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Full text of "Report no. 3 to the United States District Court, District of Massachusetts on Boston school desegregation"

BOSTON PUBUC UBBAWJ 



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3 9999 06315 375 1 



GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS 

DEPARTMENT 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



REPORT NO. 3 

TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME II A 



JULY 15, 1984 







GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPT 

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

700 Boylston Street 

Boston, MA 02117 




Publication of this Document Approved by Daniel D. Carter. State Purchasing Agent 



300-6-84 177963 



Estimated Cost Per Copy $10.92 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Mr. James R. Grande, Hanover, Chairperson 
Mrs. Mary C. Wright, Falmouth, Vice Chairperson 

Mr. Robert A. Farmer, Brookline 

Mrs. Anne C. Fox, Needham 

Rev. Paul V. Garrity, Maiden 

Ms. Milca R. Gonzalez, Worcester 

Mr. Howard A. Greis, Holden 

Mr. Gregory G. Nadeau, Marblehead 

Mrs. Loretta L. Roach, Boston 

Mr. Joseph C. Savery, Lee 

Ms. Mary Ellen Smith, Boston 

Mrs. Dorothea A. Zanetti, Wilbraham 



Dr. John H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education, Secretary 
Mr. John B. Duff, Chancellor, Board of Regents, Ex Officio 



Report Coordinated by — 

Franklin Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on 

Boston Desegregation 



Produced by the Bureau of Operational Support 

Cecilia DiBella, Director 

Susan Gardner, Publications/Communications Coordinator 

Susan M. Ridge, Typographist 



The Massachusetts Department of Education insures equal employment/educational opportunities affirmative action regardless o( race, 
color, creed, national origin or sex, in compliance with Title IX, or handicap, in compliance with section 504. 



VOLUME II 

Table of Contents 

VOLUME IIA Page 

Introduction 1 

Superintendents Response to Six Major 

Desegregation Concerns 5 

Assignments 77 

Staff 145 

Special Desegregation Measures 283 

Special Education 417 

Bilingual Education 475 

Vocational and Occupational Education 539 

Transportation 623 

VOLUME IIB 

Facilities 637 

Safety and Security 711 

Student Discipline 761 

Parent and Student Organizations 807 

Dispute Resolutions 837 

Modifications 841 



" GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPT 
BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
700 Boylston Street 
Boston, MA 02117 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Introduction 

This is the third report to the Federal District Court on the progress 
of desegregation in the Boston Public Schools, as mandated by Memorandum 
and Orders of Disengagement, December 23, 1982. 

Volume I is a summary of the major findings, recommendations, disputes 
and modifications, while Volume II contains the full reports and 
supportive documentation. 

Each of the twelve monitoring reports in Volume II contains the 
following major divisions: 

I. Monitoring Report 

A. Objectives and Questions 

B. Method 

C. Findings 

D. Commendations 

E. Recommendations 

II. Support Documentation (letters, statistics, memoranda in 
support of specific findings) 

The following department personnel were responsible for the reports 
submitted: 



1. Assignments 

2. Staff 

3. Special Desegregation 
Measures 



4. Special Education 



Key 




Monitors 


Monitors 


Charles Glenn 


Judith Taylor 


James Case 


Nan Stein 


Charles Glenn 


Regina Lieb 




Judith Taylor 


(Exam School 


Maureen Wark 


Only) 


Nan Stein 


ii M 


Dan French 


ii H 


Paula Willis 


n H 


Therese Alston 


n n 


Roselyn Frank 


H ii 


Franklin Banks 


Roger Brown 


Judith Riegelhaupt 




Pamela Kaufmann 




Marie Lindahl 



-1-- 



Key 

Monitor Monitors 



5. Bilingual Education James Case Ernest Mazzone 

Gi lman Hebert 



Rudolfo Rodriquez 



6. Occupational David Cronin Elaine Cadigan 
Education Naisuon Chu 

Mamie Jones 
Therese Alston 

7. Transportation Charles Glenn Judith Taylor 

Regina Lieb 

8. Facilities David Jones John Calabro 

Samuel Pike 

9. Safety & Security Frank Banks 

10. Student Discipline James Case George Perry 

Dan French 

11. Institutional Pairing James Case 

12. Parent and Student James Case 

Organizations (Parents) Doreen Wilkinson 

Marion Gil lorn 
(Students) Dan French 

Special thanks to Marlene Godfrey, the Director of the Greater Boston 
Regional Center, for coordinating several components of this report. 



-2- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
ROBERT R SPILLANE 



May 31, 1984 



Dr. John Lawson 
Conmissioner of Education 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Ouincy, MA 02169 

Dear Conmissioner Lawson: 

In a May 7, 1984 letter to me Associate Conmissioner James Case 
addressed some concerns of the State Department relative to the School 
Department's response to the Board of Education's monitoring report 
(Report No. 2 February, 1984, Volurre I) and Boston's FY85 Chapter 
636 proposals. In the letter Dr. Case indicated that, while the State 
Department was informed of major initiatives in addressing the staffing 
and facilities aspects of the monitoring report, there remained four 
additional major areas of concern from the monitoring report in which 
no equivalent progress (or no progress at all) appeared to have been 
made. Dr. Case in the May 7 letter also mentioned the importance of 
having the 636 proposals address the findings of the monitoring report. 

The purpose of this letter is two- fold: 

1. To provide you and your staff with information relative 
to progress being made in the four areas of concern in 
the monitoring report, and 

2. To resolve possible misunderstandings relative to approval 
of the 636 projects. 

I hope that this letter will serve as a good faith effort on our part 
to maintain meaningful dialogue about all of the areas within the 
monitoring report and to attempt to expedite the resolution of the 
current 636 concerns. An update of our progress in the four areas of 
concern follows: 



26 C0UR T STREET. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 617 

-5- 



- 2 - 



Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 



1. Impediments to program access for limited English 
sufficient students will be limited throughout 

the system. Similarly a higher level of support both 
prior to entrance and after enrollment in the schools 
must be provided to minority students (p. 6, item #1 in 
monitoring report) . Attachment No. 1 includes two 
separate reports that respond to this item. The first 
report is an update by Raffael Degruttola, Senior 
Advisor for Citywide Bilingual Programs, regarding policy 
directives which will be implemented to address the issue 
of impediments to program access of bilingual students 
into mainstream classes. The second report is from 
Headmasters Michael Contompasis and Robert Binswanger 
relative to plans to address concerns about minority 
retention. Please note that I have already sent this latter 
report to you under separate cover. 

2. Racial/ethnic guidelines have yet to be met in several 
schools as well as most citywide vocational education 
programs. In many instances enrollments should be im- 
proved through vigorous recruitment and program develop- 
ment efforts (p. 6, item #3 in monitoring report). 
Attachment No. 2 provides a comprehensive and thoughtful 
response to this item from John Coakley. We are concerned 
that the February monitoring report applies the Court's 
orders regarding student assignments in a technical fashion 
at variance with the way in which the Court itself has 
applied them in recent years. I believe this is an issue 
in which we all have the same positive goals and objectives 
but one in which we need to seriously discuss the facts and 
the substantive implications of the assignment and enrollment 
procedures. 

3. The Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational Education 
should be subject to extensive review. Where appropriate , 
modifications should be proposed in order to strengthen 
equal opportunity in vocational training for all students 
(p. 7, item #4 in monitoring report). Attachment No. 3 gives 
a review of current efforts and future plans in this area. 

I would hope that we could come to agreement as to the 
direction and steps needed in this important area. If 
necessary I would be glad to convene a meeting with Dr. 
Cronin, James Caradonio and other staff from the School 
Department and the State Department so that we can come to 
solid agreement of just what needs to be done. 



-6- 



- 3 - 

Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 

4. Safety and Security continues to be a major concern for 
students, parents and school staff. A comprehensive 
program to improve safety and security throughout the 
system must be implemented (p. 7, item #6 in monitoring 
report) . Attachment 4 is an April 13 letter from Deputy 
Superintendent Robert S. Peterkin to Marlene Godfrey in 
which he responds to the student discipline findings and 
recommendations of Volumes I and II of the Department of 
Education report. Dr. Peterkin' s report should serve as 
a solid starting point regarding our response to this as- 
pect of the monitoring report. We can certainly provide 
any other reports on any other items related to a compre- 
hensive safety and security program. 

I would hope that you and your staff will review the responses relative 
to the four items mentioned above and that both of us could have appropriate 
staff convene serious and productive discussions aimed at further progress 
in these areas. 

Chapter 636 Proposals 

This section addresses the State Department concerns related to 636 
proposals. The meeting held with Dr. Case in December was certainly most 
instructive and beneficial to us; however, I believe that there may be 
different perspectives as to the major thrust of that meeting. It was my 
impression that Dr. Case was communicating that the Board was interested in 
having the School Department utilize some of the 636 monies to address the 
target areas which state staff had identified at that time based on their 
review of the draft monitoring report. The final report, I might note, was 
not published until February, 1984, well into our proposal development process. 
The May 7, 1984 letter from Dr. Case and a later letter from Dr. Doreen 
Wilkinson indicated that the Board's intent was to approve only those proposals 
which addressed the findings of the monitoring report. This is certainly 
different than what we understood in December, and poses extreme difficulties 
coming, as it does, less than two months before the end of the school year. 

Initially, I would like to assure you that we have treated the findings 
of the monitoring report with the utmost seriousness, even when we take issue 
with them, and we are certainly making efforts to address the findings of the 
monitoring report systemically as pointed out above and within the districts 
and within schools as pointed out in the summary beginning on page 5. At the 
same time I would like to reemphasize that we are in the third year of a three 
year proposal, and a dramatic shift in gears relative to the roles and expecta- 
tions at this state of the process represents real difficulties. 

We believe that the responses of the state's Chapter 636 proposal reviewers 
largely reflect (1) a misconception that the School Department would address 
the monitor's findings (or target areas as they were initially defined for our 
Chapter 636 guidelines by Department of Education staff) solely through Chapter 
636, (2) a lack of awareness of initiatives which we have taken independently 
of Chapter 636, and (3) a misreading of the proposals themselves. The School 
Department has not limited its response to the monitoring report to Chapter 636 
funding. Several system-wide steps have been or will be taken above and beyond 
those funded by Chapter 636, and I have pointed to these in my earlier comments. 



-7- 



- 4 - 
Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 



Our own re-review of our Chapter 636 proposals shows that the districts 
have indeed addressed the monitoring report through their applications. 
I believe that Community Superintendents have made a serious commitment to 
addressing the target areas. There is always room for programmatic improvement, 
however, and my staff certainly would be willing to meet with your staff to ex- 
plore promising strategies for achieving ever greater results. 

Key features of district proposals which do indeed respond to the mon- 
itoring report are highlighted below. Before getting to these, however, I 
would like to pass on to you some general concerns with the Department's 
review of FY85 proposals based on a report to me from Martin Hunt, Boston's 
Director of External Grants. I do this in the hope that these perceptions 
will not be allowed to obscure our common and larger goals and that the 
processing of our Chapter 636 proposals will not be further and unnecessarily 
delayed. Dr. Hunt has reported to me that: 

1. The feed back from the Bureau of School Programs hasn't always 
been consistent from one district to another. 

2. The feedback from our vantage point often seemed to be at 
variance with the proposal's content. 

3. The feedback unexpectedly contained new policies. For example, 
the state's review team has suggested that individualized in- 
structional programs, which have been utilized under Chapter 
636 since 1974 and which certainly are in keeping with the Board 

of Education's priority to reduce disparity in academic achievement, 
are now ineligible for Chapter 636 support. We would hope that 
this position can be modified. Additionally, state staff has 
decided that the racial composition of collaborating institutions 
should be such as to result in project staff collectively reflec- 
ting the racial composition of the student population, a quote which 
exceeds the affirmative action requirements of the outstanding Federal 
Court Order. The imposition of this requirement, however laudatory 
its goal, may well result in the termination of many collaborative 
projects as very few institutions are in a position to conform to it. 
Every institution collaborating with us under Chapter 636 documents 
that it is an equal opportunity employer and in the aggregate approxi- 
mately 30% of 636 project staff is minority. We believe for the state 
to impose additional requirements would be counterproductive and would 
serve only to reduce the number of collaborative projects. 



-8- 



- 5 - 



Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 



4. State staff has not always been able to interpret or explain 
specific comments in the feedback. 

5. Feedback delays remain a serious source of concern to us as 
they have left School Department personnel with inadequate 
time to prepare responses and may Jeopardize our chances of 
getting proposals on the Board's agenda in June. We still 
have not received any substantive programmatic feedback on our 
central proposal for the Institute for Professional Development 
and proposals submitted by Districts 1, 3 and 5. 

I hope that you will agree with me that, given the School Department's 
commitment as documented herein to addressing the target areas which flow 
from the monitoring report, the Chapter 636 proposals prepared by the 
School Department should, with minor clarification and adjustment as may 
be required, be approved by the Board of Education in June for the third 
and final year of the three year projects. We certainly will welcome 
thereafter the assistance of Department of Education staff in preparing 
proposals for FY86 which will expand and strengthen those initiatives 
which will be undertaken in FY85 to address the monitoring report. 

Target areas within district proposals which stem from or are in 
keeping with the monitoring findings are highlighted below. Documentation 
for these as provided by Community Superintendents is available. These 
programmatic needs identified in the monitoring report. 

District Target Areas Addressed 

I . Student Leadership/School Climate 

Improvement Programs at Brighton 
High School and Taft, Edison and 
Tobin Middle Schools 

. Support for Minority Students 
Preparing for Exam Schools 

. Infused Career Education 

. Bilingual Parent Training and 
Involvement 

. Dissemination of Information on 
Chapter 636 Projects 



-9- 



- 6 - 



Dr. John Lawson 



May 31, 1984 



District 



II 



III 



IV 



Target Areas Addressed 

Student Recruitment Programs for 
Jamaica Plain High School, Lewis 
Middle School and Higginson Elementary 
School 

Career Education Programs 

■ Parent Outreach and Support 

Programs Designed to Increase 
Attractiveness and Climate of 
Jamaica Plain High School 

Support for Bilingual Parent Council 

Parent Handbooks in English and Spanish 
for Reading Assistance 

Dissemination of Information on 
Chapter 636 Projects 

Recruitment Activities 

Support Programs for Lewenberg and 
R.Shaw Middle Schools 

Career Education Programs 

Parent Training and Support 

Dissemination of Chapter 636 
Project Information 

Student Leadership Programs at Hyde 
Park High and Rogers and Thompson 
Middle Schools 

Recruitment Projects at Conley and 
F.D.Roosevelt Schools 

Talented and Gifted Program to Strengthen 
Programmatic Attractiveness of Conley and 
F.D.Roosevelt Schools 

Career Education at Middle and High 
Schools 

Parent Training, Participation and 
Support 

Project Information Sharing and 
Coordination 



-10- 



- 7 - 

Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 

District Target Areas Addressed 

V • Program Improvement Projects at Burke 

and Dorchester High Schools 

. Health Career Program at Dorchester High 
School to Promote HORC Recruitment 

. Recruitment Projects and Related Program 
Development 

. Support for Middle School Students Planning 
to Enter High Schools 

. Middle and High School Career Ecucation 
Programs 

. Parent Training and Support Programs 

. Dissemination 

VT . Projects Designed to Strengthen Program 

Attractiveness and Climate of 
South Boston High School 
McCormack Middle School 
Dearborn Middle School 
Gavin Middle School 
Nine Elementary Schools 

. Recruitment and Student Outreach at 
Dearborn, Gavin and McCormack Middle 
Schools and District-Wide 

. Career Education Programs at South 
Boston High and Dearborn, Gavin and 
McCormack Middle Schools 

. Student Leadership Project at South 
Boston High School 

VTI . Programs Designed to Improve School 

Climate at Charlestown High School 

. Recruitment of Students to HORC 
Vocational Education Programs 

. Projects Designed to Increase Attractiveness 
of Eliot, Warren-Prescott and Michelangelo 
Schools 

. Parent Outreach Projects 

. Inclusion of Bilingual Students and Counselors 
in HORC Recruitment Program and Career 
Awareness Related Activities 

. Career Awareness Activities in Charlestown 
High and Middle Schools 

. Dissemination of Information on 
Chapter 636 Projects 



-11- 



- 8 - 

Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 

District Target Areas Addressed 

IX • Student Leadership at English and 

Madison Park High Schools 

. Recruitment Project for Curtis Guild 

. Support for Middle School Students 
Planning to Enter Exam Schools 

. Dissemination of Information on 
Chapter 636 Projects 

At the central level, the School Department will use Chapter 636 funds 
to provide system-wide support to middle school career education programs. 
Chapter 636 money will also be used to assist a public information campaign 
on behalf of the HORC. We concurred with the recommendation of the monitors 
that additional assistance was needed for bilingual students at the HORC. 
We intend to provide this assistance through bilingual paraprofessionals to 
be funded by a vocational education grant under P.L. 94-482. 

Also at the central level, the Bureau of School Programs questioned the 
propriety of the Chapter 636 project proposed by our Institute for Professional 
Development and recommended that this project's allocation be redirected to 
funding a systemwide recruitment team. I believe the IPD's project to be of 
utmost importance to the school system. It is basic to the School Department's 
program development efforts at the central and local levels. I might add that 
your item #3 in the monitoring report acknowledges that program development is 
the hand-maiden of student recruitment. Mr. Coakley has submitted a Student 
Recruitment Proposal to me and I support it although I am not convinced that 
it need be as large in scope as submitted. I say this in light of the target 
areas addressed in many of the local proposals and referenced above. Further- 
more, both Mr. Coakley and I understood from your staff that the Student 
Recruitment Project need not be in competition with other Chapter 636 proposals 
of the School Department, but rather might be funded by the use of unexpended 
funds statewide. We are prepared to assign an ever higher priority to student 
recruitment, in the External Liaison Unit of the Department of Implementation. 
Additionally, if the Department of Implementation can supplement its recruit- 
ment effort with some Chapter 636 funding I believe that it can provide direc- 
tion and lend support to local outreach activities. I request that you en- 
courage Dr. Case, Dr. Banks and Dr. Glenn to explore with Mr. Coakley the 
possibility of such supplementary funding for student recruitment. Moreover, 
I trust that you will agree with me that the curriculum and professional de- 
velopment activities, whether locally or externally funded, form the essential 
bases for successful student outreach. 



-12- 



- 9 - 



Dr. John Lawson May 31, 1984 

In our recent meeting, you expressed to me your opinion that we 
should be moving at this time from curriculum development to curriculum 
implementation and that, accordingly, we should place an emphasis on 
inservice work and staff training. This, of course, is what the Institute 
for Professional Development's proposal intends to do. IPD's proposal 
seeks to continue, refine and expand staff training activities funded 
by Chapter 636 the past two years under our School Based Management 
Project, partially in collaboration with Harvard University. In addition 
IPD intends to focus on implementation of curriculum objectives through 
mini-grants for teacher developed ideas and on information sharing via 
video tapes and printed materials. I see this project as a high priority 
and as one consistent with your own position. I hope that this perception 
will be conveyed to Department of Education staff. 

Through misunderstandings and as a result of coirmunication gaps our 
Chapter 636 proposals have found themselves caught in the middle and the 
timeliness of their approval thus made uncertain. Unless our proposals 
are approved by the Board of Education in June, planned summer programs 
will have to be cancelled and some positions may have to be terminated. 
Further, the implementation of many projects may have to be delayed. 

I have attempted to document in this report the seriousness with 
which the monitoring report has been taken and the extent of the commit- 
ment which we have made to addressing its findings with and without 
Chapter 636 funding. I urge that, in recognition of this commitment, you 
urge your staff to take whatever steps are necessary to facilitate the 
placement of our Chapter 636 Proposals on the Board of Education's agenda 
in June. Anything less will be seriously disruptive to our plans and 
demoralizing to teachers, administrators and parents across the school 
system. In the light of recent discussion between state staff and this 
office, I am confident that with our joint encouragements, our staffs can 
resolve all outstanding matters expeditiously. 




Sincerely, 




Robert R. Spillane 
Superintendent of Schools 



RRSrls 

Attachments 

cc: James Case 

Franklin Banks 
Doreen Wilkinson 



-13- 



ATTACHMENT I 



-11- 



-15- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
CITVWIDE BlL!."i3UAL PROGRAMS 
COUNCL CF BILINGUAL ASSISTANT HEADMAS 

MEMORANDUM 



1 



TO: Oliver W. Lancaster, Deputy Superintendent 
Office of Curriculum and Instruction 

FROM: Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor —p*\/^' ukru^ 
Citywide Bilingual Programs ^ jj^^e^urtru 1^-^ 

DATE: May 23, 1984 

RE: STATE REPORT - IMPEDIMENTS TO PROGRAM 
ACCESS FOR BILINGUAL STUDENTS 



The following policy directives will be implemented to 
address the issue of impediments to program access of 
bilingual students into mainstream classes: 

1. Updating STEP information and monitoring 
the pace at which students move from one 
STEP to another through the partial to 
full mainstreaming process will aid in 
determining when students will be ready 
for mainstreaming. 

2. Partial and full mainstreaming will be 
adddressed by training staff in the 
schools in the areas of parallel sche- 
duling and sister clustering models. 

3. ESL curriculum objectives and activities 
K-12 will be piloted to ensure that the 
transition nature of the program is 
implemented based on ESL achievement. 

4. A lower student/teacher ratio for 
standard curriculum classes will be 

in effect for the 1984-85 school year. 
This will allow more spaces to be 
available in the standard curriculum 
classrooms for mainstreaming bilingual 
students . 

A 



26 COURT STREET • BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • iSl7) 726 62'JG 726 629? 

-16- 



-17- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF T HE SUPERINTENDENT 
ROBERT R SPILLANE 



May 29, 1984 



Commissioner John H. Lawson 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Commissioner Lawson. 

The purpose of this correspondence is to outline some of the steps that are 
being taken and are being planned for action relative to the retention of 
minority students at the Latin Schools, an issue which is of priority concern 
to each of us. Headmasters Michael Contompasis and Robert Binswanger have 
detailed the current programs and some Initiatives planned to begin in 
1984-1985. I have attached the plans submitted by each headmaster. 

Boston Latin School plans to continue the current programs, some of which have 
proven very successful and others which have proven moderately successful. 
Among the current programs that would be continued or strengthened are the 
reading and study skills program, the summer enrichment program, the Two-Way 
Tutoring Program, the Roxbury Multi-Service Support Collaborative, the Shady 
Hill Educational Enrichment Collaborative, and the Boston University-Boston 
Latin Pilot Educational Program. 

Mr. Contompasis and staff have also Identified two new critical needs in the 
area of student support. They are reorganization of the guidance department 
and an after-school tutorial program. We will work with Mr. Contompasis to 
address any organizational changes possible leading to more effective 
utilization of the Guidance Department. In addition, we will work with Mr. 
Contompasis to identify sources of funding for the after-school tutorial 
program which he indicates is necessary in order to properly service the need 
for academic remedial and study skills in the 7th and 9th grades. 

Headmaster Robert Binswanger has outlined a well-conceived long-range action 
plan for Latin Academy to address the problems of minority retention. Dr. 
Binswanger and staff have taken major steps this year to begin this effort. 
He has taken action leading to the hiring of minority administrative and 
teaching staff. He has made a major effort In involving parents in the life 
of the school and putting in place mechanisms for more effective home contact 
between teachers and parents. In addition, he has taken a tutorial program 
which was already quite strong and built it an even stronger program. 



26 COURT STREET BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 617 

-18- 



Commissioner John H. Lawson -2- May 29, 1984 



Dr. Blnswanger has also outlined a number of new or strenthened Initiatives 
needed to help Latin Academy In these areas. He and staff have designed a 
more streamlined and focused summer orientation program; a strengthened 
support services thrust, including an additional guidance counselor for the 
first two grades; the development of an acadenlr advisor concept; a change in 
course content for 7th grade students; and new scheduling options for students 
experiencing some problems in Latin and math. 

I am confident that the plans submitted by Headmasters Contompasis and 
Blnswanger are a good starting point for discussion between key members of our 
staffs. 

Please advise me as to what you see aB the next steps In this process. 




Superintendent of Schools 



Attachments 



-19- 



BOSTON IATIN ACADEMY 



PIANS FOR RETENTION OF MINORITY STUDENTS 



-20- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




boston public schools 

BOSTON LATIN ACADEMY 
IOBE~> r 3 3INSWANGI" 
DCHiS C JO.N=-i 

james j za\~~ Latin Academy is a City of Boston public high school that 
ftsastant Hea*r.«tprs offers a classical education. Latin is the spine of our 

six year curricular frame. We serve approximately 1338 
students. Our program does not mirror any other; we are 
proud of our record of achievement, justifiably so, since 
our purpose is college preparation. 

Oar philosophy is quite simple: any youngster capable of 
passing the entrance requirements as stated and regulated 
by the School Department of Implementation and indicating 
a desire to attend the Academy is assumed to have the 
capability of comDleting our course of study. We do not 

subscribe to a theory that planned attrition is a sign 
of academic rigor. Nor do we believe there is any reason 

for pride if we say we begin with a class of 300 and by 
senior year only 100 remain. We welcome our students 
as ones :iho want bo graduate, attend college and enter 
the world of work and publuc service. 

Th^re is no question that some students find our work 
requisites harder than they expected. Others' discover 
tbey are unwilling to make the sacrifices in terms of study 
time necessary to comnlete the classwork. Still others, 
entering adolesence, experience physiological changes, 
psychological pressures and various peer conflicts that 
make intense study difficult. Some experience adjustment 

problems vhen they discover that they are no longer #1 
in :lie class but rather in a class with a large group of 
#1's which turns out to be more demanding and competitive 
than they had anticipated. No matter what the student? s 
reaction it is our duty, especially during the first year, 
to see that each boy or giri is receiving the assistance 
they need. We expect each child to finish the complete 
course of study and gradute . We believe we can improve 
our retention rate even further by addressing such areas 
as administrative staff, teaching faculty, role models, 
parent involvement, counselling, summer program, tutoring 
and curriculum, home contact and acadenic program. 

It is important to *ioint out that the fundamental problems 
associated with ~upil retention, school integration and 
racial balance are no> responsive to instant solutions 
nor are they aided by qtick fixes. On the contrary, 

174 IPSWICH S T REET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02215 • 266-7546 AREA 617 

-21- 



we sincerely believe that the Academy needs to attack 
such problems with a well conceived long range action 
plan. Long range is not to be interpreted as one of delay 
or postponement. We do not lack commitment. Change is 
difficult to effect in any situation, including a school, 
and since it is a massive task it will take a concerted 
effort on the part of all persons concerned with the 
Academy. As we move forward to fulfill our mission we 
wish to bring together the various competing constituent 
groups so that we can best allocate the scarce resources 
and intelligently asply the fun d s available to those items 
of highest priority. 

We have b en asked to review our actions in 1984- and 
consider what actions we would assgn priority value to 
in 1985. w e have assessed our school environment and 
point out that our factual record indicates positive 
success in attacking these probelms as noted =ibove. 
Furthermore, we believe we have made gr3at striies in 
198*f and wish to augment the initial steps by the nlans 
we have Veen developing for the coming acadenic year. 
The material that follows reflects our planning to date 
?nd encomo asses those areas that we believe exemplify 
critical uoints for effecting change. 



Robert Binswanger I 
Head Master ™ 



May 21, 1984 



-22- 



INTRODOCTION 



II. 



The foil and equal treatment of all students, Independent of race, creed, color, 
religion, national origin ia a basic tenet of the Boston Latin Academy. We are 
clear in our understanding of our mission as well as our comprehension of the 
laws of the land. Thus, we take justifiable pride in the type of environment 
offered at the Academy; one in which minority students experience success, achieve 
scholastically and complete the academic requirements in a milieu they described 
as "comfortable" and "friendly". 
SCHOOL CLIMATE 



A-. *rtinin<««- r ativ«, Sfcaff 

1. 1984 



2. 1985 



B. Teaching Facult y 
1. 1984 



1985 



C. Role Models 
1. 1984 



1985 



D. Parents 
1. 1984 



Many steps have been taken to reach our stated goals 
of full and equal treatment of all students. For the 
first time the ACADEMY actively sought and employed a 
minority Assistant Headmaster. She was selected on the 
basis of excellence in teaching, a caring attitude abov: 
students and a lifetime experience in the Boston City 
schools. 

We plan to seek qualified senior staff to fill manageri 
administrative positions. 

New instructional staff were brought to the school who 
were excellent classroom instructors and masters of the 
subject matter. This occured in modern languages, biol 
ogy, and physical education. All qualified as minority 
personnel. The elimination of dual teacher lounges, 
one used predominatly by white teachers and one used b> 
black teachers was accomplished. 

We plan to recruit new staff with the same criteria 
presented by those hired last year to enhance our 
faculty and broaden the base of our minority faculty 
which at the moment seem to be over concentrated in 
one department < social studies. 

New initiatives would include the presence of young 

■< * 

minority role models in both the math and computer 

science programs. These two men, in their early twen- 
ties served as role models for students throughout the 
term raising a standard of performance and expectation 
the students had not previously experienced. 

We plan to seek funds and resources to again involve 
it I, 

role models for the students in the Academy; this 

effort should include computer science (because of 

its technology and popularity), English and Latin. 

The active efforts to involve parents and/or guardians 
in the life of the school and to engage their attentioi 
involvement and participation so that minority families 
felt welcome ano useful in the Academy. 



-23- 



2. 1985 



We plan to continue to build on the base established 
last year so that minority parents will be equal 
participants in all parent-school activities. 



III. GOIDANCB COUNSELLING 

A. One counselor 
1. 1984 



2. 1985 

B. Support Services 
1. 1984 



2. 1985 



c. Academic Advising 
1. 1984 



2. 1985 



He currently have a single guidance counselor servicing 
the student needs of all pupils in the Class VI (7th 
grade) and Class V (8th grade) levels. There are more 
than 500 youngsters and no one person can handle the 
case load. 

We need an additional counselor to work with this age 
group 

The problem is compounded by the fact that the guidance 
office is without any clerical services, clerical equip- 
ment or the most rudimentary of office machines. 
We need support services so that we can maintain accurate 
records and so that we can keep in close contact and 
communication with families. 

Our interim solution is a plan to assign a small number 
of Class VI students to each member of the teaching 
faculty for "academic counseling" , a counseling that 
focusses on subject areas. It can begin immediately 
at the start of the new school year. 

This entails an extra assignment for the teaching staff 
and it places a burden on an already busy faculty but 
the advisory role is necessary. With such a system in 
place it is our short range plan to limit the certified 
guidance officer to those cases which need special atten- 
tion and require actual guidance and professional counsel 



IV. SUMMER PROGRAM 



1 . 1984 



2. 1985 



The summer program ran three weeks, attendance was 
spotty, few families had been encouraged or urged to 
attend since the only notice of the program had been a 
letter written in late May. The program offered actual 
coursework similar to that which was offered in the first 
two weeks of the school year. Great effort was placed 
on testing yet in 7 class days competency gains are hard 
if not impossible to measure. Diagnostic assessments wer 
lacking or late in determination and were of minimal 
value to the faculty in September. 

The program will consist of two two-week sessions that 
will focus on the ways and methods of accomplishing 
homework and preparing lessons. After a study of our 



-24- 



IV. B. 



2. 19SS 



current practices it is clear that in-coming students from minor- 
ity backgrounds seem to have the most trouble with Latin, Math 
and English. Consequently, we will address these subject areas 
in the summer session (science will be included) and the core 
curriculum will be study skills and study habits. 
Although in years past the program has been voluntary a greater, 
more intensive effort has been staged to inform parents of the 
importance of this orientation program. The concept was intro- 
duced at apunday meeting of parents and students new to the 
Academy. Despite the good weather and difficult parking more 
than 420 persons attended. These parents will receive 2 addi- 
tional mailings if 636 resources are made available. 



V. THE CURRICULUM 



Basics 



1984 



1985 



B. Half Year 
1. 1984 



1985 



The Academy has offered the traditional classical education 
curriculum that stresses 5 years of Latin, Math, and History; 6 
years of English, 4 years of science and 3 years of a modern 
language. Electives have been minimal. 

It is now evident, based on our review of scores and class 
records, that minority students have had trouble with English, 
and in particular writing skills. In the past we have offered 
a special course to Class VI that focusses on study skills but 
the instruction has not had the returns expected. We now feel 
that other options may be more useful despite classroom gains 
and reduced dropouts. 

One is to provide nore writing opportunities for 
the new students, especially those having trouble or not feeling 
confident in English. The introduction of a cadre of volunteers 
competent in writing techniques who would provide the time and 
intelligence on a weekly basis is being planned so that these 
students could write at least once a week in addition to their 
normal English classwork. The creative writing sessions would 
be offered in close correlation to the regular English program. 

The Academy offers a five term full year course in six major 
subject areas and this program is augmented by Honors courses, 
Advanced Placement classes, and courses in art, music, typing, 
computer science, health and physical education. 
Depending upon the availability of classroom space, a new pro- 
cedure is planned for new students who are experiencing severe 
problems in major courses such as Latin and Math. In the cases 
where students have received failing grades for three consecutiv 
terms (which would infer that repeating of the year is likely) 
we are investigating the plausability of removing them from 
such classes at mid year. They would begin the course again 
starting in the third term so at the very least, they could atte 
summer school assuming they were able to handle the coursework f 
the rest of the year. Such a practice would cutdown on the numb 
of failures and more importantly, cutback on the attitudinal 
problems carried by students who have been told as early as mid- 
year that they have no chance of passing. 
-25- 



VI, 



TUTORIAL 



1. 1984 This year we began to build on previous experience. 

Heretofore, we offered selective tutorial assistance 
at the request of students/parents provided that we 
had available personnel. On occasion, tutoring was 
initiatmd by the teacher. Oftentimes outside private 
tutoring was recommended. 

We have made a major commitment to tutoring based on 
the belief that immediate assistance can be useful and 
make the difference between a failing course and 
eventual drop-out. We have assigned a faculty member 
pert/time as tutorial coordinator and the assignment 
has given the program continuity, influence and clarity. 

Offered by upper level students with strong academic 
records to work one on one with Class VI and Class V 
students in the basic subject areas. Approximately 
25 students serve as tutors and approximately 80* 
students have received direct attention; 

Offered by a cadre of interns drawn from college and 
university campuses augmented by other adults who 
focus on reading and English skills. The interns 
remain in school most of the day working with clusters 
of students who have been diagnosed by faculty as 
students in need of extra attention; 

Three facukty members, from areas of Latin, English 
and Math were selected and given a stipend to organize 
and direct a a before and after school program with 
students needing assistance in specific problems 
relating to the particular discipline. 

2. 19851 We intend to increase our commitment despite the fact 

that the Academy had the largest (over 300 tutees) 
and most successful tutorial effort in the City. 
We intend to expand the number cf subjects available 
for tutorial help, prepare written materials to enhance 
the tutor sessions, start the program even earlier 
than this year (i.e. October) provided that we receive 
fubding support for a coordinator and tutor stipends. 



Peer 

Tutoring 



School 
Volunteer 



Project 
Assist 



VII. HOME CONTACT 
1. 198if: 



We have been plesased by the faculty response in 
making home calls when students are excessively tardy, 
absent or doing poorly in class. We have expanded our 
communications home to keep parents informed of 
academic problems. If a parent requests we send a 
weekly report of class progress. In addition, faculty 
fill out and send heme mid-tern reports on any student 
having serious trouble in a class. e have urged 
parental visits to school and these have been increasing. 



-26- 



2. 1985 : A new plan included a letter directly to each 

family that was accepted to the Academy inviting 
them to visit the school with their son/daughter 
in order to attend classes, tour the building and 
meet the Head Master. To date 106 families have 
visited, approximately one third minority. 

Once families hare indicated their intention to 
attend they received a letter of invitation to a 
Sunday luncheon held for all new students & parents. 
This was held on May 19 and more than 420 persons 
attended. Faculty, guidance, services and so forth 
were discussed, the summer program was explained 
and the welcome and orientation was well received. 

We plan greater contact and communication with 
parents of Class VI students at the start of the 
year. Such programs as a parebt workshop on homework, 
parent networks in neighborhoods, parent understanding 
of the courseload and parent participation in 
the development of such items as the code of 
conduct are all ndped for activities in 1985. 

VI I I . ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



1. 198^: t appears from our reviews and analysis that the 

basic program offered in-cor.ing Class VI students 
presents some difficulty, at times, to minority 
students as well as others. Some punils have 
trouble adjusting to the heavy courseload and the 
rigorous homework requirements. We feel our 
standards are appropriate for students passing the 
entrance examination and that the retention of the 
course of study reflects the will of parents. At 
the same time, we have begun to offer changes in the 
Class VI program to make it -ore interesting, alive 
and responsive. Thus, we introduced comnuter 
science to Class VI which enlivened the total 
program, "/e have also introduced outdoor ->laytirae 
( eather permitting) and this has enhanced the day. 
These are two major examples of change. 

2. 19855 We are presently planning a change in the course 

structure offered Class VI students. One examole, 
the need for science classes, is being ex->lored since 
there is a high degree of intorost in the subject 
and the discipline lends Itself to student activity. 
We will retain Latin, Math and English but review our 
content for each course so that the studies are 
more fihely attuned to the capacity of the Class VI 
entrants. Early success as a new student is a 
key to the problem of retention. 



-27- 



BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 



PLANS FOR RETENTION OF MINORITY STUDENTS 



-28- 



-29- 



The Boston Latin School currently faces two critical needs 1n the area 
of student support. They are: 

Reorganization of the Guidance Department 
An After School Tutorial Program. 
While 1t 1s apparent that there are positive systems 1n place, 1t 1s clear 
that additional support 1s necessary 1n order to provide adequate support to 
entering students. 

A brief overview follows for each critical need. 

REORGANIZATION OF THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 
There 1s a critical need for the Headmaster to have administrative options 
within the structure of the Guidance Department. They Include 

- selection of personnel 

- extended work day 1n order to meet with parents and students 

- requirements for continuing education of Staff 

- expand personnel 

- select a director for this department 

- re-organ1ze structure for Improved dellltery of services 

- develop comprehensive evaluation tool for members of the Guidance Staff 

- able to provide comprehensive program for evaluating delivery of 

services to students 



AFTER SCHOOL' TUTORIAL 
In order to properly service the need for academic remediation and 
study skills, we request additional funding for a Tutorial Program to extend 
from September through May. This program would be staffed by Boston Latin 
School teachers who have taught 1n the Summer Enrtchment Program. It would 
be conducted three afternoons a week for two hours. It would cover the 



-30- 



academic areas of Math, English, Language and Science. Built Into this pro- 
gram would be a Study Skills Component. This tutorial program would service 
seventh and ninth graders as a pilot for the first year. The following year 
it should expand to include the 8th grade. 
7th GRADE COMPONENT 
STAFF: 6 Teachers 

SUBJECT AREA: English, Math, Earth Science, Latin 
TIME? 30 weeks, three afternoons per week; 2 hours 
eOST: Stipend $15.00 per hour; 6 hours per week 

Duration 30 weeks 

$21 ,600 

9th GRADE COMPONENT 

STAFF: 3 Teachers 

SUBJECT AREA: English, Math, Latin 

TIME: 30 weeks, three afternoons per week; 2 hours 

COST: $8,100 

TOTAL $29,700 



-31- 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES - INTERNAL 

Since It 1s an acknowledged fact that a student's academic performance 
may be greatly affected by handicapping conditions and/or temporary 
psychological, environmental, medical and personal problems, a full range 
of Student Support Services 1s offered under the coordination of Or. 
Cornelius J. Holland. 
GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING 

Each student 1s assigned a guidance counselor who 1s available for 
educational, vocational, and personal counseling. In addition, the counselor, 
because of his professional training, 1s constantly alert to student needs 
that may suggest the Involvement of other student support service personnel. 
If academic or personal problems present themselves, 1f a parent or student 
needs Information regarding a student's record or educational/vocational 
opportunities, a phone call or appointment with the guidance counselor 
should be the first step. 
HEALTH SERVICES 

Although parents have the primary responsibility for the health of 
their children. School Health Service personnel are available to coordinate 
the health care of the student with the family's private physician or 
neighborhood health center. Two full-time nurses are available to provide 
health related counseling, emergency health care and first aid, immunization 
coordination, health screening, and referrals to private health providers. 
In addition, physician services are available at several school-based 
sessions through a pilot program with Children's Hospital which Includes 
consultation with school personnel, as well as episodic care, physical 
examinations as needed, and some participation 1n- core evaluations. 
PUPIL ADJUSTMENT COUNSELING 

The Pupil Adjustment Counselor 1s a social worker/counselor who can 
function as a wery helpful link between the school, the parents, and 

-32- 



community resources. The Pupil Adjustment Counselor 1s available to make 
home visits to gather Information about the student's family or neighborhood 
that will help the school team better understand causes of the student's 
problems that may be external to the school. In addition to short term 
counseling on behavioral Issues, the Pupil Adjustment Counselor can help 
parents Identify problems and seek proper assistance through referral to 
community resources. 
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES 

The school psychologist 1s available to conduct psychological assessments 
which may Include the administration and Interpretation of psychological 
and educational tests, the systematic observation of students 1n school, 
and consultation with significant people who work with the child. 

In addition to the assessment function, the school psychologist helps 
to define the student's problem and to suggest solutions through direct 
professional Intervention or consultation services to administrators or 
classroom teachers that may Involve techniques of behavior management or 
classroom restructuring to Improve the educational program. 
* READING AND STUDY SKILLS 

The reading and study skills program at the Boston Latin School were 
available for entering students who were experiencing academic difficulty 
and who needed support. There were three main functions of the program: 
to develop necessary study skills for content area subject, to develop and 
Improve writing skills, and to Increase general work knowledge. The students 
met In small groups 1n which Instruction could be Individualized. 

There was an open channel of communication between the Reading 
Specialist, the subject teachers and Guidance so that students received 
support 1n their total school program. Parents were periodically Informed 
of their child's progress. 

* The program 1s presently supported by only one Staff person funded through 

-33- 



Chapter 636. Historically 1t was administered by two teachers. The elimination 
of services available has been extreme. There 1s a pressing need to restore 
at least one position to this vital Reading Program. 



-3M- 



SUMMER ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 

A three week orientation and enrichment program 1s conducted 1n August by 
approximately 20 classroom teachers to orientate enrich and Identify students. 
Staff reflects the racial population of the student body. 
Approximately 425 Incoming students are Introduced to the routines and rules 
of the school and to the academic programs In a socially Integrated setting. 

Important study skills in English, Math, Science and Foreign Language are 
Introduced: organizing and planning study time. Fifteen dally classes 1n study 
methods, reading comprehension 1n current areas; outlining and notetaklng, pre- 
paring for essay and objective tests, are conducted. Materials one selected 
that will enhance Integration and help attract and retain white and minority 
students to the school. Activities provide positive learning experiences and 
help students Interact with students of other racial backgrounds. Films, 
essays and current events are used to Infuse multl -cultural multi-racial co- 
hesion teaching units of group dynamics where students discuss who they are, who 
their parents are and who their neighbors are are conducted. Minority speakers 
are used as role models. 



-35- 



Additional areas of support include: 

"Sixie Night " is held for parents of entering students in early 
October. At this time Administration and Staff are available to provide 
Information regarding the needs of new students. Members of parent 
groups are also available to answer questions and provide support. 
Information booklets, provided by the State Street Bank business pair- 
ing, contain helpful information and guidelines for parents and students. 
A copy 1s enclosed. 

Open House 1s held 1n May for new students. A presentation by the 
Head Master provides an orientation to the program at Latin School. 
Staff are available to answer questions. The students from the National 
Honor Society give tours of the building and the String Ensemble provide 
entertainment for the light refreshments offered at the conclusion of 
the day. 



-36- 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES - EXTERNAL 

Programs that are presently being utilized are listed below. It 1s 
significant to note that each program 1s subject to annual funding review. 
Although each project provides service and support vital 1n retention 
Issues, thay are not sufficiently staffed to adequately serve the number 
of students in need. 

TWO-WAY TUTORING 

The Two-Way Tutoring Program, 1s a project 1n which high school juniors 
and seniors whose reading skills are below grade level tutor reading to under- 
classmen with below-grade level skills. Tutoring sessions are conducted 1n 
the pupils' high schools during the regular school day. Instruction 1s super- 
vised by trained Interns and 1s coordinated by staff personnel at the respective 
schools. Both cognitive and affective growth are measured by pre/post test 
measures. At Boston Latin School 19 pairs of students are participating 1n 
the program. 

ROXBURY MULTI-SERVICE 
STATEMENT OF NEEDS : 

There are a number of Black and Hispanic students, who enter 
Boston Latin School each year 1n the seventh grade, who are 1n need of 
support services to encourage their performance 1n school. Such services 
should provide both academic and counseling support to students and their 
families. The drop out rate of entering seventh grade student at Boston 
Latin School 1s 40%. This program will reduce that rate at the end of two 
years by 20X. 



-37- 



OBJECTIVES, MAJOR ACTIVITIES AND EVALUATION PLAN: 

The Boston Latin Collaborative 1s an early Intervention program based at 
the Boston Latin High School. The program 1s coordinated by the Roxbury Multi- 
Service Center. The Collaborative may also utilize staff, consultants and 
resources from the Department of Social Services, Solomon Carter Fuller Mental 
Health Center, and Roxbury Children's Services. The objective of the Boston 
Latin Collaborative 1s to reduce the high drop out rate that Black and 
Hispanic seventh graders experience. The Collaborative 1s committed to pro- 
viding school based counseling and direct service to high risk students. The 
Collaborative will offer Individual group, and family counseling; referrals, 
and school personnel consultation. 

This program Is based on a model that has been successfully Implemented 
In the Madison Park High School. The Boston Latin Collaborative has been and 
will continue to work with Madison Park Collaborative to Insure Its success. 

The Boston Latin School Collaborative (Roxbury Multi-Service Center-lead 
agency) provides counseling services to up to 200 students with parental In- 
volvement where necessary. 

Counseling activities Include Individual group and family sessions. 
Students serviced are from the recommendations of the Summer Enrichment Program, 
as well as the general school population. Behaviors Identified Include: poor 
school adjustment, repetitive academic failure, class cutting, family conflicts 
and low self-esteem. 

Roxbury Multl -Service provides services that Increase parental Involvement 
and awareness 1n educational programs and planning of students. Provides 
specific family Interventions - counseling to referred students where family 
conflict/problems are Interfering with student adjustment to school. 



-38- 



SUPPORT SERVICES - EXTERNAL 



SHADY HILL PROGRAM - EDUCATIONAL ENRICHMENT PROGRAM 



The Educational Enrichment Program at Shady H111 School 1s designed 
for students presently 1n the seventh grade at Boston Latin School 
who are having difficulties 1n meeting academic standards In one or more 
of the three subjects to be offered: English, Latin, mathematics. 

This Is an Important program for the Latin School as it provides 
a program specifically designed to follow the curricula. Because the 
selected staff are well versed 1n their subject area and familiar with the 
expectations of the Latin School , students are better able to prepare 
themselves. Approximately sixty students attend this program each 
summer. 

Unlike the sessions held 1n the Boston Summer School, the students 
are known to their teachers, and therefore receive the encouragement to 
work hard and continue their studies at the latin School. This 1s a crucial 
time for the middle school student. It 1s Important that such programs be 
continued and expanded within the framework of the Boston Public School 
Summer Program to Include upper grades as well. 



-39- 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY - BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL PILOT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

About three years ago Dr. Adelaide Cromwell Gulliver, Director 
of the Afro-American Studies Program at Boston University met with a 
small committee of educators and a representative from the School 
Department to discuss 1n what way the Afro-American Studies Program 
could assist 1n broadening the education of black children 1n the dty 
of Boston. 

After considering several alternatives, 1t was felt that a selected 
number of students from the Boston Latin School , who by being there 
had already exhibited promise, would be the target population. The 
program 1s designed to work with students who have completed the 7th grade but 
before entering the 8th grade. The students are selected from the 
middle range of black students who predictably will make 1t through the 
Latin School but by participating 1n this program will be strenghtened 
1n their performance and consequently 1n their long range potential. 

The program has three phases. In late May and June students and their 
parents meet to discuss the Importance of education to Blacks; to hear 
reminiscences about the Latin School from former and now successful 
black graduates of the Latin School and a final session on the significance of 
Latin to Blacks as an academic tool and as a legacy from those Blacks who 
lived 1n the Graeco- Roman world. 



-40- 



Phase two Is held In July. Classes are held each week day from 
9:00 t* 1:30 and cover areas - Latin, Math, and Literature/History. 
Field trips are also Included during this phase. 

Phase three consists of Saturday meetings during October, 
November and December. These meetings provide the continued support 
the students need.. Students are encouraged to discuss this program 
as well as their present performance at the Latin School. 

This program continues to support the needs of students at the 
Latin School. It 1s critical that outside funding sources be 
maintained for Its support. 



_m_ 



ATTACHMENT II 



-1»2- 



Issue 3 "Racial/ethnic guidelines have yet to be 
met in several schools, as well as most 
citywide vocational education programs. 
In many instances, enrollments should be 
improved through vigorous recruitment and 
program development efforts" 

The difficulty with the above statement of the Board of Education in 
its February 1, I98A Report is that the reader may blur such terms as 
"substantive compliance" and "technical compliance." The Federal Court, 
in its Order of Disengagement of December 23, 1982, suggested that it had 
been concerned with "compliance with the substantive requirements of the 
remedial process." The Court also urged the use of an "administrative 
structure which employs the experience and the common understanding gained 
over the years. . ." 

The State Board itself, in its first Report of July 15, 1983, seemed 
to acknowledge that compliance was a qual i tat i ve issue. Witness a partial 
quotation of a state official: 

"All things considered, fifteen schools with 'compliance 
problems' — even if Fall enrollments reveal a few more-- 
seem a great improvement over the extreme racial separa- 
tion which characterized the Boston schools before the 
197^ racial balance plan went into effect. Compared 
with the heavy concentration of Black students in schools 
more than 90% Black, and of white students in schools 
more than 90% white, it is clear that Boston has achieved 
a significant degree of desegregation." 

The same official also stated that he came away "from this intensive... 
review of the student assignment process with respect for the integrity 
with which it is implemented..." He acknowledged that the school depart- 
ment "seems to do its best to assign appropriate numbers of students in 
appropriate racial/ethnic proportions..." 

In contrast to the Federal Court's representatives who largely re- 
stricted themselves for many years to monitoring of the annual Spring 
Assignment Process, the State Board's staff have seen fit to review the 
assignments both in the Spring and the Fall. We in the school department 
acknowledge that it is reasonable to do a mid-year assessment to determine 
if we have kept "assignment commitments" made to the State Board in the 
Spring and to make certain we are not violating the "laws and practices" 
of the remedial action. The mid-year assessment also has value as a 
reminder of priorities for the upcoming Spring Assignment Process. However, 
we have difficulty with any inference, however softly drawn, in the mid-year 
Report that we have regressed in our attempts to comply with an incredibly 
complicated, many-sided Assignment Plan. To emphasize our concern with the 
technicalities of mid-year assessment, we offer some data as proof that ours 
is a typical major urban school system. Our school enrollments probably 
are much more fluid than those of Quincy, Lexington, Wellesley or other 
suburban school systems. Kindly note: 



-M- 



2. 



New Admissions and 


Internal 


Transfers: 7/ 


'1/83 to 3/23/84 




Black 


White 


Other 


Total 


Kindergarten 


2256 


2151 


1344 


5751 


Gr 1 to 5 


4684 


2182 


3123 


9989 


Gr 6 to 8 


4036 


2407 


2467 


8910 


Gr 9 to 13 


4689 


2768 


2460 


9917 


TOTAL 


15665 


9508 


9394 


34567 




452 


28% 


27% 




Discharges 












Black 


White 


Other 


Total 


Ki ndergarten 


222 


235 


132 


589 


Gr 1 to 5 


906 


1059 


598 


2563 


Gr 6 to 8 


457 


502 


334 


1293 


Gr 9 to 13 


1622 


1281 


799 


3702 


TOTAL 


3207 


3077 


1863 


8147 




33% 


382 


23% 





Even on a gross basis, there just has to be an awareness by reasonable 
persons that student mobility is a great inhibitor to the attaining or 
maintaining of racial/ethnic percentages. 

At any rate our efforts to adhere to the obligations of the Court Order 
— and to show awareness of the State Board's mid-year critique — are to be 
found in our recent Student Assignment Process for 1984-85. A summary of 
those assignments follows: 

1 . High Schools 

Kindly reference the attached memorandum (Coakley to 
Glenn, 5/8/84) on high schools. You will note that every 
high school is within the high-low percentage range for 
Black and White students. Only three schools — Dorchester, 
South Boston and English — are somewhat above the high 
percentage for Other Minority students, but all three 
schools have bilingual programs. Please note, that schools 
within the ranges include Brighton, West Roxbury, Hyde Park, 
Dorchester, East Boston, English and Madison, all of which 
have unique vocational or magnet themes. The SCHOOLS are 
within acceptable ranges as the result of the cumulative 
effect of assignments to regular, bilingual, special, 
vocational and magnet programs. We should be commended 
for that accomplishment and we should not be cited or 
criticized for some percentage variations (short of racial 
isolation) in some programs . 



-45- 



3. 

2. Middle Schools 

Kindly reference the attached memorandum (Coakley 
to Glenn, 5/7/84) on middle schools. We consider sixteen 
of the schools to be within the acceptable percentage 
range for Black and White students and eight schools 
exhibit variations from the range, although in some cases 
very minor. We do believe that staff of the State Board 
agree with our contention that attainment of racial per- 
centage goals at the middle school level is made difficult 
by the Court-required practice of determining percentages 
based on all public school residents of a district. For 
example, it is most likely that each of the eight schools 
reflect the racial/ethnic percentages of students ATTENDING 
middle schools in their districts, most of which house three 
middle schools each. 

3. Magnet Elementary Schools 

Please reference the attached memorandum (Coakley to 
Glenn, 5/7/84) on magnet elementary schools. We consider 
all schools except one to be within the range for White 
students. (Parenthetically, the Court's measurement of 
percentages at the citywide level tends to group together 
Black and Other Minority students.) That school, the 
Hennigan, has a new Principal who almost certainly will 
restore or improve upon the school's modest popularity of 
some five years ago. In fact, there was evidence during 
1983-84 of the school's renewed ability to retain students. 

4. Elementary Schools, Districts I to VI I 

Student assignments at the elementary level are not 
analyzed easily for a host of reasons known to staff of the 
State Board. However, it is the contention of the school 
department staff that only three elementary schools—the 
Chittick, Taylor and Emerson — are of concern. Fourteen 
other schools appear to have enrollments which exceed the high 
range for White students. Historically though, these schools 
lose many of the children assigned to grade one to local 
parochial schools. 

In analyzing the elementary school enrollments, staff 
first studied each school's total enrollment in relation 
to district percentage goals, then each school's non- 
programmatic enrollment and finally each school's total 
enrollment in relation to district attendees. This method- 
ology was utilized by two Senior Officers in 1981 and did 
not meet with rejection by the Court's Expert. 



-46- 



4. 

5. Vocational Education and Magnet Education 

The assignments to a typical high school may form 
a mosaic: regular education, bilingual education, special 
education, vocational education, magnet education. We 
believe that it is desirable that the vocational educational 
assignments of a high school approximate the ci tywide per- 
centages but that is more important that they contribute to 
the district percentages for a school . 

The 1984-85 assignments in Vocational and Magnet 
Education indeed have enabled us to achieve the desired 
racial percentage goals in the high schools. They should 
be examined in that context: 

Black White Other Total 



Brighton VE 


115 


76 


18 


209 


55% - 


36% - 


9% 


West Rox VE 


74 


39 


19 


132 


56% - 


30% - 


14% 


Hyde Park VE 


39 


33 


4 


76 


51% - 


44% - 


5% 


Dorchester VE 


53 


15 


9 


77 


69% - 


19% - 


17% 


Dorchester HE, etal 


46 


14 


12 


72 


64% - 


19% - 


17% 


East Boston VE 


22 


9 


1 


32 


69% - 


28% - 


3% 


East Boston VE 


164 


84 


21 


269 


61% - 


31% - 


8% 


English VAPA 


16 


17 


14 


47 


34% - 


36% - 


30% 


Engl ish FENWAY 


32 


19 


23 


74 


43% - 


26% - 


31% 


Madison MUSIC 


65 


17 


31 


113 


58% - 


15% - 


27% 


6. Extended Day Ki 


inderqa 


rten 













The kindergarten assignments in any initial Assignment 
Process are the most difficult to carry out, and this year 
brings the same dilemma. No matter how much outreach is 
practiced, centrally and locally, we just do not obtain a 
large enrollment in the Spring. Please examine the data: 

1982-83 

Black White Other Total 

Initial Kdgn Assignments 588 1 1 73 409 2170 

27% 54% 19% 

Mid Year Kdgn Enrollment 1718 1 793 949 4460 

39% 40% 21% 

1983-84 

Initial 677 1290 519 2486 

27% 52% 21% 

Mid Year 1722 1772 1009 4503 

38% 39% 23% 



-47- 



Initial 



Mid Year 



198*4-85 












Black 


White 


Other 


Total 




700 
30* 


1077 
k7% 


518 
23% 


2295 




? 


? 


? 


? 



Predictably, our kindergarten enrollment will increase 
by 2000 before January 1st, and its racial/ethnic picture 
will be quite different from that presently assigned for 
1984-85. Note, the change in extended day kindergarten 
enrol Intents: 

1982-83 







Black 


White 


Other 


Total 


Initial EDK 
Mid Year EDK 


1983-84 


272 
461 


194 
296 


157 
250 


623 
1007 


Initial EDK 
Mid Year EDK 


1984-85 


322 
621 


269 
375 


254 
415 


845 
1411 


Initial EDK 
Mid Year EDK 




379 
? 


257 
? 


251 
? 


887 
? 



Thus, our extended day kindergarten assignments for 1984-85 are based 
on our commitments — and our ability to recruit — and the State Board should 
hold us accountable for such promises. 

This somewhat lengthy statement is intended to place on the record 
that we do not support the inference of non-compliance on matters of racial/ 
ethnic assignments. Further, to suggest in 1984 that we are not in substantive 
compliance with the May 10, 1975 Court Order is as much an indictment of the 
State Board itself and the Federal Court as it is of the School Department. 
We, however, do not believe that the Federal Court was less than diligent 
in its monitoring of the Student Assignment Process; we do contend that the 
Court was realistic in its expectations. 

Turning to the matter of recruitment, the School Department is interested 
in obtaining Chapter 636 funds for a Student Recruitment Project . The attached 
correspondence (April 26, 1984, Coakley to Glenn) is offered. This project 
would enhance the capacity of the School Department to employ marketing 
techniques and to personal ize the recruitment effort. The State Board in 
its Report has suggested that more must be done at the local level. Theoreti- 
cally, this suggestion is correct and this recent Spring central officials 
did provide local school officials with the names of potential candidates — 
from public and private schools — for student assignments. However, there is 



-48- 



6. 



a limit to which local school persons can go to seek out students. Further, 
the complexities of the Student Assignment Process — and its lottery system — 
and the emotional responses it evokes make difficult the task of recruiting 
on the part of local school persons who have numerous other priorities. 
Thus, the Student Recruitment Project is an attempt to link central resources 
with recruitment efforts. 

Finally, the School Department has been embarking upon comprehensive 
programmatic, curricular and staff development efforts. Important as 
student recruitment for racial/ethnic desegregation is, these other efforts — 
of themselves — are extremely important elements in the drive for that 
elusive and primary goal of quality education. Such efforts should form 
the bases or preludes for recruitment. 

bmj 

Attachments 



-49- 



-•-;- t- -»=«^ ; Oi 



^ — .»'•—' / 



OF 



BOSTON 



*«. 




20STON PUBLIC SChCCl 



May 8, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: 

From: 

Subject: 



Charles Glenn .- 

John Coakley y&fj'W.. 

Submission of/ 1984-85 Student Assignments - High Schools 




It may be helpful to compare our proposed 1984-85 Student Assign- 
ments with those of previous years: 



HIGH SCHOOLS 




B 


W 


O 


T 


Brighton 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


455 
458 
439 


289 

214 
201 


423 
400 
459 


1167 
1072 
1099 


Jamaica Plain 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


508 
468 
386 


200 
181 
156 


295 
277 
248 


1003 
926 
790 


West Roxbury 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


846 
823 
815 


541 
495 
467 


61 

71 
77 


1448 
1389 
1359 


Hyde Park 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


806 

766 
727 


265 
207 
182 


18 
22 
34 


1089 
995 
943 


Burke 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


509 
390 
490 


87 
74 
92 


61 
46 
85 


657 
510 
667 


Dorchester 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


665 
536 
576 


146 
126 
120 


96 
106 
133 


907 
768 
829 


South Boston 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


397 
405 
417 


350 
288 
291 


224 
202 
283 


971 
895 
991 



-50- 



HIGH SCHOOLS - continued 



B 



W 



Charles town 



East Boston 



Boston 



Boston Latin Academy 



Boston Latin School 



Boston Technical 



Copley 



English 



Madison 



Umana 



82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


375 
357 
433 


213 
161 
175 


347 
336 
435 


935 

854 

1043 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


282 

280 

207 


785 
732 
761 


44 
59 
84 


1111 
1071 
1052 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


491 
436 
516 


228 
187 
189 


171 
190 
184 


888 
813 
889 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


491 
472 
510 


719 
687 
694 


176 
167 
208 


1386 
1326 
1412 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


502 
512 
583 


1452 
1398 
1347 


394 
411 
463 


2348 
2321 
2393 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


588 
574 

570 


377 
334 
293 


255 
283 
304 


1220 
1191 
1167 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


278 
311 
302 


160 
137 
124 


99 
99 

104 


537 
547 
530 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


1120 
971 
871 


525 
382 
313 


360 
337 
326 


2005 
1690 
1510 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


1282 
1073 
1073 


668 
442 
416 


454 
375 
402 


2404 
1890 
1891 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


508 
537 
589 


318 
292 
259 


222 

217 
199 


1050 
1046 
1047 



You will note that, for 1984-85, every high school is within the 
high-low percentage range for Black and White students. Only three 
schools — Dorchester, South Boston and English — are somewhat above 
the high percentage for Other Minority students, but all three schools 
have bilingual programs. We also believe there has been a decrease in 
the number of students assigned to high schools which were not requested 
However, that belief is yet to be documented. 



JC : ab 



xc: Robert Spillane 
Robert Peterkin 
Catherine Ellison 
John Canty 



-51- 



*; ,- z OwiIJwl, L/ : wT/Ir»ii I ! w— wf i ' •» ' i wr DUO I UiN 




3CSTCN ?U3UC SCHCC 



May 7, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



To: Charles Glenn 

.' "' ' '' l 
From: John Coakley /;//' - i///'i* ^*" 

Subject: Submission of 1984-85 /Student Assignments - Middle Schools 

It may be of benefit to compare our proposed 1984-85 Student 
Assignments with those of previous years: 

MIDDLE SCHOOLS B W T 



Edison 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


176 
155 
140 


149 
116 
104 


252 
275 
287 


577 
546 
531 


Taft 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


174 
170 
150 


136 
114 
114 


244 
254 
272 


554 
538 
536 


M. Curley 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


267 
283 
275 


13 

108 

86 


248 
266 
318 


645 
657 
679 


Lewis 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


142 
137 
121 


52 

45 
37 


36 

38 
52 


230 
220 
210 


T. Roosevelt 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


14 9 
122 

141 


65 
50 
33 


134 

107 
72 


348 
279 
246 


Irving 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


316 
317 
302 


233 
208 

183 


113 
128 
128 


662 
653 
603 


Lewenberg 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


293 
250 
255 


106 
84 
70 


10 

9 

10 


409 
343 
335 



-52- 



Charles Glenn 






2 




May 7 , 1984 


MIDDLE SCHOOLS 


- continued 


B 


W 





T 




R. Shaw * 


§2-83 
#3-84 
84-85 


229 

213 
173 


65 
52 
57 


30 
27 
21 


324 
292 

251 




Rogers 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


371 
389 
398 


182 
169 
138 


13 
17 
16 


566 
575 
552 




Thompson 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


364 
347 
302 


101 
82 
66 


15 
11 
12 


480 
440 
380 




Cleveland 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


586 
638 
627 


138 

119 

98 


192 
211 
221 


916 
968 
946 




Holmes 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


266 
271 
255 


98 

78 
75 


32 
22 
29 


396 
371 
359 




Wilson 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


564 
529 
483 


119 
71 
82 


26 
35 
41 


709 
635 
606 




Dearborn 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


192 
207 
228 


97 
92 
97 


37 
48 
48 


326 

347 

373 




Gavin 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


241 
222 
214 


266 
218 
187 


57 
61 
77 


564 
501 
478 




McCormack 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


143 
164 
148 


295 
263 
228 


145 
147 
180 


583 
574 
556 




Edwards 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


148 

155 
164 


85 
92 

78 


242 
256 

277 


475 
503 
519 




Michelangelo 


82-83 
83-84 

84-85 


107 
104 
109 


30 
29 
21 


98 
113 
125 


235 
246 

255 




Timilty 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


221 
212 

187 


55 
62 
48 


136 
150 
147 


412 
424 
382 




Barnes 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


17 
14 
13 


563 
484 
455 


54 
74 
78 


634 
572 
546 





-53- 



Charles Glenn 



May 7, 1984 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS - continued 



B 



W 







Cheverus 

(6 to 8 only) 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


2 
2 

1 


130 

106 

97 


5 
7 
9 


137 
115 

107 


King 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


435 
3 02 
267 


196 
127 
116 


169 
142 

131 


.800 
571 

514 


Mackey 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


254 
248 

240 


142 
13 2 

119 


107 
115 
120 


503 
495 

479 


Wheatley 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


182 
180 
185 


95 

90 
80 


72 
75 
80 


349 
345 
345 



Nine of the middle schools have enrollments within the high-low 
percentage range for all three racial/ethnic groups, and five schools 
(if you included the Holmes) are within the range for Black and White 
students. Eight schools exhibit low white enrollments, but I believe 
this problem is caused by the practice of determining district racial/ 
ethnic percentage goals on the basis of all public school students 
residing in a district. Of the two remaining schools, the Dearborn's 
non-programmatic enrollment is in perfect compliance and the McCormack's 
enrollment should be viewed as a positive result of desegregation — no 
matter what the percentages seem to suggest. We are prepared, there- 
fore, to accept commendations for these assignments. 



JC:ab 



xc: Robert Spillane 
Robert Peterkin 
Catherine Ellison 
John Canty 



-54- 



— ' -m • I I . . ' J 1 . I —m — ' •«■> 



OSTON 




30STCN =L3L : C SCHCC. 



May 7, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



To: Charles Glenn 

From: John Coakley /£ ' • /-^ />/ , .- 

Subject: Submission of 1984-85 Student Assignments - Magnet Elementary 



It may be of benefit to compare our proposed 1984-85 Student 
Assignments with those of previous years: 



MAGNET ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



B 



W 



J. Cur ley 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


165 
153 
149 


91 
74 
75 


74 
69 
79 


330 
294 
303 


Guild 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


137 
13 5 
135 


81 
78 
64 


33 
24 
27 


251 
237 
226 


Hale 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


130 
112 
128 


75 
56 
49 


40 
48 
37 


245 
216 
214 


Haley 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


148 
156 
157 


86 

77 
77 


66 

58 
65 


300 
291 
299 


Hennigan 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


218 
215 
219 


111 
106 
120 


205 
236 
279 


534 
557 
618 


Hernandez 


82-83 
83-84 
84-85 


41 
39 
49 


25 
26 

31 


134 
136 
125 


200 
201 
205 



-55- 



2 






May 7, 


1984 


inued 

NA 
261 
262 


NA 
132 
144 


NA 
231 
243 


NA 
624 
649 




219 
278 
241 


175 
138 
109 


99 

105 

96 


493 
521 
446 




243 
254 
250 


149 
123 
109 


113 
135 
134 


505 
512 
493 




313 
323 
321 


171 
160 
145 


116 
135 
151 


660 
618 

617 





Charles Glenn 

MAGNET ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS - continued 

Jackson 82-83 

83-84 
84-85 

McKay 82-83 

83-84 
84-85 

Ohrenberger 82-83 

83-84 
84-85 

Trotter 82-83 

83-84 
84-85 

As you know, it is our contention that we can place magnet school 
enrollments within racial/ethnic high-low ranges by mid-September of 
a given year. You will notice that all but one school are within the 
range for White students. I seek approval for these initial assign- 
ments based on our track record of seven years on magnet elementary 
school enrollments . 



JC:ab 

xc: Robert Spillane 
Robert Peterkin 
Catherine Ellison 
John Canty 



-56- 



i < « '.'Ji iVW> Ww:iii'/ii • i ••- Vi i l . — . *J i t i *J \ Dvwl \JlN 










April 26, 1984 



Dr. Charles Glenn 

Equal Educational Opportunities 

State Department of Education 

1585 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Charles, 

Dr. Spillane has authorized me to make the attached request for 
Chapter 636 funding for a Student Recruitment Project. I would 
envision the project operating out of the Department of Implementa- 
tion with general activity determined by me and day-to-day supervision 
conducted by either Dr. Ellison or the Director of the External 
Liaison Unit. 

I am not at all certain of the protocol to be followed, and seek 
some guidance from you. Further, it is not my intent to place this 
proposal in competition with district-based or school-based projects; 
rather, it is my understanding you would consider funding such a 
proposal out of other Chapter 636 funds available to your office. 

Your direction on this matter will be appreciated. 



ab 
Enclosure 

xc: Office of Superintendent 
V'Catherine Ellison 
Lydia Francis 
John Canty 
Catherine Blount 
Martin Hunt 




-57- 



/ - 



i : Z.Z. '_ ." .-->■•:. ur 2UO LOIN 




April 24, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



To: Robert Spillane- 

From: John Coakley ■ pli[jHf^H'- 

Subject: Request to S,eek Chapter 636 Funding for Student Recruitement 

The State Board's Report No. 2 on Boston School Desegregation, 
dated February 1, 1984, among other things deals with Student Assign- 
ments and Special Desegregation Measures. Allow me to provide 
excerpts from the recommendations in each category: 

RECOMMENDATIONS - STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 

*1. A strategy should be developed to improve desegregation compliance 
of twenty schools which show promise of coming into compliance without 
mandatory reassignments ; such a strategy should include program develop- 
ment, communication with parents, and measures to create a safe and 
positive learning environment in each school. 

2. Extended Day Kindergarten programs make a contribution to desearega- 
tion in a number of cases; establishment of additional programs and 
expansion of exist incr ones should be considered, subject to careful 
review of equity considerations. In a few cases closer adherence to 
admission requirements and recruitment of under-represented students are 
necessary. 

3. The implications of rapid enrollment decline in magnet schools 
should be reviewed. 

,4. The reasons for non-compliance with the permitted range for White 
enrollment at Brighton and South Boston high schools should be identified 
and remedial actions taken. A plan should be developed to move Jamaica 
Plain and English High Schools toward compliance, with special attention 
to security improvements. 

*5. The non-compliance of most citywide vocational programs with the 
permitted racial ranges and with the coals for enrollment of male and 
female students requires coordinated efforts to increase the number of 
applicants from under-represented groups, with special reliance upon 
career education, guidance, and communication about what each prooram 
offers . 

' -58- 



rt Spillane 2 April 24, 1984 

'MMENDATIONS - SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 

An explicit desegregation strategy should be developed for the six 
. rial desegregation schools for which no strategy exists, that 
.rtifies the necessary program changes, leadership, and resources and 
er support required to achieve or maintain compliance. If modification 
existing assignment requirements would contribute to stable long-term 
ipliance with desegregation requirements, Boston should propose such 
mges through the modification process. 

School-level recruitment efforts should become a priority for staff 
special desegregation schools, and appropriate resources should be 
ie available to support such efforts. Recruitment should be directed 
rticularly to students in transitional grades, completing kindergarten, 
fth grade, and eighth grade, and to their parents. 

The location of middle school bilingual clusters in District I 
iculd be reviewed, and measures taken to reduce the number of dis- 
ppointed minority students applying to middle school grades at the 
obin K-8 school. 

Burke High School should consider developing a new magnet program to 
eplace the attenuated Theatre Arts program and so encourage additional 
"hite enrollment and compliance with desegregation requirements. 

5. The City and School Department should ensure that the renovations to 
3urke High called for by the special desegregation plan submitted to the 
Zourt are undertaken immediately. 

6. Plans to phase out two magnet vocational education programs at 
Dorchester High School should be evaluated for a potentially adverse 
affect on special desegregation efforts at that school. 

7. The curriculum content and administrative structure of the 3usiness 
Magnet program at East Boston High shoudl be strengthened substantially. 

8. Record-keeping should be improved for the Business Magnet program: 
information on work-site experience, post-graduate job placements, 
transfer requests and retention of students in the program is essential 
to program improvement. 

9. The Advanced Work and Academically Talented programs should be 
restructured to provide effective preparation for students who will be 
admitted to the examination schools. This will require a distinctive 
curriculum, selection of staff on the basis of experience and training 
•in this area and effective inservice training. 

*10. Selection of students for the Advanced work and Academically 
Talented programs should not rely exclusively on achievement tests, with 
their limited capacity to predict academic success of minority students. 
Informational materials about these programs should be disseminated 
more effectively, and in the principal languages spoken by Boston 
parents . 

11. All three examination schools should offer mandatory summer or 
spring orientation programs that include diagnostic testing to identify 
and remediate skill deficiencies. 

-59- 



>obert Spillane 3 April 24, 1984 

12. All three examination schools should institute a systematic 
procedure for identifying/ referring and following up on the progress 
of students in need of support services. Such services should be 
provided during school hours, including academic remediation, training 
in study habits and counseling. The ratio of counselors to students 
should be improved, clerical and attendance staff should be provided 
to permit counselors to concentrate on their primary function of student 
contact, and there should be less exclusive stress on college-oriented 
counseling activities. 

*13. There should be clear responsibility for identifying and supporting 
the education of academically talented students, including communication 
with their families, coordination of curricula of middle school and 
high school advanced programs , and comprehensive support services for 
minority students in the examination schools. 

I have enumerated these recommendations to suggest that there is a 
need for a student-recruitment strateay and to offer the view that the 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity of the Massachusetts Department 
of Education is willing to fund such an effort. It is important, how- 
ever, that you not interpret my listing of the recommendations as a 
blind endorsement of the findings of Report No. 2. In some cases I 
disagree with the findings and in many cases I question seriously the 
scope of the recommendations. Nonetheless, I urge you to allow me to 
seek Chapter 63 6 funding directly from the Massachusetts Department of 
Education's Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity for a Team of 
Research, Publicity and Recruitment persons to address some of the 
aforesaid recommendations, particularly those which are starred. 

Propo sal T hrust 

1. To analyze residential patterns, assignment and discharge data, and 
school/program preferences in order to develop enrollment strategies 
and to provide helpful data to potential applicants to our schools. 

2. To prepare brochures, news releases, flyers, informational packages 
to be utilized in public information and recruitment endeavors , 
and to seek to obtain greater use of media services by school 
personnel. 

3. To appear at schools, clubs, public meetings, shopping areas, and 
radio and television stations to encourage student enrollment in 
specific schools of the Boston Public Schools. 

Staff ina Needs and Expenditures 

i 

Title Number Yearly Salarv 

1. Data Analyst 1 $22^374 

2. Publications Specialist 1 S22,374 

3. Information Officer 2 $22,374 

4. Clerk Typist 1 $15,550 

5. Parent Recruiters 10 $ 8,000 

Personnel Expenditure $13 5,04 6 



-60- 



obert Spillane 4 April 24, 1984 

later ials 

L. Printing and Production Costs 535/000 

2. Postage $20,000 

3. Translations $ 4,000. 

Materials Expenditure $49,000 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE $234,046 

Please advise me as soon as possible if I may seek out Or. Glenn 
of the Massachusetts Department of Education to ascertain his willing- 
ness to obtain the necessary approval at his end. Please also know 
that I can modify the proposal as offered above. 



JC:ab 



-6l- 



ATTACHMENT III 



-62- 



-63- 



A). Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational Education 

1. Extensive Review and the Long Range Plan 

As the Director of Education/Employment I have had several 
meetings with the following individuals: 

a. Superintendent 

b. John Coakley 

c. Atty . Dinger 

d. Dr. David Cronin 
c. Atty. Blumenthal 

e. State Department Regional Staff 

f . Robert Murray 

All of our meetings discussed in specific detail the Unified Plan 
and what steps Boston will take to review and remedy the Plan. 

On February 21, 1984, I wrote to Dr. Cronin and clearly indicated 
what our process would be. As Dr. Cronin requested, Boston 
addressed all the major headings of the Unified Plan. These items 
were addressed in the Long Range Plan. 

I submitted a copy of the Long Range Plan to Dr. Cronin's office. 
Dr. Cronin acknowledged that he had received and reviewed the Long 
Range Plan. To date, we have not yet met to review our 
recommendations in the Long Range Plan for changes in the Unified 
Plan. 

It is our recommendation that the appropriate sections and action 
plans for the Long Range Plan shall replace the Unified Plan. 

2. Distinctive Management Structure 

The Unified Plan requires that Boston implement a distinctive 
.management structure for vocational education. I have met with 
Charlotte Harris and she has done an excellent job in upgrading 
the Unified Plan version of this management structure. Boston now 
has DRAFT reorganization plan for the Department of Education and 
Employment which meets all State and Federal Court requirements. 
Based on current budgetary constraints and School Commitee 
disposition towards administrative positions, I have not proposed 
that Boston initiate this compliance item. 



I look forward to hearing from the State Department ' s-7 review of 

our proposed changes. '/ 

i 

i 
i 

3) Compliance achievements and activities 

Is response to Report l.'o.Z, Boston has undertaken many compliance 



-64- 



activities: 

1. Services for bilingual students: 

On April 6, 1984, we reported to the State how we were increasing 
programs and services for our bilingual students. 

a. We have hired an additional bilingual paraprof essional and have 
hired a Cape Verdean parapropf essional and a Haitian 

paraprof esional . 

b. We have submitted a Vocational Education grant for $70,775 
to hire more bilingual paraprof essional staff for the 1984-85 
school year. This will be in addition to the present bilingual 
paraprof esional staff level which we will maintain. 

c. We have assumed the operations of the Vocational English as a 
Second Language (VESL) program at the Humphrey center; this progam 
was previously funded by the State. 

d. We have submitted a proposal, Bilingual Occupational Speaking 
Skills («55,528), to increase support services to bilingual 
students at the Humphrey Center. 

e. We hired a Bilingual Career Instruction Manager to provide 
supportive services to bilingual special needs students throughout 
the secondary system. 

f . At the Humphrey Center we will continue to provide LEP students 
with the largest bilingual vocational program in the country. 
Bilingual support services will be increased within middle and 
high school programs throughout the school system. All these 
activities have been reported to the State Department monitors. 

2. Recruitment and Program development efforts 

On April 19, 1984, John Coakley, Juanita Hardrick, and I met with 
Dr. Glenn regarding recruitment and retention matters. On May 4, 
we submitted an intitial Action Plan to Dr. Glenn detailing our 
past and proposed activities. Furthermore, Boston has: 

a. Hired the Public Information Specialist as required in Report 
No . 2 . 

b. Initiated planning to address the specific items in Dr. Glenn's 
April 23, 1934 memorandum. After holding planning sessions with 
Dr. Peterkin and John Coakley, I will submit to you our finalized 
Action Plan which addresses program retention and supplementary 
recruitment. , - 

3. Report No. 2 compliance issue: Program evaluation 

(2) 

-65- 



Boston is in the process of posting a personnel circular for a 
Specialst in Program Review and Research in order to meet 
compliance with Report No. 2. There is funding for this 
compliance item in the FY 85 budget. 

4. Report No. 2 compliance issue: City-wide Job 
Development 

Boston is in the process of posting a personnel circular for a 
Specialist to coordinate all job placement and development 
city-wide as required within Report No. 2. To date, I have not 
identified funding for this compliance item. This is the only 
compliance position which we have not yet been able to fill 
through the conversion of existing and/or vacant positions. 

5. 636 proposal 

Our central 636 proposal directly addressed Report No. 2. in 
substantive ways in key areas : 

a. Career education and career guidance at middle schools. 

b. Career preparation programs at high schools 

c. Student recruitment through improved career education, career 
guidance, and career exploratory programs at middle and high 
schools 

As stated above, we have utilized GSP funds and other Federal 
funds to address major areas of concern regarding: 

1. Bilingual students 

2. Student recruitment 

The School Department will increase funding to high school career 
preparation programs through the allocation of resources to the 
Boston Compact and to the Jobs Collaborative Program. I suggest 
that we provide the state with a detailed budget analysis and 
explanation of our GSP expenditures in these areas; they far 
exceed the supplemental funds from 636 and Vocational Education 
Act grants. 

6. Vocational Education Act grants 

As stated above, Boston has utilized its Vocational Education Act 
grants to address the findings in Report No. 2 in the following 
program areas: 

a. Support services to Bilingual students 

b. Support services to special education students 

c. Program improvements to all magnet vocational education 
programs 

d. Career guidance for high school students 
e. Program improvements to employabil ity programs in district and 

(3) 
-66- 



magnet high schools 

All these grants were submitted to State Department staff at the 
beginning of April. 

C. NEXT STEPS 

1. The State Department and School Department meet to review the 
Long Range Plan as it treats Career and Vocational Education items 
addressed in the Unified Plan. 

2. Boston continues to implement compliance items from Report No. 
2 in areas relating to: 

a. Program Evaluation: Assign Specialist. 

b. Coordinated Job Placement: Identify funds and assign 

Specialist, 
c. Distinctive Management: Approve and implement reorganization 
of Eudcation/Employment department. 

3. Boston continues to implement our existing programs and 
activities in targeted areas: 

a. Recruitment and retention of students 

b. Career education/guidance 

c. Bilingual support services 

d. Program improvements within magnet and district schools. 

(May 21, 1984) 



-7 



(3) 
-67- 



ATTACHMENT IV 



-68- 



-69- 



7HESCH0CH CW.I/IVii ! C>! *i t',l CT , O! BOSTON! 




April 13, 1984 



Ms. Marlene Godfrey 

Regional Center Director 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

27 Cedar Street 

Vtellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

Dear Ms. Godfrey: 

Thank you for your letter of March 29, 1984 wherein you request a 
response to the student discipline findings and recommendations of Volumes I 
and II of the Department of Education's Report Number II in Boston's 
Desegregation . 

In general I would indicate to you that student discipline in the Boston 
Public Schools has improved considerably over 1982-83. The attached quarterly 
report on suspension statistics reveals significant reduction in suspensions 
and incidents in all categories with the exception of possession of dangerous 
weapons. The increase in this latter category can be attributed to greater 
vigilance and greater cooperation among students and staff with respect to the 
reporting of weapons. In addition the Office of the Deputy Superintendent, 
School Operations has worked with administrators to create consistent 
implementation of the Code of Discipline and. reporting of incidents. The 
quality of school-based rules has improved significantly this year and 
suspendable offenses have been removed from those rules. Finally the Boston 
Public Schools cooperated with the Safe Schools Commission to produce a set of 
recommendations for the improvement of school climate in schools, especially 
secondary schools. 

In response to the specific recommendations made on page 533 of Volume II 
of your report I offer the following: 

1. The Boston Public Schools has significantly increased the number of 
minority administrators. This was in recognition of the changing 
population in our schools as well as a recognition of the various 
minority groups now represented. Please note the following: 



-70- 



Marlene Godfrey -2- April 13, 1984 



a) The first Asian-American Principal was appointed to the Patrick 
Kennedy School. 

b) The second Hispanic Principal was appointed at the Manassah 
Bradley School. 

c) Hispanic Assistant Principals were appointed at the Gardner, 
Trotter and Blackstone Schools. The first Hispanic Assistant 
Headmaster was appointed at Charlestown High School. 

d) A Black Principal was appointed at the Edwards Middle School, 
contributing to the improvement in student discipline and 
school climate at that school. 

e) Black Assistant Headmasters were appointed at Boston Latin 
School and Boston Latin Academy. 

2. A proposal has been put before the Superintendent and School 
Committee for the creation of two teams of Boston teachers proficient in 
Positive Approaches to Discipline and Reality Therapy. These teams would 
establish residency in schools for a period of two weeks to a month to 
determine a plan for the improvement of student discipline and to teach 
intervention techniques. In addition a general in-service is proposed for 
schools at the beginning of the year to deal with these topics. 

