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Full text of "Report no. 3 to the United States District Court, District of Massachusetts on Boston school desegregation"

,K!°N„';,^,?.';i,^.v,^:'r: ■ iOVcRNMEi-'JT documents 

DEPARTMENT 



3 9999 06315 376 9 



tiOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



REPORT NO. 3 

TO THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, 
DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

VOLUME IIB 



JULY 15, 1984 



\ 



GOVER^^?.^ENT D0CUME3^TTS DEFT. | 

f.. BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY f 

., 700 Bcyloton Street 
J4 Boston, MA 02117 



Publication of this Document Approved by Daniel D. Carter. State Purchasing Agent 



MASSACHUSETTS BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Mr. James R. Grande, Hanover, Chairperson 
Mrs. Mary C. Wright, Falmouth, Vice Chairperson 

Mr. Robert A. Farmer, Brookline 

Mrs. Anne C. Fox, Needham 

Rev. Paul V. Garrity, Maiden 

Ms. Milca R. Gonzalez, Worcester 

Mr. Howard A. Greis, Holden 

Mr. Gregory G. Nadeau, Marblehead 

Mrs. Loretta L. Roach, Boston 

Mr. Joseph C. Savery, Lee 

Ms. Mary Ellen Smith, Boston 

Mrs. Dorothea A. Zanetti, Wilbraham 



Dr. John H. Lawson, Commissioner of Education, Secretary 
Mr. John B. Duff, Chancellor, Board of Regents, Ex Officio 



Report Coordinated by — 

Franklin Banks, Special Assistant to the Commissioner on 

Boston Desegregation 



Produced by the Bureau of Operational Support 

Cecilia DiBella, Director 

Susan Gardner, Publications/Communications Coordinator 

Susan M. Ridge, Typographist 



The Massachusetts Department of Education insures equal employment/educational opportunities/affirmative action regardless of race, 
color, creed, national origin or sex, in compliance with Title IX, or handicap, in compliance with section 504. 



V 



SCHOOL FACILITIES 



■G0VET?N?vIENT DOamEMTS DEPT. 
BOSTON PUBLIC ULT '■ ' ' 



i ,.- 700 BcvlstoQ Street 

■ Boston, MA 02117 






FACILITIES 

MANDATE 



Construction, renovation and closing of school facilities shall 
occur according to the standards contained in the interlocutory 
Order of June 21, 1974; the Plan of May 10, 1975, pages 6-7; the 
Memoranda and Orders of May 6, 1977, pages 37-40; August 15, 1979; 
March 21, 1980; April 2, 1980; and the Order on Joint Defendants' 
Motion for Adoption, May 11, 1981. 

PROCESS 

The Director of School Building Assistance has conducted the 
reviews, assisted by the Division's Regional Center staff, through 
meetings with Boston staff In the Department of Implenentatlon, 
the Office of the Deputy Superintendent for School Operations, and 
the City of Boston Public Facilities Department. 

OBJECTIVE 

1. To determine whether all school closing measures ordered by 
the Court have been fully complied with. 

STATUS 

Compliance reported In July 1983 Monitoring Report. 

OBJECTIVE 

2. To review all proposed construction, renovation, and other 
school facility measures for consistency with desegregation 
and other requirements of the Court. 

QUESTION 

In Report No. 2, monitors reported approval of renovation plans 
for Dorchester High as of June 28, 1983. It was also reported 
that plans for renovation of Jeremiah Burke High were expected to 
be approved at the January 1984 Board Meeting. Have the 
renovation plans for the Burke and Dorchester High Schools 
outlined by Superintendent Spillane in a submission to the Court 
in May 1982 progressed as expeditiously as possible? 



-0 ::,:)- 



FINDINGS 



A recent site visit by the monitors verified that the Dorchester 
High School renovation project is approximately 50% completed with 
sub-stantial completion scheduled for Septenber 1984. 

The Burke High School renovation project was also approved by the 
Board at the January 24, 1984 meeting. However, the project has 
been seriously delayed due to complications encountered during 
bidding. The bids were substantially higher than the anticipated 
construction costs. The Boston Public Facilities Department is 
presently seeking authorization for increased funding in order to 
proceed with the agreed upon scope of v/ork. Completion of the 
work is scheduled for one (1) year from the date of contract 
signing. 



QUESTION 



In Report No. 2, it was found that joint long-range facilities 
planning had not commenced. What progress has been made to 
develop the required long-range facilities plan? 



FINDINGS 



Other than the Burke and Dorchester renovations, no formal 
proposals for construction, renovation, or other school facility 
measures have been received as of May 14, 1984. However, meetings 
have been encouraging and are the first steps in the development 
process. On May 3, an initial segment of a plan containing 
enrollment projections, capacities, and a list of schools which 
the Boston School Committee has determined will remain open over 
the foreseeable future was received. 
(65U-709) 

Boston has recently submitted educational specifications for a new 
Boston Latin School/Latin Academy building, and other renovations 
are planned. The State Board has not been involved in any of the 
planning on this project. This project, like all others, must 
become a part of Boston's long-range facilities planning. This 
planning process should include the city of Boston, the School 
Department as well, as the Department of Education. Under current 
orders, projects beyond Burke and Dorchester must await 
development and approval of a complete secondary school facilities 
plan, a component of the Court-Ordered Unified Facilities Plan. 



-oHO- 



OBJECTIVE 



3. To review the placement or proposed placement of any portable 
unit, or the rental of any space for Instructional purposes, 
for consistency with the desegregation and other requlretnents 
of the Court. 



STATUS 



Monitors have been Informed of 
for Instructional purposes. 



no plans for the rental of space 



OBJECTIVE 
4. 



To determine the extent of compliance with outstanding orders 
with respect to development of a Unified Plan, including a 
schedule of further school closings, a schedule of 
construction, renovation, replacements, as well as repair and 
refurbishing of all facilities, and a plan for secondary 
school utilization. In accordance with the provisions of the 
Manual for District Planning Activities and other 
requirements of the Court. 



QUESTIONS 



Report No. 2 stated that "joint planners" had not met for the 
purpose of developing a long-range facilities plan. Have 
discussions occurred among the "joint planners" about a long-range 
secondary school facilities plans as a necessary part of the 
Unified Facilities Plan? What progress has been made toward 
determining priorities for the available resources and for 
possible closings? 



FINDINGS 



Since the last report, representatives of the Boston Public 
Schools, City of Boston Public Facilities Department, and 
representatives of the State Board of Education have met twice to 
begin to develop a long-range facilities plan on which individual 
school construction, renovation, or improvement projects may be 
based. Volume II of this report contains summaries and reports 
related to those meetings. 

The first of the two meetings occurred on April 24, 1984, and was 
convened by a representative of the Mayor's Office. At this 
meeting a proposed outline for the contents of the facilities plan 
was discussed. (648-649) 



-6K- 



On May 3, 1984, a second meeting was held during which 
representatives of the Boston Public Schools and the Public 
Facilities Department advised the monitors that the Boston School 
Committee had voted approval of a list of schools to be retained 
in the system on a long-range basis, some of which would be the 
subject of enlargement, renon/ation, or improvement projects. A 
list of proposed projects keyed to the schools identified in the 
list, together with cost estimates, is to be submitted to the 
State Board. 

It has also been determined that funding for these proposals will 
be derived from City Council orders, and not from Boston school 
maintenance funds, which will be used for day-to-day repair and 
maintenance problems. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 



The school department, city and state should continue joint 
development of an educationally and financially sound long-range 
facilities plan. 



-6h2- 



VOLDME II ATTaCH^3E^?rS 



March 2, 1984 Letter to Commissioner John H. Lawson 

from Superintendent Robert R. Spillane, 
re: Long-Range Facilities Planning. 

March 20, 1984 Letter to Superintendent Robert R. 

Spillane from Canmissioner John H. Lawson 
in Response to the Superintendent's March 
2, 1984 Letter on Long-Range Facilities 
Planning. 

April 17, 1984 Letter to Peter Scarpignato, Boston 

Public Facilities Departraent, from John 
Calabro, re: School Construction, 
Renovation, and Improvement Projects. 

April 27, 1984 Letter to Robert W. Consalvo, Educational 

Liaison for the Mayor's Office, frcm John 
Calabro, re: Long-Range Facilities 
Planning. 

I-lay 3, 1984 Data Relating to School Facilities 

Planning submitted by tlie Boston Public 
Schools. 



-6iio_ 



THE SCHOOL COM[vl!TTEE OF THE GITY OF BOSTON 




3CST0N PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OFFlCc OF THc SUPERriNTcNOENT- 

Roeeai r. spillane ' 






March 2, 1984 



Commissioner John H. Laws on 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
1385 Hancock Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts- 02169 

Dear Commissioner Lawson: 

I understand that the School Buildings Assistance Bureau 
requires a secondary school plan from the Boston Public Schools 
prior to any consideration of school construction projects 
including our application for building modifications or 
innovations under Chapter 515 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth. 

The Boston Public Schools have undergone significant change in 
the past several years. After reestablishing fiscal 
credibility, we have embarked on a course of action which has 
seen the development and adoption of comprehensive graduation 
requirements for middle and high school students and a promotion 
policy for Grades 1-12 which will be implemented in 1984-85. 

Built upon this foundation of academic standards, I have 
presented the School Committee with a long-range plan for the 
Boston Public Schools which is designed to establish our 
direction for the next decade, as well as to prepare for the 
disengagement of the Federal District Court. This plan was 
submitted to School Cocmittae in February 1984 and will be 
discussed at their meeting of March 6, 1984. The plan includes 
comprehensive recommendations for restructuring the Boston 
Public Schools and has specific provisions for secondary schools 
in the system which are the necessary determinants of a 
Secondary Facilities Plan called for in your recent monitoring 
report to the Federal District Court. 

I offer you this long range plan as an indication of the 
direction of the Boston Public Schools for the next decade, as 
well as a description of our plan for secondary schools within 
that framework. I believe it now will be productive, based on 
these educational recommendations, to discuss joint development 
of a Secondary Facilities Plan. I am anxious, however, that 
such discussions not preclude consideration of our present 
application for critical modifications in Boston school 
buildings . 



John H. Lawson 



-2- 



March 2, 1984 



Your attendance at the State Board of Education meeting at 
Boston Technical High School undoubtedly signaled to you the 
very real physical needs of the Boston Public Schools. Boston 
Technical High is one of the schools slated for boiler 
replacement in the application presently before the School 
Building Assistance Bureau. We need to take prompt action on 
projects such as Technical High where needs are unquestioned and 
where long-range use is assured. We request that the Department 
of Education work with the Boston Public Facilities Department 
and with the Boston Public Schools to approve financing for such 
projects 

This is also to request the participation of the Department of 
Education in the joint development of a Secondary Facilities 
Plan for the Boston Public Schools. 




Superinteradent of Schools 



cc: Raymond L. Flynn 
James Hart 
Victor Hagan 
John Calabro 
Robert Peterkin 



-645- 






'-vS 



OKics of tha Coiasn!.vuan>r 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



138S Hancock Ztmi. Quincy. Massachusetts 02169 



March 20, 1984 



Robert R. Spillana 
SuperlnCendenC 
Boston Public Schools 
26 Court Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



02108 



Re: Long-Range Facilities Planning 



Dear Superintendent Spillane: ' ' . •- 

Thank you for sharing vith me the draft Long-Range Plan of February 1984, 
vhich I received under your cover letter of March 2. I was particularly 
encouraged to note that the proposed timetable contained at Section V of the 
doctcaent recognizes that , once a plan has been adopted by the Boston School 
ComndLttee, those portions of the plan that require modification of outstanding 
desegregation orders must be sxibmitted to the modification process contained 
fit Section VI of the Federal District Court's December 23, 1982 Orders of 
Disengagement. The State Board is prepared to coordinate tha reqxiired 
negotiation process once a plan has been adopted, by the Boston School Committee. 

Regarding the development" of a long-range facilities plan for Boston, the 
State Board's responsibility to participate as a joint planner with both the 
Boston School Committee and the Public Facilities Department of tha City of 
Boston predates, the -Orders of Disengagement. Again, ve stand ready to participate 
in this effort once city and school officials have identified their future needs. 
As in previous joint planning efforts, \j& feel that the. planners should work 
toward identifying a prioritized list of school constmction projects, with fixed 
commencement dates, for tha next several years. Such a list can only be created 
after comprehensive projections regarding ' future grade structure, future enrollnen 
by grade level, and the future use and capacity of existing school facilities- 

I am also aware, as you note in your letter, that certain facilities needs 
are presently apparent. In this regard,-' I direct your attention to Chapter 515 
of the Acts of 1983, which provides additional state aid for qualifying projects 
that contribute to desegregation. A copy of Chapter 515 is enclosed. The staff 
of the Department's School Building Assistance Bureau is prepared to offer any • 
necessary assistance Boston may require in pursuing funding under this statute. ■ 



Encs. 

cc: Hon. Raymond L. Flynn 

Donald B. Hanson 

Franklin Banks 





Jdhn H. Lawson 

mmissioner of Education 



The Cornmomvealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



1335 



„«,coc5cSU«tQumc. Massachusetts 



02169 



April 17, 198^ 



r 

Boston Public r<. 
16 court Str«t 

Boston, tW u-^' 



Dear Peter: 



i»f •"- 

. . -f Aorll «i 'SS*. 
„.. Peten • , ^r telephone conversatton or Pj . 

|sp«UUy those related ^^^^ ^^^^^__^ ^ Ions-range foe. Utl^^^^P^ , 



7hn A. Calabro, Ph-O- 

school Bu.H.ng Ass. 
(617) 770-7238 



JACrhh 



cc: 



Frank Banks 
aobert Bl"-nf ^^ 
Karlene Godfrey 
Robert Pccerk.n 

Samuel Pi'^e 

John Raftery 

Ca.--.issior.er Larson 



-5i;7- 



ihxi Commonyvealth of Massachusetii 
Daparcnisnt of Education 

1323 Iianco:!f S:.--e:. iluir.zy. fAszzidiur:?:'.: C;." l£i» 

April 27, 133^ 



Mr. Robert W. Consalvo ' ' ' 

Educational Liaison • • • 

Office of the tiayor ' ' ' ■' ' ■ 

Boston City Hall . ' . ... • 

26 Court Street '.':.• 

Boston, m 02108 

Dear Mr. Consalvo 

This is a brief summary of the main points of our meeting held at Public 
Facilities Department In Boston on Tuesday, April 2h, 190^, at 10:00 a.m. 
during which you, Ray Regan, Bob Hurray, Peter Scarplgnato, John Coakley, Paul 
Mooney, Ed Nicolas, Sara Pike and I discussed the Boston Public Schools* long- 
range facilities plan, procedures for possible school projects for 
construction, enlargement, renovation, and Improvement of a building, and 
funding for such project proposals. 

^ • • 

- ' ' A long-range facilities plan is both necessary and prudent and In any 
case is required both by School Building Assistance Bureau, Oepartmant of * 
Education practices and procedures and by order of the Federal Court, 



Such plan should generally provide the kinds of information Identified In 

the attached proposed outline, and inay be organized, at least at this point, 
to Identify schools certain to remain In use and those which will probably 
remain In use. The others, the future of which Is uncertain, should also be 
identified. The plan must also be consistent with desegregation/racial 
balance planning as determined by our Bureau of Equal Educational Opportunitv 
and others in the Department. Court determined capacities should be* taken 
into account. 

Ve are not now working with the City on any school project proposals.' 
All future proposals must be consistent with the approved long-range plan. 

Mr. Nicolas of my office {770-723S) and Mr. Pike of the Greater SosCon 
Regional Center in Vellesley (727-l'i70) are available to assist and cooperate 
in the development of the plan- I understand the City of Boston at this tifr.e'" 
has not identified either its PFD representative or its representative frcnj" 
the Public Schools to assist or cooperate in the 



f'aya Two 

li.-. Robert V.'. Consul vo 

Ayril 27, ISS'f 



ddvalopment of this plan. The section or Chapter 515 of tha /'ccs of I3S3 
\/hich provides ninety percent for certain approved construction projects 
terminates June 30, 193-». These projects ausC tend to reduce or eliminate 
segregation end IrnbaTonce- In order to bo considered for nlnsty percent aid, 
a project application must be submitted or approved by June 30» 198^. Such 
project must be consistent with the provisions of the long-rangs plan. H,63, 
novi In House Ways and Ileans, If enacted, would extend the ninety percent 
provisions of Chapter 5^5- ^ 

Still to be determined Is whether school ImproveTJent projects, f.e,, 
rcofs, heating systems, energy retrofits, etc., could be aided at ninety 
percent. 

Representatives of the Public Schools, Public FacIIJtfes Department, and 
perhaps others, will contact Hr. Nicolas or Mr. Pike very soon to continue the 
good work begun on Tuesday. Meanwhile, I suggest that you send us whatever 
lists of schools and proposed work In them you nay now have in order to assist 
us with our task. 

If I have omitted or misstated anything, please let me know by letter- . 

Please keep In close touch. ^; • 

' .-.i • Sincerely yours, 



JAC:hh 

cc: Charles Glenn 

Fletcher Bishop 



/^yil'ohn A. Calabro, Ph.D. 
^-^Administrator 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

(617) 71^-111^ 



-649- 



Boston Public Schools 
Data Relating to School Facilities Planning 

Kay 3, 1984 



The following pertinent information relating to the Boston 
Public Schools is being submitted to the Massachusetts School Build- 
ing assistance Bureau as a prelude to the City of Boston filing 
applications for reimbursement of modernization, rehabilitation and 
construction projects in Boston school buildings which qualify for 
State assistance under existing statutes. 

The contents of this submission include 

a) Grade Organization 

b) Estimated Enrollments - By grade, level, race and specialized 

. . program 

c) Schools in Operation - Long Range Facilities Plan - Phase I 

d) Capacity of Each School and Chronological Listing of Schools 

e) Statement of Capital Improvement Needs with Estimates of 
Keating, Roofing, Energy Retrofit and Site Improvement Keeds. 



-650- 



a) Boston Public Schools - Grade Organization 

May 1934 

The Boston Public Schools will maintain the grade structure 
established by the Federal District Court Order of 1975: - 

. . K - 5 . .- 

6-8 
.9-12. 

There are presently a fev; exceptions to this structure that have 
been approved by the Court. These include 

Boston Latin 7-12 
Boston Latin Academy 7-12 
Dmama • 7-12 

. McKay K-6 (Linked to Umana) 

Tobin K-8 

Special Education Centers? McKinley, Tileston, Mann- 

The Superintendent of Schools, Robert R- Spillane in February. 
1984 proposed a Long Range educational plan currently under review 
and requiring court approval that would have the following impact on 

grade organization — if approved 

Boston Latin 
Boston Latin Academy 
, Umana " _ • 

McKay 

In- Each District - K-8 At least one school addition 
or pre-kindergarten to K-5 schools. 



-551- 



-652- 



a. 
Boston Public Schools 
Grade Organization 

May 1984 






. b. 

Boston Public Schools 

Estimated Enrollments 
By Level, Grade, Race 
and Specialized Program 

May 1984 



-65^- 







February 28, \3Zk 
HEMORANOUM 



TO: Interested Persons 

FROM: John R. CoakleyCWj^L 

SUBJECT: Enrollment Proj4ttIons for 1984- 



and 3eyond 



Each year my colleagues and I develop the wide I y-accl aimed enrollment 
projections for the school system. (It Is not true that any of us were 
involved in the forecasting of a Dewey victory In 19^8, although seme 
did envision a world's championship for the Celtics in I983*) 

There follows: 

1. A two-page explanation of our assumptions and approach 
In developing enrollment estimates for 1984-35 

2. Thirteen charts which seek to place the various enrollment 
sub-set. project ions in historical context 

3. A recently-developed five year projection of enrollments 
- by race . Please note that this racial project I on does not 

necessarily correspond to the five-year (non-racial) 
projections found in Chart 13 

4. A recently-acquired sunmary of births in Boston by neighbor- 
hoods and by race from lg69 to 1982. it is much more de- 
tailed than Chart 8 

The data are not intended to convince you Chat the projections for a 
given school are correct. However, the data should give you a sense of 
systemic or programmatic trends. The irony is that we can estimate the 
total system's enrollment a year ahead of time and come — as we did this 
year — v/ithin three-tenths of <ine percent, and yet "miss" rather signifi- 
cantly the first-grade projection in a rather small school, 

bmj 

Enclosure 



1984-1985 iNP.OLLMEiVT PSOJECTIOMS 
• , ASSUMPTIONS AMD APPROACH 

1. The Depart-er.t of I.'nplerrientaticn developed "draft" enrollrnent 

projections for 1584-1985 based on the assvimption that all schools 
and procrams in effect in 1983-34 would be in effect in 1934-35. 
Those projections were couiplated on December 14, 1983, and than 
Comnuinity Superintendents, Headrnasters , Principals and Central 
Deoartrcant officials were asked to provide reactions by December 22, 
1983. 

2- On January 3, 1984, the Department of Imp lenient at ion submitted a 
revised set of enrollment projections for 1984-85. Again the 
projections: '' 

5) assumed that there would be no schools closed in 
1984-85, 

b) for the most part did not factor in possible program 
consolidations or expansions in 1984-85, and 

c) assumed that the expansion of Extended Day Kindergartens 
would continue in effect in 1984-85. 

3. On or about February 1, 1984 the Space Matrix for 1984-85 will be 
completed and the DI will notify the Deputy Superintendents of 
predictable changes in the "Second Effort" projections, probably 
in Special Education and Bilingual Education. 

4.. On or about June 1, 1984, after the Student Assignment Process has 
been ccmpletsd, the DI will advise the Deputy Superintendents of 
any further modifications in the 1984-35 Enrollment Projections. 

". - . ■ . • • 

5. The kindergarten enrollment of 1984-85 should reflect little or no 
increase over that of 1983-84, There should be modest 
kindergarten increases in 1985-86 and 1986-37. 

6. The second grade enrollment of 1984-85 should be smaller than the 
"sixteen-month" second grade enrollment of the current year. The 
third grade enrollment of 1984-85 should be larger than this year's 
third crade enrollment b'ecause it will be the "sixteen-month" grade 
in 1984-85. • " . ,, ..." 

7. Enrollment projections should target the mid-Decsmber ACTUAL 
enrollments. ASSIGJIED enrollments fluctuate too much during the 
school year to be of value for projections. ACTUAL enrollments 
(exclusive of those in September) vary less from month to month. 
Usually, the A.CTUAL enrollment of December is at the highest level 
of ACTU.AL enrollments through the year. Generally the ACTUAL 
enrollment of December is comparable to the .ASSIGNED enrollment of 
late March. 

8. Enrollment projections are first determined on a system-wide 
"bottom-line" basis by calculating the avsrace change from grade 
to grade over a seven-year period. We fine-tune that calculation 
by determining for each grade the "return" rate of students in each 
of the last two school years plus the "new to Boston Public Schools" 
average in each of the last two school years. 

-656- 



5- H = vina cr?^eiT-..v-<-'':'; '.vhat ths school syst'^in's enrollrr.er.t on a grads- 
• by-crac= c-icic •".j likely zc be, v/a risxt: »st:i.nata the prRdictable 
chanceii ir. c;.:cr"i.cc enrcL L.iian-ts and in the individuiil progran 
snrolir.i-^p.ts . 



^ ^-.^ 



Having created "5r.rolln;ant quidapcsts" for each grade, distric 
prograr^, •.■?■=. enc<:-^vor to c^.lculate school-by-schooi enrolluients (by 
grade and by program) by 2.-ploying a "survival-rate" approach. 

Tctal-syst-tra er.rcilment projections are the least difficult to 
deteruiirre- On January 17, 1983 we predicted a Decen±i«r 1983 
enrollr.ent of 55,759; on Decerciber 15, 1983 the enrollir.ent (ACTOAL) 
was 55,754'. Grade-level projections and total-program projections .- 
also are not too bothersome to forecast (although cur first-grade 
projection for both 1982-33 and 1933-84 were not on or near the 
roark) . However, projecting the 1700 sub-sets (exclusive of main- 
stream Special Needs) in our schools is rather difficult. It is 
important, therefore, that we refine our projections each year in 
the late Spring. It is equally important, however, that all 
schools maintain accurate enrollment data throughout each year. 
Enrollment projections reflect both the strengths and limitations 
of the estimators jand the accuracy of the enrollment data 
{including grade-level data and program dataj in each school. 

12. The charts which follow provide some indication of enrollment 
trends since 1976-77 and constitute justification for the 
projections for 1934-85. .»l1so enclosed is a listing of Births in • 
Boston from 1958 to 1982. (Please note that the 1984-85 students 

. generally were born between 1967-1979.) Another enclosiire is a 
recently refined five-year enrollment projection for 1984-85 to 
1983-89. (Please note that the 1984-85 estimates in this five 
year projection are not consonant with the school-by-school 1984-1985 
Enrollment Projection of January 3, 1984.) A final enclosure is 
a listing of reported Non-Promotes , by grade and by district, for 
each of the prior six school years. Please note- that we used the 
reported Non-Promotions of June of each year before Summer School 
and before the innumerable reconsiderations of decisions on 
promotions by local school persons . The data are of interest as 
barometers. 'Bear in mind our declining enrollments as you look at 
such data. One certainly questions the wisdom of an early-entranca 
age for kindergarteners and, by extension, first graders when one 
notes the number of kindergarten non-prcmotes since June 1982 and 
the number of first-grade non-prcmotes in June 1983 . 

13. Again, I call attention to dramatic enrollm.ent decline now occurrinc 
in middle schools (and about to begin in high schools) at a time 
when kindergarten and elementary school enrollments may begin to 
increase modestlv. 



^01- 



HISTORICAL SiJHOLLMEJlT DATA 
TOTAL ENROLLMENT BY GRADE - DECEMBER ACTUAL 



L./ •?/ w-i 



PROJ 



12/11 


12/78 


12/79 


12/80 


12/31 


12/82 


12/83 


12/84 


3303 


3391 


3221 


3185 


- 


- 


- • 


- 


4740 


4392 


4169 


4207 


5277 


. 4362 


4419 


4355 


5382 


4987 


4450 


4288 


' 4162 


5235 


4762 


4499 


4933 


4732 


. 4422 


4072 


3803 


3868 


4515 


4258 


4958 


4666 


4505 


4337 


3822 


3684 


3795 


4295 


5003 


4783 


4496 


4400 


4163 


3708 


3670 


3769 


5143 


4868 


4634 


4429 


4276 


4147 

• 


3736 


3514 


5873 


5176 


5009 


4708 


4737 


4454 


4201 


3929 


5749 


5744 


5239 


5183 


4803 


. 4870 


4744 


4422 


5497 


5201 


5117 


4760 


4575 


4330 


4365 


4239 


6382 • 


• 6271 


5999 


5851 


6058 


5692 


5444 


5275. 


5323 


5385" 


5308 


5347 


4976 


5112 


4528 


4615 


4147 


4439 


4407 


. 4476 


4399 


4017 


4129 


3857 


3644 


3015 


3337 


3490 


3444 


3350 

• 


3082 


3310 


397 


.773 


780 


, 922 


212 


242 . 


258 


250 


760 


281 


283 


61 


142 


181 


106 


120 



71244 



68104 



65331 



63716 



53849 



57252 



55754 



54707 



8043 


. 7783 


73 90 


7^92 


5277 


43 62 


4419 


4355 


25429 


24036 


22507 


21526 


20225 


20642 


20478 


20335 


17119 


16121 


15365 


14651 


14115 ■ 


13654 


13310 


12590 


19496 


19110 


19051 


19164 


18877 


18171 


17183 


17057 


1157 


1054 


1068 


983 


354 


423 


364 


370 







• 












— # -/ — - 




• 




histor: 


:CAL ENROLL 


ME NT DATA 


^ 






RT 2 
T31 


12/77 


TOTAL ENROLLMEN'T 
12/78 12/79 


BY DISTRICT - DECZM 
12/80 ■ 12/Sl 


BER ACTUAL 
12/82 12/33 


PROJ 
12/84 


I 


5iS6 


4988 


4660 


4628 


4441 


4371 


4461 


4418 


X 


6112 


5872 


5775 


5563 


4889 


4665 


4618' 

• 


4558 


:i 


7034 


6659 


6157 


6000 


5416 


5194 


4983 


• 

4816 


?r 


6021 


5652 


5198 


5144 


4585 


4443 


4319 


4212 


V 


11631 


10935 


10379 


9867 


8808 


8161 


8093 


- ' 7923 


?i 


6762 


6296 


5985 


5745 


5187 


5266 


5164 


5053 


:i 


5771 


5558 


5213 


51S3 


4631 


4757 


4879 


4882 


EI 


3916 


3780 


3666 


3442 


3201 


3086 


2958 


2881 


IZ 


18809 


18364 


18348 


18134 


17690 


17309 


16279 


15964 


'sSL 


71244 


68104 


65381 


63716 


58849 


57252 


55754 


54707 


ILHT 3 


12/77 


TOTAL ENROLLMENT 
12/78 12/79 


BY PROGRAM 
12/80 


- DECEMBER ACTUAL 
12/81 12/82 


12/83 


PROJ 
12/84 


t 


62395 


57531 


53814 


51538 


47150* 


44788** 


42683** 


41844- 


• 


1130 


962 


1045 


859 


574** 


864* 


804* 


803 


FC 


724 


1004- 


lost 


965 


1032. 


1025 


1059 


" 1051 


3P 


491 


1443 


1420 


1411 


854 


847 


1141 


1104 


lL ED? 


- 


50 


156 


271 


183 


150 


247 •' 


?42 


PSD SS 


1723 


1907 


2207 


2447 


2742 


3083 


3284 


333C 


CL 


4614 


4990 


5354 


5927 


6314 


6495 


6536 


5333 


OTAL 


71244 


63104 


65381 


63716 


53849 


57252 


55754 


54707 


HSTHX 


7110 


3096 


8055 


7926 


7820 


7514 


7161 


678^ 



Includes Business Education at East Boston High School 

'■- — _55q_ '='-'<^-*- Boston Hiqh School 



--i — » i«^. 



EIST03ICAL EUHCLLMENT OATA 
BILINGUAL EDUO^TION ENROLLHEMT - .D.-JCEJIBSR ACTUAL 



0!I31I, 

II, ED? 
IL SS 



4614 



40 



4S90 



5354 



5927 



6314 



6495 



6536 



1/4/S4 



2Qy:^ji 


12/77 


12/73 


12/79 


12/80 


12/81 


12/82 


• 

• 12/33 


PROJ 
. 12/34 


en 


452 


484 


589 


727 


.807 


789 


812 


806 


«■ *» 


231 


231 


257 


253 


383 


505 


■ 468 


. 421 


GH 


241 


: 210 


■ 191 


174 


151 


140 


140 


132 


IT 


358 


407 


433 ■ 


412- 


377 


341 


312 


279 


CV 


152 


246 


322 


382 


. 406 


523 


513 


502 


p 


110 


.85 


81 


79 


. 85 


97 


87 


82 


S? 


'3022 


3274 


3385 


3525 


3383 


3325 


. 3414 


3369 


:a/ca.m* 


- 


■ -■. 


8 


24 


352 


268* • 


300 


I 
270: 


V 


- 13 - 


37 


74 


200 


344 


374 • 


382 


. 36E' 


rs/LAO* 


35 


■ 16 • 


14 


151 


26 


133* 


103 


. 10^ 



633: 



50 


156 


271 


183 


150 • . 


247 


24 


74* 


8^ 


129 


152 


190 


• 241 


22 



♦Change in "Title" on 10/28/82 



3 « 



V = 



=» CHINESE 

-- FRENCH/HAITIAN 

= GREEK 

= ITALIAN 

CAPE VERDEAN 



P = PORTUGUESE " f''^^ 

S? = SPANISH r^''-^- 

SEA/CAM = SOUTHEAST ASIAN/C\MBODIAl''''' '"' 
V = VIETNA:-IESE |#*'SELi 

OTH/LAO •= OTHER/LAOTIAH • §'1^.} 



-660- 



3- TOT 



BT 5 



1/4/^4 



JG?w\M 12/77 





i 


127 




4 


321 


5 


4 


245 


1 


4 


92 


2 


4 


377 


s'* 


15 


l'' 


133 


/* 


263 


S^V 


93 


94 


- 13 


I 


, SS 


~ 40" 



HISTORICAL EHROLLliElli: DATA 
SPSCIAL EDUCATION ENHOLLMSJiT - DECEMBER ACTUAL 



TAL 



1723 



12/73 

131 

352 

255 

87 

398 

23 

142 

344 

85 

16 

■74 

1907 



12/79 
104 
470 
247 

59 
519 

25 
143 
460 

79 

16 
- 85 

2207 



12/30 
127 
553 
228 

49 
571 

21 
132 
546 

76 

15 
129 

2447 



12/31 
162 
628 
226 

54 
616 

13 
139 
648 

87 

• 17 

152 

2742 



12/82 

216 

682 

225 

51 

775 

. 19 

138 

672 

96 

19 

190 

3083 



12/83 
248 
739 
217 

42 
799 

27 
143 
722 

87 

1^ 
241 

3284 



PROJ 
12/84 

241 

774 

.2-03 

40 
844 

29 

143 

"724 

82 

23 
221 

3330 



INSTRZAZi 


-' 




■ 






• 




2.1 635 


830 


939 




968 




925 905 . 816 


771 


2.2 4149 


4571 


4596 




4630 




4642 4230 3972 

• 


3723 


2.3 2325 


2635 


2520 




?'^2S 




2253 2379 2373 


2290 


)TAL 7110 


8096 


8055 




7925 




7820 7514 7161 


6784 


= devslo?:ie:ital basic 


SKILLS 


1. 




54 


= ADAPTIVE VISION SSSOURCr: 


3 


= SUPPORTIVE 


AOUDEMIC 


REMEDIAT 


ION 




64 


= COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENTAL 




= PP.EPARATOR: 


: LIFE SKILLS 






74 


= PSYCHO-HDUCATIONAL/MOTOR 




= SELT EEL? SKILLS , 








84 


= LEARNING/HABILITATION GCi 


iLS 


. = LZAPJIIIJG/ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR 






94 


= SPEECH AN-D HEARING 





-DC_- 



J—TY-i" 



TOT 



HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT DATA 



L^.T 6 


NON- 


■PRCCPAMM-ATIC ENROLLMENT 3Y 


GRADE - 


DECEJ13EP- 


ACTUAL 


'B'sr*' 




^AUS . 


12/77 

• 


12/78 ■ 12/79 


12/80 ■ 


12/81 


12/82 ■ 


12/83 


12/S4| 


CI 


2520 


2410 2219 


2050 


- 


- 


1 






CII 


4365 


3184 2827 


2782 


3447 


2643 


2353 


2421 


n 


4840 


4286 3801 


3586 


3377 


4241 


3858 


3672 


)2 


4365 


4078 . 3688 


3364 


3072 


3046 


3503 


339' 




33 


4318 


4034 ' 3807 


3471 


3021 


2908 


2925 


330< 




34 


4334 


3815 " 3525 


3402 


3012 


2654 


2547 


264: 




35 


4318 


3914 3576 


3402 


3160 


2952 


2575 


242! 




