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Full text of "Report no. 4 to the United States District Court, District of Massachusetts on Boston school desegregation"

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BOSTOTSI 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




^vLotC 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



BOSTON PUBUC UBRARY 
GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

MAR 1 4 1985 



REPORT NO. 4 

TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT. 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME I 
FEBRUARY 1, 1985 




tat.. 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Mr. James R. Grande, Hanover, Chairperson 
Mrs. Mary C. Wright, Falmouth, Vice Chairperson 

Mr. Robert A. Farmer, Brookline 

Mrs. Anne C. Fox, Needham 

Rev. Paul V. Garrity, Maiden 

Ms. Milca R. Gonzalez, Worcester 

Mr. Howard A. Greis, Holden 

Mr. Gregory G. Nadeau, Marblehead 

Mrs. Loretta L. Roach, Boston 

Mr. Joseph C. Savery, Lee 

Ms. Mary Ellen Smith, Boston 

Mrs. Dorothea A. Zanetti, Wilbraham 



Dr. John H. Lawson, Commissioner o/ Educaf ion. Secretory 
Mr. John B. Duff, Chancellor, Board of Regents, Ex Officio 



Report Coordinated by- 
Franklin Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on 
Boston Desegregation 



Joel Lidz, Editing, Proofreading 



Produced by the Bureau of Operational Support 

Cecilia DiBella, Director 

Susan Gardner, Publications/Communications Coordinator 

Susan M. Ridge, Typographist 

Word Processing by— 
Kathy LeBlanc, Kathy Keenan 



1 



TheMassachusettsDepartment of Education insuresequalemployrneiM,;uui.<iiiundiuppuriunitiesaiiumanve action regardlessof race color creed n2 
ongin or sex. in compliance with Title IX, or handicap, in compliance with section 504. • • -■ 

PUBUCATION OF THIS DOCUMENT APPROVED BY DANIEL D. CARTER. STATE PURCHASING AGENT. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



REPORT NO. 4 

TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME I 




BOSTON 

PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 







<-* ; / • ^ 



inQ 



y. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page No. 
OVERVIEW 1 

I. MONITORING REPORTS 

Student Assignments 7 

Special Desegregation Measures ...15 

Bilingual Education 21 

Vocational and Occupational Education 25 

School Facilities 29 

Staff 31 

Transportation 33 

Safety and Security 35 

Student Discipline 37 

Parent and Student Organizations 39 

II . DISPUTE RESOLUTIONS 43 

III. MODIFICATIONS 45 



OVERVIEW 



This is the Fourth Monitoring Report on Boston Public 
School Desegregation filed by the Massachusetts Board of 
Education and Commissioner of Education under the Orders of 
Disengagement entered by Federal District Court Judge W. 
Arthur Garrity, Jr. on December 23, 1982. The report covers 
Boston Public School operations from June 1984 through 
November 1984, and is based upon data collected by 
Massachusetts Department of Education monitors during this 
period. As in the past, our data collection efforts have 
been aided by the cooperation of Boston School Department 
staff at the Central, Community District and individual 
school level. 

The format of the present report, which at first view 
is similar to that used in our three previous documents, 
reflects refinements intended to provide greater clarity and 
focus. As in the past, the report is presented in two 
volumes. Volume I contains an executive summary of findings 
in each of the 10 monitoring areas (the Board and 
Commissioner of Education were relieved of monitoring 
responsibilities in the areas of Special Education and 
Institutional Pairings in the Court's Order on Partial 
Termination of Jurisdiction, dated October 31, 1984) , and is 
again intended to receive wide distribution. Volume II 
contains more detailed analysis of the findings, plus all 
supporting documentation. Page references in Volume I again 
direct the reader to the supporting materials in Volume II; 
and despite the more limited distribution of Volume II, a 
copy will again be made available for every elementary, 
middle and high school in Boston. 

Within each volume, and particularly within Volume I, 
our narrative approach has been modified. Descriptions of 
monitoring objectives and procedures, which were contained 
in each of the previous reports, have been eliminated. This 
allows for a greater emphasis upon compliance with the 
specific Court orders identified at Appendix I of the 1982 
Orders of Disengagement. We have also sought to focus our 
findings and identify the remedial status of each order or 



- 1 - 



set of orders by indicating where Compliance, Partial 
Compliance or Non-Compliance has been found, and in some 
instances by indicating whether current findings represent 
positive or negative trends. 

These revisions in format have been introduced in 
recognition that the first phase of the "transitional course 
of disengagement" identified in the Court's 1982 Orders has 
been completed. Section IX (B) of those Orders allows for 
the filing of motions "(a)t any time after January 1, 1985" 
so that the Court may determine "whether further judicial 
withdrawal is appropriate." The Court's comments of 
October 26, 1984, indicating its intent to have final orders 
in place by the end of the current school year, reinforce 
the need to direct current efforts toward those remedial 
orders which remain to be addressed, and to identify those 
areas in which remedial efforts have been satisfactory. 

We therefore have chosen to provide a summary of our 
monitoring findings in each of the ten areas, rather than 
focusing on more specific concerns as was the case in 
previous overviews. The reader will note, however, that 
reference to specific problems is included below. The 
critical monitoring issues identified in prior reports are 
identified with an asterisk (*) . 



STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS: Compliance with racial/ethnic 
guidelines continues to be mixed. Improvements have 
occurred in several specific schools (Burke, Dorchester and 
English High School, King Middle School), as well as in a 
few of the vocational clusters at the Humphrey Center. At 
the same time, the effect of Examination School admissions 
creates non-compliance with Middle School guidelines for 
White students; elementary school non-compliance problems 
are centered in Districts IV and VI; and enrollments 
continue to drop in citywide vocational education 
programs. * The Extended Day Kindergarten component of the 
assignment process remains popular, although specific 
instances of overenrollment and underenrollment are cited. 

SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES: The degree to which 
special measures have been implemented at schools 
specifically identified in either Court orders or voluntary 
agreements remains inconsistent. Several schools in which 
special measures were undertaken are now in compliance with 
racial/ethnic guidelines: Charlestown and Dorchester high 



_ o _ 



schools; the Lee, Pauline Shaw and Tobin elementary 
schools. Improvements are also noted at Burke High 
School. Improvement of support services for Black and 
Hispanic students at the Examination Schools has been 
undertaken at the school level and in the Advanced Work 
Classes/Academically Talented Sections program; these 
efforts must be maintained and expanded. * 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION: Compliance has been obtained in 
the screening and assignment of bilingual students, the 
provision of bilingual Extended Day Kindergartens, and the 
clustering of students in order to provide sufficient 
numbers for bilingual programs. Major problems remain in 
these areas: the provision of vocational education programs 
to bilingual students, the mainstreaming of bilingual 
students through in-school transfers, and the delivery of 
services and appropriate staffing for certain linguistic 
groups. * 

VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION: Despite specific 
examples of compliance (programs for special needs students, 
industry and community involvement) , major problems continue 
to exist in the provision of exploratory programs, guidance, 
bilingual services, and management support. The State 
Board, through the Commissioner and Associate Commissioner 
for Occupational Education, has initiated discussions with 
Superintendent Spillane and his staff on the subject of 
proposed modifications to the Unified Plan for Vocational 
and Occupational Education. The Board intends to file its 
proposed modifications, in accordance with Section VI of the 
Orders of Disengagement, shortly after the filing of this 
Monitoring Report. * 

FACILITIES: Discussions among representatives of the 
City of Boston, the Boston School Committee, and the State 
Board have been held during the fall of 1984. While 
completion of a Unified Facilities Plan had not taken place 
by the Court's deadline of December 20, significant progress 
had been made in identifying construction, renovation and 
repair needs, and discussions among the joint planners 
continue. * 

STAFF: A modification of the Orders for screening and 
rating of administrators was adopted by the Court on 
November 26, 1984. * This new process is intended to 
eliminate the large number of acting administrative 
appointments identified in previous monitoring reports. 



- 3 - 



While there have been increases in the proportion of other 
minority teachers and administrators within the system, the 
percentage of Black teachers has declined. 

TRANSPORTATION: No evidence has appeared to date to 
indicate that previously identified problems of 
contractor/driver accountability and complaint management 
have been brought under control. 

SAFETY AND SECURITY: Current safety issues are only 
marginally related to specific Court orders entered at the 
beginning of the remedial phase of this case. A new plan 
for transportation safety has been implemented, although it 
is too early to draw conclusions regarding its 
effectiveness. * 

STODENT DISCIPLINE: Total student suspensions have 
decreased throughout the system, but the disproportionate 
number of Black suspensions remains. While some schools 
have taken steps to alleviate discipline problems, other 
initiatives have yet to be funded, and the implementation of 
a new promotion policy may raise additional discipline 
issues. 

PARENT & STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS The low level of parent 
participation at the school level, and the fragmented parent 
monitoring efforts that flow from this situation, 
continue. While racially representative student councils 
function in every middle and high school, there has been 
neither compliance with Orders regarding Racial Ethnic 
Student Councils nor the proposal of an alternative approach 
within the context of the modification process. 



The above findings are discussed in greater detail in 
the individual sections of this volume, and are supported by 
the additional analysis and data contained in Volume II. 
These were developed under time constraints that were often 
severe, given the production schedule of this report. Where 
possible, data collection had to be completed by mid- 
November, although exceptions were made where more time was 
required in order to obtain accurate data. The pace of 
discussion surrounding various modification proposals and 
the Unified Facilities Plan has also made our task 
difficult, and while we have endeavored to update our data 
through early January, unavoidable inconsistencies may arise 
between the date this Report is printed and the date it is 
filed. 



- 4 - 



Notwithstanding these constraints, we believe the 
present Monitoring Report contains the information necessary 
to weigh proposals for further disengagement. In some 
cases, these proposals should call for the narrowing of the 
monitoring focus, rather than for complete disengagement. 
The State Board believes such reduced monitoring is 
appropriate in the areas of Bilingual Education, Safety and 
Security and Student Discipline, and is filing a motion in 
this regard concurrently with this Fourth Monitoring Report. 



James R. Grande John H. Lawson 

Chairperson, Massachusetts Commissioner, Massachusetts 
Board of Education Board of Education 



- 5 - 



- 6 - 



STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 



I. COMMUNITY DISTRICT SCHOOLS (DISTRICTS I-VIII) 

ORDER Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975, 
esp. pp. 71-74, as amended, with particular 
reference to amendment of March 24, 1982. 

FINDINGS 

A. HIGH SCHOOLS (Grades 9-12) Partial Compliance (Improved) 

(pp. 6-7) 

The eight community district high schools 
met assignment guidelines, with the 
following exceptions: 

1. East Boston High School was above the 
range for Black students, due to the 
presence of the Business Magnet 
program. This is a permissible 
exception under Court orders. (p. 21) 

2. Burke High School is one percentage 
point below the range for White 
students. This, however, represents an 
improvement over last fall. Note also 
that Brighton, Jamaica Plain and South 
Boston High Schools, which were below 
the permitted White enrollment range 
last fall, are now in compliance, 
(p. 22) 

3. Jamaica Plain and South Boston High 
Schools are above the range for other 
minority students, by one and eight 
percentage points respectively; and 
East Boston High School is below the 
other minority range by two percentage 
points. Each of these instances 
results from the clustering of 
bilingual students. (p. 23) 



- 7 - 



B. MIDDLE SCHOOLS (Grades 6-8) Non-Compliance (Justified) 

Fewer of the 20 district middle schools meet 
permitted ranges, due in large measure to 
the impact of Boston Latin School and Latin 
Academy. Admission of white seventh graders 
to these examination schools creates a 
situation in which some districts are 
inevitably out of compliance, since 
permitted ranges are calculated on the basis 
of students living within the geographic 
district but attending schools anywhere 
within the city. No district middle schools 
are too high in white students. (p. 6, 29) 

1. The Lewenberg (District III) and the 
Dearborn (VI ) are above the range for 
Black students, while the McCormack 
(VI) and the Cheverus (VIII) are below 
the range. Only in the case of the 
McCormack is noncompliance created by 
bilingual clustering. (p. 28) 

2. Nine middle schools fall below the 
permitted range for white enrollment: 
the Curley and Roosevelt (II), the 
Lewenberg and Shaw (III), the Thompson 
(IV), the Cleveland (V), the Dearborn 
(VI), and the Michaelangelo and Timilty 
(VII). Bilingual clustering is a 
factor in only one of these cases, the 
Curley. (p. 29) 

3. While a majority of middle schools fall 
outside the permitted range for other 
minority students (five are too high, 
seven are too low), bilingual 
clustering explains this result in 
every case except that of the Lewis 
(II), and that school is only one 
percentage point below the permitted 
range. (p. 30) 

C. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (Grades 1-5) Partial Compliance 

Compliance data for a number of the 62 
district elementary schools are influenced 
by the clustering of bilingual students. 
Additional compliance problems, unrelated to 
bilingual clustering, are concentrated in 
Districts IV and VI. (pp. 35-40) 



- 8 - 



1. The Roosevelt (IV) is below the 
permitted range for Black students, 
while the Tynan and Winthrop (VI) are 
above the Black student range. Of 
these last two, the Tynan is located in 
a White neighborhood. (pp. 35-36) 

2. Seven district elementary schools 
exceed the permitted range for White 
students: the Channing, Conley, Grew, 
Hemenway and Roosevelt (IV), and the 
Perkins and Perry (VI) The Conley is 
only one percentage point above the 
permitted range. White enrollments 
fall below the permitted range at the 
Chittick and Taylor (IV) and the 
Emerson and Russell (VI). The Chittick 
shows improvement in this monitoring 
period, however, and the Russell is 
only one percentage point below the 
permitted range. (pp. 37-38) 

II. MAGNET SCHOOLS (DISTRICT IX) 

ORDER Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975, 
pp. 74-76 

A. HIGH SCHOOLS Partial Compliance 

Boston High School and Copley Square High 
School satisfy racial/ethnic guidelines in 

all three categories. The high school 

component of the Umana is two percentage 

points below the range for other minority 

students, a result of the clustering of 

bilingual programs at other magnet high 
schools. 

English High School has realized marked 
improvement in compliance with racial/ethnic 
guidelines. The school is currently only 
one percentage point below the permitted 
White range, and one percentage point above 
the permitted other minority range (the 
latter result is explained by clustering 
bilingual students at English). 

Madison Park, on the other hand, has fallen 
out of compliance in all categories. Black 
and other minority enrollments are two and 



- 9 - 



one percentage point high respectively, due 
in part to a large Cape Verdean bilingual 
program. White enrollment is two percentage 
point below the permitted range. (pp. 8-9, 
21-23) 

(For analysis of vocational/occupational 
education assignments, see III below. 



B. MIDDLE SCHOOLS Partial Compliance 



All four magnet middle schools satisfy 
racial/ethnic guidelines for White and other 
minority students. The Wheatley and the 
middle school component of the Umana are 
three and two percentage points above the 
Black range respectively. Middle school 
results reflect improvement at the King 
Middle School, which was out of compliance 
in Black and White enrollments last year, 
(pp. 8-9, 28-30) 



C. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Partial Compliance 

With the exception of the Hernandez School, 
which operates a bilingual program with up 
to 65% Hispanic students under the Court's 
remedial plan, all magnet elementary schools 
meet citywide guidelines for White 
enrollments. Bilingual clustering explains 
failure to meet Black and other minority 
guidelines at the Curley, Haley and Trotter 
(low other minority); the Guild, Hale and 
McKay (high Black, low other minority); and 
the Hennigan and Jackson/Mann (low Black, 
high other minority). The Ohrenberger 
satisfies racial/ethnic guidelines in all 
three categories. (pp. 8-9, 35-40) 

II. CITYWIDE VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

ORDER Unified Plan for Occupational and Vocational 
Education, September 8, 1975, as amended, 
pp. 15-47 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



- 10 - 



A. ENROLLMENTS 



A major decline in vocational/occupational 
education enrollments, common to all 
programs and all racial/ethnic categories, 
has occurred this fall. There has been a 
20% decrease in skills training program 
enrollment at the Humphrey Center, a 10% 
decrease in citywide magnet vocational 
enrollments, and a 45% drop in ninth grade 
exploratory enrollments. (pp. 9-11, 54-66) 

Shortfalls are also revealed when comparing 
spring assignments to fall enrollments. 
Eighteen programs attracted fewer than 80% 
of assigned White students, and 19 programs 
attracted fewer than 80% of assigned other 
minority students. While 26 programs did 
enroll more students overall than were 
originally assigned, 14 of these instances 
increased overrepresentation of a 
racial/ethnic group. 



B. DESEGREGATION 



C. SEX EQUITY 



Applying court-ordered guidelines (derived 
from citywide enrollments, plus or minus 
5%), only two programs at the Humphrey 
Center complied in all three racial/ethnic 
categories: Welding Laboratory and Nursing 
Assistant. Four additional programs 
(Automotive/Truck, Cosmetology, Data 
Processing and Cabinetmaking) satisfied 
guidelines for both Black and White 
Students, and Word Processing satisfied 
guidelines for White and other minority 
students. Each of the magnet vocational 
programs located in district high schools 
was out of compliance in two or more 
raeial/ethnic categories. (pp. 11-13) 



Ten of the Humphrey Center programs satisfy 
the guidelines for male/female enrollments, 
compared to only six programs last year, 
(pp. 13-14) 



- 11 - 



IV. EXTENDED DAY KINDERGARTENS 

ORDER Memorandum and Order as to Kindergarten 
Desegregation, August 12, 1977 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

The extended day kindergarten option remains 
extremely popular among all racial/ethnic 
groups. In most instances parent 
preferences have been satisfied; but 15 
programs drew an excess of White applicants, 
four attracted an excess of Black 
applicants, and one an excess of other 
minority applicants. There has not been a 
concerted effort to direct families to 
under subscribed programs, and a few 
instances of overenrollment (of White 
students at the Eliot (VII) and Guild 
(VIII)) and underenrollment (of Black 
students at the Mozart (III) and Prescott 
(VII), and White students at the Hennigan, 
Mason, and especially the Lee (III)) remain. 

Boston remains unable to capitalize on the 
popularity of extended day kindergarten 
programs because of the need to reassign 
students at the first grade level. (pp.l5- 
17, 67-70) 



CONCLUS I ONS/ RECOMMENDAT I ONS 



Given the constraints of White middle school 
enrollments and bilingual clustering 
identified above, Boston has demonstrated 
general compliance with orders regarding 
assignment of students to community and 
citywide district schools. Specific efforts 
in this regard deserve commendation: these 
include the progress made at Burke and 
English High Schools and the King Middle 
School; the steady improvement in 
eliminating racially identifiable schools at 
the elementary level; and the maintenance of 
successful extended day kindergarten 
options. Further attention is required in 
order to improve compliance, as regards both 
specific schools (Madison Park High, 
Hennigan and Jackson/Mann Elementary 
Schools) and more general problem areas 



- 12 - 



(including the need to encourage alternative 
assignments for White students in the 
conununity districts, including extended day 
kindergarten options). 

The substantial enrollment decline in 
vocational/occupational education programs 
due to a lack of student interest in program 
offerings presents a serious problem. 
Regarding assignments of those students who 
do choose to enroll in these programs, there 
has been a limited amount of improvement in 
compliance with assignment guidelines and 
the reduction of sex-identifiable programs; 
however, noncompliance in these areas 
remains substantial, and Boston has yet to 
address the situation with intensive 
outreach and recruitment strategies. 

In a broader sense, the results of student 
assignment monitoring raise questions 
regarding whether the present student 
assignment system produces the desired level 
of desegregation in Boston. Part of the 
problem lies in specific assignment orders; 
the need to reassign a majority of 
kindergarten students into different schools 
for first grade is clearly counterproductive 
and should be replaced under any revised 
student assignment orders. 

Beyond such specifics, the overall approach 
to student assignments contained in the 
present orders should be reconsidered. 
Under the present approach, in which 
compliance is defined against the number of 
students in each racial/ethnic category 
attending school from separate districts, 
schools may be in full compliance with the 
enrollment ranges permitted by the Court 
without achieving meaningful integration. 
This situation will be exacerbated should 
White enrollments in the districts continue 
to decline (as is currently projected). If 
White percentages plunge to single digits, 
the notion of "compliance" may have little 
relationship to generally accepted ideas 
regarding "desegregation." 



- 13 - 



- 14 - 



SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 



ORDERS 



Orders of May 3, 1976; 
March 21, 1978. 



May 6, 1977; 



20 schools designated by the Court for 
special efforts to achieve desegregation 
compliance: 



Middle 

R.G. Shaw 
Thompson 



High 

East Boston 

Boston Latin School 

Boston Latin Academy 

Boston Technical 

Burke 

Dorchester 

Charlestown 



r 



Elementary 

Ellis 

Lee 

Bradford (closed) 

Hale (magnet) 

P. A. Shaw 

Emerson 

Tuckerman (closed) 

Guild (magnet) 

Hennigan (magnet) 

McKay (magnet) 

Tobin 

I . District Elementary, Middle, and High Schools 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Elementary and Middle 

The magnet elementary schools are discussed 
in, the Student Assignment Report. In 
general. Report Nos • 2 and 3 concluded that, 
other than at the Tobin, few concerted 
efforts have been made to attract and 
maintain White students needed for 
compliance at these elementary and middle 
schools. (pp. 74-75) 



- 15 - 



School 



1) Tobin 



2) Pauline Shaw 



3) Lee 



Special 


Desegreqation 


Efforts 



-restructured K-8 
-better compliance 

in 6-8 than K-5 
-no preference 

shown for in- 

school 5th 

graders for 6-8 
seats over other 
5th graders in 
district 

-word-of -mouth 
reports among 
parents 

-some unique 
programs 



4) 


Ellis 


None 


5) 


Emerson 


None 




R.G. Shaw 
Middle 


None 




Thompson 
Middle 


None 



Compliance Status 



Compliance 



(pp. 74-75) 



Compliance (pp. 74-75) 

Compliance " 

Non-compliance " 
Non-compliance " 
Non-compliance " 

Non-compliance " 



Some recent efforts at the Central Office and District levels to 
improve compliance at some of these schools by using Chapter 636 
funds have not yet resulted in improvement. 



- 16 - 



High Schools 



School 



1. Dorchester 



2) Burke 



3) East Boston 



4) Charlestown 



Special 
Desegregation 
Efforts 

facilities 

improvements 

completed 

new magnet 

vocational 

programs 

Safety 

improvements 

some program 

improvements 

some facilities 
improvement 
safety 

improvements 
some attention 
from school to 
improve Business 
management 
program. Central 
Office support 
needed 

improved 
enrollment and 
staffing of 
bilingual 
program as 
ordered 



Compliance Status 



Compliance 

(pp. 75-76, 86-87, 

92-93, 94-95) 



Partial compliance 
(pp. 75-77, 84-85, 
88-91) 



Partial compliance 
(pp.76, 124-152) 



Compliance 
(p. 76) 



CONCLUS IONS/ RECOMMENDAT IONS 



Dorchester and Burke - Commendation for 
significant improvement toward compliance. 
Facility improvements and program 
development at . the Burke needs to be 
completed. (p. 76) 

East Boston - Commendation for school- 
based improvement efforts, but Central 
Office support has not been forthcoming. 
(pp. 76-77) 



- 17 - 



Elementary and Middle Schools 

Recruitment and outreach efforts aimed at attracting 
geocoded students are needed, and these efforts should, 
in large measure, be school-based and be a priority use 
of Chapter 636 funds. Outreach should focus on a clear 
statement of the mission and educational offerings of 
each school. (pp. 74-75, 77) 



II. 



Examination Schools 



ORDERS Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975, 
pages 48-49 and Memorandum and Orders 
Modifying Desegregation Plan, May 3, 1976, 
page 18; March 21, 1978, page 6. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Monitors, primarily through interviews with 
administrators, other staff and students, 
have focused on the problem of high rates of 
non-promotion and non-retention of Black and 
Hispanic students at the two Latin 
Schools. (pp. 78-80) 

Monitors noted a recognition by school 
administrators that retention of Black and 
Hispanic students in all three examination 
schools was a real problem, and also noted 
attempts by them to address this problem. 
To date their efforts have been provisional, 
supported by "soft" funds, and without 
permanent allocation of funds and personnel 
to bring about improvements. (pp. 96-102, 
106-110, 115-123) 

Similarly, some efforts have been made to 
improve in the Advanced Work Classes/ 
Academically Talented Sections (AWC/ATS), 
but major improvements in the selection 
process and program implementation have not 
been approved at the Central Office level. 
Monitors have recommended improvements in 
this program (which is the primary source of 
those Boston Public School students who 
attend the examination schools) because of 
the relationship between poor preparation in 
AWC/ATS and lack of success at the 
examination schools. (pp.79, 103-105, 111- 
114) 



- 18 - 



CONCLUS IONS/ RECOMMENDAT IONS 



Administrators at the examination schools 
and the Director of the AWC/ATS are to be 
commended for planning and actually taking 
steps to improve support and other services 
to Black, Hispanic and other students. 
Boston needs to: (pp. 80-81) 

1. fully implement measures to improve the 
selection and preparation of AWC/ATS 
students so that their preparation is 
equivalent to that of non-public school 
students admitted to examination 
schools; 

2. institutionalize appropriate support 
services as regular and permanant budget 
items; 

3. institute a systematic interview process 
for students attempting to leave the 
examination schools, and use information 
gained from this to strengthen supports 
provided; 

4. recognize that the attitudes of some 
staff create problems for the retention 
of minority students, and make a firm 
commitment to solving this problem. 



- 19 - 



- 20 - 



BILINGUAL EDUCATION 



I. ORDER Student Desegregation Plan of May 10, 1975. 

This Order addressed six bilingual education 
areas. 

A. Kindergarten 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Bilingual kindergartens have been instituted 
in 22 schools where 20 or more bilingual 
kindergarten students attend. (pp.155, 163) 

B. Assignment Responsibility 

FINDINGS Compliance 

The Boston Public School Bilingual 
Department makes decisions to assign 
students, while program location decisions 
are made by the Department of 
Implementation. (p. 155) 

C. Orientation and Application Booklet 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Boston has prepared and distributed this 
booklet in all needed languages. (pp.156, 
167) 

D. Information and Guidance Center 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Bilingual Community Field Coordinators, 
located in district offices, provide 
bilingual information and guidance in all 
needed languages except Laotian. (pp. 156- 
157, 168) 



- 21 - 



Exceptions to Assignment Limitations 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Exceptions have been made to assignment 
limitations by race based on the need to 
assign bilingual students to appropriate 
programs. (p. 157) 

Individual Assignment to Appropriate Program Within 
District of Residence 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Bilingual students have been assigned to 
bilingual programs within their district of 
residence when possible. Some problems in 
service delivery exist among Hispanic middle 
and high school programs due to small 
program size and the consequent need to 
disperse bilingual counseling and other 
services among several schools. Problems 
still remain in the appropriate delivery of 
services and staffing for the Haitian 
program at English High School. (pp. 157- 
159, 169-170, 176-178, 179, 180) 



II. 



ORDER 



Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational 
Education in the City of Boston, 
September 8, 1975. 



FINDINGS Non-Compl i ance (Improvement Shown) 

See Vocational/Occupational Education 
Report, page 26. (pp. 187-190, 171-175) 



III 



ORDER 



Memorandum of May 6, 1977 



Screening and Classification of Bilingual Students 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Bilingual Master PAC and Boston Public 
Schools have agreed to include information 
leading to bilingual program assignment and 
Lau classification in interviews between 
local school staff and bilingual parents, 
eliminating the need for separate mailings 
providing such information. Bilingual 
parents sign off on all assignments made 
based on these classifications. (p. 159) 



- 22 - 



B. Program Transfers Within a School 

FINDINGS Non-Compliance (Improvement Shown) 

Boston still has not provided for the 
transfer of bilingual students to regular 
education programs in many schools, 
primarily because of crowded regular 
classrooms and lack of specific mechanisms 
to facilitate mainstreaming. Some schools 
have taken steps to address this problem 
through sister clustering (compatible 
scheduling between a regular education class 
and a bilingual class allowing mainstreaming 
to occur), and teacher training, 
(pp. 159-160) 



IV. 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Orders of March 21, 1978 
Modifying Desegregation Plan 



r 



Bilingual Extended Day Kindergartens 

FINDINGS Compliance 

12 Bilingual Extended Day Kindergartens have 
been instituted in Boston. (pp. 160-161, 
165) 

CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 

Boston is in compliance with all except two 
of the major Court orders relevant to 
bilingual education. The non-compliance 
issues in bilingual-vocational/occupational 
education are discussed in the Vocational 
and Occupational Education report. Non- 
compliance problems remaining in the area of 
transfers of students from bilingual to 
regular education programs (mainstreaming) 
can be addressed by: 

1. reducing regular education class size in 
schools housing bilingual programs; 

2. training staff ' in parallel scheduling 
and sister clustering; 

3. providing adequate ESL support in the 
regular education program; 

4. improving the effectiveness of language 
assessment teams; 



- 23 - 



5. increasing two-way bilingual schools j 
such as the Hernandez; | 

I 

6. educating bilingual parents on benefits | 
of mainstreaming. I 
(pp. 161-162) I 

I 
In addition, bilingual services to middle j 
and high school students are in need of ; 
improvement, in part through the i 
consolidation of some middle and high school ] 
clusters. 



- 24 - 



VOCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION 



ORDER Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational 
Education, September 8, 1975, and amended 
June 14, 1976 and January 28, 1978. 

FINDINGS 

A. RACIAL RATIOS AND ADMISSIONS CRITERIA 

Partial Compliance (pp. 9-15) 
(See Student Assignments Report) 

B. CORE PROGRAMS Partial Compliance 

Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

Efforts have been made to bring all of 
Boston's middle school exploratory programs 
into full compliance. Notable 
accomplishment has occurred particularly in 
the Business-Distribution-Government related 
cluster. The scheduling and instruction of 
the three exploratory clusters continue to 
vary among schools, and the student/ teacher 
ratio is inconsistent among schools. 
(pp.184) 

Middle School Career Guidance 

The status of supplemental career 
exploratory activities in Boston's middle 
schools continues to fluctuate and vary 
among schools and districts. Most middle 
schools discontinued or greatly reduced 
their career education programs when the 
priorities for Chapter 636 funding changed, 
indicating a lack of school commitment. 

A policy which outlines the career develop- 
ment goals for students from kindergarten 
through high school has finally been 
completed but is awaiting school committee 
approval. (p. 185) 



- 25 - 



High School Exploratory 

The only district high school that remains 
in partial compliance is W. Roxbury High 
where the Food-Home-Health Services Related 
Cluster is still not offered. (p. 186) 

High School Employability Clusters 

The employability cluster offerings in the 
ten district high schools continued to be in 
partial compliance with limited progress 
towards full compliance since the last 
reporting period. Non-compliance exists 
mainly in the Food-Home-Health-Services 
Related Cluster and in the Distributive- 
Marketing Cluster. Full compliance exists 
mainly in the Business-Office-Education 
Cluster. (p. 186-187) 



C. MAGNET PROGRAMS Partial Compliance 



Most of the requirements for magnet programs 
have been met; however, enrollment continues 
to fluctuate between 50% and 71% of total 
capacity. Each district, except Jamaica 
Plain High, has a city-wide magnet 
program. (p. 187) 



D. IN-SCHOOL BILINGUAL Non-compliance (Improvement shown) 



Native language bilingual vocational/ 
occupational programs are not provided by 
Boston as specified by the Unified Plan. 
All limited English-proficient students are 
mainstreamed into regular vocational/ 
occupational programs and provided with 
various instructional support services, 
(pp. 187-190) 



E. OUT OF SCHOOL YOUTH Compliance 



Boston has provided services to out of 
school youth. (pp. 190-191) 



- 26 - 



F. SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS Compliance 



Boston has provided services for special 
needs students and their teachers. (p. 191) 



G. PROGRAM CHANGES Partial Compliance 



Some incomplete program transfers as 
indicated in previous reports remain 
incomplete. (pp. 191-192) 



H. PROGRAM SUPPORT COMPONENTS: 

MANAGEMENT MODIFICATION Non-compliance 

Boston has not instituted a distinctive 
management structure for an effective 
vocational/occupational education. (p. 192) 

PUBLIC INFORMATION Partial Compliance 

A variety of public information campaign 
activities has failed to achieve the desired 
results. Some progress has been made in 
improving this situation. (p. 193) 

PROFESSIONAL AND IN-SERVICE DEVELOPMENT 
Partial Compliance 

Participation in staff development has been 
limited. (pp. 193-194) 

INDUSTRY/AGENCY COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Compliance 

(p. 194) 

CURRICULUM ACQUISITION/REVISION Non-compliance 

Only 20% of planned Competency Based 
Vocational Education curricula have been 
completed. Clear guidelines for usage of 
CBVE curricula have yet to be provided, 
(pp. 194-195) 

COMPREHENSIVE JOB DEVELOPMENT Partial Compliance 

Specific objectives for this program have 
not been established for student placement 
in trade and industry programs. Clerical 
and business positions have been most 
common. (pp. 195-197) 



- 27 - 



CONCLUS IONS/ RECOMMENDAT I ONS 



In general, Boston must either make the 
changes in the vocational and occupational 
education program necessary for full 
compliance with Court orders, or develop a 
specific proposal to modify those orders. 
Of particular concern are: appropriate 
career education programs at the middle 
schools; recruitment and enrollment of 
students in non-traditional programs; the 
development of effective bilingual/ 
vocational services; the development of an 
effective management structure; effective 
public information services; effective staff 
development; and completion of "Competency- 
Based Vocational Education" curricula, 
(pp. 197-201) 



- 28 - 



SCHOOL FACILITIES 



II. 



II 



IV. 



ORDER Interlocutory Order of June 21, 1974 
(prohibits construction of or changes to 
school facilities without Court approval). 

FINDINGS Compliance (p. 205) 

ORDER Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975, 
pp. 6-7 (limits size of student bodies in 
particular facilities and specifies which 
schools are to be closed). 

FINDINGS Compliance (p. 205) 

ORDER Memorandum and Orders Modifying Desegrega- 
tion Plan, May 6, 1977, pp. 37-40. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Boston has never developed a complete 
facilities plan as specified under these 
orders. A secondary school facilities plan 
has never been submitted. (pp.206, 218-307) 

ORDER Further Memorandum and Order as to Unified 
Facilities Plan, August 15, 1979. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

A School Committee approved list of schools 
to be closed, and a finalized list of 
projects anticipated for those schools which 
are to remain open, have not been 
presented. (pp. 206-207) 

ORDER Orders Relating to Unified Facilities 
Planning, March 21, 1980. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Joint planning from about 1981 was sporadic 
until commencement of monitoring by the 
Department of Education. (p. 207) 



- 29 - 



VI, 



VII 



VIII, 



ORDER 

FINDINGS 
ORDER 

FINDINGS 
ORDER 

FINDINGS 



IX. 



ORDER 



FINDINGS 



Supplemental Orders Relating to Unifiedi 
Facilities Planning, April 2, 1980.; 
(Requires closing of Mead School.) j 

I 
Compliance (pp. 207-208) | 

I 

Order on Joint Defendants' Motion for| 
Adoption, May 11, 1981. (Requires closing 
of 27 schools.) 1 



I 



Compliance (p. 208) 

Memorandum and Supplementary Disengagement; 
Orders, September 17, 1984. ; 



Partial Compliance I 

I 

A complete Unified Facilities Plan has noti 
been filed. Meetings on this matter 
continue. (p. 208, 262-263, 272-274, 275- 
277, 295-297) 

Order to File Unified Facilities Plan, 
November 2, 1984 



Meetings to 
a regular 
monitor ing. 



achieve this have taken place on 
basis since commencement of 
(pp. 208-209) 



CONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATION 



Boston must yet develop 
long-range facilities plan 
the Court, most recently 
to be provided 
Boston Public 



1984. Still 
list of all 
to be closed 
plan with 



a comprehensive 

as specified by 

on November 2, 

by the City is a 

Schools selected 

over the ten year period of the 

the capacity of each and the 



estimated date of closing. (pp. 209-212) 



- 30 - 



ORDERS 



FINDINGS 



STAFF 



The desegregation of faculty and 
administrative staff shall be implemented 
according to the standards contained in the 
orders of July 31, 1974, et al . 

Partial Compliance 



(pp. 311-312, 313) 



Despite a small increase in the number of 
Black teachers in the system, the percentage 
of Black teachers has dropped from 20.85 to 
20.24. This is the lowest percentage since 
1981-82, and is moving dangerously close to 
the 20% minimum and away from the 25% goal 
set by the Court. 

Both the number and percentage of other 
minority teachers in the system have 
increased during this monitoring period, the 
percentage having risen from 8.42 to 8.53. 

The percentage of Black administrators in 
Category I (principals) has increased from 
22.76 to 23.58; the percentage of Black 
administrators in Category II (district and 
central office staff) has decreased from 
24.44 to 23.80. 

The percentage of other minority 
administrators in Category I increased from 
3.25 to 4.88; the percentage of other 
minority administrators in Category II 
increased from 5.72 to 7.02. 



CONCLUS lONS/RBCOMMENDATIONS 



The decrease in the percentage of Black 
teachers is cause for concern. Since Boston 
is not now laying off teachers, the 
percentage should be increasing towards the 
25% goal. (p. 314)' 

See Modifications Report for information on 
changes in Rating and Screening Procedure 
for administrators. (p. 509-541) 



- 31 - 



- 32 - 



TRANSPORTATION 



ORDER 



May 10, 1975, pp. 80-83 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

The arrangements for identifying and 
following up on regular (corner-to-corner) 
transportation complaints by parents were 
inadequate to determine the precise scope of 
safety and reliability problems. Improve- 
ments had been made in the contract for 
transportation services and a systematic 
effort had been made by the Department of 
Implementation to be in daily contact with 
schools to determine whether transportation 
service was adequate. (pp. 343-344, 348-349) 

CONCLDS lONS/RBCOMMENDATIONS 

Monitors have not received evidence that 
improvements have been made in the 
development and implementation of a system 
of contractor and driver accountability, 
(pp. 344-345) 

Boston should develop and implement a 
complaint management procedure, and the 
Transportation Unit should revise its 
complaint log forms. 



- 33 - 



- 34 - 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



I. ORDER Safety and Security Orders, 

September 5, 1975 

FINDINGS 

A. CROWD CONTROL. Compliance (pp. 353-354) 

B. AUTHORIZED ENTRY TO SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND TRESPASSING. 

Partial Compliance 

Not all visitors are required to have 
previous appointments, although unscheduled 
visits are no longer associated with 
disruption of desegregation. (pp. 354-355, 
372, 392) 

A trespassing problem (due to multiple 
unlocked entrances) continues at Madison 
Park and HHORC, a fact which does little to 
mitigate the perception of these schools as 
unsafe. 

C. ENTRY OF LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL. Compliance 

Boston School Police have been very 
effective in removing unauthorized persons 
from schools. (pp. 355-356) 

D. PARENT AND COMMUNITY MEETINGS. Partial Compliance 

The need to prohibit parent and community 
meetings from taking place during school 
hours no longer exists. (p. 356) 

E. PHOTO ID'S FOR GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES. Non-compliance 

The elimination of photo ID's occurred more 
than five years ago. Their present need is 
questionable. (p. 356) 



- 35 - 



F. DAILY REPORTS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL. 

Non-compliance 

The Schools' Department of Safety Services 
provides yearly reports on staff deployment 
with updates as needed. (p. 357, 393-395) 

G. OTHER SAFETY MEASURES. Compliance 

Boston has gone well beyond court orders in 
attempting to provide safe and secure 
schools. (pp. 357-358, 364-370) 

CONCLDS lONS/RBCOHMENDAT IONS 

The current safety issues are only 
marginally related to the specific orders. 
The major concerns today are crime, 
neighborhood problems, substance abuse and 
disruptiveness . Boston must continue to 
make schools safe, because many parents will 
not send their children to schools they 
perceive as unsafe. Significant safety and 
discipline improvements have occurred at 
English High School, which could serve as a 
model for improvements at other schools. 
(pp. 358-361) 



- 36 - 



I. 



ORDER 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE 



Order Approving Addition to 
Discipline, January 9, 1975. 
racial slurs and epithets) 



Code of 
(prohibits 



FINDINGS Compliance (p. 399) 
SUSPENSIONS 

A decrease in suspensions from 7012 during 
the 1982-83 school year to 5707 in the 1983- 
84 school year has occurred. However, many 
schools continue to have suspension rates 
high enough to merit concern. (pp. 399-400, 
408-414) 

DISPROPORTIONATE SUSPENSIONS BY RACE 

Despite the suspension rate drop, the 
disproportionate suspension rate of Black 
students has remained the same. (pp. 400- 
401, 415) 

SAFETY AND DISCIPLINE PLAN 

Efforts have been made to systematize 
discipline procedures and develop 
alternatives to suspension through the 
following initiatives: (1) an increase in 
support services; (2) the development of 
Standards of Behavior ; (3) school review 
committees; (4) oversight committees; 

(5) development of alternative programs; 

(6) behavior management teams; (7) in- 
service training on approaches to 
discipline. However, behavior management 
teams have not been funded; no information 
has been submitted concerning oversight 
committees; and in-service training has not 
been scheduled. (pp. 401-404, 416-463) 



- 37 - 



PROGRESS REPORTS ON OTHER RECOMMENDATIONS j 

Discipline problems have been alleviated byj 
the following: (1) The addition ot 
Directors of Instruction and Support; 
Teachers to all middle schools; (2) use of; 
"time-out rooms", (3) parental involvement.: 
Some schools visited by monitors continue to 
send home students who have violated rules| 
without officially suspending them, a' 
practice which denies their Consitutional; 
rights. Shortages of books and materials is' 
a widely cited factor in discipline; 
problems. Most importantly, fears have been 
expressed that a new promotion policy, 
without a remediation plan, would worsen; 
academic frustration for some students and 
create additional discipline problems. , 

CONCLOS lONS/RBCOMMENDATIONS 

Boston has gone to considerable lengths to 
improve discipline in schools. In general, 
Boston should continue to fund and implement 
measures already initiated to reduce 
discipline problems and should pay increased; 
attention to the disproportionate suspension 
of students by race. (p. 406) 



- 38 - 



ARENT AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



I. PARENT ORGANIZATIONS 



A. CKtOER 



B . ORDER 



Memorandum and Orders Establishing Racial 
Parent Councils, October 4, 1974, and 
subsequent modifying orders. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



Although modifications have been made to 
strengthen the operation of parent councils 
at all levels, parent participation, 
especially at the school level, is still 
incomplete and often insufficient. (pp. 467- 
468, 482-485) 

Order of May 10, 1975 mandating the 
establishment of a Citywide Coordinating 
Council. 



FINDINGS 



C. 



D. 



ORDER 

FINDINGS 
ORDER 



Compliance 

The operations of the CCC ceased 
September 1, 1978, its tasks largely 
accomplished. (p. 468) 

Supplemental Order of November 8, 1976, 
concerning the role of the School Committee 
in citizen participation groups. 



Compliance (p. 469) 

Memorandum and 
September 1, 1977 
relations among 
Advisory Council, 
Parent 
Ethnic 



Advisory Councils 
Parent Councils 



Further Orders of 

concerning organizational 

the Citywide Parents 

the Community District 



and the Racial 



FINDINGS 



Compliance (p. 469) 



- 39 - 



ORDER 



Memorandum 



and 



Further 



Orders 



of 



FINDINGS 
ORDER 

FINDINGS 



September 15, 1978 clarifying the 
responsibilities of the various citizen 
participation groups as well as certain 
procedural matters. 

Compliance (p. 470) 

Order of May 8, 1980 establishing procedural 
guidelines for monitoring school 
desegregation. 

Partial Compliance 

The Guidelines are not being followed. CPC 
maintains that the Guidelines, which were 
developed by the school department, are too 
stringent. Boston maintains that CPC has 
not carried out the staff training required 
by the Guidelines. (p. 470) 



ORDER 



Memorandum and 
reorganizing the 
councils to increase 



Semi-Final Orders 
parent participation 
their effectiveness. 



FINDINGS 



H. 



ORDER 



Partial Compliance 

The goal of effective parent participation 
has not been fully achieved. 

Memorandum and Further Orders completing the 
restructuring of the parent councils. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



The 



*w^ parent councils' monitoring is 
fragmented, parents have not participated in 
the screening of applicants for 
administrative positions (because the 
screening procedures have not been used) and 
the Citywide Parents Council has not 
provided adequately for staff development 
and training. (p. 472) 



CONCLDS lONS/RBCOMHENDAT IONS 



Three major problems 
functioning of the 
parent participation 
continuing tension 



have impeded effective 

parent councils: low 

at the school level, 

between the Citywide 



- 40 - 



Parents Council and the school department, 
and a history of disorganization within the 
Citywide Parents Council. (pp. 472-473) 



We recommend the following steps: 

1. The parent councils should be 
as organizations independent 
school department. 



retained 
of the 



2. The election process and length of terms 
to school parent councils should be 
reviewed and modified to promote more 
extensive and effective parent 
participation. 

3. The councils' monitoring responsi- 
bilities should be concentrated on areas 
of significant need. 

4. The procedural guidelines for monitoring 
should be reviewed and revised. 

5. The relationship of the court-ordered 
councils to other parent organizations 
in Boston should be clarified. 



The councils 
the school 
involved in 
development 
process . 



should, with 
department, 
the Chapter 

and program 



the support of 
be actively 
636 proposal 

implementation 



II. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

A. ORDER Memorandum and Order of October 4, 1974 

establishing racial ethnic student councils 
in every middle and high school. 

FINDINGS Non-Compliance 

Only one school, Thompson Middle, has a 
functioning racial ethnic student council. 
The school department has done little to 
support these councils, and very few of them 
actually ever operated. (pp. 474-475, 492- 
493) 



- 41 - 



B. 



ORDER 



Amalgamation Plan, which established the 
system's student government organizations, 
and made the racial ethnic student councils 
subcommittees of racially representative 
student councils. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Racially representative student councils 
were elected in accordance with uniform 
election procedures in every middle and high 
school last year, but complete election 
results have not been submitted this year. 
No racial ethnic student council 
subcommittees have been elected. No data 
are available regarding the election of 
student representatives to high school 
parent councils. Last year only 10 of 17 
high school parent councils had student 
representatives; the situation is 
complicated by the existence of minimally 
operating parent councils at a number of 
high schools. (pp. 476-477, 486-487, 488- 
489) 

CONCLOS I ONS/RBCOMMENDAT IONS 

Racially representative student councils 
have been functioning in every middle and 
high school. There is only one functioning 
Racial Ethnic Student Council. Boston has 
not supported the RESCs, and has moved very 
slowly to support a proposed modification 
that would establish Communication Boards in 
place of the RESCs. (p. 477) 

Boston should: 

1. support either the RESCs or a viable 
alternative, including establishment of 
a timeline for full implementation and 
funding procedures; and 

2. collect and submit student council 
election data in a timely manner. 



- 42 - 



DISPUTE RESOLUTION 



No disputes reached the level of State Board mediation 
described at section V(D) (1) of the Orders of 
Disengagement. The only correspondence regarding disputes 
received by the State Board during this period were letters 
sent by Plaintif f-Intervenors to the School Department, 
relating to Chapter 1 and native-language remedial services, 
as well as overcrowding and the shortage of aides in the 
Bilingual programs at English High School. We have no 
record of the School Department's response to these 
matters. (pp. 497-506) 



- 43 - 



- 44 - 



MODIFICATIONS 



Negotiations concerning proposed modifications to 
jrders regarding the screening and rating of administrative 
ippointments continued throughout the summer of 1984. At 
:he close of these discussions / the School Committee filed 
its proposed modification with the Court on October 11. 
This modification, with minor modifications by the Court, 
vas adopted on November 26, except for the proposal to 
maintain the then-current percentage of other minority 
idrainistrators during periods of staff reduction. With 
■egard to this last portion of the proposed modification, 
:he Court directed the Boston Teachers Union to file offers 
)f proof and a brief in opposition, with leave for other 
sarties to respond. Both the Union and the parties 
supporting the layoff proposal filed briefs in December, 
(pp. 509-541) 

Additional motions to modify outstanding orders were 
filed on December 20, 1984. The State Board, with the 
issent of both the School Defendants and the City of Boston, 
requested an extension of the Unified Facilities Plan filing 
leadline. The School Defendants also filed 10 numbered 
issignment modification proposals, plus a more sweeping 
notion to modify the assignment process on a pilot basis 
:hrough the consolidation of present Districts III and IV. 
vt the time this monitoring report was being printed, the 
lourt had not ruled on these, motions. (pp.509, 542-580) 



- 45 - 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



. „ BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY ' 

GOVERNMENT OaaMlifs ofpffir 

RECEIVED 



MAR 1 4 1985 




REPORT NO. 4 



TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME II 
FEBRUARY 1, 1985 



5SACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

lames R. Grande, Hanover, Chairperson 
Mary C. Wright, Falmouth, Vice Chairpersorx 

Robert A. Farmer, Brookline 
Anne C. Fox, Needham 
Paul V. Garrity, Maiden 
AWca R. Gonzalez, Worcester 
ioward A. Greis, Holden 
jregory G. Nadeau, Marblehead 
Loretta L. Roach, Boston 
bseph C. Savery, Lee 
4ary Ellen Smith, Boston 
Dorothea A. Zanetti, Wilbraham 



ohn H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education, Secretary 
ohn B. Duff, Chancellor, Board of Regents, Ex Officio 



rt Coordinated by- 
din Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on 
m Desegregation 



Lidz, tditmg, Proofreading 




jced by the Bureau of Operational Support 

a DiBclla, Director 

1 Gardner, Publications/Communications Coordinator 

1 M. Ridge, Typographist 

i Processing bv — 

» Silva, Eileen Davenport, Monica Weicn, t\athy LeBlanc, Kathy Keenan 



sssachusetts Department of Education insures equal employment/educational opportunities/affirmative action regardless of race, color, creed, r 
)r sex, in compliance with Title IX, or handicap, in compliance with section 504. 



r>: lUI r,' ATU-.r 



; DOCUMENT APPROVED BY DANtEL D CARTER, STATE PURCHASING AGENT 



COMMOtWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



REPORT NO. 4 
TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME II 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
tlBR^RY 




/^r» 



' 2,3 



I 



I 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page No. 
INTRODUCTION 1 

I. MONITORING REPORTS 

Student Assignments 5 

Community District Schools 5 

Conclusions 7 

Magnet Schools 8 

Conclusions 9 

Citywide Vocational Programs 9 

Conclusions 14 

Kindergartens 15 

Conclusions 17 

Attachments 19 

Special Desegregation Measures 73 

Schools with Special Desegregation 
Measures 73 

Conclusions 76 

Examination Schools 77 

Conclusions 80 

Attachments 83 

Bilingual Education 155 

Report 155 

Conclusions 151 

Attachments 163 

Vocational and Occupational Education 181 

Compliance with Court Orders, etc.... 183 

Core Programs 183 

Magnet Programs 187 

In-School Bilingual 187 

Out-of-School Youth 190 

Special Needs Students 191 

Program Changes. . . '. 191 

Program Support Components 192 

Conclusions 197 

School Facilities 205 

Report 205 

Conclusions 209 

Attachments 213 



- 1 - 



staff 311 

Report 311 

Conclusions 314 

Attachments 315 

Transportation 343 

Report 343 

Conclusions 344 

Attachments 347 

Safety and Security 353 

Report 353 

Conclusions 358 

Attachments 363 

Student Discipline 399 

Report 399 

Conclusions 406 

Attachments 407 

Parent and Student Organizations 467 

Parent Organizations 467 

Conclusions 472 

Student Organizations 474 

Conclusions 477 

Attachments 479 



II. DISPUTE RESOLUTIONS 497 

Report 497 

Attachments 499 



III. MODIFICATIONS 509 

Report 509 

Attachments 511 



- ii - 



INTRODUCTION 

This is the fourth report to the Federal District Court on the 
progress of desegregation in the Boston Public Schools, as mandated 
by Memorandum and Orders of Disengagement/ December 23, 1982 . 

Volume I is a summary of the major findings, recommendations, 
disputes and modifications, while Volume II contains the full 
reports and supportive documentation. 

Whereas Report No. 3 contained twelve monitoring areas, the present 
document, in keeping with Memorandum and Order on Partial 
Termination of Jurisdiction, October 31, 1984 , has deleted two of 
those areas (viz.. Special Education and Institutional Pairing). 

Each of the ten reports in Volume II contains the following major 
divisions: 

I Monitoring Report 

A. Orders 

B. Summary 

C. Findings 

D. Conclusions/Recommendations 

II. Support Documentation (letters, statistics, memoranda 
in support of specific findings) 

The following department personnel were responsible for the reports 
submitted : 



1. 
2. 
3, 



Assignments 

Staff 

Special Desegregation 
Measures 



Bilingual Education 



Key Monitors 
Charles Glenn 
James Case 
Charles Glenn 

Exam School Only 



James Caste 



5. Occupational Education David Cronin 



Monitors 

Judith Taylor 

Nan Stein 

Regina Lieb 
Judith Taylor 

Maureen Wark 
Nan Stein 
Dan French 
Paula Willis 
Therese Alston 
Roselyn Frank 
Franklin Banks 

Ernest Mazzone 
Oilman Hebert 
Rudolf o Rodriguez 

Elaine Cadigan 
Naisuon Chu 
Mamie Jones 
Therese Alston 



-1- 



Key Monitor Monitors 

6. Transportation Charles Glenn Judith Taylor 

Regina Lieb 

7. Facilities David Jones John Calabro 

Samuel Pike 

8. Saftey and Security Frank Banks 

9. Student Dicipline James Case George Perry 

Dan French 

10. Parent and Student James Case (Parents) Doreen Wilkinson 
Organization Marion Gillom 

(Student) Dan French 

Special thanks to Marlene Godfrey, the Director of the Greater 
Boston Regional Center, for coordinating several components of this 
report. 



-2- 



STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 



-?_ 



STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS 



DESEGREGATION RANGE FOR COMMDNITY DISTRICT SCHOOLS 



ORDER 

SUMMARY 



May 10, 1975, pages 71-74; March 24, 1982 



"Each community district school shall have 
assigned to it geocodes that lie within the 
district, so that each school's racial and 
ethnic composition generally reflects the 
percentage of White, Black and other 
minority students, kindergarten through 
grade twelve, who reside in the 
district .... Where necessary in order 
to fit students assigned by geocode units to 
seat capacities, to make allowance for 
geographical obstacles and transportation 
routes, and to minimize mandatory busing, 
the composition of schools within a district 
may vary within ranges to be determined by 
computing the White, Black and other 
minority shares of the district's student 
populations and multiplying the resultant 
percentages by 25 percent .... Exceptions 
to these variation limits shall be permitted 
where necessary to allow appropriate 
bilingual assignments .... As a result, 
some schools may have no other minority 
students in attendance .... Students in 
need, of bilingual education or special 
education will be assigned individually to 
appropriate programs within the district of 
residence" (pages 72-74). 

The only modification of this Order which is 
significant for present monitoring is that 
of March 24, 1982, in which the Court 
allowed assignments to be made so that each 
school would reflect the percentages of each 
racial group in each district at the 
appropriate grade level (grades 1 to 5, 6 to 
8, 9 to 13) rather than for all grade 
levels. The effect of this modification is 



-5- 



to make it more feasible to achieve 
compliance. Note, however, that the 
standard continues to be based upon the 
number of public school students residing in 
a district, so that the attendance of a 
disproportionate number of students of one 
racial/ethnic group in a district in magnet 
schools can make it mathematically 
impossible to achieve compliance in some 
instances. 

FINDINGS High Schools ; Partial Compliance (Improved) 

Of the eight district high schools subject 
to the 1985 Order, four (Brighton, Jamaica 
Plain, South Boston, Burke) were below the 
permitted range for White enrollment in 
November 1983. Only Burke remains out of 
compliance, and its enrollment is improving 
as a result of the special desegregation 
measures undertaken over the past year. 

Middle Schools ; Non-compliance (Justified) 

Of twenty district middle schools subject to 
the 1975 Order, ten were below the permitted 
range for White enrollment in November 1983; 
nine remain out of compliance. The impact 
of admissions to Boston Latin School and 
Latin Academy at the seventh grade is such 
that compliance cannot be achieved for White 
enrollment in all district middle schools. 
For example, the permitted range in District 
II is 16%-26% White, but the actual combined 
enrollment of the three middle schools is 
only 14.4% White. There are no middle 
schools which are too high in White 
enrollment, nor are there middle schools 
which are substantially further out of 
compliance than others in the same 
district. Thus it appears that none of the 
district middle schools is racially 
identifiable. 

There are two middle schools below the 
permitted range for Black enrollment as a 
result of large bilingual programs, as 
permitted by the Court. Three others are 
above the permitted range for Black 
enrollment as a result of large enrollment 
in bilingual programs in other middle 
schools in the same districts. Such 
instances of non-compliance are permitted by 
the Court. 



—r>— 



Elementary Schools ; Partial Compliance 

There are sixty-two elementary schools 
subject to the 1975 Order. When allowances 
are made for the impact of bilingual 
programs in grades 1-5, there are nine 
schools out of compliance. White enrollment 
is above the permitted range in six schools, 
and below it in three; Black enrollment is 
low in one. 

High Low High Low 
White White Black Black 



IV. 



Channing 


X 






Chittick 




X 




Grew 


X 






Hemenway 


X 






F.Roosevelt 


X 




X 


Taylor 




X 




Emerson 




X 




Perkins 


X 






Perry 


X 







VI. 



CONCLDS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



Progress in high school compliance is 
commended . while substantial non-compliance 
exists in middle schools, it cannot be 
remedied given present overall White 
enrollments in district and citywide middle 
schools. As noted in Report No.l, middle 
school assignments appear to be as good as 
possible under the circumstances. One third 
of the district elementary schools are out 
of compliance, in most cases because they 
exceed the permitted range for White 
enrollment. To put this in perspective, 
note that only four of these are more than 
1/3 White; very substantial progress has 
been made since 1974 in eliminating 
racially-identifiable elementary schools. 

1. Continued effort to improve enrollments 
at Burke High School is recommended. 

2. Efforts to increase White enrollment in 
Boston should include information about 
opportunities available in district 
middle schools. 

3. Strong White enrollment in a number of 
district elementary schools should 
encourage efforts to improve 
desegregation by voluntary transfers on 
the basis of program choices. 



-7- 



II. 



DESEGREGATION RANGE FOR MAGNET SCHOOLS 



ORDER 

SUMMARY 



May 10, 



1975, 



pages 74-76 



"Admission and assignment of students to 
citywide schools shall be on an individual 
basis, not by geocode. They shall grant 
student preferences to the extent possible 
while at the same time achieving a 
desegregated student body . . . and 
that the com-posi tions of community 
schools remain within the ranges 
those schools .... The 
combined black and other 



racially 
assuring 
distr ict 
set for 
white and 
minor ity 



percentages at each citywide school shall be 
within five percentage points of the 
systemwide percentages . . . ." 

"The Hernandez School, which contains a 
citywide Spanish-English bilingual program, 
may enroll a student body up to 65% Hispanic 
.... The examination schools are subject 
to independent desegregation requirements . 

n 

... 

The 1975 Order also discussed in some detail 
the process for selecting those students who 
would be admitted to over-subscribed magnet 
schools. If necessary, students could be 
assigned involuntarily to magnet high 
schools, but not to magnet elementary and 
middle schools (pages 76-78) . 

The March 1982 Order modified these 
requirements slightly by excluding students 
residing in District VIII (East Boston) from 
the computation of the assignment goals, 
even though such students attend magnet 
schools; the two magnet schools located in 
District VIII were not affected, 
of this modification was to make 
easier to achieve compliance 
racial/ethnic ranges. 



The effect 

it somewhat 

with the 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance (Improved) 

In November 1983 one citywide high school, 
English High, was out of compliance with the 
permitted ranges for Black and White 
enrollment. After substantial program 
development and recruitment efforts, English 
is in compliance for Black enrollment and 
very near compliance for White enrollment. 



-8- 



Madison Park High has fallen out of 
compliance, with Black enrollment higher and 
White enrollment lower than the permitted 
range. This is partly explicable by a large 
Cape Verdean bilingual program. 

In 1983 the King Middle School was above the 
permitted range for Black students and below 
that for White students; this situation has 
been corrected by the new assignments. 

Of ten citywide elementary schools, the Hale 
is above and the Hennigan and Jackson-Mann 
below the permitted range for Black 
enrollment; this is attributable in part to 
bilingual assignments. 

Of eighteen citywide schools subject to 
these strict assignment requirements, only 
Madison Park High represents a real 
compliance problem. 

CONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 

Magnet school assignments and enrollments 
continue largely in compliance. English 
High School and the King Middle School are 
commended for compliance improvements. 

1. Madison Park High requires attention 
similar to that which English High has 
been receiving and will continue to 
require. 

2. As recommended in Report No. 2, an 
enrollment strategy is needed for long- 
term stability at the Hennigan and 
Jackson/Mann schools. Enrollment of the 
small Hale school should also be watched 
closely. 

III. DESEGREGATION OF CITYWIDE VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

ORDER September 3, 1975 



SUMMARY 



/ 



The Unified Plan includes detailed 
requirements for vocational programs which 
draw their enrollment citywide, including 
all programs at the Humphrey Occupational 
Resource Center and vocational programs at 
four district high schools: Brighton, Hyde 



-9- 



Park, Dorchester and West Roxbury. A fifth 
district high school program, at East 
Boston, did not admit new students last 
year. 

The Unified Plan provides that: 

1. students may be assigned to a program 
only voluntarily; 

2. oversubscribed programs will be subject 
to random selection of applicants, 
provided that racial and male/female 
enrollment objectives are met; 

3. all programs "will reflect the racial 
ratios established by the Court for the 
citywide schools" (this provision was 
modified in March 1982 to exclude the 
enrollment of the examination schools in 
calculating the enrollment standard for 
HHKORC programs) ; 

4. "in those programs in which students of 
one sex have represented less than 35% 
of the enrollment of that program, the 
admission (policy) . . . shall 
specifically encourage a student 
composition ... in keeping with the 
citywide male/female ratio"; 

5. "insufficient applications for a 
particular program from students of one 
race will result in the underenrollment 
of the program." 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 
Total Enrollnients 



The enrollment figures for students in 
skills training programs supplied to the 
monitors are summarized below, along with 
the comparable figures from the preceding 
year. They shov/ a decrease of approximately 
20% from last year to this. 

Total # 
Students* Fall 1983 Fall 1984 



Black 






1 


,362 


1 


,096 


Wh i te 








448 




342 


Other 


Minor 


ity 




491 




392 



Total 2,301 1,830 

♦Excludes students in special programs and 
freshman exploratory. 



-10- 



The number of students in the freshman 
exploratory has also declined, from 661 last 
Fall to 362 this Fall — a decrease of 45%. 
Since the exploratory program serves as a 
recruiting base for the skills training 
programs, it is likely that next year's 
figures will be even lower. 

Evidence of Recruitment 

Uo information has been provided to monitors 
on efforts, after assignments were made last 
Spring, to recruit additional students of 
the appropriate racial/ethnic groups to 
programs so as to permit full enrollment and 
compliance with the permitted range for 
assignments. 

In twenty-six instances, however, the number 
of students enrolled in November is larger 
than the number assigned last Spring. 
Unfortunately, in 14 cases (54%) the 
additional students admitted to a program 
were of a racial/ethnic group already over- 
represented in the program. Thus the 
additional assignments did not have the 
desired effect of achieving improved 
desegregation compliance. 

Actual Enrollment of Assigned Students 

In many instances the number of students of 
a racial/ethnic group enrolled in a program 
is less than 80% of the number who were 
assigned last Spring. Eighteen programs 
failed to attract and actually enroll at 
least 80% of the White students assigned, 
and nineteen programs failed to attract and 
enroll at least 80% of the other minority 
students. 

Compliance with Desegregation Requirements 

Report No. 2 identified a number of programs 
which were severely out of compliance with 
the permitted ranges (more than 10 
percentage points deviation from the 
"ideal") for one or more racial/ethnic 
groups. There were, in the Fall of 1983, 
eleven programs substantially above the 
permitted range for Black students and three 
substantially below that range. The chart 
below compares the current compliance with 
that observed last year, using the same 
standard. This year there are two below and 
seven above, an improvement from last year. 



-11- 



Program 

Word Processing 
Dental Office 

Heating, Air Cond. 



Printing 


67 


Food Service 


68 


Health Service 


68 


Cabinetmaking 


69 


Photography 


68 


TV Production 


70 


Hotel/Hospitality 


72 


Fashion/Int. Design 


75 


Advanced Office 


80 


Machine Laboratory 


80 


Ideal: 56% 


Ideal 



Black 




% Black 


1983 


Program 


1984 


13 


Machine Drafting 


38 


18 


Child Care 


44 


. 41 






67 


Marine & Sm Eng. 


70 


68 


Legal Office 


72 


68 


TV Production 


72 


69 


Advanced Office 


75 


68 


Health Laboratory 


77 


70 


Machine Lab 


82 


72 


Retailing 


82 



59% 



Note that this standard is more generous 
than that ordered by the Court, in 
recognition of the difficulty of achieving 
strict compliance. 

Similarly, in Report No. 2 there were 13 

programs identified that 

the permitted range for 

four substantially above 

are now eight below 

significant improvement. 

compares both years, 

standard. 



were severely below 

White students, and 

that range. There 

and two above , a 

The chart below 

using the same 



Program 

Banking 

Health Aide 

Fashion/Int. 

Medical Office 

Photography 

Retailing 

Kote 1/Kospi tal i ty 

TV Production 

Machine Lab 

Nursing Assistant 

Electronics 

Commercial Design 

Dental Office 
Carpentry 
Heating, Air Cond, 
Word Processing 



% V7hite 




% White 


1983 


Program 


1984 





Dental Office 


4 


6 


Machine Lab 


5 


7 


Legal Office 


5 


7 


Electronics 


9 


8 


Photography 


9 


10 


Retailing 


10 


10 


Building Maint. 


10 


11 


Hotel/Hospitality 


10 


12 






12 






12 






12 






37 


Child Care 


34 


38 


Plumbing 


44 


41 






43 







-12- 



Ideal: 26% 



Ideal: 21% 



With regard to the other minority students. 
Report No. 2 identified three programs whose 
enrollment was substantially above the 
permitted range and five whose enrollments 
were severely below it. There are now five 
programs substantially above the permitted 
range and two programs below. This 
indicates an increased enrollment of other 
minority students in citywide vocational 
programs. 



Program 

Fashion, Illustr 
Sheet Metal 
Machine Lab 
Retailing 
Plumbing 



% Other 
Minor ity 

5 
7 
8 
9 
10 



Program 

Retailing 
Plumbing 



% Other 
Minority 

4 
5 



Banking 
Dental Office 
Word Processing 



Ideal 



18% 



41 
43 
43 



Ideal: 20% 



Electronics 31 

Medical Office 31 

Banking 31 

Dental Office 34 

Machine Drafting 38 



Female/Male Enrollments 

Report No. 2 noted that six programs 
complied with the standard of enrolling 
female and male students so that the 
proportions of both groups fell between 35% 
and 65%. This year, ten programs meet this 
standard: printing, food service, TV 
production, commercial design, data 
proce.ssing, photography, health laboratory, 
retailing, fashion illustration and banking. 

Recognizing the difficulties involved in 
non-traditional recruiting. Report No. 2 
used the much looser standard of 20% and 80% 
to identify non-domplying programs. Nine 
programs were identified as having 
substantial over-enrollments of females 
(over 80%) , and eleven as having serious 
underenrollment {under 20%) . The chart 
below lists the programs with substantially 
disproportionate enrollments by sex from 
last year and this year. 



-13- 





% Female 


% 


Female 


Program 


1983 


Program 


1984 


Heating, Air Cond . 





Auto Repair 





Plumbing 


2 


Building Maint. 





Auto Repair 


2 


Heating, Air Cond 





Marine & Sm Eng . 


2 


Auto Body 


1 


Auto Body 


3 


Welding 


2 


Welding 


3 


Marine & Sra Eng. 


2 


Electrical 


4 


Plumbing 


3 


Machine 


4 


Electrical 


4 


Carpentry 


4 


Electronics 


8 


Electronics 


6 


Machine 


12 


Cabinetmaking 


15 


Carpentry 


13 


Health 


31 


Word Processing 


81 


Dental Assistant 


88 


Fashion/Int 


32 


Word Processing 


88 


Legal Office 


83 


Child Care 


38 


Dental Office 


85 


Fashion 


90 


Child Care 


86 


Legal Office 


92 


Nursing Assistant 


88 


Medical Care 


94 


Medical Office 


95 


Nursing Assistant 


94 


Cosmetology 


97 


Cosmetology 


96 







CONCLOS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



There is a serious decline in enrollments at 
the Humphrey Center. The Department of 
Implementation reported in May that all 
eligible applicants had been assigned to the 
Center. Subsequent assignments have 
increased the enrollment, but it is still 
far below the level of 1983-84. It seems 
clear that the underenrollment is a result 
of insufficient interest among Boston 
students and not of the Court-ordered 
assignment guidelines. Applications 
continue to decline despite recommendations 
since Report No.l in July 1983 that "strong 
efforts (be made) to encourage students" to 
apply- 
There has been some reduction in the number 
of programs substantially out of compliance 
for racial/ethnic enrollment. However, 18 
of 35 programs are substantially out of 
compliance for at least one of the 
racial/ethnic categories. 

Boston has argued that compliance for the 
Humphrey Center should be assessed by its 



_TU- 



total enrollment, aggregating all 
programs. This is contrary to the specific 
requirements of the September 8, 1975 Order, 
which applies the racial ratios to 
individual programs. 

The number of programs meeting the 36%-65% 
standard for enrollments of females and 
males has increased. 

The last three reports pointed out that the 
problems of underutilization of citywide 
vocational education capacity, and 
continuing non-compliance with the 
desegregation standards set by the Court 
result primarily from a lack of vigorous and 
effective outreach to students and their 
parents. Boston has not submitted evidence 
that it is prepared to undertake systematic 
recruitment for occupational education 
programs, despite extensive technical 
assistance from the Division of Occupational 
Education. 

Recommendation: Efforts to recruit students 
through active outreach, career education 
and counseling, and encouragement at the 
sending high schools should be a major 
priority, as recommended in Report No. 3. 



IV. 



ASSIGNMENTS TO KINDERGARTENS 



ORDER 

SUMMARY 



May 10, 1975, page 4 



"If kindergarten students must be assigned 
to schools outside their home neighborhoods, 
the assignments shall be made in accordance 
with . two principles: (1) the resulting 
student bodies shall be desegregated, and 
(2) the burdens of distance and 
transportation shall be distributed 
equitably across ethnic groups." 

A "Memorandum and Orders as to Kindergarten 
Desegregation" (August 12, 1977) noted that 
Boston had proposed a different approach to 
kindergarten assignments from that developed 
by the Court's experts. The latter had 
assigned students, for kindergarten, to the 
same school that they would attend for first 
grade, while Boston urged that a separate 



-15- 



set of geocodes be used for the kindergarten 
of each school, thus permitting more 
students to attend kindergarten near their 
homes. Since this would result in less 
desegregation, Boston proposed "magnet 
kindergarten programs, called extended day 
programs" to lessen racial segregation of 
kindergarten students. 

The Court noted, in this memorandum, that 

"by producing a scheme in which most 
kindergartens will constitute a fourth level 
or separate grade structure, the defendants' 
proposal does not strengthen the continuity 
of enrollment of children in grades Kl 
through 5 at the same schools. Thousands of 
white children who attend public 
kindergartens may continue to be reinforced 
to switch to nonpublic schools, beginning in 
grade 1, when the regular geocode 
assignments become applicable" (page 2 
footnote) . 

The Court approved Boston's proposal of a 
separate geocode structure for 
kindergartens, and the use of extended day 
(that is, full day) kindergarten programs to 
achieve some desegregation. 

In January 1983 the State reviewed and 
approved an expansion of the extended day 
kindergarten program to a number of new 
sites, with specific provisions for the 
racial makeup of each site. In September 
1984 Boston reinstated pre-kindergar ten 
classes (Kl) at a number of schools; the 
State was not asked to approve this. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



Parents of all racial/ethnic groups show 
strong interest in extended day kindergarten 
programs, and these programs have the 
potential to contribute significantly to 
desegregation. 

Most programs enroll appropriate numbers of 
students of each racial/ethnic group. As 
noted in Report Nos . 2 and 3, however, there 
continue to be instances in which either 
more, or fewer White or minority students 
have been recruited. 



-16- 



Monitors found no evidence of systematic 
efforts to offer alternative EDP assignments 
to parents who could not be given their 
first choices, despite an understanding at 
the time the assignments were approved, that 
such efforts would be made. 

The potential contribution of extended day 
kindergarten programs to desegregation and 
to strong public school enrollments is 
seriously weakened by the lack of linkages 
between kindergarten and first grade 
attendance. It appears that parents are 
rarely approached individually to encourage 
them to keep their children in public 
school. 

The assignment of different geocodes for 
kindergarten and for the elementary grades 
works against enrollment stability, 
continuity of instruction, and 
desegregation. 



CONCLOS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



Boston is commended for implementing an 
extended day kindergarten program which 
enjoys strong parental support, and for 
recruiting and assigning students of all 
racial/ethnic groups to desegregated 
programs which, in most cases, meet the 
Court's requirements. 

1. A more effective method should be 
developed of offering alternative 
assignments to parents who do not 
receive their first choices. 

2. Programs located in predominantly White 
sections of the city should not be 
overenrolled with White students. 

3. Parents of White children in 
kindergarten should be approached and 
encouraged to keep their children in 
public school for first grade. 

4. Consideration should be given to a 
modification of the assignment plan 
which would encourage students to remain 
in the schools to which they are 
assigned to kindergarten, if that 
supports desegregation. 



-17- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATICN REPORT #4 

ASSIGNMENTS 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



GENERAL 

1. Explanation of 1984 Enrollment Tables (with 22 tables) 

2, Special Analysis of Assignments/Enrollments (June 1984) 

OCCUPATI(»JAL RESOURCE CENTER 

' — } 

1. Humphrey Center/Occupational Education 

a. Chart: Programs and Ccxnpliance Indices 

b. Chart: Success in Enrolling Students Assigned to 

Programs 

c. Chart: Proportional Enrollment of Females 

2. Memo: Charles Glenn to John Coakley re Review of Magnet 

Vocational Program Assignments 

3. Memo: James Caradonio to Charles Glenn re Vocational Educa- 

tion recruiting 

4. Letter: Charles Glenn to James Caradonio 

5. Memo: John Coakley to Charles Glenn re ORC Assignments for 

1984-85 

KINDERGARTEN 



1. Report: Analysis of Extended Day Kindergarten Programs 

2. Clipping 



-19- 



EXPLANATION OF 1984 ENROLLMENT TABLES 



Tables have been prepared showing the November 1st 1984 enrollment 
in each Boston public school, the Court-ordered racial/ethnic ranges 
applicable to each school, and the proportion of students of each 
of the three racial/ethnic categories who are transported to school. 
The last figure provides one way of assessing the "equity of burden" 
of the desegregative assignments, and has historically been used by 
the Board of Education in reviewing assignment and facility plans. 

Brief comments are provided in cases of non-compliance with the 
permitted ranges; in most cases these point out an exception which 
has been allowed by the Court in the interest of bilingual program 
assignments. 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 



Compliance of High Schools with Black Permitted Range 
Compliance of High Schools with White Permitted Range 
Compliance of High Schools with Other Minority Permitted 
High Schools Ranked by Percent of Black Students Bused 
High Schools Ranked by Percent of 
High Schools Ranked by Percent of 
High Schools Ranked by Percent of 
Compliance of Middle Schools with 
Compliance of Middle Schools with 
Compliance of Middle Schools with 
Middle Schools Ranked by Percent 
Middle Schools Ranked by Percent 



Range 



Middle Schools Ranked by Percent 
Middle Schools Ranked by Percent 
Compliance of Elementary Schools 
of Elementary Schools 
of Elementary Schools 
Schools Ranked by Percent 
Schools Ranked by Percent 



Compliance 
Compliance 
Elementary 
Elementary 
Elementary 



White Students Bused 

Other Minority Students Bused 

All Students Bused 

Black Permitted Range 

White Permitted Range 

Other Minority Permitted Range 
of Black Students Bused 
of White Students Bused 
of Other Minority Students Bused 
of All Students Bused 
with Black Permitted Range < 
with White Permitted Range i 
with Other Minority Permitted Rangej 
of Black Students Bused 
of White Students Bused 



\ 



Schools Ranked by Percent of Other Minority Students Bus€ 
Elementary Schools Ranked by Percent of All Students Bused 
Enrollment of Other Schools [Examination Schools and Schools 
to which students are assigned exclusively for Special Education] 



[*] indicates that the school deviates from compliance primarily to 
accommodate bilingual program assignments, as permitted by the 
Court. 

[**] Indicates that the school is in compliance; enrollment reflects 
a Court-ordered magnet program. 



-20- 



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Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 

June 18, 1984 

TO: Commissioner 

FROM: Charles Glenn 

RE: Special Analysis of Assignments/Enrollments in Boston 



The following table shows the impact of receiving first choice on 
student enrollments in Boston. Whether students received their first 
choice had relatively little effect on the retention of Black and 
Other Minority students, but it did have a substantial impact on that 
of White students. 

The general rate was 86%: of the students who were assigned in May 
1983 for 1983-84, 86% of them were still in the system a year later. 



PERCENTAGE OF BOSTON STUDENTS REMAINING IN THE 
BOSTON SYSTEM ONE YEAR AFTER RECEIVING THEIR 
ASSIGNMENTS* 

Black White Other Minority 

ELEMENTARY 

Students who received first choice 92% 84% 90% 

Students who did not receive Qr>« cc<y Qo<y 

first choice ^°^° ^^^ ^^^ 

MIDDLE 

Students who received first choice 95% 89% 91% 

Students who did not receive 91% 75% 89% 
first choice 



HIGH 



Students who received first choice 91% 86% 86% 
Students who did not receive 83% 71% 76% 
first choice 



*Data for students assigned in May 83 for 1983-84. Percentages 
shown in table indicate portion of students originally assigned 
who were still in the system in May 84. 



-50- 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



VARIOUS ANALYSES OF FALL 1984 BOSTON ENROLLMENT DATA 



December 10,1984 



(1) Certain schools seem to serve primarily as kindergarten stations 
for white students who go on to non-public schools (or possibly other 
Boston public schools) for first grade. This was analyzed by 
dividing the white enrollment in grades 1-5 by the white enrollment 
in kindergarten. Schools offering kl as well as k2 are starred. 
Listed below are 13 schools with more white students in kindergarten 
than in grades 1-5. 





District 


K 


1 - 5 


1-5/K 


■**■ 1 Lyndon 


III 


115 


17 


. 15 


*<^ 10' Hearn 


V 


9£ 


££ 


.£4 


-Vr 1 Kenny 


V 


106 


£9 


.27 


♦* 1 K i 1 mer 


III 


77 


34 


.44 


^ 1 Hernenway 


IV 


38 


££ 


.58 


f« 1 Everett 


V 


50 


31 


.6£ 


* 1 Beethoven 


III 


5£ 


33 


.63 


->*• 1 Phil brick 


III 


36 


£5 


.66 


< IClap 


VI 


63 


45 


.71 


** 1 Grew 


IV 


56 


4£ 


.75 


■^ 1 Longfellow 


II 


41 


33 


.60 


X 1 Warren/PrescVII 


84 


75 


.89 


•^ IF.D. RoosevellV 


55 


51 


.93 



(2) Many schools lose a substantial proportion of the white students 
assigned to them for grades 1 - 5; this is heavily affected by the 
transfer of white students out of the system after kindergarten. 
In the Spring of 1984 elementary schools were ranked by the percent 
of white students assigned in the Spring of 1983 to grades 1-5 who 
had failed to report in the Fall of 1983. Thus the white enrollment 
at the Chittick school was 69% lower in grades 1-5 than had been 
assigned. These percents were applied to the number of white 
students assigned in the Spring of 1984 for Fall 1984 to produce a 
projected white enrollment. Comparing this projection with actual 
white enrollment in November 1984 shows that some schools did better 
than projected, while others did worse. Listed below are the schools 
whose actual enrollments were substantially lower than projected. 

Assign Projected 



Actual 



# Below % 



55 


43 


Tobin 


I 


£7 


-£8 - 


.51 


-16 


-.37 


88 


84 


S. Greenwood 


V 


56 


-3£ - 


.36 


-P8 


-. 33 


39 


£4 


Lvndon 


III 


17 


-££ - 


^f, 


-7 


-. 30 


96 


91 


McKay 


IX 


65 


-31 - 


. 3£ 


-P6 


-. £8 


30 


£8 


Ernerson 


VI 


£0 


-10 -. 


33 


-8 


-. £8 


39 


56 


Eliot 


VII 


40 


1 


03 


-16 


-. £8 


c.'4 


£9 


Baldwin 


I 


£1 


-3 -. 


13 


-8 


-.£7 



-51- 



other schools had white enrollments (1-5) substantially higher 
than projected; note that the Chittick showed the most marked 
improvement by comparison with its loss of white assigned students 
in 1983. 



£9 


19 


Mason 


VI 


£5 


-4 


-. 14 


6 


.31 


18 


17 


0' Hearn 


V 


££ 


4 


.££ 


5 


.32 


79 


6£ 


Quincy 


VII 


a£ 


3 


.04 


£0 


.33 


77 


64 


Tynan 


VI 


88 


11 


. 14 


£4 


.37 


16 


17 


Stone 


V 


£4 


8 


.50 


7 


.4£ 


67 


53 


E. Greenwood 


IV 


79 


1£ 


. 18 


£6 


.48 


60 


41 


B lac ketone 


VII 


6£ 


c! 