3. 1 cannot comment on the case load of guidance counselors as indicated 
in the recommendations. 

4. The Boston Student Human Services Collaborative was established this 
fall to provide additional support services for students. This program will 
be piloted in 17 schools this spring in order to bring community agency 
resources to bear upon the academic and social problems of students. The 
successes of this program, combined with the individual relationship schools 
currently have with community agencies, should assist these students. 

5. As indicated in your own report, new alternative programs were opened 
at English High School (Fenway Program) and the Martin Luther King Middle 
School (New Horizons Academy) this year. In addition Boston Prep was 
supported for a second year. Much of the year was spent by Sid Smith, 
Director of Alternative Programs, establishing these programs and gaining a 
greater base in the Chicago Mastery learning Concept which serves as the basis 
for the academic program in the alternative schools. 

It is the proposition of this office to work with middle school 
principals and headmasters next year in the creation of additional alternative 
programs for these levels. Much of the efforts this year have centered around 
English High School, which will be discussed later. 

6. In general class size in the Boston Public Schools is determined by a 
teacher contract. Average class size in the Boston Public Schools is well 
below the maximum allowed. It has been the policy of the Boston Public 
Schools, and continues to be the policy, to provide additional teachers where 
student population warrants. 



-71- 



Marlene Godfrey -3- April 13, 1984 

7. Additional funds have been made available In the proposed FY 85 
budget to provide for textbooks and materials In every school. 

8. Significant effort on the part of principals and teachers goes into 
creating parent outreach programs In our schools. Both the School -Based 
Mana gemen t Program and the Boston School Improvement Program work tirelessly 
to include parents on their planning councils. The Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations and that of the Special Assistant to the 
Superintendent have worked this year to support the efforts of the Citywide 
Parents Council in the establishment of School Parent Councils. This office 
will continue to support these efforts as well as the Home and School 
Association. 

9. Please be advised that I have no Intention of ending the policy of 
disciplinary procedure into district transfers. I have done a review of this 
process this year and find that disciplinary transfers are one of many items 
in a repertoire to respond to the very real needs of students. Analysis of 
students transferred this year show that those who do remain in the Boston 
Public Schools are successful. While I agree that this procedure needs to be 
monitored carefully, and my office and that of John Coakley do attempt to do 
Just that, I will continue to discreetly use disciplinary transfer procedure 
to provide a second chance for students. 

I have worked with Community Superintendents and Headmasters to Insure 
greater coordination and communication concerning discplinary transfers. In 
this fashion it is hoped that students will be afforded a clear alternative to 
continued disruptive behavior. 

10. The Code of Discipline, once reviewed and revised this spring, will 
be printed this summer for distribution at the beginning of the year. It is 
my recommendation to the School Committee that the Code of Discipline be 
shortened to one or two pages and distributed In all of the languages which 
our students speak. 

11. We are currently examining the possibility of reviewing school -based 
rules in the spring and issuing them at the beginning of the year. Ronald 
Spratling of my office is heading up that effort and we should make a decision 
on that in the very near future. 

12. With respect to alternatives to discipline, I refer you to the above 
statements wherein I address the issues of in-school alternatives , training 
and intervention techniques as well as the relnstitution of student planning 
centers proposed for next year. 

13. Please be advised that I am in the process of revising the Code of 
Discipline. In addition the Boston School Committee's subcommittee on student 
safety is reviewing the Code of Discipline with an agenda towards reducing its 
complexity. The outcome of these recommendations will be a shortened version 
of the Code of Discipline which will be clear, concise and practical. 



-72- 



Marlene Godfrey -4- April 13, 1984 



14. I have worked with Community Superintendents, Principals and the 
Department of Safety Services to Insure adequate reporting of suspensions and 
adequate handling of disciplinary cases. Principals and Headmas ters are 
reluctant to give up the practice of sending students without suspension since 
they feel it is a tool to reduce conflict and tension between administrators 
and students and allows students an ability to rebound without penalty. 
However, Principals and Headmasters have been ordered to follow the Code of 
Discipline and to mete out suspensions where necessary. Please be advised 
that the philosophy of Boston Public Schools continues to be to use suspension 
as a last resort. 

15. The Boston Public Schools recently developed a promotional policy 
and accompanying graduation requirements. Deputy Superintendent Oliver 
Lancaster is currently examining the remediation and implementation phase 
designed to address these new standards. It is our intention to develop the 
necessary remediation opportunities for students so that repeating grades is 
not their only option. 

16. Please find attached information on restructuing of English High 
School which is currently before the Boston School Committee. In this effort 
English High School will become the "hard work high school" and will contain 
four schools within a school. This restructuring of English High School is 
designed to create smaller units within the tower facility and to allow for 
greater student/ teacher contact. 

I trust that the above has provided some information on the concerns 
which you raise. In addition I have attached my draft response to my findings 
to the Safe Schools Commission wherein many of my recommendations for 
discipline are included. 

If you have any questions please call me at 726-6200, extension 5330. 

Sincerely, 





Robert S. Peter 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 



RSP:hkl 

attachments 

copy: Robert Spillane 
'John Coakley 
Ronald Spratllng 



-73- 



ASSIGNMENTS 



-75- 



-76- 



STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 

The following supportive documents and analyses have been included: 

(a) An analysis of the process of student assignments, with attachments: 

* May 11 memo from John Coakley on distribution of assignments 

* March 23 memo from John Coakley on the application process 

* selection of application and assignment forms 

* two circulars from Superintendent Spillane and one from 

Mr. Coakley on adherence to desegregation orders 

(b) Memoranda from Charles Glenn to John Coakley on Extended Day 

Kindergarten Program applications and assignments, dated April 
28 and May 16. 

(c) An analysis of the applications and assignments to the Humphrey 

Occupational Resource Center for 1984-85, with six charts of 
data. Also included are a memorandum from Charles Glenn to 
John Coakley (April 23) and an "Action Plan" by James Caradonio, 
Director of Education and Employment (May 4). 

(d) A description of the student transfer process, with an analysis 

of the numbers of transfers in certain categories. 



-77- 



Student Assignments: PROCESS 

The process of giving an assignment for the 1984-85 school year to each 
student attending or seeking to attend the Boston Public Schools is 
complex. In addition to the requirement of maximizing desegregation, 
it is necessary to have a process which will give each student an equal 
chance for desirable options, will be protected from illicit influence 
or manipulation, and will take into account the great variety of 
choices available under the Plan. In addition, this process must be 
completed within a relatively short period of time. 

Since these Reports are intended, in part, to provide information to a 
broad public, we have included a variety of materials which illustrate 
the assignment process. These include: 

(a) Two "circulars" from Superintendent Spillane, stressing 
the importance of strict adherence to the Court-ordered 
process, and a memorandum from Mr. Coakley making the 
same point. The fact that such communications are felt 
to be necessary illustrates the need for continued 
vigilance about attempts to manipulate the assignment 
process. 

(b) Mr. Coakley's memo of March 23, 1984 outlining the assign- 
ment process. 

(c) Application forms for students new to the Boston Public 
Schools, illustrating the options available for kinder- 
garten, for elementary, for middle, and for high school. 
Note that the last also includes the options for the Humphrey 
Occupational Resource Center, on the reverse side. 

(d) A sample from a list of students in one home room, showing 
what type of application each should receive. In this case, 
all students are entitled to a guarantee to remain at 
Brighton High School, unless they request and are granted 
another assignment. 

(e) A Sample - bilingual assignment form; the form received by 
a student would include a listing of the options available 
to that student. 

(f) A sample of the form (2 sides) for application to participate 
in the 9th grade exploratory program at the Humphrey Center, 
and for skill training programs for grades 10-12. Note that 
the Unified Plan requires that career exploratory programs 

be provided to all ninth graders, though not that this occur 
at the Humphrey Center. 



-78- 



(g) Samples of the application forms for students who have 

the option of remaining in their present schools ("yellow"), 
and for students who, because of completing the final year 
of elementary or middle school, are required to make a 
selection for the following year ("green"). 

(h) Samples of the notifications of assignment to an advanced 
work class/academically talented section, to an examina- 
tion school, or to a substantially-separate program. 

Monitoring of the assignment process included the following steps, apart 
from the review of recruitment and other special measures for certain 
schools: 

(1) Review of target enrollments for advanced work/academically 
talented classes (including recommendations for increased 
assignments to certain programs), and of the list of potential 
invitees. 

(2) Review of similar materials for the examination schools. 

(3) Review of space matrices for all schools, and provision of 
an opportunity to comment to state TBE and Special Education 
officials. 

(4) On-site visit to a district office where applications for 
students new to Boston were being received and authenticated. 

(5) Review of preferences expressed by students through the 
application process, with special attention to kindergartens, 
magnet schools, high schools, and vocational assignments 
(see separate discussion). 

(6) Review of proposed assignments to schools for grades K-12 
(see separate discussion). 

(7) Review of vocational education assignments, including assign- 
ments to the Humphrey Center (see separate discussion). 



-79- 



t 



'M- W l 



( Wff ' May 11, 1984 

{/])&' J / /V H EMORANDUM 



Headmaster 



7o: Community Superintendents , Principals, 
From: John R. CoaJ£ley, Catherine^-tr. Ellison 
Subject: Assignments for Students, School Year 1964-33 

1. Distribution 

A. Staff of the Department of Implementation will deliver the 
notices of assignments and related materials to district 
offices on Wednesday morning, May 16, 1984. 

3. Principals and headmasters are requested to convene with staff 
of the Department of Implementation on a staggered schedule 
beginning 12 M to receive and sign for their packages. 

2. Directions 



A. Insure the issue of each attending student's assignment 

on May 17, 1984 or on the afternoon of May 16, if time and 
convenience allow. 

B. Do not mail assignments to students. This year time is 
avaiiabxe ' tor absentees, students with home tutors, or 
students with other particular concerns to receive their 
assignments during the month from the home school. 

C. Please follow carefully the directions printed on the forms 
A , o , G « 

D. Do not try to address retentions in grade at this time. 
Procedures for non-promotions will be disseminated in June, 
1984. 

Correction Process 



A. Duplicate and c orrected assignments will be mailed to students 
in Jul y, 1984 . 

3. Addresses, grades, programs that were not submitted to the 
Department of implementation during the application process 
will require corrected assigments. Use Form A. 

C. Students who entered the Boston Public Schools after 
April 13, 1984 will not receive assignments until the 
mailing in July, 1984. 



-80- 



0. Some students/ parents will be dissatisfied because their 
preferences were not honored. These students are entitled 
to apply for transfer: but all should be forewarned of the 
very few transfers granted during the midsummer transfer 
period. 

Reminder: The deadline for application for transfer is 
July 15, 1984. 

£. Assignments for students new to the Boston Public Schools 
between April 13 and June 30, 1984 will be mailed in July, 
1984. 



Please refer to the Procedural Manual of the Student Services 
Unit of the Department of Implementation for designation of policy 
for assignments, transfers, and corrections of students' data. 



-81- 



CHECK LIST 



MATERIALS FOR ASSIGNMENT NOTICES 



Item 1 



Item 2: 



MEMORANDUM FROM 
JOHN COAKLEY/ 
CATHERINE ELLISON 



ASSIGNMENT NOTICES ■ 
in English and in 
other home language 
where required 



For issue to students in attendance. 
Do not mail notices. Return 
undeliverable assignments to DI with 
Form B on June 14, 1984. 



33333333 3333333 333333: 



Item 3: 



3333333: 



Item 4: 



SENDING ALPHA 
PRINT-OUT 



1 = 33333333333: 



Item 5: 



RECEIVING ALPHA 
PRINT-OUT 



FORM A 



Item 6: 



FORM B 



Item 7: 



FORM C 



1333333333333333333333: 



Item 3: 



LABELS 



For students enrolled prior to 
April 13, 1984. 

For students enrolled prior to 
April 13, 1984. 



For request of corrected assignment 
for change in grade, address, and/or 
program, i.e., special needs, 
bilingual, voc. ed., AWC, EDP . 

13333333333333333=3333333=33333333333: 

For accounting the return of 
undeliverable assignment notices. 
Return on June 14, 1984. 






S3 3 3 3 3 = 



For the request of duplicate 
assignments for those students whose 
names appear on the school's latest 
print-out. 

(Note that date of entry must be 
before April 13, 1984.) 



For use on Forms A, B, C for High 
and Middle Schools - Sorted 
alphabetically by homeroom. 



i H£ wonUUL wwr/livU ! ! zz -j" ■ n • UJ l T U~ 



BOSTON 



1 




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- 5r." 


.-L 




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M 



TO: Principals, Headmasters, Community Superintendents 

FROM: John R. Coakley, Catherine A. Ellison 

DATE: March 23, 1984 

SUBJECT: Application Process for School Year 1984-85 



Please be notified of the schedule of responsibilities delineated below 
for the application process for the coming school year. 



Orientation of principals, headmasters and staff 
of District Offices 



March 26, 1984 



A. convene in the respective district offices at 
11:00 a.m. 

B. pick-up and sign for pre-printed applications 
and accompanying materials 

II. Distribution of pre-printed applications to 
students 

A. issue to each student the application and an 
envelope 

Please instruct each student to fold the 
application lengthwise before inserting in 
envelope . 

B. account for each application issued to students 
and each application not issued by notation on 
the homeroom print-out (Item 2) 

III. Correction Period 

A. Request for corrected application: Form A (Item 4) 
Submit daily, but not later than March 30, 1984 
at 2:00 p.m., to the district office a completed 
"Request Form" stapled to the pre-printed 
application for each student whose application 
contains an error which would affect the student's 
assignment 



March 27 



March 27-March 30 



URT 



-83- 



I'KIJ. V.11 t--> ■ 



Principals, Headmasters , Community superintendents . " ----- 

B. request for duplicate applications: Form B (Item 5) 
Submit daily, but not later than March 30 at 

1:00 p.m. to the district office a completed "Request 
Form" for each student who does not receive or who 
loses her/his application 

C. be very circumspect in examining an application 
for an error, especially in comparing an address 
and the community district school pre-printed on 
the application 

0. do not return for correction applications with 

misinformation that does not affect assignments, e.g., 
homeroom number, spelling, apartment numbers, or 
street numbers with fractions or letters of the 
alphabet; these kinds of information may be corrected 
after the application process by submission of signed 
letterheads 

IV. Return of Applications (on-going) March 27-April 6 

A. account for each application returned by students 
by notations on the homeroom print-out (Item 2) 
that was used to account for the distribution of 
the applications 

B. submit daily to the district office those 
applications returned by students 

V. Distribution of Corrected Applications April 4 

A. pick-up and sign for at the district office 
corrected and duplicated applications for 
those students for whom "Request Forms" were 
submitted on or before March 30, 1984 

3. see directions in II , A and B above 

VI. Last Day for Returned Applications April 11 

corrected and duplicated applications, are 
submitted to the district office by 2:00 p.m. 

Note : Processing cannot be assured for any 

applications submitted after April 11, 1984 

Complete fully an affidavit for each application 
that is not returned by student 



-8H- 



3. 
Principals, Headmasters , Community Superintendents March 23 , 1984 

VII. Kindergartens 

The application process for kindergarten 1984-85 will be held in 
district offices from March 27-April 11 and from April 2 to 
April 11 in those elementary schools offering classes for 
kindergarten. 

Principals must insure that: 

a. parents are notified that prospective enrollees must be 
five 7ears of age on or before December 31, 1984; 

b. each signed, completed application is submitted with a 
birth certificate, two proofs of address, and Lau forms. 

VIII. New to Boston Public Schools 

Students in grade 1-11 who are not enrolled currently in the 
Boston Public Schools must be referred to the district office 
to complete applications for 1984-85. Those applications 
completed and submitted between March 27 and April 11 will be 
processed with all other applications. Those applications 
submitted after April 11 will require assignments to be mailed 
during the summer of 1984, just prior to the opening of school 
in September, 1984. 



Notes : 



1. Principals /headmasters must be particularly concerned for the 
security of all materials related to this application process. 
Absenteeism or error by school personnel cannot be a factor 
for the loss, late return, or non-return of applications. 

2. Department of Implementation Staff in District Offices 
District Staff 

I Roger Cunningham 

II Kathy Sparks 

III Lydia Foster 

IV Patricia Blume 

V Shirley Burke 

VI Thomas O'Brien 

VII Shirley Gooding 

VIII Ann Richards 

IX ' Carl Nickerson 

3. Information Center (726-6555) 

School Days, March 26 to April 11, 1984 - 7:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. 

4. Department of Implementation Contacts at 26 Court Street 

Lydia Francis Shirley Gooding 
Ethel F lores 

726-6555 

Direct inquiries to the staff members listed here. Please do not 
call John Canty with each inquiry. 

-85- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
APPLICATION FOR STUDENT ASSIGNMENT 

KINDERGARTEN 
STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED CURRENTLY 



For office use only 

I. Results of LAU Home Language Survey 



L. Pref. 



□ 



DDDDD 



A. Based on the results of the LAU Home Language Survey, does the student require a bilingual educational program 
Yes No 

B. If the answer to question A is yes. parent/guardian must fill in the appropriate Bilingual Application only. 
If the answer to question A is no, parent/guardian must fill in this application only. 



II. Personal Information (Please print) 



Date. 



Name of Student Last . 



first. 



Middle Initial 



Sex M. 

Address — 



Apt. No. 
Home Phone No. 



Dale of Birth 



Mo. 



Day. 



Street No. 



Street 



LincrgciH.') Phone No. 



Yr. 



Section of City 



Zip Code 



Name of Parent/Guardian Last 



First 



Middle Initial. 



Student's Last School of Assignment: 

School Name 

Race or Ethnic Group. (Check one of the following): 



City 



State 



Black 1 



White 2 



Asian 3 



Hispanic S 



Native American 6 

(American Indian) 



III. Choices) of Assignment: 

Directions: Mark number J_ next to the school of your first choice. 

Mark number ^_next to the school of your second choice. 
Mark number^ next to the school of your third choice. 
Sign this application at the bottom. 



NO CHOICES FOR MAGNET SCHOOLS MAY BE GUARANTEED 



Half-Day Programs 

20 Community District School 

14 Curley Elementary 

17 Haley Elementary 

30 Jackson-Mann Elementary 

32 Ohrenberger Elementary 

33 Trotter Elementary 

Extended-Day Program 

21 Community District School 

34 Guild 

35 Hale 

36 Hennigan 

37 McKay 

09 Adams (Black and other minority students from Districts 1 - 7 only) 

1 3 Hernandez 



Entrance Code 



(For Office Use Only) 



UPON ADMISSION TO SCHOOL, THE STUDENT NEW TO THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS MUST PRESENT A RECORD OK IMMUNIZATIONS. 



Signature of Parent/Guardian 

Verifier must attach Two Proofs of Address, 

a Birth Certificate for Grade 1, and Language Forms. 



Date 



Signature of Verifier, District /School 



-86- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

APPLICATION FOR STUDENT ASSIGNMENT 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEVEL 

STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED CURRENTLY 



For office use only 

I. Results of LAU Home Language Survey 



L. Pref. 



□ 



□□□□n 



A. Based on the results of the LAU Home Language Survey, does the student require a bilingual educational program? 
Yes No 

B. If the answer to question A isyes, parent/guardian must fill in the appropriate Bilingual Application only. 
If the answer to question A is no. parent/guardian must fill in this application only. 



II. Personal Information (Please print) 



Date. 



Name or Student Last. 
Sex M F 



Date of Birth 



. Fir$t______ 

Mo Dsv 



Yr. 



Middle Initial 



Address 



Apt. No. 
Home Phone No. ___ 



Street No. 



Street 
Emergency Phone No. 



Section of City 
Grade for September, 



Zip Code 



Name of Parent/Guardian Last 



Student's Ust School of Assignment: ______________ 

School Name 

Race or Ethnic Group. (Check one of the following): 



Black 1 



White 2. 



Asian 3 



First 



City 



Hispanic S. 



Middle Initial. 



Slate 



Native American 6 

(American Indian) 



III. Choice(s) of Assignment: 

Directions: Mark number J_ next to the school of your first choice. 

Mark number 2. next to the school of your second choice. 
Mark number 3_next to the school of your third choice. 

NO CHOICES FOR MAGNET SCHOOLS MAY BE GUARANTEED 



20. 



14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 



.Community District School 
.Curley Elementary 
.Guild Elementary 
iale Elementary 
.Haley Elementary 
.Hennigan Elementary 
.Hernandez Elementary 
Jackson-Mann Elementary 
.McKay Elementary (program ends at grade 6) 
.Ohrenberger Elementary 
.Trotter Elementary 



Entrance Code 



(For Office Use Only) 



UPON ADMISSION TO SCHOOL. THE STUDENT NEW TO THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS MUST PRESENT A RECORD OF IMMUNIZATIONS. 



Signature of p«"«> /<"■■■—■< i«n 

Verifier must attach Two Proofs of Address, 

a Birth Certificate for Grade 1 , and Language Forms. 



Date 



Signature of Verifier. District /School 



-87- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

APPLICATION FOR STUDENT ASSIGNMENT 

MIDDLE SCHOOL LEVEL 

STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED CURRENTLY 



For office use only L. Ptef. 1 2 3 4 5 6 
I. Results of LAU Home Language Survey I I I I I I I II II I I II I 



A. Based on the results of the LAU Home Language Survey, does the student require a bilingual educational program? 
Yes No 

B. If the answer to question A is yes, parent/guardian must fill in the appropriate Bilingual Application only. 
If the answer to question A is no, parent/guardian must fill in this application only. 

II. Personal Information (Please print) Date 

Name of Student Last , — Fi"« Middle ,ni,ial - 

Sex M F Date of Birth Mo. Day Yr. 

AddrCSS Apt. No. Street No. Street Section of City Zip Code 
Home Phone No. Emergency Phone No. Grade for September, 

Name of Parent/Guardian Last First Middle Initial. 

Student's Last School of Assignment: 



School Name City State 

Race or Ethnic Group. (Check one of the following): 

Black 1 White 2 Asian 3 Hispanic 5 Native American 6 _ 

(American Indian) 

III. Choice(s) of Assignment: 

Directions: Mark number J_next to the school of your first choice. 

Mark number J2_next to the school of your second choice. 
Mark number^, next to the school of your third choice. 

NO CHOICES FOR MAGNET SCHOOLS MAY BE GUARANTEED 

20 Community District School 

60 King Middle 

61 Mackey Middle 

62 Wheatley Middle 

31 McKay School (program ends at grade 6) 

76 Umana School of Science and Technology (entry at grades 7 and 8 only) 

63 Tobin (Residents of District I only) 



Entrance Code 



(For Office Use Only) 



UPON ADMISSION TO SCHOOL, THE STUDENT NEW TO THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS MUST PRESENT^ RECORD OF IMMUNIZATIONS. 

Signature of Parent/Guardian D»«« 

Verifier must attach Two Proofs of Address and Language Forms. 



Signature of Verifier, District/School 

-88- 



STUDENT APPLICATION 
HUBERT HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 



Name of Student Last 



First 



Date of Birth Mo.. 



. D »y. 



Yr. 



In addition to making one, two, or three choices for District or Magnet High Schools on the front side of this application, 
you may choose to participate in the Exploratory Program (grade 9 only) or the Skill Training Program (grades 10, 11, and 
12 only). You will attend one half day at your assigned high school and one half day at the Humphrey Center. 



COMPLETE ONLY ONE SECTION 



SECTION 1 



STUDENTS ENTERING GRADE 9 
EXPLORATORY PROGRAM 



Directions: Check either box A or box B. Do not check both boxes. 

A CD I want to participate in the Grade Nine Exploratory Program at the Humphrey Center. 

B D Ido not want to participate in the Grade Nine Exploratory Program at the Humphrey Center. 

Note: This Program is offered for one half day for one half year, either first or second semester. 



SECTION II 



STUDENTS ENTERING GRADES 10, 11 AND 12 

SKILL TRAINING HALF DAY PROGRAMS 

CHECK EITHER BOX A OR BOX B. DO NOT CHECK BOTH BOXES. 



I wunl lo iiiaki' one nr more choice", tor uvsi^nmcnl 



DIRECTIONS: If you check Box A 

• Mark numberj_next to the program of your first choice 

• Mark number _2_next to the program of vour second choice 

• Mark number_3_next to the program for vour third choice 

• Mark number _4_ next to the program of vour fourth choice 

• Mark number _5_ next to the program of vour fifth choice 

• Sign this application at the bottom. 

H A Food Service 

H B Retailing, Marketing and Management 

HC Cabinetmaking 

H P Carpentry 

H E Plumbing 

H F Building Maintenance and Repair 

H G Autobody Repair Laboratory 

H H Machine Laboratory 

HI Sheet Metal Laboratory 

HJ Welding Laboratory 

H K Advanced Office and Management 
H L Legal Office Procedures 
H M Dental Assistant 
H N Word Processing 

HO Banking 

HP Child Care 

HQ Cosmetology 

HR Fashion/Interior Design 



HS Hotel Hospitality 

H T Data Processing 

HU Health Aide 

H V Health Laboratory Skills 
HW Medical Office Assistant 
H X Nursing Assistant 
H Y Electricity 
H Z Electronics 

HI Heating, Air Conditioning, Refrigeration 

H2 Commercial Design 

H3 Illustration /Advertising 

H4 Machine Drafting 

HS Photographic Technology 

H6 Printing 

H7 Television Production 

H8 Automotive/Truck Repair 

H9 Marine and Small Engine Repair 



H wail! id p.n ircipjtc 



B □ 

DIRECTIONS: If you check Box B 

*Sign this application at the bottom 



e hall da\ -kill 



a ins ai ilic 



Signature of Parent or Guardian 



Signature of Student (if 18 years of age or older) 



- Two Sided Copy - 



APPLICATION FOR STUDENT ASSIGNMENT 
HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL 
STUDENTS NOT ENROLLED CURRENTLY 



For Office Use Only L.Pref. 1 2 3 4 5 6 

I. Results of LAU Home Language Survey CD 1 I I 1 O Q D Q Q 

A. Based on the results of the LAU Home Language Survey, does the student require a bilingual educational program? 
Yes No 

B. If the answer to question A is yes, parent/guardian must fill in the appropriate Bilingual Application only. 
If the answer to question A is no, parent/guardian must fill in this application only. 



II. Personal information (Please print) 


First 
Date of Birth Mo. 


Date 
Day Yr. 




Name of Student Last 


Middle Initial 


Sex M F 
Address 




Apt. No. Street No. 
Home Phnne Nr> 


Street 

Emergency Phone No. 


Section of City 


Zip cod* 
Grade for September 


Name of Parent/Guardian Last 


First 




Middle Initial 


Student's Last School of Assignment 




School Name 
Race or Ethnic Group (Check one of the following): 

Black 1 White 2 


Asian 3 


City 

Hispanic 5 


Stat* 

Native American 6 


(American Indian) 



NO CHOICES MAY BE GUARANTEED 

III. Choice(s) of Assignment: 

Directions: Mark number X ne *t to school of your first choice 

Mark number 2 next to the school of your second choice 
Mark number ^3 next to the school of your Third choice 

20 Community District High School 

7 1 English High School 

72 Boston High School 

73 International High School at Copley Square High School (entry at grade 9 and 10 only) 

74 Copley Square High School 

75 Madison Park High School 

76 Umana School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

77 Music Magnet at Madison Park High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

80 Business Education at East Boston High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

81 Automotive at Brighton High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

82 Agri- Business at West Roxbury High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

83 Machine Shop at Hyde Park High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

84 Architectural Woodworking at Dorchester High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

85 Urban Retrofit Program at Dorchester High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

86 Health Careers Magnet at Dorchester High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

87 Interior Design at Dorchester High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

88 Performing and Visual Arts at English High School (entry at grades 9 and 10 only) 

Entrance Code . 



(For Office Use Only) 
UPON ADMISSION TO SCHOOL, THE STUDENT NEW TO THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS MUST PRESENT A RECORD OF IMMUNIZATIONS. 



Signature of Parent/Guardian Date 

Verifier must attach Two Proofs of Address and Language Forms 

— Two Sided Copy — 



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-91- 



PERSONAL INFORMATION: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

APPLICATION FOR STUOENT ASSIGNMENT 



AST NAME OF STUOENT 



HRST 



0.0.4. 



'RESENT GRAOE HOME ROOM PRESENT SCHOOL 



RACE 



II. Check Miter Sox A or Sox 8. Do not cluck fioffl boxes. 

Marque el encasiilado A o el encasilUdo 8. No los marque k» 
dos a la misma vez. Marque soiamente un encasiilado. 

■Siea vao phln A hoac phan B. thing 

ctlen vao ca hai 

Comrasseqnaie con una crocetta una delie caseiie A o 8. Non 
comrassegnate amoedue le caseiie 

»aifT9ijA*BJS - <i3F«ia»affi3l" 
Assmaiar apenas uma das letras A ou 8. Nao assmaiar amoas 
somente uma. 



xO. STREET NAME CITY ZIP APT NO. 

J A. ' want to °e assigned to bilingual education for the school year 1984*5 (Turn to directions on reverse side) 

Vo quiero ser asignaao a un programa ce Eaucacion Biimgue para el ario escoiar 1984-55 ( Lea las msirucciones en ia pane ae atras ae.esta noiai 

To*i mufin cti/dc hoc chiidng trinh song ngu\ 1984*5 (xem each ctien nc?i trang khac) 
Oesidero essere iscntto ad un proqramma bilinque oer lanno scolastico 1934*5 (Per le tstruzioni guardare a tergo) 

&im&£&.m 1984*5 #-«&£»?» ccsss) 

Quero ser matnculado na EducacSo Bilingue durante o ano lectivo 1984-35 ( ver mstrucoes no verso) 



^■M^r- f*sS-*^2i§»&&*^ 



3 



¥Em$Mbfr^ 



<^2*&Em&t!-^^ 



D 



-xsm 

^■ ■ w - w- yew*, urv: ' f^ i^r->: ^ ■ «^E^,4^yv^ ? 4V^ 

B. I do not want to be assigned to bilingual education tor the school year 1984-85 (Turn to directions on reverse side) 

vo no quiero que se me asigne a un programa ae Educaaon Biimgue para el arto escoiar 1984*5 I Lea las msirucciones en ia oarte de airas de esta noiai 

Toi khong muon hoc chtidng crinh song ngu?. 1984-85 (Xem each dien nc?i crang khac) 

Non desidero essere iscntto ad un programma bilingue per I'anno scolastico 1984-85 (Per le istruzioni guardare a tergo) 

Si^Erf &#2i] 1984*5 #^fi*rSS^msff C ESS® ) 

Nao quero ser matnculado na Educagao Bilingue durante o ano lectivo 1934*5 (ver mstrucSes no verso) 






•!@!^ 



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ta«Ji*u«i.- ^n^^Li. ■■ f n l hi ■ >•■' ■■ ■ "■T i n ' " ■ ' r i ii r ai mi -' ■■ V i ^ • ' ' ' - 'rwri- . -r-i ij .rf --y~ ;, -~-f ■■ ; ' , ' , ■ ,, .- ,. M .r- - ffi . ' i. ^ A ^ j, 

""5~^r-_-— »'- —- ■_' j i. jr.'i 1 t«. -.. ; ■~-' ? - jM t ujj ! i_!n i . i wjjj« ■ ' . ■* > i» "t»y. - .. 'i ^.n i ^ i! . i _ i | : »ji iii j i lu i jji | i ih »i » i jju.'.j ,i. " "H-:! !»' . ' mwv- ' T 1 '» .-" » pi i i'.m « u J"J.^ _"-J* ' ... ' ■ f.t< 

SIGNAruM OF STUOENT (IF I a TEARS OF AGE OR OtDCR) 



SIOKATURE OF PARENrOR*GUAR6lA"N 



RETURN THIS APPLICATION TO THE HOMEROOM TEACHER BY. 



.. KEEP BOTTOM COPY FOR YOUR RECORDS 



REMOVE BOTTOM COPY. FOLD TOP COPY LENGTHWISE. PEEL BACK TAPE AND SEAL. NO RETURN ENVELOPE NEEDED. 

-92- 



PERSONAL INFORMATION: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

STUDENT APPLICATION 

HUBERT H. HUMPHREY 

OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 

FOR GRADE 9 DURING 1984-85 



3 



.ST NAME Of STUOENT 


FIRST 


M I 


D.O.I 


ESENT G8aO£ HOME DOOM 


PRESENT SCHOOl 




DACE 



STREET NAME 



CITY 



ZIP 



APT NO 



EXPLORATORY PROGRAM FOR GRADE 9 DURING 198445. 

PROGRAMA EXPLORATORIO SOLAMENTE PARA EL. NOVENO ORAOO 1! 

■sancu ants*. **»**£ imms ** 

PROGRAMME EXPLORATIF SUELEMENT POUT ELEVES OE NEUVIEME POUR L ANNEE ACAOEMKX1E I 

eEP€VNHTKO tVOCPUMA MONON (n. « r« ™ 1904-39 

PROQRAMMA ESPLORATORIO SOLO PER II GRAOO NOVE OURANTE L ANNO 19S44S 
PROORAMA EXPLORATORIO SOMENTE PARA ORAO *• NO ANO ELECTIVO 1 MA-OS 
CHu6NGTRINHKHAOSAT0ANHRIENaCHOL6'p9NIENKH6A 19*4-83 
QMiga^WMM^l 4 !%mm~] 3 1984-88. n^ajffr-^jS^Sj,* *<»V«W 



' »»'••>» » /9% XV> 



DIRECTIONS: CHECK EITHER BOX "A" OR BOX "B M . DO NOT CHECK BOTH BOXES. 

INSTRUCCIONES: MARQUE UNO OE LOS SIGUIENTES ENCASILLAOOS "A" -8" NO MAROUE AMBOS ENCASILLAOOS. 

»«£2«" a "32- a •***♦>»** 

i NSTSUCTIONS. MAROUEZ CrUN CROCHET L UN Ou L AUTRE CASIER "A" OU CASIER-8' NE MAROUEZ PAS LES OEUX CASIERS. 

OAHnEC oneciTE STE TO KOYTI -A" -S" 0X1 KAI TA 1VO 

OIREBONE; INOICARE QUALE SCEGUETE. 'A' O "8.- NON INOtCARE TUTTE E DUE. 

iNSTRUCffES: ASSINAL ATENAS UMA OAS CATEGORIAS 'A* OU '3.' NAO ASSINALAR AS OUAS CATEGORIAS. 

Co I CHl' SA 0: XIN OA NH OAU A HOAC OAU 8. XIN OUNG8ANH OAU CA MAI A VA 8_ 



"I'V. 



..*} ... ^m 




• ph>4</4 vy^mww^wt^S/iR*."* 

- ;> / / /" 



Ha.1 



I WANTTO PARTICIPATE IN THE EXPLORATORY PROGRAM AT THE HUMPHREY CENTER. 



06SEOPART1C1PAR EN EL PROGRAMA EXPLORATORIO OELCENTRO HUMPHREY. 

aJS*aoft Humphrey *,k*»W*£33S3RiSS 

JE VEUX PARTICIPER DANS LE PROGRAMME EXPLORATIF AU CENTRE HUMPHREY. 
0EAQ NA AABQ MEPOX XTO EaEPEYNHTIKO nPOrPAMMA TOY KENTPOY HUMPHREY (XAMOPI) 
VOGUO PARTICIPARE NEL PROGRAMMA ESPLORATORIO AL CENTRO HUMPHREY. 
DESEJO PART1CIPAR NO PROGRAMA EXPLORATORIO NO "HUMPHREY CENTER." 

T6l MUo'n THAM GIA VAO Lo'p KHAO SAT NAY TAI TRUNG TAM HUMPHREY. 



jr- 



Db. 



I DO NOT WANTTO PARTICIPATE IN THE EXPLORATORY PROGRAM ATTHE HUMPHREY CENTER. 



NO OESEO PART1CIPAR EN EL PROGRAMA EXPLORATORIO EN EL CENTRO HUMPHREY. 

mX®am& Humphrey 4><fr*^ftK*E$i%!lS 

JE NE VEUX PAS PARTICIPER DANS LE PROGRAMME EXPLORATIF AU CENTRE HUMPHREY. 

AEN 9EAQ NA AABQ MEPOI ZTO EIEPEYNHTIKO nPOrPAMMA TOY KENTPOY HUMPHREY 

NON VOGLIO PARTICIPARE NEL PROGRAMMA ESPLORATORIO AL CENTRO HUMPHREY. 

NAO OESEJO PART1C1PAR NO PROGRAMA EXPLORAT6RIO NO "HUMPHREY CENTER." 

T6l KH6NG Mu6'n THAM GIA VAO LO P KHA SAT NAY TAI TRUNG TAM HUMPHREY. 



urcv 



"tAIUtt C* PA«ENT 0« OUAtOUN 



SIGNATURE Of STUDENT (if is rEARS Of ACE OR OLDER) 



URN THIS APPLICATION TO THE HOMEROOM TEACHER BY. 



KEEP BOTTOM COPY FOR YOUR RECOROS 



REMOVE BOTTOM COPY. FOLD TOP COPY LENGTHWISE PEEL BACK TAPE AND SEAL. NO RETURN ENVELOPE NEEDED. 

-93- 



. PERSONAL INFORMATION: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

APPLICATION FOR STUDENT ASSIGNMENT 

HU8EFTT HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 

SKILL TRAINING HALF OAY PROGRAMS (ENTRY FOR GRAOES 10. 11 4no 12) 



3 



AST NAME OF STUDENT 



FIRST 



oos 



'RESENT GRAOE HOME DOOM PRESENT SCHOOL 



DACE 



NOT& IF A STUDENT IS OBSIGNATED TO ATTENO A 
SKILL TRAINING HALF OAY PROGRAM. THAT 
STUOENT WILL ATTENO ONE HALF OAY AT 
HIS/HER ASSIGNEO HIGH SCHOOL ANO ONE 
HALF OAY AT THE HUMPHREY CENTER 



NO 



STREET NAME 



CITY 



ZIP 



APT NO 



n 



LWANTTO PARTICIPATED THESKILLTTRAININGHALF DAY PROGRAM 



PINK 



HA FOOD SERVICE HS 

HB RETAILING, MARKETING AND MGMT. HT 

HC CABINETMAKING HU 

HD CARPENTRY HV 

HE PLUMBING HW 

HF BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR HX 

HG AUTOBODY REPAIR LABORATORY HY 

HH MACHINE LABORATORY HZ 

HI SHEET METAL LABORATORY H1 

HJ WELDING LABORATORY H2 

HK ADVANCED OFFICE AND MANAGEMENT H3 

HI LEGAL OFFICE PROCEDURES H4 

HM DENTAL ASSISTANT H5 

HN WORD PROCESSING H6 

HO BANKING H7 

HP CHILD CARE H8 

HQ COSMETOLOGY H9 

HR FASHION / INTERIOR DESIGN 



. HOTEL HOSPITALITY 

.DATA PROCESSING 

.HEALTH AIDE 

. HEALTH LABORATORY SKILLS 

. MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 

.NURSING ASSISTANT 

. ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY 

. ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY 

. HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION 

.COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

. ILLUSTRATION/ADVERTISEMENT 

.MACHINE DRAFTING 

. PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNOLOGY 

. PRINTING 

.TELEVISION PRODUCTION 

.AUTOMOTIVE / TRUCK REPAIR 

.MARINE AND SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 



D 



B. 



tDaNOXWAWTrraPARTlCIPATEINiTTiESKILJITRAININCHALFDAVPRaGRAWI? 



Signature Of Parent OR Guardian 



SIGNATURE Of STUOENT (If It TEARS Of ACE OR OlOERI 



RETURN THIS APPLICATION TO THE HOMEROOM TEACHER 8Y. 



KEEP BOTTOM COPY FOR YOUR RECOROS 



REMOVE BOTTOM COPY. FOLD TOP COPY LENGTHWISE. PEEL BACK TAPE AND SEAL. NO RETURN ENVELOPE NEEDED. 

-94- 



I. PERSONAL INFORMATION: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

APPLICATION FOR STU0ENT ASSIGNMENT 



3 



LAST NAME Of STUOENT 



flUST 



O.O.8. 



PRESENT GRAOE HOME. DOOM PRESENT SCHOOL 



RACE 



If printed address is incorrect, please 
attach copies of two pre-printed 
proofs of your correct address (e.g. 
utility bills, driver's license). 



NO. 



D 



STREET NAME 



CITY 



ZIP 



APT NO. 



check either boxva:* an Boxcar. oa not check both boxes-* 



A. I WANT TO 8E ASSIGNED FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 



TO MY 



I OO NOT WANT TO MAKE ANY OTHER CHOICE. I UNDERSTAND I SHALL SE 
ASSIGNED AUTOMATICALLY TO THIS SCHOOL 



IF YQU CHECK BOX "A," MAKE NO CHOICES BELOW AND SIGN THIS APPLICATION ATTHE BOTTOM 



3 



B 



I WANT TO MAKE ONE OR MORE CHOICES FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 
• IF I OO NOT RECEIVE ONE OF MY CHOICES, I SHALL BE ASSIGNED TO MY 



IFYQU CHECK BOX'-BTr' 



• MARK NUMBER J— NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR FIRST CHOICE 

• MARK NUMBER - -2L.NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR SECOND CHOICE 

• MARK NUMBER -%3£| NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR THIRD CHOICE 

• SIGN THIS APPUOCTJON AT BOTTOM 



I UNDERSTAND THAT 




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OATE SIGNATURE OP STUOENT (IP 18 YEARS OP AGE OR OIOER1 



JNATURE OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN 



rOIRN THIS APPUCATION TO THE HOMEROOM TEACHER BY. 



.. KEEP BOTTOM COPY FOR YOUR RECORDS 



REMOVE BOTTOM COPY. FOLD TOP COPY LENGTHWISE. PEEL BACK TAPE AND SEAL. NO RETURN ENVELOPE NEEDED. 



=95- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
APPLICATION FOR STUOENT ASSIGNMENT 



!. PERSONAL INFORMATION: 



LAST NAME OF STUDENT 



FIRST 



0O.S. 



PWSENT GRAOE HOME HOOM PRESENT SCMOOl 



RACE 



NO. STREET name 

II. 



CITY 



ZIP 



APT NO. 



3 



If printed address is incorrect, please 
attach copies of two pre-printed 
proofs of your correct address (e.g. 
utility bills, driver's license). 



CHOICE(S) OF ASSIGNMENT? ' 



DIRECTIONS: 



• MARK NUMBER J£3 NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR FIRST CHOICE 

• MARK NUMBER . *aa NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR SECONO CHOICE 

• MARK NUMBER *5^ NEXT TO THE NAME OF THE SCHOOL OF YOUR THIRD CHOICE 

• SIGN THIS APPUCKUON AT BOTTOM 



NO CHOICE MAY BE GUARANTEED 



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NATURE Of PARENT OR GUAROIAN 



SIGNATURE OF STUOENT (IF IS YEARS OF ACE OR OIOER) 



TURN THIS APPUCATION TO THE HOMEROOM TEACHER BY. 



.. KEEP BOTTOM COPY FOR YOUR RECOROS 



REMOVE BOTTOM COPY. FOLD TOP COPY LENGTHWISE. PEEL BACK TAPE ANO SEAL. NO RETURN ENVELOPE NEEDED. 

• -96- 



3 



SAMPLE 



TO 3S ISSUED TO STUDENTS INVITED TO 
AWC/ATS FOR L98 -19 8 . THIS NOTICE 
SHOULD BE INCLUDED WITH THE PERSONAL 
APPLICATION FOR EACH OF THESE STUDENTS. 






BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STUDENT NAME 



STUDENT NUMBER 



THE DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION RECENTLY ADVISED YOU THAT 
THE STUDENT NAMED ABOVE WOULD BE INVITED FOR ASSIGNMENT FOR 
198-8 TO THE ADVANCED- WORK CLASS /ACADEMICALLY TALENTED 
SECTION AS THE 



SCHOOL CODE 



SCHOOL. NAME 



SCHOOL ADDRESS 



SECTION OF CITY 



GRADE 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS OPTION APPEARS CN THE STUDENT APPLICATION 
FORM ACCOMPANYING THIS NOTICE. WE URGE YOU TO ACCEPT THIS 
INVITATION BY CHOOSING THAT OPTION. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 726-5552 



NOTE: ONLY SCHOOLS WITH APPROPRIATE GRADE 
LEVELS WILL RECEIVE THIS ITEM 



-97- 



3 



5AMPLZ 



TO BE ISSUED IN PLACE OF REGULAR APPLICATION 
FOR THOSE STUDENTS WHO HAVE BEEN INVITED 
FOR AND ACCEPTED PREVIOUSLY ASSIGNMENT 
TO AN EXAMINATION SCHOOL 



STUDENT NAME STUDENT NUMBER 



THE DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION HAS RECEIVED YOUR 
ACCEPTANCE OF OUR INVITATION TO AN EXAMINATION SCHOOL. THEREFORE 
WE ARE SENDING YOU THIS ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF YOUR ACCEPTANCE. YOU 
WILL NOT BE GIVEN THE APPLICATION FOR 198 -8 THAT OTHER STUDENTS 
RECEIVE. 

ON OR ABOUT MAY , 198 YOU SHALL RECEIVE AN OFFICIAL 
ASSIGNMENT FOR 198 -8 TO — 

EXAMINATION SCHOOL EXAMINATION SCHOOL ADDRESS 

WE WISH YOU EVERY SUCCESS IN THE EXAMINATION SCHOOL. IF 
YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, CALL THE SCHOOL INFORMATION CENTER AT 
726-6555 OR THE EXAMINATION SCHOOL. 

IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO RETURN THIS NOTICE. 



NOTE: ONLY SCHOOLS WITH APPROPRIATE GRADE 
LEVELS WILL RECEIVE THIS ITEM 



-98- - - 



3 



SAMPLE 



TO 3E ISSUED TO STUDENTS TO 3E ASSIGNED 
TO SUBSTANTIALLY SEPARATE PROGRAMS 
FOR 198 -198 



STUDENT NAME 



STUDENT NUMBER 



THE DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION INFORMS 
YOU THAT THE STUDENT NAMED ABOVE WILL RECEIVE AN 
ASSIGNMENT FOR 198 -198 AS DETERMINED BY THE 
DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES.. THIS 
NOTICE SERVES AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR THE APPLICATION 
GIVEN TO OTHER STUDENTS. 

ON OR ABOUT MAY , 198 , YOU SHALL RECEIVE 
AN OFFICIAL NOTICE OF ASSIGNMENT. IF YOU HAVE ANY 
QUESTIONS, CALL. THE SCHOOL INFORMATION CENTER AT 
726-6555 OR THE DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT SUPPORT 
SERVICES AT 726-6200 SXT. 5925 OR THE STUDENT'S 
PRINCIPAL. 

IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO RETURN THIS NOTICE. 



NOTES: 1. NOT ALL SCHOOLS WILL RECEIVE PRE- 
PRINTED FORMS FOR ITEM 3 

2- MANY STUDENTS ASSIGNED TO 

SUBSTANTIALLY SEPARATE PROGRAMS 

FOR 198 -8 WILL RECEIVE APPLICATIONS 

FOR MAINSTREAM PROGRAMS FOR 

198 -8 



-99- 




SUPERINTENDENT'S 

CIRCULAR 

Robert R. Splllane, Superintendent of Public Schools 




No. 3, 1983-84 
August 9, 1983 



CONTINUED ADHERENCE TO FEDERAL COURT ORDERS ON DESEGREGATION 



TO: Community Superintendents, Headmasters, Principals and Other 
Administrative Heads 

Headmasters, Principals and Other Administrative Heads are 
requested to keep on file a DATED CHECK LIST signed by all appropriate 
personnel indicating that each has read this circular. In particular, 
this circular should be scrutinized carefully by all persons (e.g., 
registrars, guidance persons, Special Needs personnel, data 
processing coordinators, secretaries) who have responsibilities for 
advising parents or students or for maintaining student records and 
schedules . 

On December 23, 1982 Judge Garrity of the United States District 
Court issued his MEMORANDUM AND ORDERS OF DISENGAGEMENT. A copy of 
the orders has been sent to each Community Superintendent who shall 
bring them to the attention of headmasters and principals. It is 
imperative that you know what the Disengagement Orders are and what 
they are not. I quote Judge Garrity: 

"These orders mark an appropriate new phase in the lengthy 
and complicated process toward effecting a complete remedy 
in this case. The court now embarks on a transitional , 
course of disengagement as it commences a process of 
returning to the parties the responsibility for complying 
with the requirements of the Constitution." 

As noted, we are in a transitional phase. In a sense, we are 
being tested, and during the testing period we are being monitored 
closely by the Massachusetts Board of Education. (The State Board's 
Monitoring Report of July 15, 1983 was voluminous.) The School 
Committee, the Superintendent AND each of you - all of us 
collectively - must give evidence that "the school system will 
operate according to the substantive elements of a constitutionally 
required remedy without continuous oversight." 

The Court's Disengagement Orders do contain procedures for 
modifying outstanding orders and we already have embarked on a 
process of considering possible changes in orders, particularly 
pertaining to student assignments. Meanwhile, it is essential for 
you to understand that "all provisions of the May 10, 1975 
desegregation plan and other orders entered in these proceedings , 
shall remain in effect." In that regard, the Disengagement Orders 
reaffirm the responsibilities of the Department of Implementation 
for student assignments and transfers, and identify the DI as the 
school department's internal monitor for "compliance or nbn- 

-100- 



Superintendent's Circular No. 3, 1983-84 
August. 9, 1983 
page 2 

compliance with orders entered in this case." I have emphasized my 
support for the Court's directive by designating the Senior Officer 
for Desegregation as my primary liaison with Desegregation Monitors 
of the Massachusetts Board of Education. 

You have a continuing obligation to abide by the Procedural 
Manual of the Student Services Unit , Department of Implementation , on 
matters of student assignments and transfers. A related DI document, 
entitled Assignment Procedures for Hubert Humphrey Occupational 
Resource Center , is equally pertinent. 

No student shall be admitted to any school or to the Humphrey 
Center unless his name is listed on the school's latest computerized 
printout or the student submits an Official Notification of 
Assignment bearing the seal of the Department of Implementation and 
dated after the latest computerized printout. Know that rule well! 
No school official may assist a parent or student to circumvent the 
student assignment procedures. Further, no school official may 
prohibit or discourage a student from accepting an assignment to 
another school or program, e.g. , the Humphrey Center. 

This circular serves as a commendation to all faithfully 
carrying out the letter and spirit of the Court's outstanding orders, 
but also is notice that disregard for such orders and for 
departmental policy will be viewed as misconduct and treated 
appropriately. 

INQUIRIES CONCERNING THIS CIRCULAR SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO JOHN R. 
COAKLEY, SENIOR OFFICER FOR DESEGREGATION, 26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, 
MA 02108, TELEPHONE: 726-6200, EXT. 5 5 00. 



ROBERT R. SPILLANE 
Superintendent of Schools 



-101- 



'%•- i 




Robert R. Spillane* Superintendent of Public Schools 




i ™ 



No. 16, 1983-1984 
February 29, 1984 

A SECOND STATEMENT ON ADHERENCE TO COURT ORDERS 

To: Community Superintendents/ Headmasters, Principals, Other 
Administrative Personnel, Registrars, Data Processing 
Coordinators, Guidance Persons, Special Needs Personnel, 
Clerical Staff 

Headmasters, Principals and Other Administrative Persons are 
expected to keep on file a DATED CHECK LIST signed by all 
appropriate personnel indicating that each has read this circular. 

Both at the beginning of the current academic year and during 
the prior school year I issued a Superintendent's Circular entitled 
CONTINUED ADHERENCE TO FEDERAL COURT ORDERS ON DESEGREGATION . That 
circular, which I ask you to read again, was prepared because the 
Federal Court had begun the slow process of disengagement from the 
desegregation case and because we "must give evidence that 'the 
school system will operate according to the substantive elements 
of a constitutionally required remedy without continuous oversight. 

Recently, I submitted to the Boston School Committee a Lone 
Range Plan for the revitalization of the school system. That plan 
also contained a suggested restructuring of the school district 
and a revision of the student assignment process. The Long Range 
Plan will undergo intense scrutiny by many persons and agencies. 
It must be considered on its own merits. The student assignment 
component of the plan is challenging and dependent on a belief that 
we in the school department can abide by our commitment. It is 
IMPERATIVE that the present rules for student assignments and 
transfers be obeyed because the rules represent a body of law. 

This circular serves to express appreciation to those faith- 
fully carrying out the desegregation orders and to advise others 
not to be casual about their legal obligations. I have advised the 
Senior Officer for Desegregation that from this point forward he is 
to bring directly to my attention those instances of disregard for 
the United States Constitution, federal and/or state laws and School 
Committee Policy on matters pertaining to student desegregation. 

INQUIRIES CONCERNING THIS CIRCULAR SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO JOHN R. COAKLEY , 
SENIOR OFFICER FOR DESEGREGATION, 26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MA 02108, 
TELEPHONE: -726-6200, EXT. 55 00. 

Robert R. Spillane 
Superintendent 
Boston Public Schools 

-102- 



'nE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




March 8, 1984 



Dear Principals and Headmasters, 

I have become increasingly concerned about faithful adherence 
to the Federal Court's desegregation orders on student assignments 
and transfers. Indeed, recently I was exercised sufficiently to 
request that the Superintendent issue a second circular on the 
subject. Further, I asked to meet with the Council of Community 
Superintendents to dramatize both my frustration and determination. 

This letter constitutes yet another effort on my part to 
emphasize your obligations and those of us in the D.I. to the 
various Court Orders dating back to May 10, 1975. It is my estimate 
that the parents, guardians or advocates of some 2 00,000 children 
have been expected to abide by the Student Assignment Process; most 
of them have not violated the law even when, in some cases, they 
have sent their children to private schools. You and I, as school 
employees, have the same legal obligations. Moreover, in my 
opinion, we have obligations — as educational administrators and 
teachers — to set a high ethical tone in the matter of compliance 
with the law and related regulations. 

So many of you are meticulous and beyond reproach about all 
your professional responsibilities. You live by rules and regula- 
tions, and have no need to feel this letter is critical of you. 
Rather, this serves as a reminder that the Court Orders are intended 
to embrace all school persons, students and parents. 

From a fellow professional, 

i 

John R. Coakley 

ab 

Fnclosures (2) 

xc: Office of Supt. Kenneth Caldwell 

Robert Peterkin Community Superintendents 

Oliver Lancaster Registrars/Data Processing Coordinators 

-103- 



MEMORANDUM 

April 28th 1984 

TO: John Coakley 

FROM: Charles Glenn 

RE: Extended Day Kindergarten Program Assignments 

Thank you for providing a print-out of preferences expressed by parents for 
1984-85 assignments for their children. I have reviewed those for EDP 

assignments first, with three objectives: 

(1) Determining which programs will, in the initial assignments this 

May, have difficulty complying with the desegregation standards 
at full capacity. 

(2) Determining how many students will need to be recruited between 

May and September. 

(3) Identifying groups of students who will be disappointed of their 

first choices, for whom a follow-up study could determine 
whether their parents accepted alternative assignments and 
actually enrolled them in September. 

In order to conduct this review, I went through the following steps: 

(a) I set an "ideal" capacity for each program of either 25, 50, 

or 100 (Mather) students, based upon the programs approved 
last Spring, but not including TBE programs. I realize that 
some programs have operated (and perhaps will operate) above 
these capacities, and that my figures are therefore approximate. 

(b) I applied to the capacity the target elementary racial proportions 

for 1984-85, as found in your memo of a few weeks ago on AWC 
invitations. You explained to me yesterday that these are 
subject to minor changes. Using these preliminary figures, I 
determined an ideal number of students of each racial/ethnic group 
to be assigned to each program. I am aware that the existence 



-104- 



of TBE EDPs, most of whose students are "other minority", would 
justify some under-representation of other minority students 
(within Court-set ranges) in the non-TBE EDPs. 

(c) I subtracted this "ideal" number of students from the actual first 

choices for each program, to determine whether more students of a 
particular racial group had applied than the ideal enrollment, or 
whether more students of that group were needed. In the first 
case, of course, our interest will be on efforts to persuade 
parents to accept alternative assignments? in the second it will 
be on supplementary recruitment and assignment efforts. 

(d) I then reviewed the second and third choices to estimate the 

potential pool for assignments. Since I have no information 

on which parents made more than one selection, and in what order, 

this last analysis is very approximate indeed. 



Over-subscribed Programs 

The programs which significantly (3 or more students) over-subscribe Black 
students are the Perkins (!), the Blackstone, the Hernandez (the analysis here is 
complicated by the special provisions for this school), the Hale (24) and the 
Hennigan (9). In general there is under-subscription at this point by Black 
parents, with about 200 more Black applicants needed. 

The programs which significantly over-subscribe White students are the Gardner, 
the Garfield, the Mozart (14), the Grew, the Roosevelt, the Perkins, the Russell, the 
Blackstone (!), the Bradley, the Hernandez, the Guild, and the McKay. Most are in 
predominantly-white areas, and it will be important not to exceed the appropriate 
number of white students enrolled. The Blackstone and the Hernandez are two of 
the schools with the highest minority proportion (92% and 89%, respectively) in the 
Commonwealth, and it is encouraging that they attract so many white applicants to 
their EDP kindergartens. In the aggregate there are 21 more white applicants 
than the "ideal" capacity; spread over 30 non-TBE programs, it should be possible 
to accommodate this number, if all parents accept alternative assignments. 



-105- 



The only program which significantly over-subscribes Other Minority students is 
the Mendell. Overall this group needs 150 more applicants? not including those for 
TBE programs. 

I suggest that, for the study of the impact of failure to receive first choice 
assignments which the Board has required, we track the individual students who do 
not receive first-choice EDP assignments. How many of them accept other EDP 
assignments, and how many accept other half-day kindergarten assignments? How 
many leave the Boston Public Schools? 



Under-subscribed Programs 

Nineteen schools will need to recruit 5 or more Black students to achieve the ideal 
enrollment: Gardner, Higginson (!), Mendell, Parkman, Kilmer, Lee (!), Mattahunt (!), 
Mozart, Chittick (!), Grew, Roosevelt, Dickerman (!), Fifield, Mather, Mason, Russell, 
Eliot, Warren-Prescott, and McKay. You will recall that the Board's February 1984 
report raised concerns about under-enrollment of Black students at the Mason, 
Eliot, and Warren-Prescott schools! we will watch this very closely this year. 

Only five schools will need to recruit 5 or more White students to attain the ideal 
enrollment: Higginson, Lee, Mason, Adams, and Hennigan. The Board's report 
raised questions about white enrollment at the Lee, Adams and Hennigan which was 
lower than the ideal, though not constituting a compliance problem. 

Fourteen schools require 5 or more Other Minority students to reach the ideal, with 
the Gardner, Garfield, Higginson, Parkman, Eliot, and McKay requiring 10 or more. 
In some cases, as noted above, it may be appropriate to assign Other Minority 
students at the low side of the approved range to balance their over-enrollment in 
the TBE EDP programs. Nevertheless, the Eliot was cited in the Board's report as 
unjustifiably low in Other Minority enrollment (on April 18, 1984: 2.5% compared with 
45% ideal!), and this should be corrected. 

You have informed me that Black and Other Minority parents tend to wait to enroll 
their children for kindergarten until the Fall; while this appears to be true, it is 



-106- 



also unfortunately true that they may under-utilize kindergarten altogether, to the 
educational detriment of their children. I suggest that supplemental recruitment 
for the under-subscribed programs begin immediately. 



Impact of Second and Third Choices 

While aggregated information about second and third choices is of limited value, I 
have checked the impact upon each program if all of the students whose parents 
gave it as a second or third choice were assigned there, on the assumption that 
none of them were given their first choices. In most cases the impact is slight. 
Sixteen programs continue "short" five or more Black students, and twelve would 
need to recruit five or more Other Minority students. Of the schools with 
significantly too few White applicants, only the Hennigan would be able to fillits 
places with students for whom the school was second or third choice. 

In general the pattern seems to be for parents who choose a magnet school 
(District IX) EDP to use all three choices for magnets rather than to include a 
district I-VIII EDP among their choices. Thus of the 267 second or third choices 
expressed by parents of Black students, fully 78% were for four magnet schools, 
and 56% for the Hale and Hennigan (both in Roxbury) alone. The Hennigan, Hale 
and Hernandez received 59% of the second and third choices of parents of Other 
Minority students. The Guild and the McKay, both in East Boston, were given as 
the second or third choices of nearly half of the parents of White children? it seems 
likely that many East Boston parents listed both, but no EDP outside of that area. 

It appears that many parents do not indicate second or third choices. Logically, 
there could be twice as many second and third choices as first choices, but in fact 
the number of second and third choices made by white parents is only 38% of the 
number of first choices. Other Minority (51%) and Black (68%) parents seem rather 
more inclined to express alternative preferences, but it seems that overall most 
parents give only one choice for an EDP kindergarten. 



-107- 



Conclusions 

I understand that I may expect to receive the proposed assignments in about a 
week. I have noted above some of the schools which I will be especially concerned 
about) and the apparent need for supplementary recruitment and assignments for a 
number of schools. I will also be concerned that in no case the number of students 
of a racial/ethnic group assigned exceed make it impossible for supplementary 
recruitment to satisfy the enrollment requirements set by the Court. 

I hope that this and other early notices I have given about the focus of assignment 
monitoring are helpful to you in preparing assignments. 

Follow-up on parents who do not receive first-choice assignments for their children 
will help us to respond to the Board's concern about tracking such students and 
determining whether they remain with the public schools. 



-108- 



MEMORANDUM 

May 16th 1934 

TO: John Coakley 

FROM: Charles Glenn 

RE: Extended Day Kindergarten Program Assignments 

This is to confirm my discussions with Catherine Ellison on Monday May 14th. 

I understand that you will issue EDP assignments to students as indicated in the 
May 4th print-out, with the exception of the Bradley School, to which you will 
assign only 20 White studentst as provided in your proposal dated January 25th 
1983 (see pages 69-71 of Volume II of the First Monitoring Report) July 15, 1983). 

I understand that you will continue to recruit and assign students to the 
under-enrolled EDPs, but that you will devote special attention to those programs 
identified as of concern on page 32 of Volume II of the Second Monitoring Report, 
February 1, 1984. Specifically: 

Kilmer 

You will not exceed eight White students (seven are shown in the 5/4/34 
assignments). 

Grew 

You will not exceed six White students (five are shown in the 5/4/84 assignments). 

Eliot and Warren Prescott 

You will not exceed four White students each (as shown m the 5/4/34 assignments). 

Bradley 

You will not exceed twenty White students. 



-109- 



Hale 



You have again assigned more Black students (28 vs 20) than provided in the 
January 1983 memo, and fewer White students (7 vs 18). Please inform me of how 
many additional students? by race? you expect to assign. I note that the program 
is not out of compliance with the permitted range for White enrollment, though it is 
for Black enrollment. We should discuss whether low Other Minority and high Black 
enrollment are warranted in view of the high overall proportion of Other Minority 
students in EDPs. 

Hennigan 

Last Fall the Other Minority enrollment was much higher than approved, and 
questions were raised about this in view of the overall enrollment of the school. 
In my recent memo about elementary and middle school assignments for 1984-85 I 
pointed out that the Other Minority enrollment of the Hennigan has increased 
dramatically over the past two years. Initial EDP assignments (5/4/84) do not 
show an over-assignment of Other Minority students, but please inform me how 
many additional students, by race, you expect to assign. 



Recruitment 

As noted in my analysis of the preferences for EDP kindergartens (April 28th, 
reproduced below), a substantial number of White students will not receive their 
parents' first (or even second or third) preferences. I understand that you will be 
actively seeking to persuade these parents to accept an assignment to EDPs which 
to date have an insufficient number of White applicants, and that you will also 
continue to recruit students of all racial groups for all under-subscribed programs. 

As we have agreed, it is difficult to assess the Black and Other Minority 
assignments - except to the extent that they may exceed the approved level - 
because most registrations do not occur until the Fall. There are no programs for 
which over-assignment of Black and Other Minority students is presently a concern, 
except as noted above with respect to the Hale and Hernandez. 



-110- 



Assignments — Hubert HumDhrevfDccuoation^l ResourceC^enter 

Assignment Criteria 

The Humphrey Occupational Resource Center is the major suDplier 
of occupational education to Boston's high school students. 
The "admissions criteria" for the 35 programs at the HHORC are 
described on pages 9-11 of the Unified Plan of September 8, 
1975. The most important of these criteria are listed on pages 
314-315 of volume II of the first monitoring report. Briefly 
they are (1) students may only be assigned voluntarily, (£) 
modified citywide racial ratios must be observed, (3) insuffi- 
cient applications from any racial group for particular 
programs will result in the underenrol lrnent of the program and 
(4) assignments of male and female students should be made on a 
1:1 basis until all applicants of one group have been assigned 
for programs in which one sex has represented less than 3554 of 
the enrollment. 

According to Boston's "Assignment Procedures for Hubert Hum- 
phrey Occupational Resource Center, August, 1981," priority is 
given to assigning (1) students who have commenced an HHORC 
program, (£) students who have attended the Exploratory Program 
and (3) students who attended a Cooperative Vocational Educa- 
tion program. The "Assignment Procedures" does not accord 
priority to assigning students on a 1:1 basis by sex. 

The "Assignment Procedures" does not address the Unified Plan's 
requirement that each program reflect citywide racial ratios. 
Instead, according to the "Assignment Procedures, " assignments 
are made "so that the totality of the Half-Day Skill Training 
Program shall be in strict accordance with the high-low range 
of the citywide racial/ethnic percentages for Cthe year]." 
Assignments will be made, however, to "[avoid] complete racial 
isolation in a program." ("Assignment Procedures," p. 6) 

The Unified Plan specifically addressed assignments at the 
program level (opposed to the school level) because White 
students dominated the desirable programs (that offered, for 
example, better employment opportunities), while Black and 
other minority students were relegated to the less desirable 
programs. Consequently, the Department's monitoring must scru- 
tinize program-level assignments. Boston is aware, of course, 
that the Unified Plan does prescribe procedures for seeking 
modification of the assignment requirements. 

The enrollment goals for 1984-85 for HHORC programs are 

Black White Other Minority 



Hinh 


6354 


£654 


£154 


Ideal 


5954 


£154 


£0* 


Low 


5554 


1654 


1954 



-111- 



In 21 programs, the number of students assigned is less than 
capacity, virtually ensuring that those programs will be 
underenrol led. This is an improvement over last year, when the 
assignments underenrol led £7 programs. The programs that will 
be underenrol led for 1984-85 are 



Food Service 

Retailing, Marketing 

Cabinet ma king 

Carpentry 

Plumbing 

Building Maintenance 

Autobody Repair 

Machine Laboratory 

Sheet Metal Lab 

Dental Office 

Child Care 



Hotel /Hospital ity 

Health Aide 

Health Laboratory 

Nursing Assistance 

Electrical Tech 

Electronics Tech 

Photographic Tech 

Print ing 

Automot i ve/Truck Repair 

Marine & Small Engine Repair 



Qoineiiance/Race -- Assignments 

If the pattern of student enrollments in September 1984 exactly 
matches the assignments (that is, if all the assigned students 
actually enroll), the proportion of Black students will exceed 
the permitted range (63"/.) in 1£ programs: 



Food Service 
Machine Lab 
Advanced Office 
Hotel/Hospital ity 
Health Lab 
HvAC 



Retailing, Marketing 
Sheet Metal Lab 
Leaal Office 
Health Aide 
Nursing Asst 
Fashion Illustration 



The proportion of Black students 
permitted range (55%) in 10 programs: 



will fall beneath the 



Cabinetmaking 

Banking 

Data Processing 

Electronics Tech 

Photographic Tech 



Plumbing 
Child Care 
Medical Office 
Commercial Design 
Marine & Small Engine 



The proportion 
range (£6'/t) in 6 



of White students will 
programs: 



exceed the permitted 



Plumbing 
Child Care 
Printing 

The proportion of 
permitted range (16%) 

Food Service 
Machine Lab 
Weldino Lab 



Word Processing 
Photographic Tech 
Marine & Small Engine 



White 
in 14 



students 
programs: 



will fall beneath the 



Retailing, Marketing 
Sheet Metal Lab 
Advanced Office 



-113- 



Legal Office 
Hot el /Hospitality 
Health Lab 
Commercial Design 



Dental Office 
Health Aide 
Electronics Tech 
Machine Draft inn 



The proportion of other minority students will exceed the 
permitted range (21%) in 18 programs (note that the range is 
quite narrow for this group) : 



Carpentry 
Machine Lab 
Legal Office 
Banking 
Cosmetology 
Data Processing 
Medical Office 
Commercial Design 
Marine & Sm Engine 



Building Maintenance 

Welding Lab 

Dental Office 

Child Care 

Hotel /Hospital ity 

Health Aide 

Electronics Tech 

Machine Drafting 

Putomot ive/Trucking Repair 



The proportion of other minority students will fall beneath the 
permitted range (1&%) in 13 programs: 



Food Service 

Plumbing 

Word Processing 

Health Lab 

Heating, Pir Cond 

Photographic Tech 

Te 1 ev i s i on Prod uct ion 



Retailing, Marketing 
Sheet Metal Lab 
Fash ion/ Interior Design 
Nursing Pssistant 
Fashion Illustration 
Print ing 



These overall number of programs outside the permitted range is 
not very different from last year's assignments. 

PSSIBNMENTS 
NUMBER OF PROGRPMS OUT OF COMPLIPNCE 





Black 




Over 


Under 


83/4 


18 


5 


84/5 


1£ 


10 



White 
Over Under 



4 
6 



14 
14 



Other Minority 
Over Under 



14 
18 



16 

13 



The new assignments do seem to show, however, an attempt to 
reduce the number of programs with disproportionately high 
Black enrollments. 

PSSIGNMENTS 
NUMBER OF PROGRPMS IN COMPLIPNCE 



83/84 
84/85 



Black 

is 

13 



White 

17 
15 



Other Minority 

5 
4 



-114- 



QojII&Liance/Race -- Based on Projected Enrollments 

Of course, enrollments rarely match assignments exactly. Last 
year, the number of students enrolled in some programs 
represented a significant decline from the number assigned. 
Consequently, assignment figures are not always a reliable 
guide for determining which programs will be in compliance. 

It is possible to "project" the number of students who will 
enroll in the various programs by using data from last year. 
We used the ratio of students enrolled in BJ222.il i?iM to 
students assigned. For example, 19 White students were 
assigned to Carpentry last year, but only 8 White students 
(4£#) were enrolled in that program in April of 1984. Thus we 
projected that only 4£5£ of the White students assigned for the 
coming year will be enrolled for the duration of the program 
year. 

The results of the projections are presented in Figure 1. The 
programs in the upper shaded areas are ones that we project 
will fail to meet the minimum permitted range, and the programs 
in the lower shaded areas are projected to exceed the permitted 
range. (The compliance index is calculated by dividing the 
percentage enrollment (or projected enrollment) by the ideal 
enrol lrnent. 

The projections can be compared with the actual assignment 
figures. 

PROGRAMS OUT OF COMPLIANCE 

Black 
Over Under 

Assigned 1£ 10 
Pro j. Enr. 16 11 

If these projections are correct, enrollments will be in 
compliance for Black students for only 8 programs, and only 14 
for White students. However, there will be a slight 
improvement for other minority students: 5 instead of 4. 

Qompl iance/Sex —— Assignments 

If all the students who are assigned to programs actually 
enroll in those programs, the proportion of female students 
will exceed 65% in 10 programs: 

Health Lab Advanced Office 

Word Processing Fash ion/ Interior Design 

Health Aide Child Care 

Legal Office Medical Office 

Nursing Asst Cosmetology 



White 




Other Minority 


Over 


Under 


Over Under 


6 


14 


18 13 


7 


14 


13 17 



-115- 



The proportion of male students will exceed 65% in 14 programs: 

Heating flir Con Automot ive/Truck Repair 

Plumbing Marine & Small Engine Repair 

Carpentry Welding Lab 

flutobody Repair Machine Drafting 

Electrical Tech Electronics Tech 

Cabinetmaking Machine Drafting 

Sheet Metal Lab Machine Lab 

Last year's assignments showed overenrol lrnent by males in 16 
programs (and, in fact, 16 programs were overenrol led by males 
in April of this year), so this year's assignments show a 
slight improvement. The number of programs overenrol led by 
females (18) has remained constant. (See Figure £) 

Q°roBiLli£ce/Sex ™ EtLBiect 12™= 

When last year's assignment : enrol lrnent ratio is used to project 
enrollments for the coming year, the number of programs domi- 
nated by males increases by three: Printing, TV Production 
(both programs there was a sharp drop last year from the number 
of females assigned to the number enrolled) and Fashion Illus- 
tration (to which art unusually large number of males has been 
assigned this year). 

Number of Students Assigned 

The total number of students assigned to HHORC programs this 
year is £,149 — a decrease of 156 (6.8% decrease) from last 
year's total of £,305. The number of assignments dropped for 
all three racial/ethnic categories: Blacks by 111 (8. £5% 
decrease), Whites by 3 (0.7% decrease) and other minorities by 
£8 (5.7% decrease). 

This decrease cannot be attributed solely to "demographic 
decline." In fact, the decline in the total number of 
assignments for grades 10-1£ from last year to this was only 
4.3%. (See Figures 3 and 4) 

In this respect, Boston is out of step with the rest of the 
Commonwealth. Enrollments in vocational education programs 
have actually increased in most areas, even as total 
enrollments are declining. 

Rscrjjit_inn 

Both of the previous monitoring reports have stressed that the 
problems of underenrol lrnent and disproportionate enrollment at 
the HHORC will only be solved through improved recruiting — 
which is specifically mandated in the Unified Plan. Has 
recruiting improved this year? 

The number of students expressing a first preference for ar\ 
HHORC program declined from £,£56 to 1,978 between last year 



-116- 



and this, a decrease of 12.3%. (See Figure 5 for detail by 

program) There were similar declines in the number of students 
expressing a second and third preference for an HHORCORC 
program. The loss of interest was sharpest among White 
students (16.754 decline in the number of first preferences 
expressed); for Black students, the decrease was 12. 2/4, and for 
other minority students it was 10. 1%. Boston's recruitment 
efforts have not only not improved, they have regressed. 

The loss of interest among Boston students is not limited to 
those programs that traditionally fail to recruit many young 
people. It included such generally popular programs as Auto 
Repair and Autobody Repair, and programs that offer excellent 
employment opportunities in Massachusetts such as Electronics 
Technology. 

The fact that this year's assignments show an improvement in 
disproportion by race is attributable solely to the mechanism 
of the assignment process. The actual pattern of "applica- 
tions" was more severely skewed toward minority students this 
year than it was last year. The assignment process should not, 
and cannot continue to, carry the burden of desegregating 
occupational education programs in Boston. Improved recruiting 
efforts are essential. 

Boston has recently taken steps to improve its recruiting, but 
they are belated and, as yet, insufficient. On May 22 a 
Development Officer was assigned to the HHORC. 

In April the Director of the Bureau of EEO met with the Direc- 
tor of Education/Employment for the purpose of developing a 
recruitment "action plan." He specified that the plan should 
include, at minimum, (1) increased participation in exploratory 
clusters, (2) improved career guidance, (3) vigorous outreach 
to encourage applications and follow-up on students who express 
interest, (4) assignment of staff with specific responsibility 
for recruitment and (5) supplementary recruiting for those 
programs with insufficient application pools. "Full enrollment 
of each program on a desegregated basis Cis] part of the remedy 
for previous violations of the constitutional rights of minori- 
ty students in the vocational area in Boston. Such full 
enrollment depends upon vigorous and corrdinated efforts to 
encourage applications from students of all racial /ethnic 
group, male and female. ... the lack of such efforts would result 
in denial of educational opportunities." (See attached 
letter, April 23) 

The Director of Education/Employment replied on May 4th with a 

brief outline of a plan, and promised that a complete plan 

would be ready soon. (See attached letter, May 4) As of June 
8 no plan has been submitted to the Department. 



-117- 



Conci.usi.on 

The "Assignment Procedures" used by Boston fails to address the 
requirements of the Unified Plan that citywide racial ratios be 
observed in each program of the HHORC, and that male and female 
students by assigned on a 1:1 basis to the extent possible. 

Both compliance and full utilization of the HHORC depend on 
vigorous recruiting. Despite the monitors' insistence on the 
importance of improved recruiting in the last two reports, 
Boston made no attempt to undertake systematic recruiting. The 
unfortunate results are clear: the number of applications from 
each racial/ethnic group declined significantly compared with 
last year. 

Nevertheless, the new assignments to the HHORC show a slight 
improvement in two areas (overenrol lment by Black students and 
by male students), and otherwise matched the levels of last 
year. It is unlikely that the assignment procedure will be 
able to maintain this level of compliance in the absence of a 
commitment from Boston to undertake vigorous and systematic 
recruiting. 



-118- 



ATTACHMENTS - FIGURES 1 THROUGH 6 

Figure 1. HHORC Programs /Comp 1 iance Indices, Actual Index for 
1983-84 and Projected' Index for 1984-85. 

Programs are rank ordered by compliance index. Index for 
1983-84 was calculated using enrollment figures from April, 
1984. Projected Index was calculated using projected 
enrollments (projected enrollments were calculated by 
applying the ratio of assignments to enrollments from last 
year to this year's assignments). The compliance index is 
calculated by dividing the percentage enrollment of the 
racial group in question by the "ideal" percentage. An index 
of 100 represents perfect compliance. 

Figure £. Enrollment by Sex in HHORC Programs, Rank Ordered by 
Percentage of Females Enrolled in Program. 

All numbers represent percentages. Each is the percentage of 
females assigned to or enrolled in the program in question. 

Figure 3. Comparison of HHORC Assignments, 1983/4 and 1984/5. 

Compares the actual number of students assigned to each 
program last year and this year. 

Finure 4. HHORC Programs — Assignment Trends from 83/4 to 
84/5 

The numbers in the E'nd and 5th columns are the result of 
subtracting the number of students assigned this year from 
the number assigned last year. Each negative number repre- 
sents, therefore, a decrease in the number of assignments. 
The numbers in the 3rd and 6th columns represent the 
enrollment in those programs in April, 1984. 

Figure 5. HHORC First Preferences. 

The numbers are the result of subtracting the number of 
students expressing first preferences this year from the 
number expressing the first preferences for the same program 
last year. Each negative number represents, therefore, a 
decrease in the number of first preferences. Shaded areas 
indicate declines in the number of first preferences. 

Figure 6. HHORC Proposed Assignments for 1984/85. 

The first three columns show the caoacity of each program 
— that is, the number of seats available. The second three 
columns show the number of students assigned to the program. 
The third three columns are the result of subtracting the 
number of students assigned from the number of seats 
available. Each Dositive number in the third set of columns 
represents unused seats. 



-119- 



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-127- 



Bureau of Equal Educational upportumty 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



April 23rd 1984 



TO: 

FROM: 

RE: 



John Coakley 
Charles Glenn 



d 



Review of Magnet Vocational Program Assignments 



Thank you for arranging a meeting last Thursday in your office to 
review with Mr. Caradonio the assignment requirements related to 
city-wide vocational programs. 

I requested at that time that Mr. Caradonio develop an "action 
plan" covering measures by the school system to encourage sufficient 
applications from each racial/ethnic group to permit assignment of 
and maintenance of enrollments in each program consistent with the 
"admissions criteria" section of the Unified Plan. Such measures 
would include participation by all middle school students and ninth 
graders in exploratory cluster programs designed to expose them to 
a broad range of occupations and to encourage them to consider 
applying to city-wide vocational programs. It would also include 
career guidance efforts tied specifically to the available programs, 
vigorous outreach from the various programs to encourage applications, 
follow-up on students who express interest, assignment of staff with 
specific responsibility for recruitment (with an indication of what 
portion of their time would be or already is devoted to it), 
supplementary recruitment for programs for which (at the time of 
initial assignments) an insufficient pool of applicants from any 
racial/ethnic group are available, and follow-up with assigned 
students to increase the likelihood of their attending in the Fall. 

It was my understanding from the discussion that definite problems 
exist in obtaining the cooperation of some headmasters and middle 
school and high school guidance staff, and that, currently, no staff 
have the primary responsibility of recruitment for city-wide 
vocational programs. I understand that there was considerable 
participation in a recent "career day," and that Boston staff will 
be receiving training arranged by the Department of Education on 
recruitment of under-represented groups to vocational programs. 
I'm sure you will agree that such activities, vafuable as they are, 
must be supported by a solid commitment at the sending schools, and 
we will be looking for evidence of such commitment. 



-128- 



April 23rd 1984 page two 

I agreed to state, in writing, the concerns with which we will 
approach the review of proposed assignments to city-wide vocational 
programs. 

We expect that the proposed assignments to each city-wide program 
(the Humphrey Center and the "magnet programs" at certain high 
schools) will reflect the required standards. We expect that 
insufficient applications for a particular program 
from students of one race will result in the 
underenrollment of the program 
and that there will be 

supplementary recruitment in the event that insufficient 
applications are received from students of one race. 

We also expect that admissions to these programs 

shall be made on the basis of equal numbers of male 
and female students, so far as the pool of applications 
filed permits. 



I went over these and other requirements of the "admissions criteria" 
from the Unified Plan with you and Mr. Caradonio to assure that we 
were all agreed about what the Court has required with respect to 
city-wide vocational program assignments. 

I questioned Mr. Caradonio about language in his April 6th response 

to Report No. 2 , which suggested that he believed that 

the State also calls for the adoption of procedures 
which will further decrease enrollments in vocational/ 
occupational programs. 

I pointed out that 
(aj these procedures are required by the Unified Plan and have 

been since 1975; and 
(b) the Court-ordered procedures are designed and intended to 
assure full enrollment of each program on a desegregated 
basis, as part of the remedy for previous violations of 
the constitutional rights of minority students in the 
vocational area in Boston. Such full enrollment depends 
upon vigorous and coordinated efforts to encourage applications 
from students of all racial /ethnic groups, male and female. 
It is the lack of such efforts, and in particular of 
cooperation on all levels of the School Department, which 
would result in underenrollment of any program and thus in 
denial of educational opportunities. 

• u 

I believe that we reached an understanding about the source and nature 
of assignment requirements, and the efforts required to achieve 
compliance and full enrollment for each program. I will look forward 
to receiving an "action plan" from Mr. Caradonio and the proposed 
assignments - in early May - from you. 

cc. Franklin Banks, Robert Blumenthal, tsq. , Dr. David Cronin 
Marlene Godfrey , James Caradonio, Boston Public Schools 



-129- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

84-244 



May 4, 1984 



'■ 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

EDUCATION/EMPLOYMENT 
JAMES A CARADONIO, Director 



MEMORANDUM TO: 

FROM: 

RE: 



Dr. Charles Glen? 
James A. Carkft 
"Action Plan*/ 



The enclosed information is in response to your early 
May request for an action plan which will address recruit- 
ment and retention of students to vocational programs in the 
Boston Public Schools. 

I would like to emphasize that this is by no means a 
complete document and that a more comprehensive action plan 
is currently being developed by members of the Vocational 
Education Marketing Committee. This committee is meeting on 
a regular basis to develop an effective working plan. I will 
forward the final document to you as soon as it is completed. 

Enclosures include: 

o Mission statement 

o Objectives 

o Completed and On-going Citywide Marketing Activities 

(with documentation) 
o Proposed Citywide Marketing Activities 
o Committee Roster 
o Resource Persons 
o Humphrey Center Recruitment Strategies 

Please feel free to call me or Juanita Hardrick regard- 
ing any questions you may have. 

Your interest is appreciated. 



c: Robert Spillane 
John Coakley 
Juanita Hardrick 
Clifford Janey 



75 NEW DUDLEY STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02119 • (61 71 442-5200. x587. 588 

-130- 



PROPOSED OBJECTIVES 



1. To encourage sufficient applications from each racial/ 
ethnic group to permit assignments and maintenance of 
enrollments in each program consistent with the 
"admissions criteria" section of the Unified Plan. 

2. To increase participation of all 7th, 8th, and 9th 
grade students in exploratory programs for the purpose 
of exposing them to a broad range of occupations and 
to encourage their application to citywide vocational 
programs . 

3. To develop an in-service training program for appropriate 
Boston Public School staff on how to recruit under-repre- 
sented groups to vocational programs. 

