(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Report of the Commissioner of Education made to the Secretary of the Interior for the year ... with accompanying papers"

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at http : //books . google . com/| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



c^\* 



.\ 



>r- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



\ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^=^ [ Whole Number 583 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Commissioner of Education 



FOR 



THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1913 



VOLUME II 



WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1914 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198566 
C 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME H. 



INTRODUCTORY SURVEY. 

Page. 

Table 1.— School and ooUege enrollment In 1912 1 

Table 2.— Pupils and stadents of all grades in both pablic and private sdMxds and ooDeges, 1912 2 

Table 3.— Average number of years' attendance (of 200 days) at public schools for each individual, as 

indicated by the school statistics for the years named 6 

Table 4.— Average number of years' schooling (of 200 days) at any school received by each individual, 

as indicated by the statistics for the years named 6 

Tables.— Estimated school enroUment by age groups in 1912... 7 

Table 6.— Distrfbutioa of school enroUment for 1912 by grades, according to estimated percentages. . 7 

Table 7.— Progress of elementary grade enroUment for eight years 8 

Table 8.— Elimination of high-school students 8 

Table 9.— School enrollment and estimated cost fn 1912 9 

Table 10.— Distributioin of teachers for four periods 9 

Table 11.— Common-sdiool statistics of the South, 1912 11 

Table 12.— Progress of school enrollment and expenditure in the South 12 

Chareb I.— State Common School Systems, 1911-12. 

General statement. 13 

Table 1.— Comnum-echool statistics of the United States in various years 18 

Table 2.— Total populatloD and school population •. 20 

Table 3.— O>mpu]sory school attendance laws 21 

Table 4.— Percentage analysis of population and per cent of illiterates, census of 1910. 22 

Table 5.— Number of pupils enrolled in the common schools at different dates— Estfanated private 

school enrollment in 1911-12... 23 

Table 6.— Per oent of the total population and per cent of the school population enrolled in the com- 
mon schools at different dates.. . 24 

Table 7. The school enrollment, average daily attendance, and aggregate number of days attended, 

1911-12. 25 

Table 8.— The aveiftge daily attendance at various periods, and its relation in 1911-12 to the enroll- 
ment. 26 

Table 9.— Average length of school term at various periods— Attendance compared with the school 

population and the enrollment (columns 8 and 9) 27 

Table 10.— Number and sex of teachers in 1911-12— Percentage of men teachers 28 

Table 11. — Teachers' wages — Length of school term in months— Number of sohoolhouses — Value 

ofschool property— AU for 1911-12 29 

Table 12. — School moneys received in 1911-12 30 

Table 13. — Percentage analysis of the school rovenue, 1911-12, and expenditure per capita of total 

population at various periods 31 

Table 14^— Progress of school expenditure 32 

Table 15.— Payments for school purposes, classified by ftmction, 1911-12 33 

Table 18.— (1) Percentage analysis of school expenditure; (2) average annual expense per pupil phased 
on average attendance) ; (3) average daily expense per pupil; (4) average annual expense per capita 

ofschool population— All for 191 1-12 34 

Table 17.— Permanent school ftmds and school lands, 1912 35 

Chapteb n. 

Rbtisxmbnt Allowance Systems op the Pubuc Schools 37 

Chapteb m.— Statistics or Crrr School Systems, 1912-13. 

General summary 43 

Table 1.— Summary of school statistics for the 50 cities of 100,000 population and over, 1912-13 44 

Table 2. — Summary of attendance and personnel 4« 

Table 8.— Summary of expenses, outlays, and other payments for sdiool purposes, 1912-13 • 50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



IV CONTENTS OF VOLUMB n. 

Table 4.--ToUlpopcilatian and distrfboticm of fttta)danceaxMlp«f90^^ 54. 

Tables.— A«greK»te of school omsos; attendance and persomnel in day acboob, 1912-13 00 

Tables.— ReeeipU of city school systems, 1912-13 110 

Table 7.— Expenses, oatlays, and other payments for school poiposes, 1912-13 132 

Tables.— Expenses (ezclosive of general control), ootlays, and other payments for elamentaiy 

adiooh, 1912-13 1«8 

Table 9.— Expenses (exehislve «f rifgrieetfot), eotlaya, and ottier pajiaenliibr seoondary sdioob, 

1912-13 172 

Chaptks IV.— UNiTKKSinxs, CoftUMBS, A]f» Tbchnoumhcal Schools. 

General review 177 

DtCreee conferred 178 

Benebctione 179 

Table 1.— Nnmbv el UMlenndnaH aad gradnata atraianUi Ia poliUie aBlv«aitiM» oeU«M» and 

tirrhTM^iTcifal ertiaftle ^ *. 1^ 

Table 2.— Number of m^tanradoate and gndoatft utrulMite in private BBiwaUiaB^ coU«es, and 

^^hi^^it^^^ m*¥<w?to ^.-. » ^~. Wl 

Table 3.— Undergradoate itndents in miiversities, coDeew, aad tecJaolagifal wiieoli 183 

Table 4.—PrQCesBar8 and iiMtractors in indv«BrittaB,aQUiCHk and tachnologicalarhoeiL UO 

Table 5.~^StndeBtoin miiv«lti», wi H^m , iitmI todinoletleal aehooi^ lU 

Table 6.— Degrees conferred on men by oniiwgitiai^ cnHegea^ and tecimnkigiral erhaele, 1S& 

Table 7.— Dccreee omferred on women by nniversitiee, coDeew, and torhnakiglcal achoola DS 

Tables.— Honorary degrees conferred by aMveraLUesyaeUegea^ and teckaolfliicalacfaeQls — 1S9 

Table 9.— Income of universities, coUegee, aad technolnginal ar.hnali. ^..^ ISO 

Table 10.— Property of miiversities, cottages, and tertaelngpr ■! ■rhonii. ^ 192 

Table 11.— Technical and apedaUsed connea oC atodj oAnd biy noivciitiei^ con i y, and taehno- 

logicaiachoob 1« 

Table 12.— Univeraities, coUegea, and t echtw lag k ai ac Jwula I^ ial i m <B ie and aliii M ta. 210 

Tijl>le 13.— Univerritiea, coltogee, and terhnolnglcal achool»-Income from all aoorcea. 243 

Table 14.— Univeraitiea, cottages, and teehnalogical arfwala-Pwparty, fettoiMdi&pa and irh ola rahip B, 

fees aw 

CHAmm v.— AauctnjuKAL akd Kecbaskal Collbobs. 

General atatemani.^ « - - - ^•. 3W 

riMinges in couraee and methods of instroction. 211 

InstmctoraandatiidAita «.—..« 353 

Degreas 274 

Property..., ...........^.........^.......^....^ .......... , .- 275 

laeome. 2n 

Endowment of Angusl 30^1800, aad Maioh 4. 1907. «. 278 

LagialaUve appropriations, 1913 3!9 

Table 1.— Statialica of ooUagea of agEiaoltara and tha mecfaanio arU endowed by acta of Coogreaa 

approved July 2, 1862, August 30, 1890, and Man^ 4, 190Z» 2.8 

Table 2.— Pro fa aaor s , instnicioca, and atatien stag ia oettagea U ag rimltnr a and tha mechanir artaL.. 3B1 

Tables.— Stndflntoincottegea of ^ritfinknia and tha menhanio arts 294 

Table 4.— Undergraduate students in four-year oottega ooursaa in c<dlegaa of a^ienltura and the 

mechanic arts .........*..-. — 288 

Tiililii fi flfialiinla In i niiiwiB umraaain inllajiHrif a£ri<iilfiirn ai¥l thu maihanin artn finrthn riolnrni 

nee 300 

Ti^le 6.— Number of degrees conferred by cottages of agriculture and. the mechanioarta. 391 

Tabfe 7.— Valoe of property of cottegea ot agrimltma and the mechanic arts. 3C3 

Table a.— Vahiaol additiwia during thayear to atidpiiiant of coUegaBof agricnltnte and the meehanio 

arts 306 

Tabfe 9.— IncomeofooUegeaof i^ricultureand the mechanic arts. 306 

Tabfe 10.— Disbursenient of funds received under acta of Congress approved August 30, 1S90> and 

ICar. 4, 1907, by cottegea of agricolture and the mechanic arts for the year ending June 30, 1913. . . 311 

Chaptek VL— PaorKssioNAL Schools. 

General summaries of statistics 815 

Statistics of schools of theology 323 

Law 332 

MedJks&ie 337 

Dentfetry S?2 

Pharmacy 344 

Veterinary mediciDe 347 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME H. V 

CHAniB vn.— Ftouc Ain> PBiTAn Normal Schools. P3g^ 

Ctatngts In nonaal Mhool list 34» 

8liitisti«a sommaries (Tabka 1-43). 351 

LHtructon and stttdnto in pabUo normal sobools (Table 14) 364 

P rot>er ty and Ineoma of pnbUa noimal seboofe (Tabto 15) 370 

ItasCructen and stodnlB in privaifee Donnal scliooto (Table 16) 377 

Prapertj- and ineoma of privttta normal aebootoCTabla 17) 879 

Chaptsk VHL-SuMHxa ficaott^ m IMS. 

General statement 383 

Table 1.— Statistical sommary of nports Ihim BoauBer sehoolB of IMS: CksBiflcation, credits, 

lostnictors, students, estima^ oost. 384 

Goorses offered in summer acboola. 386 

Table 2.~Sammer schools reportinc sessions held iaIftU.. 414 

Chaftsb CS.— SnvcATioirAL WosK or tbx Toxtmo Mtar^ Crsxarruv AasociATXoifs. 

Qffowth of the work 437 

Statistieftl summary of association work (Tabtoa 1-22) 437 

Camsa X.^Pmuc ak» Pbcvaxk Hioh Schools. 

General smTey , 455 

Statisttoalsmninarteofpabltoh^ schools (Tables 1-14) 4SB 

Prtrate hfgh aohoofei and academies (Tables 15-36) 472 

PiiblioaiMl9rii>atahi^soboalsoonbiaed(Tabls»27-tf) 4W 

Chapteb XI.— Manual and Industblal Tbainino. 

General sommary 496 

Students in pabUo hi^ schools in manual or t^^chniftal training, agi icaltural, and domestic economy 

coorses, 1912-18 (Table 1) 498 

Smnmaries of publio manual trainhig hi^ schools (Tables 2 and 3) 517 

Summaries of schoob of agriculture (Tables 4 and 5) 519 

Manual and industrial traintaig schools (Tables 6 and 7) 522 

Industrial schools for Indian children (Table 8) 526 

Manual and industrial training schools and schools of agriculture (Tables 9-13) 527 

Public manual traininghigh schools (Tables 14 and 15) 532 

Schoob of agriculture (Tables 16 and 17) 637 

Manual and industrial training schoob— Instructors and students, 1912-13 (Table 18) 546 

Manual and industrial trahiing schoob— Property and expend itures, 1912-13 (Table 19) 554 

Industrial schoob for Indian ohfldren— Instructors and students, 1912-13 (Table 20) 561 

Industrial schoob for Indian children— Property and expenditures, 1912-13 (Table 21) 5G4 

Chapteb XII.— Commbboal and Business Schools. 

General summaries. 567 

Commercial and basiness schoob r^ortfaigfai 1912-18 (Table 9) 578 

CEARIH Xm.— STATlSnCB OF SCHOOLS FOB NbOBOES. 

General summary «07 

Table 1.— Teachers and students in public high schoob for the negro race, 1913-13 608 

Table 2.— Teachers and students In secondary and higher schoob for the negro race (not including 

public high schoob), 1913-13 1 609 

Table 3.— Financial summary of the secondary and higher negro schoob (not Including public high 

schoob), 1913-13 610 

Table 4.— Secondary and higher schoob for the negro race (excluding public high schoob)— Teachers, 

studentSyOoursesofstudy, etc., 1913-13 611 

(Chapter XIV.— State Industbial Schools. 

General statement 623 

Table 1.— Inmates enrolled in State industrial schoob, 1912-13 624 

Table 2.— Parentage of the mmates of State industrial schoob, 1912-13 625 

Table 8.— Items relating to enrollment In State Industrial schoob, 1913-13 626 

Table 4.— Inmates able to read or write 627 

Table 5.— Education of Inmates in State Industrial schoob, 1913-13 628 

Table 6.— Income of State industrial schoob, 1912-13 629 

Table 7.— Property and expenditures of State industrial schoob, 1913-13 630 

Table 8.~43tatbtics of State industrial schoob— Teachers, assbtants, property , receipts, and expend- 
itures, 1912-13 632 

Table9.—StaUstIcs of State industrial schoob— Inmates, 1912-13 638 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



VI coirr&rrs op volttms n. 

CHAnsB XV.~8oBooL9 re« ibm Blbh> jan> Dmaf. "Pt^^ 

SBUentfestiim 64« 

T»bie9 l-^—SammarlM of pablte sdiooh for the blind 646 

Table 6.— Statistics of public adiools tor the blind 661 

Tables 7-11.— Summaries of State schools for the deaf 656 

Table 12.— Sommary of statistics of pablio day schoob and private schools ibr the deaf 660 

Table 13.— Statistics of State schools for the deaf 661 

Table 14.— Statistics of public day schools for the deaf 666 

Table 15.— Statistics of private schools for the deaf 668 

Chaptib XVL— Schools foe tbx Fkkblb-ICoidbd. 

Tables 1 and 2.— Summaries of State and private schools for the feeble-minded 671 

Tablea.— Sunmmry of public day schools and classes for backward and subnormal children 673 

Table84 and 5.— Summaries of State and private schools for the feeble-minded 674 

Tabled.— Statistics of State institutions for the feeble-minded 676 

Table 7.— Statistics of public day schools and classes for backward and subnormal children 679 

Tables.— Statistics of private institutions for the feeble-minded 682 

Table 0.— Special institutions for backward and nervous chfldren 684 

Chapteb XVn.— Elemkhtabt Education in Fobxigh Countbixs. 

Salient particulars presented * 687 

Statistics of elementary education in foreign countries 680 

IMDBX 606 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INTRODUCTORY SURVEY. 

By Alex Summers. 
Stati$tkian, Bureau of Education. 



Beginning with Chapter III, about 600 pages of this volume are 
devoted to the educational statistics of 1913, collected by the Bureau 
of Education by direct correspondence with city school systems, 
universities, and colleges, and other institutions of higher education, 
public and private high schools, and other schools above the grade 
of elementary. 

The statistics of State common-school systems for 1912 are tabu- 
lated in Chapter I from reports furnished by the State superintendents. 
The difficulty of securing prompt returns from minor school officers 
made it impossible to secure consolidated public school reports from 
most of the States for 1913 in time for publication in this volume. 

The comparative siunmaries presented in these introductory pages 
belong to 1912 and former years. 

The school and college enrollment for 1912 aggregated 21,102,113, 
as shown in the last line of Table 1. This nimiber includes 823,673 
in miscellaneous schools. In the tables which follow, this number is 
not considered, the summaries being based upon the total 20,278,440, 
as given in the first part of Table 1. 

Table 1. — School and college enrollTnent in 191 1. 



Grades. 



Number of pupils. 



Public. Private. Total, 



Elementary (kindergarten, primary, and grammar) 

Secondary (high schools and academies) 

Secondary (preparatory departments of higher institutions).. 

Universities and colleges 

Professional schools 

Normal schools 



17,077,577 
1,105,360 
21,431 
76,448 
11,967 
83,474 



1,505,637 
141,467 
70,788 
123,702 
64,078 
6,510 



18,583,214 

1,246.827 

92,220 

200,150 

66,045 

89,984 



Total for the above. 



18,376,257 



1,902, 183 



20,278,440 



C ity evening schools 

Business schools 

Reform schools 

Schools for the deaf 

Schools for the blind 

Schools for the feeble-minded . 
Government Indian schools. . 



419,981 



Schools in Alaska supported by the Government 

Schools in Alaska 8upport«d by Incorporatod municipalities (esti- 
mated) 

Orphan asylums and other benevolent institutions (estimated) 

Private kindergartens * 

Miscellaneous (art, music, etc.) (estimated) 



51,967 
13, 172 
4,992 
7,409 
46,131 
4,018 

5,000 



137,790 

his 

476" 



20,000 
52,219 
60,000 



419,981 
137,790 
51,967 
13,600 
4,992 
7,885 
46,131 
4,018 

5,000 
20,000 
52,219 
60,000 



Total for special schools 

Total for all schools in the United States.. 



552,670 



271,003 



825.673 



18,928,927 



2,173,186 



21,102,113 



177270— BD 1913— VOL 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



B^CAtlON BBPOBT, 1913. 



Table 2.— Pupils qrvi'UuJknU of all grades in both public and private schools and 
, %>/'•* colleges, 1912— Part I. 



•• • 


Pupils receiving ele- 
mentary instruction 
(primary and gram- 
mar grades). 


Pupils receiving sec- 
ondary instruction 
(high-school grades). 


Students receiving 
hiffaer instruction (see 
columns 8 to 16, next 
page). 


• • SUtes. 


Public. 


Private 
(largely es- 
tfanated). 


Public. 


Private (in 
Pre^tory 

academies, 

semhiaries, 

etc.). 


Public. 


Private. 


1 


2 


S 


4 


i 


< 


7 


United States 


17,077,577 


1,505,637 


1,126,791 


212,256 


m,889 


184.290 






North Atlantic Diybkm 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 

Western Division 


3,992,627 
6,500,500 
2,625,998 
8,838,433 
1,220,019 


667,081 
647,138 

94,328 
126,732 

70,358 


346,821 
465,146 
80,472 
117, 118 
117,234 


68,406 
57,361 
32,945 
36,983 
16,561 


28,126 
82,411 
16,600 
24,239 
21,613 


74,650 
69,583 
23,199 

Klaoo 

9,649 






North Atlantic Division: 
- Maine 


128,210 
56,565 
59,382 
481,202 
74,644 
182,911 
1,335,956 
429,664 
1,244,094 

775,345 
482,761 
915,802 
510,691 
402,062 
413,912 
464,782 
650,347 
133,053 
125,320 
262,667 
363,768 

33,974 
219,026 

51,319 
396,182 
278,155 
612,794 
324,070 
557,904 
153,574 

501,745 
527,362 
417,866 
483,771 
280,501 
790,945 
400,763 
435,480 

66,601 

25,047 

162,826 

59,310 

31,785 

87,535 

10,195 

80,234 

202,366 

128,560 

366,561 


13,088 
13,624 
6,701 
93,781 
18.531 
44,719 

957,300 
65,592 

163,746 

97,881 

23,181 

187, 175 

65,020 

66,334 

17,082 

28,179 

36,874 

639 

1,538 

8,593 

14,092 

3,503 
17,304 
3,615 
22,368 
3,910 
21,085 
9,234 
5,682 
7,537 

22,529 

24,256 

13,410 

5,733 

30,030 

14,209 

8,419 

8,147 

6,318 

217 

5,687 

4,366 

• 4,237 

3,180 

524 

1,538 

7,964 

7,135 

29,192 


11,825 
6,621 
5,136 

65,712 
7,165 

14,959 
127,324 

29,754 

78,335 

77,870 
50,070 
71,989 
44,716 
36,426 
33,472 
42,327 
38,164 
6,929 
7,696 
22,870 
32,617 

1,928 
9,757 
6,846 

15,723 
8,028 

12,986 
7,720 

13,715 
3,760 

11,697 
12,872 
12,033 
9,718 
7,573 
39,782 
9,112 
14,331 

4,615 

1,507 

15,016 

2,135 

1,662 

5,013 

991 

4,938 

22,468 

11,158 

47,731 


3,239 
2,938 
i;459 
9,698 
1,268 
4,111 

22,926 
5,392 

17,376 

7,562 
4,468 
12,567 
4,100 
3,307 
5,130 
6,264 
6,288 
707 
950 
2,980 
3,048 

307 
3,844 
1,663 
6,573 
1,711 
7,332 
3,939 
5,944 
1,632 

6,022 
9,373 
3,207 
2,991 
3,775 
8 812 
11717 
1,086 

473 
113 

1,042 
234 
263 

3,820 

*1,'682* 

1,739 
2,046 
5,799 


1,719 
419 
686 

3,218 
587 
996 

8,528 

1,606 
10, 2n 

7,491 
6,766 
9,471 
11,287 
9,699 
7,314 
5,529 
9,432 
1,711 
1,573 
5,863 
6,275 

168 
1,379 
1,401 
2,543 
2,450 
2,434 
2,316 
2,491 

419 

3,613 
1,050 
3,382 
1848 
2,667 
6,608 
1,099 
4,082 

670 

156 

2,094 

290 

567 

1,276 

279 

861 

4,616 

2,227 

7,878 


1,410 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


1,300 
514 


MA^^mrtbiiflAttfi, 


17,195 


Rhode Island 


1,084 


Connecticut 


4,102 


New York 


27,623 


New Jersey 


3,263 


PennsylvAnift^ 


18,210 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


10,493 


TndMft . . 


7,308 


Illinois 


17,936 


Michigan 


2,387 


Wisconsin 


2,966 


Mlnn<¥iotft......... 


2.308 


Iowa 


4,589 


Missouri 


6,278 


North Dakota 


232 


South Dakota 


635 


Nebraska 


2,015 


Kansas 


2,666 


South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 


11 


Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 


4,563 

3,821 

3,656 

619 


North Carolina 


8,415 


South Carolina 


2,078 


Georgia 

Klorida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 


3,649 
498 

2,647 
5,137 




1,148 


Mississippi 


1,187 




1,768 


Texas 


4,506 


Arkanwvi 


'651 


Oklahoma 


173 


Western Division: 

MontJI^nA , 




Wyoming 




Colorado 


1,619 


New Mexico 




Arizona 




Utah 




Nevada 




Idaho 


31 


Washington 


682 


Oregon 


855 


Camomia 


6,462 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



inteoducto'by survey. 3 

Table 2. — Pupils and students of all grades in both public and private schools and 

colleges, 1912 — Part II. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4 EDUCATION BtePOET, 1913. 

Table 2.— PupiU and students of all grades in both public and private schools and 

colleges, IPii— Part III. 



states. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.., 
South Atlantic Division., 
South Central Division.., 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine , 

New Hamp^iire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts , 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut , 

New York 

New Jersey , 

Pennsylvania , 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

niinois , 

Michigan 

Wisconsin , 

Minnesota 

Iowa , 

Missouri , 

North Dakota. 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division*: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Distrfct of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

FlorWa. 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana , 

Texas '.','.'.'. 

Arkansas , 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arixona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Calliomia 



Summary of pupils, by grade. 



Elemen- 
tary. 



17 



18,583,214 



4,659,708 
6,047.638 
2,620,326 
3,965,165 
1,290,377 



141,298 

70,189 

66,083 

574,983 

93,175 

227,630 

[,593,255 

485,256 

[,407,839 

873,226 
505,882 
,102,977 
575,711 
468,396 
430,994 
492,961 
687,221 
133,692 
126,868 
271,260 
378,460 

37,567 
236,330 

54,934 
417,550 
282,065 
533,879 
333,304 
563,586 
161, 111 

524,274 
551,617 
431,276 
489,504 
310,531 
805,154 
409, 182 
443,627 



Secondary. 



18 



1,339,047 



415,227 
522,507 
113, 417 
154,101 
133,795 



15,064 
9,559 
6,595 

75,410 
8,423 

19,070 
150,249 

35,146 

95,711 

85,432 
54,538 
84,556 
48,816 
39,733 
38,602 
48,581 
44,452 
7,636 
8,646 
25,850 
35,665 

2,235 
13,601 

8,509 
22,296 

9,739 
20,318 
11,659 
19,659 

5,401 

17,719 
22,245 
15,240 
12,709 
11,348 
48,594 
10,829 
15,417 



71.919 


5,088 


25.264 


1,620 


168.512 


16,058 


63.676 


2,369 


36,022 


1,925 


90,715 


8,833 


10,719 


991 


81,772 


5,970 


210,330 


24,207 


135,695 


13,204 


395,753 


63,530 



Highei 



19 



356,179 



102,776 
141,994 
38,799 
41,548 
31,062 



3,129 
1,719 
1,200 

20,413 
1,621 
5,098 

36,150 
4,959 

28,487 

17,983 
14,074 
27,396 
13,674 
12,664 
9,616 
10, 118 
15,710 
1,943 
2,108 
7,878 
8,830 

179 
5,932 
5,222 
6,198 
3,069 
5,849 
5,293 
6,140 

917 

6,260 
6,187 
4,530 
3,035 
4,325 
11.206 
1,750 
4,255 

670 
156 

4,313 
290 
567 

1,275 
279 
892 

5,198 

3,082 
14,340 



Summary according to 
control. 



Public. 



20 



18,376,257 



4,367,574 
6,048,057 
2,622,070 
3,979,790 
1,358,766 



141,754 

63,605 

65,204 

550,132 

82,386 

198,866 

1,471,807 

461, 114 

1,332,706 

860,706 
539,587 
997,262 
566,694 
448,187 
454,608 
512,638 
697,943 
141,693 
134,589 
291,400 
402,660 

36,070 
230,162 

59,566 
413,448 
288,633 
528,214 
334,105 
574, 110 
157,762 

517,055 
541,284 
433,281 
495,337 
290,631 
837,335 
410,974 
453,893 

70,886 
28,710 
180,535 
61,735 
34.014 
93,823 
11,465 
86,033 
229,450 
141,945 
422,170 



Private. 



21 



Grand 
total. 



1,902,183 20,278,440 



810, 137 
664.082 ! 
150.472 
181,024 ' 
96,468 



31,198 
38,765 
17,765 

9,911 
35,573 
27,619 
10,787 

9,406 

6,791 

330 

8,348 

4,600 

4,500 

7,000 

524 

2,601 

10,285 

10,036 

41,453 



5,177,711 
6,712.139 
2,772,542 
4,160,814 
1,455,234 



17,737 


159,491 


17,862 


81,467 


8,674 


73,878 


120,674 


670,806 


20,833 


103,219 


52,932 


251,798 


307,847 


1,779.654 


64,247 


525,361 


199,331 


1,532,037 


115,935 


976,641 


34,907 


574,494 


217,667 


1,214,929 


71,507 


638,201 


72,606 


520,793 


24,514 


479,212 


39,022 


661,660 


49,440 


747,383 


1,678 


143,271 


3,023 


137,612 


13,588 


304,988 


20,295 


422,966 


3,911 


39,081 


25,701 


255,863 


9,099 


68,665 


32,596 


446.044 


6,340 


294,873 


31,832 


600,046 


16,151 


360,256 


15,275 


689,385 


9,667 


167,429 



648,263 
680,049 
451,046 
606,248 
326.204 
864,954 
421,761 
463,299 

77,677 

27,040 

188,883 

66,335 

38,514 

100,823 

11,989 

88,634 

239,735 

151,981 

463,623 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INTEODUCTOEY SXJBVBY. 5 

Table 2. — Pupils and Btudents of all grades in both public and private schools and 

colleges y 19l!S— Part JV. 



States. 



Per cent of the whole 
number of pupils 
in each grade. 



Ele- 
men- 
tary. 



Sec- 
ond- 
ary. 



High- 
er. 



Per cent in eoch 
grade receiving 
public instruction. 



Ele- 
men- 
tary. 



Seo- 
ond- 
ary. 



High- 



Per cefit of the total popu- 
lation enrolled in each 
grade. 



Ele- 
men- 
tary. 



Sec 
ond- 
ary. 



Hi^- 
er. 



TotaL 



2S 



24 



26 



2« 



27 



29 



81 



United States. 



North A Uantic Division 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 

Western D ivision 



91.04 

90.00 
90. 10 
9t.51 
95.30 

K8.fi7 



6 60 



1.76 



92.19 



84.15 



North AtlanUc Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont , 

Massachusetts , 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey , 

Pennsylvania , 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana , 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Mteotiri 

North DakoU 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

t^ftTtW^ff , 

Sooth Atlantic Divlsioo! 

Delaware 

Maryland , 

District of Columbia. . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

NorUi Carolina , 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida , 

Sooth Central Division: 

Kentucky 



Alabama. 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma.... 
Western Division: 

Montana 

Wvoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico.. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington.., 

Oregon 

Caliiomia 



88.59 
86.16 
89.46 
^.72 
90.27 
90.40 
89.53 
92.37 
91.89 

89.41 

88.00 
90.79 
90.21 
89.94 
89.94 
89.36 
91.95 
93.31 
02.19 
»<.94 
89.48 

93.96 
92.37 
80.00 
03.61 
95.66 
95.33 
95.16 
95.62 
96.23 

95. C3 
95.10 
95.62 
96.88 
95.19 
93.09 
97.02 
95.75 



92 59 
93. 43 
89.22 
95.99 
93.53 
89.97 
89.41 
92.26 
87. 73 
89.28 
85.36 



8.02 
7.78 
4.09 
3.70 
9.19 



1.98 
2.12 
1.40 
1.00 
2.14 



85.68 
90.95 
96.40 
96.80 
94.55 



83.53 
89.02 
70.95 
7»i. 01 
87.62 



9.45 
11.73 
8.93 
11.24 
8.16 
7.57 
8.44 
6.69 
6.25 

8.75 
9. 49 
6.95 
7.a5 
7.63 
8.05 
8.81 
5.95 
5.33 
6.28 
8.48 
8.43 

5.59 
5.31 
12.39 
6.00 
3.30 
3.63 
3.33 
3.34 
3.22 

3.23 
3.83 
3.38 
2.52 
3.48 
5.62 
2.57 
3 33 

6.55 
5.99 
8.50 
3.57 
5.00 
8.76 
8.27 
6.73 

10.10 
8.69 

11.56 



1.96 
2.11 
1.62 
3.04 
1.57 
2.03 
2.03 
.94 
1.86 

1.84 
2.45 
2.26 
2.14 
2.43 
2.01 
1.83 
2.10 
1.36 
1.53 
2.58 
2.09 

.45 
2.32 
7.61 
1.39 
1.04 
1.04 
1.51 
1.04 

.55 

1.14 

1.07 

1.00 

.60 

1.33 

1.29 

.41 

.92 

.86 
.58 
2.28 
.44 
1.47 
1.27 
2.32 
1.01 
2.17 
2.03 
3.09 



90.74 
80.59 
89.86 
83.60 
80.11 
80.35 
83.85 
88.54 
88.37 

88.70 
95.43 
83.02 
88.71 
85.84 
96.04 
94.28 
94.63 
99.52 
98.79 
96.83 
96.12 

90.44 
92.68 
93.42 
04.64 
98.61 
96.05 
97.22 
98.90 
95.32 

95.70 
95.60 
96.89 
98.83 
90.33 
98.24 
97.94 
98.16 

91.22 
99.14 
96.62 
93.14 
8S.24 
96.49 
95.11 
98.12 
81.62 
94.74 
92.62 



78.50 
69.26 
78.01 
87.14 
84.95 
78.44 
84.74 
84.66 
81.85 

91.16 
91.81 
85.14 
91. GO 
91.68 
86.71 
87.13 
85.85 
00.74 
89.01 
88.47 
91.45 

86.26 
71.74 
80.46 
70.52 
82.43 
63.91 
66.21 
69.76 
69.78 

66.01 
67.86 
78.96 
76.47 
66.73 
81.87 
84 14 
92.96 

90.70 
93.02 
93.51 
90.12 
86.34 
56.75 
100.00 
82.71 
92.82 
84.50 
89.17 



48.26 



19.46 



27.37 
58.04 
40.21 
58.34 
60.03 



17.29 
19.71 
20.82 
22.17 
17.35 



64.94 
24.37 
67.17 
15.76 
36.21 
19.54 
23.50 
34.20 
36.06 

41.66 
48.07 
S4.67 
82.54 
76.59 
76.06 
64.66 
60.04 
88.06 
74.62 
74.42 
71.06 

03.85 
23.25 
26.83 
41.03 
79.83 
41.61 
43.74 
40.57 
45.60 

57.73 
10.97 
74.65 
60.89 
69.12 
58.97 
62.80 
96.93 

ino.oo 

100 00 
62.46 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
96.52 
88.80 
72.26 
54.94 



18.76 
16.14 
18.42 
16.47 
16.40 
19.61 
16.72 
18.08 
17.66 

17.81 
18.45 
18.95 
19.87 
19.67 
20.06 
22.17 
20.61 
21.06 
20.31 
22.23 
21.76 

18.21 
17.91 
16.03 
19.81 
22.04 
23.45 
21.44 
20.89 
20.07 

22.58 
24.83 
19.54 
26.13 
18.08 
19.71 
25.05 
23.97 

17.73 
16.00 
19.66 
17.86 
16.19 
22.97 
11.82 
22.57 
16.41 
18.57 
15.35 



1.40 



1.54 
1.71 
.90 
.86 
1.80 



2.00 
2.20 
1.84 
2.16 
1.48 
1.64 
1.58 
1.31 
1.20 

1.74 
1.99 
1.45 
1.69 
1.66 
1.80 
2.19 
1.33 
1.20 
1.38 
2.12 
2.06 

1.08 

1.03 

2.48 

1.05 

.76 

.80 

.75 

.73 

.67 

.76 
1.00 
.69 
.69 
.66 
1.19 
.66 
.83 

1.26 
1.02 
1.88 
.66 
.86 
2.24 
1.09 
1.65 
1.89 
l.Sl 
2.08 



0.37 



.38 
.46 
.31 
.23 
.42 



21 22 



19.21 
21.88 
22.03 
23.26 
19.57 



.42 


21.18 


.40 


18.74 


.33 


20.50 


.58 


19.21 


.29 


18.17 


.43 


21 68 


.38 


18.68 


.19 


19.58 


.36 


19.22 


.37 


19.92 


.61 


20.95 


.47 


20.87 


.47 


22.03 


.63 


21.76 


.45 


22.31 


.46 


24.81 


.47 


22.41 


..31 


22.57 


.34 


22.03 


.64 


24.99 


.50 


24.30 


.09 


19.38 


.45 


19.39 


1.52 


20.03 


.20 


21.15 


.24 


23.04 


.26 


24.60 


.34 


22.53 


.23 


21.85 


.12 


20.86 


.27 


23.61 


.28 


20.11 


.20 


20.43 


.16 


27.28 


.25 


18.00 


.27 


21.17 


.11 


25 82 


.23 


25.03 


.16 


10.14 


.10 


17.12 


.50 


22.04 


.08 


18.50 


.25 


17.30 


.32 


25.53 


.31 


13.22 


.25 


24.47 


.40 


18.70 


.42 


20 SO 


.56 


17.99 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



6 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

It is shown in the chapter on State school systems <Ch. I) that the 
average length of school term in 1912 was 158 days. In one State 
the schools w^e open for an average of 92 days and in another 194 
days. In five States the term exceeded 180 days. In 26 States the 
average term fell below 160 days; and in 14 of these States it was 
below 140. For all the State school systems the average number of 
days* attendance for every child 5 to 18 years of age was 83.5, varying 
from 43 days in the State with the lowest averg^e to 112 in the State 
having the highest. 

Table 3. — Average number of years' (of 200 days) attendance at public: schools for each 
individual as indicated by the school statistics for the years nanud. 



Di\isions. 


1870 


1875 


1880 


1885 
3.69 


1890 1 1895 


1900 


1905 1910 


1912 


The United States 


2.91 


3.32 


3.45 


3.85 


4.35 


4.67 


4.81 5.40 


5.43 










North Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 


4.43 
3.71 
0.80 
0.80 
2.77 


4.74 
3.91 
1.70 
1.53 
3.48 


4.84 
4.19 
1.90 
1.57 
3.57 


5.02 
4.37 
2.19 
2.04 
3.79 


4.90 
4.67 
2.42 
2.20 
3.98 


5.51 
6.27 
2.73 
2.69 
5.04 


5.91 
6.57 
2.95 
2.91 
4.99 


6.17 
5.58 
3.26 
2.85 
5.85 


6.38 
6.28 
8.93 
3.77 
6.29 


6.44 
6.35 


Pmith Atlantic Division,, , 


3.79 


South Central Division 


3.79 


Western Division 


6.51 







Should the percentage of enrollment, average attendance, and 
length of school term computed for 1912 continue for 13 years (the 
period of school life 5 to 18), the average amount of schooling for each 
individual in this group would be 1,086 days, or 5.43 years. This is 
shown in the above table which compares the estimates for 1912 with 
former years. 

If the work of the private schools be estimated in the same way and 
added to the above, it would bring, the averg^e number of days' 
schooling up to 1,184, 5.92 years of 200 days each, as shown in 
Table 4. 

Table 4. — Average number of years* (of 200 days) schooling at any school received by 
each individual, as indicated by the statistics for the years named. 





Years. 


1 In public schools 
only. 


In public and pri- 
vate schools. 




Days. 


Yeara. 


Days. 


Years. 


1870 




582 


2.91 
3.45 
3.85 
4.67 
5.40 
5.43 


672 

792 

892 

1,046 

1,173 

1,184 


3.36 


isso.. 




690 


3.96 


1800 




770 


4.46 


1900 




934 


6.23 


1910 




1 1,079 


5.87 


1912 




1,086 


5.92 






! 





The approximate number of children in school in each of half a 
dozen age groups was reported by the Census Office in 1910. Apply- 
ing the same percentages to the enrollment reported to the Bureau 
of Education for 1912, a similar age distribution is obtained, as shown 
in Table 5. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INTRODUCTOBY SUBVBY. 
Table 6. — "Ettimaied school enrollment by age groups in 1912, 



Age groups. 



Estimated 
populatUtfi 



by age 
groups. 



Enrc^ed in school. 



Number. Per cent, 



Not in school. 



Number. Per cent. 



Under 5 years. 

5 years 

6 to 9 years . . . . 
10 to 14 years.. 
15 to 17 years.. 
18 to 20 years.. 
21 to 24 years.. 



2,111, 
8,025, 
0,458, 
6,57y, 
6.761 
7,471 



56,780 
380,346 
6,893,702 
0,040,128 
8,094,490 
951,059 
1352,845 



18.44 
79.67 
95.57 
55.46 
16.51 
4.72 



1,722,206 
1,632,016 
418,860 
3,485,358 
4,810,325 
7,118,800 



81.56 
20.33 
4.43 
44.54 
83.49 
95.28 



5 to 24 years. 



38,409,225 



20,278,845 



18,187,565 



1 Includes enrollment 21 years of age and over. 

As already shown in Table 2, the total enrollment of 20,278,440 
for 1912 was distributed as follows: 18,683,214 in elementary schools, 
1,339,047 in high schools, academies, and preparatory schools, and 
356,179 in higher institutions. Usiiig the approximate percentages 
ascertained for public elementary schools and applying the actual 
percentages ascertained for secondary or high schools, a fair estimate 
of the number in each grade may be found. 

Table 6. — DiatribtUion of school enroUment for 191t by grades^ according to estimated 

percentages. 



Oradee. 



Estimiated 
percent. 



Estimated 
enrollment 
in grades. 



First nade 

Second grade... 
Third grade.... 
Fourth grade... 

Fifth grade 

Sixth 0Bde.... 
Seventh grade. 
Eighth grade... 



23.50 
14.79 
13.91 
13.28 
11.28 
9.25 
7.63 
6.36 



4,367,055 
2,748,457 
2,584,925 
2,467.851 
2,096,187 
1,718,947 
1,417,899 
1,181,803 



Total elementary . 



100.00 



18,583,214 



First year in hidi school. . . 
Second year In high school. 
Third year In high school. . 
Fourth year in high school . 



Total high school. 

Higher institutions 

Grand toUl 



41.00 
27.06 
1&50 
13.45 



549,009 
362,212 
247,724 
180,102 



100.00 



1,339,047 



356,179 



20,278,440 



Assuming that the percentages of grade distribution shown in the 
above table for the elementary schools have been approximately the 
same for eight years, it is found that in 1904 the first grade had 
3,952,945 pupils, that 2,297,774 reached the fourth grade in 1907, and 
1,181,893 enrolled in the eighth grade in 1911, while only 549,009 of 
the number reached the first year of the high school in 1912. These 
figures are shown in Table 7. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8 EDUCATION BBPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Proffress of elementary grade enrollment for eight years. 



Years. 


Elementary 
enrollment. 




Grades. 


Number. 


Percent. 


1903-4 


16,821,043 
17,119,259 
17,231,178 
17,302,515 
17,373,852 
17,654,303 
18,339,828 
18,683,214 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
1st H. 8. 


3,952,945 
2,531,938 
2,396,857 
2,297,774 
1,959.771 
1,633,023 
1,399,329 
1,181,893 
549,009 


23.50 


1904^ 


14.79 


190^-6 


13.91 


1906-7 


13.28 


1907-8 


1L28 


1908-9 


9.25 


1909-10 


7.63 


1910-11 


6.36 


191 1-12 













It is more likely that the first grade had about 25 per cent of the 
elementary enrollment in 1903-4. It is usually estimated that the 
beginners make up about half of the first-grade enrollment, while 
repeaters or retarded pupils comprise the other half. The number of 
bepnners in 1903-4 must have been about 2,100,000, and of these 
about 26 per cent reached the first year of the high school in 191 1-12. 

Table 8 shows the enrollment of first-year high-school students for 
four successive years, and the number of graduates for four years later. 
It appears that about 39 per cent of the students entering the lowest 
grade of the high school will be found in the graduating class at the 
end of four years. 

Table 8. — Elimination of high-school students , 



First-year students. 






Years. 


Number. 


Year. 


Number. 


Percent 
of first- 
year 
students. 


Elimi- 
nated. 


1906-7 


310,684 
360,035 
393,260 
430,280 


1909-10 
1910-11 
1911-12 
1912-13 


125,772 
136,442 
155,656 
167, 117 


4a 48 
37.90 
39.58 

38.84 


184.912 


1907-8 


223,503 


1908-9 


337,604 
263,163 


1909-10 





The annual cost of education in the United States is not less than 
$700,000,000. The expenditures for State common schools, for all 
public institutions, and for most private institutions of higher edu- 
cation* are reported with reasonable accuracy. The cost of private 
high schools is partly estimated. Estimates are necessary for private 
elementary schools, conmiercial schools, private kindergartens, and 
miscellaneous schools. Table 9 seems to present a fair statement of 
the cost of education for 1912. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INTRODUCTOBY SURVEY. 
Table 9. — School enrollment end estimated tost in 191?. 



Classlflcatlon. 



En- 
rollment, 
1912. 



Estimated 

I>er capita 

cost. 



Estimated 
total 
cost. 



Public elementary schools 

Pabl ic hiKh schools 

Private elementary schools 

Private faish schools 

Other public and private secondary schools 

Univereities, colleges, and professional schools 

Normal schools 

Commercial and business schools 

Reform schools 

S<diools for the deaf 

Schools for the blind 

Schools for the feeble-minded 

Government Indian schools 

Schools in Alaska supported by the Federal Government. 

Other publ ic schools in Alaska 

Orphan asylums, etc , 

Private kindergartens 

Kiscellaneous, music, art, etc 



077,577 

105,360 

506,637 

141.467 

92,220 

206,195 

89,984 

137,790 

61,967 

13,600 

4,992 

7,885 

46, 131 

4,018 

5,000 

20,000 

52,219 

60,000 



Total 20,682,132 



$24.81 
53.40 
32.00 
94.10 
157.47 
335.57 
158.34 
60.00 
174.11 
290.05 
440.98 
675.56 
81.45 
49.78 
50.00 
200.00 
32.00 
100.00 



34.13 



$423,860,509 

69,026,224 

48,180,384 

13,312,045 

14,621,883 

89,327,066 

14,248,067 

6,889,600 

9.(M7,753 

3,970,758 

2,201,364 

6,317,765 

3,757.495 

200.000 

250.000 

4,000,000 

1,671,008 

6.000.000 



705,781,871 



The per capita cost of $53.40 for public high schools is based upon 
the tabulation of financial returns from 2,642 public high schools in 
all parts of the country. 

Table 10 shows the number of teachers reported to this bureau in 
1890, 1900, 1910, and 1912 by the schools and colleges. For private 
elementary and miscellaneous schools the numbers are partly esti- 
mated. 

Tablb 10. — Distribution o/teachers for four periods. 



Teaobera in— 



1890 



Men. Women. 



Total. 



1900 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Pnblks elementary schools 

Public high schools 

Private elementary schools (estimated)... 

Private high sdiools 

Universities and colleges: 

FMaratory departments 

CoUeglate departments 

CoDeges for women: 

Preparatory departments 

Colfegiate departments 

Professional schools: 

Theology 

Law 

Medicine 

Dentistry 

Pharmacy 

Veterinary medicine 

Normal scho(Ms, public: 

Normal depcurtment 

Other departments 

Normal schools, private: 

Normal department 

Other departments 

Conunercial and business schools 

Schools for defectives and delinquents 

Indian and Alaskan 8Cho<^ 

Kindergartens and miscellaneous (esti- 
mated) 



121,877 
3,648 
6,807 
8,272 

5,080 



595 

744 
346 
2,851 
541 
183 
93 



1,133 
564 
644 

1,050 



332,925 
6,472 
15,199 
3,937 

1,083 
1,700 



460 
962 
965 

4,960 



354,802 

9,120 

22,006 

7,209 

6,163 

2,205 

744 
346 
2,851 
541 
183 



1,182 
227 

274 

135 

1,693 

1,526 

1,609 

6,000 



116,416 
# 10,172 
6,648 
4,275 

2,433 
8,450 



703 

1,004 

4,483 

1,118 

493 

185 

935 
133 

535 
267 

1,413 
813 

1,180 

1,350 



286,274 
10,200 
19,768 
5,842 

1,008 
949 

1,764 



1,236 
611 



1,650 
1,793 

7,150 



402.690 
20,372 
26,416 
10, 117 

3.441 
9,399 

2,457 

1,004 

4,483 

1,118 

493 

185 

2,171 
744 

917 

540 

2,112 

2,463 

2,982 

8,500 



Total 149,428 



267,653 



418,899 



163,9 



339,599 



603,598 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



10 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 10. — Distribution of teachers for four periods — Continued. 



Teachers in— 



1910 



Men. 1 Women. | Total. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Public elementary schools 

Public high schools 

Private demon tary schools (estimated).... 

Private high schools 

Universities and colleges: 

Preparatory departments 

Collegiate departments 

CoDeges for women: 

Preparatorv departments 

Collegiate departments 

Professional schools: 

Theology •« 

Law ^ 

Medicine 

Dentistry 

Pharmacy 

Veterinary medicine ^ 

Normal schools, public: 

Normal department 

Other departments 

Normal schools, private: 

Normal department 

Other departments 

Commercial and business schools. ........ . 

Schools for defectives and delinquents 

Indian and Alaskan schools 

Kindergartens and miscellaneous (esti- 
mated) 



91,691 
18,890 
6,171 
4,512 

2,716 
13,428 

91 



1,463 
1,534 
7,586 
1,546 
815 
361 

1,10S 
587 

355 

248 

1,736 

1,134 

1,702 

1,600 



Total 158,574 



389,962 
22,777 
29,572 
6,634 

1,216 
1,549 

625 
1,681 



2,080 
1,042 

320 

277 

1,200 

2,362 

2,456 

8,000 



471,633 



481,543 
41,667 
84,743 
11,146 



14,977 

616 
2,304 

1,453 
1,534 
7,586 
1,546 
816 
361 

3,185 
1,629 

675 

625 

2,936 

3,486 

4,158 

9,500 



91,636 
22,923 
5,943 
5,307 

2,781 

15,485 



403,800 

28,930 

33,679 

7,076 

1,080 
3,794 



1,495 
1,570 
7,672 
1,588 
962 
400 

1,487 
539 

144 

124 

1,758 

1,173 

1,842 

1,500 



2,677 
968 

257 

180 

1,262 

2,635 

2,462 

8,000 



630,207 



166,229 



497,600 



496,436 
61,853 
39,622 
12,383 

4,761 
19,279 



« 



1,496 
1,679 
7,572 
1,688 
062 
400 

4,064 
1,507 

401 

304 

3,020 

3,806 

4,304 

9,500 



663,820 



1 Induded in universities and colleges. 

Tables 11 and 12 relate to the public-school systems of the Southern 
States, where all the schools for negro children are separate from the 
white schools. Separate accounts of the cost of maintaining white 
and negro schools are not kept in most of these States. These tables 
deal with the items of population, enrollment, average attendance, 
number of teachers, etc. The aggregate expenditure for the public 
schools in the SoutMm States was $95,616,998 in 1912, as shown in 
Table 12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



INTRODUOTOBY SURVEY. 
Table 11. — Common-achool statistics of the Southy 191 S. 



11 



states. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

District of ColiunbiiA. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Loaisiana... 

Maryland 

Mississippi 

iissoon... 



North Carolina.. 

Oklahoma. 

South Carolina. . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

VlTKtnia 

West Virginia- 



Total, 1912 

Total, 1910 

Total, 1900 

Total, 1890 



Population 5 to 18 
years of age.^ 



White. Negro. 



377,738 
370,047 
41, 749 
46,064 
130,719 
445,865 
594,971 
277,137 
273,876 
241,504 
827,978 
477,562 
511,095 
202,271 
506,008 
1,007,574 
305,131 
356,295 



7,083,583 
6,874,772 
5,892,392 
5,132,948 



323,074 

142,626 

9,258 

22,148 

99,744 
415,544 

87,413 
260,889 

72,180 
361,352 

42,478 
253,997 

56,788 
316,639 
161, 109 
273,023 
245,068 

14,074 



Perqentage of Enrolled in public 
whole. schools. 



White. Negro. White. Negro. 



53.90 
72.18 
81.85 
67.53 
56.72 
51.76 
87.19 
51.51 
79.14 
40.06 
05.12 
65.28 
90.00 
38.96 
75.85 
78.68 
61.72 
96.20 



3,157.413 
3,019,834 
2,705,142 
2,510,847 



69.17 
60.48 
68.55 
67.15 



46.10 
27.82 
18.15 
82.47 
43.28 
48.24 
12.81 
48.49 
20.86 
59.94 

4.88 
34.72 
10.00 
61.02 
24.15 
21.32 
38.28 

3.80 



30.83 
3a52 
31.45 
32.85 



288,887 
300,126 
29,978 
39,118 
09,517 
348,571 
461,202 
199,967 
187,029 
231.490 
660,451 
373,234 
413,305 
156,280 
438.602 
679.465 
292,806 
273,097 



6,473,147 
5,345,553 
4.261,309 
3,402,420 



1.769,859 
1,748.853 
1,560,070 
1,296,960 



Per cent of per- 
sons 5 to 18 
years enrolled. 



White. Negro. 



76.48 
81.10 
71.81 
84.92 
76.13 
78.18 
77.52 
72.16 
68.29 
05.85 
70.77 
78.15 
80.87 
77.26 
86.68 
67.44 
74.10 
78.65 



77.27 
77.75 
72.32 
66.28 



43.59 
76.86 
63.99 
84.26 
67.79 
53.68 
59.39 
83.73 
67.34 
72.30 
64.67 
69.95 
62.90 
65.36 
62.88 
65.37 
47.75 
82.85 



66.05 
67.91 
67.67 
61.65 



States. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

Delaware' 

Distrk^t of Columbia 

Florida 

Qeorgla 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

MUsissippi 

Missouri 

North Carolina 

Oklahoma 

South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas* 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Total, 1912.... 

Total, 1910 

Total, 1900.... 
Total, 1890.... 



Average daily attend- 
ance. 



White. 



173, 116 

194,789 

19,142 

31,601 

60,252 

226,914 

262,069 

119,045 

124,592 

140, 470 

« 471, 469 

242,798 

1264,840 

102,978 

299,595 

464,931 

193,888 

187,103 



3,508,402 
8,540,683 
2,775,059 
2,165,249 



Negro. 



82,375 

66,958 

3,377 

14,630 

41,112 

130,329 

30,500 

53,852 

23,301 

152, 452 

* 21, 975 

89,748 

« 21, 433 

114,033 

69,293 

96,242 

70,947 

7,797 



1,089,354 

1,105,629 

081,026 

813,710 



Per cent of enroll- 
ment. 



White. 



59.93 
64.90 
63.85 
80.78 
60.59 
65.10 
56.82 
59.98 
66.62 
64.57 
71.39 
65.05 
64.08 
65.89 
68.31 
68.43 
66.22 
68.51 



65.75 
66.23 
65.12 
63.64 



Negro. 



58.49 
61.08 
57.01 
78.39 
71.32 
58.53 
58.75 
61.19 
56.29 
58.35 
80.00 
58.94 
60.00 
65.05 
68.40 
63.00 
60.63 
66.87 



61.65 
63.22 
62.88 
62.74 



Number of teachers. 



White. 



144,336 
134,066 
98,710 
78,903 



Negro. 



7,253 


2.344 


8,227 


1,948 


790 


153 


1,180 


557 


3,281 


1,003 


9,053 


4.052 


9.819 


1,270 


5,306 


1,322 


4,908 


830 


6,793 


4,160 


17,870 


756 


9,017 


2,898 


10,876 


854 


4,363 


2,760 


9,499 


1.038 


18,626 


3,417 


8,676 


2,441 


8,899 


413 



33,116 
32,797 
27,313 
24,072 



iBsthnated. 



« Partly estimated. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

TibBLE 12. — Progress of school enrollment and, expenditure in the Souih. 



Years. 


Common-achool 
enroUment. 


Expenditures 
(for both races). 




White. 


Negro. 


1870-71 






( — — — 


1871-72 








1872-73 







1873-74 








1874-75 








1875-76 








1876-77 


, ~v, ,39 

46 
R4 
74 
77 
53 
10 
48 
11 
45 
73 
06 
30 
20 
24 

^ 

41 
67 
01 
92 
37 
43 
69 
54 
22 
42 
44 
98 
61 
35 
27 
83 
53 
12 
47 


571,506 
675,150 
685,942 
784,709 
802,374 
802,982 
817,240 

63 
59 
56 
05 
92 
59 
49 
16 
15 
98 
93 
25 
84 
49 
75 
70 
08 
59 
32 
85 
94 
98 
25 
81 
37 
53 
99 
59 




1877-78 




1878-79 




1879-80 . . 




1880-81 




1881^82 




1882-83 




1883-84- . . . - 




1884-«5 




1885-86 




1886-87 . 




1887-88 




1S88-89 




1889-90 




1890-91 




1891-92 




1892-93 




1893-94 




1894-96 




1895-96 




1896-97 




1 S97-98 




1898-99 




1K99-1900 




1900-1901 




1901-2 




1 \Kf2-3 




19(0-4 




1904-5 . . . 




19U5-6 




1906-7 




19D7-8 




1908-9 




1909-10 




1910-11 




1911-12 








Total 






1,313,781,179 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER I. 
STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



The statistics of State common schools presented in this chapter 
are for the school year ended June, 1912. The other chapters of 
tlus volume include statistics of educational institutions one year 
later. The slow process of collecting common-school returns from 
county superintendents or other local officials makes it impossible 
for many State superintendents of public instruction to send con- 
solidated reports to the Bureau of Education within the first six 
months after the close of the school year. Summaries made up of 
reports, some for 1913 and some for 1912, would be most unsatis- 
factory. Tables one year delayed are far more useful. Most State 
superintendents are now making efforts to overcome the enforced 
delay in collecting statistical information for their reports. 

The State school summaries in this chapter relate exclusively to the 
public elementary and high schools maintained by State and local 
taxation, including city and village systems. 

The school census age is not the same in all the States. To make 
enrollment figures comparable betweefi different systems, it is neces- 
sary to use a uniform school age. Years ago this bureau began to 
use the estimated population 5 to 18 years of age (i. e., 5 to 17, inclu- 
sive) as a basis for comparison of school population for the whole 
country. This estimate is made annually, using the Census Office 
estimates of total population and the percentage of 5 to 17 population 
at the last census. The estimated population 5 to 18 (5 to 17, inclu- 
sive) for 1912 was 25,167,445, as shown in Table 2 and also in the 
following synopsis : 



Estimated school population in 19 It — Children 5 to 17 years of age 
groups— Per cent of total population. 


, inclusive 


, in two 


Divisions. 


5 to 14 years. 


16 to 17 
years. 


6 to 17 years. 


Number. 


Percent. 


Number. 


Percent. 


Tnited States 


19,586,794 


20.5 


6,680,651 


26,167,445 


26.35 






North Atlantic Division 


4,890,560 
6,029,805 
3,016,093 
4,375,918 
1,274,418 


18.1 
19.6 
23.9 
24.4 
17.1 


1,435,051 
1,795,728 

802,099 
1,176,430 

371,343 


6,325,611 
7,825,633 
3,818,192 
6,552,348 
1,646,761 


23.47 


North Central Division 


25 50 


South Atlantic Division 


30.34 


South Central Division 


31.03 


W^rtArn Division 


22 13 







13 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



14 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Each census since 1870 has shown a decrease in the ratio of children 
of school age to the total population. This is due mainly to the 
decreasing birth rate, but partly to the addition of an increasing 
number of foreign-born adults to our population. The following 
table shows the ratios for five decennial years: 

Number of children 5 to 18 years of age (5 to 17 y inclusive) to every 100 persons of the total 

population. 



1870 

1 


1880 


1890 


1900 


1910 


United States 


31.27 


30.04 


29.61 


28.35 


26.35 








North Atlantic Division 


28. 30 


26.87 
30.63 
32.24 
33.13 
25.13 


25.39 
29.33 
34.04 
34.76 
24.33 


24.42 
28.24 
31.79 
32.84 
25.06 


23.47 


North Central Division 


32.40 


25.50 


South Atlantic Division 


33.02 


30.34 


South Central Division 


33. 92 


31.03 


Western Division 


25.57 


22.13 


1 





The number of children of each age can not be given at this time, 
but the approximate apportionment by certain age groups most 
useful for comparative purposes in school statistics is given in the 
following table: 

Population, by age groups, in 1910 and approximate apportiojimentfor 1912. 



The population outside of cities and towns of 2,500 inhabitants 
and over is defined as rural by the Census Bureau. In 1910 this num- 
ber was 53.7 per cent of the total population. Using the percentages 
ascertained for that year the distribution of tiie population in 1912 
was approximately as shown in the following table: 

Estim/ited population per square mile, and urban and rural population, 1912. 



Divisions. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division 
North Central Division. 
South Atlantic Division 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 



Population 
in 1912. 



95,545,336 




Popula- 
tion per 
square 
mile. 



32.1 

~mT 

40.6 
46.8 
29.4 
0.3 



Urban. 



Rum!. 



Number. 



44,237,491 




Percent.! Nunilx^r. 



F'er cent. 



46.3 ; f)l.307,815 



74. 
45.1 
25.4 
2«.5 

4H.8 



6,997,012 
16, 865, 731 

9.397,472 
14,23.S.112 

3.K12,.51S 



53.7 

"25."9 
54.9 
74.6 
79.5 
51.2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



15 



Nearly 60 per cent of the school population 5 to 17 years of age, 
inclusive, will be found in rural communities. The exact distribu- 
tion for this age group can not be given, but the distribution for the 
group 6 to 20 was ascertained in 1910. Using the same ratios the 
apportionment of the like population in 1912 was approximately as 
shown in the following table: 

Urban arid rural population 6 to £0. years of age, inclusive, estimated for 1912. 





Population, 6 to 20. 


Urban, 6 to 20. 


Rural, 6 to 20. 


Divisions. 


Number. 


Percent 
of totAl 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


United Slates 


28,826,028 


30.17 


11,962,802 


41.5 


16,863,226 


58.5 






North Atlantic Division 


7,380,813 
9,047,556 


27.39 
29.48 
33.95 
34.59 
25.87 


5,441,328 
8,n2,164 

903,000 
1,053,972 

852,209 


73.7 
41.1 
21.2 
17.1 
44.3 


1,948,485 
5,335,392 
3,370,069 
5,134,491 
1,074,789 


26.3 


North Central Division 


58.9 


South Atlantic Division 


4,273,138 
6.188,463 
1,927,068 


78.8 


South Central Division 


82.9 


Western Division 


65.7 







It is difficult to make a satisfactory estimate of the number of 
children enrolled in each grade in the public schools of the United 
States. Fourteen States reported enroUment, by grades, in 1912. 
The following table exhibits the enroUment of the first eight grades 
in these States: 



Enrollment, by grades, in the public eUmentary schools of 14 States in 1912, 



States. 



California. 

Georgia 

niinois 

Indiana 

y^tnMM 

Louisiana. 

Maine 

Maryland 

New Mexico... 
North Dakota. 
South Carolina 
South Dakota. 

Tennessee 

Utah 



First. I Second. Thbxl. 



76,831 

147,424 

203,903 

92,630 

35,058 

47,838 

13, 101 

51,323 

14,637 

29,882 

36,653 

19,440 

152,354 

23,624 



46,925 
91,421 
123,913 
63,260 
26,931 
21,960 
10,663 
30.049 
7,494 
18,312 
22,154 
12,095 
79,073 
11,659 



46,162 
77,608 
117,487 
64,942 
24,399 
21,459 

9,885 
29,470 

4,974 
17,138 
19,063 
11,846 
75.242 
10,989 



44,778 
68.558 
119,010 
63,935 
23,391 
20,948 

9,591 
26,307 

3,832 
16,393 
15,713 
11,852 
71,871 
10,364 



40,531 
48.195 
.40 
72 
'21 
E30 
130 
IQO 
107 
168 
[74 
(71 
69 
40 



36,990 
33,867 
100,402 
51,647 
19,653 
11,517 

8,072 
15,754 

1,980 
11,750 

8,145 

8,696 
34,206 

8,635 



h. Eighth. Total. 



33,408 

22,605 

70,916 

43,314 

18,071 

8,593 

7,359 

11,704 

1,100 

9,796 

6,496 

8,467 

23,622 

7,284 



31,320 

12,023 

80,950 

39,296 

18,013 

5,993 

6,306 

5,922 

846 

9,426 



7,322 
15.924 
6,222 



356.945 
501,786 
912,811 
476,298 
187,237 
154,647 
108,886 
191.619 

37,870 
126,565 
119,698 

90,389 
609,063 

88,417 



Each geographical division is represented in the above table. 
By giving each State its proper weight, percentages for the several 
divisions are derived. These percentages are applied to the entire 
elementary enrollment for the division, and an approximation of the 
grade enrollment is reached. 

The peculiar distribution in Illinois made a readjustment for the 
North Central Division necessary. The one State reporting for the 
North Atlantic Division may not furnish correct percentages for that 
division. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



16 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

The uximber enrolled above the eighth grade was eliminated before 
making these estimates. For half a dozen years the Bureau of Educa^ 
tion has published the enrollment by grades, or years, in the high schools. 
In 1912 there were 1,105,360 students in the public high schools. 
There were 461,288, or 41.73 per cent, in the first year; 299,304, or 
27.08 per cent, in the second; 201,311, or 18.21 per cent, in the third; 
and 143,457, or 12.98 per cent, in the fourth year. 

An approximate grade distribution of the 17,077,577 pupils in the 
public elementary schools is given in the table below. The imgraded 
pupils are here distributed with those in the graded schools, but it is 
probable that they should have less weight in the upper grades than 
in this distribution. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



17 



oowoocf 



V r« OO ob 



• " »-< « 00 t^ 



2Si« 



CO o 



^ 

Q 









§122 



5 









gsgg 



ma 



ssss 









liS2 



S § 



•4 
n 

I 












m5 25»o 



5^ 



•a 



s 









S c4 3 CO 
-- ci r-^ -C 



2^*'r3S 

0«>5 toes 



© «a 









-a 3 



17727°— ED 1 913— VOL S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



as" ^ 



^§ S S § 

fj| ^ i z- 



ig 



If 



2S|8 






9" 



- S i ° 



tS ^ 



2- S SgS3 

c^ rt -^ „• ^ '^ X^ 



«5 -:'*'*«. 












CN. Ok « O CI 

^ g « i£ ^ 



§1 



CO €9 00 O 

5 §. S S 



t^CM r^ 



IS 5 8SS8 
I S »8g| 



s i 8§§i 






5|B§ 









I 



•s 






^8 



O lO g 0» lO 

CO CO •> o cfi 

6 



§S" 



!j^ 



i ^ ^5§| 



••8SS 



;s s 



§S 8 



r 8 



* S g ^. S 8 






--S 









IS i ^ 



ss 



^ g !- 
3 



si 









KJ- t-- 2 



y i 



3 00 



gg 



«s;S 



s^s 



S:3 



>4 






8 ^ 



3. s S r. 3 f: 












85 *^ '^ 



5 S 



f:8 



8 









III 
111: 



iSl^ 



§ . 

iBi2 



11 I 



III i 



I 

^m 



m I 



lis ?^ && 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



coocoo 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 

9 



19 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 EDUCATION BEPOBT^ 1913. 

Table 2. — Total population and whool population. 



1 Estimati's based upon the ratio of cbildrca 5 to 17, inclusive, to the total population in each State, 
according to the oensus of 1910. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 21 

Table 3. — Compulsory school attendance laws. 



> And 14-16 if not able to read and write. 

* And 14-16 if not employed. 

* 7-12 in country districts, 7-16 in cities. 

* 16-20 if not employed. 



Digitized by VjO(3QIC 



22 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 4. — Percentage analysis of population and per cent of illiterates, census of 1910^ 



> United Sut«a census. * Les3 than one-tenth of 1 per cent. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



23 



Table 5. — Number of pupUs enrolled in the common sdtools at dxffere:ni date^ — Estimated 
private school enrollment in 1911-12. 



Number of different pupils ot all ages enrolled during the school 
year (excluding duplicate enrollments). 



States. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
SOolh AUantic Division. 
South Central Division . . 
Western Division. 



1870-71 



7,561.582 



9,867,505 



2,743,344 

. 3,300.660 

603,610 

767,839 

146,120 



North Atlantic DtvMon: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Itassachuaetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

lUlnois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nerth Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . 

Virgtala 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South CaroUna 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyommg 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

"Utah 

Nevada 

Idahd 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



2,930,345 
4,033,828 
1,242,811 
1,871,975 
288,546 



162,600 

71,957 

65,384 

273,661 

134,000 

113,588 

1,028,110 

160,430 

834,614 

719,372 
450,057 
672,787 
292,466 
265,285 
113.983 
841,938 
330,070 

\ 1 1,660 

23,265 

20,058 

115,683 

15,157 

131,088 

76.999 

1115,000 

66,056 

49,578 

14,000 

178,457 

1140,000 

141,312 

117.000 

57,639 

63,504 

69,927 



11,657 

1450 

4,357 

11,320 



16,992 

3,106 

906 

15,000 

21,000 

91,332 



1879-80 



12,722,581 



149,827 
64,341 
75,328 

306,777 
40,604 

119,694 
1,031,593 

204.961 

937,310 

729,499 
511,283 
704,041 
362.556 
299,457 
180.248 
426.057 
482,986 

13, n8 

92,549 
231,434 

27,823 
162,431 

26,439 
220,736 
142,850 
252,612 
134,072 
236,533 

39,315 

276.000 
300,217 
179,490 
236,654 

77,642 
1220.000 

81,972 



4,270 
2,907 

22,119 
4,755 
4,212 

24,326 
9,045 
5,834 

14,780 

37,533 
158,765 



1880-90 



15,503,110 



8.112.622 
5,015,217 
1,785,486 
2,293,579 
616,677 



139.676 

59,813 

65.608 

371,402 

52.774 

126,505 

1,042,160 

234.072 

1,020,522 

797.489 
512.955 
778.319 
427.032 
351,723 
280,960 
493,267 
620,314 
r 35,543 
i 78,043 
240,300 
899,322 

31.434 
184,251 

36,906 
342,269 
193,064 
322,533 
201,260 
381,297 

92,472 



447,950 
801,615 
334,158 
120,253 
466.872 
223,071 



16.980 

7,052 

65,490 

18,215 

7,989 

37.279 

7,387 

14,311 

55,964 

63.254 

221,756 



1809-1900 



8.643.949 
5,842,569 
2,182,615 
3,018.609 
815,368 



130.918 

65,688 

65.964 

474.891 

67,231 

155.228 

1,209,574 

322,575 

1,151,880 

829.160 
564.807 
058,911 
504,985 
445,142 
399,207 
566.223 
719,817 
77,686 
98.822 
288,227 
389,582 

36,895 
222,373 

46.519 
370,505 
232,343 
400,452 
281.891 
482,673 
108,874 

500,294 
485,354 
376,423 
386,507 
196,160 
650.598 
314.662 
09,602 

39,430 
14,512 

117,555 
36,735 
16,504 
73,042 
6,676 
36,669 

115,104 
89,405 

209,736 



1909-10 



17,813,852 



4,216,879 
«, 981, 989 
2,573,386 
3,813,989 
1,227,609 



144.278 

63,972 

66,615 

535,869 

80,061 

190,353 

1,422,969 

429,797 

1,282,965 

838,080 
531,459 

1,002,687 
541,501 
464,311 
440.083 
510,661 
707,031 
139,802 
126,253 

1281,375 
396,746 

35,950 
238,393 

55,774 
402,109 
276,458 
520,404 
340,415 
555,794 
148,080 

404,863 
521,753 
424,611 
460,137 
263,617 
821,631 
395,978 
422,399 

66,141 

24,584 

168,798 

56,304 

31,312 

91,611 

110,200 

76,168 

215,688 

118,412 

368,391 



1911-12 



18.182.937 



4,333,060 
5,960,320 
2,602,175 
3,952,913 
1.334.469 



Esti- 
mated 
number 
of pupils 
enrolled 
in private 
schools, 
1911-12. 



1.647,104 



130,057 

63,186 

64,518 

546,014 

81,700 

107,852 

1,457,391 

459,189 

1,322,254 

853,002 
632,821 
987,379 
555, 137 
438.460 
446,083 
507.109 
687,920 
139,361 
132,764 
285,220 
395,064 

35,902 
228,425 

67,781 
409,825 
284,7.S7 
525,507 
331,587 
571,230 
157,161 

513,118 
539,911 
429,725 
492,756 
287,988 
830.642 
409,746 
449,027 

70,065 

26,502 

177,428 

61.027 

33,310 

92,129 

11,008 

84,002 

224,410 

130,520 

414,078 



718.982 
579.082 
116,947 
149.060 
83,024 



16,257 
16,458 
8.160 

102,273 
19,705 
48,593 

272,536 
60,000 

175,000 

100,960 
25,170 

193,734 
68.391 
69,000 
21.000 
32,000 
40,000 
1,000 
2.000 
10.000 
15,818 

3,900 
20,000 

5.000 
27,347 

5,000 
26,500 
10,700 
10.000 

8,500 

26,019 

30,000 

15,503 

7,500 

31,448 

20,000 

9.599 

9,000 

6,791 

330 

6,174 

4,600 

4,500 

7,000 

524 

2.500 

9,196 

8,409 

33,000 



I Approximate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24. 



EDUCATION EEPOET, 1913. 



Tablb 6. — Per cent of the total population and per cent of the aehool popidation enrolled 
in the common schools at different dates. 



States. 



Per cent of the total population 
enrolled. 



1870- 
1871 



187»- 
1880 



188^ 
1800 



1809- 
1900 



190(^ 
1910 



1911- 
1912 



Per cent of school population (i. e., 
of children 5 to 18 years of ace) en- 
rolled. 



1870- 
1871 



1879- 
1880 



1889- 
1800 



10 



1809- 
1900 



11 



1909- 
1910 



12 



1911- 
1912 



18 



United States 



North Atlantic Div.. 
North Central Div... 
South Atlantic Div. . 
South Central Div... 
Western Division. . . . 



North AOantio Div.: 

Main e 

New Hampshire.* 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania.... 
North Central Div.: 

Ohio .-... 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota.... 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 



South Atlantic Div. : 

Delaware 

Maryland.. 

Dist. Columbia".*.! 

Virginia 

West Virginia.... 

North Carolina... 

South Carolina... 

Oeorda 

Florida 

South Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Div.: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington. 

Oregon 

Calif (xnia 



19.14 



19.67 20.32 



20.51 



19.38 



19.03 



61.46 



65.50 68.61 



72.43 



73.12 



72.25 



21.95 2a 20 17.89 

24.80 

ia06 

11.56 

13.99 



23.23 
1&36 
15.38 
16.32 



22.43 
2a 16 
20.19 
17.03 



17.31 
22.10 
20.00 
22.06 
19.03 



16w31 
20.00 
21.10 
22.23 
1&04 



16.08 
19.43 
20.67 
22.09 
17.94 



77.95 
76w87 
3a 51 
34.17 
54.77 



75.17 
75.84 
5a 74 
46.43 
64.96 



7a 45 
76.46 
50.22 
60.14 
7a 01 



70.86 68.78 
7& 65 78.08 
65.73 69.50 
67.28 71.50 
79.51 



68L50 
76.17 
6&15 

n.i9 

8a 381 8L09 



24.25 
22.41 

no. 77 

18.31 
15.11 
20.83 
23.18 
18.26 
23.24 

26.50 
26.34 
25.99 
23.98 
24.60 
24.47 
28.19 
ia74 

^9.34 

16.61 
22.28 

15.79 
14.55 
11.23 
ia47 
1&85 
ia45 
9.05 
4.08 
7.19 

13.21 

laoo 

13.85 
13.70 
7.73 
7.26 
13.72 



23.09 
18.54 
22.64 
17.20 
14.60 
10.22 
20.30 
18.12 
21.80 

22.81 
25.85 
22.88 
22L15 
22.76 
23.00 
26.23 
22.27 

iai5 

20.46 
23.23 

18.08 
17.37 
14.88 
14.50 
23.10 
18.05 
13.46 
15.34 
14.50 

16.74 
10.46 
14.22 
20.91 
8.26 
13.82 
ia21 



21.13 
15.80 
no. 74 
16.50 
15.27 
16.95 
17.37 
ia20 
10.41 

21.72 
23.40 
20.34 
20.30 
20.85 
21.58 
25.80 
23.15 
flO. 45 
\23.74 
22.60 
27.08 

ia66 
17.68 
1&02 
20.67 
25.31 
19.03 
17.40 
2a 75 
23.63 

21.50 
25.34 
10.93 
25.92 
ia75 
20.88 
19.77 



7.54 
4.55 
9.33 
1.40 



18.61 
7.04 
5.50 
18.62 
21.63 
15.61 



laoo 

13. 
11.38 
3.98 
ia42 
1&90 
14.53 
17.80 
10.68 
21.47 
18.36 



12.85 
11.62 
15.80 
11.86 
13.40 
17.93 
16.14 
16.96 
16.02 
20.16 
18.36 



18.85 
15.96 
19.20 
16.93 
15.60 
17.00 
16.64 
17.12 
18.28 

19.94 
22.44 
19.80 
2a 86 
21.51 
22.79 
25.37 
23.17 
24.34 
24.60 
27.03 
26.49 

19.98 
ia72 
16.60 
10.09 
24.23 
21.14 
21.03 
21.78 
20.60 

23.30 
24.02 
20.59 
24.92 
14.20 
21.64 
23.99 
25.01 

16.20 
15.68 
21.78 
18.81 
13.42 
26.39 
15.77 
22.67 
22.22 
21.62 
18.16 



19.46 
14.86 
18.72 
15.93 
14.78 
17.25 
15.62 
16.95 
16.74 

17.58 
19.70 
17.80 
19.20 
19.93 
21.20 
23.05 
21.50 
24.23 
21.62 
23.66 
23.65 

14.25 
18.35 
16.87 
19.55 
22.75 
23.55 
22.44 
21.33 
19.66 

21.65 
23.95 
19.86 
26.10 
15.95 
21.10 
25.25 
25.48 

17.60 
16.90 
21.14 
17.23 
15.35 
24.58 
11.10 
23.40 
19.00 
17.60 
15.50 



18.58 
14.53 
17.99 
15.66 
14.40 
17.04 
15.30 
17.11 
16.59 

17.40 
19.43 
16.96 
19.16 
18.32 
20.77 
22.81 
20.63 
21.96 
2L25 
23.37 
22.70 

17.41 
17.31 
16.86 
19.44 
22.25 
23.09 
21.33 
21.18 
19.58 

22.10 
24.30 
19.42 
26.61 
16.76 
20.33 
25.09 
24.26 

17.27 
16.78 
20.70 
17.10 
14.97 
23.33 
12.23 
23.44 
17.61 



187.35 
91.31 

7i*34 
159.24 
80.83 
82.98 
63.20 
7a 35 

84.04 
78.64 
81.01 
79.66 
73.92 
75.92 
84.44 
56.03 

139.26 

5a 79 
74.22 

50.04 
46.70 
41.60 
32.34 
49.47 
131.23 
27.28 
11.89 
21.21 



89.80 
81.32 
87.21 
71.76 
50.50 
76.97 
77.10 
64.77 
74.37 

7a 69 
82.39 
74.61 
7a 08 
73.78 
75.87 
83.52 
6a 85 

41.68 

6a 48 
73.23 

65.20 
5a 13 
55.40 
45.00 
60.21 
55.87 
40.56 
4a 24 
44.16 



132.00 
4a 36 
40.60 
24.78 
21.00 
40.20 



5a 21 
42.60 
61.20 
25.87 
142. 40 
1.81 



85.88 
71.28 

'7i'66 
62.66 
72.02 
7a 71 
62.21 
60.53 

7a 54 
79.21 
71.97 
73.45 
69.77 
74.50 
85.51 
74.43 
r71.26 
^81.04 
75.35 
8a66 

aaio 

6a 37 
63.10 

6a5i 

7a 27 
6a 39 
47.08 
6a 45 
71.10 

65.64 
74.05 
65.83 
7a 62 
31.58 
50.50 
55.41 



7a 24 

>4a34 

42.28 

4.42 



53.36 
53.07 
4a 06 
60.00 
10. OO; 67.73 
ia07> 63.63 



63.77 
77.44 
60.82 
13.32 
53.16 
50.61 
79.73 
77.85 
72.36 
7a 02 
73.3 



71.14 
54.46 
72.20 
42.25 
62.72 
6a 26 
7a 80 
62.66 
7a 68 
74.78 
77.38 



81.38 
73.98 
82.15 
7a 21 
6a 79 
74.64 
09.57 
6a 52 
6a90 

7a 40 
81.10 
72.68 
77.13 
72.51 
77.59 
89.06 
7a 63 
81.26 
79.49 
89.50 
89.21 

7a 33 
67.00 
7a 81 
63.19 
7a 58 
6a 65 
6a 74 
6a 30 
6a57 

7a 27 
7a 09 
61.67 
73.27 
43.62 
64.67 
71.02 
79.82 

72.80 
65.66 
8a 19 
61.43 
51.94 
81.02 
74.06 
79.18 
87.86 
82.13 
79.56 



84.52 
6a 56 
80.27 
7a 65 
63.05 
73.79 
67.75 
60.96 
6a 73 



81.07 
65.49 
77.26 
7a 17 
62.22 
74.29 
67.28 
71.33 
6a 56 



73.82 73.50 



7a 44 



77.79 



71.72 6a92 
77.98 77.89 
72.43 6a 75 
77.89 7a 68 



8a 94 



8a 83 



81.75 79.03 



85.41 



7a 02 



77.70 7a 76 
8a 49 8a 11 



8a 71 



71.47 
60.94 



8a86 



7a 39 

6a 01 



83.25 84.71 

64.26 64.02 



77.87 
73.51 
67.30 
6a 76 
6a 13 

73.63 
79.49 
62.71 
8a 41 
50.82 
67.24 
80.01 
82.90 

8a70 
79.71 
89.62 
59.20 
61.95 
84.32 
73.93 
87.90 
85.30 
79.20 
7a 56 
1 



7a 88 
71.83 
63.90 
6a 31 
6a 19 

7a 19 
80.93 
61.32 
81.74 
63.53 
<M.86 
79.92 
79.07 

80.24 
81.31 

8a 47 
59.00 
61.00 
80.33 
74.55 
8a 82 
79.92 
8a 98 
82.65 



1 Approximate. 



> Pupils of legal school age. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



25 



Tablx 7. — Tk4 Mchool enrollment^ average daily attendance, and aggregate number of days 

attended, 1911-lg, 



States. 



Numbtf of dlfleront pupils of all 
ages enrolled. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Total. 



Average 

daUy 

attendanoe. 



Aggregate 
number 
of days' 

attendance. 



United States. 



0,165,109 



0,027,828 



18,182,037 



13,302,903 



2,102,414,079 



North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division . . 
Boi:Ah Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont , 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

minois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin ^ 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

NeboBska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware (estimated)., 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 



2,171,290 
3,046,424 
1,274,397 
1,981,596 
682,397 



60,191 
31,794 
32,524 



41,317 



731,424 
231,218 
665,314 

432,096 
268,343 
497,993 
279,867 
220,546 



345,845 
71,525 
67,832 
144,778 
198,505 



27,966 
203,538 
145,611 



Georgia., 
orida.. 



Florl 
South Central Division: 

Kentucky...., 

Tennessee!.... 

Alabama 

Mississippi.... 

Louisiana..... 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Dhriston: 

Montana. 



Wyoming..., 
Colorado..... 
New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada , 

Idaho 

Washington., 

Oregon , 

California 



157,630 

276,862 

76,176 

260,000 
272,748 



244,707 
141,014 
411,334 
205,250 
227,096 



13,396 
89,932 



17,482 
47,078 
5,728 



71,243 
214,363 



2,161,764 
2,914,896 
1,327,778 
1,971,318 
652,072 



70,766 
31,392 
31,994 



40,482 



725,967 
227,971 
656,940 

420,906 
264,478 
489,386 
275,270 
217,915 



342,075 
67,836 
64,932 
140,442 
190,559 



29,815 
206,287 
139,246 



173,957 
294,368 
80,985 

253,118 
267,163 



248,049 
146,974 
419,308 
204,496 
221,931 



13,106 
87,496 



15,828 
45,051 
5,370 



68,277 
199,715 



4,333,060 
6,960,320 
2,602,175 
3,952,913 
1,334,469 



139,957 

63,186 

64,518 

546,914 

81,799 

197,852 

1,457,391 

459,189 

1,322,254 

853,002 
532, 821 
987,379 
555,137 
438,460 
446,083 
507,109 
687,920 
139,361 
132,764 
285,220 
395,064 

35,902 
228,425 

57,781 
409,825 
284,757 
525,507 
331,587 
571,230 
157, 161 

513,118 
539,911 
429,725 
492,756 
287,988 
830,642 
409,746 
449,027 

70,065 

26,502 

177,428 

61,027 

33,310 

92,129 

11,098 

84,902 

224, 410 

139,520 

414,078 



3,463,033 
4,640,372 
1,693,542 
2,500,860 
1,004,496 



107,768 

49,624 

52,160 

458,065 

64,878 

155,735 

1,164,992 

348,238 

1,061,673 

669,044 
430,862 
865,009 
464,556 
323, 781 
335,951 
368,631 
493, 444 
99,686 
87,792 
213. 488 
298,128 

22,519 
147,893 

46,231 
264,835 
194,900 
332,546 
217,011 
357,243 
110,364 

292,509 
3aS888 
255,491 
301,922 
173,797 
560, 173 
261,747 
286,273 

50,836 

19,877 

120,326 

40,018 

22,813 

75,313 

8,190 

66,359 

170,041 

112,057 

318,666 



626,326,026 
764,764,692 
222,639,320 
323,816,728 
164,867,313 



17,697,185 

8,309,650 

8,345,640 

85,200,090 

12,695,260 

28,686,387 

218,485,416 

65,401.010 

181,546,083 

109,085,385 
72,384,810 

136,671,636 
79,903,632 
56,886,798 
54,423,996 
63,404,532 
77,643,653 
14,584,125 
14,669,791 
33,828,512 
51,278,016 

3,828,230 
26,548,589 

8,284,877 
36,779,208 
26,701,300 
36,314,023 
19,965,012 
50,728,506 
13,489,576 

40,729,270 
47,148,327 
33,834,924 
37,136,406 
22,948,484 
73,942,853 
30,859,974 
37,215,490 

8,408,471 

2,931,935 

21,057,050 

5,002,250 

3,547,413 

11.717,466 

1,187,594 

10,086,568 

29,579.662 

16,080.180 

55,268,724 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



26 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Tablc 8. — The average daily atUndance at various periods^ and it$ relation in 1911--li 

to the enrollment. 



States. 



Average number of pupils actually present at school each day. 



1870-71 



1879-80 



1880-00 



1890-1900 



1909-10 



1911-12 



Number 
attend* 
ing daily 
for each 
100 en- 
rolled in 
1911-12. 



United SUtes.... 

North Atlantic Div.. 
North Central Div... 
South Atlantic Div.. 
South Central Div... 
Western Div 



4,545,317 



6,144,143 



8,153,635 



10,032,772 



12,827,307 



1,627,208 

1,911,720 

368,111 

535,632 

102,646 



1,824,487 

2,461,167 

776,798 

902,767 

188,024 



2,036,459 
8,188,732 
1,126,683 
1,467,649 
334, 112 



2,636,892 
4,080,400 
1,344,334 
2,015,457 
555,629 




13,302,308 

3,463,033 
4,640,372 
1,603,542 
2,500,860 
1,004,496 



North Atlantic Div.: 

Maine 

New Hampshire... 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Div.: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Div.: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Dist.ofColiunbia.. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carol Ina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi. 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Div.: 

Montana 

Wvomlng 

Colorado 

!»ew Mexico 

Ariiona 

rtah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washinifton 

Or«^on 

California 



100,392 
48,150 

» 44, 100 

201,750 
22,485 
62,683 

493,648 
86,812 

567,188 

432,452 

295,071 

341,686 

1193,000 

U32,000 

50,694 

211,562 

187,024 

U,040 

114,300 
52,891 

U2,700 
56,435 
10,261 
77,402 
51,336 

» 73,000 

» 44,700 
31,377 

U0,900 

129,866 
189,000 
107,666 
»90,000 
» 40,500 
141,000 
146,600 



11,100 
1250 
2.611 

1880 



12,819 
11,800 
1600 
13,300 
115.000 
64,286 



103, 115 

48,966 

48,606 

233,127 

27,217 

73,546 

573,089 

115, 194 

601,627 

476,279 

321,659 

431,638 

1240,000 

1156,000 

178,400 

259,836 

1281,000 

8,530 

60,156 
137,669 

17,439 

85,778 

20,637 
128,404 

91,604 
170, 100 
190,600 
145.190 

27,046 

178,000 
208,528 
117,978 
156,761 
154,800 
1132,000 
154,700 



98,364 

41,526 

45,887 

273,910 

33,905 

83,656 

642,964 

133,286 

682,941 

549,269 

342,275 

538,310 

1282,000 

200,457 

127,025 

306,309 

384,627 

20,694 

48,327 

146,139 

243,300 

19,649 
102,351 

28,184 
198,290 
121,700 
203,100 
147,799 
240,791 

64,819 

225,739 
323,548 
182,467 
207,704 
87,536 
291,941 
1148,714 



13,000 
1,920 

12,618 
3,150 
2,847 

17, 178 
5,401 
3,863 

10,546 

27,435 
100,966 



10,596 
14,700 
38,715 

113,000 
4,702 
20,967 
5,064 
19,500 
36,946 
43,333 

146,589 



97,697 

47,276 

47,020 

366,136 

47,124 

111,564 

857,488 

207,947 

854,640 

616,365 
429,566 
737,576 
355,226 
1309,800 
243,224 
373,474 
460,012 
43,500 
168,000 
181,874 
261,783 

125,300 
134,400 

35,463 
216,464 
151,254 
206,918 
201,295 
298,237 

75,003 

310,339 
338,566 
297,805 
224,526 
146,323 
438,779 
195,401 
63,718 

126,300 
19,650 
73,291 
22,433 
10,177 
50,595 
4,698 
21,962 
74,717 
64, 4U 

197,395 



106,955 

50,101 

52,104 

444,090 

61,487 

« 147, 190 

1,122,649 

324,239 

1,001,464 

648,544 
420,780 
779,040 
443,458 
320,439 
348,500 
360, 178 
490,390 
90,149 
80,032 
191,076 
291,329 

22,559 
145,762 

44,627 
259,394 
189,900 
331,335 
243,901 
346.295 
103,892 

315,196 
363,953 
266,589 
261,384 
182,659 
544,691 
255,135 
278,650 

41,314 

16,730 

107,520 

37,389 

20,094 

69,246 

17,400 

51,137 

156,064 

103,553 

286,744 



107,768 

49,524 

52,160 

458,065 

64,878 

155,735 

1,164,992 

348,238 

1,061,673 

659,044 
430,862 
865,009 
464,556 
323,781 
335,951 
368,631 
493,444 
99,686 
87,792 
213,488 
298,128 

22,519 
147,893 

46,231 
264,835 
194,900 
332,546 
217,011 
357,243 
110,364 

292,569 
368,888 
255,491 
301,922 
173,797 
560,173 
261,747 
286,273 

50,836 

19, 8n 

120,326 

40,018 

22,813 

75,313 

8,190 

66,359 

170,041 

112,057 

318,666 



73.2 



79.9 
77.9 
65.1 
63.3 
75.3 



77.0 
78.4 
80.8 
83.8 
79.3 
78.7 
79.9 
75.8 
80.3 

77.3 
80.9 
87.6 
83.7 
73.8 
75.3 
72.7 
71.7 
71.5 
66.1 
74. t 
75.5 

62.7 
64.7 
80.0 
64.6 
68.4 
63.3 
65.4 
62.5 
70.2 

57.0 
68.3 
59.5 
61.3 
60.3 
67.4 
63.9 
63.8 

72.6 
75.0 
67.8 
65.6 
68.5 
81.7 
73.8 
78.2 
75.8 
80.3 
77.0 



1 Approximate. 



* High-school attendance not reported. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 27 

Table 9. — Average lenath of school term at various periods — Attendance compared with 
the school population and the enrollment {columns 8 and 9). 



1 Approximate. 

* Includes period during which certain schools were maintained by tuition fees. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 10. — Number and 9ex of teachers in 1911-lt — Percentage of men teaeher$i 



states. 



United States. 



North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware (estimated). 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama , 

Mississippi , 

I>onisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

» Oklahoma , 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Maho 

Washington 

Orecon 

California 



Whole number of different 
teachers employed. 



Men. Women, 



114,559 



18, m 
39,870 
16,139 
31,750 

8,029 



818 

243 

293 

1,615 

200 

361 

5,334 

1,753 

8,154 

8,433 
5,844 
6,746 
2.708 
1,344 
1,730 
2,600 
6,025 
1,260 
1,071 
1.470 
2,639 

117 
895 
214 
1.964 
4,214 
3.159 
1.581 
3.029 



6.382 
3,970 
3,196 
2,924 
1,410 
6,455 
5.044 
3,369 



174 
902 
510 
120 
702 
68 
689 

1,545 
999 

1,921 



432,730 



116.966 
168,272 
49,035 
61,902 
36,555 



6,710 
2,735 
3,139 
14,818 
2,228 
5,130 
41,662 
11,753 
28,791 

20,026 
11,660 
24,727 
16.116 
10,916 
14,343 
24.148 
13,601 
6,309 
5,493 
9,469 
11,464 

826 
4,843 
1,523 
9,053 
5,098 
8,756 
5,542 
10,076 
3,318 

5,707 
7,467 
6,401 
8,029 
5.218 
15,588 
6.131 
8,3«1 

2,406 
1,051 
4,823 
1.088 

757 
1,935 

461 
2,021 
6.496 
4,190 
11,327 



TotaL 



647,289 



135,737 
208.142 
65,174 
03,652 
44,584 



7,528 
2,978 
3,432 
16.433 
2.428 
5,491 
46,996 
13,506 
36,945 

28,459 
17,504 
30,473 
18,824 
12,260 
16,073 
26,748 
18,626 
7,569 
6,564 
10,939 
14,103 

943 
5,738 
1,737 

11,017 
9,312 

11.915 
7.123 

13,105 
4,284 

11,069 
11,437 

9,597 
10,953 

6.628 
22,043 
10. 175 
11,730 

2,805 
1,225 
5,725 
1,598 

877 
2,637 

529 
2,710 
8,041 
5.189 
13,248 



Percentage of men teachers. 



1870-71 



41.0 



26.2 
43.2 
63.8 
67.5 
45.0 



124.4 
15.0 
16.5 
12.7 
»20.4 
122.1 
22.9 
32.5 
42.8 

43.2 
60.5 
43.5 
26.3 
»28.8 
33.7 
39.0 
65.3 

124.7 

61.9 
47.2 

129.9 

45.0 

8.2 

64.5 

79.0 

173.2 
62.4 
71.4 

165.7 

166.0 
1 75.0 

66.8 
160.8 

50.9 
> 77. 3 
175.6 



» 60.3 
1 28.6 

48.8 
191.7 



55.0 

32.4 

164.3 

146.5 

151.7 

40.0 



187»-«0 



42.8 



28.8 
41.7 
62.5 
67.2 
40.3 



127.2 
16.8 
16.8 
13.2 
20.2 

122.8 
26.0 
28.5 
45.5 

47.8 
67.6 
39.7 
29.2 
28.9 
35.9 
33.6 
68.1 

140.8 

40.7 
45.1 

46.6 
42.6 
7.8 
61.8 
75.2 

171.3 
59.5 

165.2 
61.6 

64.6 
74.4 
63. S 
61.2 
46.1 
175.0 
78^ 



1880-90 



1899- 
1900 



84.5 



20.0 
32.4 
49.1 
57.5 
31.1 



116.0 

9.8 

12.0 

9.8 

12.6 

113.4 

16.9 

18.4 

34.2 

43.1 
61.1 
32.5 
22.3 
19.8 
23.9 
20.6 
44.4 
28.3 
29.0 
27.1 
40.8 

131.0 
27.8 
13.0 
41.5 
63.4 
69.1 
49.6 
63.3 
48.0 

49.8 
61.8 
62.9 
49.6 
44.7 
61.1 
68.5 



38.5 


22.9 


44.3 


22.4 


36.4 


26.2 


78.0 


162.2 


47.5 


38.8 


54.5 


46.6 


46.7 


16.3 


67.4 


133.4 


37.4 


40.6 


48.3 


43.3 


33.6 


21.4 



29.9 



18.4 
28.3 
40.7 
47.4 
24.7 



116.4 

8.9 

13.6 

8.8 

9.5 

19.0 

14.9 

12.9 

32.0 

40.4 
46.2 
26.4 
20.3 
18.4 
19.4 
17.2 
37.6 
28.8 
24.4 
21.8 
32.7 

25.3 
21.7 
13.1 
31.5 
57.9 
49.4 
143.5 
44.0 
36.9 

45.5 
164.0 
30.1 
44.2 
47.9 
48.9 
59.7 
42.8 

16.6 
15.6 
20.9 
155.2 
27.3 
36.6 
11.1 
31.2 
28.9 
28.4 
17.8 



1909-10 



21.1 



14.0 
19.4 
26.3 
27.4 
17.9 



11.2 
7.1 
8.9 
9.1 
8.9 
6.2 
11.7 
12.3 
22.6 

31.1 
35.7 
18.6 
14.0 
11.8 
12.0 
9.8 
26.4 
17.4 
16.6 
11.9 
18.0 

13.7 
17.1 
11.5 
19.9 
48.0 
28.5 
23.1 
24.4 
25.7 

41.7 
37.0 
35.0 
31.0 
21.4 
30.8 
47.0 
26.2 

12.0 
12.8 
15.6 
34.4 
17.0 
26.6 
10.8 
25.5 
20.0 
19.4 
13.8 



1911-12 



10 



20.9 



13.8 
19.2 
24.8 
33.9 

18.0 



lao 
8.2 
8.5 
9.8 
8.2 

6.6 
1L3 
13.0 
22.1 

29.6 
33.4 
18.9 
14.4 

11.0 
10.8 
9.7 
27.0 
16.6 
16.3 
13.4 
18.7 

12.4 
15.6 
12.3 
17.8 
45.3 
26.6 
22.2 
23.1 
22.5 

48.6 
31.7 
33.3 
26.7 
21.3 
29.3 
49.6 
28,7 

14.2 
14.2 
15.8 
31.9 
13.7 
26.6 
12.9 
2.'). 4 
V.K 2 
\9.\ 
14. 5 



I Approximate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 



29 



Tabus ll^^Teachera! i 



-Length of school term in months — Number ofschoolhouses — 
Value of school properttf — All for 1911-lt. 



states. 



Average monthly salary 
of teachers. 



Men. 



Women. 



AU. 



Averase 
lenftn 
of school 
year, In 
months. 



Average 

annual 

salary 

of all 

teachers. 



Number 
of buUd- 
Ingsused 
as school- 
houses. 



Estimatf^d 
value of ui I 
public prop- 
erty usen 
for school 
purposes. 



United States.. 



North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Centra* Division: 

Ohio. 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Sooth Central Division: 

Kentucky 



Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico. . . 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington... 

Oregon 

Calflomia , 



178.08 



105.90 
75.71 
60.13 
62.68 

103.71 



73.29 
120. 78 
60.53 



136.24 
125.01 



116. 19 
65.04 

70.05 
73.41 
92.69 
82.33 
83.38 
84.77 
79.11 
59.87 
68.82 
58.52 
79.02 
80.50 

79.00 



53.29 



67.60 
63.00 
65.64 



75.89 



67.78 

100.78 
78.85 
88.93 
63.88 
117.64 
106.63 
125.92 
92.11 
87.25 
82.11 



$58.04 



$62.23 



7.90 



$49L62 



273,511 



$1,266,382,277 



66.52 
56.99 
39.53 
48.60 
76.52 



71.96 
60.58 
46.86 
53.37 
81.42 



9.05 
8.24 
6.58 
6.48 
8.21 



651.24 
499.18 
308.34 
845.84 
668.46 



43,495 
111,806 
89,151 
60,046 
19,013 



42.39 
45.11 

88.78 



62.80 
57.87 



78.78 
48.41 

56.28 
62.29 
68.48 
64.97 
46.78 
50.30 
48.71 
66.95 
63.20 
49.46 
65.31 
67.25 

39.00 



39.21 



50.00 
39.55 
43.66 



59.03 



54.48 

68.50 
57.48 
64.68 
59.20 
81.76 
70.11 
81.91 
78 96 
67.80 
59.96 



45.72 
51.28 
40.63 
72.45 
68.98 
60.46 
93.87 
81.68 
52.16 

63.16 
66.01 
73.05 
58.91 
50.79 
54.01 
51.67 
57.66 
55.80 
50.93 
57.97 
60.73 

43.96 
56.52 
104.58 
41.73 
46.69 
35.77 
53.90 
45.54 
47.85 

51.46 
47.70 
48.09 
37.99 
55.51 
63.98 
52.88 
58.70 

73.09 
60.51 
68.42 
62.37 
86.67 
79.83 
87.57 
82.24 
71.53 
64.22 
105.33 



8.21 
8.45 
8.00 
9.30 
9.71 
9.21 
9.38 
9.39 
8.55 

8.28 
8.40 
7.90 
8.60 
8.79 
8.10 
8.60 
7.87 
7.32 
8.36 
7.93 
8.60 

8.60 
8.98 
8.96 
6.96 
6.85 
5.46 
4.60 
7.10 
6.11 

6.96 
6.39 
6.62 
6.15 
6.60 
6.60 
6.90 
6.60 

8.27 
7.38 
8.75 
6.25 
7.78 
7.78 
7.25 
7.60 
8.70 
7.18 
8.67 



375.38 
433.33 
326.06 
674.04 
660.84 
556.84 
880.50 
767.02 
445.95 

623.00 
654.50 
577.10 
606.59 
446.46 
437.48 
444.32 
453.80 
408.45 
425.77 
459.70 
699.70 

373.68 
507.59 
937.00 
290.01 
319.80 
105.32 
247.98 
323.33 
292.36 

358.17 
304.80 
318.33 
233.64 
366.37 
422.25 
312.00 
381.56 

604.45 
446.56 
698.68 
389.80 
674.29 
621.09 
634.86 
625.00 
622.31 
461.10 
913.22' 



8,862 

1,707 

2,008 

4,326 

630 

1,537 

2,167 

12,071 

16,207 

12,666 
9,020 

13,261 
8,668 
7,912 
8.835 

13,870 

10,804 
5,162 
4,932 
7,365 
9,312 

470 
2,474 

203 
6,743 
6,791 
7,777 
5,161 
6,907 
2,625 

8,093 
9,036 
6,207 
7,781 
3,520 
12,678 



1,568 

777 

2,678 

1,007 

580 

601 

331 

1,304 

3,278 

2,479 

4,330 



498,560,921 
462,753,246 
71,607,726 
100,237,542 
133,222,843 



8,404,385 

6,775,409 

9,060,416 

80,800,732 

8,520,972 

20,982,007 

62,806,162 

205,508,543 

110,612,296 

76,870,709 

41,279,285 

110,860,023 

40,223,747 

20,530,000 

37,827,800 

31,409,534 

43,111,128 

9,763,351 

8,267,739 

18,934,024 

23,685,905 

1,600,000 
10,822,070 

9,813.245 
11,112.992 
10,642,688 

7,380,616 

4,944,224 
11,431,421 

3,960,470 

12,045,931 
12,192,663 
8,343,581 
3,110,300 
8,553,942 
30,023,027 
10,131,828 
15,836,270 

6,500,000 

1,496,948 

14,281,916 

1,649,122 

1,845,021 

7,804,714 

1,343,103 

7,202,725 

25,450,747 

12.380.308 

53,259,239 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



30 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — School moneys received in 1911-12. 



I Included in column 3. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 31 

Table n. — Percentage analysis of the school revenue^ 1911-12. and expenditure per capita 
of total population at various perioas. 



I Approximate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



32 



EDUCATION KBPOET, 1913. 
Table 14. — Progress of school expenditure. 



states. 



United States.. 

North Atlantic Div.. 
North Central Div... 
South Atlantic Div... 

Sonth Central Div 

WestemDiv 



North Atlantic Div.: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . 

Vermont 

Maasachusetts 

Rhode Island 

C'Onnecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvuiia. , . . . 
North Central Div.: 

Ohio 

Indiana , 

IlliDois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri , 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Div.: 

Delaware 

Maryland , 

Dist. of Columbia. 

Virgtoia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina.... 

South Carolina 

Georgia , 

Florida 

South Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tenness^ 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Div.: 

Montana 



Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexkw.. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington.. 

Oregon 

California.... 



Total amount expended for schoote. 



1870-7 



169,107.612 



$78,094,687 



29.796,835 
28,430,033 
3,781,581 
4,854,834 
2,244,329 



950.662 

418,545 

499,961 

6,579,363 

461,160 

1,496.981 

9.607,904 

2,302,341 

8,479,918 

6,831,085 
12,897.537 
6,656,542 
2,840,740 
1,932,539 
960.558 
3, 269. 190 
1,749,019 

\ » 23,000 
365.620 
9(M,323 

153,509 
1,214.729 
373,535 
687.472 
577,719 
177.498 
275,688 
292.000 
129,431 

11,075.000 
1758.0C0 
1370.000 
950.000 
531,834 
1 6.50. 000 
1520,000 



»35, 
67. 



1 117. 

185. 
19, 

135. 
1 160, 
1,713, 



1879-80 1889-90 1899-1900 1909-10 



28,538,058 
35,285,635 
6,130,492 
4,872,829 
4,267,673 



1,067,991 
665,339 
446,217 

4,983,900 
626, 112 

1,408,375 
10.296,977 

1,873,465 

7,369,682 

7.166,963 
4,491,850 
7,014.092 
2,775,917 
2,177,023 
1,328,429 
4.484,043 
2,675,364 

246,000 

1.108.617 
1,818,337 

207,281 
1,544,367 
438,567 
946.109 
707.553 
376.062 
324,629 
471.029 
114,895 

1.069.030 
744,180 
1500,000 
830,705 
411,858 
11,030,000 
287,056 



78,730 

2S,504 

395,227 

28,973 

61.172 

132, 194 

220.245 

38,411 

112.615 

307.031 

2,864,571 



$140,506,716 



48,023,492 
02,823,563 
8, 767, 165 
10,678,680 
10,213,815 



1,327.553 

844,333 

711,072 

8,286,062 

884,966 

2,157,014 

17,543,880 

3,340,190 

12,928,422 

10,602,238 
5,245,218 

11.645,126 
5,349,366 
3,801.212 
4.187,310 
6,382,953 
5,434,262 
626,949 
1,199.630 
3,376.3.32 
4,972,967 

1275,000 
1.910,663 

905,777 
1,604,509 
1.198,493 

714,900 

450.936 
1.190.354 

516,533 

2,140.678 
1.526.241 
1890,000 
1,109,575 
817,110 
3,178,300 
1,016.776 



.364.084 

1 225.000 

1.681,379 

185,000 

181.914 

394.685 

161.481 

169.020 

958.111 

805.979 

6, 187, 162 



9214,964,618 



83,910.564 
86,165,827 
12,921.797 
14,753,316 
17,212.614 



1,712,795 
1,052,202 
1,074,222 

13,826,243 
1,648,675 
3,189,249 

33,421,491 
6,608,692 

21,476,996 

13.335,211 
8, 182, 526 

17. 757. 145 
7,297,691 
6,493,370 
6,630.013 
8,496,522 
7,816,050 
1.526.090 
1,605.623 
4.403.222 
4,622,364 

453.670 
2.803,032 
1,076,620 
1,989,238 
2,009.123 

950,317 

894,004 
1.980.016 

765,777 

3.087.908 

1.751,047 
923.464 
1.385,112 
1,135.125 
4.465.2,'>5 
1.369.810 
686,095 

923,310 

253,. 551 

2,793,64H 

343,429 

299,730 

1,094,757 

224,622 

400,043 

2,375.7.''.3 

1.594,420 

6,909,351 



$426,260,434 



143,185.086 
165,033.625 
26,761,897 
41,637.583 
49,632,243 



2,934.263 

1,654,163 

1,606,996 

20, 135, 745 

2,486,757 

5,450,006 

51.861,986 

17,064,990 

39,968,180 

25.500.216 

14,910,500 

34.036.195 

14,596,819 

10,789,236 

13,724,437 

12.767.210 

13,067,193 

4,549,660 

3,825,273 

7.454,215 

9,812,671 

604,796 
3.792.424 
2,679,564 
4.407.853 
4,094,092 
3,037.907 
1,951,945 
4.419.596 
1,773,720 

5,648.644 
4.402.575 
2,904,537 
2,726.248 
4,252.244 
11.777.03r. 
3,187.08.3 
6, 739, 216 

2.633,521 
796.021 

5.211.186 
793.202 

1,000,628 

3.052,990 
619,268 

2,175,063 
10,493,347 

4.646.270 
18,210,747 



1911-12 



$482,885,798 



158. 786. 190 
182,078,430 
31,596,994 
49.299.148 
61.126.031 



3,151.917 

1,826,643 

1,815,267 

22,602,985 

2,404.652 

6,217,127 

67,935.136 

20.374.527 

42,557,986 

28.858.413 
16.443,654 
34,217,582 
16,730,370 
11,763,878 
15,224,507 
14,634,982 
14, 720, 856 
5,459.002 
4,109.642 
8, 757, 2HS 
11,158,256 

605.000 
4, 1"29. 747 
2.989,513 
5,262.130 
5.030.940 
3,777.125 
2.380.714 
5.094.430 
2,327.395 

6,699.872 
5.537.031 
3.708.418 
2,806.562 
4,608.927 
14,497.750 
3.837.549 
7,603,039 

3,354.934 
997,022 
6.527.569 
1.112.840 
1,321,631 
3.626,686 
625.562 
2,959.124 

10, .5%. 931 
6.095.111 

23.978 621 



' Approximate. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1911-12. 33 

Table 15. — Payments for school purposes, classified by function, 1911-12. 



1 If not reported here, these items are UAually included in column 5. 
• Frequently included in column 6. 



17727**— ED 1913— VOL 2- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



34 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913, 

Table 16. — (1) Percentage analyns of school expenditure; (i) average annual expense 
per pupil (based on average attendance); (S) average daily expense per pupil; (4) average^ 
annual expense per capita of school population — all for 191 1-1 i.^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE COMMON-SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 19U-12. 35 

Table 17. — Permanent school funds and school lands, 19 It, 





Permanent 
common- 
school funds, 
State, and 
looaL 


Unsold school lands. 


Total value 

of permanent 

funds and 

school lands. 




Number 
of acres. 


Value of 
same. 


1 


2 


S 


4 


6 


United States 


t282,545,534 
















North Atlantic Division 


24,350,060 
124,092,454 
7,942,557 
94,772,582 
31,387,861 








North Central Division 








flont^ AtkntV* nfvi«{nn , 








Booth Central Division. 









Western Division ? 
















North Atlantic Division: 

Wftln« 


453,610 

59,470 

1,120,596 

5,000,000 

245,215 
3,046,389 
9,097,486 
5,327,314 






9453,610 


N«rw RAmp^^lTA (lono) 






59,470 


Vermont 







1,120,596 

5,000,000 

245,215 


Massachusetts 






Rhode Island 


r ' 


ConnM*tif^lit. . . T , 


1 


3,046,389 


New Yorlc (1911) 


1 


9,097,480 
5,327,314 


New Jersey 


i}) 


0) 


p^npsylvania i 


North Central Division: 

Ohio (1911) 


!45 
170 
(85 
55 
.91 
»4 
22 
37 

m 
m 

168 
!29 

944,407 
1,024,430 




9258,346 


2,868,691 
11,435,970 


Indiana , 




Illinois 


6,171 
9,796 


12,499,374 
58,779 


31,603,050 
6,573,934 
4,048,191 

22,614,294 


Michigan 


Wisc^isin 


Mtnne!>K>ta 






Iowa ( 191 1 ) 


200 


10,000 


4,809,722 
14,829,237 
38,121,264 


Missouri... 


North Dakota(1910) 


1,578,898 
2,142,723 
1,681,678 


22,330,211 


S<Hith Dakota ^ ' 


Nebraska (1911) 


16,816,780 


24,809,648 
9,297,229 

944,407 


Kansas 


Soath Atlantic Division: 

Delaware (1910) 






M«iryiiind(i9ii) 






1,024,430 


District of Columbia 






Virginia 


2,527,094 

1,000,000 

456,471 






2,527,094 

1,000,000 

456, 471 


West Virginia 






North CSarolina ( 1910) 






South Carolina. . ' 








Georgia (1911) 


•575,000 
1,415,155 

1,406,800 
12,512,500 


3,000 
226,528 


300,000 


875,000 


Florida (1910) 


Boath Central Division: 

Kentucky 




1,406,800 
2 512,500 


Tennessee 






AlfthftrnA 


250,000 


3,000,000 


3,000,000 


Mississippi (1910) 


« 816, 615 


816,615 


Ix)uisifljiia 








Texas 


83,902,167 
1,134,500 
6,000,000 

2,299,497 

191,973 

2,627,413 

112, 154 

629,848 

715,858 

1,993,000 

1,377,256 

8,229,057 

6,211,805 

7,000,000 


1,636,176 


2,454,285 


86,356,432 
1 134,500 


Arki^nsas (1911) 


Oklahoma (1911) 


1,413,862 

12,986,710 
3,758,010 


15,000,000 


20,000,000 


Western Division: 

Montana 


Wyoming (1908) 


3,179,000 


3,370,973 
2,627,413 


coWoT...^... ..::::::::::::::::::.::::: 


New Mexico 


8,464,000 


50,000,000 


60,112,154 
629,848 


ArliAfift . . . 


Utah 






715,858 


Nevada 


.............. 




1,903.000 


Idaho 


2,613,079 

2,055,073 

500,000 


30,000,000 
40,000,000 
3,750,000 


31,377,256 


Washfaigton (1911) 


48,229,057 


Oregon (1910) 


9,961,805 


caffiomia:..... .:.:.:.::..:..:....::.:::;:: 


7,000,000 









1 Riparian lands; value not reported. 

* This fund exists only as a credit cm the books of the State treasurer, the moneys having been used for 
general purposes. The State pays interest on the full amoimt. 

• High-school endowments. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 






g 



Eh 

^ o 

•^ CO 

§ I 



1 

§ 



;3 



O is 



TO 



J3 

•II 

^1 



-2 g 

GO ^ 



« 1 



I 






Hi 



3— DO'S 



■§s 



nil 












f. ^pid 

§1 |S2|- 



jr fsili 







I c8 wg go© p^ 
Eh O O r^ 







JB 8 8 S 

Jh >i Jh >< 



» S » » 



V 












IIS 
3sl 






w O O w 




37 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



38 



EDUCATION BGPOBT, 1913. 



III! 

III! 

Isia 



s. 



o z 



11 



1^ 



III i| 



tell 



ii 



ill 

-085 



t§il 






IslfJL 






.4}tlilli lilliflp 






g 



I 



! 



It 



^t - 



Ills! 



^8 



ii 



ill! 






pi 

111-- 

lid 

S5 



Hi 



S— GO'S 



I 



>1 >^ 









^' 



^ 



8| 



ill 



Is 



^t 






S3 



S S 



s 



s s 



s 






12 8^3' 






iiss| 



«3 5? • 

2l» 



I 



III 
plioq a 

8 



a 

I 



: 5 

. OQ 



§8 






§1-5 



's 11 






C 2 



=^§«r SI 



^3 



la 

IP 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BETIBEMEITT AIXOWANOE SYSTEMS. 



39 



1 



IB 
PS 






1^1 



^ Pi 

II IP 

o o 



1^ 

■8R 






^1 



1 1 



§> 



5"3 



CQ O 



^ ^ 






8 






ma 



I 
I 



I' ^ 

lis S 

Bo el 

I if « 

III. S' 









- 


U3 


- 




N 


S5 


c 


^ 


i 


i 


1 


i 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



40 



EDUCATION BBPOET, 1913. 






I 



a 
-< 



t 



S « 






O 



5 



g.^ 



i§i 
?.2i 

lit 

%3a 



■n 

1 






it 



8 

i i i I 11 



1. 



m tHHt III 
liiliiiisEyi li: 

coo* o 



^11 

^ a kt 

I! 



•si 
s 






o o 



S— DO'S 

^ 



I 



^ 



;S 



I 



I 



3 



S> 



8 
.S 



51 



51 



li 









u s 






s 

^ 



s 

^ 






«12 

s S fl 



IB 



2 ftSS & 



^1 ^ 



§1 - 






m 



^ 



■oSs 
8 



I 



li 

II 



I 



P 



I I 









5 

I 



i 



k' 

•^ 

>» 



t I 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BETQtiafBNT AIiLOWAKOB SYSTEMS. 



41 



a 




i 



II 



i.'S 



8 
Is 



I 



ill 



r^ < ^ 




I 



8 

I 

I 

& 



II 

1 1 

11 



a 



i 

a o 



•2-S, 







.■3 i?tf 

o^ dOQ 



^ 


i 


8 S S8 


;^ 


i 


^i 


^ 


i 

>* 


? 


a 




8 

s 


8 

2 


8 ^ 

- a 


m 


^ 




s 


8 8 88 

s s a 3 


to 

2 


U3 
1 


2 ^ 
s a 


© 


8 







11 



_ o o 

SZ5 5z;5z; 



1^ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



42 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



•s 

p 

■n 
g 

1 

I 

1 



& 



CK 



X3 ^ 



e 



la 






II 



^•Si 



r sill . 

Ill 1131 



"B "S s ® B ■« 




I 



I ill |lli 



M 




II 



iillli 



s 



J§ 


fli 


g 


S 


s 


^ 




55 


"^ 


S> 


M 


• 


»g^ 


gl 


w*^ 


•< 






>» 

^3*-* 


P5 


s 


s 


« 


ill 


^1 

T3 




< 







11^ 
1§1 



5gc 



111 



® w^ i A o 



S 



■35 i 



S3 



feci 



i 



lip 



§12^ St: 3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER III. 
STATISTICS OF CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



For three successive years the statistics of city school systems 
have been collected on schedules differing materially from any used 
by the Bureau of Education prior to 1911. The schedule is in two 
parts, printed on separate sheets. The first relates to the teaching 
force, enrollment, attendance, and all school statistics other than 
fiscal; the second part covers receipts and expenditures and value 
of school property. 

In 1911 there were 253 of the 1,243 city school systems failing 
to make a report on part one, and 356 making no return on part two 
of the schedule. For 1912 there were 136 systems failing to report 
statistics of school attendance, and 219 making no fiscal returns. 
In 1913 there were still 86 city systems delinquent as to attendance 
statistics, and 204 giving no items of receipts and expenditures. 

It should be noted that these statistical schedules are sent to all 
cities having 5,000 population and over. There are 1,233 of these 
cities, having 1,243 school systems. In tabulating the returns the 
cities were arranged in four groups, according to population. . 

The cities of 100,000 population and over, comprising the first 
group, are all represented in the tabulation for 1913, and all save 2 
of the 185 systems in the second group, representing the cities of 
25,000 to 100,000 population. 

This chapter presents summaries for each of the four groups, 
covering the more important statistical items. These tables have not 
been combined into one general summary for the United States, 
owing to the failure of over 200 cities of the third and fourth groups 
to report on the fiscal schedule. 

The tables presenting the statistics of cities in detail offer facilities 
for the study of any number of groups. For example, a superin- 
tendent in a city of 17,000 population may wish to know many facts 
about the school systems of other cities having between 15,000 and 
20,000 population. He may select a number of these cities from 
sections of the table covering Group III, preparing a summary 
covering such cities as may be desired for comparison with his own 
school system. 

43 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 

The following summary shows the footings of the columns in the 
tables presenting the statistics of the 50 cities of Group I, and 
suggests a method of handling the statistics of selected groups: 

Table 1. — Summary op School Statistics fob the 60 CmBS of 100,000 Popula- 
tion AND OVER, 1912-13. 

/. — Total population and distribution of attendance and personnel in day schools. 

Total population (in 50 cities) 20, 302, 136 

Supenntendents and assistant superintendents (50 cities) 400 

Supervisors (49 cities) 825 

Elementary schools and kindeigartens: 

Principals (49 cities) 3, 318 

Regular teachers (50 cities) 65, 932 

Enrolbnent (50 cities) 2, 851, 038 

Abrogate days' attendance (48 cities) 379, 840, 076 

Average daily attendance (48 cities) 2, 190, 316 

Secondary schools: 

Principals (48 cities) 246 

Regular teachers (50 cities) 10,008 

Enrollment (50 cities) 264, 009 

Aggregate days' attendance (48 cities) 35, 659, 791 

Average daily attendance (48 cities) 207, 295 

II. — Aggregate of school census: attendance and personnel in day sdiools. 

Children of school-census age (in 43 cities) 5, 157, 957 

Pupils in private schools (largely estimated) (38 cities) 509, 048 

PuDlic school-teachers (50 cities) 75, 862 

Enrollment in day schools (50 cities) 3, 129, 467 

Average daily attendance (49 cities) 2, 466, 957 

Public school buildings (50 cities) 4, 391 

Number of rooms (47 cities) 50, 544 

Number of sittings (48 cities) 2, 839, 314 

III — Receipts of city school systems. 

Subventions and grants from State (in 38 cities) $17, 468, 255 

Subventions-and grants from county (11 cities) 5, 832, 060 

Subventions and grants from other civil divisions (5 cities) 1, 929, 198 

Appropriations from city treasury (17 cities) 46, 862, 677 

General property taxes (33 cities) 51, 763, 287 

Rents and interest (26 cities) 2, 487, 949 

Tuition and other fees from patrons (39 cities) 874, 249 

Total revenue receipts » (43 cities) 127, 214, 983 

Loans, bond sales, and unpaid warrants (29 cities) 16, 616, 778 

Sale of property and proceeds of insurance adjustments (28 cities) 454, 563 

Other nonrevenue receipts (22 cities) 1, 756, 881 

Total nonrevenue receipts (37 cities) 18, 828, 222 

Grand total (43 cities) 146, 044, 205 

> Inoladiog aome receipts not mentioned above. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1012-13. 45 



IV. — Expenses f outlays, and other payments for school purposes. 

Board of education and buonees offices (in 50 cities) $2, 578, 017 

Superintendent's office (49 cities) 1, 430, 882 

Salaries and expenses of supervisors (49 cities) 1, 187,696 

Salaries and expenses of principals (47 cities) 5, 468, 733 

Salaries of teachers (50 cities) 74, 196, 762 

Textbooks (42 cities) 1, 086, 969 

Stationery, supplies, other instruction expenses (48 cities) 4, 102, 190 

Wages of janitors and other employees (48 cities) 7, 082, 361 

Fuel (49 cities) 3, 014, 823 

Water, light, power^ janitors* supplies, etc. (49 cities) 1, 214, 821 

Maintenance — ^repairs, replacement of equipment, etc. (50 cities) 5, 857, 320 

Libraries (30 cities) 325, 708 



Promotion of health (30 cities) 435, 495 

Transportation of pupils (19 cities) 100, 453 

Payments to other scnools, pensions, rent, etc. (46 cities) 1, 935, 664 

Total expenses (50 cities) 118, 380, 895 

Outlays — ^new buildings, grounds, new equipment (47 cities) 29, 318, 344 

Grand total, including other payments (50 cities) 159, 838, 084 

F. — Expenses (exclusive of general control), outlays, and other payments /or elementary 

schools. 

Salaries and expenses of supervisors (in 36 cities) |888, 052 

Salaries and expenses of principals (36 cities) 7, 675, 452 

Salaries of teachers (39 cities) 53, 327, 633 

Textbooks (33 cities) 660, 319 

Stationery, supplies, other instruction expenses (38 cities) 2, 371, 661 

Wages of janitors and other employees (39 cities) 5, 100,906 

Fuel (39 cities) 2,355,366 

Water, light, power^ janitors* supplies, etc. (38 cities) 699, 094 

Maintenance — repairs, replacement of equipment, etc. (39 cities) 4, 182, 664 

Libraries (16 cities) 160, 064 

'• Ithf" •• ^ — -- 



Promotion of health (20 cities) 231, 438 

Transportation of pupils ( 13 cities) 99, 528 

Payments to other scnools, pensions, rent, etc. (29 cities) 1, 394, 044 

Total expenses (39 cities) 79,877,833 

Outlays— new buildings, new equipment (32 cities) 15, 568, 972 

Grand total (39 cities) \ 95,446,975 

FT. — Expenses (exclusive of general control), outlays, and other payments for secondary 

schools. 

Salaries and expenses of supervisors (in 19 cities) $163, 594 

Salaries and expenses of principals (37 cities) 767,220 

Sp.larie8 of teachers (39 cities) 12, 466, 301 

Textbooks (22 cities) 203, 869 

Stationery, supplies, other instruction expenses (38 cities) 635, 515 

Wages of janitors and other employees (39 cities) 96C, 732 

Fuel (39 cities) 353, 076 

Water, light, power, janitors' supplies, etc. (38 cities) 195, 831 

Repairs, replacement of equipment, otner upkeep charges (39 cities) 643, 954 

Libraries (18 cities) 50,405 

Promotion of health (9 cities) 8, 504 

Payments to other scnools, pensions, rent, etc. (20 cities) 99, 680 

Total expenses (39 cities) 16, 564, 214 

New buildings, grounds, new equipment (28 cities) 6, 572, 144 

Grand total (39 cities) 23,137.358 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 EDUCATION BEPORTy 1913. 

Table 2. — Summary of attendance and personnel. 
GROUP I.— CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER, 1913-13.» 



States. 



City 

school 

systems. 



Super- 
vising 
offloeni. 



Number 

of 
teachers. 



Em-oll- 

mentinday 

schools. 



Average 
daily at- 
tendance. 



Pupils in 
private 
schools 
(largely es- 
timated). 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
Sooth Central DiviBion.. 
Western Divisloo 

North Atlantic Division: 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jer«ey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

niinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

South Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

District of Columbia . 

Virginia 

Georgia 

Sooth Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Western Division: 

Colorado 

Washington 

Oregon 

CaUfornia 



50 



815 



435 
108 
24 
62 
96 



41 
10 
9 

240 
25 

110 

66 
23 

6 
22 

8 
18 
47 

9 

5 
19 
3 
7 

15 

33 

6 

8 

6 
15 

7 



75,862 



38.791 
21,972 
4.546 
3,286 
7,267 

4,847 

939 

951 

21,761 

2,966 

7,337 

5,384 
977 
6,217 
2,175 
1,323 
2,122 
8,211 
563 

1.889 

1,731 

451 

475 

708 

821 

612 

1,145 

1,078 

1,418 

858 

3,913 



3,129,467 



29,754 
36,975 
25,320 
43,251 

37,295 
51,559 
31,265 
147,215 



2,466,957 



514.048 



1,286,649 
735,596 
138,707 
100,686 
205,319 



150.912 
30,810 
34,180 
728,798 
100,565 
241,384 

175,804 
28,720 

244,810 
66,182 
41,297 
63,610 

100,358 
14,815 

57,154 
46,468 
14,509 
20,576 

22,341 
27,666 
17.833 
82,846 

27,936 
40,354 
24,628 
112,401 



262,627 
176,404 
21.604 
36,666 
17,657 



42.150 

6,319 

6,191 

133,244 



74,723 
70,250 



33,160 
25,286 
14,708 
30,000 
3,000 

14.500 
5.000 
2,194 



11,000 
4,666 



20,000 



4,820 
4.957 
7,871 



1 States omitted have no cities of this class 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



47 



Table 2. — Summary of attendance and personnel — Contmued. 
GROUP n.— CITIES OF 26,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION, 10ia-13.> 



Stotes. 













Pupils in 
private 


City 


Super- 


Number 


EnroU- 




8Ch<^l 


▼isbig 


of 


mentinday 


dally at- 


schools 


systems. 


offioen. 


teachers. 


schools. 


tendance. 


(largely es- 
timated). 


183 


884 


87,213 


1,361,813 


1,078,939 


273.536 


79 


403 


16,636 


597,381 


486. 156 


139,220 


59 


371 


11,487 


404,843 


323.479 


93,077 


15 


56 


2,478 


109,667 


87.816 


9,107 




80 


3,529 


145,847 


106,276 


22,152 




66 


8,083 


104,105 


76.212 


9,980 




10 


367 


12,814 


10,053 


4.158 


>2 




298 


11,679 


8,409 


6,688 




110 


4,e04 


158,614 


134,154 


46.482 




18 


584 


20,473 


16,271 


8,848 




58 


1,420 


53,328 


43,820 


16,626 




76 


8,276 


110,795 


88,994 


22,615 




66 


2,731 


103.929 


80,787 


11,716 




66 


8,266 


125,749 


103,668 


22,067 




28 


1.787 


67.442 


56,588 


11,151 




24 


1,075 


86.896 


27,111 


9,500 




60 


1,942 


65,878 


52.507 


31,870 




45 


1,458 


50,928 


41,460 


11,551 




25 


1,081 


36,086 


29,201 


16,313 




8 


412 


13.714 


11,452 






58 


1,853 


58, 767 


47,015 


6,286 




10 


616 


28,567 


21,245 


2,050 




11 


407 


14.000 


11.206 


930 




7 


856 


32,475 


25,694 


3,427 




8 
32 


286 
575 


10,417 
24,656 


8,544 
18,980 




>3 


1,866 




6 


308 


11,718 


9,247 


2,141 




4 


201 


9,712 


7,250 


450 




3 


209 


9,768 


7,414 


750 




8 


626 


29,128 


23.761 


1,500 


3 


5 


273 


14,268 


12,620 


2,400 


3 


15 


390 


15,273 


11,504 


7,003 


3 


7 


262 


13.212 


10,557 


1,900 


2 


1 


259 


11,293 


8,115 


675 




4 


90 


5,155 


3,606 


600 




45 


1,841 


73,848 


61,411 


10.674 




7 


210 


8,150 


6,568 


1,000 




10 


472 


18,916 


13,515 


300 


1 


6 


229 


7,645 


5,924 


3,500 




17 


504 


14,361 


6,062 


800 




11 


754 


26,698 


21,418 


1,002 




6 


873 


15,838 


12.581 


1,778 




26 


1,223 


39,663 


30,227 


2.900 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Divisian.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . . . 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

niinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Mhmesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

K<»"Mm 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Virginia 

WestVirghiia 

North Car(4ina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

AJabama 

Lrouisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Ckdorado 

Utah 

Washington 

California 



I States omitted have no cities of this class. 



« One city not reporting. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



48 EDUCATION BBPOBTy 1013. 

Tablb 2. — Summary of attendance and personnel — Contmued. 

GROUP III.-CITIE8 OF lOfiOO TO 25,000 POPULATION. 1913>13.> 



States. 



City 
school 
sys- 
tems. 



Cities 

not 
raport- 

wg. 



Super- 
vising 
officers. 



Num- 
ber of 
teachers. 



Enroll- 
ment 
in day 
schools. 



Average 
dafly 

attend- 
ence. 



PopOsin 
private 
schoob 
(lan!«ly 

esti- 
mated). 



United States. 



North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division. . 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Dlvisbn. . 
Western Division. 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hami>shire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

Virginia 

WestVirginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida '. 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississ^pi 

Louisiana. 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Dh^ision: 

Montana. 



Wyoming — 

Colorado 

New Mexkx). 

Arizona 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington. 

Oregon 

Califomia 



374 



155 
122 
26 
40 
31 



35 



1,011 



27,528 



1,006,249 



789,701 



375 
370 
66 

85 
115 



10,747 
9,599 
. 2,049 
2,490 
2,643 



389,424 
334,887 

81,045 
107,850 

93,043 



312,696 

266,993 

61,689 

77,422 

70,902 



15,963 



346 


10,857 


227 


7,856 


2,294 


76,353 


304 


12,928 


1,007 


36,485 


1,930 


66,335 


1,693 


63,190 


2,502 


99,457 


1,868 


65,884 


1,624 


58,516 


1,558 


55,963 


1,174 


39,166 


928 


30,324 


316 


9,396 


793 


26,214 


288 


11,311 


166 


5,118 


152 


4,772 


55 


2,378 


677 


26,825 



•l 



227 
417 
358 
454 
140 
279 
174 

294 
74 
186 
332 
149 
733 
297 
425 



53 
68 
56 
144 
54 
133 
524 
90 
1,282 



8,878 
13,796 
13,283 
17,612 

8,014 
13,042 

6,420 

10,958 
3,174 
8,206 
16,070 
6,738 
31,504 
13,596 
17,602 

11.205 
2,133 
2,329 
2,268 
6,161 
1,983 
4,324 

17,223 
3,172 

42,245 



11,865 

8,970 

4,506 

64,316 

8,774 

29,044 

52,576 

48,124 

84,520 

54,628 

41,520 

46,842 

32,496 

25,140 

7,930 

20,399 

8,380 

4,403 

3,853 

1.802 

20,591 

7,370 
10,962 
10,352 
13,416 
5,278 
9,161 
5,160 

7,896 
2,542 
5,433 
11,651 
4,100 
22,589 
10,522 
12,689 

8,760 
1,698 
1,651 
1,670 
4,002 
1,456 
3,269 

13,331 
2,364 

32,701 



1 States omitted have no cities of this class. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



49 



Table 2.— Summary of attendance and personnel — Continued. 

GROUP IV.—CITIES OF 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION, 1912-13.1 



States. 



United States. 



North Atlaatic Diyision. 
North Central Division. . 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North C(aitral Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

IlUnois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

- Iowa 

Missouri 

NOTth Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebras-ke 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

VIiKinla 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 



City 
school 

sys- 
tems. 



Oeonia.. 
FlorWa.. 



South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Teitas •.... 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming '. 

Coilorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

CalSornla. 



632 



234 
226 

58 
69 
45 



Cities 
not 
report- 
ing. 



59 



16 


3 


6 




5 




49 


3 


9 




20 


3 


25 




21 


6 


83 


6 


44 


4 


26 




44 


2 


23 




18 


1 


16 


2 


9 


2 


17 


1 


3 




4 




9 




13 


1 


4 


2 


7 


2 


6 





Super- 
vising 
officers. 



359 
45 
83 

114 



22 
12 

6 
93 

5 
22 
46 
31 
101 

48 
59 
59 
46 
25 
28 
13 
27 
7 
6 
22 
19 

4 
4 

11 
11 
5 
10 



22 



Num- 
ber of 
teachers. 



24,274 



9,192 
8,965 
1,725 
2,348 
2,044 



741 
190 
164 

1,924 
989 
763 
895 
924 

2,602 

1,670 

1,106 

1,593 

1,020 

672 

638 

403 

653 

100 

160 

393 

557 

103 
180 
312 
395 
285 
369 
81 

379 
194 
148 
347 
115 
805 
118 
242 

94 
101 
417 

46 
169 

93 
248 
178 
267 
431 



Enroll- 
ment 
in day 
schools. 



872,464 



289,532 
323,412 
89,842 
99,995 
69,683 



20,306 
5,662 
5,388 
62,720 
313 
26,169 
30,229 
32,919 
106,826 

59,604 
38,675 
59,589 
33,834 
22,266 
24,155 
13,442 
26,597 
3,168 
5,269 
15,025 
21,788 

11,328 
8,232 
11,998 
20,768 
16,201 
18,544 
2,771 

14,482 
9,289 
6,481 

15,841 
5,310 

32,546 
6,014 

10,032 

3,254 
4,116 

13,620 
2,347 
6,259 
4,171 
5,903 
6,490 
8,878 

14,645 



Average 
dafly 

attend- 
ance. 



711,219 



249,789 
264,348 
67,143 
75,041 
54,898 



16,482 
4,582 
4,333 
54,540 
11,698 
17,664 
25,709 
26.200 
88,581 

49,760 
31,883 
48,534 
27,943 
18,335 
20,162 
11,006 
20,676 
2,475 
4,139 
11,540 
17,895 

7,826 
6,919 
8,931 
14,860 
11,152 
15,395 
2,061 



Pupils In 
private 
schools 
(largely 

esti- 
mated). 



96,101 



41,626 

37,985 

3,583 

7,785 

5,122 



1,652 
2,171 
1,145 
3,293 
8,474 
3,347 
2,805 
2,766 
15,883 

6,204 

4,164 

7,286 

5,270 

8,343 

2,029 

285 

1,615 

400 

710 

885 

794 

350 
992 
546 
485 
360 
690 
160 



11,300 


1,860 


7,201 


552 


4,061 


795 


11,664 


1,182 


4,460 


450 


23,230 


1,255 


4,911 


747 


8,214 


936 


2,631 


1,196 


3,160 


174 


11,131 


660 


1,677 


900 


4,437 


308 


3,622 


312 


4,438 


248 


5,097 


374 


6,823 


589 


11,882 


362 



1 states omitted have no cities of thb class. 
17727"— ED 19ia— VOL 2 i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



50 EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 

Table 3. — Sum/nwry of expenses ^ cmtlaySy and other payments for school pur poses y 191i-lS. 

GROUP I.— CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER. 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



C5ITT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 51 

Tabids 3, — Summary of expenses, outlays, and other payments for school purposes , 

ISli-lS'-Coniinued . 

GROUP n.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



52 



BDUCATION BBPOET, 1913. 



Table 3. — Summary of expenses ^ ovUays^ and other paym&nts for m^iool purposes, 

1912-13— Continued. 

GROUP in.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 26.000 POPULATION. 



States. 



at- 

i08. 



Admin- 
istration 
(includ- 
inp super- 
intend- 
ent's 
office). 



Salaries or 
principals, 
teachers, 
and super- 
visors. 



Text- 
books and 
other in- 
struction 
supplies. 



Ox)eration, 
mainto- 

nance,and 
miscella- 
neiMis ex- 
penses. 



Total ex- 
penses. 



New build- 
ings, sites, 

equip- 
ment, in- 
terest and 

other 
indebted- 



Grand 
total. 



United States 

N.AtlanticDiv... 
N. Central DIv.... 
S.Atlantic Dlv.... 
8. Central Div.. 
Western Dlv... 



301 



$1,090,433 $15,805,980 



$1,022,022 



$4,997,475 



$22,915,860 



$5,201,761 



N. Atlantic Div.; 

Kaine 

New Hamp- 
shire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. 

Rbcde Island. 

Connecticut... 

New York... 

New Jersey. . . 

Pennsylvania. 
N. Central Div.: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin... 

Minnesota... 

Iowa 

Missouri . 

North Dakota. 

South DakotA 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

S. Atlantic Div.: 

Maryland.... 

Virginia , 

West Virginia. 

Noth Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

S. Central Dlv.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi... 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma. . . 
Western Dlv.: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico. , 

Arlr.ana 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington.. 

Oregf 



$31,485,035 



132 
98 
18 
28 
25 



California. 



472,679! 

377, 6C1 
44,812 
73,019 

122,362 



8,328 

13,518 

5,055 

94,552 

7,813 

41,503 

106,490 

73,978 

120,542 

46.510 

68,753 

80,187 

42,004 

38,949 

21,598 

£9,207 

7,516 

8,134 

11,348 

2,560 

20,715 



8,372 
6,791 

13,8C4 
2,262 

13,493 

10,777 

348 

2,95C 

13,789 



21,000 
4,470 
19,685 

12,901 
2,820 
3,300 
2,100 

10,653 
3,250 
7,752 

14,330 
3,000 

62,256 



6,162,705 
5,482,952 
683,719 
1,118,034 
2,353,52^ 



277,761 
29,723 
21,143 

J 04, 702 



2,061,140 

1,919,421 

133,182 

281,099 



9,305,217 
8,057,095 
896,436 
1,493,295 
3,163,226 



1,556,845 

2,313,580 

116,336 

605,642 

610,358 



12,223,786 

11,822,188 

1,080,247 

2,206^300 

4,153,416 



114,436 

198,840 

127,916 

1,447,220 

153,635 

1,220,847 
1,148,355 
1,151,460 

725,580 
1,110,256 
1,039,083 
569,674 
604,004 
217,808 
407,326 

96,678' 
127,9211 
128,420 

33,727 
362,415 

73,286 
121,441 
111,507 
188,299 

32,837 
161,350 

158,463 

47,743 

22,578 

194,179 

17,109 

307,274 

107,574 

263,114 

167,443 
37,288 
64,814 
50,463 

112,193 
37,769 

127,340 

305,241 

96.000 

1,364,978 



11,481 

13,213 

11,648 

143,193 

13,272 

42,309 

106,006 

104,337 

143,334 

42,603 
28,065 
56,223 
35,029 
31,290 
25,863 
27,477 
2,700 
8,461 
7,640 
3,829 
8,681 

3,416 
1,019 
4,710 
10,516 
160 
0,902 

6,289 
927 



3,592 

752 

6,951 



3,632 

15,409 
1,829 
2,874 
1,331 
4,291 
474 

10,561 

10,124 
300 

57,508 



40,143 

72,419 
40,308 
500,728 
60,589 
186,676 
411,332 
368,666 
400,379 

221,620 

404,243 

386,730 

182,348 

215,376 

96,011 

167,804 

23,159 

40,608 

45,231 

11,646 

125,655 

10,769 
30,817 
23,531 
37,752 
2,603 
27,710 

53,290 

8,286 

6,031 

27,883 

4,256 

70,437 

20,924 

89,994 

51,954 
16,820 
16,645 
12,487 
24,070 
8,067 
29,206 
85,420 
16,800 
321,162 



174,388 

297,990 

185,727 

2,185,693 

235,309 

870,384 

1,844,675 

1,695,336 

1,815,715 

1,036,213 

1,611,317 

1,561,223 

829,065 

889,679 

361,280 

691,904 

130,053 

185,114 

192,639 

61,752 

617,466 

87,470 
161,649 
146,539 
250,461 

37,862 
212,455 

228,819 
57,303 
31,569 
239,443 
22,116 
404,662 
132,968 
376,425 

247,707 

58,757 

87,633 

66,381 

151,207 

49,560 

174,861 

415,115 

116,100 

1,795,905 



57,108 

227 
323 
314,592 
14,372 
124,927 
132,602 
753,574 
158,320 

628,826 

488,293 

601,776 

61,575 

48,735 

109,330 

167,683 

9,686 

36^638 

11,227 

8, — 

140, 

30,301 
2,066 
32,467 
20,192 
1?,092 
19,206 

39,974 



33,000 
149,325 



113,483 
193; 910 
70,950 

145,760 

1,181 
29,039 

1,055 
83,300 
69,556 

9,374 
64,739 

5,500 
200,854 



235,996 

316,230 
189,000 
2,683,814 
250,656 
1,083,271 
2,343,001 
2,729,558 
2,492,270 

1,772,899 

2,387,205 

2,384,006 

1,106,066 

1,046,976 

514,728 

1,055,685 

185,931 

235,013 

355,500 

64,C38 

715,564 

117,771 
166,132 
210,839 
301,967 
49,954 
234,564 



60,820 
69,559 
412,173 
22,116 
536,546 
348,435 
487,768 

430,642 

60,380 

130,654 

71,827 

234,097 

156,420 

214,854 

619,045 

201,760 

2,033,147 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



53 



Tablb 3. — Summary of expenaeSy otUlaySy and other payments for school purposes , 

/Pif-1,?— Continued . 

OROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION. 



States. 



at- 

ins. 



.A-dmin- 
istration 
(Includ- 
ing super- 
intend- 
ent's 
office). 



Salaries of 
principals, 

teachers, 
and super- 
visors. 



Text- 
books and 
other in- 
struction 
supplies. 



Operation, 

mainte- 
nance, and 
niL<Kella- 
neons ex- 
penses. 



Total ex- 
penses. 



New build- 
ings, sites, 

equip- 
ment, in- 
terest and 

other 
Indebted- 
ness. 



Grand 
total. 



United States. 

N. Atlantic Div... 
N. Central Div.... 
S.Aa-mticDlv.... 

S.ContralDiv 

Western Div 



47811,071,825 



$11,551,602 



1799,911 



$3,900,762 



$17,324,100 



$3,673,687 



$23,661,731 



N. Atlantic Div.: 

Maine. 

New Hamp- 
shire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts. 

Rhodelsland.. 

Connecticut... 

New York.... 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. 
N. CentralDiv.: 

Ohio 

IndJtaJia....... 

Illinlos 

MfcWgan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota. 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska... 

Kansas. 

8. Atlantic Div.; 

Virginia 

WestVkginJa. 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida.-... 
S. Central Div.: 

Kentucky.. 

Venn<«see.. 



Mississippi... 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas..... 
Oklahoma... 
Western Div.: 

Montana 

Wvoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico.. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Idaho 

Washingtom. 



191 
172 
33 
48 
34 



12 

5 
5 

89 
8 
17 
24 
15 
66 

30 

21 

35 

18 

15 

10 

7 

11 

3 

8 

7 

12 

5 
5 
9 

4 
9 

1 

11 
5 
5 
8 
1 

12 
2 
4 

3 
3 



380,456 
433,667 
54,361 
103,199 
100,149 



15,478 

8,439 
10,664 
83,610 
16,096 
26,124 
50,136 
36,751 
133,166 

91, 5n 
55,130 
67,397 
49,378 
30,192 
34,020 
12,597 
27,426 
8,177 
10,495 
18,912 
28,363 

3,836 
7,691 

16,535 
8,587 

17,816 



foTBia. 



3 

4 
3 
7 



26,844 
9,484 
7,530 

18,928 



28,396 
1,840 
10,182 

5,000 
7,070 

22,780 
2,180 
5,482 
6,124 
9,299 

13,071 
8,241 

20,902 



4,245,784 

4,490,618 

578,030 

949,068 

1,288,192 



217,050 

72,366 

95,668 

1,025,167 

139,592 

344,755 

541,178 

552,527 

1,357,481 

771,038 
652,223 
719,203 
526,630 
349, r" 

341, 
193,291 
347,600 
68,539 
98,943 
195,135 
32e,402 

65,557 
183,256 
123,003 

61,216 

138,469 

6,540 

200,069 
78,042 
64,491 

161,029 
10,000 

300,743 
28,309 

106,325 

79,735 
78,342 
251,122 
40,726 
78,232 
27,883 
114,406 
141,857 
113, 108 
362,782 



446,570 

229,972 

15,304 

14,776 

93,289 



22,804 

6,747 
12,866 

109,018 
12,644 
25,373 
32,400 
54,212 

170,511 

23,371 
18,817 
40,579 
28,189 
17,742 
38,464 
6,326 
8,977 
3,350 
2,671 
29,202 
12,384 

3,305 
1,966 
3,886 
67 
6,061 



2,230 

672 

2,594 

3,647 



1,945 

60 

3,619 

3,223 

12,114 

9,764 

865 

7,710 
6,177 

10,093 
5,474 
6,395 

81,484 



1,664,314 

1,550,663 

134,100 

207,149 

344,536 



82,798 

41,832 
50,7401 
426,613 
71,507i 
124,278 
245,815 
173,345 
448,386 

235,457 

166,387 

345,202 

319,325 

134,794 

191,339 

64,683 

80,172 

25,290 

31,199 

59,826 

87,990 

12,884 
69,066 
23,060 

8,661 
17,267 

3,134 

61,436 
15,554 
11,569 
25,944 

1,900 
60,704 

5,180 
24,862 

31,235 
19,626 
91,011 
10,560 
36,031 
7,297 
41,069 
33,279 
33,512 
51,036 



6,737,124 
6,7W,910 
781,798 
1,274,192 
1,826,166 



338,130 

129,384 
169,928 

1,643,403 
239,841 
520,530 
860,529 
816,836 

2,009,544 

1,121,437 
892,557 

1,072,381 
823,522 
532,678 
605,402 
273,807 
373,174 
105,356 
143,306 
303,074 
458,039 

86,582 
261,897 
166,402 

78,531 
179,622 

9,(|74 

290,588 
103,751 

86,184 
209,543 

11,900 
291,788 

35,449 
144,988 

119,193 
117,052 
374,677 

54,321 
117,455 

47,481 
174,856 
193,681 
161,256 
466,194 



1,030,858 

1,642,258 

104,459 

179,822 

746,290 



39,923 

650 

35,839 

188,309 

42,013 

72,488 

9,660 

210,861 

400,175 

320,429 

270,091 

161,378 

150,799 

130,000 

188,197 

33,908 

84,888 

47,301 

1,692 

72,782 

171,193 

196 

40,606 

4,066 

11,562 

47,149 

800 

1,850 
15,715 

8,297 
77,581 



70,781 

500 

5,098 

3,022 
48,060 
18,074 
25,720 
45,761 
15,272 
70,918 
55,953 

6,602 
457,908 



8,718,465 
9, 5! 6, 373 
969,898 
1,544,655 
2,912,350 



880,421 

142,553 

213,061 

1,865,386 

'283,755 

606,080 

1,0?9,790 

1,137,077 

3,063,317 

1.623,706 

1,335,844 

1,400,808 

1,190,178 

070,999 

911,357 

328,947 

547,007 

181,630 

187,547 

395,409 

736,942 

87,647 
323,266 
203,555 

97,501 
247,396 

10,474 

329,935 
130,240 

98,484 
296,404 

15,700 
475,434 

43,330 
166,310 

140,738 
183,380 
534,189 

92,972 
168,735 

65,003 
304,295 
281,754 
210,762 
931,623 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



-§ 



Pi 

> 

o 



I 

J ^ 
o fi 



'4 fe 

a o 

^ 00 

1 ^. 



S 
•§ 



I, 



S 
^ 



e2 



J3 

I 
t 



I 
t 



mu 



111 



14% 






l§l|i 









I 2§i i 11 s 



§ I'll g* s¥ f 



§ I § i s §g|§l 



Qo CO es 



§ i i i I Mm 






s i s s, § gs§ns 

o" '*' eT ef ef V^cf rn'.^ eo 



s 3S2 s 



g S g S S 3 § 



00 »OWCD h- ^»- 



-« CO t« »oe% •» 



2" 4^S S" =3 $■ 



§ §i§ § if g 



I i § S I piSi 

S" JO* »■ ^ m' .-Te^'croot-r' 



I I § I I §ag§i 

i s 8" §; 2" SXlsS 

eg" •^ eo* M? oT ^efcfi-Tco 



s i§i g s§ § I g s § i I §giii 

a'sVss' ss a'sf s" s" s sT s" s" s" a'ssaa 



§ SIS i Ss S ^ ^ § I § § §§ia§ 



^t 



iis§|s||§ 



"II ^-B 



J- 

"232 

^1 



8 ass S3a»28§2a36SS 



*0 AOOt 9 •Oft Ok t» <D 



lo 00 *o £oe«to<o*o 



d <ioco>c 1-^ »-n-f CO e^ to ^ «-i CO t» r^eovsM^ 



^ S8SS sS's^ssssss^^s S'ssss 



§ SS§ S ii i § ^ § 
2 22| e IS S 2 S S 









8 

51 

h30 



Iiql 



'^5 






iWMmimmm 



''11 



Q o .:4 .q M 



<-i e«eo-« u> «Dt« 00 



eo ^ lOcOt^OOOk 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



88 SI ss § m isiis SI 

^^ lo'eT V»o 1-? cTeCi-T w^eodlcfef to 



cm SCHOOL STSTBMS, 1912-13. 



§§ SI §§ % §s§ §§§Sr I§ 



§i §§ §§ i 3311 §iigi sB 



^^^ 04 r-i^ ^ ■««•« CO 






^g §3 S§ I §S§ ISIilH l§§i§ s §§i § 11 g ig s 



• ^ «o«o •o«o' eT efcot-T r^toj^ci^cf tot^to^cf to 



^s g§ s§ § §§g iig^i US ;§i g si§ § g§ § §§ 



ss ss «3 S 99S «9|3S 83 



SI §s i§ § r^^g §l§iS §§ 



gs §S §§ S gs§ §§ei§ Ss 



•oe4 «« le^co ^va-^ton «-4 



:3 ;; 9SS » ss s »s 



g§ « §SI g Si § i§ g 



§§ § Sga S i§i § SS g 



«eo "<* 



SCO •* «e« w -^w r* 



§g §S SS § §11 §!§§§ SS§§§ g §§§ g g§ ^ gg 
ss" 58" S8 2" s'ss" =5*ga"s' sfrsfsa" J5 gffa S3 s's* 2" a"s" 



IS §s §g i sii %nnn !=§!§ g m s li § gg 

i-T ^ .-T fH .-To of •^'i-T 






55 



§s §g i;g s 39S ssggs s^ggi^s § gg^ S S9 ss §s s 



t«M tc-^ ■<«« et e««o«H v-4*coe«eo eo^t«cee« «o t^oet •« coc« et «Det to 



t 



IS 

il 

M « 



1^ 



•or* coio f-i« e» ooiee« ^o*-40« oioocoet »* SSSQ ^ :SA «o oot« 






ss 
II 

Bta 






..£ J3 ^* 



iE^ll&i1ii 



Sa 3 






if ais- 



ill 



55 55 



lilliiillli 






^f"^-^--^^ 



-I 



^S 

II 



SS sn ;s^ s (;«» ss;^8;s »sSoSS3 9 ^99 ^ 9$ ^ 99 s 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 



.9 

d 

o 

5 



I . 

1 ^ 

I 2 






12 

I 2 



^ 



e2 



8 

I 

I 



I 

I 

I 

i 






1^8 



SI® 



Istli 






^1 



1*1 § 
« 5* 



11 



l|ii|'4|i 



00 J9 






Sis 

0-3S 



IS§H§ 






mm 



s 8 SSsas 



S So $P!9S9 









s 9 ss2;ss 






S<8 



ss 



Hi 

88" 



i§ 



s s 

2 S^ 



§1 



S^S ^ 






§s 



S88 

ecMsco 



g g 



I" I 



"<<!'«'eo»o« of 



^^ eO »-• ^^ r-< r^ » CS 



1-4 t» ceeoto«-<co oft e««o ^eo«oeo«cD 






o t^ o> F* w 00 o5 o> 00 Ca 00 Ofo 2 00 oo o da 



§§§ 



5i 



sPi 



282 






ggl 






ssr 



S Sr^S 



as s 



t9 §S5g§ 













o 



5 



s sssioss s 8s ssssssd s s^ ;:s:s 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



57 



S§3S3IS 



isi urn §§iss§§ M ill § 



5 S 



i^SSS 



ffS"t:iS"2"S"SS 



isg gg§g §§iBSSg g§ lie § 

Si's S'SS's SSIsISS" SfS" 2'8"g" 8" 



sag 

S? S 3' 






!§§§§§§ 



§g§ ills i^sssss Si iiB I 



i g i 






1^ o 00 »o t-< go 'f 



S§?§$ ^2S5S§SS5J 22 399 2 



o o -^ 



1-^ • e4c^i-4 1-^ 



If 
II 















III iiig" SSSSlii" M S§3 I* 



§11 
5 1" §" 



o Q o £2 o o ^ 5! 






CO '* es 



§§gs§ 



co«o«eo»oco 



n «o 



SSoSS^oSo 



isi §«§§ S-sSS§a ss gig S 



s s 



M -« © CI ^ r-i ^ 1-1 



e«c«r^ • eo a» o> C5 ^ <o t» <o • SQ«09Q oo 



M<or« <o ; SS^SS 



•« ^ « 



CO O C4 ^ » © ic ■« 



M9o<o <o<Oh.M9 o C4 '4< a» «o «o X) ^-^ ««c« -^ 






Q O 



ss?sSoSSsss£SSo ^sss {^s?:sss? s^ ?:???! t: 



t^ 00 ^ <« r- oo 

aOCGC O) 00 W 









|||J ... 



