 
14.23 
14.20 
14.07 
14.00 
13.87 
18.73 
13.63 
18.47 
13.38 


13.80 
18.20 
18.13 
13.07 
18.00 
12.90 
12.90 
12.80 


1&60 
12.50 
12.48 
13.37 
12.80 
12.23 
12.07 
11.07 


14.00 
14.10 
14.07 
14.00 
14.00 
14.07 
13.87 
13.60 
13.60 
13.47 
13.40 
13.27 
13.06 
13.00 
12.90 
12.80 
12.77 
12.70 
12.53 
12.37 
12.17 
12.03 
U.93 
11.83 
11.67 
1L47 
U.26 
ILOO 
ia70 
10.47 


10.27 

10.07 

10.00 

10.13 

9.90 

9.63 

9.43 

9.27 

9.07 

8.80 

8.73 

8.50 

8.10 

7.83 

7.63 

7.40 

7.23 

7.47 

7.67 

7.93 

8.80 

8.60 

a77 

9.27 

10.67 

10.88 

11.07 

11.53 

12.00 

12.30 

12.88 


12.97 
18.23 
13.70 
13.67 
13.67 
13.67 
13.87 
13.67 
13.80 
13.73 
13.70 
13.60 
13.47 
13.27 
13.03 
12.87 
12.70 
12.60 
12.58 
12.40 
12.80 
12.13 
U.97 
U.83 
1L70 
U.60 
1L50 
1L50 
11.87 
1L17 
10.93 


10.73 
10.67 
10.47 
10.27 
10.07 
9.87 
9.80 
9.70 
9.57 
9.33 
9.17 
9.08 
9.03 
9.13 
9.17 
9.00 
9.23 
9.50 
9.63 


9.63 
9.90 
10.40 
10.80 
U.40 
11.70 
12.00 
12.13 
12.27 
12.43 


10.03 
10.07 
10.13 
10.23 
10.40 
10.50 
10.60 
10.57 
10.50 
10.50 


11.60 


2 


l,^fi 


8 


4 

5 


U.IO 
11.10 


6 


11.00 


7 


11.00 


8 


11.00 


9 


12.80 1 11.80 
13.07 i U.60 
12.63 11.33 


11.00 


10 


u.oo 


11 


12.50 


in Kn 


11 00 


12 


12.83 
12.83 
12.83 
12.83 
12.74 
12.74 
12.63 
12.67 
12.67 
12.80 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.10 
12.10 
12.10 
12.33 
12.50 
12.43 


11.07 
10.93 
10.70 
10.30 
10.07 
9.97 
10.10 
10.93 
11.43 
n.93 
12.20 
12.77 
18.10 
13.13 
18.10 
18.28 
13.47 
13.83 
18.87 
18.90 


12. 57 10. 53 
12.67 10.77 
12.47 10.97 
12.37 1 11.20 
12.20 1 11.43 
12.10 n.57 
12.03 11.70 

11 ft? 11 AA 


11.00 


18 


11 00 


14 


11.00 


15 


10.90 


16 


10.90 


17 


10.87 


18 


10.80 


19 


10.70 


20 


9.87 1 U.60 11.90 
10.03 11.47 12.00 
10.07 11.80 12.00 


10.67 


21 


10.57 


22 


10.60 


28 


9.90 
9.77 
9.63 
9.57 


11.07 ' 11-90 


10.40 


24 


10.93 
10.80 
10.67 


11.83 
1L70 
11. no 


10.27 


25 


10.07 


28 


9.90 


27 


9.50 


10. 47 11. 53 


9.80 


28 

29 

zi.y/.'.y.'.z'" 


9.40 1 10.37 

9.40 10.28 

9.50 1 10.17 

10.10 


U47 
U.48 
U.60 


9.70 
9.60 
9.60 
8.40 


Mmubw. 


16.88 


14.» 


U.78 


IS. 88 


IS. 88 


IS. 78 


8.88 


IS. 70 


^88 


U.87 


U.10 


10.64 



Digitized by 



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2820 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

Means of {tridaily) readings of (he upper gauge at Lagrange Lock, 1896* 
[PlMne of referenoe: Lower miter bOL] 



D»j. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Kar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


oc 


Not. 


Deo. 


1 


19.87 
20.02 
19. »5 
19.76 
19.60 
19.33 
19.07 
18.93 
1&80 
18.72 
18.68 
18.70 
18.70 
18.53 
18.43 
18.34 
18.20 
18.13 
17.08 
17.95 
17.85 
17.76 
17.76 
17.70 
17.67 
17.47 
17.40 
17.33 
17.30 
17.80 
17.43 


17.68 
17.65 
17.62 
17.50 
17.45 
17.46 
17.50 
17.60 
17.60 
17.66 
17.60 
17.67 
17.78 
17.85 
17.83 
17.85 
17.80 
17.75 
17.68 
17.40 
17.22 
17.20 
17.35 
17.60 
17.88 
17.97 
17.95 
17.97 
18.00 


18.00 
18.03 
18.05 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.10 
18.05 
18.03 
18.00 
18.00 
17.96 
17.90 
17.88 
17.86 
17.78 
17.69 
17.62 
17.68 
17.56 
17.60 
17.46 
17.40 
17.30 
17.20 
17.20 
17.18 


17.18 
17.08 
17.00 
17.00 
17.00 
16.98 
16.95 
16.95 
16.98 
17.05 
17.05 
17. OJ 
17.00 
17.02 
16.98 
16.95 
16.95 
16.95 
16.93 
16.90 
16.90 
16.85 
16.80 
16.80 
16.77 
16.73 
16.70 
16.75 
16.76 
16.80 


16.78 
16.76 
16.75 
16.78 
16.70 
16.70 
16.72 
16.60 
16.50 
16.45 
16.40 
16.36 
16.28 
16.18 
16.10 
16.05 
16.08 
16.10 
16.33 
16.50 
16.78 
16.90 
16.95 
16.95 
16.95 
17.00 
17.02 
17.12 
17.15 
17.20 
17.27 


17.85 
17.85 
17.48 
17.45 
17.40 
17.35 
17.30 
17.42 
17.52 
17.36 
17.30 
17.23 
17.20 
17.20 
17.20 
17.13 
17.13 
17.15 
17.12 
17.03 
16.97 
16.90 
16.83 
16.76 
16.68 
16.62 
16.52 
16.48 
16.40 
16.36 


16.26 
16.25 
16.26 
16.20 
16.13 
16.08 
16.05 
16.00 
15.96 
16.88 
15.83 
16.76 
15.70 
15.63 
15.60 
16.52 
16.46 
15.35 
16.65 
16.82 
16.92 
16.82 
16.58 
17.48 
17.68 
17.60 
17.48 
17.42 
17.52 
17.60 
17.68 


18.12 
18.32 
18.47 
18.86 
ia20 
17.97 
17.88 
17.72 
17.65 
17.60 
17.47 
17.38 
17.32 
17.28 
17.22 
17.13 
17.10 
17.12 
17.13 
17.10 
17.00 
16.97 
16.95 
16.90 
16.83 
16.78 
16.73 
16.68 
16.58 
16.53 
16.45 


16.43 
16.40 
16.38 
16.28 
16.23 
16.23 
16 13 
16.02 
15.97 
15.90 
16.90 
15.87 
16.85 
16.88 
15.90 
16.90 
16.37 
16.47 
16.60 
16.62 
16.40 
16.25 
16.15 
16.12 
16.08 
16.02 
16.00 
16.93 
15.90 
15.90 


16.92 
16.97 
16.06 
16.25 
16.88 
16.30 
16.60 
16.48 
16.67 
16.67 
16.77 
16.80 
16.80 
16.80 
16.75 
16.73 
16.68 
16.65 
16.62 
16.67 
16.55 
16.50 
16.48 
16.43 
16.82 
16.27 
16.22 
16.15 
16.07 
16.10 
16.10 


16.15 
16.10 
16.12 
16.27 
16.28 
16.26 
16.25 
16.25 
16.26 
16.26 
16.25 
16.25 
16.25 
16.28 
16.87 
16.48 
16.66 
16.67 
16.66 
16.66 
16.55 
16.65 
16.55 
16.53 
16.52 
16.50 
16.47 
16.42 
16.47 
16.47 


16.45 


2 

8 


16.40 
16.40 


4 

6 


16.40 
16.38 


6 

7 


16.85 
16.40 


8 


16.88 





16.85 


10 


16.35 


11 


16.35 


12 


16.85 


13 

u 


16.85 
16.85 


15 


16.30 


16 

17 

18 


16.30 
16.30 
16.26 


19 


16.25 


20 


16.20 


21 


16.20 


22 


16.18 


23 


16.15 


24 


16.13 


26 

26 

27 


16.08 
16.05 
16.00 


28 


15.96 


29 


16.90 


90 


15.95 


81 


15.95 






Means. 


18.40 


17.63 


17.81 


16.92 


16.65 


17.07 


16.42 


17.32 


16.13 


16.43 


16.38 


16.24 



Means of {tridaily) readings of the lower gauge at Lagrange Look, 1896. 
[Plane of referenoe: Lower miter sill.] 



Day. 


Jan. 


Ftob. 


Mar. 


AprU. 


May. 


Jane. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Deo. 




19.10 
10.28 
19.30 
19.22 
18.98 
18.60 
18.36 
18.15 
17.97 
17.87 
17.75 
17.70 
17.67 
17.50 
17.38 
17.15 
16.92 
16.77 
16.55 
16.35 
16.20 
16.06 
16.00 
15.95 
15.65 
15.87 
15.20 
16.05 
14.95 
14.90 
15.18 


16.33 
15.35 
16.35 
16.23 
16.27 
16.30 
15.25 
15.32 
15.85 
16.42 
15.68 
15.72 
15.92 
16.13 
16.20 
16.20 
16.05 
15.95 
15.75 
15.33 
15.02 
14.92 
14.97 
15.87 
16.05 
16.22 
16.25 
16.80 
16.88 


16.40 
16.38 
16.43 
16.65 
16.60 
16.60 
16.58 
16.60 
16.60 
16.68 
16.60 
16.46 
16.40 
16.35 
16.35 
16.27 
16.17 
16.10 
16.05 
15.85 
15.73 
15.62 
15.37 
15.30 
16.18 
16.06 
14.90 
14.82 
14.58 
14.58 
14.48 


14.85 
14.08 
13.95 
13.90 
18.85 
13.77 
13.67 
13.70 
18.78 
13.96 
14.00 
13.96 
13.87 
13.85 
13.80 
18.72 
13.70 
13.66 
18.60 
13.68 
13.43 
18.30 
18.20 
18.17 
18.07 
13.08 
13.05 
18.00 
13.08 
13.17 


13.16 
13.03 
12.95 
12.93 
12.88 
12.82 
12.68 
12.58 
12.48 
12.25 
12.10 
12.00 
11.75 
11.52 
11.38 
11.18 
11.07 
11.30 
11.70 
12.27 
12.96 
18.48 
18.72 
18.95 
14.12 
14.28 
14.32 
14.45 
14.66 
14.90 
16.06 


15.13 
15.03 
15.43 
15.35 
16.22 
15.17 
15.02 
15.33 
15.50 
15.12 
15.03 
14.73 
14.50 
14.30 
14.20 
14.10 
14.10 
14.08 
14.05 
18.95 
13.70 
18.48 
13.25 
13.06 
12.86 
12.60 
12.37 
12.18 
12.00 
11.80 


11.66 
11.60 
11.35 
11.22 
11.10 
10.97 
10.90 
10.85 
10.75 
10.65 
10.37 
10.16 
9.95 
9.70 
9.65 
9.45 
9.28 
8.97 
9.90 
12.95 
13.23 
12.67 
12.13 
14.00 
15.30 
15.22 
14.63 
14.12 
14.00 
14.13 
14.32 


16.37 
16.20 
16.77 
16.95 
16.73 
16.42 
16.16 
15.88 
15.65 
15.45 
16.20 
14.95 
14.78 
14.62 
14.42 
14.32 
14.25 
14.30 
14.28 
14.05 
13.95 
13.85 
13.65 
13.68 
13.45 
13.30 
13.10 
12.95 
12.73 
12.68 
12.46 


12.25 
12.05 
11.98 
11.85 
11.63 
11.40 
11.17 
11.10 
10.95 
10.75 
10.63 
10.52 
10.47 
10.48 
10.62 
10.45 
11.83 
12.50 
12.52 
12.40 
12.07 
11.65 
11.45 
11.26 
11.15 
11.06 
11.03 
10.93 
10.87 
10.80 


10.82 
10.93 
11.19 
11.60 
11.82 
12.12 
12.36 
12.53 
12.70 
12.90 
13.02 
13.20 
13.20 
13.20 
13.18 
13.12 
18.03 
12.97 
12.85 
12.73 
12.62 
12.53 
12.35 
12.23 
12.10 
11.96 
11.73 
11.65 
11.37 
11.87 
11.42 


11.53 
11.60 
11.63 
12.28 
12.07 
11.98 
11.90 
11.83 
11.73 
11.70 
11.73 
11.75 
11.80 
11.95 
12.15 
12.30 
12.42 
12.50 
12.65 
12.60 
12.63 
12.67 
12.70 
12.67 
12.70 
12.68 
12.60 
12.63 
12.50 
12.60 


12.40 
12.35 
12.35 
12.30 




12.28 




12.20 




12.25 


8 


12.22 


9 


12.20 


10 


12.20 


11 


12.20 


12 


12.20 


13 


12.20 


14 


12.13 


15 

16 


12.03 
12.00 


17 


11.97 


18 


11.90 


19 


11.85 


20 


11.80 


21 


11.73 


22 


11.70 


28 


11.68 


24 


11.58 


25 


11.48 


26 


11.28 


27 


11.18 


28 


11.10 


29 


10.95 


80 


10.82 


81 


ia88 






Means. 


17.06 


15.64 


15.92 


18.61 


12.90 


14.00 


11.77 


14.59 


11.82 


12.28 


12.20 


11.85 



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APPENDIX I I — ^BEPOBT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2821 



M&an9 of (tridaily) readings of the upper gauge at Kampsville Look, 1896. 
[Plane of referonoe: Lower miter sill.] 



Day. 



1 

2 

8 

4 

6 

« 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

U 

15 

18 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

26 

26 

27 

28 

20 

30 

81 

Meaim... 



Jan. 



18.48 
18.00 
18.68 
18.47 
1&38 
18.80 
18.30 
18.26 
18.20 
18.16 
18.10 
18.10 
18.06 
18.03 
17.08 
17.00 
17.85 
17.80 
17.75 
17.68 
17.68 
17.50 
17.50 
17.50 
17.48 
17.38 
17.30 
17.28 
17.26 
17.26 
17.27 



17.88 



Feb. 



17.37 
17.40 
17.40 
17.38 
17.35 
17.35 
17.36 
17.35 
17.35 
17.30 
17.35 
17.43 
17.67 
17.70 
17.75 
17.76 
17.70 
17.55 
17.40 
17.20 
17.00 
17.30 
17.25 
17.32 
17.52 
17.60 
17.61 
17.65 
17.70 



Mar. 



17.45 



17.70 
17.65 
17.66 
17.65 
17.65 
17.75 
17.70 
17.70 
17.65 
17.66 
17.60 
17.60 
17.55 
17.60 
17.60 
17.60 
17.65 
17.55 
17.60 
17.60 
17.40 
17.40 
17.40 
17.35 
17.30 
17.28 
17.15 
17.10 
17.12 
17.05 
17.00 



Apr. 



17. OC 
16.95 
16.90 
16.85 
16.85 
16.80 
16.80 
16.82 
16.90 
16.90 
16.96 
16.90 
16.90 
16.90 
16.90 
16.85 
16.85 
16.85 
16.83 
16.70 
16.80 
16.73 
18.70 
16.65 
16.60 
16.80 
16.60 
16.60 
16.65 
16.75 



17.48 I 16.80 



May. 



16.70 
16.70 
16.70 
16.65 
16.63 
16.60 
16.80 
16.55 
16.60 
18.47 
16.40 
16.36 
16.28 
16.23 
16.15 
16.10 
16.03 
16.10 
16.68 
16.85 
17.88 
18.77 
19.25 
19.70 
20.00 
19.93 
19.52 
19.90 
20.45 
20.63 
20.26 



17.80 



Jane. 



19.03 
19.85 
19.75 
19.87 
19.83 
19.68 
19.55 
19.82 
19.95 
20.05 
19.85 
19.08 
18.10 
17.30 
17.08 
17.00 
17.22 
17.17 
17.05 
17.00 
16.92 
18.90 
18.82 
16.65 
16.60 
18.55 
18.55 
16.45 
16.40 
16.36 



17.71 



July. 



16.25 
18.25 
16.30 
16.30 
16.23 
16.10 
16.00 
16.00 
18.00 
15.93 
15.88 
15.85 
15.85 
15.80 
15.78 
15.80 
15.77 
15.68 
16.25 
17. 27 
17.88 
17.10 
16.82 
17.00 
17.85 
17.85 
17.55 
17.25 
17.08 
17.00 
17.20 



10.60 



Ang. 



17.90 
17.90 
17.92 
17.95 
17.95 
17.90 
17.78 
17.68 
17.58 
17.48 
17.40 
17.36 
17.30 
17.26 
17.15 
17.10 
17.05 
17.00 
17.00 
17.02 
17.03 
16.93 
16.85 
16.85 
18.83 
16.78 
16.72 
16.70 
16.65 
18.58 
16.50 



Sept. 



16.50 
16.40 
16.40 
16.40 
16. 33 
16.25 
16.18 
16.10 
16.08 
16.00 
18.00 
16.00 
16.95 
15.95 
16.00 
15.93 
16.67 
16.88 
16.75 
18.63 
16.55 
16.46 
18.28 
16.18 
16.08 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 



17.23 I 16.23 



Oct. 



16.00 
16.00 
18.00 
18 12 
16.25 
16.82 
16.36 
16.42 
16.47 
16.62 
16.57 
16.70 
16.70 
16.70 
16.70 
16.68 
16.60 
16.55 
16.52 
16.50 
16.50 
16.48 
16.40 
18.37 
18.30 
18.30 
16.28 
16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
18.20 



16.39 



Not. 



16.20 
16.20 
16.20 
16.82 
16.40 
16.46 
16.36 
16.20 
16.20 
16.27 
18.28 
16.25 
16.28 
16.22 
16.33 
16.86 
16.40 
16.36 
16.36 
16.40 
16.60 
16.45 
16.46 
16.50 
16.45 
16.45 
16.58 
16.46 
16.45 
16.40 



16.36 



Dec. 



16.40 
16.40 
16.40 
18.40 
16.40 
16.40 
16.40 
16.40 
18.40 
16.40 
18.35 
16.35 
16.35 
16.35 
16.36 
16.36 
16.35 
16.30 
16.30 
18.30 
16.30 
16.26 
18.25 
16.26 
18.18 
16.10 
16.05 
16.00 
16.00 
15.95 
15.00 

16.28 



Mrane of {tridaily) readings of the lower gauge at Kampsmlle Look, 1896. 
[Plaiie of reference : Lower miter aill.] 



Day. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Apr. 



May. 



Jane. 



July. 



Aug. 



Sept 



Oct 



KoT. ! Deo. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

16 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

81 

Means 



16.82 
16.00 
18.87 
18.80 
16.80 
16.76 
16.65 
16.26 
16.05 
15.86 
15.80 
15.78 
15.70 
15.60 
15.50 
15.43 
15.32 
15.15 
14.98 
14.82 
14.58 
14.50 
14.50 
14.50 
14.35 
14.05 
13.80 
13.60 
13.68 
13.50 
13.62 



13.85 
13.95 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
14.00 
18.95 
13.90 
18.92 
13.96 
14.12 
14.78 
15.07 
15.30 
15.28 
14.98 
14.70 
14.35 
13.86 
13.60 
14.10 
18.82 
13.88 
14.27 
14.45 
14.66 
14.00 
14.07 



15.05 
15.05 
15.05 
16.03 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
14.95 
14.90 
14.85 
14.77 
14.70 
14.70 
14.68 
14.68 
14.50 
14.44 
14.83 
14.26 
14.00 
14.00 
18.98 
13.86 
13.68 
13.63 
13.43 
13.86 
13.37 
13.15 
18.00 



13.00 
12.87 
12.68 
12.63 
12.58 
12.50 
12.60 
12.50 
12.52 
12.70 
12.80 
12.80 
12.80 
12.90 
12.86 
12.80 
12.73 
12.68 
12.66 
12.60 
12.45 
12.36 
12.25 
12.23 
12.13 
12.10 
12.00 
12.00 
12.28 
12.70 



12.85 
12.90 
13.05 
13.37 
13.67 
13.05 
14.07 
14.27 
14.38 
14.45 
14.45 
14.43 
14. 33 
14.13 
13.86 
18.80 
13.80 
13.65 
14.80 
16.65 
17.77 
18.87 
10.16 
10.60 
10.00 
10.83 
10.42 
10.80 
20.38 
20.57 
20.16 



19.77 
19.46 
19.57 
19.66 
19.60 
19.53 
19.38 
19.62 
10.85 
19.95 
19.68 
18.87 
17.75 
16.66 
16.85 
15.25 
15.18 
15.07 
14.75 
14.56 
14.85 
14.15 
13.82 
18.63 
13.28 
13.08 
13.05 
13.05 
12.75 
12.87 



12.15 
12.15 
12.2:{ 
12.75 
12.95 
12.65 
12.15 
11.80 
11.45 
11.15 
10.90 
10.55 
10.28 
9.90 
9.72 
0.56 
9.3U 
9.13 
10.28 
13.26 
14.97 
15.93 
15.45 
16.22 
16.70 
15.65 
16.10 
14.30 
13.87 
13.60 
13.67 



16.80 



14.20 



14.36 



12.66 



16.00 



10.46 



12.61 



16.25 
15.55 
15.75 
16.95 
18.10 
15.05 
15.60 
15.22 
14.80 
14.40 
14.10 
13.83 
13.80 
13.50 
13.43 
13.28 
13.06 
12.96 
12.96 
13.17 
13.30 
13.23 
13.05 
12.77 
12.47 
12.32 
12.10 
11.98 
11.80 
11.66 
11.50 



11.38 
11.16 
11.10 
10.95 
10.83 
10.63 
10.40 
10.22 
10.15 
10.10 
9.93 
9.85 
9.70 
9.87 
9.82 
9.78 
11.48 
12.48 
12.43 
12.16 
11.98 
11.83 
11.63 
11.20 
10.85 
10.70 
10.78 
10.59 
10.35 
10.20 



10.17 
10.20 
10.27 
10.45 
10.72 
10.98 
11.12 
11.35 
11.47 
11.55 
11.76 
11.90 
11.98 
11.98 
12.00 
11.08 
11.90 
11.83 
11.77 
11.70 
11.62 
11.50 
11.32 
11.23 
11.05 
10.90 
10.92 
10.*) 
10.76 
10.70 
10.66 



10. 

10. 

10.65 

10.95 

n.30 

11.60 

11.30 

11.00 

10.00 

10.96 

10.88 

10.86 

10.86 

10.87 

11.06 

11.10 

11.16 

11.22 

11.30 

11.36 

11.56 

11.65 

11.66 

11.63 

11.66 

11.60 

U.60 

11.47 

11.40 

U.86 



I 



18.70 



10.80 



U.24 



ILIB 



11.80 
11.30 
11.26 
11.20 
n.l5 
11.16 
11.16 
11.16 
11.07 
11.06 
11.00 
11.00 
U.08 
n.06 
11.00 
11.06 
11.12 
11.25 
11.28 
11.30 
11.25 
11.17 
11.08 
10.03 
10.76 
10.58 
10.47 
10.43 
10.35 
10.20 
10.10 



10.07 



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2822 KEPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

116. 

OPERATING AND CARE OP LAGRANGE AND KAMPSVILLE LOCKS. 
ILLINOIS RIVER, AND APPROACHES THERETO. 

These locks and dams have been operated and maintained under the 
indefinite appropriation provided for in section 4 of the river and harbor 
actof July 5, 1884. 

Lagrange Lock and Dam, — These works were operated and maintained 
in good order during the year. The drift was kept cleared from the 
dam, the pointing of lock walls completed, 1,117 cubic yards mud were 
dredged from the approach above the lock and 19,814 cubic yards from 
Meredosia Bar below the lock, a small warehouse was constructed, and 
a new hull was built for the cabin of an old quarter boat pertaining to 
the work. 

The hull of Dredge No. 2, begun during preceding fiscal year, was 
completed. 

Kampsville Lock and Bam. — A small amount of dredging was done at 
the approaches to the lock, 3,720 cubic yards of earth tilling was put 
upon the grounds. Three of the barges pertaining to the operating 
and care plant were calked and repaired, and the house for the lock 
hands that was wrecked by the storm of July 31, 1896, was rebuilt by 
the lock hands. 

The lockages of boats through the Lagrange Lock increased from 
504 in 1896 to 640 in 1897, and the tonnage from 129,ti97 in 1896 to 
167,641 in 1897. The average tonnage of the boats passing increased 
from 236 tons in 1896 to 262 tons in 1897. 

At Kampsville Lock the lockages decreased from 592 in 1896 to 426 
in 1897, but the tonnage increase<l from 165,686 tons in 1896 to 174,624 
in 1897, and the average tonnage of boats and barges increased from 
279 tons in 1896 to 409 tons in 1897. 

There was an increase of tonnage passing the two locks of about 15 
per cent over the preceding year. 

Di9bur9etMnt9 fiaoal year 1897. 

Lftgrange Look, Ulinois River: 

Operating and CAring for look $4,884.41 

Dredging 1,528.44 

Property and i^lant 1 2,758.91 

Care and repair of property and plant 630.57 

9,802.33 

Eampsvine Lock, Illinois River: 

Operating and caring for lock 4,165.93 

Dredging 48.00 

Property and plant 4,102.97 

Care and repair of property and plant 1, 888. 51 

10,205.41 

20,007.74 

Money statements* 

LAORA290B liOCK. 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended (ontstanding) $1,292.71 

July 1, 1896, allotment for fiscal year 13,000.00 

14, 292. 71 
Jnne 30, 1897, amonnt expended dnring fiscal year 9, 802. 33 

Joly 1, 1897, balance unexpended 4,490.38 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 496. 10 

July 1, 1897, balance available 3, 994. 28 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL.. 2823 

KAMPSTILLB LOCK. 

/ 

July 1, 1896, balance nnexpended (outstanding) $8,132.72 

Jnly 1, 1896, allotment for fiscal year 10,000.00 

13,123.72 

June 90, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 10, 206. 41 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 2,927.31 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 480.60 

July 1, 1897, balance available 2,446.71 



BBPOBT OF MB. a Y. BRAINABD, ▲SSISTikin' BNOINBXB. 

Kampsville, Iix., June SO, 1897. 
Majob: I bave tbe bonor to submit the foUowiuf report of operating and care of 
look and dams, Illinois River, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

LAQBANGB LOCK. 

The remainder of the joints of both walls were painted with Portland cement (the 
copin£[ having heen pointed the previous vear). The grounds were kept in order and 
the drift was removed from the dam as fast as it accumulated. Eighteen inches of 
dirt was tilled in the ice house to bring the bottom above the level of the ground, the 
drain to it repaired, and 100 tons of ice nut up during the winter. A warehouse 12 
by 14 feet was built of old material; built 150 feet of 4-foot cement walk; cemented 
cellar of superintendenfs house ; painted ironwork of lock gates ; put in a few cubic 
yards of stone at east abutment of dam where caving had begun. Owing to the good 
stage of water prevailing during the year no flashboards were required on the dam. 

Dredifing. — In October and November the bar at Meredosia was dredged out; a 
channel 155 feet wide and 7 feet deep at low water (with flashboards on tne Eamps- 
ville Dam) being made. There were removed from this bar, which was 1,200 feet long, 
19,814 cubic yaius of sand, scow measurement. The work was completedNovember 20, 
and the dredge and other boats were moved to Kampsville Lock into winter quarters. 
This work was done by Dredge Apaohe and steam tender MarioH of the Illinois and 
Mississippi Canal, which were sent to this river the last of September. 

In June the upper entrance to Lagrange Lock was dredged for a distance of 400 
feet above the upper gates, 417 cubic yards of mud being sco wed away, and 700 cubic 
yards cast on the bank to be used as filling. 

Bepaira to plant.— A new hull was built for the cabin of the old quarter boat that 
had been on the bank at this lock for a number of years, a new canvass roof was 
put on the cabin, the cabin divided into rooms, and bunks put in. Tho boat is used 
for quarters for the dredge crews. 

Dredge No, £. — At the beginning of the fiscal year the material for a new hull for 
this dredge had been received and a small amount of framing done. The hull was 
completed, the machinery and iron truss from the old hull were put on this hull, the 
old crane was put on, the only new part being a boiler. The dredge was ready for 
work November 3. The new hull is 80 feet long by 30 feet wide and 8 feet deep. 
Oregon fir was used mainly in the construction of the hull, the gunwales and keel- 
sons being furnished in lengtbs of 80 feet, thus doing away with any splices in the 
hull. During the winter the woodwork of this crane was rebuilt, roof of cabin 
recanvassed, a 2^ cubic yard dipper, new hoisting and bacidng chains, and a new 
spider frame and sheave were put on. 

KAlCFSynXB LOOK. 

Sixty cubic yards of mud were removed from above the upper gates, a deposit left 
by the high water; 12 cubic yards of rock were placed above tne dam, where the 
break occurred in the fall of 1895, to fill up a settlement. The force at this lock, 
aside from their regular duties of locking boats and keeping the lock and grounds 
in order, rebuilt the lock-hands' house that was wrecked by the wind July SI, 1896, 
and were employed upon the two new dredge hulls built during the ^ear. 

Dredging. — During the high water of April 3,270 cubic yards of dirt was scowed 
on the pounds, to be used &t filling. 

Repairs to plant. — Three of the ecu barges were hauled out, oaulked with 1 thread 
of oakum, and launched. 



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2824 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

There is herewith a statement showing hoats and tonnage passing both Kampa- 
yiUe and Lagrange locks, and one showing hoats navigating this river. 
Very respectfully, yonr ohedient servant, 

0. y. Bbainabd, A$Hitani JOngineer. 
Maj. W. L. Mabshall, 

Corps of Engineers. 



Tonnage passing Lagrange Look, 



1890. 



1891. 1892. 



Fiscal year ending Jane 30— 
1805. 



1893. 



180i. 



1800. 



1897. 



Steamboats nnmber.. 

Bargea do 

Steamboats tonnage, 

Barges do 

loe tons. 

Wheat bnshels, 

Com do... 

General merchandise. .. .tons. 

Passengers number. 

Coal tons.. 

Stock head 

"Wood cords 

Logs feetB. M 

Lmnber do.. 

Apples barrels 



142 

68 

41,915 

12,386 

(a) 

5,082 



ia) 
(a) 

100 
(a) 



147 

63,967 

45.711 

20,575 

9,800 

18, 176 

(•) 

(a) 

650 

70 
45,000 



266 

168 

68,236 

79, 211 

89,400 

14,536 

83,800 

1,651 

1,334 

729 

219 

250 



10,000 



291 

176 

80,181 

162,118 

46,600 

12,700 

29,691 

4,675 

2,382 

225 

298 

'i8i,"66o' 

15,000 



213 

59,780 

91, 361 

31,900 

6,750 

45,900 

3,734 

2,179 

1,087 

2,307 

60 

200,000 

50,0UO 



374 

251 

00,814 

76,530 

11,950 

22,017 

87,563 

1.976 

4,682 

640 

1,323 



340 

164 

79,495 

49,802 

11,150 

30, 142 

67,179 

6,455 

6,891 

80 

1,926 



10,000 
9,670 



416 

224 

91,560 

76,091 

19,425 

21,477 

161,767 

4,508 

4,774 

820 

1,657 

35 

70,000 

70,000 

158 



a No record kept. 
Tonnage passing Kampsville Lock, 



Steamboats nnmber. 

Barges do... 

Steamboats toniiRge. 

Barges do... 

Ice tons. 

Wheat bushels. 

Com do... 

Oats do... 

Rye do... 

Apples barrels. 

General merchandise tons . 

FasHengers nnmber. 

Stock head. 

Logs fcetB.M. 

Bran * bushels. 



Fiscal year ending June 3 



1894. 



177 
120 
57, 149 
51. 295 
31.000 
63,600 
86,267 



4,692 
1,197 
8,760 



1895. 

440 

1!»2 

99,315 

81.597 

11, 930 

178.025 

164, 000 

1,284 



2,359 
3,454 
5,017 
8,735 



1896. 



4:t6 

156 

111,382 

54.304 

10,950 

158, 7ft5 

178, 188 

305 

2,172 

6,396 

8,169 

7,049 

12,368 



1897. 

820 

106 

107,855 

66,769 

. 19,426 

130, 081 

72,047 

1,097 

471 

1,231 

7,899 

4,796 

14,003 

30,000 

306 



List of steamboats navigating the Illinois Birer, 



Name. 



Iowa 

D.H.Pike 

City of Brunswick. . . . 

Cherokee 

Polar Wave 

Ouatoga 

Claribel 

Carrie CnrrenH 

Henry W. Longfellow 

Benton 

Ruth 

Virginia 

Echo 

Thomas Parker 

Viva 

Eileen 

Spread Eagle 

Diana 

Blsa 

Edna 



Registered 
tons. 



73 

465 

77 

631 

150 

15 

29 

7 

47 

894 

60 

6 

16 

67 

80 

35 

630 

8 

83 

80 



Kame. 



Joliet 

U.S.LUy 

Leo 

Jack Frost 

Charlotte Boeckeler 

Clad Tidings 

G.M.Sivley 

JosieSivley 

LaTosca 

Belle of Ottawa 

Lotus 

Newldlewlld 

R,G.Schmoldt 

Edith K 

Peoria.. 

CitvofPekin 

Defender 

Pilot 

Grey Hound 

Flora 



RegisU^red 
tons. 



76 

206 

36 

860 

143 

6 

99 

46 

16 

10 

22 

692 

15 

26 

6 

6 

7 

6 

9 

6 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2825 

I I 7. 

CONSTRUCTION OF ILLINOIS AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL. 

The object of this improvemeiit is to famish a navigable waterway 
from Lake Michigan at or near Chicago, 111., to the Missisippi Biver at 
the mouth of Bock Biver, near Bock Island, III., in connection with 
the Upper Illinois River and the proposed enlarged waterway along the 
present line of the Illinois and Michigan Oanal. 

Various surveys of different routes from the great bend of the Illi- 
nois, near Hennepin, 111.^ to the Mississippi Biver, at or above the 
mouth of Bock Biver, have been made, viz: In 1871 (Beport Chief of 
Engineers, 1871, p. 303), in 1882 (Beport Chief of Engineers, 1883, p, 
1757), and in 1885 (Beport Chief of Engineers, 1886, p. 1707). 

There was also a report upon the canal by a board of engineers in 
1887 under the provisions of the river and harbor act of August, 1886 
(Beport Chief of Engineers, 1887, p. 2145). 

After much discussion the present or Bock Island route was adopted. 

Detailed plans and estimates, based upon preliminary surveys and 
under the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, were prepared in 
this office and submitted to Congress June 21, 1890, the report of which 
plans and estimates was published as House Ex. Doc. Fo. 316, Fifty- 
first Congress first session. This report was the basis of subsequent 
appropriations. 

The plans submitted in 1890 were subsequently modified (reports 
Chief of Engineers, 1891, 1892, 1896, and in papers herewith) and con- 
template the construction of a canal at least 80 feet wide at the water 
surface, 7 feet deep, with locks 170 ieet long between quoins, 35 feet 
wide, admitting barges carrying 600 short tons of freight, if we allow 
240 short tons for weight of vessel, and 140 feet length, 34 feet beam, 
and 6 feet draft of vessel that may easily navigate the canal. 

The canal to begin at the Great Bend of the Illinois Biver, thence via 
the valleys of Bnreau and Cowcatcher creeks to the summit level near 
the eighteenth mile, ascending 196 feet through 21 locks, with lifts 
varying from 7 to 11 feet each; thence to the Feeder Junction near the 
twenty-eighth mile; thence to Bock Biver just above the mouth of 
Green Biver ; thence down Bock Biver to its mouth. The length of the 
canal is about 75 miles, having been shortened about 2 miles by the 
adoption of the Green Biver route instead of the Penny Slough route. 
Tlie descent from the summit level to the low- water level of the Mis- 
sissippi Biver is 93 feet, effected by 10 lift locks of from 6 to 14 feet lift, 
with 1 guard lock. The number of lift locks has been reduced from 
37 to 31, and the summit' level has been cut down 9 feet in the changes 
since the 1890 report by subsequent surveys, and the length of the main 
line of the canal has been reduced from 77 to 75 miles. 

The feeder as now located is 29 miles in length instead of 34f miles 
as proposed in 1890, and 37^ miles as proposed in 1871 and 1883. 

The entire line of the canal and feeder has now been definitely located 
by authority of the Secretary of War, as required by river and harbor 
act of August 11, 1888, and subsequent acts of Congress. The esti- 
mated cost of the canal has not been increased by the changes in loca- 
tion, but the lockage has been reduced by 18 feet, the length of the 
canal and feeder by from 7 to 9 miles, the number of locks by six, and 
the resulting time of passage between the Illinois and Mississippi Bivers 
due to these changes about three hours, or about 10 per cent, and the 
probable cost of maintenance and operation has been correspondingly 
reduced. 



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2826 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 
OONDITION OF THE WORK JUNE 30, 1897. 

Work began under the conditions imposed by the river and harbor 
act of September 19, 1890, upon the Rock River end of the canal in 1892 
by the construction of a canal around the Lower Bapids of Bock Biver 
4^ miles long, with 3 locks, 3 swing bridges, 2 dams, 3 lock houses, 7 
sluiceways, and 1 arch culvert, which canal was formally opened for 
navigation April 17, 1895, and bas since that date been in operation. 

Further prosecution of work on the Rock River section has been pre- 
vented by the Moline wagon bridge across Rock River a short distance 
above the head of the canal, which prevents the passage of all craft 
requiring 11 feet headroom or more. Proceedings have been instituted 
in the United States district court to compel the removal of this obstruc- 
tion, the authority of the Secretary of War in the matter being denied 
by the city of Moline. 

All appropriations made subsequent to the act of September 19, 1890, 
have, therefore, been expended in locating the canal, acquiring its right 
of way, and in constructing the eastern section, beginning at the Illi- 
nois River and proceeding westward. 

At the date of this report 8 miles of canal trunk on the eastern sec- 
tion is completed (with the exception of dredging entrance to Lock 1 
and some minor filling)^ also the foundations and masonry of 7 locks 
and 1 aqueduct, 5 arch culverts and 4 pipe culverts, and the masonry 
and superstructure of 1 highway bridge. The earthwork, foundations 
for 11 locks and 2 aqueducts, diversions of creek channels, and the 
masonry of 2 arch and 6 pipe culverts along the next 8 miles, from mile 
9 to mile 16, inclusive, have been awarded to contractors and the work 
is just beginning. 

The right of way for the canal has been acquired and paid for over 
the 16 miles named. Awards have been made for more than a year, but 
not yet reported for right of way from miles 17 to 24, inclusive. All 
lands have been described, abstracts of title secured, and agreements 
made as far as practicable for the right of way for the Sterling Feeder 
and for the right to flow lands affected by the Sterling Dam, and 
all these papers, except a few relating to tracts of land in the vicinity 
of the Feeder Junction, have been forwarded to Washington for the 
action of the Department of Justice in acquiring title. The western 
section, from mile 24 to Bock River at the mouth of Green River, has 
been located on the ground, and the necessary legal descriptions, plats, 
etc., preparatory to proceedings to acquire title to the right of way are 
now in course of preparation. 

PROGRESS OF THE WOBE DXJBINO THE FISOAL YEAB ENDING JUNE 

30, 1897. 

The funds available during the fiscal year admitted no work of con- 
struction of magnitude. 

Eastern section, — The contract for earthwork over the sixth mile, in 
progress at the close of the preceding fiscal year, was completed ; 31,768 
cubic yards of earthwork were placed. The force was reduced to one 
assistant engineer, one inspector, and two watchmen, and employed in 
caring for property and preparing maps, plans, and estimates for the 
work to be done on this section, and necessary papers for acquiring 
right of way from mile 24 to feeder junction near mile 28. 

Since the passage of the sundry civil act of June 3, 1897, oontracts 



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APPENDIX I I — ^BEPOBT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2827 

have been awarded to the lowest responsible bidders under proposals 
opened Jane 3, 1897, for constracting 8 miles of earthwork, at 8| cents 
per cnbio yard, to Katz, Orandall & Callahan, of Omaha, Nebr.; for 
the foundation of 11 locks and 2 aqueducts, to Oogan & Pound, Chi- 
cago, lU., and for the construction of 2 arch culverts and 6 pipe culverts, 
to McArthur Bros. & Co., Chicago, 111. The formal contracts had not 
been approved at the close of the fiscal year, but it is expected work 
will be begun early in July, 1897. 

Beference is made to report of Assistant Long, herewith, for detailed 
statements of his work. 

Western section. — ^The definite location of that part of this section 
from mile 24 to Bock Biver at the month of Green Kiver was approved 
by the Secretary of War February 1, 1897. The canal has been defi- 
nitely located on the ground by Assistant L. L. Wheeler and party, 
and all necessary field work has been done for completing the work of 
describing lands, etc., which office work is now in progress. The report 
upon the final location of the western section is hereto attached. 

The entrance to the Milan Canal from the Mississippi Kiver was 
dredged, 18,628 cubic yards of material having been removed. The 
approaches to the landing at Blossomburg were also dredged by con- 
tract, and 2,860 cubic yards were removed. To aid in scouring away 
the sand bar near the Mississippi terminus of the canal, wing dams 
were constructed in Bock Biver at its mouth, to concentrate and direct 
its current near to the lock. The situation is now much improved, 
and but little difficulty is anticipated in keeping the mouth of the canal 
open and clear. 

Feeder line. — All necessary surveys, maps, plans, and descriptions 
of lands necessary for acquiring title to lands taken or damaged, and 
for constructing the feeder were completed during the year, and, as far 
as now practicable, have been tbrwarded for the action of the Depart- 
ment of Justice. The acreage required for the feeder is 1,111.71 acres 
and for overflow outside of the United States meandered line 1,271.31 
acres, a total of 2,383.02 acres, titles to which are to be acquired. 

PROPOSED APPLICATION OP FUNDS NOW AVAILABLE. 

It is proposed to apply the funds now available to securing additional 
right of way for the canal; to carrying on work under conti*acts already 
awarded over miles 9 to 16, inclusive; to the completion by hired labor 
of the earthwork and lining of the canal from Lock 1 to end of mile 7, 
eastern section, and to paving the approaches to the locks and culverts; 
to the contracting for earthwork over miles 17 to 24, inclusive. 

It is estimated that to complete the eastern section as far as to the 
Feeder Junction near end of mile 28 will require in all to complete, exclu- 
sive of amounts already expended, $2,391,964, as shown on the accom- 
panying table of estimates. 

PROPOSED APPLIOATION OF FUNDS ASKED FOR FOR THE FISOAL 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1899. 

It is proposed to apply these funds to prosecuting toward comple- 
tion under contracts and by hired labor, in accordance with the act of 
June 3, 1896, the work on the canal as rapidly as the necessary right 
of way be acquired, and in prosecuting the proceedings and meeting 
the awards, or agreed-upon costs, for nght of way. 



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2828 REPORT OF THE CHlEP OP ENGINEERS, V. S. ARMY. 

APPROPBIATION8. 

July 1, 1890, balance nnexpended ftom previoiiB appropriationB $786. 46 

Act of— 

September 19, 1890 500,000.00 

July 18, 1892 500,000.00 

August 17, 1894 190,000.00 

Junes, 1896 45,000.00 

Sundry oiyil act, June 4, 1897 875,000.00 



Total 2,110,786.46 

Expended to June 30, 1897 1,203,887.55 



Balance unexpended June 30, 1897 906,898.91 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $64,811.28 

Amount appropriated by sundry civil act approved June 4, 1897 875, 000. 00 



939,811 28 
June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 32, 912. 37 



July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 906,898.91 

July 1,1897, outstanding liabilities $4,100.55 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 241, 026. 75 

245,127.30 



July 1, 1897, balance available 661,771.61 



'Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 4, 815, 960. 00 

Amouut that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 

30,1899 : 1,427,740.00 

Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



ILLINOIS AND MISSISSIPPI CANAI^-WESTBRN SECTION AND FESDEB. 

Annual atatementf JUoal year 1897. 

Surveys, feeder to Rock River $1,676.54 

Wing dams at mouth of Rock River.. 3,398.79 

Superintendence and oflice 1,114.04 

Survey of feeder line 7,416.43 

Right of way, feeder line 2,140.50 

Property, feeder line 5.70 

Total 16,752.00 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPOBT OF MAJOR MABSHALL. 



2829 



DM-t^tifioii 0/ eonUngemi expMMM, JUeal year 1897. 



OonBtmo- 

tion 

ud right 

of way. 



Snperin- 
tendenoe 
Aod office. 



Ooe-flflh 

OOfttof 

proporty. 



Total. 



SnrreyB, feedor to Book BItw 

Wing d»mB at month Book Blrer. 

Snnrey of feeder line 

Right of way, feeder line 

Property (Tjune of, fow-flftha coat) 

Total 



$1,676.54 

3,396.79 

7,416.48 

2, 140. 60 

i.56 



$137.64 
258.77 
664.66 

162.07 



$1.14 



14,636.82 



1,114.04 



L14 



$1,804.18 

8.667.56 

7.982.28 

2.808.47 

4.66 



15,752.00 



Total co$t to elo9e offiioal year 1897, 



Bnrreya 

Bight of way 

Canal trunk: 

Hilel 

Mile^ 

Miles 

Milee4and5 

Lock No. 87 

Lock K0.86 

Guard lock 

Dams 

Bridgee 

Property 

Survey of feeder line 

Bight of way, feeder Une. 

Total 



At doae of 
1896. 



$29,986.49 
26,85L14 

24,154.91 
18.985.64 
18, 680. 01 
126,716.52 
89,542.31 
89.532.19 
72.696.97 
81.428.57 
89, 437. 89 
32.607.80 
17.530.71 
543.00 



668,643.65 



FiBcal year 
1897. 



$1,804.18 



3, 657. 56 



4.56 
7.982.23 
2,808.47 



15.752.00 



Total. 



$31,740.67 
26,851.14 

24,154.91 
18, 985. 64 
18,680.01 
126.716.53 
89,542.81 
39,532.19 
72,696.97 
35,086.13 
39.437.89 
32,611.86 
425,512.94 
2.846.47 



584.395.65 



ILUN018 AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL— EASTERN SECTION. 

Annual siatementf fiical year 1897, 



Sarreys $1, 

Right of way 

Canftl trunk : 

MUel 

Mile2 

Mile3 

Mile 4 

MUe5 

Mil©6 2, 

Mil©9 

Mil© 10 

Mil© 11 

Mil© 12 

Mil© 13 

Mil©U 

Mil© 15 

Mil© 16 

Lock No. 1 



980.04 
293.55 

54.00 

^.44 

2.25 

6.08 

71.00 

632.90 

9.37 

18.01 

9.37 

9.38 

212.83 

196.56 

208. IH 

226.51 

&1S 



Look No. 2 


^.13 


Lock No. 3 

Lock No. 4 

ArchcnlTorts: 

No. 1 


5.13 
5.13 

5.14 


N0.2 


5.14 


G©n©ral coDstmction 


380.85 


SaperiDtendenc© and offic© .. . 

Car© and r©pair of propor ty and 

T>1ant X 


10,299.87 
689.20 


Proporty 


18.76 


Mat©riibl (etook on hand) 

Total 

L©B8 material on hand Jun©30, 
1896 


16,120.32 
33,490.30 
16,329.93 





Total for fiscal year 1897. 17,160.37 



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2830 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 
Total oo$i to clo$e ofJUeal year 1897, 





Atoloeeof 
1896. 


Fboal 

year 1897. 


Deterio- 
ration of 
property. 


Eqnitable 
part of 
general 

tion. 


Eqnitable 
part of 
saperin- 
tendenoe 
andofBfle. 


Bqnitable 
part of 

oareand 
repair. 