4. To develop effective outreach and recruitment activities 
for citywide vocational programs to be implemented by 
career guidance counselors and other appropriate Boston 
Public School staff. 

5. To systemitize the follow-up process for students who 
have expressed interest in vocational occupational 
careers . 

6. To organize a supplementary recruitment effort for pro- 
grams lacking a sufficient pool of applicants from any 
racial /ethnic group and to encourage students to attend 
vocational education programs in the Fall as assigned.. 

7. To address student retention issues by utilizing the 
in-service training program for vocational educators: 
Making It Work - Module I (Strategies for Retaining 
Students in Vocational High Schools) 

8. To develop, implement and maintain a community outreach 
program which will encourage local businessess agencies 
and colleges to utilize vocational facilities within 
the Boston Public Schools. 



-131- 



COMPLETED AND ON-GOING CITYWIDE 
MARKETING ACTIVITIES 



1. Publications-disseminated to parents, students, busi- 
nesses, colleges, community agencies, State Department 
. Education & Employment Newsletter 

. School Based Restaurants 

. The Humphrey Center Bulletin 

. Vocational/Occupational Education Fact Sheet 

. Scholarships for Vocational/Occupational Students 

2. Career School Expo '84 

3. Citywide Celebration of Vocational Education Week 

4. LIFE Conference (Living Is For The Elderly) 

5. In-Service Staff Development for Guidance Counselors: 
Project B.I.C.E.P. (Barnstable Instructional Career 
Education Program) . 

6. Business Seminars for Business Instructors on Office 
Automation 

7. Citywide Type-Off 

8. Commonwealth In-Service course for I. A. instructors: 
"High Tech Career Guidance Information" 



-132- 



PROPOSED CITYWIDE MARKETING ACTIVITIES 



1. Develop standardized career themes based on HORC clusters 
to be presented in 3 year cycles. 

2. Organize student peer recruitment teams to demonstrate 
acquired vocational skills. 

3. Implement shadowing programs which provide students with 
an opportunity for hands-on experiences according to 
their interests. 

4. Provide curriculum enrichment opportunities through mini 
exploratory programs at Boston Public Schools, Community 
and business sites. 

5. Design and publish, posters, brochures, and a yearly 
calendar containing visuals and information to support 
recruitment for vocational education in Boston Public 
Schools . 

6. Perform on-going research and evaluation to produce data 
for updating B.P.S. staff in the areas of student 
interests, retention, and program strengths and weak- 
nesses . 

7. Develop and implement appropriate media activities to 
get the word out about vocational education. 

8. Implement the Intergenerational Program between B.P.S. 
students and senior citizens. This activity will focus 
on learning video tape and interview techniques and will 
utilize The Humphrey Center's facilities. 



Other citywide recruitment activities will be developed 
by the Marketing Committee as they get deeper into 
the project. 



-133- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



Headmaster 
CLIFFORD JANEY 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
HUBERT H HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOU°CE CF.NTER 



May 1, 1984 



Assistant Headmasters 

THOMAS GIACCHET TO 

DIANA k'.VS 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Mr. James Caradonio 
FROM: Clifford Janey, Headmaster 
RE: Recruitment Strategies 



In response to your request for documentation of recruitment strategies 
employed at the Humphrey Center during School year 1983-84, I submit 
the following: 



Activity 



Expected Outcomes 



1. 



2. 



3. 



4. 



5. 



* Direct mailing to all 
9th graders in the Boston 
Public Schools 



Quarterly 9th grade career infor- 
mation assemblies for exploratory 
students currently enrolled at 
the Humphrey Center 

Special 9th grade workshops 
conducted by O.R.C. guidance 
staff for students pursuing non- 
traditional careers. 

Assemblies for newly assigned 
skill students on the assignment 
and transfer process 

Visitations by staff and students 
to selected high schools such as 
Charlestown, English, Umana, Brighton 



Increased contact with potential 
skill students 

More diversified enrollment 
patterns in terms of sex and 
race 

Increased retention rate, i.e., in 1984/ 
85 more students will enter skill 
programs from their exploratory 
experience 

More diversified enrollment patterns 
in terns of sex and race 



Increased retention rate between 
semesters and school years 



*Attached 



The Umana and Brighton were chosen to 
try to retain the 64% and 66% increase 
of assigned students from these 
schools respectively 

- English was selected to clarify 



-13 2 *- 



Memo to: J. Caradonio 
May 1, 1984 



-2- 



Distribution of Posters, flyers 
and buttons to high schools 
and middle schools 



student and staff concerns about 
accessing the Humphrey Center 
given the new reorganization. 

Charlestown was chosen to address 
white and other minority students 

Image building and general support 
for vocational education 



Information dissemination to 
Humphrey Center parent council 
members 



- Same as above 



10. 



11, 



Humphrey Center Graphics Career 
Fair 

Development of 9th grade student 
council, VICA, DECA and O.E.A. 
activities — raffles , competitions 
field trips. 

Schoolwide parent council raffle 
and a parent handbook (draft to 
be ready by May 31, 1984.) 



Distribution of posters and flyers 
by students and staff to respective 
neighborhood agencies across the 
city 



Concentrated effort to recruit students 
into underenrolled programs 

Student pride and identification 
with the Humphrey Center 



- Scholarship monies and toolkit 
awards at graduation 

- Sharing of information to other 
school parent councils 

- Increased awareness to neighborhoods 



You should note that the appointment of a Job Development Officer will increase our 
capacity to recruit student by virtue of the public information skills required 
in the job. 



vds 



cc: 



Mr. John Coakley 

Mr. Thomas Giacchetto 
Mrs. Juanita Hardrick 
Mrs. Diana Jones 



-135- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



'•-N 



1 • » .-l 

BOSTON PU8LIC SCHOOLS 
HUBERT H HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 

He.dm.ster As " slam •*•»*-» 

TLIFFORDJANEY THOMAS G.ACCHC II. : 

• .►• • DIANA JONES 



March 19, 1984 



Dear Student: 

i 

In a very short time you will be making a decision" for the 
1984-85 school year. ■ We are sending you the enclosed material to 
help you make that decision. 

Read all the material over very carefully. Discuss # it with your 
parents/guardians. Make a decision that will be a good'one for 
you for the next school year. • 

• 
Take advantage of the many exciting vocational programs which we 
have here which will prepare you to become a ski He'd worker. We 
will also prepare you to continue your education if that is your 
choice. Once you have learned, then you can earn money in a job 
which our job-placement person will find for you. You can keep 
this job on a part-time basis while you continue y»our education. 
Or, you can get a full-time job when you graduate. 

Keep The Humphrey Center in your mind when you fill in your 
application for next year. 

Your school will give you your application shortly. Indicate 
on that application that you choose to come to The Humphrey 
Center. It is a decision you will be happy you have madel 

See you at The Humphrey Center! 

Sincerely yours, 



Clifford Janey 
Headmaster 



75 NCW DUDLEY STIVE I. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 021)9 • *« 5700 AREA 617 

-136- 



( THE HUMPHREY CENTER 1 



PROGRAM OFFERINGS) 



O BUSINESS/DATA PROCESSING 

• ADVANCED OFFICE AND 
MANAGEMENT 

• DATA PROCESSING 

• LEGAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 

• MEDICAL SECRETARY 

• WORD PROCESSING 



O GRAPHICS/MEDIA 

• COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

• ILLUSTRATION/ADVERTISING 

• MACHINE DRAFTING 

• PHOTOGRAPHIC TECHNOLOGY 

• PRINTING * 

• TELEVISION PRODUCTION 



O COMMERCIAL MALL 

• BANKING 

• CHILD CARE 

• COSMETOLOGY 

' • FASHION DESIGN 

• FOOD SERVICE 

• HOTEL/HOSPITALITY 

• RETAIL/MARKETING/MANAGEMENT 



O HEALTH 

• DENTAL ASSISTANT 

• HEALTH AIDE 

• MEDICAL LABORATORY SKILLS 

• MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT 

• NURSING ASSISTANT 



O CONSTRUCTION 

• BUILDING MAINTENANCE 
AND REPAIR 

• CABINETMAKING 

• CARPENTRY 

• ELECTRICITY 

• HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING, 
AND REFRIGERATION 

• PLUMBING 



© METALS FABRICATION/ELECTRONICS 

• AUTOBODY REPAIR LABORATORY 

• BASIC ELECTRONICS 

• COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONICS 

• COMPUTER ELECTRONICS 

• MACHINE TECHNOLOGY 

• SHEET METAL LABORATORY 

• WELDING LABORATORY 



O POWER MECHANICS 

• AUTOMOTIVE/TRUCK REPAIR 

• MARINE AND SMALL ENGINES 
REPAIR 



March 1984 




lh« Mub«il M Humph, , y Ot <upol,onol Itmm Ctnld ;j N«- Dudlr , S"««i Boilo" MA02H9 Ul 161 7 I 4 4 2 5200 



-137- 



WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT T H E H U MPHREY CENTER 



T' 



1. what is The Humphrey Center? 

It is a vocational-training facility which prepares you for 
a career after high school graduation. (It is sometimes 
referred to as ORC.) 

2. Where is The Humphrey Center? 

It is next to Madison Park High School, but it is not a part 
of Madison Park. 

3. Can I attend The Humphrey Center? 

Yes. Any high-school student attending a Boston public high 
school can go to The Humphrey Center. 

4. How do I get to The Humphrey Center? 

If you come to the Center in the morning, a bus will pick 
you up (if you live more than two miles away). When you 
complete your program training, a bus will take you to your 
home school for classes. 

If you attend the afternoon session, a bus«will take you 
from your home high school to the Center. When you complete 
your program training, a bus will take you to your home (if 
you live more than two miles away). * 

5. How long are sessions at The Humphrey Center? 

Morning and afternoon sessions are 2 hours 45 minutes 
according to stste law. 

h. Is The Humphrey Center a safe place to go to school? 

It certainly is. The same students who attend all Boston 
•high schools make up the student body at The Humphrey 
Center. In addition, Humphrey Center staff and instructors 
are outside the building at the school bus stops to meet you 
when you arrive and to assist you when you leav.e the Center. 



Why should I attend The Humphrey Center? 



i 



'You will learn skills which will help you get a full-time 
job when you graduate from high school or which will get you 
a part-time job to help pay college expenses.* 

How many points do I get for completing coufses at The 
Humphrey Center? •, ■ 

You get 7 1/2 credits or points for each semester. In one 
year, you receive 15 credits or points. 



-138- 



9. Will I be able to learn skills at my own speed? 

Yes. You will learn and work at a speed which is 
comfortable for you. If you learn quickly, you will advance 
rapidly. If you have any difficulty, we will help you to be 
successful. „ 

10. I do not speak English very well. Can I get help? 

Yes. Bilingual teachers and bilingual aides at The Center 
are very willing to help you. 

11. Can I get extra help in math and reading if I need it? 

Absolutely. We have specialists in math and reading to 
assist you. 

• 

12. I am a college-bound student. Are Humphrey Center programs 
for me? 

• - • . 

Certainly. Just schedule your required academic passes* 
during the four periods you are at your home high school. 

13. Cart' I get help in finding a job when I graduate? 

Yes. The Humphrey Center has a job-placement staff. These 
people will help you to get the best job possible according 
to the skills you have mastered. Counselors at th # e Center 
will also help you apply for a technical school, a 'trade 
school, or the college of your choice. 

14. Can I practice the job skills I have learned before I leave 
the Center? 

Yes. We have work experience programs for all- students who 
have completed their skills training. We arrange work 
experiences while you take regular academic classes at your 
home High school. • 

15. I already have a part-time job in the afternoons*. Will I 
still be able to work and go to The Humphrey Ce«nter? 

• . 
Yes. Discuss your job with our job placement counselor. 
Depending on the skills you are gaining both on the job and 
in your Humphrey Center program, you will receive early 
dismissal, provided your job relates to your Humphrey Center 
training. 

16. I want to participate in after-school sports. • Will that be 
a problem? • 

Not at all. Give the list of scheduled games to your 
instructor. If you are listed on the roster, you will 
receive permission to attend after-school games. 



-139- 



Student Assignments: TRANSFERS 

The Student Assignment Procedures identify five categories of transfers 
for students: 

a. change of address 

b. programmatic 

c. desegregative 

d. sibling, and 

e. medical 

Each category requires specific procedures and principals/headmasters 
must explain the policies and procedures required for each type of transfer. 

The parent/guardian of every student with an assignment within the 
Boston Public Schools is entitled to request transfer to another school. 
In addition, the parent/guardian of an eligible student may request 
transfer to a program that requires admission through authorized transfer 
only: 

1. the parent of a student assigned to half-day kindergarten 
may request transfer to the geocoded Extended Day Program, 
to another Extended Day Program within the district, or 

to an Extended Day Program in District IX, or any other 
kindergarten within the district of residence 

2. the parent of a student assigned to an Extended Day Program 
may request transfer to the geocoded half -day kindergarten 
or any other kindergarten within the district of residence 
or within District IX 

3. the parent of a student assigned to a bilingual program 
may request transfer to another bilingual program for 
the same grade level within the district or within 
District IX (bilingual advanced work class/academically 
talented section excepted) 

4. the parent of a student assigned to an advanced work 
class/academically talented section may request transfer 
to an advanced work class/academically talented section 
in District IX (in District V, a parent of a student 
assigned to one advanced work class may request transfer 
to the other advanced class) 



-H»0- 



a parent of a student or a student eighteen years or older 
may request transfer into, within, or out of special education 

a parent or a student eighteen years or older assigned to 
grade 9, 10, or 11 may request transfer into, within, or out 
of most vocational education programs, if the requested program 
is offered for the student's grade. 



A. Transfers for Change of Address 

After the first month of the school year, a written parental request 
must be submitted to transfer to another community district school 
if a change of address is geocoded to another community district 
school or to remain until the end of the school year at the 
community district school of assignment at the date of the change 
of address. 



B. Transfers for Programmatic Reasons 

Requests for programmatic transfers may be made at any time of the 
school year but those requests may be processed only twice a year: 
1) after July 15 for all requests that have accumulated until 
that date and 2) after December 15 for all requests that have 
accumulated until that date. 

Programmatic transfers with the general exception of transfers within 
bilingual education and special education are subject to: 

1) seat availability by race, and 

2) lottery of requests if more requests are made than seats 
by race are available. 

A student who is in a Cooperative Vocational Education Program 
or in the Hubert Humphrey Occupational Resource Center or in the 
AW/AT Program or in an Examination School may request a transfer 
out of such a program and action on the request may be made at 
any time. This rule does not apply to transfers into such 
programs. Moreover, such a transfer may be effected only if the 
administrator of the program/school can attest to good-faith 
efforts made to support and encourage the student in the program/ 
school . 



C. Transfers for Desegreqative Reasons 

Processing within the Department of Implementation: 



-141- 



1) approval if transfer would result 1n the improvement of the 
racial composition of both the sending and receiving schools, 
i.e., movement toward the ideal percentages for both schools; 

2) rejection if any other impact on racial composition of either 
or both schools. 



Transfers for Siblings 

a. such transfers are subject to the restrictions of desegregative 
transfers; 

b. sibling transfers require the siblings to be eligible for 
identifical programs and instruction levels. 



E. Transfers for Medical Reasons 
Medical transfers: 

1) may be obtained only for an incapacity of a student caused by 
or exacerbated by an assignment to a school ; 

2) require the statement of a physician; 

3) require approval by the community district superintendent. 

Medical transfers are granted for varying durations based upon the 
student's incapacity. 

F. Transfers According to The Code of Discipline 

Transfers for disciplinary reasons require the submission on signed, 
dated letterhead by the Community District Superintendent of: 

1) specification that all requirements of the Code of Discipline , 
have been completed; 

2) the name of the recommended receiving school within the 
same district; or 

3) the name of the recommended receiving school arid the agree- 
ment of the Community District Superintendent of the 
recommended receiving school if the recommended receiving 
school is within the administration of another community 
district. 



-142- 



G. Transfers between Instructional Levels 

Certain changes of grades constitute transfers between instructional 
levels. 

Consequently, changes of grades: 

1) within kindergarten 

2) from KII to grade 1 

3) from grade 5 to grade 6 

4) from grade 8 to grade 9 

require the written approval of the community District Superintendent 
of the "present" school. 



REVIEW OF 1983-84 TRANSFERS 

The Department of Implementation provided a printout of transfers in and 
out of schools granted between July 1, 1983 and March 23, 1984, by school, 
by grade, by race. This information was analyzed to determine (a) the 
scale of transfers of various types, and (b) whether patterns of abuse 
of transfers seem to exist. 



Number of Transfers Granted July 1, 1983 to March 23, 1984 

Black White Other 



a. 


Change of Address 
transfers into schools 


1,730 


504 


899 


b. 


Programmatic 
transfers into schools 


1,193 


695 


531 


c. 


Desegregative 
transfers into schools 


28 


35 


39 


d. 


Si bl ing 

transfers into schools 


75 


38 


83 


e. 


Medical 

transfers into schools 


18 


28 


11 



-113- 



Black 



White 



Other 



Bilingual 
transfers into schools 

Special Education 
transfers into schools 



80 



383 



29 



246 



290 



164 



In each case essentially the same numbers were reported "transferred out 
of" other schools. 

Although a greater use of "medical" and "desegregative" transfers of white 

students may reflect a greater sophistication about how to get children 

into the desired schools, the scale of the problem - if it is one - is 
minor. 



Areas of Concern 



The data was spot-checked, with special attention to middle and high 
schools, for patterns suggesting potential abuse. No problems were 
uncovered which require further investigation at this time. 

For example, concern was created by the granting of 115 transfers of white 
students into District VIII schools for programmatic and desegregative 
reasons, compared with only 41 in District VII. Does this indicate a 
"flight" to predominantly-white schools? Closer analysis, comparing the 
number of transfers with total white enrollment, reveals that in each 
case transfers represent 5%. There is not a disproportionate number of 
such transfers into District VIII schools. 

Another potential problem is the use of "behavioral" transfers, predominantly 
of Black students. While no schools reported such transfers out , there 
were 18 transfers of Black students into different high schools. We have 
been told, in visiting a number of schools, that it is sometimes desirable 
or necessary to transfer a disruptive student. We looked for a pattern 
of certain schools receiving a disproportionate number of such transfers. 
Such a pattern does not seem to exist. No high school received more than 
three such transfers (Jamaica Plain and Charlestown) ; some schools (Hyde 
Park, Burke, Madison Park) received two ; others (Brighton, Dorchester, 
Boston High, Copley Square, English, Umana) received one . In short, no 
school is clearly a "dumping ground" for difficult students. 

The only possible unfairness is that certain schools did not receive 
any behavioral transfers: the three exam schools (for obvious reasons), 
West Roxbury, South Boston, and East Boston. We are not able to say 
to what extent these schools transfer out their disruptive students 
without accepting such students from other schools. At very least this 
pattern must be taken into account in assessing discipline and security 
issues in high schools. 



_mn_ 



STAFF 



-1H5- 



-146- 



STAFF 



Mandate 

The desegregation of faculty and administrative staff shall be implemented 
according to the standards contained in the orders of July 31, 1974; January 2^, 
1975; the amended Order of August 30, 1975; the Order of February 24, 1976, tie 
Special Order of July 7, 1977; the Further Order of July 5, 1978; the Modification 
of January 27, 1981; the Conditional Order of June 2, 1981; and the Bench Order of 
July 9, 1981. 

PROCESS 



The following documents from the School Department were analyzed: 

Report to the United States District Court on Administrators of January 15, 1S84; 
Report on the number of White, Black, and Other Minority Permanent and Acting 
Administrators of March 19, 1984; Status Report - Affirmative Action 
(Memorandum of Superintendent Spillane to the School Committee, March 9, 
1984); two memorandams from Dr. Spillane to the School Committee on Acting . 
Positions, one dated March 27, 1984; one dated April 23rd 1984, and adopted by 
the School Committee; and several additional letters and memoranda, all inclafed 
in volume n of this report. Monitors also interviewed appropriate central office 
personnel. 

OBJECTIVE 

To determine whether the 20% Black requirement for teaching and administrative 
positions continues to be met. 



-147- 



FINDINGS 

PERCENTAGE OF BLACK TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS 





REPORT #1 
(6/83) 


REPORT #2 
(2/84) 


CURRENT 
FINDINGS 


TEACHERS 


20.46 


20.30 


20.85 


CATEGORY I 
ADMINISTRATORS 


21.14 


21.14 


22.76 


CATEGORY II 
ADMINISTRATORS 


21.76 


NOT 
MONITORED 


24.44 



Source ; Boston Public Schools (Reports to the United States District 
Court on the Number of White, Black, and Other Minority Teachers and 
Administrators, March 19, 1984). 

QUESTION: Are acting administrative appointments being used to circumvent the 
requirement for 2096 black administrators (both categories)? 

FINDINGS 

Problems with acting appointments will be discussed below, but it is clear from 
the statistics already reported that appointments to an "acting" rather than 
"permanent" status are not being used to evade the 20% requirement. 

OBJECTIVE 

2. To determine whether the required procedure for administrative ratings has 
been followed in all cases. 

QUESTION: How many ratings have been conducted during this monitoring period? 

PREVIOUS FINDINGS: 

Report #1: (not monitored) 

Report #2: Seven, two completed ratings 



-148- 



FINDINGS 

Of the seven ratings being conducted in the last reporting period, two more were 
completed. Since that time, four more have been scheduled, but none completed. For all 
practical purposes, the promotional rating system described in the court's orders is not 
being used by the Boston Public Schools. Almost all administrative appointments are on 
an acting basis; there are now approximately 350 acting administrators in Boston, out of 
a total administrative staff of 710. 

OBJECTIVE 

3. To assess the affirmative action efforts of the School Department to reach the 
goal of 25% Black teachers and administrators. 

STATUS 

As reported previously, the School Department is filling vacancies from the recall list, as 
specificially allowed by the court. Nonetheless, as reported above, the percentage of 
Black teachers and administrators is slowly increasing. 

OBJECTIVE 

4. To assess the best efforts of the School Department to increase the percentage of 
other minority teachers and administrators. 

QUESTION: Have the percentages of other minority teachers and administrators 
increased? 

PREVIOUS FINDINGS 

Report #1 Teachers: 8.25% other minority 

Category I: 1.63% other minority 
Category II: 4.01% other minority 

Report #2 Teachers: 8.54% other minority 

Category I: 2.44% other minority 
Category II: (not monitored) 

FINDINGS 

The percentage of other minority teachers on March 15, 1984, was 8.42%, a slight 
increase over a year ago, but a slight decrease since the last monitoring period. The 
percentage of other minority administrators has increased significantly, however, to 
3.25% in Category I and 5.72% in Category II. 



-149- 

— " ■ ■ 



QUESTION: What affirmative action and recruitment activities have taken place? 

FINDINGS 

Volume n contains a copy of a report of the recruitment specialist recently hired by 
Boston's Department of Personnel and Labor Relations. While there are as yet bo 
substantial results of these recruitment efforts, they appear to the monitors to be 
positive and appropriate steps towards an effective minority recruitment program. 

SPECIAL NOTE 

On May 2nd, 1984, Counsel for the School Committee informed the Department of 
Education that the School Committee had approved a request for modification of the 
orders requiring a promotional rating system. Such a modification had been 
recommended in the Second Monitoring Report. The specific terms of any motfification 
will have to be determined through the court -established procedure, but the request for 
such a modification is a very positive step. At present, the School Departments refusal 
to use the promotional rating procedure, and to make acting appointments instead, has in 
effect excluded parents and teachers from the process by which administrators in Boston 
are chosen. 



-150- 




Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 



April 11, 1984 

Mr. Manuel Monteiro 

Acting Deputy Superintendent 

Administration and Finance 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. Monteiro: 

Thank you for hosting and arranging the meeting last week (April 5, 1984) 
between your key staff members and me regarding staff and administrative 
monitoring under the court orders. I have been requested by Jim Case to 
ask you to put in writing your responses to our last monitoring report - 
the Staff section (Vol. I, February 1, 1984, pp. 19-25, Objectives 1 through 
5). 

In addition, we would like information on the new recruiter's accomplishments 
to date, as well as his plans for the spring. We recognize that this posi- 
tion has only recently been filled, but nonetheless will need this material 
for inclusion into our next monitoring report. 

As I mentioned in our meeting, I need any and all material from your office 
by Friday, April 20, 1984 . Besides these two requests for information con- 
tained in this letter, I am also expecting the following: 1) a list of 
positions which have been rated and screened from November 1983 through 
April 1984 (from Vic Mclnnis); 2) Any new figures on minority hiring (from 
Ida White and John Conley) ; 3) Final and approved proposals on eliminating 
the backlog of acting positions. 

If you would like to discuss any of these matters further, please call me at 
my office (431-7825), or contact Jim Case at 770-7540. 



Sincerely yours, 





Nan D. Stein," Ed.D. 
Civil Rights Specialist 

NDS:lk 

cc: Dr. James Case 

Ida White v 

John Conley 

Dr. Victor Mclnnis 

Dr. James Walsh 



-151- 




MSUQ*'" 



City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston, Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



April 13, 1984 



Ms. Nan Stein 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Ms. Stein: 

This office has not received a request from the Boston School 
Department for parent participation on a screening committee since 
November 1983. The last screening for which a request was received 
was for the position of Project Director for Interagency Collabora- 
tion. 

Moreover, despite the School Committee President Rita Walsh- 
Tomasini's efforts to address the latest proposal for resolving the 
issue of the more than 400 acting positions, the initial meeting 
provided no substantive results to comment on. Therefore, another 
meeting will be scheduled and I am expecting to receive the notifi- 
cation next week. 




fames Stanton 
Executive Director 



-152- 
A multi-cultural parents organization monitoring quality, desegregated education 



1 i\ 



-j 3 i i '.J r 




I ■ - ••-i-^s-. 



TO: Ida White, Manager 

FROM: Carlo Abrams, Recruitment Specialist 

SUBJECT: Progress Report 

DATE: April 18, 1984 



Reviewed recruitment procedure, identified two (2) 
major areas for improvement. 

a) Method for identifying vacancies: 

Recommended change in automated records 
management system. 

b) Method of advertising: 

Recommended change to local newspapers. 



Recruited for vacant positions, a total of thirteen 
(13) vacancies reported to the recruiter by Personnel 
Analyst and Department Heads between February 16, date 
of hire, and April 18, date of report. The breakdown 
is as follows: 



-153- 



Pg. 2 



RACE 


POSITION 


NO 

TO 
BY 


REFERRED 
DEPT. 
RECRUITER 


SELECTED NO. 
BY DEPT. 


NO. 
PENDIN( 


Hispanic 


Bilingual 
Aide 




7 


5 


N/A 


Haitian 


Bilingual 
Aide 




10 


6 


N/A 


Asian 


Bilingual 
Aide 




1 





1 


Cape Verdean 


Bilingual 
Aide 




4 


1 


N/A 


Hispanic 


Attendance 
Clerk 




2 


1 


N/A 


Black 


Management 
Development 
(Consultant 
BPS Operations) 




2 





N/A 


Black 


Curriculum 
Development 
(Social Studies 
Dept. ) 




3 





3 



29 



13 



3. Community Contacts 

Prom February 16 to date, I have contacted sixteen (16) 
organizations requesting their cooperation with the re- 
cruitment program. The list is as follows: 



o 


Boston Chinese YES 





Opportunities Indust- 


o 


Boston University 




rialization Center (OIC) 


o 


Chinese American 


o 


Roxbury A.P.A.C. 




Civic Association 





Roxbury Community College 


o 


Curry College 





Simmons College 


o 


Haitian Multi-Service 


o 


South End Employment 




Center 




Agency 


o 


Harvard University 





U./Mass. Boston 


o 


Leslie College 


o 


Wentworth Institute 





Neighborhood Development 
Employment Agency 


o 


WROR-AM 



-154- 



PS- 



Conventions Attended 



From February 16 to date, I have attended two (2) 
Conventions for recruitment purposes: 

o Harvard University Job Fair 
at Harvard University 

o National Association of Science 
Teachers at Sheraton/Boston 



Recruitment Plans for the Spring 
a) Conventions 



DATES 
April 18-19 



April 23,24, 
26 & 27 



NAME 

State Wide Conference 
for teachers 

Council for 
Exceptional 
Children (CEC) 



LOCATION 



Emmanuel College 



Convention Center 
Washington, D.C. 



April 25 



Howard University 
Job Fair 



Howard University 
Washington, D.C. 



b) Up-dating Contacts 



There are approximately sixty (60) organizations 
listed by the previous recruiter that were used 
for obtaining names of qualified applicants. During 
the course of the next month I intend to re-establish 
contact with the organizations for recruitment purposes 

I also intend to contact Universities in the South 
which have large numbers of qualified Minority students 
Some of the Universities include: 

o Spellman College 

o Hampton Institute 

o Tuskeegee Institute 

o Morehouse College 

o Clark College 



-155- 



pg. 4 



c) Advertising Campaign 



I have composed a list of local newspapers representing each 
neighborhood of the city for purposes of advertising, (see 
attached list) I also made contact with the local papers to 
determine what the cost factor would be and found it would 
cost $272.30 per position to advertise in 15 local newspapers 

In order to expand the campaign, another possibility could be 
to contact Television and Radio Stations and broadcast that 
employment opportunities within the Boston Public Schools are 
being advertised in the local newspapers. If we advertise on 
television and radio under Public Service Announcements (PSA) 
it should be cost free. 






-156- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



V* BOSTO.t I A ft/ 

V-j. :oao. < >a' 

BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

MANUEL P. MONTEIRO 
May 2, 1984 



Ms . Nan Stein 
Civil Rights Specialist 
Department of Education 
27 Cedar Street 
Wellesley, MA 02181 

Re: Response to April 11, 1984 Information Request 

Dear Nan: 

Enclosed you will find the written response you 
requested in your letter of April 11, 1984. This informa- 
tion was provided verbally at our April 5th meeting. 

Since our meeting, the School Committee approved a plan 
to address the backlog of acting positions. (At its 
April 26, 1984 meeting). A copy of that plan is enclosed. 

If you have any questions on any of the information, 
please feel free to contact me. 

Sincerely, 



Manuel P. Monteiro 
Deputy Superintendent 
Finance and Administration 

em 

enclosure 



-157- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL 



May 2, 1984 



MICHAEL J. BETCHER 
General Counsel 

VIARV JO HOLLENCER 
Associate General Counsel 

Robert H. Blumenthal, Esquire 
State Board of Education 
Quincy Center Plaza 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Bob: 

In accordance with Section VI of the December 23, 1982 
Memorandum and Orders of Disengagement, I am presenting to you 
and by copy of this letter, to all other parties, to the 
remaining intervenors, and to the C.P.C., a memorandum entitled 
"Acting Positions" dated April 23, 1984 which contains the 
substance of a modification to the February 24, 1976 
Administrative Staff Desegregation Order. The School Committee 
is proposing this modification to establish a streamlined 
process to eliminate the backlog in making permanent 
appointments to administrative positions, and to prevent a 
recurrence of a similar backlog. The School Committee is 
desirous of insuring a meaningful parental role in any mutually- 
negotiated modifications. 

As contemplated in the Disengagement Order, would you 
please initiate a meeting of the parties to discuss and, if 
necessary, negotiate over the proposed modifications. The 
School Committee will be represented by Mr. Robert Hayden and 
Ms. Barbara Fields and counsel. Other parties may wish to 
involve appropriate staff people as well. 

Very truly yours , 

Michael J. Betcher 
General Counsel 

MJB/ctm 
Enclosure 

cc: Counsel of Record, Citywide Parents Council 

:e=3L=Tsr-==r . s ,sr-\ Massachusetts 021 ..a • 6<- Zft-tz^ 
-158- 



^W i'7'1 'Vi i i « £_ 



... ..' V..' 




May 2, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO 

FROM 

SUBJECT 



Ida White, Manager 

John M. ConleyijL^^^ 

Hiring Since March 15, 1984 Court Reports 



As you are aware, the majority of minority teachers 
granted retroactive provisional teacher contracts were 
counted in the March 15, 1984 Teacher Court Report. In 
addition a permanent black Project Director has been 
appointed to the Department of Student Services and we 
are in the process of hiring an acting black Program 
Director in the Department of Information Systems. 



JMC/lg 



-159- 



Jfur.r 1 ' v. : a ;r re -;; juz pis**/ r>j= daothk, 




r : - .-: Si -Li 



May 2, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO 

PROM 

SUBJECT 



Ida White, Manager 
John M. Conley 



K 



Increase in Percentage of Black and Other 
Minority Administrators and Teachers 



Black % 


Other % 


20.46 
20.85 


8.25 
8.42 



Pursuant to Dr. Nan Stein's letter of Aprill 11, 1984 
to Deputy Superintendent Manuel P. Monteiro, specifically 
her reference to pp 19-25 of Vol. 1, February 1, 1984 
monitoring report, please be advised of the following: 

1) The following comparison of the March 15, 1983 
and March 15, 1984 Teacher Reports: 



March 15, 1983 
March 15, 1984 

+ .39$ +.17* 

It should be noted that, even with several hundred 
permanent white teachers still on recall, we have increased 
32 black and 13 other minority teachers over March, 1983^ 
Additionally the increase in other minority teachers was 
not limited to the area of bilingual education. 

2) The following comparison of the March 15, 1983 
and March 15, 1984 Administrator Reports: 

Category I Black % Other* 

March 15, 1983 21.14 1.63 



-160- 



Category I 
March 15, 1984 

Category II 

March 15, 1983 
March 15, 1984 



Black % 



22.76 




+1.62 
Black 


% 


21.76 

24.44 



Other % 
3-25 



+ 1.62 

Other % 

4.01 
5.72 



+2.68 



+1.71 



The number of black headmasters and principals (Category I) 
have increased by two (2) between March, 1983 and March, 1984. 
The number of other minority headmasters and principals 
(Category I) have also increased by two (2) between March, 
1983 and March, 1984. Additionally the number of black 
Category II administrators have increased by twenty seven (27) 
between March, 1983 and March, 1984 and the number of other 
minority administrators have increased by twelve (12) between 
March, 1983 and March, 1984. 

3) After reviewing teaching certificates/approvals on 
file in this office (a printout was provided to 
the state monitor resulting in their analysis 
showing forty two (42) teachers under review) and 
contacting those individuals without certifications 
approvals on file and contacting the Bureau of 
Teacher Certification it has been determined that 
all but six (6) of those forty-two (42) teachers 
are certified or approved. One (1) of them is 
resigning effective June 30, 1984. A determination 
must be made as to the future status/employment of 
the five (5) remaining. 



IW/lg 



-161- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




■'_ ci.'i. :.'_ HCQI -"5 



May 2, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Sandy Tennant 
FROM:. V. Mclnnis ' ' ,. 

RE: Findings (122) on Page 21 



The status of each of the five promotional ratings which were incom- 
plete as of November 10, 1983*is as follows: 



Position 
Headmaster, English High School 

Program Director for Reading 



Project Director for Interagency 
Collaboration 



Project Director - Department of 
Student Support Services 

Educational Specialist /Horticul- 
tural - Phillis Wheatley School 



Status 

No nomination made pending reor- 
ganization of English High School 

Person has been appointed to this 
position - approval by School 
Committee 

Person has been appointed to this 
position - approval by School 
Committee 

Rating cancelled 
Rating cancelled 



* Report attached 



RT 



-162- 



i r > c o k*> i "j \*j 



v^» ;^ — w 



. - : or. _l';- ■_. -' 




PRQMDTICNAL RATINGS 
Since November, 1983 



.... .^. _. i 



April 20, 1984 



Name of Position 



Status (as of April 20, 1984) 



Coordinators (2) For Bilingual/ 
Multicultural Education Resources 
posted March 19, 1984 



Credentials due April 23, 1984 



Project Director, Title VII 
posted March 19, 1984 



Credentials due April 23, 1984 



Specialist, Title VII 
posted March 26, 1984 



Credentials due April 23, 1984 



Assistant Business Manager, Expenditures 



To be posted approximately on 
April 30, 1984 



-163- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
RECRUITMENT AND EVALUATION UNIT 

VICTOR A. MclNNIS. Ed. D. 
SENIOR EVALUATION COORDINATOR 



JOSEPH F. CAREY 
Evaluation Specialist 



November 10, 1983 



UVAUGHN CHAPMAN 
Recruitment Specialist 



PROMOTIONAL RATINGS 

Since July 1, 1983 
(including those initially posted in June, 1983) 



Name of Position 



Status (as of November 10, 1983) 



Occupational Development Specialist 
HHHORC (posted 6/10/83) 

Placement Specialist Ch. 74 
HHHORC (posted 6/10/83) 

Headmaster, English High School 
(posted 6/15/83) 



Approved by School Committee 



Approved by School Committee 



Finalists' names sent to 
Superintendent for nomination 
of one to School Committee 



Program Director for Reading 



Project Director for Interagency 
Collaboration 



Candidates being interviewed by 
central screening committee 

Applications due 11/21/83 
Credentials due 11/30/83 



Project Director - Department of 
Student Support Services 

Educational Specialist/Horticultural 
- Phillis Wheatley School 



To be posted approximately 
on 11/14/83 

To be posted approximately 
on 11/15/83 




-164- 

26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 021C8 • 726-6389 AfiEA 6i 7 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




30STC\ PUBLIC SCHCC-S 



APR 2 4 1984 



April 23, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: President and Members, Boston Sen 
FROM: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
SUBJECT: Acting Positions 




'fitt-^ 



At its April 13 meeting, the Subcommittee on Personnel considered 
the recommendations on "acting positions" which I had forwarded • 
to the School Committee. The subcommittee decided to refer the 
issue of "acting positions" to the School Committee as a whole 
in Executive Session. They further requested that we provided 
a brief updated svnopsis of the recommendations included in the 
March 27 memorandum on "acting positions." 

The purpose of the memorandum is to provide that synopsis in three 
parts : 

-- Need for an expedited orocedure to reduce the backlog 

— The expedited procedures 

— A modified process for the future 

I. Need for Expedited Procedures to Reduce the 3ackloc: 

We presently have approximately 350 acting positions. They 
roughly break out as follows: 

— 200 school-based positions most of whom have beer, 
appointed within the past year . 

10 Acting Headmasters/Principals 

— 26 Acting Assistant Headmasters (High School) 

12 Acting Assistant Principals (Middle School and 
Elementary Schools) 

— 140 Department Heads, Development officers, Registrars 

(High School) 



-165- 



Boston School Committee -2- April 23, 1983 



12 Miscellaneous (Guidance Counselors, Job 
Supervisors, HHORC positions) 

— 80-90 Positions - Central Administration 

— 50-60 Positions - Bilingual/Special Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

— 10 Teachers on Assignment 

3 Community Superintendents 

If we were to try to rate all or most of 350 positions 
according to present court-ordered procedures or even a 
modification of present procedures, we would be unable to 
reduce a significant amount of the backlog. 

II. Recommended Expedited Procedures 

A. Exemption of Non-Academic Positions 

These positions do not directly impact academically on 
the educational process. They are technical, management 
positions. Positions in this category are: (a) all 
positions under the Deputy Superintendent/Finance and 
Administration; (b) Facilities Management, Food Services, 
and School Safety under the Deputy Superintendent/ 
School Operations; (c) all positions in the Department 
of Implementation; and (d) Business Agent and Specialist/ 
Occupational Grants Manager - HHORC. For the long term we 
would recommend that these positions not be included in the 
formal rating and screening procedure. For the interim 
exemption procedure we would recommend utilization of the 
following steps: 

. Where there has previously been a posting and selection 
process the appropriate Deputy Superintendent/Senior 
Officer, upon recommendation of the responsible center 
manager, will review past performance and decide upon 
making recommendations for permanent status to the 
Superintendent. The Superintendent would then decide 
making recommendations for approval by the School Committee. 

. Where there has not been a previous screening and selection 
process, the positions would be advertised and a posting 
and selection process would occur prior to the review and 
recommendations of the responsibility center manager and 
Deputy Superintendent/Senior Officers. 

. Affirmative action guidelines will be followed to ensure 
racial/gender representation. 



-166- 



Boston School Committee -3- April 23, 1984 



B. Expedited Process for School-Based Positions 

Positions will be posted systemwide. The Headmaster and 
two or three racially representative SPC members will 
review incumbents to determine whether a recommendation 
should be made to the Superintendent for permanent 
appointment. Any incumbent who does not receive the 
approval of the Headmaster or Principal and parents will 
not be nominated. Other applicants will be considered 
for such vacancies and forwarded to the Deputy Superin- 
tendents and key Senior Staff and for recommendation to 
the Superintendent and approval by the School Committee. 
Appointments within each category will be reviewed 
carefully and required to comply with affirmative action 
guidelines. 

If we were to be able to address the above positions by 
exemption or an expedited process, we would be able to 
reduce the "acting positions" backlog from 350 to approxi- 
mately 60-90 positions. the remaining 60-90 positions are 
made up mostly of the 10 Acting Headmasters/Principals and 
the 50-60 Bilingual/Special Education positions. It is my 
sense that these positions are of such a sensitive and 
important nature that they do not lend themselves to exemption 
or expedited process. I would therefore recommend that we 
begin immediately to post and rate these positions by the 
current process. 

III. A Modified Process for the Future 

The expedited procedures are designed to reduce the backlog. 
We also need to agree upon a procedure for the future 
which includes some of the best features of the current 
court-ordered process, while streamlining the amount of 
time and the amount of bureaucratic layers involved 
in that process. Attached, from my March report, is 
a proposed modification of the current process. 

I look forward to discussing these recommendations and the 
succeeding steps with the School Committee on April 24. 



Attachment 

cc: Robert S. Peterkin 
Michael Betcher 
Barbara Fields 



-167- 



ATTACHMENT 



-168- 



DRAFT 



PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS TO THE PROMOTIONAL RATING PROCESS 



Applicability 

Academic administrative positions which provide or impact heavily 
on direct services to students will be covered by the" Promotional 
Rating Process. Specifically, these positions are those listed 
below and any comparable positions. 

School Based 

Headmaster/Principal 

Assistant Headmaster/Assistant Principal 

Guidance Counselors 

Cluster Administrators (Humphrey Center) 

Special Schools/Programs (Special/Alternative Education) 

Program Director 
Assistant Program Director 
Clinical Coordinator 
Program Advisor 
Coordinator 
Project Director 

District Office 

Community Superintendent 
Pupil Adjustment Counselors 
School Psychologists 

Centra! 



Positions within the Department cf Instructional Services 
Bilingual Department 
Student Support Services 

and the 
Senior Officer for Equal Opportunity 

Positions previously covered by the Promotional Rating Process 
but now exempted will continue to be filled on a desegregated 
basis. The Superintendent shall have the authority to rake 
recommendations granting permanency for positions so exer.pted. 

Promotional Ratine Procedures 

- 

A. All positions to be promotionally rated shall be posted 
in ail schools and departments by way of Personnel 
Circular. Extra efforts, such as recruitment, newspaper 
advertisement, etc., shall be undertaken to ensure a poc. 

of qualified black and other minority candidates. 



-169- 



-2- 



B. The Department of Personnel Management shall be the 
recipient of all applications. 

C. The Department of Personnel Management shall determine 
eligibility of all candidates. Adverse determinations 
of eligibility may be appealed in writing to the Manager 
of Personnel by an applicant within two (2) days of such 
notification. The appeal must be reviewed and decided 
within five (5) days after receipt of the appeal. 

D; The names and applications of all eligible candidates 

will be forwarded to the appropriate screening committee. 
If the screening committee is dissatisfied with the 
minority applicant pool, additional recruitment efforts 
will be made before the process continues. 

E. The members of the screening committee shall interview 
candidates, select finalists, and submit a ranked list 
in order of preference to the appropriate Deputy Superin- 
tendent or Senior Officer for comments on any particular 
candidates . 

F. The final list, inclusive of the comments, will be sub- 
mitted to the Superintendent for consideration for 
nomination to the School Committee. 

G. The Superintendent will notify the screening committee 
of the decision in writing within four (4) weeks. The 
Superintendent maintains the ootion to select a candidate 
frc 

Interview 

Members of the screening committee shall evaluate the candidate ' 5 
knowledge m the ;ob area, ability to express himself or herself. 
interpersonal skills, commitment, interest in the position, ar.d 
managerial or supervisory skills. 

Individual members of the screening committee shall use scorinc 
sheets to assist them in ran* ordering candidates. 

The ranked list of finalists must include at least four 4} 
candidates, one of whom must be black and cne an other minority 
(uniess there are no applicants from the racial rrou?:. 

Screening Committees 

There will be a screening committee for school based and district 
office administrative positions and one for central office positions 
They differ in that students will play a greater role in the 
selection process for the school based positions. The Councils 
of Senior Officers and Community Superintendents have been eliminate': 
and their involvement in the process will be in an advisory capacity 
to the Superintendent. 

-170- 



-3- 



Screening Conmittee for School Based Positions 
Membership on this committee shall include: 

1 Headmaster/Principal (Chairperson) 

3 Additional School Department employees selected by 
the Community Superintendent whose racial designation 
and knowledge of the position would enhance the com- 
position of the screening committee. 

3 Parents (1 black, 1 white, 1 other minority) 

2 Students (1 black, 1 white or from any racial ethnic 
group entitled to full membership on the Racial Ethnic 
Student Council) . 

Screening Committee for Central ar.d District Offices Adninistraj 
Positions 

Membership on this committee shall include: 

The Responsibility Center Manager ) for the position being 
screened) (Chairperson) 

3 Parents (I black, 1 white, 1 ether minority 

2 Additional School Department employees whose racial 
designation and knowledge of the position would enhance 
the composition of the screening committee 

1 N'on-School Department person with expertise in the area 
selected by the Superintendent m consultation with the 
chairperson. 



-171- 



'^ { THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY O^BOSTON / 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

;p=C£ ;s Trig S i -?E?i\'"s\rE\T 

=C3E" a 5PiilA\E 



March 27, 1984 




MEMORANDUM 

TO: President and Members, Boston Schoo 

FROM: Robert R. Spillane, Super inte 

SUBJECT: Acting Positions 

On February 1, 1984, I submitted a preliminary outline approach to 
the reduction of acting positions. Since that time, I have had 
Senior Staff fleshing out that recommendation and developing more 
detailed approaches. 

Attached for your review and consideration please find: 

1. Approaches to Reducing the Backlog of Acting Positions 
(Approximately 350) 

2. A Modified Process for the Future 

The approaches suggested for reducing the backlog of acting positions 
would allow us to reduce the number from approximately 350 anting 
positions to approximately 50 acting positions between now and the 
end of the school year. Attachment A includes the people in central, 
district, and school-based positions who are currently "acting." At- 
tachment B contains details of procedures and positions recommended for 
use in clearing up the backlog. The approaches include exemption of 
certain non-academic central administrative positions, an expedited 
process for school-based positions (and certain positions in curriculum 
and instruction) , and court waiver of certain limited administrative 
positions. 

Attachment C includes a modified promotional rating process which is 
proposed to cover present and future academic positions. We recommend 
that this process be substituted for the present process once the back- 
log of academic positions is cleared up. This recommendation is more 
effective than the court process in that it eliminates the middle 
tiers in central administration from the process. 

I look forward to discussing these approaches with you, as well as recom- 
mendations which I have for developing a strong pool of applicants for 
administrative positions. If we are able to come to consensus, I would 
recommend that staff be directed to discuss these approaches with the 
CPC and plaintiffs prior to submission to the court. 

mc 
Attachments 



xp* 



305 : 



S5ACmuSE t "S CZ'uS • iz-62'X AP = -i 61 : 



-172- 



ATTACHMENT A 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 



-173- 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 
ACTING APPOINTMENTS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



RACE 



Senior Program Director Albert McHill w 

Staff Assistant Elaine Ethridge B 

OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT/FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

*fc Project Director William Manning w 

Senior Program Director Melanie Barron w 

OFFICE OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER 

A-e Jl. Dujini - Jj Man agar Ohailus> Aluui • ■ M— 

Asst. Business Manager John McDonough W 

Coordinator Margaret R. McNamee w 

Coordinator Ronan Fitzpatrick K 

Coordinator Lynette Jones-Carradine B 

DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT 

'Manager of Info. Systems Albert Lau AA 

Project Leader Lynn Hackett W 

Project Leader Richard Petitti w 

Project Leader Christopher Murray W 

Unit Leader Joseph McLaughlin W 

Unit Leader Ronald Giberti K 

Analyst Eileen Ahearn w 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

jk*ir Assistant Manager Manuel P. Monteiro B 

Unit Leader-School Services John M. Conley w 

Junior Analyst-School Services Mirna Vega H 

Analyst - School Services Yvonne Iturrino H 

Junior Analyst-School Services Claire E. Sullivan W 

Junioi An a l ' j'e e Record Myeji t . Aww bywetf w 

Unit Leader-Recruitment t Eval. Victor Mclnnis W 

Sr. Coordinator -Cont.Adm. Raymond Shaw w 

Sfc. Caetdiwa>ci guiiL.AUur. lU wey Dii.kn.juii " B 

Unit Leader-Record Mgemt. Vincent Lee AA 

Sr. Coordinator-Recruitment & Ev. Charlotte Harris W 

Sr. Analyst -Teacher Placement Alvin Shiggs B 

* Transferred Co School Operations 
** Presently assigned Acting Deputy for Finance and Administration 



-174- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 

- 2 - RACE 

OFFICE OF BUDGET MANAGEMENT 

Program Analyst Ronald Chavious B 

Program Analyst Thomas Gorham W 

Sr. Ext. Funds-Coordinator Martin Hunt W 

Ext. Funds Coordinator Robert Collins W 

Sr. Coordinator Catherine Blount B 

Analyst Donald Richard W 

Jr. Specialist John Mann B 

OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT/SCHOOL OPERATIONS 

Exec. Ad m . Aosia fcant Ronald gprartfcrn g B- 

Pro j . Director -Citywide Stud. Ldr. Sidney Smith W 

Adm. Asst. Lyle Kirtman w 

Sr. Program Director Claryce Evans B 

Sr. Coordinator Richard Allen W 

Coordinator Marjorie Powell B 



FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 

Spv. of Physical Plt.Saf. Edmund Strother B 

Asst. Mgr. Field Operations Thomas Goodwin W 

Asst. Mgr. Field Operations William White B 

Chief Structural Egr. Henry Scagnoli W 

Assistant Manager Robert Roy W 

Senior Engineer Elmo R. Boari W 

Specialist Anna Jordan W 

Proj .Director -Communication Andrew F. Puleo W 



DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SERVICES 

None 

SCHOOL SAFETY SERVICES 

Safety Chief John Chistolini W 

Sr. Safety Coordinator John Sisco B 

Adm. Assistant Daniel O'Leary W 

Sr. Safety Coordinator Valerie Shelley B 

OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT/CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

p r «jz>/-«- nir^fA, TiH. 'ITT «JT|ill lWli mj,l[ ftft — 

Specialist-Title VII Betsy Tregar W 

Sr. Specialist/Cur r. Writer Beverly Zimmerman W 



-175- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 3 - 



RACE 



Associate Director 
Asst. Director 
Asst. Director 
Asst. Director 
Asst. Director 
Asst. Director 



DEPARTMENT OF CHAPTER I PROGRAMS 

David Reardon 
Michael Fiorillo 
Yvonne Husbands 
Robert Gallo 
John LoConte 
Audrey Coleman 



W 
W 
B 
W 
W~ 
B 



Manager 

Senior Coordinator 

Coordinator 

Coordinator 



INSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

William Lee Dandridge 
Judy Burnette 
Brenda Jones 
Michael Scott 



B 
B 
B 
B 



OFFICE OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 



Sr. Curriculum Advisor 
•Prog. Director-Gifted & Talented 
Prog. Director -Elem. Reading/ 

Language Arts 
Program Director-Music 
Program Director-Media 
Program Director-Media 
Senior Advisor-Arts 
Coordinator -Swimming 



Mary G. O'Neill 
Joanne McManus 

Pamela Mason 
Henry Guarino 
Polly Kaufman 
Barbara Elam 
Donald Brown 
Harold Miroff 



W 

w 

B 
W 
W 
B 
W 
W 



Coordinator 
Coordinator 
Coordinator 
Coordinator 
Junior Specialist 
Lau Coordinator 
Lau Specialist 



BILINGUAL 

Bak Fun Wong 
Mildred Ruiz 
Judith Gregory 
Peter Plattes 
Betty Rivera 
Ildeberto Pereira 
Linda Friedman 



AA 

H 
B 
W 
H 

B 

W 



Manager 

Systems Specialist 

Evaluation Specialist 



TESTING AND EVALUATION UNIT 

Thomas Deveney 
Virginia Cahill 
Mary Ellen Donahue 



W 
W 
W 



Director 

Coordinating Supervisor 



ADULT EDUCATION AND RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Gillis, Jr. 



Frederick J. 
James Hughes 



W 
W 



-176- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 4 - 



RACE 



OFFICE OF SENIOR OFFICER - STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



Staff Assistant 
Special Education 
Special Education 
Projects Director 
Manager^ 

Prog. Advisor -Low 
Prog. Advisor -Low 
Prog. Advisor -Low 
Prog. Advisor -Low 



Monitor 
Monitor 



Incidence 
Incidence 
Incidence 
Incidence 



Mary Condon 
Eleanor Kearse 
Nancy Mehlem 
William Hardin 
Thomas Hehir 
Jennifer (jones) Clark 
Mary Daniels 
Mary Nash 
Rita Rinella 



W 
B 
W 

B 
W 
B 
W 

w 
w 



Program Advisor 



MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAM 



Kathleen McArdle 



W 



EARLY CHILDHOOD/ELEMENTARY STUDENT SUPPORT PROGRAM 



Senior Advisor 

Program Advisor 

Program Advisor-Early Childhood 



Patricia Walsh 
Alys Wye he 
Cynthia Plumb 



SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENT SUPP. SERVICES 



Senior Advisor 
Program Advisor 



Assistant Manager 
Program Advisor 
Program Advisor-Over/Under 
Program Advisor -Over /Under 
Program Advisor-Compliance 
Program Advisor -Compliance 
Program Advisor-Compliance 



Cynthia Williams 
Vacancy 

COMPLIANCE/PLACEMENT 

Patricia Crowley 
Frances Martuscello 

Rep. Rhonda Goodale 

Rep. Idola Williams 
Richard Kalp 
Elaine Lombardozzi 
Muriel Jackson-Leonard 



W 
B 
B 



W 
W 
W 

B 
W 

w 

B 



Program Advisor -Cont. Ed. Serv. 
Program Advisor -Cont. Ed. Serv. 



CONTRACTED SERVICES 

Janice (Murphy) Hannah 
Joseph Tondorf 



W 

w 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL AND, EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 
Reports to Director - Humphrey ORC 



Transitional Associate 
Transitional Assistant 
Transitional Associate 
Coord. -Urban Retrofit 



James Mahoney 
Frank Laquidara 
Aurelia Kelley 
Raymond Tomasini 



w 
w 
w 
w 



-177- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 5 - 
OFFICE OF SENIOR OFFICER-IMPLEMENTATION RACE 

Staff Assistant Maura McGroarty K 

EXTERNAL LIAISON UNIT 

Director Lydia B. Francis-Joyner B 

Jr. Specialist Kathleen Boly Sparks W 

Monitoring Inf. Specialist Lydia River a-Abrahms 

Information Officer Shirley Gooding B 

Information Officer Vacancy 

STUDENT SERVICES UNIT 

Operations Assign. Coord. Ann Richards W 

A.sign. Transfer Specialist Thomas O'Brien W 

Assign. Transfer Specialist Shirley Burke B 

Assign. Transfer Specialist Vacancy (2) 

TRANSPORTATION UNIT 

Director Arthur Gilbert W 

Asst. Director Robert Rizzo W 

Transp. Officer Richard Jacobs W 

Transp. Officer Toni Jackson B 

Transp. Officer Joyce Berman B 

Transp. Officer Martha Clemence W 

Transp. Officer Joyce McCormick W 

RECORDS MANAGEMENT UNIT 

Director Hagop Yessayan w 

Systems Analyst Arleen Kelley w 

Programmer/Analyst Vacancy 

Data Control Specialist Vacancy 

OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 
Sr. Administrative Assistant Vacancy 

OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL 
None 

COMMUNITY DISTRICT ONE 

Community Superintendent Joseph Bage W 

Administrative Assistant Maurice Downey W 

Guidance Counselor Maria Thuy Nguyen AA 



-178- 



Administrative Assistant 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 6 - 
COMMUNITY DISTRICT TWO 
John J. Coakley 



Community Superintendent 
Administrative Assistant 



COMMUNITY DISTRICT THREE 

Joseph Ippolito 
Joseph T. Sullivan 



W 



COMMUNITY DISTRICT FOUR 
Community Superintendent Joyce Grant 



Adm. Assistant - Funded 636 



COMMUNITY DISTRICT FIVE 



Margaret Willis 



COMMUNITY DISTRICT SIX THRU EIGHT 
None 



Administrative Assistant 
Administrative Assistant 
Coordinator 



COMMUNITY DISTRICT NINE 

Kathleen F. Harmon 
James D. Garvin 
Bennie Walker 



W 
B 
B 



District I 
District II 
District VI 
District IX 
District IX 



PUPIL ADJUSTMENT COUNSELORS 

James McNiff 
Ellen S. Mazur 
Rebecca Ruiz-Cantres 
Hermon Broady 
Diego Ballarati 



W 

w 

H 
B 
H 



SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES 



Districts VI (. IX (Bil.Span.) LOA 
Districts II fc VIII (Bil.Span.) LOA 
Districts V t VII (Bil.Span.) LOA 



Teresa Nazario 
Rosemarie Paunero 
Ivonne Romero 



H 
H 
H 



-179- 



SCHOOL - JAMAICA PLAIN 



SCHOOL - WEST ROXBURY 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 



- 7 - 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL - BRIGHTON 



RACE 



Asst. Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Registrar 

Guidance Counselor 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Oept. Head-Bilingual 
Dept. Head-Business 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Dept. Head-Technology 
Dept. Head-Special Education 
Development Officer 



Vincent Donovan 
Virginia DiFranza 
John W. Henry 
Gloria Pope 
Dominic Bruno 
James O'Connor 
Stephen Pacifico 
Joyce Campbell 
William Quinn 
John X. Doherty 
Ruth Connaughton 
Carol Scott 



w 

w 
w 

B 
W 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

B 



Assistant Headmaster 
Registrar 

Development Officer 
Dept . Head-Technology 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Dept. Head- Special Education 



Marilyn Corsini 
Kathleen Bartlett 
Karen Williams 
Gerald Howland 
Virginia Kemp 
Aileen Rice 
Placida Galdi 
Paul Howe 



W 

w 

B 
W 
B 
W 
W 
W 



Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Guidance Counselor 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Dept. Head-Mathematics 
Dept. Head-Special Education 
Dept. Head-English 
Dept. Head-Business 
Dept. Head-Science 
Dept. Head-Social Studies 
Development Officer 
Registrar 



David Glenn 
Roger Harris 
Mary McLaughlin 
Edmund Sprissler 
Robert J. Russell 
Edward Holland 
Robert Feeney 
Daniel Foley 
Ruth Morgan 
John Golner 
Alfred Lennon 
Alicia Barrasso 



W 

B 

W 

w 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 



-180- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 8 - 



SCHOOL - HYDE PARK 



RACE 



Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Oept. Head-Special Education 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Dept. Head-Business 
Dept. Head-Technology 
Development Officer 
Registrar 



Derrick Sudeall 
Lorraine Hamilton 
Nancy Methelis 
Edna Cason 
Robert McNutt 
Michael Roberts 
Phillip Capernaros 
James Mullan 
John Shea 
Gary Lewis 



B 
W 
W 
B 
W 
B 
W 
W 

w 
w 



SCHOOL - JEREMIAH E. BURKE 



Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Guidance Counselor 
Registrar 

Dept. Head-Humanities 
Dept. Head-Mathematics 
Dept. Head-Special Education 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Development Officer 



Albert Holland 
Rosalyn Browne 
William B. Heath 
Joan Sneed 
Rosa Snyder 
John J. Weeks 
Lloyd Hanna 
Kathleen Flannery 
Mary Haley 
Helen Varasso 
Ann Foley-Tierney 



B 

B 
B 
B 
W 
B 
W 

w 
w 
w 
w 



SCHOOL - DORCHESTER 



Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Senior Coordinator 
Clinical Coordinator 
Registrar 

Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Dept. Head-Special Education 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Math/Tech. 
Dept. Head-Science 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Development Officer 



Michael Anderson 
Anthony Dileso 
Karen Singleton 
David Belcourt 
Joseph Scarbo 
Mariano Communale 
Charles Flaherty 
Joseph Casey 
Joseph LaCtoix 
Christina Capernaros 
Rosemary Sport 
William Fitzgerald 



B 
W 
B 
W 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

B 
W 



-181- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 9 - 



SCHOOL - SOUTH BOSTON 

Assistant Headmaster 

Coordinator Director 

Dept. Head-Bilingual 

Dept. Head-Business 

Dept. Head-Humanities 

Dept. Head-Language Arts 

Dept. Head-Math/Tech. 

Dept. Head-Science 

Dept. Head-Special Education 

Security Coordinator • 



Thomas Pilleri 

Anita Jamieson 

Isabel (Aucella) Mendez 

George Dunn 

James Poor 

Audrey Leung-tat 

Thomas Leydon 

Paul Grueter 

Charles Martindale 

John Giblin 



RACE 

W 
W 
H 
W 
W 
B 
W 
W 

w 
w 



SCHOOL - CHARLESTOWN 



Assistant Headmaster 

Guidance Counselor 

Bilingual Guid. Counselor 

•Registrar 

Development Officer 

Dept. Head-Bilingual 

Dept. Head-Special Education 

Dept. .Head-Language Arts/ 

Humanities 

Dept. Head-Technology 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 



Albert Vasquez 
B eu iu Che a h an 
Kenneth Boatner 
Juana Flores 
John Green 
Ralph Berkowitz 
Wendy Lee 
Leo Raftery 

John Morris 
Willie Williams 
Warren Toland 



H 
W 
B 
H 

w 
w 

AA 
W 

W 
B 
W 



SCHOOL - EAST BOSTON 



Assistant Headmaster 

Registrar 

Adm. Assistant 

Development Officer 

Dept. Head-Career Prep. 

Dept. Head-Language Arts 

Dept. Head-Humanities 

Dept. Head-Business 

Dept. Head-Technology 

Dept. Head-Special Education 



Jane O'Leary 
Raymond Gerrior 
Michael Rubin 
William Kearns 
Max Corbett 
Elaine Halkopoulos 
Anthony Lori 
Anna Fisher 
Paul Natola 
Rocco Jesso 



W 

w 

B 
W 
W 
W 

w 

B 
W 
W 



-182- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 10 - 



SCHOOL - BOSTON BUSINESS 



RACE 



Assistant Headmaster 
Dept. Head-Business 



John McGrann 
Mildred Sanders 



w 

B 



SCHOOL - BOSTON 



Job Supervisor 
Job Supervisor 



James Keenan 
John Jackson 



W 

B 



SCHOOL - BOSTON LATIN ACADEMY 



Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Registrar 

Guidance Counselor 
Dept. Head-Classics 
Dept. Head-English 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Dept. Head-Mathematics 
Dept. Head-Foreign Language 
Dept. Head-Science 



Robert Binswanger 
James Zanor 
Doris Jones 
Richard Bailey 
John F. Splaine 
William Sullivan 
Frederick Spracklin 
Thomas Lavin 
Krishna Rajangam 
Eraldo DeSantis 
Sandra Driggen 



W 

w 

B 

w 

w 
w 
w 

w 

B 
W 

w 



SCHOOL - BOSTON LATIN 



Assistant Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 

Registrar 

Development Officer 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Dept. Head-Mathematics 

Dept. Head-English 

Dept. Head-Classics 

Dept. Head-Physics 

Dept. Head-Chemistry 

Dept. Head-History 

Dept. Head-French 

Dept. Head-Physical Education 

Dept. Head-Music 



Carmen Vara 
Steven Leonard 
Philip Haberstoh 
Jacqueline T-ibbetts 
Zita Cousins 
Joan C. Hawkins 
William Durante 
Maureen White 
Joseph Desmond 
Joseph Connolly 
Joseph Walsh 
Peggy Kemp 
Anthony Diodato 
Paul Costello 
Jerry Boisen 



W 

B 

W 

AI 

B 

B 

W 

W 

w 

w 
w 

B 
W 
W 

w 



-183- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 11 - 



SCHOOL - BOSTON TECHNICAL 



RACE 



Assistant Headmaster 
Assistant Headmaster 
Guidance Counselor 
Registrar 

Development Officer 
Dept. Head-Social Studies 
Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Career Prep. 
Dept. Head-Mathematics 
Dept. Head-Science 



Joseph Staples 
Robert Belle 
Charles Andrews 
James Halligan 
Jane MacDonald 
Peter Wals h 
Sonya Leroy 
James O'Day 
Richard Brown 
Kenneth Cray 



W 
B 
W 
W 

w 
w 

H 

w 

B 
W 



SCHOOL - COPLEY SQUARE 



Headmaster 

Dept. Head-Language Arts 
Dept. Head-Technology 
Dept. Head-Humanities 
Asst. HM-Subj.- Language 



Gloria Ray 
Maureen Tisei 
Paul Foley 
Mildred Fryer 
Yu-Lan Lin 



B 
W 
W 
B 
AA 



SCHOOL - ENGLISH 



Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 

Registrar 

Clinical Coordinator 

Development Officer 

Development Officer 

Project Director 

Dept. Head-Mathematics 

Dept. Head-Bilingual 

Dept. Head-Special Education 

Dept. Head -Science 

Dept. Head-Art 

Dept. Head-Career Prep. 

Dept. Head-Language Arts 

Dept. Head-Social Studies 



James Corscadden 
Susan Burke 
Livaughn Chapman 
William Brown 
Jacqueline Bullock 
Stephanie D. Hamston 
Susan Omsberg 
Larry Myatt 
Richard Murphy 
Gary Daphnis 
Robin Hardy 
Jeremiah Ready 
Betty Bowker 
Antonio Gizzi 
John Yurewicz 
Luis Liggerio 



w 
w 

B 
W 
B 
B 

W 

w 

K 

B 
B 
W 
W 

w 

w 

w 



-184- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 12 - 



SCHOOL - MADISON PARK 



RACE 



Administrative Assistant 

Registrar 

Coordinator 

Clinical Coordinator 

Development Officer 

Dept. Head-Bilingual 

Dept. Head-Special Education 

Dept. Head-Language Arts 

Dept. Head-Mathematics 

Dept. Head-Science 

Dept. Head-Humanities 

Dept. Head-Career Prep. 

Dept. Head-Physical Ed. 

Dept. Head-Perform. Arts 



James Watson 
Ronald Tremblay 
Janet Ferone 
Gwendolyn Holloway 
Jill Byerly 
Joan Taylor 
Jane Sullivan 
Ronald Gwaizda 
Patricia Tremblay 
Eufrazia Hamadeh 
Wilbur Wyatt 
Allen Butters 
James Thornton 
Robert Winfrey 



B 
W 

w 

B 
W 
W 

W 

w 
w 

w 

B 
W 
W 
B 



SCHOOL - UMANA TECHNICAL 



Assistant Headmaster 

Registrar 

Dept. Head-Mathematics 

Department Head-Humanities 

Dept. Head-English 

Dept. Head-Science 

Dept. Head-Special Education 

Guidance Counselor 



Frederick Johnson 
Diane Vraux 
Robert Ohlson 
Dwight Barnett 
Mary Canty 
Frank Santosuosso 
Jacqueline Hill 
Vacancy 



B 
w 

w 

B 
W 
W 
B 



SCHOOL - HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 



Headmaster 

Assistant Headmaster 

Registrar 

Business Agent 

Cluster Adm. -Health 

Program Director/Occ. Inst. Design 

S yfcfLiali3t/0cc« Cg a nto Manager 



Clifford Janey 
Diana Jones 
Glen McKenzie 
Chester Buras 
Deborah Ward 
Joyce Malyn-Smith 
P e Ltii RutfS 



B 
B 
W 
W 
B 
W 

-w- 



-185- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 
- 13 - i 



SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS 



RACE 



Teacher -In-Charge - CARTER School 
Program Director - MCKINLEY School 



Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 
Assistant 



Program 
Program 
Program 
Program 
Program 
Program 



Director 
Director 
Director 
Director 
Director 
Director 



Development Officer - Boston Prep. 
Program Advisor - TILESTON School 



Roger Mazur 

John Brown-Verre 

Garland Brassfield 
Bernadette Wright-Hester 
Jean Laterz 
Ralph Natola 
Neal Elliot 
Bonnie Miller 

Jametta Hunt 

. Elliot Feldman 



w 

w 

B 
B 
W 
W 
W 

w 

w 
w 



Principal - M.E. CURLEY 
Asst. Principal - M.E. CURLEY 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 

Valerie Lowe 
Robert Redd 



Senior Coordinator - S. LEWENBEG Alexander Stankowicz 
Clinical Coordinator - S. LEWENBERG Judy Bongiorno 



Assistant Principal - W. WILSON 

Assistant Principal - P.F. GAVIN 

Principal - C.R. EDWARDS 
Asst. Principal - C.R. EDWARDS 

Principal - MICHELANGELO 



Johnny Vann 

William B. Stevens 

Gregory Thomas 
John Dennehy 

William Abbott 



Assistant Principal - J. P. TIMILTY Helyn C. Hall 

Development Officer - M.L. KING, JR. Michele J. Marrow 
Project Director - M.L. KING, JR. Stephen Driscoll 



B 
B 

w 

w 

B 

B 

B 
W 

W 

B 

B 
W 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



DISTRICT I 

Assistant Principal - T. GARDNER 

DISTRICT II 

Assistant Principal - AGASSIZ 

Assistant Principal - D.A.ELLIS 



Catalina Montes 



Alfredo Nunez 
Nora Toney 



H 



H 
B 



-186- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS 

// 
- 14 - 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



DISTRICT III RACE 

Senior Coordiantor - BEETHOVEN William Henderson W 

Clinical Coordinator - BEETHOVEN Deborah McFarland B 

DISTRICT VII 

Principal - ELIOT Marion J. Fahey W 

Clinical Coordinator - HARVARD-KENT Sara Finn W 

Senior Coordinator - HARVARD-KENT Joanne Tisei W 

DISTRICT VIII 

Principal-M.E. BRADLEY Diana Lam H 

Principal-P.J. KENNEDY Libby Chiu AA 

DISTRICT IX 

Assistant Principal - J. HENNIGAN Robert Holland W 

Assistant Principal - W.M. TROTTER Lynda B. Garden H 



-187- 



ACTING APPOINTMENTS /, 
- 15 - 



PERSONNEL ON ASSIGNMENT - CENTRAL 



RACE 



Rehab. Counselor-Int. & Coll. Funded 

irectoc on Assignment to Personnel 

Teacher-Bilingual - 636 

Librarian 

Program Specialist - Appeals-S.S.S. 

Program Specialist - Appeals S.S.S. 

Office of Implementation 

Program Specialist - Low Incid. Appeals- 

3 • 9 ad • 

Deputy Supt. - Curr. t Inst. 
Audio Visual Department 



Elizabeth Doherty 
Joseph Carey 
Deborah Sercombe 
Jeanette Pollard 
Barbara Hughes 
James A. Galvin 
Robert Murray 

Sheila Burke 
James Buckley 
Nancy Jones 



w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 
w 

w 

w 

B 



-188- 



ATTACHMENT B 



ACTING POSITIONS 



APPROACHES TO REDUCTION OF BACKLOG 



-189- 



ACTING POSITIONS 
APPROACHES TO REDUCTION OF BACKLOG 

1. Exemption of Non-Academic Positions 

These positions do not directly impact academically on the 
educational process. They are technical, management positions. 
The Superintendent, upon the recommendation of the Responsi- 
bility Center Manager and approval of the appropriate Deputy 
Superintendent/Senior Officer, will make recommendations for 
permanent status at his/her discretion. Affirmative action 
guidelines will be followed to ensure racial/gender represen- 
tation. 

Positions in this category are: 

a) All positions under the Deputy Superintendent, Finance/ 
Administration 

b) Facilities Management, Food Services, and School Safety 
under the Deputy Superintendent/School Operations 

c) All positions in the Department of Implementation 

d) Business Agent and Specialist/Occupational Grants Manager - 
HHORC 

2. Expedited Process for School Based Positions (and Some Positions 
in Curriculum and Instruction) 

The Headmaster and parents will review incumbents to determine 
whether a recommendation should be made to the Superintendent 
for permanent appointment. Any incumbent who does not receive 
the approval of the Headmaster and parents will not be nominated 
Said position will be posted and a selection will be made for 
review and consideration by the Deputy Superintendents and key 
Senior Staff and for recommendation to the Superintendent. Any 
school and/or job categories in need of affirmative action 
efforts will be reviewed carefully and required to comply with 
affirmative action guidelines. 

Positions in this category are: 

a) Assistant Headmaster, Assistant Principals 

b) Guidance Counselors 

c) Department Heads 

d) Development Officers 

e) Registrars 

f) Job Supervisors 

g) Community Field Coordinators (HHORC) 

h) Some positions in Curriculum and Instruction 

-190- 



-2- 



3. Court Waiver for Superintendent Selections - Academic 

A one-time only waiver will be requested to exempt the following 
positions from Promotional Ratings. The appointments were made 
on an emergency basis for the good of the system; the Superin- 
tendent is pleased with the performance of the individuals and 
believes nothing would be accomplished by promotionally rating 
them. 

The positions are: 

a) Headmasters - Burke, Latin Academy, Copley 

b) Principals - Curley Middle, Edwards Middle, Michelangelo 

Middle, Patrick J. Kennedy Elementary 



-191- 



ATTACHMENT C 



MODIFICATION OF FEDERAL COURT ORDER 



PROMOTIONAL RATING 



-192- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




CS"0\ PUBL.C SCHOOL; 



March 27, 1984 



TO: 
FROM: 



MEMORANDUM 

President and Members, Boston School 
Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 



SUBJECT: Modification of Federal Court Order on Promotional . Rating 




Enclosed please find an updated draft proposal for modification of 
the Federal Court Order on Promotional Ratings. 

The proposal differs from the present promotional rating process 
in that it: 

1. Reduces the number of screening committees from five to 
two. 

2. Exempts all non-academic administrative positions. 

. 3. Reduces the number of academic administrative positions 
subject to promotional rating to include only those 
which impact on or provide direct services to students. 

4. Decreases the membership on the screening committees to 
a more workable number. 

5. Eliminates the Councils of Senior Officers and Community 
Superintendents Screening Committees to streamline the 
process and avoid duplication of efforts. 

The proposed modification adheres to the intent of the Promotional 
Rating Process as it: 

1. Maintains maximum parental involvement in the process. 

2. Ensures participation of racial/ethnic groups repre- 
sentative of the student body. 

3. Requires posting and, if necessary, advertising and re- 
cruitment in order to solicit a pool of qualified racially 
representative candidates for all positions. 

4. Allows student participation for school-based positions. 

-193- 



Boston School Committee -2- March 27, 1984 



5. Provides the opportunity for community input in the 
central and district ratings. 

Although the non-academic administrative positions have been 
exempted from promotional rating in this proposal, it is still 
the expressed intent of this proposal that all positions will 
be posted. Departments and categories in need of desegregation 
efforts must comply with the provisions of the affirmative action 
plan and recruit and recommended blacks and other minorities 
where they are under-utilized or not represented. 



mc 
Attachment 



-194- 



DRAFT 



PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS TO THE PROMOTIONAL RATING PROCESS 



Applicability 

Academic administrative positions which provide or impact heavily 
on direct services to students will be covered by the Promotional 
Rating Process. Specifically, these positions are those listed 
below and any comparable positions. 

School Based 

Headmaster/Principal 

Assistant Headmaster/Assistant Principal 

Guidance Counselors 

Cluster Administrators (Humphrey Center) 

Special Schools/Programs (Special/Alternative Education) 

Program Director 
Assistant Program Director 
Clinical Coordinator 
Program Advisor 
Coordinator 
Project Director 

District Office 

Community Superintendent 
Pupil Adjustment Counselors 
School Psychologists 

Central Office 

Positions within the Department of Instructional Services 
Bilingual Department 
Student Support Services 

and the 
Senior Officer for Equal Opportunity 

Positions previously covered by the Promotional Rating Process 
but now exempted will continue to be filled on a desegregated 
basis. The Superintendent shall have the authority to make 
recommendations granting permanency for positions so exempted. 

Promotional Rating Procedures 

A. All positions to be promotionally rated shall be posted 
in all schools and departments by way of Personnel 
Circular. Extra efforts, such as recruitment, newspaper 
advertisement, etc., shall be undertaken to ensure a pool 
of qualified black and other minority candidates. 

-195- 



-2- 



B. The Department of Personnel Management shall be the 
recipient of all applications. 

C. The Department of Personnel Management shall determine 
eligibility of all candidates. Adverse determinations 
of eligibility may be appealed in writing to the Manager 
of Personnel by an applicant within two (2) days of such 
notification. The appeal must be reviewed and decided 
within five (5) days after receipt of the appeal. 

D. The names and applications of all eligible candidates 
will be forwarded to the appropriate screening committee. 
If the screening committee is dissatisfied with the 
minority applicant pool, additional recruitment efforts 
will be made before the process continues. 

E. The members of the screening committee shall interview 
candidates, select finalists, and submit a ranked list 
in order of preference to the appropriate Deputy Superin- 
tendent or Senior Officer for comments on any particular 
candidates. 

F. The final list, inclusive of the comments, will be sub- 
mitted to the Superintendent for consideration for 
nomination to the School Committee. 

G. The Superintendent will notify the screening committee 
of the decision in writing within four (4) weeks. The 
Superintendent maintains the option to select a candidate 
from the ranked list or to reject all of the finalists. 

Interview 

Members of the screening committee shall evaluate the candidate's 
knowledge in the job area, ability to express himself or herself, 
interpersonal skills, commitment, interest in the position, and 
managerial or supervisory skills. 

Individual members of the screening committee shall use scoring 
sheets to assist them in rank ordering candidates. 

The ranked list of finalists must include at least four (4) 
candidates, one of whom must be black and one an other minority 
(unless there are no applicants from the racial group) . 

Screening Committees 

There will be a screening committee for school based and district 
office administrative positions and one for central office positions 
They differ in that students will play a greater role in the 
selection process for the school based positions. The Councils 
of Senior Officers and Community Superintendents have been eliminatec 
and their involvement in the process will be in an advisory capacity 
to the Superintendent. 

-196- 



-3- 



Screening Committee for School Based Positions 
Membership on this committee shall include: 

1 Headmaster/Principal (Chairperson) 

3 Additional School Department employees selected by 
the Community Superintendent whose racial designation 
and knowledge of the position would enhance the com- 
position of the screening committee. 

3 Parents (1 black, 1 white, 1 other minority) 

2 Students (1 black, 1 white or from any racial ethnic 
group entitled to full membership on the Racial Ethnic 
Student Council) . 

Screening Committee for Central and District Offices Adminis-trative 
Positions 

Membership on this committee shall include: 

The Responsibility Center Manager ) f or the position being 
screened) (Chairperson) 

3 Parents (1 black, 1 white, 1 other minority 

2 Additional School Department employees whose racial 
designation and knowledge of the position would enhance 
the composition of the screening committee 

1 Non-School Department person with expertise in the. .area 
selected by the Superintendent in consultation with the*;, 
chairperson. 



-197- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

ROBERT R SPILLANE 



February 1, 1984 




MEMORANDUM 

TO: President and Members, Boston Schoo/ f// /? -*^ 

FROM:. Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent'' 

SUBJECT: Acting Postions : Problems and Proposed Solution 

I. The major problems associated with promotional rating 
are: 

A. The extraordinarily large number., (approximately 

350) of acting positions to be promotionally 
rated. 

B. The time consumed in conducting these ratings 
according to the U.S. District Court guidelines 
could take up to two years or more for completion, 
and take the Deputy Superintendents and Senior 
Officers from present functions. -' 

C. Many parents,- teachers, middle level administrators, 
upper level managers, including Senior Officers and 
Community Superintendents, would be involved on a 
continuing basis with screening and interviewing 
candidates. The inordinate amount of time and the 
complexities involved in tying up so many top level 
administrators and the hundreds of screening com- 
mittees would be impractical. 

D. Staff in the Recruitment & Evaluation Unit would 
have to be temporarily augmented to effect this huge 
enterprise . 

E. Even if we used an alternative method, as we have on 
occasion in the past (Recruitment & Evaluation de- 
termines eligibility of only those applicants whose 
resumes pass screening by the Screening Committee) , 
it would still take ud tc a ceriod of two years. 

-198- 



Boston School Committee -2- February 1, 1984 



Also, the alternative procedure, although advan- 
tageous to the Recruitment & Evaluation Unit, puts 
tremendous pressure on screening committees which 
must examine resumes of all applicants, eligible 
or ineligible"" . 

II. A Proposed Solution: 

I recommend that we propose a modification to the court 
orders to permit an expedited screening process whereby 
those personnel in acting positions as of December 31, 
1983, who fulfill the following conditions, could be 
nominated by the Superintendent for permanent appointment 
by the School Committee: 

A. They occupy the position on an acting basis for 
one year or more. 

B. Their most recent annual performance evaluation 
strongly endorses their continuation on the job. 

C. They are recommended for permanent appointment by 
their immediate supervisor and parent representa- 
tives. Such recommendations for school-based 
personnel would be subject to approval of the 
appropriate Community Superintendent and Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations . Recommendations 
for other personnel must be approved by the ap- 
propriate Senior Officer or Deputy Superintendent. 

D. They possess all Boston School Department promo- 
tional rating prerequisite qualifications, including 
appropriate state certification as approved by the 
U.S. District Court. 

III. The court and the parties would be assured that all such 
permanent appointments (whether through the expedited 
screening process or the court rating process) would 
result in the Boston Public Schools having a total 
administrative body reflecting the mandate of the 
Federal Court and the spirit of affirmative action 
with regard to the numbers of black, white, and other 
minority administrators. 



mc 

cc: Deputy Superintendents 
Michael J. Betcher 
John R. Coakley 
Barbara Fields 
Ida White ~ 199 ~ 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 

March 15, 198^ 

Dr. Robert R. Spillane 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Dr. Spillane: 

• The United States District Court in its Order on Faculty Recruiting and Hiring, 
issued on January 28, 1975, required the defendents on or before March 15 of each 
year to file with the Court and all parties a ranking system by which they pro- 
pose to rank all black applicants for teaching positions, together with a report 
on the numbers of black and white permanent and provisional teachers then em- 
ployed at each level. 

In its July 5, 1978 Memorandum and Further Orders on Faculty Recruiting and 
Hiring the United States District Court also ordered that the reports due March 15 
and October 15 shall include tables showing: 

i. The number and percentages of white, black and other minority teachers 
in regular, special and bilingual education for the current year and 
the previous three (3) years; 

ii. The number of black, white and other minority first, second and third 
year provisionals currently employed and provisionals hired for a 
fourth year; 

iii. The number of newly hired provisional teachers for the current year and 

the previous three (3) years subdivided .by subject areas to which assigned; 

iv. The number of newly appointed provisional teachers for current year and 
and the previous three (3) years sub-divided by subject areas to which 
assigned. 

Enclosed herewith for your processing is the information required by the 
Court for March 15, 1981*. 

k trul^yours , 

ite, Manager 

enclosure 
IW/mlh 

-200- . 

26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108* 726-6600 Ext 6600 AREA 617 




TEACHING STAFF - MARCH 15. 198*« 







HIGH 


SCHOOLS 








BLACK 


WHITE 


OTHER 
HTNUHITY 


TOTAL 




REGULAR TEACHERS 


1*5 

28 

1 

17l» 


731 
21 
9 
761 


23 



23 


899 

fc9 

10 

958 




Permanent 
Provisional 
" , Temporary 

Sub-Total 




VOCATIONAL TEACHERS 


28 
8 


36 


92 
3 


95 


7 

6 



13 


127 

17 



ikh 




Permanent 

Provisional 

Temporary 

Sub-Total 




BILINGUAL TEACHERS 












Permanent 


12 


32 


31 


75 




Provisional 


12 


2 


21 


35 




Temporary 

Sub-Total 




2k 



3* 


1 
53 


_1 
111 




SPECIAL EDUCATION 












TEACHERS 












Permanent 


29 


118 


11 


158 




Provisional 


7 


2 


2 


11 


. 


