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Full text of "Report of the Adjutant General of the state of North Carolina [serial]"




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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C353.6 

N87a 

1968/70 

c*2 



UNIVERSITY OF N C AT CHAPEL HILL 



00032750425 



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall 
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North 
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal. 



Form No. A-369 



REPORT 



OF 



THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 



OF THE 



State of North Carolina 



1 JULY 1968-30 JUNE 1970 



REPORT 



OF 



THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 



OF THE 



State of North Carolina 



1 JULY 1969-30 JUNE 1970 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Pages 

Letter of Transmittal 5 

L General 7 

IL Administration and Personnel 8 

in. Public Affairs and Special Activities 10 

IV. United States Property and Fiscal Officer 13 

V. Armory Commission and Construction 14 

VI. Strength of the North Carolina National Guard ... 16 

VII. State Special Duty 17 

VIII. Army National Guard 18 

A. Organization 18 

B. Annual Training 19 

C. Army Service and Area Schools 21 

D. Reserve Enlisted Program 22 

E. North Carolina Military Academy 22 

F. Annual General Inspections 24 

G. Maintenance 24 

H. Army National Guard Technician Program .... 25 

I. Military Support to Civil Authorities 27 

J. Army Advisors 28 

IX. Air National Guard 29 

A. Organization 29 

B. Mission 35 

C. Reorganization and Aircraft Conversions 37 

D. Construction 38 

E. Annual Training 39 

F. Schools 41 

G. Air Technician Program 43 

H. Air Advisors 46 

I. Conclusions 47 

X. Simplified Fiscal Statement 49 

XI. Attachments 50 

North Carolina Armory Commission Statement 

of Capital Assets 50 

Report of the United States 

Property and Fiscal Officer 53-62 

Reports of Annual Field Training 63-72 

Reports of Military Support to Civil Authorities . .73-118 

Digest of General Orders 119-121 

National and Army Area Awards 122 

Special Military Honors and Awards 123 

Adjutants General of North Carolina 125 



STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT 

RALEIGH 

6 July 1970 

To: His Excellency, The Governor of North Carolina and Com- 
mander-in-Chief, North Carolina National Guard Raleigh, 
North Carolina 

Sir: 

In compliance with the provisions of Section 127-14, General 
Statutes of North Carolina, I submit this Report of the opera- 
tions of the Adjutant General's Department for fiscal years 1969 
and 1970. 

Respectfully yours, 

FERD L. DAVIS 

Major General, NCARNG 

The Adjutant General 



SECTION I 
GENERAL 

A. Definition 

The Army National Guard of the United States and the Air 
National Guard of the United States are integral parts and first 
line Reserve Components of the Army of the United States and 
the United States Air Force. The National Guard of the States 
has a dual and simultaneous status, is organized under State 
laws, and in time of national emergency may be called or order- 
ed into active Federal service. All federally recognized units and 
elements of the Active National Guard and the personnel of the 
Inactive National Guard of the several States, District of Colum- 
bia and Puerto Rico together constitute the National Guard of 
the United States. 

B. Missions 

1. Mission of the National Guard of the United States to the 
Federal Government : 

To provide a Reserve Component of the Army of the United 
States and the United States Air Force capable of immediate ex- 
pansion to war strength, able to furnish units fit for service any- 
where in the world, trained and equipped to : 

a. Defend critical areas of the United States against land, 
seaborne or airborne invasion. 

b. Assist in governing, mobilization and concentration of the 
remainder of the Reserve Forces. 

c. Participate by units in all types of operations, including 
the offensive, either in the United States or overseas. 

2. Mission of the National Guard of the States : 

To provide sufficient organizations, so trained and equipped 
as to enable them to function efficiently at existing strength in 
the protection of life and property and the preservation of 
peace, order and public safety, under competent orders of State 
authorities. 

C. Composition of the North Carolina National Guard 

The North Carolina National Guard is composed of units of 
both the Army and the Air National Guard located in 98 cities 
and towns of North Carolina. Units and locations are listed in 
Section VIII (Army) and Section IX (Air). 



SECTION II 

ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL 

This department is organized and functions under the mili- 
tary concept of staff organizations and includes the following 
principal staff positions : 



The Adjutant General: 
Assistant Adjutant General: 
Assistant Adjutant General, Air: 
Administrative Assistant to 

The Adjutant General: 
U. S. Property and Fiscal Officer: 
Chief, Operations-Training: 
Chief, Personnel-Administration: 
Chief, Public Affairs: 
State Maintenance Officer: 
Technician Personnel Officer: 
Military Support of 

Civil Authorities Officer: 
Commandant, 

N. C. Military Academy: 
Army Aviation Staff Officer: 

Consulting Engineer: 
Military Property Auditor: 

State Budget and Fiscal Officer: 
Military Publications Supervisor: 



Major General Ferd L. Davis 
Brigadier General Roy E. Thompson 
Brigadier General William J. Payne 

Colonel David L. Britt 
Colonel Thomas B. Longest 
Colonel Samuel T. Arrington 
Colonel David W. Donovan 
Colonel Charles S. Manooch, Jr. 
Colonel Charles D. Isom, Jr. 
Colonel Neil J. Pait, Jr. 

Colonel Arthur J. Bouchard 

Colonel William P. Keeton, Jr. 
Lieutenant Colonel William S. 

Griffin, Jr. 
Major Elbert McPhaul, Jr. 
1st Lieutenant 

Ernest R. Dickerson, Jr. 
Mr. Howard R. Cooke, Jr. 
Mr. John C. Coats 



In addition to the seventeen staff positions referred to above, 
the following are under the direction of The Adjutant General: 
Nine assistant staff officers (Assistant Operations and Training 
Officer, Assistant Personnel - Administration Officer, Enlisted 
Personnel Officer, Consulting Engineer II, Organization Main- 
tenance Officer, Assistant to the State Maintenance Officer, As- 
sistant to the Technician Personnel Officer and two Assistant 
Military Support to Civil Authorities Officers) ; two Informa- 
tion-Communications Specialists; Administrative Secretary; 
Plant Maintenance Supervisor; eight Maintenance Mechanics 
(three at North Carolina Air National Guard at Charlotte, three 
at Raleigh, and one each at Wilmington and the North Carolina 
Military Academy at Fort Bragg) ; three Security Officers 
(North Carolina Air National Guard at Charlotte) ; Security 
Officer (USPFO) ; janitor-messenger (USPFO) ; Duplicating 
Equipment Operator and twenty-one clerical assistants — total 
65. 



8 



Report of The Adjutant General 9 

The staff and employees operating under the direction of The 
Adjutant General are paid from both State and Federal funds. 
The following are Federally supported positions: Assistant Adju- 
tant General, Air; employees of the United States Property 
and Fiscal Office (USPFO) ; employees of the Technician Per- 
sonnel Office; employees of the Military Support of Civil Au- 
thorities Section; employees of the State Maintenance Office; 
employees of the N. C. Military Academy, less maintenance per- 
sonnel; the Assistant Operations-Training Officer; the Assistant 
Personnel-Administration Officer ; the Enlisted Personnel Offi- 
cer and two clerical assistants. 



SECTION III 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

The Public Affairs Section is responsible for the internal and 
external public relations and public information programs of 
the North Carolina National Guard. 

The programs are designed primarily to: inform the general 
public and the troops of matters affecting the Guard, Guards- 
men and their families ; to explain the Guard's dual mission as 
a State militia and a reserve force for the active services; and 
to provide liaison with local communities to effect close support 
between the unit and community. 

During the period of this report, the National Guard was the 
object of nationwide attention much of which was due to an un- 
favo-able press. (Fortunately, with few exceptions, this has 
not been true in North Carolina.) Of the many reasons for this 
unfavorable national press, those receiving considerable atten- 
tion were: increased draft quotas without first ordering the 
Guard for duty in Vietnam; handling of civil disorders in the 
nation's cities and on college and university campuses ; citing the 
Guard as ill equipped, untrained and undisciplined troops; and 
the lack of minority races in the Guard. 

With few exceptions, the North Carolina press did not depict 
the Tar Heel Guard in the light generally portrayed by the na- 
tional press. In fact, the North Carolina press, for the most part, 
has been highly cooperative in working with this section as well 
as unit representatives in "telling it like it is." This section also 
has worked closely with media personnel so they could accurate- 
ly inform the reading public, listening and viewing audiences on 
North Carolina National Guard matters. 

Public Affairs activities encompassed a wide area of activity 
during the biennium. The following are some of the more spe- 
cialized areas of activity. 

a. Annual Training FY 1969 and FY 1970 : News media in- 
vited to attend summer encampments, news releases pertaining 
to all training periods sent prior, during and after the training 
periods; 

b. Natural disasters and civil disorders : News media person- 
nel were kept advised of National Guard missions, progress and 



10 



Report of The Adjutant General 11 

results as pertained to natural disasters; on civil disorder mis- 
sions, teams of Guard professionals in the information field 
were dispatched to the disorder site where they conducted twice- 
daily news conferences, escorted media personnel during the cri- 
sis, assisted in troop information procedures, and released news 
regarding the mission's activities ; 

c. North Carolina Military Academy Officer Candidate 
School: Feature articles regarding Guardsmen, condidates and 
the school in general were distributed to the media, photogra- 
phic support of all Officer Candidate School activities was pro- 
vided and selected media personnel were invited to attend grad- 
uation and commissioning exercises; 

d. Armed Forces Day and Veterans' Day: Assisted National 
Guard units in coordinating community activities ; 

e. Pamphlets for employers of North Carolina Guards- 
men : Designed, printed and distributed special pamphlets 
which explained the missions of the Guard and Guardsmen's 
responsibility; 

f . Special ceremonies : Provided news releases and photo- 
graphs to the media of special commissioning ceremonies at the 
North Carolina National Guard Center of the Fort Sill, Okla., 
and Fort Penning, Ga., Officer Candidate School graduates and 
provided coverage for other ceremonies involving the awarding 
of various medals and ribbons; 

g. Hargrave Military Academy: Arranged for an inspection 
party, headed by The Adjutant General, to inspect cadets at the 
Academy in Virginia; 

h. National Guard Association of the United States: Collec- 
ted dues and administered the membership program for North 
Carolina National Guard officers ; 

i. "History and Traditions, North Carolina National Guard": 
Researched, compiled, edited and printed an Addendum to up- 
date the departmental publication ; 

j. Inquiries: Answered innumerable requests from the gen- 
eral public and those forwarded from the Governor's Office for 
information about the Guard, biographical sketches of various 
senior officers, pictures and shoulder patches of the North Caro- 
lina National Guard ; 

k. Publications support: Supported The Tar Heel Guardsman, 
a magazine published by the North Carolina National Guard As- 
sociation, by supplying the editor with approximately 50 7^^ of 



12 Report of The Adjutant General 

each issue's copy and photographs. Also furnished copy and pho- 
tographs to The National Guardsman, the official publication of 
the National Guard Association of the United States, and various 
other publications ; 

1. Tours : Planned and coordinated visits to Raleigh and 
the North Carolina National Guard Center by allied nations' offi- 
cers studying at the John F. Kennedy Center for Special War- 
fare at Fort Bragg. These tours included visits to the Legisla- 
tive Building, Museum of Art, North Carolina Supreme Court, 
Governor's Office, television stations, and other businesses. This 
activity resulted in the Section v^inning an Adjutants General 
Association of the United States Public Relations trophy, "The 
Minuteman Mike Av^ard," in the community service category; 

m. Television and radio tapes : Made several special feature 
tapes and distributed them to the media ; 

n. Printed materials : Special retirement certificates are pre- 
pared by this department and sent to the units for their retirees. 
Furnished units of the North Carolina National Guard printed 
materials supplied by the National Guard Bureau. Over 183,000 
pieces of material were shipped during this biennium ; 

o. Photography : Pictorial coverage of North Carolina Nation- 
al Guard activities amounted to more that 4,500 negatives 
with almost 5,000 prints during the biennium. These pictures 
were sent to newspapers, television stations, National Guard 
publications, and various other publications ; 

p. Conferences : Made arrangements for National Guard offi- 
cers to attend the annual conferences of the National Guard 
Association of the United States and the Adjutants General As- 
sociation of the United States ; 

q. Adjutant General's visits: Special news releases and invi- 
tations to the media were sent about one week in advance of the 
new Adjutant General's visits to all units located in 98 communi- 
ties in the State ; 

r. Youth activities : Coordinated requests in support of youth 
activity programs involving National Guard personnel and/or 
equipment ; 

s. Promotional releases : News releases for all officer promo- 
tions were prepared by this department, coordinated and re- 
leased through the Governor's Office ; 

t. Speech file : Wrote and maintained a speech service file for 
use by National Guardsmen who had speaking engagements. 



SECTION IV 
UNITED STATES PROPERTY AND FISCAL OFFICER 

The United States Property and Fiscal Officer is authorized 
the State under the provisions of Title 32, United States Code, 
Section 708. This officer is a member of the North Carolina 
National Guard on extended Active Duty and detailed for duty 
with the National Guard Bureau for administrative purposes. 

In Comptroller matters, the United States Property and Fiscal 
Officer is responsible for the proper financial planning, obli- 
gating, accounting, reporting and administrative control of all 
Federal funds allotted to the State, for the support of Army and 
Air National Guard Activities, by the National Guard Bureau 
and other Government agencies. He is also the Federal Contrac- 
ting Officer. 

In the Logistical area, the United States Property and Fiscal 
Officer is responsible for the requisitioning, receipt, warehous- 
ing, issue, shipment, disposition and accounting for supplies 
furnished and equipment loaned to the State by the Federal 
Government for the support of Federally recognized Army and 
Air National Guard units and activities. As the Transportation 
Officer for the NCNG, he is responsible for transportation of 
National Guard personnel, technicians, supplies and equipment. 

A detailed report of the activities of the USPFO NC is out- 
lined in Annexes A through E to this report. 