.03 


£1 


.51 


29 


19 


Kenny 


V 


£9 


13 


.00 


10 


.57 


65 


£9 


Marshall 


V 


5£ 


-13 


-.£0 


£3 


.80 


13 


lei 


End i cot t 


V 


19 


6 


.46 


9 


.95 


36 


11 


Chittick 


IV 


30 


-6 


-. 17 


19 


1.67 



(3) The tables in #2 are ranked by the percent change from projected 
enrollment to actual enrollment in 1984. The following table 
shows the schools with the highest percent of white students 
assigned in Spring 1984 who did not report in Fall 1984. 



DNR 1983 



1984 



1984 DNR 1984 



# 


% 


Assigned 


Projected 




Actual 


# 


% 


-15 


-.38 


39 


£4 


Lyndon 


III 


17 


-££ 


-.56 


•14 


-.22 


55 


43 


Tobin 


I 


£7 


-£8 


-.51 


-36 


-.51 


61 


30 


Ellis 


II 


33 


-£8 


-.46 


■42 


-.38 


114 


71 


Lee 


III 


67 


-47 


-.41 


-3 


-.04 


86 


84 


S. Greenwood 


V 


56 


-3£ 


-.36 


£4 


-. 33 


62 


41 


P. fl. Shaw 


IV 


40 


-££ 


-.35 


-2 


-.07 


30 


£8 


Emerson 


VI 


£0 


-10 


-.33 


-7 


-.05 


96 


91 


McKay 


IX 


65 


-31 


-. 3£ 


■21 


-.30 


59 


4£ 


Winship 


I 


40 


-19 


-.32 


-5 


-. 10 


42 


38 


Hale 


IX 


£9 


-13 


-.31 


•16 


-.26 


55 


41 


Con 1 ey 


IV 


40 


-15 


-.27 


10 


-. 12 


85 


75 


Gardner 


I 


63 


-££ 


-.£6 


-6 


-. 11 


62 


55 


Fifield 


V 


47 


-15 


-.£4 


15 


-.22 


51 


40 


Guild 


IX 


40 


-11 


-. ££ 


-5 


-. 13 


39 


34 


Parkrnan 


II 


31 


-a 


-. £1 


59 


-.56 


65 


£9 


Marshall 


V 


5£ 


-13 


-. £0 


■21 


-. 16 


127 


106 


Jackson-Mann IX 


10£ 


-£5 


-.20 


15 


-.32 


41 


£8 


Beethoven 


III 


33 


-8 


-. £0 



-52- 



(4) Some schools have a persistent problem of losing white students 
who are assigned for grades 1-5. The following table gives a 
combined ranking for 1983 and 1984 of the percent of white students 
assigned who did not report. It should be noted that, of the top 
four, three are "special desegregation schools" designated by the 
Court for efforts to improve desegregation compliance. 



)id not report 1983 



1984 



Did not report 1984 1983&1984 



Rank 



Assigned 



Actual # 



Rank 



Combined 
Rank 



-.38 
-.51 
-. 38 
-. 33 
— . 56 
-. 30 
-.37 

-.26 
-.32 
-.69 
-.27 
~~ ■ ca 
-.28 
-.31 
-.34 
-. 18 
-. 16 
-. 12 
-. 13 
-. 11 
-.26 
-. 16 



5 39 Lvndon III 

3 61 >^Elli5 II 

4 114 »*Lee III 
9 62 * P.A.Shaw IV 
2 65 Marshall V 

13 59 Winship I 

6 27 Hemenway IV 

25 55 TiDbin I 

17 55 Conley IV 
10 41 Beethoven III 

1 36 Chittick IV 

15 55 Clao VI 

26 51 Guild IX 

14 40 Loriqfellow II 
12 68 Charming IV 

8 29 Mason VI 

29 81 Holland V 

33 127 Jackson-Mann IX 

39 85 Gardner I 

36 39 Parkrnan II 

41 62 Fifield V 

18 75 flgassiz II 
35 38 J. F. Kenned 1 1 



17 
33 
67 
40 
52 
40 

•DO 

27 
40 
33 
30 
45 
40 
33 
57 
25 
66 
102 
63 
31 
47 
65 
31 



-28 
-47 



-19 -. 

-5 -. 

-28 -. 

-15 -. 

-8 -. 

-6 -. 

-10 -. 

-11 -. 

-7 -. 

-11 -. 

-4 -. 

-15 -. 

-25 -. 

•-> •-% 

-8 -, 

-15 -. 

-10 -, 

-7 -. 



46 

41 

35 

20 

32 

19 

51 

27 

20 

17 

. 18 

22 

, 18 

16 

, 14 

19 

,20 

,26 

,21 

,24 

, 13 

, 18 



1 
3 
4 
6 

16 
9 

19 

C 

11 

18 

27 

23 

14 

26 

29 

34 

20 

17 

12 

15 

13 

36 

21 



3 

3 
4 

a 

9 
11 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
19 
20 
20 
21 
21 
25 
25 
26 
26 
27 
27 
28 



-53- 








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-55- 



PAGE NO. 
12/03/84 



00001 



The HuniDhrey Center 
Proportional Enrollment of Females 



Program 



BUILDING MfllNTE 
HEATING AIR CON 
AUTQMOTIVE/TRUC 
AUTOBODY REPAIR 
WELDING LABORAT 
MARINE & SMALL 
PLUMBING 
ELECTRICAL TECH 
ELECTRONICS TEC 
MACHINE LABORAT 
CARPENTRY 
MACHINE DRAFTIN 
SHEET METAL LAB 
CABINETMAKING 
PRINTING 
FOOD SERVICE 
TELEVISION PROD 
COMMERICAL DESI 
DATA PROCESSING 
PHOTOGRAPHIC TE 
HEALTH LABORATO 
RETAILING, MARKE 
FASHION ILLUSTR 
BANKING 
HEALTH AIDE 
HOTEL/HOSPITALI 
ADVANCED OFFICE 
WORD PROCESSING 
FASHION/INTERIO 
LEGAL OFFICE PR 
DENTAL OFFICE 
CHILD CARE 
NURSING ASSISTA 
MEDICAL OFFICE 
COSMETOLOGY 



# Females 




% Fei 


na les 




Enrolled 


IZI 



1 

1 

1 
1 

£ 

5 

g 

3 

11 

3 

A 

8 

£4 

4£ 

£9 

1£ 

56 

£3 

5 

17 

14 

£3 

G 

£0 

41 

40 

£8 

30 

£0 

40 

31 

4G 

87 


Enr- 


-jlled 






1 

£ 
S 
3 

4 

8 

1£ 

13 

14 

17 

18 

35 

40 

40 

46 

49 

5£ 

55 

56 

56 

58 

66 

71 

75 

81 

8£ 

83 

86 

86 

88 

95 

97 



-56- 



Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

April 23rcl 1984 



TO: John Coakley 

FROM: Charles Glenn 

RE: Review of Magnet Vocational Program Assignments 



d 



Thank you for arranging a meeting last Thursday in your office to 
review with Mr. Caradonio the assignment requirements related to 
city-wide vocational programs. 

I requested at that time that Mr. Caradonio develop an "action 
plan" covering measures by the school system to encourage sufficient 
applications from each racial/ethnic group to permit assignment of 
and maintenance of enrollments in each program consistent with the 
"admissions criteria" section of the Unified Plan. Such measures 
would include participation by all middle school students and ninth 
graders in exploratory cluster programs designed to expose them to 
a broad range of occupations and to encourage them to consider 
applying to city-wide vocational programs. It would also include 
career guidance efforts tied specifically to the available programs, 
vigorous outreach from the various programs to encourage applications, 
follow-up on students who express interest, assignment of staff with 
specific responsibility for recruitment (with an indication of what 
portion of their time would be or already is devoted to it), 
supplementary recruitment for programs for which (at the time of 
initial assignments) an insufficient pool of applicants from any 
racial/ethnic group are available, and follow-up with assigned 
students to increase the likelihood of their attending in the Fall. 

It was my understanding from the discussion that definite problems 
exist in obtaining the cooperation of some headmasters and middle 
school and high school guidance staff, and that, currently, no staff 
have the primary responsibility of recruitment for city-wide 
vocational programs. I understand that there was considerable 
participation in a recent "career day," and that Boston staff will 
be receiving training arranged by the Department of Education on 
recruitment of under-represented groups to vocational programs. 
I'm sure you will agree that such activities, vatuable as they are, 
must be supported by a solid commitment at the sending schools, and 
we will be looking for evidence of such commitment. 



-57- 



April 23rd 1984 page two 



I agreed to state, in writing, the concerns with which we will 
approach the review of proposed assignments to city-wide vocational 
programs. 

We expect that the proposed assignments to each city-wide program 
(the Humphrey Center and the "magnet programs" at certain high 
schools) will reflect the required standards. We expect that 

insufficient applications for a particular program 

from students of one race will result in the 

underenrollment of the program 
and that there will be 

supplementary recruitment in the event that insufficient 

applications are received from students of one race. 

We also expect that admissions to these programs 

shall be made on the basis of equal numbers of male 
and female students, so far as the pool of applications 
filed permits. 

I went over these and other requirements of the "admissions criteria" 
from the Unified Plan with you and Mr. Caradonio to assure that we 
were all agreed about what the Court has required with respect to 
city-wide vocational program assignments. 

I questioned Mr. Caradonio about language in his April 6th response 

to Report No. 2 , which suggested that he believed that 

the State also calls for the adoption of procedures 
which will further decrease enrollments in vocational/ 
occupational programs. 

I pointed out that 

(a) these procedures are required by the Unified Plan and have 

been since 1975; and 

(b) the Court-ordered procedures are designed and intended to 

assure full enrollment of each program on a desegregated 
basis, as part of the remedy for previous violations of 
the constitutional rights of minority students in the 
vocational area in Boston. Such full enrollment depends 
upon vigorous and coordinated efforts to encourage applications 
from students of all racial/ethnic groups, male and female. 
It is the lack of such efforts, and in particular of 
cooperation on all levels of the School Department, which 
would result in underenrollment of any program and thus in 
denial of educational opportunities. 

I believe that we reached an understanding about the source and nature 
of assignment requirements, and the efforts required to achieve 
compliance and full enrollment for each program. I will look forward 
to receiving an "action plan" from Mr. Caradonio and the proposed 
assignments - in early May - from you. 

CO. Franklin Banks, Robert Blumenthal, Esq., Dr. David Cronin 
Marlene Godfrey , James Caradonio, Boston Public Schools 



-53- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

EDUCATION/EMPLOYMENT 
JAMES A. CARADONIO, Director 



84-416 



September 14, 1984 



Memorandum to: Dr. Charles Glenn 



From: James A. Caradonio 



Re: Vocational Education Recruiting 




rector, Education/Employment 



Prior to submitting a formal Action Plan for Vocational Education 
Marketing, we have asked to meet with you in order to clarify 
State monitoring criteria. 

At our meeting, I hope that we will be able to clearly agree to: 

a) realistic goals and operations for a systemwide marketing 

program. 

For example, the task to follow-up on all students 
expressing interest in vocational programs requires further 
discussion . 

What does "fol low-up" . entai 1? Why all students? 

b) an understanding of how the present assignment procedures are 
often inconsistent with standard, acceptable recruitment 
procedures. Professionals who recruit students, athletes, 
soldiers, etc. have the ability to often immediately guarantee 
placement. Our current process has too little "pay oft 
potential" for both recruiters and recruitees. We wish to 
make some suggestions to current assignment procedures, 
especially regarding supplemental recruitment campaigns. 



75 NEW DUDLEY STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02119 • (6171 442-5200, x587, 588 

-59- 



c) The- student market. We must clarity the student market: 

(1) over 50% ot all white BPS high school students are en- 
rolled in schools or programs which exclude them trom 
active participation in the Humphrey Center. Although 
some adjustments have been made to account tor this, the 
State does not seem to be cognizant ot this reality. 

(2) Tne new Promotional Policy has had - and will continue 
to have - a negative impact on student participation in 
any extra-curricular activities or programs, including 
vocational education. 

(3) When enrollments decline, individual schools hold on to 
their students quite tenaciously and discourage students 
from participating in any external programs. State 
Department reports have documented the declining 
enrollment ot our school system. 

(4) Vocational programs are voluntary. Students are 
assigned only if they choose programs. It is quite 
possible that consumers will not choose to purchase 

a product - even if that product is properly packaged 
and well-advertised. 

(5) Adolescents make tentative career choices. Human 
development research indicates that people make firm 
career decisions between the ages ot 24 and 44 - not 

15 - 19. For the majority of high school age vocation- 
al students, their skill training programs are explora- 
tory programs. We must administer our programs to 
assist students to clarify their self-images and 
abilities in relation to the skills required in the 
world of work. We are having more ability to satisfy our 
customers through more streamlined assignment procedures 
which allow students to change programs during the course 
of the school year. 

(6) Some of our programs should have declining enrollments 
because there is little potential for career growth. 

(7) Vocational education has a negative image. The Humphrey 
Center's location has a negative image for city residents 

These are realities within which we must operate and set 
realistic goals and objectives. Any marketing program is 
a long-term effort - not just a one-shot blitz of in- 
formation. We are utilizing our 636 funds to increase and 
strengthen career education in the middle schools. Our 
"career guidance efforts are tied to attracting students to 
available programs". 



-60- 



However, it is not our goal to "attract students to avail- 
able programs". It is our goal to assist students to plan 
productive and satisfying lives. All our activities are 
means to this end. In the process of so assisting 
students, students will fill the programs - or we will 
phase out underenrolled programs in order to re-allocate 
funds into other high growth/high demand areas. 

We ar<i required to help students and parents change 
traditional viewpoints and stereotypes. 

We have already completed many activities related to the 
planning of a comprehensive marketing plan. Since none of 
us has tormai marketing training we are learning the 
trade. We also are requesting technical assistance from 
business and/or university resources. Please see 
enclosures . 

d) It would help us if you could provide examples of what con- 
stitutes "vigorous outreach from the programs themselves." 
The use of teachers for recruitment could have collective 
bargaining and financial implications which we need to address 
prior to any implementation. 

e) Time allocations 

I would like to decide on procedures for responding to Court 
monitors which minimizes our time pent in filing out reports 
nd maximizes our limited time and resources to doing these 
needed activities. 

For example, the State Department will soon conduct monitor- 
ing for Report #4. Staff assigned to work on marketing will 
have to lessen ttiose activities to address State inquiries for 
Report #4, IVe need you to be aware of the impact of the 
monitoring process - while we aid the monitors we are not 
achieving tasks. 

I also am enclosing a copy of the l9«4-85 Key Results tor our 
department. As you can see, we had already included several 
activities relating to marketing and guidance. Vv'e are spending 
our money and time (not enough of the former is available). 



-61- 



We look forward to meeting with you in order to clarity our | 

concerns. ; 

I. 

Enclosures j 

/n i 

I 

c: Robert Spillane . j 

John Coakley I 

Frank Banks j 

I 



-62- 









DUredU UT cqud I cuuLat-iuiia 1 ujjpui cum ljt 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

October 2, 1984 



Mr. James Caradonio 
Director, Education-Employment 
55 New Dudley Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02119 

Dear Jim: 

I am sorry I couldn't make the meeting on September 21st, but the new 
requirements of the Court make it appropriate to postpone discussion 
until we have a chance to review the forthcoming filing of the School 
Department. I assume that the filing will include a plan for bringing 
vocational education assignments into compliance through vigorous 
outreach. I also want to be sure that Associate Commissioner Cronin 
and his staff are fully involved in assessing the plan. 

However, there are several points in your letter that do deserve a 
prompt response. Let me start by emphasizing that we are realistic 
and flexible in our monitoring. For example, our reports have called 
attention only to the vocational programs that are sharply out of 
compliance; nit-picking is not our purpose. I must stress neverthe- 
less that the task given us by the Court is monitoring for compliance, 
to identify problems as well as progress. We cannot negotiate the 
terms of compliance. The Boston Public Schools must take the initiative 
for any changes. 

Surely the request for an effective program to increase the number of 
applications from all racial/ethnic groups is not an unreasonable one. 
The Unified Plan of 1975 required a public information campaign to 
(1) increase awareness of vocational/occupational education goals and 
programs, (2) aid parents and students to make informed choices and 
(3) increase enrollments to targeted levels. Pages 53 to 56 of the 
Plan identify specific audiences and recruiting procedures. Moreover, 
staff from the Department of Education have provided technical 
assistance to Boston. Just one example: Mimi Jones of the Greater 
Boston Regional Education Center delivered two inservice training 
sessions, on recruitment and retention, to HORC staff this past spring, 
and supplied them with extensive materials developed by the Division 
of Occupational Education. These materials, by the way, contain not 
only step-by-step procedures for recruiting but also numerous 
successful examples and models. 



-63- 



Mr. James Caradonio page two October 2, 1984 



Nine years have passed since the Unified Plan was ordered. It is almost 
the end of 1984, and we hope for more than "activities related to the 
planning of a comprehensive marketing plan," or a litany of reasons 
why you can't conduct effective recruiting. 

Let me address the specific points in your letter concerning vocational 
education assignments. 

• assignment procedures - Suggestions for improvements in the 
procedures should be proposed to the Court, not to us, 
through a motion to modify existing orders. Remember that 
declining applications for vocational assignments accounted 
for a significant portion of the non-compliance noted in our 
last report. 

• enrollment goals - The enrollment goals for the HORC have been 
adjusted to reflect the proportion of white students enrolled 
in programs which preclude participation in the HORC. 

• impact of the new promotional policy on extra-curricular 
activities - Is vocational education an extra-curricular activity? 
If it is true that the new policy is having a negative impact 

on assignments, the Court should be alerted to a possible 
conflict with its orders. 

• high schools discourage students from attending the HORC - 

Our reports have called attention to this problem, as you noted 
in your recent circular to headmasters. 

t vocational programs are voluntary , adolescents make tentative 
career choices , voc ed has a^ negative image - Are you arguing 
against vocational education or the HORC? 

If you believe, as I assume you do, that Boston offers valuable 
vocational education programs, aren't you disturbed that students 
are not attracted to them? Can we agree that a positive approach 
to vocational education outreach will benefit both the students 
and the vocational education programs of Boston? 



cc: John Coakley 
David Cronin 
Naisuon Chu 
Franklin Banks 




Charles Glenn 



-6h- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION 
John R Coakley, Senior Officer 



May 25, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: 
FROM: 



Charles Glenn 
John Coakley 




SUBJECT: ORC Assi gnmeiiirs for 1984-85 



Please find enclosed the proposed ORC assignments for 1984-85 and 
other pertinent information. 

1 . Exploratory 

Printout #1 contains the numbers — and September schools of all 
el igible applicants. We propose to assign all: 



Black 

587 
60% 



White 

139 

]k% 



Other 

261 
26% 



Total 
987 



We would monitor carefully the future applications for ORC and 
would allow only White applicants to be assigned until we reach 
17^. We also would join ORC's marketing effort to recruit 
students. 

In fairness, I wish to acknowledge that history suggests some of 
the above applicants/assignees will "drop out" of ORC by October 1, 
1984. 

2. Ski 1 1 Development 

a. The ORC tallies — first, second, third preferences — for each 
skill program are enclosed. Kindly note that some students 

may not have been eligible, e.g., a Music Major at Madison Park. 

b. Skill codes are enclosed on a Student Application. 

c. Proposed assignments - by program , by race and gender. 



26 COURT STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 • 726-6200, EXT 5500, 726-6555, EXT 5500 AREA 617 

-65- 



Charles Glenn 2. May 25, 198^ 



Please note on the printout: 

Ampersand = a new program in Graphics for substantially 
separate special needs students who will not 
be mainstreamed 

Dollar sign = students who are still carried on ORG register 

but who did not return applications. ORG will 

be directed to consult with such students and 
ascertain their plans 

Asterisk = a relatively new program in Building Maintenance 
for substantially separate special needs students 
who are not mainstreamed. 

Kindly note the ORG goals for 198i»-85 

Black White Other 



High 


63% 


2$% 


2]% 


Ideal 


S3% 


2}% 


20% 


Low 


55% 


]e% 


19% 



The proposed skill development assignments, in total are 

Black White Other Total 

1312 396 A68 2176 
60% 18% 22% 

d. Proposed assignments - by September schools 

The printout would appear to be self-explanatory 

e. Proposed assignments - by GLUSTERS 

Please note that each of the eight clusters is within the 
range for White students, and six of the clusters are within 
the range for Black students. 

In conclusion, we have endeavored to address issues of racial isolation 
and sexual stereotyping and predictable enrollment "fall-off". Our proposal 
for the Exploratory Program is aimed at avoiding a common criticism that we 
turn away applicants to the Occupational Resource Genter. Our proposal for 
the Skill Program is consistent with the rules listed on page 3 of the 
April 1983 Assignment Procedures for ORG (Attachment #3). 

bmj 

Enclosures 

cc: Office of Superintendent 
Robert Peterkin 
James Garadonio 
Catherine El 1 i son 
John Canty 
Lydia Francis 
Patricia Murray-Blume _r/- 



Analysis of Extended Day Kindergarten Programs 

Extended day kindergarten programs are a common and effective element 
in desegregation plans in Massachusetts. In addition to their 
educational benefits, they allow school systems to draw students to 
schools to which they are not assigned on a mandatory basis, and thus 
to enhance desegregation on a voluntary basis. Such programs in 
Worcester and in Springfield, for example, have made an important 
contribution to desegregation. 

To be effective in desegregation, extended day kindergarten programs 
need to attract and enroll the appropriate numbers of students of 
each racial/ethnic group, and to have an effective linkage with the 
primary grades in the same school, so that parents will keep their 
children in the school when they have the option of returning them 
to a local school for first grade. 

BOSTON 

The extended day kindergarten programs (EDP's) in Boston are clearly 
attractive to parents of all racial/ethnic groups. As of April 1984 
there were fifteen EDP programs with more white applicants for 1984-5 
(a total of 83 students) than could be accommodated. Although 
Black and Hispanic parents tend to wait until Fall to register for 
kindergarten, there were four programs (30 students) which could not 
accommodate all of their Black applicants, and one (6 students) which 
could not accommodate all of the Other Minority students who had 
already applied. 

Several of the programs which, last April, had an access of white 
applicants are located in primarily minority areas, and one of those 
with an excess of Black applicants is in South Boston. 

Although there is strong parent demand for EDP's, problems arise in 
two respects in the relation of these programs to desegregation. 

(1) In a few cases, more students of a racial/ethnic group are 
assigned to an EDP than should be, under the Court's guidelines. 
Instances of concern were pointed out in Report #2, and again in a 
memorandum from Charles Glenn to John Coakley dated April 28, 1984, 
included in Report #3 (volume IIA, pages 104-108). 

* the Guild School in East Boston enrolls fifteen white 

students in its EDP, rather than the ten which would 
be appropriate; 

* the Eliot School in the North End enrolls seven white students 

in its EDP, despite an agreement (see Report #3, IIA, 109) 
that no more than four would be enrolled. 



-67- 



At the same time, some schools enroll fewer students of a racial /ethnic 
group than would meet the desegregation standard. Concern was 
expressed, in the April 28 memo, about Black enrollment at the Mozart, 
which remains low by 11 students, and at the Warren Prescott, which 
remains low by 7 students. Several other programs, it is fair to 
add, did attract additional Black students. 

The memo noted the need to recruit more white students for five 
programs; four of these remain low. In one case, the Lee School, 
the substantial shortfall of white EDP enrollment is a matter of 
special concern, given the intended contribution of the program to 
meeting special desegregation requirements for that school. Last 
year the Black/white ratio in the EDP was 2.5:1; this year it is 6:1. 

As noted above, tiiere were 83 white applicants who could not be 
accommodated in fifteen EDP programs which were oversubscribed by 
the initial applications. Monitors were informed in April and May 
that a special effort would be made to reach disappointed white 
applicants, to encourage enrollment in the undersubscribed EDP's. 
An update on this effort was requested in August. So far as 
monitors have been able to determine, however, the kindergarten 
recruitment efforts which have occurred have been generalized public 
information notices rather than specific approaches to parents who 
did not receive their requested assignments. 

In one instance in which no white applications were received initially 
but four white students are not enrolled in the EDP, the principal 
attributes this improvement to "word of mouth" and "networking". 
Such informal efforts can be highly significant, when coordinated 
with a concerted effort to target and reach potential enrol lees. 

(2) Whatever the success of enrollment strategies -- and the high 
level of parent demand in Boston has produced EDP enrollments which, 
in most instances, are satisfactory -- the impact of extended day 
programs upon desegregation in the upper grades depends upon the 
encouragement of continuing enrollment in the same school. If 
students leave the school and attend first grade elsewhere, especially 
in a non-public school, the contribution to desegregation is minimal. 

The nature of the Boston student assignment plan, with different 
geocodes for kindergarten and for elementary grades, require the 
reassignment of many students after kindergarten. If a student is 
changing schools, there is a greater chance that he/she will attend 
a non-public school for first grade. Although EDP enrollment is not 
limited by geocode, EDP students are frequently reassigned for first 
grade. 

Several principals told monitors that they made no effort to persuade 
the parents of kindergarten students to consider remaining in their 
schools for first grade; one questioned whether it would be appropriate 
to do so. Another principal makes a special effort, and seems 
successful in retaining many students who come to his school for 
kindergarten. 



-68- 



It is clear from the "Memorandum and Orders as to Kindergarten 
Desegregation" (August 12, 1977) that the Court was not initially 
in favor of different geocodes for kindergarten and first grade 
assignments, and agreed to the "separate grade structure" for 
kindergarten only at Boston's urging. 

The Court predicted, in the memorandum, that "thousands of white 
children who attend public kindergartens may continue to be 
reinforced to switch to nonpublic schools, beginning in grade 1, 
when the regular geocode assignments become applicable" (page 2). 
Monitors have pointed out the strong pattern of "no show" assign- 
ments (Report #2, volume II, pages 94-96); while some schools 
have improved their ability to "hold" the students assigned to 
them, the problem remains a serious one (see attachment ). 

SUMMARY 

Parents of all racial/ethnic groups show strong interest in 
extended day kindergarten programs, and these programs have the 
potential to contribute significantly to desegregation. 

Most programs enroll appropriate numbers of students of each 
racial/ethnic group. As noted in Report #2 and Report #3, however, 
there continue to be instances in which more white students are 
assigned than should be, and others in which insufficient numbers 
of white or of minority students have been recruited. 

Monitors found no evidence of systematic efforts to offer alternative 
EDP assignments to parents who could not be given their first choices, 
despite an understanding, at the time the assignments were approved, 
that such efforts would be made. 

The potential contribution of extended day kindergarten programs 
to desegregation and to strong public school enrollments is seriously 
weakened by the lack of linkages between kindergarten and first 
grade attendance. Parents of kindergarten students should be 
approached in an effective way to enroll their children in either 
the same or another desegregated school for first grade. 

The assignment of different geocodes for kindergarten than for the 
elementary grades works against enrollment stability, continuity of 
instruction, and desegregation. 

/Charles Glenn 
November 20, 1984 



-69- 



OCT '17 '1984 



NEW ENGLAND NEWSCUP 

THE DAILY NCiVS 

SPRINGFiaO, MA 
D. 75.559 



Brightwood Draws 
Kids From 'All Over' 



By KAREN M. THOMAS 

Some Springfield kindergartners 
are traveling as far as nine miles 
from Sixteen Acres to attend school 
in tiie North End. 

That is because Brightwood Ele- 
mentary is the only school in the 
city to offer full-day icindergarten, 
school officials said. And the pro- 
gram has become so popular a sec- 
ond class has been added. 

According to Superintendent 
Thomas J. Donahoe, the second 
class, part of the city's magnet pro- 
gram to reduce Hispanic isolation in 
the North End, began Monday. , 

The. magnet program, offered on 
a voluntary basis, provides special 
services, such as the all-day kinder- 
garten, as an incentive to reduce a 
high concentration of Hispanic stu- 
dents currently enrolled at 
Brightwood. 

Kindergartners usually attend 
school in their own neighborhoods. 

Caoght Off Gaard 

School officials were caught off 
guard when a waiting list began to 
grow this fall after the ^3 slots in 
the first class were filled, he said. 

"We were recruiting all summer 
long and we didn't really know what 
the total impact of our efforts 
would be," Donahoe said. 

Brightwood Principal Bruno Mar- 
sili said 10 slots in the second class 
are still open. 

The classes are funded by state 
Cha pter 6.36 f unds, said magnet pro- 
gram supervisor Vivian George. 

"4 Youngsters Left" 

"There are four youngsters left 
on the list, but to accept them we 



have to enroll more white, non-His- 
panic pupils," she said. 

Donahoe said the all-day class 
had generated a lot of interest. 

"And what we find too, is that 
when pupils enter the program in 
kindergarten, the retention factor in 
Grade 1 is about 90 percent," he 
said. 

George said she did not know how 
many youngsters were on the wait- 
ing list before a decision was made 
to open another class, but "we had 
enough of a waiting list for a com- 
mitment to open another.". 

George said several youngsters 
are traveling from all over the city 
to attend the all-day class. One 
pupil, she said, left private school to 
attend the class. 

Increase Learning 

A 20-member study team of the 
Springfield School Committee had 
recommended last year that full- 
day kindergarten programs be 
adopted within all the city's ele- 
mentary schools to allow pupils to 
increase their learning and to help 
working parents who now must find 
part-time babysitters. 

The committee ruled in July, 
however, it would be too costly for 
the city to adopt the program all at 
once. The program could cost the 
city up to $1 million, per year and 
would add about 40 teachers to the 
payroll 

Parents interested in enrolling 
youngsters in the all-day program 
should contact George or Gary 
Roberts at the Springfield School 
Department. 



-70- 



SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 



-71- 



SPECIAL DESEGREGATION MEASURES 



ORDERS 

SUMMARY 



May 3, 1976; May 6, 1977; March 21, 1978 



The May 3, 1976 Order designated four 
schools for special measures to bring them 
into desegregation compliance; the May 6, 
1977 Order designated nine additional 
schools. The March 21, 1978 Order required 
special support for minority students at the 
three examination schools (see below). In 
November 1981 the Court accepted a voluntary 
compliance plan to bring Burke and 
Dorchester high schools into compliance. In 
April 1982 Boston was ordered to maintain a 
minimum of five staff at the Spanish 
bilingual program at Charlestown High 
School. Finally, in May 1982 the Court 
allowed the Tobin Elementary School to 
extend to the middle school grades as a 
pilot K-8 school. 



FINDINGS 



Order 



May 3, 1976 



Partial Compliance 

There are twenty schools which have been 
designated by the Court for special 
desegregation measures. 



Schools 

Ellis 
Lee 

Bradford 
Hale 



Comments 



now closed 

now a magnet 

school 



-73- 



May 6, 1977 



R. G.. Shaw Middle 

Thompson Middle 

P. A. Shaw 

Emerson 

Tuckerman 

Guild 

Hennigan 

McKay 

East Boston 



March 21, 1978 Boston Latin School 



Boston Latin Academy 
Boston Technical High 



November 1981 Burke High 



April 1982 



May 1982 



Dorchester High 
Charlestown High 

Tobin 



now closed 

a magnet school 

a magnet school 

a magnet school 

create a 

"business 

education magnet" 

"support" for 
minority students 
same 
same 

not issued - 
voluntary 
compliance 
same 

adequate 
bilingual program 

became K-8 



Elementary and Middle Schools 

Two of these schools have subsequently 
closed, and four are magnet schools and are 
discussed in the Assignments section of this 
report. 

The Tobin School was allowed to become a K-8 
school (as an exception to the uniform grade 
pattern) in May 1982. It was subjected to 
an extensive enrollment analysis in Report 
No. 2 (Volume II, pages 183-189); this 
concluded that the K-8 structure was 
generally a success from a desegregation 
perspective, with minor improvement in the 
overall enrollment, and desegregation 
compliance in grades 6-8. Subsequent 
monitoring found a problem of articulation 
between the elementary and middle levels, 
with students in grade 5 receiving no 
preference over other District I students 
for assignments to grade 6. This was 
partially corrected for 1984-85 
assignments. Fall 1984 enrollments show no 
significant change; the upper elementary 
grades are somewhat more desegregated than 



-74- 



in Fall 1983, but the primary grades are 
less desegregated. 

Four elementary and two middle schools were 
designated, in 1976 and 1977, for special 
desegregation measures without further 
specification. These schools were monitored 
extensively in Report Nos . 2 and 3. It was 
concluded that there was no concerted effort 
to make these schools more able to attract 
and retain the White students needed, in 
each case, to achieve compliance with the 
permitted range. The Pauline Shaw and Lee 
Schools were in compliance, in large part, 
because of program factors and "word of 
mouth" among parents, while the Ellis and 
Emerson Elementary Schools and the Shaw and 
Thompson Middle Schools were out of 
compliance, with no efforts under way to 
correct this. 

White enrollment of the Shaw improved 
substantialy in 1984; that of the Thompson 
and four elementary schools worsened. 

In November the Department of Implementation 
proposed funding a recruitment program, on 
condition that the funds not be taken out of 
the 5.3 million which Boston receives 
annually under Chapter 636, the States 
desegregation funds. This replaced a 
proposal developed in April which failed to 
find a place on Boston's list of priorities 
for the use of these funds. The proposal 
will be funded out of the statewide Chapter 
636 reserve, but Boston has been informed 
that recruitment must be a priority for 
funding in 1985-86. Also in November, the 
District II community superintendent began a 
recruitment effort which will attempt to 
bring the Ellis School into compliance and 
to increase White enrollment in other 
schools in the district. 

High Schools ; 

Boston gave the Court a voluntary compliance 
plan for the Burke and Dorchester High 
Schools in November 1981. Report Nos. 2 and 
3 found substantial progress in program 
improvement and recruitment at both schools, 
with Dorchester ahead in facility 
renovations and the development of new 
vocational offerings. Current monitoring 



-75- 



found that all problems identified at 
Dorchester High had been addressed 
successfully, and the school is in 
compliance with the permitted range. 

Facility improvements at Burke High were 
started very late, but are now under way. 
Efforts are also under way to address the 
need for a distinctive "magnet" offering to 
increase White enrollment as well as 
contribute to the educational effectiveness 
of the school. Safety and security issues 
are being addressed. The ninth and tenth 
grades are in compliance with the permitted 
range, and overall enrollment of White 
students is close to it. Of 92 White 
students assigned, 78 are enrolled, another 
indication of progress in creating a safe 
and educationally-positive environment. 

Boston was ordered on May 6, 1977 to create 
a "business education magnet" at East Boston 
High. Past reports have shown that this 
program, despite its attraction of a 
substantial number of minority students, had 
been implemented very inadequately. Some 
signs of progress were commended in Report 
No. 3. The school administration is now 
moving to strengthen the program in a 
coordinated way, but has not received the 
systemwide resources and support which are 
needed. (See attachment) 

The number of students currently enrolled in 
the Charlestown High Bilingual Program is 
91, This represents an increase of 50% from 
the 1982-83 school year, when the enrollment 
was 60. There are five professional staff 
assigned, as ordered. 



C»NCLUS ICMS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



Dorchester and Burke High Schools are 
commended for significant improvements in 
programs and school climate, and for efforts 
to attract and retain white students to 
comply with the desegregation requirements. 

East Boston High School is commended for 
facing the need for implementation of the 
original commitment to a business education 



-76- 



magnet, for planning significant 
improvements in the program, and for seeking 
the resources to complete this task. 

The Department of Implementation and 
District II are commended for their plans to 
begin a process of outreach to parents to 
increase desegregated enrollments in 
selected schools. 

1. There is still a need for concerted 
recruitment efforts, and they should be 
a priority for the use of Chapter 636 
funds allocated to Boston. Outreach to 
parents should be on the basis of a 
clear statement of the educational 
mission and offerings of each school; 
experience in other desegregating cities 
in Massachusetts indicates that this 
essential step should involve teachers 
and parents. 

2. The facility improvements at Burke 
should be completed, and a distinctive 
program offering developed and 
supported. 

3. The Central Office should provide the 
resources and support necessary for full 
implementation of the business education 
magnet at East Boston High. 



EX2^MINATIC»I SCHOOLS 



ORDER 



May 10, 1975, pages 48-49; May 
page 18; March 21, 1978, page 6 



3, 1976, 



SUMMARY 



"The School Department shall ... institute and 
conduct programs (a) to make all students in 
the system aware of the admission 
requirements and type of instruction offered 
at the examination schools, and (b) to 
recruit black and Hispanic appli-cants to 
the examination schools in future years. 
Any tutorial prog^'ams given to prepare 
students for entrance examinations shall be 
conducted on a desegregated basis, as shall 
advanced work classes (if they are to be 
continued) . Any enrichment and remedial 
programs for students admitted to or 
enrolled in the examination schools shall be 
available and conducted on a desegregated 



-77- 



basis. There shall be no tracking of 
students within the examination schools 
which results in racially segregated 
classes." (May 10, 1975) 

"Assignments to the examination schools 
shall be made . . . exclusively from among 
students ranking at or above the 50th 
percentile ... on two ranked lists of 
students who took the Secondary School 
Admission Test .... Applicants shall be 
divided into two groups: group A shall 
comprise black and Hispanic students; group 
B shall comprise all other students. 
Students shall be accepted according to 
their ranking, in the following order of 
priority: (1) from group A, 35% of students 
accepted at each level of admission at each 
examination school . . . provided that a 
lesser number of students from group A may 
be accepted at any level if an insufficient 
number rank at or above the 50th percentile 
. . . ." (May 3, 1976) 

"The superintendent of schools shall (1) 
review the need for additional support 
services at the examination schools, 
including guidance and counseling, summer 
orientation and screening, professional and 
peer tutoring and remedial instruction, (2) 
develop additional support services as 
needed and (3) file a report with the court 
and parties . . . ." (March 21, 1978) 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



The three examination schools were monitored 
closely in Report Nos. 2 and 3; the 
monitoring included interviews with staff, 
with present and former students, and 
repeated discussions with administrators. 
In Report No. 3 detailed recommendations 
were made for each school. The primary 
focus of these recommendations was to 
address the problem of high rates of non- 
promotion and non-retention of Black and 
Hispanic students at Boston Latin Academy 
and Latin School. 

Monitoring for Report No. 4 concentrated on 
documenting progress in implementing the 
recommendations made in Report No. 3. 



-78- 



Monitors noted, in all three examination 
schools, a recognition by the school 
administrators that retention of Black and 
Hispanic students was a real problem, and 
also noted attempts by them to address this 
problem. To date their efforts have been 
provisional, supported by "soft" funds or by 
temporary reassignments, and without strong 
and consistent Central Office support. 

Plans have been developed for the 
improvement of the preparation for 
examination schools provided by the Advanced 
Work Classes/Academically Talented 
Sections. With the exception of a few 
improvements in teacher training and 
support, and a State-funded program through 
the University of Massachusetts to work with 
Hispanic students, these plans have not been 
implemented by Boston. 

Some improvements have been made by Boston 
Latin and Boston Technical High Schools in 
the use of summer orientation programs to 
identify those students who might develop 
difficulties, and to provide skills for 
success. These improvements have been made 
within existing resources. 

There has been some improvement in 
procedures for assisting and following up on 
students requiring extra support at all 
three schools. Technical High School has 
been allocated an additional teacher to 
provide English as a Second Language 
support. No school has been provided 
additional guidance counselors or clerical 
support. Some additional tutorial services 
have been planned with State funds. It is 
too early to assess the effect of the new 
procedures and resources. 

To date there have been no fundamental or 
permanent changes in the support available 
to students experiencing academic failure. 
The measures planned, while valuable, do not 
yet constitute a / comprehensive effort 
supported by the Central Office to address 
this issue. 

There has been no response to two 
recommendations. Information should be 
collected systematically on the reasons 
individual students leave the school before 



-79- 



graduation, and used to develop effective 
strategies to retain more minority students. 

In addition, each school should develop a 
plan to assure that all staff have positive 
attitudes toward the enrollment and 
retention of minority students. Monitors 
were told that school administrators had 
only a limited ability to deal with problems 
of staff attitude. Less has been done, in 
this respect, than in many desegregating 
schools in Boston and elsewhere in 
Massachusetts. 



CONCLUS ICMS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



The headmasters of the three examination 
schools and the community superintendent are 
commended for a frank recognition of the 
problem of support and an attempt, within 
the resources and authority available to 
them, to address this problem. The director 
of the Advanced Work Class/Academically 
Talented Sections is also commended for 
developing a plan to make them more 
effective in preparing students for the 
examination schools, and for working to 
improve cooperation between staff of the 
programs and of the examination schools. 

1. The measures to strengthen the AWC/ATS 
should be implemented in full, to assure 
that students entering the examination 
schools from the Boston Public Schools 
have a preparation equivalent to that of 
students entering from non-public 
schools. 

2. Support services, including tutorial and 
counseling support, for students in the 
examination schools should become a 
regular and permanent budget item. 

3. There should be systematic interviewing 
of students leaving the examination 
schools before graduation, and use of 
this information to strengthen the 
program and the support provided. 



-80- 



There should be -a frank recognition that 
the attitudes of some staff create 
problems for the retention of minority 
students, as confirmed by the extensive 
interviews conducted for Report No. 3, 
and a commitment to find an effective 
solution to this problem. 



-81- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATICasF REPORT #4 

SPECIAL DESEGREGATIOJ MEASURES 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 

Burke and Dorchester 

1. Two Letters, one each to Schwartz, Holland 

2. Two Reports to M. Griffith, one each from Schwartz and 
Holland 

3. One Letter from Coakley Re: Dorchester/Transportation 



EXAM SCHOOLS 



1. Three letters to headmasters 

2. Two Reports: Tech/AWC/ATS 

3. Two Charts: BLS/BLA 

4. One Chart BLS drop-out rate 

5. Four memos: McManus, Beat tie. Lane 

EAST BOSTON BUSINESS MAGNET 

1. Letter to J. Poto 

2. One Action Plan 

3. One CPC Report 

4. Non-compliance Issues Report 

5. Three letters from Poto to parents, Caradonio, Laquidara 



-83- 



M! 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Qiiincy, Massnclmsctts 021B9 
September 25, 198A 



Mr. Albert Holland 
Headmaster, Burke High School 
60 Washington Street 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 02121 

Dear Mr. Holland: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance at the 
Burke with the plan developed in response to the Court's 
requirement in November I98I of special measures "to meet the 
Court's dual objective of desegregation and enhancement of 
educational opportunity." 

Our last report (submitted on July 15, 198^) made the following 
findings regarding the Burke: 

e The programs available at the Burke, while improving, 
still do not constitute an effective magnet offering 
which could draw students; 

• facility improvement had not yet begun; 

• no major recruitment efforts had yet been undertaken; 
and 

• the large number of LA/B students may impair the 
Burke's ability to mobilize resources for educational 
Improvement. 

The Report made three recommendations regarding the Burke. 

1. Facility improvements should proceed on a priority 
basis. 

2. The computer offerings should be developed into a 
distinctive and attractive program. 

3. There should be additional staff support if a 
disproportionate number of LA/8 students with behavior 
problems continues to be enrolled. 



-8i|- 



A fourth recommendation, that Boston should make student 
recruiting efforts a clear priority, is also relevant for the 
Burke. 

For this monitoring period we are requesting that you develop an 
"action plan" that provides details — activities, staff 
responsible, timelines — for fulfilling the special court order and 
the recommendations listed above. The action plan will be the 
basis of any further Departmental oversight deemed necessary by 
the Court. 

I wi I 1 call you to schedule a visit to the Burke at a time 
convenient to you. I would like to review the action plan with 
you and any other school officials you believe appropriate during 
that visit. 

It has been a pleasure to observe the Burke's progress, and I look 
forward to my next visit. Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely, 



Judith Taylor 



cc: Robert Spi 1 lane 
John Coakley 
Mildred Griffith 
Charles Glenn 



-85- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 



STANLEY SWARTZ 
HEADMASTER 

TO: 
FROM : 
DATE : 
RE: 



Mrs. Mildred Griffith, ComiEiinj;ty Superintendent, District V 
Stanley Swartz, Headmaster, yc^ip^t^^^osr High School 

October 22, 1984 

Addendum to Current School Safety and Security Plan 



As you are well aware approximately 95% of the student 
population at Dorchester High School walk each day to and from school, 
Therefore, it is appropriate, that some measures be employed to 
insure their safety. The following addendum to our 1984 — I985 
Safety Plan addresses measures designed to insure the safety of 
those walking students. 



II 



Students, when crossing Roberts 



;tv.'een the Kich School 



;ii 



and Washington Street have been instructed to:- 

a. Walk together in a group (prior incidents have occurred 

when students were travelling alone); 

b. Walk in front of the grandstand; 

c. Arrive to school on time; 

d. Practice vigilance and 

e. Report all incidents and suspicious persons; 

School Staff 

a. are assigned duty on the school grounds at the front 
entrance to the school; 

b. all student movement and 
by the school staff; 

c. the administrative staff has developed a 
and concern for the walking student and m 
to monitor their activities. 



early dismissals are monitored 



eneral awareness 
kes every effort 



The Department of Transportation: has assigned a vehicle to 
transport students who are dismissed during the school day. 



PEACEVALE ROAD • DORCHESTER f/A _g^_ ^E'TS 02' 24 • 436-2065 AREA 61 : 



ADDENDUM TO CURRENT SCHOOL SAFETY AND SECURITY PLAN p. 2 

IV. The Department of Safety Services have assigned :- 

a. Three (3) uniformed Officers to Dorchester High School. 

b. Their duty Includes monitoring student movement across 
the field - - they have been strategically positioned 
for high visibility. 

c. A fourth Officer is available at dismissal. 

d. One (1) Officer walks with the group from the school 
across the field. 

e. One (1) Officer is positioned at the tennis court which 
provides a good vantage point. 

f. One (1) Officer is stationed on Dunbar Avenue in the 
vicinity of the Fifield School. 

g. A marked Boston School Police cruiser is available on 
regular patrol on Washington Street (Codman Sq. area). 

The above provisions have been in effect since last October and 
have been relatively effective in terms of substantially reducing 
the number of incidents involving walking students. 



SS:jmf 



-87- 




Septeriber 23, 1984 



TO: Mildred Griffith, Conraunity Su-perintandent 

FROM: Albert D. Holland, Headaaater *^ 
RE: September Status Report 

Opening of School ; 

i 

The opening of school this year was one of the smoothest and nioat organised 
at the Burke, Students have been very cooperatiTe and well-behaved in returning 
to school. All students received an orientation in their hoaerooms and a 
general asseably orientation by grade on the new standards of behavior and the 
school-based rules, A welcoaing letter including the school-based rules and 
the standards of behavior was mailed to every parent. Essentially, a positive 
and cooperative tone has been set in the building between teachers and students, j 

Presently, we are in the process of student schedule changes which should 
be coa-oleted by the first week in October, After this date, no program changes 
will be made unless for a disci-olinary reason. 

Staffing: 

Staffing needs have been eoa-oleted with all pesitions filled. The new 
staff have been assisted by deuartaent heads and have adjusted quite well. 
Staff morale appears to be good with teachers setting higher expectations for 
students ^lnder the new curriculum objectives. There has been one teacher who ^ 
has been on an extended absence due to a back injury. If his absence is pro- 
longed, this aay have an inroact on typing and computerised accounting classes. 

We have just instituted a supervisory and evaluation training workshop 
for all (Apartment heads through the University of Massachusetts/Boston, Dr. 
Ann DePlacido has agreed to aeet weekly with our department heads and other 
administrative staff to discuss staff develoTsment, supervisory teehniques, and 
curriculum develonraent. This has been most beneficial to administrators who 
have requested formal supervisory training on the graduate level through the 
university, 

Thomas Hennessey, Senior Advisor to High Schools, has -aade two visits to 
assist us and to make resources available as we need thea. 



-88- 



1 5-credlt (optional) graduate coaptiter cotirse is present-being offered for 
staff and other aohool depsurtaent staff every Wednesday after school at the Buries, 
The comptiter woricshopa will be an on-goin^ program through out the year for 
District V teachers under the cooperation of the Burke, University of "Massachusetts/ 
and the District V Teacher Center. 

Renovations t 

The renovations are proceeding with the painting, plumbing and outside 
landscaping underway. The delay now is with the approval process which nust be 
agreed upon by the architects. Public Facilities and Planning and Engineering, 
Most of the wo2^ will be coordinated at weekly aeetinga held every Tuesday 
afternoon with the architects and the Headnaater, 

The aajor delay was due to the City Hall Law Department which held the 
contract until late July, Therefore, no work was started until August, and then 
that was only the painting contract. 

The delay of the contract and the approval process have not helped; however, 
we are riuch more optitaistic now that the renovational project is finally underway. 

Custodians ; 

The custodial preparation of the btiilding for the onening of school as not 
conpleted until the last aonent. This has been an on-going problem here to 
proTjerly clean the btiilding, suah that the suuervisor of custodians had to cone 
out to the building to personally supervise. 

There were unavoidable problems due to the painters working in the building 
at the same time; however, there wore sections of the building that should have 
been completed and were not. School was only able to open with proper maintenance 
because the custodians had to work during the Labor Lay weekend, 

I realize that the senior custodian is in charge; however, it an^jears that 
the senior doesn't have the authority to get the job done, I tried to meet 
with all the custodians, but was later informed that this violated their 
contract. 

All I hare requested is a clean btiilding for my students and faculty. If 
this is not possible, then I 'rfould like to submit a proposal to secure an 
outside cleaning fiira that would properly clean the building and would in the 
long run be mor« cost effective than the present situation. 

Magnet Proerams: , 

It is the feeling of the administration that the Jeremiah Burke School now 
has the resources to offer our computer education iDrogram on a cityvide magnet 
basis, Ve currently have tliree computer rooms in operation with another room 
awaiting electrical vriring. This will total four computer rooms equipped with 
Apples, Digital Rainbows, and IB'T PCs. The- teacher training workshops are 
increasing the number of teachers who have been exposed to the comTJuters. Also, 
TJore subject area teachers will be trained to onerate the computers and to use 

-89- 



the software for their olaaaea. 







Our business partner, ^Tew England Life, will assist the Burice as we celebrair 
our 50th year of servioe in the community and as they celebrate their 150th 
anniversary. -lew England Life has planned to contribute a fully equipped high "^ 
tech claasroon for the training of business education students in office machine L 
and computer operations. Their plans also include a modernization of the school 
library on the sane wing, .'J 

I 

The Burke Minth Grade Cluster Prograa has now entered its third year of ; 
operation, 1 full-tine cluster coordinator and seven teachers meet weekly with 
the Assistant Headmaater(Curricalua), Math and English Department Heads, and 
a curriculum consultant from the University d Massachusetts. Cluster teachers ; 
have scheduled a weekly agenda to address implementation of the new citywide i 
curriculum objectives, the new promotional policy, parental involvement, basic ' 
skills, testing, student discipline, and student evaluations. 

The cluster has shown positive results in the areas of attendance, achieve- 
ment, and discipline. At the end of the 1985-84 school yestr, it was noted that ' 
the non-repeating 9th grade students attained a higher average daily attendance 
than any other grade. Metropolitan achievement test scores also showed a 1 

significant improvement in grade 9 over the previous year. Fewer discipline 
problems evolved in the cluster as a result of the structure of the program and 
the regular teacher/student consultations. 

Last year, the cluster was able to develoD several new projects. Through a 
team leadership approach, every ninth grade student met at least twice a semeste: 
with his/her subject area cluster teachers to discuss report card grades, attend- 
ance, and behavior. Teachers were able to observe that this regular monitoring 
served aus an early warning or as a support mechanism for students in jeopardy 
of failing. The cluster coordinator and teachers have already begun to identify 
repeaters who are in need of counseling or naLrental conferences. These students 
will be scheduled for October meetings. 

On September 27, 1984* all freshmen participated in a Higher Education 
Awareness program held at the E\irke, Under the schiool plan of the Boston 
ComTDact, this was the first of several seminars to be hald for freshmen or. 
planning career and educaticnal goals. Interesting and informative presentations 
were ^nade by guidance staff, the School Development Officer, and volunteers from 
Horbury Community College, School Volunteers, and the University of Massachusetts 

f 

Chapter 636 Programs 

The following 636 projects will be offered during the 1984-65 school year: 

University of Massachusetts /Burke Computer Training Program 

The third year of implementation of a staff training program in conjputers 
has already begun. The project will fund a part-time coo^mter resource person, 
consultants, and software to be used to enhance the quality of the computer 
magnet program being offered here at the Burke, 

On September 19, I984 a new graduate level course in Basic was opened to 
teachers at the Burke, Dorchester High, and District 7 -aiddle schools. With the 



-90- 



aasistanoe of the District V Teacher Center, "Jew England Life, and other 
connrater aoftvfare comDaniea, a aeries of workshops and courses in cotaputer 
operations will be offered throughout the course of the year. 

Universitr of Massachusetts /Burke Photography Program 

Due to substantial reductions in the budget, the photography program 
will no longer be considered a magnet prograra, A full-time BPS teacher will 
instruct five classes in the fundamentals of black and white photography and 
darkroom techniques. The university will be used to fund the program and to 
provide its resources for our students. 

Unity Through Creativity 

This project will enter its third year at the Burke, A part-time instructor 
from the company is scheduled for four clJWses in dance, movement and therapy, 
and theatre arts with regular and spe cial needs students. Creative consultants 
and technicians are hired through the cotapany to prepare students for two 
school /community productions. 

Institute of Contemporary Art 

A new project for the Buike last year, the Arts in Education project was 
an exciting program for five art classes and their teacher. Students participated 
in a one-day a week program for twenty weeks with an instructor from the ICA. 
The project also provided four artists, materials, field trips to the museum, 
and a final photo-documentation of students' work. The project has been funded 
for a second year at the same level, 

, Parent /Community Outreach 

The Burice School Parent Council held its Slections/Open House on September 20-th 
in the evening. We were pleased to have ever:-- parent who attended volunteer 
to serve on the SPC Executive Board or a committee. 

The Burke Collaborative will meet on October 3» 1984 here at the school. 
The goals of the Collaborative, this year, include strengthening parental 
involvement, imuroving^the image of the school (monthly press releases), and 
establishing an adjunct Human Services Collaborative, 

, SuT3T)liea 

There has been a :najor dealy in receiving paper sunulies for 1934-85. Out 
of necessity to provide teachers with naper for clas swork, I h3:ye borrowed pauer 
from other schools. We have completely run out of xerox and dunlicating pauer. 
After contacting the sup-oly room at the Campbell Resource Center, we were told 
that the general delivery had not yet arrived, 

. Student Attendance 

See attachment. 



-91- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



\\ uo;>ToaiA il 

\J. 1830 ^pY 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

[;E?ARTr^/1E^iT O^ ;\IPL£M£riTiT'C' 
Jcnn - Cc3K;ev. Senior C'tl cer 



November 13, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: Joseph McDonough 
FROM: John Coakley 




SUBJECT: Transportat i-bn and the Magnef /'rograms at Dorchester 
High School 

I would like to think that a reasonable person examining this paper 
would appreciate that we in the Department of Implementation have tried to 
treat Dorchester High School's transportation needs evenly and fairly. The 
following analysis is comparable to the one I provided in August or September 
when Mr. Swartz sought yellow-bus transportation for all, most or some 
students in the magnet programs at Dorchester High School. 

I am particularly sensitive to the desegregat i ve needs and court orders 
of Dorchester High School and would not ignore them. I also am sensitive 
to the need to be fair to ALL students, ALL schools and ALL taxpayers. My 
annoyance is showing because I have had to devote some of my weekend — time 
I badly needed for the Long Range Plan and the Unified Facilities Plan — to 
prepare an analysis no different from one of some weeks ago. (Of course, 
if I were not doing this analysis, I'd probably be studying the latest 
disciplinary or safety transfer request to emanate from Dorchester High School.) 

Magnet School Attendees (10/25/84) - Dorchester High School 

Home District V Black White Other Total 

Walkers 
T Passes 
Ye 1 low Bus 
TOTAL 



Al 1 Other District s Black White Other Total 

Walkers 
T Passes 
Yellow Bus 
TOTAL 



25 CC'JRT STrtEET. aOS~GN. MASSACnUSETTS 021"" " "''e-o^CO. EXT 55CO. 726-6555. EXT 5500 AREA 6i 

-92- 



28 


16 


6 


50 


7 


8 


A 


19 














35 


2k 


10 


69 



15 





5 


20 


38 





3 


k] 





3 





3 


53 


3 


8 


6k 



Joseph McDonough 2. November 13, 1984 

1. More than half the students in the magnet programs 

at Dorchester High School reside in District V. They 
are treated the way we treat the regular education and 
bilingual education students at Dorchester and Burke 
High Schools and at a significant number of other high 
schools which are accessible to good MBTA service and 
which are not racially isolated. 

2. District Visa compact geographic district. Anyone 
living west of the Murphy School or south of the 
Cleveland and Holland Schools resides within the two mi les 
1 imi t. 

3. Certain parts of District 111 (near the Lee and Lewenberg 
Schools) and District IV (near the Mattahunt School and 
almost to the Chittick School) are within two mi les of 
Dorchester High School. 

^4. MBTA service to Codman Square via bus service or trolley 
service from Dudley, Egleston, Mattapan and Ashmont is 
very reasonable. All but nine of the Black and Other 
Minority students who do not reside in District V live 
within or extremely near one of the above terminal-areas. 
I do not think that those students are inconvenienced (or 
inhibited from attending Dorchester High School) because 
they are only provided MBTA passes. 

5. The three white students who reside outside District V 
are a considerable distance from the school and arguably 
for one reason or another might be inhibited from attending 
Dorchester High School unless they were provided yellow-bus 
service. They are provided yellow-bus service. 

Remember, the purpose of recently-developed magnet programs at Dorchester 
High School was to encourage a better racial /ethnic mix at the school. I don't 
see how providing yellow-bus service to Dorchester High School to students 
currently not really in need of it will enhance the racial/ethnic mix at 
the school now or in the future. What it will do is begin a dramatic system- 
wide increase in costly yellow bus service (and not necessarily better service 
either) at a time when we must contain costs probably by shifting more high 
school students to MBTA service, not away from MBTA service. 



Please put this topic to bed! 



bmj 



cc: Office of Superintendent 
Mi Idred Griffith 
James Caradonio 
Stanley Swartz 
Robert Dentler 
t Charles Glenn 



-93- 






Bureau of Equal t'ducational Opportunity ///j^ 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetis ^ 
Department of Edu.ation 



1385 Hancock Stfect, Quincy, Massachusetts 021G9 



September 25, 1984 



Mr. Stanley Schwartz 

Headmaster, Dorchester High School 

9 Peace vale Road 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 02124 

Dear Mr. Schwartz: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of monitoring 
under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance at Dorciiester 
with the plan developed in response to the Court's requirement in 
November 1981 of special measures "to meet the Court's dual objective 
of desegregation and enhancement of educational opportunity." 

Our last Report (submitted on July 15, 1984) found that most of the 
previously identified problems at Dorchester are or have been resolved. 
The Report did note: 

e Safety problems outside the building that may deter 
students from attending; and 

• a small number of White applicants to Dorchester despite 
an ambitious recruiting effort. 

The Report made one recommendation regarding Dorchester: 

6 Safety must be improved for students walking to Dorchester 
High School . 

For this monitoring period we are requesting that you, in conjunction 
with other appropriate school officials, develop an "action plan" 
that explains in detail how Dorchester (1) will maintain the improve- 
ments that have already been accomplished, and (2) will remedy the 
problems regarding safety and recruiting noted above. The action 
plan will be the basis of any further Departmental oversight deemed 
necessary by the Court. 



_gi}_ 



Mr. Stanley Schwartz 
September 25, 1984 
Page two 



I will call you to schedule a visit to Dorchester at a time convenient 
to you. I would like to review tlie action plan with you and any other 
school officials you believe appropriate during that visit. 

It has been a pleasure to observe Dorchester's progress, and I look 
forward to my next visit. Thank you for your cooperation. 



Sincerely, 




-«s^ 



1th Taylor 



cc: Robert Spillane 
John Coackley 
Mildred Griffith 
Charles Glenn 



-95- 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

September 28, 1984 



Dr. Robert Binswanger 
Headmaster, Boston Latin Academy 
141 Ipswitch Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02115 

Dear Dr. Binswanger: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance with the 
Order of March 21, 1978 requiring development of "additional 
support services as needed." In Report #2 (February 1, 1984) the 
State Board identified support for minority students at the exam 
schools as one of the critical monitoring issues that will be 
used to evaluate proposals for modifications from the Boston 
Public Schools. 

The Department was pleased to receive evidence of Boston's 
commitment to improved support for minority students in the 
form of "Plans for Retention of Minority Students" submitted 
by Superintendent Spillane on May 29. We would like to commend 
Boston Latin Academy for a comprehensive and essentially sound 
plan. We have reviewed the Plan, and our review indicates the 
areas in which further action by the Boston School Department 
will be needed for a satisfactory response to the Department 
of Education's concerns. 

We would like to schedule a meeting with you to assist your 
development of a plan that does address the Department's 
remaining concerns. We will use this plan as the basis of 
any further monitoring authorized by the Court. The attached 
"Review of BLA Plan of May 29" summarizes the Department's 
response, and indicates areas in which the BLA Plan will need 
revision or expansion. We would also like to use this meeting 
to monitor those elements of the BLA Plan that adequately 
address Departmental concerns. These elements are also 
identified in the attached "Review." 

I will be visiting Latin Academy along with Nan Stein and 
Judith Taylor. Would October 9 be convenient? I realize 



-96- 



Dr. Robert Binswanger 



page 2 



October 28, 1984 



this is short notice, but believe it is important to discuss these 
matters with you as soon as possible. Please call me at 770-7303 
to affirm the 9th or arrange a new date. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely, 




Franklin Banks 
Special Assistant to the Commissioner 
on Boston Desegregation 



Attachment 

cc: Robert Spillane 
John Coakley 
Roger Beattie 
Charles Glenn 



-Q7-- 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street. Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

September 28, 1984 



Mr. Michael Contompasis 
Headmaster, Boston Latin School 
78 Avenue Louis Pasteur 
Boston, Massachusetts 02115 

Dear Mr. Contompasis: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance with 
the Order of March 21, 1978 requiring development of "additional 
support services as needed." In Report #2 (February 1, 1984) 
the State Board identified support for minority students at the 
exam schools as one of the critical monitoring issues that will 
be used to evaluate proposals for modifications from the Boston 
Public Schools. 

The Department was pleased to receive evidence of Boston's 
commitment to improved support for minority students in the 
form of "Plans for Retention of Minority Students" submitted 
by Superintendent Spillane on May 29. We have reviewed the 
plan for Boston Latin School, and find serious problems in it 
in addressing the Department of Education's concerns. 

We would like to schedule a meeting with you to assist your 
development of a plan that does address the Department's 
remaining concerns. We will use this plan as the basis of any 
further monitoring authorized by the Court. The attached 
"Review of Boston Latin School Plan of May 29" summarizes 
the Department's response, and indicates areas in which the 
Boston Latin School Plan will need revision or expansion. 
We would also like to use this meeting to monitor those 
elements of the Boston Latin School Plan that adequately 
address Departmental concerns. These elements are also 
identified in the attached "Review." 

I will visiting Boston Latin School along with Dan French, 
Maureen Wark and Paula Willis. Would October 15 be convenient? 



-98- 



Mr. Michael Contompasis page 2 September 28, 1984 



I realize this is short notice, but believe it is important to discuss 
these matters with you as soon as possible. Please call me at 
770-7303 to affirm the 15th or arrange a new date. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely, 




Franklin Banks 
Special Assistant to the Commissioner 
on Boston Desegregation 



Attachment 

cc: Robert Spillane 
John Coakley 
Roger Beattie 
Charles Glenn 



-no- 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
September 28, 1984 



Mr. Christopher P. Lane 

Headmaster, Boston Technical High School 

205 Townsend Street 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 02121 

Dear Mr. Lane: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance with the 
Order of March 21, 1978 requiring development of additional 
support services as needed. In Report #2 (February 1, 1984) the 
State Board identified support for minority students at the 
examination schools at one of the critical monitoring issues that 
will be used to evaluate proposals for modifications from the 
Boston Public Schools. 

In its last two reports, the Department has made the following 
recommendations regarding Boston Technical: 

1. There should be mandatory summer orientation program 
with a diagnostic component or follow up of students 
unable to attend. 

2. There should be a systematic procedure for identifying, 
referring and following up students in need of support 
services. These services, especially counseling, 
should be expanded, improved and provided during school 
hours. 

3. There should be systematic Investigation to determine 
whether the attitudes of some staff discourage students 
from persisting at the exam schools, and a plan 
submitted describing how verified problems will be 
resolved. 

Regarding recommendation #1, we were pleased to learn that this 
year's summer orientation was extended to five days, and included 
a significant diagnostic component as well as study skills 
classes. Request ; Please describe your plans to identify 
students in need of support services who did not attend summer 
school . 



-100- 



We have several requests regarding recomnendation #2. 

a. Please describe your plans for a systematic procedure 
for identifying, referring and following up students in 
need of support services. 

b. Please describe the specific support services that will 
be available during this school year. 

c. Will there be an ESL teacher at Tech this year? 

d. Will there be a peer tutoring program this year? If 
so, please describe it. 

e. Have you obtained the services of three additional 
counselors from the Human Services Collaborative? 

f. Has a study sicill curriculum been developed? 

Regarding recommendation #3, we have one request. Please describe 
your plans to investigate and remedy, if necessary, attitudes 
among staff that discourage students from persisting at Tech. 

I will be visiting Tech this fall along with Judith Taylor. Would 
October 16 be convenient for you? Please call me at 770-7303 to 

arrange the date. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 
Sincerely, 



FrankI in Banks 
Special Assistant to the Commissioner 
on Boston Desegregation 

cc: Robert Spi 1 lane 
John Coakley 
Roger Beattie 
Charles Glenn 




-101- 



BOSTON TECHHICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Although Boston Technical High has never had as high an attrition 
rate among Black and Hispanic students as the two Latin 
schools, it is still under Court orders to recruit and provide 
appropriate supports to Black and Hispanic students. It has also 
suffered from some of the same problems cited for the two Latins 
in providing adequate recruitment and support — lack of 
financial and other resources, inadequately prepared and informed 
in-coming students, poorly coordinated counseling and outside 
referral services, and a weak and poorly attended summer 
orientation. In addition, Boston Technical High has also had a 
problem in providing adequate language support services to a 
growing number of limited English proficient students. 

In response to these concerns, Boston Technical High has: 

1) become involved in the Direct Student Services 
Collaboration which provides counseling and 
referral services in conjunction with a number of 
human services agencies; 

2) established a peer tutoring program after school, 
and some informal peer tutoring during the school 
day; 

3) developed a study skills component to the summer 
orientation and infused study skills into the 
regular curriculum; 

4) developed a diagnostic procedure to be carried out 
during the summer orientation to identify students 
in need of remedial help, and coordinated test data 
on other students not attending summer orientation 
to determine remedial needs. Students are also 
monitored if they receive warning notices, and are 
strongly encouraged to participate in one of the 
support services described above. 

5) added an ESL teacher to work with limited English 
proficient students. 

While Boston Technical High has made significant efforts to 
develop a comprehensive support procedure which will follow 
students throughout their academic and other difficulties, the 
success of these efforts in terras of reducing drop-outs and 
increasing achievement has yet to be clearly demonstrated. 

-102- 



PREPARATION/RECRUnyENT 

Advanced Vfoiic Class/Academically Talented Sections 

In previous monitoring reports monitors have cited substantial Inadequacies 
In the systemwlde AWC/ATS programs which feed students Into the examination 
schools. Althougji students admitted to the examlnatlcxi schools cone from almost 
all middle schools In the system, =ind many others from parochial and private 
schools, the AWC/ATS program has clearly been deslgjied (with Its gr. ^,5,6 
structure) as a conduit for students going to the examination schools. Monitors 
lave. In the past, recommended the following Inproveipents: 

1) the developmsnt of an appropriate identification and selection 
process replacing the existing one vrtiich relies solely on achieve- 
ment test scores. 

2) the develcx)ment of a differentiated curriculum which Is appropriate 
for acadendcally able students 

3) the development of a training orogram for AWC/ATS teacher, who to 
date have received no special preparation for teaching gifted and 
academically able students , and an appropriate teacher evaluation 
procedure. 

1) the development of strong links between the AWC/ATS program and the 
examination schools to improve curriculum and teaching strategies and 
to enhance reciniitment efforts and program information flow. 

5) inprovement of the poorly developed Spanish AWC/ATS conponent. 

En response to these concerns Bostoi has taken the following actions to date: 

1) The AWC/ATS Director has developed proposals for a new multiple- 
criteria identification process, as well as a new city-wide selection 

process (see appendix ) . Thou^ this proposal has been examined 

and tentatively supported by representatives from the Department of 
Education's Office of Tsilented and Gifted, and EEO, it has still to be 
finalized and approved by Boston Itself. Monitors will continue to 
look for closure on this issue. 

2) While Bostcxi has taken some initial steps to identify appropriate 
materials for AWC/ATS classes, a differentiated curriculum is still 
not in place. Plans to hire a national authority en curriculum 
development for gifted students fell throuph when funds were not 
appropriated as expected. Efforts to, hire the same authority and to 
continue to develop the needed curriculum are still planned. In 
additlOTi, a 'Children's Literature' program, developed in conjunctlai 
with Tjesley College and aporoprlate for academically able students, 
has been disseminated and Is being used In several schools with AWC 
programs, 

3) Teacher training for AWC/ATS teachers is being conducted in several 
ways: 



-10 V 



a) throu^ a Lesley College graduate credit seminar program in 'Children's 
Literature for the Gifted' 

b) through an in-service credit course caid^cted by the Director of Gifted 
and Talented for Boston, entitled "Int^^ip^atinp; Thinking Across the 
Curriculum" 

c) throu^ several teacher in-service sessions required of all AWC/ATS 
teachers 

d) several AWC/ATS teachers have applied for various grants to develop 
sppropriate curricula 

Boston still evaluates AWC/ATS teachers along the same guidelines established 
for evaluating all other teachers (as mandated by uniwi coitract). 

4) Meetings continue to be held between AWC/ATS teachers and Latin School staff- 
a concept initiated in the last school year. Discussions have also been held 
with the Headmaster of Boston Latin Acaderry about starting a similar series 
of information sharing sessions, thou^ no sessions have been held yet. 

Boston is under specific Court orders to recruit and inform Black and 
Hispanic students of the instructional requirements of the three examination 
schools. While this has occurred to sons extent throui^ visits by examination 
school staff to various middle school^ posted notifications of SSAT exams and 
other admissions requirements, and various community foi'ums on high school 
options- some exam school students interviewed, both minority and non-minority, 
have clearly been poorly informed of what to expect when they decide on different 
exam school c^tiois. Some students interviewed, especially females, attending 
Boston Technical Hi^, had no idea of what a technical school was, and spec- 
ifically had no idea they would be required to take drafting or wood-wor^-'ng. 
Some students interviewed at Bostoi Latin School and Boston Latin Acadeny iiad 
no idea of hew much homework they would be «xp3cted to do, nor that they would 
be required to take four or five years of Latin. Many of these students, and 
especially minorities, vrtio come to these examination schools with unrealistic 
or inaccurate expectations have been virtually programmed for failure, and be- 
come a part of the hi^ attrition rate at Boston Latin and Boston Latin Acadeny. 

Boston must continue to address this problem by increasing the level of 
conTOinications between AWC/ATS teachers, parents and students and examination 
school staff and students, particularly in improving the focus and quality of 
A^/ATS instruction and pix>vldlng students and their parents with realistic ex- 
pectations of different exam school requirements. Some exam school teachers have 
cited the better preoaration which many parochial and private school students re- 
ceive and the advantage this has given them in succeeding in the exa-n schools. 
Boston must take steps to insure that its own students are as well prepared and 
that the exam schools are not perceived as public schools which cater primarily 
to private and parochial school students. Better preparatlOTi in elementary and 
middle schools and better information oti exam school requirements and expe'ctatiais 
will lower the high attrition of Black and Hispanic students and will insure their 
more conplete access to these valuable educational resources. 

5) Steps are being taken to irrprove the Spanish conponent of the AWC/ATS program, 
the ATS program at the F^ackey School has now been separated fran the regular 
bilingual program there, and ATS students are taught in a self-contained unit b 

-lOM- 



primarily caie teacher: In addition, a preparation and support orofgrajn (funded 
by Chapter 636 and the Mass. Board of Re{5ents) developed by U.Mass/Bostc»i-ILT 
works with Hispanic students in (1) Suinmer enrichment program (50 students), 
and (2) throu^ tutorial and counseling suoport during the school year. This 
program was designed to prepaire and support Hispanic students before and after 
admlsslcn to the exam schools. 



-105- 



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01 

B 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF INPTPUC nONAL bEfiViCES 

JOANNE M McMANUS 

P'ogifin- r)"(.!or Gillnd ani Talented 

TO: Franklin Banks 

FROM: Joanne McManusUTkc 

DATE: November 1, 1984 

RE: Federal Court, Desegregation Monitoring Report-Advanced Work Program 
Update 

I am writing in response to your request for updated information 
regarding the Advanced Work Class Program compliance report, dated April 27, 
1984, This report outlined Boston's efforts to address the five problematic 
areas of concern that were cited in the January, 1984 Report to the United 
States District Court on Boston School Desegregation, Volume #2. 

Continuous efforts are being made to implement the plans we proposed in 
April. Each area of concern is listed below and is accompanied by a written 
update that expresses our commitment to strengthen the Advanced Work Class 
Programs in the City of Boston. 

1. Progress in developing and implementing a new method of identifying 
aj^ selecting academically able students for AWC/ATS ,. _This_ new 
method would be culture-fair and consistent with the state-of-the- 
art in the identification and selection of gifted students. 

The final proposal was presented to the Superintendent for his approval 
in September, 1984. He is aware of the flaws and limitations connected with 
the present Court Ordered Selection Process and he supports our efforts to 
improve this situation. Due to concerns voiced by the Department of Implemen- 
tation, Dr. Spillane requested that the Office of Curriculum and Instruction 
and the Department of Implementation work together over the next few months to 
further examine the proposed modifications and to develop a plan of action 
that both departments can find acceptable. Given this, the AWC selection 
process for the 1984-1985 school year, will remain unchanged. William 
Dandridge, the Deputy Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction, has kept 
the process moving and he has expressed hi^ desire to reach closure and be 
ready to submit a Boston Advanced Work Class Identification and Selection Plan 
to the Court at its next quarterly review session on December 12, 1984. Mr. 
Dandridge has also requested that I: 

a. Disseminate the AWC proposal to authorities in the field of 

gifted/talented who have addressed the issues related to identifying 
the gifted minority student. We are particularly concerned about 
making sure that our identification model will be successful in 
identifying our academically talented minority children. 

iO COUP' ■' ■■■:■:■■ • /26-b20iJ. EXT 546/ AREA (>! ;' 



- 2 - 

b. Request identification models from other urban cities. 

I have enclosed copies of these coitmiunications. 

The final AWC proposal was also submitted for review to Roselyn Frank, 
Director of the Massachusetts Office of Gifted and Talented. We were 
heartened by the letter of support that we received from you, Roselyn and John 
Glenn. This positive response to our proposal modifications will be helpful, 
as we proceed to move toward presenting our plan to the Court. 

2. Prngrpfis in developing and consistently implementing a 
differentiated curriculum appropriate for academically able student s. 

The 1984-1985 budget request, submitted by the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction, that proposed hiring Irving Sato 
from the National State Leadership Training Institute on 
Gifted/Talented to assist us in creating a differentiated 
curriculum for the Advanced Work Program, was denied. Level 
funding was imposed on our department. 

Although this is a setback, we still intend to proceed with 
our plans to create an AWC (grades 4-6) differentiated 
curriculum. I attended Mr. Sato's Curriculum for the Gifted 
Conference on October 22nd and we intend to hire him on an 
advisory capacity in June, when he returns to Boston to conduct 
a week-long curriculum writing conference at Emmanuel College. 
I have also requested and received permission to submit a 
Central Office 636 Proposal that will specifically address our 
academically talented curriculum needs. 

The study of Children's Literature has penetrated numerous 
Advanced Work Classrooms. The Literature Resource Exchange 
that was established last fall has had to grow in order to 
respond to the large number of requests made by AWC teachers 
this year. 

The literature units that I have written to accompany these 

novels emphasize and model the teaching/learning strategies 
that are recommended for academically talented classrooms. 
Demonstration lessons have also been a very successful method 
of having teachers understand the meaning of curriculum 
differentiation. These units will be bound and collectively 
distributed to all AWC teachers this year. 

In addition to last year's recommended textbook booklet, the 
Office of Curriculum and Instruction is presently working on a 
1984-1985 Textbook and Supplementary Materials Listing. This 
list will be the result of a comprehensive study of those 
materials that we feel best meet Boston's Curriculum 

Objectives. Those materials that are most appropriate for 
advanced work class instruction will be included. 

3. Progress in developing and implementing both a tr ain-tng fr;nf^T ^m foy 
AWC/ATS teachers and an appro pr ia te evaluation procedure . 

-112- 



- 3 - 

I conducted a three graduate credit sununer course, entitled 
Children's Literature for the Gifted, in conjunction with 
Lesley College for Boston's AWC teachers. Nine AWC teachers 
attended. (Course evaluation sheets enclosed.) 

I am currently conducting an "Integrating Thinking Across the 
Curriculum" course for eighteen Boston teachers who will 
receive in-service credit. 

As part of Boston's citywide September 24, 1984 Inservice Plan: 
All grade 4 Advanced Work. Teachers attended an inservice 
session at the Hennigan School that was conducted by two fourth 
grade AWC teachers. The purpose of the session was to discuss 
the use of Children's Literature as a reading/thinking program 
for Advanced Work students. 

All grade 5, Advanced Work Teachers attended a science oriented 
inservice session at the Museum of Science, under the direction 
of Jack Tyrell, Senior Advisor-Science. 

All grade 6 , Advanced Work teachers attended an inservice 
session that I conducted at Boston Latin School. The topics of 
this training (Study Skills, Test Taking Skills, Listening 
Skills) were directly related to the issues that were raised 
during the 1983-1984 Latin School/AWC Council meetings. 
Michael Contompasis addressed the teachers and they received a 
wealth of materials for use in their AWC classrooms. 

Four AWC teachers received School Department Impact II grants 
on October 22, 1984 to develop creative curriculum projects for 
their classrooms. These teachers are presently implementing 
these programs at the Quincy and Ellis Elementary Schools and 
the Timilty and Holmes Middle Schools. 

The Thompson Middle School had asked me to help them develop a 
Commonwealth Inservice Grant proposal that will provide their 
faculty with a training program on how to integrate thinking 
skills into their curriculum instruction, 

A thinking skills, problem solving component will also be part 
of Boston's upcoming January 24th inservice plan. 

Progress in the crea tion of curr iculum an d ot her links between the 
examination schools and the AWC/ATS program feeding students into 
these schools . 

This process is on-going. In addition to the continuation of the 
AWC/Latin School Council that was established last year, dialogue 
has begun between Latin Academy and the AWC Program. 

Progress in Improvement of the Spanish bilingual AWC. 



-113- 



- 4 - 



. A Preparation and Support Program for talented and gifted 

Hispanic students has been funded by the Mass. Board of Regents 
and Chapter 636, This program is designed to offer support to 
Hispanic students before and after they are admitted to a 
Boston examination school. This support was offered last 
summer to 50 students and will continue throughout this school 
year. This program also is sponsoring eight days of special 
S.S.A.T. preparation training for Hispanic students from 
October 23rd through November 15th. 

. The Bilingual Advanced Work Program at the Mackey Middle School 
has changed its structure. These students are now part of an 
organized, self-contained unit that is being predominately 
taught by one teacher. This teacher has worked with 
academically talented students before and seems very open to 
learning new techniques. 

1 have seen continuous Improvement and progress over this past year and I 
am confident that this growth pattern will be maintained. 

me 

enclosure 



-114- 



[ THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
BOSTON TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

iijTOPHER p LANE November 1, 198^ 

Head Master 

TO: Roger Beattie, Community Superintep<i^nt 
FROM: Christopher P. Lane, Headmaste; 
RE: Response to State Department-' 

SUPPORT SERVICES 

Having been selected as a pilot school for the Direct Student Services 
Collaborative, we are refining our support services with the assistance 
and support from Roxbury Children's Services, Parent and Children's 
Services, Chinatown YES and the Fuller Mental Health Clinic. 

We have developed an inschool counseling program which is coordinated 
through the guidance department. Students, teachers and parents 
can make a referral for support services through the guidance department 
We have had counselors, psychologists etc meet with the staff to 
describe the program, referral process etc. We have also used inservice 
time to discuss the types of indicators which might justify the referral 
of a student to this support service program. Students referred to 
this program are monitored through the guidance department. 

Roxbury Children's Services - 2 social workers on site 
Parent and Children's Services - 2 part time psychologists 
Fuller Mental Health- consultant to peer counseling program 
Chinatown YES - social workers available on call 
Special Education - 1 teacher, 1 aide 
ESL - 1 teacher 
Guidance -3 counselors 
i' Nursing Staff - 2 

PEER TUTORING 

We have a peer tutoring program which is •' supported through our 636 
Tufts/Technical Collaborative and is a part of our after-school 
program. Currently, 6 students remain after school three days per 
week for the purpose of tutoring other students. Naturally informal 
peer tutoring occurs throughout the school day. 

STUDY SKILLS 

During our summer orientation we ran a series of study skills workshops. 
Currently, Department Heads are working with their staff to develop 
strategies for infusing more study skills activities into the classroom. 

205 TOWNSE'.? STREET, DORCHESTi-115- i.'--':!SfTTS Ol':' • ■:-■■. 43B: A^EA 617 



I 



IDENTIFYING STUDENTS IN NEED OF SUPPORT 

During our 5 day, summer orientation, we administered a series of 
diagnostic tests in order to identify those students in need of 
remedial and support services. This Included; math, reading psychologic. 
and career Interests tests/surveys. The results of these tests 
have been recorded. For those students who did not attend orientation, 
we have recorded the results of their reading and math scores from 
middle school. At this point, we have attendance and reading and 
math scores on all students. Any student whose score indicated a 
possible need for remediation ( 2 or more years below grade level ) i 
has been notified in writing and has been interviewed by the 
Development Officer. Warning notices have also been recorded alongside 
student test information so that we are able to monitor the progress 
of students throughout the school year. 

