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Full text of "Report of the Department of the Interior ... [with Accompanying Documents]."

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REPORTS OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

FOR THE PI8CAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30 

1913 



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS 

IN 2 YOLUMBS 



VOLUME II 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 
TERRITORIES 




WASHINGTON : GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1914 



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REPORTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

Administrative reports, in 2 volumes. 
Vol. 1. Secretary of the Interior. 

Bureaus, except Office of Indian Affaire. 
Eleemosynary institutions. 
National parks and reservations. 
Vol. II. Indian Affaire. 
Territories. 
Reprt of the Commissioner of Education, in 2 volumes. 



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CONTENTS. 

~ " — ran 

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affaire 1 

General statement 3 

Agricultural work 9 

Stock raising 10 

Cooperation of Department of Agriculture and others 10 

Reimbursable funds for promoting agriculture.. 11 

Agricultural fairs and associations 12 

Farming and grazing leases 12 

On the Uintah and Ouray Reservation 12 

On the Wind River Reservation 13 

Grazing on tribal lands 13 

Grazing on open lands 13 

Road building 13 

Suppression of the liquor traffic 14 

General operations 14 

Difficulties of the liquor service 15 

Use of liquor among employees 15 

Wines for sacramental purposes 16 

Denver conference 16 

Peyote 16 

Forestry 16 

Menominee Indian mills 18 

Irrigation 19 

Health 20 

Indian schools . # 22 

Vocational training 23 

Academic training 23 

Visual instruction 24 

Physical training 24 

Public schools 24 

Aid of common schools in eastern Oklahoma 25 

Efficiency of employees 25 

Conferences 26 

Marriage and divorce 26 

Murderers of Supt. Stanley 27 

Employment of Indians 27 

Purchase of supplies 28 

Enrollment with Indian tribes 28 

Finance 29 

Individual Indian moneys 29 

Depositories for Indian moneys 29 

Sale of Indian lands 30 

Mining on Indian lands 30 

Oil and gas leases on Osage Reservation 31 

Inheritance cases 32 

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IV CONTENTS. 

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affaire — Continued. Pica. 

The Florida Seminoles 33 

Trust plan for Pueblos 34 

Opposition of Pueblos to education 35 

Release of Apache prisoners of war 36 

Five Civilized Tribes 36 

Legislation 37 

Traders' claims against Indians 39 

Indian art 40 

Increase in office work 40 

Cooperation with Bureau of Mines 41 

Rights of way 41 

Patents in fee 42 

Allotments 43 

Conclusion 44 

Statistical tables (for fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, unless otherwise noted) : 

Table 1. Work and force of Indian Office since 1899, compared 46 

2. Indian population of United States, 1759 to 1913, by States 

and tribes * 46 

3. Indian population of United States, 1913 47 

4. Indians under Federal supervision, allotted and unallotted. 62 

5. Marriages, missionaries, churches, language, dress; citizenship. 65 

6. Crimes, misdemeanors, and arrests for drunkenness 70 

7 . Reservations, authority for establishing, and areas not allotted 

or specially reserved 72 

8. Areas of Indian lands, allotted and unallotted 90 

9. Use of agency and school lands, value of products raised 94 

10. Patents in fee issued to mission organizations 100 

11. Land set aside temporarily for mission organizations 100 

12. Lands opened for settlement since 1898 101 

13. Valuation of Indian property and incomes 105 

14. Farming 112 

15. Crops raised 117 

. 16. Stock raising 122 

17. Industries other than farming and stock raising 125 

18. Employment of Indians 132 

19. Vital statistics, deaths from tuberculosis, dwellings 138 

20. Tuberculosis and trachoma 144 

21. Hospitals and sanatoria 147 

22. Indians self-supporting and those receiving rations 149 

23. Miscellaneous supplies issued 153 

24. School population and attendance 156 

25. Capacity of schools; children unprovided for 163 

26. Schools, location, employees, attendance 169 

27. School libraries 180 

28. Schools, average attendance and appropriations since 1876. . 183 

29. Industrial instruction and value of articles made 184 

30. Demonstration farms 186 

31. Experimentation farms 186 

32. Suppression of liquor traffic 187 

33. Timber on reservations 189 

34. Sawmills on reservations and timber cut 192 

35. Cost of care and protection of timber 195 



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CONTENTS. V 

Report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs — Continued. 
Statistical tables — Continued. 

Table 36. Irrigating ditches on reservations, areas irrigable and under Page, 

projects 197 

37. Expenditures for irrigation 200 

38. Areas irrigable under and not under projects and irrigated 

land cultivated 203 

39. Use of irrigated areas 206 

40. Allotments approved and made 208 

41. Sales of allotted lands 209 

42. Patents in fee issued 212 

43. Removal of restrictions on alienation of land 214 

44. Certificates of competency issued under act of June 25, 1910. 214 

45. Certificates of competency issued to Kaw and Osage Indians. 214 

46. Lands leased for mining 215 

47. Production of minerals and royalty 215 

48. Leases of tribal lands 216 

49 . Leases of allotted lands 218 

50. Buildings erected 221 

51. BuildingB under construction 222 

52. Building plans prepared 222 

53. Live stock belonging to tribes and individuals 223 

54. Stock belonging to Indians sold and slaughtered 228 

55. Government property valuations 232 

56. Government property valuations classified 255 

57. Property of individual Indians, value 259 

58. Property of Indians, tribal and individual, value 264 

59. Employees, school and agency 267 

60. Employees, miscellaneous, field 276 

61 . Employees in Indian Service, recapitulation 277 

62. Appropriations and disbursements for Indian Service 278 

63. Account of Commissioner of Indian Affairs 281 

64. Receipts and disbursements of Indian Service 281 

65. Sales of Indian lands, receipts and disbursements 282 

66. Treaty liabilities of the United States to Indians 284 

67. Interest-bearing tribal funds held in trust by Government. . 286 

68. Incomes of Indian tribes 289 

69. Pro rata shares of tribal trust funds settled 292 

70. Funds of Five Civilized Tribes in banks 292 

71. Volume of business in Indian warehouses 293 

Supplies for the Indian Service 295 

Classification of supplies index 295 

Appendix 399 

Report of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes 407 

Introductory 409 

General statement 414 

Allotment and sale of unallotted lands 416 

Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations 417 

Cherokee Nation 418 

Creek Nation 419 

Seminole Nation 420 

Equalization of allotments 421 

Auction sale of unallotted lands 422 

Timber lands _. . 429 

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VI CONTENTS. 

Report of the Commissioner of the Five Civilized Tribes — Continued. 

Segregated coal and asphalt lands 

Improvements on segregated coal and asphalt lands 

Illegal conveyance of allotted lands 

Recording of patents and other instruments 

Deposit of tribal funds in bankB 

Tribal revenues 

Sale and leasing of tribal buildings 

Sale of timber illegally cut 

Coal and asphalt tribal leases 

Town sites 

Expenses of tribal governments 

Tribal officers 

Tribal attorneys 

Taxation of Indian lands and moneyB 

Title to land within meandered banks of Arkansas River 

Abandoned railroad rights of way 

Disbursing office 

Union Agency 

Field service 

Alienation of allotments 

Leasing of allotted lands 

Per capita payments 

Schools 

Report of superintendent of Union Agency 

Introductory 

Financial 

Mailing record 

Field work - 

Probate 

Alienation of lands 

Removal of restrictions 

Inherited land deeds 

Pipe lines and other rights of way 

Land sales 

Supervision of land-sale proceeds 

Drainage districts 

Leases 

Filed and handled 

Agricultural and grazing 

Royalties, individual, oil and gas 

Royalties, tribal, coal and asphalt 

Oil and gas operations and inspection 

Conservation of gas 

Manufacture of gasoline 

Per capita payments 

Equalization payments 

Health 

Education 

Industrial work 

Government town sites 

Miscellaneous 

Intruder work 

Taxation of Indian lands 



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CONTENTS. VH 

Report of the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes — Continued. p *ff*> 

Report of supervisor of schools 601 

Scope of duties 601 

Aid of public schools 501 

Employees 502 

Health play 502 

Industrial training 503 

Material improvements 503 

Accounts and records 504 

Statistics 604 

Report of the Governor of Alaska 511 

General conditions 513 

Population 513 

Transportation 514 

Territorial legislature 515 

The future of Alaska 515 

Farming 516 

Lack of available markets 516 

Hybridisation of grains 516 

Early maturity of grains 517 

Cultivation of alfalfa 517 

Turnip seed 517 

Potato growing 517 

Kodiak Island station 518 

Cattle breeding 518 

Agriculture capabilities of Alaska 519 

National forests and other reservations 520 

Minor fur-bearing animals 521 

Pur seal 521 

Sitka Indians' claims 522 

Alaska reindeer 522 

Fisheries 524 

The salmon industry 525 

Troll fishing 526 

Halibut fishing 526 

Cod fishing 527 

Herring fishing 527 

Whale fishing 527 

Protection and development of fisheries 528 

Use of fishing devices 529 

Fishing experiment station 531 

Aids to navigation 531 

Insane 531 

Detention hospitals * 532 

Native inhabitants 532 

Labor conditions 533 

Assessed valuation and taxes 534 

Alaska game law 535 

The coal lands 635 

Mines and mining 537 

Utilization of water-power sites 638 

Public schools 539 

Railroads 540 

Telegraphs and cables 54 1 

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Vm CONTENTS. 

Report of the Governor of Alaska — Continued . Page. 

Public health 541 

Relief of destitution 542 

Territorial legislature 543 

Alaska pioneers' homes 543 

Library and museum 544 

Public buildings 544 

Territorial banking laws 544 

Commerce 545 

Indian land allotments 547 

Territorial officers : 547 

Mail service 548 

Roads and trails 548 

Simplification of land laws 549 

Governor's office 550 

Appendixes: 

A. Statement of library and museum fund 551 

B. Official directory 554 

C. Newspapers in Alaska 560 

D. Domestic corporations 560 

E. Foreign corporations 567 

F. Imports and exports 575 

G. Incorporated towns 581 

H. Rate of wages and cost of living 582 

I. Legislation passed at the third session of the Sixty-second Con- 
gress 582 

J. Game regulations and list of game wardens ami licensed guides . . . 583 

K. Regulations for the protection of fur-bearing animals in Alaska 585 

L. Laws passed by Territorial legislature relative to mining and 

relief of destitution 588 

M. Government publications on Alaska 595 

Report of the mine inspector for the Territory of Alaska 609 

Acts passed by legislature bearing on mining 611 

Creation of office of Territorial mine inspector 611 

Other acts passed 613 

Work of inspector's office 614 

Situation of headquarters 614 

Needs of office 614 

Districts visited 614 

Distribution of publications 614 

Condition of the mining industry 614 

Labor conditions 615 

Sources of accident 615 

Recommendations for the betterment of mining conditions 615 

Report of the governor of Hawaii 617 

General conditions 619 

Needed legislation 623 

Elections 624 

Legislature 629 

City and county governments 631 

Finances 632 

Bonded debt 632 

Receipts and disbursements 634 

Special funds ! 637 

Taxation 



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CONTENTS. IX 

Report of the governor of Hawaii — Continued. Page. 

Corporations 644 

Banks 645 

Insurance 647 

Commerce 648 

Imports and exports 648 

Customs receipts 650 

Tonnage 651 

Transportation facilities 652 

Vessels 653 

Interisland traffic 653 

Traffic between Hawaii and the mainland and Mexico 653 

Through service , 654 

Steam railroads 655 

Street railroads 656 

Roads and bridges 657 

Harbors 658 

Lighthouses 658 

Telegraphs and telephones 659 

Postal service 660 

Population, immigration, and labor 660 

Public lands 671 

Homesteading 671 

Sales for other than homestead purposes 674 

Leases and licenses 675 

Transfers, exchanges, and purchases for public purposes 676 

Patents and commutations 676 

Revenues and disbursements 677 

Proposed Kilauea National Park 678 

Survey 678 

Office work 678 

Field work 679 

Hawaii 679 

Maui 679 

Oahu 680 

Kauai 680 

Topographic and hydrographic surveys * 680 

Irrigation and reclamation 681 

Bureau of Agriculture and Forestry 682 

Forestry 683 

Animal Industry 683 

Entomology 684 

Federal experiment station 684 

Public works 686 

Wharves and harbors 686 

Public buildings 687 

Water and sewer works 687 

Schools 688 

College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 693 

Library of Hawaii 693 

Public archives 694 

Courts 694 

Territorial courts 694 

Supreme court 695 

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X CONTENTS. 

Report of the governor of Hawaii — Continued. 

Courts — Continued. Page. 

Circuit courts 695 

District courts 695 

Cases 696 

Juvenile courts 697 

Land registration court 698 

Federal court 698 

Attorney general's department 699 

Territorial prison 699 

Public health 700 

Health institutions 701 

Vital statistics 702 

Sanitation and communicable diseases 702 

Rat and mosquito campaigns 702 

Tuberculosis 703 

Leprosy 703 

United States leprosy investigation 703 

United States Public Health Service 704 

National Guard of Hawaii 705 

United States military and naval affaire 705 

United States Internal-Revenue Service 705 

United States Climatological Service 706 

Appendix: Territorial register and directory 707 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Pare. 

Map showing Indian reservations of the United States 406 

Map of Alaska 608 

Plate I. Queen Street wharf and sheds, Honolulu 686 

II. A, Hilo Union Public School, Hilo, Hawaii; B, Kamehameha III 

School at Lahaina, Maui 686 

III. Boys' industrial school at Lahaina, Maui 686 

IV. A, Boys' industrial school at Waialee, Oahu; B, Insane asylum, 

Honolulu 688 

V. Proposed territorial prison, Honolulu, Oahu 688 

VI. A, Armory for National Guard at Honolulu, Oahu; B, Armory at 

Lahaina, Maui 688 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF 
INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



15036°— int 1913— vol 2 1 



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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN 

AFFAIRS. 



Department of the Interior, 
Office Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 

December 8, 1918. 
Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith the Eighty-second 
Annual Report of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, covering the period 
from July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1913. 

GENERAL, STATEMENT. 

During the last fiscal year the Bureau of Indian Affairs was under 
the direction of Hon. R. G. Valentine, Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs, up to the time of his resignation, September 12, 1912. There- 
after, Hon. F. H. Abbott, Assistant Commissioner, was in charge as 
Acting Commissioner until June 4, 1913, on which date I took the 
the oath of office as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 

Before giving a r&umfi of the activities of the Indian Bureau for 
the last fiscal year, I deem it appropriate to invite attention to a few 
of the larger questions which now confront this office for solution in 
the administration of the affairs of the Indians. 

It may be interesting to note that the Indian country, under the 
jurisdiction of this office, covers an area almost as large as that of 
all the New England States and the State of New York combined. 

There are about 6,000 employees in the Indian Service, who 
supervise the affairs of about 300,000 Indians, whose combined 
property is estimated to be worth nearly $900,000,000. 

There have been appropriated by Congress for the Indian Service 
and for fulfilling treaty stipulations with the various Indian tribes 
since the fiscal year 1881 the following amounts: 

Appropriations since 1881. 

1881 to 1890 $53,797,649.09 

1891 to 1900 78,883,746.47 

1901 to 1910 93, 337, 617. 42 

1911 10, 129, 357. 29 

1912 8,957,199.64 

1913 9,055,614.43 

1914 9,461,819.67 

Total 263, 623, 004. 01 

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4 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

The Government is the guardian of this vast Indian estate. How 
this property shall be conserved for the benefit of the Indians and 
how they shall be taught to make the best possible use thereof so 
that they may ultimately take their rightful place as self-supporting 
citizens of the Republic are the great problems confronting this 
bureau. 

A few of the administrative details yet to be worked out or com- 
pleted may be mentioned as follows: 

1. It is estimated that under the act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 
855) there are now pending at the various agencies throughout the 
Indian country, awaiting the determination of the heirs, about 40,000 
heirship cases, which represent inherited lands valued at approxi- 
mately $60,000,000. There are pending in this office about 1,500 
heirship cases on which final action has not been taken. 

A large appropriation is needed in order to enable the office to 
bring this work up to date. When the heirs are determined the 
inherited lands will be available for sale and the proceeds can be 
used to improve the allotments of the heirs. Expediting the work 
of determining the heirs of deceased Indian allottees is one of the 
urgent necessities of the Indian Service. 

2. The allotting of lands to individual Indians has been continued 
ever since the enactment of the general allotment act of February 8, 
1887 (24 Stat. L., 388). It is estimated that there have been 
allotted to 180,000 Indians about 34,000,000 acres and there remain 
to be allotted about 39,000,000 acres. There are nearly 120,000 
unallotted Indians. There has been expended for allotment work 
heretofore completed about $4,500,000, and it is believed that it will 
require at least $3,000,000 to complete the allotment work. 

I find that there are a large number of the reservations which not 
only have not yet been allotted but which have not been surveyed. 
The earliest possible completion of the allotment work is desirable, 
as it is the main chance of perhaps 70 per cent of the Indians to become 
self-supporting, and this work is also preliminary to the opening of 
reservations. The settlement of white people in the Indian country 
will result in very materially increasing the value of the lands retained 
by the Indians as their allotments, for it will be the means of locating 
therein free schools, churches, good roads, and other agencies of a 
modern and progressive community. 

3. The timber holdings of the Indians have stumpage value of 
more than $80,000,000. Approximately one-seventh of this value 
is in timber upon allotted lands. The greater part of the unallotted 
timber is upon nonagricultural lands in the Rocky Mountain and 
Pacific States. The timber cover on these tribal lands bears a very 
direct relation to the regulation of a water supply for lands both 
within and outside of Indian reservations. Even where it is not 

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BBPOBT OF THE C0MMI8SI0NEB OF INDIAN APFAIB8. 5 

essential tibat the forest cover be maintained on tribal lands for water 
conservation purposes, it is frequently advisable that the forest be 
perpetuated as a source of fuel and lumber supply. 

Que of the difficult problems which confront the Indian Service is 
the administration of these timber lands so as to derive a sustained 
revenue adequate to provide for the needs of the Indians aa agri- 
cultural development takes place within the Indian reservations and 
yet not affect unfavorably the future needs both as regard the timber 
and water supply. The solution of this problem will require sound 
business foresight, enlightened by the scientific principles which 
form the basis of the practice of both forestry and irrigation. 

Practically nothing has yet been done in the line of valuation 
surveys and the preparation of working plans. The timber upon 
tribal lands in the Western States has heretofore been inaccessible, 
but railroads recently constructed or now projected will afford an 
outlet for a large amount of such timber. The valuable timber of the 
Indians should be made a very potent agency in promoting their 
progress. 

4. Notwithstanding the fact that the Government has provided 
since 1876 approximately $80,000,000 for schools among the Indians, 
there are to-day about 10,000 Indian children without any school 
facilities whatever, principally in the Southwest and more particu- 
larly among the Navajo and Papago Indians. There are also about 
7,500 defective Indian children, either physically or mentally, for 
whom no adequate facilities are available for their care and training. 

The present available appropriations for Indian schools provide 
for 223 Indian day schools situated on Indian reservations near the 
Indian homes, 76 boarding schools located on the reservations, and 
35 boarding schools located off the reservations and known as non- 
reservation schools. Of the 65,000 Indian children of school age, 
these schools care for approximately 25,000. There are enrolled in 
mission and public schools 22,500 Indian children, leaving 17,500 
normal and defective Indian children unprovided for. Efforts will 
be made to procure increased appropriations for Indian school work 
so that all Indian children may be provided with school facilities. 
All Government schools for Indians are largely industrial. 

5. I find that the health conditions among the Indians are deplor- 
able. Under the jurisdiction of this bureau there are approximately 
25,000 Indians suffering from tuberculosis. Available Indian hospital 
facilities for all these patients, adults and children, will not exceed 300 
beds. During the last fiscal year 1,905 Indians were reported as 
having died from tuberculosis. This is probably not more than 75 
per cent of the total number of Indians who have died from this 
disease during the fiscal year. Of the whole number of deaths 
reported from the various Indian reservations, 32 per cent were due 

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6 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONS OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 

to pulmonary tuberculosis, as against 11.2 per cent due to the same 
disease occurring in the registration area of the United States. The 
death rate among Indians is 32.24 per thousand, while the Census 
Bureau gives 16 per thousand in the registration area of the United 
States. 

It is also estimated that there are more than 60,000 Indians in the 
United States who are suffering from trachoma. This eye disease is 
considered so serious as to cause the exclusion from this country of all 
immigrants who are thus afflicted. It will be remembered that the 
Indians are living among a very large white population, which is an 
added reason for taking every precaution to check and control this 
disease. Additional appropriations are needed to construct and 
equip hospitals to be located on Indian reservations and to check and 
control disease among Indians and to improve their health conditions 
generally. 

6. The housing conditions of the Indians throughout the country 
is one of the important subjects which demand immediate considera- 
tion. It is estimated that there are approximately 8,000 Indian 
families without homes, who live in mud lodges, tepees, or wickiups — 
a large number of them on dirt floors and under the most revolting, 
insanitary conditions. There are thousands of other Indian families 
who live in one and two room shacks or cabins, under sanitary condi- 
tions that must of necessity cause the propagation and transmission 
of the most dangerous diseases, such as tuberculosis and trachoma. 

Notwithstanding the fact that a large number of the Indians have 
been allotted valuable lands, ranging from 80 to 320 acres to each 
Indian, these deplorable housing conditions continue to exist. An 
Indian family owning from 400 to 1,000 acres of valuable land cer- 
tainly should not be permitted much longer to live under sanitary 
conditions that are a serious reflection on Indian administration. 

The Indians own tribal and individual timber valued at more than 
$80,000,000, and as the Government has provided a large number of 
sawmills located on different reservations throughout the Indian 
country, it is my purpose to enter into a vigorous campaign to improve 
the housing conditions of Indians wherever practicable. 

7. The Indian water-right situation on a large number of reserva- 
tions is such as to demand most serious consideration. Unfortu- 
nately, legislation has been enacted by Congress which makes beneficial 
use of water on Indian lands within certain reservations necessary, 
if the water rights are to be held by the Indians. Congress ha3 pro- 
vided appropriations for constructing expensive irrigation projects on 
several reservations, reimbursable out of Indian f unds, and the Indians 
are required to make beneficial use of the water on said reservations 
within a limited time. If this is not done they will be in danger of 
losing their water rights and forfeiting the same to subsequent appro- 
priators of the water. On a large number of the reservations agri- 



EEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 7 

cultural lands are practically valueless without water. The Govern- 
ment holds the allotted lands in trust for the benefit of Indians for a 
period of 25 years, because of the fact that they are deemed incompe- 
tent to protect their property rights. It seems equally important to 
conserve the water rights of the Indians, at the same time encouraging 
them to make beneficial use of the water by farming their allotments. 
In this connection it should be remembered that the Indians, in a 
large number of cases, live far removed from railroad facilities, that 
they are handicapped by lack of adequate live stock and fanning 
implements, and that they are living and working under conditions 
which would discourage even the most progressive white farmers who 
are well trained and accustomed to hard work on their farms. Legis- 
lation will probably be necessary in a number of cases to protect fully 
the water rights of the Indians. 

I find also that Indian tribal funds have been used in construction 
and maintenance of irrigation projects, and that only a certain portion 
of the Indians have received any benefit from the irrigation systems. 
This is a question that will necessarily have to be worked out with 
great care, in order that the Indians who receive the benefits from 
irrigation projects shall be required to pay the cost of the same. 

It is proposed to give the question of water rights of Indians very 
thorough and careful consideration, with the hope of fully protecting 
the- rights of the wards of the Government. 

8. I find the work of this bureau is very materially in arrears and 
that it is practically impossible with the present force to bring the 
work of the office up to date and keep it current. 

The employees of this office, as a rule, are diligent, intelligent, and 
faithful. The records show that they did 1,522 days voluntary over- 
time during the last fiscal year in an effort to keep the work of the 
bureau as nearly current as possible. 

Because of the breaking up of tribal relations and the making of 
individual allotments, the necessary work of the Indian Office has 
been very much increased during recent years without a corresponding 
increase in the number of employees. For example, the increase of 
work for 1913 over 1899 was 361.34 per cent, while the increase in 
employees in the Indian Office for 1913 over 1899 was only 134.65 
per cent. The number of letters received in the Indian Office during 
the year 1899 was only 59,707, while the number of letters received 
during the fiscal year 1913 was 275,452. This was an increase of 
23.97 per cent over the preceding year. 

It is apparent that the policy of individualizing Indian property 
and the removing of restrictions from the Indian as fast as he demon- 
strates competency, together with the proper protection of incompe- 
tents and minors, will greatly increase the work of this office for sev- 
eral years, and that the faster these things are accomplished the 

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8 BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 

greater will be the office force required to handle allotments, sales of 
tribal property and allotted timber and agricultural lands, the deter- 
mining of heirs, the granting of patents in fee, the handling of segre- 
gated trust funds, and the numerous other duties devolving upon this 
office. 

I wish to emphasize the fact that the work of the Indian Bureau, 
handling a trust estate valued at approximately $900,000,000 belong- 
ing to 300,000 wards of the Government, should not be crippled 
further because of the failure to procure an additional appropriation 
of approximately $50,000 for employees whose services are abso- 
lutely necessary to keep the work of this bureau current. I shall 
include in the estimates for employees for this bureau a request for 
the additional help absolutely required. 

9. The conditions existing in eastern Oklahoma among the Five 
Civilized Tribes in connection with the probating and handling of the 
estates of minor Indians in the local State courts are such as to 
require prompt consideration. I consider it very important that an 
appropriation of at least $75,000 be procured in the next Indian 
appropriation act, so as to enable this office to employ probate attor- 
neys to look after the interests of minor Indians in the Five Civilized 
Tribes, and to meet properly the probate situation now existing in 
eastern Oklahoma. 

If proper action is not promptly taken, it is only a question of time 
until a very large number of the Indians in eastern Oklahoma will be 
deprived of their property, with the result that they will become 
charges on the local community. 

10. There is undoubtedly a larger field for the improvement of 
existing industrial conditions of the Indians than any other activity 
of the Indian Service. 

I find that the Indians have more than 600,000 acres of irrigable 
land, approximately 9,000,000 acres of other agricultural lands, more 
than 50,000,000 acres of grazing lands, and that the Government 
has expended approximately $10,000,000 in connection with Indian 
irrigation projects. 

Many able-bodied Indians who have valuable lands are wholly or 
partially without seeds, teams, implements, and other equipment 
to utilize properly such lands. This is particularly true in several 
reservations where large sums of public or tribal funds have been used 
in constructing irrigation systems, and is in part the reason why such 
large areas of irrigable and other agricultural lands are not under 
cultivation. 

The valuable grazing lands of the Indians offer unusual opportuni- 
ties for increasing the meat supply of the country, at the same time 
furnishing a profitable employment for the Indians as well as utiliz- 
ing their valuable grazing lands. During the last year the Indians 

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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 9 

cultivated less than 600,000 acres of their vast area of agricultural 
lands. 

It shall be my purpose to attempt to procure reimbursable appro- 
priations so as to advance to the Indians needed agricultural equip- 
ment in order that they may make beneficial use of their resources 
and become self-supporting and progressive citizens. These reim- 
bursable appropriations, if procured and properly used, will result in 
ultimately decreasing the gratuity appropriations for Indians. 

I find that there is need for additional legislation by Congress to 
meet the problems arising, such as legislation authorizing the minin g 
on Executive-order reservations, legislation segregating tribal and 
trust funds in the United States Treasury, legislation authorizing the 
submission of claims of Indian tribes to the Court of Claims, and other 
additional legislation which will be prepared and ready for submission 
to the Congress at its regular session in December. 

The foregoing are a few of the many important problems confront- 
ing this bureau. The following contains a r6sum6 of the work of the 
bureau during the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913: 

AGRICULTURAL, WORK. 

Agriculture has been given the first place in this report because it 
has received greater emphasis than any other activity of the Indian 
Bureau during the last fiscal year. The results of the stress placed 
upon this subject are shown in a general awakening to the recognition 
of agriculture and stockraising as the main road for the Indians' 
advancement toward civilization. 

Realizing that each Indian is a problem, and the only hope of 
success is to go to each one and see what he has, what he needs, and 
show him how to make the best use of his resources, special efforts 
have been made during the year to bring the workers in the Indian 
Service into closer touch with the Indian's life and his everyday 
problems. 

Reservations, in the sense in which they were formerly known, 
are gradually disappearing, and the Indians are taking their places 
on homesteads and allotments, and are finding themselves face to 
face with the all-important and serious problem of gaining a liveli- 
hood for themselves and families, some from the soil and others 
from live stock. 

The reservations are now largely divided into farm or stock dis- 
tricts, and a farmer or stockman is stationed in each. Approxi- 
mately 249 farmers and 13 assistants were employed at the various 
reservations during the year. They make their homes, to a large 
extent, in such districts, thereby keeping in the closest possible 
touch with the activities of the individual Indians, and advising and 
directing them in their operations. 

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10 REPORT OP THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Books dealing with various industrial topics have been purchased 
and sent to a number of schools for the use of the school and reserva- 
tion employees. 

Experimentation in agriculture is being carried on at Pima, San 
Juan, Shoshone, Pala, Colville, Kaibab, San Xavier, Shivwits, and 
Leupp, while efforts are being made to utilize all the reservation 
Indian school farms to demonstrate to the older Indians the possi- 
bilities of the soil, at the same time producing the maximum income 
to be used in the support of the school plant. 

STOCK RAISING. 

In addition to the farmers, 37 stockmen were employed to give 
special attention to this important industry. The plan, begun about 
a year ago, of rounding up and disposing of worthless pony stallions 
and other breeding stock was continued during the year. Stallions 
of the draft type and a good grade of bulls, cows, and heifers were 
purchased for a number of reservations. 

Good results are being accomplished by breeding the pony mares 
with stallions of the draft type weighing 1,400 to 1,600 pounds. 
One of the greatest difficulties to be met in encouraging the Indians 
to farm more of their lands is the poor condition of their stock. 
The introduction of the larger stallions among their herds is gradually 
overcoming this obstacle, and the Indians are cooperating in the 
plan of upbreeding their stock. 

COOPERATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND 

OTHERS. 

The Department of Agriculture and its various bureaus and also a 
number of the State authorities have continued to give our service 
much valuable advice and aid in the inspection of livestock, eradi- 
cation of diseases of animals and plants, the protection of orchards, 
the improvement of seeds, and the promotion of improved farming 
methods. 

The Bureau of Plant Industry has sent to Government farmers as 
well as to Indian farmers, bulletins on various phases of agricultural 
industry, and pamphlets on home topics for the women. Drought- 
resisting seeds were sent to Indian schools in arid and semiarid 
sections of the country, and a supply was also sent to 1,000 progres- 
sive Indians. 

The Bureau of Entomology cooperated in the work of eradicating 
grasshoppers and potato bugs, and in the inspection of orchards on 
several reservations. Local State authorities also gave advice and 
aid in this work. 

The Bureau of Animal Industry has been very generous in fur- 
nishing experts to assist in the purchase and inspection of breeding 

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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OP INDIAN APEAHtS. 11 

stock bought for the Indians, and in the eradication of dourine, 
glanders, mange, ticks, and other diseases of live stock. 

The dairy being an important adjunct of practically all the Indian 
schools, the Bureau of Animal Industry has continued its work of 
sending experts to the schools for the purpose of making tuberculin 
tests of the dairy herds and inspecting methods of dairying. 

The farmers among the Five Civilized Tribes continued their 
cooperative work with the various organizations in ihe State, both 
national and local. The business men, railway companies, and com- 
mercial clubs of eastern Oklahoma are all aiding Indian Service 
farmers in the campaign for general improvement among the Indians 
of this section. 

REIMBURSABLE FUNDS FOB PROMOTING AGRICULTURE. 

The office has during the year continued to utilize tribal funds 
and funds appropriated by Congress as revolving, reimbursable funds 
to purchase needed live stock and farming equipment for those 
Indians who have neither the cash nor the credit to purchase the 
equipment necessary to make their lands productive. These funds 
are repaid by the Indians in accordance with the terms of definite 
written agreements. 

Appropriations for the purchase of agricultural implements, wag- 
ons, and other supplies and live stock to be sold to the Indians under 
the reimbursable plan are being used at the following reservations: 
Fitt Belknap, Tongue River, Flathead, Pueblo (Albuquerque, Santa 
Fe), Fort Mojave, Martinez, Pala, Pechanga, Soboba, San Xavier, 
Walker River, Shawnee, Malki, Fort McDermitt, and Salt River. 

The practice heretofore in vogue of issuing implements, wagons, 
harness, stock, etc., to Indians in return for labor is being gradually 
discontinued on several reservations, the Indians being given the 
privilege either of paying cash for what they get, or in the case of 
seed, returning to the superintendent an equal value in kind. This 
seed is then stored at the agency and the next year it is reissued upon 
the same conditions to other Indians who need assistance of this 
character. 

While the precise number of Indians benefited through these 
reimbursable appropriations and funds can not be stated in exact 
numbers, the number runs well up into the hundreds, and superin- 
tendents are unanimous in their testimony as to the good which has 
been accomplished. The money has been expended for the benefit 
of able-bodied Indians in amounts not exceeding $600, under regu- 
lations approved by the department on November 4, 1911, which 
provide for the proper use and repayment of the money. The 
Indians for the most part are meeting their payments when due and 
with surprising promptness. 

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12 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN A9FAIBS. 

AGRICULTURAL FAIRS AND ASSOCIATIONS. 

Fairs were held at Crow, Crow Creek, Fort Belknap, Fort Peck, 
Fort Totten, Lower BruW, Nevada, Pima, Pine Ridge, Pala, Rose- 
bud, Standing Rock, San Carlos, Soboba, Sac and Fox, Iowa, Santee, 
Sisseton, San Juan, Tongue River, Cheyenne River, and Uintah and 
Ouray in the fall of 1912. A joint fair for the four Cheyenne and 
Arapaho superintendences in Oklahoma was held, and about 2,500 
Indians visited the fair, where one of the special features was a health 
exhibit, with posters giving sanitary maxims, diagrams, etc. 

The Indians at Camp Verde, Fallon, Fort Lapwai, Western Navajo, 
Kiowa, Malki, Oneida, Pawnee, Rapid City, Red Lake, Sac and Fox, 
Iowa, Salt River, Siletz, San Xavier, Union, Uintah and Ouray, and 
White Earth had exhibits at the county and State fairs. 

Farmers' clubs have been organized at Malki, Sisseton, Union, 
Fond du Lac, Oto, Potawatomi, Ponca, Standing Rock, Tongue 
River, Winnebago, and Yankton. A boys' corn club was started at 
Red Moon. An industrial workers' association was organized at Red 
Cliff. Farmers' institutes for the discussion of agricultural and other 
topics of interest to the Indians were held at a number of places, 
principally at Potawatomi, Union, and Sisseton. 

Many of the fairs are self-supporting, and a very gratifying feature 
has been the increased number of Indians taking part in county and 
State fairs. 

FARMING AND GRAZING LEASES. 

Under the act of Congress, dated June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855), 
the allottees of lands held under trust patents are authorized to lease 
their allotments for a period not to exceed five years, under regula- 
tions prescribed by the department. Under these regulations allot- 
tees at various agencies have been classified as competent and non- 
competent, the competent Indians being permitted to transact the 
business incidental to making their own leases and collecting their 
own rentals. In the case of incompetent Indians, leases of lands are 
negotiated in the agency office and the rentals paid through the super- 
intendent. All leases made by Indians classified as competent are 
subject only to the approval of the superintendent. During the past 
year the privilege of negotiating their own leases was given to 1,198 
Indians. 

LEASING ON THE UINTAH AND OURAY RESERVATION. 

Under the laws of the State of Utah, in order to preserve the water 
rights, beneficial use must be made before the summer of 1919 of 
water to irrigate 78,000 acres of excellent agricultural land now under 
ditch on the Uintah and Ouray Reservation. In order to reclaim as 
much as possible of this land before the expiration of this time limit, 

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BRPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 13 

a vigorous Advertising campaign has been inaugurated offering to 
lessees very favorable terms for leasing land within the next two years. 
In some cases it is only required that the lessee clear the land of sage 
brush, level it, and leave buildings on the leased premises to the value 
of about $500 at the expiration of the lease. 

LEASING ON THE WIND RIVER RESERVATION. 

Lands on the Shoshone Indian Reservation have been advertised 
for lease and sale on very liberal terms. The immediate reclamation 
of irrigable lands on this reservation was necessary not only to pro- 
vide income for the Indians, but chiefly to comply with the State law 
requiring beneficial use of the water before the year 1916. Thirty- 
two tracts out of over 87 advertised during the last fiscal year were 
sold. The total irrigable area on this reservation to be reclaimed is 
65,674 acres, 35,000 acres of which are already subject to irrigation, 
$607,637 of Indian money having been expended on this project. 

GRAZING ON TRIBAL LANDS. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, there was received for 
grazing privileges on tribal lands (exclusive of ceded lands) approxi- 
mately $435,000. 

GRAZING ON OPEN LANDS. 

One of the most important developments in the leasing policy 
during the last fiscal year was a decision of the department per- 
mitting the leasing of so-called ceded Indian lands, which thereto- 
fore had been grazed free of charge by stockmen. Regulations gov- 
erning the use for grazing purposes of these vacant Indian lands 
turned over to the Government to be sold, promulgated on July 25, 
1912, have been put into operation on seven reservations. During 
the year permits to use such lands for grazing have been issued, 
rentals therefrom aggregating about $75,000. 

ROAJD BUILDING. 

A systematic plan of road building and improvement is being 
gradually worked out under which each able-bodied Indian is re- 
quired to donate a certain number of days 1 labor each year. At 
Shoshone Reservation a very comprehensive system of roads has 
been planned, which is a part of the national system of highways. 
At San Carlos, in Arizona, much road work has been done, and a 
new bridge has been constructed across the Black River, which 
divides the San Carlos from the Fort Apache Reservation. This 
road and bridge will enable the Fort Apache superintendency to 
receive its supplies from the south over a distance which is consider- 
ably less than that from the present railroad station to the north. 

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14 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

SUPPRESSION OP THE UEQUOR TRAFFIC. 

The use of intoxicating liquor is an insurmountable bar between 
the Indian and progress. Education, health campaigns, appropri- 
ations to encourage industry, all fail so long as he uses intoxicants. 
Realizing this, the bureau has continued during the year with vigor 
the campaign against illegal sales of intoxicating liquor to Indians 
and its introduction into what is termed the " Indian country.' ' 

GENERAL OPERATIONS. 

While special emphasis was laid upon the separation of Indians 
from whisky and not the multiplication of individual cases, there 
was a total of 1,054 cases instituted, and convictions were secured 
in 553 cases, while 114 were dismissed. 

As three-fourths of the Indians in Minnesota are citizens, the Fed- 
eral officers have curtailed their operations in that State, as the sale 
of liquor to them must be prosecuted under the State laws. 

Operations in New Mexico, among the Pueblos, were restricted by 
the decision of the United States district court in the case of United 
States v. Sandoval (198 Fed. Rep., 539), which held that the portion 
of enabling act declaring the lands of the Pueblo Indians to be Indian 
country was unconstitutional. This case is now before the Supreme 
Court of the United States. 

An important decision affecting the use of tulapai or tiswin was 
handed down during the year. The Indians of the Southwest brew 
this beverage, which is a fermented product made from corn and 
various roots. Recently the superintendent of the Salt River Reser- 
vation instituted proceedings and obtained a conviction against an 
Indian who had supplied other Indians with tiswin, on the charge of 
furnishing intoxicating liquor to Indians in violation of the pro- 
visions of the act of January 30, 1897. 

An active campaign against the liquor traffic among Indians is 
being waged in Oklahoma. In that State during the year 179 
arrests were made, 52 convictions secured, and 24,865 pints of liquor 
seized and destroyed. Every step has been contested in the courts, 
resulting in two Supreme Court decisions, three decisions of the cir- 
cuit court of appeals, and six decisions of the district courts, besides 
the various cases taken into the State courts. One-third of the 
Indian population of the United States resides within the State of 
Oklahoma, which, owing to the great agricultural and mineral 
wealth of this Indian population, offers an attractive field for the 
bootlegger. 

On September 19, 1912, Deputy Special Officer R. L. Bowman was 
killed, and Posseman W. R. Mayfield was wounded while in the per- 
formance of duty. Considerable liquor was being introduced into 
Oklahoma from Kansas, and, upon receiving information that a 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 15 

shipment was being made, these officers set out to intercept, seize 
and destroy it after it crossed the State line. The drivers were 
arrested, searched, and three loaded revolvers taken from them. 
Two loads of liquor had been destroyed and the greater part of the 
third, when Officer Mayfield went over to the fourth and commenced 
destroying its contents. An automobile came from the direction of 
the Kansas line at a rapid rate of speed, set the emergency brakes 
directly opposite the wagon upon which Mr. Bowman was standing, 
and one of the occupants opened fire with a shotgun. Mr. Bowman 
was killed, Officer Mayfield received three slight wounds, and an 
onlooker was shot in the right breast. The State authorities of 
Kansas and Oklahoma were asked to take immediate action, and the 
United States attorney at Muskogee immediately brought action 
against these parties. Two of them have been found guilty in the 
Federal court on the charge of conspiracy to deprive an officer of the 
rights guaranteed him by the Constitution. 

DIFFICULTIES OF THE LIQUOR SERVICE. 

The officers engaged in the work of suppressing the liquor traffic 
among the Indians are called upon to face situations which require 
the special exercise of tact and judgment; they inust handle the 
bootlegger on the one side, and the Indian and the witnesses on the 
other; they must conduct their operations so as to get results and yet 
endeavor not unnecessarily to antagonize the best men of the local 
community or create a sentiment against their work. The Oklahoma 
situation is a striking example of the risks that the officers must take, 
and it is therefore essential that these men should be encouraged and 
afforded every possible personal safeguard. Congress (37 Stat. L., 
519) extended to these officers the powers conferred by section 788 
of the Revised Statutes upon marshals and their deputies. This also 
applies to all persons working under the supervision of the chief 
special officer "whose appointments are made or affirmed by the 
Commissioner of Indian Affairs or the Secretary of the Interior/ ' 

USE OF LIQUOR AMONG EMPLOYEES. 

It has been found in some instances that white employees of the 
Indian Service have introduced liquor upon reservations under 
physicians' prescriptions, and although possibly none of this liquor 
found its way to Indians it was a direct violation of the law and 
guilty persons have been prosecuted. To stop absolutely this prac- 
tice an order was issued to employees strictly forbidding the use by 
them of intoxicants even under physicians' prescriptions, and regula- 
tions were issued, after securing permission from the War Depart- 
ment, to govern Indian Service physicians in the use of ethyl alcohol 
for medicinal and scientific purposes among the Indians and employees 
of the Government. 



16 EBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBB. 

WINES FOB SACRAMENTAL PURPOSES. 

In order to overcome a hardship affecting the various churches on 
the reservations, Congress (37 Stat. L., 519) has provided that wines 
used solely for sacramental purposes under church authority could 
be introduced at any place within the Indian country, or any Indian 
reservation, including the Pueblo reservations in New Mexico. 

DENVER CONFERENCE. 

On December 30 and 31, 1912, and January 1, 1913, a conference 
of all the special officers and a representative of the office was held 
at Denver for the purpose of arriving at a better understanding as to 
the needs of the service and the maimer of operating and conducting 
the work. The conference was a profitable one, resulting in a better 
understanding of the work and a closer cooperation of the officers of 
this special service and other field employees of this bureau. 

PEYOTE. 

Very careful consideration is being given to the question of the 
use of peyote. Much information has been submitted both by 
Indians who were members of so-called mescal organizations and 
who have pressed their petitions for permission to use it, and by 
missionaries, physicians in the Government service, and others inter- 
ested in both sides of the question. The bureau has taken a firm 
stand against the introduction and use of peyote in the Indian 
country, and directed its liquor officers to obtain evidence of the use 
of this drug with a view to prosecution, on the ground that the data 
in the files of the bureau fully warrant the classification of peyote 
as an intoxicant. A full discussion of peyote was incorporated in the 
annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1911. 

FORESTRY. 

The systematic attempt to ascertain the amount and value of the 
timber on Indian lands, begun in 1910, has been continued. When 
consideration is given to the extent of the areas embraced, to the unde- 
veloped condition of these areas, and to the very large part of these 
lands still unsurveyed, the magnitude of the undertaking will be readily 
appreciated. The timber growth varies from the scrubby mesquite 
and pinon on the arid plateaus of Arizona and New Mexico to the 
giant redwood of the Hoopa Valley region in California, and from 
the scattered red cedar and cottonwood of the subhumid plains and 
their water courses to the dense virgin stands of spruce, fir, and 
cedar in the Puget Sound region. 

The best information available places the total amount of timber 
on both tribal lands and allotments at approximately 40,000,000,000 
feet, with a value of about $84,000,000. 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 17 

The building of telephone lines, roads, and trails for the protection 
of timber has been continued, and the advantage of such means of 
communication has been demonstrated. A total of the forest and 
prairie fires reported from all reservations during the calendar year 
ended December 31, 1912, showed that the great majority were 
extinguished before any great damage was done. Approximately 
900,000 feet of timber were injured, about 50,000 acres were burned 
over, and the total damage done by all fires was estimated at only 
$10,000. A large part of this is estimated damage to forage and 
young growth. 

Logging operations on the Bad River, Lac du Flambeau, Lao 
Courte Oreille, and Fond du Lac Reservations have been continued 
by the regular contractors. The total amount cut on each of these 
reservations was as follows: Bad River, 57,183,770 feet; Lac du 
Flambeau, 23,049,110; Lac Courte Oreille, 4,268,050 feet; Fond du 
Lac, 13,128,775 feet. All of this timber was cut on allotments 
except 12,068,620 feet cut from unpatented lands of the Lac du 
Flambeau Reservation, claimed by the State of Wisconsin as swamp 
lands, and 56,955 feet cut from tribal lands of the Bad River 
Reservation. 

In the summer of 1910 the pine timber on the Red Lake Indian 
Reservation was injured by fire. An attempt to dispose of this 
timber in 1911 at minimum prices of $8 for white pine and $6 for 
Norway was unsuccessful. The timber was considerably damaged 
by standing after burning. In the autumn of 1912 it was again 
advertised at a lower price. During the logging season of 1912-13 
there were removed 9,411,920 feet of white pine and 4,426,620 feet 
of Norway, for which $71,167.80 has been received. About 1,000,000 
feet still remain upon one of these tracts. This will be cut during the 
season of 1913-14. 

Timber on allotments under the Red Cliff Indian Reservation was 
advertised for sale during the fiscal year 1913, but no bids were 
received. 

On December 17, 1912, the department approved the recommenda- 
tion of this office that all existing contracts between Mr. A. V. Johnson 
and allottees of the Grand Portage Reservation be canceled, and that 
no further contracts be made under the authority granted to Mr. 
Johnson on November 4, 1907. Very many of the original allottees 
of Grand Portage are deceased, and the heirs have not been deter- 
mined in most instances. As soon as such determinations are made 
an attempt can be made to dispose of the remaining timber. 

About 20,000,000 feet of timber standing on allotments under the 
jurisdiction of the superintendent of the Leech Lake Indian School 
were sold under sealed bids opened on March 28, 1912. 

15936°— int 1913— vol 2 2 

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18 BSFQBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIH. 

The tie industry on the Jicarilla Reservation has been continued 
with success; but the destruction by fire of the agency sawmill on 
May 30, 1913, interrupted the work, which had just begun to show 
results. Steps toward the rebuilding of the mill were taken imme- 
diately. No timber was cut on this reservation during the year under 
the contract with the Navajo Lumber & Supply Co. for 130,000,000 
feet, consummated in 1912. 

Sales of 1,500,000 feet, at $3.25 per thousand, and 10,000,000 feet, 
at $3.51 per thousand, were made from tribal lands of the Klamath 
Indian Reservation. 

The 16 sections of pine lands in the Choctaw Nation segregated 
under authority of section 7 of the act of April 26, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 
137), were offered for sale for cash, as required by the act, at four 
different limes, and wide notice was given in each offering. The only 
bids received were rejected as not representing the value of land and 
timber. Realizing the impracticability of selling this land and timber 
for its market value at a cash sale, upon recommendation of the 
department, legislation was enacted as a part of the Indian appro* 
priation act for 1913, which provided for sale under deferred pay* 
ments. On August 30, 1912, the timber and land were reoffered on 
terms of a payment of 25 per cent of the purchase price within 60 
days from acceptance of bid, 25 per cent additional within 12 months, 
and the remainder within two years, all deferred payments to draw 
interest at 6 per cent per annum from the time of the acceptance of 
the bid. There was a ready response to the more liberal terms of this 
advertisement, and after brisk bidding at public auction the land and 
timber were sold for $287,000. These timber lands had been appraised 
by several different parties. The price received was more than 
$40,000 above the highest appraisal ever placed upon them and 
$120,000 above the highest offer received under any one of the earlier 
offerings. 

MENOMINEB INDIAN MILLS. 

The Menominee Indian mill, at Neopit, Wis., established in the 
spring of 1908, by the act of March 28, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 51), to man- 
ufacture into lumber the timber on the Menominee Indian Reserva- 
tion, reports progress. The town of Neopit numbers over 900 people, 
composed largely of white and Indian laborers in the lumber indus- 
try, and contains churches, schools, stores, a music hall, and hotel. 
The mill has a capacity of 150,000 feet of lumber daily, beside lath, 
shingles, crating, and other miscellaneous products. The project 
owns and operates its own logging railway, about 35 miles in total 
length. The planing mill has recently been enlarged to double its 
former capacity, a new engine and new machines for finishing lumber 
having been installed within the last year. The total investment in 
the plant is over $1,000,000. 

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BBP0BT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 10 

The timber on the reservation consists of about 1,750,000,000 feet 
of pine, hemlock, and hardwoods, of which approximately 40,000,000 
feet are cut annually, a basis which id calculated to insure a perpet- 
ual source of income for the Indians employed. In and about the 
mills, yards, camps, and railway are many Indians, some in skilled 
positions — the greater part in unskilled — all learning the value of 
daily employment and making social and economic progress. During 
the fiscal year just passed, an average of 322 Indians have been 
employed at an average wage of $29.70 per month. Of this number, 
271 were Menominees, an increase of 23 per cent over the number of 
Menominee Indians employed during the previous fiscal year. The 
able-bodied males of 18 years of age and over of the Menominee tribe 
number 408. 

The deputy supervisor of forests who was recently assigned to this 
project has experimented in the renewal of forests by reforesting 
burned-over districts and establishing a nursery. Forest damage on 
this reservation has been reduced to a minimum through careful 
patrol of the forest and the installation of a telephone system and the 
erection of lookout towers. 

IRRIGATION. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year 1913 the office of the chief 
engineer was removed from Los Angeles, Cal., to Washington, D. C. 
The irrigation force consists of the ohief inspector of irrigation, an 
assistant inspector of irrigation, who reports directly to the chief 
engineer, and six superintendents of irrigation at the head of as many 
districts, whose offices are convenient to the principal irrigation 
projects now under construction. 

The legal right to the use of water is of primary importance in the 
work of the irrigation branch of the Indian Service. The water right 
for Indian lands rests upon common-law riparian rights in some cases, 
and in others it would appear that beneficial use of water must be 
made before title can be acquired. The United States Supreme 
Court has decided in the case of Winters v. The United States (207 
U. S., 564) that prior appropriation by the United States and bene- 
ficial use by the Indians is not necessary, because of an implied reser- 
vation of water with and at the time of the reservation of the land 
sufficient for the irrigation thereof. However, the land in question 
had not been allotted, and the case did not involve the rights of any 
individual Indian but settled the right of the United States on behalf 
of unallotted Indians. 

There is urgent necessity for looking thoroughly into all conditions 
pertaining to water rights on the various reservations and to protect 
the Indians against the loss of such rights. 



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20 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

There is at present no general method of procuring reimbursement 
for maintenance and operation expenses of the irrigation systems on 
the various reservations. On a majority of the reservations no pro- 
vision is made for the reimbursement of this expense. Conditions on 
many reservations at the present time are such that it is not advisable 
to require that individuals pay the maintenance and operation ex- 
penses; but the time is not far distant when this method must change, 
and the owners benefited must bear this expense rather than allow 
it to be borne by the entire tribe or by the Government. 

The total sum of $624,066.54 was expended during the year in the 
irrigation by the Indian Service of Indian lands, of which the follow- 
ing amounts were expended on nine of the largest projects: Yakima, 
165,476.02; Fort Hall, $26,146.80; Uintah, $35,031.06; Fort Bel- 
knap, $20,313.58; Wind River, $31,236.65; Colorado River, 
$34,561.33; Fort Mojave, $34,978.47; Navajo and Moqui, $83,943.64, 
and Ganado, $13,420.86. 

health:. 

In accordance with directions contained in the Indian appropria- 
tion act approved August 24, 1912 (37 Stat. L., 519), the Surgeon 
General of the Public Health Service detailed 13 officers of that 
service to make an investigation as to the prevalence of tuberculosis, 
trachoma, smallpox, and other contagious and infectious diseases 
among the Indians of the United States, assigning each to a separate 
school or reservation. This investigation began September 28, 1912, 
and was concluded December 30, 1912, covering the tribes of Indians 
in 25 States and involving the personal inspection of 39,231 Indians. 
Senate Document No. 1038, Sixty-second Congress, contains a com- 
plete report of the investigation as transmitted to Congress by the 
Secretary of the Treasury. 

Comparative studies plainly show that the prevalence of tubercu- 
losis among Indians is greatly in excess of that among the white race, 
and the prevention of the ravages of this disease is the most important 
medical problem of the bureau. 

Repeated examinations with the Von Pirquet tuberculosis test 
have demonstrated that on many reservations tuberculosis infec- 
tion exists in as many as 90 per cent of the school children, and 
while this of course does not mean active cases, it does indicate the 
excessive incidence of the disease, much of which under favorable 
conditions may at some time become active. On account of the 
high incidence of tuberculosis in pupils of Indian schools the matter 
of health is one of paramount importance. 

The service sanatoria at Fort Lapwai, Idaho, Phoenix, Ariz., and 
Laguna, N. Mex., have each completed a successful year. Their 
success has stimulated the office to add to their number, and accord- 



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BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 21 

ingly there has been established at Toledo, Iowa, an additional sana- 
torium with a capacity of 65 patients, which by reason of its location 
will be admirably adapted for the treatment of children with incipi- 
ent tuberculosis from the northernmost reservations. Besides offer- 
ing them the advantages of sanatorium treatment, it will give them 
the benefit of a change of climate without taking them too far from 
home. As at the other sanatoria, a school will be provided for chil- 
dren able to take advantage of it. 

The force of ophthalmologists has been increased to six, each of 
whom has been assigned to a separate district in which he will have 
supervision of the eye work, it being the plan to have a qualified 
operator within reach of e4ch agency physician. These surgeons 
will be important factors in controlling the spread of trachoma. 

Trachoma with an incidence approaching 70 per cent was reported 
among the Five Civilized Tribes, presenting such an alarming situ- 
ation that an assistant medical supervisor was directed, during the 
fiscal year 1913, to make a survey of the whole Five Tribes country 
with a view of determining the medical and sanitary needs of the 
Indians. 

During the year epidemics of certain of the more common infec- 
tious diseases occurred on many reservations — diphtheria, smallpox, 
scarlet fever, and measles occurring most frequently. Diphtheria 
visited seven reservations during the year, with but one death in 54 
cases. This unusually low death rate is due to the close observa- 
tion under which the school children are kept by the physicians, the 
immediate use of diphtheria antitoxin, and the mild form in which 
the disease appeared. 

Smallpox occurred in a mild form excepting in the Five Tribes, 
where it appeared in a most virulent type. Indians generally sub- 
mitted cheerfully to vaccination by and followed the instructions of 
service physicians. 

Typhoid fever, a disease formerly so rare among Indians that 
many service physicians believed that there existed a racial immu- 
nity, is occurring with greater frequency, due in all probability to 
the closer contact of the Indians with the white race. Sufficient 
cases have already occurred and these have been so widely dis- 
tributed among the tribes that it can be safely said that the Indian 
is not naturally immune to this disease. 

By especially prepared lectures illustrated by stereopticon slides 
and motion pictures, delivered to Indians on the reservations during 
the past few years, appeal has been made direct to them to improve 
their living conditions, and they have been taught by this means 
how to guard against disease. These lectures have been well at- 
tended, and their influence for good has been great. 



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22 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 

INDIAN SCHOOLS. 

There were maintained 217 Indian day schools situated on the 
reservations near the Indian homes, for pupils from the first to the 
fifth grades. The boys were also instructed in gardening and . ele- 
mentary carpentry and the girls in sewing and housekeeping. A noon- 
day lunch is served at many of these schools. 

The typical Indian day school consists of a school building with a 
capacity of 25 to 40 pupils, a room for the serving of the noonday 
lunch, or for industrial training, and quarters for the employees, 
who are usually a teacher and his wife, the latter acting as house- 
keeper. There is always a garden at each school and frequently 
from 40 to 160 acres of land, which is used for grazing purposes. 

Seventy-six reservation boarding schools were maintained. They 
enrolled pupils for the entire year in grades from the first to the 
seventh, inclusive. These schools are better equipped than the day 
schools to give training along industrial lines to both the boys and 
the girls. The pupils are housed, clothed, and fed and allowed to 
return to their parents during the summer vacation. Ordinarily these 
schools have a capacity of from 75 to 400 pupils, the plant consisting 
of school buildings with classrooms and assembly halls, dormitories 
for girls and boys, and such accessory buildings as laundry, ware- 
house, shop buildings, and employees' quarters. 

There were 35 nonreservation boarding schools, situated off the 
reservations, some of them at a considerable distance from Indian 
communities. Pupils are brought to these schools at Government 
expense for periods of 3 to 5 years. These schools have more 
buildings and are usually better equipped than the reservation 
schools. There are several dormitories, large shops, increased facili- 
ties for the housing of employees, domestic science cottages, and also 
buildings for the electric power and heating plants. Their capacities 
range from 75 to 750 pupils. Nonreservation schools represent the 
highest class maintained for Indian pupils and furnish academic 
training through the eighth grade, a few doing work comparable with 
that given in the first year of public high schools. 

Indian children were also enrolled in 45 public schools in which a 
tuition was paid and in several hundred public schools in which no 
tuition was paid, not including the 325 public schools in eastern 
Oklahoma among the Five Civilized Tribes where the schools are in 
Indian communities but under the control of the State. Sixteen 
mission schools under contract and 53 not under contract enrolled 
Indian pupils. There is no record of the number of Indians enrolled 
in private schools. 



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KBPOBT OF TBS COMltflSSIOHEK OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 23 

VOCATIONAL TRAINING. 

For all pupils in and above the third grade industrial training 
occupies at least one-half their time. Superintendents are giving 
careful attention to the selection of the land of training taken up by 
the different pupils. If a boy has an allotment, he is advised not to 
take a regular trade course, but to take such training in carpentry, 
simple blacksmitking, etc., as would be of value to a farmer, for it is 
expected that he will return to his allotment. If a boy has no land, 
then he is encouraged to take up one of the trades. 

The vocational training for boys includes carpentry, blacksmithing, 
masonry, harness making, tailoring, plumbing, tinning, steam and 
electrical engineering, printing, and agriculture, and for girls house- 
hold economy. 

Many Indian pupils are the possessors of considerable land, and 
the boys, unless they have no land, are taught the wholesomeness 
and value of agricultural pursuits. Each girl is given the actual 
care of a group of rooms comparable with what she might have in 
her own home and taught how to care for them; she prepares and 
serves meals, preserves foods, and cares for poultry; also the proper 
care of the household from a sanitary point of view is taught. 

ACADEMIC TRAINING. 

Pupils are given such training as will enable them to acquire a 
ready use of conversational English. Many pupils come from Indian 
homes in which no English is spoken, and great care must be given 
to the first year's training in English. A satisfactory standard of 
acquirements has been set in many schools where pupils of this kind 
have learned to use, actually, at least 280 English words in one year. 
Two new words can be mastered each school day during the first two 
years by the average Indian pupil. This is the time when he can 
acquire more readily than at any other a knowledge of a new lan- 
guage; and every effort is being made to develop the pupils during 
this period. 

Better textbooks and supplemental reading matter, more black- 
boards for the classrooms, and primary equipment suitable for use 
in die primary grades have been in use. To prevent the spread of 
any contagious diseases from the handling of books, superintendents 
hav* been directed to reissue no soiled book or any book which has 
ever been in the hands of a pupil who might have such a disease. 
Hie courses of instruction followed in most Indian schools have con- 
formed quite closely to those used in the public schools of the State 
in which the school is situated. 



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24 BSPORT OF THB COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

VISUAL INSTRUCTION. 

One feature of the work which bears upon every phase of Indian 
education is that of visual instruction. Stereopticons are now in use 
at most of the schools and careful attention was given to the selec- 
tion of a complete list of topics suitable for use in the instruction of 
pupils in geography, history, industrial activities, manufacturing 
processes in connection with the production of machinery, etc. A 
series of lectures along moral lines was given by Dr. Milton Fairchfld 
in a number of schools, his talks being illustrated by selected pictures. 

This plan was used particularly in connection with the study of 
"Home building," which was the subject of essays written by the 
pupils of those schools maintaining grades above the second. The 
improvement of home conditions among Indians is of vital impor- 
tance to the future health, happiness and usefulness of the Indian. 
About 700 prizes were awarded to those pupils preparing the best 
essay on the subject of "Home building." The results obtained 
were excellent. The Indian children took great interest in the study 
and no doubt gained a large fund of practical and useful knowledge 
relative thereto. Many pupils prepared creditable house plans, 
wrote descriptions of their ideal houses and their equipment, and 
drew word pictures of their ideal future homes. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING. 

Outdoor life being essential to the health of Indian pupils, play- 
grounds are available at all schools; and where homemade apparatus 
has not been provided, the office has authorized the purchase of 
ample equipment for both boys and girls. Baseball, basket ball, 
and other forms of athletics are enjoyed at all the larger schools. 
The boys are organized into military companies, and in order to effect 
a uniform system of drilling a pamphlet has been published for the 
use of employees reproducing a portion of the Manual for Infantry 
Drills now used by the United States Army. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

A large number of Indian pupils have been enrolled in the public 
schools, and the relationship between the public-school authorities 
and the Indians has been very satisfactory. In most communities 
there is but little opposition to the enrollment of healthy Indian 
children in these schools. 

Where public-school facilities are available and Indian parents are 
owners of taxable property but have actually paid little or no taxes, 
the public-school authorities have maintained, when the district is 
poor financially, that children of such parents should pay for tuition 
in the public schools, the tuition to be paid for by the General Gov- 



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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 25 

eminent. The office has taken the position that whenever one or the 
other of the parents of Indian children is an owner of taxable prop- 
erty in the district, tuition for such children in the public schools 
should not be paid. Where they are not taxpayers, however, the 
Indian Office has paid for tuition of Indian children in the public 
schools an amount approximating that necessary to furnish school 
facilities for white children in the same community. Indian children 
are frequently admitted to these schools without the payment of 
tuition, even though their parents pay no taxes. 

AID OF COMMON SCHOOLS IN EASTERN OKLAHOMA. 

For the fiscal year 1913 there was appropriated by Congress the 
sum of $300,000 "To be expended, in the discretion of the Secretary 
of the Interior under rules and regulations to be prescribed by him, 
in aid of the common schools in the Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, 
Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations in Oklahoma." The purpose of 
this appropriation was to aid the public schools attended by Indian 
children whose parents do not assist in the support of the schools 
by the payment of taxes on their real estate. This appropriation 
resulted from a recent decision by the Supreme Court which relieved 
a large amount of unrestricted Indian lands in the Five Civilized 
Tribes' country from taxation. 

Pursuant to regulations approved by the Secretary of the Interior, 
this money has been distributed to the Oklahoma public schools, 
payments to each district being based in part on the number of Indian 
children in attendance, and in part proportioned to the needs of the 
districts, their revenues available for school purposes differing 
because of the varying amounts of nontaxable Indian lands in differ- 
ent districts. 

EFFICIENCY OF EMPLOYEES. 

In order to strengthen the work now being done for Indian educa- 
tion, careful attention has been given to the improvement of the per- 
sonnel of the service. To induce teachers to continue work along 
professional lines, a reading circle is maintained and books bearing 
upon the profession of teaching are selected for study and discussion. 
To add emphasis to this work, teachers are asked to prepare theses 
on subjects designated by the office and closely related to those 
treated in the texts discussed in the reading circle. The theses are 
submitted to the Indian Office, given a rating, and placed with the 
status files of the individual teachers. This has induced them to do 
more professional reading, and the service has been directly benefited 
thereby. 

As a further encouragement the teachers were told that those who 
made a record of ' ' excellent" in their efficiency report would be given 



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26 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 

a promotion of not less than $2.50 per month. As a further induce- 
ment to teachers to enter the Indian service, legislation was secured 
providing that teachers may have, in addition to their annual leave 
of 30 days, 15 days educational leave with pay, this 15 days to be 
spent in attending summer schools, teachers' institutes, or other insti- 
tutions that afford training which will directly increase their efficiency 
as instructors. 

Another matter which will result in the increase in the compensa- 
tion now received by employees is the provision in the current appro- 
priation act authorizing the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to fur- 
nish necessary heat and light without charge to employees who are 
furnished quarters; such heat and light to be paid for out of the fund 
for heating and lighting other buildings at the same place. This 
amounts to a virtual increase in salary for many employees. 

It has been difficult heretofore to retain in the service valuable em- 
ployees in such positions as matron, industrial teachers, disciplina- 
rian teachers and others who, of necessity, are considered as being on 
duty at all hours of the day and night. In order to relieve this class 
of employees from the long hours incident to their service, superin- 
tendents have been authorized to allow them one-half day off duty 
each week. This relief, with such other annual and educational leave 
as they may be entitled to, renders service in these positions much 
more attractive than heretofore. 

CONFERENCES. 

A conference of supervisors and other employees of the service 
was held at Haskell Institute September 4 to 11, 1912; also one of 
employees among the Sioux Indians at Flandreau, S. Dak., Novem- 
ber 12 to 15, 1913. These conferences have strengthened the super- 
vision of schools and unified the activities and aims of employees in 
reference to the welfare of Indians. 

MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE. 

The constant efforts of this bureau for several years to overcome 
Indian customs as to marriage and divorce and to substitute therefor 
the practices recognized by law have met with considerable success, 
but there are certain deficiencies in the law which are embarrassing. 
Where Indians desire to be married according to law, they have no 
trouble in procuring a license and having the ceremony performed by 
an authorized person. However, complications are likely to arise 
when a divorce is sought, a number of State courts holding that they 
do not have jurisdiction to hear the application of noncitizen Tndians 
residing on Indian reservations, and there is no law under which 
divorce suits may be taken into Federal courts. In such cases the 
Indians often, and naturally, follow their native custom, which is 

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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRB. 27 

simply the abandonment of the spouse and perhaps the immediate 
marrying by Indian custom of another. In cases of this kind the 
office finds its hands tied ; it can not consistently punish the Indians 
for following their own customs when it has no legal and no better 
plan to offer as a substitute. A number of crimes were committed 
during the year against Indian women and girls, and in every instance 
the office endeavored to bring about the prosecution of the offender. 
In some of the cases the crimes were committed off the reservations 
and under the jurisdiction of the States, but in others the offenses 
were committed on the reservations, and because of the inadequacy of 
Federal statutes the offenders have remained unpunished. The 
necessity of further legislation regarding this important subject is 
apparent and urgent. 

MURDERERS OF SUPERINTENDENT STANLEY. 

A brief statement was made in last year's report of the death of 
Mr. Will H. Stanley, formerly superintendent of the Soboba Reserva- 
tion, at the hands of the Indians under his jurisdiction. Ambrosio 
Apapas, Francisco Lugo, Comelio Lube, Pio Lubo, Pablino Lubo, 
and Leonicio Lugo were convicted of this murder in the United States 
District Court for the Southern District of California, and were 
sentenced on March 27, 1913, to 10 years 1 imprisonment at McNeil 
Island penitentiary. This unfortunate tragedy was the culmination 
of a long series of events running through a number of years in which 
Leoniak) Lugo was the principal. For years he had been a disturbing 
element and was continually inciting the Indians to opposition to 
constituted authority. The conviction of this ringleader and his 
coconspirators will undoubtedly have a salutary effect on the Indians 
and remove from an otherwise peaceable band criminal elements of 
danger and discord. 

EMPTjOYMENT OF INDIANS. 

Procuring employment for Indians is an integral part of the work of 
Indian civilization, and its immediate direction is controlled by a 
Supervisor of Indian Employment. The purpose of this branch of 
work is, briefly, to bring the Indians and the work together. Family 
ties and home interests, health, climate, and environment have to 
be considered. 

The contractors for the construction of the North Platte irrigation 
work in Nebraska have recently made arrangements for the employ- 
ment of a number of Indians for that project. The development of 
western beet fields gives opportunities for the employment of Indians, 
and the sugar companies each year grant more liberal concessions in 
the way of railroad rates and care of young Indian boys in times of 

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28 BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 

illness, in order to secure them as helpers in cultivating and harvest- 
ing this crop. These boys live in tents in small communities in charge 
of a Government employee, who sees that hygienic, moral, and social 
conditions are carefully looked after. 

Through hearty cooperation between Indian-school superintendents 
and those in charge of reclamation and other projects, Indians are 
being given splendid opportunities for employment, of which they 
are availing themselves. Agreements are made with fruit growers 
and fruit companies for the harvesting of crops, and where cotton is 
grown Indians are employed for picking this staple. In fact, many 
fields of domestic and industrial activity are being opened for Indians 
under conditions which promote their general welfare. 

PURCHASE OF SUPPIJES. 

The importance and necessity of exercising economy in expendi- 
tures is receiving the greatest consideration, and the practice of invit- 
ing proposals through warehouses and locally in advance of making 
purchases has been followed closely. Thus the bids obtained in large 
distributing centers and at factories, plus freight charges to points of 
consumption, are compared with local bids. This results in lower 
prices, due to increased competition, and opportunity is afforded to 
utilize as far as practicable the low freight rates which apply on 
Government shipments over land-grant railroads. 

The plan to have the disbursing officer of the Interior Department 
pay claims covering supplies purchased through the warehouses in 
lieu of their settlement through the Treasury Department, after such 
claims have received administrative examination in the Indian 
Office, has effected a saving of time in the settlement of claims. 

During the fiscal year there were purchased for the Indian Service 
approximately $3,160,000 worth of goods and supplies. 

ENROLLMENT WITH INDIAN TRIBES, 

Applicants for enrollment with Indian tribes are required to fur- 
nish about the same kind of evidence as would be necessary to prove 
an inheritance before a court. The various Indian reservations have 
been established by Executive orders, laws, treaties, or agreements 
with Indian tribes, and in many instances enrollment for participa- 
tion in land or other tribal benefits is limited by treaty stipulation, 
agreement, or special legislation, and varies accordingly. 

During the past fiscal year 128 persons have been enrolled at agen- 
cies or reservations throughout the United States, exclusive of the 
Five Civilized Tribes, and 441 persons denied enrollment. 

In some instances tribal authorities and Indian Service officials 
have challenged the enrollment of persons, and these cases are now 
being investigated, either in the field or before the department. There 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 29 

are about 260 such contested cases at the Cherokee School, North 
Carolina, to be passed upon before the reservation can be allotted. 

At White Earth, 86 persons of mixed Chippewa blood enrolled with 
the tribe were challenged. Their rights have been carefully inves- 
tigated by a special attorney of the department, and the record, 
including voluminous testimony, has been referred to the Court of 
Claims for findings of fact. 

FINANCE. 

The system of accounting maintained in the Indian Service is, 
necessarily, more complex and difficult than that of any other branch 
of the Government service, because of the number and variety of 
appropriations, as well as the large amount of tribal and individual 
Indian money handled. Appreciating the benefits to be derived from 
personal instruction of the field force in accounting methods as well 
as the necessity for more frequent and systematic investigation of 
the fiscal affairs of disbursing officers, special agents, qualified as 
expert accountants for that particular work, have been employed. 

INDIVIDUAL INDIAN MONEYS. 

The principal sources from which individual Indian moneys are 
derived are: (1) Sale of allotted and inherited lands; (2) lease 
accruals; (3) sale of timber; (4) oil and gas royalties; (5) earnings of. 
outing pupils. 

The total amount of deposits of moneys of this class in depositaries 
on June 30, 1913, was approximately $10,500,000. The Federal law, 
as respects individual Indian moneys, is broad and comprehensive 
and permits a wide discretionary authority in the administration of ' 
the trust moneys belonging to individual Indians. For administra- 
tive and accounting purposes, requests for authority to approve the 
disbursement of an Indian depositor's funds are submitted to this 
office by the local superintendent. The superintendent justifies his 
requests by submitting a report of the circumstances in each par- 
ticular case. 

Indian allottees are encouraged to use as much of their funds as 
necessary in building modern and sanitary homes on their lands. 

On the theory that lease money represents income rather than 
principal, the greatest possible liberality has been exercised toward 
the lessor in the handling of his own rentals. 

DEPOSITOBIES FOB INDIAN MONEYS. 

On March 17, 1913, the department approved a regulation, effective 
July 1, 1913, which provides for the payment of interest on all indi- 
vidual Indian funds held to the official credit of superintendents at 
the same rate as that paid by banks on open accounts of individual 

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30 BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONBB OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Indians. At the same time a new system for keeping in touch with 
holding banks was installed. This system requires a report to this 
office on a specified form, by national banks when a call is made by the 
Comptroller of the Currency and by State banks when a call is made 
by the State banking departments. 

Deposits of tribal and individual Indian moneys at the close of the* 
fiscal year 1913 amounted to approximately $15,000,000, held in 450 
depositories under surety bond. Two failures occurred among hold- 
ing banks, but in each case the surety promptly paid to the Govern- 
ment the amount of the deposit with interest to and including the 
date of payment. 

SALE OF INDIAN IiANDS. 

The acts of Congress approved May 27, 1902 (32 Stat. L., 245), 
March 1, 1907 (34 Stat. L., 1015), May 29, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 444), 
June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855), and February 14, 1913 (37 Stat. L., 
678), provide for the sale of allotted and inherited Indian lands. 
During the fiscal year 317 sales have been made, involving 31 576.74 
acres, consideration $692,413.28. 

Some criticism has been made by purchasers of Indian land on 
account of delay in the approval of sales. The chief cause of delay 
is the complications which arise over the heirs of the deceased allottee. 
In many cases the determination of the heirs is a difficult and com- 
plex question. Recently changes have been made in the depart- 
mental practice in sales cases, which will permit of sales being ap- 
proved more expeditiously than formerly. It is believed that this 
will have a tendency to increase prices and to popularize sales of 
Indian lands. 

MINING ON INDIAN IiANDS. 

Oil and gas mining operations on Indian lands in Oklahoma have 
been increasingly active during the year. A productive oil pool 
discovered near Cushing, Okla., stimulated leasing in the Five Civil- 
ized Tribes to approximately 50 per cent over last year. Many 
leases of allotted lands under the Sac and Fox> Ponca, Pawnee, and 
Kiowa Agencies have been taken, and some development work has 
been done. The price of crude oil advanced from 70 cents per barrel 
on July 16, 1912, to a maximum of 88 cents per barrel on June 30, 
1913. 

Discovery of oil in the State of Washington has resulted in the 
filing of many applications for permission to negotiate leases of lands 
on the Quinaielt Reservation. A thorough investigation in connec- 
tion with the acquiring of leases in this field was begun, pending which 
the approval of leases was suspended. At the present stage of 
development, prospects for finding oil in paying quantities on this 
reservation can only be conjectured. 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 31 

Lands on the Shoshone Reservation in Wyoming have been leased 
for oil and gas purposes f or several years, and some wells have been 
brought in. Development has been slow and small returns derived 
from this source, owing largely to the lack of proper transportation 
facilities. 

The production of oil and gas in the territory of the Five Civilised 
Tribes is referred to under that head. 

OIL AND GAS MINING LEASES ON OSAGE BESEBVATION. 

During the year there were leased 24,561 acres of the so-called un- 
leased portion of the Osage Reservation (consisting of approximately 
800,000 acres) for oil and gas mining purposes under regulations 
raising the rate of royalty for the Indians from one-eighth to one- 
sixth, and providing for competitive bidding for Indian oil and gas 
leases. By the provisions of the act of June 28, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 
539), all the minerals under the lands within the Osage Reservation 
were reserved to the tribe for a period of 25 years from April 8, 1906. 

In the early part of 1912 the Osage tribal council authorized the 
principal chief to execute four leases of about 200,000 acres each, 
covering the entire unleased part of the reservation. Notwithstand- 
ing the absence of departmental regulations on the subject, as re- 
quired by law, the four leases were presented to the department in 
the spring of 1912 by the Osage tribal council, with the request that 
they be approved. They were promptly disapproved by the Secre- 
tary on June 14, 1912, on the ground that they were not in accord 
with the best interests of the Indians and contained some provisions 
which were thought to be illegal. 

Hie department on July 3, 1912, prescribed regulations as required 
by the act of June 28, 1906. These regulations provided for offering 
the lands to the highest bidder under sealed bids. Approximately 
107,000 acres were advertised for lease and the bids opened on 
November 11, 1912. The bids covered 42,210 acres, the bonus 
offered aggregating $143,438.65, an average of about $3 per acre. 
While the lands were under advertisement, the Uncle Sam Oil Co. 
continued its efforts to have the lease executed in its f avx>r approved 
in spite of the previous definite disapproval by the department. The 
Osage council passed a resolution rejecting all the bids received by it 
under the advertisement made in accordance with the approved 
regulations of July 3, 1912, and refused to reconsider its action, 
despite a petition signed by a majority of the male adults in which 
the council was asked to accept the highest bids. 

The action of the council and the circumstances surrounding the 
execution of the four leases were such that the department ordered a 
special investigation of the entire matter, and on receiving the report, 
the department issued an order removing the entire Osage tribal 

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32 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

council. A suit was instituted against the Secretary of the Interior 
by one of the deposed councilmen in the Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, questioning the right of the Secretary to remove 
him. The court rendered a decision in which the action of the Secre- 
tary was upheld, and that decision was affirmed on appeal to the 
court of appeals. After the dismissal of the tribal council, a special 
election was held on January 22, 1913, which resulted in practically 
the unanimous election of new tribal officials. The bids rejected by 
the old council were reconsidered by the new council, the highest 
accepted, and the principal chief authorized to execute leases to the 
successful bidders. 

The regulations of July 3, 1912, prohibited pipe-line companies 
from bidding. Some of the best bids received on November 11, 1912, 
were made by the Gypsy Oil Co. On account of its close affiliation 
with the Gulf Pipe Line Co., the department held that the Gypsy Oil 
Co. was not eligible and refused to approve leases executed in its 
favor by the principal chief of the Osage Tribe. Eight leases in favor 
of parties shown conclusively not to be interested in pipe-line trans- 
portation, covering 24,561 acres, were approved by the department 
in the early part of March, 1913. 

On January 9, 1913, the regulations were amended so as to permit 
leases and assignments to be approved to pipe-line companies pro- 
vided that no right, claims, or equities as against future action by or 
under authority of Congress respecting oil or gas pipe line companies 
should be predicated upon such approval. 

INHERITANCE CASES. 

The act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855, 856), devolved upon the 
Secretary of the Interior the duty of determining the heirs of deceased 
Indians, but failed to make an appropriation to carry out this work. 
As already said, there are approximately 40,000 Indian heirship cases 
pending at the various agencies, representing inherited property, valued 
atmore than $60,000,000, which can not be sold or otherwise disposed of 
until the heirs are determined. The adjudication of these cases is one 
of the most important duties confronting the Indian Service. This 
work has been greatly handicapped by the lack of appropriation and, 
consequently, by lack of a sufficient number of employees to handle 
it. The Indian appropriation act for the fiscal year 1914 has partially 
removed this impediment by an appropriation of $50,000. 

There is a provision that upon the determination by the Secretary 
of the Interior of the heirs of a deceased Indian, the sum of $15 
from the proceeds of the estate shall be paid into the Treasury, to 
cover the cost of determining the heirs. 

During the year over 10,000 cases have been received pertain- 
ing to heirship matters. This includes not only cases where the 



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fcBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 33 

determination of heirs is the sole object, but also includes wills and 
petitions for sales and all miscellaneous correspondence in connection, 
therewith. 

Special attention was given the determination of heirs at the 
Shoshone and the Uintah and Ouray Reservations in order to safe- 
guard the water rights of the Indians. Each of 28 agencies reports 
from 100 to 1,200 undertermined inheritance cases. An adequate 
appropriation available for both field and office work should be pro- 
vided by Congress so that the Indian Bureau can be able to clear up, 
at the earliest possible date, the tangled condition of the estates of 
deceased Indians, in order that the lands not needed by the Indians 
may be leased or sold and the proceeds used to improve and farm the 
allotments of the heirs. 

THE FLORIDA 8 EM IN OLE 8. 

For hundreds of years the Seminoles of Florida have made their 
homes in the Everglades, and have obtained a living by hunting, 
trapping, and fishing. 

On account of the various drainage projects now being constructed 
for the reclamation of the Everglades, and the diminishing swamp 
area which has been their home and hunting ground these Indians 
are rapidly being deprived of the game upon which they have hereto- 
fore subsisted. They are in no sense agriculturists but are natural 
hunters and trappers, making fully 75 per cent of their expenses of 
living from alligator skins. In addition to the restriction of their 
hunting grounds, during the past year the tanneries have discon- 
tinued the purchase of alligator skins, the main source of their income. 

An appropriation of $10,000 for their relief was reappropriated and 
made available in the Indian appropriation act for the current year 
(37 Stat. L., 518), and on March 1, 1913, Mr. Lucius A. Spencer, of 
Florida, was commissioned as a special commissioner to these Indians. 
It was not deemed advisable, taking into consideration the traditions 
and history of this remnant of Osceola's band, to place a Government 
official in charge of them as the term is usually applied to Western 
reservations, as they are extremely suspicious of the good intentibns 
of any representative of the Government ; but their condition required 
some action in order to prepare them for the inevitable change which 
must in a few years come to them. 

There are about 400 of these Indians who live in camps surrounded 
by vast tracts of uninhabited swamps and morasses. They are 
splendid types of the physical man and are nearer the aboriginal 
Indian in habits and customs than almost any other band. 

The Florida State Legislature in 1889 set aside 36 townships as a 
Seminole Reservation, but while the law apparently has not been 
repealed, nearly all the land has been obtained by private persons. 



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84 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

A bill to set aside 15 townships in Monroe County, Fla., was intro- 
duced in the legislature of that State in 191 1 , but failed to become law. 

During the period from 1895 to 1900, from funds provided by Con- 
gress, 23,061.72 acres lying in Ts. 47 and 48 S., Rs. 32, 33, and 34 E., 
were purchased for the Seminole Indians. On November 22, 1897, 
there were withdrawn for them approximately 480 acres lying in 
Ts. 50 and 51 S., Rs. 40 and 41 E. 

All efforts for their education on the part of the State and Federal 
Governments and missions have been unsuccessful, because of the 
severe penalty inflicted by the tribal laws on any Seminole who 
learns to read and write. 

TRUST PIiAN FOR PUEBIiOS. 

It has been proposed that the lands of the Pueblo Indians shall be 
deeded by them to the Government to be held in trust for their 
benefit for a period of 25 years. 

There are 20 Pueblos in New Mexico, with a total population of 
about 6,000 Indians, Laguna, with about 1,600, being the largest. 

The land grants to these Indians were in most cases made by the 
King of Spain in 1691, or later, and these titles have been confirmed 
to them by Congress or by the Court of Private Land Claims and 
patented since the American occupation after the Mexican War. 
These Indians have lost considerable land through their own improv- 
idence, the encroachments of white settlers, and the adverse deci- 
sions of the courts, and there are now pending before the courts suits 
involving the title to much of it. 

Owing to the gradual loss of land, and the difficulty of maintain- 
ing schools and otherwise administering the affairs of these Indians 
because of the lack of jurisdiction over their lands, the department, 
in 1911, recommended to Congress the enactment of legislation which 
would permit the Secretary to accept, on behalf of the United States, 
as trustee, all such lands as might be conveyed by any of the com- 
munities of Pueblo Indians. The bills making this provision were 
introduced in the Sixty-second Congress as H. R. 22528 and S. 6085. 

Representatives of 11 of the Pueblos made a trip to Washington 
last February, accompanied by their special attorney, to urge upon 
the department the acceptance of trust deeds and to petition Congress 
to enact legislation authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to accept 
the trust. These Indians appeared before the Senate Committee on 
Indian Affairs in connection with the hearing on Senate bill 6085, 
where they argued that if their property is to be conserved it will be 
necessary for the United States to hold it in trust for the next 25 
or more years, and until the coming generation may have an oppor- 
tunity to become educated. 



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BEPOBT OF THB COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 85 

Although by the Territorial law the Pueblo lands were exempted 
from taxation, and this same exemption is provided in the constitu- 
tion of New Mexico, the decision of Judge Pope on July 22, 1912 (198 
Fed. Rep., 539), holds that the separate provisions of the State con- 
stitution which contain the compact with the United States that 
the Pueblo lands are Indian country is unconstitutional, and there- 
fore the lands are subject to taxation and to sale for nonpayment of 
taxes, in accordance with the provisions of the State law. 

OPPOSITION OF PUEBLOS TO EDUCATION. 

The Federal Government has made appropriations from time to 
time to maintain schools among the Pueblo Indians; nevertheless, the 
Indians have refused to lease buildings for school purposes in their 
villages, in some instances making it necessary for the Government 
to institute condemnation proceedings to procure land on which to 
erect permanent day-school plants. Out of IS pueblos under Albu- 
querque and Santa Fe schools, 13 sites have been procured in this 
manner. 

There was also opposition to the erecting of school buildings among 
the Pueblo Indians. At San Domingo the Indians at one time showed 
some actual resistance to employees undertaking to build a school- 
house. This resistance, however, was insignificant and the construc- 
tion work has proceeded without any interruption, although the In- 
dians showed considerable resentment. If handled discreetly and 
tactfully, it is believed the opposition will soon disappear and the 
advantages of having in their midst a trained teacher and a well- 
equipped day-school plant will be recognized by the Indians. 

The threatened taxation of their lands and their utter inability to 
meet such payments have awakened the Pueblo Indians to the need 
of an adjustment to the conditions which surround them, and many 
of them are now willing and anxious to receive the aid of the Gov- 
ernment, so that their children may have opportunity to adopt the 
customs of white communities which they have refused for them- 
selves. 

The Indians are generally favorable to education and anxious to 
enroll their children in school. Some of the Hopis, however, refused 
to enroll their children. They were put into school, against the wish 
of the parents, and the superintendent was authorized to retain 
them in his boarding school during the summer vacation unless the 
parents would agree to return them to school at the opening in Sep- 
tember, 1913. 



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36 BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

BEUEASE OF APACHE PRISONERS OF WAR. 

The survivors of Geronimo's band of Apaches and their descend- 
ants, who for many years have been living at Fort Sill, Okla., as 
prisoners of war, have been released, some going to the Mescalero 
Apache Reservation in New Mexico, and others remaining in Okla- 
homa. On April 2, 1913, 183 of these Indians in charge of Maj. 
Geo. W. Goode, United States Army, went to Mescalero, where they 
are now living with this branch of their kindred, under the super- 
vision of the superintendent of the Mescalero Reservation. The 
transfer of these Indians was made with their consent and under the 
terms of the act of Congress passed at the last session making the 
necessary appropriations for the purpose. There were 78 of the 
band who elected to remain in Oklahoma, where they will be per- 
manently located on allotments provided for them. 

FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 

The tribal work pertaining to the Five Civilized Tribes is per- 
formed under the direct supervision of the Commissioner to the 
Five Civilized Tribes acting under instructions from the depart- 
ment, through this office. The details of the work performed by 
him during the past year are set forth in his annual report to the 
Secretary of the Interior. 

The affairs of individual Indians after allotments are made, espe- 
cially of the restricted class remaining under the supervision of the 
department, are handled through the office of the superintendent of 
the Union Agency under direction of this office. 

There are 101,216 persons enrolled as members of the Five Tribes, 
of which number 32,939 are what is known as "restricted" Indians, 
which means that they are still wholly or partially under the super- 
vision of the Government. The citizenship rolls were closed by opera- 
tion of law on March 4, 1907. There were 1,238 applications for the 
removal of restrictions made during the year ended June 30, 1913, 
making a total to that date of 9,594. 

The work of allotment is practically completed, although there 
remains considerable work in connection with the closing of final 
records and other details and the disposition of the remaining tribal 
property. 

The work at the Union Agency, in connection with the Indians 
after allotment, includes the making of oil and gas and other leases 
by Indians under supervision of the department, the collection, 
supervision, and disbursement of royalties, removal of restrictions, 
leasing of land, and the handling of money derived from sales of land, 
all of which required the handling of $8,215,989.71 by the agency 
during the year ended June 30, 1913. During that time there were 
filed at the Union Agency 28,526 leases of which 26,846 were for oil and 

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RBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONBB OF INDIAN AFFAIBB. 37 

gas; 3,522 oil and gas leases were approved; 49,176,000 barrels of 
oil were sold. There were collected during the year for individual 
Indians from oil and gas leases $1,301,326.99, and for the Choctaw 
and Chickasaw tribes as royalty from coal and asphalt leases $217,- 
226.61. The proceeds of lands sold for Indians under the super- 
vision of the agency aggregated $502,406.36. 

Under existing law the probate courts of the State have jurisdic- 
tion in probate matters affecting minor Indians, and during the year 
reports have demonstrated that such matters are not in a satisfactory 
condition, principally because of the vast amount of business handled 
by such courts and the inadequate statutes affecting probate pro- 
cedure. A bill seeking to remedy existing evils was introduced in 
the last Legislature of the State of Oklahoma, and although its 
passage was urged by the Government and the entire Oklahoma dele- 
gation in Congress it failed of enactment. 

IiEGISLATION. 

The Indian appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913 was not 
approved until August 24, 1912. It therefore became necessary for 
the appropriation act of the previous year to be extended, which was 
done by joint resolutions of July 1 and August 1, 1912. 

For the fiscal year 1910 the Indian appropriation act carried about 
$11,800,000. The act for 1911 carried about $9,200,000, for 1912 
$8,800,000, and for 1913 $8,900,000. The estimates for the Indian 
Service for the fiscal year 1914 amounted to $11,303,316.53. The 
Indian appropriation act for the fiscal year 1914, which failed of 
passage at the regular session of the last Congress, but was enacted at 
the special session of the present Congress and approved by the 
President June 30, 1913, after very extensive hearings by the Senate 
and the House Committees on Indian Affairs, carries an appropriation 
of $9,461,819.67. 

In addition to the usual items and appropriations, the act of June 
30, 1913, carries an appropriation of $50,000 for the purpose of deter- 
mining the heirs of deceased Indian allottees, pursuant to the act of 
June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855) ; an appropriation of $100,000 (reim- 
bursable) for the purpose of encouraging industry among the Indians 
and to aid them in the culture of crops; and an appropriation of 
$25,000 for a joint commission of three members of the Senate and 
three members of the House of Representatives for the purpose of 
mulriTig inquiry into the conduct and management of the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs. This act for 1914 also ratified an agreement dated 
May 10, 1911, with the Wiminuche Band of Southern Ute Indians, 
which agreement relates to the exchange of certain lands; an appro- 
priation of $100,000 was made to provide school facilities for the 
children of the Navajo Indians; and provision was also made 

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38 BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONED OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

for the appointment of a commission consisting of two persons to 
make a roll of the Chippewa Indians allotted within the White Earth 
Reservation in the State of Minnesota. 

This act also provides for a commission consisting of two members 
of the Senate and two members of the House of Representatives for 
the purpose of investigating the necessity and feasibility of estab- 
lishing, equipping, and maintaining a tuberculosis sanatorium in New 
Mexico for the treatment of tuberculous Indians; also to investigate 
the necessity and feasibility of procuring impounded waters for the 
Yakima Reservation, or the construction of an irrigation system upon 
said reservation, to impound the waters of the Yakima River for the 
reclamation of the lands within the reservation. 

There was also appropriated $150,000 for the purchase of allot- 
ments for the individual members of that portion of the Wisconsin 
band of Pottawatomie Indians now residing in the States of Wiscon- 
sin and Michigan. 

Section 26 of the act provides for the installation of a system of 
bookkeeping in the Bureau of Indian affairs which will afford a ready 
analysis of expenditures by appropriations and allotments and by 
units of the service, showing for each class of work or activity carried 
on, the expenditures for the operation of the service, for purchase and 
construction of additional property, for repair and preservation of 
property, salaries and wages of employees, and for other expenditures 
and purposes; but it carries no appropriation to make the provision 
effective. 

The most important general legislation passed during the fiscal 
year, other than that contained in the Indian appropriation act, is as 
follows: 

By the act of July 1, 1912, the Secretary of the Interior is author- 
ized, when the amount of tribal funds due the Winnebagoes in Wis- 
consin shall have been ascertained in accordance with the enrollment 
as provided by law, to expend the funds for their benefit in such 
manner, including the purchase of lands for said Indians, as he may 
deem proper, or, in his discretion, to distribute the funds, or any part 
thereof, per capita among the Winnebago Indians in Wisconsin. 

The act of July 19, 1912, authorized the Secretary of the Interior, 
in his discretion, to approve maps showing right of way and definite 
location of proposed drainage districts and assessments, made under 
the laws of Oklahoma, upon the allotments of certain Absentee 
Shawnee and Citizen Potawatomi allottees in the little River 
drainage district in Pottawatomie County, Okla., and upon the allot- 
ments of certain Sac and Fox allottees in Deep Fork drainage district 
in Lincoln County, Okla. 

By the act of March 4, 1913 (37 Stat. L., 1007), the Secretary of 
the Interior is authorized, in his discretion, to request of the present 

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BBPOBT OF THE 00MMIS8I0NBB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 39 

claimant under any railroad land grant a relinquishment or recon- 
veyance of any lands situated within the States of Arizona, New 
Mexico, or California, passing under the grant, which are shown to 
have been occupied for five years or more by an Indian entitled to 
receive the tract in allotment under existing law, but for the grant 
to the railroad; and, upon the execution and filing of such relinquish- 
ment or reconveyance, the land shall thereupon become available 
for allotment and the company relinquishing or reconveying shall 
be entitled to select, within the period of three years after the approval 
of the act, and have patented to it, other vacant, nonmineral, non- 
timbered surveyed public lands of equal area and value, situated in 
the same State, as may be agreed upon by the Secretary of the 
Interior under the terms of the act. 

The Secretary of the Interior is authorized by the act of March 4, 
1913 (37 Stat. L., 1007), under rules and regulations to be prescribed 
by him, to grant to the operator of any coal mine in the State of 
Oklahoma, the right to lease additional acreage from the unleased 
segregated coal lands of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations in 
Oklahoma, not to exceed in any case 640 acres of land, under certain 
conditions named in the act. 

The act of February 14, 1913 (37 Stat. L., 678), very materially 
broadens the scope of section 2 of the act of June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. 
L., 855), relating to the disposition of trust property of Indians by 
will. Under the original law only allotments held in trust could be 
disposed of by will by the allottee with the approval of the Secretary 
of the Interior. The act of February 14, 1913, authorizes any 
Indian 21 years of age to dispose of any right, title, or interest in any 
allotment held under trust or other patent containing restrictions on 
alienation, or individual Indian moneys or other property held in 
trust by the United States, with the approval of the Secretary of 
the Interior and under such regulations as he may prescribe. 

The act of February 14, 1913 (37 Stat. L., 675), authorizes the 
sale and disposition of the surplus unallotted lands in the Standing 
Bock Indian Reservation in the States of North Dakota and South 
Dakota. 

TRADERS 9 CIiAIMS AGAINST INDIANS. 

Superintendents were directed on December 28, 1910, to forward 
to the Indian Office all claims for goods furnished and services 
rendered to individual Indians prior to December 17, 1909. Claims 
amounting to $1,706,196.82 were submitted. The greater part of 
these claims were against Indians in Oklahoma, South Dakota, 
Montana, Wisconsin, and Nebraska. After compiling records in 
this office of the claims submitted, they were returned to the superin- 
tendents with a circular letter under date of October 12, 1912, in- 
structing them to audit each claim with the view to determining the 

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40 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIA* At f AtBk 

reasonableness of the charges, and then to call in the debtors and 
creditors and endeavor to liquidate the indebtedness in so far as 
the funds of the Indian debtor might permit without depriving the 
Indians and their families of a means of support. Sixty-two reserva- 
tions and about 2,500 traders are involved in the outstanding in- 
debtedness. 

During the year authorities for the settlement of 206 claims were 
granted, and the Indian traders themselves adjusted 57 of their 

accounts. 

INDIAN ART. 

The blanket industry among the Navajo Indians of Arizona and 
New Mexico is perhaps the most profitable of the native industries. 
The actual number of Indians engaged in this industry is unknown, 
but it is estimated that between $600,000 and $700,000 worth of 
blankets were produced during the year. The women usually do 
the weaving. Plans have been formulated to award prizes ranging 
from $50 to $100 at Indian fairs and exhibitions this coming fall, 
for the best blankets made in sizes of not less than 4 J by 6J feet from 
wool clipped from native sheep. The whole purpose of these plans 
is to discourage inferior work and the making of the smaller sizes. 

Many of the tribes are still more or less extensively engaged in the 
mitring f baskets, beadwork, and pottery. At Pima about 1,200 
Indians made baskets during the year. About 9,000 baskets ware 
made, valued at $14,500. The Indians at this reservation also made 
about 16,500 pieces of pottery, valued at $4,300. At Moqui about 
100 baskets, valued at $1,000, and 100 pieces of pottery at approx- 
imately the same value were made. At Camp Verde the Indian 
women wove some excellent willow baskets ranging in value from 
$1 to $30 apiece. 

At Red Moon, Okla., about $220 worth of bead work was done for 
the Mohonk Lodge, and about $200 worth was sold to the Indian 
traders. 

At La Jolla, Cal., the Sybil Carter Lace Association has a lace 
teacher who brings supplies to the Indian women and buys from 
them the lace manufactured. At Rincon, Cal., 11 Indian women are 
receiving instructions in lace making from a teacher under the aus- 
pices of the Redlands Indian Association. 

INCREASE IN OFFICE WORK. 

The policy of individualization in Indian affairs and of individual 
allotment of reservation lands has greatly increased the work of the 
bureau during the last few years, and will continue to increase it 
for several years to come. 



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BEPOET OF THE COMMlSSIOtfBB OF INDIAN AFFAEKL 41 

Each allotment made may also involve any or all of the follow- 
ing questions: The sale of timber, a patent in fee, a hearing to de- 
termine the heirs of the deceased allottee, the opening of a bank 
account for the handling of the segregated trust funds, and the erec- 
tion of improvements upon the restricted land. 

As already said, the single item of the determination of heirs of 
deceased allottees has very greatly increased the work of the office 
since the passage of the act of June 25, 1910, and the need of increased 
office help for this class of work is pressing. The increased effort put 
forth to get each able-bodied Indian settled upon and started in 
farming his own allotment, or equipped for some other occupation in 
which he may become self-supporting, has largely increased the labor 
of handling individual Indian money, with a corresponding increase 
in the number of requests for authority to approve checks against 
Indian bank accounts. 

During the fiscal year 1912 a total of 222,187 communications was 
received in this office; in the year 1913, as before noted, the number 
was 275,452 — an increase of 23.9 per cent. In the fiscal year 1912, 
the total number of letters written and transmitted was 201,271, and 
in 1913 was 255,261 — an increase of 26.4 per cent. 

COOPERATION WITH BUREAU OF MINES. 

In February of this year the department placed upon the Bureau 
of Mines the duty of inspecting the physical operations under leases 
for ™i"uig purposes which covered Indian lands. Prior to that time 
complaints had been filed to the effect that much gas and oil was 
being wasted, particularly in the State of Oklahoma, by reason of the 
lack of scientific methods in drilling. Representatives of the Bureau 
of Mines were detailed to Oklahoma and their efforts to instruct 
operators and drillers as to the proper manner in which to drill so as 
to conserve the oil and gaa during the drilling operations have met 
with gratifying success, have been appreciated by the operators, 
and have resulted in the Baving of many thousands of dollars' worth 
of gaa heretofore wasted. The enormity of the waste which has 
been going on year after year can best be understood from a report 
of the Bureau of Mines which indicates that there was a daily waste 
in a single oil field of about 300,000,000 cubic feet of gas, or about 
$75,000 a day. 

RIGHTS OP WAY. 

Railway construction. — Railway construction on Indian lands during 
the past year has not been as active as it has in former years. The 
Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railway Co., and the Great 
Northern Railway Co. have been authorized to construct lines across 



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42 BBPOBT OF THE 00MMIB8I0NBB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 

the Fort Berthold Reservation. These new lines will materially 
enhance the value of the lands in that vicinity, and give new incentive 
to industry on the part of these Indians, who, heretofore, because of 
the lack of railway facilities, have been out of reach of a market for 
their farm products. 

The Great Northern Railway Co. has agreed to complete and put 
into operation by December 31, 1913, its entire line from Wenatchee 
to Oroville, along the Okanogan and Columbia Rivers, in the State 
of Washington, for which right of way was acquired almost three 
years ago. This line will undoubtedly stimulate the development of 
lands under the Okanogan reclamation project, heretofore without 
convenient transportation facilities. 

Pipe lines. — To furnish an outlet for the great production of oil 
from the new Cushing field, located within the Creek Reservation in 
Oklahoma, about 8 or 9 miles east of the town of Cushing, the follow- 
ing companies have been granted pipe-line rights of way across Sac 
and Fox and Creek lands : Creek County Oil & Gas Co., Jane Oil & Gas 
Co., Chanute Refining Co., Charles B. Shaffer, Gulf Pipe Line Co., the 
Texas Co., and the Prairie Oil & Gas Co. 

PATENTS IN FEE. 

The act of May 8, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 182), provides for the issuance 
of patents in fee to Indian allottees who are shown to be competent. 

In 1907 and 1908, when the issuance of fee patents under this act 
was in the experimental stage, a very large percentage of Indians who 
received patents in fee sold their lands and now have nothing to show 
for the proceeds of sale. 

The Indians receiving patents in fee during the later years have 
been more successful in the care of their property, the superintend- 
ents in the field having learned, through experience, how to judge 
more accurately the competency of the Indian applicant. 

During the past year 90 per cent of the fee patents which have 
issued cover land allotted to Indians of one-half blood and less. 
While it is true that the fact of being a mixed blood does not of 
itself constitute or prove competency, yet it is undoubtedly true 
that the mixed blood, both by reason of his inherited capacities, 
and because of his somewhat more advanced home environment, is, 
as a rule, better able to care for his property without supervision 
than is the full blood. 

During the fiscal year 779 applications for fee patents were received, 
259 of which were denied, and 520 approved. The area patented 
embraced 67,477.49 acres. 



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B1P0BT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 43 

AliliOTMENTS. 

During the year allotments to 4,262 Indians, covering 1,159,585 
acres, were approved, and within the same period 5,141 allotments 
were made in the field but not approved, embracing an aggregate 
area of 591,772 acres. These allotments were made on the various 
reservations, as follows : 

Colorado River, Ariz. — Allotments of 10 acres each of irrigable 
land to 510 Indians, under the provisions of the act of March 3, 1911. 
There is no authority for the disposal of any of the surplus lands 
within this leservation, but bills have been pending under which 
the surplus irrigable land there, approximately 100,000 acres, would 
be turned over to the State for disposal under the Carey acts. 

ColviUe, Wash. — Approximately 79,018 acres were allotted to 
601 Indians. This work, it is expected, will be completed in the 
near future and the surplus lands classified and appraised prior to 
disposal in accordance with the provisions of the act of March 22, 
1906 (34 Stat. L., 80). 

Fort Berthold, N. Dak. — The allotment work on this reservation, 
under the act of June 1, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 455), is being brought to 
a close by the superintendent in charge. During the fiscal year 
just ended there were allotted 17,280 acres to 61 Indians. The 
surplus lands, other than those classified as coal, lying north and 
east of the Missouri River have heretofore been opened in accord- 
ance with the act mentioned. 

Fort HaU, Idaho. — Dining the year some 76,760 acres were allotted 
to 441 Indians. Of this, 72,160 acres were grazing lands and 4,600 
acres irrigable lands. This completes the work on this reservation, 
1,859 Indians having been allotted 39,280 acres of irrigable and 
305,040 acres of grazing land. There is no authority under existing 
law for the disposal of the surplus lands — some 100,000 acres, mostly 
mountainous or arid. 

Lummi, Wash. — Allotments to 28 Indians, under the treaty of 
January 22, 1855 (12 Stat. L., 927), covering 974 acres, were made 
during the year, which exhausts the available land within this 
reservation. 

Pine Ridge, 8. Dak,— Under the act of March 2, 1889 (25 StatL., 
888), and supplemental acts, 152,341 acres were allotted to 640 Indians. 
Owing to the large number of Indians within this reservation, at least 
12 months longer will be required within which to complete the 
allotment work. A part of this reservation was opened by the act 
of May 27, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 440), but there is no authority for the 
disposal of the remainder other than by allotment. 

Truckee-Oarson, Nev. — Allotments of 10 acres each were made to 
four Indians within the seven and one-quarter sections heretofore 



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44 BWOBff 09 THE COMMIBSIOKfiB OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

withdrawn for allotment purposes under the Truckee-Carson irriga- 
tion project, making a total of 3,640 acres allotted to 360 Indians. 

Quinaidt, Wash. — Approximately 14,400 acres of agricultural and 
grazing land within this reservation were allotted during the year to 
180 Indians. A large part of this reservation is heavily timbered and 
should be administered for the benefit of the tribe at large. There 
is no authority for the disposal of any of the lands within this reser- 
vation except by allotment. Every available acre will probably be 
required for allotment purposes. 

Standing Bock, N. arid S. Dak. — During the year 193 Indians were 
allotted 65,401.89 acres. The act of February 14, 1913 (Public, 380), 
provides for the disposal of the remaining lands within this reservation. 

White Earih y Minn. — Allotments on this reservation are being 
made by the superintendent in charge and 8,326 acres were allotted 
to 112 Indians during the fiscal year just ended. Desirable lands 
for allotment purposes within this reservation are becoming very 
scarce and it is doubtful whether sufficient land will be found to 
provide for all Indians entitled. 

Wind River, Wyo. — A number of the Indians within this reserva- 
tion were allotted during 1905-6. In the early spring of 1913 a 
special allotting agent was directed to continue the work there. 
Prior to June 30, he made allotments in the field covering 12,650 
acres to 148 Indians. Owing to the quantity of work on hand, at 
least 12 months will be required to finish it. 

Yakima, Wash.— On June 30, 1913, allotments in the field to 241 
Indians, embracing 37,240 acres, had been made. This work will 
be completed during the present fiscal year and possibly the surplus 
lands placed on the market as authorized by the act of December 21, 
1904. (33 Stat. L., 595.) 

On the public domain 32 allotments were approved during the 
year, covering 4,709.41 acres, and 982 applications, covering 122,240 
acres, were filed at various local land offices in the States of Arizona, 
New Mexico, Montana, North Dakota, Washington, and California. 
The Indian appropriation act of June 30 prohibits the use in Arizona 
or New Mexico of any part of the sum available for survey and allot- 
ment work. This necessitated the practical suspension of field 
operations in these States and will prevent any further active field 
work there with a view to aiding Indians to obtain allotments on the 
public domain during the present fiscal year. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion I wish to say that I am emphasizing in every possible 
way the industrial education of Indian pupils and the industrial 
development of the Indian population generally, and every effort 
is being made to improve the efficiency of the employees of the 

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REPOBT OF THE 00M3OSSI0NBB OF INDIAN AFFAXB8. 45 

Indian Service in order to accomplish more successfully the work along 
these lines. 

I am also emphasizing the need of and doing everything possible to 
obtain for the Indians more sanitary homes, more adequate school 
facilities for Indian children, supplying sick Indians with medical 
attention and taking precautionary methods to prevent disease, 
adjusting more equitably the cost of irrigation projects constructed 
out of reimbursable funds, making larger use of the timber resources 
of the Indians for their industrial and social advancement, taking 
advantage of the valuable grazing lands of the Indians to build up 
tribal herds as well as promoting among individual Indians a larger 
and more profitable cattle, sheep, and horse industry, and utilizing 
in every practicable way the resources of the Indians, both tribal 
and individual, in promoting their more complete civilization and 
economic independence. 

It is my fixed purpose to bring about the speedy individualizing 
of the Indians, and to this end I shall continue to devote my best 
efforts. 

Very truly yours, 

Cato Selus, 
Commissioner. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 



JFi 



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46 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



STATISTIC AIj TABUES. 

Table 1. — Comparative statement of work and force in Office of Indian Affaire since 1899. 



Year. 



Work. 



Commu- 
nications 
received. 



Increase 
over pre- 
ceding 
year. 



Employees. 



Total 
number 

em- 
ployed in 
Indian 
Office. 



(+)or 
decrease 

preced- 
ing year. 



1809. 
MOO. 
1091. 
1902. 
1903., 
1904. 
1905. 
1900.. 
1907.. 
1908.. 
1900.. 
1910.. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 



59,707 
62,001 
67,376 
79,237 
79,415 
86,588 
96,322 
106,533 
117,556 
152,996 
176,765 
194,241 
197,637 
222,187 
275,452 



Percent. 



4.84 

7.62 

17.60 

.22 

9.03 

13.55 

8.35 

10.34 

30.14 

15.53 

9.88 

1.74 

12.37 

23.97 



101 
115 
119 
132 
131 
142 
149 
145 
160 
179 
189 
203 
227 
224 
237 



P«re 



+13.86 
+ 8.48 
+10.92 
- .73 
+ 8.89 
+ 4.93 
-2.68 
+10.34 
+11.87 
+ 6.68 
+ 7.40 
+11.82 
-1.32 
+ 5.80 



Percent. 

Increase in work, 1913 over 1899 861.34 

Increase in force, 1913 over 1899 134.65 

Table 2. — Indian population of the United States from 1759 l to 1913. 



Year. 


Authority. 


Number. 


Year. 


Authority. 


Number. 


1759 
1764 
1768 
1779 


Estimate of George Crogan 

Estimate of Col. Bouquet 

Estimate of Oapt . Hutchins 

Estimate of John Dodge 

Estimate of the Secretary of 
War 


19,500 
54,960 
35,830 
11,060 

76,000 
60,000 

471,036 
129,366 
312,930 
293,933 
812,610 

253,464 
302,498 
388,229 

400,784 
314 622 
879,264 
254,300 
294,574 
313,712 
313,371 
305,068 
291,882 
276,540 
276,695 
278,628 
822,534 
256,127 
328,258 


1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 


Report of Indian Office 

!!I!IdoIim!"!!I*"!"!""II! 


826,089 
331,972 
330,776 
844,064 


1789 


do 


834,736 




do 


243.289 


1790 
1820 


Estimate of Gilbert Inbay 

Report of Mono on Indian Af- 
fairs 


Report of United States Census. 

Report of Indian Office 

....!do 


246,086 
250,483 
248,258 


1825 
1829 


Report of Secretary of War 

do 


246,834 
248,340 


1832 


Estimate of Samuel J. Drake. . . 

Report of Secretary of War.. . . . 

Report of Superintendent of 

jTM^fftn Affairs. 


do 


249,866 


1834 


do 


251,907 
248,340 


1886 


do 




do 


248,354 


1837 


do 


do 


248,813 
262,965 
267,906 
270,544 


1850 
1853 


Report of H. R. Schoolcraft.... 
Rebort of United States Census, 


llllldoII""!"ll"!!l!!l"lI" 




do 


1855 


Report of Indian Office 

Report of H.R. Schoolcraft.... 

Report of Indian Office 

....^do 

Report of United States Census 

Report of Indian Office 

....Tdo 


do 


269,388 
270,238 
263,233 
274,206 


1857 
1860 
1865 


do 

do 


1870 


do 


284,079 
291,581 


1870 


do 


1876 


do 


288,472 


1876 


do 


do 


800,412 


1877 


do 


do 


800,546 


1878 


do 


do 


304,960 


1879 


do 


do 


822,715 


1880 


Report of United States Census 
Report of Indian Office 


do 


827,426 
330,630 


1880 
1881 


do 









> Figures from 1759 to 1900 as given in report of Indian Office for 1900. 



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BEPOBT OF THE OOMIOBSIONBB 07 INDIAN AVFAIB8. 



47 



Table 3. — Indian population of the United States, exclusive of Alaska, June SO, 1918. 

[Figures compiled from reports of Indian School superintendents, supplemented by information from 1910 
census for localities in which no Indian Office representative is located.] 

Grand total 330,639 

Five Civilized Tribes, including freedmen and intermarried whites. 101, 216 

By blood 75,263 

By intermarriage 2,682 

Freedmen 23, 381 

Exclusive of Five Civilized Tribes 229, 423 



INDIAN POPULATION BT STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Alabama 909 

Arizona 41,505 

Arkansas 460 

California 16,513 



Colorado. 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida 

Georgia. 



870 

152 

5 

68 

600 

95 

Idaho 4,089 

Illinois 188 

Indiana 279 

Iowa 365 

Kansas 1,345 

Kentucky 234 

Louisiana 780 

Maine 892 

Maryland 55 

Massachusetts 688 

Michigan 7,512 

Minnesota 11,338 

Mississippi 1,253 

Missouri 313 



Montana 11,331 

Nebraska 3,890 

Nevada 7,756 

New Hampshire 34 

New Jersey 168 

New Mexico 21,725 

New York 6,029 

North Carolina 7,945 

North Dakota 8,538 

Ohio 127 

Oklahoma * 117,274 

Oregon 6,414 

Rhode Island 284 

South Carolina 331 

South Dakota 20,555 

Tennessee 216 

Texas 702 

Utah 3,231 

Vermont 26 

Virginia 539 

Washington 11,335 

West Virginia 36 

Wisconsin 9,930 

Wyoming 1,715 



i Includes 23,381 freedmen and 2,582 Intermarried whites. 



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62 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 4. — Indiana under Federal supervision — Unallotted and holding trust and fee 

patents, June 40, 1913. 





Unallotted. 


Allotted. 




States and superintendenoies. 


Holding 


Holding fee patents 


Total 
allotted. 


Total 
TwiiMift 

under 
Federal 




trust 
patents. 


Part of 
their al- 
lotment. 


Entire 
allot- 
ment. 


super- 
vision. 


Arizona: 

Camp Vflrde. ...--■< 


419 










419 


Colorado River 


486 






486 


486 


Fort Apache 


2,397 






2 '2E 

820 


Fort Mojavo 


820 






820 


Havasupa* . 


171 
93 
1,400 
4.108 
10,000 
6,096 

506 
2,362 
2,085 

482 
6,650 






171 


Kaibab 










98 


Loupp 










1,400 
4,108 
10,000 
6,006 
1,214 

J25 

4,907 
482 


Moqui... 










Navajo. 










Pima 










Salt River 


706 






706 


San Carlos - - - T 






San Xavier . ..... 


2,822 






2,822 


Truzton Canyon ......... •.-!■■,--, 






Western Navajo 










6,650 












Total 


36,671 


4,834 






4,834 


41,506 








California: 

Bishop. - , T T - 


1,180 
217 
45 
443 
20 
850 
656 
613 
401 
162 
968 
412 

2,051 
693 


173 




2 


175 


1,355 
217 


Campo. - - - T - r 




Digger 










45 


Fort Bid well 


208 
774 
150 
584 






208 
774 
150 
595 


651 


Fort Yuma 






794 


Greenville 






1,000 

1,261 

618 


Hoopa Valley 




11 


SStBi y 




Pala 


239 
51 
558 






239 
51 
560 


640 


Pechanga 






213 


Round Valley 


2 




1,528 
412 


Soboba '. 




Tale River 










2,051 
683 


VolfflMl.,... ,. L 






















Total 


8,711 


2,737 


2 


13 


2,752 


11,468 




Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 


610 
150 










510 


Southern Ute 


210 






210 


360 










Total 


660 
600 


210 






210 


870 








600 














Coeur d'Alane 


259 

11 

466 


570 

1,808 

868 




28 


598 

1,808 

947 


857 






»B 


Fort Lapwai 


12 


67 




Total 


736 
365 

275 
244 


3,246 


12 


95 


8,853 


4,089 
865 


Iowa: Sao and Fox 


Kansas: 

Klokapoo 


270 
465 


8 

4 


37 
42 


315 
611 


690 


Potawatomi 


786 






Total 


519 


735 


12 


79 


826 


1,845 




Michigan: 

BayMfliff 




248 
67 






248 
78 


248 


Chippewa, Lake Superior 


1,024 




6 


1,097 








Total 


1,024 


315 




6 


321 


1,845 








Minnesota: 

Fond du Lac 


693 
122 
656 
352 
1,456 
2,362 
211 


270 

183 

1,065 

320 




15 
4 

14 
3 


286 

187 

1,079 

823 


978 


Grand Portage * ..... , 




809 


Leeoh Lake.^. 




1,735 
675 


NettLake 




Red Lake 




1,456 








3,523 


8,523 
89 


5.885 


Birch Cooley 


89 




800 










Total 


5,852 


1,927 




8,559 


6,486 


11,338 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIR8. 



63 



Tablb 4.— Indians under Federal supervision— Unallotted and holding trust and fee 
patents, June SO, 1913 — Continued. 





Unallotted. 


Allotted. 




States and sur^rmtendencies. 


Holding 


Holding fee patents 


Total 
allotted. 


Total 

under 
Federal 




trust 
patents. 


Part of 
their al- 
lotment. 


Entire 
allot- 
ment. 


super- 
vision. 


Montana: 

Blackfeet , 


128 
288 
321 

1,195 
67 

1,438 


2,714 
1,371 
1,790 






2,714 
1,405 
1,990 


2,842 
1,693 
2,311 
1,195 
1,857 
1,433 


Crow 


1 
17 


33 
183 


Flathead 


Fort Belknap T 


Fort Peck 


1,790 






1,790 


Tongue River 
















Total 


3,432 


7,665 


18 


216 


7,899 


11,331 




Nebraska: 

Omaha. T , , , r - - 


649 

1,011 

692 


338 
213 
284 


20 
24 
3 


305 
231 
120 


663 
468 
407 


1,312 


Santee 


1,479 
1,099 


Winnebago 




Total 


2,362 


835 


47 


656 


1,538 


3,890 


• 


Nevada: 

Fallon 


106 
244 
113 
609 
155 
579 
4,500 


309 
93 






309 
93 


415 


Fort MoDermltt 






337 


Moapa River 






113 


Nevada 










609 


Walker Ri^er. r 


348 






348 


503 


Western Shoshop* 






579 


RwiOj special ag* n t . . T T . , , r 


500 






500 


6,000 








Total 


6,306 


1,250 






1,250 


7,556 








New Mexico: 

Albuquerque Pueblos 


3,196 
95 
629 

w « 

8,000 
3,473 
1,616 


1,457 
574 






\H 


4,653 
669 


Jlcarula -. 












629 




2,370 


0) 


0) 


Sko 


p w 


Pueblo Bonito 


flan Juan T , 






8,000 
3,473 
1,616 


8anta Fe Pueblo* r ..-- - 










Zunf , . , r , 




















Total 


17,324 


4,401 






4,401 


21,725 








New York: New York Agency 


5,419 
2,109 










6,419 
2,109 


North Carolina: Cherokee 




















North Dakota: 

Fort Berthold 


HI 
460 


1,052 

466 

3,267 

2,508 


5 
62 

84 
80 




1,057 

639 

3,415 

2,615 


1,168 
999 


Fort Totten. 


11 
64 
77 


Standing Rock 


8,415 


Turtle Mountain 


841 


2,956 






Total 


912 


7,293 


181 


152 


7,626 


8,538 




Oklahoma: 


351 
564 

939 
133 


384 
607 
3,110 
1,905 
415 
316 
470 
151 
194 
299 


3 
19 
55 


86 
57 
110 


423 
683 
8,275 
1,905 
449 
336 
514 
151 
274 
826 
933 
746 


774 


ChtymrM and Arapaho 


1,247 


Kiowa. ." 


4,214 


Osage 


2,038 


Otoe 


25 
4 

41 


9 
16 
3 


449 


Pawnee 


324 
298 


660 


Ponca. 


812 


Bed Moon 


151 


Sac and Fox 


383 

252 

997 

1,724 

78 


47 
10 


33 

17 

933 

105 


657 




578 


Seneca 


1,980 


Shawnee 


572 


69 


2,470 


Five Civilised Tribes 


78 






* 101, 216 


i6i,216 


101,216 












Total 


6,043 


8,423 


273 


102,535 


111,231 


117,274 







iSee Arisona. 



* 32,989 restricted Indians as to alienation. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 



64 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER 07 INDIAN ATFAIB8. 



Table 4.— Indians under Federal supervision— Unallotted and holding trust and fee 
patents, June SO, 191S— Continued. 





Unallotted. 




Allotted. 


• 




States and superintendencies. 


Holding 


Holding; fee patents 


Total 
allotted. 


Total 

TfuHanf 

under 
Federal 




trust 
patents. 


Part of 
their al- 
lotment. 


Entire 
allot- 
ment. 


super- 
vSton. 


Oregon: 

Klamath- r 


326 
6,000 
214 
551 
318 


781 
1,969 
112 
392 
429 


5 




786 
2,000 
215 
573 
431 


1,112 


Roeeburg 


ii 

98 

160 

2 


18,000 


Sflets. .T. 


10 
21 


429 


Umatilla 


1,124 


Warm Springs * - . 


749 








Total 


7,409 


8,703 


36 


266 


4,005 


11,414 






South Dakota: 

Cheyenne River. ............ r . 


246 


2,339 
941 


12 
1 


21 
36 


2,372 
978 


2.618 


Crow Greek 


978 




282 

8 

1,795 


282 


Lower Brule 


425 

4,888 

5,153 

788 

686 


8 
220 
27 
309 
134 


31 
37 
211 
20 
79 


464 

5,145 

5,391 

1,117 

899 


472 


Pine Ridge 


6,940 


RosebudT. 


5,391 


Simtmi 


966 
892 


2,083 


Yankton 


1,791 






Total 


4,189 


15,220 


711 


435 


16,866 


20,555 


Utah: 


130 
222 
500 










130 


Uintah 


960 


1 


2 


963 


1,185 


Bait Lake, special agent 


500 












Total 


852 


960 


1 


2 


963 


1,815 




Washington: 

Colville 


766 

1,956 

376 


1,501 
734 
827 
631 
213 

2,681 




• 18 
381 


1,519 

1,115 

327 

637 

214 

2,770 


2,285 


Cushman 




3,071 


N>ah "Ray 




708 




3 


3 

1 

69 


637 


*rTii*Mp 


1,280 
282 


1,494 


Yakima 


20 


3,052 






Total 


4,660 


6,087 


23 


472 


6,582 


11,242 




Wisconsin: 

Carter 


291 

535 
1,692 

341 
<*) 
1,464 

374 










291 








717 


717 
606 
365 
2 
058 
127 
(») 


1,252 
2,298 


Keshena. r -, 


606 
861 

( % 

126 




I<ao da Flambeau. * 




4 

2 

690 

1 

(■) 


708 


LaPointe 


104 


1,192 


n n ?Ma 


2,422 

501 


RedClifl 


Tomah , 


(*) 


1,268 






Total 


4,697 


1,257 


104 


1,414 


2,775 


9,930 




Wynpntnir? Shoshone 


391 


1,313 




11 


1,324 


1,715 








Grand total 


121,233 


72,411 


1,420 


109,911 


183,742 


807,438 







COMPARISON. 



Total, 1912... 
Total, 1911... 
Total, 1901 «. 
Total, 1890 «. 



120,876 
120,780 



103,417 
88,182 



1,926 



70,904 
•76,033 



177,626 
164,215 
64,853 
15,166 



809,980 
296,820 
247,522 
230,437 



1 5.000 of these Indians in California, 
i Unknown. 



* Includes fee patents for part of their allotment. 

* Only items reported. 



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BIPOBT OF THE C0MMI88I0NBB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



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69 



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si©-* JO 

2^33 


siii 
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1,783 
1,350 
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Total, 1911* 

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70 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 6. — Crimes and misdemeanors committed (not to include cases of drunkenness) 
and arrests for drunkenness during fiscal year ended June 30, 19 IS. 



States and superintendencies. 


Crimes. 


Misdemeanors. 


Arrests for drunken- 
ness. 


By In- 
dians. 


whites. 


Total. 


By In- 
dians. 


whites. 


TotaL 


Indi- 
ans. 


Whites. 