Temporary 

Sub-Total 



36 




120 



13 




169 




GRAND TOTAL 


270 


1010 


102 


1382 





-201- 



TEACHING STAFF - MARCH 15. 198»« 
MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



BLACK 



WHITE 



OTHER 
MINORITY 



TOTAL 



REGULAR TEACHERS 




Permanent 


159 


Provisional 


18 


Temporary 


3 


Sub-Total 


180 


VOCATIONAL TEACHERS 




Permanent 





Provisional 





Temporary 





Sub-Total 





BILINGUAL TEACHERS 




Permanent 


9 


Provisional 


5 


Temporary 





Sub-Total 


Ik 


SPECIAL EDUCATION 




TEACHERS 




Permanent 


k9 


Provisional 


5 


Temporary 





Sub-Total 


5* 



1*98 
11 

1 
-510 








16 
1 
| 

19 



98 

6 

1 

105 



10 

1 


11 








30 

17 



1»7 



5 

6 

1 

12 



667 

30 

h 

701 








55 
23 

2 
80 



152 

17 

2 

171 



GRAND TOTAL 



21*8 



63fc 



70 



952 



-202- 



TEACHING STAFF - KARCH \b. 30?l 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL? 



BLACK 



WHITE 



OTHEP 
K1HOR!' 



TOTAL 



REGULAR TEACHERS 

Pernanent 

Provi6ionel 

Tecporary 

Sub-Total 

VOCATIONAL TEACHER S 

Fersanent 

Provlsonal 

Temporary 

Sub-Total 

BILINGUAL TEACHERS 

Fernanent 

Provisional 

Tecporery 

Sub-Total 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
TEACHERS 

Pernanent 

Provisional 
Tecporary 

Sub- Total 



190 


72c 


12 


35 


10 


ii 











225 


738 


16 























c 



16 


70 


81 


It 


3 


16 





2 





30 


75 


127 



1*1 


1?3 


17 


3 


16 


e 


3 


L 


_i 


1*7 


203 


26 



930 
h 9 


979 







167 

63 

2 

232 



2H 

27 

£ 

276 



GRAND TOTAL 



302 



1016 



169 



1U97 



-203- 



TEACHING STAFF - MARCH 15, 196^ 
SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PRD3SAMS 



BLACK 



WHITE 



OTHER 
MINORITY 



TOTAL 



Permanent 


12 


109 


Provisional 


07 


18 


Temporary 


_0 





Sub-Total 


19 


127 



2 

1 

3 



123 

26 



11*9 



GRAND TOTAL 



19 



127 



lli9 



ITINERANT TEACHERS 



BLACK 



WHITE 



OTHER 
MINORITY 



TOTAL 



Permanent 


29 


150 


Provisional 


2 


Ik 


Temporary 








Sub-Total 


31 


161» 



7 


7 



186 
16 


202 



GRAND TOTAL 



31 



l6fc 



202 



-20 k- 



9 1 




ii. NUMBER OF WHITE. BLACK. AND OTHER MINORITY. FIRST. SECOND. 
THIRD. AND FOURTH YEAR (PERMANENT) PROVISIONALS 



YEAR 



BLACK 



WHITE 



OTHER MINORITY 



FIRST 


70.5 


71.5 


k2 


SECOND 


58 


23.5 


50 


THIRD' 


15 


12 


20 


FOURTH ( Permanent ) 


l» it 


Ik 


*5_ 

137 


TOTAL 


187.5 


121 



TOTAL 

18* 

131.5 
1*7 

83 
W»5.5 



-206- 



Hi.. NEW PROVISIONAL HIRES BY YEAR 1930-81 - 1983-8** 















PERCENT 




1980-81 


1981-8? 


1982-83 


1983-8'' 


TOTAL 


BY AREA 


ELEMENTARY 














B 


3 


h 


22 


lfc.5 


ko 


7l».07 


V 








1 


9 


10 


18.52 











1 


_3 


k 


7.«»1 


T 


3 


H 


24 


26.5 


54 




SECONDARY 














B 


23 


2 


11 


23 


59 


65.56 


V 


2 





2 


23 


27 


30.00 





2 





2 


0_ 


1L 


4.44 


T 


27 


2 


15 


46 


90 




AST 














B 








2 





2 


100.00 


V 









































T 








2 










HOME ECONOMICS 














B 


5 











5 


83.33 


V 











1 


1 


16.67 























T 


5 








1 


6 




INDUSTRIAL ARTS 














B 








1 


1 


2 


100.00 


V 
































) £ 








T 








1 


l 


2 




VOC. ED. 














B 


18 


1 


9 


2 


30 


50.85 


V 


10 





2 


2 


Ik 


23.73 





8 


1 


3 


3 


15 


25.42 


T 


36 


2 


14 


7 


59 





-207- 



NEW HIRES (Cont.) 







1980-1981 


1981-82 


1982-83 


1983-8fc 


TOTAL 


PERCENT BY 
AREA 


MUSIC 
















B 




2 








2 


k 


80.00 


W 













1 


1 


20.00 

























T 




2 








3 


5 




PHYSICAL ED. 














B 




3 


2 


3 





8 


88.89 


W 










' 
















1 











1 


11.11 


T 




U 


2 


3 





9 




FUNDED 
















B 




7 


5 


« 




12 


57.lfc 


w 




5 


1 






6 


28.57 







3 









3 


ll».29 


T 




15 


6 






21 




ENGLISH 


LANGUAGE 












CENTER (closed) 












B 






















W 




1 











.1 


100.00 

























T 




1 











1 





♦included in subject/grade level areas 



-208- 



NEW HIRES (Cont.) 



1980-81 1981-82 1982-83 



BILINGUAL 


B 


12 


W 


2 





46 


T 


60 


SPECIAL ED. 


B 


U3 


W 


14 





12 


T 


69 


GRAND 


TOTALS 


B 


116 


W 


34 





72 


T 


222 



2 15 

1 2 

21H 49 



24% 66 



2 

13 
8 



1983-84 


TOTAL 


PERCENT B 
AREA 


14 


43 


22.34 


3 


8 


4.16 


25 


141.5 


73.50 


42 


192.5 





8 


14 


67 


' 37.50 


18 


32.5 


77.50 


43.40 


3 


11 


34 


19.10 



23 29 57.50 178.50 



14% 


71 


70.5 


272 


45.90 


!5 


25 


71.5 


145.50 


24.56 


30.5 


30.5 


42 


175 


29.54 



60 126.5 184 592.5 



-209- 



Iv. 



SECONDARY 
E 
V 


T 





1980 


-1981 


thru ] 


983 - 


1981< 




■ 


3980-1981 


1981-1 


98? 


198?- 


■1?83 


1983-198^ 


TOTAL 


PERCENT 
BY AREA 



























-, 































































ART 
E 
V 

T 













































FUNDED 



B 




















V 









































T 




















GRAND TOTALS 














E 




















V 









































T 





















-210- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




^tSv- 9-tO) 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



MAR 1 3 1984 

R08ERT R. SPILLANE 

March 9, 1984 




MEMORANDUM 

TO: President and Members, 
Boston School Committee 

FROM: Robert R. Spillane, Super intenden 

SUBJECT: Affirmative Action - Status Report 



Attached for your review and information you will find 
a systemwide workforce analysis by race, sex, and job 
classification. The report illustrates the progress 
that has been made in certain categories and points out 
other areas where progress still needs to be made. It 
is particularly noteworthy that the total of Black and 
other minority administrators within the past 2H years 
has increased from 25.12% to 29.04%. 

As a result of my review of this report, I will be re- 
questing a more detailed analysis within categories in 
order that we can appropriately focus our affirmative 
action and equal opportunity efforts. 



mc 
Attachment 



-211- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 




March 8, 1984 



TO: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

FROM: Barbara E. Fields, Sgrti£>5^0ff icer 
Equal Opportunity. 

RE: Workforce Analysis 

Attached please find an analysis of the workforce for the Boston Public Schoc 
as a result of information submitted to my office from Personnel. The analysis is 
presented in four (4) forms: 

1. Systemwide numbers and percentages of employees by race, sex, 
and job classification/category. 

2. The number and percentage of the teaching staff by race and 
instructural area for the current school year and the last 
three (3) years. 

3. The number and percentage of administrators by race for the 
current school year and the last four (4) years. 

4. A systemwide salary analysis of the present staff (excluding 
teachers) . Please note that this is not a complete analysis 
as a few salaries were not listed on the computer sheet at 
the time that the information was submitted from Personnel. 
A revision will be done as soon as possible. 

The workforce systemwide is 70.38% White, 21.73% Black, 5.40% Hispanic, 
2.24% Asian, and .25% American Indian. Male and female representation is 37.70% 
and 62.30% respectively. 

The administrative report charts the gains made this year, in particular, as 
compared to the past year. The total Black administrative workforce has risen fron 
21.64% to 24.76% and Other Minorities from 3.55% to 4.91%. Additional efforts are 
underway to strengthen the recruitment of Hispanics and Asians in the administratis 
workforce. 

The minority percentages of the teaching staff has remained constant since tfc 
teacher layoffs of 1981. The teaching workforce is 20.46% Black, 70.91% White, 
5.42% Hispanic, 2.78% Asian, and .43% American Indian. 

continued 
-212- 

26 COURT STREET, BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200. EXT. 5650 AREA (617) 



TO: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

FROM: Barbara E. Fields, Senior Officer 

RE: Workforce Analysis March 8, 1984 

- 2 - 

My office is presently working closely with the Massachusetts Division of 
Personnel Management to increase the number of women and minorities in some of our 
job categories covered by Civil Service. 

I shall be available to respond to any questions or concerns. 

BEF/lem 
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UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



***************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL. , * 

* 

Plaintiffs, * 
* 

v. * CIVIL ACTION NO. 72-911-G 

* 

KEVIN McCLUSKEY, ET AL. , * 

* 

Defendants * 

* 

***************** 



REPORT OF THE NUMBER OF WHITE, BLACK AND OTHER MINORITY 
PERMANENT AND ACTING ADMINISTRATORS AND TEACHERS 



The School Defendants file herewith the report of the 
number of white, black and other minority permanent and acting 
administrators and teachers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

/?/ r 

Henry Dinger, Esquire 
Goodwin, Procter Sc Hoar 
ZB State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
Tel. (617) 523-5700 




-~2 



Dated: March 1 9, 1984 



-221- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




TO: 

FROM: 

SUBJECT: 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
;PAa - \'ENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 
IDA WH.7E 

March lU, 198U 



MEMORANDUM 

Dr. Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

Ida White, Manager^~V^ 

March 15, 198^ Report to the United States District 
Court on Administrators 



Please find enclosed the number of white, black and other minority 
permanent and acting administrators as required to be filed on March 
15, 198^ by Order of the United States District Court. 



Attachment s) 
IW/mlh 



-222- 

2c '-'..- i~ : ;£~. 3CS"GY VAsiAC^USSTTJ .^'_'c» ''2c ".viji, '-*: -o.v A^tA 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

1 Superintendent 

1" Executive Administrative Assistant 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant 

1 Media Assistant 

1 Special Assistant 

*1 Senior Program Director 

*1 Staff Assistant 



W 
W 
B 
W 

B 

W(A) 

B(A) 



OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT - FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 



1 Deputy Superintendent 

1 Administrative Assistant 

1 Executive Administrative Assistant 

1 Administrative Assistant 

1 Senior Program Director 

Office of the Business Manage r 

1 Business Manager 

2 Assistant Business Managers 

3 Coordinators 



B(A) 
B 
W 


W\A) 



W 
1 W(A); 1 vacancy 
2W(A) ; 1B;A) 



Department of Information Systems Development 



1 Manager of Information Systems 

3 Project Leaders 

2 Unit Leaders 
1 Analyst 

1 Senior Coordinator 

Department of Personnel and Labor Relations 

1 Manager 

1 Assistant Manager 

1 Junior Specialist 

4 Unit Leaders 
1 Analyst 

4 Junior Analysts 

3 Senior Coordinators 

1 Personnel Relations Coordinator 



iA) 

W (A) 

W ,A) 

W (A) 

W (A, 



B 






Vacancy 






B (A) 






2W;A) ; 1 





(A); 


iA) 






3W ( 2A) ; 1 





(A) 


2W(A) ; 1 


vacancy 


W 







1 B (A) 



Office of Budget Management 

1 Budget Chief 

1 Senior External Funds Coordinator 

1 External Funds Coordinator 

2 Senior Coordinators 
2 Coordinators 

1 Analyst 

2 Program Analysts 

1 Junior Specialist 
1 Junior Analyst 

♦Compact Project 



w 




w 


(Aj 


w 


;A) 


1W; 


1B 


1W; 


1B 


W 


(A) 


1W 


(A, 


B 


(A) 



lA) 



1B yk) 



Vacancy 



-223- 



OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT - SCHOOL OPERATIONS 

1 Deputy Superintendent B 

1 Executive Administrative Assistant B (A) 

1 Senior Program Director B (A) 

1 Project Director W (A) 

1 Coordinator B (A) 

1 Senior Coordinator W (A) 
Facilities Management 

1 Director W 

1 Senior Technical Manager W 

2 Assistant Managers - Field Operations 1W (A) ; 1B (A) 
1 Supervisor B (A) 

1 Chief Structural Engineer W (A) 

1 Senior Structural Engineer W 

1 Assistant Manager w (A) 

1 Senior Engineer W (A) 

1 Senior Specialist 

1 Specialist W (A) 

1 Project Director W (A) 

1 Program Director W (A) 
Department of Food Services 

1 Director W 

1 Assistant Director W 

1 Project Director B 

School Safety Services 

1 Safety Chief W (A) 

1 Administrative Assistant W (A) 

3 Senior Safety Coordinators 1W; 2B (A) 

2 Investigative Counselors 1W; IB 

OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT - CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

1 Deputy Superintendent B 

1 Executive Administrative Assistant W 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant W 

1 Project Director - Title VII Vacancy 

1 Specialist - Title VII W (A) 

1 Senior Specialist/Curriculum Writer W (A) 

Department of Chapter I Programs 

1 Director W 

2 Associate Directors W (1A) 

10 Assistant Directors 8W (3A) ; 2 B (A) 

1 Coordinator W 



-221- 




CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 
Institute for Wr^essional Development 



B (A; 




B i$X 

1W; 2B 


(A) 


W 




1W (A), 


1 


W (A) 




B (A) 




W (A; 




W 




W 




B 




W 




B 




1B(A); 


1W 


W (A) 




W 




w 




w 




W (A) 




W 





1 Manager 

1 Senior CoordJ^a^tor 

3 Coordinators 

Office of Instructional Services 

1 Manager . ™ ... , n 

2. Senior Curriculum Advisors 

1 Program Director - Gifted and Talented 

1 Program Director - Elementary Reading/ 

Language Arts 

1 Program Director - Music 

1 Program Director - Reading 

1 Program Director - Mathematics 

1 Program Director - Social Studies 

1 Program Director - Foreign Languages 

1 Program Director - Health/Physical Ed. 

2 Program Directors - Media 
1 Senior Advisor - Arts 
1 Senior Advisor - Music 
1 Athletic Director 
1 Senior Advisor - Science 
1 Coordinator - Swimming 
1 Assistant Program Director - Physical Ed. 

Testing and Evaluation Unit 

1 Manager W (A) 

1 Systems Specialist W (Aj 

1 Evaluation Specialist W (A) 

1 Junior Analyst W (A) 

Bilingual Department 

1 Senior Advisor W 

6 Bilingual Coordinators 2W(1A) MB(A) ; 2 0(A); 1 vacancy 

1 Administrative Assistant 0(Aj 

1 Junior Specialist 0(A) 

1 Lau Coordinator B(Aj 

2 Lau Specialists 1W(A) ; 1B (A; 

Adult Education and Recreational Activities 

1 Director W (A) 

1 Coordinating Supervisor W (A; 

SENIOR OFFICER - STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

1 Senior Officer W 

1 Staff Assistant W (A) 

1 Projects Director B (A) 

1 Administrative Assistant 

2 Special Education Monitors 1W iA);1B (A) 
1 Manager W (A) 

4 Program Advisors — Low Incidence 3W (Aj ; 1B (A> 

-225- 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



Early Childhood/Elementary Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor W (A) 

1 Program Advisor -Early Childhood b (A) 

1 Program Advisor -Elementary B (A) 

Middle School Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor W 

1 Program Advisor - Middle Schools W (A) 

Secondary School Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor B (A) 

1 Program Advisor - High Schools W iA;. 

Pupil Services 

2 Senior Advisors W 



Compliance/Placement 

1 Assistant Manager W (A) 

4 Program Advisors - Compliance 3W (A) ; 1B (A) 

2 Program Advisors - Over/Under Representation 1W (A) ; 1B (A) 

Contracted Services 

1 Associate Manager W 

2 Program Advisors - Contracted Ed. Services W (A) 

OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

1 Senior Officer B 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant Vacancy 

1 Administrative Assistant O 

OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL 

1 General Counsel , W 

2 Assistant General Counsels W 
1 Assistant General Counsel-Labor Relations B 

OFFICE OF SENIOR OFFICER - IMPLEMENTATION 

1 Senior Officer W 

1 Staff Assistant W (A) 



-226- 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



5. 



Department of Implementation 

1 Executive Director 

4 Directors 

1 Assistant Director 

1 Coordinator 
11 Specialists 

13 Officers 

2 Analysts 



B 

3W (2A) ; 1B (A; 
W (A) 
W (A) 

3B (2A) ; 4W (2A) 
2 vacancies 
6B(4A) ; 6W (3A) 
1W (A) ; 1 OiA) 



2 (1A); 
1 vacancy 



* DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 

2 Transitional Associates W (A) 

1 Transitional Assistant W (A) 

1 Coordinator of Urban Retrofit Programs W (A) 



♦Reports to Director of Educational and Employment at Hubert Humphrey 
REsource Center 



-227- 



TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING 
ADMINISTRATORS - CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



6. 





PFRM1MPNT 


Af-TTNr: 


VACANCIES 


...-IQX 


— 
i 




B 


K 





B 


W 







: Superintendent 




• 1 












1 


Deputy Superintendent 


2 






. .,!.... 






■ 


3 


Senior Officer 


1 


2 










3 




Executive Admin. Assistant 




3 




1 








4 


Senior Administrative/ 
Administrative Assistant 


. ? 


1 


3 




1 


1' 


1 


9 


Media/Special Assistant 


1 


1 












2 


Executive Director 


1 














1 


Director 




5 




1 


3 






9 


Senior Advisor 




6 




1 


2 






9 


Associate Director 




1 






1 






2 


- 


Assistant Director 




6 




2 


4 






12 


Project/Program Director 
Senior Proiect/Proq. Directoi 


3 


4 




4 


8 




1 


20 


Staff Assistant 








1 


2 






3 


" Coordinator 
Junior/Senior Coordinator 


2 


7 




q 


12 


2 


2 


_. .3* 


Supervisor 








1 


1 






2 


Specialist " 

Junior/Senior Specialist 


1 


2 


2 


5 


6 


2 


3 


21 


Officer 


2 


3 




4 


3 


1 


13 


Investigative Counselor 


1 


1 












2 


Manager 


1 


3 




1 


2 


1 




8 


Assistant/ Associate Manager 




1 




2 


5 






8 


Analyst 
Junior/Senior Analyst 




1 




1 


7 


3 




12 


Project/Unit Leader 








1 


7 


1 




a 


••. 


Budget/Security Chief 




1 




• 


1 






2. 

2: 

3: 


, 


Evaluation/Systems Specialis 











2 






t- 


Chief/Senior Engineer 


1 




2 









" if 









TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING 
ADMINISTRATORS - CENTRAL ADMINISTRATE ON 





PPRMANFNT ftPTTMr 


VACANCIES 


TOTALS 




B 


W 





B 


w 









Senior Curriculum Advisor 


.._1 








1 






2 


rransitional Associate 










2 




- 


2 


Pransitional Assistant 










1 






1 


3eneral/Asst. General Counsel 


1 


3 












4 


>rogram Advisor 








4 


12 


• 




16 


Special Education Monitor 








1 


1 






2 


•OTALS 


19 


53 


5 


40 


86 


10 


8 


221 
















































































































































- 





























' 






•• 














































































^ 


m 









































- 








. 










• 




" (1 




I 


| 





CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION" 



♦PROGRAM SPECIALISTS - STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



♦PERSONNEL ON ASSIGNMENT 



3W 



Library 

Personnel 

Student Support Services 

Office of Deputy Superintendent/ 

Curriculum & Competency . 

Audio Visual Department 

Office of Implementation 

TOTAL 

♦Not included in any previous totals. 



1W 

1W (Director on Assignment) 

1W 

1W (Assistant Headmaster on Assignment; 

1W 

1W (Headraster on Assignment) 



9W 



-230- 



• OFFICES OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 

Camunity District One - 

1 Camunity Superintendent W(A) 

1 Administrative Assistant W(A) 

1 Guidance Counselor 0(A) 

Camunity District Two 

1 Camunity Superintendent W 

1 Administrative Assistant W(A) 

Community District Three 

1 Camunity Superintendent W(A) 

1 Administrative Assistant W(A) 

Camunity District Four . . . 

1 Camunity Superintendent B(A) 

1 Administrative Assistant B 

Camunity District Five 

1 Camunity Superintendent B 

1 Administrative Assistant B 
1 Administrative Assistant for 

636 Projects B(A) 

Community District Six 

1 Camunity Superitendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

Camunity District Seven 

1 Community Superintendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

Camunity District Eight 

1 Camunity Superintendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

Camunity District Nine 

1 Camunity Superintendent 

2 Administrative Assistants 
1 Coordinator 



w 
w 








w 
w 








w 
w 








B 

1W 
B 


(A); 
(A) 


1B 


(A) 



-231- 



TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING ADMINISTRATORS 
OFFICES'OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 



10. 























EEBUHBRS 


ACTING 

* 


VACANCIES 


TOTAL 




B 


V 





B 


V 









Ccrmunity 


? 


4 


n 


1 


2 







9 


Administrative 


,2.. 


3 


o 


2 


4 


9 




11 


Guidance 
Cqnnsplors 


Q 


o 











1 




1 


Coordinators 











1 










1 


TOTALS 


4 


7 





4 


6 


1 




22 




















- 








































































- 






. 












* ■• 


• 


































• 
























































































• 










-232- 











OFFICE OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 
School Psychologists and Pupil Adjustment Counselors * 



11 



School Psychologists 

Pupil Adjustment Counselors 



Permanent 


Acting 


Total 


B W 





B W 


B W 


8 31 


1 


3 


8 31 4 


15 





1 2 2 


1 17 2 



District 


One 


District 


Two 


District 


Three 


District 


Four 


District 


Five 


District 


Six 


District 


Seven 


District 


Eight 


District 


Nine 



Personnel on Assignment * 

2 1W; 1B(1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle 

School Coordinator - funded) 

3 1W; 2B(1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 teacher- 

636 funded; 1 Middle School Coordinator 
funded) 
3W( Includes 1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle 
School Coordinator - funded) 

2W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle School 
Coordinator - funded) 

.7 6W; 1B (includes 1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 
4 Teachers - 636 funded; 1 Middle School 
Coordinator - funded) 

3W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Teacher - 636 
funded; 1 Middle School Coordinator - funded; 

3W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Teacher - 636 
funded; 1 Middle School Coordinator - funded) 

2W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle School 
Coordinator - funded) 

5 1W; 3B;1-0 (includes 2 Teachers - 636 funded; 

1 Middle School Coordinator -funded. 



TOTAL 



30 



22W; 7B; 10 



*Not included in any previous totals 



-233- 



12. 




SI 






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-235- 



1 



ADMINISTRATIVE P03ITI0MS - MIDDLE SCHOOL 



, 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 


PRINCIPAL 




ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 




B 


V 





T 


B 


W 





T 


DISTRICT I 


















Edison 




1 






. 


1 




1 


Ta*4- 






1, 






i x 




.-.:._.i. 


DISTRICT II 


















Curley, Mary E. 


1A 






•1A 


1A 


1 




2 


Lewis 


1 










1 




1 


Roosevelt 




1 








1 




1 


DISTRICT III 


















Irving 




1 








2 




2 

■ - ■ 


Lewenberg 


1 










1 




1 


Shaw, R. G. 




i jujuL . »^» *. «r-c 


~~~. -r*~ 


—,-«-« 


™~™ 


vj»t. umiati 


~~~ 


L 

1 


DISTRICT IV 




Rogers, W. B. 




1 








1 


Thompson F. V. 


1 










1 




1 


DISTRICT V 


















Cleveland, Grover 




1 








3 




3 


Holmes. 0. W. 




1 








1 




1 


Wilson 


1 








1(A) 


1 




2 


DISTRICT VT 






-^ 


SU rffc— *B 


:*^a— *".*rj ■ &mtsL 


1 


joaBiian— — 


1 - 


Dearborn 




1 


Gavin 




1 






1(A) 






1 


McCormack, John W. 


1 






1 




2 




\ 


















\ 


















■fci 


















■* 





















ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS - MIDDLE SCHOOL 



15 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 


PRINCIPAL 




ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 




B 

r 


V 





T 


B 


V 





T 


DISTRICT VII 


















Edwards 


1(A) 






1(A) 




1(A) 




1 (A) 


Michaelangelo 




1(A) 




1(A) 




1 




1 


Timilty 


1 • 




' 




1(A) 




- " 1 (A) 


DISTRICT VIII 




- - 












• 


Barnes 




1 








2 




2 


Cheverus 




1 














DISTRICT IX 


















King, Martin L. 


1 










2 


2 


Mackey, Charles 


1 










1 




1 


Wheatley, Phyllis 


1 


- 


~*~U~*KC 


i ii WWW 


. -~ 


1 




1 












TOTALS: 
















Permanent 


9 


11 


1 


21 





26 





26 


Acting 


2 


1 





3 


4 


1 





5 


GRAND TOTALS 


11 


12 


1 


24 


4 


27 





31 












































— 


■ >w miMi wti 


~,~™. 


_ — 








































X 




• 















































































ADMINISTRATORS - SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS 



16. 



CARTER SCHOOL 

1 Teacher- in-Charge 

Mckinley school 

1 Program Director 

6 Assistant Program Directors 

1TLESTON school 

1 Program Advisor 

ANOTHER COURSE TO COLLEGE 

1 Headmaster 

BOSTON PREP. 

1 Project Director 
1 Development Officer 

HUBERT H. HUMPHREY OCaJPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 

1 Director 

1 Headmaster 

2 Assistant Headmasters 
1 Registrar 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant 

7 Cluster Administrators 

1 Business Agent 

1 Bilingual Coordinator 

1 Special Needs Coordinator 

1 Program Director/Occ. Instr. Design 

1 Specialist/Occ. Grants Manager 

1 System Support Specialist 

LEWENBERG MIDDLE SCHOOL 

1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 

KING MIDDLE SCHOOL 



1 Project Director 
1 Development Officer 

BEETHOVEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 



1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 

HARVARD-KENT ELEMENTARY 

1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 



W (A) 



W (A) 
4W (A); 2B (A) 



W (A) 



W 



w 




w 


(A) 


w 




B 


(A) 


1W 


■ 1B (A) 


W 


(A) 


B 




6W; 


IB (A) 


W 


(A) 


B 




W 




W 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


W 




W 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


w 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


W 


(A) 



-238- 



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1 





TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING ADMINISTRATORS 
SCHOOL FACILITIES . 





PEEMAKEST 


ACTING 


VACANCIES 


TOTAL 




B 


V 





B 


V 









Headmaster 


4 


11 


,0 


3 


2 







20 


Assistant Headmaster 


2 


9 





11 


13 


1 




36 


Department Head * 





5 





20 


79 


4 




108 


Guidance Counselor 


15 


29 


5 


5 


4 


2 




• 60 


Registrar 














15 







15 


Development Officer 











4 


11 


1 


•» 


• 16 


Safety/Clinical/ 
Senior Coordinator 


1 


1 





4 


8 







14 


Senior Administratis 
Administrative Asst. 


1 








2 





o . 




3 


Project/Program 

I") 3 rpr*" 1 " 11 " 


a 


i 


n 


A. 


4 


9 




s 


Principal 


19 


76 


2 


2 


2 


2 




103 


Assistant Principal 





54 





6 


2 


4 




£6 


Teacher-in -Charge 














1 







1 


Assistant 
Program Director 











2 


4 


n 




6 


Program Advisor 














1 







1 


'Director 





1 
















1 


Cluster Administrator 





6 





1 










7 


Business Aqent 


o 


n 


n 





1 


..0 




1 


Specialist 





1 








1 


* 






2 


TOTALS 


42 


154 


7 


60 


148 


14 




465 



♦Includes Job Supervisors 



at Boston High School and South Boston High School. 
-2H8- 



27. 



TOTAL ADMINISTRATORS, SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS, PUPIL ADJUSTMENT COUNSELORS 

AND PERSONNEL ON ASSIGNMENT 
( Inc ludes Vacanc i esf " 



Central Administration (pages 1-7) 221 



School Psychologists 102 

Pupil Adjustment Counselors 
Personnel on Assignment 
(pages 8 and 11 ) 



Community Superintendents' Offices 22 

(pages 9 and 10) 



School Facilities UGft 

(pages 12 to 26) 



TOTAL 810 



_249- 



CATEGORY I 



25. 



Headmas ter/Pr inc ipal 



NUMBER 



PERCENT 



B 



W 



91 



123 



B% 



22.76 



W% 



73.99 



0% 



3.2 



CATEGORY II 





NUMBER 






PERCENT 








B 


W 





T 


B% 


W% 


0% 




Central Administration 


59 


139 


15 


213 


27.70 


65.26 


7.04 




Offices of the Community Superintendents 





13 


1 


22 


36 36 


59.09 


4.55 




School Facilities 


74 


251 


1 7 


342 


21.64 


73.39 


4.97 




TOTAL 


141 


403 


ii- 


577 


24.44 


§?,S4 


5i72 





CATEGORY II - By Title 





NUMBER 






PJ 


RCENT 




1 


B 


W 


I 


T 


B% 


W% 


0% 


Superintendent 


Q,. 


1 


n 


1 





1 nn 


n 


Deputy Superintendent 


3 








3 


100 








Senior Officer 




-) 


q I 


3 


33.33 


66.67 





Executive Administrative Assistant 


1 


3 





4 


2S.00 


7 5.00 


o 


Senior Administrative/ Administrative Asst 


9 


9 


A 


22 


4fl91 


40. Q1 


1R-15 


Media/Special Assistant 


1 


1 





2 


saoo 


50.00 





Executive Director 


1 








1 


>00 





i 



Director 


1 


9 





10 


10. oc 


90.00 





Senior Advisor 


1 


3 





9 


11.11 


38.8? 





Associate Director 





2 





2 





100 





Assistant Director 


2 


10 





,2 


|l6.67 


33.33 





V f L^aiUC./ Program LJifecto'^ 
Senior Prniprt/Prnaram Dirorfor 


7 


n 


n 


?,< 


3.17 


70.3 3 


o 


Staff Assistant 


1 


2 





3 


33.32 


6 6.67 





Coordinator-Saf ety/Ci in ic a 1/ Junior /Senior 

Coordinator 


1 7 


23 


2 


47 


3 6.17 


50.57 


4.: 



CATEGORY II - By Title. (Cont'd 



29 





NUMBER 






PERCENT 




TITLE 


B 


W 





T 


B% 


W% 


9* 


Supervisor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 





Spec ial is t- Jun ior/Sen ior Spec ial is t 


6 


10 


4 


2Q 


30.00 


50.00 


2Q r f 


Officer 


6 


6 





12 


50.00 


50.00 





Investigative ."Counselor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 


2 


Manager 


2 


5 


1 


£V 


?*. no 


s?_qn 


12.' 


Assistant/Associate Manager 


2 


6 





3 


25.00 


75.00 





Anaiyst-Junior/Senior Analyst 


1 


8 


3 


1'2 


3.33 


66.67 


25. ( 


Project/Unit Leader 


1 


7 


1 


l 

9 


11.11 


77.73 


11 . 


Budget/Security Chief 





2 





2 





100 





Evaluation/Systems Specialist 





2 





2 





100 





Chief/Senior Engineer 





3 





3 





100 





Transitional Associate/Assistant 





3 





3 





100 





General/Assistant General Counsel 


1 


3 





4 


25.00 


7 5.00 





Program Advisor 


4 


13 





17 


23.53 


76.47 





Special Education Monitor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 





Community Superintendent 


3 


6 





9 


33.33 


66.67 





Guidance Counselor 


20 


33 


8 


61 


32.79 


54.10 


13. 


Assistant Headmaster 


13 


22 


1 


36 


14.44 


52.73 


2. 


Department Head 


20 


34 


4 


103 


18.52 


77.78 


3. 


Registrar 


p 


15 


n 


i* 


• n 


mn 


n 


Development Officer 


4 


11 


1 


1* 


?«j on 


£3 -- 




Assistant Principal 


6 


56 


4 


66 


9.1Q 


°4 54 


c . 


Teacher- in-Charge 


Q 


1 


n 






mo 





Assistant Program Director 


2 


4 





6 


33.33 


56.^ 





Cluster Administrator 


1 


6 





7 


14.29 


35.71 


o 


business Agent 





1 





1 





100 





enior Curriculum Advisor 


1 


1 





2 

577 


.5.0.00 
24.43 


5il^QQ_ 
70.30. 





1 t%Li j 


141 


403 


33 


3 . 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 



January 13, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 

TO : Dr. Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

FROM : Ida White, Manag< 

SUBJECT: January 15, 1984 Report to the United States District 
Court on Administrators 

Please find enclosed the number of white, black and other 
minority permanent and acting administrators as required to be 
filed on January 15, 1984 by Order of the United States District 
Court. 




/ IW/lg 

Attachment (8) 



■-/ -252- 

26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSFTTS 02108« 726-6600 Ext 5600 AREA 617 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 
OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT - SCHOOL OPERATIONS 



1 Deputy Superintendent 

1 Executive Administrative Assistant 

1 Senior Program Director 

1 Project Director 

1 Coordinator 

1 Senior Coordinator 

Facilities Management 

1 Director 

1 Senior Technical Manager 

2 Assistant Managers - Field Operations 
1 Supervisor 

1 Chief Structural Engineer 

1 Senior Structural Engineer 

1 Assistant Manager 

1 Senior Engineer 

1 Senior Specialist 

1 Specialist 

1 Project Director 

Department of Food Services 

1 Director 

1 Assistant Director 

1 Project Director 

School Safety Services 



B 

B (A) 

B (A) 

W (A) 

B (A) 

W (A) 



W 
W 
1W (A) 
B (A) 
W (A) 
W 

W (A) 
W (A) 


W (A) 
W (A) 



W 
W 
B 



1B (A) 



1 Safety Chief 

1 Administrative Assistant 

3 Senior Safety Coordinators 

2 Investigative Counselors 



W (A) 

W (A) 
1W; 2B (A) 
1W; 1B 



OFFICE OF DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT - CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 



1 Deputy Superintendent 

1 Executive Administrative Assistant 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant 

1 Project Director - Title VII 

1 Specialist - Title VII 

1 Senior Specialist/Curriculum Writer 

Department of Chapter I Programs 

1 Director 

2 Associate Directors 
10 Assistant Directors 

1 Coordinator 



B 

W 

w 





(A) 



W (A) 
W (A) 



W 

W (1A) 
8W (3A) ; 2 B (A) 
W 



-253- 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 

Institute for Professional Development 

1 Manager 

1 Senior Coordinator 

3 Coordinators 

Office of Instructional Services 

1 Manager 

2 Senior Curriculum Advisors 
Program Director - Gifted and Talented 
Program Director - Elementary Reading/ 

* Language Arts 

Program Director - Music 
Program Director - Reading 
Program Director - Mathematics 
Program Director - Social Studies 
Program Director - Foreign. Languages 
Program Director - Health/Physical Education B 
Program Directors- Media 
Senior Advisor - Arts 

Senior Advisor - Music W 

Athletic Director W 

Senior Advisor - Science W 

Coordinator - Swimming W (A) 

Assistant Program Director- 
Physical Education W 



B 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


1W; 


2B (A) 


W 




1W 


(A); 1B 


w 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


W 




W 




B 




W 




B 




1B 


(A); 1V* 


W 


(A) 



1W (A) 



Testing and Evaluation Unit 

1 Manager 

1 Systems Specialist 

1 Evaluation Specialist 

1 Junior Analyst 

Bilingual Department 

1 Senior Advisor 

6 Bilingual Coordinators 

1 Administrative Assistant 

1 Junior Specialist 

1 Lau Coordinator 

2 Lau Specialists 

Adult Education and Recreational Activities 

1 Director 

1 Coordinating Supervisor 

SENIOR OFFICER - STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

1 Senior Officer 

1 Staff Assistant 

1 Projects Director 

1 Administrative Assistant 

2 Special Education Monitors 
1 Manager 

4 Program Advisors - Low Incidence 



W (A) 
W (A) 
W (A) 
Vacancy 



w 



2W(1A);2B(1A) ; 2 (A) 
Vacancy 
(A) 
B (A). • 
1W (A) ; 1 vacancy 



w 


(A) 




w 


(A) 




w 






w 


(A) 




B 


(A) 











1W 


(A) ; 


1B (A) 


W 


(A) 




3W 


(A); 


IB (A) 



_25U- 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 

Early Childhood/Elementary Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor W (A) 

1 Program Advisory-Early Childhood B (A) 

1 Program Advisor -Elententary B (A) 

Middle School Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor W 

1 Program Advisor - Middle Schools W (A) 

Secondary School Student Support Programs 

1 Senior Advisor B (A) 

1 Program Advisor - High Schools Vacancy 

Pupil Services 

2 Senior Advisors W 



Compliance/Placement 

1 Assistant Manager W (A) 

4 Program Advisors - Compliance 3W (A) ; 1B (A) 

2 Program Advisors - Over/Under Representation 1W (A) ; 1B (A) 

Contracted Services 

1 Associate Manager W 

2 Program Advisors - Contracted Ed. Services W (A) 

OFFICE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

1 Senior Officer B 

1 Senior Administrative Assistant B (A) 

1 Administrative Assistant O 

OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL 

1 General Counsel W 

2 Assistant General Counsels W 
1 Assistant General Counsel-Labor Relations B 

OFFICE OF SENIOR OFFICER - IMPLEMENTATION 

1 Senior Officer W 

1 Staff Assistant W (A) 



4. 



-255- 



Department of Implementation 

1 Executive Director 

4 Directors 

1 Assistant Director 

1 Coordinator 
11 Specialists 

13 Officers 

2 Analysts 



CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



B 



3W (2A) ; 1B (A) 

W (A) 

W (A) 

2B (1A); 4W{2A); 2 0(1A) ; 

3 vacancies 

5B (3A) ; 6W (3A) ; 2 vacanc: 

1W (A) ; 1 vacancy 



* DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 

2 Transitional Associates 

1 Transitional Assistant 

1 Coordinator of Urban Retrofit Programs 



W (A) 
W (A) 
W (A) 






Reports to Director of Educational and Emptoyi*e»t at Hubert Humphrey Resourc 
Center 



-256- 



»T 


TOTAL 


NUMBE 


;r of p 


ERMAN 


ENT A^ 


ID AC1 


"ING 


*J '* * 


• r- 


i • • ADMINISTRATORS - CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIS 




. 


• 






PPRM1MPMT 


A,C rTMf: 


VACANCIES. w 




1 

3 


B 


'W 





B 


w 









1 

Super in tenden t 




1 












1 




Deputy Superintendent 


2 


1 













■a 


: 


Senior Officer 


1 


2 










3 




Executive Admin. Assistant 




3 




1 








4 


i 


Senior. Administrative/ 
Administrative Assistant 


2 


1 


3 


1 


1 


• 


1 


9 




Media/Special Assistant 


1 


1 












2 




Executive Director 


1 














1 


i 

> 

! 

■ ) 

Si 


Director 




5 




1 


3 






9 


Senior Advisor 




6 




1 


2 






9 


Associate Director 




1 






1 






2 


Assistant Director 




6 




2 


4 






12 


Project/Program Director 
Senior Project/Proq. Directoi 


3 


4 




4 


8 


1 


- - - 


20 


Staff Assistant 








1 


2 






3 


" 


Coordinator 

Junior/Senior Coordinator 


2 


7 




11 


11 


2 




33 




Supervisor 








1 


1 






2 . 


( 
1 


Specialist 
Junior/ Senior Specialist 


1 


2 


2 


2 


6 


2 


6 


21 


I 


Officer 


2 


3 




3 


3 


2 


13 


Investigative Counselor 


1 


1 












2 


Manager 


1 


3 




1 


2 


1 




8 


Assistant/ Associate Manager 




1 




2 


5 






8 


Analyst 
Junior/Senior Analyst 




1 




2 


6 


2 


2 


13 


Project/Unit Leader 








r5k 


7 


1 


.- 


8 


Budget/Security Chief 




1 




• 


1 






2 


Evaluation/Systems Special is 












2 






2 


Chief/Senior Engineer 


1 





2 




• 


3 


'/ 






1 


* 



TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING 
ADMINISTRATORS - CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



• 


PERMANENT 


- 

ArTTMn 


VACANCI1 






B 


W 





B 


w 







Senior Curriculum Advisor 


._1 








1 






Transitional Associate 










2 




■— — 


Transitional Assistant 










1 




General/Asst. General Counsel 


1 


3 














Program Advisor 








5 


10 


• 


1 




Special Education Monitor 








1 


1 








TOTALS 


19 


54 


5 


39 


82 


9 


12 



















' 




























































































_ 







































































•• 
















































































^ 
v 


















* 

























I 




* • 

— - — , [1 




_.J 













CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION 



♦PROGRAM SPECIALISTS - STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



8. 



♦PERSONNEL ON ASSIGNMENT 



3W 



Library 

Bilingual Department 

Personnel 

Student Support Services 

Office of Deputy Superintendent/ 

Curriculum and Competency 

Audio Vfsual Department 

Office of Implementation 

TOTAL 

*Not included in any previous totals. 



1W 

1W 

1W (Director on Assignment) 

1W 

1W (Assistant Headmaster on Assignment) 

1W 

1W (Headmaster an Assignment) 

10W 



-259- 



OFFICES OF TOE C0MM3NIT V SUPERINTENDENTS 
Comunity D istrict One - 

1 Comunity Superintendent JJJJj 

1 Administrative Assistant j»W 

1 Guidance Counselor • wv "' 

Comunity District Two 

1 Comunity Superintendent JJ 

1 Administrative Assistant w **' 

Comunity District Three 

1 comunity Superintendent JJ(A) 

1 Administrative Assistant "»w 

Comunity District Four 

1 Comunity Superintendent B(A) 

1 Administrative Assistant 

Comunity District Five 

1 comunity Superintendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 
1 Administrative Assistant for 
636 Projects 

Comuni t y District Six 

1 Comunity Superltendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

Comunity District Seven 

" i comunity Superintendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

commnity District Eight 

1 Comunity Superintendent 
1 Administrative Assistant 

Comuni t y District Nine 

1 comunity Superintendent J 

2 Administrative Assistants ™ A , i« I ; 
1 Coordinator 



B 
B 

B(A) 



W 
W 



W 
W 



-260- 



TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT WD ACTING ADMINISTRATORS 
OFFICES'OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 



1 

• 


PERMANENT 


ACTING 

* 


VACANCIES 


TOTAL 




B 


V 





6 


V 









Camunity 


2 


4 


n 


1 


2 







9 


Administrative 


2 


3 


o 


2 


4 







11 


Guidance 
Camsplors 

















1 




1 


Coordinators 











1 










1 


TOTALS 


4 


7 





4 


6 


1 




22 


















• 
















































































m ■ 
















































































































_ 








— . — 












. I _ 





-261- 



OFFICES OF THE COMMUNITY SUPERINTENDENTS 
School Psychologists and Pupil Adjustment Counselors* 



School Psychologists 

Pupil Adjustment Counselors 



Permanent 


Acting 


Total 


B W 


B W 


B W 


8 31 1 


3 


8 31 4 


15 


1 2 2 


1 17 2 



District 


One 


District 


Two 


District 


Three 


District 


Four 


District 


Five 


District 


Six 


District 


Seven 


District 


Eight 


District 


Nine 



Personnel on Assignment * 

2 1W; 1B(1 Liaison teacher - funded; 1 Middl 

School Coordinator- funded) 

3 1W; 2B(1 Liaison teacher - funded; 1 teacht 

636 funded; 1 Middle School Coordine 
funded) 

3W (Includes 1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Mid 
School Coordinator - funded) 

2W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle Schoo. 
Coordinator - funded) 

7 6W; IB (includes 1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 
4 Teachers - 636 funded; 1 Middle Schc 
Coordinator - funded) 

2W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Teacher - 636 
funded) 

3W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Teacher - 636 
funded; 1 Middle School Coordinator - fundec 

2W (1 Liaison Teacher - funded; 1 Middle School 
School Coordinator - funded) 

5 1W; 3B; 10 (includes 2 Teachers - 636 funded; 
1 Middle School Coordinator - fun« 

TOTAL 29 21W; 7B; 10 



*Not included in any previous totals 



-262- 



A\ 



*r> 



3« 



— < 



lL 



"A 

IS 



= * 



5 



-3 



SZ 



si 



-5 



< 



"3~ 



■5 



s; 



T 



s 

s 



ft 



> 

ft 



5 
ft 



5 
2 



5 
ft 



a 

3 



5 
ft 



S 

a 



\\ 



J5. 



- : 



< <t. 



S, 



< <e 



,- » 



- Sr^» 



S 



S 



-it 

o 



o 



»«< 



^ 3 in 



S~ 



SI 3 



S 31 



6 



3 



I 



-261- 



ADMINISTRATIVE P03ITI0H3 - MIDDLE SCHOOL 



IH. 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



PRINCIPAL 



ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 



B 



B 



DISTRICT I 



Edison 



Tfift- 



J^toi «aMimx> 



r B-Mi rufcJn i w 



DISTRICT II 



1A 



1A 



1 



n « j "* % i» 6 * > > 



Curley, Mary E. 



Lewis 



1 



1A 
1 



2 (1AJ 



1 



1 



Roosevelt 

■ ' I M »l 



1 



mr mrx-m m r Mmj- 



DISTRICT III 



2 . 



Irving 



*Wli i I II ■ I 0K0* 



» < , i n »«l»1» W 



Lewenberg 



Shaw, R. G. 



DISTRICT IV 



t-*w«v«;^ t^w 



Rogers, W. B. 



Thcnpson F. V. 



DISTRICT V 



Cleveland, Grover 



HoLnes. 0. W. 



1 



Wilson 



KA) 



2 (1A) 



DISTRICT VI 



:fc»*^r«s.i^««J 



Dearborn 



Gavin 



1(A) 



KA) 



W^VMW— I I ■«■ 



McCormack, John W. 



r«t«WMA4M 



-w^*-»w*-— - 



ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS - MIDDLE SCHOOL 



«3. 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 


PRINCIPAL 


ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 


f 


B ' 

I 


V 





T 


B 


V 





T 


DISTRICT VII 










• 








Edwards 


1(A) 






1(A) 




KA) 




1 (A) 


Michaelangelo 




1(A) 




1(A) 


1 


1 . 


Timilty 


1 • 




• 


1 


1(A) 






" 1 (A) 


DISTRICT VIII 
















• 


Barnes 




1 








2 




2 


Cheverus 




1 




1 








• 


DISTRICT IX 


















King, Martin L. 


1 










2 




2 


Mackey, Charles 


1 










1 




1 


Wheatley, Phyllis 


1 


- 









1 




1 


















TOTALS: 


















Permanent - 


9 


11 


1 


21 





26 





IS 


Acting 


2 


1 





3 


4 


1 





■ 
5 


GRAND TOTALS 


11 


12 


1 


24 


4 


27 





31 














































_ 


MmmaOnM 














































X 














































.. 


















" 



















ADMINISTRATOR - SPECIAL SCHOOLS AND PROGRAMS 

—————————— ————___ j^ 



CARTER SCHOOL 



1 Teacher- in-Charge W (A) 

Mckinley school 

1 Program Director W (A) 

6 Assistant Program Directors 4W (A) ; 2B (A) 

TILESTON SCHOOL 

1 Program Advisor W (A) 

ANOTHER COURSE TO COLLEGE 

1 Headmaster W 

BOSTON PREP. 

1 Project Director 
1 Development Officer 

HUBERT H. HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 

1 Director 

1 Headmaster 

2 Assistant Headmasters 
1 Registrar 
1 Senior Administrative Assistant 

7 Cluster Administrators 
1 Business Agent 
1 Bilingual Coordinator 
1 Special Needs Coordinator 
1 Program Director/Occ. Instr. Design 
1 Special is t/Occ. Grants Manager 
1 System Support Specialist 

LEWENBERG MIDDLE SCHOOL 

1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 

KING MIDDLE SCHOOL 

1 Project Director 
1 Development Officer 

BEETHOVEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 

HARVARD-KENT ELEMENTARY 

1 Senior Coordinator 
1 Clinical Coordinator 



-267- 



w 




w 


(A) 


w 




B 


(A) 


1W; 


1B (A) 


W 


(A) 


B 




6W; 


1B (A) 


W 


(A) 


B 




W 




w 


(A) 


w 


(A) 


w 




w 


(A) 


w 


(A) 


w 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


w 


(A) 


B 


(A) 


W 


(A) 


w 


(A) 



m 



8 
S 

o 

CO 



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to 



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-270- 



Cjl 



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•1 

PRINCIPALS 


8 


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-271- 



fH 
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TOTAL NUMBER OF PERMANENT AND ACTING ADMINISTRATORS 
SCHOOL FACILITIES. 



26. 



■ 








AC 










PLkhaiusnt 


:tinu 


VACANCIES TOTAL 




B V 





"B 

« 


V 









Headmaster 


4 


11 


o . 


3 


2 







20 


Assistant Headmaster 


2 


9 





11 


13 


1 




36 


Department Head * 





5 





20 


79 


4 


• 


108 


Guidance Counselor 


15 


29 


5 


5 


4 


1 




. 59 


Registrar 














15 







15 


Development Officer 











4 


11 


1 




• 16 


Safety/Clinical/ 
Senior Coordinator 


1 


1 





4 


8 







14 


Jenior Administratis 
administrative Asst. 


1 








2 










3 


roject/Program 

Dirprfnr 


n 


1 


n 


n 


4 







«j 


rincipal 


19 


77 


2 


2 


2 


1 




1Q3 


ssistant Principal 





54 





5 


2 


3 




64 


eacher-in-Charge 














1 







1 


Assistant 
rogram Director 











2 


4 


n., 




6 


rogram Advisor 














1 







_ 1 


irector 





1 
















_1 


.uster Administrator 





6 





1 










7 


isiness Agent 


n 


n 


n 


n 


1 

1 


o 




1_ 


ecialist 





1 








1 







_2 


TOTALS 


42 


195 


7 


59 


148 


11 




462 



•Includes Job Supervisors at Boston High School and South Boston High School. 

-277- 



27. 

TOTAL ADMINISTRATORS, SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS, PUPIL ADJUSTMENT COUNSELORS 

AND PERSONNEL ON ASSIGNMENT 
(Includes Vacancies) 

Central Administration (pages 1-7) 220 



School Psychologists 105 

Pupil Adjustment Counselors 
Personnel on Assignment 
. (Pages 8 and 11) 

Community Superintendents* Offices 22 

(Pages 9 and 10) 

School Facilities 462 
(Pages 12 to 26) 



TOTAL 809 



-278- 



luHlOJLUM X 





NUMBER 






PERCENT 






TITLE 


B 


W 





T 


B% 


W% 


0% 




Headmas ter /Principal 


28 


92 




■m yy.in 


J24^a 


•> AA 




» 


CATEGORY II 




NUMBER 


• • 




PERCENT 


» 


B 


W 


O 


T J 


B% 


W% 


0% 




entral Administration 


58 


136 


14 


208 27.88 


65.39 


6.73 




ffices of the Comnunitv Siioprii-itRnjipnts. 


8 


13 


1 


22 . 


36.36 


59.09 


4.55 




chool Facilities 


7"? 


5<;1 


k 


33 ft-., ' 


21.53 


74.05 


4.42 




DTAL 


139 


400 


30 


569 


24.43 


70.30 


5.27 






CATECORY. I! 


C - By Title 










NUMBER 






PERCENT 




B 


W 


O 


T 


B% 


W% 


0% 




■uperintendent 


n 


1 


n 


1 


n 


mn 


n 




>eputy Superintendent 


2 


1 


n 


T 


fifi-6J 


« -n 


n 




enior Officer 


1 


2 





3 


33.33 


K&.Kl 


n 




Scecutive Administrative Assistant 


1 


3 


o 


4 


25. OQ 


7S.nn 


n 




snior Administrative/Administrative Assistant 


10 


9 


3 


22 


*5.45 


40.91 


i^fia 




edia/Special Assistant 


1 


1 





2 


5Q.00 


50.00 







icecutive Director 


1 








1 


too 










irector 


1 


9 





10 


10.0C 


90.00 







enior Advisor 


1 


8 





9 


11.11 


88.89 







ssociate Director 


.0* 


2 





2 





100 







ssistant Director 


2" 


10 





12 


16.67 


r 83.33 







-oject/Program Director 

»nior Proiect/Proqram Director 


7 


17 


1 


?s 


2RM 


Kft.nn 


4.nn 




taff Assistant 


1 


2 





3 


33.33 


66.67 







cordinatot—Saf ety/cl inical/ Junior/Senior 

CoorrHnafnr 


19 


27 


2 


48 


39.58 


56.25 


4.17 





-279- 



WWl^jmill n — uy iiuc \ww»iw u 



*P. 





NUMBER 






PERCENT 




title 


B 


W 





T 


B% 


W% 


04 


Supervisor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 





Special is t-Junior/Senior Specialist 


3 


10 


4 


17 


17.65 


58.82 


23. 


Officer 


5 


6 





11 


45.45 


54.44 





Investigative Counselor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 





* 
Manager 


2 


5- 


1 


8 


25.00 


62.50 


12. 


Assistant/Associate Manager 


2 


6 





8 


25.00 


75.00 





Analyst-Junior/Senior Analyst 


2 


7 


2 


11 


18.18 


63.64 


18 


Project/Unit Leader 





7 


1 


i 
8 





85.71 


14 


Budget/Security Chief 





2 





2 





100 




Evaluation/Systems Specialist 





2 





2 





100 




. Chief/Senior Engineer 





3 





3 





100 




Transitional Associate/Assistant 





3 





3 





100 




General/Assistant General Counsel 


1 


3 





4 


25.00 


75.00 




Program Advisor 


5 


11 





16 


31.25 


68.75 




Special Education Monitor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00 




Community Superintendent 


3 


6 





9 


33.33 


66.67 




Guidance Counselor 


20 


33 


7 


60 


33.33 


55.00 


1 


Assistant Headmaster 


13 


22 


1 


36 


44.44 


52.78 




Department Head 


20 


84 


4 


108' 


18.52 


77.78 




Registrar 





15 





15 


. 


100 




Development Officer 


4 


11 


1 


16 


25.no. 


fifl.7^ 


._j 


Assistant Principal 


5 


56 


3 


64 


7,81 


87.50 


i 


Teacher- in-Charge 


0" 


1 





1 





100 




Assistant Program Director 


• 

2 


4 





6 


33.3? 


66,67 




Cluster Administrator 


1 


6 





7 


14.29 


85.71 




Business Agent 





1 





1 





100 




Senior Curriculum Advisor 


1 


1 





2 


50.00 


50.00. 


c 


'lOT'AT.R 


139 


400 


30 


569 


| 24. 43 


70.30'- 


i; 

■"ii 



SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 



-281- 



SPECIAL DESEGREGATION BACKUP 



The following support documents are included here: 

page 

(a) analysis of recruitment measures for special 

desegregation schools 284 

sample recruitment materials 291 

(b) letter from Mrs. Hattie McKinnis about Burke High 320 

(c) update on Dorchester High health careers magnet 322 

(d) materials on East Boston High business magnet 323 

(e) progress report on strengthening Advanced Work 

classes 334 

(f) discussion of exam school support services 339 

(g) "Attrition at the Examination Schools: A Survey 

of 135 students" 344 

(h) text of the questionnaire 363 

(i) characteristics of students interviewed 377 

(j) responses to selected questions [a full analysis 

will be included in Report #4] 379 

(k) memorandum on Latin School /Latin Academy facility 

issues (with enrollment projections) 403 



-283- 



Special Desegregation: RECRUITMENT 



It is a commonplace of civil rights implementation that strict compliance 
with legal requirements should be matched with active efforts to achieve 
the purpose of those requirements. 

To support such active efforts, the General Court enacted a program of 
state assistance to school systems implementing race desegregation, known 
as "Chapter 636" of 1974. Under this program the Boston Public Schools 
have received more than $60 million to strengthen educational services 
and magnet schools since 1974-75, not counting even larger amounts for 
desegregation transportation reimbursement and for school construction 
for desegregation. 

In other desegregating school systems in Massachusetts, "active efforts" 
have focused on program development in individual schools and on outreach 
to prospective parents and students, including those who might otherwise 
select a non-public school. These efforts are complementary - more than 
supplementary - to the careful control of assignments and transfers to 
assure that all legal requirements are met. It is the active efforts 
which make the assignments work to result in schools which are really 
desegregated as well as educationally integrated. 

Distinctive program development and vigorous recruitment are not limited, 
it should be noted, to "magnet schools". Districts such as Holyoke, 
Springfield and Cambridge have involved every elementary school in the 
process, though of course not every school is able to recruit students 
system-wide. Simply to enroll a high proportion of the students who 
live within the geographical attendance area defined for a particular 
school may require substantial efforts. In Boston, for example, there 
are "geocodes" in which three or four students attend non-public schools 
for each student who attends the Boston Public Schools. 

The Earlier Monitoring Reports 

The Board's First Report (July 1983) found that there was a need to 
recruit additional minority students to certain Extended Day Kinder- 
garten programs and additional students of all groups to most city-wide 
vocational programs (volume I, pages 11 & 18). Concern was expressed 
about school -level efforts to reach the parents of students newly- 
assigned to "special desegregation" schools, to increase the likelihood 
that white enrollment would come up to Court-established standards 
(page 18). The failure of Madison Park and English High Schools to 
be attractive to students of all racial/ethnic groups was also a 
matter requiring priority attention (page 12). 

The basic conclusion was that "the assignment process was carried out 
appropriately, but the assignment outcomes are not satisfactory in all 
cases," leading to a need to "strengthen the attractiveness" of many 
schools and to "follow up on assignments by energetic outreach". 



-28H- 



The Board's Second Report (February 1984) made "vigorous recruitment 
and program development efforts" a priority "of greatest concern to 
the State Board of Education" (volume I, page 6). 

With respect to Extended Day Kindergarten programs, the Board noted 
the need, in some cases, for "effective recruitment" as well as 
"careful attention to assignment limitations" (page 12). A long- 
term enrollment strategy" was needed for several magnet elementary 
schools (page 13). 

Several high schools enrolled an insufficient proportion of White 
students; while Burke was progressing toward compliance, Jamaica 
Plain did not appear to be. Brighton and South Boston had just 
fallen out of compliance with White enrollment ranges. Special 
concern was expressed about English High (page 13). 

In a review of "White enrollment trends," it was pointed out that 
many schools lost a high proportion of the white students assigned 
to them for first grade. Twenty schools were identified which 
showed "promise of coming into compliance without mandatory 
reassignments," through "program development, communication with 
parents, and measures to create a safe and positive learning 
environment in each school" (page 16). 



Follow-up Assistance 



In January 1984 Dr. Doreen Wilkinson, administrator of Chapter 636 
(state desegregation funding) grants to Boston, informed Boston 
staff of the "target areas" for more than $5 million in grants 
for 1984-85. 

First of these target areas was efforts to improve school climate 
at English, Madison Park, Burke, Dorchester and Charlestown high 
schools; second was recruitment to assure proportional enrollment 
in vocational programs. The third was recruitment projects to 
achieve Court-ordered enrollment goals in fifteen schools. Five 
other target areas addressed other aspects of the Board's Reports. 

In making funding decisions, the extent to which these priority 
areas are addressed will be a major concern. Associate Commissioner 
Case has stressed to Superintendent Spillane the expectation that 
the Board's findings will be addressed with Chapter 636 funds. 

The Department of Implementation has recently developed a funding 
proposal for coordination and support of recruitment efforts. 



-285- 



Recruitment Efforts: Central Office 

The Department of Implementation undertook a variety of efforts to 
encourage school-level recruitment activities. These efforts included: 

(a) mailing press releases to the local and citywide media; 

(b) printing mailing labels for students who live in the 
geocodes for certain schools but do not attend the 
Boston Public Schools, so that these schools could 
send direct mailings to prospective students; 

(c) writing directly to parents of 2,082 8th grade students 
who do not attend the BPS, encouraging them to consider 
an application to a Boston high school, and explaining 
the process; 

(d) advising school-level administrators on how to increase 
applications (see attached, March 26th); 

(e) reminding the same of the concern, expressed in the 
Board's Reports to the Court, about recruitment to 
schools which are not in compliance with Court require- 
ments, enclosing relevant sections of the Report, and 
making specific recommendations on recruitment (see 
attached, March 31st); 

(f) supplying each elementary principal in districts 1-8 
with labels of BPS kindergarten students who live in 
the geocodes assigned to their schools for first grade 
(since students may be assigned to one school for 
kindergarten and another for first grade, and many 
white kindergarteners do not continue on to public 
school first grade); and 

(g) making special efforts to reach prospective students 
from Court Street (see attached, April 9th). In 
support of these efforts a proposal was developed 
for Chapter 636 funding, with the provision that 

it not compete with school -based or district-based 
proposals but be considered for supplemental funding. 
A copy of this proposal is attached; it constitutes 
a comprehensive response to issues raised in the 
Board's Reports. Subject to the availability of 
funding, the Department of Education will seek to 
support the proposed activities. 

The efforts outlined above constitute a serious effort, by the 
Department of Implementation, to come to grips with the challenge 
of student recruitment. The use of press releases and other public 



-286- 



information efforts is a continuing practice, but the direct mailings 
to parents of students not in the public schools, the effort to reach 
kindergarten students who might not continue on to first grade, and 
some of the other special efforts made this year deserve commendation. 

Recruitment Efforts: Local Schools 

Monitors visited each school designated for "special desegregation" 
measures to inquire about program development and recruitment efforts, 
this included: 

Elementary : Middle : High : 

Ellis R. G. Shaw Burke 

Emerson Tobm (K-8J Dorchester 

Lee Thompson East Boston 
P. A. Shaw 

In addition other schools about which previous monitoring had raised 
desegregation-related concerns were visited: 

Elementary : High : 

Chittick English 

Kennedy Hernandez Jamaica Plain 

Mattahunt Winthrop 

In each case inquiry was made about efforts; a follow-up letter to 
"special desegregation" schools invited them to provide up-dated 
recruitment information. Response was as follows: 

Ellis Copies of materials sent to parents, with special 

emphasis on advanced work classes. Principal 
reports that she or the parent coordinator called 
most prospective parents. One letter is attached. 

Emerson Copy of letter sent to prospective parents 

(attached). 

Lee no response 

P. A. Shaw A variety of materials sent to parents and 

prospective parents, and a letter describing 
direct outreach efforts by school staff and 
parents. 

R.G. Shaw Middle Copy of a letter sent to parents of about sixty 

students geocoded to the Shaw but attending non- 
public schools. 



-287- 



Thompson Middle Copy of a letter sent to parents of students 

living in the school's geocodes. Principal 
reports that the guidance counsellor would be 
visiting elementary schools during May to assist 
recruitment efforts (note that applications were 
returned in April, but this effort might still 
help to hold some assigned students who might 
otherwise not attend the Thompson in September 1984). 

In addition to these materials from "special desegregation" schools, 
we attach a letter sent by the principal of the Hernandez magnet school 
to parents who had expressed interest in that school's kindergarten. 
The Hernandez was identified, in the Board's Reports, as a school 
which should enroll more white students. 

The purpose of attaching so much material is to provide illustrations 
of the approaches to student recruitment taken by various schools in 
Boston. In general there seems to be a greater awareness of the. 
importance of outreach efforts. On the other hand, it remains 
questionable whether a single letter giving general information about 
a school will have a significant impact. 

By contrast, the efforts of three schools could be considered exemplary. 

P.S. Shaw elementary school was singled out, in the Board's First 
Report (July 1983) for the extensive school/parent communication 
around explicitly educational concerns. Some of. this material, 
which is also used for recruitment, is attached. The general 
impression given is one of attention to detail, of seeking to 
draw parents into a cooperative relationship with the school. 
Not Included in these attachments are the reprints of articles 
on "how to help your child" and other materials sent to parents. 
It would be evident to any parent that the school is committed 
to helping each child to learn; this is of course a commitment 
of other schools as well, but rarely so well communicated . 

Dorchester High School developed a variety of new program 

emphases and reached out aggressively through recruitment 
visits to public and non-public intermediate schools. 
Individualized letters were then sent to each student 
expressing an interest in a particular program, stressing 
that interest. In addition, letters were sent to parents 
of 1,300 8th graders attending non-public schools, using 
labels provided by the Department of Implementation. 

Results, as indicated by student preferences, have been 
modest (for example, an increase from 5 to 9 in the number 
of white students giving the Dorchester vocational programs 
as their first choice), but there are some signs (for example, 
41 second choices by white students; that these efforts will 
result in more white students actually attending Dorchester 
in September. 



-288- 






English High School restructured its organization, with a ninth 
grade cluster and three program emphases (apart from bilingual 
and special education) for grades 10-12. Material was mailed 
to parents of students attending non-public schools, giving a 
clear impression that the school practices selective admission 
(see attached). While in fact the Court has not authorized 
such a modification of the assignment process, there may be 
a distinct advantage in creating the impression that English 
is an elite school ! 

Results have been modest, but encouraging. The number of white 
students who gave English as first choice for ninth grade increased 
from 22 in 1983 to 53 in 1984. Ten white students gave the 
performing arts program as their first choice (compared with two 
who listed the Music Program at Madison Park). Ten others listed 
the "Fenway Program." Interestingly, the number of first 
preferences for the "traditional program" was also higher, at 34, 
than the 22 White first preferences for English High in 1983, 

The number of white applicants to English from middle schools in 
District VIII rose from one to seven, and those from middle schools 
in District I from two to 11. Three "new to Boston" students 
(perhaps from non-public schools?) gave English as their first 
preference. 

Despite this progress, it will be essential to follow through 
successfully on the promise of new programs, improved school 
climate, and successful education. The Board has recently given 
a small discretionary grant to move the program development at 
English ahead, and the next few months will be critical. After 
all, the "International Program" at Copley High was the "star 
attraction" for prospective ninth graders in 1983, butits first 
preferences dropped from 175 to 115 for Black students and from 86 
to 64 for White students for 1984. Boston students and their 
parents are sophisticated educational consumers. 



-289- 



Summary 



There is a good deal of new "recruitment" activity in Boston, 
both from the Department of Implementation and from schools 
designated for "special desegregation" measures. Mr. Coakley 
has developed a proposal for Chapter 636 funding which would, 
for the first time, give central coordination and support to 
recruitment and thus to the "active efforts" so necessary to 
the desegregation plan. 

Efforts at the school level range from sending a general letter 
of information, perhaps including an open house or an invitation 
to visit the school, to the sophisticated efforts to communicate 
an educational commitment and direction which we found in the 
case of the Shaw elementary and Dorchester and English High Schools. 

It cannot be stressed too strongly that such successful communi- 
cation efforts rely upon having something to communicate about, 
that they must reflect a year-round effort to be responsive to 
educational needs and to parent concerns. Again and again we 
were told that "word of mouth" was the best recruiter, that 
satisfied parents could best convince other parents. In this 
sense, "recruitment" must begin the first week of school, and 
include many outreach and communication efforts which show 
no immediate results. 

Further analysis will be based upon the number of assigned students 
who actually enroll in September, and upon a comparison of such 
figures for 1983 and for 1984. 



-290- 



Recruitment-related Materials 

1. from the Department of Implementation 

2. from "special desegregation" scnools 

3. exemplary materials relating program 
development and recruitment, from: 

P. A. Shaw elementary school 
Dorchester High School 
English High School 



-291- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




_ i 



- c 




March 26, 1984 

MEMORANDUM 

TO: Principals, Headmasters, ^Program Heads 

FROM: John R. Coakley S/M" 

SUBJECT: Public Information 

At this time of the year — and again in late August — we in the 
Department of Implementation send press releases ad nauseam to local and 
citywide media, and we send informational packets to many agencies in an 
effort to attract students to the Boston Public Schools. You should 
give serious consideration — and many of you do — to issuing your own 
individualized notices to local papers and agencies. 

If you have any brochures or notices which could be sent to me— 
preferably in volume — I would see to it that they are visible on the ninth 
floor when parents visit the Department of Implementation. (Many of you 
know that we are visited by scores of parents/students on a typical day 
in the year and by hundreds on those days of our "crunch" periods. In fact, 
sometimes we have to hand out numbers as though we are operating a Star 
Market Deli.) If you do not have brochures but d_o have posters advertising 
your schools' educational attractiveness do consider sending those to us. 
We can display them on the 9th or 1st floors of Court Street, and possibly 
seek out display space at City Hall, the Faneiul Hall area or Downtown 
Crossi ng. 

You know that there are nearly 30,000 students residing in the city 
but not attending our schools. Surely, not all of them or their parents 
are delighted with their present schools (or tuition costs). There also 
are 4000 or so prospective ki ndergartners "out there." If you do not 
seek converts I can assure you that many enrollments — especially at the 
secondary school level — will decline further. Even at the elementary 
school level any increases will impact some schools proportionately more 
than others. Enough of this, however! We can provide you with address 
lists of non-BPS students who reside in your geocodes. 

Kindly remember that a quick way to get back _to me (not a_t me) is to 
give a message to the D.I. person who makes the daily telephone inquiry 
about school transportation. 

bmj 

cc: Robert Spi 1 lane 

Robert Peterkin, Oliver Lancaster, Catherine Ellison, Community Superintendents 

I: ::. = TS"Er SGSTO'-i. '.!~53<iCH'„Sc~S 021C3 • ~26-c2CO. sXT ==CO. 726-o555, EXT 55COAREA617 

-292- 



'HE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 





March 31 ,1984 



Dear Principal or Headmaster, 



I realize that my colleagues and I have been flooding you 
with memoranda and other materials, and that there is considerable 
overlap in what we send out to you. However, this is a truly 
important request. It is a certainty that any Long Range Plan 
which emerges from the school system will be subject to skeptical 
and thorough examination by the Parties to the Desegregation Case, 
the Massachusetts Board of Education and the Federal Court. We 
will be seeking extremely major changes in the Student Assignment 
Orders, and almost certainly we will be challenged about so-called 
Compliance issues in the present orders, e.g., Vocational Education, 
the Unified Facilities Plan and schools which are outside the range 
of racial desegregation. The school system is addressing those first 
two issues and there may be some controversies, especially about 
the sencond of the first two issues. 

This note seeks your assistance in doing everything 
possible within the strictures of a demanding Cour Order to address 
seeming cases of non-compliance. On February 1st the State said 
35 (although I count 36 in its listing) schools were out of 
desegregative compliance, but that 20 of the schools showed promise 
of coming into compliance. The state also expressed concern about 
some magnet schools ' enrollments and those of the cooperative 
vocational education programs. I strongly urge you and parent 
councils to do some or all of the following: 

1. Recruit public school kindergarteners who are in your 
geocodes for first grade. I'll supply stickers if you write to 
me or if you speak to the DI person who makes the daily inquiry 
about transportation service. 

2. Where appropriate, recruit public school fifth-graders 
and eighth-graders who are in your geoceodes for middle school or 
high school. Same offer from me. 

3. Recruit non-BPS students who live in your geocodes and 
will be in the appropriate grades. I sent some of you (who were 
among the 36 schools noted above) such names and address labels, 
and need to know what you might have done. However, you and others 
should ask for labels. 

4. Use material I have sent to you or develop your own to 
send home noticesto parents of BPS and non-BPS students, and to 
notify local papers, agencies and churches. 



"CvAJ Arc-* r> \ 



-293- 



Recruitment Letter to Principals 



March 31 , 1984 



5. Provideme with a narrative of your recruitment efforts, 
which efforts should be heavy before April 11th but which can 
continue up to and beyond Labor Day also. At this time, it is 
more important that I learn of your aggressive efforts than of 
the degree of success . 

I sense the frustration which many of you feel with 
what you may consider the rigidity of the Court Orders or the 
arbitrary natuere of the geocodes. (Why, a few have even been 
known to be frustrated with the rigidity and arbitrariness of 
such charming persons as my colleagues and me.) This note asks 
you to transcend your feelings, and help us prove, once and for 
all, that we have done all that reasonable women and men can to 
implement the Court Orders. WE NEED TO DOCUMENT OUR CASE. 
Please help in that documentation by doing some or all of the 
recruitment efforts I have suggested and, equally important, 
advising me in writing of your various efforts. Don't forget, 
too, to seek the involvement of parents and others in your 
activities. Thank you very much, and please note that I did 
not write this on April 1 . 

Sincerely yours, 



//John R. Coakley & 



-29 1 *- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 








April 9, 1984 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: Catherine Ellison 
John Canty 
Lydia Francis 

FROM: John R. Coakley 

SUBJECT: Continued Registration for 1984-85 

I ask Catherine to coordinate a response to these inquiries/suggestions: 

1. Publicizing that we will accept late registrants 
through 4/20 IF they register at Court Street. 

2. Do the Supermarket run on 4/13 to 4/15. Give staff 
who do it on 4/13 one day off and give staff who do 
it on 4/14 2 days off and give staff who do it on 
4/15 2 days off. (A person could do one, some or 
all 3 dates. ) 

3. Send material out to schools on 4/9 and 4/10 so that 
ELEM Schools, at least, can register through June ? th. 

4. Study "Coming Events" calendars to see if we can set 
desks up on key days at key places in the Spring and 
Summer. Examples: Quincy Market, Downtown Crossing, 
Dorchester Day Parade, Boston Marathon, Bunker Hill Day, 
Any parade days I haven't thought of, any ethnic days 

at Esplanade. 

5. Call each school and ask them to provide us with the 
names of living well-known (or not well-known but 
obviously successful) men and women who attended given 
schools of the BPS. Then, write and ask the people 

to forward us each a bio. and a nostalgic remembrance 
of the school for use in a June media blitz. 

I also want you to know that I will seek Chapter 636 monies for what 
I term on-going recruitment. I welcome bright ideas and specific budgetary 
needs (wi th detai 1 ) . 

bmj 

;; .:;,-' 3 :- = £" 3C5"\ '•.'.iS3-C.— _-S£ T "r ' i' Cz • ~Zi 52CC '-■' ^SCO, 725-6555. EXT 55CO AREA 617 

"295- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R. Coakley, Senior Officer 



April 26, 1984 



Dr. Charles Glenn 

Equal Educational Opportunities 

State Department of Education 

1585 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Charles, 

Dr. Spillane has authorized me to make the attached request for 
Chapter 636 funding for a Student Recruitment Project. I would 
envision the project operating out of the Department of Implementa- 
tion with general activity determined by me and day-to-day supervision 
conducted by either Dr. Ellison or the Director of the External 
Liaison Unit. 

I am not at all certain of the protocol to be followed, and seek 
some guidance from you. Further, it is not my intent to place this 
proposal in competition with district-based or school-based projects; 
rather, it is my understanding you would consider funding such a 
proposal out of other Chapter 636 funds available to your office. 

Your direction on this matter will be appreciated. 

Sincerely 



/senior Ofiieer/y 



ab 
Enclosure 

xc: Office of Superintendent 
Catherine Ellison 
Lydia Francis 
John Canty 
Catherine Blount 
Martin Hunt 



26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200. EXT 5500, 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 

-296- 



i ! 1 






iilUii i -T DUO! Jn 




, _. w w\(M ' — 



April 24, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



To: 

From: 

Subject: 



Robert Spillane 



John Coakley 

Request to Seek Chapter 636 Funding for Student Recruitement 



The State Board's Report No. 2 on Boston School Desegregation, 
dated February 1, 1984, among other things deals with Student Assign- 
ments and Special Desegregation Measures. Allow me to provide 
excerpts from the recommendations in each category: 

RECOMMENDATIONS - STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 

*1. A strategy should be developed to improve desegregation compliance 
of twenty schools which show promise of coming into compliance without 
mandatory reassignments ; such a strategy should include program develop- 
ment, communication with parents, and measures to create a safe and 
positive learning environment in each school. 

2. Extended Day Kindergarten programs make a contribution to desearega- 
tion in a number of cases; establishment of additional programs and 
expansion of existing ones should be considered, subject to careful 
review of equity considerations. In a few cases closer adherence to 
admission requirements and recruitment of under-represented students are 
necessary. 

3. The implications of rapid enrollment decline in magnet schools 
should be reviewed. 

4. The reasons for non-compliance with the permitted range for White 
enrollment at Brighton and South Boston high schools should be identified 
and remedial actions taken. A plan should be developed to move Jamaica 
Plain and English High Schools toward compliance, with special attention 
to security improvements. 

*5. The non-compliance of most citywide vocational programs with the 
permitted racial ranges and with the goals for enrollment of male and 
female students requires coordinated efforts to increase the number of 
applicants from under-represented groups, with special reliance upon 
career education, guidance, and communication about what each program 
offers . 



-297- 



Robert Spillane 2 April 24, 1984 

RECOMMENDATIONS - SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 

*1. An explicit desegregation strategy should be developed for the six 
special desegregation schools for which no strategy exists, that 
identifies the necessary program changes, leadership, and resources and 
other support required to achieve or maintain compliance. If modification 
of existing assignment requirements would contribute to stable long-term 
compliance with desegregation requirements, Boston should propose such 
changes through the modification process. 

*2. School-level recruitment efforts should become a priority for staff 
of special desegregation schools, and appropriate resources should be 
made available to support such efforts. Recruitment should be directed 
particularly to students in transitional grades, completing kindergarten, 
fifth grade, and eighth grade, and to their parents. 

3. The location of middle school bilingual clusters in District I 
should be reviewed, and measures taken to reduce the number of dis- 
appointed minority students applying to middle school grades at the 
Tobin K-8 school. 

4. Burke High School should consider developing a new magnet program to 
replace the attenuated Theatre Arts program and so encourage additional 
White enrollment and compliance with desegregation requirements. 

5. The City and School Department should ensure that the renovations to 
Burke High called for by the special desegregation plan submitted to the 
Court are undertaken immediately. 

6. Plans to phase out two magnet vocational education programs at 
Dorchester High School should be evaluated for a potentially adverse 
effect on special desegregation efforts at that school. 

7. The curriculum content and administrative structure of the Business 
Magnet program at East Boston High shoudl be strengthened substantially. 

*8. Record-keeping should be improved for the Business Magnet program: 
information on work-site experience, post-graduate job placements, 
transfer requests and retention of students in the program is essential 
to program improvement. 

9. The Advanced Work and Academically Talented programs should be 
restructured to provide effective preparation for students who will be 
admitted to the examination schools. This will require a distinctive 
curriculum, selection of staff on the basis of experience and training 
in this area and effective inservice training. 

*10. Selection of students for the Advanced Work and Academically 
Talented programs should not rely exclusively on achievement tests, with 
their limited capacity to predict academic success of minority students. 
Informational materials about these programs should be disseminated 
more effectively, and in the principal languages spoken by Boston 
parents . 

11. All three examination schools should offer mandatory summer or 
spring orientation programs that include diagnostic testing to identify 
and remediate skill deficiencies. 



-298- 



Robert Spillane 3 April 24, 1984 

12. All three examination schools should institute a systematic 
procedure for identifying, referring and following up on the progress 
of students in need of support services. Such services should be 
provided during school hours, including academic remediation, training 
in study habits and counseling. The ratio of counselors to students 
should be improved, clerical and attendance staff should be provided 
to permit counselors to concentrate on their primary function of student 
contact, and there should be less exclusive stress on college-oriented 
counseling activities. 

*13. There should be clear responsibility for identifying and supporting 
the education of academically talented students, including communication 
with their families, coordination of curricula of middle school and 
high school advanced programs, and comprehensive support services for 
minority students in the examination schools. 

I have enumerated these recommendations to suggest that there is a 
need for a student-recruitment strategy and to offer the view that the 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity of the Massachusetts Department 
of Education is willing to fund such an effort. It is important, how- 
ever, that you not interpret my listing of the recommendations as a 
blind endorsement of the findings of Report No. 2. In some cases I 
disagree with the findings and in many cases I question seriously the 
scope of the recommendations. Nonetheless, I urge you to allow me to 
seek Chapter 636 funding directly from the Massachusetts Department of 
Education's Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity for a Team of 
Research, Publicity and Recruitment persons to address some of the 
aforesaid recommendations, particularly those which are starred. 

Proposal Thrust 

1. To analyze residential patterns, assignment and discharge data, and 
school/program preferences in order to develop enrollment strategies 
and to provide helpful data to potential applicants to our schools. 

2. To prepare brochures, news releases, flyers, informational packages 
to be utilized in public information and recruitment endeavors, 
and to seek to obtain greater use of media services by school 
personnel. 

3. To appear at schools, clubs, public meetings, shopping areas, and 
radio and television stations to encourage student enrollment in 
specific schools of the Boston Public Schools. 

Staffing Needs and Expenditures 

Title Number Yearly Salary 

1. Data Analyst 1 $22,374 

2. Publications Specialist 1 $22,374 

3. Information Officer 2 $22,374 

4. Clerk Typist 1 $15,550 

5. Parent Recruiters 10 $ 8,000 

Personnel Expenditure $185,046 



-299- 



Robert Spillane 4 April 24, 1984 

Materials 

1. Printing and Production Costs $35,000 

2. Postage $20,000 

3. Translations $ 4,000 

Materials Expenditure S 4 9, 000 

TOTAL EXPENDITURE $234,046 

Please advise me as soon as possible if I may seek out Dr. Glenn 
of the Massachusetts Department of Education to ascertain his willing* 
ness to obtain the necessary approval at his end. Please also know 
that I can modify the proposal as offered above. 



JC:ab 



-300- 



DAVID A. ELLIS SCHOOL 

April 6, 1984 
Dear Parents: 

The Boston Public Schools now have a brighter future, than they have 
had in several years. Our scores ar> going up, schools are stable, and 
many of our programs are exceptional. Currently a recruitment drive is 
underway to encourge you to send your children to us. 

To thfs end, we are asking that you give serfous consideration to 
enrolling your children fn the David A. Ellis. 

The David A. Ellis School has an illustrious history in this community. 
It has graduated pupils' who went on to become, professionals in every field; 
many of whom returned to the area to live and work. 

Those of us who are fortunate enough to be a current part of the El lis 
are working very Bard to once again make it an attractive beacon, not only 
to the community, but to the city at large. 

Some of our programs are as follows: 

1. Extensive homework four nights each week. 

2. Chapter I for pupils who need extra academic attention. 

3. A computer program. 

4. Advanced Work Class. 

5. An excellent Kindergarten. 

6. A BtHngual program. 

7. A well stocketl Library.. 

8.. And a 636 Enrichment program, among others. 
Please feel free to look us over and/or call at any time. (445-0432].. 

Very Truly Yours, 

Florence A. Hadley (7 

Principal 



-301- 



RALPH WAEDO EMERSON SCHOOL 

6 Shirley Street 
Roxbury, Massachusetts 02119 

T O PAREHTS WITH CHILDREN ELIGIBLE TO A TTEND Tlffi EI ERSON SCHOOL 

Have you considered sending your child to the Boston Public Schools? 
If you have - then one option open to you is the E-TSBSOK SCHOOL located at 
6 Shirley Street, Roxbury* 

The EMERSON SCHOOL is a brick building built in 1923 housing 14 
traditionally oriented classrooms. It contains a Library, Cafeteria, 
Resource Room, two (2) Kindergarten Classes and two (2) Chapter I Reading 
Rooms, It is located in a quiet residential area of Roxbury. 

Other items worthy of note concerning the EE.T3RS0E SCHOOL are: 

1. Cur main goal is to provide for the children a safe, 
happy and successful school enviornnent. We have done 
this . 

2. School attendance at the EMERSON is excellent. We had the 
best attendance for District 6 schools for the school year 
1982-1983. During February of 1984 our attendance per- 
centage was 95.6/S. Kids like to come to the EMERSON. 