13 



SECTION V 
ARMORY COMMISSION AND CONSTRUCTION 

The North Carolina Armory Commission, constituted under 
the authority of Article 23, Section 143-230, General Statutes of 
North Carolina, is charged with the responsibility for the Nation- 
al Guard construction program including the construction 
of new armories and the maintenance and modernization of the 
existing facilities. The Commission consists of five members in- 
cluding the Governor, The Adjutant General, The Attorney Gen- 
eral and two Federally recognized officers of the North Carolina 
National Guard appointed by the Governor. The present ap- 
pointed members are Major General Daniel K. Edwards and 
Brigadier General William M. Buck. 

State appropriations to maintain existing facilities and to pay 
a portion of the cost of armories supported with Federal aid are 
made to this Commission. 

During the period 1 July 1968 through 30 June 1970, one new 
armory was completed and occupied and construction contracts 
were awarded for three armories. Federal funds were allocated 
and contracts executed for design of an Organizational Mainte- 
nance Shop to be constructed in Raleigh during Fiscal Year 71. 
Also, during this period, numerous repairs and renovations were 
made to a number of facilities. 

At the present time the Armory Commission real estate in- 
ventory includes 152 buildings for which there is a direct re- 
sponsibility for maintenance. This figure includes facilities 
which are State owned, leased and under license from the Fed- 
eral Government. Major repairs and renovations are being ac- 
complished by independent contractors and minor repairs and 
maintenance services are being provided by the Maintenance 
Branch of the Engineering and Facilities Division, Adjutant 
General's Department. A substantial savings in funds is being 
realized by providing organic maintenance services and it is an- 
ticipated that these savings will increase as the maintenance 
program expands. 

The following is a tabulation of projects under contracts or 
completed during the period for which the report is made. An 
indication is given of the amount of State funds mvolved in the 
new construction projects : 

14 



Report of The Adjutant General 



15 



State 
Contri- 
NEW CONSTRUCTION Total Cost bution 

Armories 

Nashville $174,566.37 27^/^% 

Fremont 199,694.12 31i^% 

Greenville 239,054.37 25 1/^ % 

Roseboro 191,901.80 26V2% 

Organizational Maintenance Shops 

Concord 45,946.50 

Winston-Salem 46,929.40 

Aviation Maintenance Shop Addition 

Raleigh-Durham Airport $167,333.53 51/2 % 

MAJOR MODIFICATIONS/REPAIRS 

Armory — Clinton 

Renovations to Range Area 1,068.75 100% 

Armory — Edenton 

Renovations 6,950.00 100% 

Armory — Raeford 

Renovations to Garage Area 3,944.00 100% 

Armory — New Bern 

Roof Repairs 3,559.60 100% 

Armory ■ — Butner 

Roof Repairs 2,152.00 100% 

Exterior Painting 8,410.00 100% 

(15 Locations) 

Interior Painting 48,119.51 100% 

(21 Locations) 

Security Fences 8,979.71 100% 

(9 Locations) 

Gasoline Storage Tanks 3,659.06 25% 

(3 Locations) 

Miscellaneous Repairs (Contracted) 25,609.22 100% 

(40 Locations) 



SECTION VI 

STRENGTH OF THE NORTH CAROLINA 
NATIONAL GUARD 

The North Carolina Army National Guard is comprised of the 
State Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment; major ele- 
ments of the 30th Infantry Division (Mechanized) and the Non- 
Division Troop Command. The total strengths for these organi- 
zations were 722 commissioned officers, 99 v^arrant officers and 
10,133 enlisted personnel, for an aggregate of 10,954 as of 30 
June 1970. 

The North Carolina Air National Guard is comprised of Head- 
quarters of the North Carolina Air National Guard ; Headquar- 
ters 145th Military Airlift Group; 145th Supply Squadron; 
145th Support Squadron; 145th Aerial Port Flight; 145th Com- 
munications Flight (Spt) ; 145th USAF Dispensary; 145th Con- 
solidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron ; 145th Civil Engineer- 
ing Flight; 206th Weather Flight; 156th Military Airlift Squad- 
ron; 156th Aeromed Evacuation Flight; 156th Weather Flight; 
and the 263d Communications Squadron. The Air National Guard 
consisted of 168 commissioned officers, 1 warrant officer and 983 
airmen with an aggregate of 1,152 as of 30 June 1970. 

The total strength of the North Carolina Guard was 12,106 
at the close of the reporting period. 



16 



SECTION VII 



STATES SPECIAL DUTY 

During the period of this report, elements of the North Caro- 
lina National Guard were ordered to State special duty 15 
times to assist in various emergencies. 

On 17 February 1969 a severe snow and ice storm occurred in 
Anson, Richmond, and Robeson Counties, Fifty-seven guards- 
men were ordered to State special duty during the period 17 
February to 25 February to operate military generators in order 
to provide emergency electrical power to these hard hit areas. 

On seven separate occasions elements of the North Carolina 
National Guard were ordered to State special duty to assist 
authorities in searching for missing persons. The dates, county 
where search was conducted, and number of guardsmen in- 
volved per incident were : 



3 September 1968 


Bladen County 


148 guardsmen 


1 January 1969 


Brunswick County 


52 guardsmen 


2 February 1969 


Franklin County 


190 guardsmen 


5 March 1969 


Bertie County 


87 guardsmen 


7 October 1969 


Brunswick County 


66 guardsmen 


16 October 1969 


Cumberland County 


112 guardsmen 


10 April 1970 


Lenoir County 


113 guardsmen 



Elements of the North Carolina National Guard were ordered 
to State special duty on seven occasions to assist civil authori- 
ties in the restoration of law and order caused by civil distur- 
bances. The periods of disorder, location, and number of guards- 
men involved per incident were : 



13-16 February 1969 

5- 7 March 1969 

12-15 March 1969 

18-19 April 1969 

29 April-1 May 1969 

16-20 May 1969 

21-25 May 1969 



Duke University 
City of Durham 
City of Durham 
City of Raleigh 
City of Winston-Salem 
City of Burlington 
City of Greensboro 



965 guardsmen 
603 guardsmen 
660 guardsmen 
452 guardsmen 
162 guardsmen 
502 guardsmen 
735 guardsmen 



17 



SECTION VIII 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 

A. Organization 

The troop basis for the State did not change during the period 
of this report. There were, however, a few minor reorganiza- 
tions and changes in unit designation. The locations which ex- 
perienced those changes and the current unit designation at 
those locations are as follows : 

NON-DIVISIONAL UNITS 
Unit Location 

HHC (-Det 1 & 2), 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Hickory 

Det 1, HHC, 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Statesville 

Det 2, HHC, 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Newton 

Co A (-Det 1), 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Morganton 

Det 1, Co A, 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Boone 

Co B (-Det 1), 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Lexington 

Co C (-Det 1 & 2), 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Mt. Airy 

Det 1, Co C, 2d Bn (M). 120th Inf Elkin 

Det 2, Co C, 2d Bn (M), 120 Inf Mocksville 

DIVISIONAL UNITS 

HHC (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Ahoskie 

Det 1, HHC, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Tarboro 

Det 2, HHC, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Roanoke Rapids 

Co A (-Det 1), 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Wilson 

Det 1, Co A, 1st Bn, 119th Inf Nashville 

Co B (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Williamston 

Det 1, Co B, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Scotland Neck 

Det 2, Co B, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Woodland 

Co C (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Elizabeth City 

Det 1, Co C, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Edenton 

Det 2, Co C, 1st Bn (M), 119th Inf Windsor 

HHC (-Det 1), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Wilmington 

Det 1, HHC, 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Wallace 

Co A (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Jacksonville 

Det 1, Co A, 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Morehead City 

Det 2, Co A, 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Beulaville 

Co B (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Shallotte 

Det 2, Co B, 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Fair BluflF 

Co C (-Det 1), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Smithfield 

Det 1, Co C, 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf Warsaw 

HHC (-Det 1 & 2), 1st Bn, 252d Armor Fayetteville 

Det 1, HHC, 1st Bn, 252d Armor Roseboro 

Det 2, HHC, 1st Bn, 252d Armor Parkton 

18 



Report of The Adjutant General 19 

The "Selected Reserve Forces" (SRF) mission, designation 
and requirements was terminated 1 October 1969. 

B. Annual Training 

Calendar Year 1968 

The 5th Battalion, 113th Artillery performed Annual Train- 
ing at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, during the period 17-31 August 1968. 

The following units performed Annual Training at Fort Gor- 
don, Georgia, during the period 7-21 July 1968 : 

HHD, NCARNG (-) 
167th MP Bn (Army) 
HHD, 109th MP Bn (TM AD) 

210th MP Co (Gd) 

211th MP Co (Gd) 

213th MP Co (Gd) 

The North Carolina Military Academy, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina, conducted Annual Training during the period 24 July - 
11 August 1968. 

Annual Training conducted during the first half of CY-1968 
was included in the last biennial report. 

All periods of Annual Training were considered effective. 

Calendar Year 1969 

North Carolina Army National Guard units conducted Annual 
Training during this calendar year as follows : 

1. Non-Divisional Units: 

(a) Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 1-15 June 1969 
Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, NCARNG (-) 
205th Medical Detachment 

823d Medical Detachment 

2d Battalion (MECH) 120th Infantry 

Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, 690th Maintenance 

Battalion 
691st Maintenance Company 
694th Maintenance Company 
696th Maintenance Company 
382d Quartermaster Detachment 

(b) Fort Stewart, Georgia, 14-29 June 1969 
878th Engineer Company 

(c) Fort Gordon, Georgia, 15-29 June 1969 

Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, NCARNG (IP) 
167th Military Police Battalion 

Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, 109th Military Police 
Battalion 



20 Report of The Adjutant General 

210th Military Police Company 
211th Military Police Company 
213th Military Police Company 
(d) Fort Stewart, Georgia 19 July - 3 August 1969 

Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, 540th Transportation 

Battalion 
1450th Transportation Company 
1451st Transportation Company 
1452d Transportation Company 

2. 30th Infantry Division (MECHANIZED) Units: 

(a) Fort Stewart, Georgia 5 July - 3 August 1969 

30th Infantry Division (MECH) minus 1st Squadron, 196th Cavalry, 
5th Battalion, 113th Artillery, Company E, 730th Maintenance 
Battalion, Ground Surveillance Sections of the Infantry and Armor 
Battalions and Radar Section, 1st Battalion, 113th Artillery 

(b) Fort Bragg, North Carolina 31 May - 14 June 1969 

Ground Surveillance Sections from each Infantry and Armor 
Battalion and Cavalry Squadron 

(c) Fort Sill, Oklahoma 19 July - 2 August 1969 
5th Battalion, 113th Artillery 

3. North Carolina Military Academy conducted Annual Training at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina, during the period 10-24 August 1969. 

4. Selective Service Section, HHD, NCARNG, conducted Annual Training 
in one and two officer increments at the State Selective Service Headquar- 
ters, Raleigh, North Carolina, during the period 1 July - 20 December 1969. 

There were no serious mishaps to personnel or equipment. 
Training accomplished during all periods was considered 
effective. 

Calendar Year 1970 

North Carolina Army National Guard units conducted Annual 
Training during the first half of this calendar year as follows : 

1. Non-Divisional units: 

Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 30 May - 13 June 1970 
Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment, NCARNG (-) 

167th Military Police Battalion 

Headquarters & Headquarters Detachment (-), 690th Maintenance 
Battalion 

691st Maintenance Company 

696th Maintenance Company 

2. 30th Infantry Division (MECHANIZED) Units: 
(a) Foi-t Stewart, Georgia 23 May - 7 June 1970 

Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 30th Infantry 
Division (MECH) 



Report of The Adjutant General 21 

1st Battalion (MECH), 119th Infantry 

1st Battalion (MECH). I20th Infantry 

1st Battalion, 252d Armor 

2d Battalion, 252d Armor 

Company B, 105th Medical Battalion 

Company B, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

Detachment, 230th Supply & Transport Battalion 

Detachment, 30th Administration Company 

1st Platoon, 30th Military Police Company 

(b) Fort Bragg, North Carolina 30 May - 13 June 1970 
Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 30th Infantry Division 

(MECH) 
30th Military Police Company (-) 
130th Signal Battalion 
105th Engineer Battalion (-) 
1st Squadron, 196th Cavalry (-) 
Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 30th Infantry Division 

(MECH) Artillery 
1st Battalion, 113th Artillery 
4th Battalion, 113th Artillery 
5th Battalion, 113th Artillery 
Headquarters & Headquarters Company & Band, 30th Infantry 

Division (MECH) Support Command 
30th Administration Company (-) 
Headquarters & Company A, 105th Medical Battalion 
Headquarters & Company A, 730th Maintenance Battalion 
230th Supply & Transport Battalion (-) 

(c) Fort Bragg, North Carolina 20 June - 4 July 1970 
Troop D, 1st Squadron, 196th Cavalry 

Training accomplished during all of the above periods was 
considered effective. 

Troop movements and training were conducted without seri- 
ous mishap to personnel or equipment. However, one individual 
was killed in an off-duty private automobile accident. 
C. Army Service and Area Schools 

Officers and enlisted men of the North Carolina Army Nation- 
al Guard continue professional improvement by attending courses 
of instruction offered by United States Army Service Schools and 
Third United States Army Area Schools. During this report 
643 officers and 115 enlisted men attended courses at these 
schools. 

For the first time since 1962 spaces were made available to 
National Guard personnel to attend aviation qualification 
courses. During fiscal year 1970 twelve (12) officers and one (1) 
enlisted man attended the Officer/Warrant Officer Rotary Wing 
Aviator Course. 



22 



Report of The Adjutant General 



During the spring of 1970 a Mechanized Platoon Leader 
Course was conducted by the 30th Infantry Division (MECH) 
at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The course was conducted on 
four weekends. Sixty lieutenants attended the course. 

D. Reserve Enlisted Program 

This program, commonly referred to as The Six-Months 
Training Program or The Reserve Enlisted Program '63, pro- 
vides that all individuals entering the Army National Guard 
without prior military service participate in an active duty for 
training status with the Active Army for the purpose of basic 
and specialist training. Individuals must participate in this pro- 
gram for a minimum period of 120 days ; the total time being en- 
tirely dependent upon the type of training required by individ- 
ual's assignment. This program provides two basic advantages 
for the National Guard in that it affords excellent training of an 
individual in the initial phase of his military career and relieves 
the National Guard units of the additional burden in time and 
man power to conduct this training. During the fiscal year 1969, 
a total of 695 individuals entered this program and during fiscal 
year 1970, a total of 2,308. A total of 3,003 were trained during 
the reporting period. 