TotaL 


Arizona: 

Camp Verde 


3 

1 
3 




3 

1 
3 


36 
1 


15 


51 

1 


10 




10 


Colorado River 




Fort Apache 








Fort Mojave 








22 




22 


Havasupal 








2 
18 
12 




2 
18 
12 




Leupp.r 


1 




1 


23 




23 


Moqul 




Navajo 








35 
12 
10 
6 
10 
86 
11 




35 


Phoenix 














12 


Pima 


11 
6 
1 

10 

1 
1 


66* 


11 
6 
1 

76 
1 
1 








10 


Bait Rim- 








6 


San Carlos 


153 
14 

3 




153 
14 
9 
3 


10 


San Xavier 


86 


Truxton Canyon 

Western Navajo 


11 










Total 


38 


66 


104 


248 


15 


263 


225 

5 

2 
12 
55 

8 
13 

1 


ii" 

1 
1 
2 


225 


California: 

Bishop 


5 


Digger 














2 


FortBIdwell 




11 
5 
1 
2 


11 
6 
7 
2 


10 
1 
17 


5" 

2 


10 
6 
19 


23 


Fort Yuma 


1 
6 


56 


Hoopa Valley, 


9 


UfdfT. 


15 


Pala 










I 


Round Valley 


4 

1 


1 


5 

1 










Soboba ." 








19 

7 


1 


20 


Tule River 








7 


Volcan 1 








2 


i 


3 


















Total 


12 


20 


32 


30 


8 


38 


122 


16 


138 






Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 


1 


1 


2 














SouthernTTteT 


1 


1 


2 






















Total 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 
















Idaho: 

CoApr d'Alene. 


7 
3 


13 


20 
3 


13 
16 


........ 


13 
16 


19 
2 




19 


Fort Hall 


2 






Total 


10 


13 


23 


20 
3 


2" 


29 
5 


21 




21 


Iowa: Sac and Fox 




Kansas: Kiokapoo . . , _ 








1 




1 


* 
















Minnesota: 

Fond du Lac 








2 




2 


10 




10 


Grand Portage 


2 
3 


1 
6 


3 

8 




Leech Lake." 


4 


7 


11 


21 
1 
5 
60 
17 
95 


6 

i" 

1 


27 


NettLake.. , , 


I 


Pipestone 


2 




2 


4 
8 


4 


8 
8 


ft 


RAdT^I^ 


00 


Vermillion Lake 








18 


White Earth 


24 


1 


25 


2 


4 


6 


96 






Total 


31 


7 


38 


20 


15 


35 


209 


8 


217 






Montana: 

Riftckfeet,.^ 


10 
6 

23 
5 


6 
6 

1 


16 
12 

6 



12 

5 
23 


1 


9 
12 

6 
23 


50 
22 
18 
14 


4 
5 


54 


Crow 


27 


Flathead 


18 


Fort Peck 


14 


Tongue River 


















Total 


44 


48 


92 


73 


1 


74 


104 


9 


113 






Nebraska: 

Santee 














10 
34 


2* 


10 


Winnebago 














36 


















TotaL 














44 


2 


46 



















»1912 report 



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BEPORT OF THE COMMIS8IONEE OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



71 



Table 6. — Crimes and misdemeanors committed (not to include cases of drunkenness) 
and arrests for drunkenness during fiscal year ended June SO, 1913 — Continued. 





Crimes. 


Misdemeanors. 


Arrests for drunken- 
ness. 




By In- 
dians. 


whites. 


Total. 


By In- 
dians. 


whiles. 


Total. 


Indi- 
ans. 


Whites. 


Total. 


Nevada: 

Fallon 


1 




1 


1 




1 


36 
15 
4 
2 
4 
11 
100 


2* 

i" 


36 


Fort MoDermitt 


17 


Moapa River 


1 




1 








4 


Nevada. ... , 








2 


Walker River 














5 


w^ftem Shoshone, . 














11 


Reno, special agent 














100 


















Total 


2 




2 


1 




1 


172 


8 


175 






New Mexico: 

Albuquerque Pueblos. . . 








10 
1 
2 

13 


1 
1 


11 
2 
2 

13 


2 

18 
8 
25 

1 




2 


Jicarfila 


1 




1 


18 


If escalero . , , 


8 


Pueblo Bonito 








25 


flan Juan 


3 

4 




3 

4 


1 


Santa Fe 










Zuni 


2 




2 


1 




1 












Total 

North Carolina: Cherokee 


8 




8 


28 


2 


30 


60 
13 




50 
18 


















North Dakota: 

Fort Berthold 


1 




1 


1 

8 

51 


i" 

3 


1 

54 








Fort Totten 


4 
7 
52 


8" 


4 


Standing Rock 


1 
11 




1 
11 


10 


Turtle Mountain 


52 


Total 


13 




13 


71 


4 


75 


63 


3 


66 






Oklahoma: 

Cantonment 














4 
150 
130 

4 
82 


95* 


4 


Kiowa. 


47 
7 


73* 


47 








150 


Osage.. ........... 








225 


Otoe. 


4 


Pawnee 














82 


flac and Fo* .--,, 










8 


8 
32 




Shawnee 


7 




7 


82 


66 




66 






Total 


61 


73 


134 


62 


288 


340 


378 


96 


471 






Oregon: 

•namath 


1 
8 




1 
8 


4 


8 


12 


10 




10 


Roseburg 




Sileti 


2 
22 
18 




2 
22 
13 


2 
18 
27 




2 


Umatilla 


a 


1 


3 


18 


Warm Springs 


27 












Total 


u 


1 


12 


41 


8 


40 


57 
8 




57 


Pennsylvania: Carlisle 


3 


















South Dakota: 

Cheyenne River 


3 


1 


4 


56 

1 




56 

1 


57 




57 


Crow Creek, 




Lower Brule 


1 




1 


2 


2* 


2 


Pierre 








2 


Pine Ridge 


8 
4 
6 


8 


11 

4 
6 


61 
5 




61 
5 






Rosebud? '. 


10 




10 


Sisseton 




Yankton 


6 




6 


12 




12 












Total 


22 
4 


4 
4 


26 
8 


129 




120 


81 
3 


2 
1 


83 


Utah: Uintah and Ouray. . . . 


4 










Washington: 

Colville. 


11 


3 


14 


33 


1 


34 


115 
23 
4 
3 
38 
110 


4" 


115 


Cushman 


23 


N«ah Bay 








13 
4 
25 


i* 


13 
5 
25 


8 


Spokane.' 


2 




2 


3 


TTlt&lfp 


38 


v*viria 








110 


















Total 


13 


3 


16 


75 


2 


77 


293 


4 


297 







1 1912 report. 



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Google 



70 



BSPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 6. — Crimes and misdemeanors committed (not to include cases of drunkenness) 

and arrests for drunkenness during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913. ^&/^ 



**5?v 



Arrests for drunken- 



States and aupertatendentUa, 




***0X2 



**BZ,M 6 



o* 



•V- A 



*** 



CO, 







l acres allot- 
ted for mis- 
.-■I to ullottees; 

\ paid to heirs. 

, vul. 30, p. 92; 

*,.d of Mar. 6, 1861. 
ml ullm led to 143 

and comcrery pur- 
3,1885(9 Stat., 

,531.27 acres allotted 

for ehurnb ncttl sonool; 

tllfittecl (letler books 304, p. 

f Fob. 2S, 1S9U, vol. 30, p. 909, 

,007 \ 

i' 9-p. B&l of Nov, 15, 18*11, voL 12, 

nqmsbuient, Feb. 27, ISti7, vol. 15, 

i ttlloitwi to 2.363 In (1 bms; 9U0 acres 

and agency j and 1 aero for church; the 

.res, uimUutied (letter book* 238, p. 328; 

p. 3ul; 6itf , p. SOft and 836, p. 167). (Acts Of 

voL30 t p.tMJ T and Mar, 3, l»U3 t vol. 33, p 1007.) 

plus tribal land sold under act Fob. 28, lW. 



.day 18, 1&»4, vol. 10, j>, 1074, and of ICar, (J, 1861, 
p, 1171; acts of J una 1 0, 1872 



fi, 187fl. vol. 19, p. 



... V, Xi 

, vol. it, p, 391, and 
' 2,8-i&.97 acres In "" 



lo, lain, vol jy, p. zw< ipO-m-?* »i-n\i hi amiww, 

.33 acres In Nebraska, aRKregatinK 7,038.30 acres, allot- 

.i to 84 Indians, and under act Juno 21, 1906 (31 Stats., 

J4-349), 960.91 acres were allotted lo 37 Indians, laving 

24,03 acres unallotted. { Let tor Looks 233, p. 361; 383, p. 

37; and 512, p. 110 j 



> In Kansas and Nebraska. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



72 



BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



Table 6. — Crimes and misdemeanors committed (not to include cases of drunkenness) 
and arrests for drunkenness during fiscal year ended June 30, 7915— Continued. 



States and superintendencies. 


Crimes. 


Misdemeanors. 


Arrests for drunken- 
ness. 


By In- 
dians. 


By 
whites. 


Total. 


By In- 
dians. 


whiles. 


Total. 


Indi- 
ans. 


Whites. 


Total. 


Wisconsin: 

Carter 














4 
5 




4 


Hayward 


14 
3 

1 




14 
3 
1 


2 



i* 


2 
10 


5 


Kcafaena. ••• 




Lao du Flambeau 


36 
21 
41 


i" 

1 


96 


La Pointe 








30 


Red Cliff 


3 




3 


10 


1 


11 


42 






Total 


21 

1 


4* 


21 
5 


21 


2 


23 


107 
16 


10 


117 


Wyoming: Shoshone 


16 










Grand total 


292 


244 


536 


822 


348 


1,170 


1,060 


183 


2,113 











COMPARISON. 












Total, 1912 


266 


207 


473 

»507 

* 1,511 

« 1,243 


1,264 


327 


1,591 


2,057 


165 


2,972 


Total, 1911 




Total, 1900 


















Total, 1890. . 





































1 Only item reported. 



» Includes misdemeanors; only item reported. 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted sir specially reserved, aid authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



ARIZONA. 

Camp McDowell 

(Under Bait River School.) 
Tribe: Mohave Apache. 

Colorado River i 

(Under Colorado River 
School.) 
Tribes: Chemehuevi, Ka- 
wia, Cocopa,' Mohave. 

Fort Apache 

(Under Fort Apache 
Behcet) 
Tribes: ChUion, Chirica- 
hua, Coyotero. Mim- 
breffo, and Mogolon 
Apache. 

FortMojave. 

(Under Fort Mojave School.) 
Tribe: Apache. 

Gila Bend 

(Under Pima SchooL) 
Tribe: Papago. 

Gila River 

(Under Pima School.) 
Tribes: Maricopa and 
Pima. 

Havasupai (SupeJ) 

(Under Havasupai 8chooL) 
Tribe: Havasupai. 

Hopi (Mogul) 

(Under Moqui School.) 
Tribe: Hopi (Moqui) and 
Navajo. 

Kaibab 

(Under Kaibab School.) 
Tribes: Kaibab and San 
Juan Paiute. 

» Partly in California. 



Acre*. 
24,971 



« * 240, 640 
« 1,681,920 

31,328 

M0, 231 
366,309 

1518 
2,472,320 

138,240 



Executive order, Sept. 15, 1903; act of Apr. 21, 1904, vol. 83, 
p. 211. (See Ann. Rapt. 1906, p. 98.) 

Act of Mar* 3. 1665, vol. 13, p. 55$: Executive orders* Nor. 22, 
1873, Nov. 14, 1374, and Hay 15, 1876. (See sec. 25, Indian 
appropriation act. approved Apr. 21, 1904. vol. 33* p. 224.1 
Act Apr. 30> 1908 (S.SStat, 77); act Apt. 4 P 1910(36 Stat.,, 273 ) ; 
act Miir.3, 1911 (34 Stat,, I 063 );act A ug. 24, 1912(37 Stat., 523). 

Exe iitiv*! on I nr s, Nov, 9 t 1871, July 21, 1S74 # Apr, 27, 1876, 
Jan. 26 and Mar. 31, 1877; act of Feb. 20* 1893* voL 27, p. 
46W: agreement oinda Fuh, '#, lsy6, approved by act of June 
10, I89t3 h vol. 29, p. 358. (See act ol June 7. 1887, VOL B0, p.64. J 



Executive orders, Dec. 1, 1910 and Feb. 2, mi. Sao 11. act 
June 25, 1910 (36 Stat., 855-858). Lands now being allotted. 
See 18579-1910. Area original military reservation, 14,000 

Executive orders, Dec. 12, 1883, and Jan. 17, 1909. (See 4106, 
1909.) 

Act of Feb. 28, 1859. vol. 11. p. 401; Executive orders, Aug. 31, 
18^6, Jan. 10, 1879, June 14, 18"9, May 6. 1882, and Nov. 15, 
1883; Mar. 22, May 8, July 31, 1911; Dec. 16, 1911; and June 2, 
1913. 

Executive orders, June 8 and Nov. 23, 1880, and Mar. 81, 1882. 

Executive order, Dec. 16, 1882. Act of Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stat 
L.,1021). See 45096-1910. 



Secretary's withdrawal, Oct. 15, 1907. (See 73684-1907.) 
Executive order, June 11, 1913. 



* Outboundaries surveyed. » Surveyed. « Not on reservation. 

Digitized by ^ 



/Google 



BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



73 



Table 7.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reservea, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name or reservation an d 
tribe* 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, lav, or other authority establishing 



jLREONA— continued. 



Navajo i.. 
(Under 

Western Navajo, San 
Juan and Pueblo Bonito 
Schools.) 
Trlbei Navajo. 



Leupp, Navajo, 
Navajo, " 



Acres. 
11,887,793 



»U4,84S 



22,317 



M, 834, 240 



730,040 



19,417,875 



370 



><9*,OSl 



181,524 



Treaty of June 1 , 1368, vol. 15, p. 667, and Executive orders, 
Oct. 20, IS78, Jan. G, 1880 .two of May 17, 1884, and Nov. 19, 
1892. ijm/m acres in Ariiona and 967,0*0 acre* In Utah 
were added to this reservation by Executive order of May 
17, 1384, and 46,030 acres in New Mexico restored to public 
tiurmUn, but again reserved by Executive orders, Apr. 24. 
1836, Jan. 8, 1900, and Nov. 14. 1001. Executive or Jew of 
Mar, lQ.and May 15, 1905, 61 ,523 acres added to reservation, 
and by E xecu Live order of Nov . 9. 1 9(37 . as amended by E ■> 
ecu five order of Jan. 23, Item, 2.072, 1^0 acres vers added. 
2,064 Indiana have been allotted 323,963 acres under the act 
of Feb, 8, 1 SS7 ( 24 S 1 ats. , 388 ) , as amended . By E xecuti ve 
orders of Dec. 30, 1003, and Jan. 10, 191 1 , the surplus lands, 
approximately 1,1141 ., ISO acrm, In that part of ihe extension 
in New Mexico restored to the pubtic domain (see 35 Stat. 
L, 457 and 7*7). (See 1277-9) Act of May 27, 1902 (32 Slat., 
204.) Executive order May 24, 1911, Feb. 17, 1913 (2), Feb, 
10, 1913 (2), and May 6, 1913. 

Executive order, July 1, 1S74, and act of Aug. 5, 1883, voL 22, 
p. 291, 41,006 acres allotted to 291 Indians, and 14 acres 
reserved for school site, the residue, 27,533 acres, unallotted. 
(See let ter book 208, p/40S.) Executive order June 16, 1911, 
and May 28, 1913. 

Executive orders, June 14, 1879, and Oct. 20, 1910; Sept. 28 and 
Oct. 23, 1£1 1. See 26731-1910. (See Senate Doc. 90, 58th 
Cong., 2d sess.) 804 Indians allotted 24,403 acres under 
general allotment act. 

Executive orders, Nov. 0, 1871, Dec. 14, 1872, Aug. fi, 1873, 
July 21, 1874, Apr. 27, &nd Oct, 30, 1870, Jan. 26 and Mar. 31, 
1877; act of Feb, 20, 1893, vol. 27. p. 469; agreement made 
Feb, 25, 1896. approved by act of Juno 10, 1896. voL 20. p. 
368. ( For fuller text see Misc. Indian Doc,, vol, 39, p, 35910.) 
(See act of June 7, 1&97, vol. 30, p. 64; act of Mar, 2, 1901 1 
vol. 3 1 , p. 952. ) Executive order of Dec. 22, 1 002. 

Executive orders, Jan. 4, 1883. Dec. 22, 1808, May U, 1000, 
June 2, 1911, May 29, 1012, and July 18, 1913. 



Act of Mar. 3, 1803 (27 Stets., 612), provides for purchase of 
330 acres; not allotted. 40 acres were reserved by order 
of the Secretary of the Interior, Oct. 28, 1903, for Digger 
Indians. (See 46597-1907, 71*61-1008, 39245-1900.) 

Act of Apr. 3, 1864, vol. 13, p. 39; Executive orders, Jane 23. 
1670, and 6c t. 10, 1891. There have been allotted to 630 
Indians 29,143 33 acres, reserved to 3 villages 63,74 acres, 
and opened to settlement under act of June 17, 1802 (27 
Stats., p. 52), 15,09*5.11 acres of land {formerly Klamath 
River Reservation). (Letter book 263, p. 06; 382, p. 480; 
383, p- 170.) 

Executive orders, Jan. 31, 1870, Dec. 27, 1375, May 15, 187ti, 
May 3, Aug. 25. Sept. 29. 1877. Jan. 17, l&SQ, Mar. 2, Mar. 9, 
IB8I, June 27, July 24, 1882, Feb, 5, June 19, 1*83. Jan, 25, 
Mar. 22, 1886. Jan, 29, Mar. 14, 1637. and May 6, 1889. 270.24 
allotted to 17 Indians and for church and cemetery 
on Syquan Reserve (letter book 303, p. 297). and 
allotted to 15 Indiana on Pala Reserve (letter 



(Under 8an XaVte ScbOQlV}' 
Tribe: Fapago. 

Salt River... ., 

i Under Salt River School.) 

Tribes: Maricopa and 
Pima. 

San Carlos. 

{ Under San Carlos School, ) 
Tribes: Arlvavpa.Chilion, 
Chiricahua, Coyote™, 
Munbreno. MogoUon, 
Mohave, Phial, San Car- 
los, Tonto, and Yuma 
Apache, 

WelapaL,.,...... 

(Under Truxton Canon 
School.) 
Tribe: Walapai. 

Total 

CAtrroaHLt. 

Digger..- .... 

(Under a farmer.) 
Tribe: Digger. 

Hoops Valley 

(Under Soopa Valley 

School.) 
Tribes: Hunsatung, Hu- 

pa, Klamath River, 

M&kut, Redwood, 

Saiax, Sermalton, and 

Tishtanatan. 

Mission (28 reserves) 

(Under Martlnex, Soboba, 

Pecbanga. Malki, 

Campo a nd Volcan 

Schools.) 
Tribes: DwKueno, Kawla, 

Sen Luis Key , Serranos , ll 9.1. 

and Temecula, book 303, p. 57), 1,299.47 acres allotted to 85 Temecula 

Indians, 2.70 acres reserved for school purposes (tetter book 
351, p. 312). Proclamations of President of Apr 10, IOOI, 
vol. 32. p. 1970, and May 29. 1002, vol, 32, p. 2005; act of Feb. 
11, 1003, voL 32, p. 822. YV arner's ranch of 3,353 acres pur- 
chased. (See authority 7971; also letter book 580, p. 113. 
D eed recor J ed In m Ise. record book No. 6. p. 1 93. ) 1 ,276.28 
acres allotted to 162 Pala Ind Urn. 6.687, 81 acres have been 
purchased under act of June 21, 1006 (34 Stats,, 325-333). 
and act o f Mar. 1 , 1907 (34 fl tats. , 1015- 1 022). D eeds recorded 
misc. record book No. 0, Area subject to change by addi- 
tions under above acts. 171,936,73 acres patented r>y the 
Government to various bands under acta of Jan. 12, lfc&l (2ft 
Stat. L., 712). and Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stat. L., 1015-1022). 
See misc. tract book 36, 

» Partly in New Mexico. (See Table 8.) "Surveyed. « Partly surveyed. « Outrjoundartaasiri«3«\» 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



purposes 
119.99 ad 



74 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 7.— -General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishmetU, to Nov. 3, 1913 — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



California— continued. 



Paiute. 



Round Valley 

(Under Round Valley 
School.) 
Tribes: Clear Lake, Con- 
oow, Little Lake, No- 
melaki, Pit River. Pot- 
ter Valley, Redwood 
Waiiaki,andYuki. 



Tule River. 

(Under Tule River School.) 
Tribes: Kawia,* Kings 
River, Moache, Tenon, 
Tule,and WichumnU 

Yuma 

(Under Fort Yuma School.) 
Tribe: Yuma-Apache. 



Total. 



COLORADO. 



Ute« 

(Under Navajo Spi 
and Southern Ui 
Schools.) 
Tribes: Capote. Moache, 
and Wimmuche Ute. 



Total. 



( Under special agent. ) 



Total 

IDAHO. 



Coeur d' Alene 

(Under Coeur d'Alene 

Agency.) 

Tribes: Coeur d'Alene 

K u t e n a i,» Pend 

d'Oreille,* and Spoken. 



Acres. 
»75,746 



Executive orders, Mar. 11, 1012; May 0, 1912; Sept 7, 1913; 
Sept. 16, 1012, and Feb. 14, 1013. 



Acts of Apr. 8, 1864, vol. 13, p. 39, and Mar. 8, 1873, vol. 17, 
p. 634; Executive orders, Mar. 80, 1870, Apr. 8, 1873, May 
18,1875,and July 26, 1876;actof Oct. 1, 1800~voi. 26, p. 658. 



« 48, 661 



0,060 



436,211 



375,060 



875,060 



•26,741 



26,741 



p. 634; Executive orders, 
18, 1875, and July 26, 1876;»u» v* w*. *, «**/. y 
42,105.56 acres allotted to 1,034 Indians, 1,110 acres reserved 
for school and agency purposes (72068-1007, letter books 
206, p. 17, and 305. p. 260). (See act of Feb. 8, 1006, pro- 
viding for a reduction of area of reservation, voL 33 j>. 706.) 
36,602.23 acres additional allotments made to 610 Indians 
and 740 acres reserved for school purposes. 
Executive orders Jan.' and Oct. 8, 1873, and Aug. 3, 1878. 



Executive order. Jan. 0, 1884; agreement, Dec. 4, 1808. rati- 
fied by act of Aug. 15, 1804, voL28. p. 832. (See sec. 25, In- 
dian appropriation act, approved Apr. 21, 1004. voL 33, 
p. 224.) 7,756.54 acres Irrigable land opened under act of 
June 17. 1002 (32 State., 388), act Mar. 8, 1011, (36 State., 
1063). 8,000 acres allotted to 800 Indiana. 



Treaties of Oct. 7. 1863, vol. 13. p. 673. and Mar. 2, 1868, vol. 
15, p. 610, act of Apr. 29, 1874, voL 18, p. 86; Executive or- 
ders, Nov. 22, 1875, Aug. 17, 1876, Feb. 7, 1870. and Aug. 4, 
1882, and act of Congress approved June 15, 1880, vol. 21, 
p. 100, and July 28. 1882, vol. 22. p. 178. May 14. 1884, vol.23, 
p. 22, Aug. 15, 1804. vol. 28. p. 337. Feb. 20, 1805. vol. 28, p. 
877. 72.651 acres allotted to 371 Indians and 360 acres re- 
served for use of Government (letter book 821, p. 86); also 
7.300.32 acres allotted to 30 Indians Getter book 331, p. 305). 
523,070 acres opened to settlement by President's proclama- 
tion dated Apr. 18, 1800 (31 Stats., 1047). The residue, 
375,060 acres, retained as a reservation for the Wiminuche 
Utes, act June 30, 1013 (Public, No. 4). 



ncu. a, ion iw £>**!•., vuoy, tfiuro o, AVW \9k DIAL, OIMJ, 

Apr. 4, 1010 (36 Stat., 274). 23,061.72 acres purchased for 
Seminole Indians in Florida under acts mentioned (see 
Annual Report for 1000, p. 101). 8,680 aores reserved by 
Executive order of June 28, 1011. (See 20817-1000.) 



Executive orders, June 14, 1867, and Nov. 8, 1873; agree- 
ments made Mar. 26, 1887, and Sept. 0, 1880, and confirmed 
in Indian appropriation act approved Mar. 8, 1801, voL 



served for agency, school, and church purposes and for 
mill sites. (See 86960-1906, and acts of June 21, 1006 (34 
Stat. L., 325-355). Mar. 3, 1801 (26 Stat. L., 1026-1030), 
Aug. 15, 1804 (28 Stat L., 822), Mar. 27, 1008 (35 But. L., 
56), Apr. 30, 1000 (35 Stat. L., 78).) President's proclama- 
tion issued May 22, 1000, opening 234,210 acres surplus 
lands to settlement. (87 L. D., 608.)' 



* Partly in Nevada. 

« Outboundaries surveyed. 

* Not on reservation. 



« Partly in New Mexico. 
• Surveyed. 



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75 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov, S, 191S — Continued. 



Nama of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



n>.iKO— Qoatinoad, 



Fort Hall 

(Under Fort Hall School.; 
Tribes: Bannock and 
ShoahouL 



Lapwai, .»*.. 

(Under Fort L a p w a i 
School.) 
Tribe: Not Perce. 



I -em i.i. 



Total. 



IOWA. 

Sauk and Fox. 

(Under Sao and Fox 

Tribes rotawatomi, 
Sauk and Fox of the 
Mississippi and Winne- 
bago, 



Total. 



KANSAS, 

Chippewa and Munsee ........ 

(Under Potawatoml 
School.) 
Tribes: Chippewa and 
wimsm 



Iowa 1 ... ..... 

(Under Klckapoo School. J 
Tribe: Iowa. 



Klckapoo 

(Under Kickapoo School) 
Tribe; KJexapoo. 



Potawatoml. ............. 

(Under Potawatoml 
School.) 
Tribe: Prairie Band of 
Fotiwatorol. 



Sauk and Fox *. 

(Under Ktekapoo School.) 
Tribe: Haux and Fox ol 
the Missouri. 



Total. 



Act™. 
" 447,940 



34,190 



4S3 p m 



3,479.94 



3,479.94 



24 



Date of treat;, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



Treaty of July 3. 1668, vol. la, p. 67a; Executive orders, June 
14, 1867, and July 30, 1869; agreement with Indiana made 
July 18, 1881, and approved by Congress July 3, 1883, vol. 
22, p. 148; acts of Bopt. 1, 1883, vol 23, p. 452. Feb. 23, 
tm, voL25,uJ387,anclMar,3, 1891, vuL26.p. 10lL Agree- 
ment made Fob. 5, 1K98, ratified by act of Juno 6, 1900, vol. 
31, p. 672, ceding 416.000 acres, of which 6,208.73 acres have 
been allotted to 79 Indians (see letter book 537, p. 478); re- 
matador of ceded tract opened to settlement June 17, 1902 
(Presidents proclamation of Hay 7, 1902, vol. 32, p. 1997), 
act of Mar. 30, 1904, vol. 33, p. 153, act of Mar. 3, 1911 (36 
Stat., 1004 J. 

Treaty of June 9, 1863, vol. 14, p. 647; agreement of May 27, 
1887, ratified by act of Sept. 1, 1888. vol. 25, p. 452; agree- 
ment, May 1, 1S93, ratified bv act of Aug. 15, 1394, vol. 28, 
p. 326, 3-8,812 acres allotted to 1,876 Indians, 2,170.47 
acres reserved for agency, school t mission, and cemetery 
pupates, and 32,020 acres ol Umberland reserved for the 
tribe; the remainder restored to public settlement. ( Pres- 
ident's proclamation, Nov. 8, 18S5, 29 Stats., 873.) 

Unratified treaty of Sept. 24 , 1868. and Executive order. Feb. 
12, 18*6: agreement of May 14, 1880, ratified by act of Feb. 
23 , 1 889, vol . 25. p. 687. ( See 34 Stat. L , , 335, and agreement 
executed Dec. M. 1Q05, approved by President Jan. 27, 1906.) 
Act of June 21, 1900 (34 Stat. ,334), about 64,000 acres opened 
In 19Q9, (See 36809-1909.) 



By purchase. (See act of Mar. 2, 1867, vol. 14, p. 507.) Deeds 
1867, 1865, 1867, 1868, 1899. 187$, 1880, 1883, ISS3. 1888. June 
July, and Oct. 1B92-1896 (see act of Feb. 13, 1891, vol. 26, 
p. 749) . (See Ann. Repts. . 1 891 , p. 681 ; 1 B98, p. 81 . ) Deeds 
recorded, vol. 6. (Se*Tw866-10O7T> 



Treaty of July 16, 1869, vol, 12, p. 1105, 4,195,31 acres allot- 
ted to 100 Indians; the residue, 200 acres, allotted for mis- 
sionary and school purposes. Patents issued to allottees; 
balance of allot men is sold and proceeds paid to heir*, 
(See ninth section.) (Act of June 7, 1897, vol. 30, p, 92; 
i. B„332,p>6*.) 

Treaties of May 17, 1854, vol. 10, p. 106$. and of Mar. 6, 1861, 
vol, 12, p, 1171, 11,768.77 acres of land allotted io 143 
Indians; 162 acres reserved for school arid cemetery pur- 
poses, (Letter hook 266, p.8fl.) AeteMar.3,lSS5(23Btat., 
:k32;, and Jan. 26, 188 / (24 Stat., 367) 

T reaty of J une 28, 1 862, vol . 13 , p. 623 J 27,531 .27 acres all otted 
to 350 Indians; 245 acres reserved for church and school; 
the residue, 39887 acres, uiuilloued (letter books 304, p. 
ISO, and 773, p. 54). (Acts of Feb. 28, 1890, vol. 30, p, 909, 
and Mar. 3, im t vol, 351, p, 1007,) 

Treaties of Juno 6, 18*6. vol. 9, p. 853; or Nov. 15, 1861, vol, 12, 
p. 1x91; treaty ol reUnouishrnent, Feb. 27, 1867, vol. 15, 
p. 531. 220,785 acres allotted to 2303 Indians; 319 acres 
reserved for school and agency, and 1 acre for church; the 
residue. 600.02 acres, unallotted (letter books 238, p. 328; 
2*9, p, 437; 303, p, 3ul; 6i5, p. 202; and 825, p, 167). (Act* of 
Feb, 28, 1899, vol 30. p. M, and Mar, 3, 1903, vol, 32, p. 1007,) 
980 acres surplus tribal land sold under act Feb. 28, 1899, 

Treaties of May 18, J8o4, voL 10, p. 1074, and of Mar. 6, 1861, 
vol. 12, p. 1171; acts ol June 10, 1872, vol. 17, p, 391, and 
Aug. 15, 1876. vol. 19, p. 208. 2,8*3.97 acres In Kansas, 
4,194 ,33 acres in Nebraska, aggregating 7,038.30 acres, allot- 
ted to 84 Indians, and under act June 21, 1006 (34 Slats., 
324-349), 960.91 acres were allotted to 37 Indiana, leaving 
24.03 acres unallotted. (Letter books 233, p. 361; 383, p. 
37; and 612, p. 110.) 



« In Kanaaa and Katorattaa, 

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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribe* 
occupying or belonging to it, area not alloUted or specially reserved, and authority for it* 
establishment, to Nov. 8, 1913 — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



Isabella 1 

Tribe: Chippewa of Sagi- 
naw. Swan Creek, and 
Black River. 
L'Anse 

(Under special agent) 
Tribe: L'Anse and Vleux 
Desert Bands of Chip- 
pewa of Lake Superior. 



Ontonagon. ................ ..< 

(Under special agent.) 
Tribe: Ontonagon Band 
of Chippewa of Lake 
Superior. 
Ottawa and Chippewa 



Total.. 



MINNESOTA. 



Bois Fort 

(Under Nett Lake School.) 
Tribe: Bois Fort Chip- 
pewa. 



Deer Creek 

(Under Nett Lake School.) 
Tribe: Bois Fort Chip- 
pewa. 



Fond du Lao 

(Under Fond du Lao School.) 
Tribe: Fond du Lao Band ' 
of Chippewa of Lake 
Superior. 



Grand Portage (Pigeon 
River).i 
(Under Grand Portage 

Tribe: Grand Portage 
Band of Chippewa of 
Lake Superior. 

Leech Lake* 

(Under Leech Lake Agency.) 
Tribes: Cass Lake, Pil- 
lager, and Lake Wini- 
bigosnish bands of Chip- 
pewa. 



Mdewakanton 

(Under Birch Cooley School.) 
Tribe: Mdewakanton 
Sioux. 



MfUeLao 

(Under White Earth 
School.) 
Tribe: Mule Lao and 
Snake River bands of 
Chippewa. 

RedLakeVT 

(Under Red Lake School.) 
Tribe: Red Lake and 
Pembina Chippewa. 



Acres. 
191 



*732 



923 



543,528 



Executive order, Hay 14, 1855; treaties of Aug. 2, 1855, voL 
11. p. 633, and of Oct. 18, 1864, vol. 14, p. 657. 08^95 aorea 
allotted to 1,943 Indians. 



Treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, vol. 10, p. 1109. 52,041 1_ __ 

to 666 Indians. Payment for lands in sec. 18, see 98879- 
1907. 



Sixth clause, second article, treaty of Sept. 30, 1864, voL 10, 
p. 1109; Executive order, Sept. 25, 1855. 2,561.35 acres 
allotted to 35 Indians. 

Treaty July 31, 1855. (11 Stat, 621.) 120,470 acres allotted 
to 1,818 Indians. 



Treaty of Apr. 7, 1866, vol. 14, p. 765; act of Tan. 14, 1880, voL 
25, p. 642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 247, 61st Cong., 1st seas., 
p. 63.) 54,524 acres allotted to 684 Ind^au andlM.68 acres 
reserved for agency, etc, purposes. (L. B. 359,382); real* 
due, 61,863 acres to be opened to public settlement. 

Executive order, June 30, 1883; act of Jan. 14, 1889. vol. 25, p. 
642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 247, 61st Gang., 1st seas., p. 
63.) 295.55 acres allotted to 4 Indians; residue, 22,744 aorea, 
opened to publio settlement. (Executive order of Deo. 21, 

Treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, vol. 10. p. 1109; act of May 26,1873. 
vol. 17, p. 190. 27.637 acres allotted to 406 Indians; act of 
Jan. 14, 1889. vol. 25, p. 642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 247, 
61st Cong., 1st sess., p. 60.) The residue, 76,837 acres, re- 
stored to settlement. Agreement of Nov. 21. 1889. (See 
act of Jan. 14, 1889, vol. 25, p. 642.) Act June 30, 1913 (Pub- 
lio No. 4). 

Treaty of Sept. 30. 1854, vol. 10, p. 1109; act of Jan. 14,1889. 
vol. 25, p. 642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 947, 61st Cong., 1st 
sess., p. 69.) 24,191.31 acres allotted to 304 fefflansT3&2* 
acres reserved for agency and wood purposes; residue, 
16,041.97 acres, to be opened to publio settlement. 

Treaty of Feb. 22. 1855, vol. 10, p. 1165; Executive orders, 
Nov. 4, 1873, and May 26, 1874; act of Jan. 14, 1889. voL 25, 
p. 642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 247, 51st Cong. . 1st sess., 
p. 49.) 47,513 acres allotted to 619 Indians andloi.60 acres 
reserved for agency and school purposes. (Act of June 27, 
1902, vol. 32, p. 402.) Minnesota National Forest act, May 
23, 1908 (35 Stat., 268). 

By purchase. (See acts of July 4, 1884, Mar. 3, 1885, May 15 
1886, June 29, 1888 (25 Stat., 228); Mar. 2. 1889(25 Stat.. 992). 
and Aug. 19. 1890 (26 Stat, 349). 339.70 acres deeded to 47 
Indians; 12,242.76 acres allotted to 88 Indians and held in 
trust by the United States, 8.90 acres reserved for school. 
(See Ann. Rpt., 1891, pp. Ill and 179, and schedule ap- 
proved Nov. 5l. 1904.) 

Treaties of Feb. 22, 1856. vol. 10, p. 1165. and article 12, of May 
. .- efe, 695; act of Jan. 14, 1889. vol. 25, p. 



7, 1864,vol. 13, pp. 693, 695; act of Jan. 14, 1889. vol. 25, p. 
642. (See H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 247, 51st Cong., 1st sess.. p. 
45.) Joint resolution (No. 6), Dec. 19, 1893, vol. 28, p. 676, 
and Joint resolution (No. L 40J approved May 17, 



30, p'. 745. (See Ann." Rept.'18tfb: pp. 38-43.) ' 
Treaty of Oct. 2, 1863, vol. 18 j>. 667; act of Jan. 14, 1899, voL 
25 L p. 642. (See agreement July8, 1889, H. R. Ex. Doc. No. 
" ' " , and Executive 

, vol. 32, p. 1009, 
at made Mar. 10, 
1902, vol. 33, p. 46, for sale of 2b8,l$2 acres. Act of Feb. 8, 
1906, vol. 33, p. TO, granting 320 acres as right of way for the 
Minneapous,%edLake ^Manitoba Rwy. Co. 



M.p. V*jb. \O0« BUWUlVUk *UlJf O. AOOO, XI. X _ 

247, 51st Cong., 1st sess., pp. 27 and 32), and Executive 
order, Nov. Titt, 1892. Act of Mar. 3, 1903, vot 32, n. 1009, 
and act of Feb. 20, 1904, ratifying agreement made Mar. 10, 



i Agency abolished June 30, 1889. 



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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFATB8. 



77 



Table 7.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what aoency or school, tribe* 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
staohshme 



establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913 — Continued.- 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Are* (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other Authority establishing 
reserve. 



Minnesota— continued . 



VennJlUon Lake, « . . . , 

(Under Vermillion Lake 
School,) 
Tribe: Bot$ Fort Chip- 
pewa, 

White Earth, 

(Under White Earth School.) 

Tribes: Chippewa of the 

Mississippi, Pembina, 

and Pillager Chippewa, 



White Oak Point and CbJp- 
(tinder Leech Lake Agon- 



T&4: 



Late WraJbigo- 
■hjeh and Pillager 
bands of Chippewa and 
White Oak Point band 
of Mississippi Chip- 
pewa. 



Total. 



BteekJeet 

(Under Blackiee* School) 
Tribes; Bbckfeet, Blood, 
and Fiegan. 



574,344 



I. I'ff^n-. 



Craw*. ,,,....,»...... 

(Under Crowfoot) 
Tribee: Mountain and 

River Crow. 



• 1,834,511 



Fort Belknap..,. .. 

(Under Fort Belknap School.) 
Tribe*: Grosventre and 
Asiinfboin. 



407,600 



i Outboundaries surveyed. 



Executive order, Boo. 30^ 1831, act of Jan. 14, I860, vol. 35, p, 
942, 



Treaty of Mar, 19, 1867, vol 16, p. 719: Executive orders, 
Mar, 18, 1879, and July 13, 1SS3; act of Jan, 14, 1889, voL 35, 
p. 642. (See agreement July 29, 1889, 11. Ft Ex, Doc. No. 
24 7, 51st Cong, . Is t seas, , pp> 34 and 3a ) U nder act of Jan. 
14, 1889 (25Sut, 642), 428, 401,05 acres have been allotted 
to 6,152 Indians, and 1WI acres reserved for agency, 
pchool. and religious purposes and under act of Apr. 2B, 
l»m (33 Stat, 539), 244,585. 43 acres have been allotted to 
2,7** Mississippi and Otter Tail Pillager Chippewa, being 
additional allotments to a part of the allot tees under act of 
Jan. 14* 1880, leaving unallotted and unreserved 29,736 
acres. Lands now In process of allotment under both acts. 
Act June 21. 1906 (34 Stat, 353). 

Treaties of Feb. 22, 1*55, voL 10, p, 1165, and of Mar. 19, 1867, 
voL 16, p. 719; Executive orders. Oct 29, 1873, and May 26, 
1874; act of Jan, 14, 1889, VoL 25, p. 742, (See H, E. Ex, 
Doc No. 247, filat Cong., 1st saw., pp- 42, 49.) 64.732 
acres allotted to 8241 Indians; the residue opened to public 
settlement; 240 acres reserved for bail park. (See 289-1908. > 



Treaty of Oct 17, 1855, voL It p. G67; unratified treaties of 
July 18, 1806, and of July 13, and 15 and Sept, 1. 18*8; Exec- 
utive orders, July 5, 1873, and Aug, IB, 1874; act of Apr. 15, 
1874, vol. 18, p. 28; Executive orders. Apr. 13, 1875, and 
July 13, 1SS0, and agreement mode Feb, 11, 1887, approved 
by Congress May 1, 1888, vol 25, p. I2t>; agreement made 
Sept 26, 1595, approved by act of June 10, 1896. voL 29, 
p. 353: act of Feb. 27, 1905, confirming grant of 356. U acres 
of land and 120 acres o( unsurveyed land, (See vol. 33 
p, 819,) Act ol Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stats., 1Q3.U Five Indians 
allotted LGOO acres. 44,240,07 acres Umber reserved. 
(Bee4C2M913.> 

Treaty of May 7, 1868. voL 15, p. 049; agreement made June 
12, 1880, and approved by Congress Apr. 11, 1S83, vol 22, 

a. 42, and agreement made Aug, 22, 1881, approved by 
ongress July 10, 1882. vol. 32, p. 157; Executive orders, 
Oct. 20, 1875, Mar, 8, 1S76, Dec. 7, 18S6; agreement made 
Dec* 8, 1590; ratified and confirmed m Indian appropriation 



act approved Mar. 3, 1391, vol. 26, pp. 1039- 1040; agreement 
made Aug. 27, 1892, {See Ann. flept, 1892, p. 718; also 
Presidents proclamation, Oct 15, 1892, vol. 27. p, 1034.) 
Act of Apr, 27. 1904 T vol. 33, p. 352, to amend and ratify 
agreement of Aug, 14, 1899. Under act Feb, 8, 1857 (24 
Stat, 388), and act Feb, 28, 1391 (26 Stat, 794), and Execu- 
tiTe order, June 8, lOOl {modifying Executive order of 
Mar, 25, 1901 ) f 479 . 18207 acres have been allotted to 2.439 
Indians, and l,fi22.fil acres reserved for administration, 
church, and cemetery purposes, leaving un£dlolted ana 
unreserved L834 r SU acres, and 14,711.96 acres on ceded part 
have bwa allotted to 81 Indians, (See L. B. 713, p, 50; 
852, p. 160. and 956. p. 416.) 37 Indians (Schedule A ) have 
been allotted 7,429.55 acres under acts of Apr, 31, 1882 (22 
Stat, 12), Feb, 8, 1887 {24 Stat., 388), and amendments 
thereto. President's proclamation. May 24, 1906 (34 Stat, 
3200). 
Treaty of Oct 17, 1855, vol, 11, p. 657; unratified treaties of 
July 18, 186ft, and of Juiy 13 and 15 and Sept, 1. l*r>S; i:*^ 
utive tn July 5, 1873, and Aug. 19, 1874; act of Apr. 15, 
1871, voL 18, p. 28; Executive orders, Apr. 13, 1875, and 
July 13, 1880, and agreement made Jan. 21, 1687, approved 
by Congress May 1, 1883, vol.25, p. 124: agreement made, 
Oct 9, 1895, approved by act of June 10, 1896, vol. i#, p. 360. 

i Outboundariee surveyed; partly surveyed. 



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78 



REPORT OP THE COMMISSIOSTEB OP INDIAN APPAIBS. 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for Us 
establishment, to Nov, 3, 191$ — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



Montana— continued. 



Fort Peck 

(Under Fort Peck School) 
Tribes: Assiniboin, Brule\ 
Santee, Teton, Hunk- 

gapa, and Yanktonai 
ioux. 



Acres. 



Flathead 

(Under Flathead School.) 
Tribes: Bitter Root, Car- 
los Band, Flathead, 
Kutenai, Lower Kalis- 
pel, and Pend d'OreQle. 



Northern Cheyenne 

(Under Tongue River 
School.) 
Tribe: Northern Chey- 



1489,500 



Total. 



4,313,416 



NEBRASKA. 



Niobrara 

(Under Santee Agency.) 
Tribe: Santee Sioux. 



Omaha 

(Under Winnebago Agency.) 
Tribe: Omaha. 



4,500 



Ponca 

(Under Santee Agency.) 
Tribe: Ponca. 



Sioux (additional) 

(Under Pine Ridge School.) 
Tribe: Oglala Sioux. 

Winnebago 

(Under Winnebago Agency.) 
Tribe: Winnebago. 



040 



Total. 



6,279 



Treaty of Oct 17, 1855. voL 11, p. 657; unratified treaties of 
July 18. 1866, and of July 13 and 16 and of Sept 1, 1868; 
Executive orders, July 5. 1873, and Aug. 19, 1874: act of 
Apr. 15. 1874, voL 18, p. 28; Executive orders, Apr. 13, 1875, 
and July 13, 1880; and agreement made Dec. 28, 1886, ap- 

Soved by Congress May 1, 1888, voL 25, p. 113, act May 30, 
38 (35 Stat7558). 2,025 Indians allotted 722,133.47 acres. 
1,225,849 acres surplus land opened to settlement and entry 
by President's proclamation July 25, 1913. (See 42 L. D., 
264.) 1,032.84 acres reserved for town site, religious, and 
administrative purposes. 
Treaty of July 16, 1855, vol. 12, p. 975. Under acts of Apr. 23, 
1904 (33 Stats.. 302), Feb. 8, 1887 (24 Stats., 388), and Feb. 



28, 1891 (26 Stats., 794), 2,438 Indians have been allotted 
226,633 acres, and under act of Apr. 23, 1904, 2,524.70 acres 
have been reserved for tribal uses, and under act of Apr. 23, 
1904, as amended by act of Mar. 3, 1905 (33 Stats., 1049-1080), 
6,774.92 acres have been reserved for agency purposes, 
18,521.35 acres reserved for Bison Range under acts of May 
23, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 267), and Mar. 4, 1909 (35 Stats., 927). 
See 51019-1908. May 22, 1909, proclamation issued by Presi- 
dent opening surplus lands. Aot Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stats., 
795). 45,714 acres reserved for power and reservoir sites, 
act Apr. 12, 1910 (36 Stats., 863). Executive order Jan. 14, 
1913. 
Executive orders, Nov. 26, 1884, and Mar. 19, 1900, act of Mar. 
3, 1903, vol. 32, p. 1000. 



Act of Mar. 3. 1SC3, vol. 12, p. 819, ith paragraph, art. 6: 
treaty of Apr. 29, 18fi8, voU 15, p< 637; Executive orders, 
Felu27, Jul v 20, I860, Nov. 16, 1S67 S Aug. 31, 18#9r Dec- 31, 
1873, and Feb, 9, 1K85. 3-2,875.75 acres selected as homo- 
steads, 38,908.01 acres selected as allotments, and 1,130-70 
acres selected for agency, school, and mission purposes; un- 
ratified agreement, of Oct. 17, 1882. ( For mod ifi cat too, su« 
sundry civil appropriation act approved Mar. 3, 1883, voL 
22, p. G24, For text, see mfsc, Indian doc., vol, 14, p. 305,) 
Act of Apr. 30, 1SSS- vol, 25, p. 91 , not accepted. 

Treaty of Mar. 16, lEai, vol. 10, p, 1 043; selection by Indians 
witn President's approval. May 11, 1855; treaty of Mar. 6. 
ISftf, vol, U, p, 6o7; acts of June 10, 1872, vol. 17, p t 391, an4 
of June 22, 1874, vol. 18, p, 170: deed to w Inns boco Indians, 
dated July 31, 1874; act of Aug. 7, 18*2, vol. 22, p, 341; act 
of Mar. 3, 1803 [27 Slats., p. 6t2); 130,522 acres allotted to 
1 ,458 Indians; tho residue, 4,500 acres, unallotted; act May 
"1, 1913 (37 State., Ill), sale of surplus land. 



Trcjiiv of Mar. 12, 1858, vol. 12, p. 097. and supplemental 
treaty, War. 10, 1865, voL 14, p. 6*5; act of Mar. 2, 18S&, sec. 

13, vol. 25, p. 892. 27,236 acres allotted to 168 Indiana; 160 
acres rewrved and ocvupl^ fry agency arid school build* 
lugs. (See letter book 205, p. 330; also President's procla- 
mation, Oct. 23, 1890. vol. 26, p. 1550.) 

Executive order, Jan. 24, 1882. 

Act of Feb. 21, 1863, vol. 12. p. 658; treaty of Mar. 8, 1865, vol. 

14, p. 671; act of June 22, 1874, vol. 18, p. 170: deed from 
Omaha Indians, dated July 31, 1874. (See vol. 6, Indian 
deeds, p. 215.) 106,948.22 acres allotted to 1,558 Indians; 480 
acres reserved for agency, etc.; 610.10 acres sold; aot July 4, 
1888; the residue, 1,130 acres, unallotted. 



' Partly surveyed. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEPOBT OF THE 00MMIS8I0NBB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



79 



Table 7.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law. or other authority establishing 



NXVADA. 

Duck Valley .. 

(Under western Shoshone 
School.) 
Tribes: Faiute and West* 
ernSho&honl 
Moapa River, . «...**...***-... 
(Under Moapa River School.) 
Tribes: Chemehuevi, Kai~ 
bab, Fawipit, Falute, 
and ShJvwlU* 

Paiutfl , 

(Under Fallon School.) 

Pyramid Lake. . . .. 

(Under Nevada School,) 
Tribe: Paiute. 

Walker Riven- 

(Under Walker River 

School*) 
Tribe: Paiute. 



Total „ 

WEW MEXICO* 



J jcarilla Apache.. 

(Under iWllla School.) 
Tribe: Jlcarllla Apache. 



Mescalero Apache. 

(Under Mescalera School.) 
Tribes: Mescaiero and 

Mimbrefio Apache, 
Pueblo: 
(Under Santa Fa and Albu- 
querque Schools.) 
Tribe: Pueblo— 

Jemei ***.*„ 

Acoma. .,*.-*.-..*...-. 

San Juan 

Ficurts 

San Felipe.* 

Pecos >....*.. 

Cochltl... 

Santo Domingo........ 

Taos , , . . „ 

Banta Clara 

Tesuque**...* 

Banlldetbnso 

Pojoaque 

Sla 

San Dia . 

Isleta „**. 

Nambe...*. 

Lagunn 

Santa Ana..., ,,.. 

Zoni... ..„.„. 

(Under ZufH School.) 
Tribe: Zufli Pueblo* 



Aert$. 
tBtt,UD 



* 1*128 

1,000 

322,000 
40,746 



686,704 



407,300 



474,240 



«40,660 
'05,792 
i 17,645 
' 17, 461 
■34,767 
MS, 763 
3 21,256 
'02,398 
"17,361 
» 19,369 

* 17,471 

* 17,293 
* 13,530 

* 17,515 

* 24, 187 
* 110,080 

* 13,586 

* 1-54,026 
* t7 r 361 

* 215,040 



Total . 1,889.880 



Executive order*, Apr. 16, 1877, May 4, 1886, and July 1, l«0i 



Executive orders, Mar. 12, t873, and Feb. 12, 1874; act of Mar. 
13* 1875, vol* 18. p. 446, selection approved by Secretary of 
too Interior, July 3* 187S; Executive orders of June 28, 1875, 
July 3, 1875, July 31, 1903, Oct* 28, 1912, and Nov* 26, 1912* 

7i sections (4,644) scree) reserved under second form with- 
drawal, reclamation act June 1 7* 1902 (32 Stats., 388). for re* 
allotment to Indians; 3,640 acres have been allotted to 364 
Faiute Indians and 10 acres reserved for school purpose* 
(see 76982-1907), 1,000 acres unallotted and unreserved. 

Executive order, Mar, 23, 1874* Act July 1, 1998 (30 Stat*., 
594* ) ( See sec. 2*j , 1 od Ian appropriation act approved A pr 
21, 1904, vol. 33, p* 235.) Executive older Sept. 4, 1913, 
creating bird reserve out of Amino Island. 

Executive order, Mar. 19, 1574; joint resolution of June 19, 
1902, vol* 32, p. 744; act Of May 27, 1902 (32 Stat*,, pp. 245- 
260); act of Mar. 3. 1003, vol. 32, pp. 983-997; act or June 21, 
1906, vol. 34, p, 325; proclamation of President, Sept. 26, 
1906. opening ceded part to settlement. It contains 
268.006,84 acres, leaving in diminished reserve 50,809.16 
acres. Allotted to 490 Indians, 9,783.27 acres: reserved for 
agency and school, SO acres; reserved for cemetery, 40 acres; 
reserved for gnulng, 37.84k 29 acres; reserved for timber, 
%3fto 62 acres; reserved for church purposes, 160 acres, (L. 
B 885, p*187.) 



Executive orders, Mar* 25, 1874, July 18, 1876* Sept* 21, 1SS0, 
May 15. 18S4, and Feb, 11, 1887; 129,313,35 acres allotted to 
845 Indians, and 280.44 acres reserved for mission, school, 
and agency purposes, (I„ R* 335, p, 323.) Executive or- 
ders of Nov. 11, 1907, and Jan. 28, 1908. The above-men- 
tioned 845 allotments have been canceled; reallotments 
have been made under the act of Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stat, L,» 
1413 ). ( See f4513-1909 ) ( A Uotme ts to 797 Indians oovor- 
ing 354,294 acres unnroH * 

Executive orders, 



ing 354,294 acres approved Aug. 28, 1909.) 
Executive orders, May 29, 1873, Feb. 2, 1874, Oct. 20, 1875* 
May 19, 1S82, and ifar, 24, 1883, (See 25961. 48680. 75169, 
75469-190S, and 14203, 26542-1909, and Senate bill 5602, 60th 
Cong., Istsess.) 



Confirmed by United States patents in 1864, under old Span- 
ish grants; acts of Dec. 22, 1868, vol. 11, p* 374, and June 21, 
1H60, vol* 12, p* 71. (See General Land Office Report for 
1876, p. 242, and for 1880, p. 658.) See Executive orders of 
June 13 and Sept, 4* 1902, setting apart additional lands for 
San Felipe and Nam be Pueblos, and Executive order of 
July 29, 1905, setting apart additional lauds for Santa Clara 
Pueblo, (^eo 60800-1905.) Approximately 32,000 acres 
added* Area original Santa Clara Pueblo, 17,368,62. Ex- 
ecutive orders, Dec. 19, 1906. and Sept, 1, lull, withdrawing 
23,040 acres for Jemez Indians. Area of original Spanish 
grant, 17,510 acres. Executive order, July 1, 1910. 28,800 
acres* Area of Pueblo proper, 125,225. {See 66714-1910.) 
Total area Pueblos, including Zunl and Executive order 
n»'n, 1.008,346. 

Executive orders, Mar* 16, 1577, May 1, 1883, and Mar. 3, 1885. 
(Area of original Spanish grant, 17,581,25 acres.) 



» Surveyed; partly In Idaho. 



» Outboundaries 

Digitized by 



80 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 0» INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 1.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribe* 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allottted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913 — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



NEW YORK. 

Allegany 

(Under New York Agency. ) 
Tribes: Onondaga and 
Seneca. 

Cattaraugus 

(Under New York Agency. ) 
Tribes: Cayuga, Ononda- 
ga, and Seneca. 

Oil Spring 

(Under wew York Agency.) 
Tribe: Seneca. 

Oneida 

(Under New York Agency.) 
Tribe: Oneida. 

Onondaga 

(Under New York Agency.) 
Tribes: Oneida, Ononda- 
ga, and St. Regis. 

St. Regis 

(Under New York Agency. ) 
Tribe: St. Regis. 

Tonawanda 

(Under New York Agency.) 
Tribes: Cayuga and Ton- 
awanda Bands of Seneca. 

Tuscarora 

(Under New York Agency.) 
Tribes: Onon d aga and 
Tuscarora. 

Total 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

Qualla boundary and other 
lands. 
(Under Eastern Cherokee 
School.) 
Tribe: Eastern Band of 
Cherokee. 



Acres. 
130,409 



121,680 

1640 

1350 
6,100 

14,640 
* 7,549 

6,249 



Total 

NORTH DAKOTA. 



Devils Lake. 

(Under Fort Totten School.) 
Tribes: Assiniboin, Cut- 
head, Santee, Sisseton, 
Yankton, and Wahpe- 
ton Sioux. 



Fort Berthold 

(Under Fort Berthold 
School.) 
Tribes: Arikara, Gros- 
ventre, and Mandan. 



87,677 



* 48, 000 

* 15,211 



63,211 



443,982 



i Partly surveyed. 



Treaties of Sept. 15, 1797, vol. 7, p. 601, and of Kay 20, 1842, 
vol. 7, p. 587. 

Treaties of Sept 15, 1797, vol. 7, p. 601; June 30, 1802, voL 7, 
p. 70, and of May 20, 1842, vol. 7, p. 587. (See Ann. Rept., 
1877, p. 164.) 

By arrangement with the State of New York. (See Ann. 

Kept., 1877, p. 166.) Seneca agreement of Jan. 8, 1893, 

ratified by act of Feb. 20, 1893, vol. 27, p. 470; act of June 7, 

1897 vol 30 D. 89 
Treaty of Nov. 11, 1794. vol. 7, p. 44, and arrangement with 

the State of New York. (See Ann. Kept., 1877, p. 168. ) 

Do. 



Treaty of May 13. 1796, vol. 7, p. 55. (See Ann. Rept., 1877, 
p.168.) Theyhold about 24,250 acres in Canada. 

Treaties of Sept. 15, 1797, vol. 7. p. 601, and Nov. 5, 1857, voL 
12, p. 991; purchased by the Indians and held in trust by 
the comptroller of New York; deed dated Feb. 14, 1862. 
(See also Ann. Rent., 1877, p. 165.) 

Treaty of Jan. 15. 1838, vol. 7, p. 551, and arrangement (grant 
and purchase) between the Indians and the Holland Land 
Co. (See Ann. Rept., 1877, p. 167.) 



Held by deed to Indians under decision of U. S. circuit court 
for western district of North Carolina, entered at November 
term, 1874, confirming the award of Rums Barringer and 
others, dated Oct. 23, 1874, and acts of Aug. 14, 1876, voL 19, 

J). 139, and Aug. 23, 1894, vol. 28, p. 441, ana deeds to Indians 
rom Johnston and others, dated Oct. 9, 1876, and Aug. 14, 
1880. (See also H. R. Ex. Docs. No. 196, 47th Cong., 1st 
sess. , and No. 128. 63d Cong., 2d sess.) Now held m Tee by 
Indians, who are incorporated. Act of Mar. 3, 1903, vol. 33, 
p. 1000. (See Opinions of Asst. Atty. Gen., Mar. 14, 1894, 

and Feb. 3. 1904. 36,000 acres of the 98.211 acre 

Deeds dated Oct. 4, 1906; approved Dec 12, 1906.) 



Treaty of Feb. 19. 1867. vol. 15, p. 605, agreement Sept 20, 
1872; confirmed in Indian appropriation act approved June 
22, 1874, vol. 18, p. 167. (See pp. 328-337 Camp. Indian 
Laws.) 137,381 acres allotted to 1,189 Indians; 727.83 acres 
reserved for church and 193.61 acres reserved for Govern- 
ment purposes. Act of Apr. 27, 1904, vol. 33, jp. 319, to 
amend and ratify agreement made Nov. 2, 1901. Presi- 
dent's proclamation of June 2. 1904, vol. 33, p. 2368. 

Unratified agreement of Sept. 17. 1851, and July 27. 1869 (see 
Laws relating to Indian Affairs, Department of Interior, 
1883), pp. 317 and 322; Executive orders, Apr. 12, 1870, July 
13, 1880, and June 17, 1892; agreement Dec. 14, 1886, ratified 
by act of Mar. 3, 1891, vol. 26, p. 1082. (See Pros, proc 
Mav 20, 1891, vol. 27, p. 979.) 229,634.91 acres allotted 
to 1,379 Indians (see letter book 445, p. 811); the residue, 
884,780 acres, unallotted. Lands now in process of allot* 
ment under act of Mar. 1 . 1907 (34 Stat. L. , 1042). Act June 
1, 1910 (36 Stat.. 455). (8ee 61502, 10 Pros, proa. June 29, 
1911, 40 L. D., 151.) 227,504 acres opened; see H. J. Res. 
Apr. 3, 1912 (37 Stat., 631). ' 

» Surveyed. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



81 



Table 7.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribe* 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 19 IS — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (anal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



north Dakota— continued. 



Standing Rook 

(Under Standing Rock 
SchooL) 
Tribes: Blackteet, Hunk- 



ACTCM. 

166,033 



?anfe 



Upper and Lower 



anktonei Sioux. 



Turtle Mountain 

(Under Turtle Mountain 
Agency.) 
Tribe: Pembina Chippewa. 



Total 

OKLAHOMA. 



610,006 



Apeeke 



Under Kiowa School.) 



(Under Union Agency.) 
Tribe: Cherokee. 



OMrokee Outlet. 



Oroeoneand Arepeho 

(Under Cheyenne and Arap- 
aho, Cantonment, and 
Soger Schools.) 
Tribes: Southern Arasaho 
and Northern and South- 



Treaty of Aor. 20. 1868, vol. 16, p. 636, and Executive orders 
Jan. 11-Mar. 16, 1875. and Nov. 28, 1876. Agreement rati- 
fied by act of Feb. 28, 1877, voL 10, p. 254, and Executive 
orders Aug. 0, 1870, and Mar. 20, 1884 (1/20,640 acres in 
South Dakota); unratified agreement of Oct. 17, 1882. 
(For modification see sundry civil appropriation act ap- 
proved Mar. 3. 1883, vol. 22, p. 624; lor text see Misc. In- 
dian Doc.. voL 14, p. 305.) Act of Congress of Apr. 30, 
1888, voL 25, p. 04, not accepted. Act of Congress, Mar. 2, 
1880, voL 25, p. 888. President's proclamation of Feb. 10, 
1800, vol. 26, p. 1554. Under act of Mar. 2, 1880 (25 Stats.. 
888). and authority of the President of Sept. 26, 1905, 4,418 
Indians have been allotted 1,338,571 acres, leaving unal- 
lotted 364,598 acres. [See act of May 29, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 
444, 451, and 460); 61,938.14 acres school land, act of Mar. 1, 
1907 (34 Stat L. f 1041).] Under President's proclamation 
of Aug. 19, 1909 (36 Stat, 2500), 1,061,500 acres were opened 
to settlement. Act of Feb. *' "~"" '" " ~"~ % ~* 5 *~" " 
acres school land. 



14, 1913 (Pub., 380), 71,235.18 



Executive orders Dec. 21, 1882, Mar. 29 and June 3, 1884. 
Agreement made Oct. 2, 1802, amended by Indian appro- 
priation act approved and ratified Apr. 21, 1904, vol. 33, 
p. 194. 43^20 acres allotted to 326 Indians and 186 acres 
reserved for church and school purposes under the above- 
named act. Allotments to 1,880 members of this band on 
public domain aggregating 280,619.04 acres have been ap- 
proved. 



Formerly Fort SlU. (See Executive order Feb, 36, I8B7,) 
Act Mar. 3,1901 (31 Stat., UTiy, act June 28, 1902 (32 Stat., 
467), Ex, l>oe* No* 1 17, 4&tb Cong. T 3d seas. , act Aug. 34, 1912 
(37 Stat. , 534); act June 30, 1013 (Pub. h No. 4). Lands to be 

fmrchnsed for those members of this band , some BQ In num- 
>er, who elected 10 remain in Oklahoma* 
Treat v with Western Cherokeca ate it v of Washington, Mnv 6, 
ISaS f7 Stat. r 311). as amended bytne treaty at Fort Gibson 
of Feb. 14, 1833 <7 Slut., 414 1: referred to In treaty with 
C/hbrokeesat New Kchoia, On., Dec. 29, 1835(7 Stat, ,476)- 
July 19. 1863(14 StaL,7Wl, as sup|jlnfneui*d bv treaty of 
Apr. 27 h 1808 06 Stet.,?Z7t. Agreement o( July t , 1902(32 
Stat., 716), Approximately 4l t flQfl Cherokeeg, Including 
4,d24 freed m on , were allotted an average of 1 10 acres, 40 acres 
of whif'b was home&tead to be nontaxable while held by 
the original allottee. Total acreage allotted, 4,420,067.73; 

Agreenrotof Dec. 10, 1801; ratified sec. 10 by act of Mar. 3, 
1803 (27 Stat.,340), unoccupied part of Cherokee Outlet, not 
included in Territory of Oklahoma (30 8tat., 81). 63 In- 
dians allotted 4,040.46 acres under act of Mar. 3, 1803. 

Executive order Aug. 10. 1860; unratified agreement with 
Wichita, Caddo, and others, Oct. 10, 1872. (See Ann. 
Rept., 1872, p. 101.) Executive orders of Apr. 18, 1882, 
and Jan. 17, 1883, relative to Fort Supply Military Reserve 
(relinquished for disposal under act of Congress of July 5, 
1804, by authority of Executive order of Nov. 6, 1804; see 
General Land Office Report, 1800, p. 158). Executive order 
of July 17, 1883, relative to Fort Reno Military Reserve. 
Agreement made October, 1800, and ratified and confirmed 
in Indian appropriation act approved Mar. 3, 1801, vol. 26, 
pp. 1023-1036. 628^80 acres allotted to 3)331 Indians; 
2Bl,828.6o acres for Oklahoma school lands; 32,343.03 acres 
reserved lor military agency, mission, etc., purposes; the 
residua, 3,500,562.06 acres, opened to settlement. (8ee 
Pras. proa. Apr. 12, 1802, vol. 27, p. 1018). Executive order, 
July 12, 1806. President's proclamation of Aug. 12, 1003, 
vol. 83, p. 2317. Act June 17, 1010 (36 Stat., 633), 67,637-10. 

* Surveyed. 



1C0S6°— irt 1913— vol 2 6 



Digitized by 



Google 



82 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to ifov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted), 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



Oklahoma— continued. 



Chickasaw 

(Under Union Agency).. 



Acres. 
7,830.00 
104.05 



Tribe: Chickasaw. Total 



Choctaw 

(Under Union Agency.) 
Tribe: Choctaw. 



17,943. 05 



ai,721,107 



Creak 

(Under Union Agency.) 
Tribe: Creek. 



Iowa 

(Under Sao and Fox 
School.) 
Tribes: Iowa and Tonka- 
wa. 



Kansa or Kaw 

(Under Ponca School.) 
Tribe: Kansa or Kaw. 



Kickapoo , 

(Under Shawnee School.) 
Tribe: Mexican Kickapoo. 



Kiowa and Comanche 

(Under Kiowa Agency.) 
Tribes: Apache, Coman- 
che, Delaware, and 
Kiowa. 



Modoc 

(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribe: Modoc. 



> Surveyed. 



Treaty of June 22, 1856, vol. 11, p. 611; agreement of Apr. 23, 
1897, ratified by act of June 28. 1808, vol. 30, p. 606: act of 
July 1, 1902, vol. 32, p. 041, ratifying agreement of Mar. 21, 
1902; act of Apr. 21, 1904, vol. 33, p7209: act of Apr. 28. 1904, 
vol. 33, p. 644. 10,956 Indians have been allotted 3,801,- 
989.91 acres: sold. 859,600.32 acres; unallotted area, 104.06 
acres, not including 7,839.43 acres segregated coal and 
asphalt lands. 

Treaty of June 22, 1855, vol. 11, p. 611. Same as Chickasaw. 
Approximately 26,730 Indians have been allotted 4,297,- 
385,99 acres; sold, 893,790.20 acres; unsold, 1,296,257.88 acres; 
which includes 1,278,753 acres of timber land in the Choctaw 
Nation, but does not include 424,745 acres in the Choctaw 
Nation, which added to 7,839 acres in the Chickasaw Nation 
makes a total of 432,584 acres of the segregated coal and 
asphalt land belonging to the Choctaw and Chickasaw 
Nations jointly. 

Treaties of Feb. 14, 1883, vol. 7, p. 417, and June 14. 1866, 



Limviosi vt *w. *■», aoo0, tv*. f, y. in, ouu *uub *■■. law, 

vol. 14, p. 786, and the deficiency appropriation act of Aug. 5, 
1882, vol. 22, p. 265. (See Ann. Kept. 1882, p. uv. ) Agree- 
ment of Jan. 19, 1889. ratified by the act of Mar. 1,1889, 



vol. 25, p. 757, President's proclamation, Mar. 23. 1889. 
vol. 26, p. 1544, agreement of Sept. 27, 1897, ratified by act 
of June 28, 1898, vol. 30, p. 514; agreement of Mar. 8, 1900, 
ratified by act of Mar. 1, 1901. vol. 31, p. 861: President's 




21, 1904, vol. 33, p. 204.) Approximately 18,716 Indians 
have been allotted: 2,998,997.14 acres; sold, 63,578.89 acres. 

Executive order, Aug. 15, 1883; agreement May 20, 1890, rati- 
fied by act of Feb. 13, 1891, vol. 26, p. 753. 8,606 acres 
allotted to 108 Indians; 20 acres held in common for church, 
school, etc.; the residue opened to settlement. Proclama- 
tion of President Sept. 18, 1891, vol. 27, p. 089. (See Ann. 
Kept., 1891, p. 677, and letter book 222, p. 36 1.) 

Act of June 5, 1872, vol. 17, p. 228; 260 acres reserved for ceme- 
tery, school, and town site. Remainder, 99,644 acres, 
allotted to 247 Indians; act of July 1, 1902, vol. 32, p. 636, 
ratifying agreement, not dated. Act Mar. 3, 1909. (358tat, 
778.) 

Executive order. Aug. 15, 1883; agreement June 21, 1891; rati- 
fied by act of Mar. 3, 1893, vol. 27, p. 557. 22,650 1 



allotted to 280 Indians; 479.72 acres reserved for mission, 
agency, and school purposes: residue opened to settlement 
by proclamation of the President May 18, 1895, vol. 29, p. 
868; act of Mar. 3, 1903, voL 32, p. 1001. June 21, 1906. (34 
Stat., 362.) ->'»*- » v 

Treaty of Oct. 21, 1S67, vol. 15, pp. m and 589; agreement 
made Oct. 6, 1392; ratified by act of June 6. 1900, vol. 31, 
p. 676, ceding 2,4&MP3 acres, of which 445,000 acres have 
bean allotted to 3,144 Indians; 11,972 acres reserved for 
agency «i school, rolJ poos* and c th er purposes. The residue, 
2,033,583 acres, opened to settlement (lot far books 486, p. 
440; 488, p. 478), President '» procJamM i a* of July 4, 1901, 
vol. 32, p. 1975; June 23, 1502, vol. 32, p. 2007; Sept 4, 1902. 
VOl.32,p.2i.^,aT,d Mar. 29, ltiOi, ttC% p. 2340. Ofthe 
480.000 acres giving Uud „ut uparl under act of June 6, 
1900, 1,841.92 acres were reserved for town sites under act 
Mar. 20, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 801), 82,069.52 acres were allotted 
to 513 Indians under act of June 5, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 213), 
and 480 acres allotted to 3 Indians under act of June 5, as 
amended by act Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stat. L., 1018). The Gen- 
eral Land Office reports the sale and entry of approximately 
401,465.92 acres under act of June 5, and of 21,251.75 acres 
under act of June 28, 1906, to June30, 1911. (See 87404-1909.) 
(See 75344-1908.) Under act May 29, 1908 (35 Stat., 471), 
and act June 25, 1910 (36 Stat., 861), 20,498 acres allotted to 
169 Indians. 

Agreement with Eastern Shawnees made June 23. 1874 (see 
Ann. Kept., 1882, p. 271), and confirmed in Indian appro- 
priation act approved Mar. 3, 1875, vol. 18. p. 447. Lands 
all allotted— 3,966 acres allotted to 68 Indians, 8 acres re- 
served for church and cemetery purposes, 2 acres for school, 
and 24 acres for timber. (Letter book 220, p. 102.) Act 
Mar. 3, 1909. (35 Stat., 762.) 

» Partly surveyed. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



83 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, ana authority for its 
establishment, to Nov, 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



Oklahoma— oontinned. 

Oakland 

(Under Ponca School.) 
Tribes: Tonkawa and 
Lipan. 



Acres. 



°3K 



nder Osage School.) 
Tribes: Great and Little 
Osage. 



Otoe , 

(Under Otoe School. 
Tribes: Oto and ** 



Ottawa 

(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribe: Ottawa of 
Blanehards Fork and 
Roche de Boeuf. 

Pawnee 

(Under Pawnee School.) 
Tribe: Pawnee. 



» 1,587 



(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribes: Kaskaskla. Mi- 
ami, Peoria, Pianka- 
shaw, and Wee. 

Ponca 

(Under Ponca School.) 
Tribe: Ponca. 



»330 



Potawatoml •..••••........... 

(Under Shawnee School.) 
Tribes: Absentee Shaw- 
nee and Potawatoml. 



Tribe: Qnapaw. 



School.) 



Act of May 27. 1878, vol. 20, p. 84. (See Ann. Rept. for 1883, 
p. Lxn). (dee deed dated June 14, 1883, from Cherokee, 
vol. 6. Indian Deeds, p. 476.) (See deed from Nes Perce, 
May 22, 1885, vol. 6, Indian Deeds, p. 504.) 11,456 acres 
allotted to 73 Indians; 160.50 acres reserved for government 
and school purposes. The residue, 79.276.60 acres, opened 
to settlement. (Letter book 257, p. 240.) Agreement made 
Oct. 21, 1891, ratified by Indian appropriation act approved 
Mar. 3. 1803, vol. 27, p. 644. (For text, see Ann. Rept., 1803, 
p. 524.) 

Article 16, Cherokee treaty of July 19, 1866, vol. 14. p. 804; 
order of Secretary of the interior. Mar. 27, 1871; act of June 
5, 1872, vol. 17, p. 228. (See deed dated June 14. 1883, from 
Cherokee, vol. 6, Indian Deeds, p. 482.) (8ee act of June 28. 
1906 (34 Stats., 539). act of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stats., 787), and 
PubUo Resolution No. 51, approved Feb. 28, 1909.) 2,230 
Indians have been allotted 1.065,134.31 acres (3 selections). 
Since July 1, 1909, these 2,230 Indians have been allotted 
1,465,350 acres from surplus lands, and 6,178.53 acres have 
been reserved for church, town-site, and railroad purposes. 
Act Mar. 3, 1909. (35 Stat., 778.) 

Act of Mar. 3, 1881, vol. 21, p. 381; order of the Secretary of 
the Interior, June 25, 1881. (See deed dated June 14, 1883, 
from Cherokee, vol. 6, Indian Deeds, p. 479.) Under acts 
of Feb. 8, 1887 (24 Stats., 388), Feb. 28, 1891 (26 Stats.. 794). 
and Anr. 21, 1904 (33 Stats., 180), 128,251 acres were allotted 



to 514 Indians (885 allotments-see letter book 929, p. 326), 
720 acres were reserved for agency, school, church, and cem- 
etery purposes, and 640 acres set aside for tribal uses. 
Treaty of Feb. 23. 1867, vol. 15, p. 513; 12,995 acres were al- 
lotted to 160 Indians; 557.95 acres were authorised to be sold 
by act of Mar. 3, 1891 (vol. 26, p. 989). The residue, 1,587.25 
acres, unallotted. (Letter book 229, p. 115.) 

Act of Apr. 10. 1876. vol. 19, p. 29. Of this, 230,014 acres are 
Cherokee and 53,006 acres are Creek lands. (See deed dated 
June 14, 1883, from Cherokee, vol. 6, Indian Deeds, p. 470.) 
112,701 acres allotted to 820 Indians; 840 acres were reserved 
for school, agency, and cemetery purposes; the residue, 
169,3X8cres. opened tosettlement. (Letter books 261. p. 388, 
and 263, p. 5.) Agreement made Nov. 23, 1892, ratified by 
act of Mar. 3, 1803, vol. 27, p. 644. (For text see Ann. Rept., 
1893, p. 526.) 

Treaty of Feb. 23, 1867, vol. 15, p. 513. 43,334 acres allotted 
to 218 Indians. The residue, 6,313.27 acres, sold under act 
of May 27, 1902. (32 Stats., 246.) 



Indian Deeds, p. 473.) There Wre been allotted to 782 In- 
dians 100,734a^res,and reserved for agency, school, mission, 
and cemeteiypurposes 623.56 acres, leaving unallotted and 
unreserved 320 acres. (Letter books 302, p. 811, and 813, p. 
401.) Indian appropriation act approved Apr. 21, 1904, 
vol. 33, p. 217. 

Treaty of Teb. 27, 1867, vol. 15, p. 531; act of May 23, 1872, 
vol. 17, p. 159. (222.716 acres are Creek ceded lands; 365,861 
acres are Seminole lands.) Agreements with citlsen Pot- 
awatoml June 25 and Absentee Shawnees June 26, 1890: 
ratified and confirmed In the Indian appropriation act of 
Mar. 3,1891, vol. 26, pp. 1016-1021. 215,679.42 acres allotted 
to 1,480 Potawatoml, and 70,791.47 acres allotted to 563 
Absentee Shawnees, and 610.63 acres reserved for Govern- 
ment purposes; the residue opened to settlement by the 
President's proclamation of Sept. 18. 1891, vol. 27. p. 989. 
(See letter book 222, pp. 442, 444, and Ann. Rept for 1891, 
p. 677.) 

Treaties of May 13. 1833. vol. 7, p. 424. and of Feb. 23, 1867. 
vol. 15, p. 513. (56,245.21 acres allotted to 248 Indians, 400 
acres reserved for school and 40 acres for church purposes. 
(Letter book 335, p. 326.) Agreement of Mar. 23. 1893, 
ratified in Indian appropriation act approved Mar. 2. 
1895, vol. 28, p. 907. Agreement of Janf 2. 1899. ratified 
in Indian appropriation act approved Mar. 8, 1901, vol. 31, 
p. 1067. Actof&tf.8,1903,voL82,p.097. 
' Surveyed. 



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RBPOBT OP THE COMMISSIONER OP INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 7. --General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribe* 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for 
its establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



Oklahoma— continued . 



Sauk and Fox 

(Under Sac and Fox 
School.) 
Tribes: Ottawa, Sauk and 
Fox of the Mississippi 



Acre*. 



Seminole 

(Under Union Agency.) 
Tribe: Seminole. 



160 



Seneca 

(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribe: Seneca. 



Shawnee 

(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribes: Seneca and East- 
ern Shawnee. 



Wichita. 

(Under Kiowa Agency.) 
Tribes: Ioni. Caddo, Co- 
manche, Delaware, To- 
wakoni Waco, and 
Wichita. 



Wyandot 

(Under Seneca School.) 
Tribe: Wyandot. 



1535 



Total. 



1,733,050.05 



OREGON. 



Grande Ron<Je* ♦...„,..., 

(Under Stletx Agency. 1 
Trlt*"5: Kalapuy a. Clack- 
amas, Cow Creek, Lak- 
miut, Marys Hlvm, Mo- 
lata, Neslucca, Rogue 
River. Santiam, Shasta, 
Turn water , Umpiua, 
Wapnto, and Vimnlli. 

Klamath .......*.,.. ... 

(Under Klamath School,) 
Tribes: Klamath,, Modoc, 
Padnte, Pit River, Wal- 
pape. and Yanoo*fdn 
Band of Snake (Sho- 
shoni). 



BUeti 

(Under SileU Agency.) 
Tribes: Alsea, Coquille, 
Kusan, Kwataml, 
Rogue River. Skoton, 
Shasta, Saiustkee, Siu- 
slaw.Tututni, Umpqua, 
and 13 others. 



» 811,803 



3,300 



Trei of Fob. 18, LB67 r vol, 15. p, 4&5; agreement June 12, 
18 i.:tofFeb,13,lWl,vf)La3,p.74B. B7,GS3 T W 

acred allotted to MS Indians, and SOO acroa reserved for 
school and tma&j purposes; the resJduo opened to set tie- 
men L Ltv I he frcefdent'ii proclamation Sept. 18, 1801, voL 
27, p. tfsa. i'S«i letter book 222, p. 169, and Ann. Kept, 
for 1891, p. 677.) 

Tref m of Mar, 21, iS66 t vol 14, p, 75k (See Creek agrw- 
ment of Fob. U, 1881, Ann* Ran. 1SS2, p. M t and defi- 
ciency act of Aug. 5, 1S82, voL 22, p. 3A5J AgroeroeiU of 
Mar, 16, L8#9 + <Seo Indian appropriation act approved 
Mar. 2, 15S9, ) Apreemcnt r^ordod in tho treat/ hook, vol. 
3, p* 35; u^roement made Deo. 16, 1807, ratified by the act 
of July 1, Ism, vol. 30, p, 5<j7; B^roamont of Oct- 7, 1399, rati- 
fle d h | ac t of J Line 3, 1900, vol . 31 r p. 250,. A pproiimetelT 
3,119 Indians have been allotted 369,096.93 acres, sold, 
4,223.74 acres. 

Treaties of Feb. 28, 1831. vol. 7, p. 348; of Dec. 29. 1832, vol. 
7. p. 411, and of Feb. 23, 1861 vol. 16, p. 513. 41,813 acres 
allotted to 435 Indians; 104.22 acres reserved for Govern- 
ment, church, and school purposes. Agreement of Dee. 2, 
1901. ratified by act of May 27, 1902. vol. 32. p. 262. 

Treaties of July 20, 1831. vol. 7, p. 351; of Dec. 29, 1832, vol. 
7. p. 411; of Feb. 23, 1867, vcl. 15. p. 613, and agreement 
with Modocs, made June 23, 1874 (see Ann. Kept.. 1883, 
p. 271), confirmed by Congress in Indian appropriation 
act approved Mar. 3, 1876, vol. 18, p. 447. 12,745 acres 
allotted to 117 Indians; 86 acres reserved for agency por- 

E (letter books 208, p. 266. and 233, p. 207); the restdne, 
acres, sold (agreement of Dec. 2, 1901. ratified by act 
y 27, 1902. vol. 32, p. 262). 

(See treaty of July 4, 1866, with Delawares, art. 4, voL 14, p. 
794.) Unratified agreement, Oct. 19, 1872. (See Ann. 
Rept., 1872, p. 101.) Agreement made June 4, 1891, rati- 
fied by act of Mar. 2, 1895, vol. 28, p. 895. 152,714 acres 
allotted to 957 Indians; 4,151 acres reserved for agency, 
school, religious, and other purposes. The residue, 586,468 
acres, opened to settlement (letter book 490, p. 90). Presi- 
dent's proclamation of July 4, 1901, vol. 32, jp. 1975. 

Unoccupied Chickasaw and Choctaw leased lands west of 
the North Fork of the Red River. Act of May 4, 1896. voL 
29, p. 113. President's proclamation, Mar. 16. 1896, vol. 29, 
p. 878. Act of June 6, 1900 (31 Stat., 680). 

Treaty of Feb. 23, 1867, voL 15, p. 513. 20,942 acres allotted 
to 244 Indians, 16 acres to churches, etc., leaving 534.72 
acres unallotted (letter book 228, p. 332). 



Treaties of Jan. 22, 1855, vol. 10, p. 1143, and of Deo. 21, 1855, 
voL 12, p. 982; Executive order June 30, 1857. 440 acres 
reserved for Government use and 32.983 acres allotted to 
269 Indians. (See letter book 210, p. 328.) Act of Apr. 28. 
1904, voL 33. p. 567, amending and ratifying agreement of 
June 27, 1901 (33 L. D., 586). 



Treaty of Oct. 14, 1864. vol. 16, p. 707. Act June 10, 1896 (29 
Stat., 321). Act of May 27, 1902 (32 Stat., 260). 207,373 
acres allotted to 1,345 Indians; 6,094.77 acres reserved for 
agency, school, and church purposes. Indian appropria- 
tion act approved Apr. 21, 1904, vol. 33, p. 202; act of Mar. 3, 
1905, voL <B, p. 1033. and act of June 21, 1906 (34 Stat, 367). 
(See act of Mar. 3, 1909 (35 Stat. L., 752), removal of Modocs 
in Oklahoma to Klamath and allotments thereto.) Bound- 
ary Dispute (see 9881-1911). 

Unratified treaty, Aug. 11, 1855; Executive orders Nov. 9, 
1855, and Dec. 21, 1865, and act of Mar. 3, 1875, vol. 18, p. 446. 
Agreement Oct. 31, 1892, ratified by act of Aug. 15, 1894, 
vol. 28, p. 323. 44,459 acres allotted to 551 Indians. Resi- 
due. 177,563.68 acres (except 5 sections), ceded to United 
States. (See letter book 281, p. 358.) President's proclama 
tion, May 16, 1895. vol. 29, p. 866. Acts of May 31, 1900, 
vol. 31, p. 233, and Mar. 3, 1901, vol. 31, p. 1085. Act of May 
13, 1910 (36 Stat., 367). 

s Outboundarles surveyed. 
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BBPGBT OF THB COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



85 



Tablb 7. — General data/or each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913 — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



objeoon —continued. 



Umatilla 

(Under Umatilla School, j 
Tribes: Cayuse. Umatilla, 
and Walkwalla. 



Warm Springs 

(Under Warm Springs 
School.) 
Tribes: Des Chutes, John 
Day, Patate, Tenino. 
Warm Springs, and 
Wasco. 



Total 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Crow Creek and Old Winne- 
bago. 
(Under Grow Creek School. ) 
Tribes: Lower Yanktonai, 
Lower Brule, Mtnicon- 
Joo, and Two Kettle 



Lake Traverse 

(Under Bisseton 8chooL) 
Tribes: Bisseton and Wah- 
peton Sioux. 



Cheyenne River 

(Under Cheyenne River 
School.) 
Tribes: Bbokfcet, Mini- 
eanjou. Sans Arcs, and 
Two Kettle Sioux. 



Lower Brule 

(Under Ixmer Brule School.) 

Tribes: Lower Brule and 

Lower Yanktonai Sioux. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Act it. 
174,232 



» 322,760 



1,211,994 



129,266 



340,540 



152,159 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 
reserve. 



Treaty of June 9, 1855, vol. 12, p. 945, and act of Aug, 5, 1882, 
vol. 22, p. 297; M bj. 3, 1885, voL 23. p. 340, and sec. 8 of act 
or Oct, 17, iftSS, vol. 25, p. 55G. (&* orders Secretary of 
Interior. Deo. 4, 18Bti, Ann. Rapt,, 1891, p. 682. J 82,542.15 
acres allotted to 1,1W Zndiuns, tw acres reserved for school 
and mission purposes. {See fetter book 255, p. 132.) Act 

of inly l f lDQ9,Yol.32,p.7tt. 

Treaty of Judo 25, 1855, vol. 12, p. 963. 140,044 acres allotted 
to M IntiitutJ, sod IjlBS acres reserved for church, school, 
an d agency purposes. The real due , 322, LOS acres , unallotted 
and unreserved (letter boo* 334, p. 295). 



Order of department, July 1, 1863 (see Ann. Rent., 1863, p. 
318); treaty of Apr. 29, 1868. voL 15, p. 635, and Executive 
order, Feb. 27, 1885 (see President's proclamation of Apr. 17, 
1885, annulling Executive order of Feb. 27, 1885; Ann. Kept., 
1885. p. 51); act of Mar. 2, 1889, voL 25, p. 888; President's 
proclamations, Feb. 10, 1890, voL 26, p. 1554. There have 
been allotted to 1,348 Indians 254,656.82 acres, and reserved 
for agency, school, and religious purposes 1,076.90 acres, 
leaving a residue of 111,711 acres (letter books302, p. 443; 372, 
p. 485; 373, p. 347). Lands are now In process oi allotment. 

Treaty of Feb. 19, 1867, vol. 15, p. 505; agreement, Sept. 20, 
1872; confirmed in Indian appropriation act approved 
June 22, 1874, vol. IS, p. 167. (See pp. 32fv-3J7, Comp. In- 
dian Law so Agreement, Dec. 12. uttB, ratified by act of 
Mar. 3, 1801, vol 26, pp. 1035-1038. 308,838 acres allotted 
to 2,0w Indians, S^SKMnaflMi reserved for Stale school pur- 
posed, 1,347.01 acres for church and agency purposes; the 
residue, 574,678,40 acres, opened to settlement. (Sea 
President's proclamation, Apr. 11, 1B92. vol. 27, p. 1017.) 

Treaty of Apr, 20, 1868, vol. 15, p. 635, and Executive orders, 
J&n 11, Mar. 16, and May 20, i&75, irnd Nov. 28, 1876: ogree- 
raent ratified by act of Feb. 28, 1877. voL 19, p. 254, and 
Executive orders, Aug. 0, 1879, and Mar. 20. 1884. Unrati- 
fied agreement of Oct. 17, 1882, { For modification see sun* 
dry civil appropriation act approved Mar. 3, J 883, vol. 22, 
p. €24; for text sue M i v. Indian Docs., vol. 14, p. 305.1 Act 
of Apr. 30, 188B, vol. 25, p. 94, not accepted. Act of Mar. 3, 
1S80, vol. 25, p. 888, President's proclamation of Feb. 10. 
1800, T oL 28, p. 1554. (Seeact or F B b. 20. 1800, vol. 20, p, 100 
President's proclamations Of Fab. 7, 1003. vol. 82, p. 2035, 
and Mar, 30, 1 004, vol . 33, p. 2340. 990,087. 14 acres Have been 
allotted to a, 154 Indians. (See L. U. 828, p. 321. > Act of 
May 20, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 460). Under president's procla- 
mation of Awjj. Ui, 1'JKJ (36 Stat., 25<J0J, 1,158,010 acres war© 
opened to settlement, leaving unallotted and unreserved 
940,540 acres. 

Treaty of Apr. 29, 1868, vol. 15, p. 635, and Executive orders, 
Jan. 11, Mar. 16, and May 20, 1875, and Nov. 28, 1876; agree- 
ment ratified by act of Feb. 28, 1877. vol. 19. p. 254, and 
Executive orders. Aug. 9, 1879, and Mar. 20. 1884. Unrati- 
fied agreement of Oct. 17, 1882. (For modification see sun- 
dry civil appropriation act approved Mar. 3, 1883. vol. 22, 
p. 624; for text see Misc. Indian Does., vol. 14, p. 305.) Act 
of Apr. 30, 1888, vol. 25. p. 94, not accepted. Act of Mar. 2, 

1889, vol. 25, p. 888. President's proclamation of Feb. 10. 

1890, voL 26, p. 1554. (Seeactof Feb. 20, 1898, vol. 29, p. 10^ 
Agreement made Mar. 1, 1898, ratified by act of Mar. 3, 1899. 
vol 30, p. 1362, ceding 120,000 acres to the United States. 
187,356 acres allotted to 777 Indians, and 964.06 acres re- 
served for agency, school, and religions purposes, leaving 
unallotted and unreserved 175,470.76 acres. (See letter 
book 498, p. 336.) (See act of Apr. 21, 1906, 34 Stats., 124 and 
1048, and President's proclamations of Aug. 12, 1907, and 
Sept. 24, 1913.) 

» Surveyed. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. S, 1913 — Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



obegon— continued . 



Pine Ridge.... 
(UnderFboe 



RidjgeAgency.) 
Tribes: Brule Sioux, 
Northern Cheyenne, 
and Oglala Sioux. 



Acre*. 
1395,320 



Rosebud 

(Under Rosebud School.) 
Tribes: Loafer, Minicon- 
jou, Northern Oglala, 
Two Kettle, Upper 
Brule, and Wazhazhe 
Sioux. 



x 72. 342 



Yankton 

(Under Yankton School.) 
Tribe: Yankton Sioux. 



Total 

UTAH. 



870,636 



Uintah Valley 

(Under Uintah and Ouray 
Agency.) 
Tribes: Gosiute, Pavant, 
Uinta, Yampa, Grand 
River, Unoompahgre, 
and White River Ute. 



1240,340 



Treat v of Apr. 29, 1S63, vot 15, p* 635, and Executive orders, 
Jan. 11, Mfir HI, and Mav 20, 1375, and Nov. 28, 1S76; agree- 
ment ratified by act of' Feb. 2S, 1877. vol. 19, p. 254, and 
E XM.T] t i v o ordeni , A u g, 9, 1879, an d Mar. 20, 1BS4, V lira ti- 
tled agreement of Oct, 17, 1&S2, ( For modification see sun- 
drv civil appropriation art iJ|>proYt*d Mar- 3, 1&S3, Z3 Stats., 
634; for text see Mb*. Indian Does,, vol. 14, p. 305, ) Act of 
Apr. 30 T 1SSS (25 fcStats., 941. not accepted- Act of Mar. 2, 
1&&, vol. 25, p. 888. President's proclamation of Feb. 10. 
IS9Q, vol . 2fi« p - 1554 , ( S«i at :■ t of Feb. 20, 1890, 23 BtatS. , 10. 1 
A trai't of 32j000 acres in Nebraska was set apart by Execu- 
tive order of Jan, 24, 1KA2, and was restored to the public 
domain by Kxecuttve order of Jan. 26, 1904, and by Execu- 
tive order of Feb. 20, 1904, fl4fl acres of this land was set 
apart for Indian school purposes and Is called the Sioux 
additional tract, {Sim Nebraska,) Act oT Mar. 2, 1JJ59 
[25 Stats,, 888), authority of President of July 29, im 
2,032,9*0.18 acres have been allotted to 5.750 Indiana, and 
U h 3&UiS acres reserved for agency , school, ami ctunvh 
purpose, apim? eating 800,323 J 9, leaving unallotted and 
unreserved 385 ,'129 acres. Lands still In process of lillot- 
innrjt muter flcu of Mar. 2 t \$ffl (75 Stat. L + , 88$), Mar, 1, 
1W7 i:m StaL L. t 1048). and May 2i», 1908 (35 Stat. L., 451). 
Act May 27, 1910 (:lii Stat., 440), 40,9% acres State school 
land; 22,434 acres tlmluT ro^rved. President*? proclama- 
tion, Johii 2j, lyll MiJ L, D., 1U4), opening 109,592 acres 
May 1, 1912. 

Treaty of Apr. 20, 1868, vol. 15, p. 635, and Executive orders, 
Jan. 11, Mar. 16, and May 20, 1875, and Nov. 28, 1876; agree- 
ment ratified by act of Feb. 28, 1877. vol. 19. p. 254, and 
Executive orders, Aug. 9, 1879, and Mar. 20, 1884. Unrati- 
fied agreement of Oct. 17, 1882. (For modification see 
sundry civil appropriation act approved Mar. 8, 1883, vol. 
22, p. 624; for text see Misc. Indian Docs., vol. 14, p. 305). 
Act of Apr. 30, 1888, vol. 25, p. 94. not accepted. Act of 
Mar. 2, 1889, vol. 25, p. 888. President's proclamation of 
Feb. 10, 1890, vol. 26, p. 1554. (See act of Feb. 20, 1896. voL 

29, p. 10.) 1,643,048.80 acres allotted to 7,195 Sioux Indians, 
416,000 acres opened to settlement, 29,392.01 r ea ct ve d for 
Government purposes, churches, cemeteries, etc. The 
residue, 436,151 acres, unallotted and unreserved. Agree- 
ment made Mar. 10. 1898, ratified by act of Mar. 3, 1899. vol. 

30, p. 1364. Act of Apr. 23, 1904, vol. 33, p. 254, ratifying 
agreement made Sept. 14, 1901. Presidents proclamation 
of May 16, 1904, vol. 33, p. 2354. Act Mar. 1, 1907 (34 Stat.. 
1048); act Mar. 2. 1907 (34 Stat., 1230); act May 29. 1908 (35 
Stat., 451); act May 30, 1910 (36 Stat., 448); President's 
proclamation, Aug. 24, 1908 (35 Stat.. 2203), opening 838,000 
acres in Tripp County. President's proclamation. June 
29, 1911 (40 L. D., 164). opening 300,000 acres in Mellette 
and Washabaugh Counties. 43,520 acres State school land. 
Executive order, July 6, 1912. 

Treaty of Apr. 19, 1858, vol. 11, p. 744. 268,263 acres allotted 
to 2,613 Indians and 1,252.89 acres reserved for agency, 
church, and school purposes. (See letter book 207, p. 1.) 
Agreement Dec. 31. 1892, ratified by act of Aug. 15, 1894, 
vol. 28, p. 314. The residue open to settlement. (See 
Presidents proclamation May 16, 1895, vol. 29, p. 865.) 



Executive orders, Oct. 3, 1861: act of June 18, 1878 (2 
Stats.. 165); acts of May 5, 1864, vol. 13. p. 63. and May 
24, 1888, vol. 25, p. 157; joint resolution of June 19. 1902, vol. 
32, p. 744; act of Mar. 3, 1903, vol. 32, p. 997: Indian appro- 
priation act, approved Apr. 21, 1904, vol. 33, p. 207; Presi- 
dent's proclamations of July 14, 1906, setting aside 1,010,000 
acres as a forest reserve, 2,100 acres as town sites. 1 ,004^285 
acres opened to homestead entry, 2,140 acres in mining 
claims; under act May 27, 1902 (32 Stats., 263), 99,407 acres 
allotted to 1,284 Indians, and 60,100 acres under reclama- 
tion, the residue 179,194.65 acres, unallotted and unreserved. 
(See letter book 75, p. 396.) 

■ Surveyed. 



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BBPOBT OF THE OOMMISSIONEB 07 INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



87 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school , tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (anal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



utah— continued. 

Uncompahgra 

(Under Uintah and Ouray 

Tribe: Tabaquache Ute. 



Total.. 

WASHINGTON. 



Chehalis 

(Under Coahman School.) 
Tribes: ChinookCTsinuk), 
Clatsop, and Chehalis. 



Columbia 

(Under Colvllle School. ) 
Tribe: Columbia (Moses 
band.) 



Colvllle 

(Under Colvllle Agency.) 
Tribe*: Coaur d'Alene, 
Colrffle,Kah>pel,Okin- 
agao, Lake. Methow, 
NemelimT^Pend d' 
Oreille, Banpoil, and 
Spoken. 



Hon River , 

(Under Neah Bay School.) 
Tribe: Hoh. 
Lummi ••••••....• » . . 

(Under Tulalip School.) 
Tribes: Dwamlah, Etak- 
mur, Lummi, Snoho- 
mish, Sukwamish, and 
Bwlwnmishi 



(Under Neah Bay School.) 
Tribes: Makah and Qui- 
leute. 

Muckleshoot 

(Under Cushman School.) 
Tribe: Muckleshoot. 

NlsqualH 

(Under Cushman School.) 
Tribes : Muckleshoot, 
Nisqualli, Puyallup, 
Skwawksnamish, Stall- 
akoom, and 5 others. 

Osette 

(Under Neah Bay School.) 
Tribe: Osette. 

Pot Madison 

(Under Tulalip School.) 
Tribes: Dwamlah, Etak- 
mur, Lummi, Snoho- 
mish, Bukwamish, and 
Swiwamish. 

* Partly surveyed. 



Acres. 



240,340 



1,297,000 



640 



U9,312 



640 
•65 



Executive order, Jan. 6, 1882. (See act of June 15, 1880, rati- 
fying the agreement of Mar. 6, 1880, vol. 21. p. 199.) 12,540 
acres allotted to 83 Indians, remainder of reservation re- 
stored to public domain, act of June 7, 1897. vol. 80. p. 62. 
(Letter book 408, p. 115.) Joint resolution of June Id, 1902, 
vol. 82, p. 744. 



Order of the Secretary of the Interior, July 8 V 1884; Executive 
order, Oct, I, 1SS9. 471 acres set aside for school purposes* 
The mid ue, 3,753^63 acres, restored to the public domain 
for Indian homestead entry. 3fl Indiana made homestead 
Meet Jons, covering oil the land. (See latter book 152, p. 
201, and 153. p. 45.) 

Executive orders- Apr. lfl T IS79, Mar. 6, 1880, and Feb. 23, 
1883. ( See Indian approbrMlon oc t of J uiy 4. 1SS4, voL 23, 



p. 79.) Agreement mode July 7, 1883, ratified by act of 
July 4, 1884, vol. 23, p. 79. Executive or dor, Hay 1, 1888: 
Executive order of Afar. 9, 1594; department orders of 



Apr. II, 1S&4, and Apr, 20, 1*94, and Executive order i 
Jan. 15*. 1896. 26,21 & acres allotted to 35 Indians (see 
E*«"titive order of May 21, 1SS0, and act of Mar. &, 1906, 34 
Stats., 65}. 

Executive orders, Apr. and July 2, 1S72; agreement made 
July 7, 1SS3, ratified by act of July 4. 1S84, vol. 23, p. 7ft. 
Act of July 1, 1892, vol. 27, p. tt£ (See art* of Feb, 20, 
1396, vol. £», p. 9. and July 1, 1898, rol. 30, p. &&*,) 51,653 
acrea In north half allotted to 060 Indiana (we Letter book 
428, p. 100 >: remainder of north half, estimated at IMA 
acres, opened to settlement Oct. 10. 1900 (see proclamation 
of tLe Vreriaem, dated Apr. 10, ittX), 31 Stats., p. 1043), 
240 acres have been reserved for town eltea. 2 t 750.82 acres 
temporarily withdrawn tor town sites. The residue, 
1,297,000 acres (estimated), unallotted. Act of Feb. 7. 
1903, vol, 32. p. 603. Allotments to be mode under act of 
Mar, 22. 1906 (34 Stat. L. f 80), and act of June 23, 1910 (36 
Stat. j 863). Lands now being allotted. 

Executive order, Sept. 11, 1893b 



Treaty of Point Elliott, Jan. 22, 1855, vol. 12, p. 927; Executive 
order, Nov. 22, 1873. Allotted 12,560.94 acres to 109 Indians; 
reserved for Government school, 80 acres. 



Treaty of Neah Bay. Jan. 31. 1855, voL 12, p. 939; Executive 
orders, Oct. 26, 1872, Jan. 2 and Oct. 21, 1873. 3,727 acres 
allotted to 373 Indians. (See letter book 960, 228 and 37679 
1907.) 

Executive orders, Jan. 20, 1857, and Apr. 9, 1874. 44 Indians 
have been allotted 3,532.72 e — 



Treaty of Medicine Greek, Deo. 26. 1854, vol. 10, p. 1132; Exec- 
utive order, Jan. 20, 1857. Land all allotted. 4,718 acres to 
30 Indians. 



Executive order, Apr. 12, 1893. 



;y of Point Elliott, Jan. 22, 1855, vol. 12. p. 

Secretary of the Interior. Oct. 21, 1864. 

itted to 51 Indians; the residue, 65 acres, ui 



j. 927; order of 
4. 7J19 acres 
unallotted. 



> Outboundaries surveyed 



• Surveyed. 



Digitized by 



Google 



88 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFflAlfcS. 



Tablb 7.— General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, carta not allotted or specially reserved, ana authority for its 
stabhsh 



establishment, to Nov. 3, 1913— Continued. 



Name of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- , 
lotted). ! 



Washington— continued. 



PnyaDup , 

(under Cushman School.) 
T r 1 b e ■ : Muckleshoot, 



NlsquaUl, Puvallui 
Skrowksnanush, Sta' 
akoom, and 5 others. 



Qoileute 

(Under Neah Bay School.) 
Tribe: Quileute. 

Quinaieit 

(Under Cuahman School. ) 
Tribes: Quaitso and Quin- 
alelt. 



Shoalwater , 

(Under Cushman School.) 
Tribes: Shoalwater and 



Skokomish. 
(Under Cuahman School.) 
Tribes: Clallam, Skoko- 
mish, and Twana. 



Bnohomiah or Tulallp 

(Under Tulalip School.) 
Tribes: Dwamish, Etak- 
mur, Lumml, Snoho- 
mish, Sukwamish, and 
Swiwamish. 

Spokan 

(Under Spokane Agency) 
Tribe: Bpokan. 



Squaxoa Island ( Clahchemln) , 
(Under Cushman School.) 
Tribes: Nisqualli, Puyal- 
lup, Skwawksnamish, 
Stallakoom, and 5 others. 
Swlnomlsh (Perrys Island)... . 
(Under Tulalip School^ 
Tribes: Dwamlsh, Etak- 
mur, Lummi, Snoho- 
mish, Sukwamish, and 
8wiwamish. 

Yakima. 

(Under Yakima School.) 
Tribes: KUkitat, Paloos. 
Topnish, Wasco, and 
Yakima. 



TotaL. 



Acre*. 



>837 



'158,784 



»335 



• 324 



83,647 



• 796,753 



2.357.346 



i Outboundaries surveyed. 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority attabUshinc 



Treaty of Madlaine Creek- Deo. 26, 1854, vol. 10, p. U33; Ex- 
ecutive orders, Jan. 30, IBS?, and Sept. fl, 1S73. 17,*Li 
acres alLotied to lft7 Indiana, Agreement made Nov. 21, 
1876, ratified by act of Feb. 20. 1883, vol. 27. p. 464. (For 
text see annual report 1893. p. M8.) The xssiaW 590 acres 
laid out as on addition to t Uu c\ ty of Taooma, had bees sold, 
with tho exception oi 39.70 aoes reserved for school, and 
19.48 acres for to arch end cemetery purposes, under ecu of 
Mar. 3, 1.HU3 (37 Stat. , 633, Juno 7, 18&7) (30 Stala., §2j t and 
act of June 21, 19W {$4 Stats., 377). 

Executive order, reo. iv, low. 



, 25, 1856, vol. 12, 
'ndaraotaofrejfc 



8, 1887 (24 Stats., 388). and Feb. 28, 1801 (26 Stats.. 794), 600 
Indians have bean allotted 64,080.80 acres and 466.66 have 
bean reserved for agency, lighthouse, and other purposes, 
leaving unallotted and un re s si v ed 168.784 acres. Act Mar. 
4, 10U (36 Stat., 1645). Lands now being allotted. 
Executive order, Sept. 22, 1866, 55,635-7-1000. 



Treaty of Point No Point, Jan. 26, 1866, vol. 12, p. 033; Ex- 
ecutive order, Feb. 25, 1874. Allotted in treaty reserve 
4,000 acres; residue, none. (See L. B., 80S, p. 264) *■<*- 
ted in Executive ardor addition, known as the Hater ad- 
dition, 814 acres; residue, none. (L. B., 886, p. 988.) 62 
allotments. 

Treaty of Point Elliott, Jan. 22, 1856, vol. 12, p. 027: Execu- 
tive order, Deo. 23, 1873. 22,166 acres allotted to 164 
Indians. 



Executive order, Jan. 18, lS8l* Agreement made Mar. IS, 
1887, rating by Indian appropriation act approved July 
U, \W2 f vol, 27, p. 139. (For text we Ann. Kept., 1882, 
p. 743.) Joint resolution of Congress of June 10, 1902. vuL 
32, p. 7«. Under act of May ®, 1908 (35 Stat. W45B), 
approximately &ffl Indians have been allotted 64,794 acres. 
ana 1,247,30 acres set aside Tar church, school, agency, ana 
town-site purposes. By proclamation of May 22, 1909, the 
President opened the surplus lands to settlement, 5,7S1 
acres classified as agricultural land, 82,647,50 aero* class!- 
fled us timber reserved for tribal use. Act May 29* 190S. 

Treaty of Medicine Creek, Dec. 26, 18*4, vol. 10, p. 1132; land 
all allotted, 1,494.15 acres, to 23 Indians. 



Treaty of Point Elliott, Jan. 22, 1855, vol. 12, p. 927:«. 
tive order, Bept. 9. 1873. Allotted , 7JW9 acres to 71 Indians; 
reserved for school, 89.80 acres; unallotted, 0.35 a — 



Treaty of WaUa Walla. June 9. 1855, vol. 12, p. 951. Agree- 
ment made Jan. 13, 1885, ratified by Indian appropriation 
act approved Mar. 3, 1893. voL 27. p. 631. (For text sea 
Misc. Indian Docs., voL 41, p. 227; see also Ann. Kept., 
1893, pp. 520-521, and Senate Ex. Docs. No. 21, 49th Oong., 
1st sess., and No. 45, 50th Cong., 1st seas.) Executive order. 
Nov. 28, 1892. Agreement, Jan. 8, 1894, ratified by act of 
Aug. 15, 1894, vol. 28, p. 320. 296,407 acres allotted to 8,187 
Indians, and 1,020.24 acres reserved for agency, Charon, and 
school purposes. (See letter books 354, p. 419; 416, p. 283, 
and 879. p. 243.) Act of E>ec. 21, 1904 (33 B tots., 8^, recog- 
nising claim of Indians to 293,837 acres additional land, sub- 
ject to the right of bona fide settlers or purchasers, aeoutred 
prior to Mar. 6, 1904. (See 39848, 1609.) Act Mar. i 
(34 Stat., 53), and act May 6, 1910(36 Stat., 348). 



1906 



* Surveyed. 



* Partly surveyed. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 



fcBPOBT 07 THE C0MMI8SI0NEB OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



89 



Table 7. — General data for each Indian reservation, under what agency or school, tribes 
occupying or belonging to it, area not allotted or specially reserved, and authority for its 
establishment, to Nov. S, 1913 — Continued. 



e of reservation and 
tribe. 



Area (unal- 
lotted). 



Date of treaty, law, or other authority establishing 



WISCONSIN. 



Lao Court Oreflk. 

(Under Hayward School.) 
Tribe: Lao Court Oreille 
Band of Chippewa of 
Lake Superior. 

Laodu Flambeau. 

(Under Laodu Flambeau 
School.) 
Tribe: Lao du Flambeau 
Band of Chippewa of 
Lake Superior. 

La Pointe (Bad River) 

(Under La Pointe Agency.) 
Tribe: La Pointe Band 
of, Chippewa of Lake 
Superior. 



Red Cliff 

(Under Red 
Tribe: La Pointe Br 
(Buffalo Chief) of Chip- 
pewa of Lake Superior. 



Acres. 
1403 



26,153 



46,613 



(Under Keahena School) 

Tribe: Menominee. 

Oneida. 

(Under Oneida SchooL) 
Tribe: Oneida. 



1231,680 



(Under Keahena SchooL) 
Tribes: Stookbridge and 
Muntee, 



TotaL 

WYOMDTO. 



Wmd River 

(Under Shoshone SchooL) 
Tribes: Northern Arap- 
aho and Eastern Band 
of Shoshoui. 



304,849 



•608,526.06 



TotaL 

Grand total. 



608,526.06 



36,319,091.05 



Treaty of Sept. 30. 1854, voL 10. p. 1109: lands withdrawn by 
General Land Office. Nov. 22, I860, Apr. 4, 1865. (See re- 

Sort by Secretary of the Interior, Mar. 1, 1873.) Act of May 
», 1872, vol. 17, p. 190. 68,511 acres allotted to 876 Indians. 
Act of Feb. 3, 1903. vol. 32. p. 795. 

Treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, vol 10, p. 1109, lands selected by 
Indians. (See report of Superintendent Thompson, Nov. 
14, 1863. and report to Secretary of the Interior, June 22, 
1866. Department order of June 26, 1866. Act of May 29, 
1872, vol 17, p. 190. 44,877 acres allotted to 589 Indians; 
act of Feb. 3, 1903 (32 Stats., 795), leaving unallotted 26,153.40 
acres. 

Treaty of Sept. 30, 1854, vol. 10, p. 1109. 368.91 acres patented 
under art. 10: 195.71 acres fishing ground. 83,871 acres allot- 
ted to 1,063 Indians. (See letter to General Land Office. 
Sept. 17, 1859, and letter book 381, p. 49.) Acts of Feb. 
11, 1901 (31 Stats.. 766), and Mar. 2, 1907 (34 Stats., 1217), 
leaving unallotted and unreserved 46.613 acres. 

Treaty of Sept. 30, 1854. vol. 10, p. 1109; Executive order. 
Feb. 21, 1856. (See Indian Office letters of Sept. 3, 1858, and 
May 25. 1863, and General Land Office letter of May 27. 
1863. See Executive orders. See report of Superintendent 
Thompson, May 7, 1863. Lands withdrawn by General 
Land Office May 8 and June 3, 1863.) 2,536.91 acres allot- 
ted to 35 Indians under treaty; of the residue 11,566.90 acres 
were allotted to 169 Indians under Joint resolution of Feb. 
20. 1895, voL 28, p. 970, and 40.10 acres were reserved for 
school pu 



Treaties of Oct. 18. 1848. vol. 9, p 952; of May 12, 1854, voL 
10, p. 1064, and Feb. 11, 1856, voL 11, p. 679. 

Treaty of Feb. 3, 1838, vol. 7, p. 566. 65,402.13 acres allotted 
to 1,501 Indians; remainder, 84.08 acres, reserved for school 

Treaties of Nov. 24. 1848, voL 9, p. 955; Feb. 5, 1856. voL 11, 
p. 663, and of Feb. 11,1856, voL 11, p. 679; act of Feb. 6, 
1871, vol. 16, p. 404. (For area, see act of June 22, 1874, vol. 
18, p. 174.) 167 Indiana allotted 8,920 acres. Patents in 
fee, act June 21, 1906 (34 Stat., 382). Act Mar. 3, 1893 (27 
Stat., 744). 



Treaty of July 3, 1868, vol. 15, p. 673; acts of June 22. 1874, vol. 
18, p. 166, and Dec. 15, 1874, voL 18, p. 291; Executive order. 
May 21, 1887. Agreement made Apr. 21, 1896, amended 
ana accepted by act of June 7, 1896 (vol. 30, p. 93); amend- 
ment accepted by Indians July 10, 1897. (see Land Div. 
letter book 359, p. 468.) Act of Mar. 3, 1905, ratifying and 
amending agreement with Indians of Apr. 21. 1904. (See 
voL 33, p. 1016.) President's proclamation June 2, 1906. 
opening ceded part to settlement. It contained 1.472,844.15 
acres. (See letter book 866, p. 157.) Reserved for Mail 
Camp, 120 acres; reserved for Mail Camp Park. 40 acres; 
reserved for bridge purposes, 40 acres. Subject to disposi- 
tion under President's proclamation, 1,438,633.66 acres. 
223,236 acres were allotted to 2,154 Indians, and 1,792.05 
acres were reserved for agency, school, church, and ceme- 
tery purposes, under acts of Feb. 8, 1887 (24 Stats.. 388). 
as amended by act of Feb. 28, 1891 (26 Stats.. 794), and 
treaty of July 3. 1868 (15 Stats., 673), leaving unallotted 
and unreserved 608,526. 06 acres. 



■ Surveyed. 



* Outboundariss surveyed. 



» Partly surveyed. 



Digitized by 



Google 



90 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 8.— Area of Indian lands, June SO, 1918. 



States and reservations. 



Area in acres. 



Allotted. Unallotted. Total. 



Arizona: 

Camp McDowell (Salt River) . 
Colorado River 



Fort Apache. 

FortMojave 

Gila Bend (Pima). 
Gila River (Pima).. 
Havasupai 



Hualapai. 

Kaibab 

Moqui 

Navajo (see New Mexico). , 

Papago 

SaltRiver 

San Carlos 



9,000 
41,006 



34,971 

240,640 

1,681,930 

31,338 

10,231 

357.130 

618 

730.880 

138,240 

2,472,320 

9,880,397 

136,319 

46,720 

1,834,240 



Total., 



51,206 



California: 

Digger 

Hoopa Valley 

Mfcslon— 

A gua Calient* 

Augustine (Malki) 
Cabason (Malki).. 
Gahuilla(Soboba). 



29,091 



Campo.. 

Capiian Grande (Volcan). 



S5$&2E!?.: 



Laguna (Campo) 

La Posta (Campo) 

Los Coyotes (Volcan).. 
Mansanita (Campo) . . . 
Martinet (Malki) 



Mission Creek (Malki) 

Morongo (Malki) 

Pala 

Pechanga (Temecula) 

Potrero (Pala) 

Ramona 

Rinoon 

San Manuel (Malki) 

SanPascual 

Santa Rosa (Soboba) 

Soboba 

Santa Ysabel (Mesa Grande).. 

Syquan (Volcan) 

Torres (MalM). 

Twenty -nine Palms (Malki) . . 

Round Valley 

Tule River 

Yuma 



120 
1,299 



270 
"42,*i66 



Total 

Colorado: Ute 

Florida: Seminole. 

Idaho: 

Coeurd'Alene. 

Fort Hall 

Lapwai 



72,886 
72,651 



104,077 

6,299 

178,812 



Total 

Iowa: Sao and Fox 

Kansas: 

Chippewa and Munsee. . . . 

Iowa (Kickapoo) 

Kickapoo 

Potawatomi 

Sac and Fox (Kickapoo).. 



0,188 



4,195 

11,769 

27,216 

220,785 

8,079 



Total., 



272,044 



Michigan: 

Isabella 

L'Anse 

Ontonagon. 



98,395 
52,041 
2,391 



Total.. 



152,827 



Digitized by' 



17,585,844 



370 
99,051 

7,205 

616 

1,280 

18,880 

1,640 

15,080 

4,080 

760 

320 

3,679 

21,530 

19,680 

1,280 

1,930 

11,069 

4,360 

3,896 

8,339 

560 

3,554 

653 

2,200 

2,560 

5,461 

15,042 

370 

30,800 

480 

1,111 

48,551 

39,386 



364,743 
483,910 
23,542 



447,940 
33,578 



481,518 
3,251 



519 
"*24 



543 



191 
732 
100 



1,083 



34,971 

340,040 

1,681,930 

31,838 

10,331 

357,130 

518 

730,880 

138,340 

2,472,330 

9,889,997 

177,935 

46,730 

1,834,340 



17,637,050 



370 
138,142 

7,305 
616 

1,380 
18,880 

1,640 
15,080 

4,080 
760 
330 

3,670 
21,530 
19,680 

1,380 

1,920 
11,060 

4,480 

5,195 

*S 

2,200 
2,560 
5,461 
15,042 
640 
30,800 
480 
43,217 
48,551 
39,386 



437,629 

556,561 

23,542 



104,077 
454,239 
212,390 



770,706 
3,251 



4,195 
11,769 
27,735 
220,785 

8,103 



272,587 



98,586 
52,773 
2,551 



153,010 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 91 

Table 8.— Area of Indian lands, June 30, 1913— Continued. 



States and reservations. 



Area in acres. 



Allotted. Unallotted. Total. 



Minnesota: 

Bob Fort (Nett Lake) 

Deer Creak (Nett Lake) 

Fond da Lao 

Grand Portage 

Leech Lake 

Mdewakanton 

Red Lake 

Vermillion Lake 

White Earth 

White Oak Point and Chippewa (Leech Lake)- 



Total. 



Montana: 

Blackfeet.i 

Crow 

Fort Belknap 

Fort Peck..:. 

Jocko ( Flathead ) 

Northern Cheyenne (Tongue River). 



Total.. 



Nebraska: 

Omaha 

Ponca(Santee)!.'!. 

San tee 

Sioux (additional;. 
Winnebago 



Total. 



Nevada: 

Duck Valley (Western Shoshone).. 

Moapa River 

Paiute (Fallon) 

Pyramid Lake (Nevada) 

Walker River 



Total. 



New Mexico: 

Jtearilla Apache 

Mescalero Apache 

Navajo (see Arizona) 

Aooma (Albuquerque) 

Cochiti 

Isleta (Albuquerque) 

Jemez 

Laguna (Albuquerque) 

Nambe 

Pecos 

Picuris 

Pojoaque 

San Dia (Albuquerque) 

Ban Juan 

San Felipe (Albuquerque). . 
Santa Ana (Albuquerque). 

Santa Clara. 

Santo Domingo 

Sia 

San ndefonso 

Taos 

Tesuque . . . ; 

Zuni 



Total. 



New York: 
Allegany .... 
Cattaraugus, 
oar— '-- 



Stl _ 

Tanawanda.. 

Tuscarora. 



Total.. 



54,524 
296 
27,637 
24,191 
47,453 
12,582 



674,887 
64,733 



543,528 

1,080 

29,736 



906,303 



1,600 
479,028 



574,344 



721,743 
227,970 



1,501,850 

1,834,185 

497,600 



257 
489,500 



1,430,341 



4,323,392 



130,522 
27,236 
72,567 



4,500 



108,838 



72 
640 



339,163 



5,212 



100 
9,983 



321,920 

1,000 

1,220 

322,000 

40,526 



10,083 



686,666 



353,812 



319,363 



407,300 

474,240 

1,980,637 

95,792 
24,256 

110,080 
17,510 

154,025 
13,586 
18,763 
17,461 
13,520 
24,187 
17,545 
34,767 
17,361 
49,369 
92,398 
17,515 
17,293 
17,361 
17,471 

215,040 



673, 175 



3,847,477 



30,469 

21,680 

640 

350 

6,100 

14,640 

7,549 

6,249 



54,524 
296 
27,637 
24,191 
47,453 
12,582 

543,528 
1,080 

704,623 
64,733 



1,480,647 



1,503,450 
2,313,213 
497,600 
721,743 
228,227 
489,500 



5,753,733 



135,022 

27,236 

72,639 

640 

108,838 



344,375 



321,920 

1,000 

1,320 

322,000 

50,509 



696,749 



761,112 

474,240 

2,300,000 

95,792 
24,256 

110,080 
17,510 

154,025 
13,586 
18,763 
17,461 
13,520 
24,187 
17,545 
34,767 
17,361 
49,369 
92,398 
17,515 
17,293 
17,361 
17,471 

215,040 



4,520,652 



30,469 

21,680 

640 

350 

6,100 

14,640 

7,549 

6,249 



Digitized by 



XSdogVF 



r 



92 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 8.— Area of Indian Umd$, June SO, 19 IS— Continued. 



States and reservations. 



Area in acres. 



Allotted. 



Unallotted. 



TotaL 



North Carolina: Qnalla 

North Dakota: 

Devils Lake (Fort Totten).. 

Fort Berthold 

Standing Rock 

Turtle Mountain 



Total.. 



Oklahoma: 
Cherokee.. 
Chickasaw. 
Choctaw.... 

Creek. 

8eminole.. 
Cherokee Outlet. 



Cheyenne and Arapaho 

Iowa (Sac and Fox) 

Kansa (Kaw) 

Kickapoo (Shawnee) 

Kiowa and Comanche and Apache.. 

Modoc (Seneca) 

Oakland 

Osage 

Otoe 

Ottawa (Seneca) 

Pawnee 

Peoria (Seneca) 

Ponca 

Potawatoml (Shawnee) 

Quapaw (Seneca) 

Sao and Fox 



Shawnee 

Wichita (Kiowa)... 
Wyandot (Seneca). 



Total. 



Oregon: 
Oral 



JrandeRonde. 

Klamath 

Silets 

Umatilla 

Warm Springs. 

Total 



South Dakota: 

Cheyenne River 

Crow Creek and Old Winnebago. . 

Lake Traverse (Slsseton) 

Lower Brule 

PincRklgc 

Rosebud 

Yankton 



Total. 



Utah: 

Paiute 

Uintah Valley. 
Uncompahgre.. 



Total. 



Washington: 

CheBalis (Cushman). 
Columbia (Colville).. 
ColviUe.. 



Hob River (Neah Bay), 

Lummi (Tulalip) 

Makah (Neah Bay).... 



Makah (Neah Bay) 

Muckleshoot (Cushman). 



Nisqualll (Cushman) . 
Osefte (Neah Bay)...... 

Port Madison (Tuhllp).. 



Puyallup (Cushman). 



63, 211 



137,381 

229.554 

1,338 530 

44,140 



444,0© 

290,237 

1,754 



1,749,605 



745,053 



4,346,793 

3,801,263 

4,303,666 

2,999,360 

360,464 

4,949 

628,789 

8,605 

99,644 

22,650 

546,375 

3,966 

11,456 

1,465,350 

128,351 

12,995 

112,701 

43,334 

100,745 

291,616 

56,245 

87,684 

41,813 

12,745 

152,714 

20,942 



625 

349,430 

2,273,328 

MS 



1,587 
159 



940 



535 



19, 565,215 

32,963 
207,374 
44,459 
82,156 
139,729 



2,628,323 



165 

811,802 

3 200 

74,618 

823,075 



506,701 



1,212,860 



869,307 
254,657 
306,838 
187,350 
1,853.672 

268,263 



380,704 

34,348 

1,347 

165,510 

733,593 

72,342 



5,384,976 



1,396,844 



99,407 
12,540 



600,000 
179,154 



111,947 



779,154 



3,799 
22,618 
61,653 



12,561 
3,728 
3,491 
4,717 



1,297,009 
640 



19,312 



7,219 
17,463 



65 



63,211 



187,881 

673,616 

1,637,767 

45,894 



2,494,668 



4,347,418 

4,150,803 

6,676,994 

3,000,913 

360,634 

4,949 

528,789 

8,606 

99,644 

22,660 

546,375 

3,966 

11,456 

1,465,350 

128,361 

14,682 

112,860 

43,334 

101,091 

291,616 

56,245 

87,684 

41,813 

12,745 

152,714 

21,477 



22,198,538 



33,149 
1,019,176 

47 669 
156,774 
462,804 



1,719,561 



1,259,011 

289,006 

310,185 

852,860 

2,567,265 

1,715,231 



6,781,820 



600,000 

278,561 

12,540 



891,101 



3,799 

22,618 

1,348,662 

640 

12,561 

23,040 

8,491 

4,717 

640 

7,284 

17463 



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BfiPOBX OF THE COMMISSIONS OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 93 

Tabus &.—Area of Indian lands, June SO, 191$— Continued. 



