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Full text of "Report no. 2 to the United States District Court, District of Massachusetts on Boston school desegregation"

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5°,ST0IV PUBLIC I 

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]OV£RN/Vie;'IT documents 
department 

!:05rON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



REPORT NO. 2 

TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ON 



BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME 11 
FEBRUARY 1, 1984 





BOSTON PUBLIC UBRAW 

700 Boylston Street 
Ni Boston, MA 02117 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Dr. Donald R. Walker, Reading, Chairperson 
Mr. Howard A. Greis, Holden, Vice Chairperson 

Ms. Darcy Fernandes, Wareham 
Mrs. Anne C. Fox, Needham 
Rev. Paul V. Garrity, Maiden 
Ms. Milca R. Gonzalez, Worcester 
Mr. James R. Grande, Hanover 
Mrs. Loretta L. Roach, Boston 
Mr. Joseph C. Savery, Lee 
Ms. Mary Ellen Smith, Boston 
Mrs. Mary C. Wright, Falmouth 
Mrs. Dorothea A. Zanetti, Wilbraham 



Dr. John H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education, Secretary 
Mr. John B. Duff, Chancellor, Board of Regents, Ex Officio 



Report Coordinated by — 

Franklin Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on 

Boston Desegregation 



Produced by the Bureau of Operational Support 
Cecilia DiBella, Director 
Susan Gardner, Publications Coordinator 
Susan M. Ridge, Typographist 



The Massachusetts Department of Education insures equal employment/educational opportunities/affirmative action regardless of race, 
color, creed, national origin or sex, in compliance with title IX, or handicap, in compliance with section 504. 

Publication of this Document Approved by Daniel D. Carter. State Purchasing Agent 

20a 1 84- 1 76405 ESTIMATED COST PER COPY: < I 3.88 



VOLUME II 



GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPT. 
^^ BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
H^ 700 Boylaton Street 
%^ Boston, MA 02117 



Table of Contents 1^,^. 



Introduction 



Page (at bottom) 
1 



Assignments 

■ Overview 

Historical and Present Compliance 

Extended Day Kindergarten 

Magnet Elementary Schools 

High Schools 

HHORC and Magnet Vocational Programs 

Other Minority Students 

White Enrollment Patterns 



5 
9 
27 
3H 
49 
61 
71 
77 



Staff 



Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



99 

105 



Special Desegregation Measures 
Overview 

Tobin K-8 School 
Burke and Dorchester High 
East Boston Business Magnet 
Examination Schools 



151 
183 
190 
202 
213 



Special Education 

Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



271 
286 



Bilingual Education 

Monitoring Report 
Documentation 

Occupational and Voc ational Education 
Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



3^3 
359 



391 

420 



Transportation 

Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



449 
455 



Facilities 

Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



469 
472 



Safety and Security 

Monitoring Report 
Documentation 



475 
493 



Student Discipline 

Monitoring Report 



519 



Page 
Institutional Pairings 

Monitoring Report 

Documentation 535 

539 
Parent a nd Student Organization.c^ 

Parent Organization Report c-n^ 

Parent Organizations Documentation con 

Student Organizations Report r^i 

Student Organizations Documentation 533 



Introducticn 



This Is the second report to the Federal District Court on the progress of de- 
segregation in Bostcn Public Schools, as mandated by Msmorandum and Orders of 
DisengagenEnt , Decenber 23, 1982 . 

VolunE I is a summaiy of the major findings and reconnEndations contained in 
the complete reports sxibmLtted for each of the twelve desegregation areas in 
Volume H 

Each of the twelve reports in Volume H contains the following major divisions: 

I. Monitoring Report 

A. Object Ives and Questions 

B. Method 

C. Findings 

D. Commendations 

E. RecOTraendations 

H. Support Documentation (letters, statistics, memoranda in 
si?)port of specific findings) 

The following department personnel were responsible for the reports submitted: 



1. Assigimsnts 

2 . Staff 

3. Special Desegregation 
Measures 



^. Special Education 



5. Bilingual Education 



6. Occunaticnal Education 



Key 
Monitors 




Operative 
Monitors 


Charles Glenn 






James Case 




Nan Stein 


Charles Glenn 

(Exam Schools) 
n It 

If n 

n n 


Judith Taylor 
Maureen Vferk 
Prank-Hn Banks 
Nan Stein 
Dan French 


Roger Brown 




Judith Riegelhaupt 
Pamela Kauftnann 
Marie Tilndahl 


James Case 




Ernest Mazzone 
Oilman Hebert 
Marie Eberle 
Rudolfo Rodriguez 


David Cronln 




Elaine Caddigan 
Naisuon Chu 



-1- 



6. Occupational 
Education 

7. Transportation 

8. Facilities 



9. Safety and 
Security 

10. Student Discipline 



11. Institutional 
Pairings 

12. Parent and Student 
Organizations 



Key 
MOTiltors 



Charles Glenn 
John Raftery 

Franklin Banks 
James Case 

Jamss Case 



Operative 
Monitors 

Mamie Jones 
Iherese Alston 

Judith Taylor 

John Calabro 
Samuel Pike 



George Perry 
Dan French 



James Case (Parents) - Doreen Wilkinson 

Marion Gillom 
(Students) - Dan French 



In additiOTijthe Director of the Greater Boston Regional Center, Marlene Godfrey; 
has provided much of the coordination, manpower, and support needed for several 
aspects of the monitoring and report writing. 



-2- 



Assignments 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT Or EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Analys's of Fall V3S3 Enrorirnerits: Overview of Fall Enroriment Monitonng 



Seven rriomtoring issues are covered in separate "essays" in this section of 
the Report: 

(A) Compliance with Court-ordered Desegregation Standards 

(B) E::;tended Day Kindergarten Programs 

(C) Magnet Elementary Schools 

(D) High Schools 

(E) ORCy'Citywide Vocational Prograrris 

(F) Distribution of Other Minority Students 

(G) White Enrollment Trends 

For related issues, see the section on "special desegregation measures," which 
includes enrollment analyses of a number of individual schools. 



MuNITORING ObJhCTIVES 

(A) Compliance page 9 

How many schools are in compliance with the permitted ranges for Black and 
white enrollment, and how does this comipare with previous years since the 
Court-ordered desegregation plan was implemented, in 1975? Do certain schools 
have persistent patterns of non-compliance? If so, are there special 

circumstances which contribute to this outcome? What are the prospects for 
desegregation of schools which are out of compliance in November 1983';-' 



Overvnew of Fall Enrc'lrrnentE pess i 

(B) E>;tend£G Day KinoerssrLen Programs page 27 

EstaDnErrment of new e;ctenaed day programs was approved last Spring aespite 
concerns tnat certann wol;1g not be desegregatea. ano SLioseQuentTy assTgnrnentE 
to a;;tenGed day programs were approved despite non-compliance v-'ith the 
permitiea ranges in a niimber of casesi on the oasis of commiitTrients to recruit 
additional kindergarten students and to restrict assignment of over-represented 
racial applicants groups until success-^u" recruitment of underrepreEented 
students. What have been the results of recruitment and assignments since May 
1583? Have the coririTiitments been kept? and what contribution do these prcgrsmiE 
make to the desegregation of the schools wnere tney are housed? 



(C) Magnet hlementary Schoo's page 34 

Concerns were e:-;='reEsed, in the last Report) about potential enrollment 
instability in somie of the ten 'magnet elementary schools. How do thev 

enrollments Iooki and what proDlems need attention? 



(D) High SchoolE page 49 

The Cou""t has ordered developrrrent of a plan for secondary school facility use 
and desegregation, pararie": to the plan under "■.■■hich elementary anc m^iddle schools 
were affected (and some closed) in beptemiber 1 3S1 . What is the status of 
desegregation of Boston's high schools, and how much evidence ie there of efforts 
to bring themi into compliance? 



(E) ORC/Citywide Vocational Programs page 61 

Assignmients to cityi/Hde vocational programs at the Occupational Resource 
Center and in five district high schools were approved last Sprang desPite 
evidence that many w-'ould be out ot" compliance with the permitted ranges for 



Overview of Fall Enronments page 3 

enronment by racei and would enroll dTsproportionate numbers of female and male 
students. Ample unused program capacity held out the promise that additTonal 
recruitment and counselling could bring at least some programs into compliance. 
To what e>;tent are these programs now in compliance vjith enrollment goals? 
Which programs have especially disproportionate enrollments? 



(F) Distribution of Other Minority Students page 71 

The last report looked at the distribution of other miinority students not 
enrolled in bilingual programs, and raised potential equity concerns. This 

analysis has been updated. Where do these students go to schoolj and where do 
they seem over- or underrepresented? 



(G) White EnrolliTient Trends page 77 

It IS common i^nowiledge that wihite public school enrollment has declined in 
Boston, as in other cities and indeed statewide. What is the e;-tent of this 
decline in the last five years, and are certain schools more affected than others? 
Is there evidence that some schools are less able than others to persuade 
assigned white students to attend, or that this problem is more prevaleni: in some 
sections of the city'' To wihat extent are non-public schools in Boston 

desegregated, and what proportion of all white students attending school in 
Boston attend desegregated schools? 



NEXT STAGE OF MONITORING 

In reviewing space matrices, prograrri locations, and assignmients for ^all 
1984, the experience of the first two phases of monitoring will pose questions 
more snarpTy than wias possible in early 1 9S3. In particular, the pattern of 
assignments to substantially-separate special education programs, to extended 
day kindergarten programs, and to citywnde vocational programs (including the 



-7- 



Overview of Fall EnrollmentE page ^ 

ORC) will be reviewed in relation to the outcomeE of the last round of aEEignTnentE, 
aE obEer\'ed nn November 1 9S3. 



The level of new asEignmentE to magnet elementary scriools '-especially 
JackEon Mann and Hennigan) and to high schools (Brighton, Jamaica Plain, Burhie, 
South Boston, English) which were not in compliance this Fall will receive close 
attention. 



-MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUnITt 



^r.alysis of Fall 1983 Enroriments: Histoncal and Present uoimpliance 



The Board of Education has directed us to place our review of corfiPliance 
with the desegregation objectives of the Court m an historical context, noting 
which schools show a persistent failure to achieve coinpliance with the 
permitted ranges for each racial group. With inforrnation providec by Mr. 
Coakley we have established, for each school presently in operation, b 
"compliance history" since 1975, the first year of desegregation under the 
plan ordered by the Court to replace the State Board's 1974 "Short-terrri 
Racial Balance Plan", 

Please note eacn of the following oefore drawing any conclusions from the 
data ana analysis: 

* three racial categories are used in all discussions of compliance: 
Black, white, and other minority (including Hispamcs, Asians, and Native 
Americans or Indians.!. 

* kindergarten assignrfients are covered c^y separate orders, and 
knncergarten enrollments are not included in the analysis which follows (but 
see the discussion of Extended Day Programs)/ 

* the Court has set up two standards. For schools in districts I - VIII 
there is a rather generous requirement that the enrollment of each racial 
group be vMithm 25% plus or minus the "ideal" for that district. 

Example: elerrientary schools in District VI can be fromi 23% to 45% 

Black, 28% to 46% white, and 19% to 33% other minority. 

For city-wide magnet schools m District IX (and this includes half of the high 

school enrollment.* the requirement is much stricter: the permitted range is 

five percentage points plus or minus the citywide "ideal" for white enrollment. 



•9- 



HiEtoncal £; F'resent Compriance psge 2 
and five Percentage Points plus or minus for the corribined Black and other 
minority enrollment. 

Exaffiple: elementary schools in District IX can be from 49% to 55% 
Black, 16%- to 26% white, and 25% to 29% other minority. 

* In March 1982 the Court approved a revision of its previous assignment 
requirements. The most significant aspect of this revision is that each 
school would hereafter be luoged by a standard set for its grade level (1-5, 
6-8, 9-12; rather than by a K-12 standard. We had supported this approach 
for several years, since it establishes a realistic standard which is more 
possible to Tfreet, and so actually improves accountability while autorriatically 
bringing some schools into compliance which had, for essentially technical 
reasons, been persistently out of compliance. It is necessary to l-:eep this 
change in mind when comparing the compliance history of a school from 1975 to 
19S1 witn Its compliance record in 1932 and 1 9S3. 

Students who require bilingual programs must be "clustered" to provide an 
effective concentration of resources and educational options, even if this 
requires assignments across district lines. Host such students fall into the 
"other minority'' category (Hispanics, Chinese, Vietnamese, Lao, Khmer, Hmong) 
though sovTie are reported as Black (Cape Verdean, Haitian) or white (Italian, 
<3reei<i. Altogether, 38% of the "other minority" students in Boston last year 
were in bilingual programs (40% of the Hispanics, 37% of the Asians). The 
clustering of rnany of these students in particular schools for bilingual 
prograffis has a double effect upon desegregation: it tends to mak:e those 
schools e>cceed the permntted range for other minority enrollment (which is set 
on the basis of the total number of other minority students residing in the 
district, wnether or not in bilingual programs), and it tends to miake the other 
schools, to which those students would have gone were it not for a programi 
assignment, fall below the permitted range. 

The Court has recognized that it is sometimes necessary for the School 
Defendants to fail to comply with assignment requiremients in order to assure 
that students receive bilingual education if appropriate. For the same 
reason, our analysis of compliance has placed more stress upon the 



-10- 



Historical &. Present Compliance page 3 
requirements for Black ana wnne enrollment than upon that for other minority 
enrollment. Even with that limitation, of course, the Black and white 

enrollment in a given school can both be above the permitted range if the 
other minority enrollment is very low. Only a case-by-case examination of 
the schools with poor compliance histories can reveal what impact bilingual 
and other program considerations may have had. 

* Another distorting factor is the sue of a particular racial group in a 
district. In the case of District VI, cited above, the three racial groups are 
in roughly equal numbers, and the result is a permitted range in each case of 
between 14 and IS percentage points. In District IV, on the other hand, the 
Black Share of the total enrollment is so large, and the other minority share 
so small, that the permitted ranges vary sharply. The "window" for Black 
enrollment is frorf. 55% to 91%, or 36 points, while that for other minority 
enrollment is from 4% to S%, or 2 points. It is obviously hard to miss the one, 
and hard to hit the other! In fairness, then, the compliance history of any 
school must be considered in the context of the standard by which it is being 
judged. 



Schools with a poor history of compliance 

Our method will be to list and discuss those schools which have been out 
of compliance with the permitted ranges for Blaci;: and/or white (not other 
minority) at least half the timie over the nine-year period from 1975 through 
1933. A school out of compliance every year on Black enrollment but always 
in compliance on white enrollment would have a 50% compliance record! so 
would a school out of compliance four times on Black enrollment and five times 
on white enrollment. The maximum possible chances to be out of compliance, 
then, IS eighteen, or two per year. 



16 out of IS 
no schools 



-II. 



1 7 out of 1 S 
Lewenberq Middle 



Histoncal & Present uomphance page 4 



16 out of IS 

Thompson Middle 
Chittick Elementary 



a "special desegregation" school 



1 5 out of 1 y 

Shaw Middle 
Burke Hign 
Marshall Elementary 



a "special desegregation" school 
a "special desegregation" school 



14 out of 18 

Lee Elementary 
Russell Elementary 
Lewis Middle 



a "special desegregation" school 



1 3 out of 1 8 

Mendel! Elementary 
Lyndon Elementary 



caused by high "other minority" enrollment 



1 2 out of 1 8 

Henmgan Elementary 
Ellis Elementary 



a magnet school! large bilingual program 
a "special desegregation" school 



1 1 out of 1 8 

J.F.Kennedy Elementary 
Kent Elementary 
Timilty Middle 
Farragut Elementary 
Winthrop Elementary 
Jackson/ Mann Elementary 



caused by high "other minority" enrollment 



a magnet school! large bilingual program 



1 out of 1 8 

Winship Elementary 
DearDorn Middle 
Taylor Elementary 



-12- 



Historical & Present Compliance page 

Dorchester High School a "special desegregation" school 

Higginson Elementary 



These 24 schoolsi then, were out of compliance with the requirements for 
Black ana white students more than half of the time over nine years. It would 
be a mistake to place too much weight on such a simple analysis, however. 
The Higgmson. for example, is located m a heavily Black area! in 1975 and 
1376 it enrolled too high a proportion of Black students, and in 1975 through 
1981 it enrolled too low a proportion of white students. Through vigorous 
program development and student recruitment, assisted with state 
desegregation funding under Chapter 536, the school was in compliance for 
both groups in 1982, and this Fall slightly exceeds the white permitted range, 
with 31% white enrollrrient m grades 1-5. It used to be accepted wisdom that 
white parents would not send their children to schools in which they were not 
m the majority; the Higgmson has increased its white enrollment in grades 1-5 
from 15 in 1 37S to 41 in 1983, a 173% increase, without being a magnet school. 
38 of those students ride a bus to school. While the record of the Higginson 
IS exceptional, it should warn us not to rely too heavily on aggregate figures 
from the whole period of desegregation in Boston. 

There are certain schools which have fallen below the permitted range for 
white enrollTiient every year , including this year and last. They are: 

Tobin Elementary Jamaica Plain High School 

Ellis Elementary J.F.Kennedy Elementary 

Thompson Middle Chittick Elementary 

Burke High School Marshall Elementary 

Emerson Elementary Blackstone Square Elementary 

Two other schools have fallen below the white range for eight of the past nine 
years, including this year and last: 

Lewenberg Middle R.S.Shaw Middle 

Two others have fallen below for seven out of nine years, including this year 
and last; 

Roosevelt Middle Russell Elementary 

Three schools have fallen Delow for six out of nine years, including this year 
and last: 



13- 



HiEtoncal ii Present Compliance page 6 
Cleveland Middle Wilson Middle 

DsarDorn Middle 

These seventeen schoolsi it is fair to say. have a persistent proDlero in 
enrolling enough white students to meet the Court's desegregation 
requirements. It is no surprise to find that three of them head the list ot the 
schools with the greatest "shrinkage" from white students assigned in May 
1983 to white students attending in November 1983: 

% Loss 

Chit tick 69% 

Marshall 55% 

Ellis 51% 

Wmle. of the seventeen, only five nave Deen designated DV tne Court for 
"special desegregation" rrieasures (not counting the Tobin), the enrollment 
history of the others suggests that, at the least, the School Department 
Should seek to replicate wnat nas worked well at certain schools (the 
Higgmson, the Pauline Agassii Shaw, for example) to attract and retain white 
students. 

Proportionately, it is middle schools which have had the greatest 
difficulty in achieving compliance. In large part this may be the effect of the 
siphoning off of large numbers of white students to Boston Latin School and 
Latin Academy for the seventh and eighth grades, as demonstrated on tne 
following chart (with 1930 figures, in an analysis by the Department of 
Implementation), Those cited above for poor compliance records are 

indicated with an asterisk. 

Middle School White students to exam schools 



37 

15 



64 
114 
104 



Edison 




Taft 




Cur ley 




Lewis 


« 


Roosevelt 


* 


Irving 




Lewenberg 


* 


Shaw 


« 



-14- 



Histonca'l & Present Compliance page 7 

Roger E 78 

Thompson * 48 

Cleveland * 25 

Holmes 29 

Wilson * • 57 

Dearoorn * 7 

Gavin 3S 

McCormack 26 

Edwards 15 

Michelangelo 2 

Timrnlty * 25 

Barnes IS 

CnevsrLis 11 

(The wide variation in levels of examination school attendance is an 
interesting indication 07 which sections of the city tne enrollment of Boston 
Latin School and Latin Academy are drawn fromi it will be noted that the 
non-compliance of certain schools, including the Roosevelt, Cleveland! 
DearDorn, and Timilty, cannot be attributed to the competition of the 
e::-;amiination schools..' 

Assessment of overall compliance history is complicated by the change of 
standard which took effect in 1982-83. The years 1 S75 to 1981 may be 
coiTiPared with one another, and we find significant initial compliance progress 
on Black enrollment, with a deteriorating recoro of compliance on white 
enrollrfpent: 

Year Black Range Schools out of Comipliance Wnite Range 

1 975 47 46 

1975 39 46 

1977 30 47 

1978 37 46 

1 979 32 46 
1 930 32 39 
1S81 32 57 

The sharp increase in the numoer of schools out-of-compliance with the 
permitted range for white enrollment from 1930 to 1981 is surely related - 



15- 



Historical & Present Compliance page 8 
though it IS not clear why - to tne closing of 27 schools in September 1981) 
after several years of planning ano hearings. During the planning process 
options were prepared for the reassignment of stuaents from tne scnools tobe 
closed in such a way tnat compliance would be irnprovedi but the eventual 
reassignments were if anything negative in their impact. 

The figures given above aggregate schools which were aciove the permitted 
ranges with those -which were below . In 1975 there were 43 schools above the 
range for Blac!; students, and five above the range for white students! four 
were below tne range for Black and thirty-mne below that for white students. 
The pattern of non-compliance, m other words, was remarkably consistent, ,, 
with many schools enrolling too many Black and/or too few white students. 

This pattern had changed significantly by 19S1, with a shift m the pattern 
of non-compliance witn the Permiiien range for Blaci< stuaents: nineteen 
scnools were above the range, and thirteen below it, while the 1575 pattern 
remaineo substantially unchanged for white enrollment (54 below, 3 above;. It 
seems likely - though a school-by-school analysis nas not been made - that 
tne growing number of scnools below the range for Black enrollment had been 
affected by the rapidly increasing other minority enrollment, especially in 
schools with bilingual programs (see the discussion, in the section on magnet 
elementary schools, of the Hennigan and Jaclisor Mann schools.). 

The impact of the change in miethod of determining the permitted ranges, 
which went into effect in 1932, was slight m the aggregate tor non-compliance 
wnth Black enrollment requirements (ISSl: 19 above, 13 below! 1983; IS above, 
10 below.i, but in fact this aggregate conceals 17 schools coming into 
compliance ana 14 schools going out of comipliance as a result of the new 
stanaard (and, of course, population changes). 

The aggregate impact was much greater for compliance with white 
enrollment requirements. In 19S1 53 schools u;ere Delow the permitted range 
for wnite enrollment, and 3 scnools abovei m 1933 26 scnools are below and 13 
schools aoove, witn some schools moving froro non-compliance to compliance. 



-16- 



Histoncal & Present CorriPlTsnce Page 9 
Gti-ierE- from comphance 'o non-compliance, and the Lyndon in West RoxbarV 
going from unaer-enrollment to over-enroHfrient of white stuaents. 

The Lynaon will serve as a warning against attacmng any great 
significance to these "non-compliance' figures in the aggregate. In 1981 the 
scTiOol enrollec 17 white stucents in grades l-5i and in 1 SS3 it enrolls 255 as a 
result of this minrmal iana encot!raging!i change the scnool appears again and 
again in enrolrrrient analyses as naving an unusual enrollriient record. Only a 
school-oy-school analysis, ss Delow, can give a true picture of the extent of 
racial segregation remaining in the Boston schools. 



i_-cmparin 



with tne '-urrent yea) 



inc some progress; 
41 
39 



i_ast year, tnen, tnere were /: instances (not scnoolsj or non-comp:iance 
with the permitted ranges for BlacK or white students- ano this year tnere are 
63 instances of such non-comPliance. Nine scnools are out of comipliance with 
doth ranges this year, twenty are out of comipliance only with the Blaci-:: range, 
and thirty only with tne white range. 



JNon-L-omp nance in 



uioser analysis snows tnat some ot tnese instances are mo 
others. These schools are out of compliance with botn ranges; 



■e serious tnan 



Garfield (IJ 
Agassiz (Il.i 
J. F. Kennedy (II) 
Lewenberg (III; 
F.D.Roosevelt (TV) 
DearDorn (V'l.i 
Warren Prescott (VII) 
King (IX.i 
Guild (IX) 



over diaci;, over white 
under Black, under white 
unoer Blaci-:. under winite 
over BlacK, under u.inite 
unde" Blacii, over white 
over Black, unaer white 
unaer EHacK, over wnite 
over Eilaci:, unoer white 
over BlacK, over i/imte 



17. 



HTStoncal l: Present Cumpliance Page 10 
The Giarfielcit AgaESiz. Kennedy and Guild are in aistrictE witn large o^ner 
rmnority enrollmentsi vjrncri require clustering of other minority st'jaents for 
DilmgLial programs at certain Echools? including the Agassir and f:.ennedy< 
which there&y fall below the perrmttGO ranges for BlacK and white students. 
The reciprocal effect is seen at the Garfield and Guild; Decause of clustering 
of other rrnnonty students at other schools in their districts for bilingual 
eaucationi they have Decorrie too high in Blaci:: and white enrollment by the 
standards set for their districts) standards which reflect district-wide 
enrollment including other minority stuoents. These instances of 

'■non-compliance" are not significant. 

The other five schools are classic cases of "racial identifiaoility"! 
schools which enroll too high a proportion of the racial group which 
cnaractenzes the area where they are located, and too low a proportion of 
the racial group requirec to achieve desegregation. The i_e<"ienDerg Midcle m 
Msttapan. the King Magnet Middle in Dorchester, and the Dearborn Middle in 
fto>;bury each has a history of controversy around desegregation, and each 
must make a special effort to attract and retain white students. The 
Lewenberg has now unaerenrolled white stuoents for seven years straight, and 
the Dearborn for five. Desegregation of the King through recruitment of 
white students for voluntary transfers was one of the early success stories 
of desegregation in Boston," unfortunately, the rmpetus seems to have slowed, 
and the school has underenrolled white students, despite housing the District 
IX Acaderriically Talented Program, for three years straight. 

The F.D.Roosevelt in Hyde Park and the Warren Prescott in Charlestown 
are underenrolling Black students and overenrolling white! this should be 
readily correctable, in view of the reverse situation in a number of schools in 
their respective districts. 

There are thirteen schools which are within the permitted range for white 
students, out over that for BlacI; students: 
Farragut (I) 
Lewis Middle (ID 
Longfellow (II) 



-18- 



Historical Sc Present Comp nance page 11 

McConTiacI:: Middle (V'l.i 

Mason (VI) 

Tynan (VI.i 

WinthroP vVI) 

East Boston High (VIII) 

Adarris (VIII) 

Alighieri (VIII) 

Bradley (VIII) 

Otis (VIII) 

Haley (IX) 
Of these, five are in East Boston and their "non-compliance" is a function of 
the e;ctremely low range (l%-3%) for Blacl; students! the Bradley is "too high" 
with a 5% Black enrolVment; the Alighieri has only 7 Black stuaentS' In the 
case of East Boston High School the Business Magnet program, itsel^? 
predoiTiinantly minorityt creates an apparently high Blaci< enrolliTient m a 
school which IS otherwise almost entirely white. 

The remaining eight schools which are too high in Blacl-:: enrollment include 
four m District VI. South Boston/Roxbury. In the analysis of white 

enrollment trends, we found that an number of District VI schools had 
increasing white enrollments, and that overall white enrollment is declining 
less in this district than in any of the others which have been desegregated. 
The WinthroP has seen an encouraging 35%. increase (from 31 to 51 ) in its 
grade 1-5 enrollment, despite being an old builoing m a Black neighborhood. 
If this trend continues, it may be that one or more of the four will come into 
compliance. 

The Farragut, as noted in the section of this report devoted to Extended 
Day Kinaergarten, is located near the Harvard Medical area, with new and 
expensive housing nearby. Prospects seem good for stable desegregation of 
this school, with few students needing to come from a distance! presently only 
13 out of 32 Black students and 14 out of 45 white students require 
transportation. Tne Longfellow is located in a predorriinantly white area 
which sends few children to the public schools for grades 1-5, despite a 
kindergarten which is 85% white! this year there are 29 white children in 



-19- 



Historical Si PreEent Compliance page 12 
kindergarten out only 7 m the first grade. It seems likely that it could De 
desegregated with vigorous recruitment frorri its assigned geocodes. The 
Haley IS out of compliance to an insignificant degree. 

The Lewis Middle School, on the other hand) is a school whose prospects 
for desegregation do not seem particularly bright; the other two rniddle 
schools in District II are also below the permitted range for white students. 
Even when it was the middle school for the Model Subsysterri, Detween the 
successfully-desegregated Trotter Elementary and Copley Square High 
Schools, the Lewis was over the permitted range for BlacK students each year, 
and below that for white students most years. 

There are six schools which are within the permitted range for vjhite 
students but below that for Black students: 
Vnnship (I) 

Mc Cor mack Middle (VI) 
Edwiards Middle (VII) 
P.Kennedy (VIII) 
Hennigan (IX) 
Jackson Mann (IX) 

The Kennedy in East Boston enrolls no Black students! two would bring it 
into co'mpliance! The other five schools house la'-ge bilingual pros'^ams wihose 
students are "other minority"! this forces down the Blaci: proportion. In none 
of these cases is there significant "non-compliance". 

There are twenty schools which comply with the permitted range for Black 
students but enroll too fewi white students: 

I Brighton High Tobin K-S 

II Jamaica Plain High Cur ley Middle 

Roosevelt Middle Ellis 
Puller 
III Shai.v Middle 

IV Thompson Middle Chittick 

V Burke High Cleveland Middle 



•20- 



HiEtorical it. Present ComplTsnce page 13 
WilEon Middle MarshBll 

VI South Boston High Emerson 
RuEseVi 

VII Michelangelo Middle BlackEtone Square 
IX Boston High 

Brighton High School is a "firEt time offender", with a growing AEian 
(including VietnaYriese bilingualj enrollmenti Jamaica Plain High has been below 
ihe permitted range for white enrollment for nine years straight. These 
schools, the BurKe, South Boston High, and Boston High Scnool are discussed 
in the section of thiE report on high schools. In brief, there is encouraging 
progress as a result of special desegregation measures at the Buri^e, but a 
comparable effort nas not been devoted to Jamaica Plain, with its equally 
dismial record of non-compliance. Boston High is a work-study school, and 
presumably its enrollment reflects demand for that program. The new 

non-compliance at South Boston is a matter of concern and will be 
investigated. 

Among the middle schools, the Shaw and Thompson are "special 
desegregation" schools and are discussed at length in a separate section of 
the report. A review of middle school assignments last May (included in the 
Spring report) concluded that many would be in non-compliance but that in no 
case did assignments among middle schools in a district appear inappropriate. 
As noted above, the impact of ejiamination school assignments for many white 
seventh and eighth graders brings a number of schools out of compliance. 

The Ellis and Emierson are also "special desegregation" schools, and 
monitoring found no plans in place to bring them into compliance. White 
enrollment at the Emerson has held constant for five years, and it may benefit 
from the lowi decline in white enrollment generally in District VI. The Fuller 
IS located in a stably desegregated neighborhood, and would be in compliance 
i.Mere not a number of Black students transported in to loin those wiho live near 
the school. Unfortunately, tnere is no alternative school in the district to 
which we could recommend that they be assigned. It is encouraging that there 
are currently as many wihite students in the first grade as in the second, third 



■21- 



Hi5tonca1 ii Present Cornphance page 14 
and fourth corribined; the first grade is in compliancei and perhaps over time 
the school will reach compliance. The Chittici; is m a racially-transitional 
section of Hyde Park, ano rriost of its white Inndergarteners do not remain for 
first grade. The Marshall, m Dorchester, is iwith the Lee.i one of the schools 
about which the original confrontation between the Board of Education and the 
School Committee over racial imbalance remedies occurred. It has never been 
in compliance on white enrollment, and it seems unlikely, in view of the rapid 
white enrollment decline in District V, that it will. 

The Russell is not far out of compliance, and might benefit from the 
relatively stable lAihite enrollment in District VI. Blacl<stone Square, on the 
other hand, has the lowest white percentage (8%.) of any public school m 
Boston, despite having oeen built with extra state desegregation funding. A 
very large Hispanic bilingual program (237 students') contributes to the 
non-coi'fipliance, but it seems probably that vigorous leadership could attract 
more white students out of the racially-mnxed South End to this attractive 
facility, (By the way, there are at least five non-Public schools m Boston 
with a lower percentage of white students than Blackstone Square..) 

There are eight schools which are in compliance with the permitted range 
for Black stucents but enroll too high a proportion of white students: 
Higgmson (.11) Bates (III) Lyndon (III) 

Conley (IV) Mamer (V) Perkins (VI) 

Perry (VI) Hale (IX) 

In the case of the Higgmson and the Hale, located in Roxbury, the 
overenrollment of white students is not alarming, as a prudential rrieasure 
against attrition in the upper grades! both schools are discussed elsewhere in 
this report. The Mather is a large school in a racially-mixed area! at 19% 
white (the permitted range is 10% to 18% for District V) it does not have a 
real problem. The Bates, Conley, Lyndon, Perl-ins and Perry are located in 
white areas and should not be overenrolling white students, especially m view 
of the other schools in their districts which have too few white students. 
This IE not to say that geococses should be reassigned, but that a system of 
voluntary transfers from within the district to, for e;;ample, the Lee and the 



■22- 



Historical & Present Compliance page 15 
Shaw and the EmerEon (all special desegregation schools'! would be justifiabls 
from 3 desegregation perspective. 



nummary of Present Non-Compliance 

The Board's Spring Report made a preliminary judgment that fifteen 
schools had serious desegregation compliance problems, based upon the 
projected Fall 1383 enrollments. The list which follows (a recapitulation of 
the discussion above) identifies thirty-five schools u.ihich are out of 
compliance with the permitted range for either white or BlacI:: enrollment. 
Those followed by an asterisk wiere included m last Spring's list as well. A 
plus sign follow's those for which, in my judgment, the desegregation prospects 
are quite favorable, given program development, vigorous recruitment, and 
some fleKiDility aDout transfers, consistent with the approaches recommended 
for "special desegregation" schools. This should not be taken to mean that I 
would give up any school on the list as hopeless, having seen startling 
desegregation progress in other communities as well as in Boston with 
"hopeless" schools under the right circumstances, of which the most important 
are leadership at the school level and support and flexibility from central 
administration. 

Schools with too many Black or too few wihite students 

Lewenberg Middle * 

King Magnet Middle + 

Dearborn Middle « 

Farragut + 

Lewis r'"1iddle * 

McCormack Middle + 

Longfellow + 

Mason + 

Tynan + 

Wmthrop + 

Brighton High + 



•23- 



Toton K-8 

Jamaica Plain High 

Cur ley Miad'ie + 

Roosevelt Middle * 

Ellis 

Fuller + 

Snaw Middle » + 

Thompson Middle 

Ch-ttick + 

Biirke Hign * + 

Cleveland Middle 

Wilson Ml dele 

Marshall 

Soutn Boston Hign + 

Russell 

Michelangelo Middle * 

BlacksTone Square 

Schools with too many white or too few BlacI-; students 

F.D.Roosevelt + 

warren Prescott * + 

Conley * + 

Perry * + 

Bates * + 

Lynaon + 

Perkins « + 

Two schools - the Eliot and the Guild - for which problems were predicted 
last Spring do not appear on the present list; in tne case ot the Guild, the 
overenrollment of both Blaci; and wnite students is tne result of tne 
concentration of ether minority stuaents for bilingual prograrris elsewhere in 
tne city-wioe district (.see discussion of the Guild above anc in the section on 
magnet elementary schools.*. 



-24- 



Histoncal J: PrsEent Covnpnance page 2 
Triere are thirty-five Ecnools identified nere as having desegregation 
probleiTiS. Of thesei twenty seerr.i to offer substantial hope of compliance in 
the short rangei giver the combination of favorable ingredients mentioned 
above. Anotner fifteen do not seem lilcely to come into compliance, given the 
present demographics and pattern of non-public school attendance, barring 
really inspired leadership and initiative at one or another of them. 



RecoTfiiTiendation 

A specific strategy should be developed for the desegregation of each of 
the scnools iaentified above as having good prospects for desegregation 
compliance, identifying clearly the responsibilities of school-level leadership 
and of the central adminisiration. Tne emphasis should be uPon voluntary 
measures such as the successful Extended Day Kindergarten Program which 
have the potential for attracting students who might leave the system! 
altogether if additional miandatory assignments were made. The School 
Department's proposal, several years ago, for "beacon schools" should be 
studied again, wnth a view to possibly recommenaing a miodification of the 
assignment orders to perinit its implementation. 



Charles L. Glenn, Director 
November 1 98; 



-25- 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY" 



AnalysiE of Fall 1 9S3 EnrolTmentE : Extended Day Kindergarten Program (EDP) 



The Court approved the eEtablishment of "extended day kindergarten 
prograiTis" (EDPe) at twenty eleimentary schools for the 1979-80 school year. 
The purpose of these programs was to achieve a measure of desegregation, on 
a voluntary basTS, at the kindergarten level! regular half-day kindergartens 
were and are desegregated to a much lesser extent than are grades 1-5, with 
students generally attending a kindergarten near their homes, under the 
Court-ordered assignrnent plan. The EDPs, by offering a full-day prograrn, 
would encourage some parents to enroll their children in a more distant 
school, thus achieving desegregated kindergartens. The enrollment standards 
for EDPs was set at those for grades 1-5 in their districts. 

Of the twenty original programs, four were not functional as of 1582-83. 
because of school closings. Eleven more were approved for the 1982-33 
school year, most of them bilingual. A non-bilingual program was approved 
for the Higginson School, for example, presumably in support of that school's 
vigorous efforts to attract white students. As a I'esult, twenty-seven were 
operational in 1982, enrolling 1,005 students in January 1983. (The original 
approval for 1979-80 authorized 2,020 places, but was never fully 
implemented.) 

In January 1983 the School Defendants proposed establishment of sixteen 
additional EDPs, and expansion of some of the existing ones. Total proposed 
enrollment, including continuing, expanded, and new) programs, was 1,436 
students. The proposed programis would, in the aggregate, be 44% Black, 28% 
white, and 28% other minority (the November 1933 system-wide kindergarten 
enrollment is 38% Black, 39% white, and 22% other minority, while the grade 
1-5 enrollment is 49% Black, 24% white, and 27% other minority). 



•27- 



Extended Day Kindergarten Program page 2 

Review of the proposed program e::;pansion considered not only 
desegregation concerns but also the equity of availability of the benefits of 
an extended day program to minority students and in minority neighborhoods* 
and the adequacy of provisions for limited English-speaking students. 
Additional information was obtained from the Department of Implementation, 
including a school-by-school analysis of the racial character of the 
surrounding area. In addition, Mr. Coakley made a commitment to limit 
enrollrrient in certain programs of the predominant race until the necessary 
number of students of other racial groups had been recruited. Approval was 
given for the program expansion on February 23rd, subject to this commitment. 

At the end of April the state reviewed EDP assignments to date, and 
concluded that problems rriight exist with certain programs located in white 
areas, which were filling the white but not the minority spaces; 

Parkman Forest Hills 

Mozart Roslindale 

Grew Hyde Park 

F.Roosevelt Hyde Park 

Russell Dorchester 

Warren Prescott Charlestown 

Bradley East Boston 

Guild East Boston 

An earlier state analysis had noted that the new program locations placed 
EDPs for the first time in a number of white areas to which it might be 
difficult to attract minority kindergarten students voluntarily: South Boston 
(Perkins), Charlestown (Warren Prescott), West Roxbury (Kilmer), Brighton 
(Garfield), the North End (Eliot), and Orient Heights (Bradley). This concern 
v*ias reinforced by the April review. It was also noted that certain programs 
had generally low registration as of late April: P.A.Shaw, S.Greenwood, Eliot, 
Hernander. 

In the monitoring this Fall, therefore, primary attention has been given to 
the extent to which different racial groups are served by EDPs, and the 
success of attaining desegregation goals. In this discussion, "approved" will 



-28- 



Extended Day Kindergarten Program page 3 

mean the number of students of a particular racial group (Black, white, or 
"other minority") approved for 1983-84 at each school on the basis of the list 
provided to the state in January, and approved in February. 



School with EDP Compliance in November 1983 

Farragut substantially more Black and other minority students than 

as approved; however, the enrollment of all groups is in 
compliance 

Gardner white percent slightly high, other minority 

slightly low 

Sarfield white enrollment and percent higher than projected, other 

minority lower! in February Mr. Coakley commiitted to 
assigning three more other minority students and not 
assigning additional white students (from the waiting list)! 
one iTiore white student was apparently assigned, with one 
more other minority. 

Tobin Spanish bilinguall almost entirely other minority 

Agassir ssmei six of 25 places unfilled 

Higginson substantially fewer Black and other minority students than 

approved, which is sensible in view of the location! in 
compliance for all groups 

J.F.Kennedy Spanish bilingual! fully enrolled 

Mendell white enrollment higher than approved! sensible for a 

school which has been below the permitted range for white 
enrollment in grades 1-5 for si>; of the past nine years 

Parkman enrolled substantially as approved 

Kilmer white higher than approved! within ranges! note, however, 

that the Kilmer is an extreme example of the drop-off of 
wihite enrollment after kindergarten (40 white students in 
kindergarten, 39 in grades 1-5 total) so that the probable 
contribution of this program to desegregation is limited 

Lee bilingual program drastically underenrolled (27 approved, 7 

enrolled! regular EDP: white lower than approved but 
within the permitted range (why were additional white 
applicants assigned to KiTmer rather than to Lee, in the 
same district?) 



•29- 



E>;tended Day Kindergarten PrograTn page 4 



Mattahunt bilingual prograrri (Greek) OK! regular EDP: white enronment 

higher than approved, which is sensible in view of the low 
white enrollment in the regular prograrri in this school 

Mozart enrollment OK 

Chittick white enrollment is high, sensible in a school located in 

an area of rapid racial change, now predominantly Black 

Grew as of February, 5 other minority students were assigned, 

but there are none currently enrolled! otherwise enrollment 
is as approved 

F.D.Roosevelt white enrollment is only half that projected! this is 

desirable from the perspective of desegregation, since the 
school is in a white area and the regular (non-EDPJ 
kindergarten has no Black students 

P.A.Shaw this Haitian bilingual program enrolls slightly fewer 

students than approved 

Dickerman white enrollment substantially (3 vs. 3) lower than approved 

but the program complies with the permn'tted range for the 
district, at 14% white! in his February memo, Mr. Coakley 
calls attention to recruitment efforts for this EDP 

Fifield white enrollment lower than approved, but higher than 

required 

S.Greenwood this Spanish bilingual EDP was projected for a low 5, which 

drew objections from El Comite! actual enrollment is 24 

Marshall one of the schools with the poorest compliance histories 

for white enrollment - below the permitted range for nine 
years straight - it is encouraging that the EDP is above 
the approved white enrollment! can these students be 
retained for first grade? 

Mather this is the largest EDP! white enrollment is lower than 

approved but within the permitted range 

Dever a Spanish bilingual program! enrollment OK 

Emerson a Cape Verdean bilingual program! enrollment OK 

Mason Blacl< enrollment substantially lower (S vs. 21) than 

approved, and than in 1 9S2-S3! EDP seems to constitute 
the entire inndergarten and 1/4 of the entire enrollment 
of this small school 

Perkins this new EDP was of particular concern during the approval 

-30- 



Extended Day Kindergarten Program page 



prGcesEi because of the history of low Black enrollrfient at 
the Perldns in South Boston - would enough Blaclc parents 
volunteer their Inndergarteners? Mr. Coal::ley has kept his 
commitment not to allow the white enrollment to exceed the 
minority enrollment and the enrollment results are more 
than satisfactory 

Russell enrollment OK 

Blackstone the Spanish bilingual programi is slightly underenrolled! the 

Square regular EDP is higher on white and other minority and 

substantially lower on Black enrollment than approved? 
sensible in view of the failure of this school, since it was 
built, ever to reach the permitted range for white students 

Eliot questions were raised, in the review process, about the 

location of this program in the North End, on the ground 
that it would be difficult to recruit minority students! the 
prograiTi was approved after a commitment to recruitment, 
for 14 Black, 4 white, 14 other minority students. For 
some reason 10 white students have been admiitted, with 
only one other -minority student enrolled. This EDP is 
unjustifiably out of compliance. 

Quincy Chinese bilingual EDF'i enrollment OK 

Warren-Prescott establishment of this new program was also justified on the 
basis of recruitment efforts, and of the value of 
strengthening public school enrollment from Charlestown. 
White enrollment (7J is higher than approved (4) and 
minority enrollment (14) lower (27); like the Eliot, this 



Adams althougn in East Boston, this EDP enrolls somew.'hat more 

minority (13 vs. 12) and fewer white (32 vs. 35) than 
approved; will the minority students continue to first grade 
at the Adams'^' 

Bradley questions were raised about creating this new programi at a 

school unlikely to attract 20% minority enrollment to a 
I :: indergarten class; assurances were given about 
recruitment, but in fact only 2 minority students (9%) are 
enrolled. White enrollment is higher than approved or than 
the assurance given in February. This EDP is unjustifiably 
out of compliance. 

Guild Although located in East Boston, like the Bradley, the Guild 

EDP enrolls miore minority students and fewer white 
students than approved, which shows that it is possible! 

Hale this EDP, located in Roxbury, enrolls substantially more 



-31 



Extended Day Kindergarten Prograrfi pags 6 

Black (27 vs. 10) and other minority (S vs. 2) stLsdents than 
allowed; although white enrollment percent te not below the 
perrntted range, thene assignments seem unwise, 

hennigan other minority enrollment is 'much higher than approved (15 

vs. 5); although not outside the permitted range, this seems 
unwise in view of the persistent overenrollment of other 
minority (Hispanic) students in the Henmgan and the under- 
enrollment of both Black and white students for six of the 
past nine years. 

Hernanaei Spanish bilingual ED^': enrollment OK. 

McKay Italian bilingual and regular EDPs." enrollment OK. 



COMMENTS 

Recruitment efforts, assignments, and enrollments for extended day 
inndergarten programs are generally co'mmendable, but attention is called to 
problems with certain programs: 

Kilmer 

Grew 

Eliot 

Warren Prescott 

Bradley 

Hale 

Hennigan 
If these prograiT;s are to continue in 1983-84, recruitment should be vigorous 
and early; proposed assignments to these EDPs will be watched with particular 
care next Spring. 

In general, however, the extended day kindergarten seems a useful 
component of Boston's desegregation effort. Several special desegregation 
schools have sucn programs to attempt to increase their white enrolrment; two 
principals mentioned their frustration that non-geocoded EDP students were 
reassigned to other schools for the first grade. At the Higgmson, a school 
which has made particularly successful desegregation efforts without a 
special designation, these students were apparently permitted to rerriain and 



-32- 



Extended Day Kindergarten Program page 7 

contributed sigmficantly to desegregation. If this mas possible at the other 
schools visitedi the principals seerried unaware of it! such a provision seerns 
sensible from a desegregation perspective. 

The demand for extended day inndergarten appears strong arriong all 
racial groups, though we noted that several of the bilingual EDPs were 
under-enrolled. Total EDP enrollment as of November 3rd was 583 Black 
(43%). 377 white (23%), and 408 other friinority (30%); because of the bilingual 
programs, other rriinority students are over-served by ejctended day 
kindergarten, which must be considered a significant effort to improve their 
long-termi educational performiance. 

Charles L. Glenn, Director 
November 17th 1983 



•33- 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT 0~ EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Analvs-JE- of T383-4 goston Enrol hTients: Magnet Elementary SchoolE 



Boston operates ten magnet elementary schools under the 1975 
Desegregation Order. Desegregation of these schools is achieved entirely 
by voluntary attendance by students whose parents make applications in the 
Spring of each year on a city-wide basis. 

Eight of the schools are expected to achieve racial proportions which 
reflect system-wide enrollment in grades 1-5, except those students resident 
in District VIII (East Boston). Racial/ethnic percentage goals for 1 9S3-S4 
were computed in early April 1983: 

Ideal Permitted Range 

Black 52% 49% - 55% 

White 21% 16% -26% 

Other 27% 25% - 29% 

Sources : May 10, 1975 Order! March 24, 1 9S2 Order! April 12, 19S3 memo from 
John Coakley to John Canty. 

The McKay School in East Boston is required to reflect city wide 
percentages in grades 1-5, thus including East Boston: 
Ideal Permitted Range 

Black 47% 45% - 49% 

White 28% 23% - 33% 

Other 25% 24% - 26% 

Sources : March 24, 1982 Order, with percentages calculated by me from the 
April 27, 1933 print-out of proposed assignments. 

The Hernandez School in Dorchester is required to comply with the 
following provision of the May 10, 1975 Order, reaffirmed by the March 24, 
1982 Order: "The Hernandez School, which contains a citywide 

Spanish-English bilingual program, miay enroll a student body up to 65% 



-34- 



Magnet Elementary School Analys-is page 2 

Hispanic. Non-Hispanic other rfiinority students will be eligible along with 
white and black students, within the remaining 35% of school capacity" (page 
75f.). 

The chart which I have prepared applies the standard set for the eight 
schools to tne other two as well) in order to consider the overall impact of 
magnet schools, but in my discussion I will take into account the special 
criteria set for the McKay and Hernandez. 

Further language in a March 10, 1982 School Department proposal 
approved by the Court in the March 24, 1982 Order should be noted: 
Exceptions to the variation limits . . . shall 
continue to be permitted where necessary to allow.' 
appropriate bilingual and/or substantially separate 
special needs assignmients. 
Several magnet elementary schools are heavily impacted by bilingual and/or 
substantially separate special needs assignments: 

School 1983-84 Bilingual 1983-84 Sub. Separate 

Cur ley 

Guild 

Hale 

Haley 

Hennigan 139 (Spanish) 49 

Hernandez 115 (Spanish) 

Jackson/Mann 1 97 (Vietnamese) 31 *■ 

McKay 82(Italian/Portugue5e) 

Ohrenberger 53 (Lao/Khmer) 21 

Trotter 20 

* does not include 146 substantially-separate students in the Horace 
Mann section of the facility 

The enrollments of magnet elementary schools will be analyzed m two 
ways: to determine how closely each school meets the desegregation goals in 
the three racial/ethnic categories, and to assess the relation between Black 
and white enrollment. The second analysis will permit us to set "other 



■35- 



F^'lagnet Elemeritary School AnalysiE page 3 

minority" enrollment aside and thus to avoid the distorting effect of bilingual 
programs (except the Italian progrsmri) upon racial proportions. The ratio 
between "ideal Black percentage" and "ideal white percentage" for 1 9S3-S4 is 
2.48/1 1 and the white and Black proportions of each school will be assessed 
for proxrmity to that ratio. 

These are the questions which I will be asking of the enrollment data 
and projections: 

* Is each school in compliance in the three racial/ethnic categories? 
If not, how serious are the instances of non-compliance? Are there program 
considerations which explain it, such as a bilingual program? -Cln this 
analysis we will leave the kindergarten enrollment aside, as with other 
elementary schools, though in the case of magnet schools there should be no 
significant difference.)- 

* To what extent do Fall 1983 assignments to the first grade correct 
past problems, as measured by racial/ethnic proportions in first grades in 
April 1933, and by overall racial/ethnic proportions in grades 1-5? Do the 
new assignments to the first grade (I have no way of assessing assignments 
to upper grades) in any case exacerbate desegregation problems? For the 
purpose of this analysis please note that the permitted ranges for 1 SS2-83 
were as follows: 





Ideal 


Permitted 


Black 


52% 


49% - 52% 


White 


23% 


1 8% - 28% 


Other 


25% 


23% - 27% 



The ratio of "ideal Black percentage" to "ideal white percentage" was 2.25/1. 

* Have these new 1983 assignments had the desired effect? Do the 
actual November 1933 enrollments reflect the enrollments projected at the 
time that the assignrrients were approved? What is the relation between the 
number of students assigned (especially minority students assigned to magnet 
schools in predominantly white neighborhoods, and white students assigned to 
magnet schools in predominantly minority neighborhoods) and the number 



•36- 



Magnet Elementary School AnalysiE page 4 

actually enrolled? Are there inEtances which call for attention to improved 
Echool-hoTTie contact after assignmentE are lEEued? 

* Do overall magnet elementary school enrollments meet the intentions 
of the desegregation orders, including equitable representation of the three 
racial/ethnic categories? For example, is the permitted over-enrollment of 
Hispanic students at the Hernandez balanced elsewhere? 



PROJECTED COMPLIANCE 



Cur ley 



This school was projected to be within the permitted range for Black and 
white students, but belou.i the range for other miinority students. The 
entering class has more Blaci< students and fewer other minority students 
than projected, and the first grade is 10% over the "ideal" Black proportion. 
Overall enrollment, however, is within the permitted range for Black: and 
white students, though not as securely as projected. As we will see again 
and again, the magnet elementary schools without bilingual programs fall 
below the permitted range on other minority enrollment; this is probably 
unavoidable. The ratio of Black to white students, on the other hand, is 
nearly perfect, and is in fact better than was projected last Spring. 



Guild 



This school was identified by the Court in 1977 for special 
desegregation measures "to strengthen the rffagnetism", but in subsequent 
years it has been out of compliance a number of times. Since the school is 
located in East Boston, vigorous efforts are needed to assure a sufficient 
number of minority students. Last Spring it was noted that the then first 
grade had much too high a Black enrollment - 75% - but that the 
newly-assigned first grade swung too far in the other direction. As a 
result, the white enrollment w»ould go well above the permitted range, and 48% 



-37- 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 5 

above the "ideal". Concern was expressed about an apparent instability of 
desegregation, and the need for a long-term assignment strategy for the 
school. 

The actual enrollment of the school is rather better than projected, 
with an increase in Black and a decrease in white enrollment at the first 
grade level. Whereas the ratio of Black to white in this grade was to have 
swung frorri an excessive 4.5/1 to a deficient 1.3/1, the actual enrollment is a 
nearly-perfect 2.7/1. Other minority enrollment continues low, as at the 
Curley. The school continues rather above the permitted range in Black 
enrolliTient, especially in the lower grades (not unrealistic, in view of the 
probably higher attrition rate of Black students at a school in East Boston), 
and exactly at the "ideal" rate for white enrolrment. 

The concerns expressed in the last report have been answered! we will 
continue to monitor enrollment at the Guild. 



Hale 



This school, by contrast, is located in Ro>;bury, and was originally 
unsuccessfully desegregated as a district school. Black enrollment was too 
high in 1S75, 1976, and 1377, and white enrollment too low in those years and 
in 197S. More recently the Hale has had a good record as a desegregated 
magnet school, meeting the more stringent standards for such schools in most 
years. It is worth noting that the white percent in grade 1-5 enrollment has 
declined less at the Hale than at any other magnet school (except the 
Hernandez) between 1978 and 1983: from 33% (57 white students) to 27% (47); 
compare the Trotter (40% to 24%), the Ohrenberger (43% to 21%), the McKay 
(52% to 21%). 

New assignments last Spring were substantially high on white and low on 
Black students! as noted in the last report, "over-assignment of white 
students to this school, in view of its location, is more sensible than 



-38- 



Magnet Elementary School AnslysiE page 6 

over-asEigniTient of white students to the Guild! it may be regarded as a 
prudent margin; there ie, in fact, a corrective action involved." 19S2-83 
grade 1-5 enrollrfpent was 58% Black, rather above the permitted range! 
projected enrollment was to be 51% Blacki and the actual grade 1-5 
enrollment is 55% Black, within though at the high end of the permitted range. 
More detailed analysis shows that S white students were assigned to first 
grade and S are enrolled! the higher-than-projected Black percentage is the 
result of 15 Black students in the first grade compared with 11 assigned last 
Spring. It is not clear whether additional students were assigned, or some 
students held back in first grade. In either case, the first grade remains 
slightly above the permiitted range for white students, a "prudent margin" as 
in the case of high Black enrollment at the Guild. 

On the other hand, as noted in the report on Extended Day Kindergarten 
programs, the Hale program is 63% Black, well above the approved 
assignments or the permitted range! care should be tal<en to assure that the 
school remains stably desegregated. 

The Hale was designated as a "special desegregation" school in 1976, 
when it was a District VII school which had not become desegregated. A 
small and rather antiquated building located in a predominantly Black 
neighborhood, it was not closed under the state plan of 1974 or the Court's 
plan of 1975 because so many other schools in the same area were closed, but 
the prospects for desegregating it seemed slight. After becoming a magnet 
school, the Hale developed a distinctive "friendly" quality which a number of 
white parents found attractive, and it has generally met white enrollment 
requirements in recent years. As we have learned around the state, the 
success of a magnet school depends less upon a new facility or a highly 
distinctive program than it does upon an atmosphere of responsiveness to 
parent concerns! often a small school flourishes as a magnet. The Hale, lil<e 
its neighbor the Higgmson, has demonstrated that white parents will enroll 
their children in an "ordinary" school in a heavily Black neighborhood, if they 
develop confidence in the staff and philosophy of the school. 



■39- 



Magnet Elementary School AnaTyEis page 7 



Haley 



The Haley, located ir Roslindale, has consistently been a successfully 
desegregated school, though with a high Black enronrnent several years 
because of low other-rrnnority enrolliTient. The ratio of BlacI-: to white 
students projected was a nearly-ideal 2.38/1; the actual grade 1:5 enrolTment 
is 2.43/1 - close to the ideal 2.4S/1 . Black enrollment is slightly high (10% 
above the ideal), and white enrollment within the range though also slightly 
high. 

The Haley is one of the few schools in Boston which was a magnet from 
the start. Approved by the Board of Education under a racial balance plan, 
the school opened in a racially-neutral commercial area, in a converted 
bowling alleyi 



Hennigan 

With the Hennigan in Jamaica Plain we begin to see where the other 
minority magnet students have been assigned. The school was 5S% high in 
this category (37% projected, 25% ideal) last year, with Black students 25% 
low and white students 15%. low (though within the permitted range). The 
ratio of Black to white was a quite favorable 2.14/1, however, and the 
enrollment problems are attributable largely to the large Spanish bilingual 
program. 

The Hennigan has been below the permitted range in Black enrollment in 
si;; of the nine years since the 1975 plan was implemented, and also below the 
white permitted range in six of those nine years. 

This large school was low in BlacI-. enrollment in each grade last year 
but tne first, which was assigned an unusually high number of BlacI:. students 
in 1982, in common with other magnet elementary schools. The 

newly-assigned first grade swung sharply the other way, bringing the 
school-wide proportion Black down from 42% to 38%, with actual numibers of 



■40- 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 8 

Black first graders dropping from 5S to 23. Subsequent to the approved 
assignments, however) an additional fifteen Black students have appeared in 
the first grade, bringing the grade from 36% to 44% Black, The second grade 
is 50% Black, bringing it within the permitted range, with the upper grades 
substantially lower. The fourth and fifth grades at the Hennigan are the 
most heavily white, as a result of the Advanced Work classes. It is not 
clear why the school enrolls at present 22 more white students than 
projected in the approved assignments last Spring, but the increase is in the 
upper grades. The school overall is in perfect compliance with the permitted 
range for white students, though the new first grade is at the bottom edge of 
that range. 

The other minority grades 1-5 enrollment, already substantially above 
the permitted range, becomes even further above the ideal (41%^ versus 27%) 
as a result of the decline in Black assignments to the first grade! note, 
however, that this is the result of the large Spanish bilingual program, and 
that non-bilingual other minority enrollment is below 13%. The necessity of 
concentrating - "clustering" - students for bilingual education results in 
under-enrollment of other miinority students at those magnet schools without 
such programs, and over-enrollment at the Henmgan and other schools with 
programs. It is for this reason that, in assessing the compliance history of 
schools in Boston, we have concentrated upon EHack and white enrollmient, and 
upon the relation between the two. 



Hernandez 

In 1 97S the Hernandez was the only public school in Boston with lass 
than 10% white enrollment (8%, 19 white students grades 1-5); in 1983 there 
are three schools with a smaller percentage of white students. The 

Hernandez is 9% white, making it one of a handful of Boston schools which 
have increased their white percent - and the only magnet school. By any 
standard, though, the school is identifiably minority. 



•41- 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 9 

The Hernande2 is slightly above its permitted other minority proportion 
(SS% versus 65%) as a result, largely, of the Spanish bilingual programi. It 
appears that 17 Hispanic students attend the Hernandez who are not enrolled 
in the program, together with 22 white and 54 Black students (K-5), resulting 
in a non-bilingual enrollment which is 54% Black, 25% white, and 21% other 
minority. The Black/white ratio is a near-perfect 2.53/1, as a result of a 
larger-than-projected Black enrollment and a smialler-than-projected white 
enrollment. Two white students were assigned to first grade, and two are 
enrolled, but grade 1-5 vjhite enrollment has dropped fromi a projected 20 to 
15. 

The Hernandez is the only rriagnet (District IX) school in Boston which 
increased its white enrollmient percent from 1 97S to 1 9S3 (grades 1-5), though 
only from S% to 9%! In 197S the school was the on'y one in Boston with less 
than 10% white enrollment, while there are now three schools - Chittick, 
Marshall, and Blaclistone Square - with slightly lower white enrollrrient 
percents! there are only two schools (Endicott, Lucy Stone) with fewer white 
students than the Hernandez. 

The unusual assignment pattern of the Hernandez, though permntted by 
the Court, creates problems from the point of view of state bilingual program 
policy, which seeks to locate bilingual programis in large schools with a 
majority of non-limited-English-spealnng students, to facilitate educational 
mainstreaming and maxiiTium integration in non-instructional activities. The 
Hernandez is one of the smallest schools in Boston, with one of the largest 
elementary bilingual programs. 



Jackson Mann 

This school, located in Allston/Brighton, has a poor record of 
compliance with the permitted ranges for both Elacl< and white students, 
falling short in six of nine years for Black enrollment and in five of nine 
years for white enrollment. Last Spring the school was projected to be high 
in other minority enrollment (34% above the ideal), with a large Vietnamese 



-42- 



Magnet Elementary School AnalyE-is page 10 

bilingual program accounting for thiEj actual enrollment is almost 30 other 
minority students higher, so that the actual percentage is 42% (56% above 
the ideal of 27%). White enrollment is slightly low but within the permitted 
range, while Black enrollment, though higher than projected, is, at 35%, 
substantially below the permitted range (25% below the ideal of 52%). The 
ratio between Black and white enrollment is low at 2.14/1. The 

Jackson/Mann and the Hennigan have both been out of compliance with the 
permitted ranges far more than the average! while this is in part 
attributable to bilingual programs, both schools have also had recurring 
difficulty reaching the Black and white ranges. 

The Jackson Mann has one of the fastest rates of decline in white 
enrollment, from 43% in 1 973 to 21% in 19S3, or 1 S3 fewer white students, the 
highest numerical loss for any elementary school in Boston. 



McKay 



The McKay, in East Boston, is subject to special provisions (outlined 
above) which raise the permitted range for white students and lower those 
for Black and other minority students! the presence of an Italian bilingual 
program also has the effect of pushing wihite enrollment up. In the eight 
years prior to 1 9S3 the white enrollment was higher than the permitted range 
for other magnet elementary schools six timnes. It is interesting to observe, 
therefore, that the Black enrollment proportion is within the higher range 
which other magnet schools must observe, and is "too high" for the special 
provisions applying to the McKay. White enrollment, at 27%, is slightly above 
the range applied to other magnet schools but slightly lowi by the "McKay 
standard", wihile other minority enrollment (18%) is substantially low by either 
standard. The Black/white ratio is a low 1 .99/1 . In brief, the school seems 
to be doing quite well. 



•43- 



I 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 11 
Ohrenberger 

The Ohrenberger, like the Haley and the Trotter, began as a rciagnet 
school before the May 10, 1975 Order, and has consistently functioned well as 
a desegregated school. White enrollment has been in compliance with the 
permitted range every year, while Black enrollment has been high three years 
(in a school in a white area) and low once. Black, white, and other mnnority 
enrollment are all very close to ideal, with the Black/white ratio a positive 
2.39/1. In this case the presence of a bilingual program has not upset the 
desegregated balance of enrollment; indeed it has helped the Ohrenberger to 
overcome a persistent non-comipliance in other minority enrollment. 



Trotter 



The Trotter shares with the formier Greene School in New Bedford the 
honor of being the first "magnet school" in Massachusetts, and has attracted 
national attention for its strong linkages with minority and white parents. 
The school has been in compliance with the permitted range for white 
enrollment every year! it has been high on Black enrollment once (in 1975) and 
low once (1979). Blac!:: enrollment is ideal this year, white at the upper end 
of the permitted range, and other minority (24%) slightly below the permitted 
range (25%-29%). Black/white ratio is somewhat low at 2.12/1. The Trotter 
is located in a almost entirely Black neighborhood, as the Ohrenberger is in 
an almost entirely white neighborhood! neither has any difficulty attracting 
a desegregated enrollment. 



Sumriiary 

It has been customary to state "compliance" in terms of the number of 
schools in or out of compliance in each of the three racial/ethnic categories, 
I hope that this detailed discussion demonstrates that each school is much 
more dynamic than such an analysis can hope to show, and that particularly 

-44-- 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 12 

the relation between bilingual program assignments and other minority 
enrollment requires other approaches to assessing compliance. For example, 
the over-representation of other minority students in certain schools 
(Hennigan, Hernandez, Jackson/Mann) to permit clustering of bilingual 
students for a full program requires under-assigning such students to other 
magnet elementary schools, unless they are to receive far more than their 
share of magnet school places. The reason that the Ohrenberger does 
better than the Haley or the Trotter in meeting the other minority standard 
is that it accommodates a small Lao/Khmer bilingual program. In short, only 
a clear view of the broad picture mal<es it possible to do justice to the 
enrollment efforts for individual schools. I believe the ratio between Black 
and white enrollment represents a helpful "short-hand" by which schools can 
be compared with one another, without suggesting that this represents a new 
standard for compliance with court orders. 



OVERALL MAGNET ELEMENTARY ENROLLMENT 

The opinion is widespread, that magnet elementary schools in Boston (as 
in many other cities) cater especially to white students, and serve them to a 
disproportionate extent. An analysis of the current enrollment data makes 
it clear that this is not true. Magnet schools in Boston (as in eight other 
Massachusetts cities: Brockton, Cambridge, Holyoke, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, 
Medford, Springfield, and Worcester.'! are not elitist and do not serve a 
disproportionate number of white students, exception being made for Boston's 
e>;amiination schools. 

Considering grades 1-5 in Boston, 17% of the Black students, 16% of the 
white students, and 19% of the other minority students attend magnet schools 
in November 1 9S3, compared with 17%, 17% and 18% last year. 

Magnet elementary schools serve a slightly lower proportion of white 
students than do other public schools in Boston. Magnet schools are 47.3% 
Black, 22.8% white, and 29.9% other minority in grades 1-5; corresponding 
figures for the entire school system are 43.9% Black, 23.9% white, and 27.2% 

-45- 



Magnet Elementary School AnalyEis page 13 

other minority. The large bilingual programs at several magnet elementary 
schools have the effect of giving a disproportionately large numiber of 
magnet school places to other minority students. At the middle school level, 
by contrast, other -minority students are under-represented in magnet 
schools because of the distorting effect of the heavily-white seventh and 
eighth grades in Boston Latin School and Latin Academy . . . but that is 
another story, and the object of a special monitoring report. 

In brief, miagnet elementary schools are at least equally available to 
minority students as to white students in Boston. 

On a less positive note, magnet elementary schools have been declining 
in white enrollment more rapidly than has the system as a whole; of the 12 
elementary schools (out of 7S) which have experienced the sharpest white 
enrollment decline since 197S, si;; (out of 10) are magnet schools: 



School 


% White Enrollment Decline 


Eliot (VII) 


71% 


Kenny (V) 


70% 


O'Hearn (V) 


66% 


Jackson Mann (IX) 


63% 


Marshall (V) 


63% 


Beethoven (III; 


61 % 


S.Greenwood (V) 


5S% 


Haley (IX) 


5S% 


J.Curley (IX) 


57% 


Ohrenberger (IX) 


57% 


McKay (IX) 


55% 


Trotter (IX) 


54% 



Conclusions and Recomimendations 

The magnet elementary schools in Boston are equitable in terms of whom 
they serve, and successful from a desegregation perspective. Although it is 
not within the scope of this analysis, it may be important to add that these 

-46- 



Magnet Elementary School AnalyEiE page 14 

schools cannot be called "elitist" in the sense that some magnet elementary 
schools in other states deliberately seek the most academically gi-fted 
students. 

Bilingual program students are "over-represented" in magnet elementary 
schools, representing 15.2% of the total enrollment, compared with 11.2% in 
the system in general. Substantially-separate students, on the other hand, 
represent 3.6% of the grade 1-5 magnet school enrollment comipared with 4.8% 
for the system in general. 

The Hennigan and Jackson Mann schools cause some concern because of 
their persistent non-compliance with the permitted ranges. We have noted 
the contribution which large bilingual programs make to this problemn, but it 
would be desirable to develop a long-term assignment strategy to provide 
stability and improved compliance. 

White enrollments have generally declined faster in magnet elementary 
schools than in other elementary schools. Since miagnet school enrollments 
are a function of assignments, especially at the elementary and middle levels 
wihere there is generally a surplus of white applicants, this decline must be a 
matter of decision to assign fewier of them. In certain respects this seems a 
wise decision, to protect white enrollments at the less popular district 
schools. On the other hand, the evident popularity of Boston's magnet 
schools among all racial groups suggests that their continued viability meets 
a real educational need. 

There should be a long-term strategy (as with the Hennigan and Jackson 
Mann) to assure that magnet schools continue to be successful and to offer 
education alternatives with distinctive flavor to a racially-diverse 
enrollment. 

Boston's magnet elementary schools are, generally, a success, but this 
does not mean that they could not be strengthened, both in themselves and in 
their contribution to the system as a whole. It is not within the scope of 
this analysis to offer suggestions which go beyond the determination of 

-47- 



Magnet Elementary School Analysis page 15 

compliance or non-compliance, but it would be encouraging to see discussion 
taking place about the place of magnet schools in Boston's future, and how 
Boston could learn from e>cperience elsewhere with desegregated rrragnet 
schools in the absence of court requirements and supervision. 



Charles L. Glenn, Director 
November 1 933 



I 



-48. 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Analysis of F5I"! 1933 Enrorirfients: High Schools 



The review of proposed high school assignments, in late April, found them 
generally acceptable but noted several areas of concern for further 
monitoring; 

* despite an effort to assign a higher proportion of white students to 
Burke. Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain High Schools, concern was expressed 
about whether the staff of these schools would reach out successfully to 
assure that the assigned students actually enrolled! 

* the attrition of Blaci-: enrollment at Boston Latin, Latin Academy, and 
East Boston High School indicated a need for close monitoring of support 
measures at these schoolsl 

* continuing difficulty in attracting white students to English High and 
Madison Park School - both new facilities built with state desegregation funds 
- indicated a need to strengthen program, climate, and perception of what 
these schools have to offer! 

* analysis of the preferences expressed by students in the eighth grade 
for high school assignments demonstrated the strong popularity - among all 
racial groups - of the Urnana and of Copley Square High School, and an 
unwillingness of all racial groups to attend certain other high schools! it was 
suggested that this "annual referendum" be used as a basis for program 
planning and development. 

The Spring proposed assignments cannot be more than an approximation of 
wihat the actual enrollments will be, because of a great variety of factors 
including non-promotions, residential mobility, transfers to non-public schools 
or to the Metco program, and new registrants. The first task in monitoring of 
enrollments, therefore, has been to compare the actual enrollments with the 
projected enrollments and with the permitted ranges for each school. As in 
the earlier report, we have confined this analysis to Black and white 
enrollments, since other minority enrollments are heavily impacted by program 

-49- 



High School EnrolTments page 2 

considerations. As last Spring, there will be a separate review of the 
placement of other minority students, m and out of bilingual programs. 

The second aspect of this Fall mionitoring has been to follow up on the 
questions raised last Spring. On-site monitoring has occurred at the 

examination schools, at Burke and Dorchester High Schools, and at East 
Boston High, and efforts to strengthen the desegregation of these schools are 
described in separate sections of this report. Jamaica Plain, English and 
Madison Park High Schools were not monitored during the present period, 
though the author has visited each of them at least a dozen times in the past. 

Other aspects of the Court-ordered monitoring task - including student 
discipline, safety and security, bilingual education, and vocational education 
- will be correlated with enrollmient monitoring over the months ahead to 
provide an in-depth view of compliance with specific orders as well as success 
in achieving the desegregation and equal opportunity objectives which lie 
behind these orders. 



BLACK ENROLLMENT 

As predicted last Spring, the assignments have generally been successful 
in achieving compliance with the permitted ranges for Black enrollment in the 
seventeen high schools. It had been projected that Brighton High School 
would be slightly high in Black enrollment; in fact, it is not. All district high 
schools are in compliance. 

The March 1332 modification of the method for calculating the target 
percentages for enrollments has made compliance considerably easier to 
achieve at district high schools. Burke High, for example, was too high in 
Black enrollrfient for six of the first seven years of desegregation! it has now 
been in compliance for three years straight. The "window" for compliance 
with the permitted range for Black enrollment is from 52% to 86% in District V 

-50- 



High School Enrollrnents page 3 

(Burke and DorcheEter) for example, while it is only from 49% to 57% for 
District I.X high Echools, including English and Madison Park. 

AiTiong the magnet high schools only English is above the permitted range, 
for the fourth time in nine years but the third year in a row (60% Black vs, 
4S%-57% allowedJ, with SS more Black students attending than had been 
proiected last Spring. 

Madison Park enrolls 103 more Black students than projected, but also 48 
more white students, so that the projected racial proportions are rfiaintamed. 
Charlestown High also enrolls substantially (43) more Black students than 
projected, but has a perfect (40%) proportion of Black students. 

Dorchester High also increased its Black enrollment (by 46) but has a 
nearly perfect proportion, while Burke added 162 Black students over the 
projectd number and is 13%. above the "ideal" proportion, though not out of the 
permitted range. This additional assignment of students to the Burke is 
discussed in the "special desegregation" report on that school. 

Several high schools enroll substantially fewer Black students than 
projected last Spring. West Roxbury enrolls 79 fewer Black and 42 fewer 
white students, so that the racial proportions are not disturbed. The 
numbers assigned to this school seemed high, but it is strongly popular among 
Black as well as white students in District III. We will seek information on 
why the numbers dropped so much for both groups! West Roxbury High has had 
a "perfect score" on both Black and white enrollment since it opened. 

East Boston High enrolls 2S fewer Black students than projected, and this 
will be considered in our "special desegregation" monitoring of that school. 
East Boston is "out of compliance" almost every year because of Black 
enrollment above the permitted range! this is the result of counting the 
business magnet program, which operates under District LX admission 
standards, in with the enrollment of East Boston High School where it is 
housed. 

-51- 



High School Enronments page 4 



Boston High School - the work-Etudy school - enrolls 41 fewer Black 
students than projected! since its students are all at least sixteen and 
employed as part of their course of study? it may be that some chose not to 
continue their studies! white enrollment declined by 25 as well. The 

enrollment of this school generally builds up over the yeart by referrals from 
other schools. 

The examination schools enroll fewer Black (99.1 and white (163) students 
than projected! it miay be that this is a function of the many applications from 
students already attending or planning to attend non-public schools. The 
Assignment Unit counts on a certain "shrink:age" of the number of students who 
receive exam school assignments. The group monitoring these schools is also 
lool::ing closely at the informiation on students "discharged", including those 
who choose to return to other Boston schools, for clues to the high attrition 
rate of minority students, 

This miay be an appropriate point at which to correct an impression gained 
by Mr. Coakley, and perhaps by others, from the remarks in the Spring report 
about the examination schools. It was pointed out (volume II, page 103) that 
they "deviate very sharply fromi city-wide enrollment". Mr. Coakley has 
correctly pointed out that admissions to these schools are governed by strict 
Court orders, whose administration we monitored and approved last Spring. 
The question which we seek to raise is not whether there is any 
non-compliance with those admission requirements, but whether the long-term 
effect of such admissions over the past eight years has been to achieve 
effective desegregation. We have pointed out the need to retain minority 
students in the Boston Latin School, in particular, if the annual assignments 
are to have the desired effect. 

Mr. Coakley points out, in a letter dated August 15, 19S3, that the 12th 
grade at this school in May 1977 was 2% Black and 0.4% Hispanic, and in June 
1 9S3 was 13% Black and 3% Hispanic. This represents definite progress, even 
though the November 3rd 1983 print-out indicates that the present 12th grade 

-52- 



High School Enrollments page 5 

is only 9.84% Black and 2.2% Hispanic. But the population of the city has also 
changed substantially in that period: in 1977-73 the public school enrollment 
was 43% Black and 11% Hispanic! in 1933-84 it is 48% Black and 16% Hispanic. 
The enrollment of the Latin schools is changing to reflect changes in the 
population frorri which it draws, but they by no means serve a proportionate 
share of minority students. Again, this is not a comment about 

"non-compliance" but rather an observation about the result of a number of 
years of generally strict compliance with admission standards, and the need 
for continued efforts to provide educational support. 

Mr. Coakley also observes that the high proportion of white students in 
the Latin schools is partly attributable to the many white students who enter 
from non-public schools! the Latin schools thus reflect the school-age 
residential population of the city rather than the public school enrollment. 
This is a fair observation, but it should be put in the context of the fact that 
the total combined enrollment of public and non-public schools located in 
Boston is substantially more heavily minority than is that of Boston Latin 
School: 

% Black % White % Hispanic 

K-1 2 enrollment of all 39% 43% 13% 

schools reporting 

7-12 enrollment of 22% 60% 5% 

Boston Latin School 

The problem! to which the Spring report sought to draw attention, however, 
was that of the attrition of Black and Hispanic students at the examination 
schools. As of November 3rd, Boston Latin School is 33,6% Black at the 7th 
grade and 9.8% Black at the 12th grade. Put another way, there are 169 Black 
students in the 7th grade and only S3 in the 3th. It is precisely because of 
the general recognition of the academic excellence of these schools and the 
opportunity which they have offered to generations of Boston children who 
would not otherwise have gone on to successful careers that we have urged a 
close look at the support systems now in place. We have done so not on the 
authority of the assignment orders but on that of the "special desegregation" 

-53- 



High School EnrolliTientE page S 

order of March 21 st 1 S78, which applies to "support services at the 
examination schools." 

Altogether) there are 47 more Black students enrolled in grades 9-12 
(9077) in the Boston Public Schools than was projected last Spring (9030). Of 
these only the 1034 who attend English High School attend a school out of 
compliance with the permitted range for their racial group. 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 

Several district high schools have not done as well on white enrollment as 
was projected during the Spring assignment process. Brighton High was 
projected to be 17% below the white "ideal", but is in fact 33% below (ideal 
24%, actual 16%j; this is attributable primarily to increased Black and other 
rninority enrollment. Brighton High has never before been out of compliance 
with the permitted range for white enrollment. 

Jarfiaica Plain High, on the other hand, has failed to reach the minimum 
required white percentage for nine out of nine years. Last Spring the school 
was projected to be 26% below the "ideal" - slightly out of compliance - but it 
IS actually 37% below (ideal 27%, actual 17%). Burke High (also nine for nine) 
was projected to be 30% below the "ideal", but is actually 40% below (ideal 
20%, actual 12%). 

Most disappointing. South Boston High, which has not been out of 
compliance with the permitted range for white enrollment since 1975 (when it 
was too high), is out of compliance this year. The school was projected to be 
20% below the "ideal" and within the perrriitted range, but is actually 32% below 
(ideal 40%, actual 27%). On the other hand. West Roxbury, Dorchester (!), and 
Hyde Park High Schools achieved their projected white percentages, in each 
case with rather more white students than were projected last Spring. 



■54- 



High School Enrollment s page 7 

Four district high schoolE-, then, are Out-of-cornpliance with the white 
permitted range! in the case of all but Brighton High, we can at least report 
that the ninth grade has a higher white proportion than the tenth and higher 
grades, which suggests progress toward compliance. In the case of Euri-:e 
High, in particular, school improvement rrieasures are under way (and discussed 
in another section of the report) which give some promise of attracting a more 
substantial white enrollment. South Boston High seems to be a school which 
has already "turned the corner" educationally (based on expressed student 
preferences last Spring, and on repeated monitoring over recent yeBrs')i but 
14% of the assigned white students are not enrolled at present. Since 75 
white eighth graders gave South Boston as their first high school preference, 
one might expect more than the present 97 to be enrolled in the ninth grade. 
By contrast, only 4 white students gave Burke or Dorchester as their first 
choice, but 99 white students are presently enrolled in the ninth grades of the 
two schools. 

By the time wie review the proposed 1 9S4 assignments we hope to have an 
improved insight into the relation between preferences, assignments, and 
actual attendance. 

Of the magnet high schools, Madison Park did rather better than expected 
and English High rather worse, again with no obvious relation to expressed 
preferences: 

White Students 

First Preference 

Assigned 9th Grade 

9th Grade 11/33 

All Grades 11/83 

% White ("Ideal" 28%) 
As a result, Madison Park is just within the permitted range, and English High 
just below it. 

It seems evident that the desegregation issue with these city-wide 
schools, potentially the leaders in providing effective urban education, has to 

-55- 



English 


Madison Par 


22 


15 


141 


199 


150 


187 


377 


490 


22% 


24% 



High School Enrollments page S 

do with Echool climate and strengthening of educational program more than 
with assignments. Between them thev enroll 15% of the white high school 
students in Boston - less than Boston Latin School by itself) and somewhat 
more than East Boston High by itself, but a not insignificant proportion. 
Unlike the district high schools, they are not obligated to seek to please every 
student! they are not only permitted but required to be distinctive, flavorful, 
attractive. They already have far rriore to offer than many prospective 
students and their parents know, but we have heard again and again that 
concerns about safety and learning clirriate make many unwilling to give either 
of these schools a chance. This attitude gains some support, in the case of 
English, from the finding of monitoring of safety and security issues, that 
there were more than three times as many safety- and crime-related incidents 
in September and October 1 9S3 at English as at any other school. It is 
obvious that the educational and "magnet" potential of the school cannot be 
fully developed until it can provide an appropriate environment. 

There is no question that the school system and the building 
administrators are l<eenly aware of these problems! if they can find solutions 
they will be maldng a significant contribution not only to education but also to 
desegregation. 

There are 263 fewer white students enrolled in grades 9-12 (5293) in the 
Boston Public Schools than was projected last Spring (5556)! this represents a 
"shrinl<age" of 5%! this does not seem an e>;cessive rate of change, in view of 
national and statewide trends. 

It is interesting to note the destinations of white students who were 

"discharged" fromi the ninth grade in the Boston Public Schools between July 

1st 1982 and April 14th 1983 (more recent figures are not available): 

Destination Number of White 9th Graders 

"Parochial" 184 

"Non-Parochial" 62 

Massachusetts Public 71 

Out of State 27 

-56- 



High bchool EnronrnentE. page 9 

Did Not Report 31 

Moved - No Address 19 

Other 45 

Of the white students who are currently enrolled, 1073 attend the five 
hiqh schools which are out of compliance for white enrollment. 



OTHER MINORITY ENROLLMENT 

Throughout this Report the point has been made that "compliance" with 
respect to other minority enrollment is profoundly affected by the enrollment 
of nearly half (42%) of Hispanic and of Oriental students in bilingual classes. 
Since students are "clustered" for bilingual programs, even if that involves 
assignments across district lines, it is inevitable that some schools will have 
other TTiinority enrollments over the permitted range, and that correspondingly 
others will be under it. Under these circumstances, a finding of 

"non-compliance" would be inappropriate in many cases, and discussion of 
compliance has therefore been limited to Black and white enrollments. 

In a separate analysis of other -minority students who are not enrolled in 
bilingual programis, it becomes very clear that the Hispanic and "Oriental" 
students who make up 5S% of the other minority category are distributed in 
distinctively different ways, with equity implications. This is a further 
reason why the aggregation of the two groups for compliance analysis is of 
limited usefulness. 



DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 

A final point of interest is the distribution of Black and of white students 
among the high schools in Boston. 24% of the Black students (and 29% of the 
Hispanic students not in bilingual programs) in Boston high schools attend 

-57- 



High School EnroTlrfients page 10 

English or Madison Park, compared with 16% of the white students (and 6% of 
the Oriental students not in bilingual programs). 

By contrast, 31% of the white students (and an astonishing 57% of 
Oriental students not in bilingual programs) attend one of the three 
examination schools, compared with 11% of the Black students (and 8% of the 
Hispanic students not in bilingual programs). 

In other words, there is an almost perfect symmetry which may be 
represented as follows: 

Exam Schools English/Madison Park 

Oriental* 57% fa%- 

White 31% 16% 

Black 11% 24% 

Hispanic* 8% 2S% 
* non-bilingual program 



RECRUITMENT 

Some of the assignments wiere optimistic and required recruitment 
follow-up, as we noted in the Spring report. Those efforts which occur along 
this line (though note that we have not mionitored on-site for high school 
recruitment efforts yet) seem to be of a generalized nature. In late March, 
for example, Mr. Coakley sent sample fliers about registration for the Boston 
Public Schools to community superintendents, building administrators, and 
school parent councils! these were to be distributed as they wished to 
agencies and churches, in shopping centers and stores, or by mail. In 
rriid-March he sent cut a press release on student recruitment to more than 75 
mdeia outlets. The principal efforts, quite naturally, have to do with 

kindergarten registration. Otherwise, this central "recruitment" effort is 
more in the nature of public information about registration times and places 
than of an attempt to convince parents and students to give the public 

-58- 



High School EnrollmentE. page 11 

schools a chance by presenting the diversity and strength of what they can 
offer. 

More pro-mising, though limited, is the participation by individual schools, 
including Burke and Dorchester, in a "high school information day" at Boston 
College High School on October 16th. According to a report addressed to Mr. 
Coakley, "The Burke, in addition to literature, had s personal computer 
operating for students to experiment with, Dorchester High's magnet 

programs were informative and nicely displayed. Messr. Holland and Schwartz 
were in attendance and actively recruiting potential students. Mr. Beattie 
was also in attendance providing support to the magnet schools represented." 

School people who are convinced that what they have to offer will be of 
real benefit to prospective students are the most effective "recruiters", in 
any community. Opportunities should be multiplied to reach students and 
their parents in direct ways. 



CONCLUSIONS 

Only one high school - English - is out of compliance with the permitted 
ranges for Black students, but five - Brighton, Jamaica Plain, Burke, South 
Boston, and English - underenroll white students. 

A promising start has been made at the Burke, and Jamaica Plain High 
should be considered for similar efforts. Brighton High School's enrollment 
should be wiatched closely. Improving the environment for education at 
English High School is an important desegregation priority. 

In view of the critical significance of desegregation of South Boston High 
School, our mionitoring plans for the Spring will include a review of any 
factors which may be contributing to its current non-compliance with the 
permitted range for white enrollment. 

-59- 



High School EnrolVments page 12 

High school "recruitment" was not monitored on-site this Fall, though we 
did monitor program development at three high schools for which special 
desegregation rrieasures have been ordered. 

The support and retention of minority students at the examination schools 
is a continuing problem, as indicated by the enrollment figures, and intensive 
monitoring is under way in that area. 

The distribution of different racial/ethnic groups in citywide high schools 
deserves close attention for equity implications in the development of a 
long-term secondary plan for the Boston Public Schools. 



Charles L. Glenn, Director 

November 29th 1983 



■60- 



i 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNIT'^i 



Analysis of Fall 1983 Enroll-mentE .' Occupational Resource Center and other- 
magnet vocational programs 



Students entering ninth grade in Boston are given the opportunity, as part 
of their assignment application, to express a desire to participate in an 
exploratory program at the Occupational Resource Center (ORC.1. This program 
IE offered on a half-day basis for either the first or second semester. 

Students entering grades ten, eleven, or twelve are given the opportunity 
to apply for up to three half-day skill training programs from among 35 
provided in nine "clusters" by the ORC. Such students are also assigned to a 
high school for their academic program. Students may also request a "magnet" 
vocational program at a district high school," if admitted, they enroll full-time 
in that school, even if it is not their own district school. 

The controlling standards for assignments to the ORC and to other 
"magnet" vocational programs are the "admissions criteria" found on pages 
5-11 of the Unified Plan of Septerfiber 8, 1975, as modified by the Court in the 
Spring of 1932 to exclude the enrollment of the examination schools from the 
city-wide enrollment standard for the ORC. The most important are: 

* students may be assigned to a program only voluntarily 

* oversubscribed programs will be subject to random selection of 
applicants, provided that racial and male-female objectives are met thereby 

* all programs "will reflect the racial ratios established by the Court for 
the city-wide schools" (modified as noted above, this means a range of 52%-50% 
Black, 18%-28% White, and 20%-22% Other Minority for 1 9S3-S4:i 



•61. 



Occupational Resource Center page 2 

* "In those programs in which students of one sex have represented less 
than 35% of the enrollment of that program, the admission . . . shall 
specifically encourage a student composition ... in keeping with the citywide 
rnale/female ratio." 

* "Insufficient applications for a particular program from students of 
one race will result in the underenrollment of the program." This provision was 
intended to assure that program school staff would recruit vigorously for 
applicants from under-represented groupS) and also that questions would be 
raised about programs which proved persistently unable to attract applicants 
from all groups. 

* If applications in appropriate racial proportions greatly exceed 
program capacity, consideration is to be given to expanding the program 
through use of out-of-school sites and training resources. 

* "Admissions to each such employability skill prograrri shall be made on 
the basis of equal numbers of male and female students, so far as the pool of 
applications filed permits." 

* Students already enrolled are to be allowed to continue in programs 
"without regard to the racial or se;;ual composition of the enrollment of the 
second year of the program". While this provision applied to 1975, it states a 
principle which should still be operative. 

As will immediately be apparent, these requirements and the large number 
of programs make analysis of assignments and enrollments a matter of great 
complexity; compliance with the Order cannot be measured by the outcome 
alone. In order to monitor the process employed last Spring, with a view to 
assuring that the process used in the Spring of 1 9S4 complies fully with the 
Court's requirements, we have requested and received a computer tape of 
individual student preferences for high school and vocational program 
assignments, and we will be analyzing this data over the next several months. 
Before completing this analysis it will not be possible to say, for example, how 



•62- 



Occupational Resource Center page 3 

many students have not been assigned to particular programs for which there 
are openings because of efforts to comply with desegregation requirements, or 
whether female and male students were in fact assigned on a one-for-one basis 
within the pool of applicants. 

The present report, therefore, does not offer conclusions about 
compliance with all aspects of the 1975 Unified Plan! it addresses itself only to 
the expected outcome that, as noted above, all programs "will reflect the 
racial ratios established by the Court for the city-wide schools", and also to 
the goal that programs enroll at least 35% of students of each se;;. 



ORC Program Enrollments as of October 24th 1333 



(a) Twelve programs (of thirty-five) were left underenrolled in June 1933 
because of desegregation considerations. That is, an insufficient number of 
white students (for example) applied to a program to permit all of the Black 
applicants to be assigned to the program, even though some space was left 
available. These prograrrrs were well below the permitted range in white 
assigned enrollment: 

Retailing Machine 

Advanced Office Dental Assistant 

Banking Health Aide 

Medical Office Assistant 

Nursing Assistant Commercial Design 

Photo Technology Television Production 

The only programs over the permitted range for white students were; 
Carpentry Heating, Air Conditioning 

Note that it was not possible to say whether the newly assigned students 
for each program complied with the permitted range or helped to bring the 



■63- 



Occupational Resource Center page 4 

program toward compliance. The form of analysTS carried out in detail with 
school assignmentE could not be done for the ORC with the data available. 

Review of the ORC program data in October 1983 shows that a number of 
programs are out of compliance with the enrollment goals of the Unified Plan. 
Of 35 programs, eleven were within the permitted range for white enrollment, 
while four were significantly over that range (lS%-28%) and eleven 
significantly under it: 



Program 


% White 


Banking 





Health Aide 


6% 


Fashion 


7% 


Medical Office 


8% 


Photography 


8% 


Retail 


9% 


Hotel 


1 0% 


TV Production 


10% 


Machine Shop 


1 2%. 