Total. 


flarre s 


$87,664.64 
67,514.08 

14.84L62 

14,087.64 

13,708.76 

83,389.26 

21,664.04 

7, 846. 09 

12,206.56 

10.120.78 

487.20 

423.27 

423.29 

428.82 


$1,980.04 
293.55 

54.00 

20.44 

2.26 

6.08 

71.00 

2,682.90 










$89,644.58 
67.807.58 

14,867.62 
14, 519. 01 


Wf ht of way . ! II " ! . . . . 










Cuftltnuik: 

Mllel 


$100.89 

98.04 

96.62 

232.90 

151.58 

78.08 

85.12 

70.58 

8.11 

8.07 

8.01 

8.02 

1.48 

1.87 

1.45 

1.57 

253.04 

266.30 

238.74 

242.29 

255.25 

263.98 

223.00 

22.25 

1.36 

48.92 

40.98 

60.12 
48.29 
71.04 
87.16 
48.29 
93.96 
21.48 


987.59 

26.94 

26.28 

68.79 

41.65 

20.09 

23.40 

19.40 

.85 

.84 

.81 

.82 

.41 

.88 

.40 

.48 

69.53 

72.89 

65.60 

66.57 

70.18 

72.58 

6L27 

6.11 

.87 

18. M 

11.25 

16.52 
11.90 
19.52 
23.95 
13.27 
25.82 
5.90 


$322.54 

814.08 

307. 21 

748.25 

486.99 

284.79 

278.50 

226.76 

10.00 

9.89 

9.69 

9.69 

i.76 

4.40 

4.66 

5.07 

812.97 

852.37 

767.02 

778.44 

820.07 

848.11 

716.46 

71.52 

4.88 

157.19 

181.52 

193.16 
189.10 
228.24 
280.04 
155.18 
801.90 
69.03 


$21.58 

21.07 

20.55 

50.08 

82.59 

15.71 

18.30 

15.17 

.66 

.66 

.64 

.64 

.81 

.29 

.81 

.83 

54.41 

57.05 

51.34 

52.10 

54.89 

56.76 

47.96 

i.78 

.29 

10.51 

8.80 

12.92 
9.31 
15.27 
18.73 
10.38 
20.20 
4.62 


Mile 2 


Mile 8 


14,160.67 
84,490.56 


Mile 4 


Mile 5 


22,447.85 
10, 822. 66 


Mile 6 


Mile 7 


12,606.88 

10,452.09 

461.19 


Mile 8 




Mile 9 


9.87 

18.01 

9.87 

9.38 

212.85 

196.56 

208.19 

226.51 

5.13 

5.18 

6.13 

6.13 


Mile 10 


456.74 


Mile 11 


446 81 


Mile 12 


446.87 


Mile 13 


219. 81 


Mile 14 




203.00 


Mile 15 




215.01 


Mile 16 




233.91 


IxMjk No 1 


86,279.07 
88,087.39 
84, 228. 15 
84,737.52 
86,600.65 
87,852.12 
81,976.29 

8,190.91 

195.46 

7,015.68 

5,870.08 

8,615.48 
6,208.22 
10,186.72 
12,498.06 
6,924.06 
18,474.07 
8,081.17 
5,324.20 
18,500.00 
16, 010. 21 
16,829.93 


87,474.15 
89, 290. 18 


LockNo.2 


LockNo.3 


35, 355. 98 


Lock 1^0.4 


85, 882. 05 


LookNo.5 


87, 800. 99 
89, 093. 50 
88,024.97 


LockNo.6 




LockNo.7 




PipecalTerta: 

^0.1 




8,296.57 
201.86 


lJo.2.... 




No.8 




7, 245. 74 


No.4 




6,062.58 


▲roh oalverte : 

No.l 


5.14 
5.14 


8,903.83 


Ko.2 


6,411.96 
10,620.79 
12,907.94 


Uo.8 


No.4 




Ko.5 




7,152.07 

18,915.95 

8,182.20 


AqnedactKo.l 

Highway bridge 

Look forming 








6,824.20 
18,000.00 




880.85 

18.76 

16,120.32 

10,299.87 

689.20 










Property 










12,823.18 
16,120.32 






















Care and repair of prop- 
erty and plant • • . 
































83,490.30 
16.829.99 












Leea material on hand 
June 30, 1896 


8,205.79 


880.85 


10,299.87 


689.20 






602,831.58 




Total 


17,160.87 


619,491.90 





SxpendiUurm IHinoU and Mi89%$9ippi Canal for fiscal year 1897, 

Eastern seetion $17,160.37 

Western seotion and feeder line 15,752.00 

Total 32,912.37 

Total expenditures HHnois and MisHaeippi Canal to end of fiscal year 1897. 

Eaatem section $619,491.90 

Western section and feeder line 584,395.65 

Total 1,203,887.55 



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APPENDIX I I ^REPORT OF MAJOB MABSHALL. 



2831 



CofI of completing eastern eeeiion Illinoia and Hissiaaippi Canal, from Ulinoia Biver to 
Feeder Junction. (Estimated June 30, 1897,) 



a 


1 

1 


h 
n 

1^ 


^ 


III 


ftz III 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 








$17,000 




$5,000 
10,000 














$2,600 
6,000 


$24, 600. 00 
66,500.00 








2,6001 








$7, 000 $32, 000 






f U 500 


9. 9nn 










16,700 00 




11 !vno T'fton 




5, 000 *^ 000 










2,600 
2,600 


73,900.00 








l.»00j 


6,000 








7,000 







16, 400. 00 







14,500 








"* 




14, 500. 00 




i,5o6 

2. 000 


6,000 
6.000 








9,o66l 38.666 




2,600 

2,500 


^ 68, 000. 00 




14.500 








7,000 




81,000.00 




A»,«WV| _,---, 








' 








58.000 29,000 


35,000 50,000 







30,000| 70,000 




17,600 


289, 600. 00 




ContingoucicB, 10 per cent.. 






28,960.00 














Total. 




818, 460. 00 








6,000 







46,000 19,200*^ 000' 70.000 






$4,000 


f- . -.1 


187, 200. 00 
44,800.00 
122.800.00 
208, 000. 00 
78, 800. 00 
183,100.00 
174, 400. 00 


10 


18,000 19,000 

32,500 29,300 

21,000 14 000 


1 






7.000 
7,000 






11 
11 


12,000 35.000 

39 000 70.000 88.000 


$4,000 








2,600 
6,000 
2,500 
7,500 
2,500 
2,600 


IB 




18.300; 12,000 35,000 
14,6U0 36,000105,000 






4,000 

"*4,'666 

12,000 


7,000 
7,000 
7,000 
7,000 






14 






8,000 




$5,000 


15 




36,900{ 20,000| 35,000 flO. 666 


1<( 




39,200 12,000 35,000 








107,700.00 
















'116,600'l91,100148.000 


386,000186,000 


12,000 


24,0001 42,0001 


6,000i 27,600 


1,088,100.00 
108,610 00 














Total. 




1,194,710.00 








2,600 
6,000 


17 )l 12,000! 86,000 

18 )l 91 OnA 70.000 








17.0001 30 000 11 000 


131,300.00 
134, 200. 00 
43,100.00 
77,800.00 
68,300.00 
77,000.00 
85,500.00 
43, 100. 00 








14! OOOL. .'..,. 

7,000 

7,000 


600 
7,600 
1,000 


19 ) 

20 ) 

21 ) 

22 ) 

23 ) 

24 ) 


1 — , 






























7,000 



































6,000j 


7,000 


















), 38,000 
»er oeut. 
kv. miles 


106,000 




fl,ooo| 


69,000, 30.000 


22,000 


7,600 


808,300.00 
80, 830. 00 


17-5U. nnnn m.n 


proval of title. 






42,054.00 
















711 184 00 










2ft 


600 

600 
600 
500 




25,20G 
21,800 
24.000 
19,200 


1 






1 ... . 




26,700.00 
35, 800. 00 
87,600.00 
36,700.00 


2ft 








«,"666 

8,000 - 


7,000 
7,000 
7,000 








27 














M> 










9,000 


























2,000 
Gout 




90.200 


1 




12,0001 9,000i 21,000 








134,200.00 
13, 420. 00 




nirencies. 10 ner cent 




' 






Estimated eoat of right of 


way 






20,000.00 












Total. 




167, 620. 00 












Total ooat of completing aastem section. . 
Expended on eastern section to June 30, 1 

Total nxobabla ooat of aastem secti 


2,391,9647o6 
619,491.90 




807 






9n.. ...................... ..••••...... 






3, OU, 466. 90 





















iTraotionaL 



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2832 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

I4$t of eontraetifor oonatrucHon of Illinois and MUHsiippi Canal in force dwring JUoal 

year ending June 30, 1897, 



Kame and address of oon- 
uuctor. 



Nature of contract. 



Date. 



To expire. 



Bemarka. 



James Carroll, St Louis, 
Mo. 

Kats. Crandall & Calla- 
han, Omaha, Nebr. a 

Cocan Sl Poond, Chicago, 

ICoArtharBros.Co., Chi- 
oafo,IU.a 



Earthwork, mile 6 

Earthwork, mUes 9-16 
(incloAiye). 

Pits and foundations for 
11 locks and 2 aque- 
ducts. 

% concrete arch cul- 
Terts, cast-iron pipe 
eulverts. 



Oct 10,1894 
June 19, 1897 
do 



Sept 80, 1895 
July 1,1898 
do 



.do. 



..do . 



Extended to and com- 
pleted Aug. 1, 1889. 



•Contracts awarded, but had not been approved by the Chief of Engineers June 30, 1897. 

Abetraei ofpropoeaU for canal trunk earthwork, lock-pit exoavatione, preparing founda- 
Hone for focki and aqueducts, and constructing cast-iron pipe culverts and concrete arch 
culverts for Illinois and Mississippi Canalf between mile 8 and mile 16, received in 
response to advertisement of April 8, 1897, and opened at 12 m,, central time, June 3, 
1897, by Maj, W, L, Marshall, Corps of Engineers. 



I 



Name and address of bidder. 



Crescent Stone Co., Peoria, HI 

Kate, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Kebr . 
K. 8. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Monroo &, Bryan, Portsmouth, Ohio..... 

McArthur Bros. Co., Chicago, 111 

B. C. Cushing & Co., Chicago, 111 

Herbert Bipley, Chicago, lU 



Earthwork, mile 9 to mile 18, inclusiye. 



Mile 9 (134 000 
cubic yards). 



Per 
cubic 
yard. 



OenU. 



14 



11.8 
9.81 



Amount 



$12,000.00 
18,700.00 



16,812.00 
18,145.40 



Miles 10 and 11 

(307,000 cubic 

yards). 



Per 
cubic 
yard. 



OmUs. 



10 
9.85 
8.4 
9.76 
8.6 



Amount 



7.25 $22,257.60 



30,700.00 
28,704.60 
25,788.00 
29,932.60 
26,095.00 



Mfle 12 (103,000 
eubio yards). 



Per 

cubic 
yard. 



Oenta, 
10.9 
8.5 

12 



9.8 



Amount 



$11,227.00 
8,755.00 

12,360.00 



10,094.00 



ill 
I 



Name and address of bidder. 



Earthwork, mile 9 to mile 16, indusiye— Continued. 



Mile 18 (144,000 
cubic yards). 



Per 
cubic 
yard. 



Amount 



Mile 14 (129,000 
cubic yards). 



Per 

cubic 
yard. 



Amount. 



Mile 15 (258,000 
cubic yards). 



Per 
cubic 
yard. 



Amount 



Orasoent Stone Co., Peoria, HI 

Winston Bros. 8l Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kjtta, Crandall Sc Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

John J. Shea, Chicago, 111 

K. S. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Qrifflths & McDormott (instruction Co., 

Chicago, 111 

H. A BMdker & Co., Chicago, HI 

B. C. Cushing 8l Co., Chicago, 111 



Ctnts. 
11.3 
12 
9.25 



$16,272.00 
17,280.00 
13, 320. 00 



OenU. 
9.9 
13.5 
9 



$12,771.00 
17.415.00 
11,610.00 



(kwts. 



13.6 



19,440.00 



11.5 
14.5 



14,835.00 
18,705.00 



8.9 



12, 816. 00 



10 



12,900.00 



15 
8.5 
14.5 

15 

16.25 
.14.26 
12.4 



$38,700.00 
21,930.00 
37,410.00 

38,700.00 

41,025.00 
36, 765. 00 
31,992.00 



Digitized by 



Qoo^^ 



APPENDIX I I ^BEPOBT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2833 



Abstract of proposals for eanal trunk earthwork, ote. — Continued. 



Name and addreas of Mdder. 



Earthwork, mile 9 to mile 18, 
incloaiye— Continued. 



Hile 16 (906,000 
cable yards). 



Per 

enbio Amount, 
yard. ! 



The entire 8 
mUea (1,880,000 
cabio yards). 



Per 
cabic 
yard. 



AmoQDt. 



Per 

square 
yard. 



Slope paring, 
miles 10 and 11 
1,500 squ 
yards). 



Amount. 



Winston Bros. A Co., Minneapolis, IClnn . 
Kats, Crandall Sc CallahAn, Omaha, Kebr . 
K. 8. Yoong & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Honroe Sl Bryan, Portamonth, Ohio 

Qrifflths A MoDonnott Construction Co., 

Chicago, 111 

Heldmaier A, New, Chicago, HI 

John Soott A Sons, St. Louis, ICo 

McArthur Bros. Co., Chicago, 111 

K. C. Cashing & Co., Chicago, 111 

Bamett A Kecord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 

Herbert Ripley, Chicago, HI 



I 
Cents. 
14 $42, 700. 00 
8.5 25,925.00 



Oentt. 



15 



U 



9.8 



45,750.00 



8.25 
18 



$113,850.00 
179,400.00 



$1.26 

1.76 
1.10 



42,700.00 



29,890.00 



11.67 
5.74 

11.2 
9 

16 



161,046.00 
79,212.00 
154,560.00 
124,200.00 

220,800.00 



1.66 
1.35 
1.40 
1.00 

1.95 
1.47 



$5,626.00 

7, 875. 00 
4,050.00 



7, 425. 00 
6,075.00 
6.300.00 
4,500.00 

8,775.00 
6,615.00 



FOUNDATION irOR LOCK NO. 8. 





Kama and address of bidder. 


Earth excavation 
(6,600cubicyarda). 


Piles (363). 


Pine timber 
(60,000 feet B.M.). 


Price. 


Amount 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 


Rftrmn A. Paa/w. M'araAlllAn. HI ^ 


$0.20 
.30 

.40 
.40 
.15 
.20 
.24 


$1,820.00 
1,060.00 

2,640.00 
2,640.00 
99U.00 
1,320.00 
1,584.00 


$4.00 
4.00 

8.00 
8.50 
3.36 
3.80 
4.00 


$1,462.00 
1,452.00 

2,904.00 
1,270.50 
1,219.68 
1,379.40 
1.452.00 


$20.00 
22.50 

40.00 
21.00 
28.48 
22.00 
22.00 


$1,000.00 
1,125.00 

2,000.00 
1,060.00 
1,174.00 
1,100.00 
1, 100. 00 


6 

7 


Kate. Crandall A CaUahan, Omaha, Nebr . 

N. S. Yoong A Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa - 


9 


I>oan A Tolman. Aurora. HI -x. .-«....-, 


1? 


fTniran A Pound. Ohi<MMr'». Ill ,^.,,,, 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, lU 

Barnett A Becord Co.,MinneapoU8,Minn . 


« S 


Name and address of bidder. 


Pineplank (15,000 
feetB.M.). 


feetB.M.). , pounds). 


tig 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


ft 


Bamm A^ Peace. Maraeilles. HI -.-.T*r-- 


$20.00 
21.00 

30.00 
21.00 
21.00 
20.00 
20.00 


$300.00 
315.00 

450.00 
315.00 
324.00 
800.00 
800.00 


$40.00 
49.00 

50.00 
45.00 
29.40 
4&00 
60.00 


1 
$620.00 an.02.<i 


$137.50 
123.76 

275.00 


6 

7 


N. S. Young A Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 
Iowa 


637.00 

660.00 
686.00 
382.20 
624.00 
660.00 


.0226 

.06 

.08 

.02 

.025 

.025 


9 


Uoan & Tolmsn AnmF* Til 


166.00 


11 


Coiran A Pound. Chicaso. HI 


110.00 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker A Co.Tchicago, HI 

Bamottdc Becord Co.,Minneapoli8,Minn. 


137.60 
187.60 


i 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


Natural cement 
(925 cubic yards). 


Portland cement 

with pebbles 
(60 cubic yards). 


Portland cement 
with broken stone 
(50 cubic yards). 


1 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount 


8 
6 

7 

9 


Barron ft Peace, Marseilles, m 

Kats, Crandall ftCaUahan, Omaha, Nebr . 
N.S. Young A Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa , 

Doan A Tolman. Aurora. HI -,.,,.,- 


$3.65 
8.75 

5.00 
2.96 
3.28 
3.00 
3.00 


$3,376.26 
3,468.75 

4,625.00 
2,728.75 
3, 034. 00 
2,776.00 
2,775.00 


$5.72 
6.26 

6.76 
6.20 
6.72 
4.50 
6.00 


$286.00 
262.60 

337.60 
260.00 
336.00 
225.00 
250.00 


$7.00 
6.00 

7.76 
7.20 
7.35 
6.75 
7.00 


$350.00 
800.00 

887.50 
360.00 


11 


Coean A Pound. Chicago. Ill 


367.50 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker ACoTchicago, 111 

Bamett& Keoord Co., Minneapolis, Minn . 


287.50 
850.00 



BNa 97 178 



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2834 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Abstraet of propoaaU for canal trunk earthwork, etc. — Contiiiaed. 
FOUNDATION FOR LOCK NO. ft-Continuod. 



« 

•5& 


Name and address of bidder. 


GraTel (800 
oabic yards). 


8-inch drain 

pipe (210 
line!itffeet). 


10-inoh drain 

pipe (560 
linear feet). 


Total. 




Price. 


Am't. 


Price. 


Am*t 


Price. 


Am*t. 




^ 


Barron A, Peaoe If araeUles. HI 


$0.00 
1.25 

1.50 
1.10 
.00 
.00 
.85 


$180.00 
375.00 

450.00 
330.00 
180.00 
180.00 
195.00 


$0.10 
.80 

.25 
.15 
.10 
.80 
.80 


$21.00 
03.00 

62.50 
81.50 
2L00 
03.00 
83.00 


$0.14 
.35 

.80 
.18 
.15 
.40 
.85 


$78.40 
196.00 

168.00 
100.80 
84.00 
224.00 
196.00 


$8,671.15 
0,908.00 

14,552.00 
9, 476. 55 


6 

7 


Kata, CrandaUdt Callaban, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Young Sc Wm. Steyh, Bnrlingtou, 

Iowa • ........---.-.-.-..••«-•.-... 


9 


"P^an A- Tolman, Aurora, Tll^.x,, ,,,.,. r- 


12 


Coiran & Pound' GhicaffO. Ill 


7 854 88 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicago, lU 

Bamett&RecordCo.,Minneapolis,Minn. 


8,327.90 
8.702.50 



FOUNDATION FOR LOCK NO. 9. 



11 


Name and address of bidder. 


Sarth excavation 

(3,200 cubic 

yards). 


Piles (868). 


Pinetimber (60,000 
feetB.M.). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount 


Price. 




8 


Bflrron A. Peace Mameilles. Ill 


$0.20 
.12 

.40 

.20 

.145 

.15 

.17 

.19 


$640.00 
884.00 

1,280.00 
640.00 
464.00 
480.00 
544.00 

606.00 


$4.00 
3.97 

8.00 
8.50 
4.25 
8.86 
8.80 

4.00 


$1,452.00 
1,441.11 

2.904.00 
1,270.50 
1, 542. 75 
1.219.68 
1, 379. 40 

1,462.00 


$20.00 
2L00 

40.00 
21.00 
21.50 
23.48 
22.00 

22.00 


$1,000.00 
i; 060. 00 

2,000.00 
1.060.00 
1,075.00 
1,174.00 
1,100.00 

1,100.00 


5 

7 


Kate, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr . 

N. S. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa . ......................... 


9 


Doan Sr Tolman. Anrorm, 111 


10 


Wm Mclvor Marseilles. Ill 


12 
13 
19 


Cogan & Pound, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicago. Dl 

Bamett & Record Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 






il 


Name and address of bidder. 


^'"ffl^iir 


Oak plank (18,000 
fe£tB.M.). 


Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (5,500 

pounds). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 


Barron A. Peace. Maneilles. Ill 


ri!0.00 
20.00 

30.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.60 
20.00 

20.00 


$300.00 
300.00 

450.00 
815.00 
800.00 
824.00 
800.00 

300.00 


$40.00 
47.00 

50.00 
45.00 
50.00 
20.40 
48.00 

50.00 


$520.00 
611.00 

650.00 
585.00 
660.00 
382.20 
624.00 

660.00 


$0,026 
.0225 

.05 

.03 

.0275 

.02 

.026 

.026 


$187.60 
128.76 

276.00 


6 

7 


Kate, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr 

N. 8. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa • ...........-.--.-....-....-.. 


9 


DoAn Ac Tolman Aurora. Ill ............. 


166 00 


10 


Wm Molvor. Marseilles. Ill 


151.25 


12 


Coflran St. Pound. Chicaico, 111 


110.00 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, HI 

Bamett A Record Co^ Minneapolis, 
Minn 


187.50 
187.60 








i 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


si 
11 


Natural cement 
(925 cubic yards). 


with pebbles 
(50 cubic yards). 


with broken stone 
(50 cubic yards). 


a 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 
5 

7 


Kats, CrandaU&Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N.S. Young Sl Wm. Steyh, BurUngton, 

Iowa .................................. 


$3.66 
8.40 

5.00 
2.06 
3.25 
8.28 
8.00 

8.00 


$8,376.25 
8,145.00 

4,625.00 
2,728.75 
8,006.25 
8.034.00 
2,775.00 

2.775.00 


$5.72 
4.90 

6.75 
5.20 
4.60 
6.72 
4.50 

5.00 


$286.00 
245.00 

887.50 
260.00 
230.00 
836.00 
225.00 

250.00 


$7.00 
6.15 

7.75 
7.20 
5.25 
7.86 
6.76 

7.00 


$850.00 
807.60 

887.60 


9 


Doan & Tolman, Aurora, 111............. 


860.00 


10 


Wm Melvor. Marseillea. Dl 


2G2.60 


12 


Coffan & Pound. CbicaiEO. Ill 


367.60 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicaso, lU 

Bamett A, Record Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn ,— 


287.60 
850.00 









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APPENDIX I I ^REPORT OF HAJOB MAKSHALL. 



2835 



Alstraet of proposals for oanal trunk earthwork, etc. — Contiiiaed. 
FOUNDATION FOB LOCK NO. O-Contiiiiied. 



\i 


Name and ftddress of bidder. 


Orayel (300 
oubio yards). 


8-inoh drain 
lineS? feet). 


10-inch drain 

pipe (660 
linear feet). 


Total. 


1^ 


Price. 


Am't. 


Price. 


Am't. 


Price. 


Am't. 




3 
5 

7 


Barron ft Peoee, KarMlllea, IB 

Katz, CrandaB&CallahaD. Omaha, Nebr. 

K. S. Yonng ft Wm. Stejh, Burlington, 

Iowa...---.-.. 


$0.60 
1.25 

1.50 
1.10 
.75 
;60 
.60 

.65 


$180.00 
375.00 

450.00 
330.00 
225.00 
180.00 
180.00 

195.00 


$0.10 
.25 

.15 
.14 
.10 
.80 

.80 


$21.00 
52.50 

52.50 
31.50 
20.40 
21.00 
63.00 

68.00 


.80 
.18 
.17 
.15 
.40 

.85 


$78.40 
168.00 

168.00 
100.80 
06.20 
84.00 
224.00 

196.00 


$7,00L15 
7,895.86 

13,192.00 




10 


Doan ftTolman,AarDra,IU 

Wm. Mclvor, Mameilleik 111 


7.476.55 
7,768.85 


1? 


Oogan A Po^nd, Obloago, 'ni-,,T,,T 


7,844.88 


13 
19 


H.A.BoedkerftCo.,Chicago.Ill 

Bamett ft Beoord Co-, Hinneapolla. 
Minn 


7.55L90 
7,726.66 









FOUNDATION FOB LOCK NO. 10. 



11 


Name and address of bidder. 


Earth exoaration 

(3.900 oubio 

yards). 


PUes (868). 


Pinetlmber (50,000 
feetB.M.). 


Prioe. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


3 
5 
7 


Barron ft Peace, Maneflles^IU 

Katz. Crandall ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Builington, 

Iowa .............................. 


.40 
.145 
.16 
.20 

.28 


$780.00 
1,365.00 

1,560.00 
565.50 
585.00 
780.00 

887.00 


$4.00 
4.10 

8.00 
4.25 
3.86 
3.90 

4.00 


$1,452.00 
1,488.13 

2.904.00 
1,542.76 
1,219.68 
1,415.70 

1,452.00 


$20.00 
22.50 

40.00 
21.50 
23.48 
22.00 

22.00 


$1,000.00 
1,125.00 

2,000.00 
1,075.00 
1,174.00 
1,100.00 

1,100.00 


10 


W ni McI vor, Marseilles, 111 


12 


Cmrtak Sl Pound Chioaffo 111 ...-.-. 


13 
19 


H.^.Boodker ft Co., Chicaao.IU 

Bamett ft Beoord (Jo., Minneapolis, 
Minn 






^•3 

11 


Name and address of bidder. 


Pine plank (15,000 


"^fSr^^^ 


Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (5. 500 

pounds). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount 


3 


Bamm ft Peace. Marseilles. HI 


$20.00 
21.00 

30.00 
20.00 
21.60 
20.00 

20.00 


$300.00 
315.00 

450.00 
300.00 
324.00 
300.00 

800.00 


$40.00 
50.00 

50.00 
60.00 
29.40 
48.00 

50.00 


$520.00 
650.00 

650.00 
650.00 
382.20 
624.00 

660.00 


$0,025 
.0225 

.05 
.0275 
.02 
.025 

.026 


$137.60 
128.75 

275.00 
151 25 


5 

7 


Kats, CrandaUft CalUhan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. 8. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Buriington, 
Iowa • ...•..---•......-............ 


10 


Wm. Molvor. Marseilles. Ill 


12 


Cocan ft Pound. Chicairo. HI 


110 00 


13 
19 


H.A.BoedkerftCo..Chicago,I]l 

Bamett ft Becord Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


187.50 
187.50 






i 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


|1 


Natnra] cement 
(925 cubic yards). 


Portland cement 

with pebbles 
(50 oubic yards). 


Portland cement 
with broken stone 
(50 oubio yards). 


JZJ 


Prioe. 


Amonnt. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


n 


Barron ft Peace, Marseilles, III 


$3.65 
4.00 

5.00 
3.25 
3.28 
8.00 

8.00 


$8,876.25 
3,700.00 

4.625.00 
3,006.25 
8,034.00 
2,775.00 

2.775.00 


$5.72 
5.00 

6.75 
4.60 
6.72 
4.50 

6.00 


$286.00 
250.00 

387.50 
230.00 
886.00 
225.00 

260.00 


$7.00 
6.15 

7.75 
5.25 
7.35 
5.75 

7.00 


$350.00 
807.50 

387 50 


5 

7 


KatK. Crandall ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Yonng ft Wm. Steyh. Burlington, 

low A 


10 


Wm. Molvor, Marseilles, Dl 


262.50 
367.50 
287.50 

860 00 


1? 


Cogan ft Pound, Chicago, Dl 


13 
19 


H.ABoedkerftCo.,CJhicaffo,m 

Minn .' JV....*. 









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2836 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARliT. 

Absiraot of proposals for canal trunk sarihworJc, 0tc.— Continiied. 
FOUNDATION FOB LOCK NO. 10— Continued. 



II 



Name and address of bidder. 



Gravel (800 
cubic yards). 



Price. Am't 



8-inch drain 

pipe (210 
linear feet). 



Price. Am*t. 



10-lnch drain 

pipe (660 
linear feet). 



Price. Am't. 



Total 



Barron & Peace, Marseilles, HI , 

KatZy Crandall Sc Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N.S. Young Sl Wm. Steyh, Burliugton, 

Iowa 

Wm. MclYor, Marseilles, 111 

Cogan & Pound. Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker & Co., (jfbioa£o, HI 

Bamett Sc Record Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



$0.60 
1.25 

1.60 
.75 
.60 
.60 

.65 



$180.00 
375.00 

450.00 
225.00 
180.00 
180.00 

196.00 



$0.10 



.80 



$21.00 
63.00 

52.60 
29.40 
21.00 
63.00 

63.00 



$0.U 
.35 

.80 
.17 
.15 
.40 



$78.40 
196.00 

168.00 
95.20 
81.00 

224.00 

196.00 



$8,181.15 
9, 651. 06 

13,472.00 
7,870.35 
7,449.88 
7,824.20 

8,015.50 



FOUNDATION FOR LOCK NO. 11. 



if 


Name and address of bidder. 


Earth excavation 

(11,600 cubic 

yards). 


PUes(368). 


Pine timber (50,000 
feetB.M.). 


&i 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 
6 

7 


Barron ft Pearoe, Marseilles, m 

Katz, Crandall Sc Callahan, Oniaha,Nebr. 

N. S. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Barliiigton, 

Iowa 


$0.20 
.15 

.40 

.22 

.155 

.15 

.22 

.16 


$2,820.00 
1,740.00 

4, 640. 00 
2, 552. 00 
1,798.00 
1, 740. 00 
2,552.00 

1.856.00 


$4.00 
3.95 

8.00 
3.50 
4.25 
3.36 
8.80 

4.00 


$1,462.00 
1,488.85 

2.904.00 
1, 270. 50 
1.542.75 
1,219.68 
1,379.40 

1.452.00 


$20.00 
21.50 

40.00 
21.00 
21.50 
23.48 
22.00 

22.00 


$1,000.00 
1,075.00 

2,000.00 
1.050.00 
1,076.00 
1 174 00 


9 




10 


Wm. Molror. Marseilles, HI 


1? 


Cogan A Pound, Chicag", Til r 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co.. Chicago, HI 

Barnett ft Record Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


1,100.00 
1 100.00 









II 


Name and address of bidder. 


Pine plank (15,000 
feetB.M.). 


Oak plank (13,000 
feetB.M.). 


Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (5.500 

pounds). 


Price. 


Amoant. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 
6 

7 


Barron ft Peaoe, Marseilles. lU 

Katz, Crandall ft CaUahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. & Young fttWm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 


$20.00 
19.50 

30.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.60 
20.00 

20.00 


$300.00 
292.50 

450.00 
315.00 
300.00 
324.00 
800.00 

300.00 


$40.00 
47.00 

50.00 
45.00 
.50.00 
29.40 
48.00 

50.00 


$520.00 
611.00 

660.00 
585.00 
650.00 
382.20 
624.00 

660.00 


$0,025 
.0225 

.05 

.03 

.0275 

.02 

.025 

.026 


$137.60 
123.75 

275.00 





Doan ft Tolman. Aurora Til 


165 00 


10 


Wm. Mclvor, Marseilles. Ill 


151.25 


1? 


Cogan ft Pound, Chicago, IB 


110. OQ 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co.. Chicago, Dl 

Bamett ft Record Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


137.50 
137.50 








1 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


Natnral cement Portland cement 
(925 cubic , with pebbles 
yards). j (50 cubic yards). 


Portland cement 
with broken stone 
(50 cubic yards). 


}A^ 


Price. 


Amount, j Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 


Barron ft Peace, Marseillea, 111 


$3.65 
3.40 

5.00 

3.28 
8.00 

8.00 


$3,876.25 aS-72 


$286.00 
245.00 

337.50 
260.00 
230.00 
836.00 
225.00 

260.00 


$7.00 
6.05 

7.76 
7.20 
5.25 
7.36 
6.76 

7.00 


$350.06 
302.50 

887.50 


6 

7 


Kata^OrandaU ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

K. S. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Barliugton, 

Iowa 


3,145.00 

4,625.00 
2,728.75 
3,006.25 
3. 034. 00 
2, 775. 00 

2,775.00 


4.90 

6.75 
5.20 
4.60 
6.72 
4.50 

6.00 


9 


TV>an ft Tolman, Aurora, 111 


860.00 


10 


Wm. Molvor, M'arHeiDes', 111 


262.50 


n 


Cogan ft Pound, Chicago, 111 


867.50 


13 


H. A. Boedker, Chicago, 111 


287.50 


19 


Bamett ft Record Co., Miuneapolis, 
Minn .. !. 


860.00 









Digitized by 



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APPENDIX I I — BEPOBT OF MAJOB IfABSHALL. 



2837 



Ah8tr€U!t of prapoiaU for canal trunk earthwork, ete, — Continued 
BSouNDATION FOK lock irO. ll^Contlnaed. 



1 


Kame and address of bidder. 


Gravel (800 
onbic yards). 


8-inch drain 

pipe (210 
linear feet). 


10-incb drain 
linJarfeet). 


Total. 


Price. 


Am*l 


Price. 


Am't 


Price. 


Am*t. 




8 


Barron & Penoo Marseilles. Ill 


fO 60 aiso.on 


$0.10 
.25 

.26 

.15 
.14 

.10 
.80 

.80 


$21.00 
52.60 

52.50 
31.50 
29.40 
21.00 
63.00 

68.00 


$0.14 
.30 

.80 

.18 

.17 

.15. 

.40 

.85 


$7^40 
168.00 

168.00 
100.80 
96.20 
84.00 
224.00 

196.00 


$9. 671. 15 


6 

7 


Katx. Crandall &CaUahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Yoong A Wm. Steyb, Burlington, 

Iowa 


1.25 

1.50 

1.10 

.75 

.60 

.60 

.65 


375.00 

450.00 
330.00 
225.00 
180.00 
180.00 

195.00 


9,261.60 
16,662.00 





Doan & Tolnian ^nrara. Ill .......•>... 


9,888.65 


10 


Wm. Mclvor Marseilles. Ill 


9, 102. 85 


12 


Coean &Pooud, Cbioago. Ill 


8,604.88 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedoker & Co., Chicaeo, 111 

Barnett & Becord Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


9,559.90 
8,974.50 









FOUNDATIONS FOB LOCK NO. 12 AND AQITEDXJCT NO. S. 



^1 



Name and address of bidder. 



Earth excavation 

(9,200 cubic 

yards). 



Price. Amount. 



Pfles(977). 



Price. Amount. 



Pine timber 

(100,000 feet 

B. M.). 



Price. Amount. 



Eatz, Crandall Sc Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young &. Wm. Steyb, BurUngton, 

lovra 

Monroe & Bryan. Portsmouth, Ohio 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, Dl 

H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, 111 

Barnett & Kecord Co., Minneapolis, 



$0.85 

.60 
.39 
.15 
.24 



$3,220.00 

4,600.00 
3, 588. 00 
1, 380. 00 
2,208.00 

2,116.00 



$4.04 

8.00 
4.00 
3.36 
4.10 

4.00 



$3,947.08 

7, 816. 00 
3,908.00 
3,282.72 
4,005.70 

8,908.00 



$28.50 

40.00 
22.00 
23.04 
28.00 

22.00 



$2,350.00 

4,000.00 
2,200.00 
2,304.00 
2.800.00 

8,900.00 



la 



Name and address of bidder. 



Katz, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young Sc Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Monroe ic Bryan, Portsmouth, Ohio. . . . 

Cogan & Pound. Chicago, III 

U. A. Boedker A. Co., (Chicago, HI 

Barnett & Record Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



Pine plank (15,000 
feetB.M.). 



Oakplank(18.000 ^^^"^{^^^ 



feetB.M.) 



Price. Amount. 



$22.00 

30.00 
21.50 
21.60 
21.00 

20.00 



Price. Amoont. 



$330.00 

450.00 
822.50 
324.00 
815.00 

800.00 



$50.00 

50.00 
49.00 
29.40 
50.00 

50.00 



nails (11,200 
pounds). 



Price. Amount. 



$900.00 $0.0225 



900.00 
882.00 
529.20 
900.00 

900.00 



.06 
.0225 
.02 
.06 

.026 



560.00 
252.00 
224.00 
836.00 

280.00 



jS. 



Name and addieea of bidder. 



Price. Amount. 



Eats, Oandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr 

H. S. Young St, Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa. 



Monroe & Bryan, Portsmouth, Ohio. . . 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, III 

H. A. Boedker Sc Co., Chicago, HI 

Barnett & Kecord Co., Mmneapolis, 
Minn 



Concrete. 



Natural 
oement (1,125 
oobio yards). 



$4.00 

5.00 
2.25 
3.28 
3.00 

3.00 



$4,500.00 

5. 625. 00 
2, 531. 25 
3, 690. 00 
3, 375. 00 

8,876.00 



Portland 
cement with 
pebbles (480 
cubic yards). 



Price. Amoont. 



Prioei Amount. 



$6. 60 $3, 120. 00 

6.73' 3,240.00 
7. 25 8. 480. 00 
6.72 3,225.60 
4.50 2,160.00 

7.00 8,860.00 



Portland 
oement with 
broken stone 

(480 cubic 
yards). 



$7. 65 $3, 672. 00 $18, 619. 06 



7.75 
8.26 
7.85 
5.75 



3, 720. 00 
3,060.00 
3,528.00 
2,760.00 



9.00 4,820.00 



TotaL 



27, 191. 00 
17,163.75 
14, 959. 52 
15.599.70 

16,489.00 



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2838 REPOBT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABHT. 

Ahitraoi ofproposaUfar eanal trunk earthwork, etc — Continaed. 
FOUNDATION FOB LOOK NO. 18. 



'■a 


Name and addreM of bidder. 


Eaith exca-Ta. 

tion (3.000 
onbio yards). 


Piles (863). 


Pinetimber(50,000 
feetB.M.). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Prioew 


Amount. 


n 




f0.20 
.216 
.12 

.40 
.18 
.15 
.15 

.17 


8600.00 
OVi.OO 
360.00 

1,200.00 
540.00 
450.00 
450.00 

510.00 


$4.00 
3.00 
3.97 

8.00 
3.50 
3.30 
8.80 

4.00 


$1,452.00 
1,306.80 
1,441.11 

8,904.00 
1,870.50 
1,219.68 
1,879.40 

1,462.00 


$20.00 
21.60 
21.00 

40.00 
21.00 
83.48 
22.00 

22.00 


$1,000.00 
1,076.09 
1.050.00 

8,000.00 
1,950.00 
1,174.00 
1,100.00 

1,100.00 


i 

6 

7 


Winston Bros. & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kate, Crandall ^Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young & Wm. Stoyh, Burlington, 
Iowa •••••.. .......•..•.■•••>•••>••••• 


9 


Doan Sl Tolman, Anrora, Til -•r--r-- 


12 
13 
19 


Cogaa & Pound. Chicago. Ill 

H. A. BoedkerA Co., Chicago, 111 

Barnett &, Becoid Co., Minnempolis, 
Minn -V..... 








^•3 

11 


Name and addrees of bidder. 


Pine plank (15,000 


^-^eSi^isr 


and nSls (5.600 
pounds). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 


Barron Sl Peace Marseilles. HI 


120.00 
21.25 
19.00 

30.00 
21.00 
21.00 
2U.00 

20.00 


1300.00 
318. 75 
285.00 

450.00 
315.00 
824.00 
800.00 

300.00 


$40.00 
48.00 
47.00 

50.00 
45.00 
29.40 
48.00 

50.00 


$520.00 
624.00 
611.00 

650.00 
585.00 
382.20 
624.00 

650.00 


$0,025 
.025 
.0225 

.06 
.03 
.02 
.026 

.026 


$137. 60 


4 
6 
7 


Winston Bros. & Co., Minneapolis, Minn 
Kats. Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. B. Young & Wm. Stoyh, Burlington, 
Iowa ...••..••.... 


137.60 
123.75 

276.00 


9 


Doan ft Tolman, Anrora,Tll 


165.00 


IK 


Ooffan A Ponnd. IThi«*iyA. Til 


110.00 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, Dl 

BameU ft Becoid Co., Hiimeapolis. 
Minn A-, .*?__. 


137.60 
187.60 








1 

1^ 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


Natural cement 
(925 cubic yards). 


with pebbles (50 
cubic yards). 


Portland cement 

with broken 

stone (50 cubie 

yards). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amonnt. 


Price. 


Amount. 


8 

4 
6 
7 


Barron ft Peace, Marseilles, Dl 

Winston Bros, ft Co., Miuneapolis, Minn . 

Katz^Crandall ft Callahan. Omaha, Nebr. 

N. & Xoong ft Wm. Stoyh, BurUngton, 

Iowa 


f3.«5 
3.40 
3.40 

5.00 
2.95 
3.28 
8.00 

8.00 


$3,878.25 
3, 145. 00 
3,145.00 

4,825.00 
2,728.75 
8, 084. 00 
2,775.00 

8,776.00 


$5.72 
6.25 
4.90 

6.75 
5.20 
6.72 
4.50 

6.00 


$286.00 
312.50 
245.00 

837.50 
260.00 
336.00 
225.00 

250.00 


$7.00 
9.00 
6.05 

7.75 
7.20 
7.35 
5.75 

7.00 


$350.00 
450.00 
302.50 

887.60 


9 


Doan ft Tolman. Anrora. Ill ........ 


860.00 


1? 


Conm ft Pound. Cfaicaso. Dl 


867.50 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, ni 

Barnett ft Beoord Co., Minneapolis. 
Minn 


287.60 
850.00 








11 


Name and address of bidder. 


Gravel (300 
onbio yards). 


8-inoh drain. 

pipe (210 
li£e£ feet). 


10-lnch drain- 
pipe (560 
linear feet). 


TotaL 


Price. 


Am'L 


Price. 


Am*t. 


Price 


. Am*t. 




8 
4 
5 
7 


Barron ft Peace, Marseilles, 111 

Kats, CrandaUftCallahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Yoang ft Wm. Stoyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 


to. 00 
.75 
1.25 

1.50 

1.10 

.00 

.00 

.65 


8190.00 
225.00 
375.00 

450.00 
330.00 
180.00 
18U.00 

196.00 


$0.10 
.20 
.30 

.25 
.15 
-10 


^1.00 
42.00 
68.00 

52.50 
81.50 
21.00 


$0.14 
.25 
.86 

.80 
.18 
.16 
.40 

.86 


$78.40 
140.00 
196.00 

168.00 
100.80 
84.00 


$7.9.51.16 
7,97L56 
7,894.86 

13, 112. 00 


9 


Doan A Tolman. Anrorfk DL....«....... 


7, 376. 55 


11 


Cogan ft Poqnd, Chicago, Til ,^ 


7, 314. 88 


18 
19 


H.A.Boedker ft Co., Chicago, m 




.80 
•80 


1 


t3.00 
iSwOO 


224.0 
196.0) 







7,457.90 
7,628.60 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OP ICAJOB ICASSHAU^ 



2839 



Ah$iract of propo§aU for oanal trunk earthwork, etc. — ContmnadL 
F0X7in)ATI0N FOB LOCK KO. 14. 





Name and addrasa of bidder. 


Earth excaTation 

(9,100 cubic 

yarda). 


PUee (868). 


Pinetimber(50,000 
feetB.M.). 


1- 




Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 1 Amount. ' Price. | Amount. 


3 
6 

7 


Barron Sc Pea4)^ MameiUoa. lU 

Knts. CrandaUA CaUahan, Omaha. Nabr. 

N. S. Yonng ft Wm. Stoyb, Burlington, 

Iowa - 


.40 
.22 
.15 
.21 

.154 


$1,820.00 
1,092.00 

3,640.00 


$4.00 ' $1,452.00 $20.00 
3.97 1,441.11 21.00 

8. 00 2. fifti. 00 la 00 


$1,000.00 
1,050.00 

2,000.00 
1,050.00 
1, 174. 00 
1,100.00 

1,076.00 


9 
17. 


Doan & Tolman, Aurora, ni 

Coffan Sc Pound, Chicago, HI 


2,002.00 , 3.50 
1,865.00 , 8.36 


1. 270. 50 21. 00 
1,219.68 23.48 
1,415.70 22.00 

1,416.70 21.50 


13 
10 


H. A. Boedker A Co.. Chicago, 111 

Bamett ft Becord Co., liinneapoUa, 
Minn 


1,911.00 
1,401.40 


3.90 
8.90 






I 


Kama and addreaa of bidder. 


Pine plank (15,000 
fe?tB.li.): 


Oak plank (13,000 
fMtB.M.). 


Spikes, bolto, 

and nalU (5,000 

pounda). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


S 


Barron ft Peace, MarseiUee, 111 


$20.00 
19.00 

80.00 
21.00 
21.00 
20.00 

19.00 


1800.00 
285.00 

450.00 
815.00 
824.00 
300.00 

286.00 


$40.00 
47.00 

50.00 
45.00 
29.40 
48.00 

48.00 


$520.00 
611.00 

660.00 
685.00 
382.20 
624.00 

624.00 


$0,025 
.0225 

.05 
.03 
.02 
.025 

.0225 


$137. 50 


6 
7 


Kats, Crandall ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa .......... 


123.76 
275 00 


9 


Doan ft Tolman, Aurora, lU 


165.00 


17, 


Cogan ft Pound, Chicago. Ill 


110.00 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co.,Chlcagp, III 

Minn 


187.50 
128.76 








i 


Name and addreaa of bidder. 


(Concrete. 


n 


Natural cement 
(925 cubic yarda). 


Portland cement 

with pebbles 
(50 cubic yarda). 


Portland cement 
with broken stone 
(60 oubie yards). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


B 


Barron ft Peace, Marselllea, HI 


$3.65 
8.00 

5.00 
8.10 
8.28 
8.00 

2.90 


$3,376.25 
8,330.00 

4,625.00 
2,867.50 
8,034.00 
2,776.00 

2,682.50 


$5.72 
4.95 

6.75 
5.85 
6.72 
4.50 

4.96 


$286.00 
247.60 

837.50 
267.50 
336.00 
225.00 

247.50 


$7.00 
6.10 

7.75 
7.45 
7.35 
5.76 

6.96 


$350.00 
805.00 

887.50 


6 
7 


Eats, Crandall ftCaUahan, Omaha. Nebr. 

N. & Young ft Wm. Sieyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 


9 




372.50 


1^ 


Coiran ft Pound. Chicaco. HI 


867.50 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, HI 


287.50 
847.60 








it 


Name and addreaa of bidder. 


Gravel (300 
cubic yards). 


Sinch drain- 
pipe (210 
linear feet). 


10-inch drain- 
Un^f^). 


TotaL 


Price. 1 Am*t. 


Price. 


Am't 


Price. Am't 




8 
6 

7 


Barron ft Peace, Maraeniea, HI 

Kata, CrandaUftCallahanTOmaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Young ft Wm. Stoyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 


10.60 
1.25 

1.50 
1.10 
.60 
.60 

.60 


$180.00 
375.00 

450.00 
380.00 
180.00 
180.00 

180.00 


$0.10 
.30 

.25 
.15 
.10 
.80 

.25 


$2L00 
68.00 

62.60 
81.50 
21.00 
68.00 

12.60 


$0.14 
.86 

.80 
.18 
.15 
.40 

.80 


$7&40 
196l00 

168.00 
100.80 
84.00 
224.00 

168.00 


$9,171.16 
8,814.86 

15, 552. 00 





Hoan ft Tolman. Aurora. HI.. ..r 


8,984.80 


n 


Cogan ft Pound,' Chicago, HI 


8,229.88 
8,966.39 

8, 256. 86 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, HI 

BameU ft Beoord Co., Minneapolia, 
Minn. 
















- 



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2840 EEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Abstract of proposals for eanal trunk oarthworkf ete. — Continued. 
FOUia)ATION FOB LOCK NO. 16. 





Name md address of bidder. 


Earth excavation 

(5,000 cubic 

yards). 


Piles (3(3). 


Pine timber 
(50,000 feet B.M.). 


1^ 


Price. 