Department Heads have lists of those students who received warning cards 
as well as lists of students targetted for remediation. We have made 
considerable efforts to encourage these students to participate in 
our after-school program. See previous page for information 
regarding peer tutoring and other support services. 



i 



-116^ 



October 2, IsSk 
IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

E STQN TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL HUMAN SERVICE COLLABORATIVE 

lis year we are Implementing a pilot, In-school human service program 

wth the assistance of the following agencies: Parent and Children's 

Srvlces, Roxbury Children's Services, Fuller Mental Health and Chinatown YES. 

Sclal workers and psychologists will be on site Tuesdays, Wednesdays and 

lusdays ( and are available to us on an on-call basis ) and will provide the 

fllowlng services: Individual, group and family counseling, crisis interventlc 

sd teacher consultations. Collaborative staff will have offices on the 

Ibrary balcony. 

Rl'ERRALS: A student, teacher, parent or outreacher worker can make a referre 

b completing a short form which Is obtainable through the Development Office. 

ftl referrals and consultations are confidential. Once the referral form Is 

cmpleted. It should be placed In the mailbox assigned to the collaborative. 

S^dents and staff members are encouraged to utilize these services. If a 

Budent must be released from class In order to see a counselor, the classrooa 

tacher will be given prior notice. ( whenever possible. ) We hope you will 
icommodate these requests. '^ ^ t- j ^ 

tlOJECT GOAL: The primary goal of this project is prevention. Our intent is 

t, prevent social and academic problems experienced by TECH students from 

scalating to severe levels thus preventing the student from successfully 

C'mpleting his/her high school education. Students who seem depressed or 

ider stress, students whose attendance or grades are poor - students 

speriencing home problems etc. can and should be referred. 

I TER SCHOOL TUTORING PROGRAM 

lie after-school program will begin on October 9 and will run Tuesday- 
rdnesday - Thursday, from 2-3:00 until May. A late bus will transport 
E.udents at 3:00 from TECH to Forest Hills and Fields Corner. Ruthe L'Esperanc 
til be the coordinator and any student in need of help should be referred to 
:'r. In addition to after-school instruction and tutorials in math, science, 
l.nguage arts and study skills, we will be running special SAT preparation 
nrkshops and various other activites. These will be announced in the 
tilletin. Students interested in participating in the after-school 
lisic progran ( Tuesdays and Thursdays ) should sign up with Ms. L'Esperance. 
DMPUTER CENTER: Any students interested in utilizing the computer center afte 
i'.hool should sign up with Ms. L'Esperance. 

iJPPLEMENTARY PROGRAMS ACTIVITIES 
\ 

;?sources are available to teachers Interested in planning field trips, 
Decial activities , guest lecture programs etc. 

I ' 

JISON GRANT FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT 

;iere are still funds available to reimburse teachers for the cost of staff 
(jvelopment programs or activities. A request for reimbursement form must 
I; completed and approved before the start of the semester/course/activity. 
i )R MORE INFORMATION ON ANY OF THESE PROGRAMS - SEE JANE MACDONALD ^ 

| )pies of the 636 Proposal, SBM-MOA, Compact Plan, Annual Report, Collaborative 

i ;reement and Carnegie Grant are available for revi ew in the Development 
I "f 1 ceT ~~~ 

-117- 



TnE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 






',! ATrit 



TO: 
FROM: 
DATE: 
RE: 



MEMORANDUM 

Franklin Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on Desegregation 

Roger M. Beattie, Community Superintendent /^nK- C/*^. Al^iScXZSC— - 

October 30, 1984 

Desegregation Monitor Report No. 3, Examination Schools 

The three examination school, Boston Latin, Boston Latin Academy and 

Boston Technical provided students with a comprehansive Summer orientation 

program. The following are some specific areas that the three Headmasters 

will address during the present academic year relative to foUow-up and the systemizatic 

of providing adequate support services. 

Boston Technical High; 

Please refer to the comprehensive report submitted by Headmaster, Christopher Lane 
relative to your concerns stated in the Monitor Report and letter to him dated Septembc 
28, 1984. 



The Headmaster will address the area of tutorial services by applying for additonal 
Chapter 636 funding for after school tutorial services, Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday for those students in need. The systematic procedures for referral and 
providing of educational resources will be strengthened. The Headmaster is attempting 
to expand counseling services by the re-organization of the guidance department. 
The one area that remains a problem is the promotion policy that requires students 
not promoted to repeat those courses they have successfully completed. 

Boston Latin Academy: 

The last two reports focussed on the need for early counseling especially in the 
academic area. Because of the high caseload of guidance counselors of more than 
500 students it is indeed not possible to adequately identify or diagnose c£ises in time 
to truly help students new to the Academy who may be having academic difficulties. 
Therefore, the Headmaster Dr. Robert Binswanger, has developed the following plan. 



H SCrC 



-118- 



,:..'.-.bAC:r'uSETTS 021 It) • 4-12-1396 AREA 617 



-2- 



Memorandum (continued) 
Franklin Banks 
Special Assistant to the 
Commissioner on Desegregation 
October 30, 1984 



CLASS Vn ACADEMIC ADVISING PROGRAM 

Despite the positive efforts of faculty and staff it is a fact that the 
first three of four weeks of school are particularly demanding for 
the in-coming class VI and IV-B. The adjustment from being the#l or 2 
student in the sending school to membership in a group of over 300 students, 
all of whom were considered top students, causes fears, worries, loss of self- 
confidence and like problems. 

One approach to a smoother adjustment was the visits by in-coming students 
to the Academy last spring. Another was to increase attendance in the summer 
preparatory program. A third will be the assignment of 4-5 pupils to each faculty 
and staff member for the first marking period. Each faculty member is asked to 
contact the student, check to see if his/her program is correct, if the adjustment 
is developing smoothly and to let the students know if they have questions about 
the courses or schedules, they should come to them. It is expected that these 
conversations wiU take time. If the faculty member senses a problem or identifies 
academic difficulties he/she should send a note the guidance counselor with the 
student's name and the nature of the problem. No further record may be 
necessary. At that point it becomes a guidance issue. It is hoped that their contact 
with these students will ease their adjustment to the Academy and the school 
year will result in improved academic performance and early warning of 
academic problems. This type of activity is very important in preventing 
the first time grade repeaters and will assist an already overburdened guidance 
department. 

The recently implemented Bilingual Talented and Gifted Program assisted 
by the Institute of Teaching and Learning, University of Massachusetts will 
contribute to the adequate preparation of Spanish students to take the 
S.S.A.T. examination and provide follow-up once they have been accepted into 
and examination school. 

The following schools are involved in this program, Boston Latin, Boston Latin 
Academy, Boston Technical and the Charles E. Mackey Middle School. 

Activities: ' 

Workshops with bilingual advanced work class at the Chalres E. Mackey Middle 
School in preparation for the S.S.A.T. with eighty (80) 6 & 8th grade bilingual 
students interested in takeing the test. The locations for the workshops are the 
Mackey Middle School, Cleveland Middle School, Jamaica Plain High Library, 
Conley Library, and University of Massachusetts Campus. 



-IT)- 



-3- 



Memorandum (continued) 
Franklin Banks 
Special Assistant to the 
Commissioner on Desegregation 
October 30, 1984 



In the three examination schools the group works with the School Development 
Officer in Counselling students, and providing peer-tutoring, tmd locating 
appropriate resources for 7th and 9th grade bilingual students. 

The purpose of this effort is to attempt to adequately prepare Spanish students 
by providing follow-up services in order to prevent retention in the critical entry 
grades of 7 and 9, which consequently results in drop-out of Spanish students. 

The three Headmasters wiU investigate any attitudinal discouragement 

by faculty against minority students that may eventually result in the parent 

and student requesting a transfer to a non-examination school. 

It is strongly recommended that the Boston Summer Review School be more 
adaptable to the examination school curriculum content or a separate Summer 
School for examination school students be planned and developed. 

My final recommendation and one that 1 mentioned on several occassions is to inclu 
the District IX office as part of the exit interview process before a student is refer 
to the Department of Implementation for transfer. I present this recommendation * 
because of the reasons f or transfers are in many cases multi-dimensional rather th< 
a simple case of academic failure. 

Please call me if you have any questions or additional concerns. 



/pmm 

Enclosures: 

c.c. Joseph McDonough 



-120- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 







.^^ 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

BOSTON TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

RISTOPHER P LANE 
Head Master 

TO: THE STATE BOARD OP EDUCATION 
PROM: CHRISTOPHER P. l^^^^'^y^ (/-^ L(l_ 

KE: SUMMER ORIENTATION," 

Boston Technical High School's Summer Orientation for incoming students 
was a tremendous success. Orientation ran for 5 days, from August 
20-2^ and students were in attendance from 9:00am until 12^00 pm. 
each day. 

9 Teachers were hired as instructors for orientation and they worked from 
8:00am - 1:00 each day. The hour before and after student activities occured 
teachers were responsible for correcting tests, developing curriculum 
and discussing educational issues and concerns with consultants and 
members of the Technical administration 

This year, the five day orientation focused upon the testing of students 
so that we would be able to identify those students in need of remediation 
prior to the opening of school. Additionally, study skills workshops for 
content classes were held to better prepare the students for the rigorous 
academic program of Boston Technical High School. 

The follov/ing tests were administred and results were placed on a student 
card which will be available for guidance personnel, support staff 
etc. We hope to use much of this information to monitor student 
progress and prevent academic failures by referring students to remedial 
and after-school programs. 

Stanford Diagnostic - Reading Comprehension and Word Parts 

Stanford Diagnostic -Math Applications and Basic Computation 

Writing Diagnosis 

Kuder Career Interest Survey 

Preliminary Psychological Survey ( a sentence completion model ) 

Additional information, regarding attendance and activity schedules 
are attached. 



205 TOWNSCfJD STREET, DORCHESTER. MASSACHUSETTS 02121 • 445-433' AREA 617 

-121- 



230 Students Attended Orientation 
103 Males 
127 Females 

125 Black Students 

52 White Students 

53 Others 



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The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
September 25, 1984 



Mr. John Poto 

Headmaster, East Boston High School 

86 White Street 

East Boston, Massachusetts 02128 

Dear Mr. Poto: 

The Department of Education Is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance with the 
plans submitted by the Boston School Department to the Court for 
desegregating East Boston High School. 

Our last Report (submitted on July 15, ^^Sk) made the following 
findings regarding EBHS. 

■ • EBHS officials demonstrated commitment to improving the 
quality of education at their school. 

• There is little evidence that Central Office officials 
have made an effort to promote compliance with the court 
orders relevant to EBHS, or to support the positive 
efforts of EBHS officials. 

• School officials are developing a long-range Improvement 
plan for EBHS. 

• There is a need to strengthen the Business Magnet in 
three areas: 

1) Support services for students, especially 
freshmen; 

2) placement services for students; and 

3) opportunities for higher education. 

• The Headmaster has taken steps to Improve record keeping 
for the Business Magnet, Including requests for 
transfers, but require additional staffing support. 



-124- 



The Report made the following recommendations regarding EBHS: 

• Boston should support development of the East Boston 
Business Magnet along the lines originally submitted to 
the Court, with a well-structured course of studies, 
appropriate staffing, learning objectives for each 
student, work-site experience and employment counseling, 
college preparatory opportunities, and coordination with 
other programs in the school. 

' • More support should be provided to freshmen and other 
minority students in the Business Magnet. 

• Records should be kept of all transfers requested and 
their disposition. 

For this monitoring period we are requesting that you, in 
conjunction with other appropriate School Department officials, 
develop an "action plan." The action plan should provide detailed 
proposals for bringing East Boston High School into compliance 
with federal court orders. The action plan will be the basis for 
any further Department of Education oversight deemed necessary by 
the Court. 

I will call you to schedule a visit to EBHS at a time convenient 
to you. I would like to review the action plan with you and any 
other officials you believe appropriate during that visit. 

The renewed commitment to the Business Magnet at EBHS is 
encouraging, and deserves the support of the School Department. I 
look forward to returning to East Boston High School. 

Sincerely, 





ucRth Taylor 



Taylor 



cc: Robert Spillane' 
John Coakley 
Peter Ingeneri 
James Caradonio 
Luci 1 le Koch 
Charles Glenn 



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-132- 




iywide Parents Council 

smplePlace Boston.Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



October 15, 1984 



Mr. John Poto, Headmaster 
East Boston High School 
86 White Street 
East Boston, Mass. 02128 



Dear Mr. Poto: 

Please find attached the results of the survey of your Business 
Magnet parents and Business Magnet drop-outs that was conducted last 
June by the Citywide Parents Council 

Our recommendations, together with a list of the Business Magnet 
Program parents who signed the survey responses, is enclosed. 

It is hoped that the survey results will help you and the pro- 
gram's director in your efforts to improve the program. The list 
of parents can serve as a preliminary contact list for developing a 
monitoring/ advocacy group for the Business Magnet Program. 

Our new field specialist for the high school, Ms. Greta Cameron, 
will be contacting you in early November to assist in efforts to 
develop the program's monitoring/ advocacy group. 

Every best wish for a successful school year. 



Sin^rely _ ,^ 



Ludille M. 



Koch 

Executive Director 
Citywide Parents Council 



Elizabeth Wood 
CPC Members 



cc: Judith Taylor ir 
Joseph McDonough 
Peter Ingeneri 
Anne Fisher 
Greta Cameron 

East Boston High School Par---^ Council 

-133- 
A multi-cuttural parents organization monitoring qualty, desegregated education 




City wide Parents Council 

»9Temple Place Boston,Mass. 021TI (617)426-2450 



SAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL BUSINESS MAGNET PROGRAM SURVEY REPORT - OCTOBER, 1984 

In May/ June 1984, the Citywide Parents Council surveyed 252 parents of 
students enrolled in the Business Magnet Program at East Boston High School ; 
.n an attempt to identify problems with the program as viewed from a student/j 
>arent perspective. 

Concurrently, a second survey (B) was distributed to 23 parents of I 
students who had dropped out of the program during the 1983-84 school year to 
letermine if there was a coimnon cause for this 9% drop-out rate. j 

The latter survey (B) did not meet with any success. No returns were j 
received from any of the addressees. Four (4) survey forms were returned to 
:he offices of the Citywide Parents Council as undeliverable: address unknown 

Thirty-seven (37) responses representing a 15% response rate were re- 
:eived by the Citywide Parents Council from the first survey (A) which had 
)een sent to parents of students currently enrolled in the Business Magnet 
>rogram at East Boston High School. It was clear from the parental/student 
responses to survey (A) that: 

o little information had been shared with the respondents about the 
goals and objectives of the Business Magnet Program at East Boston 
High School 

o little information had been shared with the respondents concerning 
the curriculum of the Business Magnet Program at East Boston High 
School 

o little was offered to students in the Business Magnet Program that 
the respondents could identify as clearly distinguishable from the 
regular business program at the school 

The Citywide Parents Council concurs with the recommendations made by 
:he State Department of Education in its Monitoring Report of December, 1983 
It page 208, regarding the Business Magnet Program at East Boston High School 
'urther, the Citywide Parents Council recommends that a monitoring/ advocacy 
rroup of parents of students currently enrolled in the Business Magnet Progrsj 
)e established as a sub-committee of the East Boston High School Parent Coun-i' 
:il to work with school authorities to: 

o improve the content of the Business Magnet Program 

o enhance the administrative structure of the progrcim 

o insure that job site placements appropriate to the goals and 
objectives of the Business Magnet Program are developed 

Amulti-culturalparentsorganizationm- iigqualty. desegregated education 



2 

Boston High Business Magnet Program Survey Report - October 1984 

o insure that appropriate school department support/resources are 
developed to upgrade the Business Magnet Program to bring it 
into compliance with the court-approved plan. 



-135- 



age 3 



DLLATED RESULTS OF RESPONSES TO SURVEYS A AND B ON THE BUSINESS MAGNET 
^OGRAM AT EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL - OCTOBER, 1984 

xrvey A was sent to 252 parents of students enrolled in the East Boston ' 
isiness Magnet Program as of June, 1984. Thirty-seven (37) completed ^ 
jsponses were received by the Citywide Parent Council from parent res- \ 
indents. The response rate for Survey A was 15%. ] 

I 
irvey B was sent to the parents of 23 students identified as drop-outs from j 
le Business Magnet Program at East Boston High School through the monthly i 
rop-out statistics covering the period from October, 1983 through May, 1984. \ 
) completed survey responses were returned to the offices of the Citywide j 
irents Council by parent respondents. The post-office did return four (4) , 
irveys because they were undeliverable: address unknown. j 

le collated responses represented below are the answers to the questions 
icluded on Survey A only. 

lESTION 1: Did you know that your child is enrolled in the Business Magnet 
Program at East Boston High School? 



JSPONSES; 



YES - 31 



NO - 2 



NO ANSWER - 4 



TOTAL: 37 



IESTION 2: 
;SP0NSES : 



Have you received information about the curriculum? 
YES - 14 NO - 16 NO ANSWER - 7 TOTAL: 37 
In what form? 



WRITTEN - 13 
STUDENT - 7 



PHONE CONTACT - 
OTHER - o 



CONFERENCE - 1 
TOTAL: 



21 



ESTION 3; 



Do you understand what the Business Education Program is 
supposed to teach? 



SPONSES; 



YES - 15 



NO - 3 



NOT SURE - 13 



NO ANSWER - 6 
TOTAL: 37 



ESTION 4: Are you satisfied your child is learning special skills that 

he/she would not be able to get if not enrolled in the Business 
Education Magnet Program? 



SPONSES; 



YES - 19 



NO - 1 



NOT SURE - 9 



NO ANSWER - 8 
TOTAL: 37 



What special Skills? 

Typing - 8 Stenography - 1 Business Terminology - 1 

-136- 



age 4 



JUESTION 4 (continued) 



What special skills? 

Legal Terminology - 1 
Accounting - 2 
Clerical Skills - 1 
Bookeeping - 1 



Word processing - 1 Calculators - 1 
Office machines - 1 Shorthand - 1 
Computer training - 1 Business - 1 



lUESTION 5: Does your child seem satisfied with the Business Education 
Magnet Program? 



:ESP0NSES: yes - 25 



NO - 2 



NOT SURE - 5 



NO ANSWER - 5 
TOTAL: 37 



lUESTION 6: Why did your child enroll in this program? 



ESPONSES; 



To learn office practices - 1 

To acquire skills of technical training - 5 

Wanted the program - 5 

Nothing else being offered - 1 

Better job after high school - 10 

Put into program unwillingly - 1 

Accidental - 1 

Feels she can handle it - 1 

Given course when she entered high school and has to keep 

it until graduation - 1 

I don ' t know - 1 

No answer - 6 

To learn more about the business world - 3 

Transferred out - 1 

TOTAL: 37 



UESTION 7 



ESPONSES: 



If your child is no longer enrolled in program, why did he/she 
withdraw? 

No answer - 32 

Still enrolled - 1 

Transfer - 1 

So she can go to the ORC in the afternoon - 1 

Graduating - 1 

At East Boston High , viien ypu hit a certain age, they don't 

care about you - 1 

TOTAL: 37 



UESTION 8: Would you like more information on the Business Education 
Program? 



ESPONSES: YES - 26 



NO - 7 



NO ANSWER - 4 



TOTAL: 37 



■■ -137-' 



Page 5 

CONTACT LIST OF PARENT RESPONDENTS ^-'THO SIGNED SURVEY FORMS 



*^rs. Fisher 

35 Banfield Ave. 
yiattaoan. Ma. 02126 
296-0664 

Ella Mae Jackson 
48 Bellevue St. 
Boston, Ma. 02125 
B25-6697 

yiargaret Gittens 

36 Nightingale St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02124 
265-2888 

Paul Lyons Jr. 

402 Meridian St. 

East Boston, Ma. 02128 

561-0389 

barmen Pinto 

122 Summer St. 

East Boston, Ma. 02128 

569-3897 

STellie Nance 
43 Bowdoin St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02122 
B25-7617 

^aria Tilichicchia 
31 Doris St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02122 
436-3169 

Linda Roberts 
P.O. Box 277 
Dorchester, Ma. 02122 



Florence Grieco 

99 Bennington St. 

East Boston, Ma. 02128 

569-6756 

Clara Holloway 
51 Armandine St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 0212 4 
282-4095 

Mildred Cody 
110 Brookway Rd. 
P.oslindale, Ma. 02131 
522-2344 



Eileen Ashob 
3 Arcadia St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02122 
825-6196 

Susan Medina 
93 Bowdoin Ave. 
Dorchester Ma. 02122 
825-6876 

Katie Jones 
608 Park St. 
Dorchester , Ma. 02124 
265-4818 

Janet More land Ames 
14 Cluney Ct. 
Roxbury, Ma. 02119 
445-0790 

Sophia Morris 
50 School St. 
Boston, Ma. 
524-0962 

Esther Sargeant 
70 Harvard St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02124 
825-2045 

Jadwiga Gentek 
16 Crescent Ave. 
Boston, Ma. 02125 



Pierre Moody 
5 Codman Park 
Roxbury, Ma. 02119 
427-6879 

Ollie Tyra 
166 Seaver St. 
Roxbury, Ma. 02119 
445-8797 

Dolores Finklia 
272 Geneva Ave. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02124 
265-7256 

Minnie McFayden 
38 Millet St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 02124 



Ellen Reed 

11 St. William St 

Boston, Ma. 02125 

825-4675 

i 

Mrs. Blackmore 
21 Taft St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 



Elena DeMeo 
1060 Saratoga St. 
East Boston, Ma. 
569-8645 

Pearlita Gilpin 
27 Gayiand St. 
Dorchester, Ma. 021 
445-5569 

Zainaol Ali ■ 
10 Emmons St. 
P.O. Box 289 
East Boston, Ma. 02 

Dora Daley 
20 Carmen St. 
Roxbury, Ma. 02121 
436-0341 

Patricia Cotter 
10 Ashmont Ct. 
Dorchester, Ma. 021 
825-9668 | 

Mary Medeinoa 
240 Waldemar Ave. 
East Boston, Ma. 



Anne Brongiluke 
84 West Eagle St. 
East Boston, Ma. 
569-8948 

Carmine lanochini 
161 Adams St. I 
Dorchester, Ma. 02 
265-8712 



-138- 



ge 



ATT A CHMENTS 



Survey A with Cover Letter 
Survey B with Cover Letter 



-139- 




Feel free to attach any 
additional comments 



Jity wide Parents Council 

JTemple Place Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



A. 



II 



May 15, 1984 



Dear Parent 



We are studying the Business Education Magnet Program at East 
Boston High School to ensure that the program is fulfilling its 
potential to educate enrolled students for the business world. 
As the parent of a student in this program, please take a minute 
answer the questions below and return in the enclosed envelope, 
as soon as possible. If your child is no longer in the program, 
skip ahead and respond to the last question only. 



I 

I 

to 
pie. 



Thank you very much. If you have any questions, call me at 426-2450. 

-Kathi Barat, District 8 field specialist 
****************************************************************** *^ 

I 
1. Did you know that your child is enrolled in the Business magnet 



program at E.B. High? 



yes 



D 



no O 



yesj 



2. Have you received information about the curriculum? 
If yes, in what form? written conference 

phone contact student 

other 

3. Do you feel that you understand what the Business Education 
Program is supposed to teach? yesO noO not sure^ 

4. Are you satisfied that your child is learning special skills that 
he/she would not be able to get if not enrolled in the Business 
Education Magnet program? yes D no Q not surel 
If yes, what special skills? 



5. Does your child seem satisfied with the Bus-iness Education 
Magnet program? yes Q no Q not surep 

6. Why did your child enroll in this program? 



7. If your child is no longer enrolled in program, why did he/she 
withdraw? 

OPTIONAL INFORMATION: Name 



^ 



Address _mo-_ 

Phone 



M 



.l°l'il?ij-i^«^^^^jx,z„ffi„»^tfj?4.js«»?^i^^ n „o □, 




3. 



ty wide Parents Council 

Temple Place Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



May 29, 1984 



Dear Parent and Student: 

A review of the 1983-84 East Bostcxi High School matrix of forner stixients 
has revealed that your child has left the Magnet Biisiness Education 
Program In vMch he/she had been enrolled earlier in this school year. 

Please take a moment of your valuable Hmo to conplete this questionnaire 
about the East Boston Business Magnet Program, about your reasons for 
choosing the program, and your reasons for leaving the program. 

The in£3rmation gathered from this survey will be used to make recoomen- 
dations to the Boston Public School administration for inprovenents in 
the program, its operation, and its services to students. 

Thank you for your assistance in this survey. 



Citywide Parents Council 
Monitoring Office 



rr 



-141- 



A multi-cultural oarents or qanization monitofinq oualtv. deaeqroqated education 



CrnWIDE PARENT COUNCIL SURVEY 
EAST BOSTCN BUSINESS MAQET reOOlAM 



Please circle the vunber next to the a ppropriate answer to each question. Please 
feel free to coament after any question. 

A. When did you begin your studies in the East Boston Business Magnet Program? 

1 Grade 9 . Freshman Year 

2 Grade 10, Sophomore Year 

3 Grade 11, Jxaiior Year i 

4 Grade 12, Senior Year 



Ccmments, if any: 



B. Why did you select the East Boston Business Magnet Program? 



1 Wanted legal office work pr^aration 

2 Wanted medical office work preparation 

3 Wanted business office work preparation 

4 None of the above 



Gooments, if any: 



C. Did the East Boston Business Magnet Program meet your expectaticxisl 

1 Yes 

2 No 

3 Sometimes 

4 Never 

Comments, if any: 



I 



-lil2- 



Page 2 



D. Wtty did you withdraw from the East Boston Business Magnet Program? 

1 Personal reasons 

2 Academic reasons 

3 Program not meeting ny expectations 

4 Other reasons 



Please specify other reasons: 



E. If you could inprove the East Boston Business Magnet Program for future 
students, what one suggestion would you make? 



Signature (optional) 
Race (optional) 
Date 



-1^3- 



EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL BUSINESS MAGNET: Non-compliance Issues 



Non-compliance Issue : failure to implement the plan ordered by the 
Court on May 3, 1976 and submitted by Boston in 1977 to create 
a business magnet. Specifically: 

1. business magnet not unique or "magnetic" 

2. program offerings of questionable quality 

3. business magnet students have no access to a college- 
oriented business program 

4. no special guidance or other support for entering (9th 
grade) minority students 

5. lacks placement staff 

6. poor record-keeping (no retention rates, placement 
rates, etc. ) 

7. program director has no administrative assistance and must 
also teach. 



Issue Suggested Uses of Funds 



1 - 3 



6 - 7 



Support collaboration with 
Salem State College (higher 
education partner), and 
development of other pairings 



Provide support to new and 
minority students: guidance 
counselor, minority aide, 
multicultural materials, etc. 

Placement officer 



Clerical assistance 



Expected Outcomes 

Curriculum revision 

• Upgrading teachers' skills 

f Develop program with college 
link 

• Develop program to make 
business magnet unique 

• Improve retention of 
minority students 



• Develop job placements 

for students and graduates, 
and higher education place- 
ment for graduates 

• Improved record-keeping 

• Free up time of program 
director for program 
improvement 



-1^^- 



I 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




30ST0N PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

:n\^.^0-C November 29, 1984 



Dear 

As you recall last Spring, the Citywlde Parents Council sent to you a survey 
questionnaire in an attempt to identify any problems with the Business Magnet 
Program at East Boston High School as viewed from a student/parent perspective. 
I want to take this opportunity to personally thank you for your response to 
that questionnaire. 

The Business Magnet is a court-ordered program to desegregate East Boston High 
School. It has been in operation for over 7 years. Through internal — within 
the school itself — and external monitoring by the State Department, we are 
constantly looking for ways to improve the quality and attractiveness of the 
program. However, we are in need of parental input in order to strengthen our 
search for financial and other forms of support of this program. 

United parents has always been a highly successful means to a desired end in 
educational endeavors. Ic is with this in mind that we urge you to become 
actively involved with the progress of the Business Magnet aspect of our school. 
We invite you to attend our Open House on Thursday, December 6 from 7-9 p.m. 
and to see our facilities and meet our Business Department staff members. 
Then we would hope that you will contact our Business Department Head, 
Mrs. Ann Fisher, either before or after the Open House meeting to let her 
know of your interest and availability to help imnrove the Magnet Program. 
Mrs. Fisher can be reached by telephoning 569-7739 between 7:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

We look forward to seeing you on December 6. 

Sincerely yours, 






John A. Poto 
Headmaster 

Enclosure: Business Dept. Newslettei- 
Copy to: Cit:A.-ide Parents Council -l45- 
State Deot. of Education 








ilovenber, 1984 

BUSINESS /BUSINESS MAGNET DEPARTMENT 



From Che Deoartment Head's Desk 



[H^ 






ibcai;! 



East Boston High School 

East Boston. MA 02128 , j 

TELEPHONE: 567-2140 | 

John A. Poto, Headmaster] 



I 



The Business Department wishes to take this opportunity to welcome to its staff two 
new teachers, Mrs. Ingram and Mrs. Sanders, both of whom come from the former Boston 
Business School. 

The 1984-85 school year got off to a good start. After the Headnaster and his adninis- 
crative staff and teacher assistants spent many hours last school year reviewing the 
curriculum, the result was a revised curriculum. Major revisions include: 

1. All courses required for graduation have been placed in the 9th 
and 10th grades. It is felt that with the fulfillment of gradua- 
tion requirements in the first two years, students will be better 
prepared to select a major area of learning for the remaining two 
years. 

2. All 9th-grade students are required to take: 

1 semester of Computer Literacy 

1 semester of Personal Keyboarding (typing) 

1 full year of Occupational Information which consists of 

4 segments (one quarter each segment) of exploring Careers 
in Business Education, Wholesaling and Retailing; Foods and 
Health and the Machine Shop area. 

A further note of interest is the fact that after testing, all Grade 9 students are 
placed in an appropriate level of English and Math which will enhance their oppor- 
tunity for making the proper Individual progress. 

The Business Department is now offering a full-year course in Wordp recessing (on 
the newly-acquired IBM Personal Computers) as well as Wordprocessing on the Wang 
Wordprocessors . Accounting continues to make use of the Apple computers for the 
time being but expects to transfer to the IBM PC's next school year. 

This year, as in the past, the school will continue to work with local institutions 
of higher learning (Fisher Jr. College, Boston University, Salem State College) and 
with the business community (Massport Authority and The Boston Compact) in order to 
continue to upgrade the quality of education for our students. 

Finally, through the Private Industry Council (PIC), Ms. Paula Kelley has recently 
joined "Eastie's" staff as a Career Specialist to assist students in their job 
search, on the job and other career related aspects. 



SLIMMER HAS GOfIE...But the memories linger on in the following ways: 

Mrs. Alberghini enjoyed summer gardening 

Mrs. Bryant , gardening and redecorating 

Mrs. Fisher , that 6-day drive to and from Los Angeles 

Mr. Gallo , home remodeling at his leisure 

Mr. Green , His home on The Cape 

Mr. Hardv , his 8 days spent in Chicago for the VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) conver.tlot 

Ms. Henr^.- , her family 

Mrs. Ingram , her trips to Disney World; Atlantic City and North Carolina 

Mr. Mlraglia , his trip to California 

Mr. Rucnick . his hone on The Cape and especially his golfing and gardening 

Mrs. Sanders , trios to Disney World and Hershey Park in Pennsylvania 



_ia6- 



-2- 

OPEN HOUSE, a successful event! ( NEXT ONE : Thurs . , DECEMBER 6, 7-9 p.m. ac 

East Boston High School) 

On Thursday, September 20, Open House for parents and students was held at East Boston 
High School. Following the Headmaster's welcome, Parent Council elections were held. 
This was followed by a building tour and coffee and refreshments. 

Although the parental response was good, we all are hoping that more of our parents 
will take the time to become MORE INTERESTED and ACTIVELY INVOLVED in the educational 
progress of their children and the goals of East Boston High to give their children 
the best education has to offer. WE LOOK FORI^ARD TO SEEING YOU ON DECEMBER 6 . 

: : : help : : : 

The Business Magnet Program of East Boston High is a racially-integrated component 
of the Business Education program. After students have completed their graduation 
requirements in Grades 9 and 10, they may select from the following major areas of 
interest in this program for their 11th and 12th years: 

Legal-Medical Office Clerical 
Secretarial — Court /Legal-Medical 
Computer-Oriented Accounting 

Because the Business Magnet Program is a special program under Court order, it is 
continuously monitored by both the State Department of Education and by the Citywide 
Parents Council. Through this monitoring process, and with the cooperation of East 
Boston High School, ways are continuously being sought to improve and upgrade the 
program. INTERESTED PARENTS OF MAGNET STUDENTS are needed in this program to provide 
input into the reviewing and updating process. We not only invite you but strongly 
urge you to come visit our school and see the wealth of modem office equipment and 
instructional materials which are being used to educate your children; then to take 
an ACTIVE INTEREST in making the Business Magnet a better program. 

Please feel free at any time to contact: Mrs. Ann Fisher 

Business/Business Magnet Dept. Head 
TELEPHONE: 569-7739 or 567-2140 

Mr. Donald Coverdale 

Guidance Counselor 

TELEPHONE: 567-3601 or 567-6073 

A "Word to the Wise" 

As of this school year, both the students' subject teacher and the homeroom teacher 
will complete a warning notice approximately midway each quarterly marking period. 
Please understand that a prophesied failure in a subject does not necessarily indicate 
that a student will actually fail. It serves only to warn students to be on guard 
against such negative factors as the following which can cause failure: 

Excessive absence-^Students must be in school attendance at least 852 of the 
total number of days for the marking period. 

Failure to do homework — Homework is an extension of the education process and 
is therefore important to complete the prescribed amount 
and quality of work for a particular subject. 

Poor test results — Keeping up with diss assignments, participating In classrooo 
discussions, taking advantage of test reviews — all serve to 
help alleviate the possibility of getting poor test results. 

Failure to make up work missed — Teaching and learning go on even while a student 
Is absent. This work must be made up in order not to miss 
important elements of learning. 

Continued on next page 



-m7- 



-3- 

I 

Poor class work tlncluding oral participation) --Class work provides an opportunity 
for students to seek assistance from the teacher. It also 
provides an opportunity for students to learn from each other. 
Failure to participate in class work is denying oneself an 
important segment of the teaching /learning process. 

Parents are asked to assist their children in every way possible to overcome any of 
the above negative factors which threaten the student's successful completion of a 
course. 

TO ALL BOSUJESS/BUSINZSS MAGNET SENIORS— C ONGRATnLATI_ONS: 

You deserve applause for "hanging in there". This year will go by so swiftly you'll 
look back and wonder where it went.' So make the most of your last year of public 
education — good attendance prepares you for the work world; good grades prepare you 
to go on to higher education or to get a job in your chosen field. Don't forget 
either during this brief, last year to enjoy your extra-curricular activities and 
to enjoy your classmates from whom you may soon be separated as you go your separate 
ways in pursuit of your individual careers. 

In this same vein, following are the senior, business job placements for 1984-85: 

Zafrlen All — Woolworth's Vicki Halsell — Sheraton Hotel Headqusri 

Rosalind Braithwalte — -McDonald's Nicole Jones — Coopers and Lybrand 

Ethel Brown — Bradlees Maureen Johns — Winthrop Hospital 

Sally Bynoe — Liberty Mutual Insurance Company ■ Michelle McDonald — Brooks Fashions 

Sandra Cappuccio — Jlmbo's Pierre Moody — Army Materials and 
Anita Donaldson — Woolworth's Mechanical Research Center 

Rosemary Grasso — Coopers and Lybrand Cheryl Othner — Sandwich World 

Doreen Gleeson — Atlas Bedding Corporation Lisa Peterson — Woolworth's 

Mario Rocha — Dunkin' Donuts 
Marco Watkins — Brigham and Women's Hospital 

United States Business Education Awards 

East Boston High School has been invited to nominate students for the U.S. Business 
Education Awards. This is an opportunity to give a few accolades to our worthy 
business students. The honor of being selected as one of America's most outstanding 
business education students is indeed a tribute to leadership, hard work and achieve- 
ment. Furthermore, It can possibly provide future scholarship opportunities for our 
business students. 



TEACHER/ADMINISTRATOR PROFILES 



eli 



With our first Business Education Newsletter of the year, we are initiating this seclis 
on staff -background. We hope it will ser'/e not only to inform you of the educational 
qualifications of our staff members in this department but also to provide a little 
human interest by letting you know of some of our non-school related interests and 
activities. The result, hopefully, will be better knowledge and understanding of 
each other. 

. Ann L. Fisher (Fh) — Department Chairperson 

Bom and reared in Columbus, Ohio, Mrs. Fisher is currently a resident of Lexington, 
MA. She attended school at New York University (B.S.); Boston University (M.S.); 
Boston State College and Salem State College for Certification in Guidance and School 
Administration. She has been in the field of education for 25 years — 21 years of 
which have been with the Boston Public School System (and at East Boston High); other 
years were in New Jersey. 

Mrs. Fisher is married and has one daughter, 21 years of age and an 81-year old 
mother who resides with her. Her hobbles are: music, writing, flower gardening. 
Interior decorating and fashion consulting. She is an active member of the Pilgrim 
Congregational Church of Lexington and of the Boston Chapter of Lambda Kappa Mu 
Sorority which is a national business and professional women's organization whose 
primary interest Is promoting the educational growth of women. 



,i.Q Continued on next page 



-4- 



Donald Coverdale(Cv) — Guidance Counselor (and Track Coach) 

Bom and reared in New York Clcy, Mr. Coverdale is a product of the New York City public 
schools. He currently resides in Dorchester. Mr. Coverdale attended Bluefield State 
College in West Virginia and the University of Mass. at Amherst for graduate work. He 
has completed all course work for his doctorate which he is seeking in counseling and 
school administration. He has over 20 years experience in the field of education with 
previous experience in the state of New York and in western Massachusetts. 

Mr. Coverdale is also an ordained Baptist minister and a member of the Concord 
Baptist Church in the South End. He is married and the father of two children. 
His hobbies, as an active fitness enthusiast, Include marathon running, cycling, 
swimming and winter sports such as skiing and ice skating. 

Peter Gallo (Ga) — Teacher of Business Law, Consumer Education, Legal and Medical 
Office Practice and Legal and Medical Terminology 

Mr. Gallo was reared in East Boston and is a product of the Boston Public Schools 
(East Boston High, 1961). He attended Mas.s. Bay Community College (A.S.); Suffolk 
University (B.S.); Suffolk University's Graduate School of Business Administration 
(M.B.A. ) and Boston State College for certification in Educational Administration. 
Mr. Gallo has taught in both summer and evening schools, culminating in the appoint- 
ment as Principal of the East Boston Evening School, a position which he held for 
three years. He has been in the field of education for 18 years — 16 of which have 
been at East Boston High School. Mr. Gallo pioneered the course in Consumer Education 
at East Boston High in 1971. He is an advisor to the Mock Trial Competition Team, a 
position which he enjoys a great deal. 

Mr. Gallo is married and the father of three children. His hobbies include physical 
fitness, reading, home repair, music and swimming. 

Wardrobe Tips for "The Girls — Young and Old" 

Did you know that : 

...prints and bright colors (especially pastelles) expose the quality of a garment 

more than solid, darker colors do. So choose darker, solid colors in less expensive wear . 

...simple, clear-cut lines (as opposed to extensive detail in styling) are less likely 

to show flaws in workmanship in garments which are less expensive. 

...you can wear those colors you like but find unflattering to your hair or facial 

coloring. Simply wear them on the lower part of your body (skirts and pants) and 

coordinate with an upper garment (blouse, sweater, jacket) in a color which you feel 

confident looks well on you. 

...the length of your shoulder-strap bag should be governed by your height. Most are 

adjustable; so try adjusting it to your height to make it more flattering. 



POETRY COBNER 



A Friend 

Take time to love 
And time to care. 
Take time to feel 
For others' fare. 
Just let them know 
That even when 
Their world goes wrong 
You'll be 'a friend. 



Thomas C. Gallagher 



HONOR ROLL —CONGRATULATIONS 



Names of honorees will appear next issue of newsletter. 



-149- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

joMMA porn October 24, 1984 

Headmaster 

Mr. Frank A. Laquidara 
Boston Public Schools 
Dept. Of Education/Employment 
75 New Dudley Street 
Boston, MA 02119 

Dear Frank, 

In our telephone conversation today I stated our desire 
to update our vooaLioiicil Li-cilnlng facilities here at East 
Boston High School. CVIA PL 94-4821 There are numerous 
necessary improvroents needed to make our machine technology 
center comparable to other similar facilities around the 
state. We are requesting your involvement in our planning 
because of your expertise and knowledge of funding sources 
and our'-ehared responsibilities for the vocational training 
received by our students. 

As you are aware, the State Department of .Education has 
indicated the need for magnet upgrading at East Boston High 
School be it Vocational or Business entitling- us to 
PL 94-482 consideration. 

Please advise me of your availability so that I may 
make plans with John Poto for our meeting. It should also 
be noted that I have scheduled our Vocational Advisory Committee 
meeting for November 30, 1984. I would like to have something 
to report to them at that time. 

Sincerely yours 



Max R. Corbett 

Dept^ Head Career Preparation 




MRC/pc ffo^n A. Poto, Headmaster 

cc: J. McDonough 

J. Walsh 

W. Dandridge 

P. Ingeneri 

D. Cronin 

J. Caradonio 

C. Glenn , 

J. Taylor v/ -150- 

86 WHITE STREET, EAST BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS „.'128 • 567-21'n3 AREA 617 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

N fCTC • October 31, 19 84 

anaster 

ear Mr. Caradonio: 

s you are already aware, the East Boston High School's Business 
agnet Program has been and continues to be reviewed by the State 
epartment of Education. Through that monitoring process, the 
rogram has been found to fall short of both its purpose as 
pproved by the Court in 1976 as well as its potential . 

n Jrs Report No. 3 to the U.S. District Court. District of Mass. 
n Boston School Desegregation (July 15, 1984, Vol. 1), the 
epartment of Education found the Business Magnet Program to be 
... a v/eak program that suffered from neglect by the School 
epartment..." Among the areas pinpointed for attention were the 
ollowing : 

1. No teaching or adminstrative staff assigned full time — 
Director of the program is also Chair of Business Depart.ment. 

2. Business Magnet teachers are also Business Department 
teachers. 

3. No special support services for students in the program 
(especially freshman) , mostly minority from outside 
District 8. 

4. No staff specially assigned to develop cooperative 
(work-site) experience or job placement. 

5. \'o seats reserved in post-secondary business education 
institutions. 

n addition to the above-mentioned report by the State Department, 
he Citywide Parents Council has reached similar conclusions which 
ere further enhanced as a result of Business Magnet students. 

t 
s a result of this external, constructive criticism, it is more than 

bvious that something must be done to insure the uniqueness of this 

rogram in order that it may be in conformity with the Court order 

s well as to continue to attract students. 



86 -A-.Tt STREE' EAST BOSTON. MAG -151- VS CZ^lIS • 567-2i'20 AREA 617 



- 2 - 



We already have the rudiments of what could be an excellent program 
but financial assistance is an absolute essential. For example, 
we are currently considering an Office Simulation Program for 
seniors (and possible juniors) who either do not feel educationally 
ready for outside work experience or for some other reason choose 
to remain in school all day. We envision this program as being 
a well-developed plan, but the need for equipment and staff support 
are prerequisites to initiate such a piar.. 

With P.L. 94-482 funds in mind.- T will te1*=phone ynu soon to 
arrange a mutually convenient time to discuss this further, 
including format of proposal, time deadlines, etc. 




erely,^^ — . 



I {y/if 



n A. Poto 
eadmaster 



JAP/mr 



cc: Mr. Joseph McDonough, Deputy Supt. 

Mr. James Walsh, Deputy Supt. 

Mr. William Dandridge, Deputy Supt. 

Ms. Joyce Malyn- Smith, Manager Occup. Ins true, 

Mr. Charles Glenn, State Dept. 

Mr. David Crcnir. , State Dept. 

Ms. Judy Taylor, State Dept. 

Mr. Peter Ingeneri, Comm. Supt. 

Ms. Ann Fisher, Dept. Head 



Design 



-152- 



BILINGUAL EDUCATION 



-153- 



BILINGUAL EDUCATION 



I. 



ORDER 



Student Desegregation Plan of May 10, 1975 
This Order addressed six bilingual education 
areas. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



"Where 20 or more kindergarten students 
attend a school and are found to be in need 
of bilingual instruction, the School 
Department shall provide it." (Page 4) 

Compliance 

Throughout the years the Boston Public 
Schools have made an effort to develop 
bilingual kindergarten programs for limited 
English proficient students. There are 
Kindergarten-1 programs in 17 schools and 
Kindergarten-2 programs in 25 schools. 
(Appendix A) 



B. 



SUMMARY 



"The School Bilingual Department staff shall 
make the decision to assign students to 
programs, but not to specific schools within 
community districts. Bilingual program 
assignments will be made first by the 
Assignment Unit". (Page 5) 



FINDINGS Compliance 



An agreement reached between the Master 
Parent Advisory Council and the Boston 
Public Schools, approved by the Department 
of Education, and incorporated into the 
Voluntary Lau Plan, stating that the 
Department of Implementation would assign 
students to programs as well as to specific 
schools within community districts has been 
implemented. Bilingual program assignments 
are the first ones made by the Assignment 
Unit of the Department of Implementation. 



-155^ 



SUMMARY 



"The School Department shall, under the 
court's supervision, prepare an 'Orientation 
and Application Booklet.' This booklet 
shall be printed for mailing in English, 
Spanish, and Chinese versions. 



Translations into French, Greek, Italian and 
Portuguese shall be printed for distribution 
and copies of the booklet in these languages 
as well as in English-Spanish and Chinese 
shall be made available at local schools, 
community school district offices and at 
other municipal locations. A statement in 
each language shall appear in 
Spanish booklet mailed to 
students informing them of the 
and location of copies in these 



the English- 
parents and 
availability 
languages. 



SUMMARY 



The orientation section of the booklet shall 
present brief but cogent descriptions of all 
of the schools and their programs within 
Citywide District 9 and shall orient readers 
accurately to school resources and to the 
range of options and restrictions governing 
final assignments." (Page 44-45) 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Boston has prepared, printed and distributed 
thousands of copies of the "Orientation and 
Application Booklet" in the language of all 
students in bilingual programs. The booklet 
complies, in all respects, with the 
specifications of the order. (Appendix B) 



"After the booklets have been mailed, there 
shall be an information and guidance center 
located in each community school district 
office to which parents and students may 
direct inquiries. The address and telephone 
number of each center shall be printed in 
the booklet." (Page 45) 

FINDINGS Compliance 

Bilingual Community Field Coordinators have 
been assigned to provide information and 
guidance in most district offices for all 
language groups except for Laotians. Even 
though the Laotian position has been 



-156- 



E. 



SUMMARY 



budgeted and advertised, and candidates have 
been interviewed, no one has yet accepted 
the position. (See Appendix C - List of 
Community Field Coordinators and Appendix D 
- Letter from Dr. Spillane to Ms. Marlene 
Godfrey. ) 



"Exceptions to variation limits shall be 
permitted where necesary to allow 
appropriate bilingual assignments or to 
allow students in any racial or ethnic group 
to be assigned to a particular school in 
groups of at least twenty." (Page 73) 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Limited English proficient students have 
been assigned according to the Order. 
Exceptions have been made throughout the 
years to allow for the assignment of limited 
English proficient students of all 
ethnic/language groups to particular schools 
in groups of at least 20. 



SUMMARY 



"Students in need of bilingual education 

will be assigned individually to 
appropriate programs within the district of 
residence." (Page 74) 



FINDINGS Compliance 



of 
all 



Boston is in full compliance with this 
order. Exceptions have been made thoughout 
the years to allow for the assignment 
limited English proficient students of 
ethnic/ language groups to particular 
schools. However, the dispersal of Hispanic 
middle and high school students in all the 
district high and middle schools, as 
reported in Report No. 3, remains a problem. 

Because of that dispersal, bilingual 
services have been inadequate or 
inappropriate. For example, Hispanic 
guidance counselors are assigned to three 
schools rather than one or two. This means 
that they can be at certain schools only one 
day of the week. During critical periods 
such as the first days of school, this 



-157- 



creates problems such as those documented at 
English High School. (See Appendix F) For 
a more complete picture of the inadequacy of 
counseling services, in spite of actual 
compliance with Court orders and the Lau 
Plan, refer to Appendix G. For more 
information about non-compliance with state 
regulations related to course offerings, 
refer to Appendix H. 

The following illustrates the above 
findings: 

Last year's visits to the Chinese Program at 
Charlestown High and the Spanish Program at 
Dorchester High highlighted two contrasting 
situations. On the one hand, the 
Charlestown High School Chinese bilingual 
program, with 11 Chinese bilingual teachers 
and a full-time Chinese bilingual counselor, 
had achieved high standards of academic 
excellence and was in compliance with all 
state regulations relative to pupil/teacher 
ratios and course requirements. Students in 
the program received not only required 
courses but also "extras" such as calculus 
and physics. This was, in part, made 
possible because 219 limited English 
proficient Chinese students from throughout 
the city had been assigned to the program. 

In contrast, the Spanish bilingual program 
at Dorchester High, with only 83 students 
and five bilingual teachers, did not offer 
the minimum number of courses required by 
state law. For example, 24 limited English 
proficient students, grades 9 through 12, 
were taking the same science class and using 
a Spanish First Aid Handbook as a text. 
Some of these students had already studied 
biology and chemistry in Puerto Rican and 
Dominican Republic high schools. 

Last year this situation was repeatedly 
documented in most middle and high school 
Hispanic bilingual programs with the 
exception of Jamaica Plain High. This year, 
the Assignment Unit of the Department of 
Implementation assigned some Hispanic 
bilingual students from the Jamaica Plain 
cluster to other high schools, thus reducing 
the cluster's size and quality. 



-158- 



Despite some efforts to improve the 
situation, the English High School Haitian 
bilingual program — a program of large 
cluster size — remains without appropriate 
and adequate staff, materials and other 
resources necessary for compliance with 
state regulations. 



II. 



ORDER 



Unified Plan 
Education in 
the Court on 



for Vocational and Occupational 
the City of Boston, filed with 
September 8, 1975 



For a report on 
Vocational/Occupational 
pp. 187-190. 



this order, see 
Education Report 



III. 



ORDER 



Memorandum of May 6, 1977 
Modifying Desegregation Plan 



SUMMARY 

"Screening and classification of the 
prospective student shall be presented by 
the bilingual department prior to final 
assignment, however, in accordance with 
state law. As part of the orientation and 
assignment process, direct mailings shall be 
made in appropriate languages to all parents 
explaining the rights of their children 
under M.G.L., c. 71A, to enroll in or 
transfer into such classes." (Page 23) 

FINDINGS Compliance 

An agreement between the Master PAC and the 
Boston Public Schools, approved by the 
Department- of Education and incorporated 
into the Voluntary Lau Plan states that 
mailings to inform parents of their 
chidren's enrollment status are no longer 
necesary. Parents have the opportunity in 
the parent-school personnel interview to 
agree or disagree with the school 
department's decision to enroll a child in a 
TEE program, according to c. 71A regulation 
#45. A signed statement from the parent is 
kept on f ile . 



B. 



SUr^lMARY 



"Transfers ... to or from a bilin- 
gual . . . class may be made at any time. 
Other transfers may be made only at the 
beginning of the second half of the school 
year." (Page 27) 



-159- 



FINDINGS Non-Compliance (Some Improvement) 

Boston has taken steps to facilitate partial 
and full mainstreaming . Boston has offered 
training in parallel scheduling and sister 
clustering to schools where parallel 
scheduling had not been used. Boston has 
also made efforts to improve the physical 
conditions in schools such as Dorchester 
High where space limitations caused over- 
crowding in non-bilingual classes and thus 
made mainstreaming difficult. The staff of 
the Lau Unit and the Bilingual Department 
have also taken steps to develop language 
assessment teams in schools such as the 
Ohrenberger Elementary which previously did 
not have them. These teams monitor the 
students' progress in the acquisition of 
English as well as their native language. 
Based on the testing done by the language 
assessment teams, students are either 
retained in bilingual classes or transferred 
to non-bilingual ones. 

Boston needs to explore effective methods of 
mainstreaming for bilingual students 
including : 

1. reducing the student/teacher ratios for 
non-bilingual classes in schools that 
have bilingual programs; 

2. providing sufficient and adequate 
language support services in the non- 
bilingual program as recommended in 
Report Nos. 2 and 3 ; 

3. educating parents about the benefits of 
mainstreaming students into non- 
bilingual programs; and 



4. creating "two way' 
like the Hernandez. 



bilingual schools 



IV. 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Orders of March 
Modifying Desegregation Plan 



21, 1978 



SUMMARY 



Section 2(c) of the kindergarten plan, 
approved with modifications on August 12, 
1977, is amended by adding thereto the 
following sentence: "Bilingual Extended Day 



-160- 



Kindergarten Programs may be organized 
separately from regular Extended Day 
Programs." (Page 5) 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Boston has complied with this order; there 
are 12 Bilingual Extended Day Kindergarten 
Programs in existence. {Appendix A) 



CONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



Boston has fully complied with orders 
related to: 

1. the provision of bilingual instruction 
for limited English proficient (L.E.P.) 
kindergarten students; 

2. the organization of Bilingual Extended 
Day Kindergarten Programs; 

3. the assignment of L.E.P. students to 
programs and schools; 

4. the preparation and distribution of the 
"Orientation and Application Booklet" in 
all languages, the establishment of 
information and guidance centers located 
in each Community School District 
Office; 

5. the allowance of exceptions to variation 
limits; 

6. the assignment of L.E.P. students to 
programs within their district of 
residence; and 

7. the classification of prospective 
students by the Bilingual Department 
prior to final assignment. 

While Boston has made some efforts to comply 
with the orde.r regarding in-school 
transfers, it has yet to implement our 
recommendations or to reduce student/teacher 
ratios and provide sufficient and adequate 
native language support services in the non- 
bilingual program. 

Serious questions and concerns about the 
adequacy and appropriateness of bilingual 



-161- 



services in most Hispanic middle and high 
school clusters due to clustering problems 
also remain. 

Non-compliance issues still remain in the 
provision of appropriate administrative, 
counseling and instructional support 
services in the native language to L.E.P. 
students in the bilingual 
vocational/occupational programs. For 
specific recommendations regarding bilingual 
services to vocational/occupational 
programs, consult the 

Vocational/Occupational section pp. 198-199. 

In order to enhance mainstreaming : 

1. the Department of Implementation must 
reduce the student/teacher ratios for 
non-bilingual classes in those schools 
which house bilingual education 
programs; 

2. the Bilingual Office must continue to 
train school personnel in the areas of 
parallel scheduling and sister 
clustering; 

3. Boston must provide sufficient an 
adequate native language support 
services in the non-bilingual program; 

4. the Lau Unit must help organize and 
improve the effectiveness of language 
assessment teams; 

5. Boston should create more "two-way" 
bilingual schools like the Hernandez; 

6. Boston should educate parents about the 
benefits of mainstreaming students into 
non-bilingual programs; 

7. the adequacy and appropriateness of 
bilingual services in the Hispanic 
middle and high school clusters must 
also be addressed. Boston must involve 
all relevant parent organizations, 
plantiff interveners, the Bilingual 
Department's staff, leaders of the 
Hispanic community in Boston, and 
others, in the development of a plan to 
consolidate some of the high and middle 
school clusters. 



-162- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATION REPORT #4 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



1. Appendix A: Bilingual Kindergarten Programs 

2. Appendix B: Table of Contents from 1984-85 Student 

Assignment Handbook 

3. Appendix C: Community Field Coordinators 

4. Appendix D: Letter, Robert Spillane to Marlene Godfrey 

Re: Non-Compliance Issues at English High 
School 

5. Appendix E: Questionnaire for Vocational/Occupational Educa- 

tional Programs 

6. Appendix F: Marlene Godfrey to Robert Spillane 

Re: Bilingual Non-Compliance Issue 

7. Appendix G: Hispanic Guidance Counsellors 

8. Appendix H: Regional Courses Offered and Access to Extra 

Curricula Activities 



-163- 



i Page 7 



APPENDIX A 
-BILINGUAL KINDERGARTEN PROGRAMS* 



District Schools 



Baldwin 
Hamil ton 
Tobin 
Winship 



Language 

Chinese 
Cambod ian 
Spanish 
Spanish 



Programs 
Kl K2 E.D.P 



t-r 



XX- 
XX- 

X X EDP 

XX- 



Agassiz 
Kennedy 



Spanish 
Spanish 



X 
X 



X 

X 



EDP 
EDP 



Lee 
Mattahunt 



Spanish 
Greek 



X 

X 



EDP 
EDP 



Shaw 



Haitian 



EDP 



S. Greenwood 

Holland 

Marshall 



Spanish 
Spanish 
Spanish 



X 
X 



X 
X 
X 



EDP 



Dever 

Emerson 

Winthrop 



Spanish - x EDP 

Cape Verdean x x EDP 
Spanish x x - 



Blackstone 
Hurley 
Qu incy 



Spanish 
Spanish 
Chinese 



X 
X 
X 



X EDP 
X - 
X EDP 



Otis 



Italian 

Portugese 

Spanish 



X X 

- X 

- X 



Hennigan 
Hernandez 
Jackson Mann 
Ohrenberger 



Spanish 
Spanish 
Vietnamese 
Laotian 



X EDP 

XX- 
XX- 



*Refer to Court Orders of May 10, 1975 (p. 4) and March 21, 1978 
(p. 5). 



** 



Schools with Bilingual Extended Day Kindergarten Programs 



-165- 



APPENDIX B 
TABLE OF CONTENTS FROM THE 1984-85 STUDENT ASSIGNMENTS HANDBOOK 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 4 

COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT: 

DEFINITIONS 4 

ASSIGNMENTS: 

Bilingual Assignments 7 

Special Education Assignments 7 

Advanced Work Assignments 8 

Kindergarten Assignments 8 

Transportation 9 

Change of Address 9 

PARENT/STUDENT PARTICIPATION 10 

COMMUNITY DISTRICT SCHOOLS— DISTRICTS I THRU VIII 10 

MAGNET SCHOOLS— DISTRICT IX (City-wide) 11 

MAGNET PROGRAMS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS: 

KINDERGARTEN 12 

ADVANCED WORKyACADEMICALLY TALENTED 13 

TOBIN SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAM 13 

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS 13 

Vocational/Occupational 13 

Health Careers Magnets 14 

Special Business Education Program 14 

Boston International Studies and Language High School Program 14 

Hubert H. Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 14 

Music Magnet 15 

AnotherCourse to College 15 

Boston Preparatory 16 

Fenway School/English High School 16 

Magnet Art Program/English High School 16 

BOSTON EXAMINATION SCHOOLS 16 

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 16 

BILINGUAL EDUCATION SERVICES 17 

SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES 17 

OTHER CITY-WIDE PROGRAMS 18 

DIRECTORY: 20 



<^4f(*vju-i<^.«r^*5^«« ,,.''''v'« C7U-fi«-o • -167- "* 



1 



APPENDIX C 



Community Field Coordinators 



1 



Name Languace District office P, Ph om 

Ramonita Diaz Spanish 

Sophy Seng Cambodian 

Anh Iran Vietnamese 

Vacant Laotian 

Ana Rodrfguet Spanish 

Pauline Tsoumis Greek 

Evelio Rodriguel- Spanish 

Raymond George Haitian 

Manuela Costa Cape Verdean /Portuguese VI 

Norma. Rodri9ue: Spanish VI " 

Isabel Yee Chinese VII 426-5552 

Amelia Manana Spanish it 

Rosario Cascio Italian VIII 569-2959 

Felix Ibanez Spanish IX 442-1397 



I 


783-1195 


1 


I 


It 


! 
1 


I 


II 




I • 


II 




II 


522-7100 




III 


323-6020 




V 


283-6068 




V 


It "* 


;i>?-i 


VI 


282-5440 





-16^.- 



APPENDIX D 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



^ 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OrF'CE OF THE SUPERlN'^ENOENT 

ROBERT R SPILLAN6 



October 11, 1984 



Ms. Marlene Godfrey, Director 

GBREC 

27 Cedar Street 

Vellesley, Massachusetts 02181 

Dear Ms. Godfrey: 

RE: Non-Compliance Issues at English High School 

There has been a steady increase of bilingual Haitian and Spanish 
students at English High School since the beginning of school in 
September. We made allowances in our projections last spring for 
a normal increase; however, the summer months brought many new 
families into Boston. 

We have adjusted our original and new projections and have 
increased the number of teachers to address the current staffing 
problem. All positions have been budgeted and teachers are being 
interviewed to fill needed slots. This includes the numbers you 
mentioned in your October 1st letter. Aides will also be 
assigned as needed. 

We have also interviewed candidates for the Laotian Community 
Field Coordinator position and offers have been made, however, to 
date no one has accepted. We have also assessed the need for an 
additional Guidance Counselor slot for the Hispanic students; 
however, we do have a person covering the school one and one-half 
days each week which is adequate for the number of students 
assigned. This is probably more of a scheduling problem than an 
unmet service. We do follow the 250:1 student/counselor ratio as 
outlined in the Lau Plan for bilingual students. 

It usually takes two to three weeks for bilingual students to be 
tested and leveled each year; consequently, there is a scheduling 
delay which is unavoidable, especially when new students enter 
during the month. Every effort is being made to remedy this 
situation presently. 

-169- 



Ma. Marlene Godfrey " -2- October 11, 1984 



English High School this year is undergoing " major changes in 
programming. The school currently has a bilingual population 
which is more than 30X of the enrollment and growing. In a 
situation like this, it is important that bilingual students are 
mainstreamel as soon as possitsle so that they can be integrated 
into the standard curriculum classes. 

Mr. Sidney Smith, the new Headmaster, is well aware of the 
complexities of his task and needs our support. I would 
appreciate it if Mr. Rodriguez wduld meet with him on a regular 
basis and discuss the issues. 

Sincerely, 





Robert R. Spillane 
Superintendent of Schools 



mc 



-170- 



APPENDIX E 



iJut-iiiUiNNAi^.!:. rUrw vUC/\i iO.VfVL/ uci^uf Ai IUNAjl 
EDUCATION PROGRAMS - SPRING 198A 



Leoond 

X = yes 

- = does not exist 



Are there written procedures to en- 
courage LZ? students to enroll in 
Occ/Voc Ed. program 

letters in native lang. to parent 

other 

Do written prccadurea exist to dotor- 
mina LE? szudents? 



3. 




What kind of services are offered to 
LEP students in the native lang. 

voc/occ ed. in native lang. 
other 

Staffing mfor-ation 

native lancuace teachers - 

ESL teacner 

aices 

counselors * 



3. 



3. 



What are the numbers of LE? studencs 
enrolled m this school? ** 

w'hat is the teacher/student ratio? 

How do you teach LEP students? 
teach nionolingually 
teach monolmgually v;ith a bil. 
student translating 
teach nonolingually with some 
native lang. materials 
teach monolingually with a native 
language speaking aide, 
teach bilingually - in English 
and the targeted native lang. 

Are aides available to work with 
your students 

Are aides used in the voc/occ educa- 
tion classes to help the LEP students 



* represents the number of days/weekly 
** Lau Categories A&B only 



93. h9 



X I X X X 



lo: 



lo: 



-171- 



-> I _ 



6R ^3 



93 



175 



X X 



on 




What proRraraa are available 

automative 

foods 

clothing 

electronic 

woods 

drafting 

metal 

data processing 

printing 

business 

computer education 

child care 

nachine technology 
Curricular materials are available 
in the following native lang. 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Haitian 

CamDodian 

Laotian 

Vietnamese 

Chinese 

Italian 

Greek 

Czechoslavakian 

Spanish 

Other 



are used in the 



Curricular materials 
following language. 

Cape Verdean 

Portuguese 

Haitian 

Cambodian 

Laotian 

Vietnamese 

Chinese 

Italian 

Greek 

Czechoslavakian 

Spanish 

Other 



■hat kind of native language mater- 
ials do you use? 













X 












X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




X 


X 








X 


X 


X 


^ 








X 








X 






X 










X 






X 


V 


X 




X 




X 


X 


X 






X 




X 


X 








X 








:c 


V 










X 




X 












X 
















' 


V 




X 








X 


V 












X 




X 


X 


X 








X 










X 


X 


X 






















X 
























X 






= r 


^ av 


:r> \ 


l.^<.r» 




^, 


sr><> 


, ■; c. 


n " in" 




I'. 


■iiL,- 


hilitv -f -.Tn."--:,<ls - 


.' -rCT.TT .:r»! 


nr 


d ^v 


i ^W. 


^U.Tu- 


t '^rrjuD'^. . 




1 














1 




i 1 




































































































1 




t 

1 


















i 








































M- 


ceri 


-lis 


In t 


-t> n: 


civ. 


Ian 


"iia'' 


2S ^1 


•? nK 


u^^ 


«d. 


















































































1 


































. 










































































































1 
















i 

172- 

1 










--■ - 


^ — 


- 


i 






Does coordination exist between the 

voc/occ education teachers and the 

bilinqual teachers in: 
automocive 


* 












• 
r 


* 








foods 






















clothing 














c 


^ 








electronic 














c 


c 








woods 
















— 








. drafting 














(t: 


r: 








metal 
















- 








. data processing 














u 


u- 








printing 














c 










business 
























coriputer education 














c 


c 




I 


. other 














c- 


'J'. 








Does coordination exist between the 
voc/occ education teac;:ers ana tne 
ESL teachers m 
automotive 


* 












n 


'A 








foods 
















— 








clothing 










1 - 1 - 








electronic 












1 ? 


= 








woods 












t ■ ■ 
1 


— 








drafting 




I 




1 :- 


-: 








netal 


1 1 




i = 


— 






data processing 




1 




i r 


'•: 


\ 




printing 












- 


■~ 








business 










( ■ 


, 








. computer education 




i i 


1 g 


^ 








;■ other 














'JZ 


(.'. 








Is this administration/teaching 
peers receptive to bilingual educa- 
tion services to the LEP students? 
























• 
















































* ":o '-ocrdln.Ttipn oxisr«; 




























































































-r 


n-^ 

































I 

1 






t 

I 









AVAILABLE NATTVE lANOTACE CXHRIOnAR MATtRIALS VOCATIONAL/O CCJPATIONAL EDUCATION ^^ 



PROGRAM 
Food Service 




Retailing, Marketing and 
Management. 



Cabinetniaking_ 

Carpentry 

PliCTibing. 

Building Hiintenance 
and Repair_ 

Autobody Repair 
Laboratory 

Machine Laboratory 



Sheet Metal Laboratory 

Welding Laboratorv 

Advanced Office dnc 
Manaoenent 



Leaal Office 
Procedures 



Medical Office As sistant 

Word Process inc 

Banking 



Child Care 



Cosmetology 



Fashion/Interior Design_ 

Hotel Hospital itj;j 

Data Processing 

Health Aide 



Health Laboratory Skills 



Medical Office Assistant- 
Clinical 



Nursing Assistant 

Electrical Technoloav 



Electronics Tecnnoloov 



Heating. Air Conditioning, 
Refrigeration 



Co.Tinercial Design 



fashion niustration_ 
Machine .Drafting 



X} 



! ( I M M ■ M I I M I M I ! .XI I I I I 



k 



I xj 

1 1 



II 



x| 



r I • I 



Mil! 



k 



M i M I i i ! ) ! I i i ' ' ! ! f< I ! I I I 



! i I 



I I I I I I I I I M I I I t I TTT 



I Ixl 



IX 



K 



X 



j I I . 

" -174-* 



I'M I 



I M I III I I 



//Lg?!:';5I'. H ^ccnt )/ 



LANGUAGE 



PROGRAM 

Photographic Technology 
Printing 



Television Production 

Automotive/Truck Repair 

Marine and Small Engine 
Repair 




-175-' 




APPENDIX F 
Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street. Weilesley. Massachusetts 02i8l 431-7825 



OctcDer i, 1984 , 

I, 

ji 
Superintenaent Koberc S. Spiliano l' 

Boston Public Schools i 

26 Court Street 

boston, MA 02106 

1 
Re: Bilingual (Chapter 71A) Non- 
Compliance Issues at English 
Higp. School 

Dear Superintendent Spillane: 

On September 19, 1984 Mr. Rodolfo Rodriguez conducted a 
nionitcring visic at the English High ScnooL. He tound that the 
enrollment in the Haitian and the Hispanic clusters had 
increased. As of that date, two hunared fifty-five (255) Haitian 
and seventy (70) Hispanic students had been assigned to the 
bilingual program by the Department of Implementation. Vvith 
those figures and regulation #14.05 of the Massachusetts 
Transitional Bilingual Education Act (Cnapter 71A) as a point of 
reference, Mr. Gary Daphnes, the Bilingual Department Head, 
reported to Mr. Rodriguez the following statting needs: 

1. One Haitian bilingual teacher. 

2. One ESL teacher. 

3. One Spanish bilingual teacher. 

4. Two bilingual aides. 

Mr. Rodriguez also learned that a Laotian community field 
coordinator had not been assigned to assist Laotian parents even 
though that need had been identified in previous reports. In 
addition, there were no guidance counselors or teachers available 

to help Hispanic students with registration and scneduling . 

problems. It was also learned that the guidance counselor can be 
at English only one and a half days a week; a guidance counselor 
should be available at least three days a week. This situation 
at English was previously reported (Report Number 3, Volume 2). 

To document the teaching staff needs reported by Mr. Daphnes, our 
monitor provided 25 -copies of a Bilingual & ESL teachers 
questionnaire to be completed by all teachers in the program. 
Mr. Rodriguez agreed to visit the English High School again on 
Tuesday, September 25, 1984 to pick up the forms and evaluate the 
reported staffing needs. 



-176- 



Superintendent Spillane 

Page 2 

October 1, 1984 



On September 25, 1984 Mr.- Rodriguez returned to English High 
School and reported the following: Sixty-nine (69) of the 
seventy-eight (78) Hispanic students were sitting in class 
without schedules or materials. A new bilingual Spanish teacher 
had arrived that morning. Mr. Seda, the bilingual teacher was 
attempting to figure schedules tor the students. When Mr. 
Rodriguez noticed that only two teachers were scheduled for the 
classes, he asked why the five teachers required under regulation 
#14.05 of Chapter 71A were not in place. He was told that a 
third bilingual teaching position was being used to offer college 
preparatory courses for both limited English proficient and 
mainstreamed bilingual students. Therefore, this teacher could 
not be scheduled to assist the other two teachers. Mr. Rodriguez 
informed Raffael DeGruttola about this situation. 

Further inquiry into this matter at the central office that same 
afternoon disclosed that by September 4, 1984 the Department of 
Implementation had projected sixty-five (65) students for the 
Hispanic cluster. Eighteen (18) more students had been assigned 
to the program. In all likelihood at least twenty-two (22) more 
students will be assigned there during tne next few days. After 
conversing with Mr. Daphnes, Mr. Sid Smith (headmaster), Ms. 
Ivonne Iturrino of the Personnel Department, Mr. Dana Rizzotti of 
the Budget Office, Ms. Georgette Gonsalves (bilingual 
coordinator), Mr. Raffael DeGruttola and Mr. Carl Nickerson 
( Deparcment of Implemencation ) , it is our understanding tnat : 

1. The ESL position was budgeted but has not been filled yet. 

2. The bilingual teacher who had been teaching College prep 
courses will be included with the other two Spanish bilingual 
teacher when scheduling the seventy-eight (78) new students. 

3. There is need for a Hispanic bilingual counselor at least 
three days of the week. 

4. There is need for a Laotioan community field coordinator 
citywide. 

5. In order to teach the seventy-eight (78) Hispanic students at 
the English High School, at least one more Spanish bilingual 
teacher should be budgeted and assigned to the school. If 
the cluster increases to one hundred (100) students, as Mr. 
Nickerson expected, then another teacher would have to be 
budgeted and hired to comply with regulation #14.05 of 
Chapter 71A requirements. 



-177- 



Superintendent Spillane 

Page 3 

October 1, 1984 



6. To serve the two hundred eighty-one (281) Haitian students 
assigned to the school, at least one more Haitian bilingual 
teacher and two more aides are needed. Once the forms 
completed by the teachers are analyzed by our monitor, it 
will be possible to determine whether another teacher is 
needed . 

Given the seriousness of this situation, we expect the needs 
identified above to be satisfied within the next few days so 
students will not have to lose additional days of class. I would 
appreciate hearing from you regarding the resolution of these 
issues . 



Sincerely, 




Marlene Godfrey ^*^ 
Regional Director 



MG/mw 

cc: Raphael DeGruttola 

Jim Case 

Rod o 1 f o Rod r i g ue z 

Frank Banks 

Ernie Mazzone 

Sid Smith 



-178- 



APPENDIX G 



HISPANIC GUIDANCE COUNSELORS AND SCHOOLS TO 
IffllCH THEY HAVE BEEN OR WILL BE ASSIGNED 



1. Carmen Janda 
2„ Margarita Perez 

3. Luis Torres 

4. Juana Flores 

5. Ana Bunker 



Brighton High, Taft Middle, Edison Middle 

J. P. High, Mary Curley Middle 

Dorchester High and Cleveland Middle. Will 
pick up the McCormack Middle. 

Charles town High and Timilty Middle. Will 
pick up Martin Luther King Middle 

English High, Madison Park High, Mackey Middle 



NO HISPANIC GUIDANCE COUNSELORS ARE AVAILABLE FOR 
HISPANIC STUDENTS ATTENDING CLASSES AT 



1. South Boston High 

2. Mario Uraana High 

3. H.H.O.R.C. 

4. Boston High 



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APPENDIX H 
- .REQUIRED COURSES OFFERED AND ACCESS TO EXTRA-CURRICULu\R ACTIVITIES 



SCHOOLS 


All Chapter 71A mandated 
courses offered? ' 






YES 


NO 




English Hi^h 


Haitians 


Laotians 
HisDanics 




Dorchester High 




X 




South Boston High 




X • 




Jamaica Plain High 


X 






Boston High 




N/A 




H.H.O.R.C. 




N/A 




Madison Park High 




X 




Mario Umana High * 




X 




Cleveland Middle 




X 




M. L. King Middle 




X 




Dearborn Middle 




X 




Taft Middle 




N/D 




Mackev Middle 




X 




Boston Tech 




N/A 




Blackstone Elementarv 




N/D 





N/A - Does not apply 
N/D - No data 

* Umana offers two years of TBE (7th and 8th grades) to a Chinese and a Hispan; 
cluster limited in size to 30 students per cluster. This does not allow for 
full TBE program. 



-180- 



VOCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION 



-181- 



VOCATIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL 
EDUCATION 



I. ORDER Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational 

Education in the City of Boston, filed with 
the Court on September 8, 1975, and amended 
on June 14, 1976 and January 28, 1978. 

A. COMPLIANCE WITH RELEVANT COURT ORDERS, STATE LAWS AND 
REGULATIONS (pp. 8-11) 



SUMMARY 



All vocational/occupational education 
programs are required to be in compliance 
with (1) racial ratios established by the 
Court and (2) the admissions criteria 
specified by the Unified Plan, including 
proportional enrollment representation by 
sex. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



(The findings of the implementation of this 
requirement are incorporated in the STUDENT 
ASSIGNMENTS report. See pages 



B. CORE PROGRMIS (pp. 15-17) 
SUMMARY 



Boston is required to provide all middle 
school students in exploratory programs with 
a strong career guidance emphasis in three 
major cluster areas: Industry Related, 
Food-Home-Health Services Related, and 
Business-Distribution-Government Related. 
In addition, supplemental career exploratory 
activities are required to introduce 
students to a broad range of career choices 
free of race or sex sterotypes. The 
Cleveland School is required to have a full 



-183- 



time Career Education Coordinator 
position. High school exploratory clusters 
are required for grades 9-12; the ninth 
grade cluster is mandatory for all 
students. Boston is also required to offer 
employability skill programs for grades 10- 
12 in Business-Office Education, Food-Home- 
Services-Health Education, and Distributive- 
Marketing Education. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

Significant efforts have been made to bring 
all of Boston's middle school exploratory 
programs into full compliance. Notable 
accomplishment has occurred particularly in 
the Business-Distribution-Government related 
cluster through the implementation of 
extensive computer education programs. Two 
schools (Cheverus and Tobin) with small 
enrollments, however, remain in non- 
compliance. The Cheverus Middle School does 
not offer the Industry Related Cluster. The 
Tobin with grades K-8 has a middle school 
enrollment of 85 students and does not offer 
the Industry Related Cluster and the Food- 
Home-Health-Services Related Cluster. 

The scheduling and instruction of the three 
exploratory clusters continue to vary among 
schools. Some offer two to three double 
periods per week while others offer one or 
two single periods per week. The length of 
time that a student may remain in any 
specific program ranges from 5 to 14 
weeks. In addition, some schools offer 
three or four different Industry Related 
shops while others offer only one. The 
student/teacher ratio is inconsistent among 
schools, particularly in the Food-Home- 
Health-Services Related Cluster. In some 
cases there is only one teacher for 500 
students or more, twice the preferred 
ratio. Some instructors expressed concerns 
about reduction in the quality and amount of 
supplies; however, others felt that they had 
ample materials for instruction. (See pages 
560 and 561 in Report No. 3 for middle 
school program distribution, scheduling 
process and enrollment data.) 



-184- 



Middle School Career Guidance 

The status of supplemental career 
exploratory activities in Boston's middle 
schools continues to fluctuate and vary 
among schools and districts. Several years 
ago, full-time career education coordinators 
existed in all middle schools. After 
Proposition 2 1/2, these full-time positions 
were eliminated except for the full time 
coordinator at the Cleveland Middle 
School. The Cleveland School position was 
eliminated during the last school year but 
was reinstituted as a part-time position 
this year. In most districts, career 
education activities were carried out 
through the use of Chapter 636 funds. Most 
middle schools discontinued or greatly 
reduced their career education programs when 
the priorities for Chapter 636 funding 
changed, indicating a lack of school 
commitment. Project Business in a few 
classrooms in some schools, annual career 
fairs, and some assistance from school 
volunteers currently substitute for previous 
comprehensive programs. Most guidance 
counselors are reluctant to assume the re- 
sponsibilities for implementing career 
education activities because each has 
guidance responsibilities for more than 400 
students. To a degree, some schools provide 
career education, but a comprehensive 
program does not exist. As a result, many 
8th graders continue to enter high schools 
without adequate information, guidance, 
preparation, or decision-making skills for 
making high school choices. 

This year, 4 middle schools (Taft, 
Lewenberg, Cleveland and Barnes) and the 
middle school component of the Tobin through 
a Commonwealth In-Service Institute Grant 
will adapt a career education model. Project 
BICEP (Barnstable Instructional Career 
Education Project) , in targeted program 
areas. 

A policy which outlines the career develop- 
ment goals for students from kindergarten 
through high school has finally been 
completed but is currently awaiting school 
committee approval. 



-I85- 



High School Exploratory 

The high school exploratory programs have 
been in partial-compliance throughout the 
last three reporting periods. Initially, 
only 5 district high schools were in full- 
compliance. As of the last reporting 
period, 10 district high schools (Brighton 
High, Jamaica Plain High, Hyde Park High, 
Jeremiah E. Burke and Dorchester Highs, 
South Boston High, Charlestown High, East 
Boston High, English High and Madison Park 
High) were in full compliance with the 
exploratory offerings. The only remaining 
district high school. West Roxbury High, is 
now also in full compliance with the 
offering of the Food-Home-Health-Services 
Related Cluster this year. The exam, 
technical and other specialized schools such 
as Copley High and Boston High do not offer 
vocational exploratory clusters. However, 
all of these schools, with the exception of 
the exam schools, have 9th graders attending 
exploratory clusters at the HHORC. 

Other supportive exploratory activities 
provided through school, business and 
university partnerships are offered in many 
high schools and at the HHORC. 

High School Employability Clusters 

The employability cluster offerings in the 
10 district high schools continue to be in 
partial-compliance with limited progress 
towards full compliance since the last 
reporting period. Non-compliance exists 
mainly in the Food-Home-Health-Services 
Related Cluster and in the Distributive- 
Marketing Cluster. Full compliance exists 
mainly in the Business-Office Education 
Cluster. 

The Food-Home-Health-Services Related 
Cluster is offered in the high schools 
primarily as an exploratory program as 
opposed to an employability program. The 
number of Distributive Education/Marketing 
programs has continued to decrease over the 
past two years and the four schools 
(Brighton, Burke, Dorchester and Madison 
Park) which still have Distributive 
Education programs have low enrollments. In 
addition, the HHORC only offers one program 



-186- 



in this cluster area. The Business-Office 
Education Cluster continues not only to be 
in compliance but also to expand and improve 
citywide because of the purchase of computer 
hardware. 



C. MAGNET PROGRAMS (pp. 18-24) 
SUMMARY 

This provision delineates specific program 
and capacity requirements for the HHORC, 
lists specific district programs to be 
transferred or phased out, and requires 
specific magnet programs to be established 
in each district. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Most of the requirements for magnet programs 
have been met. The HHORC is operational; 
however, enrollment continues to fluctuate 
between 50% and 71% of the total capacity. 
As of November 2, 1984, the enrollment at 
the HHORC reported as 2,256 (however, this 
includes approximately 400 students who Did 
Not Report-DNR) . The program offerings at 
the HHORC emphasize the trade and industry 
area. However, certain major occupational 
clusters are not offered, including 
Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environ- 
ment, Transportation, Fine Arts and 
Humanities, and Public Service. Instead, 
all of these clusters, with the exception of 
Public Service is offered as district magnet 
programs. 

Jamaica Plain High in District II does not 
offer a citywide magnet program. To date no 
active efforts have been taken to establish 
the magnet program. Information Management 
System, in this school as recommended in the 
Unified Plan. 