:s 


5008 


" 4330 3936 


3677 


3627 


■ 3352 


3020 


275 


1 


37 


;- 5265 


.5221 4708 


4502 


4132 


4170 


4001 


367' 




33 ■ 


5071 


•4773' 4629 


■ 4231 


3955 


. 3716 


3666 


353 1 


• 


39 


5594 


■ 5649 " 4991 


■ 4910 


5146* 


- 4624 


■ • 4403 


43Ls 


!l«C 


LO 


4556 


- 4533 4525 


4421 


4201* 


4104 


3639 


1 
367 


W 


a 


3562 


3716 3735 


3807 


3708* 


3265 


3301 


f 1: 
305 


L2 


3103 


2536 2778 


2950 


2938* 


2690 


2514 


2S0 




.3 


386 


771 780 


922 


212 


242 


258 ' 


22 




A 


6S0 


281 _. 288 


61 


142 


181 


106 


■12, 





623 95 



57531 



53814 



51538 



47150* 44783 



42683 418^ 



Includes approximately 300 Business Education students at East Boston High 
School. 

ote: The above enrollments are NON- PROGRAMMATIC (i.e., regular education). 

-662- 



vd 



??' 



EISTOaiCAL ENROLLMENT DATA 



1/4/84 



12/8 

• 


7 NO?T- 
12/77 


•??OC?JiHMAT 
12/78 


IC SNROLLiiSilT BY 
12/79 12/80 


DISTRICT - 
12/81 


DECEMBER 
12/82 


ACTUAL 
12/83 


PROJ 
12/84 


m 


40S9 


3717 


3230 


3069 


2767 


2761 


2735 


2774 




5175 


4763 


4595 


4292 


3794 


3494 


3331 


3274 


35] 


6201 


5642 


5044 


4905 


4313 


4033 


3752 


3634 


33J 


5575 


5189 


4679 


4604 


4061 


. 3885 


3761 


3638 


1 


10612 


9605 


8901 


8393 


7306 


6659 


6379 


. 6219 


1 


5837 


5240 


4798 


4484 


3991 


3867 


3630 


252S 


242 


4541 


4154 . 


3574 


3379 


3111 


3171 


3150 


3141 


275 


3345 


2917 


2666 


2416 


2475* 


. 2099 


•2023 


2C05 


m 


17016' 


" "16258 


16277 


15996 


15332 


14819 


13867 


13633 



62395 57531 53814 51538 47150* 44788 42683 41844 



^^ieLudes aooroximately 300 Business Education students at East Boston High 
The above enrollments a re, NON-PROGRAMMATIC (i»e., regular education), 



-663- 



£SSIRT2 


- 


HART 8 


BIRTHS T 


YEAR 


NUMBER OF BIRTHS 


1953 


162SQ 


1959 


16397 


1960 


15631 


1961 


15627 


1962 


15373 


1963 


14635 


1964 


14249 


. 1965 


13112 .. 


1966 


■ 12776 


1967 


12157 


1968 


- . ■ •• 11646 


1969 


■ ■ . ' 11057 


1970 


- 11217 


1971 .: 


10275 ■ . 


1972 


8926 


1973 


" 8168* 


1974 


7778 


1975 


7481 


1976 


7098 


1977 


6966 ' ^ 


1978 


7102 


1979 


7411 


1980 


7670 


1981 


8026 



1/4/84 



COMiMENT 

GRADE 12, 1975-75 



GRAPE 12, 1973-79 



GRADE 12, 1983-34 



GRADE 8, 1983-84 



grade's, 1983-84 



KINDERGARTEN, 1983-34 



MM 



0-3 Ct 



-66>^- 



RT 9 

:-K 
i-s 

VSZL. 
l-S. 

S— a 



•3-Sl 
•H-3 
OTaL 



HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT DATA 

BILINGUAL ENROLLMENT BY GRADE LEVEL - DECEMBER ACTUAL 

12/73 12/79 12/80 12/81 12/82 12/83 

95* 101* 120* 96 58 . 51 

205 255 304 334 387 407 

60 91 no 134 127 ' 138 

124 141 193 243 217 216 

484 589 727 807 789 812 



13* 
84 
55 
79 

231 

29* 
69' 
55 
57 
210 

30* 

176 
101 
100 
407 

7* 
78 
57 

104 



101* 


120* 


96 


255 


304 


334 


91 


110 


134 


141 


193 


243 


589 


727 


807 


23* 


10** 


1 


98 


95 


122 


56 


39 


52 


80 


109. 


208 


257 


253 


383 


21* 


3** . 


2 


62 


70 


73 


49 


34 


29 


59 


67 


47 


191 


174 


151 


• 32* 


31* 


10 


174 


150 


150 


113 


109 


101 


114 


122 


116 


433 


415 


377 


27* 


54* 


44 


97 


113 


130 


67 


100 


89 


131 


115 


143 



-665- 



10 
155 

60 
280 
505 


75 
21 
44 

140 

6 

136 
87 

112 
341 

55 
192 
111 
165 





172 

68 

228 

463 

1 

81 

20 

38 

140 

14 

103 

70 

120 
312 

18 

223 
109 
163 
513 



PROJ 
12/8 4 

50 

377 

167 

212 

806 



158 
65 



133 



421 


79 
19 

34 
132 

8 
98 
^3 



105 



279 

IS 

213 
120 

iSl 
502 



• 


12/78 


12/79 


12/30 


12/81 


12/82 


12/33 


PROJ 
12/34 


-K 


7* 


13* 


10* 


9 


7 


6 


6 


-2 


42 


34 


40 


42 


54 


42 


36 


-M 


16 


22 


18 


24 


25 


25 


20 


-E 


20 


12 


11 


10 


11 


13 •• 


20 


JTAT. 


85 


81 . 


79 


85 


97 


•i 
. 87 


82 


— S 


374* 


393* 


406* 


316 


221 


152 


149" 


-E 


1649 


1672 


1728 


1707 


-.1836 


1S42 


1877 


=-H 


650 


. 716 


766 


750 


699 


750 


730 f 


"-E 


601 


604 


625 • 


610 . 


569 


570 


613 1 


^lEAI.- 


3274 


3385 


■ 3525 


3383 


3325 


3414 . 


f 

• 3369 ,, 


'-S-S 








3* 


25 


9 


9 


■•; • 7 iH 


^-s. 





4 


8 


171 


107 ■ 


104 


■ 95 ^' 


'?.-H 


_ ..^ 


1 '. 


• ' 4 


73 


57 


82 


rt 


^S-H ■ 





3 . 


9 


83 


95 

• 


105 : 


^°^ , I.: 


3!Z^ 


. 


8 


24 


352 


268 


300 


. '2^° L 


r-2 


6* 


• 11* 


29* 


25 


20 • 


34 


.■■ * 30 '«-^ 


r-s 


24 


' .33 


.74 


107 

t 


• 149 


163 


• 170 ' "^ 


T-H 





10 


34 


56 


50 


66 


65 


T-E 


5 


20 


63 


156 


155 


119 


• ■^"^ V. 


ITAL 


37 


74 


200 


344 • 


374 


382 


1 


'0-K 


3* 


3* 


30* 

». 


6 


9 


10 


■ i. 


'0-S 


3 


7 


66 


10 


39 


39 


■ ■ i\ 
{1.7 


'o-a 


4 


2 


23 


6 


32 


27 


2( 


O-H 


6 


2 


32 


4 


53 


32 


11 .1 

311 

■■'-' 


TAL 


16 


14 


151 

r r r 


26 


133 


108 


^0 ./ 



-666- 



•I.2V 

• 












1/4/3 r 




- 


HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT 


DATA 






: ic 


SPED 
12/73 


ENROLLMENT 
12/79 


BY GRADE LEVEL - 
12/80 12/81 


DECEMBER 
12/82 


ACTUAL 

12/33 


?RGv 

12/a^- 


X 


97 


92 


119 158 


215 


247 


241 




31 


12 


8 4 


1 





ff 


L 


2 

















'E 


1 











1 


.-0 


^HL 


131 


104 


127 162 


216 


248 


' 241 


•K 


• 

2 


8 


14 26 


26 


54 


22 


-S 


1^6 


198 


237 265 


269 


266 


296 


-H 


108 


162 


179 , 169 


161 


187 


191 


-H 


76 


102 


123 168 


226 


232 


259 


EAL 


352 


470 


553 628 


682 


739 


. 774 


-K 





i 


5 10 

• 


4 


1 . 


1 


-K 


69 


61 


56 47 


60 


65 


59 


-M- 


50 . 


51 


44 ■ 50 


46 


47 


- 44 


-3 


136 


135 


123 119 


115 


104 


99 


rAL 


255 


.247 


, 228 226 


225 


217 


203 


-K 








6 


4 


1 





-2 


87 


59 


49 48 


47 


41 ■ 


40 


rAL • 


87 


59 


49 54 


51 


42 


40 


-Z 





6 


'0 7 


10 


7 


4 




159 


181 


200 195 


199 


203 


136 


-M 


147 


180 


195 212 


224 


255 


27 ( 


_a 


82 


• 152 


176 202 


342 


329 


37 




393 


519 


571 61S 


775 


799 


84 



-co/- 



IHAV 


12/73 


12/7 9 


12/80 


12/31 


12/32 " 


12/33 


12/3 .. 


* 


5 


4 








4 


10 


'■)-! 


-2 


4 


14 


16 


11 


13 


13 


U 


—.V 


12 


7 


4 


2 


2 


4 


-pn 


— H, 


2 





1 











°G 


'^rAL. 


23 


25 


21 


13 


19 


27 " 


29^ 


■r-2 . 


14 


IS 


20 


26 


24 


20 


7 


i-Z 


59 


52 


44 


40 


37 


■ 35 


54 


1-H 


32 


26 


29 


26 


31 


36 


29 I 


4-H 


37 


46 


39 


47 . ■ 


46 


52 


59 


32AL 


142 


143 


132 


139 . 


138 


. 143 


149 

1 ii 


4-2 


8 


11 - 


10 


• 

.9 


10 


6 


11 


4-2 


247 


312 


325 


343 


281 


333 


29£. 


4-X 


66 


98 


148 


201 


250 


• -245 


24: 


4-H 


23 


.39 


63 


95 


131 


• 138 


17^.,, 


DTJiT. 


',. 344 


460 


546 


648 ■ 


• 672 


722 


1 \t 


4-S 


5 • 


4 


3 


. 9 


9 


. . ■ . 11 


' -i 


4-E 


38 


39 


37 


39 


'41 


.36 


1 


4-H 


11 


- 12 


10 


11 


12 


15 


1 " 

21' 


4-E 


31 


24 


26 


28 


34 


25 


■ sTi 


CTAL 


85 


79 


76 


87 


96 


87 ' 


■i 


4-E 


IS 


16 


15 


17 


18 


10 


ii 


4-H 


1 





*0 





1 


9 


I 




16 


16 


15 


17 


19 


19 


L-K 


3 


2 


11 


11 


21 


26 


I 


L-E 


37 


47 


71 


84 


93 


107 


1 




•«^ 


95 


■5 c; 


-?« 


47 


71 


H 



!^ ^\XJ — V3 



HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT DATA 
TOTAL NON-P?jCMOT£S 3Y GRADE - JU^'E (3EF0RE ?' 



6/7 3 


6/79 


6/80 


6/81 


/ 

• 




45 


42 


65 


35 


• 




873 


760 


665 


636 


53. 


P 


325 
203 


318 
212 


263 

198 


264 
188 


271 
. 160 




115 


135 


94 


122 


120 


;■ 1^ ^ 


125 


116 


71 


82 


84 


.844- 




'. 




• 


. 


;4- 


822 


827 


818 


741 


717 


589 • 
54- 


1018 


1051 


1047 


958 


1012 


894 

CO 


813 


816 


887 


644 


• 765 


536. 


1581 


1676 


1298 


1759 


1717 


11 

1717 
7- 
985 _ 


1113 


1145 


1002 


1054 


1109 


692 


. 681 


'553 


6i00 


615 


589 _ 


212 


200 


• 116 


56 . 


127 


39 



7937 



7979 



7077 



7139 



7465 



7207 



45 


42 


,. 65 


35 


184 


• .127 


1641 


1541 


1291 


1292 


1219 


1681 


2653 


2694 


2752 


2343 


2494 


2019 


3598 


3702 


2969 


3469 


3563 


3330 



-669- 



IL 



1/4/24 

HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT DATA ' 

-rrv-rp ^w^-c-ORE 811^1^' ER SCHOOL) 
TOTAL NOl^-PBOMOTES - BY DISTRICT - oUl^ (B..OR- SL..--. . 

fi/ai 6/82 6/83 

6/78 6/79 6/80 6/81 





508 


434 ' 


440 


363 


500 


438 


• 


505 


675 


537 


689 


590 


438 

1 


r 


623 


609 


489 


617 


632 


597 


7 


576 


527 


461 


461 ■ 


415 


419 


V 

7 


1604 


1617 


1352 


.1168 


1133 


1012 


T 


638 


474 


401 


506 


635 


659 


T 


622 


: ■ 525 


499 


478 


469 


547 


:2 


■ - - 375 
2436 


■ 421 
■ 2697 


436 
. 2412 


348 
2509 


441 

2630 


395 

• 

2602 



7937 7979 



7077 7139 



7465 7207 



_;;7n_ 



jr-yR-?RO 



:haht 13 



;ilA.DZ 



01 
Q2i 
03 
04 
05 

OS 
07 

OS 

09 
10 

n 

12 

13 

14 



HISTORICAL SMP.OLLMENT DATA 
FIVE YEAR Ei^ROLLMENT PROJECTIONS 



1/4/34 



.2/84 


12/85 


12/86 


12/87 


12/38 


4450 


4600 


4775 


4975 


5200 


4350 


4550 


4725 


4900 


5100 


4500 


3825 


4025 


4175" ■ 


4325 


4250 


4325 


3675 


3875 


4000 > 


3775 


, 4125 


4200 


. 3575 


3775 


3500 


3725 


4050 


4125 


3525 


3925 


3600 


3825 


4175 


4250 


4425 


3925 


3600 


. 3825 


4200 


4250 


3975 


3525 


3225 . 


3425 


5275 


5100 


4775 


■ 4225 


3875 


4625 


4475 

• 


4325 


4050 


3575 


3850 


3800 


3675 


3550 


3325 


3300 


2925 


2900 


, 2800 


2700 


250 


250 


250 


250 


250 


i25 


125 


125 


125 


125 



TOTAL 



54850 



53325 



52450 



51350 



51650 



SUMMARY 












K 


4450 


4600 

«. 


4775 


4975 


5200 


E 


20375 


20550 


20675 


20650 


2072S 


H 


12600 


• 11500 


10950 


11225 


11875 


H 


17050 


16300 


15675 


14525 


13475 





375 


375 


375 


375 


375 



-',71- 



ei Q«;n 



*iT650 



-672- 



FIVE YEAR ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS 
BY GRADE £ BY RACE 



NOTE: DIFFERS FROM CHART 13 OF HISTORICAL ENROLLMENT DATA 0/k/Bk) 



-673- i 



5 YEAii ENROLLMENT PROJSCTICilS HY GRADE 3Y RACE . 

• BLACK 

ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG EST PROJ PROJ PROJ PROJ PROJ 
• 3/79 4/30 4/81 4/82 4/83 4/84 4/35 4/36 4/37 4/38 4/89 

KI 1101 1132 1093 . . .- 

KII 1572 1589 1637 2088 1766 1744 1824 1834 1801 ' 1854 1853 

1 2421 2158 2127 2134 2709 2345 2316 2406 2412 2373 2450 

2 2287 2117 1930 1886 1904 2403 2080 2060 2138 '2144 2107 

3 2201 2221 2071 1848 1831 1846 2329 2016 1993 2072 2077 

4 2229 2139 2146 2029 1793 1780 1794 2264 1962 1937 2014 

5 2281 2209 2146 2112 2011 1779 1766 1781 2243 1946 1921 

6 2485 2405 2296 2261 2195 2105 1862 1846 1863 2343 2035 

7 2736 2498 2456 2288 2259 2207 2116 1873 1850 1870 2354- 

8 2436 2556 2275 2257 2099 2079 2031 1942 1721 1700 1719 

9 2990 2901 3075 3132 2921 2658 2632 2603 2519 2204 2174 

10 2564 2549 2419 2439 2546 2404 2188 2151 2118 2060 1806 

11 1972 1931 2003 1917 1939 1990 1879 1722 1694 1666 1617 ' 

12 1312 1408 1496 1631 1537 1505 1545 1482 1363 1333 1305 

T 30587 29813 29170 28022 27510 26845 26364 25980 25677 25503 25434 

K 2673 2721 2730 2088 1766 1744 1824 18-34 1301 1854 1853 

E 11419 10344 10420 10009 10243 10153 10236 10527 10747 10471 10570" 

M 7657 7459 7027 6806 63-53 6391 6010 5661 5435 5914 6108 

H 8838 8789 8993 9119 8943 8557 8244 7958 7S94 7264 6902 

T 30587 29813 29170 28022 27510 26845 26364 25980 25677 25503 25434 



Sjii- 



5 Y2A5 E^iROLLMSIIT PROJECTIONS 3Y GRADE BY RACE 

WHITE 

ASo'J ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG EST ?ROJ PROJ PP.OJ PROJ PROJ 

3/7? '-/SO 4/81 4/32 4/33 4/84 4/35 4/86 4/87 4/83 4/89 

KI 17 47 1576 1593 ' ... 

KII 2C55 1S39 1828 2255 1819 1783 1704 1700 1705 1720 1720 

1 1523 1352 1200 1053. 1235 1095 1073 1008 992 997 .1019 •- 

2 1527 1302 1187 1033 969 1085 962 948 891 881 8SQ ' 

3 1604 1415 1249 • 1058 958 897 1005 891 871 824 . 815 

4 1729 1503 1356 -.1157 1010 904 847 950 840 825 779 

5 1744 1609 1438 1281 1063 947 848 796 889 784 '.772 

6 1907 1643 1507 1431 1215. 1016 905 813 766 850 ' .751 

7 2155 1976 1747 1593 1549 1288 1076 963 865 817 903 

S 2122 .1952 1849 1606 1527 1448 1203 1008 902 313 765 . 

9 2474 2202 2054 2094 1737 1624 1540 1293 1092 968 872 

10 2097 1912 1832 1512 1500 1323 1241 1174 963 820 " 734 

11 1330 1645 1550 1432 1155 1178 1042 975 916 755 642 

12 1362 1421 1366 1245^ 1143 926 945 841 782 735 606 

T 25947 23547 21751 18760 16880 15519 14392 13359 12430 11790 11260 

K 3S13 3575 3426 2265 1819 1783 1704 1700 1705 1720 1720 . 

E 3127 7131 6430 5582 5235 4929 4735 4592 4483 4312 4265 

a 6244 5611 5103 4630 4291 3751 3185 2784 2534 2480 2419 

H 7763 7180 6302 6283 5535 5055 4763 4283 3758 3279 2855 

T 25947 23547 21761 18760 16880 15519 14392 13359 12480 11790 11260 

-675- 



5 YEAR ENROLLiMEJIT PROJECTIONS BY GRADE BY RACE 

ORIENTAL 

ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG EST PRCJ ?ROJ PROJ PRCJ PROJ 
3/79 4/30 4/81 4/82 4/83 4/34 4/85 4/86 ' 4/87 4/33 4/39 



KI 


139 


101 


156 












1 

• • 


■ 




KII 


168 


170 


183 


287 


212 


262 


259 


268 


278 


290 


303 


1 


174 


206 


214 


240 


321 


284 


322 


333 


337 


353 


366 


2 


165 


. 153 


228 


228 


267 


319 


299 


330 


345 


347 


365 


3 


171 


183 


246 


278 


285 


298 


378 


344 . 


385 


400 


404 


4 


167 


164 


203 


268 


282 


294 


304 


387 


352 


394 


410 


5 


162 


184 


201 


254 


301 


313 


328 


339 


432 


392 


439 


6 


142 


175 


213 


253 


254 


315 


320 


340 


349 


446 


404 


7 


189 


172 


219 


266 


268 


279 


340 


349 


368 


379 


484 


8 


156 


'201 


200 


245 


254 

• 


277 


277 


345 


■ 350 


371 


381 


9 


204 


216 


266 


321 


334 


329 


368 


364 


455 


461 


490 


10 


207 


■ 243 


305 


338 


341 • 


335 


340 


375 


373 


465 


472 


11 


200 


258 


279 


380 


306 


316 


307 


313 . 


344 


343 


427 


12 


139 


'l85 


250 


275- 


324 


297 


288 


289 


290 


3?T 


313 



T 2383 2657 3163 3633 3750 3918 4131 4374 4658 4963 5265 

K 307 271 339 287 212 262 259 268 278 290 303 

E 839 930 1092 1263 1-^57 1508 1632- 1733 1851 1887 1985 

M 487 548 632 764 776' 871 938 1033 1067 1195 1269 

E 750 903 1100 1314 1305 1277 1303 1341 1463 1591 1708 

T 2333 2657 3163 3633 3750 3918 4131 4374 4658 4963 5265 

-676- 



1 



5 Y£A:i £N?.OI-LMEiiT ??.OJ"JCT ..-'JNS 3'/ CHJ^.^i^'^ 3Y PACE 






ASSG A3SG ASSC ASSG 

3/79 4/SG 4/81 4/S2 4/'d3 



3* O*"*^ ^ ^7*^ T 

toJ W .. 'ST ■kV^a' *>« 

/S4 4/65 



??.0J PRO J ?ROJ PRO J 
4/33 4/87 4/83 . 4/89 



KI 


397 


440 


468 


" 










• 




• 


BTTI 


588 


613 


625 


344 


731 


747 


731 


755 


784 


817 


840 


1 


932 


804 


809 


829 


1C42 


985 


980 


951 


979 


1012 


1064 


2 


769 


803 


697 


671 


770 


903 


859 


856 


832 


866 


886 


3 


709 


716 


780 


682 


631 


750 


835 


844 


843 


821 


849 


4 


656 


699 


688 


730 


679 


660 


727 


855 


816 


821 


795 


5 


698 


635 


667 


671 


723 


660 


642 


707 


835 


797 


800 


6 


635 


704 


696 


738 


753 


783 


715 


705 


777 


916 


871 


7 


631 


594 


664 


655 


734 


718 


747 


684 


677 


749 


877 


8 


567 


555 


584 


599 


617 


680 


666 


699 


634 


631 


696 


9 


644 


650 


627 


663 


718 


711 


784 . 


768 


810 


* 733 


lis 


IQ 


467 


476 


533 


490 


518 


560 


555 


618 


601 


634 


578 


11 


364 


341 


377 


397 

9 


387 


396 


428 


428 


474 


463 


■ 487 


12 


221 


252 


266 


322 


330 


306 


313 


346 


348 


382 


371 



T 8273 8283 8481 3291 3703 8865 9031 9217 9411 9S47 .9843 

K 985 1053 1093 844 731 747 731 755 784 817 840 

E 3764 3657 3641 3533 3S95 3964 4093 4213 4306 4317 4394 

M 1333 1854 1944 1992 2104 2182 2123 2089 2Q8S 2295 2444 

E 1696 1719 1803 1S72 1953 1973 2079 2160 2233 2217 2164 



T 8273 8233 3431 8251 3703 SSS5 9031 9217 9411 9647 9343 

-677- 



5 YEAR ENROLLMENT PROJECTIONS BY GHADE BY PJ^iCE 

AiMERICAN I^roiAil 

ASSG ASSG AS3G ASSG ASSG EST PROJ PPvCJ PROJ PROJ PROJ 

3/79 4/80 4/31 4/32 4/83 4/34 4/35 4/8 6 4/87 4/38 4/39 



KI 


58 


15 


21 














• 




KII 


34 


34 


21 


25 


17 


15 


14 


15 


1 

15. 


15 


17 


1 


24 


28 


23 


22 


25 


26 


15 


15 


17 


17 


18 


2 


15 


21 


23 


16 


25 


25 


24 


14 


14 


17 


16 


3 


25 


14 


17 


26 


12 


28 


24 


22 


14 


13 


16 


4 


15 


22 


13 


18 


26 


17 


30 


26 


25 


15 


15 


5 


21 


16 


23 


16 


16 


29 


18 


32 


28 


26 


17 


6 


21 


22 


18 


23 


16 


24 


33 


21 


37 


33 


32 


7 


25 


24 


23 


16 


20 


23 


26 


35 


22 


40 


38 


8 


21 


23 


21 


19 


13 


19 


20 


22 


30 


20 


36 


9 


37 


25 


22 


23 


• 20 


18 


22 


23 


26 


35 


23 


10 


28 


19 


20 


20 


24 


21 


16 


20 


22 


25 


34 


.11 


14 


16 


18 


15 


12 


IS 


.15 


11 


14 


14 


17 


12 


7 


10 


14 


12 


13 


9 


12 


12 


9 


11 


11 



346 289 277 251 239 269 256 267 271 282 291 



K 


92 


49 


42 


25 


17 


15 


14 


15 


15 


15 


17 


S 


100 


101 


99 


98 


104 


125 


110 


109 


97 


89 


82 


M 


68 


69 


62 


58 


*"49 


66 


79 


78 


39 


93 


106 


H 


86 


70 


74 


70 


69 


63 


63 


65 


70 


86 


85 


T 


346 


289 


277 


251 


239 


269 


266 


267 


271 


282 


291 



-673- 



5 YEAR ENROLLMENT PR0JECTIC?:3 BY G3ADE BY RACE 

TOTAL 

ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG ASSG EST ?ROJ PROJ ?ROJ PROJ PROJ 
3/79 4/80 4/81 4/82 4/83 4/84 4/S5 4/86 4/37 4/88 4/89 

51 3442 3364 3336 .' 

5 I KII 4428 4305 4294 5509 4565 4551 4532 4572 4533 4696 4733 

1 5074 4548 4373 4278 5332 4736 4707 4712 4737 4753 4918 

2 4763 4436 4065 3834 3935 4740 4224 4208 4220 4255 4255 

3 4710 4549 4363 3892 3768 3819 4621 4117 4105 4130 4161 

4 4796 4527 4406 4202 3790 3655 3702 4482 3995 3992 4013 

5 4906 4653 4475 4334 4114 3728 3603 3654 4426 3946 3949 

6 5190 4949 4730 4706 4433 4243 3836 3724 3792 4583" 4093 

7 5737 5264 5109 4818 4830 4515 4305 3904 3783 3855 4656 

8 5362 5328 4929 4726 4510 4503 4198 4015 363a 3535 3597 

9 6349 5994 6044^ 6233 5730 5340 5346 5050 4901 4407 4287 

10 5363 5205 5109 4799 4929 4643 4339 4339 4082 4005 3623 

11 4380 4191 4227 4141 3799 3895 3671 3449 3443 3242 3191 

12 3041 3276 3392 3485* 3347 3043 3101 2970 2792 2783 2614 

T 67541 64589 62852 58957 57082 55416 54184 53198 52498 52187 52092 

K 7870 7669 7630 5509 4565 4551 4532 4572 4583 4696 4733 

S 24249 22713 21632 20540 20339 20679 20856 21174 21434 21076 21297 

M 16289 15541 14753 14250 13773 13261 12339 11645 11213 11973 12347 

H 19133 18666 18772 18658 17805 16925 16453 15803 15218 14437 13715 

T 67541 64539 62352 53957 57082 55415 54184 53198 52498 52187 52092 

-679- 



-680- 



K 



BIRTHS TO BOSTON RESIDENTS 
BY NEIGHBORHOOD & BY RACE 
. 1969 - 1982 



-''31- 



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-658- 






; . c. 
Boston Public Schools 

Schools in Operation - 1990 

Long Range Facilities Plan 
and Cornmitment to Long Term 
Use of Core Schools 

May 1984 . 






-sen- 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




5CS70.\ PU5LiC SCrCCLS 

May 2, 1934 . ' • 

John H. Lawson, Cnnnissioner of Education " .•«■ 

Ccrriinn'/.-ealth of Massachusattis _ .- . ■.. '■' 

Deoartirent of Education • . ■ • ^ 

1233 ftencock Street . i 

Cuincy, f-^^ssachusetts 02169 • ' • . ■ '• 

Dear Gatiitiissicner Lawson: ■ • '.-■•". 

On ?^aril 26/ 1984, the Boston School Ccrrmittee approved the long 
Pance Facilities Plan v/hidi accompanies this correspondence.' The plan 
identifies in its first phase over seventy schcol facilities which will 
be in use by Soston Public Schccl students over a long period of tine- -. * 

The second phase of the Facility Plan vdll be conpletsd follo>*-ing 
deliberations/ negotiations arjd decisions on the educational requirstnents 
of the liong Range Plan ^rfiich was i5orwarded to you in ^Sarch of this year. 
P^lic discussion on this plan will be initiated this month and ;ve hope 
to nave to resolution of the critical issues addressed in the plan over 
t±s caning months of th-is cal^:dar year. • 

ttis schools identified in the first phase of the Facility Plan con- 
stitute the priorities of the Boston Public Scxols for renovation, re- 
habilitation and construction. We have begun discuss ior^ with the School 
Building Assistance Bureau to pursue reirrbuirsensnts frciu the state for " 

projects that cualify .for state aid under the stattites. We hope through 
cur Public Faclities Departirent to file a nurrber of project applications 
in tirre to cualify for the additional state aid related to projects that 
contribute to desegregation. 

This is to acprise you of our initiatit/es and our progress and to . 
ask the continued cooperation and assistance of your office and of vour' 
staff to bring needed physical improverents to Scston's school buildings. 




Pobert 
Sucerintendeni of Schools 



PJ?S:l3 



-690- 



THE SCHOOL COiVIMlTTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOL: 

OPKCe OF THg SUP6ai.NTEr.i;€\' 

S03EBT ff. SPtUA-^S 



May 1, 1984 




MEMORANDUM 

10: President and Heoibers, Boston Sdbco 
iBCM: Robert R. Splllane, Superlnb 
SUBJECT: Long Range Facilities Flan - Bostdci 

Attached are recommended guidelines for development of a Long Range Facilities 
Plan for the Boston Public Schools. I believe they will enable us to maintain 
pace in two critical areas at the same time - deliberation ai>d decision on the 
educational direction of the Boston Public Schools resolving the issues raised 
in the recent proposals of the Long Range Plan, and action in x^grading and 
iQodemizii^g facilities that require linnediate attention. 

Tha six-point plan is, of necessity a generalized approach to facility 
planning. It is based on the concepts - although not necessarily the specific 
details - of the recctnsendatlons contained in the accoopaiying m em oraodua. from 
Senior Officer for Desegxregation, Jchn Coakl^. 

I recosE-jsnd your approval of these guidelines as I seek to enlist the 
cooperation and assistance of City and State Departxent officials to develop 
and icplenent a long range plan for Boston sdiool facilities. 

fflC • 

Attachaents • 



-691- 



LOyG KAiNGE FACILITIES PLVN' - BOSTON PUBLIC SO-COLS 

1. Facilities Flrin iind the Lono Range Plan 

A Facilitiad htdamization and Ucillzacion Plan for the Boscon Public 
Schools will hrs cccpleted upon final resolution of the organizacion and 
progrscnatlc issuas contained in the Inrjg Range Plan of Teoruaxy 13, 
1984. Hc/y-evsr, public review and dialcgua are integral to erd will 
precede final decisions on the racccjEtiridations proposed in Section TV of 
Che plan "Restructuring of th^e Bostca Public Schools." 

2. Cotrm^tcegt to Lcr:? Term Use of Basic Core of Facilities 

No matter what ttie final form of tb-a Long Range Plan and the Facilities 
Modernization arxl Utilization Plan, tb^re are a nucber of school buildings 
that by all rational criteria related to prograrrrnatic potential, physical 
condition of building, proximity to student populations and des^regatLon 
equity will continue in vise in all conceivable school utilization plans 
and form the nucleus of Boston's School Facilities Plan. The Boston 
Public Schools is ccnxnitted to utilize in the long run the seventy-three 
(73) schools - twenty-nine (29) secondary, forty-three (43) eleasentary, 
and the Hutaphrey Center - identified in the accompanying memorandua frcm 
Jdin Coakley, Senior Officer, Department of In^lementation. 

3. Pet errm' nation of Rpmilm'ng Facilities in the Plan 

. There are other schools which also, with certainty, will be required In 
the .long term. To identify with, certainty their long-term need would be 
of questionable wisdom until Section IV of the Long Range Plan is agreed 
upon. Kcwe%*ar, even thoijgh some of these may be subject to closing, ti^ 
- majority of schools in this grouping almost surely will be required- It 
is not educationally sound, however, to tenninate any of those schools 
prior to the appro".^ of a Long Range Plan because some children might be 
subject to reassignment in sxxcessive years. 

4. Priorities for Facility Improvement and Mcdemization 

Priorities for planning and inalcmentation of major facility iicprovesent 
projects will focus on th^ facilities specifically identified for certain 
long-term use (item 2 of this plan) . 

5. Chapter 515 Proiects ' ' ' •' • . 

Projects presently in planning by the City of Boston, the Boston Public 
Schools and tha Massachusetts Department of Education - specifically, 
projects affecting Hyde Park High, Boston Technical High, Burke High, 
. Lewenberg and Dearborn Schools - should be advanced with all due speed. 

6. Boston Latin Academy ■ • 

The Boston Latin Academy is an oustanding secondary school. It presently 
functions in a leased facility that is inadequate for its educational 
program - a facility that cannot and should not be utilized any longer 
than is necessary. All attempts to find alternative school facilities 
have been unsuccessful Redesignaticn of an existent secondary facility 
for Latin Acrdeary's use is not advisable and not recomrcended . The Boston 
Public Schools seek appra</al for development of plans and for construction 
of a new facility for Boston Latin Acadeny. 

•692- 



• '^■■- OOCDi Ul^i 




March 13, 1984 



MEMORANDUM 



To: 

Firoia; 
Subject: 



Robert Spillane 



John CoaJcley^-,/;;'/J^/^:j[,- ' 
Facility Renewal and Utilization 



The school system finds that representatives of city and state,, 
acencies are reluctant to act on certain requests for facility renewal 
(e.g., boiler replacements) and utilization (e.g./ a permanent home for 
Boston Latin Academy) because there is no comprehensive plan for school 
facilities, especially at the secondary school level. However, the 
representatives of the school department have the dilemma of not wishing 
to produce such a facility plan until the recently-developed Long Range 
Plan, which should form the basic educational foundation of a facility 
plan, is refined and approved by the Boston School. Committee- In fact, 
one portion of the 'Long Range Plan deals with proposed changes in the 
organization and student assignment patterns of the Boston Public 
Schools and , consequently, will require review by the Massachusetts Board 
of Education" and the Federal District Court. We should not and cannot 
provide a facility plan with specificity until we obtain approval of the 
educational and Ojcganizationai elements of the Long Range Plan. 