E. North Carolina Military Academy 

The North Carolina Military Academy was established in 
1958 and remains in operation at Fort Bragg, N. C. 

In August 1968, ninety two (92) members of Officer Candi- 
date Class Number Ten (10) graduated and were commissioned 
Second Lieutenants in the North Carolina National Guard or 
were presented certificates of eligibility. The following is a list 
of graduates : 



Harold G. Allen 
George W. Angel 
Gregory D. Armstrong 
Franklin M. Averitt Jr. 
James H. Baker Jr. 
Horace B. Barbee 
Joe A. Barkely 
Robert E. L. Baxter III 
James B. Beam 
Stephen R. Best 
Terry W. Benson 
Daniel W. Biggerstaff 
Carl R. Bishop 



Robert R. Boyce 
Walter N. Burton Jr. 
Tommy M. Gloninger 
James C. Cooper III 
Bobby R. Crawford 
Lawrence W. Davis 
Willard R. Dean Jr. 
Earl L. Dutton 
Richard L. Edwards 
Luther R. Finch 
Stanley A. Fink 
Thomas G. Fisher 
John T. Furmage 



John C. Griffis 
Isaac D. Gurley 
Robert E. Grant 
Samuel B. Hendrix Jr. 
Walter R. Highsmith Jr. 
David H. Hill Jr. 
William A. Hill 
Larry N. Holland 
Curtis E. Holleman 
Lignell W. Hood III 
Dewey E. Howell Jr. 
William C. Howard Jr. 
Willie A. Hunt 



Report of The Adjutant General 



23 



Douglas F. Israel 
Charles H. Jackson 
Richard T. Jones 
Wayne H. Jones 
Henry A. Jordan Jr. 
Clarence L. J. Joyner 
William B. Joyner 
Ronald E. Kress 
David B. Lancaster 
Benjamin W. Lanier 
Walter L. Lewis 
Robert B. Long Jr. 
William F. McCombs 
Warren E. McCormick 
Benny L. Merrell 
Ulrich G. Mizell Jr. 
Don R. Moody 
Phillip T. Nordan 

*Distinguished Graduate 

In August 1969, fifty four (54) members of Officer Candi- 
date Class Number Eleven (11) graduated and were commis- 
sioned Second Lieutenants in the North Carolina National 
Guard. The following is a list of graduates : 

Phillip A. Baddour Jr. Robert K. Dunlap 



John W. Ollis 
Dwight L. Osborne 
Joe D. Parker 
Michael L. Parks 
Burke F. Partin Jr. 
George W. Pleasants Jr. 
James C. Plyler Jr. 
Raymond F. Perry Jr. 
Clarence A. Price Sr. 
George C. Pratt 
Richard A. Rabb 
James W. Richardson 
William N. Rigsbee Jr. 
Alton K. Rollins 
Herbert T. Ruark 
Charles H. Scruggs 
Robert B. Sharer 
John E. Sloop 



Ronald L. Snow 
Carroll W. Spencer 
John F. Stone 
Ray M. Sykes 
James L. Taylor 
Richard E. Tucker 
Kenneth R. Wade 
Howard W. Watkins Jr. 
William L Watson Jr. 
Gaines L. Wullenwaber 
George D. Williams III 
Richard L. Williams 
Armond H. Wright 
Reginald R. Wright 
Daniel W. Wise 
John S. Yow 
*Paul Ziglar 



John D. Edge III 
Lyle R. Edwards Jr. 
David W. Faircloth 
Charles E. Gibson 
Milton C. Green 
Forrest M. Grimes 
Robert F. Gunter Jr. 
Thomas O. Gwinn 
William E. Harrison 
William C. Howard Jr. 
Robert D. Huneycutt 
Derrick W. James 
Robert D. King 
William J. Leach Jr. 
Luther G. Leonard 
Jonathan Lucas 
Ralph F. Lyon 



Richard A. Baddour 
James A. Bailey 
Johnnie C. Bailey 
Clyde R. Brawley Jr. 
*Gary M. Brown 
Terry W. Brown 
Wiley Brown Jr. 
Howard F. Bryan 
George A. Burnham 
James D. Coble 
James T. Cowan 
James L. Cox Jr. 
Delbert M. Cranford 
Gene A. Grumpier 
Thomas E. Daughtry 
Dailey J. Derr 
Alvis B. Dickson Jr. 

*Distinguished Graduate 

At the present time there are thirteen (13) members of Offi- 
cer Candidate Class Number Twelve (12) enrolled and are 
scheduled to graduate in July of this year. Four (4) of these 
candidates are members of the USAR. This is the first class in 
which Army Reserve personnel have participated. 



William L. Mayo II 
Jules McMichael Jr. 
Gregory P. Mills 
James H. Mills Jr. 
Hugh J. Moore 
Dennis W. Patrick Jr. 
John E. Penland 
Donald C. Plaster Jr. 
Edward R. Pope Jr. 
Kenneth C. Ritter 
Charles W. Robinson 
George E. Shelton III 
Thurman R. Smith Jr. 
Edgar G. Smoak 
Tommie L. Stone 
Charles D. Strickland 
Danny D. Williford 
Theodore F. Winters 



24 Report of The Adjutant General 

The NCO Leadership School which was organized as an inte- 
gral part of the Academy in 1960 continues to provide the State 
with trained personnel. NCO Class Numbers 5, 6, and 7 gradu- 
ated a combined total of 153 students. 

It is anticipated that the Officer Candidate School will con- 
tinue its present programs. The initial class size will be made to 
conform with the projected requirements for junior officers in 
the North Carolina Army National Guard. 

F. Annual General Inspections 

In accordance with the provisions of Section 105, Title 32, 
United States Code, general inspections of all units of the Army 
National Guard are conducted annually by the Inspector Gen- 
eral's Department, Headquarters Third United States Army, 
Fort McPherson, Georgia. 

The purpose of these inspections is to determine whether : 

1. Units are organized as prescribed and minimum strength 
requirements are being maintained. 

2. Personnel possess the prescribed qualifications. 

3. Organizations and members thereof are armed, equipped 
and uniformed with prescribed allowances. 

4. Instruction and training are in accordance with prescribed 
standards. 

5. Property issued to units is properly maintained and safe- 
guarded. 

6. Records are maintained in accordance with requirements 
of the law and regulations. 

These inspections were conducted during the biennium as 
follows : 

1. Fiscal year 1969—9 September— 18 October 1968 

2. Fiscal year 1970—16 February— 12 March 1970 
All units received a satisfactory rating. 

G. Maintenance 

The State Maintenance Officer has the responsibility for su- 
pervising the maintenance and repair of all Federal equipment 
except Army aircraft issued to the North Carolina Army Nation- 
al Guard. The functions are performed at the Combined 
Support Maintenance Shop, Raleigh; Raleigh-Durham Airport; 
Weekend Training Equipment Pool (WETEP), Fort Bragg and 



Report of The Adjutant General 25 

the twenty (20) Organizational Maintenance Shops located 
throughout the State. Maintenance of all supported equipment 
is considered outstanding. 

The Weekend Training Equipment Pool was established 1 
May 1965 to provide a facility for maintenance, storage, issue 
and receipt of tracked combat vehicles pooled at Fort Bragg, 
N. C, for training armored elements of the NC ARNG. The 
WETEP is under the operational control of the State Mainte- 
nance Officer. 

The Annual Command Maintenance Management Inspections 
for FY 1969 and FY 1970 were conducted by personnel from the 
Office of the State Maintenance Officer and Combined Support 
Maintenance Shop. Units and activities are rated either satis- 
factory or unsatisfactory. All units were rated Satisfactory for 
FY 1969. All units except one were rated Satisfactory in FY 
1970. The concept for the conduct of these CMMI's has accom- 
plished the objective of causing commanders at all echelons to 
become aware of their responsibilities for maintenance and Care 
of their equipment. 

The activities under the operational control of the State Main- 
tenance Officer were inspected by the Third United States Army 
Inspector General during Annual General Inspections in FY 
1969 and FY 1970. Commendable results were recognized by 
the Inspector both years. 

H. Army National Guard Technician Program 

Since the reorganization of the National Guard in 1947, vhe 
many and varied administrative, accounting, logistical, main- 
tenance and training functions required at each National Guard 
unit and activity have been performed by a workforce of full- 
time personnel known as National Guard Technicians. While 
this group of employees has always been supported by Federal 
funds, they were not recognized officially as either Federal or 
State employees. After many years of effort on the part of the 
National Guard Bureau, the National Guard Association of the 
United States, the Adjutant General's Association of the United 
States and congressional leaders, Public Law 90-486, the Na- 
tional Guard Technician Act of 1968 (82 Stat. 755; 32 OSC 
709), was approved on 13 August 1968. As a result of this law, 
National Guard technicians were fully recognized as Federal 
employees effective 1 January 1969. 



26 Report of The Adjutant General 

With the number of Army National Guard technicians auth- 
orized for the State being based on the overall troop structure 
and operational requirements of the State Army Nation- 
al Guard's units and activities, the technician workforce has in- 
creased during the period of this report from 470 to 490 full- 
time employees. The majority of these technicians are required 
to be members of the National Guard in a military assignment 
related to their civilian employment, and for this reason are des- 
ignated as "Excepted" Civil Service employees. In addition, a 
small number of female stenographers and clerks are employed 
and appointed as "Competitive" Civil Service employees. 

Under the present manning criteria, at least one technician 
is authorized for each Company or Detachment size unit with an 
assigned strength of 50 or more Guardsmen. Battalion and 
higher type headquarters are provided additional administrative 
and training technicians based on the type of unit concerned. 
Each battalion is supported by an Organizational Maintenance 
Shop, manned by a Shop Chief and one or more mechanics who 
perform the proper level of maintenance of Unit equipment. 
The ofRce and warehouse of the United States Property and 
Fiscal Officer, and the Army National Guard Combined Sup- 
port Maintenance Shop, both located at the National Guard Cen- 
ter Complex on Reedy Creek Road in Raleigh are supported, 
personnel wise, entirely by technicians. 

Technician positions and funding support for Army National 
Guard units and activities during the biennium covered by this 
report have been as follows : 



Unit/Activity 


No. of Technicians 


Total Salaries and Wages 




FY-69 


FY-70 


FY.69 


FY-70 


State Hq Tecs 


15 


13 


$ 137,320.00 


$ 139,367.26 


MSCA Tecs 


5 


5 


51,436.51 


56,808.58 


Unit Admin Tecs 


219 


222 


1,845,480.00 


2,147,587.07 


Orgn Maint Tecs 


94 


100 


665,086.80 


767,052.74 


USPFO Tecs 


63 


64 


510,046.04 


588,420.03 


Maint Acty Tecs 


85 
481 


86 
490 


645,609.16 


710,179.20 


TOTAL 


$3,854,978.51 


$4,409,414.88 



From the standpoint of operations, the conversion of the tech- 
nician workforce to a Federal employee status has been almost 
unnoticeable. It has had, however, a considerable effect on the 
administration and management of the program, which must 



Report of The Adjutant General 27 

now be performed and accomplished in accordance with applic- 
able Civil Service as well as National Guard Bureau rules and 
regulations. To the individual technician, it does provide numer- 
ous improved benefits in the area of retirement, insurance 
privileges, placement and promotion policies, grievance and ap- 
peal procedures, and eligibility for participation in employee- 
management relationships. While the full impact of Public Law 
90-486 is yet to come, it should result in a more stable Army 
National Guard Technician Program for both employees and 
management than we have experienced heretofore. 

I. Military Support To Civil Authorities 

The Military Support to Civil Authorities Section has a dual 
mission. This mission encompasses planning for and coordinat- 
ing military support to Civil Defense Agencies in the event of 
nuclear attack on the United States. Of equal importance, the 
mission also includes planning for and coordinating military 
support to civil authorities during natural or man-made disas- 
ters, to include civil disorders. 

This section functions as a full-time staff for The Adjutant 
General in planning, coordinating, and furnishing planning 
guidance in the military support of civil defense to all military 
forces in the State of North Carolina. In addition, it serves The 
Adjutant General in furnishing planning guidance in the mili- 
tary support to civil authorities for all elements of the North 
Carolina National Guard. 

Military assistance to State and local government is provided 
in times of hardship caused by unusual circumstances. Authori- 
zation for affording military support from the North Carolina 
National Guard at the State and local level remains under the 
direct command of the Governor of North Carolina. In the event 
of a national disaster of any type, the North Carolina National 
Guard, in its entirety or by specific elements, could be ordered 
into active Federal service. This section plus the other troops 
concerned would then come under direct command of the Presi- 
dent of the United States or his designated representative. At 
that time only, would military assistance requirements be allo- 
cated through the Federal Government. 

This section is authorized and composed of five Army Nation- 
al Guard Technicians. Although these technicians are supported 
by Federal funds, they are under direct control and supervision 
of The Adjutant General. Three members of the section have 



28 Report of The Adjutant General 

attended and graduated from the Office of Civil Defense Staff 
College at Battle Creek, Michigan. Two members have attended 
the Senior Officers Civil Disturbance Orientation Course (SEA- 
DOC) at Fort Gordon, Georgia. 

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 

J. Army Advisors 

To provide assistance to unit commanders at the various 
echelons of command in solving problems of training and ad- 
ministration, the Department of Army authorizes an Advisor 
Group, composed of regular Army Officers and enlisted men, to 
each State. The Group assigned to North Carolina has an 
authorized strength of 26 officers and 34 enlisted men. There 
has been a noted increase in strength during the reporting 
period vi^ith a year end assigned strength of 20 officers and 33 
enlisted men. 

Colonel John N. Schoming has served as Senior Advisor 
throughout the period. The 30th Infantry Division (Mech) Ad- 
visor, Colonel Albert M. Nash, has also served during the entire 
period. 