D. IN-SCHOOL BILINGUAL (pp. 24-30) 

SUMMARY 

The Unified Plan stipulates that selected 
bilingual vocational/ occupational programs, 
with appropriate administrative, counseling 
and instructional support services, would be 
established to serve limited English 
proficient (LEP) students. These bilingual 



-187- 



vocational/occupational education programs 
would utilize the native language of the LEP 
students as the primary medium of 
instruction. 

FINDINGS Non-Compliance (Improvements) 

Monitors have found that native language 
bilingual vocational/occupational programs 
are not provided by Boston Public Schools as 
specified by the Unified Plan. All limited 
English proficient students are mainstreamed 
into regular vocational/occupational 
education programs and provided various 
instructional support services. The policy 
directive and operational guide for the 
delivery of these services is the Bilingual 
Vocational Education Policy Manual . This 
document outlines the fundamental approach, 
strategies and procedures for instructional 
and pupil personnel support services to LEP 
students enrolled in vocational/occupational 
programs. The major emphasis of the 
monitoring efforts has been to assess the 
progress in implementing the provision of 
support services. 

The following findings have emerged: 

1. Bilingual Vocational Education Policy 

The focus of this monitoring period has 
been to assess the degree to which the 
Bilingual Vocational Education Policy 
Manual is undergoing revisions and 
modifications within the Boston Public 
Schools. The revisions and 
modifications are intended to provide 
greater clarity of definitions, to 
broaden the scope of the policy, and to 
develop individual student service plans 
based upon identified needs. 

The Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center, 4 high schools (Boston, Jamaica 
Plain, Dorchester and Brighton) and 2 
middle schools (McCormack and Martin 
Luther King) are using the policy in a 
limited way. These efforts were 
initiated very recently. The impact and 
results, therefore, cannot be adequately 
measured. 



-138- 



2. Bilingual Staffing 

The absence of bilingual aides available 
to limited English proficient students 
enrolled in occupational education 
programs, particularly at the middle 
school level, continues to be an out- 
standing concern. Bilingual aides are 
not available to LEP students enrolled 
in middle school exploratory programs. 
Bilingual aide staffing at the high 
school level has improved since the 
previous reporting period. For example, 
Boston has utilized federal vocational 
education funds to hire a Cambodian aide 
for the Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center and South Boston High, and a 
Hispanic aide each for Jamaica Plain and 
Dorchester High Schools, who are 
scheduled to work in the first week of 
December, 1984. 

The lack of adequate bilingual 
counseling services remains a serious 
concern. Although bilingual guidance 
counselors are available in some 
schools, these services are 
inadequate. The bilingual counselors 
are available at schools on a limited 
basis, ranging from full-time to one to 
two days per week or month. The 
Humphrey Occupational Resource Center 
presently has no bilingual counselor on 
staff. Supplemental vocational guidance 
is provided to a limited number of 
Hispanic students (40) at the Humphrey 
Occupational Resource Center by 2 
Hispanic community based organizations. 
Talent Search and the Ecumenical Social 
Action Council. 

3. LEP Student Recruitment and Referral 

Recruitment of limited English 
proficient students is conducted in some 
native languages. Informational 
bulletins describing 

vocational/occupational programs in 
Boston are disseminated to LEP students 
and parents in their native languages. 
Information has been disseminated 
through television programs and 
announcements and other available print 
media. The Bilingual Field Coordinators 



-189- 



have contributed significantly to these 
efforts. Results indicate that these 
strategies have been successful in 
attracting and increasing the enrollment 
of limited English proficient students 
in vocational/occupational programs in 
Boston. Enrollment data indicate that 
LEP students enrollment in 
vocational/occupational programs has 
increased from a total of 2,919 for 
school year 1983-84 to 3,022 for the 
current school year. 



4. Availability 
Materials 



of 



Native 



Language 



E. 



Substantial efforts have been devoted to 
adapting curricular materials for 
limited English proficient students. 
Native language instructional materials 
(primarily Spanish) also are available 
in several occupational/vocational 
program areas from the HHORC through the 
Coordinator of Bilingual Vocational 
Services. These materials are utilized 
by instructors to a very limited 
degree. Coordination among the 
bilingual, E.S.L., vocational English as 
a second language (V.E.S.L.) and 
vocational/ occupational teachers is 
also very limited. 

OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH, AGES 16-21 (pp. 31-3 5) 

SUMMARY 



Boston is required to cooperate 
agencies to provide vocational 
services 
21. 



for out-of-school 



with city 

education 

youth, ages 16- 



FINDINGS Compliance 

The previous report indicated that the City 
of Boston is providing a wide range of 
services to out-of-school youth through the 
joint efforts of the Neighborhood 
Development and Employment Agency and the 
Boston Private Industry Council. Many are 
alternative education programs linked with 
Boston Public Schools and lead to credit 
toward a high school diploma and entrance 
into skills training programs. With the 
implementation of the provisions of the Job 



-190- 



Training Partnership Act, these programs are 
continuing to serve out-of-school youth. 

The Boston Neighborhood Development and 
Employment Agency reported that a total of 
1,383 out-of-school youth between the ages 
of 16-21 were served during the 1983-84 
program year. An approximate number is 
projected to be served during the current 
1984-85 program year. 



VOCATIONAL/OCCUPATIONAL 
STUDENTS (pp. 36-3 9) 



EDUCATION FOR SPECIAL NEEDS 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



Boston is required to maintain 
vocational/occupational education services 
for special needs students and to provide 
training for vocational/occupational 
instructors in this area. 

Compliance 

Boston has been providing a comprehensive 
range of vocational/occupational education 
services for special needs students. 

The provision of in-service training for all 
vocational/occupational instructors on 
strategies to instruct special needs 
students remains an outstanding concern. 



PROGRAM CHANGES AND DELETIONS (pp. 47-48) 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



Boston is required to transfer certain 
programs as specified. 

Partial Compliance 

Some incomplete program transfers as 
indicated in previous reports remain 
incomplete. The Cabinet Making 
(Architectural Woodworking) and Upholstery 
(Interior Design) programs at Dorchester 
High have not been transferred to the 
HKORC. The Machinist program at East Boston 
High is being phased out at the site. 
Boston has no plans for transferring these 
programs to the HHORC. 



-191- 



other required program transfers are 
completed. Vocational programs formerly at 
Boston Trade High and the Pilot Occupational 
Resource Center were phased into the 
HHORC. The Horticultural/Animal Husbandry 
program at Jamaica Plain High also was 
transferred into the Agri-Business and 
Natural Resource program at West Roxbury 
High. 



H. PROGRAM SUPPORT COMPONENTS 



SUMMARY 



1. Management iModif ication (pp. 48-52) 

Boston is required to establish a 
distinctive management structure which 
defines clear lines of authority and 
responsibility over fiscal control and 
program operation of vocational/occupational 
education programs. 

FINDINGS Non compliance 

As indicated in every previous monitoring 
report Boston has not instituted a 
distinctive management structure for an 
effective vocational/occupational education 
as specified by the Unified Plan. Although 
the Department of Education and Employment 
drafted a modified management structure 
plan, this plan has not been filed with the 
Court for review and approval. 

Report No. 3 identified three areas that had 
not been systematically or effectively 
managed. These remain unchanged: (1) the 
current management structure does not 
provide firm fiscal control and supervisory 
authority over all citywide occupational 
education programs by the Director of 
Education and Employment; (2) Boston's 
Department of Education and Employment is 
not organized to manage and evaluate the 
effectiveness of all vocational/occupational 
education programs, or to assess outcomes of 
outreach efforts involving school personnel, 
students, parents and communities; (3) the 
annual systemwide program operational plan 
and the annual accountability report with 
measurable outcomes are not submitted to the 
State Department of Education. 



-192- 



SUMMARY 



2. Public Information (pp. 53-56) 

This section of the Unified Plan requires 
Boston to institute an aggressive and 
systematic public information system. This 
system should include a pervasive media 
component directed toward the entire 
population in Boston. 



FINDINGS 



Partial Compliance 



SUMMARY 



Boston has undertaken a variety of public 
information campaign activities; however, 
these efforts have not had the thrust, scope 
and impact defined in the Unified Plan. 
Some progress has been made in improving 
these efforts. An ad hoc marketing team was 
convened to develop and implement a 
comprehensive and systematic marketing plan 
that mobilizes all facets of the school 
system and utilizes community, governmental 
and business resources. The plan was 
developed and the marketing committee has 
since disbanded. The Assistant to the 
Director of Education and Employment and the 

Officer at the HHORC have been 
to coordinate marketing 

on a part-time basis. The 
implementation of a campaign of 

requires a full-time experienced 
and, in addition, a budget to 
the operational costs. 



Development 

designated 

activities 

successful 

this nature 

manager 

support 



3. Professional and 
Development (pp. 57-63) 



In-Service 



Boston is required to establish and 
implement comprehensive in-service training 
for all systemwide vocational/occupational 
education instructors in the areas of equal 
educational opportunity, bilingual 
vocational education, and special education. 



FINDINGS 



Partial Compliance 



Since September of 1982, numerous in-service 
training activities have taken place at the 
HHORC. Most of the in-service training is 
incorporated within the regular program 



-193- 



activities at the HHORC. Frequent workshops 
or conferences were conducted on topics such 
as curriculum development, shop safety, 
instruction for special needs students, 
instruction for limited English proficient 
students, and equity issues. 

In-service training was also provided for 
vocational/occupational staff at other 
schools, but the scope of offerings was not 
as extensive as that at the HHORC. 
Selective vocational/occupational staff have 
participated in workshops, conferences, or 
seminars on topics such as curriculum 
development, shop safety, career education 
and updatings on Industrial Arts, Home 
Economics and Business Education. 

Although numerous in-service programs have 
been offered (some mandated, some 
voluntary) , evidence suggests actual 
participation varies considerably; it has 
not been assured that teachers in need of 
specific areas of training actually receive 
it. The Department of Education and 
Employment is currently surveying individual 
vocational/ occupational staff members. 
After this survey, some remedies will be 
developed to ensure full participation. 



SUMMARY 



4. Industry/Agency 
(pp. 67-72) 



Community Involvement 



Boston is required to establish an Advisory 
Council for Career Vocational/Occupational 
Education (ACCVOE) with specific target 
group representation. 

FINDINGS Compliance 

The previous reports to the Court indicated 
that the membership of the ACCVOE is in full 
compliance with the stipulations of the 
Unified Plan. 



SUMMARY 



5. Curriculum Acquisition/Revision (pp. 
64-67) 

Boston is required to develop and implement 



-194- 



full-scale Competency-Based Vocational 
Education (CBVE) curricula for all programs 
at the HHORC and other schools. 
FINDINGS Non Compliance 

The development of CBVE curricula at the 
HHORC has not been completed as planned. 
With four years of extensive efforts, the 
development of CBVE curricula for all forty- 
seven programs at the HHORC was scheduled to 
be completed by June 1984. Although half of 
the total number of learning guides of the 
CBVE curriculum were developed by the staff, 
only 20% (10 programs) were completed by 
that date. Three program curricula were 
also purchased for adaptation. The previous 
report recommended that by June 30, 1984 the 
total curricula for all programs should be 
made available for instructional use. The 
development of CBVE curricula is continuing 
through Fiscal Year 1985 with a new target 
completion date of June 1985. 

The effective implementation of CBVE 
curricula for classroom instruction has not 
been clearly demonstrated. Curriculum is 
meaningful only when effectively used. To 
date, the curriculum focus has been on the 
development of learning guides. Other 
components such as learning styles, 
classroom management, audio-visual equipment 
usage, and computer-assisted instruction 
have not yet been incorporated into the 
total curriculum package. Clear guidelines 
for usage of CBVE curricula have yet to be 
defined. 

SUMMARY 



6. Comprehensive Job 
Placement (pp. 69-70) 



Development and 



Boston is 
acomprehensive 
development and 



required to institute 

and responsive job 

placement system based upon 



current manpov^er 
capabilities, 
capability/interest, 
required to develop 
design employability 
counseling teams, (c) 



demands, system 

and student 

The school system is 

the capacity to: (a) 

plans, (b) establish 

plan and implement a 



job development system and, (d) maintain 
three-year statistical follow-up of 
graduates. 



-195- 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



The previous reports indicated that although 
activities for job development and placement 
were ongoing, a comprehensive job 
development and placement system was not 
fully in place. While a system does exist 
for the HHORC, a similar system does not 
effectively extend to all citywide magnet 
and vocational programs. Although Boston 
Compact and Private Industry Council 
(P. I.e.) activities include job development, 
placement, and follow up studies, specific 
objectives have not been established for 
placement of vocational students in trade 
and industry programs. Placement services 
have mainly involved clerical or business 
positions. 

According to the recent placement report on 
the Summer Jobs Program sponsored by Boston 
Public Schools and the Private Industry 
Council, summer placements continue to 
increase. A total of 1,766 students were 
placed in jobs this past summer compared to 
1,181 students placed in summer jobs the 
previous year. Those high schools which 
have P. I.e. career specialists had the 
highest placement rates. The majority of 
these summer jobs were clerical positions. 

The HHORC reported a placement rate of 90.5% 
for the 1983-84 school year, 55% of whom 
were placed in jobs related to their 
training, 20.3% in non-related jobs, 11.6% 
in further education and 3.4% military. The 
five (5) Job Development Specialists based 
at the HHORC are also responsible for 
providing job development, placement and 
follow-up services to students attending 
district magnet vocational programs. As a 
result of the heavy work load very limited 
impact is made upon the placement and 
follow-up of students in the district magnet 
programs. In most instances, the 
instructors or career preparation department 
coordinators assume job development and 
placement responsibilities for those 
programs. For the school year 1983-84, 
there were a total of 85 program completers 
in the 5 district magnet vocational programs 
(57 were reportedly placed in related jobs 
and 10 in non-related jobs) . A 



-196- 



comprehensive job development and placement 
system is needed for district high school 
magnet vocational programs. 

Since Report No. 3, a job circular 
announcing an acting position for a Citywide 
Job Placement Specialist has been posted. 

CONCLUS I ONS/RECOMMENDAT I ONS 

A. ASSIGNMENTS 

(See the section for Student Assignments) 

B. CORE PROGRAMS 

1. Middle School Exploratory Clusters 

Alternative methods of providing 
exploratory clusters such as 
participating in district high schools 
and HHORC exploratory program offerings 
should be explored. 

Currently, there are no specific 
requirements for exploratory program 
scheduling. Systemwide standards should 
be established for exploratory offerings 
and scheduling to reduce the current 
disparites among school programs. 

2. Middle School Career Guidance 

Appropriate administrative commitment 
and support must be forthcoming at the 
school building level in order to insure 
the effective and successful 
implementation of career education 
initiatives. 

The roles and responsibilities of 
guidance counselors and other school 
personnel for the implementation of 
career education activities should be 
established. 

Career guidance for 8th graders entering 
9th grade should be strengthened to 
assist students in making appropriate 
career program choices. 



-197- 



3. High School Exploratory 

A more concerted effort needs to be made 
citywide to expose and encourage 
students to enroll in non-traditional 
occupational training. 

4. High School Employability 

All district high schools should provide 
program offerings in Distributive 
Marketing Clusters. 



C. MAGNET PROGRAMS 



A motion should be filed with the Court to 
modify the existing order if certain 
district programs will not be transferred or 
phased out. 

The school system should make an active 
effort to establish a magnet vocational 
program at Jamaica Plain High that meets the 
demands of job market as well as the needs 
of the school system. 



D. IN-SCHOOL BILINGUAL 



If the provision of native language 
instruction in selective vocational programs 
is no longer viable, Boston must take 
appropriate action to modify the 
requirements of the Unified Plan. 

The development of a Bilingual Vocational 
Education Policy, while not consistent with 
the Unified Plan, provides a conceptual 
framework for delivering a comprehensive and 
coordinated system of 

vocational/occupational education support 
services to limited English proficient 
students. The ultimate value of this 
concept paper, however, lies in its 
implementation. The procedures and 
strategies outlined in the policy have been 
implemented on a limited basis. Appropriate 
administrative procedures and policy 
directives should be forthcoming in order to 
further its implementation. 

Appropriate supportive services should be 
provided through native language speaking 
counselors, aides and native language 
instructional materials. 



-IQfl- 



Policies of bilingual language instruction 
in the vocational/occupational programs 
should be implemented by building 
administrators. 

The vocational/occupational bilingual and 
ESL teachers must coordinate the teaching of 
the content of the vocational/occupational 
program in order to ensure that the L.E.P. 
students achieve the same level of concept 
development as the English proficient 
students. 



OUT OF SCHOOL YOUTH 



In compliance, 
necessary. 



No recommendation is 



VOCATIONAL /OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION FOR SPECIAL NEEDS 
STUDENTS 

In-service training for all vocational/ 
occupational instructors on strategies to 
instruct special needs students should be 
incorporated into a comprehensive staff 
development plan. 

PROGRAM CHANGES AND DELETIONS 

If the required program transfers are no 
longer desirable, a motion must be filed 
with the Court to modify the existing order. 



H, 



PROGRAM SUPPORT COMPONENTS 



Management Modification 

Boston should file a motion with the 

Court to modify the organizational and 

management structure specified by the 
Unified Plan. 

Evaluations for all vocational and 
occupational education programs and for 
out-reach efforts involving a public 
information campaign and student 
recruitment should be systematically 
organized and effectively implemented. 

Program operational plans and 
accountability reports should be 
annually submitted for review to the 
Division of Occupational Education, 



-199- 



state Department of Education. 

2. Public Information 

The need for a full-time experienced 
Public Information Manager to coordinate 
and direct the implementation of the 
various marketing activities continues 
to be an outstanding concern. In 
addition, unless the necessary financial 
resources are forthcoming these efforts 
will remain fragmented in approach and 
will achieve minimal results. 

3. Professional and In-Service Development 

An accountability report for the 
implementation of the comprehensive 
staff development plan for all 
vocational/ occupational instructors 
should be submitted for review to the 
Division of Occupational Education, 
State Department of Education. 

4. Industry/Agency Community Involvement 

Effective measures should continue to 
insure the active participation of all 
members of the Council in improving 
vocational/occupational education in 
Boston. 

5. Curriculum Acquisition/Revision 

The incomplete learning guides of the 
CBVE curricula should be developed as 
soon as possible. If necessary, 
available materials should be 
immediately purchased for adaptation. 

CBVE curricula completed at the HHORC 
should be thoroughly implemented with 
clear guidelines for all instructors. 

The completed CBVE curricula should be 
disseminated citywide to relevant 
programs for adaptation and 
instructional use. 

6. Comprehensive Job Development and 
Placement 

Boston should re-examine the effects of 
its current mechanism for the job 



-200- 



placement of students at the HHORC and 
other district vocational/occupational 
education programs and devise ways to 
improve and strengthen its 
effectiveness, particularly for the 
district programs. The appointment of a 
person to coordinate and implement a 
comprehensive job development system 
citywide should be forthcoming. 



Documentation (On file) 

B. - List of Boston Public Schools Computer 

Inventory 

- Career Development Model and Policy K- 
12, 1984 

- Chapter 636 Career Education Grants 
November 2, 1984 HHORC Cluster Tally 

- K-12 Boston Computer Education 
Curriculum 

ORC 1983-84 job placement statistics 
Magnet program 1983-84 job placement 
statistics 

C. - November 2, 1984 HHORC Cluster Tally 

D. - Limited English Proficient Students 

Enrollments in Occupational Education 
Programs. 

E. 1. - Comprehensive Staff Development Plan, 

1984-1985 

Summary of In-Service Training, 1983- 

1984 

Summary of In-Service Training, 1982- 

1983 

E 6. - 1984 Boston Summer Jobs Program 

Placement List 

- Personnel Circular for Citywide Job 
Placement Specialist 

Job Placement Report 1983-1984 - HHORC 
Boston Chapter 74 Completer Leaver 
Student Follow-up Report, June 30, 1984 



-201- 



SCHOOL FACILITIES 



-203- 



SCHOOL FACILITIES 



Construction, renovation and closing of school facilities shall 
occur according to the standards contained in the following 
orders: 



I. 



ORDER 

SUMMARY 



Interlocutory Order of June 21, 1974 



FINDINGS 



II. 



ORDER 



This order prohibits the construction of new 
buildings, expansion of existing ones, or 
placement of portable buildings without the 
specific approval of the Court. 



Full Compliance 

Monitors have found Boston 
compliance with this order. 



in 



full 



Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975 pp. 
6-7 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



to remain 
closed by 



This order (1) requires that each school 
facility which is to remain open will house 
a student body that does not exceed the 
tables in the plan (though these capacities 
need' not be met to determine internal 
distributions by programs) and (2) lists 
schools which are closed and are 
closed and those which are to be 
August, 1975. 

Full Compliance 

Monitors have found that no school has 
exceeded the capacity ceiling ordered by the 
Court and all schools ordered closed have 
been closed. This was initially reported in 
the first monitoring report. 



-P05- 



Ill, 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Orders Modifying 
Desegregation Plan, May 6, 1977, pp. 37-40 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



This order spells out the long-range 
construction and repair programs filed 
November 1976 and modified in December, 
1976. For example, it establishes 
timetables for the building of Charlestown 
High and the ORG. It establishes the joint 
planning process (city, state, school 
department) to be carried out in developing 
the Unified Facilities Plan due September, 
1977 and specifies what the plan shall 
include. It also requires state defendants 
to report to the Court any problems with 
specific financing commitments already made 
as well as commitments hereafter made by the 
state for construction and renovation 
projects. 

Partial Compliance 

Many aspects of the Unified Facilities 
Planning process relating to elementary 
schools were carried out as ordered. 
Boston, however, has never developed a 
complete facilities plan as specified under 
these orders. A sum of money for 
unspecified heating system and school 
improvement projects is contained in the 
Department's FY 1986 budget request. Some 
of this money may be used for smaller Boston 
projects, if appropriate. The estimated 
first annual payment for a Latin Schools 
Complex project is not presently included 
in the Grant Budget Request of the 
Department of Education for Account 7052- 
0004 for FY 1986. The Secretary of 
Administration and Finance has assured that 
funding will be restored if such project is 
entitled to a first annual payment in FY 
1986. 



IV. 



ORDER 



SUMMARY 



Further Memorandum and Order as 
Facilities Plan, August 15, 1979 



to Unified 



These orders establish the December 1979 
deadline for filing the revised joint UFP. 
It specifies a ten-year period to be covered 
and calls for the elimination of no fewer 



-206- 



than half of the excess seats at the 
elementary level, requiring, as well, the 
names of schools to be closed. It also 
requires a revised assignment plan based on 
the closings. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

While the school closings were reported 
carried out in accordance with the Court 
orders and a revised assignment plan 
developed, a 10-year facilities use plan, 
including use of secondary facilities, a 
list of schools to be closed, and a list of 
projects anticipated for those schools which 
are to remain open has not been presented. 



V. 



ORDER 



Orders Relating to Unified 
Planning, March 21, 1980 



Facilities 



SUMMARY 



These orders adopted proposals of the joint 
planners insofar as they proposed the 
closing of ten elementary schools beginning 
with the school year 1980-1981, ordered the 
closing or retention of various schools, 
rejected proposals to establish linkage and 
beacon schools, ordered the filing of an 
elementary student assignment plan, and 
required the joint planners to resume 
unified facilities planning and to file 
further proposals. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



Although the Conley School was ordered 
closed, the order in this respect was 
subsequently rescinded. Joint planning from 
about 1981 was sporadic until commencement 
of monitoring by the Department of 
Education. 



VI, 



ORDER 



Supplemental Order Relating to Unified 
Facilities Planning, April 2, 1980 



SUMMARY 



This Order requires the closing of the Mead 
School and states that the Court's failure 
to comment on the content 
schools space matrix filed 
and dated March 6, 1980, not 
approval of changes in 



of a secondary 

with the Court 

be construed as 

court-ordered 



-207- 



VII. 



capacities. It specifically orders that 
such changes be denied but that they may be 
approved later after appropriate discussions 
between specific appropriate parties. 

FINDINGS Compliance 

The Mead School is closed. 

ORDER Order on Joint Defendants' Motion for 
Adoption, May 11, 1981 



SUMMARY 



This order requires the closing of 27 
schools and denies the request to create a 
kindergarten program at the Robert Gould 
Shaw Middle School as inconsistent with the 
Court's orders with respect to uniform grade 
structure. It forbids in 
modifications of this type. 



general all such 



FINDINGS 



VIII. 



ORDER 



Compliance 

All twenty-seven schools have been closed as 
ordered. 

Memorandum And Supplementary Disengagement 
Orders, September 17, 1984 



SUMMARY 



These orders identify several earlier orders 
which have not been carried out, including 
filing of a complete Unified Facilities 
Plan, and present a draft order. Partial 
Termination of Jurisdiction, to be discussed 
in Court on October 12, 1984. 



FINDINGS 



IX. 



ORDER 



Partial Compliance 

These orders make clear the Court's 
recognition and displeasure that a complete 
Unified Facilities Plan has not been 
filed. Meetings on this matter continue. 



Order to File Unified 
November 2, 1984 



Facilities Plan, 



SUMMARY 



This order requires that a unified 
facilities plan be filed on or before 
December 15, 1984, requires that the plan be 



-20ft- 



FINDINGS 



authored and filed jointly by the school 
defendants, the state defendants, and the 
city defendants, and requires that it 
address among other things the Court orders 
of May 6, 1977, and August 15, 1979. This 
plan must be filed regardless of whether a 
modified student assignment plan has been 
negotiated. 



Meetings to achieve this end have taken 
place on a regular basis since commencement 
of monitoring, and a large volume of 
material has been filed. A series of weekly 
meetings was scheduled through the first 
week in December to meet the filing date. 
The following section. Conclusions and 
Recommendations , contains specific comment 
on this matter. 



CONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATIONS 



Boston has complied with most aspects of the 
Court orders relating to the construction, 
renovation, and closing of schools, but it 
must yet develop a comprehensive long-range 
facilities plan as specified by the Court, 
most recently on November 2, 1984. Much of 
the data to be refined for inclusion in such 
a plan has been provided to the Department 
of Education by the Boston defendants. The 
major task at this time (December 3, 1984) 
is to organize and reduce this material to 
address the specific requirements for the 
plan. Still to be provided by the City is a 
list of all Boston Public Schools selected 
to be closed over the ten-year period of the 
plan with the capacity of each and the 
estimated date of closing. 

With this major piece of information in 
hand, the Department of Education staff will 
be able to proceed jointly to draft a 
focussed plan dasigned to meet the Court's 
requirements. 

The next steps are to develop a document 
containing the following information: 

1. An agreed upon estimated student 
enrollment to be housed over a future 
ten-year period. 



-209- 



2. A list of all Boston Public Schools 
selected to remain open for the same 
ten-year period, with 

a. capacities for each school 

b. a list of projects, both capital and 
so-called major maintenance (such as 
boiler and burner replacements) for 
each school, showing estimated costs 
and start dates, and any planned 
change in capacity as a result of 
such projects. 

3. A list of Boston Public Schools selected 
to be closed together with the capacity 
of each and the estimated date of each 
closing. 

4. A mechanism for providing for agreed 
upon changes to the plan necessitated by 
changes in enrollment, unforeseen 
changes in buildings, financial or 
economic conditions, and other major 
factors whichnormally impact upon 
facilities planning, consistent with the 
intent of the Court ordered plan. 

5. "A statement of opinion by the D.I. 

(Director of the Department of 
Implementation) regarding the likely 
effect upon desegregation of any 
developments in implementing the UFP" 

(Unified Facilities Plan) , as required 
by the Court order of May 6, 1977. 

6. A statement which describes the manner 
in which the mayoral defendant, 
(including the Boston Department of 
Capital Planning and the Public 
Facilities Department) will interface 
with the Boston Public Schools and the 
School Committee to coordinate 
applications for and funding of projects 
as they relate to the types of projects 
identified at page 39, item (d)(3) of 
the May 6, 1977, order. This concern 
has been addressed in discussions with 
Boston. It is reflected in 
correspondence to Boston dated September 
7, 1984, and is needed to produce an 
orderly and harmonious resolution of 
school facilities problems in the 
system, so that projects funded by the 
public schools and by the City will 



-210- 



coincide, be complementary, and reflect 
the educational needs of the system. 

The status of two major proposals 
introduced by the City of Boston must 
also be included in this report. These 
are 1) a proposed enlargement and 
renovation project designed to produce a 
Latin Schools Complex to include a 
Boston Latin School and a Boston Latin 
Academy, and 2) a request by the City 
for the Commonwealth to share 
financially in the renovation of the 
George Robert White Schoolboy Stadium 
under the provisions of the School 
Building Assistance Act, Chapter 645 of 
the Acts of 1948, as amended. 

The City of Boston has submitted 
sufficient documentation relative to an 
application for a Boston Latin School (s) 
project to satisfy the requirements of 
Section 4 of Chapter 515 of the Acts of 
1983 which authorizes ninety percent 
state financial assistance for racial 
balance/desegregation projects approved 
or submitted by June 30, 1984. The 
status of this proposal is as shown in 
letters in the appendix of this 
report. The filing of the Board of 
Education on October 22, 1984, further 
explains this matter; "Legislation 
enacted by the Massachusetts General 
Court provides increased State 
assistance up to ninety percent of 
approved cost for construction projects 
intended to reduce or eliminate racial 
imbalance, or imbalance of minority 
students, if such projects were 
'submitted or approved' after December 
31, 1981 and before July 1, 1984 . . . . 
The State Board took pains to stress 
that receipt of these 'submissions' in 
no way committed the State Board to 
either support of these projects as part 
of a Unified Facilities Plan or the 
awarding of School Building Assistance 
funds for the specific projects in 
question. " 

Staff of the Department of Education 
have consistently advised the 
representatives of the City of Boston 
that the proposed renovation project for 



-211- 



the George Robert White Stadium is not 
an approvable project under the current 
provisions of Chapter 645 of the Acts of 
1948, as amended, the School Building 
Assistance Act. The reasons for this 
position are contained in a letter dated 
November 20, 1984, filed in the appendix 
of this report. 



-212- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATION REPORT # 4 

SCHOOL FACILITIES 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



April 30, 1984 Memo from John R. Coakley to Boston 

School Committee 



May 4, 1984 School List 

May 14, 1984 Letter from Commissioner John H. 

Lawson to Superintendent Robert 
Spillane regarding joint response 
to May 2, 1984 correspondence. 

May 15, 1984 Long Range Facilities Plan, May 

1984 pages F-1, F-2 and H 1. 

May 15, 1984 Letter from Robert Roy, Mechanical 

Engineer to James Hart, Director of 
Public Facilities Department. 

May 30, 1985 Letter from Commissioner John H. 

Lawson from Superintendent 
Robert R. Spillane with regard to 
Boston School Committee approval of 
Long Range Facilities Plan. 

June 5, 1984 Letter to Commissioner Lawson From 

James F. Hart, Director, Public 
Facilities Department re the City 
of Boston's support for Long-Range 
Facilities Plan. 



-213- 



June 6, 1984 



Letter to Commissioner Lawson from 
Robert R. Spillane, re school 
closings (with attachment of May 7, 
1984) . 



June 12, 1984 



Memorandum to Commissioner Lawson, 
from Robert H. Blumenthal, Esq. re 
proposed Boston Latin School/Latin 
Academy construction. 



June 27, 1984 



Memorandum to Commissioner Lawson 
from David A. Jones, Associate 
Commissioner re Boston Facilities 
Plan project submittals. (See 
attached correspondence dated 
May 15, 1984 and June 26, 1984). 



July 5, 1984 



Letter to Dr. John A. Calabro from 
James F. Hart, Director of Public 
Facilities. A follow-up to the 
June 28, 1984 meeting regarding 
submitted school applications. 



August 10, 1984 



Memorandum to Mayor Raymond L. 
Flynn to City of Boston Department 
heads re Office of Capital 
Planning . 



August 22, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Messrs. Robert Murray, and Peter 
Scarpignato. A summary of the 
status of our joint activities re 
Long-Range Facilities Plan. 



September 7, 1984 



Letter from Dr. John A. Calabro to 
Mr. Robert Roy, Mechanical Engineer 
re heating system approvals. 



-2m- 



September 12, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Messrs. Robert Murray and Peter 
Scarpignato re the proposed Latin 
School complex. 



September 14, 1984 



Letter from Superintendent Spillane 
to Dr. John Lawson. A review of 
the MA Board of Education's 
Monitoring Report #3 dated July 15, 
1984. (Facilities pages 18 and 
19.) 



September 24, 1984 



Letter to Governor Michael Dukakis 
from Mayor Flynn re White Stadium 
Complex (received November 16, 
1984) . 



September 26, 1984 



Letter to Stephen A. Moynahan, Jr. 
Esq., Deputy Clerk, U.S. District 
Court from Robert H. Blumenthal, 
Esq., Counsel, State Board of 
Education. The State Board's 
supplement to the 3rd 
Report. (See pages 6 



Monitoring 
and 7.) 



September 28, 1984 



Letter from Robert L. Murray to 
John A. Calabro re proposed Latin 
Schools project — response to 
September 12, 1984 correspondence. 



October 2, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Peter Scarpignato, re confirmation 
of Long-Range Facilities plan 
status. 



October 11, 1984 



Memorandum from John R. Coakley, 
Senior Officer, Boston School 
Committee, to Robert R. Spillane re 
Report #1 Unified Facilities Plan. 



-215- 



October 11, 1984 



Letter to Stephen A. Moynahan, Esq. 
from Michael J. Betcher, General 
Counsel, Boston School Committee, 
re School Defendants' Status 
Reports. 



October 12, 1984 



Letter to David A. Jones from 
Robert L. Murray - a follow-up to 
the October 5th meeting. 



October 17, 1984 



Memorandum from David A. Jones to 
Robert Blumenthal re Boston Public 
Schools Status Report (Octover 11, 
1984). 



October 22, 1984 



Letter to Stephen A. Moynahan, Jr., 
Esq. from Robert H. Blumenthal, 
Esq. re State Board of Education's 
Comments on October 11, 1984 
Filings of the Parties. (Unified 
Facilities Plan pages 4-7) . 



October 22, 1984 



Letter from James F. Hart to David 
A. Jones re Project Milestone 
Chart. 



October 23, 1984 



Morgan v. McKeigue — City 
Defendants' Comments on Unified 
Facilities Plan. 



October 24, 1984 



Letter to David A. Jones from 
Michael J. Smith re Auditor's 
certification. (See attached 
certification from Leon Stamps, 
Auditor, City of Boston). 



October 25, 1984 



Letter to James R. Grande, Chairman 
of the Massachusetts Board of 
Education from Mayor Raymond Flynn 
re Financial Commitment for School 
Repairs and Renovations. 



-216- 



November 1, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Michael Smith, Director, Capital 
Planning, Public Facilities 
Department re response to 
October 24th correspondence. 



November 19, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Messrs. Murray and Smith — summary 
of Joint Planning Meeting 
November 16, 1984. 



November 19, 1984 



Letter to Robert Murray from 
John A. Calabro re Latin School 
Projects. 



November 20, 1984 



Letter from John A. Calabro to 
Robert Murray and Michael Smith re 
White Stadium. 



November 21, 1984 



Letter to Robert Murray from 
David A. Jones in response to 
October 12, 1984 correspondence and 
comments on October 11th, BPS Court 
Filing. 



November 21, 1984 



Letter to David A. Jones from 
Michael J. Smith re Proposed 
Schedule of Long-Range Facilities 
Plan. 



November 23, 1984 



Letter to Michael J. Smith from 
David A. Jones in response to 
proposed schedule of November 21, 
1984. 



-217- 



-5 ■=:;-! COL CC.MMITTEZ OF T.-.l OiTY OF BOSTON 




'S." ST*' > '-i il !'~ »^. ^-•. ^ 



April 30, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 




I 



To: Robert Spillanj 

From: •• John Coakley ^"^Vl \i'^ltl2i^ 

Subject: Response to ^hool' CommitJ^ Request of April 26, 1984 

My March 13, 1984 paper, entitled Facility Renewal and Utilizatior ' 
identified 73 school buildings which "comprise an unarguable core of 
our facility needs for the next twenty-five years." That paper also 
referred to. 47 other schools (and other school department facilities) 
which were placed in some one of three categories: "most probably 
needed," "probably to possibly needed" and "of uncertain need." I 
did not deem it strategically advisable to specify which of the 47 
schools were in such categories. For one thing, the final form of 
Section IV of the Long Range Plan (i.e., districting, K-8 schools, 
magnet schools and student assignments) will influence considerably 
our facility needs. Also, there are other policies and commitments 
which may influence our facility needs. For example, a re-instating - 
of a full Kindergarten I Program would call for 3000 kindergarten P 
spaces , and a successful retention of those secondary school students 
who otherwise might become school "drop-outs" would require the 
maintenance of nearly the present numbers of high school seats. 

The School Committee, nonetheless, has requested my enumeration 
of the three categories noted above. I offer you my enumeration with 
the assertion that the listing is not casually offered. If necessary, 
I can prepare for you a very detailed report touching on BPS and non- 
3PS enrollment history, enrollment projections, residential trends and 
facility potential. I do not claim that. the listings are unassailable 
but I do believe them to be reflective of one person's thorough and 
comprehensive knowledge of the school system and city. On that humble 
note, I provide the following assessment of schools and other. 
facilities which were not listed by name in the March 13th paper. 



-218- 



Boston School Committee 



-1- 



May A, 1984 





Most Probably Needed 


Probably to Possibly 
Needed 


Of Uncertain Need 


ist Boston 


Adams 
Guild 


Barnes* 

Cheverus* 

Otis 


Alighieri 


larlestown 




Edwards 




Duth Boston 


South Boston High 


Perkins 


Perry 


;ntral 


Michelangelo* 


Boston High 
Copley High 


Eliot 


2nway 




Farragut 




Llston, Bright! 


on Baldwin 


Taft* 


V7inship 


amaica Plain 




T. Roosevelt 


Fuller* 
Manning 


Dxbury 


Lewis 
Dickerman* 


Higginson 




Drchester 


Emerson 
Hernandez 
Kenny 
O'Hearn 


Holmes 
Everett 
Mason 
Winthrop* 


Clap* 

Endicott 

Stone 


attapan 




Thompson 




Dslindale 


Conley 
Mozart 


Parkman* 
Philbrick 


Longfellow* 


est Roxbury 


Beethoven 
Kilmer 




Lyndon 


fde Park 


Channing 
Grew 




Hemenway ' 



* Recommended for closing, in part or in entirety, in Sargent 
Report of 1962, in some cases to be replaced by new schools 
which were never built. 
In addition, it is my view that we should make determinations about 
th lonq-term needs of all other buildings under our jurisdiction. I 
offer the following for consideration: 



Building 
Central Headquarters 



Need 
Probably long-term. 



-219- 



Boston School Committee 



-2- 



May 4, 1984 



Building 
Campbell Resource Center 
Faneuil School 

McKinley and Milmore 

District One Office 
District Three Office 
District Five Office 
Tileston School 



Need 

Obviously long-term 

Probable long-term need 
as an elementary school 
or for alternative school us€ 

Consider vacating one or botf 
in order listed 

Vacate 
Vacate 
Vacate 
Consider vacating 



-220- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



4 2 Qo 'f 



'■-.' i^ 



1385 Hancack Street. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



o 



May lA, 1984 



Dr. Robert R. Splllane 
Superintendent of Schools ' 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108' 

Dear Superintendent Spillane: 

This is in response to your letter to me dated Hey 2, 1984, fn which you 
refer to Boston's long-range planning efforts and in winch you make particular 
reference to school facilities projects. You refer specifically to the 
Interest of the City In qualifying for additional state aid related to 
projects that contribute to desegregation. 

Representatives of our School Building Assistance Bureau have met three 
times with representatives of the Public Schools and the Public Facilities 
Department to develop a long-range facilities plan. On May 3, the Department 
received the initial segment of the planning document, including enrollment 
projections, capacities, and a list of schools which the School Committee has 
determined will remain open over the foreseeable future. The Boston 
representatives promised that a second segment would be presented v/Ithin two 
to three weeks. Indicating which schools on the Hay 3 submission v/ould be 
proposed for school construction/renovation/ Improvement projects together with 
estimated costs. We currently await this report. 

Recent unverified news stories Indicate that the City of Boston has also 
developed a list of school buildings to be closed. This Information would 
also be of assistance to the planners. 

As you know, by court order, all Boston projects to be approved must be 
consistent with a long-range facilities plan. This is also required by state 
practice. 

Projects to reduce or eliminate racial imbalance or segregation must be 
approved or submitted by June 30, 1984, in order to be considered eligible for 
funding at 90 percent of costs. On that date, the section of Chapter 515 of 
the Acts of 1983 which authorizes this percentage terminates. The Board of 
Education's H.63, If enacted, will make permanent this level of aid. 



-221- 



h. 

Fiscal. Commitment - City of Boston 
Boston School Facility Plan 

May 1984 



-223- 



Boston Latin School/Boston Latin Academy 

Construction Project 

May 15, 1984 



Need | 

The need for major renovation at Latin School is unarguable; for i 
more than 60 years no significant upgrading of the building has been 
made. Indeed in 1980, following a comprehensive facility planning I 
effort, the Board of Education of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts I 
endorsed the renovation of the Latin School as a priority need of the 
Boston Public Schools. The City of Boston, acting through its Public 
Facilities Department^ also endorsed the renovation of Latin School as 
one of the School Departments greatest facility needs. 

The need for a new facility for Boston Latin Academy is equally 
great. The present facility is one leased from the State. The terms 
of the lease are precarious; the school system has already received 
notices to vacate but has fore-stalled that notice pending acquisition 
of better quarters. The facility is inadequate; built as a garage it 
lacks many of the proper educational spaces for a secondary school. 
There is no facility to which this program can be relocated. Only two 
other BPS facilities have sufficient capacity to house the program. 
English High and Madison Park High are presently well enrolled and 
these schools will retain their purpose and identity over the long 
term. A recent plan for English High School has been approved and 
the Boston Public Schools are committed to the success and continuance 
of this facility as English High. Madison Park High is presently well 
enrolled and any prospective change in its long term philosophy will 
clearly relate to the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center which 
is part of the same complex of buildings. 

Project Description 

The plan to construct a new Boston Latin Academy and to return 
Boston Latin to new condition will combine on one site these two 
compatible but distinct and highly acclaimed secondary schools. It 
will provide modern and appropriate facilities for approximately 
thrity-five hundred students, 1500 students in Boston Latin Academy 



-224- 



in grades 7 through 12 and 2200 students in Boston Latin also in 
grades 7 through 12. ' 

i Each school will offer a college preparatory program with emphasis 

on a classical curriculum stressing languages, science, mathematics, 
humanities and computer science. Students will also be encouraged 
to develop skills in self study, self expression, research and 
communication. They will have opportunities to develop individual 
talents and interests in music, art, physical development and emerging 

technologies. 

I 

' The site is presently occupied by the Boston Latin School building 

which is to be extensively renovated to a condition "equal to new". 

The resultant new and renovated facilities will contain approximately 

400,000 square feet. In addition to the school facility, the site 

must accomodate customary support services for a secondary school 

including a bus access system which will serve vitually all of the 

students in the school. 

The facilities are to be designed and constructed to assure a 
separate identity for each school. The design should also assure 
equal access by students and faculty to unique and specialized 
facilities and resources that can be mutually and beneficially shared 
in both school programs . 

The school construction schedule must be carefully arranged and 
coordinated to assure minimum disruption to the students in Boston 
Latin School and Boston Latin Academy. 



-225- 



Fiscal Commitment - City of Boston 

The Public Facilities Department will provide a total of $4 million a year 
for each of the next five years for school renovation expenditures. In addi- 
tion, the Public Facilities Department will provide $35 million for the reno- 
vation and construction of the Boston Latin and Boston Latin Academy High 
Schools and ip to $3 million for the rehabilitation of White Statium. 

This commitment by the Public Facilities Department is contingent on the 
City of Boston's ability to raise the specified funds in the bond market 
and on 90% relnibursement from the State. 

On May 11, 1984, Mayor Raymond Flynn approved a contract for development of 
architectural plans for the Boston Latin/Boston Latin Academy project. A 
copy of the award letter to the firm of Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and 
Abbott is attached. 



-226- 



HOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
DEPARTMENT Of PLANNING AND ENGIN6EF1ING 

ROBERT R HOY 
Mechanical Enginee'. P.E 



May 15, 1984 



ames Hart, Director 

ublic Facilities Department 

ity of Boston 

6 Court Street 

oston, MA 02108 

^ear Mr. Hart: 



his is to certify that, after investigation, the vork listed in 
>ur letter dated May 4, 1984 - First Year - 



Dearborn 
Hyde Park High 
Phillis Wheatley 
Boston Technical 
Solomon Lewenberg 
Jeremiah E. Burke 
Dennis C. Haley 
Patrick F. Gavin 
James Hennigan 



Modernization of Heating 

If If n 



n 


II 


It 


It 


II- 


ti 


it 


It 


II 


ft 


It 


II 


It 


It 


II 


II 


tt 


If 



New Roof, including Vents, 

Hoods and Penthouse 

New Roofs, Bldgs. 5 and 6 

$4,090,000, 
is necessary to prolong the life of these buildings for educational 
purposes . 



Madison Park High 



450 


,000.-- 


275 


,000.1^ 


450 


.000.. 


450 


.OOO.u- 


450 


,000. c 


650, 


,000.- 


100, 


,000.- 


500, 


.000. • 


365, 


,000.: 


400 


,000.^ 



Very t;ruly yours 







T P E 






■ ♦ri'L-x"* ■ 



Raymond T. Regan Director of Facilities Management 

-227- 
25 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MASSACHUSEl I cj 021Ca • 726-64CX) AREA 617 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUP6RINTEN0ENT 

ROBERT R. SPILL4NE 



May 30, 1984 



Coomissioner John H. Lawson 
{•lassachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Goamlssijoner Lawson: 

The Boston School Cocmittee recently approved a Long Range Facilities Plan 
CLRFP) for the Boston Public Schools. The LRFP is the first stq) in what 'vill 
ultimately be a comprehensive Facilities Modernization and Utilisation Plan 
which will reflect the resolution of the organizational and programnatic 
issues contained in tire Long Range Plan submitted to the School Coomittee by 
the Sqperintendent on February 15, 1984. You were furnished a copy of the 
LRFP on May 2, 1984. 

Among other things, the LRFP identifies seventy-three schools which the School 
Department can say with certainty will be in use in Boston for the long term. 
It also directs that priorities for facility iaprovement projects be focused 
on these seventy-three schools. 

The City of Boston and the Boston Public Schools have now formulated a 
five-year program of capital improvements. Enclosed with this letU<ir you will 
find a description of this program and other pertinent data requested by tiie 
School Building Assistance Bureau in support of those school p^rojects for 
which Boston is now seeking state relmb'jrsements . Tliis sifantssion, in 
conjunction '^ith previoiisly forwarded docunentation relating to the Long Range 
Facility Plan, constitute ti^ basis of Boston's request for approval by the 
Board of Education of the work program specified in the attachment. 

We are seekirig maximum 90Z reimbursement for all rehabilitation and 
modernization projects (first throLgh fifth year) and for the proposed Boston 
Latin School/Boston Latin Academy con struct ion- renovation project as described 
in this submission. We are also seeking state assistance for rehabilitation 
of our White Stadium athletic cooplex in Franklin Park. We believe that these 
projects further the purpose of reducing or eliminating racial imbalance. 



26 COURT STREET. BOSTON. MAS' '•'^TTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 61 7 

-228- 



Connissioner Jcfaa H. Lawson 



-2- 



May 30, 1984 



^fuch of tie infoEnacica Inclxjded in this attachnent has been shared in 
ccafaretxrss with repreaeacativHS of t±ia Sc±col Btjilding Assiscanca Bureau. We 
ara prepared to forward any fltidifrinnal. reports and studies on individual 
projects as required to cacpleta each project application. It also goes 
witTiOuc saying that thie United States District Court's approval will be sought 
for the renovation of Boston Latin School ard the construction of a new Boston 
Latin .Academy. We also intend to submit the LSFP and the other proposals to 
the court for its information. 

We are pleased with recant progress toward bringing needed pt^rsical 
improvements to Boston's school bvdJLdings and appreciate th.a assistance we 
have received from the "Departaent of Education in this effsrt. 

Please advise as to ary otinar steps we aiight take to expedite approval cf this 
request. 




Superintendeiat 
Boston Public Schools 



-2?Q- 




City of Boston 
Public Facilities Department 

26 Coun St/6th Floor 
Boston. Musacbuxns 02 lOS 



James F.Han "J^e 5, 1984 

Direnor 

Victor E. Hagan 
Aisociate Direaor 

Conmissioner John H. Laws on 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Commissioner Lawson: 

The Public Facilities Department of the City of Boston 
is pleased to be able to support the request for repairs of 
school facilities designated by the School Committee. We have 
worked with the Department to prepare a plan for capital im- 
provements to these schools over a five year period. This plan, 
combined with the construction of a new Latin Academy, and 
the rehabilitation of White Stadium, will be a major step for- 
ward in solving the problem with facilities that have plagued 
the schools for so many years. 

The administration of Mayor Flynn is committed to pro- 
viding quality education to students in all neighborhoods 
across the city. We see these physical improvements to the 
school buildings as integral to that education process, 

I look forward to your support of this facilities im- 
provement plan. If I can be of further assistance, do not 
iiesitate to call on me. 

Sincerely, 

7 M^ 

iS F. Hart, Director 
jrH/td (/f>ublic Facilities Dept. 




-230- 



UUO 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 







BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

ROBERT R. SPILLANE 



June 6, 1984 




John H. LavTson, Ccxtimissioner of Education 
CarrnTDnwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 
1365 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Mi\ 02169 

Dear Dr. Lawson: 

In correspondence of !^y 14, 1984 you referenced news reports 
about a list of Boston Public School buildings to be closed- Attached 
you will find a communication that I recently forwarded at the request 
of the Boston School Comntdttee and that relates to the possible status 
of facilities not among the 73 schools specifically designated for long 
term use in the liDnq Range Facilities Plan. 

VJhile this report to the School Corrndttee is probably the source 
for recent news stories, it is not, as explained in my comnunication, 
a list of schools proposed for closing at this time. I trust that the 
attached memorandum vdll put this matter in proper perspective. 

I believe all other information that you have requested relating 
to Boston's long Range Facilities Plan and to the ntent and scope of 
the construction/rehabilitation program, for which Boston requests 
state reiinbursement, has been incorporated in the recent submission of 
Boston's long Range Facilities Plan. 



c c 



(■/."7/ri 




Pbbert R. 
Superintendent o 



Schools 



RRS:ls 
Attachment 



-231- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



, Uii:iT:>niA M 
'■^ X.IJ ,y:j 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

ROBERT R SPILLANE 



May 1, 1984 




TO: President and Members, Boston School 

FROM: Robert R. Spillane, Superintend? 

SUBJECT: Response to School Ccmmittee Request of April 26, 1984 

When John Coakley's March 13, 1984 paper entitled Facility Renewal 
and Utilization was discussed at the School Committee meeting of 
April 26, 1984, members of the Committee asked for further delineation 
of the 47 schools (and other School Department facilities) which 
were placed in one of three categories: "most probably needed," 
"probably to possibly needed," and "of uncertain need." 

I must emphasize that no school is under consideration for closing 
during the 1984-85 school year. Clearly, most of these schools 
will be needed in the long term to satisfy enrollment needs. 
Further, as Mr. Coakley stated, there are no final determinations 
or firm conclusions about any of the 47 schools at this time. Sub- 
sequent decisions on Section IV of the Long Range Plan (i.e., 
changes in districts, student assignments, magnet school organization, 
K-8 schools and other new programs) will influence our facility 
needs. There are other policies and commitments which will also 
influence our facility needs. For example, a reinstating of a full 
kindergarten I program will call for 3000 kindergarten spaces, and 
a successful retention of those secondary school students who 
otherwise might be school "drop-outs" would require the maintenance 
of nearly the present number of high school seats. Therefore, taking 
these contingencies into consideration, a present view of the other 
4 7 facilities is attached. 

I would advise the School Committee that, upon resolution of the 
issues in Section IV of the Long Range Plan, staff then develop 
specific school utilization proposals identifying for my consideration 
and yours which geographic areas would be assigned to which schools. 
Then, and only then, would all of us be able to determine which of the 
47 schools would be needed for the forseeable future. It is almost 
certain, therefore, that the listing contained herein, even schools 
identified as "of uncertain need" would be somewhat modified. At best 
then, the attached can only be considered an estimate. Until the Long 
Range Plan is adopted, all facil'^'^s discussed will be in the specu- 
lative realm. -232- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



^^r 



1385 Hancock Street Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



il A ^ £ A A ii 2. £ H 

June 12, 1984 



TO: 



FROM: 



RE: 



John H. Lawson 
Commissioner of Education 

Robert H. Blumenthal, Esq.'^Q|g 
Legal Office -^ 

Morgan v. Walsh-Tomasini - Proposed Boston Latin School/ 
Latin Academy Construction 



This memorandum has been prepared in response to questions the Board of 
Education raised during the Executive Session on May 30, 1984, regarding the 
proposed Boston Latin Schools construction. 

1) Recent SBAB grants to Boston - From FY 1979 to date, the Board has 
granted School Building Assistance funds to two Boston projects, Dorchester 
High School (project 83-10, $111,562) and Burke High School (project 84-27, 
$92,259 - to be increased)* 

2) Other construction needs in Boston - The attached memorandum from 
Edward Nicolas in SBAB lists other construction projects for which Boston has 
indicated an intent to seek state funds. The list is subject to change, based 
upon the outcome of Boston's effort to generate a long range plan and joint 
facilities planning negotiations. 

3) Exam school students who previously attended private schools - The 
following chart, prepared by Charles Glenn, breaks down the current year's 
entering classes at both Latin schools by race and previously attended school: 



-233- 



John H. Lawson 

Page 2 

June 12, 198A 



7th Grade Entrants 1983 
Black 
White 
Asian 
Hispaaic 
Indian 
TOTAL 



From Boston Public 



From Non-Public 



154 


59 


28Z 


135 


221 


62% 


55 


11 


17% 


33 


8 


20% 


1 





0% 


378 


299 


44% 



4) budget process for repairs and mainteaance in Boston - Unlike every 
other school district in the Commonwealth, Boston generates funds through a 
special otatutory mechanism that guarantees, as a minimum appropriation, the 
figure approved in the previous fiscal year by the Mayor and City Council. 
The process for arriving at this "charter iipprcpriation" is described at 
St. 1936, c. 224, § 2, as most recently amended by St. 1982, c. 190 ("the 
Tregor bill"), § 21. 

The charter appropriation is actually two discrete budgets, one for 
operating expenses and one for alteration and repair. The relevant statutory 
language regarding the latter, as most recently amended, is as follows: 

Section 2 . (1) The scnool committee, by vote of -at 
least two-thirds of all oi its members, taken by yeas 
and nays, may make appropriations as follows: 

(A) For the alteration and repair of school buildings 
and for furniture, fixtures, and means of escape in thp. 
case of fire, and for fire protection of existing 
buildings and for improving existing school yards: :.or 
the fiscal year beginning July first, nineteen hundred 
and eighty-two:- six million dollars. 

(i) For subsequent fiscal years, the school 
committee, by a like vote, may appropriate up to the 
same amount as was appropriated by a the school 
committee for the immediately preceding fiscal year for 
such purposes, plus an amount equal to amounts, if any, 
appropriated for the immediately preceding fiscal year 
by the city council with the approval of the mayor for 
such purposes, unless such appropriation is by its terms 
excluded from the calculation established herein. 



-23^^- 



John H. Lawson 

Page 3 

June 12, 1984 



In addition, Che Boston School Department has often been given access to 
the City of Boston capital budget for specific capital improvement projects. 

During the current school year (1983-84), $6,000,000 was appropriated for 
alteration and repair. As in prior years, however, all of these funds were 
not available for actual school improvement. Under an arrangement of long 
standing with the City of Boston, salaries and benefits for 45 Planning and 
Engineering Supervisors are paid out of this appropriation. These Supervisors 
inspect buildings and equipment in need of repair, contract for necessary 
services (with money for the contracted services coming out of the remainder 
of the appropriation), and give final approval for all contracted work. The 
current Boston Schools budget shows an expenditure of $2,400,000 (or 40% of 
the appropriation) for Planning and Engineering Supervisors, with the 
remaining $3,600,000 allocated for contracted alteration and repair services. 



RHB/kal 

Enclosure: 

cc: John Calabro 
Charles Glenn 
David Jones 



-235- 



.^fe4v 



5i 









The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 

MEMORANDUM 



TO: 
FROM: 

DATE: 
SUBJECT: 



Commissioner Lawson -j 

David A. Jones '' 

June 27,' 1984 

Boston Facility Plan Project Submittals 




As a follow up to our meeting a week ago with Superintendent Spillane and 
other Boston officials, we agreed to monitor the project submission process 
in order to verify eligibility for 90% reimbursement prior to July 1, 1984, 
at which time that section of Chapter 515 of the Acts of 1983 expires. If 
H.63 is favorably enacted, the 90% funding eligibility will be extended. 

I am pleased to inform you that material submissions have been received for 
renovation of Boston Latin School and construction of a building for Latin 
Academy, We have received a copy of a City Council Order for $35 million 
for tht Latin School's project. Submissions have also been received for the 
first year projects listed in the attached May 15, 1984, correspondence. 
At this time we are av/aiting additional information, however, I have been 
assured that SBAB staff are working with Boston officials to complete the 
submission of material by June 30. 

At our meeting with Superintendent Spillane, I questioned Boston's intent 
relative to seeking state assistance for rehabilitation of White Stadium in 
Franklin Park. As this project cannot be considered a school house, it is 
unlikely that Chapter 545 funds could be used to support this rehabilitation 
work in the absence of special legislation. This information has been 
conveyed to representatives of the Boston School Department and Public 
Facilities Department. 



Attachment 



cc: Fred Williams 
Bob Blumenthal 
John Calabro 
Charles Glenn 



-23^- 



Patrick Gavin 

The plans and specifications for this project 
will be completed by 2/1/85. 

Denais C. Haley /Jeremiah £. Burke 

The plans and specifications for the above schools 
will be completed by 2/1/85. 

Technical Audits 

The Technical Audits for the schools listed below 
will be completed on the following dates: 

Schools Completion of Technical Audit 

Boston Technical 9/1/84 

Phillis Wheatley 9/1/84 

Dearborn 9/1/84 

Hyde Park High 9/1/84 

Solomon Lewenberg 9/1/84 

Patrick F. Gavin 9/1/84 

Dennis C.Haley 12/1/84 

Jeremiah E. Burke 12/1/84 



V7e look forward to v/orking with you and your staff on 
these facilities. If I can be of further assistance, please 
call me. 



Sincerely, 

J^es F. Hart, Director 
JFH/td /Public Facilities Dept. 



-2?7- 




v.v-i j;o.vr()XiA. •s/^' 

•'.V-i. rOMIITAAII ^/'^ 




C.'iC} of Boston 
PuW'C ?ucilities Department 

26Ci>urlSi./6lh l-loor 
Bo^roii. Massachusetts 02 1 OS 

James F.Han July 5, 1984 

Director 

Peter Scarpignato 

Pl'jnning/Dcvcldpiiicnt 

John A. Calabro, Administrator 
School Building Assistance Bureau 
1381 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Mr. Calabro: 

As a follow up to the meeting on 6/28/84 at which we 
discussed th*- school applications submitted to your office on 
6/25/84, please be advised of the following: 

SCHEDULE FOR 515 PROJECTS 

Boston Latin Academy /Bos ton Latin School 

As you know, this project is very complex and we 
appreciate the concerns your department has expressed 
regarding adjustments that must be made to the documents 
we submitted to your office. Once the architect has 
further developed the plans we will meet with your staff, 

Madison Park High School/ James Hennigan 

We expect to complete the plans and specif ication^ 
for these projects by 2/1/85. 



SCHEDULE FOR 613 PROJECTS 

Boston Technical/Phillis I-Jheatley/Dearborn/ 
Hyde Park High/ Solomon Lewenberg 

The plans and specifications for the above schools 
will be completed by 10/1/84. 



-238- 



Patrick Gavin 

The plans and specifications for this project 
will he completed by 2/1/85. 

Dennis C. Haley/ Jeremiah E. Burke 

The plans and specifications for the above schools 
vrill be completed by 2/1/85. 

Technical Audits 

The Technical Audits for the schools listed below 
v/ill be completed on the following dates.- 

Schools Completion of Technical Audit 

Boston Technical 9/1/84 

Phillis Wheatley 9/1/84 

Dearborn 9/1/84 

Hyde Park High 9/1/84 

Solomon Lev7enberg 9/1/84 

Patrick F. Gavin 9/1/84 

Dennis C.Haley 12/1/84 

Jeremiah E. Burke 12/1/84 



We look forv7ard to vrorking with you and your staff on 
these facilities. If I can be of further assistance, please 
call me. 



Sincerely, 

„ 7. //^ 

?mes F. Hart, Director 
JFH/td (public Facilities Dept, 




-239- 



r?^^ BO-VfO.VIA. sj 



CITY OF BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 



OFnCE OF THE MAYOR 
RAYMONTJ L. H-YMN 






TO: DEPARTMENT HEADS 

FROM: MAYOR RAYMOND L. FLYNN 

RE: OFFICE OF CAPITAL PLANNING 

DATE: AUGUST 10, 1984 







I would like to introduce Mary Nee, the Director 
of Capital Planning, who began work July 9, 1984. 

This office has been established to develop a 
long-range capital budget and to monitor on going 
capital improvement projects. The deteriorated condi- 
tion of far too many of Boston's streets, parks, bridges, 
and municipal buildings demand a comprehensive and carefully 
planned response from my administration. I am confident 
that Mary will bring to city government the experience 
and energy necessary to meet this challenge. 

Ms. Nee has left a position as a senior budget analyst 
for the Massachusetts Senate Committee on .'ays and Means 
where she was responsible for the preparation of budgets 
for five state agencies as well as involved in policy re- 
search and financial analysis of legislation before the 
Committee. Prior to her work for the state legislature, 
Mary worked for over eight years in social service agencies 
in Boston. 

I look forward to working with Ms. Nee in developing 
a capital improvements plan which will address the substan- 
tial back log of infrastructure projects facing the City 
of Boston. Your cooperation is essential to the success 
of this effort. 



BOSTON cm" HALL • ONE CITY HALL ^' •■•■ BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 02201 • 6l7/725-}OCO 

-240- 



THE OFFICE Or CAPITAL PLANNING 

THE OFFICE OF CAPITAL PLANNING (OCP), WILL ADDRESS THE 
OUTSTANDING NEED FOR THE ADMINISTRATION TO COORDINATE THE 
PLANNING, FINANCING AND MONITORING OF CAPITAL PROJECTS. 
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF OCP IS INTENDED TO FACILITATE THE DEV- 
ELOPMENT OF AN OVERALL CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN FOR BOSTON. 
OCP WILL NOT SUPPLANT THE EXISTING CAPITAL PLANNING FUNCTIONS 
OF CITY AGENCIES BUT RATHER WILL ESTABLISH A PROCESS BY WHICH 
CAPITAL PROJECTS IDENTIFIED BY INDIVIDUAL CITY DEPARTMENTS WILL 
BE ANALYZED ON A COMPARATIVE BASIS. THE CITY'S ABILITY TO RAISE 
FUNDS FOR CAPITAL PROJECTS, AND THE CAPITAL INVESTMENT ACTIVI- 
TIES OF THE STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS. AS THEY PERTAIN TO 
BOSTON WILL BE ASSESSED AS WELL. 

OCP WILL BE A MAYORAL AGENCY. THE DIRECTOR OF OCP WILL 
REPORT TO THE MAYOR. CRITICAL TO THE SUCCESS OF A LONG-TERM 
CAPITAL PLANNING PROGRAM FOR BOSTON IS THE CLEAR ARTICULATION 
OF MAYORAL PRIORITIES AND THE CITY'S CAPITAL INVESTMENT POLICY. 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE CAPITAL PLAN FOR BOSTON 
WILL REQUIRE SUBSTANTIAL INPUT AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT FROM 
EXISTING CITY AGENCIES. CONSULTATION AND STAFF SUPPORT WILL 
BE SOUGHT FROM -- THE PUBLIC FACILITIES DEPARTMENT AND THE 
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES. 

THE MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES OF OCP WILL INCLUDE: 

* COMPILING A COMPREHENSIVE INVENTORY OF 
CURRENT AND FUTURE CAPITAL PROJECTS. 

* ESTABLISHMENT OF PROCEDURES FOR THE PRE- 
PARATION OF CAPITAL BUDGETS INCLUDING A 

-2 ill- 



-2- 



STANDARDIZED BUDGET FORMAT AND DATA COLLECTION 
SYSTEM FOR ALL CITY DEPARTMENTS. 

* PREPARATION OF MULTI-YEAR CAPITAL BUDGETS TO 
BE ISSUED ANNUALLY, WITH PLANNING HORIZONS OF 
FIVE YEARS. 

* COORDINATION OF LOAN ORDERS SUBMISSION PROCEDURES 

* ANALYZE THE IMPACT OF PROPOSED STATE AND FEDERAL 
FUNDING PLANS ON BOSTON'S CAPITAL PROJECTS. 

* ESTABLISH A PROCESS FOR NEIGHBORHOOD INVOLVEMENT 
IN THE PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTATION OF BOSTON'S 
CAPITAL PROGRAM. 

* ANALYZE THE CAPACITY OF THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 
PROGRAM MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (CIPMIS) 
TO PROVIDE AN INTERDEPARTMENTAL DATA BASE FOR 
CAPITAL PROJECTS. 

OCP BEGAN OPERATIONS JULY 9, 1984. 



-2^12- 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street. Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



August 22, 1984 



Mr. Robert Murray 
Boston Public Schools 

and 
Mr. Peter Scarpignato 
Boston Public Facilities Department 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Murray and Mr. Scarpignato: 

This is to summarize the status of our joint activities to date on the 
matter of the Boston Long-Range Facilities Plan. 

We Kave reviev/ed and compared the two lists which you have submitted on 
behalf of the City: the list of schools to remain open over a long-range 
period, and the list of schools for which facilities projects of some kind are 
planned, together with estimates of costs and a general timetable. We await a 
list of schools to be closed or otherwise dealt with. 

Our comparison reveals that the Agassiz Elementary School is listed for a 
$50,000 renovation in the physical education area. This school, however, does 
not appear on the list of those to remain open. 

At present I understand that Superintendent Spi I lane's Long-Range Plan is 
not finally adopted by the Boston School CoTimittee. In any case, all 
facilities planning must be consistent with the final approved version of this 
plan. 

t 

Initial analysis of your proposed renovation schedule suggests that some 
of the proposed work will require the closing of certain schools. This and 
related scheduling matters should be discussed in a future meeting. 

Becnuse the Boston plan includes the creation of certain K-8 schools, 
planning for renovations should also include provisions for creation of needed 
spaces riiich as industrial arts shops, home arts spaces, etc. as found in 
schools containing grades 7 and 8 elsewhere in the Commonwealth and the City. 



-2^3- 



Page Two 

Messrs. Murray and Scarpignato 

August 22, igS^t 

The Boston Facilities Plan should also Include specific provision for the 
Boston Latin proposal. All project proposals must be compatible with the 
Long-Range Facilities Plan. 

You have submitted a proposal for a Boston Latin School project under the 
provisions of Section A of Chapter 515 of the Acts of 1983. This section 
requires that all racial balance or desegregation projects to be considered 
for eligibility for. state aid at ninety percent of cost must be submitted or 
approved by June 30, 198^. Consultant staff of the Bureau have advised me 
that sufficient basic material has been submitted to satisfy Bureau 
requirements for submission of this proposal. A number of items related to 
this proposal must be discussed and agreed upon, however, or amended before 
staff approval is given. 

Educational specification worl<sheets for the combined Latin Schools 
proposal show a combined planned enrollment of 3700 pupils in grades 7-12. 
This represents an increase in enrollments while City-wide enrollments are 
declining. How this planned increased enrollment is consistent both with the 
nature of the Latin Schools and current trends is an example of one item which 
must be discussed. 

It Is our opinion that projects to Improve the condition of school 
buildings in Boston will contribute to racial balance and desegregation and 
may therefore be considered for increased funding under Chapter 15 of the 
General Laws or under other provisions of law v;hen In effect, in this 
connection, the City of Boston has submitted material for Board approval 
covering the first year of the long-range plan. These are proposals to be 
considered under Chapter 613 of the Acts of 1982 and Chapter 515 of the Acts 
of 1983. This material is subject to amplification and amendment. The 
schools affected by this material are; 

Chapter 613 Section h Proposals 
'i^KBoston Technical High 
'i/>-Phyl I Is Wheat ley 
«i/j-Oearborn 
'j'^cHyde Park High 

Solomon Lewenberg 

Patrick Gavin 

Dennis C. Haley 

Jeremiah E. Burke 

Chapter 515 Section 1 Proposals - 
Madison Park High 
James Hennigan 

Other 



Boston Latin Academy/School Project 



Page Three 

Messrs. Murray and Scarpignato 

August 22, 1984 

As we all know, any proposals which impinge upon or are not consistent 
with court orders must be approved by Judge Garrity. In addition, all of the 
foregoing is subject to successful staff review and subsequent Board of 
Education approval before any grant funding is approved. 

With surmier nearly over, I look forward to working with you again on 
these matters. , .. 

Sincerely, 




John A. Calabro, Ph.D. 

Administrator 

School Building Assistance 

Bureau 

(617) 770-7238 



JAC:hh 

cc: Commissioner Lawson 

Super i ntendent Sp i 1 lane 
Associate Commissioner Jones 
•Frank Banks 



-245- 




The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169' 

,i>'eptemier 7 , 1984 



Mr, Pob Roy, M.F.. 
Boston Public Schools . 
DepavLment of Planning and 

Eo'j.ineering 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 " - 

Dear tlr. Roy; • 

This is in response to your memorandum dated August 24, 1984, in 
which you request reiicibursement for certain heating system projects in 
the Boston Public Schools under provisions of Chapter 613 of the Acts of 
1982. It appears from your memorandum that work on these projects has 
-already been completed . 

Chapter 613 of the Acts of 1982 was approved on December 29, 1982, 
and became effective 90 days thereafter^ On May 10, 1983, all superin- 
tendents of schools were notified by the Commissioner of Education of 
procedures to be followed in- applying for approval of proposed beating 
System projects under Chapter 613. 

Applications for approval under the provisions of Chapter 613 must 
be received before commencement of the work Involved. There is no pro- 
vision for retroactive approval. Therefore, these may not be procesed. 

In the interest of streamlining communication on school facilities/ 
construction related matters between the City of Boston and the Department 
of E(hi(:atlon, may I suggest that all facilities related material, regard- 
less aC funding source, be forwarded via the team of Robert Murray and 
Peter Scarpignato who represent the City on facilities matters and who will 
intcti ntte ail requests with other proposed projects and assure their com- 
pabil H.y with the Boston Long - Range Facilities Plan, currently in de- 
veJo/'iirjnt. '. 



JAC: • 

cc: 'lunissioner Lawson 

•rerintendent Spillane 
'tiert Murray 
'. -tor Scarpignato 
i'.iinuei Pike -2HS- 




Sincerely yours, 

'john A. Calabro, Ph.D. 



■^--— — — — — J j-^— — — , 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169' 

September 12, \3Bh 



Mr. Robert Murray 
Boston Public Schools 

and 
Mr. Peter Scarpigriatb 
Boston Public Facilities Department 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Murray and Mr. Scarpignato: 

This letter is in regard to the proposed project to create a Latin 
Schools Complex through renovation and enlargement of the existing Boston 
Latin School. 

Educational specifications, preliminary plans, and related documents In 
support of this proposal were submitted prior to June 30, ISS't, in order to 
make the proposal eligible for state aid at ninety percent of approved 
construction and interest costs under provisions of Section k of Chapter 515 
of the Acts of 1983, once the project has received staff and Board of 
Education Approval. 

Before this proposal may proceed further, agreement must be reached on 
the planned enrollment of the complex and the planned grade range. These 
matters must be discussed in the very near future, in light of the following 
questions, some of which have been raised in earlier meetings and/or 
correspondence: 

1. How Is a proposed enrollment of 3700 students 7-12 to be justified? 
This planned enrollment Is larger than the existing reported 
enrollment. As the Latin Schools traditionally have offered highly 
selective academic programs for college preparatory students, why has 
the planned enrollment for this multi-million dollar proposal 
Increased while the student enrollment system wide has markedly 
declined and perhaps continues to defcline? 

2. Will the proposed project perpetuate two Latin Schools or Is it 
designed to create a single unified school? If the former, why 
should this be so and why should the tv/o schools with their large 
proposed enrollment be located on the same restricted site In an area 
already noted for its high student density with its concomitant 
impact upon public transportation capacity? Why could not an 



-247- 



Mr. iii.:rr;.v/ and Mr. Sccirpignato 



oltcrrative site, possibly using an extsCiny city-owned building, be 

co.i^;Jared for developi.-.^nt? 

3. Is it important to the nature of the Latin Schoo1(s} to retain a 

grade range of 7-12 or is It possible to consider a plan of grades 9- 
12 v/ith grades 7-8 (or 6-8) located elsewhere In one or more 
bui Idings? 

h. If the proposed Increase In enrollment In comparison to current 
system-wide enrollments Is to be upheld^ can one conclude that the 
nature of the programs offered in the Latin School (s) will change and 
that curricular offerings will Include general and remedial 
courses? If so, these should be included In the educational 
specifications. 

5< in addition, the proposed size of spaces In the facility must be 
discussed. 

Hay I suggest that these and related questions be discussed and resolved 
as soon as possible so that whatever proposal Is agreed upon, consistent with 
the Boston Long Range Facilities Plan now In planning, It may go forward 
without serious delay later. Until such plan is approved, however, no 
projects may be approved. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. Calabro, Ph.D. 

JACtcc 

cc: Commissioner Lawson 

Superintendent Splllane 

Robert Murray 

Peter Scarp ignato . ' 

Samuel Pike 




-243- 



•i.i- 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CiTY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON r'JBuC SCHOOLS 

CPrlCE 0? THE 3i-PER;NT£NCEN7 

flOSEST R. SPILLANE 



Septarber 14, 1984 



Dr. Jcim Lawson > .. ,. 
Gcmnissioner of Education 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear CarroLssicner Lawson: ■ 

School Departitent staff have revie/^ed carefully the Beard of 
Education's Monitoring Report No. 3 dated July 15, 1984. Weview 
the monitoring r e ports- and our responses to then as opportunities 
for further assessing the progress we have irade in a nunfcer of im- 
portant areas, enhancing understandings between the School Departient 
and the Department of Education, and most importantly, providing doc- 
rassntation to support our position that the court and state should 
disengage thsnselves fran the School Department's operational respon- 
sibilities. The School Department has demonstrated, we believe, that 
it has the will, the resources and the competencies to ccmply with 
desegregation, equal opportunity and quality of education requirements. 

CXir response to Monitoring Report No. 3 will: 

1. offer carments including, when appropriate, areas of 
disagreettsnt of specific monitoring reports based on 
review and analysis by relevant School Department staff, 
and 

2. provide you. Department of Education staff and the Heard 
of Education with additional inforrtation on those steps 
^.^ch ha^/e been or will be taken in' 1984-1985 in each of 
the areas to address concerns raised in the report. 

Meaningful dialogue has been initiated between Schcol Department 
and Department of Education staff. We look to a continuation of this 
dialogue; it can only strengthen our institutional and progranrratic 
responsiveness to issues of critical importance to both our departnents . 



-2^9- 



- 2 - 



Dr. John Lawson Septarber 14 , 1984 

Ccmnissioner of Bdiacation 



Pesponses ta each of the ncniiMring reports contained in 
Monitoring Report No- 3 are enclosed with the exception of those 
for stLident assignments, special desegregation measures and trans- 
portation. Responses to those sections of the monitoring report will 
follow. Itiese responses will offer you both a general reaction to 
the particular section as well as specific catinents on progre ss which 
has been or is expected to be made in the particular substantive area. 

I believe it important that at this tine we bring together key 
personnel from the Depsrtnent of Education and the School Cepartrent 
to discuss our positions and concerns, suggest future direction for 
our staffs and set a tone for continuing cooperation. By convening 
key staff responsible for those areas addressed in the ixonitoring re- 
port, we shall enhance a sensitivity to each Etepartment's needs, re- 
sources and constraints and pronote a convergence of our efforts toward 
the achievenisnt of amtual goals. 

Please have your secretary call Mary Caton in my office to schedule 
a meeting at a time convenient to both of us. 

^sincerely 




Spillane 



Si:5!erintendKit of Schools 



RRS:ls 
Attachment 



-250- 



FACILmES 
GENERAL OCiMMEyiS 

In its Monitoring Report It3 to tha Uoited States Listxijzz 
Court on Boston School Des^pcegatLon dated July 15, 1984, the 
Board of Education of the ConxEOOwaaltii of Massachusetts issued 
a number of findings and approved one reccnsEendation aa the 
siibject oi "Facilities" in the Boston Public Schools. 

The Boston Public Schools etdorses the reconireririan'.na of 
Report //3 to continue joint development of an educationally 
and financially sound long range facilities plan. All parties 
axe pT^sently engaged in just such a cooperative effort to ccmplete 
and Inclement a facilities plan. 

In addition, the Boston Public Schools can agree that the 
findings of Report tf3 are accurate as of the time that the report 
was written, probably about mid-May of 1984. 
SCHOOL DEPARIMEiNT RESPONSIVE MEASURES 

It is iiqjortant to note, however , that significant progress 
has been made in Long Range Facilities planning between the tinse 
that the report likely was written and June 30, 1984, a pivotal 
date with r^ard to the determination of State binding for con- 
struction and rehabilitation projects. The following develop- 
ments are wortiy of note: 



-251- 



-19- 



. On June 5, 1984, a Long Range FacilitdBS Plan and 
Iiq?leiceatatrLon Progr=ni was suboiittsd to Che Department 
of Education by t±e Boston Public Schools and the City 
of Eoston Public F:;cilities Department. 

. Throughout June, 1984, tbere were a nuoiber of joint 
meetings of Department of EducatLoa officials and 
representatives of the Boston Public Schools and die 
City of iksston Public Facilities Department. 

. In late June, 1984, the City of Boston and the Bostca . 
Public Schools si±cd.tted significant data and svjpportive 
technical studies in support of: 

- a renovation/construction project for Boston 
Latin School az3d Boston Latin Academy 

- ten (10) rehabilitation projects relating to 
roofing, heating and energy conservation 

- one pttysical education site improvement project 
(White Stadium). 

. On June 13, 1984, the Boston Sctool Coccmittee held public 
hearings in Faneuil Hall as a step in tl"ie development of 
a long range plan to restructmre facility utilization, 
district organization and assignment procedures in the 
Boston Public Schjools. 

. As of July 1, 1984, the finance problems delaying the 
Burke renovations project were resolved. A construction 
contract has been executed and actual construction at the 
Burke High School began on August 6, 1984. 

-252- 




'31 



CITY OF BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 



OFFICE OF Tl-IE MAYOR 
RAYMON D L. FLYf-rN 



Governor Michael S. Dukakis 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Executive Departmentj Room 360 



September 24, 1984 



State House 
Boston MA 02133 

Dear Governor Dukakis: 

My purpose in writing this letter is to request your support £or 
the rehabilitation of the White Stadium athletic complex. At my 
recommendation, the proposed renovation of the White Stadium 
athletic complex, estimated to cost three million dollars, was 
included in the $23 million five-year program of capital 
improvements to schools that was submitted to the Massachusetts 
Department of Education by the City of Boston and the Boston Public 
Schools- I hope that with your support the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Departraent of Education School Building Assistance 
Bureau will approve the maximum 901 reimbursement for this project. 

» 

As you know. White Stadium was once one ot the premier 
school-boy sports complexes in the country. Constant use and lack 
of funds for proper maintenance have contributed to the present 
deplorable state of the facility. The condition of the fields and 
the stadium have created an increasingly unattractive and 
debilitating environment for athletes and spectators. Even Special 
Education events, always held at White Stadium, have been 
temporarily moved to other less hazardous facilities. — 

Despite these problems, the V/hite Stadium athletic complex 
continues to serve as the principal school athletic facility for 
Boston Public High School students. Many of these high schools 
consider White Stadium to be their home field. While other 
municipalities may have offset the cost of maintaining their school 
athletic facilities by generating re.venue through rental agreements 




BOSTON' CITY HA±L • ONE Cm" HALL TLAZA • ^OSIC.X • VASSACHUSETTS ZZ:! • 617/ 725-4X0 

-253- 



Page Two 



and volleyball practices and competitions scheduled to take place at 
the facility. In addition to its primary use as an athletic 
complex, White Stadium is the service facility for upkeep and 
maintenance of other high school athletic facilities. 

With limited funds available, I have already directed the City's 
Public Facilities Department to immediately schedule the repainting 
of the facility and the replacement of stadium seats. The School 
Pepartment, fot its part, will repair the score board. However, 
there is much more to be done to renew this stadium. Your support 
for this project will iielp ensure that this school facility is 
properly restored and will meet the needs of the students of Boston. 



Sincerely. 




7//' 



Raymond L. Flynn 
Mayor 



RLF/aracd 



-254- 



■irk 



The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



13S5 Hancock Street. Quincy, Massachu^^ttts 02169 



September 26, 19S4 



Stephen A. Moynahan, Jr., Esq. 

Deputy Clerk 

U.S. District Court 

1525 U.S. Post Office and Courthouse 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 



Dear Mr. Moynahan: 



Morgan v. Walsh-Tomasini 
C.A. 72-911-G 



Enclosed please find for filing in the above action the 
State Board's Supplement to Third Monitoring Report Under Orders 
of Disengagement. 

Thank you. 




Counsel, Stat^J 
Education 



RHB/kal 

Enclosures: 

cc: Parties of Record 



-255- 



If modification proposals are developed. Section VI(3)(5) of 
the Orders of Disengagement reguries that the proposed 
modifications be filed no later than December 15, 1984 in order 
to affect student assignments for 1985-1986. When and if this 
filing is made, the State Board will evaluate any proposed 
modifications to the student assignment plan by the same 
stanaards it applies to plans formulated by other Massachusetts 
communities; the equitable spreading of transportation and 
reassignment burdens among all racial/ethnic groups; the adoption 
of clear, consistent guidelines with minimum potential for 
manipulation; the inclusion and encouragement of options leading 
to voluntary desegregation; the accommodation of special needs 
and transitional bilingual programs; and the indication of 
prospects for improvement over current desegregation efforts. 