3. Scores on the Metropolitan ReadingTest were excellent. 

4. Scores on the Metropolitan Math Test were excellent. 

5. Computer Education is now available to all students. 

6. There are no tuition or book charges to attend the 
EMERSON SCHOOL. 

TO REGISTER YOUR CHILD - GO TO THE AREA 6 OFFICE 

Campbell Resource Center 

1216 Dorchester Avenue 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 02125 ' -.• 

Telephone #282-3440 . , 

OR YOU MAY GO TO THE MAIN OFFICE OF THE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT AT 26 Court Street. 

YOU MUST PRESENT TWO PRE-PRINTED PROOFS. OF ADDRESS (i.e. Utility Bills) and 

YOUR CHILD'S BIRTH CERTIFICATE. / I ~ 

/y / JOSEI^f. FREIDERGAST - Principal 
-302- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



JOHN J BRADLEY 
Principal 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
PAULINE AGASSIZ SHAW SCHOOL 

April 11, 1981+ 



Tot John Coakley, Senior Officer 

From: John J* Bradley, Principal^^bV 

Subject: EPS Kindergarteners Eligible for Your First Grade 

Enclosed find sample of written communication sent to eligible 
first graders. Continuing notices regarding our school will be sent 
hose. 

Teachers telephoned soae parents, especially those in the Hyde Park 
area. 

1 contacted parents in both the Dorchester and Hyde Park areas 
and expressed the hope that their son or daughter would in fact attend 
the Shaw School. 

The School Parent Council will continue to contact parents in an 
effort to recruit pupils for the Shaw School. 

JJB:f« 



-303- 

429 NORFOLK STREET, DORCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 02124 • 436-3145 AREA 617 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
PAULINE AGASSiZ SHAW SCHOOL 

JOHN J BRADLEY 
Principal 

To Parent(s), 

Welcome to the Pauline A. Shaw School Our school is located in a residential 
section of Dorchester, U29 Norfolk Street, Telephone Ii36-31l|5. 

The organization provides for kindergarten through grade 5 children. Our school 
also features an extended day/bilingual kindergarten and Chapter 766 services. 

The Shaw's educational philosophy concerns itself with the development of a 
positive self-image in all our childrea and insuring creative opportunities for 
each of them to utilise fully their individual talents. We are committed to the 
Reading/language, Arts and Mathematics Curriuclum Objectives as approved by the 
Boston School Committee. 

Our school possesses experienced, motivated, and dedicated teachers. All of 
us have a common objective, namely, to provide meaningful programs based upon the 
identified needs and desires of your children. 

The adjustment to individual needs is the cornerstone of all of our educational 
pl anning . Children are encouraged and urged to develop and extend their strengths 
and remdiate needs. 

In addititon to the dally instruction in basic skills development, we provide 
remedial and enrichment programs. Through additional federal and state funding, 
we have been able to expand our programs in Chapter I, Reading, Reading and Music 
through Chapter 636. We have a 636 collaborative with Stonehill College, Easton, 
Massachusetts in the area of literature and computer usage. 

All of the materials used in our programs are both multi-level and multi-cultural 
in content and are in full compliance with Chapter 622. 

The School-Parent Council and the Home and School Association work diligently 
in cooperation with the staff and administration to develop programs and strive 
for a continuing upgrading of the physical facilities so as to provide a more 
comfortable, safe and inspirational setting for your children. 

Given such exciting programs, experienced, motivated, earing teachers and 
administration, cooperating parents, happy and relaxed children, it is any womder 
that we feel that the Shaw School is an "Opportunity School". 

If you have any questions, kindly call us and we shall be glad to respond to 
your inquiries. 



SCHOOL HOURS 8; $0 A.M . - 2:20 P.M. 

429 NORFOLK STREET. DORCHESTE". ' " ■ ' ' • .'SETTS 02124 • -136-314? AREA 6V 

-304- 




THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




March 28, 1984 



Dear Parent/Guard Jan, 

The Boston Public Schools is holding the annual enrollment effort, 
called the Student Application Process. We are urging parents of children 
not attending our schools to sign up for the next school year. 

Student Applications are available in all public schools, district 
offices and School Headquarters at 26 Court Street in Boston. Student 
Assignment Information Booklets will be available. 

The Student Application Process for 1984-85 will take place until 
April 11, 1984. A student can be enrolled after that period, but the 
chances of obtaining a' magnet or district program are better if applica- 
tions are made before April 11th. 

To enter our kindergarten in the next school year a child must have 
been born in 1979 (or earlier). To enter our first grade a child must 
have been born in 1978 (or earlier). 

This letter is intended for the parent or guardian who might have 
a child who is not presently attending the Boston Public Schools but who 
would be eligible to attend in the next school year. Children already 
In the Boston Public Schools have received their application forms from 
their teachers. 

For assistance, please call the School Information Center at 726-6555 
or call a nearby public school. School phone numbers are listed on page 6 
of the blue-pages section of the regular Boston Telephone Directory. 

Sincerely, 






-305- 







8.XLAW ML 

/\iT ftppw+*/>ity School:* Where children,, 
parents, teachers, Qnd +he dJroiniS- 
+ra+lon Wor/c -for a bef fer tomorrow. 



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THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

ROBERT GOULD SHAW MIDDLE SCHOOL 



April 20, 198M 



CORNELIUS J. KEOHANE 
Principal 






Dear 

It is once again that time of year when parents and students 
are considering the choice of schools that the students will attend 
for the approaching school year. This is an important decision, and 
it is never an easy one. 

I would like to offer for your consideration the District III 
Boston Public Schools that are located in your neighborhood and in 
particular the Robert Gould Shaw Middle School located at Mt . Vernon 
and Centre Street in West Roxbury. 

The Robert Gould Shaw offers a disciplined environment where 
students in Grades 6, 7, and 8 are provided a structured academic 
program combined with the opportunity to sample career-oriented 
support subjects. 

Every student in every grade takes the academic subjects of 
English, Reading, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Science. Those 
students reading at or above grade level may participate in the AIP 
program (Advanced Individual Potential) which allows them to progress 
at a faster rate of growth, and in addition, they begin the study of 
a foreign language in Grade 6. The support subjects of Art, Music, 
Physical Education, Home Economics, Graphic Arts and Drafting are 
provided en a rotating basis to all students. There are no study 
periods at the Shaw. 

Building on the success of our Grade 8 Computer Program (15 Apple 
Computers), we will be expanding next year so that every seventh and 
eighth grade student will receive classroom instruction and hands-on 
experience in programming. In addition, Grade 3 students will be able 
to participate in a newly designed Electronics Laboratory course. 

I have very briefly described the educational program at the 
Robert Gould Shaw Middle School. I urge you to consider our program 
as you make educational decisions for the 1984-1985 school year. 
If you have any questions or need additional information, don't hesi- 
tate to call the school at 325-2727. If you wish to visit the school, 
an appointment can be made at your convenience. 

I realize the importance of your educational decisions, and 
I thank you for your consideration of the Shaw Middle School. 

Sincerely, 




C. J. Keohane 
Principal 

20 MT. VERNON STREET • WEST ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS 02132 . 325-2727 AREA 617 

-307- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



v^_ : v 

BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

FHANK V THOMPSON MIDDLE SCHOG: D'STR'C 



GERALD mi. i 
Pnncipa! 



April 11, 198^4 



Dear Parent: 

Have you been thinking about the right school assignment for 
your child? 

The Frank V. Thompson Middle School would like you to take a 
look at the innovative programs we have to offer for the 1984- 
1985 school year. 

These Programs include Academic Cluster Instruction, Frank V. 
Thompson Chorus, Student Government, after-school sports, computer 
education, basic skills instruction and career awareness. 

We invite you to contact our Guidance Counselor at 825-0^75 to 
arrange a visit to our school. 



Hope to hear from you soon! 
Sincerely yours, 

Gerald Hill ^ 



Principal 
GH:dmc 



100 MAXWELL STREET, DORCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 02124 • 282-4040 AREA 617 

-308- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

RAFAEL HERNANDEZ BILINGUAL SCHOOL 



March 22 , 1984 



Dear Parent/Guardian: 



The Boston Public Schools will be holding the annual enrollment effort, called 
the Student Application Process, somewhat earlier this year. We are urging parents 
of children not attending our scnools to sign up for the next school. year. 

Student Applications will be available in all public schools, district offices 
and School Headquarters at 26 Court Street in Boston. Student Assignment Informa- 
tion Booklets will be available. 

The Student Application Process for 1983-84 will take place between March 26 
and April 11, 1984. A student can be enrolled after that period, but the chances 
of obtaining a magnet or district program are better if applications are made 
between March 26th and April 11th. 

To enter our kindergarten in the next school year, a child must have been born 
in 1979 (or earlier). To enter our first grade, a child must have been born in 
1978 (or earlier) . Monday, April 2, 1984, has been designated as Kindergarten 
Application Day . There will be no Kindergarten on April 2 , so that the Kindergarten 
teachers can assist in the kindergarten application/registration process at school. 
You need to bring a birth certificate and two proofs of address in order to register. 

This letter is intended for the parent or guardian who might have a child who 
is not presently attending the Boston Public Schools but who would be eligible to 
attend in the next school year. Children already in the Boston Public Schools will 
receive their application forms from their teachers. 

For assistance, please call the School Information Center at 726-6555 or call 
a nearby public school. School phone numbers are listed on page 6 of the blue-pages 
section of the regular Boston Telephone Directory. 

* 

We would appreciate it if you pass this information along to your relatives 
and friends who have school aged children.. They are welcome to visit the Hernandez 
on Mondays. We would appreciate a phone call if you do plan to visit. 



Thank you. 



S ince re ly , 

Margarita M. Muniz 
Principal 




-309- 



PAULINZ A. SUM SCHCCL 

A29 NORFOLK STR2ST 
DQRCHEST3R, MASSACHUSETTS 



02124 



SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY 

We are committed to the concept of self-contained classrooms emphasizing 
individualized instruction in developing the basic skills. The staff 
and administration in all- their efforts in the areas of teacher . 
preparation, planning and -presentation attempt to provide the type of . 
instruction which will enable pupils entrusted to us to develop their . 
skills in accordance with their personal growth rate. 



SCHOOL GOALS AND CflJ ECmgS ... 

., :,.. . ••. • ■• ::• : ■ - :■•'.' ' • • •':• ". 

. Develop a positive self image in all our pupils as a means to achieving 
. •-• in school and life. : -'■■■■.'■ .. 

In development of a positive self image pupils will be assisted- to 
.. grow in terms of their individual capacities, assisting them in the 
realization of their strengths and weaknesses, not being overwhelmed 
with the' latter but ever' striving to overcome then. 

Stress development of reading, mathematical and language skills. To 
this end all staff members will refrain from embracing consciously or 
unconsciously a rigid grouping system. Flexibility will be the key 
in all our grouping practices. ~ *~ ■""" — 

Help pupils build a foundation forindepcndent work habits. Tension 
and poor attitude toward school will be held to a winimun by continuously- 
evaluating pupils in terms of needs and performance. ' . • 

Design p r o g r am s that will provide a purposeful educational experience -. 
for our special needs pupils. . 

Generate in our pupils a realization of the differences in cultures 
and an understanding and appreciation of the contributions that each 
makes to the society in which we all live. 

. Prepare and submit purposeful 636 proposals ► -; 

Continuous upgrading of physical facilities in an effort to provide 
a comfortable, safe' and inspirational setting for our pupils. 




-310- 




PAULINE A. SHAW SCHOOL 

A29 NORFOLK STREET *) 
DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS' 02124 



Suggestions For Parents 



Interest is very important in learning to read, Your interest 
and your child's are equally. vital. If yon want to help him learn. 
to read, show him that you appreciate his progress* In turn your 
'interest will cause him to be interested. He needs your sympathetic" 
understanding and encouragement. He needs to knew that you are 
interested. These are seme ways you can show him that your are: 

•.•.«■•'" •• ' • .. : • . ; • .'■-•••■-*• • '-•'■-■.•••■• '•' ■'■»*■*/*..■■ 
Be a. good listener - listen to him read often. Enjoy ■;_.*• 
the story he reads to .you, and tell him that you enjoy it. 

. ' ..' •• <■ ■. ■•'•'' •%¥%?: 

• .: Don't tell him you want to hear him read. Tou'd get 

nervous, too, if you thought scene one was listening to how 

you read instead of to what you were reading. " • # . s '- 

Do take time to hear him read by sitting down- and giving 
your sincere attention to him for at least fifteen minutes. 

Don't interrupt him to converse with soasone else while 
. .. he is reading. 

Don't read the newspaper and give an occasional "uh huh" 
to let him think you are listening, for he knows you are just 
pretending to listen. 

Don't wash the dishes while he tries to read above the 
clatter. 

Always urge him to read as he irould talk, for reading i3 
just another way of communicating. 



John J. Bradley 

Principal 

. — 1— 

Claire Mc Ardle 

Reading Teacher-Coordinator 



-311- 



• ' Reading: Suggestions for Parents 

i * 

Parents can help their children become successful readers by following the 

* suggestions listed below. 



At Home ~ '." "* 

1. Vi'ork toward creating a relaxed atmosphere. 
: 2. Take your child for regular hearing and eye tests since impaired vision 

or hearing may impede classroom comprehension. 
3. Bring your child regularly to the public library and help him/her select 

books that interest him/her. 
A. Keep a few of your child's books in an area where he/she spends much of 

his/her time. 
5* Let your child see you reading magazines, newscapers and books. The 

example you set will do more than telling him/her to read. 
6. Provide a variety of good reading materials. 

Techniques 

1. Whenever necessary help your child with unfamiliar words. Try to 
anticipate a difficult work and- explain it. - . _ , : 

2. Read to your child at bedtime, or consider letting your child read in 
bed a few minutes after his/her noma! bedtime. 

~ 3» Tactfully discourage lip movement, head movements and finger pointing. — 

A. Encourage reading of materials in addition to bocks, such as road signs, 

letters, game directions, recipes and advertisements. 
5* Much learning takes place at play. Obtain and encourage your child's use 
of attractive games with educational value i.e. scrabble, spill and spell* 

6. Encourage your child and praise him/her often. Show him/her that you are 
pleased with his/her reading successes, no matter hew small they may seem. 

7. Try not to compare your child unfavorably with other children. Let him/her 
"" compete only with his/her own past performances. _ .. 

8. Take ycur child on trips and encourage his/her interest in and awareness 
of different people, experiences, places and objects. 

— — School ... 

1. Show your interest in your child's school, by visiting and learning about ' 
the reading program as well as other important programs. - - 

If you have any questions or concerns, the teachers, the principal are more 
than willing to discuss your child and his/her progress. The school plays a major 
role in teaching your child hew to read but you as a parent play a strategic role 
too. Only through a partnership of school and home car: /our child become a .. _ J 
truly effective reader. 



■ 




liA^^-f- 



-312- 



The school committee of the city of boston 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 



January 10, 1984 



Sister Catherine Gilmore 

Stanley swartz St - Matthew School 
29 Stanton St. 



HEADMASTER 



Dorchester, Ma. 02124 

Dear Sister Catherine: 

Dorchester High School is acquiring a new look these days. We 
are in the middle of a $1.5 million renovation program. We 
have added new programs, such as Health Careers, ROTC, etc. 
With the increased emphasis on additional points for 
graduation, new and tougher standards for promotion, etc., we 
find that our student body has become a much more academically 
motivated one. This is not to say that we do not also have a 
full athletic program for both boys and girls. 

Because we feel that we have a lot to offer students, we are 
interested in visiting the 8th grade classes in the Dorchester 
area to provide information about our school to students who 
are in the process of deciding on their high school for next 
year. 



We would like to send a team of two or three 
students to visit the 8th grade classes in yo 
will be bringing a slide show, so although we 
audio-visual equipment we will need electric 
thinking in terms of having all the 8th grade 
collected in one central location such as an 
cafeteria, or any other large area. However, 
and if another arrangement such as visits to 
grade homerooms is more to your liking, 
presentation to that situation. The 
last approximately 20 minutes, and th 
for another 10 to 20 minutes to answe 



we ca 
presenta 
e team w 
r studen 



adults and two 
ur school. We 

will have our own 
outlets. We are 

students 
auditorium, 

we are flexible, 
individual 8th 
n adapt our 
tion itself would 
ould be available 
t questions. 



We contemplate visiting your school, at your convenience, 
sometime during the period January 17 to February 17, 1984. 

We would like to call you the week of January 17 to set up a 
visiting time that will be most convenient for you. 

Sincerely yours, 



STANLEY SWARTZ 
Headmaster 

-313- 

PEACEVALE ROAD • DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 02124 • 436-2065 AREA 617 




Recruitment Dates 4/27/84 



January 30,1984: Monday 

9a .n. St. Matthews School - 21 6tudent6 
10:15-10:30 . St. Aobrose - 3^ students 

February 1, 1984: Wednesday 

10 s.n. King Jr. Middle 
February 6, 1984: Monday 

8 a.m. Cleveland - 150 students 

February 8, 1984: Wednesday 

9:30 Wheatley Middle - 100 students 

February 15 i 1984 Wednesday 

l/ 

10:00 Maekey School - 150 students 

February 29 , 1984 Wednesday 

8:45 a.?. Wilson School - 160 students 



• V > 






^ 






) *<> 



-314- 



DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 
PEACEVALE ROAD 
ORCHESTER, MA. 02124 







/ 



March 22, 1984 



I am so pleased that you have expressed an Interest in 
iis course has been designed as a vehicle for demonstrating 
tractical application of leadership and citizenship taught in 
many other high school courses, and there is no military 
obligation. It is Important to develop self-reliance, 
responsiveness to constituted authority and the ability to 
communicate effectively early in life. The objectives outlined 
above will benefit you and the entire community, regardless of 
your selected career. 

With that in mind, I would like to remind you that at 
Dorchester High School we have classes for your particular 
interests. What this means, , is that you can come to 
Dorchester High School with a small number of other students 
who share your interests in this field. As a member of this 
group, you'll be challenged by an intensive curriculum which 
will give you an ideal preparation to meet your future goals. 

Please be sure to check the appropriate box on the 
assignment form you will be receiving soon. If you have any 
questions, please feel free to call me at 436-2065. 



Very truly yours, 



-315- 

uorcnester, Ma. UZ1Z1 Dear Michael: J.R.O.T.C. Michael V.M, 






*4 



DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

PEACEVALE ROAD 
DORCHESTER, MA. 02124 



March 22, 1984 



I am so pleased that you have expressed an Interest in 
It is important for young people to plan and set their career 
goals early. Future job openings are high in the Health Career 
field and will continue to be high far into the future. 

With that in mind, I would like to remind you that at 
Dorchester High School we have a Health Career cluster. What 
this means, , is that you can come to Dorchester High School 
with a small number of other students who share your interest 
in Health Careers. As a member of this group, you'll be 
challenged by an intensive curriculum which will give you an 
ideal preparation to meet your future goals. 

Please be sure to check the appropriate box on the 
assignment form you will be receiving soon. If you have any 
questions, please feel free to call me at 282-5020. 

Very truly yours, 



-316- 



<, 






DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

PEACEVALE ROAD 
DORCHESTER, MA. 02124 



March 26, 1984 



I am so pleased that you have expressed an interest in . It is 
important for young people to plan and set their career goals early. 
Careers in business sappear to be promising, both now and for the 
future . 

With that in mind, I would like to remind you that at Dorchester 
High School we have classes for your particular interests. What this 
means, , is that you can come to Dorchester High School with a small 
number of other students who share your interests . As a member of 
this group, you'll work on the latest equipment and be challenged by 
an intensive curriculum which will give you an ideal preparation to 
meet your future goals. 

Please be sure to check the appropriate box on the assignment 
form you will be receiving soon. If you have any questions, please 
feel free to call me at 436-2555. 



Very truly yours, 



-317- 



flfllrhl &r«t~J- 



/>// 



V 



DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 

PEACEVALE ROAD 
DORCHESTER, MA. 02124 



<4? 



March 26, 1984 



I am so pleased that you have expressed an interest In 
It is important for young people to plan and set their career 
goals early. At Dorchester High we have several programs, such 
as our Business Careers Prep Course, Health Careers Cluster, a 
Junior ROTC program, etc., which help people prepare well for 
their future. 

With that in mind, I would like to remind you that at 
Dorchester High School we have classes for your particular 
interests. What this means, , is that you can come to 
Dorchester High School with a small number of other students 
who share your interests . As a member of this group, you'll be 
challenged by an intensive curriculum which will give you an 
ideal preparation to meet your future goals. While you do 
this, you may wish to participate in one or more sports in one 
of the most athletically active schools in the city. We are 
very proud of our winning tradition. 

Please be sure to check the appropriate box on the 
assignment form you will be receiving soon. If you have any 
questions, please feel free to call Mr. DIodato at 282-5020. 



Very truly yours, 



-31&- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 







Z 






BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS jjf J y 



t>- 



SOHOOt. 






Mac 



MARCH 22, 1984 



Dear Parent: 



We are pleased Co Inform you about the progress that Dorchester High School 
is making in an effort to provide quality public education to the high school 
students of Dorchester. 

We feel that a team effort by parents, students, faculty and administration 
has given a new Impetus to improvement of the educational programs and the 
climate at Dorchester High School. 

Our $1,300,000 renovation of the school plant Is well under way. We are 
very enthusiastic about the magnet Health Careers and Home Improvement 
Enterprise programs, as well as our new Army Junior R.O.T.C. offering. We 
also have several new opportunities for the college bound student, Including 
the '■ UMass/Amherst Challenge Program and the UMass/Boston Urban Scholars 
Program. 

We realize that your son/daughter probably has already formulated his/her 
educational plans for the next school year. However, if you wish to have 
additional information about our school or any of our programs, feel free to 
call us at 436-2066, at 436-2555 for information about the Home Improvement 
Enterprise, or at 282-5020 for the Health Careers Program. 

We wish 'your son/daughter success In whatever educational endeavor he/she 
may pursue during the next school year. 

Sincerely, 



v 



STANLEY SWARTf, Headmaster^ 
WJFrd'a 



-319- 



EXTRACTS FROM A LETTER TO MONITOR CHARLES GLENN 
FROM MRS. HATTIE B. MCKINNIS 



April 27, 1984 



...I have had an interest in the Burke for the past several years. I have 
seen the school go from bad to worse and then good again. I am still 
waiting for the better and finally the best because I think that is 
possible. I will first talk about the change and then what I see that 
is still a problem as I see it and as it was discussed by some of the 
parents that I work with. 

CHANGE : There was a time when the Burke was so bad that as a parent I 
would never have sent my child there. The hallways were so 
crowded that one would have thought that it was the classroom. 
One could get a natural high just walking past the end of the 
hallway. There were more students going out the doors between 
class than in any one classroom. Education was something that 
was at the bottom of the academic school list and discipline 
was all that was ever talked about amongst both teachers and 
administrators, ^ery little was done for the students. Now 
or should I say for the past two years (school years) things 
have changed for the better. It is a pleasure to go to the 
school these days. One would hardly believe it was the same 
place. This is not to say that everything is fine. 

NEEDS : There needs to be some serious staff development especially in 
multicultural education. How to deal with different ethnic 
backgrounds, and it needs to be mandatory. 

The School Department's commitment to the Burke is lacking. 
They have allowed things to happen at the Burke so that it 
appeared that everything was leading to its eventual closing. 

It is strange how a group of people representing different 
elements of the community came together with the School Depart- 
ment to develop a plan that would help bring about changes not 
only at the Burke but also Dorchester High. 

Most of the proposed plans for Dorchester High began rather 
quickly, but still the Burke was left behind. Dorchester 
High is just about set while the Burke remains where it was 
almost four years ago. Why? 

We decided that the Burke should become a Computer Science and 
Communication Art programs to help not only keep the students 
that were there but to attract other students mainly white. 
Neither of these programs has done what they set out to do. 
The Communication Arts program just didn't seem to materialize. 



-320- 



Of course a small insignificant portion was implemented. As 
for the computers every school now has them so what makes them 
special at the Burke unless they can be developed to a greater 
degree than they are now? 

To make matters worse check the student assignment information 
booklet, page 14, notice how the Department of Implementation 
mentions the special programs at Dorchester High, but the only 
mention of the Burke is its location. I'm sure the School 
Department will have a good excuse as usual but to me it's 
another way of showing there isn't the commitment to really 
improve the school. 

Now let's take the physical plant. For more than two years the 
city has been waiting for the school department to say they intend 
to keep the school open so that repairs could be made. For some 
reason this was not done until recently, meanwhile Dorchester 
High's repairs have been marching along. In addition to the 
lack of concern for the Burke repairs a large portion of the 
monies that were allocated was used for contractual fees just 
to say how much the repairs will cost which has resulted in 
the deletion of some repairs originally asked for. Why? 

There is talk of the needed reform being done this summer 
but they have told us that for the past two summers. 

The changing of the headmaster has helped a great deal, but 
still his hands are tied to a certain degree because he is not 
given all he requires to make things work in the form of 
resources, etc. 

As I have said before I have worked with that school for several 
years and I believe it can become the best school in the 
system if some serious commitment to bring about the changes 
was seen by the School Department. 

The fact that the Burke was placed on the list of some 73 
schools to remain open for the next 25 years does not impress 
me at all if it can not improve academically and the physical 
plant does not become one that the students take pride in 



-321- 



UPDATE - Dorchester High School 
HEALTH CAREERS MAGNET PROGRAM 



From September 1583 to January 1934, the Health Careers students, 
were involved in field trips to eight greater Boston hospitals. In 
addition the Codman Square Health Center offered a five day 
program during which small groups- of students observed the daily 
operating procedure. The students also participated and received 
certificates in the Basic Life Program at the American Red Cross 
in Boston. We also had several guest speakers ranging from a 
pediatric nurse specialist from Jos 1 in Clinic to an officer from 
the Drug Unit of the Boston Police Department. 

The Dimock Community Health Center has been on board since 
January 1934 with a career counselor four days a week from 12 noon 
to 2:00 p.m. Now for seven weeks an operating room technician 
instructor will be teaching a course on Operating Room Procedures. 
The students will then have some on site training at the Dimock 
Cen ter . 

From January 26, 1934 to May 10, 1984 the Health Career students 
have been on an in ter ship rotation at Carney Hospital. Each 
Thursday the students were given a thirty minute lecture by 
various, department heads of the hospital. The students were then 
divided into groups of two and brought to the participating 
departments. On Friday the students returned to the same 
department for continued observation. Enclosed is the rotation 
schedule. Between 15 to 20 students participated in the Carney 
experience. Evaluations were completed by the hospital department 
heeds, the Health Career students and the teachers involved in the 
program. The results were favorable and enthusiastic. 



Goals for 1984-1935. 

Students starting the program next year will participate in a 
similar exploratory program. Minor changes include two six week 
rotations at Carney Hospital, separated by a four week period to 
allow for greater flexibility with the program. The details are 
being worked out with Dr. Younes and Mrs- Virgina Cur tin, Nursing 
Department. The exploratory program will be two days per week, 
two hours each day. Hopefully the programming will be such that 
students will not be missing major subjects during this time. 

The advanced students (those who have successfully compieied the 
exploratory program) will be placed one day per week for three 
hours in a department they are interested in either at Carney 
Hospital, Faulkner Hospital or Beth Israel Hospital. All of the 
above mentioned hospitals have been approached and we have firm 
commitments that our students can be placed. 

The students entering the 10th grade will be taking biology I and 
lab tech/nutrition, and students entering the 11th grade will be 
taking chemistry and biology II. Therefore the students will be 
under academic pressure to perform well. A higher degree of 
clustering will facilitate academic monitoring. The students will 
be supervised at the clinical sites by the two coordinators and 
the head of the department. The Dimock Health Center will 
continue its present role. 




City wide Parents Council 

9TemplePlace Boston, Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



May 30, 1984 



Mr. John Coakley, Senior Officer 
Department of Implementation 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, Ma. 02126 



Dear John: 

A review of the drop-out statistics at the East Boston Business 
Magnet Program for this year is somewhat depressing. According to 
our figures, roughly 10% of the students assigned have dropped out 
of the program this year. 

Is there any way that your department can analyze the class of 
1984 of the East Boston Business Magnet program from their original 
assignment in 1980 to present, to determine how many students origi- 
nally assigned to the program in 1980 graduated from the program in 
1984? 

Can this drop-out rate be compared to the drop-out rate of all 
other students assigned to East Boston High School in 1980, who are 
graduating from the school in 1984? 

Not only are we interested in securing these statistics, but 
Jane Margulis of the Boston Compact, has expressed her desire for 
a copy of this data, if it can be generated. 

Please let me know if this request can be fulfilled, at your 
earliest convenience. Many thanks. 

Sincerely, 

:ille Koch 
Citywide Parents Council 




cc: Judith Taylor 
John Poto 



-32> 
A multi-cultural parents organization monitoring quality, desegregated education 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CI1 V OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC oc HOOU 

I AST" Rl iS 7 ; ,: : ' IICH i ■ !( >0! 



JOHN A (VIO 
xxxx H< idmasiei 

SffiKXXXX Jane O'Leary 

Acting Assistant Headmaster 



April 10, 1984 



Ms. Judith C. Taylor 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Education 
Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Ms. Taylor: 

I am in receipt of your letter of March 27, 1984 and a letter dated March 21, 1984 
from Ms. Lucille M. Koch of the Citywide Parents Council in which you respectively 
requested correspondence explaining certain problems which exist in the Business 
Magnet Program at East Boston High School, as well as its future course in addres- 
sing these problems. 

We at East Boston High School would first like to express our gratitude to both 
the State Department and the Citywide Parents Council for the sincere concern 
expressed for the education and welfare of our students and to assure you that 
we are committed just as you are to the pursuit of excellence in educating students 
at East Boston High School. We are working extremely hard to correct some inade- 
quacies that are within our power to correct. 

The Business Magnet major courses as approved by the Court are: 

1. Legal Secretary 

2. Medical Secretary 

3. Computerized Bookkeeping (Accounting) 

4. Court Stenography 

In essence, the program offered in the 1983-84 school year is basically the same 
as that approved by the Court. This program is listed in our curriculum guide 
as follows: 

1. Legal/Medical Office Clerical 

2 . Secretarial — Court /Legal-Medical 

3. Reprographics 

4. Computer-Oriented Accounting 



S "■ .■ HiTF . ■ -i I i 0! I a: ' HUS! 



- « 



i 



-32 U- 



-2- 



1. The Legal/Medical Office Clerical major was devised to provide an option 
for those Business Magnet students who did not want to prepare for the secretarial 
aspect of office work, just as the conventional business program provides a cleri- 
cal major for students not desiring to take a form of shorthand. 

2. The Secretarial — Court /Legal-Medical major was listed as such due to 
the following reasons : 

a. Preparation for secretarial work has so much in common (whether 
in a legal, medical or conventional office setting) that the 
minor differences among the three previously listed as separate 
majors (namely, Legal Secretary, Medical Secretary, Court Steno- 
graphy) could be listed in the curriculum outline under one 
heading which incorporates the three aspects of secretarial work. 
A student opting for a specific specialization (e.g., Court 
Stenography as opposed to Legal-Medical) will simply choose from 
among the choices that course which is suitable to the major. In 
the example given above (Court Stenography) , the student would 
select Machine Shorthand rather than Gregg Shorthand. 

b. Teacher shortages made it necessary to teach the legal and 
medical aspects in the same class. A positive by-product of 
having these students exposed to both the legal and the medical 
aspects of secretarial work (through courses in Legal/Medical 
Terminology, Legal/Medical Typewriting and Legal/Medical Office 
Procedures) is the fact that the student can be prepared to seek 
employment in either a legal or medical setting. Furthermore, 
medical secretaries sometimes are called upon to prepare legal 
documents. 

3. With respect to Reprographics as a major course of study, this was not 
in the original plan submitted to the Court. This was instituted during the time 
the Magnet Program was receiving Federal funds under the Emergency School Aid Act 
(ESAA) , as it was felt the program needed a selection of major pursuits which 
would have wider appeal for male students. Due to the fact that funding was dis- 
continued, reprographics was not fully developed as a major. Subsequent thinking 
and current review of the curriculum reflect strong opinion that the subject as a 
single, one-semester course would be sufficient as preparation for entry-level jobs 
(for both Magnet and non -Magnet business students) . 

4. With regard to Computer-Oriented Accounting , the original idea was to 
utilize future personal computers to enhance such a program. In the interim, 
when ESAA funding was available, we opted to purchase and make use of sophisti- 
cated calculators to be used until computers could be secured. 

Prior to addressing the four points mentioned in your letter of March 27, 1984, 
it is important to understand that since the development of the Business Magnet 
Program at East Boston High School, certain factors have come into play that 
directly impact on the implementation of the program as originally perceived. 



-325- 



-3- 



In the years since the program was first offered, we have lost 7 staff members in 
the Business Education Department. In earlier years we were able to retain 5 teachers 
in the department in order to maximize the effectiveness of the program. Also it 
must be pointed out that some teachers who were specifically trained to teach the 
Business Magnet course offerings are no longer employed at East Boston High School 
for a variety of reasons , including declining enrollment (city-wide) as well as 
seniority and budget restrictions. Examples of the impact on the Magnet Program are: 

1. With regard to the 9th-Grade Cluster, one of the main strong points of 
that concept was the ability of teachers to have a common meeting period 
for the purpose of planning, preparation and dealing with problems common 
to all 9th-grade students as well as individual student problems. Staff 
reduction eliminated that possibility therefore minimizing the effective- 
ness of such a program. At the present time, we are exploring new ways 
which would include some of the advantages of the cluster arrangement, 
namely, a ninth-grade curriculum common to all. 

2. Courses at times have had to be combined (e.g., Stenograph I and Steno- 
graph II) or eliminated on a yearly basis because of the reduction in 
staff. 

3. Any significant changes in the program's course content would require 
sufficient staffing as well as time for reviewing, exploring, further 
strengthening and developing the program. The aforementioned factors 
preclude this. 

Relative to the four points mentioned in your letter: 

1. Strengthening Administrative Structure of the Program 

The current structure has the Business Magnet Program under the direct super- 
vision and direction of the Business Education Department Head who supervises and 
evaluates all business teachers and makes recommendations for improving methods, 
procedures, etc. 

If "strengthening. . .structure" means the availability of personnel for the 
specific purpose of directing and developing the Magnet Program, this would require 
additional staff as when the program had a separate coordinator. 

2. Implementing an Improved Curriculum 

We are presently prioritizing the needs of East Boston High School, with the 
Business Magnet Program being given special consideration. With respect to this, 
we have involved Salem State College, Fisher Junior College, and the entire faculty 
and staff of East Boston High School, as well as Dr. Robert Sperber from Boston Uni- 
versity. All of this is being done for the purpose of curriculum development and 
improvement as well as addressing the graduation requirements set forth by the 
Boston Public School system. Furthermore, Mr. James Caradonio, Director of H.H.O t R,C. 
is aware of this development. 



-326- 



-4- 

During the course of this school year, the Department Head has submitted a 
proposal for the acquisition of 20 Apple computers which would be used exclusive- 
ly by teachers in the Business Education Department for computer-assisted in- 
struction. Currently, both Word-Processing and Accounting 2 classes are 
receiving instruction in computer use. In the event the proposal is approved, 
Business Magnet students, as well as other business students, will greatly bene- 
fit therefrom. 

3. Preparation of Staff in All Relevant Curriculum Areas 

All business teachers, along with other professional staff at East Boston High 
School, have received an orientation in the use of computers. This was done on 
four occasions with the assistance of Dr. Alice Stadhaus from Salem State College. 
In addition, a number of the business staff are in the process of either self-training 
or receiving formal instruction in the use of computers. 

The present teaching staff in the Business Department has stabilized somewhat 
within the last two years; accordingly, the teachers have become familiar with 
and developed some expertise within the Magnet offerings. 

If there is any assistance the State Department could offer, it would help to 
identify areas where solutions to some problems may be given. 

4. Re cord -Keeping System for Retention, Transfer Requests, Work-Site Experience 

and Placement of Graduates 

a. Retention of students 

The weekly DP listing indicates the total number of students in school, 
including Business Magnet students. A specific Business Magnet list, by 
student's name, must be provided by the Department of Implementation. 

b. Transfer requests 

The Department of Implementation provides the school with transfer re^ 
quests both into and out of East Boston High School as they arise. One 
counselor has been identified as a Business Magnet guidance counselor who 
will be responsible for keeping records on student transfers as well as 
those who leave school altogether. 

c. Work-site experience 

Previously, a job-placement director was identified in the Business 
Magnet area who was directly involved with seeking jobs, as well as place- 
ment and followup of students. Lack of ESAA funds Q/2 salary of placement 
director) eliminated this position. Presently, the Development Officer 
and guidance personnel are responsible for coordinating this effort. 
Present plans include a more comprehensive followup on job placement which 
would include learning of student strengths and weaknesses on the job as 
reported by the employer in order that teachers may make an effort to 
correct the weaknesses . 



-327- 



-5- 



d. Placement of graduates 

In addition to a centralized system of recording the placement of gradu- 
ates throughout the Boston Public School System, East Boston High School 
guidance personnel (specifically the Business Magnet counselor) will have 
available a list of names of those graduates either placed on jobs or who 
have indicated a plan to enroll in post-high school institutions of learning. 

I trust the foregoing addresses all of the points and concerns raised in your letter 
of March 27. Your interest and concern are deeply appreciated. May I reiterate that 
we welcome any suggestions and/or assistance which would promote the growth of the 
Business Magnet Program. It is our sincere hope that through the cooperative spirit 
and combined efforts of all concerned parties, we may proudly share in the merits 
of a good program which was well conceived. 

I shall look forward to hearing from you soon for the purpose of scheduling a 
meeting as you suggested. 

Sincerely, 




A. Poto 
Headmaster 



JAP/af 

Copy: R. Spillane, Supt. of Schools 

R. Peterkin 

0. Lancaster 

M. Monterio 

P. Ingeneri 

J. Caradonio 

J. Coakley 

C. Glenn 

L. Koch 

K. Bar at 

A. Fisher 



-328- 



I"!!!: tfO'il.OOI. t VOTmMI I ill: 01- '11 'it- CllYOI : ■ PISTON 




BOSTON PUB! k; SCHOOLS 
EAST BOSTON ; IGH SCHOOL 



JOHN A. POTO 
Headmaster 



May 1, 3984 



Dr. Robert Sperber 
147 Bay State Road 
Boston, MA 02215 



Dear Dr. Sperber: 

I am writing with further regards to our earlier conversation relative 
to the availability of funds to assist East Boston High School with its 
curriculum revision. 

At this point I would like to mention that East Boston High has been 
identified as qualifying for Chapter 6 36 assistance since some of these 
funds may be used to rectify weaknesses indicated in a report by the 
Department of Education's Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity after that 
body monitored our Business Magnet Program. 

Some of the things we hope to target for attention if and when adequate 
funds become available are: 

1. A supportive element, especially for students who come from 
outside the East Boston community (first-year students) . 

2. More intensive job-placement for Business Magnet students 
(perhaps combined with recruiting more students into the program). 

3. Some formal articulation with a college or university to assist 
East Boston High School in its efforts toward making the 
Business Magnet a truly magnetic and dynamic program. 

Although all three areas are important, our most immediate concern is 
#3 above. In direct relationship to our need for some outside assistance, 
following are some of the more outstanding areas of concern with which a 
college or university could assist us: 

1. Review of Major C ourse Content 

Since the curriculum revision currently under consideration would 
schedule all 9th and lOth-grade students in a program which would 
meet the basic graduation requirements , our main concern would be 
with the Business/Business Magnet major course pursuits which 
would be taken in the 11th and 12th years. 



:■£ vVHilf s, Ri tT, - :>: bos ro\, 



'■iUStTTS 021 ;8 • 567 



"-TA 617 



-329- 



- 2 - 

1. Review of Major Course Content (cont . ) ■ 

The content of major course areas needs to be reviewed .~-nd brought 
up to dale to make sure the curriculum provides adequate preparation 
for either entering today's job market or entering a post-high 
school educational program. 

In addition, the Business/Busihci.-s Magnet Curriculum needs to 
compare the content of courses which is similar. While content 
lines may (and should) cross, too much repetition in separate 
courses indicates the need for consideration of combining the 
best elements of the two courses into one. 

2. Compute r-Assisted Instruction 

Computer awareness will be a graduation requirement for all 
students beginning with the 1934-85 freshman. However, in 
addition to this requirement. East Boston High School plans to 
use computers as a tool to enhance the effectiveness of teaching-- 
i.e., computer-assisted instruction. In order to do this, - 
assistance with curriculum planning for computer-assisted 
instruction is needed as well as more indepth training of teachers 
in computer use, program selection, curriculum planning, etc. 

3 . Exp an din g t. h e_ Pro gram 

Consideration needs to be given toward additional courses which 
would improve the preparedness of all students either for jobs 
or further education. Some examples: notehand or some form of 
shorthand other than Gregg Shorthand with which some students may 
be more successful; Business English (including correspondence) 
and Business Math. 

The foregoing is merely a brief orientation to the priorities in 
curriculum development and revision which we would like to address. This 
all takes time and personnel. We have made a concerted effort to get off 
to a good start with some of the basics. At this point we must dig deeper 
into the special major areas of study. 

Anything you can do which would facilitate the assistance from a 
college or university would be deeply appreciated. 

Sincerely, 




Ujj? ® 



John A. Poto 
Headmaster 



JAP/mr 

cc: Dr. Spillane,- Supt. of Schools 

Mr. Ingeneri, Comm. Supt., Dist. 8 

Mr. Caradonio, Director, H.H.O.R.C. 

/Ms. Taylor, Dept. of Education 

Ms. Fisher, Dept. Head/Business 



-330- 



rV*yxjfiM^ij.\ 



!i: r;0!!00LGQ;V;!V1li i 'I-IH Of- Tl Hi CITY OF ; v: u ;j 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
EAST BOSrON HIGH SCHOOL 



JOHN A POTO 
Heodmsf.er 



May 1, 1984 



Mr. James Ca radon io 

Boston Public Schools 

H.H.O.R.C. 

75 New Dudley Street 

Roxbury, MA 02119 

Dear Mr. Caradonio: 

As you are aware, the Fast Boston High School Business Magnet Program 
was monitored last Fall by the Department of Education's Bureau of Equal 
Educational Opportunity. 

While this court-ordered program is operating effectively, the State 
Department finds a number of areas which are sorely in need of attention 
in order to make the program the dynamic, r.agnet offer.-" ng envisioned at its 
inception. Since you received a copy of our letter dated April 10, 1984 to 
Ms. Judith Taylor of the Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity (as well as 
other correspondence with regard to this matter) , you are aware of the areas 
of concern. 

It has recently come to our attention that money possibly may be avail- 
able through PL94-482. Such money, if obtained, could be used for additional 
equipment, course improvement. 

We would appreciate any efforts you could extend in helping us to seek 
such funds for either this school year or next. 



Sincerely yoirs, 



'<> 



Jotfn A. Poto 
.Headnvister 



JAP/pc 

cc: Rita Walsh Tomasini, President School Comra. 
Joseph Nucci, Member School Coram. 
Robert Spillane, Supt. of Schools 
Peter Ingeneri, Comm. Supt. 
Judith. Taylor \y 
Anna Fisher 



hllC Si'HlET, EAST rCS'ON. UASSACHVSET1S C217S 

-331- 



37-2140 AREA 617 




City wide Parents Council 

59TemplePlace Boston.Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



May 4, 1984 



Ms. Judith C. Taylor 

Mass. Department of Education 

Bureau of Equal Educational 

Opportunity 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Ma. 02169 

Dear Judith: 

Pursuant to our telephone conversation this week, please find below my plan 
for the continued monitoring of the East Boston Business Magnet. 

To date, we have received the Headmaster's response to our written inquiries 
concerning the current status of the program and plans for further development . 
We also have reviewed the drop-out statistics for the program and plan to develop 
an inquiry survey to ascertain why students have left the program. The District 8 
field staff specialist, Kathi Barat, is attempting to identify parents of students 
in the business magnet who would be willing to meet and discuss their concerns 
and views of the business magnet program. Both Kathi and I will be visiting the 
school in late May to talk with Mr. Poto and Ms. Fischer about the program, its 
problems, its needs, and their plans for improvement next year. 

Finally, I intend to write to Dr. Robert Peterkin, Mr. Peter Ingeneri, and 
Mr. Roger Beattie to ask them to clearly define who has administrative, budgetary, 
and evaluative responsibility for the program and its staff. I will suggest that 
these responsibilities for the program be clearly defined by the close of this 
school year. 

Any information gained through our activities during the next two months 
will, of course, be shared with you. 

Thanks again for your valuable support and counsel in this effort. 



ely, 




^yt^cX- 



Llle Koch 
Monitoring Department 

LK:rs 

-332 
A multi-cultural parents organization monitoring quality, desegregated education 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street. Ouincy. Massachusetts 02169 



May 17, 1934 



Dr. Robert R. Spillane 
Superintendent of Schools 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Dr. Spillane: 

This is to inform you that review team reports of the district 
proposals and central office proposal components that are not 
consistent with the major criteria for FY '85 funding are being 
forwarded to the 636 office for redrafting. One exception to 
this process as noted in my letter of May 4, is Objective ID 
of the Boston Central proposal. The review team has suggested 
to the 636 office that a recruitment project, as outlined by 
John Coakley to Charles Glenn, might bs more appropriately 
funded by 636 than the staff development project. If you wish 
to pursue this option, the recruitment project should be developed 
consistent with guidelines and submitted on the appropriate 636 
forms. 

Other examples of appropriate projects would be support of the 
East Boston Business Magnet and/or student leadership projects 
that focus on school climate issues. As you know, all projects 
should address the findings of the monitoring reports. 

Sincerely, 



Doreen H. Wilkinson 
Assistant Director 

/rg 



cc: Jim Case , 
Charles Glenn -^ 



-333- 



EXAM SCHOOL PREPARATION 



QUESTION: 



In Report No. 2 it was reported that the 
Advanced Work Classes /Academically 

Talented Section, the city-wide program 
(grades 4,5,6) designed to prepare 

students for the examination schools, had 
several major problems in adequately 

preparing students: (1) an inappropriate 
student selection process, (2) lack of a 

specific differentiated curriculum, (3) 
lack of required training for AWC/ATS 

staff and a relevant teacher evaluation 
process, (4) lack of currlcular and 
other ties with the examination schools, 
and (5) a poorly organized and 
unsuccessful Spanish bilingual AWC/ATS 
component. What has Boston done to 
improve the quality of this program 
through remediation of the problems 
cited? 



HIOCESS: 



Monitors requested an update on the 
status of problems cited in Report No. 
from the Program Director-Academically 
Talented. Monitors also met with the 
Program Director regarding plans for 
change . 



FINDINGS 



1. 



Improved Selection Process 



The Program Director - Academically 
Talented has proposed a new selection 
process which utilizes MET test scores 
(Math and Reading), Curriculum Reference 
tests, and a teacher's rating scale as 
admissions criteria (see appendix 
pp ). The proposal also calls for 

the elimination of the district-wide 
selection process now in place in favor 

of citywide selection. This would insure 
greater consistency in the standards by 

which students are selected throughout 
the city. The plan also would create a 
centralized screening committee to decide 
on the placement of special students who 
though recommended may not meet the 
selection criteria described above. 
Lastly the plan proposes replacing the 
district percentage cut-offs (5% of 4, 5, 
6 grades per district) with a grade score 
equivalent cut-off. 



-334- 



- 2 - 



Differentiated Curriculum : 

Although some initial steps have been 
taken to help teachers adapt their 

curricula for gifted students, a truly 
differentiated curriculum for AWC/ATS 
does not exist. To begin to develop this 
curriculum plans have been devised to: 

-contract Irving Sato, President of 
the National State Leadership 
Training Institute on 
Gifted/Talented, to work with 6 
AWC/ATS teachers to adopt city-wide 
curricula for AWC/ATS use. 

-to disseminate "The Study of 
Childrens Literature" a language 
arts program already successfully 
operating at the Hennigan School 

(developed through Lesley College 
collaboration) for citywide use in 
AJC/ATS programs. 

-provide a list of recommended 
materials for teachers to use in 
AWC/ATS classes. 

Staff Training and Evaluation : 
Several initiatives have been made to 
improve teachers training for AWC/ATS 
teachers : 

-inservice sessions have been held 
for all AWC/ATS teachers to discuss 
methods of incorporating critical 
thinking skills into curricula. 

-a needs assessment and a materials 
survey were made of AWC/ATS 
teachers . 

-a monthly newsletter for AWC/ATS 
teachers was established. 

-curriculum development projects 
have been undertaken. 

-specific courses on differentiated 
curricula in language arts have been 
offered at Lesley College. 

No specific plans have been described for 



-335- 



- 3 - 



evaluating AWC/ATS teachers in ways 
different from the evaluation process for 
other teachers . 

4 . Curricular and Other Ties with the Exan 
Schools : 

In order to close the gap between exam 
school expectations and AWC/ATS, 
preparation an AWC/Latin School Council 
has been established. To date two 

meetings of this Council have been held 
including the participation of some 

Spanish Bilingual AWC/ATS instructors. 

Monitors applaud these initial efforts at 
linkage and hope that similar efforts 
will be made with Boston Latin Academy 

and Boston Technical High. 

5. Upgrading Spanish Bilingual AWC/ATS ; 

a. As mentioned, Spanish Bilingual 

AWC/ATS teachers have attended tie 
AJC/Latin School Council meetings, 
as well as the inservice training 
sessions . 

b. A parents informational session was 

held for AWC Bilingual parents 
(March 28, 1984) and a welcoming 
party was held (May 6) for Bilingual 
students accepted in an exam 
schools . 

c. U. Mass/Boston through the Institute 

for Learning and Teaching (ILT) is 
seeking funds to establish a 
Bilingual Advanced Work Class/Exam 
School Support Program. This 
program would provide direct skills 
instruction and tutorial help for 
Bilingual students in the exam 

school or the AWC/ATS. 

Although efforts to improve the 
bilingual component of AWC/ATS are 
clearly being made, monitors see the 
need for more coordinated efforts 
within this component than have been 
presented so far. 

COMMENDATIONS : Boston is clearly responding to the need 
for improving the AWC/ATS program through 



-336- 



- 4 - 



the planning efforts of its Director and 
others . 



EECOMMENDATIONS; 



: Boston needs to: 

(1) finalize a multiple-criteria 

selection process, and provide 
funding and other resources to 

implement it. This new selection 
process must be presented to the 

Federal Court as a modification of 
existing orders; 



(2) continue to pursue the development 
of a differentiated curriculum for 
AWC/ATS classes; 

(3) continue to provide more required 
in-service training for AWC/ATS 

teachers in teaching strategies for 

gifted or academically able students 
and teacher evaluation procedures 

appropriate to the different 
responsibilities of these teachers; 

(4) expand links between the exam 
schools and AWC/ATS to include 

Boston Latin Academy and Boston 
Technical High. 

(5) continue to upgrade the Spanish 
Bilingual AWC/ATS and better 
coordinate administrative 
leadership . 



-337- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPAPTMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 

JOANNE U WcMANUS 

p fog r a rr ' Director — Gi'ieO and Talented 

April 27, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 

To: Franklin Banks, Boston Desegregation Monitor 

From: Joanne M. McManus, Program Director - Academically Talented 

Re: Federal Court Report #2 - Advanced Work Class Findings 



The January, 1984 Report to the United States District Court on 
Boston School Desegregation, Volume #2, cited five areas of concern 
with regard to the Advanced Work/Academically Talented Programs. Each 
area of concern is listed below and is accompanied by a written update 
that expresses Boston's efforts to address the problematic areas noted 
in the Massachusetts State Board of Education's most recent desegregation 
monitoring report. 

i . Progress in developing and implementing a new method of identifying 
and selecting academically able students for AWC/ATS. This new 
method would be culture-fair and consistent with the state-of-the- 
art in the identification and selection of gifted students. 

The Program Director - Academically Talented, has drafted a proposal 
that offers an alternative method of identifying and selecting 
students for Boston's Advanced Work Program. This proposal is based 
on the currenr research in gifted/talented education and it emphasizes 
the need for developing a multi-criteria based identification procedure. 

A number of Boston School Department personnel have been asked to 
react to the proposed changes and many of their recommendations will 
be incorporated into the document's final draft. A copy of the pro- 
posal was also sent to Roselyn Frank, Director of Gifted Education, 
State Department of Education, for her reaction. 

A final proposal will be presented to the Superintendent for his ap- 
proval within the next month. I am hopeful that a "new method" of 
identifying and selecting academically able students will be imple- 
mented in time to effect the selection process for the 1985-1986 school 
year. I arr. enclosing a copy of the first DRAFT of the AWC PROPOSAL for 



- 2 - 

Student Identification and Selection for Placement into the 
Advanced Work Class Program. 

2 . Progress in developing and consistently implementing a differentiated 
curriculum appropriate for academically able students. 

a. A 1984-1985 budget request was submitted bv the Department 
of Curriculum and Instruction that proposed hiring • a cur- 
riculum consultant who would assist us in creating a dif- 
ferentiated curriculum for the Advanced Work Class Program. 

Irving Sato, President of the National State Leadership 
Training Institute on Gifted/Talented has agreed to consult 
with and direct a committee of six Boston teachers of the 
academically-talented as they develop an interdisciplinary 
curriculum model for the Advanced Work Class, grades 4-6 
Program. This model will be based on Boston's present cur- 
riculum objectives, but it will differentiate them to spe- 
cifically meet the needs of Boston's talented student popu- 
lation. Funding for this consultant, however, has not yet 
been approved. 

b. The Study of Children's Literature has been designated as the 
main focus of Advanced Work Class reading programs. A Liter- 
ature Resource Exchange has been established, based on the 
Hennigan School model. This exchange enables Advanced Work 
Class teachers to borrow multiple copies of children's novels 
to use with their Advanced Work Class students. Complete 
teaching units accompany each novel. These units have been 
developed by the Program Director, Academically Talented, and 
stress the higher level thinking processes. Dpon teacher re- 
quest, demonstration lessons and unit team teaching have also 
been conducted. The Advanced Work Class teachers have been very 
responsive to this materials sharing process and children's lit- 
erature has penetrated into many Advanced Work Class classrooms. 
Modeling teaching strategies and curriculum approaches that are 
designed to meet the needs of academically able students has been 
a most successful method in having teachers understand the meaning 
of curriculum differentiation. 

c. The Office of Curriculum and Instruction has developed a 1984 
Recommended Materials List. This list is designed to guide 
Boston teachers and administrators as they begin to select and 
order materials for the 1984-1985 school year. This list of 
recommended materials includes a section that outlines the most 
appropriate materials for advanced work instruction. They high- 
light critical and creative thinking skills and allow for diver- 
gent student responses. 

3. Progress in developing and implementing both a training program for 
AWC/ATS teachers and an appropriate evaluation procedure. 

a. On November 28, 1983, AN AWC teachers' meeting was held (see at- 
tached notifications) with three prime objectives in mind: 

1. To establish a consensus among AWC teachers as to how 
Advanced Work Instruction should differ from the in- 
struction offered in regular classrooms. Twelve major 

337b 



- 3 



points of differentiation were identified. These twelve 
points were formulated and agreed upon by representatives 
of nineteen out of twenty-one AWC schools and they have " 
become the foundation from which our AWC Program will grow. 
These twelve elements'? differentiation were sent to all AWC 
principals in order to establish a common understanding of 
the goals of our Advanced Work Program. 

AWC teachers were asked to respond to two surveys : A Needs 
Assessment Survey, and a Classroom Materials Survey. Teacher^ 
training efforts have been geared to the three top-priorities 
of need voiced by the AWC teacher population. They are: 

a. Need to identify those teaching strategies 
that are designed to provide optimum learning 
opportunities for the academically able student. 

b. Need to develop a study skills program that can 
better prepare our students to become independent 
learners. 

c. Need to learn how to integrate critical and creative 
thinking skills into daily instructional practices. 

On February 15, 1984, all Advanced Work Class teachers were re- 
leased early from their schools to attend an inservice session 
that dealt with teaching critical thinking skills. These teachers 
were trained in how to use the newspaper as a means to promote 
critical thinking. Teaching materials were provided to each 
teacher and newspapers were delivered to each AWC classroom 
for a three-week period . 

An Advanced Work Monthly Newsletter has been established. This 
newsletter outlines professional development opportunities 
in gifted education that Boston's AWC teachers can take part 
in. Many of our teachers have taken advantage of this training. 

This newsletter also highlights the work of our most successful 
programs and enables teachers to share ideas! 

Five AWC teachers received School Department Impact II grants 
to develop creative curriculum projects for their classrooms. 
These teachers are presently implementing these programs at 
the Lee and the Farragut Elementary Schools and at the Timilty 
and Curley Middle Schools. 

AWC teachers will be given an opportunity to work on developing 
a differentiated curriculum program for language arts instruction 
this summer at Lesley College. Lesley is sponsoring the program 
that has been designed and will be taught by Boston's Program 
Director for Academically -Talented , Joanne M. McManus. 

All participating AWC teachers will receive three graduate 
credits in gifted education upon completing the course. 



337c 



- 4 



4. Progress in the creation of curriculum and other links between the 

examination schools and the AWC/ATS program feeding students 
into these schools. 

a. In an effort to open up communication lines betweenBoston ' s 
elementary program for academically talented students 
(grades 4-6) and Boston's secondary programs for academically 
talented students (grades 7-12), we have established an AWC/ 
Latin School Council. This council is made up of twenty-two 
7th grade Latin School teachers and teacnurepresentatives 
from the twenty-one Advanced Work Class schools throughout 
the city. 

Our first meeting, which was held on March 22, 1984, proved extjemely 
productive and mutually beneficial. We are planning our second meeting 
for May 8, 1984. It is our intention to continue these council meetings. 

5. Progress in improvement of the Spanish bilingual AWC/ATS Programs 

♦The three bilingual AWC/ATS classes are presently under the 
supervision of the Principals of the respective schools in 
collaboration for programmatic concerns with Raffael DeGruttola, 
the Senior Advisor for Bilingual Education. 

I am aware that he is cognizant of the particular problem areas 
addressed in the State Department's desegregation monitoring 
report, I have not been involved in his decision making plans 
for the future of this program. On an informal basis, however, 
I have made suggestions for programmatic changes. 

a. The Hennigan bilingual AWC teachers and Mr. Francisco Ruiz 
from the Mackey School have attended all of the AWC teacher 
training sessions. Francisco is also an active member of 
our AWC/Latin School Council. 

b. Zaida Rios, the 4th grade AWC bilingual teacher at the 
Hennigan School, conducted an AWC bilingual parents' 
informational session on March 28, 1984. This was part 
of a total Hennigan School AWC informational meeting 
arranged for parents of children selected to attend the 
school's AWC programs in the fall of 1984. Meetings such 
as this were held at several AWC schools. 

Ms. Rios presented the parents with a written Spanish 
translation of the general AWC Informational Brochure. 

c. The University of Massachusetts has involved me in their 
efforts to establish a bilingual Advanced Work Class/Exam 
School Support Program. Francisco Ruiz and the University 
of Massachusetts, ILT Division, collaborated in designing 
a structured support mechanism that intends to offer AWC 
grades 5-6-7 bilingual students direct skills' instruc- 
tion and tutorial services. This program, however, has 
not yet been funded. 



337d 



5 - 



In summary, I feel that significant progress in each area of concern 
has been made within a very short period of time. 

I am looking forward to continued movement in our efforts to strengthen 
the Advanced Work Class Programs in the City of Boston. 



Ends. 



JMM/r 



-338- 



EXAM SCHOOL SUPPORT SERVICES 

QUESTION : In Report No. 2, a number of findings were presented 
relating to the inadequacy of academic and other 
support services available to Black, Hispanic and 
other students at one or more of the examination 
schools. A number of general recommendations were 
made, as well as recommendations for improvements at 
specific schools. How has Boston responded to these 
recommendations and what plans have been made or 
actions taken to improve the inadequacies cited? 



PROCESS: 



Monitors spoke with the Headmasters of Boston Latin 
School, Boston Latin Academy and Boston Technical 
High. Conversations were also held with senior 
officer for Implementation, John Coakley, Community 
Superintendent Roger Beattie, Deputy Superintendent of 
Academic Operations, Oliver Lancaster and the head of 
the Summer School Program, Fred Gillis. In addition 
written updates on Summer Orientation programs, and 
other changes were submitted by Community 
Superintendent Beattie. 



Update on Findings and Recommendations Concerning Support Services in Report 
No. 2 

In Report No. 2, monitors provided information on the kinds of 
support services offered at each of the examination schools and 
recommended changes intended to improve those services. The 
following is a list of general recommendations from Report No. 2 
(Vol. II) affecting all examination schools followed by the actions 
taken to effect change: 



Report No. 2 General 
Recommendation 



Actions Planned or Taken 



1. Establishment of an "early 
warning system" to identify 
students in need of acade- 
mic and other help. 



All examination schools 
have worked to further im- 
prove their summer orien- 
tations (see pp....). 



2. Establishment of basic sup- 
port services structure in- 
cluding study skills, aca- 
demic resource teachers and 
classes and improved coun- 
seling services to keep 
track of students at risk 
for academic problems. 



There is no evidence of 
this comprehensive struc- 
tural change yet. Some 
changes planned in coun- 
seling structure at speci- 
fic schools. (See specific 
school reports) 



3. Establishment of a uniform 3. The Department of Implemen- 

procedure for exit inter- tation processes the transfer 

views to determine more pre- of students out of the exami- 

cisely why Black, Hispanic, _ooq_ nation schools, and exit in- 



4. 



- 2 - 



and other students leave the 
examination schools (and 
perhaps to encourage them 
to remain). 

Establishment of academical- 
ly appropriate summer school 
courses, especially in Alge- 
bra, English, French, and 
Spanish, to meet examination 
school requirements. 



5. 



Establishment of a new pro- 
motion policy at Boston La- 
tin School and Boston Latin 
Academy which does not pena- 
lize students by requiring 
them to repeat courses in 
which they have succeeded. 



School Responses to Specific Recommendations 



5. 



terviews are not usually con- 
ducted. However, exit inter- 
views are usually held at the 
students examination school. 

Exam school teachers submit 
syllabi and curricula of 
their courses to summer school 
staff. Sections of some 
courses are made up of only 
exam school students, and are 
often taught by an exam school 
teacher. However, this does 
not differ from past 
practices, and it remains to 
be seen if significant numbers 
of exam school students will 
pass the summer school course 
yet fail the exam school make- 
up test. 

No change in the promotion 
policy has been made. 



The following is a school-by-school update on recommendations from 
Report No. 2 and other continuing improvements: 



Recommendations 



Boston Latin Academy 

Actions Planned or Taken 



1 . Reduce the student load 
for guidance counselors 
in the lower grades and 
provide more clerical 
assistance. 



2. Physical Education classes 
should be instituted imme- 
diately to comply with 
Massachusetts State Law. 



1. The process by which stu- 
dents are assigned to 
guidance counselors will 
be revised in June 1984. 
The guidance department is 
be reorganized. 



to 



Some physical education 
classes are conducted within 
the constraints posed by a 
building with no gymnasium, 
and with limited and seasonal 
access to outside park 
facilities. 



-3^0- 



- 3 



Continuing or Expanded Programs 

1. Shady Hill Summer School 

- 60 7th graders who need to pass two subjects in order to be 
promoted to the next grade will participate in this 3-week 
summer program. 

2. Tutoring 

- 235 students are served through three tutoring programs: 
School Volunteers, Project Assist, and faculty-to-student 
tutoring program commenced in January 1984. The 636 funded 
student-to-student tutoring program commenced in January 1984. 

3. Mass PEP (Pre-Engineering Program) has involved more students 
since its citywide reorganization and revitalization. 

4. A new computerized reporting system on student attendance and 
tardiness serves as an immediate and first step in an "early 
warning" system. 

Boston Latin School 



Recommendations Actions Planned or Taken 

1. Refocus guidance efforts for 1. A refocusing of counselling 
greater emphasis on support services and a reorganization 
services and school survival of the guidance department is 
skills. under discussion. No changes 

to date. 

2. More cooperation between 2. Inservice training through the 
guidance staff and outside Commonwealth Inservice Insti- 
agencies offering help. tute has been discussed. Two 

meetings with Advanced Work 
Class teachers have provided 
some insights for those Latin 
School staff attending. 

Continuing or Expanded Program 

1. Shady Hill Summer School 

- 7th graders will participate. Minority students who have 
failed 2 subjects will be given priority. 

2. Another reading specialist position has been requested. 
Currently 143 students are served by a reading specialist - 88 
Black and 18 Hispanic. 

3. Additional funds from the Permanent Charities Foundation have 
been requested in order to expand the Boston University Pilot 
Education Program which works toward improving the self-image of 
minority students (17 participants). 

4. Mass. PEP participation has increased since its citywide 
reorganization and revitalization. 3m— 



- 4 - 



5. Present tutoring services provided through peer tutoring and 
School Volunteers for Boston serve 98 students - 47 Black, 8 
Hispanic, 4 Asian and 39 White. 



6. An after-school tutorial program has been designed for 

implementation next fall, subject to funding through Chapter 636 
or some other source. 



Boston Technical High 



Recommendations 



1. Improve language support 
services for limited 
English Proficient stu- 
dents. 



2. Implement the rudiments of 
academic and other support 
services. 



Actions Planned or Taken 

1. Language support services 
through an English-as-a- 
Second-Language instructor 
are offered, and currently 
serve 30-45 students in 5 
classes. 22 of these students 
are Asian. 

2. Academic support services are 
offered through the student- 
to-student afterschool 
tutoring program. 50 students 
have regularly participated 
since January (25 of whom are 
Black). They are tutored by 
15 paid tutors (5 Black, 5 
Asian, 5 White). In addition 
30 Asian students are tutored 
by a regular teacher through 
the Tufts University Chapter 
636 program. 



Continuing or Expanded services 
1. 



Through the Human Services Collaborative which Will begin in the 
fall, 3 counselors will be in the building daily. 9th graders 
will be targeted for these services. 



2. A study skills curriculum is being developed. 
Commendations : 



Boston should be commended for taking some initial steps in planning 
changes in counselling services and other support services available 
to examination school students. All of the examination schools 
should be commended for working to improve their summer orientation 
programs. 



Recommendations : 



Boston needs to provide the financial and other resources necessary 
to actualize some of the planned changes. Boston also needs to: 

-3^2- 



- 5 - 



1 . change its promotion policy at the two Latin Schools to avoide 
making students repeat courses they have already successfully 
passed; 

2. coordinate summer school requirements with Latin School and 
Latin Academy make-up test requirements; 

3. begin conducting uniform and centrally recorded exit interviews 
for Black and Hispanic students attempting to transfer out of an 
examination school. 



-3^3- 



ATTRITION AT THE EXAMINATION SCHOOLS: A SURVEY OF 135 STUDENTS 



INTRODUCTION 



The Department has been investigating the causes of high 

attrition rates among Black and Hispanic students at the exam 

schools as part of its monitoring of the court orders. The 

monitors' last report was based primarily on interviews with 

staff of those schools. During this monitoring report the 

Department focused on the students of the exam schools. The 
monitors interviewed 135 students, using a 14-page question- 
naire prepared for computer coding. 

Because the Department's mandate concerned both students who 
have experienced trouble at the exam schools and minority 
students who have attended those schools, the students 
selected for interviews included a high proportion of both 
groups. The preponderance were minority students (74%) : 26% 
were White, 56% were Black, 8% were Hispanic and UZi% were 
Asian. A good portion (4l3%) of the 135 students had left ar\ 
exam school before graduating. Many of them had experienced 
trouble while at ari exam school: 76% had failed one or more 
classes, and £3% had been suspended. However, those inter- 
viewed included honor-roll students and students with exem- 
plary discipline records. All 135 students are currently 
enrolled in a public school in Boston. We believe these in- 
depth interviews represent the best data available regarding 
the causes of high attrition rates among Black and Hispanic 
students at the exam schools. 

The scope of this project was so extensive that it was not 
possible to analyze all the resulting data in time for this 
report. Consequently, this report focuses on the data 
concerning three topics: support services, support from fami- 
ly and friends and school climate. We had hypothesized rela- 
tionships between high attrition rates and inadequate support 
services, lack of support from family and friends and ari 
inhosDitable school climate. A brief summary of the report's 
finding is presented immediately below. 

1. Support Services 

Forty percent of the students who failed a class reported 
that no one offered to help them. The rate was the same 
at all three exam schools and for White and for Black and 
Hispanic students. A somewhat higher percentage of the 
students now in an exam school (67%) reported offers of 
help than did students who had left (54%), which may 
reflect recent improvements in support services at the 
exam schools. 



-34H- 



£. Support from Family and Friends 

The students reoorted a generally high level of support 
from families and friends for their efforts at the exam 
schools. There were some differences among the 
racial /ethnic groups. For example, only &4% of the Black 
and Hispanic students said their friends thought going to 
an exam school was a good idea, compared with 77% of the 
White students. It is important to note that there was no 
perceptible difference between the responses of the 
leavers and the students still in an exam school for 
puestions concerning friends' attitudes and parental helo 
with homework. 

3. School Climate 

a. Students and Race 

The students' responses were overwhelmingly positive (71%) 
when asked how people of differenct races and ethnic 
backgrounds got along at their schools, and about their 
own degree of comfort with the racial mix (81% said they 
were comfortable); these results must be qualified by 
noting that the students seem to have interpreted these 
questions as referring only to race relations among stu- 
dents. Again, there was no noticeable difference between 
the responses of students who left an exam school and 
those who are still in attendance. Within this generally 
positive framework, however, both race and the exam school 
made a difference. A lower percentage of Black and 
Hispanic students responded favorably than did White stu- 
dents, and Tech and Latin Academy students were, propor- 
tionally, more favorable than Latin School students. 

b. General School Climate 

Despite the students' highly favorable perceptions of race 
relations, their general attitudes toward their schools 
were negative; only 23% responded "positive" when asked to 
rate their schools, 3£% were neutral, and 45% responded 
"negative." Surprisingly, the students who had left ar\ 
exam school were far more positive than the students who 
are currently enrolled (the percentage of positive 
responses was twice as high among leavers as among current 
attenders). Again, minority students were more negative 
than White students, and Latin School students gave the 
highest proportion of negative responses. 

This finding, when taken in conjuction with the findings 
about race, implies that race relations (especially among 
students) are not the cause of negative feelings about the 
exam schools. The causes must be sounht elsewhere. 



-345- 



c. Relations with School Staff 

When asked what they like least about their exam school, 
students most frequently cited relations with school 
staff. In fact, it is the only factor examined in this 
report that provoked widely differing responses from 
leavers and current enrol lees. 

Although not one question on the survey instrument 
directly asked students about their perceptions of staff, 
&7% of the leavers referred spontaneously to staff with 
"bad attitudes" and/or teachers with unsound teaching 
practices, compared with only 35% of the current enrol- 
lees. While this finding is not a statistical correla- 
tion, it is highly suggestive and must be taken into 
account by anyone concerned with reducing the dropout rate 
at the examination schools. 

It is also noteworthy that more than half the students 
from each racial /ethnic group made such references. fi 

much smaller percentage of the students — 15% — talked 

of, spontaneously, racism among school staff. Twice as 

many minority students as White students, and twice as 

many dropouts as current enrol lees, referred to such 
racism. 



Several policy implications can be drawn from the responses 
of these students. First is the importance of early, coor- 
dinated intervention at times of academic and other problems. 
Individual students spoke enthusiastically of the effective- 
ness of school-initiated support, However, the overall 
impression is that such intervention is isolated and 
haphazard, at all three exam schools. 

Second, this survey does not substantiate the hypothesis that 
lack of support from family and friends accounts for exam- 
school attrition, especially among Black and Hispanic 
students. To be sure, some students related that trouble 
with family or friends interfered with their ability to 
perform at school. But in general, students of all races felt 
supported by family and friends. Leavers and currently 
enrolled students did not report any appreciable differences 
in such support. 

The students' responses to school climate issues were com- 
plex, clearly differentiating between the atmosphere created 
by relations with other students, and that created by rela- 
tions with school staff. The students' regard for race rela- 
tions among students was high. 



-346- 



The climate created by school staff is another matter. Here 
again the critical students were selective, contrasting 
"good" and "bad" staff in the same school. The students were 
also specific and functional in their criticisms, describing 
in detail the behaviors and attitudes they found 
discouraging or provocative, and explaining "bad" in terms of 
failure to perform the functions of teaching, counseling or 
administering effectively. It is doubtful that support sei — 
vices alone will be able to (or should be asked to) redress 
these internal problems of the exam schools, or that the high 
attrition rate will be significantly reduced until the 
problems are redressed. 

The details of the findings in these four areas are presented 
below. The methodology of the survey is described in the 
appendix that follows immediately after the findings. 

Several factors should be kept in mind when reading the 
findings. First, the survey presents only the respondents' 
perceptions of their educational experience, and these 
perceptions do not necessarily reflect "reality." Second, 
the students reported their perceptions of past, as well as 
present, events; some of the situations that provoked student 
complaints may well have been corrected by this time. Third, 
the exam schools are really three schools with distinct 
missions, leadership, teaching staffs and physical plants. 
Finally, the students we interviewed — as was explained 
above — are not a representative sample of the student 
bodies of the exam schools, and the general characteristics 
of this group do not necessarily reflect the general charac- 
teristics of all exam school students. 

The importance of the findings must be emphasized, however. 
Student perceptions affect student behavior, and should be 
taken into account by Boston administrators. Moreover, 
changes are proceeding slowly at the exam schools. The 
monitors have attempted to report all recent reforms aimed at 
improving retention rates, but have had few concrete improve- 
ments to report. There is, also, a commonality to the three 
exam schools that justifies investigation of their students 
as a group, and variations among students of the different 
schools have been reported in the findings. 

Finally, this was intended from the outset to be a study of 
students who have experienced trouble at the exam schools, 
especially minority students. We have therefore concentrated 
on these students, and believe the findings are valuable for 
discerning specific problems and corrective actions. 

The students we interviewed had high expectations of the exam 
schools, but many of them have been disappointed. Boston 
cannot afford to waste the talents of these bright and ambi- 
tious students. We hope this report will enable many more 
students, especially minorities, to benefit from the advan- 
taoes of these venerable educational institutions. 



-3*»7- 



FINDINGS 

1 . Support Sery i ces 

A fundamental goal of support services is to provide 
assistance to students who are in trouble, trouble that 
adversely affects their ability to perform in school. In 
addition, support services should enable a school to inter- 
vene and redress problems before they become serious. The 
survey questioned students about support services in several 
contexts — academic failure, serious non-academic problems 
and disciplinary suspensions; the questions were addressed 
only to students who had experienced that particular kind ori 
difficulty. In addition, all students were asked questions 
about summer orientation programs, whose functions should 
include both remediation and identification of students need- 
ing further assistance. 

a. Academic failure. 

Seventy six percent of the students we surveyed had failed 
one or more classes in an exam school (remember that this 
figure cannot be taken to represent the actual failure rate 
at the exam schools). These 103 students were asked a series 
of questions intended to probe the exam schools' responses to 
academic failure. 

Forty percent of the students who had failed said no one had 
offered to help — a substantial proportion (question 44). 
These students made comments such as "no help was ever of- 
fered; the Cteacherl just didn't care (BLA)*, " "there just 
isn't much help to be offered as far as I know (BLS) " and "I 
failed all my classes — they went too fast and there was no 
remedial teacher to help (BLS)." The rate of "no offers" was 
the same for the three schools, and for Black and Hispanic 
students compared with White students. Of the small numbers 
of Asian students — S — who were asked, £ said they had 
been offered help. Those students who are currently in an 
exam school reported a higher rate of offers (67%) than did 
leavers (54%), which may simply reflect recent improvements 
in support services at the exam schools. 

The vast majority (81%) of those students who had been of- 
fered help said the offers came either from their counselors 
or the teacher of the class in which they were failing, 
(question 45) The quality of the "offers" ranged considerab- 
ly, from mere pep talks to referrals to operating tutorial 
programs with available slots. 

* The initials of the school of the student whose comments 
are related are enclosed in parentheses immediately after the 
comments. Boston Latin School is BLS and Boston Latin Acade- 
my is BLA; Boston Technical Hiah School is abbreviated Tech. 



-348- 



We asked the other students — those who had not been offered 
helD — whether they had sought help on their own (question 
46). Seventy eight percent said they had; the percentages 
were the same for the three schools. Interestingly, the 
groups that might seem least likely to have sought assistance 
reported a higher incidence of asking for help. Thus 81% of 
the leavers, compared with 75% of the students currently 
attending an exam school, said they sought help on their own. 
Similarly, 87% of the Black and Hispanic students said they 
tried to get assistance, while only 85% of the White stu- 
dents said they did. Three of the four Asians questioned 
said they did request help. 

Forty percent of the students who reported seeking help on 
their own did not turn to their schools, but instead sought 
assistance from somewhere else (their families, private agen- 
cies, etc.) (question 47). For example one student, who has 
difficulty with the English language (it is not the student's 
native tongue) turned to the Maryknoll Sisters, who provide 
tutoring and help with homework 3 to 4 hours a day (BLS) . 
Another "needed help or tutoring in English," but none was 
available in the student's native language (BLS). 

Some students did not seek help at school because they were 
unsure what to do. One ninth grader, for example, said "I 
don't even know who my counselor is (Tech)." Most students 
who sought help outside school went to their families. One 
felt she could only seek help from her family, and added, 
"they really don't have enough help at Boston Latin to do any 
good." Another's parents called and asked the school to 
provide a tutor, which it did (BLS). 

The majority (78%) of all these students — those who were 
approached by someone else and those who sought assistance on 
their own initiative — said some offer of assistance result- 
ed (question 48). However, one quarter of those offers came 
from outside the school system (question 48a). The student 
who needed tutoring in English, for example, talked with his 
parents, who arranged for a private tutor two hours per day 
after school. 

Three quarters of these students said they accepted the offer 
of assistance; the reasons given by students who did not 
accept varied widely. One young woman who was having trouble 
with algebra did not accept remedial assistance because it 
was only offered after school, and she was afraid of having 
to take Dublic transportation late and by herself (BLS). 
(auestion 51). Almost half the offers (44%) were for pro- 
Drams or services outside school hours. 



-3^9- 



Fewer than half these students (47%) said someone checked to 
see if they were following through on the proffered assis- 
tance (question 53). Forty percent of the students said that 
the assistance did not help (question 56). ft number of 
complaints centered on student tutorial programs, with stu- 
dents objecting to the peer tutoring element. One student 
said the Latin tutor, a senior, "went too fast. I would have 
□referred a teacher (BLS) . " Other students noted that peer 
tutoring sessions too easily degenerated into socializing. 

Students who did find the assistance valuable were often 
quite appreciative. One student who described herself as 
"needCing] a lot of time to study and do homework as deter- 
mined by a 766 evaluation" attended an exam school with no 
special education support, and then had to be hospitalized 
for seven weeks. She had no trouble making up the coursework 
because the remedial teacher brought her materials to the 
hospital and helped her study. This student, when asked 
what one thing would she change at her school to make it 
better said, "change the general counselors' attitudes to 
reflect the attitude of [this teacher]." 

We asked students who had been failing but were now doing all 
right to state in their own words what factor had made the 
difference. Fully one half attributed it to improved study 
skills (question 57). 

b. Non-academic problems that interfered with ability to do 
school work. 

Thirty-five percent of all the students interviewed said 
they either were currently experiencing or had in the past 
experienced serious non-academic problems (question 60). 
Leavers did not, perhaps surprisingly, report a higher inci- 
dence of problems, and a higher proportion of White students 
(47%) said they had non-academic problems than did Black and 
Hispanic students (35%). Only one of the 14 Asian students 
interviewed in the survey reported having serious non- 
academic problems. 

Forty percent of the responses indicated troubled relations 
with someone at school and thirty percent, family problems 
(question 61). The pattern did not vary much from one exam 
school to another, or from one race to another. 

When asked whether anyone at school knew about their prob- 
lem (s), 65% of the students said yes (question 63). While 
cautioning that the number involved is very small, it is 
still worth noting that race made a big difference. Eighty- 
eight percent of the white students said someone at school 
knew, but only 53% of the Black and Hispanic students an- 
swered affirmatively. 



-350- 



Of those students who said someone knew, two thirds indicated 
that someone offered to help (question 64). Again, the 
numbers involved are small, but the variations by race and 
status are large. A much higher proportion of students in ari 
exam school (75%) reported offers than did the leavers (54%), 
as did Black and Hispanic students (85%) compared with White 
students (58%). 

Clearly a number of students received no help. One student 
related that there had recently been a death in the family, 
which resulted in the loss of a number of school days. The 
student's thoughts kept returning to her family matters, 
distracting the student from schoolwork. The only help of- 
fered was make-up work for the time missed. "Few teachers 
care about students or their family problems. There should 
be more guidance counselors so problems like mine can be 
resolved." (Tech). 

Several students specifically recommended that there be 
psychological counselors "to help students deal with their 
problems, not just guidance counselors. People there aren't 
geared to help with emotional or personal problems (BLS) . " 
this student had tried talking to an administrator, "but [the 
administrator] didn't help at all." 



c. Disciplinary suspensions. 

Because previous monitoring had suggested a connection be- 
tween disciplinary trouble and failure to complete ari exam 
school, the survey questioned students who had been suspended 
about the consequences of suspensions. Thirty percent of the 
students interviewed said they had been suspended at least 
once — again, this figure does not reflect suspension rates 
at the exam schools. 

Of the students who had been suspended, only 43% said some- 
one had tried to help them with their classwork after return- 
ing from the suspension (s) (question 87). However, 63% said 
someone did try to help them avoid getting in the same 
trouble again. 

About one third of the suspended students believed they had 
not been treated fairly. One young woman, for example, was 
suspended for fighting. "Some girls jumped me outside of 
school. I fought to protect myself." She believed the 
suspension "damaged her good reputation." She said no one 
tried to help her with her work, or to avoid trouble — 
except that the Headmaster warned her about future problems 
(BLA). 



-351- 



d. Summer orientation 

The vast majority — 69% — of the students interviewed said 
they had received an invitation to attend a summer orienta- 
tion before matriculation at an exam school. However, only 
63% of the students who said they were asked to attend did 
so. A slightly higher percentage (61%) of Latin School 
students said they attended than did the students of other 
schools (59* for Tech and 56% for Latin Academy), and a 
higher proportion of Black and Hispanic students reported 
attending orientation (6454) than White students (55"/-) or 
Asian students (5ft%) . The differences between students cur- 

rently attending and leavers were also slight: 63S versus 
56%. 

Most students who did not attend gave as their reason family 
vacation or other family plans — "I didn't want to give up 
two weeks of family vacation" as one student said (BLR). The 
second most-frequent ly cited reason was "did not want to give 
up free time. " Some students said, however, that they could 
not attend because they had summer jobs; one of them added 
"they should have a program for kids who are having problems 
at the beginning (BLS) . " 

The students who did attend were asked to explain in their 
own words what part was most helpful. Their answers fell 
into three major clusters. "Preview of what to expect" was 
most important, followed by "specific course material" and 
"study skills." Many students made specific recommendations. 
One at Tech, for example, said the orientation "should be 
longer, at least £ 1/2 weeks, Cso there is time! for academic 
help, especially algebra." One Latin Academy student appre- 
ciated the fact that orientation prepared students for the 
homework load and other demands of the school, and another 
liked the study skills. A students from Latin School said 
the most helpful parts were "study skills, meeting other 
kids, making friends and the tour of the building." A 
schoolmate suggested that the orientation should show "what 
the Latin language is about." 

2. Sup_p_ort from Family and Friends 

Our interviews with exam school personnel had led us to 
hypothesize that lack of family and community support might 
be a major factor associated with poor performance at the 
exam schools. Consequently, the survey included questions 
about the attitudes of family and friends, students' respon- 
sibilities at home, accommodations for doing homework, and 
family solicitude regarding homework. 

Our findings do not support the hypothesis that lack of 
family and community support has a significant, adverse im- 
pact ori student performance. The students we interviewed 
believed that their families and, to a lesser extent, their 
friends, supported their efforts at exam school. 



-352- 



It is important to note that this survey could not examine 
the extent and depth of support. Clearly, parents with 
graduate educations are in a position to provide better 
homework assistance than parents with no education. But 
support cari be manifested regardless of educational level, 
and the issue of whether students felt supported is neverthe- 
less an important one. These students clearly felt supported. 