States and 



Area in acres. 



Allotted. Unallotted. Total 



Washington— Cool 

Qpilente (Neah Bay! 
QoinaleU (Cushman 
Bheahrater 



Skoknmish (Cushman) 

Snohomish (Tulalip) 

Spoken. 

Squaxon Island (Cushman).. 

Swinomish (TulaUp) 

Yakima.... 



Total. 



Wisconsin: 

Lao Courts Oreille (Hayward). 

Leo du Flambeau 

La Pointe (Bed River) 

M enomin ee 

Oneida 

BedCUil 

Stoekbridge and Hunsee 



Total 

Wyoming: Wind River (Shoshone). 

Total reservation lands 

Public domain 



Orand total. 



54,990 



837 
188,653 



7,803 

22,106 

04,794 

1,494 

7,359 

294,007 



324 
82,048 



797,852 



580,822 



2,368,215 



68,511 
44,877 
83,871 



65,440 
14,160 
8,920 



82,340 
39,880 
231,080 



285,785 
221,943 



32,076,801 
893,988 



304,309 
008,526 



38,575,097 



33,570,847 



38,575,097 



837 

223,543 

335 

7,803 

22,490 

147,442 

1,494 

7,359 

1,092,819 



2,949,037 



88,914 
77,223 
123,751 
231,680 
66,440 
14,168 
8,920 



590,094 
830,469 



71,252,558 
803,986 



72,146,544 



i Does not agree with unallotted area in Table 7, dated Nov. 3, 1913. 



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Table 10. — Patents in fee issued to mission organizations during fiscal year ended June 

30, 1913. 



States and reservations. 


Organization. 


Act. 


Citation. 


Acres. 


Idaho: Fort Lapwai.... 
Minnesota: Fond du 


Board of Home Missions of Pres- 
byterian Church in United 
States. 

The Northern Minnesota Confer- 
ence of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

Trustees (named) for the Associ- 
ated Executive Committee of 
Friends on Indian Affairs. 

Board of Home Missions of Pres- 
byterian Church in United 
States. 


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do 

do 

do 


36 Stat, 814 

do 


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80.00 


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Oklahoma: Seneca 

Sooth Dakota: Rose- 
bud. 


36 Stat., 752 

35 Stat., 814 


44.22 
40.00 



Table 11. — Lands set aside during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913, for temporary use and 
occupancy by mission organisations. 



States and reservations. 


Organization for which set apart. 


Date of act. 


Warrant for action. 


Aarease 
of lands. 


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Pima 


Franciscan Fathers 




General policy 

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5.00 


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Jesus Christ of Latter Day 
Saints. 

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byterian Church in United 
States. 

Methodist Episcopal Church 




10.00 


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Minnesota: NettLake.. 




do 


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do 


26.00 


Nevada: Western Sho- 


Board of Home Missions of Pres- 
byterian Church in United 
States. 

Reformed Church in America 




do 


25.23 


shone. 
New Mexico: Mescalero. 




do 


10.50 




Bureau Catholic TnHkn m taji^m 




do 


10.00 


South Dakota: 

Lower Brule 


....do 




do 


40.00 


Pine Ridge 


Domestic and Foreign Missionary 
Society Protestant Episcopal 
Church in United Btates. 

Bureau Catholic Indian Missions. 


May 27,1910 
(36 Stat. L., 


do 


10.00 


Wyoming: Shoshone... 


do 


1.00 









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122 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Tablb 16. — Indians engaged in stock raising during fiscal year ended June SO, 1913. 





Able- 
bodied 
male 
adults 
on res- 
erva- 
tion. 


Indians engaged in 
stock raising. 


Acreage of lands used by In- 
dians for grating. 




States and reserva- 
tions. 


As prin- 
cipal 
means 
of sup- 
port. 


As par- 
tial 
means 
of sup- 
port. 


Total. 


Allotted. 


Unal- 
lotted. 


Total. 


Value of 
stock grated 
by Indians. 


Arizona: 

Camp Verde 


110 

115 

467 

221 

51 

29 

513 

1,531 

8,375 

1,232 

331 

664 

1,525 

104 

1,650 














1914 


Colorado River.. . . 


647* 

2 

""366" 

1.500 

6,000 

822 

1 

25 

450 

*2,666* 


8 
496 
67 
69 
80 

"""MO* 

"**9u6" 
251 
600 
850 
1 
500 


8 

1,043 

69 

69 

80 

300 

2,000 

6,000 

1,722 

252 

625 

1,300 

2,500 




1,000 
510, 100 

""i38,*240* 

40,960 

75,100 

1.588,320* 

4,990,000 

316.960 

29.648 

742,268 

35,566 

125 

3,039,647 


1,000 

610, 100 

1,000 

138,240 

40,960 

75,100 

1,588,320 

4,990,000 

316,960 

46,698 

742,268 

342,086 

125 

3,039,647 


23,650 

268,666 

16,858 

11,026 

8,500 

93,900 

415,750 

3,240,000 

410,096 

40,134 

57,200 

293,196 

2,200 

406,175 


Fort Apache 

FortMojave 

Havasupai 




1,000 


Kathab . . 




Leupp 




Moqul 





Navajo. 


P«tfi* 


""n'oio* 
"366*526* 


Salt River 

San Carlos 

SanXavier 

Troxton Canyon . . 


Western Navajo... 








Total 


11,918 


11,647 


4,322 


15,969 


324,570 


11,507,834 


11,832,404 


5,288,251 




California: 

URhop 




3 

1 

2" 


447 
40 

4 
40 


450 
41 
4 
42 


9,530 


"""13*688" 
220 


9,530 
13,688 
220 
18,000 
1,925 
4,600 
7,664 


35,596 

7,366 

44 

17,775 

13,880 

55,375 

25,291 

40,732 

3,122 

65,540 

36,812 

56,100 

29,357 


Campo 


55 

14 

164 

229 

309 
187 
206 

89 
424 
142 

43 
183 


Digger 

Fort Bid welL 


*Vi8,*666* 


Fort Yuma 


1,925 
3,000 
7,664 
2,617 


Hoopa Valley 


12 

25 

15 

4 


212 
105 
86 
30 
100 
107 
15 
8 


212 
105 
86 
30 
112 
132 
30 
12 


1,600 


Pala 


474 


PwhangH 


Round Valley 

Soboba 


39,612 


80 

9,825 

15,000 

1,650 


39,692 
9.825 

15,000 
1,650 


Tule River 




Volcan' 








Total 


2.045 


62 


1,194 


1,256 


69,216 


55,669 


124,885 


388,969 




Colorado: 

Navajo Springs. . . . 


80 
74 


7* 


90 


90 
73 




1210,010 


210,010 
2,000 


40.275 


Southern" Ute. 


2,000 


47,881 








Total 


154 


7 


156 


163 


2,000 


210,010 


212,010 


88,156 




Idaho: 

Coeur d 'Alone 

Fort Hall 


150 
390 
152 


42 
6 


304 
120 
600 


346 

126 
600 


42,772 

337.040 

1,000 


*"*i03,"i26* 
6,000 


42,772 

440,160 

6,000 


80,566 
192,800 
221,460 


FortLapwal 


Total 


692 

104 


48 


1,024 
50 


1,072 
50 


380,812 


106,120 
1,255 


488,932 
1.255 


494,825 
14,971 


Iowa: Sac and Fox.... 




^^___^^ 


Kansas: 

Kickapoo , , 


131 
156 




135 


135 


1,577 
»8.834 




1,577 
8,834 


151,062 
68,340 


Potawatomi. 














Total.... 


287 




135 


135 


10,411 




10,411 


219,402 






Michigan: 

Bay Mills 

Chippewa, Lake 
Superior 


66 
290 




6 
175 


6 

175 


240 




240 


640 




17,955 












Total 


356 




181 


181 


240 




240 


18,595 






Minnesota: 

Fond du Lac 


217 

70 

371 

121 

125 
309 
841 




50 

5 

137 

18 

4 

200 

400 


50 

5 

137 

18 

4 

200 
400 


1,000 
800 

6.718 
930 




1,000 
800 

6,718 
930 


4,350 
268 


Grand Portage. .. . 




Leech Lake 




32,533 


NettLake 




5,753 

4,194 
29,700 
38,960 


Pipestone (Birch 
Cooley) 




Red Lake 








White Earth 


















Total 


2,054 




814 


814 


9,448 




9,448 


115.756 

ssaaaBES 







1 Overestimated last year. 



11912 

Digitizei 



$b?GoogIe 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 123 

Table 16. — Indians engaged in stock raising during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913 — Con. 





Able- 
bodied 
male 

adult* 

onres- 

*>n \- 

tlon< 


Indiana engaged in 
stock falsing. 


Acioaee of lands used by In- 
dians for grazing. 




States and p&serva- 
ttddft, 


As prin- 
cipal 
means 
of sii im- 
port. 


As par- 
tial 

TMr.Jlls 

ofsnp- 

porU 


Totat. 


Allotted. 


Unal- 
lotted. 


Total. 


Value of 

r ' m - k jrmrrd 
by Indians, 


Montana: 

BlaekJeet......... 


MS 
305 
5M 

305 
300 


1,050 
37 
1,500 
30 
100 
405 


1,589 
275 
400 
530 
200 
28 


2.039 
312 

1,900 
560 
300 
403 


847,240 
334,107 

102,526 

176*060' 


121,214 


933,454 

139.000 

127,6*8 

349,500 


1034,420 


Crow. ............. 


361,680 


Flathead. 


96.500 

1J7,| L VS 
180.000 

134K,5UU 


moo 

101.260 
379,405 
450, 10Q 


Fort Belknap 

FortPfcck......... 


Tongue River,..., 






Total..-.. 


2,305 


3,182 


3.022 


6.204 


1,103,933 


771 <JY2 


2,173,836 


2,^,92! 




Nebraska: 

Omaha, 


349 
270 








4,900 
14.450 
2,449 


280 


6,180 
11.450 
2,449 


103,782 


fianuw....... . 




115 
200 


111 

209 


30,160 


Winnebago, ...... 




124,330 








Total..... . 


061 
120 

m 

3d 
143 

140 
144 




324 


324 

04 

150 


21,799 


m 


22,079 


313,868 




Nevada: 

Fallon 




64 

150 








3,405 


Fort McDormlU.. 
Moapa Klvtr.. 


1,900 


i,ow 

■17.1 

120,000 


2,830 

470 

120,000 

2,000 

75,000 

11,300 


6,300 

1,036 
9,164 

18,905 


Nevada........... 




20 

140 

1,000 


20 
fid 

140 

1.000 




Walk ar River..... 


2,000 


Western Shoshone 


76,000 


118,550 
24,900 


Reno, special 

a-VTlt 


11,300 










Total...., ._ 


456 




1,424 


1,424 


15. 100 


iiw. rxxi 


211,000 


182, 109 






Now Mexico: 

Albuquerque I'u- 
eblas 


15 

140 


206 

10 

6 

2,985 

1,000 

"""loo' 


058 

30 
02 

**u666" 

1,000 
400 


804 

30 

93 

2,985 

%tm 

1.IHKI 

1,200 


30,862 
100,577 


370,012 

16,000 

40,810 

1.000,000 

;:.Sl^.im 

37,440 

114. GOO 


409,374 
115,577 , 
40,810 
1,448,000 
3| »10, 000 
37,440 
114,000 


276,336 
54,752 


Jfcarllle.. 


Mescalero. ... 


07.570 


Pueblo Bonito 


448,000 


608.510 


San Juan,... 




2,180,550 
141,250 


Bon La Fe Pueblos. 


490 




2uni, ....... 




163,775 






Total 


420 


5,007 


3, 170 
300 


8,177 
300 


679,439 


5,402,802 
40,000 


5,982,301 
40,000 


3,498,732 
30,044 


North Caroliaai 

Cherokee, ......... 








North Dakota: 

Fort Bert hold..,,. 
FortTotten 


217 
230 
760 


250 

"'lift 


18a 

250 

1,500 


438 i 
250 
2,400 


194,789 

12,000 

1,094,277 I 

15,000 


101,496 


356,284 

U,356,564 
15,000 


332,850 

u£aio 


Standing Hock.... 
Turtle Mountain . . 


162,287 


1,474,000 
132, 151 












Total 


2,032 


1,150 


1,338 


3,088 


Mio. 000 


323,782 


1,639,848 


2,043,351 




Oklahoma: 

Cantonment. 


17o 

389 
829 
490 

80 
137 
177 

43 
132 
130 
311 
S4o 








4,385 

19.000 

*J,OU) 

fm 

7,120 
7,990 
1,240 
3,051 
20,000 
5,221 
^28,010 




4,386 

19,000 

83,000 

C") 
3,160 
7,120 
7,3« 
1,240 
3.051 

20,000 
5,422 

28,010 


33,109 
163,263 


Cheyenne and 
Aropaho.. ...... 


....... 


250 
150 

110 
115 
195 
3 
91 


250 

i.vi 

110 
115 
195 
2 
9t 




Kiowa.... i. . . 




SOD; 000 

175,030 
37,280 
47,789 

20,833 
tfjltf 

09,580 
108,738 
76,320 


Osage........... 


100 


Otoe........ 


Pawnee 


Poaea...., .,....., 




Red Moon........ 


Boo and Fox .. 




Seger. 




Seneca 

Shawnee 




238 
157 


238 
457 


201 








Total 4 .......... 


3.340 


35 


l,Aflg 


l t 043 


131,007 


301 


1S1.3CS 


1,316,731 





1 Overestimated last year, 
t Unknown. 



> Estimated. 

« Exclusive Five Civiliied Tribes. 



Digitized by 



Google 



124 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 16. — Indians engaged in stock raising during fiscal year ended June 30, 19 IS — Con. 





Able- 
bodied 
male 
adults 
on res- 
erva- 
tion. 


Indians engaged in 
stock raising. 


Acreage of lands used by In- 
dians for grating. 




States and reserva- 
tions. 


As prin- 
cipal 
means 
of sup- 
port. 


As par- 
tial 
means 
of sup- 
port. 


Total. 


Allotted. 


Unal- 
lotted. 


Total. 


Value of 
stock erased 
by Indians. 


Oregon: 

iHftnwtfc 


233 

0) 
83 

194 
ICO 


260 
5 
2 


40 

25 

40 

300 

205 


300 
30 
42 
300 
205 


56,900 
18,000 
21,375 
25,600 
129,696 


151,000 


207,900 
18,000 
21,375 
99,200 

199,056 


$348,933 


Roseburg 


25,000 


Biletr 




17,940 


Umatilla 

Warm Springs — 


73,600 
69,360 


12,000 
62,620 


Total 


670 


267 


610 


877 


251,571 


293,960 


545,531 


466,493 






South Dakota: 

Canton Asylum .. . 
















10 


Cheyenne ftiver.. . 

Crow Creek 

Flandreau... 


539 
200 
72 
97 
1,375 
930 
473 
378 








582,835 
265,092 

""44,424* 

2,139,670 

401,394 

49,000 

11,000 


259,629 

15,873 

200 

"488*835* 
124,240 


842,464 

280,965 

200 

» 44, 424 

'2,628,505 

525,634 

49,000 

11,000 


967,890 


2i2" 

4,210 
700 


180 
66 

107 
2,600 

650 
50 

350 


180 

66 

319 

6,810 

1,350 

50 

350 


273,820 
6,350 


Lower Brule 

Pine Ridge 

Rosebud *. 


150,625 

1,537,937 

554,380 

199,896 


Sbseton 


Yankton 




264,510 








Total 


4,064 


5,122 


4,003 


9,125 


3,493,415 


888,777 


4,382,192 


3,975,418 






Utah: 


41 
341 


22* 


20 
126 


20 
148 


"*37,"674' 


6,200 
« 218, 080 


6,200 
255,754 


2,061 


Uintah and Ouray 

Salt Lake, special 

agent 


138,358 
2,510 




















Total 


382 


22 


146 


168 


37,674 


224,280 


261,954 


142,929 






Washington: 

Colville 


556 
356 
187 
148 
370 
779 


69 

6* 

7 


347 
77 
63 
164 
180 
1,050 


416 
77 
63 
164 
186 
1,057 


69,052 
14,488 
3,530 
250 
8,439 
126,000 


325,000 


394,052 

14,488 

3,710 

250 

8,439 

231,000 


613,996 


Cushman 


32,155 


NeahBay 


180 


13,055 


Spokane T 


37,612 


Tulalip.. 


**"id5,"666* 


63,849 


YftWnift 


16,800 






Total 


2,396 


82 


1,881 


1,963 


221,759 


430,180 


651,939 


777,466 




Wisconsin: 

Carter* 
















6,335 


Hayward 


325 
400 
103 




75 
200 
200 
200 
400 

12 


75 
200 
200 
200 
400 

12 


12,300 




12,300 
76,812 


6,460 


Keshena 


76,812 


35,192 


Lao du Flambeau. 
La Point© 


ftoo 


14,625 
89,711 


Oneida 


668 
123 




100,000 


Red Cliff 


100 




100 


5,785 








Total 

Wyoming: Shoshone.. 


1,619 
324 


3i" 


1,087 
175 


1,087 
206 


14,100 
•211,567 


77,512 
75,700 


91,612 
287,267 


257,106 
282,898 


Grand total 


39,951 


26,662 


27,564 


54,226 


8,544,127 


20,611,984 


29,156,111 


22,777,075 



COMPARISON. 



Total, 1912. 
Total, 1911. 
Total, 1900. 
Total, 1890. 



39,901 
*65,C34 



26,014 
20,178 



25,366 
24,807 



51,380 
44,985 



8,755,552 
4,696,446 



21,314,688 
18,729,124 



30,070,240 
23,425,570 



22,238,242 

17,971,209 

•11,697,296 

•11,660,240 



i Unknown. 

' Overestimated last year. 

' 1912 report. 



* Underestimated last year. 

* Only item reported. 



• Not reported. 

' I^ KH ^ r fora i! A adults. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



125 



Table 17. — Indians engaged in industries other than farming and stock raising during 
fiscal year ended June 30, J91S. 



i Unknown. 



Steles and superintended Jo;, 


Industry. 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 

products. 


Arizona: 

Camp V«d*_ ....... . ,...,,,.. A 


Basket making, 


50 

m 


1300 




Woodcutting .7. . . 


100 








Tot*! 


75 


400 




Bead work 




Colorado River - 


10 

30 

1U 


r 1Kl 




Woodcutting. ............ 


2,000 
C 1 ) 




Others _..,...,...,,.. ! 






Total 


143 


3,X» 




B asVet mflfr lug 


Fort Apache.. ♦. ....... 


8 

500 


£00 




Bead work 


50 




Woodcutting 


8,750 






Total., 


500 


0,300 




Basket making mM ....... . 




Fort Uojave . , ,,..„..., ,...-.. 


10 

8 


350 




Bead work......... _ ., 


500 




Woodcutting ..,,..,,. . 


3,500 




Others , ..... 


44,037 






Total . ..,_..,.._..._., 


x> 


48,277 




Basket making,... 


Havnsupa].. , 


2fl 
30 


350 




tiers ,7... ][ 


1,220 






Total 


44 

20 


1**70 


Keibab . 


Basket making.... „ 


ISO 




.„„dtf ,,.. 




Lenpp ■ . . . . . ,,..,, 


50 
400 


600 




Blanket weaving. " 


7,000 






Total . 


450 


7,500 




Basket making. ... , 




Uoqul..... 


100 
600 
100 
250 
30 


1,000 

100,000 

1,000 

14*603 




Blanket wearing. 




Pottery ........... . 








Others...... 








Total..... . 


070 


110,603 




Blanket weaving, 




Navajo ... 


ft 


270, 000 




Woodcutting. . .7. ................... . 


a, 300 






Total. ............... 


(*) 


373,200 




Basket making .*,-»«* 




Pima 


1,300 
550 
600 
929 


14,500 
4.300 




Pottery...... 7 ,.. 






30,500 




Others 








Total ........ 


8,279 


45,300 




Basket making j 




SaltRlYSr.. 


130 
2 


2,400 




Pottery...... T. 


100 








Total 


m 


3*500 




ftngktt IpaWnf T r x .. * * . « * f . ... . . 




p*n f?arlf|(i ± *.-*■ 


•2LMi 

100 
300 


000 




Bead work 7 ..,..,......,,.,,. 


300 




Woodcutting.. . . . 


0,000 








500 


10,000 




Baaket making.. 


ffrri TC*v\t*r , 


750 

50 

350 

e 


7,000 
400 




Pottery. .....7. , .....^ 




Woodcutting. 


.|f,..-HH> 

350 




Others .................... 








Total.......... 


l.MB 


54,250 




Basket making.. ...................... 




Tnutton Canyon >...,......... 


M 

122 


360 






3.000 




Others ...................... 


4*000 








Total... 


186 


7,250 









i Estimated. 



Digitized by 



Google 



126 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 17. — Indiana engaged in industries other than farming and stock raising during 
fiscal year ended June 30, 19 IS— Continued. 



States and superintendencies. 


Industry. 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 
products. 


Arizona— Continued. 

Western Navajo 


Basket making. 


75 

1,000 

20 

125 


1250 




Bl«Ui1r*t w^ftvfiig. K , t .... a ^ .... * 


15,000 
900 




Woodcutting... 7 




Others 7. 


1,500 








Total 


1,220 


17,650 








Total > Arlisonft.. ili . . ............ 


8,771 


506,149 




Basket making t . , , , . 




California: 

Bishop . . . . 


5 
8 


0) 




Woodcutting. 7 illt ,, 


1,280 








Total 


13 


1,280 




Basket making.. . ...... 




Campo . . ,.,..... 


4 
1 


125 




Others 7 


80 








Total 


5 


205 




Basket making. . , „ , . 




Digger 


3 

4 


40 




Woodcuttmg.7. . . . ... 


96 








Total 


7 


136 




Basket making Ui 




Port Bid well 


50 
15 
50 
10 


750 




Bead work 7 


300 




Woodcutting 


10,000 
450 




Others 








Total 


125 


11,500 




Bead work 




Fort Yuma 


40 
50 
3 


2,500 






4,200 




Others 


2,200 








Total 


03 


8.900 




Basket making 




Greenville 


50 
10 
150 
125 


250 




Bead work.. ..7 


75 




Filing .,. 


700 




Woodcutting 


10,000 








Total 


335 


11.025 








Hoopa Valley 


80 
120 
35 


500 




Fishing 


25,000 




Woodcutting ^ 


2,400 








Total 


235 

~ 44~ 
4 

65 


27,900 


MalM 


Ttofrftt ni^Hngr r - - - 


jjjj 




Lace making .7. . r ,.. , .... 


O) 




Woodcutting 


4,780 








Total 


113 


5,478 




Baslmt maMng 




Pala* 


37 
71 
9 


650 




T^ace making. 7 T . TT , 


471 




Woodcutting 


281 








Total 


117 


1,402 




Basket making 




Soboba 


10 
1 
2 


200 




Ftwhlng 7 


300 






90 








Total 


13 


590 




Basket making 




Tula River 


22 
14 


450 




Woodcutting." 


420 








Total 


36 


870 








To**! niiHfnmi* 


1.092 


69,286 




Bead work 




Colorado: Navajo Springs 


10 


50 









1 Unknown. 



« Estimated. 

Digitized by 



Google 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



127 



Table 17. — Indians engaged in industries other than /arming and stock raising during 
fiscal year ended June SO, 191 3— Continued, 



1 
States and suparinlendanatt«5. . 


Industry, 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 
products 


Idaho: 

CoeuT d' A Inmi .,..._., ....... 


Woodcutting., .... 


20 


IS, 000 




Basket making . . . 


Fort Ball *,.,«, 


7 
1 
50 


m 




Bead work... ,..— ^. .„*„*„,.•» 


1,000 




Others 


18 000 








Total ...... . 


as 


10*250 






Total Idaho _ 


86 


27,250 




Beadwork........... . .....,„ 


Iowa: 

Sac and Tax K .,...».., ........ 


20 

m 


100 




Other*.... , 


11,025 


■ 




Total Iowa. ......... 


78 


u f i2e 




Fishing ,....._.„„ 




Michigan: 

Bay MlUs m _. 


m 

3 
200 


l *^ 




Woodcutting. _ J .„. 




ntfaar-.. ™ 


10 000 








Total .. ..... 


243 


33JS0 




^■■hrt making ............ 




Chippewa, Lake Rnperfor. ......,._ 


SO 

100 

]7. f , 


1.000 




Fishing., 


4,000 

8,000 




WoodoutUnf. ..____ 








Total ..... 


325 


13 imo 








Total Michigan,..,.. 


558 


46 180 




Bcadwork.. ....... ....... _.., 




Minnesota: 

Grand Portage . 


5 
10 
10 

40 


30 






45 




Filing,......*.;...";.:/.":;:"". 


80 




Others............ 


454 








Total 


55 


609 




Basket making 




Leach Lake . 


100 

no 

450 
112 

420 


000 




Bead work 


l.'-'M 




Lace malting ..... 


1,400 




Fishing 


16,450 




Woodcutting..... 


3,150 




othem.. .„..:. v... :;::::::::::::::: 


12,525 








Total... ....... . ........„...,.._. 


1,217 


36.025 




Basket mating ......... 




NettLakoi ... 


15 
15 

9ft 
t 1 ) 


380 




Bead work....... 


1,030 

1.100 




FlsHi^,,, ± 




OUierel. _.,.... 


7, £00 






Total...., 


08 


10,310 




Bead work. _,....... ....„,. 


Red Lake. . , 


200 
SO 


100 




FishiT^ , , , 


12*000 




Woodcutting ......................... 


4,000 






Total,... ........ . . , . .......... 


300 


ifl.ioo 




Bead work ...................... 


White Earth ' 


50 
200 
100 


1,000 




Fishing.... 


2,000 






5,000 








Total,- 


3150 


8,000 








To**l Minnesota* t . . _. 


2,030 


71,044 




Woodcutting. , ............... 




Montana; 

Blackfeat . 


20 
30 


2,500 


Fcrt Belknap 


.„..do.. ....... ..:::::::::::::::::::; 


2,100 




Bead work..... . ,.... 




Fort Peck. ... 


90 
75 

m 


700 




Woodcut ting 1**1. , 


2,400 






2,000 








Total. ........ 


115 


5,100 




* Unknown. 

D 




» Estimated. 


gitized by V 


^ooq! 



128 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 17. — Indians engaged in industries other than farming and stock raising during 
1 year ended June SO, 19 IS— Continued. 



States and superintendencies. 


Industry. . 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 
products. 


Montana— Continued . 

Tongue Ki vex 


Beadwork 


150 
15 
25 


3300 




T^we mftidng 


75 




Woodcutting 


1,500 






Total 


190 


1,875 






Total Montana 


385 


11.575 




Beadwork 




Nebraska: 

Santee* 


21 
58 


1,300 
29,300 




Others 






Total 


79 


30,600 




Woodcutting 




Winnebago. .. . . x . . 


2 
5 


| 300 




Others 


3,120 






Total 


7 


8,420 






Total Nobraska 


86 


34,020 




TtAflVnt maklTIg x 


Nevada: 

Fallon. 


10 
5 


25 




Beadwork... T. 


25 








Total 


15 


50 




Woodcutting 




Fort McDermitt 


6 
25 


400 






100 








Total 


31 


500 








Moapa River 


15 


600 




do 




Nevada 1 i 


30 
30 
50 
20 

4 


200 




Beadwork 


300 




Fishing... 


2,000 

1,500 

500 




Woodcutting 




Others 








Total 


134 


4,500 




Banket making , 


Walker River 


50 
30 
10 
15 
15 


400 




Beadwork . . . 7. 


300 






100 




Fishing... . 


400 




Woodcutting 


1,300 






Total 


120 
30 


2,500 


Reno, special agent i . , . . , 


Fishing ... 


2,000 








Total Nevada 


345 


10,150 






New Mexico: 

Albuquerque Pueblos 


5 

5 

130 


130 




Blanket weaving 4 


300 




Pottery 


1,275 






Total 


140 


1,606 




Biuknt making ........... 




Jicarillai 


100 
60 
48 


000 




Beadwork ... T. 


300 




Woodcutting 


5,914 






Total 


205 


7,114 




Hfwtet maWng 


Mescalero 


12 
15 
20 
15 


300 




Beadwork... T. 


125 




Woodcutting 


600 




Others 


310 








Total 


62 


1,336 




Bwfirqt making 




flan Inan , 


25 
1,000 


200 




Blanket weaving 


200.000 






* 


Total 


1,025 


200,200 









i Estimated. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONED OF INDIAN AFFAIES. 



129 



Table 17. — Indiana engaged in industries other than farming and stock raising during 
fiscal year ended June SO, 1913— Continued. 



States and suparlntendenctaa. 


Industry. 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 
products. 


New Mexico— Continued:. 

Santa Fe Pueblos l . ,....,,,... . 


Pottery 


1,600 
30 


ia.ooo 

500 




Woodcutting 








Trial ...... 


1.530 


2,500 




Beadwork 


Zunl . 


100 
30 
10 


5,000 
flO 




Pottery.-. ...,...;.. 




Woodcutting 


2 T €00 






Total.,. 


140 


7,000 






Total New Mexico . 


3,0*5 


210 814 




fcfti^t making. , 




North Carolina: 

Cherokee ...,..., ,, 


30 

1 
40 
10 


8 m 




Pottery...,,...., .... 




Woodcutting ...,,,.. 




Others.. ...7.......,..*.. 


(*) 






Total North Carolina .. ... 


77 


800 




Beadwork. .... 




Oklahoma: 

Cantonment 


300 
10 


500 




Woodcutting................... ... 


800 








Total .. 


310 


1,300 




Beadwork ,. .,♦,.,,.......,. 


Cheyenne and Arapaho, 


133 

10 


7,100 
260 




Woodcutting. . . . 










143 
30 


7,360 

4.000 


Otoa. 


Others ..., .... 




Ba?^*t making . ,,,,... 




7 
41 


30 




Beadwork * . . * 


400 








Total.... 


4* 


4» 










UNl 


1.000 


r^X 




Total Oklahoma* . 


521 


14,070 




Rf|4)rrtt TOftklTlgj , 


Oregon: 

Klamath p. 


300 
10 


1,000 




Woodcut ting. 7. , 


3,050 








Total... ..,,. 


310 


3,050 




Fishing ,.„ 




Rose burg *_....,. ..,.„.„,... ....... . 


21 Mj 

100 

1,000 


1,000 




Woodcuttings 


3,000 
3,000 




Otheti.. „,...,. 






Total.,.. 


1,300 


5,000 








Total Oregon imkm , 


1,510 


8.050 




Hfu;kflt- mi>lr{nf . , 




South Dakota: 

Crow Creak....-., 


1 
B0 

8 
16 


35 






460 




Woodcutting.. , .. .. . ...1. ... 


too 




Others .7-, 


300 








Total 


104 


775 




Beadwork 




Flandrfleu mwm 


e 

5 


aoo 




Others.............. .................. 


500 








Total*..* 


11 
84 


700 


Lower Brute..., ....... ...*,., ,..,.., 


Beadwork ....,,,. 


0) 








800 
50 


0\ 




Woodcutting.. 


5 t 000 






TotaJ_,. LIll _ 


850 


6,000 








fotal South Dakota 


1,049 


8,475 









i Estimated. * Unknown. 
16986°— wt 1913— vol 2 9 



• Exclusive Five Tribes. 



Digitized by 



Google 



130 



REPORT OF THB COMMI8SIONEB OF INDUK 1FFAIB8. 



Tablb 17.— Indians engaqed in induttriei other than fanning and stock raising during 
fiscal y$ar ended June SO, 1913— Continued. 



States «*d superm tendencies . 



Industry . 



Number 
engaged. 



Valued 



Utah: 

Shtvwits.. 



Total 

Uintah and Ouray. 



TWal 

Total Utah, 



Washington: 
CotfUa... 



Total. 



Total..... 
NeauBay*. 



Total. 
Tnlaltp. 



Total.. 
Yakima. 



Total 

Total Washington. 



"Wisconsin: 
Hay ward. . 



ToiaL,. 



Total. 

Lac du Flambeau . 



Total. 



Woodcattlna.. 



Baikal making,. 

Beadwotk . _„ . , . 



Basket making. 

Beadwofk 

Fishing 

Woodcutting. . . . 
Others.......... 



Basket making.. 

Fishing 

Woodcutting..,, 
Others . 



Basket making., 

Fishing 

Others..... 



Basket making.. 

Fishing.. 

Woodcutting... 
Others, ......... 



Ha-kPt Tnakiru:.. 
Bead work,..... 
Woodcutting.... 



Beadwork.... 

Fishing 

Woodcutting. 
Others.., 



Basket making. . 
Bead work ...... 

Fishing. 

Woodcutting.,.. 
Others..... 



Basket making. . 

Beadwork 

Fishing 

Woodcutting..,. 
Others 



i Estimated. 



9 

17 

100 

12 

7 



14.S 



70 
100 



216 



08 
~28? 



58 

103 

U 



50 

100 

8 



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54 
500 

30 
300 



334 



20 
50 

500 
50 



850 



200 
200 
500 
15 
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1. 415 



*3W 
1,350 



m 



1.125 



S.TO 



*ffi 



4,250 



m 

20.300 

I, Mi 

no 



24.800 



4,200 
8.000 
15.000 

27.800 



400 

MO, 750 

AOi 538 

Km 



83,837 



300 
«00 

103 



141,539 



400 
400 

1,000 

3.125 



hM 



100 

150 



2,000 

iao6 



3,718 



1.000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,300 
3,500 



8.700 



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BEPOBT OF THE C0MMI88I0NEB OP INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



iai 



Tablb 17.— Indiana 



in industries other than farming and stock raising during 
year ended June S0 t 1913— Continued. 



States and siiparintandenaiea. 


Industry. 


Number 
engaged. 


Value of 
products. 


Wkoonstn— Continued. 

Le Points 


neffimt making , 


7 
23 
16 
6 
8 
11 


$35 




Bead work. . .7. 


200 




l/tim making. 


125 




*T*hmg....7 


1,700 




Woodcutting 




Others 7 


0) 






rtotal 


71 


2,438 




TAce making , , , . , , L 


Oneida 


70 
3 


1,500 
0) 




Others 7 






Total 


73 


1,500 




Taca making 


Red Cliff 


2 
10 
25 


10 




Fishing 7 


5,000 
500 




Others 








Total 


37 


5,510 






Total Wisconsin... x... 


3,380 


27,488 




Beadwork 


Wyoming: 

Shoshone 


50 
10 
205 


m m 




Woodcutting 




Others 7 


17,506 






Total Wyoming 


325 


17,008 






Orand total 


24,490 


1,310,208 







RECAPITULATION. 



Total. 



Grand total. 



Basket making. . . „ 
Beadwork........ 

Blanket weaving.. 

Fishing.... 

Lace making. 

Pottery..- 

Woodcutting 

Others 



4, Ufi 
3,023 
2,025 
3,408 

2,373 
2,821 
4.B33 



24,400 



115,701 

31,061 
502,445 
13S.S8Q 
3,681 
0,135 
270, 702 
277,657 



1,316,308 



COMPARISON. 



Total, 1012. 
Total, 1011. 
Total, 1000. 
Total, 1800. 



22,584 
21,236 



81,211,335 

847,450 

•177,100 

• 131,374 



i Unknown. 



* Only item reported. 



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132 



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144 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 20.— Prevalence of tuberculosis and trachoma among Indians, fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1913. 





Popu- 
lation. 


exam- 
ined 
for 

disease. 


Found 

afflicted 

with 

tuber- 


Esti- 
mated 
number 
having 
tubercu- 
losis, all 
forms. 


Found 
afflicted 

with 

tra- 
choma. 


Esti- 
mated 
num- 
ber 
having 

tra- 
choma. 


Treatment of 
trachoma. 


Stales and snperintendonoies. 


Cases 

operated 

upon. 


Cases 






operated 
upon. 


Arizona: 

Camp Verde 


419 
486 

2,307 
820 
171 

1,400 

4,108 
10,000 

4.096 

1,214 
2,362 
4,907 
482 
6,550 


200 

354 

462 

78 

165 

500 

1,797 

1,000 

3,233 

236 

99 

1,350 

400 

300 

741 


2 
106 
256 

5 

46* 

23 

110 

472 

4 

14 

15 

76 

81 

213 


6 

23 

1,562 

10 

44 

46 

29 

1,100 

645 

4 

59 
167 
237 
247 
652 


75 

140 

208 

13 

6 

235 

502 

800 

367 

130 

67 

55 

64 

130 

70 


100 

243 

925 

45 

11 

235 

2,000 

1,500 

819 

40 

807 

210 

325 

270 

320 


6 
14 
96 
13 


60 


Colorado River 


140 


Fort Apache 


126 


FortMojave 




Havasupal 


9 


Leupp.' 


29 

60 
800 
86 
42 


200 


Moqul 


442 


Navajo 


600 


™m* 


232 


Rloe Station 


88 


8alt River 


16 


San Carlos 




60 


flan Xavfer 


7 


41 


Truxton Canyon 


27 


Western Navajo 




48 








Total 


39,412 


10,915 


1,422 


4,821 


2,362 


7,360 


663 


1,962 




California: 

Btehop 


1,355 
217 
651 
794 

1,000 

1,251 
613 
640 
213 

1,528 
412 
693 


108 
152 
310 
600 

30 
301 
379 
202 

13 
525 
107 
236 


33 
3 
37 
32 
10 
35 
16 
16 


68 
4 
76 
82 
13 
74 
25 
11 


6 

5 

198 

50 


6 

6 

410 

60 




8 


Campo 




5 


Fort*BidweU 


84 
20 


94 


Fort Yuma..... *..... . ,*, 


90 


Greenville 




Boona Valley 


2 
9 
11 
8 
17 
24 
14 


15 
41 
11 
8 
35 
26 
22 




31 


u3B\ J 




5 


Palm 


4 


7 


Peohanga 


s 


Round valley....... . , 


15 
8 
18 


15 

4 
31 


8 
2 

1 


14 


Soboba 


16 


Voloan* 


4 






Total 


9,367 


2,982 


223 


353 


339 


640 


64 


906 






Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 


610 
360 


178 
180 


1 
46 




17 
55 


75 
55 


4 


10 


SouthernUte 


46 


66 








Total 


870 


358 


47 


46 


72 


130 


4 


66 






Idaho: 

Cceur d' Atone. 


857 
1,819 
1,413 


279 
700 

844 


21 
33 
180 


16 
92 
239 


7 
75 
40 


11 
360 
82 




7 


Fort Hall 


16 

16 


69 


Fort Lepwai. ....... , iA 


34 






Total 


4,069 
365 


1,823 
215 


234 
31 


347 
72 


122 
75 


453 

120 


81 
35 


100 


Iowa: Sao and Fox 


88 






Kansas: 

Klokspoo.... ;.,. L 


590 
755 


90 
700 


7 
16 


7 
32 


45 
7 


59 
7 




82 


Potawatoml* 


4 


8 






Total 


1,345 


790 


23 


39 


52 


66 


4 


85 






Michigan: 

Bay Hills 

Chippewa, Lake Superior. . 


248 
1,097 


115 
500 


2 

4 


4 
4 










6 


5 




6 








Total 


1,345 


615 


6 


8 


5 


5 




5 








Minnesota: 

Fonddu Lao 


978 
809 

1,735 
675 
800 

1.456 


201 
286 
764 
450 

•815 
963 
128 

2,525 


14 
11 

184 
43 
6 
38 
15 

201 


14 

6 

611 

72 

6 

222 

13 

1,000 


10 


10 


8 


2 


Grand Portage 




Leech I*ko.~ 


in 


475 


2 


UO 


N*ttT*v* i 




Pipestone (Birch cooley) . . . 


62 
356 

1 
492 


135 
615 

1 
1,600 


27 
45 


86 
85 


Vermillion Lake 


1 


White Berth 


900 


90S 






Total 


11,338 


5,631 


461 


1,943 


1,038 


2,736 


282 


475 







i Under San Carlos. 
» 1912 report. 



• includes pupils at Pipestone school. 
« Pupils from Minnesota and W 



I Wisconsin. 



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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONBB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



145 



Table 20. — Prevalence of tuberculosis and trachoma among Indians, fiscal year ended 

June 30, 1913— Continued. 





Popu- 
lation. 


Indians 
exam- 
ined 
for 
disease. 


Found 
afflicted 
with 
tuber- 
flulosia 


Esti- 
mated 
number 
having 
tubercu- 
losis, all 
forms. 


Found 
afflicted 

with 
tra- 
choma. 


Esti- 
mated 
num- 
ber 
having 

tra- 
choma. 


Treatment of 
trachoma. 


States and euperintendenoies. 


Cases 

operated 

upon. 


Cases 






but not 






operated 
upon. 


Montana: 

Rtackfmt , 


2,843 
1,008 
2,311 
1,195 
1,867 
1,433 


1,162 

070 

160 

1,000 

1,070 

650 


496 
138 
19 
367 
235 
109 


606 

166 
199 
250 
290 
400 


209 
431 
7 
800 
149 
887 


450 
431 
66 
360 
225 
500 




200 


Crow 


143 

1 


70 


Flathead 


7 


Fort Belknap 


250 


Fort Peek... 


07 
20 


47 


Tongue River 


867 






Total 


11,331 


4,724 


1,366 


1,822 


1,543 


2,011 


231 


1,010 






Nebraska: 

Santee 


1,479 
1,099 


504 

115 


14 
38 


350 
94 


14 
60 


600 
86 




14 


Winnebago 


2 


24 






Total 


2,578 


079 


52 


444 


70 


686 


2 


88 






Nevada: 

Fallon 


415 
337 
113 
609 
508 
579 


123 
173 
70 
358 
300 
160 


14 
60 
15 
7 

89 
10 


41 
110 

35 

7 

205 

39 


286 
123 
29 
366 
55 
17 


208 
222 
52 
430 
135 
144 


5 


80 


Fort McDermltt 


72 


Moapa River 


4 

78 


10 


Nevada 


86 


walker River 


26 


Western Shoshone 




18 








Total 


2,550 


1,184 


195 


437 


874 


1,180 


87 


240 






New Mexico: 

Albuquerque Pueblos 

JloarlDa... 


4,053 
009 
029 
2,085 
8,000 
3,473 
1,010 


980 
342 
130 
213 
482 
450 
325 


60 
70 
10 

8 
28 
47 

3 


75 
73 
20 
40 
1,766 
170 
2 


204 
35 
15 
13 
191 
566 
12 


500 

40 

30 

1,406 

3,000 

1,730 

30 


100 



79 
14 


Mesoalero 


15 


Pueblo Bonito 


5 
21 

1 
2 


2 


Sen Juan 


170 


Santa Fe Pueblos 


566 


Srtil 


8 






Total 


21,725 
2,109 


2,928 
800 


224 
13 


2,152 
22 


1,030 
24 


0,801 
133 


141 


864 


North Carolina: Cherokee 


24 








North Dakota: 

FortBerthold 


1,108 

999 

8,415 

2,950 


500 

2,219 

2,400 

160 


26 
15 
467 
13 
11 


25 
225 
852 

13 


166 
175 
459 
173 
17 


161 
375 
680 
200 


124 
42 
54 
98 
12 


10 


Fort Totten 


8 


Standing Rock 


60 


Turtle tfountain 




Wahpeton 


5 










Total 


8,538 


5,279 


521 


1,115 


979 


1,410 


326 


68 






Oklahoma: 

Cantonment. 


774 

1,247 

4,214 

2,038 

449 

800 

812 

151 

057 

578 


425 
909 
720 
150 

65 
365 
227 

41 
325 
173 


23 

50 
168 

27 
8 
6 
2 

38 
6 

20 


221 
106 
863 
171 

26 

24 
8 

42 
6 

63 


46 
149 
400 
20 
30 
60 
47 
20 
300 
146 


225 
400 
1,500 
450 
400 
85 
70 
85 
300 
250 




45 


Cheyenne and Arapaho 


33 
20 

1 

62 
60 

1 


98 
150 


Osage.. , 4 


15 


Otoe 


60 


Pawnee 




Ponca 


46 


Red Moon 


4 


Sao and Fox 




26 






146 


Seneca 






Shawnee 


1,655 






22 




«680 


130 


«92 










Total 


13,235 


3,400 


848 


1,551 


1,222 


4,461 


207 


079 






Oregon: 

Klamath 


1,112 
3,000 

429 
1,124 

749 


480 


68 


34 

2,000 

65 

72 

234 


80 

% 

26 

1 


80 
2,000 
10 
60 
10 




30 


Roseburg * 






Silets.... 


296 
365 
450 


48 
66 
131 




8 


Umatilla 




26 


Warm Springs 




1 








Total 


0,414 


1,596 


288 


2,405 


70 


2,160 




64 









» No examination* 
15036°— int 1913— vol 2 10 



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146 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Tablb 20.— Prevalence of tubercuUme and trachoma among Indiana, fiscal year ended 

June $0, 1913— Continued. 





Popu- 
lation, 


Indians 
exam- 
ined 
for 
fllpomo 


Found 
afflicted 
with 
tuber- 
culosis. 


Esti- 
mated 
number 
having 
tubercu- 
losis, all 
forms. 


Found 
afflicted 

with 

tra- 


Esti- 
mated 

be?" 
having 

tra- 
ohoma- 


Treatment of 
trachoma. 


States and supermtendondeB, 


operated 
upon. 


Cases 

treated 
but not 






operated 
upon. 






Sooth Dakota: 

Canton Asylum 




57 

1,363 

600 

1444 

250 

4,460 

2,200 

500 

420 


11 
468 
49 
16 
38 
798 
408 

no 

61 


5 

468 
65 
11 
53 
1,250 
465 
243 
61 


8 
807 
143 
89 
20 
213 
220 
110 
210 


7 

650 

195 

89 

40 

229 

600 

600 

1,440 




1 


Cheyenne River. 


2,618 

078 

282 

472 

6,940 

5,301 

2,083 

1,791 


23 


155 


Crow Creek 


85 


Flandrean 


54 


85 


Lower Brule 


20 


Pine Ridge 


4 

25 
83 
48 


168 


Rosebud.... 


185 


Sbseton* 


10 


Yankton 


74 






Total 


20,555 


10,294 


1,039 


2,611 


1,320 


3,850 


232 


668 






Utah: 

Bhivwlts 


130 
1,185 


HI 
580 


8 
33 


8 
60 


119 
135 


128 
300 


8 
26 


78 


Uintah and Ouray 


100 






Total 


1,315 


691 


86 


63 


254 


428 


34 


178 






Washington: 

Colville 


2,285 
8,071 
708 
637 
1,494 
8,052 


519 
388 
228 
600 
656 
600 


23 

18 
8 
47 
67 
31 


763 
34 
22 

47 

71 

1,120 


28 
32 


750 
32 


1 


27 


Cushmsn . . . . 


33 


Neah Bay 






Spokane ~. 


67 
78 
81 


67 
150 
500 


8 


64 


TSihvlip 


62 


Yakima. 


15 


40 






Total 


11,242 

291 
1,252 
2,298 

706 
1,192 
2,422 

501 
1,268 


2,991 


194 


2,067 


286 


1,490 


10 


226 






Wisconsin: 

Carter 


8 
996 

788 
210 
510 
8 
850 


6 
106 
48 
81 
56 

8 
87 


22 

118 
67 
31 
99 

150 
87 
61 










Hayward 


35 
50 
46 
6 

r 


42 
70 
65 
6 
2 




25 


Keshena 




50 


Lao du Flambeau 


4 


86 


LaPomte 


2 


Oneida 




2 


Red Cliff 




1 


Tomah '...... ............. 






















Total 


9,930 
1,715 


2,870 
450 


341 
48 


630 
161 


138 
225 


185 
857 


4 
20 


116 


Wmrnfrur; ffhOfthOPe, 


300 


y ** 




Grand total 


181,874 


61,201 


8,012 


23,099 


12,106 


37,068 


2,375 


7,358 





* Inolodei pupils at Flandrean school. 



• Only items reported. 



SUMMARY. 



Of 61,201 Indians reported by superintendents as examined for disease, 13.09 per cent were found afflicted 
with tuberculosis and 19.78 per cent with trachoma. 

Of 181,374 Indians reported upon by superintendents, 12.73 per cent are estimated to have tuberculosis 
and 20.44 par cent tzaohoma. 



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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN APFAXBS. 147 

Tablb 21. — HotpUala and tanatoria in Indian Service, fiscal year ended June SO, 1913. 





Agency 

or school, 

hospital, or 

sanatorium. 


1 
I 

56 


Character 
of con- 
struction, 




*d 

II 


During fiscal year 1913. 


id 


States and superiD- 
tendencies. 


1 
1 


I 

3 

s 


1 


1 

P 


Si 

•- — 


(So, 


Arizona: 

Fort Apache 

Do.. ..... 


Agency.... 
School..... 
T ..do , 


1 

n 

i 

i 
i 

i 

l 
1 

t 
i 
l 

l 
I 

5 

t 
1 

3 

1 

1 

1 

(') 
1 

~T 

t 

i 
i 
i 

i 
i 

i 

<? 

i 

5 

1 

1 

T 


Brick... 

Stone. . . 
...do.... 
Frame. . 
Brick... 

Frame. . 
Adobe. , 
Stonn . . . 
Brick... 
Stone... 


12 
10 
8 

10 
40 
40 
GO- 
TO 

a 

15 
S 


13 
12 


1 
1 

eg 
§i 


16 
13 
63 

M 


4 

■ 
67 
SI 


..... 


4 

6 
68 
31 


12 

7 


Fort Mojave...... 




Leupp... . , 


...do h .. 




Mogul ...♦ 


...(to,.-.... 

Sanatorium 
School..,.. 

■ *.do 

...do .. 

...do,..*... 




Navajo 


i 

i 

m 


294 

son 

m 
m 

m 

134 
42 


299 
314 

107 
148 

fie 

134 
42 


273 
511 

50 

148 
49 

133 
41 


e 

3 

3 

...... 

1 


379 
514 

53 

145 
59 

134 
42 


30 


Phoenix— G « u - 

Phoenix, ..„.• 

1'ima, i, 


55 


Rke Station 

Ttuxton Canyon.. 
Wee tern Navajo.. 




Total ..... 


277 


74 


1,407 


1,411 


1.373 


11 


1.3*7 


94 




School 

...do .. 

...do 

. . .do. ...... 

. . .do. . . 


Frame . . 
...do.... 
...do.... 

..do.... 

Brfc*... 




California: 

Fort Bid well 

Fort Yuma 

Greenville... . 

Hoopa Valley .... 
Ghermon lusti- 
tut©. 
Total.,... 


lfl 
25 
12 
A 
100 




M 
175 
74 
Si 

■11.4 


36 
175 
77 

31 
470 


34 

172 
73 
31 

471 


3 

"'i' 
..... 


36 
172 

76 
31 
473 


I 

l 
.... 


153 


is 


780 


798 


781 





7ST 


11 




School..... 
Sanatorium 


Stone. . . 
Frame. . 




Fort Hall 


■ 
100 


'"« 


50 
142 


59 

182 


49 

33 


i 

4 


50 

37 




Fort Lapval 


145 


Total 


106 
70 

24 


10 
4 

3 


192 
529 

340 


332 
533 

343 


82 
530 

342 


3 

i 


87 
533 

343 


145 


Kansas; Haskell In- 
stitute. 

Michigan: Mount 
Pleasant. 


School. ... . 
...do , 

...do „ 


Brick... 

...do.... 

Stone... 
Frame,. 

..do 


1 


Minnesota: 

Pipestone .... 


12 

f 
35 


1 
1 
U 


200 

72 

375 


201 

73 

389 


300 

73 
370 


" ++ 7 


200 

73 

377 


1 


Vermillion Lake.. 
White Earth 


...do 

Agency,,.. 


.„„ 


Total 


m 


m 


§47 


663 


043 


7 


650 


13 




Agency 

School..... 


Frame.. 
Log'.... 

Frame.. 
...do.... 

...do... 
Adobe.. 

Frame.. 
Tent,... 
Brick... 
...do.,.. 




Montana: 

Crow .... 

Fort Feck 


s 


5 

i 


106 
12S 


113 

129 


111 
12* 


...., 


111 

129 


2 


Total.. 


n 

90 
11 


r, 

1 

3 


23fi 
349 
243 


242 

350 
346 


239 
350 
174 


1 
...... 


240 
350 
175 


1 


Nebraska: Genoa..,. 
Nevada: Carson 


School..... 
...do....... 

...do 

Sanatorium 

School 

Sohoof."."." 
...do....... 


ii 


New Mexico: 

Albuquerque 

Albuquerque 

Pueblos. 
Jicarilla 


U 

26 

8 
10 

8 
40 


...... 


509 
15 

is 

10 
142 

m 


503 
17 

35 

10 
142 
209 


503 
S 

34 
5 

142 
200 


1 
1 


503 

8 

35 

6 
142 
209 


,...,£ 


Mescalcro , 


4 


Ban Juan ......... 




BantaFe.. 




Total ..... 


135 


2 


914 


916 


901 


2 


90& 


13 




School . 

Agency 


Brick... 
Frame., 




Norm Dakota: 
Fort Totteo 
Standing Rook... 


10 
Id 


""i* 


213 


213 
57 


313 
84 


""V 


213 
37 




Tot*!....,....,. 


90 


6 


294 


.100 


297 


3 


300 










■ 



* In process of construction. 



* A large room is used when needed. 



• Temporary. 



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148 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Tablb 21. — Hospitals and sanatoria in Indian Service, fiscal year ended June SO, 1913 — 

Continued. 



States and superin- 
tendencies. 



Agency 

or school, 

hospital, or 

sanatorium. 



Character 
of con- 
struction. 



Daring fiscal year 1913. 



1 






% 

U 

tfo, 



Oklahoma: 

Cheyenne and 
Arapaho. 

Chiloooo 

Osage 

• Rea Moon 

Soger 



School. 



.do. 
.do. 



Agency. 
School.. 



Frame.. 

Stone... 
Frame.. 
..do.... 
Brick... 



15 
0) 



100 
488 

w i 

25 



100 
498 

25 



100 

479 
0) 



( ! ). 



100 

479 

25 



19 



0) 



Total 

Oregon: Salem 

Pennsylvania: Car- 



South Dakota: 

Canton Asylums, 
Cheyenne River. , 

Flandreau 

Lower Brule 

Rapid City 



School 

..do 



Agency. 

..do 

School.. 

Agency... 

School.... 



Brick... 
..do 



..do. 

Frame.. 

..do.... 

..do.. 

Brick... 



70 



609 
177 
538 



199 
653 



604 
187 
534 



605 
190 
537 



19 
9 
16 



8 

273 

122 

10 

84 



60 
274 
124 
10 
84 



3 
272 
111 

9 

84 



8 

272 

111 

10 

84 



52 
... 



Total. 



122 



65 



497 



652 



479 



Tulalip. 



School., 
do.... 



.do. 



Total. 



Wisconsin: 
Hayward.. 



School. 



Lao du Flambeau 
Oneida 



.do. 



Frame 

...do.... 

...do.. 



738 
119 
109 



738 
119 
109 



729 
119 
109 



485 



729 
119 
109 



59 



966 



966 



957 



957 



Briok... 
Frame 
..do.... 
..do.. 



613 
86 



614 
101 



613 

84 



614 
88 



62 



52 



48 



13 



Total 

Wyoming: Shoshone. 



Agency. 



Grand total.. 



Stone... 



16 



751 




767 
6 



745 

4 



296 



9,475 



9,771 



9,231 



62 



761 
6 



16 
1 



478 



COMPARISON. 


Total 1912. 




■53 

50 
5 
4 




1,256 
1,268 


258 
330 


9,257 
8,078 
•4,176 
•2,198 


9,615 
8,408 


9,141 
7,940 


68 
65 


9,209 
8,005 


806 


Total* 1911 






408 


Total' 1900* 








Total, 1888 T 









































t Not reported. 

• Temporary. 

• Asylum for insane Indians. 
« Not used. 

• Does not include rooms in dormitories used for ill pupils. 

• Includes rooms in dormitories used for ill pupils. 
' Only items reported. 

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169 



Table 26.— Location, capacity, a 



attendance, etc., of school*, during fiscal year 
June 30, 1913. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees.! 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Arizona: 

Camp Verde 


2 
3 


30 
80 


37 
84 


31.9 
71.0 


Day. 

Reservation boarding. 


Colorado River 






Fort Apache snperintend- 
ency— 
Fort Apache 


6 
2 
2 
2 


153 
42 
50 
40 
20 

20 


225 
46 
53 
42 
16 

21 


200.8 
40.6 
40.3 
39.7 
14.0 

15.9 


Do. 


Canyon ,.*,** 


Day. 
Do. 


Cibecue 


East Fork 


Do. 


Cibecne 


Mission day; Evangelical Lu- 
theran. 
Do. 


East Fork 










Total 


12 


325 


403 


351.3 








Port Mojave 


5 
1 
2 


200 
35 
22 


197 
31 
20 


192.1 
23.0 
14.0 


Nonreservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Havasupai- - 


KafW>.. 






Leopp superintendency— 
Leupp 


3 


63 
20 


69 
25 


63.5 
19.3 


Reservation boarding. 
Mission boarding; independ- 
ent. 


Tokshaeo 






Total 


3 


83 


94 


82.8 








Mogul superintendency— 



3 
3 
5 
4 
4 


120 
65 
65 
156 
100 
90 


130 
51 
55 

124 
81 
96 


107.3 
48.7 
49.9 
95.6 
71.0 
87.5 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Dc. 


BacabL 


Chimopovy 


Oraibi*..." 


Do. 


Folacca 


Do. 


Second Mesa. 


Do. 






Total 


25 


596 


537 


460.0 








Navajo superintendency— 


9 
5 
5 


240 
62 

150 
40 
35 
40 

150 


281 
77 

135 
35 
35 
56 

138 


260.5 
76.0 

111.7 
29.6 
30.0 
54.8 

116.1 


Reservation boarding. 
Do. 


ChlnT^e. T T 


Tohatchl , 


Do. 


Cornfields. 


Day. 

Mission day; Presbyteriar. 

Mission boarding; Christian 

Reformed. 
Mission boarding; Catholic. 


Oanado. -,-, 


Behoboth 




Rt. Michaels. 








Total 


21 


717 


757 


678.7 








phoenix . . . . , 


19 


700 


785 


647.1 


Nonreservation boarding? 






Pima snperintendency— 
PimaT. 


8 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 


218 
36 
36 
40 
40 
36 
40 
35 

236 


224 
36 
47 
43 
34 
35 
49 
44 

217 


203.1 
19.4 
35.5 
32.6 
32.4 
17.4 
36.1 
22.4 

200.9 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Blackwater 


Casa Blanca 


Gile Crowing , 


Do. 


Maricopa ~ 


Do. 


Sacaton 


Do. 


Ran tan 


Do. 


Rt. Ann's. . , r , - 


Mission day; Catholic. 
Mission boarding and day; 
Catholic. 


St. John's 








Total 


19 


716 


729 


599.8 








Rice Station. 

Salt River superintendency— 
Salt River 


6 

2 
2 
2 


216 

30 
40 
30 


227 

47 
40 
30 


204.4 

35.7 
32.2 
23.2 


Reservation boarding. 

Day. 
Do. 
Do. 


Camp McDowell. 

Leon 






Total 





100 


117 


91.1 









* Includes teachers, disciplinarians, housekeepers, and 



Digitized by 



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170 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June SO, 1913 — Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Arizona— Continued. 

Ban Carlos superintendency— 
Ban Carlos 


5 


60 
28 


129 
36 


97.4 
31.4 


1*7- 

Mission day; Evangelical Lu- 
theran. 


Globe 






Total 


5 


88 


165 


128.8 








San Xavier superintend- 
ency— 
Ban Xavter. T , , , T , . T 


3 
2 


155 
35 
140 


139 
60 
146 


119.9 
31.3 
97.8 


Day. 
Do. 


Tucson 


Tucson Mission 


Mission boarding; Presbyte- 
rian. 






Total 


5 
3 


330 
100 


345 
80 


249.0 
66.7 




Tmxton Canyon .,-,-,, 


Reservation boarding. 




Western Navajo superin- 
tendency— 
Western Navajo 


4 
2 


88 
35 


126 
44 


95.6 
32.6 


Do. 


Moencopi. . . J7. 


Day. 




Total 


6 


123 


170 


128.2 








Total Arlfona 


143 


4,461 


4,778 


4,019.9 








California: 

Bishop superintendency— 
Bishop 


2 
2 
2 


36 
25 
25 


59 
21 
14 


33.4 
14.0 
9.9 


Do. 


Bis Pine 


Do. 


Independence. .......... 


Do. 


* 




Total 


6 

_ _ 


86 
30~ 


94 
~2f 


57.3 








Campo - r .,..,... , 


21.1 


Do. 






Fort Bidwell superintend- 
ency— 
FortBIdwell 


4 
1 
2 


98 
24 
26 


95 
17 
25 


87.4 
8.4 
14.7 


Nonreservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Alturas 


Likely 






Total 


7 


148 


137 


110.5 








Port Yuma. 


4 
4 
7 

1 
2 


180 
90 
146 

30 
30 
100 


117 
104 
187 


105.2 
89.3 
148.9 


Reservation boarding. 
Nonreservation boarding. 
Reservation boarding. 


Greenville 


Hoopa Valley 




Malki superintendency— 


20 
22 
113 


16.7 

16.5 

102.1 


Day. 

Do. 
Mission boarding; Catholic, 


Martinez 

Bt. Bonlfaw (Banning) 


**' 




Total 


3 


160 


155 


135.3 








Pala superintendency— 
Pala 


2 
2 


40 
30 


26 
23 


21.5 
16.4 


Day. 
Do. 


LaJolla 






Total 


4 

1 


70 
30 


49 
13 


37.9 
10.9 

103.3 
8.3 
17.3 
22.4 




Pechangs 


Do. 






Round Valley superintend- 
ency — 
tfound Valley 


4 

1 

1 
2 


135 
18 
25 
30 


121 
16 
32 
34 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Manchester. ." 


TTWfth 


Upper I*ake 


Do. 






Total 


8 
15 


208 
550 


203 
700 


151.3 
555.0 




Bherman 


Nonrwwrvation boarding. 






Soboba superintendency— 
Soboba 


2 
2 


25 
25 


12 
10 


10.4 
9.7 


Day. 
Do. 


Cahuilla 






Total 


4 


50 


22 


20.1 









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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



171 



Tablb 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June SO, 19 IS— Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


California — Continued. 

Tule River superintend- 
ency— 
Tule River 


2 

1 


30 
36 


19 
39 


12.1 
18.3 


Day. 
Do. 


Auberry 






Total 


3 


66 


58 


30.4 








Volcan superintendency— 
Volcan , 


1 
2 


30 
24 


26 
11 


22.7 
10.6 


Do. 


Capitan Grande 


Do. 






Total 


3 


54 


37 


33.3 








Total California 


71 


1,868 


1,898 


1,506.5 




Colorado: 

Navajo Spring*, 


2 


20 


24 


15.9 


Do. 






Southern Ute superintend- 
ency — 
Southern Ute 


3 
2 


45 
30 


56 
25 


45.6 
17.7 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Allen 




Total 


5 


75 


81 


63.3 








Total Colorado 


7 


95 


105 


79.2 




Idaho: 

Coeur d'Alene superintend- 
ency— 
De Smet 




80 
100 


87 
45 


59.6 
24.3 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 
Do. 


St. Joseph's 










Total 




180 


132 


83.9 










Fort Hall superintendency— 
Fort Hall 


7 


160 
30 


184 
23 


165.5 
21.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Mission boarding: Episcopal. 


Good Shepherd. 


m 






Total 


7 


190 


207 


186.5 








Fort Lapwai superintend- 
ency— 
Fort Lapwai 


3 
1 


100 
30 


143 
31 


93.0 
10.9 


Reservation boarding (sanato- 
rium). 
Day. 


Kamiah 




Total 


4 


130 


174 


103.9 








Total Tda^«. „ ....... 


11 


500 


513 


374.3 








Iowa: 

Sac and Fox superintend- 
ency — 
Fox 


2 
2 


40 
20 


32 
20 


17.2 
13.4 


Do. 


Mesquakie -.,,,., 


Do. 






Total 


4 


60 


52 


30.6 








Kansas: 

HaskelL 


23 

3 
1 


650 

71 
40 


797 

90 
28 


635.1 

69.5 
12.7 


Nonreservatkra boarding. 
Reservation boarding. 


Kickapoo superintendency— 
Rjckapoo 


Great fcemaha 


Day. 




Total 


4 


111 


118 


82.2 








Potawatomi superintend- 
ency— 

Rlanrlfn 


2 
2 
2 


40 
30 
30 


20 
30 
23 


5.7 
17.5 
11.3 


Day. 
Do. 


Kewtmkah 


Witcheway 


Do. 






Total 


6 


100 


73 


34.5 








Total Kansas 


33 


861 


988 


751.8 





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172 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June SO, 1918— Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Michigan: 

Bay Mills 


2 


32 


46 


31.4 


Day. 




Chippewa, Lake Superior 
superin tendency — 
Baraga (Holy Name) 




152 
200 


82 
138 


22.5 
133.0 


Mission boarding and day; 

Catholic. 
Mission boarding; Cathoifc. 


Harbor Springs (Holy 




Childhood). ~ 






Total 




352 
325 


220 
363 


155.5 
311.2 




Moiifit Pleasant 


10 
12 


Nonreservatton boarding. 




Total Michigan 


700 


629 


498.1 




Minnesota: 

Cass T#ake 


2 
2 
2 


40 
30 
20 


51 
43 
21 


42.6 
20.2 
11.2 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Fond du Lac 


ftrand Portage. 






Leech Lake superintend- 
ency— 
Leech Lake 


4 
2 
2 
2 


54 
24 
29 
24 


110 
12 
21 
28 


83.1 
8.8 

12.0 
7.9 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Old Agency 


Squaw Point 


Sugar Point 


Do. 






Total 


10 
2 


131 
35 


67 


111.8 
44.9 




NettLake 


Day. 




Pipestone superintendency— 
Pipestone 


6 
2 


225 
36 


228 
20 


197.4 
13.8 


Nonreservation boarding. 


Birch Cooley 


Day. 




Total 


8 


261 


248 


211.2 








Red Lake superintendency— 
Red Lake 


4 
3 


74 
40 
70 


104 
60 
103 


87.3 
49.7 
69.2 


Reservation boarding. 


Cross Lake 


Do. 


St.Mary'8 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 








Total 


7 
5 


184 
110 


267 
137 


206.2 
112.1 




Vermillion Lake 


Reservation boarding. 






White Earth superintend- 
ency— 
White Earth 


6 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


130 
53 
43 
30 
45 
30 
36 
30 

130 


166 
65 
69 
28 
35 
22 
99 
30 

118 


130.6 
39.4 
51.8 
15.0 
23.4 
16.4 
56.1 
20.2 
98.6 


Reservation boarding. 


Pine Point 


Do. 


Wild Rice River 

Elbow Lake 


Do. 
Day. 
Do. 


Portervflle 


Round Lake 


Do. 


White Earth 


Do. 


Twin Lake 


Do. 


St. Benedict's 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 








Total 


22 


527 


632 


451.5 








Total Minnesota 


60 


1,338 


1,637 


1,211.7 




Montana: 

Blackfeet superintendency— 
Blackfeot (Cut Bank).... 
Browning 


3 

1 
1 
2 


62 
60 
16 
30 
145 


101 
40 
18 
28 

113 


69.3 
28.0 
12.2 
8.7 
83.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Burd 


Do. 


Cut Finger 


Do. 


H"ly Family 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 








Total 


7 


313 


300 


201.2 








Crow superintendency— 
Crow 


4 

2 


91 
51 
50 
30 

35 
25 


74 
42 
35 
19 

27 
23 


54.5 
31.5 
32.1 
15.5 

26.3 
16.9 


Reservation boarding. 


Pryor Creek 


Do. 


Lodge Grass 


Mission day; Baptist. 


Black Lodge 




Day; American Missionary 


Reno 




Association. 
Do. 


St. Anne's 




Mission day; Catholic. 



Digitized by 



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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 173 

Table 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June SO, 19 IS— Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Montana— Continued. 

Crow superiu tendency— Con. 
San Xavier 




125 
• 30 


43 
12 


42.0 
11.9 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 


WycJa. 




Mission day; Baptist. 








Total 


6 


437 


275 


230.7 








Flathead superintendency— 
Flathead 


2 


30 
300 


31 
199 


14.0 
167.0 


Day. 

Mission boarding; Catholic. 


St. Ignatius 






Total 


2 


330 


230 


181.0 








Fort Belknap superintend- 
ency— 

Fort HVflknap T 


3 
2 


47 
37 
160 


67 
39 
93 


34.6 
22.1 
91.0 


Reservation boarding. 

Day. 

Mission boarding; Catholic. 


Lodge Pole .'. 


St. Paul's 






Total 


5 


244 


199 


147.7 








Fort Peck superintendency i— 
Fort Peck 


5 
2 
2 
2 


95 
30 
30 
30 
40 


126 
24 
28 

18 
65 


100.3 
16.7 
21.2 
14.9 
53.2 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


No.l 


No.2 


No.3 


Do. 


Wolf Point 


Mission boarding and day; 
Presbyterian. 






Total 


11 


226 


261 


206.3 








Tongue River superintend- 
ency— 
Tongue Ri^er , 


4 
2 
2 


69 
35 
32 
60 


87 
53 
42 
49 


64.0 
34.9 
26.4 
48.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Birney 


Lamedeer 


St. Labre's 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 






Total 


8 


196 


231 


173.3 








Total Montana 

Nebraska: 

Genoa 


39 
9 


1,745 
345 
125 


1,496 
415 
123 


1,140.2 
313.2 
108.2 


Nonreser ration boarding. 
Mission boarding and day; 


Santee superintendency— 
Santee Normal Training. 






Congregational." 


Winnebago superintend- 
ency— 
Decora 


2 


30 
122 


27 
53 


14.3 
38.6 


Day. 

Mission boarding; Catholic. 


St. Augustine 






Total 


2 


152 


80 


52.9 








Total Nebraska 

Nevada: 

Carson 


11 
7 


622 
286 


618 
294 


474.3 
235.7 


Nonreservation boarding. 




Fallon superintendency— 
Fallon. 


2 
2 


40 
25 


30 
17 


16.4 
8.9 


Day. 
Do. 


Lovelocks 






Total 


4 
2 


65 
80 


47 
49 


25.3 
35.7 




Fort McDermitt 


Do. 






Moapa River superintend- 
ency — 
Moapa River 


2 
2 


30 
25 


36 
6 


15.9 
4.7 


Day. 
Do. 


Las Vegas 






Total 


4 


55 


42 


20.6 








Nevada superintendency— 
Nevada 


4 
1 


70 
25 


77 
19 


77.0 
13.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Wadsworth 




Total 


5 


> 95 


96 


90.0 





1 Day school No. 4 not reported. 



Digitized by 



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174 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Tablb 26.— .Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1913 — Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Nevada— Continued. 
Walker RJ**r 


2 
4 


60 
65 


57 
67 


40.9 
63.3 


Day. 

Reservation boarding. 


Weston Shoshone 




Total Nevada 


28 
11 


706 
321 


652 
365 


511.5 
336.2 




New Mexico: 

Albuquerque 


Nonreservation boarding. 




Albuquerque Pueblos— 
A come. 


2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


32 
30 
60 
34 
25 
13 
65 
20 
60 
32 
125 


66 
33 
105 
47 
38 

35 
52 
36 
101 


28.5 
25.1 
63.8 
38.5 
25.6 

%.< 

26.1 
38.4 
30.2 
94.4 


Day. 
Do. 


Encinal 


Isleta. 


Do. 


Laguna 


Do. 


MoCarty's 


Do. 


Mesita. 


Do. 


Pagoate 


Do. 


Panje 


Do. 


Ben Felipe 


Do. 


Beama 


Do. 


Bernsdlllo 


Mission boarding; CathoUo. 








Total 


21 


501 


579 


426.0 








Jkarflla supertntendency— 
Jicarflla 


5 
2 


107 
30 


96 

28 


90.6 
24.4 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Do 




Total 


7 
4 
2 


137 
83 
25 


124 
109 
32 


115.0 
88.3 
25.0 




Mescalero 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Pueblo Benito 




Ban Juan supertntendency— 
Ban Juan 


5 
2 


150 
30 
30 

20 


169 
17 
30 

22 


15X3 
12.5 
26.6 

22.0 


Reservation boarding. 

Day. 

Mission boarding; Presbytar- 

rian. 
Mission boarding; Methodist 

Episcopal. 


Toadlene 


Liberty (Jewett) 


Navajo Mission 








Total 


7 


230 


238 


213.4 








Santa Fe supertntendency— 
Santa Fa 


12 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
S 
2 
2 
S 


300 

28 
120 
19 
25 
40 
70 
40 
30 
70 
75 


364 
22 
69 
14 
22 
22 
63 
35 
18 
119 
183 


333.9 
14.0 
40.1 
8.4 
17.2 
14.0 
47.2 
21.1 
13.8 
71.2 

176.8 


NonreseiTation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Cochiti 


James 


Ntmhe 


Do. 


Pfcurfe 


Do. 


Ban ndefonso. 


Do 


Ban Juan , , 


Do. 


Banta Clara 


Do. 


8ia 


Do. 


Taos 


Do. 


St. Catherine's. 


Mission boarding; Catholic 








Total 


32 


817 


931 


757.7 








^anr^r:. 


5 
2 


66 
35 
30 


90 
60 
29 


76.6 
39.5 
18.2 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 

Mission day; Christian Re- 
formed. 


Do 


Christian Reformed 






Total 


7 


131 


179 


134.2 








Total New Mexico 


01 


2,245 


2,557 


2,095.8 




North Carolina: 

Cherokee supertntendency— 
Cherokee 


5 
1 
2 

1 
1 


160 
40 
40 
20 
40 


199 
30 
36 
16 
32 


160.1 
14.6 
20.1 
8.1 
18.5 


Reservation boarding. 


Big Cove 


Day. 
Do. 


Bird town. 


Little Snow Bird 

Snow Bird Gap 


Do. 
Do. 






Total 


10 


300 


813 


221.4 





i Not in session. 



Digitized by 



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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



175 



Table 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance^ etc. t of schools, during fiscal year 

" June SO , 19 IS— Continued, 



Reservations and names of 
schools, 


Number 
offltn- 

[rtoym'*. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 

Hl-IiV. 


Average 
ntronil' 
once. 


Class of school and remarks. 


North Dakota; 

Bismarck 


3 


m 


OS 


71.1 


Nonreservatkin boarding. 






Fort Borthold sufierin tend- 
ency — 
Fort Bertbold 


4 
2 
3 
2 


75 
;tn 
30 
30 
13 


95 
27 
30 

m 

13 


18.7 
15.0 
23,6 
10.0 


Reservation boarding. 


No»L.» 


Day. 
Do, 


No. 2 , 


No.3. ..,,*.... 


Do. 


Congregational . . 


Mission boarding; Congrega- 






tional. 


Total... „.„.„ * 


10 
10 


17* 
333 


1S2 
407 


129, 11 
331.8 




Fort Totten ili«.-.i 


BowfTatioa boarding. 




Standing Rock superin tend- 
ency— 
Standing Rock ,, 


7 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


M 

40 
40 
:m 
40 
34 
30 
50 


232 
130 
3S 
40 
21 
23 
17 
15 
55 


188.5 
93.9 
29.6 
39. « 
14.7 
18.0 
121 
13.3 
37.4 


Do. 


Martin KeneL, , 


Do, 


Bullhead 


Day. 
Do. 


Cannon Ball- „ 

Grand Rlvar.... ,.♦...*. 


Little Oftk Crook 

Porcupine,. ,.,»»„„,< 


Do, 
Do. 


No. 1. . 


Do. 


Bt, RUiabeth'j 


Mission boarding; Episcopal, 






Total 


34 


529 


562 


437.0 




Turtle Mountain superin- 
tend ency— 
No.l„, m i 


2 
3 
3 
3 
3 


30 

30 
30 
30 
30 


73 
42 
5fl 
H 
43 


211 
18,5 
31.5 
31,8 
16.7 


Day. 
Do, 


No.2„.„.„„ 


No,3 ... 


Do, 


No. 4 „ 


Do, 


No.fi ..„„ 


Do, 






Total . -., 


10 

i 


150 
ISO 


302 

15a 


110.9 
139,0 




Wahpeton.,,, 


Nonreservation boarding. 






Total North Dakota... 
Oklahoma? 

Cantonment. . x llCj , 


63 
3 


1,430 
SO 


1,707 
94 


1,209.7 
73.0 


Reservation boarding. 




Cheyenne and Arapaho su- 
per in tendency — 
Cheyenne and Arapaho. . 
St. Luke's.. .„,,.. 


a 


140 
45 


lfl4 
35 


142.3 
33,9 


Do, 
Mission day; Eptsoopal. 








Total 


a 
ifi 


185 
600 


L99 
B57 


*?6,2 
534.9 




CbJQoceo,, „.*.„*...* 


Nonreservation boarding. 




Kiowa snporm tendency — 
Anadarko.......... 


a 
a 

6 

e 


175 
173 
147 
150 
50 


158 
172 
17« 
114 
43 


134.8 
161.2 
142.9 
103.0 
31.0 


Reservation boarding. 


Fort SIN .......... 


Do, 


Rainy Mountain. , 

Riverside, . .,.„.,.,...*.. 


Do. 
Do, 


Cache Creek 


Mission boarding- Reformed 
Presbyterian, 






Total.... 


23 


005 


6fi2 


572,9 








&nge superin tendency— 

Osage ...,,,, 

StYJohn'*, „„ 


7 


130 
05 
75 


124 

ie 

77 


109.3 
9.3 

5rt. 1 


Reservation hoarding. 
Mission boarding; Catholic. 
Do 


St. Loub's.... . . . m 










Total..., _ 


7 
4 

4 


270 
77 
74 


217 
75 
104 


174. e 

64,6 

07. 1 




Otoe .. 


Reservation boarding. 
Do, 


Pawnee,.....,..,.,., F 






Fooca supertntendeficy— 










Day. 

Reservation boarding and day* 

Day. 


Ponca 


fi 
1 


00 
28 


11* 
10 


01. 8 
9.3 


Tonkawa 




Total .„„.„.. 


ft 


113 
iNotina 


128 
Boston, 


101.0 






Digitized by VjOOQLC 



176 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



Table 26. — Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1913 — Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Oklahoma— Continued . 

Red Moon 


1 
5 

4 


66 
75 
90 


38 
84 
93 


24.3 
74.2 
75.6 


Day. 

Reservation boarding. 

Do. ^^ 


Sac and Fox 


Soger 






Seneca superintendency— 
Seneca 


4 


85 

45 


127 
36 


105.9 
33.9 


Do. 


St. Mary's 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 






Total 


4 


130 


163 


139.8 








Shawnee superintendency— 
Shawnee 


5 


110 
100 

100 


150 
64 

93 


103.1 
39.7 

74.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Mission boarding; Catholic 

Do. 


Sacred Heart (St. Bene- 


dict's)!. 
Sacred Heart(St.Mary's)» 










Total.... 


5 


310 


307 


216.8 








Total* 


87 


2,604 


2,821 


2,324.9 








Five Civiltoed Tribes- 
Cherokee Nation- 
Cherokee Orphan 

School. 
Hfldebrand 


5 

1 


75 
35 


91 
32 


65.8 
15.1 


Tribal boarding. 
Day. 




Total 


6 


110 


123 


80.9 








Creek Nation— 

E uchee 


6 
6 
6 
5 


100 
100 
90 
75 


167 
109 
143 
101 


111.3 
76.5 
77.9 
74.5 


Tribal boarding. 
Do. 


Kufeula. .... 


Nnyaka 


Do. 


Tnflahftssee. . . . 


Do. 






Total 

Seminole Nation— Meku- 
sukey. 


23 
6 


365 
100 


520 
115 


340.2 
89.3 


Do. 


Choctaw Nation- 
Armstrong Male 

Academy. 
Jones Male Academy. 
Tuskahoma. . . : 


5 

5 
6 
6 


100 

100 
100 
100 
80 

40 


123 

181 
168 
89 
88 

51 


103.4 

94.5 
107.0 
73.3 
77.0 

40.4 


Do. 

Do. 
Do. 


Wheelock Academy . 
Old Ooodland 


Do. 
Mission boarding; Presbyte- 
rian. 
Mission boarding; Catholic. 


St. Agnes Mission.... 








Total 


22 


520 


700 


495.6 








Chickasaw Nation— 
Bloomfleld Seminary 

Collins Institute 

ElMetaBondCoUege 


5 
3 


80 
60 
35 


99 
74 
16 


71.7 
46.0 
13.5 


Tribal boarding. 

Do. 
Private boarding. 








Total 


8 


175 


189 


131.2 








Choctaw and Chicka- 
saw Nations- 
Murray School of 




150 

55 

50 

160 
70 
30 


73 

47 
51 

96 
65 
10 


54.9 

27.2 
37.7 

70.3 
44.3 
7.0 


Do. 


Agriculture. 
Hargrove College 




Mission boarding; Methodist. 
Mission boarding; Presbyte- 
rian. 
Mission boarding; Catholic. 
Do. 


Oklahoma Presbyte- 




rian College. 
St. Agnes Academy.. 




St. Elizabeth's 




St. Joseph's 




Do. 








Total 




515 


332 


241.4 










Total Five Civilized 
Tribes. 


05 


1,785 


1,979 


1,378.6 




Total Oklahoma 


152 1 4,449 


4,800 


3,704.5 





» These schools are filled by Indian pupils from various tribes and reservations. 
» Exclusive Five Civilized Tribes. 



Digitized by 



Google 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



177 



Table 26.— Location, capacity, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
ended June SO, 1913— Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Oregon: 

Klamath saperta tendency— 
Klamath 


5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


70 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 


101 
18 
26 
18 
12 
84 


83.9 
10.3 
19.5 
11.7 
7.1 
22.1 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Modoc Point 


Yniimx .... 


No.l 


Do. 


No. 2 


Do. 


No.3 


Do. 






Total 


15 
17 


220 
650 


200 
684 


154.6 
615.6 




Attorn , x 


Nonresarvation boarding. 




snets sopertatendency— 
Silete 


1 
1 


30 
20 


42 

17 


14.8 
12.0 


Day. 
Do. 


Upper Farm 






Total 


2 


50 


59 


26.8 








Umatilla sopertatendency— 
Umatilla 


4 


03 
150 


111 

78 


77.8 
60.1 


Reservation boarding. 
Mission boarding; Catholic. 


St. Andrews (Kate 


Drexel). 




Total 


4 


243 


189 


137.9 








Warm Springs superintend- 
warm Springs 


4 
2 


100 
30 


109 
21 


100.3 
16.3 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 


Simnasho. . . 7. .......... . 




Total 


6 


130 


130 


116.6 








Total Oregon 


44 

25 


1,283 
737 


1,271 
982 


951.5 
798.5 




*p^TifiYivftiife.* ^Wilier 


Nonreservation boarding. 




8ooth Dakota: 

Cheyenne River superin- 
tandency— 
Cheyenne River 


9 
2 
2 
2 


200 
30 
22 
22 
75 


182 
17 
20 
23 
14 


162.4 
11.6 
17.1. 
17.9 
14.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


No. 2 


No.7 


No. 8 


Do. 


Oahe 


Mission boarding; Congrega- 
tional. 






Total 


15 


340 


256 


223.0 








Crow Creek superintend- 
ency— 
Crow Creek 


5 
1 


32 
25 
76 


97 
17 
64 


83.8 
13.0 
60.7 


Reservation boarding. 

Day. 

Mission boarding; Catholic 


Grace Day 


Immaculate Conception . 






Total 


6 
14 

4 
6 


182 
860 
84 
234 


168 
383 
83 
212 


147.5 
3704 
68.5 
171.3 




Ftandreau , 


Nonreservation boarding. 
Reservation boarding. 
Nonreservation boarding. 


Lower Brule 


Pierre 




Pine Ridge superintend- 
ency — 
Pine Ridge 


7 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


210 
30 
32 
30 
31 
33 
30 
30 
30 
33 
30 
26 
40 
25 
30 
19 
24 
24 
24 
83 
» 


235 
17 
28 
41 
' 31 
36 
21 
25 
35 
20 
16 
16 
27 
27 
56 
20 
34 
26 
25 
17 
M 


215i6 
12.1 
21.4 
28.3 
23.9 
26.6 

9.5 
17.8 
20.4 
17.5 

7.6 
12.9 

9.7 
16.4 
28.2 
13.1 
18.3 
15.2 
21.8 

9.9 
10.2 


Reservation boarding. 
Da 


No.3 


No. 4 


No. 5 


Do. 


No.6 


Do. 


No.7 


Da 


No.8 


Da 


No.9 


Da 


No. 10 


Da 


No. 11 


* Da 


No. 12 


Da 


No. 13 


Da 


No. 14 


Da 


No. 15 


Da 


No. 16 


Da 


No. 17 


Da 


No. 18 


Da 


No. 10 


Da 


No. 20 


Da j 


No. 21 


Dttniti7PrihvCaO( 


No. 22 







15036°— int 1913— vol \ 



-12 



178 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 26. — Location, ca\ 



, average attendance, etc., of schools, during fiscal year 
" June SO, 191S— Continued. 



Reservations and names of 
schools. 


Number 
of em- 
ployees. 


Capacity. 


Enroll- 
ment. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Class of school and remarks. 


Sooth Dakota— Continued. 
Pine Ridge superintend- 
ency— Continued . 
No. 23 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


30 
35 
30 
30 
33 
30 
33 
240 


36 
31 
23 
23 
25 
19 
18 
240 


25.2 
19.2 
15.3 
15.5 
13.7 
12.1 
10.1 
207.4 


Da 


No. 24 


No. 25 


Do. 


No. 28 


Do. 


No. 27 


Do. 


No. 28 


Do. 


No. 29 


Do. 


Holy Rosary 


Mission boarding; Catholic 






Total 


61 
10 


1,251 
208 


1,204 
285 


883.9 
252.6 




Rapid City 


Nonreservation boarding. 




Rosebud superintendency— 
Rosebud 


6 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 


200 
35 
20 
32 
33 
24 
29 
23 
25 
25 
24 
29 
25 
25 
20 
23 
25 
20 
21 
26 
27 
19 
70 

325 


197 
28 
24 
16 
87 
39 
27 
26 
16 
10 
18 
21 
20 
42 
21 
22 
18 
31 
29 
15 
18 
21 
73 

311 


141.8 
22.4 
21.6 
12.3 
27.1 
26.2 
19.4 
25.4 
13.3 
9.5 
17.9 
12.9 
18.4 
24.1 
19.5 
19.8 
15.8 
23.3 
26.3 
1L5 
15.4 
16.2 
73.0 

249.0 


Reservation boarding. 
Day. 
Do. 


Big White River 

Blackpipe 


Bull (5reek 


Da 


Corn Crfwk 


Da 


Cut Meat 


Da 


He Dog's Camp 


Da 


Ironwood * 


Da 


Little Crow's 


Da 


Little White River 

Lower Cut Meat 


Da 
Da 


Milk's Camp 


Da 


Oak Creek. ? 


Da 


Pine Creek 


Da 


Red Leal 


Da 


Ring TTinnder 


Da 


Rosebud 


Da 


Spring Creek 


Da 


tfpper Cut Meat 


Da 


Wnirlwind Soldier 

White Thunder 


Da 
Da 


White Lake 


Da 


St. Mary's 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 


St. Francis's 




Da 








Total 


47 

5 
2 
5 


1,133 

107 
60 
70 


1,060 

172 
81 
110 


862.1 

156.4 
51.5 
80.9 




Slsseton superintendency— 
Sissrton. , . « * . 


Reservation boarding. 
Nonreservation boarding. 
Reservation boarding. 


Sprlngftald 


"VW?mi 




Total South Dakota... 


174 


4,038 


4,034 


3,268.1 




Utah: 

Deep Creek 


1 
1 

4 


25 
40 

67 


24 

17 

72 


lfcO 

10.5 

53.6 


Do. 


Shivwits 


Uintah and Ouray- 
TTfutah . 


Reservation boarding. 




Total Utah 


6 


132 


113 


80.1 








Washington: 

Colville superintendency— 
No.3 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


30 
30 
25 
25 
25 
25 
90 
100 


48 
35 
31 
26 
8 
18 
82 
94 


27.2 
21.3 
19.8 
16.5 
5.9 
14.7 
29.5 
79.3 


Day f^ 
Da 


No. 4 


•No. 6 


Da 


No.6 


Do. ' 


No. 7 "... 


Do. 


No.9 


Da 


Sacred Heart Academy . . 


Mission boarding; Catholic. 
Da 


St Mary's 










Total 


12 


350 


292 


214.2 








Cushman superintendency— 
Cushman i . . 


7 

1 
1 
1 


350 
15 
28 
28 
70 


389 
12 
31 
25 
74 


338.3 
9.9 
22.0 
18.9 
62.0 


Nonreservation boarding. 
Day. 
Da 


Quests River 


flkokomfah 


Taholah 


Da 


St. George's 


Mission boarding; Catholic 








Total 


10 | 491 | 531 


451.1 





» Receives 197 pupils from other reserv*tiona^ tized by ( 



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*«i'f»Hi ni- mn ,i u ,. 1 1 , 



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Google 



180 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



Table 27. — School libraries, 
[Schools not listed have reported no library. Leaden indicate not reported.] 





Number of books in library. 


Circulation. 


Expend- 


States and schools. 


Text 
and 
refer- 
ence. 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total 


ed for 

books, 

fiscal year 

1913. 


Arizona: 

Colorado River 




227 
30 
113 


io* 


227 
150 
281 
262 
131 
131 
131 
1,600 
129 
204 
145 
23 
27 
238 
136 








$185.85 


Fort Apache 


120 
158 
262 
131 
131 
131 








142.89 


Leupp 








142.89 


Moqui 








281.94 


Navajo 












142.88 


Chin Lee 












142.88 


Tohatchi 












142.88 


Phoenix 


1,000 


600 








98.32 


Pima 


129 
148 
145 
7 
9 
127 
135 








142.88 


Rice Station 


40 


16 


30 


26 


55 


151.87 


San Carlos. - . 




Ban Xevier . T r * 


9 
12 
14 


7 

6 

97 


2 




2 




Tucson 




Truxton Canyon 










Western Navajo 








161.43 
















Total 


1,634 


1,445 


736 


3,816 


32 


25 


57 


1,726.71 




California: 

Bishop x 


39 

60 
182 

33 
127 
129 

60 

8 

131 

212 


31 


9 


79 
60 
213 
236 
284 
129 
237 
82 
131 
948 










Big Pine 


6 




6 




Fort Bid well 


21 
50 
119 


10 
153 
38 


148.75 


Fort Yuma 








142.89 


Greenville 


115 


38 


153 


129.99 


Hoopa Valley 


140.89 


vSEi v 


177 
20 


54* 










Pais 


5 


18 


23 




Round Valley 


142.88 


Sherman Institute. 


550 


186 


11 


60 


71 


296.10 






Total 


961 


968 


450 


2,399 


136 


116 


252 


1,001.50 




Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 




131 
22 
3 


36* 

2 


131 

205 

10 








142.89 


8outtiern*TJteT 


147 
5 


12 


22 


34 


264.68 


Allen 














Total 


162 
98 


156 
35 


38 


346 
183 


12 
16 


22 


34 
16 


407.57 


Idaho: Fort Hall.. 


316.23 






Kansas: 

Haskell 


383 
40 


483 
34 


518 
12 


1,384 
86 


2,135 
34 


2,463 
12 


4,598 
46 




Kickapoo 


21.41 






Total 


423 
160 


517 
143 


530 
141 


1,470 
444 


2,169 
15 


2,475 
80 


4,644 
45 


21.41 


Michigan: Mount Pleasant 








Minnesota: 

Cass I*ke, 




127 
160 
25 


2i* 


127 
202 
202 
128 
186 
270 
144 
125 
7 
22 
298 








159.98 


Leech Lake 


21 
177 
128 
134 
165 

40 


30 




30 


127.64 


Red Lake 


142.80 


Cross Lake 








142.80 


Vermillkm T^ke 


38 
66 
49 
50 
1 

20 
100 


14 
39 
55 
75 
6 
2 
53 


26 


7 


27 


142.80 


White Earth 


142.80 


Pine Point 










Porterville 


100 
2 


250 
4 


350 
6 


50.00 


Round T*Ve.. „_, . 






White Earth 






Wild Rice 


145 








142.80 












Total 


810 


636 


265 


1,711 


152 


261 


413 


1,052.07 




Montana: 

Blaokfeet— Cut Bank 




93 
133 
2 
142 
9 
19 
5 
10 
6 


21 
60 
5 

2* 

1 
5 
7 


114 

411 

14 

142 

666 

200 

16 

15 

25 


5 


6 


11 


142.80 


Crow 


218 
7 


142.80 


Flathead 








7.53 


Fort Belknap 








153.15 


Fort Peck 


657 

179 

10 


9 




9 


142.80 


No.l 




No. 2 








No.3 






::::::::!:::::::::: 


No. 4 


i.2 






i 



Digitized by 



Google 



BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Table 27.— School libraries— Continued. 



181 





Number of books in library. 


Circulation. 


Expend- 
ed for 
books, 

fiscal year 
19ll 


States and schools. 


Text 
and 
refer- 
ence. 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total. 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total 


Montana -Continued. 

Tongue River 


172 
141 


218 


78 


468 
141 








$142,89 


Lamedeer 
























Total 

Nebraska: Winnebago— Decora 


1,390 



637 
3 


179 
11 


2,212 
14 


14 
3 


6 
11 


20 
14 


732.24 






Nevada: 

Fort McDermttt 


21 
131 


22 


13 


56 

131 
50 
131 








14.48 


Nevada 








142.89 


Walker River. . 


27 


23 










Western Shoshone * 


131 








142.89 
















Total 


283 


49 


36 


368 








300.26 












New Mexico: 

Albuquerque 




129 
316 
51 
5 
137 
215 
139 


26* 

15 

4 

65* 

20* 


129 
383 
157 
135 
137 
330 
139 
162 








122.82 


JfcarJJJa 


41 
91 
126 




47 


47 


142.89 


Mescalero 






117.36 


Pueblo Bonito 








155.37 


flan Joan 








141.98 


Santa Fe 


50 










day schools 


63 




63 


133.49 


Ztmi 


142 


142.89 












Total 


450 
127 


992 


130 


1,572 
127 


63 


47 


no 


956.80 


North Carolina: Cherokm 


144.43 








* 








North Dakota: 
Bismarck . , , 


36 
121 
129 

27 
131 


60 
30 
66 
5 


4* 

17 
13 


96 
155 
212 

45 
131 


8 


9 


17 


0) 
142.89 


FortBerthold 


Standing Rock 








238.78 


Mar&nKenel 








45.00 


Turtle Mountain 








142.80 
















Total 


444 


161 


34 


639 


8 


9 


17 


560.56 






Oklahoma: 

Cantonment , 


108* 
135 
436 


3 

260 
617 

128 
7 


"**2i5* 
527 


HI 

610 

1,580 

128 
128 
131 
297 
165 
136 
259 
158 
412 
400 
131 


20 

40 

1,359 


"""ieo* 

1,126 


20 

200 

2,485 


140.97 


Cheyenne and Arapaho 

Chuocco /17T. 


142.89 
171.48 


Kiowa— 

Anadarko 


142.89 


FortSUl 


121 
131 
172 
144 
136 
56 
149 
215 
173 
131 








142.89 


Rainy Mountain 








142.80 


Riverside 


100 
16 


25 

5 








142.89 


Otoe 








142.89 


Pawnee 








83.97 


Poor*.. , . 


180 

i97* 

104 


23 
9 

*"*i23* 


49 


33 


82 


142 89 


Sac and Fox 


148*62 


Soger 


131 
50 


80* 


131 
130 


152.89 


Seneca 


126 00 


Shawnee 


120.90 
















Total* 


2,107 


1,612 


927 


4,646 


1,649 


1,399 


3,048 


1,945.06 




Five Civilised Tribes-- 
Armstrong., . ,,, 


55 

20 
22 
46 
16 


60 


21 


136 
20 
79 
66 
107 
43 
88 
177 
90 
194 
181 
142 


40 


21 


61 


61 81 


BloomAekl 




Cherokee 


50 
11 
71 
23 
29 
103 
14 
82 
53 
71 


7 
9 
20 
20 
18 

ii" 

27 
128 








51.50 


Collins 








35.64 


Bochfe..,.. 


34 


26 


60 


43.06 


Euisnla 


12.54 


Jones 


41 
74 
65 

85 










Meknsukey 










Nnvaka... 










TnllahaiwB , , t 


53 
48 
20 


39 
198 
56 


92 
246 

76 


2.50 


Tnakahoma . 


50.82 


Wheelock 


7i 


.72 






Total, Five Tribes 


495 


567 


261 


1,323 


195 


840 


635 


258.59 


Total, Oklahoma. 


2,602 


2,179 


1,188 


5,969 


1,844 


1,739 


3,583 


2,203.65 



i Belong to superintendent. 



a Exclusive of Five Civilized Tribes. 

Digitized by 



Google 



182 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Table 27. — School libraries — Continued. 





Number of books in library. 


Circulation. 


Expend- 


States and schools. 


Text 
and 
refer- 
ence. 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total. 


Liter- 
ature. 


Fiction. 


Total. 


ed (or 

books, 

fiscal year 

191& 


Oregon: 

Klamath. ± 




208 
628 


87* 


208 
615 
191 
174 
250 








$142.89 


Salem * 










18.00 


Siletx 


191 
76 
151 










fTmatflfe, 


68 
71 


30 
28 








142.89 


Warm Springs 


108 


72 


180 


16.88 






Total 


418 


875 
3,043 


145 
745 


1,438 
3,788 


108 
1,831 


72 


180 
2,730 


315.66 


Pennsylvania: Carlisle 


237.29 








Booth Dakota: 

Cheyenne River 


108 
213 
30 


45 
186 

60 
131 
106 


26 

75* 

80* 


179 
399 
165 
131 
499 
131 

131 
170 
131 
204 
290 
166 








142.89 


Crow Creek 








165.08 


FlAnrireart 










Lower Brule 








142.89 


Pierre 


314 
131 

131 
85 
131 
179 
100 
151 








23.50 


Pine Ridge 








158.33 


Circulating library among 
25 day schools 












158.33 


Rapid City 


10 


75 


10 


75 


85 


177.87 


Rosebud — 21 day schools 


142.89 


Sisseton 


9 
95 
12 


16 
95 
3 


25 


35 


60 


142.89 


RpringflAld 


41.50 


VimVtOfi. 








142.89 












Total 


1,573 
114 


653 


370 


2,596 
114 


35 


110 


145 


1,439.06 
142.89 


VUh: nintah .. 
















Washington: 

Colvlle 


129 
298 






129 
869 








142.89 


Cushman . , ,. 


258 


313 








142.89 


Spokane— 

No.l 










No. 2 


44 

75 
44 

35 
129 


36 
46 
45 


18 
29 
80 


98 
150 
169 

35 
131 


4 
4 


4 
12 


8 
16 


70.89 


No. 8 


72.00 


Tulalip 


142.89 


Swinombh x ......... . 










Yakima. . . 


2 










142.89 












Total 


754 


387 


440 


1,581 


8 


16 


24 


714.45 






Wisconsin: 

Hayward 


















La Courte Oreille 


















Reshena .... 


143 


49 
131 




192 
131 
139 
195 
131 








142.89 


I/ftc dii Flambeau 








142.89 


Oneida ..... .. 


139 
130 
131 








151.28 


Red Cliff 


55 


10 


20 


4 


24 


140.78 


Wittenberg 


142.89 
















Total 


543 
12,962 


235 
13,114 


10 


788 


20 


4 

^842 


24 
12,308 


720 73 






Q rand total 


5,448 


31,524 


6,466 


13,002.51 







Digitized by 



Google; 



REPORT OP THE COMMISSIONER OP INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



183 



Table 28.— School statistics for 37 years. 
INDIAN SCHOOLS AND AVERAGE ATTENDANCE FROM 1877 TO 1913.1 





Boarding schools. 


Day schools.* 


Total. 


Year. 


Number. 


Average 
attendance. 


Number. 


Average 
attendance. 


Number. 


Average 
attendance. 


1877 


48 
49 
52 
60 
68 
71 
80 
87 
114 
115 
117 

12 6 
136 
140 
146 
149 
156 
157 
157 
156 
145 
148 
149 
153 
161 
163 
162 
162 
167 
169 
173 
170 
161 
158 
156 
•170 
•168 




102 
119 
107 
109 
106 
76 
88 
98 
86 
90 
110 
107 
103 
106 
110 
126 
119 
115 
125 
140 
143 
149 
147 
154 
143 
136 
144 
141 
145 
149 
168 
173 
202 
227 
227 
242 
230 




150 
168 
159 
169 
174 
147 
168 
185 
200 
214 
227 
233 
239 
246 
256 
275 
275 
272 
282 
296 
288 
297 
296 
307 
304 
299 
308 
303 
312 
318 
341 
343 
363 
385 
383 
412 
398 


3.598 


1878 






4,142 


1879 






4,448 
4,661 


1880 






1881 






4,976 


1883 


3,077 

3,793 

4,723 

6,201 

7,260 

8,020 

8,705 

9,146 

9,865 

11,425 

12,422 

13,635 

14,457 

15,061 

15,683 

15,026 

16, 112 

16.891 

17,708 

19,464 

20.576 

20,772 

21,582 

21,812 

21,848 

21,825 

21,725 

20,940 

20,106 

18,774 

20,973 

20,607 


1,637 
1,893 
2,237 
1,942 
2,370 
2.500 
2,715 
2,406 
2,367 
2,163 
2,745 
2,668 
2,639 
3,127 
3,579 
3,650 
3,536 
3,631 
3,860 
3,613 
3,544 
3,610 
3,522 
3,643 
3,644 
3,977 
4,239 
4,678 
4,839 
4,873 
5,308 
5,223 


4,714 


1883 


5,686 


1884 


6,960 
8,143 
9,630 
10,520 
11,420 
11,552 
12,232 
13,588 
15, 167 
16,303 
17,220 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1880 


1880 


1891 


1893 


1893 


1894 


1895 


18,188 
19,262 


1896 


1897 


18,676 


1898 


19,648 


1899 


20,522 


1900 


21,668 




23,077 


1902 


24,120 
24,382 
25,104 
25,455 




1904 


1906 


1906 


25,492 




25,802 
25,964 
25,568 


1908 




1910 


24,946 


1911 


23,647 


1912 


26,281 
25,830 


1.913 





i Some of the figures in this table as printed prior to 1896 were taken from reports of the superintendent 
of Indian schools. As revised, they are all taken from the reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 
Prior to 1882 the figures include the New York schools. 

t Indian children in public schools under contract are included in the average attendance, but the schools 
are not Included in the number of schools. 

• Includes Five Tribes boarding schools. 

APPROPRIATIONS MADE FOR SCHOOLS BY THE GOVERNMENT SINCE 1876. 



Year. 


Approprlur 
if on. 


Per cent 
increase. 


Year. 


Approprtft- 


Per cent 
BoOOsiik, 


un 


mooo 

30,000 

0O T OOO 

76.000 

75 t 0OO 

136,000 

487, 200 

676,200 

Nfi; 800 

MOO, 065 

1,211.415 

1.179.916 

1,343,015 

i,364,5to 

1.842,770 

2,201,650 

2.316.612 

2,243,407 

2,060,695 

2,056 T 515 




1807 „.„ 


*2 r 517,2fl5 
2,631.771 
2,638,390 
2,936,06" 
:j. 080 T 307 
3,244,250 
3,531,250 
3,622,950 
3.880.740 
3,777,100 
3,925,830 
4. 105, 715 
4,008,825 
3.767,909 
3,685.290 
3,767,496 
4.015,720 

"4.403.3*5 


22.46 


1878 ...*._.♦ 


6a 0Q 

too. 00 

25.00 


IH'.is 


4.54 


IBTfl 


1899 1. 


.26 


1«8G... 


1900 . 


11.28 


1881 . .. 


1901 


4 91 


ibb2, ,.."^.r.. 


SO. 00 
260,00 
3&00 

IT 00 
10.00 
10,00 
'2.00 
14.00 

100, 
35.00 
24.30 

1.04 
13.60 
*&S7 
'2.00 


1902... 


5.32 


1883..., ,. 


11MH 


8. 84 


1884.. 


1904 .,.„ ... .... 


1.23 


HBfi_ .. 


1905... 


10 16 


1886 


HifKi 


■2.67 


1387..,., 1 „ 


1907 . . . , 


3^93 


1888 


1908 


4.68 


1889... 


1909... 


l 2,36 


1890 


1&I0... 


l *. 26 


1891 1 


1911... 


L l.93 


*8fi2 . 


1912 ...... 


1.96 


1898. . .... 


1013.... 


6-87 


1894 


1914.......... 


9.65 


l**"i 


Total since 1878...... 




1896. 


84.986,220 









i Decrease. 



' Includes $400,000 for Indian school and agtiici \nlV&\b&. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 29. — Industrial instruction and value of articles fabricated in shops during fiscal 

year ended June SO, 1918. 



States and schools. 


Employees. 


Value of 

material 

used. 


Market value of articles fabricated. 


Number. 


Cost. 


Used. 


Sold. 


On hand. 


Total. 


Arizona: 

Fort Apache School 

Fort Mojjavti Anhflnl , , . . . 


2 
2 
1 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


$1,020 

1,440 

640 

1,960 

2,240 

1,560 

1,260 

1,800 

900 

300 

600 

640 


$1,121 

1,122 

1,071 

772 

1,432 

589 

216 

297 

17 

305 

42 

452 


$1,673 

1,270 

1,371 

710 

1,986 

729 

325 

526 

62 

633 

30 

422 




$1,181 
1,077 


$2,864 
2,347 
1,371 
1,066 
1,966 




Ltiupp School *... 




lioquf School, , . , * . 




346 


Nsvajo Schools 




Phoenix BohooL..-^ 


$28 


767 
200 


1,624 
525 


Pima School 


Rice Sutton School 




525 


San Carlos Aranoy ...... 






62 


San Xavier ScbooL 






633 


Truxton Canyon SchooL . . . 
Western Navujo School. . . . . 




64 

147 


84 




569 








Total 


24 


14,180 


7,435 


9,736 


28 


8,772 


18,536 




California: 

Campo Day School 


1 
1 
1 

1 
3 

1 


800 
600 
600 
620 
1,860 
300 


58 

2,992 

400 

253 

819 

64 

3 

3,514 


106 

4,467 

668 

640 

1,303 

72 

4 

5,966 




26 
50 
111 


132 


Fort*Bidwell School 




4,517 
679 


Fort Yuma School 




Greenville School 




640 


Hoopa Valley School 

MalkTSchool 




463 
11 


1,766 




83 


Pechanga 




4 


Sherman Institiitfi 


5 


3,600 




264 


6,230 








Total 


1 
7 


• 7,680 

480 

840 

4,400 


8,093 
242 

842 
Mil 


13,126 
285 
622 
88 




926 

no 

1,064 
860 


14,051 
396 


Colorado: Southern Ute School . . 




Idaho: Fort Lapwai Sanatorium 
Kansas: Haskell Institute 




1,676 


418 


856 


BayMiUs School 


| 


193 
2,713 


118 
9,822 




200 


318 


Mount Pleasant School 


5 


2,260 




9,822 










Total 


5 


2,260 


2,906 


9,940 




200 


10,140 








Minnesota: 

Caas Lake School 


1 
1 
4 
2 

1 
5 


300 

300 

2,600 

1,320 

480 

2,520 


204 

64 

1,224 

1,059 

339 

2,139 


252 

124 

1,811 

3,385 

477 

2,777 




96 
26 
639 
860 


348 


Nett Lake School. 




149 


Pipestone School 




2,350 


Reel Lake Agency 


1,690 


5,935 
477 


Red Lake Schoof 


White Earth Schools 


88 


662 


8,527 


Total 


14 


7,420 


5,029 


8,826 


1,778 


2,182 


12,786 






Montana: 

Blackfeet School 


1 


600 


590 
15 
397 
( s ) 
214 
910 
166 


1,010 




469 

32 

649 

3,197 


1,469 
32 


Crow Agency. . 




Crow Scnoof. 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


500 
900 
500 
540 
600 


76 

1,975 

428 

964 

216 




626 


Flathead School 


23 


5,196 
428 


Fort Belknap School 

Fort Peck School 




94 
26 


1,068 
241 


Tongue River Schools 








Total 



5 


3,640 
8,780 


2,292 
4,572 


4,669 
7,111 


23 
443 


4,366 
66 


9,048 
7,609 


Nebraska: Genoa School 


Nevada: 

Carson School ,,, 


2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1,440 
300 
300 
600 
500 


958 
4 

21 
209 
159 


1,379 

* 7 

36 

303 

200 




6 


i.» 


Fallon School 




Fort MoDermitt School 




32 

102 


53 


Nevada School 




336 


Western Shoshone School 




302 








Total 


« 


3,040 


1,351 


1,925 




166 


2,081 








New Mexico: 

Albuquerque School 

Albuquerque Pueblo Day 
Schools 


6 

3 

1 
1 

1 


3,620 

900 
500 
500 
600 


1,686 

343 
625 
387 
35 


6,174 

769 

1,046 

244 


146 




6,820 
789 




jlcarilla School 






1,046 
887 


Mescalero School . , , , 




143 
125 


San Juan School 




125 



i Full value not reported. 



• Not reported. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 



BKPOET OF THE COMMI88IONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



185 



Table 29. — Industrial instruction and value of articles fabricated in shops during fiscal 
year ended June SO, 1913 — Continued. 



States and schools. 


Employees. 


Value of 

material 

used. 


Market value of articles fabricated. 


Number. 


Cost. 


Used. 


Sold. 


On hand. 


Total. 


New Mexico— Continued. 

Santa Fe School 


4 

1 


$2,720 
540 


$4,131 
( l ) 


$4, 131 

179 






$4,131 
563 


Zuni School 




$384 








Total 


17 
2 


9,380 
1,060 


7,207 
1,198 


12,533 
463 


$146 


652 
2,037 


13,331 
2,500 


North Carolina: Cherokee School 






North Dakota: 

Bismarck 


1 


500 


1,637 

42 

112 

1,165 

1,591 

56 

581 


2,065 
56 
87 

1,662 

1,985 
3 

1,074 




234 


2,299 
56 


Fort Berthold Annoy 




Fort Berthold School. 


1 
7 
3 


420 
4,200 
1,560 




75 
315 
352 

78 


162 


Fort Totten School 




1,977 


Standing Rock Schools 

Turtle Mountain School 




2,337 
81 




Wahpeton School 


* 


480 




1,074 










Total 


13 


6,660 


5,184 


6,932 




1,054 


7,986 








Oklahoma: 

Cantonment School 


1 

2 
7 

4 
1 
1 

5 

1 
1 
1 

9 


480 

1,000 

4,660 

1,980 

540 

500 

1,260 

740 

500 

450 

500 

3,810 


152 

1,054 
2,132 
1,386 

386 
97 

575 

147 
12 

250 
1,211 

722 


213 

1,124 
3,421 
2,333 
65 
192 
575 
214 






213 


Cheyenne and Arapaho 
School 




537 


1,661 


Ohflocoo School 




3,421 

4,537 

519 


Kiowa Schools 




2,204 
454 


Qmge Schoolx i. x 




Otoe School 




192 


Pawnee School 






575 


Ponca School 




128 
22 
21 

398 

515 


342 


Red Moon School. 




22 


Sac and Fox School. 


483 
1,067 

607 




504 


Shawnee School 




1,466 
1,181 


Five Civilised Tribes 
Schools 


59 




Total 


32 


16,420 


8.124 


10,294 


59 


4,279 


14,632 






Oregon: 

Klamath School .. , , ... 


2 

5 

1 
1 


1,220 

3,680 

500 

540 


593 
C 1 ) 
156 
707 


698 

3,342 

88 

791 




231 
705 
115 
218 


929 


Salem School 


255 


4,302 
208 


Umatilla School 


Warm Springs Agency 




1,009 






Total 


9 
8 


5,940 
5,500 


1,456 
12,716 


4,919 
41,556 


255 


1,269 


6,443 
41,559 


Pennsylvania: Carlisle 










Sooth Dakota: 

Canton Asylum 


1 
3 
1 
4 

1 
2 

4 
3 
2 
1 


500 

1,520 

540 

1,960 

480 

1,260 

2,340 

1,880 

1,240 

540 


402 

100 
2,378 

429 

676 
1,074 
1,287 
1,085 

385 


757 
1,536 

153 
3,673 

429 

948 
1,663 
1,237 

633 
1,081 






757 


Cheyenne River School 






1,536 


Crow Creek SchooL 






153 


Flandreau School 


40 




3,713 
429 


Lower Brule School 




Pfarre School 


36 


225 


1,209 
1,663 


Rapid City School 


Rosebud Schools 




50 
452 


1,287 


Siseeton School 




1,085 


Yankton School 




1,061 








Total 


22 


12,260 


8,810 


12, 110 


76 


727 


12,913 




Utah: 

Shivwits School 


1 


22 
151 


33 
293 






33 


Utatah tohoo) 


1 


500 






298 










Total 


1 


500 


173 


326 






328 










Washington: 
rolvfllA school 






61 
961 
460 

818 


167 

1,289 

761 

482 




9 
456 
352 
633 


178 


Cushman School 


2 
2 
2 


1,380 
1,100 
1,220 




1,745 


TMIaltp So booi 




1,113 


YftA School 




1,115 








Total 


6 


3,700 


2,300 


2,699 




1,450 


4,149 









1 Not re ported. 



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186 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 29. — Industrial instruction and value of articles fabricated in shops during fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1913 — Continued. 



States and schools. 


Employees. 


Value of 

material 

used. 


Market value of articles fabricated. 


Number. 


Cost. 


Used. 


Sold. 


On hand. 


Total 


Wisconsin: 

Hayward School 


2 
3 
1 
2 
2 


$1,260 
1,620 

540 
1,260 

840 


$2,962 

3,033 

508 

547 

974 


$4,082 

1,337 

680 

1,193 

1,174 






$4,082 

4,028 

680 


Keshena Agency 


$2,691 




Keshana Schoof. 




Lac du Flambeau School . . . 






1,188 
1,174 


Toman School 












Total 


10 
3 


5,520 
1,560 


8,024 
MR 


8,466 
940 


2,691 




11,157 
MO 


Wyoming: Shoshone School 












Grand total 


205 


116,020 89.021 1 157.566 1 5.917 


$24,628 


188,111 


f a 






' 







Table 30. — Demonstration farms, fiscal year ended June SO, 1913. 



States and schools. 


Acreage. 


Value. 


Value of 
tools and 
imple- 
ments. 


Employees 
engaged. 


Value of products. 


Num- 
ber. 


Wages. 


Raised. 


Con- 
sumed. 


Sold. 


On 
hand. 


Arisona: 

San Carlos > 




















SanXavier 


*60 


$12,000 


$902 


7 


$1,978 


$1,295 


$594 


$701 




California: 

Campo 


7 

1 


280 
75 




1 
1 


720 
266 


240 
50 


100 




$140 


Pala: .... 




50 












Total 


8 
40 

638 

410 


355 
400 

5,104 

32,800 




2 

1 

13 


986 
900 

643 


290 
(«) 

845 

1,250 


100 
(•) 

47 

975 


78 


190 


Montana: Blackfeet.... 

North Dakota: Fort 

Berthold 


101 
390 
556 


(■) 
720 


Oklahoma: Cheyenne 
and Arapaho 


275 








Grand total 


1,156 


50,659 


1,949 


23 


4,507 


3,680 


1,716 


779 


1,185 



i Included in agency farm, Table 9. > Leased. > Not reported. 

Table 31. — Experimentation farms, fiscal year ended June SO, 19 IS. 



States and schools. 


Acreage. 


Value. 


Value of 
tools and 
Imple- 
ments. 


Employees 
engaged. 


Value of products. 


Num- 
ber. 


Wages. 


»— J.S&. 


Sold. 


On 
hand. 


Arisona: Pima 

Oallfotnia: IV*. . , , 


50 
2 
9 


$5,000 
150 
90 


$1,165 


69 
1 

1 


$3,400 

266 

1,200 


$2,818 


$383 


$2,123 


$312 


Montana: Blackfeet. . . . 


71 


(') 


(») 


<») 


(«) 


New Mexico: 

Albuquerque Pu- 
eblos.... 


47 
10 


418 
150 




1 
1 


1,100 
900 


112 


% 


<*> 


(*) 


San Juan 














Total 


57 
36 


568 
360 




2 

6 


2,000 
300 


112 
1,600 


112 
1,600 






Utah: Shivwits 
















Grand total. 


154 


6,168 


1,236 


79 


7,166 


4,530 


2,095 


2,123 


312 



i Includes 68 cotton pickers. 



* Not reported. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 187 

Table 32.— Suppression of liquor traffic among Indians, fiscal year ended June 30, 1913. 





i 

H 
II 

1 


3 

bo 

!!• 

! 


l 

i 


— ' 

i 

a 


Disposition of eases. 


I 


mtm> 


i 

E 
□ 

3 


R 


i 
I 


i 


1 


o 


if 


Sj4 

S 




Arteona. 


a 


48 


ISO 

20 
U 

M 

11 
1 
1 

47 

101 

is 

28 
31 
12 


237 

20 

93 

2 

7 

88 

Sfl 

3 

1 

108 

181 

20 

34 

06 

101 

12 

5 


141 
12 
Oft 


10 


4 
2 








1M 
14 

OS 


73 


Arkansas... .„..„ ..... 








13 


California. . . , 


7 
i 


9 
2 








24 


Colorado... ... .*.♦. * 










2 


Florida*. 


4 
24 

I 












4 
40 
1 


3 


Idaho... . 


7 
*3 


34 

its 
i 


13 

4 






i 




4S 


Iowa. . 






31 


ftfinm? tj . 










2 


Michigan 




1 
tt 
N 

4 

IS 
21 
11 

6 












1 
23 
70 

8 
23 
2* 
19 

6 




IfChniimtA- , , 


4 

a 
i 

5 

7 


so 
» 
W 

38 
67 


8 

IS 

4 
3 

4 
7 


1 

1 








ao 


Montana . . . 








111 


TC^hfttikft, , , 








IS 


Nevada 

New Mexico 


1 




i 
i 

i 


" r 2 


11 

33 


New York 






S3 


North Carolina 








6 


North Dakota... , 




i 












5 


Ohio 


t 

i 


















Oklahoma ... . 


203 

34 

1 

H 


m 

26 

a 

110 
82 

4 


442 
» 

2 
ft 

2 
170 
271 

12 


62 
7 

1 

ie 

i 

tie 

20 
3 


Ifl 


1 








71 
7 
1 

24 
1 

75 

29 

a 


S71 


OllEtfffD 








33 


PntnayJ vtp\fa , . 












1 


South ^Dakota. . . ....... 


l 


4 


3 


i 






08 


Utah 






I 


Washington. . . _, j L JlU - - 


7 


189 
8 


5 



I 

3 








M 










212 


Wyoming. . 





























Total „ 


07 


1,004 


1,054 


2,058 


553 


114 


17 


l 





2 


aw 


uaoo 







COMPARISON. 



Total, 1912. 
Total, 1911 . 
Total, 1900. 



184 
143 



846 
596 



1,480 
1,717 
M63 



2,326 
2,313 



1,002 

1,168 

97 



267 

265 

18 



13 
>78 
•3 



,322 

1,547 

118 



1,004 

. 768 

346 



1 Includes 75 suspended. 



* Oases prosecuted. 



1 Suspended. 



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188 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 32. — Suppression of liquor traffic among Indians, fiscal year ended June SO, 

1918 — Continued. 



8 


tate. 






Fined bat not 
sentenced. 


Jail sentences. 


Penitentiary 
sentences. 




Number. 


Fines. 


Number. 


Term. 


Number. 


Term. 


Arizona 


3 

19 

1 


115 
845 
150 


1 
33 


Yn. «. e*. 

6 

8 6 15 


2 




Yn. m. d, 
2 6 


California 




Idabo 


1 




2 


iffohigan 


1 
4 
2 


1 
9 20 
6 




Minnesota 


2 


160 






Mont Ana 






New Mexico 


1 

1 


128 
50 






New Y ork 


6 

1 
2 


4 

4 

2 4 






North Carolina. 






Oklahoma 


2 
5 
2 
13 


81 
1,350 

50 
1,250 


2 




6 


Oregon 




South Dakota 










Washington. , 


2 


S 10 


1 
1 




10 1 


Wyoming 


16 




















Total 




49 


4,079 


52 


14 4 15 


7 




13 1 








Miscellaneous.* 


Wh 


Seizure of liquors (gallons;. 




State. 


Num- 
ber. 


Fines. 


Term. 


isky. 


Bran 
dy. 


- Alco- 
hol. 


Malt 


Wine. 


Miscel- 
lane- 
ous. 


Total. 


Ariiona.. 


135 
11 
17 


$13,403 
1,000 
1,285 


Yrt. 
36 

3 

3 


m.d. 

11 
4 2 

25 


0.25 

777.50 

5.75 

.25 










5.00 
7.00 


5.25 


Arkansas. .... 




83.00 


120.50 
1.25 


100.00 


1,088-00 
7.00 


Callfon^ift 


Colorado 










.26 


Florida 


4 
21 
4 


300 

2,250 

400 


1 
7 


4 
2 
8 














Mftho . , 


14.75 
23.00 
.75 
10.50 
13.25 
2.50 
2.50 
3.00 


....... 


3.00 
2.00 

.25 
1.00 
1.00 

.25 
1.00 


.50 


.50 




18.75 


Iowa 




25.00 


Michigan... 








1.00 


Minnesota 


13 

49 

4 

18 

20 

4 

5 

46 

1 

1 

14 

1 

53 

20 

2 


1,150 
6.255 

500 
2,000 
2,400 

550 

50 

5,264 

200 

100 
1,300 

500 
5,200 
2,000 

105 


2 
12 

1 
6 
5 
1 

10 

6 
1 
8 
3 


2 10 
9 13 
1 

1 6 
10 12 



5 
10 14 

2 

3 

1 11 

6 1 

10 

11 
8 








11.50 


Montana. 








14.26 


Nebraska 


6.00 
6.00 






8.75 


Nevada 






9.50 


New Mexico 


8.50 




6.50 


NewYork 












North Carolina. . . 
















Oklahoma 

Oregon 


0,342.50 


24.50 


352.50 


17,043.50 


721.50 


380.50 


24,865.00 


Pennsylvania 

South Dakota 
















3.00 






1.00 




4.50 


8.50 


Utah 










Washington 

Wisconsin 


5.25 
9.50 


".'50" 


.50 
2.00 


1.50 
1.00 






7.25 




90.00 


103.00 


Wyoming 




















Total 


443 


46,212 


113 


4 15 


7,214.25 


25.00 


446.50 


17,181.25 


825.50 


487.00 


26,179.50 



1 Includes fined and sentenced, alternative sentences, and sentences suspended. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



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BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



195 



Table 35. — Cost of care and protection of timber, relative percentage of cost of protection 
to value of forests, and acreage per employee for protection, fiscal year ended June SO, 
1913. 





Cost of care and protection of timber during year. 


Relative percentage of 
cost of protection to 
value of forests. 




• 


Employees. 


Cost of 

fire 

fighting.* 


Total. 


Acre- 


States and reserva- 
tions. 


Sala- 
ries. 


Fire 
fight- 
ing. 


Total. 


age per 


Special. 


Forest guards. 


ployee 
for pro- 
tection. 




Num- 
ber. 


Sala- 
ries. 


Num- 
ber. 


Sala- 
res. 






Arizona: 

Colorado River.. . 






2 

7 
3 


sooo 

1,425 
900 




$900.00 
3,555.75 
2,300.00 


4.00 
.07 
.03 


6.03"" 


4.00 
.10 
.03 


11,250 
81,250 
107,500 


Fort Apache 

Navajo 


1 

1 


$1,300 
1,400 


$830.75 


Pima* . 






flan Carlos 

Truxton Canyon . 