Office 


12% 


Nursing Assistant 


12% 


Plumbing 


34% 



Dental Assistant 3S% 

Carpentry 39% 

Heating/Air Conditioning 42% 

There are ten programs in compliance with the permitted range for Black 
enrollment (52%-60%.i, with five significantly under and twelve significantly 
over the range: 



Programi 


% Black 


Dental Assistant 


1 9% 


Building Maintenance 


38% 


Legal Office 


40% 


Machine Drafting 


42% 



•64- 



Occupational Resource Center page 5 

Heating/AC 42% 

TV Production 70% 

Hotel 72% 

Retail 7S% 

Fashion 76% 

Office 76% 

Machine Shop 80% 

(Note that the citywide machine shop program located at Hyde Park High School 
is only 46% Black although the school is 76% Black; there are thus two machine 
shop programs, one too high in Black enrollment and one too low. A third 
program, at East Boston High, is being phased out; it is currently 64% Black,) 



There are four programs which comply with the narrow (20%-22'4} 
permitted range for other minority enrollment; five programs are significantly 
below and two significantly above the range: 

Program % Other Minority 

Illustration 6% 

Sheet Metal 7% 

Machine Shop 8% 

Plumbing 9% 

Retail 9% 

Banking 42% 

Dental Assistant 44% 

The question of language support for students of limited English-speaking 
ability (in view of the 1975 Order's requirement of bilingual vocational 
programs for these students) is dealt with in another section of this report. 



(b) The assignment process is required to give preference to male or 
female students to the e>;tent appropriate to correct past 

-65- 



Occupational Resource Center page 6 

under-representation of either group. It appears that this aspect of the 
Unified Plan has not been momtored in recent years! it is unusual for a race 
desegregation plan to include such a provision, but Massachusetts law places 
an obligation upon school systems to tal<e active efforts in this area. In June 
1982, for example, the Board of Education approved a high school racial 
balance plan for Springfield which dealt explicitly with male/female 
enrollments. 

The assignment projections showed sixteen of the thirty-five skills 
programs underenrolling female students (tailing 35% as the standard), and ten 
underenrolling male students! the programs were generally predictable. Mr. 
Coakley pointed out that second and third year students might account for 
much of this disparity, and also that racial considerations may have precluded 
assigning all of the female students expressing a preference for a particular 
program. 

There are only six programs which are between 35% and 65% female and 
male: food, photography, data processing, hotel, illustration, and retail. In 
eleven programs female students are significantly under-represented, and in 
nine they are significantly over-represented: 

Program % Female 

Heating/AC 

Plumbing 2% 

Auto Repair 2% 

Maritime 2% 

Auto Body 3% 

Welding 3% 

Electrical 4% 

Machine 4% 

Carpentry 4% 

Electronics 5% 

Cabinetmaking 15% 

Health 81% 



■66- 



Occupational Resource Center page 7 

Dental Assistant 38% 

Word Processing 8S% 

Child Care 38% 

Fashion 30% 

Legal Office 32% 

Medical Office 34% 

Nursing Assistant 34% 

Cosmetology 36% 

It should be noted that the Unified Plan included specific requirements for 
career exploratory programs for all students in grades six, seven, eight, and 
nine, and for particular attention to counselling students into non-traditional 
occupations. The Department supported this effort with over $1.5 million in 
state desegregation funds and with substantial federal vocational funds, to 
assure that such programs were in place in each middle and high school. 
Follow-through was weak, with commitment to the goals of non-stereotyped 
career education varying greatly from school to school, and with little 
consistent support from central administration, as was noted in several 
evaluations of the funded programs. The distribution of female students, 
sharply over-represented in traditional female occupations and sharply 
under-represented in traditional male (and financially more rewardingi 
occupations, suggests that much remains to be done. 



Other "Magnet" Vocational Programs 

Less complete information is presently available for the five citywide 
vocational programs offered in district high schools, which are subject to the 
same enrollment guidelines as are programs at the ORC. The weeidy school 
enrollment reports provide information for these programs by race, though not 
by sex. Four of the five programs are in compliance with the permitted range 
for Black enrollment, two with that for white enrollment, and none with that for 
other minority enrollment: 



•67- 



Occupational Resource Center page S 



Black 




White 




Other Minority 


52% - 


60% 


1 8% - 


28% 


20% - 22% 


55% 




34% 




10% 


57% 




28% 




16% 


45% 




53% 




1% 


60% 




25% 




15% 


60% 




36% 




3% 



permitted range 
Brighton 
West Roxbury 
Hyae Park 
Dorchester 
East Boston 



A few comments about these programs, which are, in most cass, the last 
relic of the old system of effective vocational programs in Boston (in contrast 
with the Boys and Girls Trade Schools). The low other minority enrollment at 
Brighton is odd in view of the 43% other minority enrollment of that schools! 
the high white enrollment (in a school only 16% white overall, and below the 
permiitted range) reflects the traditional high enrollment of white male 
students in these programs. 

We have noted, above, the contrast between the machine shop program at 
Hyde Park High and that at the ORC; the school is 76% Black and 21% white. 

The Dorchester High figures will require refinement? one of the vocational 
programis is being phased out, while another is serving as a "magnet" to help 
desegregate the school. 

The East Boston machine shop program is also being phased out, by the 
expedient of not assigning new students. As noted in the detailed discussion 
of this school, the "desegregation" of the school in the future will rest 
exclusively upon the "business magnet" prograrri. 

In brief, the citywide vocational programs located in district high schools 
are in somewhat better compliance than are those at the ORC with respect to 
Black enrollment and perhaps even to white enrollment, but they have a 
considerable way to go. Their other minority enrollment is uniformly too low, 
especially at Hyde Park and East Boston, The program in Hyde Park, in 
particular, seems to reflect its community much more closely than it does the 

-68- 



Occupational Resource Center page 9 

city; there was a diEcusEion of the pattern of applications- in the Spring 
report. No review has yet been conducted of enrollment by sex. 

SuTfimary 

Citywide vocational assignments were approved in June despite the 
projected non-compliance of many programs because of the nature of the 
assignment process. At least twenty-seven of the forty programs had 

available space either for additional students who might be encouraged to 
apply, or for additional students already on the waiting list if students of the 
under-represented racial groups could be persuaded to apply so that 
desegregation requirements would be met. In other words? the assignment 
process was far from complete when the initial assignments were -made. 

Unfortunately! the effect of recruitment and additional assignments over 
the summer was limited. Female enrollment was increased in plurribing! white 
enrollment in the medical office assistant program, Black enrollment in 
heating/air conditioning, and there was other progress. On the other hand, 
Black enrollment decreased from the projected in carpentry and white 
enrollrfient in photographic technology and nursing assistant. The ORC 

programs overall are out of compliance to roughly the extent projected. 

For several years after the 1975 Unified Plan was ordered state monitors 
noted a lack of progress in implementing its sweeping provisions for 
desegregation and improvement of vocational educational opportunities in 
Boston. District core programs, career exploratory programs, bilingual 

programs were delayed in their development or modification, while the citywide 
cooperative industrial programs remained predominantly white. The 

heavily-minority Boston Trade School languished. All hopes were pinned upon 
the construction and phase-in of the Occupational Resource Center. 

The ORC is now operational, and another section of this report reviewis 
the status of its programs, which include many offerings not previously 
available in Boston. It is clear that, on balance, enhanced educational 

-69- 



Occupational ReEource Center page 10 

opportunities are now available to Boston students. On the other hand, the 
analysis of enrollments demonstrates that there is much left to doi that 
vocational education in Boston is far from being desegregated by race or se;;. 

It may be that there are problems with the way in which assignments are 
made! as noted above, it is not yet possible to reach any conclusions about 
that, but an analysis and recommendations will be included in the Spring 1984 
Report. 

It is clear that much more needs to be done to create demand, on the part 
of students of the different racial groups and of male and female students, for 
programs for which such demand would be non-traditional. Career education, 
counselling and vigorous recruitment will need to be in place and well 
coordinated. The assignment task is dependent, in the case of such voluntary 
programs, upon prior efforts. 

In addition, those programs which have not been able to attract 
applicants frorri all groups should be reviewed to determine whether there is an 
e."planation in the content of the programs or the opportunities which they 
offer for later employment and career satisfaction. 

Review of citywide vocational enrollments makes it clear that the Division 
of Occupational Education will need to work with the Boston Public Schools 
over the months ahead, applying what has been learned through the annual 
admissions review process with selective vocational schools statewide. This 
is 3 field in which the Department has considerable resources of expertise 
among its staff, as well as models of successful school-level leadership to 
offer. No effort which could be made over the next year would have so great 
an impact upon sex equity and the life-chances of minority students. 

Charles L. Glenn, Director 
Judith Taylor 

November 1983 



-70- 



^'iASSALHUSETTS L'cf-'MRTMtNT OF ^rUUCA i luN 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Analysis of FaTi 1983 tinrorimerits : Other Minority btudsnts 

More than one third of the Other Minority students in Eoston are 
assigned to tilingual programs: 

Racial Category In TBE Prog Not in TBE Total % in TBE 

"Oriental'^* 

3611 37% 

3932 42% 

3569 40% 
52G3 42% 

234 2% 

273 1.5% 

12514 38% 

13408 41% 

* corresponds to "Asian" in state and federal reports 
(Note that an additional 1657 students in bilingual Prograrfis (incuding 
Haitian French, Italian, PortLiguese, Cape Verdean, and Greel<) are 
classified as "BlacK" or "white"; altogether there are 7182 students 
assigned to TBE programs for 1933-84, or 12.5% of system enrollment.) 

The increases between the projected assignments of April 1983 and 
the actual enrollments as of November 7th may be attributed, in part, to 
the late registration of other minority students for kindergarten or first 
grade, but they also undoubtedly indicate a continuation of tne rapid 
growth of the Hispanic ana Asian population, and especially of families 
wnth young cnildren. The overall enrollment of the Boston Public Scnools 
is over 27%. other minority in grades 1-5, over 23% in grades 6-S, and not 
quite 20%- in grades 9-12. 



assigned 4/83 


1338 


2273 


actual 11/83 


1654 


2258 


Hispanic 






assignee 4/83 


3452 


5217 


actual 11/83 


3857 


5346 


Native American 






assigned 4/83 


5 


229 


actual 11 /S3 


4 


269 


Total 






assigned 4/83 


4795 


7719 


actual 1 1/83 


5525 


7883 



-71- 



rtUC 

tne 
1 Bee 
un 



Other f-hnority Student Ass-gnfTients page 2 

It 1.S difficult to asEesE desegregstion asEignmentE of other miriority' 
ents, because of the priority given to bilingual program asEignments, 
neea to cluster studentE in such programs for effective instuction 

the bilingual reports and oecauEe other minority students are 
■■enly aistributea among the geographical districts: 





Asian 


Hispanic 


Indian 


I 


954 


1327 


IS 


II 


44 


1754 


18 


III 


145 


311 


6 


IV 


33 


103 


IS 


V 


4S 


1 1 70 


43 


VI 


133 


1031 


57 


VII 


1179 


1085 


S 


VIII 


73 


195 


22 


<IX>* 


1 339 


2223 


oi- 


total 


3932 


3203 


273 



* draws students city-wide 

One aspect of other minority student desegregation cJeserves special 
attention, however; the distribution of such students who are not in 



Dilinguai programs at tne 



c -* ■t-'-,^ '-■- 



;n scnooi ieve ; 



it was within recent memorv 



trist Hispanic stucents began to be significantly represented in nigh 
schools, and a oecaoe ago their drop-out rate was nearly 100%, The 
number of Asian (including not only Cmnese but an increasing number of 
Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lao anc other Asian students) and Hispanic 
students at each high school Provides significant information about the 
educational benefits available to such students. 

The distribution of other minority students among the district high 
schools follows neighborhood resiaentia"! patterns, with 1^^% of Asian 
stuaants '.not in bilingual programs) attending Brighton High, anc Hispamc 
stucents neavily represented at both Brighton and Jamaica Plain (11% of 
the citywide non-bilingual enrollment at each). 



72. 



other Minority Student AESignments page 3 

It IE trie city-WTde schools which might De expected to enroll other 
minority students in roughly comparable nuTHDersI in fact, we see that 
Asian and Hispanic stuaents nave sharply different enroHrritnt patterns. 
For tne purpose of this analysis, we corfipare tne proportion of students 
of eacn group wno would be e>;pected to atteno each school, if tney were 
distriDuted randorrily, with the number actually enrolled. 

Asian students are enrolled at Boston High (the v^iorh-study school) 
ana at Englisn nigh at less than half the expected rate, while they are 
even scarcer at Madison Park High (only 17% of the expected number;. 
On tne otner hanc, Asian students attend Latin AcaaerfiV at double tneir 
numoers systemi-wide, Latin School at £ 1/2 trmes, and Boston Technical 
at nearly 3 1/2 times tneir proportional rate. Copley Square has almost 
the "ideal' number of Asian students, while Umana Tech nas substantially 
r'lore than tne proportional number. 

msr'anic students, on the other hand, are strongly over-represented 
at Boston High and Hadison Pari:, and somewhat over-represented at 
English, Copley Square, ar.v. Umana. Tnev are under-represented at 
Technical Uhough note that the schoc/ also has a Spanish TBE programs 
at less tnan half the Proportiona" nuTiibers at Boston Latin, and at less 
than one third the proportional numibers at Latin Acaoerr.y. 

In the section of this Report on high schools a chart is presented 
which show's the proportion of high school students of each of four grcjps 
citywide who attend the examination scnools and English and Madison 
Park. The groups are: Black, white, Asian students not in bilingual 
classes, and Kispanic students not in bilingual classes: 

Exam Schools Engl i s h / M a d i s o n Par i< 

Asian 57% 5% 

:,;i---^ 111 V 1S»>' 

Black 11% 24% 

Hispanic 8% 29% 

The symmetry of this distribution is disturbing; it suggests equity issues 



73- 



Uther Hinofity Student Assignments &age 4 

wriicn go far Dei'ond compliance with Court-ordered assignment 
requireiTients. .Note that there is no suggestion nere that SLich 

assignments are not being made properTy'i but the fact remains that Asian 
students are talking fuller aavantage of tne Boston high schools which 
are college-orienteo! in clear contrast with Hispanic studentsi who are 
concentrated in the district and general high schools. 

Hispanic students are under-represented in those vocational 
programs which traditionally have led to good jobs without higher 
education. Of 521 students enrolled in full-tirfie vocational education 
programs (such as machine shop or carpentry, at district high schools), 
only S% are Hispanic, though 12% of hign school enrollment and 15% of 
K-12 enrollment is Hispanic. By contrast, 35% of the vocational prog^-am 
enrollment is white, compared with less tnan 30% of the overall high 
school enrollment, Asian stuaents are severely under-represented in 
vocational programs (1% of vocational enrollment but 7% of high school 
enrollment); many' are in the examination schools and many in bilingual 
programs. 

Mention was made, above, of the low; proportion of Hispanic students 
in Boston high schools a few years ago, because of a strong drop-out 
rate. Information is provided, in the section of this Report on bilingual 
education monitoring, which suggests an encouraging improvement in the 
number and rate of students in bilingual programs who graduate from high 
school and who go on to higher education, often with scholarships. 
Without in any way detracting from what is a real and solid 
accomplishYTient, it is important to point out that these outcomes are 
distributed very differently among the language groups. 

In 1583 90 students graduated from hign school Spanish bilingual 
p r o g r a w s :! B r i g h t o n , J a m a i c a Plain, Dorchester, S o u t h B o s ton, 
Charlestown, English, Madison Pari-;:.) and 136 from Chinese (Charlestown,', 
Vietnamese (Brighton) and Lao (English High) bilingual prograrris," the 
Khmer or Cambodian programi at South Boston is expected to graduate 



-74- 



other Minority Student Assignments page 5 

students in 15'S4. Of tne former group, SI plan to go on to higher 
education? and among them they won 33 scholarship awards! of the latter 
group, 114 plan to go on to higher education, and they won 94 awards. 
There is no question that this represents solid progress, but the 
discrepancy between the two groups (and note that riiany of the Asian 
students are recent refugees!* shows how seriously Hispanic students are 
lagging behind. 

The grade 9-12 enrollment of the Spanish bilingual programs 
mentioned is 600 (November 19S3); the proportion of 1933 graduates is 
15%. The grade 9-12 enrollment of the Chinese, Vietnamese and Lao 
programs is 374, and the proportion of graduates is 37%, This suggests, 
by the way, that the gratifyingly-high number of students graduating 
from bilingual programis is m part a one-time phenomenon reflecting a 
skewed age-profile among Vietnamsse and Chinese high school students, 
with more students graduating in each case last year than are m the 
entering freshman classes this year. 

Of Hispanic graduates, S8% are planning to go on to higher 
education, compared with 83% of the Asian graduates! there was roughly 
one scholarship award for every three Hispanic graduates end two for 
every three Asian graduates. 



SUMMARY 

It is clear that Hispanic students on the one hand and Chinese and 
Vietnamese students on the other are deriving very different benefits 
from the Boston schools. Many factors beyond the control of educators 
contribuie to the heartening success of Chinese and Vietnamiese high 
school students, as illustrated oy their reoresentation in the examination 
schools and by their high school graduation and scholarship award 
records. 



■75- 



other Minority Student Assignments page S 

Hispanic students do not fare so well in the Boston schoolsi and it 
is legitimate to ask whether factors over which educators do have 
control are contributing to these unev/en outcomes. 

Without having available direct information on drop-out rates, it is 
disturbing to note that overall Hispanic enrollment (both in and out of 
bilingual programsi this November is 354 in the ninth grade, 245 in the 
tenth, 251 in the eleventh, and 151 in the twelth. 

It would be appropriate to review the educational opportunities - 
and outcomes - for Hispanic students who zre not enrolled in TBE 
programs, and to ask whether the programs and services available could 
challenge and support them more effectively. 

Charles L. Glenn, Director 

November 1 933 



-76- 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDLJCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



AriBlyEis of Fall 1583 EnroriiTisnts: White Enrollment Patterns 



In aEsesEing deEegregation progress in Boston, one of the rriajor diffiizulties is 
caused by the constant changes in the overall enrollment of the school systerfi and 
in the rf;al::eijp of its commLimty districts. The steady decline in the nLtmbet" of 
white students, the increase and then leveling-off in the nLrmber of Black 
students, and the recent sharp rise in the number of Hispanic and Asian stLidents 
have made Boston a \'ery different school systern today than when the Student 
AssignTnent Plan was ordered, in 1975. 

The emphasis of this section of the Report is on some of the patterns of 
enrolrment change in the Boston public schools, with particular stress on the 
distribution of white students geographically, historically, and between public and 
non-public schools in Boston. Its purpose is to begin to create a context for 
Bssessment of the extent to which the Boston Public Schools are now a "unitary 
school system" in which the vestiges of illegal segregation have been elirninated; 
needless to say, no such assessment will be ventured at this prelifninary stage. 



Changes l^SQ - 1983 

When the Massachusetts Racial Imbalance Law was enacted, in 1 9S5, the 
enrollment of the Boston Public Schools was 74.3% white and 25.7% "non-white". 
"Non-white" corresponded generally to those students who are now designated 
"Black", though it appears that some of the small Chinese and Hispanic enrollment 
was reported as "non-white" and some as "white". 

In 1950 the white proportion was 83.6% and the non-white IS. 4%, so that the 
change frorri 1350 to 1955 was 1.85 percentage points a year, the combination of 
Black enrollment increases (largely through in-migration) and white enrollirfient 



•77- 



White Enrollment .Analysis page 2 

declines as a result of suburbamzation and the aging of the white population of 
Boston's neighborhoods. 

If the racial proportions had continued to change at the savfie rate, Boston's 
1 9S3 enrollment would be 59.2% non-uihite and 40. S% white in 1983. In facti of 
course, the demography of the city changed in ways which would not have been 
predicted in 1965. The sharp decline in white birthrate statewide and even 
nation^iide, the slowing of Elacl; in-migration and the decline in birthrate among 
Blacks, and the strong in-rriigration of Hispanic and (more recently) of Chinese, 
Vietnamese, Cambodian and Lao famiilies have produced a school enrollment which 
must be described in three categories, none of which is in the majority. The 
enrollment November 3rd 1 983 was 48.4% Black, 28.2% white, and 23.5% "other 
minority". 

\In any discussion of recent enrollment changes, it is important to tai;e note 
of the impact of dropping the first year of kindergarten effective September 1932. 
Since - as we will see below - white enrollment is 3S% lower in first grade than it 
is in kindergarten systerffwide, as a result primarily of the transfer of students to 
parochial schools which do not offer kindergarten, the drastic decline in 
kindergarten enrolTment in 1932 had disproportionate impact on white enrollment 
totals. The analyses which follow are not affected by the 1 9S2 abbreviation of 
kindergarten^ 



The Growth of Hispanic Enrollment 

It seems likely that Hispanic enrollment will continue to represent a larger 
share of the whole over the years ahead, while Asian enrollment will depend for 
the ne::;t few years on the flow of refugees, many of whom are of school age when 
they arrive. This is suggested by a 1980 survey by the Boston Redevelopment 
Authority, which found that 17% of the Hispanic population was below the age of 
5, compared with 11% of the Black population, and 5% of the Asian and white 
populations. The growth of Hispanic population has been especially strong in 
certain neighborhoods; 



78- 



White Enronrfisnt Analysis page 3 



Hispanics as % of populatTon 

East Boston 

South Enc 

A 1 Is t on/Br ight on 

Jamaica Pla in/Pa r|::er Hill 

Roxbury 

North Dorchester 

South Dorchester 

Mattapan 



1970 



1977 



1 930 



1 .6% 


1% 


3% 


7.2% 


13% 


14% 


2.9% 


3% 


4% 


S.5% 


16% 


25% 


S.5% 


6% 


9% 


4% 


9% 


13% 


1.3% 


6% 


4% 


2.8% 


1% 


6% 



Despite these significant changes, Boston is not nearly as heavily Hispanic as 
3re several other Massachusetts school systems, with 16% Hispamc enrollment 
lornpared with 41% in Lawrence, 36% in Chelsea, 35% in Holyoke, and 23% in 
Bpnngfield. 



State-wide Trends 



The Boston enrollment trends are comparable, though in an exaggerated form, 
to those occuring state-wide.' 



1S74 



1978 



•lance 1974-1981 



White 


1,101,033 


383,291 


844,378 


ii I- .'C- 


Black 


59,202 


61 ,422 


57,673 


- 2.5' 


Hispanic 


27,750 


31,508 


35,488 


■*■ 28% 


Asian 


5,937 


S,217 


1 1 ,9S9 


+ 102% 



The continuing movement of wihite famiilies with school-aged children to 
suburban communities and of minority families new to Massachusetts to" Boston 
and other cities exaggerates the statewide trends in Boston's enrollment, 

Between 1978 and 1981 wihite enrollment in the Boston Public Schols declned by 
26.3%. Over the samie period, white enrollment in school systems wihich we"e not 
desegregating also declined substantially. For example, white nrollment in Quincy 
declined by 20.4%, that in Medford by 23.2%, that in Newton by 19%, that in 



•79- 



White EnrolVment AnaTysis page 4 

Lexington by 1S%. White enrolTment in Chicago, which was not desegregating over 
this period, oeclined by 2S.5%. 



Changes 1975 - 1 9S0 by Boston District 

In October 1 9S1 Mr, Coakley prepared an analysis of racial changes between 
1975 and 1980 in each o+ twenty-four geographical areas which he identified. 
Over this period white enrollment declined from 47% to 35% of the systerri, Blacl^ 
enrollment increased from 41% to 46%, Hispanic enrollment from 9% to 14%, and 
Asian enrollment fromi 3% to 5%. 

Mr. Coakley's data reflect residential enrollment, the number of students 
living in each geographical area and attending Boston public schools, whether or 
not they attend "district" schools. This helpful form of analysis rnalies it 
possible to identify the neighborhoods which have experienced the most dramatic 
change in either the number or the percent of students in each racial group. 

White enrollment declined by 12,398 or 34% in this period. In three areas the 
decline was substantially heavier, 50% or 51% over five years: Mattapan, 

Mattapan/Hyde Park, and tJorth Dorchester (Franislin Field to Fields Corner). As 
we will see below, these are areas wnere many schools have experienced 
especially heavy white enrollment loss from 1378 to 1983, indicating that the 
pattern of the earlier period is continuing. 

Although these three areas experienced particularly strong white enrollment 
decline, there was no section of the city which did not lose white enrollment. As 
Mr, Coakley points out, "Although District VIII \East Boston> was least affected 
by the Court Orders on student desegregation, it lost 1097 student residents, 
representing a 21% decline which was second only to District Ill's residential 
decline of 22%". This is a helpful remiinder that population trends ujhich have 
nothing to do with desegregation are an important factor in white enrollment 
decline. 



■80- 



White Erirollment Analysis page 5 

District VIII had 3 high overall enrollrfient loss because it has few minority 
students, and thus does not benefit frorri the rrnnority enrollment increases wrnch 
partially offset white enrollment declines in District IV' (Mattapan and Hyde Park) 
and District V (Dorchester). The Black enrollment gain in the transitional 
Mattapan/Hyde Pari; area was 17S%, or 1077 students, while white enrollment 
dropped by 8S5 students. In the Codman Square/Lower Mills section of 

Dorchester, Black enrollment increased by 529 (43%), partially offsetting the 
white enrollment declines noted above in other sections of Dorchester- 
Black enrollment in the public schools declined by 2% over these f^ive years! 
since white enrollment declined even more rapidly. Black enrollment became a 
larger proportion of overall enrollment. Substantial increases in the two areas 
mentioned were more than offset by a 25% (573 students) decline in Black: 
enrollment from the Mission Hill area (District I), a 13% (537 students) decline in 
the Mattapan North/Franklin Field area (III), a 43% (395 students) decrease in 
Columbia Point (VI) as a result of the depopulation of the housing development, 
and a 10% (333 students) decrease in the Lower Ro.xbury/South End area (VII). 

Asian enrollment increased by 45%, concentrated largely in Allston (I) (188 
students or 32%), Brighton (I) (139 students or 133%), Mission Hill/Fenway (I) (210 
students or 67%), and Chinatown (VII) (209 students or 37%.; Asian enrollment did 
not increase significantly (43 students or 6%) in the South End. Note, by the way, 
that these figures do not reflect the very recent growth in Asian enrollment 
through the resettlement of refugees. 

Hispanic enrollment increased by 23%, with strong increases in Mission Hill (I) 
200 students or 14%), Egleston Square (ID (433 students or 35%), Jamaica Plain 
West (II) (220 students or 27%), North Dorchester (V) (533 students or 44%), Dudley 
Street (VI) (2S3 students or 23%), and the South End (VII) (242 students or 20%). 
Hispanic enrollment declined in Columbia Point (VI) and there was a sharp though 
numerically slight decline in Hispanic students resident in South Boston (from 33 
students in 1975 to 7 students in 1930), perhaps as a result of the harrassment 
which some Hispanic families experienced in public housing there. 



•8L 



White EnrolTrnent AnBlVEis page 6 



Certain of the areas identified by Mr. Coakley are dintinctively white, others 
racially rriijted, while yet others are predominantly Black; only one of the 
twenty-four was more than half Asian (North End/Back Bay/Chinatown was 4S% 
Asian in 1975 and S5% Asian in 1 9S0) and none was more than half Hispanic. 
Following is a brief characterization of the areas in 1930, based upon their public 
school enrollments: 



I Allston 
Brighton 
Mission Hill 

II Egleston Square 
Forest H/Roslindale 
Jamaica Plain West 

III Roslindale 
Mattapan/Roslindale 
West Ro>;bury 

IV Mattapan/Hyde Park 
Hyde Park South 
Mattapan 

V Dorchester East 
Dorchester South 
Dorchester North 

V I R o X bur y / Dorchester 
South Boston 
Columbia Point 
Dorchester Avenue 

VII North End/Chinatown 
South End/Roxbury 
Charlestown 

VIII East Boston (E) 
East Boston (W) 



white (41%) and Asian (36%) 
predominantly (68%) white 
Blacio (45%) and Hispanic (38%) 
Black (67%) and Hispanic (24%) 
predominantly (68%) white 
white (49%:i and Hispanic (41%) 
predominantly (83%) white 
predominantly (86%) Black 
predominantly (94%) white 
Black (64%) and white (33%) 
predominantly (94%) white 
predominantly (90%) Black 
preacmmantly (94%) white 
Black (50%) and white (41%) 
predominantly (74%) Black 
Black (62%) and Hispanic (33%) 
predominantly (98%) white 
predominantly (81%) Black 
predominantly (31%) white 
Asian (65%) and white (29%) 
Black (56%) and Hispanic (23%) 
predominantly (96%) white 
predominantly (89%) white 
predominantly (93%) white 



Nine of the 24 areas identified by Mr, Coakley are racially-mixed, eleven are 
predominantly white, and four are predominantly Black:. 



•82- 



White Enronment Analysis page 7 

A few of these areas experienced substantial racial change over the period 
1375-1930. Allston's white enrollment dropped substantially while its Asian 
enrollment increased! the same thing happened in Brighton. Mission Hill's Elacl< 
enrollment dropped and its Hispanic enrollment increased. White enrollment 
dropped and Hispanic enrollment increased in Jamaica Plain west of the Corridor. 
As already noted, white enrollment was replaced with Black in the Hyde 
Park/Mattapan area (so that some now refer to northern Hyde Park as "Mattapan 
West). Black: enrollment decreased relative to Hispanic in the section of Ro>;bury 
and Dorchester along Dudley Street, and also in the South End. White enrollment 
decreased and Asian increased in the downtown area (North End, Back Bay, 
Chinatown, Bay Village). 



Distribution of Students among Schools 

Early racial balance efforts were designed in general to increase the Black 
enrollment in predominantly white schools, primarily through parent-initiated 
"controlled transfer" and through construction of new schools (such as the Lee, 
the Marshall, the Holland, and the Hennigan in areas where, it was projected, they 
would be able to draw both minority and white students on a walk-in basis). 
Transportation costs for voluntary transfers and construction costs for schools 
which would contribute to racial balance were provided extra financial support by 
the Commonwealth 

In a 1971 Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity analysis of Boston 
enrollments, it was found that most white students attended schools wihich were 
over 90% white, and most "non-white" (generally, Black) students attended school 
which were over S0% non-w^hite. One indication of the extent of desegregation i 
the shift of white students away from heavily-white schools: 
School % White 1971 White Students 1 9S3 

0-10% 447 fO, 7%) 200 (1%) 

10.1-20% 393(0.6%) 2929(19%) 

20.1-30% 1,277(2.0%) 5416(34%) 

30.1-40% 1,501(2.3%) 1771(11%) 



'S 



■83- 



White Enrollment Analysis page 3 

40.1 - 50% 2,432 (3.9%) 899 (.&%) 

50,1 - S0% 1,855(2.9%) 816 (5%) 

60,1 -70% 3,081 (4.8%) 2043(13%) 

70,1-80% 2,763(4,3%) 222 (1%) 

80,1-90% 11,843(18.5%) 861 (5%) 

90,1-100% 37,698(59.5%) 488 (3%) 

Todsy there are only s few public schools which are predominantly white! thus 
Boston schools are far more desegregated than they were a decade ago. Only 3% 
of the white students in Boston public schools attend schools which are over 90%. 
white! only 11% attend schools (all in East Boston) which are over 70% white! most 
vjhite students in Boston attended such schools in 1973, as do most white students 
who attend non-public schools in Boston today. The majority of white students 
(about 7,500 of 14,000 grades 1-12) in the public schools attend schools which srs 
less than 30% white. 

As we will see below, the non-public schools in Boston continue to reflect the 
racial pattern characteristic of the public schools in 1971, with 63%- of non-public 
schools 90% or more white. 

A major part of the current desegregation tasl; is to assign and retain a 
sufficient number of white students at schools which are predominantly minority 
to provide a racially-integrated education for all students and to prevent racially 
identifiable schools. 

Other sections of this report deal in depth with the program supports needed 
to provide a satisfactory educational experience for minority students at several 
predominantly-white schools: East Boston High (69% white), Boston Latin School 
(60% white), Boston Latin Academy (51% white). Yet others deal with recruitment 
efforts for particular "special desegregation" schools with heavily minority 
enrollments, with city-wide magnet schools, and vjith other aspects of 
assignments for desegregation. The present section steps bacli to look broadly 
at where white students are distributed among schools in Boston, including nearly 



•84- 



White Enron-ment AnalysTS page 9 

sixty non-public Echools which report their enrollrrientE to the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. 

Please note that this is not a discussion of where Boston-resident students 
go to school; it does not include nearly three thousand minority students who 
attend suburban schools under the Metco program, nor does it include Boston 
residents who attend public or private schools outside of Boston under individual 
arrangemients. The Boston School Department reported, in 1932, that 25,S2S 
students resident in the city attended non-public schoolsl this figure would 
include such schools located outside of Boston and also a few non-public schools 
located in Boston which do not make a voluntary enrollment report to the state. 
We will be concerned with students attending schools which are located in Boston, 
wherever those students may live. 



Public and Non-public schools 

There were more than 34,000 white students attending school through grade 12 
in Boston in 1 9S2-83; of these, 16,975 (49%) attended the Boston Public Schools. 
Another 17,324 attended 59 non-public schools located in Boston which reported 
their enrollments to the Massachusetts Depart-ment of Education, 

These 34,000 students made up 43% of all the students attending schools in 
Boston, with 30,516 Black students representing 39%, 9,925 Hispanic students 
representing 13%, and 4,500 "other minority" (mostly Asian) students representing 
6% of all students attending schools in Boston. 

As these figures suggest, Boston has an unusually high proportion of its 
resident school-age children in non-public schools. Statewide- in 1982, 12.4% of 
school-age children attended non-public schools! m such cities as Springfield 
(20%) and Worcester (17.5%i the proportion rose substantially higher. Boston's 
rate of non-public school attendance was the highest, at 29%. 



•85- 



White EnrolTment AnalysiE page 10 



In general, the piiblic schoolE in Boston <*iere much more 1-l::e1y than non-public 
schools to reflect the city-wide racial proportions. There were 1 OS public 
schools (Sl% of the total of public schools) which enrolled between 10% and 69% 
white students, corripared with si;-; non-public schools (11% of the total of 
non-public schools). 

Nearly half (45%) of the white students attended two public and thirty-sev.'en 
non-public schools which were at least 50% white. Six non-public schools 

reported enrollment 100% white, while 21 reported enrolling no Black students. At 
the other extreme, two public and six non-public schools reported less than 10% 
white enrolliTient, with three of the non-public schools reporting no white students. 

There were a number of exceptions to the clustering of non-public schools at 
the ends of the continuum of racial proportions, schools which are desegregated 
by the standards with which public schools are judged. 

Cathedral High School in the South End, for example, was 13% white, within the 
11-15% range required of neighboring public schools in District VII. Other 
schools with the same white proportion were the Tobin, the Quincy (a near 
neighbor), and Dorchester High School, Eight public schools were 11% or 12% 
white, and nine were 14% or 15% white. 34 public schools were between 10% and 
19% white. 

Parkside School in Jamaica Plain was 25% white, as were the public Edison and 
Wheatley Middle Schools. Altogether, 38 public schools were between 20%. and 29% 
white. 

Three other Jamaica Plain non-public schools - Blessed Sacrament (5S%), Our 
Lady of Lourdes (57%.) and Holy Childhood (58%i - were clearly desegregated, and 
in the same range as several desegregated public schools; the Clap (South 
Boston), the Bates (Roslindale), the Kilmer (West Roxbury), the Lyndon (West 
Roxbury), and the Perry and Tynan (South Boston), 



-86- 



White EnrolTment Analysis page 11 

Shaw Prep in the Back Bay was 48% white, exactly the same as the McCormack 
Middle School in Columbia Point, Dorchester, The Advent School on Beacon Hill 
was 70% white, exactly the same as East Boston High School counting its magnet 
programs. 

As noted above, 45% of the white students attending schools located in Boston 
are in schools at least 30% whitel another 12% attend schools between 70% and 
S9% white. By the definition in Massachusetts state law, then, 57% of the 
students attend "racially isolated" schools (more than 70% white). Only eight 
public schools compared with forty-seven non-public schools fall into this 
category. 

Only two public schools (and six non-public schools) are more than 90% 
minority! this contrasts with the years prior to desegregation, when 30 public 
schools in Boston were more than 90% miinority. 



It is important to note that some three thousand minority students are being 
educated in non-public schools in Boston, a numiber equivalent to that in the 
urban/suburban Metco Program, but without state financial support. Several 
schools serve significant numbers of Black students: St. Patrick's (353), 
Cathedral High (250), Parkside (223), St. Matthew's (204), St. Angela's (195), St. 
Gregory's (ISl), St. Joseph's (141), We have no enrollment figures from Berea 
School (Adventist), which is predominantly Black, and there may well be others. 

Hispanic students are less commonly served by non-public schools, with Our 
Lady of Lourdes (60) and St- Patricia's (49) serving the greatest number, followed 
by Cathedral High (39) and Blessed Sacrament (31). This is curious, given the 
heavy reliance of earlier predominantly Catholic immigrant groups on parochial 
schools, but it IS a pattern common around the country, as is the use, by many 
non-Catholic Elacic families, of parochial schools. Of Blacic students attending 
any school in Boston (which reported its enrollment), 7% attended non-public 
schools, as contrasted with 51% of white students. 4% of Hispanic students and 
5% of "other minority" students attended reporting non-public schools. 



-87- 



White Enrollment AnalVEis page 12 



ParliEide School is affiliated with the Asseimblies of God! the other schools 
cited as serving fairly large numbers of minority students are Roman Catholic. 



What conclusions can we draw from this brief overview of the distribution of 
white students in Boston? 

(1) The great majority (99 of 113) of public schools in Boston are clustered in 
the range froin 10% to A3% white, within twenty percentage points of the 29% white 
which represents the public school's overall enrollment. This is a very 
substantial contribution of the desegregation efforts over recent yearsi by 
contrast with 1971, when the majority of white students attended schools over 
30% white, and the riiaiority of Elaci-: students attended schools over S0%- Blaci<. 

(2) The majority (3S of 59) of non-public schools reporting their enrolTments 
were more than 90% white, and 45% of the white students in Boston schools 
attended these 36 non-public schools or three public schools, all in East Boston, 
in the sarfie enrollment range. Put another way, almost all of the rnost heavily 
wihite schools were non-public. 

(3) At the other e;;trerfie, six of the eight schools with very heavy minority 
proportions were non-public. These and other non-public schools educated some 
three thousand minority students. 

(4) A few non-public- schools are as desegregated as equivalent Boston 
schools! four of the seven are in Jamiaica Plain, two are downtown, and one is in 
the South End. Four are Romian Catholic, one Assemblies of God and one 
Episcopalian. 

The chart which follows presents white enrollment figures for schools in each 
percentage range, with the number of public and non-public schools in each. 



•88- 



White Enrollrfient Analysis page 13 

Public Schools Non-Public Schools 

2 6 

34 1 

35 1 
15 
12 1 

1 3 


2 5 
4 5 
2 37 



Note the Ermilarity to the chart of the distribution of white enrollment in the 
public schools in 1971. 



% Whi 


10% 


# of White Students 


0% - 


219 (<1%) 


11% - 


20% 


2137 (6%) 


21% - 


30% 


5353 sl5%) 


31% - 


40% 


2655 (3%) 


41% - 


50% 


1594 (5%) 


51% - 


60% 


1386 (4%.) 


£1% - 


70% 


1588 (5%.t 


71 % - 


30% 


1993 (S%) 


SI % - 


90% 


2071 (6%) 


90% - 


1 00% 


15272 (45%) 



Declining White Enrollment 



A constant concern of those following Boston desegregation is the decline m 
white enrollment over recent years. This decline cannot be attributed entirely to 
desegregation, since it was already talking place rapidly before implementation of 
the first desegregation plan, as a result of declining births, an aging residential 
population, and the post-war tendency of young families to settle in suburban 
communitieE. The white enrollment of the Worcester public schools, for example? 
declined by 22% from 1978 to 1982, and the state-wide public school white 
enrollment by 20%. This trend must be kept in 'mind when assessing the white 
enrollment decline at individual Boston schools. 

Despite these cautions, it seems valid to note that iMhite enrollment decline 
has not affected all Boson public schools equally, and to take the rate of such 
decline as at least one indicator of whether a school is in difficulties with 
respect to parental perceptions, at the very least. Continually assigning new 

-89- 



White Enrollment AnalysiE page 14 

white students to a Echool rnust prove ineffective for desegregation if their 
parents will not enroll or keep them there. 

There are wide variations among Boston schools in the rate of white 
enrollrfient decline from 1978 to 1 S83. Some of these variations depend, of 
course, on whether the neighborhoods from which a school draws is undergoing 
rapid racial change or a dynamic housing market with young white families moving 
in. Magnet schools are affected if fewer students are assigned for some reason, 
even if there were m/ore than enough applicants to maintain enrollment. In some 
cases the movement of programs in or out of schools can have a significant 
effect. 

For these reasons, and others, the figures presented below should be tal;:en as 
a preliminary scanning of data which may indicate areas of strength and 
weakness, rather than as a sophisticated diagnosis of what may have taken place 
at different schools. The primary use of this data will be to identify schools 
which may have been unusually successful in attracting and retaining white 
students. 

Two measures are used. One is the rate and scale of wihite enrollment change 
from 1978 to 1983, exclusive of kindergarten! this data is subject to the 
distorting factors mentioned above. The other is the rate of "shrinkage" of the 
white enrollmient assigned in May 1983, as compared wnth enrollments in November 
1983. Note that the latter is subject to distortion by the additional assignments 
made by the Department of Implementation as new students register over the 
Summer and Fall, and by the wiell-known phenomenon of white Idndergarten 
students continuing on to first grade in parochial schools which do not offer 
Inndergarten. 

There are 25 public schools in Boston which lost half or more of their white 

enrollment between 1973 and 1983," this includes si;: elementary and three middle 

schools located in predominantly white areas." the Eliot (-71%) and Michelangelo 

Middle in the North End, the Kenney (-70%) and O'Hearn (-66%) in Dorchester, the 

Beethoven and the Shaw Middle in West Roxbury, the Irving Middle in Roslindale, 

-90- 



White Enronment Analy'EiE. page 15 

the Clap in South Boston and the AgasEiz in Jamaica Plain. In these cases we 
may assume that the areas surrounding the schools are either changing in age 
profile or sending more students to non-public schools. 

Eight magnet schools lost half or more of their white enrollment, including the 
Jackson-Mann (-63%), Haley, J.Curley, Ohrenberger, McKay and Trotter elementary 
schools, the King Middle School, and English High School! with the e>;ception of the 
two last, it IS likely that there were more white applicants than were admitted 
each year, so that the enrollment decline must be the result of a policy decision 
not to assign as many students, while remaining within the permitted ranges for 
wihite enrollment, as most of these schools have done each year. 

The other eight schools with a loss of at least half of their white enrollment 
are located in Black or racially transitional areas: the Marshall (-53%), Sarah 
Greenwood, and Taylor elementary schools in Dorchester and the Fuller in Jamaica 
Plain, and the Wilson (-S2%), Thompson, Cleveland, and Holmes middle schools in 
Dorchester, In the case of these schools we may assume that the geocodes from 
which they draw white students are either racially changing themselves, changing 
in the age profile of the population, or sending miore students to non-public 
schools, 

Qf the seventeen non-magnet schools which lost half or more of their white 
enrollment, seven are in District V, three in III, twio each in II, IV and VII, and one 
IS in District VI, None of them is in districts I or VIII, though Brighton High lost 
47% of its white enrollment in the five-year period. 

On the other hand, one must note that white first grade enrollment is actually 
higher than wihite kindergarten enrollment in District VIII (East Boston), the one 
section of the city where district elementary schools have not been desegregated. 

The percent decline in white enrollment doesn't tell the wihole story, of 

course! it is also useful to look at the schools wihich have lost the largest number 

of white students since 197S, Citywide, the white enrollment decline in grades 

1-12 has been 7,527, or 35% of the white enrollment in 197S, for an average 

-91- 



White Enronrnent Analysis page 16 

decline of 7% a year (compar-e with the 5.5% annual decline in Worcester, and 5% 
annual decline statewide from 1978 to 1982). The following schools have the 
largest decline in the number of white students over the period 1978 to 1983: 
School District # White Decline % White Decline 

English High IX 514 58% 

Madison Park High IX 468 49% 

Boston Technical High IX 312 53% 

Irving Middle School III 212 50% 

King Middle School IX 1 94 63% 

East Boston High VII 185 21% 

Jackson Mann Elementary IX 183 63% 



White Enrollrnent Gain 

Turning to the fifteen schools which have experienced no white enrollment loss 
in the period 1978-83, and thus have actually gamed relative to citywide and" 
statewide (indeed, nationwide) trends, we find that five of them are in District VI, 
four in I. twio in V, and one each in II, III, VII and VIII. None is in District IV, 
Hyde Park-Mattapan. 

The unquestioned leader is the Higginson, which increased white enrollment by 
173% through a conscious effort of recruitment in its assigned geocodes. Also in 
a Black area is the Winthrop, which increased white enrollment by 65%. In 1973 or 
1979 the Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity made supplementary Chapter 
636 funds available on a competitive basis to carry out special recruitment 
projects for schools which needed to improve their desegregation, and the 
Higginson and Winthrop i«iere two of the schools awarded grants. Whether the 
grants helped, or the eagerness to compete for them indicated qualities of 
initiative u.ihich have directly impacted upon white enrollment, both of these 
schools stand out for their ability to attract wihite students into non-magnet end 
older school buildings. 



92- 



White Enrollment Analys-is page 17 

The Toton'E white enronment increased by 2S%| this is an instance of an 
apparent improvement caused by a program change, the addition in 1 SS2-S3 oi 
middle school grades, currently enrolling twenty white students. 

A fourth school in a predominantly minority area is the Emerson, the only one 
of this group of 15 designated by the Court as a "special desegregation school". 
The Emerson has exactly level white enrollment with 1978. In the report on 
special desegregation schools discusses the Emerson in some detail. 

The Dever is located in Columbia Point, a predoTrnnantly-rrnnority public 
housing development with a declining residential population; its white enrollment 
has increased by 20%. The Fifield, in Dorchester, is the school to which some 
white parents insisted upon sending their children, in 1971, rather than to the 
newily-opened Lee School, When the School Committee reversed its earlier 

commitments to the Board of Education and allowied the Lee to open racially 
segregated, the legal controversies began wihich led the Board of Education and 
eventually the Federal District Court to require implementation of a 
comprehensive desegregation plan. The neighborhood has now become 

substantially Blacl;, and it is interesting to note that the Fifield is ones again 
proving popular with white students! 

The Farragut School has always been considered to be in a "Black" 
neighborhood because of its Roxbury address and the proximity of Mission Hill 
Housing Development, but in fact the school is nearer to the Harvard Medical area 
and a considerable amount of new and expensive housing. The school would seem 
to have good long-term prospects as a desegregated school! at present only 14 of 
its 45 white students receive transportation to the school. 

These eight schools in predominantly minority areas have held even or 
increased their white enrollments since 1973! so have seven schools in 
predominantly v*ihite areas; the Gardner and Winship f+39%) in Brighton, the 
Perlnns and Condon in South Boston, the Alighieri in East Boston (+46%), the Kent 
in Charlestown (+33%), and the Lyndon-in West Roxbury (+79%). 

-93- 



White Enronment AnalysiE page 13 

The figureE for District VI (Roxbury/South Boston) are especially interesting. 
As noted above, five schools in this district have shoiAin strong white enrollment 
trends. South Boston continues to provide affordable housing for young families; 
IS it possible that their children are returning to the public schools as a result of 
a gradual easing of the tensions created by desegregation? If so, the relative 
ease with which the Emerson School retains the white students assigned to it (see 
the report on special desegregation schools) compared with the Lee (District III) 
or the P.A.Shaw (District IV) may reflect a greater acceptance of desegregated 
public schools than in West Ro::;bury or Hyde Park. On the other hand, it may 
simply reflect a greater ability, in the latter communities, to afford non-public 
schooling. School closings have had their impact as well, of course. Whatever 
the reasons, the five District VI schools enroll 85 more white students in grades 
1-5 than they did in 1 97S. 



"No Show" Assignments 

In the discussion of "special desegregation schools" the problem of white 
student assignments which do not result in i.vhite enrollment is discussed with 
respect to four elementary schools for which the Court has ordered special 
efforts to achieve desegregation requirements. Historically rriany Boston parents 
- most of them white - have sent their children to public schools for kindergarten 
and then on to parochial schools for first grade. Since the students have been 
registered for kindergarten, they are assigned to first grade places which in fact 
they never fill. When assignments are made, in April, it appears that 

considerable desegregation progress will be made, but these hopes are 
disappointed when hundreds of white children fail to appear for first grade in the 
Fall. 

The phenomenon does not affect all districts and all schools equally, and 

indeed the loss of students is partially offset by others who register for the first 

time in the Fall, so that ten elementary schools - including several in 

predominantly minority neighborhoods - actually enroll more wihite students than 

wer& projected last Spring. System-wide at the elementary level (exclusive of 

-94- 



White EnrDllinrient Analysis page IS 

kindergarten) the white enrollment this November was 14% below the enrollment 
projected last April, but some schools have much higher rates of loss. 

The Chittick in the racially-transitional area between Hyde Park: and 
Mattapan lost 69% of its assigned white students this Fall; the kindergarten 
enrolls three times as many white students as the first grade. The Marshall lost 
56% of its assigned white students, and the Ellis (a special desegregation school) 
lost 51%. The Lee, another special desegregation school, lost 38%, as did the 
Lyndon in West Roxbury; close behind were the Hemenway in Southern Hyde Park: 
(37%), the Kenney (35%), the Mason (34%) and the P.A.Shaw (33%) - another special 
desegregation school - in Dorchester, the Beethoven (32%) in West Roxbury, the 
Blackstone Square (31%) in the South End, the Channing (31%) in Hyde Park, and 
the Winship (30%) in Brighton. It is clear that attrition of assigned white 
students is a problem in many parts of the city. 

There are variations on this theme, however. By comparing the white 

enrollment in kindergarten and in first grade for each of the nine districts it is 
possible to identify the areas in which the greatest "shrinkage" occurs. In 
District III (most of the u.ihite students live in West Roxbury and Roslindale), there 
are 61% fewer wihite students in first grade than in kindergarten. In District I 
(Allston/Brighton), the drop is 59%, in District IV (Hyde Park) it is 53%. and in 
District V (Dorchester) it is 52%, In District VI (South Boston), by contrast, the 
drop is only 20%, and in District II (Jamaica Plain) it is 29%^, 

In District I and District III the number of white first graders "discharged" to 
non-public schools is 18% higher than the numjber attending public schools, and in 
District V the number is 14% higher! it seems likely that this understates the 
preponderance of non-public school enrollment among white students in these 
districts. In District VI, by contrast, the number of white students discharged to 
non-public schools in first grade is 30% lou.ier than the number attending public 
schools. 

While the pattern of white students leaving public schools after kindergarten 
is discouraging from a desegregation perspective, it also represents an 

-95- 



White Enrollment Analysis page 20 

opportunity for outreach and persuasion. Parents who have placed their children 
in a public school kindergarten should be given every opportunity to understand 
what the schools can offer in the elementary grades and beyond. Needless to 
say, this "recruitment" can be successful only if public school representatives are 
clear about what it is that they offer, not only academically but in terms of 
school climate, values, and commitment to the development of each child. There 
is abundant evidence that parents choose non-public schools for their children for 
Tfiany reasons other than concern about racial integration. 

Withdrawing children at the end of kindergarten is a pattern of long standing, 
only exacerbated by desegregation. Can any special desegregation strategy hope 
to attract an increased proportion of the white students who would otherwise 
attend non-public schools'^' In Chicago and other communities the desegregation 
effort has made explicit attempts to recruit frorfi local non-public schools, and it 
IS possible to imagine such an effort occurring in Boston. If it did, it would have 
to take into account recent research on the reasons which lead parents to select 
between public and non-public schools. 

According to a major study released recently (July 13S3) by the United States 
Department of Education ( Private Elementary and Secondary Educaticm j, parents 
transferring their children from public to non-pubhc schools cite three reasons 
with roughly equal frequency; academic standards, discipline, and religious 
instruction; the primary reasons given for transfers the other way were cost and 
convenience. This suggests that public schools have not been as effective at 
articulating clearly what it is that they have to offer in terms of educational 
quality, school climate, and the teaching of moral values as have non-public 
schools. Last year's community-wide survey in Springfield and several of the 
Gallup Polls on education have pointed to discipline and moral values as the most 
serious perceived lacks in trie public schools. These elusive questions of school 
climate and focus are very close to the heart of successful special desegregation 
measures, and surely much more so than are specialised program offerings. 



■96- 



White Enrollment Analysis page 21 
IMPLICATIONS 

(1) The pattern of racial change in Boston is one of long standing, and a 
school system most of whose students are members of minority groups could have 
t^een predicted on the basis of the changes which occurred between 1 9bU and 1355. 
The present racial mal<e-up of the systemi has also been affected by the more 
recent settlement of thousands of Hispanic and Asian families in Boston in recent 
years, and by the dramatic decline m white birth-rate in the 1960's. 

(2) Certain sections of the city have been experiencing rapid racial change 
since implemientation of the student desegregation plan, as reflected in public 
school enrollment. Most strildng has been the decrease in white enrollrrient and 
increase in Black enrollment from the Hyde Park/Mattapan area. In 
Allston/Brighton and in the downtown area white enrollment has dropped and Asian 
enrollment increased. In Mission Hill, along Dudley Street in Roxbury/North 
Dorchester, and in the South End Black enrollment decreased and Hispanic 
enrolrment increased. In Jamaica Plain Hispanic enrollment grew while white 
enrollment declined. 

(3) The distribution of white students among public schools in Boston has 
changed radically since desegregation, with most (64%) white students noui 
attending schools which are between 10% and 40% white, contrasted with 1971, 
when 78% of white students attended schools which were miore than 30%- white. A 
very substantial degree of desegregation of the public schools has been achieved. 

(4) Non-public schools are much more racially-identifiable than are public 
schools in Boston, with nearly two-thirds of non-public schools over 90% white. 
Slightly more than half of the white students attending schools located m Boston 
attend non-public schools. Thousands of white students in Boston continue to 
attend schools which are almost entirely white - out this is true of only a few of 
the white students attending public schools. 

(5) Some non-public schools in Boston are thoroughly desegregated, and 
about three thousand minority students are educated in non-public schools. 

-97- 



White Enronment AnalyEiE page 22 



(6) Declining white enronrnent has affected some public Echools with 
particular severity, while others ha\/e remained stable or even increased their 
white enrollment. Some of each category are located in white neighborhoods and 
in minority neighborhoodsi and it is apparent that demographic change is only one 
of the factors which affect enrollment levels. <The ne;;t Report will seel; to 
identify other factors. > 

(7) Magnet schools have been especially hard-hit by white enrollment declines 
over the past five years, and it is suggested that the policy implications require 
careful consideration in view of the preference of many minority and white 
parents alilie for these schools. ■ 

(8) The famiiliar Boston phenomienon of white students enrolled for 
kindergarten but talien out of public school for first grade inhibits desegregation 
compliance in many parts of the city, but particularly in Districts I 
(Allston/Brighton), III (West Roxburyi, IV (Hyde Parki and V (Dorchester). It 
should be a priority to reach the parents of such children with a convincing 
message of what the public schools can offer! this will require clarity of purpose 
and philosophy, sound instruction, and positive school climate, and the ability and 
recources to communicate these qualities. 

Charles L. Glenn, Director 
December 19S3 



■98- 



Staff 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



MANDATE 



The deseareqation of faculty and administrative staff shall 
be implemented accordinq to the standards contained in the 
orders of Julv 31, 1974: January 28, 1975; the amended Order 
of Auqust 30, 1975; the Order of February 24, 1976, the 
Special Order of July 7, 1977: the Further Order of July 5, 
1978; the Modification of January 27, 1981; the Conditional 
Order of June 2, 1981; and the Bench Order of July 9, 1981. 



PROCESS 

The followinq documents from the School Department were 
analyzed: Report on Faculty Recruitinq and Hirinq, October 
15, 1983; Memorandum on Cateqory I Administrators of 
November 2, 1983; and a subsequent computer print-out of 
all actinq appointments; the "appointments" section of min- 
utes of the Boston School Committee; a computer print-out 
of all teachinq assiqnments and credentials in the School 
Department (as of October, 1983) ; and miscellaneous other 
documents. Monitors interviewed the Deputy Superintendent 
and the Director and staff of the Office of Personnel and 
Labor Relations, and met with the staff and members of the 
City-wide Parent Council (CPC) . 

OBJECTIVE 

1. To determine whether the 20% Black requirement for 
teaching and administrative positions continues to 
be met. 



QUESTION: It was reported to the Court in July, 198 3, that 
as of March, 1983, the 20% Black requirement was 
being met for teaching positions and both cate- 
gories of administrative positions. 



Is this requirement still being met? 



FINDINGS 



In March, 1983, the percentage of Black teachers in Boston 
was 20.46; by October, 1983, that percentage had fallen 
slightly to 20.30. Since the total number of teachers in 
Boston is declining (from 4,096 to f.085 in this reporting 



-99- 



period) , and since the turnover is relatively slight 
(137 people left the teaching force; 126 were newly 
hired into it), this decline is not remarkable; Boston 
is working within very narrow limits, and three or 
four people can affect the percentages. But since 
Boston is skating very close to the edge of the 20% 
figure, any decline is cause for concern. 

It should be noted that Boston is still rehiring teachers 
previously laid off and on the recall roster. Once that 
roster is exhausted, the Court's requirements that Boston 
make its best efforts to raise the number of Black teachers 
to 25% comes into effect again. This requirement will be 
monitored during the next reporting period. 

Of the 55 Black teachers who left the teaching force be- 
tween March and October 1983, 2 5 were promoted to adminis- 
trative positions. As a result, the percentage of minority 
administrators in Category I (headmasters and principals) 
has increased slightly. The percentage of minority head- 
masters and principals in acting positions, however, is still 
almost four times greater than that of non-minority. 

PRINCIPALS AND HEADMASTERS 



ACTINq 



PERMANENT 



TOTAL 



White 



4 (5%) 



87 (95%) 



92 (100%) 



Minority 6 (19%) 



25 (81%) 



31 (100%) 



TOTAL 



11 (9%) 



112 (91%) 



123 (100%) 



Source: Boston Public Schools 11/2/83 

Since reports on Category II administrators were not re- 
quired by the Court until January of each year, the analy- 
sis of data on all administrators other than headmasters 
and principals is not included in this report but will be 
included in the July, 1984, Monitoring Report. 



-100- 



QUESTION: Are acting administrative appointments being 
used to circumvent this requirement? 

FINDINGS 

It is already clear that the desegregation of the 
administrative staff in both categories cannot be 
considered separately from Boston's use of acting 
rather than permanent appointments. Leaving aside 
entirely the question of intentionality , the use of 
acting appointments is having the effect of barring 
parents (and others) from participating in the selec- 
tion of administrators, and is probably decreasing 
the chances of minority candidates to be hired or 
promoted. There are presently 343 administrators in 
Boston serving in an acting capacity, out of a total 
of 710. Furthermore, since the number of new acting 
appointments had been and continues to be in excess 
of the number of new permanent appointments, the 
"backlog" of acting appointments has increased each 
year. 



OBJECTIVE 

2. To determine whether the required procedure for 
administrative ratings has been followed in all 
cases. 



QUESTION: How many ratings have been conducted during 
this monitoring period? 



FINDINGS 

The number of permanent appointments remains small be- 
cause Boston has been unable or unwilling to use the 
promotional rating process ordered by the Court for all 
permanent administrative appointments. During this re- 
porting period, only seven promotional ratings have been 
scheduled, and only two completed. 



-101- 



QUESTION: How full and effective has parent participation 
in this procedure been? 



FINDINGS 

Not only have few promotional ratings been scheduled, 
but there have been problems with parent participa- 
tion, with the definition of those jobs that are ex- 
empt from the process, and with acting appointments 
made after and i ndependently of a promotional rat- 
ing. Parents have reported and documented: (a) in- 
convenient scheduling, (b) short notice, and (c) in- 
sufficient preparation for interviewing. In one 
instance, members of the promotional rating team 
were given assigned questions by the Chairman just 
before the interview. In another, a parent received 
a mailgram on a Saturday requesting her presence at 
an interview the following Thursday. In at least 
two other cases, recommendations of rating teams 
have been apparently ignored and acting appoint- 
ments made, leaving team members frustrated over 
wasted time and effort. 



QUESTION: What positions are exempt from the rating 
procedure? 



FINDINGS 

At the monitor's request, Boston has clarified its 
understanding of the positions exempted by the Court 
from the promotional rating process, and this 
clarification has been found acceptable. 

There have been attempts by the School Department to 

streamline the promotional rating system in order 

to deal with the backlog of acting promotions. Nothing 

has come of these attempts to d=^+-e although they still 

continue. 



-102- 



OBJECTIVE 

3. To assess the affirmative action efforts of the 
School Department to reach the goal of 25% Black 
teachers and administrators. 



STATUS 

It was reported to the Court in July, 1983, that the 
School Department had made no effort to meet this re- 
quirement because it was still filling vacancies from 
the recall list, as specifically allowed by the Court. 
This Situation still holds. 



OBJECTIVE 

4. To assess the best efforts of the School Department 

to increase the percentage of other minority teachers 
and administrators system-wide. 



QUESTION: It was reported to the Court in July, 1983, 

that there was a slight increase in the over- 
all percentage of other minorities. 

Have these percentages increased in this 
monitoring period? 



FINDINGS 

In March, 1983, the percentage of other minority teachers 
was 8.25, an increase of one percent from the previous 
hear. In October, 1983, the percentage increased slightly 
again to 8.54. This percentage represents an increase in 
the actual number of other minority teachers of eleven 
(from 338 to 349) . 



QUESTION; If there has been an increase, how is it spread 

among various programs and categories of positions? 



FINDINGS 

Other minority teachers are now somewhat less concentrated 
than previously in bilingual programs; the percentages in 
regular, vocational, and special education programs increased 
slightly (less than 15%) while the percentage of bilingual pro- 
grams decreased slightly (less than 3%). Tho porcontagu of 
other minority headmasters and principals, however, remains 
very low (2.44). -103- 



QUESTION: What affirmative action and recruitment activ- 
ities have taken place? 



STATUS 

Affirmative action and recruitment activities will 
be monitored during the next reporting period. 



OBJECTIVE 

5. To determine whether the School Department is in com- 
pliance with state certification laws and regulations, 
particularly with reference to minority teachers whose 
certifications were waived by the Court. 

This objective was not previously monitored 



FINDINGS 

The monitor's analysis of the certification data supplied 
by Boston shows that 95.9% of all Boston teachers are ap- 
propriately certified for the function to which they are 
officially assigned. Of the remaining teachers, 2.9% (or 
122) are or will be covered by waivers granted by the Depart- 
ment, .2% (or 7) are exempted by the Court, and 1.0% (42) 
are currently under certification review by Boston's Personnel 
Office and will be reported on in the next monitoring report. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. The decrease in the percent of black teachers, even 
though it remains within the limits set by the Court, 
and even though Boston is still recalling teachers, 
should be reversed as soon as possible by aggressive 
recruiting and the implementation of the recently adop- 
ted affirmative action plan. 

2. The percentage of other minority teachers and adminis- 
trators should be increased through the same means. 

3. The number of "acting" administrative appointments must be 
drastically reduced in a manner consistent with the pro- 
motional rating process 



-104- 



In order to meet this recommendation, either the pro- 
motional rating process will have to be modified, with the 
approval of the Court; or a major high priority adminis- 
trative effort must be undertaken by the School Depart- 
ment; or both. Any proposed modification to the process 
must guarantee the participation of parents and teachers, 
ensure racially balanced screening committees, and be 
less unwieldy. (See Finding #2 above.) At the very 
least and as evidence of good faith, the School Depart- 
ment should establish immediately a schedule of ratings 
for all positions currently filled on an acting basis. 



-105- 



TI-IE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDAV\/HITE 

October 14, 1983 

Dr. Robert R. Spillane 
Boston School Corntiittee 
26 Court Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Decur Dr. Spillane: 

The United States District Court in its Order on Faculty Recruiting and 
Hiring, issued on January 28, 1 975, requires that the City Defendants be- 
ginning on April 15th of each year and on the 15th day of each successive 
month through October 15th shall file with the Court and with all parties a 
report detailing: 

. a. The projected nuniber of teaching vacancies in various categories; 
.b. The projected number of permanent and provisional teachers to be hired; 

c. A suiraiary'of "applications~and interviev? activity of black applicants; 

d. The number and race of permanent and provisioriol teachers hired or 
r^ired. 

In its July 5, 1978 Memorandum and Further Orders on Faculty Recruiting and 
Hiring, the United States District Court also ordered that the reports due March 
15 and October 15 shall include tables shai^ing: 

i. The number and percentages of white, black and otiier minority' teachers 
in regular, special and bilingual education for the current year and 
the previous three (3) years; 

ii. The number of black, \*iite and other minority first, second and third 
year provisicnals currently eirplcyed and provisionals hired for a 
fourth year; 

iii. The number of ne-;ly hired provisional teachers for the current year and 

the previous three (3) ^ears subdivided by subject areas to viiich assigned. 

iv. The number of newly appointed permanent teachers for the current year and 
the previous three (3) years subdivided by subject areas to uhich assigned. 

Enclosed here.-jith for your processing is the information required by the Court 
for October 15, 1983. 

Very truly yours, 

I^a~^Vhrte, lianager 

HVnilh 
enclosLires 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTO.N, MASSACHUSfTrS 02'.0i- ■/2-.:-GeK>: E.I 5&:0 A?l-\ b:7 

-105- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 

October 14, 1983 



MEMORANDUM 

To: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent of Schools 
From: Ida White3V' 

Re: October 15, 1983 Court Report 

After reviewing the percentages of Black teachers being reported 
in the Court Report, I feel that it is necessary to provide you with 
some explanation for the slight decrease (.16%) from the March figure 
(20.46%) to the October figure (20.30%). 

In the aggregate, we are down 11 teachers in the total teaching 
force and 9 in the Black teachers category. The major factors which 
contributed to the_ reduction of Black teachers are as follows: 

(1) 25 teachers who were counted in the March 
Report were promoted to administrative 
positions. 

(2) 17 teachers who had provisional contracts 
in 1982-1983 have not been rehired because 
they are not available, have refused assign- 
ment, are uncertified, were unsatisfactory, 
or failed to re-register. 

(3) 1? permanent teachers left the system as a 
result of terminations — resignations, retirements, 
etc. 

(4) 1 permanent teacher took a leave of absence. 

-The net impact on the Black teacher count is 55. One additional 
factor which contributed to the reduction in the Black percentage is the 
fact that no layoffs took place for this school year. 

My staff is confident that with new hires and the filling of 
vacancies, we will be able to surpass the March, 1983 percentage. 



26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 021C3* 726-66'00 Ext. J>600 AREA 517 

-106- 



REPORT ON FACULTY RECRUITING AND HIRING 
OCTOBER 15^ 1983 

Projected Number of Teaching Vacancies in Various Categories 

The projected number of teaching vacancies as of October 1983 is 
as follows: 



Elementary Schools 


2 


Middle Schools 


*11 


High Schools 


** 7 


Bilingual Schools 


*** 9 


Special Education 


***.*14.5 


Vocational Education 


***** 3 


Total: 


4 6.5 



♦Includes three (3) Mathematics; Two (2) General 
Science; two (2) English; one (1) Spanish; 
two (2) French; one (1) Performing Arts 

**Includes five (5) Mathematics; one (1) English; 
one (1) Music/ Vocal 

***Includes three (3) Cape Verdean; one (1) Chinese; 
one (1) Spanish; one (1) English as a Second 
Language; one-half {h) Laotian/Hmong; one-half {h) 
Spanish/Portuguese; tv/o (2) Laotian ' 

**** Includes one and one-half (H) Resource Room; 

three (3) L.A.B.; one (1) S.A.R. ; One (1) L.D. ; 
one (1) Speech & Language; two (2) Vision Resources; 
one (l)Bilingual Early Childhood; one (1) Bilingual 
Speech & Language; one (1) YES Alternative Program; 
two (2) Career Instructional Managers 

*****Includes one (1) Culinary Arts-Chef; one (1) Data 
Processing; one (1) Automotive Repair 

B. Projected Numbers of Permanent and Provisional Teachers to be Hired 

At the present time the vacancies listed above are being filled by 
permanent teachers from the recall list or teachers who have been 
recruited through the efforts of the Office of Recruitment and 
Evaluation. 

C. Summary of Applications and Interview Activity of Black Applicants 
Attached hereto as Appendix A. 



-107- 



L''^-- -"•"" ; - or REHIRED 

PERMANENT TEACHERS HIRED 

■SPANISH ASIAN OTHER 

BLACK 17HITE SURNAME AMERICAN MINORITY TOTAL 

"7" 



\ 

\ 



•108- 



PROVISIONAL TEACHERS HIRED 



ELEMENTARY 
MIDDLE 
HIGH 

BILINGUAL 
SPECIAL ED, 



BLACK 


WHITE 


OTHER 


MINORITY 


TOTAL 


41 


5 


3 




49 


19 


1 







20 


36 


21 


10 




67 


34 


11 


85 




130 


31 


56 


20 




107 



TOTAL PROV. 



161 



9^ 



118 



373 



-109- 



'TEMPORARY TEACHERS HIRED 



BLACK WHITE OTHER MINORITY TOTAL 



LEMENTARY 


1 








1 


IDDLE 


5 


2 





7 


IGH 


1 


2 


2 


5 


1 LINGUAL 


1 


5i 


3 


9^ 


P. EDUCATION 


3 


1 


3 


7 


OTAL TEMPS 


n 


lOi 


8 


29 i 



no- 



TOTAL TEACHERS HIRED 





BLACK 


WHITE 


OTHER MINORITY 


TOTAL 


ELEMENTARY 


k2 


5 


3 


50 


MIDDLE 


2k 


3 





27 


HIGH 


yj 


23 


12 


72 


BILINGUAL 


35 


I6i 


88 


139 


SPECIAL EDUCATION 


3^ 


57 


23 


nii 



TOTAL 



172 



1041 



126 



A02i 



-m 



L 






J CO 






CM 









eo 



crt 



in 

eo 



to 

< = 

o < 



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» CO 
1 c\ 



o 



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in 

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o 



^ i 



r 

V cs 

CO 






o 

CM 



i CO 












n 



o 



n 



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o 

• 

o 






5 i 



o 

CM 
C^ 
CM 



cn 

CM 



o 

cri 

CM 



2 I 



Si 



sjcsup^aj, 



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o 
o 






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o 



To 

O 



o 
o 






< 

1 in 

CO . 

o 






I CM 



in 



in 

in 



cr> 



m 

CO 



in 



in 

CM 
CM 



CM 



in 
in 



CM 



J 2 

< o 

O M 
O £-< 
.2 < 
M U 

M a 
a a 



sJisup=aj, 
. >P^Te 



CM 
O 



SJCoUpeSi 



5X I 



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CM 

n 



CO 



.o> 



CM 

o 



in 



in 



CM 

in 



vo 



VO 






n 



CM 

r- 



O 
O 



CM 



vo 

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CM 



in 



cr> 

CM 



o 
n 



n 

CO 



CO 

U 

A. 

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vo 
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° 1 



vo 

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(3 
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G) 

5 



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2 

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J M 
< f^ 
h-i < 

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& Q 
to 10 






vo 
vo 



m 

vo 






m 
vo 



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5 !. 



J "^ 



CM 
VO 



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o 



vo 



- .1 






I CM 
I CM 



VO 
CM 



C7> 
CM 



vo 5 ,>. 



CM 



cr» 



en 



12 



tn 
vo 



°: I 

CO • 

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en 









CM 
CM 



vo 
vo 



vo 



o 
o 



vo 



vo 



vo 



o 

00 

vo 



CO 






vo 
vo 



CO 

o 



CM 



o 
o 



CO 
o 



o 
o 



r*fM 

CO 



o 
o 



r. I .? Tl-.^i 



CO 



o 



susupsai 

JSIRO 



< 

2 

O 

M 

< 

O 
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> 



2 

O 

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Q 



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SJcaqo^ax 



vo 



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CM 






in 
m 



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CM 



CM 
CM 



CO 



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saaip=3i 



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CO 



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ro 



TTT 



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VO i CTt 



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vo 



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CM 
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CM 



CO 



o 

CO 



CO 

in 
ro 



o 
o 



ro 



00 

CM 



VO 
VO 

in 



-r4- 
vo 



CM 
CO 
CM 
CM 



cn 



vo 



O 

o 



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n ^ 



:= I 



C 



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ro 



vo 
oo 



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-fS- 






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ro CTi 

CM 

-vo. 



VD O 

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<D 






00 



eo 

VD 

in 



in 
in 



-CM. 



CM 

o 

CM 



vo 



vo 



in 
CO 

00 
CM 



O 
O 



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ro 
vo 

CM 



o 
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in 



CO 
CM 



vo 
in 



00 

in 
o 

CM 



ro 



vo 



CM 

OO 

•vo 

CM 



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o 



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o 



c 



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to 



en 



en rt 



CM 

00 



I 

o 



c 
o 
u 



^ J3 

• 5 



tn 
grllZco 



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I 

CM 



a 


TT 


tr> 


00 


B 


€J\ 


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1 


o 


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en 

C) 

c 
a 
u 



YEAR (PERHANEHT) PROVISIONALS 



ltl^l%l • • I •*\^* y «^W\«VI1t>> flll(\b/ r^*%Lf I UUtVll.' 



BLACK 



V/HITE 



OTHER MINORITY 



FIRST 


53 


.hh 


29 


SECOND 


57 


2k 


ks 


TH 1 RD 


16 


ii 


20 


FOURTH 


35 


15 


20 



TOTAL 

126 
130 

70 



161 



Bh 



118 



373 



•113- 



XJ.X jiijn r x\v/ V .L >j jL '^11 f\ jj m.r\Lij j->.t xj-ir>i.\ i ^ mj u i ^i ^ci_/ oi 

1980-81 1981-82 1982-83 



.EMENTARY 



B 3 % 5 

\1 

O 2 

T 3 % 7 

ZCONDARY 

B 23 9 

W 2 0. 

_2_ JD_ _1_ 

iT 27 10 

^ • ■ 

B 1 1 

-V7 do 

.0 



1983-84 . 


TOTAL 


PERCENT 
BY AREA 


12 


20% 


71.94 


4 


4 


14.03 


2 


4 


14.03 


18 


28% 


100.00 


20. 


52 


82.54 


6- 


• 8 


12.70 





3 


. 4.76 


26 


63 


100.00 



T ' ■■■ Q~:r. TjO -t: 1 ' 1 100.00 
3MS ECONOMICS 

B 5 0.0 5 100.00 

W 

O 



T 5 0-5 100.00 

:;dustrial arts 

B 1 0.1 100.00 

W 

o o' .0 



T ,0 1 1 100.00 
3CATI0NAL ED 

B 18 6 

W 10 1 

O 8_ 3 

T 36 _ii4_10 7 53 100.00 



1 


25 


47.16 


3' 


14 


26.42 


3 


14 


26.42 



NEVJ iilRES (continued) 



• 
• 


1980-81 


1981-32 


1982-83" 


1983-84 


TOTAL 


PERCENT 
BY AREA 


■;sic 


2 











2 




B 


66.67 


W 











1 - 


1 


33.33 


O 

T 



2 










0^ 
1 



3 




100.00 


lYSICAL ED. • 


3 


1 


1 





5 




B 


83.33 


W 


- 














r • ■*.' - 





1 











1 


16.67 


T 


•4 


1 


1 





6 


100.00 


n;DED 


7 


4 








n 




3 


57.89 


V7 


5 











5 


26.32 





3 











3 


15.79 


T 


15' ' " 


"4 ~ 





•0 


19 


100.00 


ULT ED. 

















• 


B 




W 





. 













3 



















r 



















3LISH L.2i^3GUAGE 






% 








;^;tsr 






V 






•• • 


3 








p 










•7 


1 











1 


100.00 


D 



















[* 


1 











1 


100.00 



-115- 



■IHCtVi nxnCJ vl,wij uxnuoa; 



* . 








. -.: 




PERCENT 




1980-81 


1981-82 


1982-83 


1983-84 


TOTAL 


BY AREA 


'LINGUAL 














Ft 


12 


1 


8 


8 


29 


19;21 


W 


2 


1 


2 


5 


.1.0 


6.62 


o 


46 ' 


16^ 


29 


21 • 


112 


74.17 


-T 


60 


18^ 


39 


34 


151 


100.00 


FECIAL ED. 










* , 




B 


43 


2 


5 


11 


61 


43.26 


W 


14 


3 


11 


19. 


• 47 


33.33 


■O 


12 


7 


3 


11 


33 • 


23.41 


"T 


69 


12 


19 


41 


141 


100.00 


.^JVMD TOTALS 








■ 






-E 


116 


8^ 


36 


53 


213 


45.23 


K 


34 


4 


14 


44 


96 


20.34 





72 


23Ji 


38 

*- 


& 


162 


34.43 


T 


222 


36 


88 


126. 


472 


100.00 



Si 



-116- 



iv. . -NEWLY APPOINTED PERMANENT BLACK, WHITE, AND OTHER MINIQRITY TEACHRR .^ 

1980-1981 through 1983-1984 

PERCENT 
1982-83 1983-84 TOTAL BY AREA 



0.0 













• 


1980-81 


1981-82 


SECONDARY 






B 








W 

















T 








ART 






B 








W 

















T 








FUNDED 






B , 





o._ 


W 








o 








T 








.gra>;d 






TOTALS 






B 








W 

















T 



























































































b 







n?. 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RECRUITMENT AND EVALUATION UNIT 

VICTOR A. MclNNlS, Ed. D. 
SENIOR EVALUATION COORDINATOR 



JOSEPH F. CAREY 

Eva'jsiion Specialist 

UVAUGHN CHAPMAN 
Recruitment Spacial:st 



October 11, 1983 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Ida White, Manager 

Department of Personnel and Labor Relations 

FROM: Livaughn Chapman, Recruitment Specialist^^^v^j^ /ly 

SUBJECT: Recruitment Activities '-■(''' 

April 15, 1983 - September 15, 1983 



I, Interviewing and Counseling Activities 

a. The Recruitment Specialist of the Office of Recruitment and 
Evaluation interviewed and referred a combined total of nine 
hundred and twenty five (925) prospective minority and white 
candidates interested in working with the Boston Public 
Schools. These candidates were screened lui a lluilLed number 
of administrative, professional and teaching positions. Given 
the economic times many of the prospective employees were 
walk-ins and referrals. 

b. The recruiter interviewed and referred a combined total of 
forty five (45) minority candidates for non-professional 
positions with the School System. 

\' 

c. The Recruitment Specialist served as Counselor for black, white 
and other minorities relative to employment possibilities, pro- 
viding job referrals and job related counseling. 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02103 



• 720 6600 EXT 56 59 AREA 617 



- 2 - 






the Boston Public Schools, 
II • Recruitment Activitj as 
a. 



In an effort to meet the court mandate for hiring black and 

adve\\?^rifL"f''f'^' ^'^ recruiter vill con'tinue to 
general u.r.l? ^"^ "^tional newspapers, network, and in 
general use all recruitment tools necessarv tn <:«ov\i ^ ^ 
minority candidates to fill staff vacancS. '"^ ""' 



-119- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




TD: 
FROM: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 

Novariber 2, 1983 



MEMORANDUM 
Ida l-Jhite, Manager 
Jchn M. Conley 




SJBJECT: Category I Ac3nanistrators, (Heacannasters and Principals) 
by Level 

KLOi SCHOOL HEADMASTERS 





BLACK 


WHITE 


OTHER MINORITY 


TOTAL 


Perrranent 


4 


11 





15 


Acting 
Total 


3 
7 


2 
13 







5 

20 


Percent 


35.00% 


65.00% 

MIDDLE 


0% 

SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 




Permanent 


9 


11 


1 


21 


Acting 

Total 

Percent 


2 

11 

45.83% 


1 
12 

50.00% 

ELEf1E^!TAEY 




1 

4.17% 
SCHOOL PRINCIPALS 


3 
24 


Permanent 


10 


65 


1 


76 


Acting 
Total 



10 


2 

67 


1 
2 


3 

79 


Percent 


12.66% 


84.81% 


2.53% 






T 
23 


OTAL HEADMASTERS A\'D PRINCIPALS 




Permanent 


87 


2 


112 


Acting 
Total 


5 
28 


5 
92 


1 
3 


11 
123 


Percent 


22.76% 


74.80% 


2.44% 





26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. r/ASS^CHuS? T fb O^ICH* 72;". 6C>'' Em i.OiO A-lEA ot7 

-120- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

ROSEMARIEV ROSEN 

MEMORANDUM 



October 24, 198 3 



TO: Michael Betcher, General Counsel 

FROM: Rosemarie V. Rosen, Deputy Superintendent 

Finance and Administration 

SUBJECT: RATING AND SCREENING PROCESS 




I met with Jim Case recently as part of his regular 
review of staffing issues related to monitoring the court 
orders. He expressed some interest and restrained support 
■for our notion of streamlining the process. If we take the 
initiative, I think the State would be helpful. They would 
not serve as mediators, but I think they can see the deficiencies 
in the current process. Would you mention this to Henry and 
let me know what you both think. 



x.c: 



Ida \"Jhite 
Jim Case 



/ha 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTON t.';ASSACHL:SETTSC2T0S 

-121- 



r25tI;CJG Ea 1 ocvjO z-'-::--'! o ' 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RECRLMTMENT AND EVALUATION UNiT 

VICTOR A MclNNIS. Ed D 
SENIOR EVALUATION COORDINATOR 



JOSEPH F, CAREY 
Evaluation Specialist 



November 10, 1983 



LIVA'JGHN CHAPMAr; 
Pecruitment Specialist 



PROMOTIOHAL RATINGS 

Since July 1, 198 3 
(including those initially posted in June, 198 ^ 



Name of Position 

Occupational Development Specialist 
HHHORC (posted 6/10/83) 

Placement Specialist Ch. 74 
HHHORC (posted 6/10/83) 

Headmaster, English High School 
(posted 6/15/83) 



Program Director for Reading 



Project Director for Interagency 
Collaboration 

Project Director - Department of 
Student Support Services 

Educational Specialist /Horticultural 
- Phillis Wheatley School 



Status (as of November 10, 1983) 
Approved by School Committee 

Approved by School Committee 



Finalists' names sent to 
Superintendent for nomination 
of one to School Committee 

Candidates being interviewed by 
central screening committee 

Applications due 11/21/83 
Credentials due 11/30/83 

To be posted approximately 
on 11/14/83 

To be posted approximately 
on 11/15/83 



/,^/fSi^.^l_ 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6389 AREA 617 

-122- 



BQSTQr.i PUELIC SCHOni DEPT CARE R 
■55 "'Ew DUDLEY ST 
HOxiauwy MA 02119 2flAM 






a-05-5aa-^?3ni 10/28/83 ICS IPmmtzZ CSP BS^A 
6l7au2l35ri ^GM THMj ROXSURY MA bU 10-28 OUS^P EST 



^s Clarice o-ie^s 

U8 H4ZF|_TCiJ ST 
MATTaPAiw '--ft 02126 



PLE4SF BE DPESfKjT FOR THE SCREENINP COMMITTEE INTEPVIE^^ OF CANDIDATES 
FOP T^F POSITION! OF" PROGRAM DIRECTOR POR READING ON THURSDAY NOVEHBER 
3 1^583 AT lOAM IN THE DISTRICT 9 OFFICE. PLEASE CALL ME OR My 
ASSISTANT JiMES GARVIN IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ATTEND THIS MEETING ON 
THE SPECIFIED DAY OR TIME. 

SiN'CERELY, 

R0r,F9 9FATTIE 

16:55 EST 
rtGMCOMP 



-123- 



im 



1. Tvhat is your philosophy in counselling? How do you perceive your 
role? 



2. What do you see as the needs of the Cape Verdean students at 
Madison Park High School? 



3. How would you program and monitor a 16 year old, newly arrived Cape 
Verdean student v7ho has a 2nd grade level of education? 



4. What techniques or methods would you use to develop rapport with 
students? 



5. T-That outside resources would you use for Madison Park High School 
Cape Verdean students? (crisis intervention) 



6.. What would you immediately do to help a student: 
(a) Who is threatening suicide? 
<b) Who is pregnant? 
(c) Who is using drugs? 



7. What would you do to initiate and maintain communications with 
parents? 



WjV a/sL N' Kre sabi modi na Madison Park High bu ta pripara alumus 
'j,(A ^ Kabaverdianus pa un besita p'es bai ti Kabuverdi^ 

How would you prepare student for a summer trip to Cape Verde and 
V7hat would you do while visiting Cape Verde? 

(^'■^ 9. Are there any activities that you can think. of that would provide 
the Cape Verdean students with multi-Cultural experiences? 



124- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTER OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



Vv. :«.v; ,.y 



BOSTOM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF THu co^;^.rj,\iTY $ur5Ri,\rE,\D:;.-.T 



SCR£aTIZrS COMHIgTSg REGIS5HATICIT 



HAIffi 



ADDIGS 3 6> il'C^cA^ k^^-r^J 

H02.E PHCirS ITOLSg l ^^^ —Sj^^^ ' 

SCHOOI PHOZTE ITUT.S S ^h^Jcjjl "^ fC^^ -^ ^i:' 



125- 



T) 



JcP^ 






// 



1 






■'ZcJ ^JcL^ .^'yy-^.r^jJ 



y . 










/• 




y- 



/-/ 



i^/jayc'U^ /<:'■< x^- ^M/z^^. >-> -^//^ 



^/^, A(^^X^/ y^Zy /^:^>4b'^^/ ^^^ .-«/ c:'/^^'^^^'^- ■ 

V. y ' /' / ^ —7& ^ -^ ^ 

^=- — ^ y'2/^i/^^'/ y<:?^'c^'^.^~a^^ y^^'^^zj^ .•:^ 







^Z^ _y97-/^y^J -<;/?.^^?c^ ^^^^^ 



y..../y ^ / ^, ' v^y ., /^ / y y.yy 



'# 



?^' ; "y^'p^^c^^^^y J-A-i-^ .r/-/z^jL<^yCv^/^/^^'^ 






■U6- ■ 






THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



JOSEPH F. CAREY 
Evaluation Specialist 

LIVAUGHN CHAPMAN 
Recruitment Specialist 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RECRUITMENT AND EVALUATION UNIT 

VICTOR A MclNNIS. Ed D 
SENIOR EVALUATION COORDINATOR 



November 30, 1983 



Mr. James Case, Associate Commissioner 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock St. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear l^^^-GaseTH^ ^V J* 

In accordanc4/with your request, a sampling of letters sent by 
chairpersons of screening committees to organizations providing 
members is enclosed. 



I hope this information proves helpful. 



Sincerely, 



fictoT A. Mclnnis 
Unit Leader 



rt 



26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 

-127- 



726-6600 EXT 5649 AREA 617 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENT 

ROGER BEATTIE 

DISTRICT IX 



October 13 , J 983 



Mr. Thomas E. Clegg 
President, B.A.S.A.S. 
Blackstone School 
380 Shav/mut Avenue 
Boston, Mk. 021] 8 

Dear Mr. Cleg^: 

I am currently forming a screening committee to select finalists for the position 
of Program Director for Reading. According to Boston School Department guidelines for 
composition of this committee there must be two (2) B.A.S.A.S. members (1 blsck, 1 white) 
selected by B.A.S.A.S. o'' the committee. 

Therefoic, 1 an, requesting that yo'i forv.arc' the r:hove inforrrirllon to n.r \>y rriri.y, 
October 21, 1983. 



Thank you for your continued cooperation. 



Sincerely, 




J:>s^-/t^i 



Roger Beattie 
Community Superintendent 



RBrpmm 

c.c. Dr. Victor Mclnnis 
Mr. James Garvin 



t^-AD!3uM i'Arr, HIGH SCHUOL, i'l") fJFW DL'DLEV STRfET, BUILL^ING 1, tlQiHUHY, .MASo- 

-128- 



■■■ij-'r j-ri .A.-??A ri' 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

A 

BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE CO.MMUNITY SUP£RI^;TE^JDE^.■T 
DISTRICT IX 

October 14, 1983 



Tubal Padilla 

District IX Parent Coordinator 

59 Temple Place 

Boston, Ma. 02111 

Dear Mr. Padilla, 

I am currently forming a screening committee to select finalists for the 
position of Program Director for Reading. According to the Boston School Department 
guidelines for composition of the committee there mast be 3 parents (1 black, 1 white, 
1 other minority) who are members of the C-P.C. or D.P.C- selected by the C.P.C. on the 
committee. 

Therefore, I am requesting that you forward the above information to me by 
Friday, October 21, 1983. 

Thank you for your continued cooperation. 

Sincerely, 

Roger Beattie 
Community Superintendent 

RBrpmm 

c.c. Dr. Victor Mclnnis 
Mr. James Garvin 



-129- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston.Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



November 15, 198 3 



James H. Case 

Nan D. Stein 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



Dear Jim & Nan: 

Enclosed are copies of 
regarding screening committ 
of documentation. The firs 
quests for parents to serve 
to those requests. The sec 
phone requests for parental 
The third is a CPC memo to 
of all the screening commit 
this timetable. The fourth 
One is feedback from a pare 
meeting while the other is 



the corres 
ees . Thes 
t group CO 

on the sc 
ond set do 

part icipa 
the School 
tee meetin 

type of d 
nt who was 

the mailg 



pondences made to and fron the CPC 
e correspondences represent four types 
nsists of the School Department's re- 
re en in g committees and the CPC's replies 
cuments the School Departcent's tele- 
tion and the CPC's subsequent responses. 

Department requesting for a schedule 
g dates. We still have not received 
ocumentation was submitted by parents. 

unable to attend our October 24th 
ram we had discussed at the meeting. 



Nan, in response to your inquiry, the CPC was not notified of the screen- 
ings for the positions of Occupational Development Specialist and Placenent 
Specialist Ch . 74 at the H.H.H.O.R.C. According to Roger Beattie (District 
9 Community Superintendent), parents were called to re-screen the position 
of English High School Headmaster but only one parent attended and it was 
for a single resume review session. Moreover, upon speaking with a parent 
on the issue of the Program Director for Reading, it was indicated to Tne 
that the screenings for this position. has been suspended for unspecified 
reasons. As for the position of Project Director for Interagency Collabora- 
tion, a request has been made and I will be submitting the names soon. 

Also enclosed are two copies of the November 8, 1982 Agreement. The 
section pertaining to screening committees is now invalid. Due to a dispute. 
Judge Garrity ruled in June 1983 that the original orders on screening com- 
mittees be in force. 



A multi-cultural parents organization monitoring quality, desegregated education 

-130- 



-2- 



I hope this material wil] flc;c-!c:^ , 
:ional correspondences become avL-I^Kr" t" ^^^ >^eport. Should any addi- 

ecome available, I will again forward copies to you, 



gmd 
Enclosures 



Sincerely , 

Carol K. Ng 
Monitoring Assistant 



■131 



A- 




June 7, 1983 



James Stanton, Executive Director 
City Wide Parents Council 
59 Temple Place 
Boston, MA ■ 02111 

Dear Mr. Stanton: 

This is to inform you that in accordance with Personnel Circular 
No. 67 (enclosed) , there will be a Central Screening Committee for the 
Academic Administrative position of Program Director for Health and 
Physical Education. 

Please select three (3) parents, one (1) black, one (1) white and 
one (1) other minority, to serve on this Screening Committee, per Federal 
Requirements. 

Thank you very much for your cooperation in this regard. I will 
be in contact with you by telephone in the next few days concerning 
names, addresses and telephone numbers of your selections for this 
important task. As this will involve meetings during the early summer 
its important that I convey this to your selectees. 

Sincerely yours. 




Frank G. Power, Jr. 
Internal Advisor 




FGP:B 
End. 