Notwithstanding the dilemma, you believe that we must be prepared 
to make some statements and generalized commitments regarding long-term 
facility needs. This paper, therefore, offers you an overview of school 
building requirements for the next two to three decades. First, it 
provides a m.inimal listina of schools absolutely needed for aducationa.l 
purposes by the Boston Public Schools. PLEASE NOTE CAREFULLY THAT THE 
TOTAL CAPACITY OF THE SCHOOLS IN THE MINIMAL LISTING IS LESS TH.^.nt THE 
PRESENT TOTAL ENROLLMENT; THE SCHOOLS SYSTEM COULD NOT SURVIVE IF IT 
WERE LIMITED TO UTILIZATION OF ONLY THOSE SCHOOLS. Secondly, the paper 
comments in general terms about the remainina schools and capacity needs 
of the system. Please also note that this paper does not seek to address: 
regular or unusual maintenance and renewal needs of our schools. 



-o'yi 



7- 



Robert Spillane 2 March 13, 1934 

School Building Rgguirgnento ; 1985-2010 

1 . - Source Docuinents , Agencies 

A - "The Sargent Report" - May 1962 - Reconroendations for a modem 

school plant for the City of 
Boston 

3 - Needed Seats Studies of 1970 and 1972 - Educational Planning 

Center, B.P.S. 

C - Unified Facilities Plan - August 1977 - City, State and school. 

Department Planning Tei 

D - Boston School Enrollment Projections - 1977 and 1979 - Harbridi 

. House , 

E - Declining Enrollments in the Massachusetts Public Schools: 

What it means and what to do - 1978 - Mass .Department of Educ 

P - Unified Facilities Plan - October 1979 - Office of Planning anj 

Policy, B.P.S. 

G - Unified Facilities Plan - March- 1981 - Department of-Implement^ 

. . cind Office of Planijina 
. Policy ,B. P. s. 

K - Space 'Matrices of the Department of Implementation - 1978 to 

I - Enrollment Studies of Senior Officer for Desegregation - 1978, li 
- ■ . . ■ • . ■ • • 1981 

J - Annual Enrollment Projections - 1981 to 1984 - Department of 

■ Implementation,,! 

II . - Enrollment Projections 

■ - . 1983-84 1984-85 1985-86 1986-87 1987-88 l988-8? t 

Kindergarten 4419 4450 4600 4775 ■ 4975 5200 

Elementary 20478 20375 20550 • 20675 20650 2072S 

Middle 13310 12600 11500 ' 10950 11225 11875 

High 17547 17425 16675 16050 ISOOO 13850 

Total ■ 55754 54850 53325 52450 51850 _ 51650 

Note 1: Although our total enrollment will not level off until 

approximately 1990, our kindergarten enrollment already is 
increasing and by 1988 our elementary and middle school 
enrollments will be on a modest upswing. By 198 9 the enter inc 
crrades at the high school level will begin to show son'.e 
increase. ■ .1 

Note 2: By 1989 Other Minority students, who presently constitute 2<% 
of the enrollment, will represent nearly 30% of the students 
in the system. Predictably, bilingual education needs will 
continue to increase. 



-69U- 



?.cb?»rt Spillane 3 March 13, 1934 

N-otp 3: For four years Special Needs students have ccnstitutdd 18 to 
19 percent of the enroll.-snt. There is no evidence that 
Special Education programs, •••.-hich consume school space due to 
the low teacher-pupil requirements/ will diminish in the comin'; 
decade. 

III. School Capacity • . 

It seems to me that once wa moved away from, the concept of 
the one-rooin schoolhouse we entered upon the never-ending dis- 
putations abou*- school capacity. A dozen years aqo the Massachu- 
setts Board of jducation nearly convinced a State Superior Court 
that the use of public capacities of the Department of Public -- 
Safety was not invalid educationally. (Latin School had a . 
Public Safety capacity of 3000, the Lewenberg had a 1400 capacity 
and the Burke School had one of 1650.) Six years later the 
Federal District Court contrived a fonmila for school capacity 
for the obvious purpose of trying to force school closings and 
student reassigninents. (Admittedly, some of our own counter- 
arqxuflents on school capacity were circuitous.) Plain and simple, 
a school's capacity is its capacity is its capacity. With 
apprehension, I offer the following: 

A Present Enrollment Present Capacity* Utilization Rate 

30370 Secondary 36042 84%. 

25139 Elementary 32936 76% 

S5509 TOTAL 68978 80%** 

.-♦Based on 1983-84 assignable capacities of D.I. Space -Matrix 
** Actually the non-programmatic utilization rate is 83% and the 

procrammatic rate (i.e., bilingual, special education, etc.) is 
; 71%' 

B Projected Enrollment (1988-89 ) Present Capacity Utilization Rate 

25725 Secondary 36042 71% 

-25925 Elementary 32936 79% 

51650 TOTAL 68978 75% 

C Using the -tenor of the Sargent Report of 1962 as ny bible and 
making adjustments for the enormous facility impact of Special 
Education and Bilingual Education since Saraent's time, I 
believe in this rule of thumb: ^ - 

1. An 80% to 90% utilization rate at the elementary level is 
justifiable but, under no circumstances should the utilization 
rate exceed 90% on a total-system basis at that level. 

2. A 75% to 85% utilization- rate at the secondary school level 
is justifiable and under no circumstances, should it exceed 
85% except in those secondary schools v/hich offer only 
college courses to students. 

D At the present time our secondary school ratio is v/ithin 
justifiable limits on average . However, that is likely to 
change in the next five years, especially if '-/e obtain crreater 
use of the Humphrey Occupational Resource Center (which is not 
part of this capacity study) . 



G 



Robert Spillane 4 March 13, 1S34 

S At the present tintr-; our eleinentary school utilization ratio is 
lew on aver ago . Ic cccld improve sorr^ewhat in the 'next five 
years but not sufficien-ly to be vithin justifiable liraics. 

F The fact that 23-^ of our students are in space-consuning procr.iuis 
(i.e., extende-f day kindergarten, vocational education, advanced 
v/ork, bilingual educc'tion , special education) guarantees that v;3 
cannot function at or very near 100% capacity. 

The data suggest the need to consolidate our enrollrr.ent in fev/er H 
schools in the next Several years. In making such consolidations ^ 
v;e ought to place greatest priority on the follov/ing three 
factors: 

1. The long-ter.T. '.'?.lua and flexibility of a building, rather 
than its current enrollment or grade-structure and 

2. The enrollinsnt-sources (i.e., the neighborhoods of our 
students) of cur schools. If one v;ere to draw a straight 
line from the Pauline Shaw School to Madison Park High School 
a very large percentage of our students would be within one 
mile of that Imaginary line. 

3. The' need to maintain some public-school access in all major 
neighborhoods of the city, even if presently the public school: 
enrollment is not evenly distributed across the city. 



IV. Minimal Needs of the Boston Public Schools 

The following schools, it seems to me, comprise an unarguable 
core cf cur facility needs for the next twenty-five years. They 
provide, however, only 52,639 spaces for our 55509 students. No 
reader should infer that this listing of 29 secondary schools 
(with a "capacity of 29205), 43 elementary schools (with a capacity 
of 23,484), and the Humphrey Center should constitute our sole 
present and/or future needs. Rather, the schools in this listing 
must be part of any reasonable person's list of required schools — 
especially if one accepts the three priority factors listed above 
in Section III. G. Also remembering the first and third of those 
three factors — since the second factor is self-evident — please 
note that the suggested retention of a building does not necessarilj 
mean we would plan to use it with its present grade structure or 
program. We should make use of our best facilities and adapt thera 
to our needs, be they high schools, middle schools, elementary 
schools or alternative educational centers. For example, in my 
own opinion there must be a South Boston High School but I am not 
at all convinced that in the year 2010 the current building, first 
constructed in 1901, still should be in use. In a somewhat' re lit ted 
matter, we must be prepared to consolidate some of our central 
secondary school facilities which are outside the present or 
potential population centers of the city when our high school enrol.' 
ment begins its al.-cst certain decline. However, my opinion on 
facilities should not be construed as an argument for terminating 
the International Procrram or the Work-Study Program — far from 
it — but it does suggest we must leave some facility decisions 
open at this tim.e. 

Planning Area Secondary Elementary 

East Boston East Boston High Bradley 

Umana -696- , ?• Kennedy 

O'DonnoTi' 



i 



Robert Spillane 
Planning Area 
Charles toivn 

South Boston 



Central/ Back Bay 
South End 



Fenway, Kenmore/ Mission 



Allston, Brighton 



Jamaica Plain 



Roxbury 



Dorchester 



Mattapan 

Roslindale 

West Roxbury 
Hyde Park 



Secondarv 



King 

Wheatley 
Technical 
Timilty 

Burke High 
Dorchester High 
Cleveland 
Wilson 
McCormack 



Lewenberg 



Irvina 



West Roxbury High 
R . G . Shaw 

Hyde Park High 
Rogers 



March 13, 1934 
Elementarv 



Charles town High 


Kent 
Warren-Prescot 


Gavin 


Condon 
Tynan 


Mac key 


Blacks tone 
Hurley 
' Quincy 


Boston Latin School 
Boston Latin Academy 
English 


Tobin 


Brighton High 
Edison 


Gardner 
Garfield 
Hamilton 
Jackson-Mann 


Jamaica Plain High 
Mary Curley 


Agassis 
. John Kennedy 
• J. Curley 

Hennigan 

Mendell 


ORC 

Madison 

Dearborn 


•. Ellis 
Trotter 
Hale 



Fifield 

S. Greenwood 

"Holland 

Marshall 

Mather 

Murphy 

Dever 

Russell 

Lee 

Mattahunt 
Pauline' Shav. 
Taylor 

Sumner 

Haley 

Bates 

.Ohrenberger 

Chittick 

E- Greenwood 

F. Roosevelt 



-697- 



t 



-698- 






■ ..-. ' a. - . * 

. Boston Public Schools • ' 
Capacities of Each Schools and 
Chronological Listing of Schools 

' • • May 1984 ' " 



-699- 



BOSTOtl PUBLIC SCiDOLS 
SCiCCTL CODsl LIST 3Y DIST3ICT3 



DIS-nilCT I 



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12C0 |CO?Li:'; oQUAilE r.iv.-. 


1 1 ^^.^ 


1030 


I30SI0N £;;GLI5H SIGr 


1 I'^r^ 


1210 


MADISOU ?.iJU< HIGH 


1 U/s-- 


1240 


L^^L-X-. TSCHN'ICiL bCc 


.UUL 


^G J ^2' 


2100 


iCI^iG MIDOLZ 


789 




2270 


MiC;<£Y iGDOLi 


^a^f 


2980 


v-HZAlLi'i MiDOLi; 


.r<z 




426! 


CAATiR SCHOOL | 


5V» J*' 






427 1 


J. CU7U.£Y 3L£:i | 


3 /a 






4061 


GUILD £L£M 


2f8 






4113 


KAL£ £L£M 


^J? 1 




4210 


MVLHY £L£H 1 


^/^ 1 




4230 


HE^'NIGAX ELcH | 


^'if 1 




4053 


H£R:;AyD£2 £L£:i 


J?^Z 


■ 


46 '.0 


HO-LACi MAM^ SCHOOL 


^^* 




4620 


JACXSO-N'-MA.VN £L£M 


4S0 1 




4350 


MCK.\Y £L£M 


^5-^ 1 




1290 


MCKI^XZ'/ SCHOOL 


5V»^| 




44 10 


OHRIHaiRGER £L£>1 


i-V8 1 




1230 


TIL£SIOJ{ SCHOOL 


5/1^ 1 




4530 


TROTTEil £LZM 


4^^ i 


458Qt30S-:0-M SUSIN£S5 




1 


• 




iS/a 


:2f<:?^ ^U. 



-7ni- 



s/* 



--^/' 



tiCiA t a;<*<^ f r 



BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
• 1983 - I9S4 



I. FACILITIES 

A. Schools bv District/bv Level (127) 
DISTRICT I 



■ HIGH SCHOOLS (17) 
"3r"igh ton 1930/40/52 



DISTRICT II 



HIGH SCHOOL • , 
Jamaica Plain 1979 



DISTRICT III 



-HIGH SCHOOL 



West Roxbury 1976 



DISTRICT IV 



HIGH SCHOOL 
Hyde Park 1929/1964 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS (24) 

Edison .■rl-^32 
Taft 1395/1915/1939 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



Baldwin 

Farragtit: 

Gardner ." 

Garf ieTd 

Hamilton 

Tobin 

Winship 



1926/30 

1904 . 

19D6/19-2 

1925/196 

1924/25/ 

1959 

1901/192 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS • 

Cur ley, M. 1931 
Lewis • 1912/26 
Roosevelt, T. 1923/24/41 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Ellis 1932/59 
Fuller — 1892 
Kigginson 1922 
Kennedy, J. P. 1967 
Longfellow 1897/19C 
Manning 1941/196 
Mendell 1904 
Parkraan ' 1899/04/06 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



Irving 1936 


Bates, Pr~~ 


1929"" 


Lewenberg 1930/57 


Beethoven 


.1925/31, 


Shaw, R. G. 1919/27/33 


Kilmer 


1935/33 


36/39 


Lee 


1971 


• . 


Lyndon 


1928 




Mattahunt 


1977 


• 


Mozart 


1932 




Philbrick 


1913 




Suniner • 


1931/^.V 


MIDDLE SCHOOLS 


ELEMENTARY 


* 

SCHOOLS 



Rogers 1902/20/34 
Thompson 1922/1925 



Channing 
Chit tick 
Conley 

Greenwood /E". 
Grew 
Hemenway 
Shaw, P. 
Taylor 
Roosevelt, F. 



1928/19 

1931/19 

1932 

1957/lS 

1958/19 

1952 

1919/lS 

1931/: M 

1957 



JQ2- 



I 




DISTRICT V 

EIGH 5c:-:coL - 

Burke, J. 1934 
Dorchestsr 1925/58/5 9 



DISTRICT VI 

HIGH SCHOOL 

South Boston 1901/26/ 
. 37/40 



DISTRICT VII 
HIGH SCHOOL 
Charles town 1979 



DISTRICT VIII 
HIGH SCHOOL 
East Boston 1926/40 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



ELEMENTARV' SCHOOLS 



Cleveland 


1925/23/72 


Dickerman 


1915 ■ 


Holmes 


1905 


Endicott 


1906 


Wilson 


1932 


Everett 


1909 






Fifield 


1913 






Greenwood, 


S. 1919 






Holland • 


1972 . 


• . _ • 


' 


Xenney - 


1926/1930 






Marshall 


. 1S71 






Mather 


1905 .. 






Murphy 


1973 ■. 






'Kearn 


1957 






Stone 


1937 


MIDDLE SC 


:hools 

1913/39 


ELEHENTARy 


SCHOOLS 


Dearborn 


Clap 


1896 


Gavin 


1936 


Condon 


■ 1975/77 


McCormack 


1967 


Dever 


-1957 






Emerson 


1924 


• 




Mason , S . 


1905 




. 


Perkins 


1926/52 




. 


Perry 


1904 




• 


Russell 


1903 




- 


Tynan 


1972 






Winthroo 


1911 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 
Blackstone 1975 



Edwards 1932 
Michelangelol919/21/30 Eliot 1932 

Tiitiilty 1937 Hurley , 1961 

• Harvard-Kent 1972 
Quincy 1976 
Warren-Prescott 1963 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



Barnes 
Cheverus 



1901/25 
1909 



Adams 
Alien iari 
Bradley 
Kennedy , ? , 
C Donne 11 
Otis 



1910/13 

1924 

1958 

1933 

1932 

1905/17 



I 
\ 



-70 V 



■nr-i-n * "•'^' 



DIS 



niL- 



3c? ccr c'l'T" 

3 o r: i: c n L -' '- in Ac ad e cv" 

Bos ion I.c^LA 

BCa ccr. Tec'r :• .ical 

Ccpiey Sc'iars 

English 

Madison Park 

Mario 'jnana 



MIDDL'.: SCHOOLS 

l-^'ll Kinc,>'..L. 1937 

Leased Macke-/ 195S 

152 2/3 3 Wheatlov 192 5 

1526/29/60 

1970 

1373 

1977 

1976 






OTHER SECOMDARY PROGRAMS (2) 



ACC (Faneuil) 
HORC 



1910 
1930 



Cur lev ,' J. 


1970 


Guild 


1921/ 


Halav 


1971 


Henniq-an 


1971/ 


Hernandez • 


1971 



Jackson/Mann 1975 
McKay 1526 
_ Ohrenfaerger 1972 
Trotter " 1969 
Hale 1905^ 



S?ZGIAL NEEDS CENTERS (4) 

KcKinley 1923 ■ • . 

Militicre 1929 

Tiles ton 1911 

Carter 1971 " • ■• 

POST GRADUATE 

Sos-cr. Busir.ess 1971 • . "/ ' . 

Adult Basic Education (leased space} 

i.b-. bl"ldi:-:g5 n-i-ass."FOR administrative purposes 

1. Boston School Deat. and School Corrjnittee Offices 

2. District I office (former Lyon School) 

3. District III office and progran; administration _J former Barron 

School) 

4. District V office (forner Leen School) 



Campbell Resource Center Distribution and Meeting Center/ and 

District VI office 



C . CENTRAL K ITCHEN 

Colu-Tibia Road - Dorchester 

D. TRA.:-:s?0?TATI0N FACILITIE S for l^.pprcxiziatsly 435 Vehicles 

(Buses 200, half buses 70, mini buses 100, vans 115) that 
are parked and maintained ab- 3 sites ovi-ned or leased by 
the ttcinspcrtation contractor: 

32 Cummins 'Hichv/ay - Mattapan 
57 Sprague Street - Readville 



West Howell 

S. A THLETIC FIELDS 
Madison Park High 
J'.'est Rcxbury High 
Charles tc'.'/n Hich 



- Dorchester 



Jamaica Plain High 
White Stadium 



-70^1- 



BOSTON" PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
19S3 - 1984 

Chronological Listing of School Buildings 



CHRONOLOGICAL 






^ 


RAiMK 


DATS 


SCHOOL d: 


[STRICT 


1 


1892 


Margaret Fuller 


2 


2 


1895/1915/1939 


William H. Taft Middle 


1 


••••■••3 


1896- 


Roger Cla? ■ .' 


6' 


4 


1897/1909 


Longfellow ■ • 


2 


5 


1899/1904/ '08/ '32 


Frame is Par!-:7i2n 


2 


6 


1901/1927 


Winshi? 


■ 1 -■ - 


7 


1901/1935 


Joseph H. Barnes Middle 


8 


8 


1901/1926/ '37/ '40 


South Boston High School 


6 


9 


1902/1920/1934 


William B. Rogers Middle 


4 


10 


. 1903 


■ William E. Russell 


6 


11 


1904 


Oliver H. Perry 


6 


12 


1904 


Ellis Mendell 


2 '. 


13 


1904 


Farragut 


1 • 


14 


1905/1917 


James Otis 


8 - 


15 


1905 


Oliver w. Holmes Middle 


5 1 


16 


. 1905 


Mather 


5 


17 


1905 


Samuel w. Mason . . 


6- 


18 


1906/1924 


Thomas Gardner 


1 


19 


1906 


William E. Endicott 


5 


20 


■ 1909 


• Edward Everett 


S 


21 


1909 


John Cheverus Middle 


8 - \ 


22 


1909 


Nathan Hale 


9 


23 


1910 • 


Peter Faneuil (A.C.C) 


9 ! 


24 


1910/1913 


Samuel Adams 


8 i 


- 25 


1911 


Boston High 


9 


2S 


1911/1914 


Edmund P. Tileston 


sp. 


27 


1911 


John Winthrop 


6 


28 


1912/1926 


Lewis Middle School 


2 


29 


1913 


John D. Philbrick 


3 


30 


1913/1939 


Dearborn Mddle 


6 


31 


• 1915 


Quincy E- Dickerman 


5 ' 


32 


- 1918 


Emily A. Fif ield 


5 j 


33 


1919/1920 


Pauline Acassiz Shaw 


4 


34 


1919 


Sarah Greenwood 


5 ! 


35 


1919/1921/1930 


Michelangelo Middle School ,. 


7 : 


36 


1919/1927/1933/ 








1936/1939 


Robert Gould Shaw Middle School 


3 


37 


1921/1956 


Curtis Guild 


9 i 


38 


1922/1925 


Frank V. Thorr.oson Middle School 


4 : 


• 39 


1922/1933 ». 


Boston Latin School 


9 ! 


. 40 


1922 


Kenrv L. Higginson 


2 


41 


1923 


William McK inlay 


sp. '; 


42 


1923/1924/1941 


Theo. Roosevelt Middle School 


2 


43 


1924 


Ralph 'valdo Imerscn 


6 


44 


1924/1926/1930 


Alexander Ha:7iilton 


1 


45 


1924 


Dante Alichieri 


8 


45 


1925/195S/1969 


Dorchester High School 


5 


47 


1925/1964 


Jarnes A. Garfield 


i 



-705- 



i-rti'i 



SCHOOL 



DIS' 



52 

53 

54 

55 

5o 

57 

55 

59 

60 

61 

62 

63 

54 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

73 

79 

80 

81 

32 

83 

84 

35 

86 

87 

83 

55 

90 

91 

92 

93 

95 
95 

97 
93 

CO 



1925/1923/1972 
1925/1331/1953 
1926/1930 
1926/1330 
1926 

1926/1940 
1926/1929/1950 
1926/1952 
1928 

1928/1931 
. 1929 
1929/1964 
1929 
1929 

1930/1957 
1930/1940/1952 
1931/1957.. 
1931/1937/1965 
.1931/1966 
1931 
1932 

1932/1959 
1932 
1932 
1932 
1932 . 
1932 
1932 
1933 

1934 • 
1935/1938 
1936 . 
1936 
1937 
1937 
1937 

1941/1962 
1952 
1957 
1957 
1957 

1957/1963 
1958 

1958/1963 • »• 
1953 
1959 
1961 
1963 
1964 
1967 
1969 
1970 



Grovsr Clev3lar.d Middla Schcol 

Beathcv'ssn 

HarricC A. Baldwin 

Thoraa= J- K=pj:v 

Donald McKay 

East Boston Sieh School 

Boston Technical High Schcol ' 

Michael J. Perkins 

Patrick ?. Lyndon 

William Ellarv Channing 

Phillis Wheatiey Twiddle 

Hyde Park High School 

Martin MilrriOre (McKinley) 

Phineas Bates 

Soloc3on Lev/enberg Middle 

Brighton High School 

James J. Chittick 

Charles Sumner • " 

Charles H. Taylor 

Mary E. Cur ley Middle 

Clarence R. Edwards Middle 

David A. Ellis 

Eliot 

George H, 



Con ley 



Thomas A. Edison Middle 
Woodrow Wilson 'Middle 
Hugh RoeO'Donnell 
Patrick J, Kennedy 
Jeremiah S- Burke High 
Joyce Kilmer 

Patrick F. Gavin Middle- ■ 
Washington Irving Middle 
Lucy Stone 

.James P. Timilty Middle 
Martin Luther Xing Middle 
Joseph P. Manning 
Hemenway 
Paul A. Devar 
Franklin D. Roosevelt 
Patric?< O'Hearn 
Elihu Greenwood 
Charles S. Mackey Middle 
Henry Grew 
Manassah E. Brad.ley 
Maurice J". Tcbin 
Joseph J. Hurley 
Warren-Pr ascot t 
John ?. Kennedy 
John W. McCormack Middle 
William Monroe Trotter 
James M. Cur ley 



5 
.3 

T_ 

5 
9 
8 .• 
■ 9 ' 
6 

a. 

4 

9 
4 

sp, 
3 
3 
1 
4 
3 
4 
2. 
7 
2 
7 
4 
3 
1 
5 
•8 
8 
3 
3 
6 
3 
5 
7 
9 
2 
4- 



-706- 





1 •-:.-r" »-.-T '■•. 






' 


DATF 




ICO 


1970-' 




10 J 


1971* 


s 


ic-:. 


1971* 


a 


iC3 


1971=* 


5 


1G4 


1971/1972 


5 


1 /• I 

— U V 


1971 


3 


1C.5 


• 1971 •• ■ ■ • 


i 


iC7 


1971 


5 


iC8 


1972 


4 


109 


1972 J 


Si 


110 


1972 


3 


111 


1972 


3 


112 


1972 


1 


113 


1973 


4 


114 


1973 


3 


115 


1975/1977 


i 


116 


1975 


2. 


117 


1975 


1 


118- 


1976 


2 


119 


1976 


7 


120 


1976 


4 


121 


1977 


3 


.122 


1977 


1 


123 


1978 


5 


124 


1979 


8 


125- 


1980 


9 
5 


126 


(Leased facility) 


3 


127 


(Leased facility) 



SCHOOL 

Coplo'/ Square High School 

Raf.=-;I Hernandez 

Derir. 1;: C. Haley 

Boston Business School 

Jair.es Hennigan 

John Marshall 

" Cbseph Lee . • - 

Carter School 

Earvard/Kent 

Agassis 

John ?. Holland 

William H. ehranberger 

Joseph P. Tynan 

Richard J. Murphy 

English High School 

James F. Condon 

Blackstone Square * ■ 

Jackson/Mann School 

Josiah Quincy School 

Mario Umana School (Gr. 7-12) 

West "Roxbury High School 

Madison Park High School 

Mattahunt 

Charlestown High 

Jamaic?. lair. High 

Humphrey Occupational Resource 

Center 

Boston Latin Academy 

Adult Basic Education 



DISTRICT 

9 

■ 9 

9 

9 

9 

5 

• -3 •. • 

. sp. 

7 

2 '- 
. 5 
9 
6 
5 
9 
6 
7 
9 
7 
9 
3 
9 
3 
2 
7 

9 

. 9 . 



Date of Occupancy, Renovated non-school building 



-"^07- 



Ill 



DIZ-Z-RIC 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



Boston Public School Buildings Clos?id Since 1975 

MIDDLE SCr.OCLS ELEilEN-TARY SCHOOLS 

Mead riaased) Allen 

Barrett 
Bulf inch 
■ .-. / • •••• ". • '• "Jefferson, * • •" 

Oak Square 
S tor row 



Jamaica Plain High 
(Old) 



Roslindale High 



Dorchester High ' Champlain 
School Annex (Whittier) 



South Boston High 
Annex ("L"St.) 



Dearborn 



-709- 



Abrahams ' . 

Bowditch 

Garrison 

Howe 

Parker 

Seaver 

Williams 

Wyman 

Audubon 
Cannon . 
Mason/ L.- 
Morris 
Paine 
Ripley 

Baker, M. 
Bradford • 
"Bradford Annex 
Fairaount • 
Logue 
Wolcott 

Brooks 

Gushing 

Gibson 

Motley 

Richards 

Rochanibeau, 

Stuart 

Andrev/ 

Baker/ S. 

Bicelcw 

Burnhac. 

Dean 

Hart 

Hawthorne 

Hoar 

Fenwick 

O'Reilly 

Tuckerr.an 



DISTHICT 
7 



HIGH SCHOOLS 



MIDDLE SCHOOLS 



Charles town High 

(Old) 

Charles tc^m High 
Annex (Spencer 31dg.) 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Bacon 
Bancroft 
Bates, J. 
Bunker Hill 
Dillav/ay 
Dudley : 
Holden • • 
Palmer 
Perkins , C . 
Prince 
Quincy (old) 



8 



Chapman . 

Lyman 

Sheridan 



Boston Trade High 
Boston Latin Academy 



C8) 



(3) 



(58) 



-■700- 



-710- 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



-T"! T_ 



-712- 



i\ 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 



C3JECTIVS 1 



To review monthly reports on school incidents with 
special attention to those perceived as racial in 
nature. 



QUESTIONS : 



Several schools were identified in Report No. 1 as 
having sporadic but serious racial violence 
(Charlestown and Hyde Park) and others for high 
incidence of violence (English, Hyde Park, Brighton, 
Thompson) . After a year of monitoring has this 
situation changed, and have other schools surfaced in 
need of safety and security improvements? What steps 
is Boston taking to identify causes for safety and 
security problems and provide solutions? What steps 
is Boston taking to develop and implement a citywide 
plan for improving safety and security. How are the 
increasing reports of weapons being dealt with by 
Boston? 



METHOD : 



Monitors visited South Boston High, English High, 
Charlestown High, Jamaica Plain, Boston Technical 
High, McKinley, Cleveland Middle, Lewenberg Middle, 
Mary Cur ley t-liddle. King Middle, The Log School, 
Edwards Middle, the Gavin Middle and McKay 
Elementary. Monitors talked with headmasters, 
teachers and other staff, parents, and students. 
Monitors also talked with Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkin, Chief of Safety Services, Christolini, and 
the Chief Investigator for the Safety Department, 
Sisco. In addition. School Incident Reports for 
November 1983 through March 1984 were reviewed. The 
Report" of the Safe Schools Commission was reviewed, as 
was Deputy Superintendent Peterkin' s response to that 
reoort. 



FINDINGS 



As reported in Report No. 2, most of the schools 
originally identified (in Report No.l) as having 
problems with violence in general and, more 
specifically, racial violence have taken soma steps 



-713- 



improve those situations, especially English and 
Charlestown High Schools. Other schools identified 
had made some, less aggressive, efforts to improve 
safety. 

While the school incidents reported in Report No. 3 
cover a longer period of time than those covered in 
Report No.l, the pro-rated numbers of incidents 
included in this review (Nov. 1983 - March 1984) 
compared to Report No.l (Jan. 1983 - April 1983) would 
indicate an overall decline in reoorted incidents. 



Jan. - Aoril 1933 (4 mos.) 

Racial = 34 (4.7%) 

ARA Bus Related = 50 (7.9%) 

Total = 718 (100%) 

(4/5 of 774 = 619) 



Nov. 1983 - March 1934 (5 mos.) 

Racial = 64 (3.1%) 

ARA Bus Related = 37 (4.8%) 

Total = 774 (100%) 



The percentage of reported racial incidents has 
increased (although it is still relatively low) while 
reported ARA bus incidents have declined (see section 
on School Bus Safety, pp. ) . 

Safety and Securitv Plan 



In responding to the Report on the Safe School 
Commission, Deputy Superintendent Peterkin has 
developed a "blueprint" still in a formative stage 

(see appendix pp. ) for improving safety and 

security throughout the system. Included in this 
"blueprint" are: 

- shortening and simplifying the Code of 
Discipline; 

- expansion of alternatives to suspensions, 
particularly alternative programs and schools 
(see section on Alternative Programs, pp. ) ; 

- a school discipline/school climate team, 
trained in Schoois-Without-Failure (Reality 
Therapy) strategies, to work with administrators 
and staff of targeted schools in improving school 
climate, reducing student suspensions, and 
providing greater safety within those buildings; 

- the development of "Oversight Committees" in 
each district and at the Central Office with 
administrative, student parent (CPC and SPC) and 
human service agency representation. These 



-Tl^i- 



groups would "examine controversial disciplinary 
matters and (to) review consistent application of 
current rules." These groups would be empowered 
to request changes in specific disciplinary 
decisions of appropriate school officials, as 
needed ; 

- establishment of an improved standardized 
record-keeping system incorporating reports on 
discipline, suspensions, repeat suspensions, 
attendance, etc.; 



-a strengthened policy on weapons which (1) 
spells out which are considered "dangerous" 
weapons, (2) provides for automatic 
recommendation for expulsion for students using 
deadly weapons (guns, knives) in a threatening 
manner and (3) mandates long-term suspensions for 
students caught with weapons once and possible 
expulsion foe repeat offenders; 

- updated security plans for each school, 
orchestrated by Community Superintendents, 
Headmasters and the Department of Safety 
Services; 

- the return of bus monitors to certain problem- 
ridden runs (see section of School Bus Safety, 

pp. ) and reinforced procedures and rules to be 

followed for students, drivers, and school staff; 

- more sensitive coverage by the media of safety 
and security issues affecting Boston Public 
Schools; 

It is important that Boston begin to finalize its 
security plans and provide adequate funding for their 
implementation. Monitors will carefully follow the 
development of these tentative plans and their 
implementation. 

Core Safety and Security Concerns 

After a year of monitoring it is apparent from on-site 
visits that most high schools and middle schools share 
the same core of safety and security concerns. Many 
of these concerns are related to the disruptive and 
maladaptive behaviors of certain students and the 
negative influence of community and neighborhood 
problems and disoutss on school climate. Low parent 



I 



-715- 



and family participation in resolving specific 
problems continues to frustrate school administrators, 
except in rare instances where constant and unusually 
diligent efforts on the part of staff to contact and 
involve parents have paid off in improved parental 
responses. 

WEAPONS: 

Weapons possession and use constitutes 30% of the 
incidents reviewed for this report. This represents a 
slight increase (4%) over Report No. 2. Again, most of 
the reported incidents involve only the possession of 
weapons, and some of these weapons are studded wrist 
bracelets and belts as well an an assortment of 
knives, "nunchucks", sticks and projectiles. Very few 
guns are found, and more rarely are they used in 
connection with other offenses. Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkins draft plan proposes a stronger policy on 
both the repeated possession of weapons and their use 
in the commission of other offenses. 

Incidents bv School 

English High (150 incidents) remains the most troubled 

school in the system, and the implementation of plans 

for its reorganization into 4 alternative programs is 

sorely needed. Hyde Park High (67 incidents) , 

Brighton High (44 incidents) , and the HHORC (41 

incidents) , although well behind English High in 

numbers of school incidents, should be among the 

targeted high schools for city-wide efforts for AjM 

improving safety and security. Among the middle " 

schools the Cleveland (50 incidents) needs much of the 

same extra attention. Both the Mary Curley Middle (32 

incidents) and the Edwards Middle (25 incidents) have 

begun to implement some changes in their approaches to 

safety and discipline, although their number of 

reported incidents remains relatively high among 

middle schools. The staff of the Edwards, the Gavin, 

and the Mary Curley, report great improvements in 

safety and discipline as a result of changes in 

administrative personnel and more rigorous support of 

safety procedures and discipline policies. Similarly, 

improvements have been reported at the Thompson Middle 

School. 



-716- 



South Boston High (20 incidents) continues to operate 
in the same effective manner as was reported 
previously. Long-overdue improvements in the school 
facility and in building maintenance have enhanced the 
school climate. 



Racial Violence 



As was stated before, the number and percentage of 
racial incidents has increased (64 for Nov. 83 - 
March 34) . More than half (34) are listed as 
assaults. Some of these are verbal assaults (racial 
slurs) , but many are the kinds of physical assaults 
described by the Safe Schools Commission Report as a 
part of a pattern of "victimization" of students 
(usually White and Asian) which occurs in some 
schools. The bulk of the remaining racial incidents 
are fights and harassment (23 incidents) . Some 
schools are reporting racial incidents between Blacks 
and Hispanics, or Asians as much or more than among 
Whites and Blacks (Brighton, Mary Curley, Jamaica 
Plain, Rogers, Edwards) and some report racial 
incidents between Whites and Hispanics or Asians with 
almost equal frequency (South Boston, Omana) . 
However, the majority of racial incidents are still 
occurring between Blacks and Whites. Whatever plan ii 
finally approved for the improvement of safety should 
include strategies for reducing the victimization of 
students for racial reasons and other forms of racial 
harassment. It is clear that the goals of 
desegregation can not be reached in schools in which 
students are afraid they will be the targets of 
assaults and harassment primarily because of their 
race. 