1 


583 


6 
1 

1 


8,973 

1,000 

900 


128.00 


4,684.00 

1,000.00 

900.00 


.75 
1.30 


.02 


.77 
1.30 


15,857 
32,000 


Western Navajo. 
























Total ..... 


3 


3,283 


20 


9,098 


958.75 |13,339.75 






| 










California 

Hoona Valley ... . 






3 
1 

1 
3 
1 


1,900 
600 
900 
780 
900 


627.50 


2,427.50 
600.00 
912.00 
780.00 
900.00 


.08 
.37 
1.20 


.02 

"\6i""* 


.10 
.37 
1.21 


33.333 


pau^..?!^.:::: 






200 


Round valley. . - 






12.00 


3,000 


Soboba *.... 








Tule River. 








1.30 




1.30 


45,000 












Total 






9 

1 


5,060 
263 


539.50 


5,619.50 
263.00 








Colorado: Navajo 
Springs . . . . t . . T r . . 










1 
















Idaho: 

Coeur d' Alene. . . . 






1 
2 


750 
1,920 




750.00 
1,920.00 


.56 
.24 




.56 
.24 


29,400 


FortLapwal 


1 


1,100 





9,333 


Total ......... 


1 


1,100 


3 


2,670 




3,770.00 




















Minnesota: 

Fond du Lac 

Grand Portage. . . 


1 


1,700 


5 
2 
4 
2 
3 
2 


950 

600 
1,800 

480 
1,080 

600 


6.50 


2,656.50 
600.00 

1,800.00 
480.00 

2,359.00 

3,300.00 


,00 
1.40 
.85 
.35 
.14 
.30 


.002 
"".06 ""* 


1.00 
1.40 
.85 
.35 
.20 
.30 


2,666 
20,221 


Leech iAke .".... 








22,979 


Nett Lake 








26,290 


Red Lake 

White Earth 


1 
2 


600 
2,700 


679.00 


25,785 
54,339 








Total . 


4 


5,000 


18 

2 
13 
3 


5,510 

400 
4,512 
2,839 


685.50 


11,195.50 


















, 


Montana: 

Blackfeet 






1,050.00 

400.00 

4,527.00 

2,839.00 


1.60 
.08 
.40 


".6662* 


1.60 
.08 
.40 


5,000 


Crow 








6,400 


Flathead 






15.00 


16,769 


Tongue River 






2,333 












Total 






20 


8,801 


15.00 


8,816.00 


1 




















New Mexico: 

Jicarflla 


1 

1 


1,300 
1,000 


8 
1 
1 


3,895 
450 
600 




5,195.00 

1,515.00 

600.00 


.40 
.03 
.30 


"*."66i" 


.40 
.03 
.30 


51,064 


Mescalero 

Santa Fe Pueblos. 


65.00 


175,000 
10,000 












Total 


2 


2,300 


10 


4,945 


65.00 
9.00 


7,310.00 
9.00 




1 I 


North Carolina: Cher- 
okee 


( . ....... 


.006 


.006 
















Oregon; 

Klamath . 


1 


1,500 


9 

5 

; 1 

7 


5,012 
900 
942 

2,100 


84.30 


6,596.50 
900.00 
942.00 

2,921.00 


.02 

.40 

5.00 

.12 


.0003 

".*666i" 


.02 

.40 

5.00 

.12 


79,000 


Siletx 


800 


TTm^tnia. 








3,020 


Warm Springs. . . 


1 


817 


4.00 


33,250 


Total 


2 


2,317 


| 22 


8,954 


88.30 


11,359.30 





















1 Calendar year 1912. 



• Not reported. 



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196 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 36. — Cost of care and protection of timber, relative percentage of 
to value of forests, and acreage per employee for protection, fiscal year < 
1918— Continued. 





Cost of care and protection of 


timber during year. 


Relative percentage of 
cost of protection to 
value or forests. 






Employees. 


Cost of 
Are 

fighting. 


TotaL 


Acre- 


States and reserva- 
tions. 


Sala- 
ries. 


Fire 
fight- 
ing. 


Total. 


age per 


Special. 


Forest guards. 


nloyee 
for pro- 




Num- 
ber. 


Sala- 
ries. 


Num- 
ber. 


Sala- 
ries. 


i 




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Pine Ridge 






8 

1 


82,840 
960 




82,340.00 
960.00 


1.60 




1.60 


25, 400 


Rosebud T. 
























Total 






4 
3 


8,300 
1,080 




3,300.00 
1,080.00 










Utah: Uintah and 
Ouray 








3.00 




8.00 


2,220 










Washington: 

ColvUle 






8 
3 
3 
1 

8 


3,625 
900 

1,760 
350 

3,560 


$402.25 


4,027.26 
900.00 

1,788.00 
360.00 

5,182.46 


.06 
.01 
.14 
.10 
.14 


0.007 

*"."o6i" 

"".006" 


.07 
.01 
.14 
.10 
.14 


02,260 
75,007 
3(7,000 
19, «5 
48,500 


diflh m an 






Spokane 






18.00 
*"iw."46* 


TTilellp, 






YaW»"a 


1 


81,400 






Total 


1 


1,400 


23 


10,215 


612.71 


12, 227. 71 




















Wisconsin: 

KftShfMIA, 






3 

5 
4 
2 
1 


2,160 

1,470 

1,680 

600 

525 


450.00 


2,610.00 

2,678.00 

2,760.00 

600.00 

625.00 


.03 

21.00 

1.80 

.54 

1.30 


.007 


.04 

21.00 
1.30 
.64 
1.30 


60,327 


Lao da Flam- 
bean 


1 
1 


1,106 
1,080 


206 


Ta Pointe 




22,747 
10,158 
8,000 


Hayward 




Bed Cliff 


















Total 


9 


2,188 


15 

4 


6,335 
1,564 


450.00 


8,978.00 
1,564.00 










Wynmlng; A^^ho^ 


13.80 




13.80 


75 


w w 








Grand total 


15 


17,588 


152 


67,815 


8,423.76 


88,826.76 






; 








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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



Table 40. — Allotment* approved by the department during the fiscal year ended June 
SO, 1913, and made in the field. Many of the latter vere not approved during the 
year. 



States and tribes or reservations. 


Approved by the de- 
partment 


Made in the Held. 




Number. 


Acreage. 


Number. 


Acreage 


Arizona and New Mexico: 

Colorado River 






510 
982 


6. 100.00 


Public domain T 


32 


4,709.41 


122,240.00 






Total 


32 


4,709.41 


1,492 
441 
112 


127,340.00 


Idaho* Fort Hall . ,- T 


76,700.00 
8,326.85 


If innMmtA.: Whit* Earth 


112 


8,326.86 






Montana: 

Blackfeet 


3 

2 

2,024 


980.00 

480.00 

721,743.32 






Crow 






Fort Peoa* 












Total 


2,029 

4 


723,183.32 
40.00 






Nevada: Paint*. . , T - - - T 


4 


40.00 






North Dakota: 

Fort Berthold 






61 
193 


17,280.00 


Standing Rock 


193 


65,401.89 


65,401.80 






Total 


193 


66,401.89 


254 


82,681.89 






South Dakota: 

Cheyenne River* . 


406 
600 

21 

382 


82,432.02 
82,446.01 
3,311.91 

63,134.24 






Crow Creek 






Lower Brule. 






Pine Ridge 


640 


162,341.00 


Rosebud .". 










Total 


1,863 


356,909.70 
40.00 


640 


162,341.00 


TTta*i: Uintah t - . 










Comito 






601 
180 
28 

241 


79,018.11 


Ctashman (Quinaielt) 






14,400.00 
974.00 


Tulalip (Lumml). . / 


28 


974.00 


Yakima ' 


37,240.00 








Total 


28 


974.00 


1,060 
148 


131,632. 11 


Wyoming: Wind R*ver , 


12; 660.64 








Orand total. . . 


4,262 


1,169,686.17 


4,141 


691,772.49 





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BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



209 




15086°— INT 1913— vol 2 



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19.60 

16.10 


: : : : :_, 

.... .oo 

« 

I i i I isf 

'.'.'.'. ', m 


442,762.85 
1,245,639.96 
978,588.27 
568,880.75 
407,315.56, 

3,802,606.20 


i i i : -8 

i 1 ! I |« 

1^ 


34,060.33 
82,655.80 
56,197.98 
34,391.11 
20,778.80 

236,074.90 


j j j j JSS 


235 
520 
494 
324 
208 

1,873 


1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 


: i : i : 1 

lllll £ 

go 322 

Saqas 





51 



II 
MS 

oo 

M 

§'2"S 



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Google 



212 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 42.— Patents in fee issued under act May 8, 1906 (34 Stat. L. t 18Z), as modified by 
acts of May 29, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 444), and June t5, 1910 (36 Stat. L. t 855). 





Patents in fee issued from May 8 
1013. 


,1006, 


to June 30, 


Applications for pat- 
ents in fee during fis- 
cal year ended June 
30, 1013. 


States and superin ten- 
dencies. 


Original allot- 
ments. 


Inherited land. 


« 


Total. 


I 


1 


i 

< 


6. 

'i 

OG. 






&& 
Z* 


H 


|i 


K 


i* 


Arizona: San Xavtor 


i 


40.00 


i 


12.40 


2 


62.40 




















California: 

Bishop 


2 


240.00 






2 

1 
14 

3 


240.00 
80.00 
798.00 
175.00 










Greenville . , 


1, 80.00 
14 1 708.00 

2, 15.00 















Hoopa Valley 






3 


.... 


8 


240.00 


Round Valley 


i 


160.00 














Total 


10| 1,133.00 


i 


160.00 


20 


1,203.00 


3 


.... 


3 


240.00 






Idaho: 

Coeur d' Alene 


28' 4,651.40 
23, 1,057.60 


3 
34 


470.00 
1,538.52 


31 
60 


5,021.40 
2,506.02 



12 


3 
9 


6 



061.40 


Fort Lapwai 


740.00 






Total 


&i\ 5,608.00 


37 


2,008.52 


01 


7,617.51 


21 


6 


15 


1,701.49 






Kansas: 

i^tokapoo 


371 2,301.71 
18 1,240.00 


20 

20 


2,612.84 
1,610.00 


66 
38 


5,004.55 
2,850.00 


10 

7 


6 
3 


4 
4 


182.30 


Potawatomi 


830.00 






Total 


55 3,631.71 
12 037.28 


40 


4,222.84 


104 
12 


7,854.55 

037.28 


17 





8 


512.80 


Michigan: Chippewa, Lake 

fimmripr. T . . . . . 


















IChmesota: 

Fond dn Lac 


16 1,280.00 
5 400.00 

14 1,101.60 

3 260.60 

3,573285,840.00 






16 
5 

14 

5 

5,003 


1,280.00 
400.00 

. 1,101.60 
420.60 

407,440.00 


1 
3 
4 
7 


**2 
"*4 


1 

1 
4 
3 


80.00 


Grand Portage 






80.00 


Leech Lake. . 






301.60 


NettLet* 


2 
1,520 


160.00 
121,600.00 


240.00 


White Earth i. . 














TV>tal 


3,611288,882.20 


1,522121,760.00 


5,133 


410,642.20 


15 


6 





701.60 






Montana: 

Crow 


32 6,371.00 
183 16- 062.33 


206 
17 
1 


25,051.48 

1,627.06 

200.00 


238 

200 

3 


31,422.48 

18,480.30 

280.00 


110 £1 


1 
68 


160.00 


FlAthAftd 


6,646.83 


Fort Peck" 


2 


80.00 
















Total 


217 


23,413.33 


224 


26,778.54 


441 


60,101.87 


127 


68 


60 


6,805.83 






Nebraska: 

Omaha. .„..., 


560 
226 
152 


35,770.00 
16,200.00 
8,638.07 


154 

245 

22 


22,431.00 

16,630.00 

1,670.37 


714 
471 
174 


68,210.00 
32,020.00 
10,308.44 


24 
16 
13 


12 
8 
5 


12 

8 
8 


1,020.00 


Santee 


760.00 


Whmehago 


464.30 






Total 


038 
3 


60,707.07 
360.00 


421 


40,731.37 


1,350 

8 


101,438.44 
360.00 


63 
2 


25 

1 


28 

1 


2,234.39 
40.00 


Nevada: Carson 










North Dakota: 

FortBerthold 


6 
26 
156 
117 


635.75 
2,284.30 
60,402.20 
16,015.88 






6 
62 
102 
122 


635.75 

4,515.60 

57,634.60 

16,735.62 


1 

3 

7 

83 


.... 

5 
22 


1 
2 
2 
11 


80.00 


Fort Totten 


26 

36 

6 


2,23i.30 

7,042.21 

710.74 


160.00 


Standing Rock 


422.44 


Turtle ^fountain 


1,886.29 


Total 


305 


60,428.31 


67 


0,003.25 


372 


70,421.56 


44 


28 


16 


2,048.73 






Oklahoma: 

Cantonment 

Cheyenne and Arapaho. . 


37 
104 
148 
20 
146 
26 
44 
88 
22 1 


5,125.71 
14,206.06 
18,020.07 
10,000.00 
16,655.03 
2,010.07 
1,880.61 
0,375.14 
2,240.00 


4 

11 
10 


633.76 
2,184.50 
3,040.00 


41 
115 
167 

20 
161 

33 

66 
107 

23 


6,750.47 
16,481.65 
21,060.07 
10,000.00 
16,305.03 

3,517.00 

4,586.17 
11,042.21 

2,280.00 


1 

10 
7 


"4 

1 


1 
6 
6 


160.00 
630.37 
660.07 


Osage l,. ..... . x 




Otoe 


15 

7 

22 

10 

1 


i 740.00 

607 03 

2,705.66 

2,667.07 

40.00 


.... 
6 
2 
8 
4 


4 

1 
6 

1 


9 

1 
9 

3 

1 


900.00 


Pawnee 


80.00 


Ponca 


60.00 


Sac and Fox 


240.00 


Seger 


r 1.... 


40.00 



1 Patents issued under act June 21, 1006 (34 Stat. L„ 353). » 1011 report. » 1912 report. 



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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



213 



Tablb 42.— Patents in fee issued under act May 8, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 182), as modified by 
acts of May 29, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 444), and June 25, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855)— Con- 
tinued. 




Total. 
Wyoming: Sbatiwaa 

Grand total 



SUMMARY OF PATENTS IN FEE ISSUED UNDER ACT OF MAY 8, 1906. 





Applica- 
tions ap- 
proved. 


Acreage 
approved. 


1007 


880 
1,087 
1,166 

955 
1,011 

844 

620 


02,182.60 
153,991.78 
133,331.79 

99,339.10 
115,675.37 

45,529.40 

67,477.40 


1008 


1900 


1010 


1011 


1913 


1918 




Total 


6,872 


707,877.52 





1 1911 report. 



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214 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 43. — Removal* of restrictions. 



Fiscal year. 


Quapaw (Seneca) 


FivaCivfliaed Tribe*.* 




Number. 


Acreage. 


Number. 


Acreage. 


1910 


215 
68 
53 
37 


10,170.26 
4,104.91 
3,218.28 
1,930.00 


1,740 
966 
679 
983 


99,717.02 


1911 : 


64,006.71 


1912 


45,075.51 


1913 


60,532.64 






Total 


373 


19,423.44 


"4,368 


269,331.88 







i Act of Mar. 3. 1909 (35 Stat. L., 751). 
' Act of May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 312); by 



departmental approval. 



Act of Congress dated May 27, 1908 (35 Stat. L., 312), removing restrictions from all lands of intermarried 
whites, freedmen, and Indians of less than half Indian blood, and from all lands, except homesteads, of 
Indians having half or more than half and less than three-quarters Indian blood, operated to remove restric- 
tions from the lands of 70,000 Indians, who held 8,000,000 acres. 

Table 44. — Certificates of competency issued during fiscal year ended June 30 , 1913, under 
act of June £5, 1910 (36 Stat. L., 855), to Indians holding fee patents with restriction* 
as to alienation. 



Indians to whom issued. 



Mount Pleasant, Mich 

Absentee Wyandot. Oreg 

Lao du Flambeau, Wis , 

LaPointe,Wis 

Total 

SUMMARY. 

1911 

1912 

1913 

Total 



Number. 



23 



Acreage. 



60.00 

1,440.00 

60.00 

40.00 



1,600.00 



90 



3,800.58 
1,917.05 
1,600.00 



7,326.68 



Table 45. — Certificates of competency issued to Kaw and Osage Indians. 



Fiscal year. 


Kaw.i 


Osage." 


Number. 


Acreage. 


Number. 


Acreage. 


1906 


1 
6 
6 
20 


400 
2,400 
2,400 
8,000 






1907 






1908 






1909 


19 
293 
84 
22 
23 


9,810 
143,570 
41,160 
10,890 
10,890 


1910 


1911 






1912 


1 
1 


480 
400 


1918 




Total 


35 


14,080 


441 


215,820 





i Act July 1, 1902 (32 Stat. L., 636). 



* Act June 28, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 539). 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 215 

Table 46. — Lands leased for mining purposes during fiscal year ended June SO, 1913. 



States and super- 
intendencies. 


Kind of lease. 


Allotted lands. 


Unallotted lands. 


TotaL 


Acreage. 


Annual 
rental. 


Acreage. 


Annual 
rental 


Acreage. 


Annual 
rental. 


Oklahoma: 




640.00 

2,034.00 
9.383,26 
19,000.00 

1786,250.00 


1225.00 

973,822.95 

3,350.00 

7,601.00 

10,143.00 

fl,0fif,061.00 

J 37,630.00 

1 25,915.00 

| 47.00 






640.00 

3,034.00 
9,283.26 
19,000.00 

1891,010.00 


1236.00 


Osage 


Oa and gas... 
OiL 






973,822.96 


Otoe.....!... 






3,350.00 


Pawnee 






7,601.00 


Ponca 






10,143.00 


Five Civil- 


do 

Oas 






fl,081,061.00 
J 87,630.00 


ised Tribes 








Coal 


99,800.00 
4,960.00 


$216,761.41 
475.20 


1 242,666.41 




Asphalt 


| 622.20 


Total 


817,197.36 

7.11 

2,079.93 


2,119,794.96 
1,551.50 


104,760.00 


217,236.61 


921,957.36 

7.11 

21,009.93 


2,337,021.66 


Oregon' Klamath ; ( l ) 


(i) 


Wyoming: 6ho- 1 Coal and oil.. 


18,930.00 


1,539.45 


8,090.96 


Grand total 




819,284.30 


2,121,346.45 il23.690.00 


218,766.06 


942,974.80 


2,840,112.61 






' 





1 Not reported. 

Table 47. — Production of minerals and royalty therefor, on restricted lands •of Five 
Civilized Tribes, and Osage, Ponca, and Shoshone Reservations. 



States. 


Product. 


Fiscal year 1913. 


1913 and preceding yean. 


Production. 


Royalty. 


Production. 


Royalty. 


Oklahoma: 

Five ciTilised tribes 


OH... barrels.. 
Oas 


10,878.568.00 

323,953.00 
473.00 


91,061,061.00 

37,630.00 

25,916.00 

47.00 


144,122.432.00 

33, 402, 799.00 
49.646.00 

to 


87,505,106.00 

182,401.00 

2,821,656.00 

25,713.00 

1,927.87 




Coal tons.. 

Asphalt .do... 
Miscellaneous . 






Total 




1,124,653.00 




•10,536,803.87 




Oil... barrels.. 
Qas 






Osagfi. ... .... 


♦973,822. 95 
0) 


773,962.19 
4,818.03 


«6,552.818.33 


3,328,633.12 
24,803.76 








Total 




778,800.22 
32,439.52 


**"37i,"i6i."i4* 


•3,353,436.88 
•40,633.43 


Ponca 


Oil... barrels.. 

Ofl do.... 

Coal tons.. 


293,678.98 




Wyoming: Shoshone 


68.55 
517.00 


96.81 
51.70 


834.55 

354,514.07 


178.60 




40,088.44 


Total 




147.51 




» 40,266.94 











> Not reported. 

• Brick, rock, gravel, limestone, etc. 

• From 1899 to 1913. This does not include $2,442,004.86, such as rental on nonprodudng lea ses, bonus, etc. 



« One-eighth of actual production. 
• From 1899' """ 



1899 to 1913. 
• From 1911 to 1913. 
» From 1907 to 1913. 



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216 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 48. — Tribal lands leased or under permit during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913. 



States and superin tendencies. 


Purpose. 


Number 
leases or 
permits. 


Acreage 
under 
lease or 
permit. 


Income, 


Total. 


Par acre. 


Arizona: 

Colorado R iver 


Grazing permit.... 
do 


1 

53 
37 


75,000 
997,900 
97,120 


812,118 

41,689 

958 


80.16 


Fort Apache. 


.04 


Ksibab 


do \.. 


.10 




do 




San Carlos. 


16 
3 


1,090,000 


61,952 
10 


.00 




Fanning lease. 


2.50 


Total 


18 
10 


1,090,004 
800,000 


61,982 
12,600 


.08 


Trnxton Canyon 


Grating permit.... 


.04 






Total, Arizona. ...„..,......,. 


109 
8 


2,500,044 
25,000 


129,322 
1,500 


.06 


California: 

Tuto River 


Grating permit.... 


.06 


Volcani 






Gracing lease 

Gracing permit.... 










Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 


1 
3 


80,400 
214,000 


1,925 
2,075 


.02 




.01 


Total Colorado 


3 

4 


800,400 
815 


4,000 
1,925 


.01 


Towa: Sao and Fox 


Farming lease 

Hay lease 


2.28 






Minnesota: 

Onuid Portage x , 


1 


69 


742 
20 


3.60 


NettLake 


.29 








Total, Minnesota ±l 


« 


275 


762 


2.77 




do 




Montana: 

Rlackfnftt 


58 
6 

57 
9 


1,844,182 

9 854 

410,000 


9,214 

158,158 

2,884 

19,200 


m m 


Crow 


Flathead 


Power site 

Grating permit 

Grating lease 


.29 


Fort Belknap 


.05 






Fort Peck 


3 
7 


382,083 


7,741 
2,342 


.02 










Total 


9 
4 


382,063 
460,000 


10,063 
16,832 


.03 


Tongue Riv«r, , T 


Grating permit 


.09 






Total, Montana 


143 


3,106,119 


216,371 






Fanning lease 

Grazing lease 

Farming lease 




Nebraska: 

Omaha 


33 

1 
5 


40 
204 


3,543 
11 
162 


0) ™ 
.27 


Winnebago , 




.80 


Total, Nebrw»ka 












Grazing permit 

Gravel permit 




Nevada: Nevada 


7 
1 


179,000 
«2 


3,181 
2,000 


.02 




1,000.00 


Total 


8 


179,002 


5,181 


.03 




Grazing permit 

do 




Walker River 


3 

8 


7,680 
210,000 


768 
5,339 


.10 


Western Shoshone 


.08 








Total, Nevada 


19 


396,682 


11,288 


.02 




Grazing permit 

do 




New Mexico: 

Jicarilla 


27 
5 


325,931 
351,280 


5,352 
8,250 


.02 


Mescalero 


.02 








Total, New Mexico 


32 


677,211 


13,602 


.02 




Grating pennit 

Grating lease 

Grazing permit 

Farming lease 




North Dakota: 

Fort Berthold 


10 


204,448 


18,026 


.09 






fltAiiding Rn«v _ _ _ , 


379 
12 
3 


120,092 

312,896 

703 


12,389 

15,817 

969 


.10 




.05 
1.36 


Total 


394 


433,691 


29,165 


.07 








Total, North Dakota 


404 


638,139 


47,191 


.07 









1 Not reported. 
• Unknown. 



• Grazing territory not defined by acres. 
« Estimated. 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



217 



Tabus 48.— Tribal lands leased or under permit during fiscal year ended June SO, IMS- 
Continued. 





Purpose. 


Number 
leases or 
permits. 


Aoreage 
under 
lease or 
permit. 


Income. 


States and superintendencies. 


Total. 


Per acre. 


Oklahoma: Pawner * . , 


Orating lease 

Farming lease 

Mining lease 


30 
501 
112 


46,148 
68,141 
9,283 


$11,990 
46,117 
7,601 


10.26 




.70 
.81 


Total 


643 


121,572 


65,708 


.54 


Five Civilised Tribes 


Gracing leases and 
permits 


3,128 
116 


232,268 
104,760 


116,134 
217,227 






.50 




Mining lease 


2.08 


Total 


3,244 


337,028 


333,361 


.99 


Total, Oklahoma 




.. 3,887 


458,600 


899,069 


.83 


Oregon: 

Umatilla 


Farming lease 

Gracing permit 


14 

7 


479 
204,000 


623 
2,418 


1.30 


Warm Spring* 


.01 






Total, Oregon 


21 


204,479 


3,041 


.01 


South Dakota: Cheyenne River 


Grating tease. 

Grating permit 


4 
11 


813,418 
175,920 


86,604 
6,417 


.05 




.03 


Total 


15 

1 
8 
15 


989,338 
15,873 
56,000 
83,306 


42,021 

625 

4,351 

5,175 


.04 




Grating permit... 
do 


.03 


Lower Brule. 


.08 


Pine Ridge 


do 


.06 








Total South Dakota 


39 

1 


1,144,517 
20 


52,072 
120 


.05 


Utah: Shivwita. 


Mining lease. 

Grating permit.:.. 
Farming lease 


6.00 


Washington: Oolvlll* 


9 
16 


%m 


6,791 
600 






.33 


Total, Washington 


25 


1,855 


7,391 




Wyoming: Shoshone _ 


Orating lease. 

Grating permit 

Mining lease 


5 
42 
8 


261,000 

987,943 

18,930 


6,450 

20,479 

1,540 


.02 




.02 
.08 


Total, Wyoming 


55 


1,267,873 


28,469 


.02 






4,788 


10,782,273 


919,839 











RECAPITULATION. 



Number. 



Acreage. 



Grating leases 

Orating permits 

FarmlngleaseB 

Omzing leases and permits. 

Hay l e ases . 

Gravel leases 

Gravel permits 

Mining leases 

Power sites 

Total 

'Allotted; erroneously reported. 



422 
361 

578 
3,128 

3 

1 

237 

57 



1,709,181 

8,627,499 

70,201 

232,268 

69 

206 

2 

132,993 

9,854 



4,788 



10,782,273 



177,110 

440,522 

53,939 

116,184 

20 

742 

2,000 

226,488 

2,884 



919,8 



COMPARISON. 


Total. 1912 


3,300 

7,290 

167 


8,408,194.47 
6,042,862.00 
2,102,904.00 


471,541.65 


Total. 1911 


647,657.00 


Total, 1900 


109,946.00 







* Not reported. 



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218 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 49.— Allotted lands under lease during fiscal year ended June SO, 1913. 





How leased. 


Allot- 
ments in- 
volved. 


Acreage 
leased. 


Tnppyw^ 


States and superin tendencies. 


Total. 


Per 

acre. 


California: 

Bishop 


Through department control 
do 


1 

2 

196 


40 

240 

1,810 


$80 

252 

4,258 


$2.00 


Greenville 


1.05 


Round Valley 


do 


8.26 


Volcani 


















Total, California 


198 


1,800 


4,590 


3.00 




Through department control 
By Indiana direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Colorado: Southern Ute. 


6 



465 
497 


528 
385 


1.11 
.77 


Total, Colorado 


11 


962 


913 


1.00 




Through department control 
do 




Idaho: 

Coenr d'Alene 


301 
68 


47,671 
4,800 


206,004 


4.32 


Fort Hall 






do 




Fort Lepwai 


863 
62 


60,155 
3,130 


116,115 
6,053 


2.31 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


L93 


Total 


925 


53,285 


122,168 


2.30 








Total, Idaho 


1,294 


105,756 


328,172 


3.10 




Through department control 
partment permission. 




Kansts: Kic^poOr 


139 
67 


11,970 
7,428 


29,960 
14,944 


2.58 




2.01 


Total 


206 
341 


19,398 
29,858 


44,904 
45,616 


2.30 


Potawatomi. *... 


Through department control 


1.53 






Total. Kansas 


647 

1 


49,256 
40 


90,520 
60 


1.72 


Michigan: Bay Mills. 


By Indians direct without 
department permission. 

Through department control 
do 


1.25 


Minnesota: 

Leech Lake 


6 

1 
3 


288 
69 
240 


209 
20 
148 


.73 


Nett Lake , , 


.29 


White Earth 


do 


.62 








Total, Minnesota 


10 


597 


377 


.63 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Montana: Crow 


163 
9 


19,983 
2,004 


18,650 
2,155 


.98 




1.07 


Total 


172 
466 


21,987 
37,608 


20,406 
21,836 


.95 


Flathead 


Through department control 


.56 






Total, Montana 


638 


59,595 


42,641 


.72 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Nebraska: Omaha 


209 

894 


19,311 
31,108 


57,941 
0) 


8.00 






Total 


60S 


50,419 


57,941 


1.15 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 
By Indians direct without 
department permission. 




fiantee 


160 
40 

5 


17,200 
5,300 

400 


» 12,500 
0) 

0) 








Total 


206 


22,900 


12,500 






Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 




Winnebago 


690 
291 


33,486 
16,799 


85,270 
47,976 


2.65 




2.86 


Total 


881 


50,285 


138,246 


2.66 








Total, Nebraska 


1,689 


123,604 


203.687 


1.65 



Not 



• Income not reported. 



* Partially reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 219 

Table 49.— Allotted lands under lease during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913 — Continued. 





How leased. 


Allot- 
ments in- 
volved. 


Acreage 
leased. 


Income. 


States and superin tendencies. 


Total. 


Per 
acre. 


Nevada: Walker River 

New Mexico: Jkarflla 


Through department control 
do 


2 
464 


40 
150,000 


$200 
6,374 


$5.00 
.04 




do 

By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




North Dakota: Fort Bertbold 


150 
15 


13,642 
1,050 


0,076 
614 


.67 
.56 


Total 


174 
362 
382 


14,701 
23,730 
121,406 


0,600 
23,730 
14,307 


.66 


Fort Totten 


Through department control 
do 


1.00 


Htanding Rook 


.12 








Total, North Dakota. . . 


918 


150,027 


47,727 


.30 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Oklahoma: Cantonment 


500 

155 


80,320 
24,800 


47,015 
(») 


.60 


Total 


655 


105,120 


47,015 






Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Cheyenne and Arapaho. . 


772 
241 


123,466 
52,000 


04,603 
40,560 


.76 
.78 


Total 


1,013 


175,466 


135,253 


.77 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Kiowa. 


3,100 
60 


406,000 
0,600 


180,000 
6,000 


.36 




.63 


Total 


3,160 


505,600 


186,000 


.37 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 
Through department control 
. do ... 




Osage...... .... 


0) 

785 

617 

10 


0) 

80,576 
75,425 
3,160 


0) 

73,700 
75,728 
2,600 




Otoe. 


.82 


Pawnee.... 


1.00 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


.73 


Total 


636 


78,585 


78,328 


1.00 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Ponca . 


513 
101 


50,762 
44,252 


53,410 
55,516 


.80 




1.25 


Total 


614 
76 


104,014 
30,082 


108,026 
24,538 


1.04 


Kaw 


Through department control 
do 


81 






Red Moon 


21 
43 

64 


2,505 
6,038 

0,513 


1,630 
7,064 

6,033 


.65 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 

By Indians direct without 
department permission. 


1.17 
.73 


Total 


128 


18,056 


15,627 


.87 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 
By Indians direct without 
department permission. 




Sec and Fox 


200 
33 

4 


36,808 
3,451 

400 


52,280 
8,460 

415 


1.41 




2.45 
1.00 


Total 


336 

411 


40,650 
56,672 


61,156 
51,114 


1.50 


Soger 


Through department control 
do 


.00 






Shawnee 


323 
3 


30,136 
120 


20,505 
230 


.08 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


2.00 


Total 


326 

11,338 


30,256 
843,642 


20,735 
1,405,001 


.08 


Fire Civfliaed Tribes. . . . 


Through department control 


1.77 


Total, Oklahoma 


10,478 


2,077,728 


2,308,372 


1.11 









i Not reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



220 BEPOKT OP THE COMMISSIONEE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 49. — Allotted lands under lease during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913 — Continued. 





How tossed. 


Allot- 
ments in- 
volved. 


Acreage 


.Income. 


States and superin tendencies. 


Total. 


Per 
sere. 


Oregon: 

Klam*t*» , , 


Through department control 
do 


171 
10 

4 


20,075 

1,509 

331 


84,758 
225 
275 


30.24 


Roeeburg 


.14 


Silets...". 


By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 

Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


.83 






Umatill* » r - 


445 
9 


41,965 
628 


105,420 
2,170 


2.61 




3.46 


Total 


454 


42,593 


107,590 


2.53 


Total, Oregon 




699 


i 
64,568 


112,848 


1.72 




Through department oontrol 
do 




South Dakota: 

Ch«yQi)n4 Hfv^r. 


25 

2 

175 


5,206 

480 

51,861 


1,141 

220 

3,238 


.22 


Crow Creek 


.46 


Pine Ridge 


do : 


.06 




do 




Rosebnd 


223 



34,349 
960 


10,689 
240 


.31 




By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


.26 


Total 


229 
500 
850 


35,309 
70,680 
72,250 


10,929 
61,677 
118,688 


.81 


Sisseton 


Through department oontrol 
do 


.87 


Yankton 


1.68 








Total, Sooth Dakota... 


1,781 


235,786 


190,888 


.81 




Through department oontrol 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission . 




Utah: Uintah and Ouray. . . . 


133 
1 


7,240 
80 


5,590 
2 


.77 
.03 


Total 


134 


7,320 


5,692 


.76 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 
By Indians direct without 
department permission. 




Washington: ColvUle 


99 
3 

20 


7,476 
240 

1,600 


7,023 
256 

1,600 


.94 
1.08 

1.00 


Total 


122 
23 


9,307 
1,560 


8,879 
2,887 


.95 


Spokane 


Through department control 
do...\ 


L86 






Tnlalip 


3 

1 


288 

30 


(,, «o 






By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 


15.00 


Total 


4 


318 


450 






Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 
By Indians direct without 
department permission. 




Yakima 


701 


3 


47,442 
440 

240 


98,772 
1,760 

360 


2.08 




4.00 
1.60 


Total 


710 


48,122 


100,892 


2.10 








Total, Washington. . . 


859 


69,297 


113,108 


1.92 




Through department oontrol 
do 




Wisconsin: 

La Potato 


5 

1 


277 
53 


1,551 
106 


5.89 


"mkta . 


2.00 








Total, Wisconsin 


6 


330 


1,667 


5.03 




Through department control 
By Indians direct with de- 
partment permission. 




Wyoming: Shoshone 


124 
54 


7,814 
4,999 


4,202 
4,304 


.55 

.86 


Total, Wyoming 


178 


12,813 


8,598 


.67 








Grand total.. , 


28,847 


8,109,209 


3,466,312 











i Not reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



221 



Tabus 49. — Allotted land* under lease during fiscal year ended June SO, 191$— Continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 



I Allot- 
ments 
1 in- 
.volved. 

m \ 


Acreage 
leased. 


Rental. 


Total Import through department control 


27,127 

1,623 

97 


2,878,562.00 

218,454.00 

12,193.00 


13,254,940.00 


By Tmifrn« directTwith* permission to lease without departmental 


202,014.00 


By IndJansdirect without permission to lease without departmental 


9,358.00 






Grtnd total. 


28,847 


3,109,209.00 


3,466,312.00 







COMPARISON. 



Total, 1912. 
Total, 1911. 
Total, 1900. 



27,605 
19,753 
12,592 



2,792,798.52 
2,528,494.75 



13,071,429.61 
1,844,370.84 



1 Only item reported. 
Table 50. — Buildings, etc., erected during fiscal year ended June SO, 191S. 



School. 



State. 



Improvement. 



Cost 



Albuquerque 

Albuquerque Pueblos 

Do 

Camp McDowell (8alt River day) . 

CanLake 

Colorado River 

Crow. 



Fort Belknap 

FortBerthold 

Fort Lapwai Sanatorium . 

Do 

Do 

Fort Peck 

Lower Brule 

Pipestone 

Rapid City 

Red Lake 

Red Lake (Cross Lake)... 

Red Lake !.. 

8atom 

Do 

Do 

Sac and Fox 

Santa Fe Pueblos 



Shoshone ( Arapaho). 

Western Navajo 

White Earth 

Zuni (Zuni day) 



N.Mex. 

...do... 
...do... 
Arts.... 
Minn... 
Arts.... 
Mont... 
...do.... 
N.Dak. 
Idaho.. 
...d*... 
do. 



Mont... 
S.Dak. 
Minn... 
S.Dak. 
Minn... 
...do... 
...do.... 
Oreg... 
...do.... 
...do.... 
Iowa. . . 
N.Mex. 

Wyo... 
Ark... 
Minn... 
N.Mex. 



Addition to brick dormitory 

Meslta day school building 

McCarty's school building 

Brick schoolhouse 

Frame cottage and laundry 

Frame schoolhouse 

Bridge, Crow Reservation 

Tank and tower 

Demonstration farm barn 

Remodeling schoolhouse 

Heating system , 

Water system 

Frame quarters 

8teel bridge 

Electric lighting plant 

Extension heating system 

Bridge, Red Lake Reservation , 

Heating plant 

do '. 

Addition to schoolhouse 

Oil-burning plant 

Ice-making plant 

Steam-hearing plant 

Cochiti and Santa Clara day-school 

plants. 
Day-school building 

3 farmers' cottages 

4 frame cottages 

Frame schoolhouse 



$10,000.00 
4,095.00 
4,296.00 
7,559.00 
3,700.00 

10,76500 
7,760.00 
2,950.00 
2,600.00 
4,008.00 
5,559.00 
2,999.20 
3,842.00 
1,890.00 
2,350.00 
4,879.00 
1,690.00 
1,895.00 
527.00 

12,467.00 

2,508.00 

2,615.00 

482.50 

18,545.00 

2,200.00 
2,298.15 
6,183.00 
7,125.00 



Total. 



137,787.85 



Digitized by 



Google 



222 



BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 51. — Buildings y etc, under construction during fiscal year ended June 30, 191$, 

but not completed. 



School. 



State. 



Improvement. 



Cost* 



Blackfset 

Cass Lake and Bona 

sand Aiapaho.. 



Coeurd' Atone. 

Colville 

Crow Creek.. .. 



Fort Bid well. 



Mont... 
Minn... 
Okla... 
...do.... 
Idaho.. 
Wash.. 
8. Dak. 

Cal 



Fort Bldwell (Likely day) 

Genoa 

Kiowa (Riverside School) 

NavaJo 

NettLake 

Pawnee 

Phoenix 

Pueblo Boni to. 

Round Valley 

Sao and Fox , 

Salem 

Santa Fe (Santo Domingo day).. 

Shoshone 

Southern Ute 

Standing Rock 

Tongue River 

Yankton 



...do.... 
Nebr... 
Okla... 
Arts... 
Minn.. 
Okla... 
Arts.... 
N.Mex. 

Cal 

Iowa. . . 
Ore*... 
N.Mex. 
Wyo... 
Colo.... 
N.Dak. 
Mont... 
8. Dak.. 



Brick schoolhouse 

Barn and 2 cottages 

Brick dining hall 

Dairy barn. 

New agency plant 

do 

Heating and lighting plants and 2 cot- 
tages. 

Water, sewer, and lighting systems and 
laundry equipment. 

Frame schoolhouse 

Brick dormitories 

Brick dormitory 

Frame mess hall 

Frame schoolhouse 

Stone schoolhouse 

Brick office building 

Brick schoolhouse 

Frame employees' building 

8creen porches 

Brick industrial building 

Schoolhouse and quarters 

Superintendent's quarters 

Tank and tower 

Concrete reservoir 

Superintendent's quarters 

Frame dormitory 



Total. 



$16,254.66 

3,363.00 

8,842.66 

5,615.35 

31,251.10 

126,106.38 

21,000.00 

18,238.03 

4,875.00 
48,000.00 
17,304.22 
4,029.68 
3,145.00 
8,980.00 
6,37796 
10.160 00 
7,143.00 
5,000.00 
4,645 00 
12,000 00 
5,800 00 
3,030 00 
2,600 00 
M.OOOOO 
8,997.00 



276,838.03 



i Cost to June 30, 1913. 

Tablb 52.— Plans for buildings, etc., prepared during fiscal year ended June 30, 1913 \ 

but not under contract. 



School. 



Albuquerque Pueblos 

Canton Asylum 

Cherokee 

Crow (San Xavier) 

Cushman 

Flandreau 

Fort Apache 

FortBerthold 

Fort Lapwal Sanatorium . 

Do.. 

Fort Peck 

FortTotten 

Hayward 



Kiowa (Fort 801).. 

Lower Brule 

Pine Ridge 

Red Lake 

Shoshone 

TulaUp 



Vermillion Lake. 

Wahpeton 

Warm Springs.... 



White Earth. 
Yankton 



Total. 



State. 



N.Mex. 

S.Dak. 
N.C... 
Mont... 
Wash.. 
S.Dak. 
Arts..... 
N.Dak. 
Idaho.. 

..do 

Mont.... 
N.Dak.. 

Wis 

..do.... 



Okla... 
S.Dak. 
...do.... 
Minn... 
Wyo... 
Wash.. 



N.Dak. 
Oreg... 

Minn... 
S.Dak. 



Improvement. 



Paguate school buildings 

Brick hospital 

Quarters and laundry 
uarters 

Superintendent's quarters 

Gymnasium buil ding 

Dormitory 

Employees' quarters 

Plumbing and heating 

Remodeling dormitory 

Frame hospital 

Improvements to heating 

Additions to dormitories 

Dormitory, schoolhouse, and lavatory 

building. 

Brick hospital 

Central heating plant 

Additions to buildings 

Frame schoolhouse 

Saw and grist mill 

Extension of water system and addition 

to school. 

Alterations to dormitory 

Brick hospital 

Bridge over Deschutes River, Wanr 

Springs Reservation 

Laundry building 

do 



Cost» 



$12,300.00 
31,1*9.00 
10,000.00 
2, 067.50 
6,000.00 
8,00000 
18,000.00 
4,105.00 
3,205.97 
8,510.00 
9,864.00 
10,000.00 
18.000.00 
42,000.00 

40,000.00 
6,370.00 

25,250.00 
7,000.00 
9,500.00 

16,513.00 

6,000.00 
18,000.00 

12, 45a 00 
5,000.00 
1,937.00 



331,821.47 



'Estimated. 



Digitized by 



Google 



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EEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 255 

Table 66. — Distribution of Government property valuations, June S0 t 1913. 



States and superin- 
tend aDcles* 


General 

uiimin- 

istration* 


Health, 


Allot- 
ting. 


Irrigation. 


Fanning, 


For- 
estry. 


SohooL 


Total 
value* 


Arizona: 
Camp Verde » 




15 

335 

4.720 

e,666 

35 

50 

7,150 

0.380 

17,940 

30,725 

3,580 

4,650 

295 

5,870 

850 

A, 440 

0,900 










•3,178 

M.240 

9t,62S> 

^.+J3 

!«.7l7 

3.580 

55.473 

110,630 

225,777 

407,595 

98,8*0 

84,370 

16,200 

19,000 

10,237 

114 605 

103,390 


■3*183 


Colorado River. 

Fort Apache. .....,.,. 


84,390 
IB, 000 
1,808 

595 
350 

13. 060 
14*001 
41*400 


8446 


138,708 


85,257 
2,180 
2,454 


S3 
15,165 


131,380 
132,694 
104,331 


Fort Mojav©.... 






HarasapaJ . . . . J * 






10,447 


Kalbab... 






1,360 

3,545 

1,525 

970 


"4^713" 


5,340 


LsUpp *.*,**..*. * . 




1,000 


81,118 


Moqui , 


135,536 


Navajo^...*..-*..*.** 


120 




200,020 


Phoenix „......„. 




438,320 


rizna***.- 


6,150 






31,937 




140,807 

89.020 


Rico Station 






Salt River,,,*., 


5* 490 
74.780 
2,335 






7,727 
11,500 
4,450 

"'34,'m 


"Mi* 
"'"160" 


29,742 


8an Carlos... ,. 






119,875 


Ban Xavier ._, 




35 

600 


17,907 


TniitoD Canyon...... 


121,745 


Western Navajo....... 


6,666 


150,669 








Total*. *..__. 


1B9.11H 


105.581 


580 


39,243 


107,630 


28.706 


I.531.M14 


2,002,752 






California* 
Bishop <.,.-.. 








22,413 
7,184 


22,413 


CatPp"... _*.*, 


2,735 

4,814 


lfl5 






105 




10, 189 


iHrjwr. „. ... 






4,814 


Fort Bid wetL*. 


4,325 


150 




505 




88,860 

75,735 

36,2(H 

38,220 

14.0G5 

8,900 

2,515 

73,415 

274,003 

21,389 

li:i,0l'; 

11,440 


03,840 


Fart Vunia...... T .... 






76,735 


Green villa *__*,_. 




3,985 

2,035 

00 

1,800 






735 
0,400 
3,667 
5,7*1 


"4,'i66' 


40,924 


Uoopa Valley .., 


7*700 
1,827 
0,121 
1,585 
2,585 






61,455 


Pala... ma 




8.944 

356 


23,623 
25,947 


I'nrhann* 


4,100 


Rotuid Valley*., 

fthflrman Institute ■ <• > r 


050 

131,115 

555 




100 


* i 64Vo8B # 
1,240 

8 


4,130 
'" W 


353,106 


3oboha_,. „,...„».„. 


4,001 

8 




9,000 


38,785 


Tula River. 


10,316 


Vokani 


t 1 ) 


(i) 


{■) 


11,440 






Total 


36,068 


38,020 


150 


13,400 


75,50* 


8.530 


i*5. WS 


857,876 






Colorado: 
Navajo Springs. *.... . 
Boothem Ute__, 


2,820 
18,975 


880 
775 






2,200 
3,473 




200 
40.016 


6,100 




2,571 


65,810 






Total.. .. 


21,795 


1,655 




2,571 


5,673 




40,210 


71,910 


Idaho: 
Coour d'Aleno. .. , p 


ia, m 

45,085 


1,040 
10,800 
26,840 








34 
"""273* 


277 
H7,833 
43.581 


14,342 


Fort Ball....... 






50,805 


200,708 


Fort Lapwai » 






131,380 












Total ..,..***.,.,, 


58,676 


38,680 
125 






65,005 
415 


1,307 


IfM.flSI 
38.198 


355,430 


Iowa: Sac and Fox 






38.738 


Kansas: 
Haskell Institute..*... 


13,835 


122,638 
225 










415,075 
87.533 
11,308 


442,248 


Kictapoo.,. 










67,758 


PotamitoniL *. 


0,900 










21.208 
















Total....,.......* 


13.&S5 


22,863 










V'1.HU\ 


531,214 














Michigan: 
Bay Mills.. 














2.466 

1,000 
155,119 


2,465 


Chippewa, Lake Supe- 
rior . 














2,000 


Mount Pleasant.....*, 


I 11,600 






131,546 




108,265 












Total ....* 


100 


11,600 






31,540 




159.484 


202,730 










Minnesota: 
Cass l^ake, 












*. 17,811 


17,811 


Fond du Lac.,..* 


7,835 
7,395 
Ktitt 

15.403 


500 

137 

1,636 








46 
1,410 


3.610 


12,085 
7, 578 


Grand Portage 

iitl«fl| l ^fcA M 












4.900 


69.170 

19,716 

137,732 

73,004 


06,083 


NettLefce 






35,200 




6,425 
77V 










144,177 


Kedlake 


8,618 






6.337 




88,738 



1 1912 report. 



* Included in school. 



Digitized by 



Google 



256 BEPOBT OF THE COMMIBSIONEE OF INDIAN AFFAHtS. 

Table 56. — Distribution of Government property valuations, June SO, 191$ — Continued. 



Stales and su perto- 
teadenctes. 


General 
admin- 
istration. 


Hwlth, 


Allot- 
ting. 


Irrigation. 


Farming. 


For- 

eetfy. 


School. 


Total 

vain*-. 


Mnriesota— Continued. 
V«rmtllion Lake 




1350 

20,01X1 










153,863 
107,414 


854,213 


White Earth .... 


183,070 










210,490 














Total........ * 


151.975 


29,827 






111,237 


11,1396 


472,249 


666 984 










Montana; 
Black feat 


39.130 
B&VMfl 

22, OH 
30,810 
03,187 
28,400 


2.370 
0,410 

1,050 
6,265 
1,945 






3,062 

25,345 

1,075 

4MU2 
14,706 
9,200 


"1,200" 

8/725 

"3,306' 


84.196 
90.898 
35,380 
53,298 
72.235 
62,025 


128.750 


Crow.. ........ . 


**i,W 


noCtu 

131,004 

4.550 


246,453 


Flatnead 


188,023 


Fort Malknap . . . . ..... 


129,830 


Fort Peck.. , 


158,170 


Tongue River, .,,.„... 


1.400 


108,360 






Total, .. 


273,599 


21,595 


l s 786 


ifi7,ese 


93,480 


13 T 215 


388,034 


058,395 






Nebraska: 
Genoa. .. 




5,452 










243,753 


249.306 


Omaha 


33,500 
24.616 
58,075 










23,5fc) 


H^ntM, , x . L , , , , 


400 






4,906 




8,015 

12,355 


38,645 

70,430 


Winnebago..,.. 




















Total . 


105,250 


5,013 






4,955 




2f4,723 


381,840 










Nevada: 
Canon.. 














79,243 
12,381 

10,060 
3,565 

66,080 ; 
8,740 

39,660 


79,243 


Fallon . 




226 

290 
45 






U.444 

1,790 




14,070 


Fort McDarmitt ...... 

lloapa River... 


v.;-. 




75 

so 


14, 170 


Nevada 


9,000 
4,225 
«,225 






76! 850 


Walker River 

Western Bhoaaono 


1,100 
1,425 




380 


4,060 
2.300 




18,875 
55.890 


Total , 


28.315 


3.085 




1,0% 


0.504 




218,680 


260,588 






NewMerioo: 

Albuquerque..... . 


10,300 
1,470 
IS, 303 
20,163 
IB, 525 
2©, 923 
8,325 


8,075 
7,870 
5,710 
3,272 
1.431 
9.036 
4,750 
1,310 






30,335 
7,204 
7.518 
7,830 


'i,t46* 

6.480 


108,830 
27,000 
£5. 712 
86,714 

153,080 
213,637 
124,703 


318.440 


Albaquerqae rneblos . 

Ji-'-rirLIlu 






43,544 




215 


ia>. rt'jl 


Mescal&o... 


134,459 


Pueblo Bonlto.... T ,.. 






51,990 


Ran Juan.. 






34,599 


3.080 


230,618 


Santa Ft.............. 






226.742 


Ztmi ,„.-., , 




li^sflD 


8,310 


350 


153,503 








Total 


107,009 
393 


42,354 




10,035 


85,803 


13,055 


892,640 


1, 1S9,8**J 


New York Apency. 
North Carolina: Chero- 
kee 


393 


500 










56.598 


57,098 
















North Dakota: 
R^mnmk , , , 














87.773 

8.641 

102.000 

185,358 

26,671 
146, 770 1 


87,773 


Fort Bwt bold... 


17,964 
4,260 
84, 756 
23,465 

1,185 


1.640 
2,423 
7, €05 
5,725 
185 


373 




22,190 
10,468 
35,024 

4.860 
30,198 




50.808 


FortTotten. 




188,159 


Standing Rock 

Turtle Mountain 


1,410 




314.153 




60,721 
185.338 


Wahpeton. 










Total 


138,630 

1,350 
23,961 


17,577 

300 
1,450 


1.783 




111,740 





617,213 


>^V^2 








Oklahoma; 
Cantonment . . . , . , 


100 




64,600 
58,337 




35,765 

238.156 
661,567 
415,141 
141,753 
83,008 
37,771 
76,848 
48,811 
30.495 
79,745 
31,740 
93,708 


102,305 
351,954 


Che venue and Arap- 

^ho . mnmm i mmm . . , 


Chjloeco. 






661.567 


Kiowa 


40,503 


5rS71 

40,074 










461.515 


Osage..... 










181.837 


Otoa...... ..,,. 


6,880 
21,082 
18,270 










69,888 


Pawnee * , 


300 
200 
070 
053 
3,710 
I5t5 
150 










130,053 
y5 316 


Ponca.. ....... „....„.. 










Red Moon. 










89,481 


Sac and Fos 


13,022 
1,520 










54.070 


Beger.. ........„„ 






7,400 




01,375 


Sen eon 






31,944 


Shawnee...., H ..„ 


6.760 










100,618 












Total'. .... 


134,848 


52.874 


100 




160,477 




2,043,514 


2,391.813 









1 Agricultural implements. 



» Exclusive of Five Civilised Tribes, 

Digitized by 



Google 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 257 

Table 56. — Distribution of Government property valuations, June SO, 1913 — Continued. 



States and superin- 
tendencles. 


General 
admin- 
istration. 


Health. 


Allot- 
ting. 


Irrigation. 


Farming. 


For- 
estry. 


School. 


Total 
value. 


Oklahoma— Continued. 
FrveCrvfliscd Tribes— 

Union Agency 

Cherokee Nation- 
Cherokee Orphan 
School 


$12,064 














$12,054 
26,499 
36,101 












$26,499 

36,055 
14,731 

49,105 
29,450 
28,670 
24,653 

37,083 
25,655 
18,070 
10,770 

53,129 


Chickasaw Nation— 
Bloomfleld Semi- 
nary 




$46 
125 










Collfrai TnntitutA. . _ 












14,856 


Choctaw Nation— 
Armstrong Male 
Academy 












49,105 


Tones Male Acad- 
emy 




60 










29,610 


Tuskahoma Acad- 
emy 












28,670 


Wheelock Acad- 
emy 














24,658 


Creek flatten— 
Eochee Boarding 
School 




280 

79 






$10,115 
2,775 




47,478 


Eulaula Boarding 
School... 








28,500 


Nayaka Boarding 
School... .. ... 








18,070 


Tallahassee Board- 














10,770 


Seminole Nation— 
Mekusukey Acad- 
emy 














53,129 


















Total. Five Civi- 
lised Tribes... 


12,054 


590 






12,890 




353,870 


379,404 










Total, Oklahoma 


146,902 


53,464 


$100 




173,367 




2,397,384 


2,771,217 






Oregon: 
Klamath 


3,645 


2,865 


33* 


$7,453 


25,523 


$13,360 


80,216 
1,800 
220,477 
35,071 
45,210 
58,056 


133,062 


Rosebarg 


1,833 


Satan 


4,295 
12,886 


26,553 

515 

600 

1,975 




99,345 




350,670 


6Qetz... ... ..... 






48,472 


rjffiAtfiift. , 






4,496 


5,079 


117,031 


Warm Springs. 


5,295 






74,901 








Total 

PexmsylTOnjA* Cariialfc-. 


26,121 


32,508 
25,920 


33 


7,453 


199,725 
109,900 


19,299 


440,830 
397,245 


725,969 
633,065 












South Dakota: 

Canton Aaylom 

Cheyenne River 


0) 
143,472 
22,440 


100,984 
2,160 






1,224 
4,725 






102,20 


175 






109,992 
58,998 
232,207 
41,199 
121,080 
187,558 
183,585 
182,790 
69,504 
33,659 
43,503 


309,054 






Flandreeu 




232', 207 


I>ower Brule 


39,922 

4,450 

* 396, 750 

4,340 

420,644 

19,505 


5,616 




500 






87,237 


Pierre 


42,298 
50,250 


"*i*025" 


171,062 


Pine Ridge 


6,550 
6,650 
7,110 


735 


634,916 


Rapid Ctfy 




244,825 








610,544 


Rineton 










79,009 


Springfield. , . . . r 












33,659 


Yankfon 


42,675 


740 










86,918 














Total 


1,094,198 


134,410 


7,425 


9,000 


180,004 


1,025 


1,254,075 


2,680,137 






Utah: 
Shivwits 


305 
128,548 


310 
1,930 










7,563 
44,859 


8,178 


Uintah and Ouray ... . 




28,448 


8,058 


4,560 


216,401 


Total 


128,851 












62,422 


224,579 






Washington: 
Colville 


130,444 

14,671 

4,195 

3,856 

29,216 

28,075 


750 

11,500 

500 

825 

7,150 

3,950 


6,000 




24,150 


16,800 


•721,903 

442,525 

4,330 

16,422 

159,225 

63,833 


900,047 


Cuahmen 




468,696 


NeahBay 










9,025 
29,153 


Spokane 


150 






7,900 


tulalip 






196,591 


Y^vi^a 


2,135 


18,150 


6,824 


4,105 


127,072 






Total 














1,408,238 


1,729,584 





1 Included in health. * Includes timber 
16836°— int 1913— vol 2 17 



* Includes sanatorium, now abolished. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 



258 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER 07 INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

Table 56. — Distribution of Government property valuations, June SO, 1913- Continued. 



States and superin- 
tendencles. 


General 
admin- 
istration. 


Health. 


Allot- 
ting. 


Irrigation. 


Farming. 


For- 
estry. 


School. 


Total 
value. 


Wisconsin: 
Garter 


$1,351 

1,805 

41,775 














$1,351 
105,720 
779,703 
84,016 
6,292 
70,686 
3,192 
150,381 
58,730 


Hayward 


$5,240 
7,844 
1,600 

100 
1,450 

255 
4,447 






$10,235 


$25 
1679,031 


$79,415 
51,553 
82,416 
100 
69,235 
742 
145,934 
58,730 


Keshena 




. 


Leo du Flambeau 








LaPolnte. 


5,702 






245 


55 


Oneida 






Red Cliff. 


450 






500 


1,155 


Tomah 






Wittenberg 


























Total 


51,173 


20,436 






20,070 


680,266 


488,125 


1,200,070 








Wyoming: 
Shoshone 


01,275 


3,213 


$1,818 


$12,498 


1,170 


1,600 


150,745 


262,314 




State totals 


2,874,343 


636,240 


21,066 


318,574 


1,325,847 


802,064 


12,640,697 


18,819,740 


Miscellaneous:! 
Warehouses. 


2,884 
650 














2,884 
650 


Liquor suppression . . . 
Allotting service 
















8,084 










8,984 

9,854,642 

34,742 


Irrigation service. 






0,854,542 








Indian Offloe.. .......... 


34,742 








• 














. 




Grand total 


2,012,610 


» 636, 240 


30,050 


10,173,116 


1,325,847 


802,064 


12,640,697 


28,521,642 



1 Forestry property not included in 1912 report. 

> See recapitulation, Table 55. 

* 1912 report includes sanatorium at Colvflle, now abolished. 



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264 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 58. — Value of Indians 1 tribal property, and tribal and individual property, June 

SO, 1913. 



States and superin tendencies. 


Lands, ex- 
clusive of 
timber. 


Timber. 


Funds in 
Treasury. 


Live 
Stock. 


Total. 


Total tribal 
and Indi- 
vidual 
property. 


Arizona: 

Camp Verdft 












$1,589 


Colorado River 


$1,745,500 
15,441,140 


$22,500 
3,500,000 


$56,481 
33,793 




$1,824,481 
8,974,933 


2,340,481 
9,249,088 
413,888 
38,673 
184,700 
117,960 


Fort Apache 




Fort Mojave 




Havasupai 


15,000 
174,000 

15,550 

167,432 

112,500,000 








15,000 
174,000 

15,550 

167,432 

30,000,000 


Fattmb 








Leupp 








Moqul 








631.683 


NavaJ o 


7,500,000 






23,288,200 
1,404 


Phoen1x L , 






Pima 


2,525,880 

331,180 

* 1,485, 111 

81,599 

900,580 

1,759,673 


65,000 






2,590,880 
331,180 
2,246,507 
83,526 
1,013,381 
1,759,673 


3,123,475 


Salt River 






1,216,666 
2,321,707 
1,627,221 
1,020,881 


Ban Carlo* 


603,256 

1,500 

76,800 


158,146 

427 

36,001 




8au Xaviw x . ^ 




TYuxton Canyo" 




Western Navajo 




2,183,048 










Total 


27,142,645 


11,769,050 


284,848 




39,198,543 


47,649,583 








California: 

Bishop 












469,298 


Campo. ..,».,, ......... ... 


81,855 








81,855 


89,730 
359 


Digger 








FortBidwelL 




16,000 






74,273 


503,376 

904,653 

133 


Fort Yuma 


56,000 


2,273 




Greenville 




Hoop* Wtoy 


159,000 

1,057,260 

30,952 

10,700 

320 

176,700 

108,000 

•83,125 


425,000 






584,666 

1,057,260 

32,552 

1,020 
176,700 
174,691 
83,125 


2,597,846 


Malkl . 






1, 113, 121 


Pala 


1,600 






226,283 


Pechanga 






17,931 


Ronmd Valley x ,. >. * ^ x, 




700 




672.497 
225517 
241,947 
112,483 


Soboba " 






Tula River 


65,000 


1,691 




Voiron , 










Total 


1,763,912 


522,600 


4,664 




2,291,176 


7,075,039 








Colorado: 

Navajo Springs 


•1, 971, 500 






$1,260 
180 


«1, 972, 780 
180 


2,017,034 
415,036 


Southern Ute 














Total 


111,746 






1,440 


111,746 


2,432,049 
111,746 


Florid*; RflTnlTV>K 
















Idaho: 

Coeur d'Alene. 






408,402 
53,163 
12,349 




406,402 

*1,264,734 

872,949 


2,713,167 
4,561,711 
6,893,603 


Fort Hall 


»761,571 
118,100 


460,000 
742,500 




FortLapwal 








Total 


869,671 


1,202,500 


473,914 




2,546,085 


14,168,481 






Iowa: Sao and Fox 


290.912 


5,000 


400,008 




696,520 


724,061 






Kansas: 

Kickapoo 






136,117 
302,433 




136,117 
302,433 


2,073,293 
1,711,000 


Potawatomi 
















Total 






438,550 




438,650 


3,783,392 










Michigan: 

Bay Mills 












8,040 


Chippewa, Lake Superior. . . 
























Total 












293,038 














Minnesota: 

Fond du Lac 






404,086 

845,233 
338,093 




404,086 
265,694 
846,233 
338,093 


1,067,198 
390,691 

1,633,369 
808,696 
63,994 

3,636,501 

7,740,617 


Grand Portage. .: 




16,042 




Leech Lake, a 




NettLake 








Pipestone (Birch Cooley) 








Red Lake 


912,271 
34,972 


1,124,300 
10,000 


1,316,351 
2,561,779 




3,352,922 
2,606,751 


White Earth 








Total 


1,027,448 


1,150,342 


6,634,889 




7,813,679 


15,189,963 







1 Underestimated last year. 



• Overestimated last year. ' Only item reported 191Z « Included in lands. 

Tie 



Digitized by VjOOQI 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



265 



Table 58. — Value of Indians 9 tribal property, and tribal and individual property, June 

SO, 1913— Continued. 



States and suparintendencles. 


Lands, ex- 
clusive of 
timber. 


Timber. 


Funds in 
Treasury. 


Live 
stock. 


Total. 


Total tribal 
and indi- 
vidual 
property. 


Montana: 

Rtofrtot, 


S3, 160,100 
6,531,107 
4,020,395 
3,730,000 
6,931,398 
2,080,000 


$120,000 

21,600 

4,475,314 

192,000 

60,000 

600,000 


1205,443 
878,153 
58,953 
2,915 
11,792 
62,877 




$3,584,543 
6,430,860 
9,454,662 
3,934,515 
7,003,190 
3,342,877 


$8,968,163 
11,402,945 
14,699,810 

4,091,501 
11,408,751 

3,906,961 


Crow 




Flathead 




Fort Rriknap 




Fort Peck./. 




Tongue River 








Total 


26,971,600 


5,468,914 


1,310,133 




33,750,647 


54,468,131 






Nebraska: 

Omaha 


92,200 


1,240 


36,858 
81,593 
36/, 040 




130,298 
81,593 
398,140 


4,449,821 
1,473,251 
6,434,700 


Santee 




Winnebago 


31,100 












Total 


123,300 


. 1,240 


485,491 




610,031 


12,357,772 






Nevada: 

Fallon 


22,800 

9,000 

» 10,300 

639,000 

37,390 
750,000 








22,800 
9,000 

10,300 
639,000 

37,390 
767,576 


154,095 
62,650 


Fort McDermitt 








Mbapa River 








16,535 
655,350 
360,110 
908,126 
399,900 


Nevada 








Walker River 








Western Shoshone 




17,576 




Reno, special agent 


















Total 


1,468/490 




17,576 




. 1,486,066 


2,556,766 










Albuquerque Pueblos 

Jlcarina 


1,856,716 
141,231 
619,800 
1,875,000 
3,930,000 
221,723 
783,000 


55,000 
30,000 
4,500,000 
(*) 

45,000 
19,382 
22,500 






1,911,716 

195,144 

5,119,800 

1,875,000 

3,975,000 

241,105 

806,500 


2,595,816 
1,849,409 
5,208,770 
3,045,010 


23,913 




Mescalero 




Pneblo Bonito 






Ran Jnan 






6,310,536 

443,355 

1,108,275 


Santa Fe Pueblos 






Zuni 












Total 


9,427,470 


• 4,671,882 


23,913 
76,326 
14,791 




14,123,265 
76,326 
776.430 


20,561,171 

76,326 

880,989 


New York: New York Agency.. 




North Carolina: Cherokee 


621,639 


140,000 










North Dakota: 

FortBerthoId 


1,157,784 




247,339 
25,146 
758,708 




1,405,123 

25,146 

1,947,871 


3,291,111 


FortTotten 






1,354,372 


Standing Rock 


1, 189, 163 






17,760,772 
5,041,695 


Turtle Mountain 


















Total 






1,031,193 




3,378,140 


27,447,950 








Oklahoma: 

Cantonment 






} 713,911 




713,91l{ 


1,733,030 

3,625,430 

7,637 

19,930,148 

19,515,586 

2,168,175 

2,123,425 

4,444,016 

524,678 

1,963,023 

1,816,992 

1,081,110 

2,611,651 


ChAynniA and Arapaho. 






Chilocoo .' WW. 








Kiowa 


10,000 
12,000 
6,480 




4,292,686 

7,024,565 

102,709 

232,458 

130,323 




4,302,686 

7,036,565 

109,189 

232,458 

135,123 


Osage 






Otoe 






Pawnee 






Ponca 


4,800 






Red Moon 






Saeand Fox 






618,804 




518,804 


Soger 








Seneca 


6,005 
2,933 








6,005 
2,933 


Shawnee....,., . t 
















Total 


42,218 




13,015,456 




13,057,674 


61,444,901 








Five Civilised Tribes- 
Union Agency 


•22^63,058 
( 4 ) 

(4) 
(4) 

k 


2,365,542 

(4) 
(4) 

(v 

(4) 






25,228,600 
607,431 
657,547 

2,696,677 
2,182,553 


200,521,041 
607,431 
657,547 


Cherokee Nation 


607,431 
657,547 

2,695,677 
2,182,553 




Chickasaw Nation 




Choctaw Nation 




2,390,128 


Creek Nation 




2,695,677 
2,182,553 


Seminole Nation 








Total. Five Civilised 
Tribes 


22,863,058 


2,365,542 


8,533,336 




33,761,936 


209,054,377 






Total, Oklahoma. 


22,905,276 


2,365,542 


21,548,792 




46,819,610 


270,499,278 









i Overestimated last year. 
■ Unknown, 



' Includes $15,000,000 lowest estimated value 



« See Union Agency. 



Digitized by 



/tSooglc 



266 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 58. — Value of Indians' tribal property, and tribal and individual property, June 

SO, 1913— Continued. 



States and superin tendencies. 


Lands, ex- 
clusive of 
timber. 


Timber. 


Funds in 
Treasury. 


Live 
stock. 


Total. 


Total tribal 
and indi- 
vidual 
property. 


Oregon: 

Klamath „ , 


83,257,000 
2,000 


123,160,000 


8249,361 




126,666,361 
2,000 


$28,781,546 

2,488,214 

897 


Roseburg 




Salem 








SlleU 


8,000 
214,800 
663,853 


195,000 

14,200 

2,280,000 


27,237 

233,645 

2,853 




230,237 

462,645 

2,946,706 


701,072 


Umatilla 




4,035,920 
3,689,412 


Warm Springs 








Total 


4,145,653 


25,649,200 


513,096 




30,307,949 


39,677,061 
24,368 


Pennsylvania: Carlisle 


















South Dakota: 

Canton Asylum 












1,113 


Cheyenne friver* , . , 


1,519,258 
46,619 
60,000 
112,000 




1,148,508 
186,389 


16,550 


2,674,316 
.. 233,008 


10,903,213 


Crow Creek 




2,882,842 


Flandram , 






60,000 
222,660 


98,560 


Lower Brule 




106,669 


4,000 


1,992,823 
18 


Pierre 




Pine Ridge 


1,665,223 
1,619,300 


100,000 


982,776 

3,102,522 

609,673 

277,152 




2,747,999 

4,721,822 

609,673 

277,152 


15,761,317 


Rosebud T. 




24,903,212 


Sisseton 






10,710,689 


YftnttOI 








6,442,158 










Total 


6,022,400 


100,000 


6,413,689 


10,560 


11,546,639 


71,995,945 






Utah: 

Shivwits 


15,000 
548,400 








15,000 
4,823,528 


90,211 


Uintah and Ouray 


34,875 


4,240,253 




6,645,431 
2,510 


Salt lAkn, spmlff &giuit._ T . . 
















Total 


563,400 


34,875 


4,240,253 




. 4,838,528 


6,668,152 








Washington: 

Colville 


17,372,120 

843,054 

22,650 

•835,085 

82 

1,763,550 


4,714,480 

4,213,272 

275,000 

817,875 


664,844 

141,407 

580 

187,520 




12,751,444 

5,197,733 

296,230 

1,843, 480 

5,181,500 


16,854,867 


Cushman 




7,054,080 
387,075 


Wflfth p*y 


"■"3,666" 


flpo^nn^r _ M ± ., x 


3,268,776 


TSilalfp 


3,260,787 


Y^M 


3,398,450 


19,500 




15,866,273 








Total 


10,836,541 


13,419,077 


1,013,851 


3,000 


25,272,469 


46,691,848 






Wisconsin: 

Carter 












33,804 


Hay ward 


1,000 

• 1,947,513 

92,245 

89,827 








1,000 
10,047,715 

660,462 


733,745 


Keihena, , 


6,038,840 

3,050 

570,635 


2,061,362 




10,156,197 
769,293 


Lac du Flambeau 




LaPointe 




4,404,896 


Oneida 






1 6B&844 


Red am 












, 3^826 


Toman , . , .. M L . 






534,355 




534,355 


566,995 












Total 


2,130,585 
960,664 


6,612,525 
11,250 


2,710,345 
31,779 


*66,"is6" 


11,453,455 
1,063,843 


18,685,600 


Wyoming: Shoshone 


2,-972,065 






Grand total 


120,701,799 


73,123,997 


46,668,701 


75,140 


240,569,637 


665,931,263 





i Included timber last year. 
* Overestimated last year. 

• The report for 1911 erroneously gave the value of land as $8,765,200, the value of the timber having 
been included by mistake. 



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BEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIR8. 
Table 60. — Miscellaneous field employees. 





Chief officer. 


Others. 


Total. 


Designation. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Field investigating and supervising force. 
Inspection T , . , -, 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

' 2 


13,000 
2,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 

3,000 
2,000 
2,000 

6,100 


8 
16 

4 
19 

6 

2 


$15,300 

19,720 

7,300 

26,400 

8,900 

2,700 


9 
17 

5 
20 

7 

3 
1 
5 

2 

4 
6 
20 
14 

1 
1 
1 


$18,300 
21,720 
10,900 
29,400 
11,900 

5,700 
2,000 
6,020 

6,100 

6,900 

13,900 

24,450 


Liquor 


Construction 


Health 


Schools 


Industries: 

Farming , . . . r . - - T - - . T . , . . . , 


RtOCk rftrfng. ,...,-., 


Employment 


4 


4,090 


Forestry: 

Forester and assistant forester 


Headquarters at Washington, D. C 


4 

6 
19 
4 


5,300 
13,300 
22,450 

3,360 


Field supervising officers 






Menominee r 


1 
10 

1 
1 
1 


2,000 
19,050 
3,652 
2,000 
1,500 


Special agents .,.---. * . T . . 


22,410 


Purchasing Agent of land for California Indians 

Commissioner to negotiate with Seminole Indians . 


. 3,652 






2,000 
1,500 


Attorney for Pueblo Indians 












Total 


24 


55,302 


92 


128,750 


116 


184,052 




Field irrigation service. 

Chief Inspector 

Superintendents! of irrigation . , . , , 


1 
6 


4,000 
13,600 


4 


6,700 


5 
6 


10,700 
13,600 










7 

1 


17,600 
2,000 


4 

21 


6,700 
30,660 


11 
22 


24,300 
82,660 


ArifOnaand New Mexico: Albuquerque 




Arizona: 

Pima. 


1 

1 
1 
1 


1,500 

1,200 

1,650 

780 


2 
»5 
15 


1,920 
1,405 
3,463 


3 
6 
6 
1 


8,420 

2,605 

- 5,113 

780 


Salt River 


San Carlos 


San Xavier. ....... 










Total 


4 
1 
1 

1 


5,130 

2,000 

720 

2,000 


12 
«39 


6,788 
38,880 


16 

40 

1 

7 


11,918 

40,880 

720 




Colorado: Southern Ute 


Idaho: Fort Hall 


"»6 


4,995 


6,995 






Montana: 

Crow 


1 
1 
1 


1,600 
2,000 
1,200 


9 
U 
13 


8,620 
1,113 
1,830 


10 
5 

4 


10,220 


Fort Belknap 


3,118 
3,030 


Tong»« Rivp.r 




Total 


3 


4.800 


16 


11,568 


19 


16,368 




Nevada: 

Walker River 


1 


1,200 
562 






1 
2 


1,200 
900 


Western Shoshone 


il 


338 






Total 


2 


1,762 


1 


338 


3 


2,100 




Oregon: 

Klamath 


1 
1 


2,000 
129 


»5 
1 


4,780 
69 


6 
12 


6,780 
198 


Warm Springs 






Total 


2 


2,129 


6 


4,849 


8 


6,978 




Utah: Uintah 


1 
1 

1 


2,000 
2,100 
2,100 




«12 
<22 
«13 


10,112 
21,119 
10,960 


13 
23 
14 


12,112 
23,219 
13,060 


Washington: Yakima 


Wyoming: Wind River 




rand total 


25 


44,341 


152 


146,969 


177 


191,310 




Field allotment service. 
Special allotting agents 




11 
7 
2 

16 
3 
4 

12 


32,142 

25,564 

4,000 

16,507 

1,350 

1,490 

990 


11 
7 
2 
16 
14 
15 
3 


32,142 


Appraising commissioners 






25,564 
4,000 
16,507 


Competency commissioners 






Surveyors, etc. . at large 






Arizona: Colorado River 


1 
1 

1 


1,080 
1,440 
1,000 


2,430 
2,930 
1,990 


Idaho: Fort Hall 


North Dakota: Fort Berthold 





1 All temporary positions. 
' IS were temporary positions. 



* \ tem^oTOry position. 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 
Table 60. — Miscellaneous field employee* — Continued. 



277 





Chief officer. 


Others. 


Total. 


Designation. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Num- 
ber. 


Salary. 


Field allotment tervke— Continued. 

Booth Dakota: 

Cheyenne River. . r . . T . . . . . . . 


1 

1 


$2,160 
2,160 






1 
5 


$2,160 


Pine Ridga 


4 


$3,420 


5,580 






Total. 


2 


4,320 


4 


3,420 


6 


7,740 






Washington: 

CotviUe 


(, \ 




18 
3 


20,640 
3,360 


18 
4 


• 

20,640 


Yakima 


1,080 


4,440 






Total 


1 


1,080 


21 


24,000 


22 


25,060 






Grand total . . . 


6 


8,920 


70 


109,463 


76 


118,383 






Warthoiues. 
Chicago 


1 

1 

1 


2,200 


*30 

«9 

«4 

«5 

4 


18,620 
8,225 
3,260 
4,160 
4,520 


31 
9 
5 
6 
5 


20,720 


New York 


8,225 


Omaha. 


2,000 
2,000 
2,000 


5,260 


St. Louis 


6,160 


Pa« Francisco 


6,520 






Total 


4 


8,200 


52 


38,685 


56 


46,885 







> Special allotting agent in charge. • Clerk in charge. 

* 20 were temporary positions for six months. * 1 temporary position. 

Table 61. — Recapitulation of all Indian-Service employees. 



Designation. 



Number. 



Salary. 



School 

Field irrigation and supervising force.. 

Irrigation service 

Allotment service 



ir*n*n Office employees exclusive of commissioner and assistant commissioner. . 
Grand total 



2,796 
2,250 
116 
177 
76 
56 
1222 



$1,864,254 
1,454,279 
184,052 
191,310 
118,383 
46,885 
284,550 



5,693 



4,143,722 



i The number of employees in Table 1 includes 15 field employees detailed to the Washington office. 



Digitized by 



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278 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 

b ft2. — Statement* „ Fg ..^^.^ ___._ # 

June 30, 1913, with unexpended balance*. 



Table 62. — Statements of appropriations for the Indian Service for the fiscal year ended 
fun 



Titles of appropriation. 



General ptoTfaJoni; 

Court costs, e tc., In suJta Involving lands al- 
lotted to lndiani. .....*...*..... ,. . . . 

Expenses of Indian CommiasJanora. ........ 

Wh expenses, Indiim Service 

Indian schools, nupport. . . . . .......... 

Indian school and age ncy building*. _ M . _ _ . . 

Indian school, transportation.. . » . . 

Industrial work and care of timber. 

Irrigation, Indian reservations ......,, 

Judgments. Indian depredation claims. 

Ply of Indian police. ....... ...... .. 

Fay of Interpreters . 

Pay of fudges, Indian courts 

Purchase and transportation of Indian sup- 
plles ... 

Relieving distress and prevention, ate., of 
diseases among Indtanv. .. . .............. 

Sanitary Investigations among Indians 

Suppressing liquor tr-i^c among Indians. . . 

Surveying and allot ting Indian reservations 
(reimbursable) ..,...,.. 

Telegraphing and telephoning, 



Balance In 
Treasury and 

bands or dis- 
bursing offi- 
cers June 30, 
1912. 



i9n.Slrt.Utf 
98, MS. 44 



Appropria- 
tions for fiscal 
year 1913, 



Fulfilling treaties with— 

Choctaw, Oklahoma 

Crow, Montana..... „ 

Pawnee, Oklahoma, . 

Seneca of New York.,... ,...,.__...,_.. 

Six Notions of New York . . . . 

Support of— 

Bannock, employees. Idaho. 

Cheyenne and Arapaho, Oklahoma..., . 

Chippewa of Lake Superior, Wisconsin.. . . 
ewa of the Mississippi, Minnesota. . . . 
ewa, Turtle Mountain Band, North 
koto ., 

Coeur d' Aiene, Idaho. ■ 

Confederated Bands of Uta— 

Employees, etc., Utah. . , . . . . 

Subsistence, Utah. ■ 

Dwamish and other allied tribes in Wash- i 

log ton ....... „.,,.... J 

Support of Indians in — 

Ariiona and New Mexico....... ....... J 

California I 

Nevada. ' 

Support of Indians of— 

ColvJlleand Puyallup agencies and Joseph's , 
Hand of Net Pcrees, Wash..,.. .....J 

Flathead Agency, Mont 

Fort lielknap Agency, Mont . . J 

Fort Berthofd Agency, N. Dak. ... , I 

Fort Oall Reservation, Idaho. ' 

Fort reck Agency. Mont. 

Grande Hondo and Slleti Agencies, Oreg. . J 

K Iw :sit h Agency, Oreg . 

Warm Springs Agency, Oreg. ,,......._...' 

Support of— 

Kansa Indians. Oklahoma 

KJekapoo, Oklahoma. 

Makah, Washington ...... 1 

Northern C 1 he venue and Arapuho, Montana 

Pawnee, employees, etc., Oklahoma. ....... 

Pawnee, iron, steel, etc, r Oklahoma. . 

Pawnee, schools, Oklahoma. ......... 

Poncas, Okiaboma. 

Potawatoml, Wisconsin 

Quapaw, education, Oklahoma 

Quspaw, employees, etc., Oklahoma. 

Quinaiult and Quileutcs, Washington 

Sao and Fojc of the Missouri, Kansas. 

Seminole in Florida 



Shoshoni, employees, etc., Wyoming, 

Shoshoni in Wyoming. 

Sioux of Derii3 Lake, North Dakota.. 



42,94351 



17,709.09 
10,733.(0 

7,005.41 

2,671.89 

10b 07 



82,000.00 

4,000.00 

12S.000.00 

1,430,000.00 

4ao.ooo.oo 

82,000 00 
400,000.00 
335,700.00 

75,060.00 

200,000.00 

1,200.00 

10,000.00 

285,000.00 

00,000.00 

10,000.00 
75,000.00 

250,000.00 

9,000.00 

10,00.00 
0,000*00 

30,000.00 
6,000-00 

4,500.00 

5,000.00 

as. ooo. oo 

4,000-00 

11.000.00 
3,000.00 

23,740.00 
30,000.00 

7,000.00 

330,000.00 
57,000. U0 
18,50000 



13,000.00 

9, (NX). 00 
20,000*00 
15.00000 
30,000.00 
35.000.00 

4.U0O.U0 

MXK.00 

4.000.00 

1,500.00 

^.OHO.OU 

2,tXJTMXl 

ws,ooo.oo 

6. fluO. oo 

500,00 
10,000.00 
8,000.00 
7.00000 
1,000.00 

500. iNi 
l.ooo.uii 

200i00 
a Mr,. INI 

«, una 00 
12,000.00 
5,000.00 

Digitized 



Disburse- 
ments for 



8118,39 

3,204.47 

104,717.09 

1,324, 490. £1 

305,368-72 

70.116.02 

354,2^8. 50 

301, 447. 38 

77,304.00 

184,779.02 

5^.94 

9,883.05 

25*, 727. OS 

78,531.73 

5,129.27 

©8, 896. 58 

200,970.03 

5,800.95 

17,709.00 
0.197.43 

29,291.00 
5,095.87 
3,090.02 

4,805.33 
32,389-02 

6,614.28 
3,948. 89 

10,753.78 
2,532.20 

22,001.51 

23,007.90 

A, 105. £2 

298,673.88 
47.340.21 
15,288.90 



12.421.73 

IS. ItXi. S'» 
12,350,54 
29,13386 
31,008 99 
3,759.64 
5,831.73 
3,520-85 

1,175.00 
1.953.91 
1.504.64 

76>«64.U 
6,421.18 
0.87 
8.043.04 
fi.379.6l 

s.oia.w 

363.69 
715.79 



1,348.09 
5,234.15 
11,718.18 



balance in 
United Statai 
Trwurrend 
tianda or dis- 
bursing offi- 
cers lane 30, 
1913. 



£G8ogle : 



ti,tsi.oi 

79553 
20,282.92 
95.509.49 
174,031.28 
11,883,90 
45.721.70 

125,008.09 

97,450.44 

15,230.09 

•74. OS 

1,116,95 

26,272.93 

13,498.27 
4,870.71 
6> 113.42 

82,908,48 

*, 190-06 

10,530-00 
10,538.07 

7,714.41 

2,676.02 

905.05 

10467 

2,610-98 
385.72 
£1.11 

246 22 
407.80 

1,138.49 
6,992.04 



gl.tJt 12 
9,65a 79 
3,211.04 



578.27 
1,731.68 

1.836.11 
l> r M'J.4ft 
8*6,14 
3,991-01 
240.30 
Its 27 
479. 15 

825.00 

46.00 

405.36 

5,335.86 

17383 

493.13 

!, 35fl.96 

1,62039 

1,936.54 

1U3.52 

136,31 

284.21 

200.00 

8,497.91 

765.85 

281.82 

162.31 



by 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIES. 



279 



Table 62.— Statements of appropriations for the Indian Service for the fiscal year ended 
June SO, 1913, with unexpended balances — Continued. 



Titles of appropriations. 



Balance in 
Treasury and 
hands of dis- 
bursing offi- 
cers June 30, 
1912. 



Appropria- 
tions for fiscal 
year 1913. 



Disburse- 
ments for 
1913. 



Balance in 
United States 
Treasury and 
bands of dis- 
bursing offi- 
cers June 30. 
1913. 



8upport of— Continued. 

Sioux of different tribes— 

Employee*, etc 

Subsistence and civilisation, South 

Dakota 

Sioux, Yankton tribe, South Dakota 



valla, Cayuse, and Umatilla tribes, 
Orepon. , 

Wfrhtta and affiliated bands, Oklahoma... 

Yakima and oth of Indians, Yv ashhigton 

Indian schools; 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. . . . , 

Albuquerque, N. Ma*., buildings. 

Btaaarck.N.Dak^./. 

Carlisle Pa ,__.. 

CadMe, Pa., heating plant 

Corson City, Netr„_ .„ , M „, 

Cherokee, N.C. ,-..„.. 

Cherokt*, N.C., build unjs, _, 

ChllocvOfeOkla............. 

FJf* Ctvaiced Tribes, Oklahoma 

Ftandreflu, 8. Dak, 

F Lmdieau,3. Dak,, buildings. „~. . 

Fort Mojave, Arli 

FortTottcn,N. Dak.. 4 . 

G»oa,Kehr. „ . 

Genoa, Ne.br,, buildings-*--. 

Hampton, Va ._.... 

HaywBrd, wis. .... ............ 

Haywafd, Wis,, build top 

Klckapoo Reservation, Kans. 

Lawrence, Kana......._„„.«,«»^ -...»« 

Mount Fleasant, Mich 

Mount Pieman t, Mich., claim of John E. 
Meyer. .......... 

Phoenix, Aril., ....„•,*. «.... -+..--, 

Pierre, S. Dak ,. 

Pierre, S. Dak., irrigation system ...... 

Pipestone, Mhin 

Rapid City, B.Duk 

Rapid City.B. Dak., heating plant. . -. 

Hrrersfde, C*L... 

Salem, Ore* 

Salem, Oreg. . buildings 

SauuHfl/Mex. 

Shoshnn* KffUTYLit ii.it [u Wjt or, ji-:. . .... 

Taooma, W T ash ..„..„.„„..., 

Tomab, Wis 

Truxton Canyon, Aris .......... 

Wahppton, N. Pak. T 

Wahpeton, K, Dak. , buildings. .„ „ 

IClsAeJlaneoLu: 

Administration of ami In of Five ClvOUed 
Tribes, Oklahoma...., 

Appraisement and sale of ltnf>rQVtfm-ni.s on 
coal and asphalt lands, Choctaw ad 
Chickasaw Nations, Oklahoma irtim- 
t Libie). 

Afj lum lor insane Indians, Canton, * 1 >ak. 
ylum for insane Indies Canton, S. 



$24,949.34 



6,988.50 



38,877.88 



7,056.93 



15,000.00 



52,097.27 



Asjlun 



i Colorado River, Yuma 
Reservation Cal. and Aris. ..„,._. 

Bridge acroea lh* Deschutes River, Worm 
Springs Reservation, Oree. 

Bridge across the flan Juan R Iver, at Ship- 
reck, Niivajo Reservation, N. Max 

Bridge on Old Red Lake Agency Road 
aercas Clearwater Riv^r, Minn . 

HrJdjrei, &»m Carlos Be^rration, A rif 

IfiitblitiptJip etc., Flathead Agency, M-iQt. 
( reim bumble) . 

Counsel for Pueblo Indians, New Ifexiuo. . . 

Dika, Fwt Hojaiw Reservation, A ris. . 



1,000.00 



$100,000.00 

350,000.00 

14,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 

56,900.00 

10,000.00 

22,700.00 

152,000.00 

8,769.86 
56,100.00 
32,000.00 

6,000.00 
90,500.00 
300,000.00 
66,500.00 

8,000.00 
38,400.00 
74,500.00 
58,100.00 
10,000.00 

1,690.85 
39,170.00 
18,000.00 
17,860.00 
138,750.00 
61,275.00 

116.37 
128,400.00 
39,000.00 
4,000.00 
46,175.00 
57,500.00 
5,352.07 
104,350.00 
111,000.00 
6,000.00 
58,500.00 
35,025.00 
50,000.00 
52,950.00 
22,200.00 
33,500.00 
12,500.00 



200,000.00 



5,000.00 
30,000.00 

15,000.00 
1,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,000.00 

700.00 
1,000.00 

40,000.00 
2,000.00 
25,000.00 



194,557.01 

265,369.52 
12,969.23 



2,581.15 
3,644.91 
2,454.71 

55,559.83 

34,898.93 

15,341.05 

145,709.68 

8,769.86 
50,516.00 
25,485.69 

2,097.62 
85,171.07 
296,368.47 
60,642.40 

6,588.21 

33,950.59 

65,120.21 

53,912.61 

606.88 

1,690.85 
33,041.35 



14,715.50 
133,579.67 
55,879.21 

116.37 

119,010.51 

37,364.58 

2,815.38 

43,320.41 

55,081.12 

12,409.00 

100,856.74 

106,346. 48 

13,875.68 

55,999.62 

30,888.66 

47,852.73 

47,060.54 

18,768.81 

32,540.49 

43,388.98 



199,651.86 



1,857.10 
22,629.80 



27.14 
75.00 



344.66 

3,000.00 
2,000.00 
34,059.56 



15,442.99 

84, 63a 48 
1,030.77 
1,000.00 

418.85 

1,355.09 

545.29 

1,34a 17 

50.41 

7,358.96 

6,29a 32 



5,584.00 
6,514.31 

10,840.88 
5,328.93 
3,631.53 
5,857.60 
1,411.79 
4,449.41 
9,379.79 
4,187.39 

48,271.00 



6,128.65 
18,000.00 
8,144.50 
5,170.33 
5,395.79 



9,389.49 
1,635.42 
1,184.62 
2,854.59 
2,418.88 



3,493.26 
4,653.52 
7,124.32 
2,500.38 
4,136.34 
2,147.27 
5,889.46 
3,431.19 
959.51 
21,206.29 



348.14 

8,142.90 
7, 47a 20 

i5,ooaoo 
i,ooaoo 

14,972.86 
925.00 

i,7oaoo 

655.34 

37,000.00 

940*44 



Digitized by 



Google 



280 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OP INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 62. — Statements of appropriations for the Indian Service for the fiscal year ended 
June SO, 1913, with unexpended balances — Continued. 



Titles of appropriatio 



Miscellaneous— Continued. 

Education, Sioux Nation, 8. Dak 

Granada irrigation project, Navajo Reser- 
vation. Aris 

Indemnity to certain Chickasaw Indians 
for losses— treaty of June 22, 1855 

Irrigating allotments, Yuma and Colorado 
River Reservations, Cal. and Ariz, (reim- 
bursable) 

Irrigation, Colorado River Reservation, 
Arts, (reimbursable) 

Irrigation, Pima Indian lands, Arixona 
(reimbursable) 

Irrigation, Ban Carlos Reservation, Ark 

Irrigation system, Blackfeet Reservation, 
Mont, (reimbursable) 

Irrigation system, Flathead Reservation, 
Mont, (reimbursable) 

Irrigation system, Fort Peck Reservation, 
Mont, (reimbursable) 

Irrigation system, Milk River, Fort Bel- 
knap Reservation, Mont, (reimbursable).. 

Irrigation system, Papago Reservation, 
Arii 

Irrigation, Uintah Reservation, Utah (re- 
imbursaDle) 

Irrigation system. Wind River (diminished) 



Reservation, Wyo. (reimbursable). 
Irrigation, Yakima Reservation, v 



Wash, 
(reimbursable) 

Line riders, northern Cheyenne Reserva- 
tion, Mont 

Maintenance and operation, Fort Hall irri- 

fatktn system, Idaho 
employees: 

Fort Lapwai Agency. Idaho 

Mackinac Agency, Mich 

New York Agency, N. Y 

Sao and Fox Agency, Iowa. 



Sac and Fox Agency, Okla. . 
icy, Okla.. 



Seneca Agency, 

Shawnee Agency, Okla. 

Pay of Indian agent, Utah 

Pay of physician, Shivwits School, Utah. . . 

Payment of drainage assessments, Indian 

lands, Oklahoma (reimbursable) 

Payment to— 

N. D. Brayton, physician, Pima Reserva- 
tion. Ariz 

Confederate Bands of Utes (reimbursable).. 

Clarence J. Stacy, supervisor of ditches, 
Pima Reservation, Ariz 

Tillamooks and other Ind ians of Oregon. . . . 

Protecting property interests of minor 
allottees, Five Civilized Tribes 

Reimbursement of Peter Moctelmy, a 
Coeur d'Alene Indian. Idaho 

Relief of Indians in Utah 

Relief of Kickapoo* in Mexico 

Relief and settlement of Apache Indians 
held as prisoners of war at Fort Sill, Okla. 

Roads and bridges. Shoshone Reservation, 
Wyo. (reimbursable) 

Sale of unallotted lands, Five Civilized 
Tribes (reimbursable) 

Sale of unallotted lands, Omaha Reserva- 
tion, Nebr. (reimbursable) 

Sawmill, etc. .Flathead Reservation, Mont. 



Balance in 
Treasury and 
hands oi dis- 
bursing offi- 
cers June 30, 
1912. 



$61,228.62 



500.00 
48,915.64 



152,485.60 

146,413.70 

106.10 

131.77 



77,529.81 

13,365.02 

882.79 



Surveying Fort Belknap Reservation, Mont, 

Water supply, Nomadic Papago Indians, 

Arizona 



Total 918,467.54 9,084,755.89 



Appropria- 
tions for fiscal 
year 1913. 



$200,000.00 
35,000.00 
38,035.00 

52,362.62 

35,000.00 

15,000.00 
15,000.00 

100,000.00 

200,000.00 

100,000.00 

15,022.45 

5,000.00 

75,000.00 

60,000.00 

15,000.00 

1,500.00 

20,000.00 

2,200.00 
2,000.00 
2,250.00 
1,080.00 
2,060.00 
1,500.00 

900.00 
1,800.00 

500.00 

40,000.00 

726.67 
100,000.00 

660.00 
66,000.00 

15,000.00 

500.00 
10,000.00 
15,000.00 

200,000.00 

10,000.00 

25,000.00 

3,000.00 

20,000.00 
5,000.00 

5,000.00 



Disburse- 
ments for 
1913. 



$167,772.53 
12,219.84 
38,035.00 

52,362.62 

33,764.36 

42,145.20 
14,791.53 

180,650.67 

194,122.67 

20,333.67 

15,154.22 

4,928.37 

34,523.67 

27,855.16 

15,062.34 

1,44D. 00 

9,441.85 

1,986.10 
2,000.00 
2,250.00 
1,080.00 
2,060.00 
1,500.00 
900.00 



499.99 
21,793.41 

726.67 
99,957.65 

660.00 



13,910.04 

500.00 
6,267.06 
15,000.00 

26,748.25 

478.47 

24,525.36 



7,731.25 
4,952.84 

4,876.42 



7,844,323.28 



Balance in 
United States 
Treasury and 
hands of dis- 
bursing offi* 
cars June 30, 
1913. 



$93,456.09 
22,780.16 



1,735.64 

31,770.44 
208.47 

71,834.93 

152,291.03 

79,772.43 



71.63 

118,008.14 

35,509.86 

820.45 

6a 00 

10,558.15 

213.90 



1,800.00 
.01 

18,206.59 



42.35 



66,000.00 
1,089.98 



3,732.94 



173,251.75 

9,521.53 

474.64 

3,000.00 

12,268.75 
47.16 

123.58 



2,158,900.15 



Digitized by VjOOQlC 



BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



281 



Table 63. — Commissioner's account for fiscal year ended June 80, 1918. 

(Cheeks, drafts, and other instruments of exchange, drawn to the order of the commissioner, are received 
in the office as deposits with bids for tribal leasing privileges, guarantees for rights of way across Indian 
lands, and for various other purposes. For such receipts the commissioner renders monthly accounts 
as required by section 3622, Revised 8tatutes.] 

On hand July 1,1913 $13,110.10 

Receipts: 

July, 1913 $81.60 

August. 1912 1.50 

September, 1912. 8,127.20 

October, 1912. 5,004.10 

November, 1912 9,848.41 

December, 1912. 3,664.85 

January, 1913 362.44 

February, 1913 116.02 

March, 1913 1,241.18 

April, 1913 703.16 

May, 1913 31.45 

June, 1913. 355.09 

29,537.00 

Total on hand and received 42,647.10 

Disbursed and deposited during year: 

July, 1912 8,071.10 

August. 1912. 3.10 

September, 1912 5,001.60 

October, 1913. 7.50 

November, 1912 11.35 

December, 1912. 76.60 

January, 1913. 32.10 

February . 1913 124.90 

March, 1913 5,137.75 

April, 1913 55.17 

May, 1913 1,640.40 

June, 1913 345.54 

20,507.11 

Balance June 30, 1913 22,139.99 

Table 64. — Classified statement of total receipts and disbursements of the Indian Service 
for the fiscal year ended June 80, 1918 (exclusive of individual Indian moneys). 





In Treasury 

and hands of 

disbursing 

officers 
June 30, 1912. 


Received 

during fiscal 

year 1913. 


Total on 
hand and 
received. 


Disbursed 

during fiscal 

year 1913. 


In Treasury 

and hands of 

disbursing 

officers 
June 30, 1913. 


General provisions 

Fulfilling treaty stipulations 

Supports (gratuities) 

Schools ana school buildings. 

Trust funds and interest. 

Indian moneys, proceeds of labor . 
Miscellaneous , , . 


$281,531.58 

496,860.90 

137,381.98 

948,084.65 

38,828,773.67 

2,568,675.65 

8,768,560.56 


$1,982,329.74 
860,263.89 
777,846.00 
4,215,595.61 
9,683,700.10 
4,489,248.60 
4,301,390.33 


$2,243,861.32 

1,357,124.79 

915,227.98 

5,163,680.26 

48,512,473.77 
7,057,924.25 

13,069,950.89 


$1,688,253.80 

856,981.03 

765,583.40 

4,277,380.54 

8,434,327.41 

i 3,373,552.23 

7,434,017.75 


$555,607.53 

500,163.76 

149,644.58 

886,299.73 

40,078,146.36 

* 3,684,372.02 

* 5,635,933.14 






Total 


52,029,868.99 


26,290,374.27 


78,320,243.26 


426,830,076.16 


51,490,167.10 





i The $3,373,552.23 disbursed as "Indian moneys, proceeds of labor," includes $1,509,158 placed in Okla- 
homa banks, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved Mar. 3, 1911 (36 Stat. L., 1058-70). 

* Includes $1,959,308.13 balance of proceeds of sale of unallotted lands of Five Civilised Tribes, Oklahoma. 

* Includes proceeds of sale of Indian lands (other than Five Civilized Tribes). $4,209,315.35; irrigation 
funds, $521,560.23; surveying and allotting Indian reservations, $89,088.20, and other miscellaneous funds, 
$815,969.36. 

* The total amount disbursed during the fiscal year 1913 includes reimbursements to the United States 
on account of reimbursable appropriations, surplus fund items, amounts placed in Oklahoma banks (see 
note 1), transfers, and disbursements on account of obligations incurred during the fiscal year 1913 and 



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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



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110,476.74 

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1,358.68 


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413,504.11 

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213,271.57 

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43,300.00 

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345,343.21 

462,081.88 

17,842.51 

453.188.18 

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10,800.00 


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20,867.65 

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136,003.34 

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11,646.44 


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REPOBT OP THE COMMISSIONEB OF INDIAN AFFAIBS. 



Table 67. — Interest-bearing tribal funds held in trust by the Government July 1, 

191S. 



Tribe and tuBd* 



DateofaoU, 

resolutions, or 

treaUea, 



Statutes at 
Large* 



Voir 
uma. 



Page. 



Amount in 

United States 

Trewuiy. 



A anaal In- 
ter*! tat 

3, 4, and 5 
percent. 



Apache, K Iowa, and Comancho fund 

Apache, Kiowa, and Comanche 4 percent 
land... ..... ... ...., 



Black feet Reservation 4 per cent fund 

Cherokee national fund. . . . . . . ; 

Cherokee orphan fund, ...*,„.*,_.,*«*«.,.« 

Cherokee school fond 

Cheyenne and Arapahotu Oklahoma fond. 
Cheyenne and Arapaho in Oklahoma 3 per 

cent fund ............. 

Cheyenne Hirer Reservation 3 per cent 

rand.. . * 

Chickasaw national fond 



Chippewa In Minnesota fund. 



Choctaw orphan fund * . 

Choctaw school fund .„..»_,. 

Choctaw 3 per cent fund - . 

Coeur d' Alene 3 per cent fund . 

Confederated Bands of Utes 4 percent fund 

Creek general fund,... 



Crow 4 per cent fund. .......,..„„..„., 

Crow 4 per cent hospital fund,,. »i 

Crow Creek 4 per cent fund ,„ 

Fort Hall Reservation 4 per cent fund . . . . 
Fort Berthold Reservation 3 pet cent fund , 

Iowa fund „..„. — ......... 

Kansas consolidated fund *. , . . 

Klckapoo general fund. „ , ...... . 

Kickapoo fn O klahoma fund. ........... * 

Klamath fund 

L'Anseand Vieui Desert Chippewa fund. 

Menominee fund 

Menominew log fund. . 

Nei Percos of Idaho fund. ........ 

North rarolEua Cherokee, payment to. ... 

Omaha fund ....................... 



/June 0,1000 
YMar. 3,1901 
June 5,1906 
Juno 2R, 190* 
Mar. 27, IMS 
June 10,lftSX> 
Apr. 1,1830 

....do ... 

....do....... 

Mar. 3,1801 

Jane 17,1010 
May 29,1908 
June 23.1010 
Apr. USM 

(Jan. 14,1*89 
Feb. 2A,im 
June 27.1902 
May 29,190* 
Apr. 1 T 18SQ 

....do 

Mar, 1,1907 
June 31,1801 
Mar. 4,1913 
J Apr. 1, 1*80 
\May 37,1002 
Apr. 37,1004 

....do 

2,1805 
0,1000 
1, 1910 
1,1 wi 
1,1002 

1,1880 



Mar, 

June 
Juno 
Apr. 
July 
Apr. 

June 10,1896 
June 21 , 1900 
Apr. 1,1880 
do, 



Osage fund > 



Oto and Missouri fund., 
Pawnee fund ...... 



Pine Ridge Reservation 3 percent fund.. 

Ponca fund 

Potawu tomi education fund 

Potawatoral general fund, 

Fotawatotni mills fund 

Pot&ivaiotui of Kansas and Wisconsin fund 
Puyalhip 4 per cent school fund ....... 

Rosebud Reservation a per cent fund.. 
Rosebud Reservation 3 per cent fund. . 

Round Valley general fund * 

fcac and Vox of rho Mississippi In Towa fund 
Bac and Fox of the Mississippi In Okla- 
homa fund 



Sac and Fox of the Mississippi fund, Iowa. 

Sac and Fox of the Mississippi fund, Okla- 
homa. 

Seminole general fund ... ............. 



June 12,1890 
Aug. 15,1804 
Aug. 15,1870 
June 10,1872 
An«. 7,1882 
July 15,1S70 
May 10.1872 
June 10,1330 
Aug. 10,1890 
Aug. 15,1876 
Apr. 10,1870 
Apr. 22,1900 
May 27,1010 
Mar. 3,1881 
Apr. 1,1SS0 

....do 

...do 

Apr. 4 t 191Q 
Mar. 3.1S93 
Mar. 2,1007 
May 30,1010 
/Oct. 1, 1690 
iMar. 3.1RM 
June 10. I**; 

Feh. IS, 1801 
/Mar. 3,1004 
\Apr. 4, 1010 

....do 

Apr. 1,1BS0 



% 


740 


:*;> 


803 


M 


><> 


ft 


803 


m 


280 


» 


70 



078 X 

looa > 

213 
550 

40 
354 

70 

70 

70 
1024 



160 

I--OJ 

70 

042 

17 

400 

455 

70 

70 

1027 

335 

034 

70 

240 

Mi 

352 

888 

072 

458 

70 

538 

70 

328 

3i~ 

70 

70 

140 

331 

107 

SOI 

341 

362 

yft 

202 

344 

208 

28 

€0 

442 

422 

70 

70 

70 

2S9 

633 

1230 

451 

658 

1000 

331 



1005,514,03 

2,951,103.18 

250,250,50 
104 T 331.KO 
32,851,38 
270,330.41 
503,119,07 

103,472,71 
877,410.20 
214,255.15 

4,005,438.82 

30,71000 
40,472,70 
334,154.94 
380,010.57 
3,510,731.65 

2. 472, 940. la 
100.000,00 
50,00000 

2,504.78 

217,537.68 

170. II 

126,057-61 

80,115.05 

3,397.57 

1-7,01- 1J 

045,84 

lS3.031ii.3B 

1,737,550.07 

14,790.00 
15,804.75 



0,007,722.88 

348,065.07 

224,128.88 

07,305,28 

60,125.12 

40,003.14 

46,08541 

0,030,17 

180,758.00 

125.299.17 

1,000,000-00 

204 t 165.38 

609.09 

10,334.96 

10,20035 
335, 878. 20 

497,030,02 
1,000,000.00 



148,275.75 

118,056.13 

10,250.38 
0,716, SO 
1,642 M 

n. m, n 

20,655.05 

3,104 18 
20,322-5* 

10,712.1* 

240,771,04 



i,ma 

2.473.63 

10.024,65 

U r 007.50 

140,669,27 

123,017.31 

4.00000 

2,000 00 

1,154,02 

100. 19 

0,520. 13 

854 

6,347.88 

4.455,78 

10O.SB 

6,35176 

32.29 

7,65107 

80,877.53 

142.71 

739.55 

790.24 



334,880,14 

17.447.a0 
11,206.34 
2,920,90 
3,30635 

2,m it 

451.51 
t O37 00 
5.01197 
30,000.00 

r. 124 9ft 



516.75 

810.62 

10,343.91 

24,8.11.80 
50,000,00 



» The " Osage fund " and "Kansas consolidated fund " have been segregated and are carried on the books 
of the Indian Office to the credit of individual members of the tribes. 

• The "Round Valley general fund" will bear no interest until the United States has been reimbursed 
for the amount appropriated in carrying out the provisions of the acts approved Oct. 1, 1890 (20 8tat. L., 
658), and of Mar. 3, 1801 (26 Stat. L., 1006). 



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BEPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



287 



Table 67 .—Interest-bearing tribal funds held in trust by the Government July 1, 

1915— Continued. 



Tribe »nd fund. 



Date of acts, 

resolutions, or 

treaties. 



Statutes at 
Large. 



Vol- 
ume. 



Page. 



Amount in 

United States 

Treasury. 



Annual in- 
terestat 

8, 4, and 5 
percent. 



Seminole school fund 

Beminole of Oklahoma fund 

Seneca; Tonawanda Band, fund. 

Seneca and Shawnee fund 

Seneca of New York fund 

Shoshoni and Bannock fund. 

8Ifetx general fund 

Sioux funds: 

Cheyenne River 

Crow Creek. , 

Flandrean 

Lower Brule 

Pine Ridge 

Ponca 

Rosebud 

8antee 

Standing Rock 

Tongue River 

8bseton and Wahpeton fund . 



8tanding Rock Reservation 3 per cent fund 

Stockbndge consolidated fund 

Uinta and White River Ute fund. . . 

Umatilla general fund 

Umatilla school fund 

Ute 5 per cent fund. 



'Winnebago fund, Nebraska. . . 

Winnebago fund, Wisconsin. 
Yankton Sioux fund 



July 1,1898 
Mar. 3,1900 
Apr. 1,1880 

do 

Mar. 3,1909 
July 3,1882 
Aug. 15,1894 

Mar. 2,1889 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Mar. 3,1891 
May 29,1908 
Feb. 6,1871 
May 24,1888 
Mar. 3.1885 
Aug. 5,1882 
Apr. 29,1874 
/Mar. 3,1909 
\July 1, 1912 

do 



Aug. 15,1894 



35 


806 


21 


70 


21 


70 


35 


800 


22 


149 


28 


324 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


25 


895 


26 


1039 


35 


463 


16 


405 


25 


157 


23 


243 


22 


297 


18 


41 


35 


798 


37 


187 


35 


798 


37 


187 


28 


319 



1500,000.00 
528,770.00 
48,842.60 
1,565.31 
11,931.22 
6,521.83 
13,948.76 

302,444.15 

148,262.64 

36.33 

35,955.02 

834,085.48 

458.00 

689,030.56 

122.85 

478,638.95 

48,075.07 
603,719.36 
200,560.95 

71,522.30 

18,499.01 
193,700.59 

22,078.71 
455,493.67 

344,932.19 

534,354.74 
276,504.33 



125,000.00 

26,438.50 

2,442.13 

78.26 

596.56 

326.09 

697.44 

15,122.21 

7,413.13 

1.82 

1,797.75 

41,704.27 

22.90 

34,451.53 

6.14 

23,931.95 

2,403.75 

30,185.97 

6,016.83 

3,576.11 

924.95 

9,685.03 

1,103.93 

22,774.68 

17,246.61 

26,717.74 
13,825.22 



Total. 



38,045,686.30 



1,767,506.92 



CHANGES DURINO THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1913, IN INTEREST-BEARING TRIBAL 
FUNDS HELD BY THE GOVERNMENT. 



Tribe and fund. 



Apache, Kiowa, and Comanche fund 

Apache, Kiowa, and Comanche 4 per cent fund 

Bbokfeet Reservation 4 per cent fund 

Cherokee national fund 

Cherokee orphan fund 

Cherokee school rand 

Cheyenne and Arapahoin Oklahoma fund 

Cheyenne and Arapaho in Oklahoma 3 per cent fund. 

Cheyenne River Reservation 3 per cent fund 

Chickasaw national fund 

Chippewa in Minnesota fund 

Choctaw 8 per cent fund 

Coeur d' Alene 3 per cent fund 

Confederated Bands of Utes 4 per cent fund 

Crow fond 

Crow 4 per cent fund 

Crow 4 per cent hospital fund 

Crow Creek 4 per cent fund 

Fort Belknap Reservation 4 per cent fund 

Fort Berthoid Reservation 3 per cent fund 

Fort Hall Reservation 4 per cent fund 

Iowa fund 

Kansas consolidated fund 

Klamath fund 

I/Anse and Vieux Desert Chippewa fund 

Menominee log fund 

Menominee 4 per cent fund 

North Carolina Cherokee, payment to 

Omaha fund 

Osage fund 

Osage school fund 

Pawnee fund 

Pine Ridge Re s et ration 3 per cent fund 



Increase. 



$52, 86a 57 



33,672.07 
230, 69a 59 



612,513.86 



124,777.45 
3,516,731.65 



100,000.00 
60,000.00 



44,005.59 



1,369,742.66 



14,79a 96 
1,356.06 



Decrease. 



$44,897.22 



17,G5a00 
129,869.30 
329, 97a 00 
262,266.45 
111,394.86 



6,367.09 
"44*i6L*i4 



6,614.05 



6,533.91 
3,94a 94 



397.87 

17a 54 

11,908.66 

7,946.55 

38.35 



1,079,079.40 



Digitized by 



1,699,588.68 
119,911.53 
107,400.07 

Google 



288 



REPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



Table 67. — InUrestrbearing tribal funds held in trust by the Government July 1, 

1913 — Continued. 

CHANGES DURING THE TEAR ENDED JUNE 30. 1013, IN INTEREST-BEARING TRIBAL 
FUNDS HELD BY THE GOVERNMENT— Continued. 



Tribe and fond. 



Increase. 



Decrease. 



Poncafund 

Potawatomi education fund 

Potawatomi general fund 

Potawatomi mills fund 

PuyaUup 4 per cent school fund 

Rosebud Reservation 3 per cent fund 

Round Valley general fund 

Sao and Fox of the Mississippi in Iowa fund 

Sao and Fox of the Mississippi In Oklahoma fund . 

Sao and Fox of the Mississippi fund, Iowa 

Sao and Fox of the Mississippi fund, Oklahoma. . . . 

Seneca, Tonawanda Band, fund 

Seneca of New York fund 

Shoshoniand Bannock fund 

Siletz general fund 

Sioux fund- 
Cheyenne River 

Crow Creek 

Flandreau 

Lower Brule 

Pine Ridge 

Rosebud 

Stan ding Rock 

Standing Rock Reservation 3 per cent fund 

Umat ill a general fund. 

Umatilla school fund 

Ute 5 per cent fund 

Winnebago fund 

Winnebago fund, Nebraska 

Winnebago fund, Wisconsin 

Yankton Sioux fund 



$20, 42a 23 
7*06 



37a 00 



344,032. 10 
534,354.74 



Total 

Net increase.. 



7,060,133.56 



7,060,133.56 



$865.02 

302.80 

056.68 

* 88.52 

54,54L21 



147.40 



1,80LU 
2,688.06 
60,171.48 
5,886.63 
1,74L8« 



2,554.00 

24,837.06 

6,547.68 

6,10 

2,267.30 

51,805.78 

65L35 

20,202.77 

66,386.87 

35,422.62 

5, 76a 72 

4,167.56 

870,286.03 



15,334.40 



5,248,714.54 
l,8U,4ia02 



7,060,133.56 



INTEREST-BEARING FUNDS BELONGING TO MINORS AND HELD IN TRU8T JULY 1, 

1013. 





Date of acts, 
resolutions, 
or treaties. 


Statutes at 
Large. 


Amount in 

United 8tates 

Treasury. 


Annual 
interest at 3 




Vol- 
ume. 


Page. 


and 5 per 
cent. 


Devils Lake Sioux minors' 3 per cent fund . 
Grande Ronde minors' fund 


June 21,1006 
do.. 


34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
34 

34 
34 

34 

34 
34 
34 
34 
34 


327 
327 
327 
327 
327 
327 
327 
327 

327 
327 

327 

327 
327 
327 
327 
327 


$111.82 
13,037.01 
60,752.00 
27,65a 08 
14,707.23 
00, 24a 02 
61,600.08 
258.16 

1,182.10 
65, 46a 35 

3,422 71 

1,504.20 
458.00 
2,825.57 
7,108.01 
4,075.64 


S3. 35 

606.85 


Iowa minors' fund 


do 


3,487.60 

1,382.66 

780.86 


Kickapoo minors' fund 


do 


Omaha minors' fund 


do 


Otoe *n*1 Missouri minors' fund 


do 


4,062.40 

3,084.05 

7.74 


Potawatomi minors' fund 


do 


Quapaw minors' 3 per cent fund 


do 


lied" Lake Chippewa minors' 3 per cent 
fund 


do 


35.46 


Rosebud Sioux minors' 3 per cent fund . . . 


do 


1,963.81 
17L13 


Sao and Fox of the Missouri minors' 
fund 


do 


Sioux fund— 

Flandreau minors' 


do 


70.71 


Ponca minors' 


do 


22.00 


Santee minors' 


do 


14L28 


Sfsseton and Wahpeton minors' fund 


do 


350.04 


Tonkawa minors' hind 


do 


203.78 








Total 


373.673.07 


17,343.41 











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REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



289 



Table 67. — Interest-bearing tribal funds' held in trust by the Government July 1, 

1913 — Continued. 

CHANGES DURING THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1913, IN INTEREST-BEARING FUNDS 
BELONGING TO MINORS, AND HELD IN TRUST BY THE GOVERNMENT. 



Tribe and fond. 



Decrease. 



Devil's Lake Sioux minors 1 3 per cent fond. 

Grande Ronde minora* fund 

Iowa minora' fond 

Kickapoo minors' fund 

Omaha minora' fund 

Otoe and Missouri minora' fund 

Potawatomi minora' fund . 



Quapaw minors' 3 per cent fund 

Red Lake Chippewa minora' 3 per cent fund. . 

Rosebud Sioux minora' 3 per cent fund 

Sioux fund— 

Flandreaa minora' 

Ponca minors' 

Santee minors' 

Sfsseton and Wahpeton minora' fund 



S7.65 
1,752.78 
6,513.30 

341.39 
4,326.58 
6,203.64 
2,788.68 

129.10 
1,926.94 
17,447.80 

159.42 
229.00 
245.70 
371.36 



Total decrease 42,443.14 



RECAPITULATION. 



Principal. 



Annual in- 
terest. 



Tribal interest-bearing funds. . 
Minora' interest-bearing funds. 

Total 



8,045,686.30 
373,673.97 



38,419,360.27 



$1,767,506.92 
17,343.41 



1,784,850.33 



Tablb 68. — Incomes of Indian tribes from all sources for the fiscal year ended June 30, 

1913. 



Tribe or Indiana. 



Interest on 
trust fund. 



Trenty 
and &un?fl- 
raont ob- 
ligations. 



Gratuities. 



Indian 
moneys, pro- 
ceeds of 
labor, and 
miscellane- 
ous. 



Processor 
land, includ- 
ing town 
lots. 



TdUJ. 



Apache, Kiowa, and Co- 
che. 



Arapaho in Wyoming. . . 
Bannocks, Wyoming. . . . 

Blackf eet, Montana 

Cherokee, Oklahoma. . . . 
Cheyenne and Arapaho . 
Chickasaw. Oklahoma. . 
Chfopewa m Minnesota. . 
Chfppewa of the Missis- 
sippi (White Earth)... 
Chippewa of Red Lake, 

- """*oi Lake 8u- 



$166,786.43 



10,919.87 
41,434.73 
35,106.52 
10,790.18 
222,425.76 



132,725.00 
5,000.00 



$35,000.00 



4,000.00 



74.30 



. _, ^ _ j, TurtleMoun- 
tamBand 

Choctaw, Oklahoma 

Ooenr d'Alene 

Colorado River Indians . 

Colville 

Creak, Oklahoma 

Crow, Montana 

Dwamlshand other al- 
lied tribes in Washing- 
ton...- 

Fort Hall Indians 



15,014.84 
9,987.90 



10,520.00 
3,000.00 



7,000.00 
11,000.00 



123,647.30 
6,231.94 



6,000.00 



7,000.00 
30,000.00 



814,234.26 



177,571.23 



7,436.37 

3,822.20 

740.40 

67,106.34 



72,454.60 
37,008.91 



34,535.07 

33,682.47 

613,153.12 

^805,861.39 

211.67 

49,443.08 



87,868.46 



4,926.94 
4,469.26 
13,453.76 
79,578.81 



1,860,323.03 

127,335.48 

7,211.00 

6,807.94 

136,105.64 

378,721.85 



434.50 



1 Proceeds of land and timber 



15936°— int 1913— vol 2 



8244,357.66 

46,959.26 

5,000.00 

18,356.24 

79,792.00 

104,529.39 

691,049.64 

1,028,287.16 

4,211.67 

121,971.98 

44,006.91 

11,000.00 

1,973,726.33 

140,323.38 

12,137.94 

11,277.28 

273,206.70 

470,532.60 



7,000.08 
80,434.50 



Digitized by 



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290 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIB8. 



Table 68. — Incomes of Indian tribes from all sources for the fiscal year ended June SO, 

19 IS — Continued. 



Tribe or Indians. 



Interest on 
trust fond. 



Treaty 
and agree- 
ment ob- 
ligations. 



Gratuities. 



Indian 
moneys, pro- 
ceeds of 
labor, and 
miscellane- 
ous. 



Proceeds of 
land, includ- 
ing town 
lots. 



Total. 



New 



Indians in— 
Arizona and 

Mexico 

California 

Nevada 

Indians of— 

ColTille and Puyal- 
hip Agencies and 
Joseph's Band of 

NesPeroes 

Flathead Reserva- 
tion, Mont 

Fort Belknap Reser- 
vation. Mont. 

Fort Berthold Res- 
ervation, Mont 

Fort Peck Reserva- 
tion, Mont 

Fort Yuma Reser- 

'^ation.Cal 

Grande Ronde Res- 
ervation, Oreg 

Grande Ronde and 
SUets Reserva- 
tions, Oreg 

Klamath Reserva- 
tion, Oreg 

Klamath River Res- 
ervation, Cal 

San Carlos Reserva- 
tion 

Wind River Reser- 
vation, Wyo 

Iowa 

Jicarilla, New Mexico... 

Kaibab 

Kansa 

Kickapoo 

L'Anse and Vieux Des- 
ert Chippewa, Michl- 

^ jan 

Makah 

Malxl 

McnomJnw 



191.90 
6,582.43 



$330,000.00 
57,009.00 
18,500.00 



13,000.00 
9,000.00 
20,000.00 
15,000.00 
35,000.00 



$44,965.31 

59.88 

7,094.59 



4,343.71 

3,448.73 

22,868.22 

17,675.72 



$127,833.63 



773.30 



6,502.62 



4,000.00 
6,000.00 



9,761.55 



59,713.54 



3,700.73 



6,636.62 
6,019.35 



L18 



1,500.00 
2,000.00 



23,970.49 
3.60 



2,000.00 



Navajo.... 

Nea Pence in Idaho 

North Carolina Cherokee 

Northern Cheyenne..... 

Omaha.. ■,_,.. l .,. 

Osage ...« 

OtooandlOssonrL 

Pawnee ,...., 

Pima 

Ponca In Oklahoma and 
Nebraska. 

Potawatoml, Kansas.... 

PotawatomI of Kun-tas 
and Wisconsin. 

PotawatomJ of TVfccon- 
sm 

Puyailup , 

Qnapaw ..,..„ 

Qa frmfel t an d Qu ilmite. . 

Round Valley Indians, 
California 

Sao and Fox of tho Mis- 
sissippi, Iowa...,. 

Sac ana Fox of the Mis- 
sissippi Oklahoma.. . . 

Sac ana Fox of tho Mis- 
souri ,..„ 

Seminole In Oklahoma.. 

Seminole In Florida, . 

Seneca and Shawnee.... 

S e n e c a . Tana wrinda 
Band, New York 



82,888.12 



1,593.85 

391,741.12 

22,708.85 

13,320.87 



$52,275.00 
47,166.66" 



170.15 

382,827.12 

1,327.11 

767.48 

115.93 



1,152.00 
786,245.44 



620.50 



3,341.33 
7,979.92 

9,087.90 



8,000.00 



6,977.73 
11.38 



1,500.00 



7,000.00 

*i,"666."66 



19,960.75 

27,362.77 

171.14 
101,475.17 



3,905.00 



200.00 



78.26 
2,569.35 



9,846.00 



1,275.16 



105,349.49 

720.00 

2,299.87 

475.00 



34.39 



58,889.18 



1.356.06 
1,534.58 



14,306.41 



9,288.44 



1,418.71 



11,646.44 



$374,965.81 
57,009.88 
25,504.69 



13,000.00 
141,177.34 
23,540.03 
149,300.14 
53,396.72 
2,209.87 
1,248.30 

4,000.00 

22,254.17 

34.39 

59,713.54 

68,389.18 
3, 700l 73 

23,970.49 

3.60 

8,136.62 

8,019.35 



33.18 
2,000.00 

iTa 15 

465,715.24 

1,327.11 

910.12 

115.96 

52,275.00 

4,101.91 

1,179,521.14 

22,708.85 

60, 42a 87 

62a 50 

11,341.33 
22,288.33 

9,097.90 

7,ooaoo 

16,266.17 
1,511.88 

i,ooaoo 

1,418.71 

23,895.75 

27,362.77 

871.14 

114,396.77 

9,846.00 

78.29 



2,569.81 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS. 



291 



Tablb 68. — Incomes of Indian tribes from all sources for the fiscal year ended June SO, 

1913— Continued. 



Tribe or Indians. 


Interest on 
trust fund. 


Treaty 
and agree- 
ment ob- 
ligations. 


Gratuities. 


Indian 
moneys, pro- 
ceeds of 
labor, and 
miscellane- 
ous. 


Proceeds of 
land, includ- 
ing town 


TotaL 








Benson of New York 


9852.40 
318.95 


86,000.00 




$2,329.82 




$8,982.22 
728.96 


gftflafr^gii mvI PfHTIKKTlT , 




$410.00 


ffhoffhonifn Wywi*«g. 


6,000.00 


$12,000.00 


14,213.22 


82,213.22 


Sflste. OraaonT. T... 


818.14 




818.14 


SSrf-?^ 


562,000.00 


88,000.00 


■""*60,*434.*38" 


366,593.26 
233,495.99 


1,016,593.26 

316,273.90 

8,976.08 

14,419.50 

86.99 


Cheyenne River 

Crow Greek, ....... . 