SECTION IX 
AIR NATIONAL GUARD 

A. Organization 

The North Carolina Air National Guard is composed of six 
elements reporting directly to and under the direction of Brig- 
adier General William J. Payne, Assistant Adjutant General for 
Air, State of North Carolina. These units are Hq, N.C. Air 
National Guard, 145 Military Airlift Group, 263 Mobile Com- 
munications Squadron (Contingency), 156 Weather Flight, 206 
Weather Flight, and the 145 Communications Flight (Support). 
These units, with the exception of the 263 Mobile Communica- 
tions Squadron (Contg) and the 206 Weather Flight are located 
at Douglas Municipal Airport, Charlotte, NC. The 263 Mobile 
Communications Squadron (Contg) is located at Badin, N. C, 
with a detachment at Wadesboro, NC. The 206 Weather Flight 
is located at Raleigh-Durham Municipal Airport, Morrisville, 
NC, and provides weather support for the 30th Infantry Divi- 
sion, N. C. Army National Guard. 

There were minor changes only in the organization and func- 
tions of units of the North Carolina Air National Guard during 
this period. 

Headquarters, 145 Military Airlift Group supervises functions 
of subordinate units which include the 145 Support Squadron, 
145 Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, 145 Supply 
Squadron, 145 USAF Dispensary, 156 Military Airlift Squad- 
ron, 145 Aerial Port Flight, 156 Aeromedical Evacuation Flight, 
and the 145 Civil Engineering Flight. Supervision and direc- 
tion of functions are in accordance with the Group concept and 
functional alignment whereby the authority and responsibility 
to command an Air National Guard unit is vested in one com- 
mander, the Group Commander. Although each unit with the 
Group is authorized a commander, these subordinate comman- 
ders are responsible to the Group Commander for certain func- 
tions in support of the overall Group mission. Under this con- 
cept, the Group Commander is authorized a Deputy Commander 
for Materiel, a Deputy Commander for Operations, and a Sup- 
port Squadron Commander as assistants for the supervision of 
Group line activities. The Commander, 145 USAF Dispensary, 
is the Group Surgeon and provides advice in all medical matters. 

29 



30 Report of The Adjutant General 

The 145 Civil Engineering Flight was activated on 22 Novem- 
ber 1969. The Civil Engineering function formerly assigned to 
the 145 Support Squadron was withdrawn and became the re- 
sponsibility of the Civil Engineering Flight. The basic strength 
column of the unit manning document contains the personnel 
authorizations to provide the flight with a mobile (Prime Beef 
"C" Team) response capability. The augmented strength column 
of the UMD contains the personnel authorizations required to 
fulfill a typical Civil Engineering Flight mission requirement. 
The Prime Beef "C" Team is designed to support unforeseen 
contingencies and special air warfare operations. It can be called 
upon to supplement other Prime Beef Teams that need assis- 
tance. Prime Beef (Base Engineer Emergency Forces) are de- 
signed to perform direct combat-support roles in support of the 
Air Force mission world-wide. Military Airlift Command, 
USAF, is the major gaining command for the 145 Military Air- 
lift Group. The Group is assigned to the 116 Military Airlift 
Wing, Georgia Air National Guard, for mobilization and train- 
ing purposes. In the event of recall to extended active duty, the 
Group and assigned units would become a part of the World 
Wide MAC System with assignment to 21 Air Force, McGuire 
AFB, New Jersey . The Group has an "in place" M-Day 
assignment. 

The 263 Mobile Communications Squadron (Contg) is com- 
posed of Operations, Maintenance, and self-supporting sections 
and is assigned to the 251 Communications Group (Mobile), 
Ohio Air National Guard, Springfield, Ohio for operational, 
training, and mobilization purposes. This unit has a M-Day 
assignment to Air Force Communications Service. 

The 145 Communications Flight (Support) has a M-Day 
assignment to Air Force Communications Service. The Flight 
provides communications support for the 145 Military Airlift 
Group and would continue this support in the event of activation 
of the Group. 

The 156 Weather Flight (Mobile/Fixed) and the 206 Weather 
Flight (SA) have a M-Day assignment to Air Weather Ser- 
vice, an intermediate command under Military Airlift Com- 
mand. The 156 Weather Flight has continued normal operations 
during this period without a major change in organizational 
structure. The maintenance of a high level of operational read- 
iness by the 156 Weather Flight has been noteworthy. The 206 



Report of The Adjutant General 31 

Weather Flight provides weather support for the 30th Infantry 
Division. The strength of the Fhght was increased from 2 offi- 
cers and 4 airmen to 3 officers and 15 airmen on 1 August 
1969. The progress toward operational readiness made by the 
206 Weather Flight is outstanding, especially in view of the 
significant increase in strength and training requirements. 

The concentration of a majority of the North Carolina Air 
National Guard functions at Charlotte, NC, has permitted the 
decentralization of certain Air National Guard functions to the 
Office of the Assistant Adjutant General for Air, thereby elimi- 
nating duplications of effort in some areas. This practice occurs 
primarily in the personnel and administrative areas. In ad- 
dition. Assistant USP&FO's for Air, (Fiscal), (Property), and 
(Real Property), perform Air Comptroller, Supply and Ser- 
vices, and Property accountability functions. 

Equipment in use in the North Carolina Air National Guard 
has a value of $2.4 million. Real estate is valued at $2.6 million, 
aircraft and spare parts at over $15 million, while the annual 
payrolls total approximately three million dollars. 

Air National Guard unit manning documents are the docu- 
ments which authorize military manpower spaces. Problems en- 
countered in previous years in the areas of authorizations versus 
ceilings continued at the beginning of this period. The comman- 
der must consider the drill pay ceiling when filling a manning 
document position. He alone must decide which positions to fill 
and those positions which can be left vacant. The unit manning 
document thus becomes a desired goal in the event of active 
duty. In this State, we are authorized 1,234 military spaces in 
accordance with approved unit manning standards. The pro- 
grammed drill pay spaces were 1,100 which meant that approxi- 
mately 90 7^^ of authorized positions could be filled in FY 1969. 
The overall Air National Guard drill-pay spaces were increased 
effective 1 July 1969. The drill-pay ceiling of the 145 Military 
Airlift Group was again increased to 100% of authorized spaces. 

The majority of airmen assigned to N. C. Air National Guard 
units were non-prior service personnel at time of enlistment. 
Maintenance of authorized strength levels is dependent upon re- 
ceipt of sufficient USAF training spaces to enlist non-prior ser- 
vice personnel. When drill-pay ceilings are increased, an in- 
crease in USAF Service School spaces should follow. The Air 
National Guard is not in a position to depend entirely on non- 
prior service enlistment quotas and training spaces to meet 



32 Report of The Adjutant General 

strength requirements. A small percentage of personnel with ac- 
tive duty experience are enlisted each year and a small percen- 
tage of personnel who complete their service obligation with the 
Air National Guard reenlist or extend enlistments. The intro- 
duction of the Selective Service Random Selection Procedures 
decreased the available manpower to fill authorized enlistment/ 
service school training quotas. However, we were able to fill all 
spaces authorized and still have a waiting list. Non-prior ser- 
vice personnel are processed for enlistment in accordance with 
priority system established by the Department of Defense. Or- 
der of enlistment is: Priority I: applicants who have not un- 
dergone random selection for induction ; Priority II : applicants 
who have undergone random selection for induction. Every ef- 
fort is made to retain experienced airmen completing service 
obligation, through explanation of benefits, advantages of con- 
tinued training, and appeal to patriotism. Retention of trained 
personnel will continue as a problem area until additional bene- 
fits are made available. A reenlistment bonus for the Reserve 
Forces would eliminate some of the loss of trained and proficient 
manpower. The turnover of a large force of trained personnel 
each six years is expensive and has an adverse effect on the 
operational capability of units of the Reserve Forces. During 
the latter part of this period, there was extensive discussion of 
an all volunteer regular force and the impact of such a program 
on the National Guard. 

During this period, the Air National Guard continued opera- 
tions under the generally accepted concept that the Air Nation- 
al Guard has passed from a training organization to an opera- 
tional unit. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 1969, two airlift 
missions were flown to Vietnam each month. This was the an- 
ticipated level of participation in Fiscal Year 1969. These mis- 
sions were supported from Air National Guard appropriations 
intended to support the ANG training mission. We were able 
to provide operational support as a by-product of our Air 
National Guard training dollars, thus giving the taxpayer double 
value for his defense dollar. Participation in Vietnam missions 
was over and above the average of three missions flown each 
month to Europe. Missions to Vietnam were later reduced to an 
average of one each 20 days due to budgetary limitations. The 
145 Military Airlift Group entered FY 1969 with a capability 
rating of C-2, which indicates fully operational with minor ex- 
ceptions. The limiting factor was a shortage of flight engineers 



Report of The Adjutant General 33 

and loss of qualified pilots. Additional flight engineers entered 
Cruise Control Training Course in February 1969. Overall short- 
age in assigned strength became the limiting factor later in the 
year. C-1 rating, fully operational, was attained in December 
1969 and maintained for the remainder of the reporting period. 
During this period, the 145 Military Airlift Group continued its 
excellent record of accident free flying and flew the C-124, unit 
equipped aircraft, (or primary weapons system), a total of 
11,200 hours. This makes a grand total of 18,838 hours in the 
Globemaster and a noteworthy total of 60,498 accident free fly- 
ing hours through 30 June 1970. At the close of this period, the 
C-124 aircraft had an average airframe time of 15,315 hours 
per aircraft with an average installed engine time of 564 hours. 
The direct maintenance man-hour factor for each flying hour is 
15.4. During this period, the Group flew 103.5 percent of pro- 
grammed flying hours. (Mission accomplishment will be out- 
lined later in this report). We could not list accomplishments 
without again praising our aircrew members who secured time 
off from regular civilian positions in order to make the many 
trips. The attitude displayed by the employers in this area has 
been one of understanding and acceptance. This approach has 
assured an airlift capability as well as availability of employees 
to the civilian economy a majority of the time. We feel the reali- 
zation by DoD of the airlift capability available from the Air 
National Guard has been one reason units have not been recalled 
during the Vietnam emergency. Support provided as outlined 
herein has required an average of nearly 500 flying hours per 
month during the two-year period. This is quite an achievement, 
especially since a major conversion had occurred 15 months 
prior to the beginning of this report. As of 30 June 1970, the 
following NC ANG units were Federally recognized and person- 
nel were actively participating in scheduled training activities : 



34 Report of The Adjutant General 





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Report of The Adjutant General 35 

B. Mission 

The primary mission of the flying organization is military air- 
lift with a secondary function of aeromedical airlift. The mission 
has not changed during this reporting period; however, it is 
worthy of note that the unit has actually performed its primary 
mission as well as trained to perform these missions. The de- 
velopment of this concept has been explained previously. The 
fact that Reserve Force units are demonstrating wartime capa- 
bilities with a peacetime organization cannot be repeated too 
often. This is true of all the Air National Guard Military Air- 
lift Units. The question regarding the future of airlift units was 
never clearly resolved during this period. A definite trend was 
established by conversion of two strategic (or MAC) airlift units 
to tactical airlift with Tactical Airlift Command as gaining 
command and by the reduced enroute supported provided our 
aircraft by Military Airlift Command. It appears that at least 
some of the C-124 units will be in existence for several years 
due to its capability in the outsize cargo area. What next? Who 
knows? The future must take into consideration the potential of 
the mammoth C-54, the 14 active MAC C-141 squadrons, the 
needs of the Civil Reserve Air Fleet, which is being pressured 
by MAC to provide, in the event of war, outsize cargo configured 
aircraft — DC-10, Lockheed 1011, and Boeing 747 — without a 
peacetime military cargo airlift contract to insure that this war- 
time requirement is a reasonable financial investment. USAF 
RAND studies have recommended, among other things, that the 
C-141's be transferred to the Reserve fleet. Our future aircraft 
could well be in the jet C-141 Starlifter. 

The North Carolina Air National Guard has been fortunate 
to have a stable force of key officers and airmen in past years. 
Very few officers have been eliminated by Vitalization Board 
action. This may not be the case in the next few years. We may 
lose some officers due to the vitalization concept, others will be 
lost due to age, total Federal commissioned service, etc. Pro- 
grams have been adopted to assure that replacements are avail- 
able to continue our tradition as a combat-capable force. 

Primary mission of each NC ANG unit is as follows : 

Hq NC ANG: Advises and assists the Adjutant General in the 
administration, logistics, and training of Air National Guard 
units within the State, in performance of State requirements 



36 Report of The Adjutant General 

and in preparation of the Air National Guard for its Federal 
mission. Plans for and conducts operations in support of Civil 
Defense. 

Hq 145 Military Airlift Group: Provides command and staff 
supervision over assigned units engaged in providing for mili- 
tary airlift operations. Provides command support to assigned 
units in all other functional areas. 

145 Support Squadron: Operates and maintains an installation 
in support of Military Airlift Group and subordinate units. Pro- 
vides specialized services of a support nature, i.e., personnel, 
administration, comptroller, chaplain, legal, etc. 

145 Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron: Performs 
aircraft maintenance and related ground support equipment 
maintenance under supervision of Chief of Maintenance. Pro- 
vides administrative support for assigned personnel, excluding 
personnel functions. 

145 Supply Squadron: Provides for the receipt, storage, and 
issuance of all classes of supplies, except sales store, commissary 
store, and salvage and disposal. 

145 USAF Dispensary: Provides medical support to mission 
squadron and allied units. Provides limited diagnostic and thera- 
peutic services in the fields of general and aviation medicine; 
provides limited dental services. 

156 Miltary Airlift Squadron: Provides military air transpdr- 
tation of personnel and materiel for the armed forces and other 
governmental agencies as directed. 

156 Aeromedical Evacuation Flight: Provides aeromedical 
evacuation crews for in-flight care of patients on military air- 
lift aircraft. 