Hi 









5 .b 



sllilifi.1 



^1 

is 




,3«^^a^^^3-3^^3" 



?^ieCS?S3S3S8S:S SSoSS SsiSSSSS &S S8§ |S3 § s§ sss^^s 



Digitized by.VjOOQlC 



58 



r3 



3 

X 



4S ■a 



•s § 

S ft 

js 8 

i - 

5 H 



o 



I 

o 



H 
A 

e2 



S 



•9 



tnh 






I^|S 






•d 

9 

I 
I 



|5||! 



m 



pp 



•a-ew^ii^i-a. 



II 



nmn 



-II >^l • 



•lis 

I 



EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



§§ 



N »^ »^ N ^^ ^^ ^^ CO CO ^^ ^•^ ^4 rM 1-4 w^ r^ ^ 



iSSsSSggSig §§§SIS§ § 



n §§ 



1 5S 



§ §§§ 



SS;?5S9SSI3St;i!SS8 S!39S^8<t 9S S USS 



•-Ii-IiHC4<^vHC9 .vH*-l«HCOt-«i-l •iWfMNf-tflC* iMN W t-lCO.-l 



29 



u 



•octf" 












cT V'aT 






a "3' 



SS5sl8§SSSil3ga SISsSSS S^ | Sis 



0(0j>i-4a»£0oo •aoio«o^coc4 i-i •icoooo 






a s 



<D<oc;-«too»t»iocoeoeoo>C4eo 



>ei-«»oo» 



geooe 



i««o eo« CO c««ei 



00 9 5)00 odciS aSotSScftSo QD ww adaobkaSoSooSS cBS S o685t^ 






^ fl o S >3 « «^ ; 






^ynmc^4 



£ 5 a o -M Ot 



SSSSSSSaHSSaSB SSSSBS2 SS S S22 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



59 



§ §i s 



2" ss" a" 



S§§SS§§i§§ 



8asa¥s«"i 



^ISSSggSSSii iHiSi «= mU 






S §§ § 



sigsissisg 



g§§g8l§IS§gg i§l§i §i §§§B III 



$8 3 



sssssssass^ 






c^ iH t-t f4 f4 ^4 *N C% "F^ 



fHi^ (F^M t Cf CO ^4 ^4 1-4 1-1 1-t ti-ti^CO 



i S8 § 















ggisisiggsii um §1 gs^i III 
-j: : — l:i — r_ ||i 



g §1 § 






s s^ n 



Sg§§§§§S§g 



^SS3JSgS3gr:| §^§g| S^ |SS3 






c« t^t» 'OitoroOt-at ao-«»t» 



ao-«»t»o 



t«iou3<oeo •e<or-oi«H '««et»eeoeo*o>ceooo^o lOM^-^eo c<e« e«^ 






JSSS 



r: ss f 



asl'ssi'sssss Si^sdsssssssss ssssss sr ssfsss III 



AJ3X3 






§55 









^Mh 



s"s 






-5gM! 



lilllilil^lltll 



Till! 






ill 



;z; o 



M Sa 31 

5221 

llll 

coUtQCd 



S S2 iS SSSSSSS2SSS S§S§S§§S§§sS SSSSB ss ssss 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



eo 



! 



11 



•§ c 

c 



I, 



a 8 



o 



•§ c> 



1 

e5 



H 

< 



I 
I 



|5||! 



1^8 

III 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 

^ I :i§s§ §a §§iii :§§§ 



as 



s|e 






:£3S6 as" ssf sat: 



ill 



-§§§g§ l§ §slliSSf!§ 






a 






R 



SSS^SS 93 SSSS^SSQSS^Si 



^riMfX eSi-4 i,-i,p4,-4 .C« 









iii 






£S 



1^1 s 






Veo I'^i-* CO* wf^ «^t- Woo or^t>r«D 






SSo^S 5^ *^§2®Ss*^2 



a»oo .«c^^ 



«OC400CO »c«o W'CrW 



llfi|5||l 



w^ 






iSSSS S^ §S§I§§§S§ 



S$8 









sss 



?s« 



iii 



Iii 



SRI 



ss 






S§§S 






ISlii 



^32 "^a** 



2S 

of-.- 



g§ss 












cor«a> to^ioeo 



3|ssss3 sssa 



-I 

III 



sassa as sssCa's'ssfissjrssssafes?" rss"?? 




SSSS3 SS S§S§S§Si§§§S§iS§§ ii§i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 






2^ §§ 






«^ • t-lC4 



•vet •O"* 



S9 11 



§3 s§ 



:23 s^s 



i:f2 jer: 



61 






SilsSSi §S 3 



£;»9SS&S s& s 



,^ .^e«e4,H 1-10 









^•OO "*»H CO lO* »o oo" •* 



SSsgiss gg 5 



'88" SS 






m n ii sg§si»^ 



3n is &s ssjsssszs 



CO 'i-^ C4*-«i-4 '^i-tCI 












sg § §S ^§SSSI§ 



8 S*- S 



•or- o«o •-^o 



*<» e« (O b- <« M »o<o eooo tip^ «o ^C4 co eo to fH >o >o e< 



^tHfHi-«c«fHi-4 fMco ^e«»-<»-< CO w*t-* et rH c« fH ^ -< .-I 



sbsssIb sS" SSSS S SS §§SS§s§ 







SiS §3 3§3§ISS§ §§ 9SS§ § gS §§gS3S§ 



o 



P 
Pi 
o 



o 



o 

CO 

B 



o 

O 



5S? 



;3 1 

I 



i I 



§ g 



Bl S 



e»3C« to3 






•-•l-l t-fN 






^llll§l 



§8§§ is 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 



EDUCATION BBPOBTy 1913. 



ml 



I 
I 

I 






o 



^^c 



n 



H 






^ V 



•- 2 



I 



O 



I ^ 

I « 



^ 



a 

1 

I 






I! 



'Hi 



IW4i 



m-3 • ^ 6 



3|^ 



I 



§g 



ss 



Ke 



scs 



iliSII 






iSS§l§ 



S^SiSSSS 












SS^^^S^^ 



<DeO •lOOCD 'M 



««iioeot«>oia 



§^§§ S §ISg 






sgii 8 ig§a 












^^eo .-T cT of of cf eo 



:S^^S 2 S:gSS 



•ocD •«• •lOMeo 



•or^ • lo mio'^co 



ssS's^Rssfs^sssr:? s i'ass 












i§§§ 



IMS 



9S§:3S 



95 MoO OD 






H 






I 

«a5 






HI 



•4 <^ F3 J 

83 It 



ill! I III ^ silllili ill illli 1^ 



Siii isisss^^iiigg a %nM iiisi 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



63 






^Hn^ § g§i ;§ i ; i muMk :$ :» 



!§§§§ S §ig 









ISg§§ s SS§^§ 



•Oh-^MeO 



^3 



ic4racQO 






88822^28 



^H»M i^H • »w^e* 



•*CO«©^M 






888 















III gggglil'^ 






iiiii 









s 



ss 






MCO coco C4 C4 



8S83S S SSZSSS9 SSSoSiSSSSegSSSSSS 



CO V^t-Teo* . 

I 

•SI'S 

111 

»(Sa 



00 . .»H •€<« • • .OOOOO*-* 



■*t>-eo'*t>. 



e«i-4C^e4coiO'« 



^rwc*-* 



w4i^r^9^w4 9^ f-««f-«»Nf-«f-»»N «-«1-4^1-4vNl-4f-4^^ .^,Mi-4v-4 



{^Sf388 a So8f:S?&S SSSiS^SSS^^^SSS^S 



sssss 



C4 «i« •H ^4 *H *H C4 ^H 1-H W »H »^ »H »^ W »H »H »^ ^^ »^ C< »^ PI »^ »H ^^ ^^ ^^ C* «-H N w^ .-* C< ^4 «^ *H a-H M vH Vi^ Vi 



sl 



|glili.^iili| 



}S4iS 



ill 



o o 



llitii 






. 2^ 

m£a 



5 e S?f s « 9 ga e^ ^^ §1 s^i-i 9 J2 s ^qq j 




^ 






8§ggg g§ ggggS 8 MiUU UUUUUnnun §iii§§§iS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



EDUCATION KBPOBT, 1013. 



.g 



^ 3 

J 5 

|2 



5 CO 
•^ W 

I"? 






H 
A 

e2 



|si1l 



III 



1^1 



It 



fl! 



III 



si 



PP 



It 



u 



Il§si9||s 



00^ 









§i 



m 



^H%ut n 



§§ig§§g g§ 



aszt^sss S3 

# • ^* 



§§§i§ssfgg§ i§ 



ssiiss 



iiiSsB 



fstj^aa" 



sgfllS 



asaa3232»ss sasssassa 






iii§§§s Si 






sisissiiigg £5 

ef ^cTeo cf ^eo w"^ pfcT f-Tco" 



mnt 









S9SSBS:S§?:$S3S S|S9S9g^g 



M •t-tvao<-i •-4 • •ko 't-i •t<>kor«e» 



lOOooudioM^ »o»0"««« •eoeoco'O'^ 



«Sot2?J2S8S2;!:8g SS8gJ2aSJ2sS' 



ssi^iii 



n^unu 



SSf^SSS; 



?l§82li 



S2a*^a:53 



sliSiiS 



M rl CI <-) f) 1-4 rl 






oOf^ei^eMci 

Mcfeo i-TcTcTcf 



R§e?SSi; 



^e«co«OMeo^ 



ss;ts^ss 










iiiiiiiiifaillllliilrfllili 



SSSssSSI^gS §i§§g§§§§ §§g§g§g§| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1012-13. 



65 



§§§ 




;§ lgj 


i^ i 


:§ SI 


-s§i§^ 


* 


ggis: 


♦ 


aSs 


'§§£§ 


ss4 




i§ SI i 


i§ i 


is s 


SS9S"SS38B'S§8 : 


ilSSISiiiSg 

iRSfRiSSSSSS'S 

• 


§Si 




is ii \ 


|S 1 


• 


jisi^siigsi 


>0M«O 




ja 2=a 


•« i 


ja '-2S8S2;2SS;:s;ss«'^ : 


iSt2S*^*J2S*^* 


e<4 






. ! ^^^ 




;« w^^^^^ : : 


• ! 


• ^»>^ 


^^»H 


•^ i 




S! 




i! !!i 


;S 1 


: • 


igi5§§§g§is 

• 






jg 351 i 


;§ i 

=55 : 


jig" 


Ss$ti§§ig§§i§ ; 

• 


• 






ii §g i 


=2 j 


• 




5SS 




is S853 


ja : 


jiS S!o^SSS9g:SRSS3S i 


jSSoSSgS^SSS^r: 


e« 






1 I «CT«0 


jeo • 


|«o ^^eooo 


^ 


•^ i 


•^tOiO J 


jr^e* 


^lO 


eoM • 




•ec«*^*^ J 


jeo ••••••la 




1 j eoiOM^ 


«■«• Jco 


ciooioeo I 


:«eo 




i 

ft 


li 


p.- 


t^^ • 


jn -H^^^^^^^fH^^^^w : 




ssgg ! 


:S S§& 


Is. : 


Is s 







RR 



111 



III 
III 

sss 



III 
III 

nun 



III 



UltdM 



•Ml-H-lC* ,.4,^*4*^ v^t-ie^p^..^ M,_|^^ ,M l>^ f-4 f-4 v^ ^.1 V4 C4 f-4 f-l V4 M •>! I>4 v-l V4 M t-t •-• tH ^ V4 «-• f^ *M «.« 



Bl ileitis ^ 



lelil 



PI 



i 




e4 12.5,5^ 

fill 



17727*— ED 1913— VOL 2 5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



.9 









i 5 



I 



I 



l^li 



1^8 



^ecSo c^SSS 



lai §111 



I^P 



1 



O 



I O 



I s 

O 

'3 o 






H 



M 

I 

I 
t 



2 



►^•Si 



isfli 



III 



sli SiSi 



:J2S 8SS2 



|5je 



It 



It-S.^i^ 


















238 S!;!S3 



i 



III 






i?S 



§8 



§§ 



28 



eo lo C0 1^ -^ (D 



fsf §IS§§SSiS§S 



23 



SS 






g§ 






«8t^ 



55 .H^ 



^§g§ 



co^^o»t^ oaoeo«oo» 



lis 






%n 



§§!§ 



;sasi:z 93S$!; 



^ •*-('«<0 



•<r C4-<re«»oio « •c«-4e4 



OS 0> w wwODOSS SwA 






M: 



Hi 






M 



r 



"I 

fcllplllllllll5SSI^|5sllS|S2ll^ 



gii igiii§iiii§§ii§ §§§ii iiiis 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



67 



11 § 



§ ^ 



as§§§gi 






S3 S' 



8 S" 






3 SS 






3S 



gs 



II i 



% % n 3§§isg ^§ 



Sg^iSsI 



§ § 



CO eo « •••3;0>i^ ••* ©^ 

*-l *-l f-1 CO *-l ""^ r-^^-t 



«U3 00 00QO>O 



III 

1 1 ft 



:ss9 



^g S 



3 § S 






gSlsSisI 

C4 M •-• i-^ei" -^ ef CO 



g§ 



«i 



1-1 jj 00 



50 t* 00 

!; s s; 






i H 

i in 



§1 






i§ 



gi 



ii § 



i § § s a§i§s§ §§ 



§i 



OvHrHrl^ C«^ 



coeocTcTco-Heico 



55 



35 i 

COM CC 



87 ^ 



3 9 :;! S 13^89 :? 33 



Si 



SSoS^SSoSS 



ss $ 



•-I eO'^ 



CO <0 CO 69 9 C% to (D 



M m fH 



VHOO'^I .•'T^ C««^ 



00C4 '^'mc^n 



ss 






S3 le S 3 jts8?^f:!s: SSSSS 



0> Ot w Ok 00 w 60 da do QO Ok 



$8 13 



&& 



Safl 



2S8 



oo^oi-f»H cfoioeicf cT o ^ fl QS® -^ 5?9^022:^?2£2£2aSSiaS*2fla:2?2S r2 w5 # 

fHf^«-l^4*-l fH«-«tH»-l«^ 1-1 1-1 »-H M »^f^»^^ »-l .-4 ^^ •H •-« 1^ t-t tH 1-1 f-l « 1-1 Cf •-• »-^ W « 1-1 ^ 1-1 i-< «*€ 




-iMeo-^io 






a28 



§ 9 § ^§§§§9 §3§S9§§§^§f$§Si||SII S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



BDTJOATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 



I I 
I I 



8 S5 

•- O 

1 P 

I 3 



O 



I O 

e 

•^ o 

I. 



I 






I 

I 



I 
I 



I 



pi 
III 



Ms 












li 






i|89|s||8 






J- 
111 



i 



mmun 



Ss^sSoS 



i§tss§§§ 



s«a3S"a 



Ss§§§§3 






O 00 A to 00 c4 



SSt;3S39 



SSSSSSSS 



Sigggs^SSSsSi 






5S§§§§s3e§§i 



I 2§S§E§ 






% SBasSI 



8S*J3t3**SSS25iS'* **£3S*2 



i3§ll]§S3§ggS 









I i§i§§i 



g mm 






>S9K9^;S^iSSS9Si:3 eSSSS^S 



•o ;« • • 'M 'lo 'lomo • '-^loeotb 



C« 90 CO CQ eO M M kO 00 



Wio^we* 



S§§igS§§§S§§S§ SSSSSSS 






If 



^11 



ill! 




o o 

|5?S? - 

I •♦*♦» ?*' 
3 tj « 3 









S9SSS§§99§i§§ill9ll§SS SSSSSSS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



0IT7 SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1012-13. 



69 



S3 S3 



58" ssa" 



la g§ 



§§ 13 §S 






^^ ^e« 






Is 5¥ 






ss 3iS 



<*-* co«* 



ss sg 



i 38 



r5 jf s 






•a sisa ss 



fHC« ^fH i-4iH 



§ IS 



ii IS §§ 

■Too cf w" e% ef 



S& 82 89 



«•-• ^'* ■♦«* 



9^m-t *4*4 *4«i4 



sS SS §S 



giSS 



^s^ 



MMCOkO 



aassi 



§§§§ 









Si§§ 



$283 



o»ao 86 QO 



^se 



la 



m 



KS 



3sa 









!^f3S 



5S3 



j:s 



§§ 



Si 
113 



ss 



§SSS§iS SS 






§§gis§g$ §§ 



s»asssssa "a 









SagSSssi S3 



S;:S&&8Si3 ?9 



i § 



§ I 
8' 8" 



8 S 



§ i 



is s 



T^ s % 



e«a»M CO ^ 



3§§§SiS§ §§S§SS S § 



8 

ill 






s II 



nd 






ill 



aa" saa'sa" sa" atfsfass'ssssa'ssCa-sfasssasfasa s'a"s3"JfS' s s'a"a 



III 

III 

2 



tlgl" 



55 O 



lips 



«iililiPpis|i|j 



53^1 §1152 II S||s 



^zp^Q^ 



ill 

|li|§lli|lli|i 



(ill 



sill 

M 



1^1 



SI SSilS §S §§$l§il$lll§8gi§§§s§§IS ssSSss s s§§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



.9 






I 



i < 



I 



o 



2 p^ 



CQ 



«2 



•2 ® 



Islll 






'5|S 



Isfll 









l51 



K 



ll 



I|s9|s||g 



en's • fl t 



8. 

3 



H 

pq 



3ls 

"I 



CO to 



EsS 



88 



U 



m 



efcf 



8S 



SS 



III 



i§§ 






is; So 



wm9 






ii 






l§§asg§§2 



goocdoa»r^oQ<«i 



S5i§SS5i»S3SSS 



«0t0O«t»t»«'Vi-4i0<«*«0<0i0 



iS 






giSiSslBI 



•-4^e4i^C<i-4^vHM 



§ig§s3ii§ 



iSi§i§§i§g§8gS 

^ere<rcrw'ei*creC»He4"^w'of» 



^S:2S^S!2SSSS3$9^ 



ooaDflDSoDSSflDaBQZaBwwS 



3% 



SS 



§1 

8s 



sss 



IS 






§§ 



S8 



§i 



Si 

eoef 



S3 



S8SS 






Si 



I 



J! 



gS S 9 B S 
^ 3c3S§5Soo525 









§§§§S§§§§§§§§§§§§§ls§§s§§sl§§S§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



71 



i§ 



Sgg§ §§ 



i §1 i § 



^UMM 



%M §§§ 



9 S 



nn 



9'^ 



ligf gi 



3 sa 















t 



SSIS §S 



I §§ § 3 



IslSSS 



iii s^ 



§iS§s 



r* C^ ^1 C9 r-t r^ »H 



2 2^ 



egegb-o«»g 



oa»(D locook 



SS •888S3 I 



Sa 



s5§l Si 



Si 8 § 



»hC»^c« »Heo 



« i-^-H M W 



ii§§i 



SS3 539 



I § 



•^W^ f-lNC 



iis 









3" a¥ 






Mi Mi 






glsl 



.« > •> ^ « o a 



^■^cT 



SI Si g S 












9:SSSS%$ S8 



8 93 



99&;SS9 



S^^ sss? 



58§8as - 



eVvNMMiO'VM Meo 



I 



^f-(fHfHe«*HC«i-4^ ri«»H 



10S8SS889S SS 



fc fca 



E§ 



s 



ssssss 



gs§ issss sssss 



rH r-l v^ ^ iH fH <H «N «H C9C4vH^ *H «i4 v4 «H ^ ^ iM iM t^ *H «H vH v4 ^14 v^ i-4 vH ^4 ^ iH ^ iH C4 C4 *^ *^ M P4 ^^ fi^ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 



1 



"8 
I 



•- O 

Is 

^ 5 



U4 

o 



•§ 3 

o 

a 



iuli 



I 



III 






PP 



>*'^4 



imi 



lǤ 



I'p 



li 



ll 

00^ 



if-a 



3 






"I 






8 



S 



il3 



9e^9 



000*4 



is! 

sss' 



nfu 



§§Sg 
8fBa 



liSSSSipil § 



SSSSt; :SSSS * 



§§S 



135 



s§i3 



32SS 






SSSeS :S33« 9 



e««^«o •>o^eoioe4iOt^<-*'4i ^ 



,i^*H*4*H »i4 »-t »^ 1^ ,14 1^ •H »i4 *-« *H »-t 



SSi3 ElSlgiS.iil i 

V^^*i4«i^ ^4 *4 ^ »H ^^ ^^ C< •^ "^ "^ ^* 



iJ^ti 






3 Q o 3 2 9 

fel|S|8ll|glii|||i| 



§gil §§ii§i§§ii i 



>ss 



=S8 



sss; 






§ig 



SR2 



lii§§ 



£a£H5^ 



SISSSS 






saw's 13 



SSnlh^ 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



73 



ff 


1$ ;gl: 


i ^F 


i isl 


g 


i ssiii 


is a 


;h» • ; 


: iSSgRSS :8 : [ 






i sis 

■ i 9 is 


iil§§ 
i is as • 




i5 5 
is s 


Is:! 


i iig§i§g ii i i 

i iaSSfs'R iff i i 


ijs 


is 5§8 


1 sjs 


Msis 


g §ssg§ 


ii § 


jg : : 


i iSiSSSR ia i i 


»>. |iO 


|iO •« 


• S is 


i iS»-S _ 


S5 a»sa3 


is *^ 


|«t>. '. 


• Jot*«^-*(^ joo 1 j 


*^ J 


If* ^ • 


Ii 




t-t 




w4n \ 1 


• «H ! 




. • t^ t • . 1 I j . . 


lis 

r : 


is jji 


i ^F 


isgisj 


! !^!!!- 


i§i 


jiij 


i i^iigs ji 1 i 




is iSS 


i li§ 
'i f is 


iilg§ i 




ii 2 


isii 


i issisgl is i i 


gj§ 


ii J|S 


i iil 


mm \ 


1 is§§§ 


is s 


i!i! 


i ipi^s i§ j i 


S3 JS^ 


is 8S 


: ^ i' 


j^sss ; 


S3 9S!S«S 


is K 


\^s» 


i iiSSR^Saa i9 i i 


u» j 


JM e4 ! 


i " i"" 


•»OC4 


lO 




•eo ; 1 


•« 1 






•4*«0 


: i **** 


" •" : : 


eoeow^e* j 


*-« •oeocoioioO'* je 


1 t,H J 


; 1 JiH t IfH 1 |»^ 1^ 


M^iH 


• ^ tmtr-tr^r-t ^,mt,mtw^miW^^1-* 


^ ,.4 f^ ^ ^ iH »^ fi4 fi^^^^iH 


I 1^^^^^^ ;^ : : 


§f2 




1 g^ssssl §sss§§ 

♦ ♦ 


!•• • • 



III 

ill 

III 
III 
§ll 



I 



-^lll 









Ii 



il 



giliiliiillill 
illilliiilllll 



I 















I 



iiilMi 






la* 
ill 



s§§§§ §§§§ ig§i§s§§i§ igiiiii §iii§i§§§§iiii§i§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 

1 



-5 "S 

•• S 



•s § 
i ^ 

S, o 



O 

6^ 



It 

h 

li 



I 



A 



|i||i 



I 

I 

I 



ill 






ls 



ale 






Isfll 



1^1 
6&I 



1 

I 
i 



PP 



U 



II § 91 S III 



00^ 



W' 









ooS 



S3 



si§ 



Mi 



§i§ 



f^f^<-4 C« 



SoSdoS ss 



as 



IS 



^3SS 






5:SS5? 



•o»3okS 



ssss 



g§§i 



S;SS3S; 



sss 



g§§ 



sBI 



3§i 
S3I" 



ii§ 



^ciS 



SJSSSffSJSSS 



s«g 



§8i 



c^S;s 



ill 



Mi 



i§§ 



S!«S 












I.. 



li 



a o^ 



III Umh ili|lll|li l| ill § if i 



is§ iiiisi §§&ggi';ii&§s§s§ §ii§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



s§ 



5g 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



75 






S 



§ 



ill 

S«5 



S 2 



s (; 



li 



ag 



RSis 



I II 



§§§ 



§§i 



§ i§§i 



Si 



g§s§§§§i §§ §§§ §§ 












if 



si 

§2" 



S§ 



ii 
^8' 






§§S 



i§§ 



i 9§§§ 



S§§SI 



§si§ia§§§sg i§ §i§ nt 



M 1-1 .1 ^ »-» ^ .1 



8§S9 



9S^« 



» S2S)3; 



88S39: 



^9 



9 



: o 
: « 



cocoes c«e« 









8 SSCSSSC 



§ssss§s§§ssssBssEsf§§s §f sfs SS 






li 



iiji 



11 



a^s. 



m 



illll 




-^-== s 



snnnpQuu 



O O I • 






11^ 



si§§§§ii§i §§§ggggsg§g§ggsspSssgRSggg§sg ss nm m 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



=3 

a 
o 



.& 



il 

•S o 

i :1 

i ^ 



o 

Eh 



g o 

•2 CO 

I q 

I g 
I. 



e2 



I 
I 



I 



imj 



SM 



1^1 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



'5|S 









til 



l^|s 



II 









Hi 



g§i§Si§i§§is§§fz§ii§ 

• 4 



SSS§llilS§§gS§g§§i3§gSi§s 



tH^4 ^ r^ *i4 «H *H *H 1-4 iH »H ,M <-4 f-l ^ r^ ^^ ^ 



vN iiM^tH tf-iM*^ • t»^»^»H 



isi§i§§3gsg§§§iiiiis 






Sggg5§§i§§§§llsg§s§g§§§g 



$$l39;38$!«a!tgi»8$;3:!::a3{)9»«SS> 



M .^p^^ »^» 



.H n CO CO ^ <<• f^ CO e« M « 



§1 



8R 



lis 



gi 



§»§ 



SKS 






S SS3S 






s a ills 






i 

5ipli||lill|lii'S 



"aao 



id^StS 




ggggggggSSSSSSSSSSSsSSSS SSSis 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



77 



§ss 



§Si§g8Sgg 



^gss$gg 



sss 









f§S§§§S 



• » 



■"SSSS 






^ss 



-I 



§IS 



gsi§i§ig§ 



;3 SSS983$S 



SS§SSS 



Sgs 



^oooioe^otookra 



(O 00>OUdC4(<»0»<0<0 



akUd«OUd»«'« 



gg§ 






li§ 



S§§§g§g 



c4 d> <6 0> F« w 



IIS 



ES 












SCR§IIS 









— i 

IS I 

-f 



§l§ 



SSSSsSSgS 



n^ §g§§§ii§ 



§§§SSi 



g§i 



8^$ 



8$S8($S8(aS 



$8(9 ssssss^s^a 



a«s 



28(9$S;SS 



S^SSS 



^iHe<^e<^e<iH^ 



I 



^ 1-1 ^ « iH iH iH ^^ iH 



f 



letSS 



sesjsggeeje 



S^!t F^SS^SS^So 



SSS8 



Sie SS8RSSS 



:itJ2 










^1 



^ „„^^ ^5 g gl^ IS ^^ H5 I ^ 






Ills 



I 
III! 



14 OS Pli Pi GO CO 



gggg gggigsEBggg^g gggggggggiig %uu gggs§§§iiii§§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



EOUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 

g 



:! § 

6, o 



O 



g o 

il 

O 

-2 o 

I 



H 

n 



I 
I 



1 

I 
I 



|s||l 



h\ 



§§ 



2S 



e^le 



1^ 






1^8 
III 



1| 



isale 



■A 1 

It 



§•3 



t|gS|s||g 



sa 






als 



=i 



as 



§gg§ss 



f-H«-i<v 00 com 



SSSS8 



§Ss§§g 



a»oo<ot*t*o» 






Sg§S§§ 



♦ .-i*'.-r 



SSSSSSoS^ 



00 00 00 w Ok 00 



SSSSsiSfSS 



sssiissgi 



sa3S$!;E;S!; 



§g§ 



^§§ 



ss:s 



sg^'IfigSiSSSSg 



akto«o«oooo«-4^r^to •ao>or» 












SIS 



f i§i§g§l§§g§§ ;g 



^Sl;SSSS^S3SSS :2SSSS 



eoctici • 04 CO <o *«• CO e« e« 



? 



aoabonoooboookoo Sob oo 80 9 



isSs §§§§ Siai§§§§iiS§iS§Ss§§gE3 



lot^oo 00 



'««e«o ioor»otCooioiooot>ri<r«'ordroot4*io«OiOiO«io'io' 



iilllr: 



lllfe^ 



Igl 11 illillltl llllll III 



11 

If 



lis Sss§ isSs§§3§§§§S§§iSsii§§s 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



79 



ss 



SS5JS335 






S8§SSgS8S| 



i-toooor^e^t^oot* 



oor«e« 



g ;§ 



§S§§il 






ISS§sSs§§i 



»eCS^§39S8S99 



e«^C4eoeoc4 






§!S3§ 









liS§§ 



g§§il 



sii§ 



lo^^9 



S8S2 



flkeo ra CO 



SSS2 



s§ig 



5ssg 



§g§S 



£ssia§s 



36 q6S<B 



s§§s« ggsga§i§§§is§s 






If 



§§§§§ i§s§iissggiissigs§g§§g 11 



OvMootoao ^o<oioaocot»o»eor^e4a»oaoooi-i^ao»ooo • ; 



mm mmmmu 



nun ss§ii§§sii§§ii 



III! 
III' 



Si§§8 lip 



:a5a. 



s§si§ §i§§§si§Si§sg§a§§si§E 



»-<^H r^ llt^tHCSrH i-«i>4f^' «-4 04^4 fH«>1 ^ 



iiff 

tm 

iiii 



•-as 



^ *^ ^^ ^^ •^ ^^ ^H ^^ ^^ v^ ^i T^ •H tH ^H T^ ^^ Ol ^i*^^ ^4 ^9 M^ ^1^ ^1^ ^3 ^5 .3 fl 
e • •. •O'O'O'O 



§§§i 



!§•?•( 



SJ§ 






Ui 






^il-isis; 






S 



lli"^'^ 






00 

• - •• 



§§ii33iiisisi§§§i§igi§§s§§i iiii§§sggig§ggg§§§§i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



73 

.a 



! 



<!> 



I 

a 



7 

i < 



•s § 



1 



© 



I r 



O 



g o 



1^ 

S o 



o 



^ 
S 






I 



I 



*«>»' 



Mil 



Ill 



II 



ale 



!i 



mil 



pi 
III 






mi 



li 



II 



llni^ll 






J. 

Ill 



^§i nSa 






i§ l(§3 



«-itOO fiO<D» 



Sgs §§§ 






§3 gs§ 



2(SS 38;( 



M3 eOMM 



si's sss 



IS 



SIS 



§s§ 



SSS3 



sst^s 



3^1 



§18 



ssn 



SSs 



ssss 



§i^ 



s 



^e«e«iH M^co 



t^SwSSaaDt* OOwOO 



22SI 



iii§ 



sssg 



Mm 



§ll§ 



3gSS 



ssas 



coMecctMeo 



SSSf^ffg 



M» oo^vT <o «r MTodW^r^tTrCar (o 00 «r *o *o <» t>r ao •© oo »o or»o « oo «o «o 



a 



i'HS 



^■pl 



•1ltl5 



: : '5 :« • :♦*♦• :g : i :i : 

§'--'^ :^aS5 5Pb». •>a '£q* 



5S 



JPOt^a 9 5 C2^ C > 3 ««>4Ca ® ^ « O hC3 C^ B C E S 00 o oI 



sSo8 8S«S««S3«3««SSSS SSSSSSSSSS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 19ia-13. 



81 



i3S§gS§g3 



SS 



mnn 



ir 



§i 






II 






SIS 






§i 



S3 



5i 



iasigssssi 



§§8 



§§ii§Sigi s 



$g§R 



gi 



i§§ 



I 

S 



«^«oaoc«i-ioiN.oor« 



iOO»C4 too 'OOO^ o 



2ESSSIIS3 



Hi gig §sE§l 



SoSt» t«« 



§g 






§§s§§Sii3 






3SS ss 



Si 

S5g 









%^ 



isiiisggs 



gs§ §5§ liiggiigi §s§i§i 



COt>- 



iSS 



SgSS9S9S)S^S 



^^3 S^^ SS^S) 



C0C4M COC 



SIS 



I 



rH • •'41 • 'CO 



eOMMMi-t^'^iH 



•Hcoeo coeoM •« 



««ow«eo cof^mm 



88gJ:S2^888a8gg 



oBwoB aei>.oo h- oc r>. 1^ t^ !>• t>» t>. !>. i>.r>. 







L7727'— 13) 1913— VOL 2 6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^ 



62 



bdugahok sbpobx, im. 






Istii = 


i: 


: 1 


iiisii 


gSIs S §§SS 


'i$§: 


1 111 - 1 : 

4 ^^ ', ; 


Si 


i § 


S=VES5 




SuSi 

,feas : 


1 If s 


Ss 


i § 


Jiiili 


Sgli i ISIS 


;i§ij 


' Wi = 


S2 


i s 


.SSSSSg . 


2582 S 5233 


>a» : 


11 ■ = ■ 


''^ • 


I ** 




'""'"■ *" •"•*'*'* 


»««-* • 


' . mi s ! 


1: 

CO • 




l»|5 i giii 


iigS 


1 Kl . i 

3 a= = 




i iilSISii 


Siii a SliS 


iiii 



II 

i i 
§ s 

I o 



i ^ 

■5 - 

1 3 

a flu 

•■§ § 



5^ 



IP 



- I 



ii 



ill 



<li 







S3s2 Ss5Saa§3S§S§i g iigi JiSgg 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



S :22a 



5S^ 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13, 



63 



SSiii 3 sag 



Siii^S :§ :S 









^Sg§S § SSi^S 



iSiSS i^l 



SsiisS^ 






Sa822*^2S 






,H .fH . .t-lW 






.^^^^ 888 



^s 












III ggislili 
111 llSSWll" 



i§g| 



§i 



25a B5SB 

C4-^09 « *• « 



>HM-H,-lC« 









ss 






cTco eo CO of cT 



iSSS^SS S SSSSSiSS SoKSSSSSiSSSSSSS 



^ 



SIS 



00 • '^4 'W • • 'OOOOOJ^^ 



COC0C4C0<O 



M^t^WOOiO'* 



«H^4^4iH^4 iH »H W »H »4 fH »H »H lH iH iH ^i< fH lH ^i< »M tH 'r^v^t^i-^ 



s 



Ja 



R:^I3SS S S2Sf:!S?&S SSSiSr^SS^^r^Sf^S 



^ d> 00 <0 SB 



i.H.^i-lt^ i-^W ^^C*f-HiM o-l ,-t 04 i-l f^ ^ *-) <^ M t^ C* «-t •-••-< >-4 t-t C* .-I C* r-l ^ M^,^,^^^r-lr-t^ 



■ii 



S50&i^^ 






Il 
§llil 
o 



i9 



:i2 

••a 



d d 






-II 



e|« 



ll|l||iigg|l|ffl|l^l||^ 



|-^pa»»onn 



KSggg g§ §gg§§ g ^mum u^uiu^miun muiu^^u^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



3 



g 



J 5 

o 

1 § 

I o 



2 o 



I. 



•^ 



I 

a 



n 



I 
I 



I§l1l 



I- 1 
III 






PP 



It 



I 
1 



I 



iilli 



til 



9*^ 



w 



5-i 



II 

00 > 



llfi|5li? 






lis 



Si 



as 



^§§I§§S SS 



liisiig §§ 






siiiisiigg§ ii 



§9ii§§ 



iiiSSB 



S9SS&S 



sgfiSg 



assassss'ss saasaasaa 






smmu n 









l§§§gS 



^^^r^r^tO 









rH r^ f^ 



40 .C4 .r-l'<«'00^ 



•o .^ •t^iet^a 



iO*ooo*o>or4'« toio-<«* •eoeocoioi«i 



SSoiS^RSSiS^tSS SSSSSS!5s3? 



S^I^Sli 



§ll§i§is 



SSRSSS9 



5l§a|li 



asa^sss 



iligiil 



iig§gSS 



cfcfeotH'crcfe*' 



?2?S55; 



•HC4COeOMCO^ 



96 So ba 96 1^ 9d cc 



^ r1 .M i-i r^ ^ CS| ^ ^ CI f^ ^eS^i-H,.4^^r^Cl ^ ^ ,.4 ^ _i ^ ^ ^ ^ 



l|i^ 



lllflldll 



lillllllrllllillli lillllsll 



3SS§§SS§§S§ §§§ig§§§3 §§ii§§g§l 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



§s§ 



8S« 

e9co<3 



§§3 



2SS 






S25 



9SS 



SS&S 



CITT SCHOOL 8T8TBM8, 1912-13. 



65 



§ SI 



1^ ii 



ssa 



§ 9i 



s Si 



I §g 



s s$= 



s ss^ 



§ 



3 









§ s^iiiiigSiisssB 



.-< M 1.^ A iH iH *-i i-^ 1^ i-^ 1-1 CO ct 



0* ^^»^tHw^f 






Is' 






2 S§§si3IS8SSS§S 



S SS^^SSS^S^SSSSSS 



■^■"iicoao 'fH te« • "9>to*o 



e% »-<«-• rH r-l tH t^ tH f-» »-< 1-^ .-» t^ »-• M 



s s 



aoo>w96ooo^oodF><iBoiSa6 



§S§§§§iilg 

J III 

§§li|Sig§l ill 



ooeo<o«0t*(ow)eo 



i:;;!!! 









55§si»g§si III 
isiiisisss III 



SSoSS^SSSSC 



i^« tf-iio -eo 



C4eoe«u3toc«^ 



III 






sssofg gggfa^ 



.. SAit 






^ 48 CS 08 




17727'*— ED 1913— VOL 2 5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



.9 



I § 



8, o 

1l 

J o 






1 H 

1=! 



O 

'3 o 



S 



H 

pa 



I 
I 



isili 



III 



:i^ 



Hi 



H 



M 

I 
I 



4< 



III 



1| 



|3|S 



i 



llii|4|i 



CQ^ 









I 



Wcoco TO N <o ro 



5«K 5595s 



^Sli 7l§i 



•HQOaO fiO^-O 



sss: 












29S g|;;:sSS 



SI 



il 



sss 



ilS 



is 



2«5 



ss 



C0tO«<»»-i«<D 



fsf SSS|SSS|SSS 



l§ 



SI 






B§ 



S9 









sSS 



i§g§ 



eO'V^a»r« oooeoeoo 



i»B 






a;!§ 






;ss^S?s :;!SS9^ 



•^i c«'^e«*oio M •e«-4C« 



S§2 SSS§§ §§§ :§ 






Si 












r 



iifiplilliliiiiiiiir 



o>^|wSa}z;> 



U% i§i§i§§iiiiiii§ §§§i§ §§ss^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CIXT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



67 



sa 



11 s 



§ B 



sii 



§i 



§s§i§gi 



2S5 



S53 gf 






as58 



S So 






ss 



ss 



li § 



§ i § ^i§§S§ ^§ 



SgJSSgS 



§ S 



-♦« ^ 



eo CO «o ^3:o».-i .^ o^ 



eo CO «o ^35*'^ 



co>oaooooo>o 



III 

"" I If 
Ills 



»a 



m i 



3 § S 



i un 



WW 



C4 cTi-l fi Cf ^ M CO 



gi 



f§ 



SB § 

^c3 S 



§ s 






i m 



II 






i§ 



g§ 



ii § 



i i § s ssisig i§ 



§s 



iSligisB 



§1 i 



C«,-t^^i-i M^ 



CO CO CI C« CO r^ C« CO 



8;s: 3 



3 9 < S ;::^g9 :? SS 



S8 



3SoS$;;£oS8 



S3 9 



CO <0 CO M A C4 to <D 



N W ^ 



tHOO-V •Vrl C4C«t-4 leo 



«oo« •^'<<e«C4 



^S 






ss is ^ 3 ^ss-s^s ssssaes 



SSSSSSSSi'soSs 



SSS f3 



..?^& 



Sis 






pi 

coHn 



j"ii 



FLIT'S 



MHi 



la- 

P 3 « S- 



§ i.S 







5? }? Jz; 



SSSSS 9^SS§ S § § SS§§§§ lS§9§3§9^§f^SSmSII § 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



68 



•2 

•i 
! 



I 



i 



ll 

•- o 

Is 



o 



O 
09 



I 
I 
I 



I 



l§l| 



--§ 



1| 



I^P 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 






§Sig§§§ 



CO 00 tH T-^ *^ CO oo 



i^ 

u o* 






III 



w 



1^ 






ii|i|ii 



Hill 



.2 O 
^ o 

I 

■S 

I. 

H 



J. 

Iti 



!§§§§§§ 









SSS;$ss« 



§§§§Ss§ 






s5§SI«§§g§§S 



iS S§5§Sg; 



i2»^r=fi 






g 5SsgS§ 



8S*^S<*«SSa2aSS «»J2:3*S 












§ i§i§§§ 









s^:s^!$s;ss^sesS9S?3 ^s^s^s^s 



e« CO CO CO CO M ct u3 00 



C4iO'^C«C4 



S§§S§S§§§Sg§S§ i^lSSSS 



1-4 C« 1-4 i>^ ^ *-) iFl fi^ C^ t^ >H >-« *-! <-4 .H i-i f^ *-l 1^ r-l «H M rl i^i.Hi^^i-4 






•e=is 



'S 






t&6 

5z; 



o o 



tfC^a 



S9S9§l9l§li§iill§§|§S5 SSSS^SS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-18. 



69 



ss ^\ 


iS 


3 39 :| 


SiSS 




II: 


» ! 


;: 1 i 


jS 


47,576 
60,747 

49,806 
83,000 




R" ffS is 




SSsf i 
* : 


12 i 


ig'SSKS-SS- 8"8" is- 
: * ^ \ 


ii § S 

ij 8 # 


is 


m §§ 1 


§§ i9 §^ |l 


l§g§ 


ssij 


SB : 


g§§§§sg$ §i is 


ii ^ ^ 


pu 


as -a : 


»S3 aa 2S :; 


saaa 


3Sa : 


t:a : 


s»assssa »a :• 


i : S " 


rn 


^iH iHW t 


fHW WfH Ti^iH .f 


4 • 'IH 


»HlH • < 


N 


iHvHiHfH J j 


.^ T^W* • • 


• fH fH 


I(H Wm 
** * 


1,817 
3,136 

2,576 
3,067 










ml 


igl3§§ii |g i§ 




if5 


§§ Si! 




I Si" Is 


Ills 


Mi i 




is§§s§ii §g i§ 


ii S i 


lIH 

i"8S 


1,677 
3,758 

8,484 
3,861 


3§ S2 IS h 

^•0 e«e^ efef •€ 






is! 




ii g § 

I I cf ^ 


i^ii 


SS SR : 


3So 93 S3 \i 


ssss 


5SR28 : 


gfe j 


Sr:3g&8S99 :;9 JS^ 


:;:: s s 


j8?? 


^tO ;« 1 


jj"«* <D • ;»o 1 




r««M 




• ^^4 • • ' 


: : •**::: 


•00 ■* • 


[■* 


•*•* «r» ; 




: i*^*^ 


C«C4C0 ; 


^•0 • 


I |CIC4C« j 




• 


i'lU 


*4rH f-4v4 • 


^*i^ ^if^ w4fH •» 


iwe«c« 


'VHiHiH ' 


fHv4 • 




f sss 


S§ i§i 


§§ S§ SS ;! 


ssss 


•5S2 i 


IS 1 




■a 111 






|3i 



is 



lllis 



llllli 



ill 



Ma 



6 9 



li 



Wii 



♦ - •• 






1 1? Q|;S|lilII|| 111^^ 

^ ~ o o fi 



ss ssiii §1 §i§iiiiii§i§§§§§s§§§§§3 ssssis s 3§3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



I 






I 



.s ^ 

" o 

I ^ 

ft. o 



o 









O 

I 

6 



H 
A 



I 
t 



|s||! 



1*^ 



i^l 



f^i 



►•^c 



|S|| 



III 



A c 



■i|i 



t 



llllfilll 






III 



I 



3J$ 



H 



g"3 



e^-e^- 



SS 



;8S 






§§1 






l§S 



mS^ 






SS 



S5" 



li§«Sg|§S 






S5S§SS5S«giSSa 



(0(OO^t«r«^^rHiO'v<o<owd 















9S!S8^SgSS3SS$9g 



■4C^r-4w^w^w^,-^r^r^f*w^,^,^w^ 



8695060X0606X0359606069 



s§ 









§5 



sss 



IS 



eg- 



|g 



oTef 






SI 



SS 



sgss 






^'^ 



Hi 






&la=il 



llllillll lllllll Iplllllll 



Sl5all§5SlllS:ssl5SIII§lfi, 



P^P^A^P^COOQ 



§§s»§§§§§§§§§§S§§§§s§§i3Ss§§§S§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



orrr school systems, 1912-13. 



71 



3 



m 



mm §§ 



i 11 § § 



SiS9S; 



ssi nm 



2 2 



Hi 



§§ 



§1^1 §1 
S3 5 8 S* 2 «" 









Sii sii 



r>o« e^coio 



I i 






1 



§31^ §i 



I §3 i S 



%M^n% 



iSI S§ 



s ^imn 



«-l W p^ « t^ »H »H 



1-^ ^ *-< fi^ 1-^ S 



oa»<D iooook 



2 •8S8S I 



»^ 



s5§5 Si 






r^M^e^ ^eo 



M 1-1^ w « 



umu 






I S 



§§S 



IS 
11 



11 Jt S.J 



g §§ 






§^1 i^l 






S i § s 



-Trf 






S §i § S 



eo f-«« 



§>-«'VOU3C>l 



C^v do 00 oS 






9;SSSSSS tSS 



s ?s 



99^SS9 



St*n» SeSr» 



9S3i2S 



C«t>i tio •« 



M MMOO 



e«iHe«c«»e'<«>e« coco 



I 

'■ JA 



^^iHfHe^fHMlHiH ^iH 



IQ aDODODw wQDO 96 w 00 
r^ r^ »^ ^14 *H vH »4 f-l ^ •HfH 



r: l:S 



i^^ 



SSSJ5128 



SSS 3SSSS SSSSS 







§§§§§§§§§ §§§§ §s §§ § sggsg§ggg§s§ §i§ §s§ii g§§is 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



§ 

5 



1 



.8 S5 

" O 

I 3 

!.§ 

o S 
J o 



o 

ca 

1 ^ 

P 
O 



I 






I 



|i 



ti§ 



|5|S 



if 



mt 



III 



l^|s 



t 



II 



Cj-o 






&a' 



nm 









i^S 



ISS 



9^9 






sss 



Sfll 






§s§g§9ipi!l § 



SSe;!3S; :S3S8 



!§g 






ssis 



ssss 

Q0C«9r- 

5WS 



w »4'eo cTcf cfeo r*"cfc«r «h 



oSSSSS :S3:gS 9 



c«<o*-ioo "io-^eoioe^iot*!-!^ ■* 



•tSSS !SSSSSSS8SSS S 






tlllliii?=?lilli^- 

S^^ a fli 9 &S'3 S o 9 « 3 3 « 



l« 



igi§ §§§§i§§§i§ 



^ss 



SIRS 
338" 



sss; 



m 






iiigg 



sssass 



85 3> 96 f* 85 1-» 






a I 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13 



73 



ff 


:S 


g 


R 




s 


1 




isS 


ii 


i ^ 


Sig 


i 


iS g 


|S j i 


: ;SisaRSS :S : : 

. .^rH^ ^ .,.4 • » 


Sil 


is 




4 


gi 
a i 


ill§: 








i issS2§§ ii i i 

i iaJ3SS*8 igf i i 


sis 


is S|8 


i 


Sj 


js^Hi 


g ggggg 


ii § 


ig i i 


i i^gSSSS :2 i : 


t^ |iC 


jiQ «<0 




» 


s j 


iS-S i 


2 a»aaa 


ia - 


!(ot« : 


1 |or« «'«••«»« joo • • 


1H • i 


• w^ iH 






^4 








iH i 




^« 




'«H S 




1 J J»H • 




ir 

* i 


i§ 


|S 


s 


§i 


S§ii i 




iSi 


i J is 


i iiiiiiS is i i 


lis 


is 

ig" 


IS 




§i 


§§gsi 

g s s s i 


§ §Sig§ 


il 2 
i^5 


isii 
isi^ 


i iisissi i§ i ; 
i is'sss's*" ia i i 


Sil 


ii m 


i 


ii 


ISSSi 


1 is§§§ 


is § 


ii ii 


i ii^^?^ ii 1 i 


S3 \^ 


is 8S 




s 


s i 


!9?i8S : 


s $ss«s 


is S^ 


l^sn 


i i;SSSiS!i!i \9 \ \ 


lO j i 


•« C« 






M 


"^ • 


kOC* 


>o 1 




• CO 




|«o • 








■*« 


i i '^^ 


CO t« 




cocoe«iHc« \ 


w iO«««iOO-» ;C 


1 t.« : 


', 'w^ ' 


|r4 t jr4 J.H 


C«^^ 


!,H ..^tHiH^ ^,M^iH«^i-4^fH ' 





'^^^^^^ '.^ ', ', 


§fs 






\ IssSSHSeS i| 



■§•§•1 

« n « 

lla 



-• iff 



n 



t^wtn 






sfss 






^•il 









il 



■2 . 



illlil|liliilliils||||i|^ 



§§§§§ mm §§i§§i§§§§ §§§§§i§ sii§3Siiii§iii§i§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 






Ȥ "S 



•§ o 

i < 

h Pi 

4r Ai 



o 



'o* *^ 









H 

•J 

< 



I 
I 



l^li 



"•3 a 



11 



EDTJOATION BEPORT, 1913, 



'5li 



^t 

C ^ 



1 
I 



I 



>>'^< 



mi 






SS 



Ms 



llli|i||l 



CO j 



t|itl 



lis 
I 



MU 



§11 
§¥2 



t:«5S ^ 



^.Hr^ e« 



00 QOoo »o qg 



ss 



gsg§ 






5S2g 






SS3S 



gg§i 



s;ss^^ 



^^8 



g§l 



iBi 






ii§ 



;Se^s9 



Sg88?28{28S 



S2S 



s^^^^ 






III 



Hi 

sii 



^coee 



2Kg SiftliS SPlBg§ASpBS SSSI 

pittas' *ouS'»o»0'oaS' i3oaS'>S»o»Q*o»o>ot^»d'to>o'fOt^ t^^eoTus 






^■1. 









iii §i§i§§ i§s§§is§ss§§g§ ii§§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 

S8 : : : :§S : : :£5S :S : : : : :S i^ : :i : : i : :2i§ i i^^ 



7S 









§ 



ill 



§i 



i s 



s S; 



l§ 



a§ 



ss§s 



iig 



I §1 



CO toot 



I0C9O 



i§i 



§ mi 



ig 



gi 



§§ 



g§si§§g§ §§ §§§ §§ f 



9SI 
S5§ 









ff 






si 



§1 






s§a 



§§§ 



§!§§ 



i§§sl 



s§§§i§§i§ig i§ §§§ g§ 



04 _! f-l ^ «H *N 1- 



3SS9 



9c]2!i 



» SSS)» 



SS3S329 



iS9 



I 

■ v« 

: o 

II 



COMM MM 



sss 






S nntz}^Qtz 



ssssssssssssssisssfsss §f sfs SS 



I 

s 



.-§1 



11^ 



•a -a 



3^2 






IS'3-2 



I 9 a4A4A PI 







• > d .. V osp'-j M 



till 



§i§§§§§ii§ §§§gggggggg§g§Rgg?§sgsggggggg gg g§g gg 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 



d 
o 



7 



^ a 

Is 
"2 ^ 



o 



Jo 
ca 



5^ 






I 
I 



I 
I 

J9 



s 



mil 



tǤ 



Pd 
w8 



|5|S 



t 



EDUCATIOK BEPOBT, 1913. 



|i||l 



wo 



ni 



g§i§§isi§§isi§fs§i§§ 



9iS§SiS3Sg§S§§§§Si§gSiSs 



<0(o<OQOi-i«^»«oo<e»*«ookt«ooc<c«t«-««He« 



^ .«H^^ •iHCtfH • .tH^^ 



isi§i§§asig§g§§§gii§ 



i§§§s§i^§3g§g§§§gigsi 



§g§§5§li§§§§iieg§S§g§3s^ 



$$S9:38$S;{)8»!;8S;7!3aS!3«8«8S) 



II 



0Q5 



PW¥J 



tifti 



sis 



<«^<« t-^tQ 



^ e« CO CO iH <« tH CO e« e« «o 



§§ 



§§ 



nu 



a toco 



gi 



§»g 



sas 






A do ooaoS 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



77 



§Sa 



gS3§§SSg§ 



^g^S9gg 



gssgsg 



sss 















^7^t 



§§S 



gg|§i§§g§ 



^ SSS^SS^iS 



Cl 1H 1H 1-4 tH tH 



S8S 






i-ieaoM»c«o»oo»co 



<o oou)ioe4e4 0»<o<o 



o»io<o>or«<«i 



gg| 



r^ •© t* W ^ *© 00 flp Ct 



iig 



^ * 



CO Ok <6 o> r« do 



§i§ 



BS 


















9'ffS 






— f 

-I 

S5! - 



SSI 



ssssssasi 



m §g§§§ii§ 



sii^si 



§§i 



s»$ 



8$S89$S89aS 



$«a ssssss^c^s) 



ass 



2S99^S3 



S9SSS 



iHiHCttHMiHMi-li-l 



I 



f 



iHiHtHeOtH^^^^ 



sss 



8e!2l5S«gSJ2 



SS?: i:!8SRSS^& 



SSSS 



s 



SS SS8RSSS 



SSR 






g§«8 SgiiliSiiilii PA^Apsm^ SS§SI IliiSSsSSS^Sgf 






^1 



gflitf 



Id 






asal 






S«5 









I 
Hill 



gggg nggsggggggggg ummmmu n^u^ sggi§sii§i§§s 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 



8 



•2 

I 
i 



;! § 

i < 

6, O 



I 

I 



o 



|si|i 



5^R 



|5|S 






5^« 



lis 



I 

KB 



l5li 






is 

o 
o 



lift- 



I 



J- 

SaS 



§1 



58" 



fe3 



oS 



§§SSi» 






§3S§§§ 



o»ao<ot^»^Ok 



g§i§§l 






g§gs§§ 



Sc^asiss 



00 00 3 00 Oft ci6 



SSSsggsgg 






§S§ 






sg?§g^SSg§§§§ 



0»t^«OcoooaOFi4^«^kO •aoor« 









99a 






f §§§§g§l§§g§§ ;g 



9g9^SSS{;§SS89S 



eoc4C4 •cie4<O"«*c0C4C« 



S!«S 



f 



oDCJoVkODObaookao v ob oo So e» 



s5S ills 5A=ASAP1|SA«5ASSMSAE2 




§s3 sisQ ssi3§§§§i§§§§§§s§§§ii§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



79 



ssgss? 






28§5§S|SSS 



l•><oaoot»c«^<•<oot« 



§S§§S§ 



2g22S¥ 



SS§§SS§§§§ 



»2CS!;:89S»99 



M^MMMM 






SSSSS 






2i§S 



HHU 






sisi 



ti^n^ 



i^m 






gssa 



§§ig 



8558" 



§§§S 



3a«8 



s^iSS gS§§2g§g§ggS§S 






SISiS 



i§l§S ^1 

If 



§§s§i i§2S§§iasi§§igs§gsg§ II 



§§ 



i-iao«o«o •-iO<otooocot»o»co*-ic«(»c«aooOi-i'4iaOkOoo «s 



liigi g3iSigi§§si§ii 









■^■ff 



sisii 111^ 



2SS9, 









► •a a 




S§ii§3iilzi§iSiii§§§iSi§i§S ililiigggSggggglSSSi 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



T3 
O 

.9 






I! 

•s § 

I ^ 

1i 



o 



6* PE« 



•5 w 

2 > 

I 



H 



IHii 



2^g 

III 






I 



I 
I 



i2 I" 



N 



|sil! 



m 



•JlS 



11 



II 



00^* a B^** 









Ǥa siS 






COfH 



»>4<oo ootook 



s§§ §s§ 






is gs§ 



S88 sajt 



•o eoMM 



s«s tess 



IS 



§§§ 



;s§ 



ass 



SSi^^ 



SiS 






iSs 






;§^ 



:s«a 



«^C<e«i-i M^iieo 



V4 Fi4 ^4 *-• V4 1H 1-1 fHC«^4 



• dkODdODSr* ododX 



22BI 



§ii§ 



Sssg 



igg§ 



§ll§ 






ss:3SS9 



c9C4eoc4C<c9 



•ssfcaa 



gSS §l§Sis§§§lelii§ll 



00 «o od'*o'er*Q <D 00 ^<^ 



•8 
I 



^5i2, 






lillsJ 



ll^ 



^t 



a^o>2^ 9 « e2 o £ > a ssi^i o » I 5 Ba 2*3 b £ S'3 Sis a 



si§ §iissii§i§i§§§i§ i§§§§§§§s§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



81 



|ss§§Sg32 






33 



mm 









S3 



§i 



^§ 



§1 



se 



§1 



5S 



2sSlg2Sg5 



iSiiiiiBi s 



sg^s 



Si 



!§§ 



I 

s 



oco«^ A 



SEiSBIISS 



li §11 Isgli 



§ls g§ 



ig 



§§S§§3liS 






3S8 s$ 






m 
M 






i§i§§§§gs 



2sl §B§ g§§ggll§i §|§iS| 



is 



§229?iS2SlS 



S;;:^ ISS^S^ SS^SI '.^ '.ciU^ V^^^^T^ 



nz 



iSS 






^CQMiHiH-^fH 



•^COCO COMM ^ 



coioe«e«co coihc^m 



88gt:{22'8S8S?8Sg 



888 8Sa r:8Rp:?2J2S:f2S git 



8SS 









.ll^lil 



HH*- :25^ 



=;i:^ 

'g^ 



^§bl. 






§t 









17727'— ED 1913— VOL 2 6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



-2 

a 
o 






B 



•- O 

1 3 

« § 

2 H 



S ® 

•S 00 

1 W 



I J 

IS ^ 

.§ O 

^ O 

I 



h9 



I 



§ 



t 

a 
S 



•^«>»' 



isiii 



III 



rale 



III 






fSlG 



1.1 

en > 



||§SiS||S 



oqB 






;i2 












•oaoaou»oo 



SsSSS 






£s§iS 



58558$ 



OD 00 00 dkS) 



s§ s 



m g 



8^ S9 



S3 r! 






saS 



SSI 



3SSJggS3S8ggS 






•-4 C4 M >-4 M A i-H rHt^f-t^ 



a»ooo»-^coooo-^*ooco<o 



§ii§ssiisi§s§§i§ 






gi§gS§§§§§S§§iS§ 



!;s?iss::S3ss;s;3S:i3!;!$s 



CSeO^CO • •C4I-IC9 • ••H 



<-4 '^i C4 CO 1-1 .^"^iMM^ 



Sc9SoSSgSSS$SSSSSSSS 






^ 



:^S] 



>« 



•a -a 



i4H 



«! all i 152 illals^illl liil J mUh 

g|2 III i i § III ^ I i ^£ i^l llllllll 8||| 



l3i|i:g§ 



lil 



i 



iii§iiii§§§ §g §§s§sg§§§si§iii§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



88 



gs§ss«§3§ §§ ; 


g9 




§ : 


i2a§ 2 


:5 : 

JfH J 


§S§ 




igS 


r* 

^ 


S 




3 


•18 1 


♦265 
124 
273 
184 










a": 




:!« : 

is" i 


s?'8 S" i 


is'asV 




3 


•ss" i 


s'a"s¥ i 

• 




§igg§s§§i §§ i 


§S 




o 1 


is8s iis 1 


i§iiass§§g 1 


iissi 


• 




22;2S***S3S "*** i 


tOio 




00 ; 


•« 


•<m oo»oo 


O9c«r^r»o>o«oo 




g*s* i 


o»t*^e i 






^H r^ t^ • 


I*^ 


*H • 




• fH 




fH ! 




v4»H ! 




• ^ 








^ 




J^fH • 1 


• j»-i J J 




1,033 
996 
913 

1,220 
941 
621 
885 
668 

1,005 

1,U4 
1,130 


ii 




s 


jifiS § 


|i i 


§ §8 i 


isSsi 

1.-** t-T 






12 i 


mm I 

* '» 


• 








i : 


:SS3" 1 


;5 i 


lis: 






i 




• 


.• 


1,264 
1 126 
1,218 
1,487 
1,211 

726. 
1,079 

652 
1,308 

1,527 
1,682 


IS 




!i 


mn ggs j 


sgisSigi i 


ssiji 


iiii i 


i 


:;{?{^9^SS38£; ^S^ : 


ss 




CO ; 


is 


S S^S : 


^SS»SiS8S3 




JSt;S5! : 


SS;sa : 






|eoMu» I 


JM 


iH • 


^ ' 


IiH 




»s • 




rH*^ • 




'.'•' 








jio : 


••H^ i i 








CO ! 




1M I^ 
I** 


•fH 


r 


• 'Cs 


IMd j 


Jw 


M^-^-^NW-VW 




•*©• I 


eOiHW j J 


• 




«Nv4^ 


•H^ 


!^,H>H lH*-4f-l 




,HiM^«H 1 




SSgSSgggg IS ' 


S8S 


ss 


:S2E SS2 : 


sssssssssiglsss : 


Isss i 





hTod'^A t^cTto >o QtT oo'ao t>^»o «'ar«'arao'u) tC(o'<o lo lo to" to to 9 go »o to od'to <o od'ok r> oTto O) o» a» t^to <d*u3 t-^to* 



!i 



I 




uimmmmmmmmmmtmMmmMuM 

z z o 

siisiiiii giiiiiiiiiiii iii iiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



u 



EDUCATIOK BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 

.2 

a 
o 



1 ^ 

•- o 
o 



I. 
1 



i I 

Jo 
OQ 



e A. 
8 g 

•2 2 

I. 
s 



n 



I 



III 






^_. 



|5|8 






3 

M 

i 
i 






1-9 
III 

SZeS Q 



If 



i4i 



a 



ii 



&I oils all 



« 0) «9 



In 






IIEJS 



§S§iS 



t«iHt»aoco 



|SS|S 









n CO c^ MCI 



i^S3f3S^ 



li§§»S§Sg§gSS 






8 §§ 



i §g 
3" sa" 



§§§§S§S§ 



§H§§s§ i§ 



Ot^^4D00 ••OI«>Cbt^t«iOt»«0 oo 



§§§3i§iSs§ii§ 






g 3S 



g 32 



§ii 






ll§S2S |i 



S8e;s$ :si;;sasi3sa$ ss 



§S 



c;a 



i§ 



iS 



!^ SIS 



§2§5S2S§SS£SSS§ 2S5SS5 S2 







L^liS^lllllllilll I 



o 



sis 



"so 



>Su at 
O 



la 

^1 



liiiliiiilliiiiiiiiii iiiiil §i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



85 



29SSg;S§S^8SSgSSS 



^SSSS^S 



^gggg 






»S§8S 



§i§§§i§§i§gi§§§ 



« w^r-*^ ^^-, ^ W «* «-t 1-4 r^ 






jpS'Vrt ^ 



SxsoB o 



iS§i§ 



s^a^s^s 



4 000«0 



ooo«0:j 



§§ 



gSSSgS§S!3§§|SS§ 



^oSSSocoS 



«gsis 



$!SS!$ 



!SS8§ 



'••eowstoooeo*'-"^ • ■♦ -* -^ eo ■* « 



•OUdMCQtOCO 



•ookior^eo 



s§ssiSISi§§§ss§ 



il§8R 



sa§§ 



ii§gS I 






mm 






isii 






§1 



:iiis§gi§iiiigig2sssis 



§gsii 



:SiS 



o rt •«»■ o» •«»• 



i^e^SSsS^aSS^^S^^S^SS^ :S»i:§^^ 



^S^S^^S^ 



SeomS^ 



Sra^Mn 



C«C<iH«-l 



»^^«f-i»-i 



i 

aSoSoooSoo ^ 



Rf: 



isiisigi§sgsgiigig|gig?g 



oEoDaoocXoCoDucoDwoDt'* 






§s^i??fer-is 



f 



III ?? ? |«i» <5»'l ulf 5s s 

.=.„..,„. ...I|i|l||||lalilll|liilll2il|i|l||ill|^^^ 



§is iiig§gi§igiiigiiii§§iiiliiiillii§s§§Sis§s§ssas3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



86 



BDXJCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



9 

2 



If 

I ^ 

1 i 



f*" o 
-. i 



OQ 



sf ft. 

S o 

I ° 

8. 



I 

I 



I 
I 

i 

I 






1^ 



|5|6 






Sea B 






PP 



eg 

g-i 



i 



&s 






4m 






iS| 



gs 



1^1 






sssss 



IIP 



ggfgSSg 



^3 



§§ 



Ok'^iiOkOiotoiotoMao 



IIS 






»ooo25©» 



gsiissiggsi 



§1 



S8 



^§§§s 






toS^So 



^^StS^^^eCS^^SS^^e^g^S 



1-IIO 'C* • '^C) 



c<eoc4«-4 



Sf22 



i§§ 



sii 



"(•tOOkCOtO 



9^^ 



lis 
^¥2 



^§^1 



s^si^g; 



f^iH"* .CO f-» 



SS8 



g§ 



|8 






S3 



i§ 



55" 



CO^ 



00 «^ 



IS 



11 



$s 



K S5 oB 96 1^ OD w % oB % OD dSX OD S K So w % 9c oE % So P>SS6Sa5ScSD 






c « 2 2 3 



^ 
§•5^ 



fill 



If Jlltlllil fi riil =lil is P ^= # a= 

^^1 § i gl fc k - e-il ^uS g5 £•! |3 1?^ i I i 



^3' 



52i:22asaaS»SS5SaSJ5S5?S55«^?;;?S S§§q:5?55 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



87 



SS9 



9S 



9« ss 



g§$ s 



§F3 ::: 



R 



§§3§li 






S^;^ 



c6fH eo 






*o oB o CO Os o6 



S^2 



ss 



^i § 



sgi's iigg g§ 



iSSii 



?a^§g3SS 



-^Oi C4;0 



>-«;oc»^ oci-i'^eo t*o 



o>Ot^o»eot^t^c«»« 









>r«o ''^ Sfi S S ^ 
« c*5 ^4 F« Oi So cb oo 






si§l 



105DM0000 
ci 1-t »H ^ 1-t 1-t 












ssss 



§i § 



C««-l rH^i-l 



8^S^ t225J2 8R 






S^SSeSe!: 



CO 00 CO w ^ " 



s^i^ c!:i; 



c^::^^^ si^gs^ s^ 



^5sa83?s^*j5 



rieOi-l»-l 



OD 06 95 o 



06 (^ 9k So 0i o5 



Sg§2 F2g 



S8SS128 RSSf: gJSffS 



Sf2 










•H r^ vH «H i-t 1^ 1-1 *-| *H r^ r^ ^4 f-li-4 i-( r-i r1 r1 f-^ ^ 1-4 1-4 ^ T-4 ,-« i^ ^^ ^4 _< ^ ,^ rl 1-0 r1 r1 1-1 ^4 »H iH i-« t-< »H r-f »H .-1 
•HrHr^fH^iH «-4 f-t iH iH fH iH iH iH «H «HiH iH^ «H ^ ^^ «H iH vH fH (H «H ^^-t^»H«Hr^ vH ^*-l vH^ «H*^r4^«HfH 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



9S 



EDrCATIOH KEPOBT, ISO. 



1 

.1 



•* 

X 


1 


-i 


5 


a 




>v 


A 


-« 




X 


y. 




^ 


^ 


-< 


r 








4 


"^ 


1 




•»• 


^ 


X 


9 


c 


^ 


> 


e 


i 




-i 


^ 


1 


?■ 






« 


O 


o 


r/) 




W 


3 


^H 


•e 


H 


1 


^ 


-5 


Si 




p^ 


ff 


J-" 

o 


i 


tf 


:i 


''J 


3 




o. 




2w 








•3 




f5 
1 




*»< 




14 




t 




< 




H 








•3 



It 



Pis 



1^ 



3 



3 









1^1 I 



If 



l^lj 



p; £ 



8*2 QS aS S'Sd 









2 g 



g S 



5S5 



S3 



s ggss 



8S 



i§ 



SIS§ 



«CCOBo-« 



s § 



i 3 

i i 



sii i 



ii§ i 



IS 



IS 



s gii=§ ggii 



ri^*-» « 



9 SSS^S^ SSS;; 



K S2J2J2S ff?J2S 



IISS 






iSiS 



oc akoc>^c9 



siii 






li§3 



•^ CO cc ra c* 



I I'ggg 






lit 



61 



& 



ailllllLt?!- l-^SilillUlilll 



i£3 









22222222 2g 8§8gg g8§§5S?5a SSSS 

tH r^ *H (H 1-1 (H tH fH tHf-l rHtHr-lr^iH ,^ th vH aH tH r-l r-i fH <-] iH iH 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OITT SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1012-13. 



89 



Si 



imu 



sig8§s§agg§8 8 



as 



9 iilii 

2" S9SfS9" 



s"a"sa"sss"s5sga sT 



§21 



;§SSi 



sii§§§§§l§SS S 



««o «o^o-«*« 



oooo»-*o»oooo«oM«e9oo r- 






i% 



§ U%^i 



3l2g5§giiSii S 



i SSiSS 












2§i 



ii iiiss 



^sSiS^liSlil 



2n^ 



^n n^^^^ 



SS:?g85S8^SSS^ » 



CStHCOOCO 



C« <«• _! ^ _! ^ r-l C« T-lCt C« 



ttl^jSgJ^r^ SSSSS 



sii2g§sisi2§ sss 



cTua'arr^oroo' ^^^o~® co'«r»o'«o»ood'»o»o»o«<r«radoood«d' otTcToo' 




sliisi §^^l^§l§sliiliiiil lii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schooli, IBlt-lS, 

GROUP I.— CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER. 



Cities. 



h 



all 

S Sa S 



a 



it 






— 3 
A4 



a 

s 
Jz; 





Jz; 



Alabama: 
Binniugham 7-21 

Californu: 

Los Angeles 

Oaklana 

San Francisco 

Colorado: 
Denver 6-21 

Connecticut: 

Bridgeport* 4-16 

New Haven ♦ 4-16 

District of Columbia: I 

Washington ' 5-17 

Qeoroia: I 

Atlanta ' 6-18 

Illinois: 
Chicago -21 

Induna: 
Indianapolis 6-21 

Kentucky: j 

Louisville ' 6-20 

Louisiana: \ 

New Orleans 6-18 

Maryland: 
Baltimore ' 6-16 

Massachusetts: i 

Boston 5-15 

Cambridge 1 5-15 

FaU River ! 5-15 

Lowell I 5-15 

Worcester 5-15 

Michigan: 

Detroit | 5-20 

Grand Rapids 5-20 

Minnesota: i 

Minneapolis i 5-21 

St. Paul 8-16 

Missouri: ! 

Kansas City * 6-20 

St. Louis ; 6-20 

Nebraska: 
Omaha 5-21 

New Jersey: 

Jersey City 

Newark 

Paterson : 

New York: 

Albany ' 5-18 

Buffalo ' 4-18 

New York 4-21 

Rochester ; 4-18 

Syracuse i 5-21 

Ohio: 

Cincinnati* ! 6-21 

Cleveland 6-21 

Columbus * 6-21 

Dayton 6-21 

Toledo 6-21 

Oregon: I 

Portland ! 4-20 

Pennsylvania: I 

Philadelphia ! 8-16 

Pittsburgh 6-16 

Scranton 6-16 

Rhode Island: 
Providence 5-15 

Tennessee: 

Memphis 6-21 

NashvlUe 6-21 



43,659 



51,981 

22,257 
30, (Ml 

65,867 

32, 149 

882,516 
55,123 
56,593 

115,332 

75,219 

125,178 
17,017 
21,390 
14,750 
23,232 

119,599 
30,158 



24,632 

73,750 
195,966 

28,368 



18,663 
99,294 
1,718,279 
52,934 
32,700 

86,259 
145,674 
39,979 
28,238 
44,115 

43,121 

290,927 
86,331 
30,617 

42,115 

38,088 
37,872 



7,871 



3,521 
2,670 

5,000 



612 

2,015 

623 

1,275 

1,078 

327 
624 

1,731 
475 

6,217 
977 
708 

1,145 

1,889 

2,764 
472 
533 
354 
724 

1,659 
516 

1,351 
771 

1,132 
2,079 

563 

859 

1,596 

501 

361 

1,690 

18,225 

908 

577 

1,041 

2,499 

683 

470 

691 

858 

4,759 

1,993 

585 

939 

474 
347 

* Statistics for 1911-12. 



11,000 

20,000 

14,500 

20,806 
3,687 
6,769 
5,539 
5,349 

26,183 
6,977 

5,000 
9,708 



30,000 
3,000 



5,500 
26,728 
86,708 
12,208 

2,100 

25,000 

29,975 

4,000 

3,000 

8,276 

4,957 
69,223 
*5,'566' 

6,319 

3.666 
1,000 



25,320 

69,049 
24,409 
53,757 

37,295 

15,019 
25,590 

58,153 

23,387 

315,146 

36,736 

29,754 

43,251 

73,587 

106,979 
16,672 
16,603 
12,721 
24,431 

71,003 
17,352 

48,030 
28,963 

39,351 
89, 9li9 

21,306 

39,127 
65.881 
21,800 

12,603 
52,213 
799,763 
27,529 
21,187 

56,062 
84,925 
25,648 
16,574 
26,385 

31,265 

225,837 
78,115 
23,337 

35,983 

19,532 
17,443 



17,833 

50,425 
19, 146 
42,830 

27,936 

13,104 
21,076 

46,468 

20,676 

244,810 

28,720 

22,341 

32,846 

57,154 

93,792 
14,105 
13,569 
9,991 
19,455 

51,332 
14,850 

39,585 
24,025 

30,730 
69,628 

14,815 

31,524 
51,863 
17,178 

10,225 
47,343 
631, 794 
21,415 
18,021 



69,081 
21.032 
13,875 
21,816 

24,628 

165,535 
57,297 
18,552 

30,810 

13,823 
13,843 



56 

31 
45 
91 

66 

28 
56 

154 

54 

399 



53 



126 

255 
36 
54 
53 
73 

96 
37 

75 
58 

76 
122 

36 



67 
25 

24 
114 
517 
36 
41 



112 
53 
39 
42 

60 

321 
127 

48 

96 

31 
35 



662 

434 

646 

1,296 



305 
662 

1,381 
467 

6,219 
842 
753 

1,190 

1,873 

2,604 
379 
374 
320 



1,400 
481 

1,023 
750 

970 
2,042 

464 

815 

1,376 

606 

821 
1,642 



656 
663 



2,176 



476 
646 



817 



4,546 

1,993 

641 

823 

481 
410 



10 



21,488 

61,670 
25,000 
44,678 

36,466 

15,660 
23,067 

55,027 

22,851 

280,073 
33,680 
29,160 
39,300 
78,964 

120,089 



18,698 
14,600 
26,996 

66,300 
16,667 

48,600 
29,700 

43,823 
92,959 

22,300 

88,063 
65,532 
21,132 

13,468 
71,399 
634,571 
21,370 
22,856 



98,106 
30,000 
16,096 
29,700 

32,680 

203,546 
78,115 
26,908 

34,655 

18,293 
14,310 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Omr SCHOOL systems, 1912-13. 



91 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; aitendance and personnel in day schools, 1912-lS-^ 

Continued. 



GROUP I.— CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER— Continued. 



atles. 



5J^ 



li 



sl 



It 

a*- 

9 



10 



VraonoA: 

Richmond.. 
Washinoton; 

Seattle , 

Spokane 

Wisconsin; 

Milwaukee. 



7-20 



5-21 
6-21 



4-20 



29,068 

46,105 
21,617 

121,284 



2,104 

2,785 
2,044 

25,286 



947 
471 



18,202 

33,437 
18,122 

64,705 



14,609 

26,463 
13,891 

41,297 



34 



66 



427 

948 
400 

1,171 



16,739 

37,287 
19,848 

48,140 



GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION. 



Alabama: 
MobUe* 








151 
108 

210 

246 
288 
260 
264 
165 

150 

158 
196 

469 
136 
175 
116 
162 
372 

286 

160 
113 

216 
222 

188 

77 
38 
100 
81 
172 
219 
142 
167 
316 
126 
262 
242 

283 
221 
274 
297 

207 
88 


6,359 
4,934 

8,150 

7,426 
7,088 
9,084 
9,836 
6,229 

5,951 

4,708 
3,702 

17,458 
5,174 
6,879 
3,698 
6,136 

13,983 

10,417 

8,207 
6,061 

10,230 
10, 170 
8,728 

2,655 
1,487 
3,599 
3,571 
6.471 
8,397 
4,018 
6,692 
8,423 
4,663 
8,369 
8,533 

9,580 
7,976 
8,548 
10,792 

6,567 
2,874 


4,309 
3,806 

6,668 

6,066 
6,498 
6,469 
7,073 
6,121 

4,490 

3,197 
2,865 

14,456 
4,171 
5,658 
3,001 

11,034" 

8,544 

' '5* 120* 

8,695 
7,760 
7,306 

2,112 
1,088 
2,914 
2,784 
6,109 
6,412 
3,770 
4,439 
6,738 
3,624 
6,878 
6,639 

6,752 
6,282 
6,415 
7,662 

6,268 
2,386 


12 
14 

17 

27 

35 
20 
21 
16 

20 

12 
12 

15 
17 
13 
21 
22 
29 

30 

16 
10 

66 
68 
15 

5 
77 

9 
16 
26 
12 
23 

'*'i5" 
21 
19 

23 

18 
18 






Montgomery 


7-21 
6-21 


9,846 
20,915 


675 

1,000 

600 

600 

1,000 

800 






Arkansas: 
Little Rock 


177 

229 
218 
190 
268 
181 

148 

102 
174 

402 
124 
180 
108 
148 
320 

268 


8,850 

8,111 
6,900 
7,600 
9,200 
6,500 

6,216 

3,824 
6,500 

17,175 
6,016 


Caufobnia: 
Berkeley 


Pasadena ... ^ .... ^ 






Saotunepto 






9,i^r\ DiAgn 






San Jose 






Colorado; 
Colorado Sprines 


6-21 

6-21 
6-21 

4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 

7-14 

6-21 
6-21 

6-18 
6-18 
6-18 

6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
fr-21 
&-21 
5-21 
6-21 
5-21 
5-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
(h21 

5-21 
5-21 


8,020 

7,667 
5,653 

23,547 
7,514 

11,816 
5,834 
6,744 

20,933 

9,250 


4,339 
1,692 
3,800 
2,018 
891 
3,886 

400 
2,000 

1,500 


District No. 20 


District No. 1 


Connecticut: 
Hartford 


Meriden 


New Britain 


7,560 
4,053 
5,489 
13,285 

11,336 


Norwicli 


Stamford ... ... 


Waterbury 


Delaware: 

Wilinlngt4>n ... 


Florida;" 
Jacksonville* 


Tampa 




96 

204 
210 
197 

67 
39 
128 
84 
211 
194 
163 
161 
330 
114 
231 
214 

331 
226 
274 


6,566 


Geobgla: 
Augusta 


17,856 
18,752 


10,230 


Macon 




Bavannah 


9,417 
2,750 


Illinois: 
Aurora— 
Eastside 


6,954 
2,089 
6,510 
4,678 
10,350 
27,495 
6,438 
12,638 
22,050 


1,764 
**2,'672' 

'"sso* 

2,680 
836 
2,539 
13,627 
3,150 
883 
3,469 

1,500 
6,000 
3,000 

1,025 
600 


Weetside* 


1,492 
4,887 
4,313 
7,074 


Bloominfton* 


DanvUle* 


Decatur 


East St. Louis 


8,409 


Elgin 


6,000 
6,000 


JoUet 


Peoria 


Quincy 


4,771 


Rockford 


11,604 
15,387 

19,446 

18,287 
16,225 
16,291 

10,279 
6,160 


8,665 
8,691 

10,600 
71791 
6,500 


Springfield 


Indiana: 
E vansville 


Fort Wayne 


South Bend 




12,211 
6,570 


Iowa: 
Cedar Rapids 


16 
13 


180 
90 


Clinton 


3,300 



* statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



92 



EDUCATION REPOET, 1913. 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools, 1912-lS- 

Continued. 

GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION-Continued. 



Cities. 



5-3 



r- 3 

S 



5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 



5-21 

5-21 
5-21 
5-21 

6-20 
6-20 
^20 

&-18 

5-21 
5-21 

5-15 
6-15 
5 15 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
5 15 
5-15 



Iowa— CoDtinoed. 

Council Bluils 

Davenport 

Des Moines 

Dubuque 

Sioux City 

Waterloo- 
East side 

West side 

Kansas: 

Kansas City 

Topelca 

WichiU 

Kentucky: 

Covington 

Lexington ♦ 

Newport 

Louisuna: 

Slireveport 

Maine: 

Lewiston 

Portland* 

Massachusetts: 

Brockton 

Drookline 

Chelsea : 

Chicopee 

Everett 

Fitcliburg 

Haverhill. 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Maiden 

New Bedford 

Newton 

Pittsfield 

Quincy 

Salem 

Somerville 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Waltham 

Michigan: 

Battle Creek 

BayCity 

Calumet r 

Flint 

Jackson 

Kalamaioo 

Lansing 

Saginaw— 

East side 

West side 

Minnesota: 

Duluth I 

Mis^souRi: I 

Joplin 0-21 

St. Joseph I 6-20 

S pringaeid ' 6-20 

MoNTAi^A: I 

Butte ' c^''! 

Nebraska: i 

Lincoln ' S-21 

South Omaha 5-21 

New Uaupsuire: 

Manchester I 5-16 



8,609 
12,535 
24,830 
10,910 
14,407 



3,018 

25,314 
11,641 
12,666 

18,435 
11,185 
6,609 

7,404 

9,284 
15,986 

8,408 
3,878 
6,962 
4,667 
4,456 
7,071 
7,907 
10,842 



5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5 15 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
5-15 
5 16 
5-15 
5-15 

5-20 
5-20 
5-20 



13,273 
7,936 

16,905 
7,026 
6,337 
6,990 
8,791 

12,470 

15,915 
5,410 
4,181 

6,727 
13,458 
7,836 



5-20 
5-20 
5-20 

5-20 
5-20 



8,096 
9,846 
6,950 

8,523 
6,616 



8,374 
19.a30 
8,459 

11,8S9 

12, 5S1 
7,N39 

12,351 



400 



3,200 
1,000 



160 

2,627 
500 
300 

4,918 

785 

1,300 

600 

2,630 
1,528 

1,355 
656 
2,000 
1,600 
25 
2,575 
9,808 
5,306 



161 
243 
600 
127 
252 

95 
80 

349 
242 
265 

158 
141 
91 

90 

72 
295 

299 
185 
176 
128 
204 
128 
226 
232 
305 
331 
210 
306 
275 
204 
177 
154 
369 
513 
169 
103 

147 
197 
189 
150 
148 
232 
143 

159 
93 

412 

177 
357 
182 

229 

240 
167 

198 
♦ Statistics for 1911-12. 



3,537 
2,037 
8,482 
1,440 
738 
515 
3,802 
1,839 
2,495 
1,400 
1,872 

300 
4,600 
1,051 



900 
1,300 
1,100 

1,300 
1,000 



50 
2,000 



3,500 



930 

6,088 



6,216 
7,305 
18,493 
3,641 
8,506 

2,878 
2,197 

14,998 
8,203 
9,274 

6,118 
5,676 
3,479 

5,155 

2,737 
10,077 

9,780 
4,470 
6,760 
3,921 
6,719 
4,487 
6,268 
7,359 
10,785 
12,248 
7,449 
13,718 
7,369 
6,337 
6,383 
5,280 
13,477 
17,492 
5,014 
3,298 

5,370 
6,859 
6,191 
6,445 
5,394 
6,860 
5,342 

4,828 
3,639 

13,714 

7,4S8 
12,S32 
8,247 

7,515 

8,S.W 
5,234 

6,679 



5,118 
5,819 
14,549 
2,891 
7,154 

2,330 



11,845 
6,401 
7,448 

4,570 
4,176 
2,758 

3,606 

2,110 
7,943 

9,065 
3,594 
5,780 
3,241 
6,047 
3,902 
5,871 
6,176 
8,181 

10,722 
6,212 

11,890 
6,324 
5,221 
5,509 
4,516 

11,173 

13,548 
4,464 
2,818 

4,296 
5,943 
5,361 
6,253 
4,353 
6,174 
4,458 

3,761 
2,861 

11,452 

5,483 
9,449 
6,313 

5,924 

7,036 
4,170 

6,309 



170 
250 
440 
99 
332 

80 
68 

402 
229 
245 

147 

**9i 

102 

92 



231 
143 
160 
138 
173 
135 
213 
217 
276 
305 
189 
316 
221 
140 
173 
168 
317 
383 
123 
110 

158 
227 
172 
146 
150 
207 
101 



171 
34S 
161 

232 

205 
149 

171 



10 



10,000 
19,000 
4,423 
8,800 



2,197 

14,537 
8,730 



5,662 
4,696 
3,000 

4,600 

2,964 
9,854 



5,154 



4,334 
7,401 
5,670 
7,960 
8,473 



14,079 
8,417 

15,328 
8,901 
6,353 
7,530 
6,900 

13,012 

15,727 
5,682 
3,888 

4,731 
6,930 
7,220 
6,173 



7,300 
5,238 



3,363 
14,307 



12,000 
7,550 

7,327 

0,655 
5,863 

8,086 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Cirr SCHOOL systems, 1912-13. 



98 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools, 1912-lS — 

Continued. 

GROUP II.-CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION-ContlHued. 



atles. 






% 



•^2 



New Jersey: 
Atlantic City. 

Bayonne 

Camden 

East Orange. . 

Elizabeth 

Hoboken 



4-20 



8,263 



Passaic 

Perth Amboy 

Trenton 

West Hoboken 

New York: 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 

Elmira 

Jamestown 

Kingston 

Mount Vernon 

Newburgh 

NewRochelle 

Niagara Falls 

Poughkeepsie 

Schenectady 

Troy- 
Union district 

Lansingburg district.. 

Utica 

Watertown 

Yonkers 

North Carolina: 

Charlotte , 

W ilmingt on , 

Orao: 

Akron 

Canton , 

Hamilton , 

Lima 

Lorain 

Newark , 

Springfield 

Y oungs town 

Zanesvillti 

Oklahoma: 

Muskogee 

Oklahoma City 

Pennsylvania: 

AUentown 

Altoona 

Chester 

Easton 

Erie 

Harrisburg 

Hazleton 

Johnstown 

Lancaster 

McKeesport* 

Newcastle 

Norristown ♦ 

Heading 

Shenandoah 

WUkes-Barrc ..... 

Williamsport 

York... 



4-20 



^18 
6-21 
6-18 



6,212 
6,731 
8,143 



6-18 



6,396 



6-18 
5-18 
6-18 



7,731 
6,917 
7,000 



6-18 
6-18 

6-18 
6-17 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 

6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
&-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
4-21 

6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-18 
6-lG 
6-16 
6-16 
6-10 
6-16 
6-16 
6-15 



4,866 
13,120 

10,683 
2,355 

13,000 
6,372 

17,100 

10,052 
6,299 

19,587 
14,683 
9,154 
8,518 
8,108 
6,963 
13,457 



8,292 
16,236 

9,640 
9,641 
7,217 
6,622 

12,477 

10,550 
6,127 
8,912 
9,396 
6,959 
6,143 
4,248 

17,160 
6,514 

13, 7^2 
5,857 
8,119 



1,160 



3,628 
2,600 



1,471 

876 

3,663 



1,668 
60 

921 
1,448 

446 



700 
1,769 
1,238 
2,261 

4,234 

382 

2,700 

88 

4,048 

300 
170 

1,500 
1,375 
1,476 
1,200 



1,000 
1,600 
3,000 



300 



1,020 

1,800 

1,100 

608 

3,836 

600 

700 

2,856 

1,050 



741 

600 

2,750 

1,000 

1,873 

777 

786 



209 
301 
416 
200 
266 
276 
132 
236 
146 
413 
140 

93 
127 
230 
181 

m 

114 
195 
108 
182 
150 
100 
367 

231 
71 
370 
155 
426 

120 
103 

349 
227 
148 
147 
141 
120 
213 
333 
109 

133 



185 
227 
166 
120 
280 
291 
109 
222 
161 
205 
193 

90 
337 

85 
202 
134 
200 



8,253 
11,307 
14,866 
6,424 
9,774 
10,466 
4,906 
9,614 
6,750 
15,027 
6,643 

8,487 
4,073 
7,600 
6,064 
6,447 
4,016 
6,983 
4,325 
6,158 
6,509 
4,649 
12,612 

6,521 
1,872 

12,532 
6,128 

15,019 

6,015 
3,716 



6,019 
8,804 

10,944 
6,203 
8,121 
8,160 
3,869 
7,618 
6,362 

11,647 
6,160 

3,000 
3,303 
6,884 
4,150 
4,840 
3,308 
6,698 
3,711 
4,715 
4,286 
3,613 
10,390 

6,304 
1,502 
9,115 
4,149 
12,021 

4,696 
2,811 



14,866 


11,640 


8,279 


7,058 


4,864 


4,030 


6,561 


4,918 


4,535 


3,754 


4,072 


3,805 


8,120 


6,420 


12,627 


11,286 


4,528 


3,677 


6,771 


4,250 


13,146 


9,265 


8,028 


7,434 


8,211 


6,312 


6,261 


4,416 


4,666 


3,762 


9,487 


7,607 


10,640 


8,842 


6,095 


4,050 


8,098 


6,689 


6,732 


6,415 


6,950 


6,190 


6,665 


6,378 


3,425 


2,679 


13,SC4 


11,322 


4.070 


3, 724 


11,*99 


9. 5S6 


6,523 


4,547 


7,128 


6,715 



200 
252 
384 
165 
212 
261 
123 
205 
143 
348 
123 

106 
99 
211 
208 
154 
88 
159 
113 
148 
153 
107 
269 

240 
69 
278 
142 
409 

120 



355 
222 
144 
165 
129 
143 
193 
255 
114 

147 
370 

206 
250 
176 
122 
203 
280 
113 
240 
175 
199 
175 
100 
300 
85 
262 
143 
191 



10 



8,100 
10,082 
14,167 
6,176 
9,148 
9,242 
4,900 
9,462 
6,312 
14,636 
6,614 

4,109 
4,330 
7,603 
6,396 
6,489 
4,284 
7,236 
4,611 
6,746 
5,398 
4,121 
12,240 

7,925 
2,135 

11,926 
5,188 

12,800 

6,187 
4,704 

15,976 
9,434 
6,053 
6,000 
4,975 
6,000 
8,540 

10,406 
4,800 

4,980 
12,000 

10,300 
9,945 
6,326 
6,410 

10,427 

11,000 
5,100 
9,421 
7,000 
9,552 
7,357 
3,500 

15,000 
4,400 

i:<, 100 
6,203 
7,653 



♦Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



94 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day sdiools, IBlt-^lS — 

Continued. 

GROUP II.-€ITIE8 OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Cities. 



li 

O CO 

11 



'1 






Rhode Island: 

Newport 

Pawtucket 

Warwick 

Woonsocket 

South Cabouna: 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Tennessee: 

Chattanooga 

Knoxviile 

Texas: 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Fort Worth*... 

Galveston 

Houston 

San Antonio 

Waoo 

Utah: 

Ogden 

S^t Lake City.. 
VraoiNiA: 

Lynchburg*.,. 

Portsmouth.... 

Roanoke 

Washington: 

Tacoma 

West Virginia: 

Huntington.... 

Wheeling 

Wisconsin: 

Green Bay 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Oshkosh 

Racine 

Sheboygan 

Superior 



5-17 
5-17 
5-17 
5-15 

ft-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 

7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-19 
7-17 
7-17 

6-18 
6-18 

7-20 
7-19 
7-19 

5-21 

fr-2l 
6-21 

4-20 
4-19 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 



5,284 
12,358 
6,540 
8,569 



6,000 

13,100 
11,788 

20,334 
9,706 

12,963 
7,368 

21,754 

20,796 
6,578 

7,522 
22,245 

7,108 
7,683 
8,167 

19,407 

8,589 
10,367 

8,658 
9,603 
7,369 



1,106 
2,940 
1,102 
3,700 



750 

1,100 
800 

1,500 

1,000 

500 



2,000 
5,674 



408 
594 

350 
731 

785 

1,778 

516 
1,725 



2,056 
1,238 



12,046 
9,123 



1,695 
1,553 
9,771 



135 
233 
105 
HI 

135 
74 

143 
119 

381 
156 
299 
139 
319 
388 
159 

195 
559 

107 
100 

168 

373 

140 
168 

119 
138 
159 
156 
193 
119 
197 



3,786 
7,871 
4,456 
4,360 

5,878 
3,890 

6,728 
6,484 

16,126 
5,877 

11.767 
6,181 

13,353 

15,122 
6,422 

6,424 
20,274 

4,851 
4,574 
7,231 

15,838 

5,926 
6,792 

4,083 
4,811 
4,532 
5,240 
6,685 
4,131 
6,604 



3,238 
6,122 
3,522 
3,389 

4,454 
2,960 

6,802 
4,755 

11,021 
4,221 
8.038 
3,406 
9,731 

10,457 
4,537 

5,310 
16,108 

3,715 
3,733 
5,532 

12,581 

4,558 
4,689 

3,327 
3,872 
3,788 
4,146 
6,580 
3,475 
5,013 



95 
186 
100 



128 
71 



129 

405 
142 
296 
110 
528 
356 
157 

180 
457 

104 
97 
167 

341 

134 
182 

lOB 
171 
114 
130 
165 
110 
169 



10 



4,150 
8,112 
4,773 
4,786 

5,452 
3,500 



5,120 

14,814 
5,833 

11,260 
6.000 

14,501 

13,310 
7,090 



20,028 

4,300 
4,155 
6,700 

13,802 

6,870 
6,772 

4,032 
6,642 
4,816 
4,945 
6,302 
4,247 
6,311 



GROUP III.-CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION. 



Alabama: 
Bessemer * 


7-21 


6,287 


250 


54 
41 
31 

67 
77 

38 
111 
73 

125 
66 
61 
176 
176 
126 
91 
108 
82 


2,242 
1,913 
1,553 

3,161 


1,702 

"i;23i" 

2,002 


7 
6 
5 

11 

7 

8 
10 
9 

8 
6 
10 
15 
15 
14 
10 
19 
17 






Gadsden 


42 
29 

68 
70 


1,598 
1,600 

2,720 


Selma 


7-21 

6-21 
6-21 

fr.21 
6-21 

7- 


3,674 

4,631 
3,891 

5,524 
9,(M5 
3,457 


1,500 

537 

468 

200 
480 

200 

95 

200 


Arizona: 
Phoenix 


Tucson 


Arkansas: 
Argenta* 


2,250 

4,a37 
8,209 

4,051 
2,406 
2,043 
6,646 
6,467 
3,007 
2.254 
3,378 
2,306 


**3,'522* 

3,260 
1,963 
1,714 
6.312 
4,393 
2,092 
1,838 
2,610 
1,896 




Fort Smith 


124 


4,876 


Hot Springs 


California: 
Alameda 


109 
56 
60 
178 
151 
100 
94 
120 
76 


4,285 
2,240 
2,040 
7,066 
4,715 
4,660 
2,476 
3,650 
2,400 


Bakersfleld 






Eureka 






Fresno 






Long Beach 










Pomona 








Redlands 






100 


Riverside 






San Bernardino...'. 




:;:;:::::::::::::; 



•Statistics for 1911-12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



95 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools^ 1912-13— 

Continued. 

GROUP m.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



baniauruz 

Stockton 

VaUejo 

COLORAIX): 

Trinidad 

Connecticut: 

Ansonia 

Bristol 

Danburv 

GreenwKsh 

Manchester- 
Town schools... 
Ninth district.. 

Middletown 

Naugatuck 

New Lrondon 

Norwalk 

Torrington* 

WalliBgford 

Qeoboli: 

Athens 

Brunswick 

Columbus 

Rome 

Waycroas 

Idaho: 

Boise 

Illinoi s: 

Alton 

BeUeTiUe 

Cairo 

Canton 

Champaign 

Chicago Heights.. 

Cicero 

Evans ton- 
District No. 75.. 
District No. 76.. 

Freeport 

Oalesbur^ 

Jacksonville 

Kankakee 

La Salle 

Lincoln* 

Mattoon 

Moline 

Oak Park 

Rock Island 

Streator 

Waukegan 

Indiana: 

East Chicago 

Gary 

Hammond ♦ 

Huntington 

Jefferson ville 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lai>orte 

Logansport 

Marion 

Michigan City.... 

Mishawaka 

Muncie 

New Albany 



d-21 

4-16 
4-18 
4-16 
4-16 

4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
5-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 

fr-18 
6-18 
fr-18 
6-18 
6-18 

6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 
&-21 



6-21 
6-21 
-21 
6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
7-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



2,975 

4,168 
3,270 
4,809 
4,007 

1,262 
2,018 
2,359 
3,178 
4,682 



4, (MO 
2,826 



2,567 
5,346 
3,456 
2,987 

6,121 

5,780 
6,665 
4,488 
3,976 
3,955 
4,010 
5,764 

4,563 
2,735 
3,599 
7,929 
4,619 
6,806 



6,756 
3,618 
7,899 
6,348 
6,213 
2,276 
4,039 

5,466 
6,114 
6,151 
2,832 
4,464 
4,582 
5,672 
3,509 
4,377 
•6,171 
6,736 
3,774 
7,394 
6,677 



320 
600 
450 

350 

657 

4S8 

1,400 

506 



6 
762 
553 



1,000 
31 

400 



450 
100 



329 

1,078 

1,368 

413 



250 

476 

1,075 

442 
300 
796 
350 
431 
955 
985 
375 
180 
675 
150 
1,036 
800 
608 

900 

300 

1,435 



230 



500 
737 
100 



500 
*i,'566' 



01 


1,900 


1,490 


11 


99 


4,at4 


3,151 


14 


44 


1,606 


1,296 


7 


68 


2,329 


1,651 


7 


72 


2,806 


2,327 


7 


65 


2,673 


2,086 


13 


82 


3,048 


2,123 


18 


94 


3,583 


2,476 


20 


28 


833 


676 


8 


49 


2,111 


1,746 


7 


58 


1,867 


1,635 


5 


64 


2,466 


1,996 


12 


101 


3,571 


2,824 


6 


114 


4,917 


3,541 




76 




2,241 


12 


64 


2,110 


1,973 


8 


66 


2,953 


1,938 


10 


23 


1,310 


962 


3 


95 


4,089 


3,016 


13 


52 


2,585 


1,600 


7 


43 


2,105 


1,545 


8 


133 


4,324 


3,269 


9 


95 


3,359 


2,630 


14 


73 


2,944 


2,459 


9 


70 


2,464 


1,942 


11 


63 


2,483 


2,063 


9 


66 


2,479 


2,140 


10 


51 


2,238 


1,693 


7 


59 


2,340 


2,156 


9 


87 


33 


2,182 


8 


37 


171 


1,178 


3 


85 


m 


2,483 


9 


104 


'98 


3,279 


11 


80 


104 


1,660 


7 


66 


m 


1,974 


10 


30 


M 


1,045 


5 


42 


127 


1,168 


9 


65 


'62 


2,008 


9 


151 


193 


3,702 


14 


105 


;i6 


2,924 


9 


98 


.19 


3,262 


12 


70 


!76 


1,894 


10 


61 


12 




6 


79 


2,874 


2,124 


7 


101 


4,188 


3,115 


7 


109 


4,309 


2,677 


10 


57 


1,800 


1,488 


6 


55 


1,853 


1,408 


6 


89 


3,611 


2,764 


8 


90 


2,948 


2,472 


9 


55 


1,756 


1,085 


4 


87 


2,890 


2,346 


10 


110 


3,815 




14 


75 


2,666 


2,073 


10 


61 


2,052 


1,742 


6 


135 


4,428 


8,431 


9 


93 


3,468 


2,728 


13 



58 


2,330 


115 


4,230 


52 


1,817 


85 


2,015 


69 


2,743 


61 


2,669 


81 


3,300 


94 


3,611 


23 


900 


70 


2,000 


52 


1,876 


59 


2,273 


95 


3,750 


103 


4,460 


81 


3,260 


62 


2,418 


65 


2,925 


24 




127 


3,724 


51 


1,825 


63 


2,520 


131 




84 


3,716 


77 


3,414 


67 


2,835 


61 




75 


2,207 


48 


2,215 


65 


2,690 


95 


2,460 


32 


1,250 


87 


3,730 


116 


3,900 


80 


2,560 


64 


2,600 


82 


1,215 


43 


1,564 


51 


2,763 


124 


4,176 


105 


3,500 


109 


4,171 


62 


3,418 


56 


2,178 


69 


2,898 


85 




103 


3,500 


52 


2,340 


56 


2,000 


88 


3,909 


70 




55 


1,384 


81 


3,100 


118 




84 


2,893 


60 


2,075 


149 


4,500 


102 


6,000 



♦Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



96 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in (fay s<Jiools, 1912-13 — 

Continued. 

QROUF III.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Ck)ntinued. 



Cities. 



1^ 



An 

St 



u to 

3 



10 



Indiana— Continued . 

Peru 

Richmond 

Vincennes 

Iowa: 

Boone 

Burlington 

Fort Dodge 

Iowa City* 

Keokuk 

Marshall town 

Mason City 

Muscatine 

Ottumwa 

Kansas: 

Cofleyville 

Fort Scott 

Hutchinson 

Independence 

Lawrence 

Leavenworth 

Parsons 

Pittsburg* 

Kentucky: 

Frankfort 

Henderson 

O wensboro 

Paducah 

Louisiana: 

Alexandria* 

Monroe 

Maine: 

Auburn 

Augusta* 

Bangor 

WatervUle 

Maryland: 

Frederick* 

Hagerstown 

Massachusetts: 

Adams 

Arlington 

A ttleboro 

Beverly 

ainton 

Framlngham 

Gardner 

Gloucester 

Greenfield 

Leominster 

Marlboro 

Medford 

Mc4rosc , 

Methuen 

Newburypor t* , 

North Adams , 

Northampton 

Peabody 

Plymouth 

Revere 

Southbridge 

Wakefield 

Water town 

Webster 

Westfleld , 

Weymouth 

Winthrop 

Wobum 



6-21 
6-21 
(^-21 

5-17 
5-21 



6-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 

5-21 
6-21 
5-21 
5-21 
6-21 
^21 
6-21 
5-21 

6-21 
&-20 
6-20 
6-20 

6-18 
fr-21 

5-21 
6-21 
5-21 
5-21 



5-15 



5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
6-lo 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-14 



2,747 
6,698 
4,304 

2,634 
6,860 



2,257 
3,641 
3,462 
3,329 
4,055 
6,624 

3,805 
4,300 
4,725 
2,849 



6,519 
3,192 
5,008 

2,294 
3,287 
4,603 
5,792 

2,000 
2,670 

4,839 
3,734 
6,107 
3,701 



2,480 



625 



600 



350 
426 



250 
336 
300 



100 
175 
150 
40 
1,500 
200 
250 

260 
261 
209 
400 

1,610 
460 

65 
550 
889 
713 



434 



400 
78 

604 
23 



240 



585 
550 
175 
395 
337 
800 



2,794 
4,058 
2,347 
2,107 
4,451 
4,426 
1,763 
3,301 
2,450 
4,177 
2,876 
2,654 
2,318 
4,504 
3,193 
2,665 
2,194 
4,208 
1,602 
1.900 
2, 2-^^ 
2,422 
2,959 
2,099 
1,828 
3,248 

♦Statistics for 1911-12. 



1,079 
700 



1,137 



700 

1,550 

359 



46 
110 
73 

67 
126 
74 
67 
66 
77 
74 
89 
164 

87 
61 
94 
49 
71 
84 
61 
70 

68 
68 
77 
91 

31 
43 

84 
69 
135 



60 

77 

68 
75 
80 

138 
65 
72 
69 

140 
71 
85 
68 

141 
78 
63 
60 

112 

100 
76 
62 

124 
34 
77 
65 
35 
95 
65 
61 
75 



1,730 
4,057 
3,071 

2,238 
3,984 
2,484 
1,752 
3,355 
2,758 
2,470 
2,508 
4,666 

3,230 
2,518 
3,586 
1,789 
2,671 
2,795 
2,526 
3,211 

1,774 
2,387 
2,876 
3,921 

1,193 
2,046 

2,029 
2,006 
4,127 
1,801 

1,826 
3,552 

2,097 
2,594 
2,618 
3,916 
2,109 
2,476 
2,016 
4,789 
2,066 
2,501 
2,635 
4,878 
2,813 
2,313 
2,127 
3,476 
2,813 
2,434 
2,283 
4,535 
1,011 
2,322 
2,113 
969 
2,831 
2,432 
2,182 
3,004 



1,365 
3,026 
2,178 

1,884 
3,436 
1,962 
1,437 
1,862 
2,116 
1,937 
2,063 
3,702 

2,639 
1,811 
2,775 
1,379 
2,195 
2,404 
2,061 
2,427 

1,316 
1,777 
1,927 
2,876 

835 
1,766 

1,776 
1,641 
2,984 
1,465 

1,588 
2,782 

1,667 
2,097 
2,296 
3,485 
1,858 
2,131 
1,756 
4,380 
1,734 
2,116 
1,834 
4,285 
2,606 
2,001 



2,793 
2,381 
2,104 
2,050 
3,964 

783 
2,063 
1,731 

786 
2,446 
2,118 
1,853 
2,590 



140 

77 



116 
80 
66 
63 
77 



117 

87 
69 
96 
48 
72 
85 
73 



42 

87 

67 

117 

66 



80 

68 
71 
74 

133 
66 
70 
60 

130 
60 
76 
67 

120 
97 
58 
68 
97 
98 
71 
62 

116 
30 
65 



1,700 
4,800 
3,106 



4,170 



1,810 
2,610 
2,600 
2,555 
2,860 
5,000 

3,230 
2,050 
3,860 
2,000 
2,600 
3,660 



3,600 

2,000 
2,850 
3,376 
3,800 

1,125 



2,797 
2,304 
3,872 
1,964 



1,799 
2,280 



3,150 
6,118 
2,640 
2,863 
2,500 
5,300 
2,100 
2,931 
2,352 
6,610 
3,436 
2,229 
2,200 
3,699 



3,151 
2,350 
5,014 
1,463 
2,756 



1,092 
2,500 
3,000 
2,200 
3,311 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY BOHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



97 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools^ 1912-13 — 

Continued. 

GKOUP III.-€ITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



aues. 



5>? 
|l8 



sl 

=1 

o 



8 



10 



HicmoAN: 

Adrian 

Alpena 

Ann Arbor 

Escanaba 

Holland* 

Ironwood 

Isbpeming* 

Manistee 

Marquette 

Menominee 

Muskegon , 

Port Huron , 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Traverse City 

Minnesota: 

Mankato , 

St. Cloud 

Stmwater , 

Virginia 

Winona 

MississiPFi: 

Hattiesburg , 

Jackson* , 

Meridian , 

Natchez , 

Vicksburg , 

Missouri: 

Hannibal , 

Jefferson C ity 

Sedalia 

Webb City , 

Montana: 

Anaconda 

Great FaUs , 

Missoula , 

Nebraska: 

Grand Island , 

■ Nevada: 

Reno , 

New Hampshire: 

Berlin 

Concord— 
Penaoook district. 
Union district. 

Dover 

Keene 

Laconia 

Portsmouth 

New Jersey: 

Asbiu-y Park , 

Bloomfield 

Bridgeton* 

GarOeld 

Hackensack 

Irvington 

Kearney 

Long Branch 

MniviUe 

Montclair 

MorristowB 

New Brunswick 

North Bergen 

Phniipsburg* 

Platnfield 

Townof Unton 

West New York 

West Orange 



5-20 
5-20 
fr-20 
&-20 
&-20 
5-20 
&-20 
&-20 
&-S0 
6-20 
5-20 
5-20 
5-20 
6-20 

5-16 
6-16 
5-21 
5-21 



6-21 
6-21 
5-21 
6-21 



6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
fr-20 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



5-16 

5-16 
6-16 
5-16 
6-16 
5-16 
6-16 



4-20 
6-18 
3-17 



6-16 
5^26' 



6-20 
7-20 



17727*'— KD 1913— VOL S 



2,500 
3,802 
3,704 
3,656 
3,267 
4,236 
4,041 
3,596 
3,402 
3,482 
6,893 
6,196 
3,792 
2,762 

2,129 
2,113 
1,561 
2,7r3 



4,831 
5,634 
4,992 
6,100 



6,917 
1,647 
5,778 
3,371 

3,429 
4,285 
3,184 

2,870 

2,042 

3,427 

459 
3,274 
2,211 
1,919 
1,603 
2,202 



3,172 
3,007 
3,420 



4,600 



2,517 



2,600 
6,000 



300 
1,100 
400 
744 
500 



500 
1,200 
1,225 
405 
829 
750 



200 
1,066 



1,200 

600 
376 
660 
600 



400 

600 

1,818 

25 

900 
226 
427 

212 

120 

1,800 

2 
810 
960 
326 
642 
500 



644 



220 
600 
246 
693 



164 



1,338 



400 
700 



800 



72 
68 
118 
93 
63 
67 

47 
43 
52 
93 
81 

51 
71 
103 
51 
56 

91 
47 
94 
66 

46 
91 
62 

66 

64 

36 

16 
109 
41 
62 
36 



78 
108 

62 

60 
127 

69 
102 

86 

66 
144 

47 

77 
109 

63 
122 

86 



^Statistics for 1911-12. 
—7 



1,821 
1,868 
2,703 
2,592 
2,375 
2,879 
2,777 
2,063 
2,085 
2,451 
4,768 
3,166 
2,646 
2,493 

1,681 
1,016 
1,610 
2,773 
2,516 

2,878 
3,422 
4,992 
2,231 
2,647 

3,146 
1,647 
3,660 
2,958 

1,490 
3,260 
1,966 

2,378 

1,983 

1,209 

480 
2,890 
1,393 
1,740 
1,196 
1,949 



i39 
M 
38 
179 
156 
61 
«7 
04 
43 
118 
08 
61 
33 
05 

1,312 
889 
1,347 
2,261 
2,121 

1,958 
2,490 
3,344 



1,859 

2,417 
1,268 
2,672 
2,033 

1,196 
2,621 
1,443 

1,802 

1,456 

1,014 

393 
2,327 
1,188 
1,463 

976 
1,610 

i33 
32 
14 
'26 
107 
186 
174 
168 
!81 
137 
;72 
^6 
tl6 
62 
35 
30 
07 



66 
139 
102 

60 



92 



92 

38 
98 
61 

46 
89 
66 

62 

84 

33 

16 
101 
50 
51 
35 
60 

66 
93 
66 
60 
110 
60 



60 
146 
47 
76 
95 



110 
78 
67 
56 



1,826 
2,000 
2,640 
2,736 
2,400 
2,860 
2,600 
2,052 



2,700 
6,385 
3,454 
2,600 
2,142 

1,850 



2,900 
2,600 

2,100 

*3,*826 



3,142 
1,397 
3,600 
2,999 

1,610 
3,390 
2,600 

2,333 

2,500 

1,239 

450 
3,408 
1,671 
1,800 
1,260 
1,995 

2,051 
3,700 
2,667 
2,375 
3,280 
2,784 
3,760 



2,860 
3,769 
1,690 
3,238 
4,080 



3,300 
2,499 
2,300 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



98 



EDUCATION EEPORT, 1913. 



Tablb 5. — Aggregate o/bcHooI census; attendance and personnel in day schoolsy 1912-lS- 

Continued. 

GROUP ni.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION-Ckmtlniied. 



Cities. 



5^ 
|l8 



S-3 



ft 
P 



9 



s 



New Mexico: 

Albuquerque 

New York: 

Batavia 

Cotioes 

Corning 

Cortland 

Dunkirk 

Fulton 

Geneva- 

Gloversvllle 

HomelL 

Hudson 

Ithaca 

Johnstown 

Lackawanna 

Little Falls 

Lockport 

Mlddletown 

North Tonawanda*.. 

Oedensburg 

Olean 

Ossii 

Oswei 

Peekal 
District No. 7.. 
District No. 8.. 

Plattsburg 

Port Chester 

Rensselaer 

Rome* 

Saratoga Springs. 

Watervliet 

White Plains 

North Carouna: 

Asheville 

Durham. 

Raleigh 

Winston-Salem. . . 
North Dakota: 

Fargo 

Grand Forks 

Ohio: 

Alliance 

Ashtabula 

Cambridge 

ChlUicothe 

East Liverpool... 

Elyria 

Ironton 

Lakewood 

Lancaster 

Marietta 

Marion 

Masslllon* 

Middletown* 

Norwood 

Viqua 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

St«ubenville 

Tiffin 

Warren 

Oklahoma: 

Chlckasha 

Enid 



5-21 

5-18 
4-18 
4-18 
4-18 
5-18 
5-18 
5-18 



4-18 
5-18 
5-16 
5-18 
4-17 
6-18 
4-18 
4-18 
6-18 
5-18 
5-18 
5-18 
5-18 

5-18 
5-18 
5-18 
6-18 
5-18 



5-18 



5-18 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 

(V-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
8-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
0-21 

6-21 
8-16 



4,081 

2,543 
5,127 
2,000 
2,243 
5,102 
1,961 
2,729 



1,882 
2,657 
1,915 
2,112 
2,109 
3,853 
2,661 
2,890 
3,099 
4,521 
2,207 
5,850 

1,390 
1,248 
2,839 
3,085 
1,631 



2,322 

3,' 402 

6,674 
5,339 
8,007 



4,097 
4,406 



500 

300 
1,899 



1,318 
"932 



500 
300 
385 



982 
700 
500 
500 
604 



516 

210 

2,724 

310 
80 



285 
629 



240 
'650' 
585 



315 
250 



400 



3,552 


200 


4,000 




3,366 




3,618 


300 


5,743 


300 


3,489 


450 


3,912 


1,514 


4,431 




4,198 


500 


3,698 


830 


5,628 


2,317 


3,899 


400 


3,799 


550 


4,337 


700 


3,456 


465 


7,197 


300 


6,810 


1,200 


6,641 


1,000 


2,912 


620 


3,213 





56 

63 
66 
38 
51 
75 
58 
63 
95 
70 
43 
62 
54 
43 
38 
93 
71 
63 
67 
90 
64 
85 

39 
28 
41 
74 
54 
65 
67 
64 
96 

90 
91 
94 
99 

85 
81 

80 
79 
71 
76 

107 
82 
68 
99 
70 
75 

102 
70 
75 
80 
64 

121 
81 

106 
44 
58 



2,360 

3, 123 691 

♦Statistics for 1911-12. 



2,268 

2,087 
2,216 
1,147 
1,603 
2,926 
2,227 
1,677 
3,407 
2,154 
1,552 
2,617 
1,826 
1,653 
1,334 
3,148 
2,638 
1,820 
1,844 
3,312 
1,699 
3,126 

1,233 
1,187 
1,529 
2,909 
1,631 
2,486 
2,127 
1,957 
3,173 

3,841 
3,390 
3,895 
3,486 

2,543 
2,575 

2,770 
2,908 
2,529 
2,414 
4,473 
2,573 
2,412 
3,419 
2,250 
2,728 
3,782 
2,212 
2,496 
2,479 
2,074 
4,572 
2,796 
3,399 
1,598 
2,500 

2,440 
2,749 



1,670 

1,642 
1,509 
024 
1,410 
2,064 
1,832 
1,306 
2,695 
1,850 
1,258 
2,046 
1,508 
1,187 
1,080 
2,414 
2,201 
1,510 
1,430 
2,737 
1,458 
2,515 

1,016 
913 
1,164 
2,368 
1,294 
2,008 
1,712 
1,580 
2,445 

2,838 
2,537 
3,106 
2,435 

2,120 
2,283 

2,309 
2,498 
2,375 
1,934 
3,655 
2,115 
2,114 
2,766 



2,214 
3,067 
1,927 
2,196 
1,947 



3,590 
2,403 
2,S47 

1,387 
2,285 

1,615 
2,310 



94 



54 
48 
40 
f3 
71 
62 
60 
105 
44 
90 

42 
29 



82 
51 
59 
75 
72 
03 

92 
99 
100 
85 

90 



79 
80 
70 
84 
115 
79 
68 
78 



76 



74 

81 
61 

130 
?3 

112 
44 
60 

59 
65 



10 



2,230 

2,218 
2,500 
1,250 
1,891 
2,529 
2,180 



2,839 
2,590 
1,410 
2,189 
2,317 
1.635 
1,^1 
3,705 
2,429 
2,011 
2,415 
3,680 
l,6fi5 
4,001 

1,568 
1,170 



2,794 
2,126 
2,150 
2,175 
2,150 
3,627 

3,626 
3,390 
3,500 
3,600 

2,537 
3,000 

2,928 
3,000 
3,320 
3,360 
4,600 



2,720 
3,220 



3,449 
3,600 



2,940 
2,822 
2,200 
6,206 
3,082 
3,903 
1,880 
2,864 

3,545 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13, 



99 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools^ 1912-13 — 

Continued 

GROUP III.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Guthrie* 

McAlester 

Shawnee* 

Tulsa 

Oregon: 

Salem 

Pbnnsylvania: 

Beaver Falls... 

Braddock 

Bradford 

Butler 

Carlisle 

Carnegie 

Ch5unbersburg.. 

Columbia 

Connellsville... 

Dubois 

Dunmore 

Duquesne 

Greensburg 

Homestead 

Lebanon 

McKees Rocks. 

MahanoyCity.. 

MeadvlUe 



Mount Carmel 

Nanticoke 

Old Forge 

PhoenixYllle 

Pittston 

Pottstown 

PottsviUe 

Shamokin 

Sharon 

South Bethlehem.. 

South Sharon* 

Steelton 

Sunbury 

UnJontown 

Warren. 

Washington 

Westchester 

Wilkinsburg 

Rhode Island: 

Central Falls 

Cranston 

East Providence... 
South Carolina: 

Spartanburg 

South Dakota: 

Aberdeen 

Sioux Falls 

Tennessee: 

Jackson* , 

Texas: 

Beaumont 

Brownsville* 

Cleburne** 

Denison 

Marshall 

Palestine 

Paris 

San Angelo 

Sherman 

Temple 



&-21 
e-21 
6-21 



4-20 

6-16 
6-U 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
^16 
6-16 
6-21 
6-16 



6-16 
6-21 
6-10 
6-16 
fr-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
fr-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-21 
6-16 
6-16 
6-21 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 

5-17 
6-17 
5-17 

6-21 

8-15 
6-21 

6-21 

7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 



3,089 
2,680 
4,710 



4,733 

1,900 
3,600 
2,592 
3,205 
1,767 
1,720 
2,216 
2,016 
2,796 
2,638 
4,091 



2,309 
2,721 
3,352 
2,338 
3,546 
1,983 
2,508 



3,702 
2,314 



3,484 
2.4S2 
3,725 
4,675 
3,711 
3,475 
1,542 
2,430 
2,378 
2,968 
1,997 
3,442 
1,705 
2,925 

5,638 



3,798 

4,850 

1,227 
4,228 

6,796 

4,792 
2,363 
2,517 
4,013 
3,767 
2,806 



120 

50 

350 



275 

450 
1,825 
200 
800 
100 
280 
65 
300 
490 
450 
750 



850 
401 
1,200 
200 
275 



570 
232 
332 

716 



555 
1,000 

500 

1,115 

45 

500 



50 
240 
300 
240 
275 

3,654 



128 
140 



528 

300 

300 
1,800 
100 
125 
225 



250 



1,891 
3,241 
2,370 

^Statistics for 1911-12. 



90 



70 


2,545 


1,754 


48 


2,338 


1,648 


81 


3,114 


2,274 


110 


4,416 


3,088 


90 


3,172 


2,364 


47 


1,914 


1,520 


67 


2,373 


1,863 


68 


2,473 


1,964 


79 


3,485 


2,823 


42 


1,775 


1,496 


44 


1,512 


1,267 


49 


2,131 


1,737 


47 


1,708 


1,445 


74 


2,808 


2,685 


67 


2,434 


2,358 


77 


3,257 


2,673 


74 


2,426 


2,001 


73 


2,877 


2,223 


71 


2,721 


2,167 


82 


3,068 


2,514 


34 


1,644 


1,073 


55 


2,847 


2,463 


67 


2,139 


1,791 


52 


2,409 


2,000 


54 


2,244 


1,874 


72 


3,702 


3,127 


43 


2,214 


1,761 


42 


1,667 


1,387 


70 


2,688 


2,344 


79 


2,635 


2,211 


76 


3,265 


2,975 


79 


3,635 


2,964 


71 


3,017 


2,339 


60 


2,360 


2,068 


33 


1,449 


1,405 


52 


1,851 


1,661 


61 


2,672 


2,252 


80 


3,168 


2,449 


67 


2,129 


1,815 


105 


3,527 


2,848 


65 


1,703 


1,424 


84 


3,040 


2,853 


62 


1,888 


1,427 


115 


4,405 


3,289 


77 


4,635 


2,558 


70 


4,014 


2,778 


68 


1,964 


1,539 


84 


2,808 


2,314 


74 


3,174 


2,542 


97 


4,089 


3,169 


32 


909 


616 


57 


2,620 


1,864 


68 


2,917 


2,250 


55 


2,547 


1,837 


55 


2,062 


1,522 


84 


3,689 


2,463 


44 


1,686 


1,311 


68 


2,735 


1,920 


63 


2,660 


1,647 



7 


75 


2,450 


9 


48 


2,500 


10 




2,860 


8 


100 


4,500 


9 


101 


3,200 


6 


53 


2,000 


5 


60 


2,400 


9 


63 


2,600 


7 


89 


3,606 


8 


43 


1,800 


3 


41 


1,800 


8 


53 


2,223 


7 


45 


1,760 


7 


84 




6 


73 


3,285 


12 


71 


3,314 


5 


62 


2,480 


9 


63 




7 


71 


2,721 


11 


68 


3,371 


5 


31 


1,710 


5 


55 


2,700 


6 


62 


2,150 


6 


52 


2,410 


7 


56 


2,624 


8 


71 


3,602 


7 


40 


1,700 


5 


61 


2,300 


8 


61 


2,700 


22 


79 


3,060 


12 


64 


3,500 


7 


79 


3,600 


10 


73 


3,400 


6 


59 


2,420 


6 


33 


1,584 


8 


52 


2,665 


9 


64 


2,712 


7 


81 


3,200 


6 


70 


2,664 


8 


94 


3,647 


5 


33 


1,481 


6 


118 


2,940 


10 


58 


2,470 


22 


98 


4,061 


18 


67 


3,188 


8 


70 


3,500 


7 




1,034 


11 
5 


94 


2,980 


9 


96 


4,304 


3 




350 


9 


68 


2,600 


10 


63 


2,760 


7 


48 


2,670 


10 


59 


2,148 


11 


78 


3,600 


7 


65 


1,720 


6 


82 


2,700 


8 


63 


2,370 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



100 



EDUCATION BBPOBTy 1W3. 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school cemus; attendance and personnel in day 9A00U, 191t-lS- 

Continued. 



GROUP in.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Cities. 



Vermont: 

Barre 

Burlington 

Rutland 

Vkoinia: 

Alexandria 

Danville 

NewpOTt News 

Petersburg ♦. . . 

Staunton. 

Washinoton: 

Aberdeen 

Bellingham.... 

Everett 

North Yakima. 

Walla Walla... 
We3t Virginia: 

Bluefield 

Charleston 

Martinsburg. . . 

Parkersburg ♦. 
Wisconsin: 

Apploton 

Ashland 

Beloit 

Eau Claire 

Fond du Lac.. 

Janes ville ♦ 

Kenosha 

Ifanitowoc.... 

Marinette 

Wausau 

Wyoming: 

Cheyenne 



^18 
5-18 
7-18 

7-20 
7-20 
7-21 
7-20 
7-20 

6-21 
5-21 
&-20 
6-21 
6-21 

fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

4-20 
4-20 
4-19 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
7-20 
4-20 
4-20 

6-21 



2,601 
4,467 
3,188 

3,650 
4,490 
4,073 
6,708 
1,930 

2,336 
6,603 
6,607 
3,638 
3,731 

3,090 
7,351 
2,572 
6,170 

6,712 
2,166 
4,073 
6,079 
6,149 
3,737 
6,915 
4,908 
6,304 
6,183 

3,295 



20 

1,100 

714 

276 
250 
392 
600 
275 

100 



332 
440 



255 
60 

1,651 
1,000 



673 
300 
1,400 
1,137 
856 
800 

250 



66 
98 
63 

38 
174 
93 
79 
33 

67 
142 
138 
110 

77 

66 
135 

47 
120 

106 
77 
89 

108 

113 
76 

107 
74 
68 

112 



2,539 
3,066 
2,261 

1,985 
3,174 
3,628 
3,723 
1,286 

1,842 
4,897 
4,582 
3,167 
2,735 

2,254 

6,430 
1,628 
3,971 

2,784 
2,021 
3,684 
3,33'' 
3,316 
2,480 
3,767 
2,089 
2,961 
3,865 

2,133 



2,213 
2,344 
1,949 

1,647 
2,410 
2,737 
3,120 
1,038 

1,425 
3,665 
3,606 
2,472 
2,163 

1,602 
4,080 
1,270 
3,410 

2,309 
1,788 
2,870 
3,007 
3,124 
2,003 
2,818 
1,913 
2,301 
2,806 

1,608 



o 
o 

Am 



9 



44 
150 
133 
106 



67 
128 
46 



100 
76 
73 

116 
88 
76 
90 
60 
65 
92 

58 



GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION. 



Alabama: 
Dothan* 


7-21 
7 21 
7-21 
7-21 
7 21 
7-21 

6-21 
^21 
6-21 
6^21 

6-21 
0-21 
6-21 
6^21 


1,009 
2,141 
2,131 
1,774 
2,032 
3,498 


150 
400 
220 

25* 

244 
35 
29 

""sio* 

237 
200 


20 
21 
26 
27 
18 
36 

39 

% 

23 

28 
32 
17 
41 

55 
18 
36 
39 
45 
31 
27 
79 
51 


688 

1,004 
1,230 
1,344 
828 
1,487 

1,877 

2,038 

985 

759 

1,492 
1,821 
1,000 
1,701 

1,519 

506 

1,214 

1,108 

1,850 

920 

921 

2,800 

1,807 


661 

"*"*927* 

484 
989 

1,162 

1,476 

822 

487 

940 

1,500 

911 


3 
4 
4 
7 
4 
6 


45 
20 
30 
26 
18 
39 


800 


Florence ♦ 


900 


Hunts ville 




New Decatur 


1 240 


Talladega 


'828 
1,396 


Tuscaloosa 


Arizona: 
Blsbee 


Douglas ♦ 


2,304 

1,257 

948 

3,400 
3,055 
1,077 
3,700 



6 
3 

4 
5 
3 






Olobe 


26 
28 

34 

36 
18 


1,066 


Prescott 


Arkansas: 
Helena 


1,256 
1,800 
1,000 


Jonesboro 


Paragould 


Texarkana* 


California: 
Alham bra 


1,182 
'480 

1,023 
923 

1,541 
758 
703 

2,212 

1,500 


9 

4 
6 
6 
7 
3 
6 
12 
7 


67 
35 
33 




Marvsville* 






102 


........ 


I^apa 







800 
1,250 


Petaluma * 






200 


Kichmond 

Pan l-uis Obispo 








48 
31 
48 
86 
70 


2,150 


San Rafael \ 










Santa Ana 








i.iso 


Santa Rosa...., 


.... 






3,476 



* StatisUcs for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 19lf^,.-. 101 

• .'. • 
• .-. 

Table 5. — Aggregate ofechool cennu; atUndanee and personrul iii dmie^iooU, 191t-lS~^ 

Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OP 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION-Coifthjtted. 



Cities. 



S^ 



li 



It 

Ah 



;^2 



10 



Colorado: 

Boulder 

Canon City 

Cripple Creek...., 

FortCdUns 

Grand Junction... 

Greeley* 

LeadvUle 

Connecticut: 

Branford 

Derby. 

East Hartford.... 

Enfield* 

Fairfield 

Groton* 

Huntington 

Killingly 

NewMilford 

Plalnfield 

Plymouth 

Putnam 

Southington 

Stafford 

Stonington 

Stratford 

Winchester 

Florida: 

Gainesville 

Lakeaty^ 

Oeoroia: 

Albany 

Americus 

Balton* 

Dublin 

Elberton 

Fitsgerald 

Gainesville 

Griffin* 

lAgrange 

Marietta 

Newnan 

Valdosta 

Idaho: 

Lewiston 

Pocatelk) 

Twin Falls 

Illinois: 

Beardstown 

Belvidere 

Berwyn 

Carbondale 

Centralia* 

Qiarleston 

Clinton 

ColllnsviUe* , 

DeKalb 

Dixon — 

North side 

South side 

Duquoln 

Edwardsville..... 

Forest Park 

Granite City 

Harvey 

Herrin* 

Kewanee 

La Grange. 



6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
&-21 
6-21 
fr-21 



4-16 
4-16 
4-10 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
6-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 
4-16 

6-18 
6-21 

6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
fr-18 
^18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6.21 

-21 
6-21 
6-21 

-21 
5-21 



6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



3,610 
1,358 
3,537 
2,286 
2,130 
2,200 
2,117 

1,424 

2,109 
2,069 
2,159 
1,660 
1,444 
1,649 
1,117 
1,190 
1,500 
1,123 
1,426 
1,682 
1,0G8 
2,198 
1,676 
1,880 

675 
490 

2,036 
2,394 
1,912 
930 
1,117 
1,498 
1,860 



2,233 
1,467 
1,593 
2,464 



2,221 
1,709 

1,686 
2,716 
2,562 
2,467 
2,929 
2,389 
1,553 



2,458 

717 
1,793 
2,271 
1,804 
8.384 
4,468 
2,726 
2,115 
3,310 
2,133 



156 
60 
80 



75 
'366' 



687 
32 
434 



22 

46 
219 

35 

176 

6 

613 



200 

287 

29 

661 

90 
70 



150 
12 
65 



13 
150 



250 
40 
20 



226 
23 



42 
213 



274 



22 
600 
194 
210 
236 
843 



419 
208 



35 
26 
32 
26 
28 
31 
35 
41 
25 
29 
32 

41 I 
64 



2,268 
1,040 
2,493 
2,189 
2,430 
1,760 
1,460 

1,327 
1,065 
2,053 
1,468 
1,394 
1,263 
1,394 
1,032 
1,046 
1,27« 
1,057 

938 
1,636 

775 
1,804 
1,493 
1,026 

781 
490 



1,601 
1,079 
872 
782 
1,484 
1,454 
1,328 
1,480 
1,197 
1,322 
1,566 

1,127 
1,516 
1,760 

1,389 
1,406 
1,258 

850 
1,934 

989 
1,324 
1,350 
1,393 

608 
756 
1,141 
1,228 
1,261 
1,936 
1,144 
1,»46 
2,214 
1,447 



1,858 


9 


810 


6 


1,957 


16 


1,616 


6 


2,026 


9 


1,671 


8 


1,193 


7 


987 


9 


987 


4 


1,666 


13 


1,194 


13 


1,245 


10 


907 


12 


1,173 


6 


760 


12 


818 


16 


1,034 


12 


814 


8 


688 


7 


1,310 


13 


697 


12 


1,464 


10 


1,177 


6 


852 


6 



361 



l,3<i8 

847 

662 

626 

1,026 

1,210 

1,084 

1,148 

800 

1,038 

1,421 

806 
1,265 
1,367 

1,181 
1,322 
1.100 



1,649 

821 

1,083 



1,140 

424 

638 

863 

996 

1,050 

1,428 

934 

1,402 

1,950 

1,069 



77 
38 
102 



27 

ao 

29 
32 
40 
41 
30 
30 
32 

SO 
41 
65 

I 
40 I 

37 I 



42 [ 

24 

40 

40 

29^ 

14 I 
35 1 
32 i 

34| 
26 ' 
42 I 
26 I 
32 I 
80 
42 I 



3,060 
1,129 
2,500 



2,160 



1,767 

1,166 
1,167 
1,933 
1,600 
1,300 
1,464 
1,422 
1,307 
1,160 
1.566 
1,142 
1,395 
1,443 
810 
1.866 
1,460 
1,170 

755 
401 



1,700 



960 
800 
1,100 
1.600 
1,600 
1,500 
1,650 
1,400 
1,000 

1,200 
1,625 
1,860 

1,400 
1,875 
1,176 



1,964 
1,140 
1,500 
1.620 
1,026 



1,634 
1,096 
1,300 
1,227 
1,960 
1.200 
1,606 
3,624 
1,676 



* StatiBUcs for lOU-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 



.•.''•':M>'uCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 5. — Aggregale^of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools , IBH-IS — 
•, %, ' Continued. 

QR4»IJ> IV.-CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Illinois — Cou i.ui uou . 

Litchfield 

Hacomb<* 

Madison 

Marion 

Maywood * 

Monmouth 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Vernon 

Murphysboro 

Olney 

Ottawa 

Pana 

Paris 

Pekin 

Peru 

Pontiac 

Spring Valley 

Staunton 

Steriing— 

District No. 8 

DistrictNo.il.... 
TaylorviUe— 

East side 

West side 

Urbana 

INDLA.NA: 

Alexandria 

Bedford 

Bloom ington 

Brazil 1 . 

Clinton 

Columbus 

ConnersviUe 

Ciawfordsville 

Frankfort 

Qoshen 

Oreensburg 

Hartford City ♦ 

Lebanon 

Linton** 

Madison 

Mount Vernon* 

Newcastle 

Noblesville 

Portland 

Princeton 

Seymour 

Shelby vUle 

Valparaiso 

Wabash 

Washington 

Whiting 

Iowa: 

Cedar Falls 

Centerville 

CJiarlesCity 

Creston 

Grinnell 

Oelwein 

Oskaloosa 

Kansas: 

Arkansas City 

Chanute 

Emporia 

Galena 

lola, 



6-21 
5-21 

-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

-21 



-21 
-21 
6-21 
-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
5-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
5-21 
5-21 

5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
6-21 
5-21 



2,219 
1,400 
2,809 
2,280 
4,132 
2,671 
2,750 



3,435 
1,940 
3,090 
3,402 
2,173 
3,184 
2,636 



3,640 
1,995 

953 
1,102 

1,114 

995 

2,616 

1,419 
3,054 
2,708 
2,930 
2,253 
2,319 
1,915 
2,177 
2,478 
1,894 
1,397 
1,916 
1,399 
1,885 
2,077 
1,805 
1,783 
1,164 



1,870 
1,401 
2,496 
1,667 
2,195 
2,361 
1,946 



2,295 
1,596 
1,950 
1,461 
1,746 
3,815 



2>» 



200 

210 

60 



654 



150 



350 

74 

625 



98 
75 
900 
200 
350 
613 

16 



90 



134 
100 



200 
275 
400 
200 
79 



75 
76 
100 



90 
220 
207 



100 
600 
125 
145 



250 
782 



65 



150 
70 



18 



2,252 
2,757 
2,916 
1,939 
2,637 

* Statistics for 1911-12. 



250 
46 
20 



1,886 


1,804 


7 


39 


2,591 


1,926 


9 


66 


1,806 


1,482 


6 


38 


1,447 


1,154 


7 


30 


2,091 


1,529 


4 


40 


1,647 


1,302 


5 


39 


1,219 


1,070 


2 


23 


1,532 


1,273 


5 


48 


1,310 


1,081 


6 


28 


1,717 


1,438 


6 


66 


2,106 


1,885 


8 


66 


643 


600 


4 


24 


829 


656 


4 


28 


1,489 


1,397 


4 


31 


844 


748 


3 


18 


444 


323 


2 


12 


806 


642 


a 


24 


870 




2 


24 


638 


490 


2 


16 


2,001 


1,658 


6 


60 


890 


784 


4 


24 


1,935 


1,557 


5 


62 


2,103 


1,780 


6 


67 


2,104 


1,661 


7 


68 


1,529 


1,325 


6 


36 


1,859 


1,498 


7 


63 


1,397 


1,083 


4 


40 


1,946 


1,554 


8 


59 


2,002 


1,636 


6 


66 


1,519 


1,386 


8 


60 


1.087 


878 


3 


32 


1,454 


1,253 


6 


44 


1,250 


1,117 


4 


41 


1,436 


1,130 


4 


33 


1,200 


990 


5 


42 


1,201 


1,048 


6 


46 


1,834 


1,591 


6 


53 


994 


861 


4 


35 


1,194 


995 


4 


36 


1,452 


1,150 


6 


43 


1,227 


943 


6 


35 


2,036 


1,556 


8 


79 


1,010 


947 


3 


36 


1,814 


1,445 


6 


65 


1,300 




4 


75 


902 


7i5 


6 


41 


1,093 


993 


6 


29 


1,695 


1,391 


6 


50 


1,324 


1,180 


6 


40 


1,611 


1,316 


6 


49 


1,247 


1,065 


6 


41 


1,061 


867 


4 


28 


2,111 


1,694 


6 


65 


1. S15 


1,478 


7 


51 


2,247 


1,874 


6 


50 


1,883 


1,471 


8 


52 


1,455 




6 


39 


2,171 


i,747 


7 


61 



1,975 
2,493 
2,129 
1,460 
2,400 
1,668 
1,200 
1,824 
1,310 
1,843 
2,435 
900 
780 

'"'sso 

458 



700 

600 

1,900 

895 
1,944 
2,016 
2,000 
1,700 
2,000 
1,278 
2,000 
2,064 
2,235 
1,094 

"i,'846 
1,800 
1,400 
1,201 
2,360 
1,240 
1,250 
1,500 
1.300 
2,370 
1,052 

*i,'566 
1,322 

1,140 

"i,202 

*i,'244 
1,060 
2,600 

1.900 
2,247 
2,340 
1,500 
2,080 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. ' 



103 



Tablb 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools^ 1912-tS- 

CoQtinued. 

OBOUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION-Continued. 



Citted. 



5^ 

all 



B 

il 
a 






«3 



•I 
a- 

S 



10 



Kansas— CoDtlnaed . 

JtmctJcm City 

Manhattan** 

Newton 

Ottawa. 

Salina 

Wellington 

Wlnfield 

Kentucky: 

Ashland 

Bellevue 

Bowling Green 

Danville 

Dayton 

HopkinsTille 

MayfleW 

M^vflle 

Paris 

Ridimond 

Winchester 

Louisiana: 

Houma 

Morgan City 

New Iberia* 

Maine: 

Bath 

Brewer 

Brunswick 

Calais 

Gardiner 

HoulUm 

Presquelsle 

Rockland 

Romford 

8aoo 

Sanlord 

Skowhegan 

South Portland 

Mabtland: 

Annapolis 

Frostourg 

Massachusetts: 

Abington 

AmesDury 

Amherst 

Andover 

Athol 

Belmont 

Blackstone* 

Braintree 

Bridgewater 

Chelmsford 

Concord 

Dan vers 

Dedham 

Easthampton 

Easton 

Fairhaven 

Franklin 

Grafton 

Great Barrington *. 

Hudson 

Ipswich* 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Maynard 

Middlebofo 



5-21 
5-21 



5-21 



5-21 
5-21 

6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
7-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
fr-20 
6-20 

6-18 
6-18 
6-18 

5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
5-21 
6-21 



6-21 

5-15 
5-16 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
5-15 
7-14 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
6-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-16 



1,989 
1,784 
2,188 
2,314 



1,700 
2,010 

2,307 
1,821 
2,256 
778 
2,100 
1,667 
1,565 
1,688 
2,059 
1,506 
1,946 

1,410 

*2,'875' 



2,705 
1,707 
2,121 
2,232 



2,026 



1,696 
1,764 
3,191 
1,728 
2,167 

7,428 
1,000 



125 

95 

200 



40 

340 
400 
199 
110 
200 



65 
175 
110 
200 
180 

200 



250 

112 

19 
499 
108 



80 

2 

5 

144 

76 

600 



360 



789 




1,442 


646 


829 




1,288 


760 


1,557 




1,066 


8 


950 




1,618 




648 




994 


20 


991 


40 


1,019 


16 


1,788 


100 


1,411 


376 


887 




1,102 


240 


1,055 




8S4 


io 


1,039 


35 


1,043 


12 


844 


6 


857 




1,340 


18 


832 




1,356 





63 
33 
48 
63 
42 
36 
64 
42 
42 
34 
48 
39 
57 

27 
20 

33 
32 
26 
45 
44 
35 
34 
63 
36 
33 
41 
48 
64 
35 
43 
36 
39 
25 
43 
32 
26 
31 
35 
30 
44 

* Statistics for 1911-12. 



1,197 
1,301 
1,651 
1,634 
2,074 
1,144 
1,716 

1,840 

875 

1,758 

574 

069 

1,301 

1,139 

1,071 

1,156 

1,260 

1,339 

910 

600 

1,800 

1,822 
1,138 
1,151 
1,377 
1,043 
1.300 
1,252 
1,380 
1,177 
840 
1,271 
1,063 
1,492 

7,428 
1,300 

1,002 
848 
♦994 
1,306 
1,536 
1,152 
1,116 
1,640 
1,052 
1,010 
1,207 
1,662 
1,991 
1,238 
1,087 
1,014 
1,131 
902 
1,208 
1,047 
834 
1,008 
1,568 
1,061 
1,625 



1,146 
1,004 
1,355 
1,335 
1,690 
944 
1,451 

1,440 
659 

1,213 
402 
750 
962 

1,048 
840 
921 
970 

1,095 

800 

670 

1,490 

1,600 
940 
812 

1,093 
755 



976 
1,192 
1,016 

772 
1,065 

903 
1,159 

4,768 
1,057 

987 

752 

*877 

1,112 

1,300 

962 



1,518 

890 

821 

1,062 

1,491 

1,742 

1,043 

990 

814 

1,006 

756 



946 

767 

886 

1,233 



1,313 



1,350 
1,300 
1,420 



2,245 



1,776 

1,875 
925 
1,790 
600 
1,100 
1,360 
1,150 
1,450 
1,200 
1,250 
1,296 

900 

020 



2,000 
1,362 
1,616 
1,744 
1,216 
1,500 
1,600 
1,470 
1,461 
900 
1,624 
1,147 
1,450 



1,176 

1,132 
1,037 
1,000 



1,800 
1,384 
1,400 
1,830 
1,680 
1,176 
1,396 
1,680 
2,600 
1,238 
1,385 
1,025 
1,150 
1,025 
1,350 



900 
1,171 
1,645 
1,160 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



104 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



Tablb 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in dag schools, lOlt-lS — 

Continued. 

OROUP IV— CITIB8 OP 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Contlnaed. 



Cities. 



< 



!• 



Ma8sachusbtt»— Continued. 

liUton. 

Montague 

Naticic 

Needham 

Nortli Andover 

NorthAttleboro 

Nortlibrldge 

Orange* , 

I*almer 

Heading* , 

Rockland 

8augus 

Stoneham 

Stoughton 

Swampsoott 

Ware 

Westboro 

West Springfleld 

Whitman 

W inchendon , 

Winchester 

Michioan: 

Albion 

Benton Harbor 

BoyneCity 

Cadillac 



5-16 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
5-15 
6-15 
^16 
6-15 
6-15 
^15 
^16 



Cheboygan . 



Coldwati.. 

Dowagiao ♦..._. 

Grand Haven.... 

Hancock 

Hillsdale 

Houghton 

Ionia , 

Iron Mountain.., 

Ludington 

Monroe 

Mount Clemens.. 

Negaunee 

Niles 

Owosso 

St. Joseph 

Three K I vera..., 

Wyandotte*.... 

Ypsllanti 

Minnesota: 

Albert Lea 

Austin 

Bemldii , 

Chisholm * , 

Cloquet 

Crooks ton 

Eveleth 

Fergus Falls 

Hlbbing 

LitUeFaUs*.... 

New Ulm 

Owatonna 

Red Wing* 

Rochester * 

Mississippi: 

BUoxi* 

Brookhaven*..., 

Columbus 

Greenville 

Greenwood * 



5-16 

5-20 
6-20 
5-20 
5-20 
6-20 
6-20 



7-16 
6-19 
6-20 
6-20 
5-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
5-20 
6-20 
6-20 
^20 
5-20 
5-20 
6-20 
6-20 

6-18 
6-21 
(^16 
6-16 
fr-18 
6-21 
6-16 
6-16 
4-16 
6-16 
fr-16 
6-16 



6-21 



6-21 
6-18 
5-21 
6-21 



1,260 
1,180 
1,608 
066 
W7 
1^480 
1,702 



818 

998 
1,097 
1,703 
1,121 
1,089 

946 
1,685 

605 
1,841 
1,200 



1,753 

1,503 
2,418 



2,524 
2,225 
1,267 



2,635 
1,450 
2,785 
1,222 
3,175 
2,758 
1,999 
2,385 
3,137 
1,270 
2,548 
1,720 
1,069 
2,525 
1,614 

1,340 
1,600 
1,100 
1,244 
1,531 
1,327 
1,517 
1,014 
1,521 
1,619 
1,223 
959 



1,364 



150 
200 



40 



257 



200 



110 



17 



20 



125 

448 
96 



118 



250 



525 
575 
800 
300 



270 
200 



950 
310 



100 
350 



260 
460 



300 

700 

9 



300 



920 95 

2,200 112 

3,510 200 
1,857 

*8tati8tils for 1911-12. 



1,490 
1,199 
1,912 
1,073 
1,031 
1,657 
1,785 
1,037 
1,588 
1,210 
1,190 
1,833 
1,115 

975 
1,^8 
1,292 

719 
2,022 
1,387 
1,057 
1,931 

1,340 
2,166 
1,477 
2,331 
1,261 
1,190 
1,280 
1,327 
1,631 
1,127 
2,052 
1,061 
2,595 
1,761 
1,000 
1,229 
1,649 
1,063 
1,938 
1,044 
1,056 
1,160 
1,106 

1,627 
1,391 
1,219 
1,345 
1,271 
1,599 
1,878 
1,354 
2,758 
1,319 
828 
1,287 
1,515 
1,364 

1,408 
736 
2,200 
2,159 
1,230 



1,031 
1,729 

968 

896 
1,401 
1,550 

948 
1,406 
1,031 
1,094 
1,641 

957 

905 
1,092 
1,214 

634 
1,857 
1,258 

929 
1,631 

1,014 

1,706 

1,166 

1,692 

1,049 

990 

1,064 

1,079 

1,430 

966 

1,695 

847 

2,253 

1,524 

864 

962 

1,393 

907 

1,785 

892 

974 

816 

875 

1,280 



950 
1,118 
1,130 
1,399 
1,719 
1,138 
2,064 
1,125 
710 
961 
1,327 
1,241 

976 



1,760 

1,357 

876 



4 

11 
7 
9 

10 

5 
6 
4 
7 
8 
4 
3 
5 
4 
6 
14 
6 
9 
7 
6 
6 
8 



45 



47 



1,360 
1,038 
1,625 
2,150 



1,673 

*i,*466 



1,200 
1,181 
1,401 
1,300 
772 
2,300 
1,325 



2,070 

1,311 
1,966 
1,459 
2,280 
1,482 
1,181 
1,250 
1,250 
1,720 
1,175 
2,549 
950 
2,962 
1,850 
1,100 
1,209 
1,697 
1,150 
1,600 
1,200 
1,030 
1,228 
1,210 

1,600 
1,400 
1,175 
1,420 
1,580 
2,160 
1,796 
1,400 
2,861 
1,409 
900 
1,145 
1,600 
1,500 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY 80H00L SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



105 



Tablb 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools ^ 1912-lS—' 

Continued. 

GROUP IV— CITIES OP 6,000 TO 10,000 PQPULATION-OaatlmMd. 



Cities. 



11 

P 



10 



FPi— Continued. 

Golfport* , 

Laurel 

McComb 

Yazoo City 

Missouri: 

Brookfield , 

Cape Girardeau , 

Carthage 

ChiUloothe* 

Columbia 

Flat River 

Fulton 

Independence 

Kirksville 

Lexington 

Mexico* 

Nevada , 

Poplar Bluff 

Trenton , 

Webster Groves , 

Wells ton 

Montana: 

Bozeman 

Kalispell 

Livingston 

Nebraska: 

Beatrice 

Columbus 

Fairbury 

Fremont* 

Hastings* 

Kearney 

Nebraska City 

Norfolk 

York 

New Hampshire: 

Claremont 

l>erry 

Franklin 

Lebanon 

Roches to* 

Somersworth 

New Jersey: 

Dover 

Englewood 

Guttenberg , 

Hammonton , 

Nutley 

Princeton 

Rah way* ,... 

Ridgewood , 

Rutlierford 

Salem , 

Somervillp 

South Amboy 

South Orange , 

Vlneland 

Westficld 

New Mexico: 

Roswell* 

SanUFe* 

New York: 

Albion 

Canandaigua 

CatskUl 

Fredonia 

Havorstraw 



6-21 
5-21 
6-21 

6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 

6-20 
<^20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 
6-20 

6-21 
-21 
1-21 

6-21 
6-21 
5-21 
6-21 
5-21 
6-13 
5-21 
6-21 
5-21 

6-16 
&-U 
6-16 
5-16 
6-16 
5-16 



7-16 



4-19 
6-20 
7-17 



4-18 
4-20 
4-20 
6-20 



J. 



6-21 
6-21 

6-18 
4-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 



4,268 
3,260 
2,742 



2,200 
3,014 
1,904 
2,282 
1,177 
1,051 
2,704 
1,667 
2,076 
1,600 
2,440 
2,298 
1,416 
2,265 
1,796 

1,739 
2,220 
1,346 

2,648 
1,870 
1,466 
2,700 
2,932 
2,067 
1,827 
1,909 
1,568 

1,291 
794 

1,328 
870 

1,678 
652 



1,427 



1,651 
1,177 
1,308 



1,647 



1,650 
762 



2,367 

1,179 
1,471 
1,140 
1,361 
1,430 



400 



226 
150 



600 
40 
150 
130 



30 
125 
125 

45 

50 
115 

60 



255 



1,196 

100 
250 



40 
180 



60 
160 
105 

330 
12 
464 
425 
360 
680 



3H7 
260 



50 

289 

160 

50 

17 



25 

1,054 

450 

24 



300 
600 



275 



507 



25 



1,413 
2,951 
1,672 
1,372 

79 
12 
18 
34 
53 
50 
21 
28 
08 
75 
81 
64 
81 
70 
28 
95 

1,136 
1,117 
1,002 

2,075 
1,100 
1,348 
2,105 
2,199 
1,788 
1,308 
1,909 
1,193 

1,089 
849 
826 
832 

1,382 
684 

1,808 
2,105 
1,201 
1,442 
1,332 
901 



61 


1,606 


46 


1,459 


63 


1,726 


42 


1,400 


36 


1,300 


24 


762 


45 


1,492 


67 


2,709 


48 


1,586 


30 


1,839 


16 


508 


35 


1,062 


41 


1,207 


29 


810 


26 


781 


26 


927 



1,013 
1,922 
1,350 
1,210 

982 
1,074 
1,733 
1,005 
1,674 

865 

737 
1,849 

986 
1,070 
1,017 
1,368 
1,585 
1,077 
1,354 

900 



780 

1,786 
960 
1,046 
1,626 
1,708 
1,309 
1,035 
1,166 
1,009 

927 
642 
664 
628 
1,191 
630 

1,506 
1,682 
1,009 
1,008 
1,205 
680 
1,340 
1,165 
1,405 



1,011 
594 
1,214 
2,107 
1,274 

1,337 
340 

815 
911 
606 
605 
770 



1,600 
2,250 
1,800 
1,500 

1,400 
1,600 
2,304 
1,600 
2,106 
1,110 
900 
2,400 
1,200 
1,600 
1,760 
2,000 
1,850 
1,400 
1,500 
1,000 

1,120 
1,200 



2,240 
1,200 
1,368 
2,048 



1,900 
1,400 
1,502 



1,300 

914 

860 

946 

1,800 

1,000 

1,703 
2,030 
1,294 
1,450 
1,700 
1,050 
1,641 
1,740 
1,934 
1,500 
1,400 
780 
1,392 
2,800 
1,679 

2,100 
500 

1,000 

1,668 

762 

800 

1,086 



* Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Ta ble 5. — Aggregate o/school census; attendance and personnel in day schools^ 1912-13- 

Continued. 