Ninety-four percent of the students interviewed said their 
families believed going to art exam school was a good idea 
(question 11). Only eight students reported a negative or 
mixed reaction from their parents, and some of the negative 
reactions were surprising. One student reported, for exam- 
ple, that his mother believed he would never be able to 
conform to all the rules at his exam school and recommended 
against his going and, she thought, inevitable disappointment. 

Seventy percent of the students interviewed said that their 
friends thought their going to an exam school was a good idea 
(question 12). The friends thought most highly of Tech (76% 
of the friends of Tech students approved), while 71% of the 
Latin School and &&'/• of the Latin Academy friends approved. 
The students' race did make some difference. Eighty-six 
percent of the friends of Asians students approved, seventy- 
seven percent of the friends of White students approved, but 
only 64% of the friends of Black and Hispanic students did 
so. Somewhat surprisingly, the friends of leavers were more 
approving (75"/.) than the friends of students currently 
attending an exam school (66%). 

Attending an exam school has not made any difference with 
their friendships for 7£% of the students. Twenty six per- 
cent, however, reported that it had made a definite 
difference. The nature of the difference varied. Some stu- 
dents were hurt by teasing and remarks such as "only profess- 
ors co there" from their friends. Others were uncertain: 
"they treat me more like a grownup, smarter: I don't feel 
like part of the group anymore. We're still friends, 
but...." Another said, "they down it — they aren't asso- 
ciates of mine any longer. CThey think} this is a school for 
goodie— two-shoes, as opposed to neighborhood high schools 
were you're supposed to dance and smoke. Now I just stay in 
my house. " Even though we did not ask, it is clear that some 
students felt that the difference was worth it. 

When asked whether they had time to get their homework done, 
60% of the students responded affirmatively (question 16). 
T heir responses are interesting, especially in light of the 
fact that three quarters of the students interviewed had 
failed a class. Elsewhere in the interview students regist- 
ered strong objections to the homework load, and it is sur- 
prising that they did not take advantage of this question to 
do the same. Some students indicated that they were respond- 
ing hypothet ical ly — yes, if I chose to do all my homework I 
believe T would have sufficient time to finish it — and it 



-353- 



is possible that other students were thinking along the same 
lines. As one student said, "having time to do your homework 
and doing it are two different things." 

Eighty-eight percent of the students said they did have a 
quiet place to study (question 17), and 63% said their fami- 
lies checked to make sure they did their homework (question 
£0). 

Family support dropped when it came to helping with homework. 
Tech families provided the lowest proportion of help (5054), 
and Latin Academy families the highest (61%). The student's 
race did not seem to make a difference. Fifty-nine percent 
of the White students said their families helped, 57% of the 
Asian families and 55% of the Black and Hispanic families. 
There was no difference between the students in exam schools 
and those who had left. 

The students gave various explanations of why their parents 

could not help. One, for example, said both parents worked 

in the evening and, besides, the mother had no schooling; 
sometimes an older sister helped out. 

3. Schooj. CI i mate 

a. Students and Race 

Students were asked two questions about race relations at the 
exam schools: "how do you think people of different races get 
along here" and, "do you feel comfortable with the racial mix 
at this exam school?" Student responses to both questions 
were overwhelmingly favorable. Seventy-one percent said 
people of different races got along well or very well, and 
81"/. said that they were comfortable or very comfortable with 
the racial mix. 

The rate of favorable responses from White and Asian students 
regarding the racial mix was the same (77% and 79%, respect- 
ively), while Black and Hispanic students responded somewhat 
less favorably (67%). When we asked about the student's own 
degree of comfort with the racial mix, however, there was a 
marked difference between White and minority students: 91% of 
the White students said they were comfortable, but only 79% 
of the Asians and 78% of the Black and Hispanic students did 
so. 

The exam school attended also made some difference. Latin 
School students were noticeably less inclined to rate the 
racial atmosphere highly (60%, as opposed to 76% for Tech and 
77% for Latin Academy). The highest proportion of students 
felt comfortable at Latin Academy (91%), while the propor- 
tions at Tech and Latin School were about the same (76% and 
73%, respectively). 

Leavers and students currently attending an exam school did 



-354- 



not exhibit different reactions. Seventy-one percent of both 
groups thought the races got along well in their exam 
schools. In fact, art even higher proportion of leavers 
indicated that they were comfortable (.&&%) with the racial 
mix than of current attenders (79*) . It seems that race 
relations, at least as they are qualified in the following 
paragraph, are not related to students' decisions to leave 
the exam schools before graduating. 

We had intended these questions to pertain to racial rela- 
tions among all peoole in the exam schools. However, the 
students seem to have interpreted them to concern only 
student-student relations. Some students who elaborated 
their responses drew on their experiences at other schools, 
citing student hostility and violence, to rate the exam 
schools hiahly. One young woman, who regretted having left 
her exam school, appreciated the fact that no one ever tried 
to beat her up. Others spoke of student solidarity. "We 
couldn't understand the teachers so we helped each other 
(Tech). " 

Several Latin Academy students, including students who rated 

the racial atmosphere highly, did remark that the lunchroom 

"is all divided by race." A Black student, who responded 

"not so well" when asked how the races got along, added "at 

lunch everybody sits separately by race and you can be kicked 
out of a table if you are the wrong race — mainly Blacks ask 
others to leave. " 

b. General School Climate 

Several questions asked about students' general reaction to 
the exam schools. One asked them to rate their feelings, 
from very positive to very negative, on a scale of 5. Two 
questions asked them to describe their feelings about their 
exam schools: "what do (or, did) you like best about the 
school, " and "what do (or, did) you like least about the 
school?" 

Most of the students interviewed did not like their exam 
school. In striking contrast to their responses about race 
ralations, half said their feelings were "very negative" or 
"negative". Only 23% responded "very positive" or "somewhat 
posit ive. " 

Minority students were more negative. Forty-seven percent of 
the Blacks and Hispanic students and 71% of the Asian stu- 
dents responded "negative" or "very negative" compared with 
40"/. of the White students; similarly, only £1% of the Black 
and Hispanic students and 14% of the Asians responded 
"positive" or "very positive" compared with 40% of the White 
students. 

The particular exam school also made a difference. Tech 
students nave the lowest proportion of negative responses 



-355- 



(38%) , compared with Latin School (50'/-) and Latin Academy 
students <4S%). 

Significantly, leavers were far more positive than students 
who are currently in an exam school. The proportion of 
positive responses among leavers (33%) was twice as high as 
among students in an exam school (16%). The very fact that 
leavers were not jaundiced about their exam school experience 
lends credence to their responses and the survey in general. 
There was some fear that disaffected leavers would bias the 
results of the entire study — in fact, the bias, if there is 
any, goes in the opposite direction. 

c. Relations with School Staff 

When we asked them to describe the things they didn't like, 
the most frequently given answer was teacher and staff atti- 
tudes. The students were ouite selective, usually singling 
out one or several school adults whose demeanor was described 
variously as uncaring or impersonal. Students often elabor- 
ated by referring to other exam school adults in order to 
draw contrasts — "tough but good, " "makes you want to work, " 
"cares about students. " By and large, these students were 
trying to describe their conceptions of good teachers and 
administrators and, secondarily, about the kinds of adults 
who help during academic or personal crises. 

The survey does not contain any questions that ask students 
to talk about or evaluate school staff. However, it became 
evident that many students had, on their own initiative, 
talked about school staff in general and teachers in particu- 
lar. So many students referred to problems with uncaring 
teachers that we recoded each questionnaire to indicate 
whether the student had volunteered a statement to the effect 
that one or more teachers did not care about or like kids, 
fit the same time, each questionnaire was recoded to indicate 
whether the student had spontaneously made a statement that 
one or more teachers exhibited racist behavior. 

Fifty-six percent of all the students interviewed were found 
to have volunteered statements to the effect that one or more 
of their teachers was uncaring and/or was a poor teacher. 
The proportion of Black and Hispanic students who volunteered 
such information was somewhat higher than of White students. 
The proportion was highest among Tech students (7£%) and 
lowest among Latin fteaderny students (42%), with Latin School 
students in the middle (60"/.). 

Most imoort ant, this factor provoked a major difference in 
the responses of leavers and students in exam schools. Fully 
87% of the leavers referred, on their own initiative, to such 
behavior among teachers, while only 35% of the students in an 
exam school did. No other question — from academic prepara- 
tion to race relations — revealed such a split between 
students who had dropped out and students who stayed. This 



-356- 



is not a statistical correlation, and we cannot infer any 
causal relationship between "bad teacher attitudes" and droo- 
ping out. The finding, however, is highly suggestive and 
must be taken into account by anyone trying to reduce the 
rate of minority dropouts at the exam schools. 

It is worth looking at the students' own comments about 
teacher attitudes. Most of them show art instinctive aopre- 

ciation of good teaching. 

The teachers weren't into class. They told us homework 
to do and then did something else during classes. They 
didn't go over the material . 

The teachers are terrible. They didn't helD anyone, just 
gave you the work. 

They laid off the new teachers who were better — Cthe 
others] are very strict, proper, less personal, just tell 
you to learn, don't help you. 

I couldn't even talk to them. 

CThe teacher!! went too fast — wouldn't slow down for 
anyone, wouldn't exolain things when asked puestions. 
Aren' t teachers supposed to explain things? 

CThe teacher] just told us to open our books and do work. 

The teachers Cof the classes student failed] did not ex- 
plain class work enough. 

The teachers should go a little slower and review 
materials — they don't care if you are getting the 
information or not. 

It's too impersonal — they don't really care about indi- 
vidual kids. 

CThere should be] younger teachers so you aren't so 
scared to talk to them and ask for help, and more time 
after class to ask for it. 

Some students also spontaneously referred to racism among one 
or more school staff, although the percentage was much lower, 
15S. However, the proportion was twice as high among Black 
and Hispanic students than among White students. There was 
not much variation among the three exam schools but, again, 
the proportion among leavers was twice as high as among 
students now in ari exam school. 

The students who talked about racism among staff were, 
however, vehement. 

CThe teacher] after a city-wide test said you kids are 



-357- 



dumb and don't belong here and are only here because we 
had to balance — some of you are taking lid seats from 
smart kids. 

[The teacher] was blatantly prejudiced in his attitude 
and comments to minority students in the class. CMy 
mother came up to the school to complain] but the school 
didn't do anything. They just talked to the teacher but 
he denied the accusation. His attitude stayed the same. 
They should have questioned the teacher in front of rne 
and asked other students to verify the problem. 

Most of the teachers were prejudiced, it showed a lot. 
You could see the difference between treatment of Black 

and White kids. CFor example] two kids were caught cheat- 
ing — the Black kid got suspended and the white girl 

didn't. 

Guidance picked the tutors and most were White — they 
did more for CWhite kids] than for the Blacks. 

The teachers are racist. They pick on Black and Chinese 
kids — unfair treatment — and ignore White kids who do 
something bad. 

There's a lot of prejudice in this school — unfair 
treatment and suspicious teachers pick on you. My home- 
room teacher and I don't get along — I'm absent a lot — 
and the teacher says I've made a lot more paperwork, 
because of my absences. 

It is important to stress that minority students do not 
automatically attribute their problems with school staff to 
racial prejudice. Even though it was not on the survey, some 
interviewers asked minority students whether they thought 
racial prejudice underlay a bad relationship with a staff 
person, and many students said they didn't think so. Some 
simply didn't know. One student, a young Black man, who had 
left a Latin school several years ago, talked a lot about his 
trouble with a teacher. The teacher "hassled him" and fre- 
quently tried to embarass him in front of other students. 
The student went to the Headmaster, who supported him in a 
confrontation with the teacher. The teacher "settled down a 
little, but there was still fire in his eye." "Sometimes," 
the student continued, "I thought it was a problem of race, 
but I'm still not sure." 

This was the same student who asked "aren't teachers supposed 
to explain things?" He failed that class — Latin — was 
held back, and eventually left. He gave several reasons. He 
didn't like being older" than most of the kids in his class. 
There was that teacher with the fire in his eyes. And, he 
was a serious student and wanted to improve his academic 
record ; the teachers in his new school do explain things and 
he is doinq well. 



-358- 



If there had been better support services when he was attend- 
ing the exam school he might have persisted. But support 
services would not have gotten to the root of his problem, 
and one might question the wisdom of responding to internal 
institutional problems by merely adding compensating services 
without addressing internal problems. 

E£rtcl.usion 

The general purpose of this survey was to identify factors 
that made a crucial difference to students', especially 
minority students, success or failure in the three 
examination schools of Boston. Clearly, the presence or 
absence of systematic, coordinated support services was 
critical. A near majority <405O of the students who failed a 
class said no one from their schools offered to help. The 
students who did obtain helD stressed the importance of a 
wide rarige of assistance, from remedial tutoring to emotional 
support and guidance, to helping them through difficult 
periods at school. 

Various factors precipitated the need for such assistance. 
Some students reported problems at home that interfered with 
their school work and that were amenable to school-based help. 
The responses from most students pointed, however, to a lack 
of effective coordination between the students' academic 
preparation and their experiences at the exam schools. The 
students' descriptions of their own needs for remedial 
tutoring and improved study skills, for example, show the 
necessity of both better support services and better 
coordination of preparatory schooling with the exam schools' 
method of teaching. 

The students' responses indicated art appreciation of the 
exam schools' benefits — a demanding curriculum, many fine 
teachers, excellent preparation for college and comfortable 
relations among students of various races, among others. The 
students wanted to take full advantage of these benefits. 

The students' responses also revealed the important role 
played by student-staff relations in the learning process. 
Although the questionnaire did not ask students to discuss 
relations with staff, many students did so spontaneously. 
Only one factor clearly differentiated between exam school 
leavers and the students still in an exam school: the percep- 
tion among leavers that one or more important staff were 
indifferent or hostile to their progress in the exam schools. 

Finally, it should be remembered that this report does not 
address all aspects of the survey. Additional analysis will 
be presented in the next report. 



-359- 



APPENDIX I: METHODOLOGY 

Because this report claims (with qualifications, which are 
noted in the text) to portray the attitudes of a large group 
of exam school students toward important issues, it is 
important to describe how the survey was conducted. The 
project was ambitious, but it was unavoidably conducted with 
the Department's usual resources. The project involved eight 
interviewers, three coders, five data-entry people, one 
programmer and several writers, all working parttime on this 
project. 

We made mistakes and the analysis is not yet complete. There 
was not time to code many of the questions (that is, many 
responses were not analyzed) or to prepare sophisticated 
analyses. Nevertheless, we believe these preliminary 
findings will be useful to the Boston Public Schools and 
their students and parents. 



Methodology — the questionnaire 

The survey instrument contained 102 questions. fl copy is 
attached. It was prepared so that the answers could be coded 
for computer analysis. 

The survey has four parts. The first Dart asks questions 
about the students — race, sex, first language, previous 
schooling and parental education. 

The second part contains questions addressed to all the 
students interviewed, and probed issues such as the adequacy 
of their previous schooling, their support from friends and 
family, their use of free time, their transportation and so 
on. (Questions 1 - 40) 

The third part addressed only those students who had had 
specific kinds of difficulties in the exam schools: failing a 
class, experiencing serious non-academic problems, being 
suspended from schools. Students who said they had not 
experienced these problems did not answer these auestions. 
(Questions 41 - 37) 

The last part asked all the students who were interviewed to 
give us their general iniDressions of their schools: what they 
liked, what they disliked, etc. (Questions 98 - 103) 

Because students who had left an exam school were interviewed 
as well as students currently enrolled in an exam school, a 
modified version of the questionnaire was necessary to 
reflect the fact that the exam school exoerience was in the 
past for the leavers. Lack of space prevented inclusion of 
copies of both. 



-360- 



From a technical standpoint, the survey contained two types 
of questions, closed and open-ended. Closed questions re- 
quire the respondent to choose among predetermined answers 
("did you have enough time to finish your homework, yes or 
no?"). Open-ended questions allow the respondents to frame 
answers in their own words ("if you didn't have enought time 
to finish your homework, can you explain why not?") After 
these interviews were completed, the students' responses were 
examined for common themes ("had ar\ after-school job," "the 
homework was too hard"). Each response then was "coded" to 
fit the set of common answers. 

In most questions, the students were asked to choose one 
response. In these cases, the responses should add up to the 
number of students questioned. For some questions, the stu- 
dents were permitted to give more than response (as in "What 
do you like best about this school?"). In these cases, the 
number of responses will exceed the number of students ques- 
t ioned. 



Methodology — the interviews 

The interviews were conducted by Department staff at the stu- 
dent's current school. The Headmasters of the three exam 
schools and of Dorchester, Copley Square, South Boston, Madi- 
son Park and Brighton high schools and the principal of 
Cleveland Middle school cooperated by notifying students and 
parents of the interviews and by providing quiet and private 
places. Each interview was conducted individually, and every 
student was assured that their responses would remain confi- 
dential. The average interview took one half hour. 

Methodology - selection of students 

The School Department supplied lists of present and former 
exam school students with codes identifying race, and also 
with honor roll rosters and lists of students who had been 
suspended and students who had failed one or more classes. 

fls a result of the Department's mandate (to investigate the 
reasons that Black and Hispanic students leave the exam 
schools before graduating in disproportionate numbers), 
selection procedures were designed to ensure that a full 
range of achievement levels was represented among Black, 
Hispanic and White students. In other words, the students we 
interviewed did not represent a random sample, in the statis- 
tical sense, of exam school students. 

It should be noted that the leavers we interviewed — all of 
them currently attend other Boston public schools — ars also 
not representative of all leavers. Many of the leavers 
originally selected for interviews (chosen from lists pro- 
vided by the School Department) were no longer in the Boston 
Public Schools. ft few of them had transferred to other 



-361- 



school systems; the rest were not on the rosters of the 
schools they had been assigned to. The leavers we inter- 
viewed probably represent the middle portion of the spectrum 
of exam school leavers. They included neither the lucky 
ones, the ones whose reason for leaving was family relocation 
or transfer to a private school, nor the unfortunate ones 
whose exam school experience was so discouraging that they 
left school entirely. 

Methodology — presenting the preliminary results 

The Department's IBM PCXT and the software, DBASE II, were 
used to "computerize" the results of the survey, with each 
student representing one "case." Seventy six questions were 
coded. The results are presented on an accompanying printout 
for the questions analyzed in the report. In the case of 
most questions, the printout gives only the total number of 
responses (e. g. , the number of students who responded "yes" 
and the number who responded "no" to "do you have enough time 
to get your homework done each day?"). For some questions, 
the responses have also been presented by race, exam school 
and school status (student is in an exam school, or student 
left an exarn school before graduating. 

Three categories were used to present responses by race: 
White students, Black and Hispanic students, and Asian stu- 
dents. The responses of Black and Hispanic students are 
presented together. The number of Hispanic students we 
interviewed — 11 — was very small, and analyses of such a 
small number could not be relied on. Moreover, the 
Department's mandate focuses on the potential disparities 
between White and minority students at the exarn schools. As 
for the "other" students, all of them are Asians (that is, it 
turned out that we did not interview any Native Americans). 
One is Vietnamese, two are Indian and eleven are Chinese. 
The total number of Asians — 14 — is, again, very small. 
For that reason, we have not attempted to analyze their 
responses in detail. 



-362- 



QUESTIONNAIRE FOR STUDENTS CURRENTLY ATTENDING 

AN EXAM SCHOOL 

(Remember to assure student of the confidentiality of the 
interview) 



STUDENT CODE # 



SCHOOL 








SEX 


1. 

2. 


Male 
Female 






A6£ 












1. 


12 


5. 


16 




2. 


13 


6. 


17 




3. 


14 


7. 


18 




4. 


15 


a. 


19 



1 2 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 



RACE/ETHNICITY: 



1. 


White 


4. 


Asian 


2. 


Black 


5. 


Nat i ve Amer i can 


3. 


Hispanic 


6. 


Other 



12 3 4 
5 6 



LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME: 



1. 


Spanish 


2- 


French 


3. 


Chinese 


4. 


English 


IN 


SCHOOL 


1. 


7 


2. 


a 


3. 


9 



5. 


Greek 


6. 


Cambodian 


7. 


Vietnamese 


8. 


Other 



4. 


10 


5. 


11 


6. 


12 



12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 



12 3 4 
5 6 



SCHOOL ATTENDED BEFORE THIS ONE:_ 
WAS SCHOOL IN BOSTON? 
1. Yes 2. No 

1. Private 2. Public 



1 2 
1 2 



-363- 



ADVANCED WORK CLASS? 
1. Yes 
If yes, school _ 



No 



ACADEMICALLY TALENTED SECTION? 
1. Yes 2. No 
If yes, school 



PARENTS' /GUARDIANS' EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND 



MOTHER: 

1. SOME GRADE SCHOOL__ 

2. FINISHED GRADE SCHOOL. 

3. SOME HIGH SCHOOL 

4. FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL 



5. SOME COLLEGE_ 

6. FINISHED COLLEGE 

7. SOME GRAD SCHOOL 

8. GRAD DEGREE 



12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 



FATHER: 

1. SOME GRADE SCHOOL, 

2. FINISHED GRADE SCHOOL 

3. SOME HIGH SCHOOL 

4. FINISHED HIGH SCHOOL 



5. SOME COLLEGE_ 

6. FINISHED COLLEGE 

7. SOME GRAD SCHOOL 

8. GRAD DEGREE 



2 3 4 



7 8 



***********#*********************##**i 



1. Compared with the school you came from, is the 
work r\ev^ at (exam school) 

1. much harder 

2- somewhat harder 

3. same 

4. somewhat easier 

5- mucn easier ? 



12 3 4 5 



In your classwork at 

1. do well 

2. just OK 

3. not well ? 



_( previous school), did you 



1 2 3 



3. If you think the work is harder here, can you explain 
what you mean? 



-364- 



4. How well did (previous school) prepare you for 

the classwork here? 1 

1. Adequately 

2. Not adequately 

5. IF ADEQUATELY, what was the most important thing 
(previous school) did to prepare you? 



6. IF NOT ADEQUATELY, what was the most important thing 
(orevious school) failed to prepare you to do? 



7. If you could go back to (previous school) and 

change things to help other students prepare for the exam 
schools, what is the single most important thing you 
would change? 



8. How did you first hear about the exam schools? 12 3 4 

1. teacher 5. newspaper 5 6 7 8 

2. parent 6. TV 

3. counselor 7. notice/bulletin 

4- friends 8. other 

9. What was the single most important reason you decided 
to go here"? 

1. chance to get a good education 5. other 12 3 4 

2- get into college (specify) 

3- friends going here 

4. parents wanted me to 

10. Mas this school your first choice? 1 2 

I. Yes 2. No 

II. IF NOT, what was your first choice? 



-365- 



11. Back when you first found out you were going to 

go (exam school), did your family think it was 

a good idea or a bad idea? 

1. good 2. bad 1 2 

12. Did your school /neighborhood friends think it was a 
good idea or a bad idea? 

1. good 2. bad 1 2 

13. Now that you've been here a while, has the fact that 
you're going to this school made any difference with your 
old friends? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

14. IF YES, could you exolain? 



15. On an average day, how do you spend your time after 
school is over? About how much time do you estimate you 
spend on each? 

Activity lias 

1. job 12 3 4 

2. go out with my friends 

3. go home and relax 5 6 7 8 

4. TV Yes No 

5. take care of brother (s) /sister (s) 9 10 

6. go home and do chores 

7. do homework 

8. school activities 

9. non— school structured activities 

19. reading for pleasure 

11. other 

16. Do you have enough time to get your homework done 
each day? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

17. IF NOT, why not? 



-366- 



18. Do you have a place to study at home where it's quiet 
and you can get your work done? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

19. IF NOT, what's the problem? 



20. Does your family check to make sure you get your 
homework done? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

21. IF THEY DON'T, what's the reason? 

22. Does anyone in your family help you with your homework? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

23. IF THEY DON'T, what's the reason? 



24. Are there other things your family does to help you do 
well at school? 

1. drive me to and from school 12 3 4 

2. got a tutor for me 

3. attend parent meetings at school 

4. other 

25. Were you asked to attend an orientation program here 

at (exam school) before you started your first 

year here? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

26. IF NO, could you explain the reason, if you 
know it? 



27. IF Y7S, dxj you at; end? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 



-367- 



28. IF NO, why not? 1 2 

1. had to go to ray job 

2. away with family on vacation 

3. couldn't net transporat ion to school 

4. didn't want to give up my free time 

5- ot her 

29. IF YOU DID ATTEND, what part was most helpful? 



30. IF YOU DID ATTEND, what is the single most 
imoortant thing you would do to make the orientation 
better for other students? 



31. How do you get to and from school every day? 

1. school bus 12 3 

2. MBTA 

3. parents drive 

4. other (specify) 

32. fire there any serious problems with your transportation 
that make it a hassle for you to come to school? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

33. IF YES, describe. 

1. threat to my safety (describe) 

2. inconvenient (describe) 12 3 

3. ot her ( descr i be ) 

34. Generally speaking, do you find your classes to be 
1. very interesting 

2- sort of interesting 

3. just 0K__ 1 2 3 

4. sort of dull 

5. very dull ? 

35. Generally speaking, do you find your classes to be 

1. very difficult 

2. sort of difficult 12 3 

3. just OK 

4. sort of easy 

5. very easy ? 

36. IF YOU THINK YOUR CLASSES ARE DIFFICULT, 
does that 

1. challenge you 1 2 

2. discourage you ? 



-36 a- 



37. Which classes give you the most trouble' 



38. In what way do they give you trouble? 



39. Do you think you are failing or close to failing any 
of them? 

1. Yes 2. No_ (IF NO, go to question # 60) 1 £ 

40. In the past, have you ever failed, 
, or come close to failing, a class? 

1. Yes_. 2. No (IF NO, go to question # 60) 1 £ 



IF THE ANSWER IS YES TO 39 OR 40, GO TO QUESTION #41 

IF THE ANSWER IS NO TO 39 AND 40, SO TO QUESTION #60 



4i. Would you name the class (es) which you are failing 
or close to failino? 



42. Did you receive any mid-marking-period failure notices 
to let you know you were having trouble? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

43. IF NO, how did you find out that you 
were close to failing/failing? 



44. Did anyone from the school offer to help? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

45. IF /E5, who was it? 

1. teacher of that class 1 £ 3 4 

2. another teacher 

3. my counselor 5 6 

4. another counselor 

5. assistant headmaster 

6. other (specify) 



-369- 



46. IF NO ONE OFFERED TD HELP, did you try to get 
helo on your own? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

47. IF YES, what did you do? 

1. talked to teacher 

2. talked to counselor 12 3 4 

3. talked to someone else at school 

4. talked to parent /family member 5 6 

5- talked to another organization/agency 

6- ot her 

48. IF YOU TALKED TO SOMEONE, did that result in your 
being offered helo? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

48a. IF YES, who helped you? 12 3 

1. Private (parents, etc) 

2- Agency 

3. Your school 

49. IF NO, why do you think your efforts to get help 
were unsuccessful? 



53. WHEN YOU WERE OFFERED ASSISTANCE, what did that 
person do? 

1. teacher offered to help before/after school 

2. referred to tutorial program 

3. recommended to go to summer school 1 2 

4. ^referred to resource room 

5. other (speci f y ) 

51. Did you take them up on it? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

52. IF NO, why didn't you? 



53. Did anyone check to find out that you 
weren't following through? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 



-370- 



54. IF YES, what happened? 



55. What time was the program/service held? 

1. before school 

2. during school 12 3 4 

3. after school 

4. summer 

56. Did it help? 

1. Yes 12 3 

2. No 

3. Can't tell yet 

57. Did anyone check with you to see if your 
needs were being met? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 



58. IF YOU HAD ACADEMIC TROUBLE IN THE POST, BUT ORE 
DOING ALL RIGHT NOW, what do you think is the single 
most important reason you are doing well? 

1. received academic assistance 

2. made class up in summer school 

3. improved study skills 

4. ot her (spec i f y ) , 



59. If you chould change things here to help other students 
who have trouble like yours with their classes, what would 
you do? 



-371- 



60. Aside from academic classes, have you had any other 
kinds of problems that interfered wi^th your abi_l.i.ty to do 
school, work here? 

1. Yes 2. No 



IF YES, ANSWER THE QUESTIONS BELOW 
IF NO, SO TO QUESTION # 77 

61. What kinds of problems? 1 2 

1. problems at home 5 6 

2. problems with transportation 

3. trouble getting along with a teacher (s) 

4. trouble getting along with a student (s) 

5. trouble getting along with other school staff 

6. discouraged and thinking about leaving the school 

7. other ( speci f y ) 

62. Can you explain how that interferes (d) with your school 
work? 



63. Did anyone here at school know about your oroblem(s)? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

64. IF YES, did anyone offer to help? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

65. IF YES, who was it? 

1. one of my teachers 

2. another teacher 1 2 

3. my counselor 

4. another counselor 5 6 

5- assistant headmaster 

6. other (specify) 

66. IF NO ONE KNEW, did you attempt to seek help on 
your own? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 



-372- 



67. IF YES, what did you do? 

1. talked to teacher 

2. talked to counselor 1 2 3 A 

3- talked to someone else at school 

4. talked to parent /family member 5 6 

5- talked to another organization/agency 

6- ot her 

68. IF YOU TALKED TO SOMEONE, did it result in 
your being offered any assistance? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

69. IF NO, why do you think you efforts were not 
successful? 



70. WHEN YOU WERE OFFERED ASS I STfiNCE, what did that 
person do? 



12 3 4 



1. parent contact 

2. mediation 5 6 

3. referred to in— school counselor 

4. referred to outside agency 

5. just talked 

6. other 



71. Did you take them up on it? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

72. IF NO, why didn't you accept the help offered you? 



73. IF YES, what happened? 



74. Did it help? 

1. Yes 2. No 3. Can't tell yet 1 2 

75. Did anyone follow up to see if your needs were 
being met? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 



-373- 



76. If you could change things here to helD other 
students with oroblems like yours, what would you change? 



77. Have you ever been suspended? 

1. yes 2. no 12 

IF YES, ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS 
IF NO, GO TO QUESTION #98 

78. How many times were you suspended during the last 
two years? 

1. 1 

2. 2-5~_ 1 2 3 A 5 

3. 6-10 

4. 11-15 

5. 16+ 

79. What did you do — each time — that got you suspended? 



68. Why did you do it? 



81. What was the process the school went through to 
suspend you from school? 



82. What was the process the school went through to 
reinstate you in school? 



83. Do you think the school treated you fairly? 

1. yes 2. no 12 

84. IF NO, why not? 



-374- 



85. IF YES, how? 



86. How did the suspension (s) affect your attitude toward 
school? 



87. Did anyone try to help you make up the work you missed? 

1. yes 2. no 12 

88. IF YES, whom? 



89. How? 



98. Mas it successful? 

1. Yes 2. No 12 

91. Did anyone from the school try to help you so you 
wouldn't get in the same kind of trouble again? 

1. yes 2. no 12 

92. IF YES, whom? 

93. How? 

94. Mas it successful? 

1. yes 2. no • 12 

95. Mas your class schedule changed after you came 
back from the suspension (s) ? 

1. yes 2. no 12 

96. IF YES, how? 



97. Did those changes help? 

1. yes 2. no 12 



-375- 



98. What are your general feelings about going to 
school here? 

(5=very positive; l=very negative) 

12345 12345 

99. What do you like best about this school? 



10)3. What do you like least about this school? 



101. How do you feel people of different races and ethnic 
backgrounds get along here generally? 

1. very well 

2. well_ 

3. ok__ 12 3 4 5 

4. not so well 

5. poorly 

102. Do you feel comfortable with the racial mix? 
(5 = very comfortable 1 = very uncomfortable) 

12345 12345 

103. Do you have any ideas/explanations why students 
would droo out of school? 



-376- 



CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS INTERVIEWED 
FOR THE EXAM SCHOOL SURVEY 



EXAM SCHOOL Attended /fit tend inn by RACE 



White 
Black 
Hispanic 
Asian 
Nat i ve Am 



Tech 




BLS 








BLA 






In Sch 


Left 


In 


Sch 


Left 




In 


Sch 


Left 


3 


2 




5 




5 




9 


11 


14 


£ 




IB 




9 




17 


15 


3 


1 









5 







e 


3 


1 




6 









2 


a 



























RACE and SEX 



Female 



Male 



White 
Black 
Hispanic 
Asian 
Native Am 



16 

41 

8 

9 





19 

34 

3 

4 





LANGUAGE Spoken at Home 

Spanish 4 

French 

Chinese 8 

English 10£ 

Greek 3 

Cambodian 

Vietnamese 

Other 4 



13 



udents reported that more than one language 


is sdo ken 


6 = Spanish and English 




5 = Chinese and English 




1 = Spanish and French and English 




1 = Enolish and other- 





at home 



-377- 



CHARACTERISTICS OF STUDENTS INTERVIEWED 
FOR THE EXAM SCHOOL SURVEY 

GRADE in School with LEAVER/ IN-SCHOOL Status 



Current In Exam Left Exam 

Grade School School 



Seventh £6 1 

Eighth 2 5 

Ninth 28 14 

Tenth 4 16 

Eleventh 15 15 

Twelfth 5 4 



Type of School fit tended before Exam School 



White 
Black 
Hispanic 
Asian 
Native Am 



Private 
School 




Public 
School 




In Exam 
School 


Left Exam 
School 


In Exam 
School 


Left Exam 
School 


5 

10 

2 
1 
IZI 


a 







12 
38 

1 

10 



10 

26 
8 
3 





-378- 



RESULTS OF EXAM SCHOOL SURVEY 
FOR QUESTIONS ANALYZED IN THE JULY 1984 REPORT 

a uest i on 1 1 

what did you family think about your going to an exam school 



good idea 127 

bad idea 3 

mixed reaction 5 

question 12 

what did your friends think about your going to an exam school 

good idea 94 

bad idea 22' 

mixed reaction 18 



Tech BLS BLA 



what did you friends think about your qoinn to an exam school 

12. 



good idea 


22 


34 


37 


bad idea/ 


7 


14 


19 


mixed reaction 









ML.' wnat did you friends think about your going to an exam school 

12 





Bl/His 


White 


Other 


good idea 


54 


27 


12 


bad idea/ 


3iZl 


a 


c. 


m i xed react i on 









^\, what did you friends think about your Doing to art exam school 

In Exam Sch Lett txam Sen 

good idea 52 42 

bad idea/ 27 13 

r^ixed react i or > 



a uest ion 13 

has attending an exam school made any difference with those friend; 

yes 35 

no 97 

m i x ed react i on 2 



-379- 



Question 16 

do you have enough time to get your homework done 

yes 107 

no £6 



question 17 

do you have a quiet place to study 



yes 115 

no 16 



question 19 

if not, what is the problem 



family crowding 11 

other £ 



question 20 
does your family check to make sure your homework is done 



yes 81 

no 48 



question 21 

if they dont, what is the reason 

parental trust 18 

parents not home 6 

dont know 8 



-380- 



question ££ 

does anyone in your family help with your homework 

yes 74 

no 59 

9- 

«'«•• ooes/did anyone in your family helD with your homework 
Tech BLS BLA 

yes 14 £6 34 

no 14 ££ ££ . 

Q) , does/did ariyor\e in your family nelD witn your homework 

22 

Bl/His White Other 

yes 46 £0 8 

no 38 14 6 

Q(_. does/did anyone in your family helD with your homework 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

yes 43 31 

no 35 £4 



-381- 



question 24 

are there other things your family does to help 



drive to school 21 

got tutor for me 11 

attended meetings at school 19 

other 29 

no 53 

question 25 

were you asked to attend an orientation before starting here 

yes 119 

no 15 



question 27 

if yes, did you attend 

yes 76 

no 49 



question 28 
if no, why not 

conflicted with job b 

conflicted with family vacation 23 

could not get transportation 1 

did not want to give up free time ltf 

other 15 



question 29 

if you did attend, what part was most helpful 

study skills 13 

preview of what to expect 24 

specific course material lb 

other b 



-382- 



question 44 

did anyone offer to help 



yes 65 

no 41 



q uest i on 44 

did anyone offer to help (with academic problems) 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 



yes 35 £9 

no 17 £5 



Question 44 

did anyone offer to help (with academic problems) 

Tech BLS BLfl 



yes 10 ££ 31 

no 7 16 19 



did anyone offer to help (with academic problems) 
Bl/His White Other 



yes 43 18 £ 

no £5 13 4 



383- 



question 45 

(only students who were failing or did fail a class, 

if someone did offer to helD, who was it 



teacher of that class 
another teacher 
my counselor 
another counselor 
assistant headmaster 
other 



22 
3 

£5 
£ 

1 
5 



q uest i on 46 

<only students who were failing or did fail a class) 

if no one offered help, did you try to get help on your own 



yes 
no 



39 
11 



if no one offered to help, did you try to net help on your own 
Tech BLS BLfl 



yes 
no 



7 

p 



14 

5 



19 
4 



Bl/Hii 



White 



Other 



yes 
no 



£6 
4 



11 
6 



3 
1 



In exam Sen 



Left Exam Scnool 



yes 15 £5 

no 5 6 

question H-~J 

(only students who were failing or did fail 
if yes, what did you do 



teacher 

counselor 

someone else at school 

parent / f am i 1 y member 

another organ izat ion/agency 



talked 


to 


talked 


to 


talked 


to 


talked 


to 


talked 


to 


other 





a class) 



13 
1£ 

1 
9 

1 
7 



-384- 



question 48 _.._,*., , * 

(only students who were failing or did fail a class) 
if you did approach someone on your own, did that result in help 



yes £& 

no 5 



question 48a 

if you did talk to someone about your academic problem 
(regardless of whose initiative) and help was offered 
who made the offer to help 



private (parents, etc) 12 

an agency 6 

my school 51 



question 50 

if you were offered assistance (whether on your own initiative 

or anothers) , what did that person do 



teacher offered to help outside class 14 

referred to tutorial program 50 

recommended to to to summer school 3 

referred to resource room 2 

other 10 



question 51 

if you were offered assistance, did you take up the offer 

yes 65 

no £3 



question 53 

did anyone check to see if you were following through 

yes 34 

no 39 

(a number of students did not know) 



-385- 



question 55 

if you received a service or attended a program, what time was it 

before school 5 

during school 38 

after school 22 

summer 3 



q uest i on 56 

did it help 

yes 42 

no 31 

cannot tell yet 4 



question 57 

did anyone check to see if your needs were being met 

yes 39 

no 39 



(a number of students were uncertain) 



q uest i on 57 

if you are doing all right now, what do you think is the reason 

(coded only for students still in an exam school) 



received academic assistance 3 

made class up in summer school 4 

improved study skills 16 

other 3 



-386- 



question 68 

aside from academic classes, have you had other kinds of problems 
that interfered with your ability to do school work here 

yes 46 

no 86 



question 68 

aside from academic classes, have you had other kinds of problems 

that interfered with your ability to do school work here 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

yes £6 £8 

no 51 35 

Question 68 

aside from academic classes, have you had other kinds of problems 

that interfered with your ability to do school work here 

Bl/His White Other 

yes £9 16 1 - 

no 54 18 13 



-387- 



question 61 

if yes, what kind(s) of problems 



Tech 



BLS 



BLfl 



problems at home 

problems with transportation 

trouble with a teacher 

trouble with a student 

trouble with other school staff 

discouraged 

other 



2 



1 
3 



1 
1 



9 

1 
4 
4 

1 
3 





a 



9 

2 
2 
6 

3 



question 61 

if yes, what kind(s) of problems 



problems at home 

problems with transportation 

trouble with a teacher 

trouble with a student 

trouble with other school staff 

discouraged 

other 



Bl/His 


Wh 


ite 


Other 






12 




7 







1 












7 




6 


1 




7 




2 







1 . 




2 







5 




5 







4 











if yes, what kind(s) of problems 



In Exam Sch 



Left Exam Sch 



problems at home 

problems with transportation 

trouble with a teacher 

trouble with a student 

trouble with other school staff 

discouraged 

other 



13 



2 

5 



5 
4 



6 
1 
12 
4 
3 
5 





-388- 



question 61 

if yes, what kind(s) of problems 



problems at home 19 

problems with transportation 1 

trouble with a teacher 14 

trouble with a student 9 

trouble with other school staff 3 

discouraged 10 

other 4 



question 63 

did anyone at school know about your problems 

yes 3i3 

no 17 



question 63 

did anyone at school know about your problems 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 



yes 18 12 

no 8 9 



question 53 

did anyone at school know about your problems 

Bl/His White Other 



yes 16 14 

r,o 14 £ 1 



question 64 

if yes, did anyone offer to he Id 

yes 18 

no 9 



-389- 



a uest ion 64 

if yes, cid anyone offer to heio 

In exam sen Left exam scnool 

yes IS 6 

no 4 5 



q uest i on 64 

if yes, did anyone offer to help 

Bl/His White Other 

yes 11 7 

r,o 2 7 



question 65 

if yes, who was it 



one of rny teachers 8 

another teacher 

my counselor 12 

another counselor 

asst headmaster 2 

other j 



a uest ion 66 

if not, did you attempt to seek help or> your own 

yes 1 1 

no 1 1 



question 67 

if yes, what did you do 

talked to teacher 3 

talked to counselor S 

talked to someone else at school 3 

talked to family member 3 

talked to another organization 2 

other 4 

question 68 

if you talked to someone, did it result in sr, offer of assistance 

yes is _390_ 

no 14 



question 71 

did you take up the offer of assistance 

yes 19 

no £ 



question 74 

did it help 

yes 16 

no 8 

can £ 



question 75 

did anyone check to see if your needs were being met 

yes 13 

no 15 



question 77 

have you ever been suspended 



yes 31 

no 1 04 



-391- 



Question 78 

how many times were you suspended during the last two years 
(only students who had been suspended responded) 

once 18 

c— J 3 

6-10 £ 

11-15 

16+ 1 

a uest i on 83 

do you think the school treated you fairly 

yes 15 

no 10 

no opinion 1 



a uest i on 87 

did someone tried to help you with the work you missed 



yes 1 3 

no 17 



question 90 

if someone tried to help you with your work 

was it successful 

yes 11 

no 6 

question 91 

did anyone try to help you so wyou wouldn 

same kind of trouble again 

yes 19 

no 1 1 

question 94 

if so, was it successful 

yes 1 3 

r~\o 6 

a uest ion 95 

was your class schedule changed after you came back 

yes 

no £7 

question 97 

if so, did those changes he Id 

yes 

no 4- 



-392- 



question 98 

wnat are/were your general feeling about going to school here 



very positive £0 

somewhat positive 11 

neutral 43 

somewhat negative 3£ 

very negative 29 



what are/were your general feeling about going to school here 

Tech BLS BLfl 

very Dositive 6 7 7 

somewhat Dositive 3 4 4 

neutral 9 13 £0 

somewhat negative 6 11 15 

very negative 5 13 11 



what are/were your general feeling about going to school here 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

very positive 9 11 

somewhat positive 4 7 

neutral £4 19 

somewhat negative ££ 13 

very negative £1 8 



wnat are/were your general feeling about going to school here 

Bl/His White Other 

very positive 
somewhat oos i t i ve 
neutral 

somewhat negative 
very negative 



11 


7 


£ 


7 


4 





£7 


13 


£ 


£3 


7 


£ 


17 


4 


8 



-393- 



question 99 

what do/did you like best about this school 



extensive curriculum 

teachers 

students/friends 

good preparation for college/technical 

people care/friendly 

good reputation of school 

other — including no response 



33 
31 
36 
16 
8 
13 

37 



what do/did you like best about this school 



. n bxarn Sch 



Lett txarn Sc 



extensive curriculum 

teachers 

students/friends 

good preparation for college/technical 

people care/friendly 

good reputation of school 

other — includino no response 



£7 
£7 
£0 

10 

6 

5 
7 



& 
4 

16 
6 
£ 
8 

16 



what do/did you like best about this school 



I ech 



tiLb 



t<LH 



extensive curriculum 

teachers 

st udents/fr iends 

good preparation for col lege/technicai 

people care/friendly 

good reputation of school 

other — includino no response 



99 



wnat do/pid you like best about this school 



extensive curriculum 

teachers 

st uaents/ friends 

aooc preparation for col ieoe/technical 

oeooie care/friendly 

good reputation of school 

other — includino no response 



-394- 



7 

113 

3 

4 

4 


1 



12 

9 

14 
4 
1 
7 

11 



Bl/His 


White 


£1 




16 


li3 


£iZi 


13 


1£ 


C 


7 


1 


g 


C- 


14 


9 



14 

1£ 
19 

7 
3 
6 

11 



Other 



7 

5 
3 
1 



£ 





! 



puesti on HZuZi 

what do/did you like least about this school 

no commuters p _ 

too much pressure/too much competition •-* 

no/ poor gym facilities 

too rnany~Vules/too much discipline y- 

poor facilities 

racism among students 

. . lb 

Latin 

trespassers 

teacher attitudes 

teacher racism 

impersonal /no one cares 

trans port at ion 

too much homework 

lack of extracurricular activities _j 

other — including no response 



8 
11 

1 
IS 



31 



what do/did you like least about this school 



In Exam Sch Left Exam Sc 



no computers " 3 3 

too much pressure/too much competition 3 17 

no/poor. gym facilities 1£ 7 

too many rules/too much discipline 6 6 

poor facilities 15 £ 

racism among students 2 1 

Latin ' 4 IS 

trespassers 8 ® 

teacher attitudes IS 19 

teacher racism 3 5 

impersonal /no one cares 3 S 

transportation <3 1 

too mucn homework 4 8 

lack of extracurricular activities 3 4 

other — including no resoonse £5 6 



wnat do/did you like least about this school 



no computers 

too much pressure/too much competition 

no/ poor gym f ac i 1 i t i es 

too many rules/too much discipline 

poor facilities 

racism among students 

Lat in 

trespassers 

teacher attitudes 

teacher racism 

impersonal /no one cares 

trans port at ion 

too much homewor k 

lacK of extracurricular activities -395- 

other — including no response 



lech BLS BLfl 



3 


1 


1 


£ 


1£ 


& 


13 


3 


16 


1 


5 


6 


7 


1 


9 


1 


1 


1 


tf 


b 


•=" 


iZi 


iZI 


iZi 


6 


17 


14 


1 


3 


4 


£ 


5 


4 


iZi 


IZi 


1 


1 


b 


b 


1 


1 


5 


7 


13 


11 



fDO 



what do/did you like least about this school 



no corn outers 

too much pressure/too much 

no/ poor gym facilities 

too many rules /too much 

poor facilities 

racism among students 

Lat in 

trespassers 

teacher attitudes 

teacher racism 

impersonal /no one cares. 

transport at ion 

too much homework 

lack of extracurricular 



com pet it ion 
disci pi ine 



act ivit ies 



other — includina no response 



Bl/His 


White 


Other 


3 


1 


1 


1£ 


6 


£ 


14 


4 


1 


8 


3 


1 


13 


2 


£ 


3 





13 


7 


a 


iZl 





ei 





£4 


11 


Ca 


4 


4 


IZ> 


a 


3 





iZl 


1 





a 


1 


3 


5 


£ 





19 


9 


3 



-396- 



question 101 

how do you feel 

backgrounds get 

very well 

wel 1 

ok 

not so well 

poorly 



people of different races and ethnic 
alonD here Generally 

47 

49 

£4 

10 



how do you feel people of different races and ethnic 
backgrounds get along here generally 







Tech 


BLS 


BLA 


very well 




11 


10 


£5 


wel 1 




11 


19 


19 


ok 




4 


10 


10 


not so we 


11 


3 


5 


£ 


poorly 







4 


1 



how do you feel people of different races and ethnic 
backgrounds get along here generally 



very well 

wel 1 

ok 

not so well 

poor 1 y 



In Exam Sch 


Left Exam School 


£5 


££ 


3£ 


17 


13 


11 


7 


3 


3 


£ 



how do you feel people of different races and ethnic 
backgrounds get along here generally 





Bl/His 


Wh 


ite 


Other 


very well 


£9 




10 


7 


wel 1 


£8 




17 


4 


ok 


16 




5 


3 


not so well 


8 




£ 





poorly 


4 




1 






-397- 



£ 


a 


£ 


1 


3 


3 


4 


8 


8 


7 


19 


19 


15 


16 


16 



question 10£ 

do/dia you feel comfortable with the racial mix at the school 

very uncomfortable 5 

somewhat uncomfortable 5 

ok 15 

somewhat comfortable 45 

very comfortable 65 



do/did you feel comfortable with the racial mix at the school 

Tech BLS BLft 

very uncomfortable 

somewhat uncomfortable 

ok 

somewhat comfortable 

very comfortable 

do/did you feel comfortable with the racial mix at the school 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

very uncomfortable £ 3 

somewhat uncomfortable £ 3 

ok 1 tZi 5 

somewhat comfortable £9 16 

very comfortable 37 £8 

do/did you feel comfortable with the racial mix at the school 

Bl/His White Other 

very uncomfortable 

somewhat uncomf ortabl e 

ok 

somewhat comfortable 

very comfortable 



3 


1 


1 

J. 


5 


iZi . 





11 


c 


c 


£3 


15 


7 


43 


17 


4 



-398- 



question 103 

why would other students leave this school 

why did you leave this school 



be with friends in other schools 10 

conflict between school and job 10 

pressure/competitive atmosphere 40 

poor mot i vat i on £9 

family pressure/problems/ lack of support 7 

limited English proficiency 6 

poor study habits/preparation 10 

too much homework 14 

too many rules 10 

problems with school staff 33 

pregnancy/parenting 3 

lack of extracurricular activities 8 

poor f ac i 1 i t i es 4 

to avoid retention in grade 46 

staff /student racism 9 

no computers/ lack of access 4 



why would other students leave this school 
whv did you leave this school 



In Exam Sch Left Exam Sf 



□e with friends in other schools 9 1 

conflict between school and job 8 £ 

pressure/competitive atmosphere £7 13 

poor motivation £8 1 

family pressure/problems/ lack of support 4 3 

limited English proficiency 3 3 

poor study habits/preparation 9 1 

too much homework 10 4 

too many rules 6 4 

proDlerns with scnool staff 15 18 

pregnancy/parenting 3 

lack of extracurricular activities 5 3 

poor facilities £ £ 

to avoid retention in grade 9 37 

staff /student racism 3 6 

no computers/ lack of access 1 3 



-399- 



why would other students leave this school 
wny did you leave this school 



be with friends in other schools 

conflict between school and job 

pressure/compet it ive atmosphere 

poor mot i vat i on 

family pressure/problems/lack of support 

limited English proficiency 

poor study habits/preparation 

too much homework . 

too many rules 

prop 1 ems with school staff 

pregnancy/ parent ing 

lack of extracurricular activities 

poor facilities 

to avoid retention in grade 

staff /student racism 

no computers/lack of access 



Tech BLS BLfi 



3 


£ 


5 


4 





6 


9 


1£ 


19 


7 


10 


1£ 


4 


1 


£ 


3 


£ 


1 


£ 


a 





3 


10 


1 


£ 


5 


3 


6 


9 


17 


3 








1 


1 


6 


iZi 





4 


6 


£1 


18 


1 


6 


£ 


1 





3 



why would other students leave this school 
why did you leave this school 



Bl/His White Other 



be with friends in other schools 7 3 w 

conflict between school and job b j £ 

pressure/competitive atmosphere £0 12 8 

poor motivation la' b d 

family pressure/problems/lack of support 5 £ 

limited English proficiency 4 w t: 

poor study habits/preparation 7 £ l 

too much homework iw j i 

too many rules / d i 

problems with school staff d.4 y tf 

pregnancy/ parent ing £10 

lack of extracurricular activities 7 10 

poor facilities 3 l w 

to avoid retention in grade 30 14 1 

staff /student racism b a \Q 

no computers/ lack of access 3 I id 



-400- 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
did not care about or like kids 



yes 76 

no 59 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
did not care about or like kids 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

yes £8 48 

no 5£ 7 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
did not care about or like kids 

Tech BLS BLfl 



yes 21 £9 £5 

no 8 19 3£ 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
did not care about or like kids 

Bl/His White Other 

yes 49 19 7 

no 36 16 7 



-HOI- 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
exhibited racist behavior 

yes £0 

no 115 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
exhibited racist behavior 

In Exam Sch Left Exam School 

yes 9 1 1 

no 71 44 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
exhibited racist behavior 

Tech BLS BLfl 

yes 5 8 7 

no £4 40 50 



student volunteered statement that one or more teachers 
exhibited racist behavior 

Bl/His White Other 

yes 17 3 

r.o 68 3£ 14 



-402- 



BUREAU OF EQUAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

May 31st 1984 
TO: Commissioner John H. Lawson 



FROM: Charles Glenn 



4 



RE: Latin School/Latin Academy Facility Issues 

This memorandum will review the background of the proposal - now advanced 
with considerable urgency by Boston - to renovate Boston Latin School and to 
build a new facility for Boston Latin Academy. It will also identify the 
desegregation implications and the questions which should be answered 
before such a project is approved by the Board. 

(1) Background of the Demand 

The demand for a new facility for Latin Academy at a Fenway site (near 
Latin School) has existed for many years. In 1972» when the new English 
High School was ready for occupancy? the School Committee voted to use the 
building to accommodate what was then Girls Latin School, despite the 
commitments made to the Board of Education at the time that the facility was 
approved and funded (at 65% rather than what was then the normal 40% 
reimbursement rate). The Board went to Court to assure that the new 
facility would serve the purpose intended under the approved Racial Balance 
Plan. This controversy helped to precipitate the Morgan case. 



(2) The Need for Facility Improvements 

It is unquestionable that Girls Latin/Latin Academy has existed for decades 
in inadequate facilities, first at Codman Square and more recently in 
temporary space on Ipswich Street. It is also clear that the Boston Latin 
School facility is in need of renovation, though other high schools are in 
equally poor condition. In 1980, as we will see below, the Board of Education 



-403- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 2 

and the Boston Public Facilities Department agreed to a priority schedule 
for facility projects which placed renovation of Latin School in fourth place 
of seven. A new facility for Latin Academy was not included* though in the 
preliminary discussion the question whether two Latin facilities would be 
needed was raised by School Department and State participants (my notes of 
5/28/80 meeting). 



(3) The Context of Decision-making 

It has been amply demonstrated over the years that these schools enjoy 
impressive support as a result of serving the children of many Bostonians 
who are politically active, and also of their historical role as a route to 
higher education and to success in life. It would not be fair to say that 
Latin School and Latin Academy have too much influence, but it is certainly 
accurate to say that most other high schools have too little by contrast. In 
view of the fact that the Latins serve a disproportionately small share of 
the Black and Hispanic students in Boston (see chart below), the Department 
has a long-standing concern to assure that the influence of these schools 
does not result in unequal treatment. On the other hand, of course, we wish 
to support excellent education while making it available to all students, to 
"level up" rather than to "level down". 



Grade 9-12 Enrollment 


All 


Latin Aca 


demV 


Latin School 


Black 


9077 


252 




226 


% of Black 


100% 


2.8% 




2.5% 


White 


5293 


370 




876 


% of White 


100% 


7% 




1 6.6% 


Asian 


1302 


84 




185 


% of Asian 


1 00% 


6.5% 




1 4.2% 


Hispanic 


2180 


16 




53 


% of Hispanic 


1 00% 


0.7% 




2.4% 


Indian American 


72 










% of Indian 


100% 


0% 




0% 



-404- 



Latin School/ Academy Facility Issues page 3 



(4) Minority Enrollment Increase 

It must be noted that there has been a substantial increase in the number of 
minority students attending the Latins. In 1973, the year before 

Court-ordered desegregation was implemented, the two between them enrolled 
333 "Non-white" students. <Unfortunately the statistics as then kept do not 
make a distinction among' Blacki Hispanic and Asian students) and at least 
some Hispanics were reported as "White". My own estimate from visits at 
that time is that about half of the "Non-white" students were Black and half 
Chinese-American. > Note that this figure includes 7th and 8th grades. 
Current total "minority" enrollment of the two schools, grades 7-1 2, is 1478, 
with Black and Hispanic enrollment disproportionately concentrated at the 
7th grade.' (figures below for November 1983) 



Grade 


Black Students 
280 


Hispanic Students 


7 


50 


8 


157 


36 


11 


105 


16 


12 


66 


9 



(5) An Increasing Proportion of Enrollment 

The increasing number of minority students is matched by an increasing 
proportion of White students attending these schools of all White students in 
the system. As White enrollment system-wide has declined, that at the Latin 
schools has remained almost constant? so that the proportion of all White 
students in grades 7-12 who attend these two schools has increased from 17% 
in 1979 to 24% in 1983 and a projected 25% in 1984. Put another way, in 1973 
the Latin schools enrolled 3.3% of all students (K-12) attending the Boston 
Public Schools. This increased to 6% in 1983 and is projected at 6.9% in 



-405- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 4 

1984. White Latin Academy/School enrollment was 4.6% of all White students 
(K-12) in 1973 and is projected at 12.7% in 1984. 



(6) Implications of Increasing Proportion of Enrollment 

A major concern raised by the First Monitoring Report was the high 
proportion of Black and Hispanic students admitted to the examination 
schools who are kept back or drop out. The Second Monitoring Report 
examined the support services available to these students, and the 
preparation which they receive for the academic emphasis of the exam 
schools. The Third Monitoring Report includes the results of interviews with 
135 present and former exam school students, inquiring into the causes of the 
difficulties experienced by many of them. Preliminary analysis reveals that 
these difficulties relate to the instructional program itself as much as to 
the lack of additional support services. This is not to say that the program 
does not continue to offer a great deal to many students, but to suggest 
that, for an increasing proportion of those admitted, it is not presently 
appropriate. Surely a part of the reason is that the two schools now enroll 
twice as high a proportion of all Boston students as they did a decade ago, 
and thus admit students of all racial/ethnic groups who are less 
academically gifted or less well-prepared than was the case a decade or 
even five years ago. 



(7) Desegregation Implications 

The fact that a higher proportion of all White students attend the Latin 
schools creates desegregation difficulties for other schools in the system, 
at the middle school as well as the high school level. The two Latins are 
projected to enroll 31% of the White 7th graders in 1984, compared with 21% 
in 1979. When the enrollment of District VIII (East Boston) schools is added 
to that of the Latins, their proportion of projected system-wide White 
enrollment rises to 45% in the 7th grade and 39% grades 7-12. If White 



-H06~ 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 5 

enrollment remains constant at the Latins, they will enroll 43% of White 
students grades 7-12 by 1988, or 68% together with East Boston, while the 
thirty-seven other schools serving grades 7-12 will enroll only 32% of White 
students in those grades. Their aggregate enrollment grades 7-12 would be 
less than 7% White! 

I know that John Coakley would point out that many of the White students 
attending the Latin schools would not be in the Boston Public Schools at all 
if given any other assignment. The Board, in the First and Second 

Monitoring Reports, expressed special concern for program development and 
recruitment efforts to make many Boston schools more attractive to White 
students, and there are some preliminary signs of success along these lines 
at English, Dorchester, and Jamaica Plain High Schools. From a 

desegregation perspective little would be accomplished by maintaining a high 
White enrollment at the Latins and in East Boston, if the result were a 
virtual White abandonment of other district and city-wide high schools. 

A substantial proportion of the students entering the Latins come from 
non-public schools (see chart below), and it is encouraging that English and 
Dorchester High are reaching out to eighth graders in non-public schools and 
their parents in an attempt to interest them in a public school option other 
than the examination schools. These efforts should be intensified. 



7th Grade Entrants 1983 From Boston Public 



Black 


154 


White 


135 


Asian 


55 


Hispanic 


33 


Indian 


1 


Total 


378 



From Non-public 


59 


28% 


221 


62% 


11 


17% 


8 


20% 





0% 


299 


44% 



-407- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 6 

(8) District Schools and Latin Schools 

It is difficult to compare enrollments before and after desegregation because 
our figures are not broken out by grade, and some of the district high schools 
served only grades 10-12i others 9-1 2, and the Latin schools then, as now, 
grades 7-12. As some district high schools have added grades they should 
have increased their enrollments (overall "high school" enrollment increased 
by 3,000 in 1974, when the uniform grade 9-12 pattern went into effect>, 
while of course also showing the effects of city-wide enrollment declines. 

The following chart shows that this enrollment decline fell on almost every 
school except the two Latin schools, which in fact increased their enrollment 
without adding grades. 



Total Enrollment 


1973 


1983 (9-12) 


District Schools 






Brighton 


1448* 


1177 


Jamaica Plain 


786 


975** 


Roslindale/West Roxbury 


1504* 


1263** 


Hyde Park- 


1623 


1051 


Burke 


1345 


706 


Dorchester 


1511* 


831 


South Boston 


2193 


908 


Charlestown 


1111* 


994** 


East Boston 


1359 


1028 


City-wide Schools 






Boston High 


589 


727 


Copley Square 


507 


506 


English 


812 


1712** 


Madison Park 


- 


2051 ** 


Girls High 


676 


- 


Trade High 


684 


- 


Umana 


- 


1002** 



-40&- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 7 
Technical 1676 1109 



Total 


17824*#* 


16041 


Boston Latin (7-12) 


1964 


2211 


Latin Academy (7-12) 


1160 


1233 


Total 


3124 


3444 



NOTE: * grades 10-12 in 1973 ** new facility 

#** estimated 20,500 adjusted for missing 9th grade 

As this comparison reveals, the two Latin schools increased their enrollment 
by 10% while enrollment in the other high schools (adjusted for grades 9-12) 
decreased by around 22%. Put another way, the enrollment of the Latin 
schools would total around 2575 in 1983 (or slightly more than the enrollment 
of Latin School alone), rather than 3444, if they had declined in enrollment at 
the same rate as overall high school enrollment. 



(9) The Planning Issues in 1980 

A series of meetings of the "Joint Planners" (City of Boston (PFD), Boston 
School Department, Department of Education) in May and June, 1980 
discussed secondary school options. According to my notes of a May 28th 
session, I presented the issue of the enrollment projections supporting 
continued use of two Latin facilities: 

"The 2 Latin schools now = 16% of enrollment citywidej PFD proposes that 
this increase to 23% by 1988. If held to 16%, only 2080 places 
would be needed. This argues for consolidation in a renovated 
Boston Latin." 
Joseph Bishop, representing the School Building Assistance Bureau, also 
identified this as one of the issues. 



-409- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 8 

This session discussed a study commissioned by PFD entitled An Analysis of 
Ten Selected High Schoolsi by George Collins (former Assistant Commissioner 
for School Facilities and Related Services) and Barry Coletti. This study 
included Latin Academy, and considered the option of an addition to Boston 
Latin School, to bring combined enrollment to 3,200 students. The conclusion 
was that, 

"The addition would require $13.4 million for 133,800 gross square feet 
and with this large an addition, complete renovation of the existing 
structures would be required by the Department of Public Safety. This 
would make this investment of $33.4 million economically unwise. With 
declining enrollments the State Department of Education would most 
probably not support this project when other high schools would soon 
become available. In conclusion, it is recommended that as enrollments 
decline one of several high schools which will become available should 
be used for these needed academic programs" (page 33). 

My notes of a session on June 1 1 reflect discussion of the special urgency of 
middle school facilities, with high school priorities coming after three middle 
school projects. 

On June 27, 1980 the Board of Education approved a schedule for school 
construction projects in which renovation of Boston Latin School came 
fourth, after three middle school projects. This priority list was then 
submitted to the Court by the City of Boston and the Board. A limit of $40 
million was set for all facilities measures, with at least seven and possibly 
eight projects to be covered. Note that these projects did not include the 
work on heating systems, roofs, or sanitary facilities which was and is 
needed for so many schools in Boston. The priority list did not include a 
replacement for Latin Academy. 

First priority was renovation of the Rogers Middle School in Hyde Park (built 
1902/1920/1934, 67% Black). Second was renovation of the Dearborn Middle 
School, located in the former Roxbury High building (1913/1939, 60% Black, 
13% Hispanic). Third was a converted or new middle school at the Roxbury 



-410- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 9 

end of District I, replacing the Taft (1895/1915/1939, 31% Black, 46% Other 
Minority) in Brighton. Fourth was renovation of Boston Latin School 

(1922/1933, 22% Black, 18% Other Minority). Fifth was renovation of 
Dorchester High (this project has gone ahead as a Court-ordered "special 
desegegation measure"). Si>;th and seventh were an elementary school in 
Roxbury and a middle school in East Boston. Eighth (if funds sufficed) would 
be a District II middle school. 

The relatively low priority given to high schools reflected the fact that 
seven new high school facilities opened between 1973 and 1980: 

English Umana 

West Roxbury Madison Park 

Charlestown Jamaica Plain 

Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 
Only one middle school has been built (McCormack, .1967) and one addition 
built (Cleveland, 1972) since the King opened in 1937. 



(10) The Planning Issues in 1984 

In February 1984 Superintendent Spillane submitted a Long Range Plan to the 
School Committee. One of the tasks identified under "high schools" was to 
"develop a long-range plan for Boston high schools, specifying the purposes 
and goals of citywide schools, comprehensive high schools, and the Humphrey 
Occupational Center" (page 14). 

One of the tasks identified under "Gifted and Talented Programs" was to 
"establish middle school and high school options for able students in addition 
to the present exam schools" (page 21). 

The fourth section of the Long Range Plan dealt with those "restructuring" 
issues which would affect desegregation. The first issue discussed in this 
section was the Latin schools. John Coakley, the author of this section of 
the Plan, raised several possibilities, including conversion to a grade 6 to 12 



-411- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 10 

rather than 7 to 12 structurei the combination of the two Latins into one 
schooli perhaps with an Intermediate and a Senior Division, or a 
campus-style organization premised upon construction of an addition to Latin 
School for Latin Academy (the option which Collins and Coletti recommended 
against in 1980 on cost grounds). He deferred resolution of these questions. 

The schedule included with this Plan would have completed School Commitee 
review in March 1984, with a decision by the Board and the Court by October 
li 1984, and implementation in September 1985. 

On May 1, 1984 Superintendent Spillane recommended School Committee 
approval of "guidelines for development of a Long Range Facilities Plan) 
descriping them as "a generalized approach to facility planning". The first 
of the six points was that "A Facilities Modernization and Utilization Plan for 
the Boston Public Schools will be completed upon final resolution of the 
organization and programmatic issues contained in the Long Range Plan of 
February 13, 1984. However , public review and dialogue are integral to and 
will precede final decisions on the recommendations proposed in Section IV of 
the plan "Restructuring of the Boston Public Schools." 

The sixth point in these guidelines was that "Redesignation of an existent 
facility for Latin Academy's use is not advisable and not recommended. The 
Boston Public Schools seek approval for development of plans and for 
construction of a new facility for Boston Latin Academy." No specifics are 
given on the planning process leading to this conclusion, which is directly 
contrary to that reached by the Collins/Coletti study for PFD in 1980. 

In a memorandum from John Coakley which was included with these May 1 
"guidelines", reference is made to the reluctance of city and state agencies 
to act on such requests as "a permanent home for Boston Latin Academy" 
because, 

"there is no comprehensive plan for school facilities, especially 
at the secondary school level. However, the representatives of the 
school department have the dilemma of not wishing to produce such a 



-412- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 11 

facility plan until the recently-developed Long Range Plan, which 
should form the basic educational foundation of a facility plan, is 
refined and approved by the Boston School Committee. In fact, one 
portion of the Long Range Plan deals with proposed changes in the 
organization and student assignment patterns of the Boston Public 
Schools and, consequently, will require review by the Massachusetts 
Board of Education and the Federal District Court. We should not 
and cannot provide a facility plan with specificity until we obtain 
approval of the educational and organizational elements of the Long 
Range Plan. <emphasis added> 

The memo goes on to project a decline in high school enrollment from 17,425 in 
the coming school year (1984-85) to 13,850 in 1988-89, with a growing 
proportion of all students requiring bilingual education. Combined middle and 
high school enrollment is projected at 25,725 in 1988-89, for a utilization 
rate of 71% of the present capacity (36,042) at these levels, with the 
Humphrey Center not factored into the determination of available capacity in 
the sending schools. Note that assignment to "full capacity" is impractical 
for reasons stated by Mr. Coakley, so that some 30,000 spaces would be 
needed for 25,725 students. 

Three factors are described by Mr. Coakley as of "greatest priority" in 
making decisions about school consolidation. These are (1) the "long-term 
value and flexibility of a building", (2) where most students live (a factor 
used in an earlier memo by Mr. Coakley to explain the continuing need for 
Burke High School, because of its location), and (3) "the need to maintain 
some public-school access in all major neighborhoods of the city". On the 
basis of these factors he provides a list of 29 secondary schools and 43 
elementary schools as "an unarguable core of our facility needs for the next 
twenty-five years", while making clear that some other facilities will also be 
retained. He also observes that, "we must be prepared to consolidate some 
of our central secondary school facilities which are outside the present or 
potential population centers of the city when our high school enrollment 
begins its almost certain decline." 



-413- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 12 

(11) Summary of Planning Issues 

As pointed out in Mr. Coakley's memo, some very basic educational policy 
decisions must be made before it will be possible to have a plan for Boston 
high schools, including construction of a new Latin Academy. Approval by 
the Board and the Court are essential before such a plan is implemented by 
undertaking construction and renovation projects. 

The May/ June 1980 discussions asked whether there would be a continuing 
need for the present Latin capacity in a time of declining secondary school 
enrollment. Updated analysis based upon 1979, 1983 and projected 1988 
enrollments make it clear that Boston could consider a number of options, in 
response to issues raised in the Monitoring Reports and in Superintedent 
Spillane's proposed Long Range Plan. 

For example, the Latins could continue to serve their present number (3805) 
of students of each racial/ethnic group, with the effect of increasing 
substantially their proportion of all White students in the system. By 1988 
43% of all White students in grades 7-12 would attend the Latins, compared 
with 17% in 1979 and 24% in 1983. Or the Latins could continue to serve 
their present proportion of all students in grades 7-12. Total enrollment 
would be 2565 students. Or they could serve the proportions of city-wide 
enrollment that they served in 19795 this would reduce total enrollment by 
1988 to 2219. In 1979 the two schools served 10% of all students in grades 
7-12, compared with 13% in 1983, a projected 14% in 1984, and a projected 
17% (given present enrollment) in 1988. Or the Latins could add a sixth 
grade, while continuing to serve their 1979 proportion of all students! total 
enrollment would be 2590. 

The draft Plan proposed by Superintendent Spillane in February 1984 clearly 
identified the need for development of a plan specifying "the purposes and 
goals" of such city-wide high schools as the Latins, and of options other 
than the Latins for gifted middle and high school students. Such decisions - 
clearly an equity concern - will have major implications for facility planning. 



-414- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 13 



The questions raised in the "restructuring" section of the same Plan, 
including grade structure for the Latins, whether one or two schools, and 
whether to have an intermediate and a senior division, have not yet been 
addressed. How can educational specifications and facility plans be 

developed absent such decisions? 

The cost considerations raised by Collins and Coletti in 1980, and their 
suggestion of an alternative site in a present facility which would otherwise 
be closed, have not been dealt with in the documents made available to the 
State. The implications of a major cost commitment to a Latin 

Academy/Latin School project upon other facility priorities have not been 
reviewed. 

Present monitoring efforts suggest that the Latins may already be enrolling 
students - of all racial/ethnic groups - for whom they do not provide an 
optimal educational environment. This may well be attributable to the 
increasing proportion of all students city-wide of each racial/ethnic group 
who are enrolled in the Latins. Maintaining present enrollment will (as 
demonstrated above) have the effect of increasing very substantially the 
proportion of all students attending these schools, which in turn will mean 
that the requirements for admission will be lowered substantially and more 
students will have academic difficulties - unless the educational approach is 
modified. Has this issue been faced in Boston, as it was in Springfield in the 
High School Racial Balance Plan approved by the Board? 



(1 1) Conclusion 

The planning process for secondary education in Boston has identified 
important issues, but it has not proposed solutions. As a result, there is 
nothing which could be considered a "Secondary Facilities Plan" which could 
be reviewed for equity, desegregation and educational implications, much less 
approved by the Board and the Court. This is clearly conceded by the 



-M15- 



Latin School/Academy Facility Issues page 14 
"guidelines" adopted by the School Committee in May. 
These are the basic decisions which must be made: 

(a) What capacity is needed for a school or schools offering the program 
which the Latins now offer? Possible 1988 enrollment discussed above range 
from 2219 up to 38051 the lower figure is only 58% of the higher. 

(b) The educational specifications supplied recently to School Building 
Assistance Bureau projects an enrollment of 3700. This would translate into 
a much higher proportion of all Boston students than the Latins have 
traditionally served. Does Boston propose to modify the educational mission 
and approach of these schools to serve a less highly selected clientele? Will 
more non-academic programs be needed - and spaces designed for them? 

(c) What will the grade and administrative structure be? Will grade 6 be 
addedi will Latin Academy become intermediatet will there be one school or 
two? Answers to such questions should not postponed until after facilities 
are designed and built! they have many facility implications. 



-416- 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



-417- 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 
OBJECTIVE ; 

I. To determine whether there is a resource room and 
appropriate staff and materials. 

QUESTION ; Does Boston Public Schools have an adequate pool of 
substitute teachers to ensure Resource Room service 
delivery? 

METHODS ; 

The Regional Office conducted on-site visits to verify that 
qualified substitutes are available and interviewed Principals 
and/or Headmasters. In addition, the Department requested a 
status report from Boston as to how ts pool of substitutes have 
been utilized during the 1983-84 school year (See Appendix 1). 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION ; 
Program and Staff Matrices 

MONITORING SITES ; 

Kent, Condon, Holland and Marshall Elementary Schools; Lewenberg 
and Mackey Middle; Dorchester, Charlestown, Brighton and South 
Boston High Schools. 

FINDINGS ! 

In this round of monitoring, there were 7 long term substitutes, 
as follows; 3 at Holland Elementary; 1 at Marshall Elementary; 2 
at Dorchester High School; and 1 at Charlestown High School. Of 
these seven (7), 1 at Dorchester High is enrolled in a special 
education program leading to certification. One at Charlestown 
High is near completion of certification requirements, and 1 has 
applied for certification. The remaining 4 were non-certified. 
With the exception of the Charlestown High School Resource Room, 
all long term substitutes were in substantially separate, low- 
incidence special education classes. Long term substitute 
coverage ranged from a maximum period of 8 months to a minimum 
period of 4 weeks. 

Further, it was found that there were 6 non-certified short term 
substitutes on the days of the site visits, as follows; 2 at 



-H19- 



Charlestown High; 1 at Dorchester High; 1 at Brighton High; 1 at 
Kent Middle; and 1 at the Holland Elementary. In 1 class each, 
at the Marshall Elementary and Dorchester High, there was no 
substitute for the day of the teacher's absence. Only 1 of the 
substitutes had special education certification. Of those 
classes cited in the February, 1984 monitoring, 2 still have 
substitutes. There is no longer a substitute in the Brighton 
High School Resource Room (Room 4S) . 



OBJECTIVE 



II. To determine whether out-of-district placements of special 
needs students are programmatically appropriate in 
consultation with the Director of Equal Educational 
Opportunity for assignment implications. 

QUESTION ; Is Boston Public Schools continuing to implement the 
Prima Facie Denial Action Plan, under 71B, Section 6, 
to address the over-representation of black students 
in 502.3 prototype? 

METHODS: 



Review of Boston Prima Facie Denial (PFD) 1982-83 Corrective 
Action Plan and on-going status reports. 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION ; 
Prima Facie Denial Action Plan. 

MONITORING SITES ; 

N. 

Condon, Marshall and Holland Elementary; Lewenberg Middle; 
Brighton High. 

FINDINGS ; 

The plan and status reports indicate that the majority of 
elements are in process and on schedule. 

Each school district must develop a LAU Plan to describe its 
procedures of identifying the primary languages of all 
students. In addition, it must assess the language dominance and 
proficiency as well as achievement levels for insuring non-biased 
assessment of minority children referred for a Chapter 766 
evaluation. LAU categories and steps represent the language 
proficiency levels of students and must be noted on the students' 
Individualized Education Plans. 



-420- 



While Boston has a LAU Plan and bilingual special education 
programs, it has experienced problems in obtaining current 
LAU categories and steps of bilingual students with special 
needs. At the following schools, Condon, Marshall, 
Holland, Lewenberg and Brighton, there were students whose 
Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) did not have current 
and/or complete information regarding the students LAU 
categories and steps (See Appendix 11). 



CORRECTIVE ACTION ; 

Monitors have communicated this information to the Department of 
Student Support Services and have requested an update on 
individual students LAU categories and steps. 



FINDINGS: 



2. Efforts to recruit bilingual special education staff were 
impeded by the lack of a recruitment specialist from mid- 
September to mid-February. A major problem is the 
recruitment and hiring of qualified bilingual specialists, 
e.g., speech therapists, vision resource teachers, school 
psychologists and pupil adjustment counselors, as well as 
^qualified bilingual special education teachers for those 
children from low incidence language groups who have 
special needs. 



objective ; 

III. To determine whether out-of-district placements of special 
needs students are programmatically appropriate in 
consultation with the Director of Equal Educational 
Opportunity for assignment implications. 

QUESTION ; Where disproportionality has been cited through the 
prima facie denial procedures, are the Boston Public 
Schools appropriately reviewing and placing identified 
special education students in accordance with the 
Chapter 766 procedures? 

METHODS ; 

The Division of Special Education will continue to determine over 
and under representation of minority students in all special 
education prototypes. Monitors will continue to review Boston's 
PFD Action Plan to assure that previously identified over- 
representation in 502.3 program prototypes are made for 

-1J21- 



"compelling educational reasons". 



SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION ; 

Prima Facie Denial Action Plan and Status Reports 



FINDINGS: 



1. On March 30, 1984, the Department of Education cited Boston 
for over and under representation of minority students (See 
Appendix 4) . 

2. Boston, as part of its Action Plan, reviewed a total of 401 
Black and Hispanic students in the 502.3 prototype. The 
Over/Under Representation Project has conducted a random 
record review of these cases and found that in 86% of the 
cases, students were placed for compelling educational 
reasons. Unresolved concerns in the remaining 14% continue 
to be addressed (See Appendix 3). 



OBJECTIVE: 



IV. -,To determine whether out-of-district placements of special 
needs students are programmatically appropriate. 

QUESTION : is Boston Public Schools appropriately placing 
identified Special Education students into 
substantially separate prototypes (502.3), especially 
Learning and Adaptive Behavior (L/AB) programs, in 
accordance with Chapter 766 procedures? 

METHODS: 



The Greater Boston Regional Office received and reviewed Boston 
Public Schools' submission of assurances that L/AB classroom 
enrollments are reviewed by Boston Public Schools for placement 
appropriateness for the 1983-84 school year. 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION : 

Beaton Public Schools' submission of update of L/AB program 
placements review process (See Appendices 1 and 2). 

FINDINGS : 

Boston has established procedures to ensure that placement of 
minority students in L/AB programs are for "compelling 



-422- 



educational reasons", in accordance with C.71B, S.6. 

To monitor the implementation of these procedures, Boston 
committed itself to use the PFD Checklist for all minority 
students at their original evaluation team meeting and for all 
re -evaluations of students placed in the L/AB programs. In 
addition, as part of Boston's Comprehensive Internal Program 
Review Process, developed pursuant to the Allen vs. McDonough 
state court case, Boston randomly reviewed case records of 25 
L/AB students. While this review found no inappropriate 
placements, Boston acknowledged in an April 27, 1984 letter to 
the Department of Education that not all schools are following 
the newly established procedures. Therefore, a reminder to all 
schools has been distributed. The Department win continue to 
monitor these procedures and will request periodic updates from 
Boston . 

Further, Boston is currently re-evaluating its educational, 
psychological and sociological assessments to ensure that they 
are culturally non-biased. Analysis of these assessments will be 
completed by June, 1984. Any changes will be implemented during 
the 1984-85 school year and in-service will be provided. 



OTHER FINDINGS: 



Have class size violations cited in the February 1984 Monitoring 
Report been corrected? 

METHOD : 

Teacher interviews 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION : 
Not applicable 

MONITORING SITES : 

Mackey Middle, Brighton, Dorchester and Charlestown High 

STATUS : 



Of the 10 classes in 4 schools identified in the February, 1984 
monitoring report as exceeding Chapter 766 Regulations for class 
size, 3 remain in non-compliance, 4 have been corrected, and 2 
need further follow-up. 

In addition, during the second round of monitoring (April, 1984), 
on-site visits and teacher interviews indicated that 1 resource 



-423- 



room at the Marshall Elementary School exceeds regulatory 
requirements for class size. In addition, 1 L/AB class at 
Dorchester High School exceeds class size limits during its self- 
contained physical education class 

See Chapter 766 monitoring standard, 12.5, for required 
corrective action (See Appendix 5). Boston will be required to 
submit an Action Plan for how it will remediate these non- 
compliance issues by July 9, 1984. 



OTHER FINDINGS : 

Were age span waivers submitted for 502.4 classrooms where the 
age range of students exceed 48 months? 



METHOD ; 

Teacher interviews and student record reviews 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION ; 

Boston submitted waiver requests for those programs on 
November 1, 1984. 

MONITORING SITES : 

Dorchester, Charlestown, Brighton High, Lewenberg Middle and 
Condon and Kent Elementary Schools 

STATUS : 



Of the 12 classes in 3 schools (Brighton, Dorchester and 
Charlestown High) that had students with age span ranges 
exceeding the regulatory requirements, Brighton and Dorchester 
High age span waivers submitted by Boston were approvable (See 
Appendix 6). During the site visit to Charlestown High School, 
it was difficult to verify the age span waivers because the 
information submitted on them was incomplete and/or inaccurate. 
During this round of monitoring, age span waivers were also 
approved at the Kent and Condon Elementary Schools and the 
Lewenberg Middle School. Boston will be asked to resubmit its 
age span waivers for Charlestown High. 



OTHER FINDINGS 

Has the mixing of Spanish and Cape Verdean Special Education 
students in the bilingual resource room at the Condon been 
corrected? 



_H24- 



METHOD ; 

Teacher interviews 

SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION ; 

Student's Individualized Educational Plans 

MONITORING SITES 



Condon School 



STATUS ; 

The on-site visit to the Condon Elementary bilingual resource 
room indicates that the mixing of LAU categories A and B, Spanish 
and Cape Verdean special education students, continues to 
exist. See Chapter 766, Monitoring Standard 12.2, for reguired 
corrective action (See Appendix 10). Boston will be reguired to 
submit an Action Plan for how it will remediate this non- 
compliance issue by July 9, 1984. 

OTHER FINDINGS ; 

Have facility violations at Brighton, Dorchester and Charlestown 
High and Mackey Middle cited in the February, 1984 report been 
corrected? 



METHOD: 



Interviews with teachers, principals/headmasters and on-site 
visits to classrooms 



SUPPORTIVE DOCUMENTATION : 
Not Applicable 

MONITORING SITES ; 

Brighton, Dorchester and Charlestown High and Mackey Middle 

STATUS: 



On-site visits to the Brighton and Dorchester High Schools and 

-425- 



Mackey Middle indicated that 6 resource room teachers do not have 
classroom space provided which is at least comparable in all 
nhvsical aspects to the average standards of regular education 
facilities. This problem was cited in the February 1984 report 
and has not been corrected (See Appendix 7). The space problem 
at Charlestown High School has been remediated. See Chapter 766 
monitoring standard 12.5 for required corrective action (See 
Appendix 7). Boston will be required to submit an Action Plan 
for how it will remediate this non-compliance issue by July 9, 
1984. 



-H26- 




Appendix 1 



Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 



431-7825 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Tom Hehir, Manager v 

Department of Student Support Services 

FROM: Pamela Kaufmannis 

Regional Special EcXtcMion Director 
X 
RE: Desegregation Monitoring. Follow-up 

DATE: April 10, 1984 



4. 
5. 



Thank you for providing the space matrices and the listing of "High 
Incidence Programs" as well as a description of the new ceding 
system. I am forwarding this information to Charlie Glenn, Bureau 
of Equal Educational Opportunity, for his review with respect to 
proposed 1984-85 assignment matrices. !. 

You had indicated, at an earlier meeting, that Boston could provide 
information as to the utilization of the pool of 20 substitutes. I am 
now requesting from the Department of Student Support Services a 
summary as to how and where these substitutes have been utilized 
during the 1983-84 school year, how many are there, and efforts 
made for recruitment. Please indicate, where appropriate, which of 
these substitutes are now long-term subs and if they are certified. 