145 Aerial Port Flight: Provides personnel and equipment to 
operate air terminals at airheads or other designated locations 
to process cargo and personnel to be airlifted and to prepare 
cargo and equipment for airdrop. 

145 Civil Engineering Flight: Provides support for unforseen 
contingencies and special air warfare operations. Provides 
Prime Beef "C" Team capable of performing direct combat sup- 
port under the Bare Base Concept. 



Report of The Adjutant General 37 

156 Weather Flight, Mobile: Operates a weather station pro- 
viding forecasting and observing- services. 

206 Weather Flight (SA): Provides forecasting and observ- 
ing service as required by an Army Infantry Division. 

145 Communications Sq (Support): Provides fixed ground 
communications of teletype, telephone, or radio configuration 
supporting units at the base where located. 

263 Mobile Communications Sq (Contg): The peacetime mis- 
sion is to attain and maintain an optimum effective capability to 
carry out roles and tasks assigned in gaining command plans for 
use in an emergency, with capability to install, support, and 
maintain radio relays and mobile radio terminals at unprepared 
sites. 

C. Reorganization and Aircraft Conversions 

The flying unit of the North Carolina Air National Guard was 
equipped with C-124 aircraft during this entire reporting period. 
No aircraft conversions have occurred. Only minor organiza- 
tional changes have been made. The 145 Civil Engineering 
Flight was Federally recognized during this period. Alignment 
to meet the Prime Beef concept was accomplished when unit was 
presented for Federal recognition. 

Units of the 145 Military Airlift Group are organized in ac- 
cordance with unit manning documents applicable to C-124 air- 
craft. The majority of the UMD's relating to MAC gained units 
are as of November 1966 and should be brought up-to-date by 
the National Guard Bureau. This program is under staff study. 

The 206 Weather Flight was reorganized on 1 August 1969. 
This reorganization resulted in an increase in authorized 
strength from 2 officers and 4 airmen to 3 officers and 15 airmen. 
The anticipated increase in authorized grade for the Comman- 
der was not reflected in revised Unit Manning Document. 

Military units authorized as of 30 June 1970 are shown under 
Part A of this report. One unit has been added during this re- 
porting period. The 145 Civil Engineering Flight was Federally 
recognized effective 22 Nov. 69, with assignment to the 145 Mili- 
tary Airlift Group. 

Sixteen aircrews consisting of 3 pilots, 2 navigators, 2 flight 
engineers, and one loadmaster are authorized in the 156 Military 
Airlift Squadron to operate mission aircraft. This constitutes 



38 Report of The Adjutant General 

an increase of one pilot and one navigator per basic crew over 
authorization for C-121 aircraft. Authorization is based on two 
aircrews for each of the 8 C-124 aircraft. Operational readiness 
is based on an aircrew consisting of 2 pilots, 1 navigator, 2 
flight engineers and one loadmaster. Sixteen aircrews are formed 
and 15 are operationally ready. Additional operationally ready 
crew members are in other assignments with the 145 Military 
Airlift Group and State Headquarters. In addition, 10 aeromed- 
ical crews, consisting of 2 flight nurses and three aeromedical 
technicians for each crew, are authorized for the aeromedical 
airlift function. 

The flying unit continued its accident free record during this 
period and was again given special recognition by the National 
Guard Bureau and Military Airlift Command. In November 
1969, the NC ANG completed 10 years of accident free flying 
and, on 30 June 1970 has accumulated 60,498 hours of accident 
free flying time. The last major aircraft accident occurred in 
August 1958. These records are most impressive; however, they 
become even more so considering that the flying unit has been 
involved in five major aircraft conversions . . . from F-86E Jet 
Day Fighters to the F86L All Weather Jet Interceptors, to two 
different models of the twin reciprocating engine C-119 to the 
four engined C-121 Super Constellation, and finally the four en- 
gined C-124 Globemaster. 

D. Construction 

The following projects have been completed or were in prog- 
ress during this reporting period : 

1. Constructed new parking lot. Grading, necessary storm 
drains and gravel. Enlarged one of the existing parking lots. 
Charlotte, NC. Cost $7,700.00 

2. Constructed AGE Storage Shed and Equipment Painting 
Booth, Charlotte, NC. Cost $6,800.00 

3. Alteration of Maintenance Dock, Building #22, to provide 
space for an Engine I&R Shop, Charlotte, NC. Cost $6,000.00 

4. Installed necessary switching gear to provide emergency 
power to critical functions, Charlotte, NC. Cost $2,800.00 

5. Constructed weapons vault in Base Supply, Charlotte, NC. 
Cost $1,400.00 

6. Repairs to aircraft parking apron, Charlotte, NC. Cost 
$8,250.00 



Report of The Adjutant General 39 

7.' Constructed Base Perimeter Road, Charlotte, NC. Cost 
$4,600.00 

8. Under construction — Warehouse, 263 Mobile Communi- 
cations Squadron, Badin, NC. Cost $24,460.00 

9. Training Projects Cost $2,000.00 
Total Cost $64,010.00 

E. Annual Training 

ANGM 50-01 authorizes the performance of a fifteen-day an- 
nual training by two methods. Annual training may be per- 
formed by a unit during fifteen continuous days or under the 
year-round concept. The 263 Mobile Communications Squadron 
(Contg), the 156 Weather Flight, and the 206 Weather Flight 
use the 15 continuous day system. The 145 Military Airlift 
Group uses the "year round" concept. This system was used 
during the Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970. The year round plan 
permits the spread of available annual training manpower 
throughout the year in direct support of daily mission support 
requirements. The commander is provided complete flexibility 
to schedule available mandays in all of the various categories. 
When effectively used, this plan can be invaluable in improving 
the over-all capability of individuals and units. Detailed 
scheduling is most important if the objectives of this plan are 
met. 

During each fiscal year, four primary field training periods 
were established for personnel of the 145 Military Airlift Group, 
other than rated personnel and others on flying status. An effort 
was made to schedule approximately one fourth of the person- 
nel for training during each of the primary periods in order to 
spread available annual training mandays throughout the fiscal 
year to support mission requirements. In instances where per- 
sonnel could not attend during a primary period, they were 
scheduled for other periods when services could be used. 

Changes to the Joint Travel Regulations have complicated the 
scheduling of annual field training for personnel attending un- 
der the year round concept. Personnel residing outside commut- 
ing distance are scheduled to attend during one of the two per- 
iods when dining hall is in operation. This practice conserves 
the limited funds available since we are not required to pay per 
diem during annual training when rations and quarters are 
available. Quarters are always available. 



40 Report of The Adjutant General 

Rated personnel and a majority of other personnel on flying 
status completed annual training by making overwater flights. 
This action was taken in order to assure aircrew personnel were 
current and to qualify other flying personnel on overseas routes, 
thereby increasing the operational readiness status of personnel 
in this category. Trips were scheduled to Southeast Asia and to 
Europe and aircrews operated over routes prescribed by Mili- 
tary Airlift Command. Flight nurses and medical technicians 
who had not previously performed 15 days training as medical 
crew members aboard aeromedical transport aircraft of the 
active Air Force, transporting sick and injured patients of the 
armed forces throughout the continental United States, parti- 
cipated in this training. Others performed the same duty air- 
lifting patients from overseas bases such as South Vietnam, 
Japan, and Europe to the United States. 

The year round type of annual training is quite valuable and 
has been effectively used by our flying units. Continuous evalua- 
tion is necessary to insure that full training benefits are realized. 
A program of this type is necessary in order for flying person- 
nel to meet overwater training and qualification requirements. 
The value to other personnel must be based on training benefits 
realized and contributions to the overall mission. These are the 
most important items for unit commanders to consider in pre- 
paring a field training schedule. Personal convenience must be 
the least important item in the scheduling. 

In 1968, the 263 Mobile Communications Squadron (Contg) 
participated in Exercise "Guard Strike 11", with personnel train- 
ing at Glenview NAS, 111., Volk Field (ANG Training Site), 
Wis., Truax Field, Wis., Springfield ANGB, 111. Deluth Interna- 
tional Airport, Minn., Altus AFB, Okla. Birmingham MAP, 
Ala., and Badin ANG Installation, Badin, NC. 

In 1969 this organization performed annual training at home 
stations, Badin and Wadesboro, NC. 

Both periods were highly effective in improving the overall 
capability of the 263 Mobile Communications. Squadron. 

The 156 Weather Flight (Mobile/Fixed) attended annual 
training at Phelps-Collins ANG Base in Michigan during the 
period 19 Jul 69 — 2 Aug. 69. This type of training is quite val- 
uable since personnel have an opportunity to provide weather 
support under field conditions. Reports received indicate that the 



Report of The Adjiitant General 41 

unit performed in its usual outstanding manner. Unit did not 
participate in annual training again before the end of this 
period. 

The 206 Weather Flight attended field training 10 Aug. 68— 
24 Aug 68 at Myrtle Beach AFB, SC. This type of training is 
quite valuable since personnel have an opportunity to work v^ith 
their counterparts and receive training in the operation of a 
Weather Flight on an Air Force Base. Unit attended annual 
training at Fort Stewart, Ga., during the period 6-20 July 1969 
and at Pope AFB, NC during the period 30 May 1970-13 June 
1970. 

F. Schools 

USAF and other service technical schools listed in the USAF 
Formal Schools Prospectus are available to Air National Guard 
members. Advanced and lateral courses have not been used to a 
great extent during this period since C-124 Mobile Training De- 
tachment was available to provide training in C-124 systems. 

Non-prior service personnel enlisting in the Air National 
Guard are required to complete a minimum of four months ac- 
tive duty for training as a condition of enlistment and in order 
to become basically qualified in duty Air Force specialty. Due to 
a requirement that period of active duty begin within 120 days 
after enlistment, an individual cannot be enlisted until an Air 
Force service school space has been made available by the Na- 
tional Guard Bureau. The four months active duty requirement 
may be completed by attending USAF Basic Military Training 
for six weeks and returning to home station for on-the-job train- 
ing at the "3" (or apprentice) skill level until four months ac- 
tive duty for training is completed or member qualifies as "3" 
skill level ; by attending USAF Basic and USAF Technical School 
and returning to home station for "5" (or journeyman) skill 
level OJT until active duty training is completed, or by attend- 
ing Basic Military Training and USAF Service School where 
duration is four or more months. After the initial active duty 
training period, airmen receive training toward a higher skill 
level under the dual training concept. On-the-job training is pro- 
vided while member participates in inactive and full time train- 
ing duty. Participation in Career Development Courses (Air 
University Correspondence Courses) between training periods 
is also required. Each airman is pre-tested as phases of the 



42 Report of The Adjutant General 

training program are completed, then tested by the Test Control 
Officer prior to being awarded a higher level Air Force Specialty. 
The ANG was required to assume the testing function during 
this period. This is a function of the Air Force ; however, MAC 
has not provided officer Advisor manpower to accomplish this 
required testing. 

USAF Service School spaces have been available to meet the 
majority of training requirements during this reporting period. 
Availability of spaces in the future is unknown. It will depend 
on actual support received to upgrade the Air National Guard. 

The drill pay ceiling is an ever present numbers game. The 
ceiling is dictated by the Department of Defense and is com- 
pounded by the current accounting approach whereby a given 
number of mandays are allocated based on several factors. When 
we entered into the C-124 program, immediate authorization 
for 100% manning was given. We assumed this authorization 
was here to stay ; however, this is not the case. We were heroes 
on 30 June 1970 because we had raised airman strength to a 
desired level, although we had a document, which was to become 
effective 1 July 1970, reducing our manning level to approxi- 
mately 92% of UMD authorized strength. Immediately, we 
faced an overstrength situation. To make matters worse, if pos- 
sible, the accounting factors indicate approximately 90%) of 
maximum programmed strength (drill pay ceiling) will attend 
annual training. Unit training assembly attendance is based on 
88% of programmed strength. Our participation closely approx- 
imates 100% routinely. 

The discussion in the schools area would not be complete with- 
out mentioning the pilot procurement program. The Air Nation- 
al Guard and all individuals and associations interested in the 
future of the Air National Guard have tried for many years to 
get the ANG pilot training quota increased. This was not pos- 
sible during each of the fiscal years being reported. We had a 
quota of 2 pilot trainees during each fiscal year. We anticipated 
an increase to four during FY 71. The quota of pilot trainees 
for the Air National Guard should be further increased if the 
ANG is to provide the back-up capability for our Regular Forces. 
There has been an increase in the number of prior service pilots 
making application for appointment in the ANG. This source 
of pilots could be used for appointment of additional pilots if 
support is increased. 



Report of The Adjutant General 43 

We are in a good position insofar as the pilot age factor and 
anticipated losses due to provisions of ROPA are concerned. 
Minimal losses are anticipated over the next several years. Most 
of these will be due to completion of service obligations and 
ANG obligations by young pilots trained under the ANG pilot 
training quota. We are also in a good position insofar as as- 
signed navigators are concerned. We believe young pilots and 
navigators leaving the regular Air Force could meet forseeable 
needs. We appear to be in an excellent position until 1975 if no 
unforeseen significant trends develop. We could lose some pilots 
to the vitalization program. 

Several other training programs available to the Air National 
Guard have been used during this reporting period. The Air 
Force OflRcer Training School has been used to train young offi- 
cers for assignment to non-flying positions. Upon completion of 
Officer Training School and commissioning, an effort is made to 
enter officers in an USAF Service School offering Basic Techni- 
cal Training in career area of anticipated assignment. 

The National Guard Bureau has established the ANG Non- 
commissioned Officer Academy and the ANG Leadership School 
at McGhee Tyson ANG Base, Knoxville, Tenn. The former is 
designed to train NCO's in upper grades E-5 through E-9, the 
latter is designed to train airmen in the lower grades E-3 and 
E-4. Our non-commissioned officers are taking advantage of the 
excellent training provided by the ANG NCO Academy. Gradu- 
ates are encouraging other NCO's to attend and are striving to 
increase attendance at the Leadership School. We plan to give 
NCO Academy graduates increased responsibility in the man- 
agement of the ANG. 