GROUP IV.— CITIES OP 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Cities. 



O M 



10 



New Yobk— Continued. 

Herkimer ♦ 

Hoosick Falls 

Hudson Falls 

nion 

Malone 

Mamaroneck 

Matteawan* 

MechanicsTiUe 

Medina 

Newark 

North Tarry town 

Norwich 

Oneida 

Oneonta. 

PortJervis 

Salamanca 

Seneca Falls 

Bolvay 

Tarrytown 

Tcmawanda 

North Carolina: 

Concord 

EliMbethCity 

Qastonia 

Ooldsboro* 

HighPohit* 

Klnston* 

Newborn 

Rocky Mount ♦ 

Salisbury 

Washington* 

Wilson 

North Dakota: 

Bismarck 

Devils Lake 

Minot 

Ohio: 

Athens 

Barberton 

Bellcfontaine 

Bellevue. . ., 

Bowling Green 

Bucyrus 

Canal Dover 

Clrclevlllo 

Conneaut 

Coshocton 

Defiance ♦ 

Delaware 

Delpbos 

East Cleveland 

Fostoria 

Fremont* 

Gallon 

Galllpolls 

Greenville 

Jackson 

Martins Ferry 

Mount Vernon* 

NclsonvUle 

New Philadelphia 

NUes 

Painesvllle. 

Bavenna 

et. Bernard 

St. Marys. 



fr-18 
6-18 
6-16 
6-17 



6-18 
6-18 
&-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 
6-18 



4-18 
6-18 
&-18 
6-18 
4-18 
7-16 
6-18 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
e-21 
e-21 

e-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
e-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



1,667 
1,060 
1,148 
1,318 



1,412 
967 
1,726 
1,235 
975 
1,112 
1,320 



1,844 
2,004 
1,867 
1,136 



908 
1,911 

2,708 



2,764 
8,105 
3,142 
2,487 
2,759 
2,536 
2,053 
2,030 
2,309 

1,211 
1,042 
1,571 

1,429 
2,490 
2,031 
1,381 
1,286 
2,168 
2,067 
1,762 
2,117 
2,434 
2,245 
2,207 



2,551 
3,174 



1,639 



1,923 
1,421 
2,887 
1,997 
2,011 
2,440 
2,592 
1,310 
1,3S2 
1,775 
1,614 



65 
142 

80 
110 



250 



350 



381 
112 



225 
200 



125 
'120 



200 
200 



100 
85 
12 
165 
200 
200 
268 
125 
325 
225 
170 
140 
250 
450 
150 



41 



200 
250 



110 
250 
80 
125 
800 
210 



1,457 


1,171 


925 


738 


1,212 


994 


1,549 


1,132 


1,578 


1,234 


1,251 


888 


743 


610 


1,649 


1,269 


851 


721 


1,037 


795 


956 


662 


1,639 


1,291 


1,406 


1,220 


1,555 


1,162 


1,857 


1,504 


1,443 


1,120 


870 


617 


1,229 


989 


659 


657 


1,676 


1,228 


1,664 


1,217 


1,741 


1,280 


1,800 


1,137 


1,828 


1,133 


1,725 


1,432 


1,557 




1,682 


1,178 


1,523 


1,266 


1,689 


1,216 


1,239 


951 


1,630 


1,050 



934 

900 

1,334 

1,111 

1,757 

1,500 

1,074 

1,033 

1,496 

1,239 

1,306 

1,619 

1,673 

928 

1,706 

688 

2,153 

1,728 

1,552 

1,387 

980 

1,305 

1,262 

2,027 

1,759 

1,464 

1,840 

1,663 

943 

944 

506 

1,069 



604 



1,081 

1,014 
1,521 
1,291 



1,327 
1,051 
1,048 
1,281 



913 

1,457 

647 

1,839 

1,432 

1,305 

1,126 

852 

1,041 

1,021 

1,870 

1,548 

1,399 

1,568 

1,351 

900 

851 

560 

1,013 



46 



♦^tatiaUcs for 1911-12. 



1,660 
1,306 



652 
1,939 
1,650 

700 
1,680 

854 
1,120 

894 
1,680 
1,410 



2,205 
1,675 
972 
1,331 
1,609 
1«550 



31 
35 


1,240 


12 


927 


86* 


1,036 
1,070 



1,468 
1,103 
1,650 

800 

963 

1,300 

1,88S 
2,000 
1,673 
1,225 



1,487 
1,400 
1,504 
1,482 
2,278 



1,900 
1,000 
2,260 
2,000 



1,225 
1,410 
2,080 



1,940 
2,073 
1,784 
2,150 
1,640 
1,400 
920 
650 
1,160 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



107 



Table 5. — AggregaU of school cemus; attendance and personnel in day schools, 1912-13 — 

Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OP 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Cities. 





3 

5z; 



10 



Ohio— Continued. 

Salem 

Sidney 

Troy 

Urbana 

Van Wert 

Wapakoneta 

Washington Court Bouse. 

WeUston , 

WellsviUe 

Wooster 

Xenia 

Oklahoma: 

Ardmore 

Bartlesville 

Duranf* 

ElReno 

Lawton* 

Sapulpa 

Oregon: 

Ashland 

Astoria 

Baker City 

Eugene 

Pbnnstlvanu: 

Ambrldge 

Aahland. 

Ashley 

Bangor 

Bellevue* 

Berwick , 

Blakely 

Bloomsburg 

Bristol 

Carrick 

Catasauqua 

Charleroi 

Clearfield 

Coaldale 

Conshohocken , 

Coraopolls 

Corry* 

Danville , 

Darby 

Dickson City 

Donora 

Duryea , 

East Conemaugh 

East Pittsburgh ♦ 

EdwardsviUe 

Forest City 

Freeland 

Oilberton* 

Olassport 

Greenville 

Hanover 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jeannette 

Jersey Shore 

Juniata 

Kane 

Kingston 

Lansford 

Larksville* 

Latrobe 

Lehighton 



6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
fr-21 
fr-21 
6-21 
6-21 

4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-21 

8-16 
6-16 
»-ld 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-21 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 
6-21 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
6-16 
8-14 
8-16 



2,442 
1,766 
1,507 
1,778 
1,774 
1,570 
2,488 
2,042 
1,904 
2,067 
2,519 

2,412 
2,429 
1,741 
2,000 



1,570 

1,392 
3,r05 
2,337 
8,314 

1,140 

1,511 

820 



1,065 

985 

1,350 

1,434 

1,400 

1,483 

982 

2,186 

1,650 

1,567 

1,376 

936 

910 

1,435 

1,286 

2,054 

1,940 

3,218 

800 



2,110 
1,652 
1,715 
1,160 



1,349 
1,443 
1,239 
1,002 
1,780 
1,061 
1,680 
1,405 
1,647 
1,930 
2,823 
2,024 
1,085 



120 

3C0 

55 

200 



190 

100 

8 

160 

90 
120 
850 
200 
175 



125 
250 
214 



150 
700 



250 



200 
400 
111 



300 
181 
500 



300 
48 
350 
400 
492 
116 
100 



450 



1,307 
153 
125 



100 
355 



20 
201 

50 
300 
600 
600 

69 



1,722 
1,337 
1,121 
1,038 



972 
1,481 
1,345 
1,591 
1,545 
1,650 

1,769 
2,174 
1,100 
1,655 
1,893 
1,441 

1,062 
1,653 
1,720 
2,453 

1,103 
1,250 
751 
1,162 
1,171 
1,109 
1,180 
1.439 
1,133 
922 
796 
1,984 
1.540 
1,061 
819 
1,058 
1,276 
1,298 
1,334 
1,777 
1,805 
1,786 
684 
801 
1,747 
1.027 
1,240 
030 
997 
1,349 
1,395 
1,416 
1,015 
1,532 
1,293 
1,412 
1,405 
1,565 
1,085 
2,465 
1,733 
1,028 



1,275 

1,072 

964 

911 



854 
1,247 
1,128 
1,243 



1,340 

1,649 
1,491 
979 
1,355 
1,598 
1,142 



1,402 
1,170 
1,864 

1,037 

1,031 

679 

1,011 

906 

923 



1,233 

867 

668 

655 

1,604 

1,395 

976 

662 

804 

1,006 

1,150 

953 

1,187 

4,507 

1,609 

651 

608 

1,472 

846 

995 



896 
1,127 
1,178 
1,180 

900 



1,014 
1,286 
1,034 
1,212 
1,050 
2,199 
1,386 
885 



1,890 
1,900 
1,150 



2,230 
1,000 
1,700 
1,446 
1,575 
1,760 
1,906 

2,200 
1,960 



1,560 



1,140 
1,426 
1,500 



1,160 

1,300 

900 



1,384 
1,120 
1,400 
1,600 
1,350 
1,000 

050 
2,100 
1.715 
1,000 

899 
1,300 
1,200 
1,530 
1,636 
1,526 
1,764 
1,606 

720 

714 
1,750 
1,000 
1,290 
1,380 
1,355 
1,440 
1,481 



1,200 



675 



1,864 
1,529 
1,200 
2,220 
1,800 
1,100 



* Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1M3. 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school cennu; attendance and personnel in dag mhooU, JOJi-JS — 

Continued. 



OROUP IV.-<nTIS8 OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Ccntimwd. 



CHlM. 



II 

a 



I 



10 



pEimsTLTAnA— Omtinaed. 

Lewistown 

Lockh«ir«n 

Laxeme 

Middletowii 

Mfflvale 

Mflton 

MinenviUe 

Monon 
Moantl 

MtmbaU 

NewBrisfaton.... 
New KeosiiigUHi. 



Northampton. 

Olyphant. 

Ponxsotawiiey 

lUnkin 

Rid^wmy 

Rochester 

St. CUdr (Schuylkfll Co.) .... 

8t. Marys ., 

Sayre 

Scottdale.. 

Sharpsburg 

Swtovale.. 

8 woyersville boro (post office, 
Maltby)* 

Tamaqua 

Tarennim 

Taylor 

Throop 

TitusTille 

Tyrone 

Waynesboro 

West Berwick 

WestPittston 

Wilmerding 

Rhodb Islakd: 

Bristol 

BorrillviUe 

Coventry 

Johnston 

Lincoln 

North Providence. 

South Khigston*.. 

Warren 

W^esterly 

SocTH Carolina: 

Anderson 

Florence 

Greenwood* 

Newberry 

Orangeburg 

RockHiU 

Sumter 

Union* 

South Dakota: 

Huron* 

Lead 

MitcheU 

Watertown 

Tenkessee: 

Bristol 

ClarksvOle 

Cleveland 

Columbia 

Park City 



0-16 
<^10 
0-16 
0-16 
0-10 
<^16 
0-10 
8-16 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
<^16 
0-10 
0-10 
0-10 
O-IO 
0-10 
0-10 
O-IO 
0-10 

0-10 
0-10 
fr-10 
O-IO 
O-IO 
fr-16 
0-16 
0-21 
0-10 
fr-21 
0-16 

6-17 
6-17 



6-18 
6-17 
6-17 
6-15 
6-18 
6-18 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



0-21 



6-20 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 



1,728 
1,700 
1,241 
1,168 
1,857 
1,391 
1,604 
1,760 
1,309 
1,069 
1,606 
1,010 
1,277 
2,252 
1,938 
1,230 
1,080 
1,047 
1,216 
1,484 
1,163 
1,179 
1,600 
1,600 

1,496 
1,990 
1,516 
2,006 
1,272 
1,337 
1,424 
1,610 
1,061 
1,342 
1,160 

2,087 
1,740 



1,606 
2,630 
1,647 
1,084 
1,595 
1,969 



1,085 
2,600 



1,338 
2,086 
1.653 
2,168 

2,153 
3,389 
1,789 
1.588 
1,994 



00 
145 
100 



895 



141 
160 
702 
274 
100 
103 

S80 
316 
96 
110 
225 
160 
800 



216 
050 
269 



100 
80 
170 
625 
100 
16 





768 

67 

6 



25 
160 



126 



190 
200 
320 

275 
125 



135 
17 



1,070 
1,480 

900 
1,093 

840 
1,480 
1,461 
1,800 
1,180 

815 
1,611 
1,513 
1,277 
1,607 
1,870 
1,114 
1,081 
1,100 
1,015 

685 
1,434 
1,179 

920 
1,347 

704 
1,050 
1,720 
1,059 
1,272 
1,470 
1,060 
1,610 
1,061 
1,262 
1,061 

2,202 
1,285 

085 
1,241 
1,238 
1,091 

968 
1,270 
1,058 

2,330 
1,632 
1,816 
1,227 
1,477 
2,079 
1,948 
2,093 

1,118 
1,479 
1,325 
1,347 

1,349 

2,009 
1,284 
1,250 
1,397 



1,330 



730 

847 

750 

1,230 

1,360 

1,372 

1,007 

024 

1,300 

1,314 

1,085 

1,190 

1,604 

920 

943 

1,034 

934 

472 

1,124 

1,068 



1,034 

677 
1,743 
1,341 
1,443 

989 
1,137 
1,302 
1,288 

817 
1,043 



1,302 
1,090 
653 
911 
920 
846 
603 
889 
1,300 

1,490 
1,247 
1,192 



1,416 
1,667 
1,140 

892 



1,093 
1,154 

1.040 
1,431 
934 
1,100 
1.196 



63 



* Statistics for 1911-12. 



2,017 
1,450 

800 
1,160 

900 
1,032 
1,684 
1,800 
1,206 

900 
1,780 
1,024 
1,640 
1,000 
2,200 
1,160 
1,200 
1,206 



025 
1.460 



1.025 
1,360 



1,000 

*i,6eo 

2,000 
1,870 
1,800 



1,444 
1,276 

1,677 
1,600 

900 
1.003 
1,362 

710 
1,153 
1,000 
1,447 



1,703 
2,200 
1,300 
1,600 
2,100 



1,040 

1,108 

1,800 



1,470 

1,300 
1,750 
1,000 
1,2S0 
1,200 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



0IT7 SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



109 



Table 5. — Aggregate of school census; attendance and personnel in day schools j 1912-lS — 

Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



Cltlee. 



5.b 






< 



10 



TiXAs: 

Abilene* 

Amarillo 

Brownwood* 

Corpus Chrlsti.... 

Corsicana 

Ennls* 

Gainesville 

Greenville 

Hlllsboro 

Houston Heights. 

Longview 

Orange 

Port Arthur* 

Sulphur Springs*. 

Taylor 

Texarkana 

Wcatherford 

Wichita Falls* .. 
Utah: 

Prove 

Vebmont: 

Bennington 

Brattleboro 

Hontpelier 

St. Albans 

St. Johnsbury 

Vibqinia: 

Bristol 

CharlottesvUle.... 

Clifton Forge 

Fredericksburg... 

Winchester 

Washington: 

Centralia 

Hoquiam 

Olympia 

Vancouver 

West Virginia: 

Clarksbitfg 

Elkins 

Fairmont 

Grafton* 

Morgantown 

Mounds ville 

Wisconsin: 



Antiffo... 
uraooo. 



Barab 

Beaver Dam.. 

Chippewa Falls*.. 

Grand Rapids 

Henasha 

Menomonie , 

Merrm 

Neenah 

Oconto 

Portage* 

Rhineiander 

South Milwaukee.. 

Stevens Point 

Water town* 

Waukesha , 

WestAUls 

Wtomino: 

Laramie , 

Rock Springs , 

Sheridan 



7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-19 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-17 
7-21 
7-18 
7-17 

6-18 



5-18 
5-18 
5-18 
5-18 

7-20 
7-20 
7-30 
7-20 
7-20 

5-21 
4-21 
5-21 
5-21 

6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 
6-21 

4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
7-14 
4-20 



4-19 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 
4-20 

6-21 
fr-21 
6-21 



1,565 
2,150 



3,512 
2,406 
1,221 
1,670 
2,132 
1,530 
1,925 
1,725 



1,483 
1,061 
1,239 
2,805 
1,285 
1,906 

3,075 



1,101 
1,773 
1,556 
1,889 

1,663 
2,202 
1,615 
1,437 
1,338 

2,463 
1,912 
2,004 
2,072 

4,108 
1,890 
2,975 
1,985 
2,884 
2,625 

2,415 
1,436 
2,069 
2,963 
2,382 
2.433 
1,796 
3,068 
1,912 
1,878 
1,472 



2,110 
3,196 
3,885 
2,164 
1,988 

1,582 
1,796 
2,102 



60 
600 
50 



35 



25 
45 
103 

222 



312 



600 



545 

400 
270 
108 
149 
65 

15 
100 

45 
214 

250 
41 
75 

180 



468 
109 
500 
914 
632 
939 



672 

80 

681 

265 



1,200 
696 
511 



152 
**22' 



2,050 



2,218 
1,321 
1,627 
2,264 
1,750 
1,721 
1,360 
1,234 
1,620 
1,290 
1,218 
2,098 
1,369 
1,906 

2,171 

911 
1,004 
1,048 
1,273 
1,152 

860 
2,322 
1,062 

988 



1,839 
1,383 
1,503 
1,765 

2,766 
1,380 
2,300 
1,364 
2,199 



1,639 
1,178 
1,201 
1,467 
1,413 

700 
1,232 
1,639 
1,177 

819 

930 
1,214 

963 
1,336 
1,224 
1,516 
1,518 

953 
1,605 
1,658 



1,395 



1,605 

1,000 

1,197 

1,^11 

1,194 

1,324 

965 

912 

1,335 

751 

768 

1,511 

971 

1,600 

1,822 

778 



887 
959 
909 

785 

1,761 

950 

823 



1,379 
1,120 
1,222 
1,376 

2,079 
1,080 
1,623 
1,149 



1,280 

967 

986 

1,227 

1,226 

643 

1,069 

1,436 

942 

797 

722 

967 

724 

1,135 

1,028 

1,203 

1,063 

650 
1,215 
1,295 



57 



1,700 
2,042 



1,960 
1,128 
1,424 
2,176 
1,336 
1,875 
1,500 
1,161 
1,400 
880 
1,255 
1,845 
1,609 
1,910 

2,350 

1,000 
1,600 
1,054 



1,160 

860 
1,800 



1,240 
1,000 

1,900 
1,500 
1,322 
2,200 

2,600 

*2,"266 



1,620 
1,655 



1,180 
1,800 
1,740 
905 
1,460 



1,350 
1,000 
1,083 
1,235 
050 



1,300 
1,561 
1,412 

1,160 
1,300 
1,690 



* Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 



C5 

o 



> t 

I H 

n ^ 



p 

o2 






m 



« gOyg C 3 g 






lii 



I 



III I 
Sill. 



8| 



I 



III 







/5 



|1|e| 



EDtrCATION BEPOBT, 1»13. 






eo cT^eiV^ef'*' •^S'^ ** *^e«o6' 



it 



S? 



§§ 






ig 



§§§ 



oSSn 






li 









33 



i§ 



m 'So 





















!§§§§ 






r^WfH »o»-» fli^to 






So 






sssggiaiisii 






•-H 00 t-4 t^^ 









s 









533 
SIS" 



(O woo 






S§8g 



a : 



as 



i is 









ief.}iiiiiJiiiiffiii;5%:ai5i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 















S3 



:88 









iSaSS 



22§l§ 



Sl^ss 



m 

§-ct 
9 






ass* 



l§g 



sasss 






CITY SCHOOL STSTEMS, 1912-13. Ill 

2W5l¥gWsi¥l¥a"s¥s¥8¥sWsMi¥i¥S§§Sl 



iS 



i 






§ 









ii§ss 


SSgSg : 


»-• 




^couS- I 


;§§§ 




isii: 


:SS$- 


i" 


iiiji 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 



BDUCATIOK KBPOBT, 1(03. 



1 



1| 



lift 



6aI d 



?ti*^ 



ilii 






i8|-a 



8 » 






m 






ill 









.9 w»^8 



S3 



«siss 









U 



••8* 



a- 












|!8 



§§ 



8"8 



9 



S8 



liBs 



s§s 



iiSI 






§iii§isi. 



■«r •« « «-• ^ i-« 






l§§ 



S§§i 



^1* 






§ 



Sffi 






251 












•^ Ok >o >4? >o s^ « t^ e^ c? 







ill 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



113 






ii§§§i§g§i§§§ 



III 






2S« 



to cf tcTcTe-f 3f 

5 S'^SSS 






we* 



i§ 



S 



S 



sag 



§s§§|§§§ 






S3ig 









§§si§§§ii 






I 



cooe 









§iSiiil 



ii -iiiss 



§ii 



l§s 



si 






82VS JS^ 



fS5f^S''S2Sfe2S'§fS5*"3r 

2^ ^ ^ *-• *4 ^ «H CO >-4 c« '^ '••eo 



s¥iS8§ 5iiSBSiWS¥i¥i 



S3 



58' 



§1 



00 <0 

52 



2SS 









$2 



siSis 






1772T*— ID 1918— VOL 2 8 



^Wfiiii^siii 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



114 



EDUCATION BEPOST, 1913. 



1 


"? 


1 


1 


g 


"f 


^ 


►J: 
o 






**» 


H 


« 


:S 


5 


t> 


>-l 


Pk 


•» 


o 


^ 


Ai 


"« 


§ 


«> 


?f 


f»^ 




$ 


O 


'^ 


e 


^ 


§ 


•? 


s 


"S" 


Cm 
O 



A 



PLI 

o 

o 



1l 



V as 

a25 



ga 



Iif4 







Is-t 



11^ i 
sill 



ft2 35 



i4: 



H^ 



&B 



IN 



llfif 



15, 









S 



SSI 



«g 



l§ 



ssPss 

S8 S" 



SiiSi 



gss 



ga 



i" 



ii 



3Sd> 



§fe£ 









s 



IS 






eo ■* cT f^jo'io'g coto^cfn eg'*© « «* 



«¥ 



S33 



ss 



s 



psg--^^ 






l§^ 



58¥ 



Sgliii 



sf§s¥ 






^i 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL 'SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 115 



i 



§§ 

ii 



8ii 



ss 



i 



§§ 



»H CO o to o o> t^ t^ 

3 s^^^s^'s^a 



3 



is; 



$s 



^s 



§§ 
ii 



83 



t;8 









§i 



iS 









8fi 
uSa 



S« is : : :§ :i§2 



25 



e 



SIS 



e^S 






32" 









23 

oeao 



SSS3 






S8^5f 



S3 



23 



§g 






I ml 



ifilkii 




li^ 










-•Sp 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 



EDUCATION HEPOBT, 1913. 



I ^ 

I ^ 

V si 

Jl 2 

* O 

5 A^ 



i I 

> o 

« o 

,-^ « 



§3 






-^-i-sl. 



ii 



^i^Ft 






Is-I 



fill 



til 

« 5 



' o. 









si** 8 












IS 



|8 
9" 



IS 












3i§8§ 



cS dS CD oo oo V 

8 8 «*^^ 






ig 
s 






iSS 






-w »>-r- 



w S^i S? S5 5 8 S g 5 8 









II 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



cm SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



117 






is 



s 



s 









s^a 



3SS 






S2 






Rg :3 



si§SB§ 



i§ssiiii§i 



-«M"*^ 



2 : :S 



ssssis« 






Sgg9g 



3"" 



ig 



RS^-" 



ii§i«is 






89 



isiii 



SIS 
8sa 



§§ 



8?1« 






IS§§ 



S2» 



li 



5S» 



IS5 



lis 



13 



8"SSR3S8"»'''2"SS»3£5»2"S'''s'*a2«<' 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 






V3 



1 



Oi 



T ^ 

Eh 

< 



5. ^ 



O 



.2- E2 



S3 S 

A O 

e5 g 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL BTSTEMS, 1912-13. 119 



§11 






Si 



|f255" 



11 



§il 



3S 






S 



s 



§§§§ 



§i 



s'e'ss s g¥ s s 3 g 5 af 38 gs s e 8 j sfs §'§ sss g s s | g sa s?" s 3 s"s ag" s B'saVs 5 5V? 



SSilsSS 









M •^ of NN — 00 2 « C»«0 



"R :8 



gs 



siiiiiiiii 



9!! S9SS 



S98"8asss«-« 



satis 



S38f"BfsaS!5SSJ;aS8- 



§S§S§i§a|| 
8SS>:sVs7S''!i 



§ 



gg 



§§§§§§ 



gS»iii§ §§§§|[ig§ 



§l§sg§§S§§§§§§S§§S§l§§§Sig|3§§ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



120 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



"S 


'i 


§ 


s 


1 




J. 


d 




g 




o 


5 


(^ 


1 


§ 


$» 


e^ 


•>iN» 


O 


s 


H 


*! 


§ 


c? 


o 


•6 


^ 


^ 


O 


i 


OQ 




^ 


1^ 


1 


1 


^ 




Pi 


H 


P 


A 
.1 








3i 



It 






^&i^^- 



il 






'si 

'Si 



alSd 



8g| 



it. 






i 



H 









OOOM 



ooo 



s§ 



g§§l 

S» 5 



5"" :n 



in 



i 



g8fcS2es>¥SSBS8"KS¥|Ws"s¥tSg?!SBS8a'S^^ 



5g5SfS§SiSS8iiieg|g 



« 



§§§ 



rui 



g§ 



§¥i:Ka8¥sS5SSBS8BasS5S' 



is§f§§§ 



tiacejN^Me* 



l;:2@ 



!§§§§ 

SSSeCS 



g§§ 



SS5 



laiJi 



§s 






i§g§ls§§§s§§IS§§gislii§Si§s^Ss 



oe>^Grot^^» 



S§i 



ao>c<ot^>o<o>o<Do«oaoo>^e;jt«eo<otoco »i4<v> 



^«Pk 



A.£ 






silf 



I >w g? fl « 









fill 






S^«J 



JU-u'p 






•35 



ilPltliipPllsiii 

illilillliililllfli 



sisllsaiilisslllliilllliilillilli 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



121 






i i ii i i i i i i i i i i i i ii§5 

i i JR i : : i i : i i i : : : ijCqa 


Si 


f 


gsi 

"S i 


n i n 11 n M M M = ^si- 

i i i i i : i : i i i i i : : : l^*^ 


Ii 




isj 


n i n n M i N n n ii r 




ji 




i i ii ! i : M i i ! ; M : :i§i 

i i ijs i i : : : : : i i : : i js^s 






iii 

is : 



«8S8SS8S8"SS52V§|S2g8SR8a"8g888S8 



§§iiisiiii§iiis^sisii§i§isii^ 



rl C4C9COeOCO «-i 



eo CO C4 M ^ CI <-4 «^ e>< co 



n 



§§§ 



85 



i§s§§ 



SiǤ 



S8S :aR :g 



M QO '^ « ig 1-4 Q e 



8» 



gg 












g 



§£2 ri !2 S2 o ffl S •« ^ 



£2 2Q a S *^**^ "^ * if 2 "* Sf 1X2 S SB 2 "^S « 52 '«>""^**'w "» • <» 

•O ^^ d Ct •^ »^ ^ C^tQMa^W^ tH tH pi4 tH pi4 r^ ^^4 tH i-« ^4 



S^ 



;^K^ 



:-•! 






il¥«-^i!- 




Ilflllllllllllllllll 



3^6 



52ass¥sss9ssg's§s8a 



8" 



sa 



gsasssssassssssssssa" 



E to CO CO 
•"Tcf*© 



i?- 



i§§i 












§§S 



o CO coco 
feS52 






'!^aas88= 






•6cJ'2i5 



QQQQCOnOOM 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



122 



EDUOATIOK BEPOBT, 1913. 






3' ^4. 



;§ 



11 







• "S 



slip 






§§ 



ss 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



128. 






»§§§§ 



S 



§i 



gs 






§ 



s 



§§ 



•s&s 



u 



g§§is§§ig&i§^ii§ii§§iggig§^isaii§§is§iiisis§=iii§i§§ 



s2sis§iss2s« 



oTcT V^ Veo •'cJ'eo eo'«-r« «o i-r»-r^ eo 



igii§§§iigi§§§§^ 



te^c^^^w^ 



« ! :SSS ii«S iiSS =5 ig£ 



S : :| :5g 



i§Si§§§§ 






o 'i' »-^ eo « r-l 



99 



g§S3S§ 



raOoooOfoooo 



339 






^ 






§S3 



29 



?Sf:s 






S8§ 









§gSI§ 



^¥. 









3a 




!lf. 






1"^ - 



►HTJ.QtStS'O'O^ 



•si 



III 



jaaS^aaSo 



" gifS^I e all's si efiS?""-a£ 1 3 9?i**. 
iPlI 

^ 2 I- © «3 



11^1 






il 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



© 


1 


a 


^ 


r> 


d 




^ 


Y 


O 


^ 


M 


y^ 


H 






**i 


PK 


•. 


O 


i 


A4 


■S 


§ 


$» 


S' 


'^ 


o 


^ 


H 


t 




•s« 


o 


s 


OQ 


.«. 


i-t 




H 


f 


^ 


1 


fc 


CO 






04 


H 


^ 




o 

o 



II 






11 



O0| 8 




illli 









•lit 



II 



a 



•3^ 

ill 



Sl^ 



«3 









§§ 



5V8f8Vs'2"s"9R5s¥ssVsa¥ss¥sVa¥8¥sss*!85s"s" 



Si 



a 









SB 



§§i§ 






Sisisf 






53 



uf«r 



2aa-a'2 



i§ 



IB 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 125 






CO CO C4 So 



§8 






Hit 



is 



i§B§§§§i§isS§s§s§§§sg§isi§i§§ii§§i§§§as§ii§iigi§i3§ 



lii§§is§§ 



ri t»<-iC4 



- a- 



gg 



s«ii»s§i 






§ 



Sio 



Sc<|kS 






W CO CO ^ w 



D 009 V 4> (O 



«eo^^-<«<<i5^^ooTO'veouS9eooo>4*-ii-40co 









§ 



s§ 



9 CO'* 



§§ 



^^^*HrHiHr^e« Ci ^ l-« « iH ^ 1-^ ^ ,4^^ 



li 



sl'sif§f:-iia-Bili*43ist*i:-||i 






siia^?«lllPlii^"Il1illptsiili|^|liil^liM 
Illlllilllsli§sslilllliillllllls§lisll;§llllllill<sl 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 



I I 

■e a 

f 

7 Eh 



o 



^ o 

•I ^ 

> 

Oh 

O 
OS 
O 



1 



•J 
A 









.§1 8 







^1! 



iiii 



III 



BDUCATIOir BBPOBT, 1913. 



le 



sill 



<g^ 









(^s 



;S3 






2S 



ss 



s;? 



g2 

83 



g5 



§§ 






gSSSS^SS^ 



§ 



§isi:S§§§ 



sg»§§§l§§3§§§Sg 



^ «ot* 



aSgl2SIS§l2§ 



S§§I§§I§§S§§ 

§32 •■""- a"» 5 a'a" 






i9»i 



2a*2'8"a"a's"sa"'8' 



S9 



2* a* a'a* 



§ 



as3 



lissiisis 



21 
a"2" 



g 



g§ 



2( r-ieo« 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



127 






§§ 






§§ 



S§S 



« 

s 

^ 




59|S3 i isig is i* i i i i ia i i i i is 

-* • : « : : : : : : i : : ; : : 


54* 

230 

""3,886' 

1,053 

657 

50 

440 
4,063 


i 




fasfsT^* :s3«S85?S is' : j i5^ :5*-W 


g 

s* 


: is : : : |5 i i : i : i : i i : : i : : :5!- : 


i ! i !l l§ : is i ! i i 1 1 1 is l§ i i i i 

: i : :« is j i^ : : j i i i : ja :8 : i : i 


g 

a" 


j j ! ji ii 1 ! i i i 1 i 1 j M j j j h M i 

i :::« :<^ :::: i ::::::::::: i : : 


i^ M M M H N N M^s i 1 jiss i 




""3,'52i* 


305 

7,270 
9,000 
8,837 
7,119 
6,684 
10,029 

45,340 

""22,"396* 

'810 

'"■5,"i78* 






H» 







^11 

III 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 



EDUCATIOIT KEPOBT, 1913. 



•a 


1 


G 


H 


G 
O 

•2 


§ 


♦«« 


f-i 


«'« 


-< 


*<i 


^ 


**< 


S 


«r 


o 


p 


A< 


"§ 


H 


^ 


o- 


1 


g 


,=?» 


1 


•c 


»^ 


^ 


o 


5 


00 


^ 


H 


ft? 


V 


1 


> 




t-^ 


« 


a« 


H 


P 


n 


S 


H 


c 






* fl o & 






mln 



M 

m 









111 



M 



*3 >« 

III 









s 



s 



i§§§ 



§§ 

28 



§i§ 

«28 



§i§ 



«5 



!iS§§sS§E2s§sl§l§i§S§fl^§§§g§gSiig§ 






I CO 






Si 



sss;7SS3$ 



•siSi^iig 



S : :g5; : : :S 









-? 









8 






§§ 



i§ 



sgess 



! s§iiii§§§s§3§§i 



ef ef <r V«<r r>^« «r <r iO «o »Q Wac tC« »ij 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



129 






§§ 



§§§ 



si 






«S« 



38i 



m«8 



§§ 



§§ 



8 



!§§§§ 






s$ 










1,143 

1,347 
1,310 


Ok 


; i : : 1^2* 






ss 








• ' 


2g 


s 


g 








i 


.s 




5 


§ 




is 
















sS 






15,084 
26,937 
45,009 
30,695 
29,290 
41,918 




1 







iiii§ 




iiiii 


.!>. t 

• J J J 1 • |«0 J 












i-. 








.; : : ;w 




















• i^S 












Nn§ MM 




• o 1 
























;§ 














!t- 


I Ic< 1 . I 


Mll^ 


ili 


1 lo j I 




• is : 


if: 


•22 

•C4 


i|2 


is 


j2§ j 



ag=§is§§§is§3ii§sii§§§!§g§gg§is§sis§§giig§ii§i§iise^« 



CO r. «oiooo«oo««o^«or««oto>a«otoic«oo>otot»'«i<<&^ 



do<o*Q'vt^<otQr«t^>Qvtoov«oo«t^'<«*<oe>o<oco^ 



SJ 



£«'=< 









Sag 



If s-2|| gL*J|?gil ill &li2|l 



isi 



I 



aS^«2s 

♦2 »?• irt» 



I'll 1 liP sfS ill II f IP^H iilll i ilR«lll|^ ^ll 



JSsS 



toSt 



WPm S-s 



17727*'— 13) 1913— VOL 2 9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180 M)UCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 

§SSSSS§§8§g3§SggS§gSS§§§ 



131 



s§ 



rf5SVS83*SSSfS"?'»'R5Sa¥«V53VsfSS' 



i 



m 









is§§ 






Sg 



6S 



sa 



IS 



§§§ 



E : M 






•C-^tOMC* 






xJ-g, 



^-S^i^ 



3?^ 




Iitliillliiili|p|§s 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



132 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses , outlays^ and other 
GROUP I.— CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER. 



Birj „ 
Cautornia: 

Lo8 Anseles 

Oakland 

San Francisoo 

Colorado: 

Denver 

Connecticut: 

Brideeport* 

New Haven* 

District or Columbu 

Washington*. 

Georou: 

Atlanta. 

Illinois: 

Chicago. 

Indl&na: 

Indianapcdis 

Kentucky: 

Louisville 

Louisl&na: 

New Orleans 

Maryland: 

Baltimore 

Massachusetts: 

Boston 

Cambridge 

FaU River 

Lowell 

Worcester 

Michigan: 

Detroit 

Grand Rapids 

Minnesota : 

Minneapolis 

St. Paul. 

Missouri 

Kansas City 

St. Louis 

Nebraska: 

Omaha 

New Jersey: 

Jersey City 

Newarlc 

Paterson 

New York: 

Albany ♦ 

Buffalo 

New York 

Rochester 

Syracuse 

Ohio: 

Cincinnati* 

Cleveland 

Columbus ♦ 

Davton 

Toledo 

Oregon: 

Portland 

Pennsylvania: 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Scraiiton 

Rhode Island: 

Providence 



$3,261 

85,813 
24.983 



22,036 

10,647 
8,704 

15,260 

7,607 

281,396 

36,395 



|10,680| $6,8671 $36,158 



35,648 136,980 



14,740 



24,899 

32,292 

174,407 
10, 148 
2,495 
8,003 
10,801 

37,264 
12, 131 

26,479 
8,020 

88,709 
136,302 

33,973 

8.781 
75,342 
5, 6001 

6,0631 
41,85S, 
512, 772 
23,686 

6,315 

28,729 
176,450 
20,415 
9, 6.J7| 
22,899, 



54,358 17,881 

14,5181 13,800 

7,100 
8,300 



9,122 
126,660 



4,033 

16,9561 30,488 
7,167 
79,271 
21,442| 50,058 
13,736 21,760 
10,40o| 20,776 
9,533 



27,298 

90,471 
13,818 
12,041 
3,300 
17,335 

6,090 
13,387 

7,055 
6,980 

29,986 
62,935 

9,243 

32,002 
30,833 
3,600 

5,665 
17,600 
235,441 
11,656 
10,182 

16,596 
92,707 
13,995 
6,720 
13,835 



46,768 19,033 



156,f)88 
114..T22 
64,660 

24,497' 



15,640 



76,810 
6,079 
6,068 
5,915 

10,015 

31,651 

7,498 

39,860 



16,179 
61,680 

11,963 

14,012 

33,809 

1,000 

4,800 

16,700 

210, 454 

31,61.S 

27,810 

18,247 

861 

7,010 

9,011 

11,671 

64,192 

43,875 
73.111 



365,850 2,104,619 
88,860 648,517 
160,500 1,347,916 



100,854 

32,125 
34,700 



97,106 1,614,840 



399,743 



0) 



782,470 7,759,672 



64,966 
68,732 
82,432 
16,965 



$311,300 



944,581 

198,006 
465,488 



791,527 
• 517,986 

846,473 
1,408,339 



806,958 3,282,146 

387,569 

291,954 
253,161 
573,158 



124,014 
67, 73S 
9,860 



12,936' 16,066' 76, 17j' 
* Statistics for 1911-12. 



42,905 
91,785 
28,551 
80,724 

179,971 
51,764 

107,844 
64,009 

127,298 
264,358 

58,410 

115,209 
158,000 
58,900 

40,936 
126,83<> 
4,213,917 
79,009 
56,400 

136,779 
1,360 
75,882 
39,900 
50,209 

83,905 

457,084 , . 
268,3:J3, 2,a3<l,21 
490,373 



681,981 



1,554,128 
420,248 

1,350,511 
617,677 

959,171 
2,201,735 

399,724 

849,205 

1,760,297 

392,714 

253,324 

1,540,424 

23,501,507 

752, 186 

895,807 

1,219,566 

2,287,5M 

596.050 

349,002 

544,004 

874,385 

4,087,621 



$11,684 



$5,158 

127,936 
38,854 
36,114 



4,980 36,564 



10.505 
36,389 

33,821 
(«) 

16,315 
7,282 
2,723 
4,833 

64,339 

84,569 
8,524 

11,979 
7,415 

25,174 

27,239 
4,016 

95,569 



1,701 
28,614 



29,502 
49,759 
18,153 

13, 142 
51,014 

**4,'445 
0,852 



34,082 
19,156 
2,717 
15,153 

46 

181,435 
5:J,:kS7i 
11,389, 



1,716 
34,485 

80,912 

11,034 

3n,394 

47,446 

30,870 



48,183 

163,778 
17,976 
14.268 
12,385 
22,500 

47,360 
25,272 

112,402 
24, -^ 

37,257 
87,424 



14,915 12,366 66,069 



36,913 

100,825 

11,345 

11,211 

107,099 

1,877,610 

27,599 

15,208 



2,826 
22,766 
11,302 
19,874 

26,370 

151,937 
111,7«.5 
30,393 



$36,065 

144,351 
49,860 
100,566 

71,516 

19,787 
60,101 

123,105 
(0 
1,062,270 
80,758 
57,370 
66,900 

135,702 

203,028 
48,443 
53,992 
65,050 
63,158 

185,578 
45,963 

119.1 
70,082 

85.018 
253,776 



80,039 
169,097 
36,405 

21,874 
134,435 
1,538,874 
65,093 
45,949 

124,134 

289,343 

75,962 

46,362 

40,063 

67,808 

434,967 
254,089 



24,242> 32,630' 



85,441 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 133 

payments for school purposes, 191t-13. 

GROUP I.— CITIES OP 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER. 



1 Included in column 6. * Included in ccdumn 8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



134 EDUCATION BEPOBTy 1913. 

Table 7.—Etpen9€8^ (nUkoft^ and oiher pmfmenU 
GROUP I.*€ITIE8 OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER^-Conttnned. 



CitiM. 



I 



s. 



Id 

^8 



ill 






47 



fiO 



Tknnkssbb: 

M«mphJs... 

NashviUe... 
VnoiNu: 

RJehmond.. 
Washhtoton: 

8eaUle 

Spolaiie.... 
Wisconsin: 

MUwauke*. 



8,223 

7, sea 

18.068 
0,184 

18,453 



$7,180 

5,000 



23,616 
7,170 



112,827 
11,512 

8,110 

49.468 
9A6& 

13,629; 



S55,7W 
34,750 

39,aS7 

4,551 
48^750 



$356,055 
282,712 

207,484 

1,147,315 
487,582 

1,353,007 



$15,328 

15, 

24,557 
SO, 001 

1,554 



$17,017 
5,631 

10,307 

66,961 
20,044 

56,006 



$41,07S 

20,853 

96^164 

110,934 
53,977 

101,387 



Gbouf IL— cities of 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION. 



Alabama: 

MobUe* 

Mootgomery , 

Arkansas: 

LitUeRock. 

California: 

Berkeley 

Pasadena 

Saommento. 

San Diego 

Ban Jose 

Colorado: 

Colorado SprioBi... 

Pueblo- 
District Na 90 *. 

District No. 1 

Connrcdcut: 

Hartford 

Meriden 

New Britain. 

Norwich 

Waterbury 

Dblaware: 

Wilmington*. 

Florida: 

Jacksonville* 

Tampa 

Gsorqia: 

Augusta 

Macon 

Savannah 

Illinois: 

Aurora- 
East side 

West side* 

Blooming ton 

Danville* 

Decatur 

East St. Louis 

Elgin 

Joltet 

Peoria 

Quinoy 

Rockford 

SprlngOeld 

Induna: 

Evansville 

Fort Wayne 

South IJend 

Terre Uaute* 



$5,388 



6,700 

3,900 

5,230 

480 

8,096 



600 
2,722 

3,006 
776 
8,147 
1,102 
6,957 

3,652 

8,478 

2,600 

668 
W3 



846 
1,778 
1,5?2 

550 

440 
8,360 

928 
3,941 
7,453 
l,'->99 
3,S87 
5, I39j 

3,259 
9,«20 



$4,996 
4,281 

3,725 

5,531 
5,700 
0,968 
3,000 
7,081 

4,520 

4,000 
3,850 

2,000 
4,200 
8,400 
8,000 
6,995 

5,402 

6.090 

8,300 

4,000 

6,0001 



$6,234 



I 
9,606. 



$9,262 
1,800 



6,098^ 20,346 



5,400^ 
22,000 
20,880, 
16, 70 
15, 44^ 

2,760 

(«) 
3,825 

15,100 
2,848 
6,988 
2,390 

13,950 

3,440 

900 
1,300 



1,800 



1,650 
3,625 
6,169 



8,250' 
8,700 
6,19«) 
2,730. 



20,508 
1,825 
37,800 
26,652 
22,527 

21,528 

7,050 

35,650 
16,497 
12,000 
5,600 
24,625 

26,562 

12,250 
11,600 

15,600 
20,556 
24,346 



799! 


3, 


13,596 


16; 


9,971 






20, 


4,679 


1, 


17,365 


35, 


4,450! 


15, 


8, 1371 


21, 


6,550, 


30, 



20,818 
23,00vH 

20, «»5.T 
l,600i 



$74, 
68,932|. 

114,983. 



261,1921 

315, ?36 

268,155 $390 

224,145 

164,747 487 



108,136 
76,960 

425,041 
88,985 

117,967 
60,788; 

231,497; 



1,896^ 

2,234 

15,713) 
3,480 
4,506, 
200{ 
9,097 



109,949| 8,912 

63,486 

85,000 



108,739' 
96,570 
105,701 



48,546... 

23,750^ 

78,106. 

48, SS2| 

90,098 
149, 476 

80,903 
116, 2N> 
242,200. 

86, 1431 
133,589'. 
169,013' 

208,114' 
172,724 
Itto. 187 
199, 562, . 



311 

911 

67 

(») 

518 

"261 

"325 

832 
903' 
307 



$1,906' 
1,054 



15,743 
56,938 
17,»40l 
12,735 
4,464 



147,905' 4,145 7,234 



6,733 

5,208 

17,180 
3,031 
8,354 
3,284 
4,367 

7,459 

3,153 

6,000 

1,993 
1,528 
1,463 



a, no 

2,484 
5,710 
552 
5,049 
5,070 
8,946 
9,045 
18,658 
8,923 
10,499| 
12,?22' 

4,748,' 
5,687' 
4,129 
9,294i 



$3,382' 

4,048, 



5,378 8»CI0 



30,583 
27,177 
36,179 
46,057 
13,431 

13, a 

13,806 
12,543 

87,842 
12,503 
10,408 
7,3fiB 

17,806 

15,406 

4,340 
7,500 

5,273 
3,035 

5,790 



10,704 

3,904 

8,875 

6,872 

14,408 

23,185 

12,003 

19,442 

26,237 

11,551 

24,940 

16,421 

26,942 
20,082 
26,600 
20,428 



* BUtistics for 101I-12. 



> Induded iu column 11. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



135 



for tchool pwrpotM, 19ii-13 — Continued. 

GROUP I.— aTIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER-CODttnued. 









•a 

A 



Ip. 



hi 



as 

III 

o 



I? 

^5 



10 



11 



18 



18 



14 



15 



1% 



13 



18 



19 



S0492 
6,373 

6,823 

40.306 
28,553 



111,140 
4,931 

10,054 

28,291 
34,414 

40,623 



$19,225 
22,310 

29,510 

70,922 
28,017 

148,664 



1350 
491 



2,900 
3,407 



$3,836 

6,146 

3,125 
3,471 

20,332 



$1,504 



1,090 



$2,092 
3,062 

2,379 

9,34 

1,500 

36,378 



$548,314 
424,900 

461,665 

1,601,065 
763, 118 

1,884,995 



$111,700 
175,976 

245,370 

437,603 
212,072 

222,875 



$723,861 
600,876 

707,730 

2,602.466 
1,092,351 

2,107,870 



45 
46 



47 



48 
49 



50 



GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION. 



* Included In column 6. 



s Included in column 8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses^ otUlaySy and other payments 
GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION-Contlnned. 



♦ Statistics for 1911-12. * Included in column 6. » Included in column 3. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS; 1912-13. 137 

Jot school purposes^ 191 £-13 — Continued. 

GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



» Included in column 10. * Included in column 7. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses, outlay By and other payments 
GROUP IL— CITIES OF TSfiOO TO 100,000 POPULATION— Contlnned, 



♦ Statistics for 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 139 

Jof school purposes, 191 2-1 S — Continued. 

GROUP n.-CITIES OF 25,000 TO 1CO,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



1 Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



140 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 7. — Expenses^ outlays^ and other paymenU 
GROUP II.— CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



GROUP III.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION. 



?3? 


Alabama: 
Belma 


$450 

820 
1,525 

3,807 

600 

337 

2,865 

4,122 

1,004 

1,650 

750 


$2,500 

5,308 
3,000 

(«) 
(') 

4,368 
4,845 
3,285 

3! 200 
3,000 
3,057 
2,9.'i0 
3.018 
4,200 
2,500 






$22,578 

52,3.58 
46,185 

35,000 
72,574 

128,932 

56,(06 
57,ai7 
178,771 
177,06.S 
88,671 
81,074 
98,581 
66, 076 


Wi 


Arizona: 
Phoenix 


'*$3;2U6 

(') 
(») 

7,595 
1,000 


$3,250 
7,200 

14,948 
6,250 


?34 


Tucson 


?35 


Arkansas: 
Argenta ♦ 


236 
737 


Fort Smith* 

Cautornu : 
Alameda 


238 


Bakcrsflcld 


239 


Eureka 


?40 


Fresno 


6,400 
4,270 


ii,866 
16,850 
9,815 


741 


Long Bearh 


242 


Pomona 


243 


Red lands 


244 


Riverside. 


4,666 
4,650 
2,650 
3,498 

'"4,636 


6,900 
2,034 
9,900 
2,160 
9,200 


245 


San Bernardino * 


246 


Santa Barbara ♦ 




57, 87:) 


247 


Santa Cruz 


267 

1,500 

245 


52,816 
143.033 
41,051 


748 


Stockton 


249 


Vallejo 







$933 

8,594 
3,119 


$162 
300 

2,500 

24 

22 

"*i,'636 

16 
75 




$1,829 
2,000 






5, 774 
1,670 
3,08.-. 
7, 401 
9,171 
4,168 


11,347 
5,983 
5,758 
12,874 
14,386 
9,151 
8,090 
11,419 
11,080 
9,150 
4,680 
17,550 
4,8601 


5,3C18 
6,408 


2S2 


2, SI.4 
6, 3W 
2,245 



♦ statistics for 1911-12. 



» Included in column 11. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 141 

for school purposes, 1912-13 — Continued. 

GROUP II.—CITIES OF 25,000 TO 100,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



GROUP III.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION. 



« Included in column 6. Included in column 2. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



142 BDUCATION BBPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses, Qutlays, and other pmfmmU 
QROUP UI.-CITXES OF 10,000 TO Sft^QOO POPUULTION-CozitimMd. 



♦ Statistics for 1911-12. i Included in column 7, « Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS; 1912-13. 143 

/or Bchool purpo§es, lOU-lS — Continued. 

GROUP in.-CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION-CoDtinuMl. 



s Included in column 8. Included in column 11. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7 . — Expenses, outlays, and other payments 
GROUP III.-CITIE8 OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. i. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 191^13. 145 

for school purposes J 1912-13 — Continued. 

GROUP III.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



17727*— ED 1913— VOL 2 10 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



146 EDUCATION KEPORT, 1913. 

Table 7 .—Expenses, mUlays, and other paymenU 
GROUP m.-ClTrES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POP ULAT 10 N-Conl toned. 



M 

36 
36 
37 
37 

87 
37 
37 
37 
37 

37 
371 
3? 

381 



3a 

38! 

384 
381 
38( 

38; 

38J! 



aoc 

391 
302 
393 
894 
395 
396 
397 



400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 

406 

407 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
430 
421 
423 



' btatistios for 191 1-12. , included in column 10. . included in colunm 6. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 147 

Jar school purposes, 1912-13 — Continued. 

GROUP in.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Contbuied. 



> Included In column 10. * Included In column 5. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



148 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses^ outlays, and other payments 
GROUP III.-CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



♦ Statistics for 1911-12. i Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY BGHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 149 

for school purposes J 191i-13 — Continued. 

GROUP ni.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 26,000 POPULATION-Continued. 



« Incladsd la CDluixm 11. » Included in c >luTm 8. 



-_J 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



150 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses^ outlays^ and other paymenU 



GROUP m.— CITIBB OF 10,000 TO 25,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
480 
400 
491 
4B2 
483 
404 



497 
498 



500 

501 

503 

503 
504 
506 
506 
507 
508 
500 
£10 

511 
512 
613 

514 
615 
516 
617 

518 
519 
620 

521 



524 
525 
526 
627 
628 
629 
630 
531 
533 




i'SMIHOTliVAniA \.UU 

PIttston 

Pottstown. 

PottsvlUe 

Shamokin 

Sharon 

Sooth Sharon 

Steelton 

Sunbury 

Union town. 

"Warren 

Washington ♦ 

West Chester 

AVllkinsburg. 
Rhode Island 

Central FaMs 

Cranston 

East Providence. 
Boxrra Carolina: 

Spartanburg. 
South Dakota 

Aberdeen 

Sioux Falls. 
Tennessee: 

Jackson.... 
Texas: 

Beaumont. 

Cleburne 

Denison 

Marshall 

Palestine 

Paris.... 

Sherman 

Temple. 
Vermont: 

Barre 

Burlington 

Rutland. 
VmoiNU: 

Alexandria 

Danville 

Newport News 

Staunton 
Washington: 

Everett 

North Yakima 

WaUa Walla. 
West Virginia: 

Charleston. 

MartiiLsburg. 
Wisconsin: 

Appleton 

Ashland 

Betoit 

Eau Claire* 

Fond du Lar 

Jane>vlllo, 

Kenosha 

Manitowoc 

Marinette 

Wansj\u 
Wyoming: 

Cheyenne. 



138,533 
46,960 
46,000 
45.525 
41,795 
21.000 
35,647 
33.354 
40,100 
42,611 
51,074 
42,217 
72,241 

37,712 
68.31'"^ 
38,738 

32,837 

43,233 
65,53: 

47,743 

52,901 
36,560: 
34,0S3 
29.35o: 
28,459 
39.512 
39.270' 
38,549* 

30,018 
57,41fi' 
37,382i 



$3,426 
2,6«3 
3,810 
2.959 
1," 
700 
1,933 
2,888 
4,121 
1.539 
2.50: 
1,526 
2,902 

1,521 
5.513 
4,85^ 



22, 

29,7RS' 
43,274! 
13,400. 

111,614' 
95.739. 
59,37S|. 

87.059 
24, 44s 

61,682 

45,309 

63,304 

72,045 

5.S,61o 

43,7 

64,223 

41,103 

43,2S'<I 

53,C20| 



400 



78i 



2,400 



,3{Ci Z,40U 
'.45J J 

1 -wo' 



54 



3,865, 



879! 
200 

356 
641 
963 
210 



0) 



52 
1,10() 
2,05l' 

305. 



$2,401 
2.364 
4,500 
1.971 
3,093 
900 
4,000 
1,709 
6,355 
3,196 
4,123 
1,069 
3,682 

626 



755 

160 

8,0S2 
4,188 

927 



1,242 
300 

3,600 
331 
250 

. 150 



1,059 

4.574 
2,549 

61 
300 
398 

200 

6,259 



2,990 
641 

3,170 
2,485 
3,415 
4,365 



37,2Jl^ 1,729 



2,R59 
2,458 
753 
2,050 
3,576 

100 



s . 

ri 

O u 

H 



$5,940 
5,520 
6.000! 
4,576 
5.505. 
2,295 
1.925, 
2.850 
7.245; 
4.440^ 
9.000 
4,707] 

11,115 

4,704 
9,495 
6,380 



6,359" 
7,292 

3.001 

4,779 
3,70(^ 

l!962 
2.250 
2.575 
2,250 
3,077. 

3,220' 
7.661 
4,100. 

1.455' 
2.669 
3.851 
1,066| 

10,293 
7.150 

7, 158. 

7.588' 
2,465 

7,444' 
5,954; 
6,378 
6,860, 
6,295; 
7,500 
8,746 
6,434' 
4,490' 
6,466 

4,51H 



• Statbtics for 191 1-12. 



i Included in column 6. 



• Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 151 

foT m^iool purposes, 191^-13 — Continued. 

GROUP in.— CITIES OF 10,000 TO 25,C00 POPULATION— Continued. 



s Included in column 8. * Included in column II. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



152 EDUCATION REPORT^ 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses^ outlays^ and other payments 
GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION. 



•Statistics for 1911-12. i Included in column 11. 2 Included in column G. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL. SYSTEMS, 1912^13. 153 

for school purposes J 1912-lS — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION. 



'* Included in coliunn 10. * Included in column 7. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



154 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses, outlays, and other payments 
GROUP IV.-<:3TIE8 OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION-€ontinu«d. 



• Statistics for 1911-12. » Included in column 8. * Included in column 11. » Included in column 6. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 155 

for school purposes, 1912-13 — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continned. 



* Inoloded in oolumn 7. » Includod in column 10. • Included in column 13. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 . EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses j outlays, and other payTnehU 
GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



* Statistics for 1911-12. ^ Included iu column 6. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



C5ITY SCHOQ;. systems, 1912-13. 157 

Jot scJtool purposes^ 1912-lS — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



s Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



158 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenten^ outlayf, and other payments 
GROUP IV.— CITIES OP 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Conttoned. 



* Statistics for 1011-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY BCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 159^ 

for school purposes f 1912-13 — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES or 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



» Included fn oolomn 8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses, outlays, and other paymenti 
GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



• Statistics for 191 1-12. » Included in oolomn 10. « Included in column 6. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13, 



161 



for school purposes, 1912-lS — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



17727" 



* Included in column 4. 
-ED 1913— VOL 2 ^11 



« Included in column 11. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses^ outlays^ and other paymenU 
GROUP IV.—CITIES OF 5,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



• Statistics for 1911-13. i Included in column 6. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 163 

Jot school piurposea, 1912-13 — Continued. 

OBOUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



s Included in column 10. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



164 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Expenses j otUlaySj and other paymenU 
GROUP IV.-CITIEB OP 6,000 TO lOfiOO POPULATION— Contlimed. 



• Statistics for 1911-12. i Included in column 1 1. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 165 

Jar school purposes, 191 2-1 S — Continued. 

GROUP IV.— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



« Included In column 7. * Included In column 8. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



166 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 7. — EtperueSj ovtltq^t, and other paymtnta 
OROITF IV.— CITIES OF 5,000 TO 10,080 POPrXATIOX-Coatisoed. 

r 



9»' 



9^\ 

>^ 

I" : 
1 * - 
1 • . 



1 •'■ 
1 • • 



Fr<!»l«Trk:-',''irj ' 

Wuicri^^-.tt- 

Wjl«hin<,tox: 

CtntTAlii 

HoquBun ' 

OIjTDpia 

VancoTver 

West Vikgixia: 

Clarksburg* 

Elkins 

F^irm-int • 

Monr^'.-. ^rn* ' 

Mo•;r.lc^i:}e• ' 

Biri'-o • 

Ik-iver IHm 

Cn.;:*-* i Fills* I 



«-:« 



-1 L.'.;i 
MenA=-.. 

N^r.in 

fK-.'^-o 

Rn^'.-.i-i^T 

F-v^tn M'.* iiikee... 

bv-.enj f^r.nl 

Wi*#»«^OWTi • 

Wi:k. - t 

W»-s: A^^« 

Wr-yrs ,: 

Lir.Tiy 

P. - •: <irirjr* 



307 
61 

i,oeo 

1,631 
6CO 

J 

5:'» 

9t\ 

23.. 

I 

3W 

I 

^J 
^i 
2c*> 



5i> 
147 



« « :...! 

im I eoa 

Xonr> I 5,iiJ 

2, •Til) 3.521 1 

2,30 4. SIS «,l^r 
2, no 1,300» 1.3S> 

iV) 3. 

225 6o2 1,9>0 

2,5<0 l.sn s,2S* 

30 I, ICO 4. sai 
l,aOD • i,d3a 

'I*^' I 1,757^ 

1. *>5^ 3,10l> I 

2.v-)7 1 l.VTi* 

2. ''79 2.012: 

2. M2 [? 

2. M» i,sa> 

1.7i> I l,ott>. 

2,riaj 9iii> 

• S4<> 4,.M1 

2S7 74oe l,77lX 

1.7^7 7? 

2,M3 l.iiH 

273 1.41rt 

2. 2"i*> »v^N !.'*'*>' 

2,tr27 9l10| I, HO 

2.«"> I I 

2. •«» I 2,o:t> 

2,0tO l,Jvk> ' 

__\ I 

•Statistics for 1911-12. 



9.271........' ..'.... 

28.J I I 4.0 

29.^-^ 561, 1,915 3.3 

23.a>2 MO l.OOS 3.940 

37.6a> 20Q( SSOJ 3,69Q| 

46,9« I 4.4a 

2lj»^ ' 42> 1,500» 

45.«ii^> ' I 4.80O 

29.<>o 122 2.9att 

».(>72' 1,065 8m! S.7M 

1S,3M ■ 1.52S 2,5ia. 

32.r\r> ' 2.1^ 3.«0l 

27.2V7 " 1.54S 4,54& 

14.2U ' 1,397 1.505. 

20,4<>2 191 W9 3,111 

17.r^7 • 714 2,»r, 

a\v\i 1,21'> 8S4 2,774 

14 svS 9.2 > 1,710 

1V>>1 27S S37 2,44l| 

15.71^ 90 ^osai 

25.VV2 l,6a> 2,600] 

22. 7^ 471^ TO 2,3 

25.'>^? 66 ' 2,9 

23.ys5 1.237 2,5 

J ' 

?2.yc l.rt^ 1.071 3.7 

21.'"»ii> s»i 2,'tii> 2,9 

3.\71i I.aM 5,173 3,6 

I : I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 167 

for school purposes f 191i-13 — Continued. 

GROUP rV— CITIES OF 6,000 TO 10,000 POPULATION— Continued. 



»9 
M) 
(1 
S2 

8 

A 
(6 

» 

ro 
ri 
r2 
^3 

'4 



7 
'8 
^9 
iO 

i2 
t3 

» 

» 

M) 
»1 
t2 
8 
M 

)5 

n 

)i 

)2 

n 

)5 
)6 

n 
\s 

)9 
10 

il 

12 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



168 



^ 

5 



2 






t 2 

O 



o 

I 



I? 

C? Ik, 

I « 
5* CO 

V O 
S o 



^ 



n 



2| 









aa 



111 



5^ 









•^ 
£ 






•^ o. 



a s ^ ?i H jfl 
"S hr.*"! *■ o 3 



^1 



I § 






i 



^T3 e'S 2x9 



•3^ 

CO c9 * 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

pSS§W58iX3SSlXiWSWs¥iW5ii§S" 



iMirRiiwiiiiiiSiiiiiifTiriifiii 



SI'iissi'"! ii«3 iSiSRSgg 



12 i§l :r 



§§ 



■flMsIHflHSSillllllilflllflfSSg 



c« ^ o**^ ^^to 






82 






I 



lis 



§g 



ff 



§s 



U 









Ms 
as" 



If 



liIfEllglfiiSgiIiilliiHIIB"IISSg§g 
2| s I g g 5 £0 ss 8 § s s -'c3 s ?■ 2 8 a 3 5 a s 2 1 ="a s a sts I 















228S§§SS2§55SS 



l§S8§§§2§il§giil§ig§g2iS§SsgiS8iS 



IMIHMfTPIIIilllllllllllOIli 

g2S9S|SSR\:2Saaa|58"SS!JSg35|S!»='a!9RS 



woScs*o«fCJ-««^^rtScot38 
J2 cT « w CO m" 01 •-<' ©"t^' «^ eo M3 icToc JD t«^ 



:S92£!2888i8 



:55Si 






a . J - 



II ;§' 



!llll1lll,illllllS 



>>-\ 



I^|(S g ^sitsS-g^i SI'S is ill-l lltl i ll'Sii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13, 



169 






iHlSi? 



is 

of •^ 






Liia 









~5oSo 



t«^ OO Ok (p «>l 



§^5rc^ K o Mj 






5? 
O 

M 

.-3 
P 

O 



o 



O 






O 

O 



g 

I 



J9 

8 



8 
I 



1 
1 

B 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



170 EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 



I 
§ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 



171 












imiif 

•"ssssss" 



SS"R8¥SR¥s*^8¥aS'8¥5SB8"s"e'S5SS8"S"85¥S8S 



srr 



ii:§ 



i-isij- 



lUTi 



pIMIflMIISlSMrsIIirilSiliiiT 

CI 1^ f-i *H f-i v4 CO 



r- •H eo cf « ei' -^Vefcf V^Nf-i-^ eocTcTMo f-Tr^i-T eff-J* 






MsllilSfifllf 



9aoo»^t^c2eo*o«ot»t^o»>ot» 






W»o«cf«^eoeo»-rcoc«f«-r 






- ; iissg iSif 



IMfflHilHslllllllllli ir 

R3V8a"S5¥aBSS'=Vs!8S'"s'?'S"s'R8'S fs 



iHIilHf 






ii¥i¥§l 'S i slsiffsfl^ 



p'cicoc«'eoe«f»-roorx~"vcreo»oc«fcic^ocrV«o"t^c«r'r 









J2«'K^;t;e.| 



is J! 



llis^J^ll'^-^^liliPll58^ll*l|s|| 

S'S li^^'^l^ > b i^ > a § flip's s^ i i-S^-c 3 i^^:a'§ « S. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



172 



EDUCATION KEPOBT, 1913. 



"^ 


X 
K 
> 


J5 


O 


^ 


CJ 


ft 


5z; 


1 


< 


1 


c 


o 


< 


1 


A 




o 



o 



o» ^ 



o 
Pi 
o 



ts 



•J 






o -3 U a aj 3 R 



sl 



HhiUH 






B 



0^ 






4imm 






•3 



>0^ 3 S B i 



Ill 



&. A, 






^1 



11 


















• ^ ««• M ^ ^ »-i 



ii 









fiyR 



mn 



i 



§3§i 

oecTa 



i 



m 



§s 



S3 



11 



II 















l§i§§iil 



o •^ r» ^ eo't^to «o )Q to o *o M wTf-Tco Qo cCi-Tf-i'c^ 












SSoS 



'l^j 






|i 






s| 



mi §|i|°ii|2| ill p i|l|||^ii|i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 















Si;§§ 



SSI 



§§ 









§2§SI§3ia 
























o 

O 



o 



o 



Eh 



Pi 
D 
O 

o 



CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 173 















S 






^ii 



§s 



8§- 






ilMM^ssgiisssisgssiiis 



1-1 f-l w« -^ ^ 



^,-l-H MrH OfH 



|gSsS2siiiiS|S|s§3isssi8| 



C*«-n-l «-i«»HCO»H^ ^C4 



s 






m 



ill 

-Tor 



^1 



iil§§g|§a 



^§§13 






SBigtp§iilS§S§J.§Siii§i5iSilli5l5§3| 

« jg Veo «o •-* "H ^ iM,-i CO f^'i-i cT^ •-? eo »H^co»-rcfc«cfc«fc«f .a 



88 



as!? 



S5 



g$SS"3SSS2"aS"S 



^i 



3aS-|g 












a 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 



BDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 






0> 

'♦3 

c 



l«?g 












R3" 









£• 1 






ft. a, 

I I 

I = 






u 






111 



|j 



4iill^tt 






I 



s^a 



a 



isiii 



n 



% 






ss 



S 



§SI 



2S 



§Si§i|§§|Si39p§|=§|§|S|g 



p^eo ^^-^^^e*-* e«« ^ 



lii§ii§l§IIS§i§liig§§§SS9§i§ 



« « <.re>iM 









i§5iiiiiii§?siiiiisss§i§ssi 

I jTo o — ^ •^ «« io cQ eCco CO iQ oTco cf M •< ^ ^ ^ cq «^^CQ OO ^ 






S.II§sS5sll£lsSisli§?S3 



p36-«-* r» CO c*-* 









ll==i 






28i§SiS 






£ I 



iSHiilsiiiiiSSIiliSliiiSiiiiiS 

8 rfj S 2 g S S S 8 5 S 2 $ S'S 2 2 &V5 2 5 2 g ^^ 



I " T z 









: - - i r ^ 5_ 






iiilii 



PAPA 



s 



S = | = £-r*J5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



C3TT SCHOOL SYSTKJCS, 1911-lX 175 



iSSgSiSSSSSSSiiiilisiiliiligisisgii 

8 § 5? gV!? a s sVsVs ft S S 2 § 2 2 §: s g J? g"g i $ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 



BDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



9 

'♦3 

a 
o 



§ 



^ 


O 


*^ 


*^ 


45 


< 


C 


^ 


E 


D 


S> 


(X. 


s. 


2 


1 


§ 


o 


8 


'? 


^ 


Q 


o 


^ 


H 


00 




1 


§ 


S 


^ 




b. 


:^ 


O 


8 


OQ 




u 






p 


H 




HH 


1 


t 


s. 


0^ 


'^ 


o 


^ 
*? 


o 



I 



< 



o3 



^i rills 



:s. 



••pllilN 






-"s 












III 



2* 



itiS' 






g-a^' 









.1: 









^1 

^1 



3 C 



$ X S CI «• 



•S.i s X a » * 9 
^ - a » |-3 S^ 



P = 



a 



liiii 



§i 



§§ 



gss 



32 



iSS 



siiiijsSsHsssaiissssssss 






eo i-i»H^^ f^ ^14 'VC4*H 






i§si§isiig§Eg§i§§ii§§i§§sgii§si 



'•o'o»^.^»M'«o,-rioeocf«oeoioo»'eoef^»-ri-r»^ 



S'^S 



^ COiXi^COCOf^ 






f^Mf^^^^ 



PJAI 






sgiisis 



gts2"s8"82ss¥a¥5¥ss"ssas2Vssas9"«*s" 






!§§§ 



i§§ 



§§§§ 



eococfeoeow 






Zh; 



^§S§ 







IllllllfctI ISi| il iltl|||||t||| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



cm SCHOOL SYSTEMS, 1912-13. 






8 



s 



ii 



mum 



88Vs¥»sfs'ff2sVsaVsa"a"s'2*sf!faa8V8'*a"85¥a28 



«i 



8 



31 



S£ 



Sg 






ssisssgiiisi 



.-I 00 ^ 



§§§i§ss§§§§ss§i§iis§§ig§igg»8nigiii 






§§§li3§Ssg§Sg§ 



i§§i§§§is§Sii§§§igi§§§§i§ssigi3§ii§ 



^ »« M <«• M « CO CO lO «-iOIC«^C<«i-t 



t^ c«i-i^t« Cieo^^i- 



'S§g§ig§§i§g§§i3§iii- 

cow i-Tct ^jC-TctV^'^.-r.-r 












ai 



s s 8 a 8 8"s S5 !s : s s 8 s a"a"" * 3 " : 



i§isg§g§§|ga|§g 
i2SRaag"ssaaa"s8' 



i§ 






^cfcfeocfeoeTcteo 









ss 






:« . 






i-TeocfcfcC^eo 



g§§l§ 



5 



J3 






:S5^!Sa3ii 



175 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER IV. 

UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL 

SCHOOLS. 



For the year ending June, 1913, this bureau received reports from 
596 universities, colleges, and technological schools. States or 
municipalities control 94 of these institutions, and 502 are controlled 
by private corporations. A few colleges have each year failed to 
report, and when this occurs for two years in succession their names 
are dropped from the tabular lists. Others, as New Windsor College, 
Maryland, cease to exist; or are combined with other institutions, as 
in the case of the union of Baldwin University and German Wallace 
College in Ohio; or become academies or jxmior colleges, as Ward- 
Belmont School, formerly known as Belmont College for Young 
Women, Tennessee. Additions to the tabulated list include those 
institutions newly opened for instruction, as Roanoke Woman's 
College, Virginia; and those from which reports are received after the 
lapse of two years. The names of the institutions thus dropped or 
added will be found in the following list: 

CHANGES IN TABULATED LIST OF COLLEGES. 

Colleges (IS) tabulated in 191S, but not in 1912: Cox College, Georgia; Luther College, 
Iowa; Wheaton College, Maasachusette; "Whitworth College and Chickaeaw College, 
Mississippi; State Normal College, New York; Weaver College, North Carolina; 
Oklahoma School of Mines and Metallurgy; Reed College, Oregon; Carnegie Institute 
of Technology and ViUanova College, Pennsylvania; Eastern College and Roanoke 
Woman's College, Virginia. 

Colleges (IS) not tabulated in 191S, but tabulated in 1912: Athens Female College, 
Alabama; Andrew Female College, Georgia; Margaret College,* Kentucky; Leland 
University (colored), Louisiana; New Windsor College,^ Maryland; Pritchett College, 
Missouri; St. Anselm's College, New Hampshire; Peace Institute, North Carolina; 
Greenville Female College, South Carolina; Belmont College for Young Women,' 
Boscobel College, Walden University (colored), Tennessee; Lewisburg Seminary,* 
West Virginia. 

There were 202,231 students in the collegiate and resident graduate 
departments of universities, colleges, and technological schoob. The 
number of such students for each year since 1889-90 is shown in the 
table following. 

» Transferred to Ibt of secondary schools. « Diseontinued. » Merged with Ward Seminary. 
1772T'— ED 101.3— VOL 2 12 177 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



Number of colUgiaU and resident graduate students in universities f colleges, and techuh 
logical schools from 1889-90 to 1912-lS. 



Year. 



Universities and 
colleges. 



Men. Women. 



Colleges 

for 

women 

(Division 

A). 



Women. 



CoUeges 

for 

women 

(Division 

B). 



Women. 



Schools of tech- 
nology. 



Men. Women. 



Total number. 



Men. Women. 



1889-90.. 
1890-91.. 
1891-92.. 
1892-93.. 
189:^^4.. 
1894-95.. 
1S95-96.. 
1890-97.. 
1897-98.. 
1898-99.. 
1899-1900 
1900-1901, 
1901-2..., 
1902-3..., 
1903-4... 
1904-5... 
1905-6... 
190«i-7... 
1907-S... 
1908-9... 
1909-10.. 
1910-11.. 
1911-12.. 
1912-13.. 



38, 

40, 

45, 

46, 

50, 

52, 

56, 

55, 

68, 

58, 

61, 

65, 

66, 

69, 

71, 

77, 

»97, 

»96, 

U06, 

i 119, 

» 119, 

»119, 

»125, 

il28. 



8,075 

0,439 

10,390 

11,489 

13,144 

14,298 

16,746 

16,536 

17,765 

18,948 

20,452 

21,468 

22,507 

24,863 

24,413 

26,739 

131,443 

i 32,850 

135,265 

1 42,328 

143,441 

1 64,546 

172,703 

1 73,587 



1,979 
2,265 
2,636 
3,198 
3,578 
3,667 
3,910 
3,913 
4,416 
4,593 
4,872 
5,260 
5,549 
5,749 
6,341 
6,305 
6.653 
7,612 
7,977 
8,458 
8,874 



10,013 
9,851 
9,878 
9,102 
10,559 
10,668 
10,513 
10,929 
10,570 
10,866 
11,006 
11,021 

11 511 



6,870 
6,131 



707 
481 
481 
843 
1,376 
1,106 
1,065 
1,094 
1,289 
1,339 
1,440 
1,151 
1,202 
1,124 
1,269 
1,199 



44,926 
46,220 
51,163 
65,305 
69,814 
62,063 
65,143 
64,662 
67,018 
67,505 
72,169 
75,472 
78,133 
82,394 
86,006 
92,161 
97,738 
96,675 
106,945 
119,480 
119,578 
119,026 
125,750 
128,644 



20,874 
22,036 
23,385 
24,632 
28,657 
29,739 
32,244 
82,472 
34,040 
35,746 
37,770 
38,900 
40,569 
42,731 
42,057 
45,562 
60,826 
63,125 
64,815 
62,997 
64,005 
64,546 
72,703 
73,587 



1 Students in schools of technology are tabulated in universities and colleges, 
t Students in colleges for women are tabulated in universities and colleges. 

DEGREES CONFERRED. 

Tables 6, 7, and 8 show the number and kmds of degrees conferred 
in 1913 by the 596 institutions. There were 890 honorary degrees 
conferred, including 336 D. D., 278 LL. D., 47 Sc. D., and 119 A. M. 
The degree of doctor of philosophy was conferred on exammation by 
44 institutions, on 433 men and 57 women. The institutions granting 
the degree are as follows: 

Institutions conferring the Ph. D. degree on examination in 191S. 



States. 



Cal... 
Do.. 

Cole- 
Do., 
Conn.. 
D.C. 

Do.. 

Do.. 
lU 

Do.. 

Do., 
Ind... 

Do., 

Do.. 
Iowa., 
La.... 
Md... 

Do., 
Mass., 

Do., 
Do. 
Do. 



Institution. 



University of California 

Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versitv 

University of Colorado 

University of Denver 

Yale University 

Catholic University of Amer- 
ica. 

George Washington Univer- 
sity. 

Howard University 

University of Chicago 

Ewing College 

University of Illinois 

Indiana university 

Hanover College 

University of Notre Dame. . 

State University of Iowa 

Tulane University 

Johns Hopkins University. . 

Loyola College 

Massachusetts Institute of 
Tectmology. 

Harvard University 

Radcliffe College 

Clark University 



Men. 



9 
42 

5 
15 

? 

1 
3 



Wo- 
men. 



11 

1 • 
48 



12 1 



States. 



Mich.. 

Do.. 
Minn.. 
Mo.... 
Nebr. . 
N.J... 
N.Y.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 
Ohio.. 

Do.. 
Pa.... 

Do.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 

, R.I... 

Tenn.. 

Va.... 

Wis... 



Institution. 



University of Michigan 

Adrian College 

University of Minnesota 

St. Louis University 

University of Nebraska 

Princeton University 

Cornell University 

Columbia University 

New York University 

Teachers College 

University of Cincinnati .. - . 

Ohio State University 

Bryn Mawr College 

Grove City College 

Dropsie College 

University of Pennsylvania. 

University of Pittsburgh 

Villanova College 

Brown University 

Vanderbllt University 

University of Virginia 

University of Wisconsin 



Total. 



Men. 



433 



Wo- 
men. 



67 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 179 
BENEFACTIONS. 

The aggregate of gifts and bequests, excluding grants by the 
United States, different States, and municipalities, reported for the 
year 1912-13, was $24,651,958, showing a decrease of $131,132. Of 
this amount, $4,476,581 was for increase of plant, $4,129,903 for cur- 
rent expenses, and $16,045,474 for endowment. Forty-five univer- 
sities, colleges, and technological schools reported gifts above $100,000 
received during 1912-13, amounting to $18,680,316. 

Benefactions, 



States. 



Gal.... 
l>o.. 

Colo... 
Conn.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 
D.C.. 
Oa.... 

ni.... 



Do.. 

Do.. 
Iowa.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 

Do.. 
Kans.. 
Me.... 

Do.. 
Ifd.... 

Do.. 



Do. 



Institution. 



Uiiverdty of California 

Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
versity. 

Colorado College 

Trinity College 

Wesleyan University 

Yale University 

Catholic University of America. 

Mercer University 

Armoor Institute of Technol- 

Umverslty of Chicago 

Augustana College 

Coe College 

Dee Moines College 

Drake University 

Simpson College 

College of Emporia 

Bowdoin College 

Colb y College 

Ooucher College 

Johns Hopkina University 

Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 
Harvard Univeraity 



Amount. 



$1,245,962 
100,000 

198,028 
173,120 
280;381 
1,418,936 
167,790 
100.000 
110,000 

1,307,928 
123.362 
563,061 
105,000 
210,000 
120.343 
126,706 
145,001 
112,783 
181,589 
260,566 

1,071,608 

2,095,451 



States. 



Mass... 

Do... 

Do... 

Do... 
Minn... 
N. H... 
N.J... 
N.Y... 

Do. 

Do... 

Do... 

Do... 

Do... 
N.C... 
Ohio.. 

Do... 

Do.. 
Oreg.. 

Do... 
Pa 

Do... 

Va 

Wis.... 



Institution. 



ty.. 



Total., 



Amount 



$238,609 
402,489 
106,861 
100,844 
100,387 
152,436 
769,403 
288,923 

1,421,804 
223,446 
142,446 
947,355 
202,229 

1,203,145 
314,092 
220,281 
432,389 
176,576 
179,000 
283.100 
325,957 
104,939 
126,000 



18,680,316 



Income of higher educational institutions. 



Year. 


State and 
municipal 
appropria- 


invested 
funds. 


fees for tuition 

and other 

educational 

services. 


ig07-8 


$9,649,549 
10,414,780 
14,261,360 
14,707,243 
18,323,878 
19,049,823 


$11,058,327 
11,652,678 
12,276,200 
13,203,446 
14,225,908 
16,589,808 


$16,890,847 


1908-9 


16,579,964 


1909-10 


17,048,850 


1910-1 1 


18,493,120 


1911-12 


90,062,353 


1912-13 


20,919,176 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180 



EDUCATION EEPORT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Number of undergradvuUe and graduate students in public universitieSy colleges, 

and technological schools. 



States. 



United Statea 

North Atlantic Division... . 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division.... 

South Central Division 

Western DivialoD 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvc^a 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

TnillAnA. 

lUinols 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia . . . 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Porto Rico 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mlaaisslppi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

CoICHwlo 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Caliiomia 

HawaU 



In- 

stl- 

tu- 

tiona. 



94 



Collegiate departments. 



Men. 



52,219 



5,602 
24,957 
7,346 
6,564 
7,850 



497 
228 
817 
530 
165 
129 

1,951 


1,685 

3,949 
2,331 
2.596 
8,980 
2,536 
1,542 
2,387 
1,653 
369 
857 
1,280 
1,977 

169 

997 

358 

1,395 

343 

1,122 

1,352 

1,221 

209 

180 

529 
354 
993 

1,051 
527 

2,049 
320 
741 

248 

69 

1,115 

112 

108 

785 

167 

208 

1,374 

1,161 

2,484 

19 



Wo- 



23,409 



2,400 
13,067 
655 
1,896 
5,391 



85 
31 
98 

5 
22 

9 
2,093 


67 

2,563 

761 

669 

1,001 

1,008 

1,196 

2,121 

652 

319 

182 

1,248 

1,347 




166 


123 

2 
18 

8 
146 
192 

154 
104 

77 
290 

91 
664 
164 
352 



88 

1,006 

59 

37 

568 

145 

148 

997 

60S 

1,501 

5 



TotaL 



75,628 



2.646 



7,902 

38,024 

8,001 

8,460 

13,241 



582 
259 
415 
635 
187 
138 

4,044 


1,742 

6,512 
3,092 
3,265 
4,981 
3,544 
2,738 
4,508 
2,305 
688 
539 
2,528 
3,324 

109 

997 

524 

1,395 

466 

1.124 

1,370 

1,229 

355 

372 



458 
1,070 
1,341 

618 
2,713 

4M 
1,093 

417 

167 

2,121 

171 

145 

1,353 

312 

356 

2,371 

1,769 

4,045 

24 



Graduate depart- 
ments. 



Men. 



1,305 



93 

1,647 

230 

150 

526 



15 
2 


21 

2 
4 


49 

161 

129 

245 

198 

302 

114 

117 

99 

17 

7 

155 

103 


89 
17 
62 
13 
48 
17 
25 
6 
3 

17 
7 

26 
19 
27 
40 
2 
12 

9 
4 

41 
1 
3 

29 

5 

64 

30 

340 





Wo- 
men. 



21 
734 
35 
63 
462 



5 





16 



125 
20 
61 
73 
92 
69 
64 
84 
5 
6 
114 
71 




4 

7 
1 

10 
6 
5 
2 

3 

4 
1 
2 
7 

24 
1 

11 

3 

4 
37 

6 
16 
6 

72 
17 
301 




Total. 



8,951 



114 

2,381 

265 

203 

988 



149 
306 
271 
394 
183 
181 
133 
22 
13 
269 
174 


39 
21 
62 
20 
49 
27 
31 
11 

5 

20 
11 
27 
21 
34 
64 
3 
23 

12 

8 

78 

1 

9 

45 

6 

5 

136 

47 

641 





Total number of under- 
graduate and grad- 
uate student?. 



Men. 



54,865 



5,595 
26.604 
7,576 
6,714 
8.376 



Wo- 
men. 



24,714 



2,421 
13,801 
690 
1,949 
5,853 



TotaL 



79.579 



8,016 
40,405 
8,266 
8,668 
14,229 



512 


J 


230 


31 : 


817 


98 ; 


651 


5 


166 


22 


131 


9 


1,734 


2,109 



57 


4,110 


2,688 


2,460 


781 


2,841 


730 


4,178 


1,074 


2,838 


1,100 


1,666 


1,265 


2,604 


2,185 


1,752 


686 


886 


824 


864 


188 


1,435 


1,362 


2,080 


1,418 


169 





1,036 





375 


170 


1,467 





356 


130 


1,170 


8 


1,369 


28 


1,246 


14 


215 


151 


183 


194 


546 


157 


361 


108 


1,019 


78 


1,070 


202 


554 


98 


2,089 


688 


322 


165 


753 


363 


257 


172 


73 


92 


1,156 


1,043 


113 


50 


111 


43 


814 


584 


167 


151 


213 


148 


1,438 


1,060 


1,191 


626 


2,824 


1,862 


19 


5 



602 
261 
415 
556 

187 
140 

4,064 


1,791 

6.798 
3,241 
3,571 
5,252 
8,938 
2,921 
4,689 
2,438 
710 
552 
2,797 
3,498 

160 
1,036 

545 
1,457 

486 
1,173 
1,397 
1,200 

866 

377 

703 

469 
1,007 
1,362 

652 
2,777 

487 
1,116 

429 

165 

2,109 

172 

154 

1,398 

318 

361 

2,607 

1,816 

4,686 

24 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIEB, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 181 

Tablb 2. — Number of undergraduate and graduate students in private universities^ collegeSy 

and technological schools. 



States. 



United Statca 

North AtUntIc Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Dlvidon: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

ICassachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvajila 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

nilnoiB 

lilchigan 

Wisconsin 

lilnnesota 

Iowa 

lOssouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kflnnan 

Booth Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Porto Rico 

SoDth Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mlsdsslppl 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arlsona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

HawaU 



In- 

stl- 

tu- 

tions 



Collegiate departments. 



Men. 



502 I 68, 161 



105 
192 
91 

S4 



35.366 
18,130 
6,283 
5,006 
3,376 



925 
1,256 

320 
6,512 

675 
3,078 
11.906 
2,278 
8,416 

2,595 
2,759 
4,513 

940 
1,031 

878 

1,816 

1,498 

89 

231 

590 
1,190 


734 
829 

1,182 
240 

1,622 

894 

619 

163 



577 
1,525 
318 
475 
510 
1,269 
263 
60 





581 









26 

350 

235 

2,234 





Wo- 
men. 



46,358 



114,510 



15.820 
18, 174 
6,040 
3,806 
2,500 



318 



147 

6,587 

189 



5,917 

1 

3,670 

3,139 
1,409 
5,561 

672 
1,702 

618 

1,885 

1,246 

04 

218 

543 
1,087 



673 

445 

1,288 

256 

1,093 

1,027 

1,143 

124 



627 
772 
298 
392 
319 
1,142 
193 







552 









27 

270 

244 

1,407 





Total. 



5,618 



51.195 3,473 

1,320 

414 

199 

212 



12,332 
8,812 
5,876 



1,243 
1,266 
467 
12,099 
864 
3,078 
17,823 
2,279 
12,066 

6,734 

4,168 

10,074 

1.612 

2,733 

1,496 

3,701 

2,744 

183 

449 

1,133 

2,277 


1,407 
1,274 
2,470 

496 
2,715 
1,921 
1,762 

287 


1.204 
2,297 
616 
867 
829 
2,411 
456 
132 





1,063 









53 

620 

479 

8,641 





Graduate depart- 
ments. 



Men. 



2,515 



1,275 

852 

80 

75 





11 

1 

886 

55 

252 

1,693 

151 

424 

34 

35 

1,136 

22 

8 

4 

10 

50 

3 

3 

3 

8 



177 

150 

11 


60 

4 
12 





11 

168 





11 
8 

1 



85 





3 
1 
173 




Wo- 



. 



1 

188 

25 

27 

815 



210 

21 
10 
120 
6 
2 
10 
17 
35 


2 
11 


40 
16 
7 

4 
11 
2 



11 
6 
6 

48 
10 





24 





1 
3 
205 




Total. 



8,133 



4,748 

2,172 

404 

274 

445 



Total number of under- 
graduate and grad- 
uate students. 



Men. 



73,770 



38,830 
10,450 
6,607 
6,205 
3,588 





11 

2 

1,074 

80 

270 

2,508 

151 

643 

55 
54 
1,265 
28 
5 
14 
27 
04 
8 
8 
5 
10 



217 

166 

18 


64 
15 
14 





22 
173 
6 

54 
18 

1 



60 





4 
4 
378 




025 
1,267 

321 
7,308 

730 
8,330 
13,500 
2,420 
8,840 

2,620 
2,704 
6,640 

062 
1,034 

882 

1,826 

1,557 

02 

234 

503 
1,108 


Oil 
070 

1,103 
240 

1,682 

808 

631 

163 



588 

1,603 

318 

475 

521 

1,277 

263 

70 





566 









26 

353 

236 

2,407 





Wo- 



48,873 



122,652 



17,104 
10,026 
6,120 
3,881 
2,733 



318 



148 

6,775 

214 

27 

6,732 

3,880 

8,160 
1,428 
6,690 

678 
1,704 

628 

1,902 

1,281 

94 

218 

545 
1,098 



713 

461 

1,205 

256 

1,007 

1,038 

1,145 

124 



638 
777 
304 
392 
362 
1,152 
103 
63 





676 









27 

271 

247 

1,612 





TotaL 



55.043 
38,476 
12,826 
0.086 
6,321 



1,243 

1,267 

460 

13,173 

044 

3,357 

20,331 

2,430 

12,720 

5,780 

4.222 

11,330 

1,640 

2.738 

1.510 

3.728 

2,838 

186 

452 

1.138 

2,206 


1,624 
1,440 
2,488 

406 
2,770 
1.036 
1,776 

287 


1,226 
2,470 
622 
867 
883 
2,420 
456 
133 





1,142 









53 

624 

483 

4,010 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



182 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 3. — Undergraduate students in universities, collegeSy and technological schools. 



States. 



Total 
insti- 
tu- 
tions. 



Colleges for 
men. 



Insti- 
tu- 
tions. 



Under- 
gradu- 
ate 
stu- 
dents. 



Colleges for 
women. 



Colleges for both sexes. 



Insti- 
tu- 
tions. 



Under- 
gradu- 
ate 
stu- 
dents. 



Insti- 
tu- 
tions, 



Undergraduate students. 



lien. 



Wo- 
men. 



Total. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

'tr<^Tig ft g 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Oeorria 

Florida 

Porto Rico 

Soath Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

Hawaii 



596 



145 



37,503 



105 



18,896 



846 



116 
217 
113 
98 
52 



82,877 



50,871 



20,641 
4,570 
9,053 
2,587 
652 



9,907 
1,787 
4,911 
2,154 
137 



46 
164 
39 
54 
43 



20,227 

38,517 

4,576 

8,983 

10,674 



8,322 
29,454 
1,793 
3,548 
7,754 



383 
1,256 

147 
4,453 

3,078 
6,401 
2.261 
2,662 



852 

250 

247 

94 

275 

523 





89 

78 

169 
1,570 

371 
2,189 

1,433 
1,506 
1,606 

209 


164 

357 

51 I 

311 I 

495 

1,149 



60 




272 






117 I 


263 
, 



! 





















6 


5,103 














6 


3,850 








8 


954 


3 


456 


1 


127 


4 


453 








1 


205 


1 


14 








10 


532 
































3 


490 


1 


162 


9 


1,179 


1 


100 


7 


788 


7 


946 


8 


1,100 


1 


146 








6 


267 


5 


298 


2 


291 


6 


529 


3 


817 


3 


402 


1 


50 




















1 


20 












































1 


117 









1,039 
228 
490 

2,589 
840 
129 

7,456 
17 

7,439 

5,705 
3,767 
6,257 
4,670 
3,320 
2,326 
8,928 
2,628 
458 
588 
1,781 
3,060 


161 
816 
388 
583 
1,311 
740 
234 
163 
180 

942 
1,522 
1,260 
1,216 

642 
2,169 

683 

750 

248 

69 

1,374 

112 

108 

785 

167 

234 

1,607 

1,396 

4,455 

19 



403 

31 

245 

489 

211 

9 

4,160 

1 

2,773 



99 
61 
124 
192 

614 
678 

84 
153 

93 

1,404 

807 

415 

169 

88 

1,538 

69 

37 

568 

145 

176 

1,267 

852 

2,851 

5 



133,748 



28,549 
67,971 
6,360 
12,631 
18,328 



1,442 

259 

735 

3,078 

1,051 

138 

11,616 

18 

10,212 



6,246 


10,951 


2,043 


5,810 


6,777 


12,034 


1,673 


6,343 


2,505 


6,825 


1,800 


4,126 


4,006 


7,934 


1,866 


3,994 


413 


sn 


400 


988 


1,791 


3,572 


2,434 


6,523 








183 


344 


449 


' 1,265 


109 


497 


279 


■ 862 


307 


1,618 



287 
372 

1,456 
2,100 
1,344 
1,368 

635 
3,573 

890 
1,166 

417 

167 

2,912 

171 

. 145 

1,353 

312 

409 

2,874 

2,248 

7,300 

24 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIYEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TBOHNOLOOIOAL SCHOOLS. 183 
Table 4. — Professors and instructors in umversitieSj colleges, and technological schools. 



Btates. 



InsU- 

tu- 

tiona. 



Preparatory 
departments. 



Hen. 



Wo. 



Collegiate 
departments. 



Men. 



Wo. 
men. 



Professional 
departments. 



Hen. 



Wo. 
men. 



Total number 
(excluding 
duplioates). 



Hen. 



Wo- 
men. 



United SUtes 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Hichigan 

Wisconsin 

Hinnesota 

Iowa 

Hissouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Goath Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Floridte 

Porto Rico 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Hississlppi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

NewMexioo 

Arlxona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 

HawaU 



506 



2,739 



116 
217 
113 
98 
52 



542 
1,315 
320 
289 
364 



1,744 



16,075 



3,783 



6,055 



5 
25 

15 

22 
233 
89 
203 

196 
94 
201 
43 
37 
114 
163 
110 
66 
43 
56 
112 


66 
33 
36 

6 
63 
38 
47 
40 





767 
345 
260 
144 



5,430 
6,607 
1,775 
1,383 
1,790 



1,009 

1,408 

561 

417 



2,231 

2,592 

677 

882 

573 




4 


18 

5 
113 
8 



109 
58 

191 

7 

3 

55 

92 

103 
16 
34 
39 
60 



151 
142 
02 

1,056 
107 
402 

1,941 
809 

1,230 

921 
603 
956 
534 
563 
284 
516 
473 
111 
128 
168 
440 

25 
343 
188 
299 

103 
279 
215 
235 
69 
19 

196 
222 
152 
116 
177 
317 
86 
118 

56 
20 
242 
58 
34 
111 
32 
55 
275 
202 
686 
15 



10 
4 
7 

358 
6 
5 

410 
1 

208 



112 
251 
67 
77 
48 
229 
119 
27 
46 
79 
114 


40 
27 

103 
26 
99 
08 

116 
82 
20 

49 
105 
10 
82 
49 
75 
22 
26 

14 
11 
03 
12 

5 
26 

9 
13 
56 
54 
91 

5 



72 

24 

45 

495 



61 

885 

4 

645 

351 
252 
519 
136 
239 
182 
211 
270 
17 
6 
102 
208 


130 
306 
40 

4 

65 
10 
27 

3 



101 
250 
48 

187 
156 
73 
58 

4 


60 


20 

4 

38 

70 

350 





02 



24,982 



8,087 
9,393 
2,569 
2,469 
2,464 



220 
166 
137 

1,495 
107 
443 

8,121 
841 

2,057 

1,430 
896 

1,868 
653 
900 
558 
753 
870 
130 
168 
432 
717 

26 
526 
570 
884 
116 
811 
251 
283 
84 
10 

840 
400 
232 
142 
402 
406 
170 
170 

64 
81 

844 
55 
86 

111 
32 
61 

317 

280 

1,100 

15 



5,013 



1,268 

2,458 

066 

766 

455 



10 
4 
7 

365 
6 
5 

568 
11 

202 

408 

184 

448 

75 

151 

103 

358 

213 

63 

70 

153 

232 


75 
40 
170 
43 
166 
151 
234 
55 
32 

114 
169 

26 
147 

74 
135 

60 

41 

16 
14 
100 
14 

8 
10 

9 
14 
50 
73 
124 

5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 

Table 5. — Students in universities^ colleges^ and technological schools. 



1 Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless tbey are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIBS, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 185 
Table 6. — DtgreeB conferred on men by universities^ colleges, and technological schools. 



States. 


< 

(4 


n 


1 


n 


^ 

H 

t 
U 

n 


i 




1 
i 


1 




^ 
H 

i 

CQ 


9 




3 


t 




•d 
M 

a 

i 


1 
s 


i 

s 


United States 


14 


55 


7,024 


18 79 


118 


42 


102 


148 


307 


8 


119 


6 




11 


42 


685 


6'278 


<\H 








North Atlantic Division 




36 
15 


3,065 

2,825 

867 

544 

623 

167 
118 

17 
770 

45 
345 
938 
178 
487 

580 
371 
318 
308 
210 
155 
261 
185 
30 
37 
152 
218 

2 
117 
106 
194 

35 
200 

90 
103 

20 


18' 


103 
15 


'26 
7 
9 


34 
62 


45 
30 
39 
22 
12 


134 
40 
46 
36 
51 


"8 


271... 
66i 


4 
6 


4 

11 

4 

4 


446 

189 

33 

15 

2 


1 




North Central Division 






64 


6 


197| 37 


Boatb Atlantic Division 


1 
12 

1 


1 
25 


■ 


19 ... 


South Central Division 

Western Division 


... 


15 


.... 


6 


"i 


15 1 
47 -- 


North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


= 




= 


= 




= 




= 




^ 


New Hampshire 






























8 




... 




Vermont .' 




































Massachusetts 






















' 




' 




.... 








Rhode Island 


























1 


48 
279 
32 








Connecticut. 


























'<■' 








New York 




36 


18 


... 


103 






37 


9 
125 












New Jersey 















**i 


Pennsylvania 














34 

1 
12 


8 




27 

1 
7 




1 


79 

21 
5 
92 
15 
14 
20 
14 




1 


North Central Division: 
Ohio» 




9 




5 


2 


20 


16 
9 
3 


... 




*\^ 






1 


Indiana 




"6 


51 


Illinois 








" 








1 1 




Michigan! 




6 




59 






32 
7 




8 


*2 

2 






36 


Wisconsin 


















"65 


Minnesota .... 












6 








! 


19* . . . 


Iowa 














26 










1 


l... 


Missouri 








... 


10 






11 








'1 * 


63... 


North Dakota 














3 








8... 


South Dakota 








... 


3 








1 






***!'*' 


6 




1 


NflhnM»kft 


















"'\" 




....,-.. 


Kan«w 


























5 


2 








Booth Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


































Maryland 
































4 ... 


District of Columbia 


























"'\"' 


4 






Virginia 












6 






1 










1 
3 






West Virginia 












2 


**39 


2 
13 


... 


i;... 


... 


3 
2 


... 


4 ... 


North Carolina 














1 


South Carolina 








■ 
























Georgia 


















30 












22 
? 




11 ... 


Florida 


1 


... 








1 


















Porto Rico 










' 


















South Central Division: 

Kentucky 


12 




57 
80 
53 
53 
52 
169 
49 
31 




12 
3 


.... 


9 






1 . 


20 

1 
1 


4 

2 










Tennwsw '..... ....... 


5 

1 


6 
2 

4 
10 


3... 7 i 


Alabama 






,... 




1 




Mississippi 






23 








3 


11 


Louisiana 




4 




















1 




Texas 




... 










5 
















Arkansas 














8 


.... 




3 












8... 


Oklahoma * 














...::: 












1 


Western Division: 

Montana.. 
















1 
















1 


Wyoming* 






3 

149 

2 

1 
31 

1 
10 
66 
59 
299 

2 






























ColoradoT 


































New Mexico 






























41... 


Arizona.... 


1 


... 




























....1... 


Utah 






























Nevada 
































1 


Td^o 


































Washington 
















::::::::::::::: 








1 
1 








Oregon 
















12 


...J— 1.--. 




1 


5 








Calliomia 
















51 


...1.::; 






42 

1 




Hawaii 


















...1 ... 
































•■"! 'i 1 ' 















1 Bachdof of accounts, 1. 

s Bachelor of accounts. 6; bachelor of architectural engineering, 2. 

• Bachelor of arts in education, 3; bachelor of metallurgical engineering, 1. 
4 Bachelor of oratory, 1. 

• Bachelor of arts in edocatloo, 1. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



186 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 6. — Degrees conferred on men by universities, collegeSj and technological schools^ 

Continued. 



1 Bachelor of scienco in medicine. 3; bachelor of science in law, 1; bachelor of science in pedagogy, 23. 

* Bachelor of science in sanitary engineering, 2. 

* Bachelor of science in medicine, 10. 

* Bachelor of science in animal husbandry, 68; bachelor of science In agronomy, 20; bachelor of science 
in dairying, 12; bachelor of science in ceramics, 1 ; bachelor of science in agrictiltural engineering, 10; bachelor 
of science in education, 2. 

* Bachelor of science in Joomalism, 17. 

* Bachelor of science in agricultural engineering, 1. 
' Bachelor of science in textile engineering, 0. 

* Bachelor of science in medicine, 2. 

* Bachelor of science in mechanics, 27. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 187 

Table 6. — Degree* conferred on men by univenitieSf colleges, and technological schools — 

Continued. 



States. 


a* 


i 


f^ 
^ 


^ 

^ 


1 


ad 


1 

B 


i 


i 

i 






» 


1 










United States 


1,6S5 


12 


10 


9 


26 


344 


26 


9 


45 


503 


204 


226 


471 


7 


433 


5 


19 


North Atlantic DIvisJon... 
North Central Division .... 


838 
491 
110 

m 

57 


12 


1 

8 


4 


6 


85 
152 
21 
29 

K7 


12 
10 
3 


**9' 


24 1269 

11 171 

3 1 33 

4 { 20 
3 ' 10 


65 

99 

8 

25 

7 


58 
78 

**9* 

81 


3ti0 

93 

10 

3 

5 

1 


7 


260 
109 

47 
2 

15 


3 
2 


.... 


South Atlantic Division... 


....| 


18 


South Central Division.. 










' 


Wtttem Division. 


= 


1 


5 


20 


1 


^^ 






^ 1 — 








North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


1 

6 

3 

147 

28 

S2 

415 

63 

124 

09 
52 
126 
48 
51 
17 
18 
42 
1 
4 
31 
32 




6 
4 
i 

24 
6 
8 
9 
3 

26 

17 
6 
65 
10 
19 
5 
12 
i 
2 




5 1 




.1... 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


U 














13 

1 
2 


1 






1 




.... 


















... |.... 


M'iVQ^imh f 1 QAt t« 
















2 








61 
1 

35 
110 
13 
40 

3 
6 
62 
14 
17 
2 
8 
1 


*.!:!!!;i; 


Rhode Island 






















1 


Connecticut . . .... 






4 










4 

211 
33 

34 
20 
7 
12 
14 
19 
68 
3 
3 


*37* 
3 
21 

33 
15 
6 

**7* 
13 
18 

1 
5 


2 
25 

'si' 

14 

'36' 
3 

11 


1 
6 


2 

260 
65 
32 

33 
12 
5 
5 
8 
9 
23 
2 


"5* 
"2* 


1 


New York! 










21 


3 


.... 


New Jersey .... 


.... 


Pennsylvania**.* .*!.'.... 
North Central Division: 
Ohio»... 














8 

1 
1 
2 


^^ 














9 






TnrliaQA . 










.... 


.... 


Illinois.'.. 1^1^ " 














Michigan '^ 














2 


.... 


Wisconsin I' 'I 










4 

2 




Minnesota 
















.... 


Iowa*. ,'. 


















Missouri.".!'"!. ill.. 












1 


.... 


1 


North DftkotA 
















South Dakota 
















1 




....| 




Nebraska i 






.. . 




















2 






Kansas 






15 








1 

} 


1 


1 










Boath Atlantic Division: 


























Maryland 

District of Cohimbia... 
Virginia 


30 






... 




4 
8 
6 




•'"I 










14 






13 

27 

8 

20 

7 
1 

4 






.... 






( 


4 


i 
6 
























8 


9 
3 
2 

8 

1 
4 


.... 


6 




* 


....'.... 


West Viridnia' 


















North CftTolinft 










1 












8 




1 


2 


South Carfdina 






• ••. 














1 


16 


Georgia 


.... 




.... 




i 
2 














1 




Florida 




2 


.... 


1 




.... 






Porto Rico 






















South Central Division: 
Kentnckv 


2 
26 
5 
5 
10 
8 
1 
2 






















' 










Tennessee 










1 
9 
6 
11 

1 






1 


1 
6 


"h' 


1 






2 






Alabama' 










1 










MiiKivtinni 










::::i::::::.: 
























1 




1 
9 

4 


1 


1 
2 










Texas 














8 


19 
1 


3 
































OklahoTna 










1 
1 

"s* 








5 
9 

*76' 

1 






.... 






Western Division: 
Montana 






























Wyoming 


1 
8 






.... 






.... 




.... 


**2* 


.... 




"i' 


.... 




Colorado* 

New Mexico 




.... 












.... 


Arizona 

Utah 


...... 

1 






'.'.',. 




'T 


""\--" 
".'.'^".'.'. 




"5* 


"a* 


"i' 




.... 


....L... 












1 








Id^o 






.... 






*• 






















10 

6 

81 










6 
2 






3 


2 


1 


1 




























Cauforaia*.*.'.**.*.'".!!!!!! 
HawaU 






5 




42 






1 
.... 


....'.... 


1 




13 


1 











-T- 


....|.... 



» Master of architecture. 1; master of civil engineering, 2; master of mechanical engineering, 4; master in 
landscape designs, 9.i doctor of pedagogy. 4. .. ^ ^ » 

> Master of science in architecturo, 8; eleetrometallurgist, 7. 

» Master of science in education 3. ..._,« 

4 Master of agriculture, 2; master of horticulture, 3; master of science In engineering, 3. 

» Master of didactics, 1; master of science in animal husbandry, 4: master of scienoo in dairying, 1; master 
of science in horticulture, 2; master of science in soils, 1; master of soienoe in soology, 1. 

• Master of science in mechanical engineering, 1. 
» Master of accounts, 1. 

• Forest engineer, 4. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



188 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 7. — De^ees conferred on women by universities^ colleges^ and technological schools. 



» Bachelor of fine arts. I. 

« Bachelor of architecture, 1: bachelor of commercial science, 1; bachelor of library economy, 3; bachelor 
of painting. 4; bachelor of pedagogy in art, 2; bachelor of pedagogy in music, 4; master of science in agri> 
culture. 1: doctor of science, 3. 

> Bachelor of commercial science, 1: bachelor of aoooimts, 1; bachelor of business science, 1; bachelor of 
fine arts, 1 ; bachelor ot science in pharmacy, 1. 

* Bachelor of library science, 8. * Bachelor of painting, 2. 
B Master of home economics, 6. • Bachelor of oratory, 3. 

• Bachelor of fine arts, 1 ; master of didactics, 6. lo Bachelor of science in medicine, 1. 
' Bachelor of oratory, 1 ; bachelor of science in Journalism, 6. " Bachelor of fine arts, 1. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIES, C0LLEGB8, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 189 
Table 8. — Honorary degrees conferred by universUieSf colleges , and technological schools. 



states. 






Q 

d 

HJ 




4 


ft 

CD 






t 




< 


od 


s 

^ 


i 


^ 




p4 


United Btotee 


336 


278 


15 


43 


5 


9 


47 


2 


2 


2 


119 


14 


2 


2 


3 


2 


? 






North Atlantic Division 


94 
131 
46 
45 
20 


133 
62 
37 
27 
19 


11 
2 
2 


4 
2 
2 


2 

1 


8 


32 
11 
2 






1 
1 


73 
30 

7 
7 
2 


7 
3 


1 
1 


1 
1 


3 






North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 


2 


1 
1 


2 


1 
1 


South Central Division 


2 




1 
3 












Western Division 


1 


2 


















__ . _ 












** 


North AtlanUo Division: 
Maine 


2 
2 
5 
6 


4 
11 
10 








1 


1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
3 
7 
3 
9 

3 








6 
4 
5 

20 
3 
7 

14 
4 

10 

8 
1 
5 
7 
5 




1 






New Hampshire 














2 

1 








Vermont 


2 

"2 

1 
5 


1 

11 
3 
6 
4 


















Massachusetts 




















Rhode Island 


2 2 
6 1 6 

19 1 38 

3 > 9 
49 , 32 






















Connecticut 






















New York 


2 


6 






1 






1 






New Jersey 










1 


Pennsylvania 


6 
3 


.... 


1 


....!---- 




4 

1 


1 
1 








North Central Division: 
Ohio 


35 
16 
19 

7 
3 


23 
4 

7 
11 




1 


.... 










Indiana 














TIHtiaJs . . . 










1 
5 
2 








1 
I 












Michigan* 




1 
















2 '---- 


Wiscobsin * 




1 
















1 


UlFifv*«4>tft . . 


? 


? 
























Iowa 


15 

8 
3 


6 

8 
















1 


2 

1 










....I.... 


Mlj«nuri 


























North DakoU» 


























::::i:::: 


South Dakota 


7 




















1 










1 


Nebraska 


6 
10 


1 










2 
















ICaii9&ff * 


























Boath Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


1 
6 
6 
8 
2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
































Maryland » 


2 










2 


' t 


4 

1 














Diffdrict of Columbia 










1 














V«rEin*«l 


U 
1 
13 
14 
4 
1 


2 










1 














Wert Virginia 










1 ^ 


1 
1 














North Carolina 




1 








i 1 














South Carolina 








1 














Georgia 




1 










' 


















Florida 


























Porto Rico 




























South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


5 
19 


4 
7 
6 

1 
4 
1 
4 




1 








1 


1 














Tennessee 


2 






' 














Alfthi^mA , 


4 




I 






* ' 


1 
1 
3 
1 


1 










Mississippi 1 1 

T/Ouisfana • 










1 












1 






, 














Tptow . , !} 




' 




















Arkansas . ..< 7 






















Oklahoma 4 








:::::::: 












1 


Western Division: . 
Mcmtana ' 














1 ' 




1 








1 


Wvomine - . ' '- - 












1 








i |_ ^ 


Colorado 


4 


9 




2 






2 


) 1 


1 






t 1 


New Mexico 






1 , 






' 


Arizona ' 














1 










Utah 1 ... 














1 












Nevada L... 


1 






::::i :::: 


:::::::'::::;::: 








1 ( 


Idaho 


t 










1 1 1 








' 1 


Washi n irton 


11 
2 
3 


2 














::: i.:.. 








1 i 


Orecon 






















j 1 


California 


8 
















1 


2 






1 1 


Hawaii 














1 






1 




















1 










"*'l 



I Doctor of public health, 1 ; doctor of engineering, 1. 
> Bachelor of science, 1. 
* Master of laws, 1. 



* Bachelor of arts, 1. 

ft Electrical enfHneer, 1. 

• Bachelor of philosophy, 1. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



190 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 



191 






©«So>SS?««o 



gSisssscaisga' 


















855'. 
c5Sm 



S§§*^ 



^ii 









5^5? 



1-1 O W3 •* »^ 



-^S 






s^ 



sgiigs 



S88SgS3S 

»>. o 55 00 oo 35 rt O 



SSSSSSw9^SSSS 



ISIS 



s^s isle's 






S«8S 



»oj^C-? 



8:: 



?§li§3 



S 



giis sg§§ 



» CO eo ■^ »-< »c ^ 









SMS 



lis 






200 30^2 












o« o> * >-< 



rtoSoSXoco 



S552SS3SS^ 

•^ CO «-< "-^ C* CO 






2-a -- • K 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



192 EDUCATION RBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 10. — Property of universities^ colleges ^ and technological schools. 



states. 


Number 
of fellow- 
ships and 
scholar- 
ships. 


Number 
of volumes 

in 
libraries. 


Value of 

library, 

scientmo 

apparatus, 

machinery, 

andfur- 

niturei 


Value of 
grounds. 


Value of 

buildings 

(including 

dormitories). 


Value of 
dormitories. 


Productive 
funds. 


United States. . 


13,282 


17,211,649 


164,204,619 


$87,657,168 


$280,353,861 


$39,264,658 


$350,038,287 


North Atlantic Div. 
North Central Div.. 
South Atlantic Div. 
South Central Div.. 
Western Div 


6,078 

3,652 

2,437 

723 

392 


7,552,404 
5,623,180 
1,723,591 
967,735 
1,344,739 


21,929,248 
24,306,484 
6,010,532 
4,479,222 
7,480,133 


29,680,681 
28,550,393 
12,954,485 
7,236,567 
9,236,032 


98,400,645 
79,807,324 
37,692.860 
19,752,259 
24,640,763 


16,964,676 
10,835,273 
6,940,926 
4,098,992 
2,424,692 


171,781,504 
90,335,110 
20,088,366 
20,324.874- 
47,508.433 


NorthAtianticDiv.: 

MfliTifi 


319 
387 
312 

1,239 

2 

464 

1,235 
607 

1,613 

690 
138 
1,482 
164 
188 

36 
381 
222 

43 

34 
192 

82 


248,054 
156,600 
138,689 

1,866,716 
230,409 

1,168,800 

2,107,506 
411,444 

1,224,1^ 

42 
72 
1, 99 
83 
17 
33 
44 
73 
36 

204,' 623 
361,106 

20,150 
347,963 

318,574 
330,466 

61,875 
255,671 
167.803 
153,060 

60,539 
7,500 

163,238 
235,007 
87,100 
93,229 
112, 798 
174,388 
51,260 
50,715 

43,388 

33,000 

242,364 

29,386 

20,000 

60,332 

24,52f) 

34,462 

138,004 

108,559 

600.864 

9,860 


466,317 
418,000 
358,000 

2,977,022 

1,601,238 
636,527 

8,929,777 
403,200 

6,239,167 

;23 

t63 
60 
*4 
46 
46 
83 
•88 
100 
04 

\n 

«7 

179,000 
1,969,286 

176,294 
924,894 
180,815 
•851,644 
810,570 
504,556 
308,874 
104,600 

594,588 
742, 124 
448,180 
484,286 
713,930 
668,726 
302.850 
524,538 

334,700 
179,000 

1,119,562 
291,944 
115,000 
382,700 
151,780 
182, 770 
845,653 
461,196 

3,470,328 
35,500 


141,000 

440,000 

101,584 

7,633,230 

415,000 

304,000 

16,352,026 

1,013,850 

4,180,991 

04 
57 
22 
28 
68 
57 
30 
60 
80 
00 
63 
44 

46,000 
3,838,100 

1,814,391 
2,162,200 

446,622 
1,442,734 
1,467,100 
1,448,045 

255,000 
36,293 

1,196,494 
1,978,551 
609,000 
445,000 
1,874,631 
865,991 
102,500 
202,500 

178,000 

110,000 

1,179,193 

49,350 

33,000 

59,700 

83,891 

67,775 

1,482,423 

1,524,000 

4,367,700 

100,000 


»1 
KW 

SO 
G9 
i76 
09 
173 
«0 
37 

' !50 
06 
02 
166 
164 
31 
62 
S42 
>80 
87 
«2 
42 

160,000 
13,635,587 

3,969,341 
5,673,422 
1,223,578 
3,976,961 
4,239,208 
3,639,909 
1,248,662 
126,192 

194 
>06 
00 
08 
06 
45 
OO 
00 

649,500 

302,500 

3,378,427 

271,325 

245,000 

832,600 

477,436 

695,616 

2,301,920 

1,804,637 

13,713,002 

69,000 


07 
00 
00 
13 

68 
26 
00 
06 

199 
160 
»4 
03 

r,Q 

(10 
166 
120 
00 

>11 

00 
00 

4,000 
479,500 

768,034 
877,832 
160,000 
1,444,085 
937,249 
834,225 
431,000 
6,000 

641,745 
1, 155, 185 
202,000 
462,800 
347,245 
983,617 
160,600 
156,000 

76,000 
40,000 
265,487 
60,400 
75,000 




New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts.. 
Rhode Island... 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania... 

North Central Div.: 

Ohio 




Indiana 

Illinois 




Michigan 

Wisconsfai 

Minnesota 

Iowa 




Missouri 

North Dakoto.. 
South DakoU. . 

Nebraska. 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Div.: 
Delaware 


83 000 


Maryland 

District of Co- 
lumbia 

Virginia 

West Virginia.. 
North Carolina. 
South Carolina.. 
Georgia 


444 

210 
366 

53 
606 
427 
201 

24 
104 

248 
176 
65 
27 
147 
49 
10 
1 


6,362,393 

407,433 
6,477,328 

682,389 
2,968,953 
1,448,264 
1,855,824 

805,650 
7,132 

2,711,366 
4,143,077 
1,040,933 
1,446,874 
7,477,286 
2,721,739 
461,100 
333,500 

1,331,650 


Florida 

Porto Rico 

South Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 


Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Div.: 

Montana 


Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico.... 


8 

126 

2 


61,007 
1,857,225 


Arizona 


10,500 

143,080 

306,964 

818,006 

6,198,480 

4,314,882 


Utah 




Nevada 




90,000 
90,000 
275,271 
384,000 
1,069,534 


Idaho 


2 

70 

10 

174 


Washington 

Oregon 


Califomia 

Hawaii 


32,477,650 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 193 



I 



<s 


1 


^ 


£ 


(^ 




s 


£ 


^ 


S 


;^ 


3 


.0 


g 


1 


? 


t^ 


W 


•^ 


^ 




^ 


t 


1 




o» 


5 


5 


X 


5 


1 


1 


i 


■s 


s. 



•^ 
ff 



.§ 

Si 



H 
•J 

n 

< 



*(aof8B0Jdz9 *£jo\ 



*9(6nH 



*UI8)IVUnU)£ 



'(8009108 afisamop) 
iCmooooo pioqwnoH 



'(%XB) 9\m am J 



*TIOH«ODP3 



I*90J8U2 11103 



'umooYPiaiy 



*8a|J90C[|9D3 XiV4}uvg 



*8a{JOOfq3ao 8ix|imi 



-2900(9119 iiK>{8jnn«)a|| 



•Joi 
-J90ai8a9 i«>|o«qo9H 



'8ap99ai8a9 |«j|i999(a 



'Sopoaniaoa i|A|3 



*9a|J99oi9a9 i«afiiiBiio 



-X2980IOJ 



*9jmino|j9v 



I 

H 



XX 



XX 



xxxx 



xxxx 



XXX 



^ 
^ 



H 

D 



17727*— ED 1913— VOL 2- 



-13 



xxxxx 



XX 



xxxx 



XXX 



1 

I 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



194 



BDUCATIOK BBPOBT, 1918. 



*(aoi69aidzo '^^ 
-«jo) Sa|i[TOds c 



onqnd 



XX XX 



XX 



•OITOH 



XXXX 



XXX 



I 



*UISl|VUJDO£ 



*(aoa9|d8 Ofi^somop) 
iCmooooa pioqaenoH 



XX 



'i%XB) WMB ©HI J 



:x 

XX 



*no|)«onpa 



XXX XX 



XX 



*8aioanno3 



*ejn;o9)n(aiy 



XX 



i 

I 
8 

•I 



I 

I 



'SixijaoaiSao iCjvtitreg 



*8a|i9Mip}u«i 9u}ui|^ 



Sot 



-ja9II{9D9 iB9}2jnn«)9|t 






XXX XX 



XX 



'Supaooidaa ftoix^yj. 



X :xxx XX 



*8ti(Jd9ii{Sa9 nMD 



XXXXX XX 



x£; 



XX 



*8iziid9ii|8a8 i«oiai9q3 



'^[^sajoj 



'AiminafiSY 



1 

! 



s 
I 



I 

B 



mi 



iIIIIIbI 



e 



■ 3 

1 

Pi 
III 



I 






e 8& 

I II 

s ^1 

If 



II 



5o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNTVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 19j5 



xxxxk X 



xxxxxx 



XX XXX 



XX 



XXXX 



XX 



XXX 



xxxxxx 



XX 



XX xxxxxx 



XXX 



XX :x 



XX 



X :x :x 



X :x 



XXXX :xx 



XX 
X 



XX 
XXXX 



XX XXXXX XX 



X :xxx 



XX 



XX 



XX 



XX 



x1 



X 
X 



XX 
XX 



XXX 



XX 



xl 



f 

a 



S5 



1^ 

'tip 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



196 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



.a 

o 

1 

o 









t 



'(oqneajdxo 'Xicn 
-tuo) anpindde onqnj 



'3IsnH 



*TIZB}19ILinOX 



Xmoaooo pioqaenoH 



'(%n) wiiB enj J 



XXXXX 



XXX 



XXXXX 



XX 



XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 



xxxx 



XX 



xxxx :xx 



XX 



XX 




*Tio|)«anpa 



•eojammoo 



'Mi^oa^iqaiv 



XXX 



XX 



XX 



XXX 



XXXX 



*9uiiwu{8iid iLretineg 



*3lXIJ9dll|S(19 SuJuiJf 



•8in 



'2f^ 



*8izii80cq8ci8 iQOfj^oata 



*2a)i9aiitihxa \\a\o 



*8ii{J99a|3cia pBO}iixoq3 



'^qsejoj 



1 



i 



n 

< 



'uminop^y 



JS 




55 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES,. AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 197 



jx i) 


<XX X 




XX 




XX 


jxxx 


xxxxxxxxxxxxx 


XXXXXXXXXXXXX 


XX !) 


<xx 


XXX 


XX 


jxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxx 


jx : 


j : j X 










X 












































X 




X 






X : : 


: : i ^^^ 




XX 
XX 




X 
X 
























:x 




X 








XX 


X 






X : : 


jx j 






X 




X 




XXX 




X 








X 


X 




XX 






X j 




jxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
























X 




- 


- 


- 


- 


X 




































:xx 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


i- 


:- 


-'r 


:- 




































X 












X 
































X 












jx j 


: '; : x 






X 






















X 








X 


















- 


- 








4- 
























































jxx 


: : : > 
















X 






















X 








X 




X 




-: 


jxx 


j j j X 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


-: 






-i- 




X 






















X 








X 




X 




jxx 


:x j X 




x 






X 














X 








X 




X 




jxx 


j j j X 


- 


- 


- 








-:- 


:- 




X 






















X 








X 












: : : > 


- 








1 

1 






- 














































j j j > 








































X 






hi 


nxvoraii-y 

IOWA. 


1 

i 

15 




1 


i 

c 




1- 




■a 

a- 


li 


1 


i 


•1 


J 

! 


I 

g 

■.a 

c 


'i 


1 

o 

> 

1 


1 




if 

ii 

il 


1 


1 



























&l^'=' 






IlilildlllllllllllllllJi 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



•2 
•■e 



1 



I 

8 



1 



I 






-(CKHBSOldXO ^£l<n 

-WO) 8ni3tB9d8 ojiqn J 


a' 


XX 


jx XXX jxx j j 


j j XXX 


j j XXXX 


•opmn 




XXXX jx 


XXXX j ixx jxxxx X j 


jx 


'msnviuiiof 


s 








jx j 


j j ^ j j 


ix : : 


X j 


•(wiropB onsoniop) 
iCmooooo pioqssnoH 




jx 




X j j 


jx : 




X j jxx : 


• 


;s 


XX 


jx jx 


X jx 




jx jxxx j X j 


XX 


•noRwnpa 


s 


XXXX :x 


X j j 


jxx 


; j -^ j j 


X j X : 


X j 


*90iMd\XUUOQ 


a 










j j • X j : 






•wnpniqoJV 












j j ^ j j 


:x : j 


X j 


*8lI|ja91X|8lX9 ^iv^pzBg 


s 












jx j j 




*9lIIJ99IZ|8lI9 SufUfji 


A 








jx j 








-jwujaro iBojkmim^H 


00 








jx j 








-jaoiqSao if»|ixBqooH 


K« 








:x j 


: j ^ j • 


jx j j 


X j 


•»a|j9wi|ftrarw|iv»ia 


« 








:x *: 


j j ^ : : 


jx j i 


X j 


•JuijaoiilftranAio 


>A 








jx j 


: j X : : 


:x j j 


K j 


*9iz|jmiu|Siw tB0|iii9i^) 


^ 










j j ^ j j 


:x : : 


K : 


•ilWMOa 


•0 














X j 


•aiminoijav 


M 








jx j 


: : X : : 




X : 


1 


*i* 


t\\ 

3 ■■ ■■ 


u 






: : S : : 


i\ iii 


§ j 
■3 : 



sMti 



PQAh^S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



xrsTVEBsrrnss, oollbgbs, akd tbchnoijogical schools. 



199 



X :xxxxxx XX 



:xxx 



<xx ■ X x 



XX 



XXXXX.-.X : 



X X V X X «. 



•^xxxxx :x 



xxxxx :xx 



ixx : : 



x :x : :x : : 



I i 

5 






:|5?sli 



i CO 



xxxx :xxx :xx xxxx 



XX :x : :x : : :x x . 



x .x : >^ 



X :>xxxx : :xx :^xx 5; 



<3 



:x : £ 



:x : 
:x : 
ix : 
:x : 

: :x 






n 

i? 

la 



Htl 






: 5 - S;"^ 



: : ^IflJ iSl: III 4 --^ 









'3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 





*(aoi860idx9 *Xi<n 
-uio) Sixn«9d8 0{iqii^ 


s 


XX 


:x ;x : : 


xxxx xxxxx jx jxxxx :xx : 




•oprajc 




X : 


XX jxxx 


XXX : xxxxx jxxxxxxxxxx 


i> 


'iibffnunof 


s 






: : i : : : ! :x : : : 




1 


•(aoaaiog opsamop) 
iCmouooo pioqosnoH 


S 


X : 


:x j i jx 


: : : : \ \ :^^ : !><' 


<x jx j jx : 


•(VB) nw »aw 


S 




: i jxxx 


XXX : :x ixx jxx) 


<xx j j j j j 


TiOi^TOnpa 


•9 


xxxx : ; :x 


: : jx XX j jxx j j 


jx jx j j jx 


i 


*9029aniKo 


S 




:x j j j 1 


jx j j j : j j j j j j 


::::::::• 


1 


*aiij)ae9iqaiy 


^ 
^ 










1 


'8a|i89n}9iia ^iv^img 


s 






j j ix j j j jx j j j 




1 


'SfapMoiSaa SiinziH 


A 






j j j : j j j jx j j j 




R 


-,^^;S5^„.^ 


oe 






j j j j j j j jx j j j 






•8a| 


t* 




: : ^ ! : i 


j j j j j j : :x : : : 




1 


•aoiiwniaae i«o|iv»ia 


• 




: : ^ : : i 


j j jx j j j jx j j j 




•3ii)iaoa|Siia HAfo 


u» 




: i X j i j 


j j jx j j j jx j j j 




i 


*8ll|JMII|SUVI |B9|1XI9IO 


^ 






j j j j j j j jx j j j 




t 


•ij^SMOJ 


•0 






j j j j : j j jx j j j. 




> 




w 




: : X : i ; 


: : : : . : : : :x : : : 
• • • • ; ; ; : • .' ; 




i 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

!— I 

H 

.-) 
n 


' 


F^ 


1 ; '• 

P 
Si 


ii iiil 

it llJ 

1 If 


\\\\ ijlnni! 


i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEESITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 201 



XXXX 



X :x 



XXX 



XXXX :xxxxxx 



xxxxxx 



x 

.X 



XXX 



XX :x 



XXX 



XXX 



XX 



x^ 



XXXX 



XXXXXXXXXXX X 



•5: 
X a 



XX 



-I 

X a 

xi 

- 3 



XX 



XX 



XXX 



■♦J 

I 

o 

Si 

1 

ill 

J" 

tfc ..PS 

I : i§ "S 

K^::! 1 

5«3 i 

000 s 

tn 9 9> zZ 
^^^ ? 

P « <D 



1 

i 1 

O " 



11 






5-a 
Wo 



o 



■a 

I 



la 

•So 






ll-Pl 

QQppc;££ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



202 



EDUCATIOK BEPOBT, 1913. 



■2 

g 

1 



8 



I 






g 
f? 



n 

< 



-wo) anpcmds onqnj 


S 


:x : : :x : ixx ixx 


i ixxxx i i : i ix i xx 


•OITOH 


5 


XXX j j jx : ixx ixxx :x : :x ix : :x : :: 


< 


'nvipnuDOf 


S 




: i ix ix i : i i i i i x 




-(aouaps ofiMoiop) 
XmoaoM pioqasooH 


5 


X : : : : i :x ixx ix 


i i ix : i i : i i i i : : 

• I !** ' * ^ I * I • I ! I 




'(%XB)9U9 9aii 




X ixx : i ix ixxx i 


ix ix i ix ixx ix i :: 


<• 


*iion«3Dpa 


s 


xxxx jxxxxxxxx 


xxxxxxx i ix ix i xx 


-9Q»iinii03 






i i i : ix i i i i : i i : 






w* 
^ 


: j : : : : j i : i i ix 


i i ix i i i i : i ix i : 




-Sapa9ii{2aa ^xv^fUBg 


S 


: : : i : i i : i : i ix 


i i ix i i i i i ix j i : 




*9iiiA0ii|8aa 9u)U)|i 


A 


is i j j i i i i i i ix 


i i ix i i i i i i i ix i 




-J9«ii|8a« is^kinii»i9H 


OP 




: i ix i i i i i i i i i : 




Jo; 


«• 


: i i ix i i i i ; : ix 


i i ix ix ix i i ixx : 




•auvraOTjftra lTO|JV»ia 


« 


i i i ix i i i i i i ix 


i i ix i i ix i ixxx x 




*8iz|ia9a;9iia nx\o 


KS 


: i i ix ix i : i : ix 


: i ixxx ix i ixxx x 




*8lI{i9eiI)9U9 [V9|III9IO 


^ 


i i i ix i : i i i i i i 


i i ix ix ix i i ix i x 




•XHSMOJ 


« 


i i i i i i i i i i : ix 


i i i i i i : i i i ix i i 




•wmino}j8v 


M 


i i i i i : i i : : : ix 


i i : i : i i i i : :x i i 




1 


f4 


NEW YORK. 

New York State Normal CoUege 

Alfred University 

1):::::::::::;::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


t 

NOBTH CABOUNA. 

University of North Carolina 


1 

9 



Digitiz*ed by Google 



UNIVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 208 



XX 


XX 


X 




X 




XX 




X 








X 


XXX 




X 


xxxxxxxxx 




xxxxxxxxxx 




X 




xxxxxxxxx 


X 


X 


X XXXXX X 


XXXXX 


X 




X 






xxxxxx 












































X 
















X 






X 


X 












^: 




. 




















X 


X 








X 




X 


X 






XXX 












X 


X 










X 




XX 






XX 


X 


X 






X XX 


X 


X 




X 




X 














XXXXX 


X 






XXX 


X 




xxxxxxx 




XX 


.X 


X 


XXXXX 


x 








x 


x 






.X : 






































X 








X 






XX 


xx 






































































X 
























X 




























































X 


















































































X 


X 
















X ' 






X 












































































XX 


























X 


























X 


X 




X 


X 














XX 






XX 
















X 


























X 








X 


X 






X 






XX 






XX 
















X 


























X 


X 




X 


X 






X 






XX 






XX 
















































X 
























XX 






XX 




















































































X 














































X 


X 


































X 














































s 

i 

1 

T 

c 

t 

t 

c 




1 

1 







J 

•1 


fl 


6 

i 

> 
1 











































Xl O 9 ? « 

llill 



^ 
t 



2 
o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 






1 



o 



1 

1 

8 

! 






< 



•)aoi69(udx9 *£i(n 
-Hjo) SopiQOds anqn J 


« 


XXXX 






xxxxx 




X 


X :x 


:x : jxx 


•opnH 




:> 


:xxxxxxx 


ixXXXX XXX 


ix : XXX 


'ms\i9xuno£ 


2 






















: ix 






•(wuopg opwraop) 
iCmouoM pioqosnoH 


to 


:> 




XXX 














X i : :> 




•(^)8iJSoaij 


^ 




'x : 


xxxxx 


:x 


X 




XXX 


; i : :> 




•uoRTOnpa 


•9 


:> 


:xx 




xxxxx 


XXX jxx 


i i : ;> 




*oaj9iinno3 
























: :x 


i i : \> 




•9ijiv»MmuY 


*•* 
























t\\ \y 




'Snp^niSiio ^re^nn^ 


O 




























*Siipgovi|Sna daiufn 


A 


: 




















: :^ 


i ix :> 




•8m 


00 














X 










: :^ : 






t» 














X 








: :^ 


X : i ;> 




'9op90O)So9 poppoia 


« 














X 








: ix 


X i : :> 




•SopsooiSos nA)o 


to 














X 








: : :x 


X i : :> 


• 


'Sop90O|8uo pjofmoqo 


^ 






















: :x 






'ij^saioj 


•0 
























i i : :> 




*0iTi)iii3)iSy 


w 
























K i i :> 




InstituUons. 


F^ 


fl : 

i 
















5 




■h\\ 


1 : » : 

^i| .i 

I 

II 

5c 


• 

1 : 

; 

3 : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 205 



XXXXXXX X 




X 




XXX 


X 






X 


xxxxxx 




xxxx 


xxxx 


xxxxx 


X 


xxxxx 


: xxxx 




X 


XX 


X 




xxxx 


XXX 


xxxxx 


X 










X X 


X 
































































X 










- 


- 














































X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


X 










: X 


XXX 


XX 


X 






X 




XX 




X 


XX 




X 




X 




xxxx :x 


X 


XX 


X 




XX 




X 






xxxx 


- 


X 


XXX 


XX 


xxxx 




X 




































X 






X 








XX 


- 




xxxx 


























































- 


-- 


- 




XX 


- 








X 






- 


« 


X 


































X 
















X 


X 
X 


- : 


































X 














X 


XX 




























































X 








XX 










































XX 


X 


X 












XX 


X 


xxxx 






X 


i' 






























XX 






X 


- 


- 








XX 




X 


xxxx 






X 


























X 


XX 


X 


X 




xxxx 




X 


xxxx 






X 










































X 








- 




XX 




X 


XXX 












































































X 
















































































X 








X 


o 




■ 

SI 


'5 8 


il 

10 












1 




























































5 '< 

i : 
p • 

fit • 

i 

•5 






iflini 



i 



a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



206 



JB0UCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



1 



g 



I 

I 

f 



■i 



I 



-< 
H 



-«io) 8izpi«9d8 on<lQ<I 


s 




< : 


ixx : ix ixxx ixxx ! xxx i: 


<xxx 


•opnH 


« 

^ 




< : 




xxxx jxxxxx ixx xxx :: 


<xxx 


*lII8|[VlLinOf 


s 












•(wnapBORwraop) 
iCmonooo pioqaniOH 




X 






: : ix ix i 


ix i ix i X i i i 




•a»)8^iBonij 


^ 

^ 


XX : 




X i ix ixx 


xxx i ix i jx i 


ixxx 


TWRWnpa 


M 


XX : 


:x 


i ix ixxx 


xxx ix i ixx i: 


<xxx 


*80LiwtuuiO3 












:::::: : :^ : 


: i^ : 


'ajnpo^Tqojy 


^ 






• 1 








*8ix|jaoii|8iz9 ^nn|n«8 


e 














*8n|i99a|3aa 8u|u|jf 


» 






-j-!- 




:::::: i : :^ 




-i»«xi8na i«>0Jiiit«»9H 


oe 


•I 








*• 


XX XX : 




:::::: ^ J : j 


: ix i 


•8ii|J09Ul8u9i«)ijpoia 


« 


XX : 


X : 

1* I 




i i ix i i X i i i 


: :^ i 


'8lX(I891X|8lZ9 QA|0 


lO 


XX : 


X i 


i i i ix i i 


X 

X 



: :^ : 


'8izfia9izi8iio n»|iiiaqo 


^ 


X 












•Al^flWOJ 


M 










:::::: ^ i : : 




•wimnojjJy 


M 


X 




X i 






1 


^ 


Q • 

g i 


i 






MM!! ^ i ii" 

i i i : i i ""^ i : i 

lillliii 

: : : : : : o J : 1 : 
1 -< : i • 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, Al^D TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 207 



xxxx jxx 








XX 




XX 




XX XXX 


X 


XXX 


.XXXXX XX 






xxxxxxxxxxxxxx 






XX X 


xxx 


ixxx 


JXXXXX XX 


X i 




















































ix 








X : 




XX 










x 








ix 


X : 












XX XX i 


X : 


:x 


X 


X 




x 


:x. 






X 


: X 


ixx : 


jxxx 


ixx i 




i XX 


X i 


ixx 


: jxx 


X 




X 




X 






XXX 


X 


ixxxx : 


ixxx 


ix XX i 


























4- 






















X 


• X 
































:x 




:> 
























































































X 








































X 




















-■ 





- 
















































X 




- 


X : 
X : 












:> 














X X 








- 




X 






X 




:> 














X X 


X 








XX 






XX 






X 




:> 














X X 


X 




-: '. 






X 


- 


- 


" 






X : 












:> 














X 










































X 












X 




















:> 

< 












X 


X 




5 : • 
5 : i 




























H 








• > 
: c 

;l 


1 \ 










i 


> 


J 

I 

II 

1 


• 

CD 


b 



I 

t 






"33 



5 

h 



III ^^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



208 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



■B 
I 

1 

o 

I 



1 
1 

€ 
J" 

1 

8 
■| 
;3 






*> 






?: 

»« 






•(nonB»idx9 'Jii<n 
-juo) 8tipc«8dB onqn J 


s 


XX 




xxxx 




XX 






XX :xxx : xx ixx ! 


•aiTOH 




XX 


XX 


:x 


XX 




XX :x 


XX : xxxxxx 


*1Q6|fB1UDOf 


s 


























: : i :^^ i : : 


'(oooops onsomop) 


lO 


X 








:x 




X 






X : i 


XX : xxxxx : 


•(i«) S^JB 91II J 


*-* 


X 




XX 


:x 




X 




X : :x 


XX : XX ixx : 


•noRBonpa 










X : 


X 


X 






XXX :x 


X :x xxxx :x 


*90J«fiuuiOQ 


s 




















:x 


X : : 


: : : x jxx : : 


•Mnv»»iiwv 


^ 


























: i : ^ :^ : i : 
































*8iil J9eiil9iio 9ii|ii]p[ 


A 






X 




X 












: : !• 


: : : xx : : :x 


-jMojano i«)i2inim9W 


00 


























: : : :^ : : : : 




r« 






X 




X 














: : : ^^ : : :^ 


•Sni j90iiiSn9 i«)fi)ooi:j 


« 






X 




X 








X 






: : : xx : : :x 


•SofJMinSao ipkio 


iO 






X 




X 








xx 




: : : xx : : jx 


'9a}J0du|2ua iropiieiio 


^ 






X 




X 








X 






: : : 1^ : ! : : 


•-flJBWOJ 


ee 


























: : : ^^ ! J : ! 


•gjimnopSy 


M 






X 


















: : : x : : ; : : 


i 

1 


^ 


^ 
























i J : ! ! : : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLBGBS, AND TBOHNOLOGIOAL SCHOOLS. 209 



xxxx 



XX 



xxxx 



XX 



llii 



xxxxxxxx 



XX 
X 



X 



xxxx 



XXX 






I 



i 






I 



17727**— KD 1013— VOL 1 



-14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



202 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 
I 

1 



1 

I 

t 

8 



I 



1 



I 



*(l]DI8B0idZ9 'XjO) 


2S 




X 






X 




ixx 


ixx 




KXXX 




i ix 


XX 


•opnH 




XXX 






X 


: :xx ixxx 


ix 




X ix 


i ix 


i j 


X 


*iasn«cunof 


s 




















ix 


ix 






i ^ 




Xmoaooa pioqaenoH 


ts 


X i 










X ixx ix 




ix 












•(V«) 8MB mu 


;s 


X : 


XX 






X ixxx i 


X 


ix 




X ixx ix 


• : 


X* 


lion^Kmps 


s 


xxxx 


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx : : 


X ix 


XX 


*8ai9iiraioo 


s 






















ix 










-aimao^iqojy 


^ 
^ 
















i ix 




ix 






: :^ 






*8iz|j99ix}8a9 iln^ioBs 


2 
















: :^ 




ix 






ix i 






*8apmiu(8iu» 8a|iiiH 


» 




£ 












: :^ 




ix 








< : 




-j9oni8u9is^nii«^9H 


OD 




















ix 














t" 








X 






: :^ 




ix 


ix 


ix i 


: :^^ : 




'8ii]j99ixi9ii9 i«ofjr^09ia 


« 








X 






: :^ 




ix 




ix i 


ixxx X 




'2a\i99n]2ua ijajo 


lO 








X 


X 




: :x 




ixxx 


ix i 


ixxx X 




*9iz|J90U|3uw iQ0{ni9ii3 


^ 








x 










ix 


ix 


ix i 


i ix 


: ^ 




•itqfiMoj 


ee 
















i ix 










i ix 






•wmtnoji^v 


Ot 
















i ix 










: :^ 






J 
1 


^ 


i 

M 



1 
1 
1 


> 


:2 

II 


g 

1 

1 
J 
1 
J 

> 

i 


1 

o 




i i i"^ 
• i :1 

S? i iE 

iiu 


III 


5c 


o 

M 

z; 
5 

3 


• • 


ill 

M • • 

^ • i 

» ! • 

5^ : 




li 1 

|i 

>' 

•3: 


d 



DigitifedbydOOglC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 208 



x> 




XX 


X 




X 


XX 




X 








X 


XXX 




X 


XXXXXXXXX : 


xxxxxxxxxx : 


X 




XXXXXXXXX 


X 


X 


X XXXXX X 


XXXXX 


X : 


:x 






xxxxxx 












































X 
















X 




ix 


X 












\ 




. 




















X 


X 








X 




X 


X 






XXX 










X 


X 








\ 


X 




XX 






XX 


X 


X 






X XX 


X 


X 




X 




X 












XXXXX 


X 






XXX 


x 




xxxxxxx 




XX 


.X 


X 


XXXXX 


ix : 






"x 


x 






"x : 






































X 








X 






XX 


XX j 




































































X 






















X 




























































X 
















































































X 


X 
















X 






X 

• 












































































XX 


























X 


























X 


X 




X 


X 














XX 






XX 
















X 


























X 








X 


X 






X 






XX 






XX 
















X 


























X 


X 




X 


X 






X 






XX 






XX 
















































X 
























XX 






XX 


















































































X 














































X 


X 
































X 














































< 

I 

1 

.1 
1 




i 

M 

si 

s 
< 


1 


1 


•a 

1 


IG 


d 

> 

1 

1 


■> 

1 


J 








































III 

on:9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 



EDUCATION BBPOET, 1913. 






1 

8 



I 

I 






03 



•)U0Jg9MdTO •iTJOl 




xxxx : : jxxxxx 


X 


; ^ :^ 


:x : ixx 


•opnw 


5 


:xx 


XXXXXX jxxxxx XXX 


ix : XXX 


•ins]|«tunof 


2 












i j ix 






iCmouood pioqosnoH 




:x : 


:xxx : 










X i : i> 


c : 


•(^j«) s^« oajj 


^ 
^ 


: :x 


ixxxxx ix 


jx : 


: XXX 


i : : :> 


c ; 


•uoRTOnpa 




:xx 


X : jxxxxx 


ixxx ixx 


: i : :> 


c : 


*90i9iinno3 


s 












i i ix 


i i : :> 


c i 


•aimoo^iipjv 


^ 
^ 














t\] :> 


c i 


-9iip^ii}9a9 iCj«)fireg 






'.'.'.'.'. 














-dopeooiaiia 3a|n|H 


» 












i i ix 


: :^ :^ 


c : 


-J9on|Suo i«o|kjnne)OH 


oo 






ix : 






: I 1 : 


i ix : 






t" 






:x j 






: : :^ 


X i : ;> 


c : 


-anijeeuiSao ivoppoia 


« 






jx : 






: i :^ 


X : : :> 


c : 


'8iiiJ99uiSao iiAio 


lO 






ix i 






; : :^ 


X j : i> 




■SniJeeui^e I«>ini9iio 


^ 












: i ix 






•^nswoj 


M 




: : : : : 










i i : ;> 




•wminopSv 


e« 














< : i :> 




Institutions. 


^ 


i ■■■■'■ 


; : : : : 




ii 




1 1 1 ii 


1 : » : 

1 ^1 i ^ 

il 

U 


^1 

: 

• 
! i 
Ii 
i : 

1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 205 



XXXXXXX X 


X 




XXX 


X 






X 


xxxxxx 


xxxx 


xxxx 


xxxxx X 


xxxxx : : xxxx 




X 


XX 


X 




xxxx 


XXX 


xxxxx 


X 










X X 


X : : : : : : 
























































X 


















































X 


X 


X 


X 






X 


X 


::::::: ^ 


XXX 


XX 


X 






X 




XX 




X 




XX 




X 




X 




XXXX jxx 


XX 


X 




XX 




X 






xxxx 




X 


XXX 


XX 


.xxxx 




X 




























X 






X 








XX 


' 




xxxx 




























- 


- 


























XX 








X 








• 


X : : : i : : 






















X 
















- 






X 
X 


X 
X 
































X 














XX 




















































X 








XX 


































XX 


X 


X 












XX 




X 


xxxx 




X : : : : : : 
























XX 






X 












XX 




X 


xxxx 


- 




X : : : : : : 




















X 


XX 


X 


X 








xxxx 


X 


xxxx 




X : : : : : : 


































X 












XX 




X 


XXX 






































































X 








































































X 








X 


::::::: ^ 












a 




























































I \ 



t 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



206 



.^UCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



.2 

a 
o 



8 
o 



1 



I 



I 



i 



I 



tj 
S 
c 



'5= 



GO 



-«io) 8izpi«9d8 3iiqti<I 


s 




K 




XX 


: l'^ 


: ixxx ixxx : xxx :: 


<xxx 


•opnH 


*• 




K 




:xxx> 


: jxxxxx 


ixx xxx :. 


<xxx 


'Tn8fl90IO0£ 


s 


















£xnoiuK>9 pioqaraoH 


« 
^ 


X 








: :^ 


: :x : :x 


:x : X : : : 




'(:\n)9\iB9a\ji 


« 

^ 


• 
XX 




:x 


' : :^ 


: ixxxxx 


: :x : :x : 


ixxx 


TWRwnpa 




XX 




X 


:x 


xxxxxx 


:x : ixx :: 


<xxx 


*80LiwtuuiO3 


•« 

^ 






• 








! i i 


: : : 1 :^ : 


i ix i 


••xnv»»iqwY 


^ 
^ 






s i 












'8n|J99ui2uw ^jre^insg 


s 










-i-i- 


-:- 








*2ix|j80u|3ua 8u|U|y| 


A 








-:- 


Y'A' 


: : : i ! :^ 
: : i 1 : :^ 




-i»OTn8n9i^nn«»9H 


oo 








Shi 


t* 


XX XX : 








: : : ^ i : : 


: :^ : 


•auiJOOTiiSnoiTORpoia 


« 


XX 


X : 






: : : 


X : : X : : : 


i ix i 


'8a|1891X|8lZ9 QA|Q 


lO 


XX 


X : 




X 




X : : X : : : 


: :^ : 


'9u\i99a(ihBi iBOfmaqo 


^ 


X 


















*Xj)98JOj 


M 














-i-f:- 


: : : ^ : I ' 




•wminapay 


ot 


X 




X : 








a 


^ 


g 1 

1 

CD 


: 4 

: & 

3 




- 






: : : 


M III! 

: : : S : • • 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, Al^D TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 207 



xxxx 



XX 



XX XXX 



XXXXX XX 



xxxxxxxxxxxxxx 



XX X 



XXX 



XXX 



XXXXX XX 



XX 



X :x 



XX XX 



X :x 



X :xx 



XXX :xx 



XX 



I 



il 



XX 



XX 



XXX 



xxxx 



XXX 



XX 



XX 



X 



Is 

§2 



n 

« 



f 

II 

»ti II 
lil-- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



208 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



T3 

■n 
§ 



I 



1 



S 
J' 

O 



"I 

;^ 
"S 

t 



8 
"8 









'(UOJBB03dT9 'AXn 

-wo) 8tipci»dB onqn J 


s 


XX 


xxxx 


jxx 


I jxx jxxx : XX jxx : 


•OJTOH 




XX 


XX :x 


jxx 


jxx jx 


jxx j xxxxxx 


'msirnunor 














j j j j jxx 




•(woepsonwraop) 
^monooo pioqasnon 




X : 


: : jx 


: :^ 


j jx j j 


jxx j xxxxx j 


. •(;«) evn tamd 




X : 


XX :x 


j jx 


jx j jx 


jxx j XX jxx j 


•noRBonpa 








X jx : 


X j j 


jxxx j: 


<x jx xxx> 


c jx 


*90J9ixnnoQ 












X jx j j 


j j j j X jx> 


C j : 


•wnv)e!»iiwv 


^ 












j j j j X jx 




'9iiiJoeiii9aa ^jv^fireg 


s 
















*8iiIJOdii]8ao SnpiiH 


A 




\> 


' : :^ 






j j j j XX j 


j jx 


-jo«ij3iioi«Di3inn«l9W 


00 






: I : 






• • * • • • 

: : : : :^ : 




-J98iii3ira [«>nreipoH 


r» 




:> 


' : -^ 






j j j j XX j 


j jx 


'Siq jaecqSoa i^i^ooig* 


« 




:> 


: : jx 


j j :> 




j j j j XX j 


j jx 


•9ixp90ix|Sa9 i|A{o 


lO 




:> 


: j jx ! 


j j jx 


.X j j j j 


j j j j XX j 


! :^ 


'2u\i09U(Sm fsofmaqo 


-«* 




:> 


: : jx 


j j \y 




j j j j jx j 




•iC2»»J0J 


ee 












j j j j XX j 




•wn;iiis>iJ8v 


M 




:> 








: j : : x j j 




1 


^ 


>- 










Roanoke Woman's College 

Sweet Briar College , 

CoUege of William and Mary 

State College Of Washington 

University of Washington » 

Spokane College 


3 : : 

Hi 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, C0LLBGB8, AND TBOHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 209 



xxxx xxxxx : 


XX X 




XXXX XXXXXXXX X 




: : P 


<x ix 








XX : 


ix : :x 


ix X 


xxxx : 


ix : :x 








XX xxxx jxxx X 




:x . : 


ix ix 


i i X 
















ix i i 








:x : 


ix i i 


i i X 














:x : 


ix ix 


i i X 




:x i 


ix ix 


i i X 


X : 


:x : 


ix ix 


i i X 






ix i i 


















:x : 


ix i i 


i i X 


WEST VIRQINIA. 

Bethany College 

West Virginia Wesleyan College 


rowhatan College 

West Virginia University 1 

WISCONSIN. 


• • V • 


1!^ 

> 

1 


> 



17727**— ED 1913— VOL ! 



-14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



210 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities, colleges, and technological 



Location. 



Institation. 



For men, 

for 
women, 
or coedu- 
cational. 



Control. 



Professors, etc. 



Pre- 
para- 
tory. 



Col- 
legi- 
ate. 



Pro- 
fes- 
sional 



To- 
tal.! 



10 



10 



AULBAMA. 

Auburn 

Birmingham .... 

do 

Greensboro 

Marion 

Montgomery — 

St. Bernard 

Spring HiU 

University 

ABBONA. 

Tucson. 

ABKANSAS. 

Arkadelphia.... 

Batesville 

Clarksville 

Conway 

do 

Fayette ville 

LitUeRock 

CALIFOBMU. 

Berkeley 

Ciaremont 

Los Angeles 

do 

Mills CoUege.... 

Oakland 

Pasadena 

San Francisco... 

San Jose 

Santa Clara 

Stanford Univer- 
sity. 
Whittier 

COLORADO. 

Boulder 

Colorado Springs 
Denver 

do 

Fort Collins 

Golden 

Greeley 

University Park. 
Westminster. 



Alabama Polytechnic 

Institute. 
Birmingham College. . . 

Howard College 

Southern University. . . 

Judson College 

Woman's College of 

Alabama. 

St. Bernard College 

Soring Hill College 

university of Alabama. 



University of Arizona.. 



Ouachita College 

Arkansas College* 

Arkansas - Cumoerluid 
CoUege. 

Central College 

Hendrix College 

University of Arkansas. 

Philander Smith Col- 
lege (colored). 



University of California. 

Pomona College 

Occidental College 

University of Southern 
California. 

Mills CoUege 

St. Mary's CoUege 

Throop CoUege of Tech- 
nology. 

St. Ignatius University. 

CoUege of the Pacific. .. 

University of Santa 
Clara.* 

Leland Stanford Junior 
University. 

Whittier CoUege 



University of Colorado. 

Colorado CoUege 

CoUege of the Sacred 
Heart. 

Colorado Woman's Col- 
lege.* 

Colorado Agricultural 
CoUege. 

State School of Mines. . 

State Teachers CoUege 
of Colorado. 

University of Denver. . 

Westminster CoUege. . . 



Coed... 

Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Women 
Women. 



Men... 
Men... 
Coed.. 



Coed... 



Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 

Women 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 



Coed.... 
Coed.... 
Coed.... 
Coed.... 