•132- 




PERSONNEL CIRCULAR 




No. 67, 1982-1983 
May 27, 1983 - 



^-isiia^ 



PROMOTIONAL RATINGS 
PROGRAM DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To: Comnunity Superiiiwt^dents , Headmasters, Principals, and other Admin- 
istrative Heads 

HEADMASTERS, Principals, and other Administrative Heads are requested to 
keep on file a DATED CHECKLIST signed by all academic personnel under their 
jurisdiction as evidence that each has read this circular. 

As part of the reorganization of the Division of Curriciilum and Instruction 
approved by the School Committee, the position of Athletic Director posted 
in Personnel Circular #82, June 14, 1582 and #7, September 21, 1982, and not 
filled, has been redesigned. In addition, the position of Program Director 
for Health and Physical Education was created. 

Therefore, two professional positions are available immediately: 

PROGRAM DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Description : Reports to the Manager for Instructional Services and respons- 
ible for directing curriculum for Health and Physical Education K-12, includ- 
ing monitoring implementation through frequent, regular on-site visits and 
department workshops; measuring objectives and standards, evaluating student 
achievement; advising on selecting texts and other materials; disseminating 
information; participating in selection and evaluation of teachers; advising 
on staffing levels ; providing orientation and in-service training for teach- 
ers; in conjunction with Headmasters and Principals, evaluates Department 
Heads and programs for all schools. 



Qualifications 
Required: Education 



Master's degree plus 30 graduate semester 
hours. Within the Master's or supplementary 
to it, 9 semester hours in administration/ 
supervision 



Certification - 1. Teacher Certificate Options; 



Massachusetts Certificate ifUl (Special 
Subject Teacher - Health and Physical 
Education) (old certificate) 
-133- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston, Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



June 14, 1983 



Mr. Frank G. Power, Jr. 
Internal Advisor 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Powers: 

Thank you for contacting our office regarding the upcoming 
recornmencement of the screening process for the position of 
Director of Physcial Education. 

The names of 3 parents are as follows: 



Linda Tate 

41 Michigan Ave. 

Dorchester, MA 02124 

Sonia Toledo 
P.O. Box 1029 
Roxbury Crossing, MA 

Mary Jane Lavrakas 
101 Robinwood Ave. 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 



Black 

436-0097 

Cleveland, Dorchester High 

Hispanic 
445-0061 

Garfield Elementary 

White 

522-6221 

J.F. Kennedy Elementary 



Please provide these parents with adequate meeting notification 
and information. Feel free to contact our office for further in- 
formation. 



■I 




/jv 



■<Jim Stanton 
Executive Director 



134- 



- 3 - 



No. 67, 1982-1983 
May 27, 1983 



ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

Description: Reports to the Program Director for Health and Physical Educa- 
tion and responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating intramural 
and inter-scholastic sports programs for 22 middle schools and 17 high 
schools. Duties include training and evaluating coaches; scheduling games; 
selecting game sites; coordinating players' transportation; purchasing 
uniforms and eqxiipment; arranging for officials, doctors, and security and 
evaluating and improving extra-curricular sports programs, K-12. 



QUALIFICATIONS 
Required : 



Preferred: 



1. Bachelor's Degree 

2. Minimum of 3 years supervising athletics at 
a secondary or college level 

3. Coaching, administering and/or officiating 

in an athletic program involving multi-ethnic 
youth 

4. Demonstrated ability in building talent, 
strong teams , parental and local community 
support, and pride in competitive play 

5. Commitment to provide Equal Opportunity in 
varsity sports for both boys and girls. 

1. Demonstrated ability to involve large nxmibers 
of students in athletics 



Terms: 



2. Evidence of success in advocating athletic 
programs for youth by involvement in fund 
raising and related public relations with 
the media, and business and community leaders. 

Managerial position. Class 7, 12 months; Salar;/ $32,400 
$36,300 (consistent with Management Titles and Compensa- 
tion Plan) 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES: 



Forward to the Recruitment and Evaluation Unit, 26 Court Street, 
Boston, MA 02108 (726-6600, Ext. 5649) immediately, or no later 
than June 14,1983, a letter of application and resume. 

a. State name, home address and telephone nximber, business 
address and telephone number. 

-135- 



B 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



June 21, 1983 

Mr. Frank Power 
Internal Advisor 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr Power: 

I am wrii-ing to respond to your request for an individual 
to serve on the non-academic screening committee for the Fall 
Sports Program Coaching positons. Your request called for an 
individual (preferably a parent) with experience, through his/ 
her child's participation, in school sports. 

I am pleased to say that the person identified accomodates 
your request: 

Lillian Overshown 
60 Kendall Street 
Boston, MA 02118 

Please be in touch with me if I can be of further assistance 
to you. 

Sincerely, 

Jim Stanton 
Executive Director 

/jv 



■136- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePIace Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



DEPARTMENT DF FTKT.D SPKCTAT.T.STF; 



July 2.0, 1983 



Dr. Robert S. Peterkin 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 
26 Court Street 
Boston MA 02108 



Dear Dr. Peterkin: 



In response to your request for a parent to serve on 
the screening committee for positions related to the office 
of Planning and Engineering, I have been able to recruit a 
parent from the Tobin School in District One to work 
with your group. 

The personal data you will need to get in touch 
with her is: 



Name: 
Address : 
City/State 
Contact : 



Pamela Goncalves ^ 

365 Massachusetts Avenue 

Boston MA 02115 

work: 266-8604 

home: 536-3099 



Just a suggestion, Mrs. Goncalves works as you can. see. 
In district 8 , there was a need for a parent to get time off 
for a committee that was meeting in the daytime, so the 
Community Superintendent made contact with the irector of 
one of the parent participants place of work, and was able 
to get the parent release time, which did not affect the 
parent's vacation, sick or personal time. You may want to 
assist Mrs. Goncalves in this way. 



-137- 
A mt ilti.ctiltural rwrents oroanization monitorina auaiitv. deseoreoated education 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



TO: 

FROM: 
RE: 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 



November 7, 1983 



it -J 



c^-' i^^.^ 



■ z 



h-^ 



l^ 



T- 



Rosemarie V. Rosen, Deputy Superintendent/ (O- ^^-^ 
Finance and Administration 






.^J^ 



Ida White, Manager 
Acting Appointments 



■■^'\ ,.^* l.l^'' 



rr^ 



As of November 2, 1983, there are a total of A36 positions in the 
School Department that are filled on an acting basis. Acting 
positions are distributed by central division and bargaining unit 
as follows: 



Division 



BTU 



BASAS 



MGRL 



65 



207 



16A 



TOTAL 



Curriculum & Instruction 


3 


/' 17 


33 


53 


Finance & Administration 





3 


46 


49 


School Operations 


62 


187 


30 


279 


Superintendent 






53 


53 


School Committee 






2 


2 



^JO 



Distributed by location: 



School 

District 

Central 



BTU 



BASAS 



MGRL 



TOTAL 



23 


•176 


5 


212 


8 




10 


18 


34 


31 


149 


214 



•138- 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTOM, MASSACHUSETTS C2108* 726-66CX) Ext 56M AREA CI 7 



Ms. Evalena Higginbottom 
Page Two 
October 6, 1983 



Superintendent Wood, the Court made explicit what had been 
inplicit all along and expressly exempted, inter alia, five 
Senior Management Officer positions from the screening process. 
In 1982, the "Tregor Bill" attempted to strengthen the 
management of the school system by repealing the 1978 statute 
prescribing specific numbers and titles of senior school 
officers. It was thought that the Superintendent and School 
Committee, and not the City Council and Legislature, ought to 
determine which administrative configuration best suited the 
needs of the school system. 

' "The r979' amendment " to' the Administrator DesegFeg'atiofTOrSer 
exempted ten senior officer or "cabinet" positions: two deputy 
superintendents, five senior management officers and three 
managers. Since 1979, various senior officer positions have 
been abolished or converted to non-cabinet level positions. 
Superintendent Spillane presently has six "unrated" senior 
staff: the three deputy superintendents, the Director of 
Education and Employment, the Senior Officer for Implementation 
and, and arguably, the General Counsel. (As noted above, the 
Senior Officer for Equal Opportunity has been appointed pursuant 
to rating) . The restoration of the senior officer in charge of 
special education as a cabinet-level, exempt position is well 
within the scope of the exemptions authorized by the 
Administrator Desegregation Order. 

Very truly yours, 



Michael J. Betcher 
General Counsel 



KJH/ctm 

cc: School Committee Members 
Superintendent 



139- 





The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

October 27, 1983 



Rosemary Rosen, Deputy Superintendent 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Rosemary: 

There has been some confusion about which positions are exempt 
from rating and screening. Could you please give us the title of 
those positions which the Boston Public Schools are now defining as 
exempt, and the names of the people who currently hold those positions 



7 



We will need this infomation and the information which we requested 
in our previous letter (October 5, 1983) by November 7th. If, by any 
chance, you have the information ready by Wednesday November 2, 1983, 
please let Ida ^Thite know, as we will be meeting with her at 11 a.m. 



Sincerely, 




'/CU^ 



James H. Case 
Associate Commissioner 

.n 
Civil Rights Specialist ^ , ^'p 

/l 
Enclosures /«^ \ JO"! ., t^ 









\(^\f^i\ i-'-i 










.rl^' 









140- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

ROSEMARIE V. ROSEN 

October 24, 1983 



Mr James H. Case 

Associate Commissioner 

Massachusetts Department of Education 

1335 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Jim: 

This is to bring you up-to-date on our rating and screening 
activities. 

Enclosed is the listing of acting positions and my memorandum 
to the other Deputies of July 1983. Summer activities of pre- 
paring for the opening of schools - teacher assignment pools - 
and training sessions for principals and headmasters - intervened 
before we v/snt any further in the preparation of our schedule. 
Also, the enclosed listing was difficult for the Deputies to use 
since it was not clearly organized by location of position and 
it includes some of the positions in the high school administra- 
tive structure which cannot be rated until we continue negotiations 
with the appropriate union. 

We are preparing an updated list organized by major department 
area. This list will be reviewed by the Deputies for recommendation 
on scheduling. In compiling a schedule, we will give priority to 
positions filled the longest on an acting basis and those v;hich, 
lacking permanent appointments, are creating the most serious service 
problems . 

I expect to have the schedule set by the end of November and \>7ill 
keep you posted. 



Sincerely, 





^osemarie V. Rosen 
Deputy Superintendent 
Finance and Administration 



em 
enclosures 



26 COURT STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02 108 • 726-6200 EXT 5800 AREA 617 

-141- 



■^^■ 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL 

M E M R A K D U M 



MICHAEL J. BETCHER 
Genersl Counsel 

klARYJOHOLLENDER 
Associate General Counsel 



TO:' Sandy "Tennant ' 

Executive Assistant 

FROM: Michael J. Betcheryn^}^ 
General Counsel V 

DATE: Kovenber 14, 1983 

RE: Exempt Positions 



As explained more fully in my October 6, 1983 letter 
to Evalena Higginbottom, copy attached, Judge Garrity has 
exempted ten senior positions from screening and rating as 
follows: two deputy susperintendents , five senior 
management officers, and three managers. There are 
presently seven senior officers in exempt positions: 
Rosen, Peterkin, Lancaster, Coakley, Caradonio, Betcher, 
Caldwell. In responding to the State, I suggest that we 
reserve the* right for the Superintendent to add exempt 
positions to his "cabinet" if he ,should so choose, at least 
up to the level of ten senior exempt positions already 
approved by the court. 



MJB/ctm y. 

Enclosure _^^^ 

cc: Rosemarie V. Rosen ^^vZ-^-^— <— 






c/'^^-- 



7 



^■'-^-■<_^ ^ cf^^^ C<'^ 



t 



6 I 



n^ 



^f-^. 



/l^ya-^A-^-^ t'"^^ 



i^,-^- 



iK-^^-i^<. 



A^-^'-y^ 



26 CO L'RT STREET . BOSTON 



.rjASSACHUSETT^CqiCy. !617) 726-629/^ '^ ' 



/vS 



^^ ^,£^ ^ '^/^y/?^- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



November 17, 1983 



Rosanarie V. Rosen 
Deputy Superintendent of 
Finance and Administration 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Ms. Rosen: 

I am writing to each of the Deputy Superintendent's regarding the issue of 
Ckxnmunity and Central Screening Committees in the hope of refining procedures 
that will be both consistent with the applicable Court Orders and likely to 
increase effective parent participation on these canmittees . I believe this 
is a goal we both seek to attain. 

The Conmunity and Central Screening Committees' section of the November 8, 
1982 Agreement between the CPC and School Committee has been voided by the 
Court in favor of the original order largely because of the inability of tte 
two parties to resolve the issue of parent/staff representation. However, I 
feel that there was no disagreement on the first ttacee points in the above 
mentioned section of the November 8th agreement aix3, therefore, I would like 
to suggest following these points in order to lead to more effective parent 
participation on these ccnmittees . I have listed ttese points below: 

1. The School Department shall give the Citywide Parents Council and, 
where appropriate, tte School Parent Councils three (3) weeks advance 
notice, in writing, of its intention to set up Central and Community 
Screening Conmittees. The CPC will provide to the School Department, 
one (1) week prior to the start of a screening committee, tte names 
of parents who will serve on that screening conmittee. If the CPC is 
unable to provide parent representatives, the screening process shall 
proceed on schedule. 

2. The initial meeting of any screening committee must be at tte 
convenience of all members. The dates, times, and places of 
subsequent meetings shall be determined by a consensus of committee 
members. 

3. Members of each committee must be provided with a job description for 
the position, procedures followed in recruiting and advertising for 
candidates, a listing of all the candidates who applied, and a clear, 
concise statement of committee procedures and responsibilities. 

-14/1. 
Amulti-culturalparentsorganization monitoring quaHty, desegregated education 



Letter to Rosenarie V. Rosen 
Page Two 

The first point will give us a realistic time frame for recruiting 
parents. The second point will give parents a sense that tteir participation 
is valued and desired. The third point gives parents the baseliiie infonnation 
necessary for participation. 

The CPC is making efforts to strengthen parent participation including 
working with Massachusetts Advocacy Center to develop a brief, but useful, 
one-session training program for parents who are chosen to serve on a 
screening committee but have no prior experience. We hope to have this in 
place jxjst after the first of the year. 

Carol Ng, of our staff will be coordinating this training as well as 
setting 14) a file of parents who indicate a willingness to serve on screening 
committees. So, all futxice correspondence on screening committees should be 
addressed to her. 

There are two additional steps I hope the school department will consider 
inplementing to strengthen parent participation. 

1. Providing transportation and babysitiing allowances for parents \Ax) 
would not otherwise be able to attend all committee meetings. (Both 
the CPC and a number of SPCs have found this to be essential for 
maintaining the active involvement of some parents) . 

2. Once a committee coapletes its work it would reinforce parents' sense 
of accon^jlishment if the School Department could notify each parent 
of the decision made by the Si^rlntendent and School Committee. 

Finally, I would like to ask if it vrould be possible for your office to 
provide us with a quarterly calender of proposed screening committee start ips 
and the position to be screening, as this would greatly facilitate our efforts 
to effectively involve parents in the screening committee. 

Thank you in advance fcr your thoughtful attention to these requests. 

Sincerely, 

Stanton 
'Executive Director 

/jv 

xc: Dr. James Case 
Nan Stein 



-145 



'% 



1 



JUNE 22, 1983 



137 



CITY OF BOSTON 



'V 



Proceedings of School Committee 



June 22, 1983. 

A meeting of the School Committee of the 
City of Boston was held in the Administration 
Building, 26 Court Street, Boston between the 
hours of 1 :30 p.m. and 4;30 p.m. 

PRESENT: N/lrs. McGuIre, Mr. O'Bryant, 
Mrs. Walsh-Tomasini, Mrs. Sullivan McKeigur, 
Mr. McCluskey. 

Mr. McCluskey presided. 



EXECUTIVE SESSION 
ORDERED, That the Committee go into ex- 
ecutive session for the purpose of discussing 
contract negotiations, the Committee to re- 
turn as soon as possible. 

On roll call the order was approved by the fol- 
lowing vote: 

YEAS — Mrs. Sullivan McKeigue, Mrs. 
Walsh-Tomasini, and Mrs. McCluskey — 3. 

NAYS — 0. 

ABSENT — Mrs. McGuire and Mr. O'Bryant 
— 2. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The Superintendent presented the follow- 
ing nominations for vacant category two high 
school positions. 
BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL: 
Department Head (Acting): 

Dominic Bruno (W), Careet Preparation. 

James O'Connor (W), Bilingual. 

Joyce Campbell (W), Language Arts. 

William Quinn (W), Humanities. 

John X. Doherty (W), Technology. 

Doris Phillips (W), Business. 

Ruth Connaughton (W), Special Education, 
t Development Officer (Acting): 

»^ Carol Scott (B). 
i^'Registrar (Acting): 

John W Henry (W). 
Guidance: 

Gloria Pope (B), Acting. 

Isabel Nicks (B), Permanent. 
JAMAICA PLAIN HIGH SCHOOL: 
Department Head (Acting): 

Gerald Howland (W), Technology. 

Virginia Kemp (B), Career Preparation 



^ 



Aileen Rice (W), Language Arts. 

Placida Gaidi (W), Humanities. 

Paul Howe (W), Special Education. 
t^-H^gistrar (Acting): 

Kathleen Bartlett(W). 
Guidance: 

Dolores Perenyi (B), Permanent. 

Elaine Gelinas (W), Permanent. 

Luz Osario Burns (H), Permanent/Bilingual. 
i,,.-Bevelopment Officer (Acting): 

WEST ROXBURY HIGH SCHOOL; 
Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 

Roger Harris (B). 

David Glenn (W). 

7 Department Head (Acting): 
Edmund Sprissler (W), Career Preparation. 
Edward Holland (W), Special Education. 
Derrick Sudeall (B), Mathematics. 
Robert Feeney (W), English. 
Daniel Foley (W), Business. 
Ruth Morgan (W), Science. 
John Golner (W), Social Studies. 
Development Officer (Acting): 
X Alfred Lennon (W). 
^/Registrar (Acting): 
V' Alicia Barrasso (W). 

HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL: 
Assistant Headmaster Admin (Acting): 

r <^^ 

) Department Head (Acting): 

Robert McNutt (W), Career Preparation. 

Special Education. 

Michael Roberts (B), Humanities. 

Phillip Capernaros (W), Business. 

(B), Language Arts. 

James Mullan (W), Technology, 
j^evelopment Officer (Acting): 

John Shea (W). 

^flegistrar (Acting): 

*^ Garv Lewis (W). 

BURKE HIGH SCHOOL: 

Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 

Rosalind Brown (B). 

William Heath (B). 
Guidance: 

Lorraine Mazzola (W), Permanent. 

(B), Permanent. 
Department Head (Acting): 

Kathleen Rannery (W), Special Education. 

Mary Haley (W), Language Arts 

(W), Technology. 

Helen Varasso (W), Career Preparation. 

(B), Humanities. 

velopment Officer (Acting): 

Ann Foley Tierney (W). 
Registrar (Acting): 
\y Phyllis Cook (W). 



i 



-146- 



138 



JUNE 22, 1983 



V- DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL: 
Department Head (Acting): 

Mariano Communale (W), Career Prepara- 
tion. 
Charles Flaherty (W), Special Education. 
Joseph Casey (W). Language Arts. 
Joseph LaCroix (W), Math/Technology. 
Christina Capernaros (W), Science. 
/ Rosemary Sport (B), Humanities. 
I ^Development Officer (Acting): 
^ William Fitzgerald (W). 

J^egistrat (Acting): 
\/ Joseph Scarbo (W). 



7 



SOUTH BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL: 
Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 

Department Head (Acting): 
Isabel Mendez (H), Bilingual. 
Thomas Pillari (W), Career Preparation. 
James Poor (W), Humanities, 
Audrey Leung-Tat (B), Language Arts. 
Thomas Leydon (W). Math/Technology 
Paul W. Grueter (W), Science. 
Charles Martindale (W), Special Education. 



CHARLESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL: 
Guidance: 
Name (B). Acting. 
David Sheehan (W), Permanent. 
<^ Department Head (Acting); 
Wendy Lee (O), Bilingual. 
Leo Raftery (W). Special Education 
John Morris (W), Language Arts/Humani- 
ties. 
Willie Williams (B), Technology 
Warren Toland (W), Career Education. 
V ^Development Officer (Acting): 
*^ Ralph Berkowitz (W) 

Registrar (Acting): 
^ John Green (W). 

EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL: 
^ Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 
"trt Department Head (Acting): 
^ Max Corbett (W), Career Preparation. 
Elaine Halkopoulos (W), Language Arts. 
Anthony Loro(W), Humanities. 
Ann Fisher (B), Business. 
Paul Natola(W), Technology 
Rocco Jesso (W), Special Education. 
J^fevelopment Officer (Acting): 
\/^ William Kearns (W) 
^flegistrar (Acting): 
\-/ Raymond Gerrior(W). 
Admin. Assistant: 
Michale Rubin (B). 



LATIN ACADEMY: 
Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 
(B). 
Department Head (Acting): 
William Sullivan (W), Classics. 
Frederick C. Spracklin (W), English. 
Thomas Lavin (W), Humanities. 
Krishna Rajangam (B), Mathematics. 
Eraldo DeSantis (W), Foreign Language. 
Sandra Driggens (W), Science. 
j^„XJevelopment Officer (Acting); 
Mary Thomsen (W) 
Registrar: 
\^ Richard Bailey (W). 

BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL: 

Assistant Headmaster Admin. (Acting): 

Steven Leonard (B). 
Guidance: 

Janet Owens (B), Acting 
. , Department Head: 
1 ^ William Durante (W), Mathematics. 

Maureen White (W), English 

Joseph Desmond (W), Classics. 

Joseph Connolly (W), Physics. 

Joseph Walsh (W), Chemistry. 

Peggy Kemp (B), History 

James Donovan (W), German. 

Helen Cummings (W), French 

Paul Costello (W), Physical Education. 

Jerry Boisen (W), Music. 
/ Develoment Officer (Acting): 
l^ Jacqueline Tibbetts (Amer Ind). 
BOSTON BUSINESS SCHOOL: 
Department Head (Acting) 

Mildred Sanders (B), Business. 



r 



BOSTON TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL: 
Guidance: 

Yolanda Allison (B), Permanent. 
Department Head (Acting): 

Peter Walsh (W), Social Studies. 

Sonya Leroy (H), Language Arts. 

James O'Day (W), Career Preoaration. 

Richard Brown (B), Mathematics. 

Kenneth Cray (W), Science. 
Development Officer (Acting); 

Jane MacDonald (W). 
R)»gistrar (Acting); 
\^James S. Halliqan (W). 

^ COPLEY HIGH SCHOOL: 
*" Guidance: 

Margaret Zenger (W). Permanent 
Department Head (Acting): 
Maureen Tisei (W), Language Arts 
Paul Foley (W), Technology 
Mildred Fryer (B), Humanities 



•147- 



JUNE 22, 1983 



139 



L 



U 



ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL: 
Guidance: 

Joan Dazzi (W), Permanent. 
Department Head (Acting): 
Bilingual. 

Betty Bowker (W), Art. 
Antoinio Gizzi (W), Career Preparation. 

John Yurewicz (W), Lanuage Arts. 

Joseph Sheppeck (W), Mathematics. 

Doris Jones (B), Science. 

Louis Liggerio (W), Social Studies. 
Development Officer (Acting): 

(B) 
Registrar (Acting): 
'^ William Brown (W). 

MADISON PARK HIGH SCHOOL: 
Administrative Assistant: 
Guidance: 

Roberta O'Leary(W), Permanent. 

Thomas Gilarde (W), Permanent. 

Manuel Gonsalves (B), Permanent/Bilin- 
gual. 
n Department Head: 
' Joan Taylor (W), Bilingual. 

Jane Sullivan (W), Special Education. 

Ronald Gwiazda (W), Language Arts. 

Patricia Tremblay (W), Mathematics. 

Eufrazia Hamadeh (W), Science. 

Will Wyatt (B), Humanities. 

Allen Butters (W), Career Preoaration. 

James Thornton (W), Physical Education. 

Robert Winfrey (B), Performing Arts. 
/Development Officer (Acting): 

JillByerly(W). 
Registrar (Acting): 
^ Ronald Tremblay (W). 

UMANA HIGH SCHOOL: 
Assistant Headmaster (Acting): 

Frederick Johnson (B). 
r- Department Head (Acting): 

Nicholas Rubino (W), Mathematics. 

Dwight Barnett (B), Humanities. 

Mary Canty (W), English. 

Frank Santosuosso (W), Science. 

Jacqueline Hill (B), Special Education. 
Registrar (Acting): 
''^■- Diane Vraux (W). 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOY- 
MENT FOR 
ACTING DEPARTMENT HEADS, SCHOOL 
REGISTRARS, AND SCHOOL DEVELOP- 
MENT OFFICERS 

The follovifing terms of employment are sub- 
ject to discussion with appropriate collective 
bargaining groups: 
Effective Date of Employment - July 1 , 1983. 



Salary: 

Department Head 
1 St year, $31 ,500 in 24 payments 

School Registrar 
1st year, $29,000 in 24 payments 

School Development Officer 
1st year, $29,000 in 24 payments 
Work Year: 

Eleven months, including the regular 
school year, plus three weeks before the 
opening of school and one additional 
week of work during July or August. Work 
may be required during some school va- 
cations between September and June 

Hours: 
The school day plus whatever other lime is 
required to accomplish necessary tasks 
including aftemoon and evening meet- 
ings with staff and parents. 
Sick Leave: 
1 5 days per year. 

On roll call the nominations were approved 
by the following vote: 

YEAS— Mrs. McGuire. Mr O'Bryant. Mrs 
Sullivan McKeigue, Mr McCluskey— 4. 
NAYS— Mrs. Walsh-Tomasini— 1 . 



ARA TRANSPORTATION, INC. CONTRACT 

Ordered, That on recommendation of the 
Superintendent the proposal and contract for 
furnishing school transportation services for 
theCityof Boston for the period July 15, 1983, 
through August 31, 1985, with optional re- 
newals of September 1 , 1 985, through August 
31, 1986, and September 1, 1986, through 
August 31, 1987, in the amount of 
$53,378,000 for the four-year period be 
awarded to ARA Transporatation, Inc. 

On roll call the order was approved by the 
following vote: 

YEAS— Mrs. McGuire, Mr O'Bryant, Mrs. 
Sullivan McKeigue, Mrs. Walsh-Tomasini, and 
Mr McCluskey— 5. 

NAY— 0. 



TRANSCOM, INC. CONTRACT 

Ordered, That on recommendation of the 
Superintendent the proposal and contract for 
furnishing Out-Of-City Special Needs Trans- 
portation Services for the Boston Public 



148- 



140 



JUNE 22, 1983 



Schools for the period September 1, 1983, 
through August 31, 1985, with optional re- 
newals of SeptenDber 1 , 1 985, through August 
31, 1986, and September 1, 1986, through 
August 31,1 987, in the amount of $6,400,000 
for the four-year period be awarded to Trans- 
corn, Inc. 

On roll call the order was approved by the 
following vote: 

YEAS— Mrs. McGuire, N/lr. O'Bryant, l^rs. 
Sullivan McKelgue, Mrs. Walsh-Tomasini, and 
Mr. McCluskey— 5. 

NAYS— 0. 



TEXTBOOKS 

The Superintendent submitted for review 
and consideration by the School Committee, 
a list of reading materials for secondary 
schools in District 3. These materials have 
been reviewed and approved by Deputy Su- 
perintendent Oliver Lancaster. 

Laid over. 



The meeting adjourned. 
Attest. 



EDWARD J. WINTER, 
Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



PRINTING SECTION 



149- 




Division of Occupational Education 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: 


James Case 


FROM: 


David F. Cronin> ' 


SUBJECT : 


Staffing Problems at HHORC 


DATE: 


November 10, 1983 



The Division has reviewed the HHORC faculty register for school year 
ending June 30, 1984. There are two instructors who have yet to apply 
but for whom the Superintendent has requested temporary conditional 
approval. Assistant Headmaster, Thomas Giacchetto has assured Gene Curran 
that they are obtaining documentation. The two individuals are Cesar 
Coloma, electronics and Frederick Lee, auto mechanics. It is anticipated 
that their processing will be completed within two weeks. 



/mjc 

cc: Elaine Cadigan 
Naisuon Chu 



-150- 



Special Desegregation IVIeasures 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Anslysis of Fall 1 9S3 EnrQlnTients: uverview of Specisl Desegreg; 



■tons- 



The Uourt has deaignated certain schools for "special desegregation 
rriesEures": 



Order 


1 S7b 


bchools 


May 3rd 


ElllE 






Lee 






Bradford 






Hale 



CoTfrments 



now closed 

now a magnet school 



May Sth 197 



R.G.Shaw Middle 

ThoTfiPson Middle 

P.A.Shaw 

Emerson 

TLiclierman 

Guild 

Henmgan 

McKay 

East Boston High 



now ciosea 

a magnet school 

a magnet school 

3 iii^gnet Ecn.i'j , 

create a "Ousiness education magnet' 



March 21st 1978 Boston Latin School "support" for minority student; 

Boston Latin Academy same 
Boston Technical High same 



November 1931 Burke High 

Dorchester High 



not issued - voluntary compliance 
same 



May 1982 



I ODin 



became K-3 



-151- 



Overview of bpecial Desegregation page 2 

Five monitoring issues are covered in separate "essays" in this section of the 
Report; 

(A) Eight "special desegregation" schools 

(B) Toton K-S bchool 

(C)' Burke and Dorchester High Schools 

(D) East Boston Business Education Magnet 

(E) Support Services at E:-:arrnnation Schools 

Note that four schools listed abo^.'e (Hale, Guild, Henmgan, and McKay) are 
discussed at length in the section on magnet elementary schools, under "Student 
Assignirients". Note also that aspects of the Burke and Dochester High Schools 
are discussed under both (A) and (C). 



MONITORIN G OBJECTIVES 

(A) "Special Desegregation Schools" page 155 

What nave been the effects upon compliance i«nth enrollment requirements c^" 
the designation of certain schools for "special desegregation rrieasures"'^' Have 
these schools been assisted in developing distinit-ve and attractr-'e program 
emphases'^' In recruiting students actively from their assigned geocodes"' In 
increasing their white enrollment in other ways? To what extent does each 
operate under an articulated strategy to become a stably desegregated school? 

(BJ The Tobin K-8 School page 183 

What has been the impact of the K-S structure upon the enrollment - and thus 
the extent of compliance - of this school'^' How do Fall 1 983 enrollments compare 
with Spring 1 3S3 assignments? Is there evidence of a negative impact upon the 
District I middle schools? 



152- 



Overview of Special Desegregation page 3 



CO Burke and Dorchester High SchoolE page 190 

How far advanced are the facility and program development aspects of the 
cornmitment made to these schools in November 1 9S1 ? Note that a discussion of 
the enrollment of the two schools is included under (A). 



(D) East Boston Business Magnet Program page 202 

Have the issues raised in the Spring Report - program quality and 
distinctiveness, relation with the host high school, assignment and transfer 
policies - been addressed'^' Is the program meeting its intended purpose? 



(E) Support Services at the E;:amination Schools page 213 

What are the causes of the disproportionate attrition of Blacl; and Hispanic 
students admitted to the e>;am schools? How effective is the preparation offeree 
by Advanced Work/Academiically Talented programs? Hou.i effective sre suppoi-t 
services provided at the exam schools? How coulc the retention and success rati 
be improved? 



NEXT STAGE OF MONITORING 

For the Ellis, Lee, P.A.Shaw, Emerson, Tobin, R.G.Shaw, Thompson, Burke and 
Dorchester, the next stage of special desegregation monitoring wnll review the 
recruitment efforts made to increase the number of white applications and to 
reach white parents whose children are geocoded to these schools. What 

encouragement do the administrators and other staff of the schools designated 
for special desegregation measures receive to miake such efforts, and v^ihat 
recources are made available to them? What decisions are made with respect to 



153- 



Overview of Special Desegregatiorr page 4 

programE which will be housed in these schools and assignment of students for 
1984-85? 

For the Burke, Dorchester, and East Boston high schools, the next stage of 
TTionitonng will ask whether program development has made it possible to meet the 
needs and expectations of students who have been attracted on the basis of a 
program description. 

For the three examination schools, the next stage of rrionitonng will follow up 
on several lines si:etchea out in the present report; preparation of students for 
the demanding academic atmosphere of these schools, identification of students 
who need extra support, provision of academic and counselling services, including 
support for students whose first language is not English, 



154- 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 

AnalysiE of Fall 1 983 Enron-ments : Special Desegregation Schools 



Certain schools have been identified by the Court from time to time as 
subject to special desegregation requirements. We have prepared reports on 
East Boston High School and on Buri::e and Dorchester High Schools, and on 
measures taken at the three examination schools to provide support services 
to encourage and assist Black and Hispanic. Requirements for the bilingual 
program at Charlestown High School are being reviewed as part of the 
monitoring of bilingual programs in general. The Guild, Henmgan, Hale and 
McKay schools are discussed in the report on magnet elementary schools. 

The "special desegregation" schools not identified above aree the Ellis, 
Pauline Agassii Shaw, Lee, and Eriierson elementary schools and the Robert 
Gould Shaw and Thompson middle schools. These six schools are discussed in 
the present report, together with an enrollment analysis of Burke and 
Dorchester High Schools, wihose program and facility development are discussed 
in the separate report mentioned above. 

The discussion of these schools vjill follow this outline; 

* the enrollment history of each school with respect to the permittee 

ranges of enrollment established by the Court, and in 
comparison wiith other Boston schools; 
* the demonstrated ability of each school to attract white students, in 
comparison wnth other Boston schools (note that, for several 
"special desegregation" schools - Guild, McKay, Boston Latin, 
Latin Academry - discussed elsewhere, the challenge is to 
attract and retain minority students)! 

* the irripact of the assignments approved last Spring, with special 

attention to the proportion of assigned white students who are 
actually enrolled as of November 1933! 
« the "recruitment" measures undertaken by each school to assure that 
assigned students will actually enroll," and 



155- 



AnalyEiE of Special Desegregation SchoolE page £ 

* any program ronsiderations (other than at Burke and Dorchester) 
which seern relevant to achieving the Court's objectives for 
these schools. 



Applicable Orders 

On May 3rd 1976 the Court ordered the defendants to "formulate and 
implement forthwith special measures for the effective desegregation of four 
elementary schools which are currently identifiably black schools . .". The 
schools were the Ellis, the Lee, the Bradford (since closed), and the Hale (now 
a magnet school). 

On May Sth 1977 the Court oraered the Department of Implementation to 
"formulate and implement special measures, including, where appropriate, 
modifications in geocode units and assignments of Kl and K2 students, for the 
effective desegregation of the schools listed below"! the schools were the Sh3w 
Middle, the Thompson Middle, the Shaw Elementary, the Emerson, and the 
Tucl<erman (since closed). 



Enrollment o-f' White Students 



1 97S-1 983 Change % of 19 73 White E n r o 1 1 rri e n t 



system (1-12) 


-7527 


Emerson 





P.A.Shaw 


-8 


Ellis 


-7 


Lee 


-23 


Dorchester High 


-79 


Burke High 


-77 


Shaw Middle 


-75 


Thompson Middle 


-84 



0% 


-14% 


-17% 


-25% 


-38% 


-47% 


-56% 


-60% 



-156- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 3 



Discussion of Individual Schools 



PAULINE AGASSIZ SHAW 



Enrollment in grades 1-5 in April 19S3 was 







number 


percent 


permitted 


Black 




127 


69% 


54% -90% 


White 




50 


27% 


18%-30% 


Other 


Min 


6 


4% 


3%-5% 



percent 


permitted 


70% 


55%-91% 


2S% 


1 6%-28% 


2% 


4%-6% 



The school was therefore in compliance in all three racial/ethnic categories. 

Enrollment in grades 1-5 for November 1 9S3 is 

number 

Black 119 

White 48 

Other Hin 3 

The other minority enrollment is too low), but the Court has relaxed the 
enrollment requirements in those districts with few other minority students. 
White enrollment is at the upper end of the permitted '•"ange, a significant 
accomplishment for a school located, as the P.A.Shaw is, within blocks of the 
corner of Blue Hill Avenue and Morton Streets, notorious for racial tensions. 
The Shaw must, in fact, be considered a remarkable Euccess for desegregation. 

The Shawi was below the permitted range for white students in 1975, 197St 
and 1977, and again in 19Si; Black enrollment percent wias above the permitted 
range in 1975 and 1976. The median Boston school has been out of compliance 
with these twio ranges four times over the past nine years, and 24 schools have 
been out of compliance between 10 and 17 times! the Shaw's record of si;-; timies, 
largely in the earlier years, compares very favorably. 

The last Monitoring Report pointed out that white students were 
over-assigned to the Shaw, so that the school was projected to be 

-157- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 4 

substantTally above the permitted range for white enrollmenti and I observed 
that this was only realistic, since many white students attending kindergarten 
in 1982-83 in Hyde Pari-; elementary schools would undoubtedly go on the 
parochial schools for first grade, as indeed has been the case since long 
before desegregation. There was in fact a "shrinl::age" of 24 white students, 
or 33% of those assigned. Is this a high rate under the circumstances? The 
Chittick school, located in Hyde Park and thus nearer to the white residential 
portion of the same district, but in a racially-changing area, experienced a 
59% "shrink:age" from assigned to enrolled white students! the Hemenwey, 
located in the white section of Hyde Park but enrolling many Blaci: students 
fro-m the vicinity of the Shaw, lost 37% of its assigned white students. 

A closer look at the assignments and enrollments shows that 31 white 
students were assigned to first grade at the Shaw (including, presumably, the 
two who were in its kindergarten last year), and that eleven white students are 
in the first grade, making it 3Q% white or above the permitted range. It is 
apparently necessary to assign 3 white students to assure that one will 
attend. This is not necessarily an e>;cessive rate, given the traditional 
strength of non-public schools in Hyde Park:, where the four schools reporting 
enroll some 900 students in grades 1-8, 

In the upper grades, the Shaw seems to do quite well at retaining its 
students. 



5 



n 


1 L. 


1 i- 


5 


11 


12 


12 


6 


9 


10 


12 


5 


-2 


_2 








18% 


17% 


0% 


0% 



in previous grade at Shaw 82-3 
assigned for Fall 1983 
enrolled Fall 1983 
"shrinkage" from assigned 
percent "shnni'age" 



Note that a certain amount of "shrinkage" occurs with no relation to 
desegregation or to racial issues! two students in a grade could easily move or 
be withdrawn for other reasons having little to do with the perceived quality of 
the school. 



158- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 



Principal John Bradley was asked about his efforts to assure that 
assigned students actually attend. He reported that it is his practice to send 
letters to new parents, and also to phone as many of themi as possible to invite 
theiTi to visit the school. Other Hyde Park parents, he said, also phone, and he 
placed great importance on direct communication among parents. The concern 
expressed most frequently, he said, was with the safety of white students 
attending the Shaw, on the way to school and in school! he felt that the good 
safety record and the currently excellent transportation service were 
important factors in reassuring white parents. It is also his practice to 
telephone or have his teachers telephone, by 10 AM, to the parents of any child 
missing that day, to assure that the parent was aware of the child's absence. 
Concerns about the neighborhood were, he admitted, a real difficulty to be 
overcome, but he felt that many parents sent their children to non-public 
schools in Hyde Park or Milton for traditional reasons. Others, he conceded, 
were unliiiely to agree to send their children to the Shaw under any 
circumstances. 

The Shaw offers no special prograrri attractions, nor does it seern to need 
any. Mr. Bradley spolce of his stable and experienced staff, some of whorr. 
have been with him and with the school since the start of desegregation and 
longer, of their willingness to make e>;tr3 efforts to reach out to parents, and 
of the good custodial care of the building. The school has neither an extended 
day kindergarten nor an advanced work class, nor does it receive special 
benefits under Chapter 63£ or other programs. Several microcomputers are 
now in place for instructional purposes, as in other schools, and planning for 
their use seemed ahead of so'me other schools visited, though behind at least 
one other. The bilingual kindergarten program, for Haitian children, actually 
results in the assignment of more Black students to the school, without 
bringing it out of compliance. 

The visitor to the Shaw is struck by how welcorriing the hallways are, with 
a variety of messages and decorations designed to create a positive 
atmosphere. Mr. Bradley, though unhappy about the lack of a full-timie clerk, 

-159- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page S 

was using the constant interruptions by telephone as an opportunity for 
positive contact with parents - and for lobbying with School Department 
callers for his school's needs. 

He recently received a letter from one white parent, expressing 
appreciation that her concerns had been allayed, and that her children were 
having a positive experience at the Shaw. "My children, all three of therri at 
the Shaw School, race out of doors in the morning to get to their busses. In 
short, they are enjoying school very much - they actually come bursting through 
the door in mid-afternoon laughing, chattering about their day and showing rne 
graded school ivork. Whatever you and your staff are doing over there, by all 
means continue - it works!". 

The 1982-83 Annual Report for the school confirms the impression of 
vigorous educational leadership and outreach to parents. Among the 

attachments are a number of circulars to teachers on matters of instructional 
strategy, techniques for relating individually to students, and expectations on 
the handling of attendance and discipline problems. I found these concrete 
and helpful, especially the ones posing open-ended questions for teacher 
self-evaluation of, for exarriple, a reading lesson. The school "philosophy" 
calls for flexible grouping practices and independent work habits, and Mr. 
Bradley has translated these global objectives into specific expectations for 
teachers! the inspirational mottoes and posters around the school are backed 
up with classroom practices. 

A new (and mysterious) poster had made its appearance the day of the 
monitoring visit! it said, "Shaw is 5", The principal was counting on curious 
students to asl< hirri what it meant: that education goes on five days a weelr at 
the Shaw, and students need to be there every day. One of the expectations 
placed upon teachers is that they will report all absent students by 9 each 
morning for the principal's daily telephone checl; with their parents! an attempt 
IS also made to involve active parents in telephoning to other parents. When 
health or other problems lead to chronic absenteeism, the parents are informed 
of community and school services available to help them. "Principal and 

-160- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 7 

teacher visits to homes" is one of the school's objectives, and is stated as an 
expectation in one communication to teachers, together with the suggestion 
that parents be called to congratulate children on good attendance. 

In visits to "special desegregation" schools inquiry was always made 
about written as w»ell as oral communication with the parents of 
newly-assigned students in the crucial weeks after they receive an assignment 
and while they may be considering whether to withdraw! their children from the 
public schools. The letter sent by the Shawi, while by no means unique, is a 
good example of the provision of reassuring information. Basic facts about 
the location, organization, hours, and programs of the school are provided in a 
two-page letter, together wnth a statement of the school's philosophy of 
developing a positive self-image "in all our children" through giving each 
opportunities for success and creativity. All of the materials used, the letter 
says, are "both multi-level and multi-cultural in content and are in full 
compliance with Chapter 622" <the reference must be mysterious to almost 
every parenti it should be restated in terms of avoiding stereotypes of race, 
religion, sex or national origin, and shownng the contributions which various 
groups have made and are mainng to American life). "Given such exciting 
programs, experienced, motivated, caring teachers and adrriinistration, 
cooperating parents, happy and relaxed children, is it any wonder that we feel 
that the Shaw School is an 'Opportunity School'?" the lettei- asks. 

There is nothing "glamorous" about this small, rather traditional school, 
but mriany parents would find it extremely attractive. 



LEE 



It was around the Lee School, in 1971, that a serious confrontation arose 
between the Board of Education and the School Comrmittee over the letter's 
failure to follow through on the agreements under which the school had been 
built. John Coakley developed the newi, desegregated district for the school 
which the School Committee would not implement fully, and the Board found the 

-161- 



67% 


4S%-73% 


24% 


22%-3S% 


9% 


6%-in% 



AnalysiE of Special Desegregation Schools page 8 

Committee in violation of the Fourteenth Amendment because of the de jure 
segregation of the Lee School which resulted. Out of this incident grew the 
decision, by Black Plaintiffs, to institute the Morgan case. For the first 
seven years of desegregation under the Federal Court Plan, the Lee was 
consistently out of compliance with the permitted ranges for Black, white, and 
other minority students each year. Small wonder, then, that the Lee has 
remained on the list of schools for special attention. 

Last year's (April 1933) enrollment in grades 1-5 was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 213 

White 75 

Other Min 2S 
The school was then in compliance. 

Projected enrollment for September 1983 was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 197 5S% 46%-7S% 

White ill 33% 22%-36% 

Other Mm 29 9% 7%-l 1 % 

It was reasonable to expect a drop-off in white enrollment, since 52 white 
students were projected for first grade in comparison with 43 for grades 2-5. 
If the drop-off were drastic, observed the Spring report, reducing the entering 
class to ten white students (equivalent to the projected second grade), the 
school would be 21% white in September, or slightly below the permitted range. 
Clearly, then, it would be important to make every effort to retain as many as 
possible of the assigned white students. 

The actual first grade enrollment, on Novemiber 3rd, was 19 white first 
graders, or 31% of those assigned in May. Overall enrollment (grades 1-5) 





number 


percent 


permitted 


Black 


201 


69% 


45% - 78% 


White 


69 


24% 


22% - 36% 



-162- 



AnalyEiE of Special Desegregation SchoolE page 9 

Other 22 8% 7% - 11% 

with 17 of the white students (and 43 minority students) in the Advanced Work 
Class. 

The Lee was below the permitted range for white enrollment for the first 
seven years of desegregation, but has been in compliance now for two years. 
Similarly, the Blach: enrollment was over the permitted range for seven years, 
and has been in compliance for two. Like the P.A.Shaw, the Lee is a 

desegregation success story. 

Contacts with parents of newly-assigned students seem less formalized at 
the Lee than at the Shaw, but Principal Frances Kelley stressed, as did John 
Bradley, the importance of parent-to-parent contacts. She attributed the 
Lee's ability to attract white students from West Poxbury to the Extended Day 
Kindergarten (though regretting restrictions on those students continuing on to 
first grade unless so geocoded), to a Chapter S36-funded program fo>" 
academically-talented students in grades 1-3, and to the advanced work 
classes for grades 4 and 5, as well as to the school's emphasis upon the 
performing arts. 

It IS instructive to compare the grade profile of the Shaw and Lee schools 
as of May 1 S83 (see below," each astensi: represents one white student). 



r-: ,-\ C? '■-. T. ! - ' 



'4- 

5 



■¥- -jf -H" "T^ ■*':■ ^;- "^r -K" ^ t;' "X" ^ 

■K- * -S- # -S- ****** * 

***** 

4f. 4-|. ^ ^ ^. ^ ^ JH ^*- *. 

*'!*:"******** "S" * * 'M* •??■ 
*********** 

* * * * * * * * 
********** 

* * * * * * * * * **■?•■ * * * * * 
*******************#****■ 



The Lee shows a strong white enrollment in kindergarten (the Extended 
Day PrograiTi), dropping off considerably by the second grade, and then strong 



-163- 



Analysis of bpecial Desegregation Schools page 10 

again in the fourth and fifth grades (Advanced Worl:: Classes)! clearly these 
special programs play a rriajor part in its desegregation. The Shaw, by 
contrasti has few white students in kindergarten, then maintains a very even 
profile until the fourth grade, when presumably students transfer to the Taylor 
for the district Advanced Work Class, Special programs are not a factor in 
desegregation of the Shaw. 

The 1932-S3 Annual Report of the Lee School stresses the rich resources 
offered by the school, but also the problems created by the on-going threat of 
staff lay-offs (apparently not a problem at the Shaw, with its veteran staff). 
A variety of performing arts activities took place during the year, on a scale 
which would not be possible in a smaller school. In the view of the parent 
council, the special programs were the primary mode of attracting "students 
from the white neighborhoods assigned to the Lee School." 



ELLIS 



The April 1933 enrollment of the Ellis, grades l-5< was; 

number percent permitted 

Black lfa2 46% 33%-55% 

White 40 11% 1 7%-2S% 

Other Mm 154 43% 25%-41% 

The high other rrnnority enrollmient was the result of the presence of a large 

bilingual program, amounting to 120 Hispanic students; this is permitted by the 

Court. The white enrollment, on the other hand, was clearly below the 

permitted range, despite the presence of an Advanced Work Class which 

increased white numbers in the 4th and 5th grades: 



3rade 


Number White Students 


K 





1 


4 


2 


4 


3 


5 


4 


13 



164- 



AnalysiE of Special Desegregation Schools page 11 



14 



The projected enrollment for September 19S3 was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 161 45% 32%-54% 

White 71 20% 1 b%-26% 

Other Min 123 36% 27%-45% 

The significant increase in white enrollment - into compliance - was the result 

of assignment of forty white students to the incoming first grade. The Spring 

Report to the Court observed that "white students are clearly available) since 

each of these is presumably in a kindergarten run by the public schoolsi but it 

is to be feared that the 1983-84 first grade will be nearer to the 4 white 

students of 1982-33 than to the proiected 40!" - unfortunately, this prediction 

proved accurate, and there were only seven white students in first grade as of 

November 3rd, or 18% of the number assigned? total white enrollment is lower 

than it was last Spring. 

The November 3rd enrollment (grades 1-5) was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 167 50% 32%- 54% 

White 35 11% 15% - 26% 

Other 131 39% 27% - 45% 

with 10 of the white students (and 48 minority students) in the Advanced Work 

Class. 

The Ellis has been below the permitted range for white students for nine 
years straight; it is interesting to note, however, that that it was over the 
permitted range for Black students for the first three years of desegregation, 
but has now been in compliance for Black students for six years straight. 

The principal, Florence Hadley, did not hesitate to point out shortcomings 
in the school's ability to function as an attractive educational setting. She 
started the 1982-83 school year new to the Ellis, and with fifteen (!) teachers 

-165- 



AnslysiE of Special Desegregation Schools page 12 

new to the building, some of them teaching at levels inappropriate to their 
previous experience and with insufficient orientation and support. Secretarial 
support was entirely inadequate (the one complaint expressed spontaneously by 
each of the elementary special desegregation school principals). As she put it 
in her annual report, "there was a great deal of confusion during the first 
part of the year," though conditions irriproved over the course of the year. 

Ms. Hadley was aware of the school's "special desegregation" status in 
only the most general terrris, and not of any specific implications for her 
operational goals (unlike Mr. Bradley of the Shaw and Ms. Kelley of the Lee, 
who were principals of those schools when they were so designated by the 
Court). In her annual report and in conversation she expressed doubt that 
much could be done m the u'ay of increasing support by white parents without a 
resolution of security problems! "until the negative perception of this 
community is turned around, we will always have difficulty recruiting white 
pupils," she wrote. She does not feel that the school is given special 

attention or support fromi Court Street to become strongly attractive. Even in 
a physical sense, the building was not properly cleaned and maintained (a 
complaint expressed in several other schools). 

'when asked about what might persuade a white parent to send a child to 
her school, Ms. Hadley stressed only the Advanced Work Classes. 
Unfortunately, such classes only affect the enrollment of grades 4 and 5, and 
they cannot really be said to desegregate the regular classes even at that 
level. Such schools as the P.A.Shaw and the Higginson (see below) do not 
house AWCs, and may as a result have a more solid integration. 

The November 19S3 enrollment of the Ellis is 10.5% white in grades 1-5, 
outside the permitted range of ie.%-26%. Two blocks away is the Higginson, 
also a District II school but one which has vigorously recruited white students 
from its assigned geocodes, though without a "special desegregation" 
designation and mandate, and is currently 30.3% white in grades 1-5, above the 
permitted range. It would be presumptuous, on the basis of brief visits and 
review of the 1982-33 reports, to reach any conclusions about the greater 

-166- 



AnalyEiE of Special Desegregation SchoolE page 13 

succesE ot the Higginson than the Ellis at attracting geocoded white EtudentEi 
but preEumably leadership has Eomething to do with it. Me. Hadley has 
properly devoted her first year to rebuilding a badly disrupted faculty and 
school organization; it remains to be seen whether she will now be able to 
convince white parents of the value of what the school can offer. Our 
attention in the next phase of monitoring of special desegregation rrieasures 
will turn to the extent to which she and other principals are given support) 
guidance, resources, staff stability, and the other ingredients necessary to 
exercise such leadership. 



EMERSON 

The Emerson and the Ellis are perhaps fifteen blocks apart in Roxbury, 
but the one draws white students from the far side of South Boston High School 
and the other from the far side of the Arnold Arboretumi. The grade 1-5 
enrollment of the Emerson in April 1983 was; 

number percent 

Black 52 45% 

White 28 20% 

Other Mm 48 35% 

The Emerson houses a Cape Verdean bilingual programi (the students counted as 
Black), and is one of the few schools in Boston with a significant proportion 
(9%) of American Indian students. It is located along Dudley Street, where 
rapid growth in Hispanic population is occurring. 

The school has too few white students and too rriany Hispanic students to 
be in compliance with the permitted ranges for its district. Its enrollment has 
been below the permitted range for white students for nine years straight. 

The projected Fall 1983 enrollment was; 

number percent permitted 

Black 52 41% 2S%-46% 

White 29 23% 28%-46% 

-167- 



per re 


litted 


2S%- 


-46% 


29%- 


-49% 


1 8%.- 


-30% 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 14 

Other Min 34 27% 1 9%-33% 

The projected racial proportions improved largely because fewer Black and 
Hispanic students had been assigned to the first grade than were in that grade 
in 1S82-S3; unlike the schools discussed abovei the Emerson was not assigned 
an unrealistically high number of white students! To the contrary, fewer white 
students were assigned to first grade than were in attendance in that grade 
last year! of those assigned (7), the majority (4) attend this Fall! giving a much 
lower "shrinl<3ge" rate than for other elementary "special desegregation" 
schools. Does this mean that, in South Boston, students are less likely to go 
to public kindergarten and then on to parochial first grade than in Hyde Park 
or West Ro>;bury? An analysis of the decline from aggregate kindergarten 
enrollment to first grade enrollment in each district in the current year shows 
that District VI (South Boston/Ro/cbury) is lower than average for the city. 
Citywide there are 38% fewer white first graders than kindergarteners! in 
District VI the drop is only 20%, compared with 51% in District IJI (West 
Roxbury, includes the Lee School) and 53% in District IV (Hyde Parl<, includes 
the P. A, Shaw). 

The actual November 1983 enrollments (grades 1-5) are: 

number percent permitted 

Black 45 37% 2S% - 46% 

White 27 22% 28% - 46% 

Other 49 41% 1 9% - 33% 

The principal, Mr, wloseph Prendergast, is new to the Emerson this year 
having previously served for a number of years at the Hennigan, a large magnet 
elementary school. He expresses satisfaction with the change, and confident 
that his earlier service at the Gavin School in South Boston will help him to 
reach out to that community. Like Ms, Hadley at the Ellis, he was given no 
special orientation to obligations related to heading a "special desegregation" 
school, and had no strategies in mind to reach out to white parents whose 
children had been assigned! in fairness, he was not at the Emerson when 
assignments were made last Spring. 



168- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 15 

The "grade profile" of the Emerson, like that of the Shaw, is quite regular, 
in contrast with the Ellis and the Lee, which draw white students to prograrns 
which serve only grades 4 and 5 (and kindergarten, in the case of the Lee). 
Last year's annual report, prepared by the previous principal, reflects 
energetic efforts to improve the quality of instruction and to reach out to the 
South Boston coTTimunity to encourage increased white enrollment. Relatively 
high reading and math scores were reported. Credit was given to assistance 
from the Institute for Learning and Teaching at UMass, Boston. 

According to the annual report, a substantial majority of the students 
come from homes where a language other than English is spok:en, whether Cape 
Verdean or Spanish. Concern was expressed about the difficulty of 

maintaining consistent attendance, a theme at each school! in fact, the 
Em-erson's attendance rate was the best of this group, with 42% of its students 
(62% of its white students) missing school five days or less, compared with 26% 
(17% for white students) compiling an equivalent record at the P.A.Shaw. 

In some respects the Emerson seemis to have the least likelihood of 
succeeding as a special desegregation school; located off Dudley Street in 
Roxbury, seeking to draw white students from South Boston, providing no 
special programs to attract tnem, and educating a student oody high in cnildren 
from homes where English is a second language. On the other hand, it is 5 
pleasant small school and seems to provide a solid and basic education 
prograTTh the student body is well-integrated, though it is not in compliance 
with the Court's standard for the district (VI) in wihich the school is located. 

The new principal, though comjing from a rnagnet school, has no special 
orientation toward recruitment, but this will clearly be a major challenge for 
him in the months ahead. In addition, the fact that few white students are 
assigned to the Emierson suggests that either insufficient South Boston 
geocodes are assigned to the school, or students are using false addresses to 
enroll at elemientary schools located in South Boston. Two South Boston 
schools have actually increased their white enrolVment since 1 97S; the Condon 
( + 14%) and the Perkins (+5%). 



169- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 16 



SHAW MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Shaw and the Thompson were discussed last Spring in the report on 
middle school assignments as well as in the special desegregation report. 

April 1933 enrollment of the Shaw was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 234 71% 41%-69% 

White 63 19% 2S%-4S% 

Other Mm 32 10 5%-9% 

The school was slightly high in Blacl: and other minority enrollriienti and 
significantly low in white enrollment, though located in heavily white West 
Roxbury (non-public schools in West Roxbury enrolled more than 2000 white 
students in grades 1-12 last year). Fall 1933 enrollment is: 







number 


perce 


nt 


permitted 


Black 




210 


70% 




42%-70% 


White 




59 


20% 




27%-45% 


Other 


'••hn 


29 


9% 




6%-10% 



Obviously, there is a slight improverrient but not compliance with the white 
permitted range. It might be noted, however, that the three middle schools in 
District III have a combined enrollment which is only 26% white, below the 
bottomi of the "range". 

The Shaw has been below the permitted range for white students for the 
past eight years, and was above the permitted range for Black students for 
seven of the first eight years of desegregation! the new standard has brought 
it into compliance. 

White enrollrrfent has in fact declined sharply at all District III middle 
schools since 1978: Shaw (56%:), Irving (50%), and Lewenberg (49%). On s more 
positive note, the Shaw enrolls 13% more white students than were assigned 
last Spring. Presumably this reflects the enrollment of some students wihose 



170- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 17 

parents had not accepted the assignmerit of their children, for elementary 
grades, to the Lee School in Dorchester, but are willing to enroll thern in a 
TTiiddle school in West Ro;;bury. Mr. Keohane, the principal, in fact reports no 
difficulty in convincing assigned students to attend the school; there is no 
effect, in the middle schools, comparable to the massive transfer of students 
to parochial schools at the first grade level and, for middle schools which, like 
the Shaw, do not house an Academically Talented Program, there is no large 
exodus at 7th grade level to the Latin Schools. 

The essential problems, for desegregation of the Shaw, are the changing 
age profile of its community of West Roxbury, and the heavy reliance upon 
non-public schools and the examination schools for students in that community. 

Mr. Keohane is an advocate of mainng the R.G.Shaw a l-"'-8 school, as was 
recently done, with the Court's approval, with the Tobin. He points out that 
his facility originally housed those grades, and that he has the capacity 
available to offer twio classes at each grade level f'-S. He argues that this 
would contribute to desegregation by assuring parents of a stable educational 
environment for their children over a number of years. St. Theresa's and Holy 
Name schools both offer grades one through eight; they are his direct 
competitors for white students. Implementation of this proposal would clearly 
have implications for District III elemientary schools located in West Roxbury, 
since it would be inappropriate to draw white students to the Shaw who would 
otherwise attend the Lee. 



THOMPSON MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Enrollment of the Thompson in April 1 9S3 was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 369 82% 52%-SS% 

White 70 15% 20%-3A% 

Other Mm 13 3% 2%-4% 

The way the permitted range is computed (the "ideal" Plus/rriinus 25%) has the 



-17L 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page IS 

effect of creating a very wide range if the "ideal" in any grouc is high. For 
example, if the "ideal" for each group were 33%, the range would be 25%-41%, or 
sixteen percentage points. When one group is as predominant as Black 

students are in District IV (in part because there are few "other minority" 
students), a very wide range is created - one which it would be hard to rrnss' 
The white range, by the same tol^en, is a narrow and difficult one. All this by 
way of explaining why the Thompson is out of compliance on white enrollment 
(nine percentage points from the ideal) but in compliance on Blacl: enrollment 
(twelve percentage points from the ideal). 

The projected Fall 1983 enrollment was: 

number percent permitted 

Black 347 7S% 52%-83% 

White 82 19% 2n%-34% 

Other Mm 11 2% 2%-4% 

The hoped-for improvement in white enrollment was based largely upon the 
assignment of 43 white students to the tth grade, many of thern for the 
Academically Talented Program which operates for 6th grade on''y. In fact, 
only 27 white stuents are presently enrolled in the Sth grade, substantially 
fewer than the 39 enrolled in that grade last year, so that the school is 84% 
Black, 13% white, and 4% other minority. The Sth grade is only 7% white. 
Even the faculty is predominantly minority, due to the large number of i*ihite 
teachers who requested and were granted transfers out last year. 

The overall November 3rd enrollment is: 

number percent permitted 

Black 360 S4% 52% - 8S% 

White 55 13% 20% - 34% 

Other Mm 15 4% 2% - 4% 

Of the white students, five are enrolled in the Academically Talented Program 
(with 35 minority students). 

The Thompson clearly has major problems in desegregating. The decline 
in white enrollment since 1 97S is 60%, and the school is higher than any other 



-172- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 19 

nriiddle school in "shr-nkage" from May 1933 assignments to November 1 9S3 
enrollment (-33%). The school has been out of compliance with the white 
enrollment requirement for all nine years since that requirement was 
established by the Court, and was out of compliance with the Slack standard as 
well for the first seven years (the revised standard has brought it into 
compliance for 1982 and 19S3;). 

It 15 significant that the section of this Report on safety and security 
issues gives special attention to the Thompson as a troubled school, as does 
the section on student discipline. 

The principal, Mr. Gerald Hill, attributes these problems to several 
causes, including the assignment of geocodes to the school which were 
predominantly white when first implemented but are now largely Black (there 
are three bus loads of Black students transported to the Thompson, he said, 
who could walk to the Lewenberg Middle School). Continuity of staff is a 
problem. Transportation satety issues (a bus from Readville in southern Hyde 
Park was late and had been stoned the day of my visit) and fighting outside the 
school crested a climate which did not encourage white parents to keeo their 
children in the school. His efforts to reorganize the school with ungraded 
houses and teachers working together had been largely frustrated, he says, by 
staff insiability and other problems. 

The 19S2-S3 Annual Report provides sorrietimes poignant confirmation of 
these difficulties. The Parent Council co-chairs com^plain of frequent teacher 
absences, and that "the substitutes that replace these teachers are not 
qualified to teach children in this age group. They do not follow through with 
the work that the teachers leave for them. Some of the substitutes that are 
in the building can hardly speak or understand English, and these are the 
people that allow the student to roam in the halls and disrupt the classes of 
the teachers that do care." The Student Council report concludes, "We would 
like a cleaner scnool and more white students." 



-173. 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 20 



It seems unlikely that the school will attract more i/.'hite students - even 
the Academically Talented Program enrolls only 5 white students at present 
compared with 19 who were invitedi for a "shriniiage" of 74%. While this 
problem plagues every program, the chart which follows shows that the problem 
IS especially exacerbated for the Thompson. It will be noted that several 
other middle schools located in areas as heavily minority as that of the 
Thompson - the Holmes, the Timilty, the McCormack - do much better at drawnng 
white students to ATPs (from white sections of Dorchester, from Charlestown, 
from South Boston) than does the Thorvipson frorri Hyde Pari::. It is also 
interesting, and cause for concern, that the King magnet middle school does 
almost as poorly as the Thompson . . . but that is another story. 



■p School Invited Enrol led 



Edison 
Cur 1 ey 
Irving 
Thompson 
Ho Imes 
McCormack 

T i TTi 1 It y ' 2 

30 



15 
1 3 
22 
19 
18 
2S 



H a r n e s 

K 1 n g 

Total ■■ " 



Average 



19 

1 
1 S 



s 


-0 .40 


. 10 


-0.23 


17 


- C . 2 3 


5 


-0.74 


12 


-0.3 3 


1 8 


-0.31 


1 


-0.17 




-0.23 


1 


-0.6 3 


1 1 1 


-0.3 6 


. 3 3 


-0.35 



There is no question that the location of the Thompson works against its 
desegregation, though note that it is located only blocl<s from< the Pauline 
Agassiz Shaw. So does the fact that (based on a number of indicators) Hyde 
Park seemis particularly intransigent whth respect to accepting desegregation. 
Staff turnover and other problems, as well as the general difficulties of 
working with students in grades 6-S, create challenges which do not exist, for 

-174- 



AnalysiE of Special Desegregation Schools page 21 

example, at the P.A.Shaw. It would not be easy to make the Thompson a stably 
desegregated school, with the best of will and strategy. Without such a 
strategy and commitment, as seem to be developing around Bur|::e and 
Dorchester High Schools, it is most unlikely that the Thompson will meet the 
Court's requirements. 



BURKE HIGH SCHOOL 

Desegregation of the Burke has special significance: it was in part the 
manipulation of feeder patterns and grade sructures which segregated the 
Burke as an aVmost all-Black school in the late 1950s which led to the liability 
finding by the Federal District Court. A former girls' high school, the Burl<e 
does not provide some of the facilities which schools planned for boys make 
routinely available, and it has not proved easy to achieve the Court's 
desegregation objectives. The Burke has in fact underenrolled white students 
for nine years straight, since the Court-ordered 1975 Plan went into effect, 
and it overenrolled Black students for six of the first seven years (the 
modified compliance standard has made it difficult not to comply vjith the Black 
enroll'ment requirement for the past two years). 

The white enrollment of the Burl-;:e in April 19S3 was: 
Grade Number Percent 

15% 
7% 
3% 
6% 
9% 

The ideal white enrollment would have been 22%, and the permitted range was 
15% tto 28%, so that even the ninth grade was out of compliance, though showing 
significant progress. Compare the Decemiber white enrollments as they fell 
and then began to be rebuilt: 

Year Number Percent 

1978 154 15% 

-175- 



9 


34 


10 


11 


n 


3 


12 


6 


Total 


54 



AnalyETE of Special Desegregation Schools page 22 



T3S1 


41 


6% 


1932 


70 


1 0% 


1 933 


S7 


12% 



For 19S3-84 the same number (34) ot white students were assigned to the 
ninth grade that were enrolled in that grade last year, but a much smaller 
number of Black students were assigned, with the result that projected white 
percentage for ninth grade rose to 33%. Vigorous objections were raised at 
the implications, for the school, of a decline from 231 to SS in its entering 
class, and the Department of Implementation tool; measures to increase this 
enrollment after the approved assignments had been made in early May. The 
actual ninth grade enrollment is 204, with 141 Black students compared with 
the 45 Black students originally assigned. Additional white students were 
assigned as well, so that white ninth grade enrollment is now 41 or 20%. 

The overall enrollment, as of Novemiber 3rd, wias: 

number percent permitted 

Black 553 78% 52% - 36% 

White 37 12% 15% -25% 

Other Sb 9% 3% - 14% 

In a sense, the Department of Implementation attempted to wrench the 
Burke into compliance in a single year, and then adopted a more gradual 
approach which leaves the ninth grade at the ideal percentage and the tenth 
grade only very slightly below the permitted range. 

The Burke assignments provide an opportunity to examine in unusual detail 
the process of student assignments and the choices which rriust be made along 
the way; wie will outline the steps in the process briefly. 

(a) On April 23, 1983 the Department of Implementation (DI) provided 3 
printout of proposed assignments for all schools. As noted above, those for 
the Buriie showed a substantial decline in the minority enrollment of the ninth 
grade, and a consequent improvement of the white percentage in the school 

-176- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 23 

overall. The state's analysis) dated April 30) noted this progress and some 
indications that many of the assigned white students would attend. A 

subsequent analysis of expressed student preferences for the ninth grade 
(June 1) noted that only 40 Black students in District V had expressed a first 
preference for either Burl::e or Dorchester) though S9 were assigned to the two 
schools; in other wordsi the low Black enrollfnent in the ninth grade was clearly 
not the result of the DI turning away students who were seeking to attend the 
school. 

(b.i In a May 23. 1 9S3 memo John Coal<ley s-eported that) contrary to his 
intentions) some of the white prospective ninth graders living in District V had 
not been assigned to Burke or Dorchester, but rather to other high schools. 
Of the 45 students so assigned) 14 were assigned to English High and 10 to 
Madison Park High! there has been an on-going controversy about "robbing" 
these district high schools in order to assure that the citywide magnet high 
schools met the racial guidelines of the Court. Seven of them had been 
assigned to vocational progranns at Brighton and Hyde Park High SchoolS) 
presumably on the basis of an expressed preference) five to the East Boston 
High business program) and nine to Boston High) the work:-5tudy school. Of the 
45) 20 live in Burl^e High geocodes! had they been assigned to Burl<e, as Mr, 
Coakley had intended) it would have been possible also to assign significantly 
more miinority students to the school while continuing to irr.prove compliance 
with the permitted range for white enrollment. 

(c.i On May 31st Mr, Coakley and I talked by phone about ways to increase 
ninth grade enrollment at the Burke) and on June 9th he wrote to 
Superintendent Spillane to much the same effect. His approach was to 

identify Black and other minority students from District V who had either 
received none of their choices in the application/assignment process (15)) or 
had failed to return an application (62)) and to invite the headmasters of Buri;e 
and Dorchester high schools to attempt to recruit volunteers from these groups 
(and others) to transfer to their schools. He suggested to the headmasters 
(June 2) that they work with the middle school principals to identify students 
who might be open to considering Burke or Dorchester) depending upon geocode 

-177- 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 24 

of residence. The merrio also includes the information that 332 Black and other 
minority students from District V received their first choice schools) and 31 
their second or third choice schoolsi other than Burke or Dorchester. This is 
additional confirmation that the under-enrollrnent of the ninth grades at these 
schools was not the result of denying admission to minority students who 
expressed a desire to attend thern. 

(d) In a report to the state dated September ISth, Mr. Coakley reported 
on subsequent developments. The recruitment results were modesti but grade 
nine enrollment at both high schools had been increased in two ways: by the 
unfortunate fact that a substantial number of 1982-33 ninth graders were not 
promoted (this amounted to 43 Blacki 5 white) and 4 other minority students at 
Burke)) and a determined effort to assign students registering after May 
(generally) new residents) to Burl<e and Dorchester. 

Note that the additional assignments (after early May) were not reviewed 
with the state) though the approach used was discussed in principle. 

As of September 15th 46 white students were assigned to the ninth grsde 
at the Burke! as of November 3rd 41 were enrolled? this seems to indicate that 
the school has done quite well at retaining the assigned white students. It is 
especially encouraging that 32 white students are enrolled in the tenth grade) 
only a slight decline from the 34 in ninth grade last year. 

In Mr. Coakley's wordS) last Spring "very few students of any racial group 
- in fact) less than ten percent of any group - expressed a preference of any 
kind for the Burke School." This supports the analysis of the preference data 
included in the Board's last Report. Obviously it is essential that the program 
and climate of the school be strengthened and (just as important) that the 
perception of the school be changed, as a oasis for successful recruitment of 
Tfrinonty as well as white students. Our monitoring of the program and facility 
improvements to which the Superintendent has committed the School Department 
are presented separately. 



178- 



Ana1y£i£ of Special Desegregation Schools page 25 



DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

Dorchester has a somewhat better compliance history than Burl^ei having 
been under the permitted range for white students seven of the past nine 
years, and over the permitted range for Black students only three of those 
years! unlil;:e Burke, it was a racially-rrnxed (though rapidly changing) school 
prior to desegregation. 

Enrollment as of November 3rd 1 9S3 was: 

number percent pennitted 

Black 582 70% 52% - 86% 

White 129 16% 15% -25% 

Other 120 14% S% - 14% 

White enrollment has followed much the same "curve" as at the Burke, 
though at a higher level: 



Year 


Number 


Percent 


1978 


208 


20% 


1981 


113 


11% 


1982 


130 


14% 


1933 


129 


16% 



The grade profile is rather more even than at Burke, where there were 
very few white students in the upper grades last year; at Dorchester the 
vocational programs have served to retain more white students: 
Grade (S2-S3) Number Percent 

9 43 16% 

10 28 11% 

n 24 14% 

12 23 1 6% 

The prospective ninth grade assigned last May was 30% white, again 
through the expedient of assigning far fewer Black students than usual. The 

-179- 



AnalyEiE. of Special DeE-egregation SchoolE page 25 

proteEts and the proceEE outlined above with respect to the Burke occurred 
with respect to Dorchester High as well, and Blacl< ninth grade enrollment was 
increased from the 74 projected in May to the 144 now enrolled, with white 
enrollment also going up to 58 from the 49 assigned. The present ninth grade 
IS over 22% white, 

A related enrollment controversy at Dorchester High has involved the 
Spanish bilingual program, and whether it could be expanded to include the 
students nowi assigned to the Spanish bilingual program at Charlestown High? 
the former serves 78 students and the latter 74, so that both are below the 100 
student level specified in Boston's Lau Plan. To do so would bring the white 
enrollment to 14%, below the permitted range. 

The detailed reviewi of Burke enrollment process and the separate report 
on program and facility developments at Burke and Dorchester make it 
unnecessary to discuss Dorchester High at greater length here. 



CONCLUSIONS 

This rapid review of eight "special desegregation" schools, based upon 
statistics, annual reports, and brief visits, cannot do justice to the complexity 
of their history and the reality of their present and future prospects. 
Continuing monitoring wnll seek to clarify further this reality and to develop 
recommendations. Certain prelimriinary conclusions would not be arriiss at this 
point, however, and they are offered subject to correction on the basis of 
closer study. 

(1) There seems to be no forum or vehicle for the discussion and 
developrrient of special desegregation measures for each of these schools, and 
for sharing, among Central Office planners, the Department of Implementation, 
community district superintendents, and the leadership of each of these 
schools, in a search for solutions to the non-compliance which characterizes 
most of them. 



-180. 



Analysis of Special Desegregation Schools page 2' 



(2) There is no concerted effort of recruitment, either to retain students 
who have been enrolled at a lower level (frorri kindergarten to grade one, grade 
five to grade six, grade eight to grade nine), or for students who have never 
been enrolled in the public schools, which can assist schools in presenting their 
strengths and answering concerns. Generalized public relations for the Boston 
Public Schools, while necessary, has very little to do with the specific 
questions which parents have about particular schools. Boston could learn a 
good deal in this respect frorri Worcester, Springfield, and other communities in 
Massachusetts which have desegregated, in most cases more recently. 

(3) The fact that a particular school has been designated for special 
desegregation measures seems not to be taken into account in appointing 
principals, upon whomi will rest the ultimate success or failure of the effort. 

(4) The staff of the different special desegregation schools seem newer 
to have been brought together to discuss their commion responsibility to 
respond to the orders of the Court? I suspect that some of them are unaware of 
these orders, 

(5) Some aspects of the assignment orders may militate against 
successful implementation of the special desegregation orders. One example 
would be the apparent reassignment of students who have attended an Extended 
Day Kindergarten to another school for first grade, unless they live in the 
right geocodes. Another would be the inability of special desegregation 
schools to recruit beyond their assigned geocodes, as was proposed by the 
School Department, in a sense, in the "Beacon School" proposal of several 
years ago. The magnet schools in other cities in Massachusetts, unlike those 
in Boston, have assigned geographical districts and attract additional 
students whose attendance improves desegregation! the special desegregation 
schools in Boston are not free to do so. 

(6) None of the special desegregation schools identified staff (other than 
the principal) with responsibility for outreach efforts to increase enrollment 

-181- 



AnalyEiE of Special Desegregation Schools page 28 

from the assigned geocodes! arrangements for such effortsi where they existed 
at all (P.A.Shaw, Lee), seemed to rest with concerned parents end the 
principal. In each of the four elementary schools the inadequacy of clerical 
support was a problem, and there is no question that an effective and friendly 
office staff can have a major impact upon perception of a school and upon the 
regularity of communication - especially by telephone - with parents and 
prospective parents. In several cases special publications intended to 

support recruitment had been prepared in the past, but consensus seemed to 
exist that on-going and aggressive person-to-person communication was more 
important. Every special desegregation school should be staffed for effective 
communication. 

(7) A contrast wias noted between the Lee School, which seems to have 
relied upon s variety of special and supplementary programs to attract white 
students, and the P.A.Shaw, wihich offers only a solid and conventional 
instructional program and a welcoming atmosphere. Both approaches can be 
effective, as these examples show, but experience elsewhere suggests that 
they may be successful wnth different types of parents. Some of the white 
parents geocoded to the Shawi but not attending might, I would speculate, have 
attended the Lee if offered that options, and conversely some of those not 
dra'Ain to the "glamorous" Lee rrnght be very attracted to the "homey" ShaiM. 

It is a serious limitation upon recruitment efforts, l^lhich depend in part on 
a distinctive school flavor, if the school must seek to please all of the parents 
in its assigned geocodes. Unlike non-public schools, and unlil;e many rriagnet 
schools, these special desegregation schools are not really free to develop a 
distinctive appeal, and this is an inherent limitation upon their success. This 
suggests that more program and enrollment flexibility (and the desire, on the 
part of principals, to take advantage of it) might be of greater importance 
than any extraordinary resources in achieving compliance with the Court's 
requirements. 



Charles L. Glenn, Director 
182- 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATICfN 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



Analyses of Fall 19S5 EnroTlTngnts : Tobin K-S School 



The Toton School deserves special analysis because of the decision by 
the Court, in the Spring of 1932, to allow the school to function as a K-S 
school "Pilot" school, despite severe Tmsgivings on the part of the Court's 
= -;pert about the impact of tnis innovation upon the overall desegregation 
plan. These misgivings, expressed in a memorandum dated April 26, 1932, 
were answered in part by John Coakley in rrieiTioranaa dated April 29 anc May 
3, 1333, Mr. Coaiiley especially gave assurances that the effect of the pilot 
would not be to create non-compliance with the Court's standards at the 
Edison and Taft Middle Schools in the same district. 

It was after considering the positions expressed that the Court agreed 
to approve the Tobin "pilot", with the proviso that the intermediate grades 
(6-3) would reflect the district permitted range at that level, rather than the 
e I e m enter y 1 e v e 1 . 

What does the Tobin "pilot" consist of? The Tobin, lii^e other 

elemientary schools in Boston, serves Inndergarten students from its 
imrmediate neignborhood (tne Mission Hill section of Roxbury), and students in 
grades 1-5 drawn from 2S "geocodes" or geographical areas within District I, 
Under the approved "pilot", the Tobin is allowed to draw students in grades 
6-3 on a voluntary basis from any part of District I, sub.iect to the 
requirement that these grades reflect the District middle school permitted 
range of racial/ethnic enrollment. 

The prTmary educational benefit clarmed for h--3 schools is the greater 
continuity of instruction possible, and especially the education of 
intermediate students in the relati^.'ely stable environment of an elementary 
school rather than the sometimies difficult atmosphere of a middle school. In 
particular, parents who expect their children to go on to one of the 



183- 



Boston Assignment Analysis; Tobm School page 2 

exarrnnation schools or to the Umana Technical school in grade seven rr.ight 
well be expected to prefer a sixth year in an elementary school to a one-year 
stay in a middle school. 

That a K-8 structure per se is not inconsistent with desegregation is 
clear from the use of that structure in the highly successful Cambridge 
desegregation plant the proposed use of a mixed K-5, K-8 structure in the 
Lawrence desegregation plan, the phase-in of K-8 schools as part of the 
Worcester desegregation plan, and the fact that virtually all elernentary 
schools affected by the Chicago Desegregation Plan are K-8, Brookline, with 
its large Metco program, also uses the K-S structure. 

A survey of Worcester parents (February 1982;' conducted with state 
desegregation funds found that 3"?% of 6140 parents responding e.ipressed a 
first preference for the K-S, 9-12 structure by corripanson with only 12% for 
the K-5, 6-S, 9-12 structure now employed in Boston? it should be noted that 
neither is the general structure in Worcester at present. Parents whose 
children are now in K-8 schools in Worcester supported that structure 43% to 
5% for the K-5, 6-8, 9-12 structure. 



The general problem with the K-3 structure with respect to 
desegregation is that a school can acccmrmodate fewer students at eacr. 
grade level tnan if there are fewer grades in the school. The rationale 
behind building the large elementary schools in Boston (funded with state 
desegregation funds starting with the mid-1950s) was to bring together white 
and minority students from a wide area and thus to achieve racial balance. 
Increasing the number of grades in such a school shrinks the area from which 
students may be assigned, and thus the "safety margin" for stable 
desegregation. By drawing intermediate students on a x'oluntary basis, 
however, the Tobin disarms this particular concern. 



184- 



Boston Assignment Analysis: Tobin School page 3 

IMPACT ON THE TOBIN SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 

The Tobin appears to be maldng some progress in increasing its white 
enrollment in the lower grades; 

White Students Fall 1982 Fall 1983 

grade 112 11 

grade 2 7 11 

grade 3 3 1 

grade 4 2 5 ' 

The entering first grade was projected (last April) to enroll only S white 
studentsi which was the number of white kindergarten students last year. It 
may be that white parents are encouraged to send their children to the 
"geocoded" school because of the assurance that they will be able to remain 
there through the eighth grade, which is the basic premise of a K-S "magnet". 
In this connection, note that the present first and second grades, which are 
clearly enrolling more white students than the higher elementary grades, are 
the only classes which have entered since the K-S "e;;periment" began! each 
IS .iust within the permitted range for white enrollment, at 14.5% white. 

On the other hand, the overall white percent in the elementary grades 
(1-5) declined slightly, from 10% to S%. The Tobin "lost" 14 (22%) of the 
white students assigned to the school last Spring! twenty-four desegregated 
elementary schools lost a higher proportion of their assigned white students, 
while forty-four lost a lower proportion. In other words, "shrinl<age" of 
white student assignments is definitely a problem for the Tobin, but not 
markedly more than for other schools! one might even conclude that, given its 
location in the Mission Hill Housing Development, the school does rather well 
to hold its white "shrinl::age" to 22%. 

The drop in proportion white at the Tobin miay be attributed, in fact, 
primarily to larger Black and Hispanic enrollments than pro;ected. 



185- 



Boston AsEignment Analysis; Tobin School page 4 

The elementary grades are out of co'mp'liance with the permitted range 
for white enrollment, which is 14% - 24% for District I elementary schools. 

The middle school gradesi by contrast, are in compliance with the 
permitted range for middle school white enrollment (13% - 30%i, with 24% 
white enrollment; the Black and other minority enrollments are also in 
compliance. 

The Taft and Edison Middle Schools sre in compliance with all three 
ranges, which suggests that the Tobin has not had a destabilizing effect, as 
feared, upon the other schools in its district. 

The last Report included a detailed discussion of the Tobm, with an 

analysis of the students i/iho requested assignments to the Tobin and to the 

othr District I middle schools for 19S3-84, Taking first choices alone into 

account, substantially more Black and Other Minority stuaents requested the 

sixth, the seventh, and the eighth grades at the Tobin than were 

subsequently assigned, while slightly fewer wihite students requested the 

Tobin as their first choice than were assigned: 

First choice 1383-4 Black 

Requestea 5th 14 

assigned 4/ S3 5 

enrolled 11/83 S 

Requested 7th 27 

assigned 4/83 1 3 

enrolled 1 1/83 12 

Requested 8th 24 

assigned 4/83 . 1 1 

enrolled 11/83 7 

After a year m operation, the Tobm has established itself as an 
attractive option for students in District I. It might be noted, however, 
that virtually all of the white students who requested the Tobm we'e 
currently attending the school, with one first choice applicant from the 



186- 



White 


Other J 


Minority 


7 


44 




9 


IS 




7 


n 




8 


26 




8 


17 




7 


14 




8 


20 




10 


16 




6 


13 





Boston Assignment Analysis: Totnn School page 5 

Esldwin and one from the Winship for the sixth grade at the Tobin, for 
example. This suggests that fears that the Tobin would bring the Taft or 
Edison out of compliance were ill-founded! it also suggests that the school is 
not yet perceived as a "middle school" option for white students from other 
elementary schools. 

Of equal interest is the substantial number of Black students attending 
the Edison or the Taft who requested the Tobin for the seventh or eighth 
grade; twenty for the seventh and si;;teen for the eighth, "'"o what extent is 
this a "neighborhood school" preference (though the immediate vicinity of the 
school IS more Hispanic than Black)i and to what e:;tent a reflection on the 
e>;perience of these students at the Edison or Taft? It would be useful to 
know . . . 

Talnng into account the students who expressed a second or third 
preference for the Tobin, there were 57 Black students and IIS other 
minority students who expressed interest in the school for grades six through 
eight who could not be accorrrmodated. While an unl::nown number of these 
students may have received another of their preferences, it is a matter of 
some concern that many students are being offered an opportunity which in 
fact they will not be able to tai::e ad">'antage of. It might be, for example, 
that minority students should be eligible only coming out o"' the fifth grade at 
the Tobin School (that is, out of the geocodes assigned to the school), with 
white students eligible district-wide. The effect of this would be that 
minority students living in areas near the Tobin which are "geocoded" to 
schools in Allston or Brighton would not be encouraged to apply to a school to 
which they cannot, because of desegregation requirements, be assigned. 

Since most of the other minority applicants were seeldng admnssion to a 
bilingual prograrri offered at the Tobin in grades 6-S, it may be that the 
program shoula extend only to grade 5, as was the case until last year. With 
179 students, the Tobin has one of the largest bilingual programs in Boston 
at any level, amiounting to 35% of its total enrollment. In view of the fact 
that both Edison and Taft offer Spanish bilingual programjs at the middle 



-187- 



BoEtcn AESignment AnalysTs: Tobin School page 6 

school level, with the Taft enrolling only SI students in its program compared 
with the rrnmrnum of SO called for by the Lau, Plan, it is questionable to offer 
3 third program for grades 6-8 at the Tobin. The effects of offering this 
program are disappointment for students who cannot be admitted because of 
desegregation requirements, underenrolTment of the program at the Taft, and 
an extremely large bilingual program at the Tobin. 



CONCLUSIONS 

To judge by enrollment, the Tobin pilot lOS grade structure m,ay be 
judged a success. Not only have grades 6-S attracted an enrollment which 
meet the Court's requirements, but there is an apparent improvement in the 
composition' of the entering grades. The experience in Worcester and other 
cities, that parents appreciate the continuity offered by a K-S school, seemis 
to be confirmed - though in a very preliminary way - at the Tobin. 

In addition, it does not appear that the desegregation of the Edison and 
Taft has been adversely affected by the imiplementation of grades 6-8 at the 
Tobin. There is no reason to believe that city-wnde miagnet schools will find 
the Tobin damiaging comipetition. 

On the other hand, the "success" of the Tobin should not be generalized 
into a conclusion that K-S schools could be created indiscriminately, with no 
damage to desegregation. Each potential l-:>S school should be considered in 
its context of district, neighborhoods, and other schools. It would appear, 
for examiple, that the seriously under-utilized Lee School (one whole wing of 
this modern facility has been closed off) in Dorchester might serve as an 
appropriate K-S school, in a section of the city ^«.'ith few miagnet schools (the 
Haley in Roslindale, the Ohrenberger in West Ro;;bury), Even in this case the 
potential imiPact upon the under-utilized middle schools in District III would 
have to be taken into account. The fact that the principal of the Robert 
Gould Shauj Middle School in the samie district has asked to extend the grades 
of that school down to kindergarten, and argues that he has room for two 



188- 



Boston AsEignrnent Analy'E-is: Tobin School page 7 

clssses at each grade level K-8, derrions-ti-ates. that there is more than one 
way to move to a K-S structure. Whether either or both of these schools 
should beco'ffle a K-8 school is of course a question requiring careful study. 

Finally, note that the Tobin attracts white students alfnost exclusively 
from its own enrollment, while encouraging far mjore applications from 
minority students attending other District I schools than could be 
accommiodated. In particular, a large number of Hispanic students apply to 
ihe bilingual program in those grades at the Tobin, Is it wise to offer this 
grade 6-8 program in comipetition with the under-enrolled Spanish bilingual 
program at the Taft school? 

In the next phase of monitoring, the Tobin will be mionitored on-site and 
evidence sought of any problem) s or new strengths which have developed as a 
result of adoption of the K-S structure in 1382-83. Efforts to recruit and 
retain white students will De assessed. 

In reviewing the space miatrix and proposed assignments for 1984-85, 
the issues noted above of bilingual enrollment in grades S-S and of miinority 
students disappointed in their applications for the Tobin will be discussed 
with tr.e Departmient of Implementation. 

Charles L. Glenn, Director 
November 1 S83 



189- 



mrsshchusetts department of EDUChTIGN' 
burehu of eouhl educhTionhl opportunity 



ftnaiysis of Fail iySJ t.nroi Irnents: tiu.rke and L)orc~s~-tBr 
Hioh 

DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

MflNDPiTE 

Dvaft Order of November 6, 1961: With resoGct to 
Dorchester, the D.I. shall conduct an assessment of the 
CLirr icuiar. ohysical olant ariC staffing needs of Dorchester 
High School for the 19SE-S5 school year and shall file a 
reoort of the results of such study, including 
recommendations for change. 

*■ CURRICULUM AND STAFFING 

KEY QUESTION; Are curriculum revisions and staffing 
□atterns consistent with the special desegregation plans 
submitted to the Court? 

METHOD: Monitors visited the soecial, citywide programs 
designed to attract studevits to Dorchester High School , and 
interviewed the heac of the vocational educatiori de□^^rtment 



FINDINGS 

Programs 

Dorchester High ScnooPs sceciai desegregation Dlan "i^ocusec: 
on magnet (.citywide) vocational education oro grams as a 
mechanism for attracting additional students, especially 
white students, to the school. At the time the pl-an was 
written, Dorchester had two "trade and industry" magnet 
shoDs: woodworking and upholstery. The oian proposed that 
one additional magnet "careers program" be established: a 
Human Services orogram. Since tfiat time one additional 
magnet shoo has been added (urban retrofit, the restoration 
of older dwellings incorporating energy-saving techniques) 
and ovis has begun to be ohased out (uahoistery) . A 
recommencat ion has also been made tnat the woodworking 
orogram be phased out. 

The removal of these orograms was mandated by tne Uviified 
Plan for Vocational Education. which was written in 1075,, 
The plan called for transfer of both the upholstery and the 
woodworking shoos to the Occupational Resource Center (see- 
the report on occupational education in this volume). The 

-190- 



fact that the soecial desenrenat ion Dian, which was wv^itten 
in i9Sc:, relied on these same rnaanet prograims to att'ract 
new and out-of-d istrict students oresents a diiemrna„ 



ihe soecial desegregation efforts at Dov^chester High Sch^: 
rnav be weakeried bv the removal of these arocrams. 



present , 



mere 



are S4 students enrolled in ail the mannel 



shoos: 46 Black, £0 White, and IS other minority. Sixty 
eicnt of these students ars in woodworkiriD or upholstev^y : 
37 Black, 16 White s/od 13 other minority. It is essential 
that proposals to remove programs from the school should be 
evaluated for their imoact ori desepreqat ion. 



did 



;h regard to the operation of the magnet shoo; 
the vocational deoartment expreesed 



ni: 



! e "^ h a t ij i~ r 



the head 
sat i sf act i on, but 
Chester High School lacks a Coooerative 
Education supervisor. Because there is no fulltimie 
supervisor, tnere is a limit on the number of students who 
can be o laced in cooperative vs/ork sites, ar\u thus a limit 
on the number of students who can benefit fr-om the 
experience and employmevit opportunities -result ir,g from 
coooerative work expev^ience. 



Particular attention was paid to the Health Careers I'^agnet, 
which was a centerpiece of Dorchester High School's special 
desegregation plavu The plan initially proDosed an 
ambitious but impracticable "Human Services" program, fron- 
which the Health Careers Manriet has nevolved. f^t the 
writing of the last report, there seemed to be very little; 
orooress i'n imolementinn the Health CareG^-^B l^annet. 