COMMENDATIONS : 



Boston should be commended for beginning to plan for 
the improvement of safety and security through Deputy 
Superintendents' response to the Safe Schools 
Commission Report. 



RECOMMENDATIONS , 



The response to the Safe Schools Commission Report is 
the blueprint of a citywide safety improvement plan. 
It needs to be fleshed out and more specific in many 
respects, and it needs the official support and 
approval of the School Committee, both in content and 
in the funds needed to make it work. While manv 



-717- 



schools throughout the system would benefit from 
improvements in citywide safety and discipline 
policies and procedures, certain schools such as 
English High, Hyde Park High, HHORC, Brighton High and 
the Cleveland Middle should be targeted first. 



OBJECTIVE 1 
QUESTIONS: 



In Report No. 2 monitors reported that Boston had done 
little to remedy safety and security problems on 
school buses. It was also reported that, according to 
a Safe Schools Commission survey, school buses are 
seen by students as being among the least safe places 
in their school environment. What steps is Boston 
taking to resolve safety problems on school buses, and 
to provide a more secure environment for students? 



METHOD : 



Monitors discussed school bus safety with Deputy 
Superintendent Peterkin, and reviewed the following 
reports: Safe Schools Commission Report, City-wide 
Parents Council (CPC) Report and Recommendations on 
School Bus Monitors for 1934-85, Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkins March 6, 1984 Bus Safety Proposal and a 
February 21, 1984 letter from Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkin on school bus safety. Monitors also listened 
to verbal arguments by the CPC for the placement of 
bus monitors at a Boston School Committee meeting. 



BINDINGS: 



In response to the Safe Schools Commission Report and 
increased pressure from the Citywide Parents Council, 
Deputy Superintendent Peterkin and his staff have 
developed specific plans for the improvement of safety 
and security on school buses. These plans are still, 
in part, in a formative state, and have not yet been 
officially approved by the School Committee; nor has 
the question of how much money to budget for some of 
these improvements been resolved. 

The basic elements of this plan are: (see 
appendices p? ) 

(1) increased and improved dissemination of 
specific school rules pertaining to bus safety to 
bus drivers and students; 



M 



-718- 



(2) improved training for bus. drivers in the 
handling of various safety problems on school 
buses, including reporting responsibilities, 
circumstances for denial of boarding for 
disruptive students, emergency procedures, etc.; 

(3) increased responsibilities for 
principals/headmasters for bus safety; 

(4) changes in the Code of Discipline to clearly 
specify procedures for removing unruly students 
from school bus services (temporarily or 
permanently) , especially high school runs; 

(5) the placement of bus monitors on some 
elementary and middle school runs that have been 
problem-ridden. Community Superintendents or 
Principals would be provided with a fund from 
which to pay for monitors as needed for troubled 
runs within their districts of schools. Great 
efforts would be made to hire monitors from among 
existing school staff to insure (a) familiarity 
with students, (b) efficient reporting of 
incidents and (c) appropriate disciplinary 
actions. 

While it is clear that Boston is now committed to 
making changes in the handling of school bus safety, 
there are many unanswered questions about the 
specifics of a plan to be implemented. The City-wide 
Parents Council is not satisfied with the plan 
presented by Deputy Superintendent Peterkin, and has 
itself proposed that monitors be placed on all school 
bus runs throughout the city for 1984-85, at a cost 
considerably above that contained in the Deouty 
Superintendent's proposal. The CPC proposal also 
calls for the development of a Task Force to develoo 
procedures for handling of bus safety, including the 
reduction of bus monitors as they prove unnecessary on 
certain runs, procedures for hiring and training bus 
monitors, and other specific bus safety procedures. 
The CPC bases its recommendations in part on surveys 
administered to parents and students on safety 
conditions on school buses. 63% of parents and 
students surveyed claim to have witnessed some 
misbehavior, and 93% favor the placement of bus 
monitors on buses to alleviate misbehavior. The CPC 
has previously pointed out the prevention of costly 
vandalism which monitors mav orovide. 



-719- 



COMMENDATIONS : 



Boston is to be commended for beginning to develop 
specific proposals for the improvement of school bus 
safety. 



RECOMMENDATIONS ; 



It is the opinion of monitors that the placement of 
monitors on" all school bus runs, especially high 
school runs, is unnecessary. However Boston must 
clarify its plans for the placement of monitors and 
other bus safety improvements by: 

(1) Developing a more specific plan for the 
hiring and placement of bus monitors for troubled 
bus runs, along with an adequate, approved budget 
for meeting these additional costs; 

(2) developing a more specific safety plan for 
problem-ridden high school bus runs, which 
includes some monitoring of troubled runs by 
Safety Services Staff, procedures to eliminate 
disruptive students from school bus services 
(permanently or temporarily) , and increased 
responsibilities on the part of building 
administrators for overseeing bus safety and 
appropriately responding to bus driver reports of 
disciplinary infractions. 

(3) developing an improved reporting process for 
school bus incidents, which incorporates school 
incident reports, ABA reports, and Office of 
Transportation reports - into one report. As it 
stands, school incident reports do not reliably 
reflect the degree of problems occurring on 
school buses throughout the city. 



OBJECTIVE 1 
QUESTIONS : 



Report No. 2 described strategies being used by Boston 
to develop and expand alternative educational programs 
to better' serve the needs of some disruptive and non- 
achieving students. Some of the newer programs employ 
mastery learning approaches (Fenway School, Boston 
?rep and New Horizons) , and some employ other learning 
strategies designed to improve attendance and 






-720- 



successful learning outcomes. Monitors also reported 
that most of these alternatives were reluctant to 
accept hard-core, habitually offending students, 
leaving Chapter 766 placement schools such as the 
Tileston and McKinley the only options for such 
students. What further steps are being taken to 
develop and expand alternative programs to serve the 
needs of disruptive and non-achieving students? How 
is the McKinley serving the needs of disruptive 
students with multiple problems evaluated under 
Chapter 766. 



METHOD: 



Monitors met with Deputy Superintendent Peterkin and 
held conversations with alternative programs 
development director, Sid Smith, concerning 
alternative program development and expansion. 
Monitors visited Hew Horizons, (King Middle) , the Log 
School, and the McKinley School. The progress of the 
Fenway School and plans for its expansion have been 
reviewed in reports submitted to the Boston School 
Committee. (Fenway School and Boston Prep were 
visited in the fall 1983). 



FINDINGS: 



Part of the philosophy operating behind central office 
development of alternative education programs and 
schools was described in Report No. 2, and included 

(1) smaller, more responsive learning environments, 

(2) greater accountability (through frequent testing, 
and other feedback) for skills and information to be 
learned, (3) increased counseling services built into 
several components of each program and (4) 
experiential learning opportunities. In addition, 
program planners are committed to creating a balance 
of students in each program - that is, they are 
against the creation of programs and schools which 
only serve disruptive, problera-matic students. They 
have likened these "iabalanced" programs and schools 
(which have existed in Boston in the past) to "dumping 
grounds" which are more like prisons or criminal 
training grounds than schools. They stress the 
importance of students, especially disruptive and 
troubled students, having positive peer models in 
their school environment. For this reason, 
alternative education program administrators are 
reluctant to overload their programs (or schools) with 
multiple-problem students. On the other hand, the 



-721- 



headmasters of several schools have complained that 
Boston Prep has not accepted the number of disruptive 
students for which they were promised slots. There is 
clearly a strong need expressed by many high school 
and middle school headmasters for more alternative 
programs and schools to deal with multiple-problem 
students who may not qualify for a McKinley or 
Tileston 756 placement but who are not benefitting 
from the present structure of comprehensive middle or 
high schools. 

Deputy Superintendent Peterkin's response to this 
expressed need is, in part, contained in his plan for 
the expansion of alternative education during the 
1984-85 school year- Among the components of this 
plan are: 

1. the creation of 4 alternative programs at English 
High; 

' a. The Fenway School (mastery learning) will 

expand from 120 students to between 180 and 
200 students. 

b. a ninth grade component utilizing a mastery 
learning approach. 

c. a magnet Arts component 

d. a traditional high school component to serve 
all 10-12 grade students desiring a 
traditional high school education (English 
High students already in grades 10 and 11 
can continue their present programs through 
this option.) 

2. The expansion of the New Horizons Program at the 
King Middle from 100 to 170 students. 

3. The expansion of the Re-Cap program from 
involvement with only 3 middle schools to 
involvement with 11 middle schools. This program 
allows over-age two-time-repeaters in middle 
schools to enter into contractual agreements for 
the completion of specific educational, 
attendance, and testing requirements in order to 
be placed in high schools with students who are 
their chronological peers, in an accelerated 
manner. 



-722- 



4. Boston will make available $100,000. to middle 
schools interested in seed money for the 
development of alternative programs within their 
buildings to serve non-achieving students. (This 
has not been approved.) 

In Report No. 2 monitors described the lack of 
programs designed to serve the needs of students who 
are haibitual offenders and who have multiple problems 
(academic, behavioral family, legal, etc.) Deputy 
Superintendent Peterkin maintains that many of these 
students have been evaluated under Chapter 766 and 
placed in special needs schools such as the McKinley 
or the Tileston. Others are placed in smaller numbers 
in Boston Prep and some of the other alternative 
schools. It is the goal of his office to have non- 
special needs alternatives establishd in each district 
for district-rather-than-city-wide referrals. All of 
these district alternatives would be located in 
exisitng schools along-side regular education 
programs. 

The McKinley School 

The McKinley is a special needs school which accepts 
only students evaluated under Chapter 766 as 502.4 (i) 
prototypes. These students are described as having a 
long history of emotional problems as well as academic 
problems. In addition some have family, legal and 
other problems. The school opened in 1978 
specifically to serve students who, to that time, 
could only be served in private school settings. The 
school located in three different buildings in 2 
separate parts of the city, includes a middle school, 
a high school and a technical school. 250 students 
are served, and the school claims an 30% success rate 
as measured by students who remain through 
graduation. The other 20% either drop out of school 
altogether or go on to residential placements. The 
cost per student is approximately S3500 for the 1933- 
34 school year; this is approximately ?1500 less than 
a private placement. The student-teacher ratio for 
most of the programs in 6:1, and, if other support 
staff are included, the student-staff ratio is 3:1. 
The school is a highly structured learning 
environment, which provides large amounts of support 
services and an extensive behavior management 
system. Some students are literally escorted from one 
room to another throughout the school cay for periods 
of time. 



-723- 



Referrals to this school must go through a three step 
screening process starting with a referral by the 
Chapter 756 evaluation team at the sending school, 
through a special education screening committee at the 
central office, and finally to a screening by the 
McKinley's Headmaster, John Brown-Verre and some of 
his staff. Approximately 75% of the student referrals 
reaching John Brown-Verre are accepted. 

The school has an extensive procedure in place, 
including an .in-house suspension program, to avoid 
out-of-school suspensions. Despite this, its 
suspension rate is relatively high. Strong emphasis 
is placed on teaching problem-solving techniques in 
order to change inappropriate behavior. The staff is 
higly indoctrinated, and all are involved in non- 
confrontational forms of student intervention (no 
yelling, bribing or unrealistic threats). 



Mr. Brown-Verre s 
multiple and seve 
problems, as a gr 
believes that the 
increasing and th 
such that Boston 
intervention stra 
numbers earlier i 
alternatives avai 
this early interv 
expanding, by ope 
component in the 
more non-766 ooti 



ees the situation of students with 
re problems, particularly behavioral 
owing concern for Boston. He 

number of these students is 
e severity of their problems growing 
should be devising other non-766 
tegies for dealing with these growing 
n a students develoment and more 
lable systemwide. In keeping with 
ention strategy, the McKinley will be 
ning a special education elementary 
1984-35 school year. Despite this 
ons are needed. 



COMMENDATION! 



Boston should be commended for its steady expansion of 
alternative program options, and the success, to date, 
of the existing options. 



RECOMMENDATIONS ; 



1) Boston must continue to expand alternative 
education options, as is planned, with special 
emphasis on programs which serve disruptive, 
habitually offending students. All of these students 
can not nor should be served in special needs programs 



-72 U- 



such as the McKinley, although non-special needs 
alternatives could benefit from some of the behavior 
management strategies used at the McKinley, including 
non-confrontational student intervention strategies. 

2) Early intervention strategies for disruptive and 
problemmatic students should be developed and piloted 
in regular elementary schools, to prevent referrals to 
special needs options later. 



OBJECTIVE 1 
QUESTIONS : 



In Report No. 2 monitors reported on the persistence 
of problems in the consistent reporting of incidents 
required by the Safety Procedural Manual despite 
Safety Department efforts to cross-checlc incidents 
reported. It was also reported that in some schools 
many students and staff failed to cooperate in 
reporting incidents due to fear, apathy, or 
disillusionment with the poor follow-up accorded many 
incidents reported. The Safe Schools Commission 
Report cited gross discrepencies between the rates of 
school offenses reported by students and staff in its 
survey of school offenses and the frequency of those 
same offenses on actual school incident reports and 
suspension data. What new steps has Boston taken to 
insure greater consistency in the reporting of 
incidents, leading to greater reliability of the 
reports themselves? 



METHODS : 



Conversations were held with Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkin concerning this problem and The Safe Schools 
Commission Report was reviewed. 



FINDINGS ; 



Resolving problems of complete, consistent, and 
accurate reporting of all incidents required by the 
Safety Procedural Manual is difficult and depends on 
the resolution of many contingent problems: 

- What will convince students and staff who are 
apathetic or fearful about reporting offenses to 
change their attitudes? 



-725- 



- What will it take to convince some students and 
staff that reporting incidents is not a waste of 
time and energy, and yet insure due process and 
fairness for those accused of offenses? [Some 
staff and students complain that disciplinary 
measures are not strongly or quickly enacted as a 
result of reports submitted. Others report that 
even if they are quickly enacted, the limited 
scope of disciplinary action (suspensions 
primarily) has little effect on many 
perpetrators. ] 

- How will all building and district 
administrators be convinced that complete and 
accurate reporting of incidents required by the 
Safety Procedural Manual will not be seen as 
direct evidence of incompetence in effectively 
managing their schools (or the district)? 

- How will all building administrators be 
convinced that it is not "all right" to not 
report incidents (required by the Safety 
Procedural Manual) which they personally see as 
"inconsequential" or less than important? It is 
clear from on-site visits that some building 
administrators assiduously report every assault 
and fight which occurs, regardless of how many 
students are involved or the relative importance 
of the incident (e.g., Curley Middle). Other 
schools report only those assaults or fights 
which result in injury or are considered 

' "serious". 

Because the Deputy Superintendent and the Chief of the 
Safety Department, through reports submitted by Safety 
Department staff and their personal experience, have 
some idea of the kind and frequency of safety and 
discipline problems at particular schools. Deputy 
Superintendent Peterkin has begun sending letters to 
headmasters and principals asking them to explain 
school incident and suspension data which contradict 
each other or other sources of information about what 
is occuring at a school. For example, if safety staff 
report numerous instances of weapons possession and 
fights occuring at a school, and yet suspensions are 
very low, then Peterkin will ask the principal to 
account for that discrepency. If on the other hand, 
suspensions are high and incident reports low, 
principals must also account for this. Some of these 
discrepencies could be explained by in-house 



-726- 



suspension programs or other alternatives to 
suspension. However, not all discrepencies can be 
explained in this way, and some point to problems in 
consistently filing reports and following through with 
appropriate disciplinary responses. 

The Deputy Superintendent reports that the Safety 
Department is currently setting up a computer system 
for keeping track of suspensions, repeat suspensions, 
and school incident data which will better enable the 
Safety Department to find reporting discrepencies and 
provide more complete and accurate data on the safety 
climate of particular schools. 



RECOMMENDATIONS : 



Boston needs to continue to improve the reliability of 
its two prime measures of school safety and security - 
school incident reports and suspension data. 



-727- 






-728- 



SAFETY AND SECURITY 
LIST OF APPENDICES 



Appendix I - 
Appendix II - 
Appendix III 
Appendix IV - 



Numbers of Incidents by School 



Incidents by Month, Racial, Bus, Weapons 



Incidents by Category by School (High, Middle) 



Bus Safety Improvement Plan - (February 21, 
1984) 



Appendix V - 



Citywide Parents Council Report and 
Recommendations on School Bus Monitors for 
1984-1985 School Year 



Appendix VI 



Bus Safety Proposal (March 6, 1984) 






-729- 



Appendix I 



School Incidents November, 19^3 through March, 1934 
(Crimes Against Persons and Safety Related) 



I 



High Schools 



Middle Schools 



English 


IbO 


Hyde Park 


67 


Brighton 


44 


KHORC 


41 


Dorchester 


29 


So. Boston 


20 


Madison. Pk. 


20 


Charlestown 


20 


W.Roxbury 


20 


JamaicaPlain 


16 


Boston Tech. 


15 


McKinley 


12 


Burke 


8 


Umana 


8 


E.Boston 


5 


BostonLatin 


5 


Tileston 


4 


Boston High 


]_ 



:otal 



495 



Cleveland 


50 


Mary Cur ley 


32 


Edwards 


25 


Lewenberg 


15 


Thompson 


14 


T.Roosevelt 


13 


Rogers 


7 


Irving 


6 


Holmes 


5 


Mac key 


5 


King 


4 


Wilson 


4 


Gavin 


3 


Taft 


3 


Shaw 


2 


McCormack 


2 


Wheatley 


2 


Timilty 


1 


Edison 


1 


Lewis 


1 



Total 



Elementary 

Holland 

Mather 

Trotter 

Hurley 

Ohrenberger 

Marshall 

Pifleld 

Agassiz 

P. Shaw 

Eennigan 

JackscnMann 

Eliot 

Dickerman 

L. Stone 

Ellis 

Fuller 1 

Condon 1 

Hamilton 1 

S. Greenwcodl 

Winshl? i 

Quincy 1 

' tiearn 1 

Garfield 1 



195 



35 Crimes against Persons and Sarety Related 
Incidents were reported off of school property, 



Total 



49 



-7ZC- 



Appendia II 



Crlaes Against Persons and Safety Related Incidents 

(derived from Boston Public Schools Daily Incident Logs submitted 
by the Safety Service Department) 

November I983 through March 19d4 



Month 

Nov. 
Dec. 
Jan. 

Feb. 
Mar. 



Racial 



(a3) 
(83) 
(84) 
(84) 
(84) 



9 
13 

9 
14 

19 



Involving; ARA Buses Weapons 



10 
5 
5 
6 

11 



60 
41 
38 
42 
52 



Total 

1B9 
148 

153 

123 
156 



64 (8.15) 



37 (3.8?) 



233 (3or.) 



774 



-721- 



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THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 



' 




BOSTON PUSUC SCHOOLS 
owes OF THE DEPUTY SUPSPlN^NCr-.' 
* SCHOOL OPEfUTIONS 

fioaeaT s. pstsbkin 

February 21, 1984 

Franklin Banks _ • "■- 

Ccmmccwealth of Msssachrjsetts 
Deoartaent of Bixxation 
1385 Easccck Street 
Qrrry, MA. 02169 

Dear FrsiTk: 

Thank you fst ycur ccrcera regarding an7 prcgrsss cade towards changes in 
school bx2S sa&ty pxccedures. As of this date, we have zade co changes in 
school bus safety procedures Ssr this school year except to icsara 
?ri rr.i pal bJV^PiX^ik s tars that they may, la cases where students ha:ve been 
disruptive on buses, denj t±ose students school-provided transportatica, if 
they provide an alterr-ative oeans of transportacicn or th^ conduct infcrrrrfll 
hearings according to the 1982 Cede of Discipline. la essKice tM^ r>g»^<? that 
a student would be suspended from th^ bus as an alternative to being suspended 
froai school. 

For school year 1984-85, we plan to iajplaasnt the fallowing changes: 

1. provide each bus and driver with a very concise list of school 
bus rules and regulations; 

2. recc=end that aH drivers be oriented as to &air rights and our 
procedures with regard to student bus safety and discipline; 
i.e., dri'rers will be inforaed that they do not have Che" right to 
unilaterally bar students frcn riding their buses. 

3. The Coda of Discipline will be merr^pd, to clearly reflect the 
School Bepartnant "and student responsibility fjr behavior Co and 
from school. The Code will delineate th^ responsibility of 
Csmnity Superintendents to hold fiDtrial hearings which say 
restilt in th^ denial of school-provided transportation for longer 
periods of tine tr.an is presently allowable. 

4. Ve will very shortly present Co Ch^ Scperincendenc ojr 
reccasendations to resolve concerns regarding th^ provision of 
bvis aionitors to 2ostcn Pjblic Sch-ool buses. Essentially, ctir 
rscconendaticns will in'^l'.'e c:ie' prevision of ftmds to either 
Cccnunity Superintendents or Eaacsas tars /Principals which Chav 
will utilixa on an as -needed basis Co provide bus acnitor ' 
coverage of particularly crciilescce bt:ses '.,-ichin chair schcols 
or districts. Cur plan does ncc reccmsnd Cha assignment of bus 
ncnicors Co high scr^cl busas. 



To: Franklin Hanks Ft^nrjary 21, 1SS4 

- 2 - 

5. We will develop prcceduraa far closer cooperacicn becwssn Soscon 
School Bolica,*IffiC and Boston Police with regard to enforcasenc 
of traffic regulations ccncacning scbsol buses, also provision 
ax^ training of crossing guards. 

I will provide you with copies of our specific recanasndations in response to 
schsol bus safety j*nd ^a genesal issue of the Safe Sdr^ools Gzisnissicn's 
reconxnesadations as soon as tiiey have been developed. Please do not hesitate 
to contact se with any question. 




S. Feterkin 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Cperaticns 



SS?/jMc 



-7^0- 




City wide Parents Council 

59TempIeP!ac3 Bostcn,Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



^y^Af.J^fy ,'/ 



cmwEEE ?mxm ccui\cil 

CN ■• 
SCHXL eLs MC^flTCRS 

lS64-a5 SC-m. YEAR 



INARCH 21. 1^4 



-7/:i_ 



BnEX 

School Bus f^NiroRs liN Boston: A Brief History 1 

School Bus Monhors: Surveys 2 

School Bus Monitors: Cost 5 

cfc*s secotwendanons re: bus monitors 9 

Appendix A - State Reimbursement for Transportation of Pupils lO 

Appendix B - Excw?pt from Safe Schools Commission Report H 

Appendix C - Letter from ^ Transportation^ Inc 12 

Appendix D - Listing of Incidents on Russell School Bus .......... J3 



-7'42- 



SC3C0L 5US MCNITCr.S 1^7 50S7CN: A SHORT 5I5TCRY 

Bus monitors vera first utilirad on public schccl buses durir.c 
the 1975-76 school year. They were hired by the school principal 
to ride buses sarvicir.c their particular school. In scne cases, 
the school principal utiised teachers at the school to ride the 
buses to and from the school building for an extra stipend. Both 
systems of eaploying bus nonitors were problematic. They were beset 
by the technical difficulties of record-keeping, as weir"as"5y ' the 
personnel problems of seeking last-minute replacements for those 
monitors, who could not fulfill their monitor duties. These problems, 
coupled with the growing disapproval of the School Ccamittee about 
teachers "double-dipping" into school depacrtment monies, caused seme 
dramatic changes during the 1976-77 school year. 

Responsibility for the hiring of school bus monitors was placed in 
the hands of Mr. Edward Winter, the Secretary of the Boston School 
Committee, during 1976-77. Mr.. Wintei: was authoriced to hire laid-off 
transitional, security, and lunch aides for bus monitors. The School 
Committee, by policy, restricted hiring to anyone not currently on the 
payroll of the school department. The problems that plagued principals 
during the 197S-7S school year, continued. 

With the advent of Dr. Robert Wood as Superintendent of Schools, 
responsibility for the hiring, training, and record-keeping for schccl 
bus monitors was delegated to the district offices of the nine Communi- 
ty Superintendents i At those offices , either a Transpcraticn Coordina- 
tor or the Administrative Assistant to the Community Superintendent, had 
functional control or bus monitors, their replncements , and their pay- 
rolls. This rasocnsibility continued until the elimination of bus moni- 
tors, in the 1531-32 budget, for fiscal reasons. 

-urine the lasn year cf their use on public schccl buses {1330-31), 
the e:r-=er-citura for bus r.cniiors vas S~31,129. Generally, bus ncnircrs 



r.ccn. T--ay racaivad rrai-i-nc ar.d s'-ppcr- rrcn ccch tr.a c:.s-ric- 
officas ar.c rha 3epar":r:3r-- cf Safscy ar.d Security. 

S A.MPL ING 0? ?F.03LZ:'tS ON SCHOOL 3USZS WITHOUT MONITORS DCllIITg 1^3 2-3 3 



In an effort to assess the iapac-c of tha rssicval of bus monitors 
fron the school buses transporting students to the public schools of 
Boston, the Citywida Parants Coxincil secured a linitad sampling of bus 
driver reports outlining the behavioral problasis displayed, and the 
vandalism caused by student riders from several school districts for 
a period during the 1932-33 school year. The driver report sampling 
covered a period froa Septamber 2, 1982 through Jebruary 22, 1983 and 
involved problens on some buses fron Districts 3, 4, and 9, asuang 
others. A total of 145 reports were reviewed, the unsuitable behaviors 
cited in the reports were identified and tallied,- the vandalisr. costs 
were estiziatad. and several conclusions were drawn. 

The acccnpanying charts and conclusions were part cf tha 1932-3 3 
assessssent done bv the Cifr^ide Parents Council: 



•nuUTSPCRrA-ICM r^rCP.rS R£CZIv-ZD 37 C7C F05. 'JZ'IZT 



-7UU- 



MCJITH 


wLO..^«^wI 


DISTRICT 


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3Y TH2 TY?E AITS r?.£CUZ:TC: :■ 



rrnS or CNSuIIASLi 3EH.V7I0R 



L. Refusing co obev bus driver 

2. Failure co resiaiji seacac 

3. Ocher offenses 
^. Profanicy 

5. 3ochering ochers 

6. Fighcing 

7. Lighclng oacches 

3. Throving objecss on bus 

9. Throwing objeccs ouc of bus 

LO. Hanging ouc of windows 

ll.Sciccing 

L2. Disobeying bus ccnicor^ 



r!iEQL~:Tcr of 
occtaz:;ci 



33 

23 

13 

15 

13 

10 

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6 

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3 




ANALYSIS Cr STTnDSrr Ti^AilSrORTAriON 3£:ZAVI0?.S 
3Y ?ARTIC-3'ATCRY GSCU^S: 





SZ?T, 
32 


OCT. 

82 


NOV. 
82 


DEC. 
82 


JA^I . 

33 


32 


TOTALS 


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-7^^- 



CONCLUSIONS : 

If the Scnplinc of rapor-s that we hava racaivad from seme district 
is typical of other districts, then the following conclusions can be 
drawn: 

• Student behavior on many school buses is unsatisfactory 

• 63% of student misbehavior res;ilts in serious incident, acci_dant 
or destruction of transportation equipment -;_ • ~__;^\ 

■m The estimated six-month dollar cost for repairs to school T " 
vehicles citywide, as a result of student vandalism is over 
5100,000 

• The nature and type of follow-up to student behavior reports, 
incidents, accident and vandalism reports seems fragmented and 
erratic 

• Thera is a documented ne^d for additional adult presence on 
Boston school buses . ^- ' 



-TA6- 



SCHOOL BUS MDNlTOaS: SURVEYS AND aZPORXS 
1983-1984 

Based upon Che 227 driver reports from ASA Trans porcation and che 
approxiaacely 800 bus surveys from ten schools (with aore still forthcoming ) 
a number of the school bus, olnlbxis, and van runs are operacisg under some very 
unsafe and even hazardous conditions that are caused by the disruptive behavior of 

4 

the student passengers. These unruly behaviors include fighting, vandalism, 
failure to r emain seated, use of profanity, throwing objects, and smoking. A 
complete list of the offenses and their frequency of occurrence is on Exhibit I. 

The results of the 800 school bus surveys indicate that 632 oi the parents and/or 
children have witnessed some form of misbehavior on the bases. In addition, 93" of 
these survey respondents favor the use of bus monitors as an approach to alleviating 
the unruliness.- (According to Lance Carter,. .METCO uses bus ncnitors to install 
discipline, safety and driver concentration on its buses.) Exhibit II lists, by 
school, Che percentages of parents responding to Che survey, the percenCs having 
witnessed Che stisbehaviors and Che percents favoring bus cnnitors. 

Since ASA drivers are not required by contract to report student incidents, 
only 115 transportation runs have been reported for disruptive behavior. Another 
reason for the low number of reports is the lack of thorough follow-up, %"han 
incidents are not followed chrough to resolution, drivers have no incentive to make 
a report, ilevertheless, Che 227 available reports are the accounts of 113 drivers. 
This precludes the notion chat only a few drivers are responsible for aaking the 
najority of the reports. 



-7^7- 



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-7^8- 



E3ai3IT II 
PASZOT 5ZS?0NSZS F?.0I1 THE SCHOOL 3US SURVEYS 



School 


of 
Resoonses 

51 


ResTJonse Rate 
213 


Pareacs ia Favor 
of 

Bus Mocinors 

962 


Parent 
Having 
Mlsbehavi 


acd/or Caild 
; Wtsnessed 

■OT'^'on Che Buses 


Adass 


453 


Baldvia 


55 


21:; 




912 






443 


31acksC3ce 


180 


24Z 


• 


S2Z 






723 


Bradley 


55 


393* 




91S 






803 


Ciitrick 


99 


26: 




883 






403 


Tarraguc 


21 


24Z* 




953 






903 


Garfield 


59 


273 




923 






733 


Eanllza-c. 


49 


163 




773 






353 


Quiacy 


162 


242 


-£1 


893 






613 


SusKier 


70 


173 


~ 


973 






843 



Misbehavior includes putting heads or aras out of the vindow, throwing objects, 
vandalisa, fighting, and other acts of '/iolence. 



* Surveys were not distributed to the entire school population. Instead, they 
were distributed onlv to those who received transoortation. 






SCHOOL SOS MONITORS: COST 

The currant scamcory requireaeats in che Xassacausacrs General Lavs 
concerning punil cransportacion, provide for a 100* scace relsbursesenc allcvancs 
for bxia acnicors. *(See Atrachaenc A , entitled, ?t:pil Tranaportatian, Section II, 
Ciapcar 13 : Zllaisatlcn of Racial Infaalance-Reinbursesent) . 

Tie school departaent appears to be reluctant to allocate a portion of the 
transportation budget line itaa for bus nonltors, in part, due to the fact that in 
preTlcus years the relabursesent alloxrance frsa the state vas never resubslttad to 
the school departrect but instead reaained vithln the city's finance dapartnent. 
To alleiTlate this situation the school departaent should create a separate line 
Itsa expenditure for bus nonltors. Therefore, if it takes the state approxlnately 
12 to 13 conths to issue the relnfaursement, this delay voxild net have a sonetary 
effect on the rssalnlng school budget. 

The projected cost for the bus nonltors wpuld follow this forrula: 

Total nuaber of bus nonltors 

one aonltor per bus &60 

Salary; $7. CO per hr. 

Work hrs: 5 hrs. ::er day- $23 per day for 130 days - 53,730.GQ 
33,730.00 r 460 - $1,733,300.00 

(astlaatloa) Administration and cose of training bus nonltors: $130,CCO.CO 

Total projected coat - $1,338, 300. CO 

The school dapartasnt in inplenentlng this prcgran. should ccnvane a special 
transportation task force, ccnpcsed of school department officials, ARA officials , 
parents, Cityvide Parents Council, State Departnent of Zducation, Tdtad Staalvorkers 
local 3731 (bus drivers). School Principals, and nsnoers af the Boston Sr^dent 
Advisory Council. This ta^a would be ins tr-raental in providing a clear assassnant 
of the sceciilc naeds and costs of such a progrta. 



750- 



Clrrglde Paranc Couacll Recomgendaclons Ra: Bus Monitors 

1. The School Ccsmlcree should budgec sufflcisns funds to: I) hire bus aonltars 
for every bus transporting Boston Puolic School students to and froa their 
schools for the 1984-35 school year and; 2) adsiinister and supervise the 
bus aonltor prograa, 

2. The School ConaBlttee should establish a Transporratlon Task ?orce coaiposed 
of representatives of the School Department, ASA, Cityvlde Parents Council, 
State Oepartsent of Edueadon, United Steelvorkers Local 3751 (bus drivers) , 
School Principals, and the Boston Student Advisory Council". 

The general purpose of this Task roree would be to address the substantial 
transportation related probleas affecting Boston's school children. 

Specifically regarding the bus monitor issue, proposed functions of the Task 
Force would be as follows: 

A. Deteraine what criteria shovtld be applied, la future years, to possibly 
reduce the niimber of bus monitors. At present, there is little reliable 
data for making the decision that some buses may not need monitors. 
Because of the seriousness of the situation, the burden of proof must 
be to show that,i3, particular cases, monitors may not be needed. 



B. Develop a job description and uaifora recruiting procedures for bus 

monitors. ° ' 

C. Develop a screening and hiring process for the bus monitors that fully 
involves parents in the decisions regarding reccmaendations for hirlag. 

D. Outline/Develop a mandatory one- week training prograa for all monitors 
that specifies: their rights and responsibilities; general first aid 
procedures; emergency procedures; csnxlict resolution procedures; 
procedures for reporting problaas, etc. 

S. Develop an evaluation process so Chat situations where monitors are not 

effectively carrying out their responsibilities can be prsmpcly identified 
and reaedied. 

P. ?.eccnaend that emergency phones be placed on all school buses. These 

phones should be connected to the school Deparraant so that, in a' T cases, 
parents can be notified when children are expected to be more c h^n 5« hciir 

G. Develop a prograa for a one-hour evening meeting during the first week of 
school so that Principals and SPCscan explain to all parents of children 
who are bussed Che rules for bus behavior and disciplinary actions co be 
taken for misbehavior and explain the importance of parental support and 
cooperation. 



-750a- 



attachme:!- a 



.ar ; 4 sias rs« sarrzcss ara ••^c .•:ej— r?IIy rrsvissc ts rcriij aiirrUac is rarsi.ir 
C3V ; jsy r.i s is said ciz?, csvn* raeicial rcisei d±szrzsz cr ircaraKsssr 

Tscari.cra.l 5ci:scl. . . . 



A rrvn viiara a rarrcs rasisas vns is acrirtad » a dau schscZ. ±z sssztsr zcjn 
•issar 5«crica raraS/ siiiil, Cir3u?= iis scisci er=irraa< v/taa aacasrarv^ prs- 




so erracdsd. . .arsridad. . .Chac sa graragcrragjea arsLLl ie zzsvL dad fsr, cr 
raisicraasscs sada ca acssasc «^, aa? pspil vac rasidaa lass saaa caa aad 
caa-rt3if si^ss .fras ria scssei vriici i» aeraads. . . 