Women 

Men 

Men..... 



Men.... 
Coed... 
Men.... 

Coed... 

Coed..^ 



Coed. 
Coed. 
Men.. 



State... 

M. E.So.. 

Bapt 

M.E.So... 

Bapt.... 

M.E.S0 

R.C.... 
R.C.... 
State.... 

State.... 

Bapt.... 
Presb... 
Presb... 

Bapt 

M.E.So 

State 

M. E.... 

State.... 
Nonsect. 
Nonseot. 
M. E.... 

Nonseot. 
R.C.... 
Nonsect... 

R.C... 
M. E... 
R.C... 

Nonsect... 

Friends. 



Women 
Coed- 



Men.... 
Coed... 



State 

Nonsect.. 
R.C 



Bapt.. 
State.. 



Coed.... 
Coed. 



State.. 
Stete.. 



M. E.. 
Presb. 



1872 

1897 
1841 
1859 
1839 
1910 

1892 
1830 
1831 



1881 



1880 
1872 
1891 

1892 
1884 
1872 
1877 



1869 
1888 
1887 
1880 

1865 
1863 
1891 

1855 
1851 
1851 

1891 

1901 



1877 
1874 
1888 

1900 

1881 

1874 
1890 

1864 
1907 



34 









72 




0170 
11 



67 
34 
6 

91 1 

45 



20 



36 



0129 



504 
33 

18 
2^202 



41 
21 
38 

0|l90 

11 



98 
34 
18 

Ol 1 

49 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding dupUcates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEESITIBS, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 211 
schools — Instructors and students. 



> Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree, 
s Not included in total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



212 



EDUCATION BSPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universitiea, colleges , and technoJogieal 



4a 



58 



do 

do 

do 

FLORIDA. 

DeLand 

Gainesville 

Sutherland 

Tallahassee.... 

Winter Park.. 

QEOROU. 

Athens 

Atlanta 

do 

do 

do 

College Park.. 
Dahlonega.... 

Decatur 

Demorest 

Forsyth 

Gainesville 

Lagrange 

do 

Maoon 

do 

Oxford 

Rome 

8outh Atlanta. 



Howard University 

(colored). 
St. John's College ....... 

Trinity College 



John B. Stetson Uni- 
versity. 

University of Florida.. 

Southern College* 

Florida State College for 
Women. 

Rollins College 



University of Georgia. . 

Morehouse College* (col- 
ored). 

Atlanta University (col- 
ored). 

Georgia School of Tech- 
nology. 

Morris Brown Univer- 
sity (colored). 

Cox College 

North Georgia Agricul- 
tural College. 

Agnes Scott College 

Piedmont College 

Bessie Tift College 

Brenau College 

Lagrange College* 

Southern Female Col- 
lege.* 

Mercer University 

We^leyan Female Col- 
lege. 

Emory College 

Shorter College 

Clark University* (col- 
ored). 



Ck)ed... 



Men.. 
Women. 



Coed.... 



Men 

Coed - . . . 
Women. 



Coed.... 



Men.. 
Men.. 



Coed.... 



Men.. 



Coed... 

Women 
Coed 

Women 
Coed... 
Women 
Women 
Women 
Women 



Men 

Women 



Men.... 

Women 
Coed... 



National. 

R.C 

R.C 

Bapt 

State 

M. ESo.. 
State 

Nonsect. . 



State.. 
Bapt.. 



Nonsect. 



State.... 
A.M.E. 



Nonsect.. 
State 



Nonsect. . 
Nonsect.. 

Bapt 

Nonsect. . 
M. E. So. 
Bapt 



Bapt 

M.E.So. 

M. E. So. 



1867 


6 


2 


32 


3 


91 


1 


100 


15 


1866 
1900 


8 







7 
8 



21 










15 
8 



21 


1887 


22 


15 


22 


15 








22 


15 


1884 
1902 
1905 


6 
3 
2 



3 
4 


24 
5 
10 



2 
14 


3 









31 
10 
12 



11 
18 


1885 


7 


11 


8 


1 








9 


11 


1801 
1867 



9 



3 


62 

8 




1 


6 
4 






68 
11 




4 


1869 


6 


12 


6 


5 








6 


15 


1888 


5 


2 


63 











63 


2 


1885 


4 


3 


7 


2 


3 





15 


8 


1843 
1872 


2 
2 


7 
2 


3 
U 


7 











6 
13 


19 
2 


1890 
1897 
1849 
1878 
1833 
1842 



5 
6 


1 



15 
22 
3 
5 
6 


7 
7 
6 
6 
2 
3 


16 
5 

22 

21 
5 

11 


















7 
9 
6 
12 
3 
4 


IS 
18 
22 
35 
22 
17 


1837 
1839 







4 


12 
10 



2 


14 







21 

10 



20 


1836 

1877 
1870 


3 

4 



4 
11 


14 
5 
3 



15 

4 













17 
5 
7 



19 
15 



♦ Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 213 
sckooh — Instructors and students — Continued. 



\ 



> Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree, 
s Not included In total. 
* Teachers college. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



214 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — UniversitieSy collegeiy and Uehnologioal 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNTVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 215 
BchooU — Instructors and students — Continued. 



* Includes Btudents in miuic, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 

* Not included in total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



216 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities y colleges, and technological 



♦ statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UKIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 217 
schools — Instructors and students — Continued. 



*lncludea students In miwlc, art, oratory, business, etc., tinleas they are enrolled In four-year courses 
leading to a coUeRiate degree, 
s. * Not Included in total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



218 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — UniverHtieSf colleges^ and technological 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 219 
MchooU — Instnictora and sttuientii — Continued. 



students. 


Qiim 






Preparatory. 


CoUegiate. 


Another 
students.* 


Graduate. 


Professional. 


Total.! 


school 
students.* 




1 


^ 


i 


f 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


81 


22 


2S 


24 


85 


86 


27 


J 


47 
226 
49 

15 
50 
27 
56 
70 

199 
26 
55 

63 




40 



44 

52 


85 


75 
34 





70 






181 







48 




64 


33 

13 
47 
32 
58 
60 

102 



87 
60 

30 
45 
20 
254 

60 

4 

3 




77 


16 



40 


65 













60 

49 
201 
67 

S 

93 
57 

i 




629 

128 

74 
40 

12 
81 

627 



110 




68 
15 

317 

333 
278 
497 
50 

264 


88 



64 

46 
198 

75 
112 
113 

41 



61 
60 

20 
15 
80 
42 

80 
154 

82 

127 


60 


10 

91 

70 



20 

227 


2 




,: 


86 
140 
418 

16 
23 
17 
49 
85 

623 



7 








156 



19 



40 


60 






7 








47 
32 




169 



271 

65 
15<> 
51 
17 
66 

406 



20 
20 







66 

4 

37 





14 

2 




170 



6 














1 

8 

1 




2 






a 





17 

3 

6 





27 











11 



15 










2 
2 



4 















8 

1 

10 





7 






12 




31 



5 











160 














10 



67 



287 





45 






.0 

111 


094 

72 



138i 











4 





















3 














4 



2 



4 





148 
430 
627 

81 
415 
101 
197 
221 

885 

45 
150 

127 






100 





813 

183 

877 
145 

104 
65 

649 



180 


7 

1"^ 
196 

962 

401 
278 
697 
,30 

264 


196 


868 

126 
405 
158 
191 
239 

648 



127 
140 

50 
60 
50 
296 

140 
217 

90 

163 


127 



35 

112 

110 


85 

409 

4 
361 

33 



172 

94 



146 






166 






167 






168 






160 


49 

20 


92,170 

16171 

36' 173 

Il73 






174 






175 






176 






177 






178 






170 






18a 






181 






182 






183 


138 


36 


184 
1H5 






186 






187 






188 




, 


189 






190 


262 


285 


191 
192 






193 






m 






195 






1% 






197 


277 


796 


198 
199 






200 
201 
202 

203 


77 


37 







' Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four^year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 
•Not included La totaL 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



220 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities, colleges, and technological 



Location. 



Institution. 



For men, 

for 
women, 
or coedu- 
cational. 



Control. 



Professors, etc. 



Pre- 
para- 
tory. 



Col- 
legi- 
ate. 



Pro- 

fes- 

sionaL 



10 



11 



To- 
UL> 



12 



IS 



204 
d05 

206 
207 

208 
209 

210 

211 
212 

218 

214 

215 
216 

217 



218 
219 

220 
221 

222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 

234 



235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 

241 
242 
243 

244 
245 



MABTLAND. 

AnnapoUs 

do 

Baltimore. 

....do 

do 

....do 

.....do 

Chestertown... 
CoUegePark... 

EUicott City. . . 
Emmitsbuig... 

Frederick 

Lutherville 

Westminister. . 

MASSACHUSETTS, 



Amherst. 
do... 



Boston.. 
,...do.. 



....do 

Cambridge 

do 

Northampton.. 

Norton 

South Hadley. 
Tufts College.. 

Wellesley , 

WUliamstown.. 

Worcester , 

do 

do 



.do. 



MICmOAN. 



Addan , 

Albion 

Alma 

Ann ArlxM". 

Detroit 

East Lansing.. 



Hillsdale.. 
Holland... 
Houghton., 



Kalamazoo. . 
Olivet. 



St. John's College 

United States Naval 
Academy. 

Goucher College 

Johns Hopkms Uni* 
versity. 

Loyola College 

Morgan College (col- 
ored.) 

Mount St. Joseph's Col- 
lege. 

Washington College . . . . 

Maryland Agricultural 
College. 

Bock Hill CoUflge 

Mount Saint Mary's 
College. 

Hood College 

Maryland College for 
Women. 

Western Maryland Col- 
lege. 



Amherst College 

Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Boston University 

Massachusettslnstitate 
of Technology. 

Simmons College 

Harvard University. 

RadclifTe College 

Smith College 

Wheaton College 

Mount HolyokeCoUege. 

Tufts Coll«e 

Wellesley College 

Williams CoUege 

Clark College 

Clark University 

College of the Holy 
Cross. 

Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute. 



Men.... 
Men.... 

Women 
Men.... 

Men.... 

Coed... 

Men.... 

Coed... 
Men.... 

Men.... 
Men.... 

Women 
Women 

Coed... 



Men..... 
Coed.... 

Coed..., 
Coed... 

Women. 

Men 

Women. 
Women, 
Women. 
Women, 
Coed... 
Women 
Men.... 
Men.... 

Men 

Men.... 



Men.. 



Adrian College. 
Albion College. 
Alma College.. 



U niversi t y of Michigan . 
University of Detroit... 
Michigan Agricultural 

College. 

HillsdSe College 

Hope College 

Michigan CoUege of 

Mines. 

Kalamazoo College 

Olivet College 



Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 

Men 

Coed... 

Coed... 
Coed... 
Men.... 



Coed... 
Coed... 



Nonsect. 
National 

M.E.... 
Nonsect. 

B.C.... 
M.E.... 

B.C.... 

Nonsect. . . 
State... 

R.C 

R.C 

Ref 

Nonsect.. 

M.P 

Nonsect.. 
State 

M.E 

Nonsect.. 

Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect.. 
Nonsect.. 
Nonsect.. 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
Nonsect.. 
R.C 

Nonsect.. 



1789 
1845 



1876 



1852 
1872 



1876 



1723 
1850 



1857 
1806 



1853 
1867 



1821 
1867 

1873 
1865 

1902 
1636 
1879 
1875 
1834 
1837 
1854 
1876 
1793 
1902 
1889 
1843 



1859 
1861 
1887 
1841 
1877 
1857 

1856 
1866 
1886 



B^t 1833 

Nonsect... 1844 



M.P.. 
M.E.. 

Presb. 
State.. 
R.C. 
State.. 



Nonsect. 

Ref 

SUte.... 



10 



13 



0122 




6 



44 

55 

26 
179 

29 

301 

122 

32 

6 

12 

59 

13 

49 

25 

23 

26 






94 



0|195 








55 



4 2 9 
0| 0|293 
18 
113 



0| 9 
17 
28 



20 



15 



lO" 



14 
0^125 



14 
6203 



18 



13 






206 








44 

55 

120 
179 

29 

467 

122 

32 

6 

12 

232 

13 

49 

25 

23 

32 

55 



11 



9 
19 
16 



0^358 
52 
01113 



11 



20 





01 Oj 



0] 10 4 
0* 15 lOl 



1 Excluding duplicates. 

s Includes Miidents in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to collegiate course. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 221 
fchools — InatrtLciora and students — Continued. 



* Not includeddn total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



222 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities, oollegeB, and Uehnoloffical 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 223 
$chool$ — In$tructor$ and students — Continued. 



Students. 








Preparatory. 


CoUeglate. 


Another 
students.* 


Graduate. 


Professional. 


Total.* 


oUIuuitsr 

school 
Students.' 




1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


81 


28 


28 


24 


85 


86 


87 





200 
87 
800 

98 

52 
84 







110 


20 


363 


38 


33 

35 



158 
20 




42 
52 
1,542 
162 
216 
203 
114 
89 

809 





311 





7 

129 
28 



242 

9 
28 

59 

1,653 
111 


90 





194 
52 


70 



109 



87 


162 
325 


14 





1,196 

198 

118 

138 

116 

34 

10 

18 

100 



249 

24 

6 

18 
88 
56 
82 

31 

7 
32 

33 
38 
652 
21 
64 
24 

52 

124 

61 

46 
66 
61 

26 
117 
17 



60 


177 



142 


6 
8 

3 
63 

314 









2 

25 


16 

12 
35 



















8 


14 


85 
167 


81 




27 

68 
8 
7 

93 



125 

19 



507 

68 


4 
72 



5 

22 
140 


84 



14 

42 



38 



76 



10 
42 






5861 





114 


4 



17 














2 






99 









30 


3 









26 






61 

( 
8 


















2 


1 



34 






G 



J 



32 
32 
725 















» 





122 




49 

174 









12 











696 
24^ 





55 


























2 

14 























oi 



416 
171 
8,181 
168 
322 
207 
160 
186 

1,140 





421 




237 

253 

100 

25 



372 

53 
100 

106 



1,846 

179 



161 





407 
150 


104 



200 



406 




115 





1,683 

227 

224 

154 

156 

162 

10 

291 

139 



816 

150 
226 

27 
385 
157 
116 

35 

59 
10(^ 

61 
156 

141 
112 

13? 

H 

167 

130 
218 
95 

243 

176 
116 



125 



793 






246 






247 






248 


213 


282 


249 
250 






251 






251 






253 






254 






255 






256 






257 






258 






250 



230 

93 
72 





32 
51 

46 



68 



71 





190 
53 


31 


91 


304 


433 

oi 


48 
220 

5 

225 

19 

34 



30 
36 

28 
34 

3 
77 
74 

41 

14 

68 

84 
76 
30 

217 

59 
55 



65 


o" 






260 






261 






?«2 






263 






264 






965 


90 


293 


266 
267 






?68 






?n9 






270 


328 


353 


271 
?72 






273 






274 






275 






276 






277 






278 






?79 


13 


20 


280 
2R1 






282 






283 






?84 






285 






286 



107 


20 



287 
288 
289 



» Includes students In music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 

• Not Included In total. 

* Includes School of Mines at Rolla. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



224 



EDUCATION REPOET, 1913. 

Table 12. — UnivernUes, collegeSy cmd technological 



Location. 



Institution. 



For men, 

tor 
women, 
or coedu- 
cational. 



Control. 



I 



Professors, etc. 



Pre- 
para- 
tory. 



Col- 
legi- 
ate. 



Pro- 
fes- 
sional. 



I 



To- 
tal.* 



10 



11 



12 



IS 



aoo 

282 



294 
205 



206 
207 
208 
209 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 

306 



307 



308 



309 



310 

311 
312 
313 
314 
315 



316 
317 
318 

319 
320 



MiasouRi-contd. 

Springfield 

ToTkio 

Warrenton 

MONTANA. 

Boieman 

Butte 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA. 

Bellevue 

Bethany 

College View.... 

Crete 

Grand Island.... 

Hastings 

Lincoln 

Omaha 

do 

University Place 

York 

NEVADA. 

Reno 

NEW HAKPSHIBE. 

Durham 

Hanover 

NEW JEB8ET. 

Hoboken 

Jersey City 

Keniiworth 

New Brunswick. 

Princeton 

South Orange... 

NEW MEXICO. 

Albuquerque — 

Socorro 

State College.... 

NEW TORE. 

Albany 

Alfred 



Drury College 

Tarklo College 

Central Wesleyan Col- 
lege. 



Montana College 
of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. 

Montana State School 
of Mines. 

University of Mcntana . 



Bellevue College 

Cotner University 

Union College 

Doane College 

Grand Island College. . . 

Hastings College 

U ni versi ty of Nebraska. 
Creighton University ♦, 
University of Omaha... 
Nebraska Wesleyan 

University. 
York College 



State University of Ne- 
vada. 



New Hampshire College 
of Agricultureand Me- 
chanic Arts. 

Dartmouth College 



Stevens Institute of 
Technology. 

St. Peter's College 

Upsala College 

Rutgers College 

Princeton University.. . 
Se ton Hall College 



University of New 
Mexico. 

New Mexico School of 
Mines. 

New Mexico College of 
Agriculture and Me- 
chanic Arts. 



New York State Nor- 
mal College. 
Alfred University 



Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 



Coed. 

Coed. 
Coed. 



Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 
Coed. 
Men.. 
Coed. 
Coed. 



Coed... 

Coed... 

Coed... 
Men.... 



Men... 

Men... 
Coed.. 
Men... 
Men... 
Men... 



Coed.... 
Coed.... 
Coed.... 

Coed.... 
Coed.... 



Nonsect. 
U. Presb 
M.E.... 

State 

State 

State 

Presb... 

Chris 

S. D.Ad 

Cong 

Bapt 

Presb... 

State 

R.C.... 
Nonsect.. 
M.E-... 

U.B.... 

State 

State 

Nonaeot.. 



Nonaect.. 



R.C 

Luth 

Nonsect. . 
Nonsect. . 
R.C 



State.... 
State.... 
State.... 

State 

Nonsect.. 



1873 
1883 
1864 



1000 
1806 



1880 
1801 
1872 
1802 
1882 
1871 
1878 
JOOO 
1887 

1890 



1886 

1868 
1760 

1871 

1878 
1893 
1766 
1746 
1856 

1891 
1895 
1800 



1836 



13 



221 6 



32 

40 
126 

34 

25 
12 
63 
192 
15 

12 
8 
35 

26 
42 



♦ Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AKD TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 225 
ichools — Instructors and students — Continued. 



* Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 

* Not included in total. 



17727*— ED 3913— VOL 2 15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



226 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — UnivernUeSy colUge9, and technological 



•Statistics of 1911-12. 
» Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 227 
Khools — Instructors and students — Continued. 



'Incluues scudents n music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled In four-year courses 
leading lo a couegiate degree. 
• Not included m total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



228 



EDUCATfON REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities ^ colleges ^ and technological 



367 
368 



370 
371 
872 



373 



874 

375 
376 
377 

378 



379 



380 
381 



383 
384 

385 

386 

387 



891 



394 
895 

896 
897 
898 
899 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 

407 



Location. 



NOBTH CARO- 
LINA— con. 

Raleigh 

do 

Red Springs... 

Wake Forest. . 
Woaverville. . . 
West Raleigh. 



Winston-Salem 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Agricultural Col 
lege. 

Fargo 

Jamestown 

University 

do 

omo. 

Ada. 

Akron 

Alliance 

Ashland 

Athens 

Berea 

Cedarville 

Cincinnati 

do 

Cleveland 

do 

..do 



Columbus.. 

do , 

Dayton.... 
Defiance.., 
Delaware.. 



Findlay 

Qambier 

Granville 

Hiram 

Lebanon 

MarietU 

New Athens... 
New Concord.. 

Oberlin 

Oxford 

do 



Institution. 



For men, 

for 
women, 
or coedu- 
cational. 



.do.. 



Meredith College 

Bhaw University (col- 
ored). 

Southern Presbyterian 
Collese 

Wake Forest College... 

Weaver College 

N. C. CoUege of Agri- 
culture and Mechanic 
Arts. 

Salem Academy and 
College. 



North Dakota Agricul- 
tural College. 

Fargo CoUege 

Jamestown College 

University of North 
Dakota.- 

Wesley College 



Ohio Northern Univer- 
sity.* 

Buchtel College 

Mount Union-Scio Col- 
lege. 

Ashland College* , 

Ohio University 

Baldwin- Wallace Col- 
lege. 

Cedarville College , 

St. Xavier College 

University of Cincinnati 

Case School of Applied 
Science. 

St. Ignatius College 

Western Reserve Uni- 
versity. 

Capital University 

Ohio State University.. 

St. Mary's College... 

Defiance College 

Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity. 

Findlay College 

Kenyon College 

Denison University*... 

Hiram College 

Lebanon University.... 

Marietta CoUege 

Franklin CoUege 

Muskingum CoUege. . . . 

Oberlin CoUege 

Miami University 

Oxford College for 
Women. 

Western CoUege for 
Women. 



Women, 
Coed... 



Women. 



Men.... 
Coed... 
Men 



Women. 



Coed.... 

Coed. 

Coed.... 

Coed. 

Coed. 



Coed... 

Coed... 
Coed... 

Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 

Coed... 

Men 

Coed... 
Men.... 



Men.. 
Coed. 



Men 

Coed... 

Men 

Coed... 
Coed... 



Coed... 
Men.... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Coed... 
Women 

Women 



Control. 



Bapt.. 
Bapt.. 

Presb. 



Bapt 

M.^. So. 
State 



Morav., 



State.. 



Cong-. 
Presb. 
State.. 

M.E.. 



M.E. 



Nonsect.. 
M.E 



Breth 

State 

Oer. M. E 

R. Presb. 

R.C 

City 

Nonsect.. 



R.C 

Nonsect.. 



Luth.. 
State.. 
R.C. 
Chris.. 
M. E.. 



C. of God. 

P.E 

Bapt 

Nonsect.. 
Nonsect.. 
Nonsect.. 
Nonsect. . 
U. Presb. 
Nonsect. . 

State 

Nonsect.. 

Nonsect. . 



1899 
1865 



1896 



1834 
1873 



1802 



1890 

1887 
1883 
1884 

1892 



1871 

1872 
1846 

1876 
1808 
1864 

1894 
1840 

1874 
1880 

1886 
1826 

1850 
1872 
1850 
1885 
1844 

1882 
1824 
ia31 
1850 
1855 
1800 
1825 
1836 
1833 
1824 
1830 

1855 



ProfeosoFB, etc. 



Pre- 
para- 
tory. 



13 



Col- 
legi- 
ate. 



14 
15 

4 
35 
15 

5 
9 
81 
45 

0| 11 
0| 53 

10 
259 
13 
9 
42 



20 



10 



50 



6 3 
8 1 



19 



2 24 a 24 



Pro- 
fes- 



10 



4 



9 



2 18 



11 

















9 



To- 
tal. 1 



IS 



30 

18 
22 

4 

42 
23 

6 

31 

201 

45 

28 
Oil38 



15 
272 
41 
10 
50 

10 
18 
27 
12 
8 
13 



IS 



40 



19 



50 



10 
93 37 
38 
2 18 

2 24 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 
> Excluding dupUcates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGER, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 229 
schools — Instructors and students — Continued. 



« Includes studente In music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 
« Not included In total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



230 BDUCATION EEPOET, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universiti^, colleges^ and technological 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 231 
BthooU — Instnietora and $ttuienU — Continued. 



Students. 








Prep«ntory. 


CoUegiAte. 


All other 
students.* 


Graduate. 


Professional. 


Total.! 


OUIU UlOA 

school 
studehts.* 




J 


1 


j 


^ 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


1 


^ 


1 


t 


1 


^ 




U 


15 


80 
16 
20 


24 

4 
26 

8 
93 
10 

50 

20 

67 

20 


15 
48 

10 

26 
36 
38 
30 

41 

60 



5 



129 

18 


70 

20 

8 





7 
6 
301 


16 


17 


18 


19 


SO 


21 


n 


8S 


S4 


S5 


M 


S7 





03 
40 
27 


41 
17 
60 

2 

86 
16 

60 

13 



131 

26 


21 
129 

21 

15 
38 
28 
32 
C 





46 

322 


10 







130 

10 



46 
19 

451 



14 

216 
92 
99 

107 
13 
28 

34 
225 
45 

88 

21 
326 
356 

10 
60 

12 
774 

5 

387 

32 

28 

19 

5 
48 
86 



175 
73 
60 


78 
40 







221 

121 

668 


103 
10 
19 
60 
6? 

13 

34 

210 

17 

32 

27 
156 
196 

4 


9 
324 

5 

284 

38 

22 

16 

3 
69 
82 

127 

i 

44 

62 

60 

15 
376 

68 

169 



50 



16 

30 

7^ 



20 
52 
46 


16 
31 
48 


13 


17 

31 

12 

159 

41 


20 
15 


13 
14 
26 

9 
10 


X 




18 















4 
4 
20l 


106 
26 

150 
67 

40 
76 

123 


144 
23 

40 

34 
161 
71 

82 


61 
47 


100 
66 
46 
24 
26 


59 




64 

6 


70 

20 



46 






21 

30i 







^ 









1 


10 
2 





22 


8 
1 









1 




5 




! 



3 

4 



01 






2 







1 





4 
7 





5 


12 
3 

















80 




1 









31 


69 
(M 


24 









196 











266 



! 


144 





52 


9 




83 








oi 





1 



1 












21 









20 





7 




! 
















ol 



127 
339 
162 
164 
164 
61 
160 

3« 
310 
61 

116 

65 
543 
648 

77 
60 

53 
040 

26 
671 
62 
91 
56 
47 
48 
290 



175 
138 
434 


88 
54 






434 


100 

124 

668 

299 

59 

220l 


206 
124 

258 
152 

55 
167 

85 
162 

42 
447 
51 

122 

81 
342 
331 

106 


86 
424 

15 

415 
132 
104 
78 
58 
69 
175 

187 


104 


179 
80 


200 

65 
456 

71 

215 



51 

23 
56 
I35I 






408 


39 

120 

19 


22 
109 
05 


409 
410 
411 
412 


30 
45 


106 
40 


418 
414 
415 






416 


442 

28 


852 
27 


417 
418 

410 






420 


90 
80 


85 
226 


421 
422 

421 






424 






4W 


20 


78 


426 
427 


53 


117 


428 
429 






430 






431 






432 






483 






434 






435 






436 






437 






438 






430 






440 






441 






442 






443 






444 






445 






446 






447 


29 


11 


448 
449 






450 






451 


I95I 


210I 


452 



* Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 

* Not includedln total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



232 EDUCATION KEPOKT, 1913. 

Tablb 12. — UniversitieSy colleges^ and technological 



463 
454 
466 

456 
467 

46fl 
4611 
46C 
461 

462 
463 
464 
465 

m 

467 
468 

4og 

47C 

471 

472 

473 
474 
47« 

476 

477 

478 
47« 



480 
481 



482 
483 
484 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 

• Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year ooutms 
leading to a collegiate degree. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 233 
tchooh — Instructors and students — Continued. 



» Not included in total. 

« Does not include 1,274 men and 385 women In night school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



234 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — UniverniieSf colUgeSt and technological 



♦statistics of 1911-12. 
'Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 235 
9chooi8 — Instructors and students — Continued. 



'Includes students In music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled In four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 
•Not included In total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



236 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Vniversities, colleges , and technological 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 
> Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 237 
sdioels — Instructors and students — Continued. 



Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled In lour-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 
« Not included in total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



238 EDUCATION EBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities^ colleges^ and technological 



* statistics of 1911-12. 
1 Excluding duplicates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITTES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 239 
Mchools — iTistnictorB and $iudenU — Continued. 



* Includes students In music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree, 
s Not included in total. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



240 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Universities, colleges^ and technologieal 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 
I Excluding dupUcates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 241 
schools — Instructors and students — Continued. 



s Includes students in music, art, oratory, business, etc., unless they are enrolled in four-year courses 
leading to a collegiate degree. 
> Not included in total. 

17727**— ED 1913— VOL 2 16 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



242 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 243 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



244 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 245 



S 

QQ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



246 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 247 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



248 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 249 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



250 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 251 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



252 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 258 



3 
s 

I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



254 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 






% 

EH 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 255 



OQ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



256 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 



"2 

I 

a 



1 



I 



I 



I 

8 



I 



s 

9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 257 



SS'SS" S3R" !SSS" 



S8 a^Y'-Vae' S"S33"g" §V3"2"a"SSS?588 I 



§g 



53 I 



IB §SI 



C^jO-HFHtO 



^38 






^gli 



cSua 






l§ 






C^l^iCCS 



ss 



■«»"Q «C 



ce i^ ec o o »o "^ 






(si 



C) 00 









siis 



B5i§ gig B§s 



»c T-^-r^ — ^ — -- 



3 « ^r^ 

ft t^I>.CO 



g§i§8 i 



^ ,-i-H^ r^ »oeoc 



I 



I" 

!9§ 



Bu 









I 




17727**— ED 1913— VOL 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



258 



EDUCATION REPORT^ 1913. 



Table 14. — Universities, colleges, and teehnologieal schools — Property, fellowships and 

scholarships, fees. 



iDstnatkms. 



1=; 

n 





Ii3§ 






I' 

Hi 

ill 

> 



lis 



n 



'i 



^4 . 



128 



ALABAMA. 

Alabama Pol7t«chnic Insti- 
tute 

Birmingliam College 

HcmardT College 

Soathem University 

Judflon College 

Woman's College of Ala- 
bama 

St. Bernard College. 

Spring HUlColleg 

unhreraity of Alal 



AmzoNA. 
University of Arizona. , 



ARKANSAS. 



Ooachita College 

Arkansas College * 

Arkansas Cumberland Col- 



Coitral College 

Hendrix Colle«e 

University of Arkansas 

Philander Smith College 
(colored) 



CAUrOBNU. 



University of California 

Pomona College 

Occidental College 

University of Southern Cali- 
fornia 

Mills College 

St. Mary's College 

Throop College of Technol- 

St. Ignatius University 

Coll^ of the Pacific 

University of Santa Clara *. 
Leland Stanford Junior 

University 

Whittier College 



COLORADO. 



University of Colorado 

Colorado College 

College of the Sacred Heart . . 

Colorado Woman's CoUeee ♦ 

Colorado Agricultural Col- 
lege 

State School of Mines 

State Teachers College of 
Colorado 

University of Denver 

Westminster College 



CONNECnCXTT. 



Trinity College 

Wesleyan University 

Yale University 

Connecticut Agricultural 
College 



25,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
4,000 

2,500 
5,000 



$155,180 
8,000 
50,000 
15,000 



$9,000 
100,000 
40,000 
25,000 



35,000 
10,000 



60,000 
25,000 



$355,000 

45,000 

100,000 

150,000 

275,000 

305,000 
100,000 



$40,000 
21,000 
90,000 



$281,500 

7,500 

06,000 

75,000 

35,000 



18 $8, 075 



12 



1,000 



12 



21,000 



30,600 



20,000 



7,000 
5,800 

1,500 
4,000 
13,460 
17,000 

2,500 



175,000 



115,000 



19,600 



2,750 

15,000 

24,000 

235,000 

6,500 



250,000 



33,000 



22,500 
13,000 

5,000 
10,000 
15,000 
25,000 

12,000 



800,000 100,000 643,983 



23 



2,052 



245,000 



70,000 
35,000 

25,500 

40,000 

75,000 

390,000 



75,000 10,600 



15,000 
86,000 



59,000 55,000 



259,737 
19,000 
8,000 

26,140 
15,010 
9,534 

4,409 



2,064,487 
66,798 
25,000 

95,000 
78,373 
150,000 

41,280 



142,000 
255,700 

200,000 
150,000 
250,000 

100,000 



7,801,005 
225,652 
395,000 

229,000 
300,000 
100,000 

^84,476. 



10,000 
27,963 

217,000 
4,071 



44, 118 
120,500 

774,000 3, 
10,772 



150,000 

,100,000 
20,000 



159,869 
368,000 



50,000 



66,787 281,600 

56,600 120,444 

10,000 43,000 

500 



32,477 
12,500 



40,000 
20,000 
3,500 



182,000 
252,000 
50,000 



19,100 
43,000 

5,500| 9,000 



10 



250,000 
130,000 



62,900 
70,000 
50,000 

4,000 
73,384 



5,522,068 

464,242 

•333,118 

466,000 
441,879 



119 38,250 



16 



1,750 
2,281 



558,012 



68,500 
168,000 



153,311 
390,000 



3,900,0001 656,75024,000,000 



16,0001 150,000 



2,400 



132,500 
272,718 

139,300 

125,000 

5,000 



882,000 35,000 
598,1061 174,487 

150,000 

75,000, 40,000 



235,900'. 
445,421 



225.000 
69,193 



200,000 457,000' 
61,000, 300,000 
140,000 235,000 16,000 



65,000 255,250 
91,000 201,277 
1,000,000 



150,000 
124,000 



763,100 
777,609 



1,220,538 
2,044,732 
14,665,414 

12,800l 80,000l 30,0001 450,000l 160,OOol 136,000 
* SUtbtics of 1911-12. 



600,000 
142, 768 



966,442 



12 



1,697 



164,594 



98 



980 



622,189 
84,000 



14 



4,000 



200 



6,680 
65,895 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 259 

Table 14. — UniversUieSf colleges, and technological schools — Property, fellowships and 
sdiolarships, fees — Continued. 



* statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQ LC 



260 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 14. — UniverntieSj colleges, and technological schools — Property, fellowships and 
scholarships y /ew— €ontinued. 



University of Chicago 

James Milllkin University.. 

Eureka College 

Korthwestern University... 

Ewing College 

Knox College 

Lombard College 

Greenville College 

Illinois College 

Illinois Woman's College.... 

St. Mary's School* 

Lake Forest CoUege 

McKendree College 

Lincoln College* 

Monmouth CoU^e 

Frances Shimer School 

Northwestern College 

St. Francis Solanus College. . 

Rockford College 

Augustana College 

Shurtlefl Co11m» 

University of filinois 

Wheaton CoUege 

Iin>IANA. 

Indiana University 

St. Joseph's CoUege 

Wabash CoUege 

Earlham CoUege 

Concordia College 

Franklin CoUege 

Qoshen CoUese 

De Pauw University 

Hanover CoUege 

Butler CoUege 

Purdue University 

MooresHUlCoUMTO 

St. Mary's Coflege and 

Academy 

University of Notre Dame. . 

St. Meinrad College 

Rose Polvtechnic Institute.. 

Taylor University 

Valparaiso University * 

Vincennes University 

IOWA. 

Iowa State CoUege of Agri- 
culture and Me^ianic Arts. 
Iowa State Teachers College. 

Coe CoUege 

Charles City CoUege 

Wartburg CoUege 

Luther CoUege 

Des Moines CoUege 

Drake University 

St. Joseph's College 

Parsons CoUeec 

Upper Iowa University 

GrinneU CoUege 

Lenox CoUege 



410,000 

7,821 

6,762 

174,062 

13,000 

12,208 

12,000 

3,600 

17,000 

5,255 

2,000 

33,000 

15,000 

4,000 

8,000 

i,aoo 

10,000 
10,600 

6,000 

18,500 

15,000 

238,301 

6,000 



85,000 
9,000 
47,338 
20,000 
12,000 
19,000 
4,875 
40,288 
22,500 
13,330 
44,000 
6,000 

8,141 
65,000 
22,000 
16,000 

7,000 
15,000 
12,000 



39,295 

44,053 

11,221 

8,000 

5,0001 

17,973 

8,700 

26,241 

8,700 

7,714 

13,050 

49,000 

10,000 



1,655,203 
71,318 
18,500 

677,823 
10,000 
52,764 

125,000 
10,000 
35,155 
59, 171 
35,000 
98,500 
64,000 
5,000 
31,887 



,466,030 
100,000 

12,000 
807,342 

12,000 
206,400 

75,000 

30,000 
112,735 

58,450 



280,000 



40,701 
120,000! 
63,707 



20,000 
31,598 
25,000 
42,094 



11,000 

1,371,988 

14,985 



190,000 



100,927 
67,984 



54,739 

7,500 

100,213 

33,000 

15,000 
355,000 

17,000 



100,000 



265,000 

10,000 

300,000 

5,000 



090,442 

275,000 
72,869 
15,000 
5,000 
41,500 
25,000 

175,000, 
25,000 
25,000 
19,500 

170, 720 
39,902i 



50,000 
304,846 

21,000 
345,247 

31,500 



72^000 

100,000 

82,500 

80,000 



35,857 
98,000 
50,000 
12,000 
70,000 
130,000 
12,000 



800,000 



150,000 
3,500 



100,000 



177,194 

10,000 

150,000 



10,000 
40,000 



60,000 
22,540 



227,740 
13,200 



5,576,990 
422,700 

75,000 
1,334,208 

25,000 
337,136 
150,000 

65,000 
177,400 
300,000 
172,000 
750,000 
149,000 

80,000 
181, 192 
140,000 
140,747 
185,000 
259,589 
351,464 

68,000 

3,178,735 

134,200 



552,000 
500,000 
194,800 
330,000 
350,000 
175,156 

70,000 

359,100 

159,600 

160,000 

1,300,000 

78,000 



150,000 
84,650 
350,000 
100,000 



1,877, 

950, 

334, 

87, 

80, 

190, 

200, 

262, 

575, 

200, 

125, 

337, 

49, 



1681,890 
48,000 
12,000 

143,642 
4,000 
67,515 
15,000 
30,000 
74,600 

125,000 



18,145, 

320, 

175, 

3,947, 

20, 
465, 
231, 

10, 
385, 

61, 



324,000 
72,000 
118,000 



60,000 



117,407 



25,000 



33,000 



105,000 



41,000 
38,000 



30,400 
15,000 



3,000 



1,320,000] 500,000 



11,750 



938 

000 
500 
000 
000 
OOOi 

ooo| 

000 
000' 
000 

ooo; 

545 
784] 



48,500 



13,500 
25,000 



160,000 
60,000 



22,395 
22,000 
32,000 
10,000 



166 
405 
375 
233 
000 
317 
000 
000 
505 
000 



778,627 
133,180 



375,554 

75,000 

330, 77r 



114,788 
414,356 
183,538 
647,401 
189,032 



744,000 
100,000 
741,255 
400,000 



190,000 
60,000 
866,535 
199,491 
394,954 
340,000 
60,672 



990118,803 



13 550 



15 



43 



21 



37 



60 



800,000, 
22,000 



150,000 



686,818 



710,000 
128,000 
14,700 
272,408 
150,000 



250,000 

210,000 

1,022,226 

165,5331 



80 



18 



1,180 
1,400 



1,187 
3,500 



1,847 



300 
3,900 



550 

22,550 

993 



13,000 



300 
3,000 



973 
660 



300 



150 
76 
60 



70 
60 
40 
48 
60 
80 



67 
45 
40 
56 
60 
50 
40 
100 
45 
66 



47 
76 
40 
75 
50 
60 
39 
75 



43 



100 
30 



145 
*4,'326 
*i,'i36 
2,256 



45 
73 
34 



15 
50 
50 
40 



54 

90 
60 
50 

'to 

60 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 261 

Table 14. — Universities , colleges ^ and technological schools — Property ^ fellowships and 
scholarships f fees — Continued. 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



262 



BDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 14. — Univerntus, colUge$, and tecknologieal stkooU — Property, feUawihips and 
tehoiarshipsj /us — Continiied. 



Institotioiis. 



hmUtnA SUte U nhreisitj 
and Agricoltaral and Me- 
thtoicMXCoOtgt 

SmimaiiCoUeKiste Institate 

Jeflenon CoDe«* 

lUnsfleld Female CoUege* . 

H. Soph Je Newcomb Memo- 



rial CoUece.... 
>ia Unlverstt; 



Loyola 

New Orleans 

(colore<i). 

Tnlane Unhrentty of Loui- 



Bowdoin College. 
Bates CoUe^s.... 
Unhrersity of Maine 
Van Buren College (Su 



' CoUBge! 



MABTUUfD, 




Colby 



St. John's CoUece.. 
United States Naval Acad- 
emy 

OoodierrollefQe. 

Johns Hopkins University.. 

Loyola CoUege 

Morgan CoU^ (cotored)... 
Moun t S t . Joseph *s CoU^ . 

Washington College 

Maryland Agricultural Col- 

B^UmCoUege'.' 
Mount 8t. Mary's College. 

Hood College 

MaijlMul College for 

women 

Western Maryland College . 

MABflACHUSETTS. 

Ambent College. 
Massachusetts Agricultural 

College 

Boston University. 
Massachuaetts Institute of 

Technology 
fiiramons Coll _ 
Harvard I Diversity. 
Kodciille College.. 

Smith College 

WheatonCoU*^. 
Mount Ilolyoke College., 



Tufts College 
"WeWrsU-.y Col 
Williams Colle^, 

Clark College 

Clark University 

College of the Holy Cross. . 

Worc<*stor Polytechnic In 

stltutc 



* Statistics of 1911-12. 



» Included under Clark University. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 263 

Table 14. — UniversilieSf colleges^ and technological schools — Property y fellowships and 
scholarships f /c€*— Continued. 



Ad 
All 

Alma College 

University of Micliisan 

University of Detroit 

Michigan Agricultuial Col- 

Hil£dale Coliege. i .'!!!.'!!!! ! 

llope College 

Mi^igan Collese of Mines. . . 

Kalamasoo College 

Olivet College 



ICINNESOTA. 



24,9281 34,467 
322,(M0 1,532, 585 
27,000| 



Albert Lea College 

8t. John's University 

Augsburg Seminary 

University of Minnesota 

Carleton College 

8t. Olaf College 

Hamline College 

Macalester College 

Oustavus Adolphus College. 

Mcssissipn. 

Mississippi Agricultural and 
Mechanical College 

Whitworth College 

HiUmanColleffB 

Mississippi College 

Mississippi Industrial Insti- 
tute and College 

Grenada Colle|;e 

Rust University (colored). . 

Millsaps College 

Meridian College 

Chickasaw College 

Port Gibson Female College. 

University of MississippL . . . 

MISSOURI. 

Palmer College 

Missouri Wesley an CoUege. . 

Christian University* 

Stephens College 

University of Missourii 

Central College 

Howard- Payne College* 

Synodical College 

Westminster CoUeee 

Central College for Women.. 
Lexington College for Young 

Women 

Liberty Ladies' College*.... 

William JeweU College 

Missouri Valley College 

Hardin College 

Scarritt-Morrisville CoUege. . 

Cottey College* 

Park College 

Linden wood Female College, 
Christian Brothers College . . 
Forest Park University.. 

St. J^uis University 

Washington University.. 

Drury College 

Tarkio College 

Central Wesleyan College 




137, 133 
2,707,443 



27,750 



2,000 

4; 000 

9,004 
900 
3,000 
12,000 
8,500 



1.075 
25,000 



1,500 
5,000 
5,000 
2,000 
171,006 
12,000 
1,850 
1,500 
4.911 
6,000 

4,000 
1,500 

27,000 

14,912 
1,400 
3,500 
2,000 

27,857 
2,150 

22,467 
6,000 

62,000 
138,2,S5 

33.000 
3,875 

io,oool 



18,000 
10,300 

2,500 
20.000 
25,000 

2,500 



73,800 



2,000 
70,000 

2,500 

10,000 

812,208 

33,750 

1,500 
12,500 
16,985 
15,000 

5,000 
15.000 
40,000 
32,724 

3,550 



863,625 
115,000 
150,000 
439,085 
70,000 
250,000 



98,593 
525,000 
125,000 
4,900,000 
340,553 
215,975 
190,000 
235,210 
175,000 



652,550 



100,0001 
20,000* 

7,000 
65,000 
50,000 
10,000 

8,000 
75,000 



10,000 
18,000 
20,000 
70,000 
543,335 
35,000 



18,000 
33,800 
25,000 



16,000 
105,984 



£0,000 
10,000 



000 



000 
540 
000 



8, 

143. 

82, 

800, 

100, 



000 
625 
000 
000 
OOOl 



20.000 
186,008 

356,000 
60,000 
14,000 

297,500 

150,000 
10,000 
35,250 

415,300 



70,000 
101,500 
160,000 
200,000 
1,524,880 
218,500 
125,000 

45,000 
152,545 
150,000 



65, 
70, 
272, 
117, 
75, 



000 
000 
000 
940 
000 



78«i,08< 



15,000 
15,000 



225. 
2, 
50, 



000' 
750; 
OOO' 



117, 
288, 
109, 
250, 
107, 
,250. 
,144, 
294. 
108, 
110, 



000 
800 
000 
000 
000 
000 
827 
000 
250 

oooJ 




35,000 
80,000 
120,000 
150,000 
87,500 
13,500 
38,000 
36,297 



70,000 
143,000i 
70,000 
36,000 
1,272,839, 
200,000 



222,555. 

44,000. 

50,0001 20,000. 



8,000 
60,000 



79,500 



625,023 
75.000 
50,000 
12,0001 



.1 



571,000 
192,688 
86.000 
60,000| 



451,736i. 
26,0001. 
40, ( 



40 



6,697.590- 
310,000. 
199,084 . 
169,000. 



3,330 
500 



250 



2^,771 



50 
65 
60 
60 



60 
30 
60 
60 
30 
25 
75 
50 



75 
75 
40 
40 



♦ Statistics of 1911-12. 

1 Includes School of Mines at Rolla. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



264 



EDUCATION REPORT^ 1913. 



Tablb 14. — UnirermHeg, eolUges, and teehnologieal schools — Propertaf, fiUcwskips and 
sAoiankips, fee* — Continued. 



TMtltiifiwn 



•§5 



> 



Mt 



n 

'I 

•5 

3*3 




• ' !• 



iCoOcfeof A|;riail- 

tore md Mecfaanie Arts... 
Mimtam State Sdiool of 



rnhrcrrity of Mootana.. 



13,388 $158,700 $118,000 

9,000 61,000. 
22,a)0( 125,000 



BcOerue CoOef^ 

Cotner Unhrenit7 

Unkn CoOefe 

DoaneCoOece 

Grand Island CoU^ 

Hartingf CoHeae 

UniTenitj of Nefavaska 

Cfeijt fatoDC nivcf^ty* 

UnJTCfBitT of Omaba 

NebcMkm Wakrui Uni- 

fwiity 

TorkColkve 



VKTADA. 

8tat« Unhrcnity of Nevada. 



New Hampildn CoOeiQB of 
Afrtcultimand Mechanic 
Art! 

Dtftmooth CoOeee 

HKW jnSET. 

BtBTtBB lofUtuts of Tedi* 

noloiQr 

8t. Peier'i College 

UpaalaCoile0e 

RatftnCollMe 

Prfncetoo Univerrity 

8et4nUaU College 

HKW mxico. 

rnlTereity of Kew Mexico. . 

New Mexico Bchod of Mines 

New Mexico Col leee of Aeri- 

culture and Mechanic Arts 

nw TOKK. 

New York State Normal 
CoOece 

Alfred University 

8t. Stephen's Coltefe 

WeUsCoUem 

Adclphl College 

Polytechnic Institute of 
Broolclyn 

St. Fmncis Colleite 

St. John's rollege * 

Canlflius College 

St. Lawrence T'niverslty.... 

Hamilton CoUe*;© 

Elmirarx)llcp!* 

Hobart Coilejje 

Colgate University 

Cornell University 



6,2M 

5.000 

4,or)ol 
12,5h»| 

106, &oO! 
45,000 



W,874 

6,000 
18,310 
29, 000* 
10, 745 
16.000 
461,000 



800| 
».41»| 



8. , 
2,500 



24,590 



ai.aooi 



5,200 

90,782 
15,000 



125,000 200,000 



151,780 



118,000 



10,8001 140,000] 500,000 
8,000 

2,2001 40,000 

331,0001 223,850 



2,200 
09,226 
306,218 
15,000 30,000 



10.000 
4,000 




14,595 

4,270. 

13,600 

4,500 

23,265 

69,000 

10,100 

55,267 

64,000 

423,570*2, 



60,000 



55,000 
50.000 
24,863 
53,050 
11,400 
25. 000* 
624.750 
300.000, 
80,000 

115,000' 
10,000^ 



83,891 



40,000 
400,000 



$397,500 $45,000 3331,660 



152,000. 
200,000 



30.000 1,000,000 



260,000 



10,000' 
2,000. 



71,550' 
100,000, 
143,612, 
112,650. 

96,000i 

115,000 

1,302,950 

550.000 

30,000. 

224,200. 

100,000 



48.000 
3,000 
55,000. 
30,01*0 
45,000 
U,00O 
«2,400 



51,498 

30,000. 



12 



278.126 

46,000; 

906.000 

763,441 

40,0(X> 2,750,000. 



8i 1,170 

^ 110 

150 

4,350 



3 
31 



30,000 



42.0 . 
50,000. 



120 



4n,436 90,000 306,964 



360,000' 96.000 960,000' 
1,800,000; 800,000; 3,060,000 



600,000' 76,000 875,000 

60,000 ■ TTj 

25,000| 8,000 

091,50« 76,0001 848,696 

I I 6,194,861 

226,000 



447 



138'37, 



78,000 
100,600; 



18,000 
15,000 



S60 
36 
46 
40 
43 
60 



110. 
1,873 



87 

90033,000 



4.195 



1,200 
- 633 



408 



37,350 93,325 27,400 



3$ 

40 



60 
135 



61 
46 
160 
160 



30 
30 



I 



I 



30,2001 252,922; 36,000, 375,853 

6,000' 210,000 60,000| 98,086. 

10,000' 449,000 126,500, 361,800 

70,000i 217,000 122,179. 



105,188 
27,000 
78,000 
40,000 

107,342 

20,000 

51,000 
100,0001 

48,500 

85,000 
121,000 
196,653 

• Statistics of 1911-12. 



525,0001 
100,000i 

242,5001 

6o,ooo; 



51,600 
20,000l 
60,0001 
65,000 
100,000' 



323,934. 

106,000. 

530,000 

175,000. 

312, 500 . 

600.000 

185,000 

357,480 

600,000; 



721,098' 



70,000. 



296,7251 5,131,969! 



200,000 1,040,3301 
110,(M)0 128,500. 
72,500; 727,980| 
125,000: 1,765,000 
444,3861 9,586,1171 



100 
102 



82 

961 



2,757 

4,888 

450 



8,060 



6,000 
10,390 



8,983 
15,664 



63125,1701. 



60 



160 
180 



125 



100 
60 
60 
90 
ISO 
100 
60 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVEBSITIEB, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 265 

Table 14. — Univeraities, colleaes, and technological nchools — Property , fellowships and 
achokarthips, fees — Continued. 



*StatisUcs of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



266 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 14. — UnivertUies^ colleges j and technological schools — Property ^ fellowships and 
scholarships f fees — Continued. 



Institutions. 



omo. 

Ohio Northern University* 

Buchtel College 

Mount Union-Scio College . . 

Ashland College* 

Ohio University 

Baldwin- Wallace College. . . 

Cedarville College 

St. Xavier College 

University of Cincinnati. . . 

Case School of Applied 
Science 

St. Ignatius CoUese 

Western Reserve University 

Capital University 

Ohio State University 

St. Mary's College 

Defiance CoUege 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Findlay College 

Kenyon College 

Denlson University ♦ 

Hiram College : . . . 

Lebanon University 

Marietta College 

Franklin College.. 

Muskingum College 

Oberlhi College 

Miami University 

Oxford College for Women. . 

Western College for Women 

Lake Erie Colleee 

Rio Grande College 

Wittenberg College 

Heidelberg University 

Toledo University 

Otterbein University 

West Lafajrette College* 

Wilberforce University (col- 
ored) 

Wihnington College 

University of Worcester 

Antioch College 



OKLAHOMA. 



of 



Methodist University 
Oklahoma 

Kingfisher CoUege 

University of Oklahoma. . . 

Oklahoma A gricultural and 
MechanicaiCollege 

Henry Kendall Coiicee * . . . 

Oklahoma School of Mines 
and Metallurgy 



Albany College 

Oregon State Agrteultural 

College 

Dallas College* 

University of Oregon 

Pacific University 

McMinnvUIe CoUo^o 

Pacific College 

Philomath College 

Reed College 

Willamette University 



3 >» 



> 



6,000 
10,000 
10,000 

3,000 
41,000 

8,500 

4,000 
30,000 
70,000 

10,400 

17.000 

100,000 

6,000 
128,820 

7,000 

6,500 
65.000 

3,000 
35,000 
25.000 
12,000 
10,000 
60.000 

3,000 

7,200 
125.691 
37,602 

4,000 
15,535 
11,790 

4,000 
18,000 
12,000 

2,500 
16,393 

2,500 

11,000 

6,100 

34,211 

11,000 



5,000 

6,581 

20,263 

16,671 
2,000 

1,200 



3,600 

23,600 
1,000 
44,759 
15,000 
5,000 
2,500 
2,000 



925,250 

240,088 

137,000 

2.000 

202,900 

20,261 

6,000 



464,006 



266, 
70, 
81, 
15, 
1,083, 
60, 
43, 
99, 

11, 

68, 

300, 

26, 



054 
000 
358 
000 
150 
000 
982 
872 
749 
200 
000 
325 



ll,200l 



200, 

8, 

20, 

286. 

145, 

60, 

64, 

72, 

5, 

35, 

30, 

10, 

37, 

2, 



900 
800 
500 
660 
000 
664 
059 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 
000 



6,000 
70,846 
30,000 



17,000 

12,000 

136,808 

288,730 



6,600 

218.000 

1.000 

174.446 

17,000 

11.2.S0 

5,000 



28.0001 



$44,000 
62,207 

110,000 
19,000 

600,324 

24,180 

6,000 



467,300 

400,068 
66,000 

324,600 

60,000 

1,647,500 



10,000 
65,000 
10,000 
41,000 
15,000 
17,648 



300,000 

2,600 

9,000 

105,500 

60,000 

35.000 

24,000 

65,500 

2,000 

40,000 

75,000 

200.000 

33,465 

2,000 

60,000 
60,000 
64,622 
16,000 



60,000 

15,000 

116,000 

60,000 
30,000 



70,000 1,600 



69,300 

400,000 
15,000 

300,000 
50.000 
30.700 
25.000 
16.000 

258.000 

360,000' 



9137,250 
147,490 
186,000 
106,000 
628,000 
233,000 
40.000 
375,500l 
886,7321, 



$11,674 
65.000 
60,000 

120,000 
63,000 



430, 
175, 

1,229, 
75, 

1,930, 



3101 
000 
674 
000 

837 



186, 
664, 
99, 
435, 
483. 
108, 



60, 

41, 
100, 
1,304, 
625, 
115, 
296, 
231, 

35, 
200, 
300, 

68, 
169, 

31, 



360,000 
75,000 
908,211 
200,000 



175,000 
45,000 
274,000 

626,900 
100,000 

114,000 



26,000 

653,796 

8,000 

293.000 

150,000 

37,200 

50,000 

22,000 

485.541 

140,0001 



149,000 
30,000 
135,000 



95,000 
112,000 
6,000 
153,000 
175,000 

31,000 



1,500 



337,950 
175,000 



66,430 
103.673 
16,000 
60,000 
86,000 



36,000 
2,00C 



10,000 

285,372 

60,000 



26,000 



90,000 
40,000 



6,000 

101,000 
3,000 
6«'>,500 
65,000 



«5,6001 
200,000 
298,634 

90,000 
146,066 
302,000 

76,890 



809,660 
2,390,616 



3,220.228 
39,971 
972,230 



272,358 
1,093,239 
110,000 
820,730 
765,000 
272,476 



20, 

120, 

2, 139, 

109, 



190, 
202, 
80, 
516. 
320, 



149,500 



23 



10 



23 



48 



39 11, 160 



80 4,000 



10 



62 



8210,344 



17 



30,000 

80,000... 

1,134,779 138 

115,000 30 



76,000 
166,000 



92,500 



185,000 

201,648 
25,000' 
65,000 

228,000' 
60,2341 
40.00d 
20.000 



2,500 
3.000 
150.0001 3,0a),000 . 
7,000< 600,000' 



$372 



2,062 
1,700 



2,610 



800 



5,702 



400 



8,400 



2,139 



750 



450 



900 



360 



200 



$50 
75 
64 
34 



40 
36 
60 



125 
60 

100 
40 



60 
65 
75 
48 
75 
60 
60 



75 
48 
60 
100 
30 
100 
125 
125 
26 
75 



75 
38 

2S 
60 
60 
30 



60 



40 



60 



42 



34 
61 
60 



100 
625 60 



*Statistlcs of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 267 

es, and technological schools 
olarshipSy fees — Continued. 



Table 14. — Universities ^ colleges, and technological schools — Property, fellowships and 

8 — CoE 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



268 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 14. — Universities ^ colleges, and technological schools — Property j fellowships and 
scholarships, fees — Continued. 



♦Statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TJNIVEIISITIES, COLLEGES, AND TECHNOLOGICAL SCHOOLS. 269 

olleaeSy and technological schooU 
scholarships J fees — Continued. 



Table 14. — Universities , collepeSy and technological schools — Property y fellowships and 

s — Com * 



c Statistics 011911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



270 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 14. — Universities, colleges, and technological schools — Property, fellowships and 
scholarships, fees — Continued. 



iDstitutions. 



WASHINGTON. 

Stale College of Washington 
University of Washington. , 

Gonzaga university 

Spokane Collie* 

University of Pnget Sound. . 

Whitworth College 

Whitman College 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Bethanv College 

West Virginia Wesleyan 

College 

Powhatan College ♦ 

Davis and Elkins College. . 
West Virginia University.. 

WISCONSIN. 

Lawrence College , 

Beloit College 

University of Wisconsin 

Milton College 

Concordia College 

Marquette University 

Milwaukee-Downer Collie. 

Mission House 

Ripon College 

Carroll College* 

WYOMINO. 

University of Wyoming 






mi 

_ t) C! c 



37,089 
63,215 
14,000 
2,000 
4,000 
6,000 
22,700 






$249,703 $118,700 
474,1661,060,000 






4,000 

7,500 

1.600! 

2,275 

46,500 



32, 186 

51,400 
195,000 

9,3901 

6,500l 
12,500| 

9, 659; 
17,000 
20.843 

7, 



4,000 
7,000 
12,000 
98,784 



30,000 

26,030 

3.500 

31,285 

90,000 



115,739 
131,000 
1,187,095, 
20,000 
2.000 
28.0001 
52,210| 

"168.402 
12,000 



60,000 
70,000 
62,000 
131,723 



100,000 

60,622 

10,000 

2o,000l 

250,000 



m 



$1,044,156, 

876,334 



125,000 

89,000| 

1,935.782 

7.5001 

100,000 

270,000' 

152.000' 

15,000' 

62.676i 

47,0001 



57,000 
66,000 
87,500 
170,930 



300,000 

165,578 
63,000 
70,000 

625,000 



459,390 

431,900 

3,321,749 

65,000 

75.000 

140.000 

435,390 

25,000 

231.935 

185,000 



33,000 179,000 110.000 302,500 40,000 51,007 



SO) 

o -o 
•« o a 

O 3 

§|8 
> 



60,000 






$80,000 $737,940 



II 



> CO— ( . 



5,000,0001 



10.500 
69,500 
75,271 



65,000 



108,000 
352,540, 



350,000 
117.285 



25,000 
10,000 
60,000 100,0001 
j 115,104 



124,000 
127,400 



6,000 
30,000 



215,000 



85,270 
40,000 



852.877 

1,152,213 

674,764 

136,000 

6,500 



214,000 
20.000 
251.882 
287,877 



10 



7 
104 
51 
7 
3 



$9,785. 



6,210 
1,600 



202 



610 

6,200 

17,201 

400 

84 

400 



600 
1,000 



8 GGO 



$50 
50 
55 
75 

100 



40 
100 
40 



50 
70 
40 
40 
60 
125 
30 
20 
50 



•Statistics of 1911-12. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER V. 
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



The institutiojis commojily known as " f^ricultural and mechani- 
cal colleges" are brought together in this chapter and made the 
subject of special treatment, but in addition to being considered 
here they are included in the general tables of the different classes 
of schools in other parts of this report, the dominating character of 
each institution determining whether it shall be classed among the 
universities and colleges or as a normal or secondary school; those 
for colored students appear still a third time, in the tables of colored 
schools. 

CHANGES IN COUB8BS AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Alabama Polytechnic Iristituie. — A summer session of six weeks was held. 

Agricultural and Mechanical College /or Negroes (Alabama). — The system is now 
organized as follows: Primary practice school, grades 1 to 4; grammar school, grades 
5 to 7; high school, grades 8 to 11; and teachers* college, grades 12 to 15. Courses in 
agriculture are required in each school. The degree of bachelor of arts is given in 
the college. 

The extension work includes farmers' institutes, school -improvement association, 
boys* com clubs, and girls' tomato clubs. Through the school improvement associa- 
tion 11 school farms from 1 to 5 acres each are being conducted. The patrons do the 
work, and the proceeds are used to extend the school term. 

Univergity of Arizona. — A four-year course for bachelor of science in economics is 
offered. The first year of preparatory work has been dropped. 

Colorado Agricultural College. — A course in domestic art has been added. Coopera- 
tive work with the Federal Bureau of Plant Industry and county commissioners in 
farm management investigations is now under way in 6 counties. 

Delaware College. — The recitation periods have been changed from 45 minutes to 
1 hour in length, and the work has been carried on 6 days, the week ending at 12.45 
p. m., Saturday. 

University of Florida. — Three professors have been added to the faculty. Six addi- 
tional instructors have been added for the college of engineering and college of agri- 
cultiu-e. Beginning 1913 the entrance requirements are 15 Carnegie units or 16 
according to the Florida high-school rating. 

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes. — Special bachelor of science 
courses in agricultiu-e and mechanic arts are added to the ciuriculum. 

Georgia State College of Agriculture. — The courses have been so modified as to afford 
electives in farm management, bacteriology, entomology, and agricultural economics. 

Georgia Slate Industrial College. — Poultry raising and a commercial department 
have been added. 

College of Hawaii. — Three courses in sugar technology have been added. 

271 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



272 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

Pvrdue University (Indicma). — ^A summer school for teachers in sarvice, inaugurated 
in 1912, was repeated in 1913; instruction was limited to agriculture, domestic science, 
and manual training. A system of medical and infirmary service to students has 
been inaugurated. 

Kansas State Affricultural College. — The entrance requirements to all college courses 
have been raised to 15 imits. 

Kentucky Manual and Industrial Institute for Colored Persons, — The extension work 
consists of lectures and demonstrations at farmers' institutes in Scott, Harrison, and 
Mercer Coimties. 

Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, — Courses in 
journalism have been added. 

Princess Anne Academy (Maryland). — A two-year special course has been added to 
the elementary agricultural course. Extension work among farmers at farmers' 
conference was continued. Com prizes were established. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, — ^A director of the graduate school has been 
appointed. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. — The summer surveying camp was opened 
the past summer. The transferring of field work to the summer camp has made it 
possible to give additional terms of work in a few subjects. 

University of Minnesota. — The first class in the five-year course in engineering was 
graduated in Jime, 1913, with the degrees of civil, mechanical, and electrical engineers, 
respectively. Work in architecture and architectural engineering was again resumed, 
freshman work only being offered. An additional class is contemplated each year 
imtil the five classes from freshman to post-senior are in operation. Night work was 
given in extension courses in the elements of architecture, in structural engineering, 
and reinforced concrete, and a general coiirse in electricity and applied mechanics. 
In these extension courses 146 students were registered. 

A division of agricultural education has been added. Three experienced men, 
giving their whole time to this work, have been appointed. A new division of home 
economics has been organized, and the home economics course has been completely 
reorganized. The division of horticidture was reorganized on a section basis, and 
two new men were appointed. The division of agricultural chemistry and soils was 
reorganized, making a division of agricultural chemistry and a division of soils. A 
new head of each division was appointed. 

Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College, — A tx)ur8e of study in bacteriology 
has been established; also a two-year short course in agriculture has been added. A 
practice school in vocational education, in connection with the school of industrial 
education, has been established. Additional instruction will be furnished to the 
lower classes in industrial work. 

Montana State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, — ^The school of pharmacy 
has been transferred to the State university at Missoula. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — The numbers of hours 
for graduation have been reduced and are now as follows: Arts and science course, 132, 
including military science and drill; agricultural course, 140, including military 
science and drill. A full four-year course in home economics has been provided and 
was in full operation beginning with the first semester of 1913. 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, — A short course in agri- 
culture for the county demonstration agents was added. This course covers two 
weeks and is a teaching and conference course. 

Agricultural and Mechanical College for the Colored Race (North Carolina). — A four- 
year trade-school course was begun. The classes worked half a day at their English 
studies and the other half day at the selected trade — carpentry, blacksmithing, dairy- 
ing, farming, bricklaying, broommaking, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGMCULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 273 

Oi'egon State Agricultural CoUege. — Four-year degree courses have been established 
in logging, engineering, and in industrial arts. 

I^ennsylvania State College. — A new course in commerce and finance in the school 
of liberal arts is offered. • 

University of Porto Rico. — Degrees will be given to graduates of all departments 
after next year. The following colleges are now organized at Kio Piedras: Normal, 
liberal arts, law, and pharmacy. 

Colored Normal j Industrial^ Agricultural, and Mechanical College of South Carolina. — 
All grades below the fifth have been abolished. Regular two and four year courses 
in agriculture have been established. An llnnual summer school is to begin in the 
summer of 1914. Architectural and mechanical drawing have been added. A print- 
ing department has been organized. Midsummer and midwinter farmers' conferences 
-were held at the college. Four lecturers have traveled in the southern section of the 
State, giving information relating to farming. 

University of Tennessee. — ^Hereafter all liberal arts courses, whether classical, scien- 
tific, modem language, or historical, will lead to the single bachelor of arts degree. 

Utah Agricultural College. — ^The first-year high-school work has been eliminated, 
and the second and third years will be discontinued each successive year. Short 
practical courses in agriculture, mechanic arts, commerce, and home economics have 
been added. 

Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute. — Courses in 
agricultural engineering and chemical engineering will be offered during 191^14. 

West Virginia Colored Institute. — One year has been added to the academic course 
in order to prepare students for college or professional courses. Instruction is given 
in agriculture and domestic science and arts to students preparing to teach. 

University of Wisconsin. — A two-year forest rangers' course is given in cooperation 
with the State board of forestry. 

INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS. 

The total niiinber of instructors, including professors, assistajits, 
extension workers, and experiment station investigators, employed 
by the agricultural and mechanical collies in aU departments diuing 
the year ended June 30, 1913, was 8,715. This includes 439 instruc- 
tors in the 16 separate institutions for colored students. 
17727'— ED 1913— VOL 2 ^18 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



274 



EDUCATION KBPOBT, 1913. 



Omitting the institutions for colored students, the total enroll- 
ment of the other 52 colleges was 90,705. The number of students 
in regular four-year courses in agiicultural, engineering, and other 
science courses is shown by the following table: 



Enrollment in certain courses. 



Courses. 



1900 



1910 



1911 



1913 



1913 



Agriculture 

Horticulture 

Forestry 

Veterinarv science 

Househola economy 

Mechanical engineering. 

Civii engineering 

Railway engineering. ... 
Electrical engineering. . . 

Mining engineering 

Chemical engineenng 

Sanitary engineering 

Textile engineering 

General engineering 

Architecture 

Chemistry 

Pharmacy 

General science 



4,855 

605 

198 

215 

1,443 

4,389 

4,967 



3,845 

1,293 
49S 
129 
102 

1,622 
590 
608 
183 

2,947 



5,912 

276 

853 

622 

1,617 

4,508 

4,642 

137 

3,499 

1,169 

515 

141 

97 

2,055 

633 

886 

132 

4,031 



7,696 

217 

393 

553 

2,258 

4,336 

4,229 

119 

8,445 

1,029 

587 

148 

111 

1,600 

697 

796 

232 

4,243 



9,898 
322 
487 
494 

2,506 

4,518 

4,224 
56 

8,106 
776 
466 
103 
116 

1,482 
855 
707 
153 

4,245 



10,871 

459 

534 

598 

3,074 

3,830 

3,393 

74 

3,027 

796 

506 

117 

60 

2,525 

713 

720 

196 

4,860 



The number of students enrolled in agriculture, domestic science, 
mechanic arts, short and special courses, and in all departments for 
the past nine years is shown in the following tabular statement: 

Enrollment in certain courses (not including enrollment in institutions for colored students). 



Courses. 


1906 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Agriculture 


2,473 

717 

13,000 

5,075 
48,593 


2,963 

833 

13,937 

6,303 
62,541 


3,930 
1,030 

15,896 
6,500 

56,548 


4,566 

1,319 

17,411 

8,748 
62,098 


5,873 

1,443 

17,435 

11,203 

66,099 


7,241 
1,617 

17,259 
8,143 

73,536 


8,859 
2,258 

16,301 
7,522 

80,574 


10,701 
2,506 
15,702 
10,106 
84,633 


13 463 


Domestic science 


3,074 
15, 141 


IMnchanlC fttts, ..... 


Short and special courses*. .. 
All departments. 


11.138 
88,408 







1 Not including students in summer school since 1909. 

In the separate land-grant institutions for colored students, with 
a total enrollment of 8,561, the preparatory departments included 
3,603; the agricultural and mechanical collegiate departments, 1,122; 
and all other departments, 2,382. The enrollment in the classes in 
agriculture was 1,795; in household arts, 5,365; in carpentry, black- 
smithing, painting, printing, and various other industries, 2,725. 

DEGREES. 

The earned degrees conferred by these institutions, not including 
the separate institutions for negroes, were 8,495, divided as follows: 
Bachelor of.arts and bachelor of science, 7,412; master of arts, master 
of science, and doctor of philosophy, 1,083. Of the bachelor degrees, 
1,384, or 18.9 per cent, were conferred on graduates of agricultural 
courses; 318, or 4.3 per cent, on graduates of home-economics courses; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 275 

and 1,775, or 23.9 per cent, on graduates of mechanic-arts courses. 
Of the advanced d^rees, 165, or 15.2 per cent, were for agricultural 
work; 39, or 0.35 per cent, for home economics; and 207, or 19.1 per 
cent, for mechanic arts. 

PROPERTY. 

Reports show an increase of $6,961,695 in valuation of the prop- 
erty held for the benefit of the land-grant colleges, making the total 
value $136,935,562. The total expenditure for building operations 
during the year was $4,448,228. Some of the principal buildings, as 
reported by the presidents of the institutions, are given below. 

GIPT8, BUILDINGS, AND IMFROYEMENTS. 

Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes (AlabaTna). — A reaervoir and sewer- 
age system have been completed. 

University of Arizona. — A men's dormitory has been completed, costing $32,000. 

University of Arkansas, — ^A new building for education and domestic economy has 
been completed, costing $40,000. 

Colorado Agricultural College. — A new hydraulic laboratory has been erected at a 
cost of $10,000. 

Connecticut Agricultural College. — New buildings erected during the past year 
include a dormitory, costing $75,000; a horse bam, $10,000; a cow bam, $10,000; a 
poultry building, $25,000; and an addition to the dairy building, $20,000. 

University of California. — ^The following buildings and additions to buildings have 
been erected; At Lick Observatory, dormitory and cottages, $45,964; Scrippe Bio- 
logicsd Institute at La Jolla, $13,025; buildings at university farm, $21,765; buildings 
at Riverside experiment station, $15,120; Los Angeles medical department buildings 
at Berkeley, $20,324; architectxiral building addition, $11,129; chemistry auditorium, 
$20,810; chemistry storehouse, $10,108; agricultxiral hall building, $23,598; infirmary 
annex, $7,646; Sather campanile, $7,233; South Hall addition, $5,464. 

University of Florida. — Peabody Building and Language Hall have been com- 
pleted at a cost of $40,000 each; about $40,000 has been spent for equipment of same. 
A sewerage system and a central heating plant for five of the buildings on the campus 
have been installed at a cost of $15,000. 

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes, — ^A girls' dormitory lias 
been erected. 

Georgia State College of Agriculture. — ^A new type of farm bam has been constmcted, 
framing of wood, inclosed with wire lath, and covered with cement, and metal roof. 
A bam has been built for the demonstration department for beef cattle and for the 
manufacture of hog cholera serum, and an incubator house has been built for the 
poultry department. 

Georgia State Industrial College. — A poultry house has been erected. 

University of Illinois. — The following buildings have been completed or are under 
construction: Commerce, costing $125,000; an addition to the women's building, 
$125,000; transportation group, $200,000; ceramics, mining laboratory, $15,000; ar- 
mory, $100,000; floricultural group, $50,000, and a stock-judging pavilion, $110,000. 

Purdue University (Indiana). — A library building has been completed, at a cost of 
$100,000. 

Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — Constmction was begun on 
new chemistry building to cost $250,000 and on a gas and steam engine laboratory 
to cost $50,000. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



276 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Louidana State Urdvemty and AffricuUural and Mechanical College. — ^Additional 
book stacks have been put in the library at a cost of $6,000. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, — ^An addition to the dining hall was completed 
at a cost of $25,000. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, — A new site containing 50 acres has been 
purchased for $775,000. Of this amount, $500,000 came from Mr. T. Coleman du 
Pont and the remainder from 20 public-spirited citizens. An anonymous donor 
subscribed $2,500,000 toward the fund for the new technology biiilding. Mr. Pratt 
made provision in his will for the endowment of the institute's department of naval 
architecture and marine engineering. His property, valued at $700,000 and which 
has accumulated to $750,000, was transferred to the institute, but at present the 
validity of the will is being disputed. Real and personal estate amoimting to nearly 
$40,000 has been transferred to the institute by two of its alumni for the summer 
camp in engineering. Other gifts are $50,000 for the establishment of the Samuel 
Cabot fund, and the Bering library consisting of 30,000 volumes, and rarities of great 
historical value made by the American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

University of Minnesota. — A new agricultural engineering building has been com- 
pleted. The new main engineering building was occupied in September, 1912. 
Appropriations of the 1913 legislature contemplate additional equipment in the 
electrical and experimental laboratories and in the shops of the mechanical engi- 
neering department. For a trolley line between the university farm and the main 
campus $60,000 has been provided. 

Mississippi Agricultural and Mechanical College. — ^The following buildings have 
being erected: A bacteriological office building costing $2,500; a stock bam for experi- 
ment work, $3,000; two residences on the campus, $3,500; and an addition to the new 
chemical laboratory, $7,000. Concrete walks and storm drains have been constructed 
at a cost of $15,000. 

University of Missouri. — New buildings completed the past year include a physics 
building, costing $100,000; an agricultural chemistry building, $75,000; and an edu- 
cation building to be used for an experimental elementary school, $5,000. A biology 
building to cost $100,000 and an extension to the engineering laboratories to cost 
$6,000 are in course of construction. New boilers have been purchased, and an 
extension to the power plant has been made at a cost of $25,000. A site for a library 
has been purchased at a cost of $75,000. 

University of Nebrasla. — ^The following buildings have been completed the past 
year: A law college building, costing $85,000; a laboratory building for the medical 
college at Omaha, $100,000; a school building for the agricultural school at Curtis, 
$100,000. 

University of Nevada. — A library building, to cost $10,000, and a dairy building to 
cost $5,000, are in course of construction. 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. — An engineering 
building to cost $80,000 is in process of construction. 

New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — The 1912 legislature appro- 
priated $30,000 for a fireproof engineering building, which is in course of construc- 
tion, or soon will be. 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — ^A Young Men's Christian 
Association biiilding was completed at a cost of $40,000. 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College. — A chapel building has been com- 
pleted at a cost of $84,000. An engineering building costing $75,000 has been com- 
pleted. A new boiler for heating plant has been added at a cost of $5,000. The 
former chapel has been converted into a library reading room at a cost of $5,000. A 
target gallery has been erected, costing $500. 



Digitized'by VjOOQIC 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 277 

Pennsylvania State College. — A horticultural building, to cost $40,000, is in course 
of construction. A sewage disposal plant, at a cost of $45,000, and a shop unit for 
the engineering group, at a cost of $20,000, have been completed. 

University of Porto Rico, — ^The Collie of Agriculture at Mayaguez occupied its 
building at the first of the year. Additional shops and other laboratory and recita- 
tion halls, to cost $25,000, and campus improvement, to cost $10,000, are under way. 
A home economics building at Kio Piedras, costing $11,500, has just been finished, 
and 20 acres have been put xmder cultivation for classes in agriculture. A cement 
aboratory and recitation building, costing $35,000, and new frame shops are being 
built. 

Rhode Island State College. — A science building has been erected, costing $105,000, 
including equipment. 

Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina, — New buildings and additions to 
buildings have been constructed at a cost of $10,879. 

Colored Normal^ Industrialy Agricultural, and Mechanical College of South Carolina. — 
A dairy bam, costing $4,000, and agricultural buildings have been constructed. 

SouUi Dakota State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — ^An administration 
building has been erected at a cost of $100,000. 

University of Tennessee. — ^At Memphis a laboratory building costing $36,000 was 
erected for the use of the medical, pharmacy, and dental colleges. 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. — ^An academic building, costing 
$220,000, and a dining hall, costing $110,000, have been erected. 

Utah Agricultural College. — ^A chemistry building, costing $55,000, and a machine 
shed, ccNsting $2,500, have been erected. One story has been added to the mechanic 
arts building, at a cost of $9,000, and a new heating plant has been completed at a 
cost of $29,500. 

University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. — Residences to be used as 
investment have been purchased for $15,000. 

Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytedmic Institute. — The shops 
building, and its entire equipment, was destroyed by fire, entailing a loss of $75,000. 
Steps were taken immediately to rebuild and to equip a new shop with more modem 
and more complete equipment. 

State College of Washington. — ^A mechanic arts building and an agricultural building, 
each to cost $150,000, are in course of construction. 

University of Wisconsin. — The following buildings, and additions to buildings, have 
been constructed : Biology building, costing $71,500; west wing to chemistry building, 
$60,352; agricultural chemistry building, $38,665; horticulture greenhouse, $1,703; 
home economics and university extension, $44,620; lighting station, $20,185; tunnels, 
$15,110; clinical building, $15,261; kitchen building, $4,911; women's dormitory, 
$92,367. 

University of Wyoming. — ^An agricultural hall, to cost $100,000, is in course of con- 
struction. 

INCOME. 

The following table shows the total income from all sources for the 
years ended June 30, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, and 1913, excluding 
appropriations for experiment stations, farmers' institutes, and exten- 
sion work where these funds were reported to this bureau separate 
from the regular college funds. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



278 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 
Income for five years . 



Sources of income. 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Income from endowment granted by State. 

Appropriations for current expenses 

Tax levy for current expenses 


t98,353 
3,723,992 
2,559,995 
3,488,767 

715, 171 


181,180 
4,784.659 
2,910,171 
2,991,498 

364,656 


$114,453 

5.024.965 

2,879,123 

2,792,067 

602,212 


$83,639 
6,681.044 
3,570.006 
3,851,230 

793,310 


$131,415 
6,703,831 
3,095,341 


Appropriations for increase of plant 

Tax lew for increase of plant ^ 


3,695,249 
691,924 




Total State aid 


10,586,278 


11,122,164 


11,312,820 


14,889.228 


14.217,760 




From land grant of 1862 


763,275 
161,791 

1,760,000 


772,974 
226,307 

2,000,000 


783,366 
235,445 

2,250,000 


832,673 
197,078 

2,500,000 


869,074 


From other^and grants 


186,551 
2,490,000 


From additional endowment, acts of Aug. 
30, 1890, and Mar. 4, 1907 




Total Federal aid 


2,675,066 


2,998,281 


3,268,811 


3,629,751 


3.635,625 






783, 719 
2,159,967 
2,390.863 


8^,271 
2,200,-^ 
3,741,162 


748,990 
2,436.542 
2,812,396 


780,658 
2,567,188 
3,051,163 


966,204 


Tuition and incidental fees 


2,683,960 


From mi.scellaneoiis sources , 


3,558,590 






Total income 


18,595,893 


20,890,610 


20,679,559 


24,817,988 


24,962,139 







The separate appropriations for extension work and farmers' 
institutes, as reported to this bureau, amounted to $722,425. These 
colleges received for experiment station work, from the States, 
$1,024,455, and from the Federal Government, under the provisions 
of the Hatch and Adams Acts, $1,359,302. The total income of the 
68 land-grant colleges for all purposes for the year ended June 30, 
1913, was $28,068,321. Of this amount, 56 per cent was received 
from the Federal Government and 17 per cent from the States. 
Excluding the experiment station funds and the extension work and 
farmers' institute funds, 57 per cent was supplied by the Federal 
Government and 14 per cent by the States. 

ENDOWMENT OF AUGUST 30, 1890, AND MARCH 4, 1907. 

The total appropriated for the year ended June 30, 1913, from the 
United States Treasury in aid of the land-grant colleges under the 
provisions of the acts of August 30, 1890, and March 4, 1907, was 
$2,500,000, each Stat^ receiving $25,000 under the Morrill Act of 1890 
and $25,000 under the Nelson Act of 1907. Sums from this amount 
were expended for instruction in the various subjects in the proportion 
shown in the table following: 

Percentage of appropriation expended for instruction in various subjects. 



Subjects. 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


Agriculture 


16.8 
29.6 
12.4 
11.8 
23.2 
6.2 


17.6 
30.5 

n.7 

11.6 
22.7 
5.9 


17.7 
30.9 
10.9 
11.6 
23.2 
5.7 


19.3 
27.8 
10.7 
11.0 
24.9 
5.6 

.7 


21.2 
26.9 
10.1 
10.7 
23.2 
5.7 

2.2 


20.1 
27.9 
10.0 

9.4 
23.8 

5.5 

3.3 


22.5 
26.7 
10.1 

9.3 
23.7 

5.9 

1.8 


22.0 
26.3 

8.9 
10.0 
26.5 

5.4 

.9 


23.8 


Mechanic arts 


26.3 


Enelish laniru&se 


9.4 


Mathematical science 

Natural and physical science . 
Economic science 


9.1 

24.6 

6.2 


Training of teachers of ele- 
mentary agriculture and 
mechanic arts 


1.1 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGRICULTUBAJ- AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 279 

LEGISLATIVE APPROPRIATIONS, 1913. 

The legislatures of 42 States were in session during the year 1013. 
This summary includes the r^ular appropriation bills in behalf of 
the land-grant colleges; also special appropriation bills for new 
buildings and equipment. 

Univerniy of Arwma.— -The following amounta were appropriated for the biennial 
period beginning July 1, 1913, and ending June 30, 1915: For agricultural instruction 
at the University of Arizona and for the maintenance and improvements of the univer- 
sity farm, $23,500; for printing bulletins and reports, $4,500; for office and library 
service in connection with the experiment station, $5,000; for the acquisition of 160 
acres additional land and improvements on same, $30,000; for the construction and 
furnishing of a fire-proof agricultural building, $165,000; for the maintenance of the 
university, $140,000; for improvements, equipment, and repairs, $20,000 (ch. 75, 
May 17, 1913). 

Provides an annual tax not exceeding 0.085 dollar on each $100 for each of the 
fiscal years ending June 30, 1914, and June 30, 1915, for maintenance, improvement, 
and conduct of the university (ch. 73, May 17, 1913). 

University of Arkansas. — For the biennial period beginning July 1, 1913, and ending 
June 30, 1915: For maintenance and expenses of the departments of the college of arts 
and sciences, $24,094; for the college of agriculture and experiment station, $56,500; 
for the college of engineering, $15,000; for salaries, $107,000; for general items, $85,000; 
for the medical college, $36,000 (act 224, Mar. 29, 1913). 

University of California. — For the biennial period, 1913-14: For support and main- 
tenance, $400,000; for printing, $12,000; for college of agriculture, including support 
of the university farm school at Davis, $700,000; for university extension work, $50,000; 
for Los Angeles department of the college of medicine, $20,000; for Scripp^s Institution 
of Biological Research, $15,000; for work of insecticide and fungicide control laboratory, 
$10,000 (ch. 680, June 10, 1913). 

Colorado Agricultural College. — For the biennial period of 1913-14: For interest and 
payments on lands, $29,309.80; for experiment station, $47,500; for horse breeding, 
$5,000 (ch. 8, May 13, 1913). 

For payment for 1,600 acres of land granted from the public land to the State of 
Colorado by act of Congress June 25, 1910, $2,000 (ch. 9, Apr. 15, 1913). 

Connecticut Agricultural College. — For the two years ending September 30, 1915: 
For maintenance, $60,000; for agricultural extension, $10,000; in lieu of interest on 
land-grant fund, $13,500; for the Storrs agricultural experiment station, $9,000; for 
sewerage and waterworks, $20,000; for auditorium and armory, $60,000; for cottages, 
$15,000; for furnishings for dormitory and poultry buildings, $8,000 (ch. 295, June 5, 
1913). 

For the agricultural experiment station, for current expenses, $35,000; for food and 
drug investigation, $5,000; for State and station entomologist, $8,000 (ch. 321, June 4, 
1913). 

Delaware College. — ^Annually for the years 1913 and 1914 as follows: For main- 
tenance of chair of history, $2,500; for improvement of buildings and grounds, $7,500; 
for the division of agricultural extension, $5,000; for the salary of the bacteriologist 
and all expenses of the pathological and bacteriological laboratory, $3,500; for summer 
school, $1,200 (ch. 31 and ch. 32, Apr. 22, 1913). 

For the purpose of building a greenhouse, $5,000 (ch. 119, Apr. 1, 1913). 

For finishing swimming pool and completing gymnasium, $1,000 (ch. 123, Mar. 17, 
1913). 

Authorizes that site or sites be secured and a dormitory and a laboratory be con- 
structed, equipped, and furnished, the total aggregate cost not exceeding $125 ^^^^ 
(eh. 124, Mar. 31, 1913). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



280 EDUCATION BEPOBT^ 1»13. 

Suue College for Colored Students {Delaware). — Appropriates for maintenance for the 
years 1913 and 1914, $3,000 annually (ch. 31 and 32, Apr. 22, 1913). 

Univertitg of Florida. — ^Appropriates for the agricultural college nJnlring fund, 
$2,716 annuaDy (ch. 6432, June 7, 1913). 

Georgia State College of Agriculture. — For each of the fiscal years 1914 and 1915 iox 
support and maintenance, $100,000; $40,000 of this amount is to be expended for 
extension work (act No. 264, Aug. 19, 1913). 

Georgia Stale Industrial College. — ^For the fiscal years 1914 and 1915 for support and 
maintenance, $8,000 annually (act No. 264, Aug. 19, 1913). 

University of Idaho. — Appropriates for the years 1913 and 1914 the following: For 
general maintenance and equipment, $94,800; for forestry department, $15,000; for 
building, grounds, and improvements, $21,800; for library, books, and periodicals, 
$8,500; for investigation of al&dfa weevil, $4,000; for maintenance of farmers' insti- 
tutes, movable schools, field men, and home economics, $25,000; for maintenance and 
equipment of demonstration form at Aberdeen, $5,000; at Gooding, $4,000; at Cald- 
well, $6,000; Bonner County (Clagstone), $4,800; for poultry department, |b,000; for 
. maintenance of live stock, $2,000; for United States cooperative irrigation investiga- 
tion, $5,000 (ch. 193, Mar. 15, 1913). 

University of Illinois. — ^Appropriations for the biennium beginning July 1, 1913, are 
as follows: For maintenance, equipment, and general operating expenses, $1,600,000 
per annum; for the purchase of land and the erection and permanent equipment of 
buildings, $650,000 per annum (S. B. No. 675, June 24, 1913). 

For the study of the coal-mining industry, accidents and wastes, in cooperation 
with the United States Bureau of Mines, $4,500 annually; for the pajrment of interest 
on the endowment funds of the university for the years 1913 and 1914, $65,000 annually, 
or so much thereof as may be necessary (H. B. No. 895, June 30, 1913.) 

These appropriations are paid out of money paid into the State treasury and set 
apart for the benefit of the university in accordance with an act approved June 30, 
1911, entitled ''An act to provide by State tax for a fund for the support and main- 
tenance of the University of Illinois." 

Purdue University (Indiana). —For maintenance, $32,500 (ch. 196, Mar. 13, 1913). 

For greenhouse, $30,000; for equipment for new dairy building, $28,000; for the 
purchase of additional farm lands for the agricultural department, $125,000 (ch. 184, 
Mar. 11, 1913). 

For the use of the veterinary science department, for hog cholera, $15,000 (ch. 135, 
Mar. 7, 1913). 

Provides a tax of 7 cents on each $100, two-fifths of the total proceeds to be appor- 
tioned to Purdue University (ch. 181, Mar. 10, 1913). 

For the testing of milk, $1,000 (ch. 340, Mar. 15, 1913). 

lovxi State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Jb^to.-— Provides a special tax of one- 
half of 1 mill on the dollar upon the taxable property of the State for the purpose of 
creating a fund for the further equipment and support of extension work, experimen- 
tation, collegiate and noncollegiate courses of study, to be made in the years 1913 and 
1914 (ch. 228, Apr. 23, 1913). 

For additional support of coll^:iate departments, $125,000; for agricultural exten- 
sion, $48,000; for agricultural experiment station, $57,000, of which a sum not exceed- 
ing $35,000 may be used for the purchase of an additional farm for experimental 
purposes; for one and two year noncollegiate courses, $12,500; for trade school and 
engineering extension work, $25,000; for engineeriog experiment station, $5 000* for 
veterinary practitioners* course, $5,000; for veterinary investigations, $10 000* for 
repair and contingent fund, $10,000; for support of two and four year courses in home 
economics for homemakers and teachers, $20,000; for equipment of departments and 
buildings, $40,000; for maintenance and improvement of public grounds, $10 000- for 
the enlargement of buildings and small additional buildipgs, $10,000 (ch.'228 Apr 23 
1913). • - ' P . , 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGMCULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 281 

For a laboratory for the manufacture of hog-cholera serum, toxines, vaccines, and 
biological products, and necessary equipment therefor, |35,000 (eh. 227, Apr. 23, 1913). 
An additional sum of $92,000 is appropriated for the following purposes: For addi- 
tional support fund, |20,000; agricultural extension, |7,000; two-year and other agri- 
cultural short courses, $4,000; agricultural experiment station, $10,000; trade schools 
and trade-school extension work, $10,000; veterinary investigations, $3,000; repair 
and contingent fund, including enlargements of waterworks and sewerage plant, 
$8,000; heating plant equipment, including steam lines, $30,000 (ch. 328, Apr. 23, 
1913). 

As an emergency fund, to be used as an additional fund for the construction of a 
chemistry building, equipment, and laboratory supplies, $125,000 (ch. 329, Apr. 25, 
1913), 

Kansas Agricultural College. — ^For maintenance, improvements, and eqiiipment for 
the year 1914, $466,000, and for 1915, $480,500; for equipment for mill (1913), $7,500; 
for Fort Hays branch experiment station, $25,000 annually; for Garden City branch 
experiment station, $5,000 annually; for Dodge City branch experiment station, 
$2,500 annually; Tribune branch experiment station, $2,500 annually (ch. 7, Mar. 22, 
1913). 

For Fort Hays branch experiment station, for replacing of the horse bam destroyed 
by fire, the purchase of horses, harness, equipment, tools, and feed, $7,500 (ch. 8, 
Feb. 21, 1913). 

For the establishment of a branch experiment station at Colby, $11,000; for 1913-14 
for maintenance, $2,000; for 1914-15, $2,000 (ch. 300, Mar. 3, 1913). 

For the establishment of a branch experiment station at Lakin, $6,000; for main- 
tenance for 1913-14, $2,000; for maintenance for 1914-15, $2,000. 

University of Maine, — ^For maintenance for the years 1913, 1914, 1915, and 1916, 
$110,000 per annum (ch. 99, Resolves of 1913, Mar. 12, 1913). 

For erecting a physical-chemical laboratory, $75,000; for partial erection of a dor- 
mitory for women, $20,000. Payment of one-half of the amount of each of said appro- 
priations to be made during the year 1913 and the remainder during the year 1914 
(ch. 126, Besolves of 1913, Mar. 12, 1913). 

The following amounts are appropriated annually for the years 1913 and 1914: For 
printing and binding report, $1,500; for printing reports and bulletins of the experi- 
ment station, $4,500; for animal husbandry, $5,000; for scientific farming in Aroostock 
County, $5,000 (ch. 236 and ch. 243, Apr. 12, 1913. Private and special laws). 

For analysis of foods, seeds, etc., $9,000 (ch. 238, Private and special laws, Apr. 12, 
1913). 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, — The following sums are appropriated for the 
fiscal year ending November 30, 1913: For general administration of the collie, 
$30,000; for teaching equipment and for general maintenance, $80,000; for agricul- 
tural investigations and experiments, $15,000; for theoretical and practical instruction 
required by the charter of the college and by the laws of the United States relating 
thereto, $75,000; for short courses and agricultural extension work, $50,000; for travel- 
ing and other necessary expenses of the trustees, $800; for printing and binding reports 
of trustees, $3,000; for inspection of commercial feed stuffs, $6,000; for meeting the 
cost of prosecutions in regulating the use of utensils for testing the composition or 
value of milk, a sum not exceeding $500 (ch. 46, Acts of 1913, Feb. 3, 1913). 

That there be allowed for maintenance and current expenses the following sums: 
For the year 1914, $280,000; for the year 1915, $303,000; for the year 1916, $325,000; 
for the year 1917, $341,000; and for the year 1918, $362,000 (ch. Ill, Resolves of 
1913, June 6, 1913). 

For constructing an addition to French Hall, $35,000; for an infirmary, $15,000; for 
the payment of architects' fees previously incurred for which no appropriation has 
heretofore been made, $4,202.11; for miscellaneous improvements and repairs, $26,000 
(ch. 112, Resolves of 1913, Juno 6, 1913). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



282 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology.^ — Appropriates |100,000 (ch. 10, act of Jan. 
23, 1913). 

Michigan Agricultural College. — Authorizes a tax of one-sixth of 1 mill upon each 
dollar of taxable property of the State, to be levied in the year 1913 and each year 
thereafter (act No. 324, May 13, 1913). 

University of Minnesota. — For a home economics building at the farm school at St. 
Anthony, |75,000; for a boys* dormitory at the agricultural school at Crookston, 
$40,000; for a biology building, |200,000; for a hospital service building, $50,000; for 
a women's gymnasium, $125,000; for general improvements, repairs, and alterations 
at the agricultural school at Crookston, $10,000 (ch. 498, Apr. 24, 1913). 

Authorizes the board of r^ents to provide means for transportation of persons, 
supplies, and materials between the university farm and the university campus (ch. 
257, Apr. 11, 1913). 

Provision is made for a department for collection of statistics relative to cooperative 
associations (ch. 386, Apr. 19, 1913). 

University of Missouri. — Appropriates for the years 1913 and 1914 the following: 
To promote the growing of improved com, $5,000; for the erection of buildings, pur- 
chase of land, and additional equipment for the manufacture of hc^-cholera serum, 
$50,000 (House bill No. 972, Apr. 23, 1913). 

For support and maintenance of university at Columbia, $675,000; for extension 
division, $25,000; for library building and site for same, $275,000; for biology building, 
$100,000; for summer school, heat and light station, repairs, improvements, etc., 
$147,500; for short winter course and branch short courses, $30,000; for agricultural 
library, $3,000; for orchard demonstration, $2,500; for agricultural laboratories, $10,000; 
for animal husbandry, $12,000; for dairy husbandry, $5,000; for farm management, 
$2,000; for live stock judging pavilion, $25,000; for lighting and furnishing agricultural 
chemistry building, $15,000; for horticulture, $3,000; for improvements and other spec- 
ial needs of the college of agriculture and experiment station, $23,500; for school of 
education, $7,000; for school of law, $5,000; for school of medicine, $10,000; for school 
of engineering, $22,000; for school of journalism, $8,000; for State military school, 
$12,000. 

For school of mines at Rolla, for support and maintenance, $90,000; for fireproof gym- 
nasium building and equipment of same, $70,000; for lib mry, $13,000; for experimental 
work on Missouri mineral products, $12,000; for improvements, repairs, etc., $28,000; 
for mine plant, surveying equipment, etc., $36,000 (House bill No. 763, Mar. 12, 1913). 

University of Montana. — The following sums are appropriated for the year ending 
February 28, 1914: For maintenance, $322,215; for maintenance and improvements 
of the agricultural experiment station, $37,000; for painting buildings experiment 
Btation, $2,500; for substations and demonstration farms, $26,500. The following 
Bums are appropriated for the year ending February 28, 1915: For maintenance, 
$319,090; for maintenance and improvement experiment station, $38,000; for sub- 
stations and demonstration farms, $24,000 (House bill No. 421, Mar. 8, 1913). 

University of Nebraska. — For maintenance of agricultural extension, $50,000; for 
support of experimental substations, $56,000; for equipment of law and plant industry 
buildings and for general repairs to and upkeep of buildings, $65,000; for maintenance 
of agricultural school at Curtis, $50,000; for maintenance of medical college at Omaha, 
$50,000; for furnishings, fixtures, and permanent improvements in connection with 
the new medical college building at Omaha, $10,000; for substation at North Platte, 
$10,000 (ch. 231, Apr. 23, 1913). 

Ninety- three per cent of the 1-mill State university tax levy for the years 1913 and 
1914 is appropriated for salaries and current expenses. If a special building fund 
levy is made available for university extension down town, 30 per cent of the above 
funds shall be expended for maintenance at the State farm (ch. 242, Apr. 23, 1913). • 

Creates an additional fund, known as the special university building fund, the same 

iln accordance with act of ^ay 20, 1911, which provides the institute with 1100,000 a year until 1922. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 283 

to consist of the proceeds of a tax of three-fourths of 1 mill on the dollar valuation of 
the grand assessment roll of the State, which tax shall be levied in the year 1913 and 
annually thereafter for six years, to and including the year 1918 (ch. 246, Apr. 23, 1913). 
For Curtis Agricultural School, 110,000 (ch. 258, Apr. 23, 1913). 
University of Nevada. — For»the years 1913 and 1914: For support, $30,500; for build- 
ings and equipment, $14,800; for summer school, $2,000; for r^ents' fund, $4,000; 
for experiment station, $5,000; for State hygienic laboratory, $10,000; for food and 
drug control, $10,000; for support of weights and measures, $4,000 (ch. 136, Mar. 21, 
1913). 

New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — For the years 1913 and 
1914 for £ree tuition to New Hampshire students, $3,000 annually (ch. 41 and ch. 43, 
Mar. 19, 1913). 
For poultry department, $4,000 annually (ch. 177, May 21, 1913). 
For the erection of a new building for the engineering department, $80,000 (ch. 242, 
Apr. 29, 1913). 

Appropriates $32,000 to be expended as follows: One-half for the year ending 
August 31, 1914, and one-half for the year ending August 31, 1915 (ch. 271, May 21, 
1913). 

Rutgers Scientific School {New Jersey). — For the benefit of agriculture and mechanic 
arts, $30,000; for the maintenance of short courses, $20,000; for the establishment of 
a course in clay working and ceramics, $5,000; for furnishing and equipping the agri- 
cultural building, $20,000; for furnishing and equipping the department of bacteri- 
ology, biology, and botany, $7,500; for reference books and periodicals, $2,000; for 
maintenance and development of college farm groimds, $3,000; for salaries and 
expenses of the i^ricultural experiment station, $25,000; for printing bulletins, $3,000; 
for expenses incurred in carrying out the regulation of the sale of concentrated com- 
mercial feeding stuHs, $3,000; for the extermination of mosquitoes, $15,000; for main- 
tenance and operation of the department of poultry husbandry, $3,000; for testing of 
seeds, $2,000; for floriculture, $3,000; for regulating the sale of insecticides, $1,000 
(ch. 330, Apr. 10, 1913). 

New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — For deficiency created and 
existing prior to June 11, 1912, $12,400; for support and maintenance for second and 
third fiscal years, $20,000 annually (ch. 83, Mar. 18, 1913). 

Cornell University (New York). — For maintenance of State college of agriculture, 

$450,000; for maintenance of State veterinary college, $65,000 (ch. 792, Jime 2, 1913). 

For summer school, $10,000; for repairs, etc., $10,000; for roads, walks, sewers, etc., 

$10,000; for instruction, $25,000; for extension work, $70,000; for veterinary college, 

$5,000 (ch. 791, June 2, 1913). 

For buildings and equipment, $259,000; for extension of poultry plant, $25,000; 
for the completion of the central heating plant, $35,000 (ch. 751, May 26, 1913). 

North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — For support for the year 
1913, $80,000; for the year 1914, $85,000; for the erection of an industrial shop build- 
ing, $25,000; for repairs of buildings, $5,000. 

Agricultural and Medianical College for the Colored Race {North Carolina). — For the 
years 1913 and 1914: For support and maintenance, $12,500 annually; for the purpose 
of making permanent improvements, $17,500 (ch. 106, Mar. 10, 1913). 

North Dakota Agricultural College. — For maintenance and current expenses for the 
year 1913, $25,000; for agricultural extension for the year 1914, $20,000; for repairs, 
$5,000; for re-laying worn-out steam-heating mains, $1,500; for dairy and creamery 
building and the equipment thereof and for model bam therein, $30,000; for dairy 
herd, $5,000 (ch. 5, Mar. 21, 1913). 

Ohio State University. — ^Appropriates for deficiencies, $31,877 (House bill No. 240, 
Feb. 14, 1913). 

Appropriates for the year ending February 15, 1914, to be applied to the uses and 
purposes of the university, $400,000 (House bill No. 139, Feb. 20, 1913). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



284 EDUCATION EBPOBT, 1913. 

For equipment of power house, $14,000; for library, |5,000; for summer school, 
$10,000; for repairs and upkeep of buildings and grounds, $15,000; for botany and 
zoology building, $75,000; for tunnel to archaeological museum, $7,800; for storeroom 
and receiving department building, $11,000; for new roof on gymnasium, $2,000 
(House bill No. 381, Feb. 28, 1913). 

The following sums are appropriated to be available on and after February 15, 1913: 
Winter course in highway engineering, $1,000; agricultural extension work, $35,000; 
repair of flood damages to railway, $6,160; emergency labor on farm due to flood, $300 
(House bill No. 674, May 9, 1913). 

The following appropriations are made for the fiscal year beginnilig February 16, 
1913: For horticulture and forestry building, $75,000; for apparatus and equipment, 
college of agriculture, $10,000; for apparatus and equipment, college of engineering, 
$7,000; for apparatus and equipment, college of arts, $825; for apparatus and equip- 
ment, college of veterinary medicine, $5,000; for general budget, $30,630; for remodel- 
ing buildings, $6,000; for roads and sidewalks, $3,000; for fire protection, $2,500; for 
testing milk, $2,000; for eqiupment of power house and library, $11,000; for library, 
$10,000; for extension of hot-water heating system, $16,475; for coal, gas and water 
rate, $32,000; for repairs- and upkeep of buildings and grounds, $12,500; for electric 
motor truck, $2,500; for incinerators, $1,000 (House bill No. 590, May 9, 1913). 

For the year ending February 15, 1915, the following: To be applied to the uses and 
purposes of the Ohio State University, $400,000 (House bill No. 666, May 9, 1913). 

The following appropriations are made for the* year beginning February 16, 1914: 
For additional farm lands and improvements, $42,000; apparatus and eqiuimient of 
college of engineering, $12,000; apparatus and equipment of college of agriculture, 
$10,000; horticulture and forestry building, $75,000; horticulture and forestry build- 
ing equipment, $15,000; agricult\u*al extension work, $35,000; sheep building, $5,000; 
winter course in highway engineering, $1,000; for testing milk, $2,500; general budget, 
$35,000; for summer school, $10,000; for graduate school, $2,500; general budget, 
$35,000; for summer school, $10,000; for graduate school, $2,500; for library, $20,000; 
for apparatus and equipment, $43,035; for coal, gas, and water rate, $33,000; for bio- 
logical survey, $2,500; for roads and sidewalks, $3,000; for extension of hot-water heat- 
ing system, $7,280; repairs and upkeep of buildings and groimds, $28,000; for freight 
house and kiln room and remodeling cattle building, $13,200; for fire protection, 
$2,500; for dormitory of Lake laboratory, $2,500 (House bill No. 670, May 9, 1913). 

Authorizes the establishment of a university extension division for the purpose of 
canying on educational extension and correspondence instruction throughout the 
State (Senate bill No. 191, May 5, 1913). 

Authorizes the establlehment of colleges of medicine and dentistry (Senate bill 
No. 120, May 3, 1913). 

Authorizes the establishment of an engineering experiment station of the university 
to be affiliated and operated in connection with the college of engineering, for the pur- 
pose of making teclmical investigations and supplying engineering data which will 
tend to increase the economy, efficiency, and safety of the manufacturing, mineral, 
transportation, and other engineering and industrial enterprises of the State (Senate 
billNo. 152,May6, 1913). 

Oklahoma Agncidtural and Mechanical College. — For support and maintenance for the 
year ending June 30, 1914, $112,000; and for the year ending June 30, 1915, $120,000 
(ch. 211, May 17, 1913). 

Appropriates out of the new college fund the following: For maintenance and sup- 
port for tiie fiscal year ending June 30, 1914, $19,750; and for the year ending June 30, 
1915, $8,750 (ch. 156, Apr. 30, 1913). 

Appropriates out of the income, interest, rentals, and proceeds of the sale of lands for 
support and maintenance of the agricultiural and mechanical college for the year end- 
ing June 30, 1914, $48,600; and for the year ending June 30, 1915, $48,600 (ch. 196, 
May 15, 1913). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 285 

Colored Agricultural and Normal College {Oklahoma). — ^Appropriates out of the in- 
come, interest, rentals and proceeds of the sale of lands for support and maintenance 
for the biennial period beginning July 1, 1913, and ending June 30, 1915, $5,400 annu- 
ally (ch. 196, May 15, 1913). 

Appropriates out of the new coUege fund for support and maintenance for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1914, $6,750; and for the same for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1915, $3,300 (ch. 156, Apr. 30, 1913). 

Oregon Agricultural College. — ^Appropriates the following for the years 1913 and 
1914: For library books and periodicals, $15,000; for improvements and repairs to 
buildings and grounds, $35,000; for the remodeling of Science Hall, $11,000; for the 
extension of the heating system, $21,000 (ch. 209, Feb. 26, 1913). 

Appropriates $25,000 per annimi to conduct educational extension, demonstration, 
and field work in agriculture, horticulture, dairying, domestic science, and other 
industries (ch. 110, Feb. 25, 1913). 

Appropriates for additional equipment for the years 1913 and 1914, $60,000 (ch. 217, 
Feb. 26, 1913). 

Appropriates for the reconstruction of the stock-judging pavilion destroyed by fire, 
$7,164.82 (ch. 295, Feb. 27, 1913). 

Provides an annual tax of foiur-tenths of 1 mill on the dollar, beginning January 1, 
1915, for the support and maintenance of the agricultural coUege (ch. 136, Feb. 25, 
1913). 

Penntylvania State College. — For the two fiscal years beginning Jime 1, 1913, to 
carry the benefits of the investigations of the college to the farmers of the State, $20,000 
(Act No. 796, July 25, 1913). 

For general maintenance of the school of agriculture, the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, and the Institute of Animal Nutrition for two years, $275,000; for general 
maintenance of all other depcurtments, $530,000; for the erection, equipment, and fur< 
niahing of buildings or enlargement and additions to buildings, $375,000 (Act No. 
805, July 25, 1913). 

For maintaining substations for the purpose of making experiments in the improve* 
ment, culture, curing, and preparation of tobacco, and providing for the publication . 
of the report thereof, $6,000 (Act No. 807, July 25, 1913). 

Authorizes the board of county commissioners of each county to appropriate $1,500 
annually from the fimds of the county for agricultural extension work in cooperation 
with the State college (Act. No. 142, May 14, 1913). 

University of Porto Rico. — For new buildings and the enlargement and improvement 
of the present ones in Mayaguez, $31,000; for furniture, $5,000; for construction and 
improvement of roads and lands, $5,000 (Act No. 29, Mar. 13, 1913). 

For the construction of one or more buildings and for the enlargement and improve- 
ment of present lands and buildings in Rio Hedras, $40,000 (Act No. 49, Mar. 13, 1913). 

For salaries and other necessary expenses for the college of agriculture and mechanic 
arts of the University at Mayaguez, $15,000; for support and maintenance of the Uni- 
versity at Bio Piedras, $70,500; for support of scholarship students authorized by an 
act entitled "An act to provide for the education of young men and women in the 
normal school at Rio Piedras, and for other purposes, " $10,000 (Act No. 116, Mar. 13, 
1913). 

Rhode Island State College. — For support and maintenance, $30,000 annually (ch. 
960, May 5, 1913). 

Clemson Agricultural College (SotUh Carolina). — Requires the college to furnish at 
cost to citizens of the State, upon request therefor, serimi for treatment of hog cholera 
(ActNo. 132, Mar. 1,1913). 

Authorizes that 51 beneficiary scholarships be awarded by holding competitive 
examinations; said scholarships to be of the value of $100 p>er annum and free tuition 
(ch. 129, not returned by governor, became law without his approval). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



286 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

State Colored Normal, Industrial, AgricuUwral, and Mechanical College (SoiUh Caro- 
Una.) — For maintenance and repairs, $5,000; for insurance, $3,113.78; for salaries not 
allowed under Morrill Act, $2,500; for partial payment for dairy and cow bam, $2,000 
(Act No. 147, Mar. 1, 1913). 

South Dakota College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. — ^Appropriates annually tor 
the years 1913 and 1914: For salaries, $27,000; for maintenance of office of dairy 
commissioner, $2,000; for maintenance, library, equipment, and repairs, $30,000 
(ch. 23, Mar. 8, 1913). 

Appropriates for the manufacture of hog-cholera serum, $5,000 (ch. 61, Mar. 8, 1913); 
for ^e enlargement of the heating and lighting plant, $10,000 (ch. 76, Mar. 14, 1913); 
for remodeling, repairing, and equipping the chemistry building, $3,000 (ch. 83, 
Mar. 14, 1913) ; for the erection of an addition to the creamery building, $4,000 (ch. 94, 
Mar. 13, 1913). 

University of Tennessee, — ^For agricultural extension, $5,000 per annum; to be paid 
over to and expended by the coll^;e of agriculture, $10,000 (ch. 4, Public Acts, Sept. 
23, 1913). 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. — ^For em^gency deficiencies to erect 
a new dining hall, $100,000; to erect a main building, $200,000 (ch. 9, Feb. 27, 1913). 

Agricultural College of Utah.—For buildings and improvements, $66,500; for com- 
pletion of new heating plant, $29,500; for further maintenance, $7,500 (ch. 109, 
Mar. 25, 1913). 

For deficits 1911 and 1912 for power plant, $20,000 (ch. 2, Feb. 6, 1913). 

Authorizes that the branch of the State normal school established at Cedar City be 
made a branch of the agricultural collie. 

Eight per cent of the annual revenue derived from the general tax levy for State 
purposes is appropriated for the general maintenance of the agricultural college; and 
1.52 per cent for the branch of the agricultural collie at Cedar City (ch. 31, Mar. 8, 
1913). 

For the branch of the agricultural college at Cedar City: For new bam and live 
stock, $3,000; for improvements and repairs, $1,350; for additional maintenance, 
$1,900 (ch. 109, Mar. 25, 1913). 

University of Vermont and State Agricultural College. — ^Annually for the years end- 
ing June 30, 1914 and 1915, for the payment of tuition charges of 60 students, each 
senator appointing 2 students to the college, $4,800; for agricultural extension, $8,000 
(Act No. 83, Feb. 15, 1913). 

Annually for the years ending June 30, 1914 and 1915, for the further support of 
agricultural extension, $2,000 (Act No. 84, Feb. 20, 1913). 

State College of Washington. — For the biennial period beginning April 1, 1913, and 
ending March 31, 1915, for maintenance, experimental and extension work, buildings, 
improvements, equipment, printing, etc., $653,306 (this amount is from the proceeds 
of the Washington State College fund, provided for by mill tax). For the use and 
maintenance of the State College of Washington (from the agricultural collie and 
scientific school current funds), $104,000 (ch. 12, Feb. 27, 1913). 

West Virginia C/nirer»t(y.— Appropriates for nine months ending June 30, 1913, the 
following: For current expenses, $35,000; for repairs and improvements, $10,000; for 
salaries, $90,000; for agricultural, horticultural, and home economics extension work, 
$15,000; for buildings, $20,000; for college of medicine, $3,000. For the preparatory 
branch of the university at Montgomery, for current expenses, $2,250; for repairs and 
improvements, $2,000; for salaries, $6,500. For preparatory branch of the university 
at Kcyser, for current expenses, $2,750; for repairs and improvements, $1,500; for 
salaries, $8,000; for experiment station, $9,250. 

Appropriates for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1914, the following: For current 
expenses, $45,000; for repairs and improvements, $20,000; for salaries, $105,000; for 
agricultural, hortioiltural, and home economics extension work, $30,000; for buildings, 
$20,000; for college of medicine, $4,000. For preparatory branch of the university at 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 287 

Montgomery, for current expenses, $3,450; for repairs and improvements, $2,000; for 
salaries, $7,500; for salary of mining instructor, $1,000. For preparatory branch of 
university at Keyser, for current expenses, $3,500; for repairs and improvements, 
$2,500; for salaries, $9,000; for buildings and lands, $17,500; for experiment station, 
$19,000. 

Appropriates for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915, the following: For ciurent 
expenses, $45,000; for repairs and improvements, $10,000; for salaries, $118,000; for 
agricultural, horticultural, and home economics extension work, $35,000; for build- 
ings, $20,000; for college of medicine, $5,000. For preparatory branch of the uni- 
versity of Montgomery, for ciurent expenses, $3,450; for repairs and improvements, 
$2,000; for salaries, $8,000; for salary of mining instructor, $1,000. For preparatory 
branch of university at Keyser, for current expenses, $3,500; for repairs and improve- 
ments, $2,500; for salaries, $9,500; for buildings and land, $17,500; for experiment 
station, $21,000 (ch. 3, Feb. 21, 1913; became a law without the approval of the 
governor). 

University of Wisconsin. — Appropriates on July 1, 1913, for universitv extension, 
$177,380; and annually beginning July 1, 1914, $206,110; for farmers' institutes, 
$20,000 annually; for agricultural extension, $40,000 annually; for support and 
maintenance, $1,386,269 annually; for the years 1913 and 1914 for property repairs 
and maintenance, $62,000 annually; for the years 1913 and 1914 for equipment for the 
carrying on of university extension, $7,620 annually; for the years 1913 and 1914 for 
apparatus, furniture, machinery and equipment, tools, live stock, improvement to 
buildings and grounds, $114,505 annually; for the years 1913 and 1914 for the purchase 
of lands, $50,900 annually; for 1913 for the building and equipment of boat and bath 
houses and for remodeling present boat-house buildings, $7,500; for the construction 
of a men's dormitory and commons and union, and for equipment of same and other 
student buildings, payable March 1, 1915, $350,000. 

Appropriates on July 1, 1913, $63,500; on March 1, 1914, $282,000; and on March 1, 
1915, $300,000, for the following purposes: For wing to agricultural soils building, 
$58,000; for agricultural college library, $6,000; for shop building and modifications 
of old shop building, $50,000; for improvements in the buildings for animal husbandry, 
improvements on the buildings at Raymer farm, new barn on the Hill farm, improve- 
ments in agricultural hall, construction of small structures at branch experimental 
stations, and for other permanent property and improvements, $12,500; for the con- 
struction and equipment of other buildings and permanent improvements, $519,000. 

Annually for four years for seed inspection, $3,000. 

Annually for five years for the partial maintenance of the Husk Coimty demonstra- 
tion station and for one additional station to be organized, $2,000. 

For paper, plates, illustrations, printing and binding reports and bulletins of the 
experiment station, $15,000 annually, and in addition on July 1, 1914, $2,000. 

Provides a tax of three-eighths of 1 mill, to be levied annually (ch. 758, Aug. 7, 1913). 

Appropriates on January 1, 1914, for the establishment of county agricultural repre- 
sentatives, $10,000; on January 1, 1915, $16,000; and on January 1, 1916, a sum suffi- 
cient to carry on the work (ch. 611, July 10, 1913). 

Authorizes a pharmaceutical experiment station to be established and appropriates 
for same $2,500 annually (ch. 404, June 2, 1913). 

Authorizes the establishment of a State soils laboratory in connection with the 
college of agriculture (ch. 646, July 21, 1913). 

University of Wyoming. — Changes the tax to be levied for maintenance from one- 
half of 1 mill to three-eighths of 1 mill (ch. 20, Feb. 19, 1913). 

For agricultural extension for the years 1913 and 1914, $5,000 annually (ch. 134, 
Mar. 8, 1913). 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



288 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 



00 









I 



I 



Is 



I 






5 



8 






(0 



a 

1-3 



11 



> 



llil 



Mi| 



Ill Pi 



isa^ 



|i|ii 



i3iii« 









§§§§§§§ 






§ §S§§ §1 






§§§g 



eodl eQoB C4 



83«55i§iga ill 



IS§ 



§1 



gllSaSSISS SiiS gl? 58S 



i§ 



§§§§§§§§§ 



§§§§ §§§ §§§ 

Hii m Mi 



511 § 



isi § 



s 



§5§ s" 



§ § 



I § 

2" 8 



I § 



§ S 



§ § 
S" 8" 



oSooSooSSeaoooS SSooS SSS SSSSSSdS SSoot w 






iOt 



if 



J J^-^ «- :« 



hi I 



Q« 



2 

I 

T4 r 

k ttdS ^ 

f '^ o 3 "^ 

I fJHK -S 

i PJw's § 



it 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOBIOTTLTTTBAL AND MEOHANICAL COLLEGES. 

§§ §§ §§ § I • §§§§§§ §§ !§§§§§:§ ; §§§ i§ s§ 



289 



CVCI tOjH 2<«< *^ n 



§§ §i §1 § § 

ss «a" §*" sf ^ 



SS-'-2« 83 Sa 8 "SS 



§§§!§§ 3§ i§ § §§§§ 

as-s'ss" s"" as" s' a"«sa 



§ i§§ §1 SI 



82 gs il 8 §S iiseii §g 82 § sags 



S »SS S8 S3 



i-T iH* i-T cf i^^h' 



I 

n 
s 



§ § 



!• 



§§ §§ §§ § §§ §§ 

8S" S|- §g- §■ |-§- 8g 



§§§ §§ §§ § §§§§ 



11 ig II i 11 %%mi m ii' § nil 



§ §sS sS SS 




si 






OQ ^ 3 

- ••- ••• --Si 

Is 



I" 

II 

11 



I if 11 1 



1 Hi 



I 



I 



«1 
^1 



1772T'— ED 19ia— VOL 1 



-19 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



290 



EDtTCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I 

St 

I 






} 



•I 






I 

8 

I 



•J 

n 

< 






II 



8 

i 
I 



111! 



J^llf 



l-ll 



irM 



i 



lists I 



Ills. 






s 



§ § § 

8 "■ 



g § § 



§SS s a 



188 § S 



§ § 



§ § « 



11*= 











I 



1 1 



3 



1^1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOBICULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



201 



llllt 






6^13" = 



"sh: 



ioMeoi-^*He>«QO QOeooi-i 



»as; 



23'= 



859-^^ 



J2gg|8ai5fcf! aSgsiSS SS58Sg§5Sg 



^S 






i-lOO .•H'<» 



SSSS3«:3SS 



:9ss«* aa« 



?SSgs2 as5?s2g|si: 



3|| 






^co •etc* . cQooo 



sss$s93S a^sa^s 



:^9SS 



»^ 



is 






'I3S55I 



Pill 



09 • >C% 



*:9a «s«ssss 



•o^c^oeofo w 



-8S 



S'^'^g 



gt*^ 



I 



'J 

I 

I 






5| . 

5p 




(I4 s »« 



I 
I 



lOfom^ojhfOO •oioO'H 



^asgfc* s 



^ij^.c 



32 



&»^:r$SIS9S :3SSS39tss 3f:^3 



!!)S98t^ 



^53- 



fes-'gjjasa 






i^^ 



^^SSSB^ «s^^:3ggsSF: 



- a 

-I 

1 



-^S 



22 



S-^ 



S? 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



292 



m^i 



EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



a*gs 



9 9P?j I asgsssgsgg sss^s ^S^SS 



! 



1 



^ " « 5 K^ 



"*!!!« S *<r2£2!:?SJ02!* 



SSS5:aSS*= 



«S :S<^ 



§ 9^9 § 3S§SgS3^2 S^S^ISS S9933 



ill 



t^ to**** 



aga 



Sc5 sassa 



sasoS 



11 

ss 









Mio'^oa 



C4-«C«C«OC«i-l*M lO^ 



C««-4C«0 (i-l 



eoO'-»c« 



cjoogi 



-^g -OJ'TC 



i 






8 

I 

I 



^. 



y- 



III 



filial 



*^2 o 



I 



a ^r«oo 



•aaRgs-* 



9«» 



s:3 9S^ 



q:g8&gS33 99S 



a^^ssi 



•as 



^ 93;S 



s;;:§s 



Ot^M O 



O00<-i o 



S8^ 



S^S^S 9$5:9S9 



II 



'-N :® 









1*3 
ll 



tf 

! 

3 



'^ -I 

i4 



2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTITBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



293 



'f « I* 1*^ 



5S a s* a 



r.rHc>« i-<« ^• Mj^ 



r»^rao »«*o ih 



t^^M t-4C« C« lO^ 



«>."*oo r^iQ -H Ok Ok 



J;a ;:5 •«• a 



4iHe« ^ • »• f-ffN 



i«-«rt* gio g tOH 



• 1^ '<4<o t« "-rok (O 



o t« «-i 



;5 a R' 



§ii§ 



Si ^ a {^ sa 



o c« c« «o ClOO 



O C« « (O 



£9 a 



O C« M 



3 

I 

I 

5? 



•8 






I 



3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



294 



llir 

O 2 " o 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913, 

ssgsg s 



•gamoM 



•oaK 



siis § Si I 



ggiss §i§ s ~§ii i g§ I 



-"Ti-l « ^ 






'UOTIO^ 



•neji 



git 



oo 



lilill 

/7<M s » o fi 



ixsinoAV. 



§i 



•TOJI 









^SS 



S § 



5 



1 

I 



i 

8 



n 



a 

I 
I 

I 

I 






'II9OI0M. 



S^ SS 






ss s 



•TOJI 



S§i §S^ s 



«iis 



Ss 2 






TzaoiOAi, 



•TOJI 






-nsmoAi 



•TOJI 



S8« 






nomoAi 



•TOJI 



gSl 



nomOAi 



-MO 5 



•TOJI 






•romoM. 



s^:s 



ss 



•S :82 * 



SS S 



SI S t3 : 3 



^£!£S •« 



S3 :S 



•U9JI 



•^ o o o Sb4» 



8 SoS2 S 



-82 I i- S 



8' r- 



§ a SR s; 



<«<C0»4<-4 GO i-iOO 9 



SSsSSi §§^ § ^Sai § g§ § 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICtJLTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



296 



to 


a 5; 


€0 


§ 




S « i 






i 


3 8iii« 


U ; 


S 5 




1 


896 
347 

682 

1,644 
1,368 
4,008 

1,140 
2,354 




IS Sg S i 


S 


S« : 




ig i 


§ 


9g3 » 




g 




* i i 






S i 


i 8 j 


s 


gc* : 




is sS 










I^N 






i i 


1 g 1 


i 


S« : 




is : 


g 


;0 


S o 




§ 




g SKg 






§ 1 


8 « 


s 


S=» j 


g 


is : 


i 


is 


>• O 




i 




s 5sa2 






s -s s 1 


s 


sa i: Sg| 22 


H 


i a i ss s ii ss j 


IS 




S i 


1 s i 


S3 


gS i sis U 


gi 




§§ i 


i as g §1 




o 




is : 


•* 




i *^ s ^1 ^ i 


!3 3 i : 


g i 


§^ i 






ft 




o 




'•e* '. 


us 




i *=* S Sg « Sg 58 i i 


S i 


ss i 


S 




3 


-R 2 :* 


"S i 


s 


jo« 


i « 8 «S 


£» 


! Br§" 


«5« : 


•O O J 


»• 


|S g :| 


§§ i 


i 


ss 


-- § J:| ?S |g i2S^* 2 |;5 |f2 8 8g 




O j ; 


i : ! 




: jco o ■ • 


• • N 


I •»© • 


« i 




i : i ® !•* 




2 S S-'S a 




"'S 


i N « j 


i S •- 


i i^^ 


CO • 




-* S* « 8S 




o 










i ^ 






«*-i I j • 


jto 




o 


: ® : 






.« 










i ® 




i § ^§ i i i 


ia f: 


® £ 


O CO 




8® •« SgS Sa 


^SS " 


as 


5S Sfessa 


28® i 


15 2 j 


»^ 


623 
130 

530 

1,597 
939 
624 

809 
472 






• o 




ii : 




is 


• o 






^ 
"* 


J j« J 




a« I 


: 








• o 




!i 1 




21 


: ^ 






2 


: -3 ! 




a»o 




s 




oo 


' ll 


- j 1 




u» • 


: *^ ;5 S 




• 3 


i ^* : 


O ' 

eo • 


S® : 


S ' j 






_^ 




<« '. ', 




lA '. 


o u: 


^ 




QD 


: ^«> : 


r- . a 


« 


o I 


(O e 







«l 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



296 






EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913, 



"nouiOjV^ 



•now 



£ 



sgs 



§ 8 3 § S S 2 



S 2 r: 



?50 



'uamo^ 



•i»K 



1 



•s 



^ 




mamo^ 



Sr:S 



•naji 



55R2 



I 

8 



5 



I 






11 



*II0IDO^ 



g « 



«> •o r« 

a s a 



•U9H 



512 



s » 






•nsmo/^ 



-non 



^sll 



'oomoAV 



•uaH 



1^1 



usmiOAl 



•U9H 



iiti 

•MOO 



TI9ra0jV\ 



•irajf 



11 



'namoj^ 



S9 cS $ 



•noji 



9SS 



*o « r« 



I 






UBXttO/^ 



uon 






'aamOAi 



•a9H 



•H <0 



S 3 s s I s 



ill 
III 

q o o 

^5p 



I 

it 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 297 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



298 



BDUCATION BBPOBT, 1»13. 



•S 



^ 



I 
8 



8 






H 

5 

El 



'niJpXnr^nnn 

IZ|6;iI9pi48J0 

Jdqmnii eioq^ 


8 


i 


g 


g 




§ 


g 


|S 




s 


! 


** 


i 


^ 


g§§gl 


? 


i 


5 




§ 


S§ §g: 


*ooaaiosnu9n9o 


S 


S55 


!"* 




«5 -ss-RS 




oo 


^ 




S| 


^ : 


: «5?; 


*i£osiiLrai{({ 


s 


•o 




s 






oo 






s 








»*o 














Wj-J 


: ®® : 


'Xqsimaqo 


r». 


S 




g 






oo 




5IS 








S2 


3 










t* 1 


: "^^ : 


pioqosnoH 


s 










8« 




" -9§8ag5 


jgo 




ss 






5:ga ®*^s 


'Oimoe^iqaxy 


to 


?s 














« 




i 




•* 




oo 


g 


r* 










: oo ; 




;s 










S 


•s« 




s 








jgOO 


i5«i? 




§ 


: S<=» : 


-I8to omx9X 


8 
















oo 
















oo 


















i ®^ i 




a 
















oo 




S2 








oo 


:s 














: ®® : 






s 












oo 




S8 








oo 


















: ®® : 




s 


00 












oo 


<»S8«» 




28*=» 


5 






00 






I 5;0 • 




» 


sa"*§ 






oo 


a?j 


?3 


» 


oo 


s 






i 




BS °° : 




oe 


a*s5 


;5 


gJJOO 


=8IS3 


S^SS 


n 


§ss 


as 


: 2g-» 


2? 


K« 


ssjsgss 




n 




2?2 «?2 


*8lIIJ901Z]9lI9 

l«o|n«qooK 


« 


8«^22 


a"» 


«|§Sag S52 


s 


SSft 


* ;« 


s ^a* 




•« 


s 






S 




oo 






;SR5 




oo 




s 












: ®® : 


•iCj^KUOJ 


^ 


•* 












oo 


2 


35? 






• o 




35? 








3 


. eoo J 


•wminoWJOH 


•0 


s 












oo 






t* 


o 




JO 00 
















00 


. -vO • 


*ojmini>pSy 


M 


§ass38sasg -sgigga s§s§ 


s5 


1 


Sg8 S85 


' 


1N 


1 
1 
















:_L 














X 




















:» : :.i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AOBICULTUBAL AKD MEOHAKICAL COLLEGES. 



299 



g 






sl§g iS8g« 


i 

a" 






a is : : 


III Hi 


• 00 


S 




1 






•a : : : 


it: «^® : 




•«•• 


S : 


s 


2 ^^ : : :2 




o 1 


is 


S 


^ i 


8 






r:§S j5j 


58 : S5;3 : 


is 


t: 


I* 




2 


s I : 


i is 


<=*? 




00 




CO 






»|g ja 


isg 


S i 






^ : 


N- 




i 1 












• • 


_ 






la 



ll 



OJz; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



300 



EDX7CATI0K BEPOBT, 1D13. 



I 

8 



I 

g 
£ 



I 

8 



.52 






H 

n 
-< 
H 



iiijpxjinniH 


S 


1-4 


s 


M 


s 

IH 


oa 






g 


§ 






§1 






'£jdumm 


s 


S2 


Ok 




00 1. 




^ 


00 o« 


s 


'Siq&inK 


s 


5? 




s 




o 


S 




S S ' °° 


§ 


'Sn|japim«q 


s 


g-S 2 


S a^^ §2 




S 8 8« 


s 


•Supiooo 


« 


S 


S §82 8 88 Sg 


1 i 1 S8 


p4 


•1JUJA»S 


5 


ss;s §i2 § gss gs 


g 1 § §§ 




•3xiIJ»;sBij 


^ 


00 


S is 


o 










S 


i2 


2 


•2iiIJ0iF«x 


s 


s 




s^s 


o 




^ 




5 8 8*=' 


§ 


*8u|j|«iu ssauraH 


0« 










o 










o -. oo 


s 


•aui^niJi 


rm 


<o 


-^ 8 


a ?5*- 










2 22 


S 


*3nRat«j 


e 


oonuj o»« 


?J- s 






8 


«3 


i 


•8u|^«l3iaiJa 


» 


s 


S is 


o 






s; 


'<f) 


R2 


i 


•aunq3iiMl9oqA^ 


oo 


•* 


00 ^o» 


O'T 




r-i 


• 2 2;5 


1 


*8a|i[«m moois 


K« 










o 






s 




2 i« 


9 


'Supifiukttoqg 


« 


-«o 




i5 


o 


38 " 




8 -'o 


§ 


•SoimimsilOTia 


U9 


S2« SS 


2*> SS S S S 8 «2 


S 


-doqs onniovn 


•<•• 


ss 




S5 ® 




?5 8 ?; 3 2 S« 


§ 


'£j\jmdi9o 


•0 


s^s9 8:? S3 !:;s sso 3 s :s 8 :g« 


g 


*ainmno}j8y 


01 


5S- §- S 58 S2 i § ^ S 3S 




Institutions. 


wi 


























1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



■s 



^ 



I 

8 
J* 

I 



I 

I 






I 
1 






AGBICULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES 



301 



§1 

ni 
8 



■£8 



?8 



il 



I 



•uoH 



*namoA\. 



•UOH 



'uamoj^ 



•UOH 



•uomoj^ 



•UOH 



•uomo^ 



•UOH 



•uouio^ 



•UOH 



uamoAi 



•UOH 



'uomoAi 



•UOH 



'ueuzoj^ 



•UOH 



'uouzoAl 



•UOH 



9 



& 






i<o»ui^sHa!-««o 



ss^-^s 



t^-* t-«i^^ ^c 



ioS9 



fHO*H ooeoc 



2SfS SS55 S^^-^-^gt;"? 



22$§S«*a8S ''Sgg |S8 S22SgS8g| 



— sr 



$*9g* 



S**S8:5 



o •HOk^jM o»<oa» ^^o 



88* 



flor^jQ i-it» 



a -^^§8 S85a 



gassg 



g-^-^g 



•HtOMOOM^^K^ f-<0 



jHOgCJ OjC-^g 



;l 



8J5 



i 



5ga 



s?s:3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



302 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



a 



•I 






8 
i 



1 

(On* 

s 



t 



I 

I 



n 

e5 



1 

1 


1 


iiamoM 


M 


•< 




oo 




r* 




o 


»» 






c 








ei 




^ 








9-4 


s 




s 




•TOH 


S 


s- «« 


s -^sa^s^ 






«2K 


^ 


1 


^8 


-oaixioj^ 


Ok 


to 


oo 


s 


ogo 











e« 


00 






-^^ \ 


3 


•TOH 


00 


j5^ oo 


s 


ojgoo 


s<= 






n 


S3 


weo^e; j 


s 


il 
'^1 


-nanioj^ 


t- 






oo 






o 


2 















«o 












n 


•n9H 


« 






oo 






o 





































II 


-ixamoil 


to 






oo 






o 

































m 


'WiJi 


^ 


'^ 


etet 


<* oo 


2 













Ok 




ai*N 


«Q • 


§ 


=1 


•lomOM 


FN 






oo 


^ 


o 

































»♦ 


•TOH 


s 


o 


oo 


e« 


o 


25«,.o 








-"8 


eo«o 


COiM 


S 


i 

I 
1 


i 


*IX91II0A1 


FN 


52 ®® "a 


2S 


gj-DO-* 


e«r« 




1^ 


«S8- 


1 


T»H 


o 

FN 


§2 5S «5 ssg 


S|*=*2S as2 


S S8522 


1 




'iismoj^ 


Ok 


gS «o «g 


'^o 


coe«o 




too 








ass* 


s 


•TOH 


oo 


g-» sa «| '♦^^g 


SS®"* 


•s 






-S8g- 






'000X0^ 


K« 


1^ 


oo w^ 




28 


5H«o^ 


t*«M 








« 


a*=> 


n 


•TOH 


« 






oo 






o 






































Is 

p 


•aoinoAi 


Id 






oo 






o 





















»4 










« 


•TOH 


^ 


P5" J5S **§ 8«S 


S 


«=>28 "-^S 


s asi«&^ 


5 

Si 


-< 


•noinoii 


» 






oo 


s 


o 




























'^ : 


•II9H 


91 


S^ z:*- ^1 2«S 


ujgo^^ O.r.5 


2 SZS'^S^ 


i 




J 

1 

! 

*- 


i 

i 

1 


^ 






1 
1 








1 

1 






J 

5 


' 








1 

1 


! 










1 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGRIOULTUBAL AND MBOHANIOAL COLLEGES. 



SOS 



^ 
^ 
.§ 



I 



I 



pa 



1 



3^ 



I 

1^ 



s r 
F 



ii 






2 o 



tit 






s 

I 






§§§§ 



§§§§ 



SSSSSSS 



!§§§§§§§« 






§1 
9V 



§§§$ 



§§i§ 






S§ 



§§§ §§§§§ 



§|g§ii§ 



§1 



§§§$§§§§1 






RS 



OS *o •oo 









§§§§Si 



§§§§§§ 









SSSsS 



§ 



isg" 



S§3 

0i 



SSI ii" §■ 



!Sf2" *-' 



ill §§ § 

ass' s'e" s 



ill §§ § 

Mfir^ So (D 3 






§§§ §1 S a 



i§ 



I 



11- 



ts 



I §1 

S' SsS 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



304 



3 

O 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



5» 









51 



8 



§ss§iis§ §g§s § §§§s§ 



§ ii § 



a §§§g 



§§i§ §§§§ § §§§g§ 



Veo CO c*" 



TJ 

s 





^ 
•S 



3 i 

ta 2 



§ §§§§§§§3$ §g§ 



§ §s§si 

8 8V8"gS 



§§§ U § 



I 



3 



s g§g§g§§s§ §§§g § §§§g§ 

S S"S Sii IS a I" tS I" 5 §' liWf 

8 -f -r - - - «■ 



§§§ §3 § 



II 



8 iiiiisgii §§§§ § §g§g§ 



§i§ gg § 

883* S«' S 



I 






;S 



n 









ih 



IIP^ 



Jl|t 



8~ 



i§ 

r 



irii 



s 



§ 






S8' 









ill* 



ll 



5 ^ 



i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



§§ i§ § i i § sg 



VGBIOULTUBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



805 



i§ 



Vcf CO* 



i i i I s§ 

•d* cT uf i-T j^i-l 



i § i§ 



'* cT eC 



"^"^ S^8 S? S" 5:r -*'* J2S 



«§§§§§§§§§ 

5"sf g s" 8 8 ^ n |g 



§§ §§ 



"$ a 2 9 J5 83 



- 








































o 






o 








o 


o 


s 


o 








e 


c 


d 






o 







17727**— KD 1913— VOL 2 20 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



806 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 









mi 






^ 






5g 



$§ 
-*«■ 



'SQ 









I 



I 
I 



I 
8 



I 






I 



I. 

00 
H 

A 

e2 



5| 



mi 



fH 









gg3§ 






4 



§i§§ 









§IS^ 



i^8§§S 






ft*- 



^Cf O 






§§§s 



2S«8" 



§§S§3§$§§§§II 



I 



l§§3 









§§§§§§8§g§S§s 



9 



§§§s 



iiii 

8'-8"2" 


















S>ii 



k 






Digitized by Google I 



AOBIOVLTOBAL AND MEOHAinOAL COLLEGES. 



307 






§§§! 



^ ^ eg 






% 



§§ 



iir 



II 



§i§§ 



§i§§i 



811" 



Hintinii 



nieo'oo' 



§§ 






Ills 



§§g§g§ig 

^•*^- e« CO ^cf 

iisiiiii' 



3 :S3 



98& 



l§S«"g 



§§ 



11 



I 



s 

•§ 
1 



1 

s 



I g 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



308 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



pini ^JLOJL ncngnB^xa 
joi iiofi«}jdaiad« 0|«98 



§§§§§§§ 



§i§§ii§ 






•>"8 






i §§ 



>j n6|)«|jdoida« 9|i 



JOJ 



9|«»8 






£SSk 



::s 



n^Z^ 



iir 



■fiir 



*8IX0f1V)8 

)ii0mijadza joj noi) 






M TO CO A 



lisiMiir 






nn^i iii 



t«»ox 









inimiriifrsi" 






*)iiai 
moai JO pjvoq Safpnp 
-a| )oa 'fmoQovipKMfH 



c«r» • CO CO c>« f-i d 



^ 
& 



I 



1 



1 

8 



•saraadxo ^oauna 
pmsSiiipQiiq joieaof) 



S$§ 



IS 



•«oo|Aja8 ivao|)«o 
-opo jaino pov iio{)]nx 



iiifipir 



S§23 

8S 



25" 






*«piini • 
9ii9iiimopii8 jaqio moij 



S 



S 



'oe 'Sny JO Bvrv 



*comoooooc<o oooo oor« 

gssgss5as gggs ggg" 



■fiiifiFir 

ag^ssgg" sV 



*«|ix«i8 pavi jaqio 



'Z981 
JO )iE«iS pmq 






im? 



I 



T 



ii§ i§l S 



0*^ MC4 









8S8S SS 



A 

e5 



tnv^d JO asvaiaai 
JO} aop«|jdQKldv 



*)ix«ldjo 
-iq joj ^91 x«x 



^gi 



SSS 



*80«a8dx9 loauna 
joj iio{)«|jaaiddv 



§ig§§§§i§ 



2553" 



S3S 



*898II8dX9 )Iiai 

•ino JOJ X/i9i x«x 



^aaniMOpaa mojj 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGRICULTTJBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 309 



m 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



810 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



piro 3|iOii oofsirapca 
io; nopvijdaiadv o|«)8 



9ii9anj8<ixo 



3 

V 
8 



9a9ai(i9dxa jo; no;) 
-«|jdoicUi« S9|«)8 po)!aa 



i 

Is. 



is §1 §1 § 



mox 



2 ?: as S3 s 



s z & sn 



§ ! 



§ 






1 



1 



I 

8 



•^nai 
mooj 10 pjB oq 8n;pn p 

-U( l^Oa '8O09(IBQ90B{|f 



i "§ ss g 






*09eiiadza ^nound 
pavBScqpnnq loieiiou 



S : 



i 



*BaofAjas xinio|)«o 
-npo jsq^o pa« aof^foj, 



i =? 






'spimj 
)aa«iuiopaa j^mo moj j 



§§ 2§ § i 



•i06T *f 



Til 



'89iiu9 pix«i jaq^o 



jO )iE«iS pnoq 



Si 






■l^ 



•J 

P9 



*)a«idjooraaioix( 
joj ao|)«iJdojddv 



8" 53 



'^creidjooraaio 
-n| jo; iLL9i xvx 






5 



'sasoadxa loauno 
joj aoi;«ijaoiddy 



5? S 



§ § §§ 



'sasnadxa 9031 
-jno jo; iCAai x«x 



•aiBig 
Xq pa^aBjd 
ludnxMopaa moj j 



i 



:3 .,, 
^I^Sl :i 



1 
ii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBIOULrUBAL ATSTD MEOHAKIOAL COLLEGES. 



811 



I 

I, 

8 



J 
•5 

C5 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



312 



EDUCATION SEPOBT, 1913. 



.5i 

I 
s 



Oi 


i§ 

00 •o 



II 



9 



< 



1 









oo o oo 



s 



oo oo OOfi 



m 

8« 




^1 






^?2 
SSI 












§1- • 

1 O'^ 



ng 



S^' 



I 



S'(^ i^ 8SS g8 S8 88SS 888S^S 8 8 



=^8 



OQO OO 



ns 

u 



=»8SS 



l>- O l>. « Ob •-• o» 



ss 



§1^ 



°$S SSI8S3 S S 



tetOMOCrCO 












8^ <=>S38 998S:: £9 9 

^^ s a • tf s s s" « s 



S® S 88S 33 



88 
^8' 



•«• C0C4CO 



=>as dissss s s 



33 



S8SS »8 ?8 ''S8 :3f38^SS ^ » 

lOcfV cr«o oo»-r oeo" ocotCto V e«i' c^ 






S3S 
!S83 



^9 88 8S8 S3S8;^9 S S 



sssf 



So9 



88 



89 8SSS3 tSgSS^SS S3 S 



SIS 



888 



88 



SS 



S8 88SS 88Si:S 8 8 
gg ggg gg^gg g g 



S» iS 888 88 88 888 88888 8 8 

g^ ^ ggg gg §g ggg ggggg g g 
gs d ggg gg" gg" sfgg" !8gggg 8 g 



ooo oo 



g* 



®®8 

06 



OOjgJ^» 



s 

•a 



1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AGBICULTTTBAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES. 



313 



O OO O 



OOjfiOO 



ss 
sg 



i3a 






2 5 



8 8S S ;SS^88 
3 eoS 8 S38888 



:gg 8 SS 8 $8 S8 S !$ ;:: 8 8:3 



8 



OO Q OOOOO 

8 



;5 OO o 



^8 



8 



S SS eS 8888S^ 



Sse S SS 8 



33 S38 



8 S9 






8:g 






8S « 8?2 8 8S «*=» 8 3 

^i-< ef^H .^i-T eo" 



a s 



S3 



8 ss s sasse 

cf efio" eo CO '♦cfcoio 



SS S S8 S 






8 S 



S 8 



i i % 



8 SS 8 8S!«>83 



S8 8 



«8 SS 

si y 



feS5 5® 

Ui 3 



8 S 

g i 



S 8 

2^ i 



{; 98 ^ 8S88S 
59 2"'-*' S SSrfSS 



S8 S 



U i 



9n RS 



S So 



S 8 
9 S 



8S 

is 



8 8« S 8888S 



ss s 



SS 8 



ii g 



0^ M t* 



rcf ^ 



88 8® 
^^ g 



:s 8 8 8 
g g § § 



89 
^1 



8 88 8 eS8S88 

g gg g ggggg 
g teg g* 8g§g"g 



88 8 



S8 8 

gg g 

8¥ *-" 



8S 88 S 8 



gg 



8 8 

i g 

85 a* 



ss 

gg 

ss 



8 88 8 ;S8888 
g gg g ggggg 

g teg g ag^gg 



88 8 88 8 $8 88 
gg g gg g gg M 

as" s 8s '^■^ as a" 



8 8 8 8 88 

g g g g gg 

s '«'' 8 a s s 



o OO o oo^roo 



8S 8 88 ® 88 8® S g 8 « <=>$ 



a ^ 



a I 






11 

ill* 



f I 



■ill 

III, 



|5! 



PQOQ 



I - 







9 i^ 






II 



'^ iS ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER VI. 
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



The statistics of professional schools in the United States are 
^ven in detail in Tables 10 to 16 of this chapter. The number of 
schools^ instructors, students (with increase or decrease in enroll- 
ment), graduates, value of groxmds and buildings, of endowment 
funds, benefactions, in so far as reported to this office, total income, 
and volumes in libraries for the school year 1912-13, are shown in 
Table 1. The number of schools, students, and graduates are 
comparatively shown for six different periods in Table 2. 

There was a net increase of six in the number of law schools. The 
statistics of five new schools and of four schools not reporting in 
1911-12 are included. Three schools went out of existence. 

Several medical schools were merged with other schools, and several 
went out of existence altogether. The statistics show a decrease of 282 
in the number of instructors and of 1,214 in the number of students. 

While the dental schools decreased by four in number, the statistics 
show an increase of 825 in the enrollment of students. 

In the schools of pharmacy the statistics remain, relatively, the 
same. There is no particular significance in the changes in the 
statistics of the schools of veterinary medicine. 

Table 1. — General summary of statistics of professional schools, 1912-13. 



Oass. 



Schoola. 



Instruc- 
tors. 



Students. 



Increase 
(+)or 
decrease 



Gradu- 
ated In 
1913. 



Students 
havings 
degree. 



Theology 

Law 

Medicine 

Dentistry 

Pharmacy 

Veterinary medicine 



179 
124 
108 
48 
75 
22 



1,260 
1,460 
7,290 
1,441 
784 
351 



10,965 
20,878 
17,238 
8,016 
6,165 
2,324 



- 277 
+ 118 
-1,214 
+ 825 
+ 2 
+ 42 



1,977 
4,427 
3,426 
1,976 
1,813 
633 



4,824 

4,428 

2,146 

190 

52 

21 



aass. 



Value of 

grounds 

and 

buildings.i 



Endow- 
ment 
funds.i 



BenelBo- 
tions.! 



Total 
income.* 



Volumes in 
libraries.! 



Theology 

Law 

Medicine 

Dentistry 

Pharmacy 

Veterinary medicine. . 



123,296,518 
5,458,822 
27,585,874 
2,785,237 
2,211,768 
1,503,629 



$38,514,924 

2,315,245 

12,679,436 

461,915 

205,000 



12,336,510 

180,453 

1,135,562 

12,000 

54,284 

1,250 



$5,585,272 

1,877,902 

4,753,660 

1,197,396 

510,251 

525,142 



2,933,587 
988,803 
626,307 
108,118 
105,434 
74,090 



1 In so far as reported. 

* Includes tuition fees, income from productive funds, benefactions; special app 
and city for buildings and improvements, including hospitab, In so far as reported. 



opriations from State; 
315 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



816 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Including the schools for the training of professional nurses, in 
the year 1912-13 there were enrolled in professional schools in the 
United States 100,002 students, 85,102 in privately endowed insti- 
tutions, and 14,900 in institutions supported by funds appropriated 
by city or State. 

Table 2. — Comparative statistics ofprofessional schools. 





1013 


1910 


1900 


1890 


1880 


1870 


Thedoiry: 

Schools 


170 
10,065 
1,977 

124 

20,878 

4,427 

108 
17,238 
8,426 

04 
16,130 
3,140 

10 
891 
196 

48 
8,016 
1,976 

75 
6,165 
1,813 

22 

2,324 

633 


184 
11,012 
1,750 

114 
19,567 
4,238 

135 

21,394 

4,448 

112 
19,983 
4,129 

14 
897 
184 

53 
6,439 
1,588 

79 

6,226 
1,715 

20 

2,717 
768 


154 
8,009 
1,773 

96 
12,516 
8,241 

151 

25,213 

6,219 

121 

22,752 

4; 720 

22 

1,009 

413 

54 

7,928 
2,029 

58 

4,042 
1,130 

13 
362 
100 


145 
7,013 
1,372 

54 

4,518 
1,424 

129 
15,484 
4,566 

98 
13,621 
3,853 

14 

1,164 

880 

27 

2,696 

948 

80 

2,871 

750 

7 
463 


142 

5,242 

719 

48 
3,134 
1,089 

90 
11,929 
8,241 

72 
9,876 
2,673 

12 

1,220 

880 

. 16 
730 
206 

14 

1,347 

186 


80 


Students 


3,254 


Oradui^tos. 


Lftw: 

Sohoob 


28 


Students 


1,653 


Qrttdufttes 


IIodlciM(aa classes): 




Students 


6,194 


Qraduates 


ModiciiMCrefular): 




students 


5,630 


Graduates 


HediolxMjhomeopatbic) : 




Students 


275 


Oradoatet. 




Dentistry: 

Bohools 




Students 


257 


Qradoates... 




Pharmacy: 

Schools 




Students 


512 


Qraduates 




Veterinary medicine: 

Schools 




Students 


• ..j..> 


Oraduatas. 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 317 

Tabus 3. — Summary of statistics of schools of theology^ 1912-13. 



1 53 women graduates are included. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



318 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 4. — Summary of statistics of schools of law, ISlt-lS, 



^ 71 women graduates are included. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFBSSIONAL SCHOOLS. 819 

Table 5. — Summary ofitaiisiia of schools of medicine, 19H-1S. 



1 70 women graduates are included. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



320 EDUCATION REPORT, 1W3. 

Table 6. — Summary ofstaiistica oftdiooU of dentistry , 191t-lS, 



States. 



'! 



Students. 



I 



.a 

1 

1 
o 



United states 

North Atlantic Division.. 
North Central Division... 
South Atlantic Division.. 
South Central Division.. . 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Massachusetts 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

IlUnois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri. 

Nebraska 

South Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

Georgia 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Western Division: 

Colorado 

Oregon 

CaUfomia 



48 



1,441 



7,8 



132 



190 



»1.976 



106, 118 



|2,78S,287 



$805,706 



fl,l»7,3«5 



424 
480 
214 
168 
155 



2,450 

3,085 

1,062 

622 

644 



698 
769 
296 
150 
161 



8,211 
23,411 
21,624 
61,077 

3,796 



831,635 
846,000 
833,069 
399,600 
876,033 



256,463 

819,970 

79,872 

60,098 

96,406 



149 
123 
152 

78 
19 
70 
31 
30 
63 
29 
121 
39 

61 
83 
29 
41 

26 
81 
14 
37 
U 

35 
27 



462 

966 

1,002 

447 
182 
1,021 
253 
42 
251 
174 
580 
135 

350 
341 
43 
348 

149 

304 

41 

65 

73 

121 
215 
308 



12 


62 


3 


6 


3 




3 




5 


4 


7 


6 


1 




3 


3 


3 


13 


1 




2 


25 


6 


8 


1 




3 





115 
209 
274 

121 
36 

234 
69 
34 
61 
33 

145 



106 
73 
20 
97 

82 
78 
7 
13 
20 

33 
49 
79 



4,200 
1,571 
2,440 

6,600 

600 

4,911 

2,000 



646,636 
286,000 

125,000 



160,000 
176,000 



1,000 



40,651 
168,317 
47,496 

69,706 
28,000 
70,200 
27,000 

22, no 

61,509 



9,000 
600 

11,000 

6,500 

6,000 

124 

377 

60,400 

300 



320,000 
75,000 

60,000 

16,000 

218,069 

60,000 



49,840 
11,000 

25,000 

21,556 

4,359 

28,968 



337,000 
60,000 



36,700 
6,173 



2,500 



600 

346 

2,960 



161,033 
215,000 



9,126 

18,602 
84,960 
49,823 



469,164 

427,731 

84,872 

63,814 

161,824 



56,450 

362,709 

49,906 

74,705 
28,000 
71,000 
58,700 
22,716 
99,770 



69,840 
13,000 

25,000 

21,656 

9,360 

28,968 



38,700 
5,989 



9,126 

28,145 
45,400 
88,279 



1 giaduatea are included. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PB0FES8I0NAL SCHOOLS. 



821 



Table 7. — Summary of statistics of schools of pharmacy, 191i-lS, 



States. 



Students. 