Amount 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


^ 


Rnrron Al Peaoe Marseilles. Ill 


10.20 
.12 

.40 
.25 
.15 
.18 

.154 


$1,120.00 
672.00 

2,240.00 

1,400.00 

840.00 

1,008.00 

862.40 


$4.00 
4.00 

8.00 
8.50 
3.36 
8.90 

8.90 


$1,462.00 
1,452.00 

2,904.00 
1,270.50 
1,219.68 
1,416.70 

1,416.70 


$20.00 
23.00 

40.00 
21.00 
23.48 
22.00 

21.60 


$1,000.00 
1,150.00 

2,000.00 


5 

7 


KatK, Craudall & Callahan, Omalia, Nebr. 

N. S.YonDgand Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa ..................>•■•-••••- 





Doan A- Tolman, Aflrorft,ni-».T 


],050.(K) 
1, 174. 00 


12 


Coiran &. Pound Chicairo ID 


13 
10 


H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicaco, 111 

Bamett A, Record Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


1,100.00 
1,075.00 








si. 


Name and address of bidder. 


Pine plank (15,000 
feetB.M.). 


Oak plank (13,000 
feetB.M.). 


Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (6,600 

pounds). 


1^ 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount 


Price. 


Amount 


3 


Barron & Pence, Marnef lies. III 


$20.00 
21.00 

30.00 
21.00 
21.60 
20.00 

19.00 


$300.00 
316.00 

450.00 
315.00 
824.00 
800.00 

285.00 


$40.00 
49.00 

60.00 
45.00 
29.40 
48.00 

4&00 


$620.00 
637.00 

660.00 
686.00 
882.20 
624.00 

624.00 


$0,025 
0.0225 

0.05 
0.08 
0.02 
0.025 

0.0225 


$137. 50 
123.75 

275.00 


5 

7 


Katz, Craudall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

N. S. Young and Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

lo vra 


9 


Doan A Tolman. AarorvLlllT...... ...... 


166.00 


12 


Cof'an <fr Pond Chicairo. HI. . 


110 00 


18 
19 


H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicago, 111 

Bamett A, Kecord Co., Minneapolis, 


187.60 
133.76 








i 


Name and address of bidder. 


Concrete. 


? 


Natural cement 
(926 cubic yards). 


Portland cement, 

with pebbles 
(50 cubic yards). 


Portland cement 
with broken stone 
(50 cubic yards). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount 


Price. 


Amount 


3 


Barron &, Peace, MarseiUes, lU 


$3.66 
4.00 

5.00 
8.20 
8.28 
8.00 

2.90 


$3, 376. 25 
3,700.00 

4,625.00 
2,960.00 
8,034.00 
2,776.00 

2,682.50 


$6.72 
6.25 

6.75 
5.46 
6.72 
4.50 

4.05 


$286.00 
262.50 

387.50 
272.50 
836.00 
226.00 

247.50 


$7.00 
6.10 

7.75 
7.45 
7.35 
6.76 

6.96 


$860.00 
305.00 

887.50 
372 50 


6 

7 




Katz, Craudall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Youngand Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa. 
Doan dt Tolman, AurorA, HI- x.. ......... 


1? 


Cogan *■ Ponnd, Ohicftgn, TU..rr^,.r*..T 


867.60 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicago, lU 

BameU A. Beooid Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn................ 


287.60 
847.60 








II 


ITame and addrass of bidder. 


Oravel (300 


8-inch drain 

pipe (210 linear 

feet). 


10-inch drain 
pipe (560 linea 


r 

Total. 


1^ 


Price. 


Am*t. 


Price. 


Am^t. 


Price. 


Am*t 




8 


Barron & Peace, Marseilles, Dl 


$0.60 
1.25 

L50 

1.25 

.60 

.60 

.60 


$180.00 
375.00 

450.00 
375.00 
180.00 
180.00 

180.00 


$0.10 
.30 

.25 
.16 

.10 


$21.00 
63.00 

52.60 
81.50 
21.00 


$0.14 
.35 

.30 
.18 
.15 
.40 

.80 


$7&40 
196.00 

168.00 
100.80 
84.00 
224.00 

168.00 


$8,471.15 
8.946.26 

14,162.00 
8, 525. 30 
7,704.88 
8.052.20 

7.716.86 


5 

7 

9 


Kats, Crandall &. Callahan. Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Youngand Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa. 
Doan A Tolman. Aurora. HI.. ...•• ...... 


19 


Cogan Sc Pound, Chicago, HI 


13 
19 


H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, lU 

Bamett ft Record Co., Minneapolis, 




.30 
.25 


« 


3.00 
2.60 



Digitized by 



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APPENDIX I I — ^BEPOBT OF MAJOB MAB8HAIX. 



2841 



Abiiract of propo$ah for canal trunk earthwork, ete. — Gonthined. 
FOUNDATION FOR LOCK No. Id. 



Ill 
III 



Name and addreaa of bidder. 



Earth ezoaration 

(1,800 oabio 

yards). 



Price. Amount. 



PileaOeS). 
Price. Amonnt. 



Pine timber 
(50.000 feet B.M.). 



Price. Amonnt. 



Barron & Peace, Mameillee, 111 $0. 20 

Winston Bros. & Co., Minneapolis. Minn . . 215 
Katx. Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Kebr . . 12 
N. 8. Yoang and Wm. Steyb, Burlington, 

Iow» 40 

Doan ATolman, Anrora,IU 18 

Qriffith & McDormott Constmotion Co. 

Chicago, HI .20 

Oogan & Pound. Chicago, 111 15 

H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, 111 15 

B»mett & Keoord Co., Minneapolis, 

Hlnii 164 



(860.00 
887.00 
210.00 

720.00 
824.00 

860.00 
270.00 
270.00 

2n.20 



$4.00 
3.60 
8.07 

8.00 
3.50 

5.00 
8.36 
8.80 

8.90 



$1,452.00 $20.00 
1,306.80 21.25 
1,441.11 21.60 



2.001.00 
1,270.60 

1, 815. 00 
1,219.68 
1,879.40 

1,415.70 



40.00 
21.00 

30.00 
23.48 
22.00 

21.60 



$1,000.00 
1,062.60 
1,075.00 

2,000.00 
1,060.00 

1.500.00 
1,174.00 
1,100.00 

1,075.00 



1 



^f4 



Name end addreas of bidder. 



Pine plank (15,000 
feetB.M.). 



Oak plank (13,000 
feetB.M.). 



Price. Amonnt. 



Barron & Peace, Marflellles, HI $20.00 

Winston Bros. & Co., Minneapolis, Minn . 21. 25 
Katz, Crandall A. Callahsn, Omaha, Nebr. 19. 00 
N. S. Young and Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 30.00 

Doan & Tolman, Aurora, HI 21.00 

Griffith St, McDormott Construction Co. 

Chicago, HI 80.00 

Cogan £Poiuid, Chicago, HI 21.60 

H. A. Boedker &, Ck>., Chicago, HI 20. 00 

Bamett ft Beoord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 19.00 



Price. Amount. 



$300.00 
318. 75 
285.00 

450.00 
315.00 

450.00 
324.00 
800.00 

285.00 



$40.00 
48.00 
47.00 

50.00 
45.00 

60.00 
29. 40 
48.00 

48.00 



Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (5,500 

pounds). 



Price. Amount. 



$620.00 $0,025 
624.00 .025 
611.00 .0225 



650.00 
586.00 

780.00 
882.20 
624.00 

624.00 



.06 



.08 
.02 
.026 



$187.60 
137.50 
128.75 

276.00 
166.00 

166.00 
110.00 
137.60 

128.76 



Concrete. 



Name and address of bidder. 



Natnral cement 
(925 cubic yards). 



Price. Amount. 



Portland cement, 

with pebbles 
(60 cubic yards). 



Prices Amount. 



Portland cement, 
with broken stone 
(60 cubic yards). 



Price. Amount. 



Barron & Pence, Marseilles, Hi 

Winston Bros. & Co., MinnpiipoliM, Minn . 
Katx, Crandall ft Callahan. Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young and Wm. Bteyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Doan ft Tolman, Aurora, HI 

Griffith ft McDormott Ck>n8truction Co., 

Chicago. HI 

Cogan ft Pound, Chicago, HI 

H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, HI 

Bamett ft Becord Co., Minneapolis, 



$8.65 
8.40 
3.60 

6.00 
8.20 

6.00 
3.28 
8.00 

2.90 



$8,876.26 
8, 145. 00 
8, 830. 00 

4,625.00 
2,060.00 

5, 650. 00 
8,034.00 
2,776.00 

2,682.50 



$5.72 
6.26 
5.00 

6.76 
5.45 

8.00 
6.72 
4.50 

4.96 



$286.00 
812.60 
250.00 

837.50 
272.50 

400.00 
836.00 
226.00 

247.60 



$7.00 
9.00 
6.96 

7.75 
7.46 

8.00 
7.86 
6.76 

6.96 



$850.00 
450.00 
297.60 

887.60 
872.60 

400.00 
867.60 
287.50 

847.60 



1^ 
il 



Name and address of bidder. 



GraTel(300 
cubic yards). 



pipe (210 
feet) 



Price. Am't. 



8-inch drain 



10- inch drain 
linear pipe (560 linear 
feet). 



Price. Am*t. 



Price. Am'l 



Totd. 



Bamtn ft Peace, Marseilles, 111 

Winston Bros, ft Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Katx, Crandall ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young and Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Doan ft Tolman, Aurora, HI 

Griffith ft McDormott Construction Co., 

Chicago, HI 

Cogan ft Pound, C9iicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker ft (^., (Jhicago, 111 

Bamett ft Bec<tfd Co., Minneapolis, 



$0.60 
.75 
1.25 

1.60 
L45 

1.60 
.60 
.60 

.60 



$180.00 
225.00 
375.00 

450.00 
436.00 

450.00 
180.00 
180.00 

180.00 



$0.10 
.20 
.26 

.26 

.16 

.26 

.10 
.30 



$21.00 
42.00 
62.50 

52.50 
81.50 

64.60 
21.00 
63.00 

62.60 



$0.14 
.25 



.80 
.18 

.28 

.16 
.40 

.80 



$78.40 $7.ni.l6 
140.00 7,701.06 
168.00 7,927.36 



168.00 
100.80 

166.80 
84.00 
224.00 

168.00 



12,632.00 
7,609.80 

11,681.40 
7,134.88 
7,277.90 

7,131.16 



Digitized by 



Google 



2842 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARBfT. 



Ahitraet of proposaU far eanal trunk earihwark, 0to.^?oiitiiiaed. 
FOUNDi^TION FOB LOCK KO. 17. 



1 



Kftme and addroM of bidder. 



Barth excayatioa 

(5,800 onbio 

yard(«). 



Prtoe. Amount. 



P068(S68). 



Pine timber 
(60,000 feet B.M.). 



Prioe. Amount. 



Prioe. Amoantb 



Barron & Peace. Marseilles, HI 

Winston Bros. Sl Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kats, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nobr. 
K. S. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

lovra 

Doan &ToIman, Aurora, 111 

Griftlth Sc McDormott Constmction Co., 

Chicago. HI 

C!ogan & Found, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker & Co., Cbioago, HI 

Bsmett St Becord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



$0.20 
.215 
.17 

.40 
.22 

.20 
.15 
.20 

.154 



$1,100.00 

1.247. UO 

086.00 

2,820.00 
1,276.00 

1,160.00 

870.00 

1, 160. 00 

893.20 



$4.00 
8.60 
4.05 

8.00 
3.60 

5.00 
8.86 
8.00 

8.00 



$1,452.00 
1, 306. 80 
1,470.15 

2,904.00 
1,270.50 

1.815.00 
1,219.68 
1,415.70 

1,415.70 



$20.00 
21.25 
23.00 

40.00 
21.00 

80.00 
23.48 
22.00 

21.50 



$1,000.00 
1,062.50 
1,15a 00 

2.000.00 
1,050.00 

1,500.00 
1,174.00 
1.100.00 

1,076.00 



11 



Name and address of Didder. 



Pine plank (15,000 
feet B. M.). 



Price. Amount. 



Oak plank (18,000 
feet B. M.). 



Spikes, bolts, and 

nails (6,500 

pounds). 



Prioe. Amount 



Prioe. Amount. 



Barron & Peace, Marseilles, 111 

Winston Bros. &Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Kats, Crandall & Callahan. Omaha. Nobr. 
N. 8. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Doan & Tolman. Aurora, 111 

GriflBth&MoDormott CoDstmction Co., 

Chicago, 111 

Ck>gan Sc Pound, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker Sc 0>., Chicagi), 111 

Barnett St Beoord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn ...... 



$20.00 
21.25 
21.00 

30.00 
21.00 

30.00 
21.60 
20.00 

19.00 



$300.00 
318. 76 
315. 00 

450.00 
315.00 

450.00 
324.00 
300.00 

286.00 



$10.00 
48.00 
40.00 

50.00 
45.00 

60.00 
20.40 
48.00 

4&00 



$520.00 
62:4.00 
637.00 

650.00 
685.00 

780.00 
382.20 
624.00 

624.00 



$0,025 
025 



.03 

.08 
.02 
.025 



.0225 



$137.60 
187.60 
128.75 

275.00 
165.00 

165.00 
110.00 
187.60 

123.75 



i 

I 



Concrete. 



i 



Name and address of bidder. 



Natural cement 
(025 cubic yards) 



Price. Amount. 



Portland cement 

with pebbles (60 

cubic yards). 



Prioe. Amount. 



Portland oement 

with broken 

atone (60 cubic 

yards). 



Prioe. Amount 



Barron & Peace, Marseilles, HI 

Winston Bros. &Co., Minneapolis, Minn 
Kats, Crandall &, Callahan, Omaha, Nebr 
K. & Young &, Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa , 

Doan Sc Tolman, Aurora, 111 

Griffith &McDormott Construction Co., 

Chicago, ni 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker & Co., (Jhicago, HI 

Barnett St Becord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



$3.65 
3.40 
3.95 

5.00 
8.20 

6.00 
3.28 
8.00 

2.90 



3. 376. 25 
3, 145. 00 
3, 65.3. 75 

4,625.00 
2,960.00 

5,650.00 
3,034.00 
2,775.00 

2,682.60 



$5.72 
6.25 
4.95 

6.75 
6.45 

8.00 
6.72 
4.50 

4.95 



$286.00 
312.50 
247.60 

837.50 
272.50 

400.00 
836.00 
225.00 

247.60 



$7.00 
9.00 
6.10 

7.76 
7.46 

8.00 
7.35 
6.75 

6.96 



$350.00 
450.00 
805.00 

887.60 
372.50 

400.00 
867.50 
287.60 

847.60 



^, 



I 



Name and address of bidder. 



Orayel (300 
oubic yards). 



8-inch drain 

pipe (210 linear 

feet) 



Price. Am't. 



Barron St Peace. Marseilles, HI 

Winston Bros. StCo.. Minneapolis, Minn 
Kats. OandaIl& Callahan. Omaha, Nebr 
N. 8. Yoang St Wm. Steyh. Burlington, 

Iowa 

Doan St Tolman, Aurora, 111 

Griffith dit McDormott Construction Co., 

Chicago, Dl 

Cogan it Pond, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker St Co.. Chicago, 111 

Barnett St Becord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn.. 



$0.60 $180.00 
. 75 225. 00 
1.15 345.00 



1.50 
1.25 

1.50 
.60 
.60 

.60 



450.00 
375.00 

450.00 
180.00 
180.00 

180.00 



Price. Am't. 



$0.10 
.20 
.25 

.25 
.15 

.26 
.10 



.25 



$21.00 
42.00 
52.50 

52.50 
31.50 

64.60 
21.00 
63.00 

52.60 



10-inch drain 

pipe (560 linear 

feet). 



Price. Am't. 



$0.14 
.25 
.30 

.80 
.18 

.28 
.15 
.40 

.80 



$78.40 
140.00 
168.00 

168.00 
100.80 

156.80 
84.00 
224.00 

168.00 



Total. 



$8,511.16 
8,56L05 
9,148.66 

14,282.00 
8,401.80 

12,481.40 
7,734.88 
8,204.30 

7,747.16 



Digitized by VjOO^IC 



APPENDIX I I — ^BEPUBT OF MAJOB MAB8HALL. 



2843 



Ah$1raoi of prapoiaU for eanal trunk earthtoork, ete. — Continaed* 
VOITNDATION JFOB, AQUBDUCT KO. I. 






Kame and addreu of bidder. 



Kats, Crandall A Callahan, Omaha, Nebr , 

N. S. SToong db Wm. Steyh, Uurliuffton. Iowa 

Griffith A MoDormott Conatnictiou Co., Chicago, 111 

Oogan & Ponnd, Cbicim>, 111 

H.A. Boedker&Co..Chioago,ni 

Bam«tt & Record Co., Minneapolis, Minn 



Earth exoavation 
(4,300 cnbio yard*). 



Price. Amounl 



$0.60 
.50 
.50 
.15 
.40 
.28 



$2,100.00 
2,100.00 
2,100.00 
63U.00 
1,680.00 
1,176.00 



Piles (450). 



Price. Amonn^ 



$4.15 
8.00 
5.00 
8.36 
4.50 
4.00 



$1,867.50 
8,600.00 
2,250.00 
1,512.00 
2,025.00 
1,800.00 



§11 



Kame and address of bidder. 



Pine lainber 
(48,000 feet B.M.), 



Price. Amoani. 



Oalc plank (0,600 
et B. M.). 



feet] 



Price. Amount. 



Spikes, bolts, 

and nails (4,800 

pounds). 



Price. Amonnt. 



Katz, Crandall & C^Uahau, Omaha, Nebr. $23. 50 
N. S. Young Sc Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa..... : 40.00 

Orifflth A MoDennott Gonstraotion Oo., 

Chicago,IU 30.00 

Oogan & Pound, Chicago, HI 22.00 

H. A. Boedker A Co.Tchicaco, lU 24. 00 

Bamett A Becord Co., Minneapolis, 

22.00 



$1, 128. 00 

1,920.00 

1,440.00 
1,009.20 
1,152.00 

1,066.00 



$53.00 

50.00 

60.00 
29.40 
50.00 

50.00 



$603.50 

475.00 

670.00 
279.30 
475.00 

476.00 



$0.0226 



.08 
.02 
.03 



$108.00 

240.00 

144.00 
96.00 
144.00 

106.00 



I 



It 



Name and address of bidder. 



Price. 



Kats, Oandall A Callahan, Omaha, 

Nebr 

K. Sb Young A Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Griffith A McDermott Construction 

(^., CHiicago, HI 

Cogan A Pound, Chicago, HI 

H. A. Boedker A Co., Chlcaeo, HI 

Bamett A Kecord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



Concrete. 



Natural 
cemeut (240 
cubic yards). 



$4.50 

6.00 

6.00 
8.28 
8.60 

8.26 



Q't. 



Price. AmH. 



$1,080.00 

1,200.00 

1,440.00 
787.20 
840.00 

780.00 



Portland 
cement with 
pebbles (220 
cubic yards). 



$6.80 

6.76 

&00 
6.72 
6.00 

7.26 



$1,406.00 

1,485.00 

1,760.00 
1, 478. 40 
1.100.00 

1,595.00 



Portland 
cement with 
broken stone 

(220 cubic 
yards). 



TotAL 



Price. Am*t. 



$7.65 

7.75 

8.00 
7.86 
6.26 



$1,683.00 

1,705.00 

1.76(100 
1,617.00 
1,376.00 

9.25 2,036.00 



$8,288.00 

11,020.00 

9,704.00 
5,882.10 
7,410.00 

6,990.00 



FOUNDATION FOR JjOCK NO. IS. 



Name and address of bidder. 



Earth excavation 

(19.500 cubic 

yards). 



Price. Amount. 



Piles (863). 



Price. Amount. 



Pine timber 
(60,000 feet, B.M.). 



Price. Amount 



Winston Bros. A Co.. Minneapolis, Miun 
Kjtts, Crandall A Callahan. Omaha, Nebr 
N. & Young A Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Griifith A McDermott Construction Co., 

Chicago. HI 

0»gan& Pound, Chicago. HI 

H. A. Boedker A Co., Chicago, HI 

Bamett A Bocord Co., MlnneapoUs, 



$0,215 
.12 

.40 

.20 
.20 
.82 



$4, 192. 50 
2,840.00 

7,800.00 

8,900.00 
8,000.00 
4,290.00 

8.900.00 



$3.60 
8.97 

8.00 

6.00 
8.86 
4.00 

4.00 



$1,806.80 
1,441.11 

2,904.00 

1,816.00 
1,219.68 
1,462.00 

1«462.00 



$21.25 
21.60 

40.00 

30.00 
23.48 
24.00 

82.00 



$1,062.60 
1.075.00 

2.000.00 

1,500.00 
1,174.00 
1,200.00 

1,100.00 



Digitized by 



Google 



2844 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

AhBtraet of proposdU for eanal trunk earthwork, etc, — Con tinned. 
FOUNDATION FOB LOCK NO. IS-ContiiiiMd. 



J8 
1^ 



Name and addreu of bidder. 



'Winnton BroR. &Co., Mlnneapoliii, Minn 
Katz, Crandall & Callahan, Oroalia, Nebr. 
N. S. Young & Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Griffith & McDermott Conatmoiion Co., 

Chicago, 111 

Cogan& Pound, Chicago, ni 

H. A. BofMlker & Co., Clilcaijo, 111 

Barnett Sc E«cord Co., Minneapolia, 

Minn 



Pine piRuk (15,000 Oak plank (13,000 
feetB.M.). feetB.M.). 



Price. Amount. Price. Amoant 



$21.25 
10.00 

30.00 

30.00 
21.60 
22.00 

20.00 



$318.75 $48.00 
285.00 I 47.00 

450.00 I 60.00 

450.00 I 60.00 
824. 00 < 20. 40 
330.00 I 66.00 

800.00 60.00 



$624.00 
611.00 

650.00 

780.00 
382. 20 
715.00 

660.00 



Spikes, bolts, aod 

naihi (5,500 

pounda). 



Price. Amount. 



$0,026 
.022( 

.060 

.030 



$137.50 
123.75 

275.00 

165.00 
110 00 
137 50 

187.60 



Concrete. 



Name and address of bidder. 



Natural cement 
(925 cubic yards). 



Price. Amount. 



Winston Bros. Sl Co., Minneapolis, Minn 
Kats, Crandall & (Jallahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young Sc Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 

Iowa 

Griffith & McDermott O>nstruotion Co., 

Chicago, m 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, HI 

H. A. Boedker A Co., Chictutp, 111 

Barnett A fiecord Co., Minneapolis, 

Minn 



$3.40 
3.60 

6.00 

6.00 
3.28 
8.00 

8.00 



$3, 145. 00 
8,330.00 

4,625.00 

6,650.00 
8,034.00 
2,775.00 

2,776.00 



Portland cement 

with pebbles (50 

cubic yards). 



Price. Amounts 



$6.25 
4.90 

6.76 

8.00 
6.72 
4.50 

6.00 



$312.50 
246.00 

337.60 

400.00 
336. 00 
225.00 

250.00 



Portland cement 
with broken Htone 
(50 cubic yards). 



Price. Amount. 



$9.00 
6.00 

7.75 

8.00 
7.35 
6.76 

7.00 



$450.00 
300.00 

387.60 

400.00 
867.50 
287.50 

350.00 



n 



Name and address of bidder. 



Orarel (300 
eubic yards). 



Price. Am*t. 



8-inch drain 

pipe (210 
linear feet). 



Price. Am't. 



lO'lnch drain 

pipe (560 
linear feet.) 



Price. Am't. 



TotaL 



Winaton Bros. & Co., Minneapolis, Minn . 
Kata, Crandall & Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young A, Wm. Steyh, Burlington., 

Iowa 

Griffith A McDermott Construction Co., 

Chicago, HI 

0>gan &, Pound, Chicago, 111 

H. A. Boedker A Co,, Ghloafo, 111 

Barnett A Beoord Co., Minneapolis, 



$0.75 
1.00 

1.60 

1.60 
.60 
.60 

.66 



)(226.00 
300.00 

460.00 

450.00 
180.00 
180.00 

196.00 



80.20 
.26 



.30 



$42.00 
62.60 

52.50 

64.60 
21.00 
68.00 

68.00 



$0.25 
.80 

.80 

.28 
.15 
.40 

.85 



$140. 00 
168.00 

168.00 

166.80 
84.00 
224.00 

196.00 



$11,506.56 
9,971.80 

19,712.00 

15.221.40 
10, 764. 88 
11,501.60 

11,018.60 



FOUNDATIONS FOR ELEVEN LOCKS AND TWO AQUEDUCTS. 



l! 


Name and address of bidder. 


Earth excavation 

(83,600 cubic 

yards). 


Piles (6,057). 


Pine timber 

(648,000 feet 

B.M.). 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Price. 


Amount. 


6 

7 


Kata, Crandall A, Callahan. Oraaha, Nebr. 
N. S. Young dt Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 
Iowa 


$0,199 

.4175 
.16 
.216 
.175 

.21 
.20 

.1775 
.17 


$16,616.50 

34, 861. 25 
12,526.00 
18, 036. 00 
14,612.60 

17, 535. 00 
16,700.00 

14.821.26 
14,105.00 


$3.97 

8.00 
8.25 
8.06 
8.50 

4.00 
8.70 

8.90 
4.00 


$20,076.20 

40,456.00 
16,436.25 
20, 025. 72 
17, 690. 50 

20,228.00 
18,710.90 

19,722.30 
20,228.00 


$21.90 

40.00 
22.20 
22.40 
22.75 

24.00 
23.00 

21.40 
22.00 


$14, 101. 20 

25,020.00 
14,385.60 
14,515.20 
14,742.00 

15, 552. 00 
14,004.00 

18,867.90 
14,256.00 


12 


Cosan & Pound. Chicairo. HI 


18 
14 
16 


H. A. Boedker & Co., (Chicago, HI 

Heldmaier A New, Chicago,™ 

Chicago SUr Construction and Dredg- 
ing Co., Chicago, 111 


17 
19 


MoArthnr Bros. Ck>., Chicago, III 

Barnett A Eecord Co., Minneapolis, 
Minn 


21 


Lydon A Drews Go^ Chicago, HI 



Digitized by 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2845 



Ahttr0€i ofpropa9aU far etmal frwkk eartkfoin'h, «to.— Continaed. 
FOUITDATION FOB LOCK KO. 18-Continaed. 



Kame vaA addreM of bidder. 



Kats, Cnadall&OaUalMn, Omaba, Nebr. 

K. S. Young Sl Wm. Stejh, Barlinffton, 
Iowa 

Cogan dit Pound, Chioago, 111 

H. A. Boedker & Co., Chicago, lU 

Heldmaier A New, Chicago, lU 

Chicago Star Conatmotion and Dredg- 
ing Co., Chicago, 111 

Mo Arthur Broe. Co., Chicago, HI 

Bamett Sl Beoord Co., Minneapolis. 



Lydon it Drewa Co., Chioago, 111. 



Pine plank 

(165.000 feet 

B. M.). 



Price. Amount. 



$18.75 

80.00 
22.20 
20.25 
20.30 

19.00 
23.00 

18.90 
22.00 



Oak plank 

(157,500 feet 

B. M.). 

Price. Amount. 



$3,003.75 $45.00 



4,050.00 
8,063.00 
3,841.25 
8. 840. 50 

8,136.00 
8,705.00 

3,118.50 
8,630.00 



50.00 
20.40 
48.50 
41.50 

50.00 
48.00 

47.00 
45.00 



$7,820.25 

7,875.00 
4.630.50 
7,638.75 
6,536.25 

7,875.00 
7.560.00 

7,402.50 
7,087.60 



Spikee, bolts, and 

naila (71,000 

pounda). 



Price. Amount. 



$0.0225 

.05 
.02 
.025 
.03 

.08 
.0225 

.0225 



$1,597.50 

8,550.00 
1,420.00 
1,775.00 
2,130.00 

2,130.00 
1,567.50 

1,597.50 
1,775.00 



1! 



Kame and addreaa of bidder. 



Kata, Crandall ft Callahan, Omaha, Nebr. 

K. S. Tonng A, Wm. Steyh, Burlington, 
Iowa < 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, m , 

H. A. Boedker Sc Co., Chicago, HI 

Heldmaier & New, Chicago, HI 

Chicago Star Construction and Dredg- 
ing Co.. Chicago. Ill 

MoArthnr Bros. Co., Chicago, HI 

Barnett ft Beoord O., Minneapolis, 
Minn 

Lydon ft Drews Co., Chioago, HI 



Conorete. 



Natural cement 

(10,615 cubie 

yards). 



Prioe. Amount 



5.00 
3.10 
8.U5 
3.70 

2.75 
2.72 

2.85 
3.00 



$8.65 $38,744.76 



53.075.00 
32.006.50 
32.375.75 
39,275.50 



39,191.25 
28,872.80 

30.252.76 
31.845.00 



Portland cement 

with pebbles 

(1.200 cnbio 

yards). 



Price. Amount. 



$4.90 

6.75 
6.60 
4. BO 
6.30 

4.55 
5.00 

5.70 
6.25 



$5,880.00 

8, 100. 00 
7,920.00 
5,400.00 
7,440.00 

5,460.00 
6,000.00 

6,840.00 
6,800.00 



Portland oement 

with broken stone 

(1.200 oubio 

yards). 



Price. Amount. 



$5.90 

7.75 
7.35 
5.80 
8.20 



6.75 



7.70 
6.60 



$7,060.00 

9.300.00 
8,820.00 
6,960.00 
9,840.00 



8,100.00 

9,240.00 
7,920.00 



Name and address of bidder. 



Gravel (8,000 
cubic yards). 



Prioe. Amt. 



8-inoh drain 
pipe (2.100 
linear feet;. 



Prioe. Am't. 



Price. Am't. 



10-inch drain 
(5.600 
lear feet). 



Total. 



Kata, Grandali ft Callahan, Omaha, 
Nebr 

N. S. Young ft Wm. Steyh, Burling- 
ton, Iowa 

Cogan ft Pound, Chicago, HI 

H. A. Boedker ft Co., Chicago, 111 

Heldmaier ft New. Chioago, 111 

Chicago Star Construction and Dredg- 
ing Co., Chicago, 111 

Mc Arthur Bros. Co.. Chicago. Ill 

Barnett ft Beoord Ck>., Minneapolis, 
Minn 

Lydon ft Drews (^., Chicago, HI 



$1.15 $3, 450. 00 $0.24 $604.00 



$0. 29 $1, 624. 00 $113. 007. 24 



1.50 
.90 
.60 

LOO 



4,500.00 
1,800.00 
1.800.00 
3,000.00 



50 1,000.00 



.20 



600.00 



.55 1.660.00 
1. 00, 3.000.00 



.25 
.10 



.12 



525.00 
210.00 
680.00 
252.00 

315.00 
420.00 

525.00 
420.00 



.30 
.16 
.40 
.18 



1,680.00 

840.00 

2,240.00 

1.008.00 



1, 120. 00 
.26 1,456.00 

80 1.680.00 



.80 



1,680.00 



185,492.25 
96, 735. 85 
107, 777. 67 
110, 045. 26 

104.04L25 
100.616.20 

101,477.00 
104,416.50 



TWO CONCRETE ABCH CULVERTS, AND SIX CAST-IRON PIPE CULVERTS. 



O ( 

6 * 



Name and address of bidder. 



Earthwork 

(17,000 cubic 

yards). 

Price. Am't. 



Piles (352). 



l*rioe. Am't. 



Pioe timber 

(37,000 feet 

B.M.). 



Prioe. Am't. 



Price. Am't. 



Pine plank 

(14,000 feet 

B.M.). 



Winston Bros, ft Co., Mlnneapolia, 

Minn .V..... 

Kats. Crandall ft Callahan. Omaha, 

N . S. Young ft* Wm! Steyh! Burling' ' 
ton, Iowa 

Monroe ft Bryan. Portamonth, Ohio. 

Griffith ft MoDermott Conatmotion 
Co., Chicago, 111 

Cogan ft Pound. Chicago, HI 

Heldmaier ft New, Chioago. HI 

MoArthur Bros. Co.. Chicago. HI ... . 

Bamett ft Beoord O)., Minneapolis, 
Minn 

Lydon ft Drewa Co., Chicago, HI. . . , 



$0.80 
75 



.50 
.295 



.34 



.22 
.20 



$5, 100. 00 

12,750.00 

8,500.00 
5. 015. 00 

6.800.00 
3. 4U0. 00 
3,825.00 
5.780.00 

8,740.00 
8,400.00 



W$l, 



$3. 

4.501 



872.80 
1,684.00 



8.00 2,816.00 



4.25 



1,496.00 



$24.00 

24.00 

40.00 
23.00 



$888.00 

888.00 

1,480.00 
85L0O 



$24.00 
28.00 



6.00 1,760.00 

8.60' 1,232.00 

8.75 1,820.00 

8.90 1,372.80 

4.00 



001, 



80. 

24.00 
22.75 
25.00 



1,406.00 82.00 
4.60^ 1,584.00 24.00 



[,110.00 
888.00 
84L75 
925.00 

814.00 
888.00 



80.00 
22.50 

30.00 
23.00 
22.26 
28.00 

20.00 
24.00 



$336.00 

322.00 

420.00 
315.00 

420.00 
322.00 
311.60 
322.00 

280.00 
336.00 



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2846 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARHT. 

Abstract of proposals for canal trunk earthtoork, etc. — Contlnaed. 
JrOlTNDA.TIONS FOB ELEVBN LOCKS AND TWO AQUEDUCTS-Contfamed. 



i 

a 



Name and address of bidder. 



Oak plank 
(3,000 feet 



Price. Am*t. 



Driftbolts, 
etc. (4,800 
pounds). 



Frioe. Am*t. 



Price. Am't. 



Concrete. 



Natural 
cement (755 
cnbio yards). 



Price. Am*t. 



Portland 
cement with 
pebbles (900 
eubic yards). 



Winston Bros. & Co., If inneapoUs, 
Minn 

EAts, Crandall Sc Callahan, Omaha, 
Nebr 

N. S. Yonng Sc Wm. Stoyh, Burling- 
ton, Iowa 

Monroe A Bryan, Portsmouth, Ohio 

Chiffith &MoDermott Construction 
Co., Chicago, 111 

Cogan & Pound, Chicago, 111 

HeUbnaier A New, Chicago, lU 

MeArthnr Bros. Co., Chicago, HI.. 

Bamett & Beoord Ck>., Minneapolis, 
Minn 

Lydon St Drews Co., Chica>^, lU... 



$55.00 

60.00 

60.00 
50.00 



00.00 

81.00 
42.50 
50.00 

50.00 
50.00 



$165. 00 $0,025 
180.00 .082fi 



150.00 
150.00 

180.00 
03.00 
127.50 
150.00 

150.00 
150. 



.05 
.02 



.08 



.025 



$107.50 

0&75 

816.00 
86.00 

129.00 
86.00 
129.00 
107.50 

107.50 
107.50 



$3. 90 $2, 944. 50 

4.6o| 8,478.00 

6.00] 8,776.00 
2.60 1,887.50 



6.00 
8.50 
4.00 
8.00 

8.00 
8.25 



4,680l00 
2,042.50 
8,020.00 
2,265.00 

8,265.00 
2,453.75 



$9.00 

6.90 

6.75 
7.50 

aoo 

&00 
8.05 
6.85 

6.75 
5.50 



$8,100.00 

6,210.00 

6,075.00 
6,750.00 

7,200.00 
7,200.00 
7,246.00 
6,165.00 

6,075.00 
4,950.00 



s"3 
II 



Name and address of 
bidder. 



Price. Am't. 



Rubble 

masonry 

(105 <$Dbic 

yards). 



Bubble par- 
ing scone (950 
square yaids). 



Price. Am't. 



Price. Am't. 



48-inoh cast- 
iron pipe (720 
linear feet). 



Price. Am't. 



86-inch oast- 
iron pipe (288 
linear feet). 



Total. 



Winston Bros. A Co., 
Minneapolis, Minn . . . 

Kats, Crandlla A Calla- 
han, Omaha, Nebr 

N. 8. Youns A Wm. 
Steyh, Burlington, Iowa 

Monroe A Bryan, Porte- 
mouth, Ohio , 

Griffith A McDermott 
Construction Co., Chi- 
osgo,Ill 

Cogan A Ponnd, Chi- 
cago, 111 

Heldmaier A New, Chi- 
cage. HI 

McArthur Bros. Co., Chi- 
cago, III 

Barnett A Becord 0>., 
Minneapolis, Minn 

Lydon A Drews Co., Chi- 
cago, 111 , 



$6.50 
7.75 
6.00 
4.70 

6.00 
6.00 
6.80 
6.00 
12.75 
6.00 



$682.50 
813.76 
630.00 
493.50 

680.00 
525.00 
714.00 
630.00 
[,338.75 
630.00 



80 $1, 



2.75 
1.75 
1.20 

8.50 
1.75 
1.80 
1.50 
2.00 
4.50 



710.00 
8^2.50 
1,662.50 
1,140.00 

2,376.00 
1,662.50 
1,710.00 
1,425.00 
1.900.00 
4,275.00 



$6.44j$4,636.80 
7.48 5.885.60 
30.0021,600.00 



8.45 

8.00 
8.86 
6.20 
6.20 
7.50 
16.00 



6,084.00 

5,760.00 
6,019.20 
4,464.00 
4,464.00 
5,400.00 
It, 520. 00 



$4. 30 $1,288. 40887,281. 50 
86,908.24 
54,523.60 
85,837.60 

82,628.00 
26,238.84 
24,859.75 
24,816.90 
24, 918. 25 
33,462.25 



6.53 


1,592.64 


25.00 


7,200.00 


6.45 


1,669.60 


6.00 


1,728.00 


7.53 


2,168.64 


4.00 


1,152.00 


4.20 


1,200.60 


5.00 


1,440.00 


11.00 


3,168.00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Lowest bidder on each mUe earthwork: 

Mile 9, proposal No. 5, Kats, Crandall dt Callahan $18,060.00 

Miles 10 and 11 and slope paving, proposal No. 5, Kate, Crandall A Callahan 27, 88l 50 

Mile 12, proposal No. 5, Katz,CrandaLNk Callahan 8.755.00 

MUe 13, proposal No. 18. BCCushing A Co 12,816.00 

Mile 14, proposal No. 5, Katz,Crandsn& Callahan 11.610.00 

Mile 15, proposal No. 5, Eats, Crandall & Callahan 21,030.00 

Mile 16, proposal No. 5, Eats, Crandall & Callahan 25,925.00 

Total 120, 978. 50 

Lowest bidder on entire 8 mUes earthwork : Proposal No. 16, John Scott A Sons 85^ 287. 00 

Second lowest bidder entire 8 miles : Pzoposal 2(o. 6, Eata, Crandall A Callahan U9, 475. 00 

(See reoommendationa^ 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF ICAJOB MARSHALL. 2847 

LOCK AND AQUBDUOT FOUNDATIONS. 

L^wMt bidder Meh loekasdaquedaot: 

LookNo.8,propoMlNo.l2,Gonui&Poiud 17.854.88 

LockNo.9,propoMdKo.ia,C«san&Poiuid 7,844.88 

LookN«.10,propoMaKo.l2,Cogaxk&Poand 7,449.88 

LockNo.ll,pTopoMaKaia,Cogaik&Foaiid 8.604.88 

LookNo.l2Midaqa«d«oi2,No.l2,Conui&;PoiUkd 14.959.52 

Look No. 18, proposal No. 12, Cogaa &Toaud 7.914.88 

LookNo.l4,propoMlNo.l8,Cogu &Poand 8.229.88 

Look No. 15. propoMJ No. 12, Cogan & Pound 7,704.88 

Lock No. 18, proposal No. 19, Bamett & Record Company 7, 131. 15 

Look No. 17, proposal No. 12,Co^n &Poand..'. 7,734.88 

Aqaedaot No. 8, proposal No. 12. Cogaa & Ponnd 5,882.10 

LookNo.l8,propooiaNo.6,K»ts,Crandan4bCaUahaii 9,971.36 

Total 100,188.17 

Lowest l>ldder for total 11 looks and 2 aqnedaots : Proposal No. 12, Cogan & Pou nd 96, 7:{5. 85 

Calyerts: Lowest bidder, MoArthur Bros. Co 24,815.90 

REMAEKS. 

Hie prioe of Portland oement eonorete with broken stone not inolnded in total cost of look and 
aqaednot foundations or oalverts. 

Proposal No. 5. Bond aigned br a surety oompany by aipents and attorneys in fact. No authority 
filed in tliis office for signature of agents and attorneys. No Justification of guarantor. 

Proposal No. 7. Amount of bond insnfflcient. 

Proposal No. 9. No justification of guarantor (surety oompany). 

Proposal No. 10. Amount of bond insufficient. Work bid on not inserted in guaranty. 

Proposal No. 12. Work bid on not inserted in guaranty. No justification of guarantor (surety 
company). 

Proposal No. 16. Proposal signed John Soott & Sons; guaranty as to Edward J. Scott, one member 
of firm onlf > 

Proposal A o. 17. Qnarauty signed by a surety oompany by agents and attorneys in fact. No 
Anthority filed in this office for signAtnre of ageuts and attorneys. No Justification of guarantor. 

Proposal No. 21. Not in triplicate. No bid for spikes, bolts, and nails in lock and aqueduct founda- 
tions. Pzloe bid by. this company on similar materials in calyerts used in Arriving at total amount 
of bid. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

(1.) That bid of John Soott Sl Sons (proposal No. 16), the lowest bidder for 8 miles earthwork and 
slope paving miles 10 and 11 be r^ected, on account of their unwillingness to enter into contract and 
the probability that on account of irregularity In IJond no penalty can be enforced, and that the oon> 
tract be either Awarded to Kats, Crandall & Callahan (proposal N'o.6), the next lowest bidder (if 
above alleged irregularity in their bid may be waiyed), or that the 8 miles earthwork be readyertised. 

(2.) That bid of Cogan Sc Pound (proposal No. 12), the lowest responsible bidder for lock and 
aqaednot foundations do accepted, warring alight informality. 

(3.) That bid of MoArthur Bros*. Co. (proposal No. 17), the lowest responsible bidder for the 8 
onlyerts, be accepted, if alleged irregularity in their bid m*y be waived. 

BBPORT OF FIRST LIEUT. HBNRT JERYBT, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Chicago f III., June 50, 1897. 

Major: I hAve the. honor to submit the foUowiog report of hydraulic oement 
tested ander the direction of this office daring the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 
Very little new matter is presented, as sickness during the past summer aud autumn 
prevented me from making up any briquets and from continuing the experiments 
with mixed cements and cement mortar exposed under varying conditions. About 
350 briquets that were in stock for long-term tests were broken during the year and 
the resulting tensile strength is recorded in the tables that follow, which are reprinted 
as far as seems necessary for intelligent comparison from the last Annual Report, 
page 2618 et seq., where will be found also the descriptions of all samples not 
described herein. 

Keferring to the tables, it will be seen that briquets as old ns two years have been 
broken ana that, as a rule, the tensile stren^b is very nearly the same as that given 
by one-year tests, some brands showing a slight, but unimportant decrease. It may 
be worth while to call attention to the two samples of vulcanite tested as perhaps 
giving some indication as to the effects of sulphate of calcium when added to a Port- 
land cement. The sample '^Y" (reported free from SO^Ca) in 1 to 3 mortar, exhibited 
a moderate strength and a moderate increase up to three months, and then remained 
practically stationary at nine and fifteen months. The sample ''YS^' (said to be 
treated with S04Ca), showed high tensile strength at seven days, increased very 
rapidly to its maximum at seven weeks, after which it decreased about 25 per cent 
at the end of fifteen months, but it was even then a little stronger than the sample 
"Y " at the same age. 

The mortar of mixed cements, one-half part Utioa, one-half part Portland, and 
three parts of sand gives a eood showing at the end of one vear, its tensile strength 
being aboat three-fourths of the naaal one-to-three mortar of the corresponding Port- 



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2848 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

land. Snoh a tensile strength would be ample for concrete forming the lower and 
back parts of lock walls where not exposed to frost nor to blows from vessels, and a 
saving in cost of from $1 to $1.50 per onbio yard of concrete ooiild be effected by a 
mixture of the cements as above. 

To the table exhibiting the comparison of natural and standard sand in Portland- 
cement mortar is annexed a note in regard to the relative increase in strength of the 
natural-sand mortar. 

About 200 briquets remain on hand to be broken, and we expect to make a number 
of tests this summer in connection with the foundation work on the Illinois and 
Mississippi Canal. 

ALPHA PORTIAND CEMRNT. 

Tensile etrength in pounds per square inch. 





Neat cement (average per cent of 
water, 21.5). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (average 
per cent of water, 12.5). 






1 

8 


1 

CO 


1 
i 


i 


M 


i 


1 


1 

CO 


1 


1 


1 




f 674 
887 


734 
738 






805 


764 
793 
768 
774 
780 
803 


188 
211 
211 
191 
192 
190 
197 
217 
217 


204 
289 
209 
818 
339 






278 
269 
260 
276 
271 
270 


278 












279 














278 




560 
696 
5©? 
695 
703 
I 756 


600 
785 














Alpha— barrel N, ilrnt 














series. 


































































































Averftge ........... 


630 


724 






805 


779 


202 


808 






269 


277 














Alpha— barrel N, hovoihI 
series. 


518 
462 
470 
600 
664 
678 
620 
504 


727 

760 
688 
695 
807 


066 
695 
604 
612 
816 
752 
663 
659 
688 
785 


635 
665 
750 


616 
671 
650 
626 
666 
642 




145 
165 
181 
179 
188 
230 
147 
147 


284 
256 
214 
262 
240 
241 


306 
311 
307 
284 
348 
328 
321 
289 
804 
282 


290 
287 
826 


314 
270 
232 
295 
385 
810 













































































Average 


662 


735 


062 


683 


645 




173 


250 


808 


801 


801 










Neat cement (average 
per cent of water, 21 .9) . 


Mortar, 1 cement to 3 sand (average per cent of 
water, 11). 




1 




oa 


i 


1 


1 




1 

a 

CO 


1 


1 

Ok 


1 


1 




/601 
628 


772 
721 


805 


887 


162 
168 
]64 
215 
208 
218 
237 
217 
170 
228 
210 
236 
232 
254 
251 


237 
262 
262 
261 
262 
267 
269 
265 
263 
254 
272 
260 
253 
256 
296 
316 
277 
256 
297 
289 
290 
280 


824 
330 
826 
331 
870 
831 


812 
826 
396 
413 
382 
863 
843 
865 
373 
853 
345 
815 
847 
413 


896 
418 
483 
343 
386 
883 
875 
426 
410 
396 
386 
383 


885 
421 
411 
386 
863 
421 


868 
880 
852 
348 
872 
305 


333 
















































































*" V 










































Aipna— iMUTel O.... 




































































































































































































































































016 


747 


805 


887 


211 


270 


385 


858 


885 


896 


363 


888 





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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2849 



ATLAS PORTLAND GKMKNT. 

Tmnle strength in pounds pmr square imek. 





Ne«tcement(ftv- 

enge per cent of 

water, 19.7). 


Mortar, I cement to 8 sand (average per oent of 
water, 10.7). 




1 


1 

8 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


09 


« 


« 


I 


i 




( Til 
781 


782 
847 


004 
040 




170 
170 
172 
174 


804 
299 
881 
297 
277 
287 
812 
271 
294 
280 
802 


280 
840 




872 




868 
































AUa»— BanelS 


























































































































































ATwrafft •••..... 


761 


8U 


9W 




178 


290 


810 




872 




858 








060 






166 
185 
IflO 
176 
166 
180 


144 
101 

100 

186 
160 
166 
100 
190 
187 
190 
181 
209 
190 
188 
191 
204 
197 
187 
199 
199 
197 
197 
184 
197 
186 
180 
187 
100 
217 


282 
287 
277 
266 
286 
270 
268 
270 
270 
201 
208 
274 
297 
201 


229 
274 
260 
274 
260 
270 
243 
216 
284 
838 
280 


889 
888 
806 
801 
844 
800 
808 
280 
409 
896 
800 
207 


377 
890 
880 
300 
400 
878 


898 
844 
400 
888 
810 
879 


















































































































































































AtlM— flftriftiT. ......... .X 










































-- 













































































••-• 






r'lii 




















































































































••■•.. 


























ATsnge.. ••••••...•• 


000 






154 


180 


209 


200 


844 


888 


860 








...... 




Grsnd •TerftgB ....••«.... 