'_' r I 
1 } 
X S 
ul 1 
wo 



seauent 1' 



tne 



or 1 mar 



monitor inc 



quest ion; 



wnether a pv^ogram has been established, 
educational objectives a're~ Tne r-v: 

orogram at the introductory level now 
new staff have oeen hired — a Provraur, 



ci r I L. 

mi tors f 
Coord ins 



L-oncernttL. 
(£) what 






.i '. ' r I „ 



=1 . 



'w O CI 

for 



rd i n 



; or 



U'jnc 



has 



riur 



;in: 



the program' s gaining entv^ee 



t o 



:ree, i 
med ica! 



Li inic; 
rereauisi te 

nst it ut ions) . These two staff members ars working closely 
ith the head of the science department: all seem com.mitted 
o develooinq an excellent oronram. 



Students 



There are thirty nine students enrolled in the program. 
Attendance is S0% — a figure which pleases the staff 
Decause it includes several students have no real interest 
m tne orogram ana so lower the attendance rate. The 
health Careers Magnet has lost several stuoents, or imav^i iy 
for reasons that involve transportation. Pill HeaJth 
Careers hagnet students must use the i'lBTft. Several students 
who left lived nearby. but had to use MBTh routes which 
took them into town and back out: two left because they 
preferred magnet programs for which they could get busing;; 
ana two had originally sinned uo to get out of another high 

-191- 



Bchooi, but soon returned because they could net their own 
buses to that school. 

P 1 3r:r-\ inn and I rn d 1 ement at 1 on 

The staff members described the goal of their Dronrani as 
''Diacmg kids in jobs and college — using the program to 
motivate them to go on to higher education." During the 
first two years of the progremi, students will take core 
courses ar\ti observe numerous clinical sites. By ths 11th 
grade, students will be ore pared to decide between a 
clinical internship or college prep (with clinical time 
arranged to minimize loss of in-school time). 

The Dianning group for the Health Careers Magnet included 
reDv--esentat ives of the QRC, the University of 
Massachusetts, the Department of Implementation, and the 
Office of School Operations office. Recruiting for the 
arogram was done by the Development Officer of Dorchester 
High School, and New England Telephone (Dorchester's 
business oairing) did the recruiting brochures. 

The Health Careers i^iagnet staff v^esorted that they nave 
received full coooeration from the Boston School 
Deoartment. In particular, they are collaborating with the 
ORC, so that they can use its traiviinc facilities. The- 
only problem they reported concerned trarisportat ion — 
arranging the buses necessary to transport Health Careers 
Magnet students to and from their clinical observation 
sites. The monitors will evaluate the result i'.'ig 
t ra.nsportat ion arrangements during the next phase of 
monitoring. 

Tne Healtn Careers Magnet staff also reported receiving all 
tne curricui urn materia is they nad ordered in time for the 
start of school. These included several new texts, as well 
as the relevant ORC "learning guides" (the development of 
whicn was primarily funded by the state). 

The monitors were pleased to learn that the staff of the 
Health Careers Magnet is investigating the possibility of 
coordination with a Department of Education-funded program 
at Dimock Community Health Center, whose purpose is 
recruiting, counseling and placing students in health 
careers. The Health Careers Magnet staff a.re hoping to use 
the health center as ari observation/clinical site, and to 
take advantage of its counseling resources. 

In summary, the staff a/re enthusiastic about the program, 
and believe their students are also: "the kids see a real 
purpose to it." The staff's (ana students') one ainxiety 
concerns the future. Students inquire whether the program 
will still be there in three years, and the staff are 
hesitant to offer reassurance. 

-192- 



staff 

H final question concer^ns whether the Boston School 
Decartrnent is meeting the needs for additiorial staff 
outlined in the special desegregation plan. The Headmaster 
of Dorchester High School stated that all his staffing 
needs had been met. Not only have two coordinators for tne 
Health Careers Magnet been hired, but also a new ROTC 
instructor has joined the staff. Hccordinn to the 
Headmaster. there is a real demand for RDTC at Dorchester 
High School; 91 students wanted to take ROTC, but only SQ' 
(4£i boys and iE:0 girls) could be accepted. The Headmaster 
hooes to hire an assistant ROTC instructor for next school 
year. The Headmaster did note a need, however, for an 
instructor to train his staff in the use of the computers 
Ejorchester High School has just received. It should be 
noted that all three of the new staff at Dorchester High 
Sch oo 1 ar-B white. 

«- CfiPITftL IMPROVEMENTS 

KEY QUESTION: To what extent have the facility improve- 
ments Cj.ted in the plan submitted to the court iDeen under- 
taken and /or completed? 



MbTHQu: Review of written plans submitted to the school 
f ac i 1 i t i es mon i t or , ar]d on-s i t e o bser vat i on . 

The Headmaster reported that the imorovements are actually 
uriderway; in fact, the first of them — a new blacktop 
surface for the pairkinn lot — commenced during o'ne of the 
monitoring visits. 

The Headmaster renorted a good working relat lovish i d with 
both the architectural firm and the DBrier-s.l contract o:-"- 
resDorisible for the improvements. He said that the contra- 
ctor had won the contv^act with a bid that was *£'00, ©iZiG 
under the allotted $1.3 million, but was finding that the 
work required was going to be more extensive, and expen- 
sive, than he had originally thought. The Headmiaster did 
not know whether the architect's fees — which were not in- 
cluded among the original itemized costs — would nece- 
ssitate elimination of any of the planned improvements. 

When asked whether the staff and students a.re takivic heart 
from the renovations, he 'replied that the teachers ars 
berinning to believe that the improvements will happen, but 
that ne didn't think the students are, "They get promisee 
so many things that never happen. I don't think, they'll 
believe in the renovations until they don't have to wear- 
overcoats in classrooms anvmore because the windows don't 
leak. " 

-193- 



* SAFETY HND SECURITY 

KEY QIJESTIOM: five safety and security concerns being 
resolved? 

METHOD: Consultation with the monitor for safety and 
security, and on-site observation, 

FINDINGS 




This proceed ure for discipline requires teacher involvement. 
The Headmaster said that one of the first things he did 
when becoming headmaster was tci have a lot of telephones- 
installed. Teachers are not allowed to refer students for 
discipline without evidence that they have first attempted 
to handle the orobiem on their own. Teachers ax-^e 
encouraged to call the parents of students before referring 
them; the Headmaster believes that this not only improves 
Darent-school communication, but also makes discipline more 
effective since many students are deterred from misbehavior 
by the prospect that their parents will be infc'rmed. The 
Headmaster also relies heavily on oairent conferences, often 
using them as an alternative to suspension. 

The Headmaster is pleased v-Jith his security staff — OTie 
sergeant anc two officers: each of them has been at 
Dorchester High School at least two years. He says that 
the security staff has increased respect for authiority 
among students as a v^esult of the way they handle 
themselves. The teachers also resaect the security sta-^f, 
and always back up the officers, he said. 

The Headmaster believes that it is important to have 
"alternative programs" available for students with repeated 
discipline violations, but noted that there ars not enough 
"slots" aval laible in the alternative orogram for Dorchester 
High School. and emphasized the need for more alternative 
schools and orograms in tne school system. 

During two site visits to Dorchester High this fall, the 
atmosphere seemed both secure and quiet. Hallways were 
emoty while classes were in session. Between classes,, 
students were spirited but orderly. The monitor was in 
several classes briefly without Dorchester staff, and the 

-194- 



5tuderits v-jere polite and friendly. (See the seoarate 
report on safety arid security for further information.) 

* RECRUITMENT ftND RETENTION 

KEY QUESTION: Is the school effectively recruiting 
students, and s.re students being retained? 

METHOD: Interview with the Headmaster. 

flccording to the Headmaster^ the Dorchester High School 
E'evelopment Officer did some recruiting last year, but it 
was the school's first attempt. He believes they will be 
able to do a much better job this year. With regard to 
retention rates. it is still too early in the school VBd.r 
for evaluation. Both recruiting and retention records 
will be examined closely during the next phase of 
monitoring. 

See the discussion of recruitment in the section of this 
Report on "soecial desenreoat ion schools". 



JEREMIfiH E BURKE HIGH SCHOOL 

MRNDRTE 

L»raft Order of November 6, 19Si: With respect to Burke, 
the E'eoartment of Implementation shall preoare three planss 
a curricuiar orogram olan, a facility imorovement oian, artC 
a olan for staffing which fits the curricularr program for 
Burke High School. 

* CURRICULUnI AND STAFFING 



MONITORING OBJECTIVE: fire curriculum revisions and 
staffing patterns consistent with the special desegregation 
Dlans submitted to the Court? 

METHOD: Interviews with Headmaster and curriculum 
consultant. 

FINDINGS 

ftccoraing to the Headmaster, the Boston School Deoartment 
has resDonded to all his reouests for staff. He is short 
one math teacher — but has been told there aren't any to 
be had in the system. 

The special desegregation olan for the Burke included 
Drovisions for two new orograms: Commumi cat ions Plrts 3.rtd 

-195- 



Comouters. flccording to the Headmaster, the Comrnuriicat i on 
Hrts Drogram has Deen reduced to a Theatre Arts program, 
which uses &3b funds and has a permanent staff. He 
believes that the communications arts plan was too complex, 
and he had serious difficulties putting together a 
teaching staff appropriate for the program. 

The computer program seems to be going well. The monitors 
interviewed the liaison from the University of 
rlassachusetts (656-funded, university pairing) responsible 
for establishing the computer program at the Burke. He 
stated that the computer program has two strands: business 
education and computer science. He has already revised the 
entire business curriculum to accommodate the new 
computers, and is now establishing a computer-assisted 
learning lab for all teachers to use. 

He also worked with the E-turke last year, when a successful 
in-service training involving computers resulted in the 
Burke's having the highest percentage of computer-trained 
teachers in the system. The first semester of this 
trairiinc was after school and entirely voluntary — but 
attendance was good. E'uring the second semester, teache-'s 
recBivBd credit for attendance. He reports that teacher 
enthusiasm for computers is high — a result of both the 
teachers' initiative arid the administration's commitment to 
providing training and technical assistance. 

It must be noted, however, that the intent of the special 
desegregation plan — that new and unique programs be 
developed to improve the Quality of the school ar\d attract 
new students — has not been fulfilled. The pared-down 
Theatre Arts program seems to function more as ayi 
interesting elective for Burk.e students, and its future and 
purpose av-s uncertain. The computer program, while it 
certainly seems to be good, is not unicue — all Boston 
hinn schools ar^e "computer izinn. " 



* CflPITPiL II>1PR0VEMENTS 

KEY DUESTIOIM: To what extent have the facility improve- 
ments cited in the plan submitted to the Court been under — 
taken and completed? 



MtTHQD: Review of written documents submitted to monitors 
for scnooi facilities, ana on-site observation. 

FINDINGS 



It was anticipated that the facility improvements would be 
made during the summer vacation, 1983. Ot the time of the 
monitors' interview with the Headmaster, no improvements 

-196- 



had benuri. The Headmaster expressed impatience, noting 
especially that the Burke's accreditation fv-om the New 
Ennland Association of Schools and Colleges was being held 
up by because the current facilities s.re unacceotable. Ivi 
general, the lack of orogress on renovations seems to be 
further evidence to students and staff that the Boston 
School Denartment is planning to abandon the Burke. 

Inquiry into the status of the renovations revealed that 
the cause of the delay is the failure, thus far, of the 
Public Facilities Department to obtain the certifications 
necessav^y to present their application to the Board of 
Education. These certifications will not be ready for 
action by the Board until January, at the earliest. It 
must be concluded that the City of Boston Public Facilities 
Deoartment has not fulfilled its obligations under this 
part of the special desegregation plan in a. timelv manner. 



* RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION 

KEY QUESTION: is the school effectively recruiting 
students, and ax-e students beina retained? 



METHOD: Interview with Headmaster. 

FINDINGS 

The Burke has an energetic School Development Officer, who 
will be responsible for recruiting. She appears to have a 
close working relationship with the Burke's business and 
institutional partners, so it is anticipated that thE 
r- e c r u. i t i n g will be v :'. g cr r"- o u s . Both r e c r u i t i r i r a i"i d r e t e r i t i ■:> n 
will be monitored during tne next months. 

See the discussion of recruitment in the section of this 
Report on "special desenreuat ion schools". 



KEY DUtSTION: What ars the procedures used to assign 
students to the 9th grade? 

METHOD: Interview with Headmaster. 

Difficulties arose last Spring in connection with the 
aissignment of new ninth graders to Burke (and, to some 
extent, to Dorcnester) : the issues are discussed at some 
length in the section of this Report on "special 
desegregat iovi schools". The size of the ninth grade is 
much larger than originally projected in part because of 
new assignments and in part because of non-promotion of 
manv students. 



■197- 



The Headmaster was pleased that the size of the freshman 
class at Burke was increased from 69 to £07. The increase 
heioed allay fears that the Burke was being abandoned: 
"Everybody believed that the small freshman class meant 
that the Burke was going to be closed. " 

He made several comments regarding the results of the 
assignment procedure at the Burke which identified ways in 
which the assignment orocedure and SDecial desegregation 
affect each other. First, he noted that of the 148 newly- 
assigned freshmen at the Burke, only 54 came from the 
Burke- s traditional feeder schools, Cleveland and Wilson^ 
fts a result the freshmen clusters (introduced as part of 
the special desegregation plan), which were successful last 
year in Dart because the students all kne^^| each other from 
miodle school, did not work well this year. The Headmaster- 
also noted that there were £84 new students (all grades) 
assigviBd to the Eiurke this year; only Madison Park had a 
higher number, he said. Since new students arrive without 
schedules, programs, etc, high numbers of them create many 
DroDlems during the ojening days of school. 

The last report noted that a small ninth graide (as- 
originally projected) might be an opDortunity to strengthen 
the educational program of the Burke, if staffing was not 
correspondingly reduced. The demand which emerged in 
several Quarters, in May and June, for assignment of 
additional students was responded to by the Denartment of 
Implementation, but not without creating other kinds of 
Droblems. 



* MID-TERM SDCIfiL PROMOTIONS 

KEY QUESTION: Hre mici-term social cromotions decreasing? 

METHOD: Interview with Headmaster. 

The Headmaster stated that District V has agreed that there 
VMill not be any promotions of students to the Sth grade 
excent durinn the summer. 



** RECOMMENDhTIONS 

Dorchester High School 

1. Proposals to remove magnet vocatiorial education 
programs from Dorchester should be evaluated for their 
imoact on special desepreaat ion efforts in that school. 



■198- 



£. Hrrangernents should be made to er.aare that ther- i- 
adeauate suoervisior, of coooerative education rnaanet 
students who ax-e. or sy-<=^ .= iin-ihi= +•.-. i.^ ni==^=H • ^-'^'^, 

placed in work 



students who are, or are eliaible to be 
sites. ~ ' 

3. H-rrangernents should be made to enerir:= 

be adecuate transportation for the Health 

Dians to provide extensive clinical site' 
part ici pat inn st udents. 



that there will 

Lareers Macnet ■ s 

J b 5 e r V a t i o n f jd r 



burke Hiqh School 



1. 'h\Ji*y '--'^ Boston Public Facilities Deoartment should 
ensure that the renovations called for in th^ sp^ci^l 
JSrit^ly. °''" -'^-tted to the Court are undertaken 

£■ The Boston School Department should develoo and ornpnsB 
a new magnet oronram to replace and serve the same function 
as the Communication Arts Procram. 



Judith C. Taylor 
December 1983 



•199- 



^f-O^/iivl!!! 



E£ OF 



TMECiTY O 







83-692 



L-t,UJi 



-^Z 



! i ii iCA ri'.'r:.i-:-.-"^'_;» ." ^r'A • 
November 28, 1983 



MEM0F3iNDUM TO: 
FROM : 

RE: 



V 



Dr. Robert Spillane,>>, Superintendent 

Jim Caradonio, Director, Education & Employment 

future of vocational; programs s^- — 



1 



The Department of Implementation has requested changes in the 
student assignment booklet. In order to finalize the courses 
of f ered, for 1984-85/ I recommend the following: 

1. Automotive /Brighton High ; No changes. 

2. Agribusiness/West Roxbury : No changes. 

, 3 .. Machine Shop/Hvde Park ; No changes - , ^^ 

*■ 4 ^ Machine Shoo/East Boston : No changes. 

(No new students will be admitted to this program. Existing 
students will return to complete cheir studies. Until we 
study all our machine programs and complete a labor market 
study, we will maintain the status quo.) 

5;. Do:fchester High School 

a) Upholstery : Drop the program. Last year no new students- 
were admitted. Current enrollmed:: 12 students. Last ■'-^ 
year we clearly indicted that we were phasing this program 
out. Labor market needs for upholstery workers remains low. 
We shall proceed with our plan to drop this program. 

b) Woodworking : Begin to phase program out. Do not admit new 
students (9th & 10th grade) . Existing students return to 
complete their studies. By September, 1985/ the program 
will terminate. ( Rationale : 'low labor market demand.) 

Dorchester can shift resources (staff salaries and supplies) to: 

1) Increase Health Magnet 

2) Upgrade Business Education (add computers and '.^/ord Process- 
ing) 

3) Assume costs for Urban Retrofit program. (In June 1984, the 

third year of the funded retrofit program will end. The 

State requires Boston to ccn-inue this program with GSP 

funds . ) 

-200- 



Dr. Spillane 

Future of vocational programs 



Students who wish to study woodworking can do so at the small 
program we will offer at the Humphrey Center. This one small 
program corresponds to labor market needs . 

The Federal) Court mandates that the Upholstery program and 
Woodwoifking' programs be transferred from Dorchester to the 
■^ Humphrey Center. The programs will no longer operate at 
Dorchester; we do not need to transfer them to the Center. 
We must phase out these programs since they are outdated. 

r expect opposition from District V, Dorchester, and community 
groups . 

On November 29, I am meeting with District V and Dorchester High 
staff to discuss the future of programs at Dorchester. 

If you do not approve of these recommendations, please contact me 
Otherwise, I will proceed to implement these program directions. 



/n 



Oliver Lancaster 
Robert Peterkin 
Rosem.arie Rosen 
John Coakley •. ' 
Joyce Malyn-Sraith 
Frank Laquidara 
Cl-if ford ■ Janey 



\ 



N 



■201- 



MASSflCHUSETTS DEPARTMENT GF EDUCATION 
BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 



9D^ly5i5 of Fall liQ3 Enrollment: EAST BOSTON BUSINESS 

MAGNET 



MANDATE 

Order of May 6, 19785 East Boston High shall... be 
desegregatejj in accordance with plans to be formal at sd by 
the parties and submitted to the court.... 



* CURRICULUM OF THE BUSINESS MAGNET PROGRAM 



KEY QUESTION; What is the curriculum of the business 
magnet program and does it comply with the court-approved 



METHOD: I he monitors visited the business Magnet, and 
asked to review curricula. 

OVERVIEW 

The "Freshman Cluster" 

The plan submitted by the Boston School Department for a 
Business Magnet at East Boston High School had two parts- 
(1) The first part proposed a "freshman cluster" that 
would integrate incoming students from District VIII arid 
studerits recruited to the Business Magnet . It would have 
its own permanent staff of teachers ana aides (including a 
minority aide) and would occupy a distinct section of the 
high school building. The purpose of the cluster would be 
"to establish a climate for learning, and motivation,, 
through a program of iristruct ional support activities such 
as team teaching, tutoring and field trips." Teachers were 
to be available for one houv" after school four days a week 
to contact parents, counsel and tutov^ students and plan 
cluster activities. The cluster classrooms were to be 
equipped with special educational equipment and support 
materials such as minority texts and magazines. 

"Salable Commercial Skills" 

(£) The second phase of the Business Magnet was to be 
based on "a magnet theme of salable commercial skills." 
Students could select from four areas: legal secretary, 
medical secretary, computerized bookkeeping and court 
stenography. "Substantial number Cs]" of Business Magnet 
students would be assured slots in a Vocational Work Study 

-202- 



ProDvam. Finally, a specified naraber of studei'its would be 
assured seats in the Boston Business School for orade 13. 



FINDIMGS 

There is rto freshman cluster, aud consequently vio special 

classrooms, no special staff, no aides (minority or 

othe-rwise). Freshmen Business ["^annet students are all 

assigned to the same schedule, which is substantially the 

same as the schedule for "regular" business majors at the 
high school. 

LH freshman remedial reading program, funded through 
Chaptev" 636, has been available for some time; it is 
intended to promote integration by having white and 
minority students attend the same class. Previously, only 
students requiring remedial assistance were assigned to the 
Drogram. This year, because only £8 of the incoming ■ 
freshmen read at or above grade level, all freshmeri were 
assigned to the orogram. Unfort unately, the program is noiA; 
structured so that eacn freshman receives one semester of 
reading and one semester of career exploratory. 
Consequently the program is not available to students on an 
"as-needed" basis.] 

The Business Magnet majors have also been modified; they 
are now: legal/medical clerical, legal /medical secretary, 
reprographics and computer-oriented accounting. The 
clerical major is less demanding than the secretary major 
as it does not reauire stenography. Only two classes 
distinguish the legal/medical secretary major fv^orn the 
regular business major; a Ifith grade legal/med ical 
termiviology/of f ice procedures class, and b.ti lith grade 
legal/medical typing class. 

Each of the four mapnet maiors is composed of core courses 
attended by all business majors (e.g., typing) and magnet 
cotirses — such as the ienal /med ical typing ciass ~ which 

students. 

The claim that "repropraph ics" is a major seems inflated. 
Its students major in office reproduction eouipment, 
inciudinc a xeroK machine, a collator, a stapler, and an 
offset duDlicator. The instructor said he also teacher 
"some layout and proofreading." It is difficult to imagine 
that the students reauire a three-year major to master 
these reproduction machines. The program could be a sound 
one if it actually taught the skills of layout and 
proofreadino in an office context, but it lacks the 
necessary equipment, and there was no indication that 
students' received intensive instruction in the 

-203- 



proofreading/editing skills that rnarpy offices would find 
valuable. 

The computer-oriented accounting major sounds more 
promising, especially since East Boston High School now has 
computers. Howevev% the Math Department has taken the lead 
in establishing a computer program at East Boston High 
School, and the ex'tent of involvement by the E-Jusiness 
Department is unclear. 



Planning and Leadership 

The Business Magnet is directed by the head of the 
Businiess Department. She is actually in charge of three 
programs: Business Magnet, regular business and college 
business. fls a result of fiscal cutbacks, she is also 
responsible for teaching some business courses. Aside 
from the Director and the Business Department teachers, 
there Are no additional Business Magnet staff. 

These demands or\ the time of the Business Magnet director 
have the inevitaDle result of denying her the time to 
develop art excellent program. For example, she has not 
been able to arrange any training in computers for the 
business department staff. Nor has she had time to assist 
staff in developing curricula. She has just this year 
asked the Business Depav^tment staff to prepare outlines of 
their curricula; there were no curricula for the monitors 
to examine. The director did note that special curricula 
were originally prepared for the Business Magnet, but they 
wet-e never used: "they would probably be great, if we had 
any money. " 

when asked whether she had developed proposals fov" funds to 
enhance and/or evaluate the program, the director indicated 
that hev" responsibilities deny her the time. The program 
used to benefit from ESflPi funds and an annual Chapter 536 
grant to recruit students, but at present does not receive 
any outside funds. (Chapter 63& funds were provided for 
recruiting, and withdrawn when it became clear that more 
than enough students were coming to the Business Magnet 
through the assignemtn procedure. ESftfl funds merged into a 
block grant whose fund are available to the Boston School 
Department; apparently the Business Magnet did not benefit 
from block grant funds. ) It should be noted that an 
original condition on the Business Magnet was that it 
should not rely on "soft" money. The School Department has 
complied, using local funds to support the program. This 
supDort, however, seems to be minimal. 

The entire business department suffers from fragmentation. 
Business Magnet students are in one section and can avail 
themselves only of its four majors. Regular students are 
in the other two sections, potentially benefitting from 

-204- 



Vlf.i!^ "college" cornoonent or their data Drocessino 

cornDor.ent, bat unable to take advantane r.f -h« ^^^--^^'5 
.^agnet's_ rna,ors. cm order fc^lt::^S^sl:''arrJ"''t^ 
Drwgram lines, they would have to request \rd "loo 
transfer frnrn the Di=;ti--ir-4- ty d requesr, and receive, a 
the District VIM F-i!p . Business Magnet oroqrarn 'to 
Li^tMct Vi.I E..st Boston High School regular prograrr.. ] 

Finally, the Business Mannet se^rns tr, s,,f^^.. 
administrative nenl^r-^ =.^h ^ ' _, ■ =--'"- c._. surter from 
Boston Hinn Scht'i adrnfnlt.';t "'" -^'''"^ example, an East 
the RM=i,,L^^ \ ^^-^'-^ inacvertantly r^fey^t-eti tn 
^ne Business Magnet as "transit innal " ir - J -'errea .,... 
It wa=; cle^r fha+- K= ' "fi^-i-i' luncii, m ^ content where 
v.=^ Clear that ne meant academically weak Ho , Lf 
rererring to the Deoartment of Implement tt i -^f^ • . 
on honorinn renuest= frnm m^n^of r.^^K t'"^ insistence 
transfer t,-, ^h'l V ^'^^^'^'^^ machine shop students to 

i-rcinsrei- to the repular aronram at F=^<=-t u-^-^-- -r,_ 

administrator indicated that he th'nuaht i- wn'-'^d ^^ '^ 
appropriate to transfer th^. n^r-h ! wuuxd be more 
their ooor academic 5"^=% -^h"'- ^^'"^ students, with 

- • c^-<-=ii-c;,llll_ SKI lis, to the BlU^mpcic: M;Jn•-^^- -r.- 



th( 



Imp! icat ions 



it should be remembered that after the nz,r,v--.+. 

is Phased nut th^ p,,L7^„ m f magnet machine shop 

r.,=..4!;„::!^._.: !l . ^^ Business Magnet will be the onlv 



mani,estation of desegregation m East Bostnr, Hiuh Schn.v 
The School Department's commitment to the prnpr^r^ ha; 
Shrunk to maintaining a part-time director who^^il^k" bn?h 
the time and resources to upgrade or evaluate the program !^ 

propram'""Tr,-,^f.^T' '" " P^^^dominant ly minority female 
pr-^gvc.m- It cuulu become a valuable resource fnr en-pr^n- 
the access of minority females to secure emplnvm^nt" and/n" 
aov.ncea training. However, competition for emoro;me;;t Ind 
training siots will be intense, and there i^' Titt^- %•-. 
suggest that the Business Magnet will proC dr anO 
cumpetitive edge to its graduates. Most student/ cnn Vd 
T-Z/^IV"T '■'' '^"'" d^Btrict high schools and re^ei^ed'a 
comparable business education traininp (or, in snme case=^ 
better training, since a number of other high schnnli a^; 
pursuing curriculum revision and staff develnprne^.t mnr^ 

nr^misr'LlS'^ur i^^' '^=''^^ ^''^ school );"'f?rrLnc;: 

promise held out by a magnet program —that it w^ll 
provide training/education that is more specialized and -,f 
higner quality than local schools can offer - ts nnt 
realizeq by the East Boston High School Business Majnet. 

* RETENTION AND JOB PLACEMENT RATES 

KEY QUESTION: What are the retention rate and the mb 
Placement rate of the business magnet program^ ^ 

-205- 



METHOD: The monitors requested from East Boston High 
School the retention rate for Business Magnet students, the 
rate of placement of graduates in jobs, and information 
regarding placement of students in work experience sites. 

OVERVIEW 

The plan submitted by the Boston School Department to the 
Court for the East Boston High School Business Magnet 
specifically promised special arrangements for work-site 
experience and for post-graduate training. The promised 
"slots" at Boston Business School have never materialized. 
Furthermore, the Business Magnet program has not taken 
direct responsibility for ensuring work-site experience. 

While the plan did not specifically promise to monitor" 
retention and job placement rates, such evaluative 
procedures should be automatically included in any well-run 
special program — and job placement rates ay^s a 
significant criterion used to evaulate any employment- 
training program. 

FINDINGS 

The Director of the Business Magnet does not collect or 
analyze such data hev^self. The monitors were told that the 
Guidance department would have any retention data that were 
available, and that two other staff persons might have 
information concerning placement in cooperative work sites 
and information concerning placement in jobs. 

East Boston High School did respond to questions rega>->ding 
retention and olacement rates in a letter dated November 
£i, 1983 (see attachment). According to the letter, the 
Business Magnet does not collect data regarding retention 
in orogram, but the Headmaster estimated that the retention 
rate is £5"/. (on average, the number of seniors is 
aoproximately one quarter the number of freshmen in any 
given year) . 

Recording to the same letter, there are now 14 Business 
Magnet students participating in work settings. It should 
be noted that the job descriptions for 5 of these students 
ay^e unrelated to the training offered by the Business 
Magnet: cook, bus person, sanitation controller. 

Finally, the letter states that "placement of graduates is 
not a part of the [Business Magnet] orogram. Many times, 
of course, the availability of jobs does come to tne 
attention of the Guidance Department, and these jobs are 
made known to ail students." The Headmaster does point out 
in his letter that the special desegregation plan for the 
East Boston High School Business Magnet did not promise 
that job placement would be a part of the priogram. 

-206- 



Irnpi icat ions 

The Boston School Department has failed to supoly 
sufficient support to the Business Magnet pv-ograrn to ensure 
that (1) minimal evaluation procedures can be carried out, 
(£) students atx-^B retained in the program, (3) appropriate 
work sites are developed for qualified students, and (4) 
students are indeed trained in "salable commercial skills," 
measured by job placement rates. 

* ASSIGNMENT AND TRANSFER POLICIES 

KEY QUESTION: How has Boston re-evaluated its assignment 

and transfer policies between the business magnet program 

and the rest of East Boston High School, as sugaested in 

the last Reoort? 

METHOD: The monitors submitted a written request to the 
Department of Implementation for clarification of its 
pol icies. 

FINDINGS 

In a memorandum dated September 23, 1383, John Coakley of 
the Department of Implementation stated that the Boston 
School Department's policy regarding transfers out of the 
Business Magnet is as follows: Minority students may 
request a transfer from the Business Magnet to the regular 
education comoonent of East Boston High School, and "will 
receive such a transfer. " Furthermore, "the Department of 
Implementation has asserted that black and other minority 
students seeking to transfer out of either specialized 
Drogram at East Boston High School [Business Magnet or 
Coooerative Vocational Education Program] must be advised 
of their rights to transfer into the regular educat iori 
component." White students v-equesting such transfers 
cannot, on the other hand, be guaranteed seats in the 
regular component of East Boston High School on account of 
the racial/ethnic percentage goals for East Boston High 
School. Usually the regular education component is closed 
to white students after the Spring Assignment Process, 
according to Mr. Coakley, and white students requesting 
transfers will usually receive assignments/transfers to 
English High School, Madison Park High School or possibly 
Boston High School. 

One problem remains in this regard: monitoring transfers. 
The Department of Education's monitoring plan originally 
requested that East Boston High School officials maintain a 
log of all recjuests to transfer from the Business Magnet to 
the regular education component of East Boston High School. 
However, the Headmaster of East Boston High School informed 
the Departmental monitor that he never sees such requests 
— they 3.re sent directly to the Department of 
I mp 1 ement at i on. 

-207- 



* PftREIMT/COMMUIMITY MQNITORING 

KEY QUESTION: How effective is the parent /cornmuri it y 
monitoring required by the Court-approved plan? 

METHOD: The monitor for student /parent councils conferred 
with the Executive Director of the Citywide Parent Council. 

OVERVIEW 

On January 3, 1979, the Court ordered that "the functions 
heretofore performed by the SMB CSpecial i^onitoring 
Board] ... shal 1 be transferred to and assumed by CDhC VIII 
and the RE PC" upon dissolution of the Special Monitoring 
Board. fts related in the wTuly report to the Court, 
monitoring had been carried out by parent /community 
councils for several years, but had become negligible in 
recent years, perhaps as a result of the loss of ESflfl 
funds. 

FINDINGS 

During this monitoring period, the Department contacted the 
Citywide Parents Council, and stressed its obligation to 
monitor the East Boston High School Business Magnet The CPC 
has assured the Department that it will carry out this 
responsibility; the Department will, in turn, monitor the 
Citywide Parents Council efforts. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

i. The Boston School Department should improve 
sigviif icarit iy the content of the Business Magnet at East 
Boston High School and enhance its administrait ive 
struct ure. 

£. The Boston School Department should take steps to 
ensure that data are systematically collected for (1) 
retention of students in the program, id.) placement of 
students in work-sites during their training, and (3) 
placement of graduates in related employment and post- 
graduate training. 

3. The Boston School Department should develop and 
implement a procedure for keeping a record of requests from 
Business Magnet students to transfer to the regular 
education component of East Boston High School. 

4. The Citywide Parents Council should undertake 
monitoring of the Business Magnet. 



Judith C, Taylor 
-208- December 1983 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 






BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R. Coakley, Senior Officer 

September 29, 1983 

MEMORANDUM 

TO: Charles Glenn 
FROM: John CoakleJ? >W/f 

SUBJECT: A Partial R^ponse to r/ohitoring Data Request (9/7/83) - 
Special Desegregation H ) 

By this stage in the process of responding to your data 
monitoring request of 9/7/83 I feel that half of my September 
salary should be paid by the Board of Education. This paper is 
only a partial response to Special Desegregation (9) . 

The practice of the Department of Implementation on behalf of 
the Boston Public Schools for assignments into East Boston High 
School's Business Education Magnet is as follows: 

1 . The enrollment of the program must reflect the racial/ethnic 
percentage goals for high schools of District IX. Note that 
these goals are dramatically different from the allowable 
goals for the regular education component of District VIII 's 
East Boston High School. Assignments or transfers into the 
program must reflect the District IX high school high-low 
percentages . 

2. Transfers out of the program are allowed at any time although 
a conscious effort is made to limit the actual processing to 
occur at the end of a given marking period. 

a) A white student seeking to transfer out of the East Boston 
Business Magnet is not guaranteed a seat in the regular 
education component of East Boston High School. Rather, 
in common with all other East Boston residents seeking a 
high school seat, he is allowed to express preference or 
preferences but is dependent on DI assignment decisions. 
Note that usually East Boston High School's regular 
education component is closed to white students after the 
Spring Assignment Process; such students usually receive 
assignments/transfers to English High School, Madison Park 
High School or possibly Boston High School. 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5500, 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 



- 2 - 



b) A black or other minority student seeking to transfer out 
of the East Boston Business Magnet (or the East Boston 
Cooperative Vocational Education Program) may request to 
transfer to the regular education component of East Boston 
High School. He will receive such a transfer. I have 
re-affirmed this practice to Department of Implementation 
staff and to the Community Superintendent of District VIII. 
Such practice is justified on the basis of Note 5 in the 
modification of student assignment orders, approved by the 
Court on March 24, 1982. (Reference page 181 of your 
Monitoring Report - Volume II.) The Department of 
Implementation has asserted that black and other minority 
students seeking to transfer out of either specialized 
program at East Boston High School must be advised of 
their rights to transfer into the regular education 
component. Only recently, our staff monitored and enforced 
that ruling. (Reference Dr. Ellison.) 



mm 

cc: Office of Superintendent 
Robert Peterkin 
Catherine Ellison 



-210- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




JOHN A POTO 
tBXai^. Headmasler 

XXIXDffiifi&KK Jane O'Leary 

■Vcting Assistant Headmaster 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

November 21, 1983 



Ms. Judith C. Taylor 

Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Dept. of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA. 02169 

Dear Ms. Taylor: 

With reference to your letter of November 1 regarding your monitoring of the Busi- 
ness Magnet Program at East Boston High School, herewith is the information for which 
you asked. 

1. Retention Rate 

The retention rate for Business Magnet students averages approximately 25%. For 
example, the number of students entering Grade 9 for 1983-84 school year is approxi- 
mately 120. This is about average for each year. The number who are currently in 
their senior year is 28. In the earlier years, the retention may have been slightly 
higher. 

A followup study was planned a few years ago in order to determine where the Magnet 
students went when they left Kpst Ro5!ton wjoh. Due to the withdrawal of Federal 
funds and to teacher shortage which resulted in the Magnet Coordinator returning 
full time to the classroom, the followup study could not be undertaken. However, 
just from observation and talking with students during the school year, such reasons 
as moving to another place or not wanting to take the bus ride to East Boston would 
certainly seem to prevail over the reason of being dissatisfied with the program. 
Those students who remain here seem to think highly of the program. This is evidenced 
by the fact that many of our freshmen are friends and relatives of students who have 
been here in the program. 



2 . Students Participating in Work Settings 

Ellen Barbetta - Mass. General Hospital - Secretary 
Vicki Brown - Filene's - Stock Clerk 
Lena Campbell - Boston Five Bank - Clerk 

86 WHITE STREET, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02128 • 567-2140 AREA 617 

-211- 



-2- 

Students Participating in Work Settings (Continued) 

Benita Connolly - Liberty Mutual - Clerk Typist 

Hermania Cooper - McDonald's - Cashier 

Elvira Federico - Lucia Restaurant - Bus Person 

Shaunette Fitzpatrick - Dimmock Health Clinic - File Clerk 

Clynder Moody - Harvard University - Sanitation Controller 

Denise Parham - Northeastern University - Food Service 

Paula Romano - Burger King - Cashier 

Tracey Smallwood - JFK Building - Asst. Timekeeper 

Vincenzo Valenti - Logan Hilton - Cook 

Troy Wilson - Federal Reserve Bank - Sanitation Controller 

Cheryl Martin - Burger King - Cook 

The other Business Magnet seniors are still seeking employment. 

3. Job Placement for Graduates 

Job placement was to have been a part of the Business Magnet Program only insofar 
as senior-year placement. Before funds through the Emergency School Aid Act 
were discontinued, the Magnet Program had a job-placement person for this specific 
reason. Subsequently, placement during the course of the school year has been made 
whenever possible. However, placement of graduates is not a part of the program. 
Many times, of course, the availability of jobs does come to the attention of the 
Guidance Department, and these jobs are made known to all students. 

Some of the higher achieving Magnet graduates who do not go on to school are able 
to get office jobs. A number of the graduates have been able to go on to either 
junior colleges or a regular four-year college, while some of the male students, 
unable to find jobs, have gone into the military service. 

I do hope the above will supply you with some of the information which you are 
seeking. We are planning to institute a form this year which would help us to 
know what the plans of the seniors are after graduation. In this way, we should 
have a better idea of what Business Magnet students hope to do once they have 
completed high school. 

SincereTv vnurs. 




(7- 9k 



m A. Poto 
headmaster 



■212- 



I 



Special Desegregation Measures : Examination Schools 
OVERVIEW 



The Spring 1983 Report noted a disproportionate attrition rate 
among Black and Hispanic students assigned to Boston Latin School 
and Latin Academy, and a disproportionate suspension rate for 
Black students at Boston Latin School. These issues were made 
a primary focus of Fall 1983 monitoring. 

The review was conducted by Franklin Banks, Office of the Cormissioner; 
Dan French, Student Services; Nan Stein, Civil Rights Specialist; and 
Maureen Wark, Equal Educational Opportunity. 

The problem of attrition seems to be most severe at Boston Latin 
School. Black and Hispanic students constitute 24% of enrollment 
but 46% of all withdrawals and transfers. At Boston Technical 
High, by contrast. Black and Hispanic students constitute 54% of 
enrollment but only 48% of all withdrawals and transfers. 

Of particular significance are the transfers from the two Latin 
schools to other Boston public schools. Blacks comprise 71% and 
Hispanics 63% of such transfers. Most of these transfers are 
described as "programmatic", leaving open the question of precise 
motivation. The next stage of monitoring will seek, through 
interviews with former Boston Latin School and Latin Academy students, 
to determine more clearly what factors led to the transfer. 

The first focus of monitoring has been upon the classes in grades 
4, 5 and 6 for academically talented students. How are students 
selected for participation in these programs, to what extent does 
such participation prepare them for success in the examination 
schools, and how complete and helpful is the information which they 
and their parents receive about what will be expected of them if 
they attend examination schools? 

The monitors were told, by an assistant headmaster at Boston Latin 
School, that many parochial and private schools do a better job of 
preparing students for success in the examination schools than do 
Boston public middle schools. The chart which follows shows that 
white students are disproportionately prepared by non-public schools, 
which may give them an advantage to the extent that this observation 
is accurate. 

Seventh Grade Enrollment: Latin School and Latin Academy 

Black/Hispanic White/Asian Total 
From Public Schools 187 (74%) 190 (45%) 377 (56%) 
From Non-Pub Schools 67 (26%) 232 (55%) 299 (44%) 

-213- 



A second focus of monitoring has been upon the orientation programs 
put on by each of the three examination schools in the summer prior 
to admission and the early identification of those students who 
will require additional academic support. 

A third focus has been upon the remediation and counselling available 
to students experiencing academic or social difficulties in the 
examination schools, including the role of guidance staff. 

A fourth focus has been upon issues of discipline and attendance which 
may have implications for the disproportionate attrition rate among 
Black and Hispanic students. 

Future monitoring will look in more detail at support services, and 
will seek more precise information through interviews with minority 
students formerly and presently in the three schools. 

During the course of the monitoring this Fall the problem of language 
support for students from homes where English is not the primary 
language emerged as especially critical. Commissioner Lawson brought 
the urgency of this problem to Superintendent Spillane's attention, 
and there is evidence that progress has been made in recent weeks. 



PREPARATION AND ORIENTATION 



Question : How are students attending Boston Public Schools prepared to 
succeed in the examination schools and how are they oriented to the 
academic and other requirements of these schools? 

Monitoring Process : Monitors observed part of the orientation sessions 
held for incoming students at Boston Latin Academy and Boston Technical 
High. Monitors interviewed staff involved with orientation programs 
at all their examination schools, and collected samples of curricula, 
attendance records, schedules and other relevant data. 

Monitors also visited five of the advanced work classes and academically 
talented sections: The Murphy School (AWC), the Hennigan School 
(regular and bilingual AWC), the Mackey Middle School (bilingual ATS), 
the McCormack Middle School (ATS) and the Thompson Middle School (ATS). 
AWC/ATS teachers and the Headmasters/Headmastresses were interviewed 
at these schools. The citywide director of the AWC/ATS program, 
Joanne McManus, was interviewed, and provided much written and verbal 
information on the present operation of the program and plans for its 
future. 



■214- 



Findings: Advanced Work Classes and Academically Talented Sections 

io'rk'cfasses ^(ITTJ,'" J"^^"^^""l^>' f ^e students, the Advanced 
c^^^-^ /ATc^ ^-.^"^^^^^ ^°^^ 3"^ five and Academically Talented 
Sections ATS: grade six) are designed to prepare some of the 
students in each district for entry into the examination schools 
IJ H '' '.V^^"^ ^'°"^ ^^' ^^^^ that the programs go only through ^ixth 
grade with Boston Latin School and Latin Academy admtting students 

hi middi:";chno : ^^^t^^^°" -t Provide a continuaJ?o'n p o am 
^Itt^xte^n^^rL-dln^!^^^ ' ^^^ ''''''' ^^^ devel JplS'sSJS programs 

ATsln'a m?dd?f Jhno? ^^^"^^"J^7 ^^hool in each district, and one 
Distric? IX Thf^°°] ' Vh*^ district, with the exception of citywide 
y.n T 5' ^?^ citywide district has two schools housing AWCs 

A?Ss onplf ' 1^'"^'? K^''^''^ ^^^^ ^"d t^° "Middle sc 00 s housing 
ATSs (one IS exclusively Spanish bilingual). "uubing 

Students from the sixth grade Academically Talented Sections in each 
district are encouraged to take the SSAT in October for entrv into 
one of the Latin Schools in grade seven. ^ 

Assignment to AWC/ATS 

Students are selected for the AWC/ATS on the basis of Readina ;,nd 
Math scores on the Metropol itan Achievement Tetadminineed n 
grade three. With n each district, students scoring n ?he top 

each racial category are sent invitations. Invitations are limited 
by the number of seats available (5% of each district wthiech 
Hp'tc f ^"^Pt^'^" of invitations often means transferring stu- 

e Ad InceSl^rn f' '''T''.'' '''°'' '° ''''''' school ho sing 
tne Advanced Work Class in the district. Once enrolled the onlv 

way a student can be removed is through parental request. ^ 
Admissions Standards 

In^Li^^^^^!i^^ consensus among program administrators, teachers 

ad aul e Ihff 'h''^' ''' '''''''''' '''''''' f°^ AWC/A? are 
inadequate. The inadequacies are most often described bv AWC/ATS 

teachers in terms of the inclusion of some students who fail to 

demonstrate high academic ability, and the exclusion of other 

students who have demonstrated this high potential. Some of these 

inadequacies are clearly focused on the selection process by racial 

tr-^l- disadvantage for admission while some minority students 
scoring below grade level in reading, are sometimes included ' 



-215- 



Teachers have also cited cases of high achieving minority students 
who have been excluded because of a low score on the Metropolitan 
on that particular occasion. 

The sole use of achievement test scores to identify students with 
high intellectual or academic potential is considered archair and 
inappropriate by national standards. This identification method 
clearly excludes students who (1) may have high potential but lack 
test-taking skills, (2) students who have psychological blocks to 
all testing, and (3) students who may not feel well the day the test 
is administered. The Metropolitan Achievement Test is also just 
that--an achievement test--niether an aptitude test nor a test of 
native ability. In the case of some minority students, the issue of 
culture-bias on some test items may also work to their disadvantage 
and not provide a true picture of either achievement or ability. 

While AWC/ATS administrators and the Department of Implementation 
are aware of most of these inadequacies, and have piloted alternate 
selection procedures, they have not yet proposed a replacement for 
the inadequate criteria now being used. Other urban school systems 
in Massachusetts have moved ahead in this respect, to identify and 
serve academically able minority students. 

The most serious questions about the adequacy of both the AWC/ATS 
selection process and the operation of the program surface in examining 
the track record of the AWC/ATS programs in getting students into the 
Latin schools (see Appendix I). Less than half (47%) of the Boston 
Public School students who entered the seventh grade (1983) at the 
two Latin schools, came from AWC/ATS programs. Only 40% of the Black 
Boston Public School students entering the seventh grade at the Latin 
Schools came from AWC/ATS programs. Only 179 out of 341 ATS students 
were accepted into the Latin Schools. This is a poor track record 
for a program which was designed to (1) identify and serve the edu- 
cational needs of all students with high academic ability and (2) 
prepare them for success at the examination schools. 

[Mr. Coakley has pointed out that not all ATS students apply to 
attend the Latin Schools.]. 



Transfers 

Teachers have also cited difficulties in convincing the parents of 
'inappropriately' assigned students, especially students who are 
unhappy and frustrated in class, to transfer them back to the regular 
program. Sometimes students are allowed to experience failure for 
a year or more before their parents are convinced. 

On the other hand, it is apparently difficult to get academically 
able students, enrolling in a school in mid-year, and/or students 
who have not taken the Metropolitan, into empty AWC/ATS slots. 

-216- 



Curriculum and Staff Development 

It is evident from the sample of AWC/ATS programs visited that there 
IS no clear curriculum, consistently implemented by all AWC/ATS 
teachers. In some cases even the new citywide curricula are not 
being followed, and in others there is no evidence of differentiated 

?n'wMn 'aJ^/a?^''^?'''""^^^ '^^' ^^^^^"^^- This leads to instance 
in which AWC/ATS classes are merely groupings of the higher scorers 
on the Metropolitan Achievement Test within each district On the 
other hand some AWC/ATS schools have made great efforts to provide 
an appropriately differentiated curriculum to assigned students. 

ISl?nnT ^S "^'k^' specific differentiated curriculum has been 
developed and is being used is more a function of the school which 
houses the particular AWC or ATS program and the administrative and 
teaching leadership in that school, than of any citywide curriculum 
or program mandate. While the past AWC/ATS citywide director ha 
developed an "Activity Resource Handbook" (1981) which has been 
distributed to all AWC/ATS teachers, it is unknown or rarely referred 
to in some schools. ^ icicrrtu 

This handbook, which is not a curriculum but a series of strategies 
and a list of materials for approaching existing curriculua in ways 
appropriate to the needs of gifted students, was developed and ex- 
plained in a series of workshops for AWC/ATS teachers and other 
teachers of gifted programs. Attendance at these workshops was 
optional, and many AWC/ATS teachers, particularly bilingual AWC/ATS 
teachers, did not attend any of these workshops. 

Bilingual AWC/ATS 

While there are clearly some excellent teachers involved in aspects 
?JrM?c;":'r"'' ^']'T^^ AWC/ATS, as a whole the program, like other 
AWC/ATS programs, lacks a clear focus. The bilingual ATS (gr. 6) 
students are mixed and leveled with all other bilingual sixth, seventh 

lit h^o^o'^'^k'^".^" '^^ ''^°°^' ^"^ ^he^e ^'S' i" effect, no speci??' 
til AT?^m?HH?'^°"h ^se^ection process. The bilingual coordinator for 
e?thpl A3r/2I^ 'h^°° TP?"^' ^^'^ ^" ^^' ^^^eived no direction from 

aJelv .PrSinI a^^^k"!''^"'^?"' ": ^^" bilingual department in appropri- 
ately serving ATS bilingual students. 

Another issue of concern is whether bilingual students are prepared 

schonlf ;?h.^"'f ^'"^ in non-bilingual classes at the examination 
schools (there are now no bilingual or ESL services at any of the 
examination schools). Monitors observed too many AWC/ATS classes 

rnml'nn'nfT'';''^^ '" ^P^^i^^' ^nd interviewed some instructors whose 
command of English was imperfect. How can students coming out of 
such a program be expected to succeed in highly competitive classes 
conducted solely in Engl ish at the Latin Schools? There is no apparent 
emphasis placed on helping students make this transition 

-217- 



AWC/STS Preparation for Examination Schools 



Examination school administrators and teachers complained that too 
many Incoming students, especially those from some Boston Public 
Schools, have not developed the study habits and other disciples 
necessary for success at the examination schools. They also com- 
plained that some students do not have a solid enough foundation In 
grammar and other basic skills to ensure their success in learning 
Latin, writing papers for courses, and math. However, there is 
no communication link or forum by which these kinds of concerns 
are communicated routinely to AWC/ATS staff. A few AWC/ATS teachers 
have, on their own, found out what skills are expected of students 
at the Latin Schools, and have altered their programs accordingly. 
Most apparently have not. 

The AWC/ATS programs which have established some of these communica- 
tion 1 inks have: 

1. Incorporated increasing amounts of homework (some at 
least U or 2 hours per night) through grade six; 

2. placed great emphasis on writing, and given regular 
writing assignments, requiring complete, grammatically 
correct sentences; 

3. Incorporated study skills instruction into all aspects 
of the curriculum; 

4. placed great emphasis on reading, both recreational and 
school -related; 

5. prepared students to take the SSAT; 

6. emphasized the development of self-directed learning 
skills in all parts of the curriculum; 

7. communicated with parents about exam school expectations 
and ways to support their children when they are enrolled; 

8. stressed positive self-image in a variety of ways. 

Even with this kind of preparation in some ATS programs, teachers 
report students returning fromthe Latin Schools discouraged by the 
amount of homework, the lack of free time, and the intensity of 
learning and competition. The return of students with complaints 
of this sort appear to be much higher at schools where Latin School 
expectations have not been already built into the curriculum. More 
specific data on each school 's program and its record of students 
admitted to and remaining in exam schools will be included in the 
next report. 



Plans for the Future of AWC/ATS 

The operating plans developed by the AWC/ATS program director 
recognize most of the problems and inadequacies cited in these 
findings, and include activities designed to remedy them. In 
particular, the plans focus on: 

-218- 






improving the selection process by incorporating multiple 



criteria 

providing continuty and consistency in curricula 

• improving staff development 

• developing other options for academically talented studpntc 

* kiS«."?h»?i^''^ '"h"'^''' 5^^*"" P™9'"^'"5 t° 1"<:l"<'e arts. 
Kinesthetics and sciences. 

This plan is an admirable one and is wholly consistent with the 
position paper accepted and approved by the School CommUtee two 
to'wha?'?^ h'^''-!;^' '■'' I' '' iniplemented. In o der t'give me 

P?an ?or thp'nSr/S?.^ '' ^^' P°'^"^^'°" P^P^^ «"d to carry out th 
plan for the AWC/ATS program, aggressive and active oromotinn nf 

change is needed from the highest levels of Boston"pSbl?f Ministration. 



Recommendations 



1. The School Department should develop and implement a bettpr 
method ofselecting students for AWC/ATS - a method'which 

ses niu tip e criteria including some subjective data 
(e.g., teacher and parent checklists). 

2. The School Department should develop a consistent and 

. appropriate curriculum for this program ncudgea^^in^ 
objectives consistent with examination school requirements 

^' link^hpj! Department should create strong communication 
iinKs between the examination schools and the AWC/ATS 
programs. Sharing of curricula, academic and other 

bP rn.'^i^°n^.!"'' information on student outcomes must 
De a part of this communication. 

'^' S%5.'f?°H °^P3^tme"t should develop a consistent approach 
to staff development for the program, utilizing the latest 

i?aininn%'h' f^'^'^^^^' academically giften'pro r ms 
Training should be required of all teachers in the program. 

5. The School Department should develop and implement a clear 
and consistent evaluation process. ""P'ement a clear 



-219- 



The School Department should provide better information 
for parents of AWC/ATS invitees about the goals of the 
AWC/ATS and its relation to the exam schools, in several 
languages. It should also provide more information about 
what students may expect at examination schools. 

For the bilingual component of this program to be effective, 
it must be tied more closely to the non-bilingual program, 
with equal emphasis on staff development, and with more 
time devoted to speaking and writing English, especially 
in the sixth grade. 



Findings : Orientation Programs 

Each of the examination schools offers an orientation program for 
incoming students. Boston Latin Academy's orientation is the last 
two weeks before school begins. The Boston Latin School 's orienta- 
tion is the first three weeks in August, and Boston Technical High 
provided a three-day orientation in the week before school begins. 



Boston Latin Academy 

Boston Latin Academy offers a '^ery structured orientation in which 
students are academically engaged in English, Math, and Study Skills 
courses from 9:00 until 12:00 each day. This program is designed 
to (1) provide refreshment of skills already learned, (2) diagnose 
areas of weakness, and (3) prepare students for the kinds of skills 
they will need as seventh or ninth graders. Students who are 
diagnosed as deficient in the skills assessed are referred to 
tutoring and the other support services provided. The Regis College 
collaboration is responsible for the study skills curriculum and 
other aspects of the orientation. Students are given pre and post 
tests for all three courses. Staff are regular Boston Latin Academy 
staff, with some emphasis placed on the involvement of minority 
staff. The program served 153 students in 1983, 74 White, 64 Black 
and Hispanic and 15 Asian. 



Boston Latin School 



Boston Latin School provided a three-week orientation, beginning in 
early August, called the 'Boston Latin School Enrichment Program.' 
The program went from 9:00 to 12:00 each weekday, and included 
course work in English, Math and Study Skills as well as an intro- 
duction to the school facility, school policies, regulations and 
the discipline code. Students diagnosed as having skills deficits 
were referred to the guidance office for additional help in the Fall 



-220- 



Teachers in areas in which a student had a skil Is' deficit were also 
notified of potential problems. The program served 336 students: 
173 White, 94 Black, and 69 other minority. 



Boston Technical High 

The orientation provided for incoming students (grades 9 and 10) 
lasted only three days this year. In the past, orientation has 
lasted a week, but a reduction in program funds has necessitated 
this curtailment. Students were provided very brief reviews of 
skills they were supposed to have learned, a brief overview of the 
major subject areas (Math, English), some study skills, and infor- 
mation on support services offered. Students were also given 
tours of the building and the discipline code and other regulations 
were explained by the counseling staff. This program was not as 
structured, diagnostic or comprehensive an orientation as that 
provided by the two Latin Schools. 166 students attended the ori- 
entation in 1983: 46 White, 77 Black and Hispanic and 44 other 
minority. 

Attendance 

Boston Latin Academy--Of a combined incoming seventh and ninth grade 
(1983) enrollment of 264, 153 (58%) showed up at least once for the 
orientation. Average daily attendance was 118 (77%). 

Boston Latin School --Of a combined incoming seventh and ninth grade 
(1983) enrollment of 485, 336 (69%) showed up at least once for the 
orientation. Of these the average daily attendance was 211 (63%). 

Boston Technical High--Of a combined incoming ninth and tenth grade 
enrollment of 348, 166 (48%) showed up at least once for the orienta- 
tion. Of these the average daily attendance was 148 (89%). 



While some students and their parents clearly understand the value 
of these orientations to their future success at the examination 
schools, others do not. There were some students who worked during 
this orientation period and did not attend for that reason. The 
families of some students vacationed during part of the time, and 
some parents claimed the Latin School Orientation was too long 
anyway. According to staff interviewed, many of the students who 
do not regularly attend the orientation sessions are the ones most 
in need of skills refreshment, skills diagnosis, and eventually 
extra help. In fact, since this orientation is, in the case of the 
two Latin Schools, the only early warning system for impending 
academic problems, non-attendance poses a serious problem for 
those trying to identify students in need of additional academic 



-221- 



support. For this reason and because enrollment in the examination 
schools should be a serious commitment of thought, energy and time, 
attendance at orientations should be mandatory, as a part of the 
acceptance commitment. Non-attendance for part of orientation should 
only be allowed for those students who have clearly demonstrated 
their preparedness for school success by passing a special test 
which incorporates the major skills covered in the orientation courses. 



Orientation Commendations 

Both Latin Schools should be commended for their efforts to provide 
orientation programs which are focused on skills review and refresh- 
ment, diagnosis of academic defects, and the provision of new and 
important information for incoming students. Monitors especially 
applaud the direct focus on study skills. The Regis College col- 
laborative at Boston Latin Academy has developed a particularly 
fine study skills' curriculum, worthy of wider dissemination, es- 
pecially to AWC/ATS classes. The carefully structured and focused 
programs offered by the two Latin Schools appear to serve well those 
students who attend. 



Orientation Recommendations 

Because of the high attrition rate among Black and Hispanic students, 
and the disparity in preparation among incoming students, attendance 
at orientation programs should be required of all incoming students. 
Each school should review evaluation feed-back from past orientations 
to determine the best time during the summer and early fall for ori- 
entation. Orientation for all examination schools should last a 
minimum of two weeks, and the length of time should be uniform for 
all three schools. Program content should include academic skills 
review, pre- and post diagnostic testing, study skills, and intro- 
duction to school rules, regulations, the discipline code and support 
services. Each program should have a rigorous evaluation process to 
insure that each program remains maximally effective. Whenever 
possible, operating expenses should be included in the regular budget 
to insure program consistency and continuity from year to year. 



■222- 



QUESTIONS 



What academic and other supports are provided to Black and 

Hispanic students in the examination schools, and how are 

those in need of services identified and encouraged to use 
those services? 



PROCESS 



Interviews with 59 different people were conducted over the 
course of four months (August - November, 1983). 



Title 

District Superintendent 

Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 

Guidance Staff 

Development Officer 

Registrar 

Special Support Staff 

(including Chapter I, Study Skill, 
Reading, Social Workers, Tutors, 
Summer Orientation Coordinators) 

Teachers 

Alumni Representative 





Latin 


Tech. 




Latin 


Academy 


High 


Total 
1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


2 


7 


2 


3 


3 


8 


1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


4 


5 


5 


14 



21 

1 



Totals 



19 



21 



18 



59 



Interviews with students, and staff at external agencies who offer 
student support services, will commence in the winter and will be 
reported on in the next monitoring report. 



-223- 



FINDINGS 

Boston Latin Academy 
A. Support Services 



1. List of Services Identified by the Boston School Department, 
Spring 1983 and Submitted to the Department of Education 



Service 



Current Status Determined by 

Department of Education during 

Fall, 1983 Monitoring 



Approximately 60 minority 
7th graders participate in 
the shared program with Latin 
School at Shady Hill for three 
weeks in the Summer. Students 
are pretested and post-tested 
for improvement. Math, English 
and enrichment are offered. 

District 636 funds provide 
tutoring to over 100 students 
twice a week. Tutoring is 
provided by two teachers and 
twenty students. A late bus 
is provided to facilitate 
transportation for these stu- 
dents involved in the program. 



72 students participated in 
the program; 38 or 39 of those 
students were Black. 



Tutoring program which is conducted 
primarily before and after school , 
began on 11/7/83; 25 tutors are 
available who were trained in 
October. As of November 10, 67 
students had been referred, but 
only 25 can be served. One teacher 
with a busy schedule is responsible 
for coordinating the program. 



c. Chapter 636 funds also provide 23 students receive services from 

a generic teacher for students a generic teacher; 14 of those 

needing .1 and .2 resource students are Black, 
assistance. 



d. The Educational Enrichment 
Incorporated provides for 
approximately 60 students 
attending a six-week summer 
program at Shady Hill. 

e. Students also provide peer 
counsel and peer tutoring. 

f. Study skills class provided 
for all 7th graders, five 
times a week. 



-224- 



See above (a) 



All 7th graders take the Study 
Skills class, once a day, for 
the entire year. In addition, 
they have one study hall period, 
daily, for the entire year. 



2. Additional Support Services Identified by the Department 
of Education during Fall, 1983 Monitoring: 

a. About 20-30 students benefit from Mass PEP, a private, 
voluntary after school program. 



B. Identification of Students in Need/Encouragement to Use Services 

Boston Latin Academy uses the following methods to identify students 
in need of services: 

t observation of students in the summer orientation program, 
especially results from pre- and post-tests in reading 
and math 

• standardized test information from the students' 6th 
grade records 

• referrals from teachers, and from parental requests 

• warning slips, which are sent out during the mid-point 
of the first marking period. 



As of October 5th, 47 7th graders had been referred for tutoring. 
Only 25 tutors will be available, and tutoring did not begin until 
November 7. This was after the close of the first marking period 
and 67 students had been referred by November 10; the tutoring 
program clearly cannot serve all the students in need of services. 

According to the Boston Latin Academy staff members interviewed by 
the monitors, the responsibility for coordination of the identifica- 
tion and referral system falls on the guidance counselors. However, 
this is not a formal priority of the guidance department, which is 
hard pressed to fulfill its regular tasks. Boston Latin Academy 
provides no clerical support to the guidance department, for example. 

The guidance office operates under a staggering student load: 

• One counselor for the 7th and 8th grades, a ratio of 650 to 1 

t One counselor for the 9th and 10th grades, a ratio of 400 to 1 

• One counselor for the 11th and 12th grades, a ratio of 
250/300 to 1 

Students are assigned to counselors on the basis of grade, and as 
a result, the youngest and newest students (7th and 8th graders) 
are assigned to the most over-worked counselor. According to the 
staff interviewed, this assignment procedure reflects the priorities 



■225- 



of Boston Latin Academy, which places primary emphasis on getting 
graduates into college and less importance on retaining young 
students in the school. Those young students who are the most 
vulnerable to the pressures of dropping out have the least access 
to Boston Latin Academy's guidance counselor resources. 

Furthermore, there seems to be little coordination between the 
guidance department and other units of Boston Latin Academy. Accord- 
ing to some of the staff interviewed, truant officers are often not 
informed of student absences, and the truant officers do not work 
cooperatively with the guidance department. One administrator 
stated that there is a need to develop a clear-cut procedure to 
provide the guidance staff with information from teachers on 
student behavioral problems. 

In general, the monitors found that the support services to the 
students of Boston Latin Academy are insufficient. Of the few pro- 
grams available to students during the school year, almost none are 
available during school hours. The after-school programs operate 
on a voluntary basis. The major after-school program, tutoring 
staffed by older students, did not begin until after the first 
marking period and currently lacks enough tutors for two-thirds of 
referred students. A full-time teacher with a busy schedule is 
responsible for coordinating the program. According to one staff 
person, there is an additional problem with the tutoring program 
that concerns limited-English proficient students. Peer tutors find 
it frustrating to work with LEP students and refuse to serve them. 
There is neither ESL nor native language support available to these 
students at Boston Latin Academy. 

The inadequacy of school-year programs is exacerbated by problems 
associated with the Boston School Department Summer School program. 
These problems are system-wide, but affect the examination schools 
in a distinctive way. 

According to current Boston Public Schools' policy, students who 
have failed courses are only permitted to enroll in one summer- 
school course, regardless of the number of courses they failed. 
This policy was apparently instituted for fiscal reasons, but is 
problematic and seems to perpretuate the cycle of failure for 
students with academic problems. Since students with two or more 
failing grades cannot be promoted, students who fail three or more 
classes cannot qualify themselves for promotion regardless of how 
hard they work during the summer. (It appears, but is not certain, 
that the Boston Public Schools would not accept summer school work 
from outside the Boston system.) Students who rectify one grade 
during summer school, but still have two or more failing grades, 
must repeat al 1 their subjects from the prior year--a mind-dulling 
process at best, at worst an encouragement to additional failures. 



-226- 



The examination schools are not immune from the phenomenon of second 
and third year repeaters which results from this promotional policy. 
Indeed, the summer school program seems to work least ^11 for 
examination school students. According to many of the ^taff inter- 
viewed, the content of the summer courses is not at a sufficiently 
high level for the exam schools, and the courses offered in summer 
school do not reflect the requirements of the exam schools. The 
exam schools, cognizant of the inadequate level of the course 
content at summer school, have instituted tests which summer-school 
students must pass before being credited with a passing grade 
Students find themselves in a catch-22. Those with the initiative 
to sit through a summer school course often find themselves suffer- 
ing through material they have already mastered, and then must 
confront a qualifying test for which they have not been prepared. 

Finally, Boston Latin Academy suffers from the lack of a systematic 
procedure for identifying, referring, and tracking students in need 
of services. A number of staff members characterized the process 
as "random," and depending solely on "the vigilance of the guidance 
counselor." 

Those guidance counselors and other staff members who have made, 
on their own initiative, attempts to serve students are to be 
commended. For example, one counselor attempts to see all his 
students by October 15--no easy task even when he meets them in 
groups of six or seven because he is responsible for 650. 

The new administrative team has put much time and effort into help- 
ing students. The monitors found an atmosphere of openness and re- 
evaluation at Latin Academy. For example, the administration is 
considering a revision of its promotional policy that would exempt 
non-promoted students from repeating those courses in which they 
received either an A or a B. A new discipline code was developed 
over the summer and is currently being reviewed by parents. There 
is a new method for sending report cards home. In the past, they 
were sent by mail— a costly process that implied distrust of students 
Now students take their report cards home, and are required to return 
them in three days with a parent's signature. 

These and other measures demonstrate higher expectations of and 
greater respect for students. The new Headmaster stated that 
messages do not change behaviors; examples change behavior." 
Accordingly, the monitors will be looking for concrete examples 
of improvement. 



Boston Latin School 
A. Support Services 

1. List of Services Identified by the Boston School Department in 
the Spring, 1983, and submitted to the Department of Education. 

-227- _ 



(Boston Latin School ) 



Service 



Current Status Determined by 

Department of Education during 

Fall. 1983 Monitoring 



\ 



The Student Leadership Program 
funded through Chapter 636 
provides a tutorial program 
after school with supervising 
and monitoring staff. 

A reading specialist is funded 
through Chapter 636 with 
Boston University. This per- 
son also provides study skills. 



No longer exists under this 
funding source; tutoring is 
offered by the National Honor 
Society, on a volunteer basis. 



There is one full-time reading 
teacher; students may receive 
this class about twice a week, 
based on referrals from their 
English teacher, and/or through 
the summer orientation testing 
program. 



Social worker is available four 
times a week; psychologist visits 
twice a week for i day each time. 



The Roxbury Multi-Service 
Center, in conjunction with 
Chapter 636 funds from the 
District, provides a full-time 
social worker at the school 
who gives counselling and out- 
reach services. Seventh grade 
minority students are targeted 
for this service. A psychologist 
also provides service one day a 
week. Off-site tutoring is 
being planned. 

A privately funded summer en- This program has existed for two 
richment program with the Shady years about 50 students partici- 
Hill School has proven to be pate (about 75% minority). It is 
quite successful. Approxi- the alternative to summer school, 
mately fifty 7th grade students (Evaluation submitted; see 



(heavily minority in racial 
composition) attend for three 
weeks in the summer. (This 
program is also shared with 
Latin Academy. ) 

A program with Boston Univer- 
sity targets minority 8th 
graders for self image re- 
enforcement and role modeling 
sessions which include follow- 
up during the school year. 
Approximately 20 students are 
involved. 



-228- 



attachments. ) 



A summer program, offered to students 
between grades 7-8, and 8-9. It is 
not remedial, but rather enrichment, 
and targets students who have had 
difficulties, but are generally 
successful, though in need of an , 
extra push. Follow-up is provided I 
on Saturday sessions, which sometimes 
includes sessions with parents as , 
well as with the staff from Boston 
University. (Evaluation submitted; 
see attachments. ) 



Service 



Current Status Determined by 

Department of Education during 

Fall, 1983 Monitoring 



A private program--Massa- 
chusetts Pep--offers a pre- 
engineering program, also 
for minority students. 

Contractual services: 

with Children's Hospital for 
a pediatric resident who 
provides services for four 
hours, once a week. 

Mass. Mental Health--two 
psychologists available on 
a referral basis. 



Offered after school, on volunteer 
basis. Low participation. 



On-going 

Additional use of facilities at 
other times are also provided. 



Additional Support Services Identified by the Department of Educa- 
tion during Fall, 1983 Monitoring. 

a. A new Assistant Headmaster position has been created. This 
Black Assistant Headmaster focuses on the 7th and 8th grades, 
overseeing and coordinating the support services and the 
referral process. He intervenes both with discipline prob- 
lems and with students identified to have academic problems. 
This position represents a systematic attempt to retain 
incoming minority students. 

b. One guidance counselor has, on her own initiative, established 
a "survival skills" group program for her 75 7th grade 
counselees. Students are counseled in groups of 15-20. She 
uses these groups to identify students who are having academic 
difficulties. 



B. Identification of Students in Need/Encouragement to Use Services 

Boston Latin School uses the following methods to identify students in 
need of services: 

• standardized test information from the students' 6th grade records 

• results of pre-and post-tests given during summer orientation 

• attempts to contact students who did not attend summer orientation, 
but no formal testing of these students is done once school starts 

• teacher to floorrTiaster referrals for academic and discipline 
problems 



-229- 



• warning slips, which are sent out at the mid-point of the first 
and subsequent marking periods 

• a referral sheet 

Boston Latin School has not had a systematic process for keeping track 
of the progress of students who have been referred for assistance. 
Generally speaking, information is forwarded to the Headmaster, but he 
believes that this information reaches him when it is already too late. 
However, this year, two new positions were created which should con- 
tribute to more systematic provision of support services: Assistant 
Headmaster for the 7th grade, and Director of Guidance. 

Those support services which are available during school hours are few 
and inadequate. There is no class in study skills. There is only one 
academic resource teachers, a reading teacher who sees referred students 
twice a week. Virtually all the staff interviewed cited the lack of 
academic resource teachers and classes in study skills as a major factor 
contributing to the loss of minority students. 

Finally, some staff reported that a number of teachers have a "sink or 
swim" attitude toward their students. As a result, these teachers may be 
disinclined to refer students with problems to those few support services 
provided by Boston Latin School. 

Again, those staff who undertake on their own initiative to help students 
are to be commended. So also is the new attempt to provide systematic 
assistance evidenced by the creation of two new administrative positions. 
Much more is needed. 

Boston Technical High 

A. Support Services 

1. List of Services Identified by the Boston School Department in 
the Spring, 1983, and submitted to the Department of Education. 

Current Status Determined by 
Department of Education during 
Service Fall, 1983 Monitoring 

a. The school provides an after Has not begun; is slated to begin 
school tutorial program, Monday around January 1, 1984, pending 
through Thursday for 45 minutes, approvals. 
Transportation is provided for 
these students through Chapter 
636 funds with Tufts Univer- 
sity. Peer tutoring is funded 
through Chapter 636 Student 
Leadership stipends. The 
tutorship is supervised by teachers. 

-230- 



(Boston Technical High) 



Service 

b. A Resource Room teacher pro- 
vides 766 resource assistance 
as well as core evaluations 
upon request. 

c. Three guidance counselors 
provide counsel 1 ing. 



Current Status Determined by 

Department of Education during 

Fall, 1983 Monitoring 

766 Eligible students only. At 
this time 42 students are served; 
23 are Black, 17 white, 1 Asian, 
1 Hispanic. 

Ratio of students to guidance staff 
is about 400:1. 



d. A one-week orientation is given 
to all incoming students. This 
orientation will be decreased 
to three days for the 1983-84 
school year due to 636 budget- 
ary cutbacks. 



Three-day orientation program; 
50% participation, no formalized 
testing/evaluation occurs. The 
budgetary cutbacks were 636 funds 
and the Headmaster's decision to 
save two days worth of funds for 
the cost of after school transporta- 
tion. 



Open House is held at 7:00 a.m. 
with teachers and this has been 
quite successful . 

In addition, two Sunday Open 
House events are held each 
year (September and March). 
Teachers volunteer their time 
for all events. 

An after school remedial and 
enrichment program is being 
developed for the 1983-84 
school year. This program 
will use computers four days 
per week for 45 minutes a day, 
including the late transporta- 
tion for the participating 
students. 



Held four times a year, at Report 
card time. 



Has not begun; slated to begin 
around January 1, 1984, at the 
earliest, pending approvals. 
Funded by 636-Tufts. 



Minority students are not 
singularly targeted for these 
services, however, because the 
student population at this 
school is heavily minority. 
The support programs reflect 
high minority participation. 



Mass. PEP - 
graders. 



emphasis on 9th 



Orientation held on 11/15/83. 



-231- 



Current Status Determined by 
Department of Education during 
Service Fall, 1983 Monitoring 

j. Peer Counselling: 15 students Has not begun; expected to begin 
will be trained and available around January 1, 1984. 
during the school day. Funded 
by 636 Student Leadership funds. 

2. Additional Support Services Identified by the Department of Education 
during Fall, 1983 Monitoring: 

a. Boston Technical High School has been selected as a pilot 
site for the Human Resources Collaborative. 

b. Chapter I reading teachers and an aide, who are available 
only to those students eligible under the Chapter I 
guidel ines. 

c. One special education team leader is available twice a 
week for referrals for core evaluations and for meeting 
parents and teachers. 

d. One psychologist visits the school twice a week for half 
a day. 

e. One speech therapist visits the school once a week. 

f. Referrals to outside agencies: Roxbury Multi-Service 
Center and Lenox Park Community Center. 



B. Identification of Students in Need/Encouragement to Use Services 

Tech uses only one method to identify students in need of services: 
warning slips sent at the mid-point of the first marking period. 

Tech offers no classes in study skills and provides no regular access 
to academic remediation during school hours. There are two full-time 
Chapter I remedial teachers--which is much more than the other exam 
schools have— but they are available only to Chapter I eligible students, 
Tech does not seem to have any systematic procedures for identifying, 
referring, assisting or tracking students in need of support services. 
The consequences of this lack of an "early warning system" became 
evident this Fall. The monitors learned that there are a number of 
students at Tech whose primary language is other than English, and who 
are not proficient in the English language. Some of these students have 
Lau categories of A or B (requiring bilingual education), and others 

-232- 



lacked sufficient English proficiency to grasp abstract concepts 
presented in lectures and books. Still, they had the academic 
ability to gain admittance to Tech. There are no English-language 
support services at Tech despite repeated requests from the Head- 
master for assistance. Several students with severe problems in 
classes caused by limited-English proficiency have communicated 
these concerns to school staff. 

The Commissioner of Education determined that the situation 
warranted invocation of Section 4C of the Disengagement Order, 
under which the Department may take immediate action to remedy 
a serious problem. A letter was sent to the Superintendent of 
the Boston School Department informing him of this situation, 
and asking for further information and a plan for remediation. 
In December, on Engl ish-as-a-Second-Language teacher was added 
to the staff. (See attachment.) 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

All Examination Schools 

e Should develop and implement an "early warning system" that 
will enable identification and referral of students requiring 
support services to remain and succeed in the examination 
schools. 

t Should at minimum make available during school hours a basic 
structure of support services that includes study skills 
classes, academic resource teachers and classes, a procedure 
for "tracking" referred students, and adequate guidance 
counseling services. 

• Should develop and implement a uniform format and procedure 
for "exit interviews" of students leaving an examination 
school, so that it will be possible to determine more 
precise the causes that underlie why Black, Hispanic and other 
students leave the examination schools. The District Super- 
intendent did develop an exit interview format and procedure 
(in conjunction with one of the party's attorneys) several 
years ago, but they have never been implemented. 

• Should ensure that there are appropriate courses, both in 
content and level of difficulty, available to examination 
school students in summer school. Preliminary findings 
suggest a need for Algebra, English, French and Spanish. 

• Should establish promotional policies that do not penalize 
students by requiring them to repeat courses in which they 
have already succeeded. 

-233- 



Boston Latin Academy 

• Should ease the burden on the guidance department by 
providing clerical staff and/or attendance staff, and 
reducing the student loads of counselors for the lower 
grades. 

• Should institute physical education classes immediately 
to comply with Massachusetts law. 



Boston Latin School 



• Should refocus guidance counselor efforts for greater emphasis 
on support services and survival skills. 

Should require inservice training for the teaching and the 
guidance staffs on successful methods for encouraging student 
success, in order to combat the "sink or swim" attitude that 
has prevailed among some teaching staff members. 

• Should promote a more cooperative relationship between the 
guidance staff and outside agencies that offer support 
services to students. 



Boston Technical High School 

• Should provide appropriate language support services for 
students whose primary language is other than English, and 
whose English-language proficiency is limited. 

Should implement immediately the rudiments of academic and 
other support services, especially in light of the short, 
inadequate summer orientation program. 



-234- 



DISCIPLINE AND PiTTENDPlNCE 

QUESTION: Do Black and Hispanic students attending each 
of the examination schools have special discipline and 
attendance D'roblerns? If so, how av^e these problems being 
addressed? 

This quest iiDn was formulated to determine whether those 
Black and Hispanic students who leave the examination 
schools experience special discipline and attendance prob- 
lems so that, if they do, the schools could develoD prog- 
rams to address those problems and thereby lower the 
attrition rate of Black and Hispanic students from the 
e K3.m i nat i ori schoo 1 s. 

PROCESS 

Interviews were conducted with the Headmaster. Assistant 
Headmaster in charge of discipline, guidance counselors 
and several teachers at each examination school. fill were 
asked whether they believed Black and Hispanic students 
have special discipline and attendance problems and, if 
so, why these problems exist, and what could be done to 
retain more Black and Hispanic students. In addition, 
statistics for the avev^age daily attendance by race and 
Busoensions by race for the school year 1382-83 were 
examined. 

There were vio interviews of students and former students 
during this phase of monitoring. These interviews are 
corisidered critical for understanding the attrition rate 
of Black and Hispanic students, and will be conducted 
duriviD the coming winter and spring. In addition, time 
constraints prevented avialysis of student-based data for 
c'cademic performance, discioline, attenaance and reten- 
tion. The Department hooes to be able to conduct such an 
analysis (which will require extensive use of computers) 
during the next phase of moviitoring. 

Consequently, the findings presented in this report must 
be considered partial and preliminary; all will be com- 
pared with findings from the next phase of monitoring. 



FINDINGS 

Interviews with exam school staff 

There is virtu£il consensus among the exam school staff who 
were interviewed that those students who are at risk of 
dropping out lack key skills irj language arts, studying, 
avid efficient use of time. These students — according to 
the staff — express their frustration over being unable 
to succeed in class through non-attendance and/or behavior 
problems. Staff believe these students are more likely to 

-235- 



transfer- or dv^op out of school entirely than other stu- 
dents. Many staff also assert that these vulnerable stu- 
dents come from the lowest tier of composite rank-scores 
(SSPT test scores and grade-point average) for students 
adraitted to the exam schools. It should be noted that 
school staff do not have access t'O these entrance scores, 
and could not know whev^e individual students placed. In 
general, those staff who were interviewed believed that 
discipline/attendance problems culminated in "dropping 
out," BViti they attributed discipline/attendance oroblems 
to unsuccessful academic performance. 

When these staff attempted to account for the ooor 
academic oerformance of these students, they adduced many 
factors associated with poverty and inner-city life — for 
example, lack of space to study in private, lack of desks 
and lamDS for studying at home, work obligations, lack of 
finaricial resources for outside tutors, and poor prepara- 
tion in the lower grades. They believe that if students 
in this predicament do not receive extensive support 
services, transfers and drop-outs are likely. Since the 
exam schools do not have systematic procedures to identify 
students at risk and provide support to them, the chavice 
of failure is greatly increased. One guidance counselor 
described this situation as a "built-in failure mechanism" 
for these students. 

The specific factors cited by these staff fall into 
several general categories. One category is that of 
characteristics of the exam schools themselves. For exam- 
pie, some interviewees asserted that many of the staff, 
especially those who have been at an exam school for a 
long time, have a "make it or break it attitude." These 
staff, it was said, feel that students who attend exam 
schools should already have all the skills needed to 
cornalete a rigorous academic program. Students without 
the skills should atterid a magnet or district high school. 
One staff memiber at Boston Technical High School stated, 
"most kids aren't Qualified and don't belong here." To 
be sure, not all exam school staff share this attitude, 
but it could account (in part) for the paucity of support 
services at the exam schools. The monitors will attempt 
to determine the validity of this assertion during the 
next round of monitoring. 

i^nother example of in-school factors is the academic prog- 
ram and curricula of the exam schools themselves. Some of 
the staff who were interviewed believe that the teaching 
methodology arid cur-riculum content of the exam schools had 
not adsipted to the modern world and were irrelevant to 
many urban students. Some staff cited the Latin require- 
ment at the two Latin schools as an example, although none 
favored el iminat ioin of the requirement. ft number of staff 
suggested that the academic rigor of the exam schools 
causes studerits to drop out. 

-236- 



ft third in-school factor concerns teachers' "Dehavior 
management = " Some guidance counselors and administrators 
noted that certaivi white teachers take a confrontational 
approach with Black students, especially males, often 
sscalativ-iy a minor incident to a major discipline nroblem. 
One guidance counselor stated, "we need an in-service 
training for all of us on a non-confrontational approach 
to dealing with student discipline problems." 

Some staff also believe that the majority of students with 
major discipline problems have had to repeat a grade at 
least or\ce, and often twice. These studerits reoeat grades 
with little change in their academic programs and receive 
few suDport services, and often express their frustration 
by not attending school and /or creating discipline 
problems. 

Some exam school staff who were interviewed attributed the 
failure of Black and Hispanic students to their home 
environmevit , especially to the economically disadvantaged 
status of many families, fls one staff member at Boston 
Technical High School noted, "the economic situation of a 
family can be a problem where parents can't give enough 
support [for their child's education]." Such statements 
are of course impossible to prove or disprove, but they 
reflect a perception significant of and for the attitudes 
of those who work most directly with students. It is 
clear at this point, however, that the exam schools are 
not well prepared to educate academically able students 
i^jith deficiencies in academic and study skills that stem 
from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. 

Pmother home-related factor cited by many staff concerns 
parevital pr-essure. Piccording to these staff, many parents 
believe that the exam schools represent the only high 
schools in the Boston system that &rB both safe and 
capable of preparing students for college — so they pres- 
sure their children to apply for and attend exam schools. 
However, their children often do not want to attend for a 
variety of reasons. Peer pressure to attend district or 
magnet schools may be intense, especially for Black and 
Hispanic students. Some students fear their lack of aca- 
dernic/study skills doom them to failure. Many staff 
believe these students purposely do not attend or become 
disruptive to call attention to their desire to attend a 
different school. 

H final factor concerris the central administration of the 
Boston Public Schools. According to many exam school 
staff, the central administration believes that the exam 
schools have "the cream of the crop, " and therefore do not 
need additional academic and behavioral support services. 
The administrators of all three exam school recognize the 
rieed for additional supports, but have difficulty 

-237- 



ibta. iriiriD them. 



Statistical analysis 

The statistics for avev^age daily attendance by race for 
each exarn school for i9S£-e5 offer little suoport for the 
beliefs described above. The attendance rates for Black, 
white and other minority (Pisian, Hispanic and fimerican 
Indian) students are all within a few percentage points of 
each other, and all groups in each school have an attenda- 
nce rate above those of district or magnet high schools 
(see page 261). These group rates, however, do not 
permit analysis of individual attendance rates. It is 
possible — although impossible to determine from these 
statistics — that there is a group of minority students 
with poor attendance rates which is balanced by a groua of 
rninority students with extremely high attendance rates. 
During the next phase of monitoring, attendarice rates will 
bs- examined in greater detail. 

Suspension statistics for the 19e£-83 school year vary 
from school to school (see page 261). fill three school 
had low rates in comparison with other Boston high 
schools, with Boston Latin Academy suspending only 36 
students for the entire year. The percentage of students 
rusDended at Boston Latin School was slightly higher than 
that at Tech. Expected rates of suspensions for Black and 
white students at Boston Latin Academy were even. Black 
students at Boston Technical High School were suspended at 
s slightly higher rate than expected, yet not high enough 
to merit closer scrutiny. 

Kowsver, at Boston Latin School Black students were 
BUSDevidec- at a rate that was two and one-half times x-he 
expected rs.te (obtained by dividing the percentage of 
Black suspensions by the percentage of Black students- 
enrolled.) Two Plssistant Headmasters at Boston Latin 
School did not know why there were disproportionate rates, 
and questioned the statistic, despite a finding in the 
July Department of Education monitoring report. The 
Headmaster attributed it to students' frustration over not 
beiriD able to leave the building (grounds for suspension 
under the Code of Discipline), stating that 63 of 131 
suspensions v^ere for this reason, with 50"/ of susoensions 
of 7th Arid ath graders for this reason. He did not specu- 
late about the disproportionate rate by race. The third 
Assistarit Headmaster (who is in his first year at tne 
school) expressed concern and interest in expiorinD causes 
and solutioris. He will be investigating this probiem, and 
is in charge of developing program changes to redress i' 



•Lr m 



-238- 



CQMMENDfiTICrMS 

Pil three eKarninat ion schools should be commended fov- 
establishino uniform disciplinary procedures. Each has 
established a discipline process that is clearly struc- 
tured and ensures due process to students. Each has 
developed school-based rules, with student input, that are 
within the guidelines of the Code of Discipline^ fill 
three attempt to use alterviat ives to suspension; however, 
these alternatives at-B restv^icted by inadequate funding. 
Moreover, the effectiveness of the after-school detention 
program is limited because staff are hesitant to enforce 
attendance since the late bus only drops students at two 
places, both of which by-'b considered dangerous by some 
students. 



fit Boston Latin School, there is an Pssistant Headmaster 
who is responsible for follow-up of suspended students. h 
"Btuderit Support Services" referral sheet has been deve- 
loped to regulav^ize access to existing services. h 
"Stress Tea;m" has been created to deal with students 
perceived to be in crisis. There is ar, in-house susoen- 
sior program that accounts for over 90"/ of the suspensions 
at Boston Latin School; the program ensures that students 
face a i-ienative consequence for their actions, i-ghile 
providing time to keep up with school work ar\d Derhaps 
r ece i ve counse ling. 

fit Tech, the Headmaster and his two assistants have kept 
suspensions low by maintaining a highly visible presence, 
an open door policy for students and contact with parents. 
The Code of Discioline is taught in 9th grade Civics, 
which helps orient students to the school and acquaint 
students with their resoovisibi 1 ites and the consequevices 
of Discipline Code infract iovis. Boston Technical High 
School does have an in- school suspension program, but 
staffing difficulties have reduced its effectiveness. 

Boston Latin ficademy should be commended for its low 
suspension rate. In addition, a guidance counselor is 
attempting to develop a computer program that would iso- 
late factors associated with student drop outs from the 
ficademv. 



RECCMMENDftTIQNS 

1. Develop additiona>l support services, especial iy ones 
available during school hours because the students most 
likely to r->eed them are often unable to stay after school 
(jobs, family responsibilities, etc) See the report on 
support services for related recommendations. 

-239- 



£. Develop a system fov- early identification and refei — 
ral of students with discipline and attendance problems. 

3. Hold staff development training on non-confrontational 
methods of behavior management. 

4. Review policies regarding students repeating grades 
€irid atteniDt to eliminate features that unnecessarily 
subject students to repeating courses they have already 
mastered. 

5. Develop parent outreach programs, especially for stu- 
dents with attendance and /or behavior oroblems. 



-240- 



1983 - 1984 GOALS - COORDINATOR OF GIFTED /TALENTED PROGRAMS 



I. Programmatic Goals 

A. To make myself aware of all Gifted/Talented Programs now in 
operation in grades K - 12 throughout the city by: 

1. Reading all available data (federal/state regulations, grants, 
program designs, etc.) 

2. Contacting all personnel directly involved with these 
programs and making on-site visitations. 

3. Designing a systematic longitudinal observation scheme 
that reflects my visitations and assessments of each 
Gifted/Talented program. 

B. To provide program continuity and curriculum consistency within 
the AWC/ATS (grades A-6) classes by: 

1. Developing an AWC/ATS Differentiated Curriculiun Model based 
on Boston's Curriculum Objectives. This model will emphasize 
basic skill mastery through the integration of Reading/ 
Language Arts with other content areas, and it will promote 
the teaching of "thinking processes" through strategies 
identified as conducive to organizing and executing curricula for 
Gifted/Talented , students. 

2. Exercising "quality control" in assessing materials presently 
being used in AWC/ATS classrooms and in the acquisition of 
appropriate level - new materials being ordered for the 

1984 - 1985 school year by establishing a Master List of 
Recommended Materials for Academically Talented Students. 

C. To work closely with the Department of Implementation to improve the 
present student identification procedure so that it incorporates 
multiple criteria for selection of AWC/ATS students. 

D. To disseminate information to parents regarding the AWC/ATS selec- 
tion process and program design through creating an Informational 
Brochure and organizing informational meetings at AWC/ATS schools. 

II. Direct Services to Teachers /Principals 

A. To issue a teacher questionnaire and survey to identify AWC/ATS 
teachers' immediate concerns and needs as well as their Gifted/ 

' . . Talented training and experience. This information will be 

helpful in designing staff development training opportunities. 

B. To establish a communication system that keeps teachers/principals 
informed and aware of Gifted/Talented educational opportunities^ 
trends and materials by issuing a monthly newsletter and 
establishing a Resource Center Materials Exchange. 

-241- 



Joanne McManus 



II. Direct Service to Teachers/Principals (Cont'd.) 

C. To observe the teaching learning process in AWC/ATS classrooms on 
a regularly scheduled basis and to cultivate a feeling of 
mutual cooperation and trust with teachers and principals in 
order to establish myself as a "resource". 

D. To provide in-service training opportunities for AWC/ATS teachers 
through modeling/demonstrating instructional techniques; organizing 
workshops; arranging classroom visitations for teachers; and 
conducting a weeklong, three credit course in curriculum development 
at Lesley College - June, 1984. 

E. To offer support services for teachers of regular, bilingual 
and special education classrooms who must also address the 
needs of the talented students they teach through continuing 
my work as a DRP trainer and by assisting other Program and 
Project Directors whenever possible. 

III. Personal/Professional Goals 

A. To open-communication lines with other Gifted Program Coordinators 
by becoming an active participant in the Mass. Collaborative for 
Gifted Education-- and the National Institute for Gifted 
Education. 

B. To continue my own education be reviewing current research 

and literature. , attending specialized programs and mastering my 
Apple II e Personal Computer, 

C. To write a professional paper dealing with Reading/Thinking and/ 
' or Children's Literature — ^A Reading Program. 



-242- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF 

DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT/CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION 

OLIVER W. LANCASTER 



TO: Oliver W. Lancaster, Deputy Superintendent 

Curriculum and Instruction 

FROM: Joanne McManus, Director of Academically Talented Programs 

DATE: October 31, 1983 

RE: Analysis of Exam School Enrollments 



Mr. Coakley's analysis of this year's new enrollees in grade 7 at 
Boston Latin School and Boston Latin Academy highlights several facts 
and raises three important issues. 