32,343.53 

8,976.08 

6.00 

86.99 

1,850.94 

46,600.53 

64.24 

72,488.44 

151.89 

32,658.33 

2,403.76 

14,256.08 
30,557.96 






Devils Lake 




5,000.00 




9,413.50 


Fiend rean 






Lower Brule 






6,381.89 
5,337.62 


1,590.76 
2,667.84 


9,823.59 

64,605.99 

54.24 


Pine Ridge 

Ponce, Nebraska.... 
Rosebud 














116.00 


341,353.34 


413,957.78 


fjantee 






151.89 


Standing Rook. 

Tongue River 

Yankton Reserva- 
tion., , 






30,240.88 
19,294.79 


324,497.87 


387,397.08 
21,698.56 

28,256.08 








14,000.00 




flftseton and Wahpeton. 

Six Nations of New 

York. 








30,557.96 

4,500.00 

6,716.60 

3,576.12 

203.78 


4,500.00 
1,000.00 








Spokane 






91.00 


4,624.60 




3,676.12 
203.78 




TonkawaT. 










Truxton Canyon In- 

4%m...rrr?. 






13,693.00 
1,757.98 




13,693.00 
1,757.98 

278,259.68 


T^ie River Indians 










u 5 , .?^!^ d . B ^ 


162,028.45 
924.96 


38,740.00 


15,000.00 


62,491.23 

285,061.31 

4,286.51 

12,138.70 


Ute, Uintah, etc 

Ute, Southern... 


6,698.05 
4,895.02 

51.50 
2,765.74 


292,704.82 






9,131.53 


Wifia Walla, Gayuse, 
and Umatilla fUm. . . 


11,541.38 




3,000.00 
4,000.00 

5,000.00 


26,731.58 


Warm (tarings Indian*. . 




6,765.74 


Wichita and affiliated 
bands , 






2,157.39 


7,157.89 


Winnebago, Nebraska. . . 

Winnebago. Wisconsin. . 

Yakima and other tribes, 

Washington. 


18,855.89 
25,108.45 




54.75 


18,910.64 








25,108.45 
19,907.33 




3,000.00 


16,907.33 














Total 


1,830,583.84 


780,560.00 


777,846.00 


1,940,596.91 


6,116,369.47 


11,445^56^2 







COMPARISON. 



Total, 1912. 
Total, 1911. 
Total, 1900. 
Total, 1898. 



$1,740,296.27 
1,911, 909. 28 
1,387,349.37 
1,419,213.25 



$594,560.00 
1,177,586.45 
270,648.82 
3,114,207.70 



$909,000.00 
707,145.39 
712,625.00 
738,525.00 



$1,694,081.95 

2,051,016.21 

797,209.92 

304,942.55 



$4,475,489.24 
6,010,642.17 



$9,473,427.46 
11.858,278.50 
6,599,833.11 
5,576,888.60 



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292 



REPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIR8. 



Tablb 69. — Pro rata shares of tribal trust funds settled during fiscal year ended June 30, 

1918. 



States and superintendencles. 


Tribes. 


Indians 
paid. 


Average 
prorata 
share. 


Amount 
paid. 


Iowa: Sao and Fox 


Sac and Fox 


5 
4 

26 
125 

12 


$1,130.15 

263.03 

186.23 

173.22 

79.90 


85,650.79 


Kwuflu? ^otewatomi 


Potawatomi 


1, 062. 14 

4,843.18 

21,653,40 

958.86 


New York: New York 


Tonawanda (Seneca) . . . , , , , . , 


North Dakota: Standing Rook 

Nebraska: Santee 


Sioux .". '. 


Ponces 




Cheyenne and Arapaho 




Oklahoma: 

Cantonment 


81 

166 

9 

56 

/ U27 

\ «1 

546 

161 

53 


I 368.12 

394.14 
943.91 

3,244.64 
617.95 

1,174.24 


f 29,408.12 
1 61,329.26 
1 3,283.76 
I 20,834.59 
60,056.14 


Cheyenne and Arapaho. 

Rod Moon 


So .". 

do 


Soger 


do 


Kiowa 


Apache, Kiowa, and Comanche • 

Osage 


Osage 


943.91 

1,771,577.10 

99,490.98 


Pawnee 


Pawnee 


Sao and Fox 


Sao and Fox. 


62,234.85 






Total 


1,200 




2,009,158.71 




Klamath 






Oregon: 

Klamath 


27 
180 


277.77 
297.87 


7,499.99 
53,612.09 


Umatilla , 


Umatilla, Oeymw, «to 








Total 


207 




61,112.06 




Sioux 






South Dakota: 

Cheyenne River.... , 


182 
39 
15 

394 
48 

326 
6 


142.35 
192.11 
182.57 
134.20 
263.55 
5.96 
140.48 


25,808.68 
7,492.34 


Crow Creek 


do 


Lower Brule 


do 


2,738.55 
52,874.80 
12,650.53 

1,951.39 
842.88 


Pino Ridge 


Oglala-flioux 


Yankton? 


Sioux 


Do 


do 


Rosebud 


do 








Total 


1,010 
17 


* "245." is" 


104,359.17 
4,167.56 


Utah: Uintah and Ouray 


Utes 






Grand total 


2,606 




2,302,955.88 









1 Five per cent. * Four per cent. 

Tablb 70.— Tribal funds of the Five Civilized Tribes in State and National banks. 1 



Tribes. 



Principal. 



Accrued 
interest 



Total Mar. 3, 

1911, to June 

30, 1913. 



Principal 
and interest. 

vear 

ill 



19: 



Choctaw... 
Chickasaw. 
Cherokee... 
Creek. 



62,204,949.00 

927,990.45 

266,628.70 

1,047,350.00 

27,271.30 



6119,659.21 

39,482.68 

16,585.27 

41,851.40 

1,372.93 



$2,324,608.21 

967,473.13 

283,213.97 

1,089,201.40 

28,644.23 



$567,439.24 
365,803.13 

33,965.85 
611,309.23 

11,254.55 



Total. 



4,474,189.45 



218,951.49 



4,693,140.94 



1,589,772.00 



i The deposits are made under the act of Mar. 3, 1911 (36 Stat L., 1058-1070), in 213 hanks. The rates of 
Interest are from 4 to 6 per cent 



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BBPOBT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAHtS. 293 

Tablh-71. — Volume of business in Indian warehouses, fiscal year ended June 80, 1913. 





Freight shipments. 


Express shipments. 




Number. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Number. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Chicago warehouse 


113,091 
6,596 
55,320 
48,751 
21,929 


Pounds. 
32,890,082 
514,808 

6,171,223 
16,783,631 

1,816,129 


1610,732.60 
200,655.89 
220,188.69 
290,970.73 
66,103.22 


3 
5 
6 


Pounds. 

483 

51 

179 


$165.90 


New ¥ork warehouse 


186.86 


Omaha warehouse 


162.76 


fit. Louis warehouse 




Ban Francisco warehouse 














Total 


245,687 


58,175,873 


1,388,651.13 


14 


713 


515.50 








Packages mailed. 


Requisitions issued. 




Number. 


Weight. 


Value. 


Contract. 


Open 
market. 


Total. 


Chicago warehouse 


1,988 

1,028 

90 

297 


Pounds. 

3,771 

2,666 

210 

446 


$3,394.25 

2,786.33 

153.33 

392.82 


92 
316 
238 
568 

31 


2,418 
83 
566 
610 
180 


2,510 


New York warehouse ... ........... 


399 


Omaha warehouse 


804 


fit. Louis warehouse 


1,178 


San Francisco warehouse.. 


211 












Tribal 


3,403 


7,093 


6,726.73 


1,245 


3,857 


5,102 







Total number of shipments . 

Total weight 

Total yalue 



249,104 

58,183.679 

$1,395,893.86 



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SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



FISCAL YEAB 1014. 

The following tables show the contracts awarded under adver- 
tisements of January 15, 1913, February 10, 1913, May 6, 1913. 
August 12, 1913, and September 20, 1913; also contracts awarded 
under advertisements of June 5, 1913, June 10, 1913, June 17, 1913, 
June 26, 1913, June 27 { 1913, and July 30. 1913 (see Appendix), 
for supplies for the Indian Service for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1914: 

Classification of supplies. 

Pace, 

Agricultural implements 366 

Bacon, lard, etc 330 

Barley, rolled 332 

Beef 333,399 

Blankets and dry goods 299 

Bran 392 

Boots and shoes 305 

Canned goods 386 

Coal 373 

Corn 334 

Corn meal, cracked wheat, etc 386 

Dried fruits 386 

Dry goods 299 

Enameled ware, lamps, etc 306 

Feed, ground 894 

Flour : 387,391,392 

Furniture and woodenware 360 

Glass, oils, and paints 368 

Gloves and suspenders 301 

Groceries 330,386 

Ham 330 

Hardware 313 

Harness, leather, shoe findings, etc 363 

Hats and cape 303 

Hose goods 329 

live stock (Crow Agency, Mont.) 397,398 

Livestock (Sioux allottees) 386, 400 

Medical supplies 336 

Mutton 336,400 

Notions 301 

Oats 396 

Piece goods, clothing, etc 303 

Pork, fresh 336 

Salt 331 

School books, etc 347 

Shorts 394 

8toves, pipe, hollow ware, etc 311 

Tin and stamped ware 310 

Underwear and hosiery 300 

Wagons and wagon fixtures, etc 307 

Appendix .....?. 399 



Google 



Digitized by VjOOQlC 



296 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Names and numbers of contractors. 



1. Acme Harvesting Machine Co. 

2. Albany Coal Co. 

3. Albers Bros. Milling Co. 

4. Albrecht Gustave A. 
6. Alpine Knitting Mills. 

6. Aluminum Goods Manufacturing Co. 

7. American Biscuit Co., The. 

8. American Book Co. 

9. American Carbolite Sales Co. 

10. American-La France Fire Engine Co. 

of Illinois. 

11. American Steel Barrel Co. 

12. Anderson, John Q. 

13. Armour <fc Co. 

14. Aron, J., & Co. 

16. Art Aseptible Furniture Co. 

16. Aseptic Products Co. 

17. Aspaas, Bans. 

18. Atkinson, Mentzer & Co. 

19. Austin-Nichols & Co. (Inc.). 

20. Babbitt Bros. 

21. Babbitt, David. 

22. Baker, Frayne. 

23. Balsz, Joseph M. 

24. Banks, Frederic S. 

25. Barkhausen Coal & Dock Co. 

26. Barnes, Edward. 

27. Bauer, Gustav T. 

28. Beebe & Runyan Furniture Co. 

29. Beaven, John S. 

30. Benda, Frank. 

31. Benz. John A. 

82. Bernneimer, Sidney & Co. 

33. Betz, Frank S., & Co. 

34. Blankenmeister Glass Co. 

35. Blaisdell Milling Co. 
86. Blattman Bros. 

37. Blohm, Charles H. 

38. Bloomingdale Bros. 
89. Blish Milling Co. 

40. Bonne, Max. 

41. Boy Ian. Christopher C. 

42. Brackebush, Wright & Shaw (Inc.). 

43. Bradley Co., Milton. 

44. Bragdon, Charles E. 

45. Bretney Co., The Harry V. 

46. Brewer, Howard D. 

47. Brown Shoe Co. (Inc.). 

48. Bugee,John J. 

49. Burr, William E. 

50. Burton & Davis Co. 

51. Butler Bros. 

52. Campbell, William V. 

53. Carney, Boss E. 

54. Carpenter & Hamilton. 

55. Carpenter Paper Co. 

56. Carrigan, Edmund B. 

57. Carsten Packing Co. 

58. Castle, Timothy P. 

59. Caxton School Supply Co. 

60. Chatterton, Howard E. 

61. Chicago Flag & Decorating Co., The. 

62. Christenson, Conrad. 

63. Colligan. Edward. 

64. Cope, Elmer A. 



65. Connick, Arthur E. 

66. Cosmo Trading Co. 

67. Cowen, Mark. 

68. Cox, Harry L. 

69. Crane & Co. 

70. Crucible Steel Co. of America. 

71. Cudahy Packing Co., The. 

72. Cushwa, Victor, & Sons. 

73. Cutting, Nathaniel H. 

74. Daggett. Chas. A. 

75. Damm & Sons Brush Manufacturing 

Co., John. 

76. Dana, Leslie. 

77. Decker, Edward C. 

78. Deere Plow Co. of Omaha, John. 

79. Denio Milling Co., J. W. 

80. Devitt, James. 

81. DickB, Robert H. 

82. Dietzel, Henry F. 

83. Dodge, Sweeney & Co. 

84. Douglas, Albert B. 

85. Doup, Louis G. 

86. Dulany, R. Gordon. 

87. Dyer, Abraham O. 

88. Eagle Milling Co. 

89. Eaman, Thomas J. 

90. Eames, John C. 

91. Eloesser-Heynemann Co. 

92. Empire Rubber & Tire Co. 

93. Enaicott, Johnson & Co. 

94. Enterprise Enamel Co., The. 

95. Enterprise Paint Manufacturing Co. 

96. Farr, David. 

97. Fee. C. H. 

98. Field, Marshall, & Co. 

99. Flanagan Co., A. 

100. Fletcher, William L. 

101. Floete Lumber Co. 

102. Fogle, Le Roy. 

103. Ford, J. B., Co. 

104. Fowler Waste Manufacturing Co. 

105. Frank, Max. 

106. Fricke, John W. 

107. Fuller, W. P., & Co. 

108. Galbraith, Bacon & Co. (Inc.). 

109. Gale Manufacturing Co. 

110. Garner, John T. 

111. Geldart, Richard W. 

112. Genoa Indian School. 

113. George, IraM. 

114. Gibbs, Milton H. 

115. Gilman, Stephen F. 

116. GimbelBros. 

117. Ginn&Co. 

118. Glauber Brass Manufacturing Co. 

1 19. Globe Paint & Color Co., The. 

120. Goodrich Co., The B. F. 

121. Goodyear Rubber Co. 

122. Gravier, Edward A. 

123. Greenberg, Max, & Bro. 

124. Greenhut biegel Cooper Co. 

125. Gussner, George. 

126. Gutta Percha & Rubber Manufac- 

turing Co., The. 

127. Haas, William. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



297 



128. Haase, A. G. L., & Sons Fish Co. 
120. Haarmann Vinegar & Pickle Co. 
ISO. Haisch. Jesse. 

131. Hall, Frank L. 

132. Hall & Riehl. 

133. Hanpeter, F. W. 

134. Harberg, John H. 

136. Harbison & Gathright. 
186. Hart, Henry C. 

137. Haskell Institute. 

138. Haslam, Fred, & Co. 
130. Hayward Bros. Shoe Co. 

140. Heath, D. C. ; & Co. 

141. Heath & Milligan Manufacturing 

Co. 

142. Henderson. Frank B. 

143. Henry, Robert W. 

144. Herman, Joseph M. 

145. Hersch, Leo. 

146. Hess, Eugene C. 

147. Hockmeyer, Otto. 

148. Hodge, Harry H. 

140. Homoann-LaRoche Chemical 
Works, The. 

160. Hooker Co., H. M. 

161. Hopkins Bros. 

162. Horlick's Malted Milk Co. 

153. Houghton Mifflin Co. 

154. Howard, Roland H. 

155. Howe Scale Co. of Illinois, The. 

156. Hubbard & Tyler. 

157. Humphrey, Karl E. 

158. Humphrey Supply Co. 
150. Hurd, Chas. Russell. 

160. Hyaham, Chas. J. 

161. Inland White Lead Co. 

162. Iten Biscuit Co. 

163. Imperial Elevator Co. 

164. Jamison, Charles A. 

165. Jaynes, Grailey H. 

166. Jewell Belting Co. 

167. Johns, Hugh M. 

168. Johnson, Andrew. 
160. Kanawha Fuel Co. 

170. Kansas Cooperative Refining Co., 

The. 

171. Kasper, Peter J. 

172. Kaull, Burt J. 

173. Keller A Tamm Manufacturing Co. 

174. Kendall, Oliver P. 

175. Kessling, Edward. 

176. Kingfisher Mill & Elevator Co. 

177. Kingman Plow Co. 

178. Kinney, J. C. 
170. Klemer. Frank H. 

180. Kny-Scheerer Co., The. 

181. Konzen, John P. 

182. Kupitz, Charles. 

183. Lake, J. Arthur. 

184. Laporte, Joseph K. 
186. Lancaster, George W. 

186. Laufman, Chas. H. 

187. Lewiston Milling Co. 

188. Lininger Implement Co. 
180. Littauer Bros. 

100. Lost River Milling Co. 



101. Lyford, Harry B. 

102. McCalmant, Robert. 

103. McComb, Harry. 

104. McCourtney, James F. 

105. McGlasson, Oscar B. 

106. McKey, William A. 

107. McNamara, John J. 

108. MacMillan Co., The. 
100. MagieBros. 

200. Magner, Saul. 

201. Mallmckrodt Chemical Works. 

202. Maltbie Chemical Co. 

203. Manhattan Supply Co., The. 

204. Martin Grain & Milling Co. (Inc.), 

F. M. 

205. Martin, Wilton G. 

206. Mason, Ehrman & Co. (Inc.). 

207. Matthews <fc Co., George F. 

208. Medbury, George H. 
200. Merrell Drug Co., J. S. 

210. Merrill Co., Chas. E. 

211. Mesa Milling Co. (Inc.). 

212. Messick, R. M v & Son. 

213. Mexican- American Hat Co. 

214. Meyer Bros. DrugCo. 

215. Midland Glass & Paint Co. 

216. Miller, George L. 

217. Miller & Jensen. 

218. Miller, Leonard J. 
210. Mitchell, Charles F. 

220. Moller & Schumann Co. 

221. Monaghan, William J. 

222. Monarch Oil Refining Co. 

223. Morris & Co. 

224. Mueller, Robert H. 

225. Napper. Stephenson T. 

226. Nawrath, J. P. 

227. Nayl6r&Co. (Inc.). 

228. Noff-Stiles Co. 
220. Nelson Coal Co. 

230. Neustadter Bros. 

231. Nevada Packing Co. 

232. Newton, William. 

233. New York Belting & Packing Co. 

234. Niekamp, George H. 

235. Northwestern Fuel Co. 

236. Norwich Pharmacal Co., The. 

237. Nuding, Frank E. 

238. Nystrom, Albert J. 
230. Odell & Owen. 

240. Omaha Broom Factory. 

241. Omaha News Co., The. 

242. Ortmayer A Son, A. 

243. Old Dominion Paper Co. 

244. O'Donnell, James J. 

245. Osborne, John D. 

246. Pacific Coast Coal Co. 

247. Pacific Grocery Co. 

248. Pack Bros. 

240. Pack & Allan Coal Co. 

250. Parkin Walter S. 

251. Peabody .Thomas A. 

252. Pendry. Harrison E. 

253. Pennsylvania Coal & Supply Co. 

254. Peoria Cordage Co. 

255. Perkins-Campbell Co., The. 



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298 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVICB. 



256. Perry, Geoige W. 

257. Phoenix Wholesale Meat & Produce 

Co. 

258. Pickens, Chas. H. 

259. Polinaky & Co.. L. 

260. Portland Flouring Mills Co., The. 

261. Puhl-Webb Co. 

262. Puterbaugh, Jay 6. 

263. Quartermaster, United States Army. 

264. Band, McNally & Co. 

265. Reed, Joseph C. 

266. Reed, Samuel I. 

267. Reeves Coal Co.. The. 

268. Reichardt, F. Alfred, & Co. 
260. Reid, Murdoch & Co. 

270. Reiss Coal Co., The C. 

271. Rice, Arthur J. 

272. Roberts, Benjamin. 
278. Rockwell, James A. 

274. Roderick Lean Manufacturing Co. 

275. Rosenberg, Abraham. 

276. Ross, Ed T. 

277. Ross A Modisett. 

278. Ross A Tompkins. 

279. Rothschild, John. 

280. Russell Manufacturing Co., The. 

281. Sanders, Frank L. 

282. Sanders, W. C. 

288. San-KNIT-ary Textile Mills Co. 

284. Schafer. Herman K. 

285. Schneider, Emil A. 

286. Schrank, Martin. 

287. Scrivener. John F. 

288. Seabury & Johnson. 

289. Searing, Chas. H. 

290. Seiffert Co., H. O. 

291. Seymour, C. Birney. 

292. Seymour Woolen Factory Co. 
298. Shanley, William G. 

294. Sherer-Gillett Co. 

295. Sherman Institute. 

296. Sherwin-Williams Co., The. 

297. Silver, BurdettA Co. 

298. Simmons Hardware Co. 

299. Simmons, Henry P. 
800. Simpson, Lewis H. 

301. Singer, Edward. 

302. Smith, M. £., & Co. (Inc.). 

803. Smith, Samuel R. 

804. Smith 6 Stever. 

805. Shellenburg, Joseph N. 

806. Southern Coal & Coke Co. 

307. Southwestern Broom & Warehouse 
Co., The. 

808. Spear, Willis M. 

809. Spelman, James P. 

310. Sperry Flour Co. 

311. Springer, Melvin. 

312. Sproule, Charles D. 
318. Standard Biscuit Co. 

314. Standard Oil Co. (Nebraska). 



315. Standard Oil Co. 

316. Standard Oil Company of Indiana. 

317. St. Anthony <fe Dakota Elevator Co., 

The. 

318. St. Louis Bed & Manufacturing Co. 

319. St. Louis Machinists* Supply Co. 

320. Stearns Lumber Co., J. 8. 

321. Steele-Wedeles Co. 

322. Steinwender Stoffregen Coffee Co. 
328. Steusloff Bros. (Inc.). 

324. Stover Manufacturing Co. 

325. Studebaker Corporation. 

326. Sunderland Machinery & Supply 

Co. 

327. Susskind, Joseph N. 

328. Sutton, Edwin D. 

329. Swalley, Thomas Z. 

330. Swift & Co. 

331. Syndicate Trading Co. 

332. Tanner, Brent M. 

333. Tarr, Nathaniel W. 

334. Taylor, Hollinshead W. 
885. Taylor Instrument Companies. 

336. Townsend, Edward B. 

337. Troy Laundry Machinery Co. 

338. Trueblood. Jesse. 

339. Turner, John W. 

340. Tubbs Cordage Co. 

341. Tuthill Spring Co. 

342. Tweed, Christian E. 

343. Union Carbide Sales Co., The. 

344. Union Meat Co. 

345. Upham, Chas. M. 

346. Utah Coal Sales Agency. 

347. Valley Flour Mills. 

348. Vernal Milling & Light Co., The. 

349. Wait, WalterB. 

350. Walker, William I. 

351. Wanamaker, John (New York). 

352. Washburn-Crosby Co. 

353. Watt, Robert. 

354. WeUer, Chas. F. 

355. Westermann, William H. 

356. Weston Dodson & Co. (Inc.). 
857. Western Meat Co. 

358. Whetton, Arthur J. 

359. White, Richard P. 

360. White-Ward-Fussell Co. (Inc.) 

361. Whiteside, Nathaniel H. 

362. Wilhelm. Charles M. 
863. Wilhite & Herbert. 

364. Williams, Christ. 

365. Wilson, Francis J. 

366. Windt, Morris. 

367. Wirt, Emmet. 

368. Wolf Manufacturing Co., The. 

369. Womack-Fooshe Coal Co. 

370. Wright, Gilbert G. 

371. Wyeth A Bro. (Inc.), John. 
872. Yates, Chas. M. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



299 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
good*, enameled ware, wagon* and wagon fixture*, tin ana stamped ware, etc. 



[Bids opened In Chicago, 111.) 
DRY GOODS. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



1,170. 
280... 
1,250. 
544... 



500.. 
250.. 



1,000. 
1,130. 



858 

477 

1,095 yards.. 

11,080 yards. 
5,465 yards.. 
2,016 yards.. 
60,«tf yards. 

1,230 yards.. 



18,480. 
5,421.. 
1,308.. 
8,066.. 



0,075 yards.. 
8,754 yards.. 
6,086 yards.. 
672 yards.... 
05,640 yards. 

46,200 yards. 
8,025 yards.. 

577 pieces... 

14,766 yards. 

40,616 yards. 
2,725 yards.. 

12.485 yards. 
6,810 yards.. 



18,258 yards. 
16,331 yards. . 
2,058 yards 



Blankets, wool, single: 

Indigo blue, 64 by 84 inches, to weigh not less 
than 4} to 4| pounds each. (For single 
beds.) 
Indigo blue, 68 by 84 inches, to weigh not less 
than 5t to 5f, pounds each. (For double 
beds.) 
Scarlet, 54 by 84 inches, to weigh not less 
than 4f to 4| pounds each. (For single 
beds.) 
Scarlet, 68 by 84 inches, to weigh not less 
than 5 9 to 6| pounds each. (For double 
beds.) 
White, 54 by 84 inches, to weigh not less than 
to 4# pounds each. (For single beds.) 
,te, 68 by 84 inches, to weigh not less than 
64 to 5} pounds each. (For double beds. ) 
Blankets, all cotton, no wool in, single: 

68 by 84 inches, to weigh not less than 3J 
pounds. (For double Deds.)— 

Tan 

Gray 

54 by 84 inches, to weigh not less than 3 
pounds. (For single beds.)— 

Tan. 

Gray 

Counterpanes, white: 

For single beds 

For double beds 

Bedticking, blue and white stripe, frounce 

Calico: 



wm\ 



81 

OUred. 

Crash, linen, 18-lnch, brown, washed; no colored 
border; about llj-cent grade. 

Toweling, knit 

Towels, knit: 

About 10 by 12, face cloths. 

About 14 by 28, face towels 

About 16 by 27, kitchen towels 

Bath towels 

Denim: 

Indigo blue. 8-ounce, standard 

Art green (for table and couch rovers) 

Diaper cloth, 27-inch 

Flannel, red, twilled 



Gingham, warranted fast colors, good and heavy 

quality, staple styles, 6 by 6, blue. 
Hickory shirting, fast colors. 



Linen, table. 62-inch, cream damask, about 

55-cent grade. 
Mosquito net or bar, blue, white, and green (8 

yards to the piece). 
Muslin, white, 48 by 48 in the gray; 36-inch, 

bleached, shrunk finish. 

Outing flannel, fancy 

Panama, dress, gray, 54-inch. 



Panama cloth, dark blue, 54-inch, all wool 

Serge, dress, dark blue, 54-inch 

Percale: 

80 by 80 count— 

indigo dye 

White-and-black 

Plaid, glass toweling, all linen, 18 to 20 inches 
wide, about llj-cent grade. 



292 

292 

292 

292 

292 
292 



90 
00 

98 
90 
98 

00 
90 
361 
361 



102 



90 
361 
331 
194 

90 

90 
332 

331 



90 



136 
194 
361 



i$0.70 

».70 

1.70 

».70 

1.70 
».70 



1.525 
1.525 



1.425 
1.425 

.735 
.94 
.1164 

.0525 
.06 
.0509 
.1067 



.10375 



.07 

.08 

•.28 

•.1274 
.1575 
.0671 
.34 
.0625 

.0883 
.4846 

.5692 

.1034 

.0695 
.0725 
.495 

.5715 
.735 



.0975 

.0924 

•.1075 



Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 

Do. 
Do. 



New York. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
New York. 
Chicago. 

New York. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
Do. 

New York. 

Chicago. 
NewYork. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
NewYork. 
St. Lotus. 
New York. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York, Chicago, 
St. Louis, or Omaha. 
New York. 
Chicago. 



Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 



i Per pound, in cases. 
128s by 46 inches. 



• Only. 

« Awarded 23,383 yards, light. 



• Awarded 17,233 yards, dark. 

• 18f inches wide. 



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800 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIOB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clotkmg, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



DRY GOOD8— Continued. 



Award*. 


Articles. 


No. 

of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price* 


Point i. f delivery. 


16,560 yards. . 
40,000 yards . . 


Dwnuofcw, assorted patterns, blue, fast colors: 
Crinkled 


361 
361 

08 
08 
90 
90 

m 

98 
331 

m 

194 

38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 

38 

38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
38 
32 
98 

as 

116 
116 

361 
103 
IDS 
293 

61 
61 


-0711 

.07156 
.0728 
"-117 

i . 1675 
.078 

.0875 
,006 

.1335 
.1325 

.1174 

.1174 

,1566 

.176 

.1957 

.225 

.3229 

.3718 

,0576 

.0576 

.0618 

.0793 

.0793 

.1648 

.1854 

.3502 

.29 

.10 

.235 

".60 
■ .405 

1.85 
1.83 
1.80 

1,53 

2.815 

.65 

1.30 
1.36 


Chicago. 
Do. 


T*iw>.rtnM*d , . . . , , , . ........ ..,, 


31,780 yards.. 


Sheeting: 

Brown, heavy, standard— 

4/4, 48 by 48, weight 2,85 ..,,,...... 


Do. 


0,95Q yards.,. 


4/4, 64 by 6S, weight 3.50 


Do. 


46.9iir) yards. . 


0/4.. ............ 


New York. 


2! ,450 yards.. 
30,886 yard*. . 

10,680 yards.. 
16,404 yards, . 

7,353 yards... 


^4 ,..,.,,,,,.,.,,.,,,..... 


Do. 


Shirting (sheeting), 4/4, bleached, 84 by 80, 

36-lneh. 
Silesia, black and slate, 36 inches wide ..... . 


Chicago, 
Do- 


White crossbar (for aprons), 27-Uach, about 

7JHX?nt grodr, assort ecf patterns. 
Oilcloth, table. 5/4: 

White.............. _ 


New York. 
St. Loafs. 


1,576 yards... 

7jm yards,., 
2,042 yards.., 
2 f 171 yards.. . 
413 yards...,. 


Veined, 


Do. 


Opaque, for window shades, assorted Dolors: 
36 inches wide. . . ................... 


New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 


38 laches wide ... 

42 Inches wide ,,. 


45 Inches wide .„., 


Do- 


494 yards...., 
100 yards...-. 


48 Inches wide...... 


Do. 


54 Inches wide, 


Do* 


120 yards..... 


63 Inches wide 


Do. 


130 yards,.... 


72 inches wide ,..,,.,. 


Do. 


2,150... 


Window-shade rollers, with fixtures, complete; 
30 inches wide ........................ 


Do. 


1,357 


38 Inches wide ..... 


Do. 


1,131 .... 


42 inches wido... „»...,.. 


Do. 


A :::... 


45 Inches wide..... ...... „„.....„, 


Do. 


118. 


48 inches wide... .... 


Do. 


12 


64 inches wide 


Do. 


29..... 


63 inches wide , .......... 


Do. 


IS.... 


72 inches wide .. . . . .. 


Do. 


3,287 


Auto scarfs, medium quality, assorted colors. - . . 
Cotton bats, full net weight 


New York. 


855 pounds... 
3,40S7 


Chicago. 


Fascinators, woolen, assorted colors 


Do. 


2,333 dozen . . 


Handkerchiefs. *hlte f good grade of cotton: 
Men's, 18 inches square . . 


New York. 


2,126 doieo... 

229 dot. prs... 
166,% das, prs . 
23& r vdM-pr3- 

1.501... 


JLadW, 14 tuehes square..... 


Do. 


Mittens, woolen: 
Assorted sizes— 

ftoys' , mixed gray ....................... 


Chicago. 


Girls' , plain colors 


1 >..r. 


Misses^ and women's, plain colors... 

Shawls, dart-colored ploid: 

Single, about 8/4 ,,......,...>.,...,.,.,_ 


Do. 
Do. 


4B5>- 


Double, about 16/4.. 


Do. 


3,809., 


Skirts bolmoral , wool, woven. groy only 

United States tlaga of the following nolsta (width 
of Rag); 
3.90-toot hoist ,,..,,..... 


Do. 


«... 


Do. 


40 .... 


3.25- too t holit , 


Do. 









UNDERWEAR AND HOSIERY. 



10,16o 

11,428 pairs. 

8,310 

9,359 pairs.. 

7,076 

7,281 pairs.. 



Undershirts, men's, bolbriggon, light, for sum- 
mer wear, assorted sizes, 34 to 46. 

Drawers, men's, bolbriggon, light, for summer 
wear, assorted sizes, 30 to 44. 

Undershirts, men's heavy cotton ribbed, for 
winter wear, assorted sizes, 34 to 46. 

Drawers, men's, heavy cotton ribbed, for winter 
wear, assorted sizes, 30 to 44. 

Undershirts, boys', bolbriggon, light, for sum- 
mer wear, assorted sizes, ages 6 to 16 years. 

Drawers, boys', bolbriggon, light, for summer 
wear, assorted sizes, ages 6 to 16 years. 

» Onl>\ 



381 


$0.2875 


381 


.2875 


361 


.32 


361 


.32 


102 


.161 


102 


.161 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



> To be put up loose in bundles, properly packed. 



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SUPPLIES POB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



301 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.--Contd. 



UNDERWEAR AND HOSIERY— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



8,468 

8,111 pairs... 

2,513 

3,506 

7,849....;.... 

2,898 

10366 

4,828 

3,387 

10,706 

378 dos. pre.. 
1,228 dos. prs. 
1,679 do*, pre. 

801 dos. pra.. 
1,000 dos. pra. 

1,436 dos. prs. 

1,596 dos. prs. 
1,305 dos. prs. 

1,501 dos. prs. 
528 dos. pre... 

2,127 dos. pre. 



Undershirts, boys', heavy cotton ribbed, for 

winter wear, assorted sizes, ages 6 to 16 years. 

Drawers, boys', heavy cotton ribbed, tor winter 

wear, assorted sizes, ages 6 to 16 years. 
Union suits: 

For small boys, knit, ribbed, assorted sizes, 
ages 6 to 16 years— 

For summer wear 

For winter wear 

Women's, ribbed, knit, 34 to 44— 

Low neck, sleeveless, for summer wear. . 
f For summer wear, long sleeves and high 

[ neck. 

For winter wear 

Misses', knit, ribbed, assorted sizes, 6 to 16 
years- 
Low neck, sleeveless, for summer wear. . 
For summer wear, long sleeves and high 
neck. 

For winter wear 

Half-hose: 

Men's . in whole and half sizes- 
Woolen, sizes 10*-1H 

Heavy cotton, sues 94-11* 

Cotton, medium weight, sizes 9£-U 9 

Boys', in whole and halTsizes— 

Cotton, sizes 9-10 

Heavy cotton, sizes 8, 9, and 10 

Boys', heavy cotton, ribbed, black, sizes 

7-10, in whole and half sizes. 
Women's, sizes 9-11 , in whole and half sizes- 
Heavy cotton, black 

Cotton, black, regular made, good 
quality, fast dye. 
Misses', sizes 61-8}, in whole and half sizes- 
Heavy cotton, black 

Cotton, black, regular made, good 
quality, fast dye. 
Stocking feet, sizes 6J-11, in whole and half sizes. . 



102 
102 

5 
102 
271 



90 
102 



361 



361 
361 
194 

361 
361 

102 



361 
361 



102 
361 



271 



ISO. 195 
M5 



.30 
.33 

».27 

«.30 

• .325 

.34 



.17 
•.16 



.3325 



1.775 
.75 
.72 

.605 
.73 

1.35 



1.70 
1.65 



1.15 
1.74 



'.365 



Chicago. 

New York. 



Chicago. 
Do. 

Pittston, Pa. 
jChicago. 
St. Louis. 



New York. 
Chicago. 

Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 



GLOVES AND SUSPENDER8. 



1,000 pairs.... 

855 pairs 

1,442 pairs.... 
1,336 pairs.... 



4,362 pairs... 
6.731 pairs... 



8,313 pairs.... 
6,796 pairs — 



Gloves, buck or horsehide, No. 1, standard qual- 

Boys', wool-lined 

Boys', unlined, outside seam 

Men's, wool-lined 

Men's, unlined, outside seam 

Gloves, canvas: 

Boys' 

Men's 

Suspenders: 

Mohair, leather or cord ends, solid nickeled- 
brass trimmings- 
Boys' , 28-inch 

Men's, 36-inch , 




New York or Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York, St. Louis, or 
Chicago. 

Chicago. 
Do. 



New York, St. Louis, 
or Chicago. 
Do. 



NOTIONS. 



2,750 yards... 

875 yards 

900 yards 



Braid: 

Dress, worsted, black- 

*-inch 

1-inch 

J-inch 



» Price for sise 14, rise and fall 1 cent. 

* Price for 6-year-old size, rise and fall 1J cents. 
•Price for sise 34, rise and fall 1* cents. 

• Sises 34 to 38. 



98 



10.0065 
.0088 
.0133 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 



• Sizes 40 to 44. 

• Price for 6-year-old size, rise and fall 1 cent. 
'Black. 



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302 



8UPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN SEEVIOB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



NOTIONS-Contlnued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



6,700 yards.. 
5221 yards.. 
0,744 yards. . 

781dosen 



2^06 dozen.. 



881 gross. .. 
l,ll2gro8S.. 
1,016 gross... 

878 cross.... 
1,455 gross.. 



702 gross.. 
5,551..... 



440 dozen. 



860 dosen 

1,664 dosen... 
1,104 dosen... 

3^300 doz.sp]s. 
220 dot. spls., 
244 dot. spls.. 
8,860 dos.spls. 



050 gross.... 

46 gross 

485 dosen.. 

06 gross 

1,634 gross.. 



750 handled. 
727 hundred. 
578 hundred. 
042 hundred. 
76,785 rolls.. 



503 peeks 

483 peeks 

168 peeks 

180 dosen 

406 dosen 

777 pounds... 

888 gross 

607 gross 

648 gross 



13,840 yards. 
14,460 yards. 



Braid— Continued. 
Dress, white— 

4-inch 

l-inch , 

Cardinal, worsted, i-inch 

Brushes: 

Hair, pure bristles, 8 rows, securely brass or 
copper wired, in wood block, substantially 
bacxed; held with brass pins or otherwise 
made waterproof. 
Tooth, pure bristles, 4 rows, securely drawn 
or cemented, with hole at top of handle for 
hanging. 
Buttons: 
Dress- 
Vegetable ivory, 26-line 

Smoked pearl, plain. 24-line 

Domestic pearl, 24-line , 

Shirt, bone— 

18-line 

20-line 

Shirt, domestic, pearl, 16-line 

Bone, 28-line :... 

Collars, military, white rubber or celluloid (for 
boys' uniform ooats), assorted sizes, from 12 to 

Clamps, for fastening rubber or celluloid collars 

to uniform coats. 
Combs: 

Coarse, raw horn, or aluminum— 

Boys', pocket 

Strong, dressing, with metal back 

Fine, aluminum 

Cotton: 

Darning. No. 2, 8-ply— 

Black, fast color 

White 

Gray 

Spool, best of standard 6-cord, Nos. 20 to 100, 
white and black, 200 yards to the spool. 
Hooks and eyes: 

Brass, white and black, Nos. 2, 3, and 4 

Trousers 

Indelible ink 

Laces, shoe: 

Leather, 36-inch 



Tubular, 4/4, black, extra heavy 

Needles: 
Sharps- 
No. 5 

No. 6 

No. 7 

Darning, small sise 

Paper, toilet, rolls of 1 ,000 sheets, 4} by 5} inches 
Pins: 

Brass, standard brand, 860 pins to the paper— 

8.C 



F-3J 

Hat, girls', steel, black heads— 



6finch. 

7j-inch 

Hah-, crinkled, wire, 3 sizes 

Safety, brass— 

1-inch 

lj-inch 

2-lnch 

Ribbon, all silk, taffeta, white, black, cardinal, 
navy, and light blue: 

3-Inch 

4-inch 



08 

08 

331 

351 



08 



06 
104 
361 

104 
104 
104 
102 
271 



00 
06 
361 

146 

361 



361 
361 
361 
361 
08 



00 
00 
104 

361 
861 
00 

331 
331 
331 



861 



8a 0065 

.0068 
.000 

2.48 



P«.725 
>*7025 

H00 



t 



i Awarded Oft) dozen. 
• Only. 



». 63 
.275 
.24 

.075 

.11 

.17 

.155 

.06 



.101 



.175 
.550 
.60 



.155 
.155 
.155 
.20656 



.210 
.45 



L35 
.37 



.06 
.05 
.06 
.075 
.0366 



.305 

.36 

.806 

.01 

.015 

.06 

.13 
.16 
.105 



Chicago. 
Do. 
New York. 

Do. 



Do. 

St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Chicago. 



Do. 
New York. 
Chicago. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



New York. 
Chicago. 

New York, St. 
Chicago, or ' 
Chicago. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



New York- 
Da 
St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
I>o. 
New York. 

Da 
Da 
Da 



• Awarded 025 dozen. 

* Awarded 380 dozen. 



. 074 Chicago. 
.061 Da 

•Carded. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



303 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Oontd. 



NOTIONS— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



167 do sen 

spools. 
006 dosen 

spools. 
152 



421 dosen 

pieces. 
536 dosen 

pieces. 
981 dosen 

pieces. 
674 dosen 

pieces. 

287yards 

L933yards... 
17,537 yards.. 

581 dosen 

68 dosen 



61 dosen 

spools. 
76 dosen 

spools. 
46 dosen 

spools. 
416 pounds... 



Scissors , buttonhole, 44-inch 

Silk, sewing, standard make, No. A, 60-yard 
spools: 
Cardinal 

Black 

Tape measures, medium, sateen, folded and 

stitched. 
Tape, white, cotton: 

$-inch , 

Hnch 

J4nch 

Hnch 

Tape, elastic, black: 

|4nch 

Thimbles, steel: 

Closed , 

Open 

Thread, linen, standard make, 200 yards to the 
spool, dark blue and unbleached: 

No. 30 

No. 35 

No. 40 

Twine, sack 

HATS AND CAPS. 

Caps: 

With ear covers, corduroy, assorted sizes- 
Boys ' 

Men's , 

Military, navy blue, sixes 6 to 7{ 

Cloth, tam-o'-shanter, wired, dark color, as- 
sorted sizes, for large and small girls. 
Hats: 

Military, tan color, assorted sizes- 
Boys' , 

Men's, staple shape , 

Men's, police, military, tan color, assorted 

sizes. 
Straw, Mexican, assorted sizes, for boys and 
girls. 
Stocking caps or Canadian toques, for small boys 
and girls. 



194 



361 

194 
194 
194 
194 



98 
111 
331 

26 
26 



226 



10 12 

.27 
.27 
.10 

.0694 
.0832 
.096 
.106 

:S 

.02H 

.06 
.06 

.775 
.775 
.775 
.14 



St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 



Chicago. 
NewYork. 
Da 

Da 
Do. 



Chicago. 

Da 

Do. 
New York. 



3,245 
3,036 
4,035 
1,620 

6,619 
3,309 
759.. 

2,107 

2,397 



123 


10.34 


208 


.36 


327 


.57 


116 


.469 


52 


.68 


62 


.725 


52 


.90 


213 


.15 


98 


.165 



New York. 
Da 
Da 
Da 



Da 
Da 
Da 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 



PIECE GOODS, CLOTHING, ETC. 



2,630 yards.. 
955ysW... 
1,000 yards.. 

1,630 yards.. 

2,617 

1,910 

* 



Piece goods: 

Cassimere, all wool, navy blue- 
Winter weteht 

Summer weight 

Cassimere, all wool, light blue, 54-inch, 24- 

ounce. 
Corduroy , 



Corduroy clothing: 
Coats— 

Double-breasted, sizes 244, to 28) chest 



Single-breasted — 

"Blzes 29 to 35 chest measure. 
Sizes 36 to 48 chest measure. 



159 
159 



67 



$1.75 
1.45 



1.82 



New York. 

Do. 
No award. 

No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 



New York. 



67 2,20 \ T>t>. 
124 \ 2.%4* \ T>*. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



304 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913 ', for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 

PIECE QOOD8, CLOTHING, ETC.— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
pries. 



Point of delivery. 



8,445 

2,124 pairs 
6,121 pairs. 
3,436 pairs, 

1,169.""" 

61 

66 

482 

602 

72 pairs... 
80 pairs... 

650 pairs.. 
603 pairs.. 

451 

441 

416 



637 

«32 

878 

2,228 

509 

1,224 

677 pairs.. 
053 pairs.. 

809 pairs.. 
852 pairs.. 

006 pairs.. 
2,114 pairs. 

439 pairs.. 
1,490 pairs. 

4,484 pairs. 

7,938 pairs.... 
9,097 pairs... 

1,852 

2,557 

15,705 

12,436 

8,576 

8,129 

270 yards 

8.725 yards.. 



Corduroy clothing— Continued. 
Trousers- 
Knee, 25 to 28 waist 

Long— 

24* to 27 waist, 20 to 20 mseam , 

27} to 32 waist, 27 to 33 inseam 

83 to 42 waist, 31 to 34 inseam , 

White duck clothing: 

Coats, sizes 28 to 48 chest measure 

Aprons 

Polio© uniforms: 

Coats, men's, officers'— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight , 

Coats, men's, privates'— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight 

Trousers, men's, officers'— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight 

Trousers, men's, privates'— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight 

Waistcoats, men T s, officers' and privates'— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight , 

Duck clothing: 

Reefer coats, mode duck, sheep- lined, 
double-breasted, corduroy collar, good 
quality, oiled sleeve lining, sises 32 to 48. 
Uniforms, navy blue cassimere: 
Coats, uniform, single-breasted- 
Sues 24J to 284 chest measure- 
Winter weiriit 

Summer weight 

Sises 29 to 35 chest measure- 
Winter weteht 

Slimmer weight 

Sizes 36 to 48 chest measure- 
Winter weight 

Summer weight 

Trousers, uniform, knee: 

Sizes 25 to 28 waist (ages 6 to 12)— 

Winter weight 

8ummer weight 

Trousers, uniform, long: 

Sizes 2H to 27 waist, 20 to 26 mseam— 

Winter weight , 

Summer weight 

Sizes 27i to 32 waist, 27 to 33 inseam— 

Winter weight 

Summer weight 

Sizes 33 to 42 watot, 31 to 34 inseam— 

Winter weight , 

Summer weight 

Overalls, with bib, denim: 

24J to 27 waist, 20 to 26 inseam 



124 

67 
67 
67 

67 

67 



305 
305 



305 
305 



302 



274 to 32 waist, 27 to 3* lunmu 

33 to 42 waist, 31 to 34 inseam 

Jumpers, denim: 

Boys'; sizes 29 to 35 chest measure . 



90 



Men's; sizes 86 to 48 chest measure 

Shirts, standard sample, assorted sizes: 
Chambray— 

Boys' 11 to 14$ inch neck measure 

Men's 15 to 18 inch neck measure 

Fancy flannel- 
Boys' 11 to 14} inch neck measure 

Men's 15 to 18 inch neck measure 

Lining, fancy khaki cloth, for body linings of 

corduroy coats. 
Sateen, black or Italian cloth, 32 inches wide, for 
body linings of uniform coats. 



305 



194 
194 



194 
194 



80.661 

1.15 
1.49 
L71 

.62 
.17 



6.12 
5.46 



5.93 
5.13 



4.00 
3.36 



3.70 
3.09 



1.93 
1.72 



4.75 



3.28 
3.06 



4.45 
4.16 



5.27 
4.85 



L70 
L58 



2.66 
2.47 



3.31 
3.05 



3.75 
3.46 



.75 



.70 



.32 
.36 



.49 

.57 



New York. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 



New York. 
Do. 



116 



.1448 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

No award. 

pendlz.) 

Do. 

New York. 

No award. 

pendix.) 

New York. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

No award. 

pendix.) 

New York. 



(See Ap- 



(See Ap- 



(See Ap- 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



305 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.—Conid. 

PIECE GOODS, CLOTHING, ETC.— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



1,210 yards... 
UBO yards... 

323 yards 

2,175 yards... 



Sleeve lining, twilled, 40 inches wide 

Drilling;, or corset jeans, slate, 27-28 

Haircloth, 16 inches wide 

Canvas, tailors', unbleached, 22 inches wide. 
Wadding, cotton, slate color 



116 
361 
124 
98 



200 yards.. 
88 gross... 



Wigan, black. 
Buttons 



192 gross. 
63 gross.. 



2 l 

88 gross.. 

863 gross. 
574 gross 
l,14b.s 



103,14b .spools 
817 ounces 



tons: 

Black, vegetable ivory- 
Overcoat, 40- line 

Overcoat. 50-line 

Coat, 30-line 

Vest. .................. 

Indian Service^*""*"*** •••- — ■ 

Coat, 36-line 

Vest, 24-line 

Metal- 
Trousers, suspender 

Trousers, fly 

Tissue, rubber, tailors' 

Twist, buttonhole, silk. No. 8, 2-ounce spools, 
standard make. 



98 



361 
361 
361 
361 

194 
194 

98 
98 
194 



80.1155 
.0975 
.166 
.10875 



.065 



1.65 

3.07 

.73 

.53 

1.05 
.61 



.0402 
.0358 
.80 
.3767 



New York. 
Chicago. 
NewYork. 
Chicago. 
No award, 
pendiz.) 
Chicago. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 



(See Ap- 



I 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 



581 pairs. 



1,430 pairs.. 

582 pairs.... 
755 pairs.... 
855 pairs.... 



507 pairs.. 

486 pairs... 
12502 pairs. 
657 pairs.. 



1,165 pairs.. 
6468 pairs. . 

16,619 pairs. 

9440 pairs.. 
129 pairs.... 
1,394 pairs.. 

9,753 pairs.. 
14,592 pairs. 



Boots, rubber, assorted sizes, 5 to 13 

Overshoes: 

Arctics, 4 buckles, assorted sizes- 
Boys', sizes 1 to 6 

Misses' sizes 11 to 2 

Women's, sizes 3 to 8 

Men's, sizes 7 to 13 

Rubber, ''Storm," assorted s ires- 
Boys', sizes 1 to 6. 

Misses', sizes 11 to 2. 

Women's, sizes 3 to 8 

Men's, sizes 7 to 13 

Shoes, good quality: 

Little gents', sizes 9 to 12. 

Youths', sizes 12, to 2 

Boys', sizes 2} to 5} 

Men's, sizes 6 to 13 

Children's, sizes 5 to 8 

Children's, sizes 8* to 11| 

Misses', sizes 12 to 2 

Women's, sizes 2} to 8 



124 



124 
124 
124 

124 

124 
124 
124 

224 
93 

144 

224 
224 
144 

144 
224 

47 



/»$1.784 I) 1 
\» 2.344 j 



Ml. 198 

1 • 1.276 

.988 

1.303 

1.548 

4.3703 

•.4491 

.3383 

.394 

.5358 

1.17 
1.35 



1.85 
.775 
.95 

» 1.125 

• 1.125 

1.29 



St. Louis, San Fran- 
cisco, New York, 
Chicago, or Omaha. 



► Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

► Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 

St. Louis or Endicott, 

N. Y. 
New York (freight paid 

to Chicago). 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

New York (freightpaid 

to Chicago). 

Do. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 



ENAMELED WARE, LAMPS, ETC. 



144. 



463... 
1,076. 



I 



White enameled ware: 

Chambers with covers, size 9} by 5 inches I 94 

Pitchers, water— | 

m*rt (ml 

3-quart I 124 i 



10.41 

•.35 
".35 
.4252 



1 It-ounce spools. 

• Sizes 5 and 6. 
•Sizes 7 to 13. 

* Sizes land 2. 



• Sires 3 to 6. 
•Sizes 2* to 6. 
' Awarded 4,877 pairs. 
•Awarded 4,876 pairs. 



15036°— iwt 1919— vpj, 2— -20 



Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

New York. 



•Awarded 232. 
w Awarded 231. 



Digitized by 



Google 



306 



8UPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVICB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin aria stamped ware, etc.— Oontd. 

ENAMELED WARE, LAMPS, BTC.-Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


440 


White enameled ware— Continued. 

Pitchers, washbowl, to hold 5 quarts 


94 

124 
124 
124 

355 
34 
855 

355 


$0.50 

.2625 
.1575 
.1995 

.75 
1.02 
.45 

.225 


Chicago. 
New York. 


538 


Washbowls, diameter not less than— 

151 inches 


125 


12lnches 


Do. 


159 


14 inches 


Do. 




China ware, semivitreous, hotel: 
Bowls, soup- 
Pint..:. 


St. l/ouls. 




Quart 


Do. 


1,172 dozen. . . 
1.097 


Cups, coffee, with handle- - r ■, 


Do. 


Dishes, meat, rolled rim- 
About 15-inch 


Do. 


Sb... ..:.::.: 


About 17-inch. , r . - * 


No award. (8ee Ap- 
pendix.) 
Do. 


2.230 


Dishes, vegetable, oval, about 12-inch, with- 
out covers, rolled rim. 
Pitchers- 
Pint 






541 


300 
300 

34 
34 

/ 3* 

\355 

34 

355 

191 
191 

359 
359 
359 
34 
34 

298 
34 
191 

34 
191 

351 
191 
191 

191 
191 
351 

191 
191 
298 
191 
351 
351 
300 


.075 
.11 

.85 
.58 
».32 
1.32 
.71 
.40 

.45 
.55 

.17 
.27 
.36 
.80 
.24 

.39 
.28 
.16 

.095 
.47 

2.28 
1.57 
3.00 

2.44 
2.75 
2.98 

.65 
.73 
.38 
1.43 
.74 
1.45 
1.08 


Chicago. 
Do. 


1,150 


Quart 


946 dozen 

280 dozen 

879 dozen 

157 dozen 

1,009 dozen. . . 

HA dozen.... 
58A dozen.... 

185 . . 


Plates, rolled rim- 
Dinner, about 9f inches in diameter 

Tea, about 7J inches in diameter 

Sauce, about 5} inches in diameter 

Soup, about 9 inches in diameter 

Saucers, coffee, rolled rim 

Burners, lamp, heavy, " Sun": 

No. 1 

No. 2 r 


St. Look. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 


Crocks, with covers, stoneware, acid fruit glaze 
lining: 
1 -gallon 


Do. 


321 


2-gallon 


Do. 


413 


3-gallon 


Do. 






St Louis. 


120 


Crocks, without covers, acid fruit glaze lining, 

3-gallon. 
Globes: 

Lantern, tubular, safety, No. 0, standard — 

For tubular street lamps, No. 3, standard 

Lamp shades, metal, for Mammoth hanging 
lamps, 20 inches. 
Lamp shades, porcelain, 7-inui (for student's 

lamps). 
Lamps: 

Bracket, heavy metal, with cup and thumb- 
screw for reflector, complete, with glass 
fount, No. 2sun-buraer, and chimney, and 
8-inch glass reflector and oil gauge. 
Hall, hanging, extension, complete, with 
10-inch frosted globe, No. 2 fount, No. 2 
sun-burner and chimney. 
Table, No. 4 B. & H. Radiant, nickel-plated, 
complete, with 10-inch opal dome shade, 
holder, burner, and lead-glass chimney. 
Student's No. 1, " Periection," complete, 

with opal shade and chimney. 
Hanging, Mammoth, No. 5 B. & H. Radiant, 
complete, burner and chimney — 
With 20- inch metal shade 


Do. 


102 dozen 

28 


Do. 
Do. 


10 


Chicago. 
St. Louis. 


119 


374 


Chicago. 


21 


181 


Chicago. 
Do 


58 


17 


Do 


7 


With 14-inch opal dome shade 


Do 


30 


Street, tubular, globe, No.3, with burner and 
time gauge, complete. 
Lamp chimneys, pure lead glass, for: 
Sun-burner— 

No.l 


New York. 


9 dozen 


Chicago. 
Do. 


265 dozen 


No. 2 


97 dozen 


" Perfection " No. 1 student's lamp 


St. Louis. 


17 dozen 


No. 96 B and H Mammoth lamp.'. 


Chicago. 
New York. 


67 dozen 


No. 2 B and H lamp 


27 dozen 

95 dozen 


Mammoth, for No. 5 B and H Radiant lamp. 
No. 4 B and H Radiant lamp 


Do. 
Chicago, 



•Awarded 440 doseo. 



'Awarded 439 dozen. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOE. 



307 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, far piece goods, clothing, dry 
goads, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Contd, 

ENAMELED WARE, LAMPS, ETC.— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



M 

10fV down . . 
3ft*doieu.. 
21 doicu 

] i i ■ ■ , T e n . . * . 

m... 

377 doun . - - 

nu. 

BUdoien... 



Lamp wicks: 

No.0.. . . ....... m4 

No, I,.... 

No, 2 ,. 

For " Perfection " No. 1 a taint's Lamp . 

For tubular street lam p No.3 . . . 

For No, **i Band H Mammoth lamp.*...... 

For No, 3 Band H lamp... 

For No, 5 B and H Kadiant lamp,.. . 

For No. 4 BandHRadiantlamp , 

Lantern*, tubular, safety. . „ „ . . 

Poppet sprinklers, glass. 

Pitchers, sirup, glass, pint, metal top,. 

R client ors t for bracket lamps, diameter 8 Inch w. 

Tumblers,, el&w t plain, medium b^avy, not less 

than 3 lac Win diameter and 4 Laches in depth. 



34 

34 
34 

m 

29S 
101 
191 
351 
351 
L11.-J 
51 

34 
34 
U 



*U.0I5 
.02 
,0275 
.085 

.27 
,56 
.36 
.37 
.23 
l.» 
,14 
.38 



St, Louis. 
Do. 

IK>. 

Do. 

Do, 

< falCMD, 

Do. 
New York. 

Do, 
Bt, Louis. 
Chicago. 
Bt, LouU. 

Do. 

DO. 



WAGON8 AND WAGON FIXTURES. 



12. 
15. 
12.. 
20.. 
12.. 
12.. 
12.. 
3.. 



42.. 
16.. 
12.. 
14.. 
8... 

29.. 
58.. 
10.. 



22.. 
6.. 
18. 



2.. 
26.. 
26. 
6.. 



19.. 
12.. 



2... 
8... 
32.. 
20.. 



2 

20 

18 

144 sets 



424 
545 



Axletrees, hickory, wagon, narrow track: 
2} by 31 

2iby3l 

3by* 

3t?y4J 



Axleti 



liokory, wagon, wide track: 



3iby4* 

3M>y3 

4>y5 

4* by 5* 

Bolsters, sand, oak, wagon, front, narrow track 
2y>y4J 

3ibyl!!!!!!!!"!!"!""!!!!!!!!!!!!;!!!;!!!; 

Bolsters, sand, oak, wagon, front, wide track: 
2y>y4i 

3jbyii! ."."."."!!.".*."!!."."!!!."!."!.'!!.".*.*!! '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Bolsters, rocker, oak, wagon, front, narrow 
track: 

%feE=EEE 

3* by 5 

Bolsters, rocker, oak, wagon, front, wide track: 



2#by4*. 
3V^.. 



3* by 5.- 
Bolsters, oak, wagon, rear, narrow track: 

24* "* 



IP* 



3*6^44... 

Bolsters, oak, wagon, rear, wide track: 



IW: 



3by4... 
3* by 44. 



Bows, farm wagon, oak, round top, f by 2 inches, 

per set of 5. 
Clevises, wrought iron: 

1{ inches thick, 44 inches long, and 5$ inches 

long, per pound. 
2} inches thick, 44 inches long, and 5} inches 
long, per pound. 
28 dozen .... .1* Clips, singletree, center, &-lnch clip, §-inch ring. 

> Per set of 5 places. 



358 
358 
358 
358 
358 
358 
358 
358 

358 
358 
358 
358 
358 

358 
181 
358 



358 
358 



181 
181 
181 
181 

181 



358 

181 
181 
181 
181 

181 
181 
181 
358 



358 



90.48 
.63 
.63 
.72 
.89 
.99 
1.26 
1.98 

.72 
.89 
.99 
1.26 
1.98 

.31 
.36 
.46 

.31 
.38 
.46 



.23 
.28 
.35 
.43 

.30 



.46 
.22 



.35 
.40 



.30 



.40 
.89 



.0404 
.0404 
.65 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
No award, 
pendix.) 
St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do, 



(See Ap- 



Digitized by 



Google 



308 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Gontd. 

WAGONS AND WAQON FIXTURES-Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


211 


Eveners, hickory, wagon: 
Full ironed— 

Ends riveted, top and bottom plate at 
center, f-inch nole; stay chains and 
eyebolts. 

Narrow track, 1 J by 4 inches by 4 feet. 

Wide track, 2g by 4£ inches by 54 inches. 
Not ironed— 

Narrow track, 1{ by 4 inches, 4 feet 

Wide track, 2} by 4* inches by 64 inches. 
Fellies, hickory, wagon, bent: 

If by 14 inches 


325 
325 

358 
358 

181 
358 
181 

358 
358 
358 

181 
181 
181 
181 
' 181 
181 
358 

181 
181 
181 

358 

358 
358 
358 
358 

358 
358 

325 

325 

325 
325 


f»$0.75 

\ *.46 

1.00 

.23 
.33 

■1.70 
•2.06 
•4.25 

'2.00 
•2.50 
•3.50 

U.45 
41.90 
4 2.00 
42.50 
M.50 
4 5.60 
.0427 

.56 
.26 
.48 

•1.50 

• 1.55 
•1.80 
■2.00 

• 2.25 

.45 
.48 

3.15 

3.45 

8.58 
4.12 


^Chicago. 
Do. 


291 


113 


St. Louis. 


97 


Do. 


2 seta 


Chicago. 
St. Louis. 


5 sets 


llbyllinches 


3 sets 


2 oy 24 inches 


Chicago. 
St. Louis. 


2 sets 


Fellies,' oat, wagon, bent: 

If by 2 inches 


6 sets 


2 by 24 inches 


Do. 


16 sets 


2f by 24. inches 


Do. 


41 sets 


Fellies, oak, wagon, sawed true to circle and sire, 
faced, packed in cases: 
14 by 24 inches 


Chicago. 
Do. 


32 sets 


If by 24 inches 


7 sets 


If by 2| inches 


Do. 


12 sets 


24 by 3 inches 


Do. 


20 sets. 


3 by 24 inches....... 


Do. 


9 sets 


4 by 2* inches 


Do. 


880 


Hooks ana ferrules, singletree, 1 f-inch 


St. Louis. 


106 sets 

268 sets 

84 sets 

lset 


Hounds, oak, smooth finish, wagon: 

Front, 3 pieces, side pieces 48 inches long, 1| 
inches thick, 2 inches wide; front and rear 
ends 2f inches wide, 18 inches from front 
end. Sway bar 48 inches long. 1| inches 
thick, 2 inches wide the whole length. 

Pole. 2 pieces, 34 inches long, 1} inches thick, 
2} inches wide at rearend of curve, tapering 
to 2f inches widest rear end, 2] inches wide, 
13 inches from front end at front of curve, 
with usual shape and taper to front end. 

Rear, 2 pieces, 48 Inches long and 2 inches 
thick, 2f inches wide at front end, 2J inches 
wide at rear end, and 2} inches wide, 11 
inches from front end at curve. 
Hubs, wagon, oak, mortised, crated: 

Not less than 7 4 inches diameter, length over 
all 10 inches, cupped If inches, mortised 1 J 
by A Inch. 

Not less than 7] inches diameter, length over 
all lOf inches, cupped 1| inches, mortised 
11 by | inch. 

Not less than 8 inches diameter, length over 
all llf inches, cupped 14 inches, mortised 
If by 44 inch. 

Not less than 8} Inches diameter, length over 
all 12| inches, cupped If inches, mortised 
If by f inch. 

Not less than 9J inches diameter, length over 
all 13$ inches, cupped If inches, mortised 2 
by H inch. 
Reaches, oak, wagon, in bundles not exceeding 
four, securely tied: 

9 feet 6 inches long by 31 by 11 


Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 


Iset 


Do. 


11 sets 

8 sets 

4 sets 

383 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 


453 


9 feet 6 inches long by 3} by l| 


Da 


4 sets 

14scts 

18 sets 

6 sets 


Skeins, with boxingTlong-hooded steel, wagon, 
packed in cases or barrels: 
24 by 7J or 8 inches, not less than 34 pounds 

per set. 
2f by 8 or 84. inches, not less than 44 pounds 

per set. 
3 bv 9 inches, not less than 54 pounds per set . . 
3f by 10 inches, not less than 68 pounds per 
set. 


Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



* With stay chains. 
t Without stay chains. 



•Per set of 8 pieces. 
4 Per set of 26 pieces. 



» per set of 4 pieces. 

Digitized by VjOOQLC 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOE. 



309 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 191$, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 

WAGONS AND WAGON FIXTURES-Continucd. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



Spokes, hickory, buggy, lj-inch, select second- 
growth grade; cased. 
Sprees, wngon, select oak,.srtcond~£rowrih grade; 
eas&d; 

attach -«— .i 

St-foeh. .„..„. 

24-inch «„ 

2Hnch __ . 

2f-lnch t ,., „ _ 

Spring: 

For wagon seats, 3-leaf, 2S by 1} inches 

Wagon, elliptic, pet pound, 



Tongues, oak. for drop polos: 
2* by 4 by 4 by 4* !2-]oot„ T . 

2\ by A\ by 4$ by 44, 12-foot 

Wagons, wJd** and narrow track, complete, with 
hickory ax Mines, square, Apiece, front hounds, 
iixjnod on both sides below tho roach, and also 
on the underside of tho top sliding bar with 
i by 1 1 Inch iron on the 2 j ay H inch wagons, 
ana increase according to slro of wagons. 

their respective irons; evener, lower box, neck 

yoke, singletree, stay chains, tongue, and flat 

Iron bar under the whole length of axles. 

Narrow track, equipped with gear brake, 

clipped gear, and hooded steel skeins— 

3 by 9 inches, tires 1} by § inch 

2f by 8 inches, tires 3 by | inch 



3 by 9 inches, tires 1} by | inch 

3 by 9 inches, tires 3 by J inch 

3J by 10 inches, tires l f by f inch 

3J by 10 inches, tires 3 by } inch 

3* by 11 inches, tires 2 by finch 

Wide track, equipped with gear brake, 
clipped gear, and hooded steel skeins— 
2f by 8 inches, tires 1} by J inch 

21 by 8 inches, tires 3 by | inch 

3 by 9 inches, tires 1 J by | inch 

3 by inches, tires 3 by J inch 

34 by 10 Inches, tires 3 by \ Inch 

3} by 11 inches, tires 4 by f inch 



Narrow track, equipped with hooded steel 
skein and box brake— 

2f by 8 inches, tires 3 by | inch 

3 by 9 inches, tires l\ by | inch , 

3 by 9 inches, tires 3 by \ inch 

3} by 11 inches, tires 4 by f inch 



Wide track, equipped with hooded steel 
skein and box brake— 



3 by 9 inches, tires 1* by | inch. 
3 by 10 inches, tires 3 by \ inch. 



No. 
of 

eon- 
trac- 
tor. 



358 



173 
173 
173 
173 
173 

358 
341 

181 
181 



137 



»«172 



»«172 



»«172 



"172 



Unit 
price 



i$2.70 



2.25 
2.26 
2.60 
2.75 
3.50 



».045 



1.20 
1.90 



Point of delivery. 



St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 



40.00 


Lawrence, Kana. 


43.50 


Chicago. 


43.75 


St. Louis. 


43.75 


Chicago. 


44.00 


St. Louis. 


48.75 


Chicago. 


49.00 


St. Louis. 


47.75 


Chicago. 


48.00 


St. Louis. 


51.25 


Chicago. 


51.50 


St. Louis. 


58.00 


Chicago. 


58.50 


St. Louis. 


39.50 


Chicago. 


39.75 


St. Louis. 


43.50 


Chicago. 


43.75 


St. Louis. 


43.75 


Chicago. 


44.00 


St. Louis. 


48.75 


Chicago. 


49.00 


St. Louis. 


51.25 


Chicago. 


51.50 


St. Louis. 


60.00 


Chicago. 


ea 50 


St. Louis. 


4a 00 


Chicago. 


40.25 


St. Louis. 


40.75 


Chicago. 


41.00 


St. Louis. 


44.25 


Chicago. 


44.50 


St. Louis 


6a 00 


Chicago. 


ea 50 


8t. Louis. 


40.75 


Chicago. 


41.00 


St. Louis. 


47.75 


Chicago. 


48.00 


St. Louis. 



1 Par set of 60 pieces. 

> If not under 34 inches long. 



' Awarded 328. 

« Carload lots. Carload rate freight allowance, less than carloads. 



Digitized by 



Google 



310 



SUPPLIES FOB THB INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc. — Gontd. 

WAGONS AND WAGON FIXTUBES-Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con* 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery 



014. 
202. 



241. 
79.. 



6 seta. 



Bows, oak 

Spring seats 

Top boxes 

Whiffletrees, hickory, wagon, oral, 2J by 2} 
inches center, 34 inches long: 
Full-ironed, with wrought strap irons and 
hooks at ends and iron ring at center clip. 

Not ironed 

Yokes, neck, hickory, wagon, 2|-ineh center, 38 
inches long: 

Full-ironed. 

Not ironed, turned to shape and sise 

Additional articles: 

Axletrees, wagon (full measure), 81 by 41 
inches by 6 feet long, rough-sawed, select 
seasoned hickory. 
Fellies, oak. wagon, sawed true to circle and 
size, faced, 3 by 2} inches— 
For wheels 40 inches high, 12 pieces to set 
for 2 wheels, cased. 



172 



172 



368 



St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Do. 

Do. 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



No award, 
pendix.) 



(See Ap- 



TIN AND STAMPED WARE. 



2,720 

4^ dozen .. 
37 A dozen. 
68 



148., 
42.., 



16... 

02... 
124.. 
130.. 



15. 
11. 
4.. 
81. 



68 dozen.... 
70 dozen.... 
9A dozen... 
54,v dozen. 

440 



13^ dozen. 
22ft dozen. 
4,^ dozen... 



60... 
61... 
188.. 



Boilers, wash, XX tin, flat copper bottom, size 
about 21 by 11 inches, iron drop handles, riv- 
eted, heavy. 
Buckets, water, galvanized iron, heavy, full size, 

14-quart. J-inch bail. 
CandMstlcks, planished tin or japanned, 6-inch. . 
Cans: 

Kerosene, galvanized, corrugated sides, 1- 

gallon, common top. 
MUk, all-steel, 32-quart, ironclad, retinned. . 
Coffeepots, full size, IX tin, solid spout: 

2-quart, handle riveted 

4-quart, with bail; ears and handle riveted . . 
Coffee boilers, full size. XX tin, copper bottom, 
with bail; ears and handle riveted: 
6-quart 



11-quart 

Coffeepots, 4-quart, gray enameled ware 

Coffee DoUers, 6-quart, gray enameled ware.. 
Coffee mills: 

Iron or block-tin hopper box 

Side, medium 

With wheel, capacity of hopper 6 pounds. . 



Colanders, seamless, steel, 164 by 6} inches 

Cups, full size, XX stamped tin, retinned, riv- 
eted handle: 

ifc::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

Quart 

Dippers, water. 1 -quart, XX tin, full size, long 
handles, riveted. 

Flour sifters 

Funnels, full size, stamped tin, fluted, retinned: 

1-pint 

1 -quart , 

2-quart 

Kettles, with coven, wrought-steel hollow ware, 
retinned: 

7-quart 

13^raart , 

16-quart, porcelain-lined 

* Per set of 5 pieces. » 6-inch. 



124 
208 



191 



208 
298 



124 

61 



191 
191 
191 
191 



191 
265 
191 
191 

265 

265 
265 

265 



191 
191 
191 



80.0999 

.2021 

.28 

1.23 

1.60 

.20 
.285 



1.023 
.2376 
.36 

.28 

.25 

17.26 

.60 



.48 
.96 

.85 

.07 

.26 
.40 
.60 



.765 
.86 
.66 



New York. 

Da 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 
New York. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

St 



Do. 
Do, 
Do, 



Chicago, 
Do! 



» 10-inch. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBYIOE. 



311 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures f tin and stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



TIN AND STAMPED WARE-Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



31 

66 

077 

433 

tf6 

948 

188 

600 

664 

118 down 

136 



10A dozen. 
29ft dozen., 
65X dozen. 
61 dozen.... 
46 dozen.... 

53A dozen. 
143 dozen... 

68 

67 

84 dozen.... 

698 dozen... 
1,283 dozen 
196 

11 

114 

60 

2boxes..... 
28 boxes.... 

5 boxes 

v 26 boxes.... 
13 boxes.... 
5 boxes 

242 

152 dozen.. 



1« 

672 

497 

11,220 pounds 



Measures, XX tin, with full rim: 

Pint. 

Quart.. 



Pails, water, XXX charcoal tin, wired at top, 
riveted ears; rivets soldered inside; A-inch 
bail: 

10-quart 

14-quart, with 3f4nch bail woods 



No. 27: 



Pails, milk, sanitary... 
Pans, bake, sheet steel. . 

12 by 19 by 4 inches 

15 by 20 by 4 inches, with two {-inch oval 
runners. 
Pans, dish, full size, XXXX stamped tin, re- 
tinned: 

14-quart 

17-quart 

Pans, dust, japanned, heavy 

Pans, fry, No.4, wrought-eteel, polished, 8 inches 
1 across bottom. 

Pans, tin, milk, full size, IXX, seamless, wide 
flange, re tinned: 

1 -quart 

2-quart 

4-quart 

6-quart 

8-quart 

Plates, IXX stamped tin, 0-inch: 

Baking, deep, jelly 

Pie, deep 

Scoops, grocer's, hand, IXX stamped tin, re- 
tinned: 

No. 20 

No. 40 

Spoons, basting, forged steel, returned 

Spoons, plain silver steel: 

Strainers* milk," XX'tin," i*4nchV. * ""!""""! 
Teapots: 

Heavy, planished tin, 4-pint, round, copper 

bottom. 
Gray enameled ware— 

4-quart 

6-quart 

Tin, sheet, charcoal, bright: 

10 by 14 inches, IC (224 sheets to the box) . . . 
14 by 20 inches, IC (112 sheets to the box) . . . 
10 by 14 inches, IX (224 sheets to the box).. . 
20 by 28 inches, IX (112 sheets to the box). . . 
14 by 20 inches, IX (112 sheets to the box)... 
14 by 60 inches, IX, boiler (112 sheets to the 
box). 
Trays, tea, oval, extra heavy, hotel, japanned, 

20-inch. 
Wash basins, stamped tin, flat bottom, retinned, 

11-inch. 
Washtubs, galvanized iron, 10} inches deep in- 
side measurement, corrugated bottom, and 
heavy drop handles: 
194 Inches in diameter, inside measurement. . 
21* inches in diameter, inside measurement. . 
234 inches in diameter, inside measurement. . 
Zinc, sheet, 36 by 84 inches, No. 



101 
101 



191 
191 



124 



124 

124 

191 

f»191 

1*298 



191 
191 
124 
124 



298 



191 
191 
265 

51 
191 
191 



265 
191 

334 
334 
334 
334 
334 
191 

191 

265 



191 

191 
191 
191 



10.0325 
.035 



.20 
.35 



.577 



.42 

.462 
.60 
.08 
.08 



.52 
1.449 
2.047 



.29 
.24 



.105 
.17 
.48 



.075 
.09 



.24 

.33| 

4.50 
4.50 
5.50 

11.00 
5.50 

28.75 

.19 



.33 
.38 
.435 
1.0865 



Chicago. 
Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

No award. 

New York. 

No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 



New York. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 



Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 

Do. 
No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 
St. Louis. 

Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 

St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



STOVES, PIPE, HOLLOW WARE, ETC. 



4... 

1... 



Caldrons, iron, portable, full jacket, with furnace: 

48 gallons capacity 

75 gallons capacity 



191 
191 



$20.75 
28.00 



Chicago. 
Do. 



i Awarded 68. 



* In less than 600-pound casks. 

Digitized by 



Google 



12 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVIGB* 



kmtrocts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece good*, clothing, < 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.— Contd 

STOVES, PIPE, HOLLOW WARE, ETC.-Continued. ' 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery 



806 

85 

736 

92 

670 

82 

1 

324 

349 

12 

17 

6.113 joints 
671 Joints.. 
256 dozen.. 

15 

11 

81 

13 

30 

23 

51 

58 

32 

17 

15 

16 

2 

9 

3 

11 

23 

1 

7 

9 

1 

33 

17 

29 



Dampers, stovepipe: 

Sue 6-inch 

Size 7-inch 

Elbows, stovepipe, adjustable, not corrugated, 
No. 26 iron: packed in cases: 

Site 6-inch 

Size 7-inch 

Elbows, stovepipe, corrugated, not adjustable, 
No. 2d iron: packed in cases: 

Size 6-inch ' 

Size 7-inch 

Furnace, full Jacket, for 48-gallon portable cal- 
dron. 
Hods, coal, galvanized, extra heavy, riveted bot- 
toms or pressed in: 

16-inch. 

18-inch 

Ovens. Dutch, cast-iron, deep pattern, crated: 

10 inches diameter inside 

15 inches diameter inside 

Pipe, stove, patent, No. 26 iron, polished; edges 
curved, crimped, and formed: 

8ize 6-inch 

Size 7-inch 

Polish, stove 

Stoves, box, heating, wood: 

27 inches long, to weigh not less than 130 
pounds. 

32 inches long, to weigh not less than 145 

pounds. 
37 inches long, to weigh not less than 190 
pounds. 
Stoves, steel box, heating, wood, not lighter than 
22-gauge steel, with cast lining: 

22 inches long 

25 inches long 

28 inches long 

Stoves, sheet steel, heating, coal, cast lining, with 

hot-blast tube: 

15-inch body 

17-inch body 

Stoves, heating, small, air-tight 

Stoves, heating, coal: 

14-Inch cylinder, to weigh not less than 135 

pounds. 
16-inch cylinder, to weigh not less than 175 

pounds. 
22-inch cylinder, to weigh not less than 375 
pounds. 
Stoves, heating, combined coal and wood, 22 
inches diameter, 24-inch heavy steel drum, to 
weigh not less than 285 pounds. 
Stoves, heating, wood, sheet iron, with outside 
rods, crated: 

32-inch 

37-inch 

Stoves, heating, hard coal, mounted, base burner: 

Fire pot about 12 by 14 inches 

Fire pot about 15 by 17 inches 

Stoves, coal, laundry: 

For healing 12 irons 

For heating 24 irons 

For heating 36 irons 

Stoves, cooking, coal: 

7-inch, oven not less than 16 by 16 by 10 

inches, to weigh about 200 pounds. 
8-inch, oven not less than 18 by 18 by 11 

inches, to weigh about 240 pounds. 
9-inch, oven not less than 19 by 19 by 12 
inches, to weigh about 280 pounds. 
Stoves, cooking, wood: 

6-inch, length of wood 18 inches, oven not 
less than 14 by 16 by 11 inches, to weigh 
about 180 pounds. 

i Uncrated. 



298 
298 



298 

298 
298 
191 



298 
298 



191 
191 



298 
298 
51 

191 

191 

191 



58 
58 

76 
58 

337 
337 
337 

58 

58 

58 

58 



•0.03* 
.0475 



.08 
.10 



.115 

.165 

13.50 



.1625 

.47 
1.10 



.0675 
.1075 
35A 

3.75 

5.00 

6.00 



13.82 
M.07 
U.38 



«7.01 

*8.30 

.80 

15.65 

»6.80 

19.90 

17.50 



11.00 
15.75 

120.53 
28.00 

10.50 
13.50 
16.50 

9.15 

9.55 

11.25 

9.20 



St. Louis. 
Do, 



Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Chicago, 



St. Louis 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do, 

Do, 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Chicago or St. L 

St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago or St. 

Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Chicago or f 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago or 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



'Crated. 

Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



313 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Oontd. 





STOVES, PIPE, HOLLOW WARE, 


ETC.— Continued. 


Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


. Point of delivery. 


S 


Stoves, cooking, wood— Continued. 

7-inch, length of wood 20 inches, oven not 

leas than 14 by 18 by 12 inches, to weigh 

about 225 pounds. 
8-inch, length of wood 22 inches, oven not 

less than 19 by 20 by 13 inches, to weigh 

about 270 pounds. 
0-inch, length of wood 22 inches, oven not 

less than 21 by 22 by 14 inches, to weigh 

about 310 pounds. 


68 
£8 
68 


$10.76 
12.40 
14.16 


Chicago or St. Louis. 
Do. 


27 


88 


Do. 







HARDWARE. 



8.. 
6.. 
4.. 
9.. 
11. 



170 doc. 



11., 



Adzes, c. s., house carpenter's, 4j-inch cut, square 

head. 
Anvils, wrought iron, steel face: 

100-pound, per pound 

140-pound, per pound 



1,900 pounds 



7.. 



100 feet.. 
M0 feet.. 
134 feet.. 



1,400 feet. 
696 feet... 
1,415 feet. 
250 feet... 
M68feet. 



130 feet... 
725 feet... 
1.045 feet. 
50 feet.... 



110 feet.. 



423 feet... 
853 feet... 



490 feet.. 
220 feet.. 
26 



14* c 

11* dozen.. 
15* dozen.. 
7* dozen.. 



& 



200-pound, per pound 

Augers, nut, with extension lip: 

1-inch 

14-inch 

lj-inch 

2-inch 

Augers, c. s., hollow, adjustable, to cut | to 1 

inch. 
Axes: 

Yankee pattern, assorted. 3* to 4$ pounds, 

inserted or overlaid steel. 
Broad, c. s„ 12-inch cut, single bevel, steel 

head. 
Hunter's, inserted or overlaid steel handled, 

Babbitt metal, medium quality 

Bellows, blacksmith's, 38-inch, standard 

Bells: 

Cow, No. 2, wrought 

Hand. No. 8, polished, extra heavy 

School, with fixtures for hanging— 

To weigh 240 to 260 pounds, mounted 

To weigh 300 to 360 pounds, mounted 

Belting, leather, single: 

1-inch 

14-inch 

l}-inch 

Belting, leather, double: 

2-mch .. . 

24 inch 

3-inch 

34-inch 

4-inch 

Belting, leather, triple: 

iL inoh " '""""'""'""*""' '."".". 

6-inch 

12-inch 



Belting, rubber, 3-ply : 
3-inch 



4-inch 

6-inch , 

Belting, rubber, 4-ply: 

8-inch 

12-inch 

Bevels, sliding T, 10-inch, metal handle 

Bits, auger, c. s., extension lip, good quality: 



191 



234 
234 
234 



298 
298 
298 
191 

266 

191 

265 

191 
298 

265 
265 

298 
265 

166 
166 
166 

166 
166 
166 
166 
166 



120 

120 
120 

126 
126 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 



60.74 



.085 
.085 
.085 

.22 

.28 
.35 
.48 
.35 



4.60 

1.74 

.235 

.0568 
7.60 

.17 
1.00 

8.50 
16.00 

.048 
.072 
•084* 

:&"* 

38^ 



.085 

.1075 
.155 

.25 
.36 
.37 



.96 
1.08 
1.19 



Chicago. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

No award. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York, St. Louis, 
Chicago, or Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Digitized by 



Google 



314 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. IS, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, ete.— Contd. 



HARDWARE-Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
prioe. 



Point of delivery. 



Bits auger, etc.— Continued. 

Irincn 

Hooh 

-Inch 

|-inch 

—Inch 

-inch 

Blades, saw, butcher's, bow, 20-inch 

/Blowers, blacksmith's, crank motion, 12-inch fan, 
\ complete. 
Bolts, carriage, per 100: 

*byij:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

by 2 

by2J 

by 3 

by J* 

by 4 

byU 

by 2 

£y 2* 

by 3 

by 4 

by 5 

by6 

by 4 

by 5 

by6 

by7 

by 8 

by 9 

by 10 

by 11 

by 12 

Bolts, door, wrought-steel or wrought- iron barrel: 

5-inch 

8-Inch 

Bolts, machine; made of refined iron, hot- 
punched nuts, per 100: 
J by 1 

byi* 

by 2 

;&£::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 
X 3 !:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

byii 

by 2 

by?» 

by 3 

by 4 

by 5 

>y2 

byaj 

by 3 

|by34 

by 4 

by J* 

by 5 

by 5* 

by6 

byej 

by 7 

by 7* 

by 8 

X? 6y3 

§by3J 

A by 4 

*by« 

A by 5 

Awarded 4. * Awarded 5. 



101 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
298 
191 
298 



$1.29 

1.50 

1.50 

1.71 

1.71 

1.91 

.86 

18.25 

*8.26 



Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St.Louto. 



/No award. (See Ap* 
\ pendix.) 



191 
265 



265 



.37 
.60 



.313 



Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Do 



191 
191 



•.56 
•.69 



/No award. (8ee Ap- 
\ pendix.) 



Chicago. 
Do. 



/No award. (See Ap- 
\ pendix.) 



» Rolled thread. 

Digitized by 



Google 



8T7PPUI8 FOB THB IKDEAK SEBYIOB. 



315 



Contract awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Article*. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



1,310. 



2,1*0. 

«!: 

1.140. 
410... 
1,670. 
510... 
460... 
210... 
1,320. 



3,810. 
6^60., 
9,310.. 
1,260., 
2,760.. 
3,160.. 
1,600.. 
TOO.... 
1,100.. 
1,850.. 
1,730.. 
36 do* 



72 pounds.. 
115 pounds. 
218 pounds, 
impounds. 
206 pounds. 



44f\ decors 
67£dot.prs. 
60rVdw.prs 

«A doc. pre. 

dOdos.prs... 

46tfdos.prs. 

66dos.pra... 

aoyvdoi.pn 

7Adox.pra 



3.. 
8.. 



1,440 pounds 
1,445 pounds 
84 



73 

29 pairs.. 

lOOdosen. 

62 

4 

86 

52 

88 



Bolts, machine, etc.— Continued. 



. by 3*. 



. by4 
by 4*. 
by 5.. 

, by6.. 
i by7.. 

by 8.. 

by 9.. 

by 10. 
Bolts, tire, 



100: 



Bolts, 



byl 
by 2 

by 2 

by»» 

by 3 

by 2 

^ J* 

by 3 

v .«»,wlncLow, spring, oast-brasa boltV screw 

Braces, ratchet, B. B. 10-Inch sweep, nickel or 

rustless finish. 
Brads, steel, wire, in 1-pound packages: 

Unch, No. 20 gauge 

|-mch,No. 18 gauge 

1-inch, No. 17 gauge 

1*-Jnch, No. 16 gauge 

li-inch, No. 15 gauge 

Butte, brass, middle: 

lHnch 

2-inch 

2f-inch 

Butts, loose pin. steel: 

24 by 2* Inches 

3 by 2* Inches 

3 by 3 inches 

by 3} inches 



4 by 4 inches. 

4} by 44 inches 

Calipers, spring, 6-inch* Yankee pattern: 

injue..!""lllllll!ll"l!l!!!lllllll 

Calks, toe, steel: 

No.l 



No. 2 

No. 3 

Cards, cattle, leather back, bound edge 

Catches, cupboard, wrought steel, bronsed, 



Chains; 

Log, short links, with swivel, ordinary hook 
and grab hook; 10, 12, 14, and 16 fee' as 
required, per pound— 



A-inch 



f-tnch. 



Trace, 43 inches long, with hook and swivel. 

Chalk, carpenter's, assorted colors 

Chalk lines, braided, medium «iie 

Chisels, c s., cold, octagon, | by 7 inches 

Chisels, c. s., socket, corner, 1-inch, handled.... 
Chisels, c. s., socket, firmer, sharpened, leather- 
top handles: 

finch 

1-inch 

J-taoh 



265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 
265 



191 
265 
265 
265 

265 
265 
265 

298 



298 
298 



298 
298 

298 



51 
298 



191 
191 



191 
191 
191 
191 



265 
266 
265 



SO. 09 
.098 
.105 
.123 
.168 
.173 
.188 
.22 
.242 
.263 
.284 



.95 



.075 
.038 
.036 
.03 
.028 

.195 
.30 
.56 

.26 
.35 

.38 
.55 
.68 
.86 

.44 
.44 



.0376 



.0375 
.0375 



.0485 
.0425 



.45 

.17 

.0525 

.64 



.145 
.145 
.145 



/No award. 
\ pendix.) 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



(See Ap- 



Do. 



Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do 

Do. 
Do. 
Da 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do 
Da 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

F. a b. Chicago ware- 
house. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Chicago. 

I*. 
No award. See Appen- 
dix.) 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 



Digitized by 



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316 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



HARDWARE—Contmued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



68 

72 

63 

40 

43 

6 

9 

16 

18 

16 

7 

8 

9 

44 

83 

80 

163 pairs... 

149 quires.. 
91,427 sq. ft 

2 

76 

43 

19 

17 

25 

7 

12 

S2sets 

45 sets 

44 sets 

75 

51 A dozen. 
58}^ dozen. 

21A dozen. 
10A dozen. 

16f| dozen. 
24A dozen. 

111*1 dozen. 
97^ dozen. 
8lX dozen. 
65 dozen.... 

23f\ dozen. 
14JV dozen. 
16A dozen. 
10fV dozen. 
14A dozen. 

100 dozen... 
77 dozen... 

45 dozen 

47A dozen. 
548 dozen... 

62 

13 

23 

18 



Chisels, etc.— Continued. 

|-inch 

1-inch 

H-inch 

lj-inch 

2-inch , 

Chisels, c. s., socket, framing, oval back, sharp- 
ened and handled: 

1-inch '..'.'.'. , 

t-inch , 

1-inch 

1-inch 

li-inch 

lj-inch 

2-inch 

Clamps: 

Malleable, carriage, 10-inch 

Saw, swivel, 9-inch jaw 

Cleavers, batcher's, 10-inch 

Clippers, toilet, good quality, B. B 

Emery, assorted, per quire 

Wire, for screens, galvanized, 14-mesh 

Cocks, brass, racking, to screw, loose key, 1-inch. . 

Corkscrews, wood handle, cut worm 

Crowbars, solid steel, wedge point, assorted 
sizes, per pound. 

Cutters, bolt, for i-inch. 

Dividers, c. 8., wing: 

6-inch , 

10-inch 

Drills: 

Blacksmith's vertical 

Breast, 2 pairs of jaws. 2-speed 

Bitstock, assorted, rV to | inch by 32ds 

Straight shank, jobber's, assorted, ft to } 
inch by 32ds. 

Wood boring, brace, assorted, ,V to | inch 
by32ds. 

Faucets, wood, cork-lined, best, No. 6 

Files, flat, bastard: 

10-inch 

12-inch 

Files, cabinet: 

12-inch 

14-inch 

Files, half round, bastard: 

10-inch 

12-Inch 

Files, mill, bastard, 1 round edge: 

8-inch 

10-inch 

12-inch 

14-inch 

Files, round, bastard: 

6-inch 

8-inch 

10-inch 

12-inch 

14-inch 

Files, double end, taper, with handles: 

7-inch 

8-inch 

9-inch 

10-inch 

Forks, table, 4 tines, imitation stag handle, with 
bolster. 

Gates, molasses, No. 2 

Gauges: 

Harking, brass-mounted 

Mortise, screw slide 

Gluepots, No. 1, porcelain or tin lined 

> In full rolls of 100 lineal feet. 



265 
265 
265 
265 
265 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
265 
191 

298 
298 



191 
298 
191 



358 
265 
191 
265 

265 

265 

191 
191 

298 
191 

298 
191 

298 
298 
298 
298 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
298 
191 
191 

/»191 
\*265 

265 
265 
191 



$0,165 
.19 
.21 
.225 
.255 



.19 
.19 
.19 
.21 
.24 
.26 
.28 
.34 

.30 
.28 
1.10 
.57 

.49 
1.0165 
.45 
.06 
.0238 

2.25 

.10 
.175 

5.24 

1.80 

.77 

1.25 



.055 

1.05 
1.45 

2.80 
3.72 

1.36 
L77 

.72 
.95 
1.27 
1.80 

.52 
.64 
.84 
1.12 
1.60 



.58 
.66 
.74 



.10 
.10 



.26 
.37 
.29 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Da 



Chtoaga 
Da 
Da 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 
St Louis. 

Da 
Do. 

Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicaga 



a Awarded 31. 

Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THB INDIAN SBEVIOB. 



317 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. IS, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons, and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



15. 
13.. 
11. 
13. 
7... 
17. 

IS. 
18., 
9... 
1... 
62. 



00 dozen.... 
17* dozen. 
286 down... 
36 dozen — 
125 dozen... 

21 dozen 

12* dozen. 

29 dozen 

87 dozen 

r dozen. 



».' 



16. 
11.. 

48.. 
57.. 

36.. 
11.. 
11.. 



24.. 
6... 
7... 
9... 
19.. 



42. 
17. 
8... 
48. 



64.. 
101. 



116*| dozen.. 
42 dozen 



20Adoz.prs. 
aXdocprs.. 
5 do*, pis — 



»?«* 



:. prs. 
Kftdocpm. 

36doz.prs... 
14A.dos.prs. 
15A.doz.prs. 

72Adoz.prs. 
27oos.pn... 



Gouges, c. s., socket, firmer, sharpened, leather- 
top handles: 

-inch 

-inch 

-inch 

-inch 

-Inch 

l-inch. 

Grindstones, unmounted, per pound: 

Weighing 60 pounds 

Weighing 100 pounds 

Weighing 150 pounds 

Weighing 250 pounds 

Grindstone fixtures, 17-inch, improved patent 
cap, extra heavy, turned rollers. 

Chisel, socket, leather top, assorted 

File, brass ferrule, assorted 

Ax, 36-inch, hickory . XXX 

Hammer, blacksmith's, 18-inch 

Hammer, claw, 13-inch. 

Hatchet, broad, 17-inch 

Hatchet, lathing, 13-inch 

Hatchet, shingling, 14-inch 

Pick, 36-inch, "extra" 

81edge, 36-inch, "extra" 

Hammers, A. E., solid c. s., forged, No. 1* 

Hammers, farrier's: 

Shoeing, c. s 

Turning, half-bright, assorted, 2 to 2} pounds. 
Hammers, machinist's, ball peen: 

14-pound 

2j-pound , 

Hammers, riveting, solid c. s.: 

11-pound 

lj-pound , 

lf-pound , 

Hammers, sledge, blacksmith's, single face, 
solid c. 8.. handled: 

2-pound 

3-pound 

6-pound 

8-pound 

10-pound 

Hammers, mason's, solid c. s.: 

Ax finish. 5-pound 

Natural finish, 8-pound 

Natural finish, 12-pound 

Hammers, tack, upholsterer's pattern, steel 

Hatchets, c. s., good quality: 

Broad. 6-inch cut, steel head, single bevel, 
handled. 

Lathing, No. 1 

Shingling, No. 2 

- hinge: 



10-inch 

Hinges, T , extra heavy: 

8-inch 

10-inch. 

12-inch 

Hinges, heavy: 

8-inch 

10-Inch 

Hinges, light, 6-inch 

Hinges, strap, heavy: 



10-inch 

12-inch 

Hinges, strap, light: 
6-inch.. ...777... 

8-inch 

10-inch 

12-Inch 



298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 

1234 
^234 
1234 
1234 
191 



265 
173 
360 
360 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
191 

191 
191 

319 
319 

234 
234 
234 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 

191 

191 
191 



298 

298 
298 
298 

298 
298 
296 

298 
298 
296 

296 
298 
298 
298 



$0.34 
.355 
.3716 
.3975 
.42 
.4467 

.01 
.01 
.01 
.01 
.2025 



.27 
.082 
1.05 
.40 
.27 
.355 
.28 
.27 
.77 
.76 
.22 



1.15 



.25 
.30 



St Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chicago. 



St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Louisvule, Ky. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
8t Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 



.22 
.23 
.24 



.28 
.31 
.25 
.34 
.43 

.44 

.56 

.84 
.12 

.59 

.21 
.2225 

.32 

.57 

1.02 
1.50 
2.17 



.85 
.28 

.73 
1.11 
1.69 

.34 
.47 

.65 
.97 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



tColumbla, 



Digitized by 



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318 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Oontd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



468 dozen.. 



625 pounds... 
1,325 pounds. 
475 pounds... 
1,775 pounds. 
1,650 pounds. 
1,500 pounds. 

2,475 pounds. 
3,350 pounds. 
500 pounds... 
1,400 pounds. 
300 pounds... 
700 pounds. . . 
1,100 pounds. 
1,300 pounds. 
350 pounds... 
100 pounds... 
450 pounds... 
1,500 pounds. 
2,700 pounds. 
1,850 pounds. 
2,250 pounds. 
2,050 pounds. 
450 pounds... 
850 pounds... 
600 pounds... 
250 pounds... 
300 pounds... 
500 pounds. . . 
200 pounds... 
1,000 pounds. 
2,000 pounds. 
350 pounds... 
2,050 pounds. 
300 pounds... 
800 pounds... 
1,100 pounds. 
1,150 pounds. 
550 pounds... 

3,770 pounds 
5,580 pounds . 
4,065 pounds. 
9,925 pounds. 
1,900 pounds. 
8,200 pounds 
5,000 pounds . 
2,150 pounds. 
3,000 pounds 

6,000 pounds 
1,140 pounds 
1,100 pounds 

775 pounds.. 
1,175 pounds 
1,125 pounds 
1,150 pounds 
300 pounds. . 

673 dozen . . . 
194 

55 dozen 

92 pairs 

41 



Hooks, hat and coat, schoolhouse pattern, heavy, 

japanned. 
Iron, band, American, per 100 pounds: 



265 



SO. 12 



St. Louis. 



^!: 



by] 

•bVl::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

..by 2 

Iron, refined, American, per 100 pounds: 

Jbyf r. 

byU 

fcyil 

by 2. 



r 2§. 



No award, 
pendix.) 



(See Atr^ 



byi! 

*°yf 

by 1 

J»y 1J 

by lj 

tby2 

by2J 

'by 2} 

byl| 

by2 

by2i 

Iron, refined, round, American, per 100 pounds: 

A-inch 

|-inch 

TVinch 

Hnch 

A-inch... 

i-ineh. 
J-inch. 
j-inch. 
1-inch. 



234 



1.95 



St. Louis. 



Iron, sheet, per 100 pounds: 

Juniata, galvanized, 28-inch, No. 25. 



Refined, A inch thick. 
.No. 5 



Refined. No. 26 

Iron, refined, square, American per 100 lbs: 

•-inch 

Wnch 

j-inch 

|-inch 

1-inch 

Knives: 

Table, imitation stag handle, with bolster. . 

Bread, thin blade 



No award, 
pendix.) 



(See Ap. 



Butcher, 8-inch, beech handle, without 

bolster. 
Carving, and forks, forged, with bolster and 

guard, genuine stag handles, per pair. 
Chopping, hollow iron handle, forged blade. . 

i^inch thick. 




Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 



No award. (S«« 
pendix.) 



Ap. 



Ap- 



St. Louis. 

No award. (S«* 

pendix.) 
Chicago. 

No award. (S«« Ap " 

pendix.) 
St, Louis, 



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SUPPLIES FOB THX HTDIAH SBBVIOB. 



319 



ContractM awarded under advertisement of Jan. IS, 1913', for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc* — Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



66 

37 

63 

164 

72 

13 dozen.. 
66 

41 A do«en 

22A dozen 



37^ dozen... 
31^ dozen... 
UJV dozen. . . 
6ft dozen.... 



142A dozen... 
42 dozen.... 
MAdoien.. 
94* dozen.. 

87 

67 

127M 

6,170 pounds 
4,755 pounds. 
4,285 pounds. 
•i850pounds. 
30,375pounds 
20.426 pounds 
5^300 jiounds. 
21 T 260pound3 
8,640 pounds. 
7,720 pounds. 
9,000 pounds. 
1.420 pounds. 
700 pounds.., 
400 pounds... 
4,280 pounds 
6,330 pounds 
8,530 pounds 

1,610 pounds 
1.600 pounds. 
905 pounds.. 
425 pounds.. 
32 

134 pounds.. 
253 pounds.. 
368 pounds.. 
754 pounds.. 
752 pounds. . 
574 pounds. . . 

461 

121 

331 pounds 

245 pounds. 

|00 pounds 



Knives— Continued. 

Drawing, c. s., carpenter's, hollow-ground— 

104nch 

21-inch 

Horseshoeing, assorted widths, stag handles. 

Patty, withholster 

Skinning, 6-inch, beech handle, without 
bolster. 

Latches, thumb, heavy, all wrought 

Levels, spirit, with plumb, 30-inch, adjustable. . 
Locks: 

Closet, rim. dead, 2-tumbIer, 3$4nch, brass 

bolt, witn key. 
Drawer, 2-tumbler, 2J\by 2 inches, iron, with 

Upright rim, mineral knob, brass bolt, with 

44ncn 

4Wnch 

6-inch. 
6-inch. 



191 
265 
191 
265 



90.35 
.405 
.19 
.08 



298 

191 

191 
265 

265 



.67 
.635 

12.30 

.72 



1.84 
2.45 



Spring, pad, iron or brass, 3-tumbler or 
more, 2 keys each, assorted combina- 
tions on each shipping order— 

Suitable for outside use 

Suitable for inside use 

Sash, heavy, wrought, bronzed 

Lock sets, 31-inch, mortise, jet knobs, bronzed- 
steel combined rose and escutcheon, brass 
bolts and face, with key. 
Mallets, carpenter's, hickory, round, 6 by 4 Inches. 

Measures, tape, 75-foot, bent leather case 

Nails, gilt, upholsterers, size 43 perM.. 

Nails, wire, steel, per 100 pounds: 
M - f a 



265 
265 
265 



298 

265 



2.65 

1.16 

.25 

3.15 



.14 

.805 

.235 



Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
No award, 
pendix.) 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 



Do. 

Do. 

No award. 

Do. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



(See Ap- 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



4d. 
6d. 

8d. 



lOd 

12d 

20d 

30d 

40d 

60d 

Fence, 8d 

Fence, lOd 

Fence, 12d 

Finishing, 6d 

Finishing, 8d 

Finishing, lOd 

Nails, horseshoe, per 100 pounds: 

No. 6 

No. 7 

No. 8 

Nails, oxshoe.No. 5 perlOQlbs. 

Nippers, shoeing 

Nuts, iron, square, blank, hot-punched: 

For T-inchboit".!!!!!!!!"!!!*.!""!"."*.!!!!! 

For -inch bolt 

For -inch bolt 

For -inch bolt 

For finch bolt 

Oilers, bronzed steel, No. 14, 6-inch sprout 

Oilstones, Washita, composition, or carborun- 
dum. 

Packing, hemp, Mnch, square 

Packing, C. I. rubber, good quality: 



rV-inch. 
Hach. 



298 
298 
298 
298 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
265 
298 

298 



.0678 
.0678 
.0678 
.0678 
.75 

.073 

.063 

.048 

.033 

.03 

.028 

.10 

.145 

.13 

.095 

.065 



No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 



St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
St. Louis. 
Do. 



Do. 

New York, St. 
or Chicago. 
Do, 



Louisa 



iMslleabUjkey. 



Digitized by 



Google 



320 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



130 pounds. 

232 pounds. 

671 pounds. 
709 pounds. 
600 quires.. 
222 dozen.. 
41 

57 

26 

2 pairs 

2 pairs 

2 pairs 

48 

21 

5 pairs 

8£?.::::: 

9 

6 

5 

39 

156 

50 

56 

9 

14 

81 

49 

27 

7 

114 

379 

34 

63 

44 

34 

55 

66 

14 

18 

12 

30 pounds.. 
60 pounds.. 
108 pounds. 
HI pounds. 
87 pounds.. 

14 pounds.. 
22 pounds.. 
48 pounds.. 
53 pounds.. 
35 pounds.. 



Packing, C. I. rubber, etc.— Continued. 

5-fiich 

i-inch 

Packing, "Rainbow" style: 

Jiicn.;"!!!""!!!!!!!;!!!!!*:!!!!!!;!!;;;; 

Paper, sand (assorted ) . per quire 

Pencils, carpenter's, 7-moh 

Pinchers, blacksmith's shoeing 

Planes, as follows: 

Block, 6-inch, knuckle Joint 

Fore, adjustable, wood bottoms 

Wood, hollow and round, c. s.— 

1-inch 

li-inch 

lj-tach 

Adjustable, wood bottoms- 
Jack 

Joiner's 

Match, iron— 

f-inch 

1-inch 

Plow, embracing beading and center-beading 
plane, rabbet and fillister, dado, plow, 
l pftt/^ fn g and slitting plane. 

Dado, Iron, J-inch 

Rabbet, iron— 

1-inch 

li-inch 

Smooth, adjustable, wood bottoms 

Pliers: 

7-inch, o. s.. heavy— 

8ide-cutting 

Round nose 

End-cutting, nippers, reversible blade, 10- 
inch, c. s., heavy. 

Presses, meat, suitable for schools and hospitals. . 
Punches: 

Hand, oval, assorted, Nos. 1 to 16 

Harness, spring, revolving, 6 tubes 

Saddler's, c. s., round, to drive, assorted, 
Nos. 1 to 12. 

Conductor's heavy, assorted shapes of holes. . 

torses, floor— 

12-inch 

14-inch 

16-Inch 

Shoe, regular, oval— 

io-incnI!!!"I!";"!!!!!!!I!!!!!!!!!!!!" 

Wood, flat— 

12-inch 

14-inch 

Wood, half round— 

12-inch 

14-lnch 

Rivet sets, polished and blue: 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 7 

Rivets and burs, copper, in 1-pound boxes, No. 8: 

Mnch 

f-inch 

*-inoh 

|-mch 

1-inch 

Rivets and burs, copper No. 10: 

*-inch 

l-moh 

Linen 

f-inch 

1-inch , 

i Awarded 20. * Awarded 19. 



51 



265 



191 
191 
191 

265 

191 

265 
298 
298 



298 



(U91 
1*265 



191 

[»19J 
*265 
'298 
191 

191 
191 
191 

265 



265 
265 
265 

265 

265 

191 
191 

191 
191 

265 
265 
265 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 



60.085 

.085 

.25 
.25 
.08 
.13 
.40 

.55 
.82 

.70 
.70 
. # 86 

.737 
.97 

1.30 
1.37 
4.50 



.65 
.74 
.74 



.35 
.19 
.74 
.74 
.74 
.575 



.30 
.045 



.21 



.15 
.21 
.29 

.20 
.30 

.22 
.29 



.31 

.21 
.17 
.09 

.218 
.218 
.218 
.218 
.218 

.235 
.236 
.235 
.235 
.235 



New York, St. 
or Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



DiJt*8W*4kx 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



321 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 191S, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 

HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 

of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



5potmds 

Opounds 

96 pounds... 
2? pounds. . . 
18poonds... 

19 pounds... 
43 pounds... 
64 pounds... 
60 pounds... 

77 pounds... 
48 pounds... 
37 pounds... 
66 pounds... 
33 pounds... 
80 pounds... 
76 pounds... 
104 pounds.. 
88 pounds. . . 
15/ pounds.. 

23 thousand. 
28 thousand. 
22 thousand. 
12 thousand. 
14 thousand. 

355 

224 pairs.... 



115.. 
19... 
45... 

11... 
7.... 



25... 
30... 
260.. 

50... 
76... 

15... 



3.. 
17. 

12. 
4.. 
1.. 
71< 



149. 
124.. 
S3... 
60.. 
34.., 



78 gross.. 

78 gross.. 

74 g. 083.. 

70 grass.. 

79 gross.. 
62gross.. 
12fgross. 
133 gross. 
137 gross. 



Rivets and burs, copper, No. 12: 

finch 

1-inch 

•-Inch 

1-inch 

Rrvets^n,"ovatoead,"No.7:" 

Ktach.;!;;!!!;;!;"!!!!!!!;!!!!!!!!!!;;!!!! 

1-inch 

1-inch 

Rivets, iron, oval head: 

No.ftbylinch 

No.6by2inohes 

No. 6 by 4 inches 

No. 3 by 1 inch 

No. 3 by 11 inches 

No.3by21nches 

No. 3 by 21 inches 

No. 3 by 3 inches 

No. 3 by 31 inches 

No. 3 by 4 inches 

Rivets, tinned iron, in packages of 1,000: 

10-ounce 

12-ounce 

1-pound 

11-pound 

2-pound 

Rules, boxwood, 2-foot, 4-fold, full brass-bound. . 
Sadirons, 5 to 8 pounds, polished face, half-round 

wrought handles, per pound. 
Saw sets :> 

For crosscut saws 

For handsaws 

Saws: 

Compass, 124noh 

Back, 12-inch, blued back 

Buck, complete, 30-inch blade, painted 
frames. 

Circular, 26-inch, crosscut 

Circular. 30-inch, crosscut 

Crosscut, with handles- 
Moot 

6-foot 

Hand. 26-inch, hollow back, 6 to 10 points 
to the inch. 

Meat, butcher's bow, 20-inoh 

Rip, 28-inch, 4$ and 5 points 

Scales: 

Butcher's, dial tart, spring balance, squire 
pan, 30-pourul, by ounces. 

Bar and cattle, 6-ioa h standard platform 

Platform, counter, 240-pound 

Platform, drop tev^ r, oa wheels— 

1,000-pound...^.. , 

l,3EX^pound_ 

3,0QO-p<Hind „...-♦ 

Scissors, ladies*, G-iaett r <?. &., full size 

Screw dil vpie. steel blade running through han- 
dle 

fl-inch*.,^.,*.....,.,,.^.* , 

S-Lncb 

ICMnch... . 

Screws, wrought fron, bench, l i inch 

Screws, wood, bench, 21-inoh.. 

Screws, flat head, bright: 

-inch, No. 3 

nlnoh. No, 4 

-Inch, No. 5 

-Inch, No, A 

-inch, No. 5 

-inch. No. 6 
■inch, No. 6 
■Inch, No. 7 

-inch. No. 8, 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

234 
234 
234 
234 

234 
234 
234 
234 
234 
234 
234 
234 
234 



266 
265 
265 
265 
265 
191 
296 



•0.253 
.253 
.253 
.253 
.253 

.078 
.075 
.066 
.063 

.063 
.063 
.063 
.06 
.06 
06 
.06 
.06 
.06 
.06 

.04 

.044 

.05 

.06 

.075 

.23 

.025 



.405 
.206 



.10 
.575 



265 
265 
265 
265 
101 

296 

296 
296 
296 
296 
298 
296 
298 
296 



1.20 

1.45 

.72 

.47 
.77 

1.85 

55.00 
2.03 

13.50 
18.00 
19.50 
2.X 



.09 

.14 

.17 

.275 

.28 

.05 

.0525 

.055 

.0525 

.055 

.0575 

.06 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

\No award. 
/ pendix.) 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



(See Ap- 



15886°— int 1913— vol \ 



.063 Do. 

.0607 Do. 

Digitized by 



Google 



322 



SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awuds. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



153 grow 

118 gross 

A3 gross 

184 gross 

172 gross 

187 gross 

171 gross 

187 gross..... 

167 gross 

125 gross 

150 gross 

105 gross 

97 gross 

58 gross 

51 gross 

21 gross 

•9 gross 

85 gross , 

19 gross 

22 gross 

23 gross 

15 gross , 

6 gross , 

17 gross , 

6 gross....... 

15A gross... 
19 gross 

82do*en. 

18Adosen..., 

35 

22 

1,560 pounds, 

17p*Jrs , 

11 pairs 



3.475 pounds 

6.476 pounds 
7,700 pounds. 
8,756 pounds. 
7,600 pounds. 
2,860 pounds, 
1,150 pounds 

400 pounds... 
1.060 pounds. 
460 pounds.., 

SttSE::: 

68 

18 

22 

89 

UOdosen 

160 pounds... 

126 pounds... 
200 pounds... 

666 pounds.. 
846 pounds... 
1,460 pounds. 
1,720 pounds, 
lj316 pounds. 



Screws, flat head, bright— Continued. 

1-inch, No. 7 

1-inch, No. 8 

Wnch,No.9 

1-inch, No. 7 

1-inch, No. 8 

l-inoh,No.9 

1-inch. No. 10 

lJ-inch,No.9 

1 -inch, No. 10 

1 -inch, No. 11 

1 -inch, No. 10 

1 -Lien, No. 11 

1 -Inch, No. 12 .* 

1 -Inch, No. 11 

1 -inch, No. 12 

1 -inch. No. 13 

2inch,No.lO 

2-inch, No. 11 

2-inch, No. 12 

2-inch, No. 13 

2-inch, No. 14 

21-inch, No. 14 

2*-lnch, No. 15 

2finch, No. 14 

2J-inch.No. 15 

3-Inch, No. 16 

8-inch, No. 18 

Shears, c. s., japanned handle, straight, trimmers: 

8-Inch 

10-inch 

"■fcC^. 



No. 9.. 
Solder, 50 1 



298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 



296 
296 
298 
298 
298 
296 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 

265 
191 



80.066 
.07 
.0733 
.07 
.0733 
.077 
.064 
.064 
.091 
.098 
.096 
.105 
.115 
.12 
.126 
.14 
.1225 
.18 
.14 
.154 
.172 
.186 
.217 
.203 
.231 
.294 



3.20 
4.96 



pure tin, 50 parts pure lead.., 



li pounds each, per pound 

2 pounds each, per pound 

Shoes, horse, light, assorted, front and hind, per 
lOOpounds: 

NoTo™ 

No.l 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

No. 6 

No. 6 

Shoes, mule, per 100 pounds: 

No. 2. 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Shovels, lire, hand, long handle, heavy 

Springs, door, spiral, heavy, 10-inch 

Squares: 

Framing, steel, 2 Inches wide, with rafter 



Try- 

4*-mch 

10-inch 

Try and miter, 7^-inch 

Staples, wrought Iron, 3 Inches long . 
Steel, cast: 

| by 3 Inches 



I by 4 Inches... 

by 1 inch 

Steel, cast, octagon: 

-inch 

-inch , 

-inch , 

-Inch 

-Inch 

lj-inch , 



191 
191 



358 
358 
358 
358 
358 
358 
358 

858 

358 
858 

51 

191 

191 



191 
191 
191 
265 



.24 
.24 



13.68 
13.68 
13.43 
13.43 
13.43 
13.43 
13.43 

13.43 
13.43 
13.43 

.87 
1.70 

.60 



.10 
.20 
.23 
.024 

.066 

.056 
.048 

.056 
.053 
.048 
.048 
.048 
.048 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

(No award. 

pendlx.) 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



See Ap- 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chicago. 
Do. 

Do 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

St Louis. 

New York, St. 
or Chicago. 
DoT^ 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



i phoenix Horse Shoe Co. (Joliet, HI.) make. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



823 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Article*. 




Point of delivery. 



700 pounds., 

475 pounds,. 
670 pounds.. 
40Q pounds. 
400 pounds. 
475 pound*. 
£*> pounds. 

2S5 pounds, 
445 pounds, 

27r> pounds. 
490 pounds.. 

ITS pounds.. 

325 pounds*. 
460 pounds!. 
ISO pounds. 
000 pounds., 
64 



Steel, cast, square; 
Hnch.... 



it 
f-U 

lit 



iby3incl 

!by 4 inct 
by 5 Inct 
by fl inel 
spring; 
J by lln ' 
by Hi 
by ljt 
by lit 
by 2 in 
, butc 



H9>(5„ 



70 dot. papers. 
31 dot.papers. 
B4dos.papejs. 
II 2 do*. papers 
35 doi. papers. 
■86 dot, papers. 
15 dot, papers. 

in. ..... 

302... 

fflL„,....,... 

«L. 

1 

1ft. „ 

ft. ...-. 

9 

31 5 pounds. . . 

ne pounds., . 

537 pounds... 
871 pounds.., 
607 pounds... 
343 pounds... 
7&b pounds. 

17..... „ 

§. ... 

I„. 

2 F 4SO pounds, 
250 pounds... 

150 pounds... 

300 pounds. . 
285 pounds... 
230 pounds... 
310 pounds... 
420 pounds... 



Inch.. 

.Inch/ 
Uinch.. 
Ij-incb. 
2-inch.. 
Steel, plow: 
J by 3 inches 
- * inches 
Inches 
, inches 
Steel 

'by 1 Inch 

" inches, 

inches ......... „.......„„.i....;.. 

inches ...„„.„. . 

Inches. 

Steels, butcher's, 12-inch, stag handle, with 

swivel. 

Stocks and dies, blacksmith's, to cut J, ,\ f, f Tt 
t\ M, i* and 1 inch, complete with taps, iu oisp 
Tacks, upholsterer's, lull weight, per dozen pa- 
pers i 

2-ounce., ., .,,...,, 

3-ounce 

■l-i:u>rii-i .,.* ...................... 

flounce... . . — 

8-ounce .,.,,,,....,..«,.... 

10*ounc*....,... 

12-ounoe , , . , , 

Thermometers: 

Mercurial .,,........,...,.,,..,.,,«..,..... 

Spirit ... 

Trimmers, spoke, adjustable ,...,......,,...... 

Trowels, l&i-meh; 

Brick , 

Plastering . . . , 

Tuyere (tweer). Iron, adjustable pattern, sing]*, 
heavy, with cleaning drop. 

Blacksmith's, solid box- 



6-inchJaw.., 
44-lncuJaw., 



Square slide, 4-lnch Jaw. ............ 

Washers, iron, fiat, for— 

Much bolt.,,.. 

ifci-lDCQbaH...... ., 

i -Inch boh ,.,.,...,..............,.,„...„, 

-inch bolt. 

; -inch bolt . . » . .. , .,,....,...„. 

•Inch boh < , , 

Waste, cotton, white ..►«*.. .„ 

Wedges, wood chopper's solid steel, per pound: 

5-pound — .... 

0-pound . , 

Well- wheels, japanned, 1 0-inch, heavy, swivel 

hook. 
Wire, annealed, blued: 

No. 10.. 



No. 30., 



No. 34... 

Wire, bright, Iron: 

lio,3..... 

No, 6 

No. 7 

No. a.... 

No.P...~ 



i Awarded 8. 



TO 

70 
70 
70 
70 

7" 
St 

334 
234 
234 
234 

341 
341 
341 
341 
341 
265 

191 



m 

51 
51 
£1 
51 
51 



m 

191 

205 
205 
191 



^205 

^293 

l*29S 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
104 

au 



i&i 



299 



an 

HI 



$0,050 

.053 
.043 
.048 
.045 
.049 
.043 

.037 
.027 
.027 
.027 

.0225 

.0225 
.0225 
.0225 
.32 

10. OS 



.07 
.074 
.00 
.009 
.07 
.075 
.OS 

.0* 
.15 
.15 

.30 
,38 



0.00 
0.60 
3.45 
3 45 
320 

.053 

.044 

.035 

.0255 

.0225 

.0215 

.0875 

.022 
.023 
.19 



.0367 

.043 

.0184 
.0184 
.0134 
.0134 
.0134 



New York, St. Louis, 
or Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 

CtthMO. 

Do. 

Do, 

Do, 

Do, 
St, Louis. 

Chicago. 



St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chioapr 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Chicago, 

St Louis. 
Do. 

pntoiyi. 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 

Do. 
F. o. b. V: 

St. Louis. 
D&. 
Do. 



N.J. 



Chicago, 
F. o. ft, Chioago 
bouse. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



« Awarded 1 



•Awarded*. 

Digitized by 



Google 



824 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



HARDWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



137 pounds... 

100 pounds.. 
827 pounds.. 
14 pounds... 
82 pounds... 
72 pounds... 



11400 pounds 

218,740 lbs.... 

14,745 pounds 

110 

128 

132 

88 

64 

186..: 



204 tons 

202 

842 

12 

14 

2 



Wire, bright, iron— Continued. 
No. 10 



No. 11 

No. 12 

No. 14 

No. 16 

No. 18 

Wire, 2-point barbed, galvanized, main wires 
not larger than 10 gauge, barbs not larger than 
11 gauge: 
For nog fence, space between barbs not to 

exceed 3 inches. 
For cattle fence, space between barbs not to 
exceed 5 inches. 
Wire-fence staples, steel, galvanised, 1-inch and 
1 J-lnch, as may be required. 

W Ire stretchers, for barbed wire 

Wrenches, solid handle, screw, black: 

8-inch 

10-inch 

12-inch 

15-inch 

Additional articles: 

Galvanised steel barrels, 55 gallons capacity, 
with the words "Indian Service" em- 
bossed thereon, and also the word "Gaso- 
line" or "Kerosene," as the service may 
require. 

[ Carbide, in iron drums 

or 
I Carbolite, in iron drums 



Fire extinguishers, chemical 

Extra bottles for fire extinguishers 

Tires, wagon, iron, 3 by J inch, round edges: 

For wheels 40 inches high, per pound. . . . 

For wheels 48 inches high, per pound.. . . 

For wheels 54 inches high, per pound. . . . 



298 

298 
298 
298 
298 
298 



10.0189 

.0194 
.0199 
.0219 
.0239 
.0269 



265 

191 
191 
191 
191 



>9 



>343 
10 



.40 



.35 
.41 
.7025 



»4.90 



55.00 
60.00 

(«) 
5.75 



358 .0185 

358 i .0185 
358 .0185 



F. o. b. Chicago ware- 
house. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



No award. (See Ap- 
pendix.) 
Do. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 

Chicago. 

Do! 
Do. 

F. o. b. factory, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



F. o, b. out Dutath, 
St. Louis, Chicago, 
Omaha. 

Chicago. 
No award. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 



PLUMBER'S AND STEAM AND GAS FITTER'S TOOLS, FITTINGS, AND SUPPLIES. 



134 pounds. 



31. 
51.. 
23. 



13. 
8.. 



58. 



12. 
12. 
7.. 
5.. 
5.. 
5.. 



Cement, gas fitter's, in 5-pound packages 

Cutters, pipe. 3-wheel: 

To cut 1 to 1 inch 

To cut I to 2 inches 

Furnaces, blast, gasoline, combination, hot blast, 

complete, with melting pot. 
Ladles, wrought, double lip: 

4-inch 

6-inch. 



Pliers, gas, forged: 



12-inch 

Ratchets, sleeve: 

Handle 10 inches long. 

Handle 16 inches long. 
Reamers, pipe: 

4-inch 

1-inch 

1-inch 

li-inch 

lj-inch 

2-inch 



118 


SO. 10 


St. Louis or Chicago. 


265 
265 
191 


.71 

.81 

3.50 


St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 


265 
265 


.105 
.18 


St. Louis. 
Do. 


265 
265 


.16 

.27 


Do. 
Do. 


298 
298 


3.06 
4.67 


Do. 
Do. 


191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 


.185 

.25 

.31 

.37 

.46 

.62 


Chioago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



»MeU. 

» Awarded 186 tons. 

• Awarded 18 tons. 

* 162.50 f. o. b. Fargo, N. Dak.; Minneapolis, Minn.: Sioux City, Iowa: Chicago, HI.; East St. Louis. HI; 
Omaha, Nebr.; St. Joseph. Mo.; Kansas City, Mo.; Niagara Falls, N. Y.: or Sault 8t. Marie, Mich. W0 
f. 0. b. Seattle, Wash.; Portland, Oreg.; San Francisco. Cal.; Los Angeles, Cal.; or Sacramento, Cal. 172.50 
f. 0. b. El Paso, Tex. $76.50 f. 0. b. Denver, Colo. 867.50 f. 0. b. Oklahoma City, Okla. Drums to be of 
100 pounds capacity. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8UPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVICE. 



325 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin and stamped ware, etc.— Contd. 

PLUMBER'S AND STEAM AND GAS FITTER'S TOOLS, FITTINGS, AND SUPPLIES— 

Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con* 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


13 sets 


Stocks and dies, pipe, adjustable: 

*tol inch..:. ...... 


191 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
19L 


$2.52 
4.20 

.185 

.25 

.31 

.37 

.46 

.62 

.92 

.4226 
.75 


Chicago. 
Do. 


12 seta. 


1} to 2 inches 


11 


T,p &E&f : ...... . 


Do. 


10 


1-inch 


Do. 


10 


1-inch 


Do. 


6 


lV-inch 


Do. 


4 


ll-inch 


Do. 


6 


2-uich 


Do. 


20 


Vises, pipe, malleable iron, hinged, to hold § to 2 

inch pipe. 
Wrenches, pipe, good quality: 


Do. 


87 


Do. 


100 


18-inch 


Do. 









PIPE FITTINGS. 



17*.. 
276.. 
64... 

a.... 
a.... 

60S.. 

■a*. 

34... 

44... 
1.... 

1,209 
IM 
820., 
631.. 
657.. 

236.. 
246.. 
212., 

i5i._ 

154.. 

1»._ 

123.. 
153.. 
99... 
37... 
90... 
76... 

74... 
65... 
66... 

316" 
MB.. 
200.. 

170.. 
140.. 

83f.. 



Bibbs, lever-handle, plain, finished, pipe thread; 

1-inch ... 

Bibbs, lever-handle, plain, finished with thim- 
ble*, for lead pipe: 

l-ineb. + , , 

I-lnch 

Bibbs, compression, plain, finished, pipe thread: 

finch 

{-inch .... 

I-fncb 

Bibbs, compression, plain, finished, with thim- 
bles, for lead pipe: 

When....... ...v.. .............. 

J-incb .. 

I-tnch..,.. „„,,. 

Bushings. malleable-Iron: 

J by j Inch , 

I by I inch...... , , 

I by 1 1 inches. , 

14 by U inches... 

1 } by 2 inches. ......................... ..„., 

Caps, malleable- iron, black, per pound: 

finch... ....... *...< 
inch. ..-..,, 
inch , 

if inch .. 

lf-Lnch 

2*inch . „,,,....,,. 