:s'as iacarrad sariay e±a sra^iaus fiscal yaar is t±a craasrerraaica c^ 
aa? =aail esraUad i= a craasiaicaa^ ^uLIiac;»l edacsaiaa s r syr a s sjzd ves :ss2.dss 
AZ iaasa caa axid cncbalf sLlaa £zsa cha setsaZ vttsh. zts pi?zl Azzsnds, as 
asassrad 'sa a ear— nniy £ra7aiad racaa. . . 

. , . r^ <ra=cav«aii3 saail, sajjecr sa a.spz::cr±^zi.s:z arc ;:rca r±a arcravai 
cr ria i:ca.rd, pav rs a ci2v, cava cr ra^caal disarica 3C±scl <:r.r—' rasa caa 
'TTn-TT'^ rarraaa cr ri«c=sa cr sraasaorraaica cr zcn^'^iiizs perils zrz^iS'- 
*eszsd fzcs scaag-Ls is wiziaii raciai iasa^aaaa axiras ca sesari^ is wh2.cJz 
--C- =» i irai^aica cr racial ialarra axisas aad szis JTir.dzsd. rarraaa cr sia case 
cr srsasaaraacica a^ vaiaa rrpils traasrarrad rraa sd:sa-ls ia vtixcii '■-"-• ■• * 
isoiaaica -frisaa sa scaaals ia vaici racial iaiaiaaca cr racia-l ia-iaara r'r: rar 

said sscaica c±irar- seren 3. . . 



-751- 



AITACHMEIT B 

Making Our Schools 
Safer for Learning 

The Report of the 

Boston Commission on Safe 

Public Schools 

November 1983 

RECOMMENDATION SIX 
Bus Monitors 

We recommend that adult monitors be placed on school 
buses, with priority being given to those runs on vjkich there is 
a record of misbehavior and lack of safety. 

Throughout the open hearings we were told that the conduct of 
some students made the buses and the bus stops unsafe. Just over 
half the high school students interviewed said the buses and the 
MBTA stations they used were 'unsafe or somewhat unsafe." Tnese 
figures varied by school from one-third of the students to almost 
three-quarters. The Qtywide Parents Coundi looked at transpor- 
tation problems in two districts for a six month period and fovmd 
that 139 offenses had been recorded, including failure to remain 
seated, refusal to obey the bus driver, and fighting. 

There seems to be general agreementithat it is physically impossi- 
ble, nor should it be expected, for bxiS drivers to maintain order while 
they are operating a vehicle. For several years until 19S0, Lhere were 
adult monitors on many of the buses. We have heard strong urging 
that the b\js monitors be reinstated, but with steps taken to overcome 
some of the problems that existed in the past. These were lad^ of ac- 
countability; poor screening of applicants; faiiia^ to cany out in- 
structions, and in some instances undesirable ways of relating to 
students. 

Holding Mcnitors Accountable 

The monitors should be carefully selected, well supervised, and 
held accoimtable for being at their assigned bus stops and remaining 
with the bus until the end of its nm. Bus safety should be viewed ex- 
actly the same as behavior in a classroom and communicaticn bet- 
ween btis monitors and school administrators should be a routine 
matter. 

The m.onitors should be held accountable for maintaining order on 
the buses and for reporting violations of the Code of Discipline to 
school administrators or their designee*! i'.'ho should routinely be pre- 
sent at the loading and unloading of buses. Orientation of monitors 
and periodic supervisor^/ meetings should be arranged. 

Bus monitoring is a cosdy program, but we believe it is important 
as a way of protecting children as well as beginning and ending the 
school day in a calm atmosphere. It is not essential that there be a 
m.onitor on ever/ bus run. The problems are more severe at the mid- 
dle rnd high school levels. 



_7C0_ 



,^^ ' "r.ica>!Eii c 



services 

ARA TRAjNSPORTATION, Inc. 

SSO CAtMTiS MSWWAV / MATTAPAK MASAC-USeTTS 0324 / 417-t98-C7S3 



Br. Arthur Gilberr 
Boscoa School Cosoittes 
Court Scre«t 
Boston, 2iass. 



Kazch 9. 1984 



Dear Arthur: 

I have esclosed copies o£ incident reports froa all (3) teraisals fros. sab. 27th 
to March 9, 1984. These reports will be coming to you on a weekly basis. 

I hope that the School Separtnent viU strongly consider bos nonitors on those 
routes that have a definite student/safety problem. The cost o£ the nonitors 
could possibly offset the cost of vehicle danage, such as broken g^^-^^s, torn 
seats, grafitti and personal injury. 

Thank you for your continued cooperation. _ 




David r . Schoenbeck 
ST? Directar-Bostcn 



cc: Ms. Hg-Cityvide Parents Council 

M. Seanedy-A2A Director of Operations 
3. Sorrls-ASA Sastem Area ST? Director 
W. Heltan-3T? Supervisor laadville 
J. Saowden-ST? Supervisor Cote 
J. McCarthy- ST? Supervisor Sayside 
ASA Trans. Inc. Safety Cannittee 



A I.v^cn <a A-A C'9rv«cn. ,tc. 



-753- 



ATTACHMENT D 



LISTDC OF INCTDEITrS 
CN RUSSEUL SCKCOL BUS 

Ri^jortsd by Russell School Parent 



1. Occofaer 13, 1983 



Cna child bitrsn en chs am by anochsr; 
cwo childran hit by ot±er childran 

Observed by adult 



2. Octcber 14, 1983 One kirdersartaner slanped arotfcer because 

"he wculcn"'c move ovar^' 



3. Nbvesser 3, 1983 



4. Nov 3, 1983 



5. Dace inscrrwn 



6. January 27, 1984 



^served by adult; childran sitting 3 per 
seaz - bus excrasely crowded chat csy 

^iove-toenticned kirdergartaner had his 
£ace scr?tch/?d (badly enct:^ so that 
several scars vrere visible Che next ;«e^) 
stpposedly because snothgr child couldn't 
gee into seat 

ACtach net cbser^ed; princinal, teachers, 
parent, ether adults saw the scratches 

Bus, 'f unknown ^.-..paissed btis stop at Bird 
Street and Celisfaia Road; young childran 
standing in seats, leaning out vdndcws and 
screaning profanities at children waiting 
for b\js ^604; cba verbal assault was 
directed at girls, not boys 

observed by several adults 

A 4th and 5ch grader chraataned "to kill" 
another yovnger child when Chay all got 
off Che bus; the younger child was crying 
inccntro llafa iy 

ofaser*/ed by adult 

Bus ;if€04 arri-'Ted at cha Russell with 
apprcxiaately 15 seats ripped cix and 
jagged oetal protruding. 

Observed by taachars. Students ac cha 

Deartxim school earlier ch-at cay had 
apparently gene en scce kind cf rscrage 
(was cha hus driver expected co control 
Chis kird o£ ber-avicr and also dri^"e che 
bv:s?) ; staff at ch-a Russell cock it cpcn 
che=:selves co arranse for anochsr bus. 



— / n4— 



7. Fei3rjsr7 10, 1?S4 Isc grader scrvck by kij^dsrgarcaner. 



8. Fejrja=7 12, 1984 



9. s^sr\2srj 14, 1984 



10. February 27, 1934 



Ncc cbsar'/ed; ccafirred by bcch scjdsnrs 

?''f)Jo->^ s- ;;-r'a^«a-r cxc Isc c££ bxis 5C hsr 
seep; chs a3t±sr had to chase bus co cecr 
SCOT. Iba child sits ia Isc cr 2rd rrw 
acd* '^-3-M "big Isids "^culca'c lac C^ar) off 
bt:s." Sba vas doc aslesn. 

Aisle full of scarding childran; childran 
scacdins in tesrz. 

Cbsarvisd by adulcs as bus CTHveled u? 
Coluaia read snproaching bus seep. 

Eeafsnicg noise as doors vera cpecsd 
(several cbildrss ccssiscecrly cccalaiz of 
usbearable coise en b:s) . 

A. iviadergarcanar punched in scccach, en 
bus 



3. 3rd grader held dc-.-n by others en 
floor of buSj^ • 

C. Isc grsder scrjck, en bus 

D. Money scolen frea anccher Isc grader, 
ca bus 



11. Mareh 19, 19S4 



tfcc ofaser'.'ed by adults other than ciis 
dri'.'Hr; all ftier childrsi cerreccrsce 
scery. 

GnJdran ~;''^^"3 en the ):^:s; 
icj-ritaL^Mf : ■ or- tsld her Ecther than she had 
been leLeked in the head bv one cf the 
fighting childran, despita the face th-ac 
she vias sitting in her assigned seac. 



-"^-c. 



Till- SCIIOOI i:uMMI! Il-I <)\ MH cnvornoGioN 



TO: Ms, Judith C. TSiylor 

Bureau of ESgual Edudational Ctocortunity 

TSCAi Pobert S. PeterkiftvS&eputy Super in tasdent 
School Operations\|\ V 

RE: Response to Recoirarendation #4 

DATE: April 10, 1984 

Dear Ms. Taylor/ 

Arthur Gilbert, Director of Transportation, has asked me to 
respond to the 4th reconmendation listed in your letter to him dated 
March 28, 1984. 

Attached you will find a copy of our proposal corcemino Wiiz 
issv* . 

1/ I ciT l><? of futtliet assistance, please feel free to r?^\\ me at 
726-6200 X 5330. 

R£?/lhc 

attachment 

xc: John Cbakley 
Arthur Gilbert 



-756- 



APPENDIX VI 
/ 



THE SCHOOL GOI/.MITTEE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON 




n )s I (IN* PUBLIC fCHOOi; 

t -HC<?i Or'?P.;-7lC--;! 



hECRANDCM 



To: John Csakley, Senior Officer, rep artae nt of lapleasacation 

From: Robert S. Peteridn, Deputy Sv^erintendent/School Operations y^, 

Re: Bus Safety Proposal 

i:Bte: March 6, 1984 

As I read Che transcript of budget hearings, review telephone legs and 
ircident logs, I h^ave been made aware of the extrese priority points placed on 
transportation safety and discipline. In early February Ben Spratling and I 
did a preliainary, hence incocpiete, analysis of the potential cost of several 
options for bus safety for next year. Please xmderstand th^t va are now 
ccnnitted to the provision of seme type of bus safety prograa in the Boston 
Public Scteols; the persistent coaplaints and very real incidents do not 
enable us to continue o\ic stance agaijist bus rxxitcrs, be they part of other 
options or othervjise. 

Finally , tiie recent difficulty vith the bus drivers, side-cuts, h.igh 
absenteeism and failure to nsi routes, h-as caused vis significant concern and 
has desmstratsd the need for school personnel to assist in this area. 



OPTICAS ; 
1. 



Several parents* groups have requested th^t ve pLsca "Step" signs eta 
the buses vhich automatically swirig cut into traffic (oiiii lii« a 
railroad step sign) '-hen tis essrgency lights are flashing. I hsva 
checked with the Transpcrtaticn liiit of the Departrent of 




be noted that these signs say not increase the legal lisbility 
recalcitrsnt drivers. 

2. >bst informal analyses indicate th.at the issue of safety en buses is. 

aost prevalent at the elasentary and ndddle school levels. 'We are 
not presently able to provide acre tr.an informal analyses, st^^en^ 
sane gaps in ccccLnLcation azang dri""/ar3, parsnts and schxil staff 
— acre en trls later. 

-757- 



To: John Coakley, Senior Officer >!ar=h 6, 1984 

- 2 - 

2. (Cont'd.) 

It is ny opinion that high school nsis do not require bxa nmitors 
and that safety and discipline issues can be handled by the 
Department of Safety Services. ELeasentary and niddle school ru^ 
are those vhere parents and ccnsamity people ccccplain of students 
hanging out of windows, jisping aroucid and/or craaclng other safety 
hazards. 

3. Ccfflcnunity Superintendents coxild be provided with a £jnd from which 
they would hire bus oonitors to handle specific safety and/or 
discipline problems. Tt^ idea here is not to have persanant bus 
nonitors on every rua but to give Cconunity Superi n te nd ents the 
flexibility of hiring and assigning bus ajcnitors to problecsatic 
buses. Bus nonitors would not be assured of continuous esploycent 
as monitors but could be drawn from building personnel, district 
persoimel or the ccmrunity. In this fashion the Transportation Unit 
could be asked to do an analysis of troubled bvis runs and we cculd 
assign perhaps half of the total necessary for bus nxmitors on every 
bus to the CcnxEunity Superintendents. The fraction could be 
iTiCreased or decreased according to the number of troubled bus runs. 

4. This option is a variation of nuiber thrae. A discrete fund wcidd 
be assigned to the Principal in sane proportion of the nusier of 

• buses at the elementary and middle school level. The Principal 
would hire an assigned bus monitor drawn froa the faculty or staff, 
parents and/or ccccrmty people for troubled bus nns. 

The cost of thz above options could range from approxisately $315, COO to 
$150,000 for the entire systaa- If we acc^t this option, the Ccoimnicy 
Superintendents or Principals would eien be able to respond directly to 
specific safety or discipline issues on a consistent basis and to have the 
Bcnitors deal with the probleas on the bus in school by contact with parents. 

Ifcc-ithstanding all of the above budgetary itsas and options, we need to 
supplecent an enh.anced progran of safety for buses. This would include: 

1. An imderstandirg of Boston Public School staff's rols in the 

training of bus drivers including: 

a. increasing drivers * xrvderstanding of a simplified Cods of 
Discinline, 

b. clarification of bt:s drivers' role in denying students bearding 
of buses, 

c. process for ccraamicaticn of Boston Public Schools' rasoluticn 
of discipline issues to both bus drivers and to the bus ccopany, 

d. process for drivers' reporting of bvis incidents to both schcoi 
staff and bus cccpany, 

e. clarified procsduras for bus drivers to use in case of 
emergency or illness of sradents wh^le riding buses, 

f . s\i32ary of driver training as it relates to student safaty arji 
discipline . 



-i5c- 



To: Jchn Coakley, Senior Officer March 6, 1984 

- 3 - 



2. JDore strict and understandable (short) version o£ the Cede of 
Discipline specifically designed to be posted en buses; 

3. increased responsibility for Principals in the area of bus safety 
and discipline; 

A. chaises in the Code of Discipline to clearly specify procedures 
allowing sxispension and/or expvilsion of stxadents f rcca biases for 
unruly bdnavicr, and an 

5. enhanced media cainpaign on bus safety. 

I xmderstand that this report is short and incoEolete; the first section vas 
drafted for the budget process. I should like to discuss the entire report 
for final resolution with you,. Ron Spratling, Arthur Gilbert and appropriate 
Transportation Ihit staff as soon as possible. 

If you have any questions please call me. 

Thank you for your continued cooperation. 



?S?/jMc 

cpy: Superintendent Robert R. Spillane 

2icl. 



-759- 



THE SCHOOL GOI/.l/.in F.^ Of IHE CIIY OF BOSTOI' 




ATTACHMENT 1 



SCHOOL BUS BEHAVIOR 



Pupils are entitled to ride as long as they conduct themselves 
properly and obey the following regulations: 

1. Remain seated while bus is in notion. 

2. Keep hands, feet and head inside the bus. 

3. Opening and closing windows and doors is not allowed 
except by the driver. 

'4. Riders MUST NOT play with bus or any of its equipment. 

5. Riders may be asked to pay if they damage bus equipment. 

6. Engage in quiet talk. 

7. Keep bocks, packages, coats and objects out of the aisle. 

8. Do not tlirow anything out of the bus windows, 

9. In case of a road emergency, children are to remain on th: 
bus unless requested to leave by the driver of the bus. '" 

10. Smoking is never allowed on the bus. 

11. Pupils who refuse to obey promptly the directions of the 
driver, or refuse to obey regulations after discussion 
with the principal and parents, GIVE UP THZJR RIGH TS "^O 
RIDE ON THE BUS. ~~~" ' ^-' 



-■7^0- 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE 



-761- 



-762- 



1 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE 



MONITORING OBJECTIVE; 

I. To review, on a semi-annual basis, a report of 

suspensions and expulsions at each school, with the 
nature of the offense, the grade, race and sex of the 
students affected, and the length of time for each 
Suspension. 

question ; 

Suspension statistics for schools at all levels for the 
1982-1983 school year were analyzed in the February 1984 
Department of Education report to identify those schools 
that had high and racially disproportionate suspension 
rates, as well as those schools that had even and racially 
proportionate suspension rates. Which Boston Public Schools 
in the first semester of 1983-1984 have; 



I 



a) 
b) 



c) 



significant disproportionate suspensions by race? 

high suspension rates as compared to other Boston 

schools? 

low suspension rates as compared to other Boston 

schools? 



PROCESS ; 

Suspension statistics for the first semester of the 1983- 
1984 school year were analyzed and compared with suspension 
statistics of the 1982-1983 school year. It is our purpose 
to analyze the progress made by previously cited schools » 
and to identify any other schools with high and racially 
disproportionate suspension rates that were not previously 
cited . 

FINDINGS: 



Overall, when comparing the first semester of 1983-84 to the 
first semester of 1982-83, Boston was able to reduce its 
suspensions by 849, possibly indicating increasea efforts 
systemwide to use suspension only as a last resort and to 
increase use of alternatives to suspension. This is a 
substantial improvement. However, there is still a 
significant number of schools that have high and/or racially 



-763- 



disproportionate suspension rates. 



At the high school level, Charlestown High continued to have 
the highest suspension rate , (e .g . , 0. 27 - arrived at by 
dividing the total number of suspensions by the total 
student population), although its suspension rate has been 
significantly reduced to about 40% of last year's rate. 
English High, which last year had the second highest 
suspension rate, has also considerably lowered its rate, 
while Brighton High and Jamaica Plain High have noticeably 
increased their suspension rates. 

Boston Latin School continued to suspend Black students at 
two and one-half times the expected rate^ but there were 
only 18 suspensions during the first semester. Charlestown, 
Brighton and East Boston High Schools continued to suspend 
Black students at a disproportionately high rate. Also, the 
suspension rate for Black students at Boston Technical High 
significantly increased to be disproportionately high. Of 
those schools that had disproportionate suspension rates for 
Black students last year, only the Umana School had a 
suspension rate that dropped. (See Appendix) 

Suspensions for White students at Jamaica Plain High and 
Burke High Schools continued to be disproportionately low. 
The rate of suspension for White students dropped at 
Brighton, Charlestown and Boston Technical High Schools to 
be significantly low, while Hyde Park, Dorchester, Boston 
and Copley Square High Schools did not suspend any White 
students. The suspension rates for White students at 
Madison Park High and the Umana School rose to be more 
proportionate, while suspensions for White students at West 
Roxbury High rose to be disproportionately high. Finally, 
Burke High suspended Hispanic students at twice the expected 
rate . 

At the middle school level, the Edwards Middle, which had 
the highest suspension rate in 1982-1983, reduced its 
suspensions to one-fourth of last year's rate. The Mackey, 
Cheverus, Timilty and Curley Middle Schools all dramatically 



•'•The expected rate is arrived at by dividing the percent of 

suspensions for a particular racial group by the percent of 

students of that racial group in the school. 1.00 would indicate 

that students of a particular racial group are suspended at 

exactly the rate that their proportion of total enrollment would 

oredict, "//hile 2. DO wou],d , ind,icate suspensions at double the 
expected rate, ana .d, at naif tne expectea race. 



-76 i;- 



increased their suspension rates, and the Roosevelt Middle 
continued to have a high suspension rate. The Michelangelo 
Middle and Gavin Middle significantly reduced their 
previously high suspension rates. All schools cited last 
year for suspending Black students at a disproportionately 
high rate (Roosevelt, Michelangelo, Gavin and Thompson 
Middle Schools) dropped to more proportionate suspension 
rates, while the Edison, Irving and Edwards Middle Schools 
significantly increased their suspension rates for Black 
students. 

At the elementary school level, the McKay and Eliot 
Elementary Schools continued to have high suspension rates, 
while the Beethoven and Manning Elementary Schools increases 
merited on-site monitoring. And Black students at th Tobin, 
Manning, Eliot and Prescott Elementary Schools were 
suspended at more than twice the expected rate. 

Those schools with high and racially disproportionate 
suspension rates will continue to receive on-site 
monitoring. Statistical analysis will continue to be 
completed as suspension statistics are compiled. In 
addition, future statistical analysis will include examining 
suspension records of those schools that employ in-school 
suspension programs. 



MONITORING OBJECTIVES: 



II. To monitor on site, if necessary, schools in which 

there are apparent patterns of inequitable application 
of the Code of Discipline. 

QUESTION : Ten schools were monitored during the fall 

monitoring period to identify school factors 
that may contribute to high and racially 
disproportionate suspension rates. These 
factors included the small numbers of Black 
3nd Hispanic administrators at some schools, 
conf rontative approaches to behavior 
management by some teachers, lack of adequate 
support services and alternatives to 
Suspension for students who are discipline 
problems, a low level of parental involvement, 
lack of adequate classroom materials, and most 
importantly, a small group of students in each 
School who continually disrupt the educational 
environment. What steps has Boston taken to 



-765- 



identify solutions for these problems? What 
additional school factors contribute to the 
above-identified suspension rates? 



PROCESS: 



Thirteen schools that had high and racially disproportionate 
suspension rates were visited - Charlestown High, Boston 
Latin, English High, East Boston High, Mario Umana Harbor 
School, Jamaica Plain High, Edwards Middle, Gavin Middle, 
Michelangelo Middle, Curley Middle, Roosevelt Middle, Eliot 
Elementary and McKay Elementary. At these schools, 
administrators and teachers were interviewed about causes 
for respective suspension rates. In addition, a response to 
the recommendations in Report No. 2, Boston School 
Desegregation was received by the monitor from Boston. (See 
Appendix) . 

FINDINGS: 



Some progress has been made in addressing underlying causes 
of discipline problems. These efforts have been initiated 
in large part through the Department of School Operations. 

First, the Report No. 2 student discipline section 
recommended an increase in Black and Hispanic administrators 
because of the need for positive Black and Hispanic role 
models for Black and Hispanic students. In Boston's 
response to the report, it was noted that the appointments 
this school year of 4 Hispanic assistant headmasters, 2 
Black assistant headmasters and 1 Black headmaster have 
significantly improved student discipline and school 
climates at those schools. In addition, the monitor 
observed that recent appointments of Black headmasters at 
Jamaica Plain High and the Curley Middle, and of Black 
assistant headmasters at East Boston High and Gavin Middle, 
have had a positive impact on student discipline and school 
climate . 

However, the lack of Black or Hispanic administrators at the 
Roosevelt Middle could be a factor in their high and 
disproportionate suspension rate of Black students. In 
addition, administrators at the Umana School, Gavin Middle 
and Eliot Elementary all noted that the small number of 
Black and Hispanic faculty at their schools last year 
resulted in increased student discipline problems for some 
Black and Hispanic stjdents. Additional Black faculty at 
the Gavin Middle and Eliot Elementary have had a positive 
impact on student discipline; the Umana School still lacks 
adequate numbers of Black regular education teachers. 



-765- 



The second recommendation in the Report No. 2 student 
discipline section was in-service training for all schools 
on non-confrontation approaches to behavior management. The 
Department of School Operations has since proposed the 
creation of "2 teams of Boston teachers proficient in 
'Positive Approaches to Discipline and Reality Therapy*," 
based upon the Schools Without Failure approach to student 
discipline. "These teams would establish residency in 
schools for a period of 2 weeks to a 2 months to determine a 
plan for the improvement of student discipline and to teach 
intervention techniques." The estimated number of schools 
to be served in 1984-1985 is 40 to 50, with an emphasis on 
elementary and middle schools. 

This plan, if enacted, would be a highly innovative approach 
to behavior management training and has the potential of not 
only training staff in non-confrontation approaches to 
student discipline, but also examining the constructiveness 
of a school's discipline policy and approach. A general in- 
service session on non-confrontation approaches to 
discipline is also proposed for all schools at the beginning 
of the year. 

Third, adequate textbooks and materials in every school were 
recommended in the previous monitoring report. Ample 
classroom material is key to challenging and motivating 
students and thus, reducing discipline problems. The 
Department of School Operations responded that additional 
funds have been made available in the proposed FY' 85 budget 
to provide all schools with these materials; however, this 
is contingent upon the budget being approved at its 
requested funding level. 

Fourth, the Edwards Middle, Curley Middle, Gavin Middle and 
Eliot Elementary all reported increased parent 
involvement. These school administrations have given 
special attention to parent outreach, including home visits, 
and have been rewarded by parent cooperation in discipline 
efforts. However, despite efforts by the Department of 
School Operations and the City-wide Parents Council to 
include parents on planning councils through the School- 
Based Management Program, Boston School Improvement Program 
and school parent councils, parental involvement continued 
to be cited by many school administrators as an obstacle to 
resolving student discipline problems. Hign school 
administrators in particular emphasized the need for more 
effective parent outreach programs. 



-767- 



Fifth, the previous monitoring report recommended abolishing 
the policy of inter-district disciplinary transfers (in 
which a student is transferred to another school for 
disciplinary purposes without the receiving school receiving 
that student's disciplinary record.) Deputy Superintendent 
Peterkin agreed that there is a need to monitor more closely 
these transfers and agreed to limit each school to one such 
transfer per school year. However, he will continue to 
"discreetly use" inter-district disciplinary transfers, for 
he believes that in some situations students who are given a 
fresh start at another school can be successful. He has 
"worked with community superintendents and headmasters to 
insure greater coordination and communication" of this 
process. Given these concerns and restrictions, this policy 
can be constructive, especially with the increase in 
available alternative high school programs. 

A sixth recommendation was that each school develop a 
program of remediation for students who are repeating 
grades; these students who are academically frustrated often 
times became discipline problems. Boston has developed a 
promotional policy and graduation requirements for the first 
and ninth grades next year. Most administrators expressed 
fears that these new promotional policies, without 
corresponding academic changes, will "glut" the ninth grade 
with repeaters (currently, in most schools, approximately 
25% of the ninth graders are repeaters), increase students' 
academic frustrations, and exacerbate already existing 
discipline problems. Deputy Superintendent Lancaster is 
currently developing remediation opportunities for students 
so that "repeating grades is not their only option." The 
new remediation opportunities should anticipate and reflect 
the numbers of students who may not meet the new promotion 
requirements . 

Seventh, increased support services in schools were 
recommended to aid those students whose discipline problems 
stem from academic and personal problems. The Boston Huma" 
Services Collaborative, a collaborative of Boston human 
service agencies wishing to coordinate support services to 
Boston schools, was formed this year. This collaborative 
has targeted 17 schools in which to pilot coordinated 
academic and social services for next year. This effort 
should help designated schools in delivering a wider range 
of services to students experiencing discipline problems. 
Based upon the success of the program and available 
resources, the program will be expanded the following 
year . 






Last, the most critical reason identified in the previous 
monitoring report for existing discipline problems was the 
small number of students in all schools who were described 
as habitual offenders of school rules and habitual non- 
attenders. Given limited resources and support services, 
the schools cannot serve these students. This belief was 
supported when suspension statistics for the first semester 
of 1983-1984 were examined. At Charlestown High, 33 
students accounted for 50% of the total suspensions, 5 
students accounted for 49% of the suspensions at McKay 
Elementary, 11 students accounted for 24% of the suspensions 
at English High and 8 students accounted for 25% of the 
suspensions at Curley Middle. These students who are being 
suspended multiple times are most likely not having their 
academic or behavioral needs met, and are continually 
disrupting the education of other students. 

All schools visited cited the need for alternative schools 
in which to place these students. Director of Alternative 
Programs Smith, has established 3 new alternative programs 
in the past 2 years — Fenway School (English High), Boston 
Prep and New Horizons Academy (King Middle). These are 
welcome additions to existing alternative high and middle 
school programs, such as Another Course to College, School- 
Within-School (South Boston High), Log School (Cleveland 
Middle) and Home Base School (Madison Park High). These 
schools serve habitual non-attenders and habitual offenders 
of school rules in an intimate, supportive environment that 
also provides intensive basic and some college preparatory 
skills (see February 1984 Volume II Safety and Security 
report for additional information on these schools.) 

In a short period of time, these schools have demonstrated 
success in motivating some students previously considered 
"marginal" (because of academic, behavioral and attendance 
problems). Next year, English High will be restructured 
into 4 schools based upon the school-within-school concept. 
The Department of School Operations has also indicated that 
this office will concentrate next year on creating 
additional alternative programs at the middle school 
level. The continued creation of alternative school 
programs, especially on the middle and high school levels, 
is essential to the improvement of student discipline in all 
schools . 

In general, as stated in the previous monitoring report, the 
tone set by the school administration greatly determines the 
tone of the school and, consequently, of student 
discipline. New headmasters or assistant headmasters have 
been appointed in the last 2 years at all of the monitored 



-769- 



schools. Administrators who have created sound educational 
programs that address students' academic needs, who have 
established a discipline policy where expectations and 
consequences are clear and alternatives to suspensions 
exist, who have developed academic and counseling support 
services, who have demanded high expectations of teachers 
and a high level of parent involvement, and who have high 
visibility in the building and exhibit strong leadership, 
have experienced the most success in resolving student 
discipline problems, 

QUESTIONS ; 

This past year, the Department of School Operations has 
worked to systematize discipline procedures in all schools, 
including accuracy in reporting suspensions, development of 
school-based rules and encouraging the use of alternatives 
to suspension. There continued to be, however, widespread 
inconsistencies in the administration of the Code of 
Discipline and possible inaccurate reporting of suspensions 
by some schools. Is the Code of Discipline being 
consistently enforced, especially regarding suspension rates 
and alternatives to suspensions? 

FINDINGS: 



There did appear to be some improvement in the consistent 
administration of the Code of Discipline. Schools that have 
in the past suspended high numbers of students, like 
Charlestown High and Edwards Middle, have been told by the 
Department of School Operations to reduce their suspension 
rates; this is reflected in suspension rates for 1983- 
1984. Some of these schools are now developing alternatives 
to suspension. (See individual school reports). 

Administrators at some schools, most notably Charlestown 
High, complained that the pressure to lower their suspension 
rates, coupled with few placements in alternative school 
programs and the lack of resources to develop alternatives, 
has thwarted their efforts to establish an orderly and 
controlled environment. Without proper alternatives, they 
argued, suspension as a disciplinary measure must be used 
frequently and consistently. 

However, suspension, as defined by the Code of Discipline, 
should only be used as a last resort. School administrators 
should be able to provide their students with a safe and 
orderly learning environment. Rather than continually 
resort to suspension as a disciplinary consequence for rules 
infractions, schools need to continue to develop 



-770- 



alternatives to suspension (for example, detention, parent 
conference, restitution, counseling, remedial tutoring, in- 
school suspension) and to develop sound educational 
programs. Those school administrators who feel inhibited by 
the Code of Discipline might want to observe the 
constructive changes in discipline policies at the Gavin and 
Edwards Middle Schools. 

Second, the previous monitoring report stated that the 
lengthy and cumbersome Code of Discipline could lead to 
misinterpretation by administrators and students and thus 
cause inconsistencies in the administration of discipline. 
It was recommended that the Code be revised to a shorter and 
more understandable version. The Department of School 
Operations and the Boston School Committee's subcommittee on 
student safety are currently reviewing and revising the Code 
and will distribute a short version of the Code to students 
at the beginning of next school year. This should help 
students and administrators better understand school rules 
and student responsibilities in the coming year. This will 
help to increase consistency in administering discipline 
within the spirit and guidelines of the Code. 

Third, the Department of School Operations is considering 
the possibility of reviewing school-based rules in the 
spring (instead of in the fall) and issuing them at the 
beginning of the year. This office has also recommended 
that the duties of the review committee for school-based 
rules be expanded to include a review of school climate and 
discipline problems. At the high school level, this 
committee would meet regularly with the newly forming 
Communication Boards. While this proposal could lead to 
increased involvement and cooperation among students, 
parents, faculty and administrators, it must be noted that 
many review committees this year had poor representation, 
sparse attendance and little decision making power. The 
effectiveness of these committees will depend in large part 
on the administrator's commitment to this democratic 
process . 

Fourth, closer monitoring by the Department of School 
Operations and the Deparment of Safety and Security does 
seem to have encouraged more consistent reporting of 
suspensions, although this observation cannot be easily 
verified. Deputy Superintendent Peterkin does admit that 
some administrators send students home to "cool off" without 
recording it as a suspension, using the rationale that "it 
is a tool to reduce conflict and tension ... and allows 
students an ability to rebound without penalty." Dr. 
Peterkin does give the assurance, though, that headmasters 



-771- 



and principals have been informed that all suspensions must 
be recorded and reported. 

Fifth, The Department of School Operations has recommended 
that an Oversight Committee be established in each district 
and at a city-wide level. These committees would insure 
consistent city-wide implementation of discipline policies, 
examine controversial disciplinary matters, and review 
consistent application of current rules. This could be an 
effective body in establishing constructive school 
discipline policies and procedures. 

Most importantly, Boston, in a draft response to the Safe 
Schools Commission Report, has proposed several 
modifications to Boston's overall safety and security 
plan. (See Appendix) Specific proposals already mentioned 
in this report — the behavior management teams, Boston 
Human Services Collaborative, alternative schools 
development plan, revision of the Code of Discipline, review 
committees in each school and Oversight Committees in each 
district — are key components of this plan. The plan, if 
enacted and given proper funding and administrative support, 
could be instrumental in establishing constructive and 
uniform city-wide discipline policies. However, it must be 
noted that these proposals are still in a formative stage 
and have not yet been assured proper funding for next year. 
Future monitoring will examine the progress of approval and 
implementation of this plan. 

QUESTION: 



Of those schools identified in the first 2 monitoring 
reports as having either high suspension rates or 
significant disproportionate suspensions by race, what steps 
is Boston taking to identify causes for these problems and 
to identify solutions? Can the success of any of these 
solutions be documented? What alternatives could these 
schools employ? 

PROCESS: 



Thirteen schools that had high and/or disproportionate 
suspensions by race were monitored on- site. Visits to four 
schools — Charlestown High, Boston Latin, English High and 
Edwards Middle — were follow-up visits to ascertain what 
success, if any, that newly appointed administrators and 
programs implemented in the fall have had on improving 
discipline problems within each school. Monitoring at these 
schools consisted of interviews with the headmaster and 
assistant headmaster. 



-772- 



The following 9 schools were visited for the first time; 



East Boston High School 
Mario Uraana Harbor School 
Jamaica Plain High School 
Gavin Middle School 
Michaelangleo Middle School 



Curley Middle School 
Roosevelt Middle School 
Eliot Elementary School 
McKay Elementary School 



Visits included interviews with administrators and teachers, 
and in some schools, students. These schools were visited 
to determine school factors (for example, school climate, 
staff attitudes and disciplinary procedures) that 
contributed to the suspension rates. 

FINDINGS: 



CHARLESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

Last school year, Charlestown High School had the highest 
suspension rate in the system because of a policy of 
uspending students who cut classes, were tardy or disrupted 
the classroom without first exploring all alternatives to 
suspension. New programs such as the Teacher Advisory 
Program (TAP) and a counseling program for students 
returning from suspension, along with the assignment of a 
new Hispanic assistant headmaster, have helped to address 
existing discipline problems. 