In your 11/10/83 Memo (see attached) Boston had committed itself 
to utilize the PFD checklist for all minority students in L/AB Pro- 
grams at their original IEP Team meeting. A further commitment 
was made to utilize the PFD checklist for all re-evaluations of 
students placed in the L/AB Programs. It is my understanding that 
the CIPRP Team would pull a representative sample of the above 
types of cases during the CIPRP visit. Please provide this office 
with information, by school, as to how many original and re-eval- 
uation cases of minority students placed in L/AB Programs have 
been reviewed by the CIPRP Team to date. (See p.282 of Volume II 
of February Desegregation Monitoring Report.) 

Has the PFD checklist been used for all probable CRU submissions? 

Given your new coding system, have you conducted an updated 
analysis of minority students placed in L/AB programs? If so, how 



-1127- 



Page -2- 



Appendix 1 



does this analysis effect your analysis contained in the 12/20/83 
memo regarding L/AB Placements by race? Please advise. 

6. Lastly, please provide me with an update as to the review of educa- 
tional, sociological and psychological assessments to assure they are 
culturally non-biased. 

I would appreciate a response from you by April 25, 1984. Your coopera- 
tion is appreciated. 



PK/mjc 
Attachment 

cc: Marie Lindahl " 
v Ken Caldwell ' 



-H28- 



Appendix 1 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



v . .. > :/ 



NOV 1 3 1933 



BOSTON REGIUilAL CENTEK 
DIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATE 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: Pamela Kaufman 

FROM: Thomas Hehir ~>^-Z£ 

DATE: November 10, 1983 

SUBJECT: Learning Adaptive Behavior (L/AB Placements) 

The following actions will be taken to address the State Department 
of Education's concerns regarding the apparent over-representation of 
minority students in L/AB programs. 

1. The PFD checklist will be used for all minority students 
at their original Individual Education Plan team meeting. 

2. The PFD checklist will be used for all reevaluations of 
students placed in the L/AB program. 

3. The PFD checklist will be used for all probable Central 
Review Unit submissions. ». 

4. The Department of Student Support Services will develop new 
and modified service delivery models within the L/AB program. 
We will explore the use of less restrictive options for 

serving students exhibiting behavioral and emotional difficulties. 
Currently, we have requested a change of codes from the 
Department of Implementation. This change will allow us to serve 
L/AB students within the less restrictive prototype. Currently, 
we are only allowed to assign students into the L/AB program 
with a 502.4 prototype. The implementation of new models will 
include a teacher training component. 

5. Senior Level Advisors will review all L/AB placements recom- 
mendations since last May. This will be reported in the following 
manner: 

a. L/AB placement recommendations by level, by race 

b. Actual L/AB placement by level, by race. 

Tnis activity will be completed by December 9, 1983 and forwarded 
to you. 

6. Central Review Unit submissions for L/AB placement will be 
screened to assure that alternative strategies such as counseling 
or therapy have been attempted prior to placement in L/AB 
prototype. 



26 COURT STREET • BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 61 7 

_H29- 



Appendix 1 

Pamela Kaufman -2- November 10, 1983 

7. The Over/Under Representation Project will investigate assessments 
used in educational, sociological and psychological evaluations 
to assure they are culturally non-biased. A list of tests will 
be completed by the summer of 1984. Inservice will be conducted 
for appropriate personnel during-the 1984-85 school year. The use 
of these assessment instruments citywide will commence during the 
1985-86 school year. 

I believe that these actions will assure that the rights of minority students 
to be served in least restrictive alternatives will be protected. 

If you require further information, I will be glad to provide it. 

jg 

cc. K. Caldwell 



-430- 



Appendix 1 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 
MEMORANDUM 



TO 
FROM 
DATE 

RE 



Pamela Kaufman 

Thomas Hehir ^%/ 

December 20, 1983 

LAB Placement Analysis By Race 



In response to the DOE concerns regarding the disproportionate 
number of black students placed in LAB programs, my staff conducted 
an analysis of CRU placements from May 1, 1983 to November 10, 1983. 
This analysis shows both CRU recommended placements as well as actual 
placements : 



R\CE 


RECOMMENDED 


% 


CURRENTLY PLACED 


%_ 


Black 


85 


51% 


71 


5*9% 


White 


67 


40% . 


40 


33% 


Hispanic 


12 


7% 


7 


5% 


Oriental 


1 


.6% 


1 


.8% 


TOTAL 


165 




119 





The discrepancy between recommended prototype and actual assign- 
ment occurs for several reasons. These include the unwillingness of an 
over 16 year old to attend school, rejected plans which resulted 
in a different prototype and inability to locate students. The dis- 
crepancy is greatest at the High School level. 

The current racial composition of the Boston Public School's is 
48% black, 28% white, and 23% other minority. As you can see the recom- 
mendation of the CRU for placement exceeds the systems black enrollment 
by 3%, actual placement by 11%. Recommendations for white students 
exceed the systemwide enrollment by 12% with actual enrollment exceeding 
systemwide by 5%. There appears to be a significant underrepresenta- 
tion of other minority students with only 6% of the L/AB Placements 

26 COURT STREET • BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 021 OS • 726-6200 AREA 617 

-431- 



Appendix 1 
-2- 

falling in this group as compared to a systemwide enrollment of 23*. 

This data indicates that CRU is not placing a disproportionate 
number of black students in L/AB Programs. This disproportionality 
that currently exists is probaly due to past practices which may have 
identified a seemingly inordinate number of black students. 

This data may change our original plan of action for dealing with 
this issue. I welcome your input. However, I will proceed as planned 
unless we agree, on an alternative strategy. 

cc: Kenneth Caldwell 
.Marie Lindahl 
Ronda Goodale 
Idola Williams 
Cynthia Williams 
Joyce O'Connor 
Pat Walsh 






-^32- 



Appendix 2 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



TO: Pamela Kaufmann 

FROM: Thomas Hehir , Manager z^^/. 
Student Support Services 

DATE: April 27, 1984 

SUBJ: Desegregation Monitoring 

The following is information you requested, regarding "dese- 
gregation monitoring". Per your agreement, this response is being 
provided by: April 27, 1984. 

(1) Boston has utilized a pool of substitutes for compliance purposes 
during the 1982-1983 school year to address non-compliance 
issues, due to lack of staff. Usually, these substitutes are 
deployed to serve as aides until an aide can £>e budgeted. As 
many as 32 substitutes are deployed at any one time. Attached, 
is the list of school where these substitutes have been deployed. 
None of these are currently long term. Two are certified in 
special education. (See Attachment 1) 

(2) Attached also is the special education substitute and aide 
recruitment plan and copies of advertisements put in the paper. 
Further, the Personnel Office and the Office of Equal Opportunity 
are recruiting this week at CEC and in the Washington area, 
colleges and universities. (See Attachment 2) 

(3) The CIPRP Team has reviewed 25 L/AB originals and re-evaluations. 
No instances of inappropriate placement have been found. Attached, 
is Mr. Kalp's memo which breaks down the students by school. 

(See Attachment 3) 

(4) An analysis of C.R.U. submissions reveals an inconsistent use of 
the PFD checklists, for CRU submissions. Therefore I have sent 
sent out a reminder to staff, which is attached. (See Attach- 
ment 4) 

(5) The new coding system is not yet implemented for official 
enrollment print-outs. Therefore, an analysis of placement 

is not possible at this time. These are work print-outs, which 
have been generated by the Department of Implementation, which 
are being reviewed by the Senior Level Advisors and the Program 
Advisors, to determine the accuracy of the codes assigned to 
each student. Accurate print-outs should be available by the 
end of the month. When an accurate print-out is generated, we will 
do an analysis, which will be forwarded to you. 

26 COURT STREET • BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 61 7 

-433- 



Appendix 2 



Desegregation Monitoring 
Page 2 



(6) The following is the status of our efforts to assure non-biased 
assessments : 

In order to assure that Boston utilizes culturally, non-biased 
educational, psychological and sociological assessments, Boston has 
committed itself, through the 1983-1984 Action Plan, to initiate a 
number of activities in this area. The overall thrust of Boston's 
activities is to examine and disseminate information on assessments 
currently being used in the system. Since all tests are biased in 
some way, the type of information necessary for all assessors is an 
understanding of when, and with what populations assessments are most 
appropriately used. Interpretation, administration and the use of 
informal tests are also important areas that may influence bias and 
assessments. 

The first steps that Boston has initiated in the 1983-1984 
school year, as part of its Action Plan, is to determine which for- 
mal assessments are currently being utilized. During the current 
year the following activities have been initiated: 

(a) Educational 

A Task Force, chaired by the Assistant to the Senior 
Level Advisor for Elementary Programs, was formed in 
October, 1983. Part of the Task Force's charge was to 
investigate suitable test instruments to use for educa- 
tional assessments. The Educational Assessment Sub- 
Committee met between October, 1983 and March, 1984. A 
final report with formal recommendations will be presented 
to the Manager of Student Support Services in May, 1984. 

Additionally, the Over/Under Representation Project staff 
has distributed survey forms to Middle and High School 
special education teachers. The purpose of the survey 
is to collect data on tests currently being used in the 
field. An analysis of this data will be completed in 
June, 1984, and a list of tests will be compiled. 

(b) Psychological 

A Committee has been formed and is chaired by the 
Director of Psychological Services. The Committee was 
formed in February, 1984. It was established for the 
purpose of developing a list of tests accompanied with 
descriptive narratives to be used by Boston Public School 
psychologists and educators. This Committee will not 
disband upon completion of its task. It will remain 
active, and be responsible. for the review and evaluation 
of new psychological test instruments as they become 
available. 

(c) Sociological 

During the 1982-1983 school year, a Committee was established 
under the leadership of the Senior Advisor for Pupil 
Services to review and assess the procedures used by 
Boston in completing social assessments. At that time 
they developed the procedures and the format for conducting 



Appendix 2 

Desegregation Monitoring 
Page 3 

and reporting social assessments for Boston Public School students , 



In the 1984-1985 school year, Boston will provide information 
to all assessors on the assessments used in the system. In-service 
will also be conducted on interpretation, administration and informal 
assessments . 



-435- 



Attachment 1 



Appendix 2 



#2 During the 1983-1984 school year per diem subs have been deployed upon 
principals request or by Teacher Placement to Resource Rooms and 502.4 sub- 
stantially separate classrooms in the following schools: 

„_,,,. District 9 Jackson-Mann 

District 1 Garfield 

Hamilton 
Wins hip 



Wheatley 
English 



District 2 


Parkman 




Agasslz 


• 


Lewis 


District 3 


Bates 




Sumner 




Mattahunt 




Kilmer 




London 




R.G. Shaw 


District 4 


Ghanning 




Hemenway 




E. Greenwood 




Taylor 




Rogers 




Thompson 




Hyde Park 


District 5 


Fifield 




kr§nilS HOOd 




Mather 




Ohearn 




Holmes 




Wilson 




Burke 




Dorchester 


District 6 


Dever 




Emerson 




Perry 




Winthrop 




Gavin 




McGormack 


District ? 


Hurley 




Quincy 




Warren Prescott 




Edwards 


District 8 


Otis 



-436- 



Attachment 2 
SPED SUBSTITUTE TEACHER AND AIDE RECRUITMENT 



2-84 
Appendix 2 



The purpose of this plan is to outline a process designed to establish a 
special education substitute teacher and aide lists from which both long and 
short-term SPED teacher and aide assignments can be made by the Office of 
Personnel. The plan has been developed as a result of the difficulty 
experienced by the Boston Public Schools in recruiting sufficient numbers 
of special education certified and/or certifiable staff needed to provide 
classroom service as substitute teachers. 

The following actions will be taken in accordance with the timelines noted: 



Timel ine Action 

May . Letters to Universities 

. On-site recruitment at 
local colleges and 
universities 

July . Newspaper advertisements 



August . Newspaper advertisements 

September . Newspaper advertisements 

. Letters to Universities 

. On-site recruitment at 
local colleges and 
universities 

October . Newspaper advertisements 

November . Letter to universities 

December . On-site recruitment at 
local colleges and 
universities 

. Newspaper advertisements 

January . Newspaper advertisements 

. Letters to universities 
Sub recruitment drive 

February . Newspaper advertisements 
March . Sub recruitment drive 



Responsible Unit 

Office of Personnel 

Department of Student Support 
Services and Office of Personnel 



Department of Student Support 
Services and Office of Personnel 



Office of Personnel 

Department of Student Support 
Services and Office of Personnel 



. Newspaper advertisements 



Office of Personnel 

Office of Personnel/Division of 

Employment Security 

Office of Personnel 

Office of Personnel/Division of 
Employment Security 

Department of Student Support 
Services 

Office of Personnel 



-^37- 




Appendix 2 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 

Please Post /5&tfS§b\, Please Post 

FEB0 6 \9flA 

BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL AND LABOR RELATIONS 

MANAGER 

IDA WHITE 

January 17, 1984 

The School Committee of the City of Boston has substitute 
teaching positions available - Regular, Bilingual and Special 
Education — all grades, subjects and levels. Work in various 
parts of the City. Salary $45.00 for daily work; $50.00 for 
long "terra assignment. 

Requirements: 

1. Official transcript of bachelor's degree 

2. A* certificate of a Mantoux tuberculin skin test taken 
since 1977 • 

3. An application and two references (special reference forms 
available at time of application. 

4. Completion and verification of a criminal record form. 

COLLEGE SENIORS 

College Seniors may work as substitute teachers upon presen- 
tation of a letter signed by the school's registrar which indicates: 

1. current enrollment 

2. in good standing in senior class 

3. expected date of graduation 

College seniors must also present Mantoux test, references 
and complete criminal record check. 

Apply to: 

Department of Personnel and Labor Relations 
Teacher Placement Unit, 4th Floor 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 
726-6380 



-438- 

26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02108« 726 COCO E»l 5600 AREA 617 



f'i Appendix 2 

HE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



S'IW[M:NT SUf'POn I StHVU'C; 
MEMORANDUM 



TO: Ida White 

FROM: Kenneth G. Caldwell 

DATE: s August 12, 1983 

SUBJECT: Newspaper Advertisement 




- SPED Positions 



The purpose of this memorandum is to request your support and action by 
your staff for the submission of a newspaper advertisement announcing the 
availability of certain professional positions in the area of Special Educa- 
tion. This advertisement should be placed, as soon as possible, in the Boston 
Sunday Globe, the Boston Sunday Herald, the Bay State Banner, El Nundo and any 
ether local newspaper which would be read by bilingual candidates. 

This advertisement is being requested at this time for the following reasons: 

1. to establish a pool of certified and qualified candidates for 
SPED vacancies now available or which will become available 
during the school year. 

2. to serve as documentation of our efforts to recruit and hire 
certified staff. Such documentations shall be required by 

the State Department of Education as a part of the waiver process. 

3. to identify as many certified substitute teachers as possible 
to fill both short-term and long-term SPED vacancies which 
will develop during the school year. 

The attached advertisement should be approved and submitted for publication 
to the newspapers noted. 



Encl. 



KGC/rg 



cc: 



V. Mclnnis 
M. Vega 



0'. HI 



ii.'i i 



• Wiil'i )N, MASSAl HUM I IS <i;> it. 'i 



/.'ii i: 



-139- 



Appendix 2 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 
Professional Positions 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 
(Massachusetts Certification Required) 



o DAILY SUBSTITUTES - All certification/approval areas 

(Salary for Substitucs: $45.00 per day - 
after 30 school days increases to $50.00 per day) 

• TEACIJERS OF CHILDREN WITH SEVERE SPECIAL NEEDS 

o TEACHERS OF CHILDREN WITH MODERATE SPECIAL NEEDS 

• BILINGUAL SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS 

• SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPISTS 



Salary Range: $14,733 - $28,531 - dependent upon educational background, 

experience and collective bargaining 
agreements 



SPECIAL EDUCATION FEDERAL PROJECT MANAGER (full time) 

Responsible for preparation and management of federal special education 
budgets. Twelve-month, federally-funded position. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION EVALUATION UNIT LEADER (half time) 

Responsible for evaluation of special education projects. Twelve-montii . 
federally-funded position. 

EARLY IDENTIFICATION OF BLIND/VISUALLY- IMPAIRED CHILDREN-CONSULTANT (part-til. 
Responsible for identifying blind/visually-impaired Boston children 
(age 0-3 years) and to assist in program planning. Certification in 
moderate special needs and sensory-vision. Federally funded position. 



All applications for SUBSTITUTE positions should be made to: 
Office of Teacher Placement 
26 Court Street - 4th Floor 
Boston, Ma Telephone 726-6200, ext 5635 

All other applications, resumes and proofs of certification should be forwarded 
as soon as possible to: 

Department of Student Support Services 

26 Court Street - 7th Floor 

Boston, MA Tclephone726-6200 ext 5900 

-MO- 
AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER 



Appendix 2 



. , The School Committee 
cf tha City of Boston 

Positions available at the McKinley School; a totally 
separate vocational program for adolescents with severe 
behavioral, emotional and learning disabilities. 

Ouldtnoa Advisor /Special Need* — Provide support ser- 
vices Including: liaison with agencies and homes, behavior 
management, Individual and group problem solving and 
counseling. Serve as a Service Team member on two 
teams, each serving 10-12 students. Record keeping, at- 
tendance supervision and reporting. Certification as a 
Social worker (MSW. LSW, LCSW, LICSW) or Psychologist 
required. 

Pro-Vocational Teacher — Teach basic and related 
academics, exploratory shops, eloctives and physical 
education. Manage student behavior, maintain lesson 
plans and records. Serve on a Service Team (or 10 
students. Self-contained Middlo School Class. Moderate 
Special Needs Certification required. 

Secondary Spedal Education Teacher — Teach basic and 
related academics and physical education on team with a 
vocational teacher. Manage student behavior, maintain 
lesson plans and records. Serve on a Service Team for 1 1 
students. Self-contained Middle School Class. Moderate 
Special Needs Certification required 

Secondary Spedal Education Teacher, Sodsl Studies — 
Adapt and teach Social Studies curriculum to address 
special needs of College Prep students. Manage student 
behavior, maintain lesson plans and records, teach 
physical education. Serve on service Team for 11 students 
in self-contained High School Class Certification in 
Moderate Special Noeds and Regular Secondary Social 
Studies required. Ability to teach foreign language at 
elementary level preferred. 

Secondary Specie! Education Teacher, Science — Adapt 
and teach Science curriculum to address special needs of 
College Prep students. Manage student behavior, maintain 
lesson plans and records, teach physical education. Serve 
in Service Team for 11 students In self-contained High 
School Class. Certification In Moderate Special Needs and 
Regular Secondary Science required. Ability to teach 
foreign language at elementary level preferred. 

Secondary Electronics Teacher — To teach occupational 
skills including: electronic assembly, benchwork and 
assembly line, sodering. printed circuit card assembly, etc. 
To adapt vocational curriculum and collaborate with 
special education instructor in writing related academics. 
Manage student behavior, maintain lesson plans and 
records, teach physical education. Serve on Service Team 
for 11 students. Self-contained High School Class. Cer- 

tjTyf ion »< Vrw^tinrittL%w»^»H»wUJn<trnfl or Prefe rred. 

instructional Assistant/Trainee — Assist teaching groufrs^ 
and individuals in self-contained class. Manage individual 
and class behavior, lead elective and physical education ac> 

'ities. Teaching certification preferred. 
By ■kosvtt2b. R attend tetter and resume to John Drown- 
Varre. McKinley Hlfh School. 97 Peterborough St.. Boston. 
MA0221S. 



-Ml- 



'.'*■■ 



Appendix 2 



m SCHOOL CMSITTEE t^ THE CITY Of EOT 

'it !n j nwiagh il the elcKrne-y School; a totally uimii 
•oci-icul -ro-ra.n tor adal«»cer.r- mm uwe trfjv'o jl -mo- 
UJin ane ka.r.in- fis.t- jttei 

t<«~ thtw/»>cW lr-rt< _ Provide r-joport rrvtcu 
li-Uucnc uu anW a^anoej and home*, ty-navtor muji 
Mitt mdividuil a.-d gtoup -return eoton- an) coutueill-vj S«v« 
»« a 5«ivic« T«.«n r.-efflber on two tevrj. eack awviiw 10- 12 
iiuo-nii Re-en -none, attendance KmarvuMi end repcrij--. 
trtif. i:«)n tJ a SooaJ Wnur (etSW. LSW, ICS'* LIcSWl i 
Piya.oijr.n fsqmrad- 

r-i»eu--teeJ laaaM - Teacft uk and ratatad acide-ruca, 
t.pieratory ir-ori. Uoc-jvw a,-*) p«y-icjl edocatlun Ui-joa 
ruo»rl 6tM««(. rraJfTUM'le-aor, plana aril rec-rdj Srrva in a 
Sor.n Team lor lOatuotnU. Sa.lconL.iv-- U«M.- ScVd Clasa. 
e!oce.a :• ^toal Nee.a Captation .ec-jftr. 
t-raur- tan-Lot (-.i-V- Tree** - Teach ba« an) m-isd 
ac--cm.cs ano otiytxal education en turn wilfi a yoca:«i<J 
luc'a u<irus« ituotnl beft-vwr. maintain 111 ion puna and 
?^r-ZL''ii.™ && TMm "* " «-»-*'■-. S-fl-contiinof 
K^SoramCtasa iej-nya.eScevjBiitteoeC^tlcaiicrifi-iwed 
bnlM IhtJ Ereudae Tartar, fc*n tarta _ Ada,, ,*) 
ita 1 Social Studiea eunlctitu-i to uum apeclaJ needa 0/ 
uHo;- P.-to student! n^naja atjdanl beMvior -ulniim eason 
ji^'i a-d lecorov tuck pfytical education £e,-ve on eerwce 
_t-i> i» II mae-u m Mtt-contain*) Mr-h School Clan. 
UoAulm « Uodtrata Fnaciai Meed, and rfc-iAa/ S«onaV« 
.ciei Stucaa reuuiiM. Ai-bty to taut, , a ,^, Hn 8u4 „ J 
e-me'.ujryia-ripiitfar.ed. "ir-"!i" •• < 

1*.*-*-, la-ey Teeeaioa toMkjr. tatt*. - Adapr and ludl 
iirv-a oimic-jiuti to adJiesa icecu-l neede 01 College P-10 
a:.*.-«.>ta kunai* aiu-ent Bcnara. mae-iam leeiun plana ami 
:ecc.o; tuch pn,-.icjl ecu ation Sam on Service Team Mr It 
£ "J"? „ " 1 «*'»">«« h-Jn Scnool Clau Catuncation In 
u wt >oacui Nakii and feyoai S«cond*/y Scunca rauuiol 
a:>. ■ i -o iu-i >a ,^n linjuaja at aia.i»ntjr> lavat p. «>o, red 
Uu.t*l CatiiMsa lad. _ T wef, occi*«!lo<ul tuoi 
^ 'jru^ oi^.nmc auMiUy. t»ncn«yk and ammiyy Ima 
»-'='"; pimnuarcuilca'daiaamoiv. iK To »ii»i voutlonai 
cuncmrn ar.tt consboraia «itti t;«cial aduraoon Inaorucior la 
mlrfl fr^.ad acadtmca Uanagt ttudant bohavtor. maintain 
n-.jr. plant »,.d lacoroa. taacn pdyaical adjullM. Saiva on 
Srvift laam l.« 11 nudmu S*K-canlain«j Hmd Scnod C^aa. 
C« •_.>ii'«.n aa VxjtaxuJ Spactal Kmci kiatiucict pittenad 
it,n<rjc» umaatAniai _ Autt\ laicVig grouM a.-d 
•»-*v:i:a'. ..-, wii-cCTljined class. UtiuQt lnd.^uii aTd oaa 
X'itt «jdtitcuvea«d|iliyUcalacaicatlonactiviUt». Tucnlnj 
ctnn jrionpietCTiad. m 

t ,* ^ "lii c^'i^SL* ,nd """"^ to • Wln oVo-n-Van^ 
kkJ .«• h.^ Suw* 9," tea fntn» Sv Boaun, IU B9 15. 



the school coMMrrrei 0* thb city of boston 
Pot Hiena a>adia>c>« at th« McKlrtf«y Ccriooi: ■ loiuty •>«- 
r«t* »x«tKyi»i proorom fctf OKjotoacanla wtlrt ««v«v« 
tMliav4or»l, •fnotionat and learning dlanDltltlaj. 
OUIOANCe ADVISOR/SPECIAL NECO'J — ^iodCo a»0- 
pon aarvtc«a Including: IhAJaon arflh ac*nclaa and t.ofnai. 
b»*lavio/ mancoannc/it. kndMduaJ •ml grouo protilam 
aoiving and covjnaflilng. Sarvo aa a Sarvlca Team manoar 
en two leauna. eacn aervlno 10*12 atiidama. Haoord koeo- 
ang. allandai^ca aupa«vlalon and rcporUnd C-arllfiOallcn 
•a a Gonial Workar (MSrV, LSW. LCSW, LTCSW) pr Pay- 
cnoloolet rea'Jlnad. 

PROVOCATiQNAL TEACHER — Taacn baatc and raiaiad 
accdemica, axploratory anopa. alextlvae and prtyetcaj 
a^lucaHon. Mjrao* atud«nt t>cha«lcr. maintain laeaon 
plana afid racorda. eerve on a Oarvloa Term for 10 atu- 
cVanta. 6*rf-ronleinao Mlddla Scnool Claaa. Mooarala 
Sc-eclat Nee<« Cartlftcalmn rAOul/ad. 

SECONOABl SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER — T«»cft 
bea'o and ratatad acadam^a and pnyaical adulation m 
taavn with a vocational taacher. Manapja atudant ^♦^av'.o*. 
maintain raaaon plana and rarorde. Bvrvm on Bqrvu:* 
Team tor 11 elud*>oia. Sa)f-contaln«d Hl^h School Cleaa 
I Monofata Spoclal KntOi Carttncatlon raoulrad. 

?ECONDA«TY 8PECIAL EOUCATION TEACHER. SOCIAL 
TUDIU3 — Adapt and tarcn Social 6Uid>na curriculum 
to ac'drvaa apociaj na>eda ot Cot-acja Prcu aiudanta. Man* 
aoo aludant banavtor. maintain taaaon plana and record*. 
laach phyalcal education. Serv* crt Sarvlca Team for 1 1 
eludame In a--f-conteirved High School Claaa. Cerliflce- 
ilc-n In Moderiita Special Nwe-da and Papular Seconder/ 
Social Stua-e- requirad. Ability to taach foreign language 
at rU*mentory level preferred * 

SECONOAHy SPECIAL EDLrCATION TEACHER. SCI- 

fNCE — Adapt end teecrt Science ourrtouium 10 addreee 
oeolai Neede of College Prep alcdente. Manage a'udent 
c*onavtor. mmntaln leaeon plane and recoroe. leech Phyai- 
oal Education. Serve on Dervlce Teem for 1 1 oludenta 
Soft-contained High Scnool Claaa. Certification In Modar* 
ate Special Neede and RegiiM/ Secondary Science 
reoulrel. ADlllty to leech forehsn larvguege at elementary 
level preferred. 

SICdNOARY SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER. MATH 
— Adeot and teerh the hM range* of h>.;n achool math 
currKMilum to addreea apadai neede to College Prep *tu- 
clenta. Manage atudant uenavlor. melnlem leeeon plana, 
orde. leech phyeJc 
or 11 all 
achool claaa. Certlhcalk-n Irf Moderate Special N^teda and 
Sucondary Matn required. Abmty to teach foreagn i*n- 
nuece at ete-rvenlery level prererred. 

SCCONOARY tLFCTRONICS TFACHER — To leech oc- 
cupational eltllla Including: electronic eeeumhty. be-v-n- 
evore and aeeembfy line aolderlng. printed circuit c-erd 
aaeembly, etc To adapt vocational curriculum end colla- 
borate erlin apecial education metrudor In writing related 
academlca. Manage atuoerit behavior, malnlam laeeon 

tlane and recorde. leecn plTy-e'^ej education Serve on 
erv-oe Team for 1 1 atudenfa. Self-contained High Scnool 
i Clase. Certiflcallc-n aa Vocational Special Neede Inatruc* 



and recorde. leech phyeicel education Serve aa * Service 
Teem member for 11 atudaVita in a aeff-oonie.rvA-f hign 



I tor preferred. 



to John 



1 Oy September 1. 1063. aend letter and n 

I Brown-Varre. McKlnlvy High Scnool, fc7 Peterborough 

1 Street. Boeton. MA 02115 
PEFI66NI-1 WHO ARE FIR8T HIRED ON OR AFTER JUNE 
29, 1932 ARE SUBJECT TO CITY OF BOSTON RESIDEN- 
CY ORDINANCE. • 



- ..-M2- 



Appendix 2 






SUBSTITUTE JEKM& 



3/ aac ^ rs certificate bete Sf 5sary -. "P«lenee 
"**. $50 tor longie^ KlSf a ? ~ j4 = tor daily 
gates ap Py , 0eSM' 9 T"i '"'nested candi- 

mm ?m\o schools 



-413- 



Attachment 3 Appendix 2 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



bos; 







April 23, 1984 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: Tom Hehir, imager 

FROM: Dick Kalp, Program Advisor, Caq3liar.ce <V 

SUBJECT: Analysis of CIPRP Folders 

As you requested, I have researched my files in order to determine the 
number of folders that the CIPRP teams have reviewed that specifically involve 
minority students i-i substantially separate LAB classes whose current IEPs are 
eith-r originals or re-evaluations. 

The following lists the number of students by school. 



Marshall 


1 


Madison Park 


*- 


..or Chester High 


1 


Lever 


2 


McKinley 


6 


Warren Prescott 


2 


Jeremiah E. Burke 


1 



Lyndon 






3 


Hyde Park 


High 




1 


Lewenberg 






2 


Edison 






1 


South Boston High 




1 


M. Cur ley 


Middle 




1 


Otis 






1 




TUi 


'AL 


25 



If you have any questions I am available. 



I'-ti 



-4W- 



Appendix 2 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



Attachment 4 




STL'DENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



April 26, 1984 



TO: -Heads of Department and E.T.L. 's 

F10E-*: 'Thomas Hehir, Ilanager '^^l 
„ Student Support Services 

HE: PFD Requireients for new CRU suhnussions 
and .4 LAB reevaluations 

A random review of CRU submissions indicated that many of the 
•-durational pla..s submitted for minority students did not include a 

-esigna-ed minority representative on the plan. 

All new CRU submissions for minority students require that ycu 
include a minority representative and that the PFD team complete 
uhe FFD si:eet at the school. Nev/ includes any reccm-ended prototype 
cr^r^zes. All .4 IAb reevaluations also require a PFD team and a 

minority representative. 

You are not required to send the PFD sheet as part of your CRU 
ruir ussier, tut the front page of the educational plan should include 
a minority representative signature. 

Please see enclosed FFD reference sheets. 

For any further questions or clarifications regarding this memo, 
ciease contact Idcla Williams or Ronda Goodale at 726-6200, x5955- 



tr.c lesure 



X'F-.T S'nhi^ • BOSTON '.V-SSiCH'JScTTSC^'CS • 726-62C0 A.'.EA 6 ! 



Appei 



endix 2 




January 12, 1984 



TO: ETL's 

FK3M: Thomas Hehir, Manager "-"• 5 f. 
Student Support Services 

RE: PFD Requirements 

The state department has raised ccncems with' the Boston 
Public Schools regarding the disproportionate number of minorities 
placed in L/AB programs. Student Support Services as part of the 
Over/ Under Representation effort has agreed to initiate and 
ccntinue the following activities as of February 1, 1934. 

1. NEW The PFD checklist will be used for all reevaluaticns '•• 
cf students placed in the L/AB program. 

2. ONGOING The PFD checklist will be used for all NEW Central 
Review Unit submissions. 

All of the ether PFD activities will also continue (see 
revised enclosed PFD reference sheet) . 

If there are any questions regarding these procedures, please 
contact idola Williams or Ronda Goodale at 726-62C0, extension 5955. 

Thank you for your professional cooperation. 



enclosure 

cc: Kennth G. Caldwell 
Headmasters 
Principals 



-446- 



Appendix 2 



Over/Under Representation Project 

ETL REFERENCE SHEET 

I Minority Student Placement Re /lew 

A PFD Team' (chaired by the ETL) that includes rinisa?Hy, an appropriate 
minority representative, a special educator, and regular educator will 
conduct reviews and reevaluaticns using the FED Checklist for: 

A) NEW all reevaluaticns of students placed in the L/AB programs. 

B) ONGOING minority (black and Hispanic) students newly pieced in the 

5C2.3 prototype during the 1982-1933 school year. 

C) ONGOING any minority student in the 502.1 frctcrvpe not previously 

revievved using PFD criteria and with minority representation. 

D) ONGOING all reevaluaticns of minority students in the 502.3 prototype 

E) ONGOING all minor icy students referred to the Central Review Unit 

for 'all new placements. 

If FED requirements have net been met, indicate en the form which ones 
and reschedule within two months a review that complies with all PFD 
requirements . 

If all PFD requirements have been satisfied, indicate it in the appropriate 
space and proceed with the regularly scheduled review/reevalua-cicn . 

II .'-icnthly Referral Rercrt 

lata en referrals and PFD Team, review/reevaluaticns sust be submitted 
rxr.thly by ETL's to the OverAnder Representation Project. This report 
is due at the same time monthly Compliance Data Management Reports are 
submitted. A copy is enclosed; additional copies will be sent directly 
to your school. 

If there are any questions, or for further clarification please contact 
Idcla Williams or Rcr.da Goodale at 726-6200, extension 5955. Thank 
ycu for your continued professional cooperation. 



-i»47- 



Appendix 2 



PRIMA FACIE DENIAL CRITERIA CHECKLIST 



School 

Student 

Race 



District 
D.P. # 



Lau iTEP 



Prototype 



ETL/SEDH 

Regular Edjcation Teacher 
Date 



Have all PFD requirements been met? 

If not, Answer A through I. L'ofore pro- 
ceeding withs review with- minority repre- 
sentation, all c-iteria mjst be met. 

A. Language dominance and proficiency 
testing completed prior to other 
testing -for 'imite* English profi- 
cient chilcrcn. 

B. Prtreferral rodificatio^s attempted 
and docume-t^d with results of each 
modification. 

C. Appropriate arsessments conducted 
wnich were as free as poss^le from 
cultural and linguistic bias. 

D. Composition of the Evaluation TEAM 
met requirements of Sections 311.0, 
3.2.0 and 313.0 (Refer to 766 Regu- 
lations pp. 19-21.) 

E. Interpreter was present when primary 
language of parent or student was 
other than English. 

F. Forms and notices to parent were in 
primary language of parent. 

*G. IEP .included specific criteria for 
movement to less restrictive program. 

H. IEP and placement were based on the 
results of the assessments. 

I. Progress reports prepared as required 
and show that child has made progress 
in achieving goals in IEP. 



Minority Representative 
SPED Teacher 



Yes No 



Date 
Criteria 

Met 



Comments 



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-U53- 




Division of Sptcul Educaboa Appendix 4 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



March 30, 1984 



Dr. Robert R. Spillane 

Superintendent of Schools 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Superintendent Spillane: 

As you know the Department of Education is required under Chapter 71 B, 
Section 6 of the General Laws to review annually placement statistics of 
minority children in special education. The Department has completed 
its review of the October 1, 1983 School System Summary Report for all 
school districts. Based on the statistics you submitted to the 
Department, there continues to be an indication of disproportionate 
enrollments of minority children in certain special education 
programs. This year we have attached a table showing enrollment data 
for 1982 as well as 1983 which contrasts the rates of special education 
placements for white and minority children by program. This new format 
should assist you in the analysis of placement trends in your district. 

Under the law, disproportionate placements are called prima facie 
denial. A citation for prima facie denial is not intended to imply that 
your district has discriminated against minority children in special 
education placements. Rather, this analysis points out a situation 
which "on the face of it" requires closer attention. You have chosen to 
develop an action plan to assure that all of the required procedures are 
in place. The elements of that action plan are reasonable steps any 
district that serves bilingual and/or minority students should take. We 
acknowledge and do appreciate the energy that your district has invested 
in attending to this situation. 

At this point in time, the Department will continue to monitor your 
action plan during the next year. Department staff members will assist 
in making any necessary modifications to that plan based on recent 
monitoring reports. 



_H 5 U_ 



•2"* Appendix 4 



If you have additional questions or need assistance with your action plan, 
please .contact your Regional Center* Hs ere pleased to esslst you in 
providing appropriate services to all children with special needs. 

Sincerely, 



A>, 



Roger V. Brown 
Associate Commissioner 

cc: School Committee Chairperson 
Commissioner John U. Lawson 
Regional Center Director 
Regional Special Education Director 



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-157- 



Appendix 6 




Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 



AGE SPAN WAIVER REQUESTS 



Dorchester H.S. OSDC 
ESD Class 



22 students 



431-7825 



78 months 



Dorchester H.S. OSDC 
SAR Class 



17 students 



81 months 



Charlestown H.S. 
Multihandicapped 



67 months 



Charlestown H.S. OSDC 
SAR 

Charlestown H.S. OSDC 
ESD 

Brighton H.S. 
SAR, Room 221 a 
Mr. Robert Sampson 

Brighton H.S. 

L/AB, Room 327 

Jane Farrell, Teacher 

Condon 

Developmental Day Care 

Ms, Shellie Nee, Teacher 

Kent 

LD class 

Lewenherg 
L/AB Cluster 



18 students 

24 students 

8 students 

12 students 

5 students 

7 students 

8 students 



63 months 

71 months 

v -57 months 

75 months 

50 months 

50 months 
54 months 



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-467- 



Appendix 9 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



v"- 






blUULNl SUPI'ORI bl HVICES 



MEMORANDUM 




TO: Kenneth G. Caldwell, Senior Officer 

FROM: David Noriega w/ • V[ ■ 

DATE> March 8, 1984 

SUBJECT: Bilingual Special Education Vacancies for 1984^85 



Today, M1rna Vega and I met in order to project the Bilingual Special 
Education staff needs for the 1984-85 school year. We followed these 
criteria: 

- attrition 

- lack of appropriate certification 

- expiration of 3-year waiver period 

- lack of waiver approval 

- movement to other positions 
■* creation of new positions 

As indicated on the attached chart, there are nineteen (19) projected 
teacher vacancies and four (4) projected non-teacher vacancies. I will 
immediately contact the staff who need to submit documentation in order to 
ask them to forward it immediately to the Personnel Department. 

In addition to the above projected vacancies, the availability of three 
(3) other staff is questionable now, because they might move out of State or 
opt out of special education. 

M1rna Vega and Carlo Abrams will use this information during their 
recruitment effort at the C.E.C. Convention. 

Please advise if you need additional information. 



enc. 



cc Tom Hehir 
Mirna Vega 
Carlo Abrams 

26 COURT STREET • 



BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 07108 
-468- 



• 726 6200 AREA 617 



4 


ui nnguai special e< 
Projected Vacancies, 


lucatlon 
, 1984-85 


Appendix 9 


District 


School 


Program 


Lana 


Reason 


Comment 


I 


Tobln 


Lang. Dev. 


Sp. 


Waiver Expired 


Vacancy 




Kinship 


E.C.E. 


Sp. 


Moving 


Questionable 


II 


M.E. Curley 


L.D. 


Sp. 


No proof of 
enrollment 


Vacancy 






L/AB 


Sp. 


to Regular Ed. 


Vacancy 




T. Roosevelt 


R.R. 


Sp. 


No proof of 
enrollment 


Vacancy 




J.F. Kennedy 


Prim. Lang. Dev. 


Sp. 


Sub. Teacher 


Vacancy 


III 


Mattahunt 


R.R. 


Sp. 


To Regular Ed. 


Questionable 


V 


Dorchester High 


R.R. 


Sp. 


To Regular Ed. 


Vacancy 




Marshall 


E.C.E. 


Sp. 


Expiration of 
working permit 


Vacancy 


VI 


Dever 


R.R. 


Sp. 


Moving 


Questionable 




Gavin 


E.S.D. 


Sp. 


Sub Teacher 


Vacancy 




Russell 


R.R. 


Sp. 


1 

Became E.T.L." 


Vacancy 


VII 


Charlestown 


R.R. 


Sp. 


No proof of 
enrollment 


Vacancy 




Edwards 


R.R. 


Ch. 


No proof of 
enrollment 


Vacancy 




T1m1lty 


L.D. 


Sp. 


Waiver Expired 


Vacancy 




Blacks tone 


R.R. 


Sp. 


Waiver Expired 


Vacancy 






P.T.C. 


Sp. 


No proof of 
enrollment 


Vacancy 




Hurley 


R.R. 


Sp. 


No proof of Vacancy 
enrollment; no 
certification at all 


IX 


Hennlgan 


E.S.D. 


Sp. 


Another program 


i Vacancy 


Expansion 


El em. 


E.C.E 


Ch. 


Vacancy, 


if budgeted 




Elem. 


Lang. Dev. 


Sp. 


Vacancy , 


1f budgeted 




Middle 


S.A.R. 


Sp. 


Vacancy, 


1f budgeted 



-469- 

















Appendix 9 


District 


School 


Program 


Lang 


Re a 


son 


Comment 




Other 


Central 


Psychologist 


Sp. 






Vacancy 






Central 


P.A.C. 


Sp. 






Vacancy 






Central 


Speech 
Therapist 


Sp. 






Vacancy 





Central Vision 



Sp. 



Vacancy 




^-v^^Vf/ 



W °T"d 



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BILINGUAL EDUCATION 



-475- 



BILINGUAL EDUCATION 

I. INTRODUCTION : 

This current report reflects the continuing monitoring 
of the court orders in the desegregation of Boston 
bilingual education programs. In this monitoring 
period a total of 10 elementary, middle, and high 
schools were monitored for the first time. Four of 
these schools, the Mackey Middle, English High, South 
Boston High, and Dorchester High, and the Hubert 
Humphrey Occupational Resource Center (HHORC), which 
had been monitored last fall, were visited for a 
second time because of outstanding issues. (Appendix 
A) The data gathered continued to be related to the 
following general objectives: 

A. To review proposed program locations and 
space/program matrices during the annual 
assignment process to ensure that adequate space 
and other provisions have been made for the 
programs required, including bilingual 
kindergarten and extended day kindergarten, and 
to advise the Director of EEO accordingly. 



To determine, through regular monitoring 
activities, whether all approved and requir 
bilingual programs, including kindergarten 
extended day kindergarten, are in place anc 
functioning appropriately. 



B. 

red 
and 
extenaea aay Kinaeryar and 

functioning approprial 

C. To advise the Director of EEO on all bilingual 
education aspects of students assignments, 
i ncl udi ng: 

- examination school invitations 

- advanced work class invitations 

- student assignment handbooks 

- assignments (including bilingual, 
special, vocational) 

- transfers 

- exceptions, for the sake of bilingual 
programs, to racial percentage limits for 
assignments. 

II. MONITORING OBJECTIVES: 



The monitors employed the same set of specific 
monitoring objectives and questions used during the 



-477- 



fall of 1983. To these original objectives and 
questions were added 8 out of 10 new issues identified 
during last fall's monitoring visits. The original 
specific objectives were the following: 

A. To determine the availability of bilingual staff 
and space assignments in the targeted languages, 
including native language teachers, aides, and 
supportive staff (counselors, etc.) in bilingual 
education programming, including bilingual 
vocati onal /occupat i onal education areas. 

B. To determine the implementation of procedures for 
the recruitment, and assessment of limited 
English proficient (LEP) students in bilingual 
education programming, including 
occupational/vocational programs. 

C. To determine the availability of curricular 
materials in targeted native languages in all 
bilingual education programming, including 
occupational/vocational programs. 

D. To determine the accessibility of the limited 
English proficient students to all programmatic 
educational options, supportive services, 
extracurricular options, as well as 
occupational /vocati onal programs. 

E. To determine the status of the native language 
cluster concept as mandated by the Voluntary LAU 
Plan. 

F. To determine the opportunities of bilingual 
parents to participate in the educational process 
of bilingual students. 

The 8 additional issues or concerns needing to be examined 
were as follows: 

1. Actual availability of bilingual counselors 
who work with LEP students. 

2. The use of the native speaking aides at the 
HHORC. 

3. Validity of the Lau classification assigned 
to LEP students. 

4. The feasibility of implementing language and 



-478- 



culture maintenance programs. 

The actual involvement of the bilingual 
parent in the bilingual education in-house 
review process. 

The variables which may be determining 
factors for Boston in facilitating the 
smooth transition of the LEP student for 
partial/full mai nstreami ng . 

The appropriateness/validity of the 
information provided by Boston vis-a-vis the 
educational needs of the LEP students with 
special attention given to the American 
Indian's and the Puerto Rican's linguistic 
and cultural needs. 

The factors (i.e., conditions and attitudes) 
which have limited the successful 
implementation of a full-time native 
language bilingual program at the high 
school level. Of special concern are issues 
at South Boston High School involving an 
immersion approach program for Cambodian 
students . 



III. METHODOLOGY 



As in the previous monitoring period, an 
occupati onal /vocati onal education specialist and a 
bilingual education specialist, joined forces in a 
collaborative effort to focus on issues related to 
bilingual vocational/occupational education 
programming. A one-person team collected all the data 
related to other bilingual education programming. 

To achieve the monitoring objectives previously 
stated, the following activities were undertaken: 



A. Pre-Data Collection - The monitors requested from 
the Bilingual Office, the Department of 
Implementation, the Lau Unit, and the Division of 
Personnel the following data and documentation: 
(See Appendix C) 

1. Computer print-outs with data about: 

a. bilingual teachers (names, 

certification numbers, and position) 



-179- 



b. bilingual students (language clusters 
and locations by district, school, 
grade, and language) 

c. all students by race, district, 
school ,and grade 

2. Reports on the high school graduates for the 
last three years. 

3. Copies of the Student Assignment booklets in 
different languages. 

4. A copy of the revised Language Assessment 
Team Handbook . 

5. A copy of the revised Voluntary Lau 
Compl i ance Plan. 

6. Copies of Master PAC newsletters and other 
publications. 

B. Pre-Data Analysis - The monitors reviewed last 
fall's monitoring plan, reports, and 
correspondence related to problem areas on 
bilingual education programming to determine 
program sites. 

C. Meeti ngs - The monitors met with members of 
Boston s Bilingual Office to coordinate the 
monitoring visits, clarify monitoring procedures, 
and specify monitoring objectives. 

D. On-Site Visits ; 

1. Thirteen schools were visited on this 
occasion; the Mackey Middle, Hubert Humphrey 
Occupational Resource Center (HHORC), 
English High, Dorchester High, South Boston 
High, Boston High, Blackstone Elementary*, 
Dearborn Middle, Cleveland Middle, Jamaica 
Plain High, Martin L. King Middle, Madison 
Park High, and Mario Umana High. 

2. In those schools the monitors met with 
bilingual district coordinators, building 
administrators, bilingual department heads 
or liaisons, bilingual guidance counselors, 
and bilingual/E.S.L. teachers. 



-480- 



3. 



4. 



At the central office, meetings also were 
held with the bilingual community field 
coordinators and the 636 bilingual parent 
trainer specialist. 



At Boston High 
with bilingual 
school . 



School a 
students 



meeting was held 
attending that 



E . Data Collection Instruments : 

To gather the data during the int 
documentation review, the monitor 
instruments used during the fall 
additional form to gather data on 
ratios and course offerings had t 
(See Appendix D) because the data 
October did not allow for an accu 
determination of the actual stude 
in each class. At that point the 
decided to obtain an average stud 
ratio by dividing the total numbe 
the total number of bi 1 i ngual /E .S 
the bilingual programs in each sc 

IV. FINDINGS: 



erviews and the 
s modified the 
of 1983. An 

student/teacher 
o be developed 

collected last 
rate 
nt/teacher ratio 

moni tors 
ent/teacher 
r of students by 
.L. teachers in 
hool . 



A. Availability of Staff/Space Assignment : 

The on-site visits confirmed once more last 
fall's findings regarding the availability of 
staff/space assignments. 

1. Partial or full mai nstreami ng was still a 
problem in at least 8 of the schools 
monitored because of overcrowding in the 
regular classes (sometimes 37 to 38 
students) and/or because no parallel 
scheduling has been put into effect. 
(Appendix E) 

As reported to the monitors by the Bilingual 
Office Senior Advisor, Mr. Raffael 
DeGruttola, a plan has been devised and has 
just begun to be implemented to offer 
training in the areas of parallel scheduling 
and sister clustering models to the staff of 
the schools where no parallel scheduling has 
been put into effect. Additionally E.S.L. 



-181- 



curriculum objectives and activities are 
also being developed (K-12) to ensure that 
the transitional nature of the program is 
implemented based on E.S.L. achievement. A 
lower student/teacher ratio 
curriculum classes was also 
1984-85 school year (SY) to 
spaces for mai nstreami ng in 
(See Appendi x C) . 



for standard 
proposed for 
al 1 ow more 
those classes 



the 



There is a wide variety of mai nstreami ng 
patterns throughout the schools Those 
patterns range from extreme isolation to 
almost total submersion. Interviews with 
teachers revealed aspects about the problem 
which deserve a more in-depth investigation 
in the future, such as: a submersion model 
at South Boston High and Ohrenberger 
Elementary Schools and language and culture 
enrichment (maintenance) programs at 
Charlestown and East Boston High schools. 



Non-c 
stude 
1 east 
this 
of th 
(Engl 
non-c 
begi n 
vari o 
C o m i t 
have 
of f i c 
and b 
remai 
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7 tea 



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udget 
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budge 
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ance i 
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the n 
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tempts 

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rati o 
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regard 
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end of 

this y 

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a i n t i f f 

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if the 
4-85. 
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i ng 

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) were 

March 
ear. 
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posi t 
A cl ar 
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e n d i x 



f i e d in 

during 

E) Two 
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still 

and 
After 

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venor) 
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approved 

the 
wever, it 
ions have 
i f i cati on 
In total , 
F) 



at 



i n 



to 



Bilingual guidance counselors were found to 
be needed in at least 5 of the middle and 
high schools monitored. (Appendix F) Three 
schools have counselors for 1 or 2 days a 
week. Three of the guidance counselor 
positions that were needed for the Haitian, 
Hispanic, and Cambodian programs also have 
been budgeted for the remainder of this 
school year (1983-84). These counselors had 



-482- 



not been hired as of the date of the 
submission of this report. 

In 8 of the schools visited there was at 
least 1 uncertified bilingual teacher 
teaching limited English proficient 
students. (Appendix 6) 

In 4 of the schools at least 1 bilingual 
teacher was teaching courses outside of 
his/her area(s) of certification and/or 
competence. (Appendix 6) According to the 
Senior Advisor for Bilingual Education 
(Raffael DeGruttola), the Personnel Office 
is presently engaged in updating the 
information on all bilingual teachers to 
ensure that they are certified and teaching 
in their areas of certification. 
(Appendix C) 

Outstanding certification issues from the 
previous monitoring period remain. These 
issues are as follows: a social studies 
teacher teaching math at the Mackey Middle 
School, a Hispanic bilingual math teacher 
teaching English as a second lanuage at the 
Dorchester High School, and the need for a 
Khmer speaking bilingual teacher at South 
Boston High School where there are at least 
five teachers teaching E.S.L. and native 
language courses in English (e.g. social 
studies) . 

Bilingual community field coordinators, 
substituting for PAC coordinators, have more 
responsibilities than those normally 
assigned to PAC coordinators in other local 
educational agencies (LEA's) in the state. 
This impinges upon their parent 
organizing/training activities. 

Some of the schools monitored have problems 
with the physical plan which does not allow 
for an increase in the student or teacher 
population. We found that to be the case 
with the Mackey Middle, the Dorchester High, 
and the Roosevelt Middle School during the 
previous monitoring period. Dorchester High 
School is being rehabilitated. Before 
September, 1984, all necessary measures 



-183- 



should be taken to provide adequate 
classrooms and office space to the bilingual 
program in that school. Presently, Boston 
is considering consolidating the Hispanic 
program at the Roosevelt Middle School with 
the program at the Mary Curley School. 
There are concerns about whether the 
minority staff will be re-assigned, 
transferred, or laid off. 

9. Even though the number of days for the 

bilingual guidance counselor at Dorchester 
High School increased, this was made 
possible only by taking him away from the 
Martin Luther King Middle School. Since 
then, the King School has had no bilingual 
guidance counselor. 

10. Bilingual aides are needed in 9 of the 
schools monitored. (Appendix F) In some 
instances, however, because aides lack 
training in teaching methods, some teachers 
and building administrators prefer not to 
use them or to request additional 
teachers. The Massachusetts Bilingual 
Education Act (Ch. 71A) requires that such 
aides be provided. 

11. The monitors did not see any linguistic 
minority custodians or kitchen attendants in 
most of the schools visited during last fall 
and this spring. 

12. During the maternity leave of bilingual 
teachers, no bilingual substitutes were 
provided at Blackstone Elementary and Martin 
Luther King Middle Schools. 

13. Occupational/vocational education 
instructors in the 9 schools with vocational 
education programs monitored conduct 
instruction monol i ngual ly in English. 
(Appendix K) In all of these cases, the 
teachers use bilingual students to translate 
for limited English proficient students. In 
one of the 9 schools (Jamaica Plain High), a 
native language speaking aide assists the 
monolingual teacher in the instructional 
process. The following are other specifics 
related to the staffing of the 9 vocational 



-J»84- 



education programs: 

a. In 3 of the 9 schools, bilingual aides 
are available to assist the 
vocational/occupational education 
teachers, although in only 1 school, 
Jamaica Plain High, are aides used in 
the vocational/occupational 
classrooms. (Appendix K) 

b. In 6 of the 9 monitored schools, 
bilingual counselors are available to 
work with limited English proficient 
students. The amount of time for which 
the counselor is available ranges from 

1 to 2 1/2 days per week. 

c. In 7 of the 9 schools, E.S.L. teachers 
are available to serve the limited 
English proficient students, in those 
school s . 

14. All interviewed teachers (those who use 
bilingual students to translate in the 
vocati onal /occupat i onal education programs) 
indicated that the limited English 
proficient (LEP) students do not achieve the 
same level of concept development as do the 
fluent English proficient (FEP) students. 
These teachers indicated that this lack of 
concept development relates to the inability 
of the vocati onal /occupati onal teacher to 
communicate to the limited English 
proficient students in their native 
1 anguages . 

B. Recruitment and Assessment Procedures: 



Some problems are still 
of assessment procedure 
students. In the monit 
teachers indicated that 
assessed within 30 days 
school . These teachers 
at the beginning of the 
more students to assess 
have taken longer. Dur 
year, when only 1 or 2 
the month, the process 
teachers reported delay 



apparent in the area 
s for the LEP 
oring visits, 
most students are 
of their arrival at 
also indicated that 
school year, with 
, the process may 
ing the middle of the 
students enter during 
i s faster. Al 1 
s in the processing 



-485- 



of this information after it goes to central 
office. As a result, they said, the 
computer printouts don't reflect the 
information until much later (sometimes 1 to 
2 months 1 ater ) . 

2. Students who are assigned to schools without 
the required and appropriate assessments are 
inappropriately referred to special 
education classes in monolingual English 
classrooms. This situation suggests 
possible problems related to assignments 
which should be explored in future 

moni tori ng visits. 

3. A number of factors contribute to the 
inappropriate Lau classification of LEP 
students. Some teachers and community field 
coordinators mentioned "inadequate 
assessment instruments", "students learn how 
to respond correctly after taking the same 
test over and over again", and that 
"language assessment team members 
superimpose their philosophical preferences 
on the results". 

4. As reported by Mr. DeGruttola, Senior 
Advisor for Bilingual Education, at the time 
of this report writing, plans had just been 
made to hire testers to process any missing 
information necessary to assign a Lau 
category to those students without one. Lau 
categories, he reported, were being updated 
for students in and out of bilingual 
programs. (Appendix C) 

5. The transfer of LEP students to the 
monolingual English classes continues to be 
hindered by the large class sizes in the 
mainstream classrooms and by the other 
factors previously discussed. (See Section 
IV. A. 2. above.) 

6. The placement of students in ESL classes 
rarely considers students' skills, e.g., 
students with poor verbal skills but fairly 
good reading skills are placed with highly 
verbal students who cannot read/write in 
English and in their primary language. 



-486- 



7. The placement of students in ESL classes 
also does not take into account the 
teachers' skill in using language 
transference techniques. These techniques 
require teachers to be proficient in the 
students' native languages. Therefore, 
classes of mixed language groups with a 
teacher who may know only one or none of 
those languages make the use of transference 
techniques impossible. 



C . Availability of Curriculum and Curriculum 
Material s : 



1. Last fall the monitors collected and 
analyzed data about the availability o 
curriculum materials in the bilingual 
programs of the school department. Du 
that process it was learned that there 
no sequential curricula in native lang 
arts, native history and culture, scie 
math or social studies. These curricu 
not exist for language groups for whom 
bilingual programs have been in existe 
for almost 15 years (Chinese, Hispanic 
etc.)! Moreover, they are not availab 
the most recently arrived language gro 
such as the Southeast Asians, Haitians 
others. Further investigation reveale 
even though some teachers might have h 
in the past about a curriculum develop 
some language groups, they never actua 
saw the curricula. Some of those 
interviewed expressed that the need f 
sequential curricula in the native la 
was a "most urgent need". A few of t 
however, complained that "not even th 
curriculum in the whole world can be 
adequately implemented in classrooms 
ours where we have students from 3 an 
different grades with at least 3 leve 
each grade." They also noted that th 
"more levels when illiterate older st 
are in the same room with literate yo 
students taking the same subject in t 
classroom with the same teacher and t 
material s. . .i f there are materials!" 
more the issue of the mul ti -graded , m 
level classes was related to the issu 



n ng 
were 
uage 
nee , 
la do 

nee 
s, 

1 e for 
ups 
, and 
d that 
eard 
ed for 

ny 

or 

nguage 
hem, 
e best 

like 
d 4 
Is in 
ere are 
udents 
unger 
he same 
he same 

Once 
ulti- 
e of 



-487- 



cluster size. "You can only solve this 
problem by enlarging the cluster of students 
to have enough students and teachers. If 
there are not enough students, we can not 
request more teachers. If there are not 
enough teachers, we cannot teach all of the 
required courses and level students 
appropriately. In order for our programs to 
become effective, which they are not, both 
the issue of mul ti -graded , multi-level 
classes and the issues of curricula, 
curriculum materials, etc. must be 
addressed . " 

ESL teachers don't teach ESL with 
appropriate methodologies; they teach 
traditional English grammar or English as a 
foreign language. This was found to be the 
case with both ESL and ESL grandfathered 
regular English teachers. 

Appropriate reading and composition 
materials for ESL classes are needed in most 
school s . 

There is not enough audio-visual materials 
and equipment to differentiate instructional 
activities and/or to motivate the students. 

There were not enough English materials in 6 
schools, and many materials were culturally 
inappropriate. (Appendix I) 

Curriculum materials in the native language 
were not available in sufficient 
quantities. Teachers considered that many 
of the materials available in the native 
language were culturally irrelevant. 
(Appendix I ) 

An Instructional Management Committee (IMC) 
of the Bilingual Office has been assigned 
the responsibility to review all curricula 
to ensure that texts and other resource 
materials are linguistically and culturally 
rel evant . 



8. I n al 1 school s 
responded that 
linguistically 



visited, those interviewed 
there were not enough 
and culturally relevant 



-488- 



materials in the library/resource room. 

9. Curriculum materials for 

vocati onal /occupati onal education are 
available in some native languages. However 
these materials are not used by the 
teachers. Most of the available native 
language curriculum materials are in Spanish 
with few materials in Khmer, Vietnamese, 
Laotian, and Portuguese. (Appendix N) 



D. Accessibility of Programs 
1 . 



4. 



not 



Limited English proficient students are 
provided Chapter 71A mandated native 
language instruction in at least I of the 
required courses in 9 schools visited. This 
situation seems to be most severe in the 
schools with 5 or less bi 1 i ngual /ESL 
teachers. (Appendix J). 




In all schools monitored the LEP students 
and the bilingual students were reported to 
have equal access to all extra-curricular 
activities. Some students, as previously 
reported, do not participate in after school 
activities because they have to work or live 
far away from the schools. Others do not 
participate because their culturally 
determined interests move them in other 
directions (e.g., baseball rather than 
hockey). (Appendix J) 

Limited space, equipment, supplies, and 

physical facilities affects in turn the 

provision of adequate instructional services 
to both LEP and FEP students. 



-489- 



5. Teachers in several schools expressed their 
concern that LEP students are unnecessarily 
referred to special education classes even 
though their problem is one of illiteracy in 
their native language. There are no Chapter 
I funded native language reading programs in 
the schools. In response to a question about 
developing such a program, the school 
officials stated that the "Title I (Chapter 
I) budget does not allow for expansion in 
the area of native language reading." 
(Appendix C) 



E . Parent Participation: 



1. 



2. 



As in t h 
found th 
p a r t i c i p 
Revi ews) 
programs 
school m 
school . 
are limi 
areas . 
pages. ) 
that som 
by the a 
i ntimi da 
supervi s 



e pre 
at pa 
ate i 

in a 
. Ho 
ight 

The 
ted t 
(The 

Addi 
etime 
d m i n i 
ted t 
ors . 



vi ou 

rent 

n an 

11 s 

weve 

not 

form 

o on 

Lau 

tion 

s th 

stra 

each 



s monitoring cycle, it was 

s from all districts 

nual in-house reviews (Lau 

chool s with bi 1 i ngual 

r, the parents monitoring a 

necessarily be from that 

s used to gather the data 

ly a few of many possible 

Plan itself has over 96 

ally, it has been reported 

e review forms are filled in 

tors themselves, or by 

ers in the presence of their 



In interviews with teachers, school 
administrators, and community field 
coordinators the need was stressed for them 
and for the parents to become acquainted with 
the local (Lau), state (Chapter 71A), and 
Federal Court mandates and guidelines 
relative to bilingual education in general 
and parents rights in particular. Even in 
schools where parent and teacher training 
activities may have taken place in the past, 
the training is needed for new parents and 
staff. 



3. In all of the schools visited, office support 
staff who are bilingual are needed to assist 
parents with their questions about 
registration in programs and about the 
child's performance in the school. In some 
instances principals and headmasters have 
asked the bilingual teachers or classroom 



-490- 



aides to leave the classroom or to interrupt 
their classes in order to answer 
parents ' questi ons . In several of the 
schools, administrators expect the bilingual 
assistant principals to assume this function 

4. At the only elementary school visited during 
this monitoring period, the Blackstone, 
teachers reported that the parents of 
incoming kindergarten LEP students are 
informed about the availability of bilingual 
education programming in their native 
language. An extended kindergarten program 
is available for LEP students there. 



II, Feb. 1 



F. Findings Related to Other Issues (Vol. 
1984 page 351) 

1 . Bilingual Clusters and Language and Culture 
Enrichment (Maintenance) Programs :" 



a. Seven of 9 middle 
Hispanic clusters 
the Voluntary Lau 
a minimum cluster 



and high schools with 
did not conform with 
Plan requirements for 
size of 80 students 



for the middle 
high schools. 



schools and 100 
(Appendix H.) 



for the 



b. Variables such as cluster size, number 
of teachers, quality of faculty , 
leadership of the building 
administrators, availability of 
curricula, and the availability of 
curriculum materials on the education of 
the children, were explored with 
teachers, parents, students and some 
administrators. It seems clearer now 
that to develop bilingual programs of 
academic excellence (such as the Chinese 
program at Charlestown High) in a 
desegregated school certain minimum 
requirements must be met. Teachers 
interviewed indicated the following 
minimums: 1) a large cluster in a 
desegregated setting allowing for the 
assignment of at least 10 teachers, 2) 
teachers who are highly qualified and 
are committed to their students' 
education, 3) administrators who are 
concerned and efficient, 4) faculty 



-491- 



with the ability to develop appropriate 
curricula, 5) acquisition of necessary 
educational materials, supplies and 
equipment, and 6) a schedule of 
activities with course offerings in 
single (not multi-graded) graded classes 
in all required bilingual and non- 
bilingual courses. 

Teachers interviewed also suggested the 
offering of middle and high school 
foreign language courses at an advanced 
level (not simply conversational foreign 
language courses for FEP students). 
These offerings would complement the 
native language gains of the bilingual 
program during and after the process of 
mai nstreami ng . 

During this monitoring period some 
contradictions between state mandates 
(Chapter 71A), local guidelines (Lau 
Plan), and the court orders related to 
the development of K through 12 
bilingual programs in every school 
district became apparent. 

Chapter 71A (Massachusetts Transitional 
Bilingual Education Act) mandates the 
development/implementation of full-time 
transitional bilingual education 
programming. This cannot be adequately 
done with small numbers of teachers and 
students. Also this becomes more 
difficult if teachers and administrators 
are not qualified or are reluctant to 
implement this mandate because of their 
particular philosophical preferences. 

The Lau Plan, allowing for minimum 
cluster sizes of 80 and 100 students at 
middle and high schools respectively, 
limits the possibility of the 
development of a program of excellence 
at some locations because with small 
numbers of students, no case can be made 
for the assignment of sufficient 
teachers to the cluster. 

Finally, the Student Desegregation Plan 



-1*92- 



2. 



of May 10, 1975, which mandate multiple 
sites for K-12 bilingual programs in all 
districts where bilingual students 
reside (except districts 3 and 4), makes 
the compliance with the LAU Guidelines 
regarding minimum cluster size extremely 
difficult or altogether impossible. 

Appropriateness of the Information Provided 
by the School Department: 



a. 



b. 



During last fall's monitoring the 
monitors noticed that in certain 
bilingual programs most of the teachers 
were members of the language/racial 
group being served while in others many 
of the teachers were white. This 
finding triggered an examination into 
the representativeness of the school 
department's faculty and administration 



The da 
and 1 a 
to det 
1 i ngui 
repres 
by sta 
1 angua 
exampl 
determ 
a d m i n i 
school 
H i s p a n 
of a P 
backgr 



ta ava 
nguage 
ermi ne 
stic/c 
ented 
f f rep 
ge and 
e, it 
i n e ho 
strato 
s ( whe 
i c stu 
uerto 
ound. 



i 1 able 

di d no 

whethe 
ul tural 
in Bost 
resenta 

cul tur 
was not 
w many 
rs i n B 
re over 
dents a 
Rican o 

(See A 



in printouts by race 
t allow the monitors 
r the 

student groups 
on are being serviced 
tives of their 
e (nationality). For 

possible to 
of the teachers and 
oston's public 

80 percent of the 
re Puerto Ricans) are 
r Dominican 
ppendi x L and M) . 



by 



Without data for staff and students 
nationality/culture in the school 
department, it is not possible to 
compare the information provided by the 
school department and the educational 
needs of the linguistic/cultural groups 
represented in Boston. 



G. New Issues 



1. Bilingual teachers seem to spend an 
inordinate amount of time working as 
interpreters and translators in the schools 
which were visited. Such a practice results 



.249 3- 



2. 



in the interruption of classes and reduces 
instructional time. Under these conditions, 
the bilingual teacher cannot cover the same 
amount of material as the regular teachers. 

Social workers are urgently needed to deal 
with the many personal and family crises 
experienced by students which affect their 
performance in class. This is particul ari ly 
true at the middle school level. 



3. The monitors received Boston reports about 
graduates and dropouts. These reports did 
not facilitate proper analysis, because 
absolute numbers were provided without 
relating them to the total numbers of 
students enrolled for each language group. 
Therefore, the actual magnitude of dropouts 
and graduates by language group could not be 
determined. New data has been requested to 
correct this problem. That data will be 
analyzed, and the findings will be 
incorporated into the next monitoring report 

4. Lower level administrators, teachers, 
parents, counselors or students did not 
participate in the development of the 
Superintendent's February 1984 draft of the 
Long Range Plan for Boston Public Schools. 
(Appendix C) 



V . Commendati ons : 

Based on the data collected and analyzed, we commend: 

A. The bilingual Community Field Coordinators who 
keep trying to organize and train parents in spite 
of countless other responsibilities assigned to 
them. 

B. The Jamaica Plain High School administration for 
their efforts at developing a program of academic 
excellence to respond to the linguistic and 
cultural needs of both the LEP and bilingual 
students within a desegregated context. 

C. The high expectations of some bilingual teachers 
for the limited English proficient students' 
achievement, in the bilingual classroom. 



-49U- 



VI. Recommendations 



In order to enhance mai nstreami ng possibilities, 
the Department of Implementation should reduce the 
student/teacher ratios for non-bilingual 
curriculum classes in those schools which house 
bilingual education programs. This should be 
implemented by the fall of 1984. 

The Bilingual Office should continue to train 
school personnel in the areas of parallel 
scheduling and sister clustering (pairing 
bilingual and non-bilingual curriculum teachers) 
to facilitate partial and full mai nstreami ng. 

Boston should provide school administrators, 
teachers, and community field coordinators with 
copies of the local, state, and federal court 
mandates and guidelines regarding bilingual 
educati on. 

All necessary bilingual teachers, aides, and 
counselors must be hired to provide appropriate 
bilingual education programming in accordance with 
local and state mandates. These positions must be 
budgeted for school year 1984-85. New staff must 
be in place when classes start next September. 

The information on al 1 bilingual teachers should 
be updated to ensure that everyone is teaching in 
his or her area of certification by September 
1984. 

Boston should revise job descriptions of the 
bilingual community field coordinators so that 
they can dedicate more of their time to parent 
organizing and training activities 
helping parents with non-bilingual 
probl ems . 



and less to 
educati on 



Boston should train all present and future 
bilingual aides in teaching methods so that they 
can be of greater help to the bilingual teachers 
in the classrooms. 

The Lau unit should complete the updating of the 
Lau categories of all LEP and bilingual students 
within 30 days of enrolling each LEP and bilingual 
student . 



-1195- 



J. 



K. 




The a 
rel ev 
1 i bra 
immed 
shoul 
educa 
come 
avai 1 
shoul 
suppl 
educa 
bi 1 i n 



c q u i s i t 
ant mat 
ries/re 
i a t e 1 y . 
d be es 
tion of 
in orde 
abl e in 
d, like 
ant-Bos 
tion of 
gual st 



ion of 
eri al s 
source 

Wherev 
t a b 1 i s h 

the co 
r to ac 

the na 

other 
ton ' s r 

1 i m i t e 
udents . 



linguistically and culturally 
for the classrooms and 
centers should be instituted 
er possible, formal contacts 
ed with the departments of 
untries from which students 
quire copies of materials 
tive language. This effort 
efforts, complement-not 
esponsibi 1 ity towards the 
d English proficient and 



Boston should involve the Master PAC, the City- 
wide Parents Council (CPC), plaintiffs, 
interveners, staff of the Department of 
Implementation and others in the development of a 
plan to consolidate some of the Hispanic high and 
middle school clusters. 



L. Boston should extend, at the middle and high 
school levels, their successful cultural 
enrichment (maintenance) programs as well as other 
bilingual services to include non-bilingual and 
bilingual students. 

M. The bilingual office should: reproduce copies of 
the local, state and federal mandates and 
guidelines in the native language of parents for 
use by the community field coordinators; provide 
training to parents, teachers and other school 
department personnel (including principals and 
headmasters) about those mandates and guidelines; 
and expand the participation of LEP and bilingual 
parents in the planning, development, and 
evaluation of the bilingual programs. 



--496- 



The Department of Implementation and the Personnel 
Division, in their reporting procedures, should 
ensure that students and staff are identified not 
only by language and race but also by nationality 
(cultural group). The files should also include 
the age of the students. 

The monitors should explore further with the 

Boston Indian Council and the Pupil Services 

Office of the school department the availability 

of supportive services for American Indian 
students enrolled in the schools. 

Boston should involve bilingual teachers, parents, 
counselors, high school students and, community 
leaders in the process of developing the section 
on bilingual education in the Long Range Plan for 
Boston Public Schools. 

In the absence of a certified bi 1 i ngual /vocational 
teacher, LEP students enrolled in vocational/ 
occupational education programs should be provided 
supportive services through native language 
speaking aides and native language instructional 
materi al s . 

Native language instructional materials for the 
program areas in which large numbers of LEP 
students are enrolled should be acquired or 
developed to be used by the vocational/ 
vocational /occupati onal education teachers. 

Policies of bilingual language instruction in the 
vocational /occupational programs should be 
enforced by building administrators. 

To insure that the LEP students achieve the same 
level of concept development as English proficient 
students, the vocati onal /occupati onal bilingual 
and ESL teachers coordinate the teaching of the 
content of the vocati onal /occupational program. 



-497- 



APPENDIX A 

SCHOOLS VISITED BY EACH MONITOR 
SPRING 1984 



SCHOOLS 


ALL ISSUES 
R. Rodriguez 
(No. of Visits) 


VOC. ED ISSUES 
G. Hebert 
(No. of Visits) 


COMMENTS 


1. 


English High 


2 






2. 


Dorchester High 


2 






3. 


South Boston High 


2 






4. 


Jamaica Plain High 


1 


1 




5. 


Boston High 


1 


1 




6. 


H.H.O.R.C. 


, , — M 


2 




7. 


Madison Park High 


1 


1 




8. 


Mario Umana High 


1 


—« 




9. 


Cleveland Middle 


1 


1 




10. 


M. L. King Middle 


1 


1 




11. 


Dearborn Middle 


1 


1 




12. 


Taft Middle 


... 


1 




13. 


Mackey Middle 


2 


1 




14. 


Boston Tech 


— — 


1 


s 


15. 


Blackstone Elementary 


ii 


1 


All issues 




Total Number of Visits 
by Monitor 


11 


11 





-1*98- 



Appendix B 



The following specifies the questions to be used by the 
monitoring team in determing the status of the identified 
objectives/activities. 



Objective I 



AD. Ho w are the parents of the incoming kindergarten 
LEP students informed of the availability of 
bilingual kindergarten/extended bilingual 
kindergarten education programming? 

AE. Are facilities, space, and staff provided for 
the projected bilingual kindergarten/extended 
bilingual kindergarten programs for all language 
groups? 

AF. During the registration period, are bilingual 
(in the targeted languages) school officials 
available to assist the parents of the LEP 
student enroll their child in the bilingual 
lindergarten/extended bilingual kindergarten 
programs? 

AG. Are the registration forms provided in the 
native targeted languages? 

AH. Are the parents of the LEP child informed of 
their rights relative to bilingual education 
programming? s 

AI. Have TBE/ESL student assignments been conducted 
as mandated by the Court? 

AJ. Do the program locations provide for equal 

access to school facilities for the LEP student? 

Ak. Are there adequate facilities to implement 
bilingual education programming? 

AL. Are the staff members of the bilingual education 
program certified or certifiable? 

AM. Does there exist sufficient numbers of bilingual 
education staff members to implement full-time 
bilingual education programming? Is there full- 
time bilingual programming. 



-499- 



APPENDIX B 



AN. What is being done by the HHHORC staff to 
recruit LEP students-especially the Cape 
Verdeans , Portugueses, Haitians, Laotians, 
Vietnameses, Cambodians and Czechoslovians? 



Objective II 



AO. What procedures are implemented for 

identif ication, placement and transfer of 

bilingual education students? 

AP. Do there exist equal accessopportunities for LEP 
students to participate in extra-curricular 
activities? 

AQ. Are there follow-up services available for 

students who are partially or full mainstreamed? 

AR. Do teachers have adequate instructional and 

student materials within the classroom which are 
linguistically and culturally relevant to their 
student populations? 

AS. Are those materials appropriate by grade level? 
Age level? Content area? 

AT. Are linguistically and culturally relevant 

materials located in the library/resource rrom? 

Au. Are there appropriate numbers and credentialed 
staff members to provide services to the LEP 
student population especially at the HHORC 

AV. Which grading system is used to promote 

bilingual students from one grade level to the 
next? Is this grading system consistent with 
the one used with the non-bilingual student 
population? 

AW. Is the cluster (100 bilingual students) model in 
place for all bilingual education programs for 
each language group? 

AX. Does the annual in-house review include 
involvement from the bilingual parents? 

AY. Is appropriate bilingual education programming 
available to LEP students in targeted native 
language especially at the HHORC? 



-500- 



APPENDIX B 



AZ. Have the orientation and application booklets 
been written in Spanish? Greek? Italian? 
French? Portuguese? Chinese? English? 

BA. What percentage of the targeted parents have 
received the orientation booklets in the 
appropriatetarget language? 

BB. How were the distribution locations of the 
booklets determined? 

BC. Were the native language orientation booklets 
available for distribution at the same time as 
the English orientation booklets? 

BD. How are LEP students recruited to examination 
and magnet schools? 

BE. Do the admissions criteria used to screen 
student admission into the examination and 
magnet schools provide for the LEp students? 

BF. Are notices specifying availability of bilingual 
services, locationof programs, parent rights 
available to bilingual parents in the native 
language? 

BG. What is the dissemination plan to inform 
bilingual parents of availability of services? 

BH. What is the attrition rate of the LEP and 

bilingual students in various Boston Public 
School programs? 



-501- 




APPENDIX C 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 

March 13, 1984 

Dr. Robert Spillane 

Superintendent 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Dr. Spillane: 

The purpose of this letter is to request that you identify school officials to respond 
formally to the bilingual education findings and recommendations of the Department of 
Education's Desegregation Court Report for February 1, 1984. Volume II should serve as 
a reference for formulating a response. Further, we request delivery of the response by 
April 3, 1984 so that this information can be reviewed and analyzed and incorporated into 
the next report. 

In addition, we request a March 26 meeting on these issues at 26 Court Street with our 
staff and your Senior Advisor for Bilingual Education, Senior Officers responsible for 
budgeting and personnel as well as any other staff you deem appropriate. 

Within the next few days our bilingual monitoring team will start contacting Boston 
Public School officials to inform them of activities to occur during the next monitoring 
session. They will be contacting and interviewing members of the staff of the 
Department of Implementation, Personnel Office, Bilingual Department, and Lau Unit as 
well as other units. They also will provide a list of schools to be visited and a suggested 
schedule of school visits. 

We appreciate your consideration of these requests and support during the next round of 
monitoring. x 



Sincerely, 



Marlene Godfrey ' 0* 




'&te^ 



James Case 
Regional Center Director Associate Commissioner 

Division of Curriculum and 
Instruction 

/mw Commissioner Lawson 
cc: Ernie Mazzone 

Gilman Hebert 

Rodolfo RodriqueZ 



-502- 




APPENDIX C 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street. Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 



March 19, 1984 



Mr. Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor 

Bilingual Department 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. DeGruttola: 

Enclosed find a revised list of the schools I am planning to visit 
within the next few weeks and the tentative dates of those visits. Mr. Gilman 
Hebert will contact you and Mr. James Caradonio within the next few days regard- 
ing his schedule of visits to the schools with VocEd programs. 

Please send a formal notification to the community superintendents, 
principals, bilingual coordinators, teachers, community field coordinators, 
bilingual guidance counselors and other concerned staff announcing my visits. 

I am still waiting for the final revised copy of the Lau Plan. Could 
you have a copy ready for me by next Wednesday, March. 21, 1984? 

Thanks as usual , for your usual cooperation. 



Sincerely, 



y^j^-x.^ y^M 



Rodolfo Rodrlguez-Mangual 

Transitional Bilingual Education Specialist 



Enclosure 

cc: Marlene Godfrey 

Ernest J. Mazzone 



-503- 




APPENDIX C 



Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 



431-7825 



March 19, 1984 



Ms. Catherine Ellison, Executive Director 

Department of Implementation 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Ms. Ellison: 

As part of the Boston Desegregation monitoring activities for this 
Spring, we would like to meet with members of your staff to review data 
concerning bilingual student assignments and program locations. 

First, we would like to meet, most probably next Monday, March 26, 
1984 with Mr. Carl Nickerson. Last Fall he provided us with computer 
print-outs as well as pertinent information about factors affecting the 
assignment of students to specific schools. That meeting may take 
several hours, however, the time of day would be dependent upon the 
results of a requested meeting with Dr. Spillane on the same date. 

If you have any questions you would like us to answer, please 
call 431-7825 or write before March 26th. Also, if you feel the need to 
set up additional meetings to discuss the monitoring objectives or procedures, 
please call. 

We look forward to continuing our productive working relationship 
with your Department. Thanks in advance for your cooperation. 



Sincerely, 




U 




Rodolfo Rodriguez -Man gi 

Transitional Bilingual Education Specialist 



cc: Marlene Godfrey, Greater Boston Regional Education Center Director 
Ernest J. Mazzone, Director Transitional Bilingual Education Bureau 
John Coakley, Senior Officer Deparment of Implementation 
Carlton Nickerson, Department of Implementation 



-504- 




APPENDIX C 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Weilesley. Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 

March 19, 1984 



Ms. Ida White 

Manager of Personnel and Labor Relations 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Ms. White: 

As last fall, to continue with our monitoring of staffing needs in 
the bilingual program of the Boston Public Schools, we intend to meet 
with members of your staff in the next few days. The concerns to be 
addressed during our monitoring visits will be the same as those outlined 
to you in our letter of last August 26, 1983 and in our meeting of last 
August 31, 1983. That is: 

- To determine if there are/or will be enough bilingual, E.S.L., 
and regular education teachers, aides, tutors, administrators, 
counselors, community field coordinators, etc. to serve the 
limited English proficient and bilingual students in Boston, and 

- To determine if those staff members are representative of the race/ 
nationality/language of the student body. 

If you have any questions about the monitoring process, please call 
431-7825 or write. Also, if you feel the need to set up another meeting 
with the members of our monitoring team and your staff to discuss the 
monitoring objectives and/or procedures, call me so we can make arrangements 
for such a meeting. v 

You and your staff are to be commended for the efficient and cooperative 
way in which you and they worked with our team. Our experience during the 
last Fall's monitoring session was most positive and productive. 

We look forward to meeting with you and/or your staff again. 



Sincerely, S' 

Rodolfo Rodrfguez-Mangual 

Transitional Bilingual Education Specialist 



cc: Marlene Godfrey, Greater Boston Regional Education Center Director 
Ernest J. Mazzone, Director Transitional Bilingual Education Bureau 



-505- 



APPENDIX C 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 

CATHERINE A ELLISON. Executive Director 



March 22, 1984 



Mr. Rodolfo Rodriguez-Mangual 

Transitional Bilingual Education Specialist 

Greater Regional Education Center 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Department of Education 

27 Cedar Street 

Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

Dear Mr. Rodriguez: 

The purpose of this correspondence is to confirm the rescheduled 
meeting with Carlton Nickerson, Assignment Transfer Specialist - 
Department of Implementation for Thursday, April 12, 1984, 10:00 a.m. 
at 26 Court Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Nickerson will be prepared to provide data concerning 
bilingual student assignments and program locations. 

Sincerely yours, 



Catherine A. Ell ison 



bmj 

cc: John Coakley 
John Canty 
Carlton Nickerson 



26 COURT" STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5504 AREA bl . 

-506- 



1 



Division of Curriculum and Instruction 



APPENDIX C 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



March 28, 1984 



Mr. Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor 

Bilingual Programs 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Raffael, 

I am planning to monitor/visit the Blackstone 
Elementary School on April 13, 1984 at approx- 
imately 11:00. 

Would you please send a formal notification to the 
community superintendents, principals, bilingual 
i coordinators, teachers, cummunity field coordinators, 
bilingual guidance councelors and other concerned 
Boston Public Schools staff announcing my visits. 

Thank you for your anticipated help. Grazie 

Sincerely, 

Gilman Hebert 



cc: Marlene Godfrey 
Carl Gustafson 
Ernest Mazzone 



-507- 



APPENDIX C 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
CITYWIDE BILINGUAL PROGRAMS 



March 21, 1984 



SENIOR ADVISOR 
RAFFAEL DeGRUTTOLA 



Mr. Rodolfo Rodriguez 
Greater Boston Regional 

Education Center 
27 Cedar Street 
Wellesley, Ma. 02181 

Dear Mr. Rodriguez, 

"v 

As I had asked you orally, the Bilingual Field Coordinators 
will hold their first training meeting on Wednesday, March 28, 
and I would like to invite you to provide technical assistance 
on Chapter 71A. 

The meeting will be held at 26 Court Street, 8th Floor, from 
9:00 a.m. to Noon. 

I look forward to meeting you and working together. 

Thank you for your professional cooperation. 