FACILITIES 

Regardless of whether the assignment orders are ultimately 
modified, a comprehensive, long-range Unified Facilities Plan 
remains to be produced. To date, individual proposals concerning 
the examination schools and various renovation projects involving 
roof repairs and heating systems have been generated by City and 
School Defendants. These proposals cannot be considered for 
state assistance, however, until a long-range facilities plan is 
adopted by City, School and State officials and approved by the 
Court. In our view, such a plan must address the facilities 



.-2^-"^- 



needs of the entire school system; cover an extended period; be 
clear as to timetable, purpose and mechanism for revisions; 
contain a prioritized list of construction and renovation 
projects with specific starting dates and financial commitments; 
and reflect the student assignment process. 

While any .effort to.modify the student assignment orders 
will delay the production of a facilities plan, the State Board 
is aware ct the crucial relationship between student assignment 
and facilities planning. In the interim, the State Board cannot 
consider proposals for the funding of projects in the absence of 
a coordinated student assignment plan and facilities plan. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

In the area of vocational education, two types of efforts 
are required. The Unified Vocational Plan is in need of 
substantial modification, so that it may reflect with greater 
accuracy the occupational education needs of Boston students. 
The State Board has called this situation to School Defendants* 
attention in the past and, here again, appreciates the crucial 
link betv/een student assignments, facilities planning and 
vocational planning. At the same time, the decline in 
applications for assignment to the Humphrey Occupational Resource 
Center is a problem too serious tp await possible modification. 
School Defendants should immediately address this situation, with 
a focus on recruitment efforts at the individual high school 



-257-- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DEPARTMENT OF liMPLEMENTATlOM 
John R Coakloy. 3an;or Officer 



September 28, 1984 



Dr. John A. Calabro" 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

Massachusetts Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear John: 

Your letter of September 12, 1984 regarding the proposed Latin 
Schools project gives me occasion to set down the positions we 
have expressed on the issues raised in your correspondence. 

1. Long Range Plan Including a Secondary Facilities Plan 

We are mindful of the obligation of the Boston Public 
Schools to submit a Long Range Secondary Facilities Plan 
that incorporates both Boston Latin School and Boston Latin 
Academy. A preview of the program recommendations upon 
which the Secondary Facilities Plan will be based are 
included in a Long Range Plan (Draft) which was under public 
discussion in May and June of this year. A more detailed 
and specific plan is expected by October 1, 1984. Recent 
determinations to seek out the views of plaintiffs and 
others nay delay this schedule. The only policy regarding 
the Latins that may be subject to further review in the Long 
Range Plan is the 7-12 §rade structure insofar as a "6-12" 
structure was proposed m the May draft. 

2. Planned Enrollment at the Latins 

The proposed program enrollment of 3700 students at the 
Latin schools compares with the present assigned enrollment 
of 3821 students. Both schools are attractive magnet 
schools which annually have many more aspirants than can be 
admitted. Each year, there are 4000 or more applicants to 
Boston examination schools for some 1600 seats. The dual 
thrust for the Latins - to provide preserc level of access 
to students and to carry out plans for higher retention of 
students - does not argue for a reduction in numbers of 
enrolled students. 

26 COURT STHEET, BOSrO.M. MASJAC-iiJ'iF.rrs OJiOS • r^'6'.200. cXT 5i->0 72')-o555. EXr b?0OAnEA6I7 

0' '"". : r^- -258- 



John A. Calabro -2- September 28, 1984 



3. Grade Structure 

The 7-12 grade structure at both schools is the policy o£ 
the Boston Public Schools until or unless changed. A 
division into upper (9-12) and middle (7-8) schools is not 
under consideration. Such a proposal has not been 

enthusiastically received in many quarters. The tradition 
of a combined middle and high school is 106 years old in one 
school and, at ,_least 264 years old in the other. Given the 
excellent history of these schools in meeting the needs of 
students and producing some of the nation's finest citizens, 
the traditions of the schools cannot be treated lightly. 

4. Two Schools 

The Long Range Plan (Draft) proposes that "each Latin would 
maintain its separate identity. There has been little 
evidence of support for a change in this policy. Graduates, 
students, parents, staff and administrators have given 
testimony to their preference for a distinct and separate 
identity for each school, and educational sense suggests 
that combining these schools administratively is not sound 
from a management or educational perspective. 

5. Shared Site 

The shared occupancy of the two Latins on the same site is 
timely in that it provides an available site in a desirable 
area of the City for Boston Latin Academy which presently is 
without a permanent home, and it is functional since the 
physical and human resources gathered on site will benefit 
students at both schools. Proximity of these schools is 
historic since in past decades, these schools were located 
on adjacent sites in the Fenway. 

In the event that an alternative site in the Fenway might 
become available, the relative benefits of having two 
schools on two sites would be measured against those of a 
single site. 

6- Transportation Requirements 

The transportation requirements for the proposed project 
have been estimated based on present service, and they will 
be reflected in architectural plans for development of the 
site. Alternate combinations of public (MBTA) and 
yellow-bus transportation will also be studied to address 
student access to site. 



-259-* 



Dr. John A. Calabro -3- September 28, 1984 



7. Alternative Facilities for Boston Latin Academy 

In recent years, all attempts to Identify an existing 
city-owned building for Latin Academy have been 
unsuccessful. Of the school facilities in the Boston Public 
School system, none, with the exception of English High, 
Madison Park High and possibly new district high schools in 
West Roxb.ury,.. Jamaica Plain and Charles town, are 
sufficiently sized to accomcaodate the Latin Academy 
program. To date, none of the Long Range Plan proposals 
make any of these schools available for use, but instead 
reflect a commitment to the availability of K-12 education 
in major neighborhoods of the city and to continuance of 
citywide options at English and Madison Park high schools. 

8." Nature of Program Offerings 

Changes in program and service offerings at the two schools 
are specified to some degree in a recent submission to the 
Department of Education - "Plans for Retention of Minority 
Students at Boston Latin School and Boston Latin Academy. 
In general, our proposed educational program and related 
space requirements will accommodate these and other program 
changes that will take place from time to time. I do 
believe we should strive for flexibility in the design of a 
number of instructional spaces that will respond efficiently 
to smaller class groupings. 

9. Proposed Size of Spaces 

In general, programmed space sizes were formulated to give 
some flexibility in the choice of an overall architectural 
design that efficiently incorporates the existent Latin 
School building. We expect they are open to discussion and 
to modification and view the standard space allocations 
outlined in your regulations to be the norm. I believe that 
the educational program under discussion fully reflects what 
the City of Boston and the Boston Public Schools plan for 
Boston Latin School and Boston Academy and that we can 
maintain progress in planning and design even as decisions 
that effect final approval by the School Building Assistance 
Bureau and the Board of Education are being made. 



-260- 



Dr. John A. Calabro -4- September 28, 1984 



My purpose in correspondence is as yours, to expedite this 
project; to identify, clarify and close on the issues and to 
create a climate for agreement on funding and construction of the 
project. 



Sincerely, 
Robert L. Murray 



RLM:mc 

cc: Peter Scarpignato 



-261- 



¥ 



vv^;; 



Diviiion of School Facilities and Related Services 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hantotk Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



October 2, 198A 



Mr. Peter Scarp ignato 
Public Facilities Department 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Scarp ignato: 

This is a suninary of the salient points of our meeting of Friday, 
September 28, 198A, at School Building Assistance Bureau in Quincy during 
which you, Public Facilities Department Capital Planning Director 
Michael Smith, Associate Commissioner David Jones, Educational Coordinator 
Edward Nicolas, Engineer Louis Cogliano, Specialist Samuel Pike, and I 
discussed the status of Boston's long-range plan and facilities plan and 
individual proposed projects to be keyed to it. 

You indicated that Michael Smith would be replacing you at future 
meetings between School Building Assistance Bureau and the City of Boston. 

t indicated that all applications for projects and all facilities related 
correspondence should flow from Boston to School Building Assistance Bureau 
through Robert Murray and you or Michael Smith. 

No school construction projects will be approved for the City of Boston 
until a long-range facilities plan has been approved by the Board and the 
Court, and no grant funds will flow to the City of Boston until such plan Is 
approved and projects voted. No Chapter 515 funds requested in the FY I986 
budget are earmarked for Boston at this time. An estimated amount for the 
first annual payment for a to-be-resolved Latin Schools proposal included In 
the FY 1986 grant budget request will be reviewed on December 15, 198'j, as 
will our entire FY I986 grant budget request, and a decision made at that time 
3^^o whether this amount should be retained, deleted, or placed in the FY 
1987 (or later) budget request. 

Architect's and engineer's fees are Includable in the estimated costs of 
approved projects. 



-262- 



Mr. Peter Scarplgnato Page Tv/o October 2, 1984 



You or Hike Smith and Robert I'urray will respond by letter to the issues 
raised in my letters to you and Mr. Murray dated August ?-2, 1984, and 
September 12, 1934, and to any Issues raised in my letter to Engineer Rob Roy 
dated September 7, 1984. It Is assumed that all correspondence from you or 
Mr. Smith and Mr. Hurray reflect the position of the City of Boston, that Is 
Public Fac i 1 it les Department and the Boston Public Schools. 

Mr. Edward Nicolas of this office :ind Mr. Samuel Pike of our Greater 
Boston Regional Office are available to plan jointly with the City of Bo.ston 
team. 

You Indicated at this time that planning for the Latin Schools proposal 
presently includes a review of the possible use of the Massachusetts College 
of Art building on Brookline Avenue. 

If there are any questions relative to this memorandum, please contact 
me. 



Sincerely 




A. Calabro, Ph.D. 
Administrator 
School Building Assistance Bureau 
(617) 770-7238 



JAC:hh 

cc: Commissioner Lawson 

Superintendent Splllane 
Robert Murray 
David Jones 
Michael Smith 
Samuel Pike 



-263- 



HE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

JOf"! p. CCaK.iV. StffOr ^ " -if 



October 11 , 1984 



To: 

From: 
Subject: 



Robert P. Spilla 





John R. Coakley ^^O.' I\j^^-^^ 

Report #1 (Unified Facilities Plan) of the 
Federal Court's Order of September 17, 1984 



Item #1 (Unified Facilities Plan) of the Federal 
Court's Order of September 17, 1984 reads as follows: 



(1) 



a status report regarding their compliance 



and plans for compliance with the court's 
orders, including an estimated 
in the areas of ...unified 



Tzimetable , 
facilities plan. 



The attached document was prepared by Robert Murray who 
has been the school system's primary contact with appropriate 
staff in city government and in the department of education. 

An examination of the State Board's Report No. 3 on 
Boston School Desearegation (Volume IIB, July 15, 1984 
pp 639 to 709) does give ind'ication of our good-faith efforts 
to comply with the subtle and challenging orders on the Unified 
Facilities Plan. In particular, the State Board (see Objective 
4, page 641) acknowledged that meetings of joint planners had 
resumed. The document which follows describes facility planning 
in two phases, one phase which has begun and is directed at 
seventy-three school facilities, a second phase which is 
dependent on the development and approvals of the Long Range 
Plan . It is our intent to open phase two discussions with the 
joint planners immediately upon our filing the Long Range Plan 
in accordance with the requirements of Section VI of the 
December 23, 1982 Orders of Disengagement. We are confident 
of our ability to move rapidly to complete phase two proposals 
and will do so on or after December 15, 1984, our goal for 
filing the Long Range Plan. 



-26^1- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL 



MICHAEL J BETCHER 
Gene's' Coonse; 

VARY JO HOLLENOER 
Associate Genj-al Cpv,^'?! 



October 11, 1984 



Stephen A. Moynahan, Esquire 

Deputy Clerk 

United States District Court 

1525 U.S. Post Office and Courthouse 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Re: Tallulah Morgan, Et Al . v. Rita Walsh-Toniaslni , Et Al 
Civil Action No. 72-911-G 

Dear Mr. Moynahan: 

Enclosed please find for filing School Defendants' Status 
Reports and School Defendants' Motion to Modify Administrator 
Rating and Screening Procedures. 

Please note that there is no Attachment E to the Status 
Reports. That material is reproduced in the Board of 
Education's Report No. 3, Vol. 2A at pp. 18-41, and is the 
subject of comment in Mr. Coakley's Attachment F. 

Three separate copies are included for distribution to the 
Judge's chambers. 



Very truly yours, 






^:>:V 



Michael J. Fetcher 
General Counsel 



Enclosures 



-265- 

2f. COuKI CTPETT . BOSTON V.ASbA,..,. iT7502IOS • ^^^ ^ ^ 7j?(^ ■ ^ 3 S-T 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF fl^SSACHUSETTS 

•k-k'k'k-k-k-k-kie-kic-k-k'ie-k-k-k 

•k 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL., * 
.... *• ■ 

Plaintiffs, * 

* 

V. * CIVIL ACTION 

* NO. 72-911-G 

RITA WALSH -TO MAS INI, ETAL., * 

* 

Defendants. * 

* 



SCHOOL DEFENDANTS' STATUS REPORTS 

The School Defendants respectfully submit herewith the 
status reports required by the Court's September 17, 198A orders 
as follows: 

1(a). Desegregation of Administrative Staff 

As of August 31, 1984, the School Department had achieved 
near total compliance with the desegregation goals of the 
February 24, 1976 orders concerning Category I and II 
administrative staff. As can be seen from Attachment A, 23.76% 
of the total administrative workforce was Black, just 1.24% 
short of the court-ordered 25% goal. For a variety of reasons, 
however, a substantial backlog of acting administrative 
appointments has evolved over the past several years. As of 
August 31, 1984, 402 out of 707 administrators were in an acting 
status. 

On May 2, 1984 ^ the School Department commenced the process 
prescribed in the December 23, 1982 Orders of Disengagement to 



-266- 



-2- 



seek the consensus of all parties regarding modifications to the 
screening and rating procedures. These modifications are 
designed to permit a prompt eradication of this backlog, and to 
avoid its reccurrence, without sacrificing the essential 
objectives of the original court-ordered procedures. After two 
plenary negotiating sessions, and numerous bilateral exchanges, 
under the leadership of the Senior Officer for Equal Opportunity 
Barbara Fields, a consensus was forged. The proposed 
modifications, which include further affirmative action 
assurances with respect to Black staff, and significantly 
accelerated affirmative action undertakings with respect to 
Other Minority staff, were approved by the School Committee on 
October 9, 1984. Filed contemporaneously herewith is the School 
Defendancs' "Motion to Modify Administrative Rating and 
Screening Procedures" detailing these proposals. Since the 
proposed modifications have been the subject of extensive 
discussion among the parties, the School Defendants request that 
the Motion be considered by the Court at the hearing scheduled 
for October 26, 1984. 

While the modifications proposed in the above-mentioned 
Motion will facilitate the achievement of full compliance with 
the requirement that administrative positions be filled on a 
permanent basis as soon as administratively feasible, the School 
Department has developed a schedule to make permanent 



-267- 



-3- 



appoincments, using current screening and rating procedures, for 
approximately one hundred positions during the current school 
year. In addition, the School Committee on October 9, 1984, 
ordered that no new acting appointment to a permanent vacancy 
last for more than six months. Toward ubat end, the School 
Committee further directed that, «^.ithin ten school days of 
approval, each such acting appointment must be posted for 
permanent appointment. 

A timetable for the elimination of acting appointments can 
be developed after the Court's disposition of the pending 
Motion. It should be noted, as the parties are already aware, 
that of the approximate 400 acting positions, approximately 170 
positions are being maintained in an acting status pending the 
adjudication by the State Labor Relations Commission of a 
bargaining unit placement dispute between and among the BTU, 
BASAS and the School Department. In fairness to potential 
applicants for such contested positions, permanent appointments 
ought to await resolution of that dispute. Hereafter, these 
contested positions will be reported as such, in order better to 
assess progress in eradicating the acting backlog where feasible 

1(b). Unified Facilities Plan 

On April 26, 1984, the School Committee approved key 
elements of a long-range facilities plan. The City, State and 
School Committee have joined in the commitment to retain for 



~2GS^ 



-4- 



long-term use seventy-three (73) specified schools. VJhile luch 
progress has been made in identifying certain capital 
improvement projects, a tripartite consensus has not yet been 
achieved, and., perhaps cannot be achieved, until closure is- 
reached cq proposed modifications to the student assignment 
plan. The status and contents of the School Committee's 
long-range facilities plan are described in Attachment B. 

2. The School Defendants submit as Attachment C a progress 
report prepared by Senior Officer John R. Coakley regarding the 
formulation of the Long Range Plan for student assignments. 

3. The School Defendants respond to the six critical areas 
of concern identified by the State Board of Education in its 
Monitoring Report No. 3 as follows: 

(l.)(A) Bilingual Education . Senior Officer John R. 
Coakley has reviewed the Court's orders pertaining to Bilingual 
Education and has concluded that the School Department has 
achieved substantial compliance with these orders. Accordingly, 
the School Defendants intend to petition that the Court 
terminate active jurisdiction, and the State Board's 
extraordinary monitoring responsibility, with respect to the^ 
orders enumerated in Paragraph 5 of Appendix I to the Memorandum 
and Orders of Disengagement dated December 23, 1982. A 
compendium of the orders enumerated in Paragraph 5, with Mr. 
Coakley 's assessment, is included as Attachment D. 



-269- 



-5- 



(l.)(B) Examination Schools . The School Department's Plan 
for the retention of minority students at the Boston Latin 
School and the Boston Latin Academy is attached as Attachment E. 

(2.) [The issue of acting administrators has been 
addressed above.] 

(3.) Racial/Ethnic Guidelines . Senior Officer John R, 
Coakley's report on the Department's special desegregation 
measures and recruitment efforts is attached as Attachment F. 

(4.) Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational 
Education . 

Both the School Department and the State Department of 
Education agree that the Unified Plan for Vocational and 
Occupational Education should be subject to extensive review. A 
summary of the School Department's compliance with that Plan is 
contained in a report from Director James A. Garadonio included 
herewith as Attachment G. The School Defendants intend to 
propose a substantial modification to the oi:tstanding orders in 
this area. It will be the contention of the School Defendants 
that issues such as curriculum development, specific management 
titles and structures, program content, size and location, and 
the like, ought to be the subject of an Annual Program Plan to 
be reviewed and approved by the State Department of Education, 
and not specifically prescribed by court order. Instead, the 



i 



-270- 



-6- 



Court's orders in this area ought to be focused on the 
desegregative aspects of the student assignments plan for these 
programs, much as the Court has treated bilingual and special 
education. Further consultation with the State Department. ?nd 
the parties will be pursued prior to proposing such a 
re-focusing of the court orders. 

(5.) [The issue of a long-range facilities plan has been 
addressed above.] 

(6.) In light of the Court's proposed disengagement vith 
respect to issues of safety and security except with respect to 
transportation to and from school, the School Defendants submit 
the Plan for Student Transportation Safety developed by Acting 
Deputy Superintendent Joseph M. McDonough, which plan is 
attached hereto as Attachment H. Implementation of this Plan 
has already commenced. 

Respectfully submitted, 
THE SCHOOL DEFENDANTS 
By their attorneys. 



I^liil7'i 




Date i^ "Marshall SimSnds, P.C. 

Henry Ci Dinger 
GOODWIN, PROCTER k HOAR 
28 State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(617) 523-5700 



-271- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OP I Hfc CI I Y Oh bOb i UN 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE SUPERiNTENDENT 
ROBERT R SPILLANE 



October 12, 1984 



Mr. David Jones, Associate Coramissioner 
School Facilities and Related Services 
Massachusetts Departrccat of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Mr. Jones: 

As a follow up to the productive meeting of October 5, 1984 of 
administrators and staff of the Department of Education and of 
the Boston Public Schools to discuss the issues of the Third 
Monitoring Report, I am prompted to again state my views on the 
subject of School Facilities Planning. 

As I expressed at that meeting, I hope for a reconsideration of 
the provision in the Board of Education's filing of September 26, 
"Supplement to Third Monitoring Report Under Orders of 
Disengagement," that proposals contained in the Boston Facilities 
Plan of June 5, 1984 "cannot be considered for state assistance, 
however, until a lon^ range facilities plan is adopted by city, 
school and state officials and approved by the Court." 

We know that many Boston school facilities need immediate 
attention. Basically, it is my view that any action that 
threatens to impede or delay progress in addressing these 
physical needs, whatever its interest or purpose, is not in the 
best interests of Boston's school children. 

I believe that in recent months, the Boston Public Schools has 
taken significant steps toward the completion of a Long Range 
Facilities Plan. With the cooperation and assistance of the City 
of Boston and its Public Facilities Department and of the 
Department of Education and its School Building Assistance 
Bureau, facility improvements of high-priority need are close to 
a state of implementation in a number of Boston Public Schools. 

I recognize that the Long Range Facilities Plan is incomplete in 
certain details and that the final elements of this facilities 
plan are dependent on approval of a long range educational plan. 



26 COUnT STREET. BOSTO'J. iV 'Z-z'^TS C2103 • 726-5200 AREA 617 

-272- 



Mr. David Jones -2- October 12, 198-^ 



The Bof.ton Public Schools have been developing recommendations 
for such an education plan that are comprehensive and systemwids 
in nature and address significant aspects of the present student 
assignment and districting plan. A draft plan has been 
prepared, widely disseminated and publicly discussed. Boston 
Public School officials are meeting with parties to the court 
case about the elements of the plan. However, the process and 
schedule of approval of such a plan is uncertain at present. 
Linking state reimbursements to this schedule introduces a risk 
that the completed applications for school improvement might be 
put on hold. This possibility acts as a disincentive to facility 
planning and particularly to developing detailed specifications 
for facility improvements. 

The Boston School Committee has made a commitment to long-term 
use of a significant number of key school facilities and has set 
out a five-year plan of improvements focused on these schools. 
These facilities will be part of Boston's Long Range Plan and of 
its Long Range Facilities Plan, and students will be assigned to 
these facilities for many years in the future. Some need 
immediate and, in some cases, substantial improvement. The 
nature of these improvements, certainly those that address 
heating, energy conseirvation, roofing, etc., are not related to 
the assignment plan for the school. They should proceed as 
quickly as possible. 

The Boston Public Schools has demonstrated not only its intent to 
complete a long range educational plan d.nd to set in place a 
complete school facilities plan, but it has also been active in 
detailed planning for school facility improvements, a task that 
will take many years to complete and which can no longer be 
deferred. It is possible to make progress on educational 
planning and facilities improvement simultaneously and without 
contradiction as the June 5, 1984 submission proposes. 

The City of Boston has made a commitment to address the physical 
needs of Boston school facilities. But the ability of the city 
to maintain this commitment and to continue to expend funds for 
planning, development and construction contracts is related to 
some expectancy that the reimbursements that accrue to other 
cities and towns in the Commonwealth under state statutes will 
not be withheld from Boston. And with certainty, we need the 
continued assistance of the city as a partner in our joint 
planning efforts. 

I believe that the Board and Department of Education share with 
the City of Boston and the Boston Public Schools the common goal 
of making Boston school facilities safe, environmentally sound 
and equal in quality to those . throughout the state. To this 



-273- 



Mr. David Jones -3- October 12, 1984 



point in time, the Board and Department of Education have 
provided assistance and guidance in our facilities planning 
efforts. I urge the Board of Education and ths Department of 
Education to continue that role, to make appropriate and 

equitable provisions for the funding of Boston school projects, 
to expedite the completion of projects now well into planning and 

to continue with the Boston Public Schools and the City of Boston 
the joint facilities planning process. 

On Thursday, October 11, the Boston Public Schools filed a 
progress report ori' Facilities Planning. I am enclosing a copy 
for your review and information. 

Sincerely, 



Robert L. Murray ^ 
Boston Public Schools 



RLMrmc 
Enclosure 

cc: Robert R. Spillane 

Superintendent, Boston Public Schools 
James Hart 

Director, Public Facilities Department 
John R. Coakley 

Senior Officer, Department of Implementation, 

Boston Public Schools 



-27^- 



ill 

y'f. 



DWision of School Faciliti«9 snd Related S'irviess . 

Tha Commcnvvealth of Massachusstts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quiiicy. Massachusetts 02189 

M E M R A N D U M 



TO: 
EROM: 
DATE: 
SUBJECT: 



Pobert-BlUiitenthal . I 

David A. Jones /(^■\^ 

October 17, 1984 

Boston Public Schools Status Report (10/11/84) 



Unified Facilities Plan 

Tha Long-Rangs Facilities Planning Progress Report described in Attachment B 
of the status report submitted to the U.S. District Court on October 11, 1984 
indicates that: 

A. Status of Lonq-Ranqe Facilities Planning 

As of October 1, 1984, the Boston Public Schools has developed and 
with the cooperation and assistance of the City of Bostcn ard the 
Massachusetts Department of Education is participating in the 
implementation of a first phase of a Long-Range Facilities Plan, 
which is directed at a nucleus of seventy-three school facilities 
whose utilization is guaranteed over the long term. 

The Department of Education has not joined with the City or School Committee 
in any conmitraent at this time to retain for long-term use the seventy-three 
(73) specified schools. 

There is scsne questions relative to the status of any tripartite consensus 
discussed at a SBAB meeting held on 9/28/84 vAich referenced a new Office pf 
Capital Planning (OCP) established by Mayor Flynn on July 9, 1984 (see 
Attachment #1) . The Department of Education will continue to encourage 
cooperation and open coRrounication with all parties as we move into 
discussions on phase toira of the Facilities Plafi. 

The second phase of this Facilities Plan mentioned in Superintendent 
Spillane's May 2, 1984 correspondence and in Mr. Coakley's October 11, 1984 
memorandum is dependent on the developnent and approval of a Long-Range Plan 
which includes a student assignment plan cind other educational requirem.ents. 
Mr. Coakley states, "We are confident of our ability to move rapidly to 
caitplete phase two proposals and will do so on or after Deceiuber 15, 1984, our 
goal for filing the Long-Pange Plan." 



-275- 



Robert Blumenthal 
Pag 3 T-.o 
October 17, 1984 



On April 26, 1984, the Boston School Conmttee approved Phase I of a Long- 
Range Facilities Plan and indicated that specific projects, nainely Hyde Park 
High, Boston Technical, Burke High, Lewenburg, and Dearborn Schools should be 
advcinced with all due speed. These schools were incorporated as part of a 
list of ten (10) schools listed in the First Year of a five-year plan (1985- 
1939) listing the priorities of proposed Major Alterations and Repairs (see 
AttachiTier.t t2) GStiinated to cost $20 million. At this time we have only 
receiv.ad partial submittals on four (4) of the t?n (10) first Year proposed 
projects. Lev7snbutg arid Burke High are not included in tliese recent partial 
submittals transmitted to GERBC on 9/23/84. 

It has been pointed out that this proposed list of five-year priorities varies 
substantially in scope and funding com.Tiitments fron the Status Report on 
Ravisad U.F.P. for Construction and Renovation Projects filed with the Court 
in January of 1980. 

The planning of the Boston Latin School/Boston Latin Academy 
renovation/construction project is underway. An architectural firm has been 
engaged and preliminary schematic drawings have been submitted. At the S3AB 
meeting held with the Boston Public Facilities Department on September 28, 
1984, they indicated that an alternate site location at the I-Iassachu setts 
College of Art was being considered by the architects and hopefully a decision 
vould be forthcoming by Mbvercber 1st. This project is estimated to cost $35 
irdllicxi with an estimated schedule of 1984-1988. As you know, funds are 
extranely limited for SBAB projects, and cannot acconmodate a project of this 
magnitude which is eligible for 90% reimbursement. Separate additional 
appropriations would have to be authorized prior to the Board of Education 
considering the Boston Latin School/Boston Latin Academy for approval. The 
rehabilitation of the school athletics complex at White Stadium is not 
considered eligible for reimbursement under the SBAB Program. 

The specifics of the development and implementation of a Phase II Facilities 
Plan have not been submitted for consideration at this time. We have not been 
e:<posed to the details of estimated costs ($13.5 million) and schedules 
itemized in the October 11, 1984 Long-Range Facilities Progress Report on 
pages 6-8, C.l - C.3. Judgment will have to be reserved on these 
recommendations until phase tv\ra proposal are finalized. 

The alteration and repair program outlined on page 4, item F of the 
October 11, 1984 Progress Report are substantially understated. On site 
inspections during this past suitmer confirm Mr. Scagnoli's concerns "that 
because of financial neglect, the structures have deteriorated and the 
environment for pupils and teachers is not conducive to good education" 
(letter from Boston Public Schools to Public Facilities Department 5/4/84). 
Although ordinary maintenance and ongoing day-to-day repairs are not eligible 
for reimbursement, we strongly urge that relief be sought through Mayor 
Flynn's Office and the courts if necessary from the limitations on school 
building maintenance imposed by the so-called Tregor Bill. 

-276- 



! Robert B lumen thai 
Page Three 
October 17, 1934 



The Board and the Deparbnent of Education is coratdtted to assisting tlie City 
of Boston ard the Boston Public Schools to making Boston school facilities 
safe, environmentally sound, and equal in quality to those throughout the 
state. Boston has in the last six months made a good faith effort to 
ai::celerate their long-range facilities planning process. It would seem 
reasonable that if their goal of filing a Long-Range Plan is acconplishad by 
December 15, 1S84,. that the ten (10) heating and roofing projects proposed for 
sa-nmer vv-ork in 1985 could be recornmended to the Board as .^con as their 
applications are ccanplete in every aspect. These projects, if approved by tlie 
Board, would be eligible for furding within the present constraints of FYSS 
authorization for Chapter 515 and 613 projects both in Bo:-.ton and elsewhere 
throughout the CamTonvrealth. So as not to ii^pede progress, we v/ill continue 
to encourage Boston to subiciit applications for their individual first year 
projects and assist than in any way to insure these projects move through the 
approval process smoothly. 



cc: Commissioner Lawson 
Frank Banks 
Charles Glenn 



-217- 



5^1 S'^, 



1 



5 H/ 



itW-, 



I he Lommonwealth ot iviassacnusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street. Quinc/. Massachusetts 02169 



October 22, 1984 



Stephen A. Moynahan, Jr., Esq. 

Deputy Clerk 

U.S. District Court 

1525 U.S. Post Office and Courthouse 

Boston, Massachusetts 02109 



Morgan v. VZalsh-Tonasini 
C.A. 72-911-G 



Dear Mr. Moynahan: 



Enclosed please find for filing in the above action the 
State Board of Education's Comments on October 11, 1984 Filings 
of the Parties. 



Thank you. 



1 nee rely. 




Hcbert H.' blum'ef 
Counsel, State Board of 
Education 




RHB/kal 

Enclosures: 

cc: Parties of Record 



-273- 



II. MOTION TO MODIFY ADMINISTRATOR RATIKG /ilTD SCREENIiTG 
PROCEDURES 

The State Board supports the Motion to Mo^.lfy Administrator 

Screening and Rating Procedures, filed by School Defendants on 

October 11, 1984. It supports this motion because it offers' a 

method for eliminating the excessive number of acting 

administrative 'appointments on an expedited basis, and because 

the proposal is the result of extensive negotiations conducted by 

School Defendants v/ith Plaintiffs, Plaintif f-Intervenors, and the 

Cityv7ide Parents Council. The motion represents the first 

product of the modification process described at Section VI of 

the Court's December 23, 1982 Orders of Disengagement. As such, 

it should serve the parties as a model for the resolution of the 

remaining issues in this litigation. 

III. SCaOOL DEFENDANTS* STATUS .REPORTS 

A. Unified Facilities Plan: The State Board wishes to 
note for the record the follov'ing information, j'.n order to 
clariliy statements made in School Defendants' status report On 
facilities: 

As the State Board has noted on several occasions, most 
recently in its Supplement to Third Monitoring Report filed on 
SeptfMnber 26, 1984, it cannot consider proposals for funding of 



-279- 



school con.ot ruction projects in the absence of z coordinated 
student c»ssignnient and facilities plan. At the same time, 
levjislation enacted by the Massachusetts General Court provides 
increased State assistance up to ninety percent of approved cost; 
for consMuction. projects intended to reduce or eliminate racial 
imbalance, or imbalance of jninority students, if such projects 
were "submitted or approved" after December 31, 1981 and before 
July 1, 1984. Massachusetts Statutes of 1983, Chapter 515,. 
Section 4. The State Board therefore advised City and School 
Defendants to submit any projects that might ultimately be 
contained in the Unified Facilities Plan within the statutory 
time frame, so that should these projects become approved as part 
of a Unified Facilities Plaii, they would be eligible for the 
additional State funding provisions of Chapter 515. The State 
Board took pains to stress that receipt of these "submissions" in 
no v;ay committed the State Board to either support of these 
projects as part of a Unified Facilities Plan or the awarding of 
School Building Assistance funds for the specific projects in 
question. 

City and School Defendants proceeded to submit a variety of 
materials to the School Building Assistance Bureau of the 
Massachusetts Department of Education. Among these was a list of 
73 schools proposed for retention and long-term use. Contrary to 



-280- 



ij School Defendants' status report, however, at no tine h--c the 
State Board "joined in the commitment" to retain these icesicified 
facilities. It has simply' received the list, together v;ith o'.her 
submissions regarding specific construction projects at specific 

, schools, as documents for discussion in negotiations toward the 
development of a comprehensive Unified Facilities Plan. In this 
regard, the State Board also v;ishes to note that, while it has' 
received materials identifying the projects listed at sections 
IIA and IIB of School Defendants' Long Range Facilities Planning 
Progress Report (pages 5-6) , it only learned of the proposed 
projects listed at section IIC of said report (pp. 6-8) when the 
document was filed with the Court. 

The best evidence of the need for a comprehensive facilities 
plan, which is required. by Court order and has been repeatedly 
requested by the State Board, is School Defendants' own status 
report. In 1980, City Defendants were prepared to commit only 
§40,000,000 over a five-year period for school construction. 
School Defendants' latest progress report identifies at least 
$68,500,000 in construction needs over a six-year period; yet the 
list of specific projects omits many of the priority projects 
identified by School Defendants and the State Beard in 1S30, and 
the $5,000,000 identified at section IIC2 of the progress report 



-281— 



for programmatic modifications may prove to be inadequate to 
address the structural changes required if a long-range plan 
necessitating conversion of middle schools to high schools, or of 
elementary schools to K-8 schools, is ultimately adopted and 
approved by the Court. Again, a complete plan, including 
priorities, timetables and funding commitments, is essential to""- 
the resolution yof ..this aspect of the desegregation case. 

B. Student Assigmaents: State Board Monitors are unable 
to comment at this time on the assertion contained in School 
Defendants' Attachment F that "only seven of 123 schools have 
racial/ethnic percentages of major concern." As was the case 
during the State Board's second monitoring period, monitors 
prefer to await more reliable enrollment data, which will be 
available in November. An analysis of current enrollments will 
be included in the State Board's Fourth Monitoring Report. 

The State Board has no comment on the de</-elopment of a Long 
Range Plan, and reserves comments on specific planning proposals 
currently under consideration until modifications to current 
assignment orders are formally adopted by School Defendants and 
presented to the Court and parties in a motion for modification. 

C. Transitional Bilingual Education: While School 
Defendants state that they "intend to petition that the Court 
terminate active jurisdiction" in the area of Bilingual 



-282- 




City of Boston 
c Facilities Department 

26 Coun St./6th Floor 
ston. Massachusetts 02 108 

October 22, 1984 
James F. Han 

Director 

Peter Scaipignato 
Planning/ Development 

Dr. David A. Jones 

Associate Commissioner 

Division of School Facilities and 

Related Services 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Dr. Jones : 

Attached, per your conversation of October 12,1984 
with Mike Smith, are several pieces of information that 
the staff of the School Building Assistance Bureau (SBAB) 
recently requested. 

Some of this information was requested by your staff 
to complete the review of four Chapter 613 boiler replace- 
ment projects -- Boston Technical High, Hyde Park High, 
Dearborn and VTheatley Schools. Specifically, we have en- 
closed a Chapter 766 compliance statement, certification 
from the City Auditor that fijnds are available under a 
loan order and a copy of the loan order for these pro- 
jects. 

In addition, your staff requested copies of the 
design specifications for the four school boiler projects 
pending review. As I indicated to you earlier, the plans 
and specifications for these projects will not be complete 
until the end of January , 1985 . To expedite your review 
I suggest that your staff direct, questions regarding the 
plans and specifications to the engineers selected by my 
Department to design these projects. A list of their names 
is attached. 

Finally, we have enclosed a plan and specification 
milestone chart for all projects included in the first year 



-283- 



of the City's United Facility Plan. This operating plan 
updates the schedule sent to your office on July 5, 19S4. 



If you have any questions regarding this material or 
the applications submitted thus far, do not hesitate to 
contact us. 



Sincerely, 



;'^-\ 



^^mes F. Hart, Director 
MS/td (public Facilities Dept. 



cc : Sam Pike 



-284- 



Contac 



ts for Plan & Specification Information 



HYDE PARK & DEARBORN SCHOOLS 

R.D. Kimball Inc. 

Chris Cummings - - 942-0130 



WHEATLEY SCHOOL 

Schneider Inc. 

Joe Schneider - - 742-4090 

BOSTON TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Rear don & Turner 

Al Reardon - " 523-2iZJ 



-385- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTOr 




STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 



October 16, 1984 



Mr. Samuel Pike 

School Plan Specialist 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

27 Cedar Street 

Wellesley, MA 02181 

Dear Mr. Pike: 

This is to certify that the Special Education programs 
in the following schools are in compliance with provisions 
of Chapter 766: 



Dearborn 

Hyde Park High 

Wheatley 

Boston Technical High 

Solomon Lewenberg 

Jeremiah E. Burke High 

Dennis Haley 

Patrick Gavin 

James Hennigan 

Madison Park High 



Sincerely, 




Thomas Hehir, Manager 
Student Support Services 



TH:th 



20 COURT STREET • BOSTON, WAS -286-TTS 02108 • 726-6200 AREA 51 7 







4) U 
























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-287- 



UXITED STATES DISTFICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



,ok 



/r 



TALLULAH MORGAN, et al.. 

Plaintiff 

V. 

JEAN McKEIGUE, et al.. 

Defendants 



C. A. No. 72-911-G 



\ 



CITY DEFENDANTS' COMMENTS ON 
UNIFIED FACILITIES PLAN 

The City Defendants report that they have been v;orking 

with the School Defendants in an attempt to determine which 

school facilities v.'ill be maintained in the future and to 

establish a plan for the maintenance, repair, alteration, 

rehabilitation and construction of school facilities in the 

future. In this regard, the City Defendants and the School 

Defendants have submitted to the State Board of Education a 

five year $23,000,000.00 plan for capital improvements to 52 

schools and the White Stadium facility, and a $35,000,000.00 

plan for the renovation of the Boston Latin School/Boston 

Latin Academy. The City Defendants strongly urge the State 

Board to approve these proposals forthwith. 



V7ith the exception of the omission of the White 
Stadium project, the targeted facilities and estin^ited costs 
arc identified on pages 5 and 6 {paragreiphs A and B) of the 
Boston Public Schools Long Range Facilities Planning 
Progress Report dated October 11, 1984. 

-288- 



with regard tc the maintenance, repair, alteration, 
rehabilitation and construction to facilities not included 
in the five year plan or the Latin schools project, the City 
Defendants are waiting for the School Defendants to finalize 
the so-called Long Range Plan which will identify the school 
facilities the School Defendants intend tc maintain in the 
future in addition to the facilities included in the pro- 
posals presently before the State Board. The City Defen- 
dants strongly urge that the School Defendants to make this 
decision forthwith. 

The City Defendants also wish to report to the court 
that the extent of future school facility maintenance, 
repair, alteration, rehabilitation and construction will 
depend upon the City of Boston's overall financial situa- 
tion, including its position in the bond market, and the 
participation of the State Board of Education in making 
substantial state funds available for such projects. 

Finally, the defendants Mayor and the Public Facilities 
Commission wish to emphasize to the court that they are 
committed to ensuring that future school maintenance, 
repair, alteration, rehabilitation and construction is dene 
in accordance with the continued desegregation of the Boston 
Public Schools. 



-239- 




City of Boston 
liblic Facilities Department 

26 Court St. /bih Floor 
Boston. Massachusetts 02108 

James F. Hart 

Director 

Peter Scarpignato 
Planning/ De'slopmen; 



October 24, 1984 



Dr. David Jones, Associate Comraissioner 
Division of School Facilities and 

Related Services 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Dt~r--jQnes : 

Enclosed is the Auditor's certification regarding 
the availability of funds for the Chapter 613 reimburse- 
ment applications for school boiler replacement projects 
in the City of Boston. 

With this transmittal you have received all of the 
additional information that your staff requested to 
complete the application review process, I have sent 
Sam Pike a complete set of this material under separate 
cover. 

If you or your staff need additional information, 
do not hesitate to contact me. 



bUS/td 
Attachment 



Sincerely, 

Michael J. Smith, Director 

Capital Planning 

Public Facilities Department 



-290- 



I 







■sii^^d vJi^'jJ 24 October 1984 



I certify that the amount of unencumbered funds in account 669-80-710 
is $3,701,373.36. 

I have earmarked $1/757,678 for the projects named below. 

Wheatley School: $ 496,655 

Dearborn School: 496,655 

Tech High School: 460,241 

Hyde Park High School: 304,127 

TOTAL $1,757,678 




Stamps, 



Auditor 

City of Boston 






-291- 
"^r^j Raymond L. Fiynn, MayorMUDITlNG DEPARTMENT /Boston City Hall/City Hail Plaza 02201 




CITY OF BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 



OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 
RAYMOND L. FLYNN 



October 25, 1984 



Mr. Jerries R. Grandfe 

Chairperson of the Board of Education 

Massachusetts Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 

Dear Mr. Grande: 

I was pleased to hear that the Board of Education had filed comments in support 
of termination of the court's jurisdiction over the four areas as proposed by Judge 
Garrity. I believe that the City of Boston h iJ reached a stay-- where it is 
eppropriate that the City resume full responsibility for all of its departments. 

My interest in education has rem'.'Iiied unabated sin ; "^ my election ay Mayor, 
and my goals unchanged. I bel'Ave that quality education in <j*ir City is essential to 
its growth and development. !• vestment in Boston, hence jo' ., depends greatly upon 
the quality of the workforce inat the City can provide. In tun, educated and 
productive citizens are the mainstay of stable and secure nei'jhoorhoods. 

A stab*- school sytrtf^it; with predictable assignments for teachers and students 
is just the bii'jinning of a ••:'ices3 of insuring quality e'/ .cation. For this reason, I 
became personally involv-?'; In facilitating the agreernynt between the Boston 
Teachers Union and ttje Si;;::.ol Department and per- nnully lobbied the City Council 
to support the agreement. Personal negotiations wich the Schoul Department 
resulted in a v^nsensus b' . get for this year that permitted stntiility of programs and 
staff, and restoration of I'i-ne programs lost due to budget cut - Despite the fiscal 
con traints fo'tod by the City, the School Department was perr.iitted the largest 
Increase in ev.-enditure level of all City departments. In fact, the budgets for 
nearly all departments were reduced. 

My administration has already committed $58 million to repairs and renovations 
of school facilities. In my recent visit to Dorchester High School, it was very 
satisfying to see the v/ork done on this school and the difference it has made in the 
atmosphere in the building. Our students deserve schools that are physically 
appealing and conducive to learning. 



-^.'92- 



BOSTON CFTY HALL • ONE CffY HALL TLAZA • BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 02201 • 617 '7i>KY0 



Letter to Mr. James R. Grande 
Page Two 
October 25, 1904 

In general, I believe that we have established a true spirit of cooperation 
between the School Department and the City that has not existed for some time. In 
part, this has been accomplished through the School Comcnittee's gracious offer to 
me to serve as ex-officio member of that body. Equally as important, however, has 
been my stated desire to return education in Boston to its rightful priority. 

The chief executive of Boston, I believe, has the obligation to exercise political 
leadership in all areas affecting the quality of life in this City. I recognize that the 
restoration of programmatic control to the City carries with it the restoration of 
accountability as well. -This administration will not avoid its responsibility to 
provide quality de^^iigregatEr-; education in the City of Boston nor to enforce relevant 
state and federal laws. / 

Be assured that I and rv.-j administration desire to v/ork with the Board of 
Education in resolving Boston's educational problems. " 



rely, 




RaVYnond L. F'lynn 



la/mond L. F'lynn 
Mayor 



cc: Members of the Board of Education 



-293- 



^^ The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 




1385 Hancock Street, Quiney, Massachusetts 02169 



November 7, 1984 



Michael J. Smith, 01 rector 

Capital Planning 

Public Facilities' Jepartment 

26 Court Street 

Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Smith: 

This Is In response to /our letter dated October 24, 1984, In which you 
write that the School Building Assistance Bureau has received all additional 
Information to complete the application of the City of Boston for boiler 
replacements In schools. 

The School Building Assistance Bureau has received only the Technical 
Audits. We await plans and specifications for the Wheatly, Dearborn, Boston 
Technical, and Hyde Park High Schools. 

In your letter of October 22, 1984, you Indicate that these plans and 
specifications will be completed at the end of January I985. When the School 
Building Assistance Bureau receives these plans and specifications, your 
applications will be considered for action by the Board of Education, provided 
that approval Is consistent with the approved facilities plan which Is still 
In development. 

If you have any questions regarding this letter, do not hesitate to 
contact Edward Nicolas or Louis Cogllano of the School Building Assistance 
Bureau. 




Sincerely, 





ohn A. Calabro, Ph.D. 
Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 
(617) 770-7238 



JAC:hh 

cc: David A. Jones -29^- 

F. Edward Nicolas 



I 




The Commonwealth of Massachusatts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Strset. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



November 19, 1981} 



Mr. Robert L. Hurray 

and 
Mr. Michael J. Smith 
City of Boston 
26 Court Street 
Boston, m 02103 

Dear Mr. Murray and Mr. Smith: 

This will sunmarize some of the main points of our joint planning nieeting 
held at Public Facilities Department in Boston on Fridcy, November 16, 1984, 
during which both of you, John Coakley, Robert Consalvo. Anthony Artuso, Peter 
Scarpigndto, Ray Regan, Henry Scagnol i , Associate Comtnlsilonsr David A. Jones, 
and I discussed the Boston Unified Facilities P]an and related matlrers. Major 
points are as follows: 

1. The Facilities Plan should cover a ten- year period. 



2. 
3. 



The plan should show proposed capital expenditures. 

Beyond five years, the proposed plan may be less concrete. 

The plan should contain a mechanism for changes not inconsistent 
with the Court order which forbids filing of an incremental plan. 

You Indicated that the "assignable capacities" contained in some 
documents filed by Boston are familiar to rl.e Court and are smaller 
than the "Court assigned capacities" of 1975. 

You indicated that the decline In Boston School enrollment has 
ceased. Part of this change Is attributable to the re- 
establishment of the K-1 program, authorized by Boston in July 
198**. Nevertheless, you indicated a significant number of K-2 
pupils transfer to non-public schools. 

Boston will solidify its first five-year plan. Michael Smith plans 
to convene a meeting during the week of November 19/ 1984, to 
determine substitutions in the five-year plan on v.hich the Boston 
Public Schools and the Boston Public Facilities Department must 
agree. 



-295- 



Messrs. Murray and Smith 
Page Two 
November 19, 1984 

8. Michael Smith and Peter Scarpignato v;il 1 dsvelop a calendar by 
Wednesday, November 21, ]SBk, showing a schedule for development of 
UFP-related material pertaining to the Court-ordered filing date of 
December 15, 1984. 

9. Henry Scagnol i agreed to develop a comprehensive facilities plan 
for all buildings, including the seventy-three previously 
Identified to remain open for the foreseeable future. This plan 
would also identify the scope of capita! projects with estimated 
costs for 'the next ten-year period and be presenr.id at our sheduled 
meeting on November 30, 1984, at 1:30 p.rn. in Boston. The plan 
should also forecast school closings where pcssible. 

10. The Boston Public Schools maintenance budget should be doubled. 

11. The City of Boston is interested in developing a bonding system for 
projects, the effect of which would permit the City to pay only ten 
percent and the state ninety percent of construction costs. 

12. The first annual payment for the Latin Schooi proposal (s) is not 
presently In the FY 1986 grant budget request of the Department of 
Education. The Secretary of Administration and Finance has assured 
the Commissioner of Education that a supplementary appropriation 
would be forthcoming if Boston Latin became eligible for payment in 
FY 1986. It shouM be noted that this action In no way reflects 
upon the merits of the Latin School proposal (s) but only on the 
uncertainty of when funds for such proposal (s) might be payable to 
the City. 

13. You gave us a copy of a letter dated September 24, 1984, from 
Mayor Flynn to Governor Dukakis, in which Mayor Flynn asks the 
Governor to support a renovation project for George Robert White 
Schoolboy Stadium to be funded by the Board of Education under 
Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948, as amended. This is the same 
letter you initially advised us of on November 9, 1984, when you 
notified us that an application for such project was being 
developed. Mr. Consalvo indicated that the content of the Mayor's 
letter adequately and fully reflected the concerns of the City on 
this matter. We restated our position, originally made in June 
1984 and frequently thereafter, that approval of this project is 
not consistent with existing statutes. This matter will be dealt 
with in a separate letter. 



-296- 



Msssrs. Hurray and Smith 
Paga Two 
Novembar 19, 19S^ 



If this letter contains any errors or omissions, please let me know by 
letter or memorandum. 



Sincerely, 



^/-^a^^4:5 



Oohn A. Calabro, Ph.D. 

Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

(617) 770-7238 




JAC:hh 



cc: 



Frank F. Banks 
Robert H. Blumenthal 
Charles L. Glenn 
David A. Jones 
F. Edward Nicolas 
Samuel P. Pike 
Peter W. Scarpignato 
Michael J. Smith 
Robert R. Spillane 



-?97- 




School Building Assistance Bureau ii 

Division of School Fjciliiia) sn6 Rabtsd Services { ^ 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



13S5 Hancock Street, Ouincy. Massachusstts 02169 



November 19, 198^ 



Mr. Robert L. Murray' 
Boston Public Schoo) 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr, Murray; 

.. This is in response to your letter to me dated September 28, 19S4, In 
which you respond to issues concerning the Boston Latin Schools proposal 
raised :n my letter to you and Peter Scarpignato dated Septe.Tiber 12, 198^. 

My responses are as follows: 

1. As I understand it, the grade range is yet to be decided, that is, 
whether the schools will include grades 6-12 or 7-12. 

2. We will accept for consideration by the Board of Education, a 
proposal for a combined enrollment of 3,700 students in two 
separate and identifiable schools. 

Your letter indicates that the site(s) of the complex has not been 
determined. Your argument for two schools on the site of the 
present Latin School on Avenue Louis Pasteur may be approvable if 
there will be sufficient site to ecccmmodate the needs of both 
schools. (The proximity of both schools in past years was not a 
problem since the former Girls* Latin School was housed in a 
building on Huntington Avenue, later acquired by the Commonvi'ealth ■ 
for the use of Boston State College.) 

It is my sense that acquisition of the old Massachusetts College of 
Art building on Brookline Avenue as a site for the Latin Academy is 
improbable. 

Has this site situation been resolved? 



-2Q8- 




Mr. Robert L. Hurray Page Two Hove.-nber 19, 153^* 

J am asking S-vn Pike and Ed Nicolas to proceed with reviev;. anai/sis, and 
discussion of the proposad educational specifications. Please bs ad.-ised, 
however, tiiat staff review and .'pproval in r.o v/ay indicate future .-pprc /al of 
this proposal by the Board of Education. As wa are all av/are, approval of all 
project proposals by the Board must take place within the framework of a yet- 
to-bs coiTipleted and approved Unified Facilities Plan (UFP). The 
desegregation/racial imbalance implications of this proposal v/ithin the 
framework of the. pi an rr.ust also ba quite clear. 

ily, 

C /John A. Calabro, Ph.D- 
^— ^ Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

(617) m-m^ 



JAC:hh 

cc: Frank F. Banks 

Robert H. Blu.T.snthal 
Charles L. Glenn 
David A. Jones 
F. Edward Nicolas 
Samuel P. Pike 
Peter W. Scarpignato 
Michael J. Smith 
Robert R. Spll lane 



-299- 




Division of School Facilitin and Ralatad Sarvicss 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Deoartmant of Education 



1385 Hancock Street. Q-jincy, Massachusetts 02163 



November 20, 198^ 



Mr. Flobert L. Hurray . __ 

and 
Mr. Michael J. Smith 
City of Boston 
26 Court Street 
Boston, MA 0?J08 

Dear Mr. Murray and Mr. Smith: 

This letter Is in formal response to your notification to me on 
November 9, ^SBk, that the City of Boston was in the process of developing an 
application for state assistance under Chapter 6^5 of the Acts of 19^8, as 
amended, for a project to rehabilitate the George Robert White athletic 
complex. 

Since May of 198^ when the issue of a George Robert White proposal was 
first advanced, the consistent position of the Department of Education has 
been that such project is not eligible for state financial assistance under 
the provisions of Chapter 6^5 of the Acts of 19't8, as amended, the School 
Building Assistance Act, at any rate of assistance. I must restate this 
position at this time. 

In approving school projects under Chapter 645, the Board has 
consistently required that applicants provide adequate spaces to support 
modern physical education programs. 

The basic criteria for such spaces has been that they be needed for use 
in the physical education program, that they be supported by the approved 
educational specifications for the school, that they be so located that they 
can be scheduled as an integral part of the school, and that they be located 
on site. 

All Boston Public Schools construction projects approved by the Board of 
Education at least since 1970 have had more than adequate physical education 
spaces contained within them. Not all school projects contain outside 
physical education teaching stations, nor are they required to. 



-300- 



/3/r 



Messrs. Murray and Smith 



Page Tv/o 



November 20, 198'+ 



in practice, the Schooi Building Assistance Bureau has distinguished 
between physical education and athletics . It has been the consistent practice 
of the Department of Education not to aoprov;? the construction or 
rehabilitation oF separate athletic stadiums as approved r.chool project;: under 
Chapter 6^15. This position was taken, for example, with respect to stadlci 
proposals for the Manning Bowl in Lynn and the MacDonald Stadium in Maiden. 

When Chapter 6h5 was extensively revised in 1976, legislators working on 
the task under the leadership of then Representative Rfchc^rd Kendall expressed*' 
concern that In the future, school building assistance funds should not be 
expended for large athletic facilities 3uch as hockey rinks which were not 
directly related to needed basic physical education st-:t(ons. 

If the V/nite Stadium project is seen by Boston as one necessary to the 
well-being of the City, a clear legal mandate with appropriate financial 
support should be sought from the legislature. It remains my position that 
the Intent of Chapter 6kS is not to fund stadium projects, however desirable 
they may otherwise be, but to provide needed technical and financial aid for 
safe and adequate school buildings. 

Sincerely, 

/^ /John A. Calabro, Ph.D. 
^- — ^ Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

(617) 770-7238 



JAC:hh 

cc: Frank F. Banks 

Robert H. Slumenthai 
Charles L. Glenn 
David A. Jones 
F. Edward Nicolas 
Samuel P. Pike 
Peter W. Scarpignato 
Michael J. Smith 
Robert R. Spl 1 1 ane 



-301- 




Division of Scnool FacilitiBs and Rzlated S^rvicas 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



November 21, 198^ 



Hr. Robert L. Murray 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street ' ' " 
Boston. HA 021 08 

Dear Mr. Murray: 

I appreciate the issuss raised in your letter of October 12, ]^Sk and ths 
enclosed copy of ths October 1 1th Boston Public Schools progress report on 
Facilities Planning filed with ths court. We have had several meetings since 
then and I'd like to take this opportunity to respond to your comments and 
concerns. 

As you know, Boston Public Facilities Department submitted a milestone chart 
on October 22, 1S8^ for all projects included in the first year of the City's 
Unified Facilities Plan. None of these projects are scheduled to start 
construction prior to the Spring of 1985* At this tims we have only received 
partial submittal on four (4) of ths proposed projects. The court order of 
November 2, ISS'f requires a Unified Facilities Plan (UFP) lo bs filed on or 
before December 15, 198'f. If everything goes smoothly bet'ween now and then, 
the progress on these projects should not be impeded or delayed. 

I indicated at our meeting last Friday that the estimated first annual payment 
for the Latin School Complex Projec is not presently includr.d in ths 
Department of Education's FYI986 grant budget request. The Secretary of 
Administration and Finance has assured Commissioner Lawson tiiat a 
supplementary appropriation would be forthcoming if Boston Latin becomes 
eligible for payment in FYI986. This appears to bs consistent with the 
estimated schedule set forth in the Boston Public Schools progress report of > 
October 11, 198^ and Boston should expect that the payments due to other 
cities and towns under state statutes will not be withheld. 

We do share your concern that many Boston school facilities need imnediate 
attention. On-site inspections during this past summer indicate a pattern of 
deferred maintenance with widespread vandalism and deterioration which is not 
conducive to a sound educational environment. I call your attention to ItemF 
on page 6 of the October 11 th progress report indicating the annual 
maintenance and repair budget is substantially undarfunded. The Boston Public 
Schools must seek relief from this budgetary inequity. 



-302- 



Mr. Robert L, Murray 

Page Two 

Nov amber 21, 198^ 



The Board end the Department of Education look forward to working very closely 
In the months ahead with the City of Boston and the Boston Public Schools to 
ensure we reach our common goal of making Boston school facilities safe, 
environmentally sound, and at least equal In quality to those throughout the 

stste. 

Sincerely, .' " "' 

David A. Jones 
Associate Commissioner 

DAJ/!b 

cc: Commissioner John H. Lawson 
" Superintendent Robert Spillane 
John Hart, Public Facilities 
John A. Calabro, S8AB 



-303- 




■JAVA UO.'iiO.'.LA. 5/-^' 



City of Boston 
Public Facilities Department 

26 Court St. /6th Floor 
Boston. Massachusetts 02 108 • 

James F. Hart 
Director 

Peter Scarpignato 
Pldnnin; 'Developnicnt 



November 21 , 1984 



Dr. David Jones 

Associate Commissioner of Education 

Division of School Facilities and 

Related Services 

Massachusetts Dept. of Education 

1385 Hancock Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Dr . Jones : 

Attached, per our discussion of November 20,1984, 
is the School Department's schedule regarding prepara- 
tion of the Long Range and United Facilities Plans. 

Under the schedule, the next meeting of the work- 
ing group would be on December 5,1984. At that time, 
we can present detailed information and preliminary 
decisions regarding the scope of the facility plan. 
Please contact me to arrange a time and location for 
that meeting. 

If you have any questions regarding the schedule, 
do not hesitate to contact me. 

Sincerely, 



lUS/td 

cc : Bob Consalvo 
Bob Murray 
Mary Nee 



Michael JT Smith, Director 
Capital Planning 



-30^- 



SCHEDULE: LONG RANGE & UNITED FACILITIES PLAN 



lates 



Long Range Plan 



United Facilities Plan 



ov. 1-28 



Discussion & Negotia- 
tions among : 
. School Department 

Personnel 
. Plaintiffs 
; 'Parent Groups 
. El Comite 
, City Representatives 

(11/20) 
. Dept. of Education 
Representatives (11/20) 



Discussion & Negotiations 
re: components of the plan: 
. capacities , 
. enrollment projections, 
. funding considerations 
. phase I plan and 

first year projects, 

and 
. secondary 

facilities plan. 

Participants 
. School Department 

Personnel 
, Dept. of Education 
. City Departments 

Meeting dates: Nov. 9, 16 & 20, 



lov. 29 -Dec. 7 



Preparation of Negotiated 
Plan by Boston Public 
Schools 



Presentation of Facility Needs 
and Identification of eligible 
projects for reimbursement. 

Review and comments bv P'P'D 
and the Office of Capital 
Planning. Discussion with 
School Department personnel 
on Dec. 3 and 4. 

Discussion with SBAB proposed 
for Dec. 5. 



)ec. 7-14 



Deliberations by Negotiat- 
ing parties and decision-' 
making bodies . 



Completion of UFP (by Dec. 12) 
based on Long Range Plan, 
utilization by District, by 
level and by program. 

Final deliberations by City 
parties and decision making 
bodies . 

Proposed meeting date with 
SBAB, Dec. 12. 



-305- 



Dates 



Long Range Plan United Facilities Plan 



Dec 14 Long Range plan submitted United Facilities Plan 

to Federal District Court submitted to Federal 
with comments of parties. District Court with comm 

of parties . 



-306- 




Division oi School Facilitifis and Relaied Ssrvices 

The Commonwaalth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1385 Hancock Street, Quincy. Massachusetts 02159 
i.^enbsr 23, !93U 

t. Michael J. Smith 

;ty of Boston 

•blic Facilities Department 

i Court Street 

Iston, MA 02108 

lar Mr. Smi th: 

'rsuant to our discussion this morning and as a follow up to our msstings of November 9th 
id loth, I £.11 in receipt of your November 21st correspondence and the attached Long-Range 
id Unified Facilities Planning Schedule. 

I were tentatively scheduled to meet on Friday, November 30th in your office to review a 
-year proposed facilities plan that would clearly identify capital improvemsnt projects 
.-orporarlng all of the schools that will remain open for the foreseeable future. At our 
!dtir.g on Nove.'iibsr l6th, it was agreed by Messrs. Regan and Scagnolt that this lO-year 
'cilities plan would be ready for review in two weeks. Your suggestion that wa move this 
Ite off to December 5th is unacceptable. As time is of the essence, we must continue to 
ist as previously scheduled and review whatever information, schedules, plans, or 
injections that are available. 

. you know, a Unified Facilities Plan requires a tripartite agreement and unless we are 
iforded sufficient time to review your proposals, we will not be able to join in any 
rllity recofTxtiendations scheduled to be presented to the Court on December i5th. 

is again essential to recognize that a complete facilities plan covering a projected 
-year timeframe must include priorities, timetables, funding commitments, and identify 
:ilities to be closed, all of which are necessary for the resolution of this aspect of 
i Desecjregation Case. 

iook forward to hearing from you in anticipation of maintaining the previously agreed 
I3n meeting schedule. 

icerely, 



'id A. Jones 

iociate Commissioner 



'.I/lb 



Commissioner John H. Lawson, 
Superintendent Robert Spillane 
James Hart, Director, Public Facilities 
John Calabro, Director, S3A3 



-307- 



STAFF 



-309- 



STAFF 



ORDERS 



The desegregation of faculty and 
administrative staff shall be implemented 
according to the standards contained in the 
orders of July 31, 1974; January 28, 1975; 
the amended Order of August 30, 1975; the 
Order of February 24, 1976; the Special 
Order of July 7, 1977; the Further Order of 
July 5, 1978; the Modification of 
January 27, 1981; the Conditional Order of 
June 2, 1981; and the Bench Order of July 9, 
1981. 



SUMMARY 



These orders: (1) require the Boston 
schools to achieve and maintain at least 20% 
black teaching staff, and spell out some of 
the procedures to be used to attain this 
level; (2) require the Boston schools to 
achieve and maintain at least 20% black 
administrative staff in two categories 
(building level; district and central 
offices) and spell out some procedures, 
including a promotional rating system, to be 
used to attain this level; (3) require the 
Boston schools to adopt an affirmative 
action plan and actively to recruit black 
administrators and teachers until the level 
has reached 25%; (4) require the Boston 
schools to use their best efforts to 
increase the number of other minority 
teachers and administrators; and 
(5) require the Boston Schools to file semi- 
annual personnel reports by position 
category and race. Certain modifications to 
these orders deal with maintaining the 
required levels of minority staffing during 
periods of staff reduction. 



-311- 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



Despite a small increase in the number of 
black teachers in the system, the percentage 
of black teachers has dropped to 20.24 from 
20.85. This is the lowest percentage since 
1981-82, and is dangerously close to the 20% 
minimum required by the court. (See table) 

Both the number and percentage of other 
minority teachers in the system have 
increased during this monitoring period, the 
percentage has risen from 8.42 to 8.53. 
(See table) 

The percentage of Black administrators in 
Category I (principals) has increased from 
22.76 to 23.58; the percentage of black 
administrators in Category II (district and 
central office staff) has decreased from 
24.44 to 23.80. (See table) 

The percentage of other minority 
administrators in Category I increased from 
3.25 to 4.88; the percentage of other 
minority administrators in Category II 
increased from 5.72 to 7.02 (See table) 

The increase in percentages of Black and 
other minority administrators has been 
achieved largely through the use of acting 
appointments. The court-ordered promotional 
rating system for permanent appointments has 
essentially not been used. Two promotional 
ratings have been completed during this 
monitoring period, and although nineteen 
permanent positions were posted this fall, 
no screening committee meetings have been 
scheduled. (See memo from Victor Mclnnis to 
Jim Walsh, October 4, 1984) 

Under the current orders, there are 707 
administrative positions subject to 
promotional rating. Of these, 402 were 
filled on an acting basis as of August 31, 
1984. (Out of the 402 acting appointments, 
approximately 150 could not be rated now 
since they are the subject of legal 
proceedings to determine their bargaining 
unit.) (See School Defendants Status 
Reports, October 11, 1984, and letter from 
Jim Walsh to Nan Stein, November 7, 1984.) 



-312- 



PERCENTAGE OF BLACK AND OTHER MINORITY 
TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS 



Teachers 



Black 



#1 (6/83) 



20.46 



#2 (2/84) 



20.30 



#3 (7/84) Current Finding 



20.85 



20.24 



Other 



8.25 



Category I 
Administration 



Category II 
Administration 



Black 



Other 



21.76 



4.01 



8.54 



not 
monitored 

not 
monitored 



8.42 



24.44 
5.72 



8.53 



Black 


21.14 


21.14 


22.76 


23.58 


Other 


1.63 


2.44 


3.25 


4.88 



23.80 
7.02 



i 



-313- 



CONCLUS IONS/RECX}MMENEATIONS 



The decrease in the percentage of black teachers 
is cause for serious concern. Since Boston is 
not now laying off teachers, but is in fact 
hiring new teachers, the percentage should be 
increasing towards the 25% goal. 

Recommendations t The Boston schools should (1) 
analyze the reasons for this decrease; (2) expand 
the current recruitment efforts and increase the 
funds available for advertisements, travel, etc.; 
(3) move more expeditiously to sign contracts 
with identified minority candidates; and (4) work 
more closely with the state Bureau of Teacher 
Certification to assure that minority candidates 
are certified or eligible. 

The over-all increase in the percentage of black 
and other minority administrators is a 
significant and positive step even though not 
accomplished through the promotional rating 
process . 

Since acting appointments continue to be the rule 
and have in fact increased since the last 
reporting period, parents and teachers remain in 
effect excluded from the process by which 
administrators in Boston — including building 
principals — are chosen. A new school committee 
policy (October 9, 1984) orders a promotional 
rating to be "put forward" no more than ten days 
after the committee has approved an acting 
appointment. This policy does not take into 
account the dormant condition of the promotional 
rating process. 

Recommendations ; If the recently modified 
promotional rating system is to work as 
envisioned by the court and as now ordered by the 
school committee, it will require a greater 
allocation of staff time and resources, and a 
greater system commitment, than is now evident. 
The Boston schools should make this commitment 
immediately. 



-31^- 



/' 



BOSTON DESEGREGATICW REPORT #4 

STAFF 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



1. Tallulah Morgan, et al. Plaintiff v. Rita Walsh-Tomasini, et 
al. Defendant (Civil Action No. 72-711-6) 

2. Administrative Positions as of August 31, 1984 

3. Tallulah Morgan, et al. Plaintiff, v. Kevin McCloskey, et al. 
Defendants (Civil Action No. 72-911-6) 

4. Certificate of Service, signed, Henry Dinger 

5. Number and Percent of White, Black and Other Minority 
Teachers 

6. Letter: James Walsh to Nan Stein 

7. Memo: V. Mclnnis to James Walsh 

8. Order concerning permanent vacancies (October 9, 1984) 

9. Memo: Carlo Abrams to Ida White (re; Progress Report) 



-315- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT . 

• * * DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

***************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL.-, * 

.- - • • * •■ • *•■•■• • > 

Plaintiffs, *' . 

* 

V. * CIVIL ACTION 

* NO. 72-911-G 

RITA WALSH-TO MAS INI, ETAL., * 

* 

Defendants. * 

* 

***************** 



SCHOOL DEFENDAN":S' STATUS REPORTS \ 

The School Defendants respectfully submit herewith the 

status reports required by the Court's September 17, 1984 orders, 

■,:! 

as follows: 

1(a). Desegregation of Administrative Staff 

■ As of August 31, 1984, the School Department had achieved 

near total compliance with the desegregation goals of the 

February 24, 1976 orders concerning Category I and II 

administrative staff. As can be seen from Attachment A, 23.76% 

of the total administrativ.. workforce was Black, just 1.24% 

I 
short of the court-ordered 25% goal. For a variety of reasons, 

however, a substantial backlog of acting administrative 

appointments has evolved over the past several years. As of 

August 31, 1984, 402 out of 707 administrators were in an acting 

status . 

On May 2, 1984, the School Department commenced the process 

prescribed in the December 23, 1982 Orders of Disengagement to 



-?16- 



-3- 



appointments, using current screening and rating procedures, for 
approximately one hundred positions during the current school 
year. In addition, the School Committee on October 9, 1984, 
ordered that no new acting appointment to a permanent vacancy 
last for more than six months. Toward that end, the School 
Committee further directed that, within ten school days of 

r 

approval, each such acting appointment must be posted for 
permanent appointment. 

A timetable for the elimination of acting appointments can 
be developed after the Court's disposition of the pending 
Motion. It should be noted, as the parties are already aware, 
that of the approximate 400 acting positions, approximately 170 
positions are being maintained in an acting status pending the 
adjudication by the State Labor Relations Commission of a 
bargaining unit placement dispute between and among the BTU, ■ 
BASAS and the School Department. In fairness to potential 
applicants for such contested positions, permanent: appointments 
ought to await resolution of that dispute. Hereafter, these 
contested positions will be reported as such, in order better to 
assess progress in eradicating the acting backlog where feasible. 

1(b). Unified Facilities Plan 

On April 26, 1984, the School Committee approved key 
elements of a long-range facilities plan. The City, State and 
School Committee have joined in the commitment to retain for 



-317- 



-5- 



(l.)(B)' Examination Schools . The School Department's Plan 
for the retenliion of minority students at the Boston Latin 
School and the Boston Latin Academy is attached as Attachment E.i, 

(2.) [The issue of acting administrators has been 

I 

addressed above.] 

(3.) Racial/Ethnic Guidelines . Senior Officer John R. 
Coakley's report on the Department's special desegregation 
measures and recruitment efforts is attached as Attachment F. 

(4.) Unified Plan for Vocational and Occupational 1 
Education . 

Both the School Department and the State Department of i 
Education agree that the Unified Plan for Vocational and ' 
Occupational Edur :tion should be subject to extensive review. A 
summary of the School Dc-oartment ' s compliance with that Plan is 
contained in a report from Director James A. Caradonio included 1 
herewith as Attachment G. The School Defendants intend to 
propose a substantial modification to the outstanding orders in 
this area. It will be the contention of the School Defendants 
that issues such as curriculum development, specific management 
titles and structures, program content, size and location, and 
the like, ought to be the subject of an Annual Program Plan to 
be reviewed and approved by the State Department of Education, 
and not specifically prescribed by court order. Instead, the 



-318- 



ft 



/)fxnyr''^^^^ '' 



iJEGORY I 



AEMINISTRATrVE POSITIONS AS OF AUGUST 31 , 1984 



BLACK 



WHITE 



HISPANIC 



ASIAN AMER. 



AMER. INDIAH 



TOTAL 



.irting 
2nnanent 


8 
21 


6 
82 


3 
1 


1 
1 










18 

(14.63%) 
105 
(85.37%) 


( 


29 
(23.58%) 


88 
(71.54%) 


4 
(3.25%) 


2 

(1.63%) 


• 





(0%) 


123 

(100%) 








( 


ymfR MiAK.jRj'j'ii-i; 




) 












6 (4.88%) 


Total 






J^llX^Ry II 




















BLACK 


WHITE 


HISPAKEC 


ASIAN AMER. 




AMER. D©IAN 


TOTAL 


rting 

erinanent 


101 

38 


250 
154 


20 

7 


12 
1 




' 


1 




384 

(65.75%) 
200 
(34.25%) 




139 
(23.80%) 


404 
(69.18%) 


27 
(4.62%) 


13 
(2.23%) 






1 

(.17%) 


584 
(100%) 








( 


OTHKR ^fTNORTTTF.«; 




) 




OTAL ADMINibTKATORS 






41 (7.02%) 


Tot^il 








BLACK 


WHi'lK 


HISPANIC 


ASIAN ANER. 




AMER. INDIAN 


TOTAL 


-Cat. I 


29 


88 


4 


2 









123 
(17.40%) 


-Cat. II 


139 


i£J 


27 


13 






1 


584 (82.60%) 




168 
(23.76%) 


492 
(69.59%) 


31 
■ (4.39%) 

( 


15 
(2.12%) 

OTHER MINOr- ' 


PTK*; 




1 

(.14%) 


707 
. (100%) . 



47 (6.65%> Total 



-319- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



***************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL. , * 

* 

Plaintiffs, * 
* 

V. * 

* 

KEVIN McCLUSKEY, ET AL. , * 

* 

Defendants * 
* 

***************** 



CIVIL ACTION NO. 72-911-G 



REPORT OF THE NUT- ! ?,ER OF WHITE, BLACK AND OTHER MINORITY 
PERMANENT AND ACTING TEACHERS 

REPORT ON FACULTY RECRUITING AND HIRING 



The School Defendants file herewith the report of the 
number of white, black and other minority permanent and acting 
and teachers and the Report on Faculty Recruiting and Hiring. 

Respectfully submitted, 



^e-VL1^'^ jC i'^ t^(L L/.:. ,^,^. 

Henry Dinger, Esquire 
Goodwin, Procter ic Hoar 
28 State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
Tel. (617) 523-5700 



Dated: October 15, 1984 



-320- 



CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE 



I, Henry Dinger, hereby certify that I have this day served 
the attached documents upon the parties by causing to be 
delivered in hand or by causing to be mailed, postage prepaid, a 
copy thereof to counsel of record: 



See attached list 



Dated Henry Dinger, Esquire 

Goodwin, Procter and Hoar 
28 State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Tel. (617) 726-6320 



-321- 



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-• 3. 


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X 





THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATlOri 

JAMES F WALSH 

November 7, 1984 



Ms . Nan Stein 
Civil Rights Specialist 
GBRAC ^ 

27 Cedar S.treet^x^'^^ 
We 1 les l^i| M^r-<J2 181 

Dear Miss-^tein: 




Attached per our previous discussion, please find a master 
schedule for Promotional Ratings to be conducted by the 
Recruitment and Evaluation Unit in 1984-1985 and 1985-1986. 
(In response to your inquiry about promotional ratings from 
April 15, 1984 to September 1, 1984, please be advised that 
only two positions, the Headmaster of Boston Latin Academy 
and the Media Specialist of the Audio Visual Department were 
fully screened and rated) . 

Please be advised that the School Committee recently passed 
an order which mandates any acting position approved by the 
School Committee be posted for promotional rating within ten 
(10) days. Therefore, there will be adjustments within this 
master schedule. 

You will note on page 2 of Victor Mclnnis' memorandum that 
the rating of Department Heads, Development Officers, and 
Registrars is contingent upon legal proceedings identifying 
their bargaining unit. If such information is not available 
the positions would be bypassed temporarily. Thus, we would 
begin with some of the positions under Section G on page 3 - 
positions initially scheduled for 1985-1986. 

If you have any questions in this regard, please feel free to call. 

Sincerely, 



HfrttA^ 



i2S F. Walsh 
ipJaty Superintendent 
(ance and Administration 



em 
attachment 



-323- 

26COUPTSTPEET BOSTON tvliSSACh, _ j2-0.i. 726-62C: ?/• =500 -.RrAP.t? 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON Fl3^:C schools 



1 .1! • if; •> ■>■ 



October 4, 1984 



MEMORANDUM | 



TO: Dr. James Walsh, Deputy Superintendent 
Finance and Administration 



FROM: V. Mclnnis 



/^^ 



A 



SUBJECT: Master Schedule for Promotional Ratings to be conducted 
by the Recruitment and Evaluation Unit 



Current Status and Recommended Order for Conducting Ratings 

A. The following nineteen (19) promgtional ratings are currently 
posted via Personnel Circulars (applications for these ratings 
are arriving at the Recruitment and Evaluation Unit): 

Senior Program Director - Computer Technology Development 

Manager - Department of Student Support Services 

Senior Level Advisor - Early Childhood/Elementary SPED Programs 

Senior Level Advisor - High School SPED Programs 

Senior Level Advisor - Interdistrlct Collaborative Programs 

Coordinator, Impact II Teacher Networking Program 

Teacher Specialist - Elementary Physical Education 

Health Education Coordinator 

Assistant Business Manager - Expenditures 

Alternative School Coordinator - Madison Park High School 

Project Director - Alternative Programs 

Materials Support Specialist/Teacher 

Clinical Coordinator - Cluster Program 

Senior Coordinator - Cluster Program 



■i-: C: .= • ■•-•:■•:' iCSrOfv M/-'>SAC'-..iET-i xji-^S, • •'. ■• 726-6600 



-2- 



Program Director - Social Studies 

Coordinator - External Grants 

Senior Coordinator - External Grants 

Occupational Development Specialist 

Coordinator - Bilingual/Multicultural Education Resources 

B. Obviously, additional staff members are required to bring these 
ratings to conclusion. Up to now, none of the internal work 
required has been performed on these nineteen(19) ratings since 
an additional forty-four (44) Personnel Circulars for other non- 
rated positions have been developed since September 1, 1984 — 
total 63 (19 + 44) circulars with myself and one secretary (full 
time) and one secretary (part time). 

C. After these nineteen ratings are consummated it is recommended 
that the ratings for Principalship in approximately thirteen 
(13) middle and elementary schools and Headmaster in five (5) 
high schools be conducted. 

D. Then ratings for fifteen (15) Assistant Principalships would 
be conducted. 

E. Other school-based ratings would then follow: 

(1) 28 Assistant Headmasters 

(2) 13 Guidance Counselors 

(3) 99 Department Heads 

(4) 14 Developmental Officers (2 in special schools) 

(5) 15 Registrars 

(6) 20 Directors of Instruction 

NOTE: Positions next to (3), (4), and (5) above will be rated in 
this order contingent upon identification of their bargain- 
ing unit status. If such information is not available at 
the scheduled time of rating, these positions will be 
bypassed temporarily until bargaining unit status is deter- 
mined. 

(7) 1 Clinical Coordinator - Burke High School 

(8) 3 Administrative Assistants - East Boston High 

Madison Park High 
Latin Academy 

(9) 1 Coordinator/Director - South Boston High 

(10) 1 SecuLity Coordinator - South Boston High 

(11) 2 Coordinators - Copley Square iligh 

Madison Park High 

(12) 1 Student Affairs Coordinator - English High 

(13) 1 Assistant Director - Madison Park High 

(14) 1 Business Agent - HHHORC 

(15) 1 Cluster Administrator - HHHORC 

(16) 2 Program Directors - HHHORC 



-325- 



- 3 - 



(17) 1 Specialist - HHHORC 

(18) 2 Job Supervisors - Boston High School 

(19) 1 Project Director - King Middle School 

(20) 1 Assistant/Elementary - Agassiz School 

(21) 1 Teacher-in-Charge - Carter 'School 

(22) 1 Senior Program Director - McKinley School 

(23) 7 Assistant Program Directors - McKinley School 

(24) 1 Project Director - Boston Prep 

(25) 1 Program Advisor - Tileston School 

F. The following District Office positions would be rated (may vary 
as a result of possible consolidation of districts). 

(1) 3 vJommunity Superintendents - Districts 1, 3, 4 

(2/ / Administrative Assistants - Districts 1, 2, 2, j, 6, 9 

(3) 1 Coordinator - District 4 

G. Central Administrative positions would be rated in the following 
order during the 1985-1986 school year: 

Office of Deputy Superintendent/Curriculum and Instruction 

1 Program Director - Title VII 

1 Specialist - Title VII 

1 Senior Advisor - High Schools 

Department of Chapter I Programs 

5 Assistant Directors 

Institute for Professional Development 

1 Manager 

1 Senior Coordinator 

1 Coordinator 

Office of Instructional Services 

1 Senior Curriculum Advisor 

4 Program Directors 

1 Senior Advisor 

1 Coordinator 

Bilingual Department 

4 Bilingual Coordinators 

1 Administrative Assistant 

1 Junior Specialist 

1 Lau Coordinator 

2 Lau Specialists 



-326- 



- 4 - 

Testing and Evaluation Unit 

1 Manager 

1 Junior Analyst 

1 Systems Specialist 

1 Evaluation Specialist 

Adult Education and Recreational Activities 

1 Director 

1 Coordinating Supervisor 

1 Junior Coordinator 

Office of Senior Officer-Student Support Services 

1 Staff Assistant 

2 Special Education Monitors 
1 Project Director 

4 Program Advisors 

1 Referral and Assessment Coordinator 

Middle School Student Support Services 

1 Program Advisor 

Early Childhood/Elementary Student Support Program 

2 Program Advisors 

Secondary School Student Support Services 
1 Program Advisor 

Compliance/Placement Student Support Services 

1 Assistant Manager 

5 Program Advisors 

1 Senior Coordinator 

Contracted Education Student Support Services 

2 Program Advisors 

1 Junior Specialist 

Education and Employment Services 

1 Transitional Associate 

2 Transitional Assistants 
1 Coordinator 



-327- 



-5- 



Offlce of Deputy Superintendent/School Operations 

1 Senior Program Director 

1 Director of Attendance Services 

1 Coordinator 

1 Staff Assistant 

Facilities Management 

2 Assistant Managers - Dield Operations 
1 Chief Structural Engineer 

1 Assistant Manager 

1 Senior Engineer 

1 Specialist 

1 Project Director 

1 Program Director 

School Safety Services 

1 Safety Chief 

1 Administrative Assistant 

1 Coordinator of Investigation and Discipline 

1 Senior Safety Coordinator 

Office of Superintendent 

1 Senior Program Coordinator 
1 Coordinator 

Office of Senior Officer - Implementation 

External Liaison Unit 

1 Director 

1 Junior Specialist 

1 Monitoring Information Specialist 

2 Information Officers 

Student Services Unit 

1 Director 

1 Operations Assignment Coordinator 

4 Assignment/Transfer Specialists 



-328- 



-6- 



Transportation Unit 

1 Director 

1 Assistant Director 

6 Transportation Officers 

Records Management Unit 

1 Director 

1 Systems Analyst 

1 Programmer/Analyst 

1 Data Control Specialist 

Office of Deputy Superintendent/Finance and Administration 

1 Senior Program Director 

2 Junior Specialists 

Office of the Business Manager 

2 Assistant Business Managers 

3 Coordinators 

Department of Information Systems Development 

1 Manager 

1 Assistant Manager 

2 Project Leaders 

2 Unit Leaders 

1 Senior Coordinator 

1 Junior Analyst 

1 Program Director 

1 Analyst 

Department of Personnel and Labor Relations 

3 Junior Specialists 

4 Unit Leaders 

1 Senior Specialist 

1 Specialist 

1 Junior An ■ lyst 

2 Senior Coordinators 



-329- 



- 7 - 



Office of Budget Management 

1 Budget Chief 

2 Program Analysts 

1 Senior External Funds Coordinator' 

1 External Funds Coordinator 

2 Senior Coordinators 
1 Coordinator 

1 Junior Specialist 



II TENTATIVE SCHEDULE 1984-1985 

October - November - December 1984 

Senior Program Director - Computer Technology Development 

Manager - Department of Student Support Services 

Senior Level Advisor - Early Childhood/Elementary SPED Programs 

Senior Level Advisor - High School SPED Programs 

Senior Level Advisor - Interdistrict Collaborative Programs. 