Caps, maUeable^iion, galvanised, per pound: 

finch ..,......,.,.. 

l-toch 

1-incb 

it-inch 

If inch 

2-tocb 

Couplings, boiler, with unions, malleable-iron, 
straight* 
* hy 4by 1 inch............................ 

j by I by 1 Inch 

| by I by 1 inch.......... , 

Couplings, wroughfr-ron, black*. 

Hnch""" "™;!ii*;;™;;;i;"i";""; 

i'inch............... 

if inch , 

If inch.. .. ... 

3-inch.., 

Couplings, wrought Iron, galvanised: 

I4nch ._ 



326 


la 48 


W 


,7206 


m 


1.0O41 


IIS 


46 


ns 


1.26 


191 


.27 


191 


.495 


111 


,M 


113 


.40 


U& 


.60 


ng 


1,25 


60 


.0111 


69 


.015S 


69 


-01S4 


69 


.0236 


60 


.€968 


60 


.084 


69 


.034 


69 


.084 


69 


.0504 


m 


,0304 


m 


.0504 


m 


.1176 


m 


,U76 


GO 


.1176 


69 


,07*6 


69 


.0708 


60 


.0798 


69 


.103 


60 


.1275 


69 


.1275 


32fi 


.010 


326 


.0276 


326 


.0358 


326 


.0468 


326 


.0178 


326 


.077 


326 


,0276 


3% 


.0358 


BJSJ 


.06 



Omaha. 

Chicago. 

Do. 



St. Louis or Chicago. 
Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do, 



St Louis or Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do, 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Digitized by 



Google 



326 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIOE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, tfc.—Contd. 



PIPE FITTINOB-Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


208 


Couplings, wrought iron, galvanised— Contd. 
lMnch 


326 
826 
826 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
09 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
09 
09 
09 

69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 


8a 0688 
.088 
.11 

.064 

.064 

.0604 

.0604 

.0604 

.0604 

.1176 
.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 

.064 
.064 
.084 
.0604 
.0504 
.0604 

.1176 
.1176 
.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 

.084 
.0604 
.0604 
.0604 
.0604 
.0604 

.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 
.0796 

.102 
.1275 
.1276 

.084 
.084 
.084 
.0604 
.0604 
.0604 

.1176 
.1176 
.1176 
.0798 

.084 
.064 
.084 
.084 
.064 
.064 


ftmaha. 


126 


1 l-inch, 


Do. 


100 


rtnoh 


.Do. 


66 


Couplings, B. 6 L., malleable Iron, black, 
per pound: 


Chicago. 
Do. 


90 


. IjnMi 


137 


140011............ . i,i.../i,x , , .i ,. 


Do. 


40 




Do. 


40 


1 finch 


Do. 


40 


24noh 


Do. 


106 


Couplings, B. & L., malleable iron, galvanised, 
per pound: 
Wnch 


Do. 


92 


(-Inch 


Do. 


68 


I-lnoh 


Do. 


86 


M-inch 


Do. 


18 


ll-inch 


Do. 


12 


2-inch 


Do. 


120 


Crosses, malleable iron, black, per pound: 


Do. 


107 


f-inoh 


Do. 


77 


1-inch 


Do. 


82 


1 l-inch 


Do, 


78 


It-inch 


Do! 


10 


2-inch 


Do, 


18 


Crosses, malleable iron, galvanised, per pound: 


Do. 


66 


flinch 


Do. 


87 


l-inch 


Do, 


26 


l+-*pch , 


Do. 


6 




Do. 


4 


24nch 


Do. 


632 


Elbows, malleable iron, black, per pound: 
l-inch 


Do. 


804 


I4nch 


Do. 


699 


i-lnch 


Do. 


468 


lHnch 


Do. 


839 


li-inch 


Do. 


221 


24nch 


Do. 


959 


Elbows, malleable iron, galvanised, per pound: 


Do. 


1,437 


1-inch 


Do. 


777 


l-inch 


Do. 


670 


11-tach 


Do. 


483 


ll4nch 


Do. 


897 


*Jnfth 


Do. 


67 


Elbows, boiler, with unions, malleable iron, 
bent: 
ibyibylinch 


Do. 


69 


Jbylhy 11p4»h 


Do. 


69 


{bylbyiinch 


Do. 


80 


Elbows. B. 6 L., malleable Iron, black, per 
pound: 


Do. 


88 


SJnch 


Do. 


66 


Unch 


Da 


8 




Da 


43 


lflnlvh 


Do. 


22 


2-mch 


Do. 


22 


Elbows. B. 6 L., malleable iron, galvanised, per 
pound: 


Da 


84 


f-fnch 


Do. 


46 


I-lnch 


Da 


22 


lj-lnch 


Da 


58 


Elbows, malleable iron, black, side outlet, per 
pound: 


Da 


58 


{-inch 


Da 


49 


Ktaoh 


Da 


24 


H-inch 


Da 


16 


li-inch 


Da 


2 


24neh 


Da 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



327 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc.— Contd, 



PIPE FITTINOS-Contlnued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No, 

or 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


10.„. 


Elbows* malleable Iron, galvanized, side outlet, 
per pound: 


60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 
60 
60 

m 

M 
60 
60 
60 

60 

60 

60 
60 
60 

CO 
60 

69 
69 
60 
60 

00 

60 

60 

60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 
69 

00 
60 
69 

m 

69 
60 
M 
60 
60 
60 

<?J 
1*101 

*n»i 

Klfll 

i*19l 

i*lOi 

■ 


SO. 1176 
.1176 
.1176 
,1176 
.1176 

.2567, 

,3375 

.5062 

.006 
.0(106 
.012S 
.0176 
.0208 
,0288 

.0006 
,0128 
.0176 
.0272 
.6336 
.0432 

.008 

.0096 

.012S 

.0176 

.020S 

.0288 

.0006 
-012S 
.0176 
.0272 
,0336 
.0432 

.0112 
.0144 

.0203 
,0272 
.032 
.0432 

,0176 
.0224 
.0304 
.0464 
.056 
.1.17.-,- 

.0211 

.025 

.037 

.05 

.06 

.08 


Chicago. 
Do. 


48 


finch 


11 


1-lncb. . .. 


Do. 


13. :. 


H-lnch... ,,..,,..,, ..... .. 


Do. 


ft. ; 


ltfnch. .>........ 


Do. 


M 


Gas service cocks, brass, female: 

i-lneh......... 


Do. 


46 


1 Inch. . ...,.,,.......,.....,......,., , . 


Do, 


sa„.. 


IHnch,. 


Do. 


m 


Nipples, close, wrought iron, black: 

* by 1| laches . 

J by II inches. ....... ........ ,,...,.... 


Do. 


ao ., 


Do 


M4. .... 


1 by 1| Inches .. 


Do. 


eo . 


14 by 11 Inches ....... 


Do, 


151 ...... 


If by If inches.. !!... 


Do. 


m . 


2 by 2 inches. .... . ... ......1.1* ,*..»„_». 


Do, . 


raft. 


NIpptes, closp, wrought iron. gaJvastitdi 
* by 14 inches... 


Do, 


ivo. 


1 by it leches 


Do. 


en 


1 by 14 inches,.. 


Do. 


438 


liby llinches 


Do. 


345 


14 by If Inches. ............ 


Do. 




2 by 2 Inches 


Do* 


1M ...... 


Nipples, short, wrought Iron, black 1 

* by 14 inches . . . . 


Do. 


210 


I by 2 inches „„ 1 


Do. 


309 


1 by 2 inches.. .................... .......... 


Do- 


110 


14 by 2+lnch*3 ...._.,._.,, 


Do. 


141 


ll by 2* inches,,..,..... 


Do. 


114. 


2 by 24 inches 


Do. 


#30..... 


Nipples, short, wrought iron, gaUanixed: 

4 by 1* Inches.... .... 


Do, 


808 


I by 2 inches .,..., 


Do. 


418 


1 by 2 inches. .............. 


Do. 


273 


li &j 24 Inches . „....,,.... 


Do. 


SI 


14 by 24 inches.. 


Do. 


3oa..„. 


2 by 24 Inches ..,....,...,..,, 


Do. 


12? 


Nipples, long, wrought iron, black: 

J by 3 inches...... ,,. . 


Do, 


107. .... 


I by 34 Inches. .._.......,.., 


Do. 


83 


1 by 3} inches .,,..,...,,...„... 


Do. 


oa 


14 by 4 Inches. ..... . ........................ 


Do. 


si 


14 by 4 inches..... „, ..,_._.._...... 


Do. 


»„ , 


2 by 4 inches.. .,..~. ,.,....,, ............... 


D<^ 


338...... 


Nipples, Jong, wrought Iron, galvanised: 

1 by 3 Inches ,. .»....,.,,,.,. 


Do. 


343 


joy 34 inches......... 


Do, 


SIS 


I by 3} inches........... 


Do, 


as? ,: 


14 by 4 inches........ ....,, 


Do. 


318 


1* by 4 inches 


Do, 


315........... 


2 oy 4 inches...... 


Do. 


4,275 feet 

6*086 feet 


Pipe, steel, black, per foot: 

IrEnch... 


Do. 


Hnch. 


Do. 


5,689 feet..... 


1-inch 


Do, 


2.782 feet 


IHnch. 


Do. 


2,557 feet..... 
1,700 feet..... 


IHnch 

2-inch 


Do, 
Do. 


7^51 feet 

10,627 feet..,. 


Pipe, steel, galvanized, per foot: 

f-lnrh.. 




1-lncb...... _. 




20104 feet.... 

6,777 feet 

5,691 feet 


L-inch... 


No. award. (See Ap. 
pendlx.) 


It-inch, ,.,..,,,.. 

IHnch........ 


101 
101 
101 

101 

101 

101 


1.O6 
*.06 
1.06 

*.oo 

».06 
».06 


7,464 teet 


2-luch 




»feet. 


Pipe, lead, per pound: 

4-inch , 


Chicago. 
Do. 


70feet ,. 


1-inch 


45 feet „ 


I-Lneh 


Do. 


105 feet 


lHnch - — - 


Do. 


106 feet. 


14-inch 


Do. 


37 (tot ... 


2-Trau 


Do. 



»Only. 



1 ^t roflo"! i * n g t fra , 



Digitized by 



Google 



328 



SUPPLIES FOE THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 191$, for piece good*, clothing, dry 
good*, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Contd. 



PIPE FITTINGS— Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


402 


Plug cast iron, black: 


69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
09 
69 
69 

09 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 

69 
69 
69 
69 
69 
69 


SO. 005 
.0075 
.01 
.0125 
.0175 
.025 

.01 

.015 

.02 

.025 

.035 

.05 

.084 

.T>84 

.0504 

.0504 

.0604 

.1176 
.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 

.4016 
.5552 
.8741 
1.1458 
1.7240 
.066 

.084 

.0504 

.0604 

.0504 

.0504 

.0504 

.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 

.084 

.084 

.084 

.0504 

.0504 

.0504 

.1176 
.1176 
.1176 
.0798 
.0798 
.0798 

.0495 
.0608 
.0743 
.1035 
.1305 
.1688 

.0743 

.09 

.1125 

.1575 

.2025 

.2588 


Chicago. 


535 


i-inch 


Do. 


411 


1-Inch 


Do. 


325 


IMnch .. , 


Do. • 


284 


1 J-inch 


Do. 


279 


2-inch 


Do. 


296 


Plugs, cast iron, galvanized: 


Do. 


369 


finch 


Do. 


230 


1-inch 


Do. 


207 


I44ncta,„ 


Do. 


116 


Ij-Lnch 


Do. 


120 


24och , ..,.„.„.. 


Do. 


309 


[led titers, m ulW.lt* mi., black, per pound: 
4 by linen.,... 


Do. 


276 


jby lLach 


Do. 


174 


1 by lj Inctiw.... ,. 


Do. 


149 


I*by 14 Inches 


Do. 


134 


1 5 bv 2 Inches 


Do. 


483 


Itoducers, malleable troih, galvanized, per pound: 
| by f Inch ...... 


Do. 


637 


J by 1 inch >..„...,., 


Do. 


411 


1 by it inches 


Do. 


295 


Ii hy 1J Inches.., , „ 


Do. 


211 


i\ by 2 Inches , 


Do. 


175 


Stopcocks, brass, steam: 

>lnch«„ 


Do. 


91 


1-inch.. .„.. 


Do. 


44 


14-Inch 


Do. 


24 


ij inch., + „ »...»,.„. 


Do. 


23 




Do. 


72 dor 

309 


Straps, tinned, for J, f . 1, 11, 1 J, and 2-inch pipe. . . 
Tees, malleable iron, black, per pound: 
4-inch 


Do. 
Do. 


402 


finch 


Do. 


399 


1-inch 


Do. 


283 


14-inch . . . 


Do. 


222 


lj-inch 


Do. 


146 


2-inch . .... 


Do. 


643 


Tees, malleable iron, galvanized, per pound: 
4-inch 


Do. 


799 


finch .... 


Do. 


650 


1-inch 


Do. 


409 


14-inch 


Do. 


326 


1 J-inch 


Do. 


255 


2-inch 


Do. 


24 


Tees, cross, malleable iron, black, per pound: 
4-inch 


Do 


27 


1-inch . 


Do 


12 


1-inch 


Do. 


15 


1 J-inch 


Do. 


12 


1 J-inch 


Do. 


12 


2-inch 


Do. 


69 


Tees, cross, malleable iron, galvanized, per 
pound: 
4-inch 


Do 


80 


J-inch 


Do. 


68 


1-inch 


Do 


62 


1 J-inch 


Do 


62 


1 j-inch 


Do 


30 


2-inch . 


Do 


250 


Unions, malleable iron, black: 

4-inch 


Do 


290 .. 


J-inch 


Do. 


320 


1-inch 


Do 


204 


1 J-inch 


Do 


180 


1 J-inch ... 


Do 


157 


2-inch 


Do 


617 


Unions, malleable iron, galvanized : 
4-inch 


Do 


857 


1-inch .---..... . 


Do 


547 


1-inch 


Do 


339 


14-inch 


Do 


275 


lj-inch 


Do 


265 


2-inch 


Do. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



329 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan, IS, 1913, for piece goods, clothing, dry 
goods, enameled ware, wagons and wagon fixtures, tin ana stamped ware, etc. — Coatd. 



PIPE FITTINGS— Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trao- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


ns 


Valves, gate, high pressure: 


60 
60 
69 
60 
60 
60 

60 
60 
69 
60 
60 
60 


10.8413 

.4594 

.6563 

.9188 

1.3125 

1.9688 

.3375 
.4253 
.6076 
.8505 
1. 1813 
1.7888 


Chicago. 
Do. 


381 


Linen 


387 


Marti 


Do. 


137 


lMnoh 


Do. 


153 


]<-bith.., , , 


Do. 


1» 


Staeb 


Do. 


380 


Vabas, globe, high pressure: 


Do. 


566 


Knch 


Do. 


365 


1-inch 


Do. 


1M 


lMnch 


Do. 


133 


lr-lnco 


Do. 


103 


2-nich 


Do. 









HOSE GOODS, 
hose, cast brass: 

i] 
i\ 

2Hnch. 

Hose damps, brass, per dozen: 

For f-fncn hose 

For 1-inch hose 

For 11-inch hose 

For li-inch hose.. .., 

For 2-inch hose 

For 2*4nch hose 

Hose, rubber, garden, f-inch, in lengths of 50 

Hose/cottan, rubber-lined, in lengths of 60 feet, 
coupled: 
Hnch 

If-tach 

lMnch 

24neh 

244iich, double jacket 

Noutos, hose, screw, combination, f-inch 

Nosxles, hose, screw: 

1-ineh.... 

lHnch 

2-inoh 

aHnch 



448.. 
19... 

14... 

7.... 
6... 
7.... 

ML 

SAdosen. 

ldosen... 

Sdosen... 

lWdotcn. 

Xdocen.. 

33,860 fast. 

1,250 feet.. 

150 feet.... 
360 feet.... 
2,250 feet.. 
3409 feet.. 

U 

9 

17 

14 




191 


90.065 


143 


.106 


143 


.236 


142 


.33 


142 


.68 


142 


1.13 


233 


.21 


233 


.60 


233 


.75 


233 


.90 


233 


1.20 


233 


2.10 


191 


.0675 


92 


.106 


265 


.132 


358 


.147 


265 


.192 


298 


.3975 


61 


.1875 


142 


.14 


142 


.60 


233 


.90 


233 


1.46 



Chicago. 
NewYork, St 
or Chicago. 

Dcl 

Da 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



New York, St 

or Chicago. 
St Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 



New York, St 
or Chicago. 

Chicago, 
Do. 



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880 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical fuj 
school books and supplies, furniture andwoodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. {bids opened in Omaha, Nebr.). 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



238 pounds., 



369,256108.. 



24,250 pounds 

12,270 pounds 
217 dosen 



306,598 lbs... 
152,645 lbs... 

8,425 pounds 

409 pounds.. 
1,750 dosen.. 

1,818 pounds 



725 pounds.. „ 
1,390 pounds. 
277 pounds... 

5^43 pounds. 

112.500 lbs.... 
7,803 pounds. 

812 pounds... 

878 dos cans.. 

6,000 pounds. 
2.925 pounds. 
735 bottles. . . 
972 bottles. . . 

981 



27,544 pounds 

99,455 pounds 

748 pounds... 

10,070 pounds 
72,980 pounds 
737 cans 



Allspice, ground. 



Bacon, short, clear sides, medium thickness. 



Baking powder. 



Barley, pearl 

Bath brick" 

Beans, choice reoleaned: 

White 

Pink 



Frijotes, genuine Mexican. 



Beeswax 

Braing, powdered. 



Candles, adamantine, 6's. 



Cassia (cinnamon) . 

Chocolate 

Cloves 

Cocoa 



Coffee (see Appendix). 
Cornstarch 



Cream tartar 

Fish: 

Canned salmon, Alaskan Association stand- 
ards, in No. 1 cans. 

Cod. dried, boneless strips, in 5-pound boxes. 

Mackerel, pickled 

Lemon extract 

Vanilla extract 



Ginger, African, ground. 



Ham, sugar-cured, thoroughly oared, 
smoked, and properly trimmed. 



well 



Hard bread. 



Hops, fresh, pressed............ 

Lara, pure and refined: 

In tin cans of 5 pounds net. . 
In tin cans of 10 pounds net. 



2JM2 dosen. 
727 gross... 



Macaroni, domestic 

Lye, ooncentrated 

Matches, safety 

1 |-pound cans, 

• l-pound cans. 
•Awarded 179.780 pounds. 

« Awarded 61,851 pounds. 

• Awarded 27,626 pounds. 

• *-poundoans. 

• Per case of 2 dosen; eases to be strapped. 

• Carload lots not less than 40,000 pounds. 
» Awarded 3,000 pounds. 

» Awarded 6,426 pounds. 



«330 

•330 

171 

269 
50 

269 

279 

145 

209 
294 

314 

214 

'269 

258 

•l71 

164 
195 

'269 



'258 
164 
261 

258 



162 



13 

13 

'269 
71 
60 



H 10 



09 
•.127 

.12025 



.1275 
•.1147 
1.0965 
'.0219 
•.74 

'•.0368 

.0398 

u.035 

u.035 

'.345 

.16 
".0625 
u.065 
".0735 
».076 
1.12 
•.11 

.2144 
•.23 
1.235 
•.16 
1.17 



/ 1.3025 \ 
\ •.2975 / 



1.3025 
•.2975 

.725 

.0772 

.10 

.27 

.28 
1.115 
•.11 
». 15625 



}8t. Loub.. 

South Omaha, Nebr. 
Chicago, I1L; Kansas 

1 City. Kens.; South 
Omaoa, Nebr.; East 
Bt.LoutajIU, 
Do. 

jchicago. 

Do. 
New York. 

Chicago. 

San Francisco. 

Santa Fe School, H. 

Mex. 
F. 0. b. Albuqueracsf. 

N.Mex. ^ 

Chicago. 
Do. 

Omaha. 



St. Louis. 
Chicago, 
jomaha. 

jchicago. 

New York. 
Chicago. 

Do. 



w.1575 
i'. 04375 

"043 

".043 

.16 

.1246 
.1271 
.1196 
.1221 

. »1.56 

W-22 
.445 
.885 



San Fianolsoo. 

St. Louis 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 
Do. 

lomaha. 

Kansas City, 

South Omaha, Nebr.; 

East St. Loub, UL 
Chicago. 
Omaha or Oklahoma 

City, Okia. 
San FrancJsoo. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Kansas City. 
Chicago. 
Kansas City. 
Chicago. 

\ Do. 

South Omaha. 
New York. 



it s candles per set of 14 ounces m cases of 36 seta, 
is 6 candles per set of 14 ounces in cases of 1* seta. 
u 8 candles per set of 16-ounoe cases containing 40 

pounds. 
» 8 candles per set of 16-ounoe cases containing 90 

pounds. 
i«"Empire" brand, 
i' Awarded 42,685 pounds. 
* Awarded 28 J385 pounds. 
» Per can of 25 pounds. 
*» Per wood box of 25 pounds. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



331 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical sup 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, It 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery 



til 

1,380 dec cans 
00 pounds... 

2,277 pounds . 

30,981 pounds 
85,000 pounds 

119,460 lbs.... 



164,561 lbs.... 



10,900 gallons 
14,930 gallons. 
14,416 gallons. 
266,440pounds 

17,600 pounds 

94,950 pounds 
61,300 pounds 
67,700 pounds 

6,287 pounds. 



14,360 pounds 



Mess pork. 



Milk, evaporated, "small" sise.. 
Mustard, ground 

Pepper, black, ground 



Raisins, seedless, California unbleached Sultanas. 
Rice 



8alt, coarse. 



Salt,! 



Sirup; to be a combination of refiner's sirup in 
proportions not less than 10 and not more than 
40 and the highest grade commercial glucose 
not less than 60 and not more than 90: 
In barrels of not less than 50 gallons: 

In 10-gallan kegs 

In 15-gallon oak kegs 

Soap, laundry , 



Soap, toilet 

Soap, chips: 

in 60-pound boxes 

In 100-pound boxes, strapped . 

In barrels 



Soda, bicarb 

Soda, washing: 

In 60-pound boxes, strapped . 



In barrels... 
Starch, laundry. 



38,000 pounds 
96,875 pounds 

S42£00poundsj Sugar (See Appendix) granulated . 

4.840 pou 
11,431 pounds 



Tapioca, pearl.... 

Tea, Formosa Oolong. . 



113 

l«357 
196 

171 

258 

«260 
•269 
U22 

145 

•167 
1122 

145 



19.90 



2a 70 

2tt 00 
.36 
•.14 

4.1325 

•.155 

4.15 

•.0569 

'.0466 

.0399 

/ '.0059 

\u.0064 

u.0065 

u.0065 

".005 

"0093 

".0098 

".0125 

}». 0125 



Omaha, Chicago, Sioux 
City, Kansas City, 
St. Joseph. 

St. Paul, shipment 
from Omaha or Sioux 

v City. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Do. 



fe 



Chicago. 

Malaga, Cal. 

OmaEa.* 

Duluth. Minn. 

St. Paul. Minn. 

Santa Fe School, N. 

Mex. 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 
San Francisco. 
Duluth. Minn. 
St. Paul. Minn. 
Santa Fe School, N 

Mex. 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 



171 


.1787 


Chicago. 


171 


.2537 


Do. 


171 


.2353 


Do. 


232 


».038 


Omaha, St. Paul 
Sioux City. 


232 


».0675 


Do. 


232 


n. 06625 


Do. 


232 


n.06625 


Do. 


232 


M.066 


D °' 


•269 


/ •.0278 
\ 4.0228 


^Chicago. 


1 195 


w.0087 


Do. 


1C7 


".0125 


San Francisco. 


195 
167 


".0077 
*.0094 


Chicago. 
Sen Francisco. 


354 


*.0O74 


Omaha. 


258 


•".0265 


Omaha, 


269 


•».0245 


Chicago. 


258 


•».0451 


Omaha. 


127 


•».045 


San Francisco. 


19 


■u.042 


New York 


322 


.0525 


St. Louis. 


321 


.18 


Chicago. 



* Awarded 483 barrels. 
t Awarded 2* barrels. 

■ impound can*. 
< I-pound cans, 

* Awarded 10.776 pounds 

* Only. 

t Awarded 10,155 pound*. 

* Car tote not less than 40,600 pounds. 

* Awarded 31,150 pound* 
>■ Awarded 60,750 pounds 
* Carload let* 

w Awarded l,00f> pounds. 

** Awded 8.7011 boUIld; 

m Awarded 30,860 pound*. 
»* Awarded 82,4% pounds. 
" Awarted 64,880 pounds. 



" Awarded 3,000 nound*, 

w Awarded 14,185 pounds. 

>• Not more than 30 per cent water. 

* Not more than 23 per cent water. 

n Not more thou 12 per cent water. 

" Awarded 12.770 pounds, 

" Awarded 1,SM) pound*. 

M Awarded 7,576 pounds. 

•• Awarded 4 2MI pounds. 

■• Awarded 26 .1 SO pounds, 

" Awarded 3.840 pounds, 

" Awarded 23 ,006 pounds. 

" Awarded 66,750 bounds. 

"Awarded 12 

■Awarded 15 U200 pounds. 



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332 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture andwoodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather ; 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
Of 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



2,028 gallons.. 

455 gallons 

780 gallons.... 
1,020 gallons.. 

1,250 gallons.. 
22,794 pounds 



Vinegar, pore cider: 

In new barrels 

In new 5-gallon kegs . 
In new 10-gallon kegs 

In new 15-gallon kegs. 
In new 30-gallon kegs 

Washing powder 



269 
129 
129 
269 
129 
269 
129 

103 



»*>. 



1045 

172 

153 
'.1445 
M44 
'.127 
U29 
.016 

.01715 
.022 



Chicago. 
Omaha 
Do. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 

New York, Chicago, 
St. Louia. ™- w 
Omaha. 
San Francisco. 



ROLLED BARLEY. 




Pounds. 

87,600 

2,000 

2,500 

4,000 

4,000 

29,000 

30,000 

7,500 

8,000 

600 

86,800 

60,000 

6,000 

5,000 

15,800 

96,000 

12,000 

35,000 

24,000 

20,000 

5,000 

60,000 

20,000 



Portland. Oreg., for the f 



service, vis: 



iuouu. vi^., *vf the general 
Jlcaraia School, N. Hex. . . . 

Campo Agency, Cal 

Digger Agency, Cal 

FaLon School, Nev 

Fort Mojave School, Ariz 

Fort Yuma School, etc.. Cal., viz— 
20,000 pounds for school. 



10,000 pounds for agency 

Tule River School, etc., Cal., viz— 



5,000 pounds for school. 

2,500 pounds for agency 

Volcan School, etc., Cal., viz— 

4,000 pounds for Volcan School 

4,000 bounds for Mesa Grande subagency , 

Fort McDermitt Police, Nev , 

Arlington, Cal., for reshipment to the following schools, etc., vis: 

Sherman Institute, Cal 

Soboba Agency, etc., Cal.. viz— 

3,000 pounds for 8oboba Agency 

3,000 pounds for Cahuilla subagency 

Pechanga School, etc., Cal., viz— 

1 ,750 pounds for school 

3,250 pounds for agency , 

Pala School, etc., Cal., viz— 

5,800 pounds for school , 

10,000 pounds for agency , 

F. o. b. cars Phoenix, Ariz., for reshipment to the following schools, 
etc., viz: 
Camp McDowell Agency, etc., Ariz., viz— 

8,000 pounds for day schools 

4,000 pounds for agency 

Fort Apache School, etc., Ariz., viz— 

5,000 pounds for school , 

30,000 pounds for agency 

Leupp School, etc., Ariz., viz— 

4,000 pounds for school 

20.000 pounds for agency , 

Rice Station School, Ariz 

Pueblo Bonito Agency, N. Mex 

Phoenix School, Ariz., viz: 

If delivered at the school •. 

If f. o. b. cars Phoenix, Ariz , 

Pima School, etc. (delivered at school or agency), viz: 

10,000 for school 

10,000 for agency 

»Only. 

* A warded 690 gallons. 

* Awarded 330 gallons. 



260 



49 



211 



211 
211 

} 211 



IL43 



1.55* 



« Awarded 530 gallons. 
• Awarded 780 gallons. 

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8XJPPIJBS FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



333 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
% agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



ROLLED BARLEY— Continued. 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Price per 
bundled- 
weight. 



26,000 
14,000 

6,000. 

40,000 



F. o. b. oars Parker, Ariz., for Colorado River School, etc., Arts., vis: 

6,000 pounds for school 

20,000 pounds for agency 

Malkl Day Schools, etc., Cal, viz: 

8,000 pounds for day schools at mill in Banning, Cal 

6,000 pounds for agency at mill in Banning, Cal 

MaUd-Martinex subagency, delivered at Southern Pacific R. R. Depot, 

Banning, Cal 

F. o. b. cars Tucson, Aria., for San Xavler Agency, Axis 



347 



i$1.79 



L60 
1.60 



1.50 
1.75 



BEEF, GROSS. 



167J00 
70,060. 

ra,uo 
201,000 

73,000. 
900,000 



Crow Creek School, S. Dak. (delivered monthly as required) 

Crow Creek Agency, S. Dak. (delivered monthly as required) 

Fort Belknap School, etc., Mont, (to be delivered at agency between 
Oct. 1. 1913, and Dec. 1, 1913), viz: 

18,000 pounds for school 

1 ,600 pounds for day school 

70,000 pounds tor agency 

Jicarflla A gency N. If ex 

Lower Brule School, etc., S. Dak. (delivered at school and agency as re- 
quired), vis: 

20,000 pounds for school 



steers, to be delivered twice month- 



184 
143 



174 



50,000 pounds for agency 

Pine Ridge School, etc., S. Dak. (all 
ly, as required), viz: 

90,000 pounds for school 

687,500 pounds for agency 

Rosebud School, etc., 8. Dak. (all steers, to be delivered twice monthly, 
as required), viz: 

85,000 pounds for school | 

17,950 pounds for day schools \ 308 

695,200 Dounds for agency I 

San Carlos School, etc., Ariz, (to be delivered at agency, monthly deliv- 
eries), vis: 

6,400 pounds for school 

195^00pounds for agency 

Southern ute Agency. Colo, (to be delivered at agency once a month in 

amounts as required) 

Tongue River Agency, Mont, (to be delivered monthly from July to 
November, inclusive, delivery Dec. 1 to last until May 1; May and 
June as required) 308 



293 



287 



I 



$6.60 
6.50 



6.90 
6.85 

7.00 
8.00 

8.25 

6.50 
6.40 

5.98 



BEEF, NET.« 



40,000,. 
S,0OO.. 
14,000. 
20,000. 

nkooo 

53,000. 
34,000. 
11,000. 
15,500. 

fi.000.. 
167^00 



Albuquerque School, N. Mex. . . -. . . w ....,, . . * - . ♦ 

Armstrong MsJe Orphan Academy . . . 

Bismarck School. N\ Dak. .........*«.._.«. 

Canton Afly lum for Insane Indians, S, Dak. 

Carlisle School, Pa. (meat cut up ready for usa at school). 
Carson School, Nev. £U r 8. inspected). , „ 



365 

2'U 
125 

330 
393 

223 



Cbevenne and Arapahoe School, Ok: 

Collka Institute, Ok la....... , 

Crow Agency, etc., Mont, {t o. b. R. R. Station, Crow Agency Station, 
Mont.), viz: 

15,000 pounds for agency school. \ g*-, 

500 pounds for agency J *■" 

Cushman School, Wash 

Euchee School. Okla. 

Eufaula School, Ok la.... - 

Fort Hall School, etc., Idaho, vli: 

42,500 pounds for school (delivered at school) 



125,000 pounds for agency (delivered at agency). 



Fort Totten School, N 
i in one shipment. 



"} 151 

.T 80 



18.40 
10.51 

10.71 
10-, so 
8,75 
9.90 

iaos 
10.35 



11.00 

9.40 
10.45 
10,38 



10.50 
9.59 



* See Appendix. 



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384 



8UPPLIB8 FOB THE INDIAN SEBVI01. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical suppHss, 
school books and supplies } furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

BEEF, NET-Orattanad. 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



No. 
of 
oon- 
trac- 
tor. 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 



Pound*, 
26400 

18,000 

85,000 

15,000 

10,000 

15,000 

55,000 

20,000 

50,000 

6,000 

18,000 

15,000 

90,000 

20,000 

100,000 

45,000 

10,000 

27,000 

18,000 

16.000 

113.000 

30,000 

10,000 

16,000 

30,000 

5,100 



7,500. 
15,000. 
23,000 



Fort Yuma School, etc., Cal., viz: 

20.000 pounds for school 

4,000 pounds for agency 

2,100 pounds for police 

Greenville School, Cal 

Hayward School. Wis 

Hoopa Valley School, CaL (delivered at Korbel, OaL) 

Jones Male Academy, Okla 

Keshena School, etc., Wis., vis: 

10,000 pounds for schooL \ 

5,000 pounds for Menominee Indians / 

Kiowa Agency Schools, Okla., vis: 

20,000 pounds for Rainy Mountain Schocl (delivery at school) . . . 

35,000 pounds for Fort Sill School (delivery at school) 



132 

330 

65 

223 

330 

303 

, „ , 192 

Mekusukey Academy, Okla 223 

Mount Pleasant School, Mich 330 

Nuyaka 8chooLOkla 223 

Oneida School, Wis 62 

Osage School, Okla ' 223 

Phoenix School, Ariz ■ 257 

Red Lake School, etc., Minn., vis: | 

14.000 pounds for Red Lake School (delivery at school) 168 

6,000 for Cross Lake School, (delivery at school) 168 

8alem School, Ore^. vv 57 

223 

156 

223 
223 
110 
57 
223 
330 



Santa Fe School, N. Mex. 

Sac and Fox School, Okla 

San Juan School, etc., N. Mex., viz: 

25.000 pounds for school 

2,000 pounds for police 

Seger School, Okla 

Seneca School. Okla 

Sherman Institute, Cal 

Tulalip School, W ash 

Tuskahoma Female A cademy , Okla 

Vermillion Lake School, Minn 

Wahpeton School, N. Dak 

Walker River School, etc., Nev. (delivery at school and agency), vis: 

1 ,600 pounds for schooL 

1,580 pounds for agency 

1,920 pounds for police 

(U. S. inspected.) 

Wheelock Orphan Academy , Okla. 

Wittenberg School, Wis 

Yankton SchooL etc., 8. Dak. (delivered at agency and school), vis: 

15.000 pounds for schooL 

8,000 pounds for agency 



231 



223 
364 

}330 



312.32 

12.76 
9.62 
1400 
10.36 

10.26 



9.50 
9.90 
10.35 
9.80 

iaoo 

6.00 
1L00 
9.00 

iaoo 
ia5o 
ia70 

8.75 

iao7 

8.98 

iau 

U.15 
8.66 
11.26 
10.64 
9.95 
9.06 



12.00 



10.64 
9.00 



10.80 



CORN. 



150,400 


F. o. b. cars South Omaha, Nebr.: 

In carload lots 


64 
64 






$1.04 




In less than carload lots 


1.19 


20,000 


(Acceptance of corn to be made at South Omaha, Nebr., by Gov- 
ernment agent) for reshipment to the following schools, etc. ,vis: 
For Osage School, Okla. 
For Osage Agency, Okla. 
For Bay Mills School, Mich. 
For Hayward School, Wis., viz— 

20.000 pounds for school. 

1.000 pounds for LacCourte Oreilles Indians. 
Leech Lake School. Minn. 
Nett Lake School. Minn. 
Oneida School, Wis. 
Rosebud School, etc., S. Dak., viz— 

30,000 pounds for schooL 

30,000 pounds for agency. 
Springflela School, S. Dak. 
Standing Rock Agency SchooL N. Dak. 
White Earth- Wild Rice River SchooL Minn. 
Wittenberg SchooL Wis. 




24,000 




2.000 




21,000 




8,000 




600 

5,000 




60,000 

2,000 




800 




1.000 




6,000 





Digitized by 



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8UPPLIB8 FOB THB INDIAN SERVICE. 



335 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical sup 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, te 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



CORN-Continued. 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 



Pounds, 
69,000 

1,000 

30,000 

5,000 

1,000 

lu,000 

10,000 

20,000 

11,200 

20,000 

20,000 

i<M»o 

15,320 

20,000 

18,900 

12,500 

18,000 



F. o. b. oars Lincoln, Nebr. ("or other points agreeable to you taking no 
«— freight rate torftastination"), for reshipment to the following 

Pueblo Indians (under Pueblo- Albuquerque School), N. 

Nuyaka School, Okla. 

Seneca School,* Okla 

TobatcW School (Navajo Reservation), N. Mex. 

Bismarck School, N. Dak .. 

Collins Institute, Okla. (delivery at Stonewall, Okla) 

Crow Creek School, S. Dak. (delivery to be made during open naviga- 
tion of the Missouri River). 

Euchee School, Okla. (delivery at Sapulpa, Okla) 

Eufaula School, Okla. (delivery at Eufaula, Okla.) 

Jones Male Academy, Okla. (delivery at Hartshorne, Okla.) 

Kktwa-Rainy Mountain School, Okla. (delivery at Gotebo, Okla.) 

Osage Agency, Okla., vis: 

8,000 pounds (delivery at Hominy, Okla. ) 

8,000 pounds (delivery at Ponca City, Okla.) 

Pawnee Agency , O kla. (delivery at Pawnee, Okla. ) 

Santa Pe School, N. Mez 

Soger School, Okla. , for Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians (delivery at 
weatherford, Okla.) 

Shawnee School, Okla. (delivery at Thackery, Okla.) 

Tuskahoma Female Academy, Okla. (delivery at Tuskahoma, Okla.). 



333 


$1.14 


126 

68 

349 


1.30 
1.79 
1.15 


68 

68 

289 

289 


1.37 
1.47 
1.49 
1.43 


68 
68 
68 
145 
289 


1.47 
1.27 
1.27 
1.40 
1.57 


289 
68 


1.40 
1.89 



PORK, FRESH. 



6VD00. 
1,500. 
1,000. 



Cushman School, Wash 
Haskell Institute, Kans 
Tulalip School, Wash. . 



57 
330 
57 



$12.20 
12.25 
13.25 



MUTTON.- 



4*000. 

l/no. 

1,500. 
55)00. 
20,000 
10/0). 



Albuquerque School, N. Mex 

BiBmarck School, N. Dak 

Hayward School, Wis 

Jones Male Academy, Okla 

Salem School, Oreg 

San Juan School, etc., N. Mex. (delivered at school), vis: 

6,000 for school , 

6,000 for Toadlena Day School 



$10.00 
11.50 
10.00 
10.80 
10.00 

8.00 



> See Appendix. 



Digitized by 



Google 



336 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVTCE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical su t 
school books and supplies, furniture ana woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL 8UPPLIE8. 




484 ounces.... 
10,224 ounces. 
8,149 ot 

212c 

108 ounces.. 

M ounces... 



178 pounds., 
879 ounces.. 
186 ounces.. 



820 ounces... 
1,138 ounces. 
47 bottles... 



832 ounces.. 
86 pounds. . 



860 ounces.... 
91 bottles.... 
160 ounces.... 
870 bottles... 
290 ounces.... 
116 bottles... 
1,223 ounces.. 
117bottles... 
249 bottles... 
146 bottles... 
474 ounces.... 
102 bottles... 
100 bottles... 
134 bottles... 
129 bottles... 
125 bottles... 
476 ounces... 
1,600 ounces. 



11 ounces. 
32 ounces. 



67 tubes... 
357 tubes.. 

140 tubes.. 

167 tubes.. 
357 tubes.. 

220 tubes.. 
123 tubes.. 
686 tubes.. 

452 tubes.. 

229 tubes.. 
135 tubes.. 

404 tubes.. 
352 tubes.. 



124 bottles.. 
116 bottles. 
37 bottles.. 
336 bottles. 
136 bottles. 



MEDICDTZS. 

Acids: 

Acetic, c. p., in 8-ounce bottles 201 

Boraeic, powdered, in 4-ounoe cartons 854 

Carbolic, pure, 95 per cent liquid, in 8- 201 
ounce Dottles. 

Citric, in 4-ounce cartons 209 

Gallic, in 4-ounce cartons 201 

Hydrocyanic, U. 8. P., dilute, in 1-ounce 201 

Hydrochloric, c. p., in 1-pound g. s. bottles. 854 

Nitric, c. p., in 8-ounce g.s. bottles 214 

Phosphoric, dilute, U. 8. P., in 8-ounce 209 

Salicylic, powdered, in 8-ounce bottles 201 

Sulphuric, c. p., in 8-ounce g. s. bottles 214 

Sulphuric, aromatic, U . 8. P., in 1-pint g. s. 354 

bottles. 

Tannic, pure, powdered. In 4-ounce cartons. 201 

Tartaric, powdered , in 1-pound cartons 201 

Fluid extracts, U. 8. P.: 

Belladonna, in 4-ounce bottles 1871 

Buchu, in 1-pint bottles 1871 

Cannabis Indica, in 4-ounce bottles 1 371 

Cascara Sagrada, in 1-pint bottles 1371 

Cimicifuga (racemosa). in 4-ounce bottles.. * 202 

Cinchona (with aromatics), in 1-pint bottles « 214 

Ergot, in 4-ounce bottles 1371 

Ginger, in 1-pint bottles »371 

Glycyrrhiza, in 1-pint bottles * 214 

Hydrastis, colorless, in 1-pint bottles » 202 

Ipecac, in 8-ounce bottles i 371 

Rhubarb, compound, in 1-pint bottles « 214 

Senna, in 1-pint bottles » 371 

Stigmata Maydis, in 1-pint bottles i 371 

Taraxacum, in 1-pint bottles i 371 

Triticum, in 1-pint bottles » 371 

Valerian, in 8-ounce bottles i 371 

Viburnum, in 8-ounce bottles » 202 

Solid extracts, U. S. P.: 

Cannabis Indica, in 1-ounce jars i 371 

Colocynth, compound, powdered, in 8- • i 371 

ounce bottles. 
Hypodermic tablets: 

Aconitine. ,u grain, in tubes of 25 j «214 

Anaesthetic, local, in tubes of 25, for ex- i 371 

tracting teeth. | 

Apomorphine, hydrochlorate, & grain, in « 214 

tubes of 25. I 

Atropine, Sulphate, r JU grain, in tubesof25. »202 

Cocaine, hydrochlorate, i grain, in tubes « 202 

of25. 

Digitalin, T JU grain, in tubes of 25 1 371 

Hyoscyamine, ^ B grain, in tubes of 25 i 371 

Morphia, i grain, Atropine, ^ grain, in »202 

Morphia, sulphate, } grain, each, in tubes * 202 
of 25. 



Nitroglycerin, ^ grain, in tubes of 25 i 371 

Pilocarpine, hydrochlorate, ft grain, in tubes » 371 

of 25. 
Strychnine, nitrate, & gram, in tubes of 25 . . 
Strychnine, sulphate, ^ grain, in tubes 
of 25. 
Tablet triturates: 

Aconitine, yfo grain, in bottles of 100 

Aconitine, jfa grain, in bottles of 100 

Aloin, ^ grain, in bottles of 100 

Arsenic, iodide, -fa grain, in bottles of 100. . 
Atropine, sulphate, T fa grain, in bottles of 

i Wyeth 6 Bro. 

* In New York warehouse or f. o. b. cars Chicago or St. Louis. 



.025 
.065 



.06 



.055 



.022 
.04 



1371 


.022 


1371 


.022 


«202 


.0425 


•202 


.045 


1371 


.045 


1371 


.045 


«202 


.045 



New York. 
St. Louis. 



St. Louis. 
New York. 



St. Louis. 



St. Louis. 



New 



New York. 
Do. 



Ne\ 



ew York. 



> Maltbie Chemical Co. 
« Meyer Bros, brand. 



Digitized by 



Google 



8UPPUE8 FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 



337 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan, 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIES-Continaed. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

eon- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 




medicines— continued. 










Tablet triturates— Continued. 








50 bottles 


Benxoic acid, J grain, in bottles of 100 

0rilPl7ic r fttf nfry! t w<- , ?- * rtlesof 100.. 


i 46 


30.045 


New York. 


198 bottles 


•871 


.065 


Chicago. 


548 bottles 


CeJciumsnlnhide,; grain, in bottles of 100.. 


«236 


.04 


442 bottles 


Calomel and sodium ( c alomfil fa grain, so- 
dium bicarbonate 1 grain Un brtUesoilOO. 
Sama as above, in bottles OI600 


«236 


.04 


Do. 


417 bottles 


•202 


.075 


New York. 


345 bottles 


Calomel find sodium (calomel i grain, so- 
dium bicarbonate J grain), in bottles of 100 
fcame as above, In bottles of 500 


•214 


.04 


St. Louis. 


824 bottles 


•214 


.08 


Do. 


100 bottles 


Case :ira riav'rada . do II dered extract, 1 grain, 
in bottled ol 100. 


•214 


.0475 


Do. 


254 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 600 


146 


.1025 


New York. 


126 bottles 


Cerium oxalate, 1 grain, in bottles of 100. . . 


• 214 


.045 


St. Louis. 


15 bottles 


Colocynth, compound, } grain, in bottles 
of 100. 
Same as above, in bottles of 500 


•214 


.0475 


Do. 


13 bottles 


•214 


.1175 


Do. 




Codeine, without sugar— 








340 bottles 


} grain, in bottles of 100 


•202 
146 
*871 


.20 
.38 
.075 


New York. 


370 bottles 


\ grain! in bottles of 100 


Do. 


63 bottles 


ColcnJcine/riw grain, in bottles of 100 

Copper arsenlte, ,*» grain, in bottles of 100. 
Corrosive sublimate, yi. grain, in bottles 

of 100. 
Digttalin,pure— 

vtv grain, in bottles of 100 


S3 


86 bottles 


*371 


.045 


136 bottles 


*371 


.045 


75 bottles 


«371 
*371 
•214 


.045 
.07 
.06 


9 

St. Louis. 


190 bottles 


rfo grain, in bottles of 100 


117 bottles 


Dovera Powder, 1 grain, in bottles of 100. . . 

Hvdrastin, *V grain, in bottles of 100 

Lithium, carbonate, 1 grain Jn bottles of 100 
Same as above, in Dottles of 600 


130 bottles 


*371 


.075 


(?> 


86 bottles 


•214 


.05 


St. Louis. 


33 bottles 


•202 


.12 


New York. 


138 bottles 


Podophyllin, i grain, in bottles of 100 

Salicylic acid, 1 grain, in bottles of 100 

Same as above, in bottles of 600 


•214 


.05 


St. Louis. 


74 bottles 


•214 


.046 


Do. 


34 bottles 


•202 


.10 


New York. 


99 bottles 


Santonine and calomel (santonine } grain, 
calomel, i grain, in bottles of 100. 


>46 


.26 


Do. 


43 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 600 


146 


1.22 


Do. 


210 bottles 


Strychnine, arsenate, &9v grain, in bottles 

of 100. 
Strychnine, nitrate, ^ grain, in bottles of 

Same as above, in bottles of 600 


•202 


.042 


New York. 


138 bottles 


•202 


.042 


Do. 


86 bottles 


•202 


.10 


Do. 


81 bottles 


Strychnine, sulphate, *V grata* in bottles 


•202 


.042 


Do. 


166 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 600 


•202 


.085 


Do. 


46 bottles 


Tartar emetic. J* grain, in bottles of 100. . . 


•214 


.045 


St. Louis. 


25 bottles, 


Same as above, in bottles of 600 


>46 


.08 


New York. 


469 bottles 


Terpln hydrate. 2 grain, heroin, A grain, 
in [bottles of 6fo. •**••» 


•202 


.24 


Do. 


37 bottles 

823 bottles 


Zinc, phosphide, t grain, in bottles of 100. . 
Zinc, sulpnocarbolate, j grain, in bottles 
of 100. 
Compressed tablets: 

Acetanilid, compound, ^ grains (100 in 

bottle). 
Aoetphenetldin, 24 grains (100 in bottle). . . 
Antiseptic, nasal, in bottles of 600 (each 
tablet shall contain sodium bicarbonate 


*371 
•236 


.045 
.04 


New York. 


911 bottles 


•202 


.06 


Do. 


446 bottles 

226 bottles 


•202 
•202 


.07 
.17 


Do. 
Do. 












5 grains, sodium chloride 5 grains, sodium 










borate 5 grains, sodium benzoate ^ 










grain, sodium salicylate r* grain, thy- 










mol rU grain, menthol «j v grain, oil 
eucalyptus & grain, oil wintergreen -fa 
grain). 
Bronchial (amnion, chloride i grain, ex- 
















668 bottles 


•202 


.16 


Do. 




tract glycyrrhiza 1 grain, oleoresin cubeb 
t niinun, powdered, hyoscyamus i grain, 
powdered senega i grain, powdered ipe- 
cac A grain, balsam tolu i grain), in bot- 
tles of 600. 









i Brewer A Co. 
» Wyeth A Bro. 
• In New York warehouse or f. o. b. cars Chicago or 8t. Louis. 

15036°— int 1913— vol 2 22 



• Norwich Pharmacal Co. 

• Maltbie Chemical Co. 

'"•Tg&y Google 



338 



SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical «uj 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc.— Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIEB-Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 




medicinis— continued. 










Compressed tablets— Continued. 

Charcoal, 5 grains, in 1-pound cartons 

Corrosive sublimate, blue, for external use 
(formula: Mercuric chloride corrosive 
7A grains, citric acid 3| grains) in bottles 








91 pounds 

826bottles 


1202 


$0.16 


New York. 


•214 


.0625 


St. Louis. 


















136 bottles 


Seine as above, In bottles of 100 


•214 


.18 


Do. 


154 bottles 


Same as above, in 1-pound bottles 


•46 


.82 


New York. 


80 bottles 


Creosote, beechwood, 1 minim, in bottles 
oflOO. 
Same as above, In bottles of 500 


1202 


.042 


Do. 


48 bottles 


1202 


.14 


Do. 


•7 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 1,000 

Cubeb, compound (powdered cubeb f 
grain, dried ferrous sulphate t grain, 
copaiba mass i grain, Venice turpentine 


1202 


.25 


Do. 


75 bottles 


•214 


.0625 


St. Louta. 




















i grain, oil santal A minim, oil gaultne- 
ria A minim), in bottles of 100. 
















75bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 500 


■214 


.18 


Do, 


67 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 1,000. 


'214 


.30 


Do. 


493 bottles 


Diarrhea: (Norman Grey); (powdered 
opium f grain, aromatic powder * grain, 
camphor 4 grain, bismuth subnit. 
| grain, sodium bicarbonate f grain, 
powdered kino f grain, mercury with 
chalk *V grain) In bottles of 100. 


1202 


.13 


New York. 










181 bottles 

821 bottles 


Ergotine, 2 grains, in bottles of 100 

Hexamethylenamine, 5-grain, in bottles of 

500. . 
Lithium, citrate. In 5-grain effervescent 

tablet*, in bottles of 40. 


371 
1202 


.265 
.34 


New York. 


866 bottles 


■214 


.0725 


St. Louis. 




Phenolpthalein: 








162 bottles 


1-grain, In bottles of 500 


1202 
1202 


.165 
.39 


New York. 


159 bottles 


3-grain, in bottles of 500 


Do. 


78 pounds 


Potassium chloride, 5-grain, in 1-pound 

cartons. 
Potassuimpermanganate, s-grain, in hot- 


'46 


.14 


Do. 


63 bottles 


'214 


.0425 


St. Louis. 


62 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 500 

Quinine, sulphate, 1-grain, in bottles of 100.. 


'214 


.095 


Do. 


171 bottles 


1202 


.085 


New York. 


96 bottles 


Same as above, in bottles of 500 


'236 


.34 


Chicago. 
NewYork. 


150 bottles 


Same as above. In bottles of 1,000 

Quinine, sulphate 3-grain, in bottles of 100. . 
Rennet, in bottles or 100 


1202 


.66 


1.180 bottles.... 
129 bottles 


'202 


.19 


Do. 


•371 
1202 


.10 
.09 


( 4 ) 


691 bottles 


Salol, in 5-grain tablets, in bottles of 100.. 
Sodium chloride, for normal salt solution 


Do. 


209 bottles 


•371 


.08 


(«) 




(16f grains pure sodium chloride, so that 
1 tablet In 4 ounces of water will make 










a norma] salt solution), in bottles of 100. 
Sodium salicylate. 6-grain, in bottles of 500. 
Sulfonal, 5-grain, in bottles of 100 








461 bottles 


•214 


.23 


8. Louis. 


152 bottles 


1202 


.27 


NewYork. 




Elixirs, etc.: 




1,248 bottles.... 


Aromatic elixir, U. 8. P. , in 1-pint bottles. . 


354 


.165 


Omaha. 


610 bottles 


Buchu and acetate of potassium, elixir of, 

in 1-pint bottles. 
Cod-liver oil, emulsion of— 

Simple, U. 8. P., in 1-pint bottles 

With hypophosphites and cresote, in 
1-pint bottles. 


214 


.47 


8t Louis. 


1,918 bottles.... 


354 


.16 


Omaha. 


3,669 bottles.... 


854 


.19 


Do. 


1,438 bottles.... 


Iron, quinine, and strychnine, elixir of, 
N.F., in 1-pint bottles. 


354 


.25 


Do. 


1,358 bottles.... 


Pepsin, elixir of, National Formulary, In 

1-pint bottles. 
Sodium bromide, elixir of, in 1-pint bottles . 


354 


.25 


00. 


451 bottles 


354 


.25 


Do. 


1,111 bottles.... 


Terpine hydrate and heroin, elixir of, in 
1-pint bottles. 
Oils: 


354 


.408 


Do. 


178 ounces 


Cade, in 4-ounce bottles 


214 


.02 


8 1. Louis. 


1,597 bottles.... 


Castor, cold-pressed, in 1-quart bottles 


354 


.9675 


Omaha. 



iMaltble Chemical Co. 
> Meyer Bros. 
• Brewer A Co. 



• In New York warehouse or f. o. b. 

• Norwich Pharmacal Co. 

• Wyeth A Bro. 



oars Chicago or St. Louis. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THB IHDIAN 8EBYI0B. 



889 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 191$, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIBS-Cootlnaed. 



Awards. 



Article*. 



No. 
of 



treo- 
tor. 



Unit 
pries. 



Point of delivery . 



874c_ 
1,901 bottles.. 
1,311 bottles.. 
Slot 



250000088.... 

1,266 ounces. 
674 bottles... 
136 ounces... 
282 bottles... 



239 ounces 

1,286 bottles.. 

482 bottles.... 



135 bottles... 
154 bottles... 

392 bottles... 

505 bottles... 
22 bottles.... 
211 bottles... 

427 bottles.. 
69 bottles.... 
548 bottles.. 

575 bottles.. 



809c 
560 bottles.. 
458 ounces... 
931 ounces... 
210 ounces.. 
497 ounces... 
910 ounces... 
207 ounces... 
409 bottles.. 



2,687 
Sbo 



bottles... 

232 ounces..., 
1,398 ounces.. 
4&bottles..., 

139 bottles.... 

214 ounces... 

225 ounces.-. 



96c 

123 pounds., 

57 
104 



MXDSCOfse— continued. 

Oils— Continued. 

Cloves, in bounce bottles 

Cod-liver, U. 8. P.. in 1-pint bottles. 
Cottonseed, refined, in 1-ptnt bottles 

Croton, in 1-ounoe bottles 

Cubebs, in 4-ounce bottles 

Eucalyptus, in 1-otmce bottles 

Gaultheria (synthetic), in 1-ounoe bottles.. 

Linseed, raw, in 1-pint bottles 

Male fern, ethereal; in 2-ounce bottles 

Origanum, best commercial, in 1-pint 

bottles. 
Peppermint, TJ. 8. P.. in 4-ounce bottles. . 
Sandalwood, East India, in 4-ounce bottles. 
Turpentine, in 1-quart bottles. 



Pills, or sugar or chocolated coated tablets: 
A loin, oompound (aloin {-grain, bella- 
donna | grain; strychnine X grain), in 
bottles oftoo. 



Asafetida, 1-nain, in bottles of 100.. 
Camphor and opium (camphor, 2 grains; 

opium, 1 grain), in bottles of 100. 
Cathartic, vegetable, U. 8. P., in bottles of 

500. 
Comp. cathartic, TJ. 8. P.. In bottles of 500. 
Copaiba mass , Strain, in bottles of 600 ... . 
Emmenagogue, imp., U. 8. P., in bottles 

of 100. 
Iron carbonate. TJ. 8. P., in bottles of 100. . 
Iodoform, 1-graln, in bottles of 100. 



103 



Mercury (green iodide), 4 grain each, in 

bottles of 100. 
Phosphorus, compound (phosphorus, A 

grain; iron, reduced. 3 grains; quinine. \ 

grain; strychnine ft grain), in bottles 

of 100. 
Tinctures: 

Aconite, rad., U. 8. P., in frounce bottles . 

Arnica, u. 8. P., in 1-quart bottles 

Belladonna, U. 8. P., in 4-ounce bottles. . . 
Benzoin, compound, in 8-ounoe bottles. 
Canthandes, u. 8. P., in 4-ounce bottles. 

Capsicum-in 4-ounoe bottles 

Digitalis, u.8. P., in 4-ounce bottles 

Oebemium, U. 6. P., in 4-ounce bottles. . . 
Gentian, oompound, U. 8. P., in 1-pint 

bottles. 
Guaiac, ammoniated, TJ. 8. P., in 8-ounce 

bottles. 
Iodine,, U. 8. P., in 8-ounce g. s. bottles . . 
Chloride of iron, U. 8. P., in 1-pint g. s. 

bottles. 

Myrrh, in 4-ounoe bottles 

Nuz vomica, U. 8. P., in 8-ounce bottles. . 
Opium, camphorated, U. 8. P., in 1-pint 

Opium, U. S. P. (laudanum), in 1-pint 
bottles. 

Veratrum viride, U. 8. P., in 4-ounce bot- 
tles. 

Strophanthus, TJ. 8. P., in 4-ounce bottles. . 
Powdered, select: 

Gallae, powdered, in 4-ounce cartons 

Licorice, compound, powdered, in 1-pound 
cartons.. 

Opium, U.S. P., In 4-ounoe cans 

Powder of opium, compound, U. 8. P. 



1354 

354 

214 

•214 

•209 

«209 

354 

354 

•354 

214 

•354 

•209 

354 

•214 



'46 
•202 

•371 

»46 
•371 
•371 

•371 
•371 
•371 

202 



(dovers powder), in 8-ounoe cartons . 
Rhubarb, in 4-ounoe cartons 



"354 
"354 
"354 
•371 
"354 
"354 
•371 
"354 
"354 

"354 

•371 
"354 

"354 
"354 
"354 

•214 

"354 

"354 

• 214 
•214 

201 

354 
354 



fO. 11 
.16 
.125 
.1025 
.24 
.054 
.04 
.11 
.14 
.20 

.22 
.38 
.20 

.14 



.06 
.19 



.36 



.31 
.24 



.06 
.10 
.055 

.09 



.525 

.023 

.025 

.034 

.029 

.03 

.024 

.295 

.027 

.05 
.337 

.037 
.027 
.299 

1.14 

.033 

.029 

.02 
.10 



.09 
.02 



Omaha. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Omaha. 
8t Louis. 
Omaha. 

St. Louis. 



New York. 
Do. 

<») 

New York. 



s 



New York. 



Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 
Do. 

Omaha. 
Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 

Omaha. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 
Do. 



i P. W. R. Co. 
•Meyer Bros. 

• P. i W. 

* D. * O. 
•FritscheBros. 
•Christ. 



' Brewer & Co. 

• Maltbie Chemical Co. (white or brown coated tablets only), 

» Wyeth & Bro. 

*• In New York warehouse or f. o. b. cars Chicago or St. Louis. 



" Oso Chemical Co. 



Digitized by 



1. 1AXUS. 

L.oogle 



340 



ST7PPLHS8 FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture anawoodenware, glass, oiis, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

MEDICAL SUPPLIES- Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



805 
250 

256 pounds.. 
2,0» bottles. 

396 gallons.. 

120 pounds.. 
126 pounds.. 
484 ounces..., 

469 ounces... 

171 pounds.. 

04 bottles.... 

160 ounces... 
622 ounces... 
215 ounces... 
790 ounces... 

15 ounces.... 

440 ounces..., 
1,710 ounces. 

512 ounces... 
460 pounds.. 
402 Dottles... 

649 pounds.. 
312 pounds.. 
63 pounds — 
113 pounds.. 

1,020 ounces. 
358 ounces... 

1,193 ounces. 



458 pounds.. 

58 ounces. . . . 
65 pounds... 
90j>cunds... 
719 ounces... 
17 pounds. . . 

471 ounces... 
144 doten.... 
3fil ounces... 
352 pounds.. 

170 cartons . . 

1,355 bottles. 
217 ounces... 
31 pounds... 



medicines— continued. 



Aoetanilid. powdered, in 4-ounce cartons. . 

Aoetpheneudinum, powdered, in 1-ounoe 

cartons 



Adeps lann, anhydrous, in 1-pound cans . . < 
Alcohol, U. 8. P., 190 proof, in 1-quart 

bottles 

Alcohol, methyl (wood), in 1-gallon cans, 



m,in)-poun< 

Crystals 

Granulated 

Ammonium, bromide of, granulated, in 

8-ounoe cartons. 

Ammonium, carbonate of, hard lumps, in 

Sconce cans 

Ammonium, chloride of, granulated, pure, 

in 1-pouncf cartons 

A my 1, nitrite, pearls of (6 drops each), in 

bottlesof25 

Antipyrlne 

Argyrol, in 1-ounoe bottles 

Protargol. in 1-ounce bottles 

Acetylsalicylioacid( oraspirin), in 1-ounce 

Atropine, "sulphate, crystals, In frounce 

Balsam. Peru, in bounce bottles 

Bismuth, subnitrate of, U. 8. P., in 8- 
ounce boxes 

Bismuth, subgallate, in 4-ounce cartons 

Borax, powdered, in 1-pound cartons 

Calcium oxide, powdered, U. 8. P., in bot- 
tles (size to make 1 gallon lime water) 

Cataplasm, kaolin— 

In 1-pound tins 

In J-pound tins 

Cerate, resin, in 1-pound Jars, with cover. 

Cerate, simple (ointment), in 1-pound 
Jars, with cover 

Chalk, prepared, in 4-ounce cartons 

Chloral, hydrate of, crystals, in 4-ounce 
g.s. bottles 

Chlorodyne, in 8-ounce bottles (each fluid 
ounce shall contain the following: Al- 
cohol 70 per cent, morphhydrochlor 2| 
grains, fluid ext. can. ind. m. 4ft, chloro- 
form m. 46, dilute hydrocyanic acid m. 
9. oil peppermint m. 1 J, tr. capsicum m. 



j}>- 



Chloroform, purified, in J-pound bet ties, 

securely corked 

Cocaine, hydrochlorate, in |-ounce bolt les . . 

Cocculus indicus, in 1-pound cartons 

Cocoa butter, in fpound cakes 

Collodion, in 1-ounce bottles 

Copaiba, balsam of, U. S. P., in 1-pound 

bottles 

Copper, sulphate of , in 8-ounce cartons 

Copper sulphate pencils 

Creosote, beech wood, in 1-ounce bottles 

Ether, sulphate, stronger, for anesthesia, 

in J-pound tins 

Ethyl chloride, in tubes of 10 grammes 

(local anesthesia) 

Glycerin, pure, in 1-pound bottles 

Ouaiacol carbonate, in 1-ounce cartons 

Gum arable, No. 1, powdered, pure, in i- 

cartons , 



201 

854 

209 

P354 

1*214 

354 

209 
209 

201 

354 

354 

354 
201 
354 
214 

214 

201 
354 

201 
201 
209 

»354 

«202 
214 
354 

209 



201 



214 

6 201 
201 
214 
209 
354 

354 
209 
354 
354 

»201 

214 
354 
201 

214 



10.01875 

.07 
.105 
.74 
.74 

.61 

.04 
.04 

.03376 

.01 

.09 

.46 

.16 
1.30 
1.10 

.30 

3.75 
.135 

.115 

.1075 

.06 



.14 
.20 
.22 

.34 
.004 



.07 

.41 
3.55 
.07 
.39 
.0375 

.48 
.0075 
1.10 
.055 

.28 

.45 
.24 
.17 

.225 



St. Louis. 

Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 

New York. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 



Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Omaha. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 



1 Awarded 1.580 bottles. 

* Awarded 489 bottles. 

* Oto Chemical Co. 



« Maltbie Chemical Co. 
• Mallinckrodt. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPFfXBS FOB THB INDIAN SBBVIOB. 



841 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical «uj 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc, — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIES-ContlntMd. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of deUvery. 



875 pounds... 
2Mb bottles.. 



115 bottles.. 
M ounces.... 
654 ounces... 
79 pounds... 



1,840 bottles... 
689 bottles..... 



339 ounces.... 
6,045 pounds. 

306 ounces.... 



93 ounces.. 
187c 



6540 

1640 

1,056 pounds.. 



15o 

276 pounds. 

1,300 tubes. 

485 ounces.. 



713 pounds. 



666 ounces 

86 tubes 

3,949 pounds. 

66 cans 



46 pounds. . . 
150 pounds.., 

857 ounces..., 

63 ounces.... 
105 pounds.. 
1,273 ounces. 

64 pounds... 



3,100 pounds. 
870 pounds... 



199o 

430 ounces.. 



XKHONis— continued. 

Miscellaneous — Continued . 

Gum camphor, in 1-pound tins. 



Hydrogen peroxide, nonexplosive; to be 

" ereain heavy, moderately small- 

;-neck, amber-colored bottles j 



delivei 
mouth, lo 
capacity ' 



, __ ounces, to contain 1 pouncf 
of liquid and stoppered with a 1-inch 
best-qualtty cork, driven to head, with- 
out wiring 

Ichthyol, in 1-pint bottles 

Iodine, resub limed, in 2-ounce g. s. bottles. . 

Iodoform, powdered, in 4-ounce bottles 

Lead, acetate of, granulated, pure, in 8- 
ounce cartons 

Liquor antisepticus, U. 8. P. 1900, in 1-pint 

bottles...... I....:.... 

Liquor cresolisoomp., U. 8. P., In 1-pint 



Magnesia, carbonate, in 4-ounce papers. 

w ^ gujphatt Q i f jn lo-pound strong 



paper cartons 

Menthol, in 1-ounce bottles 

Mercury , ammonia ted , in 4-ounce cartons 

Mercury with chalk, in 4-ounce cartons 

Mercury, cor. chlo. of, pure (corrosive sub. ) 
small crystals or granulated, in 4-ounce 
bottles 

Mercury, mild chloride of, U. 8. P. (calo- 
mel), in 4-ounce cartons 

Mercury, yellow oxide of, powdered, in 
1-ounce bottles , 

Milk, malted, in 1-pound bottles 



Morphia, sulphate of. in *-ounce bottles — 
Ointment, mercurial, U. S. P., in 1-pound 

Kits, with cover 
tment, yellow oxide, mercury, oph- 
thalmic, in 1-ounce tubes 

Ointment of nitrate of mercury, U. 8. P. 
(citrine ointment), in 8-ounce pots, 

with cover 

Ointment, sine oxide, benzoated, in 1- 

poundjars 

Pepsin, sacch., U. 8. P., in 4-ounce bottles. 
Physostigmine^alicylate, in 10-grain tubes. 
Petrolatum, 112° F. melting point, light- 
colored, in 1-pound cans 

Picis liquids, in *-pint cans 

Potassium- 
Acetate of, in 8-ounce bottles 

Bicarbonate, in 1-pound cartons 

Bitar. of, pure, powdered (cream of 

tartar), in 1-pound cartons 

Bromide of, granulated, in 4-ounce car- 
tons 

Caustic, purified sticks, in 1-ounce 

bottles 

Chlorate of, powdered, in i- pound car- 
tons 

Iodide of, granulated, in 8-ounce bot- 
tles. 
Nitrate of (saltpeter), powdered, in 1- 

pound cartons 

Permanganate, in 1 -pound cartons 

Potassium and sodium tartrate (rochelle 

salt) . powdered, in 1-pound cartons 

Quassia chips, in l-ounce packages 

Quinine, sulphate of, in 5- ounce cans 



209 



•16 
*354 



854 
301 
301 

301 

864 

854 

•214 

309 
214 
301 
301 

201 

301 

354 
M52 

•214 
214 
854 

314 

354 
854 
149 

354 
354 

201 
214 

201 

201 

214 

354 
201 



214 

209 

201 

214 

» 201 



10.48 



.095 
.099 



8.22 



.16 

.14 

.144 
.01 

.017 
.20 
.066 
.08126 

.065 

.0575 

.09 
.46 

4.25 
.63 
.05 

.03 

.31 

.039 

.90 

.06 
.45 

.0175 
.1025 

.27 

.0275 

.031 

.12 
.16875 



.0825 
.11* 

.195 

.01 

.235 



St. Louis. 



New York. 
Omaha. 



Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 

New York, Chicago, 

St. Louis, Omaha, 

San Francisco. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

Omaha. 
Do. 
New York. 

Omaha. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 
St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



i Awarded 1,037 bottles, 
t Awarded 1,019 bottles. 
• Meyer Bros. 



* Horlicks No. 1 pack 

• Chirmfabrik T 



Digitized by 



Google 



342 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICfa. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical «u; 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

MEDICAL SUPPLIES-Conttnued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trao- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



316 c 
lie _ 
384 pounds. 

66 ounces... 
104 ounces.. 



418 pounds 

866 pounds 

3,084 ounces... 
1,181 ounces... 

1,103 bottles... 

806 ounces 

401 ounces 



300 ounces... 
343 bottles.. 



77 bottles.... 
373 bottles.., 

367 



606 pounds.. 
446 bottles... 



4,718 

3,530 

679 bottles.... 
1,530 bottles.. 

34,350 

114 < 

176 ounces 

3,676 pounds.. 



407 pounds. 



41c 

1,641 ounces. 

416 c 



175 
16.. 



MSDICENB8— continued. 



Miscellaneous— Continued. 



Resorcinol. in l-ounoe bottles 

Santonin, In 1-ounce cartons 

Senna leaves, in 1-pound packages 

Silver, nitrate- 
Fused, in l-ounoe bottles 

Crystals, in l-ounoe bottles 

Sodium- 
Bicarbonate, powdered, in 1-pound 

cartons. 
Bromide, granular, in 1-pound boxes. . . 

Phosphate, in 4-ounoe bottles 

Salicylate, powdered, in 8-ounoe oar- 
tons. 
Solution of ammonia, 10 per cent, in 1- 

ouart g. s. bottles. 
Solution, arsenite of potassa, U. S. P. 

(Fowler' solution), in 8-ounce bottles. 
Solution iodide of arsenic and mercury, 
U. S. P. (Donovan '8 solution), in 8-ounoe 
bottles. 
Solution subsulphate of iron, U. S. P., in 

in 4-ounoe bottles. 
Spirits ammonia, aromatic, IJ. S. P., in 1- 

pint g. s. bottles. 
Spirits ether- 
Compound, U. 8. P. (Hoffman's ano- 
dyne), in 1-pint bottles, securely 
corked. 
Nitrous, U. S. P. (sweet spirits of ni- 
ter), in 1-pint bottles, securely 
corked with glass stopper attached 
separately. 
Standardsolutlon (1 to 1,000), active prin- 
ciple of suprarenal gland, in l-ounoe bot- 
tles. 

Sulphur, washed, in 1-pound cartons 

Suppositories, glycerin, each wrapped in 
tin foil, in bottles oris, with paraffined 
cork. 
Sirup- 
iodide of iron, U. S. P., in 4-ounoe bot- 
tles. 
Rhubarb and potassium, compound 
(N. FO, in 8-ounce bottles. 

Squill, V. S. P., in 1-pint bottles 

White pine compound, in 1-quart bot- 
tles. 
Wild cherry, U S. P , in 4-ounoe bot- 
tles. 

Terebenum, in 1-ounce bottles 

Thymol, in 1 -ounce bottles 

Tooth powder, in i-pound, screw-top tin 

cans (formula: precipitated chalk 4 

parts, orris root 1 part, pulverised castile 

soap i part). 

Vaseline, liquid (or liquid petrolatum) in 

1-pound sealed cans. 
Wine colchicum root, U. S. P., in 4-ounoe 

bottles. 
Zinc — 

Acetate of In, 1-ounce cartons 

Oxide of , in 8-ounoe cartons 

Sulphate of, in 4-ounoe cartons 



IXSTRUMZNTS. 



Applicators, wood, for nose and throat, in car- 
ton ""~ "■ 



tons of 72 dozen. 
Aspirators, small. . 



354 
149 
314 

301 
301 

314 

201 
201 
301 

354 

314 

309 

301 
354 

354 

354 



354 
214 



1214 

214 

1214 
1*209 

r«354 
'354 

354 
354 
354 



214 

371 



354 
354 
214 



154 



80.07 
1.65 
.075 

.44 
.41 

.03 

.47 
.0125 



.197 

.0076 

.013 

.016 



.49 
.55 



.065. 
.10 



.125 
.285 
.285 
.013 

.06 
.13 
.21 



.13 
.03 



.025 

.01 

.0075 



.185 
1.26 



Omaha. 
New York. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Da 
Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 

Do. 

Do. 

No award. 



Omaha. 
St. Louis. 



Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 

Da 

Da 
Do. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 
(«) 



Omaha. 
Do. 
St. Louis. 



New York. 
Chicaga 



i Meyer Bros, brand. 
■ Awarded 760 bottles. 



• Oso Chemical Co. brand. 

* In New York warehouse or f . a b. 



can Chicago or St. Louis. 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



348 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. IS, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, JurnUure and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIES— Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


404 


instruments— continued. 

Atomisers: 

Hand 


121 
121 
268 

214 
191 

354 
354 
33 
214 
2G8 

2C8 
138 

1/214 

H2C8 

180 

209 
209 
180 

180 
180 

268 
2C8 
33 
ISO 
180 
214 
288 

180 
180 


SO. 225 

.28 

3.74 

.40 
.67 

.01 

.015 

.23 

.135 

.33 

19.85 
3.20 

.09 
.09 
.35 

.022 
.17 
.80 

1.20 
.CO 

2.33 

2.33 

.05 

.22 

.54 

3.75 

5.20 

.90 
.80 


St. Louis. 


313 


Hand , suitable for olb 


Do. 


21 


Bags, obstetrical, all leather, 18 inches long, 
metal frame, with four 2-ounce wide-mouth 
bottles; to have damp to hold bag open when 
in use. 

Bedpans, earthenware, yellow 


Omaha or New York. 


79 


St. Louis. 


56 


Douche pans, white enamel 


Chicago. 
Omaha. 


301 pieces 


Binder's'boafds: 

24 by 12 inches 


255 pieces 


4 Dy 17 inches 


Do. 




Bougies, flexible, hard, assorted sixes 


Chicago. 
£t. Louis. 


298 


Breast pumps. . .' ' 


18 


Carrier "for gaiize, ixi packing uterus. . 1 1 ..... , 


N«w York or Omaha 


8 


Cases: 

Operating (minor) 


Do. 


20 


Pocket 


N«w York, ftmaha or 


636 


Catheters: 

Flexible, assorted sizes (hard and soft as 

required. 
Irrigating, urethral and bladder, male- 
female. 
Cups, douche, for eve, glass 


Chicago. 
St. Louis, 


68 


New York or Omaha. 
Omaha. 


1,053 


St. Louis. 


aC?... : 


Cupping classes, with' t>ulb, assorted sizes 

Curettes, Done 


Do. 


49 


Omaha. 


13 


Curettes, uterine, irrigating, medium size: 
Sharp 


Do. 


18 


Dull 


Do. 


22 


Dilators, uterine, Goodell's: 

Larre blade 


New York or Ornaha. 


28 


Small blade . . 


Do. 


36 


Director, grooved 


Chicaco. 
Omaha. 


91 


Douche tubes, uterine, glass 


32 


F.i^vAtor, periosteal . . .'" x , 


Do. 


11 


Fanadic battery 


St. Louis. 


11 square yards. 


Felt, for splints 


New York or Chicago. 


48 


Forceps, trachoma: 

Knapp's , 


Omaha. 


35 


Novels, oval 


Do. 


100 


Forceps, haemostatic, screw lock: 

Curved 


No award. 


90 


Straight 


180 

138 

180 
2C8 
180 
268 
268 
191 

180 

180 

268 
2C8 
268 

180 
138 


.37 
.24 

1.40 
.30 
.40 

2.20 
.72 
.04 

.40 

1.92 

.40 
.40 
.40 

1.44 
.90 


Omaha. 


37 


Forceps: 

Dressing , ,., 


Omaha, St. Louis, or 


37 


Tongue 


Chicago. 
Omaha. 


41 


Tissue 


New York or Omaha. 


68 


Splinter 


Omaha. 





Obstetrical 


New York or Omaha. 


17 


Velsalhim, uterine., , ..... .. ... 


Do. 


2,979 


Glasses, colored, riding bow, for the eyes, as- 
sorted colors. 
Inhalers: 

Chloroform, Esmarch's, complete with 

bottle. 
Ether, Allis* aseptic, metal cover 


Chicago. 
Omaha. 


12 


9 


Do. 


16 


Knives, operating: 

Large 


New York or Omaha. 


84 


MenUim L _ L 


Do. 


37 


Small 


Do. 


18 


Mirrors: 

Head, 4-inch, with headbands 


Omaha. 


16 seta 


Laryngeal, boilable, in sets of three 


Omaha, St. Louis, or 




Chicago. 



t Awarded 441 soft. 



'Awarded 195 hard. 



Digitized by 



Google 



844 



8XJPPUBS FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIOE. 



Contraeti awarded under advertisement of Jan, 15, 1913, for groceries, medical su A 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIES-Contlnued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



92 dozen.... 

89 

45 

40 

72 pairs.... 
09 pairs.... 

13 

11 

11 

37 dozen.... 

17 

23 

82 

82 

117 

22 

122 dozen.. 

42 

24 

108 

991 

333 

813 

14 

1,305 dozen. 

13 sets 

9 

50 

80 

32 

13 

13 

197 bundles 



572 

244 

1,254 dozen 
907 dozen.. 
204 boxes.. 



32 dozen.. 
59 dozen.. 
37 dozen.. 
34 dozen.. 
24 A dozen 
15A dozen 



nrsTBUMKNTS— continued. 

Needles: 

Extra, for hypodermic syringes, 
thread and female thread. 

Surgical, assarted 

Needle holders, Rlchter pattern 

Powder blowers, for larynx 

Probes, with eye, 8-inch 

Scissors. 6-inch, screw lock: 

Straight 

Curved 

Speculum for— 



male 



Rectum 

Vagina 

Splints, assorted sizes 

Sponge holders , for throat 

Sterilizer, for instruments, dressings, etc., in- 
cluding an alcohol vapor lamp, or Bunsen 
burner. 
Stethoscopes, Bowles's, with bell attachment. 
Stomach tube and bulb, in substantial case. . . . 
Syringes: 

Davidson's self-injector 

Dental, for local anesthesia, complete 

Ear, glass 

Hard rubber, 2-ounce 

Hard rubber, 8-ounce 

Hypodermic, in case, with 2 needles 



Penis, glass, in cases 

Fountain, 2-quart, complete, in wooden box 
Rectal, soft rubber bulb, for infants 

Tenaculum, uterine 

Tongue depressors, wood 

Tooth extracting sets, in substantial case 

Tourniquets, field 

Trocar, with canula 

Tube, rectal, of soft rubber, for high enema 

Urinometers 

Uterine dressing forceps, Emmet's 

Uterine sounds, Sim's 

Wire, for cleaning hypodermic needles, in 
bundles of 1 dozen. 

SURGICAL DRESSINGS, ETC. 

Bags: 

Rubber, 2-quart, for hot water 

Ice, screw-capped, cloth-covered, 9-inch.. . 
Bandages, gauze, 10 yards long: 

2 inches wide 

3 inches wide 

Bandages, roller, unbleached and unsized, 

assorted, in a pasteboard box (1 dozen 1 inch 
by 1 yard, 2 dozen 2 inches by 3 yards, 2 
dozen 2} inches by 3 varus. 1 dozen 3 inches 
by 4 yards, J dozen 3J inches by 5 yards, 1 
dozen 4 inches by 6 yards, \ dozen 4 inches 
by 8 yards). 
Bandages, plaster of parts: 

1J inches by 5 yards 



180 
268 
209 



268 

268 

180 

268 

P268 

1*180 

138 

180 
268 



121 

209 
354 
214 
854 

209 
175 



209 
214 
121 
180 

33 
180 
180 

33 
203 

33 
180 
180 
354 



121 
180 



2 inches by 5 yards.. 
24 inches by 5 yards.. 
3 inches by 6 yards.., 
3} Inches 6y 5 yards. 
4 inches by 5 yards... 



80.03 

.15 

2.65 

.30 

.11 

.35 
.49 

.45 
.62 
.88 
.67 



.13 
8.25 



3.75 
.935 

1.035 
1.00 
.36 
.43 
1.16 
.44 



.025 
.90 
.095 
.33 
.01 
9.40 
.55 
.25 
.29 
.24 
.50 
.18 
.006 



.60 
.244 

.37 

.47 

2.70 



.80 
.87 
.95 
1.05 
1.10 
1.15 



New York or Omaha. 

Omaha. 

New York or Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

New York or Omaha 

Do, 
Do. 

Omaha. 

New York or Omaha. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
Omaha, St. Louis, or 

Chicago. 
Omaha. 
New York or Omaha. 



Do. 
St. Louis. 

Da 
Omaha. 
St Louis. 
Omaha. ' 
St. Louis. 

New York. Chicago, St 
Louis, Omaha, San 
Francisco. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
NewYork. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 

Do. 

Do. 



St. Louis. 
Omaha. 

New York or Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 



New York. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 



i Awarded 5, "De Vflbiss." 



* Awarded 6, "Graves.' 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOB. 



845 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1918, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, bather 9 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIEB-Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



100 

06 

60 

90 

68 

100 

an 

1,308 pounds, 
2J383 pounds, 
206 pounds.. 

838 sheets... 
aoa boxes.... 

IS *•"!■" 
2,236 yards.. 

1,002 yards.. 
1,700 yards.. 

068 yards.... 
866 yards.... 
10.776 yards, 
lift bottles.. 

28 ounces.... 

148 

16*01 
1,456 

187 yards, 
126 yards. 
21 
381 

482 yards. 

a yards, 
yards. 
718aosen. 
180 yards. 

841 spools. 
660 spools. 

420 spools. 

68 yards... 
7Syards... 
132 yards. 

66* yards. 

69 yards.. , 
lASyards. 
140 yards. 

102 yards. 
314 yards., 



2/» bottles.. 
6,866 poonds.. 



sttbgical DSBSsaros, etc.— continued. 
Bandages, woven, elastic, stretched: 



2 inches by 3 yards 
*** *- """i by 3 yards.. 

by 3 yards.., 

2 inches by 5 yards.. . 
24 inches oy 5 yards., 
3 Inches by 5 yards.. . 



Bandages, suspensory 

Cotton, absorbent: 

4 pound , 

1 pound 

Cotton, surgeon's nonabsorbent, i-pound pack- 

Cotton wadding , 

Finger cots, rubber, 1 dozen in a box 

Oanse, berated, in glass: 

In 1-yard lengths 

In 6-yard lengths , 

Cause, antiseptic (bichloride), in glass: 

In 1-yard lengths , 

In 6-yard lengths 

Oanse, iodoform: 



In 1-yard glass containers. 



each, 

Ligature, silk, wound on cards containing 

about <X ounce. 
Ligature, silkworm gut, two sises, fine and 



a), in vials. 



medium, in slides ol 

Ligature, silver wire 

Lint, absorbent, in 1-ounoe cartons. 
Oiled silk, opaque, 30 inches wide: 

In 1-yard rolls 

In 6-yard roils 

Pads. Kelly's, obstetrical. 
Pencils, hair (assorted sis 
Plaster- 
Belladonna, 1 yard in a tin 

Cantharidls,lyardinatin 

Mustard, 4 yards in a tin 

Porous 

Rubber, adhesive, 7 inches wide, in 1-yard 
rolls. 
Plaster, sine, oxide, adhesive, surgeon's, 'on 
Spools, 10 yards long: 

1 inch wide. 



2 inches wide 

3 inches wide 

Rubber sheeting, maroon, double-ooated: 

1 yard wide 

If yards wide 

If yards wide 

Rubber sheeting, white, double-coated: 

1 yard wide 

1* yards wide 

1| yards wide 

Tubes, rubber, drainage, Nos. 1, 2, and 3. . 
Tubing, rubber: 

|3!ch 

{-inch 



D1S1NFKCIAOT8. 

Add. carbolic, 06 per oent, for disinfection, in 

1-plnt bottles. 
Calcium hypochlorite (bleaching powder), in 6 

and 10 pound containers, noncorroaive metal; 

shall contain not less than 30 



214 
27 

288 
27 

214 

214 



27 



214 
214 



27 



288 
27 



180 



268 

288 



121 
203 

27 
27 
27 



27 
27 
27 

121 
121 
121 

98 
08 
121 
268 

121 
121 



214 
214 



80.16 
.18 
.23 
.24 
.27 
.30 
.08 

.28 
.18 
.26 



.12 

.10 
.066 

.10 
.066 

.12 
.12 
.006 



1.00 



1.10 
.04 

.60 

.66 

3.86 

.11 

.20 

.30 

.006 

.36 

.16 



.10 
.33 
.44 

.64 

.66 
.78 

.45 
.66 
.78 
(») 

.016 
.02 



.116 
.06 



8t. Louis. 

Chicago. 

New York or Chicago. 

Chicago. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
New York or Chicago. 

St Louis. 
Do. 

New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 

New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

Omaha. 

New York or Omaha. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

Da 

Da 
St. Louis. 
New York. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York or Ctdoaga 
Chicago. 



Da 
Do. 
Da 

St. 



Do. 
Da 

Chicago. 
Do. 
St. Louis. 
New York or Omaha. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

8t Louis. 
Da 



able chlorine. 
Awarded 834 yards. 



per cent avail- 

* Na 1 80.16, Na 2 8a 20, Na 3 8016. 



ioogle 



846 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical «u; 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc.— Continued. 



MEDICAL SUPPLIES-Continned. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
prioe. 



Point of d«li very. 



1,680 bottles.... 

94 kegs 

3,062 pounds... 



80 pounds.., 
91 pounds... 
03s pounds.. 
113 pounds.. 
60 pounds... 



3^26 pounds... 
2J227 pou nds... 



57... 
445c 



2,986 dozen.. 

1,984 dosen.. 

807 

16 

1,142 boxes.. 
7., 



15 

1,161 gross.... 
413 hundred.. 
16 , 



13.482 

905 hundred.. 

19 

40 

37 



498 hundred... 
578 hundred... 
167 hundred... 



47 

43 

150 dozen.. 



2,234 

125 hundred.. 



1,560 hundred. 

997 quires 

6. 



438 gross. 

9 

4 

41 



DisoiFBCTAirm— oontinusd. 

Solution, formaldehyde, 40 per cent solution: 

In 1 -quart bottles 

In 5-gallon kegs 

i rolls (urge pieces, not crushed)... 

HOSPITAL STORM. 



Capsicum, powdered, in 1-pound bottles 

Flaxseed, whole, in cartons 

Flaxseed meal, in tins (crushed seed, not cakes) 

Gelatin; Silver Label or equal 

Ginger, powdered, in 1-pound cartons 



or medicinal use 

Castile, white 

Green, in 1-pound Jan.. 



10SCELLA2fXOU8. 

Basins, pus, medium sixe, enameled ware.. 
Bedbug destroyer, in 1-plnt tin cans 



Ointment, impervious . 
Powder 



Brushes, nail or hand, for surgical use, 

Cases, medicine, buggy 

Capsules, gelatin, assorted, Nos. to 4. 

Chairs, operating , 

Cork pressors 

Corks, velvet, best, sixes Nos. 1 to 10 . . 



Cups, sputum .paper. 

Dispensatory, United States, cloth (latest edi- 
tion). 

Droppers, medicine 

Envelopes, drug, medium size, by the 100 

Formulary, National (latest edition) 

Funnels, glass, 8-ounce 

Hones 

Labels, blank, prescription, gummed, without 
any printing: 
1 by 2 inches. 



2 by 3 inches 

3 by 4 inches. 

Measures, graduated, glass: 

8-ounce 

4-ounce 

Minim 

Medicine glasses, jounce, graduated 

Mortars and pestles: 

W edge wood , 5- inch 

Glass. 4-inch 

Nipples, for nursing bottles, to fit over neck of 

bottle. 
Papers, blue and white, 4J by 6 inches, for 

seldlitz powder. 
Paper: 

Filtering, round, gray, 10-inch 

Litmus, blue and red, in boxes of 1 dozen 
books. 

Papers, powder, 2J by 3J inches 

Paper , wrapp ing 

Percolators, glass, ^-gallon 

Pill boxes, paper, in boxes of 1 gross 

Pill tiles, 8-inch, graduated 

Saddlebags, medical, convertible 

Scales, baby, spring 



854 
214 
214 



214 
214 
214 
354 
214 

209 

66 

209 



180 
354 

154 
f*214 

\»209 
180 

33 
354 

33 
354 
354 
154 
214 

209 
214 
209 
214 
191 



354 
354 
354 

180 
180 
180 
354 

209 
214 
209 

214 



354 
214 

214 
354 
214 
209 
214 
268 
268 



10.275 
5.26 
.02375 



.21 

.06 

.0475 

.28 

.16 

.10 

1.20 

.13 



.24 
.09 

.10 

.0425 

.0425 

.02 
4.75 

.04 
25.00 

.1375 

<») 
1.25 
5.25 

.0095 
.045 
1.32 
.06 
.20 



.025 

.0375 

.05 

.18 
.12 
.12 

.17 

.40 
.15 
.017 



.1975 
.20 

.0125 
.08 
.20 
.56 
.35 
8.85 
.25 



Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Do. 



St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago or 
St Louis. 



Omaha. 
Do. 

New York. 
St. Louis. 

Da 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 

Do. 
New York. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Chicago. 



Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 



Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York or O J 

Do. 



1 Per pound of 16 ounces. 

* Awarded 992 dozen. 

• No. 1, $0,125; No. 2, 80.135; No. 3, 80.17; No. 4, $0.19; No. 5, $0,225; No. 6, $0.25; No. 7, $0.40; 
$0.45; No. 9, $0.48; No. 10, $0.63. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



347 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1918, for groceries, medical «w 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



MEDICAL 8TTPFLIE8-Contmued. 



▲WW*. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Paint of delivery. 


17 


icscklijlnious— continued. 

Scales and weights, prescription 

Snellen's test-type and astigmatic chart (for 

testing vision). 
Spatulas: 

3-tnch 


200 
33 

191 
191 
854 


81.76 
.10 

.115 
.165 
.15 


St. Louis. 


101 


Chicago. 


W 


Do. 


52. 


6»inoh 


Do. 


15 


Spirit lamps 


Omaha. 


16 


Sinis, for making distilled water, f-gallon size. 


No award. 


2. 


tables, operating '.T.I 


15 
854 
175 

854 
191 

209 
209 
209 
209 
200 
354 
83 


50.00 
.005 
.22 

.70 
.016 

.005 

.1025 

.115 

.1625 

.184 

.0275 

.10 


St. Louis. 


104 down. 


Test tribes, Mnch . . 


Omaha. 


1,467 


Thermometers, clinical, with certificate. ...... 

Tubes, drinking, glass, assorted sites 


New York, St. Louis, 


38* gross 

1,064 ounces 

1.126 down. .... 


Chicago, Omaha, San 
Francisco. 
Omaha. 


Twine, wreirotnirrcotton 


Chicago. 
St. Louis. 


vili«7 ***•*'*""** ««*•«•» 

i-ounoe 


1^680 dosen..... 


I-ounce 


Do. 


3,246 docen 


2*ounce 


Do. 


3,243 dosen 

1J69 dosen..... 
3W ounces 


4-ounce 


Da 


6-ounce 


Do. 


Wax, white, in paper 


Omaha. 


80 square feet... 


Wire netting for splints, No. 4 


Chicago. 







SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 



80. 

14 

1 

20 

74 dosen. 

463 

875 

758 

875 

404 

276 

257 

183 

906 

86. 

086. 

43 

787 

641 

887 

634 

407 

810 

106 



CSABTS. 

The Arnett Reading 

Woostar's Industrial Reading 

Appleton's Reading 

Johnson's Anatomy and Physiology. 
Wooster's Word Cards 

PBIM 

Child Life Primer, Blaisdell 

Graded Primer, Black 

Wooster Primer, The 

Primer, Arnold , 

Rose Primer, The, Turpin , 

First Book for Non-English Speaking People, 

Harrington. 
Second Book for Non-English Speaking 

People, Harrington. 
Language Lessons to Accompany First Book, 

Harrington. 

KXADHtS. 

New Education Readers, Book 1, Demarest A 

Van Sickle. 
Perception Cards for Book 1, Demarest A Van 

New Education Readers, Book 2, Demarest 6 

Van Sickle. 
Perception Cards for Book 2, Demarest A Van 

Sickle. 
New Education Readers, Book 3, Demarest A 
Van Sickle. 

New Education Readers, Book 4 

Brooks's Readers: 

First 

Second.... , 

Third 

Fourth and Fifth 

Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth 

i With manuals and tripod stands. 





[314.00 


252 


J 14.12 
1 14.20 




1 14.25 


4 


0.75 


8 


6.25 


238 


110.80 


4 


.50 


108 


».20 


4 


.23 


4 


.25 


4 


.2375 


8 


.24 


140 


.20 


140 


.24 


140 


.20 


8 


.28 


8 


1.60 


8 


.28 


8 


.60 


8 


.82 


8 


.36 


8 


.20 


8 


.28 


8 


.82 


8 


.40 


8 


.48 



Topeka, Kens. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 



New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Do. 



New York. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 



New York or Chicago. 

Do. 

Do, 

Da 

Da 

Da 

Da 
Da 
Da 
Da 
Da 

ti9flfedb 



348 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical su\ 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES— Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point o*4eHvery. 


896 


ElADKBa— continued. 

Child Life, RhiLsdcll; 

First Reader.,,., ,, 


198 
198 
198 
198 
198 

4 

4 

4 
4 
4 

4 
4 

4 
4 
4 

297 
297 
297 

297 
297 
297 
297 
297 

4 
4 

4 

.4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 

4 

153 

153 

4 

198 

198 

8 

8 
8 

117 
4 

264 

4 
4 

4 

8 
8 
8 


180.20 
1.28 
1.29 
1.82 
1.86 

.24 
.28 
.82 
.86 
.40 

.26 
.80 
.88 
.42 
.60 

1.26 
1.32 
1.89 

1.20 
1.28 
1.32 
1.36 
1.44 

.26 
.26 
.36 

.60 
.27 
.80 
.36 
.40 
.66 
.68 

1.128 

».16 

.27 

1.52 

1.88 

.48 

.40 
.80 
.40 
.47 
1.96 

.36 

.48 
.69 

.32 
.40 
.64 


New York. 


414 


Second Header J ± 


Do. 


397 


Third Reader... 


Do. 


374 


Fourth R eodtir w 


Do. 


380 


Fifth Reader 


Do. 


361 


Graded Claaslt*, HaliburtonA Norvell: 

First Rrader, ,,.,.. 


Chicago. 
Do. 


396 


Second Reader 


364 


Third Reader, 


Do. 


811 


Four th R eiider. , „ 


Do. 


338 


Fifth Reader........ 


Do. 


670. 


W coster Readers. The; 

First... .,.„!.' 


Do. 


684 


Second* % . , . 


Do. 


479 


Third 


Do. 


411 


Fourth. . , . . ... .. 


Do. 


165 


Fifth. __ 


Do. 


168 


Progressive Road to Heading, Burchill: 

Bookl.... ...T:. 


New York. 


168 


Books,., 1 


Do. 


146 


Boefc 8*. -.„*....., „ 


Do. 


838 


Silver Burdm Readers: 

First Book . 


Do. 


270. ...* 


Second Book, , 


Da 


380... 


Third Book 


Do. 


140..: ;... 


Fourth Book, .; 


Da 


184 


Fifth Book..... 


Da 


180. 


Graded Readers. Black: 

First „„» 


Chioaga 


198 


Second, ., 


Do. 


136 


Third , 


Da 


88 


Aldlne Readers, Sputd. lihg A Bryoe: 

Ma nasi for Teachers 


Do. 


400 


Primer. ... ....* 


Da 


401 


First Reader , 


Do. 


888 


Second Reader 


Da 


388 


Third Reader 


Da 


109 


Fourth Reader,.. 


Da 


100 


Fifth Reader., V. 


Da 


777 


8FELLBVO. 

Spelling Book, Bailey-Manly: 


New York. 


488 


Partii !.*...!...!!!..!. 


Do. 


770 


Qraded Lessons in Spelling, Parte I and II, 
combined, W. C. Doub. 

OBOOSAFHT. 

Terr 6 McMmray: 

First Book... 


Chioaga 
New York. 


819 


687 


Second Book. 


Do. 


189 


Natural Introductory Geography, Redway & 
Elementary Geography, Roddy 


New York or Chioaga 
Do. 


864 


108 


Complete deograpny , Roddy . .". 


Do. 


889 


First Book in Oeography, Frye 


New York. 


117 


Elementary Oeography .Dodge * 


Chioaga 
Do. 


104 


Advanced 'fteograpny ,* bodge". 


619 


PHTSXOLOOT AWD HYOIKMB. 

Primer of Hygiene, Ritchie A CaldweU. 

Primer of Sanitation, Ritahie 


Do. 


444 


Da 


160 


Human Physiology, RJtohie 


Da 


661 


Human Body andTfiealth, Davison: 

Elementary ^ ., a**** * x^*... *..***** 


New York or ^Tilnssjn 

Do. ~~ 


409 


Intermediate. 


136 


Advanced 


Do. 



i Cloth. 

» Strongly wrapped tor mail or express shipments in bandies. Nototof less than 100 books me i 

iroal to be cased m be — 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



8UPPLIX8 FOB THE IKDIAK 8EBYI0B. 



349 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
9ckool books and supplies, furniture ana woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, feather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



SCHOOL BOOKS AND BUPPLIES-Conttoued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 




of 


Unit 


con- 
trac- 


price. 


tor. 




99 


80.57 


8 


.78 


99 


.96 


4 


.80 


8 


.64 


4 


.74 


4 


.52 


8 


.80 


4 


.67 


210 


>. 80 


210 


1.38 


210 


1.68 


8 


.28 


8 


.40 


140 


.28 


140 


.48 


8 


.82 


8 


.48 


297 


«.» 


297 


».48 


4 


.60 


8 


.20 


8 


.08 


8 


.06 


8 


.12 


118 


.25 


4 


.34 


8 


.28 


8 


.32 


8 


.36 


8 


.28 


208 


.27 


206 


.27 


140 


.24 


118 


.30 


140 


.36 


8 


.48 


8 


.80 


4 


.47 


297 


•72 


117 


.48 


117 


.60 


8 


.48 


8 


.48 


8 


.80 


8 


.48 



Point of deli reiy. 



111.. 
100.. 
127.. 



111.., 
180.., 
44... 
68... 



72.. 
«... 



176.. 
62..., 
8».. 
188.., 



191.. 
118.. 



19. . 
49.. 



lOBdoien. 
BO 



•27.. 
K6.. 
478.. 



610.. 
8».. 

746.. 
467.. 
216.. 



17... 
25... 
291.. 



179.. 
179.. 



232.. 
226.. 
29... 

83... 
246.. 
265.. 

17... 
130.. 
170.. 
10... 



DicnoNASixa, websteb. 

Common School. 

High School 

Academic , 

AGB1CULTUBE. 

Agriculture for Beginners, Burkett 

First Principles of Agriculture, Goff A Mayne. . 

First Book of Farming, Goodrich 

New Elementary Agriculture, Bessey-Bruner- 
Swesey. 

Practical Agriculture, Wilkinson 

Introduction to Agriculture, Upham. 

LANGUAGE AND OEAMKAB. 

Introductory Language Work, Bead 

Graded Lessons in English, Reed 

Higher Lessons in English, Reed. 

Elementary English, E. O. Lyte. 

Elements of English Grammar and Composi- 
tion, E. O. Lyte. 
Two-book Course in English, Hyde: 

Part £:;;:!";:::!;;:::::;;::;;;::::::;:: 

Steps in English, McLean, BlaJsdell A Morrow: 

Parti 

Part II 

Guide Book to English, Gilbert die Harris: 

Bookl 

Book 2 

Wooster's Number Cards , 

Natural Number Primer. Gibbs. 

Primary Exercises in Arithmetic, Silver: 

No. I 

No. II 

No. Ill 

Wooster's Arithmetic: 

Bookl , 

Book 2 

Progressive Arithmetic, Milne: 

First Book 

Second Book. 

Third Book 

Mental Arithmetic, Milne 

Progressive Mental Arithmetic, Gilford: 

Bookl 

Book 2 

Primary Arithmetic, Walsh 

Grammar School Arithmetic, with answers, 
Walsh: 

Parti 

Part II 

UNITED STATES HISTORY. 

Primary History of United States, McMaster.. 

Brief History of United States, McMaster 

First Steps in the History of the United States, 
Mowry. 

Essentials of United States History. Mowry. . . 

Beginner's American History, Montgomery. . . 

Elementary United States History, Mont- 
gomery. 

Story of Our Country, Burton , 

Elementary History of United States, Barnes. 

School History of United States, Barnes 

Brief History of South Dakota, Robinson 

i Large type edition. 



Chieatp. 

New York or Chicago. 

Chicago. 



Do. 
New York or Cbioago. 
Chicago. ^^ 

Do. 

New York or Chicago. 
Chicago., 



New York or Chicago, 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 

New York or Chicago. 
Do. 

New York. 
Do. 



Chicago. 

New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York. 
Chicago. 

New York or Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York. 

Do. 
Chicago. 



New York. 
Chicago. 



New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

New York. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York or Chicago. 
Do. ^^ 

Do. 
Do. 



•Cloth. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES-Continued. 



Award*. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con* 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


183 


CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

How the People Role, Hoxie 


397 

8 

8 
297 
117 

4 

4 

297 

4 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 

198 
198 
198 
4 
198 

99 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
43 

18 
18 

18 
18 

18 
18 

18 
18 

•B< 


^80.32 
.48 
.48 
K58 
.80 
.57 

.32 
«.48 
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.24 
.24 

.28 
.32 
.32 
.40 
.12 

.30 
.80 
.40 
i.39 
.80 

.072 

2.40 
1.44 
1.44 
1.44 
1.95 
1.95 
1.95 
1.95 
1.95 

.65 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.65 
.12 

.075 
.075 

.075 
.075 

.1125 
.1125 

.1125 
.1125 

yards. 

Digiti2 


New York. 


187 


First Lessons in Civics, Fonnan 


New York or Chicago, 
Do. 


129 


Essentials in Civil Government, Fonnan 

Elements of Civil Government, Mowry 

How we are Governed. Dawes 


77 


New York. 


25 


Do. 


50.; 


Parliamentary Law, Paul 


Chicago. 

Chicago. 
New York. 


1,751 


SINGING. 

Carmina for Social Worship, Turner 


1,148 


Songs of the Nation, Revised, Johnson 

Assembly Song Book, Rix 


1,828 


Chicago. 

Nirrr Yfrrk or Chfci^iM 


79 


MUSIC INSTRUCTION. 

Natural Musio Course, Ripley & Tapper: 
Harmonic J'rimer. . 


87 


Harmonic First Reader 


Do. "" 


60 


Harmonic Second Reader 


Do. 


00 


Harmonio Third Reader 


Do. 


30 


Harmonic Fourth Reader 


Do* 


25 


Harmonic Fifth Reader 

Musio in the Grades (Manual for Teachers). 
Zuchtmann'8 American Music System: 

Bookl 


Do. 


23 


Do. 


58 


New York. 


137 


Book 2 


Do. 


54 


Book3 


Do. 


62 


Book 4 


Chicago. 
New York. 


24 


Teacher's Manual 


2,763 packages. . 

9 A dozen 

101 dozen 


DRAWING. 

Drawing paper, 8 by 11, 100 sheets in package. 
Prang's Progressive Drawing Books: 

Teacher's Outline Book . 


Chicago. 
Do. 


Book 1 . 


Do. 


78 dozen 


Book 2 .. 


Do. 


65 dozen 


Book 3 


Do. 


69 dozen 


Book 4 


Do. 


25 dozen 


Book 5 


Do. 


16 dozen 


Book 6 


Do. 


13 dozen 


Book 7 


Do. 


6A dozen 

18 


Book 8 ..... 


Do. 


The Prang Elementary Course in Art Instruc- 
tion: 
Manual for Teachers- 
First year 


Do. 


8 


Second year 


Do. 


6 


Third year 


Do. 


3 


Fourth year 


Do. 


4 . ...... 


Fifth year 


Do. 


3....... . . . . 


Sixth year . 


Do. 


3 


Seventh year 


ft 


3 


Eighth year 


3,768 


Prang's set color box, No. 1 


New York. 


568 


Applied Arts Drawing Books, Secgmiller: 
Third year- 
Autumn 


Chicago. 


533 


8pring 


Do. 


323 


Fourth year- 
Autumn 


Do. 


291 


Spring 


Do. 


233 


Fifth year- 
Autumn 


Do. 


233 


Spring 


Do. 


145 


Sixth year- 
Autumn 


Do. 


121 


Spring 


Do. 




i Cloth. 


edbyGOQQle 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICE. 



351 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 191$, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES— Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
prioe. 


Point of delivery. 


92 


drawing— continued. 

Applied Arte Drawing Books, Seegmffler— Con. 
Seventh year— 

Autumn ..... 


18 
18 

18 
18 
43 

8 

8 
8 

297 
297 
297 

210 

210 

210 
205 

117 

4 

116 

140 

4 

297 

117 

8 

8 

297 
8 
4 

297 
4 
8 
4 

4 
8 
8 

153 
4 

297 
8 

297 

8 

153 

153 


80.1125 
.1125 

.1125 
.1125 
.12 

1.44 

12.00 
1.20 

.48 
.77 
.87 

s.68 

.64 

.64 
2.40 

.20 
.27 
.26 

.32 

.27 
•.36 
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«.29 
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.23 

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.42 
.20 
.32 

.42 
.32 
.32 

«.32 
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•.36 

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«.36 

«».36 


Chicago. 
Do. 


75 




84 


Eighth year— 

Autumn .,,, L ,^,, > * * 


Do. 


60 




Do. 


446 


Atkinson* Mehtzer & Grover color box (or 
equal). 

PENMANSHIP. 

Steadman's Graded Lessons in Writing, Nos. 
1 to 8 (in pads). 

Steadman's Business Forms (in pads) 

Steadman's Writing Chart (in sets of 5 sheets). 
Normal Review System: 

Intermediate Slant Writing, Nos. 1 to 6. . . 

Movement Book 


New York. 


282 dozen 

26 dozen 

6 sets 


New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 


228dosen 

43dosen 


New York. 
Do. 


Sdosen 


Business Forms 


Do. 


214dosen 

175 dozen 

33 dozen 

41 A dozen 

66 


Merrill's Modem Penmanship: *" 
Intermediate Series (medium slant), Nos. 

1 to 4. 
Standard Series (medium slant), Nos. l 

to 7. 
Business and Social Forms, Nos. 8 and 9. . . 
Manual of Penmanship, Grades 3 to 8, 

Palmer. 

SUFPLXXKNTABY RXADEB8. 

little Nature Studies, Vol. I, Burt 


New York or Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York. 

New York. 


130 


Nature's Byways, Ford 


Chicago. 
NewYork, 


27 


Nature Stories for Young Readers (Plants), 

Bass. 
Nature Stories for Young Readers (Animals), 

Bass. 

Reader for Primary Grades, Holbrook 

In Fableland, Serl 


99 


Chicago. 
Do. 


68 


44 


New York. 


14 


Oriole 8 tmlea'. T.ftn*. x x _, 


Do. 


41 


Rtori*a for Children, T^ane ^ 


New York or Chicago 
Do. 


16 


Fishing and Hunting (Children of Many 

Lands), Dutton. 
Mother Ooose Reader, MIckens 


233 


New York. 


78 


TndflfW primer, Fqt. .' 


New York or Chicago. 

Chicago. 

NewYork. 


13 


Stories of Red Children, Brooks 


174 


Around the World, Book 1 


76 


Merry Animal Tale", Bingham . . 


Chicago. 

New York or Chicago. 

Chicago. 

Do. 


104 


Geographical Nature Studies, Payne 


76. 


Humane Education, Book 1 (1st part only). 

Pace. 
Fanciful Flower Tales, Bigham 


20 


43 


Five Little Strangers, 'Schwartz 

Great Americans for Little Americans, Egglee- 
ton. 

Hiawatha Primer, Holbrook 

Home Geography for Primary Pupils, Fair- 
banks. 

Around the World, Book 2, Tolman 

In Field and Pasture (Children of Many 
Lands), Dutton. 

Ethics 018000088, Book 1, Thayer 


New York or Chicago. 


63 


Do. 


108 


New York. 


248 


Chicago. 
New York. 


190 


6 


New York or Chicago. 


19 


New York. 


41 


Animal Fables, Fftefford . '. " . 


New York or Chicago. 


39 


Book of Nature Myths, Holbrook 


New York. 


35 


Book of Fables and Folk Stories, Scudder 


Do. 



1 New York City edition, 6 B, in packages of 1 dozen, Nos. 1 te 

• Nos. 1 to 3*. 

• Cloth. 

« Strongly wrapped for mail or express shipments in bundles, 
parcel tone cased in boxes. 

• Illustrated. 



12. 



No lot of lees than 100 books in a single 



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2 SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN BKEViw*. 

ntracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical sufpNet, 
school book* and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, ails, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND 8UPPLIE8-Cootimied. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

coil- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



22.. 
17.. 
14. 
20. 
90. 
85. 
80. 
24.. 
7... 
18.. 
71.. 
10. 
10.. 
11. 
16.. 
17. 
30. 
65. 
18. 
44. 
30. 
21., 

23. 
42. 
9.. 
4.. 

16. 
11. 
9.. 
17. 
11. 
6.. 
11. 
22. 
5.. 
8.. 



15.. 
22.. 
13.. 
8... 
22. 
10.. 



56 

5 sets. 
44 



24. 
36. 
36. 
29. 

21. 
19. 
5.. 
6.. 
8.. 
18. 
14. 
0.. 
5.. 



8UPPLXMEMTAST READEB0— continued. 



Fairy Tales for Little Readers. Burke. 

Fairy Stories and Fables. Baldwin 

Legends of the Red Children, Pratt. . . 

Ola Indian Legends, Zlt-ka-la-Za 

Bunnyboy and Griuly Bear, Smith . . . 

Bunny Brighteyes, Smith 

The Tale or Bunny Cottontail, Smith. 



A Boy on a Farm, Abbott. 

Animals at Home. Bartlett 

First Book of Birds, Miller 

Humane Education. Book 2, Page 

Stories of Humble Friends, Pyle 

Some Useful Animals. Monteith 

Ten Common Trees. Stokes 

Docas. the Indian Boy, Snedden 

Four American Poets, Cody 

Among the Giants, Neher 

Fifty Famous 8tories, Baldwin 

Ethics of Success, Book 2, Thayer 

Around the World, Book 3, Tolman 

Our Own Country, Book III, Smith 

Stories of American Life ana Adventure, Eg- 
gleston. 

Little Brothers to the Bear, Long 

Nature Studies on the Farm, Keller 

Our Birds and their Nestlings, Walker 

Plants and their Children, Dana 

Squirrels and other Fur-bearers, Burroughs. . . 

Trail to the Woods, Hawkes 

The R ace of the Swift. Lltzey 

True Bird Stories, Miller 

Wilderness Babies 

American Hero Stories, Tappan 

American Indians, Starr 

Abraham Lincoln, Baldwin 

Four American Explorers, Beebe 

Four American Inventors, Perry 

Around the World, Book 4, Tolman 

Four American Indians, Whitney and Perry. . 

Four (ireat Americans, Baldwin 

Ethics of Success. Book 3, Thayer 

Four American Pione?rs, Perry and Beebe 

Our Country's 8torv, Tappan 

Life of Lincoln for Boys, Sparhawk 

Choice Literature, Book 1, Intermediate, Wil- 
liams. 

Smoky Day's Wigwam Evenings, Eastman... 

The Children's Hour, 10 volumes 

Recitations for Assembly and Class Rooms, 
O'Neill. 

Grasshopper Green's Garden, Schwartz 

How We are Clothed, Chamberlain 

How We are Fed, Chamberlain 

How We are Sheltered, Chamberlain 

Stories of Industry, Chase and Clow: 

Vol. I 

Vol. II 

Discovery of the Old Northwest, Baldwin 

Four American Patriots, Burton 

Four American Naval Heroes, Beebe 

Indian Boyhood, Eastman 

Iron Star, The, True 

The Man. Roosevelt, Leupp 

Indian Story and Song from North America, 
Fletcher. 

i Strongly wrapped for mail or express shipments in bundles, 
parcel to De cased in boxes. 

* Cloth. 

* School edition. 
« Boards. 



4 

8 

8 

117 

99 

99 

99 

8 

8 

153 

4 

8 

8 

8 

140 

8 

99 

8 

297 

297 

297 

8 

117 

8 

8 

8 

153 

8 

205 

153 

205 

153 

140 

8 

8 

8 

297 

8 

8 

297 

8 

153 

205 

8 

205 
4 

198 

4 

198 
198 
198 

4 
4 

8 
8 
8 
205 
205 
116 
205 



10.25 
.28 
.24 
.40 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.36 
.36 
1.48 
.32 
.40 
.40 
.32 
.32 
.40 
.32 
.28 
t.40 
•.30 
•.40 
.40 

.40 
.32 
.48 
.52 

1.48 
.32 
.77 

1.48 

•.50 

1.44 
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.40 
.40 

».44 
.40 
.40 

».48 
.40 

1.52 
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.22 

.50 
14.75 



.50 
».32 
*.32 
».32 

«.32 
«.32 
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.40 
.40 
1.25 
•.42 
1.25 
.85 



New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
New York or Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
New York or Chicago. 



New York or Chicago. 
New York. ^^ 

Da 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

New York. 

New York or Chicago. 

Do. ^^ 

Do. 
New York. 

New York or Chicago. 
New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



New York or Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York. 
New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 

New York or Chicago. 
New York. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 

New York. 

Chicago. 

NewYork. 



Chicago. 
NewYork. 

Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

Do. 
New York or Chi* 

Do. 

Do. 
New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



No lot of less than 100 books in a si* 3 — ; 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVICB. 



358 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical sup 
ichool books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, u 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES-Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 




of 


Unit 


con- 
trac- 


price. 


tor. 




99 


80.40 


297 


1.48 


198 


1.32 


198 


1.32 


198 


1.32 


8 


.36 


198 


1.40 


4 


.15 


8 


.28 


241 


>.22 


8 


.48 


241 


1.35 


153 


»«.20 


153 


".32 


205 


1.35 


8 


.56 


153 


4.48 


153 


«.48 


4 


.40 


4 


.40 


8 


.32 


4 


.89 


4 


.89 


205 


.63 


116 


.38 


4 


.89 


4 


.19 


198 


1.20 


153 


«.83i 


198 


1.20 


116 


.90 


205 


•.50 


117 


.32 


205 


•.90 


205 


C> 


4 


1.19 


4 


.84 


8 


.80 


297 


1.44 


4 


.85 


99 


.32 


205 


.68 


198 


1.80 


205 


.80 



Point of delivery. 



SUTPLKMSHTABY BXA.DKBS— OOntlnOed. 

Dumb Animals and How to Treat Them, 

Whitehead. 

Around the World, Book 5, Tolman 

Pioneers of Rocky Mountains and the West. 

McMurray. 

Pioneers of Land and Sea. McMurray 

Pioneers of the Mississippi Valley, McMurray. 

Stories from Life. Marsden 

The Wonderful tiouse that Jack Has, Mfllard. . 

Black Beauty, Bewail 

Choice Literature, Book 2, Intermediate, Wft. 

llama. 

Hans Blinker, Dodge 

Geographical Reader, North America, Carpen- 
ter. 

The Land We Live In, Price 

Afoot and Afloat, Burroughs 

Birds and Bees, Burroughs 

Wfld Animals I Have Known, Tbompeon- 

Seton. 

Geographical Reader, Europe, Carpenter 

Captains of Industry, Par ton: 

Vol.1 

Vol.H 

Four Great American Presidents, Perry: 

No.l 

No. 2. 

Choice Literature. Book 1, Grammar. Williams 

Little Women, Alcott 

Little Men, Alcott 

Mrs. WJggs of the Cabbage Patch, Hegan-Rice. . 

Two Arrows. 8toddard 

Joe's Boys, Alcott 

Man Without a Country, Hale 

Robinson Crusoe, DeFoe 

Summer in Leslie Ooldthwaite's Life, A. 

Whitney. 

Tales from Shakespeare, Lamb 

Hero Tales from American History, Lodge and 

Roosevelt. 

The Boy's Parkman, Hasbrouck 

Franklin's Autobiography, edited by D. H. 

Montgomery. 

BOOKS FOR TEACHERS. 

Domestic Science, CWk 

Lessons in Cooking, Lincoln 

Boston Cooking School Cookbook, The 

Child Housekeeper, The, Coison and Chitten- 
den. 
Exerrfees In Woodworking, Siekda,, 



Easy Experiment* In Phwira, fekoith 

Educational Manual Training, Schwartz 

Qomes, Seat Work, &nd Smse Training Exer- 
cises, HoJUra 

Handbook of Homo KroTinm U^ r Hum 

Handbook of DomoaUo Selene* mid House- 
hold Art. Ellen H ftirhar«J.i T edited by Lucy 
L. W. WDaou 

How !o Make Baskets, Mary White 



Chicago. 

New York. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
New York or Chicago. 

Omaha. 

New York or Chicago. 

Omaha. 
New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

New York or Chicago. 

New York. 
Do. 

Chicago. 

Do. 
New York or Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
New York, 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

New York or Chicago. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
Do! 

New York. 
Do. 



Do. 



» Cloth. 

'"Good value edition." 

• Linen. 

4 Strongly wrapped for mail or express shipments in bundles. No lot of leas than 100 books in a single 
parcel tobe oaasdni boxes. 

• Linen edition; also contains Burroughs' Sharp Eyes and other papers. 

• School edW. ^^ * ^^ 

1 Lincoln's Lessons in Cooking out of print. In lieu thereof bids on Lincoln's Boston School Kitchen 
Text Book, school edition, 10.50. 



15936°— hit 1913— vol J 



-23 



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Google 



354 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical suj 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints , harness, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND 8UPPLIE8— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



3.. 
13. 
21. 

40. 



18. 
78. 



4.. 
22. 



19.. 
18.. 
22.. 
16.. 
18.. 



1.. 
3.. 
3.. 
7.. 
14. 
5.. 
2.. 
5.. 
5.. 
6.. 



3.. 
2.. 
3.. 
3.. 
4.. 
3.. 
5.. 
10. 
9.. 



10. 
15. 
29. 
9.. 



books for teachers— continued. 

Household Economy, Kitchen Garden Asso- 
ciation. 

Mind and Hand, Ham 

Needlework, School, Hapgood 

Primary Hand Work, graded course for first 
four years, W. 8eegm filer. 

Seat work and industrial occupations for pri- 
mary grades, Mary Oilman, Elizabeth B. 

Sewing Primer, Kirkwood 

School Sewing Practice, cloth with folders, 
Kirkwood. 

Sloyd 8ystem of Woodworking. Hoffman 

Primary Manual Work, first and second grades, 

Ledyard. 
King's Series in Woodwork and Carpentry, as 
follows: 

Elements of Woodwork 

Elements of Construction 

Constructive Carpentry 

Inside Finishing 

Handbook for Teachers 

Bush fruits, Card 

Farmstead. The. Roberts 

Fertility of the Land, Roberts 

Fertilisers, Voorhees 

Garden Making, Bailey 

How to Make School Gardens, Hemenway 

How to Keep Bees, Comstock 

Horticulturist's Rule Book. Bailey 

Irrigation and Drainage. King 

MUiand Its Products, Wing 

Nature Study and Life, Hodge 

Nature Study with Common Things, Carter. . . 

Nursery Book, The. Bailey 

Plant Breeding, Bailey 

Practical Garden Book, Hunn and Bailey 

Principles of Agriculture. Bailey 

Principles of Fruit Growing, Bailey 

Pruning Book, The, Bailey 

RurafWealtb and Welfare, Fairchild 

SoU, The, King 

Spraying of Plants, Lodeman 



PEDAGOGY. 



Basis of Practical Teaching, Bryan 

Choosing a Vocation, Parsons 

Everyday Problems in Teaching, O'Shea 

Administration of Public Education in the 
United States. Dutton and Snedden. 

Art of Study. The. Hinsdale 

Art of Teaching, The, White 

Among Country Schools, Kerns 

ChfldVThe, Tanner 

Common Sense Didactics, Sabin 

Great American Educators, Winship 

History of Education, Seeley 

How to Teach Reading, Arnold 

How to Study, McMurray., 



12 

7 

8 

4 

11 4AWW WDlUUViaVAUilUV 

23 In the Child's World, Poulsson 

5 

12 

3 

4 

8. 

5 

27 



Mind and its Education, The, Bett*.. . . 

Primary Methods, Hailman 

School Interests and Duties, King 

School Management, W hite 

Songs, Games, and Rhymes, Hailman . 
Teaching a District School, Dinsmore . , 
Vocational Education, Gillette 



8 
117 

4 

198 



8 
8 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 
205 
205 
198 
198 
198 
117 
4 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 
198 



297 
205 
205 

198 



4 

4 

264 

8 

8 

297 

4 

43 

4 

8 

8 

8 

43 

8 

8 



10.34 

1.00 
.40 
.80 

>.40 



.48 

.56 

.56 

.64 

.80 

1.12 

1.12 

1.12 

.94 

1.12 

.75 

.80 

.56 

1.12 

1.12 

1.20 

.47 

1.12 

.94 

.75 

1.00 

1.12 

1.12 

.94 

1.12 

.94 



»1.00 

.80 

1.10 

2 1.60 

.80 
.80 
1.09 
.93 
».80 
.40 
1.00 
'.80 
1.00 
1.50 
1.10 
.48 
.80 
.80 
.94 
.80 
.80 



New York or Chicago. 

Do. 
New York. 
Chicago. 

New York. 



New York or Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 
New York. 



New York or 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



New York. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

New York or Chi 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 
Chicago. ^ 

New York or Ch kJ^^ 

Do. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
New York. 
Chicago. 
New York or CI 

Do. 

Do. 
New York. 
New York or C! 

Do. 



i Cloth. 



1 New edition. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



355 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furnUure and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES^ Continued. 



A wwdi. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



54.. 
36.. 
43.. 
30.. 

19.. 
6... 
10.. 
9... 



11 
10 
44. 
55 
57. 
38 
28. 
18 
36. 
93 
197 square yards 



47.. 
05.. 



48 hundred.. 
70 hundred... 
53 hundred.. 
26 hundred.. 
15 hundred.. 
142 boxes 



1J837 boxes... 

254boxes 

11,900 

25 sets 

104, sets $100.. 
23 sets 



2... 

17.. 
5... 



2,244. 



12.. 
2... 
11.. 
1... 



pedagogy— continued. 

Riverside Educational Monographs, a8 follows: 
The Problem of Vocational Education, 



Education for Efficiency, Eliot. 

The Meaning of Infancy, Fiske 

Moral Principles in Education, Dewey 

Chancing Conceptions of Education, Cub- 
berly. 

Ethics for Young People, Everett 

Primer of Politeness, Gow 

What a Young Boy Ought to Know, Stall .... 
What a Young Man Ought to Know, Stall .... 
What a Young Girl Ought to Know, Allen. . . . 
What a Young Woman Ought to Know, Allen. 

Young Folks Book of Etiquette, Griffin 

Boy Scouts of America, H andbook 

Campflre Girls of America, Handbook 

Systematic Moral Education, Clark 

Free Gymnastics, Bets 

Light Gymnastics, Bete 

Gymnastics Stories and Plays, Stoneroad 

United States Infantry Regulations 

Blackboard cloth, slated 

Blackboard erasers 

Blackboard hyloplate, black, 3 by 5 

Bibles, medium size: 

Revised version 

King James version 

Book covers, as follows: 

No. 1 sise, for small arithmetics, spellers, etc 

No. 2 sise, for readers, grammars, etc 

No. 3 sise, for larger books, histories, etc.. . 