Facts/Conclusion of Study 

1. Boston Public School students constitute approximately h of the 
grade 7 entrees at both Latin Schools. 

2. AWC/ATS students represent h of the Boston Public School students 
who entered grade 7 at both exam schools. 

3. AWC/ATS graduates represent approximately \ of the total grade 7 
enrollees at both exam schools. 

A. The largest number of Black 7th grade entrants come from non AWC/ATS 
Boston Programs. 

5. Hispanic students constitute 6% of all entrees into grade 7 at 

Boston Latin and Boston Latin Academy. The majority of students (20) 
were ATS graduates. 

Surfacing Issues 

A. The fact that half of the Boston School entrees to grade seven at the 
two Latin Schools come from non AWC/ATS classes raises a serious ques- 
tion as to the validity of our present AWC/ATS selection process. In 
1983, 199 able students (93 Black, 71 White, 21 Oriental, 13 Hispanic 
and 1 American Indian) either choose not to be part of the AWC/ATS 
Program or were not allowed to take part in our program due to the 
limitations of our selection process. 

-243- 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5690 AREA (617) 



- 2 - October 31, 1983 



Surfacing Issues (Cont'd.) 

B. The Hispanic population of students attending the Latin Schools is 
extremely low. and their drop out rate is high. The bilingual 
coordinator at the Mackey Middle School, Francisco Ruiz, suggests 
a number of explanations for this: 

- The competitive academic atmosphere of the exam schools is so 
very different from the culturally supportive structure of 
Boston's elementary and middle school bilingual programs that 
these students feel lost and alone. As a result, they leave 
and re-enter their feeder middle schools. 

- The exam schools lack bilingual counselors and/or advisors to 
help students cope with this transition. 

- Both the Latin Courses and the English Composition Courses 
offered at the exam schools rely highly on a good English 
Grammar foundation. Many students do not have this. 

- The large amount of homework is a problem. Students have 
little opportunity for home tutoring or assistance due to 
having monolingual parents. 

C. In comparing the AWC/ATS May 5, 1983 enrollment statistics with 
Mr. Coakley's present analysis additional concerns appear. 

- Only 179 ATS grade six students out of 3A1 were accepted 
into the Latin Schools. 

- Why aren ' t more AWC/ATS students passing the exam ? 

- What is happening to the remaining 162 able ATS students 
who are presently not attending the exam schools ? 

- Parents and teachers have actively advocated for a continuous 
Advanced Work Program (grades 7-12) for those students whose 
learning styles need an alternative school prototype and for 
those students who fail to pass the exam. 



Opening up a communication system between the exam schools and the 
AWC/ATS schools seems to be a first step in addressing these issues. I 
have spoken with the Headmasters of both Latin Schools and they are 
willing to help me set up a committee composed of exam school personnel 
and AWC/ATS personnel in order to investigate these issues and exchange 
ideas. Through gaining a deeper understanding of the students' needs 
and the programmatic objectives, we will be able to identify those 
areas of weakness that need to be strengthened. 



■244- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R Coakley, Senior Officer 



October 24, 1983 



MEMORANDUM 



To: 
From: 

Subject: 



Frank Banks 



Johni Coakley 





Impact of No»)ABPS Schools/and AWC Program on Exam School 
Enrollments 



In our recent conversation you offered an estimate of Advanced 
Work students at the Examination Schools which seemed very high. 
Therefore, I did an analysis of this year's new enrollees in grade 7 
at Bbston Latin Academy and Boston Latin School. 



1. 



3. 



New Enrollees at Boston Latin Academy and Boston Latin School, grade 7 
Note: Based on Enrollment of 10/20/83. Non-Promotes Factored Out. 
Black VThite Oriental Hispanic Ind .Am. Total 

BLA 87 125 12 9 1 234 

BLS 126 231 54 32 443 

TOTAL 213 356 66 41 1 677 

Non-BPS Enrollees (i.e., from private schools, etc.) at BLA & BLS, gr . 7 





Black 


White 


Oriental 


Hispanic 


Ind .Am. 


Total 


BLA 


22 


74 


1 








97 


BLS 


37 


147 


10 


8 





202 


TOTAL 


59 


221 


11 


8 





299 


BPS Enrollees 


(i.e. , from 


BPS middle 


schools) at 


BLA and 


BLS, grade 7 




Black 


White 


Oriental 


Hispanic 


Ind. Am. 


Total 


BLA 


65 


51 


11 


9 


1 


137 


BLS 


89 


84 


44 


24 





241 


TOTAL 


154 


135 


55 


33 


1 


378 



-245- 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5500. 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 



Frank Burns 2 October 24, 1983 

4 . BPS Enrollees from AWC Program at BLA and BLS , grade 7 





Black 


White 


Oriental 


Hispanic 


Ind .Am. 


Total 


BLA 


24 


23 


6 


5 





58 


BLS 


37 


41 


28 


15 





121 


TOTAL 


61 


64 


34 


20 





179 


BPS Enrollees f 


rom "Regul 


ar" Program 


at BLA and 


BLS, grade 7 






Black 


White 


Oriental 


Hispanic 


Ind. Am. 


Total 


BLA 


41 


28 


5 


4 


1 


79 


BLS 


52 


43 


16 


9 





120 


TOTAL 


93 


71 


21 


13 


1 


199 



I imagine that there are many conclusions which can be drawn from 
the above data. The following are offered: 

- BPS "graduates" constitute 56% of this year's new entries to 
grade seven at the two Latins 

- BPS "graduates" constitute 59% of this year's new entries to 
grade seven at Boston Latin Academy 

- BPS "graduates" constitute 54% of this year's new entries to 
grade seven at Boston Latin School 

- Advanced Work "graduates" constitute 47% of the BPS "graduates" 
at grade seven at the two Latins, and they constitute 26% of 
all new attendees at grade seven at the two Latins 

- Advanced Work "graduates" constitute 42% of the BPS "graduates" 
at grade seven, Boston Latin Academy, and they contitute 25% 

of all new attendees at grade seven, Boston Latin Academy 

- Advanced Work "graduates" constitute 50% of the BPS "graduates" 
at grade seven, Boston Latin School, and they constitute 27% 

of all new attendees at grade seven, Boston Latin School 

- Black Advanced Work "graduates" constitute 4 0% of the Black 
BPS "graduates" at grade seven at the two Latins, and they 
constitute 29% of all Black new attendees at the two Latins 

- White Advanced Work "graduates constitue 47% of the White BPS 
"graduates" at grade seven at the two Latins, and they 
constitute 18% of all White new attendees at the two Latins 



JC:ab 

xc : Office of Superintendent 
Robert Peterkin 
Oliver Lancaster 
Catherine Ellison 
Charles Glenn 



-246- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R Coakley, Senior Officer 



December 2, 1983 



MEMORANDUM 



To: Franklin Banks. /i xi /» 

From: John Coakle^<J^y^it^j^^ 

Subject: Relationsh;^ between AWCy^'^nd Exam Schools 

I continue to be bothered instinctively by the inferences you 
are drawing about the Advanced Work Program and its perceived 
relationship as a preparation for the Examination Schools. For 
example, probably based on data provided by me, you observed that 
less than half the Advanced Work graduates of grade 6, 1982-83 are 
in grade 7, Examination Schools, 1983-84. However, further study 
shows that 95 of the 398 sixth-grade Advanced Work students of 1982-83 
did not apply for the Examination Schools. Of the 3 03 students 
who did apply, 62% were invited to the Examination Schools. You may 
not consider 62% to be a high figure, but I do when I compare it to 
the 49% figure for non-BPS applicants (which include students from 
prestigious private schools , from parochial schools and from Metco 
schools) . I also compare it favorably to the 45% figure for BPS 
students not in the Advanced Work Program. 

This memorandum is not intended to be a refutation of your 
thesis, but a request to be cautious in any analysis. I suspect 
that more analysis has to be done by "both sides." 



ab 
Enclosure 

xc : Robert Spillane 
Robert Peterkin 
Oliver Lancaster 
Catherine Ellison 
Charles Glenn 



-247- 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5500, 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 



TOTAL Attending (11/4/82) 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Invited/ At tending 

Invited/ Applying 



12/2/83 



B WO 



170 


121 


107 


398 


42 


24 


29 


95 


68 


69 


50 


187 


60 


28 


28 


116 


40% 


57% 


47% 


47% 


53% 


71% 


64% 


62% 



-248- 



12/2/83 



Analysis of 1982-83 Grade Six, Advanced Work Program and Exam 

School Applications/Invitations 



Edison 



Cur ley 



Irving 



Thompson 



Holmes 



McCormack 



Timilty 



Barnes 



King 



Mackey 



Attending (11/4/82; 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 

Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 

Attending 
Not Applying 
Invited 
Not Invited 



B 


w 





T 


15 


12 


25 


52 


6 





1 


7 


4 


10 


13 


27 


5 


2 


11 


18 


19 


13 


12 


44 


5 


3 


4 


12 


9 


7 


6 


22 


5 


3 


2 


10 


17 


20 


3 


40 


5 


2 





7 


6 


13 


2 


21 


6 


5 


1 


12 


14 


9 


4 


27 














12 


6 


2 


20 


2 


3 


2 


7 


45 


10 


8 


63 


9 





2 


11 


17 


8 


5 


30 


19 


2 


1 


22 


19 


17 


10 


46 


3 


5 


7 


15 


11 


7 





18 


5 


5 


3 


13 


21 


8 


16 


45 


7 


2 


2 


11 


6 


4 


14 


24 


8 


2 





10 





20 


3 


23 





12 


1 


13 





4 


2 


6 





4 





4 


20 


12 


6 


38 


7 








7 


3 


10 


5 


18 


10 


2 


1 


13 








20 


20 








12 


12 








1 


1 








7 


7 



-249- 



Bo-^ion Latin. Academy. 
TuiOA. TjuLinJjig. ?AJOg/iam 
■J983-8U 



Se^-ilon. 1 OvejivLew ofL tk<z ^oZd ofL TiitonJ fundamentaJbi ofL flanrdng. fioji TutoAJux^ 



^-. ''■.:. .•■'-_.(.• 



.' t. ' »t^-» .'.•■ 



.'.•-'. "tr..:'!:' o'v C.*/';'~c".''. -i-Co --' T''!. 



2. [kJ.CArrJLn.eL Ne.exLi'i} - Japut piom. tenches of. ^ub^aat cuica 

QueyitLorvi/ QoriceA/L^ pwm. student. 

?. S&t Ob^e.ciJ.ve.l'il - OeJ:(ZAnin.e.d bi}. length, of. ^oA^Lon. - orto. ba^Lc obJ.e.ctl.ve. 

/•.■eJjoJiP.c ix) Jjn.T,e.dJ.iii.e. ae.e.dA 

■'■'- , 'I'A.o vj.c • ■ J ru:,iyjj.cJiL: ,rj 

T'Oxr^exLLcJuxin — iJav'zJjO puajii. cf. a-ii.e/Vi.ail.'^e. izx.plwLoiJjon^'i 
"Relnfji/Lcumant of. c0n.ce.pH4) 

5. -. €vajjjxvte. Outcome. - U-ie. of. que^tLoriyi fo/i fe.exijback ( FoAmatLve. €vat, J 

O&veJopment of. to/ik to ^OAve. a4 SummatLve. Svat, 



SeA^iZon. 2 QejxeA.cU. St'Lot&gA.Oyi fo/i 7iemexiixitLrui/7ieln.fo/icin.g. Study. SkJJJ^ and HabLtA 



1, Ijjne. fllanag.ement 



- A'i^-Lgne.d ^turiij. timeA {^chooJ. and home.) 
Wluzt to .4tudj^ when 



2. Note. Taking Tlp4 - "Key. Woad" method 

3. Rote. of. MemoJiy, - Oe.vj.ceA fon. ^t/iengthenJjig. memoAy. 
U. fieccUt Techniques \- A't'^ooiatiorvi 

5. Reading. Ttp4 \- fiethodotogy. 

SeA^lorxA 3-8 StAotegteA fieUated to Sp&ctfic Sub^e.ct Aabjoa 

Each, of theAe yieA-i^ionA luitt addn.eA4 ^pectfLc -aub^ect ojieoA ( mathenuLticA , EngMiAh, 
Latin) tn sequence. Half of the. ^eA^ion. wLLL be. comp/iLAed of foAjnaJL input fyuom. 
the. JjiyiijuiJctoA. ofd hxitf wtti be com.pnJ.Aed. of qusAtlonA/ pnobteiM njcuAed by the. 
tutoAA , bcAed on theiyi ^xpeAience -in the pAogyiam, 



A total, of €J.i^ht yic^yiiori/i ujUJ. bi pADvj.dcji fo/7. the. fJyiAt ^em&yit^ji. Flvd yie^y.,lvi-iA 
"^■UU. be pAovtded diming. the ^iecond AemeAteji to atLoiv foA tnnintnc). of atteyinate 
tittOAA. Second /iem<iAteA. ACA^ionA wUJ. oJao be. open to tuto.iA who wcjie tnxiined 
dunlng. the fJyiAt ^emz/iteji to atlotu them oppoAtunLtieA foA queAtLonA and/oA diA- 

CUAAion, 

Second SemeAteA. 



tentative Schedule: 


FiyiAt SemeAteA. 


SeAAlon 1 


10/26 


11/1 


2 


11/8 


11/9 


3 


11/15 


11/16 


'{ 


-,1/PP 


11/.2- 


.- 


t -/ ;. 


11 /'in 


ft 


, ,■ T f> 


t / ■ ' 


'^ 


■■■--. 


1 / : J 



2/1 


2/2 


2/8 


2/9 


2/15 


2/ 16 


2/29 


3/1 



-250- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
BOSTON LATIN ACADEMY 

ROBERT B. BINSWArjGER 
Head Master 



DORIS D.JONES 

JAMES J ZANOR 
Assislant Headmasiers 



October 25, 1983 

TO: PARENTS OF ACADEMY STUDENTS 
FROM; ROBERT BINSWANGER, HEAD MASTER 
RE: SPECIAL TUTORIAL PROGRAM 

In order to counter the student transfer rate and make our curriculum 
and our concurrent support services more responsive to the individual needs 
of our student body, it is essential that Boston Latin Academy proceed 
immediately with a peer- tutorial program. The first step is early identi- 
fication of students with particular educational needs. Your son/ daughter 
has been identified to participate as a tutee in our program. 

Criteria for the selection process included any or all of the following 
ccsnponents : 

(1; pre-admission referral by summer school teachers; 

(2) referral of subject teacher, in conjunction with the department 
chairman; 

(3) performance on the following standardized tests: 

— THE METROPOLITAN READING ACHIEVEMENT TEST 

— THE GATES-MACGINITIE READING TEST 

— THE MACMILLAN SERIES R ACHIEVEMENT TEST 

— THE DEGREES OF READING POWER TEST 

— THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS CURRICULUM-REFERENCED TESTS 
[ENGLISH AND MATH] 

The target date for the commencement of the program is Monday, October 31. 
Incoming students in Grades 7 and 9 will be tutored by upperclassmen two to 
three times a week, depending upon individual needs, either during study periods 
and/or before and after school. The length of time tutored will be under 
advisement of the subject teacher, in conjunction with the department chairman. 
Initially tutorial subjects will include English, Latin, and Mathematics; later 
on in the year, we expect to expaind the program and include additional subject 
areas. Enclosed you will find two of the evaluation instruments which we will 
be using to monitor your son's/daughter's progress in the program. 

If, for any reason, you do not wish your son/daughter to participate in 
our peer--tutoricil program, please contact Miss Walter. 



-251- 

174 IPSWICH STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS..02215 • 266-7546 AREA 61 7 



BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 



CURRENT PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS 



1. Students must pass a minimum of four (^) MAJOR 
subjects of their class to gain promotion. In this in- 
stance students failing one (1) MAJOR subject should 

go to summer school, pass a make-up exam and there- 
by remove the failure. 

2. Students passing only three (3) MAJOR subjects of 
their class will not be promoted. Students in this catfei™- 
gory must go to summer school and then take makeup exam(s) 
to gain promotion. This will enable the students to pass 
the minimum requirement of four (^) MAJOR subjects of their 
class . 

3. .Students passing fewer than three (3) MAJOR subjects of 
their class must repeat the year. They may be able to go to 
summer school to gain credit for transfer purposes. Such 
students should check with the appropriate guidance counselor 
to see if promotion by transfer is possible. 

^. Students who are a year behind in a subject and fail the 
subject again must go to summer school and take a make-up exam. 

5. Students who are repeating a whole class and fail the class 
for a second time cannot be promoted; for such students transfer 
v;ould be advisable. 

6. In order to graduate, a student in Class I must pass five (5) 
MAJOR Class I subjects, including English 12. 

-252- 



Report of the Educational Enrichment Program 
at Shady Hill School 

July 5 - August 17, lyaj 

The sumner session of EEP at Shady Hill in 19S3t ran very much fdong 
the lines laid down last summer. Students were seventh graders from Boston 
Latin and Boston Latin Academy who had failures in En^lsh, Math or Latin, 
and who hoped to make up this failure. This summer we also offered Earth 
Science to Boston Latin students and Geography to students from Latin Aca- 
demy as these were subjects many had failed. 

The recruiting process was again primarily in the hands of guidance 
personel at the two Boston schools. By June 23, I had a list of 117 recom- 
mended students. On July 5. when school began, that list had dwindled to 
107 students who had verbally committed themselves to come and in fact, 98 
students were regularly in attendancd- during the 6J "^ok program. Of the 
kO students eligible for make-up exams a.t Boston Latin, 3b passed. Of the 
37 eligible for make-up exams at Boston Latin Academy, 25" passed. Of the 
2X ineligible students, 12 were students who had come for enrichment only. 
The others did not pass their Shady Hill exams and usually had absences in' 
excess of the three dayB wu allowed oach stud»nt. Dostun Latin Academy 
students could makn up two failurou whereas Boston Latin studentu wero only 
allowed one make-up. 

The faculty consisted of two returning math toachert. and an e.irth 
science teacher from Honton Latin Ara.lrmyi two now I./ktln t«iiif hef;i from 



-253- 




EEP '83 
p.2 



Boston Latin, and a new and returning English teacher from independent 
schools. I offered to teach geography, expecting one section of students. 

Each student was scheduled for two acaxienic classes and a study 
period. A few students had only one class and two studies, but most of 
these decided they would prefer to take two claisses in their subject. 
Aides, juniors and seniors from the two high schools, again provided much 
help. They monitored the busses, tutored individual students, ran two of 
the study periods, helped to mark papers and even took over classes in 
time of emergency. Classes ran for 50 minutes each with a 15 minute break 
after the second period for recreation and lemonade. Progress reports 
went home every two weeks with the final one mailed. 

The summer ran smoothly with students attending regularly and 
working hard. Nevertheless there were some difficulties and issues that 
we ai^dressed at a final ev£iluation meeting. 

Recruitment needs to follow a more consistent pattern at both schools. 
We enrolled students who would repeat seventh grade, but we didn't have 
enough of them to create a special program for them. Thus their needs 
were not addresiied In the liott wtty.l lUoally, thuy uu«j;ht to bt« In a avotlon 
taught by two teachers concentratl iiTT^on English and math skllJi-, and stres- 
sing study skills such as note taking, outlining, reviewing and test taking 
8tratep;le6./ r^oston Latin Academy also sent a number of math students to 
Brighton High School for reasons not clear to us. 

We need to rethink offering geography and earth science. We cannot 
teach or review a full year's curriculum In nix weekr,, yet that In what Is 
expected since the exam can cover material from anywhere in the year. If 
we are to teach these subjects again, we need to make some aKreeraent with 
the heads of departments of these subjects as to which units best represent 
the issues and principles they wish students to master. Both Mrs. Cunningham 

-254- 



EEP '83 
p. 3 



and I felt that we could not do justice to the subject and that students 
could not concentrate on understamdlng basic principles because so nuch 
material had to be reviewed. Soncwhat along the same lines, English teachers 
have suggested for'th* past sumiaers ^ that literature to be read in sum- 
mer ought not to be a rereading of the texts used in the winter. Boston 
Latin Academy this summer worked out with me an agreement to use two books 
from their summer reading list as the literature to be studied. This was 
much more satisfying to teachers and students than having to review texts 
already taught. 

That discussion brou^t us to the cinix of the problem facing SEP, Are 
we becoming just an alternate summer school for the Boston Latin schools, 
doing the job of the public school in a better way because we have smaller 
classes of Latin school students only, and teachers who know the students 
and the Latin school curriculum ? As Mr. Gray pointed out, ESP has stood 
for enrichment and we are losing that aspect of the SEP mandate under the 
present set-up. 

A possible solution would be to offer each student a summer remediation 
; program In one subject only, to continue to offer a modified study-study 
skills period, and an elective that would be truly enriching. That could 
v be a writing class along the lines that Mr. Britton has been offering so 
successfully, a summer literature class, a drama class, a computer program- 
ming course, some offering in studio arts and/or music, an environmental 
earth science course making use of the campus, confidence and group building 
activities along the lines pioneered by Project Adventure especially useful 
If we have a class of repeating: seventh graders. Such a proRram would serve 
the needs of the Latin schools for a summer school and would also serve 
the mandate of EEP. It might require some additional fjtfulty or a different 

distribution of faculty, bringing about a better mix of Latin and independent 

-255- 



^WSi* 



SEP '83 



school teachers and a greater exchange of Ideas on teaching and curriculum. 

The possible need for more funds brings me to another concern, the 
busses. We need 3 busses to bring 100-120 children to the Shady Hill 
campus. Their cost Is about one third of the cost~of the entire program. 
This program exists to serve Boston public school children. There ought to 
be a way to arrange to use their busses amd reduce the cost of trans- 
portation. Bus behavior also remains a thorny issue. The aides do their 
best as monitors, but do not feel confident or skilled in maintaining order. 
The drivers have been very helpful in reporting difficulties to me rl^t 
away, and parents have been supportive if students needed to be excluded 
from the bus for a few days. A better training program for aides would 
alleviate their distress. That would necessitate their being chosen early 
enough In the spring so that two or three afternoon training sessions 
could be set up. 

We all agreed that my taking on the teaching of geography heul been 
a mistake. Because I was tied to teaching two sections a day, I had less 
tlae to visit classes, to get to know each student, to be available for 
conferences or as a substitute teacher. It saved the program the salary of 
a teacher, but deprived it of a more available director. 

The student evaluatlonj again stressed how much they had appreciated 
small cleusses, a chance to ask questions, and helpful teachers who cared 
about them and wanted them to succeed. Must of them realized that they 
had to study harder, read the books, do the homework, to avoid another summer 
at school. Many mentioned that the quiet campus, the shorter day . helped 
them to concentrate. They cill wanted more recess, and fouil. Although a 
significant number found the long bus ride a burden and recommended an 
in-town location for the program, over 70>i felt that Shjuiy Hill was the 
best place, -256- 



■ip 



EEP '83 
P.5 



My final recommendation would be changing the date of the make-up exam 
to six weeks after the last Friday of the school year. Teachers and 
students need a good break from school. This program gives them about 
10 days days before and a scant three weeks after, not the best arrange- 
ment. 

Vera Nordal 



•257- 




John H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Examination School Attrition 
Student Transfers and Withdrawals (7/82 - 9/83) 

BostCTi Latin School - Total Enrollnent (1982-83) = 2192 

20% Black, H% Hispanic, 62% ^-Jhlte, Wo Asian 
Total Transfers and Withdrawals = 366 

Black and Hispanic - I68 = ^6% 

White and Asian - 198 = 5455 

Total Transfer to All Other Boston Transfers to Other ExamlnatlOTi 

Public Schools Schools 

Black and Hispanic VJhlte and Asian Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

111 (7W) ^5 (295S) 9 3 

Total = 156 Total = 12 

Withdrawals from Bostoi Public Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

57 (27%) 153 (73%) 
Total = 210 



Bostoi Latin Acadeny - Total Enrollment (1982-83) 12'<0 
35% Black, 3% Hispanic, 52% White, 10% Asian 

Total Transfers and Withdrawals - 289 

Black and Hispanic - I35 = h7% 
White and Asian - 15H = 53% 

Total Transfers to All Other Boston Piibllc Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 



96 (63%) 56 (37%) 

Tbtal = 152 

Transfers to Other Examination Schools 
Black a;id Hispanic White and Asian 

^ 6 

Total = 10 

Withdrawals from Boston Public Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

39 (28%) 98 (72%) 

Total = 137 



-258- 



-2- 



Bostcn Technical Hl^ - Total Enrollment (1982-83) = 1100 
1^9% Black, 5% Hispanic, 29f» White, 17/5 Asian 

Total Transfers and Withdrawals - 261 

Black and Hispanic - 126 = H8% 
White and Asian - 135 = 52^ 

Total Transfers to All Other Bostoi Public Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

35 (W) ^5 (5655) 
Total = 80 

Transfers to Other Examination Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

1 1 

Total = 2 

Withdrawals from Bostcn Public Schools 
Black and Hispanic White and Asian 

91 (5055) 90 (5055) 
Total = 181 



For All Examination Schools 

Total Transfers and Withdrawals - 916 

Black and Hispanic - i»29 = ^755 
White and Asian - il87 = 53? 

Total Transfers to All Other Boston Public Schools -388 

Black and Hispanic - 242 = 6255 
White and Asian - m6 = 3855 

Transfers to Other Examination Sc hools - 2i\ 

Black and Hispanic - IH 
White and Asian- - 10 

Total Withdrawals from Boston Public Schools - 528 

Black and Hispanic - lb7 = 3555 
White and Asian - 3'<1 = 6555 



pr^^X-l:- 4^v. Ks 



-259- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R Coaklev, Senior Officer 



MEMORANDUM 



October 28, 1983 



To: Franklin Banks-, , 
From: John Coakley\^Wl 




Subject: Average Daily Attendanceyby 
School Year 1982-83 U 



Race by Grade Level: 



In response to your telephone request for 1982-83 attendance 
data by race for the examination schools, I offer the following chart; 



Black 
ADA/ ADM 



White 
ADA/ ADM 



Other 
ADA/ADM 



Total 
ADA/ADM 



Boston Latin Academy £01 = 92.0% 580 = 89.8% 142 = 90.5% 1124 = 90.6% 

436 646 158 1240 

Boston Latin School 388 = 87.6% 1255 = 91.9% 376 = 97.9% 2019 = 92.1% 

443 



1365 



384 



Boston Technical 



459 = 85.3% 
5T8 



280 = 86.7% 209 = 87.4% 
139 



2192 
948 = 86.1% 



180. 



323 739 1100 

The total number of school days for the school year 1982-83 was 



ab 



-260- 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5500, 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 



Em. SCHOOL SLISPE.N5IQN STfiTISTICS 1962-63 
BOSTON LATIN fiCAD£?^Y 





# students 
em-olied 


oercent of 

total 


number 
susDended 


percent of 
ail susDensions 


suscen 
index* 


5 ion 


B_SCK 




421 




34.62S 




14 






hi.-m 




1.15 


tJKITE 




635 




K.5£)i 




20 






57.14* 




1.05 


ORIEMTftL 




ii3. 




9. 84% 




1 






2.6b> 




.£9 


HISPSNIC 




34 




£.61!t 




e 






M 




M 


TOTP^ 




im 








35 













Bu5TQ'i 'ECHNICfi:. HIGH SCriCOL 



BLHilK 


53i 


WHITE 


314 


ORIENThl 


163 


HISPaNIC 


58 


TQTft. 


1078 


BOSTON LATIN SCHQGL 




BiJHCK 


42£ 


WHITE 


1546 


GRIiNTftL 


277 


rilSPftiNlC 


193 


TOTAL 


£146 



49. £bX 

29.13* 

16.96* 

4.64* 



15.65* 

6£. 56* 

12.90% 

4.60* 



53 

26 

2 

5 

86 

92 

92 

4 

3 

191 



61.63* 

30. £3* 

2.33* 

5.81* 



46.17* 

46. 17* 

2.89* 

1.57* 



l.£5 
1.84 

.14 

l.£5 



£.45 
.77 
.16 



♦index = oercent of students suspended Mr racial grouoing divided by percent of those students enrolled; a 
number aoove 1.8 indicates a disproportionately high level of suspensions 



■261- 



( 




John H. Lavvson, CommissionBr of Education 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 , 



Dctobar 25, 1933 



Dr. R. Robert Spillane 

Sioerintendent - ■ 

Boston Public Schools 

25 Court Street 

Boston, I-kosachusetts 02108 

Dear Dr. Spillane: 

Departrsnt of Education mnitors have infomsd re of a serious sit-uaticr. at 
Boston Technical Hi£p School Involvins Inadeqioate crc-/i3i'cn of En~li3h lan- 
guass support services for sone Asian (ChLnese) and HisparJ-C students. Ihis 
situation deirands InrBdlate renEdiation. I understand that bet^.-;een six and 
tvrelve .■^^ian students and three Hispanic students ar^ ercoeriencLng considerable 
acadenic difficulty because of limited English proficiency, especially as it 
relates to understandin?; and using English in so-e of their classes. It is also 
r7 uiiderstanding that students were admitted to the school after having 
r.cored v:ell enougi on the SSAT entrance ex-ominaticn to reet the criteria applied 
to all other students. 

\-Je consider the lack of adequate language support ser-.^ces for rinority students 
attending exarlnaticn schools to be evidence of ncr.-cr:pliance vrith the special 
desegregation riEasures ordered by the Federal Court. Consequently, v;e are In- 
voking section IV C of the 1982 Disengagement Order to re-quest that you bring 
this situation into ccrpliance by providing appropriate language support ser- 
vices for these and any other students at examinaticri schools in need of such 
services. 

'ie request that you provide us vrith a report by ricverher 11, 19S3 v.-hich includes: 

1. a description of languap^ assessment procedi.ares ccr.ducted at the examination 
schools 

2. the results of those procedures as v;ell as the L.-.V categories of all enrolled 
students v/hose hcme-languag? is not English 

3. plans to provide adequate language sunport ser^/lces including the assign- 
ment of additional staff and dates for irrplementaticr. 

I am specifically bringing this to your attention nc: beca^^e of the urs^ncy 

of the situatlcn. I have been informed that one limited Er.glish proficient stu- 

-263- 



-2- 



dent at Sostcn Technical lll^i recently' attenrtel suicide at the school. I ur^ 
you to act l"nr.ediately in order to prevent pro' further acaderrac or psyc'iological 
dararp to these students. Tnan:< you for your i::rsdiate attention to this 
situation. 



Sincerely, 

•John H. La:-.'3on 
Ccnrassioner of Education 



cc: John CoaI-:ley 

Roc-ert Peterkin 

Rosemary Rosen 

Cnarles C-lerji 

Jares Case 

Franlclin Banl-is 

Robert 31unenthal, Esq. 

Robert Eohn, Esq. 



-264- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
ROBERT R SPILLANE 

November 17, 1983 



Dr. John H. Lawson 
Commissioner of Education 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Dr. Lawson: 

In response to your inquiry of October 26, 1983, concerning the 
academic difficulty of certain limited English proficient (LE?) 
students at Boston Technical High School, let me say that we 
are aware of the problem. As you know, we do have bilingual 
programs for these students; however, their parents do not wish 
for them to participate. What results often is that these 
students, even with language support, fell behind in certain 
academic areas. It usually takes them a year or two to acquire 
the necessary English language skills to compete in their main- 
stream classes. However, as you know, we cannot force children 
or parents to participate in bilingual programs. 

I bring this to your attention only because there was some im- 
plication in your letter that these students were not receiving 
adequate services. It may be that we will have to review the 
criteria for the selection of LEP students and consider modifying 
the entrance requirements to Boston Technical High School in 
the future if this is a factor. 

The language assessment procedures for the examination schools 
are to assign students based on performance on the SSAT and 
according to court orders. Language assessment procedures 
for these students, in keeping with our Voluntary Lau Compliance 
Plan, include completion of Home and School Language Surveys 
and, when the surveys do not cross-validate, administration of 
an oral dominance test. Once students enroll, they meet with 
guidance counselors regarding their schedules and services at 
the school. Boston Technical High School has a voluntary after- 
school tutoring program for students who are experiencing 
difficulty even though this is not required by law or regulations, 

-265- 



26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 617 



Dr. John H. Lawson -2- November 17, 1983 



Enclosed also is a Lau Printout indicating the Lau Categories 
and other pertinent test data on the students. An analysis 
shows that for students whose indicated home language is not 
English, Lau Categories are: A-57 students; B-26 students; 
C-71 students; D-23 students; E-30 students; and 45 students will, 
be tested soon to determine their Lau Category. It should be 
noted that Lau Categories are assessed soon after students in- 
itially enroll, most students have since progressed significantly 
in oral English, and their reading skills are evidenced by their 
performance on the SSAT. 

I must express my astonishment over the unwarranted implication 
that a lack of language support services caused a suicide 
attempt. Any attempted suicide is a tragic occurrence. Ado- 
lescent suicide is unfortunately a growing national phenomonom, 
the causes of which are as yet not clear to experts in the 
field. To suggest a direct causal relationship between this 
incident and services at Technical High seems inappropriate 
unless the conclusions are based on a full psychological 
evaluation of the student involved. 

As you know, I do intend to comply fully with Department of 
Education monitoring efforts. I request that these efforts 
be based clearly on professional analysis of our programs and 
policies. 

Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about 
the enclosed material. 




(obert^R. Spi/llane 
Superintend^t of Schools 



mc 
Enclosures 



-266- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




^OVlo 



1983 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

BOSTON TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 



CHRISTOPHER P. LANE 
Head Master 



November 8, 1983 



To: Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor 
Bilingual Education 

From: Christopher P. Lane, Headm< 

Subject: ESL Teaching Assistance 

We have reviewed the Lau category data available to us. The 
statistics below should help identify and document the need: 




Lau Average 
3.0-3.9 

4.0-4.9 

5.0 

No Lau Average 



Grade 1 1° 11 li 
30 24 27 18 



23 



18 



66 



15 



35 



10 



34 



16 



Under separate cover we have forwarded to you 148 completed Lau 
forms n. • 



The need fo 
Although Tech 
is not English 
comprehension 
with their GPA 
to understand 
in English are 
assistance and 



r ESL services at BTHS is greater this year than ever before, 
is an exam school, many of the students whose native language 

score well on the entrance exam because their level of 
in English and their Math scores are adequate. This along 

gains them an invitation. The abilities of these students 
spoken English and to use conversational skills in communicating 

weak and need specialized reinforcement. They need additional 

further instruction in developing their oral language skills. 



During the 1982-83 school year we contacted the Bilingual Department. We 
also met with Dr. Lancaster in an attempt to find an equitable solution for 
the high number of students who were experiencing physical, emotional and 
intellectual difficulties as a result of their inability to speak and to 
comprehend English at a higher level. The numbers at that time were substantial 
(at least 42 were identified - cover letter enclosed) . Our request for a 
teacher to work with these students for the purpose of supplenting their 
English oral skills received no response. 

-267- 



205 TOWNSEND STREET, DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 02121 • 445-4381 AREA 617 



Continued . . . Page 2 
November 8, 1983 
To: Raffael DeGruttola 
From: Christopher P. Lane 
Headmaster/BTHS 

This year the need is even greater. We have a list of students whose 
reading scores and performance in academic subjects can be traced to 
difficulty with spoken and written English. We feel that these 
identified difficulties, if remediated by ESL instruction, could result 
in an increase in the learning potential of the students. Our concern is 
for the development of these students both at the academic as well as at 
the emotional levels. We are not staffed or equipped to adequately provide 
the instructional services that these linguistic minorities are demanding. 

We at Boston Technical High School feel confident that the availability 
of ESL instruction would significantly increase the retention rate of our 
linguistic minorities. 



CPL/g 

cc: Roger Beattie, Community Superintendent/District IX 

End. 



-268- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF T. ;E C: i V 'jl- hoSTQN' 




BOSTON PUBHC SCliU' ■-. ■> 

BOS^O^J TtCll.-J, , 1. hi.., I ■.. ;: •! 



lurJtiY F MuLLOr , 

'i^aJMaM.-r Septeriber 24, 1932 



To:' Roger Beattie 

Comiunity Superintendent - District IX 

From: Christopher P. Lane, Headni^^fe^//'^'^^" 




Subject: Need for an ESL Instructor 



As the enclosed transfer letter request indicates, tliorc- are 
students v.'ho are assigned to our school v;ho h.Tve severe difficulty 
with spoken and \;ritten English. I have reviev.'c-J the o/30/R2 Lau' 
language report and found nine students who have current Fnnlish 
closure scores of less than 2.0 grade equivalent. Not all students 
liave, these scores. Therefore, I suspect the numher of students 
v;ho have this need to be even greater. 

One student Is approved for transfer (enclosure) and I have 
at least two more requests for transfer on ny desk. I believe that 
the students can do the math and possibly some of the. science work 
but they need ESL support. 

I request that the language needs of our student bodv be reviewed 
and if warrented an ESL instructor be assigned to Doston technical 
High School. 



CPL/g 
End. 
dd: Raffael DeGruttola 

Senior Advisor - Bilingual 



-269- 



2CJ6 TOWNSilNU STh'ttr, DOHCHEbTL-n. MASSAC) -...il I li ,,/■.- . .t.,i. 4,-" .-.> 




John H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



November 30, 1983 



Dr. Robert Spillane 
Superintendent 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02198 

Dear Dr. Spillane: 

Thank you for your response to my letter (October 26) re- 
garding problems with language sucrort services for Linited 
English proficient students at Bos-or. Technical High. The 
information on the LAU assessment rrccedure and the actual 
figures on numbers of students in various LAU categories 
have been most informative. 

As of November 30, 1983, I have beer, informed that the ad- 
ditional support staff needed to rer.edy the problem has not 
arrived at the school, nor has the r.eadmaster received any 
specific information on when this additional support v;ill b; 
provided. V/ould you please inform us of specific plans for 
remedying this problem, including dates by which staff v;ill 
be assigned? Thank you for your prompt response. 

Sincerely, 

■^ ,:,_'-^^'\ \: ,_.^. ,_-, > 

John K. Lav/son 
Commissioner of Education 



-270- 



Special Education 



Page 1 



Objectives : 

Objective #1 : 

To determine whether there is a resource room and appropriate staff and 
materials in each school. 

Objective ^f2 : 

To determine whether there are substantially separate classes (502.4) in at 
least three schools in each district. 

Questions 1 A, 2 A : 

1 A. Does Boston Public Schools have a resource room in every school? 

2 A. Does Boston Public Schools have substanr'.tally separate classes (502.4) 

in at least three schools in each district? 

Method : 

The Greater Boston Regional Office of the Department of Education (DOE) will 
request from Boston Public Schools, documentation indicating Special Education 
programs and the numbers of staff located in each school. 

Utilize Special Education Program Matrix. 

Supportive Documentatio n: 

Boston ?ub].ic Schools submitted EPS Department of Personnel and Labor 
Relations, Employees with Function Code, 1301-1392 by Name, 9/27/S3, and 
Position and Control Forms listing Special Education Teachers and Aides by 
school and level for all schools. 

The above was submitted for all schools, per agreement with the Division. 
Additionally, BPS submitted a Program/Service Data Sheet for those schools 
scheduled for on-site visits. (see appendix 1) 

Monitoring Sites : 

The following schools: 

Aggasiz Elementary - 10/13/83 
Condon Elementary - 10/13/83 
Charlestown High School - 10/4/83 
Brighton High School - 10/3/83 
Dorchester High School - 10/5/83 
Edwards Middle School - 10/12/83 
Mackey Middle School - 10/12/83 

were visited to verify program and staff. 

Findings : 

Programs listed on Program Service Data Sheets requested by Department prior 
to on-site visit were all in place. 

Based upon paper documentation submitted, there exists a resource room in 

every school and substantially separate classes (502.4) in at least three schools 

in each district. 

-271- 



Objective if I : 

To determine whether there is a resource room and appropriate staff and 
materials (continued) . 

Question 1 B l; 

Have problems with assignment of qualified staff, especially bilingual, 
been resolved? 

Methods : 

In correspondence dated 8/29/83, the Greater Boston Regional Office 
requested from Boston Public Schools a roster of all bilingual/special 
education programs, staff assigned, their certification, and/or waiver 
status, a list of vacancies in the bilingual special education area, in- 
cluding bilingual assessors and documentation of attempts to secure 
personnel. ^ 

Written documentation. On-site visits to selected schools representing 
a range, in levels. "•,.■ 

Interviews with teachers. Evaluation Team Leaders, Department Heads and 

Principals. 

Surportive Dccutnentation: 



Bo ston Public Schools Department of Personnel and Labor Relations, with 
Function Code. 1301-1392 by Xaiae, 9/27/83 . 

Bilingual Special Education Staff Status. 1983-8A . 

Position and Control Forms listing Special Education Teachers and Aides by 
school and level for all schools. This was submitted in response to DOE's 
request for complete program and staff matrices by each school. 

Update and Status Report on Those Problems Schools and Programs Cited in 
the July 1983 Board Report. 

(See appendix 2) 

Monitoring Sites : 

Site visits were conducted at the following schools: 

Brighton High School 
Charlestown High School 
Dorchester High School 
Edwards Middle School 
Mackey Middle School 
Agassiz Elementary School 
Condon Elementarv School 



■272- 



-3- 



Objective //I (continued) : 

Question 1 Bl (continued) ; 

Findings : 

According to the Bilingual Special Education Staff Status Report, there are 
6A bilingual special education teachers representing Spanish, Italian, 
Haitian, Greek, Cape Verdian and Chinese. Out of the 64, needed are: 7 first 
year waiver requests, 1 second year waiver request and 5 third year requests. 

Additionally, 2 staff are noted as on second year waivers where their first 
year waiver requests for the 1982-83 school year were denied. Of 5 who were 
identified as certified, on the Bilingual Special Education Staff Status 
Report, 2 were listed as on first year waiver status on the 9/27/83 print- 
out, 1 was listed as on second year waiver status, 1 was listed as on third 
year waiver status. Further, T court-ordered personnel who was identified 
as certified on the Bilingual Special Education Staff Status Update was 
approved only as a second year waiver in the 1982-83 school year and listed 
as a third year waiver on the 9/27/83 printout. 

Based upon a review of certification waivers submitted to the Division, 
S waiver requests were submitted for bilingual/special educacion staff, 
3 will be forthcoraing and 1 is problematic. One individual is no longer in 
bilingual/special education. Of the two denied waivers during 1982-83, 
one is problematic due to out-of-state reciprocity questions, and the other 
is certifiable. The list of Bilingual Special Education Specialists 
indicates that one of the four psychologists is not certified; one of the 
three pupil adjustment counselor positions is vacant. The three Speech 
Therapists positions were reduced from 4 to 3. The Vision Resources 
position is vacant. 

Or. I!o%-ember 17, 1983, Boston Public Schools submitted 15 special education 
waiver requests to the Division of Special Education for the current 
1983-84 school year. (Appendix 3) 



■273- 



-A- 

Objective : 

To determine whether there is a resource room and appropriate staff and 
materials (continued) . 

Question 1 B2 : 

Have problems with assignment of qualified staff, especially bilingual, been 
resolved? 

Methods : 

The Greater Boston Regional Office will review Boston Public Schools' 
waiver requests for teacher certification. 

Cross reference with past teacher certification requests; review all 
requests to ensure appropriate documentation is meeting certification 
waiver requirements. \ 

Supportive Documentation ; 

Submission of certification waiver requests. Bilingual Special Education 
Staff Status, 1983-84 Boston Public Schools Department of Personnel and 

Labor P.elations, Employees with Function Code, 1301-1392 by Name, 9/27/83. 

Monitoring Sites : 

Brighton High School 
Charlesccwn High School 
Dorchester High School 
Edwards Middle School 
Mackey Middle School 
Agassiz Elementary School 
Condon Elementary School 

Findings ; 

A total of 78 Special Education Teachers were interviewed at these 7 schools. 
Four did not have the appropriate Special Education approval or needed a 
waiver submitted for the bilingual special education services they perform. 
Eight needed their certification status further clarified. 

Of the A with inappropriate certification or outstanding waivers, one 
certification waiver will be submitted and three remain outstanding. Of 
the 8 needing clarification, 6 are certified, 1 waiver will be forthcoming, 
and 1 is provisionally approved as a vocational instructor of special needs 
students. 

On November 17, 1983, Boston Public Schools submitted 15 special education 
waiver requests to the Division of Special Education for the current 1983-84 
school year. (Appendix 3) 



-274- 



-5- 



Objective 1: 



To determine whether there is resource room and appropriate staff and materials 
in each school. 

Question (s) 1S3 

Have problems with assignment of qualified staff, especially bilingual been 
resolved ? 

Methods ; 

The Regional Office Special Education Director will meet with the Associate 
Commissioner for Curriculum and Instruction to determine process for reviewing 
certification status of court ordered personnel to ensure assignment of qualified 
staff to special education classes. Meetings, copies of relevant correspondence. 

Supportive Documentation : 

Records on file with Greater Boston Regional Education Staff Special Education 
Unit. .^ .• 

M onitoring Sites : 

xN/A 

Findings : 

All problems relative to Special Education will be forwarded to the Associate 
Commissioner. 



-275- 



-6- 
Oblective 1 ; 

To determine whether there is a resource room and appropriate staff and materials. 

Questions IC : 

^Jhat actions have Boston Public Schools taken to address the staffing concerns 
cited in the July 1983 Board of Education Monitoring Report? 

Methods : 

Correspondence from the Greater Boston Regional Office, dated 8/29/83, requested 
from Boston Public Schools an update and status report on those problem schools 
and programs cited in the July'83 Board of Education Desegregation Report. 
Utilize Special Education Matrix. 

Supportive Documentation ; 

Boston Public Schools submitted PPS Department of Personnel and Labor Relations 
Employees with Function Code, 1301-1392 by Name, 9/27/83, and Position and Control 
Forms listing Special Education Teachers and Aides by school and level for all 
schools. Update and status report on those problem schools cited in the July 1983 
Board Report. (See Appendix 4) 

Monitoring Sites ; 

The fcllowing schools, Agassiz Elementary, Condon Elementary, Edwards Middle, 
Mackey Middle, Charlestown High Schoo]., Brighton High School, Dorchester High 
School, were visited to verify program and staff. 

Findings ; 

Based upon its site visits, the team found that Boston had taken action to address 
the staffing concerns in the classrooms at the following schools: 



Mackey Middle School 
Charlestown High School 

Edwards Middle School 



Agassiz Elementary 



Condon Elementary 



- L/AB Teacher with certification present. 

- Bilingual Chinese Resource Room Teacher present... 

OSDC Culinary Arts Teacher and students present. 

- SAR & Resource Room Teachers with special education 

certification present .. .Bilingual Chinese Resource 
Room teacher present.* 

- Bilingual Spanish SAR Teacher present** ...SAR 

Teacher with special education certification 
present. 

- Bilingual Cape Verdean Resource Room Teacher 

present.*** 



Mixing of Spanish and Cape Verdean Special Education Students found at the Condon 
Elementary. (See appendix Aa) 



*The teacher does not hold appropriate Special Education certification and/or waiver. 
See Massachusetts Special Education Monitoring Standards, 19.1. (Appendix 4) 
**The teacher was approved for 2nd year waiver for 003 certification A/4/83. See 
Massachusetts Special Education Monitoring Standards, 19.1 (Appendix 4) 
*'''*Teacher was approved for 1st year waiver for 003 certification on 4/4/83. See 
Massachusetts Special Education Monitoring Standards, 19.1 (Appendix 4) 



-276- 



-7- 

Objective 1 ; 

To determine whether there is a resource room and appropriate staff and materials. 

Question(s) ID: 

Does Boston Public Schools have an adequate pool of substitute teachers to ensure 
Resource Room service delivery? 

Methods ; 

The Regional Office will conduct on-going site visits to verify that qualified 
substitutes are available. On-site visits. Interviews with teachers and Evaluation 
Team Leaders. 

Supportive Documentation : 

Program and Staff Matrices ^ 

Monitoring Sites ; 

Agassiz Elementary, Condon Elementary, Edwards Middle, Mackey Middle, Charlestown 
High School, Brighton High School, Dorchester High School. 

Findings : 

During the on-site visit, the following classrooms had substitutes: 

Dorchester High School - Room 116-OSDC 

Dorchester High School - L/AB Cluster 

Brighton High School - Room AS, RR 

None of the substitutes had special education certification. Boston Public Schools 
has a pool of 20 substitutes available on a day to day basis to be deployed as needed. 

Corrective Action Taken to Date 

Correspondence to Personnel Office requesting clarification on length of leave and 
recruitment efforts for qualified Special Education staff. 



-277- 



-8- 



Objective 1 : 

To determine whether there Is a resource room and appropriate staff and materials. 

Question(s) IE ; 

Does Boston Public Schools have a system for ordering, distribution, inventory 
control and budget maintenance for educational supplies and materials, and which 
ensures equalization of material distribution? 

Methods : 

In letter dated 8/29/83, GBREC requested "a description as to how supplies and 
materials are distributed in each school or district." Letter from GBREC to 
Boston Public Schools, on-site visits to verify system in place, , interviews 
with teachers. 

Supportive Documentation ; ^ 

Boston provided its general budgetary guidelines for ordering supplies. 
(See Appendix 5) 

Monitoring Sites : 

Agassiz Elementary, Condon Elementary, Edwards Kiddle, Mackey Middle, Charlestown 
High School, Brighton High School, Dorchester High School. 

Findings ; 



The majority of teachers indicated that they had adequate supplies. They indicated 
familiarity with ordering process, including access to Special Education monies 
from Senior Level Advisors. 

Problems mentioned were: 

- Spring '83 orders not received 

- Materials ordered not given to teachers who requested materials 

- Materials inappropriate for students because class changed 

- Inadequate native language materials in Spanish and Chinese 

- Inadequate number of materials hinders complying with homework policy 



-278- 



-9- 



Objectlve 3: 



To determine whether out-of-district placements of special needs students are 
programmatically appropriate in consultation with the Director of Equal Educa- 
tional Opportunity for assignment implications. 

Question 3a: 

Is Boston Public Schools continuing to Implement the Prima Facie Denial Action 
Plan under 71B, Section 6, to address the over-representation of black students 
in 502.3 prototype? 

Question 3c: 

Inhere disproportionality has been cited through the prima facie denial procedures, 
are the Boston Public Schools appropriately reviewing and placing identified 
special education students in accordance with the Chapter 765 procedures? 

Methods: 



The Greater Boston Regional Office submitted final monitoring report for '82- '83 
in July, 1983. 

DOE will monitor the Prima Facie Denial '33- '84 Action Plan. 

3a - Site Visits 

Interviews with: Special Education and Regular Education Staffs 
Record Reviews 

3c: The Division of Special Education will continue to determine over and under 
representation of minority students in all special education prototypes. 
Monitors will continue to review Boston's PFD Action Plan to assure that 
previously identified over-representation in 502.3 program prototypes are 
made for "compelling educational reasons". 

SupDcrtive Documentation: 



Prima Facie Denial Action Plan 
Monitoring Sites: 



A representative sample of schools from the list of over-represented schools v-'ill 
be visited (Appendix 8) 

Findines: 



Boston submitted its Action Plan 9/30/83. 

Plan will be monitored during next round, December 1983 - May, 1984 



-279- 



-10- 



Objective 3: 



To determine whether out-of-district placements of special needs students are 
prograramatically appropriate, (continued) 

Question 3b: 



Is Boston Public Schools appropriately placing identified Special Education 
students into substantially separate prototypes (502.4), especially Learning 
and Adaptive Behavior (L/AB) programs in accordance with Chapter 766 procedures? 

Methods : 

The Greater Boston Regional Office will receive and review Boston Public Schools 
submission of assurances that L/AB classroom enrollments are reviewed by Boston 
Public Schools for placement appropriateness for the 1983-84 school year. The 
Greater Boston Regional Office will conduct on-site visits to selective substan- 
tially separate programs with a focus on L/AB programs. 

Review and on-site visits, including selective individual case record reviews 
and teacher interviews. 

Supportive Documentation: 

Boston Public Schools submission of L/AB program placements revieu process. 

Boston Public Schools reports resulting from their review of 502.4 substantially 
separate placements (by Jan. 1, 1984). (Appendix 9) 

Monitoring Sites 
M/A for first round 



■280- 



-11- 

Objectlve 3, Question 3B 
FINDINGS 

The assignment of students who have been identified to be in need of a 502.4 
prototype through the TEAM evaluation process involves the Department of Student 
Support Services and the Department of Implementation. 

The Department of Implementation has to have the space matrix in place around 
February 1. According to the first Court Order (1975) bilingual and substantially 
separate assignments have to be made first, that is, before regular education 
assignments. The Depeirtment of Implementation knows it has to make unique 
provisions for approximately 3200 students in substantially separate programs. 

Some time in February the Department of Implementation staff meets with Senior 
Level Advisors and Program Specialists from the Department of Student Support 
Services and reviews the print-outs of assigned Special Education students to 
identify those students who will receive applications and/or notices. Special 
Education students who are identified as staying in substantially separate 
programs for any one of the following reasons, for example: 

student will be moving to a more restrictive prototype 
student will be moving across programs, i.e. from L/AB to LD 
student will be moving across levels, i.e. from elementary to middle 
student will be staying in same program and prototype 

will receive notices. The notice says that notification of assignment will be 
issued around May 15th and that the assignment will be determined together with 
the Department of Student Support Services through the TEAM process. 

Special Education students who are moving from siibstantially separate 502.4 or 
more restrictive prototypes to mainstream programs, 502.1-502.3 will receive 
applications together with regular education students. 

In making assignments, the Department of Implementation tries to meet court- 
ordered percentages of ideal, high and low. Because high incidence disability 
502.4 programs, that is, SAR, L/AB and LD, exist in every distiict, the Senior 
Level Advisors are guided by the following considerations when recommending 
placements of students to high disability programs* : 

1) a program within geocoded school 

2) at high school level, program within geocoded school first; if this doesn't 
work, a District IX school 

3) program in a contiguous district 

4) if the above do not work, a program in a non-contigous district 

Ideally, assignment notifications go out around May 15th. The day they are sent 
out they become obsolete for students who: 

1) move 

2) are terminated 

3) move from 502.4 program to less restrictive program 

After May 15, the Department of Student Support Services send up D15 form 



* See Memo to Pamela Kaufmann from Thomas Hehir, 11/10/83 re: L/AB Placements 

-281- 



-12- 

Findings (continued) : 

for students on whom TEAM meetings have been held and who need assignments. From 
the 15th of May to the following Spring, assignments for 502.4 students and above 
are done manually and daily. 

TO' assure appropriate placement of students in the 502.4, 502.5 and 502.6 prototypes, 
the Department of Student Support Services has developed the following procedures. 
Upon completion of the TEAM meeting, at the school level, the lEP is sent to the 
Senior Level Advisor, p. 88 of Boston Public School Special Education Procedures Manual, 
(from here on manual will be referred to as BOSPED) . At this time the Evaluation 
Team Leader also attaches the Central Review Unit Checklist and Profile (see Appendix 9 ) . 
When lEP and CRU Checklist and Profile come to Compliance Unit, they are logged and 
are forwarded to Senior Level Advisor who follows steps outlined in BOSPED manual, 
pp. 1A1-1A5 (See Appendix 9 ). The Senior Level Advisor reviews the lEP and accompanying 
materials for compliance with Chapter 766 Regulations and recommends placement in a 
program based upon considerations given above. 

Relative to Allen v. McDonough, the Boston Public Schools has developed The 
Coinprehensive Internal Program Review (CIPRP) procedures. It is a plan to 
monitor and evaluate Special Education Programs in the Boston Public Schools. 
In 1983-1954 the monitoring teams will visit 60 schools . The monitoring visit 
includes inspection of a sa^iple number of student's Chapter 766 files and records. 
To address the State Department of Education's concern regarding the apparent over- 
representation of minority students in L/AB programs, the CIPRP teams vill review 
a representative, sample of minority 502.4 students in the schools where there are 
502.4 classes, (Meeting between Pamela Kaufmann, Marie Lindaiil and Tom Kehir, 11/B/S3) 
Furthermore, to guard against bias in the TEAM Evaluation process' at the schools and 
cei-.tral office level, Boston will require that the FFD checklist be used for all 
minority students at their original lEP meeting and for re-evaluations of students 
placed in the L/AB program. It is already used for minority students, in the 502.2 and 
502.3 protot>T5e as part of Boston's Action Plan for Prima Facie Denial of Equal Edu- 
cational Opportunity. Senior Level Advisors will review all L/AB placement recommen- 
dations sirce last May, They will report their findings: 

L/AB placement recommendations by level, by race 
Actual L/AB placement by level, by race 

Central Review Unit submissions for L/AB placement will be screened to assure that al- 
ternative strategies such as counseling or therapy have been attempted prior to placement 
in L/AB prototype. The Over/Under Representation Project will investigate assessnents 
used in educational, sociological and psychological evaluations to assure they are cul- 
turally non-biased. A list of tests will be completed by the summer of 1984 and in- 
service will be conducted for appropriate personnel during the 1984-85 school year. 

The Department of Education monitoring team will conduct case studies of minority 
students in L/AB programs during the second round of monitoring. (See appendix 9) 



-282- 



-13- 

Additional Objective: 

To determine if adequate transportation arrangements have been provided for 
desegregating schools and programs (not including Special Education, which 
will be reviewed within that Division.) 

Additional Question 5; 



VThat kinds of transportation complaints are being reported and how is Boston 
responding to these problems? 

Methods : 




GBREC will continue to address transportation problems. i-» 

GBREC will review Boston Public Schools Transportation Unit's follow-up on 

Special Education complaints. 

Division of Special Education, Complaint Management System 

Interviews with Transportation Unit staff, school based staff and parents 

Review of Transportation Unit's complaint system 

Supportive Documentation 

Complaints 

Monitoring Sites 



N/A 

Findings: 

During the first round of monitoring, GBREC staff met with the Transportation Unit 
Director. The Transporation Unit has two forms to communicate with ARA Associates 
on transportation complaints which are picked up in mid-morning and late afternoon 
by ARA. (Appendix 10) 

GBREC has received 2 transportation complaints since September. 

During the on-site visit, concerns were addressed at some of the schools regarding 
transportation. They will be followed up during 2nd round of monitoring. 

The Department of Student Support Services had developed an internal complaint 
management system and are working with Boston's Transportation Unit to develop a 
method of coordination for tracking and conducting follow-up on transportation 
complaints. The Division of Special Education will conduct a sample case study 
follow-up of special education transportation complaints and the effectiveness of 
Boston's system. 



-283- 



■14- 



Other Findings : 

\^ac is the largest number of special needs children you serve at any one time? 

Methods : 

The GBREC Special Education monitoring team interviewed service providers to 
determine that class size conforms to Chapter 766 Regulations, 502.2 (b) (iv) 
and 502.4 (b) and 502.8 (b) and 502.8 (c). 

Interviews ' 

Supportive Documentation: 

Program Service Data Sheets 

Monitorini^ Sites 

Condon Elementary Dorchester Hich School Ilackey Middle 

Agassi z Elementary Charles to\>m High School 

Edwards Middle Brighton High School 

Findings : 



The number of children in an instructional group exceeded regulatory requirements 
for class size: 

Mackey - Room 101 RR Charlestown - 401 — one period substantially sep. 

439b LD 
Dorchester H.S. - Room 304 RR 432 RR 

Room 201 RR 530 RR 

Room 206 Ril 

Edwards - Room 209A RR 

217 RR 
See Chapter 756 Monitoring Standard 12.5 for DOE action. 

In addition, during the on-site monitoring, it became evident that programs for 
children in special education were not being provided in rooms which are at least 
equal in all physical respects to the average standards of regular education 
facilities in: Brighton H.S.; Mackey; Charlestown H.S.; and Dorchester H.S. 

See Chapter 766 Special Education Monitoring Standards 17.1 for Required Corrective 
Action. (Appendix 6) 



-284- 



-15- 



Other Findings: 



What is the age of the youngest child in 502. A program? Ifnat is the age of the 
oldest child in the same 502. A program? 

Methods : 



The GBREC Special Education Monitoring Teair. interviewed service providers to 
determine that age range of students in 502.4 classes does not exceed 48 months 
without a current waiver from the Regional Center. 
Chapter 766, Regulation 502, Section 4(c) 

Inter'/iews 

Supportive Documentation: 

Age Span \Jaivers 

Monitoring Sites 

Agazziz Elementary Mackey Middle Dorchester H.S. 

Condon Elementary Brighton H.S. 
Edwards Middle Charlestown H.S. 

Findings : 



There were substantially separate programs at Brighton, Dorchester and Charlestown 
that had students with age ranges exceeding 48 acnths. See Chapter 766 Monitoring 
Standards 12.4 (Appendix 7) 

Corrective Action Taken To Date 

Boston Public Schools submitted waiver requests for those programs on November 1. 



-285- 




Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonweaith of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

27 Cedar Street. Wellesley. Wassachusens 02181 431-7825 

August 29, 1983 



Mr. Kenneth Caldvell, Manager 
Departcent of Student Support Services 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MS 02103 

Dear Mr. Caldwell: 

In preparation for our FY'S4 Desegregation Monitoring on the 
orders related to Special Education, I am requesting the follow- 
ing inf orr^ation: 

1. Please cor.pldce progra:n and staff :::atricas by each schcol and 
submit to the Greater Eostcn ".egionai Office by Sepce-;ber 16, 
1953. Attached is the fora to be used. 

2. Please provide by Septe-ber 16, 19S3, a cor.plete listing of all 
bilingual/ special education prcgraois, staff assigned, their 
certification and/or vaiver status r.nd list of vacancies in the 
bilingual/special education area, including bilingual assessors, 
regarding existing vacancies. Please provide this office u-ith 

a stater.ent of efforts Boston Public Schools has taken to secure 
appropriately certified personnel. It would be acceptable to 
incorporate sone of this infojT.ation on the program and staff 
matrices. (This same request will be part of the Eoston Public 
School's ?ri-a Facie Denial Action Plan.) 

3. Please provide by Septenber 16, 1983. the Greater Boston Regional 
Office with an update and status report on those problem schools 
and prograr.s cited in the July, 19S3, Board of Education Desegre- 
gation Report. See Section 3i6C of the Appendix. (attachea) 

4. Please provide the Greater Boston Regional Office bv Septo-ber 16, 
1983, with a description as co how supplies and !?4atcriais are lILs- 
tributed in each school or district. U'e are particulariv cor.corned 
that new or transferred teachers be given the opporcuaitv to have 
adequate suppiieb and nateriais at the start of the school year. 

5. Pursuant to Rocorjnendation ■-•- in Special f.ducacion soction oz tne 
July, 1983, Coseirrec^aricn "cporc, we anticipate a rcspcnse fror. 
Boston Public Schocld bv October 1, 19S3, of assurances ci-.nc L.\2 
classroom cnroll-ents have been rc\'tcwi2J for pl-ccr.cnt .-:::prv^pr luteness 



-286- 



Mr. Kenneth Caldvell, Manager 

August 29, 1983 _2. 



for the 1983-84 school year. Please include a description of 
the process Boston Public Schools will be using to deterr.ine 
placement appropriateness. 

6. Certification waiver requests should be submitted to this 
office by Sepcer.ber 16, 1983. 

Special Education staff from this office will be conducting • ' 
selected on-site nonitoring from September 19 - October 15, 1983, 
to verify your documentation. Tentatively, we will be visiting 
the following schools: Brishton, Dorchester and Charlestown Hish; 
Edwards and Mackey Middle; and Agassiz and Condon Elementary. Ke 
will let you know by September 16, 1983, as to specific dates. 

In planning for this coming year, whether related to Desegregation cr 
Special Education Monitoring, I would appreciate receiving a list cf 
anticipated CIFRP monitoring site visits, and Special Education In- 
ser\'ice Training schedules. 

Additionally, I would like to remind you that any requests for age 
span or class size waivers should be submitted to this office by 
November 1, 1983. 

We appreciate your attention to these requests. Should you have 
questions, we rem.ain available for assistance. 

Sirrcerelv yours, / 

V- /' A' / 

•Pamela Kaufmann 

Regional Special Education Director 

PK:ed 

Attachment 

cc: Roger W. Brown 

Judith Riegelliaupt 

Maricno Godfrey 

Mariij Lindarii 

Gloria Arcisz 

Dorothy Latham t^, 

-287- 



APPENDIX 2 



BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF STATUS 
1933 - 1934 



iCHOOL 



Brighton H.S. 

Edison 

Taft 

Gardner 

Tobin 

Tobin 

Winship 

Winship 

V.'inship 



Jamaica Plain H.S. 
Mary E. Curley 
Mary E. Curley 



PROGRAI-1 



R R 

R R 

R R 

R R 

R R 

Lang. Dev 

R R 

ECE 

ECE 



LANGUAGE 



R R 



R R 



L. D. 



Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 



Sp 
Sp 
Sp 



TEACHER 



-288- 



Guillermina Guity 

Robert Doherty 

Mari'a Gsrcfa-Basil 

Carmen Folch / 

Cristina Chacon 

Marisel Rivera Fontanez 

Susan Ashkouri 

Asuncio'n Sedo' 

Vacant. Aurora Cunningham is 
being hired for this newly 
created position; a Waiver 1 
will be recuested from State 



Pedro Arias 

Mary Pechewlys 

Altagracia Vasquez 
A substitute teacher is 
currently assigned to this 
class; teacher on maternity 
leave till October 15-83 



»-0 



CERTIFIC. 
STATUS 



Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified ! 

Waiver 2 

I 

I 
Certified \ 

Certified 



Certified 
Certified 
'..'aiver 2 



BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF STATUS 
1933 - 1984 



^Q> 



:hool 


PROGRAM 


LANGUAGE 


TEACHER 


CERTIFIC. i 

STATUS i 
! 


Mary E, Curley 


L/AB 


Sp 


Miguel Prieto 


1 

1 
Waiver 3 


T. Roosevelt 


R R 


Sp 


Carmen Zayas 


Waiver 1 


Agassiz 


R R 


Sp 


Mel vena Green 


Certified 


Agassiz 


SAR-L/AB 


Sp 


Berta Berriz 


Waiver 3 


Ellis 


R R 


Sp 


Dora Brito 


Certified j 


J. F. Kennedy 


R R 


Sp 


Mar 'a Arias 


Certified 


J. F. Kennedy 


L. D. 


Sp 


Nancy Fernandez 


Certified ; 


J. F, Kennedy 


Prim. 
Lan. Dev. 


Sp 


Vacant. Fernando Perez, who 
is a BPS teacher and will need 










a Waiver 1, is being consi- 
dered for this position ( a re 
placement needed for his K) 




West Roxbury H.S. 


R R 


Gr 


Paul Vekiarides 


! 

Certified | 


Mattahunt 


R R 


Gr 


John Koutrobis 


Certified i 


Mattahunt 


R R 


■Sp 


Shelley Rienan 


J 

Waiver 1 


Lewenberg 


R R 


Ha 


Jean Philogene 


Certified 


« 




-289- 







BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF STATUS 
1933 - 1984 



SCHOOL 



PROGRAM 



LANGUAGE 



TEACHER 



»G) 



CERTIFIC. 
STATUS 



Dorchester H.S. 

Cleveland 

Sarah Greenv/ood 

Holland 

Marshall 

Marshall 

Marshall 

Murphy 

Dearborn 

McCormack 

Condon 

Dever 



Russell 



R R 
R R 
R R 
R R 
R R 
P.T.C. 
ECE 
R R 
R R 
R R 
R R 
R R 



R R 



Sp 
Sp 
^Sp 

Sp 
Sp 
Sp ' 
Ha 
C.V. 

Sp 
C.V. 

Sp 



Sp 



■290- 



Rafael Justiniano 

Gloria Pereira 

Rita Amper Agostinelli 

Mary Ellen Garrit> 

Victoria Escobar 

Virginia Mendez 

Yvonne Alvarado 

Rene Georges 

Ronald Seeley 

Cynthia Brown 

Maria Macedo 

Vacant. Teacher resigned as of 
September 23-84; Lilia Bartolo 
me', who would need a Waiver 1, 
is being interviewed for this 
position; she might start 9-Z7 

Margaret Salemme 



i.'aiver 1 

l.'aiver 3 

Certified 

Certified 

Certified 

Certified 

V.'aiver 1 

Certified 

Certified 

Certified 

Certified 



Certified 



BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF STATUS 
1983 - 1984 







SCHOOL 



PROGRAM 



LANGUAGE 



TEACHER 



CERTIFIC. 
STATUS 



Charlestown H,S, 

Edwards 

Timilty 

Timi 1 ty 

Timilty 

Blackstone 

Elackstone 

Agassiz/ Blacstone 

East Boston H.S. 

Barnes 

Otis 

English H.S. 

English H.S. 

English H.S. 

Madison Park H.S., 

Madison Park H.S. 



R R 

R R 

R R 

L.D. 

S.A.R. 

R R 

P.T.C. 

K Int. Tea 

R R 

R R 

R R 

R R 

R R 

S.A.R. 

R R 

R R 



Sp 
Ch 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 
Sp 

It 

It 
It 

Sp 
Ha 
Sp 
Sp 
C.V. 



■291- 



Nilda Di'az 
Helen Kuo 
Brad Cohen 
Mayra Morales 
Carmen Veray 
Hayde'e Irizarry 
Norma Del Ri'o 
Dora Nocera 
Yolanda Musto 
Rudolph Telia 
Agnes Capobianco 
Jody Mazur 
Nancy Giacobozzi 
Grace Quigua 
Marilia Miranda 
'•'aria Rodrigues 



llaiver 2 
Waiver 1 
Certified 
Waiver 3 
l.'aiver 1 
Certified 
Waiver 1 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certi'fied 
-ertified 
ertified 
ertified 



BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF STATUS 
1983 - 1984 



SCHOOL 



•ladison Park H.S. 

King 

•lackey 

■Mac key 

Hennigan 

JHenniaan 

i 

! 
Henm'aan 



iHennigan 



Hennigan 
Hennigan 

iHernandez 

I 

; McKay 

i 

i 



PROGRAM 



LANGUAGE 



L.D.-L/AB 


Sp 


R R 


Sp 


R R 


Sp 


S A R 


Sp 

• 


R R 


Sp 


S A R 


Sp 


S A R - 


Sp 


L.D. 


Sp 


L/AB 


Sp 


E.S.D. 


Sp 


R R 


Sp 


R R 


It 



-292- 



TEACHER 



Lya Avant 
Zayda Gonza'lez 
Judith Zagoren White 
Carolina Arango 
Mariana Serra 
Angela Arai 
Henry Haroian 
Cristina Haroian 
Jose' Garci'a 
Gloria Pineiro Landing 



Marta Valde's 



Sonia Altimari 



■a 



CERTIFIC. 
STATUS 



Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 
Certified 



Certified 
Certified 



BILIfJGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION. LIST OF BILINGUAL ASSESSORS. 

Psychologists: Manuel Sedo^ Sp 

Rosa Man'a Paunero Sp 

Yvonne Ro.xero Sp 

Vacant: recruitment effort being currently implemented Sp 



Pupil Adjustment Counselors: 

Diego Ballaratti 
.^ Rebecca Ruiz Cantres 

Vacant: recruitment effort being currently implemented 



Sp 
Sp 
Sp 



Vision Resources Teacers: ' ■" 

Vacant: recruitment effort being currently implemented Sp 



Speech and Language Therapists: 

Carlos Ortfz Sp 

Alma Aldebol Sp 

Eileen Buianowski So 



-293- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS ' 
DEPARTf.:Er>;T of PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 
.MANAGER 
iCA VVHiTE 

November 8, 1S33 



Pairela Kaufman 

Greater Boston Fegional Educational Center 

Schofield School 

27 Cedar Street 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

Dear Ms. Kaufr.on: "-•" 

Attached you will fLnd the waiver requests for uncertified Special 
ZJucation Staff for the 1933-1984 acadeimc year. The vraiver req'jests 
are organized Lnto &« (2) groups: Ccurt-ordered persoruiei ar»d non-court 
ordered persoanel. 

Tne fifteen (15) narres included hereLn will be the first batch of 
v.'aiver requests to be subr?j.tted this year. It is anricipated that v/e 
v/ill subrrat a second batch of ^^jaiver req^jests within the coring rnonth. 
lYiis gra:p was approved by the School Cornrru-ttee on KoveiTiber 1, 1983. 

T:\e waiver requests breaKdo^-.m into the follo^Lng categories: 

a. Court ordered personnel 3 

b. Non-court ordered personnel 12 

c. Modei'ate certification 9 

d. Severe certification 2 

e. Certified in Moderate, 
experierice in Speech/Language 3 

f. Bilingual Special Needs 8 

In terr,-B of number of years for which these '^raiver requests have been 
filed, the following breakda^m is provided: 

First year 4 

Second year 5 ■ 

l^iird year 6 

The fO'ur (4) first year waiver requests are e>X)iained in the attadied 
chart. 



-294- 



November 8, 1983 
Page 2 

Included for your review are all advertisements which were posted in 
variojs newspapers in an effort to recruit qualified £ind certified candi- 
dates . 

At this time I am requesting clarification of two (2) outstanding issues. 
One, is the procedure for filing v;aivers for individuals seeking Approval of 
Vocational Special Needs Instructors. The other is, the procedure for filing 
waivers for School Psychologists. 

We trust that the 'Araiver requests are in order. Staff will be available 
to answer questions upon your request. 

Ihank ycu for your professional consideration in this natter. -. ' 



SLncerely 

Ida '.\hite, Manager 
Personnel/Labor Relations 



Attad-iiiients 

cc: Kej-ineth Cald'well 
Thomas Hehir 
Mima Vega 



EVmlh 



-295- 



AJ-PEMDlX A 



FINDINGS 



A review of Boston's response to the issue of providing appropriately 
certified special education staff at the problem schools identified in 
the Board of Education Desegregation Report, July, 1983, its Special 
Education Roster and its cotnplete program and staff riatrix by school 
show discrepancies which make it difficult to tell how many Special 
Education programs and teachers there are in the schools. These dis- 
crepancies will be pursued through site visits and further review of 
paper documentation during the second round of monitoring. 



School 


EPS Response 
Appendix 


Program and 
Matrix 


Staff 


Special Education 
Roster 


Urn an a 


4 Resource Room 
1 L/A3 

ILD . 
Total 6 


5 Resource 
. 1 L/AB 
1 LD 
Total 7 


Room 


Total 8 


Mackey 


4 RK 
1 L/AB 
1 SAR 

Total 6 


4 RR 
IL/AB 
1 SAR 
Total 6 




Total 6 


Edwards 


3 PJ? 

1 SAR 
1 LD 

Total 5 


3 RR 
1 SAR 

1 LD 

Total 5 




Total 5* 


Kyde Park 


5RR 
8 ESD 
1 L/AB 
1 LD 
3 SAR 


5RR 
6 ESD 
2 MH 
2 SAR 




■ 




Total 18 


Total 17 




Total 19 


J. Burke 


3 RH 
3 SAR 
2 LD 

Total 9 


3PJ^ 
3 SAR 
2 LD 
2 L/AB 
Total 10 




Total 10 


S. Boston 


4 RR 

2 LD 

1 L/AB 

2 SAR 


4 RR 

1 LD 

1 L/AB 

2 SAR 








Total 9 


Total B 




Total 10 



Hr 



-296- 



School 


EPS Respon 


se 


Program and 


Special Education 




Appendix 




Staff Matrix 


Roster 


J.P.H.S. 


5RR 
IL/AB 
1 LD 
1 SAR 




5 RR 
1 LD 
1 SAR 






Total 8 




Total 7 


Total 10 



Charlestovm H.S. 







RR 






OSDC 






ESD 






LD 






SAR 






L/AB 




Total 16 


East 


Boston 




H.S. 








6 


RR 




2 


SAR 




1 


L/AB 



Barnes 



Roaers 



Condon 



Agassis 



Total 9 



4 


RR 




1 


SAR 




Total 


5 


4 


RR 




2 


L/AB 




2 


L/D 




Total 


8 


2 


RR 




4 


EC 




3 


LD 




3 


DDC 





Total 12 



SAR 

RR 

EC 

Vision 

L/AB 



5 RR 

5 ESD 

2 MH 
2 SAR 
1 L/AB 



Total 15 



5 


RR 


2 


SAR 


1 


L/AB 


Total 8 


4 


RR 


1 


SAR 


Total 5 


3 


RR 


1 


L/AB 


1 


L.D. 


1 


L.D. Bright 


Total 6 


3 


RR 


2 


DDC 


1 


PTC 


1 


L/AB 


3 


L.D. 


3 


EC 



Total 14 



■297- 



RR 

Vision 

SAR- L/AB 

L/AB 

EC 

Itinerant 

DDC 



Total 16 



Total 10 



Total 5 



Total 

On-site confirmation 

1 L/AB 

2 RR 

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-301- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOL RESPONSE 
V . TO 
'82- '83 FINDINGS ON CERTIFICATION 



FALL 1984 



-303- 



/IpO SKthW. 7 



SCHOOL 



Mario Umana 

High School 



»_ i_. \c>o 



4 Resource Rooms 

1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 

1 Learning Disabled 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



Jamaica Plain 

High School 



5 Resource Rooms 

1 Learning Adaptive IBehavior 

1 Learning Disabled 

1 Supportive Academic 
Remediation 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



Hyde Park 

Hiah School 



5 Resource Rooms 

8 Educational Social 
pevelopment 

1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 

1 Learning Disabled 

3 Supportive Academic 
Remediation 



1 Resource Room 

As of 9/19/83 has a 
substitute assigned. 

Permanent Certified perso: 
will be appointed as of 
October 3, 15C3. 

ALL OTHER SPED PERSONNEL 
CERTIFIED 



Jerimiah Burke 

Hich School 



3 Resource Rooms 

3 Supportive Academic 
Remediation 

2 Learning Disabled 

1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



South Boston 

High School 



4 Resource Rooms 
2 Learning Disabled 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 





1 


Learning Adoptive Behavior 






2 


Supportive Academic 
Remediation 




last Boston 


6 


Resource Rooms 


ALL SPED TEACHERS 


High School 


2 


Supportive Academic 
Remediation 


CERTIFIED 


y 


1 


Learning Adaptive Behavior 








• 








-304- 


• 


• 









SCHOOL 



Charlestown 

High School 



CLASS 

1 Bilingual Resource Room 
1 OSDC Culinary Arts 



3 Resource Rooms 

7 Educational Social 

Development 

1 Learning Disabled 

2 Supportive Academic 

Remediation 

1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 



* w *. • ) O 



Teacher on 2nd year waive 

Teacher moved. Kew teach 
recommended by Tom Hehir 
to fill position. 

ALL SPED TEACHERS 
- CERTIFIED 



Mackey 



Middle School 



4 Resource Rooms 

1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 

1 Supportive Academic 
Remediation 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



Edward- 



.Middle School 



1 Bilingual Resource Room 



2 Resource Rooms 

1 Supportive Academic 
Remediation 

1 Learning Disabled 



Helen Kuo , bilingual 
Chinese Resource on 
first year waiver. 

ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



a'.B. Rogers 

Middle School 



4 Resource Rooms 

2 Learning Adaptive Behavior 
2 Learning Disabled 



One Permanent Certified 
teacher transferred into 
Resource Room this year. 

ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



:ieveland 

Middle School 



1 Bilingual Resource Room 

5 Resource Rooms 

1 Speech and Language 
1 Learning Adaptive Behavior 
-305- 



Gloria Pereira, bilingual 
on third year waiver. 



ALL SRED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 









Sa-OOT. , - CLASS 






Cleveland 

Middle School 
(cont.) 



arnes 



Elementary 

- 1 

* 



1 Physically Handicapped 

. 1 tjiaxnimq Disabled; ;.-><. 

1 Suppcx^ive ilcademic -. 
Bejncdiation 



4 Eesource Rooms 

1 Supportive Academic 

Reniediaticn 






ALL SPED TE.:u:Ui£:J^5 
CERTIFIED 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



Elementary 



1 Resource Room 

1 Supportive Academic 

-Remediation 

2 Learni ng Disabled 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 

. .^^ CERTIFIED ■' 



V/- ^nniry 



-urce Roi 






■J»J7.=»^ec 






E:r.,-c-.t.ary 



1 5i:pL.c-:tivo Acaden;iv 
Remediation 

Lear.-, ing, Adaptive Behavior 



1 Bilingual Supportive 

Acc.c.--r.ii-: Rersdxalicr; 

1 3u7portiv'C AcadeiTiic 

fvir.-.eaiatio.T 

2 Resource Rooras 

3 Early Childhood 

2 Visicn 

2 Learning Asrptive 
Behaviour 



- -306- 



'i: :^' 



Class •cro^.vt-etrtu v^^v'*'- 
of the bu5. Ic";--" rrr. 



Berta Eerriz, bilincc-:J 

W O- J V v., -^ fc 



ALL F;Ph.D 7> :,1r~AS 
CERTIFTtD 



I 



Marshall 

Elementary 



3 Resource Rooms 

2 Supportive /Academic 
Remediation 

1 Learning Adaptive 
Behavior 

5 Early Childhood 



3C' 



ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



Condon 

Elementary 



1 Bilingual Resource Room 
(Cape Verdean) 



1 Resource Room 

4 Early Childhood 

3 Learning Disabled 

3 Developmental Day Care 



Maria Macodo graduated 
June, 1983 - awaiting 
state certification. 

Mirna Vega will expediats 
process. 

ALL SPED TEACHERS 
CERTIFIED 



-307- 



Special education materials ordered through Boston Public Schools funds "C 
are distributed frcn two sources. Bulldlr..; principals and hcadrasters are 
directed through the budget development process to allocate r.oney for special 
education r.aterlals. Guidelines used for this purpose indicate that r.atcrlals 
money targeted for special education be coded separately fxxjn that of recular 
education. The r.oney per student at elementary schools is $33, middle school S^2. / 
and hish school $U2. The per capita allowance is based on the number of students | 
attending a given school. 

■ The budget restrictions under which the School Department has been required 
to operate for the past three years have severely impacted on our ability to 
purchase educational materials and supplies. Our first priority with respect 
to the commitment of both General School Purpcse funds and external monies 
(P.L. S^^-l^S and P.L. 69-313) has been the provision of adequate and appropriate 
staffing levels. We have attempted with a $20, COO funding level to purchase 
equipment and materials for new classes as a first priority. 

There are three sources of funds which are used to purchase educational 
materials and equipment. _■■ 

1. The first source is the per capita funds budgeted In the individual 
school's responsibility center. These per capita funds are allocated 
on the basis of the total number of students projected for. enrollment 
at the tine of the budget development. At the middle and,hlgh school 
levels this allowance is calculated by multiplying the total number 
of projected enrollment (Includln,^ special education students) by Z^Z; 
at the c-lementary level the per capita allowance if $38' Attached here- 
with you will find a directive taken from the budget guidelines document 
for F'iQU, developed and distributed by the Office of Budget Coordlnaticn. 

2. The second source is $20,000 budgeted in the Deparment of Student Support 
Services responsibility center for the purpose of covering large purchases 
of equipment and materials citywlde. Our first priority in the cor.mltment 
of these r.cnies is to newly established classrooms. Materials are ordered 
by senior advisors and program advisors based on the population of students 
assigned to the program. Host materials ordered through this source are 
more costly than there order-^d ^.t the school level. A second priority for 
this money is classes or programs with newly assigned staff. Teachers are 
asked to indicate the materials needed by them. 

3. The third sourceis the external projects' budget. Several SPED projects 
include funds for the purchase of materials. The method of determining 
distribution of this money varies from project to project. In some instances- 
r.aterlals are purchased by the senior adN-isor or progra:n advisor in charge 

of a given project. In other projects teachers are asked to submit lists 

of desired materials which are reviewed by central administrative staff. 

Approximately 3/"» o^ project monies Is used for materials. 

1. 



-308- 



-p 






\Se^ 



I 



/ / 



SUPERlt^TENDEOT'S FYS 4 GOALS STATEMENT , 
BUDGET CALENDAR , 

GENERAL P ROGRAM AND 
• EUDCEYAkV CUID-£LiIJk:^~rM FY84 



nFPAR TMENT OF BUDGET 

^ooRDirlAnoN 



-309- 




The Superior Courc requires cnac we oner cojpcajiicory 
services prograna for special needs students who were not 
given Ber\'ices during the school year. The proRraa is 
typically offered on Saturdays during the school year and 
during the sunser. The Superintendent reserves the right Co 
deternine Che mechanisms by which these services are provided. 



D. Education and Enployaent Prograns : 

1.-' State regulations (Chapter 74) recommend staffing levels 
for vocational programs to be 20:1. The BTU contract states 
that 20:1 shall be the class size maxima for pupils in 
industrial classes. 

2. In Industrial Arts, Vocational, Business, and Home 
Economics programs, the number of students should not exceed 
the number of student stations in the laboratory or classroom, 

IV. NON-SALARY ALLOCATION 

A.* Schools (Per Capita) 

In order to compensate for anticipated inflationary price 
increases for materials, the per capita supplies allowance for all 
schools will be increased from $35 per student by 87. to $38 per 
student,.. In addition, an inflation-adjusted increase of 101 
beyond the $3S per capita allowance will be provided to middle snd 
high schools to meet the needs articulated by principals, 
headmasters and community superintendents. This will raise the 
per capita allowance to §42. Thus, the High School allowance will 
be defined as follows: 

...allowance - (total 1/ projected enrollment) x $42 



^ 



Please keep in mind that this non-ealary allocat 
all-inclusive. It should cover your expenses fo 
contracted services, copying , printing etc. In 
departure from last year's procedures that requi 
centers to budget for each of these items sepcr 
we will require every cost center to itemize the 
expenses for review by the Office of the Busines 
Budget to insure that all regularly occurring ex 
properly budgeted. Budgeting a per capita allow 
uniform across all schools will help to equalize 
that now exist because of historical patterns, p 
areas of equipment rental and maintenance costs. 
page shows the format of the information that wi 
from each principal in addition to the expense c 
itemization required in -for the Fy63 budget.. 

]^9JTr The percaoita funds budgeted for supplies .must also n rcvlHp 

b^Tic instruction al materials ror vocacicnar billnnual. onri 

special eoucatlon scuaents . " — ■ • 

~ '■ -310- 



ion is 

r books, stamps, 

a sense this is i 
red all cost 
ately. However, 
se non-salary 
s Manager and 
penses are 
ance that is 

the disparities 
articulary in the 

The following 
11 be requested 
ode/function code 



D-5 



I 



Over- 


-Represented Schools S2-83 


Hispanic 
10-82 4-83 


Black 
10-52 4-83 


Hispa.' 

10-52 


.iC 


Istrict 


School 


4-83 


I 


i:discn M.S. 


1 12 15 






Farraour. 


2 6 1 






Garclr.er 






6 


-J 




TobiTi 




3 • 6 


D 







V.'inshio 






/ 


; 1 


II 


• JaTaica Plain H.S. 






12 


17 




t<arv 'zl. C^iev 'A.S. 




30 33 






Aaassiz 


17 20 1 


j 


11 




f\jiler 


3 8 








J Kennedy 






ii 


x5 




Lcnafeiiow 




3 7 






f-lannir.a 


2 6 


2 5 




III 


Irvlna M.S. 




33 35 






Lee 


2 5 








r-'iattahunt 


7 10 


13 23 


, ■ 




Pnili;rick 




2 5 




IV 


Chittick 




3 6 






Ccniev 




2 6 






n. Gccei^WJOd 




4 7 






P. A. Shav 


1 5 8 




, r 


Cleveland M.S. 


18 22 








Ho liana 


.16 -19 


22 27 






Kcr.nv 


7 ii 






i'-'.ar3nali 


10 13 


29 23 






i-rjTcnv 


1 6 25 




'vT 


South B^ostcn H.S. 






4 


9' 




Dearbcrn M.S. 




6 14 






Gavm M.S. 




16 19 






I-'cCcrr.ack M.S. 






/ 


11 




Ccnccn 


1 6 








T.-an 




6 11 




VII 


Blackstone 


15 19 


5 11 


11 


13 




Elict 


i 


i 


4 




H'jriev 




1 2 6 




VIII 


!;one 








IX 


Madison Park H.S. 




76 80 






Kackey M.S. 


5 8 








Henniaan 




12 20 


7 


11 




Hernandez 


7 18 








Jac.-;son-;-iann 


1 15 19 





-311- 



APPENDIX 9 



DSPART.'-rEirr OF STUDETrr SUPP07-T 5ERVIC~S 
INTERI.'AL PROCESS FOR PLACEMENT OF STUDEI.TS 
W^CSE PROTOTYPE IS 502.4 OR ABOVT 



-313- 




The Schccl Committee ofths City of Boston 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



Interrim Placement Process for 502. i* - 502.11b Requests 

i. E.T.L. sends I.E. P. and assessments to Co.^lpl lance Unit 

II. Compliance Unit logs in folder and separates SElMS Material from written 
I.E. P. and assessments. 

a. Error Control receives SEIMS material for logging, correcting, and holds 
for printing. . ' 

(When SEl.'IS is fully operational, SEI.'IS forms will be checked for correctness, 
then will be printed and forvyarded by the Compliance Unit to appropriate 
Senior Level Advisor for processing.) 

b. Compliance Unit forwards' folder (minus SEIMS material) to appropriate 
Senior Level Advisor. 

c. Compliance Unit forv;ards contir"ji"o .5 ""d .6 rec-js^ts t o the Compliance 
Uni t Special i st 

111. Senior Level Advisor logs in folder, checks for technical compliance, and 
finally cliecks for appropriateness of request. 

IV. Senior Level Advisor makes a decision either to a. accept folder or 
b. reject folder. 

• A. tf accepted, Senior Level Advisor will: 

1. For-.'ard folder to appropriate program specialist 

2. Initiate placeme.it decision process 

B. If rejected, Senior Level Advisor returns the complete folder to the 
Compl iance Uni t. 

V. Program Specialists make a decision to either a. accept folder or 
b. reject folder. 

A. If accepted, program specialists either fol lows Placement Decision Process 
or forwards folder to the Compliance Unit Specialist. • 

B. if rejected, program specialist returns folder to Senior Scvel Advisor 
who forwards it to the Compliance Unit. 

VI. Compliance Unit Specialist makes a decision either to a. accept folder or 
b. reject folder 

A. If accepted, the folder is forwarded to the placement sjsecialist. 

B. If rejected, the folder is returned to the program specialist who makes a 
placement decision or forwards to the appropriate Senior Level Advisor who 
malies a placement decision. 

-314- 

I 



- 2 - 

VII. Placement Decision Process ■ ^^ j- ^ A 

• .^ iS'"^'^^'^^^ 

A. Decision made on disability and program. . \-l Lt-V^^'^'ijk'-*^^"^ ■•''■^ ''''^ ' I 

B. Class List marked with student's name and other appropriate data, '^t^ \ ItA ^ i 

'C. I.E. P. p. 1 and 2 completed (p. 1 - prototype, disability, and school <r^i>-"* 

p. 2 location and personnel) '. \, ''<^\ 

D. Compliance Unit Checklist is filled out. 
Vlil. Cofnoliance Unit Activities 

A. Folder returned to Compliance Unit for logging in Complianco book. 

B. If placement decision is mads, Compliance Unit: 

a. logs in folder 

b. returns Compliance Unit Checklist and p. 1,2 of I.E. P. to E.T.L. 

c. Files folder in "Unsigned f.E.P." drawer. 

C. If rejected, Ccrpi lance Unit: 

1. Logs In 

2. Returns complete folder to E.T.L. 

IX., E.T.L. receives C.U. Checklist and p. 1, 2 of I.E. P. from CcrpI iancc Uni t , 
contacts parent for signature and forwards signed I.E.?. signature sheet 
to Compliance Unit. 