Coordinator, Impact II Teacher Networking Program 

Teacher Specialist - Elementary Physical Education 

Health Education Coordinator 

Assistant Business Manager - Expenditures 

Alternative School Coordinator - Madison Park High School 

Project Director - Alternative Programs 

Materials Support Specialist/Teacher 

Clinical Coordinator - Cluster Program 

Senior Coordinator - Cluster Program 

Program Director - Social Studies 

Coordinator - External Grants 

Senior Coordinator - External Grants 

Occupational Development Specialist 

Coordinator - Bilingual/Multicultural Education Resources 

5 Headmasters 
13 Principals 

December - January - February 1984-85 

13 Assistant Principals 
20 Directors of Instruction 
28 Assistant Headmasters 
13 Guidance Counselors 
1 Clinical Coordinator - Burke High School 
3 Administrative Assistants — East Boston High 

Madison Park High 
Latin Academy 
1 Coordinator/Director - South Boston High 

1 Security Coordinator - South Boston High 

2 Coordinators - Copley Square High 

Madison Park High 



-330- 



- 8 - 



February - March - April 1985 

99 Department Heads 

1 Student Affairs Coordinator - fenglish High 

1 Assistant Director - Madison P^rk High 

1 Business Agent - HHHORC 

1 Cluster Administrator - HHHORC 

2 Program Directors - HHHORC 
1 Specialist - HHHORC 

4 Community Superintendents 
7 Administrative Assistants 

1 Coordinator 

April - May - June 1985 

14 Development Officers 

15 Registrars 

2 Job Supervisors - Boston High School 
1 Project Director - King Middle School 
1 Assistant/Elementary - Agassiz School 
1 Teacher-in-Charge - Carter School 

1 Senior Program Director - McKinley School 

7 Assistant Program Directors - McKinley School 

1 Project Director - Boston Prep 

1 Program Advisor - Tileston School 

III Requirements 

A. In order to conduct promotional ratings according to the above 

schedule additional resources (personnel and space) will be required 
as follows: 

1. Personnel: 

a. Fill current professional vacancy 

b. One additional person experienced in the conduct of 
promotional ratings should be assigned to this unit. 
Experienced persons and current assignments are as 
follows: 

Nancy Dickerson - Ass't. Principal, John Marshall 
John Grasso - Ass't Headmaster, Boston Latin School 
John Young - Ass't Principal, Holland School 
Joseph Carey - Retired 

c. Two additional professional staff who can be trained to 
perform the following necessary functions: 



-331- 



- 9 - 



1. reviewing transcripts 

2. preparing checklists 

3. checking resumes 

4. assisting screening committees 

5. learning the prerequisite qualifications for each position 

6. explaining prerequisite qualifications to interested 
parties 

7. preparation of Personnel Circulars 

8. determining eligible candidates 

9. notifying appropriate candidates of their ineligibility 
and reasons therefor 

10. handling letters of appeal from ineligible candidates 

11. responding to inquiries (oral and written) regarding the 
rating process 

12. counselling applicants 

13. assisting the Recruitment Specialist with the advertizing 
process (i.e. qualifications, job descriptions and salaries 
of positions). 

14. identifying collective bargaining unit or managerial 
placement including groups, classes, steps, etc. 

15. preparing packets of application materials to each candidate* 

16. determining certif lability of out-of-state applicants 

17. preparing letters of regret 

18. cross referencing files of applicants for multiple positions 

19. adhering to strict timelines for dissemination of all 
pertinent information to screening committee chairpersons 

20. reference checking 

d. Two additional clerks who have good typing and filing skills 
as well as human relations skills. 

2. Adherence to this schedule will be an enormous operation 

especially because numerous ratings for different positions 
will be carried on simultaneously. Therefore, there is the 
basic need for additional space if only to maintain order, 
reduce confusion, keep applicants' credentials separate, etc. 
in addition to accomodating the additional staff. 

It is requested that the two offices currently adjoining the 
Recruitment and Evaluation Unit be utilized by Recruitment and 
Evaluation for these ratings. Desks would be removed and re- 
placed by tables to provide staff with the necessary additional 
working space. 



-332- 



- 10 - 



'IV 



Implementation of this 1984-85 rating schedule (275 positions) will 
be a massive, unprecedented undertaking which will assuredly require 
future refinement and ongoing adjustments.. Again, to ensure success- 
ful implementation of this operation, staff and space needs as expressed 
above are basic and absolutely essential. 



rt 



-333- 



October 9, 1984 



ORDERED, That no acting appointments to permanent vacancies 
shall be made except for compelling reasons. 
No permanent vacancy shall be filled on an acting basis 
for a period exceeding six months. Any such acting 
appointment approved by the School Committee shall be put 
forward for promotional rating not longer than 10 school days 
following School Committee approval. 



The order was approved by general consent, the follov/ing- 

na'med members indicating their approval: 

Ms. Browne, Mr. Burke, Mr. Casper, Mr. Grady, Mr. Marchione, 

Mr. McCluskey, Mrs. McGuire, Mr. Nucci, Mr. O'Bryant, Mr. O'Reilly, 

Mrs. Owens-Hicks, Mrs. Romero and Mrs. Walsh-Tomasini 



lAttest 




-33^- 






. > ; 1 71 



bh U 



r- 1 



i 1 I 



c Cii / Ur BUCDlON 



\\3, DOSTorf lA #/ 

\V 1930. ^V^' 



BOSTON -USLiC SCHOOLS 
DEPAaiMtiNT OF PERSONN'EL A\D LA30= 
ViANAGEP 
IDA WHITE 



^El-::o;^s 



October 10, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: Ida White, Manager 

FROM: Carlo Abrams, Recruitment Specialist 

SUBJECT: Progress Report 



l^ 



I. Reviewed recruitment procedure, identified two (2) major 
areas since the previous progress report dated April l8, 
1984 for additional improvement in the Recruitment func- 
tion. 

A. Development of Source indicator 

A form that indicates the source of referral 
of the applicant (See attachment A) 

B. Affinnative Action Referral Form 
Designed to track the results of Minorities 
recommended by the recruiter for administra- 
tive positions. (This form will be used for 
the current year I984-85 upon departmental 
approval). (See attachment B) 

II. Analysis of Recruitment Data 

A. Breakdown of teachers interviewed 

A total of one hundred and seventy-two (172) 
candidates were interviewed between August 1, 
1984 and October 10 for teaching positions 
within the Boston Public Schools. 



-??^- 



Analysis of Recruitment Data C continued; 



The breakd( 


Dwn 


is 


as follows: 










B) AREA I 






RACE 


CATEGORY 






POSITION 


BLACK 


WHITE 


ASIAN 


HISPANIC 


AMERICAN INDIAN 


TOTAL 


Vocational 
Education 


1 




in 


1 







. 


16 


Reading 


3 




7 







• 







10 


Science 


5 




7 







1 





13 


Math 


4 




6 







1 





11 


Bilingual 


17 




2 


16 




11 





46 


Mono-SPED 


8 




21 













29 


Bll-SPED 


2 







2 




23 





27 


Elem.Ed. 


20 












_0 





20 


TOTAL 


60 




57 


19 




36 





172 



Total number of applicants interviewed = 172 



-316- 



C. Loss of Potential Teachers in the Special Education 

Subject Area 

Prom March, I984 to August, 1984 the recruiter had on file 
a total of one hundred (100) applications of prospective 
Special Education teachers interested in employment within 
the Boston Public Schools. However, due to the inability 
to offer the candidates reasonable assurance of employment 
the entire one hundred (100) prospective candidates took 
Jobs with other school systems. 

It was reported that we had approximately eighty-six (86) 
vacancies in the Special Education area. 

The breakdown of candidates lost is as follows: 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

BILINGUAL SPANISH BLACK WHITE 

6 13 81 

Based upon the inability to offer employment assurance to 
the above candidates the recruiter interviewed and referred 
fifty-six (56) new candidates to the Special Education Depart- 
ment between August, 1984 and October, 1984. 

D. Current Applicant Statur; 

To date there are seventeen (17) resumes on file in the 
Special Education subject area. 

Pour (4) of whom are minorities and will be recommended 
for employment pending existing vacancies. 

Pifteen (15) resumes are on file for candidates that are 
seeking employment as Bilingual Education teachers. 

The breakdown is as follows : 

(3) Spanish Teacher Total; 1 Elementary, 2 Social Studies 

(7) ESL Teachers Seven (7) Science resumes are 

on file; five (5) of whom have 
been interviewed 
4 Spanish / 

1 Haitian Twelve (12) Reading resumes are 

1 Cambodian on file; four (4) of whom have 

1 Chinese been interviewed 

(1) Laotian Teacher 



-337- 



(2) 


Aides 


(1) 


Cape Verdean 


(1) 


Chinese 



D. Ciirrent Applicant Status (continued) 

Seven (7) Math resximes are on file; 
two (2) of whom have been Interviewed 
The candidates above that have been 
Interviewed pending existing vacancies 

The above applicants will be interviewed in conjunction with the 
Bilingual Education Department. 

Interview and Counseling j 

To date a total of one hundred and one (101) prospective candidates 
have been interviewed and advised of employment opportunities with- 
in the Boston Public Schools. These candidates were screened for 
administrative professional positions and Para-Professional positions 
and referred to the proper departments for interviews. 

III. Recruitment Activities to Date 

A. Advertising 

To date recruitment efforts for identifying staff have been 
as follows: 

-Advertising In fifteen (15) local newspapers 
(see attachment C of local newspapers used) 

-Advertising in the Boston Globe 

-Advertising with the Massachusetts Division of 

Employment Security 

-The Bilingual Job-line 

-The New Boston Herald 

-PSA on Radio Stations (WBZ, WHDH, WMDO, WZIO(Hispanic Radio 

Station) 

In addition, contact has been made with approximately sixty (60) 
colleges, and one hundred (100) professional community organiza- 
tions. 

B. Authorized Travel 

To date, the recruiter attended nine (9) conventions 
for recruitment purposes. 



-338- 



B. Authorized Travel (continued) 



The breakdown is as follows: 



DATES 
March 1^ 

April 18, 19 



April 23, 2^, 
26, 27 



April 25 
May 24 
June 19 
June 21 

June 28 
Jlily 25 



NAMES 

Harvard University 
Job Pair 

State Wide Conference 
for Teachers 



Council for Exceptional 
Children (CEC) 

Howard University 
Job Fair 

Minority Network 
Convention 

Spanish Public Affair 
Networking Meeting 

Association of 
Minorities & Adminis- 
tration Convention 

Bilingual Programs 
Information Meeting 

Job Fair for Substitute 
Teachers in con nction 
with the Mass. Division 
of Employment 



LOCATIONS 



Harvard University 



Emmanuel College 



Convention Center 
Washington, D. C. 

Howard University 
Washington, D. C. 

Roxbury Community College 
Boston, MA 

1 Beacon Street 
Boston, MA 

Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 



University of Massachusetl 
Boston, MA 

Harriet Tubman House 
Boston, MA 



-^?q- 



-5- 

IV. Recruitment Activities for the Current Academic Year 

19«^ "1905 

It Is the recruiter's Intention pending departmental 
approval to be Involved in the following activities 
to Increase the pool of qualified candidates for em- 
ployment opportunities within the Boston Public Schools, 

A. -Attend Campus career days in and out of the 
Greater Boston area 

-Set-up csireer days in targeted areas In and out 
of the Boston area 

-Interface and network with other school systems. 

V. Ad vertising for Academic Year igB^t -1985 

A. -Pending departmental approval the following 
publications will be used for positions that 
require aggressive minority recruitment or 
for positions that need specialized skills. 

-Education Week 

-Computer World 

-Hispanic Times 

-Black Enterprise 

-Black Collegian 

-Chronicle for Higher Education 

-Affirmative Action Register 



-3^0- 



TRANSPORTATION 



-3^1- 



TRANSPORTATION 



ORDER May 10, 1975, pages 80-83 
SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



The May 10, 1975 Order includes general 
remarks about the provision of 
transportation. These remarks are more in 
the nature of an explanation of the need for 
transportation than of specific instructions 
to Boston. 

Monitoring has concentrated on concerns 
about the adequacy, reliability, and safety 
of transportation services, as these 
concerns have emerged during implementation 
rather than as the Orders have addressed 
them. 

Partial Compliance 

A series of recommendations were made in 
Report No. 3 (Volume I, pages 96-97). These 
recommendations addressed problems related 
to the safety and reliability of the 
transportation (excluding special needs) 
provided to desegregated schools. 
Monitoring had determined that the 
arrangements for identifying and following- 
up on complaints by parents were inadequate 
to determine the precise scope of safety and 
reliability problems, and the extent to 
which they were addressed. 

Monitoring also foupd that improvements had 
been made in the contract for transportation 
services and that a systematic effort had 
been made, by the Department of 
Implementation, to be in daily contact with 
schools to determine whether transportation 
service was adequate. 



-3^3- 



An attempt was made in September to 
determine whether the recommendations made 
in Report No. 3 had been addressed. To date 
we have received no further information (see 
attachment) . 

Related issues for the use of safety 
personnel on selected bus runs are covered 
in the section on Safety and Security. 
(Report No. 3, Recommendation 6). 



OONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATIC»IS 



An ongoing effort has been made, by the 
Department of Implementation, to improve 
transportation services. This is commended . 

Monitors have not been able to determine 
whether improvements have been made in the 
development and implementation of a system 
of contractor and driver accountability. 

Recommendations 1-5 from Report No. 3 are 
repeated below: 

1. Boston should develop and implement a 
complaint management precedure to: 

a. identify trouble spots, and 

b. identify and follow up inadequate 
responses from the contractor. 

2. The Transportation Unit should revise 
its complaint log forms to require the 
contractor to: 

a. identify by name the driver involved 
in the alleged infraction; 

b. identify the bus run by name; 

c. indicate whether substantiated 
infractions involved a recent change 
in route assignment and/or 
tardiness/ absentee ism; 

d. Develop a standardized list of 
complaints and responses on the log, 
for better accounting and 
accountability. 



-3^^- 



3. Boston should continue to press the bus 
contractor to make complaint 
investigation and management a full-time 
staff responsibility with significant 
authority. 

4. Boston should undertake, in conjunction 
with parents, a study to determine what, 
if any, liabilities are associated with 
MBTA and school bus transportation and 
recommend solutions. 

5. Boston should ensure that bus drivers 
receive training in the laws that define 
and prohibit child abuse and sexual 
harassment. It should revise its 
complaint procedures to ensure that 
educational administrators and other 
mandated reporters comply with Section 
51a of Chapter 119 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws ("child abuse law"). 



-3^5- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATIC»J REPORT #4 

TRANSPORTATION 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



1. Letter from Judith Taylor to Arthur Gilbert 



-347- 




Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunity h -^ 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

1385 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
September 26, 198^ 



o -'^H 



Mr. Arthur Gilbert 

Director, Transportation Unit 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 02108 

Dear Mr. Gi Ibert: 

The Department of Education is commencing the fourth round of 
monitoring under the Orders of Disengagement of December 23, 1982. 

As you are aware, the Department is monitoring compliance with the 
standards set forth in pages 80-83 of the Student Desegregation 
Plan, dated May 10, 1975- 

Our last report (submitted on July 15, 198'») made several findings 
regarding transportation. 

• The School Department still does not have a formal 
procedure for tracking complaints and identifying 
inadequate responses from the contractor. 

• The School Department did not yet have a report from 
the contractor regarding its efforts to reduce changes 
of route assignments. 

•• Contractor-related problems such as driver absenteeism 
and tardiness appear to be increasing, but there is 
little the School Department can do without the 
contractor's coordination. 

• The School Department has made a commitment to a bus 
safety program for those safety problems resulting from 
lacl< of student discipline, etc. 

• There are several instances of alleged sexual abuse on 
r schoolbuses. 



-^ijR- 



The report made a number of recommendations regarding 
transportation. 

1. The School Department should develop and implement a 
complaint management procedure to (a) identify trouble 
spots, and (b) identify and follow up inadequate 
responses from the contractor. 

2. The Transportation Unit should revise its complaint log 
form to require the contractor to (a) identify by name 
the driver Involved in the alleged infraction, (b) 
identify the bus run by name, (c) indicate whether 
substantiated infractions involved a recent change in 
route assignment and/or tardiness/absenteeism, and (d) 
develop a standardized list of complaints and 
responses. 

3. Boston should continue to press the contractor to make 
complaint investigation and management a full-time 
staff responsibility with significant authority. 

k. Boston should ensure that bus drivers receive training 
in the laws that define and prohibit child abuse and 
sexual harassment. It should revise its complaint 
procedures to ensure that educational administrators 
and other mandated reporters comply with Section 51a of 
Chapter 119 of the Massachusetts General Laws ("child 
abuse law")* 

5. Boston should implement a plan for student safety. 

For this monitoring period we are requesting that you develop an 
"action plan" with activities, responsible staff and timelines for 
fulfilling the recommendations listed above. The action plan will 
be the basis of any further monitoring deemed necessary by the 
Court. 

I will call you to schedule a visit to review the action plan. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely, 




cc: Robert Spi I lane 
John Coakley 
Charles Glenn 



-3^9- 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



-351- 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



A. 



ORDER 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



Safety and Security orders are 
"Further Order Concerning 
September 5, 1975. (Pages 1-5) 



contained in 
Security" , 



City defendants (Mayor School 
Superintendent) must use law 
officers (State, City of Boston, 
S. Marshals) to prevent 



Committee, 

enforcement 

M.D.C., U. 



1. crowds of three or more from gathering 
within 100 feet of any public school; 
no threatening or noisy conduct. 

2. crowds of three or more on or adjacent 
to school bus pick-up or drop-off sites 
or M.B.T.A. stops, in a threatening 
manner. (Pages 1-2) 

Compliance 

The efficient service and comprehensive 
coverage provided by the Boston Public 
School Department of Safety Services through 
the Boston School Police has obviated the 
need for the Boston Police or others to 
in Schools to maintain safety and 
While there have been two 
in May, 1984, in which small 
crowds have gathered within 100 feet of a 
school, the combined efforts of school 
administrators and Boston School Police have 
dispersed these groups quickly and without 
further incident. Other than these two 
incidents, there have been no other reported 
incidents in nearl^ two years of monitoring 
of hostile crowds gathering outside of 
schools to threaten the safety of students 
or staff. The two incidents in question 
involved (1) a small crowd gathering at the 
McKay School in East Boston over an incident 



intervene 
security, 
instances 



-3^; 3- 



B. 



SUMMARY 



which occurred involving a White student and 
a Black student, and (2) a group of White 
parochial school males using racial slurs 
and throwing rocks at students in the 
playground of the Rogers Middle School, 
after some name calling between Rogers' 
students and the parochial students. 
School Bus Safety 

Because of some reported problems both on 
school buses and at school bus pick-up 
sites, Boston has instituted a new program 
of bus safety which, among other things, 
provides for bus attendants to board the bus 
at the first pick-up stop for some 
elementary and middle school bus runs which 
have had a history of problems. The Boston 
School Police mobile units have also been 
deployed to monitor many pick-up sites where 
problems have occurred, and have the 
capacity to respond rapidly to other 
problems reported along school bus routes. 
All school bus drivers are instructed to 
stop their buses and call the safety service 
emergency line in the event of specific 
kinds of problems and disruptions. While 
there have been some problems at school bus 
stops involving trespassing on school buses, 
or neighborhood arguments boiling over into 
fights, there have been no reported 
incidents of hostile, racially motivated 
disruptive crowds gathering at bus stops 
during nearly two years of monitoring. 



City defendants shall exclude from school 
buildings all except assigned students, 
teachers, governmental employees conducting 
business, and persons authorized by U.S. 
District Court including CCC (CPC) and Home 
and School Association officers, unless a 
prior appointment has been authorized by the 
building administrator (or his/her 
designee). (Pages 2-3) 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



While most schools carefully monitor all 
people entering schools by posting 
attendants with sign-in books at main 
entrances, not all visitors are required to 
have previous appointments. In most cases 
non-parent visitors must follow a protocol 



-35V 



C. SUMMARY 



for entering schools which requires that 
they get specific permission to enter a 
school from the Deputy Superintendent for 
school operations. However, some parents 
visit schools without a specific appointment 
and some schools encourage parents to "drop 
in" when they wish. However, these 
unscheduled visits are no longer associated 
with disruption of desegregation within 
schools; this has been virtually non- 
existent during the entire monitoring 
period. 

Trespassing 

In this regard the safety issue of primary 
concern is trespassing by non-students (or 
students attending other schools) at certain 
schools. Some schools such as Madison Park, 
English High and HHORC, have a continuing 
problem with trespassers, despite 
substantial School Police coverage. The 
major problem, especially at Madison Park is 
the number of doors to the outside (the open 
campus idea) which cannot be locked because 
of fire code regulations. Although the 
reported incidents of trespassing at all 
three schools are low, there is strong 
reason to believe that at Madison Park, at 
least, many trespassing incidents are not 
reported. According to one Boston School 
Police Officer trespassing at Madison Park 
is an "everyday occurrence," and, because of 
the number of outside doors, almost 
impossible to completely control. Most 
trespassers, when discovered, are simply 
escorted off the premises; others may be 
arrested if they refuse to leave, disrupt or 
have been caught before. However, the 
continuation of the trespassing problem at 
schools such as Madison Park, does little to 
mitigate the perception of these schools as 
unsafe, especially to students attending 
them who are aware of the constant 
trespassing problem. 



If law enforcement personnel enter a 
building, persons in groups, except CCC 
(CPC) monitors, shall leave. City 
defendants shall arrange for removal of 
unauthorized people. 



-355- 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Organized groups who come to schools to 
disrupt or who are associated with school 
disruptions, has not been a problem during 
the 2-year monitoring period. Boston School 
Police have been very effective and 
efficient in removing unauthorized people 
from schools, and because of their rapid 
response capacity, would be effective in 
cases of crowd control and dispersal, should 
they occur. (Page 3) 



D. 



SUMMARY 



Parent and community meetings shall be 
scheduled only outside normal school 
hours. A draft of rules governing use of 
school buildings after school hours shall be 
filed September 16, 1975. (Pages 3-4) 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Most parent and community meetings occur 
after school hours. However, some meetings 
of parents occur during school hours. The 
need to exclude such meetings because of 
their tendency to disrupt or incite 
disruption no longer appears to exist. 



E. 



SUMMARY 



City defendants shall issue photo I.D.'s for 
governmental employees who, in performing 
their jobs, enter Boston Public Schools and 
persons authorized by the U. S. District 
Court including CCC (CPC) and officers of 
the Home and School Association. The people 
shall only be admitted upon showing photo 
I.D. 's. (Page 4) 



FINDINGS Non-Compliance 



While Boston did issue the photo I.D.'s 
described above, this is no longer a 
practice. The elimination of photo I.D.'s 
occurred more than five years ago. State 
and other agencies are still required to 
clear visits through the Deputy 
Superintendent for school operations, but no 
photo I.D.'s are issued. The present need 
for such I.D.'s for government employees is 
questionable. 



-356- 



SUMMARY 

The mayor shall submit daily reports on the 
number and deployment of law enforcement 
personnel. (Pages 4-5) 

FINDINGS Non-Compliance 

Although the City of Boston neither deploys 
Police Officers to cover public schools nor 
submits daily reports on deployment of 
Police Officers, the Boston Public Schools' 
Department of Safety Services provides 
yearly reports on staff deployment with 
updates as needed (see page 393). There 
are now 91 officers employed in the 
department of Safety Services police 
force. Each officer has a primary 
assignment to a school or cruiser, and many 
have secondary or back-up assignments as 
needed. 

The Department of Safety Services maintains 
open lines of communication and cooperation 
with the Boston Police Department, the MDC 
Police and the MBTA Police. In fact, Boston 
School Police receive their training at the 
Boston Police Academy, and the ties between 
these two organizations are strong. 



G. 



SUMMARY 



City defendants are not prohibited from 
taking other measures to ensure the safety 
of students and staff. (Page 5) 

FINDINGS Compliance 

A review of the present safety and security 
practices and procedures enacted by Boston 
clearly indicates that Boston has gone well 
beyond the Court Orders in trying to 
maintain safe and secure schools. In 
particular: 

1. They have developed their own Department 
of Safety Services employing 91 school 
police officers; 

2. They have recently re-established school 
bus attendants on many elementary and 
middle school buses; 



-357- 



3. They have set up many alternative 
education programs in an attempt to 
serve better those students who are 
having academic and/or other problems 
and are more likely to be disruptive; 

4. They have attempted to strengthen the 
Code of Discipline by enacting 
"Standards of Behavior" — which 
establishes a stronger policy on weapons 
and violent acts and a more stringent 
policy on suspensions and expulsions. 

Boston appears to be implementing: (1) 
the new "Standards of Behavior," (2) 
the new Bus Safety Plan, and (3) the 
expansion of alternative education 
progreims, in good faith and with 
reasonable effectiveness. 



1 1 . OONCLUS IONS/RECOMMENDATI (XIS 



As was reported in Report No. 1, most of the 
specific orders relating to safety and 
security, have a marginal relationship with 
the safety and security issues of prime 
importance to Boston today. Rather than 
disruptive anti-desegregation forces being 
the prime desegregation safety concern, the 
major concerns for safety and security 
involve issues of crimes (robbery, theft, 
assaults), the spilling over of neighborhood 
problems into schools (altercations), 
substance abuse, and disruptiveness among 
students who appear not be be benefiting 
from traditional academic programs. While 
these safety concerns are characteristic of 
many large urban school systems, there is a 
clear relationship between these problems 
and desegregation. Many parents, 
particularly middle class White and Black 
parents who have other educational options 
will not send their children to schools 
which they perceive as unsafe, regardless of 
the impact of their absence on school 
desegregation. Boston, therefore, has the 
responsibility to make all schools safe and 
secure to insure the highest level of 
desegregation achievable in each school. 
There is compelling evidence that Boston is 
beginning to seriously address this 
responsibility. The number of reported 
incidents for September-October 1984 as 



-358- 



compared to September-October 1983 indicates 

an almost equal number of reported 
incidents. 

Total Reported Incidents 

High 213 

September-October 1983 = 283 - Middle 50 

Elementary 7 

Other 13 



High 197 
September-October 1984 = 286 - Middle 74 

Elementary 17 

The major beneficiary of any improvment in 
school safety climate is the high school 
level. English High School, while it is 
still first among high schools in reported 
incidents, is down from 97 incidents 
reported for September-October, 1983, to 39 
reported for September-October, 1984. This 
represents a major change from previous 
safety patterns there, and appears to be an 
indication that the recent reorganization of 
that school is having a positive impact on 
school climate and safety. On the other 
hand Madison Park High has almost doubled 
its reported incidents when comparing the 
same time span. 

Madison Park 

September-October 1983 = 18 incidents 
September-October 1984 = 33 incidents 

Incidents reported at the middle school level 
have increased: 

September-October 1983 = 50 incidents 
September-October 1984 = 74 incidents 

Some of these increases may be indicative of 
the strong emphasis being placed on safety 
issues and reporting responsibilities by the 
Superintendent and Deputy Superintendent for 
school operations. A workshop was held 
(August 15-17) for school administrators 
covering, among other things, the new 
"Standards of Behavior" and the new school 
bus safety procedures (see page 367 ). 
Numerous memos on proper incident reporting 
and other safety procedures have been 
circulated for more than a year. 



In addition, Boston is beginning to 
seriously address the need for alternative 
education programs for students who are not 
achieving in regular education programs, and 
to provide increased security on school 
buses through the addition of bus attendants 
and other safety procedures. The fruits of 
those efforts are not yet fully apparent, 
but in the schools visited by this monitor, 
administrators seem very pleased with the 
new bus safety procedures, especially the 
bus attendants; some have even expressed a 
desire for additional attendants. 

Boston also seems to be making an impact on 
the problem of weapons in schools. The new 
"Standards of Behavior", which were 
disseminated to all students and their 
parents (to be signed and returned) and 
explained in assemblies and other meetings, 
has very strong and specific language on the 
possession and use of weapons. While 27% of 
the September-October 1984 incidents 
reported involve weapons as compared to 30% 
reported for November 1983 through March 
1984, Boston appears to be going through a 
transition period as more students begin to 
take seriously the new policy or face long- 
term suspensions or expulsion. It is vital 
that Boston continue to press for the 
exclusion of weapons from schools if the 
safety climate within schools is to 
improve. One very positive sign in this 
regard, is that administrators and Boston 
School Police report that most of the tips 
which they receive about weapons in schools 
come from students — most of whom do not 
want weapons in their schools and are 
willing to report them when they see or know 
about them. 

While Boston has yet to achieve an 
acceptable level of safety and security in 
all of its schools, improvements have begun 
through the initiation of new safety and 
discipline policies and procedures, and 
through examples such as English High 
School. Boston needs to continue work on 
the improvement of safety and discipline at 
specific schools such as English High, 
Madison Park High, Brighton High, Hyde Park 
High, the HHORC, Cleveland Middle, Mary 
Curley Middle, King Middle and others. Some 
of these schools need to develop and 
institute school safety plans; these plans 

-360- 



wUhitaischool ^""^ development of school- 
alternlMvSo . Programs and other 
alternatives to suspension, preventative 
deployment of staff, increased "^couSSetlinl 
and referral services for troubled «n^ 

unresponsive students and m^5? • !" 
attention t.« o^^iJuents and more specific 
attention to improving the quality and 
appropriateness of instruction. 



-361- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATICW REPORT #4 

SAFETY AND SECURITY 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 

1. Letter (11/02/84) Joseph McDonough to Franklin Banks 

2. One List: School Incidents, September to October, 1984 

3. One List: School Incidents, By Offense 

4. Seventeen Charts: Boston School Incidents on School Property 
and Enroute to and from Schools. 

5. Two Lists: School Incidents, May-June 1984 

6. One List: Department of Safety Services, Staffing 1984-1985 



-363- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPER. NTENDENT 

SCHOOL OPERATIONS 

JOSEPH M MCDONOUGH 



November 2, 1984 



Mr, Franklin F. Banks 
Boston Desegregation Monitor 
Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Dear Mr. Banks: 

In response to your letter dated September 6, 1984, I am enclosing 
the information you requested in regards to the monitoring of 
safety and security and student discipline for the school year. 
I have attempted to respond to your requests in the same format 
as they were presented. 

Please call me at 726-6200 x5331 if I can be of further assistance. 

Sincerely, 





«^ ^' 9^1/Ja-^^.^ L 




Josepfi M. McDonough 
DefKity Superintendent 
School Operations 




JMMrhkl 
Enclosure 



-364- 

?6COURTSIRt-ET BO^'JOK MASSACHU'ih i ^lOPKj^ . .':'6 6?00 f X I 5330 ARf A u 1 7 



11/1/84 

1. School Incident Reports 

Enclosed is a copy of all school incident reports from September 6 
to October 25 , 1984 (Attachment I) . The Department of Records Management 
and Department of Safety Services have developed a comprehensive program 
which permits the recording of incidents and provides the capability 
analysis of incidents by type and location. (Attachment I) 

2. School Bus Safety 

In August, the Boston School Committee approved a Student 
Transportation Safety Plan for the students of tl^ Boston Public 
Schools. The plan provides for the assignment of Transportation 
Attendants to troubled buses at the elementary and middle schx)l levels, 
the determination of safe pick-up and drop-off locations, the training of 
Transportation Attendants, and a bus safety education program for 
students . 

Transportation Attendants are responsible for the maintenance of 
order and safety on the bus to which they are assigned. Attendants are 
selected from the existing school staff i.e. teachers, paraprofessionals, 
lunch monitors. The selection of Transportation Attendants is done l)y 
the principal of the school they will serve. 

Orientation sessions ' for Transportation Attendants have been planned 
for the school year 1984-85. All Transportation Attendants are required 
to attend orientation sessions for training in student management, crisis 
intervention, emergency first aid, and policies and procedures. "IVfo 
sessions have already been completed: the first was held on August 27, 
28, 29, 1984, and the second, held on Oct'.:.>er 20, 1984. In 



-2- 

the event that new Transportation Attendants are hired, orientation sessions 
are planned for their training, as well. These sessions are jointly 
coordinated by the Transportation Unit and the Department of Safety Services 
with the cooperation of ARA Transportation Compary. See Attachment II for 
Student Transportation Safety Plan. 

3. The Alternative Education Programs, designed to encourage students to 
attend school regularly and raise achievement levels have been established in 
the following schools: English, Jamaica Plain, Dorchester, Madison Park, 
South Boston and Charlestown High Schools as well as at Another Course to 
Collie (A.C.C.) and Boston Prep. Alternative Education Programs have also 
been established in the Grover Cleveland and Martin Luther King Jr. Middle 
Schools. In addition to the programs in these schools, middle school students 
of District V may be referred to the Log School, an alternative program housed 
at a separate site. 

The success of the ReCap program at middle school level is evident in the 
increase in the number of middle schools adopting this program during the 
84-85 academic year. 

The primary goal of the Alternative Education Department is to increase 
the participation in programs at all levels. Currently, plans are being made 
to involve such schools as Hyde Park High, East Boston High, Boston Technical 
High in the School-Within-School/Cluster concept. Participation of Timilty 
Middle School, Thompson Middle School and further expansion of the Alternative 
Education program at the Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School is currently 
being explored. The Director of Alternative Education will continue to enlist 
other schools to participate in these and other programs of alternative 
education. 

A written up-date on the expansion of alternative education programs 
serving disruptive students is found in Attachment III. 

-366- 



-3- 

4. Safety, Security, and Discipline 

Orientation sessions dealing with student needs and problems and 
resources available to assist teachers in helping students were held for 
conmunity superintendents , principals Aieadmasters , teachers and staff before 
the opening of school. 

A three day workshop for administrators was held on August 15, 16, 17, 
1984. 

The areas covered during these sessions included: Code of 
Discipline/standards of Behavior; Safety Procedures in School and on Buses; 
Promotion Policy; Curriculum and Instructional Issues; Legal and Hum a n 
Mandates; School Climate; Effective Use of Test Data; Bilingual Issues; 
Special Education; Effective Use of Parent Councils. 

Orientation of teachers and staff is an on-going process throughout the 
school year. The first of these sessions was held on September 5th and 6th, 
and dealt with: student safety, classroom management, student problems and 
resources available to assist teachers in helping them, the Standards of 
Behavior and its presentation to students and parents. 

On the first d^ of school all students were given a copy of the 
Standards of Behavior. Every regulation was explained to the students in 
every classroom. Students were, also, made aware of the differences in 
language and regulations of the Code of Discipline and the Standards of ^ 

0-> 

Behavior. These oral presentations and discussions were held in all schools 

between Septeniber 6th and September 14, 1984, Xsee Attachment TV, pp. 1 - 5). 

The process for disseminating the Standards of Behavior demanded that 

every teacher personally contact the home of every student in his/her class to 

inform parents not only of the Standards of Behavior but to introduce 

himself /herself as the child's teacher and encourage each parent to maintain 

contact with the teacher. The success of this procedure can be measured in 

-367- 
part by the response of parents to the Superintendent's letter which 



-4- 

The Standards of Behavior for the Boston Public Schools was approved by 
the SchDol Committee in July, 1984. In order to inform all parents, 
regardless of their primary language, of these rules, the Standards of 
Behavior was translated into ten languages including Spanish, French/Haitian, 
Chinese, Vietnamese, Portuguese, Italian, Cambodian, Cape Verdean, Laotion, 
and Greek. 

The orientation of all students in all schools was held from September 6 
through 14. These sessions included an explanation of the rules and 
regulations of the Standards of Behavior, the consequences for violation, and 
the right of students and parents. It was enphasized that these procedures 
were mandated, in order to provide the safety and security of the student 
body, (see Attaclment IV , Appendix IV and V). 

Prior to the distribution of the Standards of Behavior parents were 
notified by telephone by teachers and told of the Standards and were asked to 
read them carefully, encouraged to call the schools if they had questions, and 
asked to tBad, sign, and return the Suerintendent's letter. 

The names of students who had not returned the signed letter were 
fon^arded to Principals/lfeadmasters on September 14, so that the school office 
could make a personal contact with homes to remind parents of the Standards of 
Behavior and the Superintendent's letter. On Septeniber 28 the name of any 
student who still had not returned the Superintendent's letter was fon^arded 
to the respective Community District Office for her/har action. As of this 
date approximately 97% of the city's entire student body has returned the 
signed letters. Through telephone contact and/or written communication, 
efforts continue to retrieve all signed acknowledgments of the Standards of 
Behavior. 
5. V7eapons Policy 

The Standards of Behavior contain very explicit rules and regulations 
regardmg the possession of weapons and/or controlled substances. 



E>cpulsion is mandatory in cases of possession of firearms, harming another 
person with a weapon, and using a mock gun in a threatening manner. The 
effect of these provisions is the nuniber evident in the significant and 
continuous decline in incidents involving dangerous weapons when conpared to 
this same period last year. Personnel of the Department of Safety are 
currently being instructed in weapon detection and confiscation. See 
Attachment VI for Standards of Behavior and Superintendent's letter. 

To assist school personnel in identifying student needs and problems and 
contribute to their solution, a program of pairing Schools and Human Service 
Agencies has been established in seventeen schools, five elementary schools, 
five middle schools, and seven high schools. The status report on the Boston 
Student Rjman Services Collaboative is found in Attachment VI. 
6. Parental Involvement 

Besides the initial contact made with every home in regards to the 
Standards of Behavior, parents are notified of any incident involving their 
children and are invited to attend informal conferences to assist in the 
resolution of both academic and behavioral prx3bleras that may arise. 

T-fenbers of the School Parent Council serve on the committee which drafts 
and publishes the school based-rules in each school. The goal of all school 
rules is self-discipline which is the most effective control in learning and 
behavior. Ttese rules are designed, in part, to establish a positive climate 
where learning can take place in a relaxed, safe atmosl^ere \(/hich will make 
schools a desirable place to be. 

The Promotion Policy approved by School Comoiittee on rtovember 29, 1983 
will be implemented this year. Parent workshops are being planned for each 
school in order to explain the standards set forth in this policy and to 
answer any questions parents may have. 

-369- 



7. Incident Reports 

Directions regarding the reporting of school incidents were issued prior 
to the opening of school to all administrators and to all staff during 
in-service sessions on September 5 and 6. All incidents must be reported in a 
timely manner to the Department of Safety Services. Weekly reports of all 
incidents are submitted to the Deputy Superintendent /School Operations. 

Any report of an incident involving disciplinary /administrative action is 
available to authorized School Parent Council representatives. 
See Attachment VIII for Deputy Superintendent's Circular //40, Reporting and 
Release of Incident Data. 

8. Department of Safety Services - Staffing 

In order to assist in the maintenance of safety and security in all 
schools, a staffing plan has been inpleraented by the Department of Safety 
Services and the Deputy Superintendent/School Operations. Eighty schools are 
staffed on a daily basis by safety services personnel. In order to respond to 
needs in schools which do not have a daily need for safety services personnel, 
menbers assigned to a particular school also have contingent assignments in 
neighboring ischools. For detailed pattern of deployment see Attachment IX. 



-370- 



SCHOOL INCIDENTS Septeiriber - October 1984 
( Crimes Against Person and Safety Related) 



HIGH SCHOOLS 




MIDDLE SCHOOLS 




ETfPIFOTARY 




English 


39 


Mary Curley 


16 


Trotter 


3 


Macilscn Park 


33 


King 


12 


McKay 


1 


Brixton 


26 


Cleveland 


8 


Blackstone 


1 


HHORC 


17 


Ihonpson 


7 


O'Heam 


1 


Hyde Park 


16 


Lewenberg 


5 


Wlnshlp 


1 


Dorchester 


10 


McKlnley Middle 


3 


Agasslz 


1 


Jamaica Plain 


9 


Holmes 


3 


Hamilton 


1 


Charlestown 


9 


Gavin 


3 


Harvard-Kent 


1 


West Ro;d3ury 


8 


Irving 


2 


Hennlgan 


1 


South Boston 


7 


R. Shaw 


2 


Mather 


1 


Boston Technical 


5 


Rogers 


2 


Parragut 


1 


McKlnley 


5 


DeartDom 


2 


Jackscai-^^lann 


1 


Bostcn Latin Acad. 


k 


Taft 


2 


Puller 


1 


Boston T-atln 


2 


Wheat ley 




Taylor 


1 


Kast Boston 


2 
2 


MacKey 

T. Roosevelt 




Everett 


1 


Copley 




Unana 


2 


Edlsc»i 








Boston Hl^ 


1 


Tlrallty 

Levd.s 

Wilson 









Total 



197 Total 



vr 



Total 



17 



Total Incidents: 288 



-371- 



SCHOOL INCIDEWrS BY OPPENSE 
SEPIE74EER - OCTOBER ISS^I 



1) Racial 

2) Weapons Poasdaslon or Use 

3) a) Incidents occurring on ARA 

School Busses or at school 
bus stops 
b) Incidents occurring oiroute 
to and from schools 
(not on ARA school busses) 



13 CJ.S*) 
77 (26.7$) 



2M (8.3«) 



?f 



(8.7«) 

(170 Total Incidents 

occurring enroute I 
to and from schools I 
(Including ARA '* 
busses) 



k) Assaults (verbal and physical) 

5) Robbery 

6) Altercations (fl^ts) 

7) Drug or alcohol use or possession 

8) Trespassing 

9) Other (Including harassment, 

threats, arson, disrupt Iveness) 



97 (33.7«) 
26 (9«) 
^ (13.9$) 
^ (15.9«) 
U (3.8« 



25 is. 7%) 

Total Incidents . . . 288 



-372- 



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16 

(1 bus) 

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8 

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( 3 weapons) 


12 

( 1 racial) 
( 4 bus) 
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Other 
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3 
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2 
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Assaults 


6 

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1 

2 
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m 


1 
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lementary 
Schools 


(I) 
rH -390- 


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OO 3 


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in > 


rH fe 


rHEH 


rH W 


w 









SCHOOL INCIDEMTS: May - June 1984 
(Crimes Against Persons and Safety Related) 



Hi^ Schools 




Middle Schools 




Elementary Schools 


Ehgllsh 


38 


Cleveland 


26 


McKay 5 


Hyde Park 


2l\ 


Mary Curley 


13 


Pifield 1 


Brixton 


12 


Rogers 


11 


Baldwin 1 


HHORC 


11 


Irving 


7 


Dever 1 


Dorchester 


9 


Edwards 


H 


S. Greenwood 1 


Madison Parte 


7 


Taft 


H 


O'Heam 1 


Jamaica Plain 


5 


Roosevelt 


3 


Jackson-Mann 1 


Boston T.atin 


5 


R. Shaw 


2 


Kilirer 1 


Charlestovm 


h 


Lewenberg 


2 


Trotter 1 


BostOTi Technical 


3 


Lewis 


2 


Hale 1 


South Boston 


2 


Ihonpson 


2 


Quincy 1 


McKinley 


2 


Dearborn 


2 


Hamilton 1 


Umana 


2 


Timilty 


1 


HigglnsOTi 1 


West Roxbury 


2 


Edison 


1 




East BostOTi 


1 


Michelangelo 


1 




Boston Hi^ 


1 
1 


Holmes 


1 




Tileston 







Total 



129 



Total 



82 



Total 



17 



Total Incidents: 2Z8 



-391- 



SCHOOL INCIDEMS EY (FftUSE 
May - June 1981 



1) Racial 

2) Weapons Possession or Use 

3) a) Incidents occurring on ARA 

School Busses or at school 
bus stops 
b) Incidents occurring enroute 
to and from schools 
(not on ARA school busses) 



11 (l».8U) 
66 (28.*?!t) 

17 ilM) 

I 
I 
20 (8.7|{) ! 

37 (16 .ZJ) Itotal incidents 

occun?lng enroute | 
to and ft^xn schools 
(Including ARA 
busses) 



i|) Assaults (verbal and physical) 80 (35 %) 

5) Robbery 28 (12.25?) 

6) Altercations (fl^ts) 32 (IW) 

7) Drug or alcohol use or possession 11 (6.1<) 

8) Trespassing 12 (5.2<) 

9) Other (includlnp; harrassment, 

threats, arson, disruptlveness ) ..... 28 (12. 2<) 

Total Incidents . . . 229 



-392- 



DEPARTMENT OF SAFETY SERVICES 



10-23-84 



STAFFING 198A-85 



DUBS 



UNIT 



OFFICER 



PRIMARY 



SECONDARY 



ORANGE ZONE 



;:15-3 


:15 


201 


Sgt. 


W. 


Smith 


Dorchester High 




;:30-3 


:30 


30 




C. 


Calloway 


Dorchester High 


S . Greenwood 


:30-3 


!30 


.31 




J. 


Lay ton 


Dorchester High 


Fifield 


:;15-3 


!l5 


32 




J. 


Gutierrez 


Wilson Middle 


Flfleld 


130-3 


!30 


33 




T. 


Sanabria 


Marshall 


Mather 


;i30-3 


30 


34 




P. 


Foley 


Holland 




;:15-3 


!l5 


35 




J. 


Oliver 


Cleveland 




;i30-3 


i30 


36 




K. 


Winn 


Cleveland 


Holland 


iOO-3:00 


202 


Sgt. 


S. 


Bell 


Hyde Park High 


District IV 


II30-3' 


30 


54 




s. 


Annnidown 


Hyde Park High 


Chittlck 


30-3 


30 


• 38 




G. 


Williams 


Hyde Park High 


Thompson/Taylo 


:30-3! 


30 


■ 88 




J. 


Fortes 


Hyde Park High 


Rogers/Channin 


:15-3! 


15 


40 








Tileston 


Lee 


00-4! 


00 


41 




G. 


Dias 


Thompson Middle 


District IV 


;00-4! 


00 


42 




A. 


Hardaway 


Mattahunt • 




130-3: 


30 


43 




V. 


Younger 


Lewenberg 












BLUE ZONE 






100-3:00 


203 


Sgt. 


M. 


Hennessey 


English High 




:15-3:15 


61 




M. 


Davis 


English High 




130-3:30 


62 




C. 


Wheeler 


English High 


Mac key 


115-3:15 


63 




H. 


Waller 


English High 


Tobin 


: 30-3: 30 


64 




L. 


Jeanetti 


English High 


Latin School 


!30-3:30 


65 




L. 


Pilet 


English High 


Hurley 


! 00-3: 00 


66 




J. 


Giardina 


Latin High 


Farragut 


[30-3:30 


67 




J. 


Retequiz 


Tobin 




130-3 J 30 


68 




W. 


Partello 


McKinley/Peterboro 




100-3; 00 


204 


Sgt. 


J. 


Cronin 


Brighton High 




s 30-3:30 


57 




T. 


0' Toole ' 


Brighton High 


Taft 


[30-3:30 


45 




L. 


Catron 


Brighton High 


Jackson-Harm 


t 30-3: 30 


46 




M. 


Johnson 


Brighton High 


Hennigan 


: 30-3: 30 


47 




S. 


Rogers 


Latin Academy 


Mac key 


100-4 1 


00 


48 




J. 


Harris 


Hennigan 





-393- 



STAFFING 1984-83 



UOUBS 


UNIT 


OFFICER 


PRIMARZ 


SECONDAJOr 








BROWN ZONE 






6:00-2:00 


205 


Sgt. 


L. Allen 


Technical High 




7:00-3:00 


49 




N. Gamby 


Technical High 


Mendell 


7:00-3:00 


50 




U. Kelley 


Technical High 


Higginson 


8:00-4:00 


79 




M. Harrell 


Trotter 




81 00-41 do 


75 




K. Baker 


Dearborn/ Wheatley 




7:00-3:00 


206 


Sgt. 


J. Dupree 


Burke High 




7:00-3:00 


53 




J. Finn 


Burke High 


G'Heam 


7:30-3:30 








Burke High 


Hernandez 


7:30-3:30 


60 




P. Wlnbush 


Gavin 


Trotter 


7:30-3:30 


69 




I. Thibodeaux 


McCormack 


Hurley 


8:00-4:00 


,52 

• 




L. Tate 
RED ZONE 


King Middle 




7:00-3:00 


5 


Lt. 


D. Rorie 


Complex 




7:00-3:00 


207 


Sgt. 


U. Baker 


Madison Park 




7:30-3:30 


70 




J. LaSelva 


Madison Park 


Hernandez 


7:30-3:30 


71 




K. Partello 


Madison Park 


Blackstoni 


7:00-3:00 


72 




K. Jackson 


Madison Park 




7:30-3:30 


73 




A. Skrine 


Madison Park 


Timilty 1 


7:30-3:30 


74 




J. Love 


Timilty 





7:00-3:00 
7:15-3:15 
7:00-3:00 
6:00-2:00 
7: 00-3: 00 


208 
76 
51 
78 
'44 


Sgt. 


w. 
s. 
w. 

E. 
P. 


Hlckey 

Hlckey 

Fredericks 

Knowlton 

Egan 


HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 
HHORC 




3:00-11:00 
3:00-11:00 
3:00-11:00 


87 
77 
89 


OIC 


J. 
N. 

P. 


Jones 

Sabater 

Shaughnessy 


HHORC (Night Shift) 
HHORC (Night Shift) 
Night Radio Dispatcher 


Waekend 


. 




P. 


Janey 


Safety Department 


7 1 30-3: 30 
7 1 30-3: 30 






C. 
B. 


McDonough 
Jeanetti 


Safety Department 
Safety Department 




10 
11 
12 


Sgt. 
Sgt. 


D. 
R. 
E. 


Johnson 

Durkin 

Conlin 


Crulset 
Cruiset 
Crulset 


• Patrol 

• Patrol 
■ Patrol 



-39^- 



DEPARTMENT OF 3APETy SERVICES 



1 

1 






STAFFING 1984-65 




f 


.OURS 


UNIT 


OFFICER 


PRIMARY 


SECONDARY 


i 








GREEN ZONE 






UJ Ui UJ Ui 
Ui O UJ o 

o o o o 


dl 
55 

56 


OIC. 


W« 
S. 
B. 


Murphy 
Graham 

Butler 


West Roxbury High 
West Roxbury High 
West Roxbury High 
Wash. Irving Middle 


R. G. Shaw 


r:15-3:15 
f:15-3:15 

rH5-3U5 
r 100-3: 00 

't 15-31 15 

f 115-3: 15 


210 
82 
86 
58 
85 
83 


Sgt. 


H. 
J. 
J. 
P. 
D. 
J. 


Strickland 
Vasquez 

Wallace 
Mclrney 
Howell 

fbane 


Jamaica Plain High 
Jamaica Plain High 
Jamaica Plain High 
Jamaica Plain High 
Curley Middle 
Roosevelt 


Kennedy 

Agassiz 
Agassiz 
Fuller 








YELLOW ZONE 






f; 00-3: 00 
f 100-3: 00 
7:15-3:15 
7:15-3:15 
7:15-3:15 
J:00-A:00 


211 
90 
91 

40 
98 
99 


Sgt. 


T. 
J. 
J. 

J. 
H. 
J. 


Gomperts 

Coleman 

Turner 

DePinho 

Dea 

Humey 


Charlestotm High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Charlestown High 
Edwards 


Blackstone 
Edwards 
Quindy 
Eliot 


7:30-3:30 
7:15-3:15 
7:00-3:00 
7:30-3:30 


209 
59 
80 
39 


Sgt. 


D. 
D. 
A; 
J. 


Bilotas 
Flakes 
Albano 
Cohen 


Umana 

Umana 

East Boston High 

East Boston High 


McKay 
Prescott 
Barnes 
Guild 


DRIVERS 














7:00-3:00 
2:00-10:00 


19 
18 


Sgt. 
Sgt. 


J. 
A. 


Di Reeno 
Almeida 






lAFETY OFFICE 














7:00-3:00 
7:00-3:00 
7:00-3:00 
7:00-3:00 


15 
16 
17 
37 




T. 
K. 
S. 
T. 


Giannino 
Devlin 
Williams 
Clements 






N. Devlin - Ma 


temity Leave 











Val Shelley -" Charlestown High 
Francis Coughlin - English Higli 
Ralph Trotman - Cleveland Middle 



-395- 



I 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE 



-397- 



il 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE 



I. 



PROHIBITKW OF RACIAL SLUKS 



ORDERS 



Order Approving Addition 
Discipline, January 9, 1975 



to 



Code of 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



An addition to the Code of Discipline was 
approved that prohibits all students from 
addressing racial slurs or epithets to other 
persons "in a manner likely to provoke 
violence or to incite an immediate breach of 
the peace or to provoke retaliation." 

Compliance 

Section 7.7 of the Code of Discipline cites 
the use of racial slurs as a suspendable 
offense. Last school year, 28 student were 
suspended for the use of racial slurs, 
indicating that school administrators are 
enforcing this section of the Code. 
Monitors have received no complaints about 
the lack of enforcement of this Order. 



CXWCLUS IONS/RE COMMENDATI CMS 



Boston has attained full compliance with the 
Order prohibiting use of racial slurs. 



SUSPENSI(»fS 



During the 2-year monitoring period, 
monitors have also examined suspension 
statistics and explored causes of suspension 
both in individual schools and system- 
wide. The overall administration of 
discipline has markedly improved, including 
employing suspension only as a last resort 
and implementing alternatives to suspension. 
This is evidenced by the decrease in 
suspensions from 7012 during the 1982-1983 



-399- 



school year to 5707 in the 1983-1984 school 
year, a net drop of 1305 suspensions. 
However, many schools continue to have rates 
of suspension high enough to merit concern 
(See Appendix A). 

At the high school level, Charlestown, 
Jamaica Plain and Brighton High Schools have 
had consistently high suspension rates over 
the 2 year monitoring period. English High 
substantially reduced their suspensions this 
past year. 

On the middle school level, the Mackey, 
Cheverus, Timilty, Roosevelt, and Curley 
Middle Schools suspended students at rates 
significantly higher than average. Both the 
Roosevelt and Mackey Middle Schools had high 
suspension rates for the second consecutive 
year . 

On the elementary school level, the McKay 
and Beethoven Elementary Schools had 
significantly high suspension rates; the 
McKay Elementary School had the highest 
suspension rate for elementary schools for 
the second consecutive year. 

The suspension rate at the four McKinley 
schools is of concern. These 4 schools 
serve K-12 special needs students who have 
multiple learning and behavior problems. 
Alternative program options meet the 
students' specific behavioral and academic 
needs. The suspension rate at these schools 
was 9 times that of the school with the 
second highest suspension rate (1090 
suspensions for a total enrollment of 240 
students). 39 students were suspended 10 or 
more times during the school year. Although 
monitors commend the McKinley' s programs, 
this excessive suspension rate merits 
scrutiny. 

DISPROPORTICXIATE SUSPENSIONS BY RACE 

Although the overall suspension rate has 
significantly dropped, the disproportionate 
suspension rate of Black students has 
remained the same (See Appendix B) . In the 
1982-1983 school year. Black students 
comprised 47.5% of the total enrollment 
while they constituted 69% of the total 
suspensions. In the 1983-1984 school year. 



~H00- 



Black students comprised 48.4% of the total 
enrollment while they constituted 67% of the 
total suspensions, an insignificant change 
in suspension rates. On the high school and 
middle school levels, Boston Latin School, 
Charlestown High, Brighton High, East Boston 
High, Irving Middle, Edwards Middle, 
Roosevelt Middle and Michelangelo Middle 
have suspended Black students at 
disproportionately high rates for the past 
two years. Some schools that have small 
numbers of Hispanic or Black students tend 
to suspend these students at 
disproportionately high rates (Rogers, 
Thompson, Shaw and Cheverus Middle Schools). 

As an incentive to reduce multiple 
suspensions, Boston's Department of School 
Operations will be providing all school 
administrators with regular printouts of 
suspensions. Administrators have been 
reminded that multiple suspensions should be 
avoided, and attempts should be made to 
provide additional services to these 
students. 



SAFETY AND DISCIPLINE PLAN 



Boston's Department of School Operations has 
made considerable effort over the past two 
years to systematize discipline procedures 
and develop alternatives to suspension. As 
reported in Report No. 3, Boston developed a 
comprehensive plan for improving school 
discipline. 

The following is a progress report on each 
initiative contained in the plan: 

Increase Support Services 

Seventeen schools were targeted by the 
Boston Human Services Collaborative to 
receive services for the 1984-1985 school 
year (See Appendix E) . Needs assessments 
have been completed in eight of these 
schools; assessments in the other nine 
schools are underway. Memoranda of 
agreement and training schedules for each 
school are being developed. Based on the 
success of this year's efforts, other 
schools will be targeted to receive services 
next year. The Private Industry Council has 
initiated programs designed to increase 



-^01- 



services to 9th graders at Dorchester High 
and English High. 

Increased support services for students with 
discipline problems are vital to addressing 
their academic and social problems. Stable 
funding of these services is essential (as 
evidenced by the cancelling of an extremely 
successful counseling program at Charlestown 
High this year because of a lack of funds to 
pay the Boston University interns). 

Standards of Behavior 

In response to the Safe Schools Commission 
Report and Report No. 2, an abbreviated set 
of rules, the Standards of Behavior , was 
developed this summer (See Appendix D). 
These rules summarize the Code of Discipline 
and strengthen the penalties (suspension or 
exclusion) for possession of dangerous 
objects or drugs and threatening or harming 
another person. This document is not 
intended to replace the Code, but rather to 
augment it. 

An extensive orientation to the Standards of 
Behavior was conducted for all staff and all 
students at the beginning of the school 
year. Parents were requested to sign a 
letter stating they had read the new rules, 
and 97% of these letters have been returned. 

Many administrators interviewed by monitors 
expressed their support for the new rules, 
but adopted a wait-and-see attitude about 
whether the Department of School Operations 
would follow through in administering a 
stricter expulsion policy. The Boston 
Student Advisory Council expressed their 
concerns that students had little or no 
input into the new rules. Although the 
Standards of Behavior has been translated 
into all languages, the 1983 Code of 
Discipline is available only in English. 

School Review Committees 

Boston's Department of School Operations has 
indicated that review committees representa- 
tive of administrators, teachers, students 
and parents exist in most schools and that 
school-based rules have been developed by 
all schools (See Appendix D). (Boston is in 



-'402- 



the process of submitting all school-based 
rules to the Department of Education 
consistent with requirements in M.G.L. 
Chapter 71, Section 37H). The timeline for 
the development of these rules has been 
changed (in response to recommendations in 
Monitoring Report No. 2) so that all rules 
must be completed and posted by the first 
day of each school year. In addition, the 
Department of School Operations has mandated 
that all school-based rules include rules in 
areas that have traditionally resulted in 
discipline infractions — locker policies, 
students' presence in unauthorized areas, 
the wearing of hats, possession of 
unauthorized items, and food outside the 
cafeteria. These rules should help to 
resolve discipline problems. 

Oversight Committees 

The Deputy Superintendent of School 
Operations has indicated that these 
committees, intended to oversee the 
consistent implementation of school 
discipline policies, are in the process of 
development. No information about them has 
been submitted from his office. 

Development of Alternative Programs 

Boston has committed considerable resources 
in the past two years to developing and 
supporting alternative school programs (See 
Appendix C). Ninth grade Cluster Programs 
have been implemented at English, 
Charlestown, Dorchester and Hyde Park High 
Schools to address the excessive discipline 
problems and the high drop-out and repeater 
rates at grade 9. Existing alternative 
programs — Boston Prep, Home Base School 
and Sahool-Within-a-School at South Boston 
High — have been strengthened. 

An alternative middle school program. New 
Horizons Academy within King Middle, has 
been created, and English High has been 
restructured into iour alternative school- 
within-a-school programs. All of these 
programs have helped reduce school 
discipline problems and have increased 
services to problem students. Initial data 
indicate that these alternative programs are 
desegregated (See Appendix F). 



-M03- 



Boston has developed a plan for the 
continued development of alternative 
programs over the next two years. This plan 
outlines the creation of additional school- 
within-a-school, in-school suspension and 
ReCap programs at the middle and high school 
levels/ an expansion of current separate 
facility high school alternative progrcuns; 
and the initiation of an exploratory ReCap 
program at the elementary level. Although 
sketchy, if implemented on schedule, this 
plan would vastly increase alternative 
program opportunities and help to reduce 
discipline problems. Future plans also 
should include the development of procedures 
designed to accelerate the referral process 
to these programs (as recommended in Report 
No. 3). 

Behavior Management Teams 

Money was not allocated for this program 
and, therefore, it was cancelled. 

In-Service Training on Approaches to 
Discipline 

All staff received an orientation to the new 
Standards of Behavior at the beginning of 
the school year. However, no system-wide 
training on non-confrontation approaches to 
discipline has been planned or conducted. 

PROGRESS REPORTS OS OTHER RECOMMENDATI(»fS 

In addition to the components of Boston's 
safety and discipline plan, Boston has 
responded to other recommendations as 
outlined in Monitoring Reports No. 2 and 
3. Boston should again be commended for the 
appointment over the past two years of 
effective administrators, particularly Black 
and Hispanic administrators, to schools with 
discipline problems. For example, adminis- 
trators at the Timilty and Thompson Middle 
Schools and English High School have taken 
steps to improve discipline policies. Also, 
the addition of Directors of Instruction and 
Instructional Support Teachers to all middle 
schools appears to be improving discipline 
policies and educational offerings at that 
level. 



-mh- 



Boston has continued to respond to the need 
for additional alternatives to suspension. 
Time-out rooms at English High have been 
instrumental in reducing discipline 
problems. Many schools are now expressing 
a need for either time-out rooms or in- 
school suspension programs (Thompson, 
Timilty and Mackey Middle Schools and 
Brighton High School). Several schools are 
also in need of support services (e.g., 
counseling, tutoring) or outreach workers 
(Mackey and Thompson Middle). 

Parental involvement with students with 
discipline problems has also increased. 
More schools now request parent conferences 
after suspensions. All parents were 
contacted by telephone and sent a letter 
regarding the new Standards of Behavior . 
And parent workshops are planned to discuss 
the new promotional policies. 

Several recommendations from Reports No. 2 
and 3 remain unaddressed. Schools that 
monitors visited (Burke High, Timilty 
Middle) continue to send students who have 
violated rules home to "cool off" without 
officially suspending them. Several 
administrators cited this as "common 
practice" throughout the school system, 
despite directions from the Department of 
School Operations to log, record accurately 
and report all suspensions. Boston should 
be reminded that such practices deny a 
student his/her due process rights as 
guaranteed by the Constitution. 

Shortages of textbooks and materials 
continue to be cited by most administrators 
as a factor in discipline problems. 

Most importantly, administrators continued 
to express their fears that a new promotion 
policy, without a comprehensive remediation 
plan, would result in a significant increase 
in students who are repeating a grade and 
thus would create additional discipline 
problems. Boston has not yet outlined such 
a remediation plan. The number of 
discipline problems related to repeaters 
should be examined. 



-405- 



CONCLUSION 



In conclusion, Boston has taken considerable 
steps to improve discipline in schools. 
Alternative programs, alternatives to 
suspension, the Boston Human Services 
Collaborative, the Standards of Behavior, 
and concrete guidelines for the development 
of school-based rules have all been 
developed within the last two years. The 
appointment of effective Black and Hispanic 
administrators has helped alleviate 
discipline problems at some schools; 
however, some concerns regarding school 
discipline remain. It is recommended that 
Boston: 

1. explore the causes for disproportionate 
suspensions of Black students and take 
steps to lower these rates; 

2. continue to develop alternative programs 
for those students who have attendance 
and/ or discipline problems, and 
alternatives to suspension for those 
schools with excessive discipline 
problems; 

3. continue to support the Boston Human 
Services Collaborative; 

4. translate the Code of Discipline into 
Spanish and Chinese; 

5. ensure that all suspensions are 
recorded, and that the practice of 
sending students home to "cool-off" 
without suspending them is discontinued; 

6. develop a comprehensive remediation plan 
to address the new promotion policy; 

7. continue to appoint Black and Hispanic 
administrators to schools where needed, 
particularly to the Cheverus Middle 
School; 

8. continue to stress improving the quality 
of instruction, including allocating 
adequate funds for the purchase of 
textbooks and other educational 
materials, system-wide and especially in 
those schools with excessive discipline 
problems. 



-k06- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATICXJ REPORT #4 

STUDENT DISCIPLINE 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENTS 



1. Appendix A: Suspension Rate Charts (with explanation) 

2. Appendix B: Boston Public School Suspensions 

3. Appendix C: Alternative Education Action Plan 

4. Appendix D: Code of Discipline 

5. Standards of Behavior in the Boston Public Schools 

6. Letter to Parent Re Standards of Behavior 

7. Memo: Robert Peterkin to Community Superintendents 

Re School Based Rules 

8. Key Activities and Dates for Stcindards cind School Based Rules 

9. Orientation and Dissemination of Standard of Behavior 

10. School Based Rules 

11. Appendix E: Boston Student Humein Services Collaborative 

Update 

12. Appendix F: Enrollment of Boston's Alternative Schools 



-^07- 




Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 

27 Cedar Street, Wellesley, Massachusetts 02181 431-7825 

APPENDIX A 
November 9, 1984 

EXPLANATION OF SUSPENSION RATES CHARTS 

The chart prepared for this analysis includes the following 
information: 

Column: 

A All Boston schools at that particular level {Latin 

Academy, Latin School, and Umana include grades 7-12; the 
others grades 9-12). 

B Number of Black students, followed by Black percent of 
total enrollment. 

C Number of suspensions of Black students, followed by Black 
percent of all suspensions. 

D Percent of Black suspensions divided by percent of Black 
students (1.00 would indicate that Black students are 
suspended at exactly the rate that their proportion of 
total enrollment would predict, while 2.00 would indicate 
suspensions at double the expected rate, and .5, at half 
the expected rate). 

E-G Same information as B-D, for white students. 

H-J Same information as B-D, for other minority students.. 

K Total enrollment for each school. 

L Total suspensions for each school. 

M Total suspensions divided by total enrollment; this is a 
measure of how frequently suspensions are necessary or 
resorted to (only closer analysis can determine whether 
suspensions are resorted to with excessive - or 
insufficient - frequency) . 

All suspension data was for the 1983-1984 school year. 



-408- 



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APPTJNDIX B 



YEAR 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS SUSPENSIONS 



PERCENT ENROLLMENT 
BLACK WHITE OTHER 



PERCENT SUSPENSIONS 



BLACK 



raiTE OTHER 



TOTAL SUSPENSIONS 
BLACK WHITE OTHEM 



TOTAL 



1982-198-3 
1983-1984 



47.6 
48.4 



30.5 

27.9 



21.9 
23.7 



69 

67 



19 
20 



12 
13 



4812 
3840 



1359 
1160 



841 
707 



7012 
5707 



-ill5- 



APPENDIX C 



ATTACHMENT III 



ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION ACTION PLAN 



-i^ie- 



Introduction 

The Traditional Method Of Developing Effective Learning 
has historically been and continues to be the primary 
curriculum, instructional style and organizational structure 
of regular school programs. Alternative education programs 
are options to the curriculum, instructional style and 
organizational structures of the regular education program. 
These options are designed for a diverse student population 
with equally diverse educational needs, abilities and 
aspirations. 

A.E.P.'s within the Boston Public Schools 
have generally been created to increase the level and rate of a 
student's academic achievement, enhance a student's feeling 
of worth and self-esteem, expand a student's horizons, 
provide enrichment and unique learning opportunities, 
increase the holding power of schools and decrease 
disciplinary and absenteeism problems. 

Present A.E.P. Methods Of Developing effective Learning 
within the Boston Public Schools provide choices to students 
in several categories: 1) classroom/program 2) 
schools-within-schoolsclusters 3) separate site: 
district/citywide. 

These H.O.D.E.L.s generally are characterized by a 
number of common features: They are generally small, 
voluntary, credit generating, flexible, have strong 
administrative leadership, involve parents and students in 
decision making and are usually distinguished by a theme or 
pedagogic style. 

Goals 

Tl.c piin.aiv ocals cf the Alternative Education 
Department of the Boston Public Schools are the same as 
those for the regular education programs as reflected in the 
curriculum objective gu^ides published by the Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction, Additional programmatic goals of 
the Alternative Education Department are: 

1. To raise students' achievement levels in the basic curri- 
culum areas, with a special emphasis on improving 
reading, writing and computation skills. 

2. To develop to the fullest the cognitive, social, affec- 
tive, physical and creative potentialities of all 
students. 

-^17- 



3. To decrease incidences of absenteeism, truancy and 
school-withdrawals, to increase the holding power of 
schools, on students, who might otherwise leave the 
system, and to attract students to (or back to) the 
Boston Public Schools. 

4. To create a variety of educational programs conducive to 
effective learning, by encouraging the active participa- 
tion of administrators, teachers and parents as well as 
businesses, colleges, universities and community agencies 
in the initiation, development, implementation and 
evaluation of Alternative Education Programs. 

5. To develop a central support system to coordinate the 
initiation, development, certification, funding, 
management and evaluation of alternative schools and 
programs. 

III. High School 

Category 1 - Classroom/Prooram 

English and Jar^.aica Plain Hioh School - CSAPP - All CSAPP 
students participate in psychosocial counseling and group 
counseling. All students matriculate in ongoing courses 
offered at their respective school sites. In addition, 
students receive tutorial services, information referral, 
advocacy services and outreach and follow up services 
are likewise provided. 

Dorchester Hiah - Health Magnet - The program provides 
credits, gives a broad and general background for a career in 
health services, provides a behind the scenes look at 
hospitals and other health agencies and emphasizes skill 
ceveioL-er.t ana ir.cernsr.ir 5 c= vifzi.:ax.icr. fc-i eriLiy Icvel 
health careers. 

Jamaica Plain Hiah - The In House Suspension Program provides 
both a short term and long term program. In the short term 
program a student reports to a designated room each morning 
for 3 to 5 days. There they are monitored and assisted by a 
teacher-in-charge and also receive counseling and tutorial 
assistance. The long term program is a six to eight week 
program for students with severe academic and social 
adjustments including chronic behavioral and class attendance 
problems. 

Category 7 Srhools-Within-School s/CI usters 

School s-wi thi n-Schools 

English High - There are approximately 1636 students, the 

school is composed of three SWS's 1) Freshmen cluster - 



-Ml8- 



basic skills orientation, block of 5 periods 2) Fenway - 
grades 10-12, college preparatory through non-traditional 
methods such as interdisciplinary instruction and self 
initiated learning 3) Traditio nal/Maonet Arts - grades 10-12 
basic skills, college preparatory - academic course 
requirements are in excess of system vide requirements and 
students select classes and activities in the case of the 
Magnet Arts that provide a concentration in the Arts. 

Madison Park - Home Base School - An SWS with an enrollment 
of approximately 125 students - grades 10-12. A variety of 
full and part time support staff work in the areas of 
counseling, career guidance, computer documentation and 
training and business agencies. The curriculum combines a 
core of required major subject courses and the following 
options. Study Skills/Writing, Communications, Computer 
Literacy and Instruction, Workshop Internship and Academic 
Tutorials. 

South Boston Hioh - SWS - a self contained program of 
approximately 75-80 students - any student is eligible-they 
can be recommended or referred by counselors, social workers, 
teachers or community workers. They utilize a block of five 
periods with flexible scheduling and independent and small 
group work. 

These are SWS;s specifically geared to the ninth grade in 
order to: facilitate improved services for all ability 
levels, improve communications and cooperation among 
teachers, better utilize and adapt material resources. These 
SWS's are designed to ease the students' transition to high 
school. Clusters currently operate at: English High School 

Hyde Park High School 
Dorchester High School 
Charlestown High School 

Category 3 Separate Site 
Citvvide 

Another Course to College fA.C.C.) - a joint transitional 
studies program in collaboration with the U of Mass., Boston 
Harbor Campus two years of traditional and intensive college 
preparatory work covering a student's junior and senior high 
school years. There are approx. 200 students in Grades 11. 
and 12 whose applications are made through hon-e high school 
or directly to A.C.C. 

Boston Prpp - grades 11 and 12 competency based, masterj* 
learning curriculurr. with graduation determined by a student's 



-^19- 



successful demonstration of competency in a variety of 

disciplines. The program is designed for overaged high 

school students at least sixteen years of age and at least 
two years behind grade level, 

IV. Middle Schools 

rateoorv One - Classroom/Proorams 

rieveland Middle School - CSAPP - all CSAPP students 
participate in psycho social counseling and group 
counseling. All students' matriculate in ongoing courses 
offered at their respective school sites. In addition, 
students receive tutorial services, information referral and 
advocacy services, outreach and follow-up services are also 
provided. 

rateaorv Two - Schools-Within-Schools 

M.L. Kino Middle School - New Horizons Academy - this program 
emphasizes the mastery of communication, computation and 
critical thinking skills across the content areas. In 
addition to this, the school places an emphasis on 
experiential learning projects interdisciplinary instruction 
and community building activities, to enhance school climate 
and support basic skill development. 

Category Three - Seoa ratg Sites 

Pistcic;: - 

Log School - students from District V Middle Schools are 
referred to this program. The program concentrates on the 
development of basic skills and community involvement. 
Educational goals and objectives focus on the strengths of 
each student's learning ability. Teaching strategies and 
presentations utilize multi method approach. 

Citvwide 

RE CAP - school based dropout prevention and outreach program 
concentrating on students who are one or more years behind 
their appropriate chronological grade level. Through a 
written contract students agree to perform at a specific 
level of academic competence, attendance and behavior. 
Students meeting these contract conditions are advanced to 
the next grade level at mid year and again at the end of the 
school year. Students attend regularly scheduled classes, 

V. Action Plan Recommendations FY' 85 - FY' 86 

Hiah School 

Category One - Classroom/Prooram 

1984-85 - A. Present programs will be stabilized and 
evaluated. 



B. A minimum of one new In House 

Intervention Program should be initiated. 

1985-86 - A, minimum of one new In House Intervention 
Program should be implemented. 

Category Two - Schools-within-Schools/Clusters 

1984-85 - A. Present SWS/clusters should be stabilized 
and e*7aluated. 

B. A minimum of two new SWS/Clusters should 
be initiated. 

1985-86 - A. A minimum of two new SWS/Clusters should 
be implemented. 

Category Three - Separate Site 

Citywi'^g - 

A.C.C. 

1984-85 - investigation of viability of possible expansion of 

A.C.C. to include a tenth crade conponent should be 

initiated. 

Bost<?n Prep 

1984-85 - initiation of discussions on changing focus of 

Boston Prep to include an experiental/work study 
skills component. This program would be greatly" 
strengthened by such a modification. Thought 
should be given to restructuring Boston Prep to 
include an A.M. Boston Prep I and a P.M. Boston 
Prep II with a portion of the day spent at 
H.H.O.R.C. or, on work study. This would double 
the capacity of the program, strengthen the skills 
c-ieiei ani ir.crecie ut iiiz?.t:cr. oi tr.t K.H.C.E.C. 
site. 

1985-86 - implementation of a modified Boston Prep Program 

RgCAP 

1984-85 - an investigation of the feasibility of initiating a 
pilot program at the high school level utilizing 
the administration structure organization and 
structure of the Re Cap Program. 

1985-86 - If feasible the implementation of a pilot High 
School RECAP program. 



-421- 



Middle Scb?<?Is 

Category One - Classroom/Program 

QSME 

1984-85 - stabilization and evaluation of CSAAP program at 

Cleveland Middle School. 

1985-86 - continuation of program contingent on evaluation 
and availability of funding. 

Category Two - Schools-within-Schools Clusters 

1984-85 - A. investigation of feasibility of 

expanding schools-within-Schools Program 
at the M.L. King Middle School. 

B. identification of a second middle school 
site for a SWS similar to the New 
Horizons Academy model. 

1985-86 - The initiation and implementation of a 

minimum of two SWS's at the Middle School 
level. 

Category Three - Separate Site 

District 

1984-85 - feasibility study on the implementation of a 
new district alternative program modeled on 
the Log School/Boston Prep Program. 

Citywide 

1984-85 - stabilization and evaluation of Re Cap 

hi Ogi oai. 

1985-86 - expansion of Re Cap program to all Middle 
Schools. 

Elementary 

Category 3 - Sepa rate Site 

Re Cap 

1984-85 - feasibility study on introducing a pilot 
fourth grade Re Cap program at one 
elementary school utilizing the 
administration, organization and structure 
of the Middel School Re Cap program. 



-422- 



fji . 



APPENDIX D 



ATTACHMENT IV 

CODE OF DISCIPLINE 

STANDARDS OF BEHAVIOR IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



-U23- 




CIRCULAR 

Robert R. Splllane, Superintendent of Public Schools 




No. 4, 1984-85 
September 1, 1984 



ODDE OF DISCIPLINE 
STANDARDS OF BEHAVIOR IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



To Coomunity SuperlnCendenCs, Headmasters, Principals and Other 
Administrative Heads: 

Headmasters, Principals and Other Administrative Heads are requested to keep 
on file a DATED CHEG^ LIST signed by all personnel under their jurisdiction, 
as evidence t±iat each nas read this memorandum. 

In July, 1984, the Boston School Committee revised the Boston Public Schools 
1980 Code of Discipline. The revision is in the form of a one-sheet, two-page 
flyer titled, STATxIi^RDS OF BEHAVIOR IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS. This 
statement of behavioral expectations will be t±ie primary tool in monitoring 
student conduct in all public schools. 

The 1982 Code of Discipline will continue to be of use in the following areas: 
A. Section 7.0 offers additional grounds for student discipline. 
B- All due process procedures detailed in the 1982 Code of Discipline 
remain in effect in order to guarantee a fair hearing for those 
charged with violation of the system's Standards of Behavior. 

The intent of this circiilar is to provide information which will assist 
headmasters and principals in planning axid organizing for the eff.'=;ctive 
implementacion of the Standards of Behavior. Contained herein are directives 
and recoomendations relative to (1) distribution of tte Standards of Behavior 
and related m at er ials to staff, students and parents; (2) orientation and 
training of staff and students; (3) development of School-Based Rules on 
disciplinary problems; and (4) records, reports and notices. 

!• Dlstxibution of the Standards of Behavior and Related Materials 

(A) Standards of Behavior 

Sufficient copies of tiie Standards of Behavior (Attachment I), 
will be provided to all schools so that one copy may be given 
to every student and every staff member. Each copy will be 
accompanied by a cover letter from the Superintendent of 
Schools to each parent. The cover letter will contain a 
parental signature section that is to be signed by the 
parent/guardian and the signed letter is to be returned to the 
school. Each school is to make a determined effort to see that 
every parent/guardian has acknowledged receipt of tte Standards 
of Behavior. A file of such returns is to be maintained in 
each school. 



iSuperinrendent ' a Circular No. 4, 1984-85 

Septedber 1, 1984 

- 2 - 



Every staff member is also to be provided with a copy of tte 
Standards of Behavior and each classroom is to have the 
document posted in an ap p r o p riate place. 

The Standards of Behavior will be made available in all 
appropriate languages. Distribution" of the Standards of 
B^aa'\^or and its attached letter to parents should be carried 
out aa soon as possible before Septenber 14, 1984. This 
distribution should be a part of the orientation and training 
process described below. 

(B) 1982 Code of DLscipline 

Sufficient copies of the 1982 Code of Discipline (Orange Bock) 
will be provided so that each classroom, school office, and 
district office will have at least one copy available upon 
request by any studeitt, parent, or other interested party. 

H. Orientation and Training of Staff and Students 

(A) Standards of Behavior* in the Boston Public Schools 

Oral presentations of the highlights of the Standards of 
Behavior must be nwde to stvidents on or before Septer h er 14, 
1984. Such oral presentations may be made at an assembly, 
conducted for that, purpose, by homeroom teachers, 
administrators, the student govemnent leaders, or in any other 
manner designed to provide effective oral notice and discussion 
for all students. 

Staff orientation to the Standards of Behavior and School Based 
Rules should be made during the in-service session of 

Septedber 5, 1984, and at appropriate released- tiaie sessions 
throughout the school year. 

Orientation and training sessions for both staff and students 
should include the following: 

Detailed analysis and discxission of the new document, THE 
STANDARDS OF BEHAVIOR 

Discxjssion of its relationship to the 1982 Code of 
Discipline. (It should be noted that Section 7.0 
describes grotmds for suspension in addition to those 
listed in tl:^ Standards of Behavior, and that the 1982 
Code still serves as a manual on due process procedures) . 