No. 4 sise, for primary geographies 

No. size, for advanced geographies 

Complete outfit of repairing material (for re- 
pairing schoolbooks, music, drawings, or any 
printed matter). 
Call bells. 



Crayons, chalk: 

White, dusUess 

Colored, assorted 

Composition books, for ink 

Eye cards, for illiterates 

Educational toy money 

Geometrical surfaces and solids for schoolroom 
use. 

Cabinet weights and measures 

Globes of the World, on stands, stationary 
meridian, as follows: 

18 inches in diameter 

12 indies in diameter 

8 inches in diameter, papier-mache' 

Individual file, binder and perforator, good 
quality. 

Kindergarten scissors, blunt points 

Maps, wall: 

Arizona 

California 

Hemispheres (outline) 

Idaho.rr. 



153 

153 
153 
153 
153 

4 

116 

4 

4 

4 

4 

116 

205 

205 

116 

09 

116 

205 

116 

99 

59 

98 

205 
205 

99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



106 



191 



i|0. 28 



1.28 
1.28 
1.28 



.43 

.60 
.665 
.665 



.35 
«.45 
1.22 

.95 

.60 

.70 

.56 

.50 

.2825 

.023 
1.05 

.27 



.94 
.94 
.94 
2.00 
2.80 
.15 



.11 



.1125 
.23 
.029 
.10 

.18 



7.75 



9.20 
3.436 
1.95 



.04* 



238 
238 
238 



«*1.60 
♦•1.00 
«'1.20 



New York, 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 

NewYork, 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
New York, 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
NewYork, 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago 

Do. 

Do. 

New York. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 

s°- 

Do. 
Do. 



Chicago, Omaha, San 
Francisco. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Da 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

No award. 

Chicago. 

No award. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 



i Strongly wrapped for mail or express shipments in bundles. No lot of less than 100 books in a tingle 
parcel to be cased in boxes. 

• Cloth. 
•Paper. 
« Maps mounted on plain rollers; $1 extra for mounting on spring roller c 

• Superior Series, 40 Dy 50 inches. 

• Unrivaled Series, 41 by 54 inches. 
'Standard Series, 32 by 44 inches. 



Digitized by 



Google 



356 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBYIOB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan, IS, 1913, for groceries t medical su pp lies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, tekher, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

SCHOOL BOOKS AND BUPPLIBS-Contmnod. 



Awards. 


_ 


No. 
of 

trac- 
tor. 


Unit 

pries. 


Point ol dfUvfrr. 


3.__ .„ 


feda □ oo ^.-continued. 

Maps, wall- Continued. 

Minnesota . 


333 
338 
238 

338 
238 

m 

304 

23ft 
364 

23S 
338 
23ft 
238 
238 
238 
204 
238 

m 
m 
m 

238 

238 

■J3s 
238 
338 
238 

338 

397 

338 

338 

338 
241 

98 
35 

m 
st 

Si 

go 

90 
90 
90 
99 

99 
99 
99 
99 


1 * 11.60 
» "3.00 
i * LOO 
■•3.00 

» • LOO 
l«MI 

'L00 
1 ILM 
[ "2,00 

« M.DQ 

i»1.30 
IU2.00 
IU2.00 
i*UM 
»"2.00 
■i»2.00 

.30 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.20 
.30 
.30 

.20 
.30 
,30 
.30 

.30 

.29 

.30 

3,50 

It 
.0335 

.185 
.17 
.03 

539 
.08 

.40 
,40 
.40 
.40 
40 

,40 
.40 
.40 
.40 


Chi- ago. 
Do. 


i.._„ 


Montana ,.,,.. . .,,....,,.........„.. . 


l ,_„. 


Nebraska. 


Do. 


j„. ..„ 


New Mexico 


Do, 


a 


North America (outline) 


Do. 


5 .... 


North Dakota. i« , . . , ,« , > f T ... ----- - ,11. . . , i 


Do. 


10 


Oklahoma 


Do, 


o....... 


Oregon... .................... . 


Do. 


13 


United Stales, Urge. ,..--.., „»* 


Do. 


3*. . ... 


United States outline. .............. ...... 


Do. 


5...., 


Washington..'. ,,„„,„.. . 


Do. 


■.„.._.„ ... 


Wisconsin . . 


Do. 


«„ 




Do, 


3 .... 


Alia.'., I ...*_.__._"""!*! 


Do. 


*„ .... 


Ante. 


Ho. 


1 „_.. 


Australia .. 


Do. 


4...... „*; 


South America. 


Do. 


73 pods.. ....... 


Individual outline maps, 9) by 111 inches (m 
pads of SO): 
North A merlca. .............. . . 


Oi. 


43pftch 

23 SS 

27 pads 

lfl p*dft. 


South America - , ........... 


Do. 


Europe. ., . 


Do, 


Australia ....._.....,.,. 


Do. 


Asb........ 


Do. 


if. pad*-- 

§7 pads 

ISpads.. ..... 

ISpidi... 

IS pods..... 


Africa ..,. 


Do. 


United Alain - 


Do. 


United States, sectional— 

Section 1 . New Kngland States ... 

Section 3, Middle Atlantic States 

Section 3. Eastern Central Slates... . . , 
Section 4. Southern Stales, eastern 

division. 
Section S. Central States, western di- 
vision- 
Section 8. Western Slates, southern 

division. 
Section 7, Western States, northern 
division 
Blackboard outline maps. United States, 78 

by Winches. 
New Testament , medium siae, re vised version. 
Pencil AharpenerB, lead. ........... 


Do. 
Do. 
Do, 


17 pads.. _.,.... 


Do* 


18 pads.. 

36 pads.......... 


Do. 
New York. 


42 pads....... i 

„,,,,. 


Chicago. 
Do. 


70 


Do. 


406 


Omaha. 


\38odo**n 


Pencil tablets, ft by 8 inches, loo leaves: 

Ruled. :.........! wimu 


Chicago. 


2,080 dozen..... 


Unruled ............... . ... 


Omaha. 


106poynds,.... 


Plaster ol Paris, in 5 or 10 pound cans 


Chicago. 


133,100 sneels... 


Practice paper, Spencertan (per loo sheets): 


Oinihd, 


lA6,6«Ubeets.,. 


Laree 


Do. 


39... ..... 

14 


Perry pictures, 32 by 18 Inches: 

Mi, An Old Monarch, Rosa Bonheur 

81<V A Kabrt, Scbreyer.,., 


Chicago. 
Do. 


32,. 


1063, tan 'I You Talk, Holmes 


Do. 


u ........ 


5*4, Cattle of Brittany, Rosa Bonheur 

1634, Calling the Ferry man , Rldpewav 
Knight. 

1131, Irving the- Hills, Farquhan»n 

3236, Madonna di San Slsto f Raphael 

1084, Race of the Roman Chariots, Cbeca, . 
302, Return to the Farm, Troyoo ..... 


Do. 


34 ...... 


Do, 


34 


Do. 


34.. .. 


Do, 


31... >.,_.. 

43. 


Do. 
Do. 



i Maps mounted on plain rollers; 11 extra for mounting on spring roller < 

• Superior Series, 40 by 50 inches. 

• Large scale map 44 by 56 inches 

• Superior Series, 50 by 40 inches. 

• Government post route, 31 by 38 inches. 

• Unrivaled Series. 41 bv M inches. 

I Mounted on cloth with molding at top and bottom. 

• Standard Series. 34 by 46 inches. 

• New School Series. 

»• Standard Series, 36 by 48 inches. 

II International, 52 by 48 inches. 



19 International, 44 by 56 Inches. 



Digitized by 



Google 



8UPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



357 



Comtrmds awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
eehoal boob and supplies, fwrntiure and isoodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc.— Continued. * 

SCHOOL BOOKB AND SUPPUES-Conttaued. 



— . 


ArtkJta* 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of ooMeory. 


14 


rapAQOQT— continued. 
Portrait*: 

Bryant. Wm. Culton ,...,., 


88 
88 
88 

90 
90 
90 
90 
90 
8 
191 


80.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.48 
1.20 


Gbioace. 


10 


Oarfteld . Jenm A 


Do. 


17 


Let, Roberts 


Do. 


48 


^THffi!". A braham. i .... i x. *mx ,„,, 


Do. 


48 


IrOiurieuW, Henry W. x , , ,..,... 


Do. 


40 


Waantngtoh. fteneral Qeorge 


Do. 


It 


Wetvttf Daniel 


Do. 


20 


Whittier John O 


Do. 


20 


Regleton, White's new common eshooL 

ffhfl"r~ wall. Mould L . ± 


Now York or Chioago. 
Chicago. ^^ 











KINDERGARTEN MATERIAL. 
[Listed from Bradley's Kindergarten Material Catalogue.] 



42 bone. 


(These or equal.) 
Pint rift 


C*. No. 
1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
5B 
6 

22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 

2000 

2008 

2151 
2151 
2151 
2151 
2161 
2151 

2151 
2151 
2151 
2161 
2161 
2151 

2151 
2151 
2151 
2151 
2151 
2151 

2144R 
21440 
21440 
2144B 
2M4D 


88 80. 

88 

43 

43 

43 

43 

43 

86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 

86 
86 

86 
86 
88 
86 
86 
86 

86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
86 

86 
86 
86 
86 
• 86 
86 

86 
88 
86 
86 

88 


75 
30 
15 
15 
30 
30 
30 

45 
45 

45 
45 

45 
45 

46 

76 

12 
30 

033 
033 
033 
033 
033 
033 

033 
033 

on 

033 
.033 
.033 

033 
.033 
.033 
.033 
.033 
.033 

.002 
.082 
.082 
.002 
.002 


Chicago. 
Do. 


28 bona*. 


Second rift 


57 bona*. 


third gDt 


New York. 


88 bona*. 


Fourth sift 


Do. 


59 bona. 


Fifth gift 


Do. 


32 bona. 


Fifth gift B 


Do. 


59 bona. 


JMxti» gift 


Do. 


27 bona. 


Seventh gift, ee follows: 
Tablets (wood) -- 


Chicago. 


It bone. 


B 


iE. 




C 


Do. 


T \\ \i lift 


D 


Do. 


T bn hi 


X 


Do. 


7 bom 


O 


Do. 


7 bone. 


H 


Do. 




K 


Do. 


97 bone. 


VABQUKTBT. 

Aeeortment No. 6A 


Cthksap. 


51 bone. 


do 


Do. 


Upeekngea 


CNe* 

R 


Do. 


ff p^w^. 


O 


Do. 


ff p^w^. 


Y 


Do. 


flfmtafrr 


O 


Do. 


ff^MM 


B 


Do. 


M ptpkigt. 


V 


Do. 


Hpr^r 


Bv T:. 


Do. 


tfTMftoilifr* 


O 


Do. 


4f p^w^. 


Y 


Do. 


^T^T^gfm 


O 


Do. 


4f p^v^. 


B 


Do. 


4f jrerrtnfrr 


V 


Do. 




Equilateral triangles: 


Do. 


f4 pt «v YfM 


O 


Do. 


2S packages 


Y 


Do. ' 


O 


Do. 


Vpacket**.... 

31 pafthagw 


B 


Do. 


V 


Do. 


89 packages 


PAPKB VOl STMNOmO. 
R 


Chicago. 


fft itetrbatrr 


O 


Do. 




O 


Do. 


ffjrairlraitr 


B 


Do. 




R. W. B. assorted 


Do. 



Digitized by 



Google 



358 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBRVIOS, 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, WIS, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies , furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, hornets, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



KINDERGARTEN MATERIAL— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of dsliTery. 



SEWING CABDS. 



Cards. 



1,846. 
1,499. 
2,018. 
1,688. 
862... 



241 packages. 
268 packages. 



106 dozen. 
71 dozen.. 
73 dozen.. 



207 packages. 
HI packages. 
361 packages. 
06 packages.. 
116 packages. 



62 packages. 
84 packages. 



218 packages. 
179 packages. 

135 packages. 
341 packages. 
74 packages.. 

48 packages.. 

89 packages.. 

87 packages.. 



870 pounds. , 



29A dozen. 
27A dozen. 

8A dozen.. 
17 dozen... 



63 packages.. 
15 packages.. 

14 packages.. 

7 boxes 



Sistuie, Madonna, plain rib- 
bon. 

Washington 

Lincoln 

Valentine 

Easter 

do 

Blank sewing cards: 

4by5J 

5by5 

8chute weaving cards: 

4-inch disk 

6-inch disk 

Bodkins for Schute weaving cards. 



R mats, 7 by 7, silts } by J, alter- 
natlng. 

O mats, 7 by 7, slits } by J, alter- 
nating. 

R, O, Y, O, B, V, 7 by 7, tints and 
shades and jjrays. 

R, O. Y, O, B, V, 4| by 4f, tints 
and shades and grays. 

R O, Y G, B, V, i by , slits, 
alternating. 

MBS. HAILMAN'S GRADED MATS. 



Cat. No. 
193-B-l 

193-E-9 

193-E-10 

193-E-14 

193-D^807 

193-D-816 



4 by 4, with 6 strips.. 
4 by 4, with 10 strips. 



PAPER CUTTING. 



Squares, 4 by 4, white 

Squares, 4 by 4, red, tints, and 
shades. 

Squares, 4 by 4, orange 

Squares, 4 by 4, assorted colors. . . 

Equi. Tri., 4 by 4, coated, assort- 
ment A. 

Equi. tri., 4 by 4, green, tints, and 
shades. 

Circles, 4 by 4, ooated, assortment 
A. 

Circles, 4 by 4, red, tints, and 
shades. 

CLAY MODELING. 

New process clay flour (5 pounds 

in a box). 
Modeling tools: 

Figure I 

Figure 2 

Modeling boards: 

No. 1,7 by 9 

No.2,9by 12 



RINGS FOR RINO LAYING. 

500 rings, gummed: 

1-inch, in 6 shades and colors. . 
l£-inch, 6 colors, tints and 

shades. 
2-inch. 6 colors, tints and 
shades. 
Soldered rings, l y 1J, and 2 inch.., 



1029-R 

1029-O 

1080 

1110 

1140 



1201 
1205 



209 
211-R 

211-0 
211-H 
212-X 

212-G 

213-X 

213-R 



457 



454 

454 



455 
455 



112 



110 



43 

43 
43 
43 
43 
43 

205 
205 

43 
43 
43 



86 



86 



43 



1 White or gray, 100 in package. 



10.0075 

.0075 
.0075 
.0075 
.0075 
.0075 

1.20 
'.20 

.1125 
.1875 
.12 



.10 

.10 
.10 
.075 
.075 



.1875 
.1875 



.05 
.125 

.125 
.125 
.19 

.19 

.19 

.19 



.1875 
.1875 



.95 
1.125 



.30 
.30 



.30 
.49 



New York. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

New York. 

Do. 



Da 
Da 



Chicago. 
Do. 

Da 
Da 
Do. 

Da 

Da 

Da 



Da 



New York. 
Da 



Chicago. 
NewYoi 



ork. 



Da 
Da 

Da 

Da 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOB. 



859 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

KINDERGARTEN MATERIAL-Cantimied. 



Awards. 



Ankle*. 



No. 
of 

OOQ- 

tr*o 



Cult 



Polm of deli very. 



lOObOXSS.. 
529 skeins. 



ERPHTR AND STCLEATEEN. 



175 papers. 
46^ dozen 
24JV<loun 
11A dosen 
62 gross... 

12 

149 

92 

884 Beta... 
356 tats... 
10* 

84 

filaets.... 

44 sets 

24A dozen 
151 boxes. 
10 sets.... 

61 

46 

IS 



68 packages. 
25 packages. 
40 packages. 
42 packages. 
67 packages. 
« packages. 
61 packages. 



17 M 

43 If 

45 M 

60M 

143 hundred 
140 hundred 



»M.... 
»M.... 

48 boxes 

16 



Assorted colors, sflkateen 

Bplit sephyr, of R, O, Y f O, B, V, 

black, white, light-brown, gray 

1, and gray 2. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Needles, Nos. 18, 20, 23, and 25. . . . 
Needles, perforating, medium . . . . 

Nml to, perforating, coarse 

Pricking cosh ions 

Hook?, to subtend drawings, etc.. 
Sti nl lo paper * ltters.KMnch blade. 

Yani>tk<k5 

Ed ucatioual clock dial. 12-inch . . . . 

Sec l Inns) animals (in box) 

8eotional birds (m box) 

Dissected map of United States, 

15 by 22. in wood. 
Numerical frame. No. 1, 12 wires, 

6 oolors of beads. 
Ludington's picture problems: 

Parti.... .. , 

Part2 

Primary peg boards, square form . . 

Round pegs, 6 colors 

Dushane's figure cards 



an. m. 

195A 
197 



199 
171 

171A 
173 
37 

4259 



BOOKS. 

Kindergarten Chimes, Kate Dong- 
las W&in. 
Songs ana Games for Little Ones, 
Harriet 8. Jenks and Gertrude 
Walker. 

Finger Plays, Emilia Poulson 

Bradley's tinted drawing, con- 
struction, and mounting papers, 
12 by 18, m packages of 50 sheets, 
as follows: 

No. 1, light brown 

No. 4, gray blue I 

No. 7, fight gray 

No. 8' blue..... 

No. 12, green 

No. 14, red « 

No. 20, gray 



STRAWS AND 8TRINQDXG. 



Straws, 1 inch long, waxed . . 
Straws, f inch long, 6 colors. 

GUMMED PAPER DOTS. 



Squares, in envelope, 6 colors. 
( ftcles, in envelope, 6 colors. . 

Silver stars 

United States flag 



STICKS. 



5 inches, plain sticks 

3 inches, plain sticks 

Six colors, from 1 to 6 inches in 

length. 
Round shoe laces, black 



4193 
4194 
4264 



463B 
463C 



459 
459A 
459C 
459E 



90 
92 
103 

471 



205 
205 



86 

43 

86 

205 

86 

99 

99 

206 

206 

205 

43 

206 



43 

43 

205 



206 
43 

206 



86 

86 

206 

43 



0.45 
.075 



.05 
.26 
.35 
.95 
.24 
1.25 
.0375 
.175 
.07 
.07 
.375 



.1125 
.1125 
1.10 
.16 
.1875 



».90 
1.125 

.84 



.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 



.1875 



.112 
.116 
.06 
.075 



.16 

.1125 

.5625 



New York. 
Da 



Chicago. 

NewYork. 

Chicago. 

NewYork. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 
NewYork. 

Do. 

Da 

Da 

Da 



Da 

Do. 

Da 
Chicago. 
NewYork 



Da 
Da 

Da 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Da 
Da 
Da 

• Da 
Da 



NewYork. 
Da 



Chicago. 

I>a 
New York. 

Da 



1 12 spools In box, assorted. 



Da 
Da 
Da 



86 .05 Chicago. 
•Boards. 



Digitized by 



Google 



860 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school hoohs and supplies, furnUure and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 



KINDERGARTEN MATERIAL-^Continoed. 



Awards. 


Articles. 




No. 
of 

con* 
trac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery 


92 packages.... 

38 packages 

66 packages — 

490 


PAPER STRIPS FOR LACING. 

1 inch wide, 6 colors 


Oat. No. 
430A 
431A 
434A 

305 

413 
411 

422 
425 
424 

134 

136A 

76 


206 
205 
206 

206 

205 
43 

86 
43 
43 

99 
99 

99 


$0.06 
.11 
.11 

.03, 

.18 
.1126 

.08 
.15 
.225 

.10 
.10 

.06 


New York. 


1 inch wide, 6 colors. *_....**..*. ^ 


Da 


4 inch widej R, W, B 


Da 


WEAVING NEEDLES. 

Weaving needles, Ball's patent. . . 

DISCONNECTED SLATS. 

Slats, 10 inches long, 6 colors 

Slats, 10 inches long, plain 

JOINTED SLATS. 

Of 8 links 


Da 


41 hnndxed 

12 bandied 

33 sets 


Da 
Do. 

Chicago. 
New fork. 


82 sets 


Of 10 links, extra heavy 


10 sets 


Of 16 links^ extra heavy 


Do. 


66 packages 

61 packages.... 

331 packages... 


RULED DRAWING PAPER. 

25 sheets, 17 hy 22, i-tnch squares. . 
25 sheets, 17 hy 22, 1-inch squares. . 

UNRULED MOUNTING SHEETS. 

12 leaves, 7 hy 7, white hristol .... 


Chfeaga 
Da 

Do. 



FURNITURE AND WOODENWARE. 



1,081 

70 

172 

173 

138 

671 

69 

94 

1,274 dozen. 

187 dozen... 

881 dosen... 

160 dozen... 
136 dozen... 
48 dozen.... 
827 

30 

172 

23 

118 dozen. 

147 

36.. 

123. 
18.. 



Baskets: 

Clothes, whole willow, large 

Measuring, rattan or galvanized iron— 

i-busheL 

L-busheL. 

Bedsteads, iron, double, 6 feet 4 inches long 

inside and 4 feet wide. 
Bedsteads, iron, single: 

Height from floor 27 inches 

Height from floor 17 inches 

Bowls, wooden, chopping, round, packed in 
cases: 

14-inch 

17-lnch 

Brooms: 

Household, 6-sewed, to weigh not less than 
27 pounds per dozen. 

Whisk .\T. 

Brushes: 

Scrub. 6-row, 10-inch, Tamplco :.. 

Shoe, horsehair. — 

Dauber 

Polishing. 

Stove, 5-row, 10-inch 

Floor, 16-inch, all bristle or horsehair, hard- 
wood, reversible block, screw handle. 

Buckets, well, oak, extra strong 

Bureaus, with glass, with dovetailed drawers 

and brass handles. 
Chairs: 

Typewriter, oak 

Solid oak, long post 

Wood, bow back, 4 spindles to back 

Wood, office, bow back and back set arms, 
revolving and tilting, with casters. 

C h i ff oniers, oak, without glass. 

Churns, barrel, revolving, to churn 5 gallons. . . 

* Awarded 660 dozen only. 



268 


30.75 


298 
298 
362 


.22 
32| 

5.20 


318 
318 


3.77 
3.77 


191 
191 


.15 
.29 


/240 

\307 

203 


12.80 

'2.00 

1.34 


298 


.831 


298 
191 
298 
191 


.55 
1.26 
.71 
.65 


191 
133 


.29 
6.28 


362 

362 

28 

98 


3.96 
12.36 
7.75 
3.59 


133 
268 


6.03 
2.65 



Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 
F. o. b. fsotory at K*- 



St Louis. 
Da 



Cbioaga 
Da 

Omaha. 
Da 
New York, 

8t Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St Louis. 
Cbioaga 



Da 



St. 



Omaha. 

Do. 

Da 
Cbioaga 

St Look. 
Omaha. 



•Awarded 624 dozen. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THB INMAH SEBVICB. 



S61 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books [and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

FURNITURE AND WOODENWARE— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



142 

eOjSQOfeet 

MB grass.. 

S 

21 

2D 

• 

M 

MM 

MB. 

Ill 

ia. 

48 

f 

S 

IS 



Clocks, 8-day, pendulum or spring lever 

Clotheslines, galvanised wire, No. 18, hollow 
center, in lengths of 100 feet, per 100 feet. 

Clothespins, spring 

Desks, office, medium size and quality 

Desks, teachers', medium sise and quality 

Desks, school, with seats, double: No. 3, for 
scholars 13 to 15 years old. 



Desks, school, back seats for, double, No. 3. 
Desks, school, with seats, single: 

No. 1, for scholars 18 to 21 years old.... 

No. 2, for scholars 15 to 18 years old ... . 

No. 3, for scholars 13 to 15 years old ... . 

No. 4, for scholars 11 to 13 years old ... . 

No. 5, for scholars 8 to 11 years old 

No. 0, for scholars 5 to 7 years old 

Desks, school, back seats for, single: 

No.l 

No. 2. '. 

No. a. 

No. 4 

No. 5 



26S 
191 



251 



251 



261 



251 



251 



251 



251 



251 



261 



261 



251 



261 



251 



82.23 



.28 
13.00 
0.50 
2.14 
2.74 
2.48 
3.64 
2.29 
1.70 
2.34 
1.94 
2.20 
1.89 

1.74 
2.17 
1.94 
3.35 
1.84 
1.74 
2.17 
1.94 
3.35 
1.84 
1.64 
2.00 
1.81 
2.99 
1.74 
1.64 
2.00 
1.81 
2.99 
1.74 
1.54 
1.83 
1.68 
2.68 
1.64 
1.54 
1.83 
1.68 
2.68 
1.64 

1.39 
1.79 
1.59 
2.99 
1.54 
1.39 
1.79 
1.59 
2.99 
1.54 
1.34 
1.74 
1.54 
2.94 
1.49 
1.34 
1.74 
1.54 
2.94 
1.49 
1.24 
1.64 
1.44 
2.84 
1.39 



St. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Bt Louis. 

Omaha. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
San Francisco. 



J, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

M anchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

8t. Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St Louis. 

San Francisoo. 

Chicago. 

Manchester,! 

Omaha. 

St. Louis. 

San Francisoo. 

Chicago. 



,Ind. 



Digitized by 



Google 



362 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for gro?*ries, medical suv 
school booh and s applies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, U 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

FURNITURE AND WOODENWARE-Contmned. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



30., 



139 dozen.. 
106 , 



6.... 
306.. 



821... 
1,843. 



14... 
88... 

448.. 



213 
84.. 



2,835 pounds.. 
5,037 pounds.. 

4.115 pounds.. 



4,665 pounds. 
6,512 pounds. 



970 pounds. . . 
1,418 pounds. 

179dosen 

50 



624.. 
442. 
100. 



91. 
4.. 



2.... 
19... 
8.... 
130.. 



Desks, school, single, adjustable: 
Large 



Small. 



Dusters, counter, bristle or horsehair 

Machines, sewing: 

" Family," with cover and accessories 

Tailor's, with attachments 

Mats, door, steel, sise 18 by 30 inches 

Mattresses: 

Double, 76 inches long, 48 inches wide, 

with a boxing of 4ft inches. 
Single, 76 inches long, 30 Inches wide, with 
a boxing of 4f Inches 
Measures, wood, iron-bound, or all iron, gal- 
vanised, cased: 



, glass to measure not less than 



el pte 
15 by 



18 



Mopsticks, extra heavy 

Fails, oak, three Iron hoops, heavy, stable pat- 
tern. 

Pillows, 20 by 30 inches, 3 pounds each 

Rollins-pins, 12 by 2| inches, exclusive of 

h ftnnV- 

Rope, manila, subject to actual tare: 

>inch 

finch 



t-lneh. 
f-inch. 



1-inoh.. 



It-inch 

Sash cord, braided cotton, i-inch 

8tools, wood, all-wood seat, height 18 Inches. . . 

Tables, typewriter (not desks) 

Washboards, double, sine: 

Family sise, 10 by ll f Inches 

Laundry sise, 14* by 13 inches 

Washstands, wood, large drawer and closet 
with two small drawers at the side, without 

Washing machines (for clothes), extra heavy. . 

Washing machines (for dishes) 

Washtubs, wood, inside not painted: 

20} inches in diameter by 9} inches deep, 

inside measurement 
23 inches in diameter by 104 Inches deep, 

inside measurement 
25 inches in diameter by Hi inches deep, 
inside measurement 
Wringers, clothes, wood frame, rolls 12 by 1| 
Inches. 



261 



251 



261 

203 

186 

185 
191 

86 



266 
265 
215 



324 

191 



98 
191 



340 
340 



254 



254 



254 

340 

265 

28 

362 

96 
96 
133 



191 



191 
191 
191 
98 



82.50 
2.96 
2.75 
4.20 
2.65 
2.85 
2.80 
2.60 
4.06 
2.50 
2.20 
2.65 
2.46 
3.90 
2.35 
2.24 

13.76 

18.50 
.50 

2.74 

2.39 



.17 
.20 
.87 



M.35 



1.125 
.07 



.125 
.126 
.106 
.107 
.109 
.106 
.107 
.109 
.106 
.107 
.109 
.126 
.21 
6.96 
3.15 



.185 
2.96 



6.10 



.60 

.66 

.80 

2.34 



Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St Louis. 

San Frandsoo. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St Louie. 

8an Franolsoo. 

Chicago. 

Manchester, Ind. 

Omaha. 

St Louis. 

San Francisco. 

Chicago. 

NewYork. 

Omaha, Chicago, 8t 



Do. 
Chicago. 

Omaha. 

Do. 



St Louis. 

Do. 
Omaha. 



Chicago. 
Da 

Do. 
Do. 



San Francisco. 

Do. 
Peoria, m. 
St, Louis. 
Omaha. 
Peoria, 111. 
St Louis. 
Omaha. 
Peoria, 111. 
St Louis. 
Omaha. 
San Francisco. 
St Louis 
Omaha. 

Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
St Louis. 



Chicago. 
No award. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



i Any quantity of 12 dosen or more. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



863. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school booh and supplies , furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

HARNESS, LEATHER, 8HOE FINDINGS, SADDLERY, ETC. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 






of 
con* 

trac- 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


tor. 






265 


10.40 


St Louis. 


191 


.21 


Chicago. 


139 


1.15 


Omaha. 


139 


.07 


Do. 


191 


.03| 


Chicago. 


139 


.16 


Omaha. 


191 


2.70 


Chicago. 


191 


3.28 


Da 


191 


.48 


Da 


191 


.47 


Do. 


98 


.03 


Do. 


98 


.041 


Do. 


135 


1.37 


New York, Chicago, 
St Louis, Omaha. 


255 


1.24 


Da 


258 


.39 


Omaha. 


135 


.38 


New York, St. Louis, 
Chicago, Omaha. 


191 


.63 


Chicago. 


1 196 


.66 


Omaha. 


i 196 


.88 


Da 


U96 


1.03 


Da 


U96 


1.29 


Da 

No award. 


191 


1.29 


Chicago. 


191 


.87 


Da 


191 


.44 


Do. 


191 


.53 


Da 


191 


.62 


Da 


191 


.70 


Da 


191 


1.00 


Do. 


191 


1.29 


Da 


191 


1.55 


Da 


191 


1.80 


Da 


191 


.31 


Da 


191 


.33 


Da 


191 


.77 


Da 


191 


.88 


Do. 


191 


1.00 


Da 


191 


1.36 


Da 


191 


.75 


Da 


191 


.16 


Da 


191 


.19 


Da 


191 


.115 


Da 

No award. 



Awl hafts, patent: 

KGt- ' 

Harness, white, common 

Shoemaker's 

Awls, assorted: 

patent, pegging , 

Regular, harness, sewing 

Patent, sewing, regular, shoemaker's , 

Awls, with riveted handles: 

Round, pad, shouldered 

Saddler's collar 

Bits, loose ring, X C, 2f inch, heavy mouth- 
piece: 

Jointed 

Stiff 

Blacking, shoe 

Paste polish, black, for shoes 

Blanket, horse 

Bridles, riding, russet leather 

Brooms, stable, with handles 

Brushes, horse, leather backs 

Buckles, Texas, breast strap, buckle snaps and 

buckles, malleable iron, X C, lfinch. 
Buckles, bar rein, with rolkr, malleable iron, 
XC: 

f-inch 

finch 

finch 

1-inch 

Buckles, harness, sensible, English wire, XC: 

finch 

finch 

finch 

finch 

1-inch 

lfinch 

If inch 

Buckles, roller, girth, malleable iron, XC, lf 

inch. 
Buckles, roller, harness, malleable iron, XC: 

finch 

finch 

finch , 

finch 

1-inch 

lfinch 

lfinch , 

lfinch 

2-inch 

Buckles, roller, trace, XC: 

lfinch 

lfinch 

Buckles, trace, 3-loop, Champion, XC: 

lfinch 

lfinch 

lfinch 

2-inch 

Cement leather, 2-ounce bottles, best quality, 
clarified. 

Cmchas, 3-mfih 

CUps: 

Hame, team, japanned, finch, 2 holes 

Trace, polished. 4f inch, malleable Iron. . . . 
Cockeyes, screw, with roller, XC: 

lfinch 

lfinch 

lfjnch 

i Only. 



Digitized by 



Google 



364 



8TJTPLIE8 FOB THE INDIAN SBKVXOX. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, tsuhsr, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

HARNR88, LEATHER, SHOE FINDINGS, SADDLERY, ETC. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of demvary. 



40 

340 

120 pounds 
334 pairs.. 



141a 



94 sets 

985 sets.... 

8A dozen. 

A down.. 
1 dozen... 
Iff dosen. 
46 dosen.. 

2 

8dosen... 
4 



118 pounds... 

116 pounds. . . 
301 pounds... 

6,076 pounds. 



66 pounds. 
163sides. . 



3,566 pounds.. 
15,010 pounds. 
68/do>cn\ 
""Apapers/*-*- 

68 pounds 



8 pounds., 
8 pounds., 



98 pounds.. 
100 pounds. 
300 pounds. 
171 pounds. 
644 pounds. 
160 pounds 4 . 
442 pounds. 
102 pounds. 
159 pounds. 

202 gallons.. 
SO gallons... 



Collars: 
Hoi 

17 to 19 inches, by half Inch 

194 to 21 inches 

211 to 24 inches.. 

Mnle, 15 to 161 inches, by half inch 

Currycombs, steel, riveted shank, closed back, 

8 bars. 
Halters, all leather, 6-ring, sewed, complete, 
withiiestrap. 

Hair, gray goat 

Hames, No. 6, Concord, sixes 18 to 22 inches, 
wood, high top, solid steel backs, 1-inch hole, 
holdback plates and trimmings, Damascus 
finish. 
Harness: 

Double, complete, with breeching, Con- 
cord hames. 



breeching. 



Double, complete, without 
Concord hames. 

Plow, double, with backbond, hip straps, 
and collars, Concord names. 
Hooks, name, double repair, weight 4 pounds . 
Knives: 

Draw, gauge, brass, improved 

Head, 4Hnch. oval handle 

Round, 6Hncn, oval handle 

Shoe, square point, paring, 4-inch blade . . . 

Splitting, 10-inch, iron frame 

Straight, harness maker's, white handle. . . 

Layer creasers, octagon, Nos. 0, 1,2,3,4,5 

Leather: 

Dongola kid, full-size skins — 

Dull 



242 
242 

242 
242 
191 

265 

868 
255 



P295 
*U2 



l«137 
242 



255 



82.10 
2.30 
2.40 
2.05 



1.43 



.07 
.479 



24.00 
27.75 
31.79 

22.50 
25.93 

15.74 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Chicago, St, Loufc F Now 
Yo^ Omaha. 

Chicago, New York, St. 



Arlington, OaL 
Genoa, Note. 

Lawrence, Kans. 



Chicago, New York, 8*. 

Louis, Onr^ ^ 
No award. 



191 
368 

191 
191 
191 
191 



16.56 
7.00 

13.20 
.50 
4.65 
1.75 



Glased 

Calfskin, to run 1J to 2f pounds per side, 

medium thickness. 
Harness, oak-tanned, heads on (15 to 23 
pounds per side). 

Kip (about 5-pound sides) 

Lace, Indian tanned, to run from 14 to 20 

square feet per side, per square foot. 
Sole (18 to 25 pounds per side)— 

Hemlock 

Oak 



Needles, harness, egg eye, assorted, 4, 5, and 6. 

Nails, saddle, Hungarian, tinned: 

|-inch 



fr-inch 

|-inch 

Nails, shoe, wire, clinching: 

Site 3-8 

Siie3i-« 

8iz«4-8 

Site 44-8 

Sire 5-8 

Site5*-8 

Siteft-S , 

8itc6*-8 

Site 7-8 

Oil, ncat's-foot: 

In 1-gallon cans 

In 5-gallon cans , 



146 



266 
45 



45 



45 
•266 



•366 

105 

191 



135 

135 
135 

298 
298 
298 
298 

298 

298 



298 



1.25 



1.70 
1.35 



1.06 
.26 



.31 
.40 



.25 

.25 
.25 

.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 
.08 

.73 
.68 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

No award. 



New York, Chicago, 

Louis. 
Chicago. 
Springfield, Ohio. 



Da 

Da 
Chicago. 



San Francisco. 
Omaha. 

Chicago. 



New York, 
Louis, Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 

St. Loins. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 
Do. 

SanFrandsca 
Do. 



1 Awarded 15 sets only without collars. 
* Awarded 25 sets, without collars. 
1 Awarded 66 sets. 



« Awarded 35 sets without collars. 

• Clear of brands. 

• Sample of oak sole leather awarded to fill this I 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVICS. 



865 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
sdsool books and supplies, furniture ana woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, tesmsr, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

HARNESS, LEATHER, SHOE FINDINGS, SADDLERY, ETC.-Continued. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



3 

at 

43 pounds 
72 pounds. 

3D 
£6 

38 

IS 

36 

at 

33 down., 
70 down. 

37 
46 

49. 

ai... 
ioa 

8 

10 down 
10 down 

r 

2 
«M? 

18 

86 pairs.... 

7 

28 

61 

2 down.... 
ldown.... 

00 pounds.. 
121 pounds. 
200 pounds. 

114 bandies 

152 bundles 
106 bundles 

190 bundles 
304 bundles 
166 bandies 

4 
2 



Ornaments, nickel, 1-inch. 
Pad screws, 1-inch, XC. 



Rwpe, peg (or peg break) . 
Rivets, name, Norway, malleable: 



101 
191 



81.05 
.70 



finch. 
Mi 



•inch. 
Rings, halter, loop, Japanned: 

1-inch loop 

lfinchloop 

Rings, harness, malleable, XC: 

finch 

finch 

1-inch 

If Inch, heavy 

Rings, breeching, malleable, XC: 

If Inch 

It-inch 

Rosettes, nickel-plated solid back and loop 
construction: 

lfinch 

2-inch 

Rules, 8-Joot, straight, boxwood 



Saddles, riding, with horn, either "o 

or "privates 7 / 1 as may be called lor. 

Sheepskins, lor shoe linings, medium 



officers'" 

weight, 
_ and russet. 
i, breast strap and snaps combined, ja- 



il-inch 

lfinch 

2-inch 

Snaps, harness, square loop, aluminum-steel 

8I f5&i XC: 

ISch!!!!!!!*!;!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

l-mch 

lfinch 

lfinch 

Spots, silvered, finch 

Squares, hip strap, XC. finch 

Staples, name, with burrs, polished, extra 

long head, 1| inches wide at shoulder. 
Stands, iron, counter, regular, 4 lasts, 23 inches 

high. 
Stirrups, solid bent wood, width of tread 5 



Stitching horses, 5-inch jaws 

Stones, sand, per pound 

Surcingles, 3) inches wide. 6 feet 9 inches long. 
Swivels, gag, XC, to buckle: 

finch buckle 

finch buckle 

Tacks, shoe: 

1-ounce 



191 
101 

1196 
1106 

101 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 



191 
191 
135 

} 255 
} 266 

368 
368 
368 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 

191 

101 
191 



.055 
.065 

.115 
.135 

.025 
.03 
.035 
.0475 

.065 
.0725 



.09 
.15 
.20 



P16.21 
1113.22 
f 4 9.00 
l»9.80 



1.20 
1.30 
1.45 



1.80 

1.80 

1.80 

3.15 

3.30 

.07 

.10 

.11 



Chicago. 
Do. 
No award. 

Chicago. . 
Do. 

Omaha. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
New York, St. Louis, 
Chicago, or Omaha, 
hicago, New York, St 
Louis, or Omaha. 



Ichlcago. 



3-ounce 

Taps, heel, in bundles of 1 dosen pairs: 
8mallsiw 



101 
191 

245 
245 
245 



.58 



2.30 
.033 
.20 

.14 
.15 

.08 
.06 
.05 



Medium sise 

Large sise 

Taps, sole, in bundles of 1 dosen pairs: 

Small sise 

Medium sise 

Large six© 

Tenets, band, XC: 

If inch 

If inch 



191 
191 



»Only. 

* Accepted tor officer's saddle. 

• Accepted tor private's saddle. 



.28 
.20 

•Pink. 



Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Omaha. 

Chicago. 
Do. 

San Francisco. 
Do. 
Do. 

No award. 

pendix. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago. 
Do. 



See an- 



Digitized by 



Google 



366 



SUPPLIES FOR THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and mpplies,furniturt and woodemsore, glass, Oils, p ai nts , harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

HARNESS, LEATHER, SHOE FINDINGS, SADDLERY. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



40 pounds 

35 pounds 

99 pounds...... 

TAdos. spools.. 
27A dos. spools. 
15rV dos. spools. 
33 

3dosen 

16ft dozen 

2,946 balls 

1,930 balls 

5 

10W dos- pairs. 



Thread: 

Harness, No. 3, Mack 

Shoe, white— 

No.3 

No. 10 

Linen, black, machine- 
No. 18 

No. 40 

No. 50 

Tools, claw, with riveted handle 

Trace carriers, XC: 

li-inch 

li-inch 

Wax, small ball, per 100 balls, summer and 
winter temperatures: 

Saddler's, black 

Shoemaker's, brown 

Wheels, overstitch, stationary, with octagon 
carriage; 0, 7, 8, 10, 13. and 14 stitches to the 
inch, as may be called for. 
Winkers, f-fnoh, sensible, 3 seams, patent 
leather, 6f inch cheek. 



191 

191 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 

191 



191 
191 
191 



$1.05 

.93 
.85 

1.70 

3.67 

3.10 

.34 

.34 
.43 



Chicago. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 



Chicago. 
Do. 
Da 



No award, 
pendix 



8ee ap- 



AQRICULTURE IMPLEMENTS, ETC. 



77 

678 down.. 

803 

3,900 

73 

20 

89 

1 

108 

17 

53 

67dosen.... 

47 dozen.... 

12 dozen.... 

64 dozen.... 
30A dozen. 

17ft dozen. 

69 dozen.... 
17A dozen. 

13 dozen.... 
13ft dozen.. 

73 

16 

3 

4 



Augers, post-hole. 9-inoh 

Axle grease (3 dozen boxes in case), with 

maker's name. 
Bags, grain: 

seamless, 3f>bushel, not less than 13 
pounds per dozen. 

Burlap, 12-ounoe 

Bush hooks, handled 

Corn planters, hand 

Corn shellers, hand, medium size 

Cradles, grain, 4-flnger, with scythes 

Cultivators: 

1-horae, iron frame, 5 blades, with wheel... 



Riding, 2-horse.. 



Diggers, post-hole, steel blade, iron handle, or 
2 sW blades with 2 — -' ' - 



Forks: 
Ha; 



I wooden handles. 



o. s., 4 oval tines, strapped ferrule, 
- m Dot handles. 
Manure, c. s., 5 oval tines, strapped fer- 
rule- 
Long handles. ... 

Short D handles 

Handles: 

Hayfork, without ferrule, 51-foot 

Plow, left-hand, straight, 1| by 2| inches 

by 5 feet. 
Plow, right-hand, double bend, for mold- 
board, If by 2| Inches by 5 feet. 
Shovel- 
Long 

Short, D 

Spade, D 

Spade, long 

Harrows: 

60 teeth, \ by 8 inches, steel, with draw- 
bar and clevises. 

Disk- 
S-horse, eight 16-inch disks, complete. . 

3-horse, twelve 16-inch disks, oomplete. 
4-horse, fourteen 16-inch disks, oom- 
plete. 



331 



331 
191 



188 
191 



48 
383 



191 



191 
191 



365 



398 
365 
396 



48 



282 



177 
274 



90.46 



.31 

.0925 

.50 

.55 
6.33 
3.17 

3.90 



17.75 
.70 

3.83 



5.90 
6.33 



1.45 
1.65 



1.95 



1.30 
1.50 
1.50 
1.15 

7.00 



11.00 



15.32 
17.53 



St. Louis. 

No award. (8ee Ap- 
pendix.) 

Omaha. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
Omaha. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

St. 

JLensas v^»* w . vi 
ha. Minneapolis. 

Omaha, Kansas City, 
Minneapolis. 

St. Louis. 



Louis, Chicago, 
uu** City, Om*- 



Chioago. 



Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 
Do. 

Da 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Chicago, St. Louis, 
Minneapolis, Omaha. 
Kansas City. 

Omaha, Kansas City. 

Minneapolis. 
Omaha. 
Da 



Digitized by VjOOQLC 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 



367 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

AGRICULTURE IMPLEMENTS, ETC. -Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delirery. 



80 dozen 

3«A dozen.. 

1&A dozen.. 

l dozen... 



&. 



16 
Mi.. 



38.. 

40.. 

6... 
6... 



37a dozen.. 



». 



72.. 
3TJ7. 



xoil 

5?:: 
it: 



Hoes: 

Garden, solid socket, c. s. t 6}-inch 

Solid forged steel, planter's eye, 74-inch, 
No. 1, with handle. 

Grab, c. 8., oval eye, No. 2 

Knives: 

Corn, c. s., three rivets 

Hay 

Mowers, lawn, hand, 14-inch, hall-bearing 

Machines, mowing (singletrees, doubletrees, 
and neck yoke complete, with 2 dozen extra 
sections): 



44-foot cut.. 
Moot cut... 
Moot cut... 



Machines, harvester and self-binder 6-foot cut, 

complete, with transports. 

Mattocks, ax, c. s., long cutter 

Picks, earth, steel-pointed, assorted, 5 to 6 

pounds. 
Plows with extra share: 



8-inch, c. s., 1 -horse.. 
C. s. f 2-horse— 

10-inch 



12-inch. 
14-inch. 



Plows, "Breaker," with rolling or standing 
coulter, gauge wheel, and extra share: 

12-inch 

14-inch 

Plows, shovel: 



Double.. 



Single.. 



101 
296 

298 

265 
258 
191 



186 

1 
186 

1 
186 

1 
186 

1 
134 
298 



282 

282 
282 
282 

282 
282 

78 
78 



S3. 15 
2.90 

2.45 

1.36 

.37 

2.85 



"33.52 

'29.00 
"33.52 

•29.00 
•736.31 

•30.00 
"98.22 

•87.50 

3.24 

.23 




Plow beams: 

For 8-lnch plow, 5 feet long 

For 10-inch plow, 5} feet long 

For 12-inch plow, 6 feet long 

For 14-inch plow, 6} feet long 

For 12-lnch ''breaker" plow, 64 feet long. 

For 14-inch "breaker" plow, 7 feet long.. 
Rakes, as follows: 

Hay. sulky, 8-foot, hand-dump— 

If 20 teeth 

If 26 teeth 



"8.75 
"9.30 

"1.84 

"1.92 

"1.77 

"1.89 



1 
186 



U12.50 
"13.48 



Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
Chicago. 



Do, 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Omaha, Kansas City, 
r or Minneapolis. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

Moline, 111. 

) Omaha, Kansas City, 
Chicago. St. Louto, 
Minneapolis. 
Moline,m 

{Omaha, Kansas City, 
Chicago. St. Louto, 
Minneapolis. 



No award. 



Chicago. 
Do. 



i Option of following: New Osborne, 4} and 5 foot cut, regular lift; McCormick, 41 and 5 foot cut, regular 
*\Ut; Deering, New Ideal, 4} and 5 foot cut, regular lift; Champion, improved, 4£ and 5 foot cut, regular lift; 
^K*]»no, 44 and 5 foot out, regular lift; Milwaukee, 4J and 5 foot cut , regular lift. 

« Awarded 12. 

•Awarded 16. 

• Awarded 33. 

• Awarded 7. 

• Option of following: Milwaukee; 
Xdeal, giant: Champion. 

'Awarded 2. 

• Awarded 4. 

• Option of following: Champion, 
^fflwankee No. 10; Osborne; Piano. 



Piano, big frame; Osborne; McCormick, New Big 4; Deering, New 



improved binder; Deering, New Ideal grain binder; McCormick; 



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368 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and wooden ware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

AGRICULTURE IMPLEMENTS, BTC-OooUnwd. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trao- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of detrtwy. 



20.. 
16. 
23. 



4doten... 
66 dozen.. 

139 

Ill 



ar.-. 

200... 



7^» dozen.... 
10A dozen.., 
m dozen.... 
19A dozen... 
41 dozen 



48 

110 

21,000 pounds. 



90., 
40.. 



Rakes — Continued . 

Hay, sulky, 8-foot, self-dump— 
If 20 teeth 

If 26 teeth.. 



Hay, sulky. 10-foot, hand-dump— 
26 teeth 



32 teeth 

Hay, sulky, 10-foot, self-dump— 

26 teeth 

32 teeth , 

Rakes: 

Hay, wood, 12 teeth, 2 bows 

Wrought-steel. handled, 12 teeth 

Scoops, grain, medium quality, No. 4 

Scrapers, road, 2-horse, size No. 2. 

Shovels, steel: 

Coal, D handle 

Long handled, No. 2, round, stiff point.. 

D handle, No. 2, square point 

Sickles, No. 3, grain 

Scythes? 

Brush, 21 to 24 Inch 

Grass, assorted, 34 to 38 inch 

Weed, 28 and 30 inch 



Scythe snaths, patent ring 

8cythestones 

Spades, steel. No. 2: 

Long handle 

D handle 

Twine, binder, long fiber (sisal), subject to 

actual tare. 
Wheelbarrows: 



All iron, tubular, capacity 3 cubic feet.. 
Garden, wood. No. 2 



186 
186 



1 
186 



1 
186 



191 
360 
208 

266 
134 
360 
266 

191 
265 
191 
265 
298 
191 

360 
191 

«258 

265 
191 



1814.88 
116.34 

>13.50 
•15.58 

•16-50 

117.44 

1.95 

2.20 

.40 

2.88 

.20 
.48 
.40 
.12 

4.50 

5.45 

4.50 

•6.15 

•6.15 

.85 

.40 
.425 



Chicago. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

8t. Louis. 
Chicago. 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Omaha. 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 
St. Louis. 

Chicago. 

8t. Louh. 

Chicago. 

it. Louis. 

Chicago. 

Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Chicago. 



)■ 



•W* }Omaha. 



•.0025 



2.45 
2.20 



St. Louis. 
Chicago. 



GLAS8, OILS, AND PAINTS. 



916 pounds. 



64 dozen.. 



59., 
54.. 

48.. 
40.. 



551. 
857.. 
360., 



33.. 
391. 



226. 

80 



Borax, powdered 

Brushes' 

Calcimine, all bristles, 7-inch, medium- 
long stock. 

Marking, bristle, assorted. 1 to 6 

Paint, round, ail white bristles, slightly 
open center: 
No.*. 
No.*. 
No. |. 



No.i. 

Paint. aO black Chinese bristles, flat, long 
stock- 

3 inches wide 

4 inches wide 

Paint, all bristles, round or oval, chisel- 
pointed (sash tools), No. 6. 

Slating, 6 Inches wide 

Varnish, all Chinese bristles, 3 inches wide, 

triple thick. 
Whitewash, all bristles. 8 inches wide, 

medium-long stock, with handle. 

Coal tar, in 5-galkm tin cans, cased 



214 


80.0425 


75 


.45 


208 


.185 


75 
203 

75 
203 


.37 

.55 

.« 

1.39 


75 
215 
298 


.3725 

.55 

.10 


203 

107 


1.14 
.30 


215 


.48 


I 101 
\107 


'.19 
•.19 



St. Louis. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
New York. 
St. Louis. 
New York. 



St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

New Y ork ; 
San FranozMB. 



Chicago. 
San Francawe. 



i Awarded 56 hay rakes. 
' Awarded 18 hay rakes. 
• Awarded Olf dozen. 
•Only. 



» Awarded ".300 pounds (sample No. 1). 
« Awarded 13,600 pounds (sample No. 3). 
» Awarded 45 gallons. 
• Awarded 36 gallons. 



Digitized by 



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8UPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN SRBVICB. 



869 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school book* and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc, — Continued. 

GLASS, OILS, AND PAINTS—Oontmued. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



44JM0 caftan.. 
11,300 gallons.. 



Gasoline, to bo delivered in 5-gatton tin cans, 
cased, to be furnished by contractor, each 
ease to contain 3 cans and to be made of 
{-inch pine throughout, or in steel barrels 
to be fornisbed by the Government; freight 
on empty barrels from destination to point 
of delivery under contract to be paid by the 
Government; the cartage of the empty bar- 
rels from railroad freight house to contrac- 
tor's warehouse to be taken care of by the 
contractor: 

68* to 73* gravity 

85* gravity 



INoaward. (SeeAppen- 
v dix.) 




81. Louts. 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 

St. r 

Do. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. I-ouls. 
Omaha. 
St. Loute. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
On 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. .._ 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 



15036°— int 1913— voi. 2 



2.39 Omaha. 

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870 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SREVIOB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware f glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

OLAS8, OILS, AND PAINTS-OoottaMd. 



Awards. 




No. 




of 


Unit 


con- 
trac- 


pries. 


tor. 




sw 


§3.04 


215 


2.10 


809 


2.04 


215 


2.10 


aw 


2.04 


215 


2.10 


aw 


2.04 


215 


2.10 


309 


2.19 


309 


2.19 


215 


2.26 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


132 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.40 


215 


2.46 


309 


2.82 


309 


2.04 


215 


2.10 


309 


2.19 


215 


2.25 


309 


2.19 


215 


2.25 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


ao9 


2.32 


215 


2.39 


309 


2.40 


215 


2.46 


309 


2.55 


215 


2.61 


309 


2.04 


215 


2.10 


309 


2.19 


215 


2.25 


215 


2.25 


309 


2.19 


215 


2.25 


309 


2.32 


215 


2.39 



Point of dattary. 



4 boxes... 
36 boxes. 
46 boxes. 

11 boxes. 
14 boxes. 
10 boxes. 

27 boxes. 

38 boxes. 

69 boxes. 

18 boxes. 

44 boxes. 

20 boxes. 
6 boxes... 

14 boxes. 

15 boxes. 
6 boxes.., 
10 boxes. 
13 boxes. 
65 boxes. 

23 boxes. 
81 boxes. 
36 boxes. 

24 boxes. 

16 boxes. 
Ibox...., 

12 boxes. 

3 boxes... 



Awards. 



St Loufa. 
Omaha. 

St. J ."I I IS. 

Omaha. 
8t T.mih. 
Omaha. 
St, I -uis. 
OmfthA. 
St. Louis. 

DO. 

Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
8t. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
8t. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
8t. Louis. 
Omaha. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 
Omaha. 
8t. Louis. 
Omaha. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



36 boxes. 

12 boxes. 
3 boxes... 
Ibox.... 

7 boxes... 
17 boxes. 
20 boxes. 
10 boxes. 
10 boxes. 
10 boxes., 

13 boxes. 

8 boxes... 
20 boxes. 



Olass, window, double thick: 

16 by 36 

16 by 44 

18 by 18 

18 by 20 

18 by 24 

18 by 30 

18 by 36 

18 by 42 

20 by 24 

20 by 26 

20 by 48 

22 by 26 

24 by 28 



215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 



$3.30 
3.38 
2.96 
2.96 
8.22 
3.22 
3.30 

1:1 

3.22 
8.64 
8.22 
3.30 

Digitized 



Omaha. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Da 






Gbogle 



SUPPLIES FOE THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



371 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 19 IS. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

GLASS, OILS, AND PAINTS— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



181 

boxes.. 
41 boxes..... 

6 boxes...... 

19 boxes..... 

11 boxes 

4 boxes 

4 boxes. 

17 boxes 

43 boxes..... 

75 

476 papers... 

566 pounds.. 
421 quarts... 

864 gallons.. 

800 gallons.. 

466 pounds. 
628 pounds. 



Glass, window, double thick— Continued. 

24 by 32 

24 by 34 

24 by 36 

24 by 40 

26 by 34 

26 by 38 

28 by 30 

28 by 32 

28 by 34 

30 by 40 

Glass cutters, diamond, glazier 's sure-cut style. 

Glasier *s points, sine, fib. papers 

Glue: 

Cabinetmaker's, sheet 

Liquid, prepared 



Hard oil, light, in 1 and 5 gallon cans.. . 

Japan, house painter 's, in 1-gallon cans . 
Lampblack: 

In 1 -pound papers. . 



2,662 pounds.. 
139,870 pounds 
2,606 pounds.. 



Pure, in oil, good strength in 1, 2, and 5- 
poundcans. 

Lead, in kegs, not over 100 pounds net weight; 

Red , 8triotl v pure, dry , 

White, in oil, guaranteed striotly pure. 

Oakum 

Oil In 5-ftaUon cans, cased, or in 6-gallon fiat- 



215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
215 
150 
191 

354 
208 

220 

73 

354 
141 



150 
161 
114 



S3. 38 
3.38 
3.38 
3.64 
3.64 
3.64 
3.38 
3.64 
3.64 
3.64 
2.10 
.0537 

.115 

4. * 

.035 
.11 



Omaha. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Omaha. 
St. Louis. 
New York. 
Chicago. 

Omaha. 
Chicago. 



.06125 
.0608 
«.035 



4471 gallons... 
4,838 gallons... 

6,910 gallons... 
41,500 gallons.. 



top jacketed cans: 

Cy ' 



Cylinder. 
Engine.. 



314 4.2125 

/ 315 » •. 185 

207 '.23 

41 «. 16 

".16 

17 



• 199 



;".l 

\".l 



Do. 

Do. 

Omaha. 



Do. 
San Francisco. 
St. Louis. 
San Francisco. 



^Chicago. 



316 

315 ! 



170 



".133 
".088 
".085 
165 
". 04875 
".125 



Eig, Ind. 
-ancisco. 
te, Eans. 



Floor 

Kerosene, water white, flashingpoint above 
115° F., by the standard instruments of 
the State boards of health of Michigan 
and New York, to be delivered in 5-gal- 
lon tin cans, cased, to be furnished by 
contractor, each case to contain 2 cans, 
and to be made of 1-inch pine through- 
out, or in steel barrels to be furnished Dy 
the Government; freight on empty bar- 
rels from destination to point of delivery 
under contract to be paid by the Govern- 
ment: the cartage of the empty barrels 
from railroad freight house to contrac- 
tor's warehouse to be taken care of by 
the contractor. 

» 1-gallon cans. 

» 5-jrallon cans. 

■ 2,600 pounds only. 

« Any quantity up to maximum of amounts called for. 

• Awarded 2,696 gallons. 

« 6-gallon cans, cased. 

f Awarded 2,142 gallons. 

•Awarded 2,600 gallons. 

•Awarded 3,310 gallons. 

"Delivery to August, 1, 1913. 

a Delivery to June 30, 1914. 

u Awarded 2,400 gallons in two 5-gallon cases and cans, uninspected. 

"Awarded 19,814 gallons in iron barrels, uninspected. 

" Awarded 5,265 gallons in barrels. Will deliver at Los Angeleo at same prioa, 

» Awarded 2,210 gallons in cases. W ill deliver at Los Angeles at same price. 

» Awarded 11,490 gallons in barrels. 

Awarded 2,315 gallons in cases. 



Digitized by 



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372 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVICB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Jan, 15, 1913. for groceries, medical supplies, 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, leather, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

GLAS8, OIL8, AND PAINTS-Oontinued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



611 gallons. 



14,930 gallons.. 

2,035 gallons... 
1,006 gallons... 

2,567 bottles... 



2^14 pounds. 
1,162 pounds. 

258 pounds... 
770 pounds... 
260 pounds... 

855 pounds... 

378 pounds... 

505 pounds... 
020 pounds. . . 
516 pounds... 

36,725 pounds 

604 pounds... 
431 pounds... 
440 pounds... 

11,050 pounds 
24,800 pounds 
576 pounds... 

4,675 pounds., 
2,665 pounds. 
025 pounds... 
270 pounds... 
238 gallons... 

1,712 gallons.. 

2,205 gallons.. 
850 pounds... 

146 gallons... 

20 gallons 

4,000 pounds., 



Oil in 5-gallon cans, cased, or in 5-gallon flat- 
*~ip jacketed cans— Continued. 
Lard, strictly pure, in 5-gallon cans, cased. 
Linseed, strictly pure, in 5-gallon 



top jacketed cans— Continued. 
Lard , strictly pure, in 5 
"Ltlnseed, strictly pure, in o-gauuu uuv. 
cased, or in 5-gauon flat-top jacketed 



cans— 
Boiled. 



Raw. 



Imbricating, mineral, crude, in 6-gsllon 
cans, cased, or in 5-gallon flat-top 
jacketed cans. 

8ewing machine, in full 2-ounoe bottles... 

paints, nc 

Chrome green, medium: 

Dry , 

In oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 5-pound cans, 
Chrome yellow, medium: 

Dry , 

In oil, for tinting, in 1,2, and 5-pound cans, 
Para red, medium, in oil, for tinting, in 1- 

pound cans. 
Ivory, drop black, in oil, for tinting, m 1 , 2, and 

5-pound cans. 
Indian red, in Japan, In 1, 2, and 5-pound cans. . 
Ocher, French, yellow: 

Dry 

In oil. for tinting, in 1. 2, and 5-pound cans. 
Prussian blue, In off, for tinting, in 1,2, and 5- 

poundcans. 
Prince's mineral, finely ground in pure linseed 

oil, in 25-pound cans. 
Sienna, in oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 5-pound 
cans: 
Burnt 

Venetian red,' in oil, fa" tinting', *m* i,'2,'and £> 

pound cans. 
Paper: 

Buflding 



Tarred, packed in crates, strapped . 

Pitch 

Putty: 

In 5-pound cans 

In 10-pound cans 

In 25-pound cans 

Resin, common 

Stain, oak, oil, in 1-gaUoncans 

Turpentine: 

In 1-gallon cans 



854 



141 
05 



110 
141 

141 

101 

61 
200 
141 

141 



141 
141 
73 



101 
55 



•0.66 



1.51 
•.505 
•.60 
«.40* 
.12 



.02 



.0376 
.106 

.04 

.1175 

.14 



.12 

.035 
». 06 
.10 



San Francisco. 



Omaha, 



Omaha, 

San FranoJsoo. 



Chicago. 
Do. 

Omaha. 

Evansvflle, Ind. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Chicago. 

Omaha. 

San Francisco. 



.005 
.005 
.0575 



.013 

• on 

r.017 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 



In 5-gallon cans 

Umber, burnt, in oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 

5-pound cans. 
Varnish: 

Wagon, heavy durable body, In 1-gallon 

cans. 
Wagon, heavy, durable body, in 5-gallon 



Whiting, extra, gilder's bolted . 



81 
81 
81 
150 
141 

41 
215 

41 
215 
141 



312 
312 
358 



.022 

.0206 

.0105 

.035 

.55 

•.57 
•.58 
».52 
".54 
.00 



1.25 
1.15 
.0075 



No award. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Do. 

Do. 
CWcage. 

Do. 



Sanl _ 

Omaha. 

San FranoJsoo. 

Omaha. 

Chicago. 



Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 



i Awarded 4,675 gallons. 
•Awarded 10.255 gallons. 
•Awarded 485 gallons. 

* Awarded 1,550 gallons. 

• Gross. 
•Crated. 



» Not crated. 

• Awarded 732 gallons. 

• Awarded 080 gallons. 
» Awarded 1,245 pOlona. 
"Awarded TOgaBoos. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVI0S. 



373 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913. 
(Bids opened in Omaha, Nebr.) 
COAL. 



Point of delivery. 



N0.0C 



trao- 
tor. 



Prleeper 
ton. 



Tout. 
2 



110 
136.34 

480 

5 

10 



10 



175 
1,500 

160 



For Albuquerque School, N. Mex., blacksmith coal, from Sonman, Pa., f. 0. b. 

can Chicago. Ill 

For Btanarck School, N. Dak.: 

Youghlogheny lamp coal, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis 

Goal, Youghlogheny, soft, lump (delivered at Fort Lincoln, N. Dak.) 

For BlackJeet School, etc., Mont.: 

Coal, toft, lump, Nelson mine. Sand Coulee, Mont., f.o.b.cars Browning, 

Mont. (350 tons for school, 50 tons for day school. 50 tons for agency). . . . 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. 0. b. cars Dufuth, Mmn., or Superior, wis. 

(for a gency) 

Coal, anthracite, nut sisc, f. o. b. cars Duhith, Minn., or Superior, Wis. 



(for agency), ^ 
llSy. "•" 



June 

July 

August 

After Sept. 1, 1913 

For BloomfleM Seminary, Okla., coal, soft, McAlester, run of mine, vk: 

Uto.b. cars Haileyville, Okla....... . 

If f.o.b.cars Kemp City, Okla. 

For Cantonment School, etc., Okla., coal, soft, McAlester, vis: 



Nut she (for school)— 

If f. o. h. cars HaOeyvffle, Okla. 

If f. o. b. cars Canton, Okla 

Run of mine (for school)— 

If f. o. h. cars Hafleyvule, Okla. 

If f. o. b. cars Canton, Okla. . 



Lump sisc (for Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians)— 
If f.o.b. cars Haileyville, Okla 



If f. o. b. cars Canton, Okla 

For fif»»*^" Asylum for Insane Indians, 8. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, taken from Wyoming District, Pa. (ship- 
per's wefchts f. 0. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements.) 
In car load lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., nut sisc, vis: 



8hipped during April.. 
Shtyped during May... 



b. cars 



8hipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August. 

8hipped during 8ept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghfogheny lump coal, f.o.b. dock, Superior, Wis 

For CarlkeScnool. Pa.: 

Coal, soft, "B% Vein George's Creek/' run of mine, vis, f. 
Gettysburg Junction. Pa. (per ton of 2^40 pounds): 

Delivery from April 1, 1913, to Sept. 1, 1913 

Delivery from Sept. 1, 1913, to Apr. 1, 1914 

Coal, anthracite "en*' sise, from Morld Colliery, Pa., SchuylkUl region, 

f.o.b. cars Gettysburg Junction, Pa 

For Carson School, Nev.: 

Coal, soft, lump, "Aberdeen" brand, Independent Coal & Coke Co. mines 
at KenOworth, Utah, f. 0. b. mines, vis: 

Delivery prior to July 31, 1913 

Delivery Aug. 1 to Sept. 30, 1913 

Delivery Oct. 1 to Nov. 30, 1913. 

Delivery after Nov. 30. 1913 

Coal, Keystone Lilly Smithing, sacked, f. 0. b. cars docks, Superior, Wis., 

or Duhith, Minn 

For Cass Lake School, Mmn. (all coal f. o. b. cars, Cass Lake, Minn.): 

Coal, blacksmith. 

Coal, anthracite, nut sise, Pennsylvania Coal Co., Luserne County, Pa., 
vis: 

8hipped during July, 1913 

Shipped during August. 1913 

Shipped fromSept. 1. 1913, to Apr. 1, 1914 

Shipped duiliajADril, 1914 

Shipped during May, 1914 



139 
267 



267 



262 
262 



262 
262 



262 
262 



262 
262 



273 



356 



193 
193 
193 
193 



342 



342 
342 
342 
342 
342 
342 
342 



15.80 



"31 

'3.97 



4.00 
5.95 



16.60 
16.00 
16.70 
16.80 
»6.90 
17.00 

3.50 
4.75 



2.75 
4.55 



2.50 
4.55 



3.50 
6.55 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 
"3.65 



3.06 
3.15 



«5.14 



2.45 
2.65 
3.00 
3.10 

••5.90 

7.60 



&65 

8.65 
&76 
8.25 
8.35 
8.45 
6.15 



Shipped during June, 1914 

Coal, Yonghtoghcny, soft, lump 

> If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 

* Leas 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

» Per ton of 2^40 pounds. 

« Carload lots. 

ft Shipments in Mas than carload lota are subject to following extra charges, if Incurred: Sacking, 81.75; cart- 



age,** cents per ton, 
* Where necessary to 



incurred, of 60 cents per tan. 



coal to freight depots to accomplish 



it, subject to extra c 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



372 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVICB. 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Jan. 15, 1913, for groceries, medical su ppkm , 
school books and supplies, furniture and woodenware, glass, oils, paints, harness, tmksr, 
agricultural implements, etc. — Continued. 

GLASS, OILS, AND PAINTS— Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. 
of 



trac- 
tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of dalhrory. 



611 gallons. 



14,930 gallons.. 

2,035 gallons... 
1,006 gallons... 

2,567 bottles... 



2,914 pounds. 
1,162 pounds. 

258 pounds... 
779 pounds. . . 

269 pounds... 

855 pounds... 

373 pounds. . . 

595 pounds. . . 
920 pounds... 
516 pounds... 

36,725 pounds 

604 pounds... 
431 pounds. . . 
449 pounds... 

11,050 pounds 
24,800 pounds 
575 pounds... 

4,675 pounds. 
2,665 pounds . 
925 pounds... 

270 pounds... 
238 gallons . . . 

1,712 gallons.. 

2,205 gallons.. 
859 pounds . . . 

146 gallons... 

20 gallons 

4,000 pounds . . 



Oil in 5-gallon cans, cased, or in 5-gallon flat- 
top jacketed cans — Con tin ned. 
Lard, strictly pure, in 5-gallon cans, cased . . 
Linseed, strictly pure, in 5-gailon cans, 
cased, or in 5-gallon flat-top jacketed 
cans- 
Boiled 



Raw. 



Lubricating, mineral, crude, in 5-gpllon 
cans, cased, or in 5-gallon flat-top 
jacketed cans. 

Sewing machine, in full 2-ounce bottles. . . . 

PAINTS, ETC. 

Chrome green, medium: 

Dry 

In oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 5-pound cans, 
Chrome yellow, medium: 

Dry 

In oil, for tinting, in 1. 2, and 5-pound cans. 
Para red, medium, in oil, for tinting, in 1- 

pound cans. 
Ivory , drop black, in oil, for tinting, in 1 , 2, and 

5-pound cans. 
Indian red, in Japan, in 1, 2, and 5-pound cans. . 
Ocher, French, yellow: 

Dry 

In oil. for tinting, in 1. 2, and 5-pound cans. 
Prussian blue, in oil, for tinting, in 1,2, and 5- 

pound cans. 
Prince's mineral, finely ground in pure linseed 

oil, in 25-pound cans. 
Sienna, in oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 5-pound 
cans: 

Burnt 

Raw 

Venetian red, in oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 5- 

pound cans. 
Paper: 

Building 



Tarrod, packed in crates, strapped . 

Pitch 

Putty: 

In 5-pound cans 

In 10-pound cans 

In 25-pound cans 

Resin, common 

Stain, oak, oil, in 1-gallon cans 

Turpentine: 

In 1-gallon cans 



41 



864 



141 
06 



119 
141 

141 

191 

51 
200 
141 

141 



141 
141 
73 



191 
55 



•0.66 



1.61 
•.506 
'50 
«.406 

.12 



.02 



.0076 
.106 

.04 

.1176 

.14 

.10 

.12 

.036 
».06 
.19 

.03625 



.005 
.095 
.0575 



.013 
«.022 
'.017 



Omaha. 



Do. 



EvansvMe, Ind. 
Chicago. 

Do. 



In 5-gallon cans 

Umber, burnt, in oil, for tinting, in 1, 2, and 

5-pound cans. 
Varnish: 

Wagon, heavy durable body, in 1-gallon 

cans. 
Wagon, heavy, durable body, in 5-gallon 
cans. 
Whiting, extra, gilder's bolted 



81 
81 
81 
150 
141 

41 
215 

41 
215 
141 



312 
312 
358 



.022 
.0205 
.0195 
.035 
.55 

•.57 
•.58 
w.52 
".54 
.09 



1.25 
1.15 
.0075 



8an Francisco. 

"BBflO. 

Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 

Omaha. 
No award. 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

San Francisco. 

Omaha. 

San Francisco. 

Omaha. 

Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

St. Louis. 



J Awarded 4,675 gallons. 

• Awarded 10,255 gallons. 
•Awarded 485 gallons. 

* Awarded 1,550 gallons. 
» Oross. 

•(rated. 



' Not crated. 

• Awarded 732 gallons. 

• Awarded 980 gallons. 
» Awarded 1,245 nlloni. 
"Awarded 960 gaDon*. 



Digitized by 



Google 



8UPPUES FOB THE INDIAK 8EBVI0K. 



373 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913. 
[Bids opened in Omaha, Nebr.) 
COAL. 



Point of delivery. 



No. of] 
con- 
trac- 
tor. 



Prfoepcr 
ton. 



Ton*. 
2 

110 
136.34 

460 

6 

10 



10 



175 
J, 500 

960 



For Albuquerque School, N. Mex., blacksmith ooal, from Sonman, Pa., f. o. b. 

can Chicago, 111 

For Bismarck 8chool, N. Dak.: 

Yougfriogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wb 

Coal, Youghiogheny, soft, lump (delivered: at Fort Lincoln, N. Dak.) 

For BlackJeet School, etc., Mont.: 

Coal, soft, lump, Nelson mine. Sand Coulee, Mont., f.o.b.cars Browning, 

Mont. (350 tons for school, 60 tons for day school. 60 tons for agency) 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Mtnn., or Superior, Wis. 

(for agency) 

Coal, anthracite, nut site, f. o. b. cars Duluth. Minn., or Superior, Wis, 
(for agency), vis.: 

^:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

June 

July 

August 

After 8ept. 1, 1913 

For Bloomneld Seminary, Okla., coal, soft, McAlester, run of mine, vis: 

Iff.o.b.carsHaileyviUe,Okla 

If f. o. b. cars Kemp City, Okla. 

For Cantonment School, etc., Okie,, coal, soft, McAlester, vis: 



Nut sise (for school)— 

If f. o. b. cars Hafleyvflle, Okla. 

If f, o. b. cars Canton, Okla , 

Run of mine (for school)— 

If f. o. b. cars HaOeyvOle, Okla., 

If f. o. b. cars Canton, Okla. . 



Lump sise (for Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians)-- 
iff. o.b. cars Hafleyvflle, OklaTTTT 



If f. o. b. cars Canton, Okla. 
For Canton Asylum for Insane Indians, 8. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, taken from Wyoming District, Pa. (ship- 
per's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements.) 
In car load lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., nut sise, vis: 



Shipped during April.. 
Shipped during May.. 



Shipped during June 

Shipped during July „ 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during 8ept. 1 to Mar. 31 

You^bJogheny lump coal, f.o.b. dock, Superior, Wis 

For CariEeScnool, Pa.: 

Coal, soft, "Big Vein George's Creek." run of mine, vis, f. o. b. cars 
Gettysburg Junction. Pa. (per ton or 2,340 pounds): 

Delivery from April 1, 1913, to Sept. 1, 1913 

Delivery from Sept. 1, 1913, to Apr. 1, 1914 

Coal, anthracite "egg*' sise, from Morld Colliery, Pa., Schuylkill region, 

f.o.b. cars Gettysburg Junction, Pa 

For Carson School, Nev.: 

Coal, soft, lump, "Aberdeen" brand, Independent Coal & Coke Co. mines 



at Kenfl 



, Utah, f. o. b. mines, vis: 



L*l. V WU. I. U. U. 1U1UI 

Delivery prior to July 31, 1918. 
Delivery Aug. 1 to Sept. 30, 1913. . 



Delivery Oct. 1 to Nov. 30, 1913. 

Delivery after Nov. 30. 1913 

Coal, Keystone Lilly Smithing, sacked, f. o. b. cars docks, Superior, Wis., 

or Duluth, Minn 

For Cass Lake School, Mmn. (all coal f. o. b. cars, Cass Lake, Minn.): 

Coal, blacksmith 

Coal, anthracite, nut sise, Pennsylvania Goal Co., Luserne County, Pa., 
vis: 

8hipped during July, 1913 

Shipped during August, 1913 

Shipped fromSept. 1, 1913, to Apr. 1, 1914 

8hipped during April, 1914 

Shipped during May, 1914 



Coal, 



Shipped during June, 1914. . . 
1, Youghiogheny, soft, lump.. 



2 
369 



239 
367 



367 



362 
362 



362 
363 



363 
363 



362 
362 



273 



356 



193 
193 
193 
193 



343 



342 
342 
342 
342 
342 
342 
342 



> If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 

* Leas 3 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

• Per ten of 2^40 pounds. 



16.60 
•3.97 



4.00 
6.95 



16.60 
16.60 
»6.70 
i ft. 80 
16.90 
17.00 

3.60 
4.78 



2.78 
4.66 



2.60 
4.66 



3.60 
6.66 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 
i»3.55 



3.06 
3.16 



«5.14 



2.45 
2.66 
3.00 
3.10 

"5.90 

7.60 



8.56 

8.65 
8.76 
8.26 
8.36 
8.45 
6.15 



> If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 

* Leas 3 per cent c 

■ Per ton of 2^40] 

♦Carload lotsT 

» Shipments in less than carload lota are subject to following extra charges, it Incurred: Sacking, 81.75; cart- 



age. 60 cents per ton. 

•Where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, subject to 
Incurred, of 60 cents par too. 



;G($3gre 



374 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8ERVICB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1918— Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



|Nc 

O" 

ti 



Tens. 

200 



166 



300 



6 
180 



2 

10 

10 

1 

3 

1,760 



For Cherokee School, N. C., viz: Coal, soft, "Coal Creek run of mine/' mined 
at Coal Creek. Tenn. (Southern Ry.), f. o. b. cars at mines, vis: 

Shipments before Oct. 1 

Shipments after Oct. 1 

For Cheyenne and Arapahoe School, etc., Okla.: Coal, soft, McAlester, lump 
(126 tons tor school, 40 tons for agency), viz— 

If f.o.b. care Haileyville, Okla 

If f. o. b. cars, Concho Siding, Okla 

For Cheyenne River School, etc., 8. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from Wyoming district, Pa. (shipper 
weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). In a 
load lots f. o. b. cars, Superior. Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz— 
100 tons nut size, for school- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 



100 tons stove and egg size, 75 tons for agency, 25 tons for school- 
ig April 



Shipped during Apr i 

Shipped during May, 

Shipped during June , 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August , 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

100 tons, grate site, 50 tons for agency, 50 tons for school- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June , 

8hipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Super 

Coal (for agency), soft, lump size, Youghfogheny, i. o. b. cs 

Minn.; Superior, Wis.; or Milwaukee, Wis. (100 tons for sch 

fordav schools, 20 tons for agency) 

For Coeur d'Alene Indians, Wash.; coal, Keystone, Lilly Smith 



f. o. b. cars docks Superior, Wis., or Duluth, Minn.. ----- 

For Collins Institute, Okla.: Coal, soft, McAlester, lump, f. o. b 

Okla 

For Colorado River School, etc., Ariz.: 

Coal, soft, lump, screened, from "Casna" mine. f. o. b. i 
N. Mex., 4 tons for school, 6 tons for agency, viz: 
Shipments between May 1, 1913. and Aug. 31. 1013 ... , 
Shipments between Sept. 1, 1913, and Apr. 30, 1914... 
Coal, Keystone Lilly Smithing, sacked, f. o.b. cars docks 

or Duluth, Minn, (for agency) 

For ColvUle Agency, Wash.: Coal, Keystone Lilly Smithing 

cars docks, Superior, Wis., or Duluth, Minn 

For Crow Agency School, etc., Mont.: 

Coal, Carney, screened, lump and nut sizes ■ 
F.o.b. Crow Agency, Mont., viz— 

650 tons lump size (200 tons for school, 350 tons 

800 tons nut size (for agency) 

F. o. b. Edgar, Mont., viz: 300 tons lump size (175 1 

School and 125 tons for Pryor subagency) 

F. o. b. Lodge Grass, Mont., viz: 100 tons lump sf 

subagency) 

©J Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. can Duluth, Minn., 

tons for agency and 1} tons for Pryor subagency). . 

For Crow Creek School, etc., S. Dak.: 

4 170 Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, from Wyomii 

par's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to goverr 

in carload: lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chi 

Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

» If sacked, S1.76 per ton additional. 

• Where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accon 
incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 

* Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to the to 



60 cents per ton. 

for school, 70 tons for agency. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVICB. 



875 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913 — Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 




font. 



260 

4 



100 
10 

75 

150 



1400 



2 

•425 



26 



For Crow Creek School, etc., 8. Dak.— Continued. 

Youghiogheny lump coal, soft, f . o. b. dock Superior, Wis. (for school) 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, Wis. 



(tor agency) 

Coal, sort, lump size, Youghiogheny, f. o. b. 



j«, wit, miup 9 »», AvuguJugiMiuj' i. w. u. cars Duluth, Minn., Superior, 

Wis., or Milwaukee, Wis. (for agency) 

For Cushman School, Wash.: 

Coal, soft, " South Prairie," run of mine. Mine at Burnett, Pierce County, 

Wash. In school bins (carload lots) „ 

Coal, Keystone, Lilly Smithing, sacked, f. o. b. oars, docks, Superior, Wis., 

or Duluth, Minn. 

For Eufaula School, Okla.: Coal, soft, McAlester, nut size, viz: 

Iff. o. b. oars North McAlester, Okla 

If f. o. b. cars Eufaula, Okla 

For Flandreau School, S. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, taken from Wyoming district, Pa. (ship- 
per's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements), In 
carload lots f o. b. cars Superior, wis., or Chicago, 111., viz— 
50 tons nut size- 
Shipped during April - 

Shipped during May , 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July , 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. I to Mar. 31 

100 tons, stove size- 



Shipped during April. . 



ol, Idaho: Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, taken 
rict, Pa. (shippers weights f. o. b. point of shipment to 
cents), in carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or 



100 



12S 



Shipped during „ . 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f . o. b. dock Superior, Wis 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn. , or Superior, Wis 

For Fort Belknap School, etc., Mont.: Coal, soft, Nelson mine, Sand Coulee, 
Mont, f. o. b. Harlem, Mont., nut size (300 tons for school, 100 tons for agency) 
For Fort Hall School, etc., Idaho: 

Coal, blacksmith, f. o. b. cars Pocatello, Idaho 

Rock Springs, wyo., soft, 3-inch lump coal, f. o. b. Rock Springs, Wyo., 
viz— 

Delivery to Sept. 1, 1013 

Delivery Sept. 1 to Mar. 31, 1014 

For Fort Lapwai School, I * " ~ 
from Wyoming district, 
govern m all settlements), 
Chicago, Dl., viz- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

For Fort Lapwai Sanitarium, Idaho: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, from Wyoming district, Pa. (ship- 
per's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements), In 
carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Coal, sort, nut size, Youghiogheny, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, 
Wis. 



300 
267 
207 

240 

235 

262 
262 



273 



- 273 



360 
267 



346 



>- 



273 



273 



267 



1*13.55 

6.06 
3.50 

4.25 

•«5.00 

2.75 
3.35 



•6.30 
•6.40 
•6.68 

• 6. 00 
•6.70 
•6.80 

• 6.14 
•6.24 
•6.34 

• 6.44 
•6.54 
•6.64 

••3.65 
5.06 

3.05 

16.00 



•2.25 
•2.50 



16.30 
16.40 
16.50 
16.00 
16.70 
'6.80 



•6.30 
•6.40 
•6.50 
•6.60 
•6.70 
•6.80 
3.60 



i If sacked, S1.75 per ton additional. 

• Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

> Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to following extra charges, if incurred: Sacking, 11.75; 
cartage, 60 cents per ton. 

• where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, subject to extra charge, U 
incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 

• 376 tons for school, 50 tons for agency. 

• Mint weights to govern. 



Digitized by 



Google 



376 SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SKBYIOB. 

Contract* awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 191&— Continued. 
COAL -Continued. 




Ton*. 



15 



1540 



10 



350 



300 



p f o. b. ears Du tutti, Minn., By porter, 



For Fort Pock School, etc.-,, Moat.: 

Youghiogheny Jump coal, f, o. b. dock Superior, Wis. (360 tons for 

135 tons for agency). 
Coal, tali, lump *bso, Voui 

Wis,, or Milwaukee* w 
Coal, blacksmith, sacked, t o. b. cars Duluth, Ulnn., or Superior, Wis.*.. 
For Fort Tot Urn School, N. Dak.; 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, stove sine, from Wyoming dUtrtct, Pa, 

(shipper's weights t oh. point of shipment to govern In all settlements), 

in carload lots f. o. b. cam Superior, Wis., or Chicago, tU., via— 



Shipped during April. . 
Shipped during May. 



Shipped during Jane 

Shipped during July .. , 

Shipped during August.. ........ ,..*.......,...„., „ 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31. . *..„..... .....*.*.., 

Yougbiogbeny lump coal, f . 0. b, dock Superior, »l Is , 

For Genoa School. Nebr : " Black Brier TT tah, mined at Johnston City, lU. g 

f. o, b. cars at mine; Johnston City, III., 3 by 11 inch nut . •...„ 

For Grand Portage School, Minn, : Coal, anthracite, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Mian., 
Superior, WLr, or Milwaukee, rtls, (sacked); 
S torn? stove slw — 

April . ...... 

May . ,„. . , ... 

/UDfl.,,.,„..„ ._ ......._......... 

July.. , . 

August t. ...... *....,... 

Aftar Sept. 1,1013......... . ...... 

5 tons grate sita - 

April, .. .... 

May ,....,.... . 

June . ..„....._■. 

July ...... ....... 

AllgUSt.......... . . f ¥ *m, 

Aft** ScpU 1. 11>13 

For Hay ward School, wis.: 

Coal, smithing, sacked, f. o> b. cars Hayward, Wis 

Coal, soft, run of mine, Youghlogheuy, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Su- 
perior, *v is . , . 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from \\ yoming district. Pa. (shinper*s 
weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements), in car- 
load lots f. o, b, cars Superior, vv is,, or Chicago, 111., vit— 
75 Ions nut site— 

Shipped during April. 

Shipped during May. .. „........,..., 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July . . . . . ...,.........,..,*........■.. . 

Shipped during August. ,..*. 

Shipped during Sept, 1 to Mar, 31 .......... .. 

376 ton* egg siie— 

Shipped during April, , „ 

Shipped during May ... .,.„.... .,..,,........,.... ..,, 

Shipped during Juno, ., .., 

Shipped during July , ......,.,...„., 

Shipped during August.. 

Shipped during Sept. 1 Uj Mar, M ... . 

For Hoopu V alloy School PaLi foal. Keystone Lilly smith lug, sacked, f.o.b. 

cara, docks Superior. Wis., or Dulii I h , Minn. 

For Jk-arilla Agency, N. Mev: 

Coal, hard , grata sIec. in bins at agortey . 

Coal, blacksmith, (n bins at ageney , 

For Koshona School, etc., Wis,: 

Coal, anthracite, kIovc site, f. o. b. cars Shawano, Wis. (Western Bail- 
way Weigher*' A asocial ton weights at loading point to govern all set- 
tlements) .., 

Coal, hjai'ksrjiilh. wiekH (Western Railway Weighers' Association 
weights at loading points to govern all settlement*).. 






367 


'3,50 


c 


SOT 


f '6.14 
l 6-24 


« 


371 

300 


*4.M - 
10.44 

16,54 

<6-64 

1*3.55 


« 



144 



2fi7 



343 

267 



273 



179 



3*7 
367 



270 
270 



\ 



i"*3,55 



1.49 



Ja. as 
ia.35 
'645 
t«. 55 
16. 96 
16.75 

■6.00 

■ «.io 

16.30 
16.30 
10,44 

0,90 

'12fl« 



i 4.3 

164 

"i 
■a 



^2 



S9 
• 
79 



"6_ 
'6^ 



i4 
34 
34 
44 
*4 
64 



]<S. «) 



is 



50 

O0 



75 
£5 



1 If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional . 

* Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

•Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to the following charges, if incurred: Sacking, $1.75 m 
tonjeartage, 60 cents per ton. 

* Where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, subject to extra chartf * 
Incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8BBVI0B. 



877 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Feb, 10, 1913 — Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 




Toms. 

30 



306 



300 

10 
470 

285 

»40 



800 

30 

18 



2* 
J75 



10 



For Kkkapoo School, Kans.: 

reiinsylvaniii anthracite tool, egg bite, from Wyoming district. Pa. (ship- 
wr'g weights f. o. b + point of shipment to govern in all Battlements), 
in carload lota r o. b. cars, Chicago, 111., vis— 

Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

shipped during June. . . . . , , 

Shipped ftiirln* July .. 

t-hippod during August. 

t>h ip pod during Sflpt. I LoMur.31 

"Black Brier" sort, mined at Johnston City, 111., f. o. b. cars at mine, 

Johnaton Cltj, I1L, lj-l«ch lump 

For Kiowa Schools, etc., Okia.: 

Coat, soft. Mi Alitor, lump (200 tons for Riverside School, 90 tons for 
A Radars o School, 15 tons for Kiowa Indians), vis— 

llf.o.b* HailoyviUe, QkJa 

If to. b. Anndarko, Okla 

Coal, soft, Mr A Inter, lump (for Fort Sill School), vis— 

If 1 0. b. Hailey vQle. Okla 

Kf. o. b. Lawton, Okla....... 

Coal, soft, Mi? A letter, lump (for It amy Mountain School), vis— 

If r.o.b.HailoyvUlo p Okla. 

If f.o. b. Gotebo, Okla...„ 

For Lac du Flambeau School, Wis,; 

Cool, PittgLon anthracite, nut site, from Scranton, Pa., f. o. b. cars Lac 
du Flambeau. Wis 



Coal, Youghiogheny, soft, iump, from Youghiogheny River district, Pa., 
f. o. b. cars Lac du Flambeau, Wis 



For Leech Lake School, etc.. Minn.. 

Coal, soft, nut sise, Youghiogheny, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, 
Wk 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut sise, taken from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f . o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements), 
in carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., vis- 



Shipped during April. 
~- * * {May.. 



Shipped during 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

For Leu pp school, etc., Aris.: 

Coal, soft, "American Block," mined by Victor American Fuel Co., egg 
sise, f. o. b. cars Gallup, N. Mex., vis- 
Deliveries before Oct. 1, 1913 

Deliveries after Oct. 1. 1913 

Coal, soft, lump, screened, from Casna mine, f. o. b. mines, Gallup, N. 
Max.. vis- 
Shipments between May 1. 1913. and Aug. 31, 1913 

Shipments between Sept. 1. 1913, and Apr. 30, 1914 

For Lower Brule School, etc., S. Dak.: 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f.o.b. dock Superior, Wis. (100 tons for school, 

30 tons for agency) 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut sise, from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
In carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., vis- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

For Mescalero School, etc., N. Mex.: 

Coal, Davis's Big Vein Piedmont smithing, tab. Tularosa, N. Mex 

Coal, soft, lump size, "American block." mined by Victor American Fuel 
Co. at Gallup, N. Max., f. o. b. cars Gallup, N. Max., vis- 
Delivery before Oct. 1, 1913 

Delivery after Oct. 1,1913 

For Mount Pleasant School, Mich,: 

Coal, soft. Hnch lump, mined in Saginaw Valley; name '•Monitor," in 

school bins 

Coal, hard, nut size, in school bins 



i If sacked, 81.75 per ton additional. 
*30 tons for school 10 tons for Chippewa Indians. 
• Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 00 days. 
« 175 tons for school, 50 tons for agency. 



273 



244 



262 
262 



262 
262 



262 
262 



286 
286 



267 



273' 



29 
29 



218 
218 



369 



273 



228 



29 
29 



60 
80 



186.14 
16.24 
18.84 
16.44 
16.54 
16.64 

1.50 



3.50 
5.15 



8.50 
5.30 



3.60 
5.86 



8.25 
4.45 



18.60 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
•6.79 
16.89 



2.24 
2.74 



2.40 
3.15 



"3.65 



16.89 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 

23.80 



274 
8.24 



8.84 

7.10 



Digitized by 



Google 



378 SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVIOB. 

Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. l(3r % 1919 — Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 



\ 




Ton*. 



00 



600 



300 



1 
106 



too 



25 



600 
80 



For Nett Lake School, Minn.: Coal, smithing, sacked, f. o. b. oars Orr, Minn. 
For Nevada School, etc., Not.: 

Cool h 50ft 1 ump * ' A between ■ ' bmo f I , I n dep* ndent Coal 6 Coke Co.'s mines 
at Kenilworth, Vtah t I o. b. cars at mines (railroad weights and inspec- 
tion as tu quality at Ke nil worth to be fttmJ), vis- 
Delivery prior to July 31, 1013 .. 

Delivery Aug, 1 to Sept. 30, 1913. 

Delivery Oct* 1, to Nov, 30, 1013., 

Delivery after Nov. 30. 1913 : 

Coal, Keystone Lilly smithing socked, f. o. bears docks, Superior, Wis., 

or Duluth, Minn. (2 toua for agency, Hon Tor school) 

For Oneida School. Wis.: 

Coal, soft, Voughlogheny screened lump, screened over 1* bar screen. 
From Kinder Mine, located at California, Washington County, Pa., 

delivered in school bins , 

Coal, hard, stove sire, Philadelphia A Heading Coal 6 Iron Co., Wyoming 

dUtttict, Pa., delivered in school him 

Discounts on hard coal- 
May, 4(J cent* per ton. 
June, 30 cents per ton. 
July, 20 cents per ton. 
August, 10 cents per ton. 
September and thereafter, no discount 
For Otoe School, Okla.: 

Coal, soft, McAlester, lump, vis— 

Iff.o.b. Haueyville, Okla 

If £ o.b. Rod Rock, Okla 

Blacksmith coal, from Sonman, Pa., f. o. b. cars Chicago, 111 

For Pawnee School, Okla.: Coal, soft, McAlester, lump, vis: 

If Lo.b. Haueyville, Okla 

Iff. o.b. Pawnee, Okla 

For Phoenix School, Aria.: Coal, soft. "American block," lump site, mined 
by Victor American Fuel Co., at Gallup, N. Max., f. o. b. Gallup, N. Max., 

Delivery before Oct. 1, 1913 

Delivery after Oct. 1, 1913 

For Pierre School, S. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, stove size, from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
In carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., vis- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

8hlpped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock Superior, Wis 

For Pine Ridge School, etc., S. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from Wyoming district, Pa. (shipper's 
weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). In car- 
load lots f. o. b. cars 8upenor, Wis., or Chicago, 111., vis — 
20 tons, nut size, for agency- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

8 hipped during August 

8hipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

40 tons, stove size, 30 tons for school, 10 tons for agency- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped daring June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 



342 



198 

m 
m 

193 
236 



262 
2 

262 



273 



flL8 



14&* 
16S-J 

10CM 
8.1». 



n&i 



50 
25 

so 



so 

90 



74 
24 



»& 


14 


•& 


24 


»6. 


34 


*& 


44 


»& 


64 


«& 


64 


»«3. 


56 



• Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to the following charges, if incurred: 
cartage, 60 cents per ton. 

• Where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment subject to 
incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 

• If sacked, SI. 75 per ton additional. 

Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 



273 




■«■ '2 

il -59 

• 6. 79 

•J: » 


273 




•6. —i« 
• 6. « 


Sacking 


f IL^fc 


extra 


charge^* 



Digitized by 



Google . / 



BUPPUES FOB THE IND1AX SBBVICB. 



879 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1919 — Continued. 
COAL-Continued. 




Tjm$. 



660 



20 



860 



76 



1,000 



66 



40 



200 



For Pine Ridge School, eU-., S. Dab, —Continued. 
PctinsylvLitiia anthracite coal, etc. -Continued. 
20 ton-!, grate she. for agency— 

Shipped diiririjR April, --* 

BhLpped during May.., 

Shipped during June.. 

ShippwJ during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghiogbenv lum r> coal, i- t>, h. <lock, Superior, Wis. (500 tons for school, 

^Oions for day schools, Bzid 100 tons for agency ) , 

For Pipestone School, Minn.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, stove size, from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
" its Superior, Wis., orC" 



In carload lots f. o. b. cars E 



Shipped during April. 
Shipped during May . . 



r Chicago, 111., vis- 



Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock. Superior. Wis 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, Wis 

For Potawatomie day schools, etc., Kans.: 

-■*-■■ .....- — . E ^strict, Pa. 

settlements). 
L, for agency, 
vis- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

8hipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

"Black Brier" soft, mined at Johnston City ,111., f. o. b. cars at mine, 
Johnston City, 111., lHnch lump (60 tons for day schools, 25 tons for 

For Rapid City SchooY. 8. Dak., coal! soft! Carney, screened, lump or egg, viz: 

Iff. o.b. cars Rapid City, s\ Dak..... 

If in bins at school 

For Red Lake School, etc.. Minn.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
In carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, I1L, 25 tons for 
Red Lake School, 20 tons for agency, 20 tons for Cross Lake School, viz*- 

Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

8hipped during August 

8hipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis. (15 tons for Red 

Lake School, 5 tons for Cross Lake School) 

For Red Moon School, etc.. Okla., coal, soft, McAlester, lump, (20 tons school, 
20 tons for Cheyenne Indians), viz: 

If f. o. b. Haileyvtlle, Okla 

Iff. o. b. Hammon, Okla 

Blacksmith coal, from Somman, Pa., f. o. b. cars Chicago, 111 

For Rosebud School, etc., S. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, taken from Wyoming district, Pa. (ship- 
per's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
In carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz— 
170 tons, nut size (60 tons for day schools, 60 tons for agency, 50 tons 
for school)— 

8hipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July a 

Shipped during August. 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 



273 



360 



273 



309 
267 



273 



244 



291 
291 



273 



262 

262 

2 



i$5.89 
i«.99 
»C. 00 
16.19 
16.29 
16.39 

"3.56 



16.14 
16.24 
16.34 
16.44 
16.64 
16.64 
113.55 
5.95 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 



1.50 



3.55 
4.35 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 

"3.55 



3.50 
6.50 
5.80 



16.39 
16.49 
16.59 
16.69 
16.79 
16.89 



i If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 



• Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 



Digitized by 



Google 



380 8UPPUB8 FOB THE INDIAN SBBVTGB. 

Contracts aivdrded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913— Continued. 
COALr-Cootintied. 



\ 




Ton*. 



10 



875 
110 

65 
300 

5 
000 



50 
30 
231 

100 



For Rosebud School, etc., S. Dak. -Continued, 
Pennsylvania anthracite coal, etc.— Com inued. 
30 tons, stove size (for agency 

Shipped during Apr! L *,,„,«, „,.„.«.**.., 

Shipped during May ........... 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July .....,♦....,__., -_... 

Shipped during August „...-.. 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

Lehigh Valley anthracite, mines of Lehigh Valley Coal Co.. In Lnaerne 
County, Pa., f. o. b. docks, Superior, wis., nut sin (for day schools) , 
▼la- 
April, 1914 . ♦.., 

May, 1914 

June, 1014 .......,..< 

July, 1013. 



August, 1013.. 

Sept. 1, 1913, to Mar. 31 f 1914 



Youghlogheny lump coal (600 ton* for school, 300 torn for day school, 76 

tons for agency) f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis. -. 

For Sac and Fox School, etc., Okla.: 

Coal, soft, McAlester, lump (100 tons for school, 10 tons for agency), via— 

Iff.o.b. Stroud, Okla , . 

Iff.o. b. Hailevville. Okla. 

For Sac and Fox Day Schools, etc. Iowa: 

Coal, Youghlogheny, screened lump (2& tans lor day schools, 40 tons for 

agency), f. o. b. cars, dock, Milwaukee, Wis 

For Salem School, Oreg.: 

Newcastle soft coal, mined by Pacific Coast Coal Co., at Coal Creek.Waah- 

f shipments to be accomplished by Nov. I, 1013}, f. o. b. cars Seattle, 

Wash., lump, over 2-inch screen u> linker; then over i-lach to ova...., 

Coal, Keystone, Lilly smithing, sacked, f. o. b. cars, docks, Superior, Wis., 

or Duluth, Minn. „.*...,*..,.. .... 

For Santa Fe School, etc., N. Mex.: 

"Ccrrillos" soft coal, run of mine, delivered at school f if entire tonnage 
can not be furnished from Cerritlos mines, coal from Raton district will 

be furnished) „ , . . „ .**.*. 

For Santee Agency, etc., Nebr.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from Wyoming district, Pa. (shipper's 
weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). In 
carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, III., vii— 
Nut sise (for Santee Indians)— 

Shipped during April . . 

Shipped during May ...,.„..„„ T T ..„♦ ^ .,♦.....,.,.« .. 

Shipped during June. 

Shipped during July . ■ „..,„...♦,„,.,....,. - 

Shipped during A ugust. ...... »*....., 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mur. 31 ..♦..„._*.........-. ...I, 

For Seger School, etc., Okla.: 

Coal, soft, McAlester, lump (150 tons for school, 20 tons for Cheyenne and 
Arapahoe Indians), vis - 

Iff. o. b. Hailevville, Okla 

Iff. o. b. Weatherford, Okla 

For Seneca School, Okla.: 

"Black Brier" soft, mined at Johnston City, 111., f. o. b. cars at mine, 

Johnston City, 111., 1 J-inch lump 

For Shawnee School, Okla.: 
Coal, hard, nut site— 

F. o. b. cars Russellville, Ark , 



273 



MOO 



F. o. b. cars Thackery . Okla 

Coal, soft, McAlester, lump, viz— 

If f. o. b. Hailevville, Okla 

Iff. o.b. Thackery, Okla 

For Sherman Institute, Cal.: 

Coal, soft, lump, screened, from "Casna" mine, f. o. b. mines Gallup, N. 
Mex., vis- 
Shipments between May 1, 1913. and Aug. 31, 1913 

Shipments between Sept. 1, 1913, and Apr. 30, 1914 



337 



2T3 



962 
262 



244 



262 
262 



262 
262 



218 
218 






■ a._ <D 

"V _ a* 



3~n 



3- * 



*5_«0 



*-* 






to 

16 
I* 
i # 



i<*_ « 



«- SO 



3. ** 



1 If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 

* I/ess 1 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

* I*ss 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

« Rescreened at dock at Milwaukee. „~ 

• Shipments in less-than-carload lots are subject to following extra charges, if incurred— sacking $17^ 
cartage 60 cents per ton. 

• Where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, subject to extra charge- 
if incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THB INDIAN SEBVIOE. 



381 



GontracU awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 191$— Continued. 
COALr-Continued. 




130 

n 

70 



61 
If 



Petwisvivania anthracite coal, 5 to vetted, from Wyoming district, Pennsyl- 
vania (shipper's weigh i I o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settle- 
ments). In carload lotsf.o. h. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz- 



Shipped during April., 
Shipped during May. 
Shipped during June, 
Shipped during July 



Shipped during August 

• t. Uolfar. 31. 



Shipped $< 
YoiwhioKhany lump coal f. o, b. dock, Superior, Wis. 
For Spokane Agency, etc., Wash J 

t'oul. Keystone Lilly Smith w, sacked, f. o. b. oars dooks Superior, Wis., 

cr Imluih. Minn, r\ ton for day schools, 1 ton for agency) 

For Springfield bVftooj. 8. J>ek.: 

P«nn.sylviuiia anthracite foal, from Wyoming district, Pennsylvania 
i sh i pner ' s weigh ts 1 . o . b , poin t of shipment togovern in all settlements). 
In carload lqis f . o. h. cars Supeiior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz— 
20 tons, stove size— 



WUW« IWI« omm^— 

Shipped during April.. 
Shipped during Hay... 



Shipped during June. 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped Sept7l to liar. 31. 
60 tons, grate sue— 



wua, gl»K> bu« — 

8hipped during Aprils . 
Shipped during May.. 



Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August. 

Shipped Septl to Mar. 31 

Youghiogheny lump coal f. o. b. dock Superior, Wis 

For Standing Rock Agency, etc., N. Dak.: 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, Wis. (6 

tons for ageucv, i ton for agency school) 

CoaL soft. Youghiogheny, f. ©. b. cars Duluth, Minn., Superior, Wis., or 

Milwaukee, wis., viz, tamp size (for agency) 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock Superior, Wis. (186 tons for agency, 
06 tons for day schools, 60 tons for agricultural school, 100 tons for agency 

school) .......... 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from Wyoming district Pennsylvania 
(shipper's weights fob, point of shipment to govern in all settlements). 
In carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wb., of thkago, TJ1., vis— 
£0 tons, nut size 1 20 tons for agency school, 30 tons for agency)— 



Shipped diirjrue April.. 
Shipper! during May.. 
Shipped during June, 
Shipped during July. 



Shipped during August. 

Shipped Sept. I to Mar, 31 . 

l&fl tons, stove siie {» tons for day schools, 100 tons Ibr agency, 50 tons 
for igTkrulturttl school)— 

Shipped during April, . , 

Shipped during May +t + t . 

Shipped during June *, 

Shipped during July. , „, 

Shipped during August,.. 

Shipped SeptTl to Mar. 31 

160 tons, egg size (for agricultural school)— 



Shipped during ApriL . 
Shipped during May... 
Shipped during June. 
Shipped during July.. 



Shipped during August 

Shipped Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 . 



273 

'309 
236 



273 



273 

•369 

267 
267 

•369 



273 



273 



273 



1*6.14 
16.24 
16.34 
16.44 
16.64 
16.64 
13.66 



•5.00 



16.14 
16.24 
16.34 
16.44 
16.54 
16.64 

15.89 
16.00 
16.00 
16.10 
16.20 
16.30 
13.66 



6.06 
>3. 60 

•3.66 



'6.30 
•6.40 
•ft. 59 
•ft. 69 

• 6.79 

• ft. 89 



•ft. 14 
•6.24 
•ft. 34 
•ft. 44 
•ft. 54 
'6.64 

•ft. 14 
•6.24 
•6.34 
•6.44 
•6.64 
•6.64 



f sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 
Less 2 per oent discount if paid within 60 days. 

mipments in less than carload lots are subject to the following charges, if inourred— sacking, $1.76 per 
cartage, 60 oants per ton. Where necessary to transfer ooal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, 
ect to extra charge, if incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 



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382 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913 — Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



No. 
of 



Price 
per too. 



Ton*. 



000 
260 



1 

200 



150 
2 



80 



142 



150 

3} 
20 



For standing Rock Agency, etc., K- Dak.— Continued. 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, etc.— Continued. 

130 tons, grata size tlor agency school)— 

Shipped daring April 

Shipped during Muy. . , 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July. 



Shipped during August. 

Shipped fiffpt. 1 to Mar. 31. 



For Toman School Wis.: 

Coal . soft, Yonghiogh^uv, h i lump, mined in whatis known as the 

nu.^burg-i gusdlsLrirt.iti school bins 

Coal, hard, egg or stove sImss, in school bins, vis, (25 tons stove sixe, 225 
tons agg sise>— 

April, 1913. , 

May, 1913 

June, 1913 

July, 1913 

August. 1913 

September, 1913, and thereafter to Mar. 31, 1914 

For Tongue River School. Mont.: 

Coal, blacksmith, sacked, f. o. b. cars Duluth, Minn., or Superior, Wb. ... 
For Truxton Canon School, Ariz.: 

Coal, soft, Diamond Coal Co.' s mines at Gallup, N. Mex., run of mine, f. o. b. 
cars Gallup, N. Mex., viz (railroad weights and Inspection as to quality 
at Gallup to be final)— 

Shipment prior to Sept. 1, 1913 

Shipment on or after Sept. 1, 1913 

For Tulalip Agency, etc.. Wash.: 

Coal, soft, Roslyn, Wash., nut size, f. o. b. dock at Tulalip, Wash., In sacks. 
Coal, blacksmith, Georges Creek, W. Va. (1 ton for agency, 1 ton for 

school) 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, from Wyoming district, Pa. 
(shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settle- 
ments), in carload lots f. o. b. cars Superior, Wis., or Chicago, HI., vis- 
Shipped during April 

Shipped during May 

Shipped during June 

Shipped during July 

Shipped during August 

Shipped Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 

For Turtle Mountain Day Schools, etc., N. Dak.: 

Coal, hard, Pennsylvania, Lehigh Valley, or Schuylkill, f. o. b. cars Holla, 
N. Dak., viz— 

82 tons nut size (10 tons for agency, 72 tons for day schools) 

60 tons stove size (for agency) 

Coal, soft, Youghiogheny, Virginia Splint, or Hocking Valley, all re- 
scroened at the head of the lakes, f. o. b. cars, Rolls, N. Dak. (for day 

schools) 

Coal, Sunday Creek Hocking lump, f. o. b. Dunseith, N. Dak. (for day 

schools) 

Coal, Lehigh anthracite, nut size, f. o. b. Dunseith, N. Dak. (for day 

schools) 

Deductions on anthracite coal — 

For April shipments deduct 50 cents per ton. 
For May shipments deduct 40 oents per ton. 
For June shipments deduct 30 cents per ton. 
For July shipments deduct 20 cents per ton. 
For August shipments deduct 10 cents per ton. 
For Tuskahoma Female Academy, Okla.: 
Coal, soft, McAlester, lump, viz— 

Iff. o.b. Wilburton, 6kla 

Iff. o. b. Tuskahoma, Okla 

For Uintah School, etc., I'tah: 

Coal, blacksmith, in bins at agency (for agency) 

For Umatilla Day Schools, Oreg.: 

Rock Springs, Wyo., soft, 3-inch lump coal, f.o.b. Rock Springs, Wyo., 
viz— 

Delivery to Sept. 1, 1913 

Delivery Sept. 1 to Mar. 31, 1914 



273 



263 



253 



267 



193 

42 

290 



273 



317 

317 
163 
163 



262 
249 



}»k 



is-** 

i*.Ot 

■ ft.19 

16. 39 



4-75 

S» 10 

a. so 
a. a> 

8L €0 



l-« 

a. » 

IT. CO 



s<V_ 39 
16. 49 
«*. £9 
16. «» 
*ft_ 79 
16. 89 



*9- *> 
19. «5 



«6u ^O 

a. 75 



3- iW 

4-» 



12 SO 



» If sacked. $1.75 per ton additional 

*To be sacked at $1.75 per ton additional. 



Agency must pay any demurrage accruing after notice of shipment of oars. 
Mln *-•-»-*- — 



< Mine weights to govern. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIOB. 



388 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1913— Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 



ids. 


Point of delivery. 


No. 
of 

con- 
trac- 
tor. 


Price 
per ton. 


fW. 

135 

no 


For Vermillion Lake School, Minn.: 

Coal, soft, Youghiogheny, lump, f. o. b. ears Tower, Minn 

Coal, Pennsylvania anthracite, from mines of Pennsylvania Coal Co. in 
Luzerne County, Pa., f. o. b. cars Tower, Minn., viz— 
150 tons, nut size- 
Shipped during July, 1913 


342 
342 
342 

273 
• 309 

193 
193 
193 
193 

235 
20 

56 
56 

273 
273 


$4.37 
f 7.81 




Shipped during August, 1913 


7.91 




Shipped Sept. 1, 1913, to Apr. 1,1914 


a 01 




Shipped during April, 1914 


7.51 




Shipped during May, 1914 


7.61 




Shipped during June, 1914 


7.71 




150 tons, stove size- 
Shipped during July, 1913 


f 7.56 




Shipped during August, 1913 


7.66 




Shipped Sept. 1, 1913, to Apr. 1,1914 ,.. 


7.76 




Shipped during April, 1914 


7.26 




Shipped during May, 1914 


7.36 




Shipped during June, 1914 


7.46 


35 


For Wahpeton School. N. Dak.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nut size, taken from Wyoming district, 
Pennsylvania (shipper's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in 
all settlements. ) In car load lots f . o. b. cars Superior, Wis. , or Chicago, 
111., viz- 
Snipped during April. ............ ± L ± , . x l± t , , L , . ,. , 


f *6.39 




Shipped during May , . , . * . ., ...... 


>6.49 




Shipped during Jutw. ... T ... ........ * . ..i.,^,.* x.^ Li , , 


>6.50 




Shipped during July 


16.60 




Shipped during August 


<6.79 




Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 


16.80 


470 


Yougbiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis 


13.55 


30 


For Walker River School, etc., Nev.: 

Coal, soft, lump, "Aberdeen," f. o. b. mines, Kenilworth, Utah (10 tons 
tor school. 10 tons for agency; railroad weights and inspection as to 
quality at Kenilworth, Utah, to be final), viz— 
Deliveries prior to July 31, 1913 


2.45 




Deliveries Aug. 1, to &pt.30, 1913 


2.65 




Deliveries Oct. 1 to Nov. 30, 1913 


3.00 




Deliveries after Nov. 30, 1913 


3.10 


3 


For Warm 8prings Agency, Oreg.: 

Coal, Keystone, Lilly smithing, sacked, t o. b. cars dock, Superior, Wis., 

or Duluth, Mfr»T» 


>5.90 


2 


For Western Navajo School, Ariz.: 

Coal, Keystone blacksmith, delivered at Flagstaff, Ariz 


24.00 


10 


For Western Shoshone School, etc., Nev.: 

Rock Springs, Wyo., soft, 3-inch lump coal f. o. b. Rock Springs, Wyo., 
viz— 
Delivery to Sept. 1, 1913 


2.25 




Delivery Sept. 1 to Mar. 31, 1914 


2.50 


87 


For White Earth School, etc., Minn.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, from Wyoming district, Pennsylvania (ship- 
per's weights f. o. b. point of shipment to govern in all settlements). In 
carload lots f. o. b. cars, Superior, Wis., or Chicago, 111., viz— 
20 tons, stove size (for Chippewa Indians)— 

8hipped during April T . T T , . / T T , 


f 1 6. 14 




Shipped during May 


16.24 




Shipped during June 


16.34 




Shipped during July 


16.44 




Shipped during August 


16.54 




Shipped during Sept 1 to Mar. 31 


16.64 




25 tons, grate size (for school) — 

Shipped during April 


f 15.89 




Shipped during May 


15.99 




Shipped during June 


16.09 




Shipped during July 


16.19 




Shipped during August 


16.29 




Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31 


16.39 



[f sacked $1.75 per ton additional. 

Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to the 

, cartage 60 cents per ton; where necessary to transfer coal to 

|ect to extra charge, if incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 



, if inc urred s acking $1.75 per 
depots to accomplish shipment, 



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384 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIGB, 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of Feb. 10, 1SJ$— Continued. 
COAL— Continued. 



Awards, 



Point of delivery. 



No. 
of 



tor. 



Prin 



Ton*. 



640 
30 



100 
250 

20 



259 
120 



For White Earth School, etc., Minn— Continued. 
Pennslyvania anthracite coal* etc,— Continued. 

m tons, nut siw? (It urns for Chippew* Indians, 2 tons for Wild Rice 
KherSihpolj 

Shipped during ApriL *„, 

Shipped during May .,..*., , , 

Stripped during Juno. „..,.„., 

Shipped during July ....... 

Shipped during August. + . 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Muf 3J r , 

22 tons, egg sIm {far Chippewa Indians)— 

Shipped during April.,,...., 

Sh ipped during May 

Shipped during June*..,,, .. 

.Shipped during July 

Shipped during August, .. „. . 

Shipped during Sept. I to Mar. 31 

Youghlogheny lump coal t.o.h. dock, Superior, Wis. (500 tons for school) 

HO ton* far Chippewa Indians) 

For Winnebago Agency , Nebr.: 

Pennsylvania anthracite coal, nnt iite, from Wyoming district, Penmyl- 
vuniii (shipper 1 * weights f. o, b, point of shipment to govern in all settle- 
ments), fn carload lota f. o. b. cars Superior, WK, or Chicago, I1L, via— 

Shipped during April, . „ 

Shipped during May, .,,..... w .,, , -,.,.. 

Shipped duringJaati... „ „_. 

Shipped during July.. „ „,* 

Shipped during August.....*.. *,..,* 

Shipped during Sept. 1 to Mar. 31.. 

Youghjogheoy lumpcoaJ, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis. 

For Wittenberg School , Wis,; 

Coal, soft, Youghiogheny screened Jump. Screened over l$-moh bar 
screen. Kinder Mine, located at California, Washington County, Pa., 
f. o. b. cars wiuenDerg, Wis. 
Coal, anthracite, stove sire, i. o. b. cars. Wittenberg, Wis. (Western Ry. 
Weigher's Association weights at loading point to govern in all settle- 
ments). 
For Yakima School, etc., Wash.: 

Coal, soft, Roslyn lump, in school bins {for school) 

Coal, Keystone Lilly smithing, sacked, f. o. b. cars, docks, Superior, Wis., 
or Duluth. Minn, (for agency). 
For Yankton School, etc., S. Dak.: 

Youghiogheny lump coal, f. o. b. dock, Superior, Wis. (234 tons for school, 

25 tons for agency). 
Coal, anthracite, Scran ton, Pa., nut site, at agency and school (100 tons 
for school, 20 tons for agency). 



273 



273 



»3W 



273 



25 
270 



87 
235 



360 
101 



»ta.» 

i. *.* 
Hj 
a a.* 

H» 

B.6.M 
me.44 
■ e.54 



»*# 

J a« 

■*« 

148 



8.06 



1100 
<5.90 



«J.55 
13.45 



1 If sacked, $1.75 per ton additional. 

* Less 2 per cent discount if paid within 60 days. 

1 Shipments in less than carload lots are subject to following extra charges, if incurred— sacking, $1.75, 
cartage, 60 cents per ton; where necessary to transfer coal to freight depots to accomplish shipment, subject 
to extra charge, if incurred, of 60 cents per ton. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



885 



Contracts awardedunder advertisement of May 6, 1913, for live $tock (Jor Sioux allottees). 
[Bids opened in Washington, D. C., Jane 10, 1013.] 



Awards. 


Description. 


Point of delivery. 


No. of 
contrac- 
tor. 


Unit 


« 008 


Heifers. 


For Cheyenne River Agency, 8. Dak. 

do. 1 


100 


880.80 


ST.:..:::::::: 


Milch cows. 




381 


Mans 


do i 


260 
350 


137.00 


123 


Heifers. 


For Standing Rock Agency, N. Dak 

do. 1 


80.08 


103 


Mflchoows. 




96 


Mares 


do 


350 

| m 

I 278 


190.00 


1,375 


Heifers. 


For Pine Ridge Agency, 8. Dak. 


/ SS0.34 

\ "40.00 

«S0.85 


318 


Mfloh cows. 


do.» 


10 


Mares .. 

Milch cows. 


do 

For Crow Creek Agency, S. Dak. 1 


t 300 
838 

278 

883 
272 
272 


•134.78 
•197.98 
/ '132.00 
\ •133.00 
•190.00 
•130.00 
•133.00 


71 


Mares 


For Crow Creek Agency^ 8. Dak. 


84 
130 


130.00 


48. 


Heifers. 


For Rosebud Agency, Bl Dak 


52.50 


1,886 


Hiloh <w»t , . . , Ll ,, 


do. 1 .1...!.' 




l|illl»M»M«««i 


Mares 


do 


304 

131 
219 
378 
273 

808 

180 


I •138.00 
{ •130.88 
1-143.00 

•138.50 
/ '134.60 
\ • 133. 50 

a 134. 00 
/ •133.00 
\ • 137. 00 

» 141. 00 

•142.00 







• No award. Bee Appendix. 

• Awarded 400. 

• Awarded 76. 

• Awarded 800. 

• Awarded 18. 
•Awarded 50. 



'Awarded 100. 

• Awarded 25. 

• Awarded 300. 
» Awarded 141. 
u Awarded 75. 
m Awarded 150. 



Oonsracts. awarded under advertisement of Aug. It, 1913, for corn meal, cracked wheat, 

dried fruit, etc. 

(Bids opened in Chicago.) 



Awards, 



Articles. 



No. of 

contrao- 

tor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



RJB8 pounds. 



"i960 pounds. 



•.883 pounds. 



Corn meal, white; must be of good mer- 
chantable quality, kiln-dried; to be de- 
livered in new double sacks containing 
not to exceed 100 pounds net, each; the 
inner one of cotton, the outer one of bur- 
lap. 
Corn meal, yellow; must be of good mer- 
chantable quality, kiln-dried; to be de- 
livered in new double sacks containing 
not to exceed 100 pounds net, each: the 
inner one of cotton, the outer one of bur- 
Cracked wheat; must be of rood merchant- 
able quality; to be delivered in new 
double sacks containing not to exceed 
100 pounds net, each; the inner one of 
cotton, the outer one of burlap. 
Hominy, pearl; must be of good merchant- 
able quality, sound end clean; to be de- 
livered in double bags containing not to 
exceed 100 pounds net, each; the inner 
one to be of good substantial burlap, the 
outer one a gunny. 

i Sample No. 3- 



105 



105 



181.00 
11.025 



1L00 
1L025 



Chicago. 
Omaha. 



Chicago. 
Omaha. 



105 



L07 
1.005 



F. o. b. cars Seattle, 
Wash., or Portland, 
Oreg . 



Chicago. 
Omaha. 



lfi«6'— utt 19ia— VOL ! 



-25 



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386 



SUPPLIES FOB THE VSOXUS 8BBVIOE. 



GontfiaaU awarded under adoertmment of Aug. H, 1913. far corn 
dried fruit, etc.— -Continued. 






Awards. 


Articles. 


No. of 
contrac- 
tor. 


Unit 
pries. 


Font of delivery. 


27/01 pounds.. 


Hominy grits; most be of good merchant- 










able quality, sharp and clean, and free 
from black specks; to be delivered In 
doable bags containing not to exceed 100 


196 


/ 81.97 
I 1.995 


Chicago, 
Omaha. 




pounds net, each: the Inner one to be of 
good substantial burlap, the outer one a 












68*484 pounds.. 


Boiled oatermust be of good merchantable 
Quality; to be delivered in pasteboard 
boxes of 2 pounds net, each, packed m 










106 


1*2. 63 
|»2.77 


Chicago. 
Omaha* 




cases of 72 pounds net to the case; cases 








to be strapped. 








4,714 poandi.. . 


Boiled oats, compressed; must be of good 
merchantable quality; to be delivered In 
sanitary tm oans ©12 pounds net. each 
(cans to have the side seam soldered, and 
the top and bottom attached with a ce- 










'268 


f .061 
\ .0616 


Chicago or 8t Leah. 




Omaha. 




ment substance in addition to the usual 










crimping); packed In cases of 72 pounds 










net to the case; cases to be strapped. 








90,760 pounds.. 


Dried apples; to be delivered in double 










banoontainincnot toexceed 100 pounds 
net. each (burlap covered with gunny), 


206 


/ •.6676 
\ «.07 


Portland, Oreg. 
Do. 


■impounds.. 


or m boxes, strapped. 

Dried peaches: to w delivered in double 
ban containing not to exceed 100 pounds 
net, each (burlap covered with gunny), 
or in boxes, * strapped. 

Dried prunes; 70 tow's; to be delivered In 
double bags containing not to exceed 100 
pounds net. each (burlap covered with 
gunny), or in boxes, strapped. 


••278 


.0606 


San Frsncjsoa. 










tlft^ pounds. 


•276 


.0686 


Do. 




















CASHED GOODS. 








SfflflB dos. cans . . 


Corn, good standard quality, m No. 2 size 
cans, packed in strong cases; cases to be 
strapped. 


'260 


.675 


Chicago. 


867 dos. cans... 


Apples, good standard quality, in No. 8 
sue cans, packed In strong cases; cases to 


tio 


L2B 


Da 










964 dos. cans... 


be strapped. 
Blackberries, good standard quality, m 


1 '■•260 

87 


.86 
LOS 


Do. 




No. 2 cans, packed in strong eases; asses 
to be strapped. 
Peaches, for table use, extra standard, in 
No. 2} sue cans, packed m strong oases; 


Ban r lauusjeSk 


768 dos. cans... 


L80 


Do. 










Ml dos. cans... 


cases to be strapped. 
Roma, good quality, either egg or green- 
gages, in No. 2} sise cans, packed in 


17 


1.07 


Do. 










8,7t84as.eans.. 


strong eases; cases to be strapped. 
Tomatoes, good standard quality, in No. 8 

size cans, packed in strong oases; cases to 

be strapped. 
Tomatoes; good standard quality, in No. 


212 


.8857 


Bethlehem, lid. 


1/77 dos. cans.. 


321 


8.06 


Chicago 




10 size cans, packed in strong oases; easss 










to be strapped. 










ADDITIONAL ABTKUSS. 








7,060 pounds... 


Rolled oats; must be of good merchantable 
quality; to be delivered in barrels. 


\ "196 


/ 6.24 
\ 6.29 


Chicago, 
Omaha. 



» For ease of 72 pounds. 

• Only. In carload lots of 40,000 
•In bags. 

• In boxes. 

• Sample No. 2. 

• Zntf-pound boxes strapped. 



'Only. 

* Awarded 400 dozen. 

• Sample No. 1. 

» Awarded 864 dosen. 
a far banal of 380 pound*. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SBBVIOS. 



387 



C ontra cts awarded under advertisement of Augitst It, 1913, for flow, feed, canned goods, 

dried fruits, etc. 

[Bids opened In Chftoafe, DL] 
FLOUR, UNBLEACHED. 



Awards. 


Agencies, school*, etc 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Price per 
hundred- 
weight 


Point of delivery. 


Pounds. 
SOjOOO 


Armstrong Hale Orphan Academy, Okla.. 

Albuquerque School, N. Max 

Albuquerque-Pueblos ( Laguna-Pueblo In- 
dians), N. Mex. 
Bismarck School, N. Dak 


176 
281 
281 

852 
206 

204 

157 
204 

310 
352 
157 

352 
39 

204 
352 
30 
176 
178 
176 

352 

204 
204 

204 

157 
352 

204 

206 
176 

157 

206 
352 

352 

204 


82.08 
1.86 
1.85 

L87 
2.14 

1.875 

/ 2.21 
\ 2.05 
1.875 

2.25 
1.87 
2.20 

1.87 
12.225 

1.876 
1.87 
12.50 
2.00 
2.05 
2.05 

1.87 

1.875 
1.875 

1.875 

/ 2.30 

\ 2.05 

1.87 

1.875 
2.14 
2.09 
f 2.21 
\ 2.05 
2.14 
1.87 

1.87 

1.875 


Bokchfto. nfcla. 