X. Compliance Unit forwards signature sheet to appropriate place.T.ent personnel. 

Xi. Appropriate placement personnel follows assignment process. 

A. D. ! . J f il led out. 

B. Teacher Letter filled out and sent. 

'C. Folder filed in " signed I.E. P." drawer. 

D. Class List marked that D.l. 5 has been completed. 

E. Yellow card completed. 

F. Student's arrival in program followed-up by appropriate placement personnel. 



PC 



-315- 



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P\acerv^er^V Per>cnne\ 



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drcvWcr . 

\e-\ner- ^-\d^cc^-^^^f^^c'.,'r\•,(^\ 




-316- 










502.4 — "DOI.. \\b 



Cg)r)V{1^v^\ i^Cv 



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3. P'ppropria-^s.r.ess 



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Piece Y^i'i^^ 0(icN'L\co r'rcci^'-'^' 



1. De:l.\Z,\CiO-0-)ac:e- 

3. C.^ . 

4-. Pi''.i-j cof Cc:>iT^. o\.'c\ n eg. u n^T (L^nccii'G.'V 






-317- 



in 



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bostcn iAiDlxc ^.cnooxs, L^porcT^c oi boocent bupfx^rr -e.-.-ices, roxic/ am Proreaurai 
Kian-jal, September 1983 

Placement in Program Prototypes 502.1, 502.2 and 502.3 

The 502.1, 502.2 and 502.3 program prototypes range fro::i a regular educa- 
tion program with modifications to a regular education program with no'c more 
than 60% time out- of regular class time each school day. 

Once a decision is made about the recommended prototype and the lEP is 
•completed, the ETL shall notify the parent, or student, within ten days of the 
date of completion of the lEP, that approval is needed in order that the IE? may 
be implemented. The parent or student has a thirty-day (30-day) period to 
either accept or reject the IcP. 

If additional elements such as personnel, materials and/or equipment are 
needed to implement the plan, the ETL will notify the appropriate Senior Level 
Advisor of such needs. Documentation of such notification and the date shall be 
retained by the ETL. 

Implementation will begin according to the conditions and criteria 
described by the Educational Plan immediately after parent signs the plan. 

Placement in Program Prototype 502.4 

Once a decision is made about the recommended program and the IE? is 
comoleted, the ETL shall send it to the appropriate Senior Level Advisor. Form 
BOSPED 18a or b shall be sent to the parents along with the IE?. The Senior 
Level Advisor will check to see that the Transportation Plan, if one is needed, 
has been signed by the parent or student. 

The Senior Level Advisor will screen the delivered materials. If the 
materials fail to pass the screening, they will be returned to the Evaluation 
TErJ-i Leader along with a statement as to wny the materials failed to pass, and a 
deadline for resubmission, with copy to the Principal /Heaamaster. 

The Evaluation TEAM Leader must complete his/he*- action on the returned 
materials and forward them to the Senior Level Advisor within three days, in 
order. that the school department can fulfill its obligation to present the IE? 
to Che parents within ten days. 

The materials will be forwarded to the Central Review Unit. The Central 
Review Unit Program Advisors will make the selection cf the reccmmended program 
prototype and location. The IE? will be sent to the ETL to obtain 
parent/student approval, during the school year. During ihe summer, the IE? 
will be sent to the parent/student by the Central [Review Unit. The carent or 
student has a thirty-aay (30-uay) perioa to ei"her accept or reject tne IE?. 



-318- 



Lateral Movement of Students in Program Prototype 502.4 

The following procedures should be observed when transferring a student lateral' 
ly, between two 502.4 program prototype designations: 

- The ETL shall receive a written request for lateral movement 

■ from the teacher, Principal /Headmaster or other school staff, 
and consult with the appropriate Special Education Senior Level 
Advisor/Program Advisor. 

- Reasons for the request will be considered; the Senior Level 
Advisor/Program Advisor will determine the appropriateness of 
the request and whether it is necessary to perfonn certain 
assessments, with parental consent. 

- The Senior Level Advisor/Program Advisor will inform the ETL of 
the decision. If the request is approved, the TEAiM shall 
convene, and a new lEP be written and submitted to C.R.U along 
with assessments. 

- Parental approval for the lEP shall be obtained. The ETL will 
infom the Central Review Unit once the transfer is completed, 
for central data management purposes. 

Placement in Program Prototypes 502.5 and 502.6 

In those situations where the services requested in an Individualized 
Educational Plan may not be offered in the Boston Public Schools, a ~ore 
restrictive prototype, i.e., a 502.5 or 502.6 prototype placement, may be 
recc.nmended. 

Prototype 502.5 is a day school program. 

Prototype 502. o is a residential school progran. 

In order to request a 502.5 or 502.5 placeT^nt, the ETL must write a cover 
letter to the Central Review Unit, sum.marizing the conclusions and reccmmenaa- 
tions of the TEAM, and send it along with the lEP and other materials. 



-319- 



•■ Manual, Sepcerrxrer 1983 

Department of Implementation Procedures for 
Assignments/Transfers to 
Special Education Programs 

Boston Public Schools' Policy 

(As outlined in the Boston Public Schools' Department of Implementation 
Manual, 1980-81, Section VII, Procedures for Assignments, Transfers/Special Entry 
Prograrris , D. Special Education , p. Zb ) . 

Transfers into, out of, and within special education require particularized 
procedures. This section is an amplification of section YI, B, "Transfers for 
Programmatic Reasons," that must be detailed for reference of parents. Commun- 
ity District Superintendents, Principals/Headmasters, and the staff within the 
Department of Student Support Services and the Department of Implementation. 

Ma.-jor Procedural Steps 

1. Mainstreamed Programs 

a) Procedures 

1. The Evaluation TEAM Leader should sign and submit DI Form 4 to the: 

Department of Implementation 

Record f-'.anaoement Unit 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02103 • 

2. The changing of the student's code for special education shall obtain 
for the stiident entering, leaving, or changing instruction in main- 
stream programs within the S5:ne school. The code is a record-keeping 
device for school personnel. The addition, deletion or revision of a 
code is only an indication that soecialized instruction ana service 
has been initiated for the student within the school of current 
assignmeit. 

3. Transfers into, out of, or within certain programs in Hearing 
Impairment, Vision Resources, and Part-Time Integration are exempted 
from these procedures (see 2a) and 2c), below). 

b) All D.I. Form 4's received by the Record .''anacerTvent Unit by Wednesday of 
the school week will be processed to be listed on the school's 
alphabetized print-out issued on the subsequent Monday. 

c) Recommendations for transfer from one school to another within mainstream 
programs require Evaluation Coordinator's (for the community district) 
submission of a completed referral, D.I. Form 1, with all other 
documentation to Director of Mainstream Program for decision-making. The 
transfer, if aoproved by the lirector, ronuircs submission of the 
referral and D.I. Form 5 to the Student Services Unit. 

d) On or about October 15 of the school year and every t.^o wnths thereafter 
the Oepartr^nt of Impi 'rnentaticn snail involve a process witn,i_n the 

-320- 



respective districts to maintain the accuracy of student information 
within special education. The Record Management Unit shall distribute to 
the con-.munity district school-by-school print-outs listing all students 
who receive service within special education. The districts shall insure 
that the data for each student is verified and if necessary corrected by 
means of the O.I. Form 4. The verified print-outs and completed O.I. Form 
4's shall be returned to the Record Management Unit for revision of the 
print-outs. 

2. Substantially Separate Classes and Day or Residential Placement 

a) The appropriate Senior Level Advisor or Program Advisor in the Department 
of Student Support Services must make recommendations for transfers and 
between October and June must request the written preferences of parents 
whose children are recommended for transfer from substantially separate 
classes: 1) the preference to remain assigned to the present school for 
the duration of the year, or 2) the preference to accept transfer to 
another school. The preference, must be offered with complete explanation 
of the implications for transportation and alternative assignments based 
upon th . Student Assignment Procedures. School Year 1980-81 . 

b) The recommendations for transfer must be submitted to the Student 
Services Unit on D.I. Form 5 with the referral and parental preference 
attached. 

c) Transfers into, out of, or within certain programs in Hearing Impairment, 
Vision Resources, Part-Time Integration, and other substantially separate 
classes within the authority of the Manager, Department of Stucent 
Support Ser/ices are included in this procedure, and are subject to the 
approval and submissions of the Manager of Student Support Services. 

d) For transfers that are authorized, the Student Services Unit shall make 
appropriate changes in the students' data, notify parents. Principals/ 
Headmasters of sending and receiving schools (where appropriate), the 
Transportation Unit and the Record Management Unit and the Department of 
Student Support Services. 

e). For transfers that are not authorized, the Student Services Unit shall 
notify the Department of Student Support Services. 

f) On or about October 15 of the school year and every ti-yo months thereafter 
the Department of Implementation shall involve a process within the 
respective districts to maintain the-accuracy of student information 
within special education. The Record Management Unit shall distribute to 
each ccmmunity district school-by-school print-outs listing all students 
who receive service within special education. The District Office snail 
insure that the data for each student is verified and if necessary 
corrected by m.eans of the D.I. Form 4. The verified data and ccmoleted 
D.I. Form 4 shall be returnea to the Department of Implementation for 
revision of the print-outs. 

Forms to be Used 

D.I. Form 1 , 4 or 5 

-321- 



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Department of Implementation Procedures for 

Assignment of Students New to the Boston Public 

Schools and for Students Re-Entering the Boston 

Public Schools After Previous Discharges 

Boston Public SchooTs' Policy 

(As outlined in the Boston Public Schools' Department of Implementation Manual 
1980-81, {pp. 7 and 11). 

Parents/quardians/students 18 years of age or older may request assignments at 
any school office or community district office during the scheduled hours of those 
offices. 

Major Procedural Steps 

Processing of the referral within the Department of Implementation: 

For the referral expressing a request for instruction within special education 
(but no other docurrentation ), the assignment will be made according to the next 
paragraph; and a copy of the referral will be sent to the Department of Student 
Support Services subsequent to the assignment. 

. . . assignment to preference if seat available by race; assignment to 
community district school for the student in grades K-VIII if no seat 
available by race at preferred school; assignment to community district 
scnool or to magnet school for the student in grades IX-XII if no seat is 
available by race at preferred school. 

For the referral submitted with a completed Individualized Educational Plan for 
substantially separate instruction or for non-public school assignment, the re- 
ferral will be filed for follow-up within the Department of Imolementation; and a 
copy of "the referral and Individualized Educational Plan will be submitted to the 
Department of Student Support Services for a recor.iiTiondation for assignment. li- 
the recommendation is not forthcoming within five working days, and/or if no ex- 
tenuating .situation occurs within five working days, the assignment will be made 
according to the above paragraph, and the Department of Student Support Services 
will be notified subsequent to the assignment. 

Transfers: 

The Student Assignment Procedures continue to identify five (5) categories of 
transfers for students assigned to school within the Boston Public Schools. 

a- change of address 

b- programmatic 

c- desegregative 

d- sibling, and 

e- medical 

Each category requires scecific procedures and transmitt3l to the Deoartrrent zf 
Imalcmentation and Principal s/Heac-nasters r.ust exolain t^:e policies ond proce- 
dures requirea for each type of transfer as scecified in this section. 



bikU- 



n^ 



I •l'?r? ^^' 






-323- 



. , . a parent of a student or a student eighteen years or older may request 
transfer into, within, or out of special education provided the directives 
and procedures of the Department of Student Support Services, the Boston 
School Committee, and appropriate legislative and judicial agencies, are 
followed. 



Transportation of Students in 
Special Education Programs 

Chapter 766 Regulation 

900.0 Transportation the school committee must provide . 

Each school committee shall provide or arrange for the provision of all 
transportation recommended by a TEAM pursuant to 902.0. In meeting such 
obligation, the school committee shall insure that there is full 
compliance with all conditions set by a TEAM for the transportation of a 
child in need of special education. 

c oston Public Schools' Policy 

The Boston Public Schools' policy on transportation of students in special 
education programs reflects the above regulation. 

."'ajor Procedural Steps 



A. For provision of transportation: 

1) Students in program prototypes 502.1, 502.2, 502.3 and 502. i '.yill 
"receive transportation in regular vehicles according to criteria set ty 

. the Department of Transportation. 

2) For students in program prototypes 502.1, 502.2 or 502.3, requests for 
special transportation shall be accompanied by a letter from the 
Principal/Headmaster and a medical statement indicating the reason for 
the request. 

3) For students assigned to program prototype 502.4, the need for special 
transportation shall be stated on the Individualized Educational Plan 
upon yearly agreement by the Principal/Headmaster, ETL and teacner. An 
Application for Special Transportation shall be included in the folder 
forwarded to the respective Senior Level Advisor, for approval. 

4) If the approved Individualized Educational Plan requires 
transportation, parents may choose to transport their child to school, 
subsenuent to pre-arranqen-icnt ano discussion with personnel in the 
Contracted Educational Services Unit. Although parents ar'i not 
r<?auireq to provide transportation, they will be reimpursed en a per 
mile basis at the "State Rate" if they choose to do so. '^' 

5) Stucents should not hawe to be contir.uo-jsl y transcortoa for -ore than 
one hcur.'each way wi trout specific knew) eccs ano :pcrcvai of t".e 
Special Education Administrator. 

-324- 



RtSPONbt 10 ITEM ? b 



Response to Pamela Kaufnann 



Ql* 



During the period of 19S0— 1981, as part of the Boston Action 
Flan, a team comprised cf educators and psycholof^ists rcvleucd folders 
of all 502.4 SAR and L/AB students (placed prior to September, 1978) 
to determine the appropriateness of their assignments. A complete ; 
report on this effort has been filed with the State Department. 

In this year's current Action Plan, all minority students referred 
for any new 502. A placement must be reviewed with a PFD Checklist by 
the PFD Team (which includes minimally, a minority representative, special 
educator, regular educator, and ETL) . (See Enclosure) 



-325- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




STUDENT SUPPOUT SCnviCf, 
MEMORANDUM 

TO; Pamela Kaufman 

FROM: Thomas Kehir "^-^>Ti 

DATE: November 10, 1933 

SUBJECT: Learning Adaptive Behavior (L/AB Placements) 

The following actions will be taken to address the State Department 
of Education's concerns regarding the apparent over-representation of 
minority students in L/AB programs. 

1. The PFD checklist will be used for all minority students 
at their original Individual Education Plan team meeting. 

2. The PFD checklist will be used for all reevaluations of 
students placed in the L/A3 program. 

3. The PFD checklist will be used for all probable Central 
Review Unit submissions. 

A. The Department of Student Support Services will develop new 
and modified service delivery models within the L/AB program. 
Ke will explore the use of less restrictive options for 
serving students exhibiting behavioral and emoticnai difficulties. 
Currently, we have requested a change of codes from the 
Department of Implementativju. This change will allow us to serve 
L/AB students within the less restrictive protot^-pe. Currently, 
we are only allowed to assign students into the L/AB program 
with a 502.4 prototype. The irplementation of new models will 
include a teacher training component. 

5. Senior Level Advisors will review all L/A3 placements recom- 
mendations since last May. This will be reported in the follcwing 
manner: 

a. L/AB placement recommendations by level, by race 

b. Actual L/AD placement by level, by race. 

This activity will be com.pleted by December S, 1983 and forwarded 
to you. 

6. Central Review Unit submissions for L/AB placement will be 
screened to assure that alternative strategics such as ccunccling 
or therapy have been attempted prior to placement in L/AD 
prototype. ' 



-326- 



Pamela Kaufman -2- November 10, 1983 

7. The Over/Under Representation Project will investigate assessnents 
used in educational, sociological and psychological evaluations 
to assure they are culturally non-biased. A list of tests will 
be coiTpleted by the sujniner of 1984. Inservice will be conducted 
■■for appropriate personnel during the 1984-35 school year. The use 
of these assessment instruments citywice will co.T.mence during the 
1985-66 school year. 

I believe that these actions will assure that the rights of minority students 
to be served in least restrictive alternatives will be protected. 

If you require further information, I will be glad to provide it. 

jg 

cc. K. Caldwell 



■327- 



— ' ■'• I nc: CDOiiooL- o^iviivii I I i_i 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

D£PARTM£,\r OF IMP'^EMENTATlOr; 
Jcfin H Cojklev. Senior Oldccr 



y.EMORAKDL*:! 



October 3, 1983 



To: 

Fro.T\: 

Subject; 



Charles Glenn 
John Coakl 



Monitoring Data Request i<^/7/S3) - Assignments (S) 



"ll^^dMi^^ 



You requested a statement of our desecregaticn guidelines for 
assianing students to substantially separate prcgrcims when there is a 
choice between or among programs which are prcgramr.atically similar. 
I offer the f clicking: 

1. Assign-.ent/Transf er requests for Substantially Separate Spt:cinl 
Education are initiated by the Depart-en- cf Student Support 
Services and then are examined and acted upon by the Depar-rr.2nr. 
of Implementation. 

a) Assignment requests for single-incidence (one site) or lev.— 
incidence program.s usually pose fe;.' problems. However, the 
DI does monitor such requests in an attem^pt to avoid racial 
isolation or unnecessary transportation burdens. 

b) Assignment requests to programs v;hich have riany sites are 
scrutinized more rigorously. Usually, the DI insists that 
such students bo assigned to programs in the district of 
residence. Occasionally, wc. agree to a cross-district aszirr-- 
ment if there is a c apacity problem or a tea cher-cupil ra zio 
issue or if there is' a truly unique educational/ soc ial/ 
phys ical need. ' ~ " 

2. The school dcpnrtm.ent ' a primary obliaation is to desegregate 
schools . A secondary obligation is internal desccrrcga ticn v.-ithin 
scnools. On March 2 4 , ll'S2 the Focierj.u^Ccur t .•'.pprove d cc rram 
chances in st\:d ent p .c3"Tc:'r!Tr"q^ri t_ C'"^'""''' - ("cforc^co panes 178 ro 
157 



ci vour 



;n 11 



. nri. \'.'? 



cer t - V o 1 u r-^.e II" 



i -^ ■? ci a 1 



.ore = - \n 



tn at ciocu;:ient o i "?.-_Ll--_J: -- - '- -^ stated _tr.ar^ rac iaT/'cc!:nicpcr cr.-n tage 
ra naci: <zt.\\ :;>.' oxcecded \;hc ro neces sary "" tQ~ a'l'lcv7~3ppr'cpfia!:a --— ' 
bilingual and/cr sur.." r ar.t laily separate specTal ncer.3 asHTrr.men ts . ' 



-328- 



•T c;!-.::t. g ?:•''■-■■■' 



£<r '.ico ■•-■ 



Charles Glenn 2 October 3, 1983 

3. Notv/ithstanding the statements in items 1 and 2 above, the Depart- 
ment cf Implementation strives to encourage substantially separate 
special education enrollments v;hich ideally are reflective of 
enrollments in the individual districts and minimally do not creat 
racially-isolated groups of students within a school or district. 

, ■ You should be aware of the fact that the school system's present 
racial/etlinic composition is 48« Black, 29% v?hite, 23*^ Other Minority 
while the substantially separate special needs enrollment is 544 "Dlac 
31% VJhite, 15% Other Minority. Predictably, the various programs 
serving substantially separate special needs students have racial/ 
ethnic compositions which vary from either of the above figures. You 
also should remem.ber that our September enrollments are assigned 
figures, not necessarily reported. VJe presently are pursuing v;ith the 
Department of Student Support Services at least one proaram in one 
school with an enrollment which appears to be racially isolated. 



w v_ . aD 

xc: Office of Superintendent 
Kenneth Caldwell 
Catherine Ellison 



-329- 



C :..N 1 .-vAi- ."^ '. . —-^ L.'.> >^.;LV-t^^..w . .■\.> 



'iscricc 



School 



Student's Name 

Race Date of Birth 

Current Prototype 



Grade 

ETL' s Nar.e 
D.P.tf 



Requested Progra-ii 



Submission 



1 



DATE DUE TO PArJINT 



(10 working days) 



of Meetir.c 



Date sent Total Date Received Data CRU Total CRU Tot; 
to CRU School Days bv CRU Dec^ D:v; ^-•.■'- 



Delay 



Yes 



No Reason for Delay _ 



Assessnent 



Assessor 



BPS/NBPS 



Date Reed. 



Cosaents 



A. Sent to Advisor 

B . Rec'd by Advisor 

C. Transmitted Date 



SPECIALIST routii;g 

2. A. Seat to Adviser 

B. Rec'd by Advisor 

C. Transmitted Date 



3. A. Sent to Adviso: 
E. Rec'd by Advise: 
C. Transmitted Da r« 



Plan complies with Boston Public School Process and 766 Regulations: 

The following 766 Program Prototype is Approved: 

The Assignment is made to the 

Advisor ___^ 

PENDING PARENTAL AM) SCiOOL A£SIG:cyjl\-T UNIT APPROVAL 
CZ'^y.ZV'S : DECISION AND/OR REJECTION 



fsc: 



-330- 



^7 fiVnTVr.L ^~ r-rn i -^u t >: T c-T :i70?. 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




TO: 
FROM: 

DATE: 
SUBJECT; 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

i!££J2£^NDUM 
Pair.ela Kaufman 
Thomas Hehir 
November 10, 1983 
L/AB Placements 



/' 



5^. 



The following information is, provided regarding the placement of students 
in high incidence (LD, L/AB and SAR) 502.4 programs. These assignrr«nt pro- 
cedures have been worked out with the Department of Implementation. 

1. All students are to be placed in their geo-coded school 
if such a placement is available. 

2. If a placement is not available in the geo-codod school, the 
student is placed in an appropriate program within the district. 

3. If a placement is not possible within the district, students 
are placed in a program within a contiguous district or with'n 
a District IX school. 

4. This procedure does not apply to low incidence programs which 
generally are assigned on a citywide basis. 



If you require further information, I will be glad to provide it. 



39 



cc. K. Caldwell 



SV 



-331- 



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-339- 



Bilingual Education 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 


I 


MONITORING OBJECTIVES 


II 


METHODOLOGY 


III 


FINDINGS 




NEW ISSUES RAISED 


IV 


COMMENDATIONS 


V 


RECOMMENDATIONS 


VI 


ADDITIONAL DATA 




APPENDICES A-P 



343 

344 

344-345 

346-352 

351-352 

352 

352-354 

355-357 

359-390 



-341- 



INTRODUCTION 

In order that the monitoring of the court orders in the 
desegregation of Boston Public School's bilingual education 
program be appropriately documented, schools, with high 
concentrations of LEP students, were targeted to be monitored 
by SEA bilingual specialists. For the purpose of this report, 
some eighteen elementary, middle, and high schools, including 
the Hubert Humphrey Occupational Resource Center, were monitored 
to gather evaluative data related to the monitoring objectives 
specified below. 

1. To review proposed program locations and space/ 
program matrices during the annual assignment 
process to ensure that adequate space and other 
provisions have been made for the programs 
required, including bilingual kindergarten and 
extended day kindergarten, and so to advise the 
Director of EEO. 

2. To determine, through regular monitoring activities, 
whether all approved and required bilingual programs, 
including kindergarten and extended day kindergarten, 
are in place and functioning appropriately. 

3. To advise the Director of EEO on all bilingual 
education aspects of students assignments, including: 

examination school invitations 
advanced work class invitations 
student assignment handbooks 
assignments (including bilingual, 
special , vocational ) 
transfers 

exceptions, for the sake of bilingual programs, 
to racial percentage limits for assignments. 

It should be noted that two teams of monitorers collected 
the evaluative data included in this report. One team focused 
on all issues related to bilingual education programming. The 
other team, collaborative effort among the occupational/vocational 
specialist and bilingual education specialist, focused on issues 
related to bilingual vocational/occupational education programming 
in Boston Public School. 

The information included in this report specifies, the 
monitoring objectives, methodology used to document the evaluative 
data, the findings of the monitoring activities, specification 
of the new issues which need to be addressed in the second round 
of monitoring, commendations and recommendations, additional data 
documenting Board concerns vis-a-vis bilingual programming in 
Boston Public Schools and appendices which support the evaluative 
findings. 

-343- 



I . Monitoring Objectives 

The focus of the bilingual education monitoring activities was 

to provide the Massachusetts Board of Education with evaluative 

data relative to the results from the July 1983 findings and 

Board concerns as they relate to the implementation of bilingual education 

by Boston Public Schools. The goals of the monitoring team were as follows; 

A. To determine the availability of bilingual staff and 
space assignments in the targeted languages, including 
native language teachers, aides, and supportive staff 
(counselors, etc.) in bilingual education programming 
including bilingual vocational/occupational education 
areas. 

B. To determine the implementation of procedures for the 
recruitment, and assessment of limited English proficient 
(LEP) students in bilingual education programming 
including occupational/vocational programs. 

C. To determine the availability of curricular materials in 
targeted native languages in all bilingual education 
programming including occupational/vocational programs. 

D. To determine the accessibility of the limited English 
proficient students to all programmatic educational 
options, supportive services, extracurricular options, 
as well as occupational/vocational programs. 

E. To determine the status of the native language cluster 
concept as mandated by the Voluntary LAU Plan. 

F. To determine the opportunities of bilingual parents to 
participate in the educational orocess of bilingual 
students . 



II. Methodology 

A number of evaluative activities were conducted by the 
State Department of Education monitoring team to gather 
the data to be included in this report. The monitoring 
activities dealing with bilingual vocational/occupational 
education were conducted collaboratively between the bi- 
lingual staff and the occupational/vocational staff 
members. The bilingual staff member of this team focused 
on the issues related specifically to bilingual occupational/ 
vocational issues. To accomplish the goals of the monitoring, 
including the on-site visits conducted during the period 
of October 10 through November 2, 1983 ,the following activities occurred: 

1. Pre-data collection - The SEA monitoring team 
requested the Department of Implementation, 
the Division of Personnel, and the Bilingual 
Department of the Boston Public Schools to 
provide the fol lowing documentation: 

-344- 



(Methodology cont' pg. 2) 



(a) computer print-outs with data about bilingual 
teachers (names, certification numbers, and 
position) and locations by district, school, 
grade, and language, 

(b) copies of the "Assignment Booklets" in 
different languages, 

(c) copies of Master PAC newsletters, and 

(d) a copy of the Language Assessment Team 
Handbook, (see appendix A) 

2. Pre-data analysis - The SEA monitoring team reviewed 
data from Boston Public Schools for FY 1983 to 
determine program sites, correspondence related to 
problem areas, and audit reports on bilingual 
education programming including bilingual occupational/ 
vocational education. 

3. Meetings - The SEA staff held meetings with Boston 
Public Schools bilingual education staff to coordinate 
monitoring visits, determine monitoring procedures 

and specification of monitoring goals, (see appendix B) 

4. On-site visit - The SEA monitoring team conducted the 
following on-site activities. 

a. Met with the bilingual coordinators for 
Boston Public Schools, the building 
administrators, district superintendents 
and bilingual liaisons of the East Boston, 
South Boston, Dorchester, West Roxbury, 
Charlestown, English and Brighton High 
Schools, Edison, Mackey, Taft, Roosevelt, 
Curley, Irving and McCormack Middle Schools, 
JFK, Agassiz, and Condon Elementary Schools, 
as well as the Hubert Humphrey Occupational 
Resource Center, (see appendix C and D) 

b. Interviews with a sampling of bilingual 
teachers, guidance counselors (bilingual 

and monolingual) ESL teachers, and occupational/ 
vocational education teachers (bilinaual and 
monolingual), (see appendices C and D). 

c. Classroom observations in the above mentioned 
schools. 

5. Instrumentation - The SEA monitoring team developed 
evaluative instruments to assess such program areas 
as staffing, availability of services and materials 
in the native language, recruitment procedures, 
coordination activities especially between vocational/ 
occupational education programs and the bilingual 
teachers, and parent participation, (see appendices 

C and D). 

-345- 



-3- 



III. Findings 



The following evaluative findings relate to the six specified 
monitoring objectives based on the results of the July 1983 
findings and Board concerns. The documentation which follows 
has been categorized to relate specifically to those objectives 
specified in the section Objectives . Immediately following 
this documentation, some key new issues will be identified to 
be investigated by the monitoring team during the second round 
of monitoring. 

A. Availability of Staff/ Space Assignment 

1. Partial or full mainstreaming still presents a 
problem in twelve of the sixteen schools 
monitored because of overcrowding of the regular 
classes (37 to 40 students) and/or because no 
parallel scheduling has been put into effect. 
The Department of Implementation assigns the 
TBE students on basis of 25 seats per classroom 
insuring compliance with regulations (Consent 
Decree). However, lack of coordination with 
the Bureau of Personnel, responsible for teacher 
and aide assignments, has resulted in non- 
compliance issues regarding student/teacher 
ratios, (see appendix G). 

2. The gamut of mainstreaming patterns range from 
isolation (no mainstreaming) to immersion 
(full mainstreaming) for LEP students. 

3. In most cases, overcrowding in the regular 
education program and limited native language 
support services (i.e, ESL, guidance, tutorial) 
present the most serious obstacle to mainstreaming. 

4. 22% of the schools monitored had at least one 
uncertified bilingual teacher. In the Mackey School, 
even though everyone was certified, not everyone 

was teaching in the area of certification. 

5. In some cases teachers certified to teach in one 
area are assigned to teach subjects for which they 
don't feel qualified to teach and for which they 
are not certified. 

6. In some schools like the Mackey Middle, Dorchester 
High, and Roosevelt Middle, the physical plant does 
not allow for an increase of the student population 
or staff whether it is the bilingual program or the 
non-bilingual program. 



-346- 



-4- 



(Findings cont' pg. 4) 



7. Occupational/vocational education instructors in the 
ten monitored schools, including the HHORC, are 
generally monolingual, thereby conducting instruction 
monolingualy in English. In some cases teachers use 
bilingual students to translate; in fewer cases, they 
use native language materials; and in even fewer cases, 
use a native language speaking aide. The following 
are specifics relative to staffing: 

a. In 90% of the ten school programs monitored 
(representing 51 teachers) , including HHORC, 
native language speaking teachers conducting 
their vocational/occupational classes bilingually 
or in the native language did not exist. The 
only school in which instruction is conducted 
bilingually occurs at the HHORC. These classes 
are either taught monolingually in English or in 
some cases some LEP students within the class 
translate in the native language for the other 
native speaking students who do not understand 

the monolingual teacher, (see appendices C,D and E) 

b. In 90% of the monitored classes, aides are 
not available/used within the vocational/ 
occupational classes, (see appendices C, D and E) 

c. In 90% of the ten targeted schools, including 
the HHORC, native language speaking counselors 
are available to service the LEP students. 

It should be noted that a bilingual counselor 
might be bilingual in Spanish assigned to a 
school which houses Laotian, Cambodian, and 
Spanish LEP students. Consequently, although 
the counselor is bilingual, he/she cannot 
orally communicate with some of the LEP 
students, (see appendices C> D and E). 

B. Recruitment and Assessment Procedures 

1. Recruitment of LEP students for vocational/occupational 
education, especially at the high school level, is 
conducted in some native languages. In some schools, 
however, students are advised not to enroll in vocational/ 
occupational education programs due to their low level 
of English proficiency. This is due to the fact that the 
great majority of occupational /vocational programs are taught 
mono-1 ingual ly in English, thereby making it difficult for 
the LEP student to be able to fully benefit from these 
programs. 

In some cases, there are relatively small numbers of students 
getting to participate in vocational/occupational education 
programming compared to the eligible numbers of students. This 
discrepancy is especially true of the Haitans, Cambodians, 
Laotians, Vietnameses, Chineses and Italians in that \ery 
small numbers, representing 14% or less, of the eligible 
students are enrolled at the HHORC. 

-347- 



-5- 



2. In 40% of the monitored ten schools, including HHORC, 
letters in the native languages are sent to parents 
specifying the availability of occupational/vocational 
programs in Boston Public Schools. It should be noted 
that letters are not sent to the students and parents 
in the native language at the middle school level and 
that those disseminated letters have been, at different 
times, sent in six of the eleven (Cape Verdean, 
Portuguese, Haitian, Cambodian, Laotian, Vietnamese, 
Chinese, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Czechoslavakian) of 
the largest LEP student groups, (see appendix C) 

3. The Bilingual Vocational Education Coordinator sends 
information relative to the vocational/occupational 
programs at the HHORC, to all high schools with 
high concentration of LEP students in the Boston 
Public Schools. 

4. At different times, information relative to the HHORC 
has been disseminated via television programs in 
Spanish, and church bulletins/newsletters in Spanish. 

5. In general, although the assessment procedures for the 
LEP students are in place and in the majority of the 
cases LEP students are assigned a Lau category, the 
following are problematic: 

a. not all students have been assigned 
a Lau category; 

b. not all students have been identified 
as LEP; and 

c. in some cases inappropriate Lau 
classification of LEP students. 

6. The transfer process of LEP students is hindered due 

to large class sizes in the monolingual English classes. 

7. Orientation booklets to Boston Public Schools have been 
written in the majority of the native languages. 

C. Availability of Curriculum Materials 

1. Although curricular materials for vocational/occupational 
education are available in some native languages 

(see appendix H), materials are either not used by the 
monolingual/bilingual teachers, are not available for 
teacher use, or are not available in the languages 
required/needed, (see appendices C and D) 

2. Most of the available native language curricular materials 
are in Spanish with limited materials available in 
Cambodian, Laotian, Vietnamese, and Portuguese, (see 
appendix H) 



-348- 



3. In 86% of the time, coordination to develop native 
language materials, or to teach certain concepts 

in the native language or ESL classes to facilitate 
the learning in the vocational/occupational programs 
between the bilingual/ESL teachers and the vocational/ 
occupational teachers does not exist, (see appendix C) 

4. In all of the schools visited, the teachers interviewed 
indicated that they did not have adequate instructional 
and student materials within the classroom, especially 
in math, science, and social studies, which are 
linguistically and culturally relevant to their student 
populations. 

5. In the large majority of the schools, those interviewed 
responded that there were no appropriate linguistically 
and culturally relevant materials located in the 
library/ resource room. 

Accessibility to Programs 

1. Generally, LEP students have access to occupational/ 
vocational education programming although in some 
cases LEP students are advised to opt not to enroll 
into the HHORC programming before a predetermined 
level of ESL is achieved by the LEP student. 

2. Although some students do choose to enroll in 
occupational/vocational education programs, in spite 
of the lack of native language instruction, many 
students choose not to participate for fear of not 
being provided a program in which they will benefit 
educationally, (see appendices L and M) 

3. Limited English proficient students in Boston Public 
Schools are subject to the same criteria for admissions 
to the examination schools as any other student. 

They have to pass exams in English and are expected 
to compete with non-bilingual students for admission, 
(see appendix I). There are no supportive services 
available for bilingual students who pass the exams 
and consequently are admitted. On the other hand, 
admissions to the magnet schools is open to LEP 
students and, since they have bilingual programs, the 
students are admitted and are entitled to receive the 
same services they would receive in any other district 
high school . 

4. In some cases, the LEP students are not provided native 
language instruction in some of the required courses, 
especially at the high school level, (see appendix J) 

5. Limited course offerings in both bilingual and non- 
bilingual education effectively denies equal acesss 
to course offerings. 

6. In some cases at the HHORC, teaching bilingually or in 
the native language is considered by other vocational/ 
occupational teachers as remediation, not necessary, and 
counter the philosophy of vocational/occupational education, 
(see appendix D) 

-34 9- 



-7- 

In TOO? of the schools monitored, the limited English proficient students were 

7. reported to have equal access to all extra-curricular activities. However, 
because of having to work after school, living far away from the school, etc, 
many cannot participate in after school activities. 

8. Due to limited space/physical facilities (specifically Dorchester High, Mackey 
Middle, John F. Kennedy Elementary) LEP and non-LEP students cannot be provided 
adequate instructional services; example, JFK has 38 students in one classroom. 

9. There are no Title I funded "Native Language Reading Programs" to deal with some 
of the students who are now referred unnecessarily to Special Education classes. 

TO. In the two elementary schools visited, the bilingual kindergarten teachers 
themselves inform parents about the availability of bilingual kindergartens. 

T]. Because of lack of physical space in one of the two monitored schools, the bi- 
lingual kindergarten teachers, as well as the regular kindergarten teachers, 
have to share their classrooms with other teachers and with their students. 

12. Bilingual teachers have been assisting with the registration of children in the 

bilingual kindergartens. In order to do that, however, they have had to interrupt 
their classes. 

E. Bilingual Clusters 

1. In the 15 schools visited, 635^ of the middle and high school Hispanic 
clusters were in violation of the Voluntary Lau minimum cluster size 
of 100. The Hispanic clusters in the two elementary schools were 

in compliance with the Voluntary Lau Plan (See appendix K). 

2. The size of the cluster by itself does not seem to be the determinant 
factor in the quality of the programs offered. A case in point is that 
the Cambodian Program at South Boston High has a large cluster but 
limited program offerings and does not respond to the educational needs 
of the LEP students. On the other hand, the Chinese program at 
Charlestown High, with a large cluster and adequate staffing and 
services has been able to develop an excellent bilingual program. 

A smaller cluster usually lacks in appropriate numbers of teaching and 
supportive staff members, and variety of course offerings and instructional 
materials. 

F. Parent Participation 

1. The annual in-house review is conducted in all of the schools with 
involvement of bilingual parents from the district, but not necesarily 
from that particular school being monitored. ' Parents are invited to 
participate in the process of visiting the schools using as a tool of 
observation or as a point of reference the Lau review forms which are 
sometimes filled by an administrator. 



-350- 



-8- 



2. Although not all parents attend, parents in the 
targeted schools are invited to participate in 
meetings organized by bilingual community field 
coordinators, the purpose of which is to inform 
them about their rights relative to bilingual 
education programming. 

3. Concentrated efforts have been directed toward 
conducting parent training sessions by the bilingual 
staff. Opportunities for parents to become 
involved in school activities and programs are 
actively encouraged ("636" and Title VII). 
However, sufficient numbers of trained native 
language speaking staff are not in place to 

addres parental concerns and to facilitate 
increased parental involvement. 

New Issues raised 

The following issues will be investigated during the next round of 
monitoring. Although these issues are not all encompassing for the 
next round, more documentation must be gathered to objectively make 
recommendations to the Board concerning these issues. 

• Determine the actual availability of bilingual counselors 
who work with LEP students. 

• Determine the use of the native speaking aic^s at the 
HHORC. 

p Determine the validity of the Lau classification assigned 
to LEP students. 

• Determine the services available to LEP students admitted 
into the exam schools. 

• Determine the feasibility of implementing language and 
culture maintenance programs. 

• Determine the actual involvement of the bilingual parent in 
the bilingual education in-house review process. 

• Determine the variables which are determining factors in 
Boston Public Schools in facilitating smooth transition of the 
LEP student for partial/full mainstreaming. 

• Determine the accessibility of the LEP students into the 
gifted and talented programs in Boston Public Schools. 

• Determine the appropriateness/validity of the information 
provided by Boston Public School vis-a-vis the educational 
needs of the LEP student? with special attention given to 
the American Indian and the Puerto Rican linguistic and 
cultural needs. 

-351- 



Determine the factors (i.e., conditions and atti tudes)which 
have limited the successful implementation of a full-time 
native language bilingual program at the high school level. 
Of special concern are issues at South Boston High School 
involving an itmiersion approach program with identified 
Cambodian students. 



IV Commendations 



Based on the evaluative data collected, the following commendations are made: 

A) The high degree of commitment and involvement by the Bilingual Department staff, 
bilingual teachers, aides, and community field coordinators in providing quality 
bilingual programming of the LEP student population. 

B) The initiative taken by the bilingual education department staff to provide quality 
teacher and parent training activities through conducting needs assessment, and 
providing workshops/conferences related to the identified needs. 

C) The consistent efforts made by the bilingual educators in Boston Public Schools 
at partially and fully mainstraaming bilingual students. 

D) The varied outreach activities conducted by the bilingual department staff through 
the publications of "Spark: and the "Parent Newsletter" as well as through the 
organization of active sub-PACs. 

E) The attitude of cooperation and candor of most Boston Public School personnel in 
clarifying issues and offering solutions to resolve bilingual problem areas. 

F) The wide variety of occupational/vocational programs available to LEP students 
especially at the HHORC. 

G) The Charlestown High Chinese bilingual program having developed a programs of 
academic excellence which responds to both linguistic-cultural needs of those 
LEP students. 

H) The success of the bilingual program of Boston Public School in graduating large 
numbers of high school students who in past years have systematically dropped 
out of publ ic school . 

I) The parents who have participated continue to participate actively in PAC related, 
activities. 

Recommendations 

Based on the evaluation data collected and analyzed, the following recommendations 
are made. Boston Public Schools should insure that: 

A) In the absence of a certified bilingual/vocational teacher, LEP students 

enrolled in vocational/occupational education programs be provided supportive 
services via native language speaking aides and native language instructional 
materials. Most materials which are available are in Spanish with few materials 
in Laotian, Cambodians, Portuguese, and Vietnamese (see appendix H). There are 
no bilingual teachers at the middle and high schools levels. Although there 
are seventeen bilingual teachers and four bilingual aides at the HHORC, most 
of the programs in which LEP students are enrolled are not serviced by 
bilingual teachers and aides (see appendices E and M). 



-352- 



(Recommendations cont') 



2) implementing the "Policy Paper: Bilingual 
Strategies and Procedures',' focusing on 
the procedures and responsibilities of 
those vocational/occupational instructors 
servicing the LEP students, and 

3) developing curricular materials in the 
native languages. 

C. Bilingual counselors, speaking the appropriate targeted native 
language, be assigned to those vocational/occupational programs 
in which LEP students are enrolled (especially at the HHORC). 

D. Recruitment activities to enroll LEP students at the HHORC 
be conducted systematically for all language groups. 

E. Native language instructional materials for the program areas 
in which large numbers of LEP students are enrolled be 
developed/adapted/commercially bought to be used by the 
vocational/occupational education teachers. 

F. Policies of bilingual language instruction in the vocational/ 
occupational programs be enforced by building administrators 
to irradicate the negative stigma of teaching bilingually 

in the various vocational/occupational education programs. 

G. Class size projections (DI) in regular education classes 
allow adequate space for mainstreaming bilingual students 
(i.e, reduce class size in targeted schools). 

H. Adequate staff and resources be available in non-academic 
subject areas (i.e, music, art) to foster integration and 
mainstreaming for bilingual students. 

I LEP students, who might be mainstreamed in non-bilingual schools, 
be retained within those targeted schools so that they can take 
advantage of existing native language services and resources within 
the school building. 

J. Native language speaking administrative aides be assigned to administrative 
tasks so as to concentrate utilization of native language 
teachers for support services and also to encourage 
collaborative efforts towards increasing team teaching. 

K. All necessary bilingual teachers, aides, and counselors be 
hired to provide appropriate bilingual education programming. 

L. The hiring process reflect the linguistic and cultural 

reality of Boston Public Schools specifically at the school 
building level to include administrators, teachers, aides_ 
and counselors representing the various targeted linguistic- 
cultural groups. 

M. Language Assessment Team and LAU STEP placement for all 
students be implemented upon recommendation without undue 
delays. 

-353- 



N. Language Assessment Team recommendations from the central 
office computer be received orior to student scheduling 
in September. 

0. Administration of appropriate (CLOZE) testing of all 
students, especially Indochinese high school students, 
be made prior to placement and/or transfer. 

P. Transfer and placement policies of ESL programming be 
reviewed to insure consistent application in all targeted 
schools. 

Q. The acquisition of linguistically and culturally relevant 
materials be instituted for the classrooms and libraries/ 
resource centers. 

R. An interim set of ESL objectives and guidelines be 

identified (although an ESL curriculum is currently being 
developed) and disseminated for teachers to implement. 

S. Those programs which have been identified as successfully 
integrated be used as models for other bilingual 
programs within the system. 

T. Chapter I services be utilized systematically throughout 
Boston Public Schools to service LEP students. 

U. LEP students be maintreamed and that their parent's 

request be honored regarding opportunities for participation 
in language and culture maintenance programs. 

V. The linguistic-cultural educational needs of LEP students 
enrolled in the examination schools be addressed to provide 
appropriate bilingual programming. 

W. Sub-PAC newsletters and bulletins be developed for dissemination 
to all parents. 

X. Native language parent trainers be trained to conduct parent 
training sessions for LEP parents. 

Y. Roles and responsibilities of community field coordinators be 
clearly defined to facilitate a more effective involvement 
of parents in the annual in-house review. 

Z. Pedagogically sound and economically efficient bilingual 
program clusters be implemented throughout Boston Public 
Schools. 



-354- 



VI. Additional Data 

The following data were collected to specifically address the 
concerns of the Board of Education related to length of time 
that LEP student remain in the bilingual education programs, 
problems encountered by Boston Public Schools in achieving 
state and federal transitional bilingual education goals, 
how Boston Public School deals with such problems, and 
factors tending to decrease the "transitional"nature of TBE 
programs. 

Length of time in bilingual programs 

As shown in appendix N, the majority (57%) of the LEP 
students in Boston Public Schools transition into non-bilingual 
education programming after one year of transitional bilingual 
education. As compared to the statistics of the school year, 
1981-1982,42% of the students transitioned into non-bilingual 
education programming. The statistics on appendix N also shows 
that 15" of the LtP students are maintained in bilingual 
education programming after the three year' period for the school 
year 1982-83 while 31% for the 1981-82 school year. 

As shown in Appendix P, further analyzes would show that out of 
the indicated 16 percent of LEP students who are maintained in 
bilingual education programming after three years, 11 percent are 
of Hispanic background, two percent are Italians, 0.7 percent Greeks, 
and 2.3 percent are of Cape Verdean, Chinese, Portuguese, French Haitian, 
and Vietnamese backgrounds. 

As shown in appendix the bilingual education programming in Boston 
Public Schools has graduated 372 bilingual students during the 1982-83 
school year. 77% of the graduating bilingual students have opted to go 
on to higher education with 58% of these rf^ceiving awards of scholarship. 

Pr oblems of Boston Public Schools in achieving state and federal 
transitional bilingual education goals 

The following specifications identifies those related 
recommendations which have previously been documented as well as 
other problems encountered by Boston Public Schools in accomplishing 
state and federal transitional bilingual education goals. 

• Absence of parallel scheduling of the bilingual and non- 
bilingual classes at the middle and high school level 
hindering the possibility of partial and full-mainstreaming. 

• Lack of sequential curriculums 'for the bilingual classes in 
thecontent areas of language arts, science, math, and 
social science^ 

• Resistance on the part of the bilingual teachers, students 
and parents to mainstream due to the absence of supportive 
services m the non-bilingual proarams 



-355- 



-13- 



How does Boston deal with the above problems 

The above stated recommendations/documentation of problem 
areas have been stated in the "Bilingual Audit Report- 
January, 1981" and the "Bilingual Audit Follow-up Report 
June, 1982'.' Nonetheless, due to a) new immigrant groups 
enrolling yearly in Boston Public Schools, b) budget cuts 
in personnel, materials acquisition/development, and staff 
training, c) lack of support from some teachers and 
administrators vis-a-vis bilingual education programming, 
and b) absence of a language policy of the bilingual 
education department, the same problems, with minor changes, 
are evident from year to year. Nevertheless, some strives 
have been made by Boston Public Schools to remediate certain 
non-compliance/problem areas. The following specifies those 
positive steps taken by Boston Public Schools: 

• hiring an ESL consultant to develop/scope and 
sequence the Boston Public Schools ESL curriculum 
as well as train teachers in ESL methodology 

e developing Title VII proposals to seek federal 
funds to supplement bilingual education activities 
in Boston Public Schools (BPS has received two federal 
grants - Project S.U.C.C.E.S.S. "Strategies to Upgrade 
Children's Competencies t^hrough E_ducational S^haring 
and Support "and Project C.H. I .L.D. "Comprehensive " 
h[elp ^n Language Development") 

» developing and receiving state 636 grants to develop 
curricular materials, and conduct staff and parent 
training 

e computerize the LAU classification of LEP students 



Factors tending to decrease the "transitional" nature of 
TBE programs 

Since generally LEP students transition into monolingual 
education programming within the recommended three years; 
nevertheless, the following decrease the "transitional" 
nature of transitional bilingual education programming in 
Boston Public Schools. 

• Over-crowding of the non-bilingual classes making 
partial or full mainstreami ng difficult if not 
impossible to happen within the same school year 



■356- 



Absence of native language support services in 
the non-bilingual education program to help in 
the smooth transition of the bilingual student, 
thereby, contributing to the hesitancy of the 
bilingual teachers, parents, and students to 
mainstream those bilingual students. 

Lack of parallel scheduling with bilingual and 
non-bilingual classes, especially at the middle 
and high school levels, making partial 
mainstreaming impossible. 



-357- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



APPENDIX A 



Division of Curriculum and Instruction 



1385 Hancock Street. Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



September 27, 1983 

Mr. Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. DeGruttola: 

We are in the process of commencing our monitoring of the Boston Public 
School Consent Decree, specifically in the area of bilingual education. As 
a result of the data collection conducted during school year 1982-83 relative 
to bilingual education and the documentation included in the Report to the 
United States District Court, District of Massachusetts on Boston School 
Desegregation, Volume I and II , vie will focus our monitoring activities on 
the priority of space assignments, bilingual vocational/occupational education, 
and the bilingual cluster models as specified in the Boston Public School 
Lau Plan. These monitoring activities will consist of reviewing related 
Boston Public School documents, interviewing (see attached proposed instrumentation). 
Department of Implementation and Bilingual Education staff members, attending 
appropriate parent meetings and conducting on-site visits to targeted schools 
and classrooms. 

In order that we might provide the U.S. District Court with valid and 
timely documentation about bilingual education programming in the above 
mentioned priority areas, would you please provide us with the following 
documents by October 5, 1983: 

--Location, by school and district, of all bilingual 
education programs specifying the numbers of 
students by grade level, and language group as 
well as the numbers of bilingual teachers serving 
these LEP students. 

— Bilingual certification status of the bilingual 
teachers at the HHORC. 

— Student lists of middle and high schools where bi- 
lingual programs are in place indicating the numbers 
of students in each of the language clusters. 

--Lau Plan Status Report. 

— Written Documentation vis-a-vis admissions criteria to 

the magnet and examination schools. 
— Any other documents which you feel would facilitate our 

monitoring efforts. 



-359- 



Please note that the Greater Boston Regional Education Center will 
coordinate with the Division of Occupational and Special Education in 
conducting the on-site visits as well as collecting appropriate data. 
It must also be noted that all responses and documentation should be 
returned to the Greater Boston Regional Education Center. Mr. Allen Gilpatrick 
will be in contact with you during the next few weeks to make the necessary 
arrangements to conduct the on-site visits. 

If you have any questions regarding this process, please contact 
Mr. Allen Gilpatrick. We look forward to your continued assistance 
and cooperation in the process. 



Sincerely, 




James H. Case 
Associate Commissioner 
Division of Curriculum and 
Instruction 



f^KOJSL/j- 




Marlene Godfrey 
Director, Greater Boston 
Regional Education Center 



Attachment 



cc: Robert Spillane 
Ernest J. Mazzone 



-360- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



APPENDIX B 



1385 Hancock Street. Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Bureau of Transitional Bilingual Education 



Memo 



TO: 
FROM : 
RE: 

DATE: 



MARLENE GODFREY, DIRECTOR, GREATER BOSTON REGIONAL EDUCATION CENTER 

til' 

ERNEST J. MAZZONE, DIRECTOR, BUREAU OF TRANSITIONAL BILINGUAL EDUCATION 

MAZZONE RESPONSE TO QUESTIONS ON BILINGUAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
MEETING 9-27-83. 

AS PER YOUR REQUEST. 

OCTOBER 3, 1983 



Question: 

1 



Chapter 71A, M.G.L. is clear on the application of dual language 
medium instruction specifically statc-d in section 2 of the Act 
and regulation 20. 

On this issue the Act makes no distinction between vocational 
education, special education, regular academic or any other 
content area. The bottom line is that instruction must be given 
in the native language as well as in English once a child has been 
identified as limited English proficient and who is incapable of 
performing ordinary classwork in English. The treatment of 
language and the time used in the native language is determined by 
the educational needs of the child. The Bureau has set forth 
guidelines for full-time program of instruction in TBE to assist 
local school districts implement this provision. 

The second issue raised in the question seeks to know the application 
of the TBE law to programs not mandated for graduation. In essence 
th« only mandated courses in Massachusetts are American history and 
Citizenship and physical education. 

Thus the reference to a full-time program of instruction in all 
courses a child is required by law to receive and which are required 
by the child's school committee have no reference to graduation 
requirements. The Act does not say that only courses required for 
graduation must be taught in the native language as well as in English. 
The intent of the Act is to Insure that whatever courses are either 
offered or required of children in a particular local school district 
must be offered dual lingually to the LEP child. 

In the hierarchy of things the higher order prevails; that is the 
more rigorous provision between two conflicting legal requirements 
will be the one which must be followed. 



-361- 



Memo to Marlene Godfrey Page 2 October 3, 1983 

Example, (1) Both Chapter 71A, M.G.L. and the Lau Remedies 
require certain procedures in the identification, placement 
and transfer of limited English proficient children into and out 
of TBE programs. The provisions in Chapter 71A M.G.L. are 
less demanding than those in the Lau Remedies. In accordance 
with the principle of higher order prevailing, a local school 
district must follow thbse requirements of the Lau Remedies 
which go beyond what is required by Massachusetts State Law. 
Example (2) Bo th^ Chapter 71A, M.G.L. and the Lau Remedies require 
the local school district to provide instruction in ways which 
ensure access to learning for the LEP child. Lau generally requires 
dual medium instruction at the elementary school level and under 
certain conditions accepts ESL instruction at the secondary level. 
Chapter 71A M.G.L. however requires TBE (dual medium instruction) 
at both the elementary and secondary levels. On this matter, then, 
in accordance with the principle of higher order, school districts 
arfe required to provide native language medium instruction in all 
subjects a child is given or takes both at the elementary and 
secondary level. As stated before the treatment of languages and 
time in each is an educational decision based on the individual 
needs of the student. 

The positions just stated have been the consistent policy of the 
Bureau on these matters since the implementation of Chapter 71A 
M.G.L. in April 1972. 

3. Reference was made to the Lau categories which defines those 
entitled to TBE. Specifically it means categories a^ and b^. 

4. Regional staffs both occupational education and bilingual engage 
in monitoring bilingual vocational education in other school 
districts. Mazzone made reference to the exemplary Title VII 
Vocational Education bilingual program in the Greater Lawrence 
Regional Vocational School and the program at the Keefe in Framingham. 

Marlene, although I gave Imput to Some of the other questions raised by Jim Caradonio, 
I believe others in the group perhaps could provide you with their more indepth 
responses. The questions I feel I spoke to in some depth are addressed above. 
Especially critical are responses to questions 1, 2, and 4. Please call if I 
can be of further help. 



:gs 



-362- 



LEGEND 



1 APPENDIX C I 
(Tallied Results of 
Key questions of 
Appendix C) 



X = indicate yes 
= indicate no 



1. Are there written procedures to encourage 
LEP students to enroll in Occ/Voc Ed. Prog? 

• Letters in native lang. to parents 

2. Are LEP students provided instruction in 
native language? 

• guidance services in native language 

• voc/occ. ed. in native language 

3. Number of LEP students enrolled in the 
specified school 

A. The variety of program available: 





Automative 




Foods 




Clothing 




Electronic 




Woods 




Drafting 




Metal 




Data Processing 




Printing 




Business 



Curricular materials are available in the 
following native languages 





Cape Verdean 




Portuguese 




Cambodian 




Laotian 




Vietnamese 




Chinese 




Italian 




Greek 




Czechoslavakian 




Spanish 




-363- 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



-r 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



A./,. Z,-^/ 



,^/#/.5./#/i?/.^/.^4 



421 95 92 158 






V / #/ #/ #/ 



152 



68 



X 

X 
X 



101 



49 



X 
X 

X 
X 



125 



X 
X 
X 
X 



( cont' Appendix C ) 



Legend 



indicate yes 
indicate no 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



6. Materials are used in the following languages 

• Cape Verdean 

• Portuguese 

• Haitian 

• Cambodian 

• Laotian 

• Vietnamese 

• Chinese 

• Italian 

• Greek 

• Czechoslavakian , 

• Spanish 



Does coordination exist between the voc/occ. 
education teachers and the bilingual teachers 
in: 

Woods 

Metal 

Electronic 

Drafting 

Printing 

Computer 

Foods 

Cloths 

Business 

Automotive 

Does coordination exists between the voc/ 
occupational education teachers and the ESL 
teachers in 

Woods 

Metal 

Electronic 

Drafting 

Printing 

Computer 

Foods 

Cloths 

Business 

Automative 



-lei- 




Legend 

X = indicate yes 
- = indicate no 



( "^""l^' Appendix C) 



HIGH SCHOOLS 

r 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



9. Written procedures exist to determine LEP 
students? 



10. Are aides used in the voc/occ education 
classes to help the LEP students? 



-36!. 




APPENDIX D 

TEACHER INTERVIEW QUESTIONNAIRE (COMPOSITE) 
HHORC 

1. Do you use native language materials in your class? 

Yes 57% iqo__43%_ 

2. What kind of native language materials do you use? 

Spanish Vietnamese 

Cape Verdean Laotian 

Haitian Cambodian 

3. How do you teach L.E.P. students? 

1 s% t each monolingually 

27% teach monolingually with a bilingual student translating 
teach monolingually with some native language materials 



9% 



9% teach monolingual with a native language speaking aide 

45% teach bilingually-in English and the targeted native 
language 

4. Are aides available to work with your students? 

Yes 17 No 83 



Wliat kinds of services are available to you which impact on the quality 
of educational programming for your LEP students? 

counseling 

community field liaison 

curriculum developers 

native language materials 



27% others ESL 



6. Is this administration/ teaching peers receptive to bilingual education 
services to the LEP students? 

20% Nn 80 



Yes ■'"'^ No 



■f • Teaching in the native language is not appreciated by the 
bpeciry innnni ing nal tparhPT _ 

t> teaching bilingually is not tolerated/not valued by non-bilingual 
xnstructors ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ 

_j^.y_ 



7. What administrative support would facilitate your task of responding 
to the linguistic -cultural needs of the LEP students in your class? 

Specify ® Need for counseling services in the native language of the 
HHORC LEP students (only one bilingual Spanish counselor who work with 

the students in the health and business clusters-no services available for 
any other language groups') 

s more time available to develop curriculum 

• scheduling to permit for coordination with other bilingual teachers 

€> more aides to focus on helping LEP students especially the Haitians, 
Cape Verdeans and Cambodians 

9 need for computers for individualized 

s more materials in the targeted native languages. 



-368- 



APPENDIX E 



Bilingual Vocational Instructors 

Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 

1983 - 1984 



Instructor 

Kenneoi Chin 
Violeta Gonzalez 
Ramon Suarez 
Corina Murphy 
Carlos Bartels . 
Julio Delgardo 
John Oliveria 

Shirley Daly Carr 
Maria Paz Lewis 
Lemardo Comarzo 
Alvaro Comarzo 
Cesar Coloma 
Leonardo Arruda 
Viriato Pereira 
Loray Pollinger 
Efren Hidalgo 

Marta Kaufman 



Native Language (s) 

Chinese 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Cape Verdean 

Cape Verdean 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 



Program 

Data Processing 

Data Processing 

Data Processing 

Cosmetology 

Carpentry 

Plumbing 

Electricity 

Health Aide 

Medical Terminology 

Electronics 

Autobody 

Electronics 

Auto Mechanics 

Auto Mechanics 

Auto Mechanics 

Special Needs Assessment 
Project (SNAP) 

SNAP 



-369- 



Appendix E-1 
Bilingual Aide-^ 

Humphrey Occupaticnal Resource Center 
1983 - 198 A 



Aide Native Language (s) 

Eddie Luis Ocasis Spanish 

Samuel Maldonado Spanish 

Esmln Rodney Spanish 

John Iran Vietnamese 

Chinese 
French 



-370- 



Appendix F 



School 


Comp. 


Non-Comp . 


Language Group 


Student/Teacher Ratios* 


Elementary: 












Condon 




X 


Spanish 


30.1 


(w/aide) 






X 


CV 


24.1 


(w/aide) 


Agassiz 




X 


Spanish 


22.1 


no aide 


J K 


X 




Spanish 


21.1 


(w/aide) 


Middle: 












Edison 


X 




Spanish 


16.1 








X 


VM 


**32.1 




Taft 




X 


Spanish 


21.1 


No aide 


Irving 


X 




Greek 


25.1 


(w/aide) 




X 




LA. 


14. 1 


no aide 






X 


CA 


**42.1 


no aide 


Roosevelt 


X 




Spanish 


14.1 


no aide 


McCormack 


X 




Spanish 


18.1 


aide 


Mackey Midd 


X 




Spanish 


18.1 


(w/aide) 


HiRh: 












Brighton 




X 


Spanish 


22.1 


no aide 






X 


VM 


** 21.1 


no aide 






X 


ESL 


25.1 


no aide 


East Boston 


X 




Italian 


18.1 


(w/aide) 


South Boston 




X 


Spanish 


25.1 


no aide 






X 


CA 


**105.1 


no aide 


Dorchester 




X 


Spanish 


18.1 


no aide 


West Roxbury 


X 




Greek 


20.1 


(w/aide) 


Charlestown 




X 


Khinese 


20.1 


no aide 




X 




Spanish 


16.1 


no aide 


English 




X 


Haitian Creole 


** 22.1 


no aide 






X 


Laotian 


** 19.1 


no aide 






X 


Spanish 


19.1 


no aide 



* The numbers reported in this column signify student/teacher ratios based 
on the total number of limited English proficient students divided by the 
total number of bilingual teachers assigned to the school. This, however, 
does not necessarily accurately reflect what the student/ teacher ratios 
are in each classroom within the school. In some classrooms there could be 
more and in others there could be less. 

** Most of these students range from to limited English proficiency. 

*** Accordltig to Regulation 14.05 of the Chapter 71A. 

"Except for multi-grade level classes (classes in which more than one grade 
level is/are included) , the maximum student-teacher ratio shall be 18.1 , 
except that the student-teacher ratio may be 25. 1 , where a native speaking 
teacher's aide is assigned to a Transitional Bilingual Education class or a 
non-natlve-speaking teacher's aide is assigned to a Transitional Bilingual 
Education class taught by a native speaker of the primary language of the 
children enrolled in the Transitional Bilingual Education program. In multi- 
grade level classes, as defined supra, the ratio shall be 16:1 without said 
aide and 20:1 with said aide, respectively. " 



-371- 



APPENDIX G 



U 

u 

E 

D 

cn 
o 



D 
CD 

c 





"O'lOii 1 1 1 j 1 icf^' 


1 


: 1 1 r I 


III! 




UD.IOOT 1 1 1 { 1 1 1 


i 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 




1 ivanonuoj 


1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 


i— ' 1 ' 




1 i ill 




U0ipoqu/03 j ^ 


i l~~i 










j 








— 


i 


o 

< 


1 atdLuou^ai/^ ^ 












-. 


i 


1 




..^1 




1 


6 

2 

4 


1 ^yuai^ 


!- 1^1 


t/ 




I-- 


di 1 









rv 




•«»uii|-3 ^ 


J 1 |--i 1 




■*** 


■ 1 


--i -- 








1 




uoapja^ SOOD ] -^j | | '^1 ~^| 


1- 


> i l^<:Td M 


rCI^ 


'>r> 


c<|-~ 




M«'"oo<; 1 jy ~^' tOI ^H ^i ^ -- ^i -^ 


J c<'N---iT<;|X7>lW>t\ ^ 


^ 


:sl^ 




! i»»'0 i 1 i 


I 1 


1 




1 1 


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-373- 



APPENDIX G-2 



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-375- 



APPENDIX G-4 



SEX 






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Brighton H. S. 


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•filr*? 




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I^H^^-^ 




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-376- 



/appendix h/ 

AVAILABLE NATIVE LANGUAGE CURRICULAR MATERIALS VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 



LANGUAGE 



A-^) 



A^ 



er 



.^ 



x 



.^ 



PROGRAM 


Y 


N 


Y 


N 


/ 
Y 


nIy 


-0 

N 


Y N 


/ 

Y 


4i 

N 


Y 


NlY 


N' 


Y 


/ 
N 


f 

Y 




f 

Y 


N 


y 

Y 


/ 

N' 


t 


7 

N 


Food Service 




















X 




































Retailing, Marketing and 
Management 
























































Cabinetmakinq 








































X 
















Carpentry 
















X 




X 




































Plumbina 




















X 




















X 














Building Maintenance 
and Repair 
























































Autobody Repair 
Laboratory 
























X 
















X 
















Machine Laboratory 








































X 
















Sheet Metal Laboratory 








































X 
















Welding Laboratory 








































X 
















Advanced Office and 
Management 
























X 
















X 
















Legal Office 
Procedures 








































X 














1 — 


Medical Office Assistant 








































X 














Word Processing 








































K 
















Banking 
























































Child Care 
























































Cosmetology 








































X 
















Fashion/Interior Design 
























































Hotel Hospitality 








































X 
















Data Processing 








































X 
















Health Aide 




















X 




















X 
















Health Laboratory Skills 








































X 
















Medical Office Assistant- 
Clinical 








































X 
















Nursing Assistant 




















X 




















X 
















Electrical Technology 






















X 


















X 
















Electronics Technology 
























































Heating. Air Conditioning, 
Refrigeration 








































X 
















Commercial Design 






X 


































X 
















Fashion Illustration 
























































Machine Drafting 




■ 


X 


































X 






_ 











-311- 



rAfl'ENDIX H (conf 1/ 



LANGUAGE 




PROGRAM 

Photographic Technology 

Printing 

Television Production 

Automotive/Truck Repair 

Marine and Small Engine 
Repair 



-378- 




DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT'S 
MEMORANDUM 




/APPENDIX 1/ 



No. 59 1983-1984 

September 19, 1983 

. ADMINISTRATION OF THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
ADMISSION TEST 

TO: Community Superintendents, Headmasters, Principals and Other 
Administrative Heads 

The Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT) required for entrance into 
Boston Latin Academy, Boston Latin School, and Boston Technical High School will 
be administered on Saturday, November 19, 1983 . 

The registration deadline for the I983 SSAT will be October 5. By this 
date, principals and headmasters will have forwarded to the Educational Testing 
Service (ETS) in Princeton, New Jersey all computer ized cand idate regi strat ions 
then in their possession. Admission Tickets will be distributed to the home 
school during the week of October 31, 1983. 

Appropriate notices, registration materials, and directions for reporting 
grade point averages are being distributed by staff of the Department of 
Implementation to our public schools which serve students in grades 6, 8, and 9, 
and to comparable private and public schools in the metropolitan area. 

It is imperative that potential candidates and their parents be advised 
^ef- the SSAT administration' date "atid' the other dates in this notice. To this 

end, principals and headmasters must direct teachers, guidance personnel and 

other administrators to notify the parents of all students in grades 6, 8, and 9. 

School personnel also should advise parents and students of the importance of^ 

t he ^ra^e~Poim~ Average ;j[t;PiA'}^ij^"^1? ing'^t^^^^ 
tehe examination "school s. ^'^ 



FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT PERSONNEL IN THE 
DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION, MOST PARTICULARLY 
KATHLEEN BOLY SPARKS, EXTERNAL LIAISON UNIT, DEPARTMENT 
OF IMPLEMENTATION, 26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MA. 02108, 
TELEPHONE 726-6555 or 726-6200 EXT. 556A. 



ROBERT S, PETERKIN 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 



-379- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CI 





Robert s. fet 
Superintendent for School 
Operations 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEWENTATl 
EXTERNAL LIAISON UNIT 





Coakley^ ^Senior Officer, 
iepartment of Implementatif 



/APPENDIX 1/ 



TO: 
FROM: 

DATE: 
SUBJECT ; 



Headmasters and Principals of Schools 

Lydia B. Francis 

September 22, 1983 

Materials f or^Candidacy for Boston Latin Academy, Bost^^j 
^atin School, Boston Technical High S.chcjil 



The Secondary School Admissions Test (SSAT), required for entrance in 
19S4-85 into Boston Latin Academy, Boston Latin School, and Boston 
Technical High School, will be administered on Saturday, November 19, 1983. 

Enclosed please find the following materials related to the SSAT 
registration process: 

1. For distribution to all students in grade 6, 8, or 9, 
copies of two documents entitled: 

a ) SSAT Bulletin of Information for Candidates wh i ch 
contains the Registration Forms 

b) Procedures for Candidacy for Admission to Boston Latin 
Academy, Boston Latin School, Boston Technical High 
School which contain the Form For Candidate's Personal 
Data and Report of Grade Point Average ( GPA ) and the 
Examination Schools - Entrance - Fact Sheet . 

2. Schedule of dates for Registration Procedures (attached 
to this memorandum) . 

Please distribute the enclosed information in accordance with the 
attached schedule. If you have questions concerning any of the enclosed 
data, please feel free to contact Kathleen Boly Sparks at 726-6200, 
extensiori: 556'+. 



Thank you for your cooperation. 

elf 

cc Community District Superintendents 

Enclosures 



1 



-380- 

26 COURT STaEET. 20ST0N MASSACHUSETTS C210S • ifii7> 77&-5553 



SCHEDULE OF DATES FOR PROCEDURES 

FOR CANDIDACY FOR ADMISSION TO BOSTON LATIN 

ACADEMY, BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL, BOSTON TECHNICAL 

September 27... on this dace you will receive a supply of: 

1) Procedures for Candidacy for Admission Co Boscon Latin 
Academy, Boston Latin School, Boston Technical High 
School which contain Che Form for Candidace's Pergonal 
Informacion and Reporc of Grade PoinC Average and the 
Examination Schools -Entrance-Fact shee t . 

2) SSAT-B Bulletin of Information for Candidates which 
contains the Registration torms. 

September 23- • .Distribution of items 1 and 2 above to all students in grades 
6,8, and 9 

September 30 .. .Students -must return: 

1) the Registration Form (enclosed in the SSAT-B Bulletin of 
Information for Candidates, 1983-84) 

2) Form for Candidate's Personal Information and Report of Grade 
Point Average (GPA) 

October 5 ...SSAT-B Registration Forms, completed and checked, must be mailed 
by the principal/headmaster to: 

SECONDARY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS TEST 
EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE 

BOX 922 
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08541 

During the ...Each principal/headmaster will receive directly from the 
week of Educational Testing Service a ticket of admission for each 
October 31 properly registered candidate enrolled in his school. The 
principal/headmaster must copy the registration number (on 
the ticket of admission) onto each candidate's Form for 
Candidate's Personal Information and Report of Grade Point 
Average. Section III , item A . The candidate must present 
the admission ticket on the day of the test in order to be 
admitted to his/her assigned test center. The candiate 
should bring some personal identif icacion co Che cesc 
cencer on the day of the test. His/her parent, teacher or 
principal should assist in obtaining the personal identification. 

If problems arise concerning delayed tickets of admission, the 
principal/headmaster, rather than the parent, should telephone 
Princeton Candidate Services, SSAT Program (1-609-921-9000). 
It is possible that some candidates will receive admission 
tickets up until November 18. 

PLEASE DO NOT DISTRIBUTE TICKETS TO CANDIDATES UNTIL THE VEEX OF ^T0VEMBER 14th. 

November 19 ...Secondary School Admission Test will be administered 

November 26 . . . Make-up Administration date should all test cenrers be closed on 
November 19 due to inclement weather or some other eventuality 
which renders chac administration impractical or impossible 

February 10 ...Return to the Department of Implementacion, ATTEN: Kathleen Sparks, 
]_934 the completed, signed, and dated Form for Candidate's Personal 

Information and Report of Grade Point Average (GPA) (See 

Directive for Grade Point Average). 

-381- 



Appcnclix J^ 



Accessibility - P. 


2q\ilred Programs 


& Support S 


ervl 


jes 










School 


Language • 


Regul 


ar N 


~.n-L 


inguage Courses Bilingual 

Guidance 






• m 

iJ u 
in 3 

•«-l 4-1 

ES .-1 

3 

J U 


0) 

u 

c 

•H 

o 

1 
►J 


u 
nj 
T. 


u 

I-I 

<C 

ID 
6C 
« 
3 

c 
« 


u 

-H 
V) 

3 
X. 


4- 

< 


Oh 


X 

o 


Counselor 


Elementary 












L pe 


^ 


w/ 






Condon 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


wk. 


nc 


bil. 
tch. 




N/A 




Cape Verd. 


X 


-X 


X 


X 


It 




ir 




N/A 


Agassiz 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


1 i 
available 


N/A 


JFK 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 




Middle 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 






TafC 


1 day per week 


Edison 


Spanish 
Vietnamese 


X 


X 


X 

X 


X 

X 


liinited 
limited 




1 day per week 


Irving 


Cambodian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


denied access 


no 




Laotian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


denied access 


no 


Roosevelt 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


1 day per week 


McCormack 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


no 


Mackey 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


1 day per week 


High School 
















Brighton 


Spanish 


limi 


ted 


offe 


ring 


s available 






Vietnamese 


limi 


ted 


Dffe 


ring 


s available 




E. Boston 


Italian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 






LEP (immigrant) 


lim: 


ted 


ESL 


serv 


unavailable 


full-time 


S. Boston 


Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


no 




Cambodian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


out-side resource 


Dorchester 


Spanish 


no 


X 


X 


X 


available 


3 days a week 


West Roxbury 


Greek 


X 


X 


no 


X 


available 


no 


Charlestown 


Chinese 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


3 days a week 




Spanish 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


3 days a week 


English 


Haitian 


X 


X 


X 


X 


available 


1 full-time 




Laotian 


X 


X 


no 


X 


i..i. liable 


no 




Spanish 


X 


X 


no 


X 


available 


Ih days per week 










-3 


12- 













Appendix K 



Bilingual Program Clusters 



Eleraenta 


n. 














School 




Language 


No. 


of Students* 


Coi 


Tipliance 


Non-Compliance 


Condon 




Spanish 
Cape Verd. 




96 
112 




X 


X 


JFK 




Spanish 




185 




X 




Agassiz 




Spanish 




271 




X 





Middle 



Edison 



Taft 



Spanish 
Vietnamese 

Spanish 



80 
64 

60 



Irving 


Greek 

Carabod ian 
Laotian 


23 
84 
27 


Curley 


Spanish 


121 


Roosevelt 


Spanish 


57 


McConnack 


Spanish 


70 


Mackey 


Spanish 


95 


High School 




o 


Brighton 


Spanish 
Vietnamese 


110 
130 


So. Boston 


Spanish 
Cambodian 


76 

107 


East Boston 


Italian 


129 


Dorchester 


Spanish 


81 


Charles tovm 


Spanish 
Chinese 


78 
219 


West Roxbury 


Greek 


40 


English 


Spanish 

French Haitian 
Laotian 


59 

224 

37 



X 
X 



X 
X 

X 

X 



X 

X 



X 

X 
X 



X 

X 

X 



X 
X 

X 

X. 



-383- 



* Student number count verified on-site. 



VOCATIONAL /OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 
MIDDLE SCHOOLS LEVEL 
"" NUMBERS OF LEP STUDENTS 



/APPENDIX L/ 



SCHOOLS MONITORED LANG. NUMBER OF LEP STU 










PROGRAM 


AREAS 










SCHOOLS MONITORED 


LANGUAGES NUMBERS 
OF LEP STUDENTS 




WWAf/ 

1^ / — / — y — ^ — •< 


'/ 

/ 


/ / 

// 


// 


Mc Cormack 

68 LEP * 


Spanish 62 
Cape Verdean 5 
Vietnamese 1 

i 

! 
i 


33 




35 




i 
i 
; 

\ 

t 

■ 

1 

) 


















Irving 

101 LEP* 


\ Greeks 17 

i Laotian 23 

Spanish 4 

■Cambodian r: 57 


26 


60 


i 

; ■ ■ ■ i 

i 
! i 

i 

] 












" 




Roosevelt 

49 LEP * 


i 

! 

i Spanish 48 
1 Chinese 1 


20 


26 


3 


' 


















Curley 

125 LEP * 


Spanish 119 
Chinese 2 
Cape Verdean 1 
Greek 2 
Laotian i 




68 


1 


I 
1 


20 


37 






— 








Edison 

151 LEP* 

* Lau Category A & B 


Spanish 70 
Vietnamese 81 




28 

■ 

-38. 


7 
- 


i 
' 31 

1 


85 


i 

i 

I 

1 


1 

; 

I 

j 
t 
1 

! 

i 


i 


i 









VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 
HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL 
NUMBERS OF LEP STUDENTS 



/APPENDIX L / 















PROGRAM 


AREAS 










>CHOOLS MONITORED 


LANGUAGES /NUMBER OF 
LEP STUDENTS 


HOME / ,<?^^ / 
1 ECONOMICS /'"S^ tS^ / 
i / / 




E. Boston High 


1 


1 
i 
1 


7 














71 








95 LEP* 


Italian 71 
Portuguese 3 


! 


















, 








1 Cambodian 8 
















1 










■ Vietnamese 7 
























1 Cape Verdea 1 














i 








j Spanish 5 
















i 


! 






S. Boston High 






A3 


J 
i 


24 






25 1 


15 




92 LEP* 


;■ Cambodians 30 
I Spanish 52 
; Cape VerdeanslO 

i 
! 

i 






t 








1 

i 

i i 

i ! 

I '■ 

i 






Brighton High 






6 


' 


2 




21 


|122| 


7 




158 LEP* 


i Spanish 58 














1 








' Vietnamese 100 








1 
1 

1 








s 

i 
I 






English High 






99 






29 








25 


1 




152 LEP* 


Haitian 72 
Laotian 20 




























Spanish 51 


























Chinese 1 






i 


















Vietnamese 5 




\ 1 


1 






) 






Cape Verdean 3 


1 
1 i 






i 




i 


i 

! 


* LAU CATEGORY A & B 




I 


] 


1 


i 

i 

i 

I 


t 
1 

i 


i 

i 
• 

i 
. 














-3£ 


5- 


i 




I 
1 


\ 

■ 


i 
'( 

i 
i 











LEP STUDENTS ENROLLED IN VARIOUS 


VOCAT lONAL / CCUP AT lONAL 


EDUCATION' 


/APPENDIX M/ 
PROGRAMS HHORC 




LANGUAGE 
PROGRAM 


Y N 


^;fx 

Y nIy N Y N 


1 

X 

Y N 


Y N 


% 

fv N' 


V 

Y N' 


4/ 

/ ^ 

Y N 


1 Y H^ 


4 

Y N 


Y n1 


if, 

U N 


Food Service 1 


1 


























1 










10 


















Retailing, Marketing and ' 
Manaqement 1 






































1 


















Cabinetmakinq j 






































3 


















Carpentry 1 


2 


























1 










4 


















Plumbinq i 


1 








3 




1 
























1 


















Building Maintenance " 
and Repair ! 






































7 


















Autobody Repair ' 
Laboratory i 










2 




















3 








ll 


















Machine Laboratory j 


2 








1 


















1 










1 


















Sheet Metal Laboratory ' 






















1 
















i; 


















Welding Laboratory | 










1 




1 








1 
















3 




! 














Advanced Office and ' 
Management j 


2 




















2 
















'< 




! 














Legal Office 1 
Procedures - ! 


2 




































i 


















Medical Office Assistant j 




























1 










4 


















Word Processing ' 


3 




































5 


















Banking 1 


2 




















1 
















1 




j 














Child Care 1 


2 




































8 




! 














Cosmetology I 


5 








2 




1 
























7 




i 














Fashion/Interior Design j 


2 




































4 


















Hotel Hospitality I 


1 








1 




























3 




1 














Data Processing j 


3 












1 














1 










■0, 


















Health Aide I 


2 






















































Health Laboratory Skills '< 










1 




























4 


















Medical Office Assistant- ' 
Clinical ' 


4 








3 




1 








1 
















LO 


















Nursing Assistant | 










1 




2 




1 




1 
















5 


















Electrical Technoloqy [ 


7 








1 




1 














1 










7 


















Electronics Technology ' 


5 










5 




J. 






1 






2 










L6 


















Heating. Air Conditioning, j 
Refrigeration 1 


1 




































1, 


















Commercial Design I 


1 




















2 
















2 


















Fashion Illustration 1 
























































Machine Draftinq ! 


r 




















4 
















3 ; 



















-386- 



LANGUAGE 



PROGRAM 

Photographic Techno! dgy_ 
Printing 



Television Production 

Automotive/Truck Repair_ 

Marine and Small Engine 
Repa i r 



SNAP 
Exploratory 

ACTUAL ENROLLMENT TOTALS: 

ACTUAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS 
ELIGIBLE FOR ENROLLMENT: 



/APPENDIX M /(cont') o 



Y N 




3 



Y r; Y fiY N 



Y N ! Y N 



Y N 



Y NjY N 



Y N'Y N 



U 



Y NirN 



23 2 



2 2 



8 

78 



78 



2 22 10 



15 15 



130 9 222 37 20 105 180 77 



25« 



364 



-387- 



/APPENDIX N/ 



LENGTH OF TIME IN BILINGUAL PROGRAMS^ 



SCHOOL YEAR 1982-83 



SCHOOL YEAR 1981-82 





Total Students 


Total Students 


Time 








Frequency 


Percentage 


Frequency 


Percentage 


to .9 


2,787 


39 






1.0 


1,416 


19 


5520 


42 


2.0 


1,314 


18 


2386 


18 


3.0 


679 


9 


1208 


9 


4.0 


450 


6 


2426 


18 


5.0 


318 


4 


1028 


8 


5 and up 


418 


5 


612 


5 



* Data taken from Boston Public Schools Computer Print Out of 10/18/83 



:gs 



-388- 



/APPENDIX 0/ 



BILINGUAL GRADUATING SENIORS 
1982 - 83 SY 



School 


Lanouaoe 


Sex 

M F 


T 

Grad. 


Hiciher 
Ed. 


Awards 


Other 










•Brighton 


Spanish 


11 


10 


21 - 


15 


12 


06 




Vietnamese 


53 


09 


62 


54 


10 


08 


Jamaica Plain 


Spanish 


09 


12 


21 


14 


01 


07 


West Roxbury 


Greek 


08 


09 


17 


10 


04 


07 


Dorchester 


Spanish 


03 


05 


08 


05 


04 


. 03 


South Boston 


Spanish 


02 


08 


10 


08 


05 


02 


Charlestov:n 


Chinese 


47 


24 


71 


57 


81 


14 




Spanish 


CI 


0? 


04 


03 


02 


01 


East Boston 


Iraiian 


08 


11 


19 


17 


'19 


02 


English High 


Fr ./Haitian 


41 


32 


73 


60 


13 


13 




Spanish 


08 


12 


20 


14 


C7 


06 




Laotian 


04 


01 


05 


03 


03 


02 


Madison Park 


Spanish 


03 


03 


06 


02 


02 


04 




Cape Verdean 
Totals 


21 


14 


35 


25 


05 


10 




219 


153 


372 


287 


168 


S5 



77% have indicated their intent to go on to higher education, 
No Cambodian students graduated this year; however many will 
be eligible next year. The relative newness of this prograiri 
and the limited English language skills of the students are 
two reasons for this outcome. Over 45% of the graduating 
seniors received scholarships or awards of some Jiind. Of 
the 23% who v.-ill not be going on to higher education, many 
students have already found emplo\'ment through the efforts 
of the Boston Compact's "private industry council." 



-389- 



(D ro -^ 



O 

X 



I ::; 



< 

a: 



<0 11 '^ 



> 



> 



jj a) 

o j: 



3 j= e 

) -M C 

I C tJ 

I n 01 

ra *J o D. -H 

<~i O C^ 10 > 

J I I I I 

J o a, ^1 > 



in iA u> -^ rg tf\ 






O <X iM r\i pg 



fsj ry fsj rvi 1 fNj 






I m — rg 

? ! 

o 

z 

-J U O IL 






o •- a£ -J O a. i/» 



QJ O O Jii -H 

C Xt C OJ -H OJ 

■H E QJ 0* ra a. 

j= n u V 4-) ffl 

O U U. O M u 

I 1 I I I I 

O Q U* U> M UJ 



Vocational and Occupational Education 



MONITORING REPORT 
UNIFIED PLAN FOR VOCATIONAL AJID OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 
BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



I. Compliance with Relevant Court Orders, State Laws and Regulations 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The major monitoring objective has been to determine if all 
vocational/occupational education programs conform to racial 
ratios established by the Court and if all programs comply 
with admissions criteria specified by the Unified Plan includ- 
ing proportional representation by sex. 

How does Boston justify disproportional enrollments 
by race and sex in certain skills training programs? 
What is being done to remedy this situation? 

B. Methodology 

Based on an analysis of enrollment data by race and by sex, 
the Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity identified 62 voca- 
tional programs at 27 schools as showing disproportionality (see 
Appendix I-l and the assignment section of the report). The 
March 1983 data base did not include enrollments at the HHORC. 
A sampling of the 27 schools (8 high schools and 8 middle schools) 
was selected for on-site monitoring by regional staff (see Appendix 
1-2, Charts a and b) . A data-gathering instrument was designed to 
facilitate the monitoring process by gathering information from 
school staff on student assignment and transfer procedures. 
Questions dealt with the current year's enrollment procedures, 
processes and policies. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

Previous Reporting Period: 

full compliance partial compliance X n on-compliance 

Current Reporting Period: 

full compliance X partial compliance non-compliance 

1. High Schools 

Assignments and transfers in and out of programs are, for 
the most part, implemented and authorized by guidance 
counselors without regard for adherence to racial ratios 
established by the Court. In rare cases, assignments and 
transfers at high schools must be approved first by the 

-391- 



headmasters. South Boston High School student assignments 
and transfers are approved by the headmaster. Dorchester 
and Jamaica Plain High Schools schedule changes are approved 
by guidance counselors before October 1 and by the head- 
master thereafter. Magnet programs are an exception to this 
policy and any changes for students in these programs are 
done by the Department of Implementation. Students must 
complete a Request for Transfer/Change form which must be 
submitted to the Department of Implementation for approval. 
These forms allow students to identify themselves by race 
and by sex. The survey sample included two magnet programs. 
Agribusiness at West Roxbury High School and Machine Coopera- 
tive at Hyde Park High School. While the current enrollment 
status of the Agribusiness program indicates overall compliance 
for Fiscal Year 1983-1984, some units within this program 
are significantly disproportionate as evidenced by underenroll- 
ment of Black students in Landscaping and Gardening. 

2. Middle Schools 

Vocational/occupational education programs at middle schools 
are part of the core curricula and all students participate 
in these programs. However, student assignments to these 
programs are a matter of random selection, alphabetical 
selection or lottery (see Appendix 1-2, chart b) . With the 
exception of two schools in the middle school sample — Timilty 
and Cleveland — assignments are made by guidance staff but 
approved and authorized by principals. Assignments at the 
Timilty are authorized by the guidance counselors and at 
the Cleveland by the registrar. 

Though all staff, including principals and headmasters, at 
the middle and high schools are aware that programs should 
be racially balanced, it is not a consideration when schedules/ 
assignments are made. Disproportionate assignments to schools 
is another factor that may contribute to disproportionate 
enrollments in programs. Future monitoring reports will 
investigate possible correlations. 

D. Recommendations /Commendations 

For other than magnet programs, headmasters and principals must 
insure strict adherence to ratios by race and proportional 
representation by sex in the assignment of students to programs 
and that guidance and other responsible staff place the highest 
emphasis on this requirement. Boston Public Schools must submit 
a plan that addresses the resolution of disproportionate enroll- 
ments in cited schools and programs. The plan should include 
policies, procedures and outreach, recruitment efforts to ensure 
that assignments to vocational/occupational programs conform to 
court-approved racial ratios and proportional representation by 
sex. 



-392- 



E. Documentation 



Appendix I-l - Enrollment Compliance Index Listing 

Appendix 1-2, Charts a and b - summary of on-site visits to 
schools with disproportionate program enrollments 



-393- 



II. Core Programs 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The monitoring objective is to determine whether middle school 
career and exploratory programs as well as high school exploratory 
and employability programs are in place as specified in the Unified 
Plan. 

Which programs are currently operational and non-operational? 
What steps has Boston taken to comply with provisions? 

B. Methodology 

Boston was requested to submit a plan delineating timelines for 
implementing district core programs specified by the Unified Plan. 
On site monitoring instruments were used to gather information 
regarding the current status of fourteen middle and ten high school 
core programs (see Appendix II-l for site visit program summaries) . 
Additional data were collected from the Occupational Resource 
Center sending school printout. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

1. Middle School Exploratory 

The last report to the court indicated that most of Boston's 
schools had identified part-time in-school staff (guidance advisor 
or teacher) to bear career education responsibilities. The 
Cleveland Middle School did have a full-time career education 
coordinator as specified by the Unified Plan. However, this 
position has been eliminated this school year. In most schools 
career education has been provided through selective classroom 
and school activities such as career fairs and guest speakers 
through Project Business and School Volunteers. A few schools 
offer career education classes. 

Boston is now in the final stage of developing a citjrwide career 
education plan," and recently completed new curriculum guides for 
all grade levels which also include some career education 
objectives for the middle schools. In the interim, the major 
activities of career education in Boston continue to include 
those activities described above. The Thompson, Curley and 
Cheverus Middle Schools have active career education classes 
and/or career education centers. In most instances school 
funds have not been allocated for related activities such as 
field trips to job sites and high school vocational programs. 

-394- 



On November 10, 1983 the Division of Occupational Education 
and Boston Public School Career Guidance staffs jointly conducted 
a workshop for Boston's middle school guidance advisors. The 
presentation focused on state and local career education resources 
including Project BICEP (Barnstable Instructional Career Education 
Program), a full developed project for career education curriculum 
infusion in all major subject areas as well as home economics and 
industrial arts. It is anticipated that Boston will supplement 
its career education plan with this model project citywide. 

Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

The last report to the Court indicated that the primary area of 
non-compliance in exploratory cluster offerings was in the 
Business Cluster . All fourteen middle schools visited were in 
non-compliance with the exception of Wheatley, Timilty, and Taft. 
The business program at Thomas Edison reopened this school year 
and a typing class is now in operation. Computer education 
appears to be the current business education focus in Boston. 
All schools visited offer the Food-Home-Health S erv i ces Cluster , 
including the Cheverus which was in non-compliance last reporting 
period. They have experienced a reduction in staff in this 
cluster. The Industry Related Cluster was in operation at the 
Cheverus. The Cheverus, McKay and Jackson Mann schools were in 
non-compliance in this area during the last reporting period. 

The scheduling process or rotation of students in clusters continues 
to vary in most districts. Some schools offer one Industry-Related 
shop and one Food-Home-Health Services Related class per school 
year. Others offer two Industry-Related shops and two Food-Home- 
Health Services Related classes per school year but for less 
periods per week than those that offer one shop/class per semester. 
In most cases. Computer Education was also scheduled as an 
exploratory offering. It was the general preference of shop 
teachers to have double periods in lieu of single periods in 
order to allow adequate teaching and student work time. Only 
a few of the middle school exploratory classes are scheduled 
with double period shop classes. It need also be noted that 
some of the shop teachers particularly in the Graphic Arts 
area indicated that they are still awaiting necessary supplies 
ordered last year or prior to, which have not yet arrived. 
Most exploratory classes include some degree of career awareness 
related to the particular subject area. 

High School Exploratory 

During the last reporting period, only five high schools offered all 
three required cluster areas: 1) Industry Related , 2) Food-Home- 
Services Health Related, and 3) Business-Distribution-Government 
Related. Those schools were Jamaica Plain High, West Roxbury High, 
South Boston High, Charlestown High and Madison Park High. During 
this reporting period, eight high schools visited were in compliance 
in the three exploratory clusters. Dorchester High continues 
not to offer the Industry Related Cluster, and East Boston High 
no longer offers the Food-Home Health Services Related Cluster. 
The following schools were in non-compliance last reporting period 
but are in full compliance this reporting period: Brighton High, 
Hyde Park High, J.E. Burke and English High (see Appendix II-2 
for individual school detail) . 