721 


814 


067 


154 


184 


281 


208 


844 


881 


8M 


868 





[Series TB of Atlaa oemeni. Teats made at Bureau, HI.] 





Neat oement (per oent of water, 


Mortar,leem«ntto8 sand (per oent 
of water, 12.1). 




1 

I* 


1 


1 

CO 


« 


1 


1 


CO 


« 


i 


Vnmber of tests 


84 
684 


78 
080 


5 
7S9 


8 
760 


85 

140 


78 
228 


8 
890 


4 
844 


8 


ATsrage tensile strength 


802 



BNa 97 179 



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2850 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF EKQINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

baylob'b ambrican pobtland cemxst. 
ToMile ttretigih in paHnd$ per tqtuire inch. 





Neat cement (per cent 
of water, 20.6). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 3 sand (per cent of water, 
10.9). 




1 


1 


1 


i 


1 

s 


1 

a 

CO 


1 


Ok 


i 




( 891 
810 
487 
661 
463 
500 
444 
480 
604 
461 
460 
443 
427 
473 
446 


456 

674 
705 
614 
616 
642 
620 


750 
735 
791 
694 
739 


186 
121 
185 
124 
184 
124 
185 
180 
188 
125 
lU 
110 
184 
113 
148 
144 
148 
129 


161 
175 
198 
193 
200 
194 
189 
186 
210 
214 
173 
180 
193 
181 
222 
242 
204 
215 
222 
196 
226 
208 
216 


248 
286 
280 
277 
241 
266 
278 
294 
806 
296 
824 


816 
818 
272 
270 
800 
296 
860 
850 
325 
276 
273 
812 
233 
280 
824 
299 
319 
849 


821 
827 
867 
887 
881 
809 

8n 

408 


836 
874 
826 
837 
800 
872 
878 




















Barrel B submitted with 








b14,tTnne, 1886 
















































































































































































ATenure. ••>•>->•■-> . 


466 


618 


742 


129 


199 


281 


304 


844 


847 







UnCA (NATURAL) CEMENT. 
[Oonthiiiatio& of teats commenced in the spring of 1896.] 

Barrel X was a sample sack received from Messrs. Meacham A Wright, agents at 
Chicago, in October, 1894. This sack was stored in the office bam all winter. 

Series Y consisted of samples taken from contract 8hii)meDt8 to Barean, 111., in 
the fall of 1894. The cement had remained in sacks ail winter in the Borean ware- 
house before the tests were made. 

Series Z consisted of samples from contract shipments to Bureau in February, 1895. 

Tensile itrength in pounde per equare inch. 





Utioa neat cement (p^ cent of water, 33.2). 


Mortar. 1 cement to 1 sand 
(per cent of water. 17.5). 




t 


1 

CO 


1 

to 


1 

t- 


1 

s 




1 


1 

00 


I 


1 


1 

CO 


1 


i 


1 

00 


i 


1 

C4 




reo 

60 
48 


64 

78 


130 
100 
95 


167 
135 
114 


128 
137 
130 
182 


256 
224 
220 
239 
193 
210 
198 






















BarrelX ... 














... 




















































70 


46 




70 
78 
73 

126 
76 
86 
79 

135 
84 


382 




370 




46 


67 
71 
63 

77 


195 
209 
215 
















SerieaY.... 
















































































f61 
62 


60 






237 
223 
220 
202 


'466' 


360 
377 
824 


888 
873 
425 
404 
823 


427 
390 
349 
863 
286 


37 
64 


65 
48 
105 
97 


177 
229 


320 
816 
297 


338 
328 
294 
800 
812 


837 
828 


SerieaZ.... 






819 











303 












































Arerage. 


60 


67 


108 


101 


144 


220 


389 


854 


861 


863 


49 


78 


206 


8U 


814 


822 



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APPENDIX I I — BBPOBT OF MAJOB HAB8HALL. 



2851 



YULCANITE— AMSKIGAN PORTLiLMD GBHXlfr. 

Barrel Y consisted of a small paekage received in January^ 1896, from the maan- 
fftotnrers of this brand and repoited by them to contain no sulphate of lime (S04Ga), 
this beinff omitted from the sample by an oversight. 

Barrel VS consisted of a package received in February, 1896, from the same com- 
pany to be tested instead of the former sample. The latter sample VS is stated to 
contain SO^Ca, and is supposed to represent the ordinary product of the factory. 

TemiU »tremgtk in poundi per tquare inch. 





Nest cement (per cent of 
w*ter,SB.5). 


Iforttr, 1 cement to 8 sand (per cent 
of water, 13). 




1 


1 


eo 


« 


1 

I* 


1 

8 


1 


i 


« 


s 












167 
145 


815 
200 




822 
244 


812 
280 
268 
832 
801 
800 
848 
309 
818 
287 
287 
268 
269 
278 
265 
806 
814 
807 
305 
200 
826 
294 
244 
810 
283 
806 


885 












818 












278 












151 
188 
146 


194 




275 
278 
289 


279 












291 












840 




998 
























152 
147 
120 


817 
202 
230 




299 

251 
274 


802 












295 












298 
























lU 
144 
151 
158 


227 
248 
283 
285 




268 
828 
279 
295 


806 












285 


Tuloiiiits— BsmlTwlthoat 8O4CS. . 










290 












278 
























169 
146 

145 


229 
261 
808 




827 
883 
810 


817 
















































154 
148 
158 


271 
287 
275 




800 
867 
890 


















































100 
122 


221 
235 




826 
































AUJJXJIM. 










144 


257 




805 


297 


298 














Bsrrel VS wiUi SOaCs 


080 
685 

625+ 


708 
831 
682 


721 

705+ 

766^ 


761 
789 
769 
684 
758 
706 


208 
268 
246 




426 
461 
887 


418 
414 
418 


876 
881 
858 


884 
840 
806 




066 
682 


747 
780 
781 




200 

100 
212 




865 
409 
485 




































A^onvn XT**. **.... ..TT.rr..... 


667+ 


747 


727+ 


787 


219 




422 


415 


858 


827 







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2852 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENQINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

WATLAND PORTLAin> OBMEKT. 

Barrel W iB on original barrel reoeiyed with proposal for ftuniBhiDg Amerioan Port- 
land cement in June, 1895; only the tests required for a selection of a brand uuder 
tiiie specifications were made on this barrel. 

Barrel WF is an original barrel submitted for testing in May, 1896. It is about 10 
per cent more finely ground than the preTious sample, and shows considerably higher 
tensile strength in sand briquets. I am informed by the agent for this brand in 
Chicago that this barrel represents the present product of the Way land mills. 

A few briquets remain on hand to be broken when two years olcL 

TenHU Birength, in pownd$, per »quare inok. 





Keat cement (per cent of water, 
21.8 to 25). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (average 
per cent of water, 11.4). 




1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 




i 




MO 
660 


706 






114 
186 
127 


242 
230 
231 
262 
238 
219 
227 
229 
216 
226 
228 


















































Bsrrel W— 61.6 per cent 

fin* .......««.*«r«*f-T,-- 















































































































































Atwaco ■■■••■••■>•' 


660 


706 






126 


230 






















674 
646 
638 
686 
024 
696 


....••#. 


747 
723 


625 
668 
633 


185 
230 
222 
176 
177 
201 
177 
103 
204 
236 
236 
220 
266 
233 
204 
222 


290 
800 
278 
273 
312 
286 
270 
259 
292 
276 
338 
310 
288 


372 
871 
376 
871 
360 
804 


348 
377 
876 
892 
890 
390 
410 
429 
400 
409 
416 
406 
866 
410 
402 
882 
426 
886 
481 
481 
426 
419 
459 
441 
896 
464 
425 
435 
406 
444 
440 


382 
898 
393 
379 










342 










870 










400 










••••••a. 


891 












398 












376 












865 












344 












880 












407 


Band WTF-W per eent 














887 

















































































































































































































































































































637 




786 


642 


211 


290 


869 


4U 


381 







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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OT liAJOB MARSHALL. 



2853 



ALSEK'S WHITB lABEL PORTLAHD CBMSKT. 

Barrel D was an original barrel received with proposals for ftimishing cement 
April 15, 1895, from Sinclair & Babson, New York City. 

Barrel £ was a %-pound. package reeeiyed by express from Baltimore July 3, 1895. 

Barrels F consisted of samples from contract shipments to Bureau, Bl., July, 1895, 
and is representative of 3,000 barrels. 

Barrel FA is an original barrel specially ground (89 per cent fine) and sent for 
testing in the winter of 1895-96. 

TefMile strength, inpoundi, per »q%are kuh. 





Alaenneat 
Bemeot (percent 
ofw*ter.22.8). 


Mortar, loementtoSMuid (per eent of water, IIJS^. 




1 


1 


1 


1 

8 


1 


« 


1 

o» 


I 


M 


■ 


( 653 
660 
687 


666 
712 
735 
670 
771 
653 


101 
233 
186 
197 


274 
276 
286 
256 
296 
284 


810 
322 
867 
856 
862 
857 






864 
850 
880 


316 








312 


BarrolD 















"''.ill*. 

























A.TflrAff9 r - 


630 


608 


202 


278 


846 






848 


814 




... .. 










657 
624 
60S 


212 
305 
180 
108 






841 
820 
831 
262 
811 


872 
812 
846 
802 


828 
820 












BarrelB 
























































628 


109 






818 


883 


822 




















326 
223 
103 
211 
366 
358 
108 
250 
235 
222 
235 
195 


278 
280 
274 
266 
885 
825 
883 
817 
299 
806 
864 
338 


:"■'.'." 


844 

852 
866 
848 
866 
816 
868 
837 
856 
844 
805 
866 
832 
811 
801 
820 
311 
328 
310 
280 
804 
801 
266 
285 


849 
858 
844 
845 
311 
888 




297 








826 








887 








812 








828 


















801 






























































BarrftlsF 




































































































































































































































ATfm£e •-- 






225 


809 




825 


840 




316 






... 




Grand ayerags 


630 


676 


815 


299 


840 


828 


887 


837 


315 



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2854 REPORT OF 'ma chief of ENGINEBRSy U. 8. ABlfT. 
TenHU ttrength, In pound$, per iquare InoA^-Gontiiiued. 





Heat oemeni. 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (IIJ to IS p«r 
cent water). 




1 

8 


1 

CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 

8 


eo 


<D 


1 

o» 


i 

*4 


1 




/ ooo 

<87 

mo 


974 
601 
748 


716 
706 
626 
675 


720 


212 
188 
260 
288 
221 
2U 
210 
226 
284 
226 
286 
231 
240 
263 
215 
220 


810 
811 
806 
288 
808 
280 
270 
279 
806 
286 
267 
272 
816 


847 
880 
856 
881 
867 
842 
876 
858 
822 
260 
272 
848 
888 
412 
844 
876 
860 
864 
881 
328 


401 
878 
860 
868 
384 
888 
840 
370 
878 
818 
858 
802 
400 
888 


878 
866 
345 
846 
877 
352 
837 
856 
805 
865 
320 
417 
421 
870 
415 
383 
407 
404 
400 


881 
860 


88S 

861 
828 
836 








858 












868 












888 












883 


























881 


BanelFA. 










844 


































































































































































660 


708 


681 


720 


227 


282 


848 


874 


872 


sn 


855 







[Teita of 8,000 1>axrels of Alsen'e White Label receiyed under contract at Borean, HL, July, 1886. 
Teste made by Mr. W. H. Fergoson.] 





Alsen*s White Label neat cement 
(per cent of water, 22.5). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (per cent of 
water. 12.5). 




1 


1 

8 


1 

CO 


i 

r4 


1 


1 

8 


1 


«o 


i 

*4 


Knmber of teste 

Ay erace tensile strength . . 


22 
618 


25 
585 


2 
646 


1 

868 


17i 


27 
228 


2 
270 


1 
872 


1 

840 



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APPBNDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOB HAB8HALL. 

OOXPOK POBTUJn> OSMKHT. 



S855 





ITeat cemeut (per cent 
of water. 31.6). 


Mortar, 1 oement to 8 sand (per oent of water, 
13.6). 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

s 


1 


1 
i 


1 
i 


1 
i 

o» 


i 


1 

i 


B«rwlCB 


f 449 

473 


784 
788 
8M 
829 

748 
716 


626 
806 
823 


745 
841 
877 
888 
816 
776 


172 
171 
131 
186 
118 
138 


i 


828 
287 
267 
260 
307 
262 


882 
821 
307 


803 
830 


371 
381 
846 


860 
367 


318 
836 
324 






































Arvnun.. ..— ••••-. 


47» 


770 


716 


790 


lU 


836 


284 


820 


817 


849 


354 


826 







GBRMANIA POBTLAin) CBMBNT. 

2*6118120 afremgih in pounda per square inch. 





Qermania neat oement (per cent 
of water, 23.4). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 3 sand 
wator, 11.4). 


[per eent of 




1 


1 


CO 


i 


f 


1 


oa 


«o 


o» 


i 




r 487 
486 
463 


660 
664 
604 


686 
730 


801 


166 
160 
146 


248 

229 
330 


330 
836 
833 






811 


Barrel L 






312 








311 














ATeraM...a.a» 


465 


673 


708 


801 


168 


331 


839 






311 












f 600 
687 


717 
731 






168 
171 
178 
101 


801 
281 
263 
284 
346 
267 
262 
350 
380 
366 
366 
382 


801 
316 
315 
373 
828 
800 


801 
848 
864 

367 
363 
352 
359 
326 


349 
857 
850 
886 


365 








386 








314 


























BarrellC 


































































































































j^ ^_uf».am. 


844 


724 






178 


289 


822 


848 


360 


338 


Vr^yOaaaa 










f 467 
478 








174 
182 
169 
190 
149 
179 


261 
268 
253 
239 
241 
265 






. 


1 


















FaiTRl LL......r... 







































































AToraM 


468 






- 


174 


252 


















* 






Grand avaraga 


612 


688 


708 


801 


169 


359 


836 


848 


860 


326 



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2856 BEPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABICT. 

STAR STBTTDT PORTLAND OBMRKT. 

Barrel A was received about April W, 1895, with propoaals for famiBhing Germaii 
Portland cement, from £. Thiele, New York Citv. About 20,000 barrels were pur- 
chased on the results of tests obtained from this barrel. 

Barrels B were samples from contract shipments to Bureau, 111., in the summer 
of 1895. 

TwHU Birengih in pound$ per iquare inch. 





SUff Stettin neat, cement (per cent 
of water, 22.2). 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (per cent of 
water, 11.7). 




1 


1 

s 


«i 


« 


i 


M 


1 


1 


1 

CO 


1 


« 


i 


« 




f 002 
696 
682 


002 
028 
078 


797 





796 
703 
830 


044 
790 
082 


192 
220 
240 


270 
281 
290 
812 
280 


296 
842 
861 
292 

824 
809 
270 
810 
330 






833 
388 
843 
856 


838 








820 




705 








82ft 










Barrel A 



































































• • 













































































*"■"" 








^Tmrftg^ 


608 


060 


761 





780 


706 


217 


280 


814 






342 


327 




' 






s 




714 740 
090 862 






201 
197 
107 
172 
184 
102 
186 
183 
193 
187 
185 
176 


220 
276 
811 
240 
283 
241 
220 
192 
244 
203 
240 
206 


803 
821 
850 


883 3&S 




801 












289 
347 
815 
380 
349 
335 
838 
808 
372 
329 
300 
360 
366 
355 
809 
345 
340 


377 
379 
332 
307 
398 


851 












878 




























































































BaR»lsB 














































































































































































































































ATerage 




702 








183 260 


851 


347 


308 ' 


80S 

















Qmndftverage... 


603 


060 


727 


799 


780 


706 


190 1 200 


823 


847 


308 1 842 


845 



TX8T8 OF 12^000 BARRELS OF STAR STETTIN RRCEIYED UNDER CONTRACT ON ILLINOIB 
AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL IN THE SUMMER OF 1895 

TenHle strengih in pavnd$per square inoK 
[Teste made by Mr. W, H. Fergnson at Bureau, BL] 





Stsr Stettin neat cement (per cent of 


Mortar, 1 cement to 8 sand (per cent 




water, 22.6). 


of water. 12.5). 




1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 




«r- 


S 


ee 


"^ 


e 


rH 


t- 


s 


00 


<« 


« 


V4 


Number of teste 


207 


207 


7 


8 


8 


5 


206 


216 


8 


4 





5 




640 


028 


721 


881 


828 


788 


107 


242 


285 


800 


800 


323 



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APPBITDIX I I — ^BBPORT OF KAJOB MABSHALL. 



2857 



mZXD CKMBim. 

I haye commenoed a series of experiments to determine the charaoteristics of 
mortar made with Portland and natural cement. In the few briquets thas far pre- 
pared equal parts of Portland and Utica were used and the usual proportions by 
weight of 3 parts of quartz sand to 1 of cement. Other bricjuets of the mixtures 
given in the following table are in the immersion trays awaiting longer term tests. 
The mixture of cements sets much more rapidlT than the Portland alone and about 
as quickly as the Utica. The tensile strength of the mortar at 7 and 28 days is about 
tw4>-thirds the strength of mortar of the same age made with the component Port- 
land and 3 parts sand. 

TmuiU Btrengih. 





percent. 


Sand, 
parte. 


Age of mortar. 


Component oements. 


7 days. 


28 days. 


6 months. 


lyear. 


Wftvlftnd mil DUkm t— - 


ULS 


t 


f 127 
110 
186 
U7 
128 
123 
121 


177 
216 
185 


287 
287 
811 
298 
280 
274 
248 
289 


299 

262 
883 
276 






289 
295 






284 














ATtmCe.. ■.*>■>••«■«■•«■••• c-rT.-r- 






127 


190 


284 


288 










AlMn** White Lftbel and Utioa 


12.5 


8 


r 121 
136 
114 
118 


172 
106 


284 

224 
267 


814 
804 
285 
285 














ATerage........ ■.....•. .......••. 






122 


160 


258 


282 










Oondor anil Uiloa. 


1 12.0 
I 12.6 


8 
8 


{ ^ 


13i 


226 
241 
250 
241 


252 
280 






268 




92 


m 


260 


ATonure .......................... 






01 


128 


289 


255 











•UMBSABT OF THNSILB TESTS ON HTDBAULIO CBMKNT8. 

UUimate tenHU itrm^ih ia paundi per §qmrti inek, 
L NKAT CSMSNT.— TESTS AT CHICAGO OFFICE. 





Saa^to. 


Water, 
per 
oent. 


Approximnte age of mortar when broken. 


Brand of oemeat. 


1 


1 


CO 


1 


1 


i 


1 


Alpha 


N. 
0. 


21.5 

21.9 

19.7 

22.4 

20.5 

22.6 

21.8 

28.9 

88. ». 

22.5 

23.2 

21.5 

20.9 

22.4 

21.8 

22 

22.5 

22.2 

22.5 


689 
615 
721 
487 
456 
657 
650 
627 
101 
680 

'"'479' 
505 
612 
454 

603 
417 
508 
890 


724 
747 

814 
578 
618 
747 
7C6 

""22O* 
676 
650 

""ooo* 

683 
600 
688 
494 
666 
448 
1 








805 


779 


Aipn».. .......... ....... 


805 
967 

"■727+ 






887 


Atlas 










Empire 




679 
742 




741 




Savior's 






Yolcauite 


VS. 


787 






Wftyland 






^o 


WF. 


735 






642 
861 




trtica 


889 




868 


AlAfin'aW Ij 






Do 


FA. 


703 
715 
652 
708 
576 
681 
689 
727 


681 


720 
790 






Condor 






Dyckerhoff. 




829 
801 
853 
774 
670 
780 




Oermania ............... 










Hemmoor ......•••..«... 











Lacerdorfer. .. . ......... 






Hunheimer 










StarStettin 






799 


706 


Stettin Gristower 





















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2858 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF EKGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

UlHmaU teiuHe strength in pounds per equwre lii«k^-€ontinued« 

8. SAKD M0RTAB.-.TBST8 AT CHICAGO OFFICE. 

[Mortar, 1 to 8 fbr PortUnds; 1 tol for Utioa.] 



Alpha 


N. 
0. 


12.5 

11 

10.7 

12.1 

10.9 

11.0 

11.8 

11.4 

17.6 

11.8 

11.8 

10.7 

12.6 

11.4 

11.9 

12 

11.8 

11.7 

11.8 


202 
211 
184 
178 
129 
219 
126 
211 
78 
215 
227 
144 
197 
109 
148 
151 
178 
190 
170 


806 
270 
281 
282 
109 

■■"'236' 
290 
205 
299 
292 
285 
218 
260 
231 
280 
254 
200 
258 








858 

860 

406 
847 
827 


277 


^Do ;;:.::.:::::;:;::: 


859 
268 

860 
281 
416 


895 
844 


896 
881 


888 


Atlas 


858 


Empire 






Saylor's 




804 


844 
868 




Vulcanite 


VS. 




Waylwid. 




Do 


WP. 


850 


411 




881 
814 
837 
871 
354 
282 
825 
816 
291 
806 
842 




Utica 


822 


Aiwn'»"W. L 




846 
848 
820 
287 
825 
272 
818 
812 
823 


828 
874 
817 


887 
872 
849 


815 


Do 


FA. 




Condor 




Dyckerhoflf........ 






Oermania , 




846 


860 




Hemmoor ............... 






Lagerdorfer ^..........^. 




818 
288 

847 


887 
840 
868 




Iffannbelmer 






Star Stettin 




846 


Stettin Griatower . : 





















8. KEAT CBHENT.-TESTS AT BUBBAIT. ILL., BY ICB. W. H. FBBGUSOK. 



Alpha 


K. 


21.5 

22.6 

22.5 

22.5 

85 

22.6 


562 
584 
550 
513 
88 
640 


786 
630 
683 
695 
188 
628 


662 
758 
786 
646 
282 
721 


688 

750 
720 




645 




Atlftff 




Bmplre. 






688 
868 
255 
788 




Alsen'sW. L 






Utica 




286 
828 






Star Stettin 













4. SAJSTD MORTAR.— TESTS AT BUBBAU, ILL., BT MR. W, H. FERGUSOH. 
[Mortar, 1 to 8 for Portlands ; 1 to 1 for XJtioab] 



Alphft 


K. 


12.5 
12.1 
12.5 
18.0 
12.5 
12.5 


178 
140 
118 
77 
174 
167 


250 
228 
203 
181 
228 
242 


808 
320 
284 
256 
270 
285 


801 
844 
808 
810 
872 
806 


!II"III 


801 
802 
328 
804 
340 
328 




AtW r. rr. 




Empire. 






Utica 






Alsen'sW. L 






Star Stettin 













COMPABISOK OF NATURAL Ain> STANDARD QUARTZ SAND IN PORTLAND CEMENT 

MORTAR. 



T^eneiU etrongik in pounds per s^[uare inek. 





Mortar, 1 cement to 8 quarts sand (water, 12. 5 per cent). 




Natural. 


Standard. 




8 months. 


lyear. 


2 years. 


3 months. 


lyear. 


2 years. 


Star Stettin cement 


( 282 
271 
278 


852 
318 
806 


346 
339 

341 


808 
290 
820 


888 
848 
355 


886 
820 




825 


ATSrage ••••.••..•....•.••.. •••... 


277 


825 


342 


306 


345 


327 






Alan's White Label cement 


f 249 
295 
259 


302 
331 
801 


311 
335 
296 


816 
861 
860 


354 

860 

. 839 


315 
312 










Average ..••.. ••........••... 


268 


8U 


814 


846 


848 


814 







From the resnlto of the two-year tests reported above it seems necessary to modify 
the statement made in the last annual report, as shown by the shorter-term tests, that 
standard sand showed an undonbted superiority to natural sand. An examination 
of the above record shows that mortar made with standard sand has retrograded in 



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APPENDIX I I — REPOBT OF KAJOR 1IAB8HALL. 



2859 



tensile Btrength at the end of two yean, while that with nataral sand has increased 
nntil the two are very close together, with a slight advantage in favor of the natural 
sand. This may possibly be explained by the greater density of the nataral sand 
mortar, dne to the graded particles, preventing or retarding the dissolving action of 
the water in which the briquets were immersed. 

Summary of hriquets for iomsUe tetto made and hroken during the year ending June SO, 1897, 

L IK CHICAGO OFFICE. 



Brand of oemeol. 



On hand 

Jnne 30, 

1896. 



Made 

during 

the year. 



Tested. 



Loet. 



Left on 
hand. 



Kataraintioa 

Foreign PortUnd: 

Aisen'a White Label 

Condor 

Gtermania 

Lagerdorfer 

Mannheimer 

Star Stettin 

American Portland: 

Alpha 

AtXae 

Baylor'* 

"Vulcanite 

Wayland 

Blag cement 

Jiixed Utioa and Portland 

Total 



10 

102 
28 
10 
18 
2 
21 

28 
20 
24 
79 
102 
86 
40 



86 

7 
7 

1 
1 
9 

11 
12 
16 
27 
27 
80 
9 



516 



844 



198 



At the offiee of the eastern section Illinois and Mississippi Canal the few briquets 
remaining on hand at last report were broken and no new ones made during the year. 
Very respectfully^ your obedient servant, 

Henry Jbrvbt, 
i1rt< Lieutenant, Engineer; 
W. L. Marshall^ 

Ccrpe of Snginoere, U, 8. A. 



BKPOBTS OF MB. L. L. WHBBLBB, ABSIBTANT BNOINSBR. 

Illinois and Mississippi Canal, 
Officb of Assistant Enqinbbb, 

SterUng, III., June SO, 1897. 
Ma.ior: I have the honor to submit the following report on the work on the Illi- 
nois and Mississippi Canal under my supervision during the flseal year ending June 
30,1887. 

VBKDSB. 

At the date of my last annual report the maps, plats, descriptions, title abstracts, 
and affreements for lands required for right of way in Whiteside County were com- 
pleted, and those relating to lands in Bureau County were in course of preparation. 
These maps and papers were completed and agreements made with property owners 
for sale of required lands wherever price demanded was considered reasonable. 

The lands in Whiteside and Lee counties which will be overflowed by the con- 
struction of the dam at head of feeder were measured, maps and plats made, descrip- 
tions, agreements, and title abstracts prepared, and agreements entered into with 
property owners wherever price demanded was considered reasonable. The agree- 
ments recommended for acceptance were approved by the Secretary of War, with 
one exception, and the property owners notined of that fact. 

The total area required for right of way for feeder is 1,111.71 acres, and the total 
area damaged by overflowing u 1,439.22 acres, of which 167.91 acres lie between 
the United States meander mie and the shore line of Bock River, leaving 1,271.31 
acres net. 

'The total amount of earthwork on the feeder, except that in the bridge approaches, 
was computed and tabulated by miles. A map yas made of the site oi the head 
works and amounts of earth and rook excavation computed. The grades of all sipe 
ftnd drainage ditches were established, profiles plottea, and earthwork computed. 



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2860 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

WESTERN SKCnOK, MAIN LINE. 

Sinoe my last annual report the Secretary of War has approved the location of the 
western section as laid out by myself in 1895. As soon as notice of that approval 
was received preparations were made for placing parties in the field for making the 
necessary measurements for describing the required lands. The force in this o£Bee 
had been '^furloughed without pay'' in November, on account of lack of funds, and 
some time elapsed before the party could be organized. 

A party witn Mr. A. O. Rowse in charge was sent to Sheffield May 11 with instruc- 
tions to commence work at the feeder junction, joining with the work of Assistant 
Engineer J. C. Long from the east and the feeder from the north. Previous to send- 
ing the parties into the field I had careftilly gone over the entire project for the 
western section, and had made many minor changes in the locations of locks, bridffee, 
etc., and had established the grades of sipe and drainage ditches as far westward as 
Mile 47. It was also decided to lower the grades about 3 feet on several of the 
levels. 

There were several objections to the line as laid out in the vicinity of Colona, and 
it was decided to improve that location if possible. With a small joarty, with Mr. 
J. W. Woermann in charge, I went to Colona May 19, and the following day made a 
thorough reconnaissance of the vicinity. 

The new line was approved by yourself June 1, and has been followed in the right- 
of-way work. 

The weather proved favorable for field work, and good progress was made. All 
the necessary measurements for describing right of way and for making all maps 
and computing earthwork were complete June 29, and the parties returned to 
this office. 

All plats of subdivisions in Henry County crossed by the line, and descriptions of 
land survey corners were copied from the county records. Proposals were sent out 
inviting bidH for preparing title abstracts. 

The landing at Blossomburg, on Rock River, was obstructed by sand so that when 
the pool was at the normal level there was an available depth of but 3 feet for a 
short distance. The steamer Hatiie Darling was employed to remove the sand, and 
removed by pumping 2,860.4 cubic yards, at a total cost of $371.85. The work was 
completed on June 29. 

The wagon bridge over Rock River, owned by the city of Moline, still continues to 
be a serious obstruction to navigation. Aside from small pleasure yachts, there are 
but 3 steamers in that vicinity that can pass under it at all, and these only by remov- 
ing their pilot houses and smokestacks. When the surface of water in the pool 
above the Milan dams is more than 1 foot above the normal stage these steamers 
can not pass under. When the water is down to the normal level then the bars 
above the bridge limit the depth to which the barges can be loaded to 3^ feet. As 
no dredge can be taken above the bridge at any stage no improvement can be 
made in the depths until the bridge is in some way modified. The owners of the 
ooal mines are expending considerable money developing the mines, with the expec- 
tation of bringing the coal to market through the canal, and it seems that some 
modification, if even of a temporary character, should be made in the bridge to per- 
mit their carrying on their business during the season of navigation without inter- 
ruption. The ooal finds a ready market at Davenport and practically controls the 
market there. 

The entrance to the canal from theMississipni River has been somewhat obstructed 
by a bar in the mouth of Rock River. The low stage that has prevailed in Rock 
River since 1892 has been favorable to the formation of this bar. The dredge Apaohe 
was put at work dredging out the entrance, and in the months of August and Sep- 
tember removed 14,219 cubic yards. The entire dredging plant was then trans- 
ferred to the Illinois River. The high water last spring in Rock River has removed 
some of the bar at the mouth, but the dredge channel was filled for a short distance 
by the sand. Proposals were invited for removing this sand and the contract let to 
the Builders' Sand and Qravel Company of Davenport, Iowa, at lOf cents per cubic 
yard, scow measurement. Under this contract they commenced work May 21, 
removed 4,209 cubic yards, and stopped work June 19, a good channel having been 
excavated. 

Four wing dams were constructed on the north side of Rock River to throw the 
current closer to the lock. The improvement of the Mississippi River in that locality 
has thrown the channel in that river nearer the lock« so that less difficulty may be 
expected there in future. 

A map on the scale 1 inch equals 2 miles, showing the locations of the main line 
and feeder as formally approved by the Secretary of War, was prepared to accompany 
the Annual Report. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. L. Whsblbb, AsHiiani Engineer, 

Ux^i. W. L. Ma Ran ATX, 

C&rp9 of EngineerB, XJ, 8, A. 



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APPENDIX I I — KEPOBT OF MAJOB MABSHALL. 



2861 



Ilunois and Mississippi Cakal, 
Office of Assistant Enginebb, 

Sterling, III, June 7, 1897. 

Major: I haya the honor to sabmit the following report npon a snryey made by 
myself in Ma^, 1897, to find, if possible, a better location for the main line of the 
canal in the vicinity of Colona, 111. 

With a small ijarty I went to Colona May 19, and the following dav made a 
thorough reconnaissance of the vicinity. I concluded that it was impossible, with- 
out great expense, to brine both railroads to one crossing, but decided to run an 
entirely new line that would improve tihe alignment and make an estimate of cost. 
This new line crosses the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad at an angle of 
70^, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at an angle of 67^, and from the 
latter railroad follows a tangent line to Rock River at the mouth of Green River. 

The field work was completed on the 22d, and the party reported to Mr. A. O. 
Rowse at Annawan the following day. The notes have been reduced and plotted, 
and an estimate of cost made. Herewith are submitted detailed estimates of the 
cost of the new line, a table showing comparative estimates of cost of the lines 
surveyed in 1895 and 1897, and two blue prints showing the location and profile. 

The new line is estimated to cost $21,601 less than the Une surveyed in 1895, and 
has in addition the following advantages over it: 

(1) The oblique crossing of the Chicago, Burlington and Quiney Railroad, as laid 
out in 1895, is avoided. 



(2) Five 48-inch pipe onlverts are dispensed with. 
fS) The total lift of the locks is better divided. 

(4) The length is shortened 2,610 feet between common points, requiring less right 
of way and fencing. 

(5) The line is removed from Qreen River and the danger resulting from being in 
dlose prozimitv to a rapid stream avoided. 

(6) Two, and possibly three, curves are avoided, and the total amount of curvature 
largely reduced. 

Tlie disadvantages of the new line are that two swing bridges instead of one will 
have to be operated, that some surface drainage will be taken into the canal, and 
that the amount of earthwork will be increased. 

It is respectfully recommended that the new line as shown on the blue print 
accompanving be adopted, except that the location of Lock No. 29 be not definitely 
fixed until a survey of Rock River in that vicinity is made. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. L. Wheeler, AesMani Engineer. 
Maj. W. L. Marshall, 

Corps of Engineers, U, 8, A. 



OoK^arative eeUmate of eoei of alternate Unee for Illinaie and Mieeieeippi Canal in ike 

ffioinity of Colona, HI. 

[Surveyed hi 1896 uid 1S87.] 



1895. 



Qwuitity. 



Cost 



1887. 



Quantity. 



Cost. 



XxCSTfttiOII 

BinlM i"^'"^" ^ 

4B-lnoh pipe onlvsrts. . 

Bailwaj DridgM 

Lock No. 28. 



Lock Ko. 39 

Look keepers' dwellinga 

Waste weir 

Highway bridge < 

Raleinff grades: 

Chicago, Borliacton and Quincy. . 

Chicago, Book Island and Pacific. 

Rightofway 

Fending , 

Contingencies 



i77,712 

131,810 

7 

2 

7-foot lift. 

li-foot lift. 

8 

1 

1 



$41,668.80 
19,896.60 
31, 600. 00 
60, 000. 00 
40, 800. 00 
76,000.00 
6,000.00 
6.000.00 
6,800.00 

8,000.00 



286,108 

149,878 

2 

2 

10-foot Uft. 

11-foot lift. 

2 

1 

1 



152. 36 aoies. 

8. 3 miles. 

10 per cent. 



16,286.00 
2,112.00 
28,480.18 



126. 81 acres. 

Smiles. 

10 per cent. 



Totals. 



824,281.43 
802,680.28 



BUforenoe . 



21,801.14 



842,786.20 
22,496.70 
9,000.00 
60,000.00 
48.600.00 
70,000.00 
6.000.00 
6,000.00 
6,800.08 



2,00O.M 
12,581.00 

1,920.00 
27,618.88 



302,680.28 



The line sorreyed in 1897 is 2,610 feet shorter than the I89S line between oommoE 
points. 



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2862 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

of ik€ lOMf em •«of{<m from m\l% 69 i 
following line twrvtyod in May, 1897, 



Detailed esiimate of eoet of ike uteet&m udian from mile 69_ to moutk of Green Biver, 
foil 



Mile 60: 

98,921 cubic yards exoavatioii, at 16 cents $14,838.15 

22.234 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents : 3,335.10 * 

148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

1 double-track railway bridge 80,000.00 

1 single-track railway bridge 20,000.00 

40 acres right of way, at $100 4,000.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Raising grade of Chicago, Rook Island and Pacific Railroad 4.2 feet. 2, 000. 00 

1 waste weir •• 5,000.00 

Total 84,313.25 

Mile 61: 

149,411 cubic yards excayation, at 15 cents 22,411.65 

45,004 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 6,750.60 

1 nighway bridge 5,800.00 

1 lock. No. 28, 10-foot lift 48,600.00 

1 48-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

Lock keepers dwelling 2,500.00 

41.81 acres right of way, at $100 4,181.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 95,383.26 

Mile 62: 

36,776 cubic yards excavation, at 16 cents 5,516.40 

82,740 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 12, 411. 00 

Lock No. 29, 11-foot lift 70,000.00 

Lock keeper's dwelling 2,500.00 

44 acres right of way, at $100 4,400.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 75,467.40 

bepobt of mr. james o. long, assistant enginesr. 

Unitbd States Engineer Office, 

lUkilwa, in., June SO, 1897. 
Major : I have 'the honor to submit the following report upon the work on the 
eastern section of the Illinois and Mississippi Canal under my supervision during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897: 

CONTRACT WORK. 

All the work under contract was completed during the previous fiscal year except 
the canal trunk on mile 6, under contract to .Tames Carroll, St. Louis, Mo. ; date of 
contract, October 10, 1894 ; expired September 30, 1895, and extended to August 1, 

1896. At the beginning of the fiscal year he had done 93,931 cubic yards of earth- 
work, at 6 cents, amounting to $5,635.86, and there was yet to be done to complete 
his contract 31,768 cubic yards, at 6 cents, amounting to $1,906.08. On August 5, 

1897, he completed the whole of the work, a final estimate was rendered, and the 
oontraot closed. 

OFFICE WORK. 

Revised the location of embankments and struotuT«B, and made' changes where 
Improvements could be made, notably in lessening the number of pipe culverts by 
concentrating the drainage through the seep ditches, enlarged, to the lower end of 
each level of the canal, where the grade of tne bottom of the canal would be above 
the natural surface of the ground, thence under the canal, thereby saving any deep 
excavations for culvert foundations, with costly quicksand excavation and pumping. 
Revised all earthwork calculations, made necessary by improvements and changes, 
such as changing lifts and locations of locks, changing alignment of embankments 
to give room for drainage ditches and roadways, and changes of cross section of 
canal prism in cuts to make a wider towpath, and tabulate same, together with 
earthwork in highway approaches, excavation of foundation pits, site and length 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2863 

of culverts, site and length of looks, leyetment of oreek channels, aad approaches 
to locks and culverts. 

Made a plat and blue-print copy of a strip of land on the Joseph Booher estate, 
upon which to locate a protection levee on mile 8 of the canal. 

Made maps and blue-print copies of revised location of embankments and struc- 
tures in 4-mile sections, miles 8 to 24. 

Made profiles, with tables of quantities of excavation and embankment, on same 
sheets, and blue-print copies of same in 4-mile sections, miles 8 to 24. 

Prepared blue-print copies of all index maps of canal right of way in 4-mile sec- 
tions for record at Chicago ofSce. 

Maps and profiles were prepared in the month of September of the sites of Aque- 
ducts Nos. 2 and 3, showing the vicinity in detail, profiles of the ^ound on the 
exact location of the ac|ueducts, borings showing character of foundations, and high- 
water levels. Blue-pnnt copies of same were made and forwarded to the Chicago 
office. 

Areas in square miles of basins drained by Main Bureau and West Bureau creeks 
were determined for use in designing Aqueducts Nos. 2 and 8. 

Excavation and embankment tables were calculated for making approximate esti- 
mates of earthwork. 

Made map of land in section traversed by the different lines f^om miles 24 to 
Feeder Junction, for use in making the land-line connections with the located lines 
and a list of owners of said lands. 

Made a report as to the method used in building the walls and arches of concrete 
culverts 1 to 5 inclusive, in order to secure a continuous monolithic structure, and 
the manner in which the dutside of the arches Was plastered. The report is as 
follows: / 

After the form for the arch culvert was erected, the bulkhead was put in directly 
under the center of each embankment, thus dividing the culvert into three sec- 
tions, the head walls and that portion of the arch from the head walls to the 
center of the embankment forming two of the sections and the third extending from 
the center of one embankment across the prism of the canal to the center of the 
other embankment. The head wall sections were erected first, the work being 
carried on continuously until the head walls and that portion of the arch in the 
head wall section was completed. After both head-wall sections were completed, 
the bulkheads were removed and work on the walls of the middle section commenced. 
This portion of the work was completed to the height of the walls, which were 
finished in skew back fashion and allowed to set or to stand until the walls were com- 
pleted. Then the work of putting on the arch was commenced at the end of the 
walls first completed. By doine the work in this manner no bond was formed 
between the arch and walls, thus allowing an opportunity for contraction and 
expansion without so much danger of cracking. Afler the arch was completed far 
enough ahead to allow a mason to work continuously, the work of plastering over 
the arch was commenced. This plaster was of the proportions of 1 cement to 2 sand 
and mixed to about the consistency of this mortar. The walls were carried up on a 
slope of 1 in about 5 or 6, thus allowing the tampers to use their tools in a perpen- 
dicular manner, and no part of the work would set before new material could be 
deposited. The finished work was covered immediately with either plank or tent 
flies, and after twenty-four hours was thoroughly wet and kept so for aboat three 
days. The proportions in the walls were 1 cement, 4 gravel in natural state, and 4 
screened pebbles. The proportions in the arch were 1 cement, 4 gravel in natural 
state, and 3 screened pebbles. The forming for the head walls was allowed to remain 
in place about six days and the arch forming about ten days after completion. 




nearer monolithic structures, as they were not built in sections. This method of 
carrying forward the work of placing the concrete without joints (except ^here the 
arch rests on the skew back of the walls) was as follows: The concrete was conveyed 
from the mixing platform to place of deposit in wheelbarrows after beinff well 
mixed by hand. One head wall was first built projecting fron>it enough of the side 
walls (about 20 feet), to allow about 6 feet of the arch to be built at same time, 
then the side walls were carried through on a slope of about 1 in 5 to the other head 
wall, then the second head wall was built up with the side walls. After the side 
walls were built and finished with skew backs, the arch was brought forward firom 
the first to the second head wall and was also carried through on a slope of about 
lin5. 

Made a tabular statement showing quantities of cast-iron pipe necessary to com- 
plete all of the pipe culverts from the Illinois River to mile 24, and the quantity of 
cast-iron pipe now on hand. 

Made a profile of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad whero it CTOsaea 
the niinoifl and Mississippi Canal on mile 17, near Wyanet. 



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2864 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERBy U. 8. ARMT. 

On January 8 to 11, inclosive, attended United States conrt at Chicago with C. A« 
Browne, inspector, in the matter of snits for the condemnation of land required for 
rifl^t of way, miles 20 to 24. 

Frepared cross sections of canal and natural surface of ground on canal right of 
way at proposed sites of culverts, miles 8 to 16. 

Made changes on the profile of the lift of Locks 15 and 16 and grades of the leveLi 
in the canal adjacent thereto. 

Prepared profiles of 8 highway crossings, from miles 1 to 16, showing grades and 
other information necessary to obtain quantities of masonry in the highway bridges. 

Made large-scale contour maps and blue-print copies of highway bridge sites on 
miles 11, 13, 14, and 16 for use in locating the bridges. 

Made a map of the Carlson gravel pit. showing areas of waste bank, land upon 
which stripping may yet be wasted, exhausted gravel pit, and land upon whioh 
gravel may yet be obtained ; also land adjoining, upon whioh gravel may be obtained^ 
with cross section and quantities of gravel and stripping. 

Made a report on the efiect of spring freshets on canal embankments and culverta 
and high- water levels at varioas points on the canal between miles 1 and 8, as follows : 

Loeh No. S. 

Feei. 

High-water level, 1897, Illinois River, elevation 22.50 

High- water level, extreme, Illinois River, elevation 29. 85 

Top of south embankment below Lock 2, elevation 21.50 

Top of north embankment below Lock 2, elevation....^ 30. 50 

Look No. S. 

High-water level, 1897, Bureau Creek, elevation 30.60 

High-water level, 1893, elevation 31.60 

Top of canal embankment below Look 8, elevation 33.00 

EoBi Bureau Creek and Lock No, 4. 

High-water level, 1897, East Bureau Creek, elevation 38. 00 

High- water level, 1893, East Bureau Creek, elevation 39. 80 

Top of canal embankment below Lock 4, elevation 41.00 

Bottom grade of canal above Lock 4, elevation 39.00 

Bottom of chord of railroad bridge, north side, elevation 39. 67 

Bottom of chord of railroad bridge, south side^ elevation 89. 81 

Look No. S. 

High-water level, 1897, Bureau Creek, elevation 48.82 

High- water level, 1893, Bureau Creek, elevation 45.50 

Top of oanal embankment below Lock 5, elevation 48.50 

Look No. 6. 

High-water level, 1897, Bureau Creek, elevation 60.62 

High-water level, 1893, Bureau Creek, elevation 61.80 

Top of canal embankment below Lock 6, elevation 62.00 

Look No. 7. 

High- water level, 1897, Bureau Creek, elevation 64.76 

High-water level, 1893, Bureau Creek, elevation 65.50 

Top of canal embankment below Lock 7, elevation 66.50 

It will be seen from the foregoingthat the Illinois River lacked, near Lock 2, 7.35 
feet of reaching its highest stage. East Bureau Creek at Lock 4 lacked 0.7 foot, and 
Bureau Creek at Locks 5, 6, and 7 about 1 foot of reaching the high- water level of 
1893, which is considered the highest known. 

The canal embankment below Lock 6 is only 0.6 foot below high- water level, but 
it is now as high as the Chicago. Rock Island and Pacific Railway embankment, 
which it is useless to exceed. When their track is raised the canal embankment at 
that i>oint can also be raised. 

While Bureau Creek was at its highest stage this spring I observed that its waters 
flowed inward through culverts, thence behind the canal embankments and through 
culverts below outward to Bureau Creek again at the following points, viz: 
Double-pipe culvert at Station 4U; on mile 5; 10-foot arch culvert at Station 383, on 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 2865 

mile 8; 48- inch pipe cnlrert at Station 300, on mile 6; 10-foot arch culvert at Station 
144, on mile 3. 

Some water also from East Burean Creek flowed behind Look 4 and discharged 
throagh arch culverts below. 

This flow of water behind the canal can be prevented by building protection 
levees below culverts as follows, viz : 

Ten-foot arch culvert at Station 383, on mile 8, levee 8 feet wide on top, 4 feet 

high, and 300 feet long, cubic yards earthwork 022 

Forty-eight-inch pipe culvert at Station 411, on mile 8, levee 6 feet wide on top, 

4.5 feet high, and 200 feet lon^, cubic yards earthwork 493 

Ten-foot arch culvert at Station 144, on mile 3, levee 8 feet wide on top, 4 feet 

high, and 60 feet long, cubic yards earthwork 125 

At the head of Lock 4, north side, levee 8 feet wide on top, 6 feet high, and 60 

feet long, cubic yards earthwork 172 

Total cubic yards of earthwork in levees 1,411 

At the 48-inch pipe culvert at Station 300, on mile 6, no levee will be required, for 
there is a 10-foot arch culvert below through which the water can flow outward, 
and which is amply able to accommodate it. 

At East Bureau Creek the opening spanned by the railway bridge was not taxed to 

its full capacity to discharge the water during the freshet of this year, but it would 

, be taxed to its full extent with a freshet like that of 1893. It is well to add, though, 

' that the capacity of this bridge to pass the water mii^ht be increased at least 26 per 

cent by removing the earth, gravel, and other debris tnat has aocummulated between 

the piers. 

In the month of May brought up to date and forwarded to the Chicago office (after 
making blue-print copies for use here) the following maps : 

Topographical maps, miles 8 to 12 and 12 to 16; maps showing location of banks 
and structures, miles 8 to 12 and 12 to 16; profiles showing borings at one-eighth mile 
intervals and at lock sites, miles 8 to 12 and 12 to 16. 

Made tracing of map of location, main line from mile 24 to Feeder Junction, near 
mile 28, and sent blue-print copies of it to Chicago office and Assistant Engineer L. 
L. Wheeler, Sterling, 111. 

Overhauled and brought up to date cross sections showing borings at sites of 
locks from Nos. 8 to 21^ inclusive; made blue>print copies of them for use here and 
sent the tracing to Chicago office. 

Made investigations of abstracts of titles to land adjoining canal right of way, 
miles 14, 15, and 16, owned by Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, and made 
various measurements in connection with their claim that we have encroached on 
their right of way, and made a report in regard thereto. 

Made a design with bills of material and estimated cost of a dwelling to be erected 
at Lock No. 11. 

During the month of May kept prospective contractors supplied with information 
in regard to the work to be let by contract June 3, 1897, from miles 8 to 16. 

On June 4 made and submitted for approval plans for reorganization of inspecting 
and office force, and made application for the reemployment of such men as were 
needed for continuing the work on the Illinois and Mississippi Canal under the con- 
tracts to be let on June 3, 1897. Also submitted an estimate of the force required to 
complete the unfinished work, miles to 8, Illinois and Mississippi Canal. 