The following changes in the rules and regulations should 
be stressed: 



-^25- 



superxntenaenc s v-ixcuiar I'w. •♦, a. 70^-0 j 

Sepcember 1, 1984 



- 3 - 



II. (A) Standards of Behavior in the Boston Public Schools (Cont'd.) 

STUDENTS WHO VIOLATE THE PXLOWING RULES MAY BE SUSPQTOED OR, 
IN SOME CASES, EXPELLED. EXPULSION IS EXCLUSICN WCbl SCBOOL 
EDR UP TO ONE CALENDAR YEAR. STUDENTS ARE NOT ALLaTED: 

To bring to school dangerous objects of no reasonable use 
to a student in sclwol, such as knives, guns, mock guns, 
studded belts or bracelets, or other weapons prohibited by 
state law. POSSESSION OF FIREARMS WILL RESULT IN EmJLSION. 
POSSESSION OF A DANGEROUS OBJECT WILL RESULT IN SUSPE^r,T.CN. 
THE SECOND POSSESSION OF ANY DANGEROUS OBJECT MAY RESULT IN 
EXPULSION. 

To threaten or to harm another person. HARMING ANOTHEPv 
PERSON WITH A WEAPON WILL RESULT IN EXPULSION. THE USE OF A 
MOCK GUN IN A THREATEIOTSG MA^;NER imi. RESULT IN EXPULSiai. 

To bring nonprescribed drugs, marijuana, narcotics or 
alcohol to school, or to use, sell or distribute such drugs or 
alcohol in school. SELLING OR DISTRIBUITNG DRUGS MAY RESULT IN 
EXPULSION. (Attachment V) 

In addition, a student may be expelled under Section 12.2 of 
the Code for inflicting serious injury on a student or staff 
menber or for repeatedly and flagrantly violating Section 7.0, 
or if the student's continued presence in school should 
constitute an ongoing threat to the physical safety of others 
or to the normal functioning of the school. 

The Standards of Behavior differ from the Code of Discipline in 
that mandatory expulsion and suspension is clearly prescribed 
for those oftenses below. According to the Standards of 
Behavior, expulsion from school may be up to one calendar year. 

Ekpulsion is mandatory when a student: 

possesses any firearm 

harms another person with a weapon 

uses a mock gun in a threatening manner. 

Expulsion is discretionary when a student : 

possesses any dangerous object for the second time 
sells or distributes drugs 

Suspension is mandatory when a student possesses a 
dangenxis object. 



-^26- 



tjerintendeot's Circular Ito. 4, 1984-85 

Septenijer 1, 1984 

- 4 - 

II. (A) Standards of Behavior in the Boston Public Schools (Cont'd.) 

In the event that a student possesses a vnsapon, or possesses a 
controlled substance which is clearly against the law, or 
engages in any act depmpfi criminal, Headmasters/Principals must 
inrnpd-ifltely notify the Community IJistrict Superintendent, the 
Boston Police, and Jdtm Qustolini, Departmeait of Safety 
Services. If a student is believed to have comoiitted a 
criminal offense, he or she may be entitled to receive Miranda 
warnings by a medber of the Department of Safety Services 
before beir^ questioned by a school administrator. 

(B) Development of School-Based Rales on Disciplinary Problems 

The Standards of Behavior establishes uniform rules and 
procedures to be followed in disciplinary actions that could 
result in suspension, transfer or expulsion. However, the 
Boston Public Schools require the establi.si-ment of school-based 
rules for nonsuspendable offenses and the development and 
consideration of nonexclusionary solutions to violations of 
school-based rules and where possible violations of Section 7.0 
of the Code (Suspendable Offenses). The rules shall not 
diminish or conflict with any procedures or rights described by 
the Standards of Behavior and the 1982 Code of Discipline. 
Description of disciplinary rules shall be clear and precise. 
Undefined terms must be avoided and no rules shall be provided 
for any demeaning, degrading or physical punishment. 

Althoijgh the official Standards of Behavior is the primary 
source for rules and regulations governing student behavior, it 
is recognized that the best school discipline arises from the 
self -motivation of the students. In order to encourage 
students to be responsible for their own behavior in their own 
school, the development of School-Based Rules is essential. 

The school-based rules on disciplinary problems shall be 
developed in accordance with the procedxires detailed in Section 
4.0 of the Code and re-evaluated each year, in accordance with 
the same procedures. The Headmaster or Principal of each 
school has convened a committee as indicated in Section 4.3 for 
the purpose of re-evaluating his Aier, school -based rules. 

The committees are conducting their meetings, and are allowing 
time for representatives of parents, teachers and students to 
involve their constituencies in the development of rules during 
ttte period from June 1984 to September 1 1984 . All 
appropriate constituencies must be represented. Each school's 
rules, re-evaluated or revised, shall be sent upon approval by 
the Atni nis trat ive Head and a majority of the committee, on the 
enclosed Form CD-4 , to the appropriate Community 
Superintendent on or before August ^, 1984 . 

-427- 



Superintendent's Circular No. 4, 1984-85 

September 1, 1984 

- 5 - 

II. Otlentation and Training of Staff and Students (Cont'd.) 

"(S) Development of School-Based Rules on Disciplinary~Problems 

The involvement of Comnunity Superintendents in the ongoing 
process of developing School-Based Rules should expedite 
district level review. Form CD-4 must be completed and signed 
by the Conrnmity District Superintendent and 
Pxrincipal/Headmaster. Please note that Form CD-4 should be 
used for school-based rules only and is not Intended to replace 
liandbooks or other materials to be disseminated within a given" 
school building . All School-Based Rules shall be re-evaluated, 
subject to approval by the Community Superintendent and tite 
Deputy Superintervdent for School Operations. Until such time as 
the new rules are adopted, or previous rules have been 
re-evaluated and approved, the previous School-Based Rules and 
regulations, provided they do not diminish or conflict with airy 
procedures or rights described in t±ie Standards of Behavior, 
will be in effect. The attached memorandum (Attachnent III) 
outlines tine requirements and principles governing School Based 
Rules_development. . 

In addition to the changes mentioned above, t±ie following should be 
addressed: 

-De'/eloping activities for students that will result in the 

grow til of self -discipline. 

-Developing a system of progressive disciplinary'' measures to be 

used in regard to referrals, parental conferences, suspensions, 

and other penalties. 

-Reviewing the school's prtx:ess for the timely reporting of 

incidents . 

-Clarifying for students the ways in which they may r. rt an 

incident which violates their rights to a peaceful, Sca.j 

education. 

-Identifying the person and his/her position who has the 

autiiority to suspend a student. 

-Reviewing t±ie School Safety Plan with students and staff. 

-Reviewing Section 16.0 of the 1982 Code which addresses 

Teacher Appeal Rights in disciplinary cases. 

Each Headmaster and Principal shall develop a summary of plans for 
orientation of all staff and students. That stmmary shall be 
submitted to the respective Cooraunity Superintendent on or before 
August 29, 1984. Community Superintendents will certify in writing 
on or before October 3, 1984 to the Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent/ School Operations that this orientation has been 
completed in each school. Any school seeking assistance in 
developing an orientation plan should consult with the Office of tive 
Deputy Si^erintendent. 



-i\2B- 



jiperlntendent's Circular No. 4, 1984-85 

Septeniber 1, 1984 

- 6 - 



III. Records, Reports, Notices 

A) Records — Administration and staff are responsible for 

logging details, phone calls and mailings wherever required 
in regard to conferences, referrals, use of alternative 
solutions, suspensions, transfers and expulsions noted 
vldiln Code of Discipline. 

Acblnlstrators and staff should state specific acts, 
avoiding vague generalities such as "unsatisfactory 
conduct." They should keep parents and guardians i- -brmed 
at appropriate steps of all disciplinary procedures. 

(B) Reports — Administrators shall continue to use the forms for 
naxjt t: I ng of incidents and suspensions vhlch have been used 
over the past couple of years. The forms (attached) include: 

Form A — Report of School Incidents 

Form B — Witness Reports 

Form C — Monthly Suspension Reports (note 

changes) 
Form D — Monthly Assault Reports 

Administrators shall keep an accurate record of all of these 
reports and shall continue to be responsible for forwarding 
copies of these forms to the Department of School Safety 
Services, and to the Office of the Conrmmlty 
Superintendent. Forms A and B should be forwarded as soon 
as possible after an Incident. Forms C and D should be sent 
within five days of the end of each month. Please note 
changes in the information required on Form C. The need for 
pxjnctuality in the sijbmission of these forms cannot be 
overemphasized. 

(C) Principal/Headmasters will be provided with printouts 
IdendLfTing students suspended and the offenses for which 
suspension was imposed. This information is intended as an 
aid to reduce cumulative suspensions, is confidential, and 
not to be shared with other agencies. 

(D) Notices — ^All writrten and oral notices required by the 
Standards of Behavior shall be in English and the primary 
language of the home. All notices shall be in simple and 
commonly understood words to the extent possible, and shall 
inform parents of the right to an interpreter of their 
primary language upon request- 



-^29- 



Superintendent's Circular 



No. 4, 1984-85 
Septeaber 1, 1984 



- 7 - 



IV. Cuniulative Suspensions 

As Building Administrators you are aware of the fact that many of 
our suspensions are for repeat violations. In order to document our 
efforts to avoid inappropriate multiple sxaspensions , and to comply 
with the 1982 Code of Discipline, your attention is directed to 
Section 11.0 CUMULATIVE SUSPENSIONS , which states, in part: 

" after a student has been subjected to suspension or 
long-term suspension twice in a marking period, or a total of 
fifteen days, or four times in a school year, wtSchever occurs 
first, the AdirSirustrative Head of the school building (this 
duty may not be delegated) shall conduct a meeting to explore 
non-punitive solutions to tiie problems resulting in 
suspension. No furtiier suspensions except emergency 
suspensions m^ be authorized until this meeting is held or 
refused." 

Please see the 1982 Code of Discipline for the coaplete text of 
Section 11.0. 

Headmasters and Principals are requested to submit to their 
respective Community Superintendent, on the attached form, 
information tinat certifies the fact tiiat tine meetings have been 
teld, or documents tdheir efforts to hold such a meeting. The Report 
to Community Superintendents shoxild include the names of all 
students who have been subjected to multiple suspensions through 
February 1, 1985, and the date that the cumulative suspension 
meeting was held or irefused. The purpose of ti^ meeting regarding 
cumulative suspensions is to explore non-punitLve means of avoiding 
future multiple suspensions. This meeting differs from an informal 
hearing.. 

If there have been no cases of multiple suspension at a school, then 
Principals/Headmasters must certify NONE and sign the attached 
form. In order to provide you with sufficient time to offer and 
conduct these meetings, I ask that you submit your report to your 
Community Superintendent no later tiien February 8, 1985. Community 
Superintendents are asked to forward all reports to the Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations with their commpnts no later than 
March 1, 1985. 

V. Minimum Attendance Rules: 



Staff is advised that minimum attendance rules will be enforced 
according to the Promotion Policy of the Boston Public Schools 
(i.e., more tiian 15X absenc:a mandates failure); however, time absent 
due to suspension may not be included in counting absences towards 
tile maximum allowable days. See D^uty Superintendent's Memorandan 
regarding Attendance Rules and Waiver Policy. 



I 



StperlntBodent's Circular Ho. 4, 1984-85 

Septenijer 1, 1984 

- 8 - 



gMlARY— It is isportanC to note tiiaC the Staodords of Behavior and ds 1982 
Code ot Discipline are conecdve instruoeats and noC punitive ones. 
Orientation, training and impleasntatlon o£ tliese documents must be doae in a 
positive manner. 

ALL INqgiRIES CaXESNnC THIS CIRCULAR SHXJLD BE AOXESSED TO THE QFEICE OF 
THE DEEVTY SUFEXUNQUDENT/saCOL QPBRATiaG, 26 COUBJ STREET, BOSTGN, 
MASSACUUSETIS 02108, TELEPHONE N3. 726-6200, EXT. 5330. 



Robert R. Splllane 
Superintendent o£ Public Schools 



Attachments ; 

I. Standards o£ Behavior 

II. Letter to Parent or Guardian 

III. Memorandun - School Based Rules - Modification of Approval Process 
17. SuBsnary of Key Activities and Dates For Code of Discipline 

V. Dates for Oin^tatlon and Dissemination of Standards of Behavior 

VI. Form CD 4 - Sdxol-Based Rules 

VII. Foxan CD 1 - ^illtlple Suspensions 

VIII. Form CD 3 - Students Who Have Not Returned fron Suspension 
DC Form A ^Eleport of School Incidents 

X. Form B Witoess R^xjrts 

XI. Form C Monthly Suspension Repoirt 

XII. Form D Monthly Assault Report 



RSP/jMc 



-^31- 



July 24, 1984 



STANDARDS OF BEHAVIOR IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Students have the right to an education and to all rights 
guaranteed by the Constitution, including the right to personal 
safety. In return, they oust respect the rights of other students, 
teachers, and staff. To protect these rights, rules have been writtei 
for all students in Boston's public schools. 

Learning and teaching can take place only when everyone behaves 

with care and respect for everyone else. Students and teachers camioi' 

work together where there is fear, disorder or violence. The rules 

below will be enforced in all public schools. 

STUDENTS FROM KINDERGARTEN THROUGH GRADE 12 ARE EXPECTED: 

- TO COME TO SCHOOL EVERY DAY, ON TIME, TO LEARN AND 

TO WORK. THEY ARE ENCOURAGED TO TAKE AN ACTIVE PART IN 
ALL SCHOOL ACTIVITIES. 

- TO BEHAVE RESPECTFULLY TOWARDS PEOPLE OF ALL AGES 
RACES, ETHNIC GROUPS, RELIGIONS AND OF BOTH SEXES. 

STUDENTS WHO VIOLATE THE FOLLOWING RULES MAY BE SUSPENDED OR, IN 
SOME CASES, EXPELLED. ETCPULSION IS EXCLUSION FROM SCHOOL FOR UP TO 
ONE CALENDAR YEAR. STUDENTS ARE NOT ALLOWED: 

- To bring to school dangerous objects of no reasonable 
use to a student in school, such as knives, guns, mock 

guns, studded belts or bracelets, or other weapons 
prohibited by state law. POSSESSION OF FIREARMS WILL 
RESULT IN EXPULSION. POSSESSION OF A DANGEROUS OBJECT 
WILL RESULT IN SUSPENSION. THE SECOND POSSESSION OF 
ANY DANGEROUS OBJECT MAY RESLTT IN EXPULSION. 

- To threaten or to harm anoch'e'r person. HAR.MING 
ANOTHER PERSON WITH A WEAPON WILL RESULT IN 
EXPLOSION., THE USE OF A MOCK GUN IN A THREATENING 
MANNER WILL RESULT IN EXPULSION. 

- To bring nonprescribed drugs, marijuana, narcotics or 
alcohol to school, or to use, sell or distribute such 
drugs or alcohol in school. SELLING OR DISTRIBUTING 
DRUGS MAY RESULT IN EXPULSION. 

STUDENTS WHO VIOLATE THE FOLLOWING RULES MAY BE SUSPENDED. 
STUDENTS ARE NOT ALLOWED: 

- To take by force things that belong to other people. 

- To steal. 

- To damage or to deface (graffiti) property that 
belongs to other people or to the school. 

-'13?- 



Page Two July 24, 1984 



- To b«hav« on school buses or «c bus stops In ways that 
puc other people in danger. 

- To disrupt school, classrooms, or school-'sponsored 
activities. 

- To Interfere with other students' learning — for 
example, by continuously and purposefully making noise. 

- To use sexually offensive or intifflidating language, 
obscena gestures or body contact. 

- To be in places in school vhere they should not be. 

- To refuse to leave an area when requested. 

Additional grounds for discipline are listed in Section 7.0 of 
the 1982 Code of Discipline and in each school's School-Based Rules. 

Students may be removed to another classroom or school where thej 
will continue to receive instruction and where they will be asked co 
examine their behavior and the problems it is causing ocher people anc 
themselves. In the most serious cases, the Boston School Police and 
the courts will be. Involved. In addition, students nay be expelled 
from school. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF MUST BE DIRECTLY INVOLVED WHEN 
EXCLUSIONARY DISCIPLINE IS BEING CONSIDERED FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION 
STUDENTS . 

In a democracy, everyone has the right to be creaced fairly, ever 
when It seems that he or she has violated rules or lavs. Students are 
entitled to a fair hearing with notice of the time and place, under 
procedures outlined in the 1982 Code-of Discipline. At the hearing, 
students and parents must be told what »he charge is. They have the 
right to tell their side of the story. 

The purpose of these standards and rules is to develop 
self-discipline; to prevent trouble from arising; and to make our 
schools safe and wholesome places in which to learn. 

A COPY OF THE 1982 CODE OF DISCIPLINE IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST 
AT YOUR SCHOOL OR DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE. 

Additional Information and assistance may be obtained by calling 
STUDENTS, PARENTS AND STAFF, as follows: 

STUDENTS STAFF PARENTS 

boston Student 6f f ice of School Monitoring Departmer. 

Advisory Council Operations Citywide Parents 
726-6200, Ext. 5333 Boston Public Schools Council 

726-6200, Ext. 5330 426-2450 



-^33- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF TH£ SOPERiNTENOENT 

ROBERT R SPILLANE 

Dear Parent or Guardian: 

The St:andards o£ Behavior in the Boston Public Schools describes the 
behavioral expectations for our students. In addition to these expectations, 
the Standards o€ Behavior descrilse the procedures and hearing rights that must 
be fiallowed to assure students, parents, teachers, and administrators that 
schools will maintain a safe and nondlsruptlve atmosphere essential to tine 
teaching and learning process. Please note that the Standards of Behavior 
place great emphasis on the safety of every student. 

It Is the policy of the Boston Public Schools to attempt to resolve 
disciplinary problems by every means short of suspension f r o m school. Fair 
and reasonable procedures will be followed to assure students of their 
rights. St\^ents may, according to established rules, regulations and 
procedures, request and receive a fair hearing in any instance in which they 
feel they have been unfairly treated. In turn, students must recognize that, 
to maintain an atmosphere condvicive to learning, the reasonable exercise of 
authority by school officials .is necessary. 

Parents are vital to the sviccess of any school. Me welcome and encoxnrage 
parents to confer with teachers regarding the progress of their children. 
Their assistance is essential to the teaching and learning process. 
Reinforcing at home the academic and behavioral expectations of stxxJents Is an 
invaluable contribution to the child's success at school. The active 
invDlvemsnt of parents with the school helps to insure that their children 
will achieve their highest potential. Adherence to the rules and regulations 
in the Standards of Behavior is one way in which students can guarantee their 
success in school. Read the Standards of Behavior which accompanies this 
letter and become familiar with its contents. Please discuss ttese behavioral 
expectations with your children. If you have questions or need assistance in 
interpreting ar^ portion of this document, please call your school. 

It is very Important that we know that each parent has received a copy of 
the Standards of Behavior. After signing below, have your child return this 
letter to hisAier school. 

With every good wish, 

Robert R. Splllane 
Superintendent of Schools 



This is to acknowledge that I have received, read and understand the Standards 
of B^iavior of the Boston Public Schools. 

Nanie of Student (s) "^ Signature ot ParentyOuardian 

Name ot SdEoI 




MEM3RANDIH 

To: Ccjonamity Superlntendeats , Principals and Headmasters /\ 

From: Fobert S. Feterkln, Deputy Superlnteadent/School Operations d 

Re: School Based Rules - ModificatijsQ of Approval Process 

Date: May 15, 1984 



Please be advised that I have incorporated yoiir comments into this 
memorandum. The result of my final review of the School Based Rules 
submissions fbr school year 1983->84) is that I have detennined some changes 
must be made in the process. As noted before, Principals , Headmasters and 
Connunity Superintendents are responsible for the much improv&d School Based 
Rules for school year 1983-84. As a result of ny review of these rules I have 
learned much .about the d^-to-day administration of the various levels of 
schools. It is this learning which I apply in tht- following changes and 
modifications of the School Based Rules: 

1. School Based Rules must be developed, reviewed, and approved locally 
during the August workshop period anid a ppro v ed centrally rio later 
tiian Septesiber 10 of a given sctxxsl year. I believe appropriate 
student, staff and p ar e nt input can be garnered. 

2. Subsequent to the a p p r ov al of School Based Rules they should be 
POSTED. 

3. Administrators MUST indicate, by name and position, who in their 
schools has been dpsi.gnafpd to suspend. 

4. Ifo School Based Rules or otiiier regulations may indicate that a 
certain nuaber of tardiea equals an absence. Such indications would 
violate X±^ Code of Discipline and render fair application of the 
Promotion Policy impossible. 



-il35- 



To: ConxEunity Superintendents, PirLncipals and Headmasters May 14, 1984 

- 2 - 

5. Posting of School Based Rules in each school should be as set out 
below: 

a. Entire rules should be posted in the following areas: 

Main Office 
Trophy Area 
Teacher Launge 

b. Applicable sections only should be posted in: 

Cafeteria 

Gymnasium 

SPC Bulletin Board 

Industrial Arts and other shops 

and, where possible, in classrooms 

Provided to each student. 

Tte change in thinking here is to note that a major purpose of School Based 
Rales is their posting and dissemination. 

6. Although we will continue to use the same basic fiarm for School 
Based Rules as used during school year 1983-84, particular types of 
offenses lEList be address^ within School Based Rules . The purpose 
of this manaatory inclusion of issues is not to direct specific 
responses to offenses, but to delineate a range of offenses that are 
covered by t±& progressive responses to offenses. I agree that a 
list of 1-100 offenses with responses would not be help&il. 

These offenses are listed by level and are th£ result of a survey of 
School Based Rules submitted by the variot:is schools by level during 
sctKJol year 1983-84; i.e. , 

a. - all middle and high schools must have School Based Rules which 

relate to student locker policy; 

- all middle and high schools must have School Based Rules that 
determine and specify unauthorized areas of the building 
clearly; 

- all middle and high schools must specify the consequences, if 
any , for the wearing of hats either in school or in individuaT 
classes. 

- all middle and high schools using a detention pro g r am should 
include a general description in School Based Rules. 

- all middle and high schools must include a section on shop 
safety rules. 

• 

b. - all elementary schools must have School Based Rules that 

respond to the issue of misbehavior or inappropriate behavior 
such as wrestling A^arate at recess, running (when not involved 
in organized games) , leaving the yard-reserved areas at recess 
for specific activities. 

- all elementary schools must have a policy for early arrivals to 
school property. (See comments section below.) 



-k36- 



Cbanunity Superintendents, Principals and Headmasters Mardi 27, 1984 

* . • 3 - 

6. (Cont'd.) 

c. - all schools at all levels must have School Based Rules that 
respond to the eating of &od la unauthorized areas of the 
building; i.e., confiscation, etc.; 
- all sdcols ac all levels cust have School Based Rules that 
respond to the possession of unauthorized, inappropriate but 
not dangerous items, such as radios, waUoien, in the school 
building; 

all schools at all levels should respond to issue of vandalism 
and defacement of school property. 

7. As during school year. 1983-84, elempnfary schools will be asked to 
specify those concerns which will require adadnistrative 
intervention and those concerns th.at are e:q>ected to be resolved by 
classroom teachers. 

8. All elementary schools will be asked to specify the use of in-school 
suspension; i.e. , detaining a student outside of his/her own 
classroom. (For exnrple, students nnjst be under adult supervision 
at all tiny 3, therefore students should not be sent to sit outside 
in the corridor for any offense.) I vinderstand the need for 
assistance to elementary schools in this area. I have been working 
with staff to try to develop scheduling options and other variations 
on positive approaches to discipline. 

9. I Have provided a structure far stiident bdiisvlor on buses 
(AttachnKit 1) , but I do request Lhat Principals/Hetniuasters 
prescribe in tbzix School Based Rules what non-exclusionary 

\ alternatives they might use to respond to inappropriate bus 

behavior. In response to your very constructive conments, I don't 
believe t±iat all bus rules necessarily require daily enforcement as 
much as they require teachli^ of appropriate behavior. We will 
provide some form of bus "monftorLng for school year 1984-85. 

Finally, Administrators may respond to bus misbehavior by suspending 
or expelling students from buses AFTER A HEARING. Remember that 
while suspension from the bus is an "alternative to suspension" fron 
school, it could be viewed as tantamount to suspensixsn from school 
for students traveling across the city. Hence, the hearing 
requirement. Community Superintendents ONLY may suspaid from buses 
lor^er than 5 days AFTER a hearing. ■ The same applies to permanent 
exclusion from buses. 

OIHER CCMMEOTS; 

1. Early arrivals - Elementary schools should inform parents of the 

\jnflvailability of supervision at schools prior 
to specified times in the morning. Unless 
specific prior arrangements have been made, we 
bear no legal responsibility for early arrivals. 

-^37- 



To: Cbmnunity Superintendents March 27, 1984 

-4 - 

OTHER OCMMEmS (Cbnt'd.) 

2. Restitution - Restitution enforcement is a function of either 

court complaints or use of restitution as an 
alternative to suspension, disciplinary transfer 
or expulsion. Restitution nay be in the farm of 
services such as erasing graffiti. 

3. Refusal of parents to cooperate -Parental refusal to coooerate 

(i£tSi3~Beirings , evali:ations , etc.} should be 
documented thoroughly. . Students should be kept 
out far the mtrHmm perlod of suspension. 
Safety Services and Attendance Officers vdJ.1 
assist In notifying parents, etc. After 
reasonable effcirt. Form 51A Qanplaints nay be 
sought. Comnunity Superintendents can be very 
supportive and help&il en this issue by 
escalating the level and seriousness of hearings. 

I hope that the above changes will allow Principals/Headaasters the 
flexibility to respond to indr/idual needs within thjair school buildings, and 
provide students with an awareness of exactly what rules apply within their 
given school building. In order to have School Based Rules approved centrally 
by Septenier 10, 1984, they should be subadtted to the Conrminity 
Superintendent by Auigust 29, 1984, then transmitted to the Deputy 
Superintendent of Schx)l Operations no later th -^ a August 31, 1984. 
Particularly important is the inclusion of the appropriate- ^-articipancs in the 
School Based Rules development, review and a pproval process. 

Please contact me or Ronald Spratling if there are any questions. 

Thank you for your continued cooperation. 

RSP/jMc 

Encl. 



-^38- 



ATEAOMENT IV 
SUMMARY OF KEY ACi'iVlTiES AND DATES P3R STANDARDS and SCHDCL BASH) RULES 

EATES AcnvmEs 



August 29. 1984 



Septenber 5. 1984 



Septenfcer" 5. 1984 



Orientation and training plans 
for Standards of Bdnavior due to 
Conxnunity Superintendents 

Copies of Standards of Bdnavior 
for middle and high school 
students 

School Based Rules coinpleted and 
posted 



Septenfcer 5-14, 1984 
Septenfcer 14, 1984 



Septedber 24, 1984 



October 3, 1984 



At the end of each month 



Vfi.thin five days of the 
end of each month 



As soon as possible 
end of each month 

va.thin five days of 
the end of each month 

F^TViary 8, 1985 



Febtuary 15, 1985 



Orientation and Training of staJEf 
and Students should be completed 

Form CD-4 School Based Rules due 
from Principals /Headmasters to 
Conmunity Superintendent 

Form CD-4 School Based Rules dvie 
from Community Superintendents to 
Deputy Superiiitendent of School 
Operations 

Certification of the completion 
of Orientation and Training 
Program due from Community 
Superintendent to Deputy . 
Superintendent/School Operations 

Form CD-3, Students \v1to Have Not 
Returned Fiom Suspension, due to 
Conmunity Superintendent 

Form CD-3 due from Community 
Superintendent to Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations 

Form A and B forwarded to 
Department of Safety Services 

FoTjm C and D sent to 
Department of Safety Services 

Cumulative Suspension reports , 
Form CD-I, due to Community 
Superintendent 

Cumulative Suspensions reports , 
Form CD-I, due from Conmunity 
Superintendent to Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations 



-^39- 



ATTAQWDrr V 
ORIINrAnON AND DISSE>fINATION OF STANDARES OF BEHAVIOR 

I. Orientation of Administrators and Teachers 

8-10-84 Orientation of Coonunity District Superintendents by the Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations 

8-15-8A Orientation of t^admasters /principals by Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations 

9-5-84 Orientation of teachers and staff by headmasters /principals 

9-6-84- Orientation of students by teachers, administrators, and other 
9-14-84 staff members. 



II. Activities 

9-5-84 - Teachers and staff call parents or guardians of all students in 
9-6-84 homeroom to tell them of the Standards of Behavior and urge 
them to read the document and return the Superintendent's 
letter signed. Teachers oust make every effort to have each 
student ratiim the signed letter. Before Septeni>er 14, 1984 
every student should have returned the signed letter to his/her 
homeroom teacher. 

This personal contact with the home also affords each teacher 
the opportunity to introduce himself/herself to the parents of 
his/her students. 

9»14-84 Teachers submit a list of those students who have not returned 
the signed letter to the headmaster /principal . The list should 
Include th.e student's name, room nuncer, address, and telephone. 

9-21-84 Headmasters /principals will establish and carry out a procedure 
9-28-84 Co contact parents of students who have not returned th^ signed 
letter and urge them to do so. 

9-28"84 Headmasters /principals submit a list of those students who have 
not returned the signed letter to the Community District 
Superintendent. The list should include the name of school, 
student's name, room number, address, and telephone. 

9-28-84 Community District Superintendents will establish and carry 
10-19-84 out a procedure to contact parents of students who have not 
returned the signed letter and urge them to do so. 

10-19-84 Cotitaunity District Superintendents submit a list of those 
students who have not returned the signed letter to Deputy 
Superintendent /School Operations. List should be separated' by 
schools and should include student's name, room number, 
address, and telephone. 



-kHO- 



.Form CD-4 School-Based Rules 



(1) 



SOffiCL-BASZD RULES 



'i SCaDGL 



KLINnPAL 

Section I 

Members of t±ie School-Based Rules Committee 



DATE 



fiAmlMtitzzaitars (2) 



Students (Middle and High S<±50ols only) (6) 



B, Wi 



i i ; i 

1 • ' 




i 1 i 


Parents 


(4) 


B 


H; 2; 


1 1 i 


1 ; i 

1 t 


1 "1 

t * 



B W ;0 



^ 



-. ; i I 

: ! I 



Teachers (2 - 4) 



! B' W 



-nm- 



Fom 04 School-Based Rules 
Section II 
Dates of Meetings 



BULL 



OOtSEqUENCES FCR VIOIAnON 



KULZ 



CD^c^JE^CI2 KR vioiAna; 



RULZ 



OONSEqUENCES FTP. VIOLATiaN 



-^^2- 



Form CD-4 Sciwol Based Rules (3) 

« 

RULE 



OOCgEgJElKSS PJl VIQU^TION 



RULE 



OavtSHj:jLJElC£S FIR yiOLATIQM 



RUIZ 













ODiHSfigUENCE^ KK VIOLATIQ^ 




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-^^3- 









Fom CD-4 School Based Rules 
RULE 



g^SEXjLJEHCES EtR VIDLATION 



.hl\^. 



Fom CD-4 Sctaool-Based Rules - (5) 

I. Please provide general scaceoenc o£ offenses 

whi.cn ceechers axe generally expected co resolve 
wlchia Che classiocm. (Elemencary Schools only) 



Please provide general scacemenc of offenses 
for which admlniscracive Incervendon is likely. 
(Elemencaxy Schools only) 



3. Please provide general scaceoenc of class cucdng 
policy, (middle and high schools only) 



4. Please provide general scateaenc of tardiness- 
policy (middle and high schools only) 



Signacur e 

Principai/HpflciiTwscar 



Siitfiacur e 

(■nrnmiiTTi ry Superincendenc 



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I CCPY TO CEP>P.T:-E:,T CP SC-^CCL safety Sc.nV!CE= 



*To HE USED pc:^ w:t:;E£3 pepcpts cp pupil sta..m- pepcpt: 



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APPENDIX E 



ATTACHMENT V 



BOSTON STUDENT HUMAN SERVICES COLLABORATIVE UP-OATE 



^^52- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




r'i«- I. \ I ■ t»l :• . \ 'i- •-. I s 



MEMORANDUM 

TO: President anrl Members, Boston School, 

FROM: Robert R. Splllane, Superintardent 

DATE: September 19, 1984 

RE: Update Report on the Boston Student Mun-an Services Colloixirati-.G 




Attached is a status report on the dev-clcpiTent and activities of 
the Boston Student Human Services ColialX3rati\T3. 

Staff will be available at the School Ccmnittce rreeting of 
September 25, 1934 to rerponJ to questions re'^jvxrdinq this report. 

RS/em 

Attachment 



-M53- 



. '. I • .1.1- 1 .. ■ I 



•1. •< . .« riX\? AiiEA „ 



BOSTON STUDENT HUMAN SERVICES COLLABORATIVE 
Status Report - September 1984 

Introduction 

In September, 1983, all Boston schools were invited to 
apply to participate in the Boston Student Human Services 
Collaborative. 

The purpose of the Collaborative is to facilitate the 
development of a more coordinated, effective and preventive 
human service delivery system to students and their families 
through the Boston Public Schools. 

Seventeen schools are participating in the Collaborative 
and over forty public and private human service agencies are 
working with the Collaborative. 

To date, agency committments have been demonstrated by the 
reallocation of agency resources, identification of new service 
dollars, provision of technical assistance with needs assessment/ 
planning activities to the Collaborative schools and development 
of a cooperative spirit on the part of agencies and schools 
towards the continued development of the Collaborative. 

The Collaborative is administered by an independent Board 
of Directors (see Attachment "1) consisting of representatives 
from state agencies and private agencies, and Boston Public 
Schools parents, students, teachers and administrators. 

This report covers the following significant developments 
and activities of the Collaborative for the period of May 18, 1984 
to September 19, 1984. 

I. Needs Assessment/Program Implementation status 

II. Resource development 

III. Training 

IV, Funding 

V. Committees of the Board of Directors 

I. NEEDS ASSESSMENT/PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION STATUS 

Eight (8) schools have completed the needs assessment/ 
planning phase which was initiated at the April 13, 1984 Workshop 
on Conducting a Needs Assessment and are ready to implement 
programs by October 1, 19 84. The schools are: 



-H5il_ 



Page 2 

P. J, Kennedy Elementary 
Timilty Middle 
M. E. Curley Middle 
Irving Middle 
Boston Technical High 
South Boston High 
Madison Park High 
Boston Prep High 

Seven (7) schools are engaged in the final stages of the 
assessment/planning process. They are: 

Grew Elementary 
Higginson Elementary 
Tobin Elementary 
Trotter Elementary 
Rogers Middle 
Cleveland Middle 
Dorchester High 

Two (2) other schools are just beginning the assessment/ 
planning process. They are: 

West Roxbury High 
English High 

The Collaborative will continue to provide technical 
assistance to those schools still engaged in needs assessment/ 
planning process. The following major student service needs 
have been identified through the Collaborative schools' needs 
assessment process: 

- individual, group and family counseling 

- services for teen parents 

- drug and alcohol education 

- crisis intervention services 

- information and referral services 

- consultation to school staff around issues of child abuse 
and neglect (identifying it and reporting it) 

The next stage in the development of the Collaborative is 
the signing of a formal "Memorandum of Agreement" between the 
school and each collaborating agency. The Memorandum of Agreement 
is a unique feature of the Collaborative and is designed to prevent 
misxinderstanding and miscommunication and to ensure that expectations 
are clear between schools and agencies and that there is follow- 
through on the responsibilities of each party. 

The Memorandum of Agreement is not a legally binding 
contract and should be viewed as a document which can be re- 
negotiated as needed to accommodate the changing needs of schools 
and agencies. 

A (draft) plan has been developed to manage the process of 
negotiating Memoranda of Agreements. This process will begin in 
October, 1984. 



ray< 



II. RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

The Collaborative is in the process of identifying and 
developing a comprehensive file on agency resources. A Human 
Services Resource Directory will be disseminated to schools 
and agencies by the end of the calendar year. 

III. TRAINING 

A plan for addressing on-going in-service training needs 
of Collaborative school/agency participants will be operational 
by late October 1984. Workshops for the fall will address topics 
of general concern such as the Memorandum of Agreement process, 
financial issues such as agency billing systems, state service 
contracts, foundation money and local fundraising strategies and 
in-school referral systems. 

IV. FUNDING 

Service Delivery Costs 

As previously reported, in the May 16th report to the 
School Committee, the Department of Social Services in February, 
1984 earmarked $200,000.00 in funding for private agencies to 
delivery direct individual group and family counseling services 
in the Collaborative schools (Attachment #2) . Five (5) 
Collaborative school/agency projects have been funded through 
this first of its kind, funding allocation from a public agency. 

The Collaborative is actively discussing with the Executive 
Office of Human Services, how to increase State monies for 
school level service delivery. EOHS has expressed a strong 
interest in working with the Collaborative to develop concrete 
proposals that will address service needs of students through 
greater public agency, participation. In addition, the 
Coilborative is exploring potential foundation and corporate 
support for school-based services. Obtaining funds to support 
service delivery costs is an urgent priority for the Collaborative, 
as the school year begins. 

Operational/Administrative 

Over the next few months the Collaborative will identify 
additional potential foundation and corporate support for 
operational costs of the Collaborative. 

V. COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Long Range Planning Committee 

The Planning Committee completed in August 1984, a long 
range plan to guide the Collaborative 's activities including 
its mission, goals and objectives. Attachment #3 is a copy 
of the BSHSC mission and goals statement voted on by the 
Board on September 19 . 



Page 4 

Evaluation Committee 

The Evaluation Committee developed an RFP for an independent 
evaluation of the Collaborative. It has reviewed proposals 
submitted and will soon enter into discussions to contract for 
a 1984-85 CollaUaorative evaluation. This committee will be 
responsible for monitoring the evaluation process. 

Training Committee 

It is recognized that school and agency personnel will 
need support to carry out the goals of the Collaborative. The 
Training Committee is responsible for identifying and developing 
in-service/staff development resources for Collaborative schools 
and agency personnel. 

School/Agency Pairings Committee 

This committee pairs schools and agencies for needs 
assessment/planning and service delivery purposes. In addition, 
it will oversee the "Memorandum of Agreement" process. 

Finance Committee 

The Finance Committee will develop public and private 
sector • funding to support operational school based service 
programs costs of the Collaborative. 



-^57- 



BOSTON STUDENT HUMi\N SEHVICHU CUl.l.ADi)»AT IVL' 
BOARD OF DIHfclCTOU'S ( !'.» ti-J-85) 



Executive CotrjnitteG 

NAME 

Robert Gass-Chairpcrson 
Donna Makin-Vico Chairperson 
Robert Hayden-VicG Chairperson 
Bonnie France-Vice Presidunt 
Arnita Cooper-Vico President 
Janes Walsh-Vice President 
Peter Post-Vice President 
Robert Chandler-Treasurer 
Ronald Young-Secretary 
Erline Shearer-Member at Lanju 
Janet Short 



AGENCY / S CHOOL /C.Wu'JP 

Family & ChlMiciv's' Agency Executivi! 

Dcpt. of Social Services 

Brs/oe.x-.-e of the Superintendent' 

Dopt. of Mental He.ilth 

Parent 

DPS/Or'ficu of Fin.-ince & Adniinistrat| 

noston Panel of *\qoacy Executives 

United Wviy 

Boy's & Girl's Clubn of Boston 

OCtice Col; ChildriM; 

lloiiron i"''ihlic Schools/Principal 



MC'ivJbcrn 



Chela Tawa 
John Palladino 
Bonnie Purnell 
Lynn Seal 
Nancy Kaufman 
Karen Kane 
Joan Tighe ' 
John Bartholomew 
Richard Peters 
Roseanna Philliponi 

To Be Filled 
Hubie Jones 
William Dandridge 
Joyce Grant 

Kenneth Caldwell 
Janet Short 
Charles Ray 

To Be Filled 
Callie Smith 
Paula Johnson 
Ben Siegel, M.D. 
Althca Jones 
Maureen Walker 
Victoria Ko 
Sabrina Ware 
George Lamb, M.D. 
Arr.ando Martinez 

To Be Filled 



Uc{ t. o: i'ublic W«:l.-'iro 
n«.;pt . ct Youth ScrvLcei; ,|l 

Depr. . or Public Health I! 

Dcpt. or Kducation 

Kxccuti.*/' Office o. :l'>--!.-n Services 
Dcpt. <jt iieuLth f. liospitals 
Ailianof for Youn.j Tar^ilies • 
r.'eiqf'jDoi-.-.ood C-ntors for Youth 
Federati'-a of Eil.K.'r: Agency Directors 
Council oL Adiiiini.straLocs of Hispani 
Acjenciea wl 

Ur;ivorn if.y CorCTutiity 

lU'tv'Of f ICO. of Curri :ulu:ii & Instructi 
Drs/Coumiunity Dir.crict Superintenden 
DPiJ/Oftico of f^cticoL Oti-^rnticns 
BPS/SLiuirnt !'u[)forf. Services 
nrs/Kloin*.-ntary iic'.K^el iTincipals 
DPS/Middlo School :-i.-*.;.cipals 
BPS/!li»3h School Hea.lmusters 
nrs/Teacher 
UPS/Teachor 

Paront.'C 1 tyvvido Parent" Council 
Paient/'Ci tj'^ide rai-«.rnts Council 
Parent/H'Mue & Sv?hool Ar.sociation 
Student 
Student 

Dept. of Heal t-h !. t-osp-tals 
Mayor 'li Off ice 'City of ^.oston 
Bo 3 to n C ..ii/jnun i. !: y S ohoo 1 s 



-^58- 



••:e sg^:". :v* . If ;•• !• i: of mr < i(: c-. "iosro 




BOSTON STUDEOT HUMAN SERVICES OOLLABORATIVE 



TO: President and ^^e^i>e^3, Boston School Co(ntiiittt.H» 

FROM: Anna Williams, Director, Boston Student Human Services Collntxjratlve ^~^ 

DATC: October 5, 1984 

RE: Addetvlum to the September 19 IJSIISC Import 



Mar;garet Janey has been hired as Deputy Director I"jy the Board of Directors 
effective Septeniser 4, 1984. 

Under the supervision of the Director die Deptity's job g<vil is to Implement 
t^e objectives of the Collaborative with particular cinphnsls on ccxardlnatlon, 
supervision and evalu'itlon of agency services, prngrnins, anfl personnel as tbey 
interface with ti>c Boston Public Schools. 

In addition, Elaine McClothin has hcMn hlretl as .Aflmuilstratlvi* Socrotiry 
effective August 6, 1984. Sal.irlcs for both jvxsltlons art» su(ij>ortc<} by 
private foundation ''jnints which are Mflmlnlsten^l by the Hnltt'fi Vny of 
Massachusetts. 

Department of Social Services (DSS) Counselint^ Conr.ricts 

Attached please fiml a revised Att^ichmcnt If 2 wtilch delineates dv oxt-.'mal 
agencies wI>d were awarded contracts, tlie schools wlio will receive services and 
the dollar amount for each contract. 

The contracts were awarded by DSS utilizing tJv^lr departments standards and 
criteria. Agency proposals were required by DSS to demonstrate ovideni:e that 
the school admlnistrntor trad approwd the agency's intent to dellvt-r services 
to the school. 

cc Robert Splllane 
Robert iiayden 
Kenneth Caldwell 



-i]59_ 



DSS Pimded Collaborative Programs - 1984-85 
' (PuDiic-Privace Paccnersnip Program) 



Counseling Services 

Agency 

Project Place 

South Cove Qmunity Health Center 

Roxbury Childrens' Services 



Ecimenical Social Action Center 
N. E. Home for Little Waixiers 



School 

Tijnilty Middle 

South Boston High 

Madison Park High 
Boston Technical High 

M. E. Cur ley Middle 



Collaborative Programs Provided Through Agency Re-allocation - 1983-34 



Aaenc/ 

Ciinese Cultural Center 

Family Services Association 

Peoples' Task Force 

Boston Childrens' Services 
Association 

Family Boston Youth Program 



Ecur:«nical Social Action 

Committee 

N. E. Home for Little 
Wanders 



Services 

Instructional Physical 
Education 

Group Therapy 

Individual/Group Therapy 

Crisis Intervention and 
placement in temporary 
shelter career education 
curriculum 



School 

P. J. Kennedy Ele. 

Rogers Middle 
Boston Prepatory High 



Alcohol/drug education; 
recreational program; seminar 
on health issues 

Individual/group therapy M. E. Curley Middle 



Individual/group therapy 



~H6o- 



Revised Actach. 92 



DSS FVjraied Collaborative Pro^rans - 19.y»-85 
(Public-Private Paraiersnip lYosram) 



Counseling Services 

Agency 
Project Place 

South Cove Comrunity Henlth Ctr. 

Roxbury Childrens' Services 



Ecumenical Social Action Ctr. 
N. E. Home for Little V/anders 



ScJwol 


nollnr 
Arrexiht 




Tlxallty Middle 


$ 30,949.33 
10,316.^6 


- DSS 

- Partner* 

- TOTAL 


South ncrst;i>n llli;h 


$ 17,993.10 

5^997.70 

$ 23,W.?0 


- DSS 

- Partner* 

- lUl■.^L 


Miidlson Pnrk HLi-h 
IV>ston Tochinical High 


$ 99,996.00 
33,332.00 

$133,323.00 


- OSS 

- Partner* 

- TOTAL 


M. K. Curlcy Middle 


$ 5^1,923.92 
19,974.r-4 


- DSS 

- Partner* 




$ 79,8^.36 


- TOTAL 


DSS Total 

Partner Total 


$208,862.40 
69,^320.50 




C3<AND lUT-NL 


$278,483.00 





School A^c Parentins Services 1984-85 
(tton-Collaborativu Schi>>l.s ill i;^lblo) 



Baston Y. W, C. A. 



^-^Dcjrchcrster Htj'.h 
Ikjrkc I Ugh 



Cooprehensive School Age Parenting **English High 
Program 



$136,724.00 
50,000.00 



- DSS 

- DSS 



■*Represent3 a 25o/o dontatloo from tht? City of noston's Nci<>,hN>d-u>xl fVvelopncnt 
i Frnploynent Agency 

**Collaborativc Schools 



-^61- 



-> 



Revised Actach. S2 
Second page 



Collatorative Prograna Provided through Agency Re-allocntton - 1983-84 



Agency 

Chinese Culturnl Center 

Family Services /Vssocincion 

Peoples'. Task Force 

Boston Childrens' Services 
Association 

Faicily Boston Youth Program 



Zciraenical SocLil Action 
Comuittee 

N. K. Hotre for Little 
WancJers 



Sorviccs S<-i»'^'l 

IiistnictiotvU Pliyslcnl Kd. 

Cr(>«i[> Thtrr.ipy 

Iiv.lividual/Crouii TIu:rapy 

Crisis Intervyntlon and 
plncc:ntint in tcmixirary 
shflter carcor c'<ivuMtion 
curriculijm 

Alcolxjl/drug education: 
reoroation.ll pro^^rain; 
seminar on htialtli issues 



P. .1. iCfiinc-Jy n:ie. 
r. .1. Vcnnf'.v ^le. 
R»>',ers '-ILddle 
iV->ston Prep. High 

Btxston Prep. High 



Individifil/grou}i tl-it.'rav"'y M- ^. Curley Middle 



Individiujl/v'/AJUf) t^vrnpy ^t. K. Curley Middle 



-H62- 



APPENDIX F 



ENROLLEMENT AT BOSTON'S ALTERNATIVE SCHOOLS 



SCHOOL 


TOTAL 
Black 


ENROLLMENT 
White Other 


Boston Prep 


38 


42 2 


Fenway Program 
(English High) 


77 


63 44 



PERCENT ENROLLMENT 
Black White Other 



46 



42 



51 



34 24 



TOTAL 



82 



184 



Home Base School 
(Madison Park High) 



70 



15 15 



70 



15 15 



100 



?^ew Horizons Academy 
(King Middle) 



70 



40 18 



55 



31 14 



128 



3chool-Wi thin-School 
(South Boston High) 



20 



38 



11 



29 



55 16 



69 



Traditional Program 
(English High) 



564 



156 147 



65 



18 17 



867 



-463- 



PARENT AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



-1*^5- 



PARENT AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



P7VRENT 0RG2^NIZATI0NS 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Orders Establishing Racial 
Ethnic Councils, October 4, 1974. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



In this order the Court mandated the 
establishment of a three-tiered structure of 
citizen participation in the desegregation 
process. Racial Ethnic Parent Councilis 
(REPCs) , Community District Advisory 
Councils (CDACs) , and a Citywide Parents 
Advisory Council (CPAC) were organized at 
local schools, in each of the city's nine 
school districts, and citywide, 
respectively. The Court defined the 
purposes of these councils as to insure 
adequate and impartial investigation and 
responsible recommendations on racially and 
ethnically oriented problems arising in the 
school; to create a means of communication 
among parents, students and school personnel 
regarding the solution of such problems; and 
to promote an environment of understanding 
among the various elements of the 
community. In addition, the Court outlined 
specific guidelines for the composition of 
the councils, elections of members, 
vacancies in membership, meetings' schedules 
and agendas, the incurrence and 
reimbursement of expenses, and the training 
and assistance of council members. 

Partial Compliance 

Although the basic organization and purposes 
of the councils have remained the same over 
the years, their structure and functions 
have been modified by subsequent orders. In 
general, such modifications have been 



-467- 



II. 



ORDER 



designed to strengthen council operations in 
light of actual experience or in response to 
changing circumstances. 

Further modifications in the structure and 
purposes of the councils are necessary to 
insure more and meaningful parent 
participation on the school level, to 
redefine the councils' desegregation 
monitoring responsibilities and to guarantee 
parent participation in meaningful decision- 
making and planning with the school 
department. 

(See recommendations 2, 3 and 5 at the end 
of this report) . 

Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 1975, 
pages 86-100. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



In this order the Court mandated the 
establishment of a Citywide Coordinating 
Council (CCC) with approximately 40 members 
appointed by the court. The purpose of the 
CCC was defined by the Court as to foster 
public awareness of and involvement in the 
process of implementation of the Court's 
desegregation orders, with the primary 
responsibility for monitoring implementation 
on behalf of the court. The order outlined 
the organizational structure of the CCC, 
meetings' schedules and agendas, and the 
powers and authority of the council. In 
addition, it mandated the continuation of 
the REPCs, CDACs and CPAC as well as defined 
the relationship among the CCC and the other 
court-ordered parent organizations. 

Compliance 

The CCC went out of business on September 1, 
1978. This ended an organization whose 
members and staff contributed enormously to 
the implementation of the Court's orders. 
The two main reasons for the termination of 
the CCC were: (1) other agencies had 
developed to a point where they could carry 
on most of the activities of the CCC and (2) 
the funds required by the CCC for its 
operations were needed more urgently 
elsewhere. 



i 



-hm- 



Ill 



ORDER 



SUMMARY 



IV. 



ORDER 



Supplemental Order to August 24 Order 
Regarding Citizen Participation Groups, 
November 8, 1976. 



All functions of the District Council 
Liaison Committee of the CCC, especially 
those enumerated in the Court's order of 
August 24, 1976, were transferred to the 
CPAC and CDACs. This supplemental order 
addressed a question raised regarding the 
role of the School Committee in the 
selection and appointment of CDAC 
coordinators. The order limited the School 
Committee's role to compensating 
coordinators selected by the various 
CDACs. Accordingly, the Court ordered that 
those persons whose names were submitted for 
districts 3 and 5 coordinators be approved 
by the School Committee. 



FINDINGS Compliance 



Monitors have found Boston is in full 
compliance with this order. 

Memorandum and Further Orders as to Citizen 
Participation Groups, September 1, 1977. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



These orders and memorandum respond to 
recommendations for modifications in the 
court-ordered parent organizations filed 
jointly by CPAC and the CDACs. Two of the 
joint recommendations were emphasized as 
"critical" and these Court orders adopted 
both by (1) establishing a formal link 
between CPAC and the CDACs and (2) 
decentralizing the support and assistance to 
the REPCs from CPAC to the CDACs, except the 
CPAC would continue to supervise 
elections. A third recommendation was for 
increased staff, and the Court made no new 
rulings in this area. Also, other 
recommendations t'hat the word "Advisory" be 
dropped from the titles of CPAC and the 
CDACs and that the Court specify 14 rights 
of REPCs were rejected. 

Compliance 

Boston is in full compliance with this 
order. 



-M69- 



V. 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Further Orders as to Citizen 
Participation Groups (III), September 15, 
1978. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



VI, 



ORDER 



These orders and memorandum regarding the 
functions and responsibilities of citizen 
participation groups at the school, district 
and citywide levels are based for the most 
part on a joint motion filed by the 
plaintiffs and school defendants on March 
13, 1978. Essentially, these orders 
clarified the distinction among CPAC, CDACs 
and REPCs responsibilities as well as the 
procedure for evaluating the performance of 
members of the staffs of the various 
councils and for terminating staff members 
whose performance is unsatisfactory. 

Compliance 

Boston is in full compliance with this 
order. 

Order as to Monitoring Guidelines, May 8, 
1980. 



SUMMARY 



Generally, this ruling approved and adopted 
as orders of the Court with minor 
modification, the Procedural Guidelines for 
Monitoring filed by the school defendants on 
March 17, 1980. 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



While the CPC reports that The Procedural 
Guidelines for Monitoring should be modified 
to make them less stringent, Boston, on the 
other hand, maintains that the specific 
mandates of the guidelines, e.g., advance 
notice to school administrators are 
necessary. Monitors have found that 
existing guidelines make on-going monitoring 
of classroom activities difficult if not 
virtually impossible. (See recommendation 4 
at the end of this report). 



-470- 



VII. 



ORDER 



Memorandum and Semi-Final Orders on the 
Structure of Citizen Participation in the 
Desegregation Process, July 20, 1982 



SUMMARY 



In preparation for the termination of its 
direct supervision of the desegregation 
process, the Court entered these orders and 
memorandum to insure the continued vitality 
of the parent councils. They constitute the 
Court's preliminary rulings on the merits of 
CPAC's Self-Evaluation Task Force's 
recommendations for modifications in the 
form or structure of the parent councils. 
The orders are designed to: (1) increase 
the level of parent participation in the 
parent councils; (2) enhance the 
effectiveness of the parent councils by 
directing their main attention to those 
levels of school department operations at 
which decisions affecting the quality and 
equality of education in Boston are most 
often made; (3) encourage the most 
efficient use of limited staff and financial 
resources available to the parent councils; 
and (4) simplify the structure of parent 
councils, restricting membership to parents 
of students currently enrolled. 

Essentially, these orders change the old 
REPC/CDAC/CPAC structure of parent and 
community participation established pursuant 
to prior orders to the new SPC/DPC/CPC 
structure. The original purpose and basic 
structure of the parent councils are not 
changed by these orders. In addition, these 
orders establish a transition committee to 
manage the transition from the old structure 
to the new one . 



FINDINGS Partial Compliance 



Overall, there are three major problems with 
the present structure and functions of the 
parent councils: (1) parent participation 
on the local school level is extremely low; 
(2) tensions between the CPC and the school 
department have impeded effective parent 
participation in school department 
operations and decision-making affecting the 
quality and equality of education in 
Boston; and (3) even though the CPC is 



-^71- 



VIII. 



ORDER 



experiencing a period of relative stability, 
it has been in the recent and distant past 
riddled with organizational problems. 

Memorandum and Further Orders as 

to Parent Councils, August 25, 1982. 



SUMMARY 



FINDINGS 



These Orders reaffirmed the Court's semi- 
final orders on the structure of citizen 
participation in the desegregation process 
with minor modifications. Also, they: 
transferred the responsibility for 
monitoring implementation of the student 
desegregation plan at the local school level 
from the CDACs to the SPCs; made the CDACs 
advisory committees to community 
superintendents; delegated to the CPC the 
responsibility for coordinating and 
assisting the SPCs in their monitoring 
efforts; and gave the parent councils the 
right to participate in the screening of 
applicants for administrative positions in 
the Boston Public Schools. In addition, 
these orders allocated an annual budget of 
approximately $500,000 for parent councils' 
operations, and directed the CPC to hire and 
train staff. 

Partial Compliance 

There is not compliance in three areas of 
this order: (1) parent councils' monitoring 
is fragmented, leaving some monitoring areas 
uncovered; (2) parents have not participated 
in the screening of applicants for 
administrative positions because the school 
department has continued to postpone the 
screening and rating for permanent community 
superintendent positions and central office 
administrative postions; and (3) the CPC has 
not provided adequate staff development 
activities and training. 



OONCLUS I(»IS /RECOMIffiNDATI ONS 



1. Provisions should be made to maintain 
the parent councils as independent of 
the school department. 

2. The election process and the length of 
the term of membership to SPCs should be 



-^72- 



reviewed and modified to increase the 
level of parent participation. 

3. The monitoring responsibilities of CPC 
and SPCs should be reviewed and modified 
to concentrate on areas of pressing 
need. 

4. The procedural guidelines for the 
councils' monitoring of implementation 
of desegregation should be reviewed and 
updated in light of actual experience 
and changing circumstances. 

5. The Court-ordered parent organizations' 
relationship with other parent 
organizations in the schools should be 
reviewed and clarified. 

6. The CPC and local SPCs (with the support 
of the school department) should become 
more actively involved in Chapter 636 
proposal development and program 
implementation. 



-^73- 



The following orders 
Public Schools. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIOHS 

cover student organizations in the Boston 



I. 



RACIAL-ETHNIC STUDENT COUNCILS 



ORDERS 



Memoranda and Order Establishing Racial- 
Ethnic Councils, October 4, 1974 



SUMMARY 



Every middle and high school shall elect a 
Racial-Ethnic Student Council that is 
composed of students from all racial and 
ethnic groups represented in the school. 
This body shall meet not less than once a 
month during the school year with the 
expressed purposes of "investigating . . 
racially and ethnically oriented problems 
arising at the school . . . and creating a 
means of communication between parents, 
students, teachers and administrators." 



FINDINGS Non-Compliance 



No Racial-Ethnic Student Council (RESC) 
currently exists in any of the 13 high 
schools (out of a total of 16) that monitors 
have visited, and only one middle school 
visited had a functioning RESC (Thompson 
Middle School). The Student Affairs 
Director has confirmed these observations. 
Further, RESCs have not been in operation in 
most schools for a number of years, and 
little support has been provided by the 
school department to support the operation 
of these councils. 

The Student Affairs Director has stated that 
because the "racial climate in our schools 
has shown a marked improvement" there may 
not exist the same need for RESCs that 



-Hjl]. 



precipitated their formation. Therefore, 
Boston is considering initiating a 
modification to the Amalgamation Plan to 
replace the RESCs with Communication Boards 
in all high schools (See Monitoring Report 
No. 3). These Boards would be composed of 
students from all racial and ethnic groups 
in the school and would serve to mediate 
resolutions to school grievances and improve 
school-wide communication, school climate, 
and racial harmony. Communication Boards 
already existed in some form (prior to this 
plan) at Boston Latin School and Boston 
Latin Academy, while another Board was begun 
at Charlestown High last year. 

Currently, the Student Affairs Director has 
met with a subcommittee of the Headmasters 
Association. This group has agreed on the 
wording to a proposed modification of the 
orders and this amendment is now on the 
November agenda of the Headmasters 
Association (See Appendix B). If it is 
agreed upon, the amendment will then be 
submitted to the School Committee for 
approval. A modification to the Orders 
would then be initiated and training for the 
implementation of Communication Boards in 
several high schools would be planned for 
January 1985. A timeline has not yet been 
established for implementation in all high 
schools. 

El Comite de Padres previously expressed 
their concern that RESCs were sabotaged by 
the "deliberate" lack of support from the 
School Department and questioned whether 
Communication Boards would be treated in the 
same manner. It must be noted that, despite 
the efforts of the Student Affairs Office, 
Boston has been very slow to initiate the 
modification process, to designate funds for 
training and to decide on a process of 
implementation for Communication Boards. 
For example, initial funds for training of 
staff in 3 schools (which have yet to be 
identified) were targeted in April 1984, but 
have yet to be allocated. 

Boston must decide by the end of this school 
year whether they will support the formation 
of RESCs or Communication Boards in all high 
schools. In either case, Boston must 
develop an implementation plan, training 



-^75- 



schedule, and orientation for students, 
faculty and administrators and allocate 
funds for operational support. 



I. STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



ORDERS 

SUMMARY 



Amalgamation Plan 



This plan establishes the school system's 
student government organizations, all of 
which are to be racially representative. It 
orders the formation of student councils and 
Racial-Ethnic Student Council subcommittees 
in all middle and high schools, the 
elections of students from each high school 
to serve on a city-wide student organization 
(Boston Student Advisory Council), the 
formation of a BSAC Executive Committee, and 
student representation on all high school 
School Parent Councils. 

FINDINGS Partial Compliance 

Boston has employed uniform student council 
election procedures in all middle and high 
schools for the past two years. The 
majority of schools have submitted election 
data to the Student Affairs Office, and all 
of these schools have elected racially 
representative councils (See Appendix A). 
However, at the time of this report, 13 out 
of 45 schools (the same number as last year 
although not all of them are the same 
schools) had not submitted any election data 
for this school year. In addition, as 
stated previously, no data has been 
submitted on the election of Racial-Ethnic 
Student Councils. 

The Boston Student Advisory Council (BSAC) 
and BSAC Executive Committee have been 
racially representative and have met 
regularly during the entire 2-year 
monitoring period. 

Last year, 10 out of 17 high schools elected 
student representatives to School Parent 
Councils. At the time of this report, no 
data was available on this year's 
representatives. This Order is problematic 
for those schools that have minimally 
operating SPCs. However, the Student 



-i<76- 



Affairs Director has met with 
representatives of the Citywide Parent 
Council to explore ways of increasing 
student representation to these councils. 



CX)NCLUS KXl/RECXMMENDATICHilS 



Boston has operating student councils in 
most middle and high schools and has a 
functioning city-wide student 
organization. All of these organizations 
comply with racial and ethnic representation 
guidelines. RESCs exist in very few of the 
middle and high schools, and the School 
Department has been slow in initiating a 
modification to replace the RESCs with 
Communication Boards. 

Before the Board can recommend that the 

Court disengage from this area, Boston 

should demonstrate progress in the following 
areas: 

1. Boston must decide whether to support 
the implementation of RESCs in all high 
schools or initiate a modification to 
replace the RESCs with Communication 
Boards in all high schools. 

2. A procedure, timeline and funding for 
training for the implementation of 
Communication Boards or RESCs must be 
identified. 

3. All middle and high schools must submit 
yearly election data on student councils 
by November 1 of each school year. 



-^77- 



BOSTOil DESEGREGATICW REPORT #4 

STUDENT AND PARENT ORGANIZATIONS 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENT 



PARENT ORGANIZATIONS 

1. Citywide Parents Council: Tentative Monitoring Program 

2. Citywide Parents Council: Update on Elected Councils 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

1. Memo: Vivian Carlo to Dem French re Date Report 

2. Boston Student Advisory Council 

3. Memo: Vivian Carlo to Headmaster Subcomittee or Support 
Services Re Proposed Implementation of Communication 
Board/Fairness Committee 



-i|79- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TempiePiace Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



TENIA TIVE MONITORING PROGRAM (CITYWIDE) 1984-1985 CITYMIDE PARENTS COUNCIL 



TRANSPORTATION SAFETY 

To monitor training and deployment of transportation attendants and numbers of 
safety incidents during year #1 of transportation attendant program on school buses. 

METHODS: Attend transportation attendant training sessions 
Survey parents regarding transportation services 
Investigate individual transportation complaints 



PROMOTIONAL POLICY 

To monitor the first year of implementation of the BPS Promotional Policy to determine 

- How is the BPS informing parents of the new policy and the gradual implementa- 
tion schedule? , 

- What efforts is the BPS undertaking to promote its 85% attendance requirement || 
among students in 1984-85? 

- Whether parents are being notified of student academic problems before ^^ 
December 15th? WM 

- Are schools providing on-going remediation for students in danger of being ™ 
retained? 

- Are Individ 1 Review Teams established and meeting in all schools? 

- What are the numbers of retentions in grade in the Boston Public Schools based 
on attendance failure? 

- What are the numbers of retentions in grade in the Boston Public Schools based 
on academic failure? 

- How will summer school assignments and remediation be implemented during 1984- 
85? 



CODE OF DISCIPLINE 

To monitor the 1984-85 modified Code of Discipline of the Boston Public Schools to 
determine: 

- Whether numbers of children are being excluded from public education for 
one calendar year? 

- To determine whether suspensions increase signifigantly during the 1984-85 
school year under the modified code? 

- To review whether black and hispanic students are excluded longer and more 
frequently than other students? 

Amulti-cultural parents organization nw^'^*^ quality, desegregated education 

-480- 



I 



Page Two " TENTATIVE MONITORING PLANS 1984-85 CPC 
! 
SCREENING COMMITTEES 

To monitor and insure that parents are involved and trained to serve on local, 
district, and citywide screening coirmittees to select appropriate school, district, 
and central personnel. 

METHODS: Identify parents to serve on screening committees 
Provide training for screening committee parents 

Survey screening committee parents randomly regarding their participatory 
experiance on screening committees 



-U81- 







City wide Parents Council 

59 Tempie Place Boston.Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



DEPARTMENT OF FIELD SPECIALISTS 



TO 
FROM 
SUB J 
DATE 



Claire Crayton, Assistant Director 
Mattleen;'Karris-Wright, Supv. , Field Specialist 
Update on Elected Councils 
October 31, 1984 



Attached, you will find a tentative report on 
the status of the elected school parent councils 
by school, by district. 

I have not included the racial breakdown and other 
data, which will not be ready until mid to 
late November. As you know, collection of data 
is slow, but steady. I hope this serves to 
help you make a report to your immediate super- 
visor, and the CPC . 

If you need additional information, feel free 
to contact me. 

Also, some schools are still in the process 
of electing councils. I have noted the dates 
of those elections as much as the specialists 
were able to procure dates and ccmjnittments 
from che school staffs. 

Thank you . 



-i<82- 






^'•^^ ^^.^^:*f\j,in^ Ml i>tl;»., WA«>A<-«»AMO^n/-< aAi i.^'Sfl/' 



SCHOOL 



NUMBER ELECTED 



OTHER ELECTION PLANS 



Citywide 






High 






Schools 


Brighton 


10 




Jamaica Plain 


6 


"■■■ 


W. Roxbury 


4 




Hyde Park 


7 




Dorchester 


1 




Burke 


8 




S. Boston 


6 




HHORC 


1- 



Total 



42 



One 



Baldwin 


13 


Farragut 


26 


Gardner 


12 


Garfield 


7 


Hamilton 


9 


Tobin 


15 


Winship 


5 


Edison 


10 


Taft 


8 



Total 



105 



Two 



Agassiz 


4 


Ellis 


9 


Fuller 


6 


Kigginson 


4 


Kennedy 


6 


Longfellow 





Manning 


7 


Mendell 


11 


Parkman 


7 


Curley 


5 


Lev; is 





Roosevelt 






to be rescheduled 
to be rescheduled 



Total 



59 



Three 



Bates 





Beethoven 


10 


Kilmer 


7 


Lee 


16 


Lyndon 


8 


Mattahunt 


13 


Mozart 


8 


Philbrick 


9 


Sunner 


9 


Irving 





Lewenberg 


12 


R.G. Shaw 


9 



Total 



100 



to be scheduled 



to be scheduled 



-^83- 



Four 



Channmg 


4 


Chittick" 


10 


Conley 


8 


Greenwood 


12 


Grew 


6 


Hemenway 


8 


Roosevelt 


3 


P. A. Shaw 


2 


Taylor 


9 


Rogers 


5 


Thompson 


5- 



Total 



76 



Five 



Dickerman 11 

Endicott 

Everett 

Fifield 8 
S. Greenwood 2 

Kenny 7 

Mather 8 

O'Hearn 

Stone 8 

ACC 9 

Boston Prep 5 

Holland 2 

Marshall 5 

Murphy 7 

Cleveland 12 

Holmes 3 

Wilson 4 

McKinley 8 



election 11/27 
election 11/13 



election 11/26 



Total 



100 



Six 



Clap 


5 


Condon 


4 


Dever 


12 


Emerson 





Mason 


10 


Perkins 


17 


Perry 


9 


Russell 


5 


Tynan 


5 


Winthrop 


5 


Dearborn 





Gavin 


7 


McCormack 


8 



to be scheduled 



to be scheduled 



Total 



97 



-H8H- 



Seven 



Blackstone 


6 


Eliot 


5 


Harvard-Kent 


10 


Hurley 


8 


Quincy 





Warren Pres 


10 


Edwards 





Michangelo 


6 


Timilty 


10 


Charlestown 


6 



to be scheduled 



Total 



60 



Eight 



Adams 


11 


Alighieri 


6 


Bradley 





P . Kennedy 


1 


0' Donne 11 


6 


Otis 


9 


Barnes 





Cheverus 





East Boston 


5 



to be scheduled 
second election 11/9 



election 11/7 



Total 



51" 



Nine 



Curley 


12 


Guild 


11 


Hale 


13 


Haley 


15 


Hennigan 


6 


Hernandez 


11 


Jackson Mann 


15 


Mann Unit 


4 


McKay 


9 


Ohrenberger 


10 


Trotter 


13 


King 


7 


Mackey 


6 


Wheatley 


9 


Boston High 





Latin Academy 


8 


Latin School 


21 


Technical 


16 


Copley 


17 


English 


7 


Madison 





L'irana 


4 



election not set 



ejection 11/8 
4 



Tctal 



214 



Citywide effective 10/31 



904 -i485- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



RE: 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

SCHOOL OPERATIONS 

Joseph M. McDonough 

APPENDIX A 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: Dan French 

FROM: Vivian D, Carlo, Director Student Affairs 



Data Report 



DATE: November 5, 1984 

1) Student representatives to School Parent Council: I have 
not received specific information from schools listing 
student reps to SPC's. I have spoken with Geraldine 
David and Michael Kozu at the CPC who said they would 
generate a memorandum to all high schools and high school 
programs encouraging that a student rep to the SPC be 
selected. 

2) Student Council Data reports for high schools and middle 
schools are attached. Where no data has been provided 
memoranda have been sent to those schools encouraging 
compliance. 

3) The BSAC and the School Committee have met once this year 
in October. At that time the Agreement between BSAC and 
the School Committee was discussed. The School Committee 
was still in agreement to the specifics. However, BSAC 
students decided on their own to re-write the agreement 
in language that the current BSAC can grasp as their own. 
They have also decided to re-work the Course Evaluation 
Section, directing it move toward curriculum and less 
specifically toward the teacher. Sub-committees on re- 
writing the Agreement and the Course Evaluation, in- 
cluding implementing have been set up. I will inform you 
as to the progress of both sub-committees. 

4) Communication Boards/RESC's: 

On October 30, 1984 I met with Tom Hennessey, Senior 
Advisor, High Schools; and the Headmasters Sub-committee 
on Support Services to discuss the amendment to the 



:6 :CU=?T STREET, BOSTON \;aSSACwU?='^'^'~ "'03 

-U86- 



• "'26-6200 9At 5330 AREA 617 



Amalgamation Plan and the Implementation of Communication 
Boards to replace RESC's in all high schools. After much 
discussion r agreement was reached. Attached you will 
find the most current amendment agreed upon by the sub- 
committee. The amendment will be placed on the Head- 
masters Association meeting agenda in November and along 
with their recommendation, will be submitted to the 
School Committee meeting agenda in December. With agree- 
ment a possibility at this time, training and implementa- 
tion should begin in several schools no later than 
January, 1985. From the October 30th meeting, I believe 
the School Department will be committed to Comnunication 
Board implementation. 



/bab 



-H87- 



HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT COUNCIL DATA REPORT 



1984-1985 SCHOOL YEAR 



Black White 



A.C.C. 


8 


7 


Boston High School 


5 


4 


Boston Latin' Academy 


38 


47 


Boston Latin School * 






Brighton High 


12 


6 


Boston Technical* 






Charlestown High 


17 


7 


Copley Square* 






Dorchester High 


19 


5 


East Boston 


19 


21 


English High* 






H.H.H.O.R.C. * 






Hyde Park 


58 


9 


Horace Mann 


3 


2 


Jamaica Plain 


15 


4 


J.E. Burke High 


40 


5 


Madison Park ' 


\H 


a 


McKinley Technical 


13 


4 


McKinley Voc. 


10 


6 


Mario Umana 


6 


6 


West Roxbury 


24 


12 



Hispanic Asian Other Male Female Total 



2 
2 
2 



13 

4 
2 





1 

10 

1 


3 
6 






6 



16 


1 




1 


1 






6 





1 





7 11 

1 10 

27 66 



12 



16 



18 
11 
93 

28 



n Data not provided 53 

13 15 28 

1 8 36 44 



3 


36 


34- 


70 




4 


3 


7 





10 


19 


29 





22 


25 


47 


i 


a 


HI 


Xh 





12 


5 


17 





17 


2 


19 





9 


15 


24 





15 


21 


36 



* NO DATA SUBMITTED. Memo has been sent to these schools. 



-J^BB- 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS STUDENT COUNCIL DATA REPORT 



Black 



White 



Hispanic 



Asian Other 



Total 



DISTRICT I 
Edison 
Taft 
Tobin 



9 
6 
8 



4 
6 
6 



10 
6 
6 



12 
4 












35 
22 
20 



DISTRICT 
MTT 



II 



Curley 
Lewis * 
T. Roosevelt * 

DISTRICT III 
Irving * 
Lewenberg 
R. Shaw 

DISTRICT IV 
Rogers 
Thompson 

DISTRICT V 
Cleveland 
Holmes * 
Wilson * 

DISTRICT VI 
Dearborn * 
Garvin * 
McCormack * 

DISTRICT yil 
Edwards 
Michelangelo 
Timilty 

DISTRICT VIII 
Barnes 
Cheverus 

DISTRICT IX 
M.L. King 
Mac key * 
Wheat ley 



10 



19 



31 



7 
12 



5 
16 



3 

5 

28 



2 

1 



15 
26 



7 
5 



5 
2 



4 
5 
4 



21 
9 



4 
9 




1 








5 
3 
8 




1 













10 



6 

5 
4 




1 



1 

4 
























1 





14 
18 



10 
18 



15 



18 
18 
44 



23 
12 



25 
49 



►DATA NOT SUBMITTED 



-m- 



BOSTON glUDENT AEVISag COUNCIL 
1984 - 1985 



Anot±er Course to College (ACC) 

Wendy Danielson 
^achelle Doyle 
Walter Sargent 

Boston High School 

Dertell Green 

(lb other nflmes siibmitted) 

Boston Latin Academy 

(Ns names svibmitted) 

Boston Latin School 

Vivian Newdick 
Izi Stahle 
Erik Know 
Peter Leon 
Jayne Floras 

Boston Technical High 

Daniel Dussor 
Diane Mastrangelo 
Victoria Ko 
Robert D. Jones 

Brighton High School 

Betty Tien 
Leslie Ross 
Ann Nbsewortity 
Peter Leon 
Jayne Floras 

Charlestown High 

« 
Pedro Ort^a 

Patricia Jackson 

Luis Ruiz 

Lisa M^es 



Dorchester High School 

Paul Bleckley 
Robert Chancholo 
E&vid Williams 
Stephanie Martin 

East Boston High 

Jeannette M. Hixon 
Luisa Ravida 
Donna Townsend 
Lynneann Hilton 



English High Schaol 

Gail Giesher 
Tanya Grs^ 

Horace ^lann School for the 
Deaf Si Hearing Impaired 

Walter Long 
Rickey Tom 
Jamie Skocik 
Tuong Truong 
Vanessa Smith 



Hiun | -)hrey Occupational Center 

Edward Mattison 
Melissa Clare 



Hyde Park High 

Daphne Edge 
Bemice Canpbell 
Naveed Ashraf 
William Lew 



-IQO- 



Copley Square High 

KiinMslle 
Sabrlna Ware 
Bernard Young 
Kristen Cl^^ton 
Rubea Ortiz 
SoLoarla Gascott 

Madison Park High 

Melody Karp 
Qiristen Jadcson 
Jewell Norville 
Maria OePina . 

McKinley School (Vocational) 

Peter Gibbons 
Senoeth Harvi^ 



South Boston High 

Maria Mantanl^ 
I^reg Burton 
Maria Colon 
Sharon Wiard 
Sopl:^ Keo 



Jaim-frn Plain High 

Jose Berrios 
Joseph Fergusen 
Komaell Flunder 



MetClnley Terhn-fcal School 

Dwalla Pendarvis 
O^sora Beliin 
Joseph (tetranga 
David White 

Mario JYmrw School 

Karen Benjamin 
Ernest Hill 
Pel Lee Szeto 
Trtishflnrn Freeman 

West Porfaury High 

Cynthia Dixon 
Marsha White 



-H91- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY SUPERINTENDENT 

SCHOOL OPERATIONS 

Joseph M. McDonough 
APPENDIX B 
MEMORANDUM 

TO: Headmastfiffi Sub-Committee on Support Services 

FROM: Vivian orXa'rlo, Director Student Affairs 

RE: Proposed Implementation of Communication Board/Fairness 
Committees 

DATE: November 1, 1984 

The Amalgamation Plan for Student Government mandates that each 
high school elect a Racial Ethnic Student Council (RESC) to serve 
as a subcommittee of the general Student Council. The purpose 
for which RESC's were proposed is to have students deal 
specifically with incidents of racial conflict in their schools. 
The racial climate in our schools has shown a marked improvement 
in the ten years that desegregation has been in effect. However, 
problems do arise in our schools over a variety of issues. And 
the premise that students could and should assist in the 
mediation of solutions to problems is a sound one. Because of 
this the following amendment to the Amalgamation Plan has been 

Under the supervision of the Headmaster a Communication 
Board as a sub-committee to the Student Council will be 
formed. Either by school-wide election, volunteer basis, or 
both, at least 10 students who racially/ethnically represent 
the student population will be selected. The Headmaster 
will appoint an individual from the staff to act as Advisor 
to the Board. The Board will meet on a regular basis. 

The purpose of the Communication Board shall be to receive and 
review any complaints, or issues from any student or faculty 
or administrative member of the school, with the stated goal 
of mediating a mutual resolution between the disputant 
parties, promoting greater school-wide communication, and 
improving school climate and racial harmony through 
increased student participation in decision making. 



-^92- 



The Headmaster will decide the scope of issues that the 
Communication Board would deal with and will have final say 
over all recommendations made by the Board 

In order to assure student participation, transportation for 
involved students shall be provided in the form of monthly 
bus passes, wherever necessary. In addition, all 
Communication Boards in all high schools shall be provided 
with the initial training to implement the Board, and shall 
receive on-going assistance to maintain them. Both the bus 
passes and the assistance will be provided by the Office of 
Student Affairs, Office of School Operations, 26 Court 
Street, Boston, MA 02108. 



/bab 

xc: Joseph HcDonough 



_!n?- 



DISPUTE RESOLUTION 



-495- 



DISPUTE RESOLUTION 

No disputes reached the level of State Board mediation 
described at section V(0) (1) of the Orders of 
Disengagement. The only correspondence regarding disputes 
received by the State Board during this period were letters 
sent by Plaint if f-Intervenors to the School Department, 
relating to Chapter 1 and native-language remedial services, 
as well as overcrowding and the shortage of aides in the 
Bilingual programs at English High School. We have no 
record of the School Department's response to these matters. 



-ii97_ 



BCSTCN DESEGREGATI(»I REPORT #4 

DISPUTE RESOLUTION 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENT 



1. Letter: C. Playter to R. Spillane (8/17) 

2. Letter: C. Playter to M. Betcher (9/13) 

3. Letter: C. Playter to M. Betcher (9/19) 

4. Letter: C. Playter to M. Betcher (9/24) 



_H99- 



LAW OFFICES OF 

KEHOE, DOYLE, PLAYTER & NOVICK 

NINE HAMILTON PLACE 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617)338-0070 

113 BROAD STREET 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 01902 

(617)599-8188 



August 17, 1984 



Frank Banks 
Tin '"^ ri s p 
Mar|^,^gg|Tey; 

EDWARD BERKIN 
CAROLINE B. PLAYTER 
EMU-Y I. NOVICK 
ELIZABETH A. RODCERS 
JOAN LENINCTON 
MARX BRONSTEIN 



Dr. Robert Spillane 
26 Court St. 
Boston, MA 02108 



RE: Disputes: English High School 

Provision of Remedial Services in Native Language 



Dear Dr. Spillane: 

Please take notice that we have to date not received 
sufficient information from school defendants regarding 
remediation actions for the English High School dispute. 
I would request that school defendant's forthwith provide 
the names, language and class assignments for bilingual 
teaching staff and bilingual guidance personnel at English 
High for 1984-85; that budgetary and ordering information 
be provided to show remediation for the failure to provide 
books to bilingual children; and that information regarding 
remedial services for bilingual children which will be avail- 
able for 1984-85 be provided, giving name of teacher or tutor,, 
remedial subject and language in which instruction will pro- 
vided. If satisfactory information is not provided promptly, 
we will plan to take this dispute to the State Board level 
based on the information given to you and to Dr. Oliver 
Lancaster in 1984. 

Secondly, I have been informed that school defendants have 
failed to budget and hire teachers to provide remedial services 
in the native language to bilingual students in need of such 
services under Chapter 1 and under regularly budgeted funds. 
Dr. Lancaster received direct evidence of the discrimination 
and denial of an equal educational opportunity to bilingual 
children from this practice of school defendants on monitoring 
visits to the Blackstone and Cleveland Schools. The State 
Board has also reported on tbis to the United States District 
Court and the parties. As a result of the failure to provide 
native language remediation services bilingual children are 
being held back and/or placed improperly in Special Education 
classes. This is an issue that has been raised repeatedly by 
El Comite de Padres and by the Master PAC over the past years. 
The issue becomes even more serious this year with the apparent 
adoption of the Promotional Standards Policy. 