The follow-up visit revealed that programmatic and 
discipline policy changes have significantly improved the 
administration of discipline and lowered the suspension 
rate. Administrators attributed these improvements to 
greater parent-school cooperation and to student 
participation in the TAP, counseling and work/study 
programs. Next year, the administration plans a ninth grade 
cluster program of intensive study in basic skills and study 
skills in order to address the present 6.3 average reading 
level of incoming ninth graders. The school also was the 
first high school to implement a Communication Board (see 
student organizations report) which focuses on improving 
school climate. Finally, the presence of Assistant 
Headmaster Vasquez has helped direct discipline policies 
toward preventing and correcting disruptive behavior rather 
than solely punishing behavior. He has been instrumental in 
building sound educational programs and academic and 
counseling support services. 

However, administrators noted that lack of staff stability, 
difficulties in securing placements for students in 



-773- 



alternative programs, and the lengthy process of referring 
students to both special education and alternative programs 
have all hindered their efforts to establish an orderly 
learning environment. The school needs to continue to 
develop alternatives to suspension (possibly an in-school 
suspension program or a school-within-school ) while 
establishing more formal linkages to alternative programs, 
specifically Boston Prep. 

BOSTON LATIN SCHOOL 

Last year, Boston Latin School suspended Black students 2 
1/2 times the expected rate (see Special Desegregation 
Issues report in the Report No. 2 , Boston School 
Desegregation report). A Black Assistant Headmaster, Mr. 
Leonard, was appointed to identify causes for this rate and 
to implement program changes. 

At a follow-up interview, Headmaster Contompassis noted that 
Assistant Headmaster Leonard had created significant changes 
in the administration of discipline. Mr. Leonard has 
accelerated the referral process for students with 
discipline problems, increased parent participation in this 
process, and built a rapport with many of the younger Black 
students. His continuous presence in the halls has diffused 
potential discipline problems. However, it was noted that 
Boston Latin School continued to suspend Black students at 2 
1/2 times the expected rate (although there were only 18 
suspensions in the first semester). This could stem, as 
Headmaster Contompassis noted, from the need for additional 
academic and counseling support services and the 
confrontational approach to behavior management by some 
teachers . 

ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 

Last year, English High had the second highest suspension 
rate in the system because of the difficulty of monitoring 
the building and high teacher absenteeism. The appointment 
of 2 Black administrators and the creation of the Fenway 
School and the ninth grade cluster program were all cited as 
attempts to address the overwhelming discipline problems. 
It was recommended in the previous monitoring report that 
additional alternative programs be created to establish a 
more manaaeable environment. 



-77^ 



This year, Alternative Schools Director Smith has planned a 
restructuring of English High into 4 smaller schools — 
Cluster Program, Traditional Program, Fenway Program and 
Magnet Arts Program — based on "the school-within-school" 
concept, which offers the advantages of a small school 
environment, a demanding basic skills/college preparatory 
curriculum, and more program options to students. This 
structure should foster a more manageable school environment 
and a sense of programmatic identity for students. 

EDWARDS MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Last year, the Edwards Middle had the highest suspension 
rate for middle schools. A new Black Headmaster, Mr. 
Thomas, was appointed this year, and his fair approach to 
discipline was viewed by staff and students as a factor in 
bringing order to the school. 

The follow-up visit revealed that alternatives to 
suspension, created since September, have greatly aided in 
the administration of discipline and in lowering the 
suspension rate. A Planning Center has been established 
where a student may be sent for a time range of 1 period up 
to several days. Parent conferences and home visits are 
regularly held. Remedial math classes have been created for 
those students performing below grade level. And clear 
behavioral and academic expectations have been given to over 
age, repeating students. This school will continue to be 
monitored, though, because it has suspended Black students 
at twice the expected rate. 

EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 



East Boston High was cited as having suspended Black 
students at twice the expected rate last year, although the 
overall suspension rate was very low. Headmaster Poto 
stared that the reason for this rate was that Black students 
had more social and economic problems than the Italian 
students, and therefore had proportionately more discipline 
problems . 

Discipline procedures at the school require a high degree of 
teacher involvement, parent contact and administrative 
communication. Students and parents receive written notice 
of any disciplinary consequences given to a student. The 
administrative philosophy towards discipline is one of 
"prevention and communication" rather than only 
punishment. A school ysychologist , a remedial reading 
program and a work/study program all contribute to 
prevention of discipline problems. The administration is 



-775- 



also considering including basic skills and study skills in 
its curriculum for next year to address the students' lack 
of basic skills and corresponding discipline problems. An 
in-school suspension program is also being considered. 

However, few support services exist in the school. In 
addition, most Black students are reluctant to go to human 
service agencies in East Boston. This could be a 
contributing factor to the disproportionate suspension rate 
of Black students. The school should consider increased 
counseling services in school and linkages with social 
service agencies in the neighborhoods of attending Black 
students . 

JAMAICA PLAIN HIGH SCHOOL 

Jamaica Plain High had the third highest suspension rate in 
1982-1983 and suspended Black students at a significantly 
higher rate than White students. Headmaster Johnson cited 
the large turnover in staff 2 years ago and the resulting 
lack of staff cohesion last year as the reason for these 
rates. 

Monitoring revealed that there is a wide range of support 
services available for student referral, including a teen 
parenting program, a school volunteers peer tutorial 
program, a theatre/arts program and a Simmons College 
tutorial program. The Private Industry Council places a 
large number of students in jobs and has a follow-up 
component that ensures a high success rate. The school also 
employs other alternatives to suspension, including parent 
contact, detention, extra assignments and an in-school 
suspension program, where students receive remedial academic 
assistance and counseling in an isolated classroom. These 
support services, alternatives to suspension, and recent 
staff stability will hopefully improve the suspension rates. 

MARIO UMANA HARBOR SCHOOL 

The Mario Umana Harbor School suspended Black students at a 
significantly higher rate than White students in 1982- 
1983. Poor teacher attendance, lack of security officers, 
lack of alternative programs for student referral, and the 
reluctance of Black students to use social service agencies 
in East Boston were all cited as reasons for this rate. 

This year, a higher teacher attendance rate and the addition 
of a security officer have helped to prevent students from 
wandering the halls, A half-time parent coordinator has 
increased oarent involvement, and Northeastern University 



-776- 



and School Volunteers provide tutoring and remedial reading 
programs. 

However, the administration must address the reluctance of 
Black students to use services in East Boston by creating 
additional support services in the school or linking with 
social service agencies in the neighborhoods of attending 
Black students. There also seems to be considerably more 
grafitti than in other schools, possibly indicating a need 
for greater control over students in the halls. 

CURLEY iMIDDLE SCHOOL 

The Curley Middle School suspended Black students at a 
significantly higher rate than White students last year. 
Staff cited the lack of leadership and resulting low teacher 
morale as the reason for this rate. 

Headmaster Lowe was appointed to the school last year. She 
has made substantial programmatic changes to build a 
constructive educational environment. Students are now 
clustered by skills levels into 4 groups. A reading 
specialist who provides remedial skills to students is 
assigned to each grade. Detention, referrals, parent 
conferences and restitution are all regularly used as 
alternatives to suspension. In addition, the Curley School 
will be one of the 17 schools served this coming year by the 
Human Services Collaborative. These changes, along with 
higher expectations of teachers and improved teacher morale, 
have significantly improved student discipline problems. 

GAVIN MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Last year, the Gavin Middle School had a high suspension 
rate and a disproportionate suspension rate for Black 
students. Staff stated that a lack of leadership and low 
teacher morale caused many discipline problems including a 
large number of fights. Few support services in the school 
and only one Black teacher on staff contributed to these 
problems. 

This year, a new Headmaster, Mr. Lee, and new Assistant 
Headmaster Stephens have considerably improved student 
discipline. The number of Black teachers has increased to 
8. Mr. Stephens has established a structured discipline 
program that requires high teacher involvement and 
consistent parent contact. All discipline interactions with 
students and all faculty and administrative actions are 
documented.' A model comprehensive support services delivery 
system has been created and is coordinated by a social 



-777- 



worker. This person has helped to establish support 
services in school and linkages with community agencies. 
And a student services team meets every other week to 
discuss all referrals to the social services coordinator. 

MICHELANGELO MIDDLE SCHOOL 



The Michelangelo Middle School had the fourth highest 
suspension rate for middle schools last year and suspended 
Black students at a disproportionately high rate. Lack of 
leadership and resulting discipline problems were cited by 
staff as the cause for these rates. 

This year, a new headmaster has emphasized the development 
of a sound curriculum, stating that "good teaching is 
paramount to good discipline." Faculty meetings have been 
held on behavior management and study skills. Teachers are 
now expected to handle most behavior problems in class. The 
small school setting also contributes to an orderly school 
climate. However, the school needs to develop more 
alternatives to suspension (e.g., an in-school suspension 
program) for students who are discipline problems and 
address the reluctance of Black parents to come to the 
school for parent conferences. 

ROOSEVELT MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Last year, the Roosevelt Middle School had the second 
highest suspension rate and suspended Black students at a 
disproportionately high rate. Staff instability was cited 
as a reason for these rates. Headmaster Gillis, appointed 
last year, stated that 5 teachers accounted for 341 days of 
absence. Spillover of neighborhood crime, a lack of 
alternative middle school programs, and the elimination of 
an in-school suspension program because of funding cutbacks 
contributed to this problem. 

Headmaster Gillis has replaced the 5 teachers and now has a 
stable staff. He cites an increase in student and teacher 
attendance as an indicator of a safer environment. However, 
classroom management and low-teacher morale were still cited 
as problems. Few alternatives to suspension are used, and 
there seemed to be a lack of communication between 
administrators and a resulting lack of focus to discipline 
policies. Community crime spillover continues to be a 
proDlem and the entire building is badly in need of repair. 



- ! I c- 



ELIOT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Eliot Elementary School had the second highest 
suspension rate for elementary schools last year. Lack of 
leadership, inappropriate placement of students in classes, 
students wandering in the halls and a confrontational 
approach to disciplining Black students by some White 
teachers were all cited as reasons for this rate. 

This year, a new Headmaster, Ms. Fahey, has established a 
sound educational program and new curricula in reading, 
penmanship, English and math. This curriculum, emphasizing 
basic skills development, has contributed to orderly 
classroom environments. The entire staff regularly 
discusses issues of classroom management and specific 
students who are discipline problems. Students who were 
inappropriately placed in classes have been reassigned to 
other classes or transferred to a special education 
setting. The headmaster has a high degree of visibility in 
the building. Also, a high level of parent involvement has 
been achieved through the efforts of a one-half time parent 
coordinator. These changes have resulted in fewer 
discipline problems and a more positive approach to those 
problems that exist. 

MCKAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Last year, the McKay Elementary School had the highest 
suspension rate of any elementary school. The headmaster 
stated that these rates resulted from his attempt to bring 
order to the school in his first year. The elimination of 
many programs such as art, music, and reading and math labs 
contributed to discipline problems. 

Headmaster Yarborough takes a sensitive and caring approach 
to student discipline and often visits students' homes. He 
has also focused much attention on raising the reading 
scores of students. However, the school needs help to 
address discipline problems more systematically (the monitor 
observed students dancing and wandering in the halls) and 
employ additional alternatives to suspension. These 
observations are confirmed by the school's continuing high 
suspension rate this year. 

COMMENDATIONS 

The Department ofSchool Operations should be commended for 
their continuing efforts to systematise discipline 
procedures, improve consistency in the adherence to the Code 
of Discipline, encourage the creation of alternatives to 



-779- 



suspension, and lower suspension rates systemwide. Director 
of Alternative Programs Smith is also to be commended for 
his continuing efforts to create alternative programs for 
all students, and especially for his efforts in the 
reorganization of English High School. 

Finally, the new administrators at Edwards Middle, Curley 
Middle, Gavin Middle, Eliot Elementary, Boston Latin and 
Charlestown High should be commended for improving student 
discipline at those schools. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 



In addition to the following recommendations, all proposed 
plans in this report will be monitored in the next 
monitoring period. 

1. Black and Hispanic administrators and teachers should 
continue to be appointed where needed. Specifically, 
there is a need for a Black or Hispanic administrator 
at Roosevelt Middle School and Black and Hispanic 
teachers at the Umana School. 

2. Boston should continue to provide resources to schools 
to develop support services and other alternatives to 
suspension. Specifically, the creation of a school- 
within-school alternative program or in-school 
suspension program at Charlestov/n High should be 
considered « Continued support for the Boston Human 
Services Collaborative should be provided. The 
Collaborative should consider providing services to 
Black students at East Boston High and the Umana School 
and to all students at the Roosevelt Middle and McKay 
Elementary. 

3. Alternative programs for students who are not 
succeeding in regular school programs, specifically at 
the middle school level, should continue to be created. 

4. parent outreach strategies centered around student 
discipline issues should be intensified. These efforts 
should be targeted at the high school level and 
developed in collaboration with Citywide Parents 
Council . 

5. Means to quicken the referral process for both 
alternative program and special education placements 
should be explored. 



-730- 



6. Needed building repair and lighting to the Roosevelt 
Middle School should be provided. 

7. Remediation programs to complement new promotional 
requirements should be developed. 

EXPLANATION OF SUSPENSION RATES CHARTS 

The chart prepared for this analysis includes the following 
information: 

COLUMN ; 

A All Boston schools at that particular level (Latin 
Academy, Latin School, and Umana include grades 7- 
12; the others grades 9-12). 

B Number of Black students, followed by Black percent 
of total enrollment. 

C Number of suspensions of Black students, followed 
by Black percent of all suspensions. 

D Percent of Black suspensions divided by percent of 
Black students (1.00 would indicate that Black 
students are suspended at exactly the rate that 
their proportion of total enrollment would predict, 
while 2.00 would indicate suspensions at double the 
expected rate, and .5, at half the expected rate). 

E-G Same information as B-D, for white students. 

H-J Same information as B-D, for other minority 
students . 

K Total enrollment of each school. 

L Total suspensions for each school. 

M Total suspensions divided by total enrollment; this 
is a measure of how frequently suspensions are 
necessary or resorted to (only closer analysis can 
determine whether suspensions are resorted to with 
excessive - or insufficient - frequency) . 

All suspension data was for the first semester of the 1983- 
1984 school year. 



-781- 



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268 44 133 4 83 1 
McKay 55 90 1.64 27 8 0.30 18 2 0.11 484 49 0.10 


110 16 126 157 
Prescott 28 100 3.57 32 0.00 40 0.00 393 16 0.04 


90 11 31 71 
Eliot 47 100 2.13 16 0.00 37 0.00 192 11 0.06 


508 6 139 2 27 
Murphy 75 75 1.00 21 25 1.19 4 0.00 674 8 0.01 


133 4 20 14 
Endicott 80 100 1.25 12 0.00 8 0.00 167 4 0.02 


254 7 115 20 
E. Greenwood 65 100 1.54 30 0.00 6 0.00 389 7 0.02 


115 8 46 13 
Mozart 66 100 1.52 26 0.00 7 0.00 174 8 0.05 


293 21 78 1 35 
Lee 72 95 1.32 19 5 0.26 8 0.00 406 22 0.05 


98 10 55 1 6 
Beethoven 62 91 1.47 35 9 0.26 4 0.00 159 11 0.07 


78 10 52 30 
Manning 49 100 2.04 33 0.00 19 0.00 160 10 0.06 


159 11 58 288 4 
Tobin 31 74 2.39 11 0.00 57 26 0.46 505 15 0.03 



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-735- 



-7S6- 



REPORT NO. 3 

ON 

BOSTON SCHOOL DESEGREGATION 

OF 

STUDENT DICIPLINE 

APPENDICES 

VOLUME II 



- / ' - 




Greater Boston Regional Education Center 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education 



27 Cedar Street, Weilesley, Massachusetts 02181 



431 -7825 



March 29, 1984 



Dr. Robert Peterkin 

Deputy Superintendent, School Operations 

Boston Public Schools 

26 Court Street 

Boston, MA 02108 

Dear Dr. Peterkin: 



As you know, we are beginning our third cycle of monitoring progress of desegregation in 
Boston Public Schools. 

To assist us in that process, we request personnel in the Boston Public Schools to provide 
a formal response to thestudent discipline findings and recommendations contained in 
Volume I and II of the Department of Education's Report No. 2 on Boston Desegregation 
as well as steps being taken to initiate a modification to the Amalgamation Plan to 
replace the Racial-Ethnic Student Councils with Communication Boards in all high 
schools. We would appreciate your submitting a written resonse to the Greater Boston 
Regional Education Center (GBREC) by April 13, 1984. 

Department staff wiU review your response to the report and documentation of 
progress. Also, as you are aware, Dan French of GBREC together with Frank Banks will 
continiue to visit schools that have had high and/or racially disproportionate suspension 
rates. 

We look forward to your continued assistance and cooperation. If you have any questions 
regarding this process, please contact Dan French at GBREC. 



Sincerely, 

Marlene Godfrey ^ ^ 
Regional Cerlter Director 



James Case 

Associate Commissioner 

Division of Curriculum and 

Instruction 



/mw 



-7S5- 



•lESCHOO 




April 13, 198A 



Ms. tiarlene Godfrey 

Resional Center Director 

Greater Boston Regional Education Center 



27 Cedar Street 
V7ellesley, Ilassachusetts 

Dear Ms. Godfrey: 



02181 



Thank you for your letter of March 29, 1984 wherein you request a 
response to the student discipline findings and recomraendations of Volunes I 
and II of the Department of Education's Report Number II in Boston's 
Desegregation . 

In general I would indicate to you that student discipline in the Boston 
Public Schools has improved considerably over 1932-83. The attached quarterly 
report on suspension statistics reveals significant reduction in suspensions 
and incidents in all categories with the exception of possession of dangerous 
.•eapons. The increase in this latter category can be attributed to greater 
vigilance and greater cooperation among students and staff ^•ri.th respect to tlie 
reporting of weapons. In addition the Office of die Deputy Superintendent, 
School Operations has ^rarked with administrators to create consistent 
implementation of the Code of Discipline and reporting of incidents. The 
quality of school-based rules has improved significantly this year and 
suspendable offenses have been removed from those rules. Finally the Boston 
Public Schools cooperated with the Safe Schools Commission to produce a set of 
recommendations for tlie improvement of school climate in schools, especially 
secondary schools. 

In response to Cb£ specific recommendations made on page 533 of Volume II 
of your report I offer the following: 

1. Tb^ Boston Public Schools has significantly increased the number of 
minority administrators. This was in recognition of the changing 
population in our schools as well as a recognition of the various 
minority groups now represented. Please note the following: 



-729- 



Marlene Godfrey -2- April 13, 1984 



a) The first Asian-American Principal was appointed to the Patrick 
Kennedy School. 

b) The second Hispanic Principal was appointed at the t-tanassah 
Bradley School. 

c) Hispanic Assistant Principals were appointed at the Gardner, 
Trotter and Blackstone Schools. Tne first Hispanic Assistant 
Headmaster was appointed at Charlestovm High School. 

d) A Black Principal was appointed at the Edwards Middle School, 
contributing to the improvemant in student discipline and 
school climate at that school. 

e) Black Assistant Headmasters were appointed at Boston Latin 
School and Boston Latin Acaden^. 

2. A proposal has been put before the Superintendent and School 
Committee for the creation of two teams of Boston teachers proficient in 
Positive Approaches to Discipline and ?»eality Therapy. These teams would 
establish residency in schools for a period of two weeks to a month to 
determine a plan for the improvement of student discipline and to teach 
intervention techniques. In addition a general in-service is proposed for 
schools at the beginning of the year to deal with these topics. 

3. I cannot comment on the case load of guidance counselors as indicated 
in the recommendations . 

4. The Boston Student VLnnan Services Collaborative was established this 
fell to provide additional support services for students. This program will 
be piloted in 17 schools this spring in order to bring community agency 
resources to bear v^on the academic and social problems of students. The 
successes of this program, conbined with the individual relationship schools 
currently have with community agencies, should assist these students. 

5. As indicated in your own report, new alternative programs were opened 
at English High School (Fenway Program) and the Martin Lutlier fCing Middle 
School (New Ttorizons Academy) this year. In addition Boston Prep was 
supported for a second year. Much of the year was spent by Sid Smith, 
Director of Alternative Programs, establishing these programs and gaining a 
greater base in the Chicago Mastery Learning Concept which serves as the basis 
for the academic program in the alternative schools. 

It is the proposition of this office to work with niiddle school 
principals and headmasters next year in the creation of additional alternative 
programs for tb<ese levels. >!uch of the efforts this year iTave centered around 
English High School, which will be discussed later. 

6. In general class size in the Boston Public Schools is determined by a 
teacher contract. Average class size in the Boston Public Schools is well 
below the maximum allowed. It has been the policy of the Boston Public 
Schools, and continues to be the policy, to provide additional teachers where 
student population warrants. 



-790- 



Marlene Godfrey -3- April 13, 1984 

7. Additional funds have been made available in the proposed FY 85 
budget to provide for textbool<s and materials in every school. 

8. Significant effort on the part of principals and teachers goes into 
creating parent outreach programs in our schools. Both the School-Based 
Management Program and the Boston School Improvement Program work tirelessly 
to include parents on their planning councils. The Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations and that of the Special Assistant to the 
Superintendent 'nave worl<ed this year to support the efforts of the Citywide 
Parents Council in the establishment of School Parent Councils. This office 
will continue to support these efforts as well as the Home and School 
Association. 

9. Please be advised that I have no intention of ending the policy of 
disciplinary procedure into district transfers. I have done a review of this 
process this year and find that disciplinary transfers are one of many items 
in a repertoire to respond to the very real needs of students. Analysis of 
students transferred this year show tliat those who do remain in the Boston 
Public Schools are successful. While I agree that this procedure needs to be 
nonitored carefully, and my office and that of John Coakley do attempt to do 
just that, I will continue to discreetly use disciplinary transfer procedure 
to provide a second chance for students. 

I have worked with Community Superintendents and Headmasters to insure 
greater coordination and communication concerning discplinary transfers. In 
this fashion it is hoped that st;idents \7ill be afforded a clear alternative to 
continued disruptive bel\avior. 

10. The Code of Discipline, once reviewed and revised this spring, will 
be printed this summer for distribution at the beginning of the year. It is 
my recommendation to the School Committee that the Code of Discipline be 
shortened to one or two pages and distributed in all of the languages v/hich 
our students speak. 

11. We are currently e:camining the possibility of revie^^^Lng school-based 
rjles in the spring and issuing then at the beginning of t'ne year. Ronald 
Spratling of my office is heading up that effort and we should make a decision 
on that in the very near future. 

12. \7ith respect to alternatives to discipline, I refer you to the above 
statements \vlierein I address the issues of in-school alternatives, training 
and intervention techniques as well as the reinstitution of student planning 
centers proposed for next year. 

13. Please be advised that I am in the process of rev'ising the Code of 
Discipline. In addition the Boston School Committee's subcommittee on student 
safety is reviewing the Code of Discipline \rLth an agenda tovrards reducing its 
complexitv. The outcome of these recommendations will be a shortened version 
of the Code of Discipline '.;hi.ch will be clear, concise and practical. 



-791- 



I'larlene Godfrey -4- April 13, 1984 



14. I have worked wit±i Community Superintendents, Principals and the 
Department of Safety Services to insure adequate reporting of suspensions and 
adequate handling of disciplinary cases. Principals and Headmasters are 
reluctant to give up the practice of sending students without suspension since 
they feel it is a tool to reduce conflict and tension between administrators 
and students and allov/s students an ability to rebound without penalty. 
However, Principals and Headmasters have been ordered to follow/ the Code of 
Discipline and to mete out suspensions wliere necessary. Please be advised 
that the philosophy of Boston Public Schools continues to be to use suspension 
as a last resort. . . ...-.:—..- 

15. The Boston Public Schools recently developed a promotional policy 
and accompanying graduation requirements. Deputy Superintendent Oliver 
Lancaster is currently examining the remediation and implementation phase 
designed to address these new standards. It is our intention to develop the 
necessary remediation opportunities for students so that repeating grades is 
not their only option. 

16. Please find attached information on restructuing of English High 
School which is currently before the Boston School Committee. In this effort 
English High School will become the "hard work liigh school" and will contain 
four schools within a school. This restructuring of English High School is ' 
designed to create smaller units within tb£ tower facility and to allow for 
greater student/ teaclier contact. 

I trust that the above has provided some information on the concern's 
which you raise. In addition I 'nave attached my draft response to my findings 
to the Safe Schools Commission wherein many of my recommendations for 
discipline are included. 

If you have arr^ questions please call me at 726-6200, extension 5330. 

Sincerely, 




Robert S. Peterkin 
Deputy Superintendent 
School Operations 



P^P:hkl 

attachments 

copy: Robert Spillane 
John Coal<ley 
Ronald Spratling 



/ 
/ 



-792- 



THE SCHOOL GOK'iMITTEE OF THE G!TY OF BOSlOls' 




1 1 1 
II- 



HAFT 



. lU'JLiC SCHO'jIf, 

t)it"J: T SU^f F-:',■T£r.I•[• 



i .;r-i 5 ^■Llc■^"■:'. 
- MEMORANDCM 



To: Robert R. Spillane, Superintendent 

From: - Robert S. Peterkin, Deputy Superintendent, SchDol Operatic; 

Eete: March 5, 1934 ■" - 

Re: Response to the Report of the Safe Schools Commission and 
Reconnendations for Modification of the Code of Discipline 




- In January I shared my initial thoughts on the report of the Safe Schools 
Coamission with you and the School Cotrmittee. At that time I indicated that 
tte results of the efforts of the Safe Schools Commission were consistent with 
my experience over the past two years. As I indicated then, the Conrnission 
has told lis what we already know: that is, any violence and fear of violence 
is unacceptable at any level. The Conrnission is also accurate in that 
violence and the fear of violence are not solely the province of the Boston 
Public Schools, rather they are indicators of the ills of urban society. 
Nevertheless our students and staff are victims who deserve our utmost 
protection . 

Having had the opportunity to analj^ze the findings, as well as tl^ 
opportunity to talk witii Safe Schools Camission members and their staff as 
well as with students, teachers and administrators, I am prepared to make 
additional recommendations to you at this time for modifications in our 
overall safety and security plan as well as to the Code of Discipline. 



CREATION OF A SAFE SCHOOL CLIMATE - 

The Boston Public Schools must be dedicated to the provision of a safe 
school climate for its students and staff. A safe school climate is a 
necessary foundation to the enhancement of quality educational programs. 

In defining and establishing a safe school climate, it is necessary to 
identify what problems exist inside and outside of the school. Inside the 
school teachers, administrators and security personnel have the responsibility 
of working with students to provide a safe sctxol climate free of fear and 
violence. It is the responsibility of administrators to develop a plan for 
this climate and to mobilize the entire school communif/ to successfully 
implement that plan. 



26 COo'^" f 



'.'^i'bfC^'jS'' 



■jC C.L.. I >■ 



-793- 



Robert R. Spillane . -2- .---• March 5, 1984 



Of equal importance Is to identify the factors contributing to the 
problems of a safe school climate by outside influences. That is, the 
disruptive factors which exist in the ccranunity surrounding the school where 
those coamunities from where students are drawn to assess or impact on school 
climate. While the school ccranunity has part of the responsibility for this 
effort, the police in the greater conxnunity bear a greater responsibility for 
protecting the school and its occupants. Only in collaborative fashion can 
the school, which does not exist in isolation from the rest of society, begin 
to provide a positive climate for its students. 

Finally the media must assist the school system by being sensitive to the 
sensational aspects of current reporting and to recognize tt^ impact their 
reporting has on young adults. Despite the findings enlisted in the report, 
the sensational atmosphere around its release only highlights the problem that 
school officials have indicated over the past few years concerning media 
reporting. The media must be sensitive to their relationship with the schxjls 
if we are to profit from their coverage. 

SPECIFIC RECOM^ETCATIONS - 

1. Shorten version of t±>e Code of Discipline - Please find attached a 

recommended short version of the Code of Discipline. This copy differs 
from that offered by the Commission, and the one currently in use in the 
Boston Public Schools, in that it has been devised to eliminate unneces- 
sary educational and legal jargon (except where absolutely necessary) and 
has been analyzed on the readability index of the Degrees of Reading 
Ibwer Scale (where it scored at 62) . "Ihis shortened version of the Code 
of Discipline wotald be issued to all students and translated into Spanish 
and Chinese. In cooperation with the Citywide Parents Council, we would 
take the responsibility to conxnunicate this version of the Code of 
Discipline to parents of Boston school children. 

It is anticipated that the communication with students and parents would 
go in the form of a packet on disciplinary procedures at the individual 
schools. In the fall of each year the school system and the Citywide 
Parents Coimcil would commit itself to mailing home information on (a) 
the short version of the Code of Discipline, (b) school -based rules 
(which have greatly improved over this year and are important to the 
creation of disciplinary procedures on the elementary level) and 
information on school officials who will be responsible for discipline in 
the particular school. It should be noted that the current version of 
tir^ Code of Discipline, with changes approved by the School Committee 
this year, will still be a legal document within the framework of the 
Boston Public Schools but would be used as a reference docunv?nt rather 
than an everyday tool. All information would be posted in each and every 
Boston Public School. 



-79'^- 



mm 

Robert R. Spillane -3- March 5, 1984 

The development and use of school-based rules has lnproved significantly 
in this academic year. Ihe school-based rules, as mentioned above, are 
particularly important at the elementary level vhere alternatives to 
discipline are difficult to maintain due to the continuous work schedule 
of teachers. Rescheduling of elementary schools to free teachers to 
handle in-school suspensions or other alternatives to a suspension could 
be tried. A modification of the Schools Without Failure/Positive 
Approach to Discipline Program will be recoamended herein to focus on 
elementary schools. 

I reconmend that the committee formed to review and revise the school - 
based rules be expanded to assume the oversight role as recommended by 
the Safe Schools Commission. In this fashion those responsible for 
developing the local code of behavior including teachers, students, 
parents and administrators would be responsible for overseeing the fair 
application and use of those rules. 

2. ALTERNATIVES TO SUSPE^5I0N - 

Tte recommendation by the Safe Schools Commission for the increase of 
alternatives to suspension was already an objective of my office and the 
School Department for this academic year. The Fenway Program at English 
High School, the New Horizons Program at the King Middle School and the 
expanded Boston Prep are evidence of the School Department's commitment 
to providing alternative educational programs for its students. All 
three programs are currently oversubscribed and experiencing a great deal 
of success. In addition the Director of Alternative Education has 
exercised supervision over existing alternative programs in the Boston 
Public Schools, ftime Base, ACC, the Log School and Re-Cap are examples 
of alternative educational programs whi(3i have been and continue to be 
successful in the Boston Public Schools. 

This year funds have been provided to schools to enable them to plan for 
alternative educational programs for subsequent academic years. The 
fruits of these programs should be presented during the current budget 
process and the School Oxmittee will have to make a decision on the 
extent of the expansion during 1984-85. 

Positive Approaches to Discipline - School Based Teams 

With regard to intervention, mediation and pre-suspension activities, 
Boston teachers who have experience in the Schools Without Failure 
Program and reality therapy will be requested to work with this office to 
develop a plan to train staffs in individual schools; the training will 
include the principles of these approaches to reduce the necessity for 
suspension. In addition by providing administrators and teachers with 
enhancad skills to deal with students and their parents around the first 
suspension, it should be possible to reduce the repetition of 
suspension-causing behavior in students . 



-795- 



Robert R. Spillane -4- March 5, 1984 \ 



The thrust of this program would be the creation of two (2) teams , the 
menbers of which . would be expert in- the Sclxols Wi though Failure 
Program. These teams, .led by a Director with two menbers to each team, 
vrauld address the following: 

A. Training, during the sunmer workshop period, of all Headmasters and 
Principals in positive approaches to discipline, reality therany, 
and alternatives to suspension. 

b. Training of individual school staffs - by applications, schx)ls 
would contract for a training period of say, 2 days to 2 weeks 
depending on the size of the school and the complexity of the need. 
The teams would move on-site, assess the overall disciplinary 
situation, make recommendation, train staff and create a school 
climate plan which would be adopted by the school. A menber of the 
team would return to the school in one month to evaluate the 

- • effectiveness of the implementation of the plan and assist the staff 
in making modifications. While all schools would be eligible, 
initial fi^cus vrould be on elementary and middle schools. Estimate 
of the nuniser of schools to be served — 40 to 50 schools. 

c. Crisis intervention — The teams could be asked to intervene in 
situations where the school climate has deteriorated significantly. 
If the school is in crisis, the teams would work with the staff and 
the Department of Safety Services on a con^rehensive school 
climate/security plan. 

While the Safe Schools Commission criticizes the use of disciplinary 
transfers, it is my belief and that of the principals and headmasters 
that, appropriately used, the transfer of students who have experienced 
certain disciplinary problems to other schools is a viable educational 
tool. In this fashion sttidents are able to start with a "clean slate" at 
another school. The current limitation of one such transfer a year would 
seem to provide some sort of protection against overuse of this device. 
Therefore I recommend that tt^ disciplinary transfer process, while 
heavily scrutinized by the Office of the Deputy Si^jerintendent for School 
Operations and the Department of Implementation, continues in effect fox 
the future. 

3. PEIDCS^MS K)R SUSPE?yDED STUDENTS - 

As indicated above, the action plan for alternative edtjcation fbrsees tte 
evolution of additional alternative education programs both within and 
outside of the schools. Conmunity Superintendents and principals have 
been .encouraged to develop school-within-school programs to deal with the 
disaffected youth in the middle and high schools. In addition the long- 
range plan for the school system reconmends that separate facilities be 



-796- 



i) 






To: Superintendent Robert R. Spillane March 5, 1984 

- 5 - 



3. FRQglAMS KR SUSPENDED. STUCENTS - (Cont'd.) 

maintained for wide ranges of students who would like an alternative 
educational experience. By accepting a wide range of students in 
alternative programs, the Boston Public Schools has been and should 
be able to avoid the "dunping" ground syndrome recognized by the 
Safe -Schools Commission. The new alternative programs, Fenway, New 
Horizons, Boston Prep, while accepting disruptive and disaffected 
students,.- have also insisted upon accepting a wider range of 
students to provide as close to a normal school experience as 
possible. ... . 

4. RECCRDS RESEARCH AND IMPROVED AEMINISTRA1T0N 

a) Oversight Committee - The Safe Schools Commission reccramends that an 
Oversight Committee be established to insure consistent citywide 
implementation of policies on discipline. I would like to take that 
reconmendation one step further and recomnend that an Oversight 
Committee be established at each Community Siperintendent ' s office. 
Ihe composition of that conmittee would include the Community 
Superintendent as chairperson, Principal or Headmaster, 
representative from the District High School Student Advisory 
Council, a representative f rom the District Parent Council, a 
representative from Special Education, a parent and one himan 
service representative from a local community agency. 