Reemployed on the 21st of June, 1897, a part of my office and inspecting foroe^ 
J. D. Truss, jr.. Inspector; C. F. Scott, clerk; Henry Fox and Qeorge P. Hawley, 
rodmen. 

PLAT8 AND DBSOiOPTION AND TITLE ABSTRACTS OF LAND. 

Had plat and description No. 104 and abstracts Kos. 80 and 81 brought up to date 
for use in condemnation suits. 

Made plat and description of Lot 35 A on mile 8, being the land required on which 
to locate a protection levee, and had title abstract No. 25, covering said Lot 35 A, 
brought up to date. 

Prepared abstracts of title to each tract of land required for right of way from 
mile ii to Feeder Junction, near mile 28. 

CARB AND RBPAIB. 

One watchman, assisted by 1 laborer, was kept at the bureau warehouses and 
storage yards to look after the plant and material stored there, and to pass over the 
line of canal from time to time between miles and 8 to see that fences were kept in 
order and repaired where damaged by freshets, and since warm weather to cut the 
growth of weeds from the canal embankments, additional laborers being employed 

BNa 97 ^180 



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2866 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

to asskt them. The roof of the main warehonse has been painted, and the looomo- 
tives and stationary engines have been painted and kept in order, and property in 
the warehonse has been generally overhanled and olassified. 

BUKVKYS. 

From the beginning of the fiscal year until Angost 19 the following field work was 
done: 

Made field observations and sarrevs neoessary to calculate the area of watersheds 
drained by culverts on miles 14 to 24. 

Made a survey on mile 8 of a strip of land on the lands of the Joseph Booher 
estate upon which to locate a protection levee. 

Made borings at lock sites 8 to 21 inclusive. 

On August 19 the entire enffiueer force (except Inspector Browne, who was retained 
at Tiskilwa to do oflice work), including office men, and consisting of one inspector, 
one clexic, one messenger, and two laborers, were transferred to Sheffield for the pur- 
pose of engaging on field work from mile 24 to Feeder Junction, near mile 28. These 
men were Kept employed until November 16, 1896, and during that time accomplished 
the following work : Located three lines of canal from mile 24 to Feeder Junction, 
near nule 28; one on Penneys Slough route; a second on my survey of 1893: and a 
tiiird on Mr. AVheeler's survey of 1895; amounting in all to 13.1 miles of located 
line, and ran levels over and made cross sections of same at 100-foot intervals. Sur- 
veyed land lines and connected them with the located line, so as to get data from 
which to describe tracts of land required for right of way. In connection with this 
work, ran 13.1 miles of located lines, including curves, 3.9 miles of preliminary line, 
13 miles of land lines, 14 miles of levels over surveyed lines, 18 miles of levels over 
cross sections of located lines, 4 miles of check levels, and 6.1 miles stadia lines in 
meandering streams. 

During uie month of September, 1896, surveys were made in the vicinity of the 
sites of Aqueducts Nos. 2 and 3, to get correct maps in detail of the vicinity, profiles 
of the ground on the exact location of the aqueducts, borings showing the character 
of the foundations, and high- water levels. 

On the I5th of November, 1896, all field work was suspended, and all employees 
were laid off except the assistant engineer and one inspector, who continued compu- 
tations, etc., in the office, one watchman and one laborer to care for property and 
plant in the warehouse and storage yards at Bureau. 

On December 31 surveyed lot 104 on mile 23 and went over the ground with wit- 
nesses, who testified in the condemnation suit for right of way. 

Took levels and field notes necessary to prepare profiles of the eight highway cross- 
ings between miles 1 and 16. 

Made necessary surveys to obtain notes to determine the amount of unfinished 
work from Illinois River, at mile to mile 8. 

Marked out boundary of canal right of way from miles 12 to 16, in order to inclose 
with a barbed- wire fence. 

Made a survey of the Carlson gravel pit and land adjoining upon which gravel 
may be obtained; took levels ana cross sections on same, and had borings made to 
determine the depths of stripping and of good gravel that may be obtained. 

Observed the effect of spring freshets in Bureau Creek upon the canal embankments 
and culverts, and run levels at various points to determine the high-water level. 

On June 21 parties were put in the field marking out canal prism and Imes of 
embankments and sites of lock pits on miles 8 to 1^ in preparation for the work of 
ooDstruction by the contractor's forces. 

lOSCBLLANBOUS WORK. 

Two hundred and fifty pieces of pine timber were loaded on cars and shipped to 
Assistant Engineer C. Y. Brainard, Columbiana, 111. 

Built a temporary wagon bridge over a washoat in the public road crossing the 
canal prism on mile 5. 

Took off longitudinal braces and removed two middle bents of the railway trestle 
over East Bureau Creek to allow drift and floating ioe to pass freely during the spring 
freshets. 

Built a wooden bulkhead on top of the breast wall and across the west end of Lock 
No. 4 to prevent the flow of East Bureau Creek through the canal during freshets. 

Repaired and strengthened a protection levee on mile 7 that was leaking and 
threatening to burst during the spring freshet in Bureau Creek in the month of 
March, 18S^. 

Purchased material and made a contract under ten-day proposals for the construc- 
tion of a barbed-wire fence inclosing the canal right of way from miles 12 to 16. The 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2867 

contraot was let to E. W. Eddy, of Wyanet, 111., and was completed Jane 7, 1S97, 
and eost as follows : 

Mile 13: 

2,651 pounds barbed wire, at $2.17 per hundredweight $65. 42 

718 fence posts, at 13.95 cents each 100.19 

20 braces, at 30 cents each 6.00 

Inspectini^ material 13.58 

Gonstmoting 1.62 miles fence nnder contract, at $41.50 i>er mile. 67. 52 

$262.71 

Mile 14: 

2,343 ponnds barbed wire, at $2.17 per hundredweight 56. 26 

713 fence poets, at 13.95 cents each 99. 70 

20 braces, at 30 cents each 6.00 

Inspecting material 13.59 

Constmcting 1.23 milea fence under contract, at $41.50 per mile. 51. 22 

226.77 

Mile 15: 

2,563 ponnds barbed wire, at (9.17 per hundredweight 62. 80 

717 fence posts, at 13.95 cents each 100. 10 

20 braces, at 30 cents each 6.00 

Inspecting material 18.58 

Constmetmg 1.51 miles fence nnder contract, at $41.50 i>er mile. 62. 86 

245.34 

Mile 16: 

2,343 ponnds barbed wire, at $2.17 per hundredweight 56. 27 

714 fence posts, at 13.95 cents each 99.84 

21 braces, at 30 cents each 6.30 

Material and constructing 30.5 rods woven- wire fence, at 90 cents 

per rod 27.46 

One gate 2.50 

Inspecting material 13.59 

Constmetmg 1.23 miles fence nnder contract, at $41.50 per mile. 51. 22 

257.17 

Total cost for constmcting 5.59 miles fence 981.99 

Cost per mile 177.45 

Fifty barrels of Portland cement were hauled by wagons to Princeton and loaded 
on cars and shipped to Assistant Engineer C. V. Brainard at Meredosia, HI. 

BBiPLOTBBS. 

Mr. Charles A. Browne, inspector, was employed dnring the whole year. Mr. J. D. 
Truss, jr., inspector, and Mr. C. F. Scott, clerk, were employed until November 15, 
1896, when they were laid off, and were reemployed on June 20, 1897. Bfr. Henry 
Fox, Mr. George P. Hawley, rodmen, who were laid off when actual operations on 
constrnction were suspended, were reemployed on June 20, 1897. All of these gen- 
tlemen have been employed on this work during active operations, and have proved 
themselves to be thoroughly reliable and competent. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Jas. C. Long, A$9%$tant Enginem'. 
Maj. W. L. Marshall, 

Corp$ of Engineers, XT. 8, A. 



report of maj. w. l. marshall, corps of enoineers. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Chicago^ Ill.y December 16^ 1896. 
General: I have the honor to submit the following report upon the 
final location of the western section of the Illinois and Mississippi 
Canal from mile 24 to Eock Biver, and to recommend a location. 

Under the provisions of the river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, 
detailed plans and estimates were reported by me, for the construction 
of the canal, June 21, 1890 (House Ex« Doc. Ko. 316, Fifty-first Con- 
gress, first session). 



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2868 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. & ARMT. 

That report stated that before final location of the canal farther snr- 
yeys were necessary, and since September 19, 1890, the foUowing changes 
in the location reported have been made by authority of the Secretary 
of War. 

First The lower rapids of Bock Biver passed by a canal on south 
bank instead of north bank. Approved September 24, 1891. 

Second. The feeder has been located four miles west, leaving Bock 
Biver at Sterling instead of Dixon. Approved January 27, 1896. 

The location of the eastern section as far as to mile 24 remains as 
originally designed, but the summit level is to be cut down 9 feet below 
the plan of 1890. 

There now remains to be finally located this part of the western sec- 
tion from mile 24 to Bock Biver at the mouth of Green Biver, and it is 
this section that is now in question. 

The plans submitted by me June 21, 1890, contemplated the Penney 
Slough route from the old feeder junction at mile 25 to Bock Biver at 
Penney Slough 25 miles distant, but the route is objectionable on account 
of the bad crossing of Green Biver, the natural surface of the country 
being such that a sufficient headroom under an aqueduct can not be 
economically obtained, but the stream must be carried under the canal 
through an invert at high water, which plan, in my opinion, is not in 
accord with good practice, at a drainage channel of the magnitude and 
character of Green Biver. The aqueduct would be in danger at every 
high water carrying drift or ice. 

The line also is not on favorable ground, the material being nearly 
pure sand in some stretches and marsh and bog in others. 

The Bock Biver section of this route is bordered by low bottom lands, 
the greater part of which is extremely rich agricultural land so low 
that fixed dams can not be maintained at any useful height, nor mov- 
able dams, even at low water, without soaking and injuring quite large 
areas. The necessary depth can not be secured by dams, but channels 
must be dredged or blasted in the bed of Bock Biver to secure 7 
feet of water. The stream is also crossed by two low railroad bridges, 
viz, a double-track bridge belonging to Chicago, Bock Island and 
Pacific Bailroad and a single-track bridge of the Chicago, Burlington 
and Quincy Bailroad. These bridges can not be altered without large 
cost nor probably until after years of delay. The alteration of these 
bridges can probably be successfully enforced against the railroad com- 
panies, but, in my judgment, if the object desired can be obtained by the 
United States at no increased expense, without damaging, taking, or 
interfering with private or corporate property, such course should be 
pursued. The present project is the construction of a canal of fixed 
capacity between two given points, and not the improvement of the 
general navigation of Bock Biver on its merits. All material for con- 
struction must be hauled from 4 to 8 miles from the nearest railroad. 
Qn account of these uncertain elements of cost and practical difficulties 
along the Penney Slough route, I had a survey made by J. G. Long in 
1893 of a route from the feeder junction to the mouth of Green Biver. 
Mr. Long was instructed to survey a line crossing Green Biver at a 
practicable point for an aqueduct and continue the canal on the north 
side of Green Biver to avoid the large drainage lines which exist south 
of the river. The original estimate along this route is published in the 
Beport of the Chief of Engineers for 1893, page 2181. This route is 
somewhat objectionable on account of bogs and sand hills, but is prefer- 
able to the Penney Slough route. Consequently a second route was 
surveyed fit>m Mile 24 to the mouth of Green Biver, in 1895-96, by 



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APPENDIX I I ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2869 

Assistant Wheeler, with the object of throwing the canal as near as 
practicable to other lines of transportation and on heavier soil. This 
line with modifications is practically the roate surveyed by M.bjot Ben- 
yaord in 1883, known as the Bock Island route in his report. 

In making estimates of cost along this line, we have the advantage 
of the results of the construction of 13 miles of the canal and of the 
awards and agreements for the purchase of right of way over some 60 
miles of the canal. 

On this ascertained basis of cost, I have caused all old estimates to 
be revised, with the results shown on Mr. Wheeler's report, as far as 
relate to the section in question, and herein below as far as the entire 
canal is in question. 

The foUowing are the estimates over the three routes from Mile 24 
to mouth of Green Biver: 

Penney Sloagh route $2,044,228 

Green Rivei roate, 1893 1,985,472 

Green River route, 1896 ^.. 2,048,445 

Mean 2,026,047 

The cost, then, as far as may be judged by estimates on equivalent 
bases, may be said to be practically the same by each of the routes. 
On the Penney Slough route the damage by flowage is indeterminate. 
The crossing of Green Biver is essentiaUy bad, if not entirely inadmis- 
sible. The line is most distant firom means of transportation and 
supply, and the nature of the earth is not advantageous for the con- 
struction of firm, tight banks for the canal. 

The latter objection applies to a less degree to the route of 1893, and 
least to the route of 1996. The objection to the last-named route is the 
great number of drainage structures required. Either Green Biver 
route will make the canal about 2 miles shorter than via Penney Slough. 

As I believe that the Green Biver route for the western section will 
be more easily and cheaply constructed, more economically maintained, 
and presents less doubtful or indeterminate elements of expense than 
via Penney Slough, I have to respectfiilly recommend the approval of 
this route substantially as shown on the maps herewith. 

This location, if approved, will complete the definite location of the 
oanal throughout its extent 

BBVISED ESTIMATES. 

The right of way over 29 miles (5 miles at Milan) having been deter- 
mined in cost, and about 13 miles of the canal nearly completed, it is 
practicable to revise the estimates of 1890. The'cost of the total actual 
work already done closely approximates the original estimates. The 
cost of the right of way exceeds the original estimates by about 60 per 
cent, because (1) the lands have increased in value in thirteen years, (2) 
the State laws provide for the payment of all damages to property not 
taken, by reason of the canal construction, and (3) because it has been 
necessary to increase the width of the strip taken to provide for drain- 
age ditches, waste banks, and other purposes. The ascertained rate of 
ihcrease of cost of right of way seems, then, the only well-defined cause 
for increasing the estimates already sent in, if the old lines are 
adhered to. 

Theline8,however,have been changed, as heretofore stated, by entirely 
relocating the feeder, and probably tibe western seotioiL The estimate^^ 



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2870 BEPOBT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEEKS, V. 8. ARMY. 

for these relocated lines have been made on the basis of the increase of 
right of way, and independently of former estimates of 1890. 
The revised estimates compare as follows : 



Section of oanaL 



1800. 



niinoia BiTor to mUe 24 

Mile 25 to Green Biver 

OreenKlver to Lower B*pids 

▲round Lower Rapide 

KavlgAble feeder 

Bxtending Sterling feeder to Green Kiver ronte. 
Extra ooat of right of way OTer 1890 eetimate 

Total 

Appropriated to Jnne 80, 1888 

To be appropriated 

Bevieed estimate, 1888 

Original estimate, 1890 



$2,886,712.80 

1,816,822.70 

62,624.00 

482,50L90 

1,858,888.80 



201,890.05 



82,882,647.07 

2,026,04«.67 

. 62,524.00 

514.375.78 

1,654,733.80 

67,052.92 



7.127,848.75 



7,157,378.74 
1,285,000.00 



5,922,879.74 



7,157,879.74 
6,925,960.70 



Xzoeaa of reviaed otst original. . 



881,420.04 



Thesis estimates are for a barge and towpath canal. If steam be used, 
the banks thronghont mast be protected against wash. 

This work is essential and should be included in the estimates. There 
is no stone convenient along the line of the canal nearer than theEock 
Biver termini, nor in sufficient quantities or quality there. It must be 
hauled from a distance. This consideration, involving the transporta- 
tion of over 1,000,000 tons of stone an average distance of 50 miles, 
must be regarded in locating the western section. 

For revetting the banks an additional estimate is submitted. For 
revetting 90 miles canal banks, at $15,000 per mile, $1,350,000. The 
paving should be done as the work progresses. For the completion of 
the canal there will be required, then — 

For animftl traotion canal $6,922,379.74 

For steam traction canal 7,272,237. 74 

A detailed report upon the survey of the Green Biver route (with 
estimates of cost and maps) has been submitted by Assistant Engineer 
Wheeler and is forwarded herewith. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. Mabshall, 
Major J Corps of Engineers. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. Obaighill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. S. A. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 



BXPORT OF MB. L. L. WHXBLBB, A8SISTA1TT XNGINSSB. 

United States Enoikbeb Officb, 

Sterling, III, June S, 1896. 
Majobs I have the honor to snbmit the following report upon a survey made by 
myself for locating the western section of the Illinois and Mississippi Canal from a 
point on the summit leyel to the month of Green River. The eastern section had 
been located to the twenty-flffch mile, near the old feeder junction, and the works at 
Milan had made Hock fiiver nayigabie to the mouth of Green River. Mr. J. C. Long, 
United States assistant engineer, in 1S93 made a survey between these two points 
which left the old line in the twenty-ninth mile, kept north of Hickory and Coal 
«neksy eroned Gnob Elver east of Spring Creek, and followed the north bank of 



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APPENDIX I I REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2871 

Oreen Rlyor to its mooth. The distance by this line is 1.8 miles less than by the 
Penney Slongh line. 

The surveys and estimates made by myself for locations of feeder in 1895 had 
alko^wn that a feeder leaving Rock River near Sterling would cost $471,680 less than 
a feeder on the old line, leaving Rook River near Dixon. The line from Sterling was 
TVLSk on the assumption that the summit level of the canal was lowered to grade 199. 
The estimates made by Assistant Engineer J. C. Long showed that the increase in 
cost of main line due to lowering the summit level from grade 205 to grade 199 was 
$45,735. The location of the Sterling Feeder line was approved by the Secretary of 
"War, thereby fixing the grade of the summit level at grade 199. 

The survey made by myself, therefore, started with the assumption that the sum- 
mit level was at grade 199 and had for an object the finding of a line which should 
avoid some of the objectionable features of previous lines, and approach as nearly 
as possible the line of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. The obiec- 
tions to the Pennevs Slough line, aside from the flowage damages along Rock River 
and the uncertainties of cost of improving Rock River are that it is at great distance 
from any railroad, requiring materials for construction to be hauled long distances 
over very poor roads or the construction of a railroad for many miles to supply mate- 
rials, and that the line lies for a large portion of its distance among sand hills and 
marshes. The crossing of Green River is at too low a grade, which would now be at 
^eater risk than when originally planned on account of the^reat amount of dredg- 
ing that has since been done in Green River and its tributaries above the point of 
crossing. 

The Ime run by Assistant Engineer Long passes over about 2 miles of peaty ground 
along Coal Creek, where construction would be diflBcult, and is somewhat objection- 
able on account of its distance from the railroad, but to a much less degree than the 
Penney Slouf^h route. 

The objection to any line lying south of Green River has been the larse number of 
drainage lines to be crossed requiring a lar^e number of culverts and aqueducts. 
The character of the soil south of Green River is more favorable for construction, 
however, than that north of it, and the nearer the main hills south of Green River 
are approached the heavier the soil. 

In making the survey, therefore, I endeavored to keep the line as far south as pos- 
sible, in order to keep on good ground and to be near the Chicago, Rock Island and 
Pacific Railroad, and to keep the bottom grade as high as possible in order to cross 
the drainage lines under favorable conditions. 

Before commencing the survey I made a thorough reconnaissance of the whole 
region included between the Penneys Slough line on the north and the Chicago, Rock 
Island and Pacific Railroad on the south, and followed out on the ground the old lines 
as near as I could. I also looked over the region east of the FeiKler junction with a 
view to finding a possible route for bringing the main line near Sheffield. I left 
Sterling with survey party October 21 by teams, and commenced work the following 
day. I first ran a transit and level line from near the eighteenth mile on the main 
line to the summit at Sheffield, one and one-half days being occupied in this work. 
The levels showed that there would be a maximum cutting near Sheffield of 60 feet, 
and that the crossing of drainage lines, both east and west of Sheffield, would be 
difiicult. The earthwork would be heavy for a long distance. 

I commenced the new line near the middle of the twenty-fifth mile of the main line, 
crossed the oatlet to Devils Slough before it joined Hickory Creek, kept south of 
Hickory Creek, and. as soon as the nature of the ground would i»ermit, turned south- 
wast toward the railroad. 

For a short distance this line is identical with the old Green River line, but they 
separated after a short distance because I considered the old line to be on too unsta- 
ble ground. The lines do not meet again until near Spring Creek. They are practi- 
cally identical from near Gtoneseo to 1 mile east of Green River Station, where they 
separate, and do not again unite. 

In order to locate the line to the best advantage it was necessary to first approxi- 
mately fix the grades of the several levels and then fit the line to these grades as 
closely as posaiMe. The profile of the old line was of great assistance to me in fixing 
the grades. Levels, cross sections, and borings were kept up with the transit party, 
and wherever the elevation or character of ground seemed unfavorable an effort was 
made to improve the location. 

The party returned to this office November 16, and the work of reducing and 
plotting of the notes commenced. The boring part^, however, was left in the field 
to make boringp along the Penneys Slough line, which was completed November 23. 
After the transit and level notes were reduced and plotted, it was evident that the 
line could be improved in some portions, especially between Anna wan and Atkinson, 
where there were several carves in the line. A small party was therefore put in the 
field December 11, and several miles relocated. The position of the Feeder junc- 
tion was also changed and much improved. This work was completed December 17. 



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2872 REPORT OF TH^ CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARHT. 

I subsequently looked over the country between Atkinson and Qeneeeo with a yiew 
to bringing the line nearer to Oeneseo, but was satisfied this could not be done, 
except at great expense and great damage to property in Geneseo. 

The notes of this survey have been plotted on the scale of 1 inch = 400 feet and 
traced on fourteen sheets, prints of which accompany this report. The profile has 
been plotted on a vertical scale 1 inch = 6 feet, and horizontal scale 1 inch = 1,600 
feet. The locations of the proposed structures are shown on the maps and profiles, 
except that of the wastewier at the west end of the Summit level, which should be 
located where the Feeder crosses Hickory Creek, a short distance from the main 
line. The location is just outside the limit of the map of that portion of the main 
line. The item, however, has been included in the estimates, as the estimates 
for the Feeder did not include it. A uniform width of 300 feet has been shown for 
right of way except at lock sites. It will be noticed, however, that using this 
width, the right of way lines sometimes differ but little from laud lines. In such 
cases when the final location is made the center line should be moved slightly to 
make the two agree. For several miles along Greeu River but one embankment is 
necessary, it being intended to flow the land to the foot of the hills. This survey 
was not sufficiently in detail to determine the exact amount of land to be taken, but 
a uniform width of 300 feet has been included in the estimates. It is probable, 
however, that the amount of land required or damaged will slightly exceed the 
amount estimated for in this portion of the line. 

An effort was made to keep the line on the south side of Green River all the way 
to Rock River, but the conditions were so unfavorable on the south side of the river 
below Colona that I decided to cross Green River east of Green River Station, where 
a good crossing could be had, and follow the right bank to Rock River. An endeavor 
was also made to so locate the line that both railroads at Colona could use one 
bridge, but I did not arrive at any feasible scheme by which this could be done. 
The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad can be carried over the canal by a 
fixed bridge, but I doubt if this can be done with the Chicago, Rock Island and 
Pacific Railroad, and believe that a double-track pivot bridge will be necessary. 

The toUl estimated cost of the whole line Is ^,048,445, of which $575,682 is for 
earthwork, $409,700 is for locks, $200,800 is for bridges, $603,100 is for drainage 
structures, $172,941 is for right of way, and $186,222 is for contingencies. In makins 
up these estimates I have used, so far as possible, prices comparable with those used 
in the estimate of the Penney Slough route and in Mr. Long's estimate of 1893. 

In the Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1894 Mr. Long submits an estimate of 
cost from mile 25 to mile 62.3 of $1,689,781 ; but this is on the assumption that the 
summit level is at grade 205. In this estimate, however, he omits a lock of 7 feet 
lift, which in another estimate he estimates to cost $57,500. There appears to be 
no estimate for contingencies. 

In his comparative estimate of cost of miles 19 to 29, inclusive, the cost of miles 
26, 27, 28, and 29 is $233,541, with summit at grade 205, and of miles 25, 26, 27, 28, 
and 29 is $224,786, with summit at grade 199. He estimates for a width of 250 feet, 
at prices ranging from $30 to $65 per acre, while I have estinated for a width of 300 
feet, at a uniform price of $100 per acre. The width of 300 feet I consider to be 
none too much, and the prices paid for right of way already acquired show that an 
estimate of $100 per acre does not cover the cost to the United States. Increasing 
the right of way to 300 feet width, at $100 per acre, his estimate for right of way 
becomes $135,600, an increase of $66,449. 

His estimate, then, with summit at grade 199 from mile 24 to mile 62.3 would be 
$1,689,781 plus $57,500, minus $233,541, plus $224,786, plus $66,449, plus $180,497 (con- 
tingencies) =$1,985,472. 

By your direction I have revised the estimate of cost of the Penney Slough route. 
This revised estimate has been prepared by using Mr. Long's estimate for cost of 
summit level at grade 199 from the twenty-fourth mile to the twenty-eighth mile, and 
increasing the estimates of 1890 by 12^ per cent for all mechanical constructions to 
Penney Slough over prices of similar structures on the Green River line, and increas- 
ing acreage of right of way 50 per cent and making the price $100 per acre. The 
estimate of cost of miles 52 to 64, inclusive, along Rock River has been taken the 
same as in the estimates of 1890. The total revised estimated cost, with 10 per cent 
added for contingencies, is $1,996,208. 

Since the survey for the Penney Slough line was made, at least one new highway 
has been opened requiring one additional bridge, and several large dredged ditches 
have been dug across the proposed line. The cost of the ad£tional structures 
reouired by these changes, with 10 per cent added for contingencies, would be 
$48,015, which increases the total given above to $2,044,223. 

The estimates of 1890 assumed that the owners of bridges over Rook River would 
modify them at their expense so as to permit navigation past them. It has been 
decided, however, in the district court of the southern district of Ohio (50 Fed. Rep., 
p. 406) that sections 4 and 5 of the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890. pro- 
viding penalty for maintaining obstructions to navigation, are unconstitutional. 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2873 

Bhoald this decision be sostaiiied, then, it is highly probable that the United States 
would hare to pat draw spans in one doable-track and one single-track railway 
bridge, and the cost of the Penney Slough route increased thereby. 

The estimated cost of the three routes for reaching Rock River at the mouth of 
Green River is as follows : 

Estimate of 1890, the Penney Slough route $2,044,223 

Estimate of 1893 1,985,472 

Estimate of 1896 2,048,446 

On account of its being more accessi^^le, it is probable that the last line can be 
built at a much less price per unit than either of the others, although, as far as pos- 
sible, the estimates have Men made on the same basis. The material met on this 
line is much better than on either of the others, and a canal built on it would be 
more cheaply maintained. Throughout all the lines very little material will be met 
that can be used in structures. There is no rock until Rock River is reached, and 
no timber that can be made ose of in structures. At Colona sandstone can be obtained 
suitable for riprap or for slope paving, bat not hard enough for any masonry which 
would be touched by boats. Gravel suitable for coucrete is not found on either of 
the lines, and good mortar saud will be very difficult to obtain. Practically all the 
materials for strnctures will have to be brought from other sources, and this fact 
alone should have large weight in determining the route to be adopted. 

In making this survey and preparing the maps and estimates I have been assisted 
by Messrs. A. O. Rowse, Max Heinze, J. G. Palmer, J. B. Bassett, C. J. Chambers, 
and F. B. Dais. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. L. Whbeler, A$9iBtant Ei^nwr. 

Mai. ^* L- Mabshall, 

Cwrp$ of JEngin0er$, U. 8, A. 



Detailed eeHrnaU of ike eoet of weetem eection from mile $d to mile 6X,S at mouik of 

Oremi River, 

Mile 25: 

52,107 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents $7,816.05 

24,141 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 8,621.15 

86.86 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 15,713.20 

Mile 26: 

40,360 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 6,052.50 

44,766 cubic yards embankment, at 16 cents 6,714.90 

1 10-foot arch culvert, at $8,000 8,000.00 

1 highway bridge, at $5,800 5,800.00 

86.36 acree right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 30,843.40 

Mile 27: «===. 

13,308 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 1,996.20 

78,212 eubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 11,73L80 

1 10-foot arch culvert, at $8,000 8,000.00 

1 highway bridge, at $5,800 5,800.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 31,804.00 

Mile 28: 

24,187 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 8,628.05 

68,544 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 10,281.60 

1 48.inch pipe culvert, at $4,500 4,500.00 

1 highway bridge, at $5,800 5,800.00 

1 300-foot wasteweir 5,000.00 

36.36 acres right ofway, at $100 : 3,636.00 

Fencing : 640.00 

Total 33,485.66 



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2874 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEEBBy U. 8. ARMY. 

Mile 29: 

S2;00e cable yards excavatioii, at 15 cents $4,801.20 

53;596 cubic yards embankmenty at 15 cents 8,089.40 

1 10-foot arch culvert 8^000.00 

2 highway bridges, at $5,800 11,600.00 

87.26 acres right of way, at $100 3^726.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 36,806.60 

MUeSO: 

5,460 onbio yards excavation, at 15 cents 819.00 

84,988 cubic yards embankment^ at 15 cents 12,748.20 

1 48-inch pijie culvert - 4,500.00 

Lock No. 22, 6 feet lift 88,600.00 

Lock-keeper's dwelling ^ 2,500.00 

89.35 acres right of way, at J$100 8,935.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 63,742.20 

Mile 31: 

127,466 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 19, 119.90 

2 30-foot aqueducts, at $20,000 40,000.00 

1 highway Dridge.« 5,800.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 69,195.90 

Mile 32: 

5,172 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents '. 775.80 

97,180 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 14,577.00 

148-inch pipe culvert .' 4,500.00 

36.36 acres nght of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 24,128.80 

Mile 33: 

39,000 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 5,850.00 

52,900 cubic yards embankment^ at 15 cents 7, 935.00 

148-inoh pipe culvert 4,500.00 

86.36 acres nght of way, at $100 £636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 22,561.00 

Mile 84: 

a869 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 998.85 

97,778 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 14^666.70 

2 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 84,742.55 

Mae35: 

15,058 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 2,258.70 

78,774 cubic yards embankment^ at 15 cents 11,066.10 

1 48-inch pipe culvert 4, 500.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 8,636. 00 

Fencing 640.00 

Totia 27,90a80 

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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2875 



RJ- 



Mile 36: 



3, §,796 cubic yards exeavatioo, at 15 cents |1,319.40 

j^i 79,866 cubic yards embankmeDt, at 15 cents 11,979.90 

j^, 160-foot aqueduct 80,000.00 

*i 1 10-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

;., 86.36 acres right of way, at$100 8,636.00 

__ Fencing 640.00 

^ Total 65,575.30 

Mile 87: === 

Hf 1,568 cubic yards excayation, at 15 oents 235.20 

2^, 118,056 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 17,708.40 

{'t 148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

jij 1 12-foot arch culvert 10,000.00 

i\ 1 highiv ay bridge 5,800.00 

z\ 86.36 acres right of way, at$100 3,636.00 

;;i Fencing 640.00 

[Sj Total 42,519.60 

- Mile 38: === 

100,997 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 15, 149.55 

ti| 22,090 cubic yards embankment, at 15 oents 3,313.50 

A 2 highway bridges, at $5,800 11,600.00 

,li LockNo. 23, lOfeetlift 48,600.00 

^ Lock keeper's dwelling 2,500.00 

\jfl 87.17 acres right of way, at $100 8,717.00 

Fencing 640.00 

f Total 85,520.05 

Mile 39: ===== 

ff 22,927 onbic yards excavation, at 15 cents 3,439.05 

64,792 cubic yards embanlunent, at 15 cents 9,718.80 

i» 1 48-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

fli 1 highway bridge 1 5,800.00 

9 40.10 acres right of way, at$100 4,010.00 

Fencing 640.00 

9 

s Total 28,107.85 

Mile 40: === 

J 40,684 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 6,102.60 

58,066 cubic yards embankment, atl5cents 8,709.90 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at$100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 24,888.50 

Mile 41: ===» 

698 cubic vards excavation, at 15 cents 104.70 

100,826 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 15, 123.90 

1 48-inoh pipe culvert 4,500.00 

110-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at$100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 87,804.60 

Mile 42: === 

108.330 cubic yards embankment, at 15 oents 16, 249.50 

1 48- inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

1 10-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 88,825.50 

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2876 BBPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF EKGINEESS, U. & ABMT. 

MUe48! 

22^016 onbio yards excayation, at 15 cents $8,902.25 

66,81^ oubio yards embaakment, at 15 cents 10,022.70 

1 48-inoh pipe culvert 4^500.00 

1 highway bridge 6,800.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at $100 .• 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 27^900.95 

Mile 44: "^'^''^''''^^^ 

2,557 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 383.55 

112.204 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 16,830.60 

1 90-foot aqueduct 40,000.00 

2 highway bridges, at $5,800 11,600.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at$100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 73,090.15 

MUe45: 

18,812 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 2,821.80 

75.778 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 11,366.70 

2 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing ., 640.00 

Total 27,464.50 

Mile 46: 

40,156 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 6,023.40 

49,885 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 7,482.75 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.38 acres right of way, at $100 3, 636. 00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 23,582.15 

Mile 47: 

24,390 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 3,658.50 

90,396 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 13,559.40 

1 10-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at$100 8,636.00 

^ Fencing 640.00 

Total 33,993.90 

ime48: 

44,217 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 6^632.55 

56.476 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 8,471.40 

2 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

86.86acresrightof way, at$100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 84,179.95 

Mile 49: 

9,630 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 1,444.50 

62,704 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 9, 405. 60 

40^304 cubic yards excavation, Oreen Biver Cut-off, at 15 cents .... 6, 045. 60 

148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

Ihighway bridge 5,800.00 

1 waste weir 300 feet long 5,000.00 

Look No. 24, 11 feet lift 50,000.00 

Look keeper's dwelling 2,500.00 

67.79 acres right of way, at$100 6,779.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Totifcl 92,114.70 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OF MAJOR HARSHALU 2877 

Mile 50: 

5,679 onbio yards exoavation, at 15 cents 1851.85 

44,272 cabic yards embankment, at 15 cents 6,640.80 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

40.75 acres right of way, at$lOO 4,075.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 18,007.65 

Mile 51: 

5,336 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 800.40 

83,665 cabic yards embankment, at 15 cents 12,549.75 

1 90-foot aqnedact 40,000.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 57,626.15 

Mile 52: 

8,061 cabic yards excavation, at 15 cents 1,209.15 

100.689 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 15, 103.35 

1 48-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

1 10-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at$100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 33,088.50 

Mile 53: 

25,053 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 3,757.95 

41,718 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 6,257.70 

llO-foot arch culvert 8,000.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at$100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 22,291.66 

Mile 54: 

21,661 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 3,249.15 

74,734 cubic vards embankment, at 15 cents 11,210.10 

1 double 10-toot arch culvert 15,600.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

Lock No. 25, 9 feet lift 44,600.00 

Lock keeper's dwelling 2,500.00 

89.37 acres right of way, at $100 3,937.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 87,636.25 

Mile 55: 

38,669 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 5,798.85 

69,141 cubic yards embankment, at 16 cents 8,871.16 

1 lO-foot arched culvert 8,000.00 

1 highway bridge 6,800.00 

Lock No. 26, 10 feet Uft 48,600.00 

Lock keeper's dwelling 2,600.00 

38.31 acres right of way, at $100 ^83L00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 84,041.00 

Mile 66: 

6,346 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 801.90 

106,030 cubic yards embankment, at 16 cents 15, 754. 60 

8 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 13,500.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 34,332.40 



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. 2878 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Mile 57: 

2,832 cabio yards ezoavation, at 15 cents $424.80 

112,226 cnbic yards embankment, at 15 cents 16,833.90 

2 48-incb pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

1300-foot aqueduct 75,000.00 

46.47 acres right of way, at $100 4,647.00 

Fencing • 640.00 

Total 106^546.70 

Mile 58: 

68,262 cubic yards ezoaTation, at 15 cents 10,239.30 

51,756 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 7, 763. 40 

2 48-Inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

Lock No. 27, 8 feet lift 42,500.00 

Lock keeper's dwelling 2,500.00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 76,278.70 

Mile 59: 

17,735 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 2,660.25 

76,309 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 11, 446. 35 

2 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

36.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 33,182.60 

MOeOO: ' 

52,236 cubio yards excavation, at 15 cents 7,835.40 

32,381 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 4,857.15 

35,811 cubic yards excavation, Green River Cut-off, at 15 cents '5, 371. 65 

3 48-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 13,500.00 

1 double-track railway bridge 30,000.00 

Lock No. 28, 7 feet lift 40,800.00 

Lock keeper's dwelling 2, 500. 00 

58.13 acres right of way, at $100 5,813.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 111,317.20 

Mile 61: 

145,267 onbic yards excavation, at 15 cents 21,790.06 

16,214 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 2, 282. 10 

1 wasteweir 5,000.00 

148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

1 highway bridge 5,800.00 

1 single-track railway bridge 20, 000. 00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 8,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 63,648.15 

Mile 62: 

40,446 cubic yards excavation, at 15 cents 6,066.90 

51,959 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 7, 793. 85 

248-inch pipe culverts, at $4,500 9,000 00 

86.36 acres right of way, at $100 3,636.00 

Fencing 640.00 

Total 27,136.75 

Mile 62.3 r 

3,952 onbic yards excavation, at 15 cents 592.80 

31,756 cubic yards embankment, at 15 cents 4,763.40 

148-inch pipe culvert 4,500.00 

Lock No. 29, Ufeetlift 76,000.00 

Look keeper's dwelling ^600.00 



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2879 



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APPENDIX I 1 — ^REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 2879 

MUe 62.3— Gontiniiea. 

21.51 acre* right of way, at $100 13,151.00 

Feaoing 192.00 

Total 90,699.20 

Grand total 1,862,222.70 

ContingeDcies, 10 percent 186,222.27 

Total estimated cost 3,048,444.97 



S Hw rn ar ff of coti qf we$tem §eetionfrom miU 24 to miU eiJ. 

1,021,010 cabio yards exoavation, at 15 cents $153, 151.50 

2,740,153 cabic yards embankment, at 15 cents 411, 112. 95 

76, 115 cable yards new channels for Green River, at 15 cents 11, 417. 25 

llock, 14 feet lift 76,000.00 

1 lock, 11 feet lift 50,000.00 

2 locks, 10 feet lift 97,200.00 

1 lock, 9 feet lift 44,600.00 

1 lock, 8 feet lift 42,500.00 

1 lock, 7 feet lift 40,800.00 

llock, 6 feet Uft 38,600.00 

26 highway bridKOS, at $5,800 150,800.00 

1 doable-track pivot railroad bridge '. 30,000.00 

1 single-track fixedrailroad bridge 20,000.00 

35 48-inch pipe cnlverts, at $4,500 157, 500.00 

10 10-foot arch culverts, at $8,000 80,000.00 

1 12-foot arch calvert 10,000.00 

1 doable 10-foot arch culvert 15,600.00 

2 30-foot aqueducts, at $20,000 40,000.00 

1 60-foot aqueduct 30,000.00 

2 90-foot aqaedaots, at $40,000 80,000.00 

1 300- foot aqueduct 75,000.00 

3 300-foot wasteweirs, at $5,000 15,000.00 

8 lock-keepers' dwellings, at $2,500 20,000.00 

1,484.29 acres of right of way, at $100 148, 429.00 

38.3 miles fencing, at $640 24,512.00 

Grand total 1,862,222.70 

Contingencies, 10 per cent 186, 222.27 

Total estimated cost 2,048^444.97 



letter of the ohiep of engineers. 

Office of the Ghief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washingtony D. 0^ February P, 1897. 
Major: Your letter of December 16 last, on the final location of the 
western section of the Illinois and Mississippi Canal from mile 24 to 
Bock River, was dnly received and submitted to the Secretary of War 
by indorsement of December 29, recommending the. approval of the 
Green Eiver route as laid (k>wn on the maps accompanying yonr report. 
This recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War under 
date of the 1st instant. 
By command of Brig. Gen. Wilson: 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. Maokbnzis, 
Lieut. OoUj Oorpi of JBJngineen. 
Maj. W. L. Marshall, 

Corps of JEngineeri. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 



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2880 BEPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

118. 

OPERATING AND CARE OF ILLINOIS AND MISSISSIPPI CANAL: CAKAIi 
AROUND LOWER RAPIDS OF ROCK RIVER AT MILAN, ILL. 

This canal is ^ miles in length, sarmoanting a fall of 18 feet, and 
the works operated and cared for inclade 3 locks, 3 swing bridges, 7 
slaiceways, 1 arch calvert, 3 lock hoases, 1 office building, and 2 dama. 

The canal was formally opened to navigation April 17, 1895. 

On account of three tixed bridges across Bock Eiver a few miles above 
the head of the canal, its traffic is restricted to excursion craft and to 
barges and such small steam craft as may pass under the bridges. 

Proceedings are in progress to compel the city of Moline to alter its 
bridge, but the authority of the Secretary of War has been denied by 
the city of Moline. The United States district court for the northern 
district of Illinois in a preliminary opinion sustains the United States 
authority, and the city of Moline has until October, 1897, to answer the 
information and complaint of the United States. 

The canal and its accessory works have been operated and maintained 
in good order during the past year^ all lock gates and sluice gates and 
the lock keepers' houses were painted, also the fences about lock hoases 
and the signal apparatus at bridges. 

Fenders were placed on the crib approaches to guard lock; movable 
roofs for main supports of sluice gates were constructed and painted; 
willow settings planted as an experiment to protect canal banks, and 
lupin seeds planted on sandy banks for the same purpose. 

During the season of navigation vessels of 56,621 tons passed through 
the canal; 1,53L lockages were made; 1,151 passengers and 9,583 tons 
of freight passed through. 

The freight was mainly coal. The amount of it is limited by the 
obstructive bridges, especially the Moline Wagon Bridge, but the coal 
by canal controls the price at Davenport and vicinity, and this result 
has been in effect ever since the opening of the canal. A reduction 
of price of from 3 to 4 cents per bushel, or approximately $1 per ton, 
on all soft coal used has resulted, which has already justified the con- 
struction of this part of the canal as an independent work. 

The change in the Moline Bridge will make this canal an important 
line of transportation for coal. 

There was expended during the year ending June 30, 1897, $4,752.46| 
exclusive of outstanding liabilities, $869.70. 

DiBhur9efMniB, JUoal year 1897. 

Operating locks and bridges $2,761.94 

Dredginff at entrance to lower lock 952. 12 

Care and repair of property and plant 530. 26 

Superintendence and office 469.93 

Property 38.21 

Total 4,752.46 

Money statement 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended (outstanding) $43.61 

July 1, 1896, aUotment for fiscal year 6,500.00 

6,543.61 
June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 4, 752.46 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 1,791.15 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities 869. 70 

July 1, 1897, balance ayailable 921.45 



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APPENDIX I I — BEPOBT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 



2881 



REPORT OF MR. L. L. WHEKLKR, ASSISTANT SMGINSER. 

Sterijng, III., June SO, 1897. 

Major: I have the honor to submit the following report on the operating and 
care of canal aronnd Lower Rapids of Rock River during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1897. 

The canal was closed to navigation bv ice on November 27 and opened again March 
27. No serious accident occurred in the operation of the canal and the condition 
of the banks and structures is practically the same as at date of last report. A 
heavy run of ice last March, followed by a high stage of water, passed without 
damaging the works except that the bottom of the river was eroded below the south 
dam. The river is still at too high a stage to permit a thorough examination of the 
river bed to be made. The levels were maintained during the winter und permits 
were sold for cutting ice from the canal, and the proceeds, $64, transmitted to 
Chicago. 

All of the lock gates and sluice gates were painted. The three lock-keepers' 
houses were given two coats of paint and the roofs also painted. The signal appara- 
tus at the bridges was cleaned, ad^|usted, and paiuted. The fences about houses 
and grounds were painted. Fenders were placed on the crib approaches to the 
guard lock. 

Movable roofs for Taintor gates were designed, materials purchased, and roofs for 
the three gates at guard lock built. The house at Lock 36 was struck by lightning, 
a chimney thrown down and other small damage done. The necessary repairs were 
made. 

A number of willow settings were planted as an experiment in protecting embank- 
ments against wave wash, and some lupin seeds were sown as an experiment in 
covering sandy banks with vegetation. 

The commerce through the canal is almost entirely confined to the transportation 
of conl from the mines along Rock River to the cities oil the Mississippi. The coal 
trade Is steadily on the incresiso and before the end of the present season will reach 
considerable dimensions, provided the boats are able to reacli the mines. The Moline 
wagon bridge so obstructs navigation that if Rock River should be at even a 
medium stage, the boats now engaged in the eoal trade would not be able to pass 
under it. 

Herewith is a table showing commerce through the canal since April 17, 1895, the 
date when it was opened to navigation. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

L. L. WiiEELEU, AsHatant Engineer, 

MaJ. W. L. Marshall, 

Corpi of Engineer; U, 8, A, 



Traffic on ike weetem section Illinois and Mississippi Canal since Jpril 17, 1895, 







Year ending Jnne 30— 




1805. 


1896. 


1897. 




............................ namber . 


24 

858 

879 

186 

8.539 

6 


150 
115 
4,065 
14.255 
562 
3,634 
1,865 


389 


Barges 


do 


831 


8team boats 


............................... tons 


10, 037 

46,584 

1,531 

1 161 


Bargra 


do 


Loc Kages 


............. . ... ...nnnibor 


Passencers 


do 


Freight 


_ tonti. 


9,583 





I I 9. 

REMOVING SUNKEN VESSELS OR CRAFT OBSTRUCTING OR ENDANGERING 

NAVIGATION. 

On November 10, 1896, the steam canal barge OAtna, aboat 59 tons 
net tonnage, while being towed up the North Branch, Chicago Eiver, 
sunk in one of the draws of the bridge at Chicago avenue and totally 
obstructed navigation through that draw. 
ENG 97 181 



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2882 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

Notice was given to owner and proposals invited for removing and 
disposing of the wreck, by public advertisement dated November 23, 
1896. Proposals were opened December 23, 1896, and the contract 
awarded to the Dunham Towing and Wrecking Company of Chicago, 
at $495, under which contract the wreck was removed, towed out into 
the lake and sunk in 60 feet of water about January 14, 1897. An old 
boiler and hand steering wheel were saved from the wreck and sold on 
May 10, 1897, at public auction to the higljest bidder for $4.10, which 
was deposited to the credit of the United States Treasurer on account 
of appropriation ^^Eemoving sunken vessels or craft obstructing or 
endangering navigation, indefinite." 

Money statement 

To allotment (E.D. File No. J^i*^) $549.71 

By advertising $28.50 

By printing specifications 25.00 

By amount paid contractor 495.00 

548.50 

By outstanding liabUities June 30, 1897* 1.21 

549.71 



I I ID. 



PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF UPPER ILLINOIS RIVER AND LOWER 
DES PLAINES RIVER. ILLINOIS, WITH A VIEW TO EXTENSION OF NAV- 
IGATION FROM ILLINOIS RIVER TO LAKE MICHIGAN AT OR NEAB 
CHICAGO. 

[Printed in House Doo. No. 333, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session.] 

Office of the Chief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washington^ D. 0., March 2^ 1897. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the accompanying report of Jan- 
uary 27, 1897, by Maj. W. L. Marshall, Corps of Engineers, of the results 
of a preliminary examination of the upper Illinois Eiver and lower 
Des Plaines River, Illinois, with a view to extension of navigation from 
Illinois River to Lake Michigan, at or near Chicago, made in compliance 
with requirements of the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

Major Marshall states that the locality embraces an important com- 
mercial route between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River system, 
and its utility and worthiness have long been recognized by Congress. 
The division engineer, Col. Henry M. Robert, Corps of Engineers, is 
of the opinion that the upper Illinois and lower Des Plaines rivers are 
worthy of improvement, and I concur in his views. 

It is estimated that the cost of the necessary survey and preparation 
of detailed plans of* improvement will be $75,000. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Oen.y Chief of Ungineers, U. 8. Army. 
Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 

* Telegrams to and from Washington, accounts for which were sent to Washington 
for payment (G. O. No. 8, A. G. O., 1896) December 18, 1896, and January 8, 1897, 



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appendix i i — ^report of major marshall. 2883 

bbpobt of maj. w. l. marshall, corps of enoineers. 