90.000 


Stanton. Nehr. 


7fi00 


Do. 


15.000 


Minneapolis. 
Portland, Oreg. 

Cheney, Wash. 

Kemp City. Okla. 
ElReno^Okla. 
Cheney, wash. 

Los Angeles, Gal. 
Minneapolis. 
Canton, Okla; 


2^00 


Bishop School. etc., Cal., vis, 1,000 pounds 
for school; 600 pounds for Bte Pine Day 
School; 500 pounds for Independence 
Day School. 

Blackfeet School, etc., Mont., vis: 10,000 
pounds for boarding school: 900 pounds 
for day schools; 18,000 pounds for agency; 
24.225 pounds for Holy Family Mission 
School. 

Bloomfleld Seminary, Okla 


53^25 


12,000 


4,000 


Camp McDowell Day Schools, etc., Arte.. 
viz, 1,000 pounds for day schools; 3,000 
pounds for agency; 600 pounds for police. 

Campo School, Cal 


L200 


16,000 


Canton Asylum for Insane Indians. S. Dak. 
Cantonment School, etc., Okla., vis: 8,000 
pounds for school; 500 pounds for police. 
Carlisle School, Pa., viz: 

60,000 pounds {spring wheat). ......... 


8V600 


120.000.. 




" 


Minneapolis. 
Gettysburg Junction, 

Pa. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Minneapolis. 
Cherokee, N. C. 




60^000 pounds {winter wheat) 


50X00.... 


Carson School, Nev 


8-000. .... 


Ham T Akn Rr>hnnl Ujrm ..,...,, 


36,000 


Cherokee School, fr. C 


15,000 


Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla... 
Chilocco School, Okla 


Ross, Okla. 


140.000 


Chflocco, Okla. 


30,200 


Cheyenne and Arapaho School, etc., Okla., 

viz, 30,000 pounds for school; 200 pounds 

for agency. 
Cheyenne River School, etc., S. Dak., vis, 
40,000 pounds for school; 5,000 pounds 

for day schools; 90,000 pounds for agency. 
Coeur d/Alene police (under CoeuroVAiene 

School), Wash. 
Colorado River School, etc., Ariz., vis, 

10,000 pounds for school; 10,000 pounds 

for agency. 
ColvQle Agency, etc.. Wash., viz, 1,800 

pounds for day schools 4, 6, 7; 2,200 

pounds for day schools 3, 5, 0; 2,000 

pounds for agency; 4,800 pounds for 

police. 

r^lljnq Trutitrtta, OMft ± 


Concho Siding, Okla. 

Minneapolis, 

Cheney, Wash. 
Do. 


135,000 


000 


20,000 


10,800 


Do. 


10,000 


Stonewall, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Minneapolis. 

Cheney, Wash. 
Portland, Oreg. 


35,000 


Crow Creek School, etc.. 8. Dak., viz, 
10,000 pounds for school; 25,000 pounds 
for agency. 

Cushman School, Wash 


75,000 


1J00 


Digger Agency, Cal 


20,000 


Euchee School, Okla 


Sapulpa/Oklal 
Eufaula, Okla. 


10,000 


Eufaula School, Okla 


200 


Fallon (Lovelocks Day School), Nev 

Flandreau School, etc.. S. Dak., viz, 90.000 
pounds for school; 5,000 pounds for Flan- 
dreau Indians. 

Fond du Lac Chippewa Indians, Minn., 
etc., viz, 2,800 pounds for Chippewa In- 
dians; 2,200 pounds for police. 

Fort Apache School.etc., Ariz., viz, 40,000 
pounds for school; 40.000 pounds for 
agency; 1,000 pounds for Cibeoue Day 
School; 1.000 pounds for Canyon Day 
School; 800 pounds for Bast Fork Day 
School. 


El Reno. Okla. 
Portland, Oreg. 
Minneapolis. 

Minneapolis. 

Cheney, Wash. 


85,000 


5,000 


•Voo.. ...... 





i Shipment before Dec. 1,1913. 



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388 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of August lt K 1913, for flour, feed, canned goods, 
dried fruits, etc.— Continued. 

FLOTJB, TJNBLKAGHKD— Continued. 



Awards. 


Agencies, schools, etc 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Price per 
hundred- 
weight 


Point of delivery. 


Pound*. 
38^300 


Fort Belknap School, etc.. Mont., Tit, 
12,000 pound* Jot school; 1,300 pounds for 
day school; LV0O0 pounds for a£oncy + 

Fort Berthold School, etc., N. Dak' vk, 
lti,000 pounds for school; 3.000 pounds for 
day school; a, 000 pounds for ugEUcy. 

Fort Hall, titc., Idaho, vit, 50,000 pounds 
for (fchoot; 3S P 000 pounds for agency. 

Fort LapwBf Sanatorium, Idaho 

Fort sfcDermilt Srhool r etc, Not.. vU, 
700 pounds for school ; 1,300 pounds for 
agency; 30Q pounds for pot Joe. 

Fort ifojavu School, etc., Arl*., rli, 3G/XW 
pounds for school, 550 pounds for policy . 

Fort Peck School, etc., Mont, tIi 30,000 
pound! for school; I J 000 pounds for day 
schools; 40,000 pounds for affencv. 

Fort Totten School , c tc. , N . Dak.,vb, 40,000 
pounds for school; 2,000 pounds for Derils 
Lake Sioux: 900 pounds for police. 

Fort Yuma School, etc., C&U, viz: 16,000 
pound* for Jihooi: 2,*W pound* for 
ajcenry: flOG pounds for poUce* 

Genoa School, Nebr. Ml *♦*..** *, 


204 

352 

370 

204 

20G 

in 

352 

310 

281 
352 
204 
281 
100 

352 

204 

281 

284 
852 

281 

\ 178 

178 
176 

208 
852 

862 

862 
204 

882 


81.875 
L8T 

1.01 

1.875 
114 

1.87 
1.87 

2.25 

1.85 
1.S7 
1.875 
1.95 

1.87 

1.875 

L86 

•2.18 
1.87 

1.85 

2.00 

2.00 
2.00 

2.14 
L87 

1.87 

1.87 
1.875 

1.87 


Cheney, Wash. 


31,000 


WIlMWfJIf 

Fort Hall, Uahc 

Cheney, Wash- 
Portland, Oreg. 

Mackmy, Idaho. 
Minneapolis. 

Do. 


85,000... *»...„ 


13.000 


a,aoo 


36,550 „ 


61,000... 


43,000 


10,200 


Los Angelas, GaL 


00,000.. ... 


Stanton, Nebr. 




Grand T'orUffl* A ft^^t, Minn . , , . , . 


Mbin^polis 
rhenev, Wash. 


18,000 


GnwnYUIe School, Caf, ". . . . . 

Haskell institute, Kans. ........... 


100,000. 


B tan ton, Nebr. 


1,100 


Havasupai School, etc,, Arti., Tfi: 1,600 
pounds for school; 1,500 pounds for 
agency. 

Hayward School, etc, Wis., via: 43,800 
pounds for school; IM0 pounds for 
Lao Court* Orafiles Day 8chool: 3,750 
pounds for Lao Court© Oreflles Indians; 
2,350 ponnds for Lao Coorte OrelUas 
poUoa. 

Hoopa Valley School, etc.. Gal, vis: 30,000 
pounds for school: 28,700 pounds for 
agencj: ljSOO pounds for police. 

Jlcarfila School, etc, N. MexTrls: 10,000 
for school; 2,000 pounds for day schools; 
20,000 pounds for agency. 

Jones Male Academy, Out 

Keshena School, etc, Wis., via: 10,000 
pounds for school; 1,200 pounds for 

^police. 

inAknpoo Pchool, Kan* 


Maekayi Idaho. 


51,000 


Mtnntapftlfe 


60,000 


Cheney, Wash. 


83,000 


Stanton, Nebr. 


24,000 


Hartahorne, Okie. 


11,200 


Minneapolis. 


12,000 


Stanton, Nebr. 


106,000 


Kiowa schools, em., Okla., vis: 

20,000 pounds for Anadarko School 

20,000 pounds for Rhrerside School 

40,000 pounds for Fort SHI School 

25.000 pounds for Rainy Mountain 

Klamath School, Ores;, 


2.000 


Anadarko, Okie. 

Lewton, Okie. 
Ootebo, Okla. 

Portland, Orex. 


27,500 


Lac du Flambeau School, etc, Wis!, vis: 
20,000 pounds for school; 7,500 pounds for 

La Points Annoy, etc, Wis., vis: 1,000 
pounds for day schools; 3,000 pounds for 
agency; 1,500 pounds for polioe. 

Leech Lake School, Minn 


Minneapolis. 
Do. 


5,500 


10,000 


Do. 


16,500 


Leupp School, etc. Aria., vis: 15,000 

pounds for school; 1,500 pounds for 

agency. 
Lower Brule School, etc, 8. Dak., vis: 

12,000 pounds for school; 15,000 pounds 

for agency. 


Cheney, Wash. 


27,000. ......... 


MlnneapoUs. 





> Delivery on or before Dec 31, 1913. 

■ Prices are based on carload lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may he oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload, then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight oar shipment then the minimum wffl be 30,000 pounds. If articles are ordered 
for shipment in less than carload lot quantities, as herein specified then the contractor is to be paid the 
sum of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



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BUPPLIB8 FOB THE HTOUN BBBVICB. 889 

ContmcUawaMtdtmderadvert&$merU of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned goods, dried 

fruits, «&.— Continued. 

FLOUB, TJNBLEACHBD-Contmued. 



Agencies, schools, etc. 




Price per 
hundred^ 
weight, 



Foint of delivery. 



Pointdi. 



18,000. 
S, 000. 

13,200. 



80,000. 
79,000. 



90,000. 



4,000. 
7,900. 



17,000. 



12,000... 
30,000... 
10,000... 
10,000... 

800 

20,000... 
150,000., 
30,000... 
100,000.. 

419,000.. 



60,000. 
16.000. 
9,500.. 



32,600., 



6,000. 



as 



Mekusukey Academy, Okla 

Mescalero School, etc, N. Max., vis: 
20,000 pounds for school^ 13,000 pounds 
tor agency. 

Moqui School, etc., Aris., vis: 3,000 pounds 
for Second Mesa Day School: 2,000 
pounds for Polacca Day School; 2,000 
pounds for Chlmapovy Day School; 700 
pounds for agency: 4,000 pounds for 
Draft* Day School; 1,600 pounds for 
Bacabi Day School. 

Mount Pleasant School, Mich 

Navajo SchooL etc., N. Mex., vis: 82,000 
pounds for Navajo School: 25,000 pounds 
for Tohatchi School; 10,000 pounds for 
Chin Lee School; 2.000 pounds for Corn- 
fields Day School; 10,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Navajo Springs School, etc.. N. Mex., vis: 
600 pounds for school; 30,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Neah Bay Agency, etc. Wash., vis: 3.260 
pounds for agency; 760 pounds for police. 

Nett Lake School, etc, Minn., vis: 2,700 
pounds for school: 4J0OO pounds for Bofa 
Fort Chippewa Indians; 1,200 pounds 
for police. 

Nevada School, etc, Nev., vis: 12,000 
pounds for school; 6,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Nuyaka School, Okla 

Oneida School, Wis 

Osage School, Okla. 

Otoe School, Okla 

Pala Agency, CaL 

Pawnee School, Okla. 

Phoenix School, Aris 

Pierre School, 8. Dak 

Pima School, etc., Aris., vis: 60,000 pounds 
for school; 60,000 pounds for agency. 

Pine Ridge School, etc.. S. Dak., vis: 
42,000 pounds for school; 16,000 pounds 
for day schools; 362,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Pipestone School, Minn 

Ponca School, Okla 

Pueblo Bonito School, etc., N. Mex.. vis, 
8,000 pounds for school; 1,600 pounds for 



Rapid City School, 8. Dak. 



agency, 

RapidCi, ..._. ............. 

Red Cliff School, etc, Wis., vis, 600 pounds 

for school; 2,000 pounds for agency; 

800 pounds for police. 
Red Lake School, etc, Minn., vis, 10,000 

pounds for Red Lake 8chool; 10,000 

pounds for Chippewa Indians; 2,600 

pounds for police; 10,000 pounds for 

Cross Lake School. 

Red Moon School, Okla , 

Rosebud School, etc., 8. Dak., vis: 



180,000 pounds ' for agency; 40,000 
pounds for school; 11,300 pounds for 
day schools. 



3,700 pounds for day schools 

Rice Station School, Aris 

Round Valley School, etc., Cal., vis, 160 
pounds for day schools; 1,600 pounds for 
Upper Lake, etc., field matrons. 



167 
157 



204 



204 



281 
208 



204 



$1.W 
2.05 
2.57 



1.875 



1.87 
1.878 



L85 

2.11 
1.87 

1.876 



170 


2.09 


352 


1.87 


284 


»2.20 


284 


12.20 


870 


2.19 


178 


2.09 


204 


1.875 


188 


2.20 


204 


1.875 



289 
204 



281 
352 



352 



284 
115 



281 
204 
206 



1.85 



1.87 
2.26 
1.875 



1.85 
L87 



L87 



12.20 
1.91 



1.85 

1.875 

2.14 



Seminole, Okla. 
£1 Reno, Okla. 
Tularosa, N. Max. 

Cheney, Wash. 



Minneapolis. 
Cheney, Wash. 



Stanton, Nebr. 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Cheney, Wash. 

Okmulgee, Okie, 
Minneapolis. 
Pawhuska, Okie, 
Red Rock, Okla. 
Arlington. CaL 
Pawnee, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Pierre SchooL 
Cheney, Wash. 

Stanton, Nebr. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
White Eagle, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Stanton, Nebr. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Do. 

Hammon, Okla. 
Valentine, Nebr. 



Stanton, Nebr. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Portland, Oreg. 



1 Prices are based on carload lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may be oats: if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight car shipment, then the minimum wfll be 30,000 pounds. If article* are ordered 
for shipment in less than carload lot quantities as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the sum 
of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



Digitized by 



Google 



390 



SUPPLIES FOB THE IMDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Ana. lt % 1913, for flour, feed, canned goods, dried 

fruits, «te.—Continuea. 

FLOUR, UNBLEACHED— Continued. 



Awarda. 


Agencies, schools, etc. 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Price per 
hundred- 
weight 


Point of delivery. 


Potmdi. 
2,100 


Sao and Vox Day Schools, etc., Iowa, viz, 
1^500 pound* for day schools; 600 pounds 
for police, 

Sao and Fox School, QJtia, 


353 

176 
204 
281 

281 
339 

204 
157 

157 

284 
370 
352 
370 

281 

281 
204 

204 

339 
352 

352 
190 

79 

204 
310 

352 

157 

157 
190 

352 


tM.87 

2.10 
1.875 
1.85 

1.85 
2.10 

1.875 

/ 2.17 

\ 2.05 

/ 2.21 

\ 2.05 

12.20 

2.19 

1.87 

2.19 

L85 

L85 
1.875 

L875 

2.10 
1.87 

L87 
»L«4 

2.06 

1.875 
2.25 

1.87 

f 2.22 
\ 2.06 
/ 2.40 
\ 2.05 
'1.64 

1.87 


Minneapolis, Minn. 
8troad, Okla. 


17,440 


140,000 


8alenj School, Oreg 


Cheney, Wash. 
Stanton, Nebr. 

Do. 


48,000 


San Juan School, etc.. N. Mex., via, 
30,ijOO pounds for sohuol: 8,000 pounds 
for Toad lean Day School; 7,000 pounds 
far Navajo Indians; 3,000 pounds ibr 
police. 

Santa Fe School, N. Mex 


60,000 


8,000 


San tea Indians (under Santas Ageney), 
Neor. 

San Xavter Papago Day Schools, Ark 

o*ger School, Okla 


Springfield, 8. Dak, 

Cheney, Wash. 
Weatherford. Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Wyandotte. Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Thackery, Okla. 
Arlington. CaL 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Arlington, Cal. 

Stanton, Nebr. 
Do. 


2,000 


11,500 


15,000 


fanm* ftahoQ], OHa ..n,. *....*...*». 


20,000 


Shawnee School, Okla 


100.000 „ 


Sherman Institute, Cal 


90,000 


8fe?rtcm <*-*— ' «. T>ak 


2,100 


8oboba Agency, etc.. Cal., vti. 1/flO 
pounds fur Sol-oNa Agency; 000 pounds 
for <J ahull In N-tiLH>i. 

8hoshon(i School, etc., Wyo., v\* t 30,000 
pounds fat school; 28.000 pounds tor 
Shoshone Indians; 40,0uu pounds tor 
Northern Arapaho Indians. 

Southern l T te school, etc., Colo,, via, 
13,0110 ponad* tor school; 1,000 pounds 
Tor day school; 30,000 pounds fur nguricv. 

S]otMia Day Schools, etc., Wash!, vis. 
2.200 pounds for day schools; 6,500 
pounds for agency; 1,500 pounds for 
jjoUco. 

8flaU A nancy, etc.. Oreg. t 7 Is, 8,000 
pounds for SUetx Agency; 4,3rtu pounds 
tar Grande Rondo. Indians; £40 pounds 
for Grande Konde police. 

SpriritffVM School, B. Dak 


107,000 


43,000 


10,200 


Cheney, Wash. 
Do. 


18,400 


8X00 


Springfield. 8. Dak, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Do. 


141,000 


Standmc Rock Agency School, etc., N. 
Dak., vis, 3o,0U0 pounds for agency 
school; 20,000 pounds for agricultural 
school; 8,000 noiuids for dav schools; 
80,000 pounds for agency. 

Tomah fiohool, Wis 


48,000 


18,000 


Truxton Canon School, etc., Ariz., viz, 
10,000 pounds for school; 8,000 pounds 
for Walapal Indians. 

Tongue River Agency, Mont 


Mackay, Idaho. 

Crow Agency Station, 

Mont/ 
Cheney, Wash. 
Fresno, Cal. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Tuskahoma, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Tullahassee, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Mackay, Idaho. 

Minneapolis. 


110,000 


80,000 


Tulalip School, Wash 


1,100 


Tule River School, etc., Cal.. vis, 600 

pounds for school ; 500 pounds nor agency. 
Turtle Mountain Day Schools, etc., N. 

Dak., vis, 3,750 pounds for day schools; 

13,600 pounds for agency; 2,000 pounds 

for police. 

Tnskahoma Female Academy, Okla 

Tallahassee Orphan School, Okla 


19,350 


12,000 


12,000 


79,300 


Uintah School, etc., Utah, viz: 8,000 
pounds for school; 70,000 pounds, 
Uintah, etc., Indians; 1,300 pounds for 
Uintah police. 

Vermillion Lake School, Minn 


15,000 



> Prices are based on carload lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds most be observed. 
If oats are ordered In straight car shipment then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are ordered 
tor shipment in less than carload lot quantities as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the 
sum of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 

t Delivery on or before Dec. 31, 1913. 



Digitized by 



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8T7PPLXB8 FOB THE IHDIA1T SBBVIOB. 



391 



Ctmtnete awarded under advertisement of Aug, It, 1913, for flow, feed, teamed good$> dried 

fruite, etc.— -Continued. 

FLOUB, UMBLBACHMD-Contmued. 



AWBTdl. 


Agencies, schooles, etc. 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 


Point of delivery.. 


rounds. 

•ijm.... 


Volcan School, etc., CaL, vis, 1,850 
pounds tor Volcan School; 1,200 pounds 
for Volcan Agency; 660 pounds for 
Capitan Grand© School; 2$00 pounds 
for Capitan Grande Agency; 1,826 
for Mesa Grande Agency. 

Wahpeton School, N? Dak 

Walker River School, etc.. Ner., via, 
2,600 pounds for school; 1,280 pounds for 
agency; 720 pounds for polios. 

Warm Sprints School, etc., Oreg., vis, 
20,000 pounds for Warm Springs School; 
600 pounds far Sfannasho Day School; 
5,000 pounds far agency; 1,400 pounds 
for police. 

Western Navajo School, etc., Aria., vis, 
25.000 pounds for Western Navajo 
School; 1,000 pounds for police: 10,000 
pounds for Marsh Pass School. 

western Shoshone School, etc., Nov., vis, 
15,000 pounds for school; 8,500 pounds 

Whlte S £arm SchnoL etc., Minn., vis, 
18,000 pounds fcrWhito Earth School; 
52,000 pounds for White Earth Chippewa 
Indians; 3,000 pounds for police: 500 
pounds for Elbow Lake Day School; 
9.000 pounds for Fine Point School; 
400 pounds for Round Lake Day School; 
600 pounds for Portervflle Day School; 
6.000 pounds for Wild Rice River School; 
500 pounds for Twin Lake Day School. 

Wheelook Orphan Academy, Okla 

Wittenberg School, Wto. 


310 

352 
206 

82 

204 

370 
352 

176 
852 
204 

352 

204 


82.25 

L87 
2.14 

2.125 

1.875 

1.88 
1.87 

2.14 
L87 
1.875 

L87 

1.875 


Loa Angeles, Cei. 

Mfanminp^, Minn. 
Portland, Oreg. 

Mecca, Oreg. 

Cheney, Wash. 

Mountain Home 
Idaho. 

MinneapoMB, Minn. 

Mfflerton, Okie, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Cheney, Wash. 

MinneapoMB, Minn. 

Cheney, Wash. 


21.000.. ........ 

4,500 


27,000 


36/100 


23,500. 

90,000 


11JD75 


gaoflft 


26^00 


Yakima School, etc., Wash., vis, 21,000 
pounds for school; 1,500 pounds for 
agency; 3,000 pounds for police. 

Yankton School/etc., S. Dak., vis, 20,000 
pounds for school; 6,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Zunl School, N. Mez 


25,000 


10,000 







FLOUR, WHOLE WHEAT. 



MOO. 

500.. 
000.. 

2,000. 

\8°. 

100.. 

iff 

2,000 
1,000 

100.. 

l^no 

1,200 

ic 

1,000 



Albuquerque 8ehool, N. Mez 

Bloomfleld Seminary. Okla 

Cantonment School, Okla , 

Cheyenne and Arspaho School, Okla. . , 

Colorado River School. Aris , 

Cushman School, Wash , 

Fort Apache School, Aris , 

Fort Lapwai Sanatorium, Idaho , 

Klamath School, Oreg 

Leupp School, Arii , 

Phoenix School, Aris 

Pipestone 8chool, Minn 

Salem, School, Oreg , 

Santa Fe School, N. Mez 

San Xavier Papego Day Schools 

Sisseton School, a. Dak 

Standing Rock Day Schools. N. Dak. . . 
Turtle Mountain Day Schools. N. Dak. 

Wheetock Orphan Academy. Okla 

Wittenberg School, Wfe...... 



81.90 



284 


12.12 


284 


12.11 


284 


»2.02 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


187 


1.80 


3 


1.90 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


3 


1.99 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


204 


1.70 


284 


12.13 


204 


1.70 



Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 
Kemp City, Okla. 
Canton, Okla. 
Concho Skiing, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 

Do. 
Fort LapwaL Idaho. 
Seattle, Wash., or Fort- 
land, Oreg. 
Cheney t Wash. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Greg' 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
MfllertonjOkle. 
Cheney, Wash. 



> Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight-car shipment then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are ordered 
lor shipment in less than carload-lot quantities, as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the 
earn of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



Digitized by 



Google 



392 SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN 8EBVI0B. 

Contracts awarded undo- advertisement of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned goodi, dried 

fruit*, «te.— Continued. 

FLOUR, GRAHAM. 



Awards. 



Agencies, school*, etc. 



Number 
of con- 
tractor. 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight 



Point of deUrery. 



Pound*. 

500 

r-.:::::: 

8,000 

iff .::::::: 

000 

000 

200 

M0 

!«°::::::: 

600 

200 

1,000 

200 

200 

200 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1.000 

100 

200 

800 

2,000 

600 

1,000 

600 

2,000 

1,000 

100 

1,100 

1.000 

100 

1,100 

600 

1,000 



Albuquerque School, N. Max. 

Blsmark School, N. Dak...' 

Blackfeet School, Mont 

Bloomfield Seminary, Okla 

Cheyenne and Axapaho School, Okla 

Colorado River School, Ariz .-. 

Crow Agency, etc., Mont., vis, 600 pounds 
for annoy school; 100 pounds for agency. 

Crow Creek Sohool. S. Dak 

Euohee School, Okla 

Eufaula School, Okla. 

Fort Lapwal Sanatorium. Idaho 

Fort MoDermitt School, Nev 



Fort Mojave Sohool, Axis 

Fort Tottan Sohool, N. Dak . 
Jones Male Academy, Okla... 

Keshena School, Wis 

Klamath School, Oreg. 



Leupp School, Axis 

Mekusukey Academy, Okla. . 
Mesoalero Sohool, N. Mex. ... 



Nuyaka School, Okla 

Pawnee School, Okla 

Pine Ridge School, S. Dak 

Pueblo Bonito School, N. Mex. 

Red Lake School. Minn 

Round Valley School, Cal 



Sac and Fox School, Okla.. 
Santa Fe Sohool, N. Mex .. 



Seneca School, Okla , 

Slsseton Sohool, S. Dak 

Tulalip School, Wash 

Tuskanoma Female Academy, Okla. 

Umatilla School, Oreg 

Vermillion Lake School, Minn 

Western NavaJo-Marsh Pass Sohool, Arts.. 

White Earth Annoy, etc., Minn^. vis: 
600 pounds for White Earth Chippewa 

Indians. 
100 pounds for Portarville Day School, 
600 pounds for Wfld Rice River School 

Wheelock Orphan Academy, Okla. 

Wittenberg School, Wis 



:} 



204 
204 
284 
170 
204 
204 

204 
170 
284 
204 
8 

3 
204 
284 
204 

8 

204 

284 

3 

170 
170 
204 
204 
204 
3 

170 
3 

284 
204 
204 
284 
204 
204 
204 



170 
204 



11.80 

1.70 
1.70 
12.12 
•2.00 
1.70 
L7D 

L70 
2.06 
'2.10 
L70 
L80 

L80 
L70 
12.08 
1.70 
1.80 

1.70 

12.06 

1.80 

2.06 
2,06 
L70 
L7D 
L70 
1.89 

2.06 
1.89 

12.12 
1.70 
1.70 

12.10 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 

2.20 



2.20 

2.10 
L70 



Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 
Kemp City. Okla. 
Concho Siding, Okla. 
Oieney,WeaI. 

Do. 

Do. 

EufauSJoUa. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 

Do. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Hartshorne, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 
Cheney. Wash. 
Seminole, Okla. 
Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land. Oreg. 
Okmulgee, Okla. 
Pawnee, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 

Do. 
Seattle, Wash., or Fart- 
land, Oreg. 
Stroud, Okla. 
Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 
Wyandotte, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 
Tuskanoma, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Do. 

Do. 

Ogema, Minn. 

Mahnomen, Minn. 

Mfllerton.Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 



BRAN. 



1,000.. 
16,000. 
2,000.. 

16,000. 

42.000. 
6,000.. 
6,000.. 

0,000.. 
8,000.. 



Albuquerque Sohool, N. Mex 

Armstrong Male Orphan Academy, Okla.. 

Bay Mills School, Mich 

Bismarck School, N. Dak 

Blackfeet School, Mont 

Bloomfield Seminary, Okla 

Carlisle School, Pa 

Carson School, Nev ... . 

Cheyenne River School, S. Dak 



Lind.Wash. 
Bokohito, Okla, 
Ltad.Wash. 

Cheney' Wash. 
Kemp City, Okla. 
El Reno, OUa. 
Lind, Wash. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Cheyenne River 

Agency, S. Dak. 
Ross, Okla. 
8tonewaIl, Okla. 
El Reno. Okla. 

i Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24.000 pounds on condition ***** 
one-third of the weight of the car -lot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in stralghfcar shipment then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are ordered 
for shipment in less than carload-lot quantities, as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the 
sum of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 

» To be shipped as ordered. 



Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla... 
Collins Institute, Okla 



260 


60.00 


170 


1.30 


260 


.00 


260 


.00 


204 


.86 


167 


/ 1.26 
\ L10 


260 


.90 


204 


.85 


188 


1.26 


170 


L30 


167 


/ 1.36 
\ 1.10 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 398 

Contract* awarded under tulvertUcment of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned good*, dried 

fruits, ete.—Continuea. 



BRAN— Continued. 



Awards. 



Agencies, schools, etc 



Number 
of con- 
tractor. 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 



Point of delivery. 



Pounds. 
15,000 

6,000 

3,000 

6,000 

2,000 

6,000 

3,000 

10,000 

17,000 

5,000 

15,000 

4,000 

13,000 

30,000...... 

8,000 

2jO0O 

loiooo...... 

3,000 

1,000 

6,000 

12,000 

10,000 

3,000 

2,000 

10,000 

1-MJ00 

6,000 

SJHQ 

30,000 

500 

8,000 

7,000 

2^)00 

2,500 

5,000 

14,000 

6,000 

ZJ0O0 

16^500 

SflOO 

3,000 

6,000 

15,000 

8,000 

1,000 

9,000 

IfiOO 



Crow Creek School, 8. Dak , 

Cushman School, Wash 

Euchee School, Okla 

EuXaula School, Olda 

Fort Berthold Agency Demonstration 
Farm, N. Dak. 

Fort Lapwal Sanatorium, Idaho 

Hayward School. Wis 

Hoopa Valley School, Cal 

Klamath School, Oreg 

Kiowa Schools, Okla., vis: 

10.000 pounds for Riverside Sohool 

2,000 pounds for Fort Sill School 

6,000 pounds for Rainy Mountain 
School. 

Laodu Flambeau School, Wis 

Leech Lake School, Minn 

Lower Brule Agency, S. Dak 

Mount Pleasant Sohool, Mich 

Navajo Sohool, etc., N. Max., vis, 20,000 

pounds for sohool; 10,000 pounds for 

agency. 

Nevada School, Nev 

Oneida School, Wis 

Osage School, etc, Okla.. vis, 9,000 pounds 

for school: 1.000 pounds for agency. 

Otoe School, Okla. 

Pala Agency, Cal 

Pawnee School. Okla. 

Phoenix School, Arts 

Pierre School, 8. Dak 

Pima School, etc., Ariz., vis, 3,000 pounds 

for school; 5,000 pounds for agency. 
Pueblo Day Schools (for Laguna-rueblo 

Indians). 

Rapid City School, 8. Dak 

Red Lake School, etc., Minn., vis: 
8,000 pounds for Red Lake School 
6,000 pounds for Cross Lake Sohool 

Rice Statfon School, Aris 

Sac and Fox School, Okla 

San Juan School, N. Mex , 

San Xavier Papago Agency, Aris , 

Santa Fe School, N. Mex 

Seneca School, Okla 

Springfield Sohool, 8. Dak , 

Shawnee School, Okla. 

Sherman Institute, Cal 

Standing Rock Agency, etc., N. Dak., vis: 
4,000 pounds for agricultural school 
10,000 pounds for agency , 

Tulalip School, Wash 

Truxton Canon School, Aris 

Tuskahoma Female Academy, Okla. , 

Uintah 8chool, Utah 

Vermillion Late School, Minn , 

Wittenberg School, Wis 

Wheelock Orphan Academy, Okla , 

White Earth School, etc., Minn., viz: 
5,000 pounds for White Earth School. , 
3,000 pounds for Wild Rice River 
School. 

W innebago Agency, Nebr , 

Yakima Tfchool, Wash. 

Zunl School, N. Mex 



204 
176 
157 
22 

204 
260 
204 
260 

176 
176 
176 

260 
260 
330 

260 
204 



204 
260 
157 

284 
260 
176 
204 
183 
204 

260 

197 

285 
285 
204 
176 
311 
204 
145 

157 



157 
148 

22 
22 

204 
260 

157 

100 
260 
260 

157 



35 

63 
204 
204 



$L12 

.85 
1.30 
L26 
1.74 



.90 
.85 
LOS 

1.30 
L20 
1.20 

.90 
.90 
L12 



.85 
.90 
1.30 

»L37 
1.05 
1.30 

.85 
1.20 

.85 

.90 

1.25 

1.50 
1.60 

.85 
1.30 
1.50 

.85 
1.50 
1.26 
1.10 
1.12 
1.22 
1.10 
1.55 

1.69 

1.56 

.85 

.90 

1.27 

1.10 

1.25 

.90 

.90 

1.27 

1.10 

1.15 
1.15 

1.25 

.85 
.85 



At contractor's mm, 
Springfield. 8. Dak. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Sapulpa, Okla. 
Eufaula, Okla. 
Elbowoods, N. Dak. 

Cheney, Wash. 
Lind, Wash. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Portland, Oreg. 

Anadarko, Okla, 
Lawton, Okla. 
Qotebo, Okla. 

Lind, Wash. 

Do. 
At contractor's mill 
Springfield, S. Dak. 
Lind, Wash. 
Cheney, Wash. 



Do. 
Lind, Wash. 
Pawhuska, Okla. 

Red Rook, Okla. 
Portland, Oreg. 
Pawnee, Okla. 
Cheney, Wash. 
At school. 
Cheney, Wash. 

Lind, Wash. 

Rapid City, 8. Dak. 

At school. 

Do. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Stroud, Okla. 
Farmington, N. Max. 
Cheney /Wash. 
At school. 
Wyandotte. Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Springfield, 8. Dak. 
Thackery, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Arlington, Cal. 

At agricultural school. 
At agency. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Lind, Wash. 
Tuskahoma, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Fort Duchesne, Utah. 
Lind, Wash. 

Do. 
Millerton, Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 

Ogema, Minn. 
Mahnomen, Minn. 

Winnebago, Nebr. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Do. 



* Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds, on condition that 
one-third of the weight of tho car-lot shipment may bo oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload, then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight car shipment, then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are 
1 for shipment in less than carload-lot quantities as herein specified, then the contractor is to be 



neJd the sum of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



394 8UPPLIBS FOB THE INDIAK SERVICE. 

Contract* awarded under advertisement of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned good*, dried 

fruits, etc. — Continued. 



SHORTS. 



Awards. 



Agencies, schools, etc. 



Number 
of con- 
tractor. 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 



Point of delivery. 



Pounds. 

10,000 

18,000 

lioo 

15,000 

2,000 

ft,000 

2JO0O 

4000 , 

9,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,000 

2,000 

3,000 

5,000 

5.000 

12,000 

2,500 

5,000 

4,000 

0,000 

5,000 

800 , 

7,500 

2,000 

500 

3,000 

2,000 



Armstrong Male Orphan Academy, Okla. 

Bismarck School, N. Dak 

Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla. . 
Cheyenne River School, S. Dak , 

Crow Creek School, S. Dak. 

Eufaula School. Okla 

Fort Derthold Demonstration Farm, 
N. Dak. 

Fort Bidwell School. Cal , 

Kiowa- Anadarko School, Okla 

Leech Lake School, Minn 

Lower Brule School, S. Dak , 

Navajo, for Tohatchl School. , 

Nuyaka School. Okla , 

Osage School, Okla. , 

Otoe School, Okla. , 

Pawnee School, Okla. 

Red Lake School, Minn 

San Juan School, N. Mex , 

Shawnee School, Okla. 

Sherman Institute, Cal , 

Standing Rock Agricultural School, 

N. Dak. 

Tulalip School, Wash 

Uintah School. Utah 

Vermillion Lake School, Minn 

Wheelock Orphan Academy, Okla 

White Earth-Wild Rice River School, 

Minn. 

Winnebago Agency, Nebr 

Wittenberg School, Wis 

Yankton School, S. Dak 



176 
260 
176 
183 

260 
157 
260 

260 
176 
260 
260 
204 
176 
157 
284 
176 
285 
311 

157 

260 
22 

204 
100 
260 
176 
35 

63 
260 
260 



$1.45 
1.00 
1.45 
1.25 

1.00 
1.44 
1.00 

1.00 
1.40 
1.00 
1.00 
.95 
1.45 
1.48 
U.57 
1.45 
1.55 
1.75 
1.40 
1.28 
1.15 
1.79 

.95 
1.35 
1.00 
1.45 
1.20 

1.50 
1.00 
1.00 



Bokchito, Okla. 

Lind,Wash. 

Ross,Okla. 

At Cheyenne River 

Agency. 
Lmd,Wash. 
Eufaula, Okla. 
Llnd,Wash. 

Do. 
Anadarko, OHm, 
Lmd,Wash. 

Do. 
Cheney, Wash. 
Okmulgee, Okla, 
Pawhuska, Okla. 
Red Rock, Okla. 
Pawnee, Okla. 
AtschooL 

Farmington, N. Mex. 
Thackery, Okla. 
El Reno. Okla. 
Portland, Ore*. 
At agricultural i 

Cheney, Wash. 
Fort Duchesne, Utah, 
Lind,Wash. 
Millerton, Okla. 
Mahnomen, lffaw- 

Winnebago, Nebr. 
Lmd,Wash. 
Do. 



FEED, GROUND. 



15,000. 

4,000.. 
2,500.. 

15,000. 

8,000.. 

6,000.. 
10,000. 

1,000.. 
20,000. 

5,000.. 
20,000. 
11,000.. 



3,000.. 
15,000. 
70,000. 



20,000. 
16,000. 



80,000. 



Albuquerque School, N. Mex 

Armstrong Male Orphan Academy, Okla. 

Bay Mills School, Mich 

Bismarck School, N. Dak 

Bloomfield Seminary, Okla 

Cass Lake School, Minn 

Cheyenne River School, S. Dak 



Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla. . 
Crow Creek School, S. Dak 



Euchee School, Okla 

Fort Peck School, Mont 

Hayward School, etc., Wis., viz, 10,000 

gounds for school, 1,000 pounds for Lac 
ourte Oreilles Indians. 

Havasupai School. Ariz 

Jones Male Academy, Okla 

Kiowa schools, etc., Okla.. viz, 50,000 
pounds for Anadarko School; 20,000 
pounds for Kiowa, etc., Indians. 

Lac du Flambeau School Wis 

Leech Lake School, etc., Minn., viz, 12,500 
pounds for school; 3,500 pounds for Chip- 
pewa Indians. 

Navajo School, N. Mex., viz, 20,000 pounds 
for Navajo School; 5,000 pounds for To- 
hatchi School; 5,000 pounds for Chin Lee 
School; 50,000 pounds for Navajo Agency. 



176 
301 
301 

157 

301 
183 

176 
339 

176 
108 



21 
157 
284 



301 
3 



$1.74 

1.80 

1.6375 

1.6375 

1.64 

1.48 

1.6375 

1.75 

1.80 
1.50 

1.80 
1.70 
1.93 



2.80 

1.59 

U.69 



1.93 
1.5975 



1.74 



Portland t Oreg., or Se-< 

at tie. \V ash. 
Bokchito, Okla. 
Cass Lake. Minn. 

Do. 
Kemp City. Okla. 
El Reno, Okla. 
Cass Lake, Minn. 
Cheyenne Rlvea 

Agency, 8. Dak. 
Ross, Okla. 
At contractor's mill- 

Springfield, S. Dak. 
Sapulpa, Okla. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Hayward, Wis. 



Grand Canyon. Aris. 
Hartshorne, Okla. 
Anadarko, Okla. 



Lac du Flambeau, Wb. 
Walker, Minn. 



Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 



i Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may be oats; of the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload, then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight-car shipment, then the minimum will be 30,000pounds. If articles are ordered 
for shipment in less than carload-lot quantities as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the 
ram of 25 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



Digitized by 



Google 



SUPPLIES FOB THB IHDIAK SBBVIOB. 



395 



°°*itract* awarded under advertisement of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned goode, dried 

fruit*, rtc—Oontinued. 



FEED, GROUND— Continued. 



Awards, 



«J3TO 

iSKr.:::: 

ia«o 

3CMHO 

mjoon* *-.., 

3flOOQ.„„. 

30,000 

X8 P 000...... 

iO,000. ..... 

a^oo 

3,000 

ataxia.... 
cooo. 

5pOO..,„.. 

15,000 

15,000 , 

10,000. 

5,000 „ 



Agencies, schools, etc. 



Oneida School, Wis.,... . 

Osage School, Okla ...... .. 

Pawnee School , Okie...... . 

Pueblo Indians, etc. , N . Mex . { undercharge 
of superintendent Pueblo day schools }, 
vto, 4,000 pounds for Pueblo, elc, In- 
dians; 4,000 pound* Jor Acoma farmer; 
4J&S0 pounds for Laguna Pueblo Indians. 

Rapid City School, 3. Dak 

Red Lake School, etc., Minn,, \h: 
5,000 pounds for Red Lake School 
3,000 pounds foT Cross Lake Bebool . 

Rosebud School, S. Dak. 

floe and Fox Agency, Iowa* . . * . . 

San Juan School, etc.; N. Me*. , viz, 10.000 
pounds for school; 10,000 pounda for Na- 
vajo Indians. 

Santa FeSchool, N. Mei..,..*.. 

Seneca School, Okl*.. 

Shawnee School, Okla.., 

Springfield School, S. Dak. .. 

Standing Rock Agency, etc., N. Dak., viz: 

9,000 pounds for agricultural school. . . . 

30,000 pounds fot agency. 

TruAton Canon School, Ariz....*.., 

Tulalip School, Wash, 

Uuj tan School, Utah Mm , ,. 

VerrniUlon Lake School, Mum..., 

Wheelock Female Orphan Academy, Okie, 

Wittenberg School, Wis. 

Yankton School, S. Dak ... 

Zunt School, N. Mex 



Number 
of con- 
tractor. 



339 

157 

17* 

3 



197 



107 

339 



157 
157 



22 

22 

336 

301 
157 



Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 



11.50 

LAS 

L80 
1.74 



LS5 

LTD 
L7fi 
1.85 
L50 

2.41 



2.23 
L02 
1.48 
l.W 
143 
LOO 

1.H9 
1.89 
1,74 

1.05 

L&o 

L75 
1,03 
1.48 

l.HH 

1.50 
L74 



Point of delivery. 



At contractor's mill, 
Springfield, S. Dak. 

Pftwhuaka.OUa. 

Pawnee, Okla. 

Seattle, Wash,, or Port- 
land, Greg, 



Rapid City, S. Dak, 

At school 

Do. 
Rapid City, S. Dak. 
At ecatracWs mill 
Springfield, S. Dak, 
Farmington, N. Mat, 



Santa Fe r N. Mex. 
Wyandotte, Okla. 
El Beno, Okla. 
Tbackexy, Okla, 
m Reno, Okla. 
Springfield, S, Dak. 

At agricultural school. 

At Agency. 

Seattle, Wash.,orPortp 

land, Ong. 
At school. 
Port Duchesne or 

Wbiterocks, Utah. 
Tower, Minn. 
Millerton, Gklo. 
El Reno, Okla, 
Wittenberg, Wis. 
At cont meter's mill, 

Springfield, S. Dak. 
Seattle, wash,, or Port- 

land, Oreg. 



OATS. 



26,000 


Albuquerque School, N. Mex 


247 
247 

3 

3 

301 
289 
183 

247 

284 

3 


11.34 
1.34 

1.49 

1.49 
1.4975 
1.91 
1.75 

1.34 

U.75 

1.49 


Lewiston, Idaho. 
Do. 


85,360 


Albuquerque- Pueblos (under charge of su- 
perintendent of Pueblo day schools, viz, 
6,000 pounds for Pueblo, etc., Indians: 
5,840 pounds for Acoma physician; 6,000 
pounds for Acoma farmer; 17,520 pounds 
for Laguna farmer. 

Bishop School, etc., Cal.. viz, 1,200 pounds 
for Bishop School; 1,000 pounds for 
Bishop police; 1,000 pounds for Big Pine 
police; 1,000 pounds for Independence 
police. 

Carson School, Nev 


4,200 


Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 

Do. 


11,000 


4JJ00 


Caw T Ake School, Minn T 


Cass Lake, Minn. 


l£o00 


Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla. . . 
Cheyenne River School, 8. Dak 


Ross, Okla. 


20,000 


Cheyenne River 


26,000 


Coeurd'Alene Indians, Idaho 


Agency, 8. Dak. 
Lewiston. Idaho. 


7JKO 


Collins Institute, Okla 


Stonewall, Okla. 


6,000 


Colorado River Xgency , Ariz 


Seattle, Wash., or Port- 
land, Oreg. 







» Prices are based on carload lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the car-lot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the car-lot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload than a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered in straight car shipment then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are ordered 
for shipment in less than carload lot quantities, as herein specified, then the contractor is to be paid the sum 
of 26 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 



Digitized by 



Google 



896 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of Aug. It, 1915 y for flour ^ feed, canned goods, dried 

fruits, etc.-— Continued. 

OA' 



lunk 



Ageixnes, schools, etc 




Price per 
hundred- 
weight 



Point of delimy. 



Potmtft. 

6.000 

10^00 

12,000 

12,500 



8JM0... 
4«\000.. 



49,800. 



00,000. 

19,000. 

77,000. 



8,760.. 
85,000. 
90,600. 

10,000. 
63,000. 



112,500. 



^000. 



7,000.. 
8,000.. 
26,000. 

6,600.. 



18,800.. 
16,000.. 

278,000. 
9,000... 
85,000.. 
18,100.. 
46,000.. 



69,000. 



6,000.. 
40,000. 



Grand Portape School, 1008. . . 

Greenville School. Cal. „ 

Havsaupal Behoof, Arte ....... , 

Harvard School, etc., Wis., vi*, 10.000 
pounds for school; 2J51W pounds for Lac 
Court e OreUles Lndisirv>. 

Jonea MflJe Arcidemy, Okla. 

Jlciirllb School, etc.. N t Mox t , vi*. 30,000 
pounds far school; 25,000 pounds for 
agency. 
Kiowa schools, etc.. Okla, vis: 

4,800 pounds for Riverside School; 
10,000 pounds for Anadarko School; 
20,000 pounds for Kiowa, etc, In- 
dians. 
15,000 pounds for Rainy Mountain 



Keshena Agency, for Menominee Indians, 

Wis. 
Leech Lake 8ohool, etc, Minn., vis. 7,600 

pounds for school; 11,600 pounds for 

Chippewa Indians. 
Lower Brule School, etc., 8. Dak., vb, 

15,000 pounds for school; 62,000 pounds 

for agency. 

La Pointe Agency, Wis 

Lao du Flambeau School, Wis 



Leupp School, etc. , Arts., vis, 5,600 pounds 
for school; 25,000 pounds for agency. 

Mount Pleasant School, Mich 

Moqui School, etc, Ark., vis, 25,000 
pounds for school; 30,000 pounds for 
agency; 8,000 pounds for Oraiba Day 
School. 

Navajo School, etc, N. Max.. vis, 80,000 
pounds for Navajo School; 10,000 pounds 
for Tohatchi School; 2.500 pounds for 
Chin Lee School; 70,000 pounds for 
Navajo Agency. 

Navajo Springs Agency, Colo 

Neah Bay Agency, Wash 



Nuyaka School. Okla 

Otoe School. Okla 

Osage School, etc, Okla., viz. 6,000 pounds 

for school: 20,000 pounds lor agency. 
Pechanea School, etc, Cal., viz, 1,750 

pounds for school; 8,750 pounds for 

agency. 

Pierre School, 8. Dak 

Pima Agency, Arts 



Pine Ridge Agency, 8. Dak 

Pottawatoml Agency, Kansas 

Pueblo Bonito Agency, N. Mex 

Red Cliff Agency, Wis 

Red Lake School, etc. Minn., viz: 
10,000 pounds for Red Lake School 
30,000 pounds for Chippewa Indians. . . 

6,000 pounds for Cross Lake School, 
Minn. 
Rosebud School, etc., S. Dak., vis, 19,200 
pounds for school; 40,400 pounds for 
agency. 

Sac and Fox Agency, Iowa 

Sac and Fox Agency, Okla 



820 
256 
247 
820 



284 

289 

284 

284 
345 
801 

820 



820 
820 
247 

320 
247 



247 



289 
284 
284 

148 



183 

3 

320 
820 
247 
320 

301 
801 

301 

320 



320 
284 



81.875 
1.63 
1.84 
1.875 



tl.74 
2.07 



»L72 

U.72 
1.60 
L4976 

1.875 



1.375 
1.376 
1.84 

1.376 
1.34 



L34 



207 
L49 

1.91 
11.75 
11.76 

1.90 



L65 
1.49 

1.375 
L375 
1.34 
L375 

L495 
L4975 

L5975 

1.375 



1.375 
IL75 



Ashland. Wis. 
At school. 
Lewiston,Idaha 
Ashland, Wis. 

Hartshorne, Okla. 
Duloe, N. Mex. 



Anadarko, Okla. 

Gotebo, Okla. 
Keshena Agency, Wit. 
Walker, Minn. 

Ashland, Wis. 



Da 
Do. 
Lewiston, Idaho. 

Ashland, Wis. 
Lewiston, Idaho. 



Da 



M&ncos, Cola 
Seattle, Wash., 
Portland, Oreg. 
Okmulgee, Okla. 
Red Rock, Okla 
Pawhuska, Okla 

Colton,CaL 



At school. 

Seattle, Wash., or 

Portland, Oreg. 
Ashland, Wis. 

Do. 
Lewiston, Idahc 
Ashland, Wis. 

At school. 

At Red Lake Agency, 



At school. 
Ashland, Wis. 



Do. 
Stroud, Okla 



1 Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds, on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the carlot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the carlot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload, then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered In straight car shipment, then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are 
ordered for shipment in less than carload-lot quantities, as herein specified, then the contractor is to bo 
paid the sum of 25 cents per hundredweight In addition to the rates above mentioned. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 897 

Contracts awarded under advertisement of Aug. It, 1913, for flour, feed, canned goods, dried 

fruits, etc.— -Continued. * 



OATS— Continued. 



Awarda. 


Agendas, schools, etc 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Price per 
hundred- 
weight. 


Point of delivery. 


Pounds. 
88,426 


San Juan School, etc., N. Mex., vis, 32,000 
pounds for school; £6,425 pounds for 
Navajo Indians. 

Santa Fe School, etc, N. Max., vis, 17,800 
pounds for school; 31,000 pounds for 

Pueblo TnHinnff- 

Santee Indians (under Santee Agency), 

Nebr. 
San Xavier Papago Agency, Arts 


811 

247 

188 
3 

284 

311 

22 
22 
22 
22 
183 
79 

247 

820 
820 
247 

284 

63 
320 
320 

247 
247 


8L90 

1.34 

L70 

L49 

«L75 
1.75 

L89 
L78 
L78 
L78 
1.70 
L25 

1.84 

L375 
L375 
L34 

*L76 
L50 
1.375 
L375 

L34 
L34 


Farmington, N. Mex 

Lewiston, Idahc 

At Springfield School, 
Seattle, Wash., or 


48,600 


4,000..... 


2,000 


17,500 


RhfhWTiAt School, Okie 


Portland, Oreg. 
Thaokery, Okla. 
At agency. 


13.000 


Southern Ute Agency, Colo 

Standing Rook schools, etc., N. Dak., vis: 

8,000 pounds for agricultural school 

10.000 pounds for agency school 

9,000 pounds for day schools. 


157,000 




At agricultural schooL 
At agency. 




130,000 pounds for agency...... ....... 


Do! 


2-600 


Springfield 'School, 8. Sak..' , ...l.......I.I 


At schooL 


30,000 


Tongue River School, Mont 


Crow Agency Station, 

Mont 
Lewiston, Idahc 

Ashland Wis. 


16,000 


Tulalip School, etc. Wash., vis, 10,000 
pounds for school; 6,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Tiirti« Mountain Agency. 8. Dak 


31.000. ......... 


6^000. .......... 


Vermillion Lake Sonool.' Minn . . .'..'.'. ..... 

Western Navajo School, etc, Aria., vis, 
10,000 pounds for western Navajo 
School; 6,000 pounds for agency; 5,000 
pounds for Marsh Pass School. 

wneelook Orphan Academy, Okla 

Wlpn^bago Agency, Nebr. .......... ^ x . 


Do. 


31,000 


Lewiston, Idahc 

Mfflerton, Okla. 
Winnebago, Nebr. 

Afihlfttid, vvig. 


8,780 


20.000. ......... 


2>000... ........ 


Wittenberg School. Wis 


40,000 


Yankton School, etc, 8. Dak., vis, 15,000 
pounds for sonool; 26,000 pounds for 
agency. 

Yakima School, etc, Wash., vis, 10,000 
pounds for school; 26,280 pounds for 
agency; 30,660 pounds for farmer and 
matron; 17,520 pounds for forestry. 

Zunl Agency, N. Mu..................... 


Do. 


84,400 


Lewiston, Idahc 
Do. 


10^000 









> Prices are based on carload-lot shipments, with a minimum weight of 24,000 pounds, on condition that 
one-third of the weight of the oarlot shipment may be oats; if the oats contained in the oarlot shipment 
exceeds one-third of the weight of the carload, then a minimum weight of 30,000 pounds must be observed. 
If oats are ordered In straight car shipment, then the minimum will be 30,000 pounds. If articles are 
ordered for shipment in less than carload-lot quantities, as herein specined,then the contractor is to be paid 
the sum of 26 cents per hundredweight in addition to the rates above mentioned. 

Contract awarded on stock cattle for Crow Agency Indians, Montana, under advertisement 

of Sept. 20. 1913. 

[Bids opened in Washington, D.O.] 
HEIFERS. 



Awards. 


Place of delivery. 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Unit 
P h2T 


LOOO 


Crow Agency, Mont , . . , 


250 
160 
160 
260 
350 


842.47 


2.400 


do.T....~.l 


43.00 


1*)00 


do 


44.00 


2j000 


do 


44.49 


So7..™.;i;:: 


do 


44.98 









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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAK SERVICE. 



Contract awarded on stock cattle for Crow Agency Indians, Montana, under advertisement 
of Sept. 20, 191S— Continued. 





STEERS (1 TEAR OLD). 






Awards. 


FUoe of delivery. 


Number 
of con- 
tractor. 


Unft 

■ST 


£00 


Crow Agency, Mont 


100 
277 


835.00 


5Q0 


do.r....v. 


tt.44 








STEERS (2 YEARS OLD). 


800 


Crow Ageney, Ko"t.. 


160 
178 


144.00 


600 


do.r....v. 


44.60 








BULLS. 


360 


Crow A fnnpy Mont 


80 


SSOiOO 









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APPENDS. 



Qontrtutt (worded wider advertisement of June 5, 1913. 
[Bldi opened In Washington, D. C] 
BEEF, NET. 



Awards, 


Point of delivery. 


No. of 

con- 
tractor. 


Price p^r 
hundred- 
weight, 


_ Found*. 
WjJOO ...... 


For Bloom Held Seminary, Okla., delivered at raQroad station, 
Kemp city, Okla, 

For Cantonment School, etc>, Okla,, delivered at railroad station, 
Canton.Okla. (10,000 pounds for school, tiOu pounds for polk*). 

For Cass Lake School, Minn., f. o, b. cars CassXake, Mino,... 

For Cherokee School , tf.O- delivered at railroad station at Chero- 
kee, N.C. 

For Cherokee Orphan Training School, Okla., delivered at railroad 
station, Rosa, Okla. 

For Chlloceo School, Okla.: 

If delivered at school ... 


221 

u 
m 

Q 

310 

2ie 

330 

07 
553 

tti 
216 

74 

11 

348 
330 

m 

2-J9 
359 
329 
165 
330 

210 

210 
71 

123 
40 

330 

239 
217 

17 
17 

m 

330 

113 
■ 
344 


111*00 


iQ,4O0 ,. .. . 


11. as 


•a^ooo .. 


u w 


5,000........... 

IS 000 


16.00 

10-99 


100 0(10 




F 


8.99 




If delivered at Chilocco, Okla 


8.79 


a&.ooo . 


For Flandrean School, 3. Dak., delivered at railroad station, Flan- 

dreau , S. Dak. (SO.000 pounds for school, 3.000 pounds for Indiana). 

For Fort Bid well School, Cal., delivered nl school , * 


10.94 




a. to 


13,000...... 


For Fort Lapwai Sanatorium, Idaho, delivered at Fort Lepwaj, 

Idaho: 
For Haskell Institute, Kans., via: 

If delivered at school ... 


1ft. 00 


1SD.0O0 . 






9.79 




If delivered at Lawrence, Kans.. .................p....... 


9.09 


MjHD.... . 


For Jicarflla Schools, etc., U , Max., delivered at railroad station, 
Duke, N. Ilex. (18,000 pounds for school, 1,000 pounds for day 
schools). 

For Kfekapoo School, Kans., delivered at school , 


19,00 


UOfjft ; 


11. Wi 


lOjOOO ..... 


For KJowerRlveralde School, Okla., delivered at school 

For Lac du Flambeau School, Wis., delivered et railroad station, 
Lecdu Flambeau, Wl*. 

For Mescalero School, etc.. N. S£e*., delivered at railroad station, 
Tularosa, N. Max. (24,600 pounds for school, 33,000 pounds for 
agency). 

For Nett Lake School, limn., f. o. b. Orr, Minn. (750 pounds for 
school, 1 ,100 pounds for police, 4*000 pounds for Bob Forte Chip- 
pewa Indians) , vis: 
Delivery from July 1 , 1913, to Jan, L 1914 


9.41 


la-,000...... 


10.3$ 


62,500-.. ... 


10.75 


£,850 . 






10,60 




Delivery from Jan. 2, 1914. to June 30, 1014...... 


11,00 


9CMM0.......... 


For Pawnee School, Okla., delivered at school...,.,., 


9.00 


11,000... 


For Pierre School, fl, Dak*» delivered at i*ierre. 8. Dak . . 


14,60 


40,000 .... 


For Pipestone School, Minn., delivered at railroad station, Pipe- 
stone, Minn, 
For Ponca School, Okla,, vie 

If delivered at school 


U.35 


16,000. m ^„ 






9.94 




If delivered at White Eerie, Qkhv. 


9.74 


40,000...., 


For Rapid City School, 8. Dak., delivered at railroad station, Rapid 

City, S. Dak. 
For Round % 7 alley School, CaL, delivered at school ,.,.._. 


M4"? 


aajOoo... „ 


ML 00 


UMX»..„. 


For Rice Station School, ArU,, delivered at railroad station, Kioe, 

Aria. 
For Ban tee Indians (under Sanies Agency, S. Dak.) delivered at 

railroad station, Sphuefteld, S, Dak. 
For Bhawnee School, Okla, delivered at school 


12.60 


12,000 .. 


lLflO 


90/tiO..... 


9.7S 


35 rOOO. ......... 


For Slsseton School, S. Dak,, dollvered at railroad station, Slsseton, 

S, Dak, 
For Southern Ute School, Colo., vis: 


10,90 


14,000......... 






13.75 




If delivered at railroad station, lenario, Colo ......... 


13-50 


1,000... 


For SprinrOold School, S. Dak,; delivered at railroad station, 

Springfield, s. Dak\ 
For Tomnh School, W is h , delivered at railroad station, Tomah, Wis. 
Fnr TniTTYin ("anttn Hfhnnl, Arft. t t. o. b. Vfllfititlne r Arifc 


n » 


48,000....,.,.., 


It 00 


12000 . 


15.00 


12,500 ...... 


For Umatilla School, Or eR.', delivered at school ..„,..,,„.......„. 

For Warm Springs School, etc., Oreg. (16,000 pounds for school, 

1,650 pound* fur agency , 4,330 pounds for police), delivered at 

railroad station, Mecca, Oreg, 


12.93 


10 ,970-. ....... * 


13.90 







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400 



SUPPLEB8 FOB THE INDIAN 8BBYI0B. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of June 10, 191$. 

[Bids opened in Washington, D. OJ 

MUTTON. 



Awards. 


Point of delivery. 


No. of 

con- 

traotor. 


Prise pes? 
hundvsbV 
welgnt. 


Pound*. 
3,000 


For Canton Asylum for Insane Indians, S. Dak., delivered at asylum . 
For Fort Lapwal Sanatorium, Idaho, delivered at sanitarium 


81 
853 


813.00 


7&> 


15.00 







Contracts awarded under advertisement of June 17, 1913. 

[Bids opened in Washington, D. C] 
MILCH COWS (FOR SIOUX ALLOTTEES). 



Awards. 



Point of delivery. 



No. of 
con- 
tractor. 



UnE 



300.. 
64... 
816., 



Pound*. 



For Cheyenne River Agency. 8. Dak. 

For Crow Creek Agency, S. Dak 

For Pine Ridge Agency, S. Dak 



3^016.. •••••••.. 

103 



For Rosebud Agency, 8. Dak 

For Standing Rook Agency, N. Dak. . 



84 
376 
*376 
•100 
•808 
«278 



809.00 
59.00 
66.50 
66.78 
67.00 
66.00 
66.60 
78.90 



» Awarded 134. 



■ Awarded 383. 



•Awarded 1,000. 



* Awarded 500. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of June t6, 1913, for issue to Indian allottees at 

the various Sioux agencies. 

(Bids opened in Washington, D. O.] 
HARNESS, WAGONS, PLOWS, ETC. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. of 
contrac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


970 sets. 

969 


Harness, double, complete with breeching, 

Concord hemes. 
Hoes, garden, solid socket, c s., 6t-ineh 

/Harrows, 60 teeth, h by 8 inches, steel, with 
\ drawbar and clevises. 

Axes, Yankee pattern, assorted. 3* to 4} 
pounds, inserted or overlaid steel. 

Handles, az, 36-inch, hickory, XXX 

Forks, hay, o. s., 4 oval tines, strapped ferrule, 
6Hoot handles. 


196 

398 
f U09 

I '383 

306 

■173 
191 


133.64 

.33 
6.78 

6.90 

.375 

1.05 


Omaha. 
StLoufa. 




Chicago, St. Louis, or 
Omaha. 


069. 


Omaha. Kansas Gttr 

or Mmneapolsfc 
St-Louto. 


969 


Do. 


969 


Chicago, 



» Awarded 766. 



•Awarded 304. 



•Per 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 



401 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of June £6, 1913, for issue to Indian allottees at 
the various Sioux agencies — Continued. 

HARNESS, WAGONS, PLOWS, ETC.-Continued. 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. of 
contrac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


8GB 


/Plows (steel beams), 12-Inch, c. s., 2-horse, 
\ with extra share. 


f »282 
I «282 


16.30 
6.00 


Omaha, Kansas City, 

or Minneapolis. 
Purchased of contrac- 












tor No. 282 under 25 










per cent clause of 










contract awarded un- 










der advertisement 










dated Jan. 15, 1913. 




Wagons, narrow track, complete, with hickory 










axletrees, square, 3-piece, front hounds, 
ironed on both sides below the reach, and 


















also on the underside of the top sliding bar 
with J by U inch iron on the 2| by 8 inch 
wagons, and increase according to sise of 


























wagons. Reaches to be ironed on both 










sides opposite their respective irons; evener, 
lower dox, neck yoke, singletree, stay 
chains, tongue, and flat iron bar under the 


















whole length of axles. Narrow track, 
equipped with gear brake, clipped gear, and 
hooded steel skeins: 














. 


970 


3 by 9 inches, tires 1 J by f inches, , 


325 


•43.95 


F. o. b. cars Chicago. 
} Do. 
Do. 


970 


Spring seats. 


325 


M1.75 

\»1.80 

•2.94 


970 


Top boxes 


325 









i Awarded 864. 

• Awarded 105. 

* All wagons to have one priming coat and two heavy coats of paint before varnishing, and to be subject 
to two inspections, one in the white when ready for painting and the other when painted and ready for 
shipment. 

« If 3 feet 2 inches. 

* If 3 feet 6 inches. 

• All boxes to have bow staples. 

Contract awarded under advertisement of June 27, 1913. 

[Bids opened in Washington, D. C.| 

COFFEE AND SUGAR. 



Award. 


Article. 


No. of 
contrac- 
tor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of delivery. 


37,500 pounds. . 


Coffee, green (in bags of about 130 pounds 
each). 


14 


10. 12 


New York. 



342,600 pounds Sugar, granulated, no award. 
15936°— int 1913— vol 2 26 



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402 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVICB. 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of July 30, 1913. 

| Bids open d In Washington, D. C.J 



Awards. 


Articles. 


No. 
of con- 
tractor. 


Unit 
price. 


Point of deli v wj 


1,630 yards 

4,484 pairs 

7,938 pairs 

1,862 


Corduroy 


167 

/ »91 
\««302 
/ »230 
\ «302 
»302 

67 


10.42 

.406 
.42 
.66 
.70 
.64 

.235 


New York 


Overalls, with bib, denim: 

24$ to 27 waist, 20 to 26 Inseara 


San Francisco- 


27$ to 32 waist, 27 to 33 inseam 


Omaha. 

San Francisco. 


Jumpers, boys', denim, sizes 29 to 35 chest 

measure. 
Tailors' trimmings: 

Lining, fancy khaki cloth, for body linings 

of corduroy coats. 
Wadding, cotton, slate color 


Omaha. 
Do. 


270 yards 

240 dozen 


New York. 
No award. 


8,025 yards 


Linen, table, 62-inch, cream damask, about 

55-cent grade. 
Saddlery, etc.: 

Cockeyes, screw, with roller, XC — 

li-inch 






Do. 


12 dozen 


•196 
M96 
M96 
•196 

191 
191 
191 


.3024 
.3402 
.4284 
.5166 

.42 
.44 
.50 




(8 dozen 


It-inch 


Do. 


19 dozen 


lf-inch 


Do. 


13 dozen 


2-inch 


Do. 


116 bundles.... 


Taps, heel, good quality, in bundles of 1 
dozen pairs- 
Small size 


Chicago. 
Do. 


152 bundles 


Medium size 


106 bundles 


Large size 


Do. 


190 bundles 


Taps, sole, good quality, in bundles of 1 
dozen pairs — 
Small size 


No award. 


304 bundles 


Medium size 






Do. 


166 bundles 


Large size 






Do. 


10A doz. pairs.. 

678 dozen 

51 


Winkers, J-inch. sensible, 2 seams, patent 
leather. 51-inch cheek. 
Agricultural implements, etc.: 

Axle grease (2 doz. boxes in case), with 

maker's name shown. 
Plow beams— 

For 8-inch plow, 5 feet long 


•196 
'314 


3.20 
1.84 


Omaha. 
Do. 
No award. 


69 


For 10-inch plow, 5 J feet long 






Do. 


104 


For 12-inch plow, 6 feet long 






Do. 


53 


For 14-inch plow, 6J feet long 






Do. 


17 


For 12-inch "breaker" plow, 6J feet 

long. 
For 14-inch "breaker" plow, 7 feet 
long. 
Gasoline, etc.: 

Gasoline, to be delivered in 5-gallon tin 
cans, cased, to be furnished by contrac- 
tor, each case to contain 2 cans and to t>e 
made of J-inch pine throughout, or in 
steel barrels to be furnished by the Gov- 
ernment; freight on emptv barrels from 
destination to point of delivery under 
contract to be paid by the Government; 
the cartage of the empty barrels from 
railroad freight house to contractor's 
warehouse to be taken care of by the 
contractor— 
About 68° to 72° Baume* 






Do. 


15 






Do. 


44,500 gallons... 






Do. 


15,300 gallons... 


About 86° Baumd 


316 


f«.345 
\».28 


1 Whiting, Indiana. 
No award. 


675 pounds 


Pitch 


Wagon fixtures: 

Bolsters, rocker, oak, wagon, front, 3 by 

4 J, wide track. 
Fellies, oak, wagon, sawed true to circle 
and size, faced, packed in cases, 3 by 2\ 
inches. 
Enameled ware, etc., chinaware, semivitrcous, 
hotel: 
Dishes, meat, about 17-inch, rolled rim 






Do. 


12 








20 sets 


Do. 


299 






Do. 


2,230 


Dishes, vegetable, oval, about 12-inch, 
without covers, rolled rim. 






Do. 











1 30 inrhes wide. 

• Awarded 4,165 pairs. 

• Only. 

• Awarded 319 pairs. 

• Awarded 7,670 pairs. 



• Awarded 268 pairs. 

» Mica axle grease, in 3-pound metal pails, packed 2 dozen in a c 

• In 6-gallon cans, cased, uninspected. 

• In steel barrels, uninspected. 



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SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SEBVIOB. 



403 



Contract* awarded under advertisement of July SO, J01J— Continued. 



Awards. 



188 

46 dozen.. 



6,2)35.. 
8,785.. 
10.310. 
9,210.. 
9,160.. 
5,710.. 
5,935.. 
4,970.. 
7,475.. 
6,530.. 
7,750.. 
7,575. . 
6,425.. 
5,725.. 
2,960.. 
8,085.. 
3,460.. 
2,410.. 
1,960.. 
1,460.. 
2,910.. 
1,860.. 
3.300.. 



3,810. 
4,610. 
3,140. 
3,990. 
2,640. 
2,110. 
3,360. 
4,290. 
4,340. 
4,410. 
3,590. 
3,360. 
3,800. 
3,750. 
3,990. 
2,940. 
3,140. 
2,340. 
3,040. 
760... 
1,360. 
740... 
990... 
540... 



2,110., 
1,190.. 

\ff:: 

1,540. 
1,310. 
860... 
2,160. 

Iff.: 



M40...., 

no , 

Iff:.:::. 

460 

210 

1,820 

29 pain. 



Articles. 



Tin and stamped ware: 

Coffee boilers, full size, XX tin, copper 
bottom, with ball; ears and handle 
riveted, 6-quart. 
Pans, bake, sheet steel, No. 27, 15 by 20 by 
4 inches, with two |-inch oval runners. 
Pans, tin, milk, full size, IXX, seamless, 
wide flange, retinned, extra quality, 8- 
quart. 
Teapots, heavy, planished tin, 4-pint, 
round, copper bottom. 
Hardware: 

Bolts, carriage, per 100— 

by 1 

by 14 

bv2 

£y J* 

by 3 

by 34 

by 4 

by 14 

by 2 

by 24 

by 3 , 

by 4 

by 5 

by 6 

by 4 , 

by 5 

by 8 

by7 

by 8 

by9 

by 10 

by 11 

4 by 12 

Bolts, machine; made of refined iron, hot- 
punched nuts— 

by 14 

by 2 

by J4 

by 3 



%■»:: 



r by 1% 

r by2 

rby2J 

r by3 

rby3* 

rby4 

by 2 

by 24 

by 3 

by 3} 

by 4 

by J4 

by 5 

^ J4 

by 6 

by<4 

by7 

by74 

by 8 

Aby3 

A by 34 

A by 4 

A by 4* 

&bv5 

A by 6 

A by 7 

by 3* 

by 4 

by 44 

by 5 

by 5* 

by6 

by7 

by 8 

by9 

by 10 

Chains, trace, 43 inches long, with hook 
and swivel. 



No. 
of con- 
tractor. 



191 
191 



$0.30 
48 



191 
298 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
298 
298 
298 
191 
191 
191 
191 
298 
298 
191 
191 



298 
191 
298 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
298 
191 
298 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
191 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
298 
191 
298 
298 
298 
191 
298 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



.195 

i .195 

.214 

.224 

1.253 

.273 

».293 

.37 

1.40 

.433 

1.464 

.526 

.589 

.641 

.997 

1 1.13 

U.27 

1.40 

11.54 

1.68 

1.816 

U.95 

12.09 



.315 
1.329 

.344 

.359 
i .374 

.37 
1.37 

.392 
i .414 

.437 
1.459 

.481 

.4736 
1 .503 

.533 
1.562 

.592 

.777 
1.814 

.85 

.888 
1.925 

.962 
1.999 
1.036 
•.786 

.832 
».879 

.925 

.97 
1.063 
1.156 
1.073 
1.133 
•1.19 
1.253 

1.313 
1.373 
>1.49 
1.614 
1.734 
1.854 



Chicago. 

Do. 
No award. 

Do. 



St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 

Do. 



St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 
St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
No award. 



■Cutthread. 



i Rolled thread. 



404 SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 

Contracts awarded under advertisement of July 30, 1913 — Continued. 



Awards. 



Articles. 



No. of 
con- 
tractor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



Sen Fran- 



St. Louis. 



025 pounds... 
1,325 pounds., 
475 pounds... 
1,775 pounds. 
1,050 pounds. 
1,500 pounds. 

2,475 pounds. 
3,350 pounds. 
500 pounds. . . 
1,400 pounds. 
300 pounds... 
700 pounds... 
1,100 pounds. 

1,300 pounds. 

350 pounds... 
100 pounds. . . 

460 pounds... 

1,500 pounds. 

2,700 pounds. 

1^50 pounds. 

2,250 pounds. 

2,050 pounds. 

450 pounds. . . 

850 pounds. . . 

000 pounds... 

250 pounds. . . 
500 pounds. . . 
200 pounds... 

1,000 pounds. 

2,000 pounds. 

350 pounds. . . 

2,050 pounds. 

300 pounds... 

800 pounds... 
1,100 pounds. 
1,150 pounds. 

560 pounds... 

3,770 pounds. 
5,580 pounds. 
4,065 pounds, 
i ,925 pounds. 



Hardware— Continued. 

Iron, band, American (per 100 pounds): 
tbyf 

Jbyl 

tbylj 

tbyl* 

Abyl 

*by2 

Iron, refined, American, per 100 pounds: 
iby* 

ibylj 

ibyll 

*by2 

Jby2i 

iby2J 

iby4 

Aby2 

Aby2j 

*by2f 

Aby3i 

|by| 

Ibyl 

Ibylj 

Ibyl* 

Iby2 

|by2J 

Iby3 

I by 3* 

Abyf 

Abyli 

ibyi : 

ibyl 

ibylj 

Jbylf 

Iby2 

Jby2* 

iby2§ 

IbyU 

Iby2 

I by 2* 

Iron, refined, round, American, per 100 
pounds: 

A-inch 

|-lnch 

•ft-inch 

4-inch 



245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 

245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
234 
245 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 



245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 



12.65 
2.20 
2.50 
2.06 
2.45 
2.00 
2.45 
2.00 
2.45 
2.00 
2.40 
1.95 

2.20 
2.00 
2.05 
1.85 
2.05 
L85 
2.06 
1.85 
2.05 
1.85 
2.05 
1.85 
2.05 
1.85 
2.05 
1.85 
1.85 
2.05 
2.05 
1.85 
2.15 
1.05 
2.05 
1.85 
2.00 
1.80 
1.05 
1.75 
1.05 
1.75 
1.05 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 
2.15 
1.95 
1.75 
2.15 
1.95 
2.05 
1.85 
1.95 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 
1.96 
1.76 
1.95 
1.75 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 
1.95 
1.75 



2.30 
2.10 
2.20 
2.00 
2.15 



Pounds. 
250 



525 
**50 



700 

ioo 



400 
400 



1,200 

'wo' 



700 
200 



300 

*75u' 
*350' 



100 
350 



150 
*45u' 
300' 

"m 

500 

ioo' 

*250' 
4fi6" 

"ioo' 



100 

"so 

700 

"so 

950 

ioo 
366 



300 

ioo 



1,325 



1.95 
2.10 
1.90 

Digitized by 



1,475 
*M>25 



Pounds. 
375 



800 

*435 



1,075 
*i,*560 

"i,*i66 

"2,*075 

'2,'iso 

"*400 

**"too 
"ioo 

""400 
"*350 



950 
360 



100 
* 1,350 



2,250 
*i,*560 
* 1,450 

"iisao 

"350 

*"ooo 
""iio 



150 
500 



100 
"950 

'i,'ao6 

"aoo 

"i.'ioo 

"266 



500 
1,100 



450 



2,445 



4,105 



2,425 



3,040 



Gobg\<? m 



SUPPLIES FOB THE INDIAN SERVICE. 



405 



Contracts awarded under advertisement of July SO, 1913— Continued. 



Awards. 



Article*. 



No. of 
con- 
tractor. 



Unit 
price. 



Point of delivery. 



San Fran- 
cisco. 



St. Lou*. 



1,900 pounds.. 
8,200 pounds.. 
5,000 pounds.. 
2J60 pounds.. 
1,000 pounds.. 

776 pounds 

1,175 pounds.. 

1,136 pounds.. 

1,160 pounds.. 

300 pounds 

194 

98 pairs 

72. 



6,170 pounds.. 
4,766 pounds.. 
4,385 pounds.. 
9,860 pounds.. 
80,376 pounds.. 
90.426 pounds. 
MOO pounds.. 
21.260 pounds. 
8,640 pounds. . 
7,720 pounds. . 
0,090 pounds. . 

1,420 pounds. . 

700 pounds 

400 pounds 



4,280 pounds. 
$330 pounds. 
8,620 pounds. 



11 

7 

86 

22 

1^50 pounds. 
14,746 pounds 



11,100 pounds.. 
218,740 pounds. 



7,551 feet. 

19,827 feet. 
20.104 feet 
6,777 feet.. 
5,601 feet.. 
7,464 feet. 



Hardware— Continued. 

Iron, refined, round, American, per 100 
pounds— Continued. 

A-inch 



|-inch. 
1-inch, 
i-inch. 
1-lnch. 



Iron, refined, square, American, per 100 
pounds: 
f-inch 



i-inch. 
|-inch. 
|-inch. 



1-inch 

Knives— 

Bread, thin blade 

Carving, and forks, forged, with bolster 
and guard, genuine stag handles, 

Skinning, 6-inch, beech handle, with- 

Nafla, wire, steel, per 100 pounds— 

Lath, 3d ... 

3d 

4d 

6d 

8d 

• lOd 

12d 

20d 

80d 

40d 

60d 

NaUs, fence, per 100 pounds— 

mV^v^Y^Y^Y^\\v^\Y.v.Y^Y^Y/^'. 
12d , 

NaUs, finishing, per 100 pounds— 

6d. .................................... 

8d 

lOd 



Circular, crosscut— 

26-mch 

30-mch 

Shears, tinner's, hand- 
No. 7.. 
No. 9.. 



Solder, 60 parts pure tin, 60 parts pure lead. 
Wire-fence staples, steel, galvaniied, 1-inch 

and U-inch. as may be required. 
Wire, 2-point barbed, galvanised, main 
wires not larger than 10-gauge; barbs not 
larger than 11-gauge— 
For hog fence; space between barbs 

not to exceed 3 inches. 
For cattle fence; space between barbs 
not to exceed 5 inches. 
Pipe, steel, galvanised, per foot- 
finch 



f-inch.. 
1-inch., 
tt-inch. 
lj-tnch. 
2-inch.. 



246 
234 
246 
234 
246 
234 
246 
234 
246 
234 

246 
234 
246 
234 
246 
234 
245 
234 
245 
234 

191 
191 



191 



191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
191 



191 
191 



298 
298 



191 



191 
191 

227 

227 
227 
227 
227 
227 



$2.10 
^.90 
2.05 
1.85 
2.00 
1.80 
2.00 
1.80 
1.95 
1.75 

2.20 
2.00 
2.10 
1.90 
2.05 
1.85 
2.00 
1.80 
1.95 
1.75 

.12 
.70 



.14 



»2.27 
2.22 
»2.07 
U.97 
11.87 
11.82 
U.82 
1.77 
U.77 
U.77 
11.77 

U.87 
11.82 
11.82 

1X22 
1X12 
1X02 



•6.40 
•8.40 

.91 
.66 
.26 
.0217 



».0217 
1.0217 

•.0275 



•.045 
•.0625 
».075 
».10 



Pounds. 
300 



2,330 
*i*866' 



900 

"i t "dS6" 



200 
*350' 

"aw 
'266 
"ioo" 



Pound*. 



1,600 
5,875 



3,200 
*i,*260 
"i,*950 



676 



960 
'206 



Chicago. 
Do. 



Do. 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Do. 
Do. 

St. Louis. 

Do. 

Do. 
Chicago. 



Do. 
Do. 



F. 0. b. cars 
burgh, Pa. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Pitts- 



1 American Steel & Wire Co. or Grand Crossing Tack Co. make, at contractor's option. 

'Hues make. 

•Shipment before Nov. 1, 1913T 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



p*.- - . '—- *fi 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE 
FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 



407 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER TO THE FIVE 

CIVILIZED TRIBES. 



Department of the Interior, 
Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes, 

Muskogee j OJcla., August 16, 1918. 

Sib: I have the honor to submit the annual report of the office of 
the Commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes for the year ending 
June 30, 1913. This office, under direction of the department, deals 
with matters pertaining to enrollment and allotment of members of 
the Five Civilized Tribes, the handling of tribal revenues, which 
includes royalties from tribal coal and asphalt leases, rents of unal- 
lotted lands and tribal buildings, disposition of unallotted lands, and 
all other matters pertaining to tribal property, and the completion and 
settlement of the tribal affairs of each of the Five Civilized Tribes. 

Reports are submitted to the department through the Commissioner 
of Indian Affairs who forwards same with his recommendation. 
Instructions are also received from the Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs and the Secretary of the Interior concerning matters pertain- 
ingto the work of this office. 

There is also inclosed the report of the Superintendent of the Union 
Agency, which office has supervision over the affairs of such individual 
Indians as are under control of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs 
and supervision of the department, but such office has no connec- 
tion with the settlement of tribal matters or with closing or prolong- 
ing such work. The report of the supervisor of schools is also 
attached hereto. 

INTRODUCTORY. 

Previous annual reports of the Commission to the Five Civilized 
Tribes and of this office have shown the work performed each year, 
but it seems advisable to refer briefly %o the conditions prevailing 
among the Five Civilized Tribes prior to the establishment of what is 
commonly known as the Dawes Commission, and of the objects 
sought to be accomplished and work since performed. This com- 
mission was abolished July 1, 1905, and the remaining work devolved 
upon the Secretary of the Interior, under whose supervision and 
direction the work has continued through this office. 

The Five Civilized Tribes embrace the Seminoles numbering 3,119 
persons, the Creeks numbering 18,716 persons, the Cherokees num- 
bering 41,696 persons, the Choctaws numbering 26,730 persons, and 
the Ghickasaws numbering 10,955 persons, a total of 101,216, or 
about one-third of thepresent Indian population in the United States. 
These Five Civilized Tribes prior to 1898 owned and controlled what 
was then the Indian Territory, an area of about 19,500,000 acres, with 
the exception of a small tract embracing the Quapaw Agency. They 
managed their own affairs within the limitations of their respective 

400 



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410 FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 

nations independent of each other and of the United States Govern- 
ment, elected their governors or principal chiefs and other national 
officers, together with legislators or councillors, who met in session 
once each year to enact laws governing their affaire generally, includ- 
ing their schools, handled their own revenues, and maintained sepa- 
rate constitutional organizations. Each tribe owned in common 
all the land within its borders, but could not dispose of it without the 
consent of the United States. Their various laws permitted, under 
certain stipulations, any member of the respective tribes to take 
possession for his exclusive use, of any area of land not in possession 
or use of another citizen, which land he could lease or quitclaim to 
others. The construction of railroads and the resources of the country 
caused a large immigration of white people and resulted in towns being 
built upon the common property of the different nations, all persons 
being required to pay specified amounts for the privilege of engaging 
in their various occupations or business. Sucn conditions caused 
much complication and confusion, and enabled the more enlightened 
and progressive members of the tribes to control large areas of tribal 
lands for their personal benefit to the detriment of others less 
fortunate. 

The act of Congress approved June 28. 1898, commonly known as 
the Curtis Act, provided for radical ana important changes in the 
administration of affairs in the Indian Territory. This act and sub- 
sequent agreements and legislation, after making reservations for 
then existing railroads, towns ? schools, cemeteries, and tribal build- 
ings, provided for the valuation and allotment of the land to the 
individual members of each tribe according to the value as appraised 
for allotment purposes and for disposal of the lands remaining. 

The Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes was charged with the 
duty of preparing rolls of Indians entitled to participate in the 
allotment and distribution of the tribal estates and of appraising 
and allotting the land according to value, under direction of and 
subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Interior. All other 
work pertaining to tribal matters, coming under the jurisdiction of the 
Department, was handled through the office of the United States 
Indian inspector for Indian Territory, as authorized by the act 
approved June 28, 1898, which provided as follows: 

That the Secretary of the Interior is authorized to locate one Indian inspector in the 
Indian Territory, who may, under his authority and direction, perform any duties 
required of the Secretary of the Interior by law relating to affairs therein. 

The office of inspector was consolidated with the office of Com- 
missioner to the Five Tribes on July 1, 1907. The area comprised in 
Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory was admitted as the State 
of Oklahoma on November 16, 1907. 

Prior to June 28, 1898, each tribe had a constitution modeled after 
the constitution of the United States, and had a full set of executive, 
legislative, and judicial officers, the chief executive being termed the 
principal chief or governor. The act of June 28, 1898, provided for 
the abolishment of tribal courts and placed certain statutes of Arkansas 
in effect in the Indian Territory and gave the United States courts 
jurisdiction except in certain cases affecting purely tribal matters. 

The Creek agreement, ratified by the act of Congress approved 
March 1, 1901 (31 Stats., 861), and the Cherokee agreement, ratified 
by the act of Congress approved July 1, 1902 (32 Stats., 716), placed 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 411 

the collection of all tribal revenues and the disbursement of all tribal 
funds of these nations in the hands of the Secretary of the Interior, 
and the act of Congress approved April 26, 1906 (34 Stats., 137). 
contained a similar provision applicable to all of the Five Civilized 
Tribes, including the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. 
The act of April 26, 1906, also contained a provision abolishing all 
taxes collected under tribal laws from and after December 31, 1905, 
The agreements with the various tribes provided that the tribal 
governments should be abolished March 4, 1906. As the work of 
enrollment and allotment proved to be much larger than was at first 
anticipated, and as such work, together with the final disposition of 
tribal property and winding up of tribal affairs, was delayed by 
various acts of Congress providing for the enrollment of new-born 
children, etc., the rolls were not finally closed until March 4, 1907. 
Furthermore, certain portions of the work were delayed or suspended 
until the litigation affecting it was finally concluded. It was thus 
impracticable to abolish the tribal governments on March 4 ; 1906, 
as it was necessary at least for each principal chief to contmue in 
order to execute conveyances, etc. Congress, therefore, by joint 
resolution on March 2, 1906, continued the existence of the tribal 
governments, and section 28 of the act approved April 26, 1906, con- 
tained the following provision: 

That the tribal existence and present tribal governments of the Choctaw, Chickasaw, 
Cherokee, Creek, and Seminole tribes or nations are hereby continued in full force 
and effect for all purposes authorized by law ; until otherwise provided by law, but the 
tribal council or legislature in any of said tribes or nations shall not be in session for a 



E any validity until approved by < 
United States: Provided further, That no contract involving the payment or expendi- 
ture of any money or affecting any property belonging to any of said tribes or nations 
made by them, or any of them, or by any officer thereof, shall be of any validity until 
approved by the President of the United States. 

While the tribal governments were continued by this act, the tribal 
officials had been divested of practically all governmental functions, 
and since the passage of the act of April 26, 1906, the tribal govern- 
ments have consisted only of the principal chief or governor, secretaries, 
interpreters, and such clerical assistants as were considered necessary. 
All tribal records, papers, documents, etc., have been turned over to the 
custody of this office, as provided by section 13 of the act of May 27. 
1908, and the Secretary of the Interior has taken charge of all tribal 
property, as provided by the Indian appropriation act of April 30,1 908. 
There being no governmental machinery in the Five Civilized Tribes 
to hold elections, there have been none held since the passage of the 
act of April 26, 1906, and as such act continued the tribal govern- 
ments existing at that time, the acting officers on that date continued 
to fill their respective positions. The act of April 26, 1906, provided 
that in case the chief executive of any of the Five CivilizM Tribes 
should refuse or neglect to perform the duties devolving upon him, he 
could be removed by the President of the United States, or if a vacancy 
in such position arose from any other cause, such vacancy should be 
filled by appointment by the ^President of a citizen by blood of the 
tribe. 

The Indian appropriation act of August 24, 1912, provided that no 
tribal funds of the Five Civilized Tribes could be expended during the 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



412 FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 

fiscal year ending June 30, 1913, without specific appropriation by 
Congress except as follows: 

Equalization of allotments, per capita and other payments authorized by law to 
individual members of the respective tribes, tribal ana other Indian schools for the 
current fiscal year under existing law, salaries and contingent expenses of governors, 
chiefs, assistant chiefs, secretaries, interpreters, and mining trustees of the tribes for 
the current fiscal year, and attorneys for said tribes employed under contract approved 
by the President, under existing law, for the current fiscal year. 

This act contained no provision for the meeting of the tribal coun- 
cils or legislatures, nor the payment of expenses of such meetings. 
Such councils, however, had not met for several years prior thereto, 
except in the Choctaw Nation. The Indian appropriation act for the 
fiscal year 1914, approved June 30, 1913, contained practically the 
same provision with reference to the use of tribal funds. 

The work involved the enrollment of 101,000 citizens from 250,000 
applicants from all parts of the United States, the establishment of 
the limits of 308 existing towns, the surveying of these towns and 
their subdivisions into lots and blocks, the appraisal and disposal of 
the town lots, for the benefit of the individual members of the tribes, 
the supervision and enforcement of tribal laws, the collection and dis- 
bursement of immense sums of money due as royalties, rents, etc., 
and the final closing up of all matters, so that each member of the tribe 
should receive his share of the whole. This work was very exacting 
and complicated and instructions from the Commissioner of Indian 
Affairs and the Secretary of the Interior were frequently asked to 
govern cases constantly arising not clearly covered by law. The 
magnitude and detail of the task can hardly be understood by those 
not familiar with the legislation, requirements, and litigation. 

The enrollment was completed and the rolls closed by congressional 
legislation March 4. 1907, and the allotments to individual members 
have been practically completed. 

Allotments have "been made as follows: To 3,119 Seminoles an 
average of 120 acres each, 40 acres of which was a homestead and non- 
taxable in perpetuity; to 18,716 Creeks, including 6,807 freedmen, 
160 acres each, of which 40 acres was a homestead and nontaxable 
and inalienable for 21 years; to 40,196 Cherokees, including 4,924 
freedmen, an average of 110 acres each, of which 40 acres was a 
homestead to be nontaxable while held by the original allottee; to 
27,020 Choctaw and Chickasaw citizens an average of 320 acres each, 
of which 160 acres was a homestead; and to each of 10,657 Choctaw 
and Chickasaw freedmen, who did not participate in other tribal 

1>roperty, land equal in value to 40 acres of the average allottable 
ana. The Choctaw and Chickasaw agreement provided that all land 
allotted should be nontaxable while title remained in the original 
allottee, not exceeding 21 years, which the United States Supreme 
Court recently upheld notwithstanding the fact that Congress in 1908 
provided that all Indians enrolled as less than half blood should be 
removed from departmental supervision, that the restrictions on lands 
other than homestead of those enrolled between one-half blood and 
three-quarter blood should be removed, that further restrictions could 
be removed by the Secretary of the Interior in individual instances, 
and that in all instances where restrictions were thus removed land 
should thereupon be subject to taxation. 



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FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 413 

Since 1910 amounts ranging from 2 cents to $651.20 each, aggre- 
gating $1,003,029.38, have been paid to 65,678 citizens to equalize 
allotments; all of these payments were made on a basis of certain 
valuations, and citizens not receiving their quota of lands were paid the 
balance due in money. 

In addition thereto payrolls covering $541,339.54 due 999 restricted 
Cherokee Indians were furnished the superintendent, Union Agency, 
forpayment when authorized by the department. 

Tnere were 28,365 suits brought by the Department of Justice on 
request of the Secretary of the Interior to set aside conveyances made 
by Indians of portions of their allotted lands before they were author- 
ized to dispose of them under the then existing law. Of these suits, 
9,674 have been dismissed to date, leaving 18,691 pending. 

The unfinished work now being performed in connection with allot- 
ments is the completion of final and permanent office records, the distri- 
bution of money to equalize allotments, and the disposition of 3,601,202 
acres remaining after allotment. To the present time 1,870,858 
acres have been disposed of, although final payments of last sales 
are not due until December, 1 914. There remain to be disposed of the 
payments to 17,708 individual members of the Creek Nation to equalize 
their allotments, which would require about $7,000,000 on the basis of 
value of allotments heretofore made, but which will require legislation; 
the disposition of about 370 cemeteries ; the sale and disposition of ap- 
proximately 1,278,000 acres of timber lands in the Choctaw Nation; 
the sale of the surface of 432,000 acres of coal lands recently author- 
ized by Congress, the final disposition of the coal underlying such 
lands, which will require legislation, the reoffering and disposition of 
such tracts of unallotted lands, scattered and interspersed with 
allotted lands) as may not be finally paid for, and finally the distri- 
bution of all tribal moneys and the proceeds arising from the sale of 
all tribal property. Of tne money derived from the proceeds of the 
sale of unallotted land and other tribal property, about $4,500,000 has 
been deposited in National and State banks in Oklahoma, which 
monej is now drawing interest at the rate of about $200,000 annually. 

This report shows in detail the work accomplished during the past 
year, there being employed in this office an average of 68 clerks, during 
which time there was received $3,535,878.15, which in turn was dis- 
bursed or accounted for. 

As shown by the report of the superintendent of the Union Agency, 
there were employed m his office in connection with handling of the 
affairs of restricted Indians an average of 152 clerks and 25 Indian 
police, during which time in connection with such matters his office 
received $4,984,181.95, which was disbursed or accounted for. 

The report of the supervisor of schools shows that there were main- 
tained during the year 12 boarding schools and that the total number 
of persons employed in connection therewith, including 4 in his office, 
averaged 183. Such force in the different offices embraces all em- 
ployees under jurisdiction of the department in the Five Civilized 
Tribes. 

Prior to 1898, before changes in the administration of affairs brought 
about by subsequent laws, and while lands were held in common, the 
Union Agency was a small affair, the force consisting of an agent at a 
nominal salary with 2 clerks and a few Indian policemen, the principal 
duties of that office being correspondence with the various principal 

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414 FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 

chiefs and the investigation of complaints. Since this office has had 
supervision over the allotments to individual members and has han- 
dled the affairs of about 33,000 individual Indians that are under 
control of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs and supervision of the 
department, including the receiving and accounting for vast sums 
realized from royalties on oil produced on the allotted lands, sales of 
lands, etc., the work and force have increased until it is now by far 
the largest Indian agency in existence. 

Special attention is invited to that portion of the report of the 
United States Indian superintendent, Union Agency, dealing with 
probate matters, and also to the reports heretofore submitted by Mr. 
M. L. Mott, national attorney for the Creek Nation, and a special 
report by Mr. W. W. Hastings, national attorney for the Cherokee 
Nation, showing the deplorable conditions existing in certain localities 
with reference to such matters, and the necessity for provision to be 
made for the protection of the estates of minor and dependent citizens 
of the Five Civilized Tribes. 

GENERAL STATEMENT, 

While the work incident to enrollment and allotment in the Five 
Civilized Tribes is practically complete, there is a vast amount of 
unfinished work still devolved upon this office in connection therewith, 
including equalization of allotments, completing final records, pUts, 
maps, etc. Many other unforeseen complications constantly arise 
which will require much time and careful investigation to unravel: 
the equalization of Creek allotments is especially complicated, seven! 
million dollars being involved and legislation being necessary. 

During the present fiscal year thousands of letters of inquiry 
requesting information in regard to allotment, sale of unallotted 
lands, ana right to enrollment have been received, all requiring special 
care in examining the records for the purpose of obtaining the neces- 
sary data to make proper replies. There nave been prepared and fur- 
nished 29,781 certified copies of the records of enrollment and allot- 
ment, and approximately 30,000 statements and certificates of various 
kinds relating thereto have been prepared and checked for the use of 
the Indian superintendent and the various field clerks. In addition, 
thousands of persons have personally appeared at this office seeking 
information of various kinds relating to such matters. These per- 
sons have had to be waited upon and furnished with the desired 
information wh°n it was found proper to do so, the services of from 
two to four clerks being constantly required for such purpose. 

During the year 50,451 communications were received and 137,813 
letters, circulars, notices, and other papers pertaining to tribal 
matters were mailed, being a daily average of 620 pieces handled. 

The average number of persons engaged in this office during the 
year was 68. These have been employed constantly in connection 
with work pertaining to enrollment and allotment, collection of rents, 
sale of unallotted lands and other tribal property, and furnishing the 
public certified information of records, etc. 

The most important work accomplished during the present fiscal 
year has been in connection with the sale of the unallotted and timber 



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FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 415 

lands. There were offered 919,182 acres of tribal unallotted and 
timber lands during the past year, of which 900,175 acres were sold 
for $4,494,683, or $1,613,786 more than the appraisement. The total 
area of tribal lands disposed of between November, 1910, and June 30, 
1913, aggregates 1,849.722 acres in 28,222 tracts interspersed with 
allotted lands. These lands were sold for $10,745,495, or $2,479,266 
more than the minimum price, the terms being partial payment at 
time of sale and balance on deferred payments covering two years with 
6 per cent interest. During the year there has been received on 
account of unallotted and timber lands sold, including interest due 
thereon, $2,656,941.26, making a total of $5,505,041.61 collected to 
June 30, 1913, leaving $5,429,709.59 to be collected on the deferred 
payments as they become due, together with interest thereon at 6 
per centper annum from the date of purchase until receipt of pay- 
ment. The total amount of interest collected on deferred payments 
during the year amounts to $138,491.17, making the total interest 
collected thereon to June 30, 1913, amount to $189,256.15. 

To June 30, 1913, the expenses, including making the agreements 
from 1893, when the Dawes Commission was first created, receiving 
. applications for enrollment from all over the country, appraising the 
land and making the allotments, issuing the certificates of allotment 
and making the final deeds covering the entire work, amounted to 
$35.20 per capita; the cost of the sales of the lands made in the last 
three years is about 4 cents per acre, which includes preparation of 
all data, advertisements, furnishing information to prospective pur- 
chasers, conducting sales, preparing and furnishing purchasers with 
certificates of purchase, receiving remittances until final payments 
are made, including computation of interest thereon, preparing deeds, 
and having them executed by the tribal authorities, approved by the 
department, recorded, and delivered. 

During the year the sale of the unallotted lands in the Seminole 
Nation was completed. The total area remaining unsold in the other 
nations is 1,730,344 acres; all of which is located in the Choctaw 
Nation excepting 7,839 acres in the Chickasaw Nation, 895 acres in 
the Cherokee Nation, and 503 acres in the Creek Nation. This area 
will probably be slightly increased by reason of the cancellation of 
duplicate allotments that may be discovered and the adjustment of 
several aUotments that are in litigation or otherwise affected and by 
cancellation of sales on which payments are not completed. 

Another branch of unfinished work, and one of the most important, 
is the survey, classification, appraisement, and sale of the surface of 
the segregated coal and asphalt lands of the Choctaw and Chickasaw 
Nations, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved Feb- 
ruary 19, 1912 (37 Stat., 67 to 70), as amended by the act of Congress 
approved August 24, 1912 (37 Stat., 531, 532). 

Several enrolled citizens and freedmen of the Choctaw and Chicka- 
saw Nations, entitled to allotments as shown by enrollment records, 
have not been located, and there are pending in the courts several 
cases involving allotments which can not be completed until de- 
cisions are rendered. In all of the nations there have been re- 
Eorted some duplicate enrollments and allotments which will reauire 
eld investigation to determine whether or not they are duplica- 



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416 



FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 



tions, and where necessary, court proceedings must be instituted to 
cancel one of the allotments and the evidence of title therein to such 
allottee. In addition there remain to be delivered approximately 
4,800 deeds or patents issued to members of the five nations; about 
4,000 of these were returned unclaimed or refused, and it is necessary 
to exercise every possible effort and care in order to make proper 
delivery. 

The work in connection with the equalization of allotments in the 
Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Nations has been pushed with 
vigor and very satisfactory progress has been made, there having 
been disbursed from this office miring the year $482,171.32 to 3,578 
members. 

The sum of $217,226.61 was collected and deposited to the credit 
of the tribes during the year as royalty on tribal coal and asphalt 
leases covering 104,760 acres in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations; 
the rental for the use of the surface of segregated coal and asphalt 
lands and other unallotted lands, for grazing and other purposes, 
amounted to $116,134.22; including smaller amounts from other 
sources, the total tribal revenues collected, aside from the proceeds 
of the sales of unallotted land, aggregated $437,791.20. 

As shown by the report of the superintendent of the Union Agency, 
the usefulness of the field clerks, formerly designated as district 
agents, has been fully demonstrated after a trial of several years, and 
the work devolved upon them has been of such importance and mag- 
nitude, especially in probate matters affecting estates of minors as 
disclosed by investigation to which special attention is invited, as to 
clearly show that their services are indispensable in protecting the 
interests of the restricted and minor citizens. 

ALLOTMENT AND SALE OF UNALLOTTED LANDS. 

The following table shows the number of enrolled citizens entitled 
to and allotted in each of the Five Civilized Tribes, the approximate 
number of restricted class, and the status of allotments and sale of 
unallotted lands: 



Status of allotment work and sale of unallotted lands on June 30, 1913. 



Tribes. 


Enrolled 

citizens 

entitled to 

allotments. 


Restricted 

Indians, 

June 30, 

1913. 


Average 
area of 
allotments, 
not includ- 
ing Choc- 
taw and 
Chickasaw 
freedmen. 1 


Area of 
home- 
steads. 


Area, 


Choctaw 


26,730 
10,955 
41,696 
18,716 
3,119 


9,434 
2,112 
11,770 
7,892 
1,731 


Acres. 
320 
320 
110 
160 
120 


Acres. 
160 
160 
40 
40 
40 


Acre*. 
6,953,048,07 
4,707,904.28 
4,420,067.73 
3,079,094.61 

365,861.67 


Chickasaw x * 


Cherokee 


Creek 


Seminole 




Total 


101,216 


32,939 






19.525.966.36 









» The ft 



average 
iftsteads. 



area of Choctaw and Chickasaw freedmen allotments is 40 acres and their entire »iift*m— ft , 



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FIVE CIVILIZED THEBES. 417 

Status of allotment work and sale of unallotted lands on June SO, 1913 — Continued. 





Reserved from 

allotments for 
town sites, 

railroad rights 

of way, ooal 

and asphalt 

segregation, 

churches, 

schools, ceme- 
teries, etc. 


Allotted to 
June 30, 1913. 


Unallotted, including 
timber lands. 


Tribes. 


Sold to 
June 30, 1913. 


Remaining 
unsold. 


Choctaw , 


Acres. 

465.614 

46,310 

22.884 

16.015 

1,931 


Acres. 
4,297.385.99 
3,801,989.91 
4,346,523.29 
2.998,997.14 

359,696.93 


Acres. 
893,790.20 
859,500.32 
49,765.44 
63,578.89 
4,223.74 


Acres. 
1,290,207.88 


Chickasaw. 


104.06 


Ch«T0%66 r r , 


895.00 


Cmk., , 


503.58 


Svninota 


None. 






Total 


552,754 


15,804,593.26 


1,870,858.59 


U, 297, 760. 51 







i This includes 1,278,753 acres of timber lands in the Choctaw Nation, but does not include 432,584 
of segregated coal and asphalt lands in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations. 

The enrollment of citizens and freedmen of the Five Civilized 
Tribes was completed and the rolls were closed on March 4, 1907, 
under the provisions of the act of Congress approved April 26, 1906 
(34 Stats., 137). The work in connection with allotments has been 
completed, with the exception of the delivery of about 4,000 deeds 
or patents which have been returned unclaimed or refused and about 
800 Seminole deeds to deceased allottees, which are being withheld 
by departmental instructions pending the determination of certain 
litigation involving alleged illegal conveyances, clouding the title to 
portions of the lands of such allottees, the adjustment of several 
allotments involved in litigation or otherwise, the investigation of 
several reported duplicate enrollments, the payment of various 
amounts aggregating approximately $307,252.28 still due and unpaid 
to equalize tne allotments of 12,016 Cherokees, Choctaws, and Chick- 
asaws, and of several million dollars in the aggregate to Creek allottees 
having amounts due to equalize their allotments, which, however, will 
require legislation before payment can be made. 

CHOCTAW AND CHICKASAW NATIONS. 

The total area of the Choctaw Nation is 6,953,048 acres and of the 
Chickasaw Nation 4,707,904 acres, making the total area of the two 
nations 11,660,952 acres, of which 8,099,376 acres have been allotted 
to 37,677 citizens and freedmen, leaving a balance of 3,561,576 acres. 
Of this balance 1,753,290 acres, including 21,134 acres purchased by 
Choctaw and Chickasaw freedmen under the provisions of the act of 
Congress approved April 26, 1906 (34 Stat. L., 137), have been sold 
and 79,340 acres have been reserved for town sites, railroad rights of 
way, and other purposes, leaving 1,728,946 acres to be disposed of, 
all of which is located in the Choctaw Nation excepting 7,839 acres 
in the Chickasaw Nation. 

During the year there were held three sales at public auction of the 
unallotted ana timber lands of the Choctaw ana Chickasaw Nations 
at which there were sold 11,750 tracts, containing 898,083 acres, for 
$4,474,867. Since 1910 a total of 23,981 tracts, containing 1,732,154 



15836°— int 1913— vol i 



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418 FIVE CIVILIZED TRtBES. 

acres, have been sold in these two nations for $10,130,368, or $2,230,806 
more than the appraisement. The average appraised value was $4.48 
per acre and the average price obtained was $5.82 per acre, making 
an average of $1.34 per acre obtained over the appraisement. 

Complete allotments have been made to all citizens and freedmen 
of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations with the exception of six 
freedmen and one citizen who have not been located and seven partial 
allotments to citizens awaiting adjustment on account of pending 
litigation and other reasons. The patents to 98 tiacts, varying in area 
of from 2 to 20 acres, reserved for cemeteries are to be prepared. 

There is a vast amount of detail work in connection with the sale 
of the unallotted lands in these two nations, because many of the 
tracts are scattered and interspersed with allotted lands. This work 
includes preparing descriptive lists and maps preparatory to adver- 
tising, furnishing desired information to the public, conducting the 
sales, checking and platting the sale of each tract, making separate 
ledger accounts for each tract sold, preparing and delivering certifi- 
cates of purchase, receiving payments and computing interest thereon, 
and finally preparing deeds, having same executed by the proper 
principal chief on behalf of the tribe, approved by the department, 
recorded in this office, and delivered to purchaser. During the year 
11,749 certificates of purchase and 1,523 deeds were prepared and 
delivered to the purchasers of lands in these nations ana approxi- 
mately 23,000 entries were made on the ledgers. 

CHEROKEE NATION. 

The total area of the Cherokee Nation is 4,420,067 acres, of which 
4,346,524 acres have been allotted to 40,196 citizens and freedmen. 
There were 22,884 acres reserved for town sites, railroad rights of way, 
and other purposes, and 49,765 acres have been sold, leaving 895 
acres of unallotted land in this nation remaining unsold. The last 
annual report shows a total of 625 acres of unallotted and unsold land 
in this nation. This area has been increased during the year by 
reason of the cancellation of one duplicate allotment. 

The litigation involving the right of the Cherokee minors enrolled 
under the act of Congress approved April 26, 1906, having been 
finallv determined in favor of such minors, the principal item of work 
devolved upon the office in connection with the Cherokee allotments 
during the past year has been the preparation and delivery of deeds 
to sucn minors and payment of moneys in lieu of allotments. Eight 
hundred deeds were checked with the allotment plats and original 
applications ; 2,700 were executed by the principal chief of the Cherokee 
Nation- and 3,400 were forwardedto and approved by the Secretary 
of the Interior. There have been mailed to allottees, or their proper 
representatives, 4,350 homestead and allotment deeds, of which 360 
have been returned unclaimed, which with 1,350 other deeds that 
have been returned to this office during previous years make the total 
number of deeds returned unclaimed or refused amount to 1,710. 
No deeds have been issued to 165 new-born Cherokees, owing to the 
fact that portions of their allotments are involved in suits to quiet the 
titles, which are clouded by illegal conveyances. 

During the year the recommendations of this office have received 
departmental approval, and appropiiate notations on the approved 



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FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 419 

rolls have been made in the cases of two enrolled Cherokee citizens 
where field investigations developed the fact that one died prior to 
September 1, 1902, and the other, who was enrolled both as a Chero- 
kee and Creek,. elected to retain his enrollment and allotment in the 
Creek Nation, thus reducing the total number of Cherokee citizens 
entitled to allotments from 41 ,698, as shown in the last annual report, 
to 41,696. 

During the year the action of the department and this office in 
awarding the land involved in the Cherokee allotment contest entitled 
Herman Knight v. Eva Waters to the contestee was sustained by 
decision rendered on March 17, 1913, by the United States Supreme 
Coin t in the case of the United States ex rel. Herman Knight v. the 
Secretary of the Interior, and all matters growing out of sucn contest 
have been closed. This contest was instituted August 28, 1907, and 
assumed much importance by reason of the great value of the land 
for oil, and all possible legal steps were taken by the litigants to secure 
a favorable decision. 

Pay rolls aggregating $1,007,772.54, showing the amounts due each 
of the 5,605 Cherokee minors enrolled under the act of April 26, 1906. 
to whom partial or no allotments were made, were prepared, approved 
by the department, and returned to this office for payment. One of 
these payrolls containing the names of 515 restricted citizens having 
amounts due them aggregating $308,942.74 was turned over to the 
superintendent, Union Agency, for payment under departmental 
instructions. The others containing the names of the balance of 
these minors were retained at this office for payment. The total of 
these pay rolls was $698,829.80, of which $452,980.66 was paid to 
2,380 persons. This necessitated considerable work, as the difference 
between the appraised value of the allotments of each citizen and the 
standard value of a Cherokee allotment had to be carefully ascertained 
and checked before making the pay rolls, and as all payments were 
made to guardians or legal representatives, they were required to 
file satisfactorv bond to account for moneys received in each case. 

Only one allotment, containing 30 acres, was made during the 
year to a registered Delaware citizen, who had lost through contest 
the same area of his original selection. 

The uncompleted tribal work in the Cherokee Nation comprises 
principally the completion of the tract books, ledgers, and allotment 
plats, the preparation and issuance of deeds to unallotted lands and 
the investigation and disposition of 272 tracts reserved for cemeteries. 
In addition, there will be a multitude of matters incident to the closing 
of complicated allotment cases and the investigation of duplicate en- 
rollments. Furthermore, the work of prepanng certified copies of 
the records and that of checking oil leases and applications for 
removal of restrictions with the allotment and enrollment records 
are to some degree increasing owing to the extensive development 
of lands for oil and gas. 

CREEK NATION. 

The total area of the Creek Nation is 3,079,094 acres, of which 
2,998,997 acres have been allotted to 18,716 citizens and freedmen. 
There were 1 6,015 acres reserved for town sites, railroad rights of way, 
and other purposes, and 63,579 acres have been sold, leaving a 
balance of 503 acres remaining unsold. 

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420 FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 

Complete allotments have been made to all citizens and freedmen. 
There are eight tentative applications made by citizens to select lands 
allotted to persons whose names have been stricken from the rolls 
and to whom deeds thereto were issued, which are involved in suits 
to cancel same, or in other litigation affecting the title to the land. 

There are due to 17,708 Creek citizens various amounts, aggregating 
$6,913,932, to equalize their allotments on a basis of $1,040 each, but 
which can not be paid as the Creek tribal fund aggregates only about 
$3,700,000. By act of Congress approved March 3, 1909 (35 Stats., 
781-805), provision was made for the equalization of Creek allot- 
ments on a basis of $800 instead of $1,040, which was the standard 
of allotment first established. This act provided, however, that 
the Creek national council should pass an act, approved by the 
Secretary of the Interior, discharging the United States from any 
further claim. The council rejected such proposition; consequently 
the equalization of these allotments remains unsettled pending 
further legislation. 

Several alleged duplicate enrollments and allotments have been 
reported in this nation. In such cases testimony must be taken 
and an opportunity given citizens having two allotments to be heard 
and elect which allotment they desire to retain, in order that the 
records may be made in proper condition to justify the Secretary of 
the Interior in denying such citizens the right to participate in more 
than one allotment, and, in the event patents have been issued 
covering both allotments, to cause the institution of suits looking to 
the cancellation of one of the allotments and the evidence of the 
allottee's title therein. 

During the vear there were advertised for sale at public auction 
the balance of the unalloted lands in the Creek Nation, consisting 
of 1,754 acres. Of the land thus advertised, 155 acres were with- 
drawn from sale by departmental instructions, leaving 1,599 acres 
which were offered, of which 1,411 acres were sold for $16,660, or 
$11,900 more than the minimum price. The average minimum 
price was $3.40 per acre and the average sale price was $11.80 per 
acre, or $8.40 more than the average minimum price per acre. 

SEMINOLE NATION. 

There is contained in the Seminole Nation a total of 365,851 acres, 
of which 359,697 acres have been allotted to 3,119 citizens and freed- 
men. There were 1,931 acres reserved for town sites, schools^ rail- 
road rights of way, and for other purposes, and the balance, consisting 
of 4,223 acres, has been sold for $40,441, or $20,336 more than the 
appraisement. The average appraisement was $4.75 per acre, and 
tne average sale price was $9.57 per acre, or an average of $4.82 per 
acre more than the appraisement. 

The work incident to enrollment and allotment and the disposition 
of the unallotted land in this nation has been practically completed. 
During the year three allotments, containing a total of 520 acres, have 
been canceled by judgments' rendered by tne United States District 
Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma, for the reason it was found 
that the allottees had two allotments, one in the Seminole Nation 
and one in the Wichita or Kiowa Reservation. 



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FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 421 

The last annual report shows that there were 160 acres of unallotted 
land remaining unsold in this nation, which with the canceled area, 
as above referred to, made a total of 680 acres remaining unsold. 
During the year this remaining area was sold at public auction in 
accordance with departmental authority for $3,156, or $1,856 more 
than the minimum price. 

Under instructions from the department there have been issued 
during the year deeds covering the allotments of 2,240 citizens and 
freedmen of this nation, leaving 879 deeds still to be issued, prac- 
tically all of which cover allotments of deceased restricted allottees. 
These deeds have been prepared, but the issuance thereof has been 
withheld under departmental instructions. Deeds covering the 
allotments of 1,304 living restricted Seminoles have been mailed 
direct from this office to the allottees. 

It appearing that a large number of unrestricted Seminoles had 
sold then* allotments, or portions thereof, for a grossly inadequate 
consideration, and that in many instances the purchasers promised 
to pay an additional sum upon the title being perfected in the allottee, 
936 deeds covering the allotments of this class of allottees were 
mailed for delivery to Mr. James E. Gresham, special assistant to 
the Attorney General at Wewoka, Okla., who has charge of suits 
and other matters affecting the rights and title to the lands of Semi- 
nole allottees, which action was approved by the department on 
December 24, 1912. 

EQUAIilZATION OF AIiLOTMENTS. 

The work of computing the amounts due to equalize the allot- 
ments of citizens and freedmen of the Choctaw, Chickasaw, and 
Cherokee Nations and preparing pay rolls thereof has been com- 
pleted, excepting in a few cases where allotments have not been 
adjusted or suits are pending. In all cases of restricted Cherokee 
Indians, where the sum due exceeds $50, payments are made by 
the superintendent. Union Agency, and the money deposited to the 
individual credit of the allottee in local banks throughout the Cher- 
okee Nation, where it bears interest until withdrawn. Payments of 
amounts due all others are made through this office. 

During the year there has been paid through this office to 3,578 
members of these three nations $482,171.32, which, together with 

Sayments previously made, makes a total of $1,003,023.38 paid to 
une 30, 1913, to equalize the allotments of 65,678 members, leav- 
ing 12,016 still unpaid. In addition thereto pay rolls covering 
$541,339.54 due 999 restricted Indians were turned over to the 
superintendent, Union Agency, for payment as authorized by the 
department. Practically all of the payments which are to be made 
through this office in order to equalize allotments are very small, 
amounting to only a few cents in a majority of the cases, which 
accounts for efforts not being made by parties entitled thereto to 
obtain same, although repeatedly notified. No action has been 
taken during the year looking to the equalization of Creek allotments. 



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422 



FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 



The following statement shows the status of the equalization of 
allotments in these nations on June 30, 1913: 

Status of the equalization of allotment* in the Cherokee, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Nations, 

June SO, 1913. 



Nations. 


Names 

on 

rolls. 


Total 
number 

paid 
prior to 


Total 
number 

paid 
present 

fiscal 

year. 


Total 
num- 
ber 
paid. 


Total 
amount 

paid 
prior to 


Total 
amount 

paid 

present 

fiscal year. 


Total 

amount 

paid. 


Total 
num- 
ber 
unpaid. 


Cherokee 

Choctaw and Chick- 
asaw X 


140,420 
37,274 


30,895 
31,205 


3,119 
469 


34,014 
31,664 


3233,988.34 
286,863.72 


$478,125.50 
4,045.82 


1712,113.84 
290,909.54 


6,406 
5,610 




Total 


77,694 


62,100 


8,578 


65,678 


520,852.06 


482,171.32 


1,003,023.38 


12,016 



1 This does not include 999 restricted Cherokees on pay rolls transferred to the Indian superintendent 
for payment under direction of the Secretary of the Interior. 

AUCTION SALE OF UNALLOTTED LANDS. 

Of the unallotted lands in the Five Nations there has been sold 
since November 1, 1910, the date of the first sale, a total of 28,221 
tracts, containing 1,838,921 acres, for $10,458,495 or an average of 
$5.68 per acre; all sales were by public auction, the lands being 
offered at the respective county seats. Of the lands thus sold, 23,980 
tracts, containing 1,721,353 acres, are located in the Choctaw and 
Chickasaw Nations and were sold for $9,843,368, or $2,124,624 more 
than the minimum price: 2,787 tracts, containing 49,765 acres, are 
located in the Cherokee Nation and were sold for $179,828, or $57,447 
more than the minimum price; 1,395 tracts, containing 63,578 acres, 
are located in the Creek Nation and were sold for $394,857, or 
$170,677 more than the minimum price; and 59 tracts, containing 
4,223 acres, located in the Seminole Nation, were sold for $40)441, 
or $20,336 more than the minimum price. 

During the year three sales of unallotted lands were held, two in 
the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, and one in the Creek and 
Seminole Nations. On August 27, 1912, regulations were approved 
by the Secretary of the Interior, providing for reoffering for sale the 
unsold unallotted laad in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations. 
At ihis sale, which extended from November 12, 1912, to December 
23, 1912, there were offered a total of 816,826 acres, contained in 
11,098 tracts, of which 697,545 acres were sold for $3,412,153, or 
$1,258,537 more than the appraisement. The average appraisement 
of the land sold was $3.08 per acre, and the average price obtained 
was $4.89, or an average sale price of $1.81 per acre more than the 
average appraisement. 

Under departmental authority of January 27, 1913, there were 
withdrawn from the timber area in the Choctaw Nation 94,571 acres, 
which were offered for sale with the other remaining unallotted lands. 
At such sale, extending from May 1, 1913, to May 15, 1913, there 
were offered 112,775 acres without any minimum price, which land 
had previously been offered but not sold, of which 112,671 acres were 
sold for $583,521, or $163,359 more than the appraised value. The 
average appraisement of the land thus sold was $3.73 per acre, and 
the average sale price was $5.18 per acre, or an average of $1.45 more 

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FIVE CIVILIZED TBIBB8* 428 

per acre than the average appraisement. Of the 94,571 acres for- 
merly in the timber reserve and for the first time offered at this sale 
at a minimum price of twice the appraisement as made for allotment 
purposes, 77,066 acres were sold tor $192,192, or $71,991 more than 
the minimum price. 

On May 13, 1913, authority was granted by the department to 
offer for sale the "balance of the unallotted lands in the Creek and 
Seminole Nations. For this sale, which was held on June 26, 27, and 
28, 1913, there were advertised 1,754 acres of land in the Creek 
Nation, of which 155 acres were withdrawn by departmental instruc- 
tions of June 23, 1913, it having been found that same was involved 
in certain claims thereto bv alleged citizens of the Creek Nation. 
The balance of the land advertised, consisting of 1,599 acres, was 
offered, of which 1,411 acres were sold for $16,660, or $11,861 more 
than the minimum price. The average minimum price per acre was 
43.40, and the average sale price was $11.80 per acre, or an average 
of $8.40 per acre more than the average minimum price. 

All of the land offered in the Seminole Nation at this sale, consist- 
ing of 680 acres, was sold for $3,156 { or $1,856 more than the minimum 
price. The average minimum price per acre was $1.91, and the 
average sale price was $4.64 per acre, or an average of $2.73 per acre 
more than the average minimum price. 

In disposing^ of these lands, advertisements were carried for from 
30 to 60 days in advance of the sales in various newspapers in Okla- 
homa and other States. In addition circulars advertising the sales 
were sent to approximately 35,000 persons, whose names were pro- 
cured from the combined mailing list of this office and the office of 
the superintendent. Union Agency, and from other sources; also 
about 15,000 were furnished to persons making inquiry at this office 
after the sales were advertised. All railroads operating in Oklahoma 
were also furnished with large^ supplies of advertising matter which 
they distributed through their immigration and advertising agents. 

There are approximately 473 tracts of unallotted land in the 
Cherokee Nation and 119 tracts in the Creek Nation, containing a 
total of 11,386 acres, which were sold at public auction, under regu- 
lations approved by the Secretary of the Interior, for $70,944. Part 
payments aggregating $16,033 have been made for land on which final 
payments due m November and December, 1912, have not been 
made, although the purchasers have been repeatedly notified of non 
payment and requested to make remittances. The cancellation of 
such sales and forfeiture of amounts paid thereon, as provided by the 
regulations under which they were sold, is now under consideration 
by the department. 

During the year there have been issued and delivered to purchasers 
of the unallotted lands 11,749 certificates of purchase and 2,455 
patents. An average of two tracts is contained in each patent; 
therefore the number of tracts patented represent about twice the 
number of patents issued. 



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424 



FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBB8. 



Patents to purchasers of unallotted lands in the Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek, and 

Seminole Nations. 



Nations. 


During 
fi seal year 
ended June 

30, 1011. 


During 

fiscal year 

ended June 

30, 1012. 


During 
fiscal year 
ended June 

30, 1013. 


Total. 


Choctaw And Chickasaw ,,.. r . r .,,,..., 


604 

207 

187 

2 


821 

650 

207 

3 


1,523 

415 

504 

13 


3,038 


Cherokee 


1,281 
848 


Creek 


SeminOle, -rTrr.T.r-T**T..., r ... , . . -, tt--- 


18 






Total 


1,040 


1,600 


2,455 


5,185 





The tabulated statements following show the result of the sales 
made in each nation to June 30, 1913: 



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FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES. 429 

TIMBER LANDS. 

There are two tracts of valuable timber lands located in the Choc- 
taw Nation. One tract consisting of 1,278,753 acres and containing 
1,043,857,500 feet of pine timber and 141,309,000 feet of hardwood 
timber was withdrawn from allotment by departmental instructions 
of January 12, 1907, and the other tract, consisting of 10,801 acres, 
and containing 43,505,000 feet of pine timber and about 3,000,000 feet 
of hardwood timber was segregated from allotment under the pro- 
visions of the act of Congress approved April 26, 1906 (34 Stats., 137). 

As shown in the annual report for June 30, 1912, the larger of the 
above-mentioned timber tracts was advertised in February, 1912, for 
a period of 90 days. Sealed bids were received and opened May 1, 
1912, for 550,608.44 acres, containing 536,616,500 feet of pine and 
64,291,000 feet of hardwood, but as the prices were unsatisfactory, 
and as no competitive bids were submitted, the proposals wore re- 
jected bv the department. No attempt was made to sell these lands 
and timber during the last fiscal year out the subject of theii further 
disposition and sue is now under consideration of the department. 

In accordance with regulations approved by the Secretary of the 
Interior the smaller tract of timber land above referred to, was 
divided into 21 tracts of not exceeding one section each, which in 
turn was divided into six groups of not exceeding three sections or 

Sarts of four sections each, and offered for sale at public auction on 
fovember 11, 1912. The pine timber was offered on a basis of $3.50 
per thousand feet, and the nard wood timber was treated as a part of 
the land and included with the appraised value thereof. Previous to 
this sale these lands were advertised in several publications for a 
period of 60 days from September 10, 1912, under the direction of 
the department, and a large number of the copies of the advertise- 
ment and regulations were sent to timbermen in various parts of the 
country. 

To enable purchasers desiring to bid on any one section, or portion 
of a section, or groups of sections, or the entire tract, as advertised, 
the sale was conducted as follows: 

First. The land, hardwood, and pine timber in each section, or part 
of a section were offered. 

Second. The land and the hardwood in each section were offered. 

Third. The pine timber, without the land and hardwood in such 
section was offered. No bids were received under the first three 
offerings. 

Fourth. Each group was then offered in t