-500- 



- 2 - 



If we cannot receive a prompt resolution of this dispute, 
we will be required to request detailed budgetary information 
regarding the provision of Chapter I and other remedial 
services including subjects offered, location of classes, 
racial/national origin breakdown of staff, racial/national 
origin, bilingual step category, grade and school of students 
receiving any remedial services for the past 5 school years, 
and all class proposals, budgets and staffing for the current 
school year. 

Thank you in advance for your prompt attention to these 
matters. 

Very truly yours, 



Caroline B. Playter 



CBP/jlw 

cc: Judge Garrity 
M. Bet Cher 
H. Dinger 
L. Johnson 
Bil. MP AC 
CPC 
R. Blumenthal 



-501- 



LAW OFFICES OF 

KEHOE, DOYLE, PLAYTER & NOVICK 

NINE HAMILTON PLACE 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617)338-0070 

113 BROAD STREET 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 1 902 

1617)599-8188 



FraSk Banks 
Jim Case 
Marlene Godfrey: 

FYI 

ROBERT |. DOYLE /Bob 
STEPHEN I KEHOE 
EDWARD BERKEM 
CAROUNE B PLAYTER 
EMILY I NOVICK 
ELIZABETH A. RODCERS 
lOAN LENINGTON 
MARK BRONSTEIiN 



September 13, 1984 



Michael Betcher, Esq. 
26 Court St. 
Boston, MA 02108 



RE; 



Disputes: English High, Title I and Remedial 



Dear Mr. Betcher: 

We have had no response from school defendants regarding 
disputes on English High School Bilingual Services and the 
failure to provide LES students access to remedial services as 
set forth in my letter of August 17, 1984. Not only have the 
rights of Hispanic and other bilingual children to equal access 
and an equal educational opportunity now been denied, but your 
failure to respond is in violation of Section V. C (1) of the 
Orders of December 23, 1982. 

If the dispute procedure is to be ignored by your clients, 
we will be required to seek direct action from the court. 



I will look forward 
important matters. 



to an immediate response on these 



CBP/jlw 



Very truly yours, 



Caroline B. Playter 



cc: Judge Garrity 
M. Simonds 
L. Johnson 
R. Blumenthal 
S. Perlmulter 
CPC 

Bil MPAC 
R. Spillane 
Boston School Committee 



-502- 



LAW OFFICES OF 

KEHOE, DOYLE, PLAYTER & NOVICK 

NLNE HAMILTON PLACE 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617)338-0070 



Prank Banks 
Jim Case 
Marlene Godfrey: 



FYI 



/Bc^ 



IIJ BROAD STREET 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 01902 

1617)599-8133 



ROBERT r DOYLE 
STEPHEiNI KEHOE 
IWARDBERJUN 
OUNi B. PIAYTER 
EM n.rl. NOVICK 
EUZABETH A. ROOCERS 
lOAN LENTNCTON 
MARX BRONSTtIN 



September 19, 1984 



Michael Betcher, Esq. 
26 Court St. 
Boston, MA 02108 



RE: Remedial Services Dispute 



Dear Mr. Betcher: 

Your response regarding remedial services for limited 
English speaking children particularly Title I services is not 
acceptable to plaintiff - interveners. There is no reason why 
Title I services can not be provided in the native language to 
the many eligible children as they were in the past . We have 
provided specific evidence of the adverse and even illegal 
impact on non-English speaking children from this discriminatory 
pol icy . 

« 

We call for a meeting pursuant to Section V, C, 2 on this 
matter. 

Thank you for your time and consideration. 

Very truly yours, 



5 ^ 

Caroline B. Playter 



CBP/jlw 

cc: Judge Garrity 
L. Johnson 
R. Blumenthal 
M. Simonds 
CPC 

Bil MP AC 
R. Spillane 
School Committee 



-503- 



LAW OFFICES OF 

KEHOE, DOYLE, PLAYTER & NOVICK 

NINE HAMILTON PLACE 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02108 
(617)338-0070 



Frank Banks 
Jim Case 
Marlene Godfrey 



FYI 



/Bob 



113 BROAD STREET 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 01902 

(617)599-8188 



ROBERT I DOYLE 
STEPHEN I KEHOE 
EDWARD 8ERX IN 
CAROLINES PLAYTER 
LMaY I NOVICK 
ELIZ.\flETHA RODCERS 
JOAN LENLNCTON 
M.ARK BRONSTEIN 



September 24, 1984 



Michael Betcher, Esq. 
Boston School Department 
5th Floor 
Boston, MA 



RE: ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL - 
AND LACK OF BOOKS 



BILINGUAL OVERCROWDING 



Dear Mr. Betcher: 

The information I have received from English High School 
shows both consistent violation in class sizes (18:1 with no 
aide and there are no aides at English High) . We have already 
discussed the inadequacies of the Spanish program in terms of 
insufficient teachers. We will expect within the next week that 
a total of four certified Spanish bilingual teachers and an 
additional E.S.L. teacher will be in place as an interim step 
to compliance for the Spanish program. The Haitian program 
is understaffed (apparently more so than the end of last year) 
and new students are entering in a daily basis. (I have attached 
figures in the over crowding as of September 20, 1984). 

We call for a meeting regarding the understaf fing and failure 
to provide books for the bilingual children. The failure to order 
books is inexcuseable on the part of the regular education 
administrators involved. The continued ignorance of or disregard 
for bilingual students is manifest in this "bureaucratic" error. 

We will expect to hear from you promptly pursuant to 
Section V, C, 2 of the Court Order. 



Very truly yours, 




Caroline B. Playter 



/km 

cc: Judge Garrity 
M. Simonds 
L. Johnson 
CPC 

BilmPAC 
R. Blumenthal 
S. Perlmutter 
R. Spillane 



Boston School Committee 



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MODIFICATIONS 



-507- 



MODIFICATIONS 



Negotiations concerning proposed modifications to 
orders regarding the screening and rating of administrative 
appointments continued throughout the summer of 1984. At 
the close of these discussions/ the School Committee filed 
its proposed modification with the Court on October 11. 
This modification, with minor modifications by the Court, 
was adopted on November 26, except for the proposal to 
maintain the then-current percentage of other minority 
administrators during periods of staff reduction. With 
regard to this last portion of the proposed modification, 
the Court directed the Boston Teachers Union to file offers 
of proof and a brief in opposition, with leave for other 
parties to respond. Both the Union and the parties 
supporting the layoff proposal filed briefs in December. 

Additional motions to modify outstanding orders were 
filed on December 20, 1984. The State Board, with the 
assent of both the School Defendants and the City of Boston, 
requested an extension of the Unified Facilities Plan filing 
deadline. The School Defendants also filed 10 numbered 
assignment modification proposals, plus a more sweeping 
motion to modify the assignment process on a pilot basis 
through the consolidation of present Districts III and IV. 
At the time this monitoring report was being printed, the 
Court had not ruled on these motions. 

-509- 



BOSTON DESEGREGATION REPORT #4 

MODIFICATIONS 

VOLUME II ATTACHMENT 



1. Motion to Modify Administrative Rating and Screening 
Procedures 

2. Support Data for Administrative Rating and Screening Proposal 
for Modification 

a. Memo: R. Spillane to School Committee 

b. Memo: B. Fields to R. Spillane (8/21) 

c. Memo: B. Fields to R. Spillane (8/29) 

d. Letter: C. Playter to M. Betcher (7/26) 

e. Letter: Lucille Koch to M. Betcher (8/28) 

f . Chart: Administrative Positions as of June 26 

g. Ruling: Judge A. Garrity on Administrative Rating and 

Screening Procedure (11/26) 

h. Procedural Order: Judge A. Garrity on Administrative 
and Rating Procedure (11/26) 

3. State Defendants' Motion to Modify Order, U.F.P. 

4. Memo: I support of Modifications to U.F.P. 

5. School Defendants' Motion to Modify School Assignment Plan 

6. Boston Public School Proposal to Revised Assignment Standards 
for Consolidated Districts III and IV (including support 
data) 



-511- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

****************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL., * 

Plaintiffs, * 

* 

V. * CIVIL ACTION 

* NO. 72-911-G 

RITA WALSH -TO MAS INI, ET AL., * 

* 

Defendants. * 

* 



SCHOOL DEFENDANTS MOTION TO MODIFY 
ADMINISTRATOR RATING AND SCREENING PROCEDURES 



The School Defendants move this Court to modify this 
Court's orders of February 24, 1976, as amended, to permit the 
implementation of a proposal set forth in the memorandum dated 
August 29, 198A from Senior Officer Barbara E. Fields to 
Superintendent Robert R. Spillane. ("Fields Mem.") This 
proposal is amended by memoranda dated September 21, 1984 from 
Senior Officer Fields to Superintendent Spillane and from 
Superintendent Spillane to the Boston School Committee. This 
proposal, as amended, is attached as Exhibit A. Specifically, 
this motion seeks to modify the outstanding orders in three 
respects: , 

1. It seeks the exemption of certain non-academic 
administrative positions from the full rating and screening 
procedures. Fields Mem. at 2-3, 5-6, and proposes to substitute 



-c; 



513- 



-2- 



the streamlined procedure described in the Superintendent's 
Memorandum at page 2. 

2. It seeks approval of a one-time expedited procedure for] 
making permanent appointments to certain administrative 
positions where the incumbent receives the approval of the.^ 
appropriate parent group and supervisors. Fields Mem. at 3-4. 

3. It seeks permanent modifications to the existing rating 
and screening procedures: 

(a) reducing the number of screening committees; 

(b) reducing the membership on the screening committees, 
and 

(c) eliminating the Councils of Senior Officers and the 
Community Superintendents Screening Committees. Fields Mem. at 
4-5, 7-9. 

Pursuant to section VI of the Memorandum and Orders of 
Disengagement (December 23, 1982), these modifications proposed 
have previously been presented to all other parties, the limited 
interveners, and the CPC and have been the subject of 
negotiations under the auspices of the State Board. Attached to 
the Fields Mem. are written statements of the positions of 
plaintiffs. El Comite and the CPC. The final version of the 
School Defendants' proposal has been drafted to accommodate most 
of the concerns articulated. 



-514- 



-3- 



The rationale for this proposal is set forth in the Fields 
Mem. In the short run, it will serve to reduce substantially 
the considerable backlog of administrators serving in acting 
positions. In addition, by streamlining the existing 
procedures, the proposal will reduce the likelihood of future 
backlogs. The proposal will have no negative impact on the 
rights of minority students since it will have no effect on the 
affirmative action goals set forth in this Court's outstanding 
orders. Indeed, the School Committee proposes to undertake even 
more aggressive affirmative action measures than currently are 
required by the outstanding orders. See Fields Mem. at 5, as 
modified by Field's 9/21/84 Memorandum. 

The proposal is timely filed and ripe for decision. It can 
be implemented immediately. 

The filing of this motion is not intended to affect the 
outcome of a proceeding currently pending before the State Labor 
Relations Commission regarding the bargaining unit placement of 
six job titles: department head, program advisor, development 
officer, school registrar, clinical coordinator, and academic 
coordinator. The Boston Teachers Union ("BTU") contends that 
these positions (other than department head) are essentially 
identical to positions which have never been subject to rating 
and screening. If the Labor Relations Commission accepts the 



-515- 



-4- 



BTU position with respect to any of these five positions, the 
School Defendants will not, unless ordered to do so by the 
Court, subject such positions to the rating and screening 
procedures without first satisfying any bargaining obligation 
with the BTU. The position of department head will be subject 
to rating and screening regardless of the outcome of the Labor! 
Relations Commission proceedings. 

Respectfully submitted, 
THE SCHOOL DEFENDANTS 
By their attorneys. 



Date 



{^ojii/f^ 




P.C. 

Henry C. Dinger 
GOODWIN, PROCTER k HOAR 
28 State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(617) 523-5700 



-516- 




zcmnu /f 



SEP 2 5 1984 



September 21, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: President and Members, 
Boston School Committee 

FROM: Robert R. Spillane, Superintenden 

SUBJECT: Amendment to Proposed Modifications to 
Administrative Desegregation Order 




Attached you will find a revision regarding Che attainment of 
ten percent total Other Minority administrators by January, 
1986, which was worked out between our staff and Attorney 
Caroline Playter. 

My staff has spent considerable time working toward the 
agreement with lawyers for the plaintiff classes, intervenors 
and the Department of Education, and the Citywide Parents 
Council . 

I recommend approval of this proposed modification to the Court 
Order as I believe it represents a beginning step toward 
disengagement from the Court as the result of consensus between 
the parties. 

I recommend, however, that the Committee approve one additional 
change to the proposed modification, a change which I believe 
all parties would support. 

Part A. seeks to exempt non-academic administrators from the 
full screening process. However, it is essential that there be 
established in its place a standard, open and fair process. 
Accordingly, I recommend that you approve and Che Court adopt 
the following sel'->cCion procedure for filling new non-academic 
administrative 'v.cancies: 



-517- 



President and Members, 
Boston School Committee 
Page Two 
September 21, 1984 



1. All nonracademic administrative 
positions shall be posted and advertised in 
accordance with School Committee policy. 

2. The Department of Personnel and Labor 
Relations shall review all applications and 
make a determination of eligibility. 
Adverse determinations of eligibility may 
be appealed within five (5) working days to 
the Deputy Superintendent/Senior Officer 
responsible for the position, who shall 
confer with the Office for Equal 
Opportunity. 

3. The Deputy Superintendent /Senior Officer 
shall convene and chair a panel consisting 
of at least three relevant administrators 

or other appropriate individuals, at least 
one VThite, one Black and one Other 
Minority, to review the applications of 
each eligible candidate. The panel shall 
forward to the Superintendent the names and 
rankings of at least four finalists, one of 
whom must be Black and one Other Minority 
(unless there are no applicants from the 
racial group after extensive documented 
recruiting efforts) . 

If the Court were to order such a selection process for 
non-academic administrators , I am confident that the School 
Department will have sufficient flexibility to fill such, 
positions promptly, consistent with adequate safeguards for an 
open and fair process. 



ctm 
Attachments 



-518^ 







/^^- 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



September 21, 1984 



TO: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

FROM: Barbara E. Fields, Setf^o;^^^€icer 
Equal Opportunity ^^^^ 

RE: Amendment to Language in Modifications to Promotional Rating Process 

To address concerns expressed regarding possible budgetary constraints, a 
possible decrease in the number of future administrative vacancies, and the impact 
this will have on the proposed goal for attaining 10% total Other Minority adminis- 
trators by January 1986, I recommend the following language revision in the pro- 
posal. 

On page 5 line 20, after.... 

"It is further recommended that the School Commit tee' commit itself to 
the attainment of 10% total Other Minority administrators by January 1986". 

add .... 

"In order to attain this goal the appointnient of Other Minorities will be 
made at the rate of at least one out of three. If there is a reduction 
in force or layoffs, the percentage attained will be maintained. If this 
goal cannot be reached by January 1986, the one to three hiring rate will 
continue until the goal has been met". 



-519- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




- »-. -M a4 



aCS'CN =",3LC 3C-CCL3 



MEMORANDUM 



TO: 
FROM: 

DATE: 
RE: 




Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

Barbara E. Fields, ^^rjipc Officer 
Equal Opportunity ^^^^3^ 

August 29, 1984 

Proposal CO Eliminace Backlog of Acciag Positions and 
Modification to the Promotional Rating Process 



As a result of your reconmendacion and che School Cocmittee's 
approval to proceed with the proposed aodification to the Promotional 
Rating Process, Attorney Betcher, Robert Hayden, and I have been 
meeting with the parties on record to che desegregation case. Ve; have 
had productive and helpful meetings and have reached a basic con. -nsus 
on a fair and equitaMe process to eliminate the backlog of acti. ^ 
positions and a proposal to modify the Promotional Rating Process. 



As you are aware, there were 372 acting 
1984. They include 11 Headmasters/Principals 
Headmaster/Assistant Principals, 137 Departme 
Officers and Registrars, most of whom were ap 
year due to reorganization and strengthening 
Also included are 147 central administrative 
38 positions are school-based and district ot 
to make permanent appointments to che posicio 
pronocionally rated. The. extraordinarily lar 
be rated and the amount of time consumed in c 
would remove, the Deputy Superintendents, Seni 
Superintendents from their daily responsibili 
time as chey muse serve as chairpersons of ch 
under the present orders. Many parents, ceac 
level adminiscracors , as well as scudencs wou 
concinuous basis in screening and incerviewin 
chis demand on che aforemencioned parties co 
hundreds of screening coramiccees given cheir 
impraccical ac chis cime and in my ooinion, n 
of che intent of ^he Federal Court Order. If 

-520- 



positions as of June 26, 
, 40 Assistant 

nt Heads, Development 
pointed within che lasc 
of che high schools, 
posicions. The remaininj 
nice positions. In order 
ns, chey r.'jsc be 
ge -u.-ber of posicicns cc 
onduccing these racings 
or Officers and Communic;. 
cies for an ir.decinlce 
e screening c one ic tees 
hers, .7.iddle and upper 
Id be involved on a 
g candidates. To place 
escablish and conduce ch: 
ocher respons ibilicies i- 
oc in che besc inceresc 
we were co crv co race 



. : »znx 62Q0 X3650 



Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
Page Two 
August 29, 1984 



all or most of these posicions according to present court -ordered 
procedures or even a modification of present procedures, we would be 
unable to reduce significantly the tremendous backlog. The Evaluation 
Unit, responsible for determining the eligibility of applicants, just 
is not staffed to pre-screen the resumes of thousands of applicants in 
a short period of time. 

Due to these factors and a desire by the parties to avoid a 
recurrence of a backlog in the future, the parties have agreed to: a) 
exempt non-academic positions from the promotional rating process, b) 
expedite on a one time basis only the conversion of certain positions 
where incumbents were in olace as of the March 15, 1984 Court Report, 
to permanent status and c) streamline the promotional rating process 
to be used for all future screenings. 

A. Exemption of Non-Academic Positions 

These positions do not directly impact academically 
on the educational process. They are technical, 
management positions. Positions in this category are: 
(a) all positions under the Deputy Superintendent/ 
Finance and Administration; (b) Facilities Management, 
and Food Services; (c) Transportation and Records 
Management Units in the Departrnent of Inplenentation and 
(d) the Business Agent and Specialist/Occupational 
Grants Manager at the HHORC. For the long term, we 
recommend that the above-stated positions not be 
included in the formal procotional rating procedure. 
For the interim exemption procedure (one cir.e only) we 
recommend utilization of the following steps: 

• Where there has previously been a posting and 
selection process, the appropriate Deputy 
Superintendent/Senior Officer, upon 
recommendation on the Responsibility Center 
Manager', will review past perfcrr.ar.ee ic.d deciia 
upon making recoccendac ior.s for per-anent status 
to the Superintendent. "'re Superintendent would 
then decide upon aaking reccr.riercac ions for 
approval by the School Ccr.rr. ictee . 

• Where there has not been a previous posting and 
selection process, the pcsiiicns will be 
advertised and the select icn ^recess will occur 



-521- 



Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
Page Thre« 
August 29, 1984 



prior to the review and recommendations of Che 
Responsibility Center Manager and Deputy 
Superintendenc/Senior Officer. 

• The Affirmative Action Policy Statement's I 
guidelines adopted by cne School Commicte'e on 
December 13, 1983 will be followed to ensure ' 
racial/ethnic representation. The Staffing 
goals set by the Committee are 251 Black and 10 
Other Minority. 

B. Exuedited Process 

For school-based positions, other than Headmaster/ 
Principal and Assistant Headmaster/Assistant Principal, 
the Headmaster and the School Parent Council, acting by 
a majority of its duly elected co-chairs, will determin 
whether incumbents will be recommended to the Community 
Superintendent, the Deputy Superintendent/School 
Operations, and the Superintendent for permanent 
appointment. If an incumbent does not receive the 
approval of the aforementioned parties, the position 
will be posted for the full racing process. Appoint- 
ments within each category will be reviewed carefully c 
make progress Coward che 25% Black and 10% Ocher 
Minority staffing goals of the Boston Public School's 
Affirmative Action Policy Statement guidelines. If it 
should appear that any position has been filled without 
a posting, then that position will be subjected to che 
full rating process. 

For central academic positions noc exempced from 
promotional rating, the Responsibility Center Managers 
and three parents designated by CPC and one parent 
designace from MascerPAC will decerniine whecher 
incumbencs will be reccnmended co che apprcpriace Oeput 
Superincendent/Senior Officer and to che Suoerincencenc 
for peraanenc appointrient by che School Cocmiccee. I: 
an incumbent does not receive the approval of che 
aforemencioned parties, che posicion will be posced for 
a full racing process. Vhere chere has noc been a 
previous poscing and seleccion process, che postcions 
will be advertised and che seleccion process will occjr 
prior CO che review and recoaciendac ions of che 
Responsibilicy Cencer Manager and Depucy Scperincender.c 
Senior Officer. 



-522- 



Robert R. Sptllane, Superintendent 
Page Four 
August 29, 1984 



If we are able Co address Che above postcions by exempcion or an 
expediced process, we will be able Co reduce che "accing posicions" 
backlog from 372 co approximacely 9L posicions. The remaining 
posicions are made up mostly of Headmascer/Principals , Assiscant 
Headmascer/Assiscanc Principals, and che posicions in Scudenc Support 
Services. These posicions are of such a sensicive nacure chac chey do 
noc lend chemselves Co exempcion or expediced process. We have 
cherefore begun co pose and race chese posicions by che currenc ■ 
process. However, ic is our hope and expeccacion chac che Court will 
approve Che modif icacions Co che promocional racing process outlined 
below which could Chen be utilized in eradicacing che remaining 
backlog . 

C. Modif icacions Co Che Oucscanding Court Order 
on Promocional Racings 

The proposed procedure for all fucure racings 
includes some of che besc feacures of che currenc 
court -ordered process, while screamlining che amounc of 
cime and bureaucracic layers involved in chac process. 

The proposal differs from che presenc promocional 
racing process in chac ic: 

• reduces che number of screening commiccees from five 
Co Cwo. 

• exempcs mosc non-academic adminiscracive posicions. 

• decreases che membership on che screening commiccees 
Co a more workable number. 

• eliminaces che Councils of Senior Officers and 
CommuniCy Superincendencs Screening Commiccees co 
screamline che process and avoid duplicacion of 
.efforcs. 

The proposed codificaclon adheres Co che incenc of 
che Promocional Racing /Process as Lc: 

• maincains maximum parencal Involvemenc in che process. 

• ensures parcicipacion of all racial/echnic groups. 

• requires posCing and, if necessary, advercising and 



-523- 



Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
Page Five 
August 29, 1984 



recruicment in order Co solicic a pool of qualified 
racially representative candidates for all positions. 



allows student participation for secondary 
school-based positions. 

provides the opportunity for community input in the 
central and district office ratings. 



« 



I 



Although the non-academic administrative positions have been 
exempted from promotional rating in this proposal, it is still the 
expressed intent of this proposal that all positions will be posted. 
Departments in need of desegregation efforts must comply with the 
provisions of the Affirmative Action Policy Statement and recruit and 
recommend Blacks and Other Minorities where they are underutilized or 
not represented. It is recommendec^ tihat the School Comnittee accept 
the inclusion of non-academic admi';.i.strators of comparaale status as 
part of the so-called Category III administrators. The School 
Committee should reaffirm its intent to make permanent appointments - 
whether by the exempt process, the expedited process or the full 
rating process -- at the rate of 25% Black for Category I and II 
administrators, and at the rate of 20Z Black for Category III 
administrators. It is further recommended chat the School Committee 
commit itself to the attainment of 107, total Other Minority 
ac^-inistrators by January 1986. Through the procedures outlined in 
t.-.-i document and through the filling of future vacancies, this goal 
seems feasible. 

Following is the Proposed Modification to the outstanding orders' 
of the Federal Court Order on Promotional Ratings. I have also 
attached copies of correspondence from the parties outlining cheir 
support for the proposals as well as their last positions which have 
in almost all cases been incorporated into this document. 



PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS TO THE PROMCTICMAL R-\TI::G PROCESS 

Aoolicabilitv 

Academic administrative positions vhich provide or i=:pact: heavll 
on direct services to students will be covered by che Promotional 
Rating Process. Specifically, these positions are chose Lisced below 
and any comparable positions. 



-5?M- 



Robert R. Sptllane, Superintendent 
■Page Six 
August 29, 1984 



School-Based 

Headmaster/ Principal 

Assistant Headmaster /Assistant Principal 

Director of Instruction 

Guidance Counselor 

Cluster Administrator (Humphrey Center) 

Department Head 

Development Officer 

School Registrar 

Special Schools/Programs (Special/Alternative Education) 

Program Director 
Assistant Program Director 
Clinical Coordinator 
Program Advisor 
Coord inacor 
Project Director 
Senior Coordinators 

District Office 

Community Superintendent 
Administrative Assistant 
Pupil Adjustment Counselor 
School Psychologist 
Supervisors of Attendance 

Central Office 

Positions within - Curriculum and Instruccicn 
Student Support Services 

School Safety (Excluding school police officers) 
Department of Implementation (Excluding the Transportation and 
Records Management Units) 
and the 
Senior Officer for Equal Opportunity 

Positions previously covered by the Promotional Rating Process 
but now exempted will continue to be filled on a desegregated basis 
conformance with the Affirmative Action Plan. 



-525- 



Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
Page Seven 
August 29, 1984 



Promotional Rating Procedures 

A. All positions to be promotionally raced shall be posted in 
all schools and departments by way of Personnel Circular. 
Extra efforts, such as recruicaent, newspaper advertisement, 
etc., shall be undertaken to ensure a pool of qualified, blac 
and other minority candidates. 

B. The Department of Personnel Management shall be the recipien 
of all applications. > 

I 

C. The Department of Personnel Management shall determine ! 
eligibility of all candidates. Adverse determinations of 
eligibility may be appealed in writing to the Manager of 
Personnel by an applicant within five (5) working days of 
such notification. The appeal must be reviewed by the 
Manager of Personnel in consultation with the Office of Equa 
Opportunity and decided within five (S)" working days after 
receipt of the appeal. 

D. CPC and MasterPAC shall receive a copy of the announcement c 
the promotional rating at least twelve (12) working days 
prior to. convening of this committee as written notice of 
intent to form a screening committee. CPC and MasterPAC 
shall within five (5) working days after receipt of the 
announcement submit to the Department of Personnel Managemen 
the names, addresses and telephone numbers of the parent 
participants. Upon receipt of such incornacion, the 
Department of Personnel Management shall give seven (7) 
working days written notice to each screening committee 
member prior to the first meeting. 

E. The names and applications of all eligible candidates will b 
forwarded to the appropriate screeni.-.^ cotnmiccee. If the 
screening committee is dissatisfied virh the rrir.oricy 
applicant pool, additional cecruicmer.c efforts viLl be =ade. 
before the process continues. 

F. The members of the screening comciccee shall interview 
candidates, select finalists, and sub-.ic a ranked list in 
order of preference to the appropriate Ccr.t:unif/ 
Superintendent, Deputy Superintendent cr Senior Officer who 
may, at his or her discretion, interview one or -^ore of the 
finalists and/or comment on anv oartic-lar candidate. 



-526- 



Robert R. Splllane, Superintendent 
Page Eight 
August 29, 1984 



G. The Deputy Superintendent/Senior Officer shall forward che 
list of finalists, inclusive of che comments, co the 
Superintendent for consideration for nomination to the School 
Committee. 

H. The Superintendent will notify the screening committee of the 
decision in writing within four (4) weeks. The 
Superintendent maintains the option to select a candidate 
from the ranked list or to reject all of the finalists. 

Interview 

Members of the screening committee shall evaluate che candidate's 
knowledge in the job area, interpersonal skills, commicment, interesc 
in che position, and managerial or supervisory skills. 

Individual members of the screening committee shall use scoring 
sheets to assist them in rank ordering candidates. All members are 
equal in status and shall have one vote. 

The ranked list of finalists must include at least four (4) 
candidates, one of whom must be black and one other minority (unless 
there are no applicants from the racial group afcer extensive 
documenced recruiting efforts) . 

Screening Committees 

There will be two (2) screening commiccee procedures. One for 
school-based administrative positions and one for district and cencral 
office administrative pos.itions. They differ in chat scudencs will 
play a greater role in the selection process for che school-based 
posicions. The Councils of Senior Officers and Corcnunicy 
Superintendents have been eliminated and cheir involvesenc ic che 
process will be in an- advisory capacicy co che Superincendenc . 



-527- 



Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 
Page Nine 
August 29, 1984 



Composicion o£ Screening Commictees 

Screening Coamittee for School«Ba3ed Positions 

Membership shall include: 

1 Headmaster/Principal (Chairperson) 
*1 Teacher selected by the Boston Teachers' Union 
*2 Additional School Department Employees selected by the Communit 
Superintendent 
3 Parents (IBlack, 1 White, 1 Other Minority) selected by the 
School Parent Council 

1 Bilingual parent chosen by the MasterPAC or SubPAC in 

consultation with the School Parent Council 

2 Students (1 Black, 1 White or from any racial ethnic group 

entitled to full membership on the Racial Ethnic Student 
Council) selected by the Racial Ethnic Student Council. 
Applies to high school level only 
1 Community Superintendent (Chairperson for Headmaster/Principal 
rating only) 

Screening Committee for Central and Districc Office Positions 

Membership shall include: ' 

The Responsibility Center Manager for position being screened 
(Chairperson) 
*1 Teacher selected by Boston Teachers' Union 
*2 Additional School Department Employees of vhich one will be 

selected by BASAS and the other selected by the appropriate 
Deputy Superintendent or Senior Officer 

3 Parents (iBlack, 1 White, 1 Other Minority) selected by the 

Citywide Parents Council 
1 Bilingual parent chosen by the MasterPAC in consultation with 

the Citywide Parents Council 
*1 Non-School "Department person with expertise in the area select 

by the Superintendent in consultation vi:h the chairperson 
1 Deputy Superintendent (Chairperson for Community Superintencen 

ratings only) selected by the Superintendent 

(* The chairperson :iust ensure that those selections enhance the 
racial composition of the Screening Committee.) 



-528- 



S-CIN 1 Ll\ r\Ji\ L-AVV /MNL^ CL>UV_/\ 1 IVJIN, IHC. 

JUL 2 5 1984 



July 23. 1984 



Cutman Lbrary. .'rd Floor 

* AppMn Wiy 

Cjmbndge. M JSMchuvera 01 1 J8 



Re: Morgan v. Valsh-Tomasini 



Michael Beccher 

General Counsel 

Boscon Public Schools 

26 Court Street, 5th Floor 

Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Betcher: 

I am agreed to the School Department's proposed modifications of che 
Order for Desegre;ation of Administrative Staff, as amended, (see Attachment A), 
if the goal to increase and stabilize permanent employment is joined co che 
desegregation goal of accomplishing 252 Black, Category I and II administrators 
and 202 Black Category III administrators, as set out in Judge Garricy's 
orders of February 24, 1976. 

I would submit chat both goals could be compatibly -reached, if the 
future employment of Black administrators under the proposed modifications 
were at the following races: 

1. 252 of the permanent appointments to Category I positions, i.e., 
headmaster and principals. 

252 of the permanent appointments to Category II positions, i.e., 
all other administrative positions. 

3. 202 of permanent appointments to Category III positions, i.e., 
directors, associate directors, assistant directors, supervisors, division 
heads, coordinators, directors, and any newly est-ablished equivalent position, 
whether "academic" or "non-academic". 

Further, all appointments should be T.ade in the spirit jf Judge Carrity's 
prohibition against segregating Black administrators vichin the School 
Deoartment. 



Finally, I would require timely notice 'of the race, position and p 
ment of ail emplovees hired pursuant to che proposed modifications. 



' • - ^ — 




cc: Parties of Record 



-529- 



UW OFHCES OF 

KIHOE, DOYLE, PLAY12K & NOVICK 

NINE HAMILTON PLACE 
BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 021M 
16171338-OO70 

1 1 J BROAD STTlilT 

LYNN. MASSACHUSETTS 0l90a 

,617)399-8188 



July 26, 1984 



ROBUTt OOYU 

tnrHtNr xwoi 

tOWAitO lUUN 
CAJ»OUM» ?LArTW 
LMItYl NOVICX 
tUZAUTHA KOOCIM 
lOAN LtNINCTON 
MAM BRONSTUN 



Michael Betcher, 
General Counsel 
26 Court St. 
Boston, MA 02108 



Esq. 



RE; Modification of Administrator Desegregation Order 



Dear Michael: 

I would be agreeable to school defendant's proposed modifi- 
cation to exempt certain positions and expedite the filling of 
others, including certain central administrative positions on 
the following conditions: 

1. That an expedited procedure including parent and 
Bilingual parent representation is developed for the expedited 
procedure for central administrative staff similar to that 
proposed for school based; 



2. 

1, 1985 
achieve 
administ 
17 addit 
of 372 a 
1986 the 
administ 
of the a 
there is 
in the o 



That 
by wh 
at le 
rativ 
ional 
ct ing 
y wi 1 
rator 
dmini 

a se 
f flee 



school 
atever 
ast a t 
e staff 
Hispan 
positi 
1 achie 
s in ea 
strativ 
rious 1 
s of: 



def 
mean 
otal 

(th 
ic a 
ons 
ve a 
ch o 
e St 
ack 



endants a 
s permane 
of 10% H 
is means 
nd other 
to be fil 
t least 1 
f Categor 
aff and a 
of desegr 



gree 

nt h 

ispa 

the 

mino 

ed) 

0% H 

y I 

ct in 
egat 



that on 
iring is 
nic and o 
hiring of 
rity admi 
and that 
ispanic a 
and Categ 
g appoint 
ion progr 



or before January 
done they will 
ther minority 

approximately 
nistracors out 
by January 1 , 
nd other minority 
ory II. A review 
.Tents shows 
ess for Hispanics 



Business Manager 

Information Systems Development 

Budget 

Facilities 

Record Management '"• '** 

Transportation ^l, i ..• 

Safety 

Curriculum and Instruction " • — 

Chapter I 

Instructional Services 

Testing and Evaluation 

Department of Educational Employment Services 

And of course, Special Education 






-530- 



- 2 - 



ia your proposed 
concerns raised in 
e. that the EEO officer 
procedure; that more 



There appears to be ample room for desegregation progress 

, at this time. 

I will also expect some adjustments 

I Promotional Sating Procedures to reflect 
the most recent meeting of the parties i, 
will be involved in the candidate appeal 

advance notice of screenings will be given to parent organizations; 
and that there will be bilingual parent representation chosen 
by the Master PAC or Sub PAC in consultation with the CPC or 
SPC, as appropriate, for bilingual positions and for school 
based positions such as Community District Superintendent 
Headmaster/Principal, Assistant Headmaster/Assistant Principal, 
ORG positions where there are bilingual programs or bilingual 
students. (This would best be accomplished by having 4 parents 
on all screening committees (1 Black, 1 White, 1 Hispanic and 
1 Asian.) 



Thank you for your time and consideration. 

Very truly yours, 



CBP/jlw 

cc: Counsel of Record 




-531- 




REC'O OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSE!: 



City wide Parents Council 

59TemptePlac8 Boston,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



Ai:gu3t 28, 1984 



htr. Michael Beccher 
General Ccuisel 
Boston Public Schsola 
26 Court Street, 5th Floor 
Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Mr. Betcher: 

The Citywida Parents CoiJicil at its regularly scheduled inonthly meeting en 
August 27, 1984, considered and discussed the School Department's proposed 
mcdlfications of the Order for Desegregation of Administrative Staff (Draft 

II). 

A.) The Council noted and approved the following: , 

The Citywide Parents Council supports the scateoents of 
Attorneys Johnson and Playter concerning desegration goals 
for black and other minority pemanent employees, hired 
pursuant to the prqjosed modifications. 

B.) The Citywide Parents Council agrees to the school 
defendant's proposed modification to exesipt certain 
positions, and expedite the filling of others on the 
following conditions: 

1). that peraanent positions be awarded subject to the 
Boston residency requirements of the Tregor 
legislation 

2). that the CPC be given vrlcten notice of intent to 
fora a screening ccraoictee at least 12 '■.orking days 
prior to the convening of chat cccmiccee. {jnLs 
time line would allow 5 days for identification of 
parents and coordination -^ch MASTERPAC and other 
agencies) . It would accotnnodate the 7 days written 
notice requirecaent to screening corciictee mesbers 
incorporated in the proposed modifications subaitted 
by the school deparcnent 



-532- 
A rruttJ«cuituraJ parwrta or ganizatjcn meiri to hng quaflty, cJd««^«gat«<l «ducaticn 



Page 3 

Letter to Michael Betcher 

8/28/1984 



3) . tha CPC Inslata that four (4) parents be inclvjded 
as part or any screening coozilttee ascdbershlp. In 
screenings for bilingual poaitions, one of the fiovir 
pareata oust be bilingual and approved by tis 
MASTESPAC. 



Sincerely, 

Lucille M. Koch 
Ebcecutlve Director 

LK:rs 

xc: CPC hfeobers 

Counsel of Record 
Marty Walsh 



-533- 



AS OF JUNE 26 , 1984 



ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS 





White 

249 
66.93% 

251 
76.29% 


Blac)( 

96 

25.81% 

66 

20.06% 


Hispanic 

18 
4.84% 

9 
2.74% 

27 
3.85% 


Asian American 


American Indiar. 


ACTING 

PERMANENT 


8 

2.15% 

3 

.91% 


1 
.27% 






0% 


TOTAL 


500 
71.33% 


162 

23.11% 


11 
1.57% 


1 

.14% 



39 
5.56% 



ACTING POSITIONS 



White Black Hispanic Asian American American Indian 



:entral 


93 

63.70% 


40 
27.40% 


8 
5.48% 


5 

3.42% 




0% 


)ept. Heads/Reg. 
)evelop.Off icers 109 
School-Based) 79.56% 


22 

16.06% 


2 
1.46% 


3 
2.19% 


1 

.73% 


ruidance Coun- 
selors 


4 

.36.36% 


5 

45.46% 


2 

18.18% 


t 


0% 




0% 


eadmasters/ 
Principals 


5 
45.46% 


5 
45.46% 


1 
' 9,08% 




<3« ' 


c 
c% 


sst.Hdmstrs./ 
Asst.Princ. 


18 
45% 


17 
42.50% 


5 

12.50% 



0% 



0% 


ther Admin- 
istrators 
Program Dir. 
Clinical Co- 
ordinators, 
etc.) 


20 
74.07% 


7 
25.93% 



0% 



0% 




c% 




249 
66.93% 


96 
25.81% 


18 8 
4.84% 2.15% 

-53^- 


1 

.27% 



137 



4 3 



CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE 

I, Henry Dinger, hereby certify that I have this date 
served the attached document upon the parties by causing to be 
delivered in hand or by causing to be mailed, postage prepaid, a 
copy thereof to Counsel of Record: 



See attached list 



Date Henry Drnger *^ ' 

Goodwin, Procter and Hoar 
28 State Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02108 
Tel. (617) 523-5700 



-535- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TALLULAH MORGAN ET AL . , 

Plaintiffs, 

CIVIL ACTION 
V. NO. 72-911-G 

RITA WALSH-TOMASINI ET AL., 

Defendants . 



MEMORANDUM AND ORDER ON ADMINISTRATOR 
SCREENING AND RATING PROCEDURES 

November 26, 1984 

GARRITY, J. 

Upon consideration of the "School Defendants* Motion to 
Modify Administrator Rating and Screening Procedures" filed 
October 11, 1984 with the consent of the plaintiffs and 
plaintiff -intervener, and the comments of Boston Teachers Union 
filed October 19, 1984, and after hearing on October 26, 1984, it 
is ORDERED that the school defendants' proposal, to the extent 
that it is contained in a memorandum from Equal Opportunity 
Senior Officer Barbara E. Fields to Superintendent Spillane dated 
August 29, 1984 ("Fields memorandum") as amended by a memorandum 
from Spillane to the Boston School Committee dated September 21, 
1984, and as further amended by the provisions of this order, be 
adopted as an order of the court. 

The proposal of the school defendants is hereby modified in 
the following manner: 



-536- 



(1) The nuniber of "non-academic" positions exempted in 
Section A of the Fields memorandum from the screening and rating 
process shall be reduced by deleting from that category those 
listed as "(b) Facilities Management and Food Services and (c) 
Transportation and Records Management Units in the Department of 
Implementation." These positions shall be included in the list 
of positions on page 6 of the Fields memorandum which are subject 
to the full screening and rating process and shall in all ways be 
treated identically with comparable "academic" positions. 

(2) The number of teachers on both the School-Based 
Screening Committee and the Central/District Screening CoiTiraittee, 
as shown on page 9 of the Fields memorandum, shall be increased 
from one to two. The teachers shall be selected by the Boston 
Teachers Union ("BTU") in such a way as to enhance the racial 
composition of the Screening Committee. 

(3) The headmaster or principal position on the School- 
Based Committee shall be filled by a person selected by the 
Boston Association of School Administrators and Supervisors in 
such a way as to enhance the racial composition of the Screening 
Committee. 

(4) Add the following on page 5, at the end of the first 

full paragraph: 

In order to attain this goal the appointment of Other 
Minorities will be made at the rate of at least one out 
of three. If this goal cannot be reached by January 
1986, the one to three hiring ratio will continue until 
the goal has been met. 



-537- 



The first modification, concerning the elimination of the 
exemption for certain "non-academic" positions is necessary to 
preserve open parent and community participation in the selection 
of administrators whose responsibilities, contrary to the 
assertions of the school defendants, substantially and directly 
affect the quality and equality of services to the students in 
the Boston public schools. Conversely, the relatively small 
number of positions hereby added to the process will not 
significantly increase the likelihood of a recurrence of a 
backlog in the future. 

The second modification concerning the number of teachers on 
the committees was urged by the Boston Teachers Union. The court 
agrees that two teacher-members are necessary to preserve the 
balance of representation among the various parties which has 
existed since the court adopted the "Leftwich Plan" by its order 
of February 24, 1976. The third modification merely incorporates 
an uncontested clarification of the proposal to which the parties 
agreed in open court. 

The final modification represents the first and third 
sentences of the amendment proposed in the second memorandum from 
Fields to Spillane dated September 21, 1984, to which no party 
has objected. The BTU objected to the adoption of the second 
sentence of the second Fields memorandum concerning the 
maintenance of the percentage of other minority administrators in 
the event of layoffs as being unsupported by findings of 
discrimination against other minorities and therefore 



-538- 



impermissible under the holding of Firefighters Local #1784 v . 
Stotts, 1984, 104 S.Ct. 2576. Accordingly, as stated in open 
court, a decision on this issue will be deferred until the court 
can consider the arguments and offer of proof to be submitted by 
the Boston Teachers Union pursuant to a separate order issued 
concurrently herewith. 



United States District .Iddge 



-539-' 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TALLULAH MORGAN ET AL . , 

Plaintiffs, 



RITA WALSH-TOMASINI ET AL . , 

Defendants . 



CIVIL ACTION 
NO. 72-911-G 



PROCEDURAL ORDER 

No vembe r 2 6,1984 .^j ■■"'"w \ 
GARRITY, J. -^-^ 

The Boston Teachers Union ("BTU") has objected to an 
amendment to the modifications of the administrator screening and 
rating procedure proposed by the school defendants, which would 
require that "[i]f there is a reduction in force or layoffs, the 
percentage [of administrative positions held by other minorities] 
attained will be maintained." At the hearing the BTU requested 
that it be allowed to offer evidence and argue that the proposed 
amendment is prohibited by the Supreme Court's recent decision in 
Firefighters Local #1784 v. Stotts , 1984, 104 S.Ct. 2576. 

Therefore it is ordered that the BTU make an offer of proof 
by way of affidavits and exhibits and submit a brief in support 
of its objection on or -before December 5, 1984. Other parties 
may respond on or before December 19, 1984. 



")tates Distriort/ Judge 



United SI 



-540- 



[JAMES T. GRAOY 
GABRIEL O. DUMONT, JR. 
MATTHEW E. DWYER 
KEVIN HERN, JR. 
MARY A. DUFFEY 



GRAOY, DUMONT AND OWYER 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. P.C. 

75 FEDERAL STREET 

P.O. BOX 1SSB 

BOSTON. MASSACHUSETTS 03205 



TELEPHONE (SI 7) 42e-»450 



December A, 1984 



HAND FILED 



Mr. George F. McGrath, Clerk 
United States District Court 
U.S. Post Office & Court House 
Room 1525 
Boston, MA 02109 

Re: Tallulah Morgan, et al. 
vs: Rita Walsh-Tanas ini, et al. 
Civil Action No. 72-911-G 

Dear Mr. McGrath: 

Enclosed for filing in the above-entitled matter 
please find the Memorandum In Support Of The Objection 
Of The Boston Teachers Union To The School Defendants ' 
Motion To Modify Administrator Rating And Screening 
Procedures and Affidavit of Edward J. Doherty In Support 
Of Intervener Boston Teachers Union Local 66 AFT, AFL- 
CIO's Opposition To Proposed Amendment Concerning Lay- 
offs Of Other Minority Adninistrators. 

Your cooperation in this matter is appreciated. 

Very truly yours. 




fames T. Grady 




JTG/RLH 

Enclosures 

cc: Robert Blunenthal, Esquire ^ 
Steven Perlmutter, Esquire 
Caroline Playter, Esquire 
Robert Bohn, Esquire 
Marshall Simonds, Esquire 
Richard W. Coleman, Esquire 
Larry L. Johnson, Esquire 



-f; 



541. 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TALLULAH MORGAN, et al.. 
Plaintiffs 

V. 

RITA WALSH-TOMASINI, et al. 
Defendants 



C.A. 72-911-G 



STATE DEFENDANTS' MOTION TO MODIFY 
ORDER TO FILE UNIFIED FACILITIES PLAN 



Defendant Massachusetts Board of Education ("the State 
Board") moves this Court to modify its Order to File Unified 
Facilities Plan of November 2, 1984 by deleting the first 
and last sentence in paragraph one of said Order, and 
inserting in place of the first sentence the following: 



A Unified Facilities Plan (UFP) shall be 
filed no later than thirty days after the 
court has ruled on (a) any motions to 
modify outstanding assignment orders that 
the parties may file, and (b) any 
proposals to modify outstanding 
assignment orders that may be presented 
by the court. 



-542- 



School defendants and city defendants, who together 
with the State Board are charged with the development and 
filing of the UFP, have assented to the above motion. 

In support of said motion, the State Board files the 
attached Memorandum. 



Respectfull 





itte 




Robejrt H. Bldmenthal, Esq. 
Counsel/ State Board of 

Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
(617) 770-7315 

Robert H. Bohn, Jr., Esq. 
Gitlin, Emmer , Kaplan & Bohn 
160 Milk Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(617) 451-6970 



DATE: December 20, 1984 



-543- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TALLULAH MORGAN, et al.. 
Plaintiffs 

V. 

RITA WALSH-TOMASINI, et al. 
Defendants 



C.A. 72-911-G 



MEMORANDUM IN SUPPORT OF MOTION TO 
MODIFY ORDER TO FILE UNIFIED FACILITIES PLAN 



In its Memorandum and Orders Modifying Desegregation 
Plan of May 6, 1977, and in subsequent orders, most recently 
its Order to File Unified Facilities Plan of November 2, 
1984, the Court has directed school defendants, city 
defendants and the State Board (the Joint Planners) to 
prepare and file a document that addresses long-range 
proposals for the construction, renovation and closing of 
school buildings in the Boston Public School system. This 
document is referred to as the Unified Facilities Plan, or 
UFP. While some progress has been made in past years toward 
satisfying the Court's facilities orders, such as the joint 
submission and approval of a school closings proposal in the 



■544- 



Spring of 1981, the Court's requirement that the UFP be 
"entire", contained in its Further Memorandum and Order as 
to Unified Facilities of August 15, 1979, has not been 
satisfied. 

In May of 1984, the Joint Planners initiated a new 
effort to reach agreement on a comprehensive facilities plan 
that would satisfy outstanding Court orders. This effort 
was intensified after the hearing of October 26, 1984, at 
which the Court ordered the Joint Planners to file a 
completed plan by December 15, 1984. (The filing date was 
later changed to December 20.) Progress has been 
substantial over the past weeks, and the Joint Planners 
continue to meet in an effort to produce a UFP. The Court's 
deadline has arrived, however, and we roust report that final 
agreement has not been reached. 

The present motion, which seeks postponement of the UFP 
deadline until thirty days after the Court has ruled upon 
assignment modification proposals that either it or the 
parties may offer, attempts to sustain the momentum of 
current negotiations, and to allow for critical facilities 
decisions to be made in the appropriate sequence. 

This motion should be considered in the context of both 
the real progress toward completion of a UFP that has been 
made to date, and the significant issues yet to be 
resolved. Negotiations to date have resulted in the 
following essential elements of the ultimate plan: 

-545- 



1) A building profile has been completed of every 
Boston Public School facility currently in 
operation, identifying the alteration and repair 
needs of each building and the cost of each 
project. 

2) A preliminary analysis of this profile has 
indicated that the total cost of all such projects 
is approximately $55 million, of which 
approximately $30 million is eligible for 
reimbursement under the Massachusetts School 
Building Assistance program, Mass. St. 1948, c. 
645, as amended. 

3) City defendants have made a commitment to 
subsidize those projects eligible for state 
reimbursement over an eight-year period. 

4) Negotiations have commenced around the creation 
of an eight to ten-year schedule for school 
improvement projects that will identify, on an 
annual basis, the order in v;hich projects are 
undertaken. 



-546- 



At the same time, the following issues have yet to be 
addressed: 

1) The mechanism for funding those projects 
estimated to cost a total of $25 million, that are 
not eligible for state reimbursement. 

2} The mechanism for funding the removal and 
replacement of asbestos materials in all school 
facilities, estimated to cost up to $40 million. 

3) The mechanism for funding the provision of 
barrier-free access for handicapped persons to all 
school facilities, estimated to cost up to $25 
million. 

4) An expansion of school defendants* annual 
alteration and repair budget, currently set in 
accordance with Mass. St. 1982, c. 190, §2. 

5) The appropriate method for funding renovations 
of the White Stadium athletic facility, estimated 
to cost $3 million. 



•547- 



6} The preparation of a conprehensive schedule of 
new construction projects. To date, school and 
city defendants have proposed only the construction 
of a new Latin School/Latin Academy facility, for 
which city defendants have committed $35 million. 
A justification of this project in terms of its 
impact on desegregation has yet to be provided. 

7) The preparation of a comprehensive schedule of 
renovation projects necessitated by any changes in 
facilities use required by proposals to modify the 
student assignment process that are ultimately 
adopted by the Court. 

8} The preparation of a comprehensive list of 
school closings that eliminates unnecessary excess 
capacity at all levels of the school system. 

9) An analysis of all facilities proposals that 
insures both the enhancement of desegregation and 
an equitable spreading of benefits and burdens 
among all members of the Boston Public School 
community. 

Each of the above nine items must be addressed before 
any facilities plan can be considered "entire". At the same 

-548- 



time, closure cannot be reached on these items, particularly 
the final four, until proposals for modifying the student 
assignment process have been acted upon by the Court. The 
relation of possible assignment modifications to school 
closings is especially critical, since school improvement 
budget projections will be reduced, and school improvement 
schedules will be revised, once school closing proposals 
have been made. 

The State Board shares the Court's disappointment that 
these issues have not been resolved to date. It is 
especially disappointing that school defendants have waited 
until the eleventh hour to propose modifications in the 
assignment process, particularly in light of the clear 
directives contained at Sections VI (B)(5) and IX(B) of the 
December 23, 1982 Orders of Disengagement. We agree, 
however, with the intentions of school defendants to provide 
for public hearings before proposals to close specific 
schools are finally adopted. 

The motion for modification that the State Board has 
presented will allow for an orderly and expeditious 
resolution of these outstanding issues. It will permit the 
school defendants to hold public hearings on school closings 
within the next few weeks. It will allow all parties to be 
heard on proposed assignment modifications, and for the 



-549- 



Court to rule on said proposals. And it will maintain an 
appropriate deadline within which the Joint Planners must 
conclude their negotiations. 

Adoption of the present motion would be consistent with 
the Court's longstanding concern for ensuring that parents 
have the opportunity to be heard during the process of 
developing school closing proposals. The State Board notes 
in this regard that the original UFP submission was rejected 
by the Court in 1978 in part to allow for such input, and 
that public hearings preceded the filing of proposals to 
close schools in December 1979 and March 1981. Further, the 
granting of this motion, together with timely action upon 
proposals for assignment modifications, will in no way delay 
the implementation of the UFP finally adopted by the parties 
and approved by the Court. Evidence on this last point is 
provided by the process of identifying and implementing 
school closings during the Spring and Fall of 1981. 
Finally, action upon proposals for modifications in the 
student assignment process, followed within thirty days by 
the filing of a UFP, will permit the Department of 
Implementation to provide the most accurate analysis of the 
anticipated impact of the UFP, as called for at section 
9(d)(4) of the Memorandum and Orders Modifying Desegregation 
Plan dated May 6, 1977. 

By its comments at the hearing of October 26, 1984, the 
Court made it clear that proposals for modifying the student 

-55C- 



assignment process would be forthcoming, from the bench if 
not from the parties. The anticipation of these proposals, 
and the impact that they might have upon facilities 
planning, have not inhibited the Joint Planners in their 
efforts to achieve as much progress on the DFP as 
possible. The filing of the present motion similarly will 
not impede ongoing discussions. For its part, the State 
Board is prepared to see the UFP negotiating process through 
to completion. Without intending to delay the Court's plan 
to have final facility orders in place by June 1985, and in 
the hopes of guaranteeing the most appropriate sequence for 
concluding present negotiations, the State Board urges the 
adoption of its motion. 





Robert H. BlUmeMhal, Esq. 
Counsel, State Board of 

Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
(63/7) 770-731; 




Robert H. Bohn, Jr., Esq. 
Gitlin, Emmer , Kaplan & Bohn 
160 Milk Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02109 
(617) 451-6970 



DATE: December 20, 1984 



■551-- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



**************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN, ET AL., * 

* 

Plaintiffs, * 

* 

V. * 

* CIVIL ACTION 

RITA WALSH-TOMASINI, ET AL. , * NO. 72-911-G 

* 

Defendants. * 

* 

**************** 



SCHOOL DEFENDANTS' MOTION TO 
MODIFY STUDENT ASSIGNMENT PLAN 



The School Defendants move this Court to approve the follow- 
ing proposed modifications to the outstanding student assignment 
orders. 

1. The May 10, 1975 Student Assignment Plan shall be 
amended by adding the following language after the first sentence 
of the first full paragraph on page 2: "provided, however, that 
beginning with the 1985-1986 school year the city defendants 
shall be permitted to consolidate school districts for adminis- 
trative purposes and to designate a single Community Superinten- 
dent to be the chief school officer for each consolidated dis- 
trict." 

Rationale: The substantial enrollment decline in the Boston 
Public Schools has brought about the situation where a single 
administrator can effectively manage more than one community 
district. The School Defendants seek leave to consolidate 



-552- 



districts for administrative purpose. This request does not seek 
to consolidate districts for student assignment purposes, except 
to the extent that (i) other proposals seek to create an experi- 
mental district for assignment purposes in districts 3 and 4, and 
(ii) School Defendants seek to make cross-district desegregative 
assignments to a middle school in East Boston, if the Court 
approves the transfer of such a School to the facility currently 
housing the Umana School. 

2. The August 12, 1977 Memorandum and Orders as to Kinder- 
garten Desegregation shall be amended to include a new paragraph 
3(c) on p. 9 to read: "Any kindergarten student may, at the 
election of such student's parents, attend kindergarten at that 
student's geocoded school for grades 1-5." 

Rationale ; Under current assignment orders, children are 
frequently assigned to one school for kindergarten and another 
for grades 1-5. For reasons of educational continuity, the 
School Defendants believe that kindergarten students should have 
the option of attending their 1-5 school for kindergarten as 
well. This proposal will have a positive, albeit modest, effect 
on desegregation, since the typical child in this situation will 
be of an overrepresented race in the sending school and an 
underrepresented race in the receiving school. 

3. The May 10, 1975 Student besegregation Plan shall be 
amended by adding at the end of the paragraph carrying over from 
page 46 to page 47 the following sentence: "No regular education 
student applying for a seat in a community district high school 



.50J- 



may be assigned to a magnet high school, unless the student's 
parents (or the student him or herself, if over 18) agree to 
such assignment." 

Rationale ; The overenrollment in the community district 
high schools which in 1975 necessitated the paradox of forced 
magnet assignments is no longer as significant in 1984 and can be 
expected to diminish further over the next five years. In light 
of this trend, the School Defendants believe that it is possible 
to maintain enrollments at the magnet high schools within the 
constraints set forth in the outstanding orders without such 
involuntary assignments. Increasing the voluntary enrollment at 
district high schools will operate to strengthen those schools. 
Increasing the number of students permitted to attend the school 
of their choice can only serve to stabilize the system and to 
increase student and parental satisfaction with the system. 
Allowing this modification will further one of the principal 
purposes of the district schools to "enable parents and students 
to plan a coherent sequence of learning experiences within an 
identifiable series of schools that culminate in Community 
District High Schools," Student Desegregation Plan, May 10, 
1975, at p. 1. 

4. The rules governing computation of desegregation 

standards and the determination of compliance shall be modified 

by adding the following language at the end of page 78 of the 

May 10, 1975 Student Assignment Plan: 

In computing the applicable citywide and 
district racial percentages, the following 
students will not be counted: 



-554- 



i 



(a) bilingual students, 

(b) substantially separate special needs 
students, 

(c) examination school students, 

(d) students attending the Hernandez School 
or any comparable school. 

In determining applicable district racial 
percentages, students attending magnet 
schools shall not be counted. In computing 
whether a particular school complies with 
applicable numerical standards, neither 
bilingual students nor substantially separate 
special needs students shall be counted. 

Rationale : Logically, the racial percentages set forth in a 
desegregation plan should reflect the demographics of the popula- 
tion of students whose assignments are made primarily for purposes 
of desegregation. This proposal makes the counting rules consis- 
tent with this premise by excluding from the computation: those 
students whose assignments are governed less by desegregation 
factors and more by program location factors, those students who 
will not, for the most part, be available for desegragative 
assignments because of special programatic needs and those 
students who attend schools subject to special compliance 
standards. 

Bilingual and substantially separate special education 
students have been individually assigned since 1975. It does 
not make sense to count them eithet in computing desegregation 
standards or in determining compliance. The examination schools 
and the Hernandez School operate under different numerical 
standards for desegregation from other schools. Counting students 



-555- 



attending these schools in computing citywide and district 
percentages skews the standard for the other schools because 
those students are disproportionately unavailable for assignment 
to those other schools. Accordingly, they should not be counted 
in determining the desegregation standards applicable for such 
other schools. 

The determination of district percentages has always been 
skewed by counting students attending magnet schools even though 
those students are unavailable for assignment to the district 
schools. Again, since the applicable percentages for magnet 
schools necessarily differ from the district percentages, magnet 
students are disproportionately unavailable for district assign- 
ments. As a result, these students should not be included in 
computing district percentages. 

5. The School Defendants shall be permitted to make 
Madison Park High School the primary academic home for students 
wishing to pursue vocational education offering at the Humphrey 
Occupational Resource Center. The half -day program currently in 
effect will be phased out. The major thrust, on a phased-in 
basis of Madison Park High School shall be vocational education. 
Students presently utilizing the half -day program at the Humphrey 
Center may continue to do so from their present high schools or 
they may transfer to Madison Park High School in September 1986. 

Nonvocational education students at Madison Park High School 
may continue at the school or may apply for other high schools on 
a first priority (but not absolute priority) basis. The Music 



-'■,'•,6- 



Magnet Program shall continue at Madison Park High School. 
Further, Madison Park High School may recruit nonvocational 
education students to the school whose presence would bring the 
school closer to compliance with desegregation standards. The 
school system shall have the right, however, to reconsider the 
maintenance of a comprehensive high school component at Madison 
Park High School in future years. 

Rationale ; The half-day linkages between the ORG and all 
other schools have not been successful. The reasons for this 
lack of success have been the programmatic contortions imposed 
upon both the student's home school and the students themselves 
from the daily commute to the ORG and from the logistical diffi- 
culties and daily disruptions involved in transporting students 
to the ORG. This proposal remedies this situation by making 
nearby Madison Park High School the academic home for students 
enrolled in programs at the Humphrey Center. 

6. The May 10, 1975 Student Desegregation Plan shall be 
amended by adding at the end of page 49 the following language: 
"Beginning in the 1986 school year the School Defendants may make 
grade six an entrance level to the three examination schools and 
beginning in the 1987 school year the School Defendants may 
eliminate grade seven as an entrance level to the three examina- 
tion schools and grade ten as an entrance level to Boston Tech- 
nical High School." 

Rationale: Under current rules, Boston Public School 
students must make the transition from elementary to middle 



■^';7- 



■j^/ 



school before applying to the examination schools and must take 
the SSAT, obtain a satisfactory grade point average, and go 
through the application procedures during that often difficult 
transitional period. Private school students, who are typically 
enrolled in K-6 or K-8 programs, do not face these disadvantages. 
This proposal is designed to remove this disadvantage of public 
school students while, in the process, conforming the examination 
school grade structure in at least one important respect to the 
grade structure in the rest of the system. 

The impact of this proposal on desegregation will be small 
but positive. By reducing the number of high school seats in the 
examination schools, the disproportionate desegregation standards 
which operate in the examination schools will have a correspond- 
ingly reduced impact on desegregation at the high school level. 
In theory at least, this proposal will also increase the pool of 
students available for district and other magnet high school 
assignments. 

7. Students currently enrolled at the Umana School will be 
permitted to transfer to Technical High School without reference 
to an examination or ranking. The Umana School shall become the 
site for a middle school in District 8. The School Defendants 
shall be permitted to make desegregative assignments to the 
middle school to be located at the Umana School without regard to 
district boundaries. The McKay School will become a K-5 school 
beginning September 1986. 



■55&- 



Rationale : This proposal consolidates the enrollments of 
the Umana School and Technical High School. This consolidation 
will enhance the system's ability to provide an advanced science- 
oriented program to qualified students. This proposal also 
results in a suitable (and larger) facility being available for a 
middle school in East Boston. Since the transfer of Umana 
students will result in a loss of a group of minority students 
currently attending school in East Boston, the School Defendants 
seek leave to assign out-of -district students to the middle 
school to be located at the Umana School to maintain a comparable 
level of desegregation in that part of the City. 

8. The School Defendants may expand the program currently 
at the Hernandez School, and may further expand the program by 
the addition of a suitable middle school component. Such expan- 
sions may be in languages other than Spanish. 

Rationale ; There is a general sense that the bilingual/ 
bicultural model in effect at the Hernandez School is worthy of 
expansion, including a possible expansion to the secondary school 
level. At the same time, the School Defendants recognize the 
concern that extensive replication of that program in a large 
number of schools creates the risk of an essentially separate 
sub-system within the Boston Public Schools. This proposal seeks 
to balance these two perspectives by requesting leave for a 
modest expansion of the Hernandez School program, possibly by 
transferring it to a larger school and/or by adding a middle school 
component. The School Defendants seek leave to explore intro- 



'559- 



ducing bilingual/bicultural programs in languages other than 
Spanish. 

9. The May 10, 1975 Student Desegregation Plan shall be 
amended by adding at the bottom of p. 79 two new paragraphs: 

Notwithstanding the foregoing, each school 
may fill a small number of reserved seats (with 
the number determined by school capacity. as set 
forth below) with students whose presence in the 
school enhances or brings the school closer to 
compliance with the applicable racial/ethnic 
percentages. Students may be assigned to fill 
such seats without regard to their geocode or 
district, provided, however, that the transfer of 
any student currently enrolled in a Boston Public 
School shall not have a negative impact on the 
compliance of the sending school with numerical 
desegregation standards. All such assignments 
shall be subject to approval by the Senior Officer 
for Desegregation. 

The number of seats which a particular school 
can fill in accordance with the previous paragraph 
is determined as follows: Schools with capacities 
under 200 may reserve 10 seats. Schools with 
capacities between 200 and 500 may reserve 20 seats. 
Schools with capacities between 501 and 1000 may 
reserve 40 seats. Schools with capacities above 
1000 may reserve 60 seats. Elementary schools may 
reserve an additional 5 kindergarten seats. The 
Senior Officer for Desegregation may permit the 
designation of additional reserve seats in Dis- 
trict 8. 

Rationale : This proposal is intended to encourage princi- 
pals, faculty and parent councils to seek out students whose 
enrollment would enhance desegregation, and, in furtherance of 
that end, to develop innovative educational programs designed to 
attract those students. One hope is that these incentives will 
promote the development of innovative educational programs which 
will (i) promote desegregative transfers across geocode and 



560- 



district lines and (ii) encourage parents of non-public school 

children to try the Boston Public Schools. In addition, the 

School Defendants believe that the internal competition among 

public schools may be healthy and will provide useful information 

pertinent to future facilities decisions. 

10. The May 10, 1975 Student Assignment Plan shall be 

amended by adding a new paragraph after the first paragraph on 

p. 72: 

In order to preserve ethnically integrated 
neighborhoods, the following special assignment 
rules shall apply. The Department of Implementa- 
tion, after consultation with the other parties, 
shall designate those schools which are located in 
ethnically diverse areas of the city. For each 
such school, the Department of Implementation 
shall identify a racially mixed contiguous re- 
cruitment area. The staff at such schools may 
recruit students from such area and such students 
may be assigned to the school, subject, however, 
to capacity constraints and to the numerical 
desegregation standards. The Senior Officer for 
Desegregation must approve any such assignment. 

Rationale : One of the stated goals of the May 10, 1975 
Student Assignment Plan was to avoid "dividing neighborhoods that 
are ethnically integrated." 2^. at 72. This- proposal seeks to 
enhance the possibility for families living in integrated neigh- 
borhoods to utilize local schools for their children. The 
desirability of integrated neighborhood schools seems self- 
evident. They not only respond to the desire of parents for 
local schools; they may also help stabilize those neighborhoods 
which are ethnically mixed. 



-561- 



The proposal would permit schools located in integrated 
areas to use available space for local children, subject, of 
course, to the racial percentage requirements of outstanding 
court orders applicable to that school. In addition, this 
proposal is similar to the previous one insofar as it fosters a 
healthy competition among the Boston Public Schools by rewarding 
success in attracting a racially diverse student body. 

Respectfully submitted, 
THE SCHOOL DEFENDANTS 
By their attorneys. 



Dated: December 20, 1984 



L125/I 
12/20/84 



Marshall Simonds, P.C. 
Henry C. Dinger 
GOODWIN, PROCTER & HOAR 
28 State Street 
Boston, MA 02109 
(617) 523-5700 



-562- 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

**************** 

* 

TALLULAH MORGAN ET AL . , * 

* 

Plaintiffs, * 

* 

V. * CIVIL ACTION 

* NO. 72-911-G 
RITA WALSH-TOMASINI ET AL., * 

* 

Defendants. * 

* 

**************** 

SCHOOL DEFENDANTS' PROPOSAL FOR REVISED 
STUDENT ASSIGNMENT STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES 
IN A CONSOLIDATION OF CURRENT DISTRICTS 
THREE AND FOUR 



The School Defendants hereby submit to the Court a 
proposal (attached to this motion as Exhibit A) for a 
revised student assignment procedure to take place in a 
consolidation of community districts three and four (the 
"Consolidated District"). They move this court to adopt 
this proposal/ subject, however, to two qualifications 
which may prompt the School Defendants to submit revisions 
to the attached version of the proposal. 

The first qualification pertains to school closings 
in the Consolidated District. At its meeting last night, 
the School Committee voted to approve a system-wide reduc- 
tion of 1,000 seats. However, the School Committee is com- 
mitted to holding public hearings prior to approving the 
closing of any particular school. The Committee intends to 
identify whatever schools are to be closed by the end of 
January. Since there is currently no authorization for school 



■563- 



-2- 

closings, the precise delineation of enrollment areas is not 
possible. The attached proposal is offered with no school 
closings. However, the School Coitunittee has approved the 
contiguous enrollment area approach in principle and the 
School Defendants will present a revised list of schools in 
the Consolidated District, together with their enrollment 
areas, by the end of January. 

The second qualification stems from uncertainties 
regarding the impact of this proposal on desegregation in the 
Consolidated District. Whatever schools are included in the 
District, a number of enrollment areas will be racially 
identifiable. The success of this proposal in maintaining 
an acceptable degree of desegregation in the District depends 
on the efforts of principals, faculties and parent councils — 
with the aggressive support of the Superintendent and the 
Central Staff — to encourage a racially mixed group of students 
to attend their schools. The School Defendants believe that 
the credible threat of closing schools which are unsuccessful in 
these efforts will provide a sufficient incentive for these ef- 
forts. 

The School Committee believes, however, that before it 
gives its unqualified approval to this proposal, the School 
Department staff should generate information, by means of 
computer simulations and survey techniques, which would 
permit the conclusion that success in avoiding substantial 
resegregation is possible. The staff has been directed to 



-564- 



-3- 

generate this information during the month of January. If the 
results raise serious doubts about the possibility of success, 
the Committee reserves the right to propose modifications 
designed to guard against substantial resegregation or to 
withdraw the proposal altogether. These modifications may 
include special desegregation measures at problematic schools, 
special non-contiguous assignments to particular schools, and 
other techniques. 

Attached to this motion as Exhibit B is a race by grade 
simulation of the system. The elementary school simulations 
in the Consolidated District (designated as "District 0") 
represents the racial composition of the enrollment areas as- 
suming no intradistrict transfers of regular education students. 
Attached as Exhibit C is a geocode matrix with explanatory tables. 

Subject to the qualifications set forth in this motion, the 
School Defendants submit the attached proposal for the Court's 
approval. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THE SCHOOL DEFENDANTS 

By their attorneys. 



Marshall Simonds, P.C. 
Henry C. Dinger 
GOODWIN., PROCTER & HOAR 
28 State Street 
Boston, MA 02109 



(617) 523-5700 



PROPOSAL FOR EXPERIMENTAL REVISION IN STUDENT 
ASSIGNMENT PROCEDURES IN CONSOLIDATED DISTRICTS 3 AND 4 

I. Re-alignment of Districts 

The Boston Public Schools will be divided for student 
assignment purposes into seven geographic districts and one 
citywide district. The composition of districts 1, 2 and 5-9 
will remain as they are currently. 

Current districts 3 and 4 (i.e. West Roxbury, Roslindale, 

Dorchester, Mattapan, Hyde Park) shall be consolidated for 

student assignment purposes (the "Consolidated District"). It 

shall be composed of the following schools. 

High Schools: Hyde Park, West Roxbury 
Middle Schools: Irving, Lewenberg, R.G. Shaw, 

Rogers, Thompson 
Elementary Schools: P. Bates, Beethoven, Hemenway, Kilmer, 

Lee, Lyndon, Mattahunt, Mozart, 
Parkman, Philbrick, Sumner, Channing, 
Chittick, Conley, E. Greenwood, 
Grew, F. Roosevelt, P. A. Shaw, 
Taylor 

II. Student Assignment Standards in the Consolidated District 
A. Statement of Purpose . The purpose of these assignment 

procedures is to achieve a stable, desegregated assignment of 
students to non-magnet schools within the Consolidated District 
which, to the greatest extent consistent with the desegregation 
goals set forth herein, permits parents to choose the school 
which their children will attend. 



B. Desegregation Standards . The desegregation standards 
set forth below shall constitute the goals to be attained by 



-566- 



means of the assignment procedures and other methods identified 
in this proposal. A school which fails to comply with these 
standards shall have seats reserved for students of the under- 
represented race(s), as set forth below. It shall be the obli- 
gation of the faculty, staff and parent council at any such 
school to take steps (such as recrxiitment and the development of 
"magnetic" programs) to attract students of the underrepresented 
race(s). This ability to do so successfully will be a major 
factor in the future of such a school, particularly if that 
school is located in a predominantly white neighborhood. The 
School Department shall devote reasonable available funds to 
support the efforts of such schools to achieve compliance with 
these standards. The applicable desegregation standards are as 
follows: 

1. The desegregation standards for elementary schools 
within the Consolidated District shall be based on the students 
in grades 1-5 residing in the Consolidated District and attending 
District elementary schools. 

2. The desegregation standards for middle schools 
within the Consolidated District are based on the students in 
grades 6-8 residing within the Consolidated District in which the 
school is located and attending District middle schools. 

3. The desegregation sl^andards for high schools 
within the Consolidated District are based on the students in 
grade 9-12 residing within the Consolidated District and attend- 
ing District high schools. 



•567- 



4. A school within the Consolidated District contain- 
ing a bilingual program may achieve compliance with desegregation 
standards if it would achieve compliance by not counting students 
enrolled in the bilingual program. 

- 5. A school within the Consolidated District enroll- 
ing substantially separate special needs students may achieve 
compliance with desegregation standards if it would achieve 
compliance by not counting such special needs students. 

6. A school within the Consolidated District achieves 
compliance with desegregation standards if the percentage of 
students of each race in the school equals the applicable stan- 
dards percentage plus or minus 25%. Where appropriate, black and 
other minority percentages may be combined. Desegregation 
standards may be computed by excluding bilingual students, 
substantially separate special needs students and students 
attending citywide schools. 

7. The desegregation standards for a given school 
year will be computed as late as possible in the spring of the 
prior school year. The enrollment at that time shall form the 
basis for that computation. 

Ill . Student Assignment Procedures for the Consolidated District 
A. Elementary Schools . 

1. Enrollment Areas . Each elementary school will 
have a contiguous enrollment area. Every effort will be made to 
create enrollment areas which are racially and ethnically mixed, 
and compactness will be sacrificed to achieve this end. Schools 



■563- 



with enrollment areas which are not racially mixed will be given 
sufficiently small enrollment areas to permit reservation of 
seats for the underrepresented race(s), as set forth below. 

2. Reservation of Seats . Elementary schools which 
have not yet achieved compliance with applicable desegregation 
standards shall reserve seats for students of the underrepresented 
race(s). 

3. .Application and Assignment Process . Parents of 
children entering the Boston Public Schools at the elementary 
level and living within the Consolidated District will be permitted 
to express their choice for either any elementary school in the 
District or a magnet elementary school. The following rules 
govern action on such applications. 

a. A child is guaranteed a seat in his or her enroll- 
ment area school from kindergarten through grade 
five. However, such a child is not guaranteed 
transportation to the contiguum school if he or 
she moves out of the enrollment area, unless such 
child's presence is racially beneficial. 

b. A child is guaranteed a seat (with transportation 
if the child is otherwise eligible) in any other 
school within the Consolidated District if, but 
only if, the presence of that child brings the 
receiving school closer to compliance with applic- 
able desegregation standards. 



-5G9- 



c. A child who fails to make a timely application or 
who applies for a school for which he or she is 
ineligible will be assigned to the enrollment area 
school, unless the parents of such child agree to 
a more desegregative assignment. 

d. School officials shall encourage parents to accept 
desegregative assignments in the Consolidated 
District and shall cooperate with individual 
schools in efforts to recruit students for such 
assignments. 

e. If any school within the Consolidated District is 
oversubscribed, selection of students shall be 
made by computerized lottery subject to the 
applicable desegregation standards. Siblings of 
existing students of the appropriate racial/ethnic 
group will be given first preference. Students of 
the appropriate racial/ethnic group residing in 
the same district as the school will be given 
second preference. All other students will be 
given third preference. 

f. The Consolidated District may designate one school 
as a district magnet which will be open to all 
residents of the Consolidated District. 

4. Transfers of non-entry level students . A non-entry 
level elementary school child may apply to attend any elementary • 
school within the Consolidated District in addition to his or her 



■570- 



enrollment area school and will be assigned to that school (with 
transportation if the child is otherwise eligible) if, but only 
if: (i) the presence of that child brings the receiving school 
closer to compliance with applicable desegregation standards, and 
(ii) there is a seat available in the receiving school. 
B. Middle Schools 

1. Enrollment Areas . The enrollment area of each 
middle school shall be a combination of elementary school enroll- 
ment areas within the Consolidated District selected to provide a 
diverse racial/ethnic student body. 

2- Reservation of Seats . Middle schools which have 
not yet achieved compliance with applicable desegregation standards 
shall reserve seats for students of the underrepresented race(s). 

3. Application and Assignment Process . Parents of 
children entering grade six and living within the Consolidated 
District will be permitted to express their choice for either any 
middle school within the Consolidated District or a magnet middle 
school. ^ The following rules govern action on such applications: 

a. A child is guaranteed a seat through grade eight 
in the middle school for the enrollment area in 
which he or she resides. However, such a child is 
not guaranteed transportation to that school if he 
or she moves out of that enrollment area unless 
such child's presence is racially beneficial. 

b. A child is guaranteed a seat through grade eight 
(with transportation, if the child is otherwise 



-571 



eligible) in any other middle school within the 
Consolidated District if, but only if, the presence 
of that child brings the receiving school closer 
to compliance with applicable desegregation 
standards. 

c. A child who fails to make a timely application or 
applies for a school for which he or she is 
ineligible will be assigned to the middle school 
for his or her enrollment area, unless the parents 
of such child agree to a more desegregative 
assignment. 

d. School officials shall encourage parents to accept 
desegregative assignments and shall cooperate with 
individual schools in efforts to recruit students 
for such assignments. 

e. If any school is oversubscribed, the procedures 
set forth in section 111(A)(3)(e) shall apply. 

4. Transfers of Non-Entry Level Students . A non-entry 
level middle school student may apply to attend any middle school 
within the Consolidated District in addition to the school for 
his or her enrollment area and will be assigned to that school 
(with transportation if the student is otherwise eligible) if, 
but only if: (i) the presence of that student brings the re- 
ceiving school closer to compliance with applicable desegregation 
standards, and (ii) there is a seat available at the receiving 
school. 



■572- 



C. High Schools . 

1. Enrollment Areas . The enrollment areas for high 
schools within the Consolidated District shall consist of combi- 
nations of middle school enrollment areas from the District, 
selected to provide a diverse racial/ethnic student body. 

2. Reservation of Seats . If either high school 
within the Consolidated District has not yet achieved compliance 
with applicable desegregation standards, it shall reserve seats 
for students of the underrepresented race(s). 

3. Application and Assignment Process . Parents of 
children entering the Boston Public Schools in the ninth grade 
and living within the Consolidated District will be permitted to 
apply for either one of the District high schools or a magnet 
high school. The following rules govern action on such applica- 



tions. 



a. A child is guaranteed a seat through grade twelve 
in the high school for the enrollment area in 
which he or she resides. However, such a child is 
not guaranteed transportation to this school if he 
or she moves out of the enrollment area unless 
such child's presence is racially beneficial. 

b. A child is guaranteed a seat (with transportation 
if the child is otherwise eligible) in the other 
high school within the Consolidated District if, 
but only if, the presence of that child brings the 



-573- 



receiving school closer to compliance with the 
applicable desegregation standards. 

c. A child who fails to make a timely application or 
who applies for a school for which he or she is 
ineligible will be assigned to the school for his 
or her enrollment area, unless the parents of such 
child agree to a more desegregative assignment. 

d. School officials shall encourage parents to accept 
desegregative assignments and shall cooperate with 
individual schools in efforts to recruit students 
for such assignments. 

e. If any high school is oversubscribed, the proce- 
dures set forth in section 111(A)(3)(e) shall 
apply. 

4. Transfers of non-entry level students . A non- entry 
level high school student may apply to attend either of the 
Consolidated District high schools that school if, but only if: 
(i) the presence of that student bring the receiving school 
closer to compliance with applicable desegregation standards, and 
(ii) there is a seat available in the receiving school. 



L125/J 
12/20/84 



-574- 



Ccnaolidacad Oistric-; 3 and ^ - Asaicmenc ?3CtsrrT 



Lawenberg 



Grew 

Mattahunt 

Phllbrick 



Hyde Park 



j^cgsrs 




Chlttick 

E. Greenwood 

Channing 



Taylor 

F. D.. Roosevelt 

Hemenway 




Wesc Raxbury 



R, G. Shaw 



3eechoven 
:<i Imer 

Mozart 

Lae 
Lyndon 




3aC3S 

?. A. Shaw 
Sumner 



Note: The Conley School is a District Magnet School 



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Recerve Seats for Consolidated District 3 and 4 

Available Seats 



■ School 

Hyde Park High 
West Roxbury High 

Irving Middle 
Lewenberg Middle 
Rogers Middle 
RG Shaw Middle . 
Thompson Middle 

Bates Elementary • ■ 
Beethoven Elementary 
Channing Elementary 
Chit tick 

E. Greenwood Elementary 
Grew Elementary 
Hemenway 

Kilmer Elementary 
Lee Elementary 
Lyndon Elementary 
Mattahunt Elementary 
Mozart Elementary 
Philbr ick Elementary 

F. Roosevelt Elementary 
PA Shaw Elementary 
Sumner Elementary 
Taylor Elementary 

Conley District Magnet 



50 
250 

50 

200 

25 

50 

TOO 

50 

100 

150 

50 

75 

150 

50 

50 

100 

75 

75 

75 

50 

50 

50 

200 

50 

250 



Sub Total - High 300 



Sub Total - Middle 425 



Sub Total - Elementary 14 00 
Sub Total - Magnet 250 

Total Available Seats 2375 



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Analysis of 198^-85 Appl feat I on Process 
Cttywtda 

1. Potential Applicants 





Black 


White- 


Other 


Total 




25584 


15790 


13627 


55001 


2. 


First Preference Requests* 

Black 


White 


Other 


Total 


... 


12326 


3042 


. 4122 


19490 


a- 


Percent Seeking Magnet Schools/P 

Black 


rograms 
White 


Other 


Total 



k8t 



\3Z 



Consolidated District 3 and 4 

1. Potential Applicants 

Black 

7677 

2. First Preference Requests*- 

Black 



White 
3918 



White 



3346 711 
3. Percent Seeking Magnet Schools /Programs 

Black' White 



30^ 



44^ 



]S% 



Other 
832 



Other 



334 



Other 



'fO^ 



25% 



Total 



12427 



Total 



4391 



Total 



353; 



Note: Excludes Sub. Sep. Students, Students Asking for "Present Schools," 
Students Not Replying 



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