.1 B 






^1 



3 



United states.... 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division. . 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dalcota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Sooth Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

District of Columbia, 

Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Sooth Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Colorado 

Washington 

Oregon 

Califomia 



75 



784 



5,938 



227 



52 



I 1,813 



105,434 



S2, 211, 763 



$407,177 



S510,251 



2,369 

1,752 

829 

618 

370 



819 
507 
228 
161 

98 



41,082 
30,970 

8,550 
20,910 

3,922 



1,328,593 

532,870 

25,000 

190,300 

135,000 



235,794 

108,300 

22,537 

22,156 

18,390 



12 
237 

98 
941 
160 
921 



226 
406 
200 
89 
82 
48 
59 
26 
21 
182 
75 

94 
109 
77 
83 
45 
421 

59 
104 
106 

42 
123 
137 

47 

10 
99 
74 

187 



4 


1 


8 


2 




"2 


2 




10 


4 




2 




1 



8 
41 
29 

406 
61 

274 

110 
62 

103 
27 
30 
26 
17 
32 
6 
8 
63 
23 

34 
20 
24 
10 
17 
123 

14 
87 
83 
15 
42 
2 
18 

1 
32 
14 
51 



7,500 
400 

8,722 

760 

23,700 

U,500 
800 
4,620 
5,600 
200 
2,750 



149,933 
3,800 
542,860 
57,000 
575,000 

157,000 
80,000 
44,670 



1,500 



125,000 

**ii,'266' 



20,241 

8,978 

112.063 

12,000 

82,512 

18,428 
12,000 
41,327 
5,220 
5,450 



2,455 
4,200 



1,200 
2,800 

250 
2,500 
5,000 

300 



90,000 
75,000 



25,000 



500 



14,920 
4,300 

8,982 
5,720 
1,635 
2,800 
3,400 



1,510 
2,800 



60,000 



8,350 
8,250 



20,000 
75,300 
85,000 



2,500 
3,235 
8,654 
11,457 
1,310 



2,500 

345 

1,077 



900 



135,000 



2,835 
14,655 



263,118 
141,832 
32,537 
49,283 
23,481 



29,477 

8,978 

127,512 

12,700 

84,451 

19, 170 
12,000 
47,407 
5,220 
5,450 



2,455 
5,910 



26,920 
17,300 

8,982 
5,720 
1,635 
2,800 
13,400 



3,000 
21,462 

3,654 
19,857 

1,310 



900 



2,835 
19,746 



1 73 women graduates are included. 

Table 8. — Comparative statistics of schools for the training of professional nurses, 

1879-1913, 



Years. 


Schools.! 


Capacity of 
hospitals 
(beds).» 


Nurse 
puplls.i 


Graduates.1 


1879 


U 

15 

34 

35 

131 

432 

862 

1,129 

1,121 

1,067 

1,094 




298 

323 

793 

1,552 

3,985 

11,164 

19,824 

32,636 

»^805 

32,389 

34,417 


141 


1880 




157 


1884-85. 




218 


1889-90 




471 


1894-95 




1,498 


1899-1900 


84,227 
145,506 
214,597 
194,236 

• 158,606 

• 158,389 


3,456 


1904-06 


5,795 


1909-10 


8,140 


1910-11 


7,720 


1911-12 


8.062 


1912-13. .. 


8,937 







» As reported to this office. 
17727"— ED 1913— VOL 2 ^21 



* Average daily number of patients. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



822 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 191X 

Table 9. — Summary of$tati8tic$ ofachools/or the training of professional nurses,! 91 2-1 S, 





Class A.I 


Class B.« 


States. 


1 


1 

OQ 


j 


il 

o 


Average daily 
number of 
patients. 


•f 


1 


1 


it 


Average daUy 
number of 
patients. 


United States 


1,026 


« 30,953 


» 8,216 


s 109,401 


« 73,629 


68 


•8,464 


"721 


"93,486 


* 84,700 






North Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 


405 

323 

124 

77 

vr 


13,617 
9,264 
2,994 
1 803 
8,275 


3,997 

2,356 

707 

411 

745 


60,475 
80,229 
10,217 
7,300 
11,090 


35,681 

20 290 

6,187 

4 443 

7,128 


39 
23 

4 
2 


1,926 

1311 

147 

80 


484 

186 

36 

16 


61,219 
23,884 

2,700 


68,027 
18,649 
6,401 
2,683 


Western Division 
















North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 


11 
14 
9 
71 
11 
17 

124 
28 

120 

61 
25 
66 
39 
17 
27 
28 
81 
7 
6 
14 
12 

2 
20 
10 
20 
15 
24 

6 
24 

3 

11 

17 
15 

15 


315 

223 

204 

2,618 

'433 

646 

4,404 

'813 

8,961 

1,460 

'666 

2,302 

1,150 

518 

861 

800 

887 

94 

86 

833 

208 

85 
805 
443 
442 
235 
346 
144 
480 

64 

191 
205 
245 
76 
875 
451 
112 
148 

109 
50 

446 
16 


80 

63 

70 

683 

182 

159 

1,528 

211 

1,021 

389 

126 

611 

302 

117 

214 

193 

192 

40 

28 

91 

63 

11 
177 
116 
103 
45 
86 
66 
99 
4 

62 
61 
87 
18 
82 
111 
27 
23 

88 

18 
89 
10 


819 

543 

421 

7,273 

1,253 

2,216 

19,459 

2,782 

16,709 

6,191 

1714 

7,803 

8,406 

1,616 

2,746 

2,176 

8,453 

306 

363 

875 

681 

148 
2,863 
1,799 
1488 

877 
1,028 

519 
1,325 

170 

847 
790 
699 
338 
1,834 
1,760 
625 
607 

686 

230 

1,692 

90 


469 

347 

240 

4,856 

774 

1,336 

14,480 

1923 

11,157 

3,530 

1069 

6 660 

2,262 

847 

1,899 

1396 

2,396 

206 

124 

606 

297 

95 
2,154 
987 
892 
452 
615 
232 
825 

35 

605 
632 
187 
292 
1,437 
973 
342 
175 

856 

116 

1,039 

'60 


2 

1 
1 
9 
1 
2 
13 
8 
7 

8 


48 
58 
23 
605 
104 
66 
496 
163 
873 

122 


6 

20 

2 

125 

19 

7 

173 

83 

100 

84 


1,490 
1,200 

726 
0,618 

200 
2,560 
81,696 
6,600 
8,229 

5,803 


1,478 
1058 


New Hampshire. ,.,,.. 


Vermont. T 


651 


Massachusetts... . . .. 


9,438 
141 


Rhodf^ Mt^ntl 


Connecticut 


2,62(» 


NewYork 


29,647 


New Jersey 


6,330 


Pennsylvania . 


7,768 
6,169 


North Central Division: 

Ohio 


Indiana 


Illinois 


6 
3 


882 
229 


82 
86 


2,170 
8,662 


1,690 
8;516 


Michigan 


Wisconsin . . 


MinnAftnta. ., , 


3 
6 


209 
207 


25 
88 


4,087 
4,686 


2,916 
8,410 


Iowa 


Missouri 




North Dakota 












South Dakota 












Nebraska 


2 
2 


47 
116 


10 
12 


1,096 
2,880 


608 


Kansas.... 


1,841 


South AUantio Division: 

Delaware .... 


Maryland 


2 

1 
1 


63 
79 
16 


13 
23 


1,485 
8,000 
1,198 


1.322 


District of Columbia 

Virginia.... 


8,950 
1,129 


WestVirginia 




North Carolina 












South Carolina 












Georgia 


.... 










FlorWa. . . .. 












South Central Division: 

Kentucky 


1 


40 


6 


1,200 


1,188 


TAnn«sfl«e..... . .. .... 




Alabama 


1 


40 


9 


1,600 


1,600 


Mississippi . . .. 




T^nisl^na 












Texas . . 












Arkansas 












oifiaboTna. . ...... 












Western Division: 

Mon tana 












Wvomine." 












Colorado 












New Mexico 












Arizona 












Utah 




138 


28 


445 


315 












Nevada 












Idaho 


2 
19 

4 
42 

2 


81 

417 

211 

1,857 

83 


4 

95 

47 

416 

7 


100 
1,563 

770 
6,614 

110 


70 

1,018 

336 

8,819 

63 












Washington. . . . . 












Oregon 












Calnomiia . . . 












Porto Rico * 

























> Excluding schools connected with hospitals for the treatment of the insane. 

> Including schools connected with hospitals for the treatment of nervous and mental diseases, insane, etc. 

• In so far as reported to this office. 

* Not included In totals. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FBOFESSIOKAL SCHOOLS. 



323 



*duiooix| iv^ox 



i § 






55 S 






'sponj oAnonpQjd JO 



I § 3S 



fi § 



8SS 



9iz|pnpxo) 83ii|pi|uq 
pa« spimaiS jo oaf«A 



JS 8 



88 8 M 
§8* » ^ 



*ii 



'iCjuiq 
-IT ^ SdiimioA pixQOS 



SS 



§§ i §§ §§ §§ 
»o^ ^ ooV oToo' «^ 



SS$8 



*8uno3 niUTOA 



coco coco** CO rococo 



•8X61 UJ po^OTipwo 






'nouioj^ 



•OC4 CO i-4<o eot« toio «o 



s «ss s 



3:2 3- 



• ■* a» ^«-< 



• *S S8lo ^ 



C40 •«-« 



•TOJf 



-^J; ^85 32 5 S^ S2 SS 2589 S ««!?? 



I 



I 






'uossejojd jvpiSo^ 



•0<0 COC4 ^^ o *oo» <o^ 



•fS '"S 



a» «o C4ioeo 



I 

8 



I 

A* 







5i I i« <• 



'STZpxddo 9fijg jo j«9j^ 



00 00 00 95 •00 00 Sao 'OQ aoaio ooooSo oo 9$9a6 



I 



^1. 



is 









J ll IS all 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



S24 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



*oniooii||«)oj, 









g§ § S 



*9pim} aAnonpojd jo 
^uoQLAiopao ^naiiviiuad 



i§ g 



§S § 






;3) 

^ 









pa 
< 



•(BSuipipiq painaj 
2ti|pinox9) B2uipnnq 
pu« frpimojS JO onx«A 



SIS i" 



§i§ s 



CO (O CO CO 



lg § § 



§g § § § 
88 - - 



CO rsco 






eoeo ^ •«• eo N 



-^ CO.-! 



^ "5 : 



5: "=§58 a 



t^ .^ 






Sa S 8&5 S 2 ISS 2 



^ S 



CO. »oeo 00 O»©oo c^ r- t*-* 



CO .-• ec t" 



'Siquddo jsjy ;o J«aA 



a 

ea 



•2:] 

w| 

cqO 






o 
pi 

I 






n 







11! 

WOP 





















600 00 9 06 00 06 



\t 









O 

I ll 






a 3 



fit; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PItOFESSIONAL SOHOOU. 



826 



§ g S § I s 

oT oo* lo oT V CO 



s s § 
5 ^" -^ 



§§§§§§ 

S" IS i ^ 8" 5'" 






^ § 



a Ȥ i 



a §|- 






i" § 



« §■ 



§ § § § 



CO C< f-« 



§ § § 

tc V V 



^8 8-" '^ 



2 S isS 13 a £38 



CO CO f» CO CO CO CO 



• CO coco ^ co<oo CO i^e» 



CO CO CO CO 



n 


;^ 


CO 


- 


M 


M 


S^ 


CO 


S2 


O 


O 


»ct^ 


^^co 




«^r^ 


o 
•-• 


2;s 


2 


« 


oco 










Ok 




a 


^ 


»o 


»-« 


^ 


»o 


js 


i'^ 


CO 


\^^ 


^ 


ig 


n 


S 


52^ 


g 






€>» 


a* 




J 


: 


: 


rH 


s 


i 


: : 


: : 


; 


<-• j I 


: 


i-^ 


\ 


: 


: : 


: 



3 S S S 



!S S S ^ 8 



§» 



=1 2 3 5S 



t^t^»^C0OCI»0 NOO Oco •-« 0»000 •* t>.»0 N 00 t<.o « 



o 

1 1 






1 1 ill 



1 o s S 



I 



5 

I 



S t i " p 
p^ I-; W ^ C 






W^ Hi 




liili^iiiSiliiSi s^i i ii i i ss I § 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



326 



EDUCATION BEPOKT, 1913. 



.s 



;3) 

^ 



I 



•5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PBOFESSIONAL SCHOOI^ 



327 






i§ 



S § g § § § g| 

" Sf 3* s" a' R 8"S" 



§§■ ii" s" 



R 



§ i 

8" a" 



cilS 



§§§§§§ 
8" i'i' i i" 2" 



ss 



§ § § 

- §■ !; 



§ S S §i 



M f g 



§ § §§ |g 



as -s 



§ s § §i 

CO » 5 gg 






^ e« eo eoeo 



"^t CO CO"** toco «0 CO CO 



i«eo «o coeo^ >* '♦ 



8 


o -* t*"* 


as ^ 


o» : ;5 ; 


c.^ ^ : 2 -* : « 5 ::s 


S -^5 : • 8 


S 


'^ ** S : 


^^ § 


^ i 9S 


j^ g ^ JS « : S S «| 


: :S§ a S 


• 


CO • ; • 


: : : 


; CO J ; 


:":::•" i i is 


i ** i i i i 



88 S S SS geS g 5? « 158 33 S « lo 



§ 28§ S «3| e I 



O ^ C>« too "JJOl 



o r>. »o 




|g gg 






S 00 



22 2 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



328 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



•eraoouj-pnox 



GOOD 

r*co 



R 

"* 

& 



i §3 

2" SS 



'spxznj OAfpnpojd jo 



^ $ s s 



s §¥ 



3mpnpX9) sijixjpnnq 
pn« ffpimoja JO oniB^ 



9 S S 

Sf 8" 8" 



8| 



'iCiejq 
-n ^ senmioA prniOQ 



5"o"<o '♦" oo" cT ^ f-T «r» 



;3 

•9 

§ 






'oemoo iz| sjtsaj^ 



eo«co eo eo e< «o coeo'^ro co 



£161 UT pojimpwD 






•uoraoAV 



•U3K 



rHOOCO N 



•* <««00t^ 



■^ iooo>o» CO '^ c< p CQ e«r^ 



^0»0 0> N «0 ■«* ^00»C>« S5 '^ I^ P fiQ PO» 

i-ic«i-« ?i 1-1 CI c^ t^t^eow «D »-i .H f5 N R40 



'UOGsajoid jQinda^ 



"*«"* W C« "* 



OiOiO«D OO 




o-«j 



I 



n 



'3iqnodo jsjg jo jreejt 



»oc« 

SoSg 



i;o ss 



gs 



s 

>5 




fl o o 

ill 



■a ^ 



05 

00 2 






f 



-I 

11 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



329 



g § S § 



in 1 5 



t: 8 



S «o o sss 
^- Jf •«"• g« 



II I 



8 gS5 



if i S § 



s ;:! 






» 8^ 



i « i 



8 r» 8 o c« C4 ^S 

CO <H A ^H iH W^H 



|-i8- 



ssa 3 s ss a s s ~ 2 " jsa » 



eo 


CO 


eo 




'♦ 


coco CO 


CO 


e9 


eo" 


CO 


CO 


't 


to 


eo 


CO 


-♦CO 

CO- 


•^ 


CO 


coco 


c« 


eo 


cc 




a» 


CO 


2 


(O '• 


»-4 


:§J8 


2 


■^ 


CO • 


1^ 


"* 




s 


O 


i 


o<o 


-^ 


"* 


«ooo 


«© 


Oft 






s 


eo 


?J 


« : 


S 


2^5 


S 


8 


^g 


n 


2 




R 


g 


00 


S32 


00 




^s 


o> 


;3 






iH 






3<^ 


i 


: : : 




; 


: ; 


: 






^ 


: 


: 


^ : 


i 






: 


i 







a S S; SS S 288U S 5 e5g 5 >s? 



S 9 



eoS S CI 



ooeo CO •o>-i*o t^ 




3w ? sea*** .g .3 c, <u h^ V cr 






I 




I ^ 11 I III i§ 11 iiiiiiil I illi 




5s 



a> 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



330 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



*aniooiii i«;ox 



i § 



i i § 
gf S" gf 5* 






'spmil OAfionpoid jo 



2 S 



li 



•(sanroipiq po^nai 
8ufpnpx9) gSoipQnq 
puB 8pcmai3 jo odi«a 



9 S 8 



8 83 



-2 
.s 

c 
o 



^ 

^ 
^ 

5 



INMt 



'iLnuq 
-n Of soinnioA ponos 



§ § 



§ § § 



§ §§ § 



'9SJnoo ni sjwx 



eo c« m CO eo 



J 3 



«* ^ CO eoeo eo 



•gT6IiiIP»»«np«J0 



^ «D M CO 



5 



g I -op 01^^391100 qiiAl 



w S S ^ 8 gg 



•TOJf 



: S 



S S 



<o C4 eo •o« 



::3S13gS9aSSS^§S 



'SiossajoJd jBinSoH 



"^ g g 



(D Ok <0 CO 




5 



< 



00 I -Suinado ;>jg jo Jt»A 



5 I- 



SaoaocScScSSookCboBBS 



Si 





iliill 



1 i 






I 1 



^> 



~ H 



S H 



I I t II ^ 



HJ P^M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



331 



s 

ft 



§ § § 
a- f «- 



§§§§§§! 



CO M eo« "* ^ 



*n "<r »o«o c< 



s ;: *" : 8 



5 J2 S^ ?J I S 



t^ ^ oot^ •^ « 



•< 
o i 






I I -i^ c S I 



li 



I ^ 11 2 S 1 

^ ^ h£ H S S 



i ; il I I I 



I 5 



I i I 













1^^ 



■S= 5 I I 

l§ i g § 

11 1 !: I 

S50 Pi CO I> 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



832 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913, 



*omooii| it^ox 



g 



i i 

8 ''■■ 



S9 a. 






% g 



■spun; 
OAponpoid JO 9iidia 
-i&opod )ii9iivmj9d[ 



•(sSnipniiq po^ooi 
9iiTpniox9) sSoTpnnq 
poB spunoiS JO 9ni«A 



TT 



•iLreiqn 
u] gomniOA panos 



§ 



of « 



S 8 S® S S S SSS S § SSS$ 9 



•9o; uoninx 



'osjnoo ni siwx 



CI c< eo ^« ^*« « eT^ 



CO CO CO CO CO CO c< 



J. 



8 






n 

Eh 



•E16I 



'eaj:S9pe)B 






'noxno^ 






e!:Sio^ s 



T= ^«« ?« 



g 



•a9H 



^" »H 1-* iH O CO »-lrH 



•sjossojojd j^inJeH 



O 00 « o»t-t^ 



&*- ^ 



^Sg" 



'8xnii9A9 JO Ivp 
Of ooAiS noipnj)stii 



as > o ? >• cJ" «' _ 

Q » pq H HP Q Q 



e) eS c8 






*- _ 



II 

a ". 

5 -^^ 



Is 

Is 



a 

II 



ft -iii 









III 11^ 

a b * * 

Sh W u m 



^ oWh 






I Eh 



'Sninddo ^sjg jo jwjt 



g i I g IS i I i 1^1 i § §111 § 



I 

3 



CS 

J?; 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PBOFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



333 



mi 



52 a-s-- -"-«■' 



§ §§§ 



Mioco CO ^eoeo 



9 ?8S*" 



§i§ 



«Dioio *-i C4 M Ok eocoeo 



5 



C4 dcicoeo eococQ eo eoeoeo co co co co eo oi ci 04 



W CO 00 CO CO CO 



gS feSSS §§28 S5 *5S S 9§J3*S«8 « S S^^ S2;3 



C4C4C« CO 



CO cococo 2 

I 



S5 


: rs 


I :2 


a» 


•« :8 


S 


gu, : :*««g5 




o» 


:ga SS5S 


^^ t 




s 


8t5t$ 


; 


: : : : 


**S'* 


c« 


eo'^ • 


1 


to '^ • • 'O 




COM . T-iCO • 


.toco 




•^ 


CQ . . 


i 


g'd^'l 


SiS 


g 


SSS 


i 


8§SS9S5S 


S 


s 




SS'-SS 


!3 


8 


=gs 


•««• 




sss 


S3 


ssa 


a 




U3 


«> 


«ooo« »ogoo 


oooor* 


"V 




2S2 


i 






i 


Hi 


i 


QPPPHQQ 


^ 

S 


i 


iiiiii 




ii 


Hi 



I 
1 




pa -• 

ill i 

^m ^ P 



fi^« i4 P 
111 I ^ 



p : 



pq a 



fcdfl 



I lili III i ill i lliilli i i l§| IP i^s i s i§s 




sill ^^^ ^ ^^^ ^ 




S i 






||P 

PQPt) 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



334 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, lftl3. 



■emooni i«»ox 



S§ 



s^ :ss 



§ § 



l§ s § s § 



-span; 
OAnonpojd JO 90901 
-iiopua )a9oiniU9j 



*(s3a|pnnq pw^osj 
8on>npx9) s^pnnq 
ptre sponoiS jo eni«A 



M 



§ § § 

jg g « 



•Xjwqil 
o} 890znioA ponos 



§§§§§§ 



§ 



§ § § § § 

a" 8' S S 8 



sss 



§i§ § § § § 

CO <D 00 lO 00 O 



"SSS^ S^ SS;g SS^ » S8S8 8 9 s ts » 



•w; oof^jn J, 



'96JnOO O} 6J99A 



CO'T'*'*" WW coco coeiei So cocoeoco eo eo So ^ So 
CO eo 

S*S;; 8g :9 2§ :2 8 SS2S S « 8 S « 






9 

^ 



^ 



■^ 



42 
S 



5 



pa 












'oamoj^ 



S^8::j2S«ss 



ri io 'to • • iH e< e< 



•o»H 



g :§g gS «ll rs5 S gisg B s g 3 a 



•ijc»bi.jjojd JBin33H 



S*"SS §^ 8*^ eoe<e< oo noot«o !o 55 35 ^J o~ 



*8o|U9A0 JO Svp 

Of oaA}S ooipnj)ioi 



►>« 



^«i 



-^*fi S<S 



OHm 



II 

Apq- 






► > ► o 
HHHpq 



Q Q S 



i 




'ISoioado )sjg ;o JB9JL i «« 



oo cK cS SS 00 00 cb So OB 00 00 oo oooooS oo oft 8o cB So 



s 




■i 



^ II ? 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



335 



§1 






i g I § 



I S § 



i § 

8 S 



FT 



IT 



§ 



§ § § 

«" 8" 8" 



irTTTIIIIgi S 



§ § § § 



§ § 



§ § 



M 



3S 8 8 8S8888S 88 S8S !3 8 S 8 8 8 8 



S8« !S 8 S iSS 
8" 



«o~co eo eo eoeoeoeoeocom coco 



coeoee «o eo eo to «o to 



' eoeoco So 35 55 -^eo 
CO 'QO « 5 fi eTs 



9S s : sg4;g§^^ 



i»ip4 a 'CI • e« ri 



25 2 So 8 as 



-> :2 8 



ei"5? eo" 



^! :388S3:;; 



s 9 



^S I 



tr^^ o ■* 



§3 S 8 8§§s§§s =- ssg K 8 s g g g 5 ass s 8 s s 



rH t-ieo 



9^ lo o» fooooeewat^eo eoi-i c«to^ « » ^ rn ^ » eo t^iSS'O « oo lo »>•»;;• 



OS O 



oB 09 c8 oOflS e9 



1^ & I J & & ^ 

Q Q iSq 1^ Q Q » 







cE 00 9$ So 25 o6 cB w w w ob SSo 90900 8o So o5 85 S oo cK oS9S9S So So 86 cnt^ 



;3 a 



ft 

SI e 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



336 



EDUCATION EEPOET, 1W3. 



1 

s 

! 






.5 

.2 



03 



'omooTii itno x 



•span; 
OAjionpoid JO 9110m 
-4ikopn3 9iidirenu9j 



'(sSoTPnnq p9)aoj 
Smpnioxa) sSnipJinq 
poB spunoiS JO 9ni«A 



•Xjuiqii 
u] BdozDioA panos 



•90; uoninj. 



-ocjnoo HI Btmx 



H. 



•8I6T 



*daxd9p9)B 

-139000 g m\IA 



'muxoj^ 



•noH 



*8J08S9jaid JBin^H 



'8nTiiOAO JO Avp 
n\ mA]2 iio})0EU)8iii 









'aiiIii9do )8jv JO mx 



I 



8 



S § §1 






S 



§§ § 

88 S" 



l§ § 



8 i S| 



§ 3 g 









S8 



i § §§ § §1 



^o t^ o»«o 



8852^8 



8S *^ ^ 8 8 ^5 S _8 
" " S 8 ^- 



CO « 



CO C4CQ rieo CO eo 00 CO eseo ^ 



XO oco 



^ ®S t; 82 



S5 8 S^ :S S • 8 ^ 28 o 5g« 



^ • C4 • eo 



a 9 s s 8S §13 I 8 I g :;§ s g§ 



•-* r» ^ ^fo 



^ b b b $' ^ b^ b b b ^ b^ l> b'3 

O <0 OS <S >C8 «B<8 « 09 <8 « «0« «0 

PQ Q Q Q NQ PQ P P Q Q on (5 PPQ 




I 




I 

GO 

I 
d 

3 

s 

s 

8 



19 

I 

m 

a 



S i g s IS sg i I § i §§ i ii 



w 5 5 
W Ph •^ 




» tJ h5 t 



if 
I 

r 




I 



3 



a 

I 

3 

« 

2 

§ 



I nil 1 1 1 J li 



J9^ 

-sl 

as 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PE0PBS8I0NAL SCHOOLS. 337 



a 



17727°— ED 1913— VOL 2 22 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



338 



BDXTCATIOK KBPOBT, 1913. 



*oinDoii| [V|ox 



2 



S3f 



WT 



f s' 



S" 5" 



as' 



*89Q| moJi omooni 



FTT 
§" S" -" 



If 



'sptmj %jioioiM.opa.^ 



ss 



Tin 



iirr 

8|§ i 



"If 



11 

s's" 



*t(9ixipi|iiq pm 
spimoif JO oni«A 



§§§ § § 
ail s" i 



TJf 



I ill i §§r 

eo •oeooo to r-Tj* 



lilF 



'Xjuqn Of mamiOA 



f§ §§ 






'naj ooi^fn J, 






•I 
g 

I 



I 



•^ 



I 






< 



*iK>|88iaip« jo; 

9891103 jO SJTOA 



"5f — ^f^r^i — ^^« 



■a la 



*9Sjnoo HI sii39A 



•8161 



*99J2top989( 

-j_oo__auiA«H 






j3 ft-g 



•CO 5p 



*iz9mo^ 



t^iopi^ ^r~ 



ssss 



•TOH 



S§ss §s|| p Egg sgg g| ggss ssg 



S ?5S5S 5589 S I^SS 8??§ 2gS St^SS 5S82 



*sjo)ani)6ixi 



§ 



u sill 



OQ 

m 

a 

« s 

III 

33'2 



ii 



I 



1 
1 

■3B 



¥4 ff 

•o tffdoQ . 5 



i 



i 



3 fi^.; ^«W 



!?5 lssi«:i| 






-aiiia9do ^sjg jo xmx 



m dS So o5 00 So oifi CD od oBooao SodF> Soo odSSqo oi ao 9 






I 



1 = 



go 
i 8«l 



.2J 






e 












:a .g' .3^ £ 

I mnm liU& sal a^ iil| J, 



-< OS'^u en 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



mOFESSIOKAL SCHOOLS. 



339 



"S 



II §§ -Mi § 



SV g* 8 



T 



oo»d* 



OM e<t« 



3§ ; §1 §§§ 

si; s; II" s's'i 

iii§§ § § § § 



§ § § i 

S" 88 I a 



3 ■ S" 

"FT 



ITU' 






•a 



IT 



"Fir 






s 8§ SSiSa 



w c5 o 5 CO S 5 



OC« lOg O CO toe* 



^r9—WT^r^rw^r-9—!¥^~ 



rd-^^c 



"55" 



«* feS*S5S 8 SsS a 


»i£^ 


: 8 S SS« S Sg 


SSS^!$8 : 


"- S-'a :2g I :** : 




- S S^ 9 : : * •^Jii 




;"•*:: :2 : 2 ; : : 


'^ ' 




;t- ;gM ; ; 



5 

g 



1 
i 

§ 

g 



Sr: g^g^^l § gg 'ooSSS&S ^ ^ § §^^ ^ ^§ i^i iSS^ 



il I 



il igiiig i is giiii § i § Hi i i§ iiiiisi 










^ o 

r a 
« o 



^s 



^ IS 



ii 



^1 



OQOOPi^ Poo 06^J5 Pk (£a< 



y^i^ 



poops S3 



Z'^B S "So© 6 -52 pS 



ss> 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



340 



BDXTCAIIOK BEPOBT, IMS. 



'emooixj Ytv>jj 



§ 



S §§i§ §§ 

S 2SS8" S« 



i ili§ §§ 



S8 



SS 



'S9o; moxi emooni 



'spim; ^nataiiopna 



IT 



'sSnrpifnq pm 

JO 9ni«A 



Si 



§ § §§ §§§ 

S" 8' SS" 832 



»S 



if 



eo of toeo* 



'Xrajqn Of GomniOA 






iTT 



§§§! i§ 



S !;S3 SS88 8 :3 §88^* s^9 



•I 

a 






'890; UDHPIJ, 



'nof66}uip« jo; 



•-•N »^^ '^ «Vh 






'o&moo uj SJWA. 






"too aa|ABH 



Si^ .T-i 



•uaraoAV 



o:^Q : :S 



- :-• ct<^ 



•TOH 



~i© 0"ci6 lO oc 1^ !>. ^ 



"^^5""»^ 



'SJO^OTU^SOI 



5§3§° 



i 






2 



III 



1i 



Is 

pqW 



It 



5^o .5^ 



5 






'da}U8do )sjy ;o j«9j(^ 



si oo 0> ocr Of) CD 5 uQ oc cn Bo oO o6 9 dS So oBoOoo oooc 






i 



I 

1 ; 

1 ' 

•a 



H^ i 



II 

I- 
II 



op 

ll 



I 



I I 



>i^ 






^ s 



S5 



I ll Jiff M 



■Is 



a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



. PBOFESSIONAL BOHOOLS. 



341 



§ § i 



^' sT "^^ 



?? ^ :8 



SoS 



2 S 8S 



fTT 



t^ ss 



S S § ^^ SSS 8S 



: !5i S : 



9 f^ S SS 



SS^ffi" 



li 



1 8 . 

« « " ^«a IS 

8 •sal- ftll: *? 

^ fn fii 6^ >■;» 



. o 



I I § II g§ li 




3^. 
•d ft 

II 

QA4 



•OQ 

il 



OS 



lib 

Si 

15 



•SO 






if 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



342 EDUCATION" BBPOBT, 1913. 



I 
I" 

■5 

I 



•5 

1= 



•J 

m 

< 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 



343 



g Si 



5>oo ^ 



§§ g § 

S2 S 9 






g s§ 



§§§ § 



§§ g I 



§§ 



§§§! S 
a**' a' 



§ §§ 



§§§ § 

SIS' §■ 



§ § 

IS s 



Ss 



§i 



§§ 



§g§ 



§ §1 § 



8 



ss ssggss §s ss s sg ss sssssss s 



C9 CO CO CO C9 OO CO CO fOC 



oeo CO eo^ coco co co <« co ^ co co co 



wb- coa»<oQt^ 



t?2«»gs;2 sr: 5S S 5g 55 52«SS88 S 



•CO "^ • "*«^ 



•OM 'COCO 



^-^$ 



8$J SSS$8S i5 Sa 2 25 SSS ?5522Sf25 



S3 ::Sc:sss 7S S9 s an as ssssa::::^ s 



go 



S9 



^1 



J as ? 









11 111111 11 |§ § 11 ii is illll i 



:>» >» : : : '^ 



Illll 



s 



5i 

^1 



Pt 



^ B 



I 

5 









ji ^ wr - 
•9 Si} 



cxs 



32 ooi«5i« da 6d •= ►'^ do =-«oT''^-i 






US 



>JO»2 



Ph^ 2 Qp; S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



844 



-omoooi p3)ox 



*t99J 

uo[%im mojj eisooixi 



EDUCATION BBPOBT^ 1913. 

^ i § : § i §g 



§ § 

8' 






» as" 






§ §§ 



§ l§ 



pus Bpunauf jo oniv^ 



11 
as' 



'XjtuqiT Ql BdnmioA 



§ § 



g § 



§ §§§§ 



•999; nopinx 



g s § § 



8 8 R_ 8SSSS5 



§8S8 8 S_8 



■88jnoo n} vi^x 



««> CO c« m 



<*« eoe«ie«i«oi« 






>> 

^ 
-^ 



►2 



•5 

I' 



n 

Eh 



ni 



•£T6T 
po^vnpiuo 



•«• »« M «0 



«o a ■« i-<j^ ••♦e 



©8ainoo8niA«H 



'OQiao^ 



5SS*> 23 5:SS 



•uejl 



3 ??. *» S 8 * SS 52|§§S 8S2;5 S 5?2S 



'sjo^onj^snx 



^ o 00 « o» ^ t>-o t^o«©«r*ci woo^oo to ^-ot<« 



^ i I « 

5 pq pq H^ 

I ^ ^* I 

» << » 3 



f^ a -I < 



falo I III 

|3 I ^ II 



■dnnxddo ?Bi^ JO I90X 



I i i I i i ii iis ill iiii i ii§ 




-< » :4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PB0FE8SI0NAL SCHOOLS. 



345 



l§3 



i SIS 






S8S 



i§ 






S 



o oo o occocf e o 



§§§ 



a 
2 



a 
5 






§ §§ § §§!§ § 



SS8 88 §^5S'S§ 



3 39 i3 ^8SS § 83 s;^ iSSS ®S 
8^ " 



go « g 







cfeT cf 


m 


I" 


M 


MCteoeo 


m 


3 


M 




"IS^ 






'I* 
«" 


« 


S~^ 


«s 


;?c3'^SSa 


Ok 


ss 


So 


ssgs 


S 




CO 


i*to 


293S 


a^ 


^00 


eo 


;:* 


CO 1^ 


i-^ 


;M ;^^ 1 




•H • 




: i i : 


: 






: 1 


: i"^ 


iH • 


: : 




: 


o*-* j 


F^-r 


J 




•*t» 




«-»3a 


o» 






:-^ 


• C4CO 


« • 


i'^ 




^ 



sss 



2X !5222!Sasi 



8 8::g^ S S3 SS SS^SS SS *^!;: 



^•c^^ ^ok eoM»*OM»^r> •«• coco n «-ieoeo«o eo moo '^a* lOt^O e4»» t<>(0 r- o 



:;4 



00 






.a ►^ 

ill 



% 



» 



I & 




> 



4^ 



ill I I 11 1^ i|« |« 






3 



If oS" 

I 
I 












11 



/I G 



lUl 



Jzi 

i 

I 



K J^g III i 



^-5552 




§^. 



E-;z; 



\i I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



846 



EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 



S 

a 

I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PBOPESSIONAL SCHOOLS. 847 



I 



I 



I 



Si 
6 



I 

I 

QQ 

n 

< o 

I 



I 

I 

I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER VII. 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



There were 284 public and private normal schools reporting to 
this bureau for the year ending June, 1913, an increase of 7 over the 
number reported for 1912. On page 350 will be found the names 
of the institutions added or dropped from the list of public normal 
schools and private normal schools. The following institutions, 
formerly listed as public normal schools, now appear in the list of 
colleges, universities, and technological schools: State Teachers 
College of Colorado, Iowa State Teachers College, New York State 
Normal College, and the Normal College of the City of New York. 
The State Normal School, Athens, Ohio, is included under Ohio 
University, and the State Normal School, Oxford, Ohio, is included 
under Miami University. 

In the regular training courses for teachers in the 284 normal 
schools there were enrolled 94,455 students, as compared with 89,984 
reported in 1912, showing an increase of 4,471 students. Of the 
94,455 students reported, there were 1,962 preparing to be kinder- 
garten teachers. In addition to the students in training courses 
for teachers in these public and private normal schools, 21,425 
students were reported as pursuing such courses in 931 public high 
schools, and 5,626 in 265 private high schools and academies. The 
following table makes a comparison of the number of students in 
teachers' training courses in public and private institutions for the 
past four years: 

Students in teachers* training courses reported for four years. 





1909-10 


1910-11 


1911-12 


1912-13 


Classes of institutions. 


Institu- 
tions. 


Students. 


Institu- 
tions. 


Students. 


In^tu- 
Uous. 


Students. 


Instita- 
tlons. 


Students. 


Public normal schools 

Private normal schools 

Public universities and ool- 


196 
68 

29 

81 
694 
189 


79,546 
9,015 

2,818 

4,146 
13,641 
4,010 


223 
65 

38 

101 
711 
259 


75,642 
8,463 

6,686 

6,670 
14.680 
5,246 


222 
66 

""838* 
268 


83,474 
6,610 

0) 

17,311 
6,819 


230 
64 

""wi* 

265 


87,172 
7,283 

0) 


Private uaiverBitiei and ool^ 
leges 


21,425 


Public hi flii schools 




6,626 






Grand total 


1,257 

919 
338 


113,175 


1,397 


115,277 


1,383 


113,114 


1,480 


121,606 






Tn all pubUo institutions 

In all private Institutions 


96.005 
17,170 


972 
425 


95,908 
19.369 


1,060 
323 


100,786 
12,239 


1,161 
319 

• 


108,697 
12,909 



1 statistics not called for in 1912-13. 



349 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



350 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



The number of normal graduates reported from the 284 public 
and private normal schools for 1913 was 20,872, or 22 per cent of 
the number of normal students in these institutions. 

The following synopsis compares the progress of public and private 
normal schools in the past 22 years: 

Progress of normal schools. 





Public nonnal schools. 


Private normal schools. 




1890-91 


1912-13 


Percent 

of 
increase. 


1890-91 


1912-13 


Percent 

of 
increase. 


Schools 


131 

1,361 

31,792 

6,060 


230 
4,459 
04,455 
19,428 


75 

• 227 

197 

283 


46 

257 

10,515 

996 


54 

438 

7,283 

1,444 


17 


Instruotors 


70 


Normftl students 




Nomiftl ffreduatos 


45 







Pv^lic appropriations to public normal schools/or t4 years. 



1889-90.. 
1890-91.. 
1891-92.. 
1892-98.. 
1893-94.. 
1894-96.. 
1895-96.. 
1890-97.. 
1897-98.. 
1898-99.. 
1899-1900 
1900-1901 



tl 


tl9 


1900,533 




00 


409,910 




«2 


394,636 




14 


810,826 




71 


1,683,399 




76 


1,008,933 


2 


75 


1,124,834 


2 


85 


743,333 


2 


32 


417,866 


2 


34 


660,806. 


2 


03 


718,507 


3 


85 


709,217 



1901-2. 
1902-^. 
1903^. 
1904-5. 
1906-6., 
190O-7. 
1907-8., 
190fr-9. 
1909-10 
1910-11 
1911-12, 
1912-13. 



00 


\ 


68 


1, 


08 




06 


1, 


65 


1 


75 


1 


80 


3, 


47 


8 


67 


2 


61 


1 


15 


1 


93 


2, 



CHANGES IN PUBLIC NORMAL SCHOOL LIST. 

Public normal schools not reporting in 191S. — ^JacksonviUe State Nonnal School, 
Alabama; State Colored Normal School, Alabama; Bridgeport (Conn.) City Normal 
School; Louisville (Ky.) Normal School; Shelby Normal Institute (colored), Mis- 
sissippi; Slater Industrial and State Normal School (colored), North Carolina; Croatan 
Normal College, North Carolina; Minot State Normal School, North Dakota; Bowling 
Green State Normal School, Ohio; Kent State Normal School, Ohio; Colored Agri- 
cultural and Normal University, Oklahoma. 

Public normal schools added in 191S. — Lewiston (Me.) Nonnal Training School; 
Schenectady (N. Y.) Teachers* Training School; West Tennessee State Normal School; 
Middle Tennessee State Normal School; State Agricultural and Industrial Nonnal 
School for Negroes, Tennessee. 

Transferred to private secondary list. — Lee Normal Academy, Maine; Springfield 
Normal School, Maine. 

CHANGES IN PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOL LIST. 

Private normal schools not reporting in 1913. — Pea Ridge (Ark.) Masonic College; 
Dixon (111.) College and Normal School; Nickerson College, Kansas; Fremont College, 
Nebraska; Albion Academy (colored), North Carolina; Ohio Southern Normal Col- 
lege; Institute for Colored Youth, Pennsylvania; Cherokee Normal and Industrial 
Institute (colored), South Carolina; Morristown Nonnal Academy (colored), Ten- 
nessee; George Peabody Collie for Teachers, Tennessee; East Texas Normal College. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 851 

Private normal schools added in 1913. — ^Normal college of the North American Gym- 
nastic Union, Indiana; Normal School of Physical Education, Michigan. 

Transferred to public high school list. — Jasper Normal Institute, Florida. 

Transferred to private secondary list. — ^Morehead Normal School, Kentucky; Tougaloo 
University, MiBsissippi; Albemarle Normal and Collegiate Institute, North Carolina; 
Asheville (N. C.) Normal and Collegiate Institute; Northeastern Ohio Normal School. 

Discontinued. — Orange Park Normal School (colored), Florida; Rochester Normal 
University, Indiana; Symonds Kindergarten Training School, Massachusetts. 

I'able 1. — Public normal schools: Summary ^ by States^ of schools and instructors. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



352 EDUCATION REPOET, 1W3. 

Table 2. — Public normal schooU: SumTnary of normal students and graduates and 
students in other departments. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PBIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



853 



Table 3. — Piiblxe normal schooU: Summary of elementary $tudenis^ ioidl enrdllmentf and 

pupUs in model schools. 



States. 


Pupils 


In elementary 
grades. 


Total enndlmentinaU 
departments, exclud- 
ing model schools. 


Children In 
schools. 


model 




Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


United States 


2,413 


2,640 


5,062 


23,870 


79,325 


103,Uft 


21,157 


23,355 


44,612 


North Atlantic Division 








8,545 
9,378 
8,091 
7,049 
807 


18,722 
32,365 

8,587 
13,389 

6,262 


22,267 
41,743 
11,678 
20,438 
7,069 


9,192 
6,807 
2,032 
1,602 
2,524 


9,727 
6,097 
2,778 
1,766 
2,987 


18,919 


NcHth Central Division 

Soutti Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 

WMtem Division 


81 
1,000 
1,213 

W 


100 

1,224 

1,263 

53 


181 
2,293 
2,475 

103 


11,9(M 
4,810 
3.368 
5,511 






North Atlantic Division: 
Mahi^ 








94 

1 



181 



2 

649 

41 

2,517 


882 

1,637 
714 

1,136 
314 


898 

201 

146 

2,581 

466 

810 

5,272 

1,753 

6,479 

471 
1,895 
6,177 
3,924 
4,535 
3,839 


992 

202 

146 

2,762 

466 

812 

5,921 

1,794 

8,996 

471 
2,777 
7,814 
4,638 
5,671 
4,153 


567 
334 
138 
2,259 
154 


658 
353 
156 
2,421 
183 


1,225 










687 


Vermont, t 








294 


Mawaohosetts 








4,680 


Rhode Tfllftiid t 








337 


Connecticut 










New York 








2,753 
1,386 
1,602 

482 
125 
910 
560 
1,136 
932 


2,982 
1,458 
1,516 

433 
129 
916 
594 
1,142 
1,101 


5,736 


New Jersey 








2,843 










3,118 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 








915 


Indiana 








264 


Illinois 








1,836 


Michigan 








1,154 


Wismi«ti™ 








2,277 


MlTlTi4»«M>tft., 








2,033 


Iowa 










ICiBsouri 


81 


100 


181 


1,835 
304 
300 
951 

1,306 


3.547 
1,067 
860 
2,900 
2,960 


5,382 
1,361 
1,160 
3,851 
4,265 


535 
141 
337 
287 
363 


563 
170 
386 
335 
328 


1,098 


North Dakota 


311 


Booth Dakota 








723 


Nebraska 








622 


Kansas 








691 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 










Ifarylnnd 


1 




67 
3 
856 
1,188 
411 
418 
48 


665 
274 
2,149 
1,584 
1,455 
1.218 
1,242 


732 
277 
3,006 
2,772 
1,866 
1.636 
1,290 


153 
444 

445 
201 
277 
394 
118 


148 
654 
670 
254 
286 
545 
222 


301 


District of Columbia 








1,098 


Vlrfftnift 


600 

46 

282 

241 




464 

61 

353 

327 

19 


964 
107 
635 
568 
19 


1,115 


West Virginia 


455 


North Carolina 


562 


Bonth CaroHna. 


939 


Georgia 


340 


Florida 




South Central Dhrision: 
Kentuclcy 


134 
224 
810 


144 
274 

ni 


278 

498 

1,581 


1,181 
818 

1,510 
180 
968 

1,313 
174 

1,606 

6 


1,986 
1,629 
1,946 

325 
1,316 
3,196 

239 
2,753 

194 


3,167 
2,447 
3,456 

505 
1,584 
4,508 

413 
4,358 

200 


247 
471 
280 


233 
504 
282 


480 


Tennesi^ee ..,.,,. 


975 


Alabama 


562 


Mississippi 




Louisiana . . , t , 








177 
55 


196 
110 


372 


Texas 








165 


Arkansas 


44 


74 


118 




Oklahoma. 


372 
233 


442 
227 


814 


Western Division: 

Montana 








460 


Wvnmhiir. 










clmS^ 


50 


53 


103 


145 
90 
116 


320 
160 
377 


465 
260 
492 








New Mexico 


148 
137 


135 
165 


283 


Arizona 








293 


Utah 










Nevada 




















Idaho 








127 

160 

16 

168 


629 
1,210 

189 
3,223 


756 
1,370 

206 
3,391 


180 

372 

96 

1,358 


228 
464 

104 
1,686 


406 


Wft«ihlnirton . 








836 


Oregon 








300 


California . 








3,044 









17727**— ED 1913— VOL 1 



-23 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



354 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1^13. 

Tablb 4. — Public normal schools: Summary of income. 



Stotes. 


Fees for tui- 

tion and other 

educational 

services. 


rent, and other 

noneducational 

services. 


From produc- 
tive funds. 


From State, 
county, or city. 


Total reoe^ts. 


^§ 


Amount. 


1^ 


Amount. 


^i 


Amount. 


It 

1^ 


Amount. 


1^ 


Amount. 


United States... 


146 


$1,098,412 


69 


$1,758,068 


17 


$333,815 


202 


$10,432,252 


202 


1 $14,439,061 


N. Atlantic Div 

N. Central Div 

8. Atlantic Div 

8. Central Div 

Western Div 


34 

59 
18 
23 
12 

1 


513,440 
340,451 

91,190 
123,144 

30,187 


23 

17 
12 
11 
6 


826,911 
154,616 
400,935 
299,733 
75,893 


1 
9 
3 
1 
3 


22,020 
54,364 
123,924 
95,273 
38,225 


55 
74 
25 
29 
19 


2,223,378 
4,708,447 
1,100,347 
1,306,234 
1,093,846 


55 
74 

25 
2». 
19 


3,713,906 
5,273,126 
2,140.669 
2,068,420 
1,242,940 


N. AUantIc Div.: 
UfthiA 


10 


1 


1,387 






6 
2 
2 
10 

1 
4 

13 
3 

14 


115,000 

46,370 

32,000 

642,401 

68,000 

110,390 

809.837 

165,318 

234,062 


6 
2 
2 
10 

1 
4 

1 

14 


116,397 
46,370 


N. Hampshire. . 






Vermoni 


1 
8 
1 


250 
5,884 
9,850 


2 
5 


6,250 
93,475 






42,075 


VftifdA^nMAttii.. 






742,988 


Rhode Island... 






77,850 


Connecticut 










110.390 


New York 


9 

1 
13 


3,992 

29,665 

463,780 


1 

1 
13 


973 

66,793 

668,033 






817,889 


New Jersey 






261,776 


Pennsvlvania... 
N. Central Div.: 
Ohio 


1 


22,029 


1,498,171 




1 
5 
4 
26 

4 


7,777 

22,459 

62,836 

104,569 

14,641 










2 
6 

4 

36 

6 


163,320 
1,128,863 

390.000 
1,066.146 

435,222 


2 
6 
4 

36 
6 


171,289 

1,178,295 

457,011 


TIlfPAf" 


1 


19,275 


1 
1 


6,493 
4; 175 


Michigan 


Wisconshi 


6 


43,757 


1,217,585 


Hlnnesota 


2 


1,661 


452,137 


Iowa 








Missouri 


6 
3 

t 

3 


73,966 
11,032 
16,164 
12,574 
14,433 


1 
2 
4 
3 


29,662 
24,337 
28,489 
9,096 






6 
3 

4 
4 
3 


448,227 
280,063 
201,000 
324,000 
271,606 


6 
3 
4 
4 
3 


561,980 


N.Dakota 






315. 432 


8. Dakota 

Nebraska 


4 


24,395 


270,048 
345,670 


Kanim^ 


1 


17,640 


803,679 


8. Atlantic Div.: 
Delaware 






Maryland 

Dlst. Columbia.. 


1 


3,034 










3 


59,500 


3 


66.034 










Virginia 


4 
6 
3 
1 
3 


16,990 
8,470 
25,840 
25,838 
11,018 


4 
3 
2 

1 
2 


211,536 
17,658 
71.500 
59,315 
40,926 


1 


122,864 


5 

7 
5 
2 
3 


245,730 
206,250 
240,425 
180,068 
159,374 


5 

7 
5 

I 


898,147 


W.Virginia 

N.Car^ina 

8. Carolina 


272,412 


1 


60 


346. 174 
345.584 


Georgia 


1 


1,000 


212 318 


Floma 




8. Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 


! 

7 
1 

1 
4 
2 

1 

1 


12,735 
8,534 

46,092 
2,827 

13,975 

36,220 

2,261 

500 

700 


3 
4 

1 
1 

1 
1 


40,428 
57,570 
20,000 
28,146 
73,589 
80,000 






3 

4 
7 
1 
1 
5 
2 
6 

1 


163,000 
144,229 
79,666 
60,000 
133,750 
828,600 
136,500 
270,590 

66,274 


3 

4 
7 
1 
1 
5 
2 
6 

1 


224,713 






214,833 


Alabama 

Hlssissippi 

Louisiana 


1 


96,273 


454,322 
80.973 






225.332 


Texas 






444,720 


A rkansas . . . . r . . . 






152. 437 


Oklahoma 










3n,090 


Western Div.: 
Montana 


1 


14,454 






81,428 


Wyoming 








Colorado 


1 
2 
2 


2,200 
4.805 
2,800 










1 
2 
2 


86,000 
58,000 
147,000 


1 
2 
2 


38,200 


New Mexico 

Aritona 


1 
2 


3.446 
85,000 


1 




800 


67,462 
184,800 


TTt^h 








Nevada 






















T^lftho... 


1 
2 
1 
2 


2,080 
5,133 
2.644 
9,825 






2 


37,425 


2 

3 

1 
7 


85,250 
232,231 

37,700 
431,391 


2 
3 

1 
7 


124.755 


Washington 

Oregon 


2 


22,993 


962,415 






40,344 


Camomia 










443,536 















* Includes $816,4M from other sources than those here mentioned. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PKIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 355 

Table 5. — Pxiblic normal schools: Summary of property. 



States. 


1 

1 


Number of 

volumes in 

libraries. 


Value of librae 

ries, scientific 

apparatus, 

machinery, 

and furniture. 


Value of 


Value of 
buOdings. 


Productive 
funds. 


if 
r 


-< 


ii 


-< 


i. 


-< 


i. 


*i 


United States. 


227 


1,488,217 


187 


$6,106,109 


173 


17,725,991 


188 


139,437,818 


10 


$4,960,894 


NorthAtlanticDiv.. 
NorthCentralDiv.. 
South Atlantic DIv.. 
South Central Div.. 
Western Division 


79 
78 
26 
27 

17 


384,339 
675, 195 
133,350 
152.315 
143,018 


49 
73 
22 
26 
17 


1,452,870 

2,680,667 

854,687 

621.180 

495.705 


40 
61 
26 
28 
18 


1,405,755 
2,996,752 
1,052,841 
1,035,393 
1,236,250 


51 
65 
26 
29 

17 


12,809,183 
13,850.914 
4,969,266 
5,071,733 
2,736,722 


1 

5 
1 
3 


5,000 

317,226 

2,642,602 

1,986.066 




'■ 





NorthAtlanticDiv.: 
Maine 


6 
2 
1 

11 
1 
4 

16 
3 

15 

4 

3 
6 
5 
34 
5 


00 
00 
00 
12 
00 
53 
01 
00 
73 

5,180 
62,300 

123.782 
86,929 

119,371 
46, 118 


6 
1 

1 
7 
1 
3 

14 
3 

13 


55,800 

5,000 

5,000 

344,659 

155,000 

65,000 

286,184 

78,408 

457,819 


6 

1 
1 
8 
1 
3 
9 
2 
9 

1 
1 
6 
5 
23 
5 


00 
00 
00 
64 
00 
00 
36 
00 
55 

20,000 
190,000 
855,000 
177,852 
412,300 
335,600 


6 
1 
2 

10 
1 
3 

12 
2 

14 

1 
1 
6 
5 
25 
6 


475,000 

98,000 

50,000 

2,903,445 

550,000 

450,000 

2,643,386 

401,431 

5,237,921 

225,000 

585,000 

3,190,200 

939,092 

2,468,132 

1,607,800 






New Hampshire. 






Vermont 






Massachusetts. . . 






Rhode Island. . . 






Connecticut 






New York 






New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . . 


1 


5,000 


North Central Div.: 
Ohio 






Indiana 


2 
6 
4 
36 
5 


250,666 
265,310 
312,513 
853,731 
151,800 






nihiois 


1 


106,226 


Michigan 

Wisconsin 






Minnesota 






Iowa 






Missouri 


7 
3 
4 
4 
3 


98,647 
24,210 
25,200 
43,000 
40,458 


7 
8 
8 
4 
3 


228,304 
138,384 
103,725 
176,000 
200,300 


7 
3 
4 
3 
3 


437,300 
44,700 

183,000 
40,000 

300,000 


7 
3 
4 
4 
3 


2,106,390 
796,000 
613,300 
570,000 
750.000 






North Dakota... 






South Dakota... 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Div.: 
Delaware 


2 

1 
1 


102,000 
80,000 
27,000 


Maryland 


4 

1 
5 
6 
5 
2 
3 


12,950 

1,000 
46,020 
33,550 

9,969 
16,183 
13,678 


2 

1 
5 
6 
8 
2 
8 


32,500 

3,000 
326,500 
166,731 
35,000 
119,456 
171,500 


3 

1 
5 
7 
5 
2 
3 


87,000 

60,000 
199,500 
341,550 

97,000 
152,791 
165,000 


3 

1 
5 
7 
5 
2 
8 


275,000 

256,000 
1,591,000 
533,930 
821,600 
904,736 
587,000 






Distrtet of Co- 
lumbia 






Virginia. 

West Virginia... 


I 


2,642,602 


North Carolhia.. 






South Carolina. . 






Oeoivia 






Fiorfla.. .:::::: 






South Central Div.: 
Kentucky 


3 
2 

7 


12,400 

3,975 

42,555 


8 
3 

7 
1 

1 
4 
2 
5 

1 


80,814 
85,000 

100,385 
42.000 
79,278 

124,036 
11,600 
98,167 

24,200 


2 
4 

7 

1 
1 
5 
2 
6 

1 


131,169 
250,000 
264,724 
40,000 
15,000 
95.500 
24,000 
215,000 

10,000 


3 

4 
7 
1 
1 
5 
2 
6 

1 


642,485 
975,000 
1,358,922 
326,000 
347,008 
612,318 
90,000 
720,000 

900,000 






Tenneifjiee. ...... 






Alabama 

Mississippi 


2 


1,958,066 


Louisiana 


2 
5 
2 
6 

1 


9,462 
48,100 

6,600 
29,223 

7,662 






Texas 






Arkansas 

Oklahoma 


1 


98,000 


Western Division: 
M^ontana 






WvomfauF 






cdorado?::::::: 


1 
2 
2 


4,000 
9,700 
9,000 


1 
2 
2 


8,000 
27,000 
69,000 


1 
2 
2 


5,000 
70,300 
63,000 


1 
2 
2 


55,666 

139,800 
367,000 






New Mexico. . . . 






Arizona ,, 






Utah 






Nevada 






















T^ftho 


2 
2 

1 
6 


13,062 
19,000 
3.200 
77,894 


2 
3 

1 
5 


66,955 

89,442 

10,000 

901,106 


2 
3 

1 
6 


53,950 
128,000 

15,000 
901,000 


2 
3 

1 
5 


338,172 
562,000 
100,000 
974,750 






Washfaigton 










Caluomia 








1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



356 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 6. — Review ofpubliQ normal school ttalxMtia, 
APPROPRIATIONS FROH STATE, COUNTY, AND CITY FOR SUPPORT. 



States. 



1907-8 



19(»-« 



190»-10 



1910-11 



1911-12 



1913-13 



United States | S4,627,680 $5,847,047 



$6,630,357 $6,368,761 



North Atlantic Divbian. 
North Central Division. . 
Sooth Atlantic Division. . 
Soath Central Division. . . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 



New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

- Pennsylvania 

North Central Diviskm: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

lUfaiols 

Midiigan 

Wisc(«isin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dalcota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kft P^ i ^ 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Distrfct Qf Columbia. 

Virginia,. 

West Virginia 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florfia 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana. 



Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah. 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington. . 

Oregon 

Calnomia 



1,561,878 
332,881 
378,434 

1,728.619 
625,868 



28,660 
23,000 
23,707 

383,783 
64,000 
65,605 

705,058 
75,000 

192,985 

75,057 

14,649 

315,487 

24.766 

293,961 

225,250 

136,750 

238,432 

74,406 

94,300 

80.300 

155,262 



30,000 



40,000 
44,960 
122,355 
60,035 
30,000 
5,531 

96,000 

"66,* 874* 



30,000 
85,650 
14,500 
83,410 

30,800 



80,000 
33.500 
57,600 



44,200 
119,000 

37,500 
223,368 



1,766,066 
463.718 
476,339 

2,461,257 
679,667 



1,993,475 
491,036 
506,945 

2,988,437 
650,464 



41,200 
25,000 
26,863 
377,838 
68,000 
91,768 
810,537 
127,500 
197,370 

91,341 
128,551 
433,487 
312,000 
253,863 
211,450 
136,750 
430,700 

94,715 
111,800 
118.700 
138,000 



47,200 

25,000 

29,100 

367,136 

68,000 

103,768 

934,417 

150,750 

268,104 

96,312 
142,736 
458,993 
345,000 
608,462 
290,360 
155,000 
317,620 
118,745 
132,500 
128,700 
194,000 



35,000 



35,000 



71,000 

116,600 

124,355 

76,763 

35,000 

5,000 

96,006 



97,820 
119,550 
109,250 
82,416 
42,000 
5,000 

107,000 



66,500 
1,339 
44,000 
97,500 
26,600 
142,500 

35,000 



53,870 
1,239 
44,000 
97,000 
43,600 
160,236 

14,335 



75,000 
21,750 
57,500 
23,000 



80,000 
21,750 
57,000 



44,030 
175,535 

25,000 
222,852 



61,750 

134,250 

5,000 

276,379 



$7,553,315 



$7,797,398 



1,481,309 
553,561 
696,456 

2,949,671 
687,704 



1,796,566 

3,430,323 

617,519 

930,792 

776,116 



73,250 
43,892 
19,000 
410,777 
64,000 
117,058 
441,824 
156,000 
154,668 

135,171 
133,115 
355,994 
871,234 
636,912 
227,875 



74,174 

43,570 

22,213 

434,615 

6i>000 

116,277 

570,531 

159,000 

314,186 

148,965 
165,628 
526,466 
380,000 
615,366 
237,780 



411,630 
195,070 
131,500 
237,670 
313,500 



506,845 
167,063 
145,500 
281,230 
257,000 



85,000 



54,532 



101,400 
140,427 
128,304 
101,430 
42,000 
5,000 

102.256 



107,730 
106,370 
145,971 
114,416 
89,500 



57,000 
1,200 

44,000 
184,500 

68,800 
238,700 

8,413 



163.260 
85,985 
77,515 
1,200 
67,500 

100,500 
66,000 

338,893 

41,820 



80,000 
46.000 
67,500 



36,000 
40,400 
67,000 



65,993 
105,000 



324,800 



85,250 
172,500 

33,795 
299,350 



1.654,967 
3.446,412 

740,293 
1,073,484 

882.237 



81,000 

46.370 

20,000 

464,401 

68,000 

110,390 

485,456 

165,318 

214,032 



163,320 
530,913 
885,000 
730,933 
274,867 



422,210 
272,503 
141,000 
254.000 
271,606 



34,500 



154,230 
180,750 
149,435 
106,888 
114,500 



163,000 

144,229 
79,665 
50,000 
72,500 

303,500 
90.000 

270,500 

41,820 



36,000 
58.000 
90,000 



85,250 
204,041 

36.200 
330,926 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUO AND PBIVATE NOBMAL SCHOOLS. 



367 



Table 7. — Review of public normal school statistics, 
PUBLIC APPROPRIATIONS FOR BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



States. 


1907-8 


1906-9 


1909-10 


1910-11 


1911-12 191»-13 


United States 


13,420,990 


$3,196,230 


$2,635,838 


$1,718,990 


$1,701,291 


$2,634,859 




Nprth Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 

South Atlahtio Division 

South Central Division 

Western Division .... 


118,940 
117, 418 
406,850 
1,975,329 
803,453 


792,651 
206,717 
478,100 
1,374,412 
344,350 


712,757 
160,453 
119,500 
1,067,912 
575,216 


255,568 
186,763 
143,400 
820,171 
313,088 


152,006 
807,020 
143,424 
181,797 
32^,954 


568,411 
1,262,035 
360,054 
232,750 
311,600 




North Atlantic Division: 


2,750 




60,800 


17,800 


7,000 


34,000 


N^w HftTnpffhire 


2,000 




Vermont 


2,500 
94,000 


1,200 


20,000 
175,000 




12,000 
178,000 


Massachusetts 


6,350 


82,000 


HhoH9 TMAnH . . . 






Connertlmit. . . , , 


35,333 
52,507 


65,000 
551,037 










New York 


5^,643 
5,000 
60,114 

66,886 


42,768 




324,381 


New Jersey 




Pennsylvania... . 


30,000 

54,000 

99,970 
291,500 
313,500 

66,759 
197,800 

60,800 
653,000 

50,000 

136,000 

7,000 

45,000 


80,114 

45,000 
99,970 

100,000 

174,000 
58,235 

311,500 
60,800 

2n,500 
30,802 
46,000 
90,000 
80,605 




63,006 
56,700 


20,030 


North Central Division: 

Ohio 


17,376 






in\m\n 


107,014 
36,000 

231, 130 

151,175 
66,000 

202,500 
50,302 
31,000 
50,000 
75,805 


28,071 
26,500 
98,075 
156,000 


194,735 

6,500 

164,800 

97,860 


697,950 

5,000 

335,213 

160,355 


Michigan 


Wisccmsin... 


Minv^ewtf^ 


Iowa 


M<«^onH. ,. 


187,250 
81,399 
8,000 

166,000 
52,500 


125,500 
46,731 
38,000 
96,000 
70,204 


26,017 

7,500 

60,000 

. 70,000 


North Dakota... . 


South Dakota 


Nebraska 


Kan.saff.. . 


South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 




MfwyUnrt . 












25,000 


District of Columbia 














VlrglnU. . . 


27,000 
12,050 
36,868 
41,500 


41,000 
45,500 
35,168 
70,049 
15,000 


51,700 
11,150 
34,666 
62,037 


50,666 
73,758 
30,300 
12,706 


20,000 
17,500 
26,400 
34,650 
44,874 


9i,566 

25,500 
91,000 


West Virginia 


North Cairolina 


South Carolina 


82,180 
44,874 


Georgia 


Florida 






20,000 


South Central Division: 

Kentucky 


300,000 


315,000 




17,500 




q>nneff^ 








A^^1ltn|^ 


16,100 


1,100 






^ 




• IflmiMfppi 










T'OntsiaiiA . 


48,000 
33,750 


40,000 
21,000 






30,297 
114,000 


61,250 
125,000 
46,500 


Texas 


46,666 
37,500 
36,000 


46,466 
37,000 
60,000 

15,716 


Arkansas^ . 


Oklahoma 


8,000 
81,177 


101,000 


20,000 
24,454 


Western Division: 

Montana 


24,454 


Wyoming . 








Colorado. 


20,000 
10,000 
95,000 


30,000 


100,000 


100,000 






New Mexico 






AritofiA- ,, 


47,500 


20,000 


10,000 


13,000 


57,000 


Utah. 




Nevada 














Idaho. 


40,000 
170,500 


28,850 
78,000 


28,850 
14,000 


56,375 
11,000 






Washington,. 


10,000 


28,190 


Oregon 


1,500 


Calliomia 


386,776 


160,000 


412,366 


119,997 


270,500 


100,465 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



858 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 8. — Private rwrmal achooU: Summary, by States, of schooU and instructors. 



states. 



Schools 
report- 
ing. 



Teachers for normal 
students. 



Male. 



Fe- 
mate. 



Total. 



Teachers wholly for 
other departments. 



ICale. 



Fe- 
male. 



Total. 



Total number teach- 
ers employed. 



Male. 



Fe- 



Total. 



United States 

. North Atlantic Pivislon. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

^hio 

Indiana 

niinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Booth Atlantic Division: 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

NorUi Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Western Division: 

Colorado 

California * 



54 



185 



253 



146 



165 



311 



321 



418 



749 



12 
141 
16 
14 
2 



60 
136 
32 
19 
6 



72 
277 
48 
33 

8 



42^ 

4 I 
8 
18 

29 
107 
43 
44 
14 

4 
12 

8 
11 

5 

14 

2 

4 
21 

2 

5 



26 
133 
110 



20 
218 
65 
25 
3 



78 
192 
93 
47 
8 



98 
410 
158 
72 
11 



42 

7 
10 
39 

34 
170 
64 
48 
22 
16 
19 
8 
13 
16 

63 
20 
26 
32 
5 
12 

19 
S 
30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



85^ 



Tablb 9. — Private normal school: Summary of normal students and graduates and 

students in other courses. 



states. 


Students in normal 
departments. 


Normal graduates. 


Students in busi- 
ness courses. 


Other students In 
secondary grades. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 

male. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


TotaL 


United States.... 


2,253 


5,030 


7,283 


448 


906 


1,444 


179 


114 


293 


738 


488 


1,166 


North Atlantic Div 


94 

1,656 

337 

156 

10 


667 

8,402 

'737 

189 

35 


761 
5,058 
1,074 

345 
45 


27 
884 

27 
10 



284 

609 

78 

14 

11 


311 
993 
105 
24 
11 








41 
527 
57 

78 
25 


54 

255 

68 

56 

5 


95 


North Central Div 

South Atlantic Div. . . . 

South Central Div 

Western Division 


135 
20 
24 


75 
25 
14 


210 
45 
38 


782 

125 
134 
30 












North Atlantic Div.: 
Massachusetts 





M 

86 

907 

196 

83 

29 

28 

283 



26 



U 
65 
16 

111 
6 

128 

73 
18 
66 

10 



268 
25 
80 

294 

131 
2,084 

381 

207 
26 
39 

355 
36 

138 
5 

28 
100 

47 

242 

8 

312 

110 
22 
57 

10 
25 


268 
25 
80 

388 

166 
3,081 

577 

290 
55 
67 

618 
36 

163 
6 

39 
166 

63 
353 

14 
440 

183 
40 
122 

20 
25 





27 

15 
317 

25 

4 

10 

11 

2 


7 
9 


133 
7 

38 
106 

36 
852 
69 
60 
7 

26 
32 
14 
12 
1 

16 
22 


133 
7 

38 
133 

51 
669 
94 
60 
11 
36 
43 
14 
14 
1 

23 
31 














Connecticut 














New York 














Pennsylvania 

North Central Div.: 
Ohio 








41 

120 
173 


M 


120 


95 








120 


Indiana .-- 


68 
25 


53 
13 


121 
38 


293 


Illinois 




Michigan 









Wisconsin 


23 





23 


89 
138 
57 


9 
63 
63 


48 


ifinnesota 


201 


Iowa 


19 


9 


28 


120 


Missouri 




South Dakota 














Nebraska 














South AUantic Div.: 
Virgtaia 








19 


29 


48 


West Virginia 

North Carolina. . 
















24 
12 

i 


17 

1 


41 


South Carolina 


1 

10 



10 


17 
5 
18 

4 

5 
5 


18 
5 
28 

4 
6 
15 








27 


Georgia 


20 


25 


45 


9 


FlorWa 




South Central Div.: 
Kentucky 


14 
10 


1 


20 

18 


28 
50 


31 
25 


59 


i>nne»flee 


75 


Alabama. . . . 




Western Division: 
Colorado 








25 


5 


80 


California 





11 


11 


























Digitized by VjOOQIC 



860 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 10. — Private normal schooU: Summary of elementary pupUsy total enrollmerU^ 

and pupils in model schools. 



States. 


Pupils in elementary 
grades. 


Enrollment in all depart- 
ments, excluding 
model schools. 


Children in model 
achoob. 




Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


United States 


788 


1,137 


1,925 


3,603 


6,100 


9,703 


1,674 


1,867 


3,541 


North Atlantic Division. . 








135 
2,385 
602 
446 
35 


721 
8,794 
1,058 

487 
40 


866 
6,179 
1,660 

933 
75 


181 
824 
190 
809 
170 


154 
902 
233 

398 
180 


3S5 


North Central Division . . . 
Soath Atlantic Division. . 
South Central Division . . . 
Western Division 


67 
533 
188 


62 

847 
228 


129 

1,380 

416 


1,726 
423 
707 
350 




^^^^__ 







North Atlantic Division: 
Massachusetts 














135 

155 

1,241 

231 

83 

101 

166 

339 



39 

40 

261 
75 

118 

307 
58 

128 

215 
78 
153 

35 



268 
25 
80 

348 

131 

2,267 

381 

207 

35 
102 
427 

86 
154 

51 

244 
119 
222 
661 
119 
312 

272 
55 
170 

15 
25 


268 
25 
80 

483 

286 
3,508 
612 
290 
136 
^8 
766 

36 
193 

91 

505 
194 
840 
968 
177 
440 

487 
133 
823 

50 
25 








Connecticut 








8 

8 

•165 

15 
393 
27 
125 
96 
80 
30 


25 

12 

117 

18 
454 
28 
150 
74 
70 
28 


3S 


New York 








20 










282 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 








8S 


Tndliwfi..,. 


3 





3 


847 


Illinois 


55 


Michigan 








275 


Wisconsin.. 


*■ io 





10 


170 


MfnnA^tA 


150 


Iowa .... 








58 


Missouri 










South DakoU 

Nebraslta 

South Atlantic Division: 
Virvinf^ 


14 
40 

231 
10 

78 
184 
30 


16 
46 

187 

19 

158 

404 

79 


30 

86 

418 
29 
236 
588 
109 


38 
20 

38 


50 
80 

50 


f8 
88 


WeitVirginia 

North Cw)lina 

Bduih Carolina 




47 


60 


107 


Georgia 








Florida 


110 

83 
159 
67 

""'Ito' 


123 

86 
232 
80 

m 


233 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


100 


115 


215 


169 


Tennessee 


891 


Alabama 


88 


113 


201 


147 


Western Division: 

Colorado 




California 








350 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PXJBLIO AND PBIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 361 

Table 11. — Private normal schooh: Summary of income. 



States. 


Fees for 
tuition and 

other 
educational 

servk»s. 


Board, room 

rent, and 

other pon- 

educational 

services. 


From 

productive 

funds. 


From private 
benefactions. 


From all 

Other 
sources. 


Total 
receipts. 




•33 

1^ 


< 


It 


-< 


I* 


•5 


If 


< 


1- 


•g 

< 


■ft 


< 


United States 


35 


1213,182 


18 


$100,483 


10 


129,463 


15 


1199,899 


14 


$72,022 


40 

7 

19 
8 
4 
2 

2 
1 
4 

2 
5 
3 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

1 
1 


>$625,299 


N. Atlantic Div 


15 


20,414 
153,810 
17,514 
12,894 
8,550 






2 

4 
3 

1 


9,598 
9,660 
8 635 
1,570 


1 
6 
6 
2 


1,200 
80,635 
92,258 
25,806 


1 
8 
3 
2 


1,304 
26,519 
37,371 

6,828 


32,516 


N. Central Div 

8. Atlantic Div 

B. Central Div 

Western Div 


11 
5 
2 


67,881 
29,358 
3,744 


338,005 

1195,386 

60,842 

8,550 




_^ 


. 


=*= 










=r-. 






N. Atlantic Dhr.: 
Massachosetts.... 




4,800 
2,793 
12,821 

11,000 
90,227 
25 975 
11,672 










4,800 


Connecticut 


















2,793 


Pennsylvania 

N. Central Div.: 
Ohio 






2 


9,598 


1 


1,200 


1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 


1,304 

233 
8,179 

911 
8,691 
8,005 
10,500 


24,923 






11,233 


Indiana r . - 


2 
3 
1 


5,221 

36,594 

625 


1 


689 


1 
1 


23,700 
20,000 


128,016 


TllfTintA 


83,480 


Michigan 






15,988 


Wisconsin 


1 


8,806 


1 
1 


8,455 
12,000 


20,260 


Minnesota 




2,500 
3 865 
2,440 
6,131 


2 
1 


8,373 
2,194 


33,373 


Iowa 






6,059 


Missouri 














2,440 


South Dakota. . . 


1 
1 

1 
1 


13,874 
500 

17,373 
8,360 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


130 
35 

1,664 
2,164 
4,257 


1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


5,850 
10,630 

50,681 
3,128 

30,701 

6,950 

800 






25,986 
U,165 

M03,657 

» 29, 847 

37, 107 


Nebraska 






8. Atlantic Div.: 

Virginia 

West Virginia.... 
North Carolina... 




4,483 
1532 
2,149 
2,300 
250 
6,800 

7,649 
4,212 
1,033 

6,000 
2,550 


1 

1 


28,960 
8,165 


South Carolina 


2 
1 


3,250 
375 


1 


250 


* 13,550 


Georgia 


1 


550 


•2,525 


FlorWa !.... 






•8,800 


8. Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 


1 


2,780 






1 


3,550 






13,979 






1 
1 


6,528 
300 


10, 740 


Alabama. 


1 


• 964 


1 


1,570 


1 


22,256 


26,123 


Western Div.: 

Colorado 


6,000 


California 


















2,550 























1 Includhig $10,250 from State, county, or city. 
* Indudhig $400 from State. 
» Including $6,500 from State. 



* Including $800 from city. 

* Including $550 from SUte. 

* Including $2,000 from county. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



362 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 12. — Private normal schools: Summary of property. 



States. 


1 


B 

'sl 

1 


Value libra- 
ries, scientific 
apparatus, 
machinery, 
and furniture. 


Value of 


Value of 
buildings. 


Productive 
funds. 




1^ 


1 


1^ 
It 


< 


1* 


1 


1^ 

|i 


< 


United States 


47 


99,456 


35 


$216,244 


24 


$251,352 


29 


$1,660,064 


14 


$737,025 






North Atlantic Division 

North Centitd Division... 


9 
25 
8 
3 
2 


5,425 
70,844 
13,575 
8,112 
1,500 


4 

20 
6 
3 
2 


7.500 
148, 442 
37,981 
19,471 

2,850 


2 
12 
6 
3 

1 


15,000 
106,800 
89,515 
20,037 
20,000 


2 
16 


70,000 
1,018,500 
458,152 
83,412 
30,000 


1 
9 
3 
1 


200,000 

354,768 

147,319 

34,938 


South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 


Western Division 


North Atlantic Division: 

Massachusetts 


3 

1 
1 
4 

4 

4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

2 

1 


640 

525 

328 

3,932 

6,100 
22,273 
9,090 
6,206 
14,500 
5,000 
3,100 
100 
2,475 
2,000 

2,200 

5,000 

5,300 

400 

175 

500 

1,112 
7,000 


1 


300 










~ 




Connecticut 














New York 




















3 

4 

5 
3 
1 

1 
2 
2 


7,200 

13,800 

71,557 

34,600 

1,450 

8,500 

10,000 

5,500 


2 

2 
3 
2 


15,000 

6,300 
21,000 
52,000 




70,000 

117,000 
288,000 
300,000 


1 

1 
3 
2 


200,000 

4,000 
53,700 
101,500 


n: 










■ 








1 
1 


189,968 
2,700 




2 

1 


13,500 
2,000 




140,000 
58,000 












1 
1 

1 
1 


2,535 
500 

28,431 
7,500 


1 

1 

1 


7,000 
6,000 

44,515 


} 


70,500 
45,000 

88,309 
175,000 
121,843 

85,000 
3,000 

35,000 

50,000 


1 


2,900 






on: 


1 
1 
1 


46,834 




63,370 
37,106 




1 
2 

1 
1 

2 


22,000 
12,000 
7,000 
4,000 

15,000 




2 

1 
1 

2 


050 
500 
600 

2,050 














n: 














1 

1 
1 


16,521 

2,000 
850 


1 

1 


5,037 
20,000 


1 


33,412 
30,000 


1 


84,038 




1 

1 


1,000 
500 























Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 363 

Table 13. — Distribution of students pursuing teachers'* training courses — Percentage of 
male and female students and of graduates. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



364 educatio;n repobt, 1913. 

'ieamoo x«mioa iq «ne a St 



•^<*'*<*'*'*««w<*'*e««e«e«e«e« 



e«e«e«c«e«e«e«Me«e«e«c« 









'aXBino^ 



S 



S 



•afpijf 



S^tSSSS 



S : i^S^ssSe : :§ iggH 



S 






jgSSSSB 



^^!S{;SS§ 



*ai«iii8j 



'^ajs^^s'^s^S'^ffgissgs s!5ssssjja2 



•9l«Il 



»-4e«o»-4^o»oo<oio<Mr«ao^ooco>o o^oo»-40C«*ho 



29 



1 



1 



2 



its 



'spnndj 



•3t«H 



ooo •» -^ 



*8|91II9J 



goog55«g55g 






•»n»ii 



S3®®8^2gS85: 






'ax^moj 



■^oo • 't^r* 



•aiBH 



•aiBoxoj 



sg|2s$sg2g2s|sg|g3; siggsssggsgg 



•aiBH 



*S5®c5SS"*S8S22$S8'^®5"* •2»-ioo.Hoeoojoogg 



lis 8 



'0I«nioj 



8g|sgsgs|saggsg|gs igggsiaggsga 



egs 



St 



•«T«Il 



5g®!5gSgS??228Sae?'"®5"* g-oo^ocoojoogg 



'apnnoj 



e«o>oeoeoto .<e«»o-^eceo»QO-^£5« t« ^ a h- <d jh a» ao a •« ao t^ 

•H »H •H • »H ^ ^ C* r>< CO CQ K9 CI ^H »S 



•ai«H 



coobcoevioi^ 



1 06 r« a» M v^ r« «D <-< »-4 o^«mc«oe«iHeo^»io 



'ai«raaj 



«22«2;:S*2*^''2»5?8S8* :::c3*!oas**89s*^ 



•&[9Ji 



eooeo«M5ooj|»oc;jo»t^o»t^jHr*«Dj2' 



0^<DC«COOC90)<0>OakOO 






2 




lllllillllilijiil llllillili 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PBIVATE ITOBMAL SCHOOLS. 



365 



e«e«e>ime«e«c<«e«^e«c«e«e«eo '«^c«e«e«^e«c<«e«e«e«c«meoc«co^e«e«e«e«c«e<e«e<c«c«coe4e4e«c«e4e«e«« 



SS :§§§ 


igS^iSga SS ijSff 




S8S 




39S| igS 


2SiS8§S i2S8|S|8| 


Si jiS§ 


:§g3S552 S8g iSg 




SSR 




ssag 


§s 


SSiiSSs isaggssss 






SS'«2ng8<=>*=*SS«53S;: S8*=*«« 


iO eo v^ CO CO 1-4 00 » 1^ <o 1-4 r« c« <««. 2 2 •-• 1^ 














000 








s s 


0000000000000000000000000000000000 














000 








9 3 


0000000000000000000000000000000000 










§3000 


ii 


5 S 


0000000000^0^0000000000000U200;«0000 










ggOOO 


gs 


8 « 


000 000000 0000 0000000000 ooogooraoooo 




- 


- 




00 jooo 




•« 


c« 


0000000000000000000000000000000000 






CO jooo 




g; 


^ 


0000000000000000000000000000000000 



§§Siiia§iSsg|S ig3«SRSSs82a3s?sgS8S2ss§|gssssg|||§5 



ggogsi^^lisgssj ll'SSS" 



O»O<<«»oeO>MC<««^<SS3OC2OOOT-(OSPOC<«OQQ2<0<X>'«<-4«-4iO 



*S«SS^®9 



ooi-4t;.e«vHe20oa<Qoe«»oao £«»oc«c«f-i'«.-4oc«^^<«<«c«to«i»c«or«i-4io<<««a»io<o>^t>a»t^««od»e<o ^ 

8 

S2as^8$^2a^ss2« 2a8;:i2^a«>*>2'^«^2^^2'°a'-^aasags^ **88:s^S2s2a § 

oo«b-c»e5«co-^o«D^o«3g eoooc«cii-((OiHe«c««i4«-i<«i^c<«D(ooc9or«ioio-^a»t^o«-ii^o>»^cQ<oa6e«o 5 

nninnnniNninnniyininlnnnnnHnr 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



366 EDUCATION SEPOBT, 1913. 



a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



367 



C4 e« C4 e« M M 04 C9 M CI C4 C« C« lO ^ ^ C« M -^ C« 04 C« C« CI C« C< CI M C) C« e« CI 04 -<r-<«i '<• '^ ^ CI C4 "T -^^ •« -"f '^ C« C4 CI -^ -^l* ^ 



*H*-t<^i-4 • eq M *-< fH CO CI C4 • «-• • ••-• -CI ••-• «-i »h c» • i-i «-ii-it^ • . *•* 



S^^g :|gSogSg| jSSS^ :S :gS :| ig^SSSS^SSSgS^gS j^SSsS^I :S :S|g 



0<DW3i-(«^»-4iOCIf-iOOOOtHCO joOCIOa«4'OOOOOCOC|iO<-i<D<D'«2CSSSSS^®SS'~'cSSS®!3^J^^2S 



0000000000<^r;00 'O 'OOOOOOOOOOOOO 'OOOOO 'O 'OOOOOOOO 



OOOOO 0000C4000 'O •OOOOOOOOOOOOO lOOOOO 'O 'OOOOOOOO 



8§SS®«SS§ 



OOOOOi0»-4OOQ0OOOOOOOOOQ»SOOO^OOOOOO3*Oc9OOOOOOOO 



ggOOOJgOOOOOgOeOC 



Q^'^QOO-^^«OOOOO-<«iClOC«^Ot0OOOOOOOgh>OOO|2OOOCIOO^O00OOOOOOOO 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOU3>0OOOt»OOOOOOOOOOOO*0a0OO00OOr«OMOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOOOiOO'«OO«OOc9OOOOOOOOOOOOO«0OOOOOOeoO*QOOOOOOOO 



Ot«t«*O»-4MiO«-iOOOO9S^O«0 



Cl«-«tHP 



■*U'^:i 



ggjjo««55 



OOOOO 



85l2SSS:2SS88g®*=>5j22888*='So®f:Sa 

^^ C"l •^ ^H ^ fH ph r^ pH Ol ^^ Ol •^ fH rH f^ Oi ^^ 



sig8sSiSS-SS5l;5||g^S§g55S§S55S||g||||2§§2g58§g||Sg-:5||§ 



gl2S5o'^'^SSS®®®°2S§®«5§2 



ooooooo^r^^'^'tDoO'^ 



§§S52SSg3|8r°gsS8S»fc»5§$ 



akt0kOb>cot>^<oc^^-'<ociroccr«^t>-ccci«ocsro<o^r«^^oa»^oot^«^<-ia6eo»oiH<Deor:eQco»oao>QOf-ieoo» ih 

t>4r-«Cl^>-JCIi-('-*<H M3 CO !-• i-< •-lCli-<*-*i-< eo »-*.^oo '^•^'^g 

■ r^ 

a6ict»t«o)U300-^OiH»-4eo<Hco-^^eo'-40o*H<->*<3«->oocio^ci'^a»«oocoocicicoot»ci<-40«e<-i<Doa»'<<«'^ ^ 



»h-t»b-o>»oooo«-^»H«-ieot^c9^'-;t^oa6^»Mt-eoo«Hop»-«Oi-^o»«ooe«90o»c«eoor>.«o«*0'*ciooi^'«« 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



3^8 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



*88raoax«auoa iq tn^x Z* 



«q^ ^e«eic«e«e«c<«c<«e« <«i^^^ eoe 



«e<«io •■«e«^e«e>«e« 



i ^8 



*8l«ni9j 



Sog mSSooSS^gco S 



•ai«H 



sg §ss^3sr:s§s; ;; 



sssgg :^ISS« 






lees's 



*0[«UI9J 



8^ SS$$S; 



•9[»lf 



*8 ®S 



ooeoioM 



S8 



g|«8 S^SSS^SSS^SSS 



S®SS3 S 



ooooooo«oao<«if-i«0 



8*3- 



\ 



I 



^0* 



§1| 



eg". 



'ar^niiaj 



•0t«H 



'afvnraj 



•0t«H 



*9{VUI4J 



•0t«H 



Se! 



ss 



oS 



siS'S 



»|-S 



'atpnoaj 



S^ i§S§§S8§8 %^^i §-8§sg|s|||s 



•oi»H 



=^8 *=>2SSS§f2S« §511 § 



ooooaoo 



issss!; 



O ^ Q u. 

:z;8 



'aprai9j 



IS §§S§§§^i§ §1^1 l&3§§g§3^§§S 



•at«H 



^2 ®S^SS|S2§ §111 g*=*®^®g<=»5S8g5 



I 



'ofvnioj 



t^eo 55'**<>g;3*^$5g'^ S23** 2*^*eJS :2**8S3*^* 



III 



•»l«jf 



aot^ b- C9 C9 c« « C4 MS p^ »-4 c«io<H<H «oc9c«a»c« ;cOi-ioor«t^ 



*9{Via8j 



W^ QO-^0»^C>4C900 CI«-^« 00 to 06 t^ «0 M lO »M dio C4 00 

»oi-» «o •-» «^ •-• f-t »-<.-» e* »-• i-<»-(»M»M ^^ C4 1-4 1^ f-4 (M e>« r-« f-4 



i»o o c« r^ M (O M >c CO r« 

« 1-1^ tH iXr^f-t 



«De<<e<<o»ogioa»o^r^t^ 



I 



n 



: :^ 



II 



It 

ll 
If 



I 

CO 



J 



I 



PJCQ 






^ijrf 




:> :5 if :•§ : 

I «l|!!|ill llll glllllilllll 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUO AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 369 



8 

I 

S 

CQ 



17727**— ED 1913— VOL 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



870 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



1 



■si 



8>. 

CO o 



.S'B 



m 



•^ « 2 o £ .2 ~ 

00^ gcSs 




u^s^ Is §i9§g§giRi§ §§!§§ 

assy's t;g ssgsss§9!;s3 ssiaas 






§§§§§ §§ §§§§§§gi§l§ §§§§§ 



[§§11 §§ §§§§§ 



ss 



§§ 
9!; 



S§ 



I 



I 



n 

•< 



•3= 



§§§§§ §§ §§§§g 



s'SiS 



§§ 



:38 



§§§ 






ass"'"'^e3 sf5 «;^'''«*2g" 



fSISfSS -^^8 



3»S 



38 



&ii 






"3,5 J S'^-^'S 



§§§§§ §i §§§§! 



ssas 



sc 






mmi 






iggSI §§§§11: 81 




iS :5 






'^a go 



o> 



<l:^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FUBLIO AND PBIVATE KOBMAL SCHOOLS. 



371 



§§§§ giili 






ilsSiS § s § 



"Sg^SS s § § 



QO^eook 



9S 






28 









§g§l§ 



§§si§§ § § § 



28 



§§ § 



58S" 






i 

a 
& 

I 
s 



gill 



S R 



'sa 



ill 



BiSis i § g 



i*o cor* 



§§§§§§§ 



3sW iMm 



§sgfi^ 8 2 S 
ooo>o o o> o 



SR"? 



ga s- 



^§ 



S25;ggSJ28 



§1 

5 § 



S"'^5?s sa^sas" 



82S2 



§ § 



8S 



§§§§§ 

sssss 



»-^S5?S SSiJ^S 



§S82 g g fio 
f85S5?f 5 5 K^ 



§1 

8SS 



c8cSSc) 



8 
B 



§§§§ 






IS§ § § i§ 



Jr;ec«oi>. C« C4 ««P<3C0 r-l 



\m § 



ip§i§§§i§§ i 



8 



d'es3 

lijl 



3-^ 



13^ 



|«i 



• 3 S ,>;' 



^? 






T3 






2 O^BS a sad 












Digitized by VjOOQIC 



372 



g 



3 



EDUCATION EBPOBT, 1M3. 

ig§g§i§ii§gs§§§ a§s$§§g§§§ 

gs a g I s s s a 3 s a 9 s ff : a s assfs s 8 



-18 



8^ 

I! 






lllllll 



l|li ill 



S 



oo8oSoac4S8S^S8 



gR 






§§ 



s^gs 



ss 



§sis§i 



§§§§§§§!§ 



§§i§§§ 



§§gi§s 



I, 



1 



H 

PQ 



§§g§i§§§i§§§§§§§i§i§§§§§ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PBIVATE NOEMAL SCHOOLS. 



373 









89388 









§§§ 
888" 



§§§§ 



!§§§§ 
SfS"«8S" 



"■""S" '"g" 18888 



§g§§§g§§§§§§ 

8"!8 SfS'S 8"S 2 S 2 " S 



§§i§ 



§i 



§ §§§ § 

S" ""8" S" 



8" 



8 



§§ 



§§ 






§si§ 



§§ 



$s 



a"- 



§11 



"85828 



§§|§i 

gass| 



i§S§ 



§1288- 



§ §§§ §§§§ 



§§§§§§§i§§ii 



§A§§ 






§§§§§ 



§§§ 



•O «0-v»O OQ0«D 



{2 S«2g 



§§§§§§§ 



I 



§§§ 



;§g§ 



:SS^ 



«S 



|g§§i§g 



g§ 



assa^ss-* 



§Q«ao 
8i^ 



iS§ i§§§§§§§g 



::iS^ :S?3S8SS^2?^ 



sRsSSSs 



s§s§i§§§Si§ii 



«c lo «•• C4 mia 



e<f«aoi»t»iaooo^eo 



li ss§ §§§ii 

00 ^OiOOO 



l§§§§8§§li§§g 

cf t'^f-^ f-T t* «■« 00 00 CO t-i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



874 



BDUCATION BEPOBT, 1»13. 



3g 



I- I 



i 

a 



8>. 

I! 

GQ 5 






& 

J 

o 

1 



ft. 



I, 



< 












8S5¥S8 



r 



icoor«ou 

-1-- -HO 



(p t^ 00 QO O 

•f CO "«r »-• o 






§ i§§§ 

3" fs t: S" 



g" 8" ssasVs" a" ss' 



mS 



3 J: 



§ §§§§ i § §§§§§§ § §§ 



o ooaot» 



S 9 ;s:;;!SSSSi8 s m^ 



§g 



s § 
8 8 



§ 2§i 
8 88*= 



§ 



CO CD 00 O 



§ § §§§§§S 

s" s" -"a'-sss 






|2 



^«0 W'^r 



§ §§§§ g § §§§§§§ § §§ 



2 



Si 

-So 






e § §§§§1 



§§ 



n S9S9 a S SS°°iSSS iS SS 






Sf §•« J5 



ssssa" 



§3-2 i 



t>- <^ lO (O CO 00 iH 






§§§i 



f2S 



:i3 



•30 

o wis a» 



I 

QQ 

> S 

s .| 

In 



52; -o 



•s^ 






i'sil 3 
















^p. «s 









;« c 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



875 






i: m\ 


ii 


§ ii 


i§i 


isgi 


i §i§ 


i i i§ ia is i i 


i i is i 


iisi 


, . 1 CO • 


is 


^•^ eT : 


In : 


ClOCO • 








• "^ ! 




















.'- 

















§§ §§§§§§ § § B§i§i§§§§g§ §i§§§§§§i§§§§iig§§gsii§g 



^^ ^ 



2tS8 



8 



S§§il g § § 
^"^-^'SSSf ?r ^"^ ::'' 



s 



^^ 



§§§ 



8* 



5 



cISpow m o mS 



■*CN|iO CI 



ill 



§giS 



C)5 t» «^ ^ 54 I-) t>4 t-t CO -^ 



§§ S§§§§§ § § §§§§§§§!§§§ g- 



^SS 



^i^g 



§§ § 



§ § §§§§§§§§§§§ 



'5S8 S S 5g§28"*8'«|S5'^^ 



28 



S^ 



l§§§§ § § 



?g{-2 s « S;::? 



§88p888 888888888888SS2888828S88 
^0^0 J» 00 36^ » S3 Jft O !35 O So SW©o3oOoS««S58S 



§§ i 

OOCT CO 



•^o^cs ?r cT CS| cs 



mi 



mmmnn 



CO •«•« -o •«»• ^ .-I 



§isi§ 






Si 



5^2 

if- 

||: 



•J? *§ ^ 



s •• 

QQ 



3 



If ill ill I 



^ ^ 






5-2 



^^ 






5^^ 



I illllllifil ifiii&ii^fi 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



376 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1»13. 



li 



a tie 

III 



8>. 

I! 

OQ O 

I 



5 Pi 



O 

1 



I 



I. 



H 
PQ 






l^llll? 









i! 






no 5 



I 






S8 



<-«SoOt«oSSSraeo 



OtOOkSS 



§§§ 



S"»a 



''li 



s 



§§§§§§§§§§2 

8 S-- 9a-"--'S 



iiiiiiiisii 



t-l o coc 



( 



:a 



:J3^^- 



:i9 












Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FUBUC AKD PBIVATE NOBMAL SCHOOLS. 



377 



■R 



I 

I, 
CO 
iH 

M 

A 



'96jnoo ivuuon ii| siooj^ 



isu 



■H 



Pi 



i 

8 



ill 



lit 



ifi] 



111 






2 
I 



'apnii9j 



•oi«H 



-8i«m9j 



•ei«H 



'sfvinoj 



•9l«H 



*9I«I09J 



•9I«H 



'opnno^ 



•9I«H 



'Ofraiej 



•afemaj 



•8T«II 



'OIBOIOJ 



•9I«H 



*e|Biiiej[ 



•oiBH 



•Oe<«C>«C« W *•• N M *•• M • •eCCl NWCO • N C« ■* W C« C>l W N M 



8S 



3 S3 



OO .© 00001-42 



S5 :• :a 






:: 3zJS®gJ^ 



coooo oooooooooo ooooo*c 



pOOO OQOOOOOOOO OeOOOOQ 'OOOOOO 



512:3S*8 



oooooo 



oooooo 



00»00 OroOOOOOQOOO Ot^jOMOtj-^OOOOOO 



S^S;^^ 



OOMBO Oe^OOOOOQOOO OiOOt^OOOCOOOOOO 



OO 'O Oioootooooaoo 



OO |0 o<30O00U3e;|OO o«poe»oO'«oooOoo 



682^ S*25^°8g2?8 |g|8§'='|SS§§^»8 



gOOO g«OO^g«9g|g5 



®Sg8§«'S®°®®®S 



Rssa 



CO»H^*^H ^^^"V <0 ^^ ^ ^^ CO ^^ vH t-i 






MM'Tco M T-i t>. t-i w o o «e o» i-< b-eoMM'^'roco'^tex.'^co 



t*oc«^ cQ'^ooeco^cor^p' 



«e^'<«<o oocor«Cjecoor^a» 



uia" 



o 55 »o '^ o» CO eo *•• « 00 -»• M 



'v«-4es«-t 'V 04 o c« o» o •-• o> t» o s^^iotCf-io^oono 



CO US ^ i-H iO (-I CO -v O O CO O (;« "-^ 

o 

I 

I 

CO 



a«S5 



^1 



5 ; jO :0 



Uia4 






d o"ii fl 9 § 0? C d d 






111] 



IP 

con 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



878 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



' 88 jnod ivnuoa u\ uva^ e4 















1 



B 

OQ 



I 



©■e-c 



5«| 



si 



Ifi^ 



P 



•opiaiaj 



•ai«H 



'aiBuio^ 



•aiBjc 



•ai'auioj 



•0l«H 



'opnnsj 



•9I«H 



•j|«uiaj 



•oi«H 



•ajBinaj 



*»l«H 



•dlBuiaj 



•8l«H 



•eiuraej 



•9l«K 



•eiBraaj 



•OIBH 



C4<ve<«MCic«cieoeoe<«c«eocicocie«^ 



R :S2S 



S rg" 



8 ::; 



S ::: 



SS^S-^S :2®8®8«<*?J5 



o-^tfooo •oooioaooaioo •«-< oc«oot^oa»f^c9 



eo«e«^ tM^M^ 



:^§S 



:::sss; : :S 



»0 Wt-.iO»OiOi-iMb-0 



sa^ 



oooo«oo90oooooooooor» 
ooooooaooooooooooog^ 









oocsooor^oooorzoooooio oootgaooao 



S5a^ 



gOOO^OgOgg^OC 



?M ooogwooi-iB; 



oooooooooooooooooo oooxooooo 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOCOOOjr 






8SS?§i3S§S®5®gSSJ^5§g S22Sg82J§® 



og8®5®2®§®SS®c5®®8o 



© 2 O oo ^ O »0 •© 5© 



"*i-iO00«*C»e«t-.O»>-O»-rWO»0«OiOO 



Oi-iC«Oi-iON«C«0»-«00'«l'000« 






t«ccooo^ou3r^ot«oc4>ooooc«o *OiQeoa»>-4to^^o 



P0)O>CO^P«CqOOt»O^O^OM CO «o O -<«• O >-4 o » a» 



CO 









: :> 



-jsa 












2 5 ««a.2SSg«^§ 



Ji 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PBIVATB NOBMAIj SCHOOLS. 



879 






1 

! 



n 



I 



Hi 



B_fei 









ill?! 



CO** £ O CJ 35 






lip 






22 a 



H 



2 bi 2 1 a - 






§ §§g §§§! 



rooo 
CO ad' 






3 il 



s§- 



siii 






l§ 



S8 



$2?8«S¥8 



8 «sS^«8^^» 



I 

3 



D 

I. 

11 
ill 

.-d o 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



380 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



SB 



2-35 § 
^ ^1 






III'? 






g 

00 

8 

1 



4S 

■I 



1 

a* 

I 

r-i 

H 
-] 

a 









§8122 SR2S 



s 



|g§ 



8-" 



§g 



ii§i 



e 

(Li 



1-s 



l^i^ia 



114 



i 



S§ 



S3 



% i§ 



S3"g2S3 



iiiiiii 



i^iii 



||§S 



U3 ^ CICO W 



I 
1 






111 

^ 08 g 

5 ill? 

as-: 



aajf lll^^; og|o-§ 



«l 




o o 



p4 
I I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUO AND PRIVATE NOBMAIi SCHOOLS. 



381 



i § I 

s" " a" 



to »o 



§ § s 



§ § H 



§ § 



I s § 



§ § S 



§s § sS 



•ooS 

cog- 



r« • 00 



H 



2§ 



a§ 



§§ 



§§ g §§ § 




^ c: 0^ S .2 ^^ ^ 
aj^H^t^ P^ MS CO 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER VIII. 
SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



The number of summer schools holding sessions in 1913 was 673, 
so far as refK)rted to this bureau. The number of students enrolled 
was 181,288, an increase of 39,071 over the number reported for the 
preceding year. 

The educational directory for 1913 published by the Bureau of 
Education (Bui. No. 46, 1913) includes a directory of the sunmier 
schools held in 1913, giving the name and location of each school, 
the name of the director or principal, and the probable date of the 
s^sion of 1914. 

The average length of the session for the 673 summer schools was 
7.2 weeks. Only 20 schools reported sessions of less than 4 weeks, 
116 held sessions of 4 or 6 weeks, 224 of 6 weeks, 58 of 7 weeks, 88 of 
8 weeks, 59 of 9 weeks, 36 of 10 weeks, 12 of 11 weeks, and 32 of 12 
weeks. The remaining 28 schools had terms running from 13 to 26 
weeks. 

Summer schools for the past three sessions. 





mi 


1912 


1913 




1911 


1912 


1913 


Summer schools reporting 


477 


569 


673 


Lectures, recitals, etc., 


2,939 


8,122 


4,201 


Number of instructors: 
Men 


6,672 
2,477 


6,140 
3,166 


7,516 
4,206 


Number of students en- 
roUed: 
Men 


38,140 
80,167 


46,657 
95,560 




Women 






62,625 
118,663 


Total 


8,049 


9,306 


11,722 


Women 




Total 


Number of lecturers: 


1,371 
303 


1,429 
319 


1,517 
393 


118,307 


142,217 


181,288 


Men 




Women 




Total 


1,G74 


1,748 


1,910 





Summer schools reporting estimated cost of maintenance. 



Divisions. 


Schools 
, report- 
ing. 


Number 

of in- 
structors. 


Number 
of lec- 
turers. 


Students 
in these 
schools. 


Estimated 
cost. 


Average 
cost per 
student. 


United States 


530 


9,598 


1,656 


147,665 


12,716,774 


$18. 40 






North Atlantic Division 


133 
199 
53 
86 
59 


2,207 
4,255 
725 
1,307 
1,104 


361 
658 
205 
350 
182 


31.561 
66,055 
11,352 
25,520 
13, 177 


613,582 
1,450,330 
131,110 
309, 737 
209,015 


19.44 


North Central Division 


21.96 


South Atlantic Division 


11.81 


South Central Division 


12.14 


Western Division 


15.86 







3S3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



384 EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



8 



I 



I 



8 



I 



CO 



n 
< 

Eh 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMBB SCHOOLS IN l&ld. 



sc;2:ss«D5 s^jg^-'S 












CO*-«0<0«^iQ 



88R{3S^ 



pss'^riipspf- 






gssa;:^ ssg^sgss ^sgs 



f-i © r>. 1-1 eo ^ ^ !-• -t-veo W«0;-jM^ C4 i-i C4 C« i-l o 



^ cb <* rt tS »>. tS 









?iisiiiris5iiiif"i?ifM 



CO *-i It c« r« N 



piminifiiiiFPfPf 



r^ 1-119 1^ 



§"SiSP2:55« SSSSSgSe RSgS 



«'8S5'*2a SSS^S^R'^:? S^^S 



^d>w^a»oo& <srt»M^^e«6 t^co^rt 



rt»Mgg^^ 



^S;:^"'*!:: S^^SS^'^S 2«!SS 



g?f2|IS^TIgIff5g~s^g?2^ 






^n M«o»«cs'Te4 



wTT^r^7T5Te7c?5 — ^o6i*i<ifi-.o4 — ec-ow .^^ 



«0 ,-1 M t>. »0 -^ CI ^ • b- O »>• »« «0 N '• M ,-• t>. -^ .-4 



Meo .^^t>..-.« 



« CO CO ^ X M 'tId cO^^QCQCtOeOX 'T 1-1 « «o M »o 



'•I 

•a :.3o| 






•4 P • ^ 

17727*— KD 1913— VOL 



i^^sfog 



C4C4 



««35 



n" 



WW 



§il§ 



siSs 



swsl^ 



2c35c5 



^^[IS^ 



spf 



SJiS55 






\^6i 



-26 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



886 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

COURSES OFFERED IN SUMMER SCHOOLS. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. — College courses in agricultiire, English, 
mathematics, chemistry, history, physics, and descriptive geometry; teachers* courses 
in manual training, agriculture, and the sciences. 

City Training School for Teachers, Birmingham. — Psychology, pedagogy, mathe- 
matics, history, civics, English, physics, physiology, geography, agriculture, manual 
training, music, drawing, and gymnastics. 

Daphne State Normal School. — ^All branches required for teachers' certificates. 

Florence State Normal School. — Mathematics, English, history, civics, psychology, 
theory and practice, school management, school laws, geography, physics, and agri- 
culture. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville. — ^Mathematics, English, history, science, peda- 
gogy, penmanship, civics, psychology, school management, school laws, and theory 
and practice. 

Alabama Normal Collie, Livingston. — ^Mathematics, history, geography, agricul- 
ture, physiology, physics, psychology, English, and school management. 

Summer Training School, Mobile. — Primary and grammar school subjects, and theory 
and practice of teaching. 

State Normal School, Troy. — ^All subjects required for teachers* examinations. 

Summer School for Teachers,^ Tuskegee. — ^AU elementary and high-school subjects, 
including bookkeeping, primary methods, general methods, practice teaching, school 
organization and administration, library work, physical training, upholstery, basketry, 
domestic science, sewing, millinery, manual training, agriculture, printing, and can- 
ning. 

University of Alabama, University. — Mathematics, biology, education, history, 
chemistry, physics, English, French, Latin, German, geography, astronomy, music, 
drawing, manual training, agriculture, and nature study. 



Northern Arizona Normal School, Flagstaff. — Psychology, philosophy of education, 
pedagogy, practice teaching, English, Spanish, music, drawing, mathematics, manual 
training, the sciences, and the common-school branches. 

Jantzen Private Summer School, Phoenix. — Common-school branches. 

ARKANSAS. 

Summer Normal,^ Camden.— Theory and practice, civics, mathematics, grammar, 
geography, music, drawing, penmanship, reading, agriculture, and orthography. 

Arkansas State Normal School, Conway. — Mathematics, Latin, English, science, 
agriculture, music, reading, home economics, history, primary methods, and peda- 
gogy. 

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. — Agriculture, biology, chemistry, economics, 
sociology, English, French, German, physics, history, Latin, manual training, mathe- 
matics, music, education, nnd Spanish. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Camp Merriam (Pasadena Y. M. C. A.), Avalon.— First aid, wood carving, swim- 
ming, life saving, spelling, and composition. 

California School of Arts and Crafts, Berkeley. — The different phases of industrial, 
normal, and fine arts, with special emphasis placed on craft work. 

» Negro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMEE SOHOOLS IN 1913. 387 

University of California, Berkeley. — ^Agriculture, anatomy, anthropology, astronomy, 
botany, chemistry, drawing, education, English, geography, German, graphic art, 
Greek, history, home economics, Latin, law, library methods, manual training, 
mathematics, music, paleontology, philosophy, physical education, physics, politi- 
cal science, public health, romance languages, stenography, typewriting, surveying, 
and zoology. 

Donaldson Summer School, Los Angeles. — Principal technical processes in metal 
and jewelry work; normal art, including composition, design, drawing, charcoal, and 
water color; and bookbinding and leather work. 

Krotona Institute of Theosophy, Los Angeles. — ^Theosophy, oratory, pedagogy and 
organization, and geometric symbology. 

University of Southern California, Los Angeles. — ^Agricultiire, biology, chemistry, 
economics, sociology, education, English, German, history, Latin, mathematics, 
philosophy, physical education, political science, and music. 

Y. M. C. A. Summer School, Los Angeles. — All the subjects of grammar and high 
school grades. 

Class in Outdoor Sketching and Painting, Monterey. — Landscape painting for ad- 
vanced students only. 

Summer Institute of Mechanic and Household Arts, Mount Hermon. — Teachers* 
training courses in manual training, cooking, sewing, pottery, art, bookbinding, 
basketry, design, metals, and jewelry. 

Marine Biological Laboratory (Leland Stanford Junior University), Pacific Grove. — 
Marine zoology, general embryology, and comparative anatomy of the vertebrates. 

San Diego State Normal School. — Education, pedagogy, history, literature, modem 
languages, arithmetic, geography, agriculture, woodwork, cooking, sewing, drawing, 
music, and physical education, including playground work. 

Stockton Commercial College and Normal School. — Commercial and normal sub- 
jects. 

Summer School of Surveying (University of California), Swanton. — Field work in 
surveying. 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Chautauqua, Boulder. — Literature, education, reviews, art, music, Bible 
study, primary methods, physical culture, folk dancing, and science. 

University of Colorado, Boulder. — ^Education, philosophy, psychology, English, 
oratory, economics, sociology, history, Latin, Greek, German, romance languages, 
mathematics, physics, geology, biology, bacteriology, athletics, library science, law, 
and medicine. 

Colorado College, Colorado Springs. — ^Archeology, mathematics, and education. 

Denver Manual Training School for Teachers. — Design, mechanical drawing, furni- 
ture construction, cardboard work, and bench work. 

Denver Normal and Preparatory School. — The regular normal and college prepara- 
tory subjects, and the common branches. 

Fine Arts Academy of Denver. — Normal art course planned especially for drawing 
supervisors and grade teacher. 

University of Colorado School of Ophthalmology, Denver. — ^Postgraduate course in 
ophthalmology. 

Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins. — ^Agriculture, home economics, mechanic 
arts, crops, soils, home management, rural sociology, animal husbandry, practical 
botany, cooking, sewing, bench work, forge, gardening, and music. 

State Teachers College of Colorado, Greeley. — The following departments were in 
operation: General lectures; superintendents and principals; hii^h school principals 
and teachers; elementary school-teachers; kindergarten teachers; domestic science; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



388 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1918. 

industrial work; art; physical education; music; rural school work; religiouB and moral 
education; defective, dependent, and delinquent children; women's clubs and our 
institutional life; moral and humane education; hygiene and sanitation; library work; 
professional work; and academic work. 

Ck)lorado State Normal School, Gunnison. — ^AU the courses of the regular school year 
leading to the degree of bachelor of pedagogy, including courses in music, domestic 
science and art, the industrial arts, manual training, stenography, and typewriting. 

School of Mountain Field Biology (University of Colorado), Tolland. — Field biologj-, 
zoology of ponds and streams, plant ecology, and systematic botany. 

University of Denver, University Park. — ^Astronomy, biology, chemistry, econom- 
ics, education, English, geology, history, modem languages, physics, psychology, and 
sociology. 

School of Surveying (Colorado College), Woodland Park. — Elementary and advanced 
railway and irrigation surveying. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Camp Wonposet, Bantam. — First aid to the injured, music, birds, snakes, etc., and 
tutoring in all branches desired. 

Camp Eastford, Eastford. — Manual training, nature study, printing, and photogra- 
phy. 

Summer School of Organic Education, Greenwich. — Development of the child, 
application of Froebel method to children under 12 years, with a view to its adoption 
in all grades to college entrance. 

Y. M. C. A., Hartford. — Seventh, eighth, and ninth grade subjects. 

Irving Camp, Morris. — ^Any subject to make up deficiencies in school work. 

Public Vacation Schools, New Britain. — Elementary school work. 

Hopkins Summer School, New Haven. — College entrance subjects. 

Massawippi Summer School (North Hatley, Quebec), New Haven (473 Edge- 
wood Ave.). — College courses in Greek, Latin, French, German, Spanish, Portuguese. 
Italian, elementary and commercial law, and all preparatory school subjects. 

New Haven Normal School of Gymnastics. — Physiology, gymnastics, dancing, and 
swimming. 

The Sanford School, Bedding Ridge. — Latin, French, German, English, algebra, 
geometry, physics, and history. 

Summer School of Nature Study and Agriculture, Storrs. — ^Agriculture, nature 
study, cooking, and methods of teaching. 

Y. M. C. A., Winsted. — Classes in English for Italians. 

DELAWARE. 

state College for Colored Students, Dover. — English, primary methods, domestic 
science, domestic art, drawing, arithmetic, manual training, and agricultural botany. 

Summer School for Teachers (Delaware College), Newark. — ^English, geography, 
mathematics, history and civics, methods, school management, psychology, physi- 
ology and hygiene, agriculture, and drawing. 

DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. 

Miss Sallie Lewin's Summer School, Washington. — Prepares for graded school, high 
school, and college entrance examinations. 

The Teachers College (Catholic University of America), Washington. — Education, 
philosophy, mathematics, science, languages, history, art, music, and library science. 

Y. M. C. A., Washington.— Grammar school subjects. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 389 

FLORIDA. 

Teachers' Summer Training School, Gainesville. — Education and psychology, 
English, foreign languages, history and civics, mathematics, primary methods, science, 
and vocational subjects. 

Y. M. C. A., Jacksonville. — Subjects of grammar and high school grades. 

Florida Normal Institute, Madison. — Common school subjects, geometry, Latin, 
education, physics, literature, drawing, sewing, manual arts, and primary methods. 

Southern College, Sutherland. — Mathematics, English, history, civics, Bible, Ger- 
man, physics, Latin, and chemistry. 

Teachers* Summer Training School, Tallahassee. — Methods, history of education, 
psychology, child study, all graded and high school branches, and college electives. 

Teachers* Summer Training School,* Tallahassee. — Common school branches, and 
agriculture, history, civics, physiology, primary methods, and psychology. 

GEORGIA. 

University of Georgia, Athens. — Elementary and high school subjecte, college courses 
of freshman and sophmore years, and graduate courses leading to degree of Master of 
Arts. 

Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. — Mathematics, English, and physics. 

The Berry School, Mount Berry. — Agriculture, botany, carpentry, dairying, draw- 
ing, pedagogy, English, arithmetic, Latin, history, and Bible. 

Emory College, Oxford. — Latin, Greek, French, German, English, history, and 
mathematics. 



Albion State Normal School. — Methods of teaching the common branches, school 
hygiene, agriculture, botany, physiography, history of education, primary methods, 
psychology, principles of teaching, literature and composition, algebra, physics, 
Latin, German, history, music, bench work, arts and crafts, manual training, mechan- 
ical drawing, sewing, cooking, and library science. 

Lewiston State Normal School. — Handwork, drawing, sewing, cookery, woodwork- 
ing, agriculture, physical education, rural sociology, principles of teaching, history of 
education, school administration, psychology, and the usual method courses. 

University of Idaho, Moscow. — Education, languages, agriculture, music, physical 
education, home economics, social and natural sciences, and history. 

State Academy Summer Normal, PocatcUo. — Teachers* professional subjects. 



Southern Illinois State Normal University, Carbondale. — All the regular courses in 
normal school subjects. 

Eastern Illinois State Normal School, Charleston. — Courses prepared to meet the 
needs of experienced teachers wishing to enlarge their professional or academic 
knowledge, coiurses for those preparing to teach, and the regular courses of the normal 
school preparing for graduation. 

The Applied Arts Summer School, Chicago. — Methods, i)encil technic, design, 
applied arts, and mechanical drawing. 

Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago. — Electrical engineering, chemical engi- 
neering, civil engineering, practical shopwork, physics, mathematics, drawing, and 
mechanics of engineering. 

Art Institute of Chicago. — Drawing, painting, illustration, normal instruction, 
decorative design, mechanical drawing, modeling, ceramic painting, and pottery. 

1 Negro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



390 EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 

Chicago Normal College. — Education, psychology, English, history and ci\dc8, 
geography, mathematics, science, physical education, art, industrial arte, and house- 
hold arts. 

Chicago School of Applied and Normal Art (310-314 Harvester Bldg.). — Drawing 
from life and still life, design, composition, bookbinding, leather tooling, and pottery. 

Chicago School of Ci\ics and Philanthropy (116 So. Michigan Ave.). — Methods of 
social advance, and principles of relief and family rehabilitation. 

Chicago School of Physical Education and Expression (430 So. Wabash Ave.). — 
Anatomy, physiology, biology, hygiene, pedagogy, theory and practice of Swedish 
and German gymnastics; games; and eesthetic, national, and folk dances. 

Columbia School of Music, Chicago. — Piano, voice, and \iolin. 

Cosmopolitan School of Music and Dramatic Art, Chicago. — Piano, voice, dramatic 
art, organ, violin, violoncello, theory, languages, sight reading, and ear training. 

Gregg Summer School, Chicago.— Shorthand, touch typewriting, penmanship, 
English, and office training. 

Lewis Institute, Chicago. — Mechanic arts, mathematics, physics, electricity, 
chemistry, sewing, textiles, cooking, history, English, foreign languages, pottery, 
and grammar-grade subjects. 

National Kindergarten College, Chicago. — Montessori method, kindergarten, and 
primary work. 

National Summer School of Music (2301 Prairie Ave.), Chicago. — Art of conducting, 
child voice, ear training, notation, harmony, history of music, interpretation, melodic 
construction, methods for music in the grades and in the high school, practice teach- 
ing, sight singing, orchestra work, and indi\idual voice training. 

New School of Methods in Public School Music, Chicago. — Notation and termi- 
nology, ear training and dictation, sight reading, melody writing, pedagogy of music, 
harmony, practice teaching, critical analysis, chorus, song interpretation, and folk 
dancing. 

Physical Culture Training School (4200 Grand Blvd.), Chicago. — Playground, foot- 
ball, and the regular work of the school year. 

Sherwood Music School (410 So. Michigan Ave.), Chicago. — All branches of music, 
dramatic art, and languages. 

University of Chicago. — In the personnel of the teaching staff, in the scope and 
methods of instruction, and in credit value the work of the summer quarter ranks 
with that of the rest of the academic year. 

University High School, Chicago. — Latin, German, EngUsh, history, mathematics, 
physics, and manual training. 

Y. M. C. A. (central department), Chicago. — College preparatory, high school, 
technical, commercial, elementary, and grammar school subjects. 

Y. M. C. A. (Di\ision St. dept.), Chicago. — High schcwl, grammar school, and com- 
mercial subjects, and English for foreigners. 

Northern Illinois State Nonnal School, De Kalb. — ^Agriculture, civics, drawing, 
English, geography, German, history, household science, Latin, manual training, 
mathematics, methods in the grades, music, pedagogy, physical training, psychology, 
reading, sociology, State course of study, and the natural sciences. 

Eureka College. — Preparatory algebra and Latin. 

American Institute of Normal Methods, Evanston. — A three years' course in public- 
school music and in drawing. 

Northwestern University, Evanston. — French, German, English, astronomy, 
philosophy, botany, chemistry, mathematics, public speaking, and music. 

Western Illinois State Normal School, Macomb. — Education, science, mathematics, 
English, foreign languages, manual training, drawing, music, household arts, etc. 

Illinois State Normal University, Normal. — All the courses of the regular school 
year. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 391 

Summer School of Manual Training and Domestic Economy (Bradley Polytechnic 
Institute), Peoria. — ^Pedagogy of the manual arte and domestic economy, woodwork- 
ing, metal working, drawing, design, domestic science, domestic art, science, and 
athletics. 

University of Illinois, Urbana. — ^Agriculture, art and design, accounting, botany, 
chemistry, general engineering, drawing, economics, education, psychology, English, 
entomology, French, German, history, Latin, manual training, mathematics, mechan- 
ical engineering, mechanics, music, physical training, physics, physiography, political 
science, rhetoric, sociology, and zoology. 



Tri-State College, Angola. — Education, engineering, pharmacy, mathematics, 
Latin, English, German, history, manual training, household economics, music, elocu- 
tion, drawing, and commercial subjects. 

Indiana University, Bloomington. — Greek, Latin, romance languages, German, 
English, history, economics, philosophy, fine arts, mathematics, astronomy, physics, 
chemistry, geology, botany, anatomy, physiology, music, education, physical train- 
ing, hygiene, and law. 

Culver Military Academy. — ^All secondary school subjects and the common 
branches. 

Earlham College. — Education, English, history, physics, mathematics, and biology. 

Summer School for Librarians, Earlham.— Cataloging, classification, reference, 
work with children, book selection, and library administration. 

Goshen College. — Psychology, education, school management, literature, history, 
German, mathematics, agriculture, bookkeeping, music, and the common branches. 

De Pauw University, Greencastle. — Biology, economics, education, psychology, 
and public speaking. 

Butler College, Indianapolis. — ^Astronomy, chemistry, economics, English, Greek, 
political history of United States, Latin, nature study, and pedagogy. 

Indiana Central University, Indianapolis. — Pedagogy, philosophy, psychology, 
literature, history, and economics. 

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis. — Drawing,- painting, and ceramic deco- 
ration. 

Normal College of the North American Gymnastic Union, Indianapolis. — German, 
educational gymnastics, playground work, classic and esthetic dancing, anatomy, 
physiology, principles of education, English literature, and German literature. 

Teachers College of Indianapolis. — Psychology, history of education, manual arts, 
method, games, songs, physical cultiure, literature, and the academic subjects. 

Purdue University, La Fayette. — Farm crops, soils, plant studies, horticulture, 
dairying, animal husbandry, poultry, foods, sewing, benchwork, and mechanical 
drawing. 

Moores Hill College. — Normal courses in psychology, geography, grammar, arith- 
metic, chemistry, botany, physiology, history, English, and agriculture. 

Manchester College, North Manchester. — Psychology, methods of teaching, history 
of education, nature study, domestic science, manual training, agriculture, nine- 
teenth centiiry history, advanced literature, and college algebra and German. 

Oakland City College. — Psychology, methods, history of education, child study, 
physiology and hygiene, mathematics, science, languages, and literature. 

Y. M. C. A., Richmond. — All grammar-school and first and second year high-school 
subjects. 

St. Mary-of-the- Woods Academy, St. Marys. — English classics of high-school grade; 
German classics; and physics, covering light, sound, and electricity. 

Summer Vacation Schools, South Bend. — ^All graded -school and high-school sub- 
jects. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



392 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

State Nonnal School, Terre Haute. — Summer quarter of tibe regular year's work, 
offering all the coiu^ of the year. 

Valparaiso University. — Kindergarten, primary and rural teaching, manual training, 
chemistry, biology, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, art, music, elocution, 
physiography, reviews, commercial subjects, pharmacy, engineering, and high- 
school branches. 

Winona College, Winona Lake. — Nearly all college and normal-school subjects. 



Iowa State College, Ames. — ^Animal husbandry, soils, dairying, farm crops, poultry, 
home economics, manual training, botany, chemistry, economics, English, mathe- 
matics, psychology, principles of education, secondary education, and school super- 
vision. 

Iowa State Teachers Coll^;e, Cedar Falls. — Seventeen departments offered courses 
of college, normal, and special teacher grades. The leading subjects were: Profes- 
sional instruction in education, Israining in teaching, languages, mathematics, natural 
sciences, physics, chemistry, history, economics, manual arts, music, commercial 
branches, government, home economics, and physical training. 

Coe Coll^;e, Cedar Rapids. — Chemistry, education, English, German, Latin, history, 
algebra, geometry, physics, and psychology. 

Palmer Method Summer School (Cedar Rapids Business College). — Penmanship — 
instruction, methods of teaching and supervision. 

Des Moines College. — Psychology, history of education, domestic science and art, 
languages, primary training, sociology, physics, mathematics, and agriculture. 

Drake University, Des Moines. — Education, mathematics, science, languages, his- 
tory, political economy, and elementary subjects. 

Highland Park College, Des Moines. — Full work is offered in normal, liberal arta, 
engineering, music, domestic science, manual training, scientific, and commercial 
departments. 

Upper Iowa University, Fayette. — ^Teachers' review work, college and academy 
subjects. 

Simpson Coll^:e, Indianola. — Preparatory mathematics, physics, and German; col- 
lege courses in education; normal review courses; biisiness coiu'ses; and music. 

State University of Iowa, Iowa City. — ^Botany, chemistry, education, languages, 
geology, history, mathematics, astronomy, philosophy, psychology, physics, econo- 
mics, sociology, political science, zoology. 

Cornell College, Mount Vernon. — Material science, social science, languages, manual 
training, domestic science, music, education, psychology, and all elementary branchee 
for teachers' review. 

Penn College, Oskaloosa. — All normal work necessary for State certificate, and col- 
lege and academy courses in German, French, English, algebra, geometry, Jewish 
history, Greek history, life of Paul, and life of Christ. 

Momingside College, Sioux City. — Mathematics, geography, history, physiology, 
civics, economics, physics, languages, grammar, primary methods, history of educa- 
tion, psychology, and child study. 

Tabor College. — Review subjects for teachers' certificates, history of education, 
and psychology. 



Baker University, Baldwin. — Pedagogy, mathematics, English, Latin, biology. 

State Normal School, Emporia. — Regular term of the school year, and offers every 
course, academic, professional, kindergarten, and music, with full credit given each 
subject. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMEB SCHOOLS IN 191Z. 393 

Weetem State Normal School, Hayes. — Regular term of the school year, subject 
to same conditions of entrance and work as any other term. 

University of Kansas, Lawrence. — Astronomy, botany, chemistry, economics, edu- 
cation, languages, entomology, geology, history, home economics, journalism, law, 
mathematics, music, pharmacy, physiciEd education, physics, physiology, psjxhology, 
shop work, sociology, and zoology. 

Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan. — Agriculture, home economics, 
engineering, and general science. 

Waahbum College, Topeka. — Astronomy, botany, chemistry, education, English, 
French, German, history, mathematics, Latin, philosophy, physical education, physics, 
physiology, music, and law. 

Fairmoimt College, Wichita. — History, economics, psychology, education, physics, 
mathematics, Latin, Greek, German, French, English,. drawing, and botany. 

KENTUCKY. 

Western Kentucky State Normal, Bowling Green. — All departments of the State 
normal are represented, also special work for teachers of every grade from the primary 
through the high school, including supervision, kindergarten methods, agriculture, 
domestic science and arts, library science, industrial arts, etc. 

University of Kentucky, Lexington. — History, languages, mathematics, education, 
law, mining engineering, and mechanical engineering. 

Eastern Kentucky State Normal, Richmond. — Pedagogy, psychology, child study; 
the history, philosophy, and practice of education; educational problems in Ken- 
tucky, primary methods, special methods, drawing and art; music, manual training, 
domestic science and art; physical culture, athletics, gymnasium, natiu*e study, 
agriculture, horticulture, biology, physiology, and hygiene; geography, physics, 
chemistry, English, Bible, Latin, German, French, history, economics, sociology, 
mathematics, handwork, and library methods. 

LOUISIANA. 

Summer School for Colored Teachers, Baton Rouge. — Arithmetic, grammar, history 
geography, algebra, geometry, physiology and hygiene, theory and art, agriculture, 
shopwork, and domestic science. 

University of Louisiana, Baton Rouge. — ^Agriculture, arts and crafts, botany, chem- 
istry, commerce, domestic science, economics, education, English, French, history, 
Latin, law, mechanic arts, mathematics, music, physics, political science, psychology-, 
sociology, Spanish, and zoology. 

Southwestern Louisiana Industrial Institute, La Fayette. — Pedagogy, mathematics, 
English, science, agriculture, and manual training. 

Louisiana State Normal School, Natchitoches. — Mathematics, languages, chemistry, 
physics, geography, physiology and hygiene, theory and art of teaching, psychology, 
pedagogy, history of education, economics, etc. 

Tulane University, New Orleans. — Education, psychology, history, languages and 
literature, mathematics, music, art, civics, economics, library work, science, house- 
hold economy, and manual training. 

Tulane University Summer School of Medicine, New Orleans. — Anatomy, histology, 
orthopedic surgery, pathology and bacteriology, physiology, pharmacy, electrothera- 
peutics and radiology', gynecology, obstetrics, nervous diseases, diseases of children, 
diseases of the skin, etc. 

Louisiana Industrial Institute, Ruston. — Regular institute coiurses, including psy- 
chology, methods, principles of teaching, pedagogy, school management, and a model 
school. 

Summer School for Colored Teachers, Shreveport. — The common branches, theory 
and art of teaching, methods, literature, geometry, algebra, and history. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



894 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

MAINE. 

Navajo Camps for Boys, Belfast (R. F. D.). — General tutoring. 

Commonwealth Art Colony, Boothbay Harbor. — Drawing, painting, modeling, art 
metal, jewelry, manual training, commercial design, interior decoration, bookbinding, 
costume design, normal art, tooled leather, music, and children's class. 

Eastern State Normal, Castine. — All the common-school branches, and music, school 
management, school laws, and methods of teaching. 

Wyonegonic and Winona Camps, Denmark. — Tutoring as desired. 

Surveying Camp (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) East Machias.-rRailroad 
engineering, siurveying, stream gaugings. 

State Normal School, Farmington. — Elementary school work, including music and 
drawing. 

Seguinland School of Photography, Five Islands. — Art in photography. 

Madawaska Training School, Fort Kent. — ^Arithmetic, geography, history, English, 
writing, music, school laws, and primary methods. 

Western State Normal School, Gorham. — School laws, school management, music, 
hygiene, agriculture, manual training, history, and the common branches. 

Moosehead Lake Camp, Greenville. — Secondary school subjects, including mathe- 
matics, Greek, Latin, French, German, English, history, and physics. 

Camp Katahdin, Harrison (R. F. D.). — All grammar and academic subjects in 
secondary schools, including horseback riding, canoeing, all forms of athletics, swim- 
ming, scout work, nature study, woodcraft, etc. 

Eden Camp and Eden Club, Harrison. — All land and water sports, fencing, folk 
dancing, gymnastics, handicraft, campcraft, woodcraft, and tutoring as desired. 

Wildmere Camp, Harrison. — Tutoring as desired. 

Washington Normal School, Machias. — Music, school management, agriculture, 
penmanship, arithmetic, geography, grammar, physiology, history, and round table. 

Independent School of Art, Monhegan. — Marine and landscape painting. 

Monhegan School of Metal Work. — ^Metal work, jewelry, basketry, leather work, 
design. 

Camp Keoka, Naples. — Natiu^ study, photography, manual training, wireless 
telegraphy, and all college preparatory subjects. 

Maine Summer Library School, Orono. — Cataloguing, reference work, book selection, 
library work with children, library economy. 

University of Maine, Orono. — Courses 87 in 11 departments of the university, cover- 
ing work similar to the regular school year. 

Aroostook State Normal School, Presque Isle. — Geometry, physiology, school man- 
agement, music, drawing, nature study, English, manual training, domestic science, 
history, mathematics, physical culture, geography, penmanship, library methods, 
etc. 

Camp Ono, Raymond. — Domestic science, French, and Latin. 

Harpswell Laboratory (Tufts College), South HarpswelL— Research W(»rk for 
instructors and advanced students. 

Alford Lake Camp for Girls, South Hope. — Cooking, arte and crafts, music, and 
tutoring as desired. 

Moy-Mo-Da-Yo Camp, South Limington. — Nature study and tutoring in elementary 
and college preparatory subjects. 

Wildwood Lodge, Steep Falls. — Nature study and tutoring in elementar>' and 
college preparatory subjects — French, German, Latin, swimming, rowing, etc. 

Camp Winnecook, Unity. — Elementary and preparatory school subjects, manual 
training, and photography. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 395 

MARYLAND. 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. — Courses, 50, covering biology, chemistry, 
domestic science, education, English, French, German, history, Latin, manual 
training, mechanical drawing, mathematics, politics, and physics. 

Peabody Conservatory of Music, Baltimore. — Piano, organ, harmony, violin, vio- 
loncello, singing, public-school music, solfeggio. 

Summer Vacation Schools, Baltimore. — All subjects of the fourth and higher public 
school grades, woodwork, metal work, printing, drawing, cooking, sewing, millinery, 
trade mathematics, business letters, industrial history, bookkeeping, and elements of 
commercial law. 

Y. M. C. A., Baltimore. — English, French, German, Latin, prose, algebra, geometry, 
and trigonometry. 

County Summer School for Teachers, Frederick. — English in the high school, Eng- 
lish in the grammar school, secondary education, history, methods, and primary work. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Summer School of Agriculture and Coimtry Life (Massachusetts Agriculture College), 
Amherst. — General agricultural subjects, home economics, handicrafts, organized play 
and recreation, sociological and economic questions of rural life. 

American Institute of Normal Methods, Aubumdale. — ^Methods, harmony, sight- 
singing, conducting, folk dancing, drawing. 

Boston Floating Hospital Post-graduate Course for Nurses. — Arithmetrical computa- 
tation for percentage feeding, preparation of formulae, infant anatomy, physiology, 
premature and feeble infants, infant feeding, gastro-enteric diseases, nursing in surgical 
diseases, skin diseases, bacteriology, contagious diseases, milk stations. 

Emerson College of Oratory, Boston. — Voice culture, physical training, expression, 
methods, Shakespeare, modem drama. 

Faelten Pianoforte School, Boston. — Piano, theory, and normal training. 

Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, Boston. — Cookery in its various branches, market- 
ing, waitress's work, and dietetics. 

Harvard Graduate School of Medicine, Boston. — ^Anatomy, physiology, biochemis- 
try, bacteriology, pathology, medicine, physical therapeutics. Roentgenology, 
pediatrics, neurology, neuropathology, psychistry, surgery, orthopedic surgery, 
obstetrics, gynecology, dermatology, syphilis, ophthalmology, otology, laryngology, 
legal medicine, life insurance, preventive medicine, and hygiene. 

Huntington School (Y. M. C. A.), Boston. — All college preparatory subjects. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. — A variety of courses in each of the 
following subjects, supplementing the work of the r^ular school year: Mathematics, 
mechanics, drawing, mechanic arts, English, modem languages, chemistry, physics, 
civil engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, architecture, 
biology, and public health. 

Monro Summer School for Training Teachers of the Deaf, Boston (518 Pierce Bldg.) — 
Speech and voice production, including Bell's visible speech, mechanism of speech, 
development of elements of speech, correction of faults of speech, development of 
voice, use of voice, resonance, rhythm in speech and voice, phonetics and word study. 

Posse Normal School of Gymnastics,^ Boston (779 Beacon St.). — ^Anatomy, medical 
gymnastics, special kinesiology, and practical gymnastics. 

School of Eugenics, Boston (585 Boylston St.). — Biology of nutrition and reproduc- 
tion; physiology and psychology of sex; sex and religion; theory and mechanism of 
inheritance; eugenics; sex education ; widows' pensions; protection by marriage; cer- 
tificate of health. 

» Formerly Posse Oymnasluni. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



396 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

School of Expression, Boston (306 Pierce Bldg.). — Public reading, vocal training, 
dramatic training, vocal expression, dramatic rehearsal, harmonic training, panto- 
mime training, and platform work. 

Sinmions College Secretarial and Library Schools, Boston. — Commercial law, book- 
keeping and accounts, shorthand, typewriting, stenotypy, business methods, methods 
of teaching commercial subjects; cataloging, classification, library economy, reference, 
work with children. 

Old Colony Union Industrial School, Bourne. — Basketry, lace, pottery, domestic 
science, embroidery, sloyd, loom weaving, sewing, folk dancing, agriculture. 

Sea Pines Personality Camp, Brewster. — Tutoring in any subject; also swimming, 
rowing, dancing, etc. 

City Public Schools, Brockton. — Elementary subjects. 

Camp Wampanoag, Buzzards Bay. — Elementary and grammar school branches. 

Cambridge Normal School of Dancing (8 Everett St.) — .Social dancing, esthetic 
dancing, folk and national dancing, Dalcroze work, music. 

Harvard University, Cambridge. — ^Astronomy, botany, chemistry, economics, 
education, engineering, geology, government, history, languages, mathematics, 
metallurgy, music, philosphy, physical education, physics, psychology, public 
speaking, and sociology. 

Y. M. C. A., Chelsea. — Grammar-school subjects. 

Summer Art School, Gloucester (3 Clarendon St.). — ^Drawing, painting, wood carving, 
composition and design. 

Summer Sketching Class, Gloucester (Annisquam). — Outdoor painting. 

State Normal School, Hyannis. — Music, psychology, English, geography, elementary, 
physiology, arithmetic methods, drawing, history, manual training, cooking, sewing, 
elementary science, supervision, and pedagogy. 

Y. M. C. A., Lowell. — ^Algebra, arithmetic, spelling, grammar, and language. 

Public Elementary School, Lynn. — Arithmetic, language, geography, history, and 
algebra. 

Y. M. C. A., Maiden. — Grammar-school subjects. 

Y. M. C. ^., Melrose. — Grammar-school subjects. 

Treat's School, Oak Bluffs. — College entrance subjects and subjects of the freshman 
and sophomore years. 

Cape Cod School of Art, Provincetown. — Painting from still life, portrait, landscape, 
and ^e figure out of doors. 

Summer School of Drawing and Painting, Provincetown. — Painting from the model 
out of doors, landscape, still life, and portrait. 

Y. M. C. A., Somerville. — Grammar-school subjects. 

"Quanset,'* Cape Cod Camp for Girls, South Orleans. — ^Various water and land 
sports, handicrafts, chorus and solo work in opera rehearsals, scene painting, poster 
painting, costuming, acting, writing and staging operas, Indian craft, dancing, and 
games. 

Moimt Pleasant Camp, South Williamstown. — ^Tutoring in elementary subjects. 

Y. M. C. A., Springfield. — Grammar, history, geography, arithmetic, and literature. 

Marthas Vineyard School of Art, Vineyard Haven. — Painting — landscape, marine, 
and portrait. 

Warren Academy Free Industrial School, Wobum. — Woodwork, sewing and cooking. 

Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole. — Morphology and taxonomy of the algae; 
physiology and ecology of marine, strand, and bog vegetation; invertebrate zoology; 
embryology; comparative physiology; philosophical aspects of biology and allied 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 397 

MICHIGAN. 

Adrian College. — Language, science, and mathematics. 

Alma College. — Biology, English, philosophy, pedagogy, and music. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. — Courses were offered in the departments of 
literature, science, and the arts, of engineering, of medicine and suigery, of law, in 
the school of pharmacy, of library methods, and at the biological station. The course 
may be classified as follows: Undergraduate and graduate courses, special or technical 
courses for teachers, librarians, engineers, lawyers, and physicians in active practice, 
and special courses for college entrance. 

Normal School of Physical Education, Battle Creek. — Swedish kinesiology, physi- 
ological physics and chemistry, dietetics, school hygiene, racial hygiene, eugenics, 
physical education, first aid and emergency nursing, massage, hydrotherapy, medicid 
gymnastics, athletic training, physiology of exercise, physical diagnosis, vocal 
expression, anthropometry, playground methods, normal practice, group games, 
baseball, football, tennis, etc. 

Emanuel Missionary College, Berrien Springs. — Old Testament history, life of 
Christ, revelation, Bible doctrines, testimonies, general history. United States history, 
denominational history, history of missions, civil government, English, agriculture, 
botany, geography, physiology, astronomy, arithmetic, bookkeeping, methods of 
teaching, psychology, pedagogy, manual training, nature study, history of education, 
sight singing, voice, piano, and observation and practice teaching. 

Camp So-sa-wa-ga-ming for Boys, Big Bay. — Private tutoring in all subjects. 

Ferris Institute, Big Rapids. — Mathematics, science, history, German, Latin, 
English literature, bookkeeping, shorthand, typewriting, pharmacy, kindergarten, 
music, drawing, and physical culture. 

Camp Eberhart (Y. M. C. A., South Bend, Ind.), Corey. — Sixth to ninth grade 
subjects. 

Cass Technical High School, Detroit. — Chemistry, physics, mechanical drawing, 
cabinetmaking, wood turning, machine shop, history, algebra, English, arithmetic, 
shorthand, penmanship, typewriting, literature, bookkeejMng. 

Detroit Conservatory of Music. — Every branch of music. 

Detroit Techinal Institute (Y. M. C. A.). — College preparatory, mechanical drafting, 
grade subjects, English for foreigners. 

Michigan Conservatory of Music, Detroit. — Piano, voice, violin, violoncello, organ, 
comet, clarinet, mandolin, guitar, theory of music, counterpoint canon and fugue, 
composition and orchestration, musical kindergarten, dramatic art, physical culture. 

School of Fine Arts, Detroit. — ^Landscape study. 

Kenmore Play School, Fountain. — Gymnastics, folk dancing, dramatics, music, 
forestry, gardening, manual training, arts and crafts, photography, nature study, 
elementary astronomy. 

Grand Rapids Kindergarten Training School. — Gifts and occupations, songs and 
games, history of education, stories and literature for children, child study, psychology, 
playground supervision, primary methods, nature study, illustrative drawing and 
composition, art expression. 

Y. M. C. A., Grand Rapids. — The common branches. 

Western State Normal School, Kalamazoo. — Certificate courses, review courses, and 
extension courses covering the following subjects: Biology, chemistry, physics, art, 
domestic science and art, education, English, expression, German, history, kinder- 
garten, Latin, library methods, manual training, mathematics, music, physical 
education, general methods, and the common branches. Special attention is given 
to preparation of teachers for rural schools. 

Forestry School (Michigan Agricultural College), Le Grand. — Forest mensuration, 
forest engineering, field methods, forest entomology, silviculture. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



398 EDUCATION BBPO&T, 1913. 

Northern State Normal School, Marquette. — Regular required courses tot normal- 
Bchool certificates, including domestic science, drawing, English, expression, geogra- 
phy, German, history, kindergarten, Latin, library methods, mathematics, music, 
natural sciences, physical sciences, physical education, education, sociology, methods, 
and practice teaching. 

Central State Normal School, Mount Pleasant. — Psychology and education, peda- 
gogy, school administration, English, Latin, German, mathematics, history, agri- 
culture, nature study, physics, chemistry, art, music. 

University of Michigan Biological Station, Topinabee. — ^Nine courses covering 
botany and zoology. 

Michigan State Normal College, Ypsilanti. — ^Ancient and modem languages, art, 
geography, history, household arts, kindergarten, manual training, mathematics, 
music, natural sciences, philosophy, and education, physical education, physical 
sciences, psychology and pedagogy, reading and oratory, and the training department. 

MINXESOTA. 

The coimty teachers' training schools (see table on p. 423) are held under direc- 
tion of the State department of education, and offer similar courses, covering the 
common school and high school branches, and agriculture, domestic science, pedagogy, 
methods, and school management. 

Teachers' Training School (North West School of Agriculture), Crookston. — Courses 
similar to county teachers' training schools. 

State Normal School, Duluth. — Psychology, education, sociology, natural sciences, 
industrial work, and the common branches. 

Summer School for Blind Men (State School for the Blind), Faribault. — New York 
point reading and writing, and typewriting, piano tuning, broom making, weaving, 
caning, basketry, cabinetwork, and minor handwork. 

State Normal School, Mankato. — ^All subjects required for State certificates and 
as many as possible of the regular course. 

Ford Offices, Minneapolis. — Shorthand, t3rpewriting, bookkeeping, penmanship, 
commercial law, and English composition. 

Handicraft Guild School of Design, Handicraft, and Normal Art, Miimeapolis. — 
Water color, drawing, design, jewelry, and pottery. 

MacPhail Violin School, Minneapolis. — Violin, harmony, theory and history of 
music. 

Minneapolis School of Art. — Drawing, painting, illustration, out-of-door sketching 
and figure painting, mural painting, sculpture, design, handicraft, and normal art. 

Minnesota College, Minneapolis. — Subjects required for teachers' certificate exami- 
nations, business courses, etc. Credit is given for summer work in all departments 
the same as during other terms of the year. 

Minnesota Summer School for Library Training, Minneapolis. — Classification, cata- 
loguing, reference work, work with children, and library administration. 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. — ^Animal biology, art, astronomy, botany, 
chemistry, economics, education, English, French, geology and geography, Ger- 
man, Greek, history, Latin, manual training, mathematics, philosophy, physics, po- 
litical science, rhetoric, shopwork, sociology, vocal expression. 

State Normal School, Moorhead. — Regular normal-school work. 

Teachers' Training School (West Central School of Agriculture), Morris.— First and 
second grade certificate subjects and industrial subjects. 

State Normal School, St. Cloud. — ^^lathematics, English, agriculture, botany, civics, 
drawing, history, history of education, manual training, general methods, physics, 
physiography, physiology, psychology, sewing, sociology, methods in reading, music, 
and themes. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 399 

Globe Business College, St. Paul. — Business, stenographic, preparatory, and civil- 
service courses. 

State Teachers' Training School and Summer School of Agriculture, St. Paul. — 
Sewing, cooking, industrial work, agronomy, farm management, grain and com 
judging, chemistry of plant and animal life, soils, breeds and types of live stock, 
poultry, dairying, horticulture, botany. 

State Normal School, Winona. — Mathematics, physiology, sociology, manual train- 
ing, psychology, literature and themes, history, history of education, primary methods, 
physics, agriculture, geography, school economy, music, civics, grammar. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

State Summer Normal, Blue Mountain. — ^Mathematics, Latin, history, English, 
agriculture, geography, civics, physiology, chemistry. 

Summer Normal, Brookhaven. — Geography, United States history, Mississippi 
history, civics, physics, physiology and hygiene, Latin, algebra, geometry, pedagogy, 
primary work. 

Clinton Normal. — General public-school work. 

Mississippi Normal College, Hattiesburg. — English, mathematics, pedagogy, 
methods, agriculture, hygiene, history, geography, civics, economics, science, Latin, 
drawing, manual training, domestic science, school music. 

University of Mississippi, University. — English literature, methods of teaching 
English in high school, algebra, geometry, ancient and American history, physiology, 
sanitation and hygiene, Latin, reading, psychology, principles and methods of teach- 
ing, agriculture, home economics, etc. 

Coast Normal, Wiggins. — Review of subjects of State full-school curriculum. 

Winona Normal. — Subjects required for teachers* certificates. 



Missouri Wesleyan College, Cameron. — Courses, 19, covering various phases of edu- 
cation and music. 

State Normal School, Cape Girardeau. — Courses, 137, covering education, history, 
English, mathematics, music, art, science, business, languages, physical training, 
manual training. 

University of Missouri, Columbia. — Courses, 119, covering the following: Agri- 
culture, art, botany, chemistry, economics, education, English, German, history, 
journalism, Latin, manual arts, mathematics, physical education, physical geography, 
physics, psychology, romance languages, sociology, zoology, forestry, geology, library 
methods, and preventive medicine. 

Public Vacation Schools, Kansas City. — Regular public-school courses. 

State Normal School, Kirksville. — College courses in history, English, science, and 
languages; and pedagogy and semiprofessional subjects. 

La Grange College. — History, pedagogy, English, science, mathematics. 

State Normal School, Maryville. — Home economics, mathematics, English, Ameri- 
can and general history, geography, agriculture, physics and chemistry, psychology, 
history of education, methods, music, art, reading, manual training, Latin, German. 

Forest Park University, St. Louis. — Music. 

St. Louis University School of Medicine. — Medicine, surgery, pathology, histology, 
immunity, embryology, anatomy, chemistry, biology, clinical pathology, operative 
8urger>% etc. 

State Normal School, Springfield. — All courses usually given in high schools, col- 
leges, and normal schools. 

State Normal School, Warrensburg. — Agriculture, geography, biology, physiology, 
chemistry, economics, ancient and modem languages, mathematics, physics, peda- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



400 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

gogy, sociology, psychology, commeice, speech arts, drawing, household arts, manual 
training, music, and physical education. 

Central Wesleyan College, Warrenton. — Courses planned especially for rural teacners 
and covering hig^-school English, algebra, physiography, American and ancient 
history, pedagogy, granunar, arithmetic, and agriculture. 

MONTANA. 

Montana State Normal College, Dillon. — The common branches, and algebra, 
physics, geometry, literature, school management, civics, physiography, trigonometry, 
anatomy, and neurology, physiology, medieval history, English, German, Latin, 
school economy, principles of teaching, theory and art of teaching, domestic science, 
methods, manual training, physical cultiire, drawing, and music. 

Univendty of Montana Biological Station, Glen. — Botany, zoology, photography. 

City Public Schools, Great Falls. — Regular courses of the public schools. 

University of Montana, Missoula. — Biology, botany, chemistry, domestic science, 
economics, education, English, fine arts, geography of Montana, geology and physiog- 
raphy, home decoration and household art, library training, literature, manual train- 
ing and shopwork, mathematics, mechanical drawing, methods in education, modem 
languages, music, physical education, physics, playgroimds, surveying. 

NEBRASKA. 

State Junior Normal Schools located at Alliance, Alma, Broken Bow, McCook, 
North Platte, O'Neill, and Valentine, are held under the direction of the State depart- 
ment of public instruction, and offer similar courses covering all the subjects required 
for all grades of county certificates and such life certificate subjects as local conditions 
may require. 

Bellevue College. — Psychology and educational subjects. 

Central and Northern Union Conference Summer School (Seventh-day Adventists), 
Collegeview. — Education; school management; methods in grade work, manual train- 
ing, sewing, etc.; zoology; reviews in common branches; and usual academic subjects. 

Fremont College. — The summer term is a part of the regular school year and offers 
the full courses of study covered by all departments, viz, preparatory courses, teachers' 
courses, college scientific and college classical, normal literary, didactic, civil engi- 
neering, elocution and oratory, commercial course, voice, piano, pipe organ, violin, 
chemistry, pharmacy, drawing, and a model school for observation of teaching. 

State Normal School, Kearney. — Full college courses in English, Latin, German, 
history, mathematics, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, art, music, physical 
culture, domestic science, and agriculture, and all common-school subjects. Com- 
plete system of observation and practice schools in operation, including a model rural 
school. 

Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln. — Education, kindergarten, Engll^, 
botany, physics, mathematics, zoology, physiology, geography, geology, history, 
chemistry, normal reviews, and music. 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln. — Agronomy, dairying, home economics, horticul- 
ture, history, botany, chemistry, education, English literature, French, geography, 
geology, German, Latin, manual training, mechanical drawing, mathematics, philoso- 
phy, physical sciences, physical education, political science, rhetoric, zoology, and 
physiology. 

State Normal School, Peru. — Agriculture, art, biology, commerce, domestic econ- 
omy, education, English, oral expression, geography, German, history, Latin, manual 
training, mathematics, music, physiology, physical training, psychology, physical 
sciences, and political economy. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1&13. 401 

State Normal School, Wayne. — Ail subjects required for county, city, and State 
teachers' certificates, besides double time on many regular subjects for advanced 
standing. 

York College. — All branches required for teachers' certificates, and special courses 
for normal and collegiate students. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Camp Algonquin, Ashland. — Tutoring in grammar and high-school branches, and 
nature study, botany, geology, astronomy, and animal life. 

Camp Winona Fields, Ashland (R. F. D.). — First aid, camp craft, nature study, 
swimming, diving, rowing, crew rowing, etc. 

Pasquaney Nature Club, Bristol. — Art; basketry; study of the birds, flowers and 
trees; physical culture; aesthetic and folk dancing; and tutoring if desired. 

Camp Rockland, Enfield. — Languages, music, science, mathematics, oratory. 

Camp Fairweather, Francestown. — Domestic science and art, social and folk 
dancing, nature study, and land and water sports. 

Dartmouth College, Hanover. — Languages, mathematics, history, physics, chemis- 
try, biology, fine arts, music, sociology, psychology, education, physical education. 

Camp Wachusett, Holdemess. — All college preparatory subjects. 

Camp Anawan, Meredith. — Metal work, leather work, basketry, athletics, swim- 
ming, water sports. 

Camp Moosilauke, Pike (R. F. D. No. 1). — Automobile, jewelry, copper work, 
road building, forestry. 

State Normal School, Plymouth. — ^Regular normal school work fully equivalent to 
any other part of the school year, with special courses for teachers of village and country 
schools including rural sociology, elementary agriculture, manual training, cooking, 
and sewing. 

Mrs. Hill's Summer School of Cookery, South Chatham. — Preparation of meals and 
food for special occasions, manipulation of materials, processes of cooking, hygienic 
combinations of foods, and other subjects relative to dietetics. 

Camp Chocorua, Tarn worth. — All subjects of grammar and high school, clay model- 
ing, use of tools, wireless telegraphy, sketching, music, and horsemanship. 

Camp Wellesley, West Ossipee. — Spelling, English, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, 
Latin. 

Wawona Camp for Boys, West Swanzey. — Elementary and high-school subjects. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Rand Summer School, AUenhurst.— All college and college preparatory subjects. 

Silver Lake Summer School, Bloomfield. — Common-schooJ subjects. 

Snell Summer Art Class in Italy, Bloomfield. — Oil and water-color painting, and 
sketching. 

Minne-wawa Camp (Algonquin Park, Ontario), Bordentown.— Tutoring as desired. 

Cape May School of Agriculture, Industrial Art, and Science. — Industrial and aca- 
demic subjects. 

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken. — ^Applied statics, hydraulics, mech- 
anism, mechanics, mathematics, physics, chemistry, German, Spanish, descriptive 
geometry. 

City Public Schools, Newark. — Kindergarten, primary, and grammar grade subjects. 

The Ronish School, Newark. — Bookkeeping, spelling, arithmetic, shorthand, type- 
writing, penmanship, English, civil service. 

State Agricultural College (Rutgers), New Brunswick.— Agriculture, manual train- 
ing, home economics, physical training, drawing, and the common branches. 