The Oversight Committee in the central headquarters would be 
established in the Office of the Deputy Superintendent/SchDol 
Operations and include the Deputy Superintendent, Special 
Educational representative, meaber of the Boston Student Advisory 
Council ,- Citywide Pairent Council representative, and a menber of the 
Boston Student Human Services Collaborative. 

These groups would exist to examine controversial disciplinary matters and to 
review consistent application of current rules. The Oversight Committees, 
when discovering inconsistencies, vrould request that the appropriate school 
official reverse or amend the disciplinary decision in accordance with current 
policies and procedures. 



-797- 



,■ DxAF 

Robert R. Spillane -6- March 5, 1984 



b) In line with the above recoomendation the Community Superintendent 
vrould exercise additional responsibility for the review and handling 
of cases within his/her district. Consistent with the reconcenda- 

' tion to be made for changes in the Code of Discipline, Connmnlty 
Superintendents will be responsible for hjlding long-term suspension 
and expulsion hearinawith respect to deadly weapons ! As chair- 
person of the Oversight Ccmmittee the Connjunity Superintendent would 
be responsible for the review and ultimate decision-making on 
discipline and . suspensions in -the district ."' Should the budget 
allow, there is a role for the person at tl^ district office to 
coordinate this information for the Community Siqjerintendent . 
Perhaps this role could be expanded to include seme responsibility 
for attendance retention and other operational goals. 

c) With respect to a standardized record system, it should be noted 

' that the Office of the Deputy Sv^jerintendent/School Operations and 
the Department of Safety Services have begun to standardize 
reporting and information forms for discipline, suspensions, 
attendance, repeat siispensions and the like. Tie Departnent of 
Safety Services will review all such forms for the upcoming school 
year to make sure that they are appropriate for gathering pertinent 
information. 

d) The Office of the Deputy Superintendent/School Operations will work 
with the Director of Informations Systems Development and tie Depart- 
ment of Safety Services to determine tie data needs for the 
disciplined and choose an appropriate software package or develop a 
program for the academic year. 

e) With regard to the form &r exchange of information and research on 
the Boston Public Schools, it is recommended that the Informal 
Exchange Grotp be continued and expanded to include persons with 
experience in research and analysis. 

REVIEW COf^^TTEES IN ALL SCHOOLS - 

As mentioned previously my recotnnendation is for the ccsnnittee which 
develops school-based rules to be expanded into a review committee to 
review the school's general climate, its disciplinary problems and to 
suggest remedy where appropriate. This comcnittee would include students, 
parents, teachers, administrators and otler persons chosen by the afore- 
mentioned groups. At the high school level the Review Committee would 
meet quarterly with the Communications Board of the Student Advisory 
Council to ascertain the climate of the school and its impact on students 
and staff. 



-798- 



DRAFI 



Robert R. Spillane -7- March 5, 1984 

6. BUS MCKLTORS - 

For the'schsol year 1984-85 we reconmend the following changes: 

a) That the Department provide the bus company, and therefore each 
driver, the very concise list of school bus rules and regulations; 

b) Reconmend that all drivers be oriented as to their rights and our 
procedures with regard to student bus safety and discipline; i.e., 
drivers will be infonned that they do not have the right to 
unilaterally bar students from riding buses ■ without appropriate 
referral for discipline. 

c) The Code of Discipline be amended to clearly reflect the School 
Department and student responsibility for behavior to and from 
sctcol. The Code will delineate the responsibility of Community 

• Superintendents to hold formal hearings which may result in the 
denial of schsol -provided transportation for longer periods of time 
than is presently allowable. 

d) Vfe recomnasnd that one of t±ie following options be adopted to resolve 
concerns regarding the provision of bus monitors to Boston Public 
School buses: 

1) That bus monitors be provided for elementary and middle school 
bus runs; 

2) That funds be available to either Comoiunity Superintendents or 
Headmasters which they may utilize on an as needed basis to 
provide bus monitor coverage of particularly troublesome buses 
within tt^ir schools or districts. 

■ Whichever plan is adopted it is strongly recorrmpnded that bus 
' monitors be school personnel who are familiar with school 
procedure and students. Prior experience has indicated that 
when school personnel serve as bus monitors, difficulty on 
buses is pr o mptly attended to within tl:^ schools and that 
student behavior changes to meet the overall school and 
community expectations. 

e) In working with the Department of Transportation, we will develop 
procedures for closer cooperation between Boston School Police, MDC 
and Boston Police with regard to enforcing traffic regulation 
concerning school buses. 

7. VOPONS AND USE OF TORCE - 

The Safe Schools Commission has reco m me n ded that the Code of Discipline 
be changed to provide that any student in possession of a dangerous 
weapon be expelled. They also reconmend suspension for three to ten days 
for use in a threatening manner of any weapon and device which may be 
employed as a weapon. Finally they reccCToend the use of force or threat 
of force be subject to automatic suspension. 



-799- 



F 

'Robert R. Spillane -8- March 5, 1984 



84 ^^i I N 



I concur vdth the Conmission on their concern over the existence of 
weapons within our schools. I would like to recoomend, however, a 
modification of their recomnnendation in that the Boston Public Schools 
retains responsibility for its students after expulsion; these students 
may return to schools within one year. Therefore I reconsuend the 
following: . . 

a) That the General Counsel, Director of Safety Services, and Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations review the list of deadly weapons 
ard determine a list of deadly weapons according to Boston Public 
School definition. This is necessary because a list of deadly 
weapons contains some items which may not be seen as deadly weapons 
in our eyes; for instance, certain studded bracelets, which are 
currently worn by teenagers, are defined as a deadly weapon within 
the laws of the Commonwealth. 

b) That possession of a gun and/or use of a gun, knife or deadly weapon 
in- a threatening manner result in an automatic recoranendation for 
expulsion. 

c) That simple possession of a knife or other dangerous weapon result 
in a long-term suspension of ten days. That the possession of a 
deadly weapon as a second offense result in automatic recomnaenda- 
tion for expulsion. 

8. SBCURTIY IN AND ARCO^ SCHOOLS - 

The Department of Safet>' Services has developed a deployment schedule 
which is masterful in the coverage which it provides for Boston Public 
Schools. These personnel are deployed based on the nunber of incidents 
reported at schools, information regarding various needs of the schools 
and secondary coverage provided to schools at the opening and dismissal 
times. In order to extend coverage in the school system, it will be 
necessary to expend additional funds to hire p>ersonnel. This was 
partially resolved this year with School Committee approval for 
additional officers and equipment. 

The Department of Safety Services is working with the Deputy . 
Superintenbdent for School Operations on a reorganization which will 
provide more adequate coverage within and outside of Boston school 
buildings. This reorganization parallels the recommendation of the Safe 
Schools Conmission in that officers will come out of uniform to work in 
school buildings on mediation, conflict resolution and conflict 
prevention. The other half of the force will continue to be deplo^^ed to 
prevent the encroachment of outside influences on the school and to serve 
as security officers within the school when necessary. Codbined with the 
training of staff and issues of conflict resolution and mediation, it is 
anticipated that the atmosphere within buildings will improve directly as 
a result of staff effort. 



-800- 



'iiMri 



.- Jtobert R. Spillane - 9 - March 5, 198^ 



I have requested that Conromicy Superintendents, Headmasters and 
Principals work vd.th the Department of Safety to review and update their 
security plans for the schools. In these plans I have instructed that 
tte role of the teacher as a wpsber of the team responsible for safe 
schools' climate be reinforced. 

Our relationship with the Boston and MBTA police continues to be very 
good. Over tte past few years, however, the reduced man levels have 
impeded their response to certain school problems. It is recommended 
that the Mayor provide additional resources to the Boston police so that 
they may interact more actively with the Boston School Police. 

9. THE MEDIA - ' . - ■ ^- 

I whDleheartedly concur with the Safe Schools Commission in their 
recom[iendation that the Boston Public Schools approach the media in an 
effort to gain some sensitivity in school reporting. While "the 
Commission feels that there is a balanced reporting by the media, the 
sensational nature of the reports on the negative incidents, especially 
those of violence or disruption, far outweigh the benefit of the good 
articles. As mentioned previously, the sensationalism around the release 
of tte report of the Safe Schools Commission was devastating to school 
personnel who had substantively inproved conditions. While this was a 
surprise to Commission staff, it was not to school staff. Perhaps the 
Superintendent or the School Committee could meet with the editorial 
boards of the media in an effort to gain more responsible and responsive 
repotting. This would be done not in an attempt to "cover up" problems 
of the sdxols but to make them sensitive to the issues of the impact 
that their reporting has on the students and staff. 

10. TRAINING AND CONFLICT RESCLinTON AND COPING WITH STUDENT PROBLEMS - 

As mentioned above it is anticipated that a recommendation will go to the 
student. Superintendent and School Committee for ongoing, onsite training 
of school staff in conflict resolution and coping with student problems. 

The Boston Strident Human Services Collaborative will be piloted in 
17 schools to detercoine the impact that coordinated provision of services 
to teachers and students can have on student problems. An e:q5ansijon of 
this program will be essential to as siting teaching staffs in coping with 
student problems. I will report on both prior to the end of the year. 

Please review the recommendations which I have made; I will be available for 
any comc^nts and/or discussion around the inplementation of these recommenda- 
tions. 

Thank you for your cooperation. 
RS?:hkl -, ^^ . 




-301- 




ffls 







WUorK^W^'' 



By Directive of the Superintendent of Schools snc 
with the support of the School Committee. Enghsr^ 
High School will be reorganized this -fall, re- 
estaSlishing itself as a strong, citywide, basic skills' 
college preparatory option within the Boston Pub- 
lic Schools As a produa of an extensive and ongo- 
ing planning effort designed to upgrade the schoo: 
procram. English High will be charaaenzed by tne 
schooi-withm-schooi concept, offering the advan- 
tages of small school environments, a demanding 
basic skills/college preparatory curriculum and pro- 
grammatic options to students withm the schoo: 
Each student at English High School will be a mem- 
ber of a small program, each with its own space ani 
Its own teaching, administrative and support staff 
Ninth grade students will be enrolled in a strong 
Cluster Program, focusing on intensive basic ski 
development. Instruaion will focus on the develop- 
ment of those reading, writing, computation anc 
reasoning skills that are prerequisites to success ir. 
other English High programs. Students in the tentn 
through twelfth grades will be enrolled m one c' 
three programs: the Traditional Program, the Fe-- 
way Program or the Magnet Arts Program, each cf 
wnich will be housed in its own space at Englis- 
Higi- School 

The Cluster program is highlighted by an'm- 
tensive Language Art: component, with extensive 
writing reading, study skills and speech offerings 
and an increasea emphasis on the reinforcement c' 
thes" same skills in the content areas The Trac:- 
tional Program will provide a strong curriculum fo- 
Cusea on basic skill development and preparation 
for college ana other post-secondary educatio.'". 
Thf- Traditional Program also offers a strong, three- 
yea- sequence of college preparatory commun::?- 
tior. and study skill courses designed especially for 



Caribbean and Latin American students. The Fen- 
way Program will serve as a basic skiiis/college prep 
program, though it will include less traditional in- 
structional options, making full use of community 
resources and concentrating on the development 
of the student as an independent learner The Mag- 
net Arts Program is accessible to students who are 
interested and committed to an outstanding aca- 
demic program with an equally strong Commercial. 
Technical and Fine Art concentration, and addi- 
tiQCtal offerings in Theatre and Dance 

Information and Interest Inventory: In the in- 
terest of attracting students who are committed to 
hard work and the particular goals of the English 
High School programs, the enclosed inventory is be- 
ing distributed to parents and students throughout 
the city The inventory is designed to provide addi- 
tional information about the schools programs and 
to highlight the expectations of the new English 
High School. 

If you are interested in English High, or just 
desire additional information, it's important that 
you fill out the inventory form and return it in the 
enclosed self-addresseo. stamped envelope, by 
March 26. Upon receipt of the form, someone from 
the school will be in touch with you. to help with 
application procedures or provide you with aadi- 
tionai information Should you wish to receive ad- 
ditional information prior to returning the form, 
please feel free to call tne number listed below. 

The faculty and administration of Enaiish 
High School is excited about the new directions to 
be taken by the school in the fall and we stand 
ready to serve you in any way possible. We look 
forward to the opportunity to talk with you fur- 
ther 



I 



• ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL 1NFORA/1A7ION: 738-0721 • 

• OPEN HOUSE: MARCH 29, 7:00 P.M., ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL • 
• PARKING AVAILABLE JIM BASEMENT LOT • 



-802- 



TRADITIONAL PROGRAM: The Traditional Program at English High School is looking for students 
interested in a strong basic skills/college preparatory program and commined to hard work and aca- 
demic excellence. The program places a special emphasis on reinforcing students' reading, writing and 
thinking skills in all sutjjea areas. After their freshman year, all students are expeaed to take an addi- 
tional three years of English and fUlath/Computers. an additional two years of Social Studies. Science and 
Foreign Language (if not previously taken) and one year of Aa. A core sequence of college preparatory 
Business courses is available to students interested in this field. Additional study, internship and work 
opportunities are available in collaboration with the John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company. 
Advanced off<ampus study opportunities ^re available in collaboration with local universities. The 
Traditional Program also offers a strong, three-year sequence of college preparatory communication and 
study skill courses designed especially for Caribbean and Latin American students. 

The total enrollment for the traditional Program is 395 students, offering students the advan- 
tages of a small school environment, with classes located on the third through fifth floors. 

FENWAY PROGRAM: The Fenway Program at English High School is looking for students who are 
interested in a basic skills/college prep program that is delivered in a less traditional way. In addition to 
providing standard classroom instruction, the Fenway Program makes extensive use of community re- 
sources. Students participate in periodic projea weeks, during which small groups of students explore a 
topic of importance within the curriculum, utilizing a full range of community and school resources. 
Students are also provided with opportunities to participate in independent or small group study pro- 
jects, internships or other community study opportunities. Special collaborative programs have been 
arranged with the John Hancock Life Insurance Co., Boston University and Harvard University. 

The Fenway Program's Teacher Advisor Program (TAP) provides students with an ongoing moni- 
toring and input mechanism. In addition to serving to keep a handle on student progress, the TAP also 
allows students to have input on program concerns 

The Fenway Program is commined to excellence through flexibility, individual anention and 
teamwork. The program enrolls a total of 1 75 students. 

MAGNET ARTS PROGRAM: The Magnet Arts Program at English High School provides students 
with a strong academic program offering the opportunity to pursue a major concentration in technical, 
commercial or fine arts, with additional offerings in dance and theatre. In completing the Magnet Arts 
Program, students will be prepared for post-secondary education or career opportunities in the arts, 
including graphic arts, architecture, design, engineering, fine arts, dance and theatre. 

The Magnet Arts Program makes extensive use of educational, cultural and business resources, 
including collaborative arrarigements with the Massachusetts College of Art, the HHORC and the John 
Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company. 

The Magnet Arts Program is developed around a strong core academic curriculum (English. 
History/Social Studies. Science, Foreign Languages) with equally strong curriculum in the arts. The pro- 
gram enrolls 3 1 5 students in grades 9-12. 

CLUSTER PROGRAM: All ninth grade students at English High are enrolled in a CLuster Program 
designed to provide an introduaory year of basic skills immersion. The Cluster Program is highlighted by 
an intensive Language Arts program, with all students enrolled in a Reading Comprehension and Study 
Skills course and a Writing and Speech course. In addition to this, there will be an emphasis on the 
development of these same skills across the content areas. Daily reading assignments, weekly writing 
assignments and direaed classroom dialogue are essential parts of all classes In addition to the Lan- 
Quage Arts courses, students are also enrolled in courses in Math, Science. Social Studies. Health and 
Physical Education. For those students who are able to shoulder additional academic responsibilities, 
elective offerings will be available in Foreign Languages. Art ano Typing. Students will be expeaed to 
complete nightly homework assignments in each subject area. 

The Cluster Program will also provide a strong introduaion. orientation and transition program, 
with all students' progress and needs monitored through a teacher advisor program which will keep in 
close contaa witn all parents. 



-503- 



• DRAFT 

STANQ^RDS OF BE4A\'ICR IN THE BOSTON PUBLIC SCmOLS 

Students have the right to a good education and personal safety. In 
return, they must respect the rights of other students, teachers, and staff. 
To protect these rights, standards and rules have been written for all 
students in Boston's public schaols. 

Good learning and good teaching can take place only when everyone behaves 
with care and respect for everyone else. Students and teachers cannot work 
together where there is fear, disorder or violence. The rules below are taken 
from the Code of Discipline but they are not meant to replace and do not 
replace the Code, which should be studied for a detailed description of" 
offenses and procediires. 

SIUDEOTS ARE EXPECTED TO: ^^ 

OWE TO SCHOOL TO LEARN AND TO WORK. THEY ARE EIOXEAGED TO TAKE AN 
ACTIVE PART IN ALL SCHXL ACTIVITIES. 

TO BEHAVE WITH RESPE:^' KR PEOPLE OF ALL AGES, RACES, EIHNIC GROUPS, 
RELIGIOrS, AND BOTH SEXES. 

Certain behavior is not allowed in school. Some acts, which injure oti^r 
people or threaten them are more serious than others. In the most serious 
cases the police and the courts inust be involved and students may be 
expelled. The consequences or penalties for breaking established rules are 
different according to the seriousness of tt^ behavior. 

Students will NCfT BE ALLOWED: 

- To bring dangerous weapons to school, such as knives, guns, nock guns or 
other weapons prohibited by State law. Possession of firearms and knives 
will result in expulsion. 

- To harm another person or threaten injury. 

- To bring drugs or alcohol to schsol. 

- To take by force thirds that belong to other people. 

- To steal. 

- To damage piroperty. 

- To behave on buses or at bus stops in ways that put other t>eople in 
danger. 

- To disrupt school or classroom activities. 

- To Interfere with other students' learning. 

- To use langviage or body contact that is offensive. 

- To make others afraid. 

- To be in places in school wtere they should not be. 



-2- 

StixJents who do not observe these rules can be suspended for one to ten 
days or they can be expelled. They 'can be reaioved to another classroom or 
school where they will continue to receive instruction and where they will 
also_.be aslsed to examine their behavior and the problems it .is causing other 
people and themselves. Their parents may be called to school to help find a 
solution. 

In. a democracy everyone has the right to be treated fairly, even when it 
seems that he or she has violated rules or laws. Students are entitled to a 
fair hearing with notice of the time and place.. At the hearing students and 
parents must be told what the charge is and tt^y have the right to give tteir 
side of the story. 

The purpose of these standards and rules is to develop self -discipline; 
to prevent prouble from arising; and to make our schaols safe and happy places 
in which to learn. 

AJditional information and assistance can be obtained by calling STUMMS 
STAFF AND PARENTS AS KLDDWS: 

STUI:E^7^s - staff- 

Boston Student Advisory Council, Office of School Operations 
726-6200, Ext. 5333 Boston Public Schxjls 

726-6200, Dct. 5330 
PARH^TS - 
Monitoring Department of the 
CLtywide Parents Council - 426-2450 



-805- 



-806 



PARENT AND STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



807- 



-808 



PARENT ORGANIZATIONS 



809- 



310- 



PARENT ORGANIZATIONS 



OBJECTIVE 1 ; To determine whether parent councils are monitoring 
matters which are apt to facilitate or hinder the desegregation 
process in particular schools, districts, and/or citywide. For 
instance, are they monitoring the implementation of court orders 
for special desegregation measures at some schools, repair and 
construction of facilities, vocational and occupational education 
programs, and support of participation by college, business, and 
cultural pairings? 

QUESTIONS ; What is the status of the newly established 
subcommittees, which are responsible for overviewing the 
monitoring in specific areas? What assistance are these 
subcommittees receiving from various community agencies? Is the 
desegregation process in areas not monitored by the CPC last 
year, such as vocational and occupational education and 
university, cultural and business pairings being monitored this 
year? How is Boston responding to the CPC's monitoring efforts? 

METHOD ; The monitors met with the Executive Director and staff 
of the CPC to review their 1983-84 Operational Plan and to 
discuss the status of the implementation of the Plan. To 
ascertain further the CPC's 1983-84 priorities, the monitors 
attended specific CPC meetings and reviewed the minutes of other 
CPC meetings. Also, the monitors met with representatives from 
the school department to discuss their work with the CPC, 

FINDINGS The desegregation Monitoring Committee of the CPC has 
expanded its activities to include areas which were not monitored 
last year. However, the committee's plan to establish 
subcommittees to be responsible for the monitoring of each area 
of desegregation has been modified. The energy which is required 
to implement the subcommittee structure is being used to support 
parent involvement in the monitoring process on the local school 
level instead. Also, the plan to have various community agencies 
assist in the monitoring has been delayed indefinitely. 

The parent councils are now monitoring the desegregation process 
in all of the required areas. However, their monitoring efforts 
are generally fragmented and in some areas they are more thorough 
than in others. Parent councils' monitoring in all areas are 
strongly connected to parents' efforts to advocate for student 
and parent rights. 

Because the parent councils are strong advocates for student and 
parent rights, according to the CPC, the school department often 
views their monitoring efforts as antagonistic. Further, the CPC 
reports that Boston is slow to respond to requests for assistance 
in the parent councils' monitoring efforts, and in several 
instances has tried to hinder the monitoring process. 



-811- 



-2- 

On the other hand, Boston officials report that the CPC's 
priorities are confused. They are not able to recruit parents 
for involvement in the SPCs because much of the CPC's time is 
spent with bickering internally and petulantly attacking the 
school department. Boston officials question the legitinacy of 
the CPC's monitoring findings because of the general low level of 
parent involvement in the monitoring process as well as in the 
overall CPC-SPC structure. 

Special Assistant Robert Hayden, the superintendent's liaison to 
the CPC, reports that the CPC has not availed itself of his 
offers to provide assistance in working with Boston. He attends 
the monthly meetings, and responds to all requests for 
information in writing. Otherwise, he reports that the CPC's 
contact with the school department has been limited. He has made 
several attempts to open new channels for parent involvement in 
Boston. Among these, he tried to initiate monthly meetings with 
the 4 co-chairmembers, and he tried to involve parents in the 
"long-range" Boston planning. The CPC did not respond. 

OBJECTIVE 2 ; To determine whether parents are responsible for 
planning and investigating matters which are apt to facilitate or 
hinder the promotion of racial harmony at their school. Also, 
whether they have access to school records and are able to send 
out pamphlets and newsletters and visit schools. And to 
determine if parent councils are proposing modification of 
student activity programs and receiving reasonable operating 
expenses from the individual schools. 

QDESTI0N5 ; Are parents becoming more actively and directly 
involved in Chapter 63 6 proposal development and program 
implementation? 

METHOD ; The monitors met with representatives from the Boston 
Chapter 636 office and reviewed FY '85 Chapter 636 Proposal 
Applications to determine the extent to which parents are 
actively and directly involved in the 636 proposal development 
and program implementation. 

FINDINGS ; It was recommended in the last Monitoring Report that 
the CPC and local SPCs (with the support of the school 
department) become more actively and directly involved in Chapter 
636 proposal development and program implementation, as an 
appropriate means for parents to assume the responsibility for 
planning and promoting matters which are apt to facilitate racial 
harmony in schools. Accordingly, the Bureau of School Programs 
mandated that each Boston school district earmark 1% of its 
Chapter 636 allocation for parent participation. Although each 
district's proposal application reflects the Bureau's 
requirement, overall, the activities prescribed for parent 
participation are superficial, limiting parent involvement to the 
publication of newsletters or monitoring students' attendance. 
The central office proposal which was not subject to 1% 
requirement but which was expected to have a significant emphasis 
on parent participation, was inadequate in addressing this 
area. In addition, two proposals submitted by the CPC to the 
school department for parent involvement training were rejected. 



-512- 



-3- 



OBJECTIVE 3 ; To determine whether Boston is providing monthly 
and semi-annual reports by principals and community district 
superintendents to parent councils and other reasonable 
educational statistics and data analyses to the CPC. 

QUESTIONS ; Is the format for monthly data reports by Boston to 
the CPC-SPC for 1983-84 working? What progress is being made 
over last year in the CPC receiving other supplementary reports 
and data from Boston? 

METHOD ; The monitors reviewed a list of all reports and data the 
CPC needs from Boston to adequately monitor the desegregation 
process and the schedule for receiving the information. Also, 
the monitors met with the Executive Director and staff of the CPC 
and Boston officials to discuss Boston's dissemination of data 
and reports to the CPC-SPC. 

FINDINGS ; The CPC reports that there is a delay of a month in 
the schedule for receiving data and reports from Boston. To a 
recent survey of SPCs concerning the timeliness and 
raeaningfulness of data from Boston, the response was mixed. Some 
SPCs receive meaningful reports on schedule and others are not 
receiving data and reports at all. 

Special Assistant Robert Hayden reports that he was under the 
impression that there were no problems with Boston's data 
dissemination to the SPCs. He has received no complaints from 
the CPC concerning data. 

OBJECTIVE 4 ; To determine whether parents have participated in 
the evaluation of community district superintendents and 
principals, and in the screening and rating of administrative 
positions. 

STATUS ; 



See July Report (Vol. I, pages 88-89 and Vol. II, pages 585-586) 

OBJECTIVE 5 ; To determine whether parents are participating in 
collective bargaining, the budget review process, major policy 
planning initiatives, and training of school department staff as 
provided by the November 8, 1982 Agreement. 

QUESTIONS ; What is the status of the CPC's subcommittee's 
involvement in the collective bargaining process? To what degree 
is the CPC's position taken into consideration? 

METHOD ; The monitors met with the Executive Director and staff 
of the CPC and school department officials to discuss the degree 
of parent involvement in the collective bargaining process. 



-813- 



-4- 



FINDINGS ; The CPC was involved in the collective bargaining 
process with full support from the school department. the CPC 
reports that parents played an important role in averting a one 
day teachers' strike. However, Boston officials report that the 
CPC's involvement in the process was problematic. On several 
occasions the CPC was not prepared for meetings to discuss issues 
of collective bargaining, and on other occasions parents held up 
the process with demands for information which was not available 
even to school committee members. 

OBJECTIVE 6 ; To determine whether: (a) all elections to parent 
councils have been conducted, (b) councils are properly organized 
and meeting, and (c) council staff are racially balanced. 

QUESTIONS : What is the level of parent participation in the CPC- 
SPC structure? How effective are the SPCs? 

METHOD : Monitors met with Executive Director and staff of the 
CPC and Boston officials to discuss the level of parent 
participation in the CPC-SPC structure. Also, the monitors 
reviewed the attendance records of the SPC meetings. 

FINDINGS ; The level of parent participation in the CPC-SPC 
structure is extremely low. There is widespread criticism of the 
CPC by parents and school officials due to the low level of 
parent participation in the CPC-SPC structure. In more than 50 
schools the SPCs do not meet regularly; also parent attendance at 
CPC meetings is low and irregular. 

The CPC is facing serious organizational problems, which have led 
to the resignation of the Executive Director and 3 of the 4 co- 
chairmembers. 

Boston officials maintain that the CPC is not following through 
on its commitments in general and specifically its responsibility 
to involve parents in Boston, adding, "given its annual budget of 
over $500,000 and staff of 22 the level and quality of parent 
participation in Boston should be much higher". 



-311 




City wide Parents Council 

59TempIePlace Boston.Mass. 02111 (617)426-2450 



At^ffiNDED VERSION 5/23/84 
See page 3, Section 2 



Report to Juc3ge W. Artiair Garrity, Jr. 
U.S. Federal District Court: 



First Internal Evaluation of Reorsanized Citizen Participation Structure 

pursuant to : 

Memorandum and Semi-Final Orders 

on the Structure of Citizen Participation 

In the Des^regatLon Process 

July 20, 1982 



-815- 



L :— -a:^^....^^:»mv:. 



Submitted by: 

Lucille Koch and Evalena Higgirfxjttoa 
Acting Executive Co-Directors 
Citywide Parents Council 

Date: May 10, 1984 



INIRDDUCrCRy STATEMENT 

In orders eatered on October 4, 1974 and Jvxie 5, 1975, t±e tfcdced States 
District Court mandated the establishment of a three- tiered strrxture of 
Citizen participation in tt& desegr^ation process and incorporated 
modifications to this structure in its orders of July 20, 1982. 

This parent organization has functioned &>r two years under this 
reorganizational structure in accordance with the July 20, 1982 orders. This 
review, however, is restricted to the actions and activities of the GPC 
menibers during the 1983-^ acadprm'r year only . """ 

This internal review was pr on pted by events in recent mon t h s that suggest 
that the CPC may not be fnl -Fining its mandate. 

It is our attempt, throi^h this review, to identify the problems, and to 
in£3im the ccxirt of corrective actions that can be taken to address the 
problems and to demonstrate the continuing viability and health of our 
organizaticn. 



-5 16- 



V 



Report to Judge Garrity 
Page 2 



May 10, 1984 



Asses sipent 

Based on interviews condtjcted by the Acting Executive Co-Directors with 
present and past CPC mencers and staff (from the 1983-84 ^radpnnV year) , we 
believe that the primary problem regarding the activ itie s of the Citywide 
Parents Council centers on the fact that it is made up ciiiefly of new and 
inexperienced parents, many of whom are serving on a pareit council for the 
first time. These parents are making key decisions en tk& day-to-day 
operations and policies that effect tte entire organization and its staff. 

Out of thirty menfcers elected to the CPC council in October 1983, only 
five parents (2 Black, 2 Hispanic and 1 White) have had previous ©cDerience 
serving on a Scicol Parent Cotmcil Executive Committee. 

Ihe inexperience of the present membership has resulted in the following 
organizational problems: 

A) Lack of Orgam'zation;^! Punxjse 

Many of the parents on CPC, by virtue of their lack of previous 
experience, cannot absorb nor fiilly comprehend, within a few short 
months, the internal relationships of the CPC, DPC and SPCs one to 
the otier, nor the external relationships of the organization to the 
Court, the State Department of Education, the City Si^^erintandent, 
and the Boston School Committee. This takes time, but during that 
same time, the council is expected to act 3S a policy board for 
parents anH establish orggT^"' -^af^' onal goals and prioritias. 

B) Lack of productivity by the Council 




SPC level can be remedied o'/er time and does cot significantly hinder 
productivity, its negative effects are magnified when those parents 
are at the CPC level. The failure of mesdsers to Sallow established 
procedures as defined by their by-laws, has resulted in. ccnfiisicn, 
frustration and diminished council memer participation . 

C) Failure to prioritize the needs of local School Parent Councils 

Tts CPC should not operate in a vacuum with its own separate agenda, 
but instead must respond, as manrt^tpd by the court, to Che. 
desegregation-related issues and concerns of the local Schcol Parent 
Council. Prior to any major policy decisions, CPC mprrhers must 
consult with their respective districts and local Schcol Parent 
Councils to get a sense of the local thinking on issues of concern. 



I 



-317- 



i 



Report to Judge Garrity May 10, 1984 

Page 3 

Recocnmpndations 

1. Court modifications of memorandvm and Semi-Final orders on the structure 
of citizen participation in the desegregation process. Section C.I., 
Citywide Parents Council mpirhership. 

A. We propose that the Citywide Parents Council be composed of 
representatives from each school district vhose eligibility is 
predicated on one year of service on the executive board of any local 
school parent council. 

B. We propose that a system be established for staggered terms of CPC 
menbers as a methcxi of maintaining continuity of thoijght within the 
organization. 

2. Proposed amendment to CPC By-Laws (addendum to Article 5 to create Section 
C which will read) : 

"Prior to final votes on any major policy decisions, it shall be tte 
duty of the CPC members to consult with their respective districts and 
school councils to get a clear sense of the local thinking on issues 
of concern." 



-818- 



THIRD QUARTERLY REPORT 
SCHOOL PARENT COUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE'S 
ACTIVITIES FOR JANUARY, FEBRUARY, MARCH 

1984 



Prepared for Citywide Parent Councj 
by Department of Field Specialists 



-3l8a- 



?A?.ZMTS ilZCTZD IN SZPTZM3E?. 1?3 3: 

clack white hisp asian tctal 

355 386 121 35 9"2 



PARENTS RECRUITED DURING OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER BY 
FIELD SPECIALISTS: 

blaclc white hisp asian om total 

90 69 IS 6 1 181 

PARENTS RECRUITED DURING JANUARY, FEBRUARY. MARCH BY 
FIELD SPECIALISTS 

brack white hisp asian om total 

41 24 13 1 86 



TOTAL NUMBER OF SPC MEMBERS IN PLACE EFFECTIVE APRIL 1, 198^ 
black white hisp asian om total 

516 479 149 42 1 1239 



-8l9b- 



MEETINGS HELD BY SPC ' S AND NUMBER IN 
ATTENDANCE 



-8l3c- 



BY MONTH 



SCHOOL 


DATE 


DISTRTCT 










ATT 


ENDANCE 














PARENTS 




TEACH 




ADMIN 




CUES 


TS 


Andrew Jackson 


1/4 


9 


7 






1 




i 




1 




Dickerman 


1/4 


5 


16 






1 




2 




4 




Umana 


1/11 


9 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Ohrenberger 


1/12 


9 


8 










1 




1 




Mattahunt 


1/12 


3 


6 










1 




2 




Hyde Park High 


1/10 


4 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Brighton High 


1/10 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








5rew 


1/10 


4 


5 


















Garfield 


1/9 


1 


7 










1 




1 




Otis 


1/12 


8 


10 














1 




Everett 


1/9 


5 


10 










2 




1 




Kenny 


1/10 


5 


4 










1 








ACC 


1/12 


9 


3 






1 




1 








Gardner 


1/12 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Tobin 


1/11 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Edison 


1/11 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Winship 


1/10 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Kilmer 


1/11 


3 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Philbrick 


i/10 


3 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


bad wea 


uh 


er 




Lee 


1/3 


3 


Ciince 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


bau wea 


th 


er 




West Rox High 


1/18 


3 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Adams 


1/18 


8 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Cheverus 


i./17 


8 


2 










1 








H. Mann 


1/20 


9 


6 










3 








Bradley 


1/20 


8 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


snow 








Hamilton 


1/18 


1 


7 










3 








District 
























Monitoring 
























Training 


i/17 


1 


4 














3 




Channing 


1/16 


4 


7 










1 




3 




Farragut 


1/18 


1 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


bad wea 


th 


er 




Russell 


i/17 


6 


5 


















Kilmer 


1/18 


3 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


bad wea 


th 


er 




Grew 


1/26 


4 


26 






9 




1 




1 




Wheatley 


1/23 


9 


4 










1 




1 




Conley 


1/25 


4 


5 






1 








1 




Dorchester Hg 


1/25 


5 


10 






4 




1 




4 




J. P. High 


1/24 


2 


cance 


11 


ed 


due 


to 


bad V e a 


th 


er 




South Boston 


1/24 


6 








2 




1 




1 




Edison 


1/25 


1 


2 










1 




1 




Farragut 


1/24 


1 


6 










1 




1 




Barnes Middle 


1/25 


8 


4 






1 




1 








Aligheiri 


1/26 


8 


15 






1 








2 




'Donnell 


1/23 


8 


23 






1 




1 




]_ 




DPC 


1/24 


3 












1 




2 




Bates 


1/25 


3 


2 














X 




Kilmer 


1/25 


3 


5 










1 




1 




M.cCor-ack 


1/26 


6 


5 






2 




1 








Clap 


1 /' 2 7- 


6 


6 



















I 



-8l3d- 



SCHOOL 



DATE 



DISTRICT 



PARENTS 



BY MONTH 



ATTENDANCE 



TEACH 



ADMIN 



CUES' 



Hennigan 


1/27 


DPC 


2/1 


Jackson-Mann 


2/9 


Bradley 


2/9 


Chittick 


2/1 


W.Rox 


2/1 


Tobin 


2/2 


Brighton 


1/31 


Taylor 


1/23 


Winship 


1/30 


Bates 


1/31 


Kennedy 


l/ol 


Bradley 


2/1 


DPC 


1/31 


Baldwin 


1/30 


Bates 


1/31 


Philbrick 


1/31 


Mozart 


1/30 


Boston Prep 


lU 


Kenny 


1/30 


DPC 


2/1 


Kenny 


1/30 


Hernandez 


in 


Mackey 


1/11 


Hernandez 


2/7 


Horace Mann 


2/8 


Garfield 


2/6 


Edison 


2/7 


Gardner 


2/8 


Hamilton 


2/10 


ACC 


2/9 


Everett 


2I(> 


Dickerman 


11% 


Brighton 


119, 


South Boston 


ll'i 


DPC 


2/9 


Bradley 


2/8 


Kennedy 


in 


'Donnell 


2/13 


Otis 


ll\l 


McCormack 


11% 


Holmes 


lid, 


Cleveland 


2/15 


Marshall 


2/16 


Holland 


1111 


DPC 


ll\b 


Conley 


2/15 


Farragut 


2/15 


Taft 


2/14 


DPC 


2/13 


Thompson 


2/9 


Endicott 


2/14 


Mather 


2/15 



9 
5 

9 
8 
4 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
8 
8 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
5 
9 
9 
9 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
5 
5 
1 
6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
4 
5 
5 



16 
x4 
57 

cancelled 

12 

2 

4 

postponed 

6 

9 

7 

cancelled 

cancellevi 

cancelled 

13 

7 

cancelled 

6 

L 

4 . 