Very truly yours, 



4kfc, 



Betty V. Rivera 

Parent Trainer Specialist 

636 Bilingual Project 



BVR/lf 



26 COURT STREET. 30ST0N. MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 16171 726-6200 EXT 5681 

-508- 




APPENDIX C 
Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 



April 6, 1984 

Mr. Raffael DeGruttola, Senior Advisor 

Citywide Bilingual Programs 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. DeGruttola: 

This is to approve your April 2, 1984 request for extension until the week of April 9th to 
submit your report and arrange a meeting to discuss its contents. As you know, this 
approval was communicated verbally to your office on this date. 

We look forward to the receipt of your report no later than April 13, 1984. We also 
expect your confirmation of a rescheduling of the March 26 meeting by that date. 

Sincerely, 

Marlene Godfrey 
Regional Director ^ 



/mw 

cc: Jim Case 

Ernie Mazzone 

Gil Hebert 

Rodolfo Rodriguez 




-509- 



APPENDIX C 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 





BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
CITVWIOE BILINGUAL PROGRAMS 



April 9, 1984 



SENIOR ADVISOR 
RAFrAEL DeGRO'TOLA 



Marlene Godfrey ,. Director 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

27 Cedar Street 

Wellesley, MA 02181 

Dear Dr . Godrey : 

Attached in the final report based on information and find- 
ings from both Volumes I and II of the State's monitoring of 
bilingual programs. I am also attaching a copy of a memorandum 
submitted to me from Tomasa Couverthier, the Bilingual Coordina- 
tor at the JfHHORC, which describes activities initiated by the 
findings concerning Bilingual Vocational Education issues. 

I have followed the format as delineated in the State's 
Report No. 2 to the Court: Boston School Desegregation ; 
Volume 2 . In some cases statements of mf ormation are made 
which need no further comment - e.g., B-4 , p. 34 8, under Re- 
cruitment and Assessment Procedures: 

B-4 At different times, information xelative 
to the -HHHORC has been disseminated via 
television programs in Spanish, and ch/urch 
bulletins/newsletters in Spanish. 

I have answered these statements, "Correct as stated", 
or in some cases may have added a comment or two which I have 

taken from Ms. Couverthier ' s analysis. 

If further discussion is needed, we can continue the evalu- 
ation of the activities and response when we me-et with our 
staffs in the near future. The response commences with Roman 
numeral III Findings . 

Thank you for your continued support during the monitoring 
process . 

Sincerely, 



f ael/ peGruttola, Senior Advil 



/k Raf f aely peGruttola, Senior Advisor 

cc : Dr. Robert Spillane Robert Peterkin James Caradonio E. Mazzo 
Oliver Lancaster Manuel Monteiro John Coakley R. Rodri 

:e CC-" ?"EE7. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS C2108 • . 6 "> 7 '- "26-620C £> T c €e" 

-510- 



Response to State's Monitoring Report - February 1, 1984 

The Monitoring Objectives focus on six different areas for 
which follow-up visits and activities have ensued. In line 
with these objectives, the Bilingual Office staff has met jointly 
and in collaboration with staff from other departments and units 
as well as the State TBE Specialists and other members of the / 
State monitoring teams in order to reconcile some of the findings 
and recommendations. 

A. Availability of Staff/Space Assignments 

1. Partial and full mainstreaming is being addressed by 
training staff in the schools in the areas of parallel 
scheduling and sister clustering models. In addition 
an ESL language policy has been implemented which 
ensures that all students K-12 will receive ESL in- 
struction daily. In some cases, especially at the 
secondary level, two or more periods a day can be 
scheduled depending on the LEP status of the individual 
student. ESL curriculum objectives and activities are 
also being developed K-12 to ensure that the Transi- 
tional nature of the program is implemented based on 

-» ESL achievement. This will facilitate partial and 
full mainstreaming at all levels. A lower student/ 
teacher ratio for standard curriculum classes is being 
proposed for the 84-85 school year and this will allow 
more spaces for mainstreaming in those classes. The 
student/ teacher ratio for bilingual classes will remain 
intact following the TBE regulations for single and , 
multi-graded classes. We have used a 20:1 and 18:1 
average ratio for secondary and elementary classes 
respectively for purposes of projections. I am pre- 
sently meeting with staff from the D.I-, Personnel, 
and Budget Office to ensure that adequate space and 
personnel are provided for the remainder of this year 
and next. 

2. Updated Step information will allow more mainstreaming 
to take place; however, we are within and in some cases 
below the State average (16%) for students who remain 
in the program for more than three years (BPS - 15%) . 
We do have certain programs (Greek and Italian) where 
students have remained in the program for many years. 
These language and cultural maintenance programs are 
not administered as "space allows" with fully main- 
streamed students but rather as studen-ts retained with 
a bilingual code as partially mainstreamed students. 
Often these students are only taking one or two courses 
with bilingual teachers and the rest of their schedule 



-511- 



- 2 - 



is with standard curriculum teachers. These students 
are maintained at parent requests but should be com- 
pletely mainstreamed with respect to English language 
proficiency status. 

Additional support services are being provided. Three 
new Guidance Counselors have been budgeted for the 
remainder of this year for the Haitian, Hispanic, and 
Cambodian programs. This brings the total to eleven 
bilingual guidance counselors employed by the BPS. 
The most serious obstacle to mainstreaming, however, 
is not predominantly the need for additional support 
personnel as the lack of additional spaces in the 
monolingual classes. The formula for the student/ 
teacher ration especially at the secondary level, but 
also at the elementary level, does not reflect the 
possibility that a certain number of bilingual stu- 
dents could be mainstreamed during the year. Another 
obstacle is that once students are scheduled in 
September it is difficult to transfer them without 
disrupting other teacher schedules during the year. 
Partial mainstreaming and Step assignments should be 
seen as a yearly placement. A pilot study should be 
undertaken to classify students by Steps and years 
in a bilingual program. This would ensure that after 
three years students would be fully mainstreamed. 
Another obstacle, or fact, is that many bilingual 
parents wish for their sons and daughters to remain 
in bilingual programs indefinitely. The School Com- 
mittee has never developed policy, nor is it specified 
in the State law, the number of years LEP students 
are to remain in a program. 

The Personnel Office is updating information on all 
bilingual teachers to ensure that everyone is certi- 
fied and teaching in their certified areas. Many of 
our newer refugee teachers (Cambodian, Laotian, Laotian 
Hmong and Vietnamese) have been granted waivers by the 
State and it will be a couple of years before they are 
certified. This accounts for the 22S as stated in the 
report findings. At the Mackey School, the Personnel 
Office has been apprised of the problem and changes 
will be made for next year. 

The case at Dorchester High School in which a teacher 
is teaching out of his certified area has been corrected 
with the addition of another ESL teacher for the re- 
mainder of this year. The Headmaster will correct 
this situation next school year in his request for 
Personnel. Other instances will be addressed after 
all the . information is gathered from bilingual 
teachers as mentioned in the response to the previous 
non-comDliance issue. 



-512- 



- 3 - 



6. The D.I. is reviewing space allocations fox bilingual 
programs for the 84-85 school year. Consolidation of 
programs may be recommended at those schools where 
space expansion is needed but unavailable. At the 
Mackey School fewer SAR students will be assigned. The 
Roosevelt Middle will be consolidated with the Mary 
Curley where space is available, and Dorchester High 
will not be expanding its bilingual program from its 
present and projected numbers. 

7. (a) There will be coordination of citywide bilingual 

aide services so that bilingual aides assigned to 
the high/middle schools will be in occupational 
education classes. There will also be an outreach 
effort to the colleges and universities as well as 
community based organizations to permit coordination 
for internships and community support programs. 

(b) The rotation of citywide bilingual aides will be 
tried in order to work in vocational/occupational 
education classes where there are large numbers of 
LEP students. They will be assigned by districts 
and language similar to the practice with the 
Bilingual Community Field Coordinators. Madison 
Park and the McCormack Middle will be used as 
models for this coordination. Bilingual aides at 
both schools will rotate with the focus on helping 
LEP students. Adults who are participating in the 
Vocational ESL classes will volunteer time in 
different vocational/occupational programs citywide. 

B. Recruitment and Assessment Procedures 

1. All information for recruitment will be translated 
into all languages for students and parents. These 
translations will be submitted to the Bilingual 
Office. Attempts will be made to adapt all materials 
at the HHHORC in order to service all I»EP students 
who wish to apply, funds permitting. 

2. Letters and information in the native language will 
be sent to all students and parents at each level. 

3. Correct as stated. 

4. Correct as stated. 

5. All students are being assigned a Lau Category. 
Testers will be hired to process any missing infor- 
mation. Lau Categories are being updated for stu- 
dents in and out of bilingual programs. 



-513- 



- 4 - 



6. The transfer process out of bilingual programs into 
monolingual classes is being addressed by the system 
as a whole. Smaller class sizes and student/teacher 
ratios are being proposed for standard curriculum 
classes. In addition, training is being conducted to 
introduce innovative scheduling practices at the middle 
school level where partial mainstreaming during the 
school year is most problematic. 

7. Correct as stated. 

Availability of Curriculum Materials 

1. Adaptations/translations of materials and/or information to 
LEP students and parents will be submitted to the Bi- 
lingual Department only if there is the lack of a trans- 
lator at the HHHORC, or other sources or for certain 
particular languages and if there are funds available. 

2. The Title VII and 636 Offices for bilingual programs have 
generated guides in various langauges to be used by 
teachers. Proposals for additional funds have been sub- 
mitted to Washington in order to obtain assistance in this 
area. Proposals for increased budgets to deal with this 

"» problem have been generated by the Bilingual Office. 

3. Bilingual Guidance Counselors and bilingual aides will be 
included in the training/workshops for the 84-85 SY in 
the areas of vocational ESL, curriculum development, and 
reading in the native language in order to assist bilin- 
gual, ESL, and vocational education teachers in their 
communication with each other relative to vocational/ 
occupational issues. 

4 . Attempts are being made by the Instructional Management 
Committee (IMC) of the Bilingual Office to review all 
curriculum materials to ensure that texts and other 
resource materials are linguistically and culturally 
relevant. This Office is also collaborating with staff 
from the Curriculum and Instruction Office to review 
materials developed for all BPS students for the same 
purpose. 

5. The Bilingual 636 Office has supplied many schools with 
guides, books, and other resource materials so that their 
libraries will have culturallv relevant materials. 



Accessibility to Programs 

1. This issue is being addressed at the HHHORC. VESL 
classes are being provided. 



-514- 



- 5 - 



2. Staff at the HHHORC will be trained to deal with this 
problem. The Bilingual Vocational Coordinator "will 
develop a timeline for June and September in order to 
train Bilingual Guidance Counselors to address this pro- 
blem. Bilingual Department Heads wil also participate 
in the training as well well as all other bilingual 
staff in order to encourage students to take full advan- 
tage of the programs at the HHHORC. 

3. An ESL teacher has been assigned as a support person for 
LEP students at Boston Technical High School. To date, 
the Headmasters at Latin Academy and Latin School have 
not requested additional ESL support for LEP students 

at their schools. A Bilingual Coordinator has been 
assigned to review the AWC Bilingual programs at the 
Hennigan Elementary and Mackey Middle to ensure that 
adequate preparation on the part of the students and 
staff is in evidence. Bilingual students who enter the 
examination schools do receive guidance services at those 
schools . 

4. When a full cluster (100 students at the secondary schools 
and 80 students at the elementary schools) is not consti- 
tuted, it is difficult to provide a full program of in- 
struction. Many high school bilingual programs were not 

« consolidated this year because of a need for stability in 
the programs and also that reorganization of the system's 
districts and student assignment patterns was suppose to 
have taken place. A Long Range Plan is presently being 
considered for the 85-86 SY. Without a full cluster, 
fewer teachers are assigned and consequently there are 
fewer course offerings. With the introduction of a pro- 
motional policy and graduation standards , LEP students 
must also take required courses for credit accumulation. 
This places a tremendous burden on both students and 
teachers especially if bilingual students must compete 
with their English-speaking peers for career, opportunities. 
Our record for graduating seniors in the past three years. 
with respect to placement in careers and institutions of 
higher education has been quite successful. 

5. With full cluster this will be less of a problem; however, 
enrollments at the high school level for all linguistic 
groups is on the decline. Equal access for all course 
offerings can only be guaranteed in relation to the stu- 
dent' s proficiency in English. The State TBE law should 
be flexible to respect this reality. 

6. The HHHORC is not presently the home school for LEP stu- 
dents that participate in the programs. These students 
should be provided with bilingual instruction in their 
home schools and supports with native language speaking 
aides at the HHHORC. Unfortunately the job market in 



-515- 



- 6 - 



Boston as well as New England is not as open to stu- 
dents with limited English proficient skills as some 
. people would like it to be. In vocational and occu- 
pational education, students who cannot function in 
English are at a disadvantage for careers and employ- 
ment. 

7. Correct as stated. 

8. The D. I. is attempting to resolve tnis issue at these 
schools mentioned in the report. 

9. The Chapter I budget does not allow for expansion in 
the area of "Native Language Reading Programs". Re- 
quests have been made through this Office. A com- 
mittee has been established to deal with those stu- 
dents who are functionally illiterate in both their 
native language and English. Since this number is 
small and represents both LEP and non-LEP students , 
the Office of Student Support Services is collabo- 
rating with the Curriculum and Bilingual Offices are 
addressing this problem. Additional bilingual and/or 
ESL teachers is one approach. 

10. The Coordinator of Early Childhood Programs has had 
% notices translated into the different languages. 

These will be disseminated along witii notices in 
English to eliminate this problem. 

11. The issue of space at the John F. Kennedy School has 
been brought to the attention of the D. I. There are 
safety factors that must be taken into consideration 
when Kindergarten students are bussed from one site 
to another. 

12. The Principals of the schools with Bilingual Programs 
can request assistance from the Distxict Office where 
native-speaking Community Field Coordinators are 
available for assistance to parents. A notice will 
be sent to them alerting them of this posibility. 

E. 3ilingual Clusters 

1. Attempts to consolidate certain programs in order to 
have full clusters are being undertaken. In certain 
cases space is not available and programs must be 
moved in their entirety. This is most evident at the 
high school level where the Hispanic enrollment is on 
the decline. This Office has made certain recommen- 
dations for consolidation in the past which have been 
denied by the Court. Specific cases are the Hispanic 
Programs at South Boston and Charlestown High Schools. 



-516- 



- 7 - 



This Office has been working closely with the Head- 
master and Bilingual Department Head at South Boston 
High School in order to remedy the problem of limited 
course offerings. Additional Cambodian staff is 
needed if this is to happen. 



F. Parent Participation 

1. Many bilingual sub-PAC parents are involved in the 
Annual Program Review. Many parents work during the 
day and are unavailable for meetings and visits 
during school hours. The Lau Review and Status Forms 
are an aid to parents as they visit the schools. 
Training and orientation of parents are always con- 
ducted before the Review is conducted. 

2. Correct as stated. 

3. This Office has 13 Community Field Coordinators who 
represent the interests of the parents in all the 
language groups serviced by the system. In addition, 
support staff exist in many other departments. Budget 
constraints have caused certain limitations in hiring 
of paraprofessional staff; however resources are 
available most of the time. 

Many of the requests and recommendations in the report have 
already been accomplished. This Office has worked closely 
with the TBE Specialists during the year to ensure that non- 
compliance issues are dealt with fairly and without delay. 
Certain areas are always problematic in how regulations are 
interpreted. 

We look forward to your continued support and cooperation in 
the coming months. 

Sincerely, 




U \(SL4td— 



Raff&el DeGruttola 

Senior Advisor 

Citywide Bilingual Programs 

A 



cc: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent of Schools 

Oliver W. Lancaster, Deputy Superintendent, Curriculum & Inst. 

Manuel Monteiro, Deputy Superintendent, Finance and Admin. 

Robert Peterkin, Deputy Superintendent, School Operations 

James Caradonio, Director, HHHORC 

John Coakley, Senior Office, Dept. of Implementation 

Ernest Mazzone, Director, Bureau of Transitional Bilingual Ed. 

-517- 



■IE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



pj <? \\ g < < p35S;j 

BILINGUAL 



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rt.cc-.;: ■a.a— : r es 



BOSTON P'J&lIC SCHOOLS 

-iuDer h no>-i3r.rev C:cupavonai Rescjrce Center 

Eiiingjs! Services 



TOMASA COUVERTHIER 
Bilingual Coordinator 




MEMORANDUM TO: Raffael DeGruttola 

FROM: Tomasa Couvethiert 

RE: Coordination between City-Wide Bilingual Programs 
and Bilingual Vocational Education Services. 

DATE: March 13, 19 84 



As we had agreed in our March 2, 1984 meeting, 
r-, ^ »v> pertaining to the State Audit for Bilingual Programs 
S^y^r-j^? ejSf and Bilingual Vocational/Occupational Education Ser- 

S>"~) r-s- H vices; please read the following impor-fcar.-tpoints of 
^J? " c •* **•? & -^f> information discussed. 

Bilingual Aides 

" 7 ~vF "K3» ~z **t Vjl 

^^SffSflE'^. State Audit Findings;" In more than 90%of classes 

% m& f! J}. IT?-^- monitored, bilingual aides are not available within 

- j.-^ 'Ji - J. "** the vocational/occupational educationclasses" (Finding- 

~— *i. 5u" "^ C,Page 401 ;ocational/Occupational Education) 

Actions to be taken; 

1. Coordination of city-wide bilingual aides service. 

2. Recruitment of Volunteers. 

Activities 

1-a. In school bilingual aides coordination; biligual 
aides assigned to high/middle schools will be in 
occupational education classes. 

1-b. City-wide bilingual aides rotation; to work in 

. vocational /occupational classes with large numbers 
of LEP students. Theywill be assigned by districts 
/language (modality used in the assignment of 
bilingual field coordinators) . 

"■ '■'■ ■ ■ : :.'■:--■■' = ;?-:•, ■:^~s-'.~jz"'i ::•*?• le*? - «i-e;cc 

-518- 



Page 
Raf fael De Gruttola 



Madison Park High and Mc Cormack Middle will be used as 
school models for the above-mentioned coordination. 
Bilingual aides at both schools rotate with a focus on 
helping LEP Students. 

2-a. Letters to colleges/universities and community based 

organizations; to permit of coordination with interships 
and community support programs. 

2-b. Adults who are participating in the Vocational ESL classes will 
volunteer time in different vocational /occupational proarams 
city-wide, (the internship modality) . This participation will 
take place after completion of program with good understanding 
and oral skills of the English . 

Bilingual Translations 

State Audit Recommendation: Native language instructional materials for 
the program areas in which large numbers of LEP students are enrolled 
be developed /adapted/commecrcially bought to be used by the vocational 
occupational education programs." (V-E,Page 353, on the Bilingual Education) 

Actions to be taken: Adaptations /translations of materials and/or informa- 
tion to LEP students and parents will be submitted to the Bilingual Depart- 
ment (Central Office) by the Bilingual Vocational /Occupational Services 
from Education and Employment under the following circumstances only: 

l.If there is a lack of a translator for a particular native language at the 
vocational /occupational program and/or the Department of Education and 
Employment (Biixnjual Support Services!. 

2. Lack of adapting . skills by bilinguals in voc./occ. programs who speak a 

particular native language. 

\. 

" 3 .Lack of funds . 



Translations guidelines listed in the Superintendent Memorandum #104 will be 
Followed. 

Bilingual Counselors 

State Audit Recommendation : Bilingual counselors, speaking the appropriate 
targeted native language, be assigned to those voc./occ. programs in wich 
LEP students are enrolled (especially at the HHHORC)." (V-C, Page 353, of 
the Bilingual Education) 

Actions to be taken: Coordination with resources available. 

l.A site visit schedule for bilingaal counselors with or without bilingual 
students at the Humphrey Center, will be developed. 

-519- 



Raffael De Gruttola 



Page 



.3 



2. A process for documenting site visits to the Humphrey Center by 
the bilingual counselors will be developed. 

3. Universities with counseling internships will be contacted. 

Other agreements 

Bilingual counselors and bilingual aides will be included in the 
training /workshops for 1984-85 school year on Vocational ESL and 
any other vocational /occupational education issues. 

The Bilingual Vocational Coordinator will set up an agenda and dates 
to meet with bilingual counselors in June and September. 

The Bilingual Vocational Coordinator -..-ill participate in the Training 
Committee Meetings. 

As discussed and agreed copies of the above-mentioned coordination of 
bilingual services will be desseminated to bilingual Department Heads, 
Bilingual Coordinators, Director of Education and Employment and Chair- 
person of the Bilingual Training Corrmittee. 



4^1- 



Barticipaats of Activities and actions to be taken r Who is responsible &€ wha- 

•Bilingual Aides 

Activity "- Department Responsible 



1-a 
1-b 
2-a 
2-b 

Bilincrual Translations 



Bilingual Department- Central Office 
Bilingual Vocational Services - Education &Emp It 
Both Departments 
Bilingual Voc. Services- Education & Employmen- 



The actions to be taken are very clear by whom. 
Bilincrual Counselors 



Actions to be taken 

n 

#3 



Department Responsible 
Combined efforts by both departments 
Bilingual Voc. Services- Ed.& Employnv 
Combined efforts by both departments 



cc: Jim Caradonio 

Bilingual Coordinators 

3i lingual Department Heads 

Peter Plattes 



-520- 



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rr 


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03 


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3 


3 






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1 




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ft 3* 


Ml _? 


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a 
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01 rr 


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rt n> 




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rt Oi 


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(3 


C 1 3 


1* 3* Cl 


3" 


c 


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X* 1 


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CD 




r— ►— 


<1 ►— 


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1 


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r- It 


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APPENDIX E 

MAINSTREAMING & STUDENT/TEACHER RATIO PROBLEMS 
SPRING 1984 



SCHOOLS 


PARTIAL OR FULL 
MAINSTREAMING PROBLEMS? 


PROBLEMS WITH 

STUDENT-TEACHER 

RATIOS? 


OTHER 




NO 


YES - Which? 


NO 


YES 




English High 




Pairing of students 
Problems 




X 


Laotians, Haitian 
Hispanics 


Dorchester High 




Overcrowded classes 
No parallel schedul. 




X 


Under rehabili- 
tation now 


South Boston High 




Too much imuersion 


X 






Jamaica Plain High 


X 






X 




Boston High 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 




rt«H.vJ.K»v_,« 












Madison Park High 




No paralled sched. 


X 


"With few teachers the 
scheduling becomes a nightmai 


Mario Umana High 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 




i 

Cleveland Middle 




No paralled sched. 
Overcrowded classes 






Multi-grade 
Multi-level 


M. L. King Middle 




No paralled sched. 


X 




Multi-grade 
Multi-level 


Dearborn Middle 




No parallel sched. 
Overcrowded classes 




X 


Multi-grade 
Multi-level 


Taft Middle 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 




Mackey Middle 




No paralled sched. 
Overcrowded classes 




X 


Multi-grade 
Multi-level 


Boston Tech 


1 

N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 




Blackstone Elementary 













-524- 



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3 ESL grandfathered 
2 teach Soc. Studies in 
English to LEP 




> 

n 
o 
o 
1 

CL 

p- 

3 
05 

rt 
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1 

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3 
rt 

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M 
O 

M 
O 

z 



APPENDIX H 



CLUSTER SIZE 



SPRING 1984 





LAU CLUSTER SIZE 




DISTRICT . SCHOOLS 


SIZE 


LANGUAGE GROUP 


NON-COMPLIANCE 


COMMENTS 




258 
36 
31 
15 












x — 












9 English High 














5 Dorchester High 


81 


Hispanics 


X 


Rehabilitation 
in process 


6 South Boston High 


105 
75 


Cambodians 

Hispanics 


X 




2 Jamaica Plain High 


117 


Hispanics 




The D.I. reports 
111; Bil. Dept. 
Head reports 123 


9 Boston High 


13 

7 

32 


Haitians 

Chinese 

Hispanics 


N/A 


Special Work- 
Study Program 


9 H.H.O.R.C. 












101 

168 

14 
















9 Madison Park High 














9 Mario' Umana High (7-12) 


18 
28 


Chinese 
Hispanics 


(limited to 30) 
N/A 


Special School for 
Science & Technolog 


5 Cleveland Middle 


98 


Hispanics 


X 




9 M. L. King Middle 


63 


Hispanics 


X 


Decreased from 76 
in September 


6 Dearborn Middle 


116 


Cape Verdeans 


_ 


16-20 at the Barnes 


1 Taft Middle 


68 


Hispanics 


A 




9 Mackey Middle 


90 


Hispanics 


X 




9 Boston Tech 


89 


Hispanics 


■ -• *» 




7 Blackstone Elementary 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 





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30 t— 
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1 


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a 


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a 


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2 
3 


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3 (D 

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z 

GO 



**1 



n 



APPENDIX J 

REQUIRED COURSES OFFERED AND ACCESS TO EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

SPRING 1984 



SCHOOLS 


All Chapter 
coutses offe 


71A mandated 
red? • 


Do LEP students have access 
to all extra-curricular 
activities? 




YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


English High 


Haitians 


Laotians 
Hispanics 


X 




Dorchester High 




X 


X 




South Boston High 




X 


X 




Jamaica Plain High 


X 




X 




Boston High 




N/A 


X 




H.H.Q.R.C, 




N/A 


X 




Madison Park High 




X 


X 




Mario Umana High * 




X 


X 




Cleveland Middle 




X 


X 




M. L. King Middle 




X 


X 




Dearborn Middle > 




X 


X 




Taft Middle 




N/D 


N/D 




Mackey Middle 




X 


X 




Boston Tech 




N/A 


x 




Blackstone Elementary 




N/D 


N/D 





N/A - Does not apply 
N/D - No data 

* Umana offers two years of TBE (7th and 8th grades) to a Chinese and a Hispanic 
cluster limited in size to 30 students per cluster. This does not allow for a 
full TBE program. 



-529- 



APPENDIX K 

QUESTIONNAIRE FOR VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS - SPRING 1984 



Legend 

X = yes 

- = does not exist 



Are there written procedures to en- 
courage LEP students to enroll in 
Occ/Voc Ed. program 

letters in native lang. to parent 

other 

Do written procedures exist to deter- 
mine LEP students? 

What kind of services are offered to 
LEP students in the native lang. 

voc/occ ed. in native lang. 
other 

Staffing information 

native language teachers # 

ESL teacher 

aides 

counselors * 

What are the numbers of LEP students 
enrolled in this school? ** 

What is the teacher/student ratio? 



How do you teach LEP students? 
teach monolingually 
teach monolingually v/ith a bil. 
student translating 
teach monolingually with some 
native lang. materials 
teach monolingually with a native 
language speaking aide 
teach bilingually - in English 
and the targeted native lang. 



Are aides available to work with 
your students 

Are aides used in the voc/occ educa- 
tion classes to help the LEP students 



* represents the number of days/weekly 
** Lau Categories A&B only 




x 



98i 69 



102 



102 



68 



63 



14 



92 



175 



'39 



-530- 



APPENDIX K 




10. What programs are available 
automative 
foods 
clothing 
electronic 
woods 
drafting 
metal 

data processing 
printing 
business 

computer education 
child care 
machine technology 

11. Curricular materials are available 
in the following native lang. 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Haitian 

Cambodian 

Laotian 

Vietnamese 

Chinese 

Italian 

Greek 

Czechoslavakian 

Spanish 

Other 

12. Curricular materials are used in the 
following language. 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Haitian 

Cambodian 

Laotian 

Vietnamese 

Chinese 

Italian 

Greek 

Czechoslavakian 

Spanish 

Other 

13. Uhat kind of native language mater- 
ials do you use? 



Refer 



a-v ailaaili :y o 



and by 



Mj 



us 



X 



:o A>pen<ix 



terials 



ed. 



Ian 



uag' i grc ups 



Ln t 



El. 



materials b r pr 



le n; 



tiv« 



spe;ify 



x 



Lng 



1 he 



?gran art a 



languagss a'e not 



APPENDIX K 



14 



15, 



16. 




Does coordination exist between the 
voc/occ education teachers and the 
bilingual teachers in: 
automotive 

• 


* 


i' 










co 

4-1 


CO 
4-1 








foods 














•H 


•H 








clothing 














01 


0) 








electronic 














c 


c 








woods 














•H 


•H 








drafting 














cfl 


n) 








metal 














•p-t 


•i-i 








data processing 














u 


!j 








printing 














o 


o 








business 
























computer education 














£ 


B 








other 














CO 


CO 








Does coordination exist between the 
voc/occ education teachers and the 
ESL teachers in 
automotive 


* 












CO 

u 


CO 

4J 








foods 














•H 


•H 








clothing 














01 


0J 








electronic 














G 


c 








woods 
















•H 
j_i 








drafting 
















id 








metal 














•H 

T-l 


•H 
T3 








data processing 














U 










printing 














O 


O 
r I 








business 














m 


I 1 








computer education 














6 


E 








:" other 














CO 


CO 








Is this administration/teaching 
peers receptive to bilingual educa- 
tion services to the LEP students? 








































































* Ho coordination exists 
















































. 


















































































j 















APPENDIX K 



17. -What administrative support would 
facilitate your task of reponding 
to the linguistic-cultural needs of 
the LEP students in your class? 




18. Additional information 



. •ml 



-533- 



APPENDIX L 



ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS BY RACE BY GRAOE 
' ASSIGNEO ENROLL OS/29/83 NON-PROG SEATING 
H-A CAPACITY 

| jr~ittiii"StmiiARY- 



■ i i 4. 

■ - . >a>.v. ; - 

.-•';■ '•■":-^- 



l«l » Wll itiTll«<t 






<v> 






AVAILABLE 
SEATS •-,•"•■ 






KCOURT CAPACITY STB 10 



" 1 - > w ' 



Kl i K2 4423 



♦ 1862 



a ■ -.-jr." 



*•,— *»-*-;-*7 



5 SUBSTANTIA 






^GRAoY 



■ — •■■ ~ ft" r ; 



ELEM. 19216 :*♦ 2949 -^• ; '?^^,A^^- VOCATION 

MIDDLE 12 730— ♦ '1427 .' "'^ r 'rfy^lff^g^ft;^ 

HIGH 15450 .'• 2B1 v- * 



• y 



'./ xV -v. - * ■ * ■ ■ '■ 






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1*0 IAN 
BNITC ORIENTAL HISPANIC AMERICAN BY CRAOE 



^WEF** 



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01 



L£ 



-02- 
03 
04 



-05- 
06 
07 

-06- 
09 
10 



-It 

12 



1733 
2557 
2329 
1917 
1861 
1806 
2231 
2439 
2051 
2929 
2583 
2386 
1578 



1614 
1235 

till 
936 
943 

1003 
1132 
1482 
1423 
1912 
1444 
1317 
991 



261 

269 

326 

298 

297 

303 

317 

285 

283 

328 

369 

354- 

312 



I 'c'vRUN TO OAT 6 "V ■■•' - .■ ; 

V . V P ERCENTAGES" 1 — 
tl KI-K2 TOTALS 

< &ssr«teit.TTOTBfJ-Tr 
>;nidol£ Totals 



28380- — 16745 — 4002 



744 

1015 

949 

759 

696 

TI4 

797 
789 
^710 
678 
620 

480 

327 

*460 



17 
22 
26 
32 

14 
27 
22 
20 
21 
21 
27 
22 
9 



4549 
5098 
4741 
3942 
3813 
3853 
4499 
5015 
4466 
4068 
5043 
4539 
3217 






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*&itl'CH TOTALS 



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1733 

10470 

6721 

9436 



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3230~T^-1493 -■'^.4133- 
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3464 s* 1363 £ 2303 



260 "~ 56687 : 

r-- 0- -—^ loo 

4369 
21449 -3 



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71 



BILINGUAL TOTAL 
f^-VOCAT ION AL" EC TOTAL 

Ej 'BUSINESS EO TOTAL 
t CRC MEEK IN/ CUT 

"' CR C KALE- CAY ' 

CRC EXPLORATORY 
EXTENOEO DAY TOTAL 
r ^-»0VA*C20~W0RK "TOTAL 
SPECIAL NEEDS . 
HAlHSUtAH »»'■!* 

"-^TSUBSTANTIALtY SEP. : 



«t> 



16867 



1082 

"321 

193 



1411 

560 

592 

—380 

4176 
1817 



610 

.196 

93 



446 

143 

386 

283 

1172 
1047 



-534- 



1695 

Tf 

' 4 



^-69 

13 

79 

142 

11 

~29 



3955 

17- w 

9 



-356 

214 

334 

'140 

1176 
483 



5 


. 7347 


*■ 


■— 370 





301 








15 


2297 


2 


932 


6 


1397 


11 


— -1138 


44 


7361 


10 


'~ 3386 



VN i 



APPENDIX M 



ANALYSIS OF STUOENTS BY LANGUAGE AND GRADE OATE 02/23/84 

JILINGUAL 02/23/84 



RUN 


SUMMARY 












• 


. 
















LANGUAGE CODE 




AOE 


CA 


LA 


CH 


FR 


GR 


IT 


CV PO SP 


VT 


K2 


13 


10 


77 


18 


19 


27 


46 8 346 


35 


01 


23 


10 


77 


47 


14 


12 


74 9 474 


38 


02 


._.. 22... 


.9 


102 


.47 . 


_ 16 


_23 


50 -J.0 ... 522 


__38 


03 


25 


8 


91 


39 


16 


28 


35 11 402 


44 


04 


23 


10 


84 


25 


19 


18 


34 9 352 


32 


05 


.23 


2 


81 


40 


_ 15_ 


_25 


_ 47 5 321 


24 


06 


27 


6 


61 


24 


10 


25 


43 10 295 


27 


07 


27 


12 


44 


27 


3 


22 


32 8 303 


26 


08 


..__. 36 


. 8 


.41 


33 . 


8 


_ 23 


__38 .11 252 


20 


09 


21 


6 


58 


35 


9 


47 


35 7 256 


23 


10 


32 


8 


54 


71 


8 


29 


48 6 164 


38 


11 . 


... ^ 43 


10 


55 


110 


11 


_ 2V 


. .62 123 


29 


12 


15 


4 


60 


55 


9 


21 


22 2 94 


36 



GRAOE 
TOTAL 



2 601 

3 781 
.4 843 

1 700 

9 615 

9 592 _ 

5 533 
I 505 

. .4 474 _ _ 

6 503 

3 461 
6 . 473 

4 322 

tUN TO OA 330 103 885 571 157 324__ 566 __96 3904 410 57 7403 

UL TOTAL 330 103 885 571 . ._ 157 .„ .324.__.566 . 96.3904 410 57 7403 



'E TOTAL 
iOV TOTAL 
,P NCS 
MNSTRM 
SUB SEP 





7 
1 





~2~ 22 

2 





17 * 

4 





23 ~~37~ 

1 

* 





43 
6 





11 
1 



45 

513 

234 





9 




45 

5 689 

1 250 




■ « 













-535- 



§ffr*N^S,f~ N 



AVAILABLE NATIVE LANGUAGE CURRICULAR MATERIALS VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 



LANGUAGE 



PROGRAM 


Y 


N| 


Y N 


Iy 


nIy 


c 

N 


V 

Y 


4 

N|Y 


n]y 


n(y 


n(y 


n[y n{y 


V 
N|Y 


'4 

n(y 


N 


Food Service 




1 














X 






















1 














Retailing, Marketing and 
Management 














































! 








Cabinetmakinq 






































X 
















Carpentry 














X 




X 




































Plumbinq 


















X 










- 










X 














Building Maintenance 
and Repair 






















































Autobody Repair 
Laboratory 






















X 
















X 
















Machine Laboratory 






































X 
















Sheet Metal Laboratory 






































X 
















Welding Laboratory 






































X 
















Advanced Office and 
Management 






















X 
















X 
















Legal Office 
Procedures 






































X 
















Medical Office Assistant 






































X 
















Word Processing 






































X 
















Banking 






















































Child Care 






















































Cosmetology 






































X 
















Fashion/Interior Desiqn 






















































Hotel Hospitality 






































X 
















Data Processina 






































X 
















Health Aide 


















X 




















X 
















Health Laboratory Skills 






































X 
















Medical Office Assistant- 
Clinical 






































X 
















Nursing Assistant 


















X 




















X 
















Electrical Technology 




















X 


















X 
















Electronics Technology 






















































Heating. Air Conditioning, 
Refrigeration 






































X 
















Commercial Desiqn 






X 
































A 
















Fashion Illustration 






















































Machine Draftinq 






< 














1 




— L 


i 








X 








1 







/ 



-536- 



rAPPENMX M (cont'V 



LANGUAGE 



PROGRAM 

Photographic Technology 

Printing 

Television Production 

Automotive/Truck Repair 

Marine and Small Engine 
Repair ' 




-537- 



o 



a, 
5: 



w 



w 

CO 

os 
o 

w 

Q 



CO 

OS 

u 



w 














—1 


CO 


• 










o 


3 

as 


o 
I-l 

CU 


1 


(M 

+ 


CM 

+ 


rH 
+ 


• 


o 


Oh 












•z 














M Id 
CO 


























33 














W OS 


• 


<r 


CM 


vO 


er> 


vO 


>< <-> 


cr 


cm 


CM 


Ov 


CM 




w 


a: 


*» 


a> 


vO 


>» 




W Q 


i-i 


en 










H 


t* 


i 


I 


+ 


+ 


+ 


H 




















• 










m 






o 










o 




-* 


I-l 










• 




00 


01 


o 


oo 


vo 


P~ 


o 




o> 


0* 


CO 


<■ 


rH 








H 
















1 

en 
















CO 
















cr» 


• 


in 


o 










.-i 


cr 


«tf 


00 


O 


CM 


o 






01 


r~ 


en 


00 


O 


00 






i-i 


r-» 


00 


-* 


c 


CM 






h 


rH 


CM 


CT> 


«3- 


















-* 






u 










o 


CO 




I-l 










o 


OS 




01 


i-l 


r^ 


m 


vO 


o 


1 


en 

00 


a. 


en 


»0- 


■-I 






>- 




























hJ 


1 














o 


CM 














O 


CO 


• 


CM 


o 








T« 


C\ 


V 


o 


r-l 


vO 


vO 


CM 


U 


iH 


0) 


cr> 


rH 


o\ 


<r 


VO 


CO 




VI 


oo 


cr> 


r- 1 


00 


CM 






Ek 


rH 


CM 


Ov 


CO 


















<r 






u 










o 






M 










o 




CM 


01 


<r 


vO 


>* 


vO 


o 




00 


0-1 


en 


sr 


r-( 








CT\ 
















i-l 

1 

i-l 




























00 
















CTv 


• 


Ov 


CM 










rH 


cr 


vO 


o 


-* 


en 


■* 






01 


rH 


en 


00 


r^ 


l-» 






U 


1-t 


er> 


r^. 


m 


CM 






Fu 


CM 


CM 


CO 


en 
















w 














s 














CO 














•H 














■a 














c 














H 










0) 


0) 












o 


i-t 


a 


Id 








•H 


CO 


CO 


u 




tn 


en 


c 


u 


a 


*£ 




O 


^ 


cfl 


c 


•H 


cc 




u 


u 


a. 


01 


i-i 






•H 


eo 


(0 


■H 


01 








5 


r-t 

PQ 


•H 

33 


I-l 

o 


1 



c 

o 

•H 
*J 

CO 

i~ 

a 
cj 

E 

0) 

i-l 
a. 

E 



d 
o 
E 

4J 
I-l 

CO 

o. 

0> 
Q 

01 

jC 



o 



3 
O 



I-l 

a. 

s 
o 
u 

vw 
C 

o> 

CO 



(0 

i-l 

CO 
Q 



-538- 



VOCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 



-539- 



MONITORING REPORT 
UNIFIED PLAN FOR VOCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Compliance with Relevant Court Orders, State Laws and 
Regulations 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The major monitoring objective is to determine if 
all vocational education programs conform to 
racial ratios established by the Court and if all 
programs comply with admissions criteria 
specified by the Unified Plan including 
proportional representation by sex. 

How does Boston justify disproportional 
enrollments by race and sex in certain 
skills training programs? 
What is being done to remedy this situation? 

B. Methodology 

The Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity 
analyzed enrollment data of vocational education 
programs submitted by Boston. Further, monitors 
met with the Senior Manager of the Department of 
Implementation and the Director of Education and 
Employment for a discussion of the findings of 
data analysis and Boston's possible action to 
remedy the disproportional enrollment by race and 
sex in certain vocational education programs. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

First Reporting Period: non-compliance 

Second Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Current Reporting Period: partial compliance 



-541- 



HUBERT H. HUMPHREY OCCUPATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER 
(HHORC) /MAGNET SHOPS 

The Unified Plan mandates enrollment goals by 
race for the 35 programs of the HHORC and the 6 
magnet shops (Cooperative Industrial Programs) in 
District High Schools, and, in addition, 
specifically requires affirmative recruiting for 
males and females. According to the Unified 
Plan, enrollment in these programs "will reflect 
the racial ratios established by the Court for 
the city-wide schools", and further, admissions 
"shall specifically encourage a student 
composition for such programs in keeping with the 
city-wide male/female student ratio" in programs 
where one sex or the other had traditionally 
predominated (that is, traditionally enrolled 
less than 35% of one sex or the other) . 

Race — Magnet Shops 

Magnet shop enrollments are required to meet the 
court-mandated goals of District IX. The 
percentage enrollments for each shop by race are 
displayed in Figure 1. There is significant 
over-enrollment of White students in the Agri- 
Business program at West Roxbury and in the 
Machine Shop at Hyde Park (while Black students 
are significantly over-enrolled in the Machine 
Shop at the HHORC; see Figure 2). Other minority 
students are significantly under-enrolled in 
those two programs and in the Machine Shop at 
East Boston. Also, other minority students are 
over-enrolled in the two shops at Dorchester 
High. 

Race — HHORC 

The District IX goals have been adjusted for the 
HHORC. These goals have been used to compute a 
"compliance index" for each program for each 
racial group; the results are displayed in 
Figures 2 through 4. (The index is computed by 
dividing the percentage enrollment of each racial 
group by the "ideal", or - goal, for each 
group.) A program in strict compliance should 
have an index between .95 and 1.05. The shaded 
area on each figure indicates programs in strict 



-5H2- 



compliance for the racial group in question. The 
programs most seriously out of compliance are at 
the top and the bottom of each list. 

For example, Figure 2 lists in order the 
compliance index for Black students for each 
program. It shows that the program with the 
lowest proportional Black enrollment is Heating, 
Ventilating & Air Conditioning, and the programs 
with the highest proportional enrollment are 
Retail, Machine Shop, and Fashion. 

Figure 3 shows that the programs with the lowest 
proportional enrollment of White students are 
Fashion, Health Aide, and Banking. Those with 
the highest proportional enrollment of White 
students are Plumbing, Illustration, and Heating, 
Ventilating and Air Conditioning. 

Figure 4 shows that other minority students — 
who are the least represented at the HHORC in 
comparison with Black and White students — are 
not enrolled at all in Building Maintenance and 
Illustration. They are over-represented in 
Health Aide, Dental Assistant and Banking. 

Eight programs at the HHORC are in strict 
compliance with the goal for Black enrollments; 
four are in strict compliance with the goal for 
White enrollments, and two for other minority 
enrollments. Eleven programs fall outside a 25% 
variation of the goal for Black students; twenty- 
four programs fall outside a 25% variation of the 
goal for White students and twenty-two programs 
fall outside the goal for other minority 
students . 

Gender — Magnet Shops 

Figure 5 shows enrollments by sex in the magnet 
shops. Agri-Business at West Roxbury comes 
closest to meeting the standard of 48% female 
enrollment (the percentage of female students 
enrolled in the Boston Public Schools), although, 
as noted in the last report, there is significant 
variation in the proportion of females enrolled 
in the specific Agri-Business programs. The 
Architectural Woodworking program at Dorchester 
and the two machine shops enroll less than 20% 
females . 



-543- 



Gender — HHORC 

Figure 6 shows enrol 
programs. The "comp 
by dividing the actu 
enrolled in the prog 
of enrolled females 
Building Maintenance 
(in Nursing Assistan 
enrollment of female 
(14% to 62%) of the 
(48%). Enrollments 
pattern: few or no 
Machine Shop, with a 
noteworthy exception 
Business and Health 



lments by sex in HHORC 
liance index" was developed 
al percentage of females 
ram by 48%. The percentage 
ranges from (in Plumbing, 
, Welding and HVAC ) to 100% 
t). In twelve programs the 
s meets halfway or better 
Unified Plan standard 
follow the traditional 
females in the trades (the 

24% female enrollment is a 
) , and few or no males in the 
Related programs. 



District-level Programs 

Enrollment in high school vocational/occupational 
programs is not handled by the assignment 
process, but is rather a function of scheduling 
procedures and student choice. Severe 
disproportionalities of enrollment by race abound 
nevertheless . 



The following high school programs have 
enrollments that vary 50% or more from the goals 
of their respective districts: 



High School 
Brighton 

Burke 



Program 



Marketing 
Health Career 
Garage Management 

Business Education 



Over- 
represented 

White 
Black 
Black 

Black 



Marketing Black 

Consumer & Home- Black 
making 

Drafting/Electronics Black 



South Boston Clothing 



Other 
Minorities 



-5M- 



Charlestown Computer Skills White 
Consumer & Home. Black 

English Most of non-special Black 
needs programs 

Madison Park Most of non-special Black 
needs programs 

Again, these are problems that cannot be solved 
through the assignment process, and instead must 
be addressed by recruiting and career counseling. 

Disproportionate enrollment in middle schools is 
a somewhat different question since some or all 
of the programs are part of the required core 
curriculum. Significant disproportions were 
found in the programs of 10 middle schools: 
Lewis, Curley, Roosevelt, Lewenberg , Irving, 
Thompson, Cleveland, Wilson, Dearborn, and 
Gavin. The overall enrollment pattern in each of 
these schools is consistent with the 
disproportions in their vocational/occupational 
education programs. 

Massachusetts law (Section 8.01 of the 
Regulations for Chapter 622) requires school 
committees to make an annual evaluation of 
policies affecting access to programs in their 
districts, and to pay "special attention... to 
schools and programs in which students... of 
racial or national origin groups present in the 
community are markedly under-represented". Each 
of the programs and schools noted above requires 
such attention. 

D. Recommendations 



Boston should develop an action plan covering 
measures by the school system to encourage 
sufficient applications from each racial/ethnic 
group to permit assignment of and maintenance of 
enrollments in each program consistent with the 
"admissions criteria" section of the Unified 
Plan. Such measures would include participation 
by all middle school students and ninth graders 
in exploratory cluster programs designed to 
expose them to a broad range of occupations and 
to encourage them to consider applying to city- 
wide vocational programs. It also would include 



-545- 



wide vocational programs. It also would include 
(1) career guidance efforts tied specifically to 
the available programs, (2) vigorous outreach 
from the various programs to encourage 
applications, (3) follow-up on students who 
express interest in vocational programs, (4) 
assignment of staff with specific responsibility 
for recruitment (with an indication of what 
portion of their time would be or already is 
devoted to it), (5) supplementary recruitment for 
programs for which (at the time of initial 
assignments) an insufficient pool of applicants 
from any racial/ethnic group are available, and 
(6) follow-up with assigned students to increase 
the likelihood of their attending in the fall. 

E. Docummentation 

Appendix-1 Cooperative Industrial Programs, 
Enrollment by Race, Sex 

Appendix-2 HHORC Programs, Index for Black 

Appendix-3 HHORC Programs, Index for White 

Appendix-4 HHORC Programs, Other Minorities 

HHORC Enrollments by Race, Grade, Sex, and 
Program Clusters, 4-2-84 (on file) 

Program Profile: Education and Employment 
Courses, Part 1, October 1983 (on file) 



-546- 



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-5M7- 



Appendix 1-2 



FIGURE 2 HHORC PROGRAMS 

COMPLIANCE INDEX FOR BLACKS 
April 1984 



PROGRAM 

1 . HVAC 

2. DENTAL ASST 
3. ELECTRICAL 
4. AUTO REPAIR 
5. CARPENTRY 



% BLACK OF 
TOTAL ENROLLMENT 

40 
47 
49 
50 
51 



14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 

22. 

23. 

24. 

25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

30. 

31. 

32. 

33. 

34. 

35. 



WELDING 

DATA PROCESSING 

WORD PROCESSING 

ILLUSTRATION 

ELECTRONICS 

MAINTENANCE 

NURSING ASST 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

PRINTING 

HEALTH AIDE 

COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

TV PRODUCTION 

OFFICE 

LEGAL OFFICE 

CABINET 

FOOD 

SHEET METAL 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

HOTEL 

RETAIL 

MACHINE SHOP 

FASHION 



60 

61 

61 

63 

63 

64 

64 

68 

68 

69 

69 

69 

71 

71 

71 

72 

72 

74 

75 

80 

81 

87 



TOTAL 
ENROLLMENT 

15 
19 
89 
153 
68 



35 
130 
49 
16 
112 
33 
36 
59 
75 
13 
13 
39 
68 
34 
58 
109 
29 
43 
24 
35 
21 
23 



COMPLIANCE 
INDEX 

.71 
.85 
.88 
.90 
32. 




1.07 
1.09 
1.09 
1.12 



1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1, 

1, 

1, 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 



,13 
,14 
14 
21 
21 
24 
24 
24 
26 
26 
26 
28 
29 
33 
34 
43 
45 
55 



-5^8- 



Appendix 1-3 



FIGURE 3 HHORC PROGRAMS 

COMPLIANCE INDEX FOR WHITES 
April 1984 
% WHITE OF TOTAL 



PROGRAM 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 



FASHION 

HEALTH AIDE 

BANKING 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

TV PRODUCTION 

MACHINE SHOP 

ELECTRONICS 

MEDICAL OFFICE 

HEALTH LAB 

HOTEL 

OFFICE 

FOOD 

CABINET 

CHILD CARE 

MACHINE DRAFTING 

LEGAL OFFICE 

COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

COSMETOLOGY 

NURSING ASST 

RETAIL 

AUTO BODY 

DATA PROCESSING 

PRINTING 

WORD PROCESSING 

SHEET METAL 

DENTAL ASST 



TOTAL ENROLLMENT 

00 
00 
06 
07 
08 
10 
10 
10 
12 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
16 
17 
17 
18 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 
22 



ENROLLMENT 

23 

13 

34 

43 

39 

21 
112 

59 

17 

24 

68 
109 

58 

49 

21 

34 

13 

95 

36 

35 

62 
130 

75 

49 

29 

,9 



COMPLIANCE 
INDEX 

.00 
.00 
.26 
.30 
.33 
.41 
.43 
.44 
.51 
.54 
.58 
.60 
.60 
.62 
.62 
.64 
.67 
.69 
.72 
.75 
.77 
.87 
.87 
.89 
.90 
.92 




31. ELECTRICAL 
32. CARPENTRY 
33. PLUMBING 
34. ILLUSTRATION 
3 5. H VAC 



_ 5 i4 9 - 



Appendix 1-4 

FIGURE 4 HHORC PROGRAMS 

COMPLIANCE INDEX FOR OTHER 
MINORITIES, April 1984 



% OTHER MINORITY 



TOTAL 



PROGRAM 


OF TOT. ENROLLMENT 


ENROLLMENT 


INDEX 


1. MAINTENANCE 


00 


33 


.00 


2. ILLUSTRATION 


00 


16 


.00 


3. RETAIL 


03 


35 


.14 


4. SHEET METAL 


07 


29 


.33 


5.MACCHINE SHOP 


10 


21 


.45 


6. PLUMBING 


11 


53 


.54 


7. PRINTING 


12 


75 


.57 


8. HOTEL 


13 


24 


.60 


9. FASHION 


13 


23 


.62 


10.HVAC 


13 


15 


.63 


11. FOOD 


15 


109 


.70 


12. LEGAL OF.FICE 


15 


34 


.70 


13. COMMERCIAL DESIGN 


15 


13 


.73 


14. CABINET 


16 


58 


.74 


15. CARPENTRY 


16 


68 


.77 


16. OFFICE 


16 


68 


.77 


17. WELDING 


17 


35 


.82 


18. WORD PROCESSING 


18 


49 


.87 


19. PHOTOGRAPHY 


19 


43 


.89 


20. DATA PROCESSING 


19 


130 


.92 


21. NURSING ASST 


19 


36 


.93 


22. MARITIME SM ENG 


20 


44 


.97 


23 .MEDICAL OFFICE/ / 


x / ,% / / 




y y° 5 


24<TV/PROD«tTipN yf y 


/ /39 / / 


s /\.jti 


25 . ELECTRICAL 


24 


89 


1.12 


26. COSMETOLOGY 


25 


95 


1.20 


2 7. AUTO BODY 


26 


62 


1.23 


28. ELECTRONICS 


27 


112 


1.28 


29. AUTO REPAIR 


27 


153 


1.31 


30. MACHINE DRAFTING 


29 


21 


1.36 


31. HEALTH 


29 


17 


1.40 


32. CHILD CARE 


31 


49 


1.46 


33. HEALTH AIDE 


31 


13 


1.47 


34. DENTAL ASST 


32 


19 


1.50 


35. BANKING 


35 


34 


1.68 



-550- 



Appendix 1-5 

FIGURE 6 HHORC PROGRAMS 

ENROLLMENTS BY SEX, 
April 1984 



PROGRAM 

1. PLUMBING 

2. MAINTENANCE 

3. WELDING 

4 . HVAC 

5. AUTO REPAIR 

6. AUTO BODY 

7.MARITIME/SM ENG 

8. ELECTRICAL 

9. CARPENTRY 
10. MACHINE DRAFTING 
11. ELECTRONICS 
12. SHEET METAL 
13. CABINET 
14. PRINTING 
15. MACHINE SHOP 
16. TV PRODUCTION 
17. ILLUSTRATION 
18. COMMERCIAL DESIGN 
19. FOOD 

20. PHOTOGRAPHY 
21. DATA PROCESSING 
22. HOTEL 
23. BANKING 
24. RETAIL 
2 5. HEALTH 
26. OFFICE 

27. WORD PROCESSING 
28. DENTAL ASST 
29. HEALTH AIDE 
30. LEGAL OFFICE 
31. CHILD CARE 
32. FASHION 
33. MEDICAL OFFICE 
34. COSMETOLOGY 
35. NURSING ASST 





TOTAL 


%FEMALE 


ENROLLMENT 


00 


53 


00 


33 


00 


35 


00 


15 


01 


153 


02 


62 


02 


44 


03 


89 


04 


68 


05 


21 


07 


112 


14 


29 


16 


58 


23 


75 


24 


21 


31 


39 


38 


16 


38 


13 


40 


109 


42 


43 


42 


130 


46 


24 


56 


34 


66 


35 


71 


17 


72 


68 


82 


49 


84 


19 


85 


13 


88 


34 


90 


49 


91 


23 


93 


59 


99 


95 


100 


36 



-551- 



II Core Programs 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The monitoring objective is to determine whether 
middle school career and exploratory programs, as 
well as high school exploratory and employability 
programs, are in place as specified by the 
Unified Plan. 

Which programs are currently operational 
and non-operational? What steps has 
Boston taken to comply with provisions? 

B. Methodology 

Site visits were conducted at 7 high schools and 
6 middle schools during this monitoring phase 
(See Appendix 11-1,2 charts). The current Boston 
Public Schools Profile (10/83), HHORC Cluster 
Tally dated 4/2/84, and written data collected 
during interviews with guidance counselors, 
vocational teachers, principals, headmasters, and 
other Boston staff during site visits were 
analyzed to determine findings. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

First Report Period: partial compliance 

Second Report Period: partial compliance 

Current Report Period: partial compliance 

1. Middle School Career Exploratory 

The last report to the Court indicated that 
Boston was developing a city-wide career 
education plan. It also was anticipated 
that follow-up in-service training would 
begin on the adaptation of the Barnstable 
Instructional Career Education Project 
(BICEP) with guidance counselors. A few 
middle schools provided on-going career 
education classes, but supplementary funds 



-552- 






were not available to augment or establish 
on-going career education activities in most 
middle schools. Furthermore, there were no 
full-time career education coordinators in 
any of the middle schools. 

In January 1984, Boston began a six-month 
training series for middle school guidance 
counselors on the adaptation of Project 
BICEP into the guidance program. In 
general, these training meetings have been 
well attended, well presented, and useful. 
They also provided an opportunity for 
counselors to share strategies for obtaining 
and using existing resources. A draft city- 
wide career education plan has been 
developed. The draft provides for 
comprehensive career development 
competencies for students from kindergarten 
to 12th grade and also plans to establish 
centrally located resource centers for 
students and staff. 

Middle school career fairs were held at a 
few of the middle schools. Individual 
middle school career education activities 
continue to include career fairs and guest 
speakers from Project Business and School 
Volunteers. Occasionally, students go out 
to job sites, high schools or the HHORC, 
but the degree of this type of activity 
continues to lessen since there are still no 
full-time coordinators. 

2 . Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

The last report to the Court indicated that 
computer education as part of the Business 
cluster in middle schools was targeted for 
expansion. It also was reported that all 
schools visited offered the Food-Home-Health 
Service cluster and that only a few schools 
did not offer the Industry Related 
exploratory cluster. 



-553- 



In this reporting period, all of Boston's 
middle schools provide program offerings in 
the three cluster areas (computer education 
replacing the Business Related cluster) with 
the exception of the following two schools: 

a. The Cheverus with a population of only 
125 students does not offer the Industry 
Related cluster, and 

b. The Mackey School's 15 computers were 
transferred due to lack of space and a 
qualified computer education teacher. 

Some of the Industry Related teachers 
have been receiving in-service on the 
teaching of electronics and computer 
education. Boston plans to redirect 
some of the exploratory offerings to 
stay abreast of current and future labor 
market demands. 

On the average, most middle schools have 
at least one Industry Related teacher 
and one Food-Home-Health Service Related 
teacher for every 250 students. Very 
few schools have assigned a full-time 
instructor for computer education. 

The scheduling process or rotation of 
clusters for all students still 
continues to vary in all districts as 
mentioned in the previous report. Some 
of the schools provide double periods 
and some provide single periods. Most 
teachers preferred double periods and 
many stated that single period slots do 
not provide ample time for instruction, 
set up of materials and project 
completion. This was especially a 
problem for schools which provided only 
one or two single periods of 
approximately 45 minutes per week of 
exploratory. (See chart on middle 
school offerings and number of periods 
per week.) Many exploratory teachers 
relate career education to the skill 
area being taught but many also noted 
their own limitations in this area. 






_ 55 l,_ 



3. High School Exploratory Clusters 

The last report indicated that only 8 high 
schools exploratory offerings were in full 
compliance. This reporting period, 10 high 
schools' exploratory offerings are in full 
compliance. They are: Brighton High (I), 
Jamaica Plain High (II), Hyde Park High 
(IV), J. E. Burke High and Dorchester High 
(V), South Boston High (VI), Charlestown 
High (VII), East Boston High (VIII), English 
and Madison Park Highs (IX). Although Hyde 
Park High and Charlestown High offer the 
three required exploratory clusters, 9th 
graders are not included in the 
enrollments. Dorchester and East Boston 
were recently brought into compliance prior 
to this reporting period. The only high 
school not in compliance is West Roxbury . 
High which has no Food-Home-Health Services 
related exploratory cluster. The Technical 
High Schools, (Boston Technical, Umana) and 
Copley High are exempt from in-school 
exploratory clusters in these areas. All of 
the high schools, including the Technical 
schools, send 9th grade exploratory students 
to the HHORC. (See high school chart) 

In addition to these high schools and the 
HHORC exploratory offerings, a career expo 
was held and well attended on April 10, 
1984, at the HHORC for interested juniors 
and seniors from all high schools. This 
expo provided a range of representatives 
from various post secondary colleges and 
institutions representing the exploratory 
cluster areas. 

Moreover, Mass PEP, a pre-engineering 
program for minority youth, has begun an 
after-school exploratory program at the 
HHORC for students from 5 high schools. 

4 . High School Employability Clusters 

The status of the high school employability 
offerings remain basically the same as 
reported on the last report. All of the 
high schools offer the Business cluster. 
Although 4 high schools offer the 



-555- 



Distributive Marketing cluster - Brighton, 
Burke, Dorchester and Madison Park - 
enrollment in these programs is very low, 
both in the district schools as well as at 
the HHORC. Seven high schools offer the 
Food-Home-Health Services cluster - 
Brighton, Burke, Dorchester, South Boston, 
Charlestown, English and Madison Park. All 
of the high schools send students to the 
HHORC for participation in the three cluster 
areas with the following exceptions: 

a. There are no students from East Boston 
enrolled in the HHORC Food-Home-Health 
Services Related cluster, and 

b. Boston Technical has only 13 seniors 
enrolled in the printing program. (All 
of the other technical high schools have 
students enrolled in the three 
employability cluster areas.) 

c. There are no students from South Boston 
enrolled in the HHORC Distributive 
Marketing cluster. 

D. Commendat ions . 

1. Middle School Career Exploratory 

Although still in the draft stage, Boston 
has made progress in planning and developing 
a comprehensive systemwide career education 
model. Efforts in staff development 
activities for guidance counselors to adapt 
Project BICEP in their individual schools is 
enhancing city-wide career education 
programs . 



Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

Significant progress has been made to 
increase the numbers of computers in the 
middle schools so that all middle schools 
will have computer education. 



-556- 



3. High School Exploratory Clusters 

Two high schools were brought into 
compliance in their exploratory offerings 
since the last reporting period. Dorchester 
High re-opened their Industry Related 
cluster and East Boston High opened their 
Food-Home-Health Services Related cluster. 

4. High School Employability Clusters 

Many career guidance activities have been 
implemented for students attending 
technical and other employability clusters 
at the HHORC. For example, the Career Fair 
was held on April 10, 1984, and the "Type 
Off" Contest was sponsored for Business 
students during "Vocational Education Week" 
(February 13 to 17, 1984). Two students in 
the HHORC Business cluster who competed and 
scored well in the Office Education 
Association (OEA) regional competition 
hosted at the HHORC on February 4, 1982 will 
represent the State in the up-coming 
national competition. 

E. Recommendations 



1. Middle School Career Exploratory 

There continues to be an urgent need to 
strengthen the coordination of activities in 
preparing 8th graders to choose and enroll 
in high school vocational programs. 
Interest assessments should be done with all 
8th graders. Coordinated field trips to 
district high schools, magnet programs and 
to the HHORC are greatly needed. To enable 
middle school guidance counselors to assist 
eighth graders better, comprehensive high 
school program information should be 
provided to counselors prior to the deadline 
for high school selection. This information 
also should be made available to the 
bilingual counselors who need to be included 
in monthly guidance meetings for middle and 
high school counselors held at the HHORC. 



-557- 



2. Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

Since many of the Industry Related teachers 
and Food-Home-Health Services Related 
teachers expressed an interest in career 
education, particularly as it relates to 
their skill training areas, Project BICEP 
adaptation projects in these two clusters 
should be piloted as a follow-up to the 
guidance in-service program. 

It also is recommended that Boston continue 
to increase computer education in-service 
for middle school teachers. 

Double periods should be required for all 
middle school exploratory offerings in order 
to maximize the degree of learning taking 
place and particularly to provide ample on- 
task time. 

3. High School Exploratory Clusters 

The Food-Home-Health Services Related 
cluster at West Roxbury High should be 
reopened to bring all high schools into 
compliance . 

4. High School Employability Clusters 

The greatest non-compliance high school 
employability offering occurs in the 
Distributive Marketing cluster. Since 
entrepreneurship is a growing trend, Boston 
needs to consider expansion of this program 
offering. Students should be encouraged to 
consider the long range or short range goal 
of "working for oneself". 

There is also a need for city-wide 
implementation and expansion of student and 
teacher participation in vocational student 
organizations such as the Office Education 
Association (OEA),the Vocational and 
Industrial Clubs of America (VICA), and the 
Distributive Education Clubs of America 
(DECA) . 



-558- 



F. Documentation 

Appendix II - 1 Middle School Career 

Education and Exploratory 
Program Summaries. 

Appendix II - 2 High School 

Exploratory/ 
Employability Program 
Summaries 

School Brochures and materials (on file) 

Boston Career Education draft paper and action 
plan (on file) 

Boston Public Schools Program Profile, Education 
and Employment, October 1983 (on file) 

HHORC Cluster Tally 4/2/84 (on file) 



-559- 



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Ill Magnet Programs 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

A major monitoring objective is to determine 
whether all required magnet satellite programs 
are in place as specified by the Unified Plan. 

Why are certain magnet programs not being 
offered as specified by the court- ordered 
Unified Plan? What is being done to 
implement these programs? 

B. Methodology 

Program listings for the Satellite programs were 
reviewed and additional data were obtained from 
Boston status reports, action plans, and Boston 
Public Schools Program Profile . 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 
First report period: 
Second report period: 
Current report period: 



partial compliance 
partial compliance 
partial compliance 



As mentioned in the previous reports, the magnet 
programs in District VI - South Boston High 
(Autobody) and District VII - Charlestown High 
(Electrical) were closed and transferred to the 
HHORC. 

The following magnet programs are currently in 
operation and scheduled to continue next school 
year. 



DISTRICT 

I 
III 

IV 



HIGH SCHOOL 
Brighton 
W. Roxbury 

Hyde Park 



PROGRAM 

Automotive 

Agri-Business & 
Natural Resources 
Occupation 

Machine Shop 



-563- 



V Dorchester Architectural 

Woodworking 
Interior Design* 
Urban Retrofit 
Health Careers* 

VIII East Boston Business 

Education 

*New programs scheduled to begin in September 1984. 

East Boston's Machine Shop program was in operation 
this year but is scheduled to be phased out and not 
transferred to the HHORC. 

D. Commendations 

That Boston has increased new program offerings 
(Interior Design and Health Careers) at 
Dorchester High for next school year is 
commendable . 

E. Recommendations 



The capacity of the computer lab at Jamaica Plain 
High needs to be expanded to provide an 
information management program for that district 
as planned. 

F. Documentation 



Student Assignment Information Booklet 
1984-85 (on file) 

Boston Public Schools Program Profile, Education 
and Employment, October 1983 (on file) 

Boston Status Reports and Action Plans (on file) 



-561- 



IV In-School Bilingual 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The major monitoring objective is to assess the 
provisions for supportive services, including 
administrative, counseling and instructional 
support services, to limited English proficient 
students enrolled in vocational/occupational 
education programs in Boston Public Schools. 

Are adequate and sufficient supportive 
services being provided to limited English 
proficient students enrolled in those 
programs? What action has been taken to 
strengthen supportive services to this student 
population? 

B. Methodology 

-„ The monitoring method consisted of analysis of data 
submitted by Boston. In addition, on-site visits 
to four high schools and three middle schools were 
conducted jointly with staff of the Bureau of 
Transitional Bilingual Education. The on-site 
visits involved interviews with the Coordinator of 
Bilingual Vocational/Occupational Education, 
vocational/occupational instructors, bilingual 
guidance counselors and building administrators, 
review of curriculum and instructional materials, 
and classroom observations. (See Appendix IV-1) 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

First Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Second Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Current Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Native language bilingual vocational/occupational 
education programs are not provided in Boston as 
specified by the Unified Plan. It is evident, 
however, that provisions are made to provide 
support services to limited English proficient 
students mainstreamed into regular 



-565- 



vocational/occupational education programs. (See 
appendix 2). The operational guide for the 
delivery of these services is the Bilingual 
Vocational Education Policy Manual . Developed as « 
supplement to Boston's Lau Plan, this document 
outlines strategies and procedures for 
instructional and pupil personnel support services 
to limited English proficient students. 

The successful implementation of the provisions of 
this policy requires effective programmatic and 
administrative coordination between city-wide 
bilingual programs and bilingual 

vocational/occupational services. In response to 
findings and recommendations from the previous 
report to the Court, the Bilingual and Vocational 
Education Departments have initiated action to 
improve and strengthen support services to limited 
English proficient students enrolled in 
vocational/occupational education programs. (See 
appendix IV-3) Follow-up to Boston's progress in 
implementing these plans will be the focus of the 
next monitoring phase. 



Based on data analysis and on-site visits to 
selected schools, the following major findings 
emerged : 

1 . Bilingual Staffing for Vocational/Occupational 
Programs 

The previous report to the Court pointed out 
the lack of adequate bilingual aides and 
counselors available to limited English 
proficient students enrolled in 
vocational/occupational education programs. 
This staffing pattern continues to be evident 
during the current monitoring period. Native 
language aides are not available to limited 
English proficient students enrolled in 
vocational/occupational education programs in 
five out of the seven schools visited. While 
peer translation is sometimes utilized by 
instructors, the value of this method in 
ensuring concept development is questionable. 



-566- 



The critical need for a Cape Verdean aide at 
the HHORC has been addressed, while the need 
for a Cambodian aide continues to be an 
outstanding concern. 

The lack of adequate bilingual counseling 
services remains a serious concern. Although 
bilingual guidance counselors are available in 
five of the seven schools visited, these 
services are inadequate. The bilingual 
counselors are available at these schools on a 
limited basis, ranging from full-time to 
one to two days per week or month. 

2. Limited English Proficient Students 
Recruitment and Referral Procedures 

Recruitment of limited English proficient 
students is conducted in some native 
languages, particularly at the HHORC and high 
school level. Communiques outlining the 
vocational/occupational programs in Boston are 
sent to parents of limited English proficient 
students in their native languages. 
Information regarding the HHORC has been 
disseminated in Spanish by way of television 
programs and announcements, and through church 
and community bulletins and newsletters. 
These strategies have been successful in 
attracting and increasing the enrollment of 
limited English proficient students in 
vocational/occupational education programs in 
Boston. 

3. Availability of Native Language Materials 

Substantial efforts have been devoted to 
strategies and techniques for adapting 
curricular materials for limited English 
proficient students. Some materials are 
available in native languages (primarily 
Spanish). These materials are available from 
the HHORC through the Coordinator of Bilingual 
Vocational Services. With few exceptions, 
these materials are not utilized at the 
schools visited. 



-567- 



D. Commendations 

Although the approach is not consistent with the 
Unified Plan, the development of a Bilingual 
Vocational Education Policy constitutes a positive 
and significant step toward structuring a 
comprehensive system and coordinated approach for 
delivering vocational/occupational education 
services to limited English proficient students. 

E. Recommendations 



The Bilingual Vocation 
been fully adapted or 
administrative procedu 
should be forthcoming 
successful implementat 
be taken to appoint a 
HHORC. In addition, s 
the services of aides 
occupational programs 
need exists. 



al Education Policy has not 
implemented. Appropriate 
res and policy directives 
in order to ensure its 
ion. Immediate action must 
Cambodian aide to the 
teps must be taken to provide 
to other vocational/ 
throughout the city where the 



The need for additional bilingual counselors 
continues to be a major concern. Appropriate 
action must be taken to appoint additional 
bilingual counselors in order to improve and 
provide adequate counseling services to limited 
English proficient students enrolled in 
vocational/occupational education programs. 

Docummentation 



Appendix IV-1 On-site Monitoring 

Questionnaire Summary 



Appendix IV-2 



March 13 Memorandum-Bilingual 
Vocational Education 
Coordinator 



Appendix IV-3 



Limited English proficient 
students enrollment in 
vocational/occupational 
programs citywide. 



-568- 



BILINGUAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 
INSTRUMENT SUMMARY CHART 



Appendix IV-1 



April, 1984 



1. Are there written procedures to encourage 

LEP students to enroll in voc/occ ed programs? 

2. What is total number of LEP students enrolled 
in voc/occ ed programs? 

3. Are native language aides available for LEP 
students enrolled in these programs? 

4. Is there an adequate number of aides available 
to LEP students enrolled in voc/occ ed programs? 

5. Is instruction conducted in native language of 
LEP students? 

6. Are curriculum and. instructional support 
materials available in native language of LEP 
students? 

7. Are native language guidance/counseling services 
available to LEP students? 

Are these services adequate? 

8. Does coordination exist between voc/occ ed 
instructors and the Bilingual Education Depart- 
ment? 

9. Is Bilingual Voc. Ed. Policy being implemented 
at this school? 




-569- 



-iCOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



C. '! ! 



: — J 







BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Hubs" H Humclrev Occupational Resource Center 

Bilingual Serv ces 



TOMASA COUVERTHlEi 
B'lingual Coordinator 



MEMORANDUM TO: Raffael DeGruttola 



FROM: 



Tomasa Couvethier 






i .-^^ 



i") 



ur 4tftj£ iLK. Hi sja 

~* I i J a a, 



RE: Coordination between City-Wide Bilingual Programs 
and Bilingual Vocational Education Services. 

DATE: March 13, 1984 

As we had agreed in our March 2, 1984 meeting, 
pertaining to the State Audit for Bilingual Programs 
and Bilingual Vocational/Occupational Education Ser- 
vices; please read the following importantpoints of 
information discussed. 

Bilingual Aides 

.State Audit Findings;" In more than 90%of classes 
monitored, bilingual aides are not available within 
the vocational/occupational educationclasses" (Finding- 
C,Page 401;ocational/Occupational Education) 

Actions to be taken; n. 

1. Coordination of city-wide bilingual aides service. 

2. Recruitment of Volunteers. 
Activities 

1-a. In school bilingual aides coordination; biligual 
aides assigned to high/middle schools will be i n 
occupational education classes. 

1-b. City-wide bilingual aides rotation; to work in 

vocational/occupational classes with large numbers 
of LEP students. Theywill be assigned by districts 
/language (modality used in the assignment of 
bilingual field coordinators) . 



/a ?.EW DUDlFV STREET, aoSTQN. MASSACHUSETTS 02110 • (61 7| 442-5200 



-570- 



.^affael De Gruttola 2 Appendix IV-2 



Madison Park High and Mc Cormack Middle will be used as 
school models for the above-mentioned coordination. 
Bilingual aides at both schools rotate with a focus on 
helping LEP Students. 

2-a. Letters to colleges/universities and community based 

organizations; to permit of coordination with interships 
and community support programs. 

2-b. Adults who are participating in the Vocational ESL classes will 
volunteer time in different vocational/occupational programs 
city-wide. (the internship modality). This participation will 
take place after completion of program with good understanding 
and oral skills of the English . 

Bilingual Translations 

State Audit Recommendation: Native language instructional materials for 
the program areas in which large numbers of LEP students are enrolled 
be developed /adapted/commecrcially bought to be used by the vocational 
occupational education programs." (V-E,Page 353, on the Bilingual Education) 

Actions to be taken: Adaptations/translations of materials and/or informa- 
tion to LEP students and parents will be submitted to the Bilingual Depart- 
ment (Central Office) by the Bilingual Vocational /Occupational Services 
from Education and Employment under the following circumstances only: 

l.If there is a lack of a translator for a particular native language at the 
vocational /occupational program and/or the Department of Education and 
Employmeiit (Biim;jual Support Services \ . 

2. Lack of adapting . skills by bilinguals in voc./occ. programs who speak a 
particular native language. 

3. Lack of funds. 



Translations guidelines listed in the Superintendent Memorandum #104 will be 
Followed. 

Bilingual Counselors 

State Audit Recommendation: Bilingual counselors, speaking the appropriate 
targeted native language, be assigned to those voc./occ. programs in wich 
LEP students are enrolled (especially at the HHHORC) ." (V-C, Page 353, of 
the Bilingual Education) 

Actions to be taken: Coordination with resources available. 

l.A site visit schedule for bilingual counselors with or without bilingual 
students at the Humphrey Center, will be developed. 



-571- 



Raffael De Gruttola 3 Appendix IV-2 



2. A process for documenting site visits to the Humphrey Center by 
the bilingual counselors will be developed. 

3 .Universities with counseling internships will be contacted. 
Other agreements 

Bilingual counselors and bilingual aides will be included in the 
training/workshops for 1984-85 school year on Vocational ESL and 
any other vocational/occupational education issues. 

The Bilingual Vocational Coordinator will set .up an agenda and dates 
to meet with bilingual counselors in June and September. 

The Bilingual Vocational Coordinator will participate in the Training 
Committee Meetings. 

As discussed and agreed copies of the above-mentioned coordination of 
bilingual services will be desseminated to bilingual Department Heads, 
Bilingual Coordinators, Director of Education and Employment and Chair- 
person of the Bilingual Training Committee. 

Earticipants of Activities and actions to be taken: Who is responsible of what 
Bilingual Aides 

Activity _- Department Responsible 

1_a ^ Bilingual Department- Central Office 

1-b Bilingual Vocational Services - Education &Employn 

' 2 ~ a Both Departments 

2-b Bilingual Voc. Services- Education & Employment 

Bilingual Translations 

The actions to be taken are very clear by whom. 
Bilingual Counselors 

Actions to be taken Department Responsible 

Combined efforts by both departments 
Bilingual Voc. Services- Ed.& Employmt. 
Combined efforts by both departments 



#1 
#2 
#3 



cc: Jim Caradonio 

Bilingual Coordinators 
Bilingual Department Heads 
Peter Plattes 



-572- 



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-574- 



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-577- 



Out-of-School Youth, Ages 16-21 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The goal of the monitoring activities is to 
assess the provisions for services for out-of- 
school youth, ages 16-21. 

What is the nature and scope of services 
being provided by the responsible agency? 
Are these services being coordinated with 
the Boston Public Schools? 

B. Methodology 

The monitoring method consisted of the review of 
Public Law 94-300, the Job Training Partnership 
Act and the Fiscal Year 1984 Annual Training 
Plan and Operational Guide developed by the City 
. of Boston and the Boston Private Industry Council 
to implement the provisions of this 
legislation. In addition, interviews were 
conducted with the Deputy Director and Education 
Liaison of the local Services Delivery Area 
Agency, the Neighborhood Development and 
Employment Agency. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance : 

First Reporting Period: full compliance 

Second Reporting Period: full compliance 

Current Reporting Period: full compliance 

The Unified Plan requires the City of Boston to 
provide services to out-of-school youth, ages 16- 
21, based upon the 1975 legislative provisions of 
the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act 
(CETA). That body of legislation has evolved 
into the present day Job Training Partnership Act 
(JTPA) which consists of a different set of 
initiatives . 



-578- 



Provisions for services to the out-of-school 
youth population also are contained within the 
JTPA legislation. 

The Fiscal Year 1984 Job Training Plan and 
Operational Guide for the City of Boston 
delineate the network of service delivery to out- 
of-school youth that is being implemented through 
the joint efforts of the Neighborhood Development 
and Employment Agency and the Boston Private 
Industry Council. These documents were submitted 
and approved by the Massachusetts Office of 
Economic Affairs. 

The analysis of these data indicates that the 
City of Boston provides a wide range of services 
to out-of-school youth. These program efforts 
are specifically designed to meet the education 
and employment needs of out-of-school youth. The 
inventory of this vast number of programs 
indicates that a comprehensive system of services 
Includes outreach and assessment, remedial and 
basic skills instruction, job readiness, skills 
training, career and individual counseling, and 
job placement. 

Many of the programs are designed as alternative 
education programs linked with the Boston Public 
Schools, and lead to credit toward a high school 
diploma and entrance into skills training. 

The participants in these programs include a wide 
range of racial and linguistic youth such as 
Asian, Black, White, Hispanic and other 
minority. These services are provided through a 
contracting process, by a number of non-profit, 
public and private organizations throughout the 
City of Boston. 

In addition to the programs that are specifically 
geared to the needs of out-of-school youth, ages 
16-21, youth that are 18 years and older also 
have access to and are receiving education, 
training and employment services available 
through the many adult programs. With this 
expanded capability, it is expected that in 
excess of 1,000 out-of-school youth will be 
served this fiscal year. 



-579- 



D. Commendations 

The City of Boston, under the auspices of the 
Neighborhood Development and Employment Agency in 
partnership with the Boston Private Industry 
Council, continues to direct its resources to 
meet the identified needs of out-of-school 
youth. This challenge is being responded to with 
creative initiatives and strategies, and is 
facilitated by a coordinated method of service 
delivery. 

E. Recommendations 

Systematic and planned coordination of resources 
of the Boston Public Schools and the Service 
Delivery Area Agency should be strengthened to 
expand the capacity to serve out-of-school youth, 
ages 16-21, in the City of Boston. 

F. Documentation 

Public Law 97-300, the Job Training Partnership 
Act (on file) 



Job Training Plan for the City 


of Boston, 


Fiscal 


Year 1984 (on file) 






Operational Guide for the City 


of Boston, 


Fiscal 



Year 1984 (on file) 



-580- 



VI Vocational/Occupational Education for Special Needs 
Students 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to determine 
if vocational and occupational education program 
services for special needs students are 
maintained, and to assess vocational/ 
occupational instructor training in understanding 
and working with special needs students. 

Does Boston continue to provide vocational 
education program services to this target 
population? What action has been taken to 
provide vocational/occupational education 
in-service training in instructing students 
with special needs? 

B. Methodology 

The methodology for monitoring this objective 
included a desk review of vocational/ 
occupational program offerings and a review of 
data on staff development activities for Boston 
Public Schools' vocational/occupational programs 
for the 1983-1984 school year. 

C. Findings 

First Reporting Period: full compliance 

Second Reporting Period: full compliance 

Current Reporting Period: full compliance 

The findings of previous reports to the Court 
determined that Boston has made significant 
achievements in instituting and providing a 
comprehensive system for the delivery of 
vocational/occupational education services to 
special needs students, exceeding the 
requirements set forth in the Unified Plan. A 
review of current program offerings indicates 
that Boston continues to provide this 
comprehensive range of vocational/occupational 
education services. Program planning and 
development activities indicate that these 
services are being expanded. 



-581- 



The need to provide in-service training on 
strategies for instruction of special needs 
students enrolled in vocational/occupational 
education programs city-wide continues to be an 
outstanding concern. A review of the data 
submitted by Boston indicates that staff 
development activities have not been devoted to 
this area. 

D. Commendations 



Boston is to be commended for directing its 
resources toward developing and instituting a 
number of laudable vocational/occupational 
education programs for special needs students. 
The most notably acclaimed programs include the 
Special Needs Assessment Program at the HHORC, a 
variety of vocational/occupational education 
programs at the Jackson Mann and McKinley 
Schools, and the Occupational Services 
Development Centers at Charlestown, Dorchester 
and Hyde Park High Schools, some of which have 
received national recognition as model programs. 

E. Recommendations 

In-service training on strategies for instruction 
of special needs students enrolled in 
vocational/occupational education programs should 
be incorporated into a comprehensive staff 
development plan for vocational/occupational 
educators in Boston. There are a number of 
resources that could assist in facilitating this 
effort. Making It Work - An In-service Program 
for Vocational Educators contains a reference 
guide for designing and conducting staff training 
on strategies for instructing special needs 
students. This in-service program has been 
developed for the Division of Occupational 
Education and has been disseminated to Boston and 
other school systems throughout the state. This 
program should be considered for its usefulness 
in preparing and delivering training to address 
this identified need. Additional technical 
assistance is available from the Division of 
Occupational Education. 



-582- 






F. Documentation 

Profile of vocational and occupational program 
services (on file) 

Mid-Year Report of Staff Development Activities, 
1983-1984 (on file) 



-583- 



VII Program Changes and Deletions 

A. Monitoring Objectives and Key Questions 

The primary monitoring objective is to ascertain 
what action is being taken by Boston to complete 
all program transfers as specified by the Unified 
Plan. 

What steps is Boston taking to complete the 
transfers of the Upholstery and Cabinet 
Making programs at Dorchester High and the 
Machinist program at East Boston High to the 
HHORC? 

B. Methodology 

The methodology used involved (1) a review of the 
April 6, 1984 written response to the Boston 
School Desegregation Report No. 2 from the 
Director, Education and Employment, (2)a review of 
Boston Student Assignment Information 1984-1985 , 
and (3) a follow-up meeting on April 10, 1984 with 
the Director. 

C. Findings 

Status of Compliance 

First Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Second Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Current Reporting Period: partial compliance 

Previous reports to the Court indicated that, as 
required by the Unified Plan, the vocational 
programs formerly at Boston Trade High and the 
Pilot Occupational Resource Center were phased 
into the HHORC. The Horticultural/Animal 
Husbandry program at Jamaica Plain High also was 
transferred into the Agri-Business and Natural 
Resource program at West Roxbury High. 

Instead of transferring the Furniture Finishing 
program at Dorchester High to the HHORC, it was 
closed. The Cabinet Making (Architectural 



-581- 



Woodworking ) and Upholstery (Interior Design) 
programs at the same school still remain in the 
present site. The Machinist program at East 
Boston High is being phased out, not transferred 
to the HHORC. Boston has repeatedly indicated 
that those required program changes