G. Air Technician Program 

Air Technician management and supervisory functions are 
decentralized under the provisions of ANGR 40-01, and are per- 
formed under the direction of the Base Detachment Comman- 
der, 145 Military Airlift Group, North Carolina Air National 
Guard, Charlotte, NC. In this capacity, the Base Detachment 
Commander directs the activities of the Air Technician Detach- 
ment, Charlotte, NC and the Air Technician Detachment, 263 
Mobile Communications Squadron (Contg), Badin, NC. Air 
Technicians perform those functions and duties which cannot 
be performed by Air National Guard members while in a mili- 
tarv status. 



44 Report of The Adjutant General 

The manpower authorizations for the Detachment at Char- 
lotte, NC are based on certain military factors and the success 
of military units in meeting- established goals. One of the most 
important factors is assigned pilot strength. Pilot strength has 
been a problem area throughout the overall Air National Guard 
until recently. The Air National Guard flying unit at Charlotte, 
NC, has maintained pilot strength above the National Guard 
Bureau programmed level throughout this period. 

The National Guard Bureau has established a Standard Man- 
ning Document System. This standard document is intended to 
authorize identical manpower spaces to units possessing similar 
aircraft. This system cannot be followed in all situations due to 
differences in support responsibilities. The standard documents 
are designed to show requirements for the basic manning of an 
Air Technician Detachment. Due to manpower and budgetary 
limitations, the National Guard Bureau has not been in a posi- 
tion to fund for authorized manpower spaces. 

The requirement or manpower spaces shown on the most re- 
cent Air Technician Manning Document indicate an authoriza- 
tion of 194 spaces for the flying base; however, we have been 
limited to a monthly average of 170 employees during the past 
Fiscal Years, The trend is toward additional reductions in 
authorized man-years. The Base Detachment Commander is 
authorized to fill those positions which, in his opinion, are most 
essential to the performance of the primary mission of the flying 
base. The present manning policy creates an austere situation. 
In some instances, it has been necessary to curtail employment 
in some areas in order to retain personnel essential to the suc- 
cessful accomplishment of the flying mission. 

The Air Technician Detachment can always use additional 
manpower. The year round concept of field training and local 
OJT program for non-prior service personnel completing active 
duty for training requirements provides some relief. 

The Air Technician manning standard applicable to the 263 
Mobile Communications Squadron (Contg) indicates a require- 
ment for 15 employees. Due to limitations in man-years autho- 
rized for the State, this unit has been permitted an average of 14 
permanent employees. Two technicians are authorized Hq NC 
ANG and two personnel technicians are authorized to support 
functions of the Air Technicians Office. 

The Air Technicians are a force of highly skilled personnel 
and the "backbone" of the Air National Guard program. The 



Report of The Adjutant General 45 

technicians have continued their leadership role in making our 
Air National Guard units a most valuable part of the Air Force. 

After many years of effort on the part of the National Guard 
Bureau, and other friends of the Technicians, the status of Tech- 
nicians was clarified when PL 90-486, the National Guard Tech- 
nicians Act of 1968, was signed by The President in August 
1968. Technicians on board on 1 January 1969 became Federal 
employees and were eligible for many of the benefits available 
to employees of Federal agencies. The law is most unique in that 
it designates Technicians as Federal employees as a matter of 
law and yet it provides for certain statutory administrative 
authority at the State level with respect to the administration 
of the Technician program. Thus, the law recognizes the mili- 
tary requirements and the State characteristics of the National 
Guard and designates the State Adjutants General as the sole 
agent for employment and administration of the Technician 
program, under appropriate regulations prescribed by the sec- 
retaries concerned. Excepted Technicians constitute the major- 
ity of the Technician force. As a condition of employment, ex- 
cepted employees must be members of the National Guard and 
hold the military grade of officer, warrant officer, or enlisted 
specified by the technician position description. 

Considerable planning was necessary in a short period to pre- 
pare for conversion of employees to a Federal status. Orientation 
conferences were conducted by the National Guard Bureau dur- 
ing October 1968. The conversion to systems and forms pre- 
scribed by the National Guard Bureau and the Civil Service 
Commission created an additional workload for the limited num- 
ber of technicians available to perform these tasks. In addition, 
it was necessary to review past technician employment records 
for financial and personnel data required for completion of 
forms which were mandatory on 1- January 1969. In many in- 
stances, data collected covered over 20 years employment as 
technicians plus extended active duty in one of the armed ser- 
vices. 

The most important factor of the new status was the retire- 
ment program and allied benefits. The Public Law provides 
credit for past technician service in full for Civil Service re- 
tirement eligibility purposes but there is a limitation of 557^ 
for retirement pay computation purposes. We still hope that full 
credit for past service for all purposes will be forthcoming in 
the near future. 



46 Report of The Adjutant General 

The Air National Guard had one involuntary retirement dur- 
ing this period. Employee occupied a technician position no 
longer listed in appropriate manning document. NGB granted a 
waiver permitting employment for the required one year after 
1 January 1969 to meet retirement eligibility requirements. 
Mandatory retirements will begin in the coming year. Plans are 
being made for replacements. Two key positions are involved. 

Operations under the new system have not been too difficult. 
The ANG has endeavored to use Air Force prescribed forms and 
procedures for a number of years. 

H. Air Advisors 

Military Airlift Command has changed its policy regarding 
assignment of Air Advisors to ANG flying groups. This policy 
change began when all pilot advisors were withdrawn from 
ANG flying groups approximately four years ago. The Flying 
Group has not had a pilot advisor since receipt of C-124 air- 
craft. An officer navigator advisor has not been assigned since 
June 1970. MAC realized that advisors are not fully utilized 
after the airlift unit is initially indoctrinated in aircraft pro- 
cedures and changed its manning concept. In the future an ad- 
visory team consisting of one pilot, one navigator, one flight en- 
gineer, one loadmaster, one aircraft maintenance superinten- 
dent and one aeromedical technician, will be assigned for approx- 
imately 18 months following receipt of a different UE aircraft. 
Long range plan provides for permanent assignment of one 
pilot, one aircraft maintenance superintendent and one aero- 
medical technician. It appears pilot advisor will not become 
available for assignment until further phase down of Vietnam 
commitment. The gaining command has a responsibility to pro- 
vide qualified personnel to conduct required testing under AFM 
35-8. No provisions to fulfill this responsibility under the testing 
program has been made. The flying unit had to assume this re- 
sponsibility to stay in business. This is just one more case of 
added responsibility without adequate manning. 

One Aircraft Maintenance Superintendent and one Aeromedi- 
cal Technician were asigned by MAC to the flying unit advisory 
staff as of close of this reporting period. 

One airman technical advisor is authorized each of the Weath- 
er Flights. Exceptionally well qualified personnel have occupied 
these positions during this reporting period. Air Weather Ser- 
vice, as intermediate gaining command under MAC, supports 



Report of The Adjutant General 47 

the advisory program in an excellent manner. The same is true 
of the Air Force Communications Service, which is gaining 
command for the 263 Mobile Communications Squadron (Contg) 
and the 145 Communications Flight. Weather Flight advisors 
are especially valuable since an Air Technician is not authorized 
for these units. 

Advisory visits are made to our units by designated regular 
Air Force units. This function is performed by Hq 21 AF Staff 
in the case of the 145 Military Airlift Group. Since their "ad- 
vice" is often challenged by the 21 AF IG Team, and their visits 
are time and manpower consuming, we question the value of 
some of the Advisory Visits and have expressed our opinion. 

I. Conclusions 

A report of this nature would not be complete without again 
mentioning the changes occurring insofar as use of the Air Na- 
tional Guard is concerned. We have progressed from a training 
concept to an operational concept. There is no question regard- 
ing the capability of the Air National Guard. Representatives of 
the Air Force have made this clear on a number of occasions. 
Aircrews are performing operational missions while on active 
duty and are eligible for the same awards and decorations as 
aircrews of the Regular Establishment. One hundred and thirty- 
one assigned aircrew members have been awarded the Vietnam 
Service Medal for service in a combat area ; 22 have one Bronze 
Service Star; 16 have 2 Bronze Service Stars; 17 have 3 Bronze 
Service Stars; 8 have 4 Bronze Service Stars and 5 have five 
Bronze Service Stars denoting campaign participation. Forty 
aircrew members have been awarded the Republic of Vietnam 
Campaign Medal and 46 have been awarded the Armed Forces 
Expeditionary Medal. 

Air National Guard aircrews continued performing operation- 
al missions in support of the Regular Establishment involved in 
limited wars. The increased flying time without a like increase 
in direct support has been an outstanding accomplishment. As in 
the past, we continue to wonder what will happen in future years 
if requirement for increased support for the active duty forces 
is reduced? 

Throughout this period of outstanding performance by the 
Air National Guard airlift forces, plans have been announced 
to reduce the number of strategic airlift forces assigned to MAC. 
The 145 Military Airlift Group has not been affected as of this 



48 Report of The Adjutant General 

date. We are looking forward to future aircraft conversion to 
more modern aircraft. The associate unit concept is a reality 
in U.S. Air Force Reserve. It has not been applied to an Air 
National Guard unit. 

Follow^ing- is a list of flying accomplishments during the re- 
porting period : 

a. 11,200 flying hours 

b. 123 overwater missions 

c. 35 Southeast Asia (Vietnam) missions 

d. 2,378.3 tons of cargo flown 

e. 8,160,223 ton miles flown 

f. Flew a total of 166 cargo missions and 88 passenger missions 

The bulk of our airmen have been well-trained in Riot Control, 
and we form the State Reserve. Our aircrews have flown several 
Garden Plot missions airlifting troops and equipment, vehicles, 
etc., in support of Civil Disturbance Control outside the State. 
Several of our members have served on State duty in the Adju- 
tant General's Public Relations/Information Program during 
civil disturbances within the State. 



SECTION X 
SIMPLIFIED FISCAL STATEMENT 

The financial report of the operations of the Department is 
made on the fiscal year basis. This report is being made to cover 
the Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970. The Fiscal Years 1968, 1969 and 
1970 have not been audited and will be show^n in the next Report 
of The Adjutant General. 

The following figures are a consolidation of The Adjutant 
General's Department and The North Carolina Armory Commis- 
sion for the period 1 July 1968 thru 30 June 1970. The Adjutant 
General's Department received $245,491.00 in Federal Funds 
during this period as reimbursement of expenses. The North 
Carolina Armory Commission received $318,707.00 in Federal 
Funds as reimbursement for armory construction ; $58,903.00 in 
Local Funds as participation in armory construction; $638.00 
from sale of timber at Butner; $77,125.00 for sale of National 
Guard property at Apex and Greenville, N. C. ; and $3,600.00 for 
right-of-way damages to National Guard property at Asheboro, 
N. C. 
Adjutant General's Department 



Administration 

National Guard 

Combined Support Mtnce Shop 

USPFO Warehouse & Office 

Morris Field 

Bluethenthal Field 

Wadesboro Radar Station 

Badin Radar Station 

Ral-Dur Army Aviation Shop 

Service Centers 

N. C. Military Academy 

Special Duty-National Guard 

Total 

N. C. Armory Commission 

Maintenance and Repairs 
Deeds and Land Titles 
Equipment Purchases 
Payments on Armory 

Construction 
Total 
GRAND TOTAL 



State Local Federal 


Total 


592,604 




592,604 


616,128 




616,128 


10,475 


31,423 


41,898 


7,687 


23,061 


30,748 


40,654 


121,963 


162,617 


4,265 


12,796 


17,061 


803 


2,408 


3,211 


2,747 


8,241 


10,988 


3,646 


10,939 


14,585 


9,289 


27,867 


37,156 


52,910 


6,793 


59,703 


194,729 




194,729 


1,535,937 —0— 245,491 


1,781,428 


127,766 




127,766 


1,288 




1,288 


2,263 




2,263 



131,837 58,903 318,707 509,447 

640,764 
1,799,091 58,903 564,198 2,422,192 



263,154 58,903 318,707 



74.3% 



2.4% 



23.3% 



100' 



49 



SECTION XI 
ATTACHMENTS 

NORTH CAROLINA ARMORY COMMISSION 
STATEMENT OF CAPITAL ASSETS 

MOTOR VEHICLE STORAGE WAREHOUSES: 

Locations Cost 

Asheboro $ 27,875.00 

Asheville 47,655.00 

Beulaville 17,258.00 

Burlington 24,573.00 

Clinton 31,867.00 

Durham 30,751.00 

Forest City 26,856.32 

Goldsboro 24,784.00 

Hickory 34,040.91 

High Point 29,372.00 

Jacksonville 27,601.00 

Kings Mountain 24,579.00 

Lenoir 27,475.00 

Lincolnton 24,840.00 

Mocksville 30,798.83 

Mount Airy 28,427.00 

Newton 27,300.00 

North Wilkesboro 28,650.00 

Parkton 15,666.00 

Red Springs 27,845.00 

Rocky Mount 26,781.49 

Scotland Neck 26,025.00 

Southern Pines 30,075.00 

Statesville 23,300.00 

Tarboro 29,029.00 

Wallace 16,970.00 

Warsaw 28,459.00 

Wilson 9,895.00 

Youngsville 31,700.00 

ORGANIZATIONAL MAINTENANCE SHOPS: 

Ahoskie 23,976.00 

Concord 45,946.50 

Greensboro 24,495.00 

Kinston 24,627.00 

Winston-Salem 46,929.40 

Youngsville 18,162.00 



50 



Report of The Adjutant General 51 
national guard armories: 