Paterson Summer School (city public schools).— The common branches. 
17727**— KD 1913— VOL 2 26 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



402 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Training School for Teachers of Backward or Mentally Deficient Children, Vine- 
laud. — ^Training of backward children, psychology' end pedagogy of feeble-minded- 
neas, and tests of intelligence. 

NEW MEXICO. 

Currj'' County Summer Normal, Clovis. — Re\aew8 of common branches, and pro- 
fessional studies for teachers. 

New Mexico Normal University, Las Vegas. — Socioiogj% economics, psj^chology, 
pedagogy', art, household arts, mathematics, Spanish, English, historj', sciences, 
commercial branches, manual training, agriculture. 

San Miguel County Institute, Las Vegas. — nistor^', pedagogy, school management, 
arithmetic, grammar, orthography, geography, reading, physiolog}'-, etc. 

School of American Archaeology, Santa Fe. — Archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, 
history. 

New Mexico Normal School, Silver City. — Common-school, high-school, and pro- 
fessional subjects. 

NEW YORK. 

State Library School, Albany. — Library science, including classification, cata- 
loguing, bibliography, reference, and work with children. 

Auburn Summer School of Theology. — English Bible, apologetics, archeeologj', 
Old Testament criticism, New Testament, theology, sociology, pastoral theologj^, 
prophets of modem literature. 

Summer School for Christian Workers, Auburn. — Bible, theology, church history, 
Christian missions, Sunday school, religious pedagogy, educational psychology. 

Titus Summer School of Dancing, Auburn. — Normal training; ballroom, esthetic, . 
folk, national and interpretive dancing; eurythmics-corrective exercise, music and 
its relation to dancing. 

Dewing Woodward School of Figiire Painting, Bearsville. — Painting the figure in 
tlie open air, composition, uses of various materials, mural decoration, color, per- 
spective. 

Adelphi College, Brooklyn. — Education, English, history, Latin, German, ste- 
nography. 

Bedford Branch Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn. — Subjects of grades 4 to 10, inclusive. 

Central Branch Y. M. C. A., Brooklyn. — ^Arithmetic, grammar, spelling, geogra- 
phy, history. 

Vacation schools, Buffalo. — Sewing, cooking, housekeeping, basketry, bench work, 
chair caning, bookbinding, cardboard construction, embroidery, crocheting, type- 
writing, stenography, cabinetmaking, carpentry, electrical construction, machine 
shop, mechanical drawing, photography, cobbling, oral expression, games, music. 

Chautauqua Summer Schools. — English, modem languages, classical languages, 
mathematics, science, psychology, pedagogy, library training, domestic science, 
music, arts and crafts, expression, physical education, agriculture, practical arts, 
religious teaching, boys* club, girls' club, and kindergarten. 

Catholic Summer School of America, Cliff Haven. — Lecture courses covering Tuil- 
eries and ALhambra; Italy, the home of art; Mexico, ancient and modern; Cuba; 
physical conditions in the solar system; archaeology; history, characteristics, and 
musical value of Gregorian chant; German classical songs by the great masters; folk 
songs; Slav and Latin peoples at close range; Catholic poets of to-day and yesterday; 
spirit and scope of social reform; the Catholic Church and the natural sciences; eastem 
religions r«. Christianity; the Wagnerian music-drama; the footsteps of Christ; devel- 
opment of the French drama in nineteenth century literature; great masters in art 
and world paintings, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 403 

Brooklyn Institute of Arte and Sciences Biological Laboratory, Cold Spring Har- 
bor. — Field zoology, bird study, structural zoology, aninud bionomics, cryptogamic 
botany, plant ecology, eugenics. 

New York Military Academy, Cornwall on the Hudson. — ^Algebra, geometry, phys- 
ical geography, English, chemistry, German, French, manual training. 

Cortland Summer School. — Subjects required for regent's and State certificates in 
New York. 

Camp Wabanaki for Girls, Diamond Point. — ^Art and manual training. 

Camp Otter (Dorset, Ontario), Ithaca. — ^Tutoring in high-school subjects. 

Cornell University, and Summer School of Agriculture, Ithaca. — Education, Eng- 
lish, history, foreign languages, mathematics, music, physics, chemistry, manual 
arts, engineering, biology, agriculture, domestic science, etc. 

Camp Setag, Lake Pleasant. — Geometry, algebra, Latin, botany, French, German, 
English, and arithmetic. 

Kyle Camp, Lawrence ville. — Secondary subjects. 

College of New Rochelle. — Logic, methods, economics, mathematics, Latin, French, 
German, English, history, physics, music. 

Art Students' League, New York (American Fine Arts Bldg.). — Painting and draw- 
ing. 

Miss Bangs' and Miss Whiton's School, New York (Riverdale). — ^Arithmetic, gram- 
mar, algebra, French, German, Latin, folk dancing. 

Brown School of Tutoring, New York (241 W. 75th St.). — All college preparatory 
subjects. 

Chalif Summer School of Dancing, New York (7 W. 42d St.). — Classical, aesthetic, 
.national, interpretative, and folk dancing. 

Chase Art Class in Europe, New York (180 Claremont Ave.) — Painting. 

Columbia University, New York. — Courses, 441, covering agriculture, anthropology, 
architecture, astronomy, religion, biology, commerce, botany, chemistry, classical 
philology, medicine, law, domestic science, drawing, education, engineering, English, 
romance languages, geology, (Jerman, physical education, industrial arts, library 
economy, mathematics, mechanics, metallurgy, mineralogy, music, philosophy, 
physics, physiology, politics, psychology, sociology, stenography, typewriting, 
zoology. 

Gilbert Normal School of Dancing, New York (21 E. 44th St.).— Aesthetic, folk, 
social, and Russian ballet dancing; music in relation to dancing; history of dancing; 
directed practice; and hygiene. 

Harlem Y. W. C. A., New York (74 W. 124th St.). -—Dressmaking. 

Maasee Summer Tutoring School, New York (501 Fifth Ave.) — All college prepara- 
tory subjects. 

National Academy of Design, New York. — Antique drawing and portrait painting. 

National Training School (Y. W. C. A.), New York. — Student courses in Bible, mid- 
sion study, and association administration; physical director courses in normal diag- 
nosis, hygiene, administration, swimming, etc. 

New York School of Philanthropy. — Criminalogy, penalogy, parole probation, and 
related topics. 

New York University, New York. — Courses, 148, covering collegiate, pedagogical, 
commercial, and law departments. 

Mechanics Institute, Rochester. — Courses, 80, covering household arts and science, 
dietetics, millinery, dressmaking, applied arts, design, jewelry, drawing, basketry, 
dyeing, trades, forging, manual training, shop, and iron work. 

St. Regis Camp for Boys, Saranac Lake. — All college preparatory subjects; also 
athletics, water sports, first aid, food values, etc. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



404 EDUCATION BBPOBi*, 1913. 

The Eastern Aflsociatioii School (Y. M. C. A.), Silver Bay.— BiUe study; Amocm- 
tion history; fundamentals of Christianity; Assodation architecture; building super- 
vision and administration; Association bookkeepng and finance; modem civic, eco- 
nomic, and rural im>blems; physiology, anatomy, practical gymnastics; sociology; 
eugenics; community service; also many others. 

Syracuse Univeraity. — Coiuses, 100, covering Knglirfi, Gennan, PMoance languages, 
Bible, chemistry, mathematics, physics, public speaking, botany, Latin, geology, 
mineralogy, zoology, agriculture, history, pedagogy, painting, drawing, and Greek. 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy. — ^Algebra, trigonometry, analytics, cal- 
culus, descriptive geometry, shades and diadows, physics, thenno-dynamics, botany, 
resistance of materials, railroad curves. 

Camp Penn, Yalcour. — Natural history, constructive work, and special reading. 

Camp Pok-OMoondiine (Peekskill Academy), Willsboro. — ^All college preparatory 
subjects. 

Camp Wake Robin, Woodland. — ^Astronomy, birds, trees, flowers, ferns, geology, 
first aid, woodcraft, manual training. 

NOBTH CABOUNA. 

Southern Term at AsheviUe (School of Expression, Boston, Mass.). — Speaking, 
reading, dramatic rehearsal, and method, with special advantages for advanced stu- 
dents. 

Blowing Rock Art School. — Painting from nature. 

Appalachian Training School, Boone. — Public-school branches, Latin, algebra, 
geometry, botany, EngUsh literature, history of education. 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. — Courses, 46, covering English, history, 
Latin, German, French, mathematics, physics, chemistry, astronomy, education, 
drawing, library administration, geography, physical culture, writing, and music. 

J^ational Religious Training School, Durham. — ^Teacher- training, music, commer- 
cial, religious, and literary courses. 

Sunmier School for Teachers (A. and M, College for Colored Race), Greensboro. — 
Arithmetic, civics, school management, dairying, sewing, English, free-hand and 
mechanical drawing, primary methods, geography, physiology, history, geometry, 
child psychology, bookkeeping, algebra, agriculture and nature study, public-school 
music, broom making, beaten-brass work. 

East Carolina Teachers* Training School, Greenville. — Primary methods, pedagogy, 
school management and supervision, English, mathematics, history, hygiene and sani- 
tation, geography, agriculture, drawing, public-school music. 

Wake Forest College School of Law. — Blackstone, equity, evidence, civil procedure. 
Constitutions of United States and North Carolina, real property, contracts, corpora- 
tion, torts. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

State Normal and Industrial School, Ellendale. — Common branches, algebra, 
pedagogy, psychology, manual training, home economics, agriculture, vocal music, 
drawing, primary methods. 

Y! M. C. A., Faigo.— -Public school subjects of grades 4 to 8. 

Y. M. C. A., Grand Forks. — ^Algebra, geometry, history, arithmetic, grammar, 
spelling. 

State Normal School, Mayville. — Normal school and certificate subjects. 

University of North Dakota, University. — College section: Seventeen departments 
open, offering 41 courses, covering chemistry, economics, education, English, German, 
history, library science, psychology, and sociology. Elementary section: Pedagogy, 
psychology, language and grammar, nature study, agriculture, domestic science, 
domestic art, manual training, music, drawing, and all the common branches. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STJMMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 405 

Wesley College School of Music, University. — ^Voice and piano. 

State Normal School, Valley City. — Standard normal and high school courses. 

Northwestern Summer School, Velva. — Subjects required for first grade State 
teachers' certificates. 

Training School for Teachers (State School of Science), Wahpeton. — Subjects 
required for teachers' certificates. 

OHIO. 

Ohio Northern University, Ada. — Courses, 160, covering preparatory and normal 
school subjects, and college work in engineering, commerce, law, pharmacy, music, 
expression, fine arts, agriculture, languages, mathematics, physics, chemistiy, philos- 
ophy, astronomy, and political, social, biological, and geological sciences. 

Mount Union-Scio College, Alliance. — ^Bible, biology, chemistry, education, 
economics, English, geology, Greek, Latin, German, mathematics, philosophy, 
physics, history, methods, agriculture, music, and general normal subjects. 

Y. M. C. A., Ashland. — Arithmetic, geography, spelling, history, grammar, civics, 
algebra. 

Ohio University and State Normal College, Athens. — Daily recitations, 160, in the 
common branches, high school branches, drawing, music, commercial branches, 
domestic, science, manual training, kindergarten, agriculture, college subjects, and 
normal school studies. 

Lake Laboratory (Ohio State University), Cedar Point. — Botany, ecology, ento- 
mology, zoology, embryology, experimental zoology. 

Art Academy of Cincinnati. — Drawing, painting in oil and water colors, applied 
design (china painting, etc.), wood carving. 

Ohio Mechanics Institute, Cincinnati. — Graphic arts, mathematics, science, lan- 
guages, practical shop work. 

Ohio State University, Columbus. — Graduate, imdergraduate, and special courses 
are offered . The following general subjects are covered : Animal husbandry, athletics, 
bacteriology, botany, chemistry, civil engineering, economics, sociology, education, 
engineering drawing, Greek, Latin, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, 
French, school administration, zoology, and entomology; and methods of teaching, 
as well as subject matter, in agriculture, history, art, domestic science, drawing, 
English, geology, manual training, mathematics, meteorology, music, and shopwork. 

Y. M. C. A., CJolumbus. — Subjects of the grammar grades, and high school. 

Defiance College. — Collegiate courses in history, psychology, English, modem 
languages, Latin, mathematics, science; high school branches; normal branches, art, 
and music. 

Denison University, Granville. — Courses, 75, covering history, sociology, Latin, 
German, French, mathematics, physics, chemistry, botany, astronomy, agriculture, 
English literature, methods, history of education, arithmetic, grammar. 

The Commercial-Normal College, Greenville. — Shorthand, pedagogy, psychology, 
high school and common school branches. 

Y. M. C. A., Hamilton. — Subjects of the fifth to eighth grades and German, geom- 
etry, Latin, and algebra. 

Kent State Normal School. — Ck)ur8es, 57, covering education, history, English, 
science, agriculture, mathematics, art, music, manual training, domestic science, 
physical education. 

Camp Wyndcroft for Girls, Kingsville. — Handicrafts, sketching, domestic science, 
athletics, and tutoring as desired. 

Lebanon University. — Philosophy, ancient languages, modem languages, pedagogy, 
mathematics, agriculture, and review of common branches. 

Y. M. C. A., Lorain. — Grammar and high school subjects. 

Muskingum (Allege, New Concord. — High school and college subjects. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



406 EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Oberlin College. — Art, chemistry, economics, education, English, French, geology, 
German, Greek, history, Latin, mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, 
]>sychology, sociology, and zoology. 

Miami University, Oxford. — Agriculture, botany, chemistry, drawing, education, 
English, French, geography, German, history, economics, Latin, manual to^ining, 
mathematics, music, physics, public speaking, physical education, school adminis- 
tration, and special methods. 

* Rio Grande College. — ^Agriculture, English, Grerman, history, mathematics, Latin, 
history of education, pedagogy, and methods in reading. 

Wittenberg College, Springfield. — Eighteen courses in pedagogy, and all college 
and college preparatory subjects. 

Heidelberg University, Tiffin. — Mathematics, English, science, history, languages, 
primary methods, manual training, art, pedagogy, agriculture, biology, chemistry, 
music. 

Otterbein University, Westervalle. — English, mathematics, sociology, history, 
economics, science, pedagogy, German, Latin, French, music, and art. 

West Lafayette College. — Agriculture, music, and all business, normal, and col- 
legiate courses. 

Wooster L^niversity. — Secondary, collegiate, commercial, and postgraduate courses, 
and general methods, oratory, music, domestic art, physical training, and art. 

Anti«)ch College, Yellow Springs. — English, German, French, mathematics, biology, 
histor>', educational subjects, domestic science, agriculture, etc. 

OKLAHOMA. 

East Central State Normal School, Ada. — Languages, mathematics, history, manual 
training, domestic science, physiography, zoology, music, drawing, psychology, 
history of education, pedagogy, etc. 

Northwestern State Normal School, Alva. — Physics, physiology, pedagogy, history, 
mathematics, psychology, history of education, etc. 

Southeastern State Normal School, Durant. — All normal-school subjects. 

Central Stat« Normal School, Edmond. — Education, methods, kindergarten, 
domestic science, manual training, agriculture, biology, taxidermy, chemistry, 
physics, public-school music, drawing, piano, English, mathematics, history, Latin, 
French, German, Spanish. 

University of Oklahoma, Norman. — Psychology, education, English, history, 
mathematics, physics, languages, etc. 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, Stillwater. — Algebra, geometry, 
history, agriculture, domestic science, pedagogical subjects, and the common branches. 

Southwestern State Normal School, Weatherford. — English, mathematics, history, 
geography, foreign languages, agriculture, physics, chemistry, physiology, botany, 
drawing, music. 

OREGON. 

Oregon Agricultural College, Corvallis. — Courses, 65, covering domestic science, 
domeslic art, manual training, agriculture for teachers, education, history, English, 
algebra, geometry, chemistr}% botany, physics. Boys Camp School: Poidtry, horti- 
culture, stock judging, soils, field crops, machinery, dairying. 

University of Oregon, Eugene. — Courses, 39, covering education, civics, nature 
study, literature, etc. 

Willamette Valley Chautauqua, Gladstone. — ^Music, political economy, domestic 
science, problems of farm life and scientific agriculture, elocution, supervised play, 
Bible study. 

Willamette University (Salem), Joseph. — Subjects required for certification of 
teachers in Oregon, methods of teaching, music. 

Oregon Normal School, Monmouth. — Methods, academic, and professional courses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 407 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Lebanon Valley College, Annville. — Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, American and 
English literature, grammar, history, physiology'', Latin, trigonometry, sociology, 
biol(»gy, Greek, German, psychology and education, Bible, music. 

Geneva College, Beaver Falls. — Normal-school subjects. 

Cheyney Summer School.* — Domestic science and art, manual training, primary 
methods, school management. 

Ursinus College, Collegeville. — Latin, English, German, French, history, political 
science, mathematics, zoology, philosophy. 

Darby School of Painting, Fort Wadiington. — Study of the fine arts in drawing and 
painting, including portrait and landscape painting, composition, etc. All work has 
a direct bearing upon the fine arts, and is of practical value in industrial art works. 

Grove City College. — Courses, 100, covering the regular college freshman, sopho- 
more, and junior subjects in each of the departments, normal courses in methods, 
management, reviews, etc., and special courses not given at other times in the yeor. 

German Summer School, Hollidaysburg. — German language, history, geography, 
and art of Germany, phonetics, methods of teaching German. 

Juniata College, Huntingdon. — Pedagogy, English, mathematics, biology, chem- 
istry, Latin, music. 

Franklin and Marshall Academy, Lancaster. — All college preparatory work. 

Institute for Keligious Education, Meadville. — Bible and religious education. 

Pennsylvania Chautauqua Summer School for Teachers, Mount Gretna. — Psy- 
chology, natural sciences, mathematics, languages, art, music, nature study, methods, 
commercial subjects, and physical culture. 

Albright Collie, Myerstown. — Greek, Latin, German, English, and physics. 

Central Educational Institute (Y. M. C. A.), Philadelphia. — Shorthand, tj-pe- 
writing, bookkeeping, English, mathematics, foreign languages, Latin, history, 
chemistry', physics, etc. 

Peirce School, Philadelphia. — Bookkeeping, business forms and customs, business 
correspondence, penmanship, arithmetic, shorthand, typewriting, and English. 

Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Institute and School of Mechano-Therapy, Philadel- 
phia.— Swedish system of massage, medical and corrective gymnastics, electro- 
therapy, and hydrotherapy. 

The School of Sloyd, Philadelphia. — Bench work, reed basketry, rug weaving, 
stenciling. 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. — ^Anthropology, architecture, chemistry, 
economics, English, French, geography, German, Greek, history, Italian, Latin, 
mathematics, music, pedagogy, philosophy, physical education, physics, political 
science, psychology, sociology, Spanish, and zoology. 

King's School of Oratory, Pittsburgh. — Public speaking, dramatics, voice produc- 
tion (singing and speaking), physical culture, Shakespeare, cure of speech defects. 

University of Pittsburgh. — Courses, 151, covering philosophy, psychology, history, 
ancient and modem languages, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, geology, 
mineralogy, paleontology, graphics, mechanics, engineering (civil, mechanical, 
electrical), economics, sociology, political science, education, fine and industrial art, 
household art, music, nature study. 

Y. M. C. A., Scran ton. — Grammar grades and high-school subjects. 

Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove. — English, ancient and modem languages, 
education, sociology, history, mathematics, survejang, piano, pipe organ, harmony, 
school music, etc. 

Lehigh University, South Bethlehem. — Art, expression, and courses in the college 
of liberal arts, conservatory of music, school of business, and the academy. 

1 Negro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



408 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

PeuBfiylvama Free Library CommiBBioix School for Library Workers, Slate College. — 
Courses covering general library work for librarians, and courses for teachers who wish 
to take charge of school libraries. 

Pennsylvania State College, State College. — Siunmer school for teachers offering 96 
courses, covering manual training, liberal arts, domestic science, agriculture, drawing, 
music, sciences. 

Swarthmore Preparatory School. — English, arthmetic, algebra, physics, French, 
German, grammar, history, geometry, trigonometry. 

Washington and Jefferson College, Washington. — Studies preparatory to college, and 
college work of the first two years. 

State Normal School, West Chester. — Psychc^ogy , school management, mathematics, 
Latin, German, history, physics, astronomy, physical geography, botany, agriculture, 
literature, grammar, drawing, industrial work. 

RHODE ISLAND. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Y. M. C. A., Providence. — ^All subjects of the grammar grades, 

ROTTTH rAROT.TVA. 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Winthrop Normal and Industrial College, Rock Hill. — College credit courses and 
courses arranged for the renewal of State certificates, covering education, English, 
astronomy, phjndcs, chemistry, biology, mathematics, history, political science, 
geography, Latin, agriculture, nature study, drawing, domestic art, domestic science, 
music, physical education, penmanship, library methods, primary methods, kinder- 
garten, observation classes, manual training, and industrial arts. 

Wofford College Fitting School, Spartanburg. — ^English, mathematics, Latin, 
physics, economics, modem language. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Northern Normal and Industrial School, Aberdeen. — ^Mathematics, Latin, English, 
German, history, drawing, music, physiography, sociology, agriculture, physics, 
chemistry, botany, manual training, pedagogy, and shorthand. 

Huron College. — ^All secondary and normal subjects. 

Dakota Wesleyan University, Mitchell. — ^Mostly review courses, besides courses in 
advanced English, sociology, and education. 

Redfield College. — Teachers' courses in the common branches; college courses in 
trigonometry economics, German; business courses in bookkeeping, shorthand; acad- 
emy courses in geometry, economics, Latin, physiography. 

Yankton College. — Economics, politics, calculus, history of education, geometry, 
algebra, history, civics, primary methods, drawing, sight singing, botany, and all the 
common branches. 

TENNESSEE. 

Webb School, Bell Buckle. — ^AU high school subjects. 

State Institute for Teachers, Clinton. — Public school subjects and domestic science. 

State Institute for Teachers, Cookeville. — State primary and secondary courses. 
Special attention given to primary work and domestic science. 

Lincoln Memorial University, Cumberland Gap. — English, French, Latin, science, 
mathematics, literature, stenography, and typewriting. 

East Tennessee State Normal School, Johnson City. — Education, school adminis- 
tration, methods, agriculture, industrial arts, science, domestic science, English, his- 
tory, mathematics. 

Summer School of the South, Knoxville.^Agriculture, art, manual training, Bible, 
civics, history, economics, education, psychology, ancient and modem languages, 
English literature, sciences, expressioiM, physical training, health education, kinder- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 409 

garten, piimary and grammar grade methods, library work, mathematics, home eco- 
nomics, astronomy, geology, mining, mechanical engineering, etc. 

State Institute for Teachers, Milan. — Public school and secondary branches, agri- 
culture, and domestic science. 

Middle Tennessee Normal School, Murfreesboro. — Public elementary and high 
school subjects, some college courses, and courses in education. 

State Institute for Teachers, Pidaski. — Public school subjects. 

TEXAS. 

The summer normal schools (see table, pp. 431-32) are held under the direction of 
the State department of education, and offer similar courses covering all the subjects 
required for all grades of teachers' certificates in Texas. 

University of Texas Summer School and Normal, Austin. — Courses, 110, covering 
botany, chemistry, domestic economy, economics, languages, geology, government, 
history, mathematics, philosophy, physics, zoology, education, law, and the regular 
normal school courses. 

Blinn Summer Normal Institute, Brenham. — History, mathematics, English, agri- 
culture, primary methods, and all subjects required for first and second permanent and 
permanent primary certificates. 

West Texas State Normal College and Summer Normal, Canyon. — The regular nor- 
mal college courses and reviews. 

Brittons Training School, Cisco. — ^Mathematics, history, science, English, pedagogy. 

East Texas Normal Collie, Commerce. — R^ular normal college courses and 
reviews of certificate subjects. 

College of Industrial Arts, Denton. — Domestic art and science, industrial arts, 
manual training, agriculture, photography, chemistry, millinery, all public school 
subjects leading to teachers' certificates, and professional subjects as psychology, 
history of education, methods, etc. 

North Texas State Normal College, Denton. — R^ular college courses. 

Polytechnic College, Fort Worth.— Chemistry, education, languages, history, 
mathematics, physics, music. 

Texas Christian University, Fort Worth. — Chemistry, physics, languages, history, 
political science, education, pedagogy, music, oratory, art, business, and all branches 
required in the normal department. 

Southwestern University, Georgetown. — College courses. 

Y. M. C. A., Houston. — Subjects of the fourth to seventh grades of public school. 

Prairie View State Normal and Industrial College.* — Normal courses, agriculture, 
mechanics. 

Our Lady of the Lake College, San Antonio. — Courses, 52, covering English, science, 
mathematics, j^ilosophy, modem languages, classical languages, history. 

Southwest Texas State Normal School, San Marcos. — Biology, drawing, education, 
English, German, history, home economics, Latin, manual training, mathematics, 
physical sciences, music, reading, public speaking. 

John Tarleton College and Summer Normal, StephenviUe. — ^Mathematics, English, 
sciences, history, and teachers' professional subjects. 

Baylor University, Summer Quarter and State Summer Normal, Waco. — ^The 
summer quarter of the college and academy offers courses equal in every respect to 
any other quarter of the school year. TTie summer normal offers every subject 
required for a State teacher's certificate. 

Trinity University, Waxahachie. — Education, psychology, Bible, German, Spanish, 
logic, child study. 

> Nefro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



410 EDUCATION KEPORT, 1913. 

UTAH. 

Agricultural College of Utah, Logan. — Accounting, agronomy, art, bacteriology, 
botany, chemistry, dairying, economics, education, English, history and civics, 
domestic science and art, mathematics, modem languages,, music, physics, physiology, 
physical education, poultry, sociology, woodwork, zoology. 

Brigham Young University, Prove. — Education, applied art, design, public school 
music, literature, plant physiology, agriculture, economics, etc. 

University of Utah, Salt Lake City. — Courses, 128, covering agriculture, art, Ameri- 
can archaeology, botany, chemistry, domestic art and science, economics and sociology, 
education, elocution, languages, historj-, hygiene and sanitation, manual arts, mathe- 
matics, music, nature study, physiology and ethics, physics, physical education, and 
the library school. 

Y. M. C. A., Salt Lake City. — Grammar grade subjects. 

VERMONT. 

University of Vermont, Burlington. — Courses, 32, covering education, languages, 
natural sciences, art. 

State Normal School, Castleton. — Common school subjects, mral school problems, 
elementary school science and nature study, school management, games, sports, 
folk dancing, domestic art. 

State Normal School, Johnson. — Normal and review courses in common branches, 
teacher certificate coiu-sea, normal credit courses, teachers* professional courses, and 
special courses in drawing and manual arts. 

Keewaydin Camps, Lake Dunmore. — Public school subjects. 

Middlebury College. — Education and psychology, English, modern languages, 
sciences, mathematics, art, domestic science, music, Latin, agriculture, history, 
Greek, Hebrew, metal craft, drawing, history of religion. 

Camp Winnisquam, Milton. — Special elementary work, mathematics, modern and 
ancient languages. 

Norwich University, Northfield. — Railroad location, geodetic surveying, topo- 
graphic surveying. 

Kamp Kiamesha, Poultney. — Mathematics, languages, biology, chemistry, physics, 
botany, physiology, and all athletics. 

Kamp Kill Kare, St. Albans Bay. — All preparatory school subjects and college 
work as desired. 

Camp Quinibeck, South Fairlee. — ^Jewelry, leather work, basketry, stenciling, 
horseback riding. 

Camp Hanoum, Thetford. — French, German, geometrj^ English history, health 
crafts, camp crafts, handcrafts, singing, folk and aesthetic dancing. 



State Summer School, Big Stone Gap. — Subjects required for teachers* certificates 
in Virginia, including agriculture, algebra, civics, physical geography, manual train- 
ing, and domestic science. 

Christiansburg State Normal,* Cambria. — Subjects required for teachers* certificates, 
including civics, English history, manual training. 

University of Virginia, Charlottesville. — Courses, 183, covering agriculture, astron- 
omy, biology, chemistry, classical philology, domestic economy, drawing, education, 
English, French, games, geography, German, history, hygiene, manual training, 
mathematics, music, philosophy, physical training, physics, psychology', story telling, 
penmanship, and library methods. 



» Negro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STXMMBE SCHOOLS IN 1913. 411 

State Normal Institute, Chase City. — Subjects required for teachers' certificates, 
including English history, general history, algebra, civics, sanitation, agriculture, 
manual training, history of education. 

Covington State Summer School. — Subjects required for teachers' certificates, 
including algebra, physical geography, agriculture, English history, general history, 
manual training, music, domestic science and art, sewing. 

Emory and Henry College, Emory.* — ^Mathematics, Latin, German, psychology, 
chemistry, education. 

Emory State Summer Normal. — ^All grammar school and primary subjects, and 
algebra and English history. 

State Summer Normal, Farmville. — ^Public-school subjects leading to first-grade 
certificate, and method courses in same leading to professional primary and grammar 
grade certificates. 

State Summer Normal, Fredericksburg. — ^All subjects required for first, second, 
and third grade certificates and for professional primary and grammar grade certificat('i<. 

State Summer Normal, Galax. — Common-school branches, and algebra, pedagogy, 
agriculture, methods, music. 

State Normal and Industrial School, Harrisonbiu:g. — Education, psychology, 
methods, English, Latin, French, geography, history, civics, household economics, 
manual arts, mathematics, music, physiology, physical education, nature study, 
agriculture, ethics. 

St. Paul Normal and Industrial School,^ Lawrenceville. — ^English literature, lan- 
guages, mathematics. 

Manassas Industrial School.^ — ^English, history, civics, mathematics, agriculture, 
domestic science, manual training. 

State Normal Institute, Martinsville. — ^The common-school subjects, and agricul- 
ture, civics, English history, algebra, primary methods, pedagogy, history of educa- 
tion, music, physical culture, physiography. 

Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute,^ Petersburg. — Elementary and grammar- 
school subjects. 

Richmond City Normal. — Courses, 48, covering industrial arts, psychology, educa- 
tion, rural arts, writing, physiology, games, physical education, music, mathematics, 
household arts, history, geography, English. 

Virginia Union University,^ Richmond. — Courses, 33, covering education or method 
work, public-school industrial work, and public-school studies. 

WASHINGTON. 

State Normal School, Bellingham. — All leading academic and professional branches. 

EUensburg State Normal School, Centralia. — The common branches and teachers' 
training courses. 

State Normal School, Cheney.— Agriculture, zoology, botany, art, domestic science 
and art, psychology, principles of education, history of education, methods, rural- 
school subjects, physiography, reviews in common branches, English, German, his- 
tory, oral expression, sex hygiene, sociology, manual training, algebra, geometry, 
music, physical training, physics, chemistry. 

State Normal School, Ellensbui^. — English, Latin, German, history, art, manual 
training, domestic science and art, music, physical culture, expression, mathematics, 
physics, geography, education, and psychology. 

Puget Sound Marine Station, Friday Harbor. — ^Algology, elementary botany, ele- 
mentary zoology, general ecology, plant ecology, embryology, ichthyology, advanced 
ecology, and plankton. 

1 Negro school. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



412 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Vacation School, North Yakima. — Grammar-echool 
Bubjecta. 

State College of Washington, Pullman. — Couraee, 110, covering agriculture, horti- 
culture, home economics, English, Latin, modem languages, chemistry, botany, phys- 
ical education, physiology, physics, history, rural sociology, rural economics, rural 
law, zoology, manual training, education, art, music, and courses preparing for first, 
second, and third grade certificates. 

Northwest Summer School, Seattle. — Algebra, physics, psychology, botany, litera- 
ture, didactics, history, political and physical geography, and the common branches. 

University of Washington, Seattle. — Regular university graduate, undergraduate, 
and teachers* courses. 

Y. M. C. A. Vacation School, Seattle. — Grammar-grade subjects. 

Blair Business CJollege, Spokane. — ^The common branches, history, State manual, 
didactics, music, physics, algebra, civics, and art. 

Jenkins Institute (Y. M. C. A.), Spokane. — ^Algebra, geometry, trigonometry, book- 
keeping, shorthand, typewriting, business arithmetic, rhetoric, business law. 

Spokane Summer High and Normal School. — Prepare for State teachers' examina- 
tions, college entrance examinations, and offers courses in high-school work. 

University of Puget Sound, Tacoma. — ^Algebra, plane geometry, physiography, 
English, botany, zoology, civics, general and United States history, history of educa- 
tion, psychology, theory and practice, and all the common branches. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Concord State Normal, Athens. — Courses, 20, covering Latin, German, mathematics, 
history, science, etc. 

Bethany College. — Courses, 36, covering normal, preparatory, and college subjects. 

West Virginia Wesleyan College, Buckhannon. — Usual courses of academy and 
college. 

Davis and Elkins College, Elkins. — All common-school branches, pedagogy, psy- 
chology, and collie preparatory courses in mathematics, English, French, German, 
and Latin. 

State Normal School, Fairmont. — School management, psychology, history of edu- 
cation, principles of education, algebra, geometry, American literature, primary 
methods, etc. 

Marshall College State Normal, Uuntington. — Latin, algebra, geometry, history, 
art, methods, and commercial geography. 

State Summer School for Colored Teachers, Institute. — Domestic science and arts, 
agriculture, grammar, English literature, general history. United States history, 
State history, civics, geography, pedagogy, manual training, arithmetic, geometry. 

West Virginia University, Morgan town. — Courses, 70, covering agriculture, botany, 
chemistry, drawing, education, English, entomology, French, history, home econom- 
ics, Latin, library science, mathematics, manual training, music, physics, zoology, 
school management, handwork for children, rural sociology, horticulture, agronomy, 
animal husbandry, physical education, and practical mining. 

Salem College. — Mathematics, English, languages, sciences, and pedagogical 
subjects. 

Shepherd College State Normal, Shepherdstown. — English, science, mathematics, 
school art, and professional subjects. 

Terra Alta Summer School. — Subjects preparing for teachers' examinations. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 413 

WISCONSIN. 

The county training schools located at Monroe, New London, Reedsburg, and 
Viroqua offer similar courses covering all subjects for all grades of county certificates. 
All work is designed to meet the needs of the rural teacher. 

The State Normal Schools located at La Crosse, Milwaukee, Oshkosh, Platteville, 
River Falls, Stevens Point, Superior, and Whitewater offer similar courses covering 
all subjects required for all grades of teachers' certificates, and offer work carrying 
credits on the regular normal course. 

Summer Normal School, Eau Claire. — School management, English history, algebra, 
physics, American and English literature, composition, methods in various branches, 
and the model school. 

Sandstone Camp for Girls, Green Lake. — ^Tutoring in elementary and high-school 
subjects. 

Capital City Commercial College Summer School for Teachers, Madison. — Short- 
hand and bookkeeping. 

Indianola Summer Camp and School for Boys, Madison. — ^All high-school subjects. 

University of Wisconsin, Madison. — Courses, 303, covering nearly all subjects regu- 
larly given in all four colleges — letters and science, engineering, agriculture, and law; 
and the library school. 

Stout Institute, Menominie. — Courses, 68, covering drawing, manual training, 
trades, domestic science, domestic art, industrial economics, and applied design. 

Y. M. C. A., Milwaukee. — Grammar-grade subjects. 

Summer Normal School, Oconto. — Courses designed to meet the needs of teachers 
and to prepare for examinations for certificates. 

Algoma Camp, Oshkosh. — Grammar-grade subjects, manual training, library read- 
ing, hygiene, nature study. 

Public Vacation Schools, West Allis. — Elementary and grammar-school subjects. 

Y. M. C. A. Institute and Training School, Williams Bay.— Bible, Y. M. C. A. 
history and administration, railroad school, first aid, physical education, physiology, 
anthropometry, hygiene, anatomy, eugenics, and technical topics of the educational 
school, city school, and industrial institute. 

WYOMING. 

University of Wyoming, Laramie. — Regular courses are given in the preparatory 
school, college of liberal arts, and the normal school; also review courses preparing 
teachers for examinations. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



414 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



•^800 pOf^BlIIpSa 



•5 Ob ^r ^» 



!§§§§§ § 



§§§ gg§ 



as 



Hill 



•SIJIO 



•sXog 



§i-^ 



^SJ3 



823 



'aamoAV 



uaW 



"gSS^gSSggS 8S gga *='g|S §§ 



5gt^»o55ecgo-o§gr^ 83 



04 oooor* 



's" "i 



0|snui 'sam^doi jTJindo j 



«S :*= 



S iS 



''TOO OOfH 



l« 



-nainoAi 



•iwH 



oo •© o 



lO 'O CO 



u 



'IZ9UK)Ai 
■U9H 



o>e<-iC4c<«eo(OU3f-H(0<t 



CHC0^«^^C«C0'««»O8 



or^^M eoa» 



^r^»-ii-i Nio 



•5 

.2 






g. 



'89ai3op joj po^ipaiaov 



dJoooooooooS} 



o o 



o d 8 



d S £ 8 do 



I 



•9S010 



lo t>> C4 00 00 a» ^ r^ 00 •« 

«a H» t-» »-» CO •-» »-, -<; »-, .»-» 



t-»f^ (R 



•« 



'Snfoado 



. 0) 0) a> u.^a> 0) 0) « s 

•3§§§3|§§§§i 



SS 



^a 



-.11 



2«.-ic>««o ooio 



•3 3 3 a S 3 



3 3 .3 3 3 



'^aopaad 

I -epui JO 'uoi;rmjs 

-ai jaqio 'looqas fvin 

' -ioa 'a^anoo 'iC^fiiaA 

I -nm JO ^oogos janmmg 






5zi5 



ll§ 



q A a fl CO 






m 
111 



II 



o-e-; 



ill 

19- 





^2'3h 3 



•^ • -aro • 
3 ea^ j^ti K Q^ 



e£ 






"a 8 



I 

I 

O 

tt 

88 

II 
« 

S3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



415 



IIS i§ :| : 

c>.-t of ; ; 


: Cf«r^" 


Ii 


800 

17.000 

3.000 

350 

2,600 
500 


00 « : 


400 

250 

1,500 

200 


§ i 


l| 


! i i i i ^ i : 






i Mi i s i 


i :S : 




^ i i I 


: M : : ^ : i 






i i is i si 


1 I"* I 




<3» ; 





?S §8« 



$§^88'«®2g5«^ 8*= 



OOt-OO00OC« C40C3 o 



r-l a 



;»" o»eo «■«»• 00 



Ss;38'^'^«S5$® s:: 



Sg3®g5«?S2:= 



wo ! 

1-1 • 


o 


S i i 


i!S2 






1 « «0 lO o 


S i 


Mr-i 














<o 


r^o 


• o • 


: "^^ : 


©^ i 


©O l-HO 


C9 • 


•t-H 
















oo 


loo 1 


"«"* • 


OON"* 




««o :««.o 


to 1 


• o 
















WW 



Othoo r^ to CI fH '<«• f-H © c9 o t» o i-*o 



OOtH©iM00O»h i-iiMCI o «o.-i 



gjo- - 



C4 OOtHOiO 



ec22«**«ooO'-'*oeo« o »-« 



t''*©csc>«ooM escoN 



Sod SS SdSS 



dSSSd 1S9SSS SS 



oooooooo Soo o 
Z^^^^^^Z >*ZZ Z 



OOesM «O00 OOC^NO to C4 00 M lO 9 ^ SP W) .N 



•<"<•-. ■««i»-j «<"<i-,i-, >< «< -«< H, -< "< -«< I-, 1^ .-< i-ai-» 






i-io «oe«i t>. 



g-C OJ 7= CJ -3 9 08 9 



gj«3« :gg52 : jSi 2« 

u.®u»*d®®®dd® ®2 



9iOt>-Q0CI ^iO»-< 



►.>ttMt>> t«>%>» 



dS 









ft 

1 

I 

o 



t§ - 



^ .^ . .►> . . : • • |> ^ ; 



•O "CO "O "tf "P "O "O o'P'P 'O 



J9 

il 

c . 



I 



1 



£| 

O « H 

§11 

pQQ 






ftp 






8 
■& 

"2 p 

HO 



s-s P 



or; 

if" 



II 






< ^ 






n 



i II al i 



I 



II 
n 



o'S® oCPo Oi- 






5 



:? 






I 



ii 

o o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



416 



*)8oo poivinpsa 



BDUOATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

' ' § § gs§§g§ §1 

o 

S5 



^ c*^^ 



§ s^§§ 



Hill 



•SWD 



'sA)a 



'uoiooAk 



So 8®«*8ff s®®® S^^=2 



nwH 



S 8?sa-^~ R5ig8 5!S2aJ:; 












S 
^ 






g. 



I 



i 

00 



H 

n 

< 



1^- 



'OOtllOj^ 



•nan 



'uooro^ 



TOH 



«<««ee'««c 



-BNJ39P Jo; pe)ip9J9or 



I i5 I 



Jh5z;5z;>^>.Sz; 



8Sd8 



8 



•9B01O 



CQ -^ eo 



00 •o ;ao ; 






*9a{ii8do 



:? $; S3 

8 K »-» 



(OQO •« • 

S S S d S 6 

g g g-cj g-o 



'^oapaod 
•«piq JO 'aoDmps 
-u] i9ino 'foocps fvta 

-Jim JO loo qo e jomomg 



8 

1 
I 

i 



§? II 



III 



-(HfcO 






§ '^ I 

8 8 I 
i ^ I 



'8' 



d d S d 



*2S 888-^ 






I ^' s Win iiii iki 



ji 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1918. 



417 



§§ 



U 



§§§ 



§S 



§§ § 



ccoogocv 



§ §§§!§§ 



S :S 



ss: 



S :S 



8^ 



sSS "'Sis 88 S8a:s§ss sas|s«« S'^SSSS^ g li^sssa 

gg« 3SS« 2® S828®SS StSSgSgg ^-'^SSgg g g|S82®S8S 







M 


O 








•o 


o 


• oeoco 




i»go| 




:S««a : 


8 


»- 


«oo :^ 






^ 


O 








CO 


: i® i® 




is i® i 




|o jo ;0 j j 


oocjo 1 






M 


OfH 






« 


« 


lo ;0 


M 


:« Jo 1 


« 


;^ jW jO 


>o 


i 


Moe»o j 



:3S^ 


o«;^c^eo 


8*- 


gSS'^SS*** 


«CO|^0»000 


toor^toxm^ 


»Q 


•*»go^^^o© 


s;s« 


ts^s® 


s^ 


;3«co;go-D^ 


^«ag^aa 


S««22SgS 


^ 


«SOOt^r-lflft«* 


III 




^i 








.» 


^^1^1.^^ 



^s-^a 8« 8«s« ia"* sa^^a i la -^sa^as^s 






33 









•< 4 ■<■<■<■<•< 



•s*" as iS ss ass jssa -«'S2 •-& sg'-as*a s 2s-g» 

lit 11% II ||N|t| ||||4|| lllllll I llllj 



k&t %m II lllllll iiilriii lllllll I lllllll 



I 



S '-70 s> 

^ II 



II 

J 

17727°— ED 1913— VOL ! 



00 OQ 



5s 



Hi 



^mm m sis III I 







-27 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



418 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



'%9oo po^vornsa 



§§§§§ 



§ 






§§§§ § §§§ §§§g 




•siflO 



•E^oa 



5§ 



S3 



S9 S 



izomoAk 



$Si§S^a gg S9S<='§§§3S § gS§ SggS 



•TOH 



ssgsa ®a ^^^'^'SSS^ ^ gs*- sasa 






£S sa 



§ 



I 



I 



P4 

n 



IIOIIIO^ 



•U9H 



p4 .00* •« 'O^ •« 



*U9UIOJ^ 



^^^'^^ 8:: N^dOaogt-g;© 



O Jjl 



»0 e«eo<Dio 



•U9H 



oo«>o>H««« '^t^ *''^^'^*^SSSS 



^:z 



^»o «'<•• 



sa<= 



*8Wj99P jo; p9)ip9J3oy 



SSddS do* SeSdSdSSS 






i 

S 



«2^«>«» -3 jo^as-^a^^sa a is-^ s r« 



•9WI0 









'Sopiado 



i|iit |i ||i|ili|§ 



i ill Nil 



*)n9pn9d 
•«pai JO 'aoi^mns 
-a| j»mo 'fooqas i«in 

-JOn '0Jf9n00 ^^9|B19A 

■pm 10 looqos jomomg 






3 2'^^ tlii 



! 



^ 



I 
1 



Ifll : 

ii|i|5' 



I 



30000 



it ppi 

S£ frills c 



.1 




•9 



B I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



StTMMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



419 



§§§§§s g§§§§§s§ §§§ §§i§ g :§§ 


§§g§§ §§§ : 


: ; :^ : ; \^^ : : : : : : :^ ^ :^^ S :^^ 




; : :<* : : :8a : : : : : : :a S :8i5i S :a-* 





55|§38s a||g|ss8 sag g^SB §"18 -gs^s- a-ss 



8g9sa^ ags§§S9<» ggs tsjsg 



&8 



as«3®a ^«*-- 



•♦egMioeoo 


kOMe«aoio 'OO 


8S£ 


•a-a 


gojgo 


<«>•(: 


eo J J« 


jooo Jo 


.H«oo J Joo 


ooo 


co»Heo J 


ooeo-* 


0«H J J 


1-4,MO<0 


|«f4C(i Jo 


eo«OfHi-i Jeooo 


<ot>.c« 


0O»O'* J 


oo«o« 


.HO J J 


Of^OO 



•VtOiOiOkOM 


"^SS*^"-* 


a«s 


C-D^-J 


•oogco 


0(De«^^o 


eoo^O 


-Dgo«eo^ 


«SSS53^2«» 


sss 


ogog^ 


asa* 


"*3**S"*S 


^w^&e* 


^l^*;S5;2 


^^^^^1^^ 




688 8 


.VV^I 


i^M^ 


an 



sa^sa J 



tt|ttitt 






3 §33 










NiN-s 



« lO M O a» CO »Q CO 

liiiiiii 






• m (Oo»e»o 






lllgll glllSlll III |g|| §131 31111^ llll 



• :g iJ ! i 



III 

III 
III 






lillll 










|4^ 



i 



(Am 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



420 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



'^Goa p99«mpiia 



8'" 



§§ 



§s§g 



§§§ 



§§§s 



lllll 



fill 



I 



•«IJIO 



•siog 



ooooo;««oeo£»ioaoc(i^; 



'adOTOAi 



=»5®SSS 



aa*= 



•TOR 






gjgOcg.H00OjgOag*>O«OOOgg feSgRSa 



;3 



§ 

Q 

X 



s 



I 

.2 



I 



H 

fQ 



'3)9 'q«)|dOJ 



le 



•n9Pio>\ 



•n9H 



•aomo^ 



oo*ooc«0f-40^e«^f 



•TOH 



<oaoe«>oe«rHiM»Qor^e«o •ooo<«oo 



'^eoQOOO^ 



«>oe«'«e«-v 



*8a9i39p joj p9)ipox>oy 



ddddd 'dddsSdSddddd 






•98010 






■^a'-a-^S' 



*8ani8do 



:» 



3 33333333333 §3*«.'«.'« I 



3;:!a :a-* 



^ .t* • -00 



-)U9piI9d 
-9pil] JO 'OOf^im^S 

-ui j9qio 'looqas i«xa 

-JOa '939noa 'A^fSIOA 

-Jim JO looqos J9uiuro8 






•g'O'cco'o 



1 



1 

6 



i9 

to5 



1-3 

Hi 

lig 






III 

fit 



I 



^S 



^•ol . 

§§WW5S 



S 



^1 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SUMMER SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



421= 



i §§ 



i ^1 



§§§ 



§S§§§ 



§§ 



§§ 



3 & 8 8 RS 



OOO O O^ ^«D 



sasssgRi^gg^^-^g^gas^sss^^^s 



O «0 CO 



og 9 |o oo «o«''»«3S«25'"ga®®SSS5J£;8*2S®SS 



QO « • fO 


a : 


j 


oo 


M 








o 


^ ! 


**a 






eo • 














e« 




r-l j O 1 


^O 


o 


oo 


^ 








M 




o • 






^ 


















S i * i 


^'a 


^ 


Of-H 


-• 








s 




« : 






N j 



















ocoo e oco ew c«c««HC9aot»<«'«c«eoOi-i^f-4t^o^^<~ioooeo«Or4io 



s « 


fH 


t-4 


c«g 


•o 


5!® 


O.H 


ooMO-*ooot^»-«OfHOOoMfHO^jgr-if-io^e«eo. 


d d 


1 


^ 


11^ 


1 


^1 


II 


^I^^^^ddddd^dddddddddd^dddd 

jH>i>ijHjHSz;Jz;S55z;Sz;>.;z;S55z;Sz;S5S5Jz;Jz;Jz;Sz;jHS5S5;2;S5 




i 


1 


8S8 


to 

1 


St 







1 1 






^ ^ ^ V •O'CO 

5 5 »S .9 .955 






i 6 1 
-» £ I 




co|||||||||l|||. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



422 



BDUOATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



•jaoo p©»«ran8a 



8 



§ 



§8§ 



§§ 









•8W0 



*8^0S 



2 :- 



38 



S39 



'TOniOj^ 



a§ as J2Sg8S«|«g8«|SR55«|®g|Sg 



•TOH 



oo S^ S«5?J5SS3*5SI«aSSS®252SS5S3 









S : :- 



I 

! 



s 



'iiotnoj^ 



o^^ooo 



•TOH 



^^^MO^ 'O • 'O •0>-4 •^•OdCOO 



ll 



*TO1I70jVk. 



o<H<-4M»fHaoo«ej020coaio^eaogjO|^ 



•TOR 



^« sa •**8a*-sa'^s*'*;:3'-«®'^a'«j2s*a 



•sMjSop J0| po)ip«iOoy 









8 



•woio 



23 -^2 rs-^asas^-^ss^sssss* : : :a«> 



*8ii|U9do 



as -« 






^ 

^ 



I 



n 



'!)1I8piI9d 

-«pixi JO 'aoj^mns 
-Of J9ino 'loonas pun 
-jou 'oifonoa '^II8»A 
-pm ;o |ooqoB jomnmg 



•CO 'O'O 

55 35 



iiliii§'iiiiiiiiii§iil^ 



i 

1 

1 



1 



2|l 



g I 



>^^ 






»|SSSS 



Is 






fil 'l^lll^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BUMMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



428 



§§g§§ §§§§§!§§§§§§ §§ ■ 


300 

9,000 
1,000 
6,600 
2,500 

1,700 
700 


800 

TOO 

675 

6,600 


12,000 

546 
700 
875 
600 
700 
600 
5,700 


is : is 2 i i :g : i i is i i i i : 
• •• •«• ••.. •• •<• 


i i iis8 i i 




■ i i i j j i i^ 


j-v 1 jco o 1 1 joo j j 1 jo 1 • j j j 


i i is- i i 




i i i i j j j J5i 



gSiSSS ^|;S»SSe;!(SSS|c^» SSg &S g-^gg ^^g8S^§2| 9^^$?9g 

tHCto^eOfHO 



'^£32^'^ ocoi-«fi'<#ci«^o^ooo S^gi koo ae>j^io ,hc«'«>- 



•^^^S 





r^ jpH 


-^r^ j |lO<4> 


O 


« 






i « i 


-^ 


"^Oi^^eocot^ 


"* 


O'^io^Mor- 


;«0 jeo 


^^fH 


MpH^^OO 


e 


o 






•♦ 


o • 


o 


OOOi-i«-4^ 1 


w< ,-iO.-i^i-i^.-l 


!iOf-i I o 


Cl-'^M 


tOeOrHMMM 


o 



o 






o 


o • 


CO 


M^igliHM^ ! 


S9 


•oeoeocococi''* 





c90e«c«<4>^eo^MO ^^.''^ 


««s 


w^ 


•4>^OtO 


CO to c* M M c« « ee e 


CO '<«• M i-l M M ^ 


«^«eo;. 


r^oMMMcoeoMMc^cie 


eoMOk 


"■♦O 


$^2*^ 


e4eoc«cie4^f^<4*M 


i-ieoc«wcii-ijH 


d d d d o 


6 d d d d d d d d si d d 


.^4« 


^i 


Mii 


666666iii 


iiiiM^ 


11111 




^«ooo 

lit 




•as • 

mi 


...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 

...do.... 
Aug. 29 
July 30 


• :S8 i •: •; 

; .H»»^ . . . 


s#;i 


S :S«a i« ; 1228 


June 1 
June 16 
June 14 

June 2 
June 16 


...do.... 
May 15 
June 16 
June 18 


July 2 

...do 

...do.... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
June 25 
June 17 
June 23 
June 18 


•^ ia :« :2 


^irii iiit^^^ 


Hi 


a 


an 


iiiiiiiU 


iiiiiii 



9 



h 



lls^l lop ill •ills S(§S p« pIIs |5 1^3 nils nil 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



4^4 



•»9oo p©»«ran8a 



EDUCATION KEPOBT^ 






1913. 

§s§ :§§§ ;!§§§ 



a-= 



'■a"8f 



§§ 



llll 



;ll 



•siJCIO 



•siCoa 



3S9 



8 :3 



:3S^ :8 :S$ : :S8 



S : :15 



'natnoj^ 



gSijaggs ^SiSS^Ss-^iSs §•«§ 



a«as5s:38 "S3§i-8®ISg- 



•5S 



0|8nin ' guiqaei jvfndo j 



CO . •.-I .1-iNeo 



s:3 



^ t^oo 



'neicoj^ 



1 .-4 eo CO M i-i o M 



•TOH 



aoio«o«o^coeoro 



eo-^o •■* •■* • '^ 



*1I0IXI0j^ 



<-4 CO US C« M ^ 1-1 C« 



'-';3^Sa'^S*'®RS® 



•TOH 



^85IS5'«;:;*^S8S5'« 



*8mj89P jo; po^ipo^'S'oy 



dddSdSdd 






S 80 8 



•eeoK) 



eO»0 .QOrHOOiOO 






»aa 



• ;2«8*8'^*S''8 SS« 



'Snpiodo 






'^nopoed 
•9piil 10 'oonn^ns 

•O] JOinO '1000318 t«iii 

-joa 'o8onoo 'X91SAA 



itiii'iii lisiii'iiliii il^i 



I 



3 

I 



,1 



If 

S o 



> .? is So 5 3 M 5 



t 5212 

i il 



a-S^sS*:?. 



if 



J J as gl a 

slllllll isli|9i^.^|si I si 



Digitized by.VjOOQlC 



ST7MMEB SCHOOLS IK 1913. 



425 



§§§§§s §§§§§§§§§§§ ill ; 


;s§§ 


1,500 
1,000 
5,000 
5,000 


1,103 

200 

7,000 

1,500 

6,000 
3,000 


300 
8,000 

1,200 


^*»M«ao J g^gggo-jjggg^g i i i : 




5 ! : i 




\ \ l^ 


OOOOJ..- i 55*5O00c^gOgO j ; j ; 




S i j j 


• • • • * * 


i i is 



00 



«'«flO^ 


;0 


j^<OC*C* 


ji^OOiOCt • II 


2 


a-* : 


iO 








1 o 1 1 


8 


« 


-^ooo 


jo 


■*« i*^® 


joeocoo 1 I • 


c« 


^o '. 


o 








1 VHO 1 




CT 


ooeoo 


•« 


•OiO JTOfH 


• C<'«i#C« • J . 


•o 


'*0 \ 


o 








1 <iO j 




: 



c«^c«cot^t'> ogMC«c«c«togocoi-ie9 



a«2* 



o »«> *o to lO *-t o Ok o »«> ee eo o o 



Of-iOO lOOCS^t^ M 





;5«oog^«eoo^c2« 


oooocoo^ao^Mgc«oc^aoci 


*0.-i»-,cO 


O-^geooj 


.«•* 


5z;?5>iS5>4>4 




6 6 6 8 6 S 6 d d d d d d d 


^1^;^ 


d S d d 8 


66 


Aug. 1 
July 25 
Aug. 8 
July 25 

Aug.'iV 


-<-<S^ = : : : : :-< 


liililFliillll 


Oct. 1 
Aug. 1 
Sept. 12 
Aug. 28 


Aug. 2 
Sept. 18 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 8 





«<oc>i .^ Ok .cootflom 






•»n 1^ •»^»ni-»i-» 



■»»->»-» .»-»mr^»-»t-»*^ 



If III II It s 






: • i : is iiiiiiiiii: !••::::::!:::• : i i^" 8 : i i? i-S a 



ill 






§§5 



M^^ 



I ir Illy. St IP' 







llllsllsliils h 



3 



A»£»H;3aSS£e^^ 



8^ 









pq un^ S2i Pi> 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



426 



•)soap«|sirn<a 



BDUOATIOK KBPOBT, 1913. 

|§§S§§ §§§§§ §§!§§§ 



« i-H«0 



e«Mco 



§1 ;§§§! 



oeoco<M 




•SIJCIO 



-s^a 



*1I9V]I0^ 



3sas5§ 8«9aa s^^gggs ®ss|?®8i2 



n»H 



s;S989;^ 



or* 



«a«s«s«a 






as 



a*8' 



I 

! 



a 



.1" 



.5 



1 



•J 

n 

j2 



TremoM 



OOJ^MO 



•TOR 



=»8« 



O '"O '"O^ 



lioinoAL 



ot^e«<MfHio 



^f:^- 



O«C0MQ0Ot^O 



•TOH 



«oi^e««M<w«^ 



eooOf-iO '«c« 



J5*^*'SSJh75 "^•■♦ojgoiooi^ 



*8mj89P jq« poiipo^'S'oy 



d IB d d d 8 



o o o o o 



jB d d d d dJB 



d d d 8 d d jS • 












P 9 Srp 9 9 9 S* 

•<-<5-<-<-<-<w 



'SuiumJo 



mm 



i^m 









')aoi>TOd 
•«pix| 10 'uonn^ns 
-Of J9qio 'looqos i«iu 

-pro to looqac jggyamg 



iliiii iiisi iiiiiii iiiiiiB 



8 

s 
B 



1 

I 

OS 

I 
I 






as 






o o t 



ik 



300, 

•SQQ, 

m- pq6o5 






Sim 



11^ 



Digitized by VjDOQIC 



SX7MMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



427 



§§ 



l§§ 



§§ 



§§ 



§§§§ §§ 



§§Si§l§§§§P 



ss 



I 



COC30. g«oo|«5o«>ggogg5jj5|a -oggsa 29 •a-*a«>8SJ5|2*> 








: s« 






« -00 I 


S<» 






•* 


•«aa ^ 


:- \ 


rs ^ ua M ^ XT 







I to j 






<oeo • 


J 






\ 


jctmo 


o« j 


fHoe« •M*^^ 




Or^ 


' '^ i 






Ok«<« 1 


a : 









:53«S : 


•*« 1 


eociM ••^•^'« 



§1 



r4 e«e«e 



J-^fXiOOOki-Ht^MOOfHOOOO 



^vHrlOOOO 000 



'«<o^e«iQeo«ao£|io^ 






CO ««^ 8«®5'^^'««S«88aS'"S'* 



f-4*-i«£|<OfH «e« 



<o<oo<Hao>oaoi-4m<oio 



I 



lill 



8 o o d d d « 8 8 0888 odd 



8 d • d d d 
JhS5 :>5Jz;jz; 



g-5 



iiiii^iiiii 






Mliilililllll 



»asas:8 »a "sass" rsa^s 






II 






8 -.»jj .-«-.-c.-g-,Q-gt.g«-.g 

||i^|l|iltitit||||t| 



8a«s2a 
§iSi9§ ._ 



n 



|tilti|§|ti 

m •-» ^m i-»i^ i-» »^ »^ t^ ^ 



I III llllllllllllllll llllll l§ lllllllllll 












1 



I 

OS 

II 

,00 8 






r<\ 



1 11 






CQ 

Sis 
' ifl 







Ill-all M 



Sll 



. .0 



|l||||"^i|| 



^HPnOap 



?>^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



428 



BDUOATIOK BEPORT, 1913. 



•^toopoiBinnsa 



s§l 



!§§§§§ 



§§! 






§§ 



illll 






£ 



•swo 



*8iCoa 



S :3S 



a : :3 : : :8 :a 



sa 



S? :-^ ;SS 



imao^ 



g^sgss^'g^^ssssfissssssags^sgssssis 



•U9H 



Jg-»|ass85sass5;a«»a$28g5ssg8ssg5 






Cl'« 'to 'Ok 



*Tniiiio^ 



•TOH 



p^ (tO-^M 



•IS 

§ 






5 



I 
1 






izoinoAL 



ao«oj^o«e««ooojo^.-i«*^«»i.o«o«oocorj«o^co«« 



•TOH 



CO^^ CO r^«0 r^^H f-4 i-l CO f^ »H i-« © »H 



'SMJ89P joj poi^ipojooy 



^.?i^»? J? •►?i.*is o'i o o J5 0888888808888 






*0B0O 






•SmuodQ 



lltlMiii||iil|iiiiii|p;H5:i| 



'^nopnod 

•9pni JO 'oonmns 

•JOVL '9891100 ^XlISJ9A 

-pm jo looqos J9nniing 



l^llll 



5iams§li§l§1il§ii§ii 



3 

I 



5 
I.- 

lis 

{Sod 

iool 



5:3 



i4f 



|| 



ae •>§■•: -82 '^l 



i<iisi S So5i3i2S2JSIS5 Sif^^^^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8UMMEB SCHOOLS IIT 1913. 



429 



§§§§§ 



§i § 



§§g§l 



§§§§§§ 



§s§ § § § 



§§ 



S3SS 



*«S5 



|gsSS§SS S"8iS3S 



'22^aSS5®aS5l*®S 



to csipoo 



ns^s^ 



g«5g2S£ 



aftcioko»c«iot»t» 



ssss'sa as^s'l^^a^^^s^gs « -^ i^S^^S 



•000*000 'O 


•og :2« ; : 


e« • 


§s£i 


a 












285 


i-«0 


j j-^o^ooo 


xrOMMM^O 




tOf-i 1 


o 












«M • • 


• o 


^ |oo«oeoo 


O^i-i»00>0i-« jtc 




8«« : 


lO 












» j"* 


^o 



•4 0Meo«-4ooc« 



•Htoooooico<Doc«ooe«oo<-<i to i-i c^eoioof^o 



sssssa^* 



i-jr*«^^«o^ 



«t«>c«aoi-4Si-i«^eoao«c«t«eo ^ o oseofc-^t*--* 






S :882:«^S 



So 8 d d^ S 



8 d d 8d8dSdddd8dd 



55 S5 ><S5>ij5><>< 



« .; : :«SS;'^ SS^-^Sa^*" 8^R^SS2SS5*«38S58« • S 2SSS» 



.Qoo^gr 



sa-^a^s^-^asa^sss 



isasss 






|^||iii| i^itti^ iitiiltiiltiiii 1 1 «:iiii§ l| 



I. 



II 






lllllll IglllgSSIIIIlll I s mill 




Jill 

•0»M p'O 03 (8^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



430 



SDUCATIOH BBFOBT, 1913. 



|§§§§ 



§§§§§ 



§§§§§ 



°8 






'^^o 



-afoQ 



I 



Sjcog 



S§^i 



•8228 



sss 



'25«IS 



S88SS S:SSSS8S 






OOOO^ 



OOO^OQ 



"2 

c 

♦^ 

o 

»*« 



s 

I 

S 

§ 



14 



imroii 



-^a- 



«eM»«io.^ 



-as 



*n0dS9p JDf P9||PU39Y 



d 8 d 2 8 d 



88 



^«^:ll 



•000888 



•8 



- :a«a a as S8222 



'Supmlo 






O»l«0k«0 0» 



-HI JMnO '100D38 |«ai 

-pm JO yx>nj8 jgommg 






H liili |Ni§i 






llllll 



8 

1 



I 




I 






CQ 

d 



?l 






I 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



^am 



SUMMEB SCHOOLS IN 1913. 



431 



ll§§§ 




;§ 


§§§§ i§ilig§§§§§§ 


g :§ :g : : 
:« : : : 




i§§§ 

9 ^ 


1! 


i«S i i 


:S3 : 




-»S35S :SS :5 :2 ;.;3 :*• : 


:p« : : :« 


:a \ 


« : ; i 


g« 


i's i • 


!oo * 




«•§ jsa ja ;« is i'^'- : 


.«• j; : JK. 


ia : 


S j ! j 


a'^ 



§3ls§ 9|:8f!8SSSSS§S$|9SS9se8S3§SaSSS8SS3SSg»S§99^SSiS 



c« 


\Of* ^ 


00 • 


MCO 


ci*og I©*"* •coeoociO'^eoi 


^eoptpi '^MO I 


• eo 


•o 


<Deoco«-««ci 


o 


OOi-t 


o • 


• 1-1 


^oc«ei-«c««'^oooc«oe« ; 


jooeooo 'ooo 


\e% 


IH 


O ;OOCOO 


m 


Oi-l»^ 


^ i 


jco 




JOO^MO ;«'«0 


;eo 


^ 


»^ ;>^t4eoeo 






8 o S 6 d 



dSdSo'ddddddd 8^ 6 6 6 6 6 6 6jB66JB69 6 6^6JB^66 66 6 6 6 6 6 6 






eo 'f-i 1-4 'CO • i.^eo»H« i-^eo^ *eo *-! ^ eo rs »h ih fHce .im .eo^cicoCv^eo .^ eo 



eo-«<o-«eot^oo<0£oe^oco«oe^o»«0fsa» :«02S*^ 'S^'^S^^^^ I |«oe«eo \^^ [^ \^ 

o • • • • •'« o 



i§N |iiliiil§ilMiii|Ni||1|||||||M|H||lW ^ 



IIISI III^|§ISSIIII§IIIIIII§IS§IIIIIIIIIISISIIIII 




n^tii 



»:»& 



Hm¥ ^ mi i 1111 i^i-sp it^'^il lilif ^llll 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



432 



BDUCATIOK BBPOBT, 1913. 



18W |NI|«U1|98K 



§ 



§§§ 



S 



§§ 






§§§§§ 



"II 



'^^o 



*siCoa 



*U8IU0M 



S93SS|g|SS§S§9^SS;l9S§SSSS gssgs 



SSS;8^g<='9S93S8S^;:SSiS89SSSSS SSS"*S3 






oeooeo'^ 



•I 
§ 

•S 

s 

3 



r 



I 



I 

1 



H 

m 



*T19niDM 



OeOCIO •OOMOOC«OOC«0^ 



o<D*ooi •ao^<ooiocooc«oioc<« ' ;<<*eooo 



'noniDj^ 



f-ifHfHfHi-4eqao<HO<e<HC«i-«^eoeoi-4«-ifH^C«*H«-« 



•TOR 



iico«<o*oai^i#ao<D'<#io-<4i'<«i'<«i«-<4ieoaeg|^ee« 



sjo«M5ge« 



•SMiaep jo; po^jpojooy 



6666669ooooofBo66o669o^o 






8 



Seo5i»»-« .eo eo . .i-ielei^eo . . . .R^ « 



•9W|0 






*Sii|iiodo 



§ii§^§§§§§iii'.'.|§§§§^'.'. 



S o S o o 



')II»P1I0C[ 

•«pa| 10 'oof^mns 

-Of 1911)0 'lOOIKW fim 

•joa 'aSonpo ^^; |R19a 
'pm fo yxmos jannnng 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii Biii 



B 



1 

I 






1 B B a B p^ 9 5 
' d 3 o 3 3 o o • 3 



bifi 



II 

>2 






ill 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



§§§§§ 






STTMMEB SCHOOLS IK 1913. 438 

§§§§§§§§ g§§s§s§ ;§§§§§ 



§ iiisiiifg 



fHMdiH fH^VOiH 



^ QOfHOO t* 



S 



s 



sas 



!:s9 



oao<^ 



S339 



sg!s®R®®®®8S SSa2S®*2SsSi^®8iS3 |88|ss8*gg5®fess s 



I 



c3®®855SaS®® S;'*g*«88*®*8S?«SSaS'' 



SSS8*8*|agS«S3 



««« jj^O 


• o 1 


00 


ONgC*-** 


(o c« ee o o c« 00 <e 00 M M 


^^-5«o 


asa .; 


M<D 


fHOC«000 


• o • 


c« 


<M • o c« o • 


r^f-iO^«0»^0 000 


O jr^OO 


•-IIO 1 j 


»H»H 


eof«'<voc«c« 


• o • 


e9 


c««;jc<ici j 


MC^OMioto'weeocico. 


^ j^^« 


"*2 i i 


i-iM 



^oo^ouavHOOOOto 



c<eooo^eok<055eoco<o^ot» 



-S»*8 



•OtiOOOrldOftCO'^Or-lOeO 



s^a 



^ctoQiOaoaoo^^^^ 



ocot2io<OM<«>iot«>*o^to«oiot>Okao»« 



o«oj5««»*3 



040Ma^OkO«-He<3t»<0'««D^ 



s«a 



SdodSdSdddo 



ddSddSSddddddddddS 



odddSdSdSd odd 



•<»^»=»0Q •<•<•< CO CO .•< 



ftNt-r^ .^«a^ 



-.ssa-^sss'^s'^^*'^ 






t- 









»-»»n»-»»-» •»^t-k»-» 



•»-»»n^»»-»l-»l-»>^ 



liliititiiili 



•-» H> Hi 1^ »-»»-» H» l-» H» l-» Hi H» H» 



? I? 



Iiiiii^iils iiliiiiiiiiiiiiii^ iiiiiiiiUiii 




2S 







1% " 



S7« 



III? 



i^ 









17727°— H) IdlS— vol. J 



: 'sir ill-* 

—28 



IHllll'T 



pquqm^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



434 



•taoo pstamnsa 



EDTTOATIOir BEPOBT, 1913. 

§§§§§§§§§§§ §§g 



f-«wwiMf-<»-i»H«e^^ 






§§§§§§§8§i 



IPII 



•«wo 



*8Xoa 



S 



S :^ 



S3 :S ;3 



I 
I 



'oamoii 



s«ss5:ss|S88 S^a^'^3«SS^S»'^2'^2s9 



•TOK 



555SSoSS3S5!SIS!2 ««SRS3S®558l:-»a88!8«' 

•-< n «-l If4 






OMOee •oc«ioc 



«D^aO 'lO 



lOtOOCOMOO^^ 



I 



¥ 



'namoii 



OiHOO 'On 



•TOK 



0<-400 'OO 



eooooeoMiMO 



c«c« •r«<oOiHeeoe«-<*ie« 



ll 



TWOIOM. 



c««'«iH^eocookC«e«o 



co^aoc«c«ao-«e«aooco*o^oao«o*-« 



•SS^S3 



eo iH o m m Qji «-« o e« r4 ee *^ lo e« n ^ 09 



*8Mi89p Jo; po^nMJOoy 






6666dS66dd6666dd6 






1 



•8 

8 



*esoo 






aOiHQooa!'H 






*8u|uimIo 



Mi^.iip;ii 



m»-» •»-» •►^H»i-» 



sas-'a :as''sssas -.a 

lillll^tlfllllMi 



*)ii9pind 
-•imf JO *uo\%n%\'\a 
-HI J9q|0 'lOouM pnn 
-joa 'mnoo *A^ [M»A 
-pro JO XOOH08 jwninng 



iiiiiiiiiii iuiiiii^iimiii 



1 



m 
< 



1 




13 






iimniifii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BUMMSB SCHOOLS IN 1013. 



435 



sg§§is§ § 



^^IR^ 



'S8S 



ssi^«r 



«5sia-»gss 



oococt"* '» 



m-vgmmoo 






6 6 d 5 6 6l) 



III33II 












Millll I 



2 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER IX. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATIONS. 



The following tables (1-22), with illustrative graphics, supplement 
the historic review of the educational work of the Young Men's 
Christian Associations contributed by Mr. George B. Hodge, educa- 
tional secretary of the international committee of the association, to 
the first volume of the current report (Ch. XXVI, 1913). 

From Table 22, which summarizes the details presented in the 
itemized tables, it appears that the number of different students in 
organized classes maintained by the associations increased in the two 
decades 1893 to 1913 from 12,000 to 72,842, or sixfold. The receipts 
from tuition alone rose from $2,000 to $714,035, which is the most 
striking proof of the vital demand met by the provision. The work 
of classes is supplemented by circulating Ubraries, lectiures, talks, and 
educational clubs for debating conferences, etc. The expenditure for 
this work, which has been growing by leaps and boimds, reached in 
1913 a total of $990,415 and is at present fuUy up to the million mark. 

Table 1. — Annual cost of association work as a tcTiole-^AU departments — Per 

capita of population. 




1896 10.037 



1901 10.043 



1906 10.055 



1909 10.078 



1911 $a097 



1913- 10.119 

437 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



438 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 2. — Aaaociations in ivhich over 5,000 hooks were drawn and read. 



Ala. Mobile 6,767 

D.a Washington 11,998 

Kans. Hoisington (R. R.) 5,807 

Minn. St. Paul (R. R.) 6,390 

Mo. St. Louis (R.R.) 6,500 

N.Y. Albany 28,387 

Brooklyn (oen.) 9,605 

Buflalo(cen.) 9,345 

New York City (23d St.) 23,763 

New York City (wert side) 76,458 



N.Y. New Yortc Oty (Madison Ave. 

R. R.) 26,388 

Pa. AUentown 6.281 

CSoatesville 7,907 

Philadelphia (oenj 6,979 

Philadelphia (P. R.R.) 261647 

Renova(R. R.) 7.00O 

Sunbury (R. R.) 7,814 

Wash. Roslyh 6,721 



Table 3.- 



'AsBOciations reporting SO or more educational lectures and practical 

talks. 



Ont. 
Ala. 

Conn. 

Oa. 
Iowa. 

m. 



Ind. 

Iowa. 
Md. 



Mich. 



Brantford 52 

Mobile 51 

Los Angeles 137 

Har^i^ 66 

NewBritahi 84 

Cohimbus (colored) 60 

Harrison 90 

Chicago (bd. of managers) 154 

Chicagotcen.) 73 

Chicago (Sears-Roebuck) 87 

Gary 50 

Indumapolis 68 

Davenport 78 

Baltimore (oen.) 70 

Boston 86 

Boston (Ford Mem. Br.) 62 

Cambridge 60 

AnnArbor 92 

T<anslng 86 

Minneapolis 34 



Mo. KansasClty 37 

St. Joseph 62 

St. Louu (north side) 33 

N.J. Camden (R.R.) 56 

Plainfleld 61 

Trenton (R. R.) 159 

N.Y. Buffalo(oen.) 90 

New York City (Harlem) 06 

Ohio. Chiclnnati 50 

Dayton 69 

Debware 61 

Oreg. Portland 73 

Pa. Bumham 130 

Fhlladelphta (cenO 52 

Philadelphia (P. R.R.) 212 

Wilmerdlng 83 

Tenn. Memphis 67 

Tex. Sherman loO 

Wash. Seattle 69 



Table 4. — Associations reporting 5 or more educational clubs with 100 or more 

members. 



Calory, Alberta. 

Ormit, Ontario. 

Los Angeles, CaL 

San Francisco.. (}aL 

Denver, Colo 

Hartford .Conn 

Tampa, Fla 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

Freeport, Ilk 

Wichita. Kans 

Boston, Mass. (Ford Mem.) . 

New Bedford, Mass 

St. Louis , Mo. (north side) . 

Sedalia,Mo 

Omaha, Nebr 

Trenton, N. J 

Albany,N.Y 

New York, N. Y. (east skle) 



Number. 



Members. 





160 




160 




.249 


16 


800 


17 


176 




113 




112 




114 




103 


13 


121 




160 




165 




200 




215 




100 




160 


19 


286 




126 


8 


279 



Nyack.N.Y 

Troy,N.Y 

White Plates, N.Y 

Spray^N.C 

Clnobuiati.Ohfo 

Dayton, Onto 

Xenla,Ohfo 

Portland.Oreg 

CSoatesville, Pa 

Philadelphia, Pa. (cen. ). . 

Pittsburgh, Pa. _(E. L.) 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (HiUTop Br.) 
Scranton,Fa... 
Columbians. C. 
Memphis, Tenn 
Sherman, Tex 



Newport News, Va. (colored). 
SeatOe,*" • 



,Wash. 



Number. 



Members. 



7 
6 
6 

18 
8 
6 
6 
6 
7 
8 
9 
8 

12 
5 

10 
5 
6 

10 



101 
143 
120 
831 
175 
186 
200 
200 
102 
825 
180 
177 
855 
115 
280 
880 
138 
342 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG MEN S 0HBI8TIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



439s 



Table 5. — Asaodatkms reporting claas-lecture series, each vHth 60 or more 

students. 



Sessions. 



Ala. 
CaL 
Del. 
Ind. 
Md. 
Mass. 



Mich. 
Minn. 
N.J. 
N.Y. 



Ohio. 
Oreg. 
Pa. 

Wash. 



BirmiDghaixi 

San Francisco 

Wilmington 

Indianapolis 

Baltimore (cen.) 

Lawrence 

Pittsfleld 

Worcester 

T4 \n ff hi g 

Minneapcdis 

Trenton 

Brooklyn (Bedidrd). . , 

Brooklyn (cen.) 

New York (west side) 

Poogfakeepsie 

Dayton 

Portland 

Phi]adetphia(cen.)... 

Scranton 

North Yakima 

Seattle 



5 
62 
34 
49 
49 

6 
39 

3 
16 
129 
53 
142 
91 
90 
10 
72 
164 
47 

3 
14 
42 



Table 6. — Enrollment in educational classes among different groups of asso- 
ciations. 



Associations. 


1906 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


City associations 


41,296 

2,978 

471 


62,566 

2,679 

602 

253 

1,120 


61,790 

2,640 

621 

737 

960 


78,469 

8,200 

616 

1,120 

i;i66 


81,808 

2,591 

409 

1,476 

1,170 


90,271 

2636 

642 


Railroad assodatiwis 


Colofed associations 


County associations 


^'Si 


Army and Navy associations. 










Total 


44,744 


67,010 


66,638 


79,660 


87,509 


96,400 





Table 7. — Number of different students in regular class work. 



1896 


22,600 


1897 


26,200 


1899 


34,080 


1901 


26,906 


1903 


80,622 



1906 36,480 



1907 42,948 



1909 46,948 



1911 61,850 



1913 72,842 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



440 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1013. 



Table 8. — Students in class work — Associations reporting over 500 students^ 
and whose numbers are 20 per cent or more of the association membership. 



Aasociationa. 



Stadents.! P«r cent. 



Out 
Que. 
Cal. 

Cola 

Conn. 
D.C. 

m. 



Ind. 
Md. 



Hioh. 



Ha 

N.J. 

N.Y. 



Ohia 



Oreg. 
PaT 

Wash. 



Toronto (west end) 

Montreal (oen.) 

Los Angelee 

San Francisco 

Denver 

Hartford 

Washington 

Chicago (cen.) 

Chicago (Div.Bt.) 

Chicago (Sears-Roebuck) . . 

Indianapolis 

Baltimore (cen.) 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Lawrence 

New Bedford 

Springfield 

Worcester 

Detroit 

Minneapolis 

St Lotus (cen.) 

Newark 

Brooklyn (Bedford) 

Brooklyn (cen. ) 

Buffalo (cen.) 

New York City (east side) . 
New York City (Harlem).. 
NewYork(?ityr23d8t.).. 
New York City (west side) 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Portland 

Philadelphia (oen.) 

Wnmerdlng 

Seattle 



717 


43 


668 


31 


1,807 


31 


766 


20 


661 


34 


760 


89 


626 


23 


i>8a4 


47 


986 


71 


665 


38 


843 


26 


788 


26 


2,106 


47 


1,102 


190 


692 


S4 


500 


47 


675 


«8 


878 


58 


1,176 


23 


827 


63 


606 


22 


879 


33 


1,062 


33 


984 


32 


756 


» 


627 


48 


718 


66 


1,702 


44 


2,721 


46 


921 


44 


1,580 


43 


637 


33 


845 


37 


1,506 


29 


2,176 


43 


1.067 


45 


1,397 


30 



Table 9. — Railroad associations having 50 or more students in class toork. 



Ont. 


Kenora 

Pine Bluff 


Students. 

90 

63 


Pa. 
Va. 


Enola 


Students. 
50 


Ark. 


Philadelphia (P. R. R.) 

Reading 

Scranton 

Tlfnhtnond . 


873 


m. 

Iowa. 
Mass. 


Chicago (C. & N. W.) 

Boone 

Springfield 

BeUwood 


60 

M 

55 

106 


70 

838 

339 


Pa. 







Table 10. — Boys* summer schools, 1912, with 25 or more students. 



Cat 



Colo. 
Conn. 



D.C. 
Fia. 



m. 



Ind. 



Students. 

LosAngeles 70 

Pasadena 80 

Denver 28 

Bridgeport 42 

Haruord 30 

Washington 55 

Jacksonville 25 

Pensacola 26 

Tampa 45 

Chicago (cen.) 50 

Chicago (DI V.St.) 48 

Chicago (Sears-Roebuck) 81 

Chicago (N. 8. Boys' Club) 153 

Richmond 25 

Chelsea 28 

Everett 35 

Lynn 65 

Itekien 80 

Melrose 29 



Btudeots. 

Somerville 5 

Springftald fj 

N.J. Paterson g 

N.Y. Brooklyn (Bedford) 87 

Brooklyn (een.) « 

N. Dak. Grand Forks S 

Ohio. Columbus. ?? 

Hamilton fl 

Lor ain...... 50 

YoungitQwn 40 

Greg. Portland 27 

Pa. Philadelphia (cen.) 89 

Scranton 75 

R.I. Providence <• 

Tex. Dallas 58 

Houston 114 

Utah. Salt Lake City « 

Wash. Seattle 97 

Wis. Milwaukee 203 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG men's CHBISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 
Table 11. — Boys* departments with 100 or more boys in class work. 



441 



Que. 


Montreal (oen.) 


Boys. 
230 


N.J. 
N. Y. 

N.C. 
Ohio. 

Tex. 
Utah. 
Wash. 
Wis. 


Trenton ; 

Brooklyn (cen.) 

New York City (east side) 


Boys. 
102 


f§1 


T/08 Angeles 


362 


171 


Conn. 


Bridgeport 

JacksonviUe 

Peosaoola 


10ft 

184 

116 

462 


112 


JFIa. 


New York City (23d St.) 


266 


m. 


Troy 

Charlotte 

Coiumbos 

Hamilton 

Portland 

Philadelphia (cen.) 


100 

116 




Chicago (biv.' St.) 


123 


126 




Chicago (Seara-Roebuck) 

Chicago (N. 8. Boys' Club) 


169 

153 


143 

281 


Ind. 


Indianapolis 

Baltimore (oen.) 


212 

231 


212 


Md. 


Williamsport 

WilfnArrling 


150 


Ifass. 


Boston 

Detroit 

Kansas City 


167 

219 

..... 147 


IHO 


Mich. 
Mo. 


Houston.. ."! 

Salt Lake City 


114 

122 


N.J. 


St. Joseph/. 

Camden 


101 

Ill 


Seattle 

Milwaukee 


272 

239 



Table 12. — Expenses of local educational work, not includinff rent, light, and 

heat. 




1906 $310,600 



1007 1438,000 



1909 $570,070 



1911 $737,899 



1913 $990,416 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



442 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 13. — Expense of educational work — Associations reporting eduoatianal 
expenses over $3,000 where such amount is 15 per cent or more of tHe total 
current expenses of the association. 



Associations. 



Expense. 


Percent. 


111,060 


37 


48,742 


21 


7,7» 


15 


38,282 


24 


7,152 


16 


5,050 


18 


102,092 


56 


18,831 


39 


6,805 


21 


10,015 


15 


30,598 


25 


22,290 


25 


20,589 


20 


7,501 


18 


5,567 


16 


41,611 


34 


83,044 


35 


29,386 


52 


28,583 


83 


10,624 


21 


41401 


17 


28,383 


18 


20,175 


15 


4,111 


15 


5,386 


30 


4,100 


16 


21,585 


18 


7,060 


16 



R«oafpt9. 



Ont. 
Gal. 
Conn. 

ni. 

Ky. 
Mass. 

Minn. 
Mo. 
N.J. 
N.Y. 



Ohio. 



Pa. 



Utah. 
Waih. 



Toronto (Broadview br.). 

Los Angeles 

Hartford 

Chicago (cen ) 

Chicago (Div. St.) 

Louisville 

i).*.* 
em) 



910,037 
43,302 
7,7» 
26,420 
3,886 
4,335 
100,068 
10,301 
6,140 
10,066 
28,752 
18,002 
14,724 
4,062 
3,545 
35,183 
77, 707 
34,135 
36,421 
8,780 
3,104 
23,260 
14,338 
2,400 
4,106 
3,943 
15,454 
8,676 



Table 14. — Enrollment of students in different groups of subjects — for six 

years. 



Cooraes. 


1908 


1909 


1919 


19U 


1913 


19U 


(Vv^vf^ial 


18,277 
11,796 
824 
11,500 
2,345 


21,281 
12,566 

1358 
17,000 

4,806 


22,000 
14,246 

1,613 
18,800 

9,879 


27,400 
17,041 
1440 
21,500 
12,179 


29,800 
17,860 
1,668 
24,900 
13,091 


83,000 
19,060 
1,754 
28,700 
13,890 




UsAhinA tLniy buiidinc tndeff r 


TAnjpi*{>A and academk^ , „ , ^ ^ , . ^ . ^ . . . 


If t^^Wkf ^TMM>U8 .. ... 




Total 


44,744 


57,010 


66,688 


79,560 


87,500 


05,400 





Table 15. — Associations reporting day work with 50 or more students. 



Students. Expense. Baoeipts. 



Ont. 
Qua. 
Ark. 
Cal. 

Colo. 

Fla. 

HI. 

Md. 

Mass. 

Mloh. 

Mo. 

N.Y. 



Ohio. 



Oreg. 
Pa. 



Wash. 
Wis. 



Toronto (Broadview br.). . . 

Montreal (oen. ) 

PineBlulI(R.B.) 

LoaAngetes.... 

r.').*::: 

sV.;'.'.*. 

It side) 



96 
107 

53 
878 

68 
238 

97 
494 
110 
670 
215 

75 
180 
109 

58 
240 
798 

58 
221 
108 
564 
107 
135 
160 

58 
145 
159 

57 



11,863 

1,680 

466 

34,013 
8,000 
4,696 
1,487 

300 

89,904 

8,750 

180 

2,001 

2,503 

2,000 

6,655 

80,000 

4,610 

700 

14,410 

2,630 

4,000 

360 

237 
6,000 
8,300 

413 



83,000 
3,679 



81,085 

3,500 

4,74S 

1,303 

10,779 

300 

. 40,7W 

8,750 



7,020 
3,190 
3,000 

85,000 
7,850 

770 

11,646 

2,250 

4,000 

260 
884 

7,108 

4,000 

657 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG MEN S CHEISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



443 



Table 16. — Boys* educational roU of honor, 191S, 
(/n eonneetUm with the annual iniemationat examhtationa.) 



Asooifttions vlnnlng the largest actual number of 
certificates among boy members. 



1. Portland. Greg 214 

2. Chicago (cent.), ni 84 

3. Rochester.N. Y 17 

4. Coming (R. R.), N. Y 16 

5. Washington. D. C 16 

6. IthacaTN. Y 14 

7. Mobile,Ala 13 

8. Hartford, Conn 13 

9. Jacksonville, Fla 13 

10. Hamilton, Ohio 12 



Associations in T»hich the largest per cent of boy 
members won certificates. 



1. Portland, Greg 28.2 

2. Chicago (cent.), HI 21.3 

3. Coming (R.R.),N.Y 19.2 

4. Ithaca,N. Y 10.5 

6. Mobile,Ala 7.0 

0. Rochester. N. Y 4.8 

7. Jacksonville, Fla. 3.3 

8. Hartford, Conn 3.1 

9. Hamilton, Ohio 3.0 

10. Washington, D. G 2.6 



Table 17. — Aaaociaiions in tchich 15 per cent or more of the students took 
and passed the international examinations. 



Association. 


Certifi- 
cates won. 


Per cent. 


Association. 


Certifi- 
cates won. 


Peroent. 


Ont 


Gait 


11 

32 
36 


18 
63 
16 
28 
17 
80 
10 
23 
34 
19 
25 
40 
100 
633 
66 


N.C. 
Ohio. 

^^- 

s.a 

Va. 


AdieviUe 


7 
6 
2 

46 

4 

870 

23 

U 
5 

35 
7 
6 

13 
5 




C<^*^. 


Waterbory 


16 


ir^nf. 


Topeka(ft.R.) 

Beverlv ---,---.-- . 


U^mifAAM... , 


16 


ICass. 


Faimttvill^ 


16 




ChelsM 


Springfield 


16 




Ifethuen^ 


WaadbLtiigtoQC.H 

Portland 


16 






25 




Taunton 


Butler 


18 


Mlob. 


Adrian... 


Chester 


16 




Ann Arbor. 


Hftffl^^n 


17 




Battle Creek 


York 


40 


N.J. 


Pl^infl^Id 


Greenville 


15 


N. Y. 


Aubum 


CharlottesviDe 

Newport News. 

Richmond 


20 




S??»«-''-^ 


82 
16 











Table 18. — Tuition receipts from students, not including membership fees, 

1808 82,000 




1907 8266,363 



1900 8366,605 



1911 8528,206 



1913 ri4,036 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



444 



llssg 



EDUCATIOK BEPOBT, 1613. 

a 



I 



•2. 



Itgl 



g§ 



§ § 



m% §§!§ § § §f 



im 



i§ S3 g§ §§!§ §§§1 § f SI 



r^ ,^ Ci 



m¥ 

do«53g| 



5 5 

>* >* 



ss : : s 



^ 



Co 

•I 

I 






o 



j 

I 

i 
I 



n 



3^81 






So 



ii^ 









i^ii 



I 



m sS &§ &!§§ Sigs I s ^9 



{;» 



s* s 



a" g 



««• ooe* eo>«coco »«oc^e4 



S 



Sfc « 



S£ 



51 J3S 



SS 8 ^^ 



§a 8-^ 



■V* 5P«e 



s«a : sss*- 












a^ 



II 






I 



t 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG MEN S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



445 



;( : : S^ 



es 00 ••I 






§ nn^MBM 



i ggg S § §S§ 



§ iS§l§SS i 



§§si§§» g I §3§ i § gi§ 



«o t«C4e< CQ w9 eOf-ic< 



8 • 


o' 


S i 


i 


8 


SSS 


8 


8 


Hi 


.8 






JH 


^JH 


jH : 


JH 


JH 


^ijHjH 


>* 


JH 


{HJH>* 


Jh 







s !s|S§sss s Sa-gSS2 g i S§8 g g ssa 



|"»88i5 



S S8S8gS 



S 3SS 



5 ;5a 



«S;5-»c5'«'^ a C0C5-,«O»00 



a a sa« 



fi|S5|aS 



3 a S S39S 2 



•o «>t:«a-»«»« 



Sass"* 



-»S3*'S «" ^ 55513 • a S*= 



i iS§ 



sags 



i a § 



§ S 



pi 

i 



8o 



fill 



AOf^i 



I 






a i 



^11 § I 



<mc 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44» 



I 



! 



m 



EDUCATION RBPOBT, 1913. 






mn 



S i§88g i§g s 



S3S 






1 



S 



I 









1111 



lin 



-in 



1^ 









till 



ggS§&|gSS ggs2§ ss| § § gg§ 



a;^'' 



8 jg S 8 



88 : :8 



8 9 



ggllgsggg |g§S§ gas 8 s gS- 



sss 



S9SS 



S3 



Sf!»S;S3 



9S 



8 S^g 



a8«*a •«« • 55 a«^ 



8 S8 



gissfcsa;;:?^ S8'^;ss is* 



S S 8 



e« 



§3 



II 



§s§ 






8 g 



« 
3 

2;al 



g 









I 



i 



"a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG MEN S 0HBI8TIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 447 



;;;;««; j^ ; ; 


io^^« 


. . .e»» . 


: :g o gj3ig : 


i 


867 

415 

2,102 

4568 




3§i i9i 1 SSi§ 






8 


8 




















88 : 


88 


8 : 


88 


8 88 


8 


8 8 




>< 


>* 




















jH>. : 


{H>^ 


^ : 


>H>^ 


JHJH>^ 


►^ 


►^JH 








3SS^SS« SSS ggS 3 §sss 



feg ::?« :'«38 : :^5$:5 



SS:S S :S ^33 {: :::SsSS 



OI4D •MtOiOOk'^O 



-ss 



8:5««s : sfc« sssi a 



ss 



21392; 



SSSS^^Ir 



2« SgS 3 S!S8| 



8*8 



M.HtHt^e«r>eetHio 



2"SSa SS- feSS * :( :»5 



§§ 



S i i i iii ii§ 



a ; iS§ S8§ §s| 



§i 



Mil 



sl^i 



nn< 






& §< 






U 



R?40Q MOQCQ O 



ll 



Jill 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



448 



EDUCATIOIT 9EP0BT, 1913. 



I 



I 






t««H ;r« • ;e«oo«en ;**JS :'^^S 



§3-3 









3§§§l 



8S |S I 









a 
^ 



lili 



8 888 :8 : 8 :88 . 



gfl® o 



§ §§S^S^ §SS§§SSS^§S^I§§^§ s^ 






{oS*5585 288g8« 



255 



I 



ill 



"- a!5®«S : 8«!2fe^S 



dcotoh-^aoe<<«i •o»i^t>«o^ 



•oeo QOcQ 



S3 "I 



!) SSioSgg gSS3:;083 



n9 



88 



'8 
o 

1 



j 



I 

I 



I 



Hill ill 



S S la^Sa 2*S : : :»23»-°S2 :8SS 3 



Wi 






ss 



nn 



IP 



€1 



filll 



^ d 



i^' 






i 

5 

^ o 






SI 



nM» 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNG men's CHBISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



449 



:~S 



s-»a- 



9SS 



as'-s 






^iU % g§§§g§i§SSg 



§8 6 SS§ 



gsiiiSi 






ssss 









5SgSS2gS|S||3| I S8S5SJ2SS3SRS82S8 g li§S38Rgg|fe§S 



aSffSeg :8 :SSSR g g*S8S^S : : j'-g :• : g :gS8l8S«SS8a'* 



•SfeS^S?FJ'^S 



2*^S S 



>ot»e«4Die^«c»>eio«-i^iot«e4 oo t<-c«e«tH«^eookOkO»<D i^ 



9 •-as'^s^ 



^s;s9 



ssas 



S| 



§ 5 



»i 



s& 



s:s 



|§:8^9SS^ 



eoQeo»^g^je« 



22*^8 n 



«2wSc5<o 



ooeo^ g W(0 



<DC9lO '00 



ss 



sSi 



IIS 



ScqS s» 



cf eoef 



: 'o :::::§;• id : ::::::: :g : :4 -Sl^ ••. 'I : : idSS^bi itfrt 

ijiiiiiii^ii I iiiiii i ri 'iii^i^^iiiiiyi 



17727**— ED 1913— TOL 2 ^29 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



450 



EDXTOATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



1 






:§ 

^ 






Ilsl 












§gs i IS 






IHM 



i :5 



555 



Ji ^ 



Has 



g^S s 2«^ S2i§3 s §t8|is g s 






2S 



25a g 



I 






<DCO XiOt«0000 ^ t^io-^^ 



m 



llllii] 



§S S S3 



S|| 



g-S 



^ n 



H 



9 ssas s • 



S 



•s 
§ 



'Mi 



s" 



H 






e3 



lis 



H 



I" 



lllflP 
llllll 



c 



ill 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



TOtTKO MBK's OHBISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



451 



sn 



§fB 



§sg§3 g 



11^3 §3§ S§is§§§ § «§§ 



•^ at^eo 






38§| SS8 feggaggi § sjs 



ss 



g«8 



»c»coe« ^c 



'fsisa 



s s 



3« 



■«aa -»•- a** fsass a "c- 



i :§ I ;§s i§ 



«8S 



sf 






ill! 



II 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



452 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 












'ZSR 



sttisass 



RS 



ass 



S8«-3gK 



m 












ilil 



s? 



III! 



SS8 :98988SS :8 :S8 : :8 : :SS8888 :88 : :SSS 



sS§S«SgSgS§l§S«'§g§»i«s§Sg§9«SI§S2SS3S§ 



t«e«^^ ^o «»-«« 



"8 
1 



$ 



I 



I. 

«5 



9 

n 






l^i 









illi 



Mi 



s|§2 iSisgssiB' iSia'ssftggaais :§ssssgssg 



8S2-"'8SRaSS'-2«*6ffa26- 



9!§St;|:a«l5gg2||Sg:38 



3§3S 



Ss§S«98»2 



HI38«2B§gj|g225gas§5gg 



«'8233«§«8'-886S2gSgSS3S8||sgggs28-g88ag 



§§83 



8§§§siisig§is§sigi§§§si§s§i 



fa's 6 a S 9 E^ u ^ o tf^S:?' 

ililpllllliflllliiPIl 



si§g§ 



Is 



llllll 



J] 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



YOUNQ MEK's CHBISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



453 



«-8 :RS :- 


8 




§ 




i 


888 :88 :8 


5 


1,085 
733 
203 
114 
793 

2,415 
879 
622 




SSS'-SSSg 


S 


9ssi'-asss 


s 


§1 jSaSSS 




§S=8SS82 


s 






• : : : • :i : 



i 1 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



454 



EDUCATION BBPOET, 1913. 
Table 21. — Summary for year 191S-13 classified. 





Kinds of associatkms. 




City. 


RaOrwui. 


County 
and 
town. 


Colored. 


Army 

and 

Navy. 


Canal 
Zone. 


Among 
boys.1 


TotaL 


Reading rooms, periodicals 

Libraries, books drawn and used. 
Lectures and talks 


26,514 
308,945 

6,821 
19,276 
67,828 

2,522 

mtxAo ftftj 
#W>, Vtf4 

$705,475 
2,114 

11,113 
6,718 
2,448 


9,280 
211,450 
2,047 
1,704 
2,477 
05 

$32,200 

$5,933 

37 

94 
188 


295 

1,900 
1,840 
1508 
1,031 

4' 


740 
1,198 
300 
626 
710 
25 

$1,639 
$447 


1,042 
48,234 
114 
101 
720 
27 

$7,044 
$2,000 


597 

611 
76 
7 


5,395 
75,306 
2,082 
7 259 
11,599 
336 

$35,415 

$24,707 

742 

387 
1,745 
2,418 


38,477 
001,183 
11,168 
23,821 
72,842 
2,646 

$990,415 

$714,035 

2,153 

11,397 
6.934 


Educatkmal club members 

Students in class work . . . 


Paid teachers 


Total expenses all educational 
features 


Reoeipts from tuitton fees 

International certificates 


Students In class work outside 
buflding 


190 
28 






Students In regular day work 












2; 448 















> These figures under boys' departments are included in the totals under City, Railroad, etc 

Table 22. — The following table shows the development of educational work 
from 189S, when this department of the international committee was or- 
ganized. . 



1898 



1897 



1901 



1905 



1909 



1911 



1912 



1913 



Number of lectures and talks 

Eduoational dub members 

Number in dass lecture-series courses. 

Expense of advertising 

Number of associations with special 

supervision 

Expense of supervision 

Number of paid teachers 

Total number of different students 

(dav and evening) 

Employed boys in classes 

Tuition receipts 

Income from endowment 

Number of international certificates 

won 

Students in association day courses. . . 
Students in boys' summer schools. . . . 
Students outside of building 



1,900 
3,260 



$2,900 

1 

$2,000 

415 

12,000 



3,929 

4,730 

140 

$6,240 

7 

$6,816 

845 

25,200 



1,041 

4,681 

750 

$12,607 

21 

$17,739 

901 



8,353 

11,899 

1,900 

$21,996 

86 

$51,877 

1,704 



4,936 

19,550 

3,907 

$59,445 

00 

$130,831 

2,443 



8,220 

22,109 

5,150 

$68,562 



9,432 

23,067 

5,937 

$74,583 



11,168 

23,821 

10,060 

$83,756 



$9 
$171, 549 $185, 039^91 
2,540 



74 
039 
2,607 



81 

828 

2,646 



$2,000 
$2,500 



$18,000 
$4,771 

566 
64 



26,906 
1 326 
$48,'000$158;508|$355; 
$4,910 



83,520 
2,900 



1,532 

560 

75 

350 



$6,754 

1,468 

1,860 

600 

1,700 



46,948 

7,521 

5,505 
$9,687^ $11,003 



61,850 
9,734 



67,321 
11,185 



72,842 
11,599 



$528, 206 $620, 534 $714, 085 



1,231 
3,060 
1,214 
5,130 



2,291 
4,281 
2,300 
8,569 



$11,563 

2,140 
5,464 
2,201 
11,039 



$10,159 

2,153 

6,934 

2,448 

11,897 



Total expense, all features (ad- 
vertising, supervision, etc.). . . 



$72, 000 $118, 000 $193, 000 $305, 062 



$570,070 



$727,889 



$007,047 



1990,415 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER X. 
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 



TTie 11,277 public high schools reporting to the Bureau of Educa- 
tion in 1913 had 1,134,771 students, and the 2,168 private high 
schools had 148,238 students. The public high-school enrollment 
has more than doubled since 1902, and in the same time the private 
high-school enrollment has increased nearly 42 per cent. 

The number of high-6chool students completing the four years' 
course is steadily increasing from year to year. In 1907 the number 
of students in the fourth year of public and private high schools was 
89,882, or 12.25 per cent of the total enrollment, while in 1913 the 
fourth-year students numbered 177,689 or 13.94 per cent of the total 
enrollment. 

In recent years there has been a substantial increase in the number 
of pubUc high schools having four-year courses. In 1909 the num- 
ber of such schools was 5,920, with 740,904 students, or 88.07 per 
cent of the public high-school enrollment for that year. In 1913 
the number of these four-year high schools had increased to 7,839, 
with 1,034,940 students, or 91.20 per cent of the enrollment reported 
by the 11,277 public high schools. 

Diatribution of public high schools with reference to length of course^ 1912-13, 





High schools. 


Teachers. 


Students. 


Percent. 

age of 
students 
in 4-year 

high 

8ChO(^ 


Dlviskms. 


With 
4 years. 


An 

others. 


In 4- 

£^ 
schools. 


InaU 
others. 


In 4- 

nigh 
schools. 


InaU 
others. 


United States 


7,839 


3,438 


47,788 


5,950 


1,034,940 


90,831 


91.20 






North Atlantic Division 


1,610 
3,720 

642 
1,064 

803 


708 
1,303 
621 
580 
136 


13,842 
20,560 
2,846 
4,569 
5,971 


1,206 
2,098 
1,116 
1,168 
362 


327,138 
431,362 
60 090 
97,204 
119,146 


10,583 
33,460 
1^704 
19,716 
71359 


04.85 


North Central Division 


02.80 


South Atlantic Division 


75.31 


South Central Division 


83.14 


Western Division. 


94.18 







Public high schools with four-year courses. 



Year. 


Schools 
reported. 


Teachers. 


Students. 


Per oont.i 


1909 


5,920 
6,421 
6,732 
7 686 
7,839 


31,758 
35,332 
38,780 
45,480 
47,788 


740,904 
806,834 
869,557 
997,555 
1,034,940 


88.07 


1910 


88.17 


1911 


88.31 


1912 


90.25 


1913 


91.20 







1 Ratio of enrollment to public higl^school enrollment. 



455 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



456 EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 

Number and per cent of students in each year of kigh-tchool course. 

1906-7. 





Schools 
re- 
port- 
ing 

grades. 


Total 
ntunber 
of stud- 
ents re- 
port*! 

by 
grades. 


In first year. 


In second year. 


In third year. 


Iniburthyear. 


Schools. 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

cent 

of 

totaL 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

cent 

of 

totaL 


Num- 
ber. 


Per 

cent 

of 

totaL 


Num- 
ber 


Per 

cent 

of 

total. 


Public high schools... 
Priratebigh schools. . 


7.624 
946 


667,306 
66.349 


288.748 
21.036 


43.27 
33.06 


182.166 
17,610 


27.30 
26.54 


118.485 
14.837 


17.76 
22.86 


77,916 
11.966 


11.68 
18.04 


Total 


8.570 


733.654 


310,684 


42.35 


199,766 


27.23 


133^322 


18.17 


89.882 


12. 2S 







1907-S, 



Public high schoob... 
Prliratehighscboob.. 


8,960 
1.172 


770.456 
79.554 


333,274 
26.761 


43.26 
33.64 


209,265 
21,403 


27.16 
26.90 


137,626 
17.381 


17.85 

21.85 


90.301 
14,009 


11.73 
17.61 


Total 


10.132 


850,010 


360.035 


42.36 


230.668 


27.14 


164.907 


18.22 


104.400 


12.38 







1906-9. 



Public his^ schoob... 
Private hl^ sohoob . . 


9,317 
1.212 


841.278 
84.752 


364,1.38 
29.122 


43.28 
34.36 


226,129 
22.820 


26.88 
26,93 


149.955 
18.066 


17.83 
21.34 


101.051 
14.724 


12.01 
17.37 


Total 


10,529 


926,025 


393^260 


42.47 


248,949 


26.88 


168.041 


18.15 


115.775 


12.50 







1909-10. 



Public high schoob... 
Private hl^ schoob. . 


10.213 
1.657 


915.061 
107,278 


392.505 
37,775 


42.80 
35.21 


247.936 
29.136 


27.10 
27.16 


163,176 
22.608 


17.83 
21.16 


111.444 
17.674 


13.18 
16.48 


Total 


11/870 


1.022.330 


430.280 


42.09 


277.072 


27.10 


185.860 


18.18 


129,118 


13.63 







1910-11. 



Public high sdioob... 
Private high schoob.. 


10,234 
1.841 


984.677 
120,777 


421.335 
41.852 


42.79 
34.65 


263.213 
32,526 


26.73 
26.93 


176.990 
25,701 


17.97 
21.28 


123,139 
20,608 


13.51 
17.14 


Total 


12.075 


1.105.454 


463.187 


41.90 


295.739 


26.75 


202.691 


18.34 


143.837 


13.01 







1911-lS. 



PuUichis^ schoob... 
Prtvatehl^ schoob. . 


11,244 
1.900 


1.105,360 
130,768 


461.288 
45.572 


41.73 
34.85 


299,304 
35,092 


27.08 
26.84 


301.311 
37.335 


18.21 
20.90 


143.457 
22,700 


12.98 
17.41 


Total 


13,124 


1.236.128 


506,860 


4L0O 


334.396 


27.05 


328,646 


18.50 


166,226 


13.45 







1912-18. 



Public hiRh schools. . . 
Private high schoob . . 


11.277 
2,039 


1,134.771 
138.944 


464,625 
48,468 


40.94 

34.88 


305.678 
37. 182 


26.94 
26.76 


211,352 
28,821 


18.63 
30.74 


153,116 
24,473 


13.49 

17.62 


Total 


13,316 


1.273.715 


513.093 


40.28 


342,860 


26.92 


240,173 


18.86 


177,589 


13.94 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AKD PBIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 457 

PubUc aiffkd privaU kigh-tchool stvdents dauified by years o/coune and by ter, 191t-13. 



Schools. 



Schools 

rvport- 

ing. 



First year. 



Boys. Qirb. 



Second year. 



Boys. Oirls. 



Third year. 



Boys. Oirls, 



Fourth year. 



Boys. Oirls. 



Total. 



Boys. Oirls. 



pDblic high schools. . . 
Private high schools . . 



Il,277|215,587t249.038|l34, 
2;039 



387 
22; 7821 25.6861 17.511 



171.291 
19.671 



80,501 
13,726 



121.851 
15.095 



62.483 
11,395 



90,6331501,968632, 
13,078 65,414 



1,813 
73,530 



Total. 



13.316 



238,369 



274,724 



151,898 



190,962 



103,227 



136.946 73,878 



103,711 



567.372706,343 



Public and privaU high schools since 1889-90. 



Year 
reported. 


Public. 


Private. 


Total. 


Schools. 


Teach- 
ers. 


Students. 


Schools. 


Teach- 
ers. 


Students. 


Schools. 


Teach- 
ers. 


Students. 


188^-00 

1890-91 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1894-95 

1895-96 

ft96-97 

1897-98 

1896-99 

1899-1900.... 
1900-1901.... 

1901-2 

1902-3 

1903-4 

1904-5 

1906-6 

1906-7 

1907-8 

1908-9 

1909-10 

1910-11 

1911-12 

1912-13 


26 
71 
35 
!18 
04 
12 
74 
09 
115 
95 
05 
118 
92 
00 
30 
76 
131 
04 
160 
117 
!13 
34 
!24 
77 


20 
70 
64 
41 
20 
22 
00 
09 
41 
18 
72 
78 
15 
^9 
60 
61 
44 
74 
199 
91 
67 
67 
i53 
-38 


163 
96 
)56 
123 
74 
09 
93 
33 
00 
!27 
!51 
"30 
111 
!13 
08 
02 
02 
«1 

73 
161 

177 

1 m 

1 71 


i32 

14 
i50 
75 
«2 
80 
06 
00 
90 
157 
78 
92 
35 
00 
06 
127 
29 
34 
!20 
01 
81 
79 
144 
68 


09 
!31 
03 
99 
09 
£9 
52 
74 
i57 
10 
17 
75 
03 
46 
66 

;;o 

'87 
156 
«4 
04 
46 
73 
183 
154 


100 
"39 
^75 
145 
147 
154 
133 
125 
138 
97 
!21 
190 
147 
107 
07 
'55 
10 
152 
156 
00 
M9 
167 
(38 


58 
«5 
»5 
93 
146 
182 
180 
09 
05 
52 
183 
110 
27 
190 
136 
03 
«0 
138 
S80 
118 
04 
113 

m 

145 




297,894 
309,996 
340,295 
356,398 
407,919 
468,446 
487,147 
517,066 
554,825 
580^065 
630 048 
649951 
655,301 
694,060 
730,215 
786 000 
824,447 
848^101 
862,108 
034.020 
1.032.461 
1,115.326 
1.246,827 
1,283.000 



Relative progress of public and private high schools in tS years. 



Year reported. 


Per cent of num- 
ber of schools. 


Per cent of num- 
ber of teachers. 


Per cent of num- 
ber of students. 




Public 


Private. 


Public 


Private. 


Public 


Private 


1880-90 


60.75 
61.78 
66.19 
66.23 
66.67 
63.37 
70.25 
70.87 
72.76 
73.74 
75.22 
76.95 
77.42 
80.04 
81.82 
82.32 
84.01 
85.99 
87.16 
87.75 
85.15 
83.80 
84.59 
83.87 


39.25 
38.22 
33.81 
33.77 
33.33 
31.63 
29.75 
29.13 
27.24 
26.26 
24.78 
23.05 
22.58 
19.96 
18.18 
17.68 
15.99 
14.01 
12.84 
12.25 
14.85 
16.20 
15.41 
16.13 


55.85 
57.03 
57.42 
60.25 
60.21 
62.26 
64.21 
63.71 
65.72 
66.55 
66.82 
69.02 
69.36 
72.05 
73.67 
74.29 
75.91 
78.54 
80.52 
81.16 
78.90 
78.91 
80.72 
80.10 


44.15 
42.97 
42.58 
39.75 
39.79 
37.74 
35.79 
36.29 
34.28 
33.45 
33.18 
30.98 
30.64 
27.95 
26.33 
25.71 
24.09 
21.46 
19.48 
18.84 
21.10 
21.09 
19.28 
19.90 


68.13 
68.26 
70.40 
70.78 
70.91 
74.74 
78.11 
79.18 
81.03 
82.10 
82.41 
83.35 
84.02 
85.33 
86.01 
86.38 
87.66 
88.55 
89.37 
89.98 
88.63 
88.29 
88.65 
88.45 


31.87 


1890-91. ...i 


31.74 


1891-92 


29.60 


1892-93 


29.22 


1893-94 


29.09 


1894-95 


25.26 


1896-96 


21 89 


1896-97 


20 82 


1897-98 


18 97 


1898-99 


17.90 
17.59 
16.65 
15.98 


1890-1900 


1900-1901 


1901-2 


1902-3 


14.67 
13 99 


1903-4 


1904-5 


13 62 


1905-6 


12.34 


1906-7 


11 45 


1907-8 


10 63 


1908-9 


10 02 


1909-10 


11.37 
11.71 
11.36 
11.56 


1910-11 


1911-12 ^ 


1912-13 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



458 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 1. — Ptibltc high schools — Number of schools ^ secondary instructors^ secondary 
studeniSf and elementary pupils, 1912-13. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 459 

Table 2. — Pvhlie high schools — Number of secondary or high-school students in leading 
courses of study in 1912-13. 



Digitized by Google-^ 



460 EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 

Table 3. — Public high schools — Number of secondary or high-school students in leading 
courses of study in 1912-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PBIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 



461 



Table 4. — Public high schools — Number of secondary students in college prepartUory 

courses in 1912-lS, 



States. 



In classical course. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Total. 



In scientiflo courses. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Total. 



Total number. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



TotaL 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division. 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hamp^iire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

nUnols 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska. 

Ka^ siw 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia. 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arlcansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico....* 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada. 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

CaUtomiii 



13,285 



19, 113 



32,308 



23,894 



8,051 



31,945 



37,179 



27,164 



6,889 
3,019 
749 
1,028 
1,600 



300 
225 
90 

2,309 
202 
219 

2,560 
306 
676 

746 
372 
433 
153 
198 
173 
288 
245 
29 
76 
80 
227 

4 
85 
105 
124 
31 
93 
74 
215 
18 

109 
134 
58 
29 
42 
386 
153 
117 

34 
12 
24 
21 
2 
4 
3 
20 
248 
243 



7,652 
5,784 
1,090 
1,656 
2,931 



14,541 
8,803 
1,839 
2,684 
4,531 



12,419 

6,660 

748 

988 

3,079 



2,161 

3,554 

346 

651 

1,339 



14,580 
10,214 
1,094 
1,639 
4.418 



19,306 
9,679 
1,497 
2,016 
4,679 



9.813 
9,338 
1,436 
2,307 
4,270 



338 
256 
124 

2,141 
180 
290 

3,150 
440 
733 

1,278 
696 
828 
429 
301 
523 
688 
360 
81 
117 
163 
320 

16 

89 
215 
125 

44 
144 
110 
296 

51 

180 
260 
121 
39 
53 
690 
184 
129 

124 
32 
85 
12 
9 
8 
7 

27 

435 

375 

1,817 



638 
481 
214 

4,450 
382 
509 

5,710 
748 

1,400 

2,024 
1,068 
1,261 
582 
499 
606 
976 
605 
110 
192 
243 
547 

20 
174 
320 
249 

76 
237 
184 
511 

69 



394 

179 

68 

95 

1,076 

337 

246 

158 
44 

100 
33 
11 
12 
10 
47 

683 

618 
2,806 



220 
152 

2,344 
157 
323 

7,011 
562 

1,353 

1,145 
451 

1,161 
467 
617 

1,476 
482 
257 
74 
157 
160 
204 

10 
73 

291 
88 
32 
54 
33 

121 
37 

140 
89 
49 
19 
50 

424 
68 

149 

76 
32 
94 
18 
5 
4 

48 
30 
731 
278 
1,763 



59 
41 
45 

282 

46 

24 

1,286 

55 

323 

615 
213 
384 
159 
233 
1,179 
291 
112 
28 
103 
109 
128 

9 
18 
98 
33 
10 
33 
16 
99 



144 

38 
42 
17 
18 
285 
56 
51 

25 

6 

45 

1 

2 



35 

11 

185 

86 

943 



347 
270 
197 

2,626 
203 
347 

8,297 
617 

1,676 

1,760 
664 

1,545 
626 
850 

2,655 
773 
369 
102 
260 
278 
332 

28 
91 
389 
121 
42 
87 
49 
220 
67 

284 
127 
91 
36 
68 
709 
124 
200 

101 

38 

139 

19 

7 

4 

83 

41 

916 

864 

2,706 



588 
454 
242 

4,653 
359 
542 

9,571 
870 

2,029 

1,891 
823 

1,594 
620 
815 

1,649 
770 
502 
103 
232 
249 
431 

23 
158 
396 
212 

63 
147 
107 
336 

55 

249 
223 
107 
48 
92 
810 
221 
266 

110 

44 

118 

39 

7 

8 

51 

50 

979 

521 

2,752 



397 
297 
160 

2,423 
226 
314 

4,436 
495 

1^056 

1,893 
909 

1,212 
588 
534 

1,702 
979 
472 
109 
220 
272 
448 

25 
107 
313 
158 

54 
177 
126 
395 

81 

324 
298 
163 
56 
71 
975 
240 
180 

149 
38 

130 
13 
11 
8 
42 
38 

620 

461 
2,760 



64,343 



29,121 
19,017 
2,033 
4,323 
8,949 



965 

751 

411 

7,076 

585 

856 

14,007 

1,365 

3,065 

3,784 

1,732 

2,806 

1,206 

1,349 

3,351 

1,749 

974 

212 

452 

521 

879 

48 
265 
709 
870 
117 
324 
233 
731 
136 

673 
521 
270 
104 
163 
1,785 
461 
446 

259 
82 

248 
52 
18 
16 
93 
88 
1,599 

962 
5,512 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



462 



EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 5. — Public high school* — Number of graduates and number of college preparatory 
students in graduating class of 191S, 



States. 


Graduates In the class 
of 1913. 


ing class of 1913. 


Students in graduating 
class preparing for 
other hlc^ Institu- 
tions. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


TotaL 


Boys. 


Olrb. 


Total. 


United States 


69,106 


88,968 


148,074 


26,780 


25,140 


51,920 


6,431 


17,404 


23,835 






North Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 

South A tlanUc Division 

South Central Division 

Western Division. 


17,304 
28,037 
3,338 
4 463 
6,964 


26,101 

40,331 

6,125 

7 754 

8,657 


43,406 
68,368 
9,463 
12,217 
14,621 


7,615 
11,797 
1,687 
2,338 
3,343 


4,653 
12,088 
2,310 
2983 
3,266 


12,168 
23,835 
3,997 
6,321 
6; 599 


2,024 

3,212 

297 

448 

450 


7,137 
6,596 
845 
1,146 
i;681 


9,161 
9,807 
1,142 
1,594 
2,131 




North Atlantic Division: 

If Ain^ 


670 

403 

416 

3,820 

334 

861 

4,814 

1,366 

4,631 

6,107 
8,565 
8,867 
2,662 
2,437 
1,736 
2,646 
2,064 
293 
420 
1,490 
1,760 

90 
609 
237 
647 
329 
473 
430 
679 
144 

646 
441 
405 
361 
263 
1,516 
341 
591 

198 
56 

826 

101 

82 

261 

52 

282 

1,141 

664 

2,402 


1,176 

667 

629 

5,231 

481 

1,359 

7,616 

2,130 

7,022 

6,722 
4,303 
6,376 
3,925 
3,367 
2,857 
4,184 
3,168 
486 
693 
2,453 
2,797 

162 
881 
467 

1,006 
633 
839 
835 

1,106 
297 

937 
801 
737 
693 
644 
2,567 
515 
860 

343 
124 

1,242 
112 
100 
299 
74 
891 

1,534 
928 

8,510 


1,846 

960 

945 

9,051 

816 

2,220 

12,430 

8 485 

11,653 

11,829 
7,858 
9,243 
6,687 
5,804 
4 593 
6,830 

779 
1,113 
3,943 
4,657 

352 
1,390 

704 
1,663 

862 
1,312 
1265 
1,684 

441 

1,483 
1,242 
1,142 
1054 

907 
4,082 

856 
1,451 

641 

179 

2,068 

'213 

182 

560 

126 

673 

2,675 

1,492 

5,912 


337 
137 
177 

1,404 
179 
360 

2,490 
599 

1,932 

2,251 

1,517 

1,641 

1,138 

909 

798 

1,163 

715 

162 

194 

620 

789 

26 
123 

92 
296 
172 
314 
277 
297 

90 

242 
206 
246 
207 
157 
780 
188 
312 

117 
26 
470 
39 
38 
142 
28 
183 
706 
333 
1,261 


201 
85 
108 
771 
63 
173 
1,662 
267 
1,233 

2,210 

1,492 

1,448 

1 189 

824 

. 824 

1,463 

723 

161 

237 

608 

859 

21 
136 

60 
311 
217 
483 
466 
488 
139 

298 
233 
284 
892 
179 
1,022 
223 
352 

158 

47 

603 

37 

24 

114 

23 

173 

640 

416 

1,121 


638 
222 
285 

2,175 
342 
633 

4,152 
856 

3,166 

4,461 
3,009 
3,069 
2,327 
1 733 
1622 
2,626 
1438 
323 
431 
1,128 
1,648 

47 
358 
143 
607 
889 
797 
743 
785 
329 

640 
439 
630 
699 
836 
1,802 
411 
664 

375 
73 

973 
76 
63 

366 
51 

356 
1,346 

749 
2,382 


73 
49 
33 
413 
35 
49 
637 
158 
697 

465 
603 
361 
301 
288 
137 
180 
807 
27 
60 
312 
181 

23 
26 
31 
63 
45 
81 
83 
45 
13 

89 
60 
36 
43 
36 
186 
31 
47 

•9 
7 
66 
33 
9 
31 

88 
78 
41 
149 


313 
121 
81 
1,203 
147 
217 

887 
2,032 

833 

860 
814 
721 
693 
693 
394 
685 
124 
128 
668 
283 

61 
161 
79 
198 
114 
66 
63 
77 
46 

163 
85 
70 
77 

228 

878 
44 

101 

28 
17 

173 
29 
18 
75 
9 
82 

350 
87 

913 


385 


New H^mpflhirfl 


170 


Vermont 


114 


Masmchnsettff 


1.616 


Rhode Island 


172 


Connecticut 


266 


New York 


2,664 


New Jersey 


1 046 
3|729 


Pennsylvania 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


1,298 


Indiana..... 


1,463 
1,175 


Tlllnois.... .. 


Michigan 


1.023 


Wisodhsln 


980 


Minnesota 


730 


Iowa 


674 


Missouri 


892 


North Dakota 


151 


South Dakota 


178 


KAhnukA 


880 


Kfttiiwff 


464 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


84 


Maryland 


176 


Dls^ct of Columbia 

Virginia 


100 
260 


West Virginia 


159 


North Carolina 


87 


South Carolina 


96 


Georgia 


122 


Florida 


68 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


202 


Tennessee 


135 


Alabama 


06 


Mississippi 


120 




254 


Texas 


664 


Arkansas 


76 


Oklahoma , T 


148 


Western Division: 

Montana 


37 


Wyoming 


24 


Colorado" 


239 


New Mexico 


61 


Arizona 


27 


Utah 


106 


Nevada 





Idaho 


120 


Washington 


328 


Oregon 7. ! 


128 


C-ftluomla 


1,063 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 



463 



Tabus 6. — Public high schools — Proportion of boys and girls^ per cent of students 
pursuing certain courses , per cent of graduates, etc.y in 1913. 



SUtes. 



Total 
number of 
secondary 
students. 



Per cent of total number. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



College 
classical 
prepara- 
tory 
students. 



Ck>lleee 
scientific 
prepara- 
tory 
students. 



Gradu- 
ates in 
1913. 



Percent 
of gradu- 
ates pre- 
pared for 
college. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division. . 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division. 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hamp^ire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York. 

New Jersey 

Ponnsylvamia 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri. 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma. 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arixona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Callfomia 



1,134,771 



44.23 



55.77 



2.86 



2.82 



346,721 
464,831 
79,794 
116,920 
126,505 



11,937 
6,325 
5,254 

65,462 
7,085 

15,952 
126,174 

28,895 

79,637 

73,745 
50,055 
69,384 
45,951 
37,076 
33,008 
44,444 
38,489 
7,206 
7,541 
23,332 
34,600 

2,006 
10,274 

5,632 
15,567 

7,282 
12,750 

7,760 
14,552 

3,971 

12, 149 
13,213 
12,436 
8,717 
7,521 
39,718 
9,505 
13,561 

4.558 

1,562 

17, 149 

1,722 

1,601 

5,683 

912 

5,522 

23,510 

12,624 

51,662 



45.43 
43.96 
42.22 
42.43 
44.91 



54.57 
56.04 
57.78 
67.57 
55.00 



4.19 
1.89 
2.30 
2.30 
3.58 



4.21 
2.20 
1.37 
1.40 
3.49 



43.70 
44.30 
44.33 
46.31 
47.78 
45.54 
45.54 
44.77 
44.95 

46.21 
46.18 
44.86 
43.87 
45.13 
41.47 
42.24 
42.80 
41.91 
41.37 
41.55 
41.49 

44.72 
42.34 
44.32 
40.84 
43.63 
44.30 
40.41 
41.81 
38.81 

42.82 
42.53 
42.37 
42.93 
38.39 
42.49 
44.12 
42.63 

41.29 
41.10 
43.82 
48.43 
43.85 
47.04 
40.68 
44.42 
45.23 
44.07 
45.51 



56.30 
55.70 
65.67 
53.69 
52.22 
54.46 
54.46 
55.23 
55.05 

53.79 
53.82 
55.14 
56.13 
54.87 
58.53 
67.76 
57.20 
58.09 
58.63 
58.45 
58.51 

55.28 
57.66 
55.68 
59.16 
56.37 
55.70 
59.59 
58.19 
61.19 

57.18 
67.47 
67.63 
67.07 
61.61 
57.51 
55.88 
67.37 

68.71 
58.90 
66.18 
61.57 
66.15 
52.96 
69.32 
55.58 
64.77 
65.93 
54.49 



5.34 
7.60 
4.07 
6.80 
5.39 
3.19 
4.53 
2.59 
1.77 

2.74 
2.13 
1.82 
L27 
1.35 
2.11 
2.20 
L57 
L53 
2.55 
1.04 
1.58 

1.00 
1.G9 
5.68 
l.CO 
1.03 
1.86 
2.37 
3.51 
1.74 

2.38 
2.98 
1.43 
.78 
1.26 
2.71 
3.55 
1.81 

3.47 
2.82 

.64 
1.92 

.69 

.21 
1.10 

.85 
2.91 
4.90 
5.43 



2.91 
4.27 
3.75 
4.01 
2.87 
2.18 
6.58 
2.14 
2.10 

2.39 
1.33 
2.23 
1.36 
2.29 
8.04 
1.74 

.96 
L42 
3.45 
1.19 

.96 

1.40 
.89 

6.91 
.78 
.58 
.68 
.63 

1.51 

1.69 

2.34 
.96 
.73 
.41 
.90 
1.79 
L30 
1.47 

2.22 
2.43 

.81 
1.10 

.44 

.07 
9.10 

.74 
3.90 
2.88 
5.24 



13.05 



12.52 
14.71 
11.86 
10.45 
11.56 



15.46 
15.18 
17.99 
13.83 
11.50 
13.92 
9.85 
12.06 
14.63 

16.04 
15.70 
13.32 
14.33 
15.65 
13.91 
15.37 
13.59 
10.81 
14.76 
16.81 
13.17 

12.56 
13.53 
12.50 
9.98 
11.84 
10.29 
16.30 
11.57 
11.11 

12.21 
9.40 
9.11 
12.00 
12.06 
10.28 
9.01 
10.70 

11.87 
11.46 
12.06 
12.37 
11.37 
9.85 
13.82 
12.19 
11.38 
11.82 
11.44 



35.06 



28.03 
34.86 
42.24 
43.56 
45.13 



29.14 
23.13 
30.16 
24.03 
29.69 
24.01 
33.40 
24.56 
27.10 

37.71 
38.29 
33.42 
35.33 
29.86 
35.31 
38.45 
27.48 
41.46 
38.72 
28.61 
36.16 

18.65 
18.56 
20.17 
39.09 
45.13 
60.75 
58.74 
46.62 
5L93 

36.41 
35.35 
46.41 
56.83 
37.06 
44.15 
48.01 
45.76 

50.83 
40.78 
47.05 
85.68 
34.07 
45.71 
40.48 
52.90 
60.32 
50.20 
40.29 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



464 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Public high schools in cities of 8fi00 population and over^ 191t-lS, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PBIVATB HIGH SCHOOLS. 465 

Table 8. — Public high schools outside of cities ofSfiOO population and over, Idlt-lS. 



11121''— TD 1913— VOL 2 30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



466 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Tablb 9. — Public kigh ndtooU reporting a four yean* count q/ 
Teadun ofMghrihool students and enrollment of students in 



Igradea. 



Stotot. 



Number 

of 
leboolB. 



High-adiool tMebflcs. 



Wamfla. 



Total. 



Stodentsinttae 
lebool 



lour lil^H 



Boys. 



Oirlf. 



TotaL 



United States 

North Atlantio Division . 
North Central Division.. 
Booth Atlantio Division. 
South Central Division . . 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Divtoion : 

Ohio 

If^ 4^ ^|lLnA. 

UUnois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Mfamesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

ITfwiiUJi 

Booth Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia, 

Virginia 

West Virginia , 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Goorgla 

FkMTMUk 

Booth Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arisona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

CaOfomia 



7,830 



10,580 



28,100 



47,788 



457,004 



5n,M6 



1,OM,M0 



1,810 
3,720 

842 
1,064 

803 



178 

52 

67 

230 

20 

55 

600 

115 

330 

406 
634 
438 
350 
200 
233 
427 
210 
114 
00 
186 
834 

8 
71 
6 
182 
61 
110 
37 
05 
63 

142 
104 
107 

74 
107 
313 

78 
130 

46 

10 
111 
18 
12 
24 
15 
56 
166 
116 
220 



5,222 
8,460 
1,227 
2,125 
2,555 



8,620 
12,100 
1,610 
2,444 
3,416 



210 
80 

n 

047 
134 
104 

1,866 
463 

1,242 

1,412 
1.182 
1,268 
767 
663 
661 
648 
586 
160 
158 
300 
646 

21 
222 

01 
252 
146 
150 

43 
200 

03 

250 
216 
214 
118 
171 
711 
166 
270 

106 

33 

825 

40 

36 

132 

28 

141 

521 

253 

040 



876 
102 
167 

1,735 
168 
455 

3,415 
740 

1,363 

1,410 

1,222 

1,700 

1,300 

1,180 

1,056 

1,380 

810 

273 

234 

611 

807 

50 
272 
152 
382 
147 
232 

70 
100 
106 

203 
222 
276 
181 
235 
722 
176 
830 

181 

48 

438 

42 

46 

115 

87 

147 

630 

337 

1,305 



13,842 
20,560 
2,846 
4,560 
5,071 



586 

281 

244 

2,682 

802 

640 

5,281 

1,212 

2,605 

2,831 

2,404 

2,077 

2,067 

1,843 

1,717 

2,037 

1,306 

442 

802 

Oil 

1,543 

71 
404 
243 
634 
203 
801 

^ 

100 



438 
400 
200 

406 

1,433 

842 

600 

287 
81 

763 
82 
82 

247 
65 

288 
1,151 

690 
2,335 



140,018 
180,552 
25,500 
40,014 
52,715 



5,148 
2,716 
2,140 
80,043 
8,367 
7,182 
56,771 
12,532 
20,110 

80,156 
22,300 
20,000 
10,742 
16,482 
13,563 
17,211 
13,875 
2,611 
2,862 
7,011 
13,672 

710 
4,135 
2,406 
5,102 
2,812 
4,005 

017 
3,838 
1,305 

4,851 
4,283 
4,633 
2,652 
2,302 
14,081 
8,205 
4,057 

1,874 
630 

7,270 
751 
602 

2,432 
364 

2,348 
10,108 

6,400 
20,756 



178,125 
241,810 
34,500 
66,200 
66,431 



6,642 
8,412 
2,828 
84,880 
3,687 
8,546 
67,801 
15,380 
85,005 

85,002 
26,200 
85,502 
25,204 
20,126 
19,215 
23,505 
18,718 
3,668 
4.005 
11.256 
19,310 



6,500 
3,136 
7,648 
8,635 
5,109 
1.392 
5,075 
2,161 

6,500 
5,743 
6,323 
8 384 
4,057 
10.262 
4,157 
6,855 

2,662 
891 

9,364 
779 
892 

2,713 
625 

2,051 
12,305 

6,870 
36,380 



897.138 
431,881 

aaooo 

07;804 
U0,14« 



11,785 
6,128 
4,971 

04,873 
7,054 

15,728 
124,572 

27,912 

04,115 

65,158 
48,508 
04,601 
44,946 
86,558 
82,797 
40,806 
32,503 
6,270 
6,867 
19.167 
32,001 

1,545 
0,734 
5,632 
12,840 
6,447 
9.114 
2.300 
8,913 
3,556 

11,360 

10,026 

10,956 

6,036 

6,350 

83,293 

7,362 

11, 8U 

4,536 
1,521 
16,634 
1,530 
1,584 
5,145 
889 
5,200 
23,508 
12,270 
47,145 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 467 

Table 10. — ErvrollmerU of secondary students ^ by years^ in public high schools reporting 

for 191B-1S. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



468 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 11. — Enrollment of secondary students^ by years ^ in public high sdioola and 
percentage of total in each year, 191S-1S. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 469 

Table 12. — Public high schools — Property and equipment^ 1912-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



470 EDUCATION REPORT^ 1913. 

Table 13. — Public high schools — Income from all sources, f91t-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 471 

Table 14. — Teaching forces enrollment^ and income 0/2^642 public high schools in 191S, 



I Not including North Dakota School of Forestry at Bottineau, N. Dak. 

1 Not including New Mexico Military Institute (State institution) at Roswell, N. Mex. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



472 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 15. — Private high schools and academies — Number of schools ^ secondary instructors, 
secondary students^ and elementary pupils in 1912-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 478 

Table 16. — Private high schools and academies — Number of secondary, or high-school^ 
students in leading courses of study in 1912-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



474 



EDUCATION EEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 17. — Private high mkooU and aoidemie*— Number of seeondarjf, or kiffh-seh(x>i^ 
etwdenU in leading eaunet o/stiulg in 1912-13, 





In tninini? oooTM 
teachers. 


s for 


In afTtcnltaral oomses. 


In domestic eoon 


amy. 


StatM. 


*i 


1 


1 


1 


h 


1 


1 


1 


^ . 


1 


1 


1 


United States 


265 


1,417 


4,200 


5,626 


117 


1,602 


630 


2,232 


288 


150 


7,182 


7,312 


North Atlantic Division.... 
North Central Division..... 
Sooth Atlantic Dirijdon. . . . 

Sooth Central Division 

Western Division 


34 
M 
63 
62 
22 


181 
852 
240 
523 
121 

2 
4 

"•"6* 


674 

1,196 

1,113 

914 

312 

106 
19 
33 
58 


855 
1,548 
1,353 
1,437 

433 

108 
23 
33 
63 


17 
22 
82 
36 
10 

5 
5 


330 
258 

314 
388 
312 

91 
100 


23 
163 
215 
230 

8 
14 


852 
421 
529 
618 
312 

99 

114 


51 
70 
67 
69 
42 

3 
3 

4 
11 


...... 

51 
80 

8 




1,234 
1,756 
1,410 
1.600 
1.1^ 

GS 
101 
290 

242 


1,234 
1,767 
1,4CI 
1 680 
lIlTO 


North Atlantic Division: 


68 


New Hampshire 

Vennont 


101 
290 


Ifassachosetts 










242 




1 
1 
2 


7 
2 
9 




7 
2 
9 




noirof<ctl<rnt 


13 

4 


...... 

**i67* 


3 
150 
16 
289 

40 


3 

153 

16 

456 

40 


3 
16 
2 
9 

6 

6 

13 

6 

9 

10 

12 

7 

3 

1 

4 

8 






...... 


33 

293 
38 
160 

82 

139 

290 

280 

108 

315 

243 

130 

42 

14 

15 

98 


33 


New York 


298 


New Jersey 


38 




3 

1 
3 


121 
"*9i* 


20 


121 

20 
91 


160 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


83 


Tndifififi 


130 


TllfnAi« 


ii 

3 
6 
6 

30 
8 
3 
5 

10 
8 


20 
126 
9 
2 
49 
45 

"*88* 

46 
17 


111 
225 
74 
58 
300 
45 
69 
117 
110 
57 


131 
851 
83 
60 
349 
90 
69 
155 
156 
74 


290 


Mich<nn . 


1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 
4 
2 


73 
6 
1 

16 
6 

10 
8 

81 

16 


79 
...... 

2 

20 

20 

...... 

7 


152 
6 
5 
18 
26 
30 
8 
42 
23 


280 


Wkcnfi<fin , 


108 


|fflnii4Ki4Ha. . , .. .....M 


315 


Iowa 


2S4 


^ilmunwi , , 


130 


North Dakota 


42 


Booth Dakota 


14 


on: 


15 
98 


iJia.**! 


2 








9 


2 


29 




29 


8 

1 
6 


'"'io* 


130 
76 
118 


130 
76 




7 

4 
20 

3 
12 

5 

10 
8 

15 
3 
6 

13 
4 
3 


20 
50 
91 
25 
37 
8 

160 
62 

153 
8 
25 
03 
22 


239 
69 

448 
65 

263 
40 

191 
74 

847 
13 
83 

156 
39 
11 


268 
109 
539 

80 
300 

48 

351 

136 

500 

21 

108 

249 

61 

11 


3 

1 

10 
6 
7 
3 

5 
7 
10 
2 

1 
5 
4 
2 


20 
10 
96 
36 
84 
30 

35 
118 
82 
23 
30 
60 
34 
6 


10 

*"96* 
84 
65 
10 

25 
84 
72 
16 
12 
86 
22 
13 


39 

10 
192 

70 
149 

40 

60 
152 
154 
39 
42 
96 
66 
19 


134 


tn: 


17 
7 

13 
6 

11 
13 
9 
4 
6 
8 
4 
4 

2 


8 
9 

'"is' 

■"24* 

1 
13 

'"is* 

*'*27* 


457 
187 
294 
148 

181 
407 
336 

62 
130 
337 
111 

46 

30 


466 

196 
294 
166 

181 
431 
337 
65 
130 
352 


Arkansas 


111 


Oklahoma 


73 


Western Division: 

Montana 


20 


Wyoming 




















Colorado 


1 
1 




2 
2 


2 
2 


1 


10 




10 


2 

1 
3 
8 




33 

3 

75 

471 


32 


New Mexico 


3 


Arlsona 










75 


Utah 

Nevada 


4 


96 


i55 


251 


C 


105 




195 


471 


Idaho 

Washinjston 


2 
5 
4 

5 


12 
4 

1 
8 


11 
29 
47 
66 


23 
33 
48 
74 


3 


107 




'iw' 


... . 

5 
4 
13 


■*"*8' 


215 
98 
39 

209 


215 
98 
30 

217 


Oregon 










CaUfomia 





















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 



475 



Table lS,—PrivaU high mkooU and aeademiu — Number of secondary, or highrechool, 
students reported as actually preparing for collie in 1912-lS. 



States. 


In classical ooorae. 


In soientiflo courses. 


Total nomber. 


Boys. 


Oirls. 


Total. 


B<v». 


Oirls. 


TotaL 


Boys. 


Oirb. 


Total. 


United States 


0,315 


5,350 


14,674 


8^638 


1,031 


0,660 


17,053 


6,390 


24,343 






North Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 

Sooth AtlanUo Division 

South Central Division 

Western Division 


4,956 
1,231 
1,510 
1,061 
518 


2,478 

1,095 

740 

590 

447 


7,434 
2,326 
2,250 
1,600 
095 


4,763 

1,331 

1,245 

706 

503 


244 
375 
06 
100 
207 


5,007 

1 706 

1,341 

815 

800 


0,n0 
2,562 
2^764 
1,767 
1,141 


2,722 

1,470 

836 

706 

654 


12,441 
4,032 
3,600 
3,475 

i;?95 






North Atlantio Division: 


267 
513 
57 
1,270 
170 
504 
067 
857 
762 

167 

71 

206 

100 
102 
240 
20 
216 
15 
83 
20 
13 

26 
141 

26 
443 

76 
262 
116 
402 

27 

171 
244 
102 
248 
34 
165 
73 
24 

65 

15 
18 


270 
47 
32 
522 
32 
180 
785 
177 
424 

101 
71 
136 
147 
144 
96 
04 
133 
26 
4 

82 
21 

68* 

61 
97 
35 

126 
67 

225 
61 

145 
125 
88 
42 
22 
136 
14 
27 

6 
17 
18 


636 
560 
80 

1,801 
202 
774 

1,752 
534 

1,186 

. 358 
142 
314 
247 
246 
345 
123 
310 
41 
37 
61 
33 

26 
200 

87 
540 
111 
388 
183 
627 

88 

316 

360 

100 

200 

56 

301 

87 

51 

60 
32 

36 


296 
327 
01 
651 
80 
430 
004 
602 
1,283 

177 

206 

213 

204 

135 

100 

28 

30 

4 

2 

60 

4 

28 
280 

34 
428 

44 
142 

15 
240 

16 

168 
216 
62 
83 
25 
100 


45 
14 
21 
14 
3 
10 
20 
20 
70 

15 
26 
58 
104 
28 
61 
32 
18 
11 
2 

11 

4* 

1 

2 
15 
38 

3 
28 

5 

20 
27 
10 
1 
2 
42 


341 
341 
112 
665 
83 
440 

1,023 
631 

1,362 

102 
322 
271 
308 
163 
230 
60 
57 
15 
4 

00 
15 

28 
203 

35 
430 

50 
180 

18 
277 

21 

188 
243 
72 
34 
27 
232 


553 
840 
148 

1,930 
260 

1,033 

1061 
050 

2,045 

344 

367 

421 

304 

237 

418 

57 

255 

10 

35 

80 

16 

54 
430 

60 
871 
120 
404 
131 
651 

43 

330 

460 

164 

281 

50 

355 

73 

36 

63 
40 
28 


324 
61 
58 
536 
35 
190 
814 
206 
503 

206 

97 
194 
251 
172 
157 
126 
151 

37 
6 

41 

32 

72' 

62 
99 

50 
164 

70 
253 

66 

165 
152 
96 
43 
34 
178 
14 
34 

18 
25 
18 


877 


New Hampshire 


001 


Vermont.r 


201 


IfiWffKhnsetts.x 


2,466 


Rhode Island 


285 


ConnfMTtlcnt.x* 


1,223 


New York 


2,775 


New Jersey 


1,165 


Pfmnsyivanfa 


2^548 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


560 




464 


TlHnnl,_ 


615 


UichlgAn , . 


555 


Wisc<nisin 


409 


KfT^n^^ffnta 


675 


Iowa 


183 


Mi«vniH 


406 


North Dakota 


56 


South Dakota 


41 


Nebraska 


130 




48 


Sooth Atlantio Division: 
Delaware 


54 


Maryland 


503 


District of Columbia..... 
Virgiida 


133 
970 


West Virginia 


170 


North Carolina 


568 


South Carolina 


302 


Qeorfida. 


904 


FioriSa::;::::::::;:::::: 


100 


Booth Central Division: 
Kentucky 


504 


Tennessee 


613 




308 


Uiiwiiwfnpl.. _ 


324 


ixnusiana 


83 


Texas 


533 


Arkansas 


87 


OVIi^hnmfi ,. 


12 

7 
26 
10 


7 

8 
8 


10 

15 
33 
10 


70 


Western Division: 
Montana. .... 


76 


Wyoming^.,,, , , , . 


65 


Colorador. 


46 


New Mexico 




Arizona..... u 




6 
80 


6 
213 


2 
185 


85' 


2 
220 


,J 


6 
115 


8 


Utah 


183 


433 


Nevada 




MftbO .. 


14 
67 
20 
226 


21 

67 

8 

225 


35 
134 

28 
451 


15 

42 

5 

302 


11 
15 
17 
113 


26 
57 
22 
415 


20 
100 

25 
528 


32 
82 
26 
338 


61 


Wikffhington . . 


101 




50 


nSl^iift,, 


866 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



476 



EDUCATION KEtOBT, 1913. 



Tablb 19. — Private high schools and academies — Number of graduates and number of 
college preparatory students in graduating doss oflSlS. 



states. 


Graduates in the class 
of 1913. 


College preparatory 
of 1913. 


Students In gradoatinc 
class preparing for 
other hasher instUa> 
tions. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


United States 


8,039 


10,104 


19,043 


5,255 


2,800 


8,055 


660 


1,401 


2,061 




North AUantio Division 

North Oentral Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Oentral Division 

Western Division. 


4,336 
1,805 

993 
1,163 

642 


8,955 
2,816 
1,164 
1,203 
966 


8,291 
4,621 
2,157 
3866 
1,608 


2,627 
886 
785 
632 
825 


1,341 
559 
287 
370 
243 


3,968 
1,445 
1,072 
1,002 
568 


223 
126 
172 
96 
31 


604 
427 
118 
115 
137 


827 
5Si 

290 
218 
168 






North Atlantic Division: 


248 

308 

90 

722 

68 

360 

1,021 

460 

1,050 

141 

176 

291 

171 

200 

325 

156 

174 

14 

37 

61 

59 

11 
1137 

23 
221 

53 
232 

53 
226 

38 

156 
295 
107 
120 
79 
354 
23 
20 

15 
5 

11 

4 

7 

175 


273 
138 
112 
710 
81 
347 
1,176 
'284 
834 

426 
187 
519 
277 
233 
264 
281 
274 
66 
37 

m 

128 

28 
156 
111 
219 

91 
190 

93 
222 

54 

213 
226 
196 
82 
52 
824 
70 
40 

84 
12 
33 
2 
20 
179 


521 
446 
202 

1,432 
149 
716 

2,197 
744 

1,884 

567 
363 
810 
448 
433 
589 
437 
448 
80 
74 
185 
187 

39 
203 
134 
440 
144 
422 
146 
447 

92 

360 
521 
303 
211 
181 
678 
93 
60 

49 
17 
44 

6 
86 
854 


150 
242 

50 
516 

39 
272 
292 
865 
701 

73 
125 
148 
115 
70 
151 
49 
86 
4 

29 
19 
18 

10 
1172 

14 
191 

28 
145 

44 
161 

26 

76 
158 
76 
09 
28 
200 
15 
10 

4 
4 
8 
1 
4 
86 


68 
84 
15 

205 
21 
74 

635 
70 

219 

77 
09 
85 
77 
48 
48 
52 
41 
12 
7 
24 
19 

7 

27 
19 
50 
11 
51 
20 
85 
17 

46 
66 

52 
20 
21 
126 
38 
6 

5 
5 
8 

9' 

42 


218 
276 

65 
721 

60 
846 
927 
435 
920* 

149 

194 

233 

192 

118 

199 

101 

127 

16 

36 

43 

87 

17 
199 

33 
241 

34 
196 

64 
246 

42 

122 
224 
128 
88 
49 
826 
48 
16 

9 
9 
11 

1 

13 
127 


44 

7 
5 
41 

6* 

77 
19 
34 

8 
20 
44 
3 
8 
15 
7 

12 

2 

5 

1 

11 

"Viie' 
if 

3 
19 

8 
16 

4 

7 
21 
11 
23 
10 
25 

1 


86 
19 
9 

110 
25 
56 

194 
42 
63 

60 
46 
97 
22 
42 
78 
22 
22 
10 
5 
11 
12 

2 
7 
1 
28 
18 
21 
7 

28 
11 

18 
21 
29 
16 
4 
15 
7 
5 

9 


130 


New Hampshire 


28 


Vermont.' 


14 


IffnasAchnsAtts 


151 


Rhode Island 


25 


Connertl^rnt 


62 


New York. 


271 


New Jersey 


61 




87 


North Oantral Division: 
Ohio 


68 


Tndl<m^ 


66 


Tlllnnifi 


141 


If Ich^Mn 


25 


Wtopwsli. . .. 


45 


Mlr^nAlfOt^ 


93 


Iowa 


29 


UimnnH 


84 


North DakoU 


12 


South Dakota 


10 


Nebraska 


12 


Kansas , . . . 


23 


Sooth Atlantic Division; 
Delaware 


2 


Maryland 


123 


District of Ck>lombia 

Virginia 


1 

80 


West Virginia 


16 


North Carolina 


40 


South Carolina 


10 




44 


Florida 


15 


South Oantral Division: 
Kentnokv 


25 


Tennessee . . 


42 


Alabama ..... ... 


40 


Mississippi 


30 


T/oulslaha ..... 


14 


Texas 


40 


Arkansas 


8 


Oklahoma. 


5 


Western Division: 
Montana, xw 





Wyoming 




Colorado 




" 9 





New Mexico 






2 
14 


7 
21 


9 


Utah 


85 


Nevada 




Idaho 


35 

76 

67 

247 


41 
102 

98 
436 


76 
178 
165 
683 


17 
38 
21 
148 


'is 

25 
16 
120 


30 

63 

37 

268 


i* 

2 
12 


2 
10 
21 
58 


2 


Washington 


11 


Oregonr. 


28 


<>4ir4irniA 


70 







' Includes students prepared for United States Naval Academy. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AKD PBIVATB HIGH SCHOOLS. 



477 



Tablb 20. — Private high schools and academies — Proportion of boys and girls, per cent of 
students pursuing certain courses, per cent of graduates, etc., in 191S. 





Total num- 
ber of 

students. 


Per oeat of total number. 


Percent 


States. 


Boys. 


Oirls. 


CoUsge 
classical 
prepara- 
tory stu- 
dents. 


CoUese 
scienWic 

tory stu- 
dents. 


Orado- 

atesin 

1013. 


of gradu- 
ates pre- 

fSr^. 
lege. 


United States 


148,238 


46.01 


63.00 


0.83 


6.52 


12.85 


41.67 






North AUantic Dlvtoion 

North Central DivisioQ 

South AtlanUo Division 

Sooth Central Division 

Western Division.. . . . 


62,727 
35,256 
23,150 
23,867 
13,238 


49.63 
39.88 
49.34 
62.71 
40.11 


60.37 
60.11 
60.66 
47.29 
50.80 


13.91 
6.63 
9.76 
6.96 
7.52 


9.50 
4.84 
5.79 
3.41 
6.04 


15.72 
13.11 
9.32 
9.91 
12.15 


46.66 
81.27 
40.70 
42.35 
85.32 






North Atlantic Division: 
Hatne 


2,938 
2,648 
1,524 
8,531 
1,184 
3,904 

15,956 
4,379 

11,663 

3,615 
2,173 
6,670 
3,357 
3,007 
4,266 
3,986 
4,338 
527 
508 
1,295 
1,514 

307 
2,986 
1397 
4,772 
1,149 
5,506 
1,611 
4 471 
1,001 

3,640 
5,910 
2,812 
1,686 
1,839 
6,523 
'768 
680 

757 
187 
545 
150 
358 
3,680 


49.18 
09.45 
47. n 
47.36 
56.15 
62.38 
41.68 
60.33 
52.90 

27.44 
46.16 
34.26 
38.07 
47.19 
47.82 
37.81 
46.96 
33.59 
42.52 
42.63 
36.72 

52.12 
53.68 
27.42 
40.29 
45.69 
51.63 
45.31 
53.61 
45.55 

44.61 
68.75 
47.44 
64.83 
62.59 
61.53 
37.37 
37.35 

38.04 
36.90 
22.02 
40.00 
37.99 
48.51 


60.82 
30.55 
62.23 
62.64 
44.85 
47.62 
58.33 
40.67 
47.10 

72.56 
53.84 
65.74 
61.93 
62.81 
52.18 
62.19 
53.04 
66.41 
57.48 
67.37 
63.28 

47.88 
46.32 
72.58 
50.71 
64.31 
48.37 
64.09 
46.39 
54.45 

55.39 
41.25 
52.56 
35.17 
87.41 
48.47 
62.63 
62.65 

61.96 
63.10 
77.98 
60.00 
62.01 
51.49 


18.24 
21.15 
6.08 
21.11 
17.06 
10.83 
10.98 
12.19 
10.17 

0.90 
6.63 
6.16 
7.36 
8.18 
6.74 
3.09 
8.05 
7.78 
7.28 
4.71 
2.18 

8.47 
7.12 
6.23 
11.32 
0.66 
7.06 
11.36 
14.02 
8.79 

8.65 
6.02 
6.76 

17.20 
3.05 
4.61 

11.33 
7.50 

7.93 
17.11 
6.61 


11.61 
12.88 
7.35 
7.80 
7.01 
11.50 
6.41 
14.41 
11.68 

5.31 
14.82 
4.06 
9.17 
6.42 
6.39 
1.51 
1.31 
2.85 
0.79 
5.33 
0.99 

9.12 
0.98 
2.51 
9.01 
5.13 
3.27 
1.12 
6.20 
2.10 

6.16 
4.11 
2.56 
2.02 
1.47 
3.56 


17.73 
16.84 
13.25 
16.79 
12.58 
18.34 
13.77 
16.99 
16.16 

15.68 
16.71 
12.14 
13.35 
14.39 
13.81 
10.96 
10.33 
16.18 
14.57 
14.20 
12.85 

12.70 
9.98 
9.60 
9.22 

12.53 
7.66 
0.06 

10.00 
0.19 

10.11 
8.82 
10.77 
12.61 
7.12 
10.39 
12.11 
8.82 

6.47 
9.00 
8.07 
4.00 
10.05 
9.62 


41.84 


New Hampshire 


61.88 


Vermont.. 