-395- 



4. High School Employabillty 

It was mentioned in the last report that none of the high schools 
offered the Food-Home-Health-Related Cluster as an employabillty 
skill area. It has been verified through site visits conducted 
during this reporting period that the following schools offer 
this cluster: Brighton High, Dorchester, South Boston High, 
English High and Madison Park High. East Boston High does not 
offer the Food-Home-Health Services Related Cluster nor do they 
have students attending the Occupational Resource Center for this 
program area. All of the ten high schools visited continue to 
offer the Business-Office Education classes. However, some high 
schools and particularly Madison Park High, demonstrated a need 
for more trained personnel and teaching time to use effectively 
the typing, word processing and micro computer labs. The four 
schools cited in the last report as not offering the Distributive- 
Marketing Cluster were West Roxbury, Hyde Park, South Boston and 
East Boston. These programs continue to be non-operational. In 
addition, two other Distributive Education Programs closed - 
Jamaica Plain High and English High. The only two high schools 
visited whose core programs (exploratory and employabillty) were 
in full compliance were Brighton High and Madison Park High. 

Recommendations /Commendations 

1. Middle School Career Exploratory 

Boston has made considerable efforts in reviewing the status and 
needs for career education systemwide. At this time, curriculum 
infusion is the primary vehicle by which career awareness, assess- 
ment and development are implemented. A school system as large 
and as diverse as Boston needs central, district and school 
coordination. Full-time central staff and part-time school 
staff exist for the middle schools and high schools. District 
level coordination input and follow up, however, are not in 
place. Such district coordination would increase the degree of 
career education in all district schools and provide a better 
transitional process for middle school students as they enter 
high school. 

2. Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

If in fact Boston's focus for the Business Cluster will be on 
computer education, then the necessary modifications or amendments 
to the Unified Plan must be made. In addition, computer education 
should not be implemented at the expense of the implementation 
of the Food-Home Health Services Related Cluster or Industry 
Related Cluser. 

3. High School Exploratory Clusters 

It should be noted that Boston has reopened five exploratory programs 
which were previously closed. Although some schools may not offer 
a particular exploratory cluster, except for East Boston High, these 
schools have students attending exploratory clusters at the Humphrey 
Occupational Resource Center (see Appendix II-2 for school detail) . 

-396- 



4. High School Employablllty Clusters 

The Distributive-Marketing Clusters which have been closed 
should be reopened. More in-school incentives and awards 
should be provided for all vocational occupational education 
students. 

Documentation 

Appendix II-l - Middle School Career Education/Exploratory Site 

Visit Program Summaries 
Appendix II-2 - High School Exploratory/Employability and Boston 

Compact Chart 

School brochures and materials (on file) 



■397- 



III. Magnet Programs 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

A major objective is to determine whether all required magnet 
satellite programs are in place as specified in the Unified 
Plan. 

Why are certain magnet programs not being offered as 
specified by the Court-ordered Unified Plan? What is 
being done to implement these programs? 



B. Methodology 

Boston was requested to submit a plan delineating timelines for 
implementing district magnet programs specified by the Unified 
Plan. On site monitoring instruments were used to gather in- 
formation regarding the current status of all middle and high 
school core programs. Additional data were collected from the 
Occupational Resource Center sending school printout. 



C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 



•Previous Reporting Period: 

full compliance X partial compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 

full compliance X p artial compliance 



non-compliance 



non-compliance 



Current enrollments in the satellite programs still show non- 
compliance in terms of total enrollment and no magnet program 
exists in District II- Jamaica Plain High. The cooperative 
programs in District VI- South Boston High and District VII- 
Charlestown High were closed and transferred as indicated in 
the last report. Enrollments in the operational magnet pro- 
grams are as follows : 











Enrollment 


Enrollment 


District 


High School 


Program 




July 


1983 


February 1984 


I 


Brighton High 


Automotive 




223 




222 


III 


W. Roxbury High 


Agribusiness 




■ 117 




120 


IV 


Hyde Park High 


Machine Shop 




93 




83 


V 


Dorchester High 


Architectural/Wood 












and Upholstery 


84 




64 


VIII 


E. Boston High 


Machine Shop 


TOTALS 


132 
649 




62* 
551 



*A substantial decrease has taken place in the Machine Shop Program at East 
Boston High. 

-398- 



I 



The current enrollment at the Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center is 2,796. This year's enrollment shows an increase of 
207 over last year's enrollment of 2,589. 

Commendations/ Recommendations 

Boston should increase its magnet programs to include federal 
clusters in the districts not represented. Strong efforts must 
be made to increase enrollments in existing cooperative programs. 



-399- 



IV. In-School Bilingual 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The major monitoring objective was to assess the provisions for 
supportive services, including administrative, counseling and 
instructional support services, to limited English proficient 
students enrolled in vocational/occupational education programs 
in Boston Public Schools. 

Are adequate and sufficient supportive services being 
provided to limited English proficient students enrolled 
in those programs? 

B. Methodology 

The monitoring method consisted of analysis of data submitted by 
Boston Public Schools. In addition, on-site visits to four high 
schools, five middle schools, and the Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center were conducted jointly with staff of the Bureau of Transitional 
Bilingual Education. Interviews were conducted with the Coordinator 
of Bilingual Vocational Occupational Education, vocational/occupational 
instructors (bilingual and monolingual) , bilingual education coordina- 
tors, bilingual liaisons, bilingual guidance counselor and building 
administrators. Classroom observations were also conducted. (see 
Appendix IV-1 for instrument summary chart). 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period : 
full compliance X partial compliance ^non-compliance 

Based on data submitted by Boston Public Schools , the previous 
report to the courts determined that bilingual vocational/occupational 
programs were not offered by Boston Public Schools as specified by 
the Unified Plan. The report also indicated that though separate and 
distinct native language bilingual vocational/occupational programs 
were not offered, it was evident that Boston Public Schools had made 
efforts to provide vocational/occupational training to limited English 
proficient students by mainstreaming them into regular vocational/ 
occupational programs and providing necessary support services. During 
this second period of monitoring, on-site visits provided the opportunity 
for a more indepth evaluation of the implementation of bilingual vocation- 
al education services in the Boston Public Schools. 

-400- 



Boston Public Schools' Bilingual Vocational Education Policy Manual 
provided the framework assessing the approach and strategies that 
are used for providing services to limited English proficient students. 
Developed in February of 1983, this document is intended to outline 
specific guidelines and procedures for providing bilingual support 
services to limited English proficient students enrolled in vocational 
programs and all staff of vocational/occupational and career programs 
throughout the city of Boston. These include strategies and procedures 
for Vocational English-as-a-Second Language instructor, student assess- 
ment, referral and placement, delivery of bilingual vocational instruc- 
tion, curriculum adaptation, and counseling support services. Although 
this policy has been developed as a working guide for vocational and 
occupational education staff throughout the system, it was generally 
found that the document has not been widely disseminated. 

Based on data analysis and on-site visits to selected schools, the 
following major findings emerged: 

1. Bilingual Staffing for Vocational/Occupational Programs 

Occupational/vocational instruction in the five middle schools 
and five high schools visited is conducted monolingually in 
English. In some cases instructors use bilingual students to 
translate language concepts for limited English proficient 
students. 

In more than ninety percent of classes monitored, bilingual 
aides are not available within the vocational/occupational 
education classes. An aide is perhaps one of the most critical 
needs of the vocational/occupational instructor in working with 
limited English proficient students. 

In eight of the ten targeted schools, bilingual guidance 
counselors are available to serve the limited English pro- 
ficient student. The time spent by the couselors in each 
school varies from one to two days each week. It should be 
noted that this percentage specifies the number of bilingual 
counselors available to serve the limited English proficient 
students. For example, a counselor might be bilingual in 
Spanish and is assigned to a school with Laotian, Cambodian 
and Spanish limited English proficient students. Consequently 
although the counselor is bilingual, he/she cannot orally 
communicate with some of the limited English proficient students. 

In eight of the targeted schools and the Humphrey Occupational 
Resource Center, community field coordinators are available 
to serve the limited English proficient students, parents or 
teacher one day per week. 



-401- 



The availability of bilingual instructional staff at the 
Humphrey Occupational Resource Center constitutes a dif- 
ferent staffing pattern. A number of bilingual vocational 
teachers provide instruction in programs and clusters 
throughout the Center. (see Appendix IV-2 for bilingual 
teacher staffing chart). Those instructors provide English 
for instruction to all students and when necessary provide 
native language instruction and translation for limited 
English proficient students. 

A total of four bilingual aides is available for 416 limited 
English proficient students enrolled in various vocational 
programs throughout the Center. This represents two less 
aides than the previous year. (see Appendix IV-3 for bi- 
lingual aide staffing chart). As the chart indicates, aides 
are not available for two significant language populations- 
Cambodian and Cape Verdean. 

Two instructors provide Vocational English as a Second 
Language instruction at the Hiimphrey Center. 

Although one period per week of Vocational English as a 
Second Language at sending high schools has been proposed as 
a supplement to the LAU Plan, this concept has not been 
adopted nor implemented. 

Only one bilingual counselor (Spanish speaking) , who is 
assigned to the Data Processing and Business Clusters, is 
available at the Center. 

Limited English Proficient Students Recruitment and Referral 
Procedures 

Recruitment of limited English proficient students is conducted 
in some native languages , especially at the Humphrey Occupa- 
tional Resource Center and high school level. Communiques in 
native languages are sent to parents of limited English pro- 
ficient students specifying the availability of occupational/ 
vocational programs in Boston Public Schools. Occasionally, 
information regarding the Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center has been disseminated in Spanish by way of television 
programs, and through church and community bulletins and 
newsletters. As a result of these outreach efforts, the number 
of limited English proficient students enrolled in vocational/ 
occupational programs has increased from 2,695 during the 
previous year to the current enrollment of 2,919. 



-402- 



A Student Needs Survey is disseminated to all vocational/ 
occupational instructors to indicate their needs for work- 
ing with limited English proficient students. The Coordin- 
ator of Bilingual Vocational Education in turn attempts to 
assist the instructor to obtain appropriate resources to 
meet the expressed need. 

3. Availability of Native Language Curricular Materials 

Although curricular materials have been adopted or are 
available in some native languages (see appendix IV-4), 
materials are either not used by the monolingual vocational/ 
occupational instructors, are not available for language 
materials is in Spanish with limited materials available in 
Cambodian, Laotian, Vietnamese and Portuguese. These materials 
are available at the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center for 
distribution systemwide. 

The implementation of services to limited English proficient 
students described above is overseen by the coordinator of 
Bilingual Vocational Education. The coordinator, with the 
assistance of a planning committee, developed the Bilingual 
Vocational Education Policy referenced earlier as a guide to 
the implementation of services to limited English proficient 
students enrolled in vocational/occupational education programs 
throughout the system. 

In general, it is evident that in spite of the lack of native 
languages instructional vocational/occupational programs, 
Boston Public Schools continues to make provisions to provide 
nearly three thousand middle and high school limited English 
proficient students access to vocational/occupational education 
programs (see Appendix IV-5 for the number of limited English 
proficient students enrolled in vocational/occupational programs 
citywide) . 

D . Recommendations /Commendations 



Although the approach is not consistent with the Unified Plan, the 
development of a Bilingual Vocational Education Policy constitutes 
a positive step toward structuring a comprehensive system for de- 
livering vocational education services to limited English proficient 
students . 



-403- 



It is evident that the Bilingual Vocational Education Policy has 
received limited dissemination. An essential step in the adoption 
and implementation of this policy requires that it becomes widely 
disseminated and fully integrated into the vocational education system. 

Immediate action must be taken to appoint native language aides to 
serve the Cape Verdean and Cambodian limited English proficient stu- 
dents at the Humphrey Center. In addition, steps must be taken to 
provide the assistance of aides to other vocational and occupational 
programs throughout the year. 

The designation of one period per week of Vocational English as a 
Second Language at the sending high schools and middle schools has 
been proposed for inclusion in the LAU Plan. Appropriate action 
should be taken to adopt and implement this provision. This would 
strengthen the coordination between the English as a Second Language 
and vocational/occupational instructors and provide language devel- 
opment skills to limited English proficient students enrolled in such 
a program. 

Doctjmentation 

Appendix IV-1 - On-site Monitoring Questionnaire Summary 

Appendix IV-2 - Hubert H. Humphrey Occupational Resource Center Bilingual 

Vocational Instructor Roster 
Appendix IV-3 - Hubert H. Humphrey Occupational Resource Center Bilingual 

Aides Roster 
Appendix IV-4 - Native Language Vocational/Occupational Curricular Materials 
Appendix IV-5 - Limited English proficient student enrollment in occupational 

vocational educations programs citjrwide. 
Draft LAU plan - Objective 5.5 (on file) 
Native Language Recruitment Materials (on file) 
Request for Bilingual Services Form (on file) 



-404- 



V. Out-o£-School Youth, Ages 16-21 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The goal of the monitoring activities was to assess the 
provisions for services for out-of-school youth, ages 16-21. 

What is the nature and scope of services being provided 
by the responsible agency? Are these services being 
coordinated with the Boston Public Schools? 

B. Methodology 

The method of achieving this objective involved a review 
of the new legislation (Job Training Partnership Act) and 
its provisions for services for out-of-school youth, ages 
16-21. The service plan for out-of-school youth which was 
recently developed by the agency having primary responsi- 
bility for providing these services was also reviewed. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
X full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: Not Applicable 
_full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 

In view of the transition from the former Comprehensive 
Employment and Training Act to the newly enacted Job Train- 
ing Partnership Act, provisions for services to out-of-school 
youth are in the development states. The agency responsible 
for providing these services, the Neighborhood Development 
and Employment Agency, has recently prepared a Job Training 
Plan which contains a description of services to be provided 
to out-of-school youth, ages 16-21. The implementation of 
this proposed service plan will be monitored and findings 
reported in the next report to the court. 

D. Recommendations / Commendations 
Not Applicable. 

E. Documentaion 

Public Law 97-300, Job Training Partnership Act (on file) 

Job Training Plan, Neighborhood Development and Employment 
Agency, October 1, 1983 through June 30, 1984 (on file) 

-405- 



VI. Vocational/Occupational Education for Special Needs Students 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objectives were to determine if vocational 
and occupational program services for special needs students are 
maintained and to assess vocational and occupational instructor 
training in understanding and working with special needs students. 

Does Boston continue to provide vocational education program 
services to this target populations? What action has been 
taken to provide vocational and occupational education instruc- 
tor training in understanding and working with special needs 
students? 

B. Methodology 

The methodology for monitoring this objective included a desk 
review of the vocational and occupational program offerings and 
Boston Public Schools' October 3, 1983 written response to the 
Unified Plan monitoring instrument. 

C. Findings 

oPrevious Reporting Period : 

full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 



oCurrent Reporting Period: 

Full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 



The findings of the July, 1983 report to the U.S. District Court 
determined that the Boston Public Schools has made significant 
achievements in instituting procedures and provisions for the 
comprehensive delivery of vocational and occupational services 
to special needs students , in effect exceeding the requirements 
set forth in the Unified Plan. A review of current program 
services indicated that the Boston Public School System con- 
tinues to provide this comprehensive range of vocational and 
occupational education program services. The previous report 
stresses the necessity of strengthening staff development train- 
ing in understanding and working with special needs students for 
all vocational and occupational instructors throughout the system. 
Boston Public Schools ' response to this concern indicated that 
such a plan has not been developed for implementation pending 
contract negotiations with the Boston Teachers' Union. In the 
absence of a proposed plan, it cannot be determined how Boston 
intends to address this concern. 

D. Recommenda t ions / Commenda t ions 

A comprehensive proposed training plan should be developed to 
assist all vocational and occupational instructors systemwide 
in understanding and working with special needs students. 

-406- 



The Boston Public School System is to be commended for developing 
and implementing a number of laudable vocational education programs 
for special needs students. Some of the most notable programs in- 
clude the Needs Special Assessment Program at the Humphrey Occupa- 
tional Resource Center, a variety of vocational programs at the 
Jackson Mann and McKinley Schools and the Occupational Services 
Development Centers at Charlestown, Dorchester and Hyde Park High 
Schools. 

E. Documentation 

Profile of vocational and occupational program services (on file). 

Boston Public Schools' October 3, 1983 response to the Unified 
Plan Monitoring Instrument, page 3, Section Ilia (on file). 



-407- 



VII. Program Changes and Deletions 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to ascertain what action 
is being taken by Boston Public Schools to complete all pro- 
gram transfers as specified by the Unified Plan. 

If such transfers are not desirable, what motions 
have been filed with the courts to modify the ex- 
isting order? 



B. Methodology 

The methodology used to achieve this objective Involved a 
review of Boston Public School's October 3, 1983 written 
response to the Unified Plan monitoring instrument. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance x p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance x partial compliance non-compliance 

The previous monitoring report indicated that all program 
deletions and transfers have been completed as specified 
by the Unified Plan with the exception of transferring to 
the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center the Machinist pro- 
gram at East Boston High and the Upholstery and Cabinet Making 
programs at Dorchester High. To date, these transfers have not 
been completed. Boston has indicated an intention to close these 
programs rather than transfer them to the Humphrey Center. Such 
action, however, would not comply with the requirements of the 
existing provisions of the Unified Plan. 

D. Recommendations /Commendations 

If the designated transfers are not desirable, a motion must be 
filed with the court to modify the existing order. 

E. Documentation 



Boston Public Schools' October 3, 1983 written response to 
Unified Plan monitoring instrument, page 4, section IV (on file). 



-408- 



VIIl-1. Program Support Conrponents-Management Modifications 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to determine if Boston 
Public Schools has implemented a distinctive management 
structure for vocational and occupational education as 
specified in the Unified Plan. 

What action has been taken by Boston Public 
Schools to institute and implement this action. 

B. Methodology 

Boston Public Schools was requested to submit a plan of action 
including specific timelines for instituting and implementing 
the management structure for vocational and occupational educa- 
tion in the Boston Public Schools as specified in the Unified 
Plan. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance partial compliance n on-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 

The previous report to the court indicated that Boston Public 
Schools was not in compliance with the court order for not in- 
stituting a distinctive management structure which accounts 
for an effective vocational and occupational education deliv- 
ery system as specified in the Unified Plan. To date, no 
plan for the implementation of the management structure has 
been submitted. In addition, the following required areas 
are not managed systematically within the existing structure: 
(1) fiscal control for all units and programs ; assist in im- 
proving systems management, district-by-district, to insure 
fiscal responsibility; (2) evaluation of outreach efforts 
involving in-system staff, student, parents and business/ 
industry and; (3) annual systemwide program activity and 
accountability report. Boston has indicated that with the 
possible adaptation of a long-range plan for the school 
system in the near future, a redefined management structure 
may emerge. 

D. Recommendations/ Commendations 

If the organizational and management structure as specified 
in the Unified Plan is not programmatically and financially 
desirable, Boston Public Schools must file a motion with the 
court to modify the existing order. 

E. Documentation 

Appendix VIII-1 - Organizational Chart for Education and 
Employment. 

Boston Public Schools' written response, dated October 3, 
1983 to the Unified Plan monitoring instrument (on file). 

-409- 



VIII-2 Program Support Components 
Public Information 



Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to examine steps taken 
by Boston Public Schools to institute and implement a sys- 
tematic, aggressive and pervasive public information system 
for vocational/occupational education. 

What action has been taken to appoint a full-time 
experienced public information officer to implement 
this system? 



B. Methodology 

The monitoring activity was conducted by reviewing the imp- 
lementation of Boston's Public Information Key Results Action 
Plan and Boston's response to the Unified Plan monitoring 
instrument. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance ^non-compliance 

The previous report to the court pointed out that the public 
information segment of the Unified Plan was not being fully 
implemented. The report further stressed the necessity to 
appoint a full-time experienced public information officer 
to coordinate an aggressive and persuasive campaign. This 
recommendation has not been acted upon. 

It is acknowledged that Boston has undertaken a variety of 
activities to implement marketing and information strategies, 
although those efforts have not encompassed the scope, impact 
and thrust of the public information system described in the 
Unified Plan. 

D. Recommendation/ Commendations 

If the Boston Public Schools has initiated some other viable 
means of implementing and achieving the goals of this segment 
of the Unified Plan, a motion must be filed with the court 
to modify the existing order. 

E. Do cumen t at i on 

Boston Public Schools' October 3, 1983 response to the Unified 
Plan Monitoring Instrument, page 6, section vd (on file). 

-410- 



VIII-3&4 Program Support Component 

Professional and Inservice Development 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary objective is to determine what action Boston 
Public Schools has taken to develop and implement Equal 
Educational Opportunity and Bilingual Vocational Educa- 
tion inservice training for all vocational/occupational 
instructors. 

Has a training plan been developed to address 
this need? 

B. Methodology 

Boston Public Schools was requested to submit a comprehensive 
staff development plan to achieve the goal of providing in- 
service training in provisions for Equal Educational Opportun- 
ity and bilingual vocational/education to instructors system- 
wide. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance ^ p artial compliance ^non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance ^ partial compliance non-compliance 

The previous report to the courts indicated that staff 
development training programs which are geared to equal 
educational opportunity, special needs instruction and 
bilingual vocational education have been conducted at the 
Humphrey Occupational Resource Center. It was also evident 
that those training provisions did not included all voca- 
tional/occupational instructors throughout the system. 

A comprehensive staff development plan to address this 
concern was requested of Boston. That plan has not been 
submitted pending contract negotiations between the Boston 
School Committee and the Boston Teachers' Union. In the 
absence of a proposed plan, it cannot be determined how 
Boston intends to address this concern. 

D. Recommendations /Commendations 

Pending negotiations, a comprehensive proposed training plan 
should be developed to address these concerns. Once the staff 
development procedures are consumated, the plan can be implemented. 

E. Documentation 

Boston Public Schools' October 3, 1983 written response to the 
Unified Plan monitoring instrument, page 3, section Ilia (on 
file). .4ii_ 



VIII-5,6,7 Program Support Components 

Indus try/ Agency /Community Involvement 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The monitoring objective is to determine if the composition 
of the Advisory Council for Career Vocational and Occupational 
Education (ACCVOE) is representative of all target groups spec- 
ified by the Unified Plan. 

What steps have been taken by Boston to modify the 
composition of the council to comply with require- 
ments of the Plan? 



B. Methodology 

The methodology included a review of the roster of the current 
membership of the ACCVOE (Blank D-1). 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance x partial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period 

X full compliance partial compliance non-compliance 

The previous report to the court indicated that the Advisory 
Council for Career, Vocational and Occupational Education has 
been convened as required by Chapter 7A Regulations and the 
Unified Plan. The one area of non-compliance related to the 
composition of the council as lacking one third (1/3) Black 
membership and parent, student and special education repre- 
sentatives. A review of the data obtained from Boston in- 
dicates that action has been taken to achieve full (Compliance 
in this area. The current composition of the ACCVOE includes 
all target groups and representatives specified in the Plan. 
The minutes of the most recent meeting of the ACCVOE, October 
25, 1983, suggest that this council provides meaningful and ef- 
fective input into the improvement of vocational education in 
the City of Boston (see Appendix VIII-5,6 ,7 (a)) . 

D. Recommendations /Commendations 

Boston is to be commended for the steps that have been taken 
to comply with this provision of the Unified Plan and to en- 
sure that the ACCVOE continues to evolve as an active and ef- 
fective council to assist in the development and delivery of 
quality vocational/occupational education in the City of Boston. 

E. Documentation 

Appendix VIII-5 ,6 ,7 (a) AACVOE minutes, October 25, 1983. 

Blank D-1, membership roster of Advisory Council for Career, 
Vocational and Occupational Education (on file). 

-412- 



VIII-8 Program Support Components 

Curriculum Acquisition/Revision 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to review Boston Public 
Schools' efforts in the development of a full-scale Personal- 
ized Competency-Based Vocational Curriculiim for all programs 
at the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center and other schools. 

What is the status of curriculum development and 
revision for all vocational and occupational programs? 



B. Methodology 

Boston Public Schools was requested to submit a plan of action, 
including specific implementational timelines, for completing 
the development and revision of Personalized Competency-Based 
Vocational Curriculum for all vocational and occupational programs. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance x p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance X partial compliance non-compliance 

The previous report to the court indicated that Boston 
Public Schools has engaged in efforts toward the develop- 
ment of a full-scale Personalized Competency-Based Voca- 
tional Curriculum for all programs at the Humphrey Occupa- 
tional Resource Center and selected programs at other schools. 

At the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center, a significant 
increase of curricular production during the 1982-1983 school 
year has been noted (see Appendix VIII-8 (b) for production 
schedule) . The completion of all program curricula is targeted 
for the end of June 1984. The production of curriculum has been 
stalled, however, due to a Boston Teachers' Union on-going griev- 
ance against curriculum development by teachers during regular 
working hours. 

Other curricular updating efforts include Industrial Arts 
(electronics and graphics) , Business Education (word pro- 
cessing, electronic office, keyboard improvement and account- 
ing. Health Exploratory (at Dorchester High) and adaptation 
of bilingual materials. 

-413- 



Boston Public Schools has submitted to the Division of Occu- 
pational Education a comprehensive plan to complete the de- 
velopment/revision of Personalized Competency-Based Vocational 
Curricula for all vocational/occupational programs (see Appendix 
VIII-8 (b)). 

D. Recommendations / Commendations 

It is commendable that Boston Public Schools has engaged in 
a series of curriculum improvement activities. These efforts 
must be expanded and directed toward completing the develop- 
ment/revision of curricula for all vocational/occupational 
programs as outlined in the attached Plan. 

E. Documentation 

Appendix VIII-8 (a) - Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 
Learning Guide Production, 1982-1983. 

Appendix VIII-8 (b) - Curriculum Development/Revision Action 
Plan. 

Boston's written response dated October 3, 1983, to the 
Unified Plan monitoring instrument (on file) . 



-414- 



VIII-9 Comprehensive Job Development and Placement 

A. Monltorlns Objectives and Key Questions 

The major objective is to determine whether a comprehensive 
and responsive citywide job development and placement component 
based upon current manpower demands, system capabilities and 
student capability/interest is in place. 

What action has been taken to implement this system? 

B. Methodology 

Boston was requested to submit a progress report on the implemen- 
tation of a centralized citywide job development and placement 
system. An analysis was made of current placement statistics 
contained in Boston's June 1983 Chapter 74 Completer /Leaver 
Report. Other reviewed materials included Boston Compact planning 
documents, individual school Compact Plans collected during on- 
site visits (see Appendix II-2) , and Boston Public Schools' Key 
Results Action Plan for citywide placement (see Appendix VIII-9 (a)). 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

•Previous Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

•Current Reporting Period: 
full compliance X p artial compliance non-compliance 

The Unified Plan requires Boston to develop the capacity to: 

1) Design employability plans (student's personal curriculum), 

2) Establish counseling teams , 3) Plan job development , 

4) Accomplish job placement and 5) Keep a statistical f ollow-up 
(maximum of 3 years) . 

The last report to the court indicated that a comprehensive 
system was in place for students who attend skills training 
programs at the Hubert H. Humphrey Occupational Resource Center. 
However, this system was not in place citywide. 

Most citjrwide district high schools provide some degree of career 
education, job preparation and job placement for their students. 
Activities include the placement of 1,182 students in summer jobs 
through P. I.e. (Private Industry Council), active trilateral 
business partnerships, implementation of the Career Passport Program 
(resume and interview preparation) in some high schools, and 
other individual school projects. This school year, all high 
schools were required to create school work teams to develop and 
implement individual school Boston Compact Plans to meet established 
goals, some of which include job development and placement. 



■415- 



School work teams consist primarily of department heads, 
teachers, guidance counselors, development officers, and in 
some cases, the newly retitled Career Preparation Department 
Head. Most high schools have finalized those plans and have 
begun implementation (see Appendix VIII-9(b)-Compact Activities 
Chart). One of the more immediate objectives for all of the 
high schools is the preparation of individual student profiles for 
all seniors . The Distributive Marketing Cluster had the largest 
number of program completers for fiscal years '82 and '83. The 
Completer/Leaver Report indicated that the employment status is 
unknown for 49% of all secondary program completers for fiscal 
year '82. The report, however, indicated that the employment 
status is known for 100% of all secondary program completers in 
fiscal year '81 as well as post secondary completers in fiscal 
years '81 and '82. 

The seven program areas showing the highest number of secondary 
completers were as follows: 





1981-82 


1982-83 


Distributive Education 


122 


133 


Automotive 


45 


47 


Architectural Wood 


24 


30 


Electricity 


21 


27 


Electronics 


9 


21 


Printing 


13 


24 


Machine 


43 


21 



277 



303 



Total number of secondary completers for fiscal year '81- '82 
was 436 and 477 for fiscal year '82-83. The Completer /Leaver 
Report does not include Business Program Completers. 

Commendations /Recommendations 

The full implementation of Boston Compact goals relating to job 
development and placement will fulfill the requirements of those 
areas, as specified by the Unified Plan. Student employability 
plans are being designed and implemented this school year through 
student profile. Counseling teams are in place in some schools. 
The Boston Compact school plans do not address student follow-up. 
The only existing instrument that provides some follow-up data 
for vocational students is the Completer/Leaver Report, which 
does not report the status of all program completers, i.e.: business 
students. It also does not include students who are still 
enrolled, but working part-time. Boston indicated in their 
Action Plan (see Appendix VIII-9(a) that a citywide work experience 
coordinator would be hired by April 8, 1983. Documentation has 
not been received to indicate that this has happened. Such an 
individual should be hired to oversee the comprehensive citywide 
system as well as to institute an adequate student follow-up 
component . 



-416- 



E. Documentation 

Appendix II-2 High School Chart 

Appendix VIII-9(a) - Boston Action Plan on Citywide 

Placements (2/1/83) 

Appendix VIII-9(b) - Compact Activities Chart 

(Materials on Boston Compact (on file)) 



-417- 



APPENDICES 



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60 f (U 

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to rH 



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c tn jj 

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to 

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to 01 

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2, Chart b 








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PROGRAMS 
CITED FOR 

DISPROPORT 
ENROLL. 

;march, 198: 




60 

c 

•H 


to e 


2 
to g 


to e 


4-1 

■H 


to 

4-1 

u 


OJ 


QJ 


a ,-1 o 

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r! rn CO 








s 

-a 


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^^ 
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u X 
< -^ 

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o 

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iH 4-1 
to CJ 


hie A 

hing 

Is 


to e 

4-1 

u X 

< -^ 


CD E 
U O 


ced ii 
2 rmls ! 
Les (] 









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TJ C 


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& 4J to 


• CD 


• CD 


G Cl, U 






1 


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c o 


C 


01 .H 


to O 4J 


T3 C 


T3 C 


CO o 








M O 


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or- to 




Q 
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c 




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-425- 















APPENDIX II-l 



e 
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10 



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01 ! <u 



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en 



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CSI I * 

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CO j CO I en ! en 
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tN| CM| 



fnl -- I ■-! 



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T 



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OJ CM' en en eo ■ co ! eo 
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0) 



en 

OJ 



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coil; 



cn 
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APPENDI|( II-I-2 


/-v 





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7- 




^ 










• 



LEGEND 



Appendix IV- i 



X = indicate yes 
- = indicate no 



SUMMARY OF ON-SITE VISIT QUESTIONNAIRE 



HIC!I SCHOOLS 



MIDDLE sc;:oo' 



5. 



6. 




C 



cy / ~ 



^ / O" 



Are there written procedures to encourage 
limited English proficient students to en- 
roll in Occupational Vocational Education 
Programs? 

oletters in native language to parents 

Are limited English proficient students 
provided instruction in native language? 
oguidance services in native language 
ovocational /occupational education in 
native language 

Number of limited English proficient students 
enrolled in the specified school 

Materials are used in the following languages 

Does coordiantion exist between the vocational 
occupational education teachers and the bi- 
lingual teachers? 



Does coordination exist between the vocational 
occupational education teachers and the ESL 
teachers? 

Written procedures exist to determine limit- 
ed English proficient students? 

Are aides used in the vocational occupation- 
al classes to help the limited English 
proficient students? 



X 

X 



421 



1 ' 



-428- 



95 




92 



158 



15 



68 



101 



49 



125 



15 



APPENDIX IV- 2 



Bilingual Vocational Instructors 
Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 
1983 - 1984 



Instructor 

Kenneoi Chin 
Violeta Gonzalez 
Ramon Suarez 
Corina Murphy 
Carlos Bartels 
Julio Delgardo 
John Oliveria 

Shirley Daly Carr 
Maria Paz Lewis 
Lernardo Comarzo 
Alvaro Comarzo 
Cesar Coloma 
Leonardo Arruda 
Viriato Pereira 
Loray Pollinger 
Efren Hidalgo 

Mart a Kaufman 



Native Language (s) 

Chinese 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Cape Verdean 

Cape Verdean 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 



Program 

Data Processing 

Data Processing 

Data Processing 

Cosmetology 

Carpentry 

Plumbing 

Electricity 

Health Aide 

Medical Terminology 

Electronics 

Autobody 

Electronics 

Auto Mechanics 

Auto Mechanics 

Auto Mechanics 

Special Needs Assessment 
Project (SNAP) 

SNAP 



-429- 



Bilingual Aide'; 

Humphrey Occupaticnal Resource Center 

1983 - 1984 



Appendix IV- 3 



Aide 

Eddie Luis Ocasis 
Samuel Maldonado 
Esmin Rodney 
John Iran 



Native Language (s) 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Spanish 

Vietnamese 

Chinese 

French 



s^^ 



b 



-430- 



T.. 






Appendix IV- 4 

AVAILABLE NATIVE LANGUAGE CURRICL'LAR MATERIALS VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIOr'IlL EDUCATIC:; 



LANGUAGE 



>" 



'o 



.'ij 



r^ 



&y 



<> 



,<^ 



"N 



^/ 



■J^, 



*\?, 



/ 



PROGRAM 

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Y 




Y 


N 


Y 


N Y 


NIY 


n(y 


4 

N 


/ 

y 


NJY 


N'Y 


N 1y nI y m 


Y 


'4 

NIY 


7 

n 


1 
















X 




















4- 














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Manaqement I 






























1 










B 














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s 


i 














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X 




X 




















s!:. 




-:- 










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X 




















N 












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and Repair 1 






















































Autobody Repair ! 
Laboratory I 






















^ 
















X 
















Machine Laboratory ' 






































s 














Sheet Metal Laboratory j 






































5 














Welding Laboratory I 






































X 
















Advanced Office and I 
Management ! 






















X 
































Legal Office _ • 
Procedures '■ - -! 


: 




































X 














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K 


1 












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K 
















Banking ! 






















































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■ 






























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X 
















Fashion/Interior Design j 






















































Hotel Hospitality j 






































X 
















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X 
















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X 




















x| 














Health Laboratory Skills ' 






































X 














Medical Office Assistant- ; 
Clinical " 






































X 


• 














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X 




















^i 














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X 


















\ 














Electronics Technology j 






















































Heating. Air Conditioning, I 
Refrigeration ! 






































X 
















Con^mercial Design I 




X 


































X 














Fashion Illustration ! 




















































Machine Drafting '< 




X 


































X 















-431- 



> 



LANGUAGE 



PROGRAM 

Photographic Techno! dgy 
Printing 



Television Production 



Automotive/Truck Repair 

Marine and Small Engine 
Repair 




-432- 



Appendix IV-3 



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Appendix IV- 5 



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--436- 



Appendix VI-5 



SEX 


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APPENDIX VIII - 5,6,7 (a) 



ACCVOE MINUTES 



The meeting of Tuesday October 25, 1983 was convened at 10:15 a.m. 
by the chairperson, Jack Fandel. The new members introduced themselves. 

Bob Borden pave a report on the recent state advisory meeting he 
had attended. He spoke about the impendin;: statewide requirements for 
hic?;h school .(graduates relative to achievinf^ higher standards on academic 
.Dubjoctij. 111! al;;!' .'jaid that l\]v. state will provide us with assistance to 
get more minorities and females into vocational progiams. 

Jim Caradonio spoke next. He stated that one of our immediate needs 
was to run pre-vocational programs for our 9th graders. He said that the 
new vocational education act will hopefully meet the needs of our students. 
The Boston P.I.C. provided 1200 jobs for Boston Public School students last 
summer. This number will be increased next year. He spoke about vocational 
education month which will be presented next year. This exhibition will be 
presented in February. It will showcase the specific skills in each school 
with vocational programs. He also said that technical assistance and 
materials are available to help correct racial/sexual imbalance in non- 
traditional occupational areas. 

At our next meeting nominations for new officers will be presented. 
Orientation for new members will be held. It will cover terminology, 
key results, curriculum and other pertinent information that ACCVOE 
members will need to know. 

ACTION ITl'MS 

1. Establish a Membership sub-committee. 

2. E:;tabli:;h a :;ub-co!nrriJ ttce for t.tie celebration oi' Vocational Education 
month . 

3. Complete election of officers. 

Our next meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 13, 1983, 10:00 a.m. 
- 11:30 a.m. at The Humphrey Center. 



Respectfully submitted 
Alb 



-'Vt J. Cdrlt-e 



HeeordeT 



-439- 



APPENDIX VIII-8 (a) 



HHORC LEARNING GUIDE PRODUCTION 
1982-1983 



Prior 3 yrs LG 1982-83 % Production 

Incr.'^dsc 



Commercial Mall (17-7) 97 119 

Graphics Media (12-9) 51 113 

Metals Fabrication (9-6) 24 51 



Electricity/Electronics (12-6) 44 74 

Construction (12-6) 100 76 

Power Mechanics (8-4) 31 29 

Business/DP (11-14) 50 154 



+ 271% 
+ 564% 
+ 538% 



Health* (7-6) 93 46 +48^ 

+ 393? 



+ 130, 
+ 190 
+ 805 



Average Production Increase of +367% "Ebtal of 662 Learning Guidt;s 
*92.2% of all Learning Guides compicte 



-440- 



APPENDIX VIII-8 (b) 



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r — ■ 

"SY 84 


Current 
Step 


Projected 
Date To 
Reach 
Step IV 


1 

ca 

X n 

z >" 


w 
■p 

c 
a 

B 
B 
O 

u 


Citywide High School Programs: 
Home Economics 


VI 


Current 
year 


84 




Practical Arts 


II 


86 


92 




Distributive Ed 


I 


87 


93 




Business 


IV 


84 


90 




Data Processing 


IV 


84 


90 




Machine Technology 


III 


85 


91 




Automotive 


III 


85 


91 














Middle School Programs: 
Practical Arts 


1 

V 


Done 


89 




Home Economics 


IV 


84 


90 




Career Education 


II 


86 


92 : 


Humphrey Center Programs: 
Auto/Truck 


IV 


current 
year 


90 




Marine 


IV 


current 


90 




Fuel /Electricity 


IV 


current 

yP3r 


90 




Chassis Suspension 


IV 


current 


90 




Advanced Office 


IV 


current 


90 




Legal Office 


IV 


current 


90 




MOA/ Administration 


IV 


current 


90 




Word Processing 


IV 


current 
year 


90 




Data Processing 


IV 


current 
year 


90 





These program revision dates are subject to change. 

Boston Public Schools reserves the right to amend this plan based 
upon changes in program offerings, labor market projections and/or 
equipment modifications. 

-442- 



SY 84 

Bench/Mill 


H Current 
< Step 


& (0 0) -P 

04 Q a; w 

Current 
year 


X > IC 

<U O 0) 

z c; >i 
90 


c 

i 
1 


Basic Carpentry 


IV 


II 


90 




Basic Plumbing 


IV 


II 


90 




Bldq. Maintenanance 


IV 


" 


90 




Architectual Drawing 


IV 


II 


90 




Health Aide 


V 


Done 


89 




'■ Nursing Assistant 


V 


It 


89 




MOA (Medical Office Assistant) 


V 


M 


89 




Medical Laboratory 


V 


n 


89 




f 

Dental Assistant 


IV 


Current 


90 




Anatomy 


V 


Done 


89 




Medical Terminology 


V 


H 


89 




Basic Electronics 


IV 


Current 
year 


90 




Communications Electronics 


IV 


II 


90 




Basic Electricity 


IV 


M 


90 




Industrial Electricity 


IV 


II 


90 




HVAC 


IV 


II 


90 




Welding 


IV 


II 


90 




Autobody 


IV 


M 


90 




Machine Technology 


IV 


II 


90 




Sheet Metal 


IV 


II 


90 




Printing 


V 


Done 


89 




Commercial Design 


IV 


Current 
Year 


90 




Photo Technology 


V 


Done 


89 




Machine Drafting 


IV 


?gi?^"^ 


90 





Boston Public Schools reserves the right to amend this plan based 
upon changes in program offerings, labor market projections and/or 
equipment modifications. 

-443- 



1 ... — 

.• SY 84 

1 


c 
I) - 

U 0) 

3 4J 


Projected 
Date To 
Reach 
Step IV 


Next 

Review 

Year 


tn 

c 
cu 

B 



u 


11 lustration/ Advertising 


IV 


Current 


90 




TV Production 


IV 


n 


90 




Banking 


IV 


■• 


90 




Child Care 


IV 


It 


90 




Cosmetology 


IV 


II 


90 




Fashion 


IV 


II 


90 




Food Service 


IV 


II 


90 




', Hotel/Hospitality 


V 


Done 


89 




' Retailing 


IV 


Current 


90 



































Boston Public Schools reserves the right to amend this plan based 
upon changes in program offerings, labor market projections and/or 
equipment modifications. 



-444- 



CO 


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Transportation 



MhlSSfiCHUbt I Tb DIuHHRTMliImT uF EDUCftTIDN 
BUREfilJ OF EQUfiL EDUCflTiaNflL OPPORTUNITY 



lyt;^. Desenreoat ion i i-^anSDortat ion 



MflNDfiTE 

"rarispo'rtat ion snail be proivided accoraing to the standards 
contained at oages 30-83 of the Student Desegregation Plan, 
dated riay Ifl, 1975. These standards include transportation 
fov students assigned to elementary schools more than c>ne 
rniie frora home. to middle schools mo^re than 1 l/£ miles from 
home, and to high schools'more than E' miles from school,. 
" T :- e r e a s o " '" "i r rn a n d a t o r y t r a n s p o r t a t i o ri may be d i s t a n c e , 
safety, or controlled transfer, or a combination of these. . 
The court has -■equired no transportation, however, that 
would pose a risk to the health of students or impinge on the 
.scational process fo 
distance travelled." 



OBJECTIVES 

i. ^o approve proposed transportation arrangements developed 
pursuant to the approved student assignment plan each year, 
assuri'fiQ that such arrangemerits will adequately suoport bc'th 
desegregat ive and program assignments. 

£:, To determine whether transportation arrangements are in 
place for the opening of the school year in September. 

3. To m.onitov com.plaints received by the Eioiston Public 
Schools in relation to transportation, and to assess whether^ 
ap:rr"ODr iete responses have been made. 



KEY QUESTIONS: Have adecuate transportation arrangements 
been provided for desegregating schools and programs? What 
kinds o-^ transportation complaints are being reported, and 
how is Bc'Ston responding top these problems? 



METHOD 

l^onitoring for the January report had two primary purpcises: 
to determine and evaluate the TrariSDortat ion Unit's 
procedures for prC'V id ing transDC>rtat icm toi Boston students, 
and to dete\'mine and evaluate the Transoo'rtat ion Unit's 
pv-ocsdures fc^r responding to and redressing complaints. The 
monitors (i) visited the Transportation Unit, examining its 
op2'."-at ions arid interviewivig the Director, ana some of his 
staff; and (£) reviewed data that included sample routing 
schedules, transportation locators by schc"0l and geocode, 

-449- 



juting sheets and, as well, ail ccrnplaint fcrrns submitted as 

■ il'ctobev" 14. 



THE TRflNSPORTflTION SYSTEM 

Sccorc; iri5 to the Director of the "'"ransDortat ion Unit, the 
Bc:hool DejDar-tnient makes use o-^ both dud lie transDortat i dvi 
(tne MBTh) and of School-Department owned vehicles in order 
TO transport students. The Boston School Deoartment has let 
ti-.'o contracts to operate its vehicles. One is with Transcorn 
and one with fiRfi, ORh is responsible for all in-city 
tr-ansDortst ion of _ "renular" (i.e., non Special Education) 
st uoents. 

"'■■rnnsoortst ion Unit E:taff members are responsible for the 
actual assinnrnent of students and for monitoring the 
contractors' performance. For regular students, staff members 
are assinned by school district, with one staff member 
responsible f'or two contiguoius districts. fl single staff 
member is assigned to District IX. These staff members 
Pat e. n, irie which studev/ts will be provided with corrjer-to- 
corner bus transportation and which will be issued special 
passes to the MBTfi. 

■"o obtain max i mum use of their school buses, the 
Transportation Unit uses a "three-tier" system. Most buses 
rnake two triDS in the morning and three in the afternoon. The 
schedule for cpeninn and closing of schools is appropriately 
staiqqev^ed. In addition to providing corrter-to-corner 
tr-r-.nsportat ion to and from school, the buses are also used 
for athletic and "field" trips, and for after-schoo'l 
activities. The Bost'On School Deoartment is reauired bv 
Court Grder to provide middle and high schoc'l students with 
late buses,; to allow students to participate in after-school 
activities. Because magnet schools draw students from around 
the city, there are constraints (numbers of buses, time, 
drivers) on the after-school transDortat ion orovided to 
students in District IX. fis a rule, these students are 
transported to central locations such as MBTfl stoDS. 

The sta^f of the Transpov^tat ion Unit state that they have 
been able to maintain their level of service to students 
during the years after "Proposition £ l/£" on account of the 
full suDDort they have received from the School Co'mmittee. 
They av-e also satisfied with the terms of the new contract 
with PiRP.. The Director was fully invoilved (along with a 
saecio.l consultant) in drafting the terms of the contract, 
aricl rs-liex-es that it incorporates the elements ne considered 

ESStf':"t; 1 a i . 



-450- 



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Dr-iver Turnover 

C".-"ie jC'l"5!"tial flaw of the contract should be merit ioried : the 
ts:-'MT3 under which bus drivers may chavioe their rurs. R n-iajor 
coriiDlaint about the transportat ip^n services from parents and 
school personnel is that changes of drivers on runs are far 
too. frequerit. It is charged that drivers unfarai 1 iar- with 
their- runs orovice inadequate service, miss oick-uas, and 



• of frecuent driver changes is a system which 
; to "bid" on more attractive ruvis evey^y thirty 
is high mobility among bus drivers (drivers 
>re attractive one-ninDs with emoloyers such as 
rivers for other sch-oo'l systems arid drivers of 
veriH atteiiipt to rnOi'e into the Boston School DeoartmenT 
sysi"5rn),. Because Boston School Department drivers can bid 
on openings every 32 days, a "domino effect" results: the 
successful bidder creates a new opening, which is in turn put 
• tp for bid. avid so on. 

There have been attempts to control the frequency of bidding 
through the contract with RRfl (for example, limiting bidding 
to several specified times during the year). The bus drivers 
have been able to convince the School Committee not to order- 
curbs on biddirig, but rather to retain the thirty— day system, 
promising to police themselves. The School Committee is 
scheduled to review the results of self-policing at the end 
of the 1983-64 school year. 

The Department of Education will pay close attention to this 
situaticn,, especially since its monitors s.re hearing that 
frsQijent driver changes continue to be a oroblem. During 
visits to special desegregation schools, the monitors were 
repeatedly told that transoortat ion service had great ly 
improved. but that drivers unfamiliar with the routes caused 
d ii-f icult les, especially failures to make scheduled stops and 
late arrival at school. 

It should be noted that the Transportation Unit itself must 
initiate many route changes to reflect students enrolling in 
or leaving schools for a variety of reasons, and new special 
education transportation requirements. Each such change may 
require that drivers grow familiar with new routes. 



ASSIGNMENTS TC TRftNSPORTftTIDIM 

Pnother issue concerninc t ransDortat ion assignments is the 
question of who gets assigned to tne MBTfi and who gets 
a5sicr;ed tc buses, and whether the system is fair. The issue 
is complex. On the one hand, many students believe that a "T 
assignment" is less desirable than a bus assipnment, and 



-451- 



quest iori whethev certain groups receive a disproDort lonate 
share of T asr-i grfriients. On the other hand, some school staff 
belie/e t;",5t many in-schoc^l discipline problems becin on 
schccl b:j-30i. and scill iVito the schools, srid woncer whether a 
more liberal use of T assinnments miDht forestall the 
develcpment of discipline problems. 

""ho Di-"c?ctor of the Transportation Unit stated that tne 
■^anersl Drocsd'j.r^s 'or allocating MBTfl and bus assignments ha.s 
not teen reviewed for a number of years. Pi general review of 
the pv ocedu-"-e, that would include both the fairness and the 
discipline issues, is needed. 

Issues or discipline and safety on school buses are discussed 
in the report on Safety and Security; here it will orily be 
noted that the Department of Education has allowed the cost 
c '^ bus rrionitc;-'s on routes for which the safety of students 
r"acu,ir'ed theiii as a reimbursable transportation expenses sirice 
initial implementation of the desegregation plan. 
Coi rsidsrat iori should be given to whether certain routes, 
especially at the middle school and high school level, 
recsuire more supervision than the driver can provide. 



COMPLAINT PROCEDURE 

T'-.r; ""ransportat io'n Unit has revised and improved its 
procedure .for processing complaints. The procedure, 
according to the Director, is as follows. 

Complaints, which generally come by telephone, are routed to 
the staff member responsible for the district in question. 
The staff member records the complaint on a special form (see 
attachnisnts) and, if possible, attempts to deal with- the 
co^iiplaint immediately (fc-- example, to rscord address 
changes, or to ensure that a back-uD bus is sent to replace a 
disabled bus). fill complaint ■forms ars forwarded to the 
contractors tiA'ice daily, with a copy of each retained by tne 
responsible staff member. The contractor is reauired to 
respond in writing tO' each complaint: when the com.pleted 
forms are returned to the Transportation Unit, they are 
■returned to the appropriate staff member. 

The monitors requested copies of these complaint forms and 
analysed the first 176 complaints received this Fall: 
l^sue E^tl^^Ot 

"no shows" &6"/. 

safety lay. 

late Pick— UPS 147. 

unauthorized passengers d'A 

e a 'r 1 y pic k - u p s I'A 



-452- 



Vii-tually all (56%) of the cornDlaints were forwarded to flRO: 
the forfiiat for reDortinc on actions taken varied and nrovided 
irsij.f f i (t:. ent ceatil to oerrnit a ju.dgrnent on its 
c5 '~'Z''r^o^:V' 1 at eness " 

B.56- u^Q'Stit E^ti^^niL 

V 5 r- b a 1 w a r n i r 1 5 5 "/ 

■allegatiion denied by driver 10"'. 

□ r o b 1 e rn r"" e e o 1 v e d ^i' £ Y- 

no v^epov^t 417- 

Note that this is a very preliminary report. and in fairness 
to QRP; there may not nave been time to ret u.rri all of the 
reports as •o'*^ tne time that information was orovided to the 
rnonitors. In the next Board Reoort there will De a more 
extensive analysis of how compliants ars dealt with. 



QUALITY CONTROL 

The Department of ImDlementat ion has designated staff to make 
daily phone calls to schools to check the quality of 
transportation service. The schools ars also asked to submit 
we-:.kjy reports docume'-"it ing any compiaints received or- 
encountered. Finally, the Department of Implementation has 
asked each school to complete a transDortat ion survey for the 
month of November concerning transportation service. (see 
3tt achr.ients) 

Hccording to the Director, the Transportation Unit olaces 
highest priority on complaints involving safety — traffic 
violations, for example. He has two options for following up 
serious complaints. He can send Boston School Department 
Transporat ion Officers out to investigate, and hRPI has Safety 
Training Personnel staff, whom he can request to investigate 
? DSC i f 1 ed com p 1 a i nt s . 

Tnis procedure represents an imorovement over orevious 
practice: in particular, it is the first time that the 
contract'ors have been required to respond in writing to each 
co>mDlaint. However, there is room for further imDrovement. 
It is particularly important that the procedure be made more 
systematic, (see Recommendations) 



-453- 



RECOKMEMDRTIONS 



1. The 3oston School Deaartrnent should review the orocedure 
for al locat ivic bus and ME^TP: transportation assignments from 
the per-s3ert ives of fairness arsd school bus safety and 
d i sc i D 1 i re. 

£,. The Transportation Unit should develop ana iniDlernent a 
procedure for identifying and redressing "trouble soots" 
through use of thie complaints system. 

3. Ti;e Transportat ion Unit should develop and imolement a 
system fov^ icentifying and following up inadequate responses 
f---om the cr^nt'-actor. includino a standardized format for 
r- e ■- o r 1 1 n g t h e a c t i o n s t a k en a n d p r o b 1 e m s resolved. 

^.. The TransDortat ion Unit is to be commended for significant 
i "fiDrovemerit s in transpor-t at ion and in its own monitoring of 
service provided. 

Cha''"les Glerii-., Reciria Ropan, Judirh Taylcir 



-454- 



>*^ '- <-- ^t^ 



^ '^- ' -*■ n '^ w' :— ■-. 




MEMORANDUM 



^.5^: 



"I ! 



OF BOSTON 



•i .i; 



November 14, 1983 



To: 
From: 



Principals/Hejidmasters , Certain Central Staff 



ieadma 

John Coa\^leY^~.^'i'\\^-dlitLi 
Subject: Yet Another Svirvey of Trartsportation Service 



This request is just that: a request. If you can see fit to 
complete the following survey I would appreciate it. I realize that 
you have been responding to our daily calls on transportation 
service and that you regularly complete validation forms. The 
purpose of this survey is to obtain your PERCEPTION of transportation 
service for all or most of the month of November. 

I ask that you consider filling out this survey and returning 
it to me between November 28th and December 2nd. Also, I am providing 
you with the copies of the survey, one for you to complete, one for 
your transportation coordinator (if your school has one) to complete, 
and one for someone associated with special education transportation 
to complete. 



I have been devoting much of my ene 
the matter of transportation and the res 
the Carrier to transportation problems, 
better target problems and attempted sol 
basedoon our daily calls to you, survey 
issued to school personnel, as well as 1 
completed validation forms. Please bear 
to add to the paper blizzard. I would 1 
attached survey can be answered with rea 
I do appreciate your cooperation. Pleas 
I will not develop a "DNR" list. 



rgy thus far in 1983-84 to 
ponsiveness of the DI and 

It seems to me that I can 
utions by developing data 
s issued to parents, surveys 
etters sent to us and the 

with me. My intent is NOT 
ike to think that the 
sonable speed. At any rate, 
e know that on this survey 



ab 
Enclosure 

xc: Office of Superintendent 
Deputy Superintendents 
Community Superintendents 



Kenneth Caldwell 
James Caradonio 



-455- 



-tX ifiEA V 



Transportation Survey: School Personnel 



Please base your comments/responses only on transportation service 
during the month of November 1983. Do not factor September or 
October into your "answers. " 



I Background Information 

1. Your School: 

2. Your Name: 



Your District 



Your Title (or Transportation Duty) : 



Describe the type(s) of transportation provided to students 
in your school. 



A. 
B. 
C. 
D. 



Picked up at home 

Picked up at a local corner 

Given an MBTA Pass to get to and from school 

Given an MBTA Pass to get to and from a centrally- 
located yellow bus stop 



Note: Circle the box or boxes which identify the service you 
monitor primarily. (Please note the distinction 
between monitor and responsibility . ) 



II. Home-to-School Bus Service ( If Applicable to Your Duties ) 

1) Do you feel it is reasonably easy for a van driver or bus 
driver to locate the homes of most students in your school 
receiving this type of service? 



3) 



Yes 



No 



2) Given distance and traffic conditions, do you feel the 
home-to-school van ride(s) or bus ride(s) takes a 
normal length of time? 



Yes 



No 



What is the longest time on average a student usually spends 
traveling in the home-to-school van(s) or bus(es) one way 
to school? (Travel time only) ("Longest" ride not "shortest" 
ride!) 

Less than h hour 



h hour to 1 hour 



-456- 



More than 1 hour 



4) Please rate the overall quality of home-to-school van 
or bus service for students in your school. 



Very 
Good 



Good 



Fair 



Poor 



Very 
Poor 



No 
Opinion 



For Office Use 
Only 



5) Please rate the following areas of home-to-school 
transportation service on average. 

Very No 



Very 
Good 



Good Fair Poor Poor Opinion 



Timeliness 

Vehicle Safety 
(Equipment) 

Vehicle Reliability 
(Breakdowns) 

Vehicle Cleanliness 



Driver Safety 



Driver Professional- 
ism (Courtesy, r 
Cooperation) [ 

Discipline 



Monitor/ Aide 



Please rate the timeliness of home-to-school van or 
bus service in your school. 



Very 
Good 



Good Fair Poor 



Very 
Poor 



No 
Opinion 



Vehicle(s) is (are) 
usually on time 



7) Taking the most extreme case(s), how many times has a 
student missed school or a significant part of the 
school day (a half-hour or more) this school year 
because of a problem with the home-to-school van or 

bus? , 

I Never late 1 



1 time 



■457- 



2 times 



3 to 4 times 



7) Continued 

f 5 to 6 times 



For Office Use 
Only 



7 to 8 times 



More ; 
Specify 



Don't know 



III. Corner-to-School Bus Service ( If Applicable to Your 
Duties ) 

1) On average, do you feel the (corner-to-school) bus 
stops are fairly located for the majority of the 
students in your school assigned to the stops? 



Yes 



No 



No Opinion 



2) Given distance and traffic conditions, do you feel 
the (corner-to-school) bus rides on average for your 
school take, a normal length of time? 



Yes 



No 



Don ' t know 



3) What is the longest time on average a student usually 
spends traveling on the (corner-to-school) school bus 
one way to school? ("Longest" ride, not "shortest" 
ride! ) 



Less than \ hour 



More than 1 hour 



Please rate the overall quality of (corner-to school) 
school bus service for students in vour school. 



Very 
Good 



Good 



Fair 



Poor 



Very 
Poor 



No 
Opinion 



-458- 



5) Please rate the following areas of corner-to-school 
transportation service on average for your school. 



Fpr Office Use 
Only 



Very 
Good 



Good 



Fair 



Poor 



Very 
Poor 



No 
Opinion 



Timeliness 



Bus Safety 
(Equipment) 



Bus Reliability 
(Breakdowns, etc.) 

Bus Cleanliness 



Bus Picks Up at 
Assigned Location 



Driver Safety 

Driver Profession- 
alism (Courtesy, 
Cooperation) 

Discipline 



6) Please rate the timeliness of (corner-to-school) school 
bus service on average for your school. 



Very 

Good Good 



Fair Poor 



Very 
Poor 



No 
Opinion 



Bus(es) is (are) I 
usually on time I ' ■ ' 

7) Taking the most extreme case(s), how many times has a 
student in your school missed school or a significant 
part of the school day (a half -hour or more) because of 
a problem with the (corner-to-school) school bus? 



Never late 



1 time 



1 2 t ime s 



3 to 4 times 



5 to 6 times 



7 to 8 times 



More: specify 



n Don ' t know 



-459- 



For 



IV. MBTA Transportation ( If Applicable to Your School 
and/or Duties ) 

1) On average, do students using the MBTA Passes 
experience delays more than once a month in 
traveling to school? 



Yes 



No 



Don ' t know 



2) Given the distance and traffic conditions, do you 
feel that the average MBTA ride for students in 
your school is taking a normal length of time? 



Yes 



No 



Don ' t know 



3) How much time does the average student using an 
MBTA Pass spend traveling on the MBTA one way to 
school most of the time? 



less than h hour 



more than 1 hour 



h hour to 1 hour 



4) Please rate the overall quality of MBTA service fo: 
the average student using an MBTA Pass in your 
school? 



Very 
Good 



Good 



Fair. 



Poor 



Very 
Poor 



5) Taking the most extreme case(s), how many times this 
■ school year has a student missed school or a 
significant part of a school day (more than a half 
hour) because of a problem with the MBTA? 



None 



1 time 



5 to 6 times 



7 to 



2 times 



times 



13 to 4 times 



More: specify 



Don ' t know 



-460- 



Office Use 
Only 



V. 



F<pr Office Use 
Only 



Follow-up Inquiries 



1) To whom do you speak first when you have a problem or 
question about school transportation? 



District Office 



Transportation Unit (School Dept. Hdqtrs) 

726-6260 

School Information Center (External Liaison 

Unit) 726-6555 

Bus Company 



Driver 



Other 



Never have to call 



2) When you have made a complaint or sought information 
at one of the following, how were you treated? 



D 

O 

0) 

4J 

>i U 

U 3 

Q) O 

> U 



03 
3 
O 
(U 

+J 
u 

3 

o 
u 



>1 

cn 

3 

o 
a; 
+j 
u 

3 
O 

CO 



03 

3 
O 

0) 
-M 
U 

3 

o 
u w 

0) -H 



o 
z 

to iH 

o a, 



School 
District Office 

Transportation Unit 

School Info. Center 

Bus Company 

Driver 
Other 



Never have to call 



□ =3 


Q > Q Q < 


L_ ^ 


CI, . 

1 1 




1 I 



-461- 



3) Please describe the most serious or most unusual problems that 

you have had with transportation, dealing with specific incidents 
Please include as much specific information as possible, for 
example, dates, time of day, bus numbers, etc. (Response is 
optional. ) 



The nature of this survey is rather general and is designed to 
provide you with an opportunity to be critical. Please feel 
free to comment on any issues not raised in this survey or on 
any matters deserving particular commendation (e.g., driver 
courtesy.) (Again, response is optional.) 



Thank you so very much for taking the time to complete this 
survey. Kindly return completed document to 

John R. Coakley 

Senior Officer, Department of Implementation 

26 Court Street, 9th floor 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 



PLEASE REMENBER THAT YOU ARE 
FREE TO ANSWER ALL, SOME OR 
NONE OF THIS SURVEY! 

-462- 






Dace 



Time of Call 

School /Prograin_ 
Contact Person 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
TRANSPORTATION MONITORING FORM - 1983-1984 SCHL YR. 



Day 



A 


pi 


.ease 


Check 


T 


U. 

A. 









Dist. 



Monitor Callins_ 

School Hours 

Phone If 



Comnlaint (Place a check) 





Vehicle ^/ 


No Show 


Lace - 


- Scace Time 


Ocher (See below) 


Morning 


































Date 










Noon 








1 
















1 


Dace 










Afternoon 


























Date 










Details of Comp 


laint : 








! 



Response/Resolution (To be completed by Bus Company or Transportation Officer): 
Dace 



-463- 



EXTERNAL LIAISON UNIT 
DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 



SCHOOL OPENING TELEPHONE SURVEY 83-84 



DATE; 



DISTRICT: 



ELU STAFF PERSON; 



STAFF; 



FACILITIES; 



MATERIALS ; 



SCHOOL: TELEPHONE; 

PRINCIPAL/HEADMASTER: , 



COMMENTS : 

PRINCIPAL/HEADMASTER SIGNATURE: 

-464- 






<J\<^ 






V 









- r- > 
5 < < 






81 



^ 
>> 



Bl 






(; 



;o 



o 






'6 



4 

3 

2 
J 



—P 



~ q8 — 

^ ^ i 

7^ ^ I 



g 
> 



7- 






C 



.1 



51 



2 



< j 

Qi 

> 

55 

i 



I 
t3 









S! 






3- 







Hi 






•i. 



-467- 



T" 



-_5 

a 



«j2 






S 21 



I = 

I c 









^i 



Facilities 



SCHOOL FACILITIES 



MANDATE 



Construction, renovation and closing of school facilities 
shall occur according to the standards contained in the 
interlocutory Order of June 21, 1974; the Plan of May 10, 
ly75, pages b-7; the Memoranda and Orders of May 6, ly77, 
pages 37-40; August 15, 1979; March 21, 19«0; April 2, 
1980; and the Order on Joint Defendants' Motion for 
Adoption, May 11, 1981. 



OBJECTIVES AND QUESTIONS 

1. To determine whether all school closing measures 
ordered by the Court have been fully complied with. 

STATUS: Compliance reported in July 1983 Monitoring 
Keport. 

2. To review all proposed construction, renovation, and 
other school facility measures for consistency with 
the desegregation and other requirements of the Court. 

Have the renovation plans for Burke and Dorchester 
High Schools progressed as expeditiously as possible? 

3. To review the placement or proposed placement of any 
portable unit, or the rental of any space for instruc- 
tional purposes, for consistency with the desegregation 
and other requirements of the Court. 

Are there any plans for the rental of any space for 
instructional purposes? Are these plans, if any, 
consistent with requirements of the Court? 

4. 




Have discussions occurred among the "joint planners" 
about a long-range secondary school facilities plans 

-469- 



.as a' necessary part of the United Facilities Plan? 
What progress has been made toward deteriryining prior- 
ities for the available resources and for possible 
closings : 



IV 



PROCESS 



The Director of School Building Assistance has conducted 
the reviews, assisted by the Division's regional center 
staff, through meetings with Boston staff in the Department 
of Implementation and the Office of the Deputy Superinten- 
dent for School Operations. 



V . F i n d i n g s 

1, Priority has been given to renovation of Burke and 
Dorchester High Schools. Approval of the Burke 
awaits action by the City of Boston. Joint long- 
range secondary school planning has not begun. 

No construction, renovation, or other facility 
measures are being planned with the Commonwealth 
at this time except for renovation at tne 
Jeremiah E. Burke High School. The renovation 
project at Dorchester High School was approved 
by the Board of Education at its June 28, 19a3, 
meeting. Approval of the Jeremiah Burke proposal 
awaits filing of certain required material by the 
City of Boston. Board approval of this project 
is anticipated in January 1984. 

Although there have been reports that the City of 
Boston is currently planning a construction project 
to upgrade Boston Latin School, the School Building 
Assistance Bureau is not assisting in such planning. 
If Boston intends to proceed with plans to build 
another Boston Latin School, this should be 
integrated into an overall secondary facilities plan 
The Department of Education should be included in 
such efforts. Under current procedures, projects 
beyond Burke and Dorchester must await development 
and approval of a completed Secondary School Facili- 
ties plan, a component of the court-ordered Unified 
Facilities Plan. 



3. Monitors have been informed of no plans for the 
rental of space for instructional purposes. 

4. Joint long-range Secondary School Facilities Planning 
has not yet commenced. 

-470- 



VI 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



It IS recommended 
submitted without 
the Department of 
that any potential 



that the final long-range pian not be 
assurances that it is approvable by 
Education. It is further recommended 
upgrading of Boston Latin School 



include the participation of the Department of Education 
and be incorporated as part of the final long-range plan, 



-471- 




Greater Roaton Regional education Center 

The Commonwsolth q! Massachi^setts 
Oepartment of Education 



K^I-IORANDUII 



27 Cedar Street, Wellealey, Massachusetts 021C1 

October il:, I963 



TO: DT?. JOHN^A, CIJA'^W, Ani-irinETnATOH, SCiiJU "UILDIIJG ASaSTAIIGL; i^UZiK^U 
,:'"'' '•' . ' 
mO;-;: SAi':irrL ?1K3, (yREn'^rB. BOSTON R':t[o:^AL SOUG/^TION C:5NT£H 

curj: :7iLr/i'n PUi-KE :iiGH scjiOJL rax--: ocTo:^::" STATE :'o\Ri 07 ii;x:CATiOM ag::s!da 

Mr, ?etcr Scarpicnoto callc;d i.io and informed rie thnt he could not 
h-"vo the noces5-ir:s^ documents ready to co;nnlote tJic -u;cke HiJih School 
Construction/Renovation proposrl. "-eter ct.TLed th; -g 'uMic FaciliVtleo 
and City of Poston Officiaj.s' sinn-^tua-es x.'crt not nvailahlc, because 
the pertinent officials vjero out or ta.-m, Ijr, Scrirpignato, of the 
• Public Facilities Office further noted tliat this v;ould hrjve no affect 
on pro.f^rers of the proposal, Iccauso they i;era r:iovin3 fonrard in pi'o- 
parlng the final xirorkinr-; droviings necess-.ry for co-'-^-S o^t to bid. He 
stated thnt all application procedures and ducoinents vrill be reacly for 
December T-;&-..rd of Education action. 



-472- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

November 18, 1983 



Dr. Robert Peterkiti 

Deputy Superintendent of Schools 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Mass. 02108 

Dear Dr. Peterkin: 

I have recently been reviewing file material related to long-range secondary 
school facilities planning and the Boston Desegregation Monitoring effort. In 
Superintendent Spillane's letter to Coiranissioner Lawson dated May 3, 1983, he 
writes that his executive planning has been in a holding pattern pending the 
development of recommendations by the Educational Planning Group chaired by Jean 
Sullivan McKeigue. In John Coakley's report entitled The proposed Renovation 
of the Burke and Dorchester Facilities, dated May 3, 1983, attached to the letter 
and incorporated by reference into it, John Coakley writes that in regard to long- 
range planning for schools in Boston, it is clear that the secondary school com- 
ponent is an ongoing and incomplete item on the agenda of the Federal Court. 

One of the key elements in the Desegregation Monitoring effort being under- 
taken by the School Building Assistance Bureau is monitoring and support of efforts 
aimed at production of an acceptable long-range secondary facilities plan jointly 
developed by the concerned parties to the case. As you know, all future secondary 
school facilities projects, with the exception of the Burke proposal which has 
been separately dealt with, must be consistent with the to-be-developed plan. 

Could you let me know where the City of Boston now stands in regard to such 
planning and how this Bureau may help in this effort? 



Sincerely yours. 



(^'John A. Calabro 
Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 
770-7238 
JAC/am 

cc: Frank Banks 

Robert Blumenthal 

Charles Glenn 

Marlene Godfrey 

Donald Manson 

John Raftery -473- 



HE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTt" SUPEHIN TENDENT 
SCHOOL OPERATIONS 
ROBERT S PETERMN 

November 23, 1983 

John A. Calabro, Administrator 
School Building Assistance Bureau 
Department of Education 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Mr. Calabro: 

Thank you for your letter of November 18, 1983, wherein you inquire as to the 
status of long range planning for secondary schools in Boston. 

Please be advised that the Boston School Department is currently undertaking 
the development of the long-range plan, to be developed in response to School 
Committee mandate. The planning effort is headed by Robert Murray of the 
Department of Implementation and Robert Hayden, Special Assistant to the 
Superintendent. For the past t\TO months, Senior Officers and Deputy 
Superintendents have analyzed their areas of responsibility and submitted 
long-range goals and action plans to Messrs. Murray and Hayden. A first draft 
recently went to School Committee for their review. 

Within the long-range plan, tlie issue of secondary schools will hi aadressed. 
Rather than elaborate upon a preliminary draft which the School Committee has 
yet to approve, I recommend that you speak directly to Mr. Murray or Mr. 
l^yden, or await the final long-range plan which will be submitted to the 
School Committee sometime this calendar year for final submission to the State 
and Federal District Court. 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me at 726-6200, 
extension 5330. 



Sincerely 





RSP/jMc 



3ert S. Peterkin 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 



cpy: Superintendent Robert R. Spillane 
L/Franklin Banks 
Donald Manson 

Robert Hayden «,- 

Robert Murray 

26 CO'JRT STREET, BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 EXT -.330 APtA 61 7 



Safety and Security 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



OBJECTIVE 1 

QUESTION : Of those schools initially identified as 
having either (1) sporadic but serious 
racial violence ( Charlestown, Hyde Park) 
or (2) a high incidence of violence with- 
in the school (English, Hyde Park, Brighton, 
Thompson) what steps is Boston taking to 
identify causes for these problems and pro- 
vide solutions? 

METHOD : Monitors visited Hyde Park High, English 

High, Charlestown High, Brighton High, and 
The Thompson Middle School, and talked with 
administrators, counselors, teachers, some 
students and parents. Discussions were also 
held with the Deputy Superintendent for School 
Operations, the Chief of Safety Services and 
members of their staff. Reports on school 
incidents submitted by the Department of Safe- 
ty Services were reviewed for May, June, Sep- 
tember, October, I983. 



FINDINGS: 



A. Schools Cited in July R eport 

Some of the schools identified in the July 
Report to the Court as having more serious 
safety and security concerns have clearly re- 
sponded to some of those problems through the 
creation of new positions, the assignment of 
additional staff and the development of new 
programs and procedures for dealing with safety 
and security and student discipline issues. 
The most dramatic changes are cited below at 
English High and Charlestown High. 

ENGLISH HIGH 

1. new alternative education program - The 
Fenway School 

2. replacement of security staff 

3. addition of a new position - student dis- 
cipline officer 

4. adoption of program which provides counseling 



-475- 



and other services and resources to over-age, 
multiple offenders (The Collaboration) 

5. replacement of two assistant headmasters, one 
in charge of discipline 

6. involvement in"School Offenders" programs, 
a court-related part of "Child In Need of 
Services" (CHINS) Law 

7- creation of 9th grade clusters 

b. increased emphasis on staff responsibilities 
for safety and security within the building 

9. plans to create additional alternative programs 

CHARLESTOWN HIGH 

1. addition of two new counselors 

2. creation of Teacher Advisory Program (TAP) for 
ninth grade students 

3. part-time services of 3 Boston University 
counseling interns 

4. plans to start a peer counseling program through 
the Student Council 

5. placement of a new minority assistant headmaster 
with a strong counseling and criminal justice 
background 

5. a more comprehensive system of keeping track 
of students with discipline problems 

It is clear the central office, the Safety Depart- 
ment and school staff have worked together to bring 
about some of these changes. While Charlestown shows 
a drop in racial and other Incidents, English High 
has not yet shown improvement through a reduction 
in violence. 

Madison Park High, Brighton High, Hyde Park High and 
the Thompson Middle School have all made some 

changes in staffing patterns and have made efforts 
to improve their links with outside social and psycho- 
logical support agencies, to improve the safety climates 
within their schools. Madison Park has been involved 
in several ongoing efforts, including the School Im- 

-476- 



provement program and other collaborative efforts 
to improve sarety for all stuaents. Brighton High 
nas stressed more teacher involvement in patrolling 
less safe areas in the Duiiding, as well as improving 
tne learning opportunities within tne school. nyde 
Park High nas re-aeployed staff to hanale discipline 
problems, ana has increasea internship and work- 
study opportunities. Tne Tnompson has a security 
ofiicer wno is actively wording with tne neighbor- 
hood to reduce the influx of crime and other prob- 
lems into the school. Both tne Tnompson ana Hyae 
Park could benei'it from the development of more 
airect strategies to prevent crime and safety proo- 
lems witnin those builaings. 

aOUi'H BuSTuN High 

Wnile recent statistics for September-uctober 
point to an increase In reportea incidents (See 
appendix lo-) on-site visits conrlrm that tne same 
fair ana comprehensive approacn to the nanaling 
or discipline and other safety-related problems 
within tne school remains intact. The climate 
wlthm tne school is conducive to learning and 
great efrorts appear to be made to keep it that 
way. Kacial incidents, usually between Just two 
students, do occasionally occur, out they do not 
pervade the scnoox. Monitors were informea by 
some staff of increased tensions between "American" 
stuaents (ootn Black and white) and uamoodians, 
aithougn these tensions have not prouuced any major 
incidents to aate. 

Monitors were, however, appallea by the filthy con- 
dition of much of the ouiiding, ootn outsiae and 
insiae. r^very staff person interviewed complainea 
about a lack of trash collection and basic cleaning, 
as well as a lacK of attention given to repairs. 
The monitors saw Classrooms witn trash cans over- 
flowing to the aegree that trash had to be shoved 
into corners to avoid stepping tnrough it. The 
monitors aiso saw oroKen winaows with broken glass 
still nanging down, others witn large winaows missing 
and replacea by plywooa for more than a month, and 
other evidence of lacK of attention to basic building 
maintenance. witn seven custodians assigned to tnis 
Duiiding, the aismal state or its general repair smacKS 
or deliberate sabotage. Tne monitors visited no otner 
schools as filthy as tnis one. 

-477- 



OTHER FINDINGS 



The statistical information provided through School 
Incidents reports (Appendices - I & II) presents a 
similar picture of safety and security issues as 
was presented in the July Report to the Federal 
Court. There are still sporadic racial incidents 
(16 for June-July and l8 for September-October) 
and there are still incidents occurring on ARA 
school buses (see report of Bus Incidents). 
English High School is still by far the most out- 
of-control-school in terms of the occurrence of 
safety-related and criminal incidents, although 
efforts are clearly being made to remedy this situa- 
tion. Monitors will continue to look for evidence 
at English High that some of these efforts are 
resulting in a reduction in criminal and safety-re- 
lated Incidents, and improvement of the school 
climate in general. 

WEAPONS 

In September and October, 26% of all of the 'Crimes 
Against Persons' and 'safety related' incidents 
involved weapons. Most of these reported incidents 
were just 'possession of weapons'. This includes 
guns, knives, razors, 'nunchucks', projectiles and 
sticks but excludes 'shod feet' which is considered 
a 'dangerous weapon' In Boston's reporting system. 
There have been very few reported incidents involving 
guns, and these have been handled quickly and severely. 
(One, this year, has resulted in an expulsion) (See 
Appendix III) . 

It appears from information provided by both school 
administrators and by central office administrators, 
that in most cases the carrying of weapons by stu- 
dents does not, necessarily, signify criminal intent. 
Part of this phenomenon appears to be related to peer 
prestige; groups of students carry some kind of weapon 
to impress their friends. When contacted about their 
children carryir^g weapons, some parents, while not 
condoning the practice, explain it as needed protection 
in moving through dangerous areas of the city enroute 
to and from school. 

It is clear, however, that regardless of how benign 
the Intent, having weapons in a school increases the 
probability of serious and violent incidents occurring, 

-478- 



and jeopardizes the safety of all students. 

Deputy Superintendent Peterkln has suggested two 
basic approaches for improving this situation. 
The first is punitive - implementing stronger, uni- 
form procedures for dealing with students possessing 
weapons. This might include more severe punishments 
(suspensions, expulsions) for students found in 
possession of weapons (other than guns), more than 
once. The second approach would be a more positive 
approach - spearheaded through student council and 
student leadership groups. This might involve school 
campaigns to encourage students to refrain from carry- 
ing weapons for the sake of improving school climate 
and the school's reputation. 

Deputy Superintendent Peterkin has Issued a memorandum 
to all Headmasters and Principals on (1) the 198O Code 
of Discipline position on weapons; (2) specific pro- 
cedures to follow when weapons are found; and (3) the 
Importance of involving student organizations (see 
appendix IV). So far, no city-wide efforts other 
than the memo, have been launched to toughen disci- 
plinary actions for weapons or further Involve student 
or parent organizations. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Boston must continue to focus the energies of central 
office staff, the Department of Safety Services, and 
school staff in preventing violence and safety-related 
Incidents in schools. This Includes: 

1. Insuring that students are promptly given copies 
of the cltywide discipline code at the beginning 
of each school year and are carefully explained 
its contents and the consequences of violations; 

2. reducing the opportunities for violent confronta- 
tions and other safety-related problems within 
individual schools by: (1) looking for repeated 
patterns of unsafe or dangerous behavior; (2) 
identifying places within or around buildings in 
which problems more frequently occur, and (3) 
identifying students who are multiple offenders 
and developing specific plans and strategies for 
dealing with these problems. 



•479- 



developing stronger, more defined procedures 
to discourage the possession of weapons in 
schools by students - including stronger puni- 
tive responses, and cltywide and school-based 
involvement of student and parent organizations, 



-480- 



Objective I 
Question : 



What steps is Boston taking to investigate the extent of 
safety problems on some school buses, and to remediate such 



problems? 
METHOD 



Monitors met with central office administrators charged with 
security on school buses to discuss plans for investigations 
of schools bus disruptions and possible remediation. Monitors 
contacted CPC and the school bus drivers union to gather and 
assess data collected by these two groups on school bus violence 
In addition, monitors discussed school bus safety with staff 
of the Safe Schools Commissfon. 



FINDINGS: 



Of the 526 incidents reported for May, June, September, Oc- 
tober, 1983, 43 were incidents involving school bus safety; 
8 were stonings, and 35 were other safety-related incidents 
occurring on school buses. (See Appendices I and II) While 
Deputy Superintendent Peterkin and Chief of Safety Services 
Christollni clearly do not see school bus safety as among 
the more important safety problems facing the Boston Public 
Schools, they have not altogether ignored its importance to 
parents. They feel that the school bus reporting procedure 
is a good one, and that, if properly utilized and followed- 
up with appropriate disciplinary and other kinds of action, 
it would reduce the repetition of certain kinds of safety 
and discipline problems. They clearly do not feel that the 
re-hiring of bus monitors will solve many of the disciplinary 
and other problems cited, nor prove cost-effective. 

The bus drivers union, CPC, and many parents and administrators 
view the removal of all school bus monitors as of 1979-80 as 
more of a cost-saving step than one dictated by lack of need. 
In fact, the CPC cites increased costs as a result of van- 
dalism caused by students on buses as an important reason to 
re-install monitors on some buses. The issue is complex and 
involves : 

a state re-lmbursement fund(Chapter 636) for school bus 
monitors which does not assure the Boston Public Schools of 
directly benefitting from funds reimbursed to the city by 
the state; 



-481- 



a school incident-reporting procedure which, according to 
some administrators is under-utilized by bus drivers (and 
a "Bus Behavioral Referral Form" which is being phased 
out) because drivers cannot or do not find sufficient time 
during their day to file timely, detailed reports with 
school administrators; 

criticism of frequent changes of bus drivers on certain 
bus runs, decreasing the familiarity and cooperation among 
drivers, student, and school administrators; 

bus driver complaints about a lack of appropriate disci- 
plinary responses from some administrators when reports 
are filed. 

charges by CPC that the BPS provides inadequate follow- 
up on reports .which are filed; 

charges by BPS administrators that some bus drivers do 
not live up to their responsibilities for maintaining dis- 
cipline, and following procedures established for handling 
disruptions on buses. 

While Deputy Superintendent Peterkin has re-emphasized to 
principals and headmasters the importance of consistent 
cooperative efforts between bus drivers and school adminis- 
trators in resolving school bus safety and discipline 
problems, this is not enough for those concerned about 
school bus safety, and those advocating the return of 
school bus monitors. Not much school department energy 
or attention has gone into responding to the school bus 
safety and discipline issues since the July Report to the 
Federal Court . 



Recommendation 



Despite the relatively low percentage of safety-related 
incidents reported on school buses, the Boston Public 
Schools should put more effort into (1) resolving some of 
the more persistent discipline and safety problems oc- 
curring on certain bus runs and responding to parents con- 
cerns about school bus safety in general. (2) Particular 
attention should be paid to those buses serving elementary 
schools and special needs students, where safety may be 
jeopardized more through high spirits and immaturity than 
willful disobedience or knowing violations of the discipline 
code. Some options for the situation might be: 

assignment and extra pay for a teacher to ride the bus 
during troublesome periods 



-482- 



the creation of a student monitor corps, selecting res- 
ponsible ^th and 5th grade students to help maintain 
order and report on problems and vandalism as a part of 
a student leadership program; 

the permanent assignment of bus monitors to elementary 
schools with particular problems 

mandating problem -solving meetings between principals/ 
headmasters, parents and bus drivers when reported bus 
incidents exceed two or three. Out of this meeting would 
come a written, mutually agreed upon plan' for reducing 
safety and discipline problems on buses. This plan would 
be evaluated at regular Intervals. 

Dealing with safety and discipline on buses serving older stu- 
dents presents a different set of problems. There are more cases 
of willful disobedience of rules and intentional vandalism. If 
monitors are to be effective, they must be well-trained in crisis 
intervention techniques, have positive and strong ties with the 
school administration, have the ability to be authoritative and 
yet defuse potentially explosive confrontations between and with 
students. All of which adds up to someone trained more like a 
Boston school police officer than an elementary bus monitor. While 
Mr. Chistolinl has cited Instances in which school police have 
ridden buses which have been problem-ridden, periodic assignment 
of school police to certain problem-ridden runs may reduce some 
abuse of the disciplinary code and Increase the climate of security 
for all students riding the school bus. In its interviews with stu- 
dents, the Safe Schools Commission has found that many students list 
school buses as one of the least safe places within their school en- 
vironment. Increasing the permanent removal from high school buses 
of students who seriously violate the discipline code more than once 
may also provide additional safeguards. 

In general, establishing a stable group of bus drivers which clearly 
understands and carries out its responsibilities for following safety 
procedures, including the consistent reporting of disciplinary in- 
fractions to a cooperative and responsive school staff may do more 
to Improve bus safety on some runs than anything else. 

Students should also be repeatedly Informed of their responsibilities 
under the discipline code and be given specific consistently rein- 
forced conseauencps for violation of that code, including nermanent 
removal from high school buses for multiple offenses. 



-483- 



OBJECTIVE 1 

yUESTION: m tnose scnoo±s with nign numbers of violent 

inciuents, whai: steps are oeing taken to 

aevelop efiective alternative programs for 
tnose disruptive studeHts not benel'ltring 
irom the regular school program: 

MEtHOjj: MoniLors met with central office administrators 

responsible for the development of such pro- 
grams and assessed tne effectiveness of their 
efforts in working with school administrators 

in those schools with more serious safety issues, 
to aevelop such programs. Monitors for both 
'safety and security' and ' stuaent discipline' 
made on-site visits to alternative programs and 
schools, ana have begun assessing the impact 
of these programs on improved school climate 
FINDINGS ^^'^ uetcer xearning outcomes for students assigned. 

alt^^rnative pkogkamis and ST u DEMT OFFEivjDEHS 

In the July 1983 Report to the Feaeral Court, state monitors 
recommended that the boston fubiic Schools begin researching 
and expanding program offerings In alternative education, 
particularly programs serving disruptive students and 
repeat offenders. This recommendation was seen as a partial 
remedy lor some of the safety and security problems plaguing 
several scnoois; Dy providing differentiated, more effective 
and engaging educational opportunities geared to the specific 
learning needs of this relatively small portion of the total 
stuaent population, the boston i'ubiic ::5Chools would also be 
reducing tne chances of tnese students aisrupting regular 
eaucation programs, and reducing their opportunities for 
victimizing other students and staff. 

AS a result of on-site visits and interviews with many school 
staff members chargea with student discipline and discipline 
referrals, several Important issues have emerged as a oacKgrouna 
for concerns about safety and security as it applies to al- 
ternative eaucation programs. 

MARGiNAi. AND HARDCORE STUDENT OFfENi)ER^> 

Many school stafi members working on discipline and safety 
issues nave made a distinction between (,a) students who are 
sometimes involved in violations of the aiscipllne code affect- 
ing tne safety and security of other students and staff; and 
(b; those who are nabitually involved m such violations. 
Tne former (a), sometimes referred to as 'marginal ' stuaents : 
more often nave poor or below average academic records, are 

-484- 



sometimes J but not always, over age; sometimes have poor self 
concepts; are occasionally Involved In acting-out behaviors 
and sometimes criminal acts; but are usually not viewed as the 
prime movers of criminal or other kinds of violations in a par- 
ticular school. These students often respond to a tone estab- 
lished in the school by other students, more heavily involved 
in criminal and other offensive behaviors. The prognosis for 
the 'marginal' students is often seen as more hopeful, and 
many of the alternative programs do accept students with this 
kind of record. Some program coordinators and others concerned 
with discipline report some dramatic turnarounds in students 
with this kind of record as the result of alternative edu- 
cational approaches and psychological, family, and social inter- 
vention strategies. Anecdotal estimates of the numbers of these 
kinds of students in schools most affected by safety and security 
problems, suggest a range between 10% and 20% of the total stu- 
dent population of those schools with more serious safety con- 
cerns . 

Those students who are habitually involved in criminal and other 
violations in schools, sometimes called 'hard-core' cases, are 
given a much slimmer chance by school officials for rehabili- 
tation within the school system. These students are: often 
over-age,' are one, two and even three-time repeaters with few 
of the 'points' needed for graduation; often come from un- 
happy, disarrayed family situations many of which are counter- 
productive to the school's attempts to provide help. These 
students are described as 'incorrigible', and are seen as atten- 
ding school primarily to victimize other students, staff and 
their property. These are the students who most school staff 
describe as "not belonging" in a regular comprehensive high 
school or middle school. Estimates of the numbers of such 
students in impacted schools range between 10 and 30 students 
per school. Although their numbers are small, these students 
are given primary blame for helping to establish a negative 
school climate, by flaunting rules, disobeying and abusing staff 
in front of other students, and remaining indifferent and some- 
times even amused by the kinds of disciplinary actions (usually 
suspensions) meted out. These students have often had several 
contacts with the police and the courts for various criminal 
offenses, and are often required to return to school, where they 
have experienced very little success, as one of the terms of 
their sentence or parole. Most of the existing 'alternative pro- 
grams are reluctant to accept referrals of 'hard-core ' students 
because of the recidivism rate among these students and the im- 
pact such students may have on other "marginal" students in the 
alternative program. 



-485- 



DISCIPLINARY TRANSFERS (see Appendix III) 

"Hard-core and some marginal students are sometimes given "dis- 
ciplinary transfers" to other (usually district) high schools 
in th. hope that a new and different school setting may prove 
more tiuccessful and not provide the same kind of peer support 
that he/she received In the original school. According to some 
reports, some of these transfers have been effective in improving 
the behavior and academic performance of some students. How- 
ever, most school administrators felt that while getting rid of 
a habitual troublemaker may be good for them, they know he will, 
more than likely, just become someone else's headache in another 
school. They have expressed little faith in most disciplinary 
transfers, and some have spoken resentfully of having been the 
recipient of such transfers without benefit of prior warning 
about the incoming student's problem-ridden record. 

It is clear that the Boston Public Schools have not devised an 
effective strategy for dealing with these 'hard-core cases' 
educationally or behavlorally , nor have they devised an effec- 
tive way of preventing these students from disrupting the edu- 
cation of other students except through continual suspensions 
and, in a few cases, expulsion. 

Many of these hard-core students have been core-evaluated, and 
placed in special needs classes for much of their school careers. 
Some administrators and staff with responsibilities for dis- 
cipline feel that special needs approaches have had little im- 
pact on their behavior nor Improved their academic achievement 
significantly. Administrators have also been constrained from 
making out-of-school placements because the majority of such 
'hard-care' offenders are Black males and out-of-school and 
out-of-dlstrict placement sites are both difficult to find and 
hareier to justify for Black males. 

ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS : Central Office Initiatives and Supports 

Sid Smith, working out of the Office of School Operations has 
within the last two years undertaken the following tasks re- 
garding alternative programs: 

1. collection and analysis of information on effective alter- 
native schools and programs throughout the country 

2. communication with individuals Involved with some of those 
programs and schools 

3. establishment and support of several alternative programs 
(Fenway School and New Horizons) and a school (Boston Prep), 
(See Appendix V) 

^. support and evaluation of all alternative programs in the 
system 

-486- 



I 



5. provision of seed money for schools wanting to develop 
alternative programs. 

Mr. Smith has expressed a specific philosophy and approach to alter- 
native education and has developed three new programs within the 
framework of some of these ideas: 

the varying educational needs of different students are 
not equally served by traditional approaches to high 
school and middle school education; 

many students disrupt, cut classes, have excessive absen- 
teeism and otherwise fail in traditional or regular programs 
because the structures of those programs and their ap- 
proaches to learning do not meet the overall human needs 
of some students, nor engage them actively enough in 
learning; 

many of these same students respond and learn better in 
an environment in which there are 

(1) more personal contacts with a smaller number of 
staff and students 

(2) clearly expressed expectations for learning specific 
concepts, skills and information, and 

(3) frequent and regular feedback on how well one is 
learning and what one needs to improve; 

- specific periods within the school program to work through 
with other students and perhaps counselors/teachers, per- 
sonal problems and other issues associated with family, 
peers and growing up; these problems will otherwise inter- 
fere with learning; 

- opportunities for experiential learning through internships, 
job placements, are important to establishing realistic 

and achievable educational and lifetime goals. (This is 
similar to the work-study goals of Boston High. ) 

COMMENDATIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. Mr. Smith is to be commended for his untiring efforts in 
expanding and improving alternative education in Boston 
Public Schools 

2. Boston needs to provide more seed money for the develop- 
ment of workable models, and to train and re-deploy staff 
to run these programs. 