United States Engineer Office, 

OhicagOj III,,, January 27, 1897. 

General: In accordance with yoar letter dated August 11, 1896, 1 
have the honor to submit the following report upon a preliminary exami- 
nation of ** the upper Illinois Kiver and lower Des Plaines River, with 
a view to extension of navigation from Illinois River to Lake Michigan 
at or near Chicago,^' directed by the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

With reference to this proposed waterway I have to say that quite 
detailed surveys have heretofore been made, dating back to 1825 and 
in more recent years, by the following officers: 

Gen. J. H. Wilson, 1867, report published in House Ex. Doc. !No. 16, 
Fortieth Congress, iirst session. 

Colonel Macomb, Corps of Engineers, Report Chief of Engineers, 
1876, Volume II, page 525. 

M^. W. H. H. Benyaurd, Corps of Engineers, Report Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1884, page 1958. 

Board of Engineers on Hennepin Canal and Illinois and Michigan 
Canal, Report Chief of Engineers, 1887, page 2125. 

Capt. W. L Marshall, Corps of Engineers, Report Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1890, page 2419. 

The latter reports are in so full detail that little can now be added to 
them by any preliminary examinations, as such are understood by me, 
and all that can be submitted now is simply a repetition of a small 
part of the information contained in these reports, with a brief state- 
ment of the conditions brought about by local engineering works con- 
structed for drainage purposes by the trustees of the sanitary district 
of Chicago. 

Any waterway constructed will extend from Lake Michigan, at the 
rooutli of either the Chicago or Calumet rivers, and terminate at Lasalle 
qr Utica, on the Illinois River. The routes are of about equal lengths 
from navigable water in Calumet or Chicago rivers to the present head 
of navigation in the Illinois RiVer, 97 miles. 

The Illinois and Michigan Canal is now the only navigable connec- 
tion, and extends from Chicago River, about 5 miles above its mouth, to 
Lasalle. It is 96 miles long, 60 feet wide at the water surface, 36 feet 
wide at bottom in earth excavation, and 48 feet wide in rock, with locks 
110 feet long, 18 feet wide, having 6 feet of water over miter sills. It 
is navigated by boats about 97 feet long, 17 feet 6 inches wide, and 5 
feet draft. The lockage is 141 feet, made by fifteen locks. 

The sanitary district of Chicago has nearly completed a canal for 
drainage purposes from Chicago River at Roby street to near Lockport 
from 18 to 22 feet in depth below the proposed water surface, and vary- 
ing in width from 160 feet in rock to more than 200 feet in earth, a length 
of 28 miles, which may be made available as part of any enlarged water- 
way over the route in question, and is of much greater dimensions than 
required by any commercial canal adapted for the conditions and 
requirements of present or prospective traffic by water between Lake 
Michigan and the region along the water courses of the Mississippi 
Valley. To comply with the law of the State of Illinois, it has been con- 
structed of a capacity to discharge 600,000 cubic feet per minute through 
the section excavated in rock, and 300,000 cubic feet per minute through- 
out the earth section. The law requires a discharge of 20,000 cubic feet 
per minute for each 100,000 inhabitants of the drainage distriot| which 



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2884 REPOBT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ABMT. 

coDdition at present requires more than 300,000 cubic feet and in a few 
years will require the full 600,000 cubic feet discharge through the canaL 
The taking of water from Lake Michigan , however, for drainage purposes 
(or rather for dilution of sewage) has not yet been authorized by Con- 
gress. This deep channel abruptly termiuates at Lockport, and it is 
proposed to discharge the water through controlling gates into a non- 
navigable tail race down the slope to and through the city of Joliet into 
the lower Des Plaines and Illinois rivers. Any navigable channel, 
therefore, constructed in continuation of the drainage canal must con- 
nect with this canal at Lockport and terminate at or above Lasalle, 
about 66 miles distant, but the lockage after the opening of the drainage 
caual will be reduced by the amount that the increas^ discharge will 
raise the water surface of the Illinois Eiver at Lasalle, increased by the 
slope in the drainage canal from Lake Michigan to Lockport, or, say, at 
least 12 feet when the drainage canal is actually discharging. This will 
result in reducing the number of locks required in any of the proposed 
schemes by one, but will substitute an obstruction due to the current 
in the canal and river, repeated in each pool of the river, if the natural 
channel be improved. 

In carrying the improvement from Lockport to the head of naviga- 
tion on the Illinois Eiver at Lasalle or Utica, it is necessary to either 
practically enlarge the Illinois and Michigan Canal throughout or adopt 
a mixed improvement by canal from Lockport to Lake Joliet, 8 miles; 
canal around Marseilles Eapids, 2miles; and improve the upper Illinois 
Biver the remaining 54 miles to (Ttica by locks and dams. It has been 
generally conceded that throughout the distance from either Chicago 
River or Calumet River to Lake Joliet an artificial channel or canal 
must be constructed or the existing canal enlarged. From this point 
to Utica a, choice of routes, either by enlargement of existing canal or 
by river, has been presented. The river route was rejected by the orig- 
inal projectors of the existing water route, but was preferred by Major 
Benyaurd in his report of survey made in 1883 (Report Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1884, p. 1958), whose conclusions were accepted without question 
by the Board of Engineers of 1886. HJ3 estimates from Joliet to Lasalle 
for locks 350 feet long, 75 feet wide, 7 feet deep, was $3,433,562, and for 
locks the size of the Hennepin Canal, 170 by 30 feet by 7 feet depth, 
$1,975,446; but as there are nine locks to be built, and the locks and 
dams already built on the lower Illinois cost more than $500,000 each, 
this estimate is evidently much too small even for 7-foot draft. In his 
report it was assumed without question that the river route is practi- 
cable at all stages of water. The hydraulics of the river were not at all 
considered, nor the conditions under which the works must now be con- 
structed, due to a probable low-water discharge ten times the natural 
low- water discharge of the stream. 

In the 64 miles from Joliet to Lasalle the river's descent is 90 feet, 
distributed unequally in pools and rapids. Its low- water discharge is 
to be increased by 10,000 cubic feet per second, which will make the 
construction and repairs of locks and dams more difficult and expen- 
sive, and its extreme high-water discharge will be increased to proba- 
bly eighty times its present low- water discharge, or to near 80,000 cubic 
feet per second. A current will be introduced into the so-called slack- 
water system even at low water, and at stages approaching extreme 
high water hydraulic formulae indicate that the improved stream with 
such slopes a^ will exist will be not navigable at all by ascending craft 
over 22 miles of the 43 miles between the mouth of the Kankakee 
River, where the Illinois River is formed, and Utica, the head of the 



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APPENDIX I I — REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 2885 

slack water on the IlIiDois River. In this coDnection reference is made 
to the discussion in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers, 1890, 
l)age 2439, and on })age 2470. 

There are four ways of constructing a navigable waterway via the 
valley of the Illinois and Des Plaines rivers below Joliet practicable 
at all stages of water. 

First. By canaling past the 22 miles where the high-water velocities 
are excessive. 

Second. By constructing the dams so high or so short that the area 
of spillways shall be small in con)])ari8on with the cross section of the 
pools, either of which means wide overflowed areas. 

Third. By much enlarging the natural waterway throughout the 
pools by excavation. 

Fourth. By enlarging the existing canal or constructing another 
throughout the entire line. 

With the understanding that the waterway can not be navigated at 
the highest stages of water, which are infrequent and of short dura- 
tion, the route by the river may be constructed at much less expense 
with capacious locks than a canal of similar capacity for passing ves- 
sels; but the river improvement in any event should stop at Lake Joliet, 
thence to Lake Michigan by canal. This would involve the construc- 
tion of an enlarged canal for 8 miles from Lake Joliet to the terminus 
of the navigable portion of the Chicago drainage canal. 

DIMENSIONS. 

In regard to the capacity of the improvement, the act of June 3, 1896, 
directing this preliminary survey states its object to be " the extension 
of navigation from Illinois River to Lake Michigan '^ or the extension of 
river navigation to the lake, not lake navigation to the river. The 
distinction is important in view of the persistent forcing of the project 
for a 14-foot channel from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River, 
when it is well known that the bulk of the commerce of the Mississippi 
system of rivers is carried in vessels of 8 feet and less draft; that the 
Mississippi improvements are directed to securing 4 feet of water at 
low water from St. Paul to the mouth of the Illinois, 6 feet thence 
to St. Louis, 8 feet thence to Cairo, 10 feet thence to the mouth of the 
river, and that these plans are not only far from attainment, but that 
the Mississippi River Commission, after laboring for fifteen years and 
expending many millions of dollars, have decided by a majority vote 
that the permanent improvement of the Lower Mississippi River for 10 
feet depth of navigation is impracticable, and have embarked upon an 
attempt to so alter the distribution of part of the cubic miles of sand 
moving along the Mississippi, by dredges of enormous capacity, as 
to maintain a navigable channel of such depth across the bars. What 
success will attend this effort is still for the future to disclose. 

The improvement of the Illinois River, the navigation of which it is 
in question to extend to Lake Michigan, has heretofore been directed 
toward securing by locks and dams, and dredging, a navigable channel 
7 feet in depth at low water from the Mississippi River to Lasalle, a 
distance of 225 miles. 

The preliminary locks and dams have been built, but sufficient money 
has not been given for dredging the crests of bars in the im)o1s. At 
present the navigable depth is about 4 feet at low water, and about 
4,500,000 cubic yards dredging is required to attain 7 feet. 

Of the Illinois River works of navigation, the State of Illinois owns. 



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2886 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ASMT. 

controlB, and collects tolls over 90 miles, and the United States has 
provided a free canalized river for 136 miles. The State of Illinois also 
owns and collects tolls over the 96 miles of canal between Chicago and 
Lasalle. It is evident from these fact« that a waterway that will meet 
the requirements of the Mississippi system of navigation may be mncli 
less in depth and cost than the proposed 14-foot channel. The line 
occupies no very urgent route of transportation. There is no large and 
pressing balk of heavy commodities demanding cheap transportation 
over the line, such, for instance, as between Buffalo and the sea, <Mr 
between the Pittsburg district and the Great Lakes. The most that 
may be expected of it is the control of cost of transportation by rail so 
far as to limit maximum freight charges over competing routes. 

The dimensions of the waterways should then be applied to meet 
the demands of the situation and probable commerce that will seek the 
route. 

In the Eeport of the Ghief of Engineers for 1890 this subject is further 
discussed, and estimates are made for an 8-foot channel and also for a 
14-foot channel with locks 350 feet long and 76 feet width of lock 
chamber. 

It is not likely that the unwieldy and frail Mississippi River boats 
would ever make use of a canal IGO feet wide, as long as one from Lake 
Joliet to Chicago, especially when there will be encountered a current 
therein. The bulk of the freights on the Mississippi system of rivers 
is carried on barges, in tows, and not in the holds or on decks of the 
steamboats. 

The trustees of the Chicago sanitary district are contemplating con- 
structing their canal with fixed bridges with 22 feet clear headroom 
over the canal. This is ample headroom for a commercial barge canal 
of the largest capacity, and the difference in cost between fixed and 
draw bridges crossing the canal between Chicago and Lake Joliet, with 
a reasonable allowance for difference in cost of operation, is probably 
sufBcient to construct the canal from the present terminus of the drain- 
age canal to Lake Joliet of from 8 to 10 feet depth, with locks suit- 
able for the passage of the largest Mississippi Eiver barges. Missis- 
sippi Kiver towboats could then carry their tows to Lake Joliet, then 
transfer them to more handy tugs for passage through the more ob- 
structive canal portion of the route. For an 8- foot channel from Lock- 
port to Lake Joliet the estimJAted cost in 1890, exclusive of bridges, 
was $3,900,000. Swing bridges from Chicago to Lake Joliet were esti- 
mated at $3,663,000. The cost of operating the swing bridges would 
far exceed the cost of operating the locks, without any corresponding 
advantages for a commercial canal, other than sentimental, over the 
part of the route where towing on the Mississippi Eiver style can not 
be applied. 

CONCLUSION. 

1. In my opinion the surveys alre<ady made are in sufficient detail for 
preliminary estimates of the cost of any suitable extension of the navi- 
gation of the Illinois River to Lake Michigan that does not involve 
enlargement of the Illinois and Michigan Canal from Joliet to Lasalle. 

2. That prior to embarking in any such improvement it is advisable 
to secure from the State of Illinois the State works along the Illinois 
liiver and such parts of the Illinois and Michigan Canal as may be 
utilized; also to thoroughly complete the lower Illinois River improve- 
ment which has slowly progressed for thirty years, resulting in diver- 
sion of water traffic to rail. 



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APPENDIX t 1 — ^EEPOtiT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 288? 

3. That the dimensions and route of the proposed extension should 
be examined into and decided by a competent board of engineers, with 
means and authority to make such additional surveys as their proper 
wlightenment demands. The expenses and costs of such a board and 
of the surveys are estimated at $^,000; if detailed plans, etc., are to 
be made, at $75,000. 

The locality embraces an important commercial route between the 
Great Lakes and the Mississippi Eiver system, and its utility and 
worthiness has long been recognized by Congress. 

Preliminary estimates of cost on various plans have been heretofore 
made, and reports containing them are referred to hereinbefore. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W, L. Marshall, 
Major, Corps of Engineers. 

Brig. Gen. W. P. Obaiohill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. S. A. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 

[First indorsement.] 

XJ. S. Engineer Office, Northwest Division, 

Netc YorJcy February 20^ 1897. 
Bespectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States 
Army. 

I am of opinion that the Upper Illinois and Lower Des Plaines rivers 
are worthy of improvement with a view to extension of navigation from 
Illinois Biver to Lake Michigan at or near Chicago. 

Henry M. Eobebt, 
Oolonelj Corps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 



II II. 



SURVEY OF WOLF LAKE AND RIVER, ILLINOIS AND INDIANA, WITH 
REFERENCE TO THEIR NAVIGATION IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
WATERS OF LAKE MICHIGAN. 

[Frinted in Honse Doo. No. 157, Fifty-foarth CongrMs, aeoond seMion.] 

Office of the Chief of Engineers, 

United States Army, 
Washington^ D. C, January J2j 1897. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit the accompanying copy of report of 
December 24, 1896, with map,* by Maj. W. L. Marshall, Corps of Engi- 
neers, of the results of a survey of Wolf Lake and River, Illinois and 
Indiana, with reference to their navigation in connection with the waters 
of Lake Michigan, made to comply with provisions of the river and 
harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

Several reports have heretofore been made between 1873 and 1893 by 

this office concerning this locality and all have been adverse to the 

expenditure of public money in the construction of a harbor at this point. 

M%jor Marshall presents a very clear and concise description of the 

* Not reprinted. Printed in House Doo. No. 157, Fifty-fourth Congress, second session. 

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2888 REPOKT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

lake and river, together with labor involved in the construction of a 
harbor at this point, but remarks that — 

There are no niannfactnring establisliinents or enterprises requiring); transportation 
hj water witbin a mile of the borders of Wolf Lake, nor establishments of any 
kind other than three ice houses along its banks. 

Major Marshall further states that there is no navigation on Wolf 
Lake and River, and navigation by other craft than rowboats with flat 
bottoms and slight draft is impossible on Wolf Lake. To adapt Wolf 
Lake and River to such navigation as may be possible in connection 
with Lake Michigan, without creating a navigable artificial system, 
requires only the excavation of a trench wide enough for the passage 
of a rowboat across the bar at the mouth of the river and 2 feet deep, 
at an expense of about $50, but as this can not have been the intent of 
Congress in ordering the survey he submits a plan providing for con- 
structing an entrance to the river and lake 20 feet in depth, extending 
from 21 feet in Lake Michigan between piers 300 feet apart; for deep 
ening, widening, and straightening Wolf River; constructing five swing 
bridges across the channel with drawspans of 100 feet each; building 
bulkheads or docks in the immediate vicinity of these bridges; con- 
structing a turning or winding basin in Wolf Lake, and for dredging a 
channel 20 feet deep and 300 feet wide, 7,400 linear feet in Wolf Lake. 
The estimated cost of this work is $1,395,042. 

For reasons given. Major Marshall states that in his opinion the 
improvement of navigation of Wolf Lake and River, with reference 
to their navigation in connection with the waters of Lake Michigan, is 
not now a public necessity, and that the locality at this time is not 
worthy of improvement by the General Government. His opinion is 
concurred in by Col. Henry M. Robert, Corps of Engineers, the Division 
Engineer. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. P. Cratghill, 
Brig. Oen., Chief of JEngirieen. 

Hon. Daniel S. Lamont, 

Secretary of War. 



beport op maj. w. l, marshall, corps op engineers. 

United States Engineer Offioe, 

Chicago, 1 11.^ December J24, 1896. 

General: I have the honor to submit the following report upon a 
survey of "Wolf Lake and Uiver,"Hlinois and Indiana, "with reference 
to their navigation in connection with the waters of Lake Michigan,'^ 
required by the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896. 

Numerous reports have heretofore been made concerning this locality, 
as follows: (1) Maj. D. C. Houston, Corps of Engineers, in 1873; (2) 
Maj. George L. Gillespie, Corps of Engineers (see Report Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1875, p. 241) ; (3) by Maj. G. J. Lydecker, Corps of Engineers (see 
Report Chief of Engineers, 1880, p. 1999); (4) by Maj. W. H. H. Ben- 
yaurd. Corps of Engineers (Report Chief of Engineers, 1885, p. 2056), 
and by me in 1893 (see Report Chief of Engineers, 1893, p. 2851). 

Majors Gillespie and Lydecker made estimates for a harbor entrance 
at the mouth of Wolf River on various plans, but the conclusions 
reached in all these reports have been adverse to the expenditure oi 
money in the construction of a harbor at this point. 

Tlie present survey was restricted to work necessary for locating and 
estimating for a full improvement of this vicinity, and was made by 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 2889 

Assistant G. A. M. Li\jeDcrantz under my direction, wliose report, with 
maps* and estimates showing the works proposed by me, is herewith. 

There has been no material change in the condition of this vicinity 
in the past twenty years, except a gradual recession and shoaling of the 
so-called lake and river. 

Wolf Lake is one of a series of slight depressions between Grand 
and Calumet rivers and Lake Michigan, covering an area of 3 square 
miles, more or less, and of an average depth of about 2 J feet, with a maxi- 
mum depth of about 4 feet, bordered by a growth of sedge and weeds. 
Its old outlet into Lake Michigan is closed by a bar near its mouth. 
This outlet — Wolf River, 1 mile, approximately, in length — averages 5 
feet, perhaps, in depth, with an occasional deeper hole. It is crossed by 
four railroad bridges and one street highway bridge. Neither Wolf 
Lake nor Wolf Eiver is a navigable water of the IJnited States, but 
the submerged lands are all private property, and parts of them are 
now being tilled in by the owners to make land. 

There are no manufacturing establishments or enterprises requiring 
transportation by water within a mile of the borders of Wolf Lake, nor 
establishments of any kind other than three ice houses along its banks. 

The act of Congress is so indefinite that J am unable to decide its 
intent. There is no navigation on Wolf Lake and River, and naviga- 
tion by other craft than rowboats with flat bottoms and slight draft is 
impossible on Wolf Lake. To adapt Wolf Lake and River to such 
navigation as may be possible in connection with Lake Michigan with- 
out creating a navigable artificial system requires only the excavation 
of a trench wide enough for the passage of a rowboat across the bar at 
the month of Wolf River and 2 feet deep, at an expense of about $50, 
which can not be the intent of Congress in ordering the survey. 

I have therefore laid out a harbor that is now demanded by the gen- 
eral navigation of Lake Michigan, to accommodate the largest as well 
as the smallest vessels, and as the act relates to the navigation of 
Wolf Lake and River, which lie inland, I have projected the work 
from deep water in Lake Michigan to the southern extremity of Wolf 
Lake. All this work within the shore line is located on private prop- 
erty, and cuts five highways where expensive swing bridges must be 
built by the United States unless the owners of these highways vol- 
untarily assume the cost. No estimates are made for rights of way nor 
damages by reason of the work. 

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS. 

It is proposed to construct an entrance to the river and lake, extend- 
ing from 21 feet in Lake Michigan, between piers 300 feet apart, by 
dredging to a depth of 20 feet; to deepen, widen, and straighten Wolf 
River; to construct five swing bridges across the channel with draw- 
spans of 100 feet each, and to build bulkheads or docks in the immedi- 
ate vicinity of these bridges; to construct a turning or winding basin 
in Wolf Lake, and to dredge a channel 20 feet deep and 300 feet wide, 
7,400 linear feet, in Wolf Lake. 

The detailed estimates are given in Mr. Liljencrantz's report and may 
be stated as follows: 

1. From shore line to deep water in Lake Michigan $274, 868 

2. From shore line to first bridge 25, 190 

3. Through the fonr railroad bridges Ssis, 840 

4. Dredging Wolf River and constrncting one street bridge 333, 344 

6. Dredging channel and basin in Wolf Lake 404,800 

Total 1,396,042 

* One not printed. 



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2890 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

The cost of the iiuprovemeiit of this vicinity may then be estimated at 
somewhere between $50 and $1,395,042, depending apon the character 
of the navigation to be snbserved and the extent of the improvement. 

I do not know any public interest that at this time maybe subserved 
by the construction of a harbor at this point. It is not known that 
any interest, public or private, engaged in or dependent upon transpor- 
tation by water demands the construction of a harbor here. The lands 
in the close vicinity are all vacant when not occupied by roadbeds and 
ice houses, and nine-tenths are owned by not exceeding ten individuals 
and corporations. The city of Hammond, Ind., desires a channel to 
Lake Michigan, but its industries are not situated on Wolf Lake. A 
channel by way of Wolf Lake would be their direct outlet. 

Undoubtedly a capacious harbor may readily be constructed here, 
and, should it be built, the lands bordering the lake would be much 
increased in value and enterprises that could use the harbor facilities 
would perhaps spring up. Whether the increase in valaes of lands and 
the uses of the harbor would be of such general benefit to the people 
of the United States as to justify the cost, is a matter for the consid- 
eration of Congress. This locality is about 3 miles from the Calumet 
Harbor and 15 miles from Chicago Harbor. Calumet Eiver has been 
improved farther than it has been docked by landowners, and its 
capacity for handling commerce has not been even approximately 
reached. 

In my opinion the improvement of the navigation of " Wolf Lake 
and River,^' Indiana and Illinois, "with reference to their navigation 
in connection with the waters of Lake Michigan," is not now a public 
necessity, and that the locality at this time is not worthy of improve- 
ment by the General Government. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. L. MiiRSHALL, 

Major ^ Corps of Engineers. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. Craighill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. A. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 

[First iodorsement.] 

U. S. ENaiNEEB Office, Northwest Division, 

Neir TorJcy December 29^ 1896, 
Eespcctfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States 
Army. 

I concur with Major Marshall in the opinion that the "improvement 
of the navigatiop of Wolf Lake and Eiver, Indiana and Illinois, with 
reference to their navigation in connection with the waters of Lake 
Michigan, is not now a public necessity, and that the locality at this 
time is not worthy of improvement by the General Goveriimeiit." 

Henry M. Robert, 
Colonel, Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer, 



BEPORT OF MR. Q. A. M. LXLJENCRANTZ, ASSISTANT ENGINEBR. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Chicago, III., December 14, 1896. 
Major: I have the honor to submit herewith a report on an '' examination of 
Wolf Lake and River, Illinois and Indiana/^ made under your direction in pumuance 
of an act of Congress of June 3, 1896 : 

I'he examination was made between the 15th and 23d of October last and con- 
sisted in — 
1. Soundings taken in Lake Michigan opposite the former outlet of Wolf River 



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APPENDIX I I — ^REPORT OF MAJOR MARSHALL. 2891 

(tliere is none now) between the shore and a depth in the lake of 20 feet below low 
water of 1847, which depth was foond at a distance of approximately one-half mile 
ftom the shore. 

2. Determining the location and elevation of the four railroads running along 
the lake shore and crossing, on timber trestles, the river bed. 

3. Locating the Indiana bonlevard and bridge, over which mns a double-track 
electric railroad, the Hammond, Whiting and East Chicago Electric Road. 

4. Locating the contours of and taking soundings in Wolf River from the Pitts- 
burg, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway to Wolf Lake, together with the ice houses 
and some of the smaller buildings in the immediate vicinity. 

5. LocatftBg t^e east shoin of Wolf Lake and running sigaag lines of soundings in 
this lake, and finally — 

6. Locating the boundary line between the States of Illinois and Indiana and 
some works of improvement made at the southerly end of the river; also locating 
some of the railroads in the vicinity. 

SOUNDINGS IN LAKE MICHIGAN. 

The area covered by soundings was 1,300 feet in the direction of the shore line and 
2,700 feet out irom the shore, or about 80^ acres. The direction of the shore line at 
this place is about N. 40^ W., i. e., running in a nearly northwesterly direction. 
The 20-foot contour (referring to Chicago city datum) was reached at an average 
distance of 2,400 feet from shore and runs nearly parallel to it. The bottom, as 
far as ascertained, is composed of sand, but clay will undoubtedly be found below, 
as is usnal along this part of the lake shore. At the time of the sounding the water 
level was 0.5 foot below low water of 1847. 

INSHORE WORK. 

From the shore line to the first railroad, the Chicago, Lake Shore and Eastern 
Railway, is a distance of 300 feet. This is at present a siugle-traek road, but a 
second track is to be built, the grading being nearly done. All the other three are 
double-track roads. The difierent roads are at about the following distances apart 
along the proposed line of improvement: Between the first, the northernmost, and 
the second, 140 feet; between the second and third, 120 feet; between the third and 
fourth, 190 feet. 

The roads and their track elevations abovQ Chicago city datum at the northwest- 
erly ends of their trestles respectively are — 

Elevatioii* 

1. Chicago, Lake Shore and Eastern Railway (or Hammond and Blue Island 

Railroad) 8.04 

2. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 9.34 

3. Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway 9.93 

4. Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railway 8.29 

Near the old mouth of the river is a pile pier 600 feet long, built by the Knicker- 
bocker Ice Company, out into the lake. At the foot of this pier is a device for pump- 
ing water into Wolf River from Lake Michigan in the interest of the ice houses along 
the river banks. For the same purpose the connection of Wolf Lake with the Calu- 
met Hiver, via Hyde Lake, h^ been closed up, thus keeping the water level in Wolf 
Lake independent of the outside fiuctuations. As is usnal m this vicinity, the shore 
north of the ^ier has advanced^ about 250 feet since 1879, and that south tnereof has 
retreated during the same period to the extent of about 75 feet, at » point 500 feet 
south of the pier. 

WOLF RIVBR. 

There is at present no resemblance of a river save a nearly dry river bed with a 
few shallow-water i>ools therein north of the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago 
Railway Bridge. Soundings were taken from south of this bridge. 

About 700 feet south of the said bridge the river is crossed by the Indiana boule- 
vard, which has a fixed bridge, over which runs a double- track electric road, leading 
to Hammond and Whiting. South of the Boulevard Bridge the river makes a sharp 
turn to the southeast, and 600 feet farther again to a sou Ui westerly course, running 
in about this direction to the second ice house, located at a point formerly the south 
limit of the river proper. The artificial formation of land in the lake has, however, 
extended the channel in a due south direction about 2,300 feet farther into the lake. 
Tlie average depth of the river channel is from 4 to 5 feet, with in some places greater| 
in others less depth. The bottom consists chiefly of mud, with underlying sand and 
probably olay. 

The commercial enterprises along the river are the three Knickerbocker ice houses 
and their aoziliary works, such as slips, etc. 



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2892 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

WOLF LAKB. 

Wolf Lake is divided into nearly two equal parts by the Illinois and Indiana State 
line, the greater part being in the State of Illinois. The average depth of the lake 
was 2^ feet at the stage of water fountl at the time of taking soundings. Reduced 
to Chicago City datum, it would be 0.6 foot less. The slope of the bottom along the 
shores is so slight as to make the determination of a definite shore line impracticable. 
Weeds and rushes grow in abundance along the shores. This is also the case more 
or less in all parts of the lake, but a small steam craft provided with revolving knives 
is engaged in cutting down these weeds in the interest of the ice-making. The bot- 
tom of the lake consists of sand, and the water therein is generally clear. The 
original area of the lake has been reduced by, in round numbers, 126 to 128 2usres, 28 
of wbich through the construction of the land at the mouth of river and 98 to 100 
acres through the construction, in the lake itself and along its easterly shoi-e, of the 
Hammond and Blue Island Railroad, and, at the south end, of a branch of the 
Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chicago Railwav. As heretofore stated, the connection 
between this lake and Calumet River, via Hyde Lake, has been closed by a dam to 
maintain a higher level in Wolf Lake. At the south end of the lake aud on its east 
shore is the Hammond Packing Company's ice house. No other commercial enter- 
prise of any kind was found in the immediate vicinity of the lake. 

MAPS. 

Two maps have been prepared to show the results of the examination. The first 
^hows Wolf River, with soundings therein, principal buildings at or near its banks, 
and the roads crossing its bed; also soundings in Lake Michigan at the north end 
of the river and soundings in the north part of Wolf Lake at the south end of the 
river ; also, in red ink, the proposed improvements of the river with a harbor entrance 
from Lake Michigan. This map is made to a scale of 1 inch = 150 feet. 

The second map shows the territory including Wolf Lake and river, together with 
the adjoining lakes, the contours of which latter, as well as of the west shore of 
Wolf Lake, were copied from the ''Sheffield Association's Survey of 1874.'' It also 
shows the railroads crossing the neighboring territory and the proposed improve- 
ments. This map is made to a scale of 800 feet to the inch. 

The soundings in Lake Michigan have reference to the ''plane of reference for the 
coast charts of Lake Michigan," in compliance with orders from the Chief of Engi- 
neers, United States Army, dated December 4, 1893. This plane is 3.06 feet below 
high water of 1838 and 1.8 feet above Chicago City datum, or low water of 1847. 

The soundings of Wolf Lake and river, neither of which is connected with either 
Lake Michigan or Calumet River, are referred to the water level at the time of the 
survey, which was 0.6 foot above Chicago Citv datum. The water levol in Lake 
Michigan was at the same time 0.5 foot below the same datum plane. 

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS. 

The proposed improvements come under three heads, viz: 

1. The harbor entrance, 

2. The river channel, and 

3. The inner harbor, or the improvement of Wolf Lake. 

It is proposed to make the improvements conform to the advanced demands of the 
present day and to what might reasonably be expected as the needs of the near future. 

A channel 20 feet deep below low water of 1847 and 300 feet in width is therefore 
provided for, to be formed by the construction of two parallel piers about perpen- 
dicular to the shore line. The existing pier might possibly have been made use of, 
but in the first place this would make a very uudesirable angle at the crossing of 
the railroads, ana in the second place the said pier is hardly adequate for the needs 
of a first'Class harbor. It is projiosed to construct the westerly pier from the shore 
line to the 20-foot contour by building a pile breakwater 20 feet wide, with .sand- 
tight "Wakefield sheet piling," a distance of 1,150 feet, or to the 14-foot contour; 
thence a 24-foot wide crib pier 900 feet long, or to the 16- foot contour; and, finally, 
a 30-foot wide crib pier 400 feet in length, reaching to the 20-foot contour. The 
easterly pier will consist of a 20-foot pile breakwater 1,300 feet long, or from the 
shore to the 14-foot contour, and thence of a 20-foot wide crib pier 500 feet in length, 
or to the 16-foot contour— all the crib work to rest on a pile foundation and the 
channel to be dredged to a depth of 20 feet to within 25 feet from the piers, which 
are 300 feet apart. 

Between the shore line and a point 50 feet south of the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne 
and Chicago Railway track it is proposed to construct docking 900 linear feet along 
the westerly and 800 linear feet along the easterly side of the channel; four double- 



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APPENDIX I I REPORT OP MAJOR MARSHALL. 2893 

track 'railroad Hwing bridges, with double draws of not less than 100-feet wide 
openings each in the clear^ the channel to be dredged as between the outer piers. 

From this point southward only dredging is provided for, to a depth of 20 feet 
and a width of 300 feet, to and through Wolf Lake, except that a highway bridge 
of similar kind and (liiiiensions as the railroad bridges is provided for at the cross- 
ing of the Indiana boulevard. A turning basin is proposed at the north end of Wolf 
Lake, which, together with the 300 feet of the river chamnel, will beBOOfeetsqnare. 

The proposed channel lines along the river are made to conform to the natural 
shores as n<-ar as ^iractioable, except in two ^ilaces, to wit, south of Indiana boule- 
vard and near the second ice htmse, at which places it was found necessary to 
straighten the channel, as shown on the maps. 

GRNKRAL REMARKS. 

The town of Hammond, with probably Bomethinj^ like from 8,000 to 10.000 inhab- 
itants, has projected the extension of its corporate limits to the shore ot Lake Mich- 
iiran, but, owing to opposition on the part of Whiting, a short distance to the east of 
the proposed Wolf Lake Harbor, the annexation has not yet become an accomplished 
fact. The town limits reach, however, at present near to the south shores of Wolf 
Lake, and the town would probably be benefited by a short water communicntiou 
with Lake Michigan. It is also claimed that the Standard Oil Company, located 
at Whiting, would derive benefit from a well-protected harbor in the immediate 
vicinity. 

BSTIMATE8. 

The estimated cost of the proposed improvement as a whole is divided into five 
sections, as follows : 

A. From the shore line to deep water in the lake — 

2,450 linear feet pile breakwater, at $30 $73,500 

500 linear feet crib work, 20 feet wide, at $58.80 29,400 

900 linear feet crib work, 24 feet wide, at $70.20 63,180 

400 linear feet crib work, 30 feet wide, at $98 39,200 

223,000 cubic yards dredging (to 20 feet depth), at 20 cents 44, 600 

249,880 
Add 10 per cent for contingencies 24,988 

Total 274,868 

13. From the shore line to the first railroad bridge — 

450 linear feet dock, at $12 5,400 

87,500 cubic yards dredging, at 20 cents 17^500 

22,900 
Add 10 per cent for contingencies 2,290 

Total 25,190 

C. Through the railroad bridges — 

1, 250 linear feet of dock, at$12 15,000 

4 railroad swing bridges, at $71,500 each 286,000 

117, 000 cubic yards dredging, at 20 cents 23,400 

324,400 
Add 10 percent for contingencies 32,440 

Total 356y.840 

D. Dredging the river to Wolf Lake, 800 feet in width— 

7,400 linear feet dredging= 1,315,200 oubio yards, at 20 cents 263, 040 

1 highway swing bridge .' 40,000 

303,040 
Add 10 per cent for contingencies 30,304 

Total 333,344 



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2894 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ABMT. 

E. Dredgine channel and basin in Wolf Lake — * 

1,840,000 cubic yards dredging, at 20 cents $368, 000 

Add 10 per cent for contingencies 36,800 

Total 404,800 

AGGRKGATF. KSTIMATE. 

For Section A $274,868 

For Section B i 25,190 

For Section C 356,840 

Forl^ectiouD 333,344 

For Section E 404,800 

Grand total 1,395,042 

I am, Major, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

G. A. M. LiLJKNCRANTZ, 

A99i9tant Enffin 
MaJ. W. L. Marshall, 

C<n^s of £ngine<frs, U. 8. A* 



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APPENDIX J J, 



IMPROVEMENT OF MICHIGAN CITY HARBOR, INDIANA, AND OF RIVERS 
AND HARBORS ON THE EASTERN SHORE OF LAKE MICHIGAN. 



REPORT OF CAPT. C. McD. TOWNSEND, CORPS OF ENGINEERS, OFFICER 
IN CHARGE, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE SO, 1897, WITH 
OTHER DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE WORKS. 

IMPROVKMENTS. 



1. Michigan City Harbor, Indiana. 

2. St. Joseph Harbor, Michigan. 

3. St. Joseph River, Michigan. 

4. Sonth Haven Harbor, Michigan. 

5. Sangutnck Harbor, Michigan. 

6. Kalamazoo River, Michigan. 

7. Holland (Black Lake) Harbor, Mich- 

igan. 

8. Grand Haven Harbor, Michigan. 

9. Grand River, Michigan. 

10. Muskegon Harbor, Michigan. 

11. White Lake Harbor, Micnigan. 



12. Pentwater Harbor, Michigan. 

13. Lndingtiin Harbor, Michigan. 

14. Manistee Harbor, Michigan. 

15. Harbor of Ref nge at Portage Lake, 

Manistee Connty, Michigan. 

16. Frankfort Harbor, Michigan. 

17. Charlevoix Harbor, Michigan. 

18. Petoskey Harbor, Michigan. 

19. Removing sunken vessels or craft ob- 

Htmcting or endangering naviga- 
tion. 



8URVBT8. 



20. Sonth Haven Harbor, Michigan. 

21. Holland (Black Lake) Harbor, Mich- 

igan. 



22. Lndington Harbor, Michigan. 

23. Charlevoix Harbor, Michigan. 



United States Enoinebr Oppiob, 

Orand Rapids, Mich., July 20, 1897. 

General: I have the honor to submit herewith the annual reports 
relative to the works of river and harbor iiuprovement in my charge 
for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1897. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

0. McD. TOWNSEND, 

Captain, Corps of Engineers, 
Brig. Gen. John M^ Wilson, 

Chief of Engineers, U. 8. A. 



J J I. 

improvement of MICHIGAN CITY HARBOR, INDIANA. 

The improvement at this harbor dates from 1836, and has resulted in 
establishing an '^ inner harbor" for local commerce and partly completed 
an " outer harbor," designed to facilitate entrance to the former and to 
sei-ve as a harbor of refuge. 

The inner harbor. — This has been made by widening and deepening 
Trail Creek and protecting the dredged channel by revetments and piers 
extending to deep water in Lake Michigan. Before improvement the 



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2896 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

creek was a narrow, shallow stream, whoso mouth was obstructed by a 
bar through which a crooked channel from 3 to 4 feet deep could be 
found under favorable conditions. The work done between 1836 and 
1869 gave a good entrance channel with a depth of 12 feet at mean 
stages of water in Lake Michigan. 

From 1869 to 1882 nothing was done on this portion of the harbor 
except to make occasional repairs to the piers and dredge the channel 
as needed to maintain the requisite navigable depth. In 1882 the proj- 
ect of operations was modified to provide for extending the harbor 
upstream by dredging so far as the local authorities or property owners 
might build substantial revetments of approved design; in this way 
the total length of the inner harbor had grown to be about IJ miles 
(9,159 feet) by the beginning of the last fiscal year. The channel depth 
at entrance was then 13.5 feet, and above the entrance varied from 12 
to 13 feet. The total length of piers and revetments built by tlie Gov- 
ernment was 4,844 feet, the width of channel way between them being 
225 at entrance and narrowing to 100 feet about 500 feet above. The 
total expenditure on the inner harbor from 1869 to June 30, 1896, was 
$418,263.11. 

Ko work was done during the past fiscal year except minor repairs 
to piers and the usual care and maintenance of plant. 

Expendituresduring the year on account of the inner harbor amounted 
to $1,330.35, making the total cost of original improvements and their 
maintenance from 1836 to June 30, 1897, aggregate $419^593.46. 

The condition of the work on the last-named date was as follows: 
The west pier had a length of 2,157 feet, as built by the Government. 
The inner section from Station to Stiition 7+85 has long been occupied 
by private parties, and is in very poor condition ; but the necessary 
repairs should be made by the occupants or owners of abutting prop- 
erty, as in all other parts of the interior channel. The outer section, 
comprising a length of 1,372 feet, must be cared for by the Govern- 
ment, and needs some minor repairs to keep it in serviceable condition. 
The east pier has a length of 1,415 feet, of which the inner 670 is in 
front of private property and in fair condition. The outlying section, 
about 745 feet long, is comi)letely decayed above water, and about 115 
feet of its outer end is gone to a depth of from 1 to 7 feet below the 
water surface. The revetment above the east pier is in a dilapidated 
condition for 1,2S2 feet of its length. It was built by the United States 
in 1869-70, and should also be maintained by the owners of the adjoin- 
ing property. The channel depth at entrance was 13 feet, and inside 
it was 12 feet, though in some places of insufficient width. 

The estimate for the inner harbor for 1899 is as follows: For minor 
repairs of piers, dredging, and contingencies, $7,500. 

Amount appropriated and expended from 1836 to 1869, iuclasive $287, 388. 92 

Original estimated cost of project for inner harbor, 1870, revisod in 1892. . 131, 375. 00 

Whole amount appropriated, 1870 to June 30, 1897 144, 375. 00 

Whole amount expended, 1870 to June 30, 1897 132,309.69 

Money statement. 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $13,495.66 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during liBcal year 1, 330. 35 

July 1, 189T, balance unexpended 12, 165. 31 

July 1 , 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 4, 000. 00 

July 1, 1897, balance available 8,165.31 

TAmount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1899 7, 500. 00 
•I Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of rivers and 
I harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



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APPENDIX J J — ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2897 
Contract i» farce for improving inner harbor at Michigan City, Ind, 

William A. Starke, dredging, dated March 26, 1897; approved April 9, 1897; date 
of beginning, April 1, 1897; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 



Tlie outer harbor. — ^The construction of the outer harbor began under 
a project adopted in 1870, which provided for an outer basin i)rotected 
by a breakwater of timber cribs tilled with stone and located east of 
the entrance to the inner harbor. In 1882 the project was modified so 
as to increase the area sheltered by extending the breakwater in a 
northerly direction and constructing an exterior breakwater to the west 
of the entrance to the inner harbor, designed to have a length of 2,000 
feet. At the close of the last fiscal year there had been completed (1) 
a pile pier 1,225 feet long, extending in a northerly direction from the 
shore and closing the basin on the east; (2) a crib breakwater 30 feet 
wide, extending westwardly from the lake end of the pile pier for a 
distance of 1,411 feet and covering the basin on the north; (3) the 
"breakwater pier," a crib structure 30 feet wide, extending northward 
from the west end of the crib breakwater for a aistance of 505 feet; (4) 
700 feet of the " exterior breakwater." 

The total amount expended in constructing and maintaining the works 
comprising the "outer harbor" from the inception of the project of 1870 
to June 30, 1897, is $753,960.46, of which $1,210.47 was expended during 
the last fiscal year. 

When, in 1882, the existing project for the construction of the harbor 
of refuge was adopted the draft of vessels navigating this portion of 
Lake Michigan was but 12 feet. With the increase in the dimensions 
of vessels a modification of the existing project has become necessary. 
A board of engineer officers, convened by Special Orders No. 8, Head- 
quarters Corps of Engineers, February 16, 1897, recommended a change 
in the location of the outer breakwater. Their report is appended. 
The only work done during the past fiscal year has been to repair 
injuries to the decking of the breakwater, caused by storms. Further 
operations have been deferred awaiting Congressional action on the 
report of the Board. 

The estimate for 1899 is as follows : For building 800 linear feet of 
breakwater, $120,000; for maintenance and repairs of about 3,850 linear 
feet of existing piers and breakwaters (a great portion of which is from 
twenty to twenty-six years old), and for engineering expenses and con- 
tingencies, $20,000; in all, $140,000. Dredging the outer basin may 
properly be deferr^ until the outer breakwater is completed and the 
old east pier is restored to a serviceable condition. 

The harbor is in the eolleotion district of Chicago, 111., which city is the nearest 
port of entry. The Light-Honse Establishment maintains a fifth order coast li^ht 
on the main shore. There is a life-saving station at the shore line east of the harbor 
entrance. 

Original estimated cost of project for onter harbor, 1S70 $324, 421. 40 

Increase by cost of repairs and maintenance to 1882 90, 067. 10 

Project for outer breakwater, including dredging of onter basin, 1882 . . 587, 000. 00 

Total estimate 1,001,488.50 

Whole amount appropriated and aUotted, 1870 to June 30, 1897 841, 875. 00 

Whole amount expended, 1870 44> June 30, 1897 753, 960. 46 

BNG 97 ^182 



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2898 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Money statement. 

Jnly ly 1896, balance anexpended 189,125.01 

June 30, 189^, amount expended during fiscal year 1, 210. 47 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 87,914.54 

{Amonnt (estimated) required for completion of existing project 159, 613. 56 
Amountthat can be profitably expended in fiHcal year ending June 30, 1899 140, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance witb i-eqiiirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



ApproprkitionB for improving harbor at Michigan City, Ind, 



Date. 



Outer harbor. 'lonor harbor. TotaL 



July 4, 1836 

March 8, 1837 

July 7, 1838 

June 11, 1844 

Auguat30,1852* 

March 2, 1855 (claim of J. U. Howos) . 

June 23, 1866 

July 25, 1888 (nllotmont) 

April 10, 1869 (allotment) 

July 11, 1870 

March 3, 1871 

.lunelO.1872 

March 3, 1873 

June 23, 1874 

March 3, 1875 

August 14, 1876 

June 18. 1878 

1878 (allotment) 

March 3, 1879 

June 14, 1880 

March 8, 1881 

August 2, 1882 

July 6, 1884 

August 6, 1886 ^ 

August 11, 1888 

September 19, 1890 

July 13. 1892 ;.. 

August 17. 1894 

Junes, 1896 



^5,000. 
15,000. 
60.000. 
50,000. 
60.000. 
50,000. 
85,000. 
50,000. 
2,500. 
40,000. 
40,000. 
20,000. 
60,000. 
40,000. 
64. 375. 
90, OsH). 
50,000. 
30,000. 
20.000. 
70,000. 



$25,000.00 



15,000.00 
25,000.00 
20,000.00 
10,000.00 
1,875.00 
5,000.00 
7,500.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 



$20,000.00 
30,000.00 
00,733.50 
25,000.00 

2o,ooaoo 

470.33 
75,000.00 
25,000.00 
31,185.00 
25,000.00 
15.000.00 
50,000.00 
60,000.00 
50,000.00 
50,000.00 
35,000.00 
75, OOO. 00 
2,600.00 
40, OOO. 00 
66,000.00 
45,000.00 
80,000^00 
60,000.00 
56,250.00 
95.000.00 
67,500.00 
45, 000. 00 
80.000.00 
80,000.00 



Total. 



841,875.00 



144, 375. 00 



1,278,638.92 



* Amount carried to surplus f^nd, $5.15. 

Abstract of bids for dredgintf harbors on east shore of Lake Michigan received and opened 
March 17, 1897, in accordance with advertisement dated February 16, 1897, by CapU C, 
McD, Townsend, Corps of Engineers, 





Name and address of bidder. 


Prom Char. 

levoix to Pent- 

vater, Mich.a 


Prom White 

Lake to 

Holland (Black 

Lake),Mich.a 


From South 

Haven to 

Michigan Cily, 


No. 


Dredg- 

pric'e 

per 

cubic 

yard. 


Trans- 
fer of 
plant, 
price 
per 
mile. 


Dredg- 

prioe 

per 

cubic 

yard. 


Trans- 
fer of 
plant, 

price 
per 

mile. 


Dredg- 

price 

per 

cubic 

yard. 


Trans- 
fer of 
phuit, 
price 
per 
mile. 


1 


Green Bar Dredge and Pile Driving Ck)., Green 


$0.13i 
.15 


$2.00 
2.00 












Green's Dredirinff Co..Ch]caffO 111...... 


$0.13 


$2.00 


.15 
.15 


$2.00 
2.00 




William A. Starke, Milwaukee, Wis 




C. E. Mitchell &, Co.. Ludington. Allch 

Arthur H. Vogel, Milwaukee, Wis 


.14 
.15 
.14 J 
.15 


2.25 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 


.14 

.14 

.141 

.15 

.15 

.16 


2.25 
2.50 
2.50 
2.60 
2.00 
8.00 


2.2S 
2.60 




Norris G Dodffe & Son Chicfl'iro HI 


2 50 


8 


Chicago Dredging and Dock Co., Chicago, 111. . 
John Smith, Manistee, Mich 


2.50 


9 
10 


Carkin, Stickney & Cram. Detroit, Mich 

Luther E. Alien. Detroit. Mich 


.16 
.18 


^3.00 
2.00 


.16 


8.00 















•Contracts entered into March 26, 1887. 



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APPENDIX J J — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN TOWN8END. 2899 

COMMKRCIAX STATISTICS, MICHIGAN CITY HARBOR, INDIANA, FOR CALENDAR TEAR 

ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

Entranoes qnd clearances. 



Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Ig88 


1,153 
795 
921 
837 

1.891 


208.617 
169,193 
172, 817 
168,654 
443.055 


1893 


1,577 
380 
343 
487 


580.863 


1889.. - 


1894 


119,920 


1890 . 




1895 


91,016 


1801 




IgM 


106,543 


1892 . 













NoTB. — ^No record is kepi at Michigan City of traffic between that port and Chicago. 



BeceipU 5y vessel, 1896. 

TGoimpiled from statemento fcumlshed by the ooUector of onfltoms at Chicago, HI., and the Michigan 

City Harbor Board.] 



Artiolea. 



Goid 

Fiab 

Lieather 

!Lamber 

liaohlnenr , 

Merchandise, general 



Tons. 



4,450 

47 

22 

96,776 

700 

108 



Articles. 



Potatoes . . . 

Salt 

Shingles... 
Ties 

Total 



Tons. 



90 

8,820 
1,431 
8,583 



121,036 



MODIFIED PBOJBOT FOR IMPROVINO OUTER HARBOR AT MIOHiaAN 

CITY, IND. 

United States Engineer Office, 
Grand RapidSj Mich,, January 12, 1897. 

Oeneral: In a letter from yoar office to Lieat. Ool. G. J. Lydecker, 
dated Aagast 14, 1896, approving the project for the expenditure of 
$70,000 appropriated for the outer harbor at Michigan City, Ind., 
authority is granted to submit a modified project for the outer break- 
water in advance of any contract being let for further breakwater con- 
struction. I have therefore to submit the following: 

The works of improvement at Michigan City are divided into an 
inner and outer harbor. The inner harl^r is merely the enlargement 
of Trail Greek, with the usual pier construction to protect its outlet 
into Lake Michigan. The outer harbor consists of an outer basin, 
located cast of the entrance to the inner harbor, which was constructed 
from 1870 to 1885, and an exterior breakwater to the west of the 
entrance to the inner harbor, which is designed to have a length of 
2,000 feet, of which 700 feet have been completed. The location of the 
various works is shown on the accompanying blue print. 

The existing project for the outer harbor was adopted in 1832, and 
its object is to create a harbor of refuge for vessels overtaken by a 
storm in the southeastern portion of Lake Michigan. The condition of 
the shore at the time the project was adopted is shown on a map in 
the report of the Ohief of Engineers for 1882, opposite page 2270, part 
3. Attention is invited to the fact that north of the outer basin, where 
the 24-foot contour is shown on the map of 1882, but 12 feet below the 
zero of the gauge is now found, and at the end of the west pier to the 
inner harbor a 15foot contour replaces the one of 24 feet. As the level 
of the lake has also fi&llen about 3 feet, these facts indicate a material 
shoaling since the project was submitted. The exterior breakwater, 
whidh was designed to be oonstrocted in water from 24 to 30 feet in 



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2900 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

deptli, if built on the lines adopted will be in depths vaiying from 19 
to 23 feet, the existing water sarface being about 2 feet below the zero 
of the gange. 

In the Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1890, Part 3, opposite 
page 2666, is given a map of the harlwr of Michigan City from surveys 
of June of that year. From this map it is noted that from 1882 to 
1890 the fill in front of the east breakwater was rapid, and behind the 
west pier slight, while since 1890 in front of the east breakwater the 
fill has been less ra]>id, and there has been a large deposit behind the 
west pier. In 1889 the construction of the west breakwater was beg-un, 
and I consider it evident that sand, which prior to 1890 was caught by 
the east breakwater, now finds an easy entrance to the outer harbor 
through the interval between the breakwaters, and finds a place of 
deposit sheltered by the work constructed after that date. Since 1890 
the area available for vessels drawing 15 feet has been reduced from 40 
acres to 25 acres, and the areas of depths over 18 feet about 25 per 
cent. The area of the proposed harbor of refuge for vessels of 12 feet 
draft is now less than it was in 1890 for those drawing 15 feet. A 
further shoaling is to be apprehended if the work is completed on the 
lines adopted. 

The area available for vessels of 18 feet draft in the proposed harbor 
of refuge is inclosed between the breakwater and the 20-foot contour 
for vessels of 15 feet dr&ft between the breakwater and a broken line 
shown on the blue print. The limits of the 12-foot area are sufficiently 
indicated by the 15-foot contour. 

While the available area of the harbor inclosed by the breakwater 
has materially diminished since the adoption of the project, the dimen- 
sions of vessels plying the lakes have largely increased. Depths of 
from 15 to 18 feet are now generally demanded for harbors on the east- 
ern shore of Lake Michigan, although in 1882 12 feet was usually con- 
sidered ample. Vessels of lengths exceeding 300 feet are not infre- 
quent, and some of the first-class freight vessels, such as the Coraliaj 
have lengths exceeding 400 feet. At Michigan City a large part of the 
commerce is in lumber and salt, which is frequently carried in barges 
or sailing vessels and towed into port. 

Not only is this shoaling diminishing the area available for a harbor 
of refuge, but it is rendering an entrance to the harbor difficult during 
storms. Depths of 16 feet are found within 200 feet of the east end of 
the west breakwater, and of 12 feet within 400 feet. No vessel drawing 
15 feet would attempt to enter between the piers and turn under the 
shelter of the west breakwater during a northwest storm. It would be 
■ difficult for a vessel drawing 12 feet, particularly if accompanied by a tow. 

In the existing project the obstruction to the entrance of the harbor 
of refuge, caused by the west pier of the inner harbor, is recognized, 
and its removal is contemplated as soon as the breakwater is completed. 
The bar which has formed since 1882 along the pier is, however, as 
serious an obstacle to navigation a-s the pier itself, and the result of its 
removal would be to close the entrance to the inner harbor with a sand 
bar without materially improving the outer harbor. The further prop- 
osition of the existing project to dredge the outer basin east of the piers 
may be dismissed with the remark that any vessel in distress that 
passes the end of the west pier of the inner harbor without disaster will 
make no effort to turn until it enters the inner harbor. 

It is therefore evident the proposed exterior breakwater, when com- 
pleted, will be of service as a harbor of refuge only to vessels of light 



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APPENDIX J J — REPORT OP CAPTAIN TOWN8END. 2901 

draft, and as the iDDer harbor has a navigable channel of 13 feet, which 
it is easier to enter tban either ot^ the outer harbors, the value of the 
exterior constructions on the lines proposed is not apparent. 

Another objection is raised by pilots to the existing structures, that 
during storms they render the entrance to the inner harbor more dan- 
gerous than it would be otherwise; that in a northwest storm a current 
is produced by the west breakwater which tends to throw the hejid of 
a vessel entering the port toward the east. While attempting to 
straighten from this action the bow suddenly plunges into a reverse 
current while the stern is being pressed to the eastward, which tends to 
drive the vessel onto the west pier of the inner harbor, and if it escapes 
this disaster a second reversal of current renders the east pier to the 
inner harbor a source of danger. During the storm from the north or 
northeast a vessel can also enter the inner harbor more readily if the 
"west breakwater be removed. That these objections are not groundless 
is indicated by the construction by the Government of pile fenders at 
the end of the east pier of the inner harbor (report of Chief of Engi- 
neers, 1896, p. 2674), and by the fact that vessels avoid the harbor 
during storms. 

To obviate these objections it has been proposed to close the opening 
between the breakwaters, placing the entrance to the harbor at AB, the 
salient of the proposed western breakwater. While by this means the 
cross currents resulting from northwest storms in the harbor would be 
destroyed, an obstructed entrance to the inner harbor would be obtained, 
difficult to navigate in calm weather. A safer entrance to the outer 
harbor would result, but the area protected from northwest storms 
would be diminished, and tbe motion of sand from the northeast which 
has already formed a shoal along the east breakwater would rapidly 
extend along the west breakwater and enter the harbor through the. 
proposed opening. 

A second proposition has been to extend the west breakwater to the 
north to a point H on the blue print. This will protect the entrance 
to the harbor from northwest storms and give a more direct passage 
to the inner harbor, but will increase the drifting of sand into the har- 
bor during northeast storms and afford little relief to the contracted 
entrance to the harbor of refuge. 

The extension of the east pier to the northwest to the point E would 
reduce the flow of sand from the northeast. The area of the harbor of 
refuge can be increased by locating the west breakwater on the line 
CD. It could then be more readily entered and the danger from cross 
currents at the entrance to the inner harbor obviated by the removal 
of the existing west breakwater. Under such conditions the extension 
of the outer breakwaters to the points F and G would be advisable, to 
diminish the dimensions of the waves which could enter the harbor 
during storms from the west to northwest. 

The propriety of building a harbor of refuge at this locality having 
been definitely determined both by the Engineer Department and by 
acts of Congress, I have the honor to recommend the following modifi- 
cations of the existing project: To extend the east breakwater to the 
point E, connect the east pier of the inner harbor to the east break- 
water, and to construct the western arm of the west breakwater at CD. 
The object of connecting the east pier with the east breakwater is, 
primarily, to avoid the cost of repairs to the works surrounding the 
outer basin. It will also have a beneficial eft'ect on the currents at the 
entrance to the inner harbor. 



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2902 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

The following estimates of the cost of completing the existing project 
and constructing the breakwaters on the lines proposed are submitted : 

To complete exUiing projeot. 

l,8001inearfeetof cribs, at $125 $162,500 

Dredging outer ba^in, 875,000 cubic yards, at 12 cents 106, 000 

Reconstruction of east breakwater, 1,420 feet, at $25 35, 500 

Repairs to eastern inclosuro of outer harbor, 1,100 feet, at $15 16, 500 

Removal of piers, 1,175 feet, at $20 23,500 

343,000 
Contingencies 34,000 

Total 877,000 

To ooinphte project recommended. 

Opening between east pier and old breakwater, 460 feet, at $25 $11, 500 

Repairs to east pier, 700 feet, at $20 14,000 

Extension of east breakwater to £, 1, 100 feet, at $130 143, 000 

Exterior breakwater CD, 1,500 feet, at $140 210,000 

Repairs to west pier, 535 feet, at $4... 2,140 

880,640 
Contingencies 38,860 

Total 419,000 

To extend the breakwaters to the points F and G and remove the 
existing western breakwater would increase this estimateabout $200,000, 
an expenditure 1 do not consider justified by the benefits to be derived* 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

C* MoD, TOWNSBND, 

Captain^ Corps of U7igineer$. 
Brig. Gen. W. P. Craighill, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. A. 
(Through the Division Engineer.) 

[First indorftemont.] 

XJ. S. Engineer Office, Northwest Division, 

New Yorky February 2^ 1897. 
Respectfully forwarded to the Chief of Engineers, United States 
Army. 

The great changes that have taken place since the present project 
was recommended by the Engineer Board of 1882 show a necessity for 
changes in the project of such a radical nature that I would recommend 
that the revision of the project for the improvement of the harbor at 
Michigan City, Ind., be referred to a special board. 

This is an exceedingly troublesome problem, and should be carefully 
studied by a board before any more money is expended upon it. 

Henry M. Robert, 
Colonel^ Corps of Engineers^ Division Engineer. 

[Second indorsemeDt] 

Office Chief of Engineers, 

U. S. Army, 
February 11, 1897. 
Respectfhlly submitted to the Secretary of War. 
Gapt. 0. McD. Townsend, Corps of Engineers, presents for approval 



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APPENDIX J J — HEPOBT OF CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2903 

a modified project for carrying on the work of improving the outer har- 
bor at Michigan City, Ind. 

Inviting attention to. the views of Ool. H. M. Robert, Corps of Engi- 
neers, the division engineer, in first indorsement hereon, I have the 
honor to recommend that a Board of officers of the Corps of Engineers, 
to consist of Lieut. Col. O. J. Lydecker, Maj. W. L. Marshall, and Capt. 
C. McD. Townsend, be constituted to consider and report upon the 
proposed moditicatious, the Board to meet at Michigan City upon the 
call of the senior member, and its expenses to be paid irom the funds 
available for improving Michigan City, outer harbor, Indiana. 

With the approval of the Secretary, the order constituting the Board 
will be issued from this office. 

John M. Wilson, 
Brig. Oen., Chief of Engineers^ 

United States Amiy. 

[Third indonement.] 

Wae Dbpabtment, February 15^ 1897. 
Approved as recommended by the Chief of Engineers. 
By order of the Secretary of War: 

John Tweedale, 

Chief Clerk. 

[Fonrtli indoraemeot.] 

Office Chief of Enoineebs, 

U. S. Army, 

February 18^ 1897. 
Kespectfully referred to Lieut. Col. G. J. Lydecker, Corps of Engi- 
neers, for consideration and report by the Board of Engineer Officers 
constituted by Special Orders, No. 8, Headquarters, Corps of Engi- 
neers, February 16, 1897. 

It is desired that the Board give this matter full and complete con- 
sideration and that its report be rendered at as early a date as practi- 
cable. 
By command of Brig. Gen. Wilson: 

A. Mackenzie, 
Lieut. Col.j Corps of Engineers. 



eeport of board of engineers. 

United States Engineer Office, 

Chicago, III., March 6, 1897. 

General: The Board of Engineer Officers constituted by Special 
Orders, No. 8, Headquarters Corps of Engineers, February 16, 1897, 
convened at Michigan City, Ind., pursuant U> call of the senior member, 
at 1.30 ]). m., March 4, 1897. After examining the harbor the Board 
adjourned to meet at 10 a. m., March 5, 1897, at the United States.Engi- 
neer Office, Chicago, HI. The Board met pursuant to adjonrnment, 
and after an examination of the modified project submitted, and careful 
consideration, submits the following report: 

The projects of 1876 and 1882 for the construction of an outer harbor 
at Michigan City, Ind., under which work has heretofore been prose- 
cuted at this locality, contemplated the formation of a harbor of refuge 



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2904 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

not only for vessels trading at this port, but also for any which may 
be exposed to storms in the southeastern portion of Lake Michigan. The 
shoaling which has taken place since the projects were submitted has 
so reduced the area of waterway protected by the proposed works and 
rendered the entrances to the protected area so difficult that the Board 
is of the opinion that the construction of a harbor of refuge on the lines 
proposed will not adequately fulfill the purposes for which it was 
intended. It has therefore to recommend that the outer western break- 
water (EF) be removed, that the eastern harbor pier be extended a 
distance of 600 feet on the line shown (AB) on the accompanying map, 
and that a detached breakwater to protect the harbor from westerly 
storms be constructed on a line also shown on the map (CD), the length 
of this breakwater at present to be limited to 1,500. 

The Board is of the opinion that a harbor constructed on these lines 
will subserve the needs of commerce for many years. An entrance 
(BC) between breakwaters is obtained having a width of 650 feet, and 
there is a space 1,500 feet wide between the southwestern end of the 
west breakwater and the 16-foot contour. The entrance to the inner 
harbor is adequately protected from storms, and an ample area afforded 
in the outer harbor for such vessels as at the present time might seek 
shelter from storms in this portion of the lake. While a gradual exten- 
sion of the shore line in this locality is to be anticipated, a further 
extension of the breakwaters in a northerly direction can readily be 
made which will protect tbe entrance between them from sand encroach- 
ment, should it ever become necessary. The area protected from storms 
can also readily be increased by extending the westerly breakwater in 
a southwesterly direction, if required by the growth of commerce. 

The question of closing the entrance to the outer basin the Board 
considers one of maintenance, which can more properly be considered 
when the repairs to the existing structures become necessary. 

The estimate of the cost of the work is as follows > 

1,500 linear feet crib breakwater, at $125 $187,500 

600 linear feet crib breakwater, at $115 69,000 

256,500 
Contingencies, 10 per cent 25,650 

Total 282,150 

The exterior breakwater to be constructed of cribs 30 feet wide on a 
stone foundation, and the extended pier of same width, founded upon 
piles, in accord with most improved practice. 

The material in the western breakwater, the removal of which is 
recommended, is considered of value in the construction of the break- 
waters proposed more than sufQcient to pay for its removal. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

G. J. Lydeckeb, 
Lieut. CoL, Corps of Ungineers. 
W. L. Marshall, 
Major, Corps of Engineers, 

O. MoD. TOWNSEND, 

Oaptainy Corps of Engineers. 

Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, 

Chief of Engineers^ U. 8. A. 



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APPENDIX J J — ^EEPOET OP CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2905 
IMPROVEMENT OF ST. JOSEPH HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

The improveineiit of St. Joseph Harbor bas consisted in deepening 
the St. Joseph Eiver along the front of the city of St. Joseph, protecting 
its ontlet into Lake Michigan by timber piers, and dredging a canal, 
about 1 mile in length, from the St. Joseph Biver to the city of Benton 
Harbor. The object of the improvement is to provide a navigable chan- 
nel of the depth of 16 feet from Lake Michigan to the upper limits of 
St. Joseph, and of 13 feet thence to Benton Harbor. When the work was 
commenced in 1836, the outlet to St. Joseph Biver was obstructed by a 
sand bar, through which a shifting and exposed channel existed with 
depths fluctuating between 3 and 7 feet, while Benton Harbor was 
without a navigable waterway to the lake. Work was commenced in 
1836, and there had been applied to it $460,835.87 to June 30, 1896. At 
the close of the last fiscal year there was an available depth of 12 feet 
at the entrance to the harbor and a narrow channel with a depth of 
13 feet within. The extent and condition of the pier work at the same 
time were as follows: 

Niyrik pier and revetment, comprising 831 feet pile work and 1,182 
feet crib work, had a total length of 2,013 feet, and projected 960 feet 
beyond the shore line; between Stations 4 + 55 and 13 + 78, a distance 
of 923 feet, this pier was badly dilapidated, had been several times 
breached and temporarily repaired and its reconstruction was a matter 
of urgent necessity; the remainder of the work was in good or fair 
condition, but lacked filling in some parts. 

The south pier J comprising 606 feet of pile work and 213 feet of erib 
work, had a total length of 819 feet, and projected 480 feet beyond the 
shore^ line. It was in fair condition, but required a large amount of 
additional filling, the stone throughout the pile section being gone to 
below the water level. 

The work of rebuilding the north pier was done by Government plant 
and hired labor. The north pier was cut down to the level of the zero 
of the gauge between Stations 9+22 and 13+78^ a double row of sheet 
piling was driven in front of the old work, secured between guide tim- 
bers, to which they were securely bolted, and protected by white oak 
piles driven 3 feet between centers, and faced by a 10 by 12 inch white 
oak wale. At distances of 9 feet, a tie rod passes through the entire 
structure, being bolted through a rear wale placed behind the rear i)or- 
tion of the old structure. The superstructure consists of five courses 
of white pine timber in the front wall and three in the rear, suitably 
joined by cross-ties. The work was completed October 10, 1896. 

On May 3, 1897, a contract was entered into with Eslow & Munroe 
for completing the repairs to the north pier. Operations were begun 
under this contract May 26, but at the close of the fiscal year the only 
work done was to cut down the old pier and assemble the material 
required for the new one. 

During the fall of 1896 dredging operations were carried on in this 
harbor with the U. S. dredge Saginaw; 52,575 cubic yards of material 
were removed from the harbor, resulting in temporarily obtaining a 
ebannel 80 feet wide and 18 feet deep from the entrance to the harbor 
to Station 6, a distance of 1,400 feet, a cut of 40 feet width and 16 feet 
deep in front of St. Joseph and through the Benton Harbor Oanal. 



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2906 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF EKQIKEERS, U. 8. ARMT. 

SoiiudiDgs made in April, 1897, showed an insufficient depth along the 
docks of the Benton Harbor basin, 11 feet on the shoal at the entrance 
to the Beuton Harbor Canal and 13 feet on the shoal outside the north 
pier. Dredging, under a contract with William A. Starke, dated March 
26, 1897, was commenced April 21^ and the harbor reopened by May 29, 
52,666 cubic yards of material being removed. 

The total amount expended in making and maintaining improvements 
at this harbor from 1836 to June 30, 1897, is $479,043.74, of which 
$18,207.87 was expended during the last fiscal year. 

In order that the projected improvements at this harbor may be 
accomplished and maintained, it is most important that the piers 
be promptly extended, and that both sides of the Benton Harbor 
Canal be protected by substantial and sand-tight revetments. If an 
entrance depth of 16 feet is to be obtained and kept, it can only be done 
by carrying the covering piers out to the curve of 18-foot depths beyond 
the outer bar. Dredging may open the channel, but the first storm that 
follows is certain to fill it up again, thereby destroying what has been 
gained at a large expenditure of time and money, for dredging in the 
open lake is a slow and expensive operation. It is therefore the poorest 
possible policy to depend upon any outside dredging for the projected 
16 foot entrance channel. To carry the north pier to this 18-foot curve 
requires an extension of 1,000 feet, and it will take double that for the 
corresponding extension of the south pier. The St. Joseph and Paw 
Paw rivers make very considerjible deposits in the upper part of St. 
Joseph Harbor when they are at freshet stages, and dredging will always 
be required to clear the inner harbor of these deposits. The construc- 
tion of revetments on both sides of the Benton Harbor Canal is neces- 
sary for reasonable permanence of any dredged channel there, but these 
revetments should not be built at the expense of the United States. 
Unless the local authorities will take the matter in hand and provide 
for their construction and maintenance in approved condition, it is a 
question whether the Government should continue to maintain this 
channel way, as the dredged channel soon fills up with material washed 
from its unprotected banks. The north side of the canal is revetted 
all the way up to Benton Harbor, though some parts of the work are 
old and nearly unservicable, but on the south side there is no revet- 
ment worthy of mention. The canal is, in fact, a long, narrow slip, 
wholly artificial, dredged from the upper end of St. Joseph Harbor to 
Benton Harbor for local benefit. It is from 85 to 100 feet wide, over 
4,000 feet long, and because it is not properly revetted its navigability 
is maintained only by repeated dredgings, once a year certainly, and 
frequently twice. So long as this dredging continues to be done by the 
Government unconditionally, it does not appear likely that the much- 
needed revetment will be built at local expense. Nevertheless, the 
records show that when the Government first entered upon the work 
of dredging there, it was with the understanding that the necessary 
revetments would be promptly built in just that way. 

While there is indicated above the extent of pier construction that is 
necessary for securing the entrance depth that is designed for this har- 
bor, the present approved project of improvement provides for only 860 
linear feet of pier in addition to what is already built. The estimate 
for pier construction is therefore limited accordingly. The appropria- 
tion made by the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, will probably be 
absorbed in putting the old piers in safe and serviceable condition^ and 



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APPENDIX J J ^REPORT OF CAPTAIN T0WN8END. 



2907 



in doiug the larjs:e amount of dredging that is required under existing 
conditions for keeping the harbor open to navigation and commerce. 

The estimate for 1899 is therefore as follows : For 850 linear feet of pier 
extension, $85,000; for dredging and minor repairs of piers, $10,000; 
making in all, with an allowance of about 5 per cent for contingencies, 
$100,000. 

The harbor is in the Grand Hayen colleotion distriot, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Hayen. Mioh. The Liffht-Hoase Establishment maintains a fourth-order 
revolying coast light on the blaff south of the harbor, and range lights and fog bell 
on the north pier. There is a life-saying station near the east end of north pier. 

Original estimated cost of the work as reyised in 1892 $519, 113.00 

Whole amount expended to June 30, 1S97 479,043.74 

Money statement. 

July 1, 1S96, balance unexpended $32,276.33 

June 30, 1S97, amount expended during fiscal year 18,207.87 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 14,068.46 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $804.66 

July 1, 1897, amount coyered by uncompleted contracts 9, 038. 21 

9,842.87 

Jnly 1,1897, balance ayaUable 4,225.59 

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 100, 000. 00 
Amount Uiat can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J tme 30, 1 899 100, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of riyer and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry oiyil act of June 4, 1897. 



Jppropriaiion$ for improving Si, Joseph Harbor and River, Michigan, 



July 4, 1836 $20,000 

March 3. 1837 15,000 

July 7, 1838 51,113 

Maroh3,1843 25,000 

June 11, 1844 20.000 

August 30, 1852 • 10,000 

June 28, 1864 (allotment) 15, 000 

June23, 186) 6,000 

March 2, 1867 23,000 

Allotted from harbors on 
Northwestern Lakes, 

1867 $7,500 

Transferred in 1870 to 
Grand Hayen Harbor . . 500 

7,000 

July 11, 1870 15,000 

March 3, 1871 10,000 

June 10, 1872 3,000 



June 23, 1874 $2,000 

March 3, 1875 35,000 

August 14, 1876 12,000 

June 18. 1878 12,000 

March 3, 1879 6,000 

June 14, 1880 8,000 

March 3, 1881 10,000 

August2, 1882 12,000 

July 5, 1884 15,000 

August 5, 1886 10.000 

August 11, 1888 12.000 

September 19, 1890 20,000 

July 13, 1892 59,000 

August 17, 1894 30,000 

June 3, 1896 30,000 

Total 493,113 



'Amount carried to surplus fund, 80 cents. 



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2908 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. B. ARMT. 

Jh$tract ofUdtfar repairing G^vermmeni pier at St, Joeeph, Mick., received and opened 
ApHl S2y 1897, in accordance with advertUement dated March U, 1897, hy Capt. C. MeD, 
Tawneend, Corps of Engineers, 







S5 


I— To secure in 










CO 


place in the work 










■Jlr? 


the following 


8— To famish the following material 








u 


material to be 


and secure it in place. 








fhruished by the 










11 

h 

PC o 

SI 

li 


Government 








s 


11. 


n 


11 


^ 


■s 


i 


f 


-o 




No. 


Name And ftddrest of 
bidder. 




'I 

.3 « 


S3, 
ft. 


i| 


a . 


if 




a 

•O Si 


^iS!r 

total. 






III 




n 


si 


n 


Zi 


5S 








f 


It 



III 




3S 

2 


II 

1 


si 


■S8 
°1 

« 


li 

QQ 




•1 


£b1ow Sc Mnnroe,Char- 












OtM. 


ou. 


ot». 


Ct$. 


Ctt. 






leyoix, Mioh 


$1.70 


$2.90 


$5.25 


$5.00 


$26.00 


2 


2i 


H 


2i 


8* 


$4,853.66 




George Cooper. Mani- 
towoc, Wis 
























1.50 


2.00 


4.76 


3.00 


30.00 


2.9 


2.9 


2.9 


2.9 


2.9 


4,575.08 




John J. Granyille, Sa«;- 


























inaw. Mich 


2.00 


4.50 


5.50 


7.00 


25.00 


2* 


5 


5 


5 


8 


4,970.00 




Nelson J. Gaylord, 
Ludington, Mich..., 






2.50 


3.00 


4.50 


2.00 


33.25 


2i 


2| 


2i 


2i 


21 


5.082.81 




John M. AUmendinger, 


























Benton Harbor, Mibh . 


3.37 


3.00 


6.00 


4.00 


25.50 


2 


3 


H 


3| 


2| 


5.000.17 




W. MolTor, Marseilles, 


























111 


2.00 


4.00 


G.50 


3.75 


29.00 


8 


3i 


3i 


8 


3* 


5,139.58 




Chicago Star Constmc- 






tion and Dredging 


























Co.. Chicago, 111 


2.60 


1.60 


6.50 


4.60 


34.00 


8 


8* 


H 


3| 


8» 


6.5(4.21 



a Contract entered into May 3, 1807. 

List of contracts in force for improving St. Joseph Harbor, Michigan, 

William A. Starke, dredging, dated March 26, 1897; approved April 9, 1897; date 
of beginning, .April 1, 1897 ; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 

Eslow & Munroe, pier work, dated May 3, 1897; approved May 20, 1897; date of 
beginning, May 1, 1897 ; date of expiration, Octob.er 1, 1897. 

COHMRBCIAL STATISTICS, ST. JOSEPH AND BENTON HARBOR, MICHIGAN, FOB 
CALENDAR YEAR ENDING DECKMBKR 31, 1896. 

Entrances and clearances. 



Calendar year. 


Voaaela entered. 


Vessels cleai-ed. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


1890 


948 

742 

1,726 

1,576 

1,100 

779 

886 


131, 607 
215,334 
707, 285 
1, 125. 063 
900,000 
327,384 
489.081 


946 

743 

1,727 

1,575 

1,100 

727 

833 


131,396 


1891 


219,591 


1892 


707,786 


1803 


1, 125. 938 


1894 


000,000 


1895 


827,837 


1800 


435,088 







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APPENDIX J J — ^EEPOBT OP CAPTAIN TOWN8END. 2909 



BeoeipU and 9hipment9 Ity vessel at Si, Joseph' and Benton Harbor, Michigan, 1896. 

[Compiled from eiUitementa furniMhed by the Gniham A Morton Tran8portAtion Company, of St. 
Joseph. Mich., and the collector of cnstoms at Grand Haven, Mioh ] 



Articlee received. 


Tons. 


Artiolee ahipped. 


Tons. 


Coal 


1,200 

70,244 

6.600 

750 

5.583 

1.430 

61 

62,800 

200 

168,313 

1,850 

1.528 

26.000 

4.200 


Farm products, miacellaneous 

Fifth. 


1.600 




250 


Grain 


Flour 


6.070 


Gravel 


Fruit 


36,000 


Hav and feed 


Lfime and cement. .......... .... ...... 


30 850 




Live stock - -. 


53 


Liive Atock . - ... 


Lumbec . ........>............ ..t^-- 


1,108 


Lumber .. ............................ 


Machinery 


300 


Machinery 


Merchand ise, genornl 


184,860 


Merchandine, general 


Paper 


1,000 


Paper 


Pig iron 


3,305 


Pie iron 


Pwatoea 


1,600 


Salt 


Total 


Wood 


274 081 








Total 


350,659 








In addition to the above, a total of 140,000 pasBengen was carried by vessoUi trad- 
ing at this port. 



JJ3. 

IMPROVEMENT OF ST. JOSEPH RIVER, MICHIGAN. 

The only portion of this stream now navigated is from the month at 
St. Joseph to Berrien Springs, a distance of about 26 miles by river, 
thongh the land distance between the two places is but little more than 
half that. It is very crooked, obstructed by numerous shoals and rip- 
plefi over which the water flows in thin sheets, and with channel depths 
of from 24 to 30 inches; the intervening pools are generally from 4 to 6 
feckt deep, and some of them 6 oi: even 8 feet. 

The river and harbor act of August 11, 1888, appropriated $2,500 for 
improving the river within the limits above indicated, and a project for 
its expenditure with a view to obtaining a low- water channel of 3 feet 
was approved March 27, 1889. The plan of operations provided for 
removing snags and sunken logs, closing secondary channels by brush 
and stone dams, and* concentrating the flow of water at other points as 
found necessary by wing dams. The plan has been followed as far as 
could be with the small sums appropriated for the work, and has pro- 
vided the anticipated depth of 3 feet at the improved places, but other 
shoals remain, and the structures already erected, having necessarily 
been of a light and inexpensive character, are in need of additions and 
repairs. 

During the past fiscal year no work has been done. 

The total amount expended on the river to June 30, 1897, is $4,862.02, 
of which $12.45 was spent during the past fiscal year. 

This navigation may be kept up at an exi>enditure of $500 annually; 
and if it is to be done the next appropriation should be $1,000 in view 
of the established custom of making such appropriations once in two 
years. 

The original estimated cost of the work, in 1880, was $11,300. 



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2910 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENQINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Money statement. 

July 1, 1896, balancA nnexpended $660.43 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 13. 45 

July 1, 1897, balance nnexpended 637.98 

July I, 1897, ontetanding liabilities 46.50 

July 1, 1897, balance available 591.48 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 5, 800. 00 
Amor nt tliat can he prolitabiy expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1899 1, 000. 00 
Siibiiiitted in compliance with reauirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



AppropriatioHB far improring St Joseph Biver, MiehUfan, 

August 11, 1888 $2,500.00 

Septembers, 1890 1,000.00 

July 13, 1892 (allotment) 1,000.00 

August 17, 1894 500.00 

June 3, 1896 500.00 

Total 6,500.00 

Whole amount expended to June 30, 1897, $4,862.02. 



COMMKRCIAL STATISTICS, ST. JOSEPH RIVER, MICHIGAN, FOR CALENDAR TEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

The steamer Maff Graham (95 tons, load draft, 30 inches) carried passengers and 
6,201 tons miscellaneous freight between St. Joseph and Berrien Springs. 

An additional steamer, the Edna (2 tons), lias run up the river Arom St. Joseph on 
excursion business, carrying passengers only. 

A new river steamer is bemg built by Dralce A Wallace, of St. Joseph, Mich. 



J J 4. 

IMPROVEMENT OP SOUTH HAVEN HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

Before improvement by the General Government the citizens of 
South Haven had constracted piers and revetments at the month of 
the Black Kiver, and thereby obtained a channel into Lake Michigan 6 
or 7 feet deep and 85 feet wide. The improvement thus started was 
taken up by the Government in 1867, under a plan of operations that 
provided for increasing the channel to a width of 120 feet between 
piers extended far enough into Lake Michigan to obtain and hold a 
navigable depth of 12 feet. The original project was subsequently 
modified to make the entrance width between piers 177 feet and extend 
the navigable channel upstream to the highway bridge, about half a 
mile above the piers. The total length of piers and revetments built 
up to the year 1888 aggregated 3,145 feet, and no extensions have been 
made to them since that time. 

The condition of the harbor works at the beginning of the last fiscal 
year was as follows: 



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APPENDIX J J ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2911 

North pier^ comprising 607 feet of crib work, 524 feet pile pier and 
revetment, and 463 feet sbeet-pile revetment, has a total length of 
1,594 feet and projects 650 feet beyond the shore line. 

South pier, comprising 657 feet of crib work, 143 feet pile revetment, 
and 854 feet plank-beam revetment, has a total length of 1,554 feet and 
projects 470 feet beyond the shore line. The plank-beam revetment is 
badly wrecked in parts, the remainder liable to give way at any time, 
and all should be rebuilt; but it is believed that appropriations for the 
improvement of this harbor should no longer be charged with the 
expense of maintaining this inferior revetment, as the adjoining prop- 
erty is mostly occupied and used for commercial purposes by private 
parties and corporations. 

The depth of water available was 14 feet, resulting from recent 
dredging. 

During the past fiscal year the superstructure of the north pier from 
Station 4+65 to 9+87 was rebuilt, and of the south pier from Station 
8+54 to 9+97, under a contract with Nelson J. Gaylord dated May 28, 
1896. No dredging has been required during the past season, and at 
the close of the year an available channel existed having a minimum 
depth of 13 feet. 

A contract was entered into May 6, 1897, with Eslow & Munroe for 
an extension of 350 linear feet to the south pier. Material has been 
collected but no work done. It is proposed to construct at this locality 
the sand-tight pier revetment invented by Maj. William L. Marshall, 
Corps of Engineers, and successfally employed by him in the construc- 
tion of docks and wharves at Chicago. 

The total expenditure by the Government in making and maintaining 
the improvements at this harbor up to June 30, 1897, is $230,828.47, of 
which $9,185.53 was spent during the last fiscal year. 

In order to realize the approved project of improvement at this har- 
bor it is essential that the piers be extended to 15 feet of water in Lake 
Michigan, which will require additions of 230 and 450 feet to the north 
and south piers, respectively. The last approved estimates provide 
for extensions aggregating but 350 feet, less than half what is needed. 

The estimate for 1899 is as follows: For 350 feet of pier extensions, 
$35,000; miscellaneous repairs and dredging, $5,000; contingencies, 
sui)ervision, office expenses, etc., $5,000; in all, $45,000. 

This harbor is in the Grand Haven collection district, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Haven, Mich. The light-honse establishment maintains a harbor light on 
the south pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner end of the north pier. 

Original estimated cost of work, 1866, amended in 1869, 1872, and 1892.. $262, 000. 00 
Whole amount expended to JuneSO, 1897 230,828.47 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $30,357.06 

June 30, 1^, amount expended during fiscal year 9,185.53 

# ■ 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 21,171.53 

.July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $12.00 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 15, 541. 78 

16,553.78 

July 1, 1897, balance available .' 5,617.75 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 45, 000. 00 
Amount that can be profi tably expended in fiscal year endi ng June 30, 1899 45, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



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2912 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 
Appropriatiana for improving kmrhor at SotiMi flaven, Miok. 



March 2, 1867 $43,000 

July 11, 1870 10,000 

March 3, 1871 15,000 

Jane 10, 1872 12,000 

Mftrch3,1878 20,000 

June 23, 1874 10,000 

March 3, 1875 10,000 

August 14, 1876 10,000 

June 18, 1878 12,000 

March3, 1879 7,500 

June 14, 1880 6,000 



March 3, 1881 

August 2, 1882 

July 5, 1884 

August 5, 1886 

August 11, 1888.... 
September 19, 1890. 

July 13, 1892 

August 17, 1894.... 
June 3, 1896 



$5,000 
10,000 
7,500 
5,000 
10,000 
15,000 
10,000 
20,000 
15,000 



Total 252,000 



Jhairact of bids for pier extennon at South Haven Harbor ^ Michigan^ received and opened 
April S7y 1897 f in accordance tcith advertisement dated March S9, 1897, by Capt, C MeD. 
Townaend, Corps of Engineers. 



No. 



Name And address 
of biddsr. 



85 

1^^ 









II 






an 

=1 






1555 

m 



its 



II 



Al 

2 
8 
4 

5 

6 



No. 



• 1 
2 
8 
4 

5 
6 



Ctasrle- 



Ealow ft Monroe, 
voix, Mich 

John M. Allmendliigor, Ben- 
ton Harbor, Mioh 

l^elKon J. Gaylord, Liiding- 
ton, Mich 

Chicafio St«r Countruotion &, 
Dredging Co., Chicago, 111., 

Handler StLntu Towing and 
Dock Co., Chicngo, 111 

John J. Granville, Saginaw, 
Mich 



Name and address 
of bidder. 



OentM. 
35 



50 



55 



OenUi. 
35 



$14. 50 
15.00 
15.00 
17.00 
15.00 
17.00 



$20. 
26. 
20. 
25. 
20. 
20. 



I 



$35.00 
80.00 
32.00 
40.00 
35.00 
30.00 



$19.00 
22.00 
18.00 
10.80 
20.50 
20.00 



$2fi.00 
27.00 
28wOO 
24.00 
29.00 
25.00 



Cent*. 
2 

2 

135 

15 

2 

15 



Ealow &. Mnnroe, Charlo- 
Yoix, Mich 

John M. Allmendingcr, Bon- 
ton Harbor, Mich 

Nelaon J. Gaylord, Luding- 
ton, Mich 

Chicago Star ConHtructlon Se. 
Dredging Co., Chicago, 111. . 

Hau8h<r &. Luiz Towing and 
Dock Co, Chicago, 111 

John J. Granville, Saginaw, 
Mich 



4 



CenU. 
125 

8 

125 

8.5 

2 

4 






CtntM. 
125 

3.6 

125 

8 

8 

4 






CenU. 
125 

8.5 

125 

8.5 

2 

4 



GO 



OtnU. 
3 

15 

125 

3.5 

4 

4 



6ft 

t8 



QQ 



$6.50 
6.00 
6.75 
7.60 
7.60 

10.00 



"I 



CenU. 
20 

25 

24 

30 

20 

40 



Z O 9 



Genu. 
25 



24 



a . 
2l 

Ok 



$13,04L78 
18,205.3 
18,823.66 
13.487.44 
13,448.46 
15,38L42 



• Contraot entered into May 6, 1897. 

List of contracts in force for improving South Haven Harbor, Michigan, 

William A. Starke, dredgiug, dated March 26, 1897; approved April 9, 1897; date of 
beginDing, April 1, 1897; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 

Eslow & Munroe, pier work, dated May 6, 1897; approved May 24, 1897; date of 
beginning, May 15, 1897; date of expiration, November 1, 1897. 



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APPENDDC J J — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN T0WN8END. 



2913 



OOMMSBOIAL 8TATI8T1G8, SOUTH HAVEN HARBOR. MXCHIQAK, FOR GALKNDAR TBAR 
■NDINO DXCXMBKR 3l, 1896. 

EntrtMoei and 6Uaranee$, 



GalendAr year. 



Kamber. 



TonnAge. 



Calendar yew. 



Kam1)er. 



Tonnage. 



1889 (eetimAted) 

1880 

1881 

1883 



1,080 
1,246 
2,884 
8,000 



128,880 
201.880 
212,100 



1898 
1894 
1806 
1890 



8,822 
8,240 
8,222 
1,218 



251,730 
228,246 
238,060 
848, 016 



During the year an additional line of boats was established between this port and 
Chicago, m. 

BeeHpts and $hipmenU hy veueU, 1896, 

(Oomplled from ttolement Amithed by C. J. Monroe, eeq., Soath HsTon, Mich.] 



Tons. 



AxtleleeeUpped. 



Tona. 



Briek 

Coal 

Floor 

Hay and feed 

Hidea 

Iron and machinery .. 

Lime and eement 

Lumber 

Merchandlae (general) 

Salt 

Stone 

Tan bark 

Total 



877 

8,660 

660 

1,600 

802 

480 

620 I 

8,006 ' 

6,438 

670 , 
1,200 
8,800 



38»113 



Briek and graTel 

Flour 

Fruit 

Hay and feed 

Leather 

Lumber 

Machlnerr 

Merobandise (general) 

Potatoea 

Slaba 

Stone 

Tan bark 

Total 



1,280 

310 

29,895 

500 

820 
6,288 
1,960 
7,187 

405 
1,200 
1,270 
1,200 



61.770 



In addition to the aboTO, a total of 4,200 passengers was carried by vessels trading 
at this pork 



JJ5. 
niPBOYEMENT OF SAUGATUCE HARBOB, inCHIOAN. 

This harbor is at the mouth of the Kalamazoo Biver aud had a chan- 
nel depth before improvement not exceeding 5 feet. Its condition was 
first improved by a private company, which built two slab piers for 
confining the river current and thereby obtained a channel depth of 7 
feet temporarily. Its further improvement was commenced by the Gen- 
eral Government in 1869. The object sought by the present project of 
improvement was to obtain an entrance channel to the Kalamazoo 
Biver of 12 feet depth, protected by piers 200 feet apart, and to extend 
the same depth to the town of Saugatnck, 3 miles above the entrance 
of the river into Lake Michigan. From 1869 to 1882 the piers were 
extended and interior channel revetments constructed until they had a 
total length of 1,907 feet on the north and 3,863 feet on the south side, 
all of pile work. Since 1882, appropriations having been too small to 
keep these structures in repair, they have gone to decay. Tlie nav- 
igable channels opened through the harbor from time to time by dredg- 
ing fill up again very soon after the departure of the dredge. The lake 
ends of the piers project less than 175 feet beyond the Lake Michigan 
shore line aud are entirely inadequate to maintain the proposed depths 
at entrance, even if they were in proper repair. 

The condition of the harbor works at the beginning of the fiscal year 
ENa 97 183 



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2914 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

was as follows: Tbe north pier^ with a total length of 715 feet of pile 
work, filling all gone and seas sweeping through the work withoot 
obstruction. The south pier projected 175 feet from the shore line, and 
with the inshore revetments had a total length of 3,863 feet, all pile 
work. For a distance of 2,525 feet from the outer end this work is a 
wreck above water and has lost a large part of its filling; farther inside 
the timber work is in fair condition, but the filling is nearly all gone. 

Operations during the past year were limited to dredging. The 
U, S. dredge Farquhar began operations June 30, 1896, and continued 
work until October 28, assisted from August 7 to 28 by the U. S. 
dredge Saginaw; 76,713 cubic yards of material was removed, result- 
ing in giving a narrow channel 12 feet in depth from the lake to the 
town of Saugatuck. Soundings in May, 1897^ showed that the effect 
of the dredging had been effaced, as usual, during the winter, but 4 feet 
being found on the bar in front of the entrance and a narrow channel 
of 75 feet between the piers. Under a contract with William A. Starke 
dredging was resumed June 2, 1897, and at the close of the fiscal year 
32,675 cubic yards of material had been removed and the harbor was 
again open to navigation with light draft boats. 

No work having been done on the piers or revetments during the 
year, they remain practically as they were at the beginning. 

The total expenditure for improving this harbor to June 30, 1897, is 
$158,760.11, of which $5,535.31 was spent during the past fiscal year. 

The port of shipment out of this harbor is the town of Saugatuck, 3 
miles above the entrance from Lake Michigan, and tbe natural difift- 
culties in the way of making and maintaining a reliable navigation by 
the present line of water travel are exceedingly great. The ultimate 
abandonment of the existing outlet to the Elalamazoo liiver is author- 
ized in the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, which provides for 
commencing work on an alternative project, as follows: 

Improving Kalamazoo BiTer, Michigan, from Lake Michigan to Sangatnck, in 
accordance with the alternative project sabmitted January twenty-eighth, eighteen 
hundred and ninety-six, five thousand doUars. 

The appropriation for ^^ Improving harbor at Saugatuck, Mich.,'' is 
therefore being applied to maintaining navigation by the present outlet 
until provision is made for completing the new one. 

The estimate submitted for 189!) is therefore as ibllows: 

For maintenance of the old harbor, $10,000. 

This harbor is in the Grand Haven collection district, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Haven, Mich. The light-house establishmeut maintains a fifth-order coast 
lijB^hti on the north side of the entrance and a harbor light near the end of the soath 
pier. 

Original estimated cost of the work, 1867, modified in 1869, 1870, 1875, and 

lfe2 $175,699.46 

Whole amount expended to June 30, 1897 158,760.11 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $14,214.20 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 5, 535. 31 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 8,678.89 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $147.31 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 8, 000. 00 

8,147.31 

July 1, 1897, balance available 531.58 

{Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1899 10, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



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APPENDIX J J — BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 



2915 



ApprcpriaUon$ for improving k&rhor at SoMgatuek, Mich. 



July 25, 1868 (allotmeiit) $23,900 

April 10, 1869 (aUotment) 6, 039 

July 11. 1870 10,000 

March 3, 1871 10,000 

June 10, 1872 15,000 

March 3, 1873 10,000 

June 23, 1874 10,000 

March 3, 1875 10,000 

Augruat 14, 1876 3,000 

June 18, 1878 2,500 

March 3, 1879 6,000 



June 14, 1880 $5,000 

March 3, 1881 5,000 

AugU8t2, 1882 8,000 

July 5, 1884 4,000 

Augn8t5, 1886 8,000 

August 11, 1888 5,000 

July 13, 1892 5,000 

August 17, 1894 12,000 

June 3, 1896 10,000 

Total 167,489 



Contract in force for improving Saugatut^ Harbor, Michigan, 

William A. Starke^^dredging, dated March 26, 1897, approved April 9, 1897, date of 
beginning April 1, 1897, date of expiration September 15, 1897. 



COMMRBCIAL STATISTICS, SAUGATUCK HARBOR, MICHIGAN, FOB GALEJNDAK TKAB 
ENDING DBCBMBBR 31, 1896. 

Entrance and 6learance$. 





Knmher. 


Tonnage. 


Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


X8M 


262 
314 
178 
492 


132,400 
76,300 
42,000 

120,000 


1886 


626 

863 

1,266 


168.682 
106,000 
134,948 
153,190 


1880 


18M 


1890 


1806 


1801 


1896 


1892a 













•Not stated. 

Daring the year the Holland &, Chicago Line established a line of boats between 
this port an4 Chicago, HI. 

Beoeipti and akipmente hg vo$9el, 1896. 
[Compiled from atatement ftamiabed by Heears. GriiBn 4t Henry, Sangataek, Micli.) 





Tons. 


Artlolee aUpped. 


Tons. 


Baakete 


;,ooo 

600 

1,000 

600 

167 

32,126 


liah 


60 


Bricks 


Fmlt 


12,103 
67 


Qoal 




Flonr and feed .^-..-r^Tr^.r ,.... 


Potatoes 


133 


TifmA cfnnMiib uifl AAlt 


Xotal .... 




Lntpb*!" - - 


12,343 






Total 


36,892 









In addition to the above a total of 7,850 passengers was carried by vessels trading 
at this port. 



J J 6. 

IMPROVEMENT OP KALAMAZOO BIVEB, MICHIGAN. 