82.18 


Haffiwchnsetttf 


60.36 




40.27 


Connecticut 


48.83 


New York 


42.19 


New Jersey 


68.47 




48.83 


North Central Division: 

Ohio 


36.28 


Indiana 


63.44 


pifnois^ 


28.77 


If ichlgAi^ , . 


42.86 


Wisoonsin 


27.25 


Mhim^mta. 


33.70 


Iowa 


23.11 


Misouri 


28.34 


North Dakota 


20.00 


South Daicota 


48.64 


Nebraska 


23.24 


Kansas 


10.79 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


43.56 


Maryland 


167.93 


DisUict of Columbia 

Virginia 


34.63 
64.77 


Vft^%V\Tp\n\tL 


33.61 


NorUi Carolina 


46.46 


Sonth Carolina 


43.84 


Georgia 


66.03 


Florida 


45.66 


South Central Division: 
Kontiicky. 


33.06 


Tennessee 


42.90 


Alabama 


42.25 


Mississippi 


42.18 


I^iisiana. 


37.40 


Texas 


48.08 


Arkftnsas.^.^ . . „. 


51.61 


OUahoma 


2.79 

1.08 
17.65 
1.83 


26.67 


Western Division: 

Montana 


18.87 


Wyoming 


52.94 


Colorado 


25.00 


New Mexico 


16.67 


Arizona 


1.68 
6.79 


0.56 
5.98 


36.11 


Utah 


3^.88 


Nevada... . 




Idaho 


898 
1,299 
1,018 
4 346 


47.66 
38.18 
40.47 
34.88 


52.34 
61.82 
69.53 
65.12 


3.90 
10.32 

2.75 
10.38 


2.90 
4.39 
2.16 
9.55 


8.46 
13.70 
16. a 
15.72 


39.47 




36.89 




22.43 


Calflomia *. 


39.34 



1 Includes students prepared for United States Military Academy. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



478 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Tablb 21. — Enrollment of ucvndaary students^ by years, in ifOS9 private high jdbool# 

reporting for ISlt-lS. 



States. 


Schools 
report- 
ing by 
grades. 


First year. 


Second year. 


Third 


year. 


Fourth year.i 


Tot»l- 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


aixla. 


United States... 


2,039 


22,782 


25,686 


17,611 


19,671 


13,726 


15,096 


11,306 


13,078 


65,414 


73,530 


NorthAtlantioDiv... 
North Central Dlv.... 
South Atlantic Div... 
South Central Div.... 
Western Division 


648 
628 
308 
360 
195 


7,829 
4,854 
3,738 
4 309 
2,052 


7,951 
7,446 
8,549 
3,872 
2; 868 


6,472 
3 455 
2,991 
3,180 
i;413 


6,532 
5,457 
2,787 
2,793 
2; 102 


5,609 
2,504 
2 193 
2 350 
960 


5,250 
4,144 
2,032 
2,063 
1,586 


5,280 
2,123 
1,608 
1,600 
784 


5,154 
3,466 
1568 
1,685 
i;205 


25,190 
13,026 
10,530 
11,439 
5; 220 


34,887 


North Atlantic Div.: 

Maine 

New Hampshire.. 
Vemumt 


33 
26 
18 
86 
14 
52 

227 
60 

132 

68 
33 
90 
42 
35 
46 
82 
65 
10 
8 
24 
25 

. 5 
39 
19 
58 
16 
69 
29 
55 
18 

69 
65 
51 
26 
30 
82 
17 
20 

10 
3 

13 
6 
6 

19 


393 
512 
268 

1,041 
213 
554 

2,198 
664 

1,986 

835 
320 
833 
487 
477 
671 
519 
623 
65 
84 
217 
223 

60 
452 

86 
636 
190 
983 
276 
888 
169 

642 
1,266 
487 
292 
851 
1,045 
113 
113 

100 
29 
50 
25 
61 

767 


437 
230 
292 

1,308 
132 
541 

2,748 
488 

1,775 

883 

866 
1,578 
806 
503 
767 
854 
805 
142 
106 
251 
383 

51 
874 
228 
609 
197 
993 
224 
719 
154 

752 
806 
610 
203 
219 
959 
180 
141 

171 
46 

146 
34 
90 

759 


345 
528 
194 
907 
141 
607 

1,717 
614 

1,519 

260 
289 
554 
316 
367 
526 
842 
458 
30 
56 
132 
125 

42 
862 

70 
698 
112 
785 
239 
654 
129 

454 
894 
821 
83^ 
245 
702 
79 
61 

64 
30 
36 
20 
36 
482 


346 
248 
233 
994 
134 
427 

2,244 
470 

1,436 

603 

296 

1,156 

479 

430 

631 

608 

561 

98 

71 

202 

237 

34 
310 
183 
5» 
114 
697 
264 
546 
119 

519 
624 
336 
154 
181 
729 
143 
107 

82 
41 

107 
26 
56 

516 


342 
441 
150 
Oil 
123 
471 

1,278 
585 

1,299 

178 
206 
418 
277 
323 
416 
244 
314 
21 
37 
98 
62 

38 
225 

66 
506 

75 
597 
148 
443 

95 

287 
682 
217 
255 
223 
586 
54 
46 

46 
8 
24 
15 
31 
304 


351 
174 
138 
014 
80 
395 

1,780 
371 

1,038 

563 
225 
834 
430 
338 
437 
498 
411 
44 
48 
154 
162 

33 
257 
184 
461 
101 
419 
181 
324 

72 

352 
473 
242 

89 
171 
554 
105 

97 

66 
21 
106 

366 


324 
356 
107 
841 
155 
403 

1,172 
596 

1,236 

146 
188 
338 
198 
252 
297 
161 
323 
16 
39 
105 
60 

20 
248 

74 
409 

61 
802 

68 
288 

63 

181 
476 
164 
190 
157 
357 
41 
34 

27 
2 
10 

8* 

242 


317 
147 
133 
903 
99 
846 

1,784 
362 

1,113 

427 
283 
697 
864 
273 
805 
864 
357 
43 
41 
136 
176 

29 
251 
178 
276 
116 
299 
109 
241 

69 

270 
449 
233 
93 
102 
404 
53 
81 

36 
10 
66 
10 
81 
254 


1,404 
1887 

728 
3,700 

632 
2,025 
6,365 
2,459 
6,040 

010 

1,003 

2,143 

1278 

1,410 

1,910 

1266 

1718 

132 

216 

552 

4T0 

160 

'•^ 

2,757 
730 

2,273 
456 

1,564 

3,318 

1 189 

1,071 

976 

2,TO0 

287 

254 

237 

69 

120 

60 

136 

1,786 


706 


Massachusetts.... 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania..... 
North Central Div.: 
Ohio 


4,119 
454 
1,700 
8506 
1 601 
5,363 

2,566 
1,170 


Indiana 


Illinois 


4,266 
2,079 
1544 
2,140 
2,'319 
2,134 


Ulf^hlinm 


Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa. 


Ul^w«iH 


North Dakota.... 
South Dakota.... 
Nebraska 

ITunfunf 

South AtlanUo Div.: 
Delaware 


327 
268 
743 
068 

147 


Maryland 

Dist. of Columbia. 

Virginia 

WeStVirginia.... 
North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 
Oecngia 


*'J2 
773 

1,866 

528 

778 

1,830 

414 


Florida 


South Central Div.: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 


1,883 
2,354 
r421 


MisslssippL 

Louisiana. 

Texas 


539 

673 

2,646 

481 


Arimnffftf, . ,. 


Oklahoma 

Western Division: 
MontiiYYA .... 


436 
365 


Wyoming 

Colorado.. 


118 
426 


New Mexico 

ArliOTia 


90 
222 


Utah 


1,806 


Nevada 




Idaho 


8 
32 
18 
80 


197 
196 
133 
504 


193 
896 


115 
140 
123 
367 


116 
243 
165 
750 


78 

86 

84 

304 


81 
137 
122 
622 


38 

74 

72 

311 


49 
114 
126 
609 


428 

496 

412 

1,486 


470 


Washington 

Or^on 


803 
606 


CaUfomia 


2,777 



1 Includes students above fourth year in schools offering advanced courses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PXJBUC AND PKIVATB HIGH SCHOOLS. 



479 



Tabls 22. — Enrollment of secondary students^ by yearSf in 2,039 private high schools and 
percentage of total in eaai year, 191t-lS. 



States. 



United States. 



North Atlantic Division . . 
Nortb C«itral Division . . . 
South Atlantic Division . . 
South Central Division . . . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hamp^ire 

Vermont 

Massachnaetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticat 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indicia 

Illinois 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin.. 

Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri. 

North Dakota. 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska 



South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia . 

Virginia. 

WestVirs^ 

NOTth Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana. 



Wyoming. 
Colorado.. 



NewMexico... 

Arizona 

Utah. 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington.. 

Oregon. 

Calii(»iiia 



Sdiools 
report- 
ing by 
grades. 



2,039 



648 
628 
308 
360 
195 



33 
26 
18 
86 
14 
62 

227 
60 

132 

68 
33 
90 
42 
36 
46 
82 
66 
10 
8 



Total 
num- 
ber re- 
ported. 



138,944 



60,077 
33,530 
20,466 
21,872 
12,990 



2,865 
2,636 
1,524 
7,819 
1,066 
3,734 

14,871 
4,150 

11,402 

3,485 
2,173 
6,408 
3,357 
2,963 
4,060 
3,585 
3,852 
469 
484 
1,295 
1,428 

307 
2,474 
1,068 
4,015 

956 
6,165 
1,506 
4,103 

870 

3,457 
6,672 
2,610 
1,610 
1,649 
5,426 
768 
680 

692 
187 
545 
150 
358 
3,680 



1,299 
1,018 
4,263 



In first year. 



Num- 
ber. 



48,468 



15,780 
12,300 
7,287 
8,181 
4,920 



830 

742 

660 

2,349 

345 

1,096 

4,946 

1,152 

3,761 

1,218 

686 

2,411 

1,293 

980 

1,438 

1,373 

1,428 

207 

192 

468 

606 

111 
826 
313 

1,245 
387 

1,976 
499 

1,607 



1,304 

2,074 

1,097 

496 

570 

2,004 

293 

254 

271 
75 

196 
59 

151 
1,516 



421 

506 

326 

1,400 



Per 
cent of 
total. 



34.88 



37,182 



31.61 
36.67 
35.61 
37.40 
37.88 



29.07 
28.15 
36,74 
30.04 
31.77 
29.33 
33.26 
27.76 
32.98 

34.95 
31.57 
37.62 
38.62 
33.07 
35.51 
38.30 
37.07 
45.10 
39.67 
36.14 
42.44 

36.16 
33.39 
29.31 
81.01 
4a 48 
38.26 
33.09 
39.17 
37.13 

40.32 
36.67 
42.03 
80.74 
34.67 
86.93 
38.15 
37.35 

45.78 
40.10 
35.90 
39.33 
42.18 
41. 19 



46.88 
38.88 
32.02 
32.84 



In second 
year. 



Num- 
ber. 



13,004 
8,912 
6,778 
5,973 
3,515 



691 

776 

427 

1,901 

276 

934 

3,961 

1,084 

2,956 

963 
585 

1,710 
796 
797 

1,157 
946 

1,019 
128 
127 
834 



76 
672 
253 

1,118 
226 

1,482 
603 

1,200 
248 

973 
1,518 
667 
488 
426 
1,5?1 
222 
168 

146 
71 

143 
46 
92 

998 



231 

383 

288 

1^117 



Per 
cent of 
totaL 



26.76 



28,821 



25.97 
26.57 
28.23 
27.31 
27.06 



24.20 
29.44 
28.02 
24.31 
25.32 
25.01 
26.64 
26.12 
25.92 

27.36 
26.92 
26.69 
23.68 
26.90 
28.67 
26.36 
26.46 
27.89 
26.24 
25.79 
25.36 

24.75 
27.16 
23.69 
27.85 
23.64 
28.69 
33.36 
29.25 
28.51 

28.15 
26.76 
25.17 
30.31 
25.83 
28.03 
28.91 
24.71 

24.66 
37.97 
26.24 
10.67 
25.70 
27.12 



25.72 
29.48 
28.29 
26.20 



In third year. 



Num- 
ber. 



Per 
cent of 
totaL 



10,859 
6,738 
4,225 
4,433 
2,666 



615 
297 

1,825 
212 
866 

3,058 
956 

21,837 

741 

431 

1,252 

707 

661 

853 

742 

725 

65 

85 

252 

224 

71 
482 
250 
967 
176 
1,016 
329 
767 
167 



1,156 
459 
344 
394 

1,140 
159 
143 

112 
29 

130 
35 
76 

670 



159 
223 
206 
926 



20.74 



24.473 



21.68 
20.09 
20.64 
20.27 
19.76 



24.28 
23.33 
19.49 
23.34 
19.62 
23.19 
20.66 
23.04 
20.50 

21.26 
19.83 
19.54 
21.06 
22.31 
21.06 
20.70 
18.82 
14.16 
17.66 
19.46 
16.68 

23.13 
19.48 
23.41 
24.08 
18.41 
19.67 
21.82 
18.09 
19.19 

18.48 
20.36 
17.69 
21.37 
23.80 
21.01 
20.70 
21.03 

18.92 
15.51 
23.85 
23.33 
21.23 
18.21 



17.71 
17.17 
20.24 
21.72 



In fourth, 
year.i 



Num- 
ber. 



10,434 
6,680 
3,176 
3,285 
1,989 



641 
508 
240 

1,744 
254 
839 

2,906 
958 

2,349 

673 

471 

1,035 

662 

525 

602 

625 

680 

59 

80 

241 

236 

49 
494 

252 
685 
167 
091 
177 
629 
132 

451 
925 
397 



761 
94 
116 

63 
12 
76 
10 
39 
496 



87 
188 
198 
820 



Per 
cent of 
total. 



17.62 



20.84 
16.67 
15.52 
15.02 
15.31 



22.46 
19.06 
16.76 
22.31 
23.39 
22.47 
19.54 
23.06 
20.00 

16.44 
21.68 
16.15 
16.74 
17.72 
14.86 
14.64 
17.66 
12.86 
16.63 
1&61 
16.63 

16.96 
19.97 
23.59 
17.06 
17.47 
13.38 
11.74 
12.80 
15.17 

13.06 
16.31 
16.21 
17.68 
15.71 
14.03 
12.24 
16.91 

10.64 
6.42 

13.96 
6.67 

10.89 

13.48 



9.69 
14.47 
19.45 
19.24 



1 Includes students above fourth year in schools offering advanced courses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



480 



EDUCATION REPOUT, i .J. 



Table 23. — Denominational and nonsectarian schools included in the table of private 
high schools and academies, 1912-lS, 





Baptist. 


Congregational. 


Eptacopal. 


Friends. 


States. 


1 


1 


1 

00 




1 


00 


1 


1 


00 


1 


i 


i 

m 


United States 


114 


636 


10,160 


83 


188 


2,250 


106 


860 


6,985 


41 


261 


2,852 


North Atlantic Division . 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Division.. 
Oouth Central Division... 
Western Diviskm 


11 
6 
fi5 
41 
1 


06 

88 

276 

221 

5 


1,607 

600 

4,923 

3,100 

80 


8 
12 

7 
11 


27 
74 
80 
57 


836 
802 
375 
737 


42 
19 
19 
11 
15 


882 
170 
129 
70 
109 


2,988 

1,394 

1,188 

577 

838 


17 
15 
5 
4 


163 
55 
30 
13 


1,524 
796 
409 
124 
















North Atlantic Diviskm: 
Kaine 


2 
1 


47 
18 
8 


911 

265 

45 














1 


7 


lOS 


New Ham'^shire^.... 


1 


10 


121 


8 
2 

4 

1 

7 

20 

1 
4 

1 
1 
8 

1 
4 

2 

1 
1 


51 
20 
42 
15 
65 
148 
10 
86 

6 
19 
16 

6 
40 
26 
14 

8 


855 
838 
367 
121 
458 
1,079 
66 
204 

36 
145 
114 

41 
430 

70 
15 




Vermont.. 








Massachusetts 


2 


17 


215 








Rhode Island 








1 


15 


189 


Connecticut. ......... 
















New York 


1 


/ 

18 
8 


01 
187 
08 








4 
2 
9 

1 
* 


23 

10 
106 

5 

1 


170 


New Jersey 








81 


Pennsylvania....^... 
North Central DivMdh: 
Ohio 








1,081 








71 


Indiana 














858 


Illinois 


1 


4 


53 


i 

2 

1 




7 
c 
14 
6 


68 
•n 

129 
88 


84 


Michigan 






5 



14 


112 
182 








Minnesota 




1 


Iowa 


4 


9 


124 


Missouri 


1 


6 


118 


2 

1 
1 
8 


9 
5 

7 
20 


228 
51 
72 

145 




North Dakota 








South Dakota 








1 
2 
2 


7 

20 
13 


54 

137 
79 








Nebraska 








1 
4 

1 

1 
1 

1 


8 
10 

9 
11 

7 
2 


40 


Kansas 


1 


6 


49 


168 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 








88 


Maryland 














8 
8 
7 


15 
25 

48 


106 
185 
491 


134 
















146 


VixKinia 


9 

3 
19 

6 
16 

2 

6 

8 
8 
2 
1 

12 
2 
3 


54 
14 
86 
30 
81 
11 

21 
38 
31 
17 
12 
74 
8 
20 


625 

288 
1,739 

535 
1,570 

166 

366 
585 

603 
183 
212 
978 
154 
119 








20 


West Virginia. 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 










3 


12 


105 


2 
2 

1 

1 

2 
4 
2 
1 


9 
16 

4 
12 

10 
23 

8 

7 


91 
172 

35 
106 

68 
151 
88 
55 


1 


1 


21 


Georgia 


4 


18 


270 








FtorMa 








Sooth Central Division: 
Kentucky 














Tennessee 


2 

6 
1 

1 
1 


11 
23 

3 
15 

5 


144 
337 
23 
122 
111 








Alabama 








Mississippi 








Louisiana 








T^x?|« , 


2 


22 


215 


1 

1 
2 


2 
6 
5 


19 


Arkansas 


54 


Oklahoma 














51 


Western Division: 

Montana 
















Wyoming 


























Colorado 














3 


14 


71 








New Mexico 




















Aritona 


























Utah 














1 


7 


"79 








Nevada 




















Idaho 














1 
4 
1 
5 


6 
26 
14 
39 


41 
171 

m 

355 








Washington 


1 


6 


80 




























CaUwmiia 










.... !.... 














1 ' 


■ 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUO AKD PBIVATS HIOH SCHOOLS. 



481 



Table 23. — Denominational and nonsectarian Bchools included in the table of prtimU 
high schools and academies , iPij^-i^— Continued. 





LathenuQ. 


Methodist. 


Methodist Epi». 
copal South. 


Presbyterian. 


Stotes. 


1 


\ 

i 

1 


OQ 


1 


1 


OQ 


1 


M 


CO 


1 


1 


5 

OQ 


United States 


50 


271 


3,311 


64 


418 


5,621 


42 


226 


4,029 


72 


357 


4,431 


North Atlantic Division . 


4 
33 

4 
4 
5 


23 
198 
18 
15 
17 


183 
2,611 
208 
179 
130 


14 

8 

13 

27 

2 


166 
60 
60 

189 
13 


1,881 
661 
721 

2,170 
188 








4 

6 

30 

28 

4 


30 
33 
142 
128 
24 


392 


North Central Division... 
South Atlantic Division.. 
South Central Division... 
Western Division 


x! 

24 

1 


14 
104 
103 

5 


137 
2,090 


305 
2,010 
1,542 

182 


North Atlantic Division: 
Mame 








2 

1 


19 
15 


348 
326 














New Hampshire 




















Vermont. .'. 




















Massachusetts. 


























Rhode Island 








1 


15 


81 














Onniiectictit 





















New York 


3 


18 


157 


6 
2 
3 


60 
27 
40 


529 
223 
874 














New Jersey 








1 
8 


17 
18 


223 


Pennsylvania 


1 


5 


26 








169 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 










Indiana...., 


1 

\ 

4 

12 

4 
3 
3 

1 
8 


\ 

8 
17 
86 
22 
12 
11 
11 
24 


29 
76 
88 
283 
1,083 
321 
245 
137 
102 
298 




















Illinois 


2 


12 


184 








2 


11 


152 


Michigan 










Wfeocmsm 




















Minnesota 


1 
1 
3 


6 
4 
15 


44 

100 
196 














Iowa 














Missouri 


3 


14 


137 


2 


7 


67 


North Dakota 




South Dakota 




















Nebraska 














1 
1 


6 
9 


46 


Kansas 


1 
1 


13 
10 


137 
81 








60 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 
















Maryland 




















District or Columbia . 


























Virginia 














5 

1 
4 


45 

8 

26 


969 
193 
445 


3 
2 
11 
6 
6 
2 

8 
4 

4 
3 


22 
14 
54 
16 
29 
7 

26 
16 
14 
14 


850 


West Virginia 














193 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 


3 

1 


12 
6 


155 
53 


3 
1 
5 
3 

4 

7 
6 

1 
2 
6 

1 


16 
2 
9 

13 

20 
36 
22 
3 

5 

48 

5 


296 
23 
80 

241 

245 

636 

399 

31 

32 

801 

26 


821 

267 


Georgia 


4 


25 


483 


294 


Florida 








85 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky ^ 








5 
3 

1 
3 


20 
10 
3 
11 


296 

218 

22 

. 242 


219 


Tennessee 








301 


A labama 








101 


Mississippi 








316 


Louisiana 


1 
3 


2 
13 


20 
159 




Texas 


8 
3 

1 


44 

11 
4 


783 
173 
21 


6 
1 

1 


42 
6 
11 

7 


403 


Arkansas 


66 


Oklahoma 








146 


Western Division: 

Montana , 








1 


9 


165 


36 


Wyoming 
















Colorado 


























New Mexico 




















1 




Arizona 




















••:*"i 




Utah 








1 


4 


23 








3 


17 


146 


Nevada 
















Idaho 


1 
3 

1 


4 
11 
2 


56 
66 
18 


















Washington 














1 




Oregon 








1 


5 


47 






Caluomia 





































17727**— ED 1913— VOL 2 31 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



482 EDUCATION REPORT, 1M3. 

Tablb 23. — Denominational and nangecUaian schools included in the table of priwUe 
Ugh schools and academies j 191t-lS — Continued. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PBIVATS HIGH SCHOOLS. 483 

Table 24. — Private high 9ehools and acatUmiM — Property^ equipment^ and pennantrU 

expenditure^ 191t-lS, 



1 Includes over $12,000,000 estimated endowment for hlgh-tchool deiMitment of Qirard College, Phfladel- 
I»hia. 
« Includes $4,000,000 endowment of Andrews Institute for Girls, WiUoughby. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



484 EDUCATION KEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 2b.— Private high schools and academies— Income from all sources y 1912— JS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBUC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 



485 



Table 26. — Average number of teachers ^ students, and graduates to the public -high school, 
and like xtveragesfor the private high school and academy , 1912^13, 



Stotes. 



Public high school. 



S . 

II 
ft 



oaSg 



•d do 






a^l 



111 



Private high school. 



5^ 









t:5. 






^8 

«B.d 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.., 
South AUantic Division. 
South Central Division... 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine , 

New Hampsh^. . . . , 

Vermont 

Massachusetts , 

Rhode Island 

Connecticat 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

niinols 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

MlSBOOri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Sooth Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

DisUict of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georeia 

Florida 

Sooth Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



4.8 



100.6 



21.1 



13.7 



13.1 



6.2 



11.1 



42.3 



6.5 
4.4 
3.1 
3.5 
6.7 



3.3 
4.9 
8.7 
11.5 
13.9 
10.4 
8.4 
8.7 
3.9 

4.1 
4.1 
5.0 
5.5 
6.2 
7.3 
3.9 
3.9 
3.2 
3.2 
3.2 
4.0 

4.7 
5.8 
40.5 
2.7 
4.0 
2.4 
2.5 
2.7 
2.7 

3.4 
3.4 
3.5 
3.0 
4.2 
3.5 
3.3 
3.7 

6.0 
3.8 
6.6 
3.4 
6.4 
7.4 
4.1 
4.5 
5.6 
4.5 
10.8 



149.6 
90.9 
63.2 
71.1 

134.7 



23.0 
20.6 
20.1 
20.4 
20.0 



8.5 
14.5 
21.4 
14.5 
10.2 



18.7 
13.4 
7.5 
7.4 
15.6 



7.6 
5.8 
5.4 
4.7 
6.3 



84.4 
63.8 
67.3 
61.4 
66.9 



10.2 
10.9 
12.3 
13.0 
10.6 



32.0 
32.2 
50.6 
62.9 
35.1 



66.0 
106.4 

74.0 
277.4 
322.0 

24.9 
195.9 
195.2 

80.3 

80.4 
81.1 
105.8 
118.4 
122.0 
138.1 
77.2 
88.7 
45.6 
54.3 
63.9 
8.4 

95.5 
112.9 
938.7 
52.8 
83.7 
62.7 
47.9 
53.3 
46.2 

67.5 
73.8 
74.2 
55.9 
68.4 
77.9 
68.9 
67.1 

95.0 
71.0 

142.0 
61.5 

123.2 

149.6 
57.0 
81.2 

108.3 
91.5 

223.6 



20.1 
21.6 
20.0 
24.1 
23.2 
24.0 
23.2 
22.6 
22.8 

21.7 
20.0 
21.1 
21.5 
19.7 
19.0 
19.9 
22.5 
14.0 
16.9 
19.8 
21.1 

20.5 
19.6 
23.2 
19.4 
21.0 
22.0 
19.4 
19.9 
17.0 

19.9 
21.8 
21.2 
18.9 
16.3 
22.1 
20.7 
18.1 

15.7 
18.6 
21.6 
17.9 
19.3 
20.1 
13.8 
17.9 
19.2 
20.4 
20.8 



2.2 
3.0 
8.7 
6.6 

10.3 
8.0 

13.1 
2.6 
8.3 

14.2 
14.7 
17.9 
10.3 
2.3 
2.7 
14.9 
15.4 
35.3 
22.2 
20.1 
12.3 

13.1 
22.1 



28.9 
1.2 
20.4 
16.9 
23.5 
23.6 

15.9 
15.5 
17.7 
24.9 
12.1 
12.4 
11.4 
10.6 

10.2 
12.5 
9.9 
9.1 
2.5 
2.5 



12.4 

18.1 

15.3 

1.5 



10.2 
16.0 
13.3 
38.4 
37.0 
34.7 
19.3 
23.5 
13.1 

14.3 
12.7 
14.1 
17.0 
19.1 
19.2 
11.9 
12.1 
4.9 
8.0 
10.8 
11.1 

12.0 
15.3 
117.3 
5.3 
9.9 
5.4 
7.8 
6.2 
5.1 

8.2 
6.9 
6.8 
6.8 
8.2 
8.0 
6.2 
7.2 

11.3 
8.1 
17.2 
7.6 
14.0 
14.1 
7.9 
9.9 
12.3 
10.8 
25.6 



6.3 
7.5 
6.1 
9.3 
7.6 
7.2 
7.1 
7.6 
8.0 

6.3 
6.4 
6.4 
6.2 
7.4 
7.7 
4.0 
6.7 
5.2 
6.1 
6.0 
5.4 

8.0 
6.7 
6.4 
6.0 
5.4 
4.8 
4.5 
4.9 
4.4 

4.3 
5.2 
3.7 
4.4 

5.2 
5.5 
3.8 
4.0 

6.3 
4.3 
5.2 
3.7 
4.3 
12.1 



86.4 
98.1 
84.7 
88.9 
74.0 
72.3 
66.8 
68.4 
86.8 

60.2 
66.8 
71.0 
79.9 
83.5 
88.9 
46.3 
60.3 
47.9 
56.4 
54.0 
58.2 

61.4 
65.2 
53.7 
72.3 
67.5 
73.4 
52.0- 
75.8 
50.1 

49.3 
85.7 
52.1 
60.2 
55.7 
60.4 
45.2 
34.0 

68.8 
62.4 
41.9 
25.0 
69.7 
141.1 



16.2 
13.1 
14.0 
9.6 
9.8 
10.1 
9.3 
9.0 
10.7 

9.6 
10.3 
11.2 
12.9 
11.3 
11.6 
11.7 
10.6 
9.2 
9.2 
9.0 
10.8 

7.7 
9.8 
8.4 
12.1 
12.6 
15.3 
11.6 
15.5 
10.3 

11.5 
16.4 
14.0 
13.7 
10.7 
12.7 
11.8 
8.6 

11.0 
14.4 
8.0 
6.8 
13.8 
16.0 



7.7 
9.4 
7.5 
24.3 
36.9 
14.0 
37.1 
38.1 
46.3 

40.0 
25.9 
33.6 
24.5 
22.6 
41.1 
34.7 
29.3 
40.6 
36.8 
37.2 
13.1 

72.2 
36.8 
31.1 
39.4 
35.7 
60.1 
84.1 
93.9 
90.9 

55.1 
60.3 
118.1 
81.3 
52.9 
44.0 
51.0 
40.7 

18.7 



31.5 
74.8 
47.0 
43.4 



7.3 
4.6 
6.6 
6.0 



112.3 
40.6 
56.6 
53.0 



15.5 
8.8 
8.6 
8.8 



30.9 
28.7 
43.3 
34.8 



8.8 



12.1 
8.4 
6.3 
6.1 
8.1 



15.3 
16.5 
11.2 
14.9 

9.3 
13.3 

9.2 
11.6 
13.9 

7.9 
11.0 
8.6 
10.7 
12.0- 
12.3 
6.1 
6.2 
7.8 
8.2 
7.7 
7.2 

7.8 
6.6 
6.2 
6.7 
8.6 
6.6 
4.7 
7.6 
4.6 

6.0 
7.6 
6.6 
7.6 
4.0 
7.2 
6.6 
8.0 

4.5 
5.7 
3.4 
1.0 
6.0 
18.6 



9.5 
5.6 
9.2 
8.3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



486 EDUCATION BSPOBT; 1913. 

Tablb 27.— iHifrKe ond private high sekoolifor boffM <mly, for girh onif, and f&r bcdk 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PBIVATB HIGH SCHOOLS. 487 

^ % Tabl£ 28. — Pvhlic and private high schools combined — Number of schools, secondary 

vMtructors, secondary students, and elementary pupils, 1912-13. 



" (,- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



488 EDUCATION REPORT, 1013. 

Table 29. — Pyhlie and private high schools combined — Number of seoondary, or high- 
school J students in leading courses of study in 1912-13, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 489 

Table 30. — Public and private high schools combined— ^ Number of secondary, or high- 
school, students in leading courses of study in 1912-lS, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



490 



EDUCATION BEPOITF, 1913. 



Table 31. — Publie and private high sdiools combined— Number of Si 
Bchooly students in college preparatory courses in IQlt-lS. 



\eeondary, or Mgk^ 



States. 


IndMriMlcoafM. 


Tn BclentJtIe eourses. 


Total nomber. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


TotaL 


Boys. 


Qlrls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Olrte. 


TotaL 


United States 


23,600 


24,472 


47,072 


82,532 


9,083 


41,614 


55,132 


33,554 


88,686 






North Atiaixtlo DirMoti..... 

Nurth Central Division 

Booth Atlantic Division 

Sooth Central Division 

Weatem Diviiiflfi 


11,846 
4,350 
2,368 
2060 
2,148 


10,130 
6,870 
1^830 
2^255 
8;37S 


31,076 
11,129 
4,098 
4^344 
61526 


17,183 
7,991 
1,908 
1^694 
8,672 


2,406 

3,929 

442 

760 

1,646 


10,687 
11,020 
2435 
2454 
6,218 


29,027 
12,241 
4 261 
3,783 
6,830 


12,686 
10,808 
2,273 
3,015 
4; 924 


41,662 
23,049 
6,533 
6 798 
10,744 






Kflrth Atlantic Diviskn: 
Maine 


657 
738 
147 

3,688 
872 
813 

3,637 
665 

1,«8 

013 
443 
641 
253 
300 
433 
. 317 
461 
44 
108 
109 
230 

10 
226 
131 
567 
107 
365 
100 
617 

45 

280 
378 

J9? 

76 
651 
236 
141 

80 

27 

42 

21 

2 

137 

3 

34 

315 

263 

1,215 


617 
303 
156 

2,663 
212 
470 

3,035 
617 

1,157 

1,460 
'767 
064 
576 
445 
619 
782 
403 
107 
121 
195 
841 

16 
157 
276 
222 

79 
270 
177 
521 
112 

825 
385 
209 
81 
75 
826 
198 
156 

129 
49 

103 
12 
15 
88 
7 
48 

502 

383 
2,042 


1,174 
1,041 

303 
6,251 

584 
1,283 
7 462 
1,283 
2,596 

2,383 

1,210 

1606 

829 

746 

1,041 

1,099 

954 

151 

229 

304 

580 

46 
388 

407 
780 
186 
626 
867 
1,138 
157 

606 
763 
360 
358 
151 
1,377 
424 
297 

218 
76 

146 
33 
17 

226 
10 
82 

817 

646 
3,267 


684 
656 

243 

2,995 
337 
783 
8,006 
1,164 
2,686 

1,333 
747 

1,874 
671 
753 

1,645 
610 
896 
78 
150 
339 
306 

47 
362 
325 
616 

76 
196 

48 
870 

63 

806 

805 

111 
52 
75 

614 
68 

161 

83 

67 
104 

18 

7 

180 

48 

45 

773 

283 

2,065 


104 
55 
66 

296 

49 

34 

1,315 

84 

403 

630 
330 
442 
263 
261 

823 
130 
39 
105 
118 
139 

9 

22 
99 
35 
25 
71 
19 
127 
35 

164 
65 
52 
18 
20 

327 
56 
58 

33 

14 

45 

1 

2 

35 

35 

22 

200 

103 

1,056 


688 
611 
909 

3,291 
286 
796 
9,320 
1,348 
3,038 

1,052 
086 

1,816 
934 

1,013 

2,885 
833 
436 
117 
264 
347 
347 

56 
384 
424. 
551 
101 
267 

67 
497 

88 

472 
370 
163 
70 
06 
941 
124 
219 

116 
71 

149 
19 


224 
83 
67 

973 

386 
3,121 


1,141 
1,394 

390 
6,583 

600 

1,576 

11,533 

1,839 

4,074 

?;S5 

1,053 
2,067 
837 
767 
122 
267 
838 
447 

77 
686 
456 
1,083 
'l83 
661 
238 
987 

98 

688 

683 
271 
829 
161 
1,166 
994 
302 

172 

84 

146 

39 



326 

61 

79 

1,068 

646 

3,280 


721 
868 
222 

'S? 

604 
6,260 

701 
1,66# 

2,099 

1,006 

1,466 

839 

706 

1,850 

1,105 

638 

146 

236 

813 

480 

25 
179 
376 
267 
104 
841 
196 
648 
147 

489 
450 
261 
99 

96 

1,163 

284 

214 

162 
68 

148 
13 
17 

128 
42 
70 

702 

486 
8,098 


1,963 
l!«63 


New Hampdiire......... 


Vermont 


612 


liassachusetts 


870 


Rhode Island 


''/wmMytifflit 


2,079 


New York 


16,783 
£530 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 


6,633 

4.834 
2,196 
8,421 


North Central DIviskm: 
Ohio 


Indiana..... 


Illinois 


Miitiif^ff.... 


1.783 


Wisooiislfi 


i;758 

1,932 
1,880 


Mlnnft^tA 


fiSTT.!.:;;;:;;;:;;;;;; 


lUsBoori 


North Dakota 


268 


South Dakota... 


493 


Nf'^r«sk^ ........ 


651 


Kansas 


927 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


102 


Maryland 


767 


Disfiict of Columbia 

Virginia 


831 
1.840 


West Virginia 


287 


North Carolina 


892 




434 


Georgia 


1,635 


Florida 


245 


Sooth Central Division: 
Kentuclnr. 


1,077 


Tonnwwe 


1 133 


Alftbairift 


632 


MissiMippi 


428 


TfOqiisianfi ,,.....,.. 


246 


IVxas 


2,318 


Arkansas , 


'648 


Oklahoma ...-,-.,,- 


616 


Western Diviston: 

Montana ......^ 


334 


W yoming 


147 


CoMMtulo 


294 


New Mexico 


62 


Arlsona 


26 


Utah 


449 


Nevada 


« 


Idaho 


149 


Washington 


1,790 


Oregon 


1,032 


California 


6,378 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AKD PBIVATE HIOH SCHOOLS. 



491 



Tadlb 82. — Public and private high idiooU combined— Number of graduates and number 
of college preparatory etudenU in graduating class of 191S, 



States. 


Graduates hi the class 
of 1913. 


College preparatory stu- 
dents in graduating 
class of 1913. 


Students in graduating 
class preparing tor 
other higher Institu- 
tions. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


BojTi. 


Girls. 


Total. 


United States 


68,045 


99,072 


167,117 


32,035 


27,940 


59,975 


7,081 


18,805 


25,886 






North Athmtic Division 

North Centml Division 

Soath AtlantkJ Dlylslon 

South Centnil Division 

Western DividoA 


31,640 

29,842 

4,331 

5,026 

6,606 


30,086 
43,147 
7 289 
8,957 
9,623 


81,096 
72 989 
11,620 
14,583 
16,229 


10,242 
12,683 
2,472 
2,970 
8;668 


5,894 
12 597 
2 597 
8,353 
8; 499 


16,136 
25,280 
5,069 
6,323 
7,167 


2,247 

3,338 

'469 

546 

481 


7,741 
7,022 
963 
1,261 
1,818 


9,988 
10,360 
1,432 
1,807 
2,299 


North Atlantfe Division: 


918 

711 

606 

4,542 

402 

1,230 

5,886 

1,815 

5,081 

5,248 
3,731 
4 168 
2888 
2,637 
2,061 
2,802 

307 

467 

1,561 

1,819 

101 
1046 
260 
768 
382 
706 
488 
804 
182 

702 
736 
612 
490 
342 
1,860 
364 
611 

213 

60 

887 

105 

89 

436 

52 

317 

1,217 

'631 

2,649 


1,449 

695 

641 

5,941 

562 

1,706 

8,792 

2 414 

7,856 

7,148 
4 490 
5,895 
4,202 
3,600 
3,121 
4 465 
3,442 
552 
730 
2,577 
21925 

190 

1,037 

578 

1,225 

'624 

1,029 

'928 

1,327 

351 

1,150 
1,027 
933 
775 
696 
2,891 
585 
900 

377 

136 

1,275 

114 

129 

478 

74 

432 

1,636 

1,026 

3,946 


2,367 
1406 
1,147 

10,483 

964 

2,936 

14,627 
4,229 

13,537 

12,396 
8^221 

10,053 
7^035 
6,237 
6,182 
7^287 
6,680 
859 
1,187 
4,128 
4,744 

291 
1,683 

838 
1,993 
1,006 
1 734 
1,411 
2,131 

533 

1,852 
1,763 
1,445 
1 265 
1,038 
4,760 
949 
1,511 

590 

196 

2,112 

219 

218 

914 

126 

749 

2,853 

1,657 

6,595 


487 
879 
227 

1,920 
218 
632 

2,782 
964 

2,033 

. 2,323 

1642 

1 789 

i;263 

979 

949 

1,212 

801 

166 

223 

139 

807 

36 
i295 
106 
487 
195 
459 
321 
458 
115 

318 
364 
322 
276 
185 
980 
203 
322 

121 

30 

473 

40 

42 

227 

28 

20O 

744 

354 

1,409 


269 
119 
128 
976 
84 
247 

827 
1,462 

2,287 

1,561 

1,533 

1,266 

872 

872 

1,515 

764 

173 

244 

632 

878 

28 
162 

60 
361 
228 
634 
486 
573 
156 

344 
209 
336 
412 
200 
1,148 
256 
358 

163 
52 
511 

33 
156 

23 
186 
665 
432 
1,241 


766 
496 
350 

302 

879 

5,079 

1,291 

4,085 

4,610 
3,203 
3,322 
2,519 
1 851 
1 821 
2,727 
1,565 
339 
467 
1,171 
1,685 

64 
457 
175 
848 
423 
993 
807 
1,031 
271 

662 
663 
658 
688 
385 
2,128 
459 
680 

284 

82 

984 

77 

75 

383 

51 

386 

1,409 

'786 

2,650 


117 
56 
38 
454 
25 
55 
604 
177 
721 

468 
623 
405 
304 
291 
152 
187 
819 
29 
55 
313 
192 

23 

1141 
21 
73 
48 
50 
36 
61 
16 

46 
71 
37 
66 
36 
211 
32 
47 

9 
? 
66 
22 
11 
45 

38* 

79 
43 
161 


896 

140 

90 

1,313 

'173 

278 

2,831 

929 

2,096 

893 
906 
911 
743 
734 
671 
416 
607 
134 
133 
679 
296 

63 
158 

80 
226 
127 

77 

70 
105 

67 

181 
106 
99 
98 
232 
393 
51 
106 

87 

17 

182 

29 

25 

96 

9 

84 

260 

108 

971 


516 


New Hampshire 


196 


Vennont.r.* 


128 


Hassachusetts 


1,767 


Rhode Island 


197 


Ckninectlcut .. 


828 


New York 


2,935 


New Jersey 


1,106 


Fetinsylvania. ,,.«, 


2,816 


North Cential Division: 
Ohio 


1,361 


Indiana...... ....... 


1 529 


Illinois... 


1,816 


Michigan 


1 047 


Wisconsin.... 


1,025 


MinnesotA. 


623 


Iowa 


603 


Missouri 


926 


North Dakota 


163 


South Dakota 


188 


Nebraska 


802 


K4in!?a5 - , 


487 


Sooth Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


86 


Mftryinrvi 


299 


District of Cohimbla. .... 
Virginia 


101 
299 


West Virginia 


175 


North Carolina 


127 


South Carolina. 


106 


Qeorgia ,.... 


166 


Fl(»1da 


73 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


227 


Tennessee 


177 


Alabama 


136 


Mississippi 


159 


Louisiana ............... 


368 




604 


Arkansas..... 


83 


Oklahoma 


153 


Western Division: 

Montana 


46 




24 


Coitwado 


248 


New Mexico 


51 


Arizona 

Utah 


36 
141 


Nevada ...... 


9 


I<iaho . . .. 


122 


Washington.. 


839 




151 


California 


1,132 







1 Inchides students prepared Ibr United States Naval Academy. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



492 



EDUCATION BEPOBT^ 1913. 



Table 33. — Public and pHvaU high 9(hodU combined— PereerUageM of college preparatory 
students, graduates, etc., in 191S. 



states. 



Total 
number of 
secondary 
students. 



Per cent of total number. 



Bays. 



Gills. 



College 
classical 
|nepara> 

tory 
stQdents. 



CoUe^ 
scientiflc 
prepara- 
tory 
stndesits. 



Qradn- 

atesln 

1013. 



Percent 
of gradu- 
ates pre- 
paradfor 
college. 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division.. 
South Atlantic Divisian. 
South Central Division. . 
Western Division 

North Atlantio Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Tn Hiftna. 

IlUnob 

Michigan 

Wlsconshi 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Distrtet of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

FlorHa 

South Central Divisian: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arlcansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



1,383,009 



44.54 



65.48 



3.68 



3.24 



309,448 
500,067 
102,944 
140,787 
139,743 



14,875 
8,973 
6,778 

73,993 
8,260 

19,866 
142,130 

33,274 

91,300 

77,360 
52,22S 
76,064 
49,308 
40,083 
37,274 
48,430 
42,827 
7,733 
8,049 
24,627 
36,114 

2,313 
13,210 

7,029 
20,339 

8,431 
18,256 

9,371 
19,023 

4,972 

15,798 
19,123 
15,348 
10,403 
9,360 
46,241 
10,273 
14,241 

5,315 

1,749 

17,694 

1,872 

1,959 

9,363 

912 

6,420 

24,809 

13,642 

56,008 



46.98 
43.67 
43.88 
44.18 
44.46 



54.02 
56.33 
56.18 
65.82 
55.55 



5.50 
2.23 
8.96 
8.09 
3. OS 



4.90 
2.38 
2.37 
1.74 
3.73 



44.70 
51.73 
46.10 
46.43 
48.83 
46.88 
46.11 
46.69 
46.97 

46.34 
46.18 
43.93 
43.48 
46.20 
42.20 
41.87 
43.23 
41.34 
41.46 
41.60 
41.20 

45.70 
44.86 
40.90 
42.82 
43.91 
46.51 
41.25 
44.58 
40.16 

43.23 
47.54 
43.30 
46.48 
43.14 
43.77 
43.62 
42.38 

40.83 
40.65 
43.15 
47.76 
42.78 
47.61 
40.68 
44.88 
44.86 
43.80 
44.74 



55.21 
48.28 
54.90 
53.57 
51.17 
53.12 
54.89 
53.31 
54.03 

54.66 
53.82 

56.07 
56.52 
54.71 
57.80 
58.13 
56.78 
58.66 
58.55 
58.40 
58.71 

54.30 
55.14 
59.04 
57.18 
56.09 
53.49 
58.75 
55.42 
59.84 

56.77 
52.46 
56.70 
53.52 
56.86 
56.23 
56.38 
57.62 

59.17 
59.35 
56.85 
52.24 
57.22 
52.39 
69.32 
55.12 
55.14 
56.20 
55.26 



7.89 
1.16 
4.47 
8.45 
7.06 
6.46 
5.25 
8.85 
3.84 

8.06 
2.32 
2.24 
1.68 
1.86 
2.79 
3.27 
2.23 
1.05 
8.86 
1.23 
1.61 

1.90 
2.00 
5.70 
8.88 
8.21 
8.42 
3.02 
5.08 
8.16 

8.83 
8.00 
2.40 
3.44 
1.61 
3.08 
4.13 
3.00 

4.10 
4.35 

.82 
1.76 

.87 
2.40 
1.10 
1.28 
8.29 
4.74 
5.82 



4.63 
6.81 
4.56 
4.45 
3.46 
4.01 
6.56 
8.75 
8.33 

3.53 
1.89 
3.39 
1.89 
3.53 
7.74 
1.73 

.99 
1.51 
8.28 
1.41 

.96 

3.43 
3.91 
6.03 
3.71 
1.30 
1.46 
.71 
2.61 
1.77 

3.99 
1.03 
1.06 
.67 
1.01 
2.03 
1.21 
1.54 

2.18 
4.06 

.84 
1.01 

.46 
3.30 
0.10 
1.04 
3.02 
2.83 
5.57 



13.03 



12.94 
14.60 
11.20 
10.36 
11.61 



15.01 
15.67 
16.02 
14.17 
11.66 
14.70 
10.20 
12.71 
14.83 

16.02 
16.74 
13.22 
14.27 
15.56 
13.00 
15.01 
13.26 
11.11 
14.75 
16.76 
13.14 

12.58 
13.74 
11.02 

9.80 
11.93 

0.50 
15.06 
11.20 
10.73 

11. T2 
0.22 
0.41 
12.16 
11.00 
10.20 
0.24 
10.61 

ILIO 
11.21 
11.94 
11.70 
11.13 
0.76 
13.82 
11.67 
11.50 
12.15 
11.78 



36.80 



81.21 
84.64 
43.68 
43.36 
44.16 



81.04 
35.48 
30.51 
87.63 
31. 3S 
30.04 
34.78 
30.63 
30.18 

87.10 
38.90 
83.04 
35.81 
30.68 
35.14 
37.53 
37.56 
39.46 
30.34 
88.37 
35.52 

81.00 
137.15 
80.88 
42.55 
42.06 
57.27 
57.10 
48.38 
50.84 

35.75 
37.61 
46.54 
54.30 
37.00 
44.71 
48.37 
45.00 

48.14 
41.84 
46.60 
35.16 
34.40 
41.00 
40.48 
51.54 
40.39 
47.44 
40.18 



1 Includes students prepared for United States Naval Academy. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC AND PKIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS. 49S 

Table 34. — Public and private high schools combined— Enrollment o/secontkiry students, 

by years. 



I Includes students above fourth year in schools offering advanced courses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



494 BDTTCATIOK BBPOBT; 1913. 

Tablb 3^.— Public and private high $ehool$ combined— Enrollment of secondary Hudente^ 
by years, and percentage of total in each year, 1912-13, 



> Includes 8tud«nt8 above fourth year in schools offering advanced courses. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER XI. 
MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



In 1913 there were 439 schools making statistical returns on the 
schedule sent to manual-training schools, agricultural schools, and 
industrial, trade, and vocational schools. An entirely satisfactoiy 
classification has been foimd impossible for this year, but the follow- 
ing grouping may facilitate the separate study of the different kinds 
of schools: 

Tables 2, 3, 14, and 15 give the statistics of 51 public manual- 
training high schools. 

Tables 4, 5, 16, and 17 present the statistics of 115 schools of agri- 
culture, most of them known as agricultural high schools. 

Tables 6, 7, 18, and 19 include the statistics of 200 manual, indus- 
trial, vocational, technical, and trade schools. 

Tables 8, 20, and 21 give the statistics of 73 industrial schools for 
Indians. 

General summaries of the above schools will be found in Tables 
9, 10, 11, 12, and 13. 

In addition to the 439 schools mentioned above. Table 1 presents a 
list of 1,167 public high schools having 50,453 students in manual 
training, 16,205 in courses of agriculture, and 51,556 in coxuses in 
domestic economy. The same students may be in different courses, 
but no school reporting less than 20 students in at least one of these 
courses was included in the list. 

In the following list will bo found the names of many schools which 
should be included in one of the tabulations of this chapter, but they 
are omitted for lack of sufficient statistical information: 

Coosa Manufacturing Co. School, Piedmont, Ala. 
California School of Arts and Crafts, Berkeley, Cal. 
Raja Yoga Forest School, Point Loma, Cal. 

McDowell Dress Cutting and Dressmaking School, San Francisco, Cal. 
Denver School of Trades, Denver, Colo. 
Y. M. C. A. School, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Waterbury Industrial School, Waterbury, Conn. 
Loomis Institute (being organized), Windsor, Conn. 

National School of Domestic Arts and Sciences, 1754-1766 M Street NW., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Thomas Industrial School, De Funiak Springs, Fla. 
Foote and Davis Apprentice School, Atlanta, Ga. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



496 EDUCATION RBPOBT; 1913. 

Babun Induetrial School, Rabun Gap, Ga. 

The Berry School, Rome, Ga. 

Artcraft Institute, 2827 Michigan Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Chicago School of Watchmaking, Bush Temple, Chicago, 111. 

Coyne National Trade School, Chicago, 111. 

Edwards Automobile School, Chicago, 111. 

International Harveerter Co. Apprentice School, Chicago, 111. 

Jeweler's School of Engraving, 1104 Heyworth Building, Chicago, 111. 

McDowell Drees Cutting and Dressmaking School, Chicago, 111. 

John Herron Art Institute, Indianapolis, Ind. 

National Technical Institute, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Apprentice School of Studebaker Manufacturing Co., South Bend, Ind. 

Wolf Lake Industrial School, Wolf Lake, Ind. 

8t. Angela Institute School of Domestic Science, Carroll, Iowa. 

Highland Park College, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. Co. Apprentice Schools, Topeka, Kans. 

Topeka Industrial and Educational Institute (negro), Topeka, Kans. 

West Kentucky Industrial College (negro), Paducah, Ky. 

National Junior Republic, Annapolis Junction, Md. 

Coyne School, Boston, Mass. 

McDowell Dressmaking and Millinery School, Boston, Mass. 

Hawley School of Engineering, Boston, Mass. 

State Steam Engineering School, Boston, Mass. 

Brockton Independent Evening Industrial School, Brockton, Mass. 

Chicopee Independent Evening Industrial School, Chicopee, Mass. 

Fitchburg Industrial School, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Lowthorpe School of Landscape Gardening and Horticulture for Women, Gn>ton, 



Hyde Park Independent Evening Industrial School, Hyde Park, Mass. 

New Bedford Independent Evening Industrial School, New Bedford, Mass. 

Newton Independent Day Industrial School, Newton, Mass. 

Newton Independent Evening Industrial School, Newton, Mass. 

Somerville Independent Industrial School (boys), Somerville, Mass. 

Taunton Independent Evening Industrial School, Taunton, Mass. 

State Industrial School, Walpole, Mass. 

Worcester Independent Evening Industrial School, Worcester, Mass. 

Beulah Land Farm for Boys, Boyne City, Mich. 

Detroit Technical Institute, Detroit, Mich. 

Lansing Industrial Aid Society, Lansing, Mich. 

Michigan Children's Home Society, St. Joseph, Mich. 

Stone's School of Watchmaking, 903 Globe Block, St. Paul, Minn. 

Piney Woods Industrial Institute (negro), Braxton, Miss. 

The American College of Dressmaking, Kansas City, Mo. 

Automobile Training School, Kansas City, Mo. 

Coyne School, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis Watchmaking School, 2308 Locust Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Philomena's Technical School, Union and Cabanne Avenues, St. Louis, Mo. 

Sellew Institute of the Y. M. C. A., St. Louis, Mo. 

Manchester Institute of Arts and Sciences, Manchester, N. H. 

E. R. Strawbridge Girls' Republic, Mooreetown, N. J. 

Rice Industrial School, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Sargent Industrial School, Beacon, N. Y. 

State Agricultural High School, Cobleskill, N. Y. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TRAINING. 497 

Training School ioi Masons and Carpenters, 65 Flushing Avenue, Jamaica, N. Y. 

Boys' Preparatory Trade School, 305 East Forty-first Street, New York, N. Y. 

Grace Institute Commercial and Trade School for Girls, 149 West Sixtieth Street, 
New York, N. Y. 

Heffley School of Engineering, Ryerson Street and De Kalb Avenue, New York, 
N.Y. 

Hoe & Co. Apprentice School, New York, N. Y. 

McDowell Dressmaking and Millinery School, New York, N. Y. 

Mae Benson School of Applied Design, 50 West Twenty-third Street, New York, 
N.Y. 

Mitchell School of Garment Cutting, 43 West Twenty-fifth Street, New York, N. Y. 

New York Electrical School, 42 West Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. 

New York Nautical School, New York, N. Y. 

New York School of Art, New York, N. Y. 

S. T. Taylor Co.*s Dressmaking School, 930 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

School of Domestic Aria for Girls, Rome, N. Y. 

Skidmore School of Arts, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Piedmont Industrial Institute, Charlotte, N. C. 

Appalachian Industrial School, Penland, N. C. 

Continuation School, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Cleveland Automobile School, Cleveland, Ohic 

Girls' Industrial School, Chickasha, Okla. 

Pennsylvania Railroad Apprentice School, Altoona, Pa. 

Hebrew Education Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Kintzel Millinery School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

McDowell Dressmaking and Millinery School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boys' Industrial Association, Scranton, Pa. 

Boys' Industrial Home, WiUiamsport, Pa. 

Textile Industrial Institute, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Dodge Industrial School, Dodge, Tex. 

Keene Industrial Academy, Keene, Tex. 

St. Andrew's Industrial School, Richmond, Va. 

Northwestern Motor Institute, Milwaukee, Wis. 

St. Rose's Orphan Asylum, Milwaukee, Wis. 

St. Mary's Institute and School of Domestic Science, Sparta, Wis. 
17727*— ED 1913— VOL 2 32 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



498 EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 

Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training, agricultural, 
and domestic economy courses, 1912^13, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDU8TBIAL TRAINING. 



499 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or tedmical training^ agricultwrat, 
and domestic economy courses, 1912-13 — Continued. 



Location. 


Name of school. 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
courses. 


Students in 

agricultural 

courses. 


Students in 
domestte 
economy 
couzses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girb. 


1 


2 


8 


4 ■ 


6 


• 


7 


8 


Califobnia— Con. 


Union High School 


40 


1 










14 


Rivenide 


Girls' HiS School 






24 


Do 


Polytechnic High School 

Union High School 


68 
7 

60 
852 
24 
74 
48 
80 
20 
20 
25 
32 





4 
15 
50 





4 


55 







fit. Helena 






30 


San Bflrnar'if'v^ 


High School 






47 


San Diego 


do 








San Fernando. . 


Union High SchooL 










San JoM. ...... 


High school 








8 






2 







95 


Santa Barbara 


do 






19 


Santa Crus 


do 


10 


2 


65 


Santa Monica. . 


do 


82 


Selma 


Union High School 

Tuolumne County High School. . 
High School ..../. 






60 


Bonma. 






80 


Tulare.......... 


10 
11 

4 
17 



17 

3 



£0 


TTkiflh.. 


Mendocino County H^h School 

(east). 
Unton High SchooL 


18 


Ventnra 


28 
30 

60 
276 


10 



6 


27 


Whittier 


do...1 


40 


Colorado: 

ColoradoSprings 
Denver. 


HighSchooL 


120 


North Side Hkh School '.. 


140 


201 


816 


Durango 

Florence 


HighSchooL „ 


20 


...."do 


20 
13 
6 
27 
23 
14 
12 
18 
30 

100 
31 
17 
25 


2 

4 

6 

10 









12 


8 




Fort Collins 


do 





62 


Fort Morgan.... 
Granada 


do 


20 


6 




Union High SchooL 

Gunnison County Hig^ School. . 
High SchooL........ Tf. 






28 


Gunnison..... 






14 


Hotchkiss 


16 


9 




Julesburg 

Montroee 


Sedgwick County High School. . 
Montrose County High School . . 
CentennialHighSchool(District 

High Sciiool (District No. 20). . . 
HighSchooL. 






20 


7 






Pueblo 










63 


Do 






70 


SaUda 






39 


Bilyerton ... 


do 






27 


Rt4rlimr 


Logan County Industrial Arts 

High SchooL 
HighSchooL 


10 
12 



13 


26 


Towner. .. . ..... 




Trinidad 


.,^do 


40 

6 
150 
669 




1 
103 
822 






38 


Connecticut: 

OSS"-:::: 


High School 






36 


do 








New Haven 


do 










Newtown. , 


do 


11 


10 






Waterbury 

Dblaware: 

Wilmington.... 
Do 


Crosbv Hieh SchooL . 


160 

234 
14 












High School . 














243 


Howard High School (negro) 

Manatee Countv Hi£h School .. 






64 


Florida: 

B rftd ADtown 






80 


Clearwater. .... 


High School .: 


29 
48 










36 


Jacksonville 


Duval County High SchooL 

HighSchooL 






129 


MlamL 

St. Petersburg.. 
TAlIahwRMW. . . a 


4 
8 


21 

7 




WashiDfton High School (negro) 


20 

77 


16 



1 
















20 
93 


Lincoln High School (negro) 


7 


17 


17 


Tamoa 


Hillsborougn County High 
SchooL 

HighSchool 


78 





109 


Georgia: 

Albany 






40 


Athens 


High and Industrial School 
(P4gro) ... . . 


11 













37 


Aogusta 

Columbus 


Tnbinan Hlffh School Virtrifl>. . . 






226 


HighSchool 


56 
17 










112 


Do . ... 


Hieh SchooHneero) 






44 


EUerton 


HighSchool 






50 


Mansfield 


.do 







9 





20 


Savannah 


do 


47 


68 


77 


Thomson 


do 


20 


10 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



500 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training, agricuUural^ 
and domestic economy courses^ 1912-13 — Continued. 



Location. 


Name of school. 
Hlgn BCbool 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
courses. 


students in 
agricultural 

C0UZ9e8. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
counas. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girts. 


1 


4 


6 


• 


7 


8 


Idaho: 

Blackfoot 


12 
200 
28 



2 



9 
100 
10 
33 
27 
10 


5 
25 



19 


1 






38 


Bolfle 


do 


12S 


Caldwell 


do 


16 


Emmett 


Wardwell High School 


58 


Idaho Falls. 


High School 


30 


20 


35 


Jerome 


do 




Lewistx)n 


do 


60 
22 
20 
12 
65 


2 


17 
8 

10 




3 






16 




44 


Malad , . _ . 


do 






43 


Meridian 


....do 


16 
3 
20 
10 
16 
18 



8 
9 

8 
2 


47 


Mountain Home 


do 


28 


Nampft 


do 


83 


Rigby 


do 


28 


Sandnoint . 


do 


6 
36 

00 
24 
16 
45 
IS 
65 
12 
25 
87 
65 
45 
223 
62 

63 
114 
238 
51 
62 
21 
42 
68 
21 
52 








3 







18 
1 
1 





19 







25 


Twin Falls 


do 


40 


Illinois: 

Alton 


High School 


114 


Anrora 


East High School 






15 


Batavla 


High School 






32 


Belvidere 


do 


18 


12 




Benton 


Benton Township High School. . 
High School ; 
















23 


Bloomlngton... 
Bridgeport 


20 





35 


do 


38 


Centrafia 

Chicago 


CentraUa Township High School 
Austin Higi School 


10 





30 
105 


Do 


Bowen High School 






50 


Do 


Calumet Hlrfi School 






4 


Do 


Carl Schurr Bieh School 

Englewood High School 

George William Curtla High 






97 


Do 






50 


Do 










28 


Do 


Harrison Technical High School. 
Lake High School 






9 


Do 








Do 


Lake View High School 



















62 


Do 


UftT«hanH|phR<»hnftl... 






65 


Do 


MedlU High' School 






5 


Do 


Parker High School 






11 


Do 


WendeU PhilUps High School.. . 
William McKinley High School. 
Bloom Township High School... 
J. Sterling Morton H&h School. . 






43 


Do 






2 


Chicago Heights 
Cicero 






36 






104 


Clayton 

Clinton 


High School 






15 





20 


*^do 




39 
46 
43 
47 








40 


Decatur 


do 






60 


DeKalb 

East St. Louis.. 


De Kalb Township High School. 
Rock High School. 


13 




17 


13 


Efflngham . 


High School 






34 


Elgin 


do 


27 
31 
43 











50 


Evauston... 


Evanston Township High School 
High School ;..... 








Fairbury 

Falrflela . . 









65 


.. ..do 


10 

3 

33 

10 


10 
6 
20 

5 




Galena 


. .do . . 


22 
125 

35 

32 
55 















Qalesburg 


do 














311 


Gibson aty.... 


Drummer Township High 
School ;. . 


20 


Harrlsburg 


Harrisburg Township High 
School 


36 


Harvey 


Thornton Township High School 
High School 






53 


Henrv 






41 


Highland Park. 
JoUet 


Deerfleld-Shields Township 
High School. 

Joliet Township High School 

High School 


60 

122 
23 
26 
24 
60 
35 

30 








3 








9 


50 
120 


Kankakee... 








Kewanee . . 


.do 


18 









30 


Kirkwood 


do 


36 


La Grange.. 


Lyons Township High School. . . 
La Salle-Peru Township High 

School. 
High School 








LaSaUe 

Lockport 


25 









30 

ao 


Lovington 


do 


18 


2 




Hattoon 


do 


25 
60 










Maywood _ 


Proviso Township mgjb. School. . 






6 


M 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 501 

Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training , agricultural^ 
and domestic economy courses^ 19 12-1 S — Continued. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



602 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training^ agricultural^ 
and domestic economy courses^ /9/f-/5— Continued. 



Looatkm. 


Name of school. 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
coozaes. 


students in 

agrksultural 

courses. 


Students In 
domestic 
economy 
oouxses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girb. 


1 


2 


8 


4 


6 


e 


7 


8 


Utduna— Contd. 
Salem 


Salem-WashlngtoQ Township 

Joint High School. 
High School 


34 

60 
124 
34 
33 
28 
15 





2 



30 


9 

20 

5 

25 




20 
2 





"0 






37 


Bhelbyville 

South Bend 


60 


do 


53 


Sullivan 


do 


30 


Terre Haute 


Garfield High SchooL 


76 


Do 


Wiley High School 







56 


Thofntown 


High School 








Valley Mills.. 


... "do 


7 


16 














16 


Wabash 


do 


24 
14 

9 








2« 


Wabash (R. 

Weitfleld. 

Whiteland (R. 
F.D.No.16). 

Whiting 

Winitate 


T'<niavn H^gh P<rhooK 


14 
20 
20 


22 




23 


Washington Township High 
Clark Township High School 


20 
30 


High School 


88 
15 

20 
35 
60 
SO 
55 
17 
100 
2« 
30 
12 













8 



14 


do 


17 


16 


10 


Iowa: 

Albla 


High School 




Algona 


...."^do 






1 











50 


Ames . . . 


do 






60 


Belle Plaine 


do 






38 


Burlington .... 


do 






87 


CafFtana 


do 


17 
60 
2 
12 




9 
3 


39 


Cedar Rapids... 
Chariton 


Washington High School 

HighS^ool 


96 

14 


Charles City 


do 


86 


Cherokee./..'... 


do 


33 


Clarinda ^ 


do 


12 
8 


13 
1 




Coin 


do 


15 












34 


Coming 


do 


65 


Creston '.'... 


do 


34 
75 
30 
49 
100 






50 


4 


12 


16 




do 


96 


Benison 


do 


10 


8 


35 


Des Moines 


North Des Moines High School . . 
West Des Moines Hi^School... 
High School 




Do 










Diagonal 

Earlham 


15 


20 






Academy and High School 



















23 


Eldora . 


High School 


15 





8 
7 


8 
18 


40 




do 


18 


Forest City * ' * 


do 


17 
60 






27 




do 






56 


Grundy Center. 
Harlan 


do 






45 


do 


11 

16 
40 
25. 


17 
10 


50 

6 


7 
25 


5 
15 


11 


Hawarden. . . 


do 


12 


Independence. . 
Tndlftnolft,. ... 


do 


97 


do 


15 


15 


60 


Iowa Falls.... 


do 


45 


I^yflift 


do 


ii 


13 




Maquoketa.. .. 


... .do 


30 
63 
49 
22 
21 
16 
29 
12 
18 
12 
45 
30 
36 
30 


6 



3 

15 
10 



1 










7 


Manon ... . 


do 







80 
60 
50 


Marshall town 


.... do 


19 


4 


Mason City 


do 


Missouri VaUey. 
Monticello 


.... do 






do 


12 


13 





14 


Muscatine 


do 


Nevada 


do 










Newton 


do 














6 





38 
18 
49 
8 
«3 
50 
13 


Oakland 


do 


12 


10 


Oelwein... 


do 


Onawa 


.... do 





9 


Osage 


do 


Oskaloosa 


do 


"*6 
13 
20 
9 


12 
9 


16 


Pella 


do 


Red Oak . . . 


do 


30 





Rockford 


do 


60 
34 
87 
16 
S8 


Rock Rapids... 
Rockwell City.. 
BheMon 


do 


19 





do 


22 
7 



30 


do 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 503 

Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manttal or technical training ^ agricultural, 
and domestic economy courses^ 19 12- J 3 — Continued. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



504 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — StudenU in public high schools in manual or technical irainvng, agncuUural^ 
and domestic economy coutses, 1912-lS — Continued. 



Looation. 


NameofaohooL 


Students in 
manual or tech- 

oouraes. 


Students in 

agrioultuiBl 

courses. 


Students in 
domestic 

oourses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


2 


8 


4 


& 


6 


7 


8 


Keiitucky: 

Calhoun .... 


McLean County High School 






10 

7 












20 


EUzabethtown.. 


Hardin County Hign School 






20 


Fmiii^no^ 


High School..:....? 


21 





21 


FrRnkfort 


do 






79 


Greenville 


Graded and High School 






16 
16 


15 
11 




La Center 


Ballard Count VHieh School. . . . 






t 


Louisville 


Central High School (negro) 

Male HighBchool 


62 
180 









1(U 


Do 








Owensboro 








5 


42 


Owingsville 

Richmond . ... 


HighSchoofrr. 






7 




22 




H^h School (negro) 

Spencer County High School 

High School 


22 
9 









35 


Taylorsville 

Wmgo 


8 
18 

24 


15 
24 












16 


Louisiana: 

Franklinton 


High School 






34 


Oibsland 


do 






20 


Marksville •. . 


do 






34 







Morgan Citv 


do 











42 




do 






30 





25 


Wlnnsboro 


.do.. 






25 


Maine: 

Bangor 


High School 


83 
48 
40 
34 
27 















Bath 


Morse High School 









69 


Calais 


Arademv 








Camden . . . - 


High School 


1 






42 


Fairfield 


Lawrence High School 






21 


South Wind- 




20 
23 








hamCR.F.D.). 
Turner Center. . 


Leavitt Institute 










Mabtland: 

Aberdeen 


F«gbftphoo1... . 


12 
39 





















23 


Annapolis. , .^. . 


do 






101 


Baltimore 


Western High School 


1 


£94 


Brookeville 


HlghSchooLV. 






12 





32 


Cambridge 


....Tdo 


69 
60 
38 
45 
79 
30 
48 
29 












107 


Catonsviue .... 


do 






51 


CentervlUe 


do 




71 


Chestertown. . . . 


do 






62 


Ciimherland . 


Allegany County High School. . . 
Caroline Countv Hi3i School.... 

Cecil County High School 

High School. 






126 


Denton 


2 


6 


55 


Elkton 


54 


EUioottCitv 






52 


Federalsburg... 


do 


19 
40 


17 



2S 


Frederick 


Boys' High School 


143 







Do 


Girls* High School 






64 


Hagerstown — 
Do 


Washington County Female 

High School. 
Washhirton County Male High 

High School 








134 


143 
32 












Havre de Oraoe. 









41 


JarT«ttsville 


do 


18 


7 




Laurel 


....do 


23 
3.5 
14 
51 
















30 


T/onawning. . ^ , . 


Central High School 






77 


North Kast... . 


High School 






30 


Oakland 


do 






45 


Oxford 


. ...do 


:::::::::::::::: 


25 


PocomokeCity. 
Poolesville . 


Pocomoke Hieh School 


31 
12 
71 
15 



12 








73 


High School. : 








Reisterstown 


Franklin Hich School 












66 


Rock Hall 


High School 






26 


Sandy Spring... 

Sharptown 

Smitnsburg 

Snow Hill 


Sherwood High School 


22 
11 
8 




21 


24 


High School 


11 





23 


Graded School 




High School 


34 

n 

39 
67 





48 












o9 


Stockton 


do 






22 


Westminster ... 


..do 






18 


MAssAcmisETrs: 

Amesbury 

Andover 


High School 






131 


ininchard High School 






20 


Arlington 


High School 


27 
134 


41 









Beverty 


do 







6 


4i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDTJSTBIAL TBAINING. 



505 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training, agricultwral, 
and domestic economy courses, 1912-13 — Continued. 



Location. 


NameofaohooL 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
courses. 


students in 

agricultural 

courses. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


2 


« 


4 


& 


6 


7 


8 


M A B S ACHUSXTTS — 

CJontiniicd. 
Boston 


Brighton High School 


28 
144 
75 
81 
31 


34 
15 
76 











32 


Do 


Dorchester High School 








Do 


East Boston High School 

HighSchooL 










Brockton 












123 


Brookline 


do 






142 


Cambridge 


High and Latin School 






34 


Chlcopee 

ninton ... 


High School 


33 
29 
32 
101 
213 
217 







1 









do 










Concord 


do 










33 


Everett 


do 

B. M. C. Durfee High School. . . . 
High School 






71 


FaU River 








Fitchburg 










Framinchani. . . 


do 









41 


Gardner 


do 


74 
90 
24 
95 
80 



2 











Haverhill . . 


do 










Holden 


do 









31 


Holyoke 


do 








Hudson 


do 


8 


7 






70 


Leominster 


do 


76 


Lowell 


do 


204 
194 
140 
22 
23 


4 

10 
17 
12 









Lvno 


English High School 











Dov.;:::::::: 


F.vpning High Rnhool 










25 


Nantucket 


HighScbool 






33 


NorthAttleboro 


do 








North Easton... 


Oliver Ames High School 


19 


1 






Quincy 


High School 


177 










49 


Revere 


do 






33 


Salem.. ....... 


Classical and High School 

High School...... 


89 
132 
25 
25 
65 
160 
122 

















Waltham 







2 



74 


Webster 


Bartlett High SchooL 






57 


WInthrop 


HighSchooL 






40 


Worcester 


Classical High School 








Do 


English High School 










Do 


South High School 










IDcmoAN: 
Ann Arbor 


High School 









79 


Bangor. 


do 






35 


20 




Battle Creek . 


do 


18 


SO 




8 


24 


BavCity 


Eastern High School 






22 


Western High BchooL 


27 









40 


Bronson 


HighSchooirr. 


10 


12 




CMillfM* 


....Tdo 


96 
85 



105 



fO 
40 


151 


Calumet 


do 






62 


Cassopolis 


do 






1 


Clio 


do 






9 


U 




Coldwater 


do 









40 




do 






14 


16 




Crystal FaUs... 
Detroit. 


do 


25 

6S9 
111 
30 
25 





10 







30 


Eastern High School 






05 


Do 


Western High School 








Eaton Rapids.. 
Fennville 


High School. 






i 




30 


do 






26 


Fremont 


do 


18 
14 


6 




Grand I/edge... 

Grand Rapids.. 

Do 


... .do 









11 


Central High School 


132 
57 








Union High SchooL 

High School.... 









106 


Hart 


21 
91 


19 
57 




nnisdf^le 


. - . .Ido 


20 
28 
136 
150 














50 


Iron River 


. do 


37 


Iron wood.. . 


Luther L. Wright High School. . 
HighSrhooL.... .. 






225 


Jackson 






120 


K-ingsley . . 


do 


10 
20 


17 





Mamstee 


do 


12 
56 
39 
20 
38 
35 







1 










25 


Marauette 


..do 


• 65 


Menominee . . . 


do 


22 


22 


58 


Midland 


do 


16 


Norway 


do 




Painesoale 


Adams Township High School. . 
Hiph School 









73 


Portland 


23 
20 
7 







Qiiincv 


I'nion School 






6 




Baginaw 


HighSchooL 


72 


6 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



506 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in piiblic high schools m manual or technical training, agricuUwrd, 
and domestic economy courses, 1912-15 — Contmued. 



Location. 


Name of school. 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
oomsea. 


students in 

agricultural 

oooraes. 


Students In 
domestio 
economy 
oonzses. 




Boys. 


Oirb. 


Boys. 


Oirb. 


Boys. 


Oirb. 


1 


2 


8 


4 


i 


• 


7 


8 


MicmGAH— Oontd. 

Bt Johns 


High School 






19 
15 
5 


2 
11 







Bcottville. 


....Ido 










South Haven 


.. ..do ^ 


25 
30 










18 


Wakefield.. 


do 


28 


Watervllet 


do 


24 

25 
28 

8 
14 
30 

6 

n 

12 

77 
23 
86 


• 6 



6 

80 
20 
14 
8 

26 
12 
41 




Minnesota: 

Ada 


FIgl* fiehonl 















64 


Albert Lea. . 


. . .'^do ' 


34 
84 

14 
75 
10 
15 

as 

77 
19 



2 










37 


Alexandria 


do 


55 


Argyle 


do 


40 


Austin.*.* I!! I!.. 


Franklin High School 


113 


Bacley 


High School 


10 


Benson 

Blooming Prai- 

Blue Earth .. 


do 

do 


80 


do 




6 










90 


Breckenridge... 
Rnff&io T-,- 


do 


18 


do 


68 


Cambridfo 


do 


80 


3 


20 


Chatfield • 


do 


20 
12 



28 


64 


Cloaoet 


do 


80 
40 
24 
27 
17 
10 
270 





9 





71 


Cokato 


do 


67 


Cottonwood. . . 


do 






28 


Dasscl 

Deer River 

Dodge Center... 
I>uhith 


.....do.. 

do 

do 


25 

7 

33 


19 




8S 
35 
30 


Central High School 




Elk River.. 


High School 


7 


4 






38 


Ely 


do 


56 
46 
43 







19 


EflJnnont 


do 








Faribault 


do 










Fertile 


do 











83 


Gilbert.. 


do 


2« 
20 
27 
25 
30 
15 
48 
57 
20 
24 
51 
18 



1 








7 







38 


Glenwood 


do 








Grand Meadow . 


do 










Grand Rapids.. 
Granite Falls.. 


do 

do 











30 


25 
19 


85 
88 


80 


Hurmcmv 


do 


40 


Hastings. . • 


do 




Hopkins 


do 


14 
35 


10 











2 











60 


Jordan . • 


do 


3S 


Kasota 


do 


49 


Lake City... 


...do 


12 
15 
16 




6 


48 


Lakefleldf 


do 


89 


Le Roy 


.. do 


36 


Le Suenr , . 


do 


18 
33 
23 





11 


80 


Litchfield 


do 


15 
15 
19 
25 
15 


32 
4 

2 
5 


46 


MantorvUle. 


Industrial High School 


80 


Mareppa 

MelnKeT 


High School 


36 


do 






16 


Mllaca 


do 


54 
825 
297 
263 
206 
202 
25 
24 
53 
24 

16 
46 
15 
78 
32 






1 

13 

1 

15 

1 




3 





88 


Minneapolis.... 
Do 


Central High School 


73 


East High School 






75 


Do 


North High School 






79 


Do 


South High School 







87 


Do .. 


West High School 






80 


Moorhead 


High School 







30 


New Rirhland. 


"do 








Northficld ... 


do 


56 
24 

16 
30 

6 
20 

8 
10 


40 






40 


14 














80 


Norwood 

Olivia 


Norwood- Young America High 

School. 
Hich School 


35 
33 


Owatonnn 


do 


83 


Red Lake Falls. 


do 


53 


Redwood Fallj. 


do 


90 


Renville 


do 


10 


Royal ton. 


do 


83 


8t Paul 


Humboldt High School 

John A. Johnson High School. . . 
High School 


150 
81 






75 


Do 








8nnd.stone ...... 


26 
7 



16 






31 


Shakopee 


do 






38 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAKUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TBAINING. 



607 



Tablb 1. — Students in mtblic high schools in manual or technical training, agricultural, 
and aomestic economy courses, 19 li-lS— Continued, 



TxxHttkm. 


NameofschooL 


Students hi 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
coones. 


students in 

agricultural 

couises. 


Students hi 
domestto 
economy 
oouxaes. ■ 






Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


2 


8 


4 


6 


• 


7 


8 


lCDnfK8OTA--00ll. 

bhorbiim 


HighSebool 


13 
2S 
15 
85 
10 
30 

ao 

80 










8 


6 
25 


14 
18 






Slayton 


. . . .~do 







80 


Spring Grove. . . 


do 

do 


28 


Spring Valley.. 
Stephen 


20 
16 



17 


80 


do 




Stewart Yille.... 


do 






50 


Thief Biver 


Lincoln High School 


18 

20 
6 
16 





10 
16 


20 


Falls. 
Tracy 


mgh School 




Wabasha 


Ido 



















40 


Warren.. . 


do 


15 
25 
22 
87 
20 
19 
83 













28 


Waseca 


do 


80 


w^u 


do 


45 
10 
42 
24 
20 




41 




16 


iviiifT^ftr 


do 


48 


Windom 


do 


94 


Winthrop 


do 


44 


WortbingtCMi. • . 


do 


88 


MBSiKapn: 

Jackson 


HlghPchooi 


40 


Laurel 


.wtao^T^, .:.:::: 










21 


McComb 

Meridian.. . 


do 

do 


15 
106 

44* 





6 


10 
26 
40 
25 

12 
9 
13 
12 
10 

>S 




39 





18 
14 
17 
16 
16 

12 
15 


20 
90 


Water Valley... 
YAXooCily 


do 

do 


28 
84 


MiBSoxnu: 

AshOroTe 


HIghflchool 




Bakersfield 


.\^Ao :.::.. 










Birch Tree 


do 

do 

do 










Breekenridge... 






Burlington 






Junction. 
Calhoun 


do 

do 










California 






Cape Girardeau. 
Charleston 


do 


34 








85 


do 


12 


10 




Clarence. 


do 






1 


46 


Crane 


do 







14 


6 




£xoelsior 


do 


37 

80 

38 











40 


Springs. 


do 








FredericKtown . 


do 


18 
13 
11 
16 


12 
22 
10 

7 





88 


Hokien . . 


do 




Hume 


do 










Independence. . 

JopUn 

Kansas City.... 
Do.. 


Central High School 


60 
150 
113 
252 




s 











41 


High School 


145 


Lincohi High School (negro). . . . 
Westport High School 






208 






703 


Kearney 

Koahkononf 


HighBchool 


25 
9 
8 
8 
20 
10 
13 
14 
15 
8 



15 

2 

5 
16 

8 
17 
16 
21 

9 


80 


do 








Lexington 


do 












42 


Maiden 


. ..do 


8 
8 
20 


2 




80 


Mexico... 


McMillan High School 


15 


Monroe aty.... 
Norbome 


High School.. 


20 


. . . ."do 




Osark 


do 










Plattsburg 


.. ..do 










Bichmond. ..... 


do 


Id 
41 
27 
248 
226 
287 
142 
174 


14 

5 

2 










St. Joseph 

Do... 


Bartlett High School (negro). . . . 
Central High School. . 






- 




59 






163 


St. Louis 


do 






236 


Do 


Frank Louis Soldan High School 
McKinley Hi^ School 






296 


Do 






809 


Do 


Stunner filgh^School (negro) 

Yeatman High School 






149 


Do 






156 


Sheldon 


High School 


26 

7 
4 
18 
12 


22 

16 

5 

22 

10 




Slater. '.'.'.' 


. .. do 










Springfleld 

Walnut Grove 


Lincoln High School (negro) 

HighSchooT. 


25 








80 


Washburn 


do 










Webster Groves 


.....do...'. 


42 





6 


48 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



508 



EDUCATION BEPOBT. 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training, agricultural, 
and domestic economy courses^ 1912-13 — Continued. 



. Location. 


NameofschooL 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
courses. 


Students in 

agricultural 

oourses. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


8 


S 


4 


h 


6 


7 


8 


Montana: 

Bigtimber 

Billings 


Sweet Grass County High School 

High School 

do 


























35 


42 
85 










45 


ButteT 






100 


Dillon 


Beaverhead County High School 
Flathead County High School. . . 

1 ergus County High School 

Cu,ier County High School 

Mi^oula County High School 

High School 


19 
13 






23 


KallspeU 

Lewistown 


25 
15 
1ft 
42 

15 
14 
10 












00 
66 


Miles City. ... 






27 


Missoula 






36 


Nebraska: 
Albion 


27 
10 
23 


28 
19 
37 


20 


Almfi. 


do 


16 




do 


20 


Hartley .. . 


do 


30 


Broken Bow 


do 






i4 

7 


23 
13 


24 


Clarks 


do 








Columbus 


do 


34 








27 


Creigbton 


do 


14 
43 
17 
29 
5 


22 
69 
9 
33 
20 




Falrniiry . 


do 


29 






2 



40 


FnPlVIin , 


do 


24 


Geneva 


do 





5 


10 


Ofoeiey 


do 




Hartington 


do 


13 

28 
4H 
20 











29 


Havelock . . 


.... do 


' 




I/extogton 


do :... 


1 





51 




.... do 






Madison 


do 











27 


MffiflAn.., 


do 


30 
25 
240 









32 


Nelson ... 


.. do 


11 


^1 


30 


Omaha 


do 


120 


Ord . 


.. do 




90 




do 






27 


42 




Red Cloud 


. do. 


20 
20 










24 


South Omaha. . 


do 





15 


Rt^^lla 


do 


11 
19 
21 


9 



37 




Tecumseh. 


.... do 


47 









T^^kamab 


do 






50 


West Point . 


.. do 


40 





22 


Wood Kiver 


do 


11 


17 




Nevada: 

Elko 


Elko County High School 

White Pine County High School . 

Academy 


20 
20 



10 






Ely. 











14 


New Hampshiek: 
Colebrook 


13 





27 


Concord 


High School 


200 





1$S 


T^vn'^str 


Academy and Hi£h School 






30 


Nashua 


High School 


30 
22 
11 


25 










Portsmoutb 


do 










Warner .... 


Simonds Free High School 

High School 










21 


New Jf.iwey: 

Bavonne 

Bridffeton 






26 


. do 


38 
174 


33 









East Orange.... 
FrAAbold 


.... do 










do 


64 


16 








do 

East Side Commercial and Man- 
High School 


A") 
80 

64 

50 

263 


3 
3 










Newark 










Orange 










Passaic . 


do 










Paterson 


.. do 











21 


Perth Am boy. . 
Rpd Bank 


do 







lf.5 


.. do 


19 
14 

10 

24 



6 










£2 


WestOjonge... 
New Mexico: 

Santa Fe .... 


.... do 








High school 










•v» 


New York: 


Acaiemic Hi^ School 






IS 


Batavia 


Hieh School 


11 
15 


14 





Belmont 


do 









i7 


Brooklyn 

Do 


Biishwick Hicrh School 


108 







Eastern District High School 






42 


168 


Brushton 


High School 







is 


9 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AKD INDUSTBIAL TEAININQ. 



509 



Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training^ agricultural, 
and domestic economy courses, 1912-13 — Contiuued. 



Location. 


Name of school. 


Students in 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
courses. 


Stude 
agricu 

COO] 

Boys. 


ntsin 
dtural 
rses. 

Girls. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


2 


S 


4 


6 


e 


7 


8 


New York— Ckmtd. 
Cambridge 


High School 






20 


4 






Carthage 


do 











56 


Elmira 


Free Academy 


19 
20 










87 


Glens Falls 


High Rchool , 






60 


Greenwich 


...."I do 


15 
18 
15 
15 
25 


7 

10 







Greigsville 


do 










Hannibal 


do 










20 


TTighl^nH 


Union School 






20 


Interlaken 


High School 








Jamwlown . . . . . 


do 


37 

23 

10 

250 












Lackawanna 


do 












do 












27 


Long Island 


Bryant High School 






393 


City. 
Lowville...:..-. 


Free Academy 


18 
24 


10 
3 


20 


Mexico 


Academy and Ili^ School 








Middletown 


High School 










24 


MiUbrook 


Memorial School 






10 
19 



6 


31 


Moravia 


High School 








Mount Vernon . 


do 


26 




4,352 






46 


New York 


WashlD^n Irving High School. 
North Cohocton and Atlanta 

High School. 
High School 






1,136 


North Cohocton 


12 


8 


Clean. 


25 
13 


5 







Penn Yan 


Academy 


13 
21 


12 






7 


Perry 


High School 




Port Chester 


do 


58 








13 


Prattsburg 


Franklin Academy and Pratts- 
burg High School. 
High School 


20 
12 



15 




Red Creek 










Schenectady 


do 


30 









Spencer 


.... do 


20 
20 










Stamford 


Seminary and Union School 










Syracuse 


North High School 


72 









122 


Troy 


Lansingburgh High School 






46 


Walton 


High School 






24 

7 
27 


3 

14 





North Carolina: 
Bessemer City. . 


High School 










Browns Sum- 


Monticello High SchooL 










12 


mit (R.F.D. 
No. 1). 
Charlotte 


HlghSchooL 






223 


Coleiain 


do 






10 


11 




I>urhain 


. .. do 


•162 
12 












219 


£denton .... 


do 


12 
22 






26 


Jamestown 


do 


26 


•Raleigh. 


.... do 






91 


Shelby 


do 






7 
22 


4 
10 
25 


13 
38 
176 


2 

4 




Washington.... 
Wilmington. . . . 


.do 










do 










North Dakota: 
Bottineau .... 


High School 


H 


6 


2 
7 


1 












12 


Do 


North DakoU School of Forestry 
High School 


16 


Grafton .... 


39 
22 
2i 

18 
30 
20 

23 

100 
25 

60" 


2 


2 








6 


61 


Hope 


do 


26 


Jamestown 


....do 






20 


J^enmnre 


do 


7 
7 


7 
6 


25 


Minto 


do 


33 


Wahpeton 

WfHist^n 


Secondary Department, State 

School of Science. 
HighSchool 


24 






25 


Omo: 

Akron 


Central High School 






95 


Barberton - 


HighSchool 






40 


Beach City 

Bellaire... 


do 

do 

do 


13 


18 







40 


Canal Winches- 


12 

14 


10 
13 




ter. 
Celina 


do 


21 
365 










Cincinnati 


Hughes High School 






380 


Do :::::. 


WaJnut Hills High School 






130 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



510 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in public high schooh in manual or technical training, agricuUuralf 
and domestic economy courses, 1912-13 — Continued. 



Location. 


NameofscbooL 


Students In 
manual or tech- 
nical training 
ooutses. 


students in 

agricultural 

courses. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Gills. 


1 


S 


S 


4 


6 


e 


7 


8 


Ohio— Continued. 
Cin^lnnftM , . . 


West Night High School 

Woodward Hirii School 


100 

»)1 

100 
94 
23 

















65 


Do 






297 


Cleveland 


Glen vllle High School 








Do 


West High School 










151 


Coliunbus . . 


South High School..... 

Scioto Township High School. . . 






25 


Commeroial 


21 


16 




Point. 
Conneaut 


High School 


65 
40 











67 


Coshocton 


. ..do 


30 


15 


20 


Dayton 


Steele High School 


35 


Dunkirk . .. 


High School 






16 

20 

5 

32 

30 


18 
17 
24 
21 

21 




Eldorado 


do 










Elyria 


....do 


33 









Farmdale'Vu. 
F.D.No.1). 

Fayette 

Fostoria 


Johnston Centralised High 

School. 
High School 














...."do 


99 
71 

123 
11 












90 


Gallon 


do 








Greenville 


do 








e 




41 


TTiimiltnn 


do 






183 


Ironton 


do 


2 

15 



17 


21 


Keene 


do 




Lakewood . 


do 


92 
71 
22 










50 


T4mft 


do 








Lookland. . 


do 









25 


- Logan 


do 


18 
13 
14 
69 
12 


16 
15 
8 
82 
14 




Lucas vllle . 


Valley Township High School. . 










Marengo 

Miamisburtf 


High School 










.....do 










Mount G il<^d . . 


do 










Mount Vernon 


do 


24 


1 





86 


NewMllford(R. 

F.D.No.18). 
Oxford 


Edinburg High School 


10 


'11 




High School 


21 








40 


Painesville 


. . . .Ido 


24 

14 
80 
11 


24 
21 
25 
12 






Riley Township High School. . . 










Kft venna ..... 


HIrfi School 










Sbauck 


Johnsville High School 










Shelby .... 


High School 


35 
284 










24 


Springfield 

Swanion.... . 


Central High School 






414 


High School 


10 


12 




Tiffin 


Columbian High School 


80 
10 










Toledo . . 


East Side HIgfi School 


is 

12 
9 

4 

28 
22 


is* 

8 
23 

12 


22 





22 


Wellington 

Wheelersburg . . 
WilllamsfiAd 


High School .T. *.. . .. 




do 










Wayne Central High School 










(R.F.D.No.2). 
Wilmington (R. 

F.D.No.3). 
\N^ooster • 


Chester Township High School.. 









24 


High School 








Wren 


do 










Youngstown — 
Oklahoma: 

Ardmore ... 


South High School 


76 

25 

20 




15 










1 




96 


High School 






50 


Claremore 

Clinton . ... 


Eastern University Preparatory 

School. 
High School 


15 





22 
40 


Dbwpv • • • 


. do 


11 
21 
35 
87 








2 





90 




do 


40 


El Reno 


do 








Guthrie 


Logan County High School 

(negro). 
Hieh School 








10 





25 


Holdenville 

L«high 


1« 
12 


8 
16 


... do 






18 


Miinciiin ... 


do 


20 
61 






24 


Muskogee 

Nowata . ... 


Central Hieh School 


13 

10 


1 



60 
34 


H i gh School 


Oklahoma 


Douglass High School (negro). . . 
High School 


35 





65 


Ryan 


14 


16 




Shawnee....... 


..,. do 


64 
36 



8 


SI 


152 


Wetumpka 


do 


36 


. ..^. 


25 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 511 

Table 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training ^ agricultural^ 
and domestic economy courses ^ 1912-13 — Continued. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



512 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in puiflic high schools in manual or technical training, agricultural, 
andcUmestic economy courses, 1912-13 — Ck)iitmued. 



Locatfen. 


NameofscbooL 


Students In 
manual or tech- 

ooorses. 


students In 

agrkmltural 

oouzses. 


Stodentsin 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Gh-ls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


8 


S 


4 


6 


• 


7 


8 


Rhode Islamd: 
Newport 




7 














South Carouna: 

Beaafort 

ChfirittiWii... . , . 


High School (negro) 

School. * 
High School 


7 


87 











87 
161 


Colombia 


75 
26 
84 











142 


Do . .. . 


Howard High School (negro). . . . 

High School. 

Normal and Industrial InsUtote 

(negro). 
Delmar Collegiate Institote 






118 


IMlloo 


84 

7 

15 


85 

21 

10 


85 


I/ancafft«r 


21 


LeesvtUeCR.F. 








^D.No.7). 
Marlon 


High School 


49 













65 


Bpartanborg.... 

fJamt^r r . r r 


Converse Street High School 






84 


Lincoln Graded School (negro). . 
Central High SchooL 


89 

52 
27 












79 


South Dakota: 
Aberdeen 






73 


Brookings 

Clark 


HighRfthrtAl ,. 






49 


....^.do 


18 


10 




Deedwood 


do 


40 
20 
64 

28 


3 









. 






88 


Fort Pierre 


do 






17 


Mitchell 


do 






60 


Sioux Falls 


do 






280 


Vermitton 


do 






40 


Tknnessek: 

Athens 


Mclfinn Coonty High School.... 






14 
23 






22 


Benton 


Polk Coonty Hflgh School 






29 


Chattanooga.... 
Clinton 


Central High School of HamUton 

County. 
HighSchool 


68 

20 
25 








36 








Concord (R. F. 
D. No. 1). 

Covington 

Dandridge 

Dayton. 




41 

89 
23 
25 


88 


12 








80 


Byara-HaU High School 


39 


Maory High School 








Rhea County Central High 

School. 
Knox Coonty Central High 

SchooL 
High SchooL 















28 


Fountain City.. 
Hixnon 


65 





117 


31 

88 






29 


Jasper 


Mwion County Hlj^ School 






43 


VnnTvinA 


Austin Hirii flohool (negro) 

Lawrence County High School.. 


22 





68 


Lawrenceb org 


30 

15 
34 


88 

80 





(R.F.D.NO. 
li-ebanon .... 


Htghflf^iool... 


35 



















25 


I/exingtOQ 


HenderKm County High School. 


13 


liberty. 


Liberty County HighSchool 






30 


Memphis 

NashyiUe 

Paris 


Central High School 

Hume- Fogg High School 

E. W. Grove-Henry County 

HighSchool 
High SchooL 


76 
U5 






10 
12 


25 
23 


50 

47 





160 

340 

77 








54 


Sale Creek 


HMnilton County High School . . 






83 


Sweetwater 


Monroe County High School 






36 


Tyner 


Hamilton County High School.. 






22 





80 


Union aty 

Tbxas: 

Ashert(m 


High SchooL 






82 


HighSchool 






14 


17 




Austin 


do 


116 
35 
74 
60 
46 
9 








11 








815 


BavCitv 


do 






86 


Beaumont. 


do 






150 


Bonham * 


.do 


20 





80 


Bryan 


do 




CUfton 


. ..do 


8 
20 


7 
6 
12 


8 


7 


Comanrhe 


do 




CookviUe. 


do 










Cooper 


do 


27 










35 


Corpus Christt.. 
Cormcana 


do 






38 


do 










60 


Cuero 


do 


30 











Coshlng 


do 


14 


24 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



513 



Tablb 1. — Students in public high schools in manual or technical training, agriculturatf 
and domestic economy coursesy 1912-13 — Continued. 



Do 

Dallas (Sia. A;. 

Decatur 

EacleLake 

ElTaso 

Florence 

Fort W or til 

Do 

Galveston 

Do 

Gatesville 

Godley 

Gordon 

Houston 

Hughes Springs 

Huntsville (R. 

r. D. No. \i 

Jacksonville (R. 

T. D. No. 6). 

Jeflerson 

Do 

Kaufman 

Kerrvilie 

L«wisville 

McGregor 

McKinney 

MarUn 

Marshall 

Do 

Merit 

Miles 

MuUin 

Navasota 

Olney 

Talestine 

Paris 

Do 

Pendleton 

Poolville 

Ban Angeio 

8an Antonio 

Stamford 

Texarkana 

VanAlstyne.... 

Victoria 

Waco 

Do 

Waelder 

Wabiut Springs 

Winnsboro 

Utah: 

American Fork. 

Heber 

Hyrum 

Monroe 

Morgan 

Moroni 

Ogden 

Park City 

Pleasant Grove. 

Price 

Richfldd.... 

Roosevelt.... 

Salina 

Bait Lake City.. 



High scnooi (n^n^).. . . 
O^ Cliff HighSchool.. 
High School 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



High School (negro) 

Ball Hich School 

Central High School (negro) 

High School 

do 

do 

High School (negro) 

High School 

Houston Industrial and Train- 
ing School (negro). 
Reynolds High School 



Sandy . . . 
Spankh F(Mrk.. 



High School 

High School (negro) 

High School , 

Tlvy High School 

HlgnSchooL 

do , 

do 

do 

Central High School (negro) 

High School 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Lincohi High School (negro) . . . 
Gibbons High School (negro).. 

High School 

do 

do 

do 

Douglass High School (negro) . . 

High School 

do 

do 

High SchooHnegro) 

A.I. Moore High School (negro) 

High School 

do 

do 

do 



120 
60 
51 
23 



23 



39 



140 



High School 

Wasatch High School (No. 1). . 

High School 

....;do 

Morgan County High School . . . 

High School 

,...!do 

do 

do 

Carbon County High School — 

Sevier High School 

Wasatch High School ( N o. 2; .. . 

Bevler High School 

Bait Lake Hirfi School 

Jordan High School 

High School 



24 
100 



53 



160 



60 



40 
13 

1 


50 
20 
2 


10 


13 


50 









14 
12 
29 


19 
17 
14 



90 



24 



10 



106 

60 I 



15 






21 





83 





185 





52 





79 





53 





10 









180 





48 




09 
27 



82 
85 
40 
85 



24 
28 
60 
95 
70 



70 



44 

176 



30 
66 
21 
45 
40 
28 
37 
175 



33 

88 
74 
12 
36 
25 
10 
139 
40 
60 
54 
75 
16 
29 
150 
101 
60 



17727*»— ED 1913— TOL 2 33 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



614 



EDUCATION BEP08T, 1913. 



Tablb 1. — ^tudent$ in public high tchools in manual or technicxil training, agricuUuraly 
and domettic economy cour$e», tBlt-lS — Gontinued. 



Looation. 


Nameofaehool. 


Students in 
manual or tedi- 
nJoal training 

OOOIMS. 


students In 

agricultural 

courses. 


Stodentoin 
domestks 
economy 
oouxses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


8 


t 


4 


ft 


• 


7 


8 


Vkbmont: 

BurlingtoD 

VotoiNu: 

Ofth>z 




37 


15 


S 

20 
20 
14 




10 
32 
15 





68 


do 




Lusay 

Mcoeta 


do 

do 


20 








32 


Norfolk 


Matthew Fontaine Maury High 

SohooL 
Aimatrong Hfs^ Sdiool (negro). 

John Mar^alTHigh Sehool 

High School 


129 







9 













e 

1 








s 


72 


RtCrhmond 






94 


Do 


73 
75 










164 


Roanoke 






135 


Btannt^Hi . . 


....Ido 






49 


SofloK 


Jefferson Hidi School 










86 


Waktfeld... 


High School 


17 

25 
24 
32 
58 

16 
15 
35 
25 
17 
75 
18 
17 
18 
10 
14 
80 
72 









16 

5 






1 

2 


17 


41 


41 


Aberdeen 


Weatfaerwaz High School 

High School 


29 


ArUnfton 

Aubiun ........ 


12 


8 


50 


do 


84 


BeUingham 

nolfriT 


Whatcom High School. 






65 


High School." 






24 


ColTille 


Umon High School 


9 





10 


BaTenport 

EUensburg 

Elnw 


High School 


30 


do 

do 

do 

. .do 






30 






28 


Everett 






74 


Garfield . . 


16 
19 
14 
8 





1 



43 


Xeanewick 


..;..do 


23 


Kir^lanfi . . 


Union High School 


20 


La Conner 


HighSchool 


20 


Tifftven worth 


UiSon High School 


24 


Monroe 


do 


11 

87 

8 




20 


28 


North Yakima. 


HiKh School 


49 


OakriUe 


do 




Palouse.. 


do 


89 
38 
70 
23 
17 
33 
88 
126 
96 
74 
20 

16 

40 

43 

166 

119 

800 

33 

38 

10 




7 
6 
8 







30 


2 
1 








M 










50 


Pomeroy ...... . 


do 






52 


"PiiyaHnp 


do 


28 

4 

11 




1 
6 


106 


Kenton * 


do 


24 


BUsville 


do 


24 


Rnii^i^ . . , , , 


do 


40 


Seattle 


Broad waylllgh School 






194 


Do 


FianklinHi^SSchool 






123 


Do 


LInooln HIgfi School 






182 


Do 


Queen Anne High School 

Ballard High School 






167 


Beattie(Balterd 

8ta.). 
Seattle (Sta.W.) 






30 


West Seattle High School 

Union High School 








SedroWooley... 
Snohflnnlsh .... 

































50 


Hijjh School 


18 
57 
37» 




27 


69 


SMkane 


Lewis and Clark High School.... 

North Central Hlph School 

Stadium High School 


284 
249 


TaAoina 


350 


Walla Walla. . 


Hirii School 






19 


WpviAtnhiw 


.do 


82 


1 


60 


Wilbur 


do 


30 


West Viroinuj 
Charleston.... . 


HighSchool 






180 


Darii 


.do 




• ■ 




27 


ElkiiH. . . . 


do 






48 


Flcmlneton 


.do 






5 





20 


Ilintim 


do 






20 


Parkersburg — 
Wlieeling 


.do 


54 
42 
21 

53 
67 








106 


do 






43 


Wllllam^fon 


do 






25 


Wesconsin: 

Antigo 


HighSchool 






76 


Annteton. 


xiiggjjcnooi.. ......... ......... 






54 


Arena 


Arena Township High Sohocd... 


27 





28 


Ashhind 


High School... '....r. 


31 
43 
38 
03 





50 


Baraboo.. . 


.do 






43 


Bff^vtf D%m 


do 

do 


1 


39 


"-^olt 


1 


130 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TRAINING. 515 

Taxlx 1. — Stadenit in pahlie ki^ mdiools %n srum/tud or iet^ical training, ^tgriculturalj 
and domegUc toonomy ccmrse^y 191£-1S — OoDtinaed. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



516 



EDUCATION KEPOBT, 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in pt^lic high schools in manual or technical training y agricultural, 
and domestic economy courses ^ 1912-13 — Continued. 



Locatioii. 


Name of school. 


Students hi 
manual or tech- 
nical trahiing 
courses. 


Students in 

agricultural 

courses. 


Students in 
domestic 
economy 
courses. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


1 


8 


t 


4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


Wisconsin— Contd. 


High R«hool 


36 
44 




6' 









ttl 


Trempealeau . . . 
WashDum 


...r.do 

do 


12 
27 
10 
30 


i9 

4 
11 








33 


Waterloo 


...do 




Waupaca 


do 


.............. 


1 AS 


Wausaukee 


Wausaukee Township High 

School. 
High School 


25 
18 












40 


WestDePere... 






33 


Whitewater 


do 


12 


16 


26 










Total, 1,167 


43,821 


6,632 


10,046 


6,150 


257 


51,299 


schools. 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 517 



I 



5 



6* 



g 
S 
^ 



.5^ 



§ 






n 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



518 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



i 



1 

«3 



I 



3> 

I 

5 



*f 



H 

•J 

m 

< 

Eh 






3 

5 






£| 






o o y 



S.sl' 



MS3 g ^ 



MA 

fa,o 



II 



•^ononiv 



'SoDiod 



•^naonry- 



'SoDJOd " 
■M g|ooqog 



'^onomy 



'Sni^iod 
-9j qoaipg 



'^lEDomy 



'dai^iod 
■9J sfooqjg 



•^imoorv 



'SaiiJod 

•91 8|00ipg 



*)niioiiXY 



Sanjod 



s||3 
5 



s 



^1 



2j 



8 if 9 S" 



^HU 



§§§ 



*.^«^ 






0*0 "T*^ 



§§§s 



§HS 



§S 



§s§§ 



IS§ 



§s§ 






g§ 



§1 



ii 

2" 8 



ig 



§1 



§1 



§i 






ii§!! 



ii'i 



§§ 






§§ 



SSI§ 






11 



If 



CO a 



•jnnoniv 



'^Ujod 
■ttj qooqag 



•WM«A 



§§§§ 

1-^5 8 






^ 



g^SSS 



ii§ § 



j5«« 



§§ 

8§ 



CQ .^*^,H<H OO 



w a 

11 
I* 



•»ni»A 



a§§§ 

2113 






-oj sjooqog 



I'll 









a¥ 



d^CO 'fHtH t» 



©npiA 



i 

I 






l§§iS 



§§i§ 



*G9iiinfOA 



§§§g 



SS3St3S S 

'•'OOJrtooo ,-1 



isl 



l§§i 



•Sanjod 



0»-l^i-«.-l^ 90 



5 5 

I 
I 



^•0 









I III 



:/Uiz^^ 






5 SQo fl «-<© 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TBAININQ. 



519 



a 






L 



&3 
II 



it 



2e 

I- 



f 



*0|QTIia^ 



•91»H 



'OXBtae^ 



•9I«H 



*it9inoAi 



•U9JI 



'a]Bmoj 



•opiK 



*9prai9j 



•9l«Jf 



'aamoAl 



•u»H 



moj. 



'9i«mdj 



•»i«w 



IB^OJ, 



•uaraoAl 



•aoH 



'2nX\iodai sfooqagi 



I 



83t8®|j 



S S 



3S'=*<=»S § 



S5g§S8 s 



o<oo«e«H«e 



«*-«S22 2 



S§ § 



» § 



§ g 



sgaiss s 



='§8a®s g 



sss^ 



»t;«gsg5 9 



oa»oa»r-to» 



•QOOCOeQOO 



.-HW^cOt-t"* w 



®S|22?§S* S 



Igsss* s 



2^s 



|oog 



0^jHggeo««c« g 



«DC0M*O9«C9f0^ tt 



=»S§S'^5S^ 2 



S«|S*-93« I 



2-s 



§"2 



o^or-e^toevco » 



«oo^'*eo«o«^ « 



SgSS§^28S I 



>S|S2SS2 3 



8^ii-is- s 



5g«g»^ § 



eocQ^^c9>Oie^ 8 



■< •H «0 W »H •-» ^ .H 






2s?2§a 



S8*-S8 



oooiotxm 



SSf2RS I 

Ji 



S8S^3 2 

3 



ass'-s I 



'^S^'^S S 



iiiii I 






!§§§§ I 



5oow?3? 



SS2SS5 



■*^«oo»^ 



»ooeo«-«»H 



I « 

00 a 



SJ 



o 

3 



1§ 



1 i wm I ii ill I mi 



9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



520 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913, 






! 



5 

I 

I 



"s> 



s 

<? 



o 

i 

I 






a 

"S 

s 
I 

I 



IS 

11 



*d|01II9J 



•ai«H 



eg* 



*9nnn9j 



•9l«H 



6 

I5 



I- 



iwraoAl 



•U9H 



*9IQin9J 



•91BPI 



'9lBni9J 



•9[BH 



6 

Is 



t 

a 



u9moA\ 



•uaK 



•mojL 



'9|Vm9J 



•9i«H 



I 
2 



nnox 



09010 M. 



•oaH 



'Soiyodai qooqog 



I 

09 






009 C4 CO CO 



g^ri !$ 



5§g 5 



isSli ^ 



OOaSf4C4CO •-• 



;fi § 



3gSSS3 g: 









^mmu s 



C4 t^f^aiCtO 



:::5SggJ2 »" 



c^ o c* CI ^ «o e« 






3 

o 






si 



(MO 



Ilii 

l|S| 



i 



ill 






'I 



*)anomy 



'Snniod 
-9J gfoogog 



'^imoaiv 



'Sfoniod 



*)iinomy 



•91 sfooqog 



•?unomv 



'Snpjod 
M sfooqag 



'^onouzy 



'Snnxod 
-9J gfooipg 



*)iitioaiY 



'SoDJod 



•lonoray 






••niHA 



'Sapjod 
-OJ siooqog 



•9niBA 



'3nr)Jod 
-9j sfooqas 



•9nniA 



•89tinnoA 



'Sapjod 
-tf J eioogog 



I 

CO 






SB2 






sB' 



lis 
s8 



s 



8 fief 



§ § 



g i 

11 



s s 



§l§ 



8 

i 



I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



521 



§3 






ss 



I9 



Mi I 



•o»Heo "I" 



5? S£f fe" 






eo»-ie« « 









«9^co CJ 



J5*:3 s 



15 "^^ s 



eo»^eo ^ 






§§§ § 



IS § 



»--' a 






^*^ioeO'^'H«-i^ og 



§3i§§§§s g 



00* ef 



^4 ^4 ^ C4 v^ fH >-4 Viil 06 






i>4 *^ M9 CO «H f-4 «H 






•^fH^CO'^f^'^*- 






. «H >0 C<t «H f-4 1-4 «H 



§§§igi§§ i 



iH iH aO CO iH •-<*-« iH <D 



CO »o g oT^-H CO ^ 



^^^^ 8 



«H «-l to CO t-l »-« <-4 iH 



g§i§§§i 



r-4^COyir-*r-*^ 



— S 



III 



§§!§ 



4iiP 



^^^ 8 






•H«eo«-«t» 



« 






s^ 



^§311 5 



.H «e .-• i-< -♦ t-< 



SSIi§ i 



•H-^W.^*© 



s 



§§§§§ § 






<-ltOC«*H« 






•ooeo»HO M 



888S8 S 



"*oeo«-"»-« ^ 

1-4 «H lO 



^8838 g 



o>o?^8 « 

^»0 -i'w CO Jg' 



udOeOfHO » 






•-4 r« 00 CO -4> us e* 



« -T^"' V'q* eo 



e«to<oeo^>o 



is^iii § 



t*^ f-i 



»-4»^^C«^C0 « 



§i§§i§ I 



ci<oooeo-4>eo n 



§gsi§§ § 

C0*O OkCO v^ 



*-«ict»<H^co e« 



§il§§g § 



•-•«0000^« M 



l§§S§§ 



C4000'<r<D r-i 



'S8 



8¥§¥s¥ S 



»^ oTeo «reo cf i-T 



•H 00 eo »<r»o ^'* i-T 



C«©«i-*'*« « 



111 



P 
3 "d 



tf 



iii^^l ^ llllllli i fil^f .§ 

S ^ S o 4> 3 ^ s--^^-^*^ o » es ^ es^ o ;s Z ^^ SJ3*» &T^iM 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



622 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



4S 
1 

I 






"Si 



I 



Jo, 



'ai^inaj 



'mn 



'0|Qindj 



••I»Jf 



'irainoAV 



•U9H 






I i 



§9 



W- 



fe 2 



^ O t> 0> 00 <D r>. fH A 









'igai'l g 



IS§§g«§ § 



eoor«o«Ds 



|5S5S5 g 



23|S2!8a3a!8'»8 g 



igssgsasssas g 



rs'8 



ioaoa«ei^ 



8 § 



eo«D*^sie«eoioc«i-«oe« 



s^s-^a 



^M*0 Ci CO ^ 



^§ls 



5S92I 



i 



t 

e 



If 



*d{viuej 



IS 



•9l«IT 






I. 



So, 
Jo. 



'apsmaj 






•*PH 



E S 



I 

I 
I 



'uomoj^ 



•U9H 



s s 



S«j:;2 S 



§=§^^ 



s.sggas g 



§§g^9 



O^OOjgeoiQ 



n 



aisigsg g 



§2i 



"8=>'*S'"S s 



g»OJg- 



-^g-^SSsSS? 5 



CJO^OW 



S^S5S 



»S«5 



s;c^ 



^"Si^ 



9 S 



$«5SS 



S S 



85|§| 



S ? 



5ggg2 



''S^^^ 



^-^sss 



nnox 



§ i 












I 



•9|«aiaj 



s^gsiisi n 



g2gR|S38aS"8 § 



CO c«5tot^ 



§^2 



Oft e« ^ 



•oi^H 









gggsggs^gssag g 



i83§§ 



1 









•mojL 



il 



^|58|?=| 5 



2g$'->goor-QO«0«gH g 



SSSS^ 



'aamo^ 



f R 






M a» m e« M «>• er^ V) ««> CO o 00 



^gcgj 



•-i«-*eo«5co 



•naw 



si 



^^'-s^j^jsg 



5q;g«S5**''?'^*'*'2 n 



SSS5SS 



'aapjodaj eiooqog 



--^a 



e*io«HiA»« 



J:; .5 



«eot^eo«t-«»-i^»^»^^^ 5* eoetoci 



OQ 



OQ C) 






III 



as 

o o 



s 
I 

5 

S3 ^O 



•§»^ili^^i o ^1 Sill e IIP i 5 I'Sflf 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TRAINING. 



523 



ssggggs* g 






t^O *0 I '^OkCOSP vocoo 






;9§l 



S2 



g2S 



ss s 



58 



S^ S 



|2§ 



a'=» s 



'^«S?SSS5'*'- S 



Sl^* fe 



coeofceoeotowo Ol 



'S52S 



s5iSi§2" 5 



^^§i 






99g| 



§gi§a 



as ss 



ss 






9® s 



sss 



2^g§?as5"» 



a® 8 



^^RSgo^-- 2 



I5ISSSS- 2 



oeoS^ 



2g 



b^SSIigs; 



«ggg 



58g5r«" S 



«^§S 



g2 
^2 



S;288ffi8«2 8 



;:aRS 



S-'gSSS^"* 9 



S'^ $5 



eo«o*2S'i'*«^'^ JO 



=»sg 



s^ 8 



M C« 0» <0 ^ <H «-i *^ O 



5 



II g ^iillail ^ lo§l 



»2oe 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



624 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 



I 
f 



•0 
^1 



3 

I 



Si 
cs 



I 



I 

II 
I 



l] 



S3 



US 



Its I 
l3S| 



II 



•ijunooiv 



•91 qooqag 



•jnnorav 



9J s|ooqog 



*)iniomv 



'2u\iiod 
9J giooqag 



•^anorav 



-91 sTooqos 



•ijunoray 






•^nnouiv 






5S 5 



31 






Tiff 
S 



Tl 



"Sil 



sussasss g 

aetoao<-4i>.n-^,H ■<* 
«"oor>^QOcaoot*'or ef 



•^^ne>«^^co«o 



a"s a 






IPS" 



Q •'•'ooe 



8 



^abr^'tiati^ 



3~^ 



3" '-"ssT^a 



^^^d^»kt6 '^ 






-^^gj^^^wg ^ 



IIISIW 



I 






-«COtOMiO«^>^'« 



•8- S' 



^^eo^fwto^ 



•O CO ^ 






'<«<^M3^»0 



C«^C4 "* . -CO 






'♦co<o««o^»N'* 






8 



IlfT 

^" ^ c*- 



[IfT 



"*- a 



o So 



« 






! 



g 



I 

•f* 

cs 









If 



•^unomv 



-9J qooqag 



^eoTSTiTTt^— oT 






IIMIfT 






•oniBA 



§§§Sil 



•:Jn]iJod 
■ftigfoogog 






r^^i-lw^r^r^ JK" 



h 

H 
I- 



••nPA 



8S§§2§§3 I 



38! 






2j«Mj}rt^ S 



•OCV^« 'C* 



ag$!jl 



•9ntBA 



3 



'somniOA. 



-0j Biooqog 



S ^ 






Hi 



M! 



'a 









im 



Krt-*g^^ g 



^ ^ 



IT 

CO «^ 



^ u 



CO o 






C5 






IS 
IS - 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



525 






^MOOk^^M 






C« lO «0 CO t» «-• 



ISissglT 



•-"-•Mi-i eo 



«-i ^ <«• ^ •« lO M ^ 



ilSiSg S 



*-« <0 <e eo 00 «i4 55" 






e4kOio-««^ «" 






1-1 c< » » "* Qc w ar 






*^ •CO«-'CiC»^ <© 



imiiFT 

c» ^ « »>• ecoT.^ sr 



lipfffT 






^ © CO ^1 M ^^ O i^ 



« ^ Ma o» ec "^ 1-1 "^ 






dt-tr-"*"^ 



RlfSf 



isHS§ 



Fllf 



Ct-itOMCO 






C4<Heooeo 



ScoScir^ 



>o5o 






aT-f 



IT 






0« O^QC ■*•«*• .H ^ 



^Sggil* 



c«e4«(0'^»-«^ 









OMOOtO'V-^^^ o 






HI" 






iiir 



If 



iiir 



'8| 



:§§§ 



IPf" 









5 



i 1 a 



bllii'&i I ^illlail s Id II 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



626 EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 8. — Industrial schools for Indian children — Instructors and students, 1912-13. 





1 


In- 
struo- 
tors. 








Manual-arts instruction. 


States. 


Piq)IIs. 


In- 
struc- 

tOTB. 


Ele. 
mentary 
puplb. 


Sets 
ond- 

stu- 
dents. 


In- 
tocs. 


Ele- 
mentary 
pupils. 


Seo- 
ond- 
WT 

Bio- 

dents. 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


^ 


i 


1 


i 


1 


1 


t 


1 


£ 


1 


£ 


United States.. 


73 
~2 

1 
28 


485 

26 
2 
24 

209 


681 

7 
21 

276 


8,155 

689 
92 
597 

2,974 


7,250 


67 


280 


7,994 


6,966 


119 


97 


414 


602 


7,195 


6,436 


111 


99 


North Atlantic Div.. 
New York . 


485 
100 
385 

2,765 


6 

1 
4 

22 


20 
6 
14 

113 


685 
92 
593 

2,904 


481 
100 
381 

2,695 


4 


4 


2 
20 

188 


11 

4 
7 

222 


628 
36 
593 

2,533 


420 

48 
381 

2,842 








Pennsylvania 

North Central Div.. 


4 
06 


4 
58 




67 


55 


Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

NOTth Dakota... 


1 

6 
4 
4 

10 
2 

1 

1 


7 

15 
24 
42 
67 
21 
33 

4 


19 
43 
26 
60 
84 
26 
27 

2 


194 
471 
306 
355 

459 
92 


169 
613 
262 
348 
867 
248 
358 

86 




4 
2 
6 
6 
4 




6 
24 

8 
13 
32 
17 
13 

8 


194 
471 

806 
355 
910 
209 
397 

92 


109 

486 
962 
348 
864 
242 
324 

86 


*"6 


"is 


7 
15 
18 
34 
68 
21 
33 

4 


IS 

37 
81 
35 
63 
26 
27 

2 


194 
348 
268 
302 
761 
260 
397 

24 


109 
884 

226 
309 
688 
242 
324 

86 


'"6 

"4 

1 
62 


is 


South Dakota... 
Nebraska 

Kan.sa3 ,... 


3 
1 

62 


3 

6 
34 




6 

34 


fioath Atlantic Div . 






* 






North Carolina . . 


1 
11 


4 
44 


2 
86 


92 
830 


86 



6 


3 
29 


92 
885 


86 
780 






4 
36 


2 
60 


24 
793 


36 
900 







South Central Div... 


6 


26 


35 


Oklahoma 

Western Division.... 


11 
31 


44 
202 


86 
290 


830 
3,670 


966 
2,958 


6 
25 


29 
115 


825 
3,488 


780 
2,924 


6 
44 


26 
9 


36 
166 


60 
207 


8,217 


900 
2,729 


1" 


Montana 


1 
1 
7 
7 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 


6 
8 
3 

50 

40 

3 

7 

2S 
27 
26 


14 
8 
2 
68 
71 
7 
16 
8 
28 
31 
37 


110 

90 

44 

764 

982 

32 

212 

92 

351 

400 

503 


169 

J 

■a 

185 

80 
305 
376 


1 
1 
2 
7 
3 

1 

2 
4 
4 


9 
8 
1 

26 

37 
2 
7 
2 

10 
9 

10 


110 
90 


169 
85 






4 
6 

% 
37 
39 
3 
6 
4 

26 
18 
21 


12 
6 

1 
37 
62 


■iS 


169 
62 




1 


Wyoming 

Colorado ... 


"44 


"9 


*"44j**9 


New Mexico 


754 
982 
32 
41 
65 
351 
400 
50S 


497 
796 

32 
185 

66 
305 
376 
424 


92^ 


467 
767 

32 
185 

80 
251 
376 
8dd 


Arizona ....... 






Utah 






5! 32 
11, 212 

6 92 

22^ 275 
17 400 
28, 434 


f 


Nevada .... 








Idaho 








Washington 

OrMon 






.. . . 






1 


VnX nnmt (k 


















1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAi- AND IMKJSTBIAL TfiAINING. 627 

Tabus 9. — Nwnhers of instructors and etudenU, hysex^ en manual aauiindustriai tramijtg 
schools and schooU c/ agriculture^ 1912-lS, not including Indian schools. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



628 EDUCATION REPOBT, 191Z. 

Table 10. — Manual and industrial training schools and schools of agriculture- 
and equipment for 1912-13, not including Indian schools. 



-Property 





Libraries. 


Buildings and 
grounds. 


Scientlflc appifc- 
ratus, etc. 


Money value 
of endowment. 


States. 




1 


i 




> 




1 


If 


-< 


United States 


305 


609,466 


9693,109 


290 


$46,961,764 


801 


$7,377,143 


68 


$66,992,149 


Korth Atlantic Division. . 
North Central Division . . . 
South Atlantic Division. . 
South Central DivisiMi. . . 
Western Division 


86 
63 
70 
77 
19 


346.031 
77,187 
67.554 
89,533 
29,161 


425,441 
84,737 
61,738 
88,443 
32.750 


80 
41 
71 
83 
15 


25.114,792 
7,768.132 
6,726,627 
4.634,550 
2,657,363 


87 
63 
66 
78 
17 


4,366,380 

1,367,556 

801.646 

333,477 

605,086 


34 

10 
11 
9 

4 


60,086,674 
11,028,400 

1,736,516 
883,577 

3,266,963 




North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


1 


54 


125 


1 
1 
1 

20 
3 
2 

28 
6 

18 

7 
3 

7 
1 
6 
4 
1 
6 
2 
1 
1 
2 


25,000 

•80,000 

60,000 

4,633,109 

282,467 

110,000 

8,771,679 

663,466 

10,649,172 

2,065,600 

665,000 

2,222,109 

45,753 

275,000 

860,300 

35,000 

1,181,370 

100,000 

45.000 

150,000 

133,000 


1 


3,600 


1 


20,000 


New Hampshire 


Vermont 


1 
22 

3 

4 
28 

7 
20 

8 
4 

11 
4 

11 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 


1,000 
9.373 
3.022 
1,322 
234,724 
6,200 
90,336 

13,000 

8,300 

32,416 

1,242 

6,231 

3,830 

750 

3,915 

2,300 

603 

900 

3,700 


600 

14,026 

1,100 

3,067 

251,665 

7,750 

147,219 

13,275 
9,000 
34,000 
1,874 
9,846 
4,173 

760 
4,220 
2,100 

360 
2,000 
3,160 


1 
27 

3 

2 
20 

6 
19 

7 
3 

10 

4 

11 
4 
1 
6 
2 
1 
2 
2 


6,000 

1,003,608 

623,000 

63,000 

1,448,382 

62,000 

1,187,880 

371,784 

11,700 

491,712 

49,904 

158,193 

84,068 

6,000 

137,329 

6,600 

6,416 

21.500 

25,360 






Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Cfflinecticut, , - - t - - 


7 
3 
2 
12 
1 
8 

3 


4,480,627 

406.000 

315,000 

U,354,121 

11,000 

33.591,936 

4,750,000 


New York 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 

North CentralDivision: 
Ohio 


Indianar .,,--. - 


nihiois 


3 
1 


3,430,900 
610 000 


Midiigan 


Wisconsin 




Minnesota. . . . . - - ^ r - - - 


** 




Iowa 






Mfasouri 


3 


3.237,500 


North Dakota 


South Dakota 






Nebraska. 






Kans*!' , . . . 






South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 






Maryland 


11 
3 
15 


11,691 
3,043 
17,947 


14,915 
5,050 
16,S05 


8 
4 
16 


1,714,500 

1,197,000 

718,003 


10 
3 
16 


214, 116 
199,811 
235,084 


1 


146,873 


District of Columbia. . 


Virginia 


3 


1,460,187 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Oeoreia 


12 

4 

24 

1 

4 
4 

19 
21 
15 
1 
5 
8 

1 


8,590 

7,665 

17,663 

1,056 

8,200 
3,052 

37,225 
9.932 

19,010 
4,000 
6.275 
2,839 

1,660 


10,375 

3,307 

10,386 

300 

7,460 
2,C50 

37,052 
6,014 

25,127 
2,000 
4,000 
3,850 

2,000 


i2 
6 

24 
2 

4 

4 

20 

27 

16 

1 

6 

7 

1 


312,425 

191.133 

1,498,FC6 

96,000 

313,900 
116,000 
1,146,780 
721,696 
973.160 
600,000 
621,500 
301,514 

110,000 


'J 
1 

4 
4 

19 
24 
14 
1 
5 
7 

1 


18,850 

14,000 

115,784 

7,000 

28,700 
6,080 
121,883 
38,391 
79,672 
10,000 
27,300 
22,451 

9,000 


2 
2 
2 

1 

1 
1 
4 
1 
2 


24,000 

57,000 

81,456 

1,000 

40,000 
130.000 


Florraa 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


Tennessee 




613,577 

3,000 

97,000 


Mississippi 


I/OuL*tiana 


Texas 




Arkansas 






Oklahoma 






Western Division: 

Montana 






Wyoming 






Colorado 


2 


3,870 


6,200 


1 


223,846 


2 


30,600 






New Mexico 






Arizona 
















.... 




Utah 




















Nevada 




















Idaho 


1 


5,200 


4,600 


1 


100,000 


1 


4,000 






Washington 






Oregon 


1 
14 


25 

18,4^6 


25 
20,925 


1 
11 


125,000 
2,098,517 


1 
12 


50,000 
410,985 






Caluomia. 


4 


3,366,083 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AKD INDUSTRIAL TBAINING. 



529 



Table 11. — JiantuU and industrial training schools and schools of agriculture reporting 
expenditures for 191t-lS, not indiuHng Indian schools. 






For salaries of 
teachers. 



For sites, build- 
ings, and last^ 
ing improve- 
ments. 



For new 
tools and 
repairs. 



I 



For materials. 



Total. 



United States. 



268 



$3,431,065 



164 



11,426,886 



218 



1603,552 



204 1423,516 



273 



16,584,300 



KorthAUanUc Division. 
North Central Division. 
Boath Atlantic Division 
South Central Division . 
Western Division 



1,818,381 
771,104 
204,347 
336,507 
301,446 



226,060 
668,430 
137,101 
240,160 
145,107 



321,571 
156,861 
28,237 
82,568 
64,315 



15 



230,203 
114,150 
26,300 
25,664 
27,007 



North Atlantic Division: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan, 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota. 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Sooth Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina 



2,850 

6,320 

6,000 

480,242 

27,774 

56,657 

770,034 

40,468 

428,036 

162,834 

73,807 

228,334 

23,377 

102,264 

88,070 

2,100 

83,060 

2,010 

1,200 

14,780 

37,462 



1,000 
10^015 
782 
7,231 
63,565 
0,090 
85,706 

5,800 
5,510 

11,603 
1,669 

57,708 
221,837 



2,227 

1,000 

51,000 

870 

2,300 

230,666 

16,000 

17,409 

8,773 
4,358 
7,074 
1,153 
70,022 
18,287 



1,000 
77,080 



14,734 
74,868 
14,026 
47,681 

15,104 
4,821 
8,707 
2,071 
81,518 
25,560 



841,763 

800 

600 

15,000 

6,150 



Tli 



ioath Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah , 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

CaUfornla 



34,501 
18,372 
40,052 



34,000 
14,608 
12,668 



27,300 

16,542 

65,301 

1,280 

51,600 
7,360 
87,000 
22,600 
82,242 



14,011 
7,407 

61,712 
2,785 

6,198 

1,063 

32,803 

54,655 

28,800 



86,486 
48,670 

2,000 



01,160 
34,650 

iOO 



46,600 



7,060 



20,000 
225,786 



6,000 



138,607 



43,624 

250 

2T0 

5,100 

2,050 



23,726 
200 

1,260 
600 

1,000 



736 

658 

0,164 



6,865 
1,481 
3,268 



1,121 

8,316 

12,853 

301 

3,774 
870 
2,168 
2,301 
7,586 



2,066 

6,621 

6,013 

102 

3,236 
3,137 
2,427 
1,575 
6,700 



12,316 6 
8,605 4 



260 



600 



4,000 



2,000 
47,665 



7,016 
1,674 

100 



1,850 



2,600 



1 2,000 
11 20,647 



2,090,167 

1,846,059 

400,056 

684,860 

653,368 



2,850 

8,547 

10,000 

816,260 

68,120 

83,782 

1,292,641 

103,400 

623,468 

201,657 

125,446 

250,521 

38,720 

284,061 

317,803 

2,106 

618,653 

4,310 

3,250 

44,080 

47,262 



76,890 
69,701 
125,300 



47,268 

34,000 

142,016 

4,501 

66,286 
20,850 
77,702 
82,078 
136,840 



201,421 
08,783 

2,850 

**40,'656 



25,840 



25,000 
450,628 



I Including $708,300 reported by 206 cities. 
1772T*— ED 1913-^OL 2 34 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



580 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



Table 12. — Summary of instructors and students in manual and industrial training 
schools and schools of agriculture y 1912-13 ^ including Indian schools. 





Institu- 
tions. 


Literary Instmetion. 


Manual-arts instructloii. 


States. 


Instruc- 
tors. 


Elemen- 
pupfls. 


Second- 
ary stu- 
dents. 


Instruc- 
tors. 


Elemen- 
pupUs. 


Second- 
ary stu- 
dents. 


United States 


439 


3,461 


44,246 


65,699 


5,017 


41,659 


101,463 






North Atlantic Division 


124 
89 
78 
97 
51 

1 
1 
1 

36 
4 
6 

42 
8 

25 

9 
5 

11 
6 

18 
9 
1 
6 
6 

11 
4 
3 


1,011 
724 
606 
749 
371 


10.018 
8,843 
8.339 

10.429 
6,617 


27,856 

12,876 

7,952 

9,437 

7,578 


2,197 

1,070 

556 

600 

585 

3 

7 

5 

623 

78 

55 

924 

95 

407 

185 
65 

127 
52 

135 

100 
7 
71 
78 

124 
54 
72 


16,204 
8,414 
5.002 
5,772 
6,267 


56,990^ 


North Central Division 


17.940 


Soath Atlantic Division 


9.973 


Sooth Central Division 


9,30i 


Western D ivision. 


7,247 


North AUantic Divisioai: 

Maine 


24 


New Hampshire 


1 


22 




309 


103 


Vermont. ! 




& 


MaAsachui^etts 


229 
38 
23 

346 
41 

327 

146 
82 

146 
8 
57 
72 
7 
61 
36 
45 
27 
37 


3,344 
18 

200 
2,703 

114 
8,617 

1,012 
147 
724 
363 
971 

1,415 
54 
37 

1,021 

1,793 
511 
795 


6,089 
1,404 

457 
11,733 

890 
7,283 

3,146 

2,326 

2,904 

99 

609 

1,158 

48 

1,984 

148 

101 

113 

240 




5,043 
1,353 

790 
5,217 

878 
3,114 

525 

840 

741 

966 

975 

1,333 

22 

15 

736 

1,463 

511 

787 


12.63<r 


n)Mx1<« Mftf^d 


2,240 


Connecticut 


797 


New York 


30.703 


New Jersey 


1.887 


Pennsylvania- r , . . . . . ^ . - - ^ . . . 


8,528 


North Central D ivision; 

Ohio 


4,290 


Indiana - . . . , - r x - - 


2,439 


lUinois 


8,971- 


Michigan 


620' 


Wisoonsfn 


1,998 


Minn<>fK>tA 


1,437 


Iowa 


48 


Mbsouri 


2,567 


North Dakota 


125 


South Dakota 


87 


Nebraska 


137 




221 


South Atlantic Division: 

Delaware 




Marylan^l 


12 

4 
16 


iii 

45 
126 


851 

138 

1,987 


2,252 

1,662 

917 


133 
58 
98 


622 
170 
508 


8,755 
1,765 


District of Columbia. 


Virginia 


1,321" 


WestVirgtaia 




North Carolina 


13 
5 

26 
2 

4 
4 

20 
28 
16 
1 
5 
19 

4 
1 
3 

7 
7 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 
18 


79 

46 

185 

15 

38 
29 
173 
161 
160 
33 
55 
100 

19 

34 
32 

40 
2 

8 
14 
12 
18 
188 


1,179 

1.388 

2,543 

253 

324 

287 

2.493 

2,023 

2,602 


469 

203 

2,417 

32 

822 

224 

2,495 

2,017 

2,170 

535 

439 

735 

60 


73 
44 
137 
13 

21 
24 
136 
106 
92 
33 
50 
147 

18 
12 
25 
74 

101 
8 
17 
15 
48 
53 

214 


834 
1,078 
1,509 

191 

324 


353 


South Carolina . . 


203 


Oeoigia 


2,544 


FlorKUi 


32 


South Central Division: 

Kontuc-k'y ,,.,,.,.,- 


775 


Tennessee 


292 


A Iftbcuna 


1,821 
505 
461 


2,446 


Mississippi 


1.964 


1x>ui<iianA - 


2,089 


Texas 


535 




639 
2,061 

323 
175 


485 
2,176 

323 
108 


501 


Oklahoma 


702 


Western Division: 

Montana 


49 


Wyoming 




Colorado . 


1,203 


1,308 


New Mexico 


1.251 
1,778 
64 
396 
159 
656 
776 
1,039 


1,157 
1,693 
64 
397 
221 
526 
776 
1,002 




Arizona 






XTtflh 






Nevada 






Idaho 


82 


82 


Washington 




Oregon 


350 
6,8i»3 


350 


Caluomia 


5,563 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 631 

Table 13. — Number of instructors and students^ by sex^ in manual and industrial training 
schools and schools of agriculture, 1912-lS, including Indian schools. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



582 



I 



la 

II 

is 



'oiQniej 



EDUCATION RBPOBT, 1913. 



•9IBH 



M 



*0[CUI8J 



•91BH 



'ueoiojvi 



•uoH 



*S 9 



CO »H ^« 



;S 3 



2:?8 



S§ 



»oeoo« "* t^ »o 00 



ccocq •« oo 



00 *AC4 <O00C9 '« t« »0 



•" as 



7^ 



1 



I 

i 



1. 
.r 
I 






H 



I 



-aicmaj 



S S ii |2S « i S i =°S 3 



•»I«H 



S iS 115 § 5 S 8 2s§ s $ 



III 



*9|BtIX9J 



•91BH 



ll 



'uainoj^ 



<-40» >o«Hto cr »0 M ;-« 



eooi^ *o r* 



•uaH 



S) ^ 



<« »o»oeo 1^ t- t- »-i 



-^ a 



•Wox 



§ I ig S§§ i s S § S^s § §S 



•ofroxoj 



S I gi |s« S i 2 i r? s 



•»P>H 



I S§ §is I S § g 



SS§ 



6 II 



•TOOX 



3 3 SS 



^«OC« t- 



s ^ ss §^ 



•uamoAi 



8 2 gg? o-Di^ 2 a 55 8 



•U9H 



C<C« f-i<-4iO lO V Ol 



^{U-* -^ !gS 



5 

II 



IS 




fil i ii 



g 

1 

1 

o 

I 



1 



V 

S 

ll 

5 



•a 



^ 1^ 
I ii. 

te*3 

bIbI: 

P4 ^S 




I 



s 

•35 



ll 



f I 






SI 






S« 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAKXTAL AND INDUSTBIAL TBAINIKQ. 



538 



s s 


g 


a 


o 


o 


5-^1 


o 


o 




s 


i 


§ 


§ 


§ 


o 


3 




o 


09 


o 


a 




« 2 § S § 8 |S a »g § 


:S a i 1 S a 1° S i° 5 S 


s M M M* 2 










s 






o 










o 




*••:••:• i^ 2 










§ 






§ 










g 




Ok CO ^ t-i o o ton t^ ceo o 


S* «S»«®SS5«^2«« 


C4 cc X3 n 00 ^ r>^ n ot^ o 


23 «2«S2®fe««a5 


s s 8 s " ' 5^ s r °§g 


1 § 1 


5| <=> OS 


o 


« g g 8 § S 88 a =s |Sg 


i,e 8 


3- 




1^ 












8 g 


















o 




o 










o 












g S 


















o 




8 










• O O U5 


o 


o ^t- t- ^lo •;52 


5 a 2 » 3" =• 3S 


o 




• a a - s«= 




e«.-i 


s 



<-4 a M 

S 3 = 



§ § Si I IS isi i i « g § g; g s§ § § 



s § s 



7S a 



r °ii S I i I ° §5 



O 0>£» O O 



S S s § S IS S °S iig S S g 8 I r g S' 8 i 2 





?: 


8 


::; 


» 


5 S» 


» 


85; 


ssc" 


s 


;; 


t* 


siS 8 ^^ ;^ as s s 


C9 


2 


•^ 
^ 


fO 


o 


o «t* 


t^ 


s-' 


«ss 


o» 


S3 


5 


S <=» 5S <=» 2?5 « <=» 



8 5 2^ 



s::2 



« ^ 



a s*^ s 2-- ?? 8 



ill 

^ « to 
52J ft 



I I. 






^« 






^'^fiV'"^^ 



•a 



1 1 « 

QQ 



la 

r 



B W| 



I II I f £|!l I II II 



S 8*^ 



Wd ►^AG 



O Ai o o 



CQ . 



1 

H w 




8Si*|l| 










lliil 1^1 II m 1 a=i i i 

3 :< ;]) ;z: I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



584 



I 



P 

d 
o 



H 



M Pi 



II 



*0[TOX9J 



•opiH 



'opsoidj 



' 090X0^ 



•U9K 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



3 3 



3S R 



*HO^ CO 



i»40 10 e>9 «oio« 



'0|BIII9J 



|2 S 8 »-i 5 



•9i«K 



S CO 



'OfBinsj 



•9i«H 



8 § 



I 



i 
I 

I 



^ 



h3 

62 



aomoAi 



2S S 



•aen 



•WOj, 



'eivmaj 









Q^ $ 



irarao^ 



•uan 



^f: 5 



»HO"* W 



ii I S Sii i 



ii g § gi 






^s^ s 



*0 vHOOO 



9i-« eh 



IS. 



it 









S 



3 



II ill 



111 

•a§-a 



. * « 



..8 

SI 



;< w;3 



o 



p H 






^ o 



C-n. 
H 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAKUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 635 

;§ 



1 



I 
I 

f 



I 



9 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



536 



EDUCATIOK BEPOHT, 1913. 



lie 



m% 



S cS 



§ g§ 



gS 8 



1 






23 



^1 

£1? 



«i 



s I 



i§ 



§s 



B i 



S S^ 



§§ § 



g §1 



i§ 



§§ 



§s 






a - 



§g 




-ses 



§ §§ 
a* "a" 



gi 



m § 



§ i 






1 

! 



I 






H 

n 






S 



m0 



mi 



§§§ 

gas 



§ § g 



8 3 



S S 



S §§ § § 



§§ 



§§§ 



§ § §§ § 

I" I' S§" I" 



§ §§ 
a 5 i" 



}oj2 

COM 






I 

00 



•33 



I 






§gi 



§§§§§§§ 






§§ 



<8 

g.2f 

S3 




If 



?1. 






ii«|l|i|i!;ip|ii2§«lfi|aa 




3« d«*iS|s|t2;5z;S"<3 sq 
9 



S 






•111 slilllsl 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



537 



3 

t 

< 



•6 S 



H 0. 



^U 



'Ofvinoj 



•oroi 



*0|«nx9j 



•oi«H 



'nomoAi 



•TOJf 



9SSS§3S9Si S9 9S93 S«=* 9 ZfH^U^ ^S 



S3 isggg 8*° ® S38SS SS 



^a" 



1 :88S t?® S '^ 



8{l?8 S"* S5 2 



''T iM C4 ^ ^ CO o lO ?r55 ••^•wcodo wo S c9MC«^e<« PT^ 



iflssiss5^~ii~5fs«s~s^~~r"s8Sfeir"i3 






*9(«TII9J 



•9I«Jf 



'0[«1II9J 






•9f»H 



&I 



-UBinoAi 



•TOJf 



"§3l8aSS$S S3 IS^I^gS S* 



c^:$ :3 ^8^^ 9« 



^a^ 



S ^8^8 83 



^ CO M ^ Ki CO <o lO 8<ro5 ^Mioao -^d 



c«coe«^c«coeoco «"3 aoioto^ r.«o 



^3SS8 S8 



««C«^o6« — W6 



e^^«^c6«A e6^ I 



^ Sl£^Mf^""§fIl""l^''l~'I®SP~s^ 



1 



I 



Wox 






'•IVOBJ 



9gd^§^i!^8§ dg 8883 g<^ £ iS^SSsi^ £)3 



•9f«H 



S 2 S §if3g"^f""g?gf~|^~ir^S^S§--8 3 



«>w*ooeo«eo»« 55g — &6oo^ — g^ — e!S — ao«^4t>. — i5<B 



•l«»oi, 



■nainoAi 



•TOJf 



^eom^^coook No» <irc<aooo FT© 5 coc<e«i-iM — ?i^ 
MebM^Mcococo — STSS — •Aa6d<4' — ST^" 



tO-«^*OM0 ^i6 



•2 

8 



H 

e2 



1^ 






1^1 



•III 



53 

I 



I 



1-t eo -* « ; ,*• 

1111 If 

8888 w| „ 

III! t^ I S« 



♦ -8 

In 
^ II 






lilt c« - 

5555 a^ a ^« 

CQOQCncQ CCQ n E->CQ 



I lis 

III 

« ll 



I 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



638 












'Ofsmoj 



•9f«H 



*9(«nX9J 



•01^ 



'nooiOAi 



EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. . 



•iww I S 



SSS s s 



00 >OC0 Qf0Oa^C0>O 



S52 8 23 S^ 






o o e>9 oc« e<ioc«^c« co csim i-if-4 



Too eoec^^c* 55 eo^5 eC?i~ 









I 



1 



A^ 



'9{vm»^ 



•9l«W 






■oi^moj 



•oi«H 



sic 



'OomoAl 



M O Ok Ot^ SS^^*^^ S '^^ '"'^ 



SoS^ s s 



»oec S^^'^S"' SB 



88 88S?f2t2S 



|2 8g 



* tB SS^aS g SS 513 



^,-iM U) O CO ^00 »0W«0W«O "5 



•uoR I S 



coMto w S i^^^ SSTi eo"i5Tr^JTi ci~ 



-•00 '♦•* 
«0 C4C1 



*mox I 






*e[vixioj 



•»I«W 



558"5^ 



^^:f3 S 8 



t^r>.aow o SS feS 



t»r«t» a o <•• coo 



"3^ 



S3S3 






C0C9^ 



ggS g a S? fig 2gg|3 § II ss ggS 



S 5S ??SS8S g ss 5j: ssl 



5^5! 



s 

I 

I 



•I«1ox 



eaDi>.'*t- t^ -^QO «o» 



•uoraoj^ 



•TOH 



~C0'"*lO~ 



•-400 iocoioroic o 



•♦ <6 ;-• cj'ci to •o'n ^ esi cT 



"eco MM 



It 
'.I 









:§ 









£ m ®5 t ^oS J 1-3 td 



n 






d»-»*^i^'H»* i-» »^C3 



f 9 






1 



H 

•J 

51 

E-i 



1 



lll I 

i-i III 

i>l I 



I 



<9 *& 









^a 



^ ^ a 



■a J 
s § 



I n 
11 

ll 

III 

Cain's 
O « 



8 i'' 
Is =1 

Its'?! 

CO o QOQ'^ 



« ■<■-) 



I 



ir 



1 1 II 






°llll 



I 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TBAINING. 639 

S S; 5r^"~5 ass JjSSJ5S"s?58{5S3S'-;;8S WIT 



S 



"5n^ 



f-H C4 <•• Ol 



e^ ^ ^ 



^ 


^ 


•Q 

~5" 


CI 

12~ 




"«ro» 


c« 


~5 








»^ 


m 


6< 
— 2~ 


CO 


» 


~5" 


U 


CM 


64 


e< 


ec 


«« 


C4 ^ 


2( cS 


S 


^ 


s 


^ 


» 


^ 


O 


3 


ss s 


S (; 


a 


s 


r- 

•* 


:a 


w 


fe 


S3 


S 


?? 


§ 


(^ 


:s 


:s 


ec 


r- 


5 


» 


S 


§3 » 




S 


«6 


5? 




5 












•o 


S 


5 


S 


5 


s 


lO 






S 









g 


(^ 


$ 




§ 










kA 


o> 


5$ 


^ 


^ 


lo 








$ 




;m CO 


m 


C9 




3 


'c 


^ 


« 


'^ 


w 




'^ 


o 








eo 


•^ 


"~M~ 


■«♦ 




o 


« CO 


^ o 


C« 


c 


^ 


« 


1H 


cs 


•H 


c* 


ec 


M 


M 


ec 


M 


CH 


ec 





I 



g~fe 



^gS SSSfe8S2g5^|2 s g ^ g s « 



25 8 is S S §«« SSS8^8Ste?2§8?: £3 ST 



SS> S 



{c s s S3 s r: 



s s 



;? s; .s ^ ~^ 



<ooot»iocoto^r«^r« 



^ »^ ec ^ »0 



R52 



ec lO 



^ ^ t«. C« CI 



ec CO «o c< CO 



^0<D ^ ec ^ CO cf 

—^Mbras Pi is er 



1 



«e -* -* S ^» 5r ;^ ^r ^ iS ci '•• 
"(S eo ci CO ?i ^S CO ^ ?^ N « « In eo~ 



J=« •§ ^- « ^ 



^ I fe 

H .5 .^ 



SI 



T? «i: w> 



Woo °° 



1 
ll 



8 



f ^ § - 

5 a 5 « 

«; o a M « 

hJ h-i i-» -< s 



i 



I I i 8 1 (H 1 

gi 2 a o d I ■<■ 



o 

•a "• "• ° I 

1^' n Q P^ H»' S 



Hi ^ Hi 



8 

I 

.fl _ 

i 1 






5 



§§§§§§§§ 



3 s s s s 

n M ti] PQ n 



I 






1 » Its 



I 






I 1 






& B^ ® 



18 

oCQ 



8fe| 

qB o o 

§ll 

73 2 



I 1 
I a 

J si. 

I CO ^00 rt« 



lllllllflll 

i I § I i I i t 3 I I 
,5 .5 y .5 .5 .5 .1 .5 .^ .» . 




p5 (w o i§ B ^ 



o z 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



540 



EDUCATION BEPOST, 1913. 









^2g 
^52 



•ofvaioj 



S2 S 



•«I«W 



'oimiiaj 



••I«W 



mmo^ 



•i»jf 



^ S 



as 






SS CQ O 



8 1^ S 



f-4 l-l C« O 



« »-i eoco o •* •-• 



C>« C< M 



CO o a»*o 



« C9 ^ 



•5 






i 

g 

1 



7 



pa 



111 



'9(«maj 



•*• fi « 
*o « ^ 



•9f«W 



'y|viU9j 



••I«H 



ill 



-mmoAi 



•TOR 



mox 



S 8 g 8 *- 



c« c« e<« C4 



»s 



a?2 



-> 5 R 



s s 



8 ;:; S 



-•« o t*- •-• 



si§g§ ^ §sss§§ ^^SS 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8?2a 



t»r« 00 io 



S 8 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TBAINING. 



541 



?s ss 



5^ 8 SaS 



ooMco a» 



9 9 



S §^ 



S5S- 



c«e<i^<^eo CI CO i-t 



coc«<-4co oo* « 1-toe^ 



t*i-ti-t<0^ ■* <o 



i<-lC«CO t-l« 



>«»-lC< CO ^ ''T 



8{3£ 



Si 3 



5555* 85; g g^S 5? 5 « 



D^^$ 



2 §§ 



g«g« ^5 JO 55g« S IS !S 



Si^SS 






t^OO-^CI-v 



C4«-lC4 CO ^ M 



f-t •* « 



.-i^weo «« 



8fe5S5 * 8 <=»<=» R 8-3" 



|S{:^ 83 8 g|g ^389 g 5; 



3ge««o 



^sr^ss 





i 


39 


§ 




s 


8 


gss^ 


S| 


§ 


*5S = 


« 


!S F3 


§ 


i^ 


a»o»oo» 


«> 


^ 


«>-iM 


8 




3 


*o 


o«-^o» 


«r- 


5 


«>^9 ^ 


00 


(0 CO 


S 


^ 


C<«C4<«>C4C<» 


C4 


« 


^0 


s 


« 


Ok 





90COO 


^•0 






^ 

""•T" 






CO 


r-QOw»ao<o 


^ 


00 


O-l 


00 


'* 


« 


•0 


r^^OI^ 


c«c« 



s 



« I i^ • 



» 



CO pq 






II 









I 



MH i"^- ° ah 

•2 -ad 









t i 



'^. ^ « 
w I ^ 

Eh 2 .^ 






I 



ill 



n 






fife 5 



^5« 






5S 






CO :co 

CO^COm 



I 



o 

o 






8 . 

n 









1 :2 

l|S| 



1:^ 



3 pSgll 



I 






00 



II 

o « 



1 1 

is ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



542 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 



I] 



§§§ §i §§§§ §s 

«"-• -" 3882 83 



§i 









■II 



gss I 



§§§§ §§ 



Si 



%^n 'S§ §§§§ §s 



C4MCII-4 



§ 
1 



I 









§ 



ss §§ §§§§ §§ 



§11 



eo«e4^ *o 



§§ §§ §§§§ §§ 



»8 



dco o«o 






i«i 



sii 



§ §§§§ §§ 



1 



I 



!! Ill 

: 11 sli 






iiiii§i| i§ §§§§ § 



§i§i 



!§§§§ § 






§g§§§§§§ §§ §§§§ §§ 



§§§§§§§§§§ § 

ffg8SS8Sa"8§ 8" 



^ 



^ 



H 

n 



§ ;is§§§§§i § 




CQCOCQQQ OCQ 



I 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAirUAL AKD INDUSTBIAL TBAINIITO. 



543 



§ § §§ 



i § «" 



I § g §§i §§ 



g 8 = §§ 

5f 



i§ 



g § 3 §§i 



I 
I 



§ s »§ 



s § » §§i f § 



I § R 



§3 f§ 
38 



§ § §§ 



s i § iii i§ 



§ § §§ g§i§§si 



^-«r 



§§§i § § i s §^§ §§ 



lO to ^ 



i§i§§i§sii 



§ §§ §§§§§§§§ 



§ § § g §§§ §§§ 
a' is 8' sa" 8"§8' sas 



§§§§§§§§§§ 3 



'ssissa^assj 



§ I 8§ 2i8§ssg| 



3 i§|S § : 3 § ill §3 



§si§§ ;§g§ 



I 



1 1 

5" 8 

2 •< 



SI 



I 3 



I 



lil 



1 



I 



! ^ 



Hit 

a : :'3 



iii 



if I 






p 

OQ 

>>0t 






5 -a 






55 

< a 






li?.|i 



111 



:$pHc 



^:^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



644 



EDirCATIOK BEPOBT, 1913. 



§§si 



i i 2 2Ss 

-4 56 ^lo^ 



§ § § i 



§§§§§ 



8 8 ::3 oS 



00 eo ooc 



§§-| 



§ § 






l§§ 



i § § §§§ § 



§ § 



I i I m 



§§ 



§§§1 



§ § § g|§ S 



§§g§§ 



liiiii^i § § § §§§ § § i § §§§§§§ 



n 



;§§§§§§§ § §§§§§§§§§ §§§§§§ 



^§ ;s^i :» ; § § §§§ i s § § §§§g :§ 



I 



J. 

-< 



§ I 



? "3 9 



^- S tt 






Oca 5 
fin OQ 



ISnl 



loo 



a).C3 O 



I 



«5 



Is,- 



e 11 



I. 



=Si I |^|S||all| 



2z: o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



KAKUAL Ain> INDUSTRIAL TBAIKING. 