Location Cost 

Ahoskie 96,968.50 

Asheboro 208,079.94 

Asheville 155,570.44 

Belmont 130,620.78 

Benson 134,154.47 

Bladenboro 95,387.50 

Burlington 97,281.00 

Charlotte 274,103.77 

Clinton 102,306.00 

Durham 246,962.66 

Edenton* 75,000.00 

Elizabeth City 141,785.21 

Elizabethtown 135,788.87 

Elkin 138.674.50 

Paid Bluff 127,500.00 

Farmville 133,813.10 

Fayetteville 117,159.00 

Forest City 143,895.43 

Fremont 199,694.12 

Greensboro 308,815.21 

Greenville 239,054.37 

Goldsboro 93,575.00 

Hamlet 131,301.68 

Hendersonville 149,322.64 

Hickory 90,525.00 

High Point* 75,000.00 

Kings Mountain 142,903.89 

Kinston 93,928.00 

Laurinburg 140,573.59 

Lenoir 97,528.00 

Lexington 103,691.00 

Lincolnton 129,829.96 

Monroe* 75,000.00 

Mooresville 138,694.81 

Morehead City 215,108.27 

Morganton* 75,000.00 

Mount Airy 128,485.58 

Mount Olive 135,405.29 

Nashville 174,566.37 

New Bern* 75,000.00 

Newton 130,529.14 

North Wilkesboro 93,308.00 

Oxford 99,615.00 

Parkton* 75,000.00 

Raeford* 75,000.00 

Raleigh 831,530.09 

Raleigh-Durham Airport 435,546.76 



52 Report of The Adjutant General 

Location Cost 

Red Springs 98,513.00 

Reidsville* 75,000.00 

Roanoke Rapids* 75,000.00 

Rockingham 133,717.35 

Rocky Mount 150,000.00 

Roseboro 191,901.80 

Roxboro 140,319.58 

Salisbury* 75,000.00 

Shallotte 153,035.94 

Siler City 136,977.20 

Smithfield 135,510.71 

Snow Hill 124,281.98 

Southern Pines 130,000.00 

St. Pauls 128,322.67 

Statesville 139,417.14 

Sylva 147,614.59 

Tarboro 91,598.00 

Thomasville 92,968.00 

Wallace 135,330.73 

Warsaw 102,444.00 

Washington* 75,000.00 

Whiteville* 75,000.00 

Williamston 96,698.50 

Wilmington 96,157.00 

Wilson* 75,000.00 

Windsor 143,505.25 

Winston-Salem 275,190.40 

Woodland 140,230.97 

Zebulon 94,205.00 

USP AND FO WAREHOUSE AND OFFICE 363,428.31 

COMBINED SUPPORT MAINTENANCE SHOP 423,145.50 



TOTAL CAPITAL ASSETS $12,587,681.01 



*WPA— Cost Estimate 



REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES PROPERTY AND 
FISCAL OFFICER 

FISCAL YEARS 1969 AND 1970 

9 September 1970 
TO: The Adjutant General, State of North Carolina 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The following report of the operation of activities of the USPFO for 
North Carolina for Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970, beginnings 1 July 1968 and 
ending 30 June 1970, is respectfully submitted. 

The USPFO is authorized this State under the provisions of Title 32, 
United States Code, Section 708. The required duties of this position are 
prescribed in Federal Statutes vvrhich are implemented by the Secretary of 
the Army and the Secretary of the Air Force by means of Army and Air 
Force Regulations, National Guard Bureau Regulations and other direc- 
tives. In the Comptroller area, he is responsible for the proper finan- 
cial planning, obligating, accounting, reporting and administrative con- 
trol of Federal funds allotted to the State for the support of Army and 
Air National Guard units and activities by the National Guard Bureau 
and other Government agencies. In the Logistical area, he is responsible 
for the requisitioning, receipt, warehousing, issue, shipment, disposition and 
accounting for supplies furnished and equipment loaned to the State by 
the Federal Government for the training support of Federally recognized 
Army and Air National Guard units and activities. The USPFO is ap- 
pointed by the National Guard Bureau as the Federal Contracting Officer 
and designated the Transportation Officer for the National Guard of this 
State. The USPFO is also the representative of the National Guard Bureau 
responsibility for making interim and final inspections of all construction 
projects for the National Guard of this State which are executed under 
State contracts utilizing Federal funds. Annex A to this report contains 
a breakdown of the functions of the Divisions and Offices of this Activity 
in the two years covered by the report. 

To assist the USPFO in carrying out his responsibilities, this office is 
authorized a total of sixty-five (65) technician employees under the Army 
National Guard Technician Program. The organizational manning structure 
for these employees is established in accordance with current functional 
criteria developed by the National Guard Bureau on a nationwide basis. 
Under the Air National Guard Technician Program, technicians are author- 
ized for this purpose at the North Carolina Air National Guard Activities 
located at Douglas Municipal Airport, Charlotte, N. C. 

Colonel Thomas B. Longest, who was appointed to this position 1 May 
1959, served as the USPFO for the State during this period. 

53 



54 Report of The Adjutant General 

comptroller 

Total Federal funds expended (see Annex B) including pay for Inactive 
Duty Training amounted to $14,338,771.24 during FY 1969 and $19,964,703.74 
during FY 1970. This represented an obligation rate of 99.77% in FY 1969 
and 99.89% in FY 1970 of total funds allocated. 

CONTRACTS AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS 

Numerous R&U and Non-Armory Construction projects were completed. 
Annex C contains a complete listing of the projects, their location and the 
amount of each contract. 

LOGISTICS 

An increase in civil unrest and the mission of the National Guard to 
restore and maintain law and order in disturbance of this nature resulted 
in considerable special equipment being issued to assist the troops in per- 
forming this duty. 

An over-all improvement in the allocation of funds made it possible to 
continue to add to the inventory of authorized TOE and TDA Equipment. 
The major items of this equipment are listed in Annex D to this report. 

The equipment on hand in the Weekend Training Equipment Pool at 
Fort Bragg, N. C, is listed in Annex E. This equipment is available for use 
by units of the NCARNG during weekend assemblies and annual training 
periods. 

At the close of this period, indications are that we will continue to re- 
ceive considerable new equipment as a direct result of the reduction in 
force by the Active Army. However, the new funding program will place 
serious limitations on funds available for new items that have to be 
purchased. 

INSPECTIONS 

The activities of the USPFO were inspected once each Fiscal Year by 
the Third U. S. Army Inspector General and a rating of Satisfactory was 
received on each of these inspections. There were no major deficiencies 
noted. 

The vehicles and equipment used by the USPFO Warehouse were in- 
spected by Command Maintenance Inspection Teams each Fiscal Year and 
there were no reportable deficiencies on either of these inspections. 

Headquarters, Military Airlift Command, Scott AFB, Illinois, conducted 
a Comptroller Inspection each Fiscal Year of the Accounts of the Assis- 
tant USPFO (Fiscal), NC Air National Guard, Charlotte, N. C. No rat- 
ings are given, however, the report noted that the accounts were adequate 
and no changes were recommended in procedure. 

The USAF Auditor General Resident Office, Shaw AFB, S. C, conducted 
an audit of the NC Air National Guard records in November, 1969 and 
found them completely in order. 



Report of The Adjutant General 55 

The USAF Auditor General Resident Office, Pope AFB, N. C, conducted 
an audit of the records supporting documents and internal controls of the 
NC Air National Guard located in the office during February 1970. No 
recommendations were made concerning procedure changes. 

The Atlanta Region of the Defense Contract Audit Agency made an 
audit of each Fiscal Year of the costs of each of the Service Contracts ad- 
ministered by this office for the support of facilities used by the North Car- 
olina National Guard. No exception to the costs or the payments made by 
this office under these contracts was taken by the Defense Contract Audit 
Agency. 

In addition to the inspections by other agencies and higher headquarters, 
examination personnel of this office conducted eleven (11) Internal Reviews 
of various USPFO functions during the reporting period to evaluate finan- 
cial and internal controls. 

THOMAS B. LONGEST 
Colonel, NGB 
USPFO for N. C. 



Annex A — Activities of Divisions and Offices 

Annex B — Itemized Expenditure of Federal Funds 

Annex C — List of Awarded R&U and Non-Armory Construction Projects, 
Locations and Costs 

Annex D — List of Major Items of Equipment Received and Distributed to 
ARNG Units of this State 

Annex E — List of Major Items of Equipment at N. C. Weekend Training 
Equipment Pool. Fort Bragg, N. C, for Use of ARNG Units of 
this State. 



56 Report of The Adjutant General 

ANNEX A 
ACTIVITIES OF DIVISIONS AND OFFICES 

1. Administrative Office 

a. Received, processed and distributed incoming mail, dispatched out- 
going mail and processed all USPFO NC publications. 

b. Maintained central administrative file for all USPFO NC Activities. 

c. Prepared and distributed all changes to USPFO NC Manuals. 

d. Maintained current USPFO NC Library of Regulations and Direc- 
tives. 

e. Maintained the Records Holding Area for USPFO NC. 

f. Maintained control and safekeeping of classified material received 
by the USPFO NC. 

g. Prepared and distributed USPFO NC publications, including opera- 
tion of multilith and photocopy machine. 

h. Maintained Biweekly Time and Attendance Report for USPFO NC. 

i. Administered the Records Administration Program for the mainte- 
nance and disposition of records required in the operation of the USPFO 
NC. 

j. Prepared and maintained a current consolidated list of file numbers 
used in the USPFO NC Activities. 

k. Approved and allocated numbers to offices and divisions of this activ- 
ity to identify and control locally reproduced forms used in their area 
of operation. 

2. Logistics Division 

FY 1969 FY 1970 

a. Number of Property 

Vouchers Processed 125,029 157,684 

b. Number of Requisitions 

forwarded to Depots 19,179 19,066 

c. Number of Purchase 

Requests Prepared 119 131 

d. Number of Excess Reports Prepared 674 764 

e. Total Value of Excess Reports $2,168,252.77 $14,194,570.52 

f. Total Value of Excess Dispositions ..$2,047,381.61 $13,934,740.74 

g. Number of Unit Issue 

Documents Processed 61,737 83,612 

h. Number of Unit Turn-In 

Documents Processed 13,571 19,171 

i. Total Value of Salvage 

Turn-in to PDO $ 273,141.10 $ 304,792.87 

j. Number of Statements 

of Charges Processed 235 273 

k. Number of Certificates 

of Droppage Processed 54 64 

1. Total Value of Certifi- 
cates of Droppage $ 6,506.34 $ 12,957.54 

m. Number of Inventory Adjustment 

Reports Processed 274 254 



Report of The Adjutant General 



57 



FY 1969 

n. Number of Miscellaneous 

Documents Processed 44,415 

o. Number of Scheduled Deliveries 360 

p. Number of Actual Deliveries Made . . 1,560 
q. Number of Miles Driven 

to Deliver Property 45,423 

r. Number of Transactions in 

Direct Exchanicre Shop 13,585 

s. Number of Items Exchanged by DES 6,665 
t. Job Order Property 

Delivered and Picked-up 4,046 

u. Number of Transportation Requests 717 

v. Number of Bills of Lading 284 

w. Total Tons Freight Shipped 1,784,528 

X. Total Number of Shipments Received 1,823 

y. Self Service Supply Center Sales ...$ 64,406.54 
z. Number of Items Issued by 

Sei-vice Stock 22,066 

Examination Office 

FY 1969 

a. Examination Accounts 148 

b. Work Units: 

(1) Annual Examination of Property 

Book Officer's Accounts 35 

(2) Annual Examination of Hand Re- 
ceipt Holder's Accounts 73 

(3) Examination for Change of 

Property Book Officers 12 

(4) Re-examination of Property Book 
Officer's Accounts Due to 
Unsatisfactory Ratings — 

(5) Internal Reviews 7 

(6) Other Reviews — 

(7) Air National Guard Examinations — 
Totals 127 

c. Property Losses: 

(1) Quarterly Reports of 

Operational Losses $ 2,316.40 

(2) Statement of Charges 2,582,21 

(3) Reports of Survey 10,118.42 

Totals $ 15,017.03 

d. Examination Report Ratings 
(Percentage) : 

(1) Satisfactory 97.6% 

(2) Unsatisfactory 2.4% 

e. Miles Traveled by Examiners 16,360 

f. Number of Examiners 5 



FY 1970 

48,471 

319 

1,369 

38,148 

19,248 
8,488 

4,319 
2,065 

246 
1,546.716 
2,054 
68,944.31 

31,260 



FY 1970 

149 



51 

86 

5 



1 

4 

2 

13 

162 



2,309.83 
5,147.76 
5,716.07 

13.173.66 



96.9% 
3.1% 
30,951 
6 



( 1969 


FY 1970 


1,025 


1,123 


345 


346 


994 


1,079 


344 


374 


250 


318 


788 


795 


863 


986 




1 




1 




5 














1 




1 








58 Report of The Adjutant General 

4. Purchasing and Contracting: Branch 

a. Purchase and Delivery Orders 
processed: 

(1) Army National Guard 

(2) Air National Guard 

b. Medical Payment Vouchers processed 

c. Communication Vouchers processed . . 

d. Imprest Fund Vouchers processed: 

(1) Army National Guard 

(2) Air National Guard 

e. Purchase Orders (SF-44) processed . 

f. Service Contracts negotiated: 

(1) Army National Guard 

(2) Air National Guard 

g. R&U Contracts 

h. Supply Contracts 

i. Educational Services Contracts 

j. Non-Armory Contracts 

k. ARNG Field Training Site Contracts 

1. K. D. Range Contracts 

TOTALS 5,214 5,748 

5. Automatic Data Processing Center 

a. Improvement in machine configuration during the report period was 
the exchange of the Type 082 Sorter with a speed of 600 cards per minute 
for the Type 083 which sorts cards at the rate of 1,000 per minute. Current 
ADP Equipment inventory is: 

Qnty Type Model Function 

Key Punch Machine 
Verifying Machine 
Sorter 

Alphabetic Collator 
XAl Computing Accounting Machine 
Reproducing Punch 
Interpreter 

b. Recent applications incorporated into the ADP System include: 

(1) Officer /Warrant Officer Personnel Data Master File — three 
(3) cards on each Officer/WO in ARNG (Strength as of 30 
Jun 70 — 821) 

(2) Enlisted Personnel Data Master File — two (2) cards on each 
Enlisted Man in ARNG (Strength as of 30 Jun 70 — 10,133) 

2. One (1) additional Machine Operator has been authorized the ADP 
Center since the last report. Current manning includes: 