-487- 



Boston central office administrators and district admin- 
istrators need to exercise more authority in seeing that 
alternative programs are expanded to those schools not 
now served, but most in need (e.g. Hyde Park, Thompson, 
Brighton High, Jamaica Plain High, Lewenberg, Charlestown, 
Gavin) and that funds are allocated and staff deployed 
and trained for their implementation and operation. 

Boston needs to devise more effective programs and 
strategies for dealing with 'hard-core' multiple offender 
students - both to limit their disruption and victimization 
of the schools which now house them, and to increase their 
chances for positive educational outcomes. The 'School 
Offenders Program' , a part of the "Child in Need of Ser- 
vices (CHINS) Law, and the development of new kinds of 
collaborative efforts between the courts and the Boston 
Public Schools should be given more attention, and more 
Information about 'School Offenders' and other existing 
programs should be disseminated among all Boston Public 
Schools . 



-488- 



OBJECTIVE I 

QUESTION 



Have problems of inconsistency in incident reporting among 
schools been resolved? 



METHODOLOGY 



Monitors interviewed administrators and staff in several schools 
throughout the system where unconfirmed reports of inconsistent 
reporting of incidents emanated. Monitors also spoke with John 
Chistolini, Chief of Safety Services and Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkin and his staff about inconsistencies in reporting in- 
cidents . 



FINDINGS 



Dr. Peterkin and John Chistolini admit that there have been 
problems in getting some school administrators to consistently 
report incidents required by the Safety Procedural Manual . To 
remedy this they periodically run spot checks to make sure all 
incidents are being completely and accurately reported. These 
spot checks consist of security staff reporting, directly to 
the Safety Department, incidents occurring in the buildings to 
which tney have been assigned. These reports are checked against 
reports submitted by the building administrator to assess their 
completeness and accuracy. If problems are found, Dr. Peterkin 
goes directly to the headmaster or principal involvea. 

The Safety Department will also move school police officers to 
other assignments when they suspect that incidents are not being 
completely or accurately reported. 

The problem, briefly stated, is that some headmasters do not 
want their schools to be perceived as problem-ridden, and there- 
fore try to limit the number of reported inciaents. They some- 
times convince safety staff to cooperate in oraer to maintain 
friendly working relationships. The irony is, however, that the 
more safety problems a school reports, the more likely that school 
is to receive additional staff and other forms of help. Instances 
of non-compliance with incident reporting required by the Safety 
Procedural Manual are very difficult for monitors to document. 
However, Deputy Superintendent Peterkin admits they do occur, and 
says that immediate corrective action is taken when they are un- 
covered. 

Problems Within Schools Regarding Accurate and Complete Reporting 

Some schools continue to have problems in getting staff and stu- 
dents to carry out safety-related responsibilities and to report 

-489- 



all Incidents required by the Safety Procedural Manual . Com- 
plete documentation of these problems remains elusive. Monitors 
have been told and have observeu, in some instances, that noc 
all staff carry out tneir responsibilities for monii^oring hall- 
ways during passing periods. Some staff 'overlook' students in- 
volved in inappropriate or unsafe behavior, seemingly because 
they are afraid to confront these students or because filing safety 
or disciplinary reports are unpleasant and time-consuming, or 
both. Some teachers interviewed report that a lack of 'ap- 
propriate' disciplinary responses by school administrators to 
reports filed, has discouraged them from filing additional re- 
ports. While many schools appear to have some of these problems, 
there are clearly some schools which have very serious problems 
involving staff morale, safety and student discipline - English 
High prime among them. 

Deputy Superintendent Peterkin and the Chief of Safety Services, 
have also reported some possible cases of 'false or inaccurate 
reports' - that is, students alledging to have been attacked or 
robbed by someone, but without any corroborating witnesses or 
evidence . 

Administrators at English High and Madison Park have reported 
a similar phenomenon, and, further, that some students, un- 
happy about their school assignments and wishing to transfer 
out of the schools, particularly White students, exaggerate 
minor happenings to appear to be far more threatening than is 
reported by other witnesses, in order to acquire a 'safety' 
transfer' to a more comfortable school. 

There is also a continuing problem at schools such as English 
High and Madison Park (which have structural lay-outs which 
are very difficult to supervise and monitor) with getting stu- 
dents to obey 'off-limits prohibitions'. Many of the robberies 
and assaults of students in these buildings occur in places in 
or around these buildings which are 'off-limits', but which 
students continue to frequent. 

Recommendations 

boston central office and all school administrators should con- 
tinue: 

1) vigorously checking all schools during the year to make sure 
that they carry out their safety-related responsibilities 
for reporting all incidents required by the Safety Procedural 
Manual . 

2) actively insisting that students and staff carry-out their 
responsibilities for maintaining their personal safety and 
the safety of others. Staff must monitor hallways, as re- 

-490- 



quired. Students must know all school rules and the Code of 
Discipline, and obey all ' of f-llmlt ' prohibitions. Both stu- 
dents and staff must report incidents required by the Safety 
Procedural Manual, and staff must file disciplinary reports 
as required. 



-491- 



la 
September - October 1983 

Total Incidents (Crimes Against Persons and Safety Related) 

' H - 213 

M - 50 

E - 13 

Other - 7 



Total = 283 

Incidents Occurring on ARA Buses 

H - 14 Bus Stonings - H = 

M - 8 M = 

E - 2 E = 2 
Other - 4 



Total = 28 

Racial Incidents 

H - 14 
M- 3 
E - 1 



Total = 18 



Incidents in which weapons were involved 

(Including robberies, assaults, alterca- ^^^^^ _ ^3 ^^ 26% of Total Incidents 

tions) 



-493- 



lb 
May - June 1 983 



Total Incidents (Crimes Against Persons and Safety Related 

H - 161 
M- 62 
E - 20 



Total =243 
Incidents occurring on Buses 



H - 


4 


M- 


9 


E - 


2 


Total - 


15 


Racial Incidents 




H - 


12 


M - 


3 


E - 


1 


Total = 


16 



Bus Stonings - H - 2 
M - 2 
E - 2 



Total - 



Incidents in which 

weapons were involved Total - 66 or 21% of Total Incidents 

(including robbery, assaults, 

altercations) 



-494- 



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Manning 

Fuller 

Lee 

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Kilmer 

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Jackson Mann 


3 



1- 



1 



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tn 


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1 




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o 


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c 

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I. 
h 


t— 


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use or 
posses- 
sion 




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(verbal & 
physical) 




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Robbery 

Attempts 


■ 


3 

d 

U) 

< 


2 (1 Racial) 

1 

1 

1 


Weapons 
Possession, 
Threats, 
Other 


1 
1 

1 

(Bus Stoning) 

1 

1 

(Bus Stoning) 

1 

1 





Ellis 

Blacks tone 
Tobin 
Fifield 

Jackson Mann 
Mather 

Elihu Greenwood 
Condon 

S. Greenwood 
Hennigan 
Trotter 
Longfellow 



-505- 



ai 



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D±SC±PLxNAnY TnAN^FEnS - Depterauer - October ly83 

Total = 6 

^ - Black males 
2 - Blcick remales 

2 01 the cases involved assaults on staff or students 

4 of the cases Invoivea repeated aisruptions and fighting 

(2y disciplinary transiers for 19o2-i98:s - 2/B, ^ W) 

£.XPuLSiONa - September - uctober 19o3 



Total = 2 

d. Black maley 

1 of the cases involved possession of a I'irearm 

1 of the cases involved possession of a knlre and 
a large amount or marijuana 

^ orher expulsion requests are pending 



-507- 



r^. 




^^--^^^<^^f DEPUTY SyPERlMTEHDEWT'S " J^8 



fi^EMORAk'DOAfi 




\M-rCi'wrr'.''.fCrrrj',";-i'T I nS' i r v 






No. 13, 1983-1984 
September 1, 1983 



mN5ER0US OBJECTS 

To: Ccornunity Superintendents, Headmasters, Principals and Other 
Administrative Heads: 

PLEASE BRING TiUS MEMCRANDUM TO THE ATTENIICN OF ALL STAFF UNDER YOUR 
JURISDICTION BY MEAIS OF A RATED CHECK LIST . 

Tbe 1980 Code of Discipline lists as grounds for suspension the possession of 
any firearm, loiife, razor blade, club, explosive, inace or teargas, or other 
dangerous objects of no reasonable vise to the student at school (Section 7.5). 

Headnasters/Principals must comcnunicate to students that the possession of any- 
dangerous weapons or objects in school, on the way to or from school, or 
during school-related activities is strictly forbidden, and that violations of 
this rule will be dealt with appropriately. Involvement from the Student 
EtT-ird.c Racial Council and Student Government should be sought in this endeavor.- 

In the event that a WEAPCN or aAN3RDUS OBJECT is confiscated tb.e following 
procedures are to be adhered to: 

1. EACH ITEM SHOULD BE KEPT IN THE POSSESSION OF THE AR-IINISTRATOR UNTIL 
CONTACT IS MADE WITH A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE SAFETY SERVICE DEPARIhEvT. 
(445-1400 or 726-6583) . , 

2. THIS EEPRESENTATIVE WELL BE RESPOGIBLE TO GIVE A RECEIPT, TAG AM) 
TRANSPORT THE ITEM TO THE SAFETY SERVICE DEPARIMENT AT MADISCN PARK HIOl 
SCHDCL (WITH THE EXCEPTION OF FIREARMS) . 

3. THE SAFETY SERVICE . DEPARTMENT WILL GUARANTEE ACCESS TO THE ITEM K)R ANY 
HEARINGS, CONFERENCES, COURT PROCEDURES, ETC. 

4. FCLLCWING ANY PARENTAL CONFERENCES, WEAPONS WHICH ARE CLASSIFIED 
ACCORDING TO MASS. GENERAL LAWS CHPS. 269 AS "DANGEROUS WEAPONS" WILL BE 
TUF^NED OVER TO THE BOSTCN POLICE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY. 

In no instance should or will a weapon or dangerous object be returned to a 
student. The Department of Safety will be responsible for returning any 
property not classified as a dangerous weapon to parents or legal guardians 
iroon request . 

INQUIRIES REGARDING THIS MBCELANDUM SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO MR. JOHN 
CHISTCLINI, CHIEF OF SAFETY SERVICES, TELEPHCWE, 445-1400, 726-6583, MADISON 
PARK HIGH, 55 NEW DUCLEY STREET, RQXBURY, MA 02119- 

. ■ ■ -508- Robert S. Peterkin 

Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 



ST/iF.-ir.'G 1983-1984 



10/17/=3 

Va. 



HOUF^ 



UNIT 



OFFICER 



PRIMARY 



SLCO.'.'DARY 



GREEN ZONE 



7:15 - 


3:15 


31 


7:00 - 


3:00 


32 


7:00 - 


3:00 


33 


8:00 - 


4:00 


101 


7:15 - 


3:15 


13 


7:30 - 


3:30 


34 


7:15 - 


3:15 


35 


7:00 - 


3:00 


36 


7:15 - 


3:15 


37 


7:15 - 


3:15 


38 



oic- 



SGT. 



w. 


Hickey 


s. 


Graham 


B. 


Butler 


E. 


Con lin 


H. 


Strickland 


J. 


Vasquez 


P. 


Collins 


L. 


Tate 


J. 


ivallace 


J. 


Kane 



West Roxbury High 
West Roxbury High 
West Roxbury High 
Washington Irving 

Jamaica Plain High 

Jamaica Plain High 

Jamaica Plain High 

Jamaica Plain High 
Curley Middle 
Roosevelt 



Transportation 
W. Irvine 



Transportation 

Kennedy 

Longfellow 

Parkman 
Agassiz 
Fuller 



YELLOW ZONE 



7:15 - 


3:15 


9 


7:00 - 


3:00 


39 


7:15 - 


3:15 


40 


7:15 - 


3:15 


41 


7:15 - 


3:15 


42 


8:00 - 


4:00 


43 


7:30 - 


3:30 


99 


7:15 - 


3:15 


98 


7:15 - 


3:15 


44 


7:00 - 


3:00 


45 


7:30 - 


3:30 


46 



SGT. T. Gomperts 

J. Coleman 

J. Turner 

J. Fortes 

H. Dea 

J. Hurney 

D. Brown 

J. DiReeno 
D. Flakes 
A. Albano 
J. Giardina 



Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Edwards 
Prep 

Umana 

Umana 

E. Boston High 

E. Boston High 



Transportation 

Late Bus 

Blackstone 

Edwards 

Quincy 

Eliot 

Timilty 

Guild 
Prescott 
Barnes 
McKay 



-509- 



Di;rAr:r;:;;:;T o? 



:TV 5UKVICES 



V b 



S7PSF1UG 1963-1954 



HOURS 



UNIT 



OFFICER 



PRIMARY 



SECONDARY 



ORANGE ZONE 



7:15 - 


3:15 


14 


7:30 - 


3:30 


47 


7:30 - 


3: 30 


48 


7:15 - 


3:15 


49 


7:30 - 


3:30 


50 


8:00 - 


4:00 


51 


7:15 - 


3:15 


52 


7:15 - 


3:15 


53 


7:15 - 


3:15 


18 


7:30 - 


3:30 ' 


54 


7:30 - 


3:30 


55 


7:15 - 


3:15 


56 


7:15 - 


3:15 


57 


8:00 - 


4:00 


58 


8:00 - 


4:00 


59 


8:00 - 


4:00 


60 


8:00 - 


4:00 


101 



SGT. 



7:00 - 


3:00 


10 


7:15 - 


3:15 


61 


7:30 - 


3:30 


62 


7:15 - 


3:15 


63 


7:30 - 


3:30 


64 


7:30 - 


3:30 


65 


7:00 - 


3:00 


66 


7: 15 - 


3:15 


67 


7:00 - 


3:00 


17 


7:30 .- 


3: 30 


68 


7:30 - 


3:30 


69 


7:30 - 


3:30 


70 


7:30 - 


3: 30 


71 


8:00 - 


4:00 


72 



SGT. 



SGT. 



SGT. 



D. Bilotas 
C. Calloway 
K. Kelley 
J. Gutierrez 
T. Sanabria 
J. Lay ton 
J. Oliver 
W. Fredericks 



Dorthester High 
Dorchester High 
Dorchester High 
W. Wilson Middle 
Marshall 
Holland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 



s. 


Bell 


Hyde Park High 


K. 


Winn 


Hyde Park High 


G. 


Williams 


Hyde Park High 


V. 


Younger 


Hyde Park High 


K> 


Partello 


Tileston 


A. 


Almeida 


Thompson Middle 


G. 


Smallwood 


Mattahunt 


K. 


Baker 


Lewenberg 


E. 


Conlin 
BLUE ZONE 


W. Irving Middle 


M. 


Hennessey 


English High 


K. 


Devlin 


English High 


W. 


Baker 


English High 


M. 


Correa 


English High 


T. 


Clements 


English High 


S. 


Ammidown 


English High 


G. 


Guptill 


Latin High 


J. 


Reteguiz 


Tobin 


J. 


Cronin 


Brighton High 


W. 


Murphy 


Brighton High 


L. 


Catron 


Brighton High 


M. 


Johnson 


Brighton High 


N. 


McDougall 


Latin Academy 


A. 


Hardaway 


Hennigan 



Transportation 

S. Greenwood 

Fifield 

Fifield 

Mather 

Mather 

Holland 



District 
Chittick 
Thompson 
Rogers - 

Lee 

District 



IV 

- Tayloi 
Channinc 

IV 



Farragut 
Ma eke y 
Tobin 

Hurley 



Transportat it 

Taft 

Jacks on -Mann 

Hennigan 

Mackey 



■510- 



di:?akt;:i:;t or gati^ty sep.vicks 



V c 



UNIT 



ST/.J-TIN'G 1983-198 '1 



OFFICER 



BROWN ZONE 



PRIM-^VRY 



SECONDARY 



2:00 


30 


3:00 


73 


3:00 


74 


3:00 


75 


4:00 


76 


4:00 


77 



SGT. L. Allen 

L. Higginbottom 
J. Stew.irt 

K. Bourque 
John Jones 
S. Willia-Tis 



Technical High 
Technical High 
Technical High 

Lewis - Ellis 
M. L. King 
M. L. King 



Mendell 
Higginson - 
'■/hite Stadium 



7:00 - 3:00 
7: 30 - 3: 30 
7:30 - 3:30 



15 
91 
92 



SGT. J. Dupree 
J. Finn 
I. Thibodeaux 



J. E. Burke High 
J. E. Burke High 
J. E. Burke High 



Bus Route 
Hernandez 



RED ZONE 



3:00 


5 


3:30 


78 


3:00 


79 


3:30 


80 


3:00 


81 


3:30 


82 


4:00 


83 


3:30 


84 


3:30 


85 


4:00 


86 


3:00 


19 


3:15 


87 


3:00 


88 


3:00 


89 


2:00 


90 




93 




94 




95 




96 




97 



LT. D. Rorie 

J. LaSelva 
T. Giannino 
K. Jackson 
R. Kelleher 
A. Skrine 
M. Ogarro 
E. Johnson 
P. Winbush 
A. Fenderson 



SGT. W. Smith 

.M. Harrell 

N. Sabator 

S. Rogers 

E. Knowlton 

Jos. Jones 

P. Janey 

P. Shaughnessy 

C. McDonough 
B. Jeanetti 



Madison Park 

Madison Park 

Madison Park 

Madison Park 

Madison Park 

Madison Park 

McCormack 

Gavin 

Gavin 

Dearborn - Wheatley 

HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 

Night Shift 
Night Shift 
Night Shift 

Safety Department 
Safety Department 



Bus Route 

Timilty 

Winthrop 
Hurley 
Wheatley 
Trotter 



TransDortation 



11 
12 



SGT. 
SGT. 



R. Durkin 
D. Johnson 



Cruiser Patrol 
Cruiser Patrol 



:00 



7:00 



15 



R. Franklin 



Night Shift - Safety Department 



■511- 



VI a 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 
SCHOOL OPERATIONS 
ROBERT S. PETERKIN 



ME>DRANDUM 



TO: Frank Banks, Massachusetts Department of Education 

IRCM: Sid Smith, School Operations A^^ 

RE: Alternative Programs 

DATE: October 25, 1983 

Please find enclosed a listing and description of the alternative programs now 
operating in the Boston Public Schools. These programs have been broken down 
into "Intervention" and "Conprehensive" programs. The intervention prograas 
offer part-time si^port services to students who have been identified as 
ha-zing academic, attendance or behavioral problems. Conprehensive programs 
enroll students for most or all of the sch£x>l day and provide academic as well 
as si5)port services. 

In addition to the above, please find a recent memorandum (Request for 
Proposals) which was circulated throughout the system. I believe this can 
give you a capsule ATiew of the state of alternative education and some 
inmediate thrusts focused on continued development. Finally, you will also 
find enclosed a copy of an evaluation program to be conducted during this 
school year. 

Should you have any additional questions, please feel free to call. 



/bab 

xc: Dan French, D^t. of Education 

Ends 



-512- 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 EXT. 5330 AREA 617 



'■^■"S It^itMi 'Lua.ixrbl 



VI b 



OOMPREHENSIVE PROGRAMS : 

1. Anot±ier Coxjrse to Colleoe (ACC) : This program, begun in 1975, and 
presently enrolling 200 11th and 12t±i grade students, is targeted at 
providing "late bloomers" with an intensive college-prep program. ACC 
has a cooperative arrangement with UNkss-Boston, allowing students full 
access to the university's courses, programs and facilities. The 
program, which is open and voluntary, is located at 60 Joy Street, 
Boston, MA.. 

2. Boston Prep : This program was initiated in October, 1982 and is designed 
to service 100 overaged high school stxjdents who have severe academic, 
attendance and/or behavioral problems. The program is competency-based, 
providing students with an opportunity to accelerate their acquisition of 
school credits and shorten the time span leading toward high school 
graduation. Boston Prep has developed a cooperative relationship with 
UMass-Boston and a variety of himan service agencies throughout Boston. 
The program is located at 60 Joy Street, Boston, MA. 

3. Fenway School : This program, initiated in September, 1983 is located on 
the 10th floor at English High School, has a total enrollment of 115 and 
is open to any 10-12 grade student at English High (with a 25X referral 
population). The program has a strong focus on the development of a 
sense of community and participation, incorporates a mastery-learning 
planning, instruction and management system and eiqjloys numerous 
community resources for experiential learning activities. Fenway has a 
cooperative relationship with Boston University and the John Hancock Life 
Insurance Company, 

4. New Horizons : (See Fenway) located at ^krtin Luther King Middle School; 
100 7th grade students. 

5. Home Base : This program is located at Madison Park High, was initiated 
in September, 1982 and is designed to service 50 students with 
conbinations of academic, attendance and behavioral problems. The 
program provides an academic and support program for a majority of their 
students day. Two to three periods are spent in the mainstream, with 
progress-tracking provided by the Home Base staff. Home Base has a 
cooperative arrangement with Northeastern University and the Madison Park 
Collaborative. 

6. Log School : This program, initiated in September, 1974, is located at 
220 Bowdoin Street, Dorchester, MA, and provides academic and si-qjport 
services to 25-30 high risk, District 5 middle school students. The 
program is run through a collaborative effort between District 5 and the 
Federated Dorchester Neighborhood Houses. 

7. School-WitJhin-School (SWS): The SWS Program was initiated in 1975 and 
provides full afvifl pmi p and siq^port services to 75 students in South 
Boston High School. The program serves any student, though it does have 
a high concentration of moderate to high-risk enrollees. Admissions is 
open and voluntary. 

-513- 



VI c 



lOTERVEMlON PROGRAMS 

8. Comprehensive School -Age Parenting Program (CSAPP) : This program was 
initiated in 1978 and provides Ir^tructional and support services to 
^proximately 200 pregnant and parent teens at English and Jamaica Plain 
High Schools. 

9. RECAP : This program was initiated in 1980 and serves five middle schools 
in District 3, 6 and 7. The program is targeted at students who have 
repeated grades, in the middle schools, at least two times. Through a 
contractual arrangement calling for rigid achievement, attendance and 
standardized test-scoring standards, students are offered an opportunity 
to accelerate their promotion into Mgh school. 

10. Student Assistance Center ; This program, initiated in September, 1982, 
provides acadfani c^ counseling and instructional stjpport services to 
at-risk students at English High School. The program is targeted at 
ninth-grade repeaters and two-time suspendees. 

11. Intervention Program : This program, initiated in September, 1982, 
provides si^jport, intervention and referral services to high-risk 
students at Jamaica Plain High School. In addition to this, the 
Intervention Program also conducts an Occupational Preparedness program 
for targeted students. 



■514- 



VII a 

THE SCHOOL COfvlMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 
SCHOOL OPERATIONS 
ROBERT S PETERKIN 

ME>PIl<^NIXJM 

TO: Principals, Headmasters, CommLinity Si^ierintendents , Teachers 

Kiai: Sid Smith, Project Director, Alternative Education 

FE: Request for Planning Proposals 

DATE: October 14, 1983 

Please find enclosed a brief narrative about Boston Public School alternative 
edvication programs and an accompanying "Request for Planning Proposals". In 
the interest of ensuring the development of the best alternative programs and 
identifying those teacJiers and administrators who have the interest, 
creativity and energy to work for their inception, small planning grants will 
be made available to individuals, schools or districts for the fell/winter of 
1983-1984. These grants may be used to pijrchase time (substitute teachers) , 
travel or technical assistance to assist in the development of an 
inrolementation plan and budget for an alternative school/program in your 
building or district. "These plans will then be supported, through the 
Alternative Education Program, during the budget development process, for 
implementation in 1984-85. In addition to this, external funds, above and 
beyond those funds already available to t±ie Alternative Education Program, 
will also be sought to provide additional seed money necessary for program 
inplementation. Though there can be no guarantees as to the level of event'aal 
funding, all funds available to the Alternative Education Program will be 
directed tc^^ard implementation of these programs. 

A maximum of five (5) proposals will be approved for contin'jed development, at 
a maximum initial expenditure of seven luxndred fifty dollars per grant 
($750). Upon g^proval of the proposals, additional technical assistance will 
be made available to grant recipients, at no cost, through the Alternative 
Education Program. 

Ten copies of this memo have been distributed to the Faculty Senates in each 
school. Please make all due efforts to ensure that all teachers are aware of 
the availability of these funds. All proposals must be filed in the Office of 
School Operations, 26 Court Street, Boston, MA 02108 (attention: Alternative 
Education Project) no later than November 11, 1984. Proposals will be 
reviewed, with appro^/al notification to be sent no later than Novenber 18, 
1984. 

Any questions or requests for assistance are welcoiaod and encouraged. Thiise 
should be directed to Sid Smith, 26 Court Street, Boston, MA 02108, 726-6200, 
&ct. 5337. 

-515- 



VTI b 



ALTERNATIVE EDUCATIC^^: EOSTm PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Alternative education prograras, as inpleaenCed in the Boston Public 
Sdho'Dls, have been designed to address the needs of a broad constituency 
se^-drg stxcr^er acadeaic programs, a more responsive school cliniate, or in 
■zziTf cases, a setting where adiieveaent can replace paSt failures and 
cooed tnent can replace boredoni, alienation or disciplinary exclusion. 

Boston Pjblic School alternative education prograais are designed to 
provide stud-eats with, learning environnents aJnd experiences that offer an 
option to the regular school program. In cost cases, alternative prograais are 
S3£ll schools or schools-witiiin-schools offering increased progransaatic 
control to participants, intensified teacher -student-parent interaction, 
ccotinuity of prograa and participants across grade levels, and an integrated 
instructional program. These programs are designed to increase the level and 
rate of stuceots' academic achievecent, enhance students' feelings of wortii 
S2d self-esteem and decrease absenteesim and disciplinary problems. In 
aiditioQ to t±iis, these programs are designed to provide teachers and 

tr^t vill provide cations for students and diversity within a given school's 
educational program. The programs are designed for any student, with a 
psrticjlar interest in attracting students, of all ability levels, who have 
been unsTJCcess5jl in the regular education program- These students represent 
E broad array of needs and interests, demanding innovative approaches to 
cjrricilira, instruction, resource utilization, credentialing and school 
orgsnizaticn- Alternative programs should represent a progrannjatic diversity 
providing stxxJents with real ciioices for their continued education. 



■516- 






VII c 



/ 



2 

* 
M 

^ 



PROGRAM DEVELOPMEOT CRITERIA: SCffiOLS WITHIN SCHDCfLS 

. proposals for tiia initiation of a sdK)ol-within-a-school will be rated 
.rding to the following criteria. 

I. Concept: The proposed program should be defined by a theme, an 
instructional style, unique learning opportunities, a unique 
organizational/social structure or sooe other characteristic that 
distinguishes it from the regular education program. In exceptional 
cases, programs may be defined to address a particular population of 
students, though in no cases will programs be allow ed to serve as 
exc l usionary sites for students . ! 

II. Location: The program should be hDused in an attractive, separate 
space, preferably with separate access. 

III. Basic Skills: The program should pay special attention to the 
development and measurement of reading, writing, confutation and 
critical thinking skills as discrete as well as cross -discipline 
concerns. ^^ 

Qjrriculum: The curriculum should be conprehensive, building upon 
the citywide curriculum and ensuring studies in Language Arts, Math 
History/Social Studies and Science (with opportunities for 
additional study in other discirjlines) . 

A. 



IV. 



V. 



B. 



C. 



Key^instructional mterial needs should be identified as a part 
of the proposal development process. 

Training/staff development needs should be identified as a part 
of the proposal developnent process. 

Any program specific skill and content requirements, above and 
beyond the citywide curriculum, should be identified as a part 
of the proposal development process. 

Resource De velopment : The program will be rated on its ability to 
recruit resources from business and university partners as well as 
volunteer and community agencies. These resources may be used as 
complements to the regular classroom activities as well as leamina 
resources external to the classroom and school. Consideration 
should be given to non-school-based learning activities. 

VI. School Supp ort Mechanisms : The program should provide for 

program, student and staff support/development activities (teacher 
advisor program, peer tutoring, student faculty senate, group 
meetirigs, in-service training . . . .) » f r 



-517- 



— .^., .— >— ^ _ . VII d 



VII. Parental Invplveraent : Provisions should be made for parental 
participation in admissions and programmatic activities. 

VIII. Student Selection : Programs shotiLd be open to all students, to be 
admitted on a referral basis. These slots should be reserved for 
students who have previously demonstrated behavior that has placed 
their academic progress in jeopardy, on a consistent basis (high 
absenteeism, truancy, repeated failures). All referrals must also 
be admitted on a voluntary basis, with permission from the 
principal, parent and program cooordinator. In all cases, the 
student population will reflect the home school's population, by 
race and ethnic origin. 

IX. Size : The program will be expected to be small, with a total 
student population not to exceed 250 stvidents. 

X. Staff : Staffing (teachers) should occur at existing levels, unless 
additional staff funding will be sought through external funds. An 
Administrator and counselor should be assigned to each pixigram. 



-518- 



Student Discipline 



I 



i 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE REPORT 

Monitoring Objective 

1. To review, on a semi-annijal basis, a report of suspensions and expulsions at 
each school, with the nature of the offense, the grade, race, and sex of the 
students affected, and the length of time for each suspension. 

Question 

A. Which Boston public schools have: 

a) significant disproportionate suspensions by race? 

b) high suspension rates as conpared to other Boston schools? 

c) low suspension rates as ccnpared to other Boston schools? 

Process 

Suspension statistics for schools at all levels for the period of January through 
April, 1983, were analyzed in the July 15 Department of Education report. These schools 
in all three levels that had high suspension rates and/or disproportionate rates of sus- 
pension were identified. Also, those high schools that had low and even rates of suspen- 
sion were identified. As statistical analysis for suspensions was only done for the 
period of January, 1983, through April, 1983, in the July DOE report, suspension statis- 
tics for the entire 1982-83 school year were corpiled to validate previous statistical 
analysis and to identify' any other schools with high and/or disproportionate suspension 
rates that were not previously cited. 

FINDINGS - ST?^TISTICAL ANALYSIS 

Suspension statistics for the entire school year of 1982-1983 were analyzed to validate 
initial statistical analysis for the July 15 DOE report, and to determine if any addi- 
tional schools not identified in the last report had high and/or disproportionate sus- 
pension rates. 

At the high school level, Charlestown High continued to s\ispend students at almost 
three times the rate of any other high school, with English High having the second 
highest suspension rate. Boston Latin School continued to suspend Black students at 
two and one-half tiities the expected rate, while Brighton High and East Boston High sus- 
pended black students at twice the expected rate. Copley Square High, Charlestown High 
and the Umana School suspended Black students at a significantly higher rate than 
expected. Suspensions for Vfute students at Jamaica Plain High, Burke High, Madison 
Park High, Copley Square High and the Iftnana School continued to be significantly lower 
than expected. The only statistic that significantly changed was that of the expected 
rate of siospensions for White students at Hyde Park High. Hyde Park High was the only 
school with a suspension rate for White students that was higher than expected. In 
analyzing suspension statistics for the entire school year, the suspension rate of the 
school dropped down to be the expected rate. The suspension rates for White students 
at West RDxbury High, Boston Latin Academy and Boston Technical High were all slightly 
above the expected rate, but none of them significantly so. 

At the middle school level, the Edwards Middle School continued to have a suspension 
rate two and one-half times that of any other middle school, vdiile the Roosevelt Middle, 
Michelangelo Middle, and the Gavin Middle had suspension rates high enough to merit on- 
site monitoring. The Roosevelt Middle, Michelangelo Middle, Gavin Middle and Thcmpson 
Middle also had significantly higher rates of suspension than expected for Black students. 

-519- 



At the elementary level, the McKay Elementary School continued to have the highest 
suspension rates, v^le the Eliot Elementary School ended the school year with a 
suspension rate high enough to also require on-site monitoring. 

Thus, statistical analysis for the entire school year of 1982-1983 validated all 
statistical analysis presented in the previous report, with the exception of Hyde 
Park High School. Those schools cited will continue to receive on-site monitoring. 

Statistical analysis will continue to be ccnpleted as suspension statistics for the 
school year 1983-84 are ccmpiled. These statistics will be analyzed to determine 
if those schools with high and/or disproportionate suspension rates have lowered 
these rates, and to identify other schools not already cited that might have high and/ 
or disproportionate suspension rates for the school year 1983-84. 

Monitoring Objectives 

2. To determine, on the basis of these reports, whether the Code of Discipline is 
being followed consistently, and whether apparent patterns of inequitable treat- 
ment persists. 

3. To monitor on site, if necessary, schools in vM.ch there are apparent patterns of 
inequitable application of the Code of Discipline. 

Question 

B. What school factors contribute to the above-identified rates of suspension; e.g., 
school climate, staff attitudes, methods of discipline, multiple suspensions for 
a small number of students? (January/ July 1984) 

FINDINGS ON DISCIPLINE PR3BLEMS 

Although discipline is administered more equitably than in the past, and although new 
programs and staff exist that address discipline, significant discipline problotis still 
remain in those schools visited. These discipline problems were found more at those 
schools identified as having high and/or disproportionate (by race) sxispension rates. 
Discipline problans were cited as existing in many forms: class cutting, tardiness, 
disruptive behavior, vandalism, graffitti, robbery, assault,and possession of weapons. 
On-site monitoring revealed several causes for these discipline problems. 

First, at sane schools, especially at Boston Latin School, Hyde Park High, and West 
Roxbury High, there is a noticeably stall number of Black and Hispanic administrators 
in positions of leadership. This absence of role models could lead to additional 
discipline problems for scms Black and Hispanic students. The Headmaster at West 
Roxbury High denied that it created a problem; however, it should be noted that the 
addition this year of Black and Hispanic administrators at the Edwards Middle, Brighton 
High, Charlestown High and Boston Latin have all produced greater sensitivity to 
discipline issues and have had a positive impact on school climate (the sensitivity 
of each individual should also not be overlooked) . 

A second factor that contributed to discipline problems was that many staff noted 
(and again, it seemed most prevalent in those schools with high and/or dispropor^tionate 
suspension rates) that certain white teachers take a confrontative approach with Black 
and Hispanic students, especially Black males. Many times, a confrontative approach 



-520- 



by a TifdtB teacher vihen dealing with a Black male student may escalate a minor 
discipline problem into a major one. Other staff noted that certain other White 
teachers (and this was also observed by the monitor) withdraw from dealing with 
a Black male student v*io is being disruptive, thus giving that student a message 
tliat his inappropriate beliavior will not be addressed. 

A third factor is that school staff noted that black students in these schools 
might be more likely to have discipline problems or be caught in possession of 
a weapon because they fear for their personal safety. Especially at Charlestown 
High (although it is being addressed by the new Hispanic Assistant Headmaster) 
and the Edwards Middle (vMch has a Black Headmaster) , students interviewed stated 
this as an issue. 

Fourth, it was observed in all schools visited that those students who experience 
academic frustrations are the students who are most likely to experience discipline 
problems. Staff members in these schools stated that a large group of students 
ccme into the middle and high schools with a lack of basic skills in language arts, 
math, and study skills, and therefore experience a high degree of frustration when 
faced with academic work they do not understand and cannot ccrtplete. This high 
level of frustration often translates into behavior problems and may result in a 
suspension. Many teachers stated that on test days, there is a higher rate of dis- 
cipline problems than on other days because students act out their frustration at 
not being able to ccstplete the test. At Charlestown High, it was noted that the 
median reading level of inconing ninth graders was 6.3 with many students reading 
between the 1st and 4th grade level. This lack of skills creates a greater likeli- 
hood of discipline problems. 

One consequence is that many of these students end up repeating grades two and three 
times. At Hyde Park High, the Headmaster stated that out of 287 freshmen, 80 students 
were repeating the grade (and this was a ccmmon proportion throughout all schools 
visited) . Few prograitnatic changes (class changes, remedial classes, tutoring ser- 
vices, coiJinseling services) are eirployed in any school to provide support services 
or incentives to these repeating students. Students who were repeating a grade were, 
consequently, more likely to becone frustrated and continue their cycle of discipli- 
nary infractions (see Safety and Security report) . 

Fifth, most students having academic and/or behavioral problems do not receive adequate 
support services fron the school. Teachers cited a severe lack of materials, especial- 
ly textbooks and mimeo paper, vAiich restricts the amount of hcmework and classwork 
that can be assigned. In addition, many teachers cited overcrowded classroons of 37, 
and even up to 44 students. Overcrowded classrocms, coupled with a lack of materials, 
severely curtails the efforts of even the most dedicated teacher to respond adequately 
to those students with additional academic and/or behavioral needs, thus creating 
additional discipline problems. 

In most schools visited, school staff cited that many teachers lacked a sensitivity 
to students, a non-confrontative concept of behavior management, and a creative ap- 
proach to curriculum. Many teachers interviewed stated that they were disillusioned 
with education, that they lacked energy for the job, and they remained in teaching 
only for the salary and the job security. One teacher stated, "How do you expect me 
to really teach when I have a classrocm full of 35 animals?" - an attitude unlikely 
to create a positive learning environment. 



-521- 



It shoxold be noted, howsver, that teachers v*io felt this way cited specific 
causes for their disillusionment: the massive layoffs, unexplained transfers 
frcm school to school, and the position taken by the School Conmittee in con- 
tract negotiations. Teachers wonder how they can be expected to prcmote higher 
student test scores v*en teacher-student ratios are increasing, shortages of 
materials are worsening, and the number of students with academic and behavior- 
al problems is growing. 

For students with academic and/or behavioral needs, there are few si^^port ser- 
vices outside of the classroom to assist them. Guidance counselors are generally 
ineffective. Most of them, v^en they have time for counseling, focus on college- 
bound students. Those gxiidance counselors v*id do have a sensitivity towards stu- 
dents with academic and/or behavioral problans are bogged down in caseloads that 
are, at a minimum, 300 st\idents. 

Other support services within most schools are generally lacking (although addi- 
tions cited previously have helped) . Most schools have experienced a cutback in 
support services to students in need (tutorials, remedial classes, counseling 
services) . This also restricts the alternatives to suspension at the disposal of 
each school. 

The sixth and final factor is that staff cited a general lack of parental involve- 
ment in the education of many students who are experiencing behavioral problems. 
Staff stated that most parents cane to the school only once. Parental involvement 
was cited as a key to student academic achievement and appropriate behavior. 

Most irtportantly, all staff eirphasized their belief that among those students having 
academic and/or behavioral problems, there is a percentage (estimated between five 
to ten percent of the student population in each school) that, given the limited 
resources and support services available, the schools cannot serve. This group is 
described as those students v^io are habitual non-attenders and habitual offenders. 
These students were cited as continually ccrmitting offenses of disruptive behavior, 
cutting classes, tardiness, leaving school grounds, and other behaviors that both 
result in the student being suspended and disrupting the education of other students. 

It was stated by seme staff that a number of students in this group were forced to 
be in school yet did not want to attend. These students included those vjho were 
told by a jxjvenile court jiadge to attend school or face incarceration, and those 
students v*io have to attend school in order for their parents to receive welfare 
benefits. Teachers understandably find it difficult to motivate these students if 
they do not want to attend; thus, they usually beccme discipline problems. 

Staff felt that this group of multiple offenders was responsible for most of the 
discipline problatis within each school. (This was also cited statistically in the 
DOE report.) 

Staff mattiers stressed the need for alternative programs in v^iich to place these 
students.. This would provide a better chance for these students to succeed, as well 
as improve the school environments of the sending schools by removing a disruptive 
element. One administrator stated, "I want to run a school where kids can learn 
and not be disrupted by a small group of students." Another administrator stated, 
"You can't force district and magnet high schools to be the alternatives." 



■522- 



One of the few options available to Headmasters for students with habitual 
discipline problans is a limited number of inter-district disciplinary trans- 
fers. This was seen by this monitor as adding to the problem more than provid- 
ing a solution. There are no additional services in the receiving school to 
help that student than are in the sending school. In addition, students were 
transferred with a "clean slate"; that is, disciplinary records are not sent to 
the receiving school. Consequently, receiving schools have little infornetion 
about the inccming student and so cannot adequately address the student's educa- 
tional needs. This procedure may endanger the receiving school, as evidenced by 
the transfer of a student at Hyde Park High (vAio was found to be carrying dynamite 
in the school) to English High without the English High administration knowing of 
the incident. 

Another option is "social pranotion." Administrators at the middle school level 
admitte d that they socially pranote students to high school . They argued that 
when students becane 16, 17, and 18 years old, they pose a major disruptive in- 
fluence in the school. Few, if any, alternative programs exist, so that it is in 
the school's best interests to pranote such students. Teachers stated that admini- 
strators scmetimes praroted students v/bo did not deserve to be pronoted, yet they 
recognized the dilenma of not being able to offer these students adequate services. 

All schools stressed the need both for increased support services within schools 
and for the development of more alternative programs for students who are not benefit- 
ting frcm the district or magnet high school program. 

Question 

C. Is the Code of Discipline being consistently enforced, especially regarding 
suspension rates and alternatives to suspension, in these schools? 
(January/July 1984) 

Process 

Those schools that were cited as having high and disproportionate (by race) sus- 
pension rates, as well as those schools having low and proportionate (by race) sus- 
pension rates, were visited on-site. These schools were visted to analyze all 
school factors (for example, school climate, staff attitudes, disciplinary proce- 
dures, numbers of students who have been suspended multiple times) that contributed 
to the suspension rates. 

The following is a breakdown of those schools that received on-site monitoring: 

SCHCXDLS WITH HIGH A^D/OR DISPROPORriC»JATE SUSPENSICN RATES 

Brighton High School Hyde Park High School 

Charlestown High School Madison Park High School 

Boston Latin School Edwards Middle School 

English High School Thcnpson Middle School 

SCHOOLS WITH LOW AND EVEN SUSPENSICW RATES 

South Boston High School 
West Roxbury High School 

All on-site monitoring included interviews with administrators, teachers, guidance 
counselors, and students (especially those students who had been previously suspended 

-523- 



multiple times) . School factors in schools with low and/or even suspension rates 
were compared to school factors in schools with high and/or disproportionate sus- 
pension rates to identify those school factors that contribute to a constructive 
learning environment. We also wished to identify existing successful alternatives 
to suspension. Finally, those schools with high and/or disproportionate suspen- 
sion rates were also monitored to find out what, if anything, they had done to 
respond to being cited in the July 15 DOE report. Because of time constraints, 
three schools (East Boston High, Roosevelt Middle, and McKay Elementary School) 
that were cited in the report were not monitored on-site. These schools will all 
receive on-site monitoring this winter and spring. 

FIM3INGS 

THE CODE OF DISCIPLINE, SCHOOL-BASED RULES AND REPORTING OF SUSPENSIONS 

There are still widespread inconsistencies throughout the middle and high school 
levels in understanding and administering the Code of Discipline. Many schools, 
like Charlestown High, suspend students without first exploring all alternatives 
to suspensions. Other schools, like the Edwards Middle, suspend students because 
not enough alternatives to suspension have. been developed. Those schools interpret 
section 7.0 of the Code (grounds for suspension, longterm sxospension, transfer or 
expiilsion) without flexibility, almost autonatically suspending those students 
v*iose cases fall under section 7.0. On the other hand. South Boston High and West 
Roxbury High take an individualized approach to suspension, and use the latitude 
and flexibility provided within the Code to explore alternatives to suspension. 

One cause of these findings may be that the Code of Discipline is cumberscme and 
lengthy, and therefore difficult to interpret. It is also apparent that the spirit 
of the Code and the consequences for specific offenses need to be more clearly 
defined. In addition, there is a need to clarify administrative practices in ex- 
ploring alternatives to suspension before actually suspending a student. 

This problon of inconsistency seenas to have been exacerbated by the Code of Disci- 
pline not being distributed to schools until the second or third week of October, 
despite a memorandum dated Septanber 1, 1983, fran Superintendent Spillane stating 
that the Code would be distributed to all schools no later than September 15, 1983. 
The delay makes it difficult for students, teachers, and administrators to observe 
and enforce the contents of the Code at the beginning of the school year. 

Additionally, the timeline for the developrent of school -based rules ccrtplicates 
the establishment of discipline. In the same memorandum. Superintendent Spillane 
stated that school-based rules should be reviewed and changes made by November 11, 
1983. The developnent of new rules for a school in the middle of a school year 
makes the likelihood of creating misunderstanding and additional discipline problems 
greater than if new rules were developed towards the end of each school year and im- 
plemented at the beginning of the following school year. 

The Code of Discipline states that the "establishment of school-based rules is for 
non-suspendable offenses (only) and the developnent and consideration of non- 
exclusionary solutions to violations of school-based rules and v\±iere possible viola- 
tions of section 7.0 of the Code (Suspendable Offenses) •" Yet, certain schools in- 
cluded suspendable offenses in the development of their school-based rules, indicat- 
ing a misunderstanding and need for further training concerning the Code. For 
example, the handbooks at Charlestown High, Madison Park High, and the Edward Middle 
School all contain sections stating that a student may be suspended for cutting a 
class. Technically, the Code of Discipline permits suspensions for cutting classes, 
but only after excessive cutting has occurred and the school administration has 
exhausted all alternatives to suspension. 

-524- 



There is a widespread belief among staff that many schools do not consistently 
and accurately report all suspensions. Many staff claim that certain administra- 
tors, instead of suspending a stiident, may send him/her home for the day to "cool 
off" and not record it as a suspension. One student at West Roxbury High that 
the monitor spoke to claimed that she vas found in the parking lot out of class 
and was sent hone for the day without actually being suspended. This story was 
corroborated by a school administrator, wt^ justified it by saying that this 
student had not reported to homerocm, was loitering around the school, was not 
considered to be attending, and therefore was sent hone for the day. Similar 
incidents were claimed to be camion practice for sane schools throughout the 
system. However, it is difficult to verify these claims. 

This . practice , if it exists, could be the result of a general perception among 
most schools administrators that the number of suspensions reported to the central 
administration is used to determine vMch schools are sxocceeding and v^dch are 
failing. It is important that both central administration and the schools per- 
ceive that consistent and uniform reporting of suspensions is essential to the 
smooth operation of the school system. Schools that report high or dispropor- 
tionate suspension rates are not necessarily using unfair practices in administer- 
ing discipline. High suspension rates may indicate that a discipline problem 
does exist in that school, and that possible additional resources need to be al- 
located to deal with the problem. 

Questions 

D. Of those schools identified as having either (1) high suspension rates or 
(2) significant disproportionate suspensions by race, what steps is Boston 
taking to identify causes for these problems and identify solutions? 
(January/ July 1984) 

E. Can the success of any of these solutions be documented? (July 1984) 

F. What alternatives to suspension, taking into account all school factors, 
could identified schools enploy that they aren't (July 1984) 

SCHOOLS WITH HIGH AND/OR DISPROPORTICa^ATE SUSPENSION RATES 

Eight schools were visited under this category. Following is a description of 
each school, listing school factors that might contribute to the school's sus- 
pension rate and programmatic changes the school has made to address these sus- 
pension rates. 

CHARLESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Charlestown High School was cited for having the highest suspension rate in the 
systan and a disproportionate rate of suspension for Black students. Last year, 
students were suspended consistently for tardiness and class cutting. Administra- 
tors did not fully utilize alternatives to suspension. The rationale was that 
the school's climate was neither orderly nor one v^ch prcmoted learning, and 
that order was needed to establish an atmosphere for learning. The administra- 
tion believes that a small group of students was responsible for disrupting the 
educational environment. One administrator stated, "I don't care about those 
students; I care about the ones vdxi want to be here. I can't do anything for 
those students vrtio don't want to be here." 

-525- 



The Housonaster responsible for most of these suspensions (by his account) jus- 
tified their approach by noting that tardiness was cut fron 75 students per day 
to 25 students, and that there was both a high student and teacher attendance 
rate, presvimably because students felt safer aix3 teachers felt supported. It 
was also stated that black students were suspended more because they perceive 
that it is a "White school in a white neighborhood" and therefore do not feel 
safe, consequently, they have more discipline problems. 

However, this is a clear violation of the Code of Discipline. Nowhere does it 
say that a student may be suspended for cutting one class or being tardy. Fur- 
ther, svispension cannot be used as a panacea in solving the problems of a school. 
The school has few alternatives to suspension (although it must be noted that 
requests for additional resources to create these alternatives have been sutmitted 
several times to the central administartion, with little response) . 

There are, hovever, significant irrprovements in the school climate. The s\ispen- 
sion policy has irtproved because the Office of School Operations has told the 
school administrators that they must lover the suspension rate. At the same 
time, the assignment of a new Hispanic Assistant Headmaster, with a psycho-educa- 
tional approach, has helped the school. The guidance counselor staff has increased 
by one, and the school has two Boston University School of Education interns to 
aid in counseling. A process has now been set up so any student who is suspended 
has to see a counselor upon returning to school. In addition, students consistently 
receiving detention are referred for counseling. A Teacher Advisory Program for 
ninth graders, adapted from the Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School model, has 
been inplemented to provide orientation, support and study skills to freshmen. 
Staff developnent in behavior management is being planned, as veil as a peer coun- 
seling and a peer tutoring program. 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

English High School was cited for having a high suspension rate. A number of 
factors contributed to discipline problans there: cuttting classes and wander- 
ing throughout the building, high teacher absenteeisn, the structure of the 
building, and difficiilties this structure presents to effective monitoring and 
management. Students were observed going up the down escalator and vice versa, 
wandering in the halls during classes, and being both loud and disruptive. 

The school needs to address why so many students wander the halls and cut classes. 
There needs to be continued focus on building a constructive educational program. 
The administration is cutting down on suspension (because of pressure fron the 
Office of School Operations) , but staff members who were interviewed do not feel 
supported by the administration in dealing with discipline. 

There are, hovever, significant improvements in the school program. The new 
Assistant Headmaster has helped to standardize discipline procedures. The school 
has created a new position, Discipline Officer, and this person meets with all 
students returning fron suspensions, and regularly confers with teachers regarding 
student discipline piroblems. The new alternative program, the Fenway School, is 
an excellent program that serves the needs of 110 students. In addition, the 
ninth grade Cluster Program and the Collaborative Program provide small group and 
individual counseling, and academic supports, to students, thereby lessening the 
sense of overv^ielming size and lack of identity the school engenders. 

-526- 



BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 

The Boston Latin School was cited for suspending Black students two and one-half 
times the expected rate. Many factors were identified as contributing to the 
disproportionate suspension rate. The new Assistant Headmaster should be can- 
mended for trying to identify these factors and develop prograitinatic solutions. 
(See the examination school report on discipline and attendance findings for a 
complete report.) 

BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Brighton High School was cited for suspending Black students at twice the ex- 
pected rate. Reasons given for this rate were the lack of visibility to students 
of the previous administration and a discipline policy that dealt with the "inci- 
dent not the individual." 

The new administration of Brighton High should be ccninended for adopting an ap- 
proach of high visibility to students and staff, caring for students, and main- 
taining high expectations of students. The discipline policy eitphasizes conflict 
resolution, not confrontation, yet also supports teachers. Teachers who were 
interviewed expressed great confidence in the new administration and responded 
with high teacher visibility in the hallways during class changing time. Staff 
members meet regularly to talk about discipline problems and discuss resolutions. 
The school has a skill of the month that is taught interdepartmentally to address 
academic needs. Finally, the Health Careers Collaborative and the Job Collabora- 
tive give students more meaningful education programs. 

HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 

Hyde Park High School was cited for a high incidence of crime and violence and a 
suspension rate for Whites that was higher than expected. Administrators stated 
that the reasons for these high rates were that the Tharpson Middle School alleged- 
ly socially pronotes students that are overage and have discipline problems, that 
certain White staff address discipline problons in a confrontive and provocative 
manner, and that five to ten percent of the students are "criminals" and cone 
to school solely to caimit crime. 

The Headmaster, although seen as accessible by other administrators, was not seen 
as sxoch by the teaching staff who were interviewed. These teachers felt little support 
fron the administration. The Headmaster seemed more concerned with keeping the 
halls quiet (v*iich is iitportant) than with the educational causes of many of the 
discipline problems the school faces. Although the Headmaster had created many 
incentives for students to do well, there are few programs developed for the 
student with behavioral and/or acadanic problons, or the stiadent labelled as 
"criminal." The Headmaster stated that he did not believe in either alternative 
programs or allowing outside agencies within the school building. Morale seemed 
especially low and disillusionment high at this school. 

The Headmaster shoxild be ccninended for creating work-study incentives for students 
to do well. The school has one of the best work/study and job placement programs 
in the system. The school also offers a considerable number of college scholar- 
ships to students. The Headmaster cites this incentive approach as resiilting in 

-527- 



one of the best attendance records for district or magnet high schools last 
year. 

MADISCN PARK HIGH SCHOOL 

Madison Park High School was cited for having a high suspension rate and for 
having a high incidence of crime and violence. In interviewing staff at the 
school, and fron this monitor's observation, the main problanns are the geograph- 
ic location and architecture of the school. Geographically, the school is 
located near Dudley Station and is connected to the Occupational Resource Center. 
It is difficult to control unwanted access to the school. This is especially 
difficult because the school is cotiposed of five buildings, some of which are 
not directly connected. It is very easy for a student to cut a class and duck 
into one of the many nooks and crannies on the plaza. Because of this, in past 
years there have been many instances of crime and violence, and students (accord- 
ing to a survey conducted by the school) had developed feelings that the school 
was unsafe. Administrators also cited the large staff turnover because of teacher 
lay-offs as contributing to the feeling of lack of control over the school. 

There have been a number of positive changes at the school. A new Assistant 
Headmaster was hired who foc\ises specifically on school climate issues. Staff 
conmittees were formed to address student activities, multi-ciiLtural education, 
in-house detention programs, and safety and security policies. Also, a new 
Assistant to the Headmaster was hired viho has focused primarily on student activi- 
ties. Seme of the student programs that exist are the Challengers Program (an 
outward bound program) , an Honor Society, an active . Student Council, and a group 
of st\jdents vto broadcast announcements and music to students during lunch periods. 
All student group coordinators meet monthly. Other programs that have been created 
that help address discipline issues are the ninth grade Cluster Program, the 
Collaborative Program, the Home Base Alternative School (serving 50 students) , and 
a collaboration by the Department Heads to develop interdepartmental curriculvm on 
job preparation, study skills and multiciiLtural concerns. Also, students v*io re- 
tum fran suspensions are given a progress report in order to let them know how 
they are doing in school . (The administration cites an increase in attendance 
and a decrease in students wandering aroiind the halls as a measure of their suc- 
cess, y The entire staff is to be coranended for their efforts. 

Yet, despite these efforts, it was learned that 900 warning notices (approximately 
50% of the student population) were mailed to students for the first term of this 
school year. It was also noted that students may be suspended for cutting a class 
and for not having a pass, both questionable interpretations of the Code of 
Discipline. 

EDWARDS MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Edwards Middle School was cited for having the highest suspension rate of 
any middle school. The reason for this high rate that was given by staff and 
students was that the administration did not administer discipline consistently 
or fairly last year, resulting in increased discipline problems. The administra- 
tion then attempted to bring the school under control by means of increased sus- 
pensions. Staff also cited that the school had a large number of repeaters 
because of behavioral, academic and absenteeism problems, and few support services 
existed in the school for these students, and they thus became discipline prob- 
lans. 

-528- 



This year, there is a new Headmaster at the school. He is viewed by both staff 
and students as fair and equitable, and thus has received more respect and sup- 
port. The school seenied to be orderly and controlled. However, the school inust 
address problons of high suspension rates and lack of alternatives to suspension. 
Suspension must not be a panacea for students with behavior and/or academic prob- 
lems. There is an almost total lack of alternatives to suspension in the school, 
and the Headmaster seemed to focus little attention on developing these alterna- 
tives* 

THOMPSON MIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Thorpson Middle School was cited as having a fairly high suspension rate and 
having a high incidence of crime and violence. All staff interviewed stated that 
the reason for the rates was the spillover of neighborhood fights and crime into 
and directly outside of the school building. 

The security guard at the school should be cotrnended for establishing positive 
relationships with the neighborhood, and thus convincing intruders to stay away 
fran the school. This year, the schDol has two Housemasters vto focus on issues 
of discipline, and both should be caimended for establishing a respecting, caring 
and consistent atmosphere in the school. The school has an active Student Council 
and RESC which helps build student participation in the school. And the school 
has created an in-house detention program, staffed by teachers, that operates 
every period for students having problems during the school day. 

However, the overall atmosphere created by the Headmaster was cited by staff to 
be a problem: that it is difficiiLt to conmunicate with the Headmaster and that 
he can sonetimes be abrasive with staff and parents. Staff cited that this has 
led to high teacher turnover (mostly among White staff. The school's present 
staff is more than 50% Black.) This canmunication problem and negative atmosphere 
must be addressed before substantial changes in the school climate can occ\ar. 

SCHOOLS WITH LOW AND EVEN RATES OF SUSPENSIOJ 

South Boston High and West Roxbury High were the two schools that had low and 
even rates of suspension. These schools were visited in order to determine fac- 
tors that may contribute to low and fair rates of siospension. This is not to say 
that other schools (including those schools with high and/or disproportionate 
suspension rates) have not created or employed scare or all of these factors iden- 
tified in these two schools. Nor is it the case that these two schools do not 
have other problons. But, factors identified in these two schools can be sugges- 
tions to other schaols as a means to lower thsir suspension rates and enploy 
alternative means to suspension. 

It was the finding of this monitor that the low and even rates of suspension at 
both West Roxbury High and South Boston High reflected, for the most part, the 
positive learning environment at each school. (It is interesting to note that 
both these schools were identified by staff in other schools visited as two of 
the schools that were inconsistent in administering and reporting suspensions.) 
As noted in the July 15 DOE report, these two schools were also highest on the 
first preference list for inconing ninth graders. 



-529- 



Both schDols have ac3minisgrators who are visible to the student body. Adminis- 
trators are viewed by students and staff that were interviewed as accessible and 
open^tdnded. Discipline was viewed as fair. Yet, each student was dealt with 
individually, taking into account the circumstances and each individual's back- 
ground. Both schools placed an enphasis on prevention, mediation, and behavior 
change. Administrators made it a practice of sitting down with individual stu- 
dents and resolving problems. An example of this process is that at West Roxbury 
High School, a student v^o was cutting classes excessively was not suspended, but 
instead asked to agree to sign a contract which the Headmaster also signed, stat- 
ing that she would attend all classes. 

In addition, the staff at both schools seemed to feel that they were supported by 
the administration. Teachers felt that if they had a problon with a student, the 
administrators would usually be available to help resolve the problem. Conversely, 
the administrators expected, and the teaching staff accepted, that teachers would 
attempt to first deal with discipline problems themselves, and rely on the adminis- 
trators for help when the attempt failed. 

Another factor that seemed to contribute to a more positive learning environment 
was a high degree of parental contact. Students who were absent were usxially 
called, and parents of students having academic or behavioral problons were always 
encouraged to come in for a parent conference. At South Boston High, home visits 
are made to encourage students who have been absent to attend school. 

At South Boston High, a Pupil Problems Comiittee exists, composed of the Assistant 
Headmaster, the two Student Advisors, a guidance counselor, the registrar, the 
Special Education coordinator, a representative from a social service agency, and 
a psychologist. The ccmmittee meets once every week to discuss students that are 
having discipline problems or are in crisis. Having representatives from so many 
different sectors of the school, the student's problem can be discussed ccrpletely 
and conprehensive measures may be planned. Many times, the student is connected 
with one of the many social service agencies with vdiich the school has formal ties. 
This linkage with social service agencies is extremely beneficial to the school. 

South Boston High also has an in-house suspension program, called the Student 
Planning Center, which is staffed by a teacher. Here, the student receives a con- 
sequence for his behavior, yet also receives academic assistance and counseling. 

Both schools had special programs that also helped address discipline problems 
and foster a positive learning environment. At West Roxbury High, the School 
Volunteers run a peer tutoring program in vrfiich sixty-four students are enrolled 
and attend. This program occurs dxiring the school day, thereby increasing its 
success rate. West Roxbury High also has an activity period the last period of 
every Tuesday and Thursday. At this time, special activities are held for v±iich 
students can choose (or not choose) to attend. Yet this is also when a teacher 
can assign detention or a staff member can request a student for extra counseling 
and/or tutoring. 

At South Boston High, teachers have written numerous grant proposals to set up 
special programs. A hone econcmics program exists that runs a small restaurant 
for staff and visitors. The school has a Reading and Writing class that everyone 
is required to take. And the school has an after-school oral history writing 
program that produces the magazine. Mosaics. 



-530- 






Another factor that is essential for developing a positive learning environ- 
ment, which both schools have, is staff stability. Staff members know each 
other and learn how to work with each other. This has a better effect on 
staff morale than when teachers do not know where they are going to be work- 
ing fran year to year, or when their colleagues are regularly transferred. 

However, the most important factor, as stated before, is the tone set by the 
administration. Both administrations should be ccmmended for providing an 
open, responsive and individualized approach to student discipline. 

At the same time, South Boston High needs to continue to address the issue 
of safety and security outside the building, and of establishing more inter- 
action between students of different ethnic groups. Students interviewed still 
felt that most conflicts within the school occur between students of different 
ethnic groups. Also, the problem of the janitorial staff and the abysmal 
state of cleanliness of the building must be addressed. (See Safety and Secur- 
ity report.) The Headmaster of West Roxbury High, while he is open to the 
suggestions of his staff and students, needs to also consider new ideas fron 
outside the school. Again, students at this school also expressed that most 
conflicts occur between students of different ethnic groups, and hence, the 
need for more focus on interaction between all students. 

Caimendations Fran Qn-Site Monitoring 

The Office of School Operations is to be carmended for continuing to emphasize 
the developtient and distribution of the Code of Discipline. The revisions of 
the Code, and a superintendent's memorandum dated September 1, 1983 requesting 
uniformity in all schools in the presentation of the Code and the developttent 
of school-based rules, indicates concern for bringing uniformity to discipline 
procedures vAiile also allowing flexibility through the development of school- 
based rules. In addition, all schools should be ccmmended for having reviewed, 
or being in the process of reviewing, school-based rules. 

Most schools are administering due process more fairly than in past years. 
Most students receive a suspension hearing if suspended. Specific channels of 
discipline have been established to help standardize, and therefore make more 
objective, the administration of discipline. 

Additional staff and the creation of new positions appear to be helping resolve 
discipline problems. Many schools received an additional assistant headmaster. 
Most schools now have an assistant headmaster in charge of discipline. This 
allows an administrator to focus specifically on discipline issues, vdiile 
enabling the headmaster to both focus on other school climate and curriculxm 
issues and serve as an objective arbitrator when and if a suspension case re- 
quires further intervention. 

Many schools have more security guards (although South Boston High School has 
less) and they are generally regarded as better trained in interpersonal inter- 
action and conflict resolution than in the past. This then changes the nature 
of their interactions fran one of confrontation to a more constructive one. 



-531- 



Department heads are now strictly itenagers and they have been relieved of 
most or all teaching duties. This is the first year there will be an 
effective teacher evaluation process, v^iich could result in greater teacher 
accountability (and therefore less behavior management problems) , increased 
curriculvim development, and better inter-departmental connunication and 
collaboration. It remains to be seen, though, vdiether a fair, uniform, and 
constructive means of teacher evaluation is instituted. Many teachers also 
expressed concern that certain department heads are not qualified, and do 
not have the skills to provide curriculxjm and behavior management resources, 
and that there is not a clear process of accountability of department heads. 

In addition, the appointment of School Development Officers may inprove school 
climate and thus, discipline. These staff members are charged with develop- 
ing programs that involve students experientially. 

The Boston Corpact has also aided discipline problems in schools. By providing 
both job exposure and actual jobs to each school, the Corpact has brought addi- 
tional resources to the schools. Students who may otherwise be discipline 
problems have been drawn into the school program through the incentive of a 
job. 

And finally, the Alternative Schools Director is to be ccmnended for the devel- 
opnent of alternative educational programs for stijdents whose needs are not 
being met in district or magnet high schools. (See the Safety and Security 
Report for further details on these efforts.) The continued developnent of 
these programs is vital to the success of all schools in Boston. 

In general, though, it is the tone set by the school administration that greatly 
determines staff performance (and thus behavior management) and students' expec- 
tations, and consequently, issues of discipline. Each school develops its own 
personality, and these personalities vary greatly frcm school to school. In 
general, those schools whose administration have a policy of sensitivity, open 
communications, and giving students a sense of pride and responsibility, as 
well as establishing clear expectations and consequences, have greater success 
with discipline. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Although there have been efforts by the central administration to create alter- 
natives to suspension and bring uniformity to administering discipline, and 
although individual schools cited for high and/or disproportionate suspension 
rates have made seme progranmatic changes, there still remains a great deal of 
inconsistency in the administering of discipline and seme possible violations 
of the Code of Discipline. There also seems to be a percentage of the school 
population in each school that, because of academic and behavioral problems, 
are also discipline problons. Little is being done to serve this group of stu- 
dents. This also results in the rest of the school population not being ade- 
quately served because of disruptions in the educational process. Therefore, 
the following recommendations are given: 



-532- 



There needs to be an increase in the number of Black and Hispanic adminis- 
trators in schools vdiere they are lacking; 

There should be in-service training for all schools on non-confrontative 
approaches to behavior management; 

3) The caseloads of guidance counselors should be reduced; 

4) Mditional support services need to be created in all schools that address 
the needs of students with academic and behavior problons; 

Alternative programs (inside and outside existing schools) for students v*io 
are not benefiting from district or magnet school programs should continue 
to be created; 

Class size should be kept at the mandated maximum. If this is not possible 
in a school, additional staff should be assigned to the school; 

Adequate textbooks and materials need to be provided to every school; 

Parental outreach programs need to be created and/or increased in every school; 

9) The policy of disciplinary inter-district transfers needs to be ended; 

10) The Code of Discipline should be distributed by the beginning of the school 
year; 

11) School-based rules should be reviewed towards the end of each school year and 
distributed at the beginning of each school year; these rules should not con- 
tain suspendable offenses; 

12) Alternatives to suspension need to be developed and established as practice in 
every school; 

13) The Code of Discipline should be revised to be more understandable and more 
clearly defined; all schools should apply discipline as defined within the Code; 

14) Every school should consistently document and report suspensions; the practice 
of sending students bans without suspending them should be stopped. 

15) Each school should develop a program of remediation to address students 
repeating grades; 

16) More alternative programs should be created at English High School in order to 
address the structural problem of the building. 



-533- 



17 



ANALYSIS OF HIGH SCHOOL SUSPENSIONS BY RACE 

The chart prepared for this analysis includes the following information: 

Column 

A All Boston high schools (Latin Academy, Latin School, and Umana 
include grades 7-12; the others grades 9-12) 

B Number of Black students, followed by Black percent of total 
enrollment 

C Number of suspensions of Black students, followed by Black 
percent of all suspensions 

D Percent of Black suspensions divided by percent of Black students 
(1.00 would indicate that Black students are suspended at exactly 
the rate that their proportion of total enrollment would predict, 
while 2.00 would indicate suspensions at double the expected rate, 
and .3 at half the expected rate) 

E-G same information as B-D, for white students 

H-J same information as B-D, for other minority students 

K Total enrollment of each school 

L Total suspensions for each school 

M Total suspensions divided by total enrollment; this is a measure of 
how frequently suspensions are necessary or resorted to (only closer 
analysis can determine whether suspensions are resorted to with excessive 
- or insufficient - frequency, and this analysis will be carried out 
during 1983-84) 

All suspensions data was for the school year 1982-1983. 



-534a- 



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-534b- 



ANALYSIS OF MIDDLE SCHOOL SUSPENSIONS BY RACE 



SCHOOL 



Expected Rate of Suspension 
Black White 



Other 



Total Suspensions 
Divided by EnrollniEnt 
Total 



Edison 


1.03 


0.91 


1.07 


0.05 


Taft 


1.29 


0.00 


1.33 


0.01 


Curley 


1.33 


0.58 


0.85 


0.19 


Lewis 


1.24 


0.73 


0.43 


0.14 


Roosevelt 


1.70 


0.88 


0.30 


0.45 


Irving 


1.66 


0.48 


0.28 


0.25 


Lewenberg 


1.08 


0.83 


0.00 


0.11 


Shaw 


1.17 


0.89 


0.00 


0.07 


Roger 


1.48 


0.12 


0.00 


0.04 


Thompson 


1.71 


0.11 


0.11 


0.44 


Cleveland 


1.35 


0.13 


0.62 


0.05 


Holmes 


1.24 


0.68 


0.00 


0.02 


Wilson 


1.19 


0.31 


0.00 


0.03 


Dearborn 


1.03 


1.15 


0.45 


0.11 


Gavin 


1.70 


0.38 


0.90 


0.34 


McCormack 


1.29 


1.19 


0.44 


0.17 


Edwards 


1.57 


1.05 


0.71 


0.84 


Michelangelo 


1.80 


0.07 


0.38 


0.38 


Timllty 


1.56 


0.42 


0.40 


0.18 


Barnes 


0.00 


0.93 


2.00 


0.04 


Cheverus 


0.00 


1.04 


0.00 


0.03 


King 


1.36 


0.23 


0.87 


0.03 


Mackey 


1.64 


0.56 


0.13 


0.23 


Wheatlev 


0.88 


0.73 


1.67 


0.11 



-534c- 



SUSPENSION RATES OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL 



% SUSPENDED 



Garfield 

Wlnship 

Tobin 

Agasslz 

Manning 

Parkinan 

Beethoven 

Lee 

Mozart 

Philbrick 

Channing 

Conley 

Greenwood 

Roosevelt 

Shaw 

Endicott 

Fifield 

Holland 

Marshall 

Mather 

Murphy 

O'Heam 

Clap 

Mason 

Perkins 

Winthrop 

Blackstone 

Eliot 

Hurley 

Kent 

Prescott 

O'Donnell 

Guild 

Hennigan 

Jackson Mann 

Ohrenberger 

Trotter 

McKay 



0.01 
0.01 
0.07 
0.01 
0.04 
0.01 
0.07 
0.08 
0.06 
0.03 
0.01 
0.08 
0.01 
0.01 
0.03 
0.06 
0,01 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
0.02 
0.03 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
0.01 
0.01 
0.12 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
0.01 
0.01 
0.01 
0.02 
0.01 
0.01 
0.17 



-534d- 



Institutional Pairings 



INSTITUTIONAL PAIRINGS 



MANDATE 



Institutional Pairings shall continue according to the stan- 
dards contained in pages 50 through 58 of the Student Desegre- 
gation Plan of May 10, 1975. 



OBJECTIVES 



1. 



2. 



To determine whether the institutional pairings identified 
in orders of continuing validity are operational. 

Status: All of the institutional pairings, as realigned by 
mutual consent, were found to be operational in 
the July, 1983 report. 

Question ; Are the Boston Public Schools continuing to make 
a positive effort to reach mutually agreeable 
contractual arrangements with the universities, 
colleges, businesses, and cultural institutions? 

To determine whether the institutional pairings require re- 
alignments. 



Question: 



Are the realignments now occurring consistent with 
the Court's intention in encouraging the pairings? 



PROCESS 



Monitoring has consisted of meetings with university and college 
coordinators, representatives of the cultural institutions, and 
staff of the Tri-Lateral Council. In addition, all of the Chap- 
ter 636 funding proposals, which embody the college, university, 
and cultural institution contracts, have been reviewed by Depart- 
ment staff. Summaries of these proposals are included in Volume 
II. 

FINDINGS 

1. At the time this report is being drafted, almost all of the 
universities and colleges are in the process of drafting 
new letters of agreement with the Boston Public Schools. 
These letters will describe in detail a new conceptualiza- 
tion of the role of the colleges and universities. These 
new agreements will be monitored and reported on in the 
first six months of 1984. 



-535- 



As reported in July, the contracting process is working in general better 
than it was two years ago. There have been, however, significant delays 
in completing contracts with MIT, Northeastern, and Boston University, 
delays which have required the universities to use their own cash reserves 
. to support projects for two to four months. Further, almost all pairings 
have suffered from lengthy delays in the processing and approval of budget 
revisions. In both contract and revision delays, Boston City Hall plays 
as great a role as the Boston Public Schools. 

The Boston Compact has apparently breathed new life into the business 
partnerships, and the evidence gathered indicates that the Boston Public 
Schools are not only making their best efforts to negotiate agreements, 
but reaching out to request additional assistance from Boston-area 
businesses. Reports of the Tri-Lateral Council are included in Volume II. 

There is no equivalent to the Boston Compact or the new college and 
university agreements in the cultural area. Representatives of the 
cultural institutions in general report "business as usual": programs 
are continuing but not growing, and the institutions are dealing with 
some delays in contracts, the payment of bills and the assignment of 
staff. In spite of these problems, there are Chapter 636 supported 
cultural programs in approximately 100 schools, and the Cultural Education 
Collaborative reports receiving requests from about 30 cultural institu- 
tions who are not now involved, but would like to be, in working with 
Boston schools if sufficient funds were available. 

2. The alignment of the college and university pairings remains as reported 
in July. Tentative or preliminary discussions have taken place with 
Roxbury Community College, Salem State College, and others. Negotiations 
are continuing with Wellesley College. 

During this reporting period there have been no evaluations of the college 
and university, business, or cultural institution pairings. Many pro- 
grams, in fact did not get underway until late October or early November. 

COMMENDATION 

\ 

/ 

The formation of the Boston Compact Office, under a director who reports to 
the Superintendent, and who has responsibility for overseeing all of the 
college and university pairings, all school-business partnerships (whether 
court recommended or not) and all cultural institution pairings, is clearly 
a step in the right direction, and may solve many of the persistent problems 
listed above in the findings. 

RECOMMENDATION 

In spite of the fact that the new Boston Compact Office has responsibility 

-536- 



for the cultural pairings, they remain collectively the step-child among 
institutional relationships. The School Department should work with the 
cultural institutions to develop, on the basis of nine years of experience, 
a new understanding and new agreements, much as it has with businesses and 
now is with institutions of higher education. 



-537- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

ROBERT R SPILLANE 



MEMORANDUM 



November 2, 1983 



J' 




TO: Deputy Superintendents,---! '^ . 
Community Superinterv^ent^ i]lj^ 
Headmasters -<? / / yOj 

FROM: Robert R. Spfll^r^ Superintendent 
SUBJECT: Role of the Boston Compact Office 

Now that we have an agreement with the higher education 
community which parallels last year's agreement with the 
business community, it is important to clarify the role of 
the Boston Compact Office. As you know, this office is ^ 
located organizationally within the Office of the Superin- 
tendent, and its Director, Robert Schwartz, reports to me. 
I have asked the Compact Office to assume responsibility 
for coordinating the implementation of the School Department's 
side of both business and hii^r education agreements. 

We are already committed to show measurable progress each 
year in reducing student absenteeism and drop-outs, in raising 
basic skills achievement, and in increasing the job placement 
rates of graduates. Under the higher education agreement, we 
will improve the college preparatory core curriculum, upgrade 
the qualifications of school personnel, develop a comprehensive 
student assessment system, and strengthen the guidance and 
counseling program, all leading to increased placement and re- 
tention rates. 

In each of these areas, we will be seeking the assistance 
of specific collaborating institutions (colleges and univer- 
sities, businesses, cultural organizations, social and human 
service agencies. School Volunteers, etc.). It will be the 
role of the Compact Office to coordinate the work of these 
collaborating organizations as that work relates to the 
business and higher education agreements. It will also be the 
role of the Compact Office to work directly with each high 
school on the development and implementation of the plans each 
school has prepared to achieve the goals of these agreements 
and to assure that human and fiscal resources are directed to 

-539- 

7fi rni;RT STREET. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02:0B • 726-6200 AREA 617 



Deputy Superintendents - 2 - November 2, 198 3 

Community Superintendents 

Headmasters 



that end* I have asked Bob Schwartz and his staff to work 
closely with the Deputy Superintendents to insure that the 
Compact's efforts to assist the high schools are well in- 
tegrated with the ongoing assistance and supervisory efforts 
of other- units within the School Department. 

Bob is already working closely with Headmasters, and I 
am asking that he work with Community Superintendents as 
wel2, in order to insure the broadest possible support for 
the Compact. T know that you will all cooperate fully with 
Bob and his staff to see that the School Department fulfills 
its educational mission with all of the necessary resources 
and assistance of the business and higher education-community . 



RRS:ls ... ':• .>'^' 

cc: Robert Schwartz " " : "-^ <- 



Robert Sperber 



-540- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



NOVl ^983- 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
ROBERT R. SPILLANE 




October 24, 1983 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: President and Msrbers, Boston 

FRCM: Robert R. Spillane, 

SQBJEXTT: Agreement betireen Boston Area Universities and ddlleges 
and the Boston Public Schools 



Attached you will find a revised version of the Universities 
and Colleges/Boston PtixLic Schools Agreanent. I met today with Bob 
Sperber and Bcb Schwartz and they agreed that they wDiild get the 
university presidents to irake twD basic changes v^iich are reflected 
in this new document. One basic change is: we will work together 
to secure an adequate level of funding v^iether it be through the 
State Education Department, State Legislature, City government, or 
the private sector, rather than rely specifically on 636 funds vdiich 
the October 4, 1983 document proposed. In addition, language has 
been added to ensure that Boston students viio enter college will have 
an adequate and, if necessary, e:i5»nded program of academic assistance 
fr o m the college or liniversity. These tsro major changes, I believe, 
give us a good policy document which, we can all support. Additionally, 
I will be preparing an Action Plan which will spell out the details of 
proposed programs to carry out an agreement for your approval. Ihat 
way we have full control over the direction of this Cattpact. 

I am requesting that School Committee members attend the press 
conference on November 1, 1983 at 9:30 A.M., vAiich will announce this 
agreement. Dr. Knapp, President of the University of Massachusetts, 
who is the new Chairman of the President's Sub-cortnittee of College/ 
Boston Public Schools Relationships, has arranged for the Governor to 
be available at this tine along with other political leaders and college 
and xmiversity presidents. Ihis would be an excellent opportunity for 
the School Ccrmittee to show its leadership role in initiating stronger 
ties with colleges and universities under the Federal Court Agreement. 

-541- 



26 CQiJCT ST^^EE^, BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS CI '03 • 7;6-62CO AREA 517 



- 2 - 



Boston School Ccmnittee 



Octcber 24, 1983 



For Board jnertfcers vdio may not be able, to at±end (John O'Bryant will be 
chairing a meeting injfashington as President of the Urban School Boards 
group) , I would appreciate it if you could have one of your staff mantters 
available to show that this- has the unanimous si^iport of the School 
Ocnmittee. . . _ 

I will be available to discuss any ^lestions contained in the Ccnpact 
with you later this week and will be giving you a calL in order to discuss 
aiiy questions or concerns that you. may have. 



RRSils 
Attachment 



-542- 



AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE BOSTON AREA UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES AND 
THE BOSTON PDBHC SCHOOLS 



r^ Backgroimd; 

For more than eight years^ the Bostoa Public Schools and area colleges and 
universities have worked together to help Boston through a difficult period 
In its history. Throughout this turbulent time, the colleges and 
universities have assisted teachers, parents and administrators in 
extensive efforts aimed at improving education for the school children of 
Boston^ . . . i ■ 

Nov in the fall of 1983, we face a time of opportunity and change: the 
federal court has proposed to diminish its role in monitoring Boston's 
schools, and nationally there is a renewed concern for the quality of 
public education. It is essential for us now to reiterate the continuing 
commitment of the Boston Public Schools and the 23 institutions of higher 
education to work together.- The Boston, schools and the colleges and 
universities recognize their interdependence. We must seize this 
opportunity to expand our efforts and to focus on new programs with the 
mutually beneficial goals of improving education and of increasing the 
potential for success of Boston Public School students who seek higher 
education. 

Many graduates of the public schools are not adequately prepared to pursue 
higher education or to enter the labor market . Ihe number of students who 
fail to gain admittance to college or to stay there once admitted is clear 
evidence of poor academic preparation. Worse, many students who enter 
ninth grade do not finish, high school; they leave school totally unprepared 
to cope with the complex society before them. If we are to remedy this 
situation, we must upgrade the schools and develop programs of support and 
assistance in the colleges and universities. 

Although the activities discussed in. this" agreement deal primarily with the 
high schools, the colleges and universities must continue their work at all 
levels. A comprehensive program aimed at improving educational quality 
will begin with the preschool, continue through elementary and middle 
school, reaching a successful conclusion in high school. The parties to 
this agreement will continue their efforts with this objective in mind. 

With this renewed commitment, we, the Boston Public Schools and Boston area 
colleges and universities agree to continuing the school and district 
pairings, and commit ourselves to working toward the implementation of an 
expanded program of collaboration at the school, district, and system 
levels. 



-543- 



.* 



-2- 

II. Goals: 

The initial goals for this expanded effort are as follows: 

■ . to improve tbe academic program that will prepare students for 
entrance into, and success at,, higher education, 
. to increase the percentage of Boston Public School students who 
graduate from high school and enter college, so that by 1989 college 
attendance will increase at. least 25 percent,. 

.. to provide the assistance necessary for students to plan their 
high schoaL programs and to select appropriate colleges and 
universities, 

. to increase the financial aid for students who otherwise would not 
be able to afford to attend college, and 

. to increase academic support for Boston students entering college 
so that, they may complete their education. 

A comprehensive effort is required. We seek to improve the academic 
preparation and increase the aspirations of all high school students 
through an improved program of teaching and instruction and of services 
necessary to encourage students to finish high school. 

At present there is serious attrition of students between the ninth and 
twelfth grade; only 5 3 percent of tbose who begin the ninth grade 
graduate. Because less than 50 percent of those who graduate from high 
school go on to college, only 20 to 25 percent of the current ninth grade 
will begin higher education. The rate of college attendance is relatively 
close to the national average; but the high school drop-out rate presents a 
major problem. 

We hope through a general improvement in the academic program of tbe 
schools to reduce the drop-out rate substantially and to encourage and 
assist an increased percentage of all graduating students to go on to 
college. It is our goal to increase by 25 percent the proportion of ninth 
graders who complete high school and go on to Boston area colleges. 

If we are to do this, improved academic preparation must be accompanied by 
improved and expanded counseling, by increased financial aid and, 
eventually, by continued support for those students who enter college. 

This is a mutual agreement. The Boston School Committee commits itself to 
improving the preparation of students and increasing their aspirations and 
motivation. The colleges and universities agree to continue and expand 
their assistance to the high schools. Tbe colleges and universities also 
commit themselves to advising and recruiting an increased number of 
qualified graduates, and to providing assistance aimed at increasing the 
likelihood that students will successfully complete a degree program. 

II I . The Boston Public School Effort: 

In order to accomplish the goals outlined in this agreement, the Boston 
Public Schools agree: 

A. to provide a sequence of core courses, each with defined 
objectives, to meet college entrance requirements, 

-544- 



-3- 

B. to ensure that a graduate will be able to demonstrate skills 
sufficient to meet college standards in reading comprehension, 
writing and mathematics , 

C. to develop a comprehensive program to improve pupil retention and 
reduce the' drop-out rate, 

D . to work to assure the highest standards for the recruitment, 
retention and promotion of the professional staff,, 

E- to establish an assessment system to monitor student progress, 

making use of- an improved student records system, 

F- to provide for a reorganized and strengthened counseling program, 

and 

G. to establish academic retraining and technical assistance 

programs for teachers, counselors and administrators. 

IV» The College and University Effort ; 

Bie institutions of higher education agree: 

A. to work with the Boston Public Schools and with individual high 
schools through the pairings, by providing technical assistance, 
training and other services, in order to assist with 

L, developing and implementing the core curriculum, 

2^ developing and supporting programs to increase retention 

and reduce the drop-out rate, as well as 

3. planning and implementing efforts to improve basic skills. 

I ■ . " 

B. to aggressively recruit Boston Rjblic School students for 
college. The colleges and universities will cooperate in these 
efforts with community-based agencies that have experience in 
counseling high school students concerning college admissions. 

C. to provide assistance to students in obtaining financial aid 
through additional lobbying and fund raising efforts aimed at 
further increasing the state scholarship fund, and through working 
to develop a corporate-funded student scholarship program. An 
effort will also be made to work with Boston businesses to expand 
the availability of part-time and full-time employment opportunities 
for college students. 

D. to support Boston students who enter college with an adequate and 
if necessary expanded program of academic assistance. The 
participating colleges and universities will share experiences 
growing out of their successful retention efforts. 

V. Evaluation of Goals : 

Each year, beginning in June 1984, colleges and universities and the 
schools will evaluate the progress towards the achievement of the short and 
long range goals of this agreement. One of the indicators to be evaluated 
in this period will be the number of graduates entering Boston area 
colleges. Beginning in June 1989, the colleges and universities and the 
Boston Public Schools will evaluate the progress made towards meeting the 
target of a 25 percent increase in the percentage of ninth graders entering 
Boston area colleges. 

-545- 



-A- 

The college admission targets will be attained by increasing the number of 
Boston Riblic Schools graduates who meet present or more rigorous college 
admissions standards. An increase in the number of qualified high school 
graduates produced by the schools is a fundamental condition of this 
agreement.. It is understood that students will complete an academic 
program that will prepare them for entrance into and success in a college 
or university ► 

VI. Implementation of this Agreement : 

The efforts agreed to in this document will be planned with the Office of 
the Superintendent, in a fashion similar to that embodied in the agreement 
between the schools and the business community.- A mechanism will be 
established by the Superintendent for cooperatively planning and 
implementing programs sponsored under this agreement. 

In order to fulfill this agreement, both parties will need to work to 
secure an adequate level of funding. Ihe colleges and universities will 
support the efforts of the Boston Public Schools to seek sufficient funds 
to enable every Boston high school to provide a full sequence of college 
preparatory courses. Both parties will work together to seek additional 
state,, federal and private foundation funding to support collaborative 
programs and will review the organization of Chapter 636 programs in light 
of the new agreement . Both parties acknowledge that collaboration costs 
money, and that higher education institutions face many of the same 
financial constraints as the Boston Public Schools. 

In. order to plan the programs associated with this agreement, as well as to 
evaluate the effort, the schools and the colleges and universities commit 
themselves to establishing a joint planning and evaluating committee. This 
committee will be charged with developing a long-term plan and with 
developing standards and methods for measuring academic improvement, 
college admissions and completion'of higher education. A research effort 
will be developed by the universities and the schools to evaluate aggregate 
progress towards meeting the targets and goals in the agreement . The 
Boston Public Schools and the colleges and universities agree to publish 
annual reports detailing their progress. 



Following the signing of this agreement and the presentation of a long 
range plan by the School Committee, participating colleges and universities 
will prepare letters specifying in detail their participation in the 
programs they can best serve. 



Revised 10/24/83 

-546- 



i i 

Tri-Lateral Council For Quality Education, Inc. 

600 ATLANTIC AVENUE, BOSTON, MA 02210 (617) 973-3830/31 



Mission Improve the educational opportunities for Boston 

Public School students through programs 
collaboratively planned and operated by Boston 
businesses and the Boston Public School System. 

Structure Twenty-one major Boston employers are partners, 

each with one of the city's 18 secondary schools. 

Kay Partnership Businesses 

Elements • A business coordinator spends at least one 

day each week in the partnership school. 

• The coordinator mobilizes a broad range of 
company resources to carry out the agreed 
upon program of assistance 

• Contributions, including dues to the Council 
and services to the high school .ranging fron 
about $10,000 to over $50,000 per flrn 

Schools 

• Headmaster responsible for development and 
implementation of partnership plans. 

• School coordinator spends at least one day 
each week matching business resources to 
school needs 

Joint Planning 

• A written annual plan designed to achieve 
measurable results 

The Tri-Lateral Staff • Provides coordination, training, and 

technical assistance to school and business 
staff in the planning and carrying out of 
partnership programs 

• works with the school administration, and 
other school assisting organizations in the 
Boston Compact, The Boston Sumner Jobs 
Program, College Awareness and other 
clty-wlde activities 

-547- 



Examples of Partnership Activities 



Curriculum 



career development and placement curriculum, 
(Project STEIP) delivered to 6,000 students 

JOBS booklet (Job Opportunities: A Boston 
Survey) saapllne entry level Jobs by level of 
education in eight job clusters 

guest speakers, In-class demonstrations, 
individualized tours, student clubs, access 
to in-house corporate training for students, 
sponsorship/scholarships for students 



Staff Development 



• faculty access to corporate training (word 
processing, data processing, etc*) 

• summer faculty internships (skills 
development, management traininp, career 
explorat ion) 

• specialized forums, workshops and conferences 
for educators and business partners (key 
results planning, time management, etc.) 



Work Experience 



Get A Job/work readiness and job maintenance- 
workshops for students 



recruitment and work readiness preparation of 
all students for the Boston Summer Jobs 
Program • 

part-time work study, summer and full time 
employment 



Management Assistance 



• energy audits, space/facility use, office 
management consultation 



• donation of computer -hardware and software 

• development of HORC advisory committees (250 
members) 

• management Information system/budget 
development, technical assistance 



Cltywlde Activity 



leadership In helping establish the Boston 
Compact, participation in executive and 
steering conmlttees and several work groups; 
co-chair with School Department officials the 
Research, Electronic Learning and Career and 
Vocational Education work groups. 

-548- 



SCHOOL BUSINESS PARTNERSHIPS IN THE CITY OF BOSTON 



Examination Schools 

Boston Latin Academy 

Boston Latin School 

Boston Technical High School 



IBM Corporation 

State Street Bank & Trust Company 

Boston Edison Company 



Kagnet Schools 

Copley Square High School 
English High School 

Madison Park High School 

• 

Mario Umana School 
Boston High School 



Shawmut Bank of Boston 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Blue Cross Blue Shield 
Mutual Bank for Savings 

Massachusetts Port Authority 

Prudential Insurance Company 



District Schools 

Brighton High School 
Jamaica Plain High School 

West Roxbury High School 
Hyde Park High School 
Jeremiah E. Burke High School 
Dorchester High School 
South Boston High School 

Charlestovm High School ' 
East Boston High School 



Honeywell, Inc. / J/- /ZLz.J^-J^-' 'rx:^/u/<U- 

Boston Gas Company 
Travelers Insurance Company 

Bank of New England 

First National Bank of Boston 

New England Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

New England Telephone Company 

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 
Gillette Company 

Liberty Mutual Insurance Conpany 

Massachusetts Port Authority 



Career and Vocational Education 

Hubert H. Humphrey 

Occupational Resource Center 

Citywlde Partner for Electronic 
Learning 



V.A. Hospital 



Digital Equipment Corporation 



-549- 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Boston School Department 

Robert S. Peterkln 

Deputy Superintendent, Operations 

Janes A. Caradonio 

Director, Vocational Education 

Joseph L. Ippolito 

Community Superintendent, District 3 

Michael S. Turner 

Community Superintendent, District 4 



William J. Spring 

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 

President 

Jeannette Hargroves 

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 

Secretary 



Businesses 

Daniel F. Morley 

State Street Bank and Trust Co. 

Diane M. Capstaff 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Joseph Cronin 

Massachusetts Higher Education 

Alan R. Davis 

Boston Edison Company 

Cecile H. Gordon 

New England Telephone Co. 

William J. McMorrow 
Gillette Company 

John Sims 

Digital Equipment Corporation 

Robert L. Stearns 

First National Bank of Boston 



Present and Past Chairmen of the Advisory Committee 
of the Trl-Lateral Council 



1981- 



Frank E. Morris 

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 



1979-1980 
1977-1978 
1974-1976 



Roderick M. MacDougall ., 
Bank of New England 

Edward E. Phillips 

New England Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

Gerhard Bleicken 

John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. 



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