545 



I §§ i §§ § § 



»C0 O CO 



§§ § 



§ § 



§ i§ § § 



3 S§ § 



§ § 



V oon to to 



§ § 



is§ 



:ss 



III 



SS 



§§ 



§g 



§ § § 

o" cT V 



§ § I 



§ § § 



I § § 



I § 



§§ § §i § §!§§§§ §§i§ § § 



00 ►'•o o 



iC» ^ ^i^^rt « »o o 



§ §§ i §§ § §§§§§§ §§§§ § § § 

a" 68" s" ss s" gsassa" g^'ats s is s" 



§ § ii § §§ 



!§§§§ gii§ i I 



n g 



a s 



g i 



II 

6 T3 



3 
t 3 



I 



I 2| "S 

is ^1 I 



i §1 ^-^ e 



I 

9 



^ 


1 




1 






i 


3 


3 


a 


"S 


"E 



1 1 1 1 :! ^ 

I ^ ^ ^ o o 



s 



>£ 






M 

2« 









o o 

II 



jpl i|l*Pl1^r||Pi| Hill 



CO H > > ^ 

17727*~ED 1913— VOL 2 36 



5 

I 



I 

QQ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



546 



! I 

1^1 



1 
I 



i^ 



« ft 



ill 



'9fVm9Ji 



•9i«H 



*0I«Ui»J 



•ei«H 



-ismoAi 



•TOH 



EDUCATION 



s 



BEPORT, 1913. 

^*0 OkOQg O 



o o«ge« gc 



""5 oTo fTc? 002" 



8g " 8 |gSg -S 



& sss s 



25? S 



g^gg S 



825S 8 



^ 



8 



"a^g" 



§|2 



*0 akC4 C4r-I 



O <«C« "TO 






""O 0«-«eoO »o^ 



•^lO^O 



9 SiS S" S"=>9g S 



«1^ 



III 



'9[Vnt9j[ 



•ei«H 



^g 6J« 



•sas 



'Qfvmoj 



g ss sa g^sg 



I 






•9i«H 



S 23 8$ gagg $ 



•TOraoAl 5 



•i»H 



<b ^^ 






t^ O 00 CO CO 



CO M CO ^H CO 



£::3 



■^ 



O .CO 



§ sg ^s 



•Wox 



fee 



siiioruHr 



I 

I 

J! 



I 



a 



'0I9IIIOJ 



s SoS 5?s g°|§ g 



»8« s*=* a^SK 



•onrji 



sns 






■3 55" 



S igli 



g|2| 



o ocO'Op. 



mox 



00 CO ^<0oeo 



namoAi 



""S ys «»o a»oaor> co 



•i»n 



•«rcMcoe>« CO 



O O>O«0O ooco 



|& 



i'^' 

bQ 






I 

I 

00 

rH 

pq 

•J 

5 



^ If h;^ If :^a 



1^ ll-« 






§ 





s. s. 



Ilii 



o Ml? S £e-i:SQ 



.^.. ..lull 

i2 SmIitKZ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAIOTAL Ain> Iin>ir8TBIAL TBAINIKa. 



647 



c 


a 




a" 


oe 


5 


gs 


S!;!3SS:SS 


s 




o 


o 


s 


a 


r 


eo 


«H 


S 


e 


^1 


a 


ee 


^ 


s 


oo 


aa8»S22 


5 




g s ^a 


IS 


§8 


B 


8 


% 






. s 


ss 


i 


s 


1* 


i§§3'- iS 


s 


s 










*^ 






- 


s 






s 


o* 


n 


s: 


»8 


raS'S :S 


s 


§ 










s 


s§ 


« 


S 


^ 



~g ©^ ^* ^r JoTo (^ CO CO « «-i •« c« SS Joo o ^^o P^O o^ S 55 ei" 
""S io cTo eo « o"^ cico'^oMeeo 5? iow « ioo» S"=* g^^i « ^5 i^~ 



25 


J -* 


S- 


i 


3i 


2' 


5t;tiS»S3 


!^ 


■a 


* g 


i i* 


•s 


- S 8 


fc 


. to 


^O 


^ 


s 


*s 


sss'asa 


5 


S 


3 fe 


1 gs 


■^ 


e s $ 




! « 


^s 


§ 


S 


SS 


iiSSSSS 


a g 












* b S 




; 8 




1 


i 


*3 


ifS'SSS 


a t 










:l 


:$ {; 8 


o 


', ^ 


•»s 


t^ 


Ok 


g« 


^«'«>oeoaoak 


« go 




: S<= 


i" 


-^ eo to 


M 


': " 


oo 


" 


M 


oco 


C4C0OOMMO 


» n« 


s a 


: S" 


I** 


to '^i o 



I 
I 



e s § s§ § g §§ s^gsssg § g§ s |s 13 se § § g 1 



® 


o 


s 


S§ 


S 


s 


S3 


sggssss 


3 


r 


* 


r 


1' 


»a 


"^ 


3 


S 


fc 


g 


s 


oo 




^ 


*S 


*s§*Ssl 


ft 


u 


S 


fes 


ga 


SI 


3 


!; 


f> 


" 


Ok 


t5 




oo 


2 


?s 


«aS3»2S 


^ 


s~ 


a 


s- 


t;^ 


s- 


a 


t* 


w 


* 


o 


c« 


•s 


o 


2 


^•» 


-a-a-'sa 






* 


8» 


Ke 




oo 


eo 


00 


M 


Ok 


to 


oo 


M 


CO 


o-» 


c«t«oo^eoo 


o 


■an 


M 


4<» 


fi-» 


4-» 


l> 


•^ 


eo 



I 



Q 00 






S» »^ 1^ 






m 



I 







5 

00 






^ a 



1 'M i"^ 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



548 



I 

■n 









-ervmo^ 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1W3. 

2^ s g s I «; 



'9[mn^ 



'oaniOAl 



•i»Jl 



'S S 



S S 



S *$ fc* 25 



'sa 



2 8 



Ts" 



s 



S8^ 



~W dd^d S 



^M ^ 



i«« <« ■&«»-. 



s ^ s g~ 



13 






•opnnoj 



•9r«H 



Irt 

w ^ 



'Ofvmo^ 



ill 



'mmoj^ 



•TOH 



"sg — ir~s"ry 



ss § 



""^s g" 



Ti 55 ?5 oeT" 



<bc* 



~~n iS 55 S" 



-55- 



gs I i I g s I iss Kg g gp§ s 

"1 



I" 
I 



•mox 



J9 



'Qfvmoj 



"|3 g8g|5|^'=»°|g 



•9C«H 



SJS 



§g§-s-sf:-sg 



FT 



•|c»ox 



s s ^ 



•uomoAV 



~c5 f: 55 00 CO S 5oo ?5"5 fT 



•TOH 



ro Ok (O O CO 0*Q too CO 









I 

a5 



I 



n 



« |. o 






1^ 



II 

RcQ 



5^ 



at " 

&< « 












H 
Eh 







'a i 1 
^% I - 



.1 

II 












5^ ^ ^ 



III 



■sc 



%a 



I I 



[l|<§sa a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



o o g 



s § 



MANUAL AND INDU8TBIAL TBAINING. 



lfSf¥f28gg§ ®gS8 1 = 



"Sl~"^ S S5S®5* 8 9 S S 



ri^^ 



649 



=Ȥ2^S: 



5°2®§S 



"g 



S 25 "*«e«ooO'««'^oooo«-t ««od •ooor^ &»h ©~ 



~ci Sc«'*»M'«««o iH o o 



2 S<=»^gSS«8'^a 



oo"*o»»-*a»oose^cuio oogciak 



8 « 



2CQO COM 



C>«^C40«OM ^ a» ^ F* 



8S5?S; 



OojPrjOO 



"sfirwf 



^1 



gggss 



g"^' 



gS2l2S?8 



28S8^5 S 






000 0400 



•OO 

oTT 



eoc«^»o«Dco ^ 



cii lo C4 >-« <o o ST" 



J«-»^'-' 



rriiimipiii ^gsi 






S s i 2 



3S*§°R 



O O ■<«00c0 00 0«0»-^0 00 0'»^ QOtOOO CO 00 



58 *<^ 



c5 «c?"*»oo»eo 55 5 w ^~ 



o«^ 



§ g OOcO^^ObO«r-te^»^iO OOON^ JlJCOO «ci ^« S NIOW^CJC* •^ 2 S 



s : : 



1 



1 s I 






1 I 

1 I 






.40^ 



^^"^••i^K-S-i^^ 



iiaag'sis'SiSi 






1^ I 









9tt&l« 



ga 



3 ilSs •= 



ij 
s 



3 . 

s : 

I' 



13§S: 



^ ? 



. ® o o p o 
;«CQ §^6:2 



ill !■ 

«3 5 a 1 

§S is 1 



Q Q QQAQ 



5 ©tj 



-I 



d 



.•ISo? 2lfc- 



d O d ^'H-S'O 9 



^llii.l 






P ft Q 5-s 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



550 



I 
.a 

d 



I 
i 

I 



I 

I 



n 



BDTJCATIOir BBPOBT, 



1913. 



2 •! 2' 




fllfililiim 



"1 1 ^ 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



551 



g 


^ 


1 


r 


s 


§ 


ooo 






S 


oo 


S 


o 


o 


|S 




^ 




04 


S^ 


ss 


sr 


s 


00 


§ 


5eoo<DO 


s 


gs^ 






1 


*s§ 


^ 


^n^ 




{; 


« 


5 


5= 


go-o 


o" 


i 








i 


5 


g 




o 


*5g 






g 




828 


g 


?*S 






s§ 


g 


"s" 












* 


1 




e 


!==« 




1 


o 




S^§^ 


s 


*a 






s* 


■s- 


* 




di 


& 


ti 


s« 


* 


o6 


a 


&<5 


6 


^ 


^ 


do 


'^ 


K 


"**^M 


COM 


eoio 


« 


« 


^ 


«^<3 


9 


r^ 


-flb 



rS CO ^^i ^0*-iO o~ 



**ss 
















*c 


o 


* ^ 


|?5S g^tS 


« a s 


i « 




* » s 


*g** 
















1 


g 


§ "^ 


S$S- g^ 


- s g 


: ^ 




* = s 








i 












°e 






* B 


S^^ ^ 


SS : 


i 3« 


£ s ; 




















§3 






1 * 


e^38$ S 


2^S : 


i S* 


* .* 


"-a- 












o«cs 


o 


O "O 


«..- «« 




; -5N 


n d> li 


C9eo0«0 












eooec 




ck 6 


•6<6eo 6«ec 


O- O Jj 


; CO<& 


n •> A 



iili'i § Sg« iS5 Ssg s Sg^s |3 5§ ts 83 ||*^ s | 



i'lri 


§ **» 


*si 


*og 


^ 


^^^tot 


§^ 


gJo 


^ 


§« 


^i*S 


;^ 


1 


d^ddi&d 


^ i^* 




S^S 


!) 


8J58$ 


^^ 


3^3 


« 


5° 






g 


asg^j-a 


S 89- 


l^'-S 


S^S 


t* 


o«oeo« 


s* 


OkO 


« 


9S 


SS-2 


S 


!^ 


n-S«j** 


05 *6© 


<S>og 


00^ 


^ 


ooo»«eo 


s« 


• <r 


CO 


•a 


SS«S 





"a 




• aa- 


8-^8 




* 




WW 


*^ 


-« 


s* 


«5d^(N 




^ 



1 
I 



:q 
4^ ■ 






OS 



i 



1^ 



s wt 




aS^S-s I ill f'^S III ^ -yii^ ^I "^^ J 



sn^ 6ad ^ol a uS^4 »^ al a .^h oillcd 



i 



I 






1^ 



^ 







a o « a eO 



1^1 



1« 



ii 



II 



3 St 



.S9 

o 

! i 1 
! ^ & 



GO 



,. .ii5f ill 



Ss 3 






Ifi 



1^ 



ou 



o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



HA 



I 
% 

i 



i 



5»l 
I 






CDCCATio^r izpoirr, l^ix 



1^^ -*«w»^ • 



^3^5! 



5 5 S 5- I - i -^ 



=ss 















1?^ 



ill 



WMX>f>Vi ^ 





•m^x 


4 


— 


1" 


'»(««»;f 




•wi 


g 


'fwi^X 


^ 


anno.^ 


1 


^ 



iS5^^ 



-g3g^ 



s5^P'2r 






-1-2" 



•»§ °|5 



4<S^<4r^ — ^-5 — =■ 



T^ 



-g-ir 



§3^ 



ip.^ s 



§ •= 






•Cr^ •-• 



-^ — 5- 



ooea 



«•« n^ae R~ 



8 




|. 




"S'C 


« 


*« Q 




i 




^ 








1 


M 







« 




£ 




>". 




i 




1 





ill-'! 



is 















r--3 




*s 


« i 








2 Si 




«^ 


S 2 




1 ^ 


" * "; 


1 *j 








d 






•: "IS 


• 


2 ; 








1 






i If* 




z \ "*~ 




-ar. 


s - 




; *X9B d5 d» ; 


• r *^ 




"S 


S " 




: 22- - -- : 



S3 i i S i SB iia S "I 



"^ 







! 2 1^ 



©•aaS^S^^r Per-* 






?.i2 



> 1* 3 5; CO . 



at, 



p o o o 00 000 — •§' 

5 S p S PQ POP r:^ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



553 



i 


te 


*s 


ss 


-w 


-m 


— 


s 


551 


-05- 


«lg 


as 


rs« 


2 


;5 

04 


8S 


g 


c> 








S 


R 


S 


CO 




00 




S3 






a 

^ 


§ 


SJJ§ 


t 


•^ 








s 


1 


» 


c^ 




-* 




^ 






« 


^ 


eQC« 


t^ 


" 


eoo 


^ 




(O 


e* 


otoec 


^c 


ogoo 


i;; 


C* 


oeo 


>o 


6i 


^CH 


«6 


■<• 


*>• 


04 


_*s« 


^oc 


t-©»t« 


s 


ss 


^$ 


^ 


3 


58 


! 


tj 


^ 


00 


-* 


^ 


s* 












^ 


S5 


«8 


s 


$ 


S 


c 


s 


9 


00 


CO 


^ 


ss 










— 




S 


gs 


^ 




§ 




8 


R 


{3 


eo 














s 


2JS 


s 


SS 


s 




^ 


^ 


» 


c< 




»o 












d 


00 


00^ 


t* 


C( 


•«i 


^ 


•0 


2 


M 


M 


« 


^0 












^ 


<o 


0^ 


'T 


** 


^ 


« 


•^ 


^ 


04 





<N 


^oc 












§ 


o 
5 


as 


§ 


'* 


i^ 


g 


§ 


§ 


S 


a§S2 


feS 


§§s^ 


t 


s 


§§ 


% 


S 


gS 


g 


s 


1 


9 


t,*^ 


g° 


d^^o 


g 


S 


S3 


s 


S 


gia 


d 


CO 


a 


SS 


-'gg 


8$S 


eo ec 


?3 


^ 


■ 2: 


CJt- 


•^ 


s 


0604 


13 


s 


» 


'* 


C.JJ.A 


t^oo 


^S*^ 


s 


06- 


C;IW 


& 


« 


'^ii) 


$^ 


«* 


S 


w 


CiO« 


eoo 


ogoo 


9 


ce 


©"• 


W3 


«- 


^« 


« 




6 


0« 


055 c. 




t-OOfc^ 




m I 



3 

Pn 






SP H 



jg3 n ^ 2 « :^a 

w«! « W I w "^11 w| 



0Q3 



I 



5 

B 
I 

O S , 

I - : 
^ it 

a w 

IP; 







_ i 



1^ 



pqo 



OSS 



-4 3 o 

5wa 



to » g 
H > 



i 



i i I 

u S o 









o o o*i 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



«54 



EDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



sii 



§ 5§ 

a • 



§§gi S 






g i si § 
§8 s *' a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



555 



§ i 8 si 



§§ 






§gi§ g§ § § § §i § § 



§§ 
•V 



§ §§§ 



ss 



S § 



J|s §» § 



ess 



m 



I 8 



JiS 



3=. 



§ S § 






11 

-5 



@s scg 



ss 



§ § 



ii§§ 



s ^ 



§ 


SS 




2,000 

900 
6,000 


§ 




§ 







§i 



§§ §^§ 



§§ 



§ §§ 



g§§§ g§ § S I §§ § § §§ g 

®"5* ef 



OKOr^r^ ^e 



•HM f-l 



§<j 



2I 



§ §§ §S§ 



H 



§ § 



§ §§§i 

8" a"s 8 



i § § § §§ § § 



t-4 t» lO 



^ 



§ § 



o CO w 6 S> o 

8" 1""^ 8"8"S" 



§§§ § § 

as-* 8" s* 



§§§ 



§§§§ §§ §§§§§§ 

s §" a" s S"8" 3 8' 81' a I" 



§ ig §§§§§§§ i §§§ !§§§ 



eo eoe»»fi 



i § i i i§ s § §§ s i ^%^ « 

1 






I II 









1 II 



UL:iS 



«i 



•R3 



o o o o'ZM 'JJS i 



t4m 

I t3 S 



o .. O •< 



5 : 
I og 



M 



;l 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



656 



3^ 



EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

§ ;§i§§§§i§§§i§3§ 



3 » SS" 



S-S^SSS^SJIi? •"- 



II 



g I mt 



i 






i§ 



§ s 



13 

.a 

a 
o 



I 
I 






1 



I 



s 

^ 



n 

■< 



i 

h 



i 9 B§ 



r§ 



iig|§ss§§s 



i s 



•^O Okco 






S 2 61 



§§SS§§§i§ 



3 S 



Piif 



i S §:§ 



§§§ 



i§§ 



w 8 S 



»2 eo eoioM 






pill 






I HP 



§ § §§ 






§§ 



3 "Is I 



g 3| 



§!§§»§ g 



hi 



§ § §§ 



ll§|ag§§g- 



2^ 



^"a? ^ O E 



I 



-•SS 



1=5 



kCQPQ 



5IS 






5j92ooooop o o o ol: t g OS >. o'S « q*»*» 






■4 

m 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MAKUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TKAINING. 



557 



3 § I g § I § 
- I s s' «' ->"■ "S' 



§§§ 






§g 



"8" 






§ § § g 
a" « 



l§§ 



i§ 



8 

a 



88S 



S 8 S 






§§ 



1"^ 



00 1-4 



25 






ss 



§ S 2 i § § 



|S 



s§ 



1= 



§ a s § 



8 

a 
•8 



m 



§ § § § g § 

R" 8 a" " «f 



§§§§§§ 



§§ 



*=l fl 



§ § 



§ !S 



§ § 



pgs § § I I § I 



§§ 



ss 



§s § §§ §§ I 



s; §s « 



I §§g §§ 

8* §^ ^m ii 




<3 



..^ 






Mi 



s s 






lill^iailll 

S u^-^ S fc d P I M*0 5 o o o^$ 



5? 



o o 



:3 
5 



5z; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



558 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 






U 






II 
II 






s § 



s §§ 



s 



Hi 






1 



i 



I 



I 
1 



s 

^ 



PQ 



I' 



eoVooCo 



§§ 



S § 



as 






ggsiii 



§ s 



i §iaas 



ri^ 









^s 



Si 






§ § 













§ §§S §§§§§ IS S§ 



s s 



co'eo of i-^'t^fS'r^cf V 



Iflil 



§§ 

fcS 

a- 










siiSi 



S" 



s §§s §§§§ 

K ''"S fi" -" "" 



I § 



§ § § 



^ S i 



§§ §g 



§§ 



i§ §§§ §§§§§ 



§§ 






Li 






I 
I 



§§ 



ii 



§§ 



§ 



t i 



§ ^§a §§§§§ §»§§§. 



I I lilt i 

a « « a eS »^ 



11 

j O (A 



III 



8 

i 



2 

B 



i 







3qO 

I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTBIAL TRAINING. 



559 



H 






g§§§S 9 § 



ic" r^r'Tod't^or 



s i g s g i 



§ 8§ 



§ iSSi 



i§ 






§ § 



3 S 8 



§ §8 



«" 1^* w' 



g§ 



§ §» § i 



s gs 



§ § §§§§ 



§§ 



§ SS 



i s § 



§ is 



:§ § 



i §§ 



§ § 



a" 



§ §8 § § 



It oc« 






§ §§§§! § 



s 



« 0» t* !>• t* t* 






§ § §§§ § 



;§i 



§ §§§g§ §1 

^ ^ JO 



§§ §§§§ § §§§ § §§ 

i-Tg eo o cTcfc g' ^'^^ *^ 



§i § 



§§§§ 



§ g § §§ § I 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



560 



ED1TCATIOH BEPOBT, 1913. 



1 

c 



1 

I 



r 

••• 
I 

I 

C5 






1] 









III 












llip 



1^^ 



> ri 






i 
J 



S§§ IS? I 

^^JJCi 09 00 CO 



8S 



i§§ 



51 s 



P§ 8gS S 



pi 



§§ s 



««» MoS S 



ss 









gSi§ 



gs 



§§§§ 



§il 






§11 sgi §i §§B§ 






§§§ a§ i §1 ss2§ 



HI 
HI 

■=85 
1*1 

m 



II 



;~g-s 



1 



•al 



«» wi 3 

11^. 



s 






*jjq2"fii 6 6 6 2 



Digitized by VjOO^JC 



MANUAL AKD INDTJSTBIAL TBAINING. 



561 



I 



^ 

O 



I 

i 

''I 

I 



j 



n 



If 






6 

11 



§•0 






^1 



J9 
t 



I 



'9IBIII9J 



'9i«n 



■aftrcooj 



•oiow 



*n9ii]0^V\. 



•noH 



*9IBm9J 



•«l«H 



'9|VIXI9J 



•9I«W 



■u9moj^ 



•U9If 



mox 



*9I^U29J 



•9I«If 



mox 



•uaraoAV. 



•aaw 



1^ 



o3oCS^'^«o ra m S 



^SS«5!SS ^ ^ JS 



S S 3 SSoS 



S S; S SSSS 



r«co*Q>go<«'oo i> .-• 



s -^ 



55 S 



CO O MS 00 M 1-4 O 



^ rH <0 d ^ 



t^ D00<0'<«> 



^ 



|S3g!:$3 



s ^ 



^«SSo>SS tS s 



:3 g I 3^&3 



S <-43«0^ 



o eo CO ^ '*• '* c* w iH «>. 



«o coc<^c« 



OO^.MO»HO O M C« C4 O ^ O 1-iOCl-^ 



?5^SI;:28S sags ^ g g S§8?5I? 



|3SSg^$S $ S I "* ^ S I ^^«^ 



gssg^ss :s S I ^ ^ § S H^^^ 



QCO^CQOlQO CO lO W9 lO ^9 



s^s:: 



r^coooo^^o 



i-lC4r^tD 



CO O CO 00 C4 •-• o 



COOtOiO 







^ M 



"5 t 

ph 6 





17727°— ED 1913— VOL 2 36 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



562 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



663 



5S •^g^sis? s* a 8J?S* ssgssi? 



^SS S 9Z 9SS 



^SS<=><=>S5r g5 § g32'« §§2S5^cJ S SSg 



S!;:S s 



•oto CO M to O to CO r^ «»o r* ^■^eoeo r«o<o<D^ci 



CO «M 



WiO 1-1 i-i <« o O CI to »oeo 



S«^ 8 



ooi^oo ^o>oa»c«c« CO -fcoa o eo*«' 



(^9 

8« 



g gss** ssggss s sss 22 ss sss s 



eo3 

MJO 



®SS g5 



gj^s 



;5^ S 



COCOM t^CI 



r^c«»eoeo eoeo'^'^^ci c^ w^^ 



-»• ■♦o wvco eo 



00 o^»-i 



000 «.-• 



lOOO ^^»^^Or 



^^o o 00 000 ^ 



-2 ss5S32g |a I gass sggsss s fsg « |g ssg g 






gg g gSoS** 3S2g2SJ? 



^^S '^ 8:!: SS38 ;2 



?o8 8SS®®S3 



s5 s siss-' sass-'c 

CO 10 »-» •-« ,-tw^w^ 



§S gS8 ® 85 S^S 8 



!• CO t^ O 00 .-< C« 



O ^"^£2 •" «*»^ co'^r^ o 



t^o> CO w o» o 00 a» t* S*^ S '^<owco ococototooo i^ r»b»'v lo om ok^a^co oo 



eo«o 1-1 •-« 00 o o w »o 



a" s 



ocioo -^ ^ »o f d f 



CO ICVO* O 00 •V •VO'V 00 



3 

3 



a; 3 



S^^ 



^1 ^Msds 







:i l-^l 



1 i«| piiS^i 







if fill 



5 2*5 ^ fl .. 2 2 S"^ ^.S fc o 









o 



Ph CO 






I 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



564 



SDCCATIOX KKPOBT, 1913. 



Ill 



ilii 



1 I Hl§§ 
5 :: s^s** 



8? 



Si 






1 ^3 



3 



5 ^ 



M ^ 



i§ 



I 



1*1 « ' 

fc.Sc I 



iili 



|s§ 



i i§i§ 



•^5 






•I 



.C5 



H 

•J 






5 ""^ ■* 






§§ 



11 



^IJ 






§'-'23 









Si 



A c S J^ > « 






a 's 



III 



§ § § 

S 3 S 



Si 

1-4 Ct 



§§§ 



1W 

>5 B 



§ss? 



§s i§§ 



§ § i §gi§ §§§ i§ §§ 



:3-2j 



ss 



I i 5 5 



8S 



QQ c> 



:3 

I 



1 



•CO— "S w 

•9-91 II 
111 ^2 

"^1 11 

111 rl 

III !=• 



i 

8 

I 



Ij 



ll ll 
II ll 



J 



11 



1^ 

15 



IFii§i 



8 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING. 



565 



§§§ 

2228 



§ §§§§ nn^n^i 



oT e^ CO 



8 



SS 



58 5*^' S *S 



00"«»» M 



22g 



oT i-T 00 



8 SS 



8 



S§§ 



S i§§§ §§§ 



82 



♦ ^* 0*c 



§ §i § g§ 






2U9 



§ §"11 ii§ 



§ §1 § ig 



§§§ 



1 1 



§i§ 



i § 



>a - 






i § i 






i§ gi § 11 



ii§§ 



cf «" «(? 



8 



OOCOQOC 

;3Rsi8l 



5S8 



§i§ 



00 ^<-4ioeo 



eo i> o 

Vi^ •-4 **4 



S88« 

ass 



§§§ 
^'2 s 



oaS 



§§§ § g I 
lis" i' f ^ 



§§ §g§l§§§§§§§ Si 



ss 



'2§a 






i2§-§§ 



S8 :3:8gS^ :^§i^§ iS S gS^ 



I88S88S g J228 

5 ■««« « t-t t>» m5 c* »-• i^»^w 



I- 



i 



I I I 






fS -s 



If I 






111 
1^1 



I 






I 






§3 



a$l ?5 



li-i 



-<5 

2> 



MOO 
^ ^ ^ 



5|: 



I £ I 



lip 






5*a 

sgm§ 

.•S a ® « 
3 ^ 



fi* OQ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



664 



ale 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 









1913. 

00 t^ sg^odio 



§§ :•§ 

8'? 



If 






i§ 






M ^ 



§§ 






lit 



§§ll 



§ i mi 

o o 



1 

i 

I 



iST 






§i§§ 



§§ 






ii§ 

.--.•5; 



i §si§ 



g§ 









iisi 

2 'S 



l§§ § § § § 

•" 8 • s" s a 



§§§ §§ 










§ § § §gi§ §§§ l§ §§ 



i» 



ss 



5 5 




H 

e2 



3 

2 






JIf 



!io>^ sag •2| g 

1g? Ill ^a I 






^ X 






1^ 



isi 



Sf^MSP<a 



'11 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MANUAL AND INDTJSTBIAL TBAINING. 

§§§§ 



665 



s a-^'sa as'"-'"- 






f a" 



8 



SS 



§§ 



g s ss 



§ §§§§ §§§ 



ss 



§ §i § g§ 



-*8 



^ i 



§1 






So »-• 8S SudS 



§8 



I §1 § i§ 

CO CO to 



§i§ 



g I 



§i§ 



'a •- 



s K 



i § i 



§ § 



oeo ooi-r-fHi- 



l§ 11 § 11 



« « • 



S 8 

a 



aD-^r«r ooo 



S ScooS 

00 1«"rH»OC0 



§g8 



li§ 



CO t>- o 



Sg883 



§§§ 



sss 



lis f 5 S- 



§§ §§§!§§§§§§§ gi § §i 



i§§§ 



^8 



s^ll I 



82??;§g8 

55 ^ 1-t rt ci 



§ § 



88 38SSSo 



§iis§ ii g |8 



1 
i 



is, 
II 



P 



a 



IP 






i 



fS -i 



ll I 

nil 



^1^1 






§ hU 



illll 






pg'' 



'g 



So 
^ ^zi ^ 



I ^ 

I 









ill 






■I liii 



I 

a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



566 



§ 



i 



I 
I 






H 

•J 

n 



3I2 



II 



8S 



SI I 






l§ll 

« 13 



lglll^ 









^r 



•Sa 






EDUCATIOir BEPOBT, 1913. 



USS5 



s; 



- s 



s 



3 I 



§§§§§§ § 



g^lggS 8 



3 
•0 






..s 



S5 >»b' 

o 09 «S 



^•S S * is 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER XII. 
COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



For the year 1913 there were 618 private commercial and business 
schools reporting to this office, an increase of 99 over the preceding 
year. There are several himdred more of these schools whose owners 
ignore all requests for statistical information sent to them by the 
Bureau of Education. 

The 618 business schools reporting had 160,557 students. In 704 
private high schools there were 15,940 students in business courses, 
and 2,091 public high schools had 154,042 students in such courses. 

Students in commercial courses, 1912 and 1913, 



aaases qT institutions. 


1912 


1913 


Schools. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Schools. 


Kale. 


Female. 


Total. 


Private high schools.. . . 

Public hiffh schools 

Commerdal schools 


603 

1,913 

619 


8,254 
68,323 
72,258 


5,919 
70,654 
65,532 


14,173 

128,977 

- 137,790 


704 

2,091 

618 


8,839 
09,135 
82,776 


7,101 
84,907 
77,782 


15,^10 
154,042 
160,557 


Total 


3,035 


138,835 


142,105 


280,940 


3,413 


160,749 


169.790 


330,539 





Several himdred students in business courses in public and private 
normal schools and higher institutions are not accounted for here. 
These and the enrollment in several hundred business schools not 
reporting would increase the aggregate to at least 350,000. 

The following synopsis relates exclusively to the statistics of the 
618 commercial and business schools reporting to this bureau: 

InstmctorSf students, and graduates in commercial and business schools, 1912-13, 



Male. Female. Total, 



Number of instructors 

Number of students enrolled 

Students in day courses 

Students in niffht courses 

Average attendance, day schools 

Average attendance, night schools. . . 

Students in commerciaTcourses 

Graduates from commercial courses. . . 

Students in amanuensis courses 

Graduates from amanuensis courses. . 

Students in combined courses 

Graduates from combined courses. . . . 

Students in English courses 

Graduates from English courses 

Students in telegraphy course 

Graduates lirom telegraphy course . . . 



1,878 
82,775 
58,902 
23,873 



1,505 
77,782 
68,979 
18,803 



35,512 
8,915 

18,534 
4,969 

13,034 
3,993 
6,390 
537 
1,880 
649 



14,131 

4,725 

37, 115 

11,872 

14,017 

4,539 

3,403 

363 

167 

39 



3,383 
160,557 
117,881 
42,676 
52,607 
18,274 
49,643 
13,640 
65,649 
16,841 
27,051 

8,532 

9,703 
900 

2,047 



To supply the information desired by many correspondents of the 
bureau, the principal of each private business or conmiercial school 
was asked to answer this question: "What system of shorthand do 

567 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



568 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1W.3. 



you teach?" The numbeA of schools teaching each system in 1911 
is indicated in the following summary: 

American, 1; Aristogmphy, 1; Arifltoe, 1; Barnes, 8; Byrne Simplified, 7; Chand- 
ler, 1; Chartier, 14; Cogswell, 1; CroeeEclectic, 11; Dahlke's Shorthand, 1; Dement- 
Pitman, 9; Eclectic, 10; Graham, 82; Graham-Pitman, 13; Gregg, 189; Heflley- 
Pitmanic, 3; Howard, 6; Lindsley's^Takigraphy," 1; Lightning L^rible, 1; McEee, 
5; Modem, 2; Modem Pitmanic, 2; Munson, 29; New Modem, 1; New Rapid, 3; 
O'Donnell-Pitman, 1; Patterson, 1; Pemin, 9; Pitman, 43; Pitman (Benn), 82; Pit- 
man (Isaac), 39; Pitman-Howard, 2; Pitman by Osgoodby. 2; Porter, 1; Script Short- 
hand, 1; Spencerian, 4; Spencerian-Chartier, 9; Stone's Rapid Reporting, 1; Success, 
3; Weaver's Progressive, 1. 

Stenographers in Executive Departments at Washington^ D, C, using various systems of 

shorthand writing. 



Pitman 252 

Isaac P itman 1 52 

Benn Pitman 575 

Modem Pitmanic 12 

Pitman-White 2 

Pitman-Murphy 1 

Pitman-Graham-Munson 3 

Pitman-Howard 67 

Pitman-Success 14 

Pitman-Munson 5 

Pitman-Universal 1 

Pitman-Scott-Browne 7 

Dement-Pitman 30 

Barnes-Pitman 96 

Moran-Pitman 4 

Pitman-Howard-Bames 1 

Pitman-Bryant & Stratton 1 

Pitman-Gregg 4 

Pitman-Campbell 1 

Pitman-Graham-Day 1 

Pitman-Graham-Osgoodby 1 

Pitman-Graham-Fuller 1 

Pemin-Pitman 1 

Osgoodby 's Pitmanic 5 

Longley-Pitman 1 

Modified-Pitman 2 

Graham-Haven-Pitman 1 

Graham-Pitman 197 

Graham 272 

Graham-Woodworth 1 

Success-Graham 3 

Columbian-Graham. 1 

Graham-Pitman-Marsh 1 

Graham-Day 1 

Graham-McKee 1 

Gregg 352 

Munson 90 

Success 26 

McKee 16 

McKee (Standard) 4 



McKee (New Rapid) 7 

Dement 8 

Dementi Aristography. ; 3 

Eclectic (Crtjss) 53 

Eclectic 7 

Success-Eclectic 1 

Barnes 23 

Sloan-Duployan 10 

Rose Expert * 2 

Pemin , 37 

Acme 4 

Paragon 1 

Haven 4 

Lindsley 9 

Chartier 11 

Boyd 's Syllable 5 

Jayne 1 

New Standard 2 

Brevescript 1 

Chandler 6 

Strayers 6 

New Rapid 2 

Burnz 3 

Longley 3 

New Modem 4 

Whitaker *! 

Eames Light Line 4 

Hickox 1 

Scovil 2 

Osgoodby 3 

Byrne 4 

Dougherty 1 

Bennyhoff 1 

Boyd 1 

Byrne's Simplified 1 

Spencerian-Chartier 3 

Howard i 

Day 1 

Craig 1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



569 



Public commercial high schools and commercial. departments in cities of 10,000 population 

<ind over. 



Location. 



Name. 



Enrollment in buainees 
courses. 



Male. 



Female. 



TotaL 



Los Angeles, Cal . 
Do 



Do 

Oakland, CaL 

San Diego. Cal 

Ban Francisoo, Cal. 
Do 



Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn. 
Waterbury, Conn. . 
Washington, D. C. 

Atlanta, Ga 

Oalesburg.ni 

Moline.Ill 

Louisville, Ky 

Beverly .Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 

Do 



Do. 
Do.. 
Do.. 
Do., 
Do. 
Do., 
Do. 
Do. 



Everett, Mass 

Haverhill, Mass.... 

L^nn, Mass 

Medford, Mass 

Newtonville, Mass. 



Quincy,Ma8B 

Springfield. Mass.. 
Wobum, Mass .... 
Detroit, Mich 



Escanaba. Mich 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Paterson, N. J 

Brooklyn, N.Y.... 

Do 

Do 



New York, N.Y. 

Do 

Do 



Cincinnati, Ohio., 
Cleveland, Ohio... 
Columbus, Ohio... 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Do 



Pottstowii,Pa... 

Reading, Pa 

Scran ton. Pa 

Providence, R. I. 

Do..... 

OshkoshyWis.... 



Manual Arts High School (oommercial department). 

Polytechnic Evening High School (commercial de- 
partment). 

Polytechnic High School (commercial department) . 

Manual Training and Commercial High School 

High School (commercial department) 

High School of C!ommerce 

Humboldt Evening High School (oommercial de- 
partment.) 

High School (commercial deinrtment) 

do. 



Crosby High School (commercial department) 

Business High School 

English Commercial High School 

High School (commercial department) 

do. 

Girls' High School (commercial department) 

High School (commercial department} 

Charlestown High School (commercial department) 
Dorchester ^gn School (commercial department).. 

East Boston Evening Commercial High School 

East Boston High Sdiool (comraerciaTdepartment).. 
Enelish High School (commercial department). . . 

Girls' High School (commercial department) 

High School of Commerce 

Roxbury High School (commercial department) 

South Boston Hieh School (commercial department). 
West Roxbury High School (commercial depart- 
ment). 

High School (commercial department) 

do. 



English High School (commercial department) 

High SchoSl (oommercial department) 

Newton Technical High School (oommercial depiurt- 
ment). 

High School (commercial department) 

High School of Commerce 

High School (commercial department) 

Cass Technical High School (commercial depart- 
ment). 

High School (oommercial department) 

South High School (commercial department) 

Evening High School (commercial department) 

Bushwick High School (commercial department).... 

Commercial mgh School 

Eastern District High School (commercial depart- 
ment). 

High School of Commerce 

Morris High School (commercial department) 

Washington Irving High School (commercial depart- 
ment). 

West Night High School (commercial department). . 

High School of Cohmierce 

....do 

Central High School (commercial department) 

William Penn High School for Girls (oommercial 
department). 

High School (commercial department) 

Evening Hign School (commercial department) 

Technical High School (commercial department) 

Engli^ High School (commercial depsurtment) , 

Evening High School (commercial department) 

High School (commercial department) , 



219 
650 

200 
150 
126 
184 
249 

205 

120 

89 

439 



198 

124 



180 

71 

209 

211 

117 

1,100 



993 

1 

169 

63 

134 
133 
108 
202 
213 

160 
155 
115 
149 

99 
157 
119 
203 
2,445 


3,289 

463 



185 
222 
221 
845 


105 
217 
301 
151 
229 
274 



234 

513 

221 
223 
185 
431 
236 

447 
447 
339 
750 
228 
167 
176 
450 
273 
211 
514 
218 
260 


1,366 


461 
308 
295 



262 
370 
256 
295 

260 
424 
130 



123 
245 
111 

1,025 


1,118 


1,156 

1,864 

191 
396 
291 

961 

108 
165 
423 
422 
201 
216 



453 
1,163 

421 
373 
311 
615 
485 

652 
667 
428 
1,189 
228 
365 
300 
450 
453 
382 
723 
429 
377 
MOO 
1,366 
993 
462 
477 
358 

437 
395 

478 
458 
508 

420 
679 
245 
612 

222 

402 

230 

1,228 

2,445 

1,118 

3,289 
1,619 
1,864 

378 
618 
612 
845 
961 

213 
372 
724 
^73 
430 
490 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



670 



EDUCATION BEPOBT. 1913. 



Table 1. — Students in commercial and bueineM courses in private high sdiaols and 
academies and in public high sdiools^ 191t~lS. 





Private hlg^ schools and acade- 
mies. 


Public Wgh sdiools. 


States. 


Schools 
report- 
ing. 


Students. 


Schools 


Students. 




Male. 


Female. 


Total 


reportf- 
Ing. 


Male. 


Female. 


TotaL 


United States 


704 


8,839 


7,101 


15,940 


2,091 


60,135 


84,907 


154,042 


North Atlantic Division 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division. 

Western Division 


109 
224 

86 
116 

79 

12 
15 
10 
24 
8 
11 
67 
17 
45 

26 
12 
36 
13 
22 
23 
28 
30 
6 
6 
11 
11 

2 

18 

6 
14 

5 
19 

4 
12 

7 

19 
16 
15 
11 
13 
31 
6 
6 

4 


3.229 
2,303 
1,021 
1,455 
831 

113 
228 
193 
243 
127 
120 
931 
101 
1,173 

103 

156 

369 

84 

267 

486 

329 

272 

32 

48 

80 

77 

24 
235 
42 
75 
32 
212 
67 
194 
120 

158 
188 
58 
223 
304 
457 
22 
45 

19 


2,994 

2,133 

677 

669 

728 

183 
123 
179 
603 
119 
215 
620 
163 
789 

278 

84 

678 

151 

193 

268 

198 

160 

33 

27 

53 

110 

8 
75 
70 

122 
45 

143 
11 
60 
43 

145 
154 
42 
41 
31 
208 
19 
29 

33 


6,223 
4,436 
1,598 
2,124 
1,659 


689 
798 
129 
145 
330 


35,020 

20,977 

2,512 

2,142 

8,484 


44,128 
24.809 
3,496 
2,519 
9,955 


79.148 
45,786 
6,006 
4,661 
18,430 






North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


296 
351 
372 
846 
246 
335 

1,551 
264 

1,962 

381 
240 
947 
235 
460 
754 
627 
432 
65 
75 
133 
187 

32 

330 
112 
197 

77 
355 

78 
254 
163 

303 
342 
100 
264 
335 
665 
41 
74 

52 


66 
38 
30 

156 
14 
40 

111 
96 

149 

135 
62 

119 
95 
79 
49 
64 
45 
34 
18 
18 
80 

3 
43 

1 

18 
15 
14 

8 
23 

4 

17 
22 
IS 
11 
14 
26 
10 
27 

19 

9 

33 

3 

7 

9 

7 

13 

52 

23 

155 


871 
802 
413 

9,034 
780 

4.170 
10,120 

3,316 

5,514 

3,464 

1,290 

3,839 

2,501 

2,618 

1,580 

1,500 

1,904 

351 

199 

440 

1,291 

135 
479 
439 
466 
355 
138 

40 
440 

20 

283 
442 
167 
142 
214 
396 
84 
414 

346 

149 

1,100 

36 

96 

386 

40 

318 

1,425 

540 

4,048 


1,362 
1,224 
601 
14,594 
1,267 
4,437 
9,970 
4,076 
6,607 

3,854 

1,616 

6,619 

3,152 

2,828 

1,956 

1,576 

1,955 

830 

227 

498 

1,299 

163 
867 
750 
667 
374 
173 

69 
621 

22 

657 
481 
188 
142 
821 
281 
95 
364 

630 
177 

1,143 

49 

154 

422 

67 

850 

1,711 
619 

4,743 


2,233 


Nffw Hampcihir^ ^ 


2,026 


Vermont. .*. 


1014 


Mf|faf|f>bn9ettff 


23,628 


Rhode Island 


2,047 


Connection t 


8,607 


NewYork 


20,090 


New Jersey 


7.392 


Pennsylvania 


12,111 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


7,318 


Tndlana . . 


2,806 


Illinois 


9,458 


Michigan.... 


6.653 


Wisconsin 


6,446 


Minnesota 


3;536 


Iowa 


3.075 


Missouri 


3,850 


North Dakota 


681 


South Dakota 


426 


Nebraska 


938 


KftFvmA.. .. 


2,590 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 


296 


Maryland 


1.346 


District of ColumWa 

Virginia 


1,180 
1,033 


West Virginia... 


720 


North Carolina 


311 


South Carolina 


00 


Georgia 


061 


Florida 


42 


South Central Division: 
Kentucky 


040 


Tennessee 


023 


Alabama x,. 


365 


MImiMippt 


284 


Louisiana ... ..... 


635 


Texas 


677 


Arkansas 


170 


Oklahoma. ........... . . 


768 


Western Division: 

Montana 


876 


Wyoming 


326 


CoIoradoT 


6 
2 
2 
11 


39 

35 

29 

445 


43 

6 

29 

244 


82 
41 

58 
689 


2,243 


New Mexico 


85 


Arizona 


2S0 


Utah 


808 


Nevada 


07 


Idaho 


4 
13 

8 
29 


42 
46 
35 
141 


44 
33 
33 
263 


86 

79 

68 

404 


668 


Washington 


8,136 


Oregon .T 


1,160 


Cftltfornlft 


8,701 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OOMMBBOIAL AND BTTSINBSS SCHOOLS. 



671 



Table 2. — Tnstnusiors and students in commercial and business- schools in the United 

States reporting f 191t-lS, 





Schools. 


Instruotors. 


Students enrolled. 


States. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


United States 


618 


1,878 


1,605 


3,383 


82,775 


77,782 


160,567 






North Atlantic Division 


179 
274 
44 
53 
68 


546 
846 
126 
159 
201 


540 
630 
94 
95 
146 


1,086 

1,476 

220 

254 

847 


20,916 

38,423 

6,776 

8,688 

7,972 


23,432 

34,145 

5,141 

6,426 

8,638 


44,348 


North Central Dtvision 


72.568 


South Atlantic Division 


11.917 


South Central Division 


15, 114 


Western Division 


16,610 






North Atlantic Dtvision: 

Maine 


9 
5 
8 
21 

4 
14 
50 
16 
57 

44 
22 
50 
24 
28 
21 
24 
21 
5 
5 
10 
20 

2 
6 
3 
9 
6 
6 
8 
6 
3 

7 
10 
3 
1 
5 
14 
• 6 
7 

4 
1 

10 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 

10 
8 

26 


18 
11 
6 
82 
13 
28 

147 
60 

191 

U6 
78 

194 
75 
62 
71 
64 
79 
15 
6 
26 
60 

16 
15 

9 
27 
14 
10 

6 
21 

8 

14 
25 
9 
2 
21 
54 
16 
18 

19 
1 

27 
9 
2 
7 
2 
7 
29 
27 
71 


25 
17 
7 

73 
13 
39 

188 
42 

136 

75 

45 

141 

52 

54 

64 

66 

48 

9 

9 

23 

45 

8 
17 
19 
22 
5 
11 
2 
6 
4 

19 
15 
3 
1 

18 

24 

4 

11 

7 
1 

27 
1 
3 
11 

3 
16 
17 
60 


43 
28 
13 

156 
26 
67 

335 
92 

327 

191 

123 

335 

127 

116 

135 

129 

127 

24 

15 

49 

106 

34 
33 
38 
49 
19 
31 
8 
37 
13 

33 
40 
13 
3 
39 
78 
20 
29 

26 

2 

54 

10 

5 

18 

2 

10 

46 

44 

131 


691 

319 

180 

2,669 

325 

1,063 

6,012 

2,194 

7,473 

4,581 
8,161 
10,037 
3,381 
2,172 
3,694 
3,067 
3,404 
1,029 
330 
1,212 
2,355 

798 
1,149 
962 
1,275 
511 
493 
293 
833 
462 

640 
1,394 

454 

67 

1,326 

3,641 

491 

675 

985 
24 

994 

230 
94 

387 
55 

226 
1,029 

939 
3,009 


769 

423 

217 

2,601 

484 

1,626 

8,609 

2,104 

6,599 

5,062 

2,656 

9^061 

8,671 

1,700 

3,145 

2,967 

2,579 

601 

200 

942 

1,647 

572 
752 
761 
884 
559 
485 
182 
360 
686 

764 
1,460 

427 

47 

1,060 

1,635 

466 

567 

935 
46 
1,115 
78 
108 
392 
56 
217 
979 
766 
3,946 


1,460 


New Hampflhir^ 


743 


Vermont 


397 




5,260 


Rhode Island s. 


809 


Coinnecticut ....t-t-t r ^-r. 


3,680 


New York 


14,631 


New Jersev 


4,298 


PtTinnylVflAlia r ., r x - ,.. r ,.,... . 


14,072 
9,633 


North Central Division: 

Ohio 


Indianat.... r . . . , 


5,817 


Illinois 


19,122 


Michigan 


7,052 


Wisconsin ^ ^ . r . r t - . r 


3,872 


Minnesota 


6,839 


Iowa 


6.034 


Missouri 


6,983 


North Dakota 


1,530 


South Dakota 


530 


Nebraska 


2,154 


Kansas ,.„,-, , . 


4,002 
1,370 


Soath AtlanUo Division: 

Delaware 


Maryland 


1,901 


District of Columbia. 


1,723 


Virrinia 


2,159 


West Virginia 


1,070 


North Carolfaia 


978 


South Carolina 


47S 


Oeorgia 


1,193 


Florida 


1,048 


South Central Division: 

Kentucky 


1,404 


Tennewee ...^.T..rrr 


2,854 


Alabama 


881 


Mississippi 


114 


Tx)uisiana 


2,386 


Texas ..rtTT rr-r.r 


5,276 


Arkansas - r.. 


957 


Oklahoma 


1,242 


Western Division: 
Montana^ X 


1,920 


Wyoming 


70 


CoIoradoT 


3,109 


New Mexico 


308 


Arizona 


303 


Utah 


779 


Nevada 


111 


Idaho 


443 


Washington 


3,008 


Oregon 


1,705 


California 


6,055 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



572 EDUCATION BEPOBT^ 1«13, 

Table 3. — StudenU in day and night courses in the commercial and btmness «d^2i 

reporting for 191i-lS, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. B73 

Table 4. — Students and graduates in commercial courses in business schools^ 1912-lS, 





Students. 


Qraduates. 


states. 


Schools 
reporting. 


Male. 


Female. 

• 


Total. 


Schools 
reporting. 


Male. 


Female. 


TotaL 


United States 


488 


35,512 


14,131 


49,643 


381 


8,915 


4,725 


13,640 




North Atlantic Dhrlslon 

North Central Divifirion 

South Atlantic Divlaion 

Soath Central Division 

Western T>ivi/iion 


143 
212 
33 
42 
58 


8,995 
16,861 
2,365 
8,751 
3,540 


4,108 
6,710 
743 
1,144 
2,426 


13,103 
22,571 
3,108 
4 806 
5,966 


121 
160 
25 
33 
42 


2,437 
3,268 
539 
1,422 
1,249 


1.388 

1,921 

173 

434 

809 


3,825 
6,189 
712 
1,856 
2,058 




North Atlantic Division: 
Kftine 


6 
3 

3 
17 

3 
12 
30 
13 
47 

33 
17 
44 
23 
20 
17 
21 
10 
3 
4 
6 
14 

1 
4 
1 
8 
6 
3 
2 
5 
3 

6 
8 
3 
1 
3 
10 
5 
6 

4 

1 
8 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
8 
6 
23 


319 
111 
51 

1,100 
187 
570 

2,634 
956 

3,067 

1,790 

949 

4,549 

2,212 

949 

1,896 

1,912 

330 

207 

201 

813 

1,053 

29 
431 

17 
602 
234 
302 
126 
456 
168 

229 
299 
282 
49 
580 
1,755 
212 
345 

224 

8 

457 

6 

65 

187 

27 

213 

457 

167 

1,734 


114 

54 

6 

392 

141 

450 

1,173 

440 

1,338 

932 

409 

1,395 

673 

405 

527 

534 

167 

16 

19 

337 

296 

8 
165 
9 
90 
56 
92 
20 
191 
112 

227 
96 
74 
10 

143 

249 
78 

267 

210 

6 

334 



12 

93 

28 

174 

274 

66 

1,229 


433 

165 

57 

1,492 

328 

1,020 

8,807 

1,396 

4,406 

2,722 

1,358 

5,944 

2,885 

1,354 

2,423 

2 446 

497 

223 

220 

1,150 

1,349 

37 
596 

26 
692 
290 
394 
146 
647 
280 

456 
395 
356 
59 
723 
2,004 
290 
612 

434 

9 

791 

6 

77 

280 

55 

387 

731 

233 

2,963 


5 

1 

2 

13 

2 

12 

33 

11 

42 

21 
11 
40 
18 
11 
12 
18 
9 
2 
2 
4 
12 


84 

8 

5 

856 

74 

175 

623 

289 

823 

431 
253 
661 
537 
835 
306 
316 
110 

37 
9 

64 
210 


65 

1 



136 

75 

193 

284 

212 

422 

274 
153 
208 
201 
695 

61 
164 

45 
5 
2 

24 

89 


149 


New Hampshire 


9 


Vermont. T 


5 


Haasdchusetts 


402 


Rhode Tfiland 


149 


C-onnectirutx .... 


368 


NewYork 


907 


New Jersey 


601 


Pennflvivanifi , 


1,246 
706 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 


Indiana . . . 


406 


Illinois 


869 


Michigan 


738 




1,030 
366 


MhiTi^iiinta. 


Iowa 


480 


Himouri. . . 


156 


North Dakota 


42 


South Dakota 


11 


Nebnwkft. . . 


88 


ITanniMi ... 


299 


South Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 




Maryland 


3 

1 
7 
6 
2 


96 

8 

126 

110 

51 


47 
4 
14 
40 
U 


142 


District of Columbia 

Virginia 


12 
140 


WestVirptaia 


150 


North Carolina 


62 


South Carolina 




Georda 


3 
3 

4 
6 
2 


46 
103 

106 
185 
41 


28 
29 

72 
62 
23 


74 


Florida 


132 


South Central Division: 

Kentucky 


177 


Tenne^sfte... . . . 


247 


AlabfiTTiA 


64 


Mi9sisRippi 




T^n^liniATiA 


2 

10 

4 
5 

2 

1 
5 


79 
780 
136 

96 

25 

3 

145 


17 
136 
61 
64 

12 

6 

109 


96 


Texas 


915 


Arkansas 


197 


Oklahoma 


160 


Western Division: 

Montana 


87 


Wyoming 


9 


Colorado 


254 


New Mexico 






1 
2 

1 
2 
4 
3 
21 


1 
98 

5 

32 

85 

24 

831 


1 
37 
5 
23 
81 
11 
524 


2 


Utah .^ 

Nevada 


135 
10 


Idaho 


55 


Washington 


166 


Oregon 


35 


Calilomia 


1,365 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



574 EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1»13. 

Tadle 5. — Students and gradxmUs in amanuennt courses in business sthools, 1912-lS. 



SteUi. 



Students. 



Oradoates. 



Schools 
'reporting, 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Schools 



reporting.^ 



I Male. 



Female. 



Total 



United States 

North Atlantic Divfalon. 
North Central Division. . 
South AUantio Division. 
South Central Division.. 
Western Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine , 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

Indiana... 

nifaiois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Ktvnyui 

Booth Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

Distrk;t of Columbia . . 

Virghiia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florfla 

South Central Divbion: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

l/ouisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 

Oregon 

Caluomia 



47» 



18,534 



37,115 



65,649 



364 I 4,g0O 



147 
200 
33 
41 

58 



6,376 
7,374 
1,636 
2,128 
2,020 



8 


130 


3 


60 


3 


21 


17 


331 


4 


97 


12 


385 


41 


1,795 


12 


574 


47 


1,993 


31 


1,177 


14 


469 


39 


2,302 


21 


697 


20 


335 


16 


791 


21 


409 


11 


602 


3 


29 


5 


97 


6 


231 


13 


435 


5 


474 


1 


109 


7 


306 


6 


122 


4 


139 


2 


56 


5 


295 


3 


135 


5 


254 


8 


363 


3 


108 


1 


40 


4 


357 


10 


714 


6 


151 


6 


141 


4 


161 


1 


11 


10 


444 


i 


15 


2 


127 


1 


17 


3 


200 


9 


304 


6 


90 


21 


651 



11,609 
15,778 
2,283 
3,411 
4,034 



16.985 
23,152 
3,919 
6,539 
6,054 



120 
153 
23 
27 
41 



167 
61 

980 

306 
1,085 
4,724 

998 
2,922 



438 
68 
463 
356 
265 
68 
247 
378 

254 

729 
281 
45 
858 
763 
262 
219 

333 

25 

604 

71 

235 

18 

191 

556 

106 

1,805 



496 

217 

82 

1,311 

403 

1,470 

6,519 

1,572 

4,915 



2,606 


3,783 


837 


1,306 


6,213 


7,515 


1,402 


1,999 


605 


1,030 


1,609 


2,400 


1,210 


1,619 


680 


1,182 


139 


168 


135 


232 


433 


664 


819 


1,254 



912 
177 
769 
478 
404 
124 
642 
613 

608 
1,092 



1,215 

1,477 

413 



494 

36 

1,138 

86 

362 

35 

391 

860 

196 

2,456 



1.622 

1,533 

269 

955 

590 



29 

41 

6 

75 

17 

122 

645 

181 

607 



152 
327 
168 
79 
86 
100 
94 
13 
14 
49 
162 

127 
22 
42 
33 
3 



9 
64 

68 
206 
37 



494 
39 
69 

17 
4 

111 

1 

68 

6 

31 

36 

10 

316 



11,872 



3,656 
4.864 
571 
1,191 
1,690 



131 
16 
10 

335 
76 

224 
1,629 

403 

932 

705 
284 
1,851 
728 
182 
294 
316 
SS 
50 
38 
47 
281 

134 
15 
62 

132 

18 



11 
199 

98 

396- 
119 



105 

300 

80 

84 

72 

17 

197 

2 

125 

6 

24 

115 

18 

1,014 



16,841 



5,278 
6,397 
840 
2,146 
2, 1st) 



160 
57 
15 
410 
93 
316 
2,074 
584 
1,539 

994 
436 
2,178 
896 
261 
380 
416 
183 
63 
52 
96 
443 

240 
37 
104 
165 
21 



20 
253 

156 
602 
156 



167 
794 
128 
143 



21 

308 

3 

183 

12 

55 

151 

28 

1,330 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OOMMEBOUL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 575 

Table 6. — Students and graduates in combined courses in business schoolSj 191t-lS. 



States. 



Studentfl. 



Graduates. 



Schools 
reporting 



Male. 



Female. 



Total. 



Schools 
reporting. 



Female. 



TotaL 



United States 

North Atlantic Division. 
North Central Division., 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division.. 
W estem Division 

North Atlantic Division: 

Maine. 

New Hampshire 

' Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYork 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania , 

North Central Division: 

Ohio 

TnrHftnfr 

Qlinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin. 

Minnesota. 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

KftTHtfyi^ 

South Atlantic Division: 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina. 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Ftorida , 

South Central Division: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama. 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma..... 

Western Division: 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington. 

Oregon 

Caluomia 



378 



13,034 



14,017 



27,081 



3,903 



101 
172 
26 
38 
41 



2,358 
6,604 
1,176 
1,439 
1,457 



161 
7 

27 

290 

7 

72 

959 

97 

738 

1,263 

1,028 

1,095 

440 

436 

633 

642 

341 

41 

23 

154 

506 

149 
5 

92 
178 
223 

49 
306 
174 

326 
249 
114 
27 
106 
242 
103 
272 

274 

2 

404 

11 

25 
7 

55 
106 

42 
531 



4,026 

6,918 

535 

806 

1,642 



6,384 
13,522 
1,711 
2,335 
3,099 



79 
120 
15 
25 
24 



922 

1,729 

275 

618 



146 

13 

116 

906 

38 

194 

1,675 

119 

819 

1,341 
971 
743 

1,248 
390 
477 
726 
227 
29 
46 
190 
530 

113 

4 

45 

122 
96 
17 
36 

102 

286 

138 
59 
17 
52 

162 
57 

125 

270 
8 
439 
9 
35 
8 
33 
135 
23 



307 

20 

143 

1,196 

45 

266 

2,634 

216 

1,557 

2,604 
1,999 
1,838 
1,688 

826 
1,110 
1,368 

568 
70 
69 

344 
1,038 

262 
9 
187 
800 
319 
66 
342 
276 

612 
387 
173 
44 
158 
404 
160 
397 

544 

5 

843 

20 

60 

15 

88 

241 

65 

1/218 



13 




127 
4 
18 
427 
35 
298 

279 

490 

214 

119 

70 

40 

280 

94 

24 

2 

54 



7 
108 

199 
166 
61 



4,539 



1,610 

1,790 

158 

417 

564 



28 



27 
355 

28 

36 
763 

48 
325 

340 

449 

220 

133 

97 

93 

295 

60 

7 

8 

54 

39 

32 
1 
6 

72 
2 



1 
44 

186 
97 
26 



10 
34 
39 
25 

21 

3 

100 



2 
308 



6 
404 



8,532 



2,532 
3,519 
433 
1,035 
1,013 



41 



27 
482 

32 

54 
1,190 

83 
623 

619 
939 
434 
252 
167 
133 
575 
154 
31 
5 
106 
102 

74 
3 
22 
171 
3 



152 



263 

77 



40 
76 
101 
93 

45 
4 

170 



18 
5 
51 



8 
712 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



576 EDUCATION EBPOBT, 1913. 

Table 7. — Students and graduates in English courses in business schools, 191t-lS. 





Students. 


Graduates. 


States. 


Schools 
reporting. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Schools 
rq>orting. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


United States 


196 


6,390 


3,403 


9,793 


37 


537 


363 


900 


North Atlantic Division. 

North Central Division 

South Atlantic Division 


66 
71 
16 
20 
22 


1,332 
2,111 

W3 
1,410 

504 


1,053 

1,007 

611 

466 

266 


2,385 
3,118 
1,554 
1,876 
860 


17 
15 


122 
336 


55 
260 


177 
506 


South Central Division 

Western Division 


8 
2 


51 
28 


44 

4 


95 
32 






North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


1 
1 
3 
8 
1 
4 

12 
9 

27 

10 
5 
15 
13 
5 
4 
8 
3 
2 
1 
2 
3 

2 

1 
5 
1 
2 
3 
2 

2 
3 
3 
5 

4 
3 

4 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

\ 

4 


1 

80 
76 
219 
27 
20 
166 
219 
674 

295 

125 

776 

445 

34 

142 

223 

23 

13 

D 

8 

18 

102 
83 

388 
20 
12 

136 

252 

236 
57 

345 

637 
33 

102 

294 
90 
40 
8 
61 
8 
8 
19 
57 
14 




25 

81 

208 

14 

23 

259 

142 

351 

219 

64 

197 

136 

12 

5 

829 

8 

3 



2 

32 

22 

4 
305 
9 
11 
68 
102 

212 
25 
24 

120 
9 
76 

154 
45 


16 
16 
8 
4 
8 
2 
13 


1 

55 
107 
427 
41 
43 
425 
361 
925 

514 

189 

973 

581 

46 

147 

652 

31 

16 

9 

10 

50 

124 
37 

783 
29 
23 

204 

354 

448 
82 

369 

757 
42 

178 

448 
135 
40 
19 
77 
16 
12 
27 
50 
27 


1 








1 


J4ew Hampshire 














M assachumtts. 


1 

1 
1 
2 
3 
8 

4 


2 

I 

22 
52 
43 

195 


6 
4 
2 
6 
20 
8 

158 


3 


Rhode Island 


^ 


CdynnpcX\e\iX, , 


2 


New York 


28 


New Jersey 


81 


Pennsylvania ............ 


51 


North Central Division: 
OhJo 


353 


Tnrllftnft 




Illinois 


5 
3 


101 
27 


28 
30 


129 


Mi'4»ieft»i 


57 


Wisconsin. 




Minnesota . . . , 










Iowa. ; 


2 


11 


36 


47 


Miwourl 




North Dakota. 










South Dakota. 










Nebraska 










Kansas. 


1 


2 


8 


10 


South Atlantic Division: 
Maryland 




Disfi-ict of Columbia 










VirHnfft 










West Virginia 










North Carolina. 










South Carolina 










Georgia 










South Central Division: 

Kentucky 










Tennessee 










T^uhfiafiii... ., , , . . 


1 


11 


2 


13 


Texas .................... 




Arkanffas. 


1 
1 

1 


3 
37 

1 


1 
41 

4 


4 


Oklahoma 


78 


Western Division: 

MnntAna 


5 


Colorado 




New Mexico 










Aritona 










Utah .^.. 










Nevada !^.. 










Idaho 










Wash ington 












1 


27 





27 


Calfiornia 















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 577 

Table 8. — Students and graduates in telegraphy in business schools^ 1912-lS. 



17727°— ED 1913— VOL 2 37 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



578 



EDUCATION BBPORT, 1913. 







2 

CO 



•oi«raaji g 



•oicH 



HI 

si 



Sis 






'oiexnaj 



•oiBK 



-oivmaj 



•eiBH 



*9Sjnoa joj 



•q^nora Jaj 



-"8 



S ® w 



-^8 ^ 



S 2c 



S S5St 



^S3 S 



S 2S 



I 2S §" 



^ 






S ss S 



SS S £2^ S S^^ 



82 : 



5a k • 



•looqas %^S]s. 



a^ 



'looqas Xbci 



3 



j! "A 



ol^ 



j ^^ 



•looqos ^q3!K 



• « W MM M 



'looqas XBd 



•Oio 



CVMC9 



I 

s 
1 



1 



I 









looqos m3i^ 



2^ 



'{ooqos Xb(i 






"5" 



$S S S8 



2Sg 



"Si 



•0ITJU13J 



•9ltJH 



U) .QO 



eo ■^•2 ■* 



2gSS 



2 S *a 3 S528 



"S 8|""S"S|~§ Sis" 



m 



'&\vm9j[ 



S ^QO 



•9IBH 



S ss 



Tsg r 






W r-t-* 



'aiBuioj 



•OlBJf 



S 8? 



;;s 



g Sg So 



sg| 



8 tt 
H 



•OIBUIOJ 



3-H M O^ O 



•oi«W 



•^ «■* c« 



o 

I 



8 II 



p4 



II 



1 






I 



5 ? 



II I il 

II i %h% 

go- 8,5 l^al 

|ISi.2lSl 
||55a5|l£ 

oa u, e^a M 





a II 



.9 



<;f«i 



.S3 



5| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



9S 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



579 



-*• :8: 



c -r, ei 



S^S 



S«2 « 



I O •»1* CM M rt 



wc 



^ ^ggj®'*"'® 



s § 



8 



l:;S*^ I ^8 SgaS 



Q »H ^ 



*2^ S SS -"S^S 



^:s s 



CS OOQOWCO'^ 



Rsssa-^ 



8 ^ : 2S 



S^^ 8 2 • c<« 



S5 



^ 8 ^;^ ^ ^ss 



^^ 



^^ : :J5 S5 



8 :^ 



8 



too CI OM C4>0>0OMOO C4 C4 U3 O C4 lO U3 C4 U3 C4 »0 



OOO M C40 C4000 



;5c5 : 






'OO 


• C4 


-oT 


i 


2S 




:« : 


-r 


2" 


:22^ 


oo*j- t-- 


<oqo 


^ 22 -^^ 


" 


r- 00 


<o 


00 








<o 


r 


wt-oo 



• M C4 C« C« M M M CO M C« C« C« d C4 M €>< 



e><c«es c« e><c« mcimm 






9 3* 



to «0 lO tb »0 to <0 «o lo «o <o «o u3«o u) <OtO«0 



OiOiO *o tOtO <OiO<0>0 



9 -.00 oo-2««o2o g g g -J g 



<b .>o 



s? g2 ^sas 



58 ^S'-S 



|^2^5g^llSS3§8^§ 



ss 



00 ■^•00«00eo« 

r*0 r-l iH 



S5 8 g« - 



S g S S 8 5« * 



c52;:l 8 
:282 I 



82 

88 



00«OO00;^;a "* 



28 



8?8 ^822 



2 ^ 



SggSJSSiS 8 2 S § 8 2^ ^ ^«§ 



«S SSJ^S 



S £S 8||22itS 8 § 8 



"TI 



g5 ?r^*s 

58 S^c52 



K5 

OOO 



S 8^ CO 



§ .-ilo cocl^S8t^od 8 3 



ssss 






O CO o 

^ ^ § 



sS ^ ^5 c58c58 ^ 



iHcT- 


■* 


0-. 


*-i U) CO C4 CS M ^ 


"' 


■ eo 


h-"- 


O 


-cT 


'TM 


® 


-.WO 




"oe" 


«« 


Mcooeo 


^Ter- 


_„.. 


-•w 


^«>«i-.^eoN 


CO 


w 


r^ 


*=* 


CO 




N 






■ r^ 


0-. 


rH^eo^ 






i 



I 

QQ 



O M 



H 



« Iff 






'I 



i 



^g 



lid, aig 



•85 



^1 5 5 



; c © c c '^ a •* 



§ s I 






2J: 



I ill i 5§? 

OQ OQ Oi OQCQ CO OOwOQ 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



580 



sdccahok kepoit, vox 



\m 



St 



-TW S I 



HI 



■ar«o»i ; 



S I 






JC99 e« *« 



'- I 



"a|«K 






ill 

» r ^ 



-afTOia^ . 5 



Sr^'-S : g 8= 5; 



S 52 $ 



SSg 



S2S 



III 



*^nB«j^j ! s 



De^-cc »• «3 OOC*C« — 



2S SS 



"F 



I 

i 



s 

£ 

I 

s 

t 



g 






03 



55 ^.. 
ll-ll 



1«>^»l'«*!X S 



:!^ & 



I io«xpii«a j 2 I 



C O K«XOO 






I 1<»^* t«P!X 2 



*e«e«flBe«e« e« e«e« c«e«c«e«c« 



i«a I 2 I 



7« 






I jooqpa li0:x 2 



s jssss s ss ;s2ss§ 



foo<p8i«<i I • 






ss 



522SSS8 ft 82 S'-SSS §g" 



5S? 



'arnzBj ■ — 



2 I 



"l5SsW2""S"S2"s^^aIS sf" 



''I 






Se; 



il 






§§ 



'sISS5F^~sS~|3fsl f 



I 

1^ 



a!jg_;SSa ^ 



t 1=1 



p;,.4b40&2*4 






!i 



i 

55 



i :• :| :^ : 

•-■3 © o£ — * • 



•1 
t 

9 * Q 

22-3 



i iiiiii i ij ii« 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMBBCIAL AKD BT7SINESS SCHOOLS. 



581 



"55" 



2 S"8 : : S 



S' 



's 3 a-»s 



o o » 



^2 



1"^ ss ® §ss 



lis ^S i^ S3SS 






S8 82 »S 2 gi$^SS : ?5 



S9 



"?~S" 



"5^ 



§« « §o«j-g g 



T~^"§" 



■^-51" 



X^^ — sirrrs^s^-XT 



"S""g s?^ 



-w^ 



9S S8 8 :S 



S S S 












» :S 



1 i 



y-lT 



2 '^ '^J J * 



M® t^ 
I 



C« 04 c« 



nn M c«C4C9Ct 



a^" «• 



"8^ 



"a— T^ 



^s 



s ^ s 



25 a raa^ 



S S S gS 9 Sg ^ S"^ ISS R 8^5S 



^s 



i § 



^ 



®5 ® sa-'s 



?as 



ec«03 



3 3 a 



2S s sass; : § 
"fs- 



S S 2 



fT 



fir 



susss 



Tr"f~Sf~| s~^ 5W~s~p31f5~f-f~ 2 



sss 



s s i 

rl »-4 « 



^ 



TS" 



^g 9 §^3S$ g 



s§§ 



8 







uu u u 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



682 



BDUCATIOIf BBPOBT, 1913. 



I 



Ok 



1 



t5 



H 

n 

-J 
H 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMEBOIAL AKD BXrSIinBSS SCHOOLS. 



58a 



{: 


S-' 


•OOk 


^^ 


•^ 


gr^^r. ; 


.o» 


RS'' 


^ 




^ 


JS 


lO 


28 :S12 


'i 


5 


§ 




S3 


o« 


•-« :Sc5-S8'-S : 


:2 


iS2 


g 


<=$? 


s 


§58 '21^ 


£-i 


C5 


i 




ns 


8S 


22gg§^J.:SsS8^ 


SS 


S' 


i^ 


^^ 


« 


82§ga 


iSS 


Cs 


8 




25 


S3«= 


a^SS^S'^SI^^FS'^ 


»MO 


'sS 


« 


S5" 


~N" 


i^2?583 


92 


e^ 


.^ 




00 


82 




• *'' 


5532 


-J^O^^ 


^„ 


2-S8& 


ss 


c^ 


g 




s 


ss 


sS^SfeS*^^^?^ 




i?B^ 




^^ 


S-^ssSg 


|S 


■^ 


fi 




§ 


§ 


iS 


§ 




SS :§3 




8S 


§ 


§^ 


i-< -^>-^ CO 


sa 


s 


o 




o«o j 


CIOO 


CJ 




o 


o :i? 


«cr 


lOOC 


OOCIO 


S 


esi,.HOoo 


22 


o 


M 




c5 


?5 


00 . 


.C^>OC4 


»ow . 


.w 






06 




^5^ ii 


ss 




O 




^ 


o 


M0»O»H<b«Kl-06UO 










r 


"i-S 


«,« 




«W 


N« 


M 


M '.C4MC>4NC4 l^C^ | 


• w« 


'm« 


ctc«c«c« 


« 


?rcs«c«c«< 


MC« 


eT WW 



00 '^ tS^OO 3'«0 O mToO tOOOCOQOO «OtOt«> iS*?o o to «o 00 r« t» 



3 : :SS :2S :2 



»8 :^:3 g 






^s 



Sm SS 39 •'H ••-tOk.coSS 



895t^Sc»5 iS 



$SS SS s 



S :g'- s§S: 



a^sss as 



^H^ ^ 



1~T31S^1~TI^ 



•*S :g3 



I'W 



S|^8 a* 



s ss 



sa 3ft*$s2s8jss» sisa^^s 



8«SSo c^S ^ «5^ 



S2S 


82 


5j55ggg^g$*«fe 


SSg^gS 


aa<*s 


8:2 


Sg:?gS 


gg 


:s 


§^ 


§S 


^$ 


asssssssss- 


sia§2g^ 


sSgsS 


S"* 


ssssg 


^1 


S 


gs 


S^ 


S2 


gc^^gS^SSSSS; 


ssiggs 


i*^is 


ss 


i25g?g 


u 


S 


§S 


6»« 




dWOdW^W^WMM 


r^C4<«^<<irH 


co<<<weo 


^o 




eo-i 


■^ 


a»w 


eT5 


»^eo 


cs^eneoco^coetcip^c* 


« ^ eo CO >* 1-I 


rnW*^ 


r-!-H 




cow 


^ 


00-.. 



1^ 



di 



fe : 2 c 
d;z;dpJ<iH^ 



Id 



•3 
►.5 £3 



IS 






^ j^ r.i ^ •"• m 









QQ 















?l 



J2 5 

^»i II 



^.9^5 fits i^S-G 






(*< n »^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



684 



5z 



i§ 



III 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

3 S9SS sa 



*0{Bai9J 



•»l«H 



'opnnoj 



•9l«R 



'9[B1U9J 



•»l«R 



I^WTTW 



"s sss ss 



^^ -'S 



"5 — «3^gS '-gS 



S28 82K8 8S !? S 



:*S 



:8S^ 



s?ss * 



SS8 



S8S S 



3^M C9 



1^. 
11^ 



*osjno3 joj 



•q^oom 19 J 



C4MO CC>400 



a 2 a 



S^ 8 



OOMtO O 



1 

I 

! 



5S 

1 




•|ooqoe ^qSiM 



'looqas i«a 



"158" 






S ^ 



-WT^ — S — JT" 






J ^^ 



lOOIlM »ii3iM 



MC«C4 c«e><esc« C4C4 



'{ooqas £9(1 



00 i?kS*? «0 0(0« 00 cc 



fell 



looqos ^q3iM 



as 



"3r^~ 



'[ooqos i£«a 



• lO •«• M9>0«( 






-gJooSg- 



t^S 



^S§ ^ 



15 S^ 



5SJ 



*9i«m9j 



•9i«H 



^2^ 



S 3^^ 



Sir 



S8S 



89a§ g? 3 9 



5|| 



•9I«ai9^ 



•ai«H 



"8 3S^ a&^ p 



«2§ « 



^5829 38 g § Sfl" 



ll 

QQ 8 



*9|tnXI9^ 



•9t«H 



-?5- 



«oo eo« S ^~ 



^S8 ^ 



?^2~fg^f"TS~|""S S«gg SS 



'9i«m9j 



•9rBH 






f-^Mcooo eoci S PT" 



^c«t« c« 



e«t*t* o^ 



c 
I. 






-< 
l:^' 






^ i-idW e"*^"f«i*c dS d ^ 






i 

5z 



8-0 

tat 






8? 






22-^ 



1 






H S3 

^ a 

I I 

j?>tf i'w >,g 

'illtti 



il 



S5 



I 



•2 • 

il« So 
11* elgf i« 

o o ® 8^ S'5 8 



fidi^ ft 



i^^ 



lis I 
IS? 

g O a sS>^ So 



i 



s 



pi 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMEBCIAL AND BUSIITESS SCHOOLS. 



585 



82'« 


S 


s 


S-'S 


S3 




5 


CO 


S 


p. 


!^ 




-s 


**P3 




l«Deo>H 






§ 




s-^ 


»ftO« 


^ 


!S 


a"S 


a 




1^ 


0& 


gS 


83 




::g 


•-S 




•OO'^-M 




§ 


8j- 


S5" 


S 


Si 


5£;S 






S 


?! 


2 


SSS 




f:g 


«5! 




gss- 








?:i5 


82-= 


^ 


s 


!S«S 






m 


t^ 


00 


eoj^ 




0<D 


o» 




«a«« 








S8 


kgtOI'- 


» 


s 


=°§ 






•K 


9 


R 


-s 




ss 


^•o 




8a«» 


S 








^« 


gas 


o 


s 


$2!8 






9. 


S 


s 


sa 




H» 


2R 




S2|2 


!^ 








s« 


§s 


8 


c 


i3SS 


s 




s 


S 


§ 


S| 


gJ5^ 


« i 




sss ; 


S 


" SSS88 


eq 


OC 

4 


« 




552S 


*t. 


•-2 


s 


^ 




2 


s i:3 


»oe 


2 




c 


jgigocjo 


s 






S :» 






\i 


: ^' i : : 










:- 


2 




3 


i^o« 




00 






64 • 


(0 9C4 








a 


<OC«CIC«<D 


** ! 


C9 


w '« 


e^ 


«« 




M 


« : 


e^cToi 




cs 


wo* • 




jc«*c«c<« 


00<O« 


(O 




SIS-u, 


t- 


•2 


' S" 


r* 


r-«o 


S-udS? 


^^ 


« 


»««« 


r>i 


QO«<OOC7 


£> 


i ^ 


: :2 


S 


5 


: ^ 


\ 


s;s 




«< 


a- : : 




: :-2a 


§ 


J5: 


i 


1 


:5| 


CI 


B 


^ 


§ 




55 


sg 


Ǥ 


s 


R%S§ 


s 


3S^£S 


R 




« 


Ki.J3 


ff 


as 


• 


o 


»-• • 


SSS 




s 


a" : : 










^r« 


S 




s 


S :S 


o 


as 


: 


CO 


eo • 


1535 




"<? 


Ot- ; ; 










*S3 



jgg g § 5SR 2 8s""§~8""ss~"sgf"^g § sssa""8~a|2sl^ 






2gg S 3 "* 









icicr« (O o covHd M i-ieq c« m c«»h ctct^ 



OMi-iM N ,-i^,HeOi-^ 



CHC9C0 t- to ^iHW J 



^M ^co^ 04 e« 



^5 MfHeciO « eo>o»HeCf-i 



s 



5d^ « 



ii i 

|w I 



rJ 

il n 

•2 3 . 



Ii Iti r 



pq 

6 












Pop- 

111 I; 




CW •! 






[I 



il 

'8 






PQ 







3 2<a 



S3C O 33 >^ 



S=5.2-^ 



I lilt Ilia 



ii 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



686 



EDUCATION BEPOET, 1913. 






g 






8 



O 09 

I 



O.S! 



<9\ 



ill 









'olBmaj 



jejtJW 



•oivuiaj 



•dlBH 



•oi«raaj 



•eitJK 



'osmoa JO J 



'looom Jaj 



looqos ?qaiK 



'looqds iCvQ 



>0«OC4 <o 



OtOtO oc 



C9^COtO t' 



^«2e5 13 



:8 R 



^S 



-8 S 



S| 



^S ^8 tS 



£S^ 



J^SS? s s 



:2 



O00»-i O O OOi-» 



•OCO ICM M oo 



t^ 



C* ' 


a 




:2 : 




• c* • 


CO« 


«6 


<o 


"1 


o 


•ooo 


s 






'lOoqDS ^qaihi 



'looq^s S^d 



t» •(«(« 00 ^o <o (0 o6 



:>3' t^^ 






looqDS ^q3iK 



: ^ 



'tooqas iBci 



S2S2 8 S 



8g 



§S3 






•a? 



'9ima9j 



f' O «>• J « 



•9i«H 



CO 13 



•^l 



CO 9 



r^octoci C9 



'oivmaj 



2C« C9 



§sg 



-a 



•oi«H 



•SS2 S « 



'S 5g g S2 



*oi«ai9j 



gsg fes as g ^Tg 



•oi«H 



ssss s 



§ iJJil ®S SS g 2§£ 



'oiBuiaj 



-IC400 CO o 



eiM C004 CO M'O 



•ot«H 



C«<-iC9« CO C4 



.2 



s 

a 



n 



I 







O or 

.S3 






&-9 

I -a 
to 3 

II 



i 



2*' a* a> 



i3 



J o 
5? 



CO « 2 

it «- 

■Ls If 

eg "S-a 



a ^^ 

o r fl 












as 



pfc 






?S 



5^5 
&> J: 

^ 36u 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



587 



9 






i 


S 3128 




; 




•^ 




8 




R 


§§ 


• eo 


§ 










S 


: : s *^S" : : 





22 




s 


u 


l2 


S 












s 


s 


1 


S? ^\2'<£ 


S 


^ 




^ 


=a 




2 


i 


52 


!S 






1- 




g 


s 


s 


^ -.-2g 





c« 




CO 


s* 




§ 


i 


?§g 


to 






CO 






f- 


§ 


S «S8 








9 


■;CM 


«c 


^ 


t: 


a« 


2 














1 


§ 


R ®8g 








^ 


ss 


« 


§ 


§ 


SS 


2 










R 




:g : : : 






• \^^ i i 








»C 


o 


•o 


o 




S22 





s 


000 


00 


g 


2 


22 


■N 


00 


S 12 


kO 


s 


' 




00 


c 


! : : : 















C4M00 • 




2 






G 


c^ 


J 


• 


«■ 


, 2:22 


t* 


r>. 


00 




CI 


2 


00®O ; 


! 








« 


c 


> w 


« 


^ 


1 e^M j 




• 


CI ; 




M 


CI 


n 


MC4C4M 


J 


N C< 







3Plo« 



IC i4»0(0« 



8 S & 



SaS S S 25! SS 



o»»o^ V 



•o to o 



S "^ 


§ : « 


:« : : 


: : : 


i^ 


•«• 


§ 


S^ : : 


; s 


: : 


S 2 


1 : S 


:g» iii 


S :S 


SIS 


■«• 


: 


§g :S 


§ s 


: - 


9 


5 S 3 


»S : I 


. e^ . 


j^ 


c« 




gas-' 


: » 


to . 


« • 


g 8 - 


^•0 ; 


: S : 


:a 


C4 


B 


2Se« 


: § 


to 



!SJ 2 



9 S 



8 


^ 


§ 


s 


?: 


*'sS 





W 


g^ 


2S 








§;?RS 


§ 


s 


-lo- 


i 


S 


2 


s 


i 


s 


^2§ 


S 


n 


gg 


;^3 





i 


1^8=^ 


» 


§ 


g 


r- 


S3 


S 


i 


§ 


s 


^IS 





C4 


g^ 


2S 


e« 


g 


|f2|53 


§ 


s 


-©- 


CO 


•^ 


*^ 






•^ 


eocoeo 


M 


W 


cow 


^0 


•^ 


•^ 


«CC«tOC4 


s 


"* 


M 


CO 


c« 





w 


« 


eo 


ow* 








to CI 


!-<« 





«o 


«^^^ 


to 


to 


ft 


" 



it 



2 > 



I 



I f 









i°llt 




















1 


a 


fu 


s 


H 


3 


b 


^ 


S 



§ 



■S "S 



J & I 

i jS « 



•3 
o 



I 



I- 



5 

1 l| 

CQ QQ Q 



§ f g 



1^^ 

Q upq 

pa's 73 



•Sag 






"s §» 



33 

art 









:« 



ii 



•SCO 
PQ 



I llii 

pq {2(eO| 
W oDHOpq 



J I 



li 

si 






P5 o a E 



*0 . 









& ^i 



Jz: jz; I 



^3 d 

or; d| 



Q P 



O e 
P3 



00** ^« 

o w K . 



00 



f o o 
g PQ pq 



Pi 






-11 lilt I tes^=' 



'aPp:5'3P5'S ! 
PQ PQ PQ(I 



8285 
pq PQ 



w^ CQ 

SifS d 
5S23 

8»8S 
PQ PQ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



588 



•a! 









EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



•91BK 



*0l«UI0j[ 



'9[9yi 



*a(tnii9j 



•»r«H 






^^ SoSSS «s 



S'5S2 ■*• 



!;: S8 









S $8 

3 '^'~' 









S5F" 



li^i 



'o&rooojoj 



r* "♦o «o i-ieo 



'innom J9«i 



I 

g 

2 



I 
I 






looqos^qaiK 



S 82 






2 :a 



I« 



'looqas A^a 



QO OO 

^5 3- 



OOM OOOQO S~ 



i^ 



TpoqD8»q3|K 



looqoe iC«a 



^M^d 



•W"* iOtO«? 



«IO»OIO «D<4 



98 R9S9 SS9$ ^ 






looqoe %^2[t^ 



s $s 



looqss l^a 



S9 J 



SS8 SSSSS ^SSSo 



4 



'onnnoj 



a^r 



8SS 



S !S@ SSSS ^SdS 9S8 



m 



*01VIIZ9J 



ss 



^ «^ c« 



•»i«w 



2 S^<S §S Sglo 



©2 $g 



28S5 "S 



ll 



*9[«UI9J 



•9l«H 



2 r:8 SS 1^2 83I5S SS;388 SS 



I 



Is 



*9I«m9j 



o coco 



•9i«K 



aoi>. c«c« c««-iMeo 






£ 

H 



•J ^« 









S. 



5 dpt «!-; po 



lis 



I 



"ll llli 

(H (OPS Seh 






g 



P s^ 



^3 



III 



Sill lb 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COHMBBCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



589 



fO« 


?S 


Jc 


r<- 




8S9 


1-^ 


«8 : : : :««g 


^ 


O 




:sa 




S 


§ 


2 


■ 8« :2 


;i 


'^ 




sag 


•^ 


«8 : : : :^^a 


22 




:23 : : 


C 


ij 


^ 


28S^ 


s 


s 


"Sg 


s 


•^jsisaasasa 


5* 


5 


9iS 


§■§ 


ss 


S 


5 


•^SfeS 




s;; 


g"*« 


9b 




o»<o 


5 


ss 


1^ 


^ 


^ 


** 


eo^r>.« 


~8 


c 


"38 


M 


"SSSS-S"'"* 


2S 


S 


$S 


SS 


c 


S3 


w ■ 


^^c,^ 


i^ 


«$g 


c^ 


9SaS22«S5 


s* 


s 


S5 


l§ 


;« 


§ 


^ 






s 


jd ; 




8S : : :SS8S 


8 


§3 


$ : 


: 3 




22 


oos 


a 


M 


sss 




OOOOtOOOkOOO 




asaaa 


« 

^ 


a 


2 


•^ 




•00 




:-- 


^ 


:** : : :SS;3S 




s 






: 3 


S" 


^ 






S 


woot- 
ob 


1H 


2 SS"I" 




a 


^■*s** 


! 


9 


c«c« 


^ 


J« 


CI 




•04 04 


<; 


je«c«c7c4cToiMC« 


e«eo 




• c« • 'm 


« 


« 


« 


STo 


«oe 


o»i< 




•4 


US 2*1? 


•a 


lO IdO io lO »C i^M) iO 


5^« 


a 


r-«oo3^ 


« 


<o 


V 


dS$ 






9 




2S§8 


c 




ds 




: j j : : 


^ 


$ 


s 


g^ 


S 


1 


Sffig 


S 


5?«2^^^^^® 


$g 




S :f:| : 


^ 


i 


6 


eo« 


iH 




C 




oo^g 


»>■ 


;e025««oeo^ 


^K 




:5 


i*^ 




§. 


Ok 


?:;« 


- 


i§ 


n 




'-SS 


S 


:«?5S-'«i:;'^8 


9X 




i» 


:S 


^ 


ff 


^ 






c>«eoe>9C40 coct o o *-4C4^ w-i 



H«OC<^^^0^ 



e«coc«to»o to ^ CO ^ 



r^ic CO t* ^c««o 



^^C«CO^fH^COC« "♦CO 






w ^ S J 






a(£?^u o-< o « Wi-;a o d All 






1 



^1 

I bed 



i Jill I I 



^ 5 55 



d H^pPpi4H^»-^ d P ^ 



II 






* 2 

5 1 



tf -J* 






ii 



illi 



iUlMli II 



^ OQ QQ 

e S e 

? IS « a 85 8* 8"° 8 
|li||3iip| 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



590 



EDUCATION BBPOET, 1913. 






I 



ill 



•91OTI9J ^ 



•ei«K 






6^2 



'dlVOlOjI 



•91«W 



•oiBuiaj 



•91BH 



:§? 



8 8 



SB » 



g 40 



^'^^ 



'-'SS 



553538 



S S 



8J2 



S^ 






9 



"¥ 

1 



II' I 



-asinoo joj 



00 ^ o 



•qinora j9j 



•o CIOOOC9 o CI o too 



a 

i 
'1 



^ 
•^ 



I 

8 
-6 



'X3 

I 



^ 9 *-^ a 



•looqoe ^q3jK 



'looqos i«a 



2 " 



•tooqos 110IK 



M« "O* C«* 



'lOoqDS Avd 



• io»o»i »o 



3^ 



3* 

-ST 






•lOoqoB %n2]s. 



-{ooqas AoQ 



3 ^ :$SS 



H^ 



8 ^ 8S 



•0|«ni9j 



•»I«W 



:8 






"T^ 



§ S g S 38 



sl 



*9ivin9j 



•oi«H 



8 S5 2 









si 






II 
11 



*9|Bnidd[ 



I I S 



*»l«H 



1" 



^^2glS5g 



"T^ 



^rr 



•aiBraa^i 



•»I«W 



^ OC<C««-liO CO 



I 



2 

O 

I 



W.53 2*3 






8 

1-4 









8 
I 

55O 



oortcoo 




t s 



o^ 



"S 5 i 



m S 00940002 CO cQ OQ 



52 



3 



U i I 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMBBCIA.L AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



591 



^ ao<D 



gS 



R S 



S^ ^t 



S S 



s s 



a :2 



^3 S$ 



1""^ 



2SS^ 



'S SI 



R 






S8SSSS 

r r 



^ 9 s 



s 



^S 9^ 



S88 S «S 



Si2 






2 8- 

3 



5 2 



c«oor*o»o 



C»l CI o 



:ot : 



3 



Sf* s 3 



i as 



"2 .— OCT 



^2-5 



CIMC9 'MCSI 



C4 C* C« C4 C« M 



MM MM 



OM) CO 00 id CO 



<o lo CO coco 




8 !5 S ffi" 



OW-WMPgQ 



22 g: 



53 J? S ?l *=' 



S5 *a 



'StS 



§^ ss^ 






«0 COt^ 



§3 ;2S 



s ??" 



s? 8?5 § a «a Si*^^^§ S ^ 2 ^ ^ ^ §1 S^ s« § sg g 



Sm "^SS 



sags 






SS I S SS3 g^SSSg g S 



g S 8 « §i 



el §R 



s s*- 



J 



!$ S3 



'^ 


MM 


M 


Fl 


rHM 


eo(Si0^eoM 


o 


"* 


"* 


M 


io 


^ 


eo«^ 


MM M^ 


CO 


M- ■ 


M 


f^M 


^ 


CO 


MM 


M«^Meo-r 


s 


■* 


<«• 


M 


'^ 


•^ 


Ok"* 


MM MM 


M 


COM 



B 



LP 






ti plW^ 1 1 1 1 M It 

^'^ ^*||^;sw I « « w w •< ^^• 



I 
If if 






^ i « I I it 

Li I hi I PI 

« « Q « 5 Oca 






5L 



g| 

'3 

in 



mo ti:M 









t^9 



P5 



i5z;^C; 



5:^:? 



III' 



g to 




^* 1 ? 2 I 



fl|o|£A ft 



OQ OD QQ 02 QQ OQQQ 



J s 

§1 If s 






P50 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



592 



I 



I 



•S2 

1 

OQ 



§1! 






Hi 



2«« 




J ^^ 



|ili 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1913. 

92 : :•" S 



*9|VI1X0J 



•9I«H 



*a[Viii9j 



•«n»H 



*opniioj 



•»r»H 



'ounoo JO J 



*iI)iioai joj 



looqjs ^q3|M 



-looqositia 



lOoqoB ?q2iM 



'looqas iBa 



lOOqM^qaiK 



'{ooqds X«a 



S2 



§S3 



8 



$« 8 



-ssf 



S« 8 



8SS 



we* 'Owao »g 



•<»-«o og 



OOOOO 






"22" 



MMm M« 



«t»t»iotet» 






asa^ 



9Ss 

OOOOC 



9 






If 



If 



?3S 

"88 



fll 



i 



'01VIIZ9J 



3*3 



.5t«a 



^1 



*0[VIII9J 



S?S*8$S ^ 



9^ 



;s»s 






•«nin 



8|^952 g 



ll 

OQ 3 



*af«ai9j 



SS|29SS g 



9 
"S" 



3SS 



S92SSS i2 



PSg S8 



89 

"as 



1 



I. 

H 
A 

e2 



-OfBinaj 



••l«H 



Mio^Moeo <D 






s 

H 









li 



i 



al 



I- 



4 
I" 



§1 



so 

If 



3 liiii^ , 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMBBCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



593 



1-1 1> 










a 


2 




sj: 


t* 








S2 


s 


"3 






s 


^ 


s 




§ 




^M3 




— 


- 


o 


S 1 


8« 


00 








S* 


a 


'8 






£5 


2 






28 


^7 


8^S 


s 


S : 


s$ 


04 


^ 






g^g 


s.t 






g 


S 


8 




So 


5S?§5 


3 


S ; 


S2 


««« 


3 






ggJOO 


»8 






s 


3 


o 




5 


^* 


s 






S3 


COO 


ss 


eo 


3 




c 


ss 


•* 


as 


5 




ts 




S 


a 


s 


^^ 


^ 






S 


So 


s^ 


^ 


§ 






•gs 


oo 


sa 


^ 




^ 


^ 




5 


2 


•S : 








s 








- 


:9 


§ 


S 


s 






s ji 




8 




§ 


s 


SI'S 


IS 


;;ss 


S32S 


s 


ooo 


s 


'T 


c 




roooo 


oej 




e 


2 


2 


<D 




OOCJM 


'•I 


00 O P« «o'c* cs 


ss 


C0C4 

"2 


I 


^ 


on 




•OOO'* 

r 5 


r 


Jt 


oc 


S3 


a 






;wj 


if 


00 


e> 


ej 


-1 


S 


*a 


ofi 


e 


525 


« 


o'o 


2 


3 


« 


2 


S 


c 

2 


22 



C4C9C40MC4C4C40C9 



C^N €4 M 



^^ 



MMC4M MCI 



C?" 



M M M 



<DU3lO^ (OiO to lO lO O to i(» t»»OtO>0 



S3;«s<=>gs;«S5g : 


$8 


^ 




S^ 


: 


i : is 


^53 


a 


T 


s 




i 


: 


sa [S 


S^SSj^gSgS ; 


^8 


<D 


§ 


9 


9 


• • :* 


RS 


S 


i 


§ 




i 


i 


gSiiS 


8t;s :gS^S?Ig 


88 


00 


s 


» 




SSS"S 


SS 


2 


eo 


s 


s 






as :S 


^L52 :g38£iRSS 


g^ 


a 


§ 


8 




SS"8 


83 


8 


§ 


§ 


00 






8S :- 


S;SSSgSSg55? 


«S 


»- 


J! 


8 


o 


gsss 


si 


S 


g 


§ 


2 


s 


o 


gsgso 


sssa^s^sss? 


^^ 


t^ 


% 


9 


§ 


„„Og 


25 c5 


'^ 


§ 


s 


w 


o 


2 


^»3S 


25SSg|S|tg2 


SS 


» 


S 


S 


o 


|S88 


28 


'•I 


§ 


1 


§ 


8 


o 


8'SS 


SJ?g«g|^g2S 


8^ 


8 


s 


g 


8 


ist-os 


F:S* 


s 


1 


a 


2 


® 


■* 


gSSS8 


c«c«c«e<t^eo^w-^c< 


w« 


•^ 


•o 


^ 


o 


« •*«« 


CMeo 


*^ 


a 


'* 


C4 


2 


o 


(OCO'4'Ct 


e4C4^^C4'*Mioeoco 


w^ 


C4 


2 


lO 


^ 


-3MO^ 


«co 


(N 


-« 


»o 


eo ■ 


o 


««« 


U3e««^- 




s 



OQ 



» 

A 
















III-: 11 II r: 1 



»^i^;iH; 1?^ 



H o P^ 



^ o'wdd 
1-3 s n cQiipQn 




il^ Jill 



»<Ph go 8S »<pq £ 8 ^^n g^Bi^ 9 
n n n n n n n n;^P4o 



17727'— KD 1813— VOL 2r 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



594 



EDUCATION' KBPOBT, 1913. 



3i 

I' 



-; = < 



all 



'oiemaj 



•9i«w 



*9IBm9J 



•91BH 



*oi«inaj 



•9l«H 



lo a» ^<• i(» u} «o M) to 



OOC«|iOOOO O Ok 



$ 



sass I"' c3 a 



g-^s- 



^-'JJSa^S S 8 :& S2 ^ 



» i § 



9 S S 



§ § i 



S 3 !3 



a a g 






'o&inoo JO J 



gs 



•qjuora i9d 



OCOMOOOO 



88 



MOO o 



O »0 CI 
v4 rH f^ 



r 



^3 



d 

o 

1 



I 






I 



< 




•[ooqos ^q^iK 



9 : :S 



'looqas iBQ 






2 9 



1 ^^ 



•I00XID8 %n2\tl 



«C? 



€4 M M M 



*looq98 iC«a 









•looqw !m2|K 



'looqos iod 



9c^^ :^S 



*enniiei[ 



a 



•oi«ji 



r: ass; § § § 

«o eo^* a M 8 



"^""^^S"5"X1~^ 



S 9 
» o 



5l 



•epsmaj 



S9g{3aSS g S83<=' I g g 



•9I«K 



^^lasa 



S a9S 8 g g 

~« (Ooo 5 3 o 



II 

00 3 



•eiBmej 



^9aS^S8 



9 S 



•oi«K 



9!S{3§8S 9 ^?:g 8 § S ^ 



MMocoMco © elrt"o ST 



'OIBUZOJ 



•9l«W 



C«e«iQC4iHiH lO MC^O 



« Ok 

^ oo 



I 



^1 



11 i 



J8 



l?« I ? 



I 



GO -«-> < 



o 

6 



I 



III 



Is 

II 



i! 1 i 



_^ o 



1^* 



^CQ 



>d'( 



1^1 

llll 

I I ? a 



•2-g 






H O 



I 



§ a 



11 



g I 



2 > 



ps W 13 



- - 82: 









^Im^^S 



z^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMEBCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



595 





s 


g 


tj 




00 


s 








S 


sa 


S 


n 


.loeo 


S 






:3 


r*oo 


^ t 




s 


r: 


s 




<N 


s 








s 


8^ 


3 


s 


:a* 


s 






:S 


wo 


S : 


§ 


2 


i 


s 


i 


s 


1 






s 


g; 


^3 


g 


g^sg^g 


^ 




o 


"S 


SS 


2 J 


o 


- « 


s 


3 


s 


2 


s 






■f6- 


3 


a* 


S 


cj»og«o> 


58 




« 


<=>s 


00 0^ 




CO 


s 


oo 


s 


S 


5 






o 




8:2 


s 


^-^82-^ 


SS 




^ 


:S 


«a 


" i 




«3 


s 


^ 


5 


9 


s 






■ 00 




?Ja 


i 


*^§«« 


S 




« 


:c3 


2S 


^ i 




§ i 




S 


S 






s 


§ 


^ : 




S 


:S : 


8|S 


^f 


8S^g| 


o 


2 


c« 


c 




S 


a 


s 


jc 


2 


S" 


2S 


>o 


2 


:2S 


222 


eoo 


CJCj 


- j 


o 


•O 


! 






N 


00 






U3 




SS 






23 : : 






;0 


=1 




« 


Ok 


% 




2 


r- 


« 


e 


S 


* 


^ 


r 


j5 


01000(0 • 


o 


(O<0 


.« 


tOOftWCJCJ 


« 


C9 


w 


c< 


« 


« 


M 




Cfl 


M 


: 


WW 


w 


CI jciww 


1 




C«C9 


www • • 


Ifl 


»o 


3- 


u: 


«0 


3? 


•o 


->* 


U3 


S" 


s? 


«3? 


s 


oS"*:?^ 


3" 


s** 


«N«0 


3?3'3'*3' 


^ 


•o 


A 






r^ 


s 






s 


: 


oo 


i 


: :s i i 


: 


: 


cjg 


00 00 






^ 


e 


2 


s 




s 


12 


s$ 


§ 


r§i! 


ss 


ss 


•i 


S8 






a 


R 


3 


s 


'^ 


S 


s 




S 


r- 




O.J3 


s 


o 


sas : 






oo 


««g 




o 


» 


§ 


s 


i 


§ 


s 




5 


00 




a>o 


•* 


•o 


gSS" ; 






»'* 


228 





I S I r2 g S S 9 SI 2 9 'S;9 I SSSS9S3 SSS2 ^| ^2^^8 . 



o- 


~2' 


T 


IT 


i 


g 


s 


u> 


1^ 


21 


n 


2* 


§ 


aȤsa 


S^SiS 


Ȥ 


^^^H 


g 


i 


s 


i 


2 


§ 


$ 


1 


S9 


^ 


$33 


§ 


SS3gS5 


SSS2 


-§ 


s$si|sg 


o 


tj 


s 


8 


§ 


§ 


i 


lo 


s 


?5 


n 


J3:3 


§ 


a»|sa 


S^SS 


.g 


SS|K| 


« 


CO- 


I- 


'^ 


00 


•o 




b« 


*H 


w 


CO 


eo^ 


t- 


e«rH«>-o 


weoow 


iH«0 


mci«c<» 


CO 


•-• 


w 


•H 


s 


CO 


U3 


^ 


CO 


fH 


w 


i-i^ 


i^ 


— o* — « 


.^weo^ 


oco 


rHeOt»e4C4 



\4 



^ 



a ^ I 

t ^ J 1 ? 

•i "? I I & 

rt o o w « 











^ W iIp^ CO ►4§W>'S 












^ &=■ « ^' H S ^ &■ &:' 



5§ 



^1 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



696 



EDUCATION BEPORT, 1913. 



V5 



ill 



is; 






•9i«raoj 



*»I«W 



*01WU9J 



•9I«R 



•aicraoj 



'9Vm 



S :S38 *« :J: S Jg 



^8 



§55 S 



S^ ^ 



SS 



8 



^ 2 



g 8 



^ 9 ^ 



^ :^§ S :io S S ^ S § f" 
3883 : zis 8 8^98 ^ 



p. 



*o&ino3 joj 



•q^nora J9 j 



OOOQOO 00OC4 C4 O 



oooooo 

•*pooo6 



2 :2 



73 

I 

d 

! 






S. 






1 

a 

•i 



<5 



A 

< 




•looqos !|q3iK 



! 



'tooqas X«a 



r^c«e40to 



0>C40 






•lOoqDS ^qSf M 



CiP«ciroM MC«eM c« CI 



a s 



'looqos iCBQ 



«OtOiO-<tiU3 tOtOtO 



U3 lO <0 



gOCjOOO 



"S~l" 



T 






lOoqos ^q8iK 



'lOoqos X«a 



S 5 



'dpraio^ 



§:2r2 ^ $ 



•®l«H 



SS^'^SS SSS S Jg 



5 2 



f: S 






3S8SS SSg 8 I * I g I 



•9|i 



■9pmi9j[ 



•oiSH 



s^:^^8 §:2£o^ ^ 



3 fe 



Iff 



S i ° S S 5 



ll 



'Oiomdj 



'91«W 



»8SS8 



S 2 § 






•oi«rao^ 



cooNiHeo »-«oo »o u5 o «^ 



•Ol«H 



<«COr-ii-4«0 COCti-i N CO »0 iO W^ 



g 

s 

H 






^i?li ell 1 1 1 «^ I I 

p4l^p^'H;l^ ^H^ pq p[; S pc; H u 



i 

S5 



^5 



6^5 



||8 



Sgigl ill J 5 I I 



I 



t 









111 



««6 t 



I j i III 

^ OQ q s A 



8 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



"-^s- 



Oboao r>> O 



ri >o i«i c '3 c^ 



COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



597 



ss 



='?5 :a 



^lO '•^ ■r 



2 StS gSS 



2® g :3 IS*- :282 8^ 8<= 



g J^-^^SS? :S":;2 Sg 



g«*«j2«S8* 



rjooo^^^oj:; :S 8 



zi 88 



8 



>S g«" 



-^a ss- 



a : S" 



::^~r"^ 



§s 



'B s" 



lOQ too 



$ $98 ;^8SSSS S8 23§§ 



^i^a 8 



•O OOO OOOOtOOO OOO OOOO •OtOOOOO 



ir 


. .c« 


t- J 1 


. opoo 


o>«c <o 


• X CI 


• «« 


JNMCS 


eo j?r 






CI ^ '£ V 



2" 



J> 7 



•ON 

r 



OOOO 



or^ >ooo o (N 



o c<o> OXCII^OO 

J ji - - p; 



too GOO 



t^ >0«0 t»<OcOiO 'lOtO 



:2^5S :g.^ 



MCS C«CIC4 '^M •?« 'M NW PIC»C«C«N 



•WW w 



&i00«00(0t00b* tOU3 



401^10 • 'O 'Q •« 



>0 0*00 

'C4cOO ^ 



8S^g :;5gggS Sg 






CI CI CO 

« «rco"~ 



"OOO OMC« 



OO 



^ s 



^ 






C4 ^'-lO 



5R 



O O 1^ O O CI '00 



^^JJc^S 8'^?SSn5»?3S?3i2 8^ SI§55S 



$S S8 



:2;: 8 



8?3 :°°2» g^a gSU;ggJ^='S8Sil 8g 8^S2S2 S^ 8^2 gg 



S §8 


2c;i?S2Si{o 


g-^ 


g2S2?;F:sg§3So 


il 


2t$$SS 


52S 


2J2g 


§a 


s 


S §12 


U^g5fi^*S 


gss 


ga^Jg^IS^^JcSS 


SI 


S^Jg8g2 


8^ 


84^8 


§8 


o 


o «o 


^OOCIOO- 


c*^-^ 


W O - CI o <i ^ -^ O M 


»-«r* 


OO^O^ 


^^ 


t-tCOrH 


OCI 


OQ 


CO CO^ 


.-• CI N ^ ^ ^ »-• 


co^co 


N^^OCOdOOCICO 


OO 


fHCO W*CO 


-<o 



i. 



i It "'t 






i III! alii ^ 



^11 liPilalil ^1 iiM 







^lliliim 



ill! 4i 
S I 




<6 oMS oS 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



598 



EDUCATIOIf REPORT, 1913. 



•3 

h 



all 



■<3g 



Hi 



*oi«uio^ S 



•ai«H 



'dpnndj 



'^vm 



'aimaaj 



•»r»H 



.^::s;'^ 



30iO<O<-l 



joe^cje 



*«S*:3 S :sga 



SS§^ 



n 



c5S5IISg8S 






8 S 2SSg5^a ~^«s 



s 



'^OOO'OCO 



S:?«2S 









-asinoo io j S 






'q^aocn ja j ;s 



lOiOiOCfM 



3" 



C9 to 

2 



oooooi^ ao^^^ 



13 

■§ 

a 
'^ 

a 
o 

5 



it 

s 

-6 



t5 

G 



a 

< 



lOoqDB^qSjK I S 



li 6= 



'{ooqas A^d i S 






S2?22S 



3 ^22 



2 



looqDs^qSiK I 2 



• e«c« • •€<« 



c«c«C4e«e«e« 



e«c«e«e<« 



lOoqDsXsa 3 



»00«OCOCO«0 >o (O 



*OiOiO>0«D«D 



Mi 

«: fis «;c 
>'a5 « 



lOoqas^qafK S 



:5 : : :3 



looqwiCBa S 



ssggsa 2^^s 



s s 



ssss^sr; s^s^s 



SSS^' 



^WW^ 



-9nrma^ ;: 






•9lB,l S 






'OfTOiaj 



•9l«H 



ll 
11 



'opmxaj 



•»l«Jl 



*9i«in9^ I 






8SSSSS ;5S8* 



■^ Oft QO r*. -If A 






S^SS9S 






"SsfssW^^gS 



aS^SSJ g S2 Rpf^25~s5SS 



"•■*0»-i^«0 « c* 



CtCieQ^MM (-lO^C* 



C«C«C«C«^«D 00 ^ 



noo^v-iM^ 



e>«c«e«^4 






.^1 



— OS 



Ji 



11 pi' 
li|i| 

_ _, 3 -« r^ 






.1? 



3 






« O Pk 



^1 
I 

gaJS 






IIP 



5oO 

zoo ;-<i-; di-;a6 



J2-2 



er> M 03 S a> O 



« Q 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMEBCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



599 



^^ s^ » 



o> 00 r- 



3 $ 



82 ss a 



as 



« sr: ss 8sa ° 



s s^ 



SS3 s^2 a:^ 



" sa 3:3 82-^ S J5 



'^12 8; 



g o6 



S§ 



^3^ 



R : iS3 38 8 :eS£5 : ^ S^S §5 82 : 8 5t 42 * 



^^^ 



is :g ^8 :S : :S3 12 



8^ S $ 8 



e 8 

e 8 a 8 



OkO 

2S~ 



ooo coo aoooor« 



Sa 82 8 



oo e^oc« je% 



c« c« »-• oo 



2S 2 



O iO^ 

3 



I ^1 



* o6 

S 3 



C4 oo CO 

3 " j» 



8" 



o c»« 



c<oo> -c^o 

"3ui 



o ooo 

3 



»o »-« o 

3 " " 



*oo 



WW «M MM .e»p« 



e»eo Me* e*«N co C4 C4 



C4 C9 C4 cs e^ 



(OO ^^ lOtOOiOtOO >0 iptO 0'« o>oo ^ 



O O K) 



30 8 






8 : :«2 



8^S» 8 88 



^ ^:^^ ^ 8 ^ 3 8 



-^ »o o 



« 8^^ 2 

■^ fio<o S~ 



»3 



: ^ 



8 R 



gas 



mcS 88 



S3 SS8 2gg :82 



TTT 



'^ 88 8?l e;S8 g 

2 88 52 8?8 ® 



S 9 



p: R g 
S~8~R~ 



S 2 5 3 5^2 



S8 ass 



3g285S^ 



58 SS ^J588SS ^ 9f2 



92 8^2 2 
PIS §§S ® 



8 ^ S I g S 8 



5?^ 
88 



SS 8S 523258-^ •:; S: 



S § 5 g S 



a; 2 



S3 8S 35g S38RS3 9 BS 


sa iss 1 


a 8 


261 

1,212 

671 


i i § 


$3 


c%n COM 1-IU5 ^MMMcto ^ ^>o 


oo owe* o 


M ^ 


^ -5 jg 


r- •<•• 00 


^<i 


tO'^ *eo MCO N^CSWdM •-• MCS 


COM •^.-1 ^ r- 


eo M 


** £0 M 


*^ M >0 


Meo 



!? 



N 11 ^1 i|WJJ 1 1^ a 1^ I 



•o^ S> pq»J d*- 

-<d << >-iQ Q^^fiww 















§ PQ ^ QQ 
^ hi QQ P^' 



il 



if 
a. % 

« w| 

d PmPm 



Sc 










Digitized by VjOOQIC 



600 



EDUCATION REPORT, 1913. 



8. 

■2? 



'Oivmaj; 



'9VBfi 



•aiwxwj 



•9l«H 



•ojwirej 



•9I«H 



5 S| 



e$ SS^ 



S eoS 



o a 



-8 c5^ :S!? 2 



^;'=» :$a ;5 



F2 ffS 



S :S*^5 



se 



a :? :^ 






2 S gS 

15- 






'o&inoo 10 J 



00 ti OD 49 t*" 



^£ 



•mnoin J9 J 



o oo e^too oooooo o c<i ^ ^^ 



T^ 



73 

o 

.2 

a 
o 



^ 

c 



a 



$ 

c 



•o 
1 



I 



6h 



5 3 A • 
i h. P fl 
it's?! 



looqos ^q3iN 



'looqos X«a 



d>MO 
""3 



2 2 3 



3 S >» 



•lOoqos ;q3i^ 



ci c«c<i C9CI1C1 « •e^oci C9 C4 C4 e<« e<« 



'lOOqos iC«a 



lOiO io«o>o >o>o 



»oic« 



Sa g c 



•lOoqos ?q8iM 



'fooqds ^e(j 



^3 



2 :g3aa r^ 3 8 s:5 



S : § 



^sts s ^ 8 :ss 



5fl 

C3 ^ 



•9[wnoj 



{;8 s*5! * 



200O 1-1 »o r* 



•oi«H 



S So e«ra8 



j«jf> 55 « c* <p 



2 ^28 






•oiwnaj 



5! §2 S«[: SS888 S a 2 SR 



•9l«H 



^^S~8^aSS 2 2 8 SS 



$:::SS8 So 8 S So^ 






•ai«ra9j 



S f2: 



•oi«H 



5 S| 858 a*§88 S3 S g S§ 



•91BIU9J 



C4 M'^ COM-^ e<(Oi^^'« C9 CO CO O^ 



•oi^H 



liF-lt>. rl 1^ i-i CO C9 i-i O C4 COCO 



I 



if hi ll|?s 






i II .111 ^a 

i^plliali 




g 



II lull 1 1 1 i 



u 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMEBCIAL AKD BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



601 









8S 


** 


a 


oa^ 




s; 


O 


00 




C4 


r.^ 


00 


s 


o» 


•^ 








r- 


« 


9 


nci 


"'s' 


00 


o 


•o 




W 


9 


82 

32 


s 


s 


2 :« 


33 


s 


o 


JS 


3 


5S*^ 


^ 


00 


i 




5 


S^S 


S^^ 


§ 


•Q 


s 


« 


^00 •< 


s 


2 


s 




- 


O'oo~" 


5S 




00 


g«c 


§5 


^ 




>o 


W9 


^M 


o 


CO 


p« 


r^«»-i 


gg 


o 




ss 


s 


^^ 


3 


^ 


*o 


^ 




»-l'^ 


ga 


s 


s 


ssa 








8S 


s 


|S 




8 




^ 


8 






1 


s 


^ 






<«i 


s 


IS2 


2 


MOaO 


o 


C4 


o 


s 


Ci 




o 


ocT 


o 


o 


o 




2 


s 


i 




o 






^ 


00 


Ci 






2 


• aOQc 






00 




S3 


r* 


2 


52 


«o 


«« 




CM 


CM 

2 


to 




^2 




© 
4. 




>o 


« 


c?- 


S 


w 


N 


« : 


sr 


« 


M 


ey 


w 


• cs 


JNCS 




: 


C4 


J 



ds* 



U oor^ 



iOiO(or« r« 



: S 



?^S S ;^ S8 R 



oo • 



8 : S <=» 



;» 8 ^ 



S^f'^ 8 



2^ 



?{2a 



^ 8 



S98 8 



^S ^ 



:$ tg 



^ ^ jH ^o 2«g6j g 



S^S 



as 


13 


r* .^ 


58 


§ 


5S;§ 


1 


^ 


n 


-s 


"f 


SS 


S-SI 


s 


352 


s§ 


•A 


§8 


as 


s 


5§8*^ 


8 


s 


S 


9 


i 


5!2 


§SiS 


§ 


feSSS 


2g 


8 


2 


ss 


S 


ss;$ 


S 


J? 


S5 


s 


o 


5§ 


5°g§ 


s 


S§2 


«o«o 


c« 




rH^ 


* 


^.-^CM 


eo 


CM 


•^ 


-« 


« 


^^ 


■--«-. 


w 


o^o 


ecb. 


cs 


<^ 


CM CM 




W-.© 


CM- 


"^ 


«-• 


CM 


eo 


«^ 


■«>■*■•*- 


-25 


■ co«^ 



I 




III 



pi 

«i| 



> 
a 



1^ 






11 9 






& :3 s 



In 






I 



> « ©CO s^ 

-.Og ^ 




III III 



^ ^ ^ : • «: :t J, 

5 5 5 il § ;#i 



o;ih: 



M 41 c 



II 



IP Is ills 



P5 



lis 

da o 
-<PQO 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



602 



BDXTCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 



8ri 

•si 
1 



III 



ill 



'oiBmaj 



•oiBW 



-9I«m9j 



•opjjl 



ill 






II 



'9pim3j 



•aiBji 



'o&inoo JO J 



-q^nom J9<i 



1~5T 



SSI 



S5" 



Tir 



8* 



00 >9 



-88 



■^If" 



SS ooSa 



ISS 



kOtOOOO 



S"9 



"=52 



I 



1 




lOoqM ?q8iN 



'looqoe ^«a 



!S 



"5 2"-' 



o c« 






•lOoqDS %^9\s. 



MCtMMMM 



"lOoqDS Xb(I 






'^ S 






•looqM %^im 



:8 



•|0oq08 Xtja 



93 



5gS^ 



^S^ 



ggSSS S?g| § § i2S:3 






•0|Qni9j 



•9i«K 



2 g552§«S 



5 g 



S S 



■91BIU9J 






•91BJI 



KS55J 



S«o lOiooScoQ '^S^ ^ »^ -^SS 



S g S2S 



GQ S 



•9prai9^ 



e3«oo»«-«M5 



•9I«Jl 



sssS9;s 



2|S 



c«eo»o 

aoco« 



1 



•9niUI9J 



•91BH 



oeoeocsi-«eo 



e2 






ll llllll ll§ 






I ^ 



si 



4) w « 



V) bCtn O O O 
rtgfl 



^ l|l«5? =^ 



§ 



H»hPe, 




« 
U 



-la o 



» 8 






? yi 



9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



OOMMESCIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



603 



iOW 


^ 




CO 




• O 


•* 


cr 






■* • 


8" 


'^ 


•* 


oogr^ 


SS2 : 


CO 


SJ3 :2 


O 


• d 


O 


•^ 




o ; 


&■= 





2 


Cl-^WCO 


52 : 


"-* 


SS2S 


8 


ss 


5 


§ 


f2a 


52 


g«e 


§ 


S 


S2S5 . 


8*S 


8 


28'-3 


CI 


32 


Ok 


CO 


sa 


30 


5«S 


£S 





2*>2?S 


OOCC 


00 


OO^OQO 


"T 


s^^ 


<o 


o» 


8S 


t>. . 


g»o 





00 




M.0(0 


•0 


60 52 
91 38 
60 


s 




« 




8 


CI 

CO 


eg 


s i 


SS5 


^ 


R 


8'SS? 


00 CO 00 


J^ 


s 


|S 


^ :f 


§ 


§3 


S : 


sa 


§S 


s 


S 


S -S : 


SSS88 


oo 


o 


oo 


^^! 


CI 


2^ 


23 


•om 







M 


0000 


oooc5'c« 








"3 


8 :8 


^ 






•00 


CM t* 




2 




2282 
6 


:t! :S8 






2 


OSOO 

3 


r^ 






• cs 


<oo 


CIO 

2" 


« 


ci- 

2 


<©eOooo> 


C>l«0»C M 


M J J« 


NM 


CO j« 


CI 


S'm 


N« 


«« 


« • 


e« 


C9 


MMe^CI 


jw je^e^ 



lOOOCS iQiO «D«DO 



k? tS'kO «D<0 «Io 



2 : :9 gSi? 12 :;:: 



"'S 2S 



UStQCOfOO 



S^ 



IJS 



8 : :i? 



i3S 

Tic 



3 •"S as 28 



2'='JS8 



^ '-JOO 



CIO R"S oTo R~ 

i^rH '•'O rH^ CO 



5 2 S28S 






^ is^ s§ ss |S 



!§SS5SS 


ss 


-i§ 


s 


feS 


a§ 


»8 


§'a 


3 


3 


c^-fcS 


S^ssa 


:$^22 


i§ 


«ss 


9 


88- 


feg 


S3 


ss» 


B 


S 


S«S2 


ssssi:; 


'53S§5S 


IS 




S 


ns 


SI 


?s 


2^3 


8 





o8'*« 


OiCMOaoeo 


e^r-i^eii 


coco 


COiOC« 


r-l 


^Cl 


N'* 


^rl 


C0*HO 


d 


d> 


00C1-. 




cocoi^eo 


iO-r 


MCOCO 


C« 


l-ll-l 


w«> 


^ '^ 


CO COO 


!-• 


CO 


co^^ci 


C|,^,^C4rH 




••3 :-d 
55*6^ fS IpI 



ft O pS" 










IS I'a la iia s 1 1 iti 
^i I I IM I a III 



1« " III II 

P.C/] ea S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



604 



kducahok kspobt, ins. 



• I 
I i ■ 



■arroaj 



s : s :;s 



*rnc; S 






■atwoaj 



2 g^::5 S ?S 



ill 

s • 3 



•»T»II I S 



S-*2 



"•iwwj 5 



•'•TO' S ! 



«• g 



•O ■* 1-t 



21' § 



'QSIDOOJOj 3 



8 S 






:§ S S; S 



' qiomu J9 j ' •* 



e«c«oo c« ooo^ o o o 



3 
O 



*«« 

St 
••• 

I 



1 










55 i. 



looipe)ii3iK I S I 



lOfOifxKma 2 



2 : S a 



r« • 'O «o 






|s^* 



looqosiqaix 2 



M «£<•«« « e«e«e« eo 



lOOqjs i»a I 2 



?«oo^ 



£s|g 



looips 



^q^X I 2 I 



-2-g«5 : S 22S 8 R 2 



100qD8i«<l' 2 S CD - or^ § 2c 



S 8 



•9ITOOJ I Z 



-»I«K , S 



c«oae o 



Z g* 



"Too"* eo c* ■♦ ?^ 



00 c« 






5^- 

I 

OQ « 



5- 



•9f«OI©J 






ooe>« -^ 



s 



•»nwn»ji 



••fK 



•9!»a»j 



8 S S*55 



eocc« eo 



2 :; 



?Sg 



8 5 S* 



i 5 






~e5 ei woetco o" 



-^ .I •••^c*co "O 



"— — « eo~ 



§& 



H H^^'d d-dd>^ iJ 



o 5 W 



I =ii& ^ III 
a3< 




^iiSS 




I 



=5 9 






1 1 i^ii I iiiiinii 

w 8 & o Si4 S ssn^ 3 a ^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



COMMBECIAL AND BUSINESS SCHOOLS. 



605 



g 2 §cg^ 



o S oo 



2S8 



^ a» «oo»*g 



n ^ S585 : *^ 



O S S 'Sc^ o 



S* O OOON O OM 



:i : 



O 'Moo 



M CSC»e>«N C4 N« 



s?^ 



.-I cit^ 



^WI^ 



C4ao^e4 



s s 



* §s 



;5 og 



S 3 



sis'* .-I 



.-I •♦00 



So oe Q "5 00 
CO •* ^ 00 t^ 



^ ci c«»eocs« o r^eo 



c* c« Meococ* »-• •-•« 



3 






£•^'2 

III 



^ ^ fedWd -< few 




I 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER XIII. 
STATISTICS OF SCHOOLS FOR NEGROES. 



The statistics of colleges, normal schools, industrial schools, public 
and private high schools for negroes will be found incorporated with 
other schools of similar grades in the preceding chapters. They are 
here brought together to facilitate the separate study of negro schools. 

In 1913 there were 426 of these schools reporting to this office, 156 
public high schools, and 270 private high schools, normal schools* 
colleges, and industrial schools. Tables 2, 3, and 4 relate to the 270 
schools. The progress of the public high schools for the past four 
years is indicated in the following synopsis: 

Comparative statistics of schools for negroes. 



, 


1910 


IMl 


1912 


1913 


Schoob 


141 
473 


150 

613 

9,641 


159 
597 

10, sn 


156 


Teacher^ 


566 


Students 


10,594 





BENEFACTIONS OR BEQUESTS OF OVER $1,000 RECEIVED IN 1912-13. 

Snow Hill Normal and Industrial Institute, Ala., $1,013; Talladega College, Ala., 
$13,565; Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, Ala., $22,901; Howard University, 
D. C, $4,417; Atlanta University, Ga., $11,704; Clark University, South Atlanta, Ga., 
$1,200; Morgan College, Baltimore, Md., $50,000; Okolona Industrial College, Miss., 
$3,000; Mather Industrial School, Beaufort, S. C, $3,798; Claflin University, S. C, 
$5,288; Knoxville College, Tenn., $175,000; Fisk University, Tenn., $3,147; Meharry 
Medical College, Tenn., $7,000. 

Twenty-two States and the District of Columbia reported 156 
public high schools for negroes in 1913. As indicated above, these 
schools had 566 teachers and 10,594 students of high-school grade. 
Enrollment by States is given in the table following. 

607 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



608 EDUCATION KEPOBT, 1913. 

Table 1. — Teachers and students in public high schools for the negro rttce, 191t-lS. 





J 


Teachers. 


Pupils enrolled. 


States. 


Secondary. 


Elementary. 


Total. 




i 


£ 


1 


1 


iH 


1 


4 

3 


1 


1 


^ 
d 


FN 


1 


Alabama 


6 
14 

10 
14 

13 
37 


10 
12 
3 

ao 

8 
13 

6 
10 

9 
16 

4 

16 
11 
43 

4 

2 
10 

1 
22 
19 
69 

7 

9 


12 
9 
7 

16 
9 

15 
7 
5 
3 

22 
2 

16 
9 

27 


9 


10 

13 

39 

20 
3 


22 
21 
10 
36 
17 
28 
13 
15 
12 
38 

6 
31 
20 
70 

4 

2 
19 

1 
32 
32 
98 
27 
12 


156 

118 

14 

306 

86 

96 

63 

86 

86 

180 

61 

169 

99 

623 

14 

7 

121 

4 

183 

170 

600 

132 

66 


366 
287 

64 
689 
166 
280 
126 
107 
161 
439 
117 
414 
257 
878 

43 

8 

223 

12 

476 

460 

1,222 

495 

82 


612 
406 

78 
894 
252 
375 
178 
192 
247 
628 
178 
583 
366 
1,401 

67 

15 
844 

16 
658 
639 
1,822 
627 
137 








166 
118 

14 
305 

86 
129 

63 
263 

86 
189 

61 
169 

99 
665 

14 

66 
171 
4 
18S 
170 
600 
132 

65 


356 
287 
64 
589 
166 
336 
12^ 
318 
161 
439 
117 
414 
257 
1,035 

43 

55 
279 

12 

475 

469 

1,222 

495 

82 


5U 


Arkansas 








405 


Delaware 








7S 


District of Columbia. 








8M 


Florida 








252 


Georgia 


34 


66 


90 


465 


Ulinois ; 


ITS 


Indiana 


178 


211 


389 


SSI 


1^f|P55t^ ... 


247 


Kentucky 








638 


T/ouisiana .,.. . 








178 


Maryland 








S& 


MiMissippi 








356 


Missouri. 


142 


157 


299 


1,7W 


North Carol iF«i,.,.. 


Ohio 


69 
60 


47 
66 


106 
106 


121 


Oklahoma 


450 


Pennsylvania 

South Carolina 


16 








658 


Tennessee .*• 








639 


Texas ^ 








1,822 
627 


Virginia 








West Virginia 








137 










Total 


166 


313 


263 


566 


3,325 


7,269 


10,694 


463 


627 


990 


3,788 


7,796 


11,584 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB NBOBOB8. 



609 



ll 



S 

I 
I 

00 



p 



7«)0X 



*9pnii9j 



•wox 



*«9[VUI0jI 



'91VU19J 



•»I«H 






I 



'tf[V1U9J 



•»n»w 



'alVDDej 






1^ M eo 






giS§Sg|2giSgiSSB«ggiS8 






gss5§i2sgsiSii5S8giiig 



o*^- ^-^w: 



,^ et lo <*i^o*c« 



i§Ss§i§''§§§i§iSs§g§l§§ 



S99«SS : :e9;38 :3:3««&S3$ 



SSSgS:^ 



sass 



i^-^mn 



Ss'80i2s§|igSgSSSii§s§ 



ia8igi8=§=iEs§2«»§ig=i 



sr 



§5s 



§r«5i'S«Ss=«§iia2 



SI§8Si 



fS|228|gg|S 



1»»oi 



■mmoiii 



gasssi-SRSsssssasggsgs 



|S~sa§-*?5oS22§3*2§gS|S 



*IIO|^ 



•giooqog 






»« c« M e« o rg iH *H o» CO lo « eo jd CI c« CO t^ 00 M « CO 



lllifl illll i§ o;! 15 i sis 



1 



17727*— ED 1913— VOL 2 39 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



t^> 



IWrCATKfS^ 



I 

1 



^ 

-8 



^ 












*^* -« 



jf'-An^ 



fliiiliii?lII5i flliii S 

|5S-'S2 t:a*»*"s« --"frs^* J 






^3«t*»g^ «3^«S^ 






I 

I 









I 

I 

I 



52 e»a***2-V-a -^M=;j»-3 






•«=-a- 



2i 



sills* 






§iS§ilg§iiiiiH§ s 

r_ 



.« ! 



I 



r» .S " 



Siil§s§§ii§g§§§§§3i§Si 13 



-•1 fiooqog . 



-•J fejooqag I 






$3 



ill 



•'* iS5 









'w^UiDfO^ 






get" eSttiiOi-^^aacfr^ottic^cmtoOQG^ci^^ 






ipon^i>-Q»-ii-Haooeo-<r-MQC«C«mao*oaooc« 



I 



lililfl 






c8£ 

ill 



-<-<ft5Eoflww»3aas;z;Qo^ 



2> H 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB NEGBOES. 611 



i 



s 

m 



s 

1 

I 

I 



n 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



612 



EDUCATION BEPOBT, 1»13. 



i 



g 

5 



'iB9l 9n% jof omoonr iB^ox 



§ s §§e§§ §i§ 

jT «r t"^ tCoo 00 t<^i^ 



Si 



Sio*o 



'99amos Aq)o xnoj| poAfooeH 



8 iSs8:S §§S 

jj «r -^r tCg rCrCV 



53" '-"S" 



<!. 



*vpiiii| 
aAnanpoid moij peAjaooH 



s 



S 



§ 



"" a" 



TTHiiriir 

•• •i' _r ^ ^ 



§g 



"If 



*S99; nonpi) mojj p9A{ao9H 



S s§§ 



'ppt iDdpnmni JO '899«)8 
pe)iaii *9ms JO tjnnoray 



is 



§ § §§§§§ §§§§! 8 



*6n)«JT3d 

-dn ogT^iwTos pm 'ojn^iainj 
'gSfnipiinq *spimoj3 jo 9ni«A 



§§ 



g§§ 



TTT 



nwm 



w 



8 
J 



JL 

»2 



*XjB2qn n| mnmioA 



§ 






!^Si 



^^1 



j) a p^ 



1 



-aiemaj 



•oi«H 



■s-s" 



•ajvmej 



•opiH 



s°£ §ss 



^g sss 



*Sg 8«3S 



^g 



s 



*ei«nz9j 



8 8 ^^"^^fS SSSS; 



8S®3 S88 



•atBK 



*e[Qui9j 



« « •««8S Sc5S^S 
js s R8S° : SSi: :s 



oS 729 



*oe4>-t 'i^ 



'9VBJi 



*oivnz9j 






3^ :? 



•« f-i ^ 



:s asf 



|3°8 gss 



•ansH 



^^ ^^ r^ ^ r^ d ^ v^ (^ {»3 ^ y^ 



.51 



5? 



-6 



TS 
C 
« 



CQ 



n 



*apnii9^ 



C4 Oft oo^eooeo ootoo<-i« 



8«®S 



•«i«w 



cs o coo^(0>o eoeO'^o<«' 












I 



: .-a 

Ml 



11 



1 1 

I I B . 



"if 



ill 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB NEOBOES. 



61S 



g§ 



§ §3§Sf 6g| IS g 

CO ««o jjj" lo 1^^ fO CO gf 



§ l§^§§ §§§ § i I 



S § II 



ill §§ 



M «.-« w 1^ 



I IS §1 



s s 



§ isi«i s|8 I 3 



S i §i 



§13 § 



"iiir 



iii: § 
:S5 



§§§§§ §§§ 



^ 



§ S 



S 9 



§ § §g 

5f ^^ ^^ 



i§ i^ 



SS" 



s§ ;s §§§ :§ i§s § § 



8 SSS 



r-lC<leQ •« 



§ i§ 



|S 3| 



§ g 



?2gff!§8 S2 



S 511 S 



gS9 



8®SS8 S« 



U 2 



S$S 



CSMOaiO 



piag^s ^s 



SS89 



S 8 «8SSiS« 2S 



^^ 



*g,-H 


ess"s 


Mcon 


. 8 9 


r 


o— M" 


ogeg^t.^ 


-g 


CO 


1 


ss&s 


22:ss 


8%9 


O O 


;0 


a s 


gggg^S 


2 : 


§ 


& 


SR3S 


§3 :3S 


ess 


s » 


;0 


o o 


«g||a;5 


53 : 


oo 


8 



-1^^ 


|gSS£ 


SSqi 


o 


3 


m 


s 


sa 


8g2g5S 


8S 


g 


o 


^2S5l 


g§S:$g 


S5^^ 


S3 


S 


2« 


o 


» 


°2S|8S 




cs 


s 


CO >0 CM CO 


'«'00'«rc«<o 


eococ* 


o 


M 


s» 


CO 


CO 


ONO>r;;.'*eO 


C^-^ 


o 


-w 


ctootc* 


ICOOO^'* 


^«^ 


•^ 


00 


OC<( 


o 


CO 


0€0'*C»^N 


-a 


-^ 


-lo 



:n 






SI 



o o 













<J-<^P 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



614 



EDtTCATIOK BEPORT, 1913. 



I 

I 



f 

f 

8 



'ml 9H% jof smoonf iv^oj, 



^SSe^S^ 






III g §§ISI§S 



*»aroo6 J9q)o moij poAjaooH 



son 






i ii 



lis i §§ig§i 



^ww ^ 



2f 



'sptraj 

9A|pnpOJd mOI) p9Af909H 



ig 



'899; no|)ix4 mcuj poA^aooH 



a 






S Sa s§S g 



m 



*pf« i«d|9rimm JO '89)«)s 
p»)inn *»»«»S JO lonorav 



'8n)iu«d 
'sItolPIinq 'spimaia )o odiba 



§§§§§§!§§§ § 



siii 



§§g § §§§§§§! 

*8V "" S83'-*<^88 



"imiiiiirTOiFrafif 



1 

I 

1, 
I 

§ 
s 

I 



o 






-§ 

?: 



CO 



M 

n 

e2 



'j£juqn Of sanmioA 



'^•oooeoct 



SI 






inli 



111 



^ii 



I 



-anniiaj 



i-i «H e^ 'lo • 



•aiBH 



*2S8 



'anniiaj 



•ei«|| 



eS5J2 



Si i sgs-^ss 



S8S3 






'apnnaj 



ssqi^jsgssa a' '^ss; s *2a»S5S5 



•9i«H 



^•*8SS5:®SSS S« •^SS S l:S2*^S| 



'apraiaj 



5Sl8g® : :§^SS 85 f gg 8 ^§SS^8 



•aiBH 



ssss 



^sla~s»'"s5f~s~sglss^ 



-arraiaj 



S«l"8§Ssp-g§s^S-R«g|S§22 



•ai«H 



i^£Sg^g2®S99 §» §«s ^ ^li^^^i 



o CO o 00 >c 00 00 r* o eo *o4 



Id 



•aiBmaj 



iO<0>-i * <<>C«<<>«0^'«C« 



•ai«K 



c>9<-ieooi«tooe>«*4M mco i-^cir^ i^ eoctooc**^^ 



II 



W WtJt 






08 o Oaso . w^ w 



il 



■< ■<zz 



1- Ititl^i 



1 



'2i 



S3 
5^, 




SqQqQpqBQa 



so 3 



li«' 



6 m;] 



42(3 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 






SCHOOLS 



FOB NEOBOB8. 



615 



C«t-j2 eoc«f-tci 



Veow' 



eof-i w^ 






§ §ai 



n ;§ 



§ §§§ 



§i§i S :i§ 



tHt-f-l CO 



w 



MM 



§§ §1 






§§ 



3 



2 gsfa 



s 



§§§§ 

asf82 









$^ 



*3S? S 



S §§§§ § § § 



13 U? 



i3 S 



'^iiS Sg§§ 



S«5:8 



^aas 



Cli-I 



lis 



3:3 



3SS 



»S!} 



I 



r^t» oo 



^S 



2 §"§? i 



SS USS3 3 



^•00004 ■* 



M 00*0C4O v-l 



?■ 




:sa 


8 


o 


s 


Sc5?35 


8a^§3 


'-gg 


^wo 


2 


i^-ss 


s 


s 


to 


;«0 


o 


s 


:S 


$3SS 


sasss 


•ss 


nose 


s 


■asgs 


^ 


R 


s 


m 


R 


M 


5 


ScSS : 


"-g :ga 


3SS 


sss 


s 


:r ii 


i 


S 


s 


igs 


s 


§ 


8 


S§^S : 


«^| :St; 


S:^9 


SSSi 


s 


:§• i i 


s 



25l::g «28®S8S 2855 SPig 






SJoSS «a2§$ 1283 SS!5 S^gSSg g 



^eowt'. eookO^iO 



<ooico eoc<eo 



f-i»-ipiaoc4 













Edt^ 



g§So .OPS'. 






ll 



ll3 

I d g ® 






i3 



:5 



1 1 



3J; 



^ (- 



b o.a 

a *= 



IJJ 



O e8 ^ C 



tlal 



1^3 



i5§ 
S tap _-fea cooooo 

aes^ oOO 99 

PQ«5 fiww ^^ 



5^«g gaS Sa«3al 5 



03 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



616 



BDTTCATION BEPOBT, 1913 



.9 

a 
o 



Oi 



t 

I 

8 



i 






1 

I 



I 



o 
c 



O 



I 



n 



'jtoX 9q) JOf omooaj i«)Ox 



§ § 



3 



!§§§§ 



s §§s § 



*«a 



-SKunos J9q)o moij poAfdooH 



iiiSS 



S §§i § 



s 



'SpOTl] 

9A))onpojd moij poAfaooH 



H 



'saej aonpi) moi} poAfooen 



§§i§3 



oiii 



rr 



•pj« ivdjonmnz jo '99)«is 
p^jjuii 'a^B|g JO )imoiny 



§ 



iir 



'sniiured 
-dB ogi^oaias pire 'ojimtunj 
's^fPIinq 'spmuuS jo anfBA 



&^ 



§3 S^ 



'Xnuqn ni sanmiOA 



§ -§§§§3 

ii§ii iiii^ig 



C«C« CCrS 



115 IS 



Tii 



itsssssss^ass 



|3 
IS 









m 



*9[ttui«^^ 



•9PH 



*9pnii9j^ 



•9l«H 



gs 



§«'§55»8»§S S§ 






'9[VIU9J 



S£S?3 S 5SS§SfS^^S3""^Sg~^ 



•9i«H 



?Sg«§« aS8S -^S 



•ajHinaj 



•apH 



S3S :SS3^{:s;i? :3S?S SS 






*9]BIIZ9J 



SSSSSS 



^^iii^S^^i^ 






Ǥ 



•9[«H 






IS 



*apnix9j[ 



'a-'^ 



OtOOkMco^toioioak^ eo<D^ 



•9i«H 



r-I^O'W 0» 



eoci<o^M»C«p-ieo^C4Ci co<OM ctio 



PI 

III 



o o . o o 



c-s'aw^usw ^ 



I 






3 

I 

^l< ... . 



':A 



^ 

^ 




I 

11=3 li^ |5g 
-<ww 5wa 55o£ 



il 



qHP 



■I II 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB NEOBOBS. 



617 



8 § 



§11 § 



"nrr 



M 












§ §§18 



el to 



S3 









SS!S S 



mr 



im^ 



ir 



s § 



1 i 



0» t^Q 



fir 



r 



§§§ § §§§ isiiiriii §§i§§ 



Moftfr cd" 









sirFUfiirssi sim^ii ii^i^r-imis 



W~S ««$ g* :||8 SS° S" 



S S *S 



3" 



"^^ 



T=^rer- 



s^s^^So s : ^$$2 a 



* :-$$ 
^ 



"^^as^"^ 



8282 



§ 



CI M<0 



2 25 



2 ^S 



^S~^ 






rH .,-1 r-l C4rHi-l 



885 S J§ :S ° 






S^'S S8SS2 -"^2^55 ^Jo ^a-*® 



?8jSg^ 



3.3S3 8^S:3;« ^U S :5§ 



r^S S 5S®2 ^S§g?5 5 



^-^2 



Se4^ 8 7$aQ 



5§S§§ 5 23g8!o 

ffg§~a1g~82^f|~S r: 8 3 S5 



"P~§§SJ3' 



w 


-r« 


coc««»o 


'* 


CIOCO 


cr o -^ t« ^ i» 


C^^O 


«-H«-jO 


o»t^co»oeo 


offTT 


2^*^'^ 


«o 


toco 










«*•« 


fQt«^<«><0 




^w 


^oe^o' 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



618 







g 



'jBdX aq) joj omooaf ib)oj, 



EDUCATION BEPOBT^ 1913. 



'Boojnos j9q)o mojj poAiaoan 









« 



1 



I 



'spunj 

OAIpnpOjd mOJJ p8A|909H 



'889; nonim mojj P9A|30oh 



'Piv isdioionin jo '9&\^iq 



'sSaiptinq 'spanoiS jo 9ni«A 



'.^iBjqn n| samniOA 



m 



w 



"iir 



T 



11 SI 



"SS" 



si Sf 



ri 






s 



"1 



in ~i 



I 



} 

I 

r 



I 

i 

o 

I 

i 
1 



I 
7 



n 



£ 



db . 









wgt 






'di«ni9j 



•aiBK 



'afQcaaj 



•91BK 



'9|«m8j 



•9i«H 



'9i«ai9j 



•qBH 



*9iein9j 



•9l»JC 



'oiBinaj 



•9i«H 



IT'S" 



— rW" 



9^3 



2 S 



^^ 



"3 



S^T 






"5r^ 



-ww^ 






88 

da6 



"5^ 



r 






55j 






An 



S5 -< 






3 



1 



Is- 



•a 



1% 



ii -s 




5q 3 



I 



1 



& 
(^ 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB KEOBOES. 



619 







O iii-iCO 






sis 

•<^ i-T «* 



mrrr 



IT 






!§§§! 



in s§ 8 s 



"rmr 



is" 






5 

I 

i 



iirimFmii §iii li 



•OO C«CO o 



3 S §g 8 8 SISS 



od'oo^ioc 



i ;§ ;§§§§§! 



1 ps 



imm 



00 "I* «••» lO '-J 



8 S S 



r: 8 9 g^ 






SI" 



eC 3; 



'>fe 



SS^~"^S5 2 2S 3 J3 8S5 



2 : :a 



3S g ?S S SS 8"^^ 



c«^iooo 



s-sss 



S -S :-SS-§siB 






f~SIS~if5Ssf|fg~r"'sS2""^^f~s" 



»sa 



srs^ss 



:S 



ls| sSssaliS 



r 


s|isS8s|§gs 


g 


a^s 


n 


S 


"§5 


3 


^" 


2SS 


sg55 


2S|s:a:2 


g 


*2|sss|gg=s 


S 


fe^i 


gl 


s 


sg 


§ 


13 


$S9 


sssss 


gssssss 


u 


rt*46JWM»«6*4 55cdg^ 


«4 


§**•* 


MOk 


<» 


*s 


•4 


«6 


ooior* 


"♦O*©-* 


•OCOO»»OCft»^ 


B 


^*A<S>^eo»-;5e*j;5<* 


'^ 


'd^McQ 


»^iO 


>^ 


*a 


CO 


•6 


M^m 


«OC«»-i 


t«'^10<0<«9 



a 'ia^fi'is' 



e||l^gpQ 



•<m(Xi:z;2 ^ ocq-< ns 



^ U| 






I 



- .1 






&B< 



I 






13 
iii 



1^ 



1 

M 

1 






i ih 



1&& 



si 



pi: 






I 




52| III Is i i^i i^ I I 5 III 55ls 1111 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



620 



BDUCATION BBPOBT, 1913. 






1 



I 

I 

8 

I 



I 






I 

Is. 

8 

1 

1 



I 
T 



< 



-JvaX aq) loj omooui fB%oj, 






I 



S3 § 



a§ §§! 



f 



III 



*890Jno6 Jdi^o moj; poAjaoen 



^ -^SS i^ 



^00 t* 






-spun; 
9Ai)anpojd mojj poAiaaoH 



a' sss' -' 



I I" 



FT 



HI 



'MOJ noDin) niojj peAfoooH 



V9%V^a '9iv%s JO ?auorav 



8 Sooo SoS 

a" ss'g's" !ss" 



1I1FT 



'fiduipipiq 'sponoiS^ eni«A 



IS" s^s 



iiT-iii mmirif 



-iJtuqn uf saozniOA 



s|-^ 



Si : : I^SSS <*a« 












w|5 



'91VIII9J 



•on»ii 



*§ s 



-aivoiaj 



•aiBH 



SS^ 



§:ss 



a22| 2S^ 



'aiBOioj 



•aiuH 



'aremaj 



•oi^W 



'afnnaj 



•»l«K 



S :^2 "^SS 






gSSS t;882 <»S§| 



I^OM i«0^ 



c< 1^ o M *n 



5 -'••^ 



9« CC-*-- 



|S$:3 8S§ : SSg 



s§s- 






>0<OC4 






S5°3 Sg^l SS2 






-ai«ui9j 



•aiBH 



00 e«««eot^ 



CO W'^ 






4^ « 3 



1; 









1 



3 



I 






fc 



J o o o 
5^ Z 






c o «s 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



SCHOOLS FOB NEGROES. 621 



I 

6 



5 

n 

I 



•3 
S 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CHAPTER XIV. 
STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 



Only 22 of the 106 State industrial schools reporting to this bureau 
in 1913 now retain the word reform or reformatory in the name of the 
institution. In nearly all of the institutions the pupils are received 
pursuant to legal conmiitment, but not on account of criminal acts. 
These schools are made the means of rescuing dependent and ill- 
treated children from criminal surroundings. 

The following institutions are not controlled by the State, but most 
of them receive public funds for the care of children committed by 
public authority: 

Delaware Industrial School for Girls, Wilmington, Del. 

Junior State School, Junior State, Ga. 

Chicago Kefuge for Girls, Chicago, 111. 

House of the Good Shepherd, Chicago, 111. 

Convent of the Good Shepherd, Sioux City, Iowa. 

St. Elizabeth's Home for Colored Children, Baltimore, Md. 

St. James's Home for Boys, Baltimore, Md. 

St. Mary's Industrial School for Boys of the City of Baltimore^ Baltimore, Md. 

Plununer Farm School, Salem, Mass. 

House of the Good Shepherd, Detroit, Mich. 

Sisters of the Good Shepherd, Grand Kapids, Mich. 

Hudson County Catholic Protectory, Arlington, N. Y. 

New York Juvenile Asylum, Chauncey, N. Y. 

House of the Good Shepherd, New York, N. Y. 

St. Vincent's Industrial School, Utica, N. Y. 

Glen Mills Schools, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Wisconsin Home and Farm School, Dousman, Wis. 

Progress of State industrial schools in 10 years. 



1903 



1908 



1913 



Number of schools reporting 

Num ber of teachers 

Assistants not employed as teachers 

Total number of inmates 

Committed during the year 

D ischarged d ur ing the year 

Couldneither read nor write when committed . 

Could read and write when discharged 

Learning some trade or occupation 

Value ofbuildings and grounds 

Value of school equipment 

Expenditure for the year 



9« 

644 

2,275 

84,423 

12,757 
12,608 
2,192 



21,603 
123,362,543 



$4,352,368 



92 

762 

2,164 

86,908 

14,834 

12,843 

2,589 

11,919 

24,899 

124,164,950 

$2,177,398 

$5,854,609 



106 

1,021 

8 160 

M,812 

19,094 

20,367 

2,994 

16,494 

85,575 

$41,414,261 

$3,341,314 

$7,814,065 



623 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



624 EDUCATION REPOBT, 1913. 

Table 1. — Inmates enrolUdin State indtutnal $chooU, 191g-lS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 626 

Table 2. — Parentage of the inmates cf State inditstrial schools, 1912-lS. 





American bom— 


Numbe 

Inmates fc 

bom 




States. 


Of American 
parents. 


With one 

American 

parent. 


With both 

parents foreign 

born. 


r of 
>reign 




4^ 

P 


1 


1 


SB 


1 


1 




1 


£ 


is 


i 


t. 


United States 


n 


14,886 


4,249 


60 


1,993 


832 


65 


6,966 


1,290 


67 


3,229 


712 


North Atlantic Division.. . 
North C>entral Division.... 
South Atlantic Division... 
South Central Division 


32 

23 

12 

2 

8 


6,108 
6,566 
2,678 
274 
1,059 


1,646 
1,800 

684 
37 

183 


29 
17 
7 


1,236 
469 

48 


316 
442 
61 


31 


4,673 

840 

46 


664 

661 

14 


30 
22 

6 


2,122 
838 
24 


431 

247 

2 


Western Division 


7 


240 


13 


7 


407 


61 


9 


.245 


32 


North Atlantic Division: 
Maine 


1 




174 


1 




10 


1 




24 








New Hamjishire . . 








Vermont 
























Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 


8 


386 
83 




""36* 


8 
2 


670 
60 


8' 


8 
2 


836 
129 


""io* 


8 
2 


236 
61 


6 


Ck)nnectlcut 




New York 


12 
6 
4 

2 
2 
6 
3 
3 


2,209 

911 

1,819 

1,732 

1,779 

384 

•— 174* 


664 
281 
600 


12 
3 
3 


409 
84 
114 


243 
""65 


12 

4 
4 

1 
2 
6 
3 
3 


2,252 

1,002 

464 

25 

76 

432 

*"itii' 


896 
"*i26' 

"'467' 

177 

4 


12 
4 

4 

2 
2 
6 
3 
2 


1,362 
262 
202 

187 
180 
331 

""89" 


347 


New Jersey 


25 


Pennsylvania 


63 


North Central Division: 
Ohio 




Indiana 


"*776' 
422 
294 


2 
4 
3 
3 


192 
74 

""65* 


"*i95* 
230 




Illinois 


48 


MIchiKan 

Wisconsin 


173 
21 


Iowa 

Missouri 


2 


350 


33 




76 


2 


90 


6 


2 


6 


3 


North Dakota 


1 
1 
1 
3 

4 
2 
2 
2 


47 
64 

198 
838 

"**767' 
642 
722 
435 


9 
29 




8 
22 


4 
8 


1 
1 


20 
11 


1 

6 


1 
1 
1 
3 


6 
2 
6 
33 




South Dakota 




Nebraska .... 




Kansas 


243 

62 

302 

118 

1 

111 


2 


33 


2 

1 
3 
1 
1 

1 


25 

— — • 

11 

4 
3 




3 
11 


2 


Soath Atlantic Division: 
Delaware 




Maryland 

District of Columbia.. 
Virginia 


3 
1 
1 
1 


24 
13 
6 
4 


61 


2 
1 
1 
2 


7 
7 
3 
7 




West Virginia 


2 


North Carolina 




South Carolina 






















Georela 


1 


12 




1 


1 












Florida 




.... 










South Central Division: 
Kentucky. . 


1 


70 


37 




1 












Tennessee '.'."' 


.... 














Alabama 














( 








MLssLssipjii . , 






















liOuisiana 












::::......::::::: 








Texas | 




















Arkansas 












i 










Oklahoma 




204 
63 




















Western Division: 

Montana 


3 


1 


1 
18 \ 


1 


14 


1 


1 


6 




Wvomine 




cdiS: 




i9* 


164 


"l 


1 » 


1 




1 








New Mexico 


1 
1 
1 


1 
105 

8 




Arf^na 






1 


1 




25 


Utah 




6