14 

3 

8 

cancelled 

9 

6 

5 

7 

5 

9 

5 

5 

19 

2 

5 

9 

2 

2 

5 

5 

3 

3 

4 

8 

1 

3 

4 

8 

6 

3 

3 

5 

6 



20 

due 



to weather 



due to 



by 
by 
by 



weather 

1 

1 

1 

chair -weather 
chair-weather 
chairs -weather 



1 
3 



1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 



due to 



due to 



(lost sign in) 

1 

1 
5 



weather 

1 
i 
1 

1 
1 
weather 
1 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1. 

1 
1 
\ 

2: 

1, 

1. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

3i 

X. 

1 
1 



li 



-3l3e- 



SCHOOL 



DATE 



DISTRICT 



PARENTS 



BY MONTH 



ATTENDANCE 



TEACH 



ADMIN 



GUESTS 



High 



father 
kCC 

Frotter 
■iernandez 
Zhanning 
•lyde Park 
Migheiri 
las t Boston 
Irving 
DPC-Budget 
Lewenberg 
shaw 
shaw 

3PC-Middle Schools 
'heverus 
3arnes 
logers 
Boston Prep 
Perry 
Cobin 
Jiaship 
Uinthrop 
lussell 
Cynan 
Perkins 
Zlap 
W.Rox High 
Dtis 
Edison 
ioosevelt 
\gasi2 
Fuller 
iCennedy 
Endico 1 1 
3'Hearn 
iCC 

Fifield 
\CC 

father 
Zheverus 
Brighton 
Sr ew 

DPC-Monitor Train 
Jlanning 
Everett 
Dickeraan 
Jackson 
;>lcKay 
ijarfield 
3aldwin 
Vligheir i 



2/16 

2/16 

2/15 

2/7 

2/14 

2/14 

;i/16 

Feb 

2/15 

2/14 

2/15 

2/15 

2/14 

2/14 

2/29 

3/1 

2/28 

2/28 

2/13 

3/2 

2/29 

2/16 

2/14 

2/14 

2/15 

2/17 

3/8 

3/8 

3/7 

2/9 

3/6 

3/7 

3/8 

3/8 

3/8 

3/8 

3/8 

3/5 

3/84 

3/15 

3/14 

3/13 

3/12 

3/3 

3/12 

3/14 

3/7 

3/11 

3/5 

3/6 

3/13 



5 
9 
9 
9 
4 
4 
8 
8 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
8 
8 
4 
9 
6 
1 
1 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
8 
1 
4 
2 
2 
8 
5 
5 
9 
5 
9 
5 
8 
1 
4 
1 
2 

5 
5 
9 

9 

1 
1 
3 



2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


20 1 


1 


1 


9 




1 


3 


1 


1 


5 




2 


6 


1 


1 


cancelled-? 






12 


1 


2 


9 


7 


2 


8 


1 


1 


7 




2 


2 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


2 




1 


5 


1 


4 


3 1 




1 


2 


i 


1 


30 2 


1 


1 


4 




1 


8 




1 


8 




1 


5 




1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


2 




1 


5 




2 


3 




4 


4 1 


1 


1 


12 


3 


1 


7 


1 


1 


6 


1 


2 


5 




1 


4 


2 


1 


2 


all 


1 


6 




1 


6 


1 


1 


75 all 


all 


3 


2 


1 


1 


11 1 


2 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 




3 


20 




1 


8 


1 


1 


8 






not indicated 






no t indicated 






10 


1 


1 


6 




1 


9 


1 





-8l8f- 



3Y MONTH 



SCHOOL 



DATE 



DISTRICT 



ATTENDANCE 



PARENTS 



TEACH 



ADMIN 



CUE" 



HHORC 

Hamilton 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park High 

South Boston 

Ohrenberger 

Winship 

Rogers 

Thomps_n 

Channing 

Grew 

Hemenway 

Roosevelt 

Shaw 

Chittick 

Thompson 

Farragut 

Higginson 

Ellis 



3/15 

3/21 

3/21 

3/20 

3/? 

2/9 

3/27 

3/14 

3/8 

3/13 

j/13 

3/14 

3/12 

3/15 

3/1 

2/9 

3/28 

3/l3 

3/14 



9 
1 
5 

4 
6 
9 
1 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 



5 








1 


4 










5 








1 


canceileu 


due 


to 


weather 


no 


attend 


ance 


sheet 


8 








1 


5 








- 1 


15 




15 




1 


30 




lu 




1 


10 




8 




1 


5 










5 




5 




1 


30 




8 




1 


30 




10 




1 


55 




10 




1 


3 








1 


2 










2 










3 








1 



-Sl3g- 



local 3?C/and or DPC Meetings officially recorded January 19a4 61 



Total SPC/and or DPC Meetings officially recorded Feoruary 1984 64 



Total SPC/ and or DPC Meetings officially recorded March 1984 43 



Total SPC and/or DPC Meetings officially recorded during 1984 
For September through December 

Total SPC and/or uPC Meetings officially recorded during 1984 
For January through March 1984 



19Z 
148 



Total SPC Meetings for 1983-84 School Year as of April 1, 1984 



340 



-3l5h- 



Addendum 

The following reports were received after the compilation of 
this section of the quarterly report: 



SCHOOL 



DATE 



DISTRICT 



ATTENDANCE 



parents teachers admin guests 



Everett 

Mather 

Kenny 

'Hearn 

Fif ield 

Endicot t 

Mattahunt 

Wash Irving 

Conley 

Dist 4 (?) 

Quincy 

J. P. High 

Blackstone 

Bates 

Sumner 

Lewenberg 

Mattahunt 

Mattahunt 

Mattahunt 

Bates 

Lee 



March 


2 


5 


March 


7 


5 


March 


16 


5 


March 


8 


5 


March 


8 


5 


March 


8 


5 


March 


8 


3 


March 


7 


3 


Jan 25 


4 


March 


12 


4 


March 


20 


7 


March 


27 


2 


March 


14 


7 


March 


28 


3 


March 


7 


3 


January 17 


3 


January 15 


3 


January 12 


3 


January 5 


3 


March 


28 


3 


February 7 


3 



100 


all 


all 


1 


150 


all 


all 


1 


25 


all 


all 


1 


20 


all 


all 


1 


100 


all 


all 




20 


all 


all 




6 


1 


1 




7 




1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


1 


13 




1 


1 


not ind 




1 




4 


1 


3 


2 


10 


4 


2 


4 


6 








7 




1 




4 






1 


5 


2 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 


3 






1 


5 




1 


1 


7 




1 


1 



Total meetings to add to addendum for January 1984 

Total meetings to add to addendum for February 1984 

Total meetings to add to addendum for March 1984 

Total meetings to add to addendum for this period 



5 

1 

15 

21 



Total SPC meetings for 1983-1984 School Year as of April 1, 1984 340 
Total meetings to add to addendum for this period 21 

Total meeting for 1983-84 School Year as of April 1984 361 



-8181- 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



-819- 



820 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

OBJECTIVE; 

I To determine whether all activities provided under 
the Amalgamation Plan have taken place. 

QUESTION: What steps has Boston taken to develop and 
implement uniform student council election 
standards? 

PROCESS: 



Circulars were reviewed for uniform student council election 
procedures. 

FINDINGS: 



The Student Affairs Office developed and implemented uniform 
student council election procedures for this year's 
elections. These procedures will continue to be used in 
future years. (See Appendix) 

QUESTION A procedure to elect student representatives to 
parent councils in all high schools was 
established by the Student Affairs Office, and 9 
high schools elected student representatives to 
parent councils. What has been done to increase 
student representation on parent councils in the 
8 remaining high schools? 

PROCESS: 



A meeting was held with the Student Affairs Director to 
determine what progress had been made. 

FINDINGS: 



The Student Affairs Office has been in contact with the 
Citywide Parents Council (CPC) to coordinate efforts 
intended to meet 2 goals: (1) increase student 
representation at parent council meetings and (2) to 
encourage elections of scudent representatives in the 8 high 
schools, (Boston High, Boston Latin Academy, Boston Latin 
School, Boston Technical High, Brighton High, Burke High, 
Copley Square High and South Boston High) that did not elect 
stuaent representatives to parent councils in the fall. 



-321- 



However, the Student Affairs Office, nor the CPC, knew at 
the time of the report whether this effort had resulted in 
achieving either goal. 

QUESTION: A tentative training schedule for implementation 
of Communication Boards in all high schools, and 
hiring of a consultant trainer for the initial 
training at Charlestown High were approved by 
the Student Affairs Director in the fall. What 
steps has Boston taken to modify the Amalgation 
Plan to replace the Racial-Ethnic Student 
Councils (RESC) with Communication Boards? 

PROCESS: 



The monitor attended the training sessions held at 
Charlestown High. Also, a written update on implementation 
of Communication Boards in all high schools was reviewed. 
(See Appendix) 

FINDINGS: 



Charlestown High students and faculty members were selected 
for participation on that school's Communication Board. A 
training program was conducted to provide necessary skills 
and structure to participating students and faculty. 
However, scheduling of meeting times and difficulties in 
administrative and faculty assignments have impeded efforts 
to initiate the board, despite support from Student Affairs 
Director Carlo. 

In addition to Charlestown High, Communication Boards are 
also in operation at Boston Latin School and Boston Latin 
Academy, although both suffer from lack of administrative 
and faculty support; (problems experienced previously at 
Charlestown High School). Although East Boston, Brighton 
and Hyde Park High Schools have "active 
grievance/recommendation student groups who meet on a 
regular basis with headmasters," these schools do not have 
Communication Boards. In all 3 schools, a subcommittee of 
students is elected from the student council to regularly 
meet with the headmaster regarding school policy issues. 
They do not employ the structure of conflict resolution used 
by a Communication Board. 

The Student Affairs Office has targeted implementation of 
Communication Boards at South Boston, Copley Square and 
Madison Park High Schools by the end of this school year or 
during the beginning of the next school year. This effort 
has been stalled, though, by scheduling difficulties and a 



-822- 



lack of funds necessary to train participating faculty and 
administrators. 

No party has yet sought for a modification to the 
Amalgamation Plan to replace the RESC's with Communication 
Boards in all high schools. 

The Comments of El Comite de Padres Regarding Second 
Monitoring Report , states, "We are concerned that the RESC's 
have been and become moribund due to school defendants' 
deliberate non-complince with court-orders. Why should 
Communication Boards be blithely accepted by the State Board 
as the solution to this deliberate non-compliance and 
sabotage of court-orders?" Boston may not have provided 
adequate support to the RESC's. However, Communication 
Boards, if properly implemented, have the potential not only 
to address conflicts of a racial nature and promote racial 
harmony, but also to address other school climate and school 
policy issues. A Communication Board is composed of a 
representative body of administrators, teachers and 
students. Any individual within a school may submit a 
complaint, grievance or school issue to the Board. These 
issues may be interpersonal or relate to school rules, 
school climate or other school policy issues. They 
therefore may include racial conflicts and issues regarding 
racial disharmony or racial conflicts. The Board is then 
responsible for hearing all points of view, investigating 
all facts, and mediating a mutual resolution. Many times, a 
resolution may involve a recommendation for a school policy 
change. Communication Boards would meet regularly with the 
headmaster to communicate these concerns. Student Affairs 
Director Carlo has recommended that all Boards sould have 
student representation from all racial and ethnic groups 
with 20 or more students enrolled in the school. 

El Comite raises a valid point when they question Boston's 
commitment to the implementation of these Boards. These 
Boards will experience success only if adequate resources 
and support are devoted to implement them, and if school 
administrators and faculty will accept an increased student 
role and a democratic process in their schools. 

OBJECTIVE: 



II To review the composition of the Boston Student 

Advisory Council, as well as the student councils in 
all miadle and high schools. 



_,P9 0_ 



QUESTION; Twenty-nine schools submitted data in the fall 

on composition of student organizations, and all 
schools were found to have proper representation 
of racial and ethnic groups. Thirteen schools 
did not submit this data (Boston High, Boston 
Latin School, Taft Middle, Curley Middle, Lewis 
Middle, Roosevelt Middle, Cleveland Middle, 
Holmes Middle, Wilson Middle, Dearborn Middle, 
Gavin Middle, McCormack Middle and Mackey 
Middle). What is the composition of the student 
councils in schools that did not submit data in 



fall? 



PROCESS: 



The monitor attended a meeting with Student Affairs Director Carlo. 
STATUS ; 

None of the 13 schools submitted any data on student council 
representation for this school year. 

COMMENDATIONS ! 

Student Affairs Director Carlo should be commended for her 
continuing efforts to develop the concept of Communication 
Boards in all high schools. In addition, the Boston Student 
Advisory Council members should be commended for their 
efforts to provide an increased city-wide presence. 

RECOMMENDATIONS: 



1. State officials should meet with Boston and the 
plaintiffs in order to discuss modifying the 
Amalgamation Plan to replace the RESC's with 
Communication Boards. If the Plan is modified, 
adequate resources and support should be 
provided by the Department of School Operations 
to implement the Communication Boards and to 
ensure necessary faculty and administrative 
support in all high schools; and an 
implementation schedule of Communication Boards 
in all high schools should be developed. 

2. Student representation needs to be ensured next 
year on all school parent councils. 

3. Student council elections with proper racial and 
ethnic representation needs to be ensured in all 

middle and high schools next year. 



-324- 



4 






>eiORANDUM 

TO: Dan French, Mass. Department of Education 

FROM: Vivian Carlo, Director^jLs^ 

Student leadership and Student Affairs 

RE: Student Organization Report; Status of: 

1) Iraplementation of Coasnunication Boards 

2) Request of Modification to Amalgamation Plan for Sttjdent 
Goverinment 

DATE: April 17, 1984 

1) Implementation of Communication Boards 

There are presently three (3) active Communication Boards /Fairness 
Committees in the Boston High Schools, one at Boston Latin, one at Latin 
Academy and a Fairness Consnittee at Charlestown High. In addition, three 
(3) high schools; East Boston, Brighton High and Ifyde Park High have 
active grievance/recommendation, student groups whD meet on a regular 
basis with Headmasters. 

From the training experience at Charlestown, it was decided that training 
funds need to be developed in order to accommodate a training for faculty 
and administrators who ^vould be participating on Communication Boards in 
the pilot schools selected. These schools include South Boston High, 
Copley Square IUgh, and t'ladison Park High. The search for funds is still 
underlay. In addition, a plan needs to be developed whereby training can 
be given to Cb£ involved personnel at a time most appropriate for their 
needs. At this junction in time it seems the most appropriate cine might 
be at the end of this schsol year or at the beginning of the naxt school 
year. Because of time factors and funding factors this project cannot 
proceed until these matters are addressed and resolved. 

2) The ifodification to the Amaloamation Plan 

A proposed raodification to Section II of the Amalgamation Plan was 
submitted to- the Deputy Superintendent of School Operations , 
Dr. Robert S. Peterlcin on March 29, 1984. 



-325- 



i 

Ic is as £3llows: 

The student council shall then hold school-wide elections for 
representation on a Cotnnunication Board which would be a subcortmittee of 
the student council. This Board shall be composed of at least ten (10) 
students and not more than twenty (20) students, at least one (1) faculty 
advisor and not more than five (5) faculty representatives, and one 
administrator, with student representatives including representation from 
all racial and ethnic groups in which there are at least twenty or more 
students enrolled in the school. The purpose of such Board shall be to 
receive and review any cotEplaints, grievances on issues from any student 
or faculty or administrative member of the school, with the stated goals 
of media t ing a mutual resolution between the disputant parties to said 
conflicts, promoting greater school-wide communication and improving 
school climate and racial harmory through increased student participation 
in decision making. Such Board shall also have advisory powers to the 
principal to make recommendations on school policy issues. Such Board 
shall meet once weekly and at least once every other month with the 
principal. All Communication Boards in all high schools shall be 
provided with the initial training to implement the Boards, and shall 
receive ongoing technical assistance to maintain them. This assistance 
will be provided by the Office of Student Affairs, Office of School 
Operations, 26 Court Street, Boston, MA 02108. 

I have not as yet received a response to this proposal. 



VC/bab 

xc: Robert S. Peterkin 
Sid Snith 



-826- 




B-%^^^^d 




DEPUTY SOPiRJMTSMDSMT'S 
MEMORANDUHA 




No. 116, 1982-83 
April 28, 1983 



ELECTION FOR BOSTON STUDENT AVDISORY COUNCIL 



TO: Community Superintendents, Headmasters, Faculty Student Advisors and 
Other Administrative Heads: 

The Boston Stixient Advisory Council (BSAC) and its Executive Committee 
are the vehicles for citywide high school student government activities, as 
mandated in t±ie Student Government Amalgamation Plan. In an effort to improve 
the effectiveness of the organization, BSAC members amended their constitution 
regarding the timing of the election and selection of representatives. 

The following changes in BSAC's election procedures timetable have been 
adopted: 

1. Election for student representatives will now be held in May . The 
new representatives will be responsible to attend meetings in June 
(monthly meeting on June 9, 1983, 12:30-2:30 R-I) , but will not 
assume office until BSAC's first regular meeting in September. 

2. Elections for BSAC officers will be held at the first regular 
meeting in November . Officers will assume their responsibilities 
upon their election. No seniors may be elected as officers . The 
tern of office will be from November to November . 

3. Election for the Execritive Committee member from each school will 
occur in Mav, after the four BSAC members are elected/ selected. 
These representatives are responsible for attending meetings in 
June, but will not assume office until September. 

Ti^ procedures for election and selection of BSAC representatives and for 
election of Executive Coraaittee members have not been amended. Ihey remain as 
follows : 

1. BSAC consists of student representatives from each and every public 
high school in the City of Boston. BSAC will be a body that is 
representative of the racial/ethnic population in each high school. 
Any racial or ethnic group (Asian, Black, Hispanic, White) 
comprising a mim'rmm of 107o of the school's total student population 
must be represented on BSAC. 



-327- 



April 28, 19S3 
No. 116 1982-83 



-2- 



2. Each student council shall elect two BSAC representatives from the 
council in May. 

3. Two representatives will then be designated from each high school. 
One is to be selected by t±ye headmaster and one is to be chosen by 
the faculty senate. 

4. The Executive Committee is composed of one representative from each 
high school, elected by the student council. The person should be 
one of the school's BSAC members. If none of the BSAC members can 
serve, a member of the student council can serve. If no one from 
those two groves can serve, an open election should occur. 

Training sessions will be held over the summer for BSAC and Executive 
Comnittee members. This will include training in leadership, conducting 
student council elections and initiating student government. 

A description of the responsibilities of BSAC and Executive Committee 
members is attached. Faculty Student Advisors are responsible for providing 
this information to student councils. 

The attached fcrm, listing the BSAC and the Executive Committe members, 
must be submitted by May 27, 1983 to Elaine O'Keilly, School Operations. 

FCR FURTHER WFCBi^KxlW PLEASE CCNIACT UJJM, O'REILLY CR SID SMIIH, OFFICE OF 
THE DEPLTTY SUPERINTETOETT FOR SCHOOL OPERATIONS, BOSTCN, MA. 02108, 726-6200 
extension 5337. 



Dr Robert S. PeterkLn, 
Deputy Superintendent/School Operations 



/bab 



-328- 




DEPUTY SUFERIMTiNDiNT'S 
; MEMORANDUM 




I 



No. 53 1983-84 
August 30, 1983 

STUEeTT GOVEEt^gNT ELBgTION 
HK3i SCHOOL 

To Coasunlty Superintendents, Headmasters, Faculty Student Advisors, and 
other Administrative Heads: 

As tnnndated in the Student Government Amalgamation Plan, each high school must 
have a representative student government with r ep r e sentatives to the Boston 
Student Advisory Council (BSAC) and its Executive Connittee. In addition to 
this, one student should also be elected from the Stixient Council to serve as 
a representative to the School Parent Council. It is the responsibility of 
the Headmaster to ensure tibat the election process outlined in this menorandua 
is comleted and that the student government and its subcooxsittees are 
establisted no later than October 7, 1983. 

In past years, each school was mandated to elect a Racial Ethnic Student 
Council (RESC) to serve as a siiscommittee of the general Student Council. 
This year, in its stead, each school will be required to initiate a 
Communication Board (sometimes referred to as Fairness Committee or Grievance 
Board) to serve as a siibcconittee of the Student Council. This Board will 
operate as a grievance/communication mechanism serving bodi students ard 
staff. The Concsni cation Board will be expected to be operational by December 
22. An additional circular will be delivered in SCTtember, outlirdng Board 
responsibilities, activities and membership requirements, as well as a 
trailing schedule for students. Faculty Student Advisors and other interested 
faculty. 

The following is an outline of the process for electing tte student gcvemcent: 

I. The responsibilities of the Headmaster are as follows: 

A. To designate one or more Faculty Student Advisors fcr the 
student government for t±e 1983-84 school year. The selection 
of the Advisor should be done in consultation with t±is school's 
Boston Student Advisory Council representatives who were 
elected in ^fey, 1982. A list of BSAC representatives is 
enclosed. 

B. If a process has not been determined, to initiate a school-wide 
election to determine the form of student government to be 
utilized for school year. (See Appendix for details). 

C. To call a school-wide assenbly (or series of assemblies) on or 
before September 23 to explain and organize a representative 
StJcent Govammsnt. 

D. To ensure that a rsprssentaclve student gcvemnent is elected 
no later than O::tober 7, 1983. (Please consult the enclosed 
Deputy Superintardent ' s >i2scrr2ndum .y116, 1982-83 if your 
school's four BSAC representatives ara not listed on the 



-S?Q- 



Deputy Super! ncendenc ' s >femorandum 1 



ffo. 53 1983- 19&4 
Ai^st 30, 1983 



- 2 - 



E. To ensure that the roles of the student government are clearly 
understood by all students and staff. 

F. To cooperate with the Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent/School Operations to ensure that all necessary 
preparations (communications, elections, orientation) take 
place in the proper manner and on schedule. 

G. To submit to the Community Superintendent and to the Office of 
the Deputy Superintendent/ School Operations the name, grade, 
address and race of each student govemcfint, BSAC and Eboecutive 
Committee member, as well as the student representative to the 
School Parent Council on or before October 12, 1983. 

H. To ensure that t±e student government receives proper sv^port 
in carrying out their goals and objectives. 

I. To cooperate with the newly elected student government to 
arrange the time, place and scheduling of meetings. The 
student government should meet either during an activity 
period, on a rotating meeting schedule or on a schedule which 
prevents students fixmi missing the same class consistently. 
Students who miss class because of a student government meeting 
should be allowed to make up all work within a reasonable time 
without penalty. 

J. Each Student Council should be provided an office/room, 

wherever space permits. In any case, a location should be set 
aside for receipt of mail and notices and adequate space for 
holding meetings. 

II. The responsibilities of the Faculty Student Advisor(s) are (a) to forai a 
Student Election Ccmnittee (b) ensure tb*e effective organization and 
implementation of the election process (c) to work with and support the 
student government on an ongoing basis throughout the school year and (d) 
to submit any information required by the Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent for School Operations. 

A. Formation of the Student Election Committee: 

1. Student Election Committee members should be solicited 
from last year's Student Council and from past and present 
BSAC representatives whenever possible. 

2. A location should be designated where interested students 
can sign up for the Student Election Committee. 

3. Student Election Committees should contain adequate 
representation of each grade and race. 



-330- 



Deputv Superintendent's Mamorandum 
No. 53 1983-&4 
August 30, 1983 



- 3 



II. (Cont'd.) 

B. Working with the Student Election Comnittee: 

1. A meeting of the Student Election Committee should be held 
on or before September 16 to inform and train the 
committee in its roles and responsibilities, 

2. The Faculty Student Advisor (s) sliould work with and 
sv^port the Student Election Committee to facilitate the 
completion of the election process on schedule. 

C. Working with Student Government: 
The Faculty Student Advisor (s) will: 

1. Advise the student government 

2. Attend student government meetings. 

3. Act as liaison to the Faculty Senate 

4. Work with the citywide student government representatives 
in the school. 

5. Ensure that agendas of meetings and attendance figures (by 
race) are forwarded to the Office of the Deputy 
Superintendent/ School Operations by the end of each month. 

III. The responsibilities of the Student Election Conmittee are as follows: 

A. To cooperate with the Faculty Student Advisor(s) and 
administration in inplementing the election process. 

B. To inform the student body of the form of government elected. 

C. To organize and aid in the process of electing the new student 
government . 

D. To coordinate a "special election" if necessary: 

1. "Special elections" are to be held only if there are less 
than eight members of each racial-ethnic group (Black, 
White, Asian-Aaerican and Spanish-Speaking) represented on 
the student government and there are more than twenty- five 
members of said groi^ in the total student population. 
All efforts mast be made to ensure that students from the 
under-reprasented groups are aware of the Student 
Government and have an additional opportunity to join. 

2. These students will become full voting members of the 
Student Government. 



-831- 



Deouty Suoerintendent ' s >femorBnduai 
No'. 53 1983-1984 
August 30, 1984 

- 4 - 

III. (Cont'd.) 

G. Once the student government leadership has been elected, the 
Student Election Committee will disband. 

IV. School Operations staff will be available to assist in coordination of 
elections and in providing ongoing assistance. Citywide BSAC aeetings 
will be coordinated by the Office of the Deputy Superintendent for School 
Operations . 

APPEM)IX 

TTT.TTrnON FDR FORM OF GOVERNMENT: There shall be no change in election 
procedures unless such a change is deemed advisable by the school or no 
election procedures are in place. If no election procedures are in place: 

A. Ihe student body will hold an election to decide the form of 
government. This process should be organized and explained at an 
assembly on Student Government (by September 23, 1982.) 

B. The election will be coordinated by the headmaster and returning 
Stiodent Council members with the assistance of the Faculty Student 
Advisor and the schools 's BSAC representatives. 

C. It is the responsibility of those mentioned above to inform the 
entire student body of the options for the form of student 
government as follows: 

1. Homeroom 

2. Open Government 

3. Class Government 

4. Open and Class Government 

5. Open and Homeroom Government 

See attachment for description of options. 

E. Students will vote on their choice of options, either at the 
assembly, or in their homeroom. 

K3R FURTHER INFDRMfmiCN PLEASE CONTACT VIVIAN CARLO OR SID SMITH, OFFICE OF 
THE DEPUTY SUPEEONTENDEOT FOR SCHOCL OPERATTOrC, 26 COURT STREET, BOSTm, 
MA Telephone 726-6200, x5337 



ROBEIT S. PETERICEN 
DEPUTY SUPERINrENDENI 
SCHXL OPEEATICNS 
SS/jMc 

Ends. 



I 
I 



STUDEOT GOVERNMEOT INITIAL nAT.FMmT? 



No later than . . < 
September 16, 1983 

September 16, 1983 
September 21, 1983 

September 21, 1983 
September 23, 1983 

October 7, 1983 
October 12, 1983 



I 



I 



Faculty Student Advisors' 
names submitted to Office of 
Deputy Superintendent/School 
Operations 

Student Election Comaiittee 
Formed 

Faculty Student Advisor 
meeting, Hubert H. Humphrey 
ORG, Conference Room, 2:30 PM 

Meeting of Student Election 
Comtnittee 

Student Government 
Assanbly/Election for form 
of government held (if 
necessary) 

Student Government elections 
completed 

Submit names, grade, address 
and race of student 
government members on 
attached reixjrt sheets. 



-833- 



STUDENT GOVES^MESTT 

Tha student goverrment is the central body from which sub-coainittees and 
projects originate. Each high school's student government, althoijgh directed 
by the Amalgamation Plan, is established differently and has a varying number 
of members. There are different ways in which students can be elected to 
student government. 

Generally speaking, there are five models a school may choose from: 

1. Hon^room - one or two representatives from each homeroom are elected 
to the student government. 

2. Open Government - Any member of the stxident body who would like to 
join the student government may. There are no elections for this 
type of government. 

3. Class Govemmsnt - Each homeroom will elect a decided upon number of 
delegates from students who either nominated themselves or are 
nominated by other students. These delegates get together with 
other delegates from the same class (freshman, sophomore, junior, 
senior) arS together elect a decided upon number of class 
representatives . 

Another way for a class government to be elected is if all members of 
each class (freshman, sophomore, junior, senior) meet together and elect 
representatives from students who nominate themselves or are nominated. 

4. Open and Class Government - Start with a class government to ensure 
class representation, and then open it up to the whole student body 
to allow others to join. 

5. Open and Honeroom Government - Start with a homeroom government to 
ensure homeroom representation, and then open it vq) to the whole 
student body to allow others to join. 

Once students are elected to student government, elections can be held for the 
student sovemment sub-conmittees. 



o^ 



STUDENT RESP0N5IBILITTES 

The student council must mset at least once monthly by court order. Members 
of any of these groups need to be able to communicate and work with students 
and adults and be willing to devote time to student government projects: 

Student Council lumbers 

must attend monthly meetings 

will represent views of other students 

will relay information to and from council meetings 

will work on identified council projects 

are willing to seek advice of Faculty Student Advisor and other adults 

Boston Student Advisory Council !fembers (Citywide) 

must attend monthly meetings at Boston School Department, 26 Court Street 

will represent views of their student body on citywide student issues 

will relay information to and from their scudent body 

will work on BSAC identified projects 

are willing to serve on School Departnent Committees (e.g. Code of 

Discipline, screening committee, high school Cask force) 
are willing to seek advice of Faculty Student Advisor, Student Affairs 
Specialist, and other adults 

-831^ 



I 



STUDEOT GOVEEINMEOT ME^EEIS 



HIGH SCHOOL 



i 



Name of School 



Faculty Student Advisor 



Please list name, address, grade and racial/ethnic group (White, Black, 
Hispanic, Asian) of each member: 

NAME ADDRESS Q^UP RACIAL/ ETHNIC (SOJ^ 



t 



Signature Faculty Student Advisor 



Signature Headmaster 



To be submitted no later than October 12 , 1983 , to the Connunity 
Superintendent and the Deputy Superintendent/ Scnooi Operations . 



-335- 



STUDENT GOVERNMBH' SUBCOMMITTEZ 

HIGH SCriDOL I 

BOSTCN STUDETT ADVISORY CaMHL 



Name of School 



Faculty Student Advisor 



There are to be four students on BSAC; two students are first elected, then 
one student is designated by the Headmaster, and one student is designated by 
the Faculty Senate. Any racial or ethnic group (White, Black, Asian/American, 
Spanish- speaking) comprising a minimum of 10% of the school's total student 
population, must be represented on BSAC 

mME ADCRESS (SADE RACIAL/EIHNIC (5^3UP 

Elected Member 

1. 

Elected Member 

2. 

Headmaster's Designee 

3. 

Faculty Senate Designee 

4. 



Executive Comnittee Representative :_ 



School Parent Council Representative: 



Signature Faculty Student Advisor 
Signature Hp-arirrASter 



To be submitted no later than October 12 , 1983 , to the Conrmmity 
SiJDerintendent and the Deputy Superinterxient/ School Operations. 



-836- 



DISPUTE FlESOLUnON 



-337- 



I 



- S 3 3 • 



DISPUTE RESOLUTION 



During the present monitoring period, one dispute reached the 
mediation stage described at section V(D)(1) of the Orders of 
Disengagement. This complaint, filed by plaintiffs, questioned the 
process for assigning special needs students to substantially separate 
classes. The complaint was withdrawn after information was provided by 
members of the School Department during the mediation session. 

Three other complaints, all brought by El Comite , remain at the 
negotiation stage described at section V(cy(2") of" the Orders of 
Disengagement. These disputes, and the date on which they were raised, 
are as follows: (1) the absence of bilingual services at the 
Occupational Resource Center, filed on August 18 and September 6, 1983; 
(2) overcrowding in the Hiatian bilingual program at English High 
School, filed on November 14, 1983; and (3) inadequate funding of 
bilingual programs, filed on April 27, 1984. An earlier dispute 
regarding access of Spanish bilingual students to District IX magnet 
programs, filed on September 20, 1983, was resolved through negotiation 
in the previous monitoring period. 



-c;35- 



840' 



MODIFICATIONS 



I 



-£i41- 



1 



-3^2- 



MODIFICATIONS 



Any of the primary parties or intervenors In the case may initiate 
a motion to modify existing orders as long as the proposed modifications 
have been presented to all parties and the Cityv/ide Parents Council 
through a negotiation process under the auspices of the Board of 
Education. 

Such modifications must be shov/n to be necessary in light of 
changed circumstances since the order to be modified was issued, must be 
detailed, complete, and show what the impact will be on the educational 
rights of minority students, must be "ripe for hearing and decision by 
the Court," and must not be inconsistent with Supreme Court decisions or 
federal statutes and regulations. 

On May 2, 1984, the Boston School Committee requested that the 
State Board convene the parties to negotiate proposed amendments to the 
orders relating to administrative desegregation. A negotiating session 
was convened on May 23, 1984, with a second session expected to occur 
during the month of June. 






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.Boston, MA 02117 



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