The project of improvement adopted in 1896 provides for dredging 
the river If miles below Sangatnck and making a new cat through to 
Lake Michigan, to obtain an entrance channel with a depth of 12 feet. 
The condition of the river prior to beginning operations nnder previons 
projects is explained in the rex)ort on <^ Improvement of Sangatnck 
Harbor, Michigan." The estimated cost is $150,000. The first appro- 
priation of $5,000, made in the act of Jnne 3, 1896, is insufficient to 
begin operations. The essential portion of the project is constructing 
works which will create a new entrance for the river into Lake Michigan. 



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2916 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Any partial cut will be filled by winter storms in the same manner tliat 
the existing entrance is, and the entire estimate of cost should be avaU- 
able before work is undertaken. 
The estimate submitted for 1899 is therefore $145,000. 

Original estimated cost of work, 1896 $150,000 

Money statement. 

July 1, 1896, balance nnexpended $5,000.00 

Jnlyl, 1897, balance unexpended 5,000.00 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 145, 000. 00 
Amount that can be prontably expended in fiscal vear ending June 30, 1899 145, OOO. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of riyer and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry ciyil act of June 4, 1897. 



JJ7- 
IMPROVEMENT OF HARBOR AT HOLLAND (BLACK LAKE), MICHIGAN. 

The first steps toward establishing a harbor at this place were taken 
by the citizens of Holland, Mich., by opening a channel having a navi- 
gable depth of abont 5 feet from Blaok Lake into Lake Michigan, and 
protecting it by piers and revetments made of brush and stone. Con- 
tinnation of this improvement was taken in hand by the General Gov- 
ernment in 1867, existing structures strengthened by pile and crib 
work, and extended until (in 1880) the north pier and revetment had 
attained a total length of 1,854 feet and the south pier 1,691 feet. They 
have remained without exteusion since that time. The approved 
project calls for a channel depth of 12 feet, but a depth of from only 8 
to 9 feet can be maintained while the piers remain in their present con- 
dition. Increased depths are attained temporarily by. repeated dredg- 
ing. The piers are not only far too short to protect an entrance channel, 
but their older portions i)ermit the passage of large quantities of sand 
through and under them. 

The condition of the harbor at the beginning of the fiscal year was 
as follows: 

yorth pier J comprising 1,137 feet of. pile work and 717 feet of crib 
work, had a total length of 1,854 feet, and projects 510 feet beyond the 
shore line. The outer end of the pier has been undermined and settled 
6.34 feet below its proper level. The section of old crib work between 
Stations 3+20 and 5+44 was in a very shaky condition, and about to 
be rebuilt. The rest of the pier was in fair condition, but needed addi- 
tional stone filling at various points. 

South pier J comprising 993 feet of pile work and 698 feet of crib work, 
had a total length of 1,691 feet, and projects 695 feet beyond the shore 
line. The pier was in fair condition. Additional filling was required 
at numerous places. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year dredging operations were in prog- 
ress with Government plant for the restoration of the required widUi 
and depth of channel. The work was completed July 14, 1896, and 
resulted in giving a channel 80 feet wide and 14 feet deep at the then 
existing stage of water. By the beginning of November the channel 
had shoaled to 10.5 feet, and the dr^ge was sent back to the harbor. 
Dredging was continued until ^November 23, when navigation ceasing, 
the plant went to Grand Haven into winter quarters. The amount 
dredged during the season by the Government dredge was 10,571 cubic 
yards. In April, 1897, soundings showed that the channel had again 
shoaled to a depth of 12 feet on the outer bar and 9 feet at the entrance 



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stiff 



APPENDIX J J — BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN T0WN8END. 



2917 



IKK 



I 

mi 
I 



m 
mi 



it 



i 




between piers. Under a contract with the Green's Dredging Company, 
dredging operations were commenced April 23 and completed June 7, 
resulting in a dredged channel 50 feet wide and 14 feet deep between 
piers and 75 feet wide and 16 feet deep across the bar. 

The result of dredging done during the year was to maintain the 
channel in a fairly serviceable condition during the time it was most 
needed for local navigation and commerce. 

The total amount expended for improving the harbor to June 30, 1897, 
was $209,533.76, of which $6,110.70 was spent during the past fiscal year. 

The condition of the piers at the close of the year was substantially 
the same as at the beginning. 

The proposed depth of 12 feet can not be maintained until the piers 
are made sand tight by sheet piling and extended to the 15-foot curve 
in Lake Michigan, which is now about 350 feet beyond their lake ends; 
but as no extensions are authorized, its cost is not included in the esti- 
mate submitted below. The repairs to the north pier will be under- 
taken during the next fiscal year. 

The estimate for 1899, being simply for doing what is needed to put 
the present piers in serviceable condition and provide a temporary 
ehannel of requisite navigable depth by dredging, is as follows: For 
sheet piling about 1,000 feet of piers, $8,000; dredging, $4,000; refill- 
ing piers and minor repairs, $2,000, making, with an allowance of about 
7 per cent for contingencies, a total«of $15,000. 

The harbor is in the Grand Haven coUection district and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Haven, Mioh. The Light-Honse Establishment maintains a harbor light 
near the enter end of south pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner end 
of south pier. 

Original estimated cost of the work, 1866, amended in 1873. 1879. 1884. 

and 1882 $291,616.31 

Whole amount expended to June 30, 1897 299,533.76 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $11,191.06 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 6, 110. 70 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 5,080.86 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $28.00 

July 1, 1897, amount coyered by unoompleted contracts 2, 636. 38 

2,664.38 

July 1, 1897, balance available 2,415.98 

{Amount that can be profitablv expended infiscalvear ending June 30, 1899 15, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements oi sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



ApproprioHofu far impr(nfing harbor at Holland (Black Lake), Mkh, 



Black Lake: 

August 30, 1852* $8,000.00 

June 23, 1866 55,615.31 

March 2, 1867 51,000.00 

July 11,1870 10,000.00 

March 8, 1871 10,000.00 

June 10, 1872 10,000.00 

March 3, 1873 12,000.00 

June 23, 1874 15,000.00 

March 3, 1875 15,000.00 

August 14, 1876 15,000.00 

June 18, 1878 10,000.00 

March 3, 1879 6,000.00 

June 14, 1880 6,000.00 



Black Lake— Continued: 

March 3, 1881 $6,000.00 

August 2. 1882 10,000.00 

July 5, 1884 15,000.00 

August 5, 1886 5,000.00 

August 11, 1888 5,000.00 

September 19, 1890 10,000.00 

Holland: 

July 13,1892 5,000.00 

August 17, 1894 15,000.00 

Jmie3, 1896 10,000.00 

Total 304,616.31 



* Amount carried to surplus fund, $1.19. 



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2918 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Contrad in fierce far impravimg HolUmd (Blaek Lake) Harbor, Miohigan. 

Green's Dredging Company, dredging, dated March 26, 1897, approved April 14, 
1897, date of beginning April 1, 1897, date of expiration September 15, 1897. 



COMMSBGIAI. STATISTICS, BLACK LAKB HARBOR. MICHiaAK, FOB OALEVDAB TKAS 
XNDINO DECBMBSR 31, 1896. 

Entrances and oUaraneei. 



Calendar jew. 


Kuinber. 


Tonnage. 


Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tomna^ 


1R89 


1,087 


80,790 


1893 


2.060 

1,816 

800 

408 


815,160 
150,eS7 
210,299 
269.183 


]S90a 


1894 


1891 


2,676 
2,800 


ni'ioo 

200.000 


1805 


1892 


1896 







•Not stated. 



BeoeipU and shipments hy vessel, 1896, 



[Compiled ftom atatements fturnlahed by W. H. Beach, eeq.. of Holland, Midh., and tha oeUeotoref 
enatoms at Grand Haven, Mich.] 



Artddee received. 


Tons. 


Artiolea shipped. 


Tons. 


Briok and atone 


2,860 

2,400 

50 

6,760 

4,600 

381 

676 

60.028 

9,600 

11,708 

730 

4,900 

21.300 


Coal 


CM 


Coal 


Farmprodacta 


820 


Flour........... 


Floor . 


8,466 

2.M9 

806 


Grain 


Pmit 


Gravel 


Grain 


Tron and machinery 


Hay and feed 


7,410 

7,930 

65 


lAw^ and cement.'. 


Leather 


Lumber 


LJmt> and cement 


Merohandiae, general. ................. 


Live stock 


106 




Lumber. 


6,009 
S90 


Salt 


Machinery 


SlalM 


Merchantfise. reneral 


2,890 

26,200 

625 


Tan bark 


lAi^foellaneoos 




Potatoes................. ....... 


l^tal 


114,982 


Stone 


6.006 




Total 




66,973 







J J 8. 

IMPKOVEMENT OP GRAND HAVEN HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

This harbor is at the mouth of Grand Biver, which had a shifting 
channel with a depth of 9 feet at its month before improvement, toward 
which some steps had been taken by the Detroit, Grand Haven and 
Milwaukee Bailroad Company, when systematic work was commenced 
by the Government in 1867, under an appropriation of $65,000 made in 
the river and harbor act of June 23, 1866. The project adopted was 
the usual one of protecting the entrance channel by piers projecting 
into the lake, and dredging as found necessary to make and maintain 
the necessary depth. The outflow of the Grand Eiver has done much 
toward keeping such depth inside of the piers, but it also acts toward 
carrying sand in suspension until the velocity of current is checked on 
reaching the lake, sand deposited, and a bar thereby kept constantly 
forming in advance of the entrance. 



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APPENDIX J J — ^BEPOET OP CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2919 

At the beginning of the last fiscal year the condition of the harbor 
was as follows: 

North pier and revetment^ with a total length of 3,538 feet, comprising 
1,411 feet of crib work and 2,127 feet of pile work, projected 1,612 feet 
beyond the shore line. It was generally in good condition, needing bat 
few minor repairs in its older portions and some additional filling. 

South pier and revetment^ with a total length of 5,774 feet, comprising 
1,507 feet of crib work and 4,269 feet of pile work, projected l,6dL feet 
beyond the shore line. It was in good condition, thongh additional 
filling was required for 1,500 feet from the east end. 

Depth of water. — Seventeen and one-half feet at entrance between 
piers, 21 feet in the southerly approach, and 19 feet in the northerly 
approach, with 14.1 feet on the crest of the middle ground between 
them. 

Operations during the year consisted in repairs to the south pier at 
Stations 18 + 15, 28 + 67, 29 + 52, and 30 + 31, where it had been run 
into by vessels during storms, repairs to the Government storehouse 
where it had been injured in a storm on July 14, 1896, and dredging, 
8,320 cubic yards of material having been removed. The Government 
fleet and property is placed in winter quarters in this harbor, and a 
force was employed during the winter and early spring repairing and 
putting plant in condition for another season's operations. 

Soundings made at intervals during the year showed depths varying 
from 15 to 16 feet in the channel just inside of the piers, and irom 17 to 
20 feet in the outside channels of the approach. 

The mean stage of Lake Michigan as shown by the automatic gauge 
at this harbor during the year was —1.799 feet; the highest monthly mean 
was for June, 1897, viz, —0.961 ; the lowest monthly mean was for Decem- 
ber, 1896, viz, —2.233; the maximum gauge reading was +0.09 foot on 
June 18, 1897, and the lowest reading was —3 feet on August 4, 1896. 
The mean reading for the month of June, 1896, was —1.711. 

The total amount expended in improving thiis harbor up to June 30, 
1897, is $727,265.77, of which $6,764.96 was spent during the last fiscal 
year. 

The general condition of the harbor works at the end of the fiscal 
year was good, though additional filling was needed at a number of points. 
The present approved project calls for an extension of 150 feet to the 
north pier and 100 feet to the south pier; it also calls for plantings to 
restrict the drift of sand over the piers into the harbor. With the 
money appropriated by the last river and harbor act, it is probable that 
therequiiHsd extension of the south pier can be made, and both piers be 
put in good repair. 

The estimate submitted for 1899 is, therefore, as follows: For 150 
linear feet of pier extension, to complete present project, $18,000; for 
restraining drift of sand over piers and revetments, $7,000; for inci- 
dental repairs of piers and revetments, $3,000; making in all, with an 
allowance of about 7 per cent for engineering, superintendence, and 
contingencies, $30,000. 

This harbor is at the port of entry for the Grand Haven collection district. The 
Light-House EBtablishment maintains a fourth-order flashinff coast light south of 
the entrance, and a harbor light, fog signal, and range light on the south pier. 
There is a life-saying station near the inner end of north pier. 

Original estimated cost of the woric, 1866, amended in 1880, 1890, and 

1892 $804,366.15 

Whole amount expended to JuneSO, 1897 727,265.77 



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2920 BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896; balance unexpended $38,865.34 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 6, 764. 96 

July 1, 1897; balance unexpended 32,100.38 

July 1, 1897, outstanding liabilities $430.09 

July 1; 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 9, 000. 00 

9, 430, OB 

Jtayl;1897, balance available 22,670.29 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 45, 000. 00 
Amount that can be urontabl^ expended in fiscal year endiuff June 30, 1899 30, 000. 00 
Submitted in coropliauce with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



Appropriaiion$ for iinpravift^ harbor oX Qramd JETaveii; Iftdk. 



August 80, 1852 (mouth of 
Grand River) 

June 23, 1866 

March 2. 1867 (mouth of Grand 
River) 

April 10,1869 (allotment).... 

July 11, 1870 

1870 (allotment) 

March 3, 1871 

June 10. 1872 

March 3, 1873 

June 23, 1874 

August 14,1876 

June 18» 1878 



$2,000.00 
65,000.00 

40,000.00 

1,866.15 

10,000.00 

-500.00 

6,000,00 

15,000.00 

75,000.00 

50,000.00 

15,000.00 

15,000.00 



March 3, 1879 $9,000.00 

June 14, 1880 50,000.00 

March 3,1881 50,000.00 

August 2,1882 40,000.00 

July5,1884 60,000,00 

August 5,1886 30,000.00 

August 11, 1888 25,000.00 

September 19, 1890 75,000.00 

Julyl3,1892 90,000.00 

August 17,1894 25,000.00 

Junes, 1896 20,000.00 

Total 759,366.15 



(kifiiTiMX in force far improving Grand Haven Harbor, Midkigan. 

Green's Dredging Company, dredging, dated March 26, 1897, approved April 14, 
1897; date of beginning, April 11, 1897; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 



COMBIBRCIAL STATISTICS, GRAND HAVEN HARBOR, MICHIQAN, FOR OALBNDAR TKAR 
BNDINO DKCEMBBR 31, 1896. 

^ Bntranooi and cUaranees. 



C»Landar yeur. 


Nnmber. 


Tonnsge. 


CSslendar yesr. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


1388 


1,608 

1,110 

1,172 

819 

816 


1,405,800 
849,870 
834,080 
616,422 
608,836 


1893 


761 
641 
674 
883 


613,425 


1889 


1894 


504,609 


1890 


1895 


AfA^ffi 


1891 


, 1896 


7271909 


1892 


1 









BeoHptB and MpmenU by vetseUf 1896. 

(Compiled from siatementa ftunlBhed by the colleotor of customs and United States Inspector &. C. 

Dnryea, Grand Haven, Mich.] 



Articles received. 



Tons. 



Articles shipped. 



Tons. 



Feed 

Floor 

Fruit 

Grain 

Lime and cement — 

Lumber 

Merchandise, general 

Pig iron 

Baft 

Wood 

Total 



90.080 

61,969 

240 

239 

9,788 

1,012 

11,788 

41,101 

460 

2.715 



141,972 



BHok 

Celery 

Flour 

Fruit 

Lime and cement. ... 

Lumber 

Merchandise, general 

Pig iron 

Potatoes 

Wood 

Total 



8,850 

^^ 
35 

2,002 

436 

1,122 

13.506 

8.941 

68 

180 



81,197 



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APPENDIX J J — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2921 

J J 9. 

mPEOVBMENT OP GRAND RIVER, MIGHIGAN. 

From 1881 to 1884 $50,000 was appropriated for Grand Biver, and 
expended in excavating a channel 4 feet deep throagh the shoal cross- 
ings below the city of Grand Bapids. The channels dredged have 
maintained themselves, bat the work did not extend a safficient distance 
down the river to materially improve navigation. 

The existing project, adopted by Congress in the river and harbor 
act of Jane 3, 1896, provides for dredging a channel from Grand Haven 
to Grand Bapids with a depth of 10 feet and bottom width of 100 feet. 
The distance by river from the piers at Grand Haven to the foot of 
Ganoes Oanal in Grand Bapids is 40 miles. The Grand Biver drains 
a basin of aboat 5,700 sqaare miles. Its extreme low-water discharge 
is slightly less than 1,000 cabic feet per second, and subject to consider- 
able flnctuation by the opening and closing of slaice gates at the mills 
along its banks in Grand Bapids. The fall of the river from Grand 
Bapids to Grand Haven was, during the low water of 1891, 6.2 feet, of 
which 5.2 feet occurs in the first 12 miles below Grand Bapids. The 
slope is, however, affected not only by the stage of the river but also 
by the fluctuations in the level of Lake Michigan. At ordinary stages 
the river is navigable for vessels of light draft, but at extreme low 
water channel depths of less than 2 feet are founa on some of the bars. 
The currents of the river are moderate, the amount of sediment carried 
during high stages comparatively small, and the banks of the river 
Arm. Borings indicate that in the upper i)ortion of the river the soil 
through which the channel is to be excavated consists of a mixture of 
sand, clay, gravel, small stones, and occasional bowlders, the glacial 
drift which covers this portion of the State of Michigan. No stratified 
rock was encountered to a depth of 14 feet. In the lower i)ortion of 
the river the material encountered was a mixture of sand, gravel, and 
shells. 

The estimated cost of this work is $670,500. The appropriation of 
$50,000 by the river and harbor act of June 3, 1896, is being expended 
in excavating a channel way with a minimum depth of 5 feet and bot- 
tom width of 30 feet, within the limits of the adopted project. Proposals 
were invited for dredging and bids oi>ened on December 21, 1896. The 
lowest bid received was for dredging at 19^ cents per cubic yard, and 
for removing bowlders at 65 cents per cubic yard, which were considered 
too high and the bid was rejected. It was decided to do the work with 
the Government plant of this district and hired labor. The (7. S. dredge 
Farquhar was overhauled and her dipper adjusted so that she could 
dredge at 6 feet depth. For removing the material dredged a 12-inch 
sand pump, with its boiler and engines, was erected on a light-draft 
scow and connected with wrought-iron pipe placed on floats. Thehopper 
from which the pump raises the material is covered by a heavy iron 
grillage which holds large stones, logs, and other material which might 
clog or break the pump; such substances are removed by hand as they 
accumulate. The plant was placed in position and began work May 26. 
At first the working of the pump was not satisfactory, but after some 
further a^ustment a rate of removal of 100 yards per hour has been 
obtained — the capacity of the dredge. The number of cubic yards 
removed to June 30, 1897, was 14,035. 

While the dredging is being done at a cost below the lowest bid 
received, the plant is not considered adapted for either cheap or rapid 
work. It was constructed from the materials at hand, as the size 
of the appropriation would not justify the large original outlay which 



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2922 REPOBT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. 8. iLRMT. 

woald be necessary for the purchase of a dredge snitable for the riyer. 
To enable the work to be done economically, it will require large enoagh 
appropriations to justify the purchase of proper plant, either by a con- 
tractor or by the Government. 

The improvement will be of comparatively little value until depths 
are obtained that will enable lake vessels to arrive at Grand Bapids. 
The work is one that can most economically be done under the system 
of continuous contracts, and could be completed within three years. 
The estimate submitted for 1899 is, therefore, $250,000. 

Whole amount appropriated and expended, 1881 to 1884, inclnBive $50, 000. 00 

Original estimated cost of project adopted in 1896 670,500.00 

Whole amonnt expended on present project to June 90, 1897 8, 420. 02 

Money gtatemenU 

July 1,1896, balance unexpended $60,000.00 

June 30, 18Sf7, amount expended during fiscal year 8,420. 02 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 41,579.98 

July 1, 1897, outstanding flabilitiee 1,409.63 

July 1,1897, balance available 40,170.35 

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 620, 500. 00 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J une 30, 1899 250, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of riyer and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4,1897. 



AppropHoHotu for improving Grand Biver, Miohigam. 

March 8, 1881 $10,000 

August 2, 1882 15,000 

Julys, 1884 25,000 

June 3, 1896 50,000 

Total 100,000 



Abeiraoi of Hd for dredging Grand Biverf Miohigan, reoeivod and opened Deoeniber Bl, 
1896j in aeoordanee with advertisewient dated November jfl, 1896, kg Copt, C, MeD, 
Towneend, Corpe of Engineere. 



Now 


Name and addreM of bidder. 


£«rih,eto., 

price per 

onbicyard. 


fiowldera. 
price per 
cubic yard. 


Bemarka. 


1 


Jamea H. Pheatt Toledo. Ohio 




OmiU. 
S6 











COMMERCIAL STATISTICS, GRAND RIVER, MICHIOAK, FOR CALENDAR YXAR KNDINO 

DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

Eniranoee and olearancee. 



Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tonnage. 


1896 .•• 


»2 


M,760 







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APPENDIX J J — BEPOBT OF CAPTAIN T0WN8END. 



2923 



BeoeiptB and BhipmeuU 5y vessel, 1896, 
[Compiled from statement Aimished by United States Inspector Dniyea, Qrand Haven, Hleh.] 



Artiolea receiyed. 



Pigixon.... 
Total. 



Tons. 



89,788 



89,738 



Articles shipped. 



Briok 

Fruit 

Pig iron... 
Potatoes.. 
Wood 

Total 



Tons. 



2,275 

487 

1,588 

45 

2,715 



7,110 



JJio. 
IMPBOYEMENT OF MUSE£GON HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

Before the Government did any work at this harbor local enterprise 
had improved the natural outlet of Muskegon Lake by building revet- 
ments and slab piers extending into Lake Michigan, whereby a depth of 
13 feet was obtained in the channel way so protected ; but the entrance to 
it was obstructed by a bar in front of the piers over which the channel 
of best water was usually only 6 or 7 feet deep. Operations were com- 
menced by the Government in 1867, with the puipose of remodeling 
the old slab piers and extending them by crib work to deep water 
beyond the bar. This was done, and subsequent extensions foUowed, 
as necessitated by th6 steady lakeward progress of the shore, line and 
sand accretions in advance of it. In this way an entrance channel 12 
feet deep was maintained, but the width between piers was only 180 
feet, and to attempt to enter this narrow entrance was a dangerous 
matter in stormy weather. The scheme of improvement was therefore 
modified by building a detached pier parallel to and 300 feet north of 
the south pier, the inner end of the new structure being about 120 feet 
north of the lake end of the old north pier; the opening left thereby 
introduced a new element of danger, which was obviated by removing 
a length of 316 feet from tbe end of the old north pier and closing the 
interval thus made between it and the detached structure by an oblique 
connecting pier of crib work 330 feet long. 

The condition of the harbor piers at the beginning of the last fiscal 
year was as follows: 

N'orthpieTj comprising 1,404.1 feet of crib work, 392 feet of pile-pier 
revetment, and 786.3 feet of new sheet-pile revetment, had a total length 
of 2,582.4 feet, and projected 1,220 feet beyond the shore line. Three 
hundred and twenty-two feet of this crib work was built in 1868-69^ 
and the timberwork above water was badly dilapidated. 

South pier, comprising 1,100 feet of crib work and 382 J feet of pile 
work, had a total length of 1,482} feet, and projected 1,280 feet beyond 
the shore line. ' Timber work generally in serviceable condition, except 
in the pile-pier section. Considerable additional filling was needed in 
both piers. 

The available depth of water in channel between piers was 14.3 feet. 

Under the contract with William A. Starke, dated May 1, 1896, a 
channel was dredged through the harbor, the two central cuts having 
a depth of 18 feet and two side cuts of 16 feet, the width of cut being 
30 feet. Work was begun August 18, 1896, and completed September 
29, 27,259 cubic yards of material having been removed. Soundings in 
May, 1897, show that tbe harbor had again shoaled so that but a nar- 
row channel remained of a depth of 15 feet. Dredging operations were 
resumed on June 15, 1897, under a contract with the Green's Dredging 



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2924 BEPOBT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY. 

Company, dated March 26, 1897. At the close of the fiscal year 17,581 
cabic yards of material had been removed under this contract. 

Under a contract with W. Mclvor and W. A. Butterfield, dated Jane 
27, 1896, the superstructure of the north pier was rebuilt a distance of 
323 linear feet, the south pier faced with sheet piling from Station 
to Station 3+80, and a pile projection built at the oblique section to 
the north pier to intercept the run of high seas along the pier and pre- 
vent their deflection across the harbor. Work was begun July 8, 1896, 
and completed December 20, 1896. The Government plant was also 
employed in driving a row of sheet piling along the north pier fiN>m 
Station to 2+82. The object of placing the sheet piling along both 
the north and south piers is to prevent the passage of sand through the 
pile piers near the shore line, and also to enable increased depths to be 
obtained by dredging, these i>ortions of the piers having originally 
been designed for only a 12-foot channel at higher lake levels. Minor 
repairs were also made to other portions of the piers by the Govern- 
ment force, and consisted in replacing timbers that had been displaced, 
refilling pockets having insufficient stone, and spiking down decking 
that had been loosened by storms. 

On May 27, 1897, a contract was entered into with Robert B. Bice to 
construct a 200-foot extension to the south pier. This is to consist of 
two cribs 100 by 30 by 22 J feet on a pile foundation and with a continu- 
ous superstructure 6 feet high. Work was begun June 14, and at the 
close of the fiscal year twenty-two piles had been driven for the founda- 
tion of the first crib, and twelve courses of the first and one of the sec- 
ond crib completed. 

The total amount expended for improving the harbor up to June 30, 
1897, is $430,341.90, of which $15,921.15 was spent during the last fiscal 
year. 

The approved project of improvement calls for extending the north 
pier 550 feet and the south pier 500 feet, and the commercial interests 
of the harbor require these extensions as soon as practicable. Funds 
now available will suffice for putting the old piers in good repair and 
for building about 200 linear feet of pier extensions. 

The estimate for 1899 is therefore as follows: For 800 linear feet of 
crib piers, to complete north and south piers according to the approved 
project, $105,000, for dredging channel between piers to full width and 
depth, $5,000, making, in all, $110,000. 

The harbor is in the Grand Haven colleotlon distriot and the nearest portof entry 
is Grand Haven, Mich. The light-honse establisbment maintains a fourth-order 
coast li^ht on the sonth shore and a harbor light, fog bell, and range lights on the 
south pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner end of the north pier. 

Original estimated cost of work, 1866, amended in 1869, 1873, 1881, 1884, 

1890, and 1892 1589,000.00 

Whole amount expended to June 80, 1897 480,341.90 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balance unexpended $49,579.25 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiaoal year 15,921.15 

July 1,1897, balance unexpended 33,658.10 

July 1,1897, outstanding liabilities $244.56 

July 1, 1897, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 18, 131. 30 

18,375.86 

July 1, 1897, balance available 15,282.24 

{Amount f estimated) required for completion of existing project 125, 000. 00 
Amount tnat can be profitably expended in fiscal year endmff June 30, 1899 110, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



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APPENDIX J J ^BEPORT OP CAPTAIN T0WN8END, 



2925 



Appropriations for improving harbor at Muskegon, Mich, 



March2,1867 $69,000 

July 11, 1870 10,000 

March 3, 1871 15,000 

June 10, 1872 10,000 

June 23, 1874 10,000 

March 3, 1875 25,000 

Augnist 14, 1876 15,000 

March 3, 1879 5,000 

June 14, 1880 7,500 

Maroh3,1881 20,000 



August 2, 1882 $25,000 

July 5, 1884 20,000 

August 5, 1886 12,500 

August 11, 1888 45,000 

September 19, 1890 50,000 

July 13,1892 75,000 

August 17, 1894 80,000 

June3,1896 80,000 

Totftl 464»000 



Abstraot of Hd9 for pier extenHon at Muskegon Harbor, MUihigam, received and opened 
May 19, 1897, in acoordanoe with advertisement dated April tO, 1S97, bg Capt. C. MoD, 
Townsend, Corps of Engineers. 



• 1 
2 

8 

4 
5 
6 

7' 

8 

9 

10 
11 



• 1 
2 

8 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

10 
U 



Robert B. Bioe, Matkefon. Mioh 

Charles Sohoenberg, Maskegon, Mich 

KelBon J. Gajlord, JLndington, Mioh 

Love Sc West, Muskegon, Mich 

EbIo-w & Mnnroe, Charlevoix, Mich 

Chicago Star Construction and Dredging Co., 

Chicago,IU "........ 

Alex. & William MoCnrdy, Honghton, Mich 
HauHlor St, Late Towing and Dock Co., 

Chicago, HI 

Dona1dA.MoLeod,Mani8te^Mich 

A. W. Clark, Muskegon, Mioh 

W. Mclvor, Marseilles, ill 



$14.00 
15.00 
14.60 
16.00 
14.00 

16.25 
16.00 

16.00 
18.00 
10.00 
18.00 



While 

pine 

timber, 

116,952 

feetB.M. 

(per 1,000 

feet 
B.M.). 



White 

pine 

plank, 

14^ feet 

B. M. 

(per 1,000 

feet 

B.M.). 



$2L00 
20.00 
21.00 
20.00 
21.00 

22.00 
28.00 

21.00 
28.00 
24.00 
24.00 



$16.00 
16.00 
18.00 
17.00 
19.00 

19.00 
20.00 

2L00 
20.00 
20.00 
18.00 



L). 



Bobert B. Bice, Muskegon, Mioh 

Charles Sohoenberg, Muskegon, Mich 

Nelson J. Gavlord, Lndington. Mich 

Love A. West, Muskegon, Mich 

Esloir A Munroe, Charlevoix, Mich 

(Chicago Star Construction and Dredging 

Co., (HiicaiFO, HI 

Alex. St, WilliaiA MoCnrdy, Houghton, Mich 
Hausler Sc Lute Towing and Book Co., 

Chicago, Hi 

Donald A. MoLeod, Manistee, Mioh 

A. W. dark, Muskegon, Mioh , 

W. Mclvor, Mar8emee,Hl , 



$5.75 


vo-.y. 


H 


5.75 


2i 


7 


6.50 


2 


21 


6.00 


H 


%L 


7.00 


r 


3 


6.60 


2 


8 


7.00 


2 


8| 


7.75 


^ 


8 


7.00 


r 


8 


7.50 
8.75 


? 


it 



8 
3 



Dredg- 
ing for 
founda- 
tion, 800 
cubic 
yards 
(per 
cubio 
yard). 



White 

oak 

timber, 

480 feet 

B.M. 

(per 1,000 

feet 
B. M.). 



$85.06 
40.00 
80.00 
22.00 
25.00 

85.00 
80.00 

60.00 
46.00 
40.00 
4A.00 



Approxi- 
mato 
totaL 



$15,481.80 
15,787.08 
15.846.07 
16,089.94 
16,610.92 

17, 159. 19 
17,455.52 

18,585.97 
19,245.08 
19,439.88 
20,816.91 



•Contract entered into Miqr 27, 1897. 



Uet of oontraots in force for improving Muskegon Harbor, Midhigam. 



Green's Dredging Compuiy, dredging, dated March 28, 1897, approved April 14, 
S97; date of beginning, April 1, 1897; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 
Robert B. Rice, pier work, date of contract May 27, 1897, approved Jane 11, 1897; 



1897; date of beginning, April 1, 1897 

Robert B. Rice, pier work, date of c ^ , , _^ ^ 

date of beginning, Jnne 1, 1897; date of expiration, NoyembOT% 1^. 



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2926 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMY. 

OOMMBRGIAL STAIISTIGS, MUSKBQON HAKBOB, MICmaAIT, TOR OAIXNBAB TXAB 
ENDING DBCEMBBB 31, 1896. 

JBmtrance9 and clearance. 



Calendiff year. 


Nnniber. 


Toiiiuic*> 


Calendar TMT. 


Number. 


Taaakagb. 




2,686 
4,626 
8,786 
2,886 
4,174 


*"Si,"86i" 
640,640 
704,046 
740,021 


1808 




Iggg , 


2.482 
081 


884, 040 


1889 


1804 


793,184 


1800 


1806 


441«289 


1891 . 


1896 


662,787 


1892 











Daring the year a new line for the transportation of freight and paasengerB was 
established by the Muskegon and Grand Rapids Transportation Company. 

Seeeipti and BhipmenU Jf$ vessel, XS96. 

[Compiled from stetemanta ftuniahed by Hon. H. H. Holt, KoBkogoii, Hioh., and oolleotor of eustoma 

at Grand Haven, Mioh.] 



Articlea reoelTed. 



Tone. 



Artidea abipped. 



Tons. 



Coal 

Floor 

Gndn 

Gravel 

Hay and feed 

Lime ami cement 

Lnmber 

Malt 

Merohandiae, general 

Pic iron 

Salt 

Steel raiU 

Tan bark 

Total 



1,600 

57,818 

2,(173 

.606 

9,574 

6,008 

60,415 

2,018 

40,606 

2,800 

200 

2,560 

200 



186,046 



Feed 

Fruit 

Grain 

Hidea 

Lime and cement 

Lumber 

Meroliandise, general 

Pig iron , 

Plaster 

Salt 

Slaba 

Stavea 

Wood 

Total 



2,511 

240 

75 

101 

60,180 

81,104 

600 

4,816 

130 

6.602 

856 

8,222 



100,796 



J J II. 

IMPROVEMENT OP WHITE LAKE HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

Before improvement by the Government a narrow and crooked out- 
let from Vf hite Lake to Lake Michigan had been improved by local 
enterprise so as to permit vessels drawing about 5 feet to pass, but 
when the improvement by the Government was commenced this chan- 
nel was abandoned, and a straight cut dredged from lake to lake and 
covered by lateral revetments and piers. This work was in progress 
until 1882, by which time 3,959 feet of pile and crib work had been 
placed, of which 2,284 feet was on the north and 1,665 feet on the south 
side of the channel. No extensions have been made since 1882, but in 
the meantime 424 feet of revetment has washed away ffom the White 
Lake end on the south side and 166 feet from the north side. 

The condition of the harbor June 30, 1896, was as follows: 

Available depth of water through channel between piers, 8^ feet. 

Hforthpier^ a close pile structure, L,515 feet long, projecting 365 feet 
beyond the shore line. It was generally in fair condition, but some of 
the piles were broken away and others loosened, and filling was lack- 
ing in many places. 

Bouth pievy comprising 1,498 feet of close piling and 356 feet of crib 
work, had a total length of 1,854 feet, and projected 630 feet beyond 
the shore line. The west end of the outer crib has been undermined, 



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APPENDDC J J — BEPOBT OP CAPTAIN TOWNSEND. 2927 

causing it to settle aboat 3 feet below its proper leyel. Timberwork 
above water was in an advanced stage of decay between Stations 3+56 
and 7+23. A large portion of the pier needed considerable additional 
filting. 

Ko work was done on the piers daring the year, which therefore 
remain substantially in the condition above indicated at its end. 

Dredging operations under contract with William A. Starke, dated 
May 1, 1896, were begun July 9 and completed August 14. A channel 
120 feet wide was dredged through the bar from 13 to 15 feet in depth, 
32,979 cubic yards of material being removed. Soundings taken at the 
close of the fiscal year indicate that less shoaling than usual has taken 
place this season, the least channel depth being 12.4 feet. 

The total amount expended for improving this harbor to June 30, 
1897, is 4280,360.26, of which $4,207.70 was spent daring the past fiscal 
year. 

The approved project of improvement calls for a navigable depth of 
12 feet through the channel between the piers, but that depth can not 
be maintain^ until extensions of about 450 and 250 feet are made to 
the north and south piers, respectively. The last approved plan of 
operations provides for extensions of 250 and 200 feet. The old piers 
need considerable additional filling and scattering repairs. 

The estimate for 1899 is as follows: For pier extensions aggregating 
450 feet, $45,000; for additional filling and general repairs of old piers, 
$5,000^ a total of $50,000. 

The harbor is in the Grand Haven ooUeotlon district, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Haven, Mioh. The Light-Hoase Establishment maintains a fonrth-order 
flashing coast light on the shore soath of the harbor and a harbor light on the enter 
end of the south pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner end of north pier. 

Original estimated cost of work, 1866, amended in 1873, 1884, and 1892. . . $337, 550. 00 
Whole amount expended to June 30, 1897 280,360.26 

M(mey stcUemewk 

Jnly 1, 1896, balance unexpended $13,397.44 

June 30, 1897, amount expended during fiscal year 4, 207. 70 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended 9,189.74 

{Amount ^estimated) required for completion of existing project 48, 000. 00 

Amount tnat can be profitably expended in fiscal year endinff J une 30, 1899 48, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



Appropriaiiofu far improving harbor at WMt^ Lake, Mich, 



March 2, 1867 $57,000 

April 10, 1869 (allotment) 44, 550 

Jnly 11,1870 20,000 

MarcW3,1871 20,000 

June 10,1872 10.000 

March 3, 1873 7,000 

June 23,1874 10,000 

March 3, 1875 10,000 

August 14, 1876 5,000 

June 18,1878 12,000 

March3,1879 7,500 

June 14,1880 5,000 



March3,1881 $7,500 

August 2, 1882 12,000 

July 5, 1884 10,000 

August 6, 1886 10,000 

August 11, 1888 10,000 

September 19, 1890 17,000 

July 13, 1892 5,000 

August 17, 1894 5,000 

June 3, 1896 5,000 

Total 289,550 



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2928 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

Contract in force for improving harhor at White Lake^ Mieh, 

Green's Dredging Company, 
1897; date of beginning, April 1, 



ng, dated Maroh 26, 1897, approved April 14^ 
'; date of expiration, September 15, 1897. 



OOMMBBGIAL STATISTICS, WHITE LAKS HABBOB. MIOHIOAK, FOB OALBin>AB TKAB 
Xin>IKa DBGBMBBB 



OBy 1 

I 81, 

B»lrance$ and cloarmum. 



Calendar year. 


Xrimber. 


Tonnage. 


Calendar year. 


»-*«. 


TmiafB. 


1888 


1,408 
782 
579 
406 
892 


147,143 

"*62,"276' 
47,185 
68.960 


1898 


MO 
195 
881 
845 


l,Mt,088 
18,115 
84,574 

S7,8as 


1889 


1894 


1890 


1895 


1891 


1890 


1892 








[Gompfled from itetoment fbniidi«d by tiiA ooUeotor of 6u 


ArtiolMrweivod. 


Tons. 




Tteiu 


Coal 


090 

88 

543 

7,887 


Fmit 


1.88S 
8,U9 

60689 
106 


Hides 


X/nmber. 


Lumber 


Merchandise, seneral 


Marohandisot general 


Potato^ !!...!! 




Ties 


406 


Total 


9,158 


Wood 


1.919 




Total 




61,4Ut 









J J ". 

IMPROVEMENT OF PENTWATER HARBOR, MICHIGAN. 

The ifovernmental improvement of this harbor was commenced in 
1867^ but before that time a narrow channel about 4 feet deep had been 
made by local action to connect Pentwater Lake with Lake Michigan. 
The project adopted by the Government was to increase the channel 
width and depth to 150 and 12 feet, respectively, and protect the chan- 
nel by lateral piers extended into Lake Michigan. Work on this proj- 
ect has been in progress ever since, but the depth of 12 feet has not 
yet been obtained, except for short periods following dredging, the 
piers having never been long enough to maintain such a depth. 

The condition of the harbor June 30, 1896, was as follows: 

The north pier had a total length of 2,223 feet, of which 1,821 is pile 
revetment and 402 crib work; it projected 610 feet beyond the shore 
line. 

The south pier, comprising 1,391 feet of pile revetment and 721 feet 
of crib work, had a total length of 2,112 feet and projected 610 feet 
beyond the shore line. 

Dredging operations were in progress at the close of the last fiscal 
year under a contract with William A. Starke, dated May 1, 1896, and 
were completed July 2, 1896. 2,639 cubic yards of material having been 
removed in the two days of tne fiscal year, and 25,471 cubic yards under 
the contract, the dredged channel being to a depth of 13 feet. Sound 
ings taken in the spring of 1897 showed that the usual shoaling had 
taken place at the ends of the piers during the winter, the prevailing 
depth being 10 ieet. To restore the required depth of navigation in 



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APPENDIX J J — ^BVPORT OP CAPTAIN T0WN8END. 



2929 



the channel, dredging was resumed Hay 18, 1897, under a contract with 
the Green Bay Dredge and Pile Driving Company, dated March 26, 
1897. A channel 100 feet wide and 16 feet deep was dredged from 
Station 8 to the outer slope of the bar, a distance of 660 feet, and 50 feet 
wide and 14 feet deep at the inner ends of the piers, the amount of 
material removed being 14,136 cubic yards. The work was completed 
June 9, 1897. 

The total amount expended for the harbor's improvements to June 
30, 1897, is $241,264.96, of which $5,342.72 was spent during the last 
fiscal year. 

The piers reached to but little beyond the lOfoot curve in Lake 
Michigan, and for this reason a greater navigable depth can not be 
kept except as dredging serves to give it temporarily. Twelve feet, as 
called for by the approved project, can be obtained and held with any 
reasonable permanence only when the piers shall have been extended 
to the 15-foot curve, now fi'om 300 to 400 feet distant. The limit of 
extension at present authorized is 200 feet for the south and nothing 
for the north pier. The old portions of both piers must be rebuilt 
above water, and the old section of the north pier should also be made 
sand-tight by sheet-piling. 

The estimate for 1899 is as follows: For extending the south pier 200 
feet, $20,000; for rebuilding above water and sheet-piling 500 feet of 
north pier, $10,000; for rebuilding above water 500 feet of south pier, 
$5,000; dredging, $3,000; minor repairs and refilling pier, $2,000; mak- 
ing in all, $40,000. 

Thifi harbor is in the Grand HaTen coUeotion dlBtriot, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand HaTen, Mich. The Light-House Establishment maintains a harbor light 
Dear the onter end of sonth pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner end 
of north pier. 

Original estimated cost of iinproYement, 1867 $327,718.40 

Whole amount expended to Jane 30, 1897 241,264.96 

Money statement 

July 1, 1896, balanoe unexpended '. $12)897.76 

June 30, 1S&7, amount expended during fiscal year 5,342.72 

July 1, 1897, balance unexpended , 7,565.04 

July 1,1897, outstanding liabilities $15.90 

July 1, 1897, amount ooyered by uncompleted contracts 193. 23 

209.13 

July 1, 1897, balance available 7,345.91 

{Amount (estimated) required for comnletion of existing project 78, 893. 40 
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30,1899 40, 000. 00 
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and 
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of June 4, 1897. 



AgprapriaHan$ for improvifig harbor at PmitoateTf Miek. 



March 2, 1867 $55,000 

April 10, 1869 (aUotment) 17, 820 

July 11, 1870 10,000 

Marehd, 1871 10,000 

June 10, 1872 30,000 

Maroha, 1873 20,000 

August 14, 1876 10,000 

June 18, 1878 10,000 

March 3,1879 6,000 

June 14, 1880 4,000 

March 3,1881 10,000 

BNG 97 184 



August 2, 1882 $10,000 

Ju&5,1884 15,000 

Augusts, 1886 10,000 

August 11,1888 8,000 

September 19, 1890 8,000 

July 13, 1892 5,000 

August 17, 1894 5,000 

June 3, 1896 5,000 

Total 248,820 



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2930 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMT. 

Coniraet in force for improving harbor at Ponitoater, 2dich, 

Green Bay Dredge and Pile Driyin^ Company, dredging, dated March 26, 1897, 
approved April 13, 1897 ; date of beginning, April 1, 1897 : date of expiration, Septem- 
ber 16, 1897. 



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS, FSNTWATER HARBOR. MICHIGAN, FOR CAUEimAS TRAB 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896. 

EntroHoes and clearance$» 



Calendar year. 


Komber. 


Tonnage. 


Calendar year. 


Number. 


Tomuise. 


1888 


800 


46,000 


1W3 


116 

60 
500 




]880a 


1894 




1890 


27 
1,140 


2,660 
71,280 


1895 




1891 


1896a 




1892a 

















a Not stated. 

BeoeipU and ahipmente by vestel, 1896» 

[Compfled from statoraent furnished by the Sands A Maxwell Lumber Company, Pentwater, Hioh.] 



Articles received. 



Tods. 



Artioles shipped. 



Tons. 



Brick 

Flour 

Grain 

Hay and feed 

Lime and cement. 
Salt 

Total , 



88 

50 
890 
100 
78 
84 



740 



Fmil misoellaoeons 

Famitore 

Lumber 

Posts and ties 

Potatoes 

SUbs 

Tan bark 

Total 



3,000 
1.268 
8,453 
1,324 
210 
1,075 
1,020 



16,860 



J J 13. 

IMPROVEMENT OF LUDINGTON HARBOR, MICHIGAK. 

The Government's part in the development of this harbor dates from 
1867, when private enterprise had made, and for some years maintained, 
a narrow channel, with a depth of 7 feet, from Lake Michigan to Pere 
Marquette Lake. The plan of improvement then adopted was to dredge 
the channel to a depth of 12 feet, widen it to 200 feet, and protect its 
projection into Lake Michigan by lateral piers. The estimated cost was 
|270,682. The improvement was duly made and subsequently main- 
tained by periodical dredging and occasional pier extensions until 
1885-86, when the north pier comprised a length of 961 feet aott the 
south pier and revetment 1,679J feet. 

In 1890 the project was enlarged into one which, by dredging and 
pier extensions, contemplated a channel 18 feet deep and 250 feet wide 
at entrance, without change of existing width within the limits of piers 
already built. The estimated cost of this modification was 1111,000. 
Work thereon was promptly commenced, and in 1891 the authorized 
pier extensions had been completed by adding 500 feet to the north 
and 700 feet to the south pier, and the channel depth has been main- 
tained at from 14 to 16^ feet, but the fnll depth of 18 feet has not yet 
been secured. 

The condition of the harbor works June 30, 1896, was as follows: 

Available depth 14 feet, due to a fall of 2 feet in the level of Lake 
Michigan since the project was adopted. 



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iff APPENDIX J J — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN TOWNSBND. 2931 

^ North pier (all crib work) bad a total length of 1,452 feet and pro- 

ii. jected 930 feet beyond the shore line. 

B bouth pier, comprising 567 feet of pile work and 1^814 feet of crib 

work, had a total length of 2,381 feet and projected 1,550 feet beyond 
the shore line. 
Under the contract with William A. Starke, dated May 1, 1896, 

^ dredging was began at this harbor Joly 29 and completed September 1, 
48,169 cubic yards of material having been removed, resulting in pro- 
ducing a navigable channel 18 feet deep and 120 feet wide between 
piers and across the bar beyond them. Soundings taken in November 

k showed a channel depth of 17 feet, which was also found in April, 1897, 
but the width of the channel had considerably diminished at the end of 

I the north pier. To widen the channel at this point the dredge of the 

J* Green Bay Dredge and Pile Driving Company, under contract dated 
March 26, 1897, commenced operations April 28, and removed 10,658 
cubic yards, completing the work May 17, 1897. 

A contract was entered into with William Brownrigg, dated March 
26, 1897, for reconstructiug the south pier between stations 8+70 and 
11+70, and the north pier between stations 10+35 and 12+35. These 

^ portions of the piers are to be cut down to a level 1 foot below zero of 
gauge, reenforced in front with a wall of Wakefield sheet piling and 
protected by a row of oak piles. A new superstructure is to be built 
above, having a height of 6 feet. Operations were begun April 27, and 
at the close of the fiscal year the front wall of the old work had been 
cut down along the portions of the piers to be repaired, and in the 
north pier the sheet piling had been driven and secured by binding 
timbers and screw bolts. Nine of the front oak piles had also been 
placed. 

The total amount expended in improving this harbor to June 30, 1897, 

is $368,819.90, of which (8,614.54 was spent during the last fiscal year. 

As a turther extension of piers has not yet been authorized, the 

estimate submitted for 1899 is as follows: For repairs to piers, $10,000; 

dredging, $5,000; making a total of $15,000. 

The harbor is in the Grand Haven coUection district, and the nearest port of entry 
is Grand Haven, Mich. The light-honse establishment maintains a harbor light and 
fog whistle near the end of south pier. There is a life-saving station near the inner 
end of north pier. 

Original estimated cost of work, 1867 $270,682.00 

Estimated cost of enlarged project of 1890 111,000.00