1 — EAM Supervisor 

1— EAM Project Planner 

2 — EAM Machine Operators 

2 — Key Punch Machine Operators 



2 


026 


1 




056 


1 




083 


1 




087 


1 




407 


X 




514 


1 




548 


1 



Report of The Adjutant General 59 

ANNEX B 
ITEMIZED EXPENDITURE OF FEDERAL FUNDS 

The followinp: is an itemized statement of expenditure of Federal funds 
including- pay for Inactive Duty Training for period of report: 

FY 1969 FY 1970 

Total Expenditure $14,338,771.24 $19,964,703.74 

Army National Guard 11,218,572.00 15,974,103.74 

Air National Guard 3,120,199.24 3,990,600.00 

Pay of Civilian Technicians 

Army 3,851,164.65 4,410,341.71 

Air 1,525,387.66 1,814,000.00 

Operation of Units 

Army 1,333,305.80 2,088,925.44 

Air 327,489.85 360,000.00 

Service Contracts 

Army 47,495.78 54,800.00 

Air 58,650.00 74,100.00 

Repairs and Utilities 

Army 25,305.68 5,338.00 

Air 994.81 17,600.00 

Pay for Inactive Duty Training 

Army 4,208,412.59 4,962,339.42 

Air 850,210.00 1,175,300.00 

AT Pay and Allowances 

Army 755,596.28 3,452,200.00 

Air 205,000.00 350,000.00 

AT Costs other than P&A 

Army 135,410.71 337,211.25 

Air 44,224.43 66,000.00 

Armory and Non-Armory Construction 

Army 494,664.39 148,069.02 

Air 25,310.11 24,500.00 

Service and Army Area School Cost 

Army 318,777.75 441,484.75 

Air 79,032.38 105,500.00 

Uniform Allowances 

Army 32,450.00 21,550.00 

Air 3,900.00 3,600.00 

Pay and Allowances while Hospitalized 

Army 9,578.48 45,769.73 

Air —0— — 0— 

Civil Defense Operation 

Army 6,409.89 6,074.42 



60 Report of The Adjutant General 

ANNEX C 

LIST OF AWARDED R&U AND NON-ARMORY 

CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS, LOCATIONS OF PROJECTS AND COST 

ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 

1. Greensboro 

Installation of new toilet facilities for 

Organizational Maintenance Shop $ 2,922.00 

2. Lenoir 

Conversion of NC ARNG Motor Vehicle Storage Building $ 8,000.00 

3. Morrisville 

Installation of Security Type Fencing $ 2,972.00 

4. Raleigh 

Improvements to Parking Area, Combined Support 

Maintenance Shop $ 5,338.00 

5. Warrenton 

Installation of Security Type Fencing $ 3,434.00 

Air National Guard 

1. Badin 

Construction of a Warehouse Building $24,460.00 

2. Charlotte 

a. Installation, construction of water line, 

meter and vault $ 4,184.68 

b. Construction, overlay and repair of 

asphalt pavement $ 4,500.00 

c. Construction, overlay and repair of 

asphalt pavement $ 8,250.00 

d. Installation of water line and meter $ 7,871.00 

ANNEX D 

LIST OF MAJOR ITEMS OF EQUIPMENT RECEIVED AND 
DISTRIBUTED TO ARNG UNITS OF THIS STATE 

Item Quantity 

Antenna Group, RC-292 82 

Armor Body, Nek & Tor 311 

Automobile, Sedan, 4 Dr 17 

Automobile, Station Wagon 2 

Bayonet, M-6 5,131 

Cabinet, File Security 32 

Center, Message, AN/GSQ-80 4 

Crane, Shovel, Trk, 20 Ton 1 

Disperser, Riot Control, M-3 34 

Disperser, Riot Control M-106 22 

Distribution Box, J-1077/U 21 

Floodlight Set 4 

Generator Set, 3KW 36 

Generator Set, PU-322/U 2 

Generator Set, PU-618/M 6 

Generator Set, PU-619, lOKW 13 



Report of The Adjutant General 61 



Heating & Tie Down Unit, 762MM Rkt 7 

Helicopter 2 

Howitzer, SP 8", M-55 3 

Howitzer, SP Ft 155MM, M-109 9 

Instrument Repair Shop, Truck Mounted 9 

Keyboard Adaptor, KLX-7TSEC 8 

Launcher Rocket, 762MM (HJ) 3 

Light Set, General Illuminating 43 

Machine Gun, 7.62MM, M-60 121 

Mask, Protective Field, M-17 567 

Mortar, 81MM, M-29 3 

Operations Center, AN/MSC31A 2 

Radiacmeter, IM-174A/PD 175 

Radio Set, AN/GRR-5 3 

Radio Set, AN/GRC-4 8 

Radio Set, AN/GRC-6 12 

Radio Set, AN/GRC-7 13 

Radio Set, AN/GRC-26 1 

Radio Set, AN/PRC-8 4 

Radio Set, AN/VRC-15 5 

Radio Transmitter, AN/PRT-4A (new family series) 119 

Radio Control Group, AN/GRA-6 24 

Radio Terminal Set, AN/MRC-69 6 

Repeater Set, Radio, AN/MRC-54, Less Power 3 

Rifle, 7.62MM, M-14 1,871 

Rifle, Cal. .30, Snipers, w/Scope, M-84 55 

Searchlight, XENON, DC, 28V, 100 Amp 2 

Shop Equipment, Rocket Maintenance 2 

Shop Equipment, Machine Shop, FM 1 

Shop Equipment, General Purpose, Semi-Trailer Mid 1 

Tank and Pump Unit, Trk Mtd 46 

Teletypewriter Set, AN/GGC-3 3 

Tent, General Purpose, Small 70 

Tent, General Purpose, Medium 105 

Tent, General Purpose, Large 12 

Tent, Kitchen 9 

Tent, Maintenance Shelter 4 

Test, Set, Tele. TS-712/TCC-11 8 

Trailer, Cargo, 1 V2 Ton, M105A2 93 

Truck, Ambulance, XM725 11 

Truck, Cargo, 21/2 Ton 30 

Truck, Stake Body, 19,000 GVW, 21/2 Ton 2 

Truck, Tractor, 10 Ton 6 

Truck, Wrecker, 5 Ton 3 

Truck, Utility, V^ Ton, M38A1 25 

Truck, Van, 2y2 Ton, M-109 10 

Typewriter, Non-Port. 13" Carr 50 

Weapon Sight, Infrared 34 

Typewriter, Non-Port. Elec 5 



62 Report of The Adjutant General 

ANNEX E 

LIST OF MAJOR ITEMS OF EQUIPMENT AT 
WEEKEND TRAINING EQUIPMENT POOL, FORT BRAGG, N.C., 
FOR USE OF ARNG UNITS OF THIS STATE 

Item Quantity 

Carrier, Command Post, M577A1 13 

Carrier, Cargo, M-548 7 

Carrier, Personnel, M-59 33 

Carrier, Personnel, M-113 14 

Howitzer, 8", SP, M-55 4 

Howitzer, 155MM, SP, M-109 9 

Mortar, 4.2, SP, M-84 4 

Mortar, 107MM, SP, M-106A1 7 

Recovery Vehicle, M-88 2 

Semi-Trailer, Tank, FS, 5,000 Gal 1 

Semi-Trailer, 25T, M172A1 4 

Tank, Combat, M48A1 54 

Truck, FS, 21/2 Ton, M49C 2 

Truck, Tractor, 5 Ton, M-52 4 

Truck, Wrecker, 5 Ton, M-62 1 



Report of The Adjutant General 63 

NORTH CAROLINA MILITARY ACADEMY 

Post Office Box 280 

Fort Bragg, North Carolina 

28307 

15 September 1968 

SUBJECT: Report of Annual Field Training— 1968 

TO: The Adjutant General 

State of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

1. This report of Annual Field Training on the North Carolina Military- 
Academy is submitted in compliance with General Order Number 17, 
AGDNC dated 24 May 1968. 

2. The North Carolina Military Academy held its annual 15 day train- 
ing period 28 July-11 August 1968 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The 
Academy functioned with its own permanently assigned Staff, which was 
authorized by the National Guard Bureau, 1 January 1968. This Staff was 
augmented as necessary with officers and enlisted personnel from other 
units in the NC ARNG. This was considered to be our most productive 
and successful AT in our history. 

3. Administration: 

a. Advance Detachment: Did not exceed authorized strength. Con- 
sidered adequate. 

b. Instructor Support: The instructor Staff was composed of NC 
ARNG Staff Assistants and professional teachers. These were organized 
into committees and all achieved outstanding results. 

c. Medical Support: The medical support consisted of one (1) Medi- 
cal Doctor, eight (8) medical technicians and three ambulances. This 
gave us 24 hour medical aid available in our area dispensary and provided 
the required medical support on all ranges and training areas. Individuals 
requiring treatment beyond the capability of our dispensary were evacu- 
ated to Womack Army Hospital here at Fort Bragg. 

d. Transportation: Considered adequate. The members of OC Class 
number 11 (Junior Class) were transported to Fort Bragg and returned to 
home station on government vehicles. Three buses from the TMP in Ral- 
eigh were used both then and during AT to transport students to train- 
ing areas. Army sedans provided the administrative transportation for 
the Staff and faculty. Tactical and combat vehicles were borrowed from 
the NCNG Organizational Maintenance Shop and the MUTA Con-Site here 
at Fort Bragg. 

e. Mess Support: Rations were drawn from the Post Quartermaster 
according to their schedule and menu. The Mess Steward and Cooks were 
provided by the Post Food Service School at Fort Bragg. Food prepar- 
ation and mess management were considered outstanding. Kitchen Police 
were detailed daily from administrative support personnel provided by the 
30th Infantry Division (Mech) and the Non-Division Troop Command. 



64 Report of The Adjutant General 

f. Inspections and Visits: 

(1) The annual inspection by the representative of the TUSA 
Inspector General was made 6 August 1968 and overall rating of Superior 
was awarded. 

(2) During this AT period, the Academy was host to the follow- 
ing distinguished guests: 

GEN James K. Woolnough, CG, USCONARC 

LTG John J. Tolson, III, CG, XVIII Abn Corps & Ft Bragg 

MG Claude T. Bowers, TAG NC 

MG Joseph R. Russ, Dep CG, TUSA 

LTC Curtis B. Eidell, Ass't IG, TUSA 

g. Miscellaneous: Graduation exercises for OC-10 were held in Thea- 
ter Number 10, Fort Bragg, 10 August 1968. MG Joseph R. Russ, Deputy 
Commanding General, Third United States Army, made the principal 
address. 

4. Training: 

a. Officer Candidate Class Number 10 completed their training. Nine- 
ty-two members received a commission as Second Lieutenant, NC ARNG. 
This was the largest graduating class in the history of this Academy. 

b. Officer Candidate Class Number II, with 82 members remaining 
completed their scheduled training for Phase I. 

c. The instructor support group was composed of 16 officers and 6 
enlisted personnel from the NC ARNG. Instruction and demonstration 
teams were provided by the 1st Battalion, 504th Airborne Infantry, 82d 
Airborne Division, USA. 

5. Active Army Support: Support was provided by the following active 
units or installations in an outstanding manner. 

a. Womack Army Hospital 

b. 1st Bn, 504th Abn Inf, 82d Abn Div. 

c. Post Food Service School 

6. Recommendations: 

a. Schedule a Pre-Camp Conference for principal Staff members and 
Committee Chiefs as soon as new lesson plans are received from USAIS. 

b. Update all directives concerning applications for NCMA. This 
should be done not later than 1 January 1969. 

WILLIAM P. KEETON, JR. 
COL., INF., NCARNG 
Commandant 



Report of The Adjutant General 65 

department of the army 

HEADQUARTERS 30TH INFANTRY DIVISION (MECHANIZED) 

North Carolina Army National Guard 

Post Office Box 9394 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

1 October 1969 

SUBJECT: Annual Field Training— After Action Report 1969 

The Adjutant General 
State of North Carolina 
Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

1. GENERAL: Annual Field Training during the calendar year 1969 
was conducted at three training sites, Fort Stewart, Georgia, Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina, and Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Training was scheduled during 
six phases to make maximum use of training areas and equipment 
available. 

2. ORGANIZATION FOR ANNUAL FIELD TRAINING: 
a. Fort Stewart, Georgia (5-20 July 1969) 

Division Troops 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company (-), 30th Infantry 

Division (Mechanized) 
30th Military Police Company (-) 
Detachment, 105th Engineer Battalion 
130th Signal Battalion (-) 
206th Weather Flight Detachment (Attached) 

2nd Brigade (Mechanized) 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company 
1st Battalion, 118th Infantry (Mechanized) 
4th Battalion, 118th Infantry (Mechanized) 
2nd Battalion, 263rd Armor 

3rd Brigade (Mechanized) 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company 
1st Battalion, 121st Infantry (Mechanized) 
2nd Battalion, 121st Infantry (Mechanized) 
1st Battalion, 108th Armor 

Division Artillery 

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery (-) 
1st Battalion, 178th Artillery (Mechanized) 
1st Battalion, 230th Artillery (Mechanized) 

Support Command 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Band (-) 
30th Administration Company (-) 
Headquarters, 105th Medical Battalion (-) 



66 Report of The Adjutant General 

Company C, 105th Medical Battalion 

Company D, 105th Medical Battalion 

230th Supply and Transportation Battalion (-) 

Headquarters and Company A, 730th Maintenance Battalion (-) 

Company C, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

Company D, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

Detachment, Company E, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

b. Fort Stewart, Georgia (19 July-3 August 1969) 
Division Troops 

Headquarters 30th Infantry Division (Mechanized) 
30th Military Police Company (-) 
105th Engineer Battalion (-) 
130th Signal Battalion (-) 

1st Brigade (Mechanized) 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company 
1st Battalion, 119th Infantry (Mechanized) 
1st Battalion, 120th Infantry (Mechanized) 
1st Battalion, 252nd Armor 
2nd Battalion, 252nd Armor 

Division Artillery 

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery (-) 
1st Battalion, 113th Artillery (Mechanized) 
4th Battalion, 113th Artillery (Mechanized) 

Support Command 

Headquarters and Headquarters Company and Band (-) 

30th Administration Company (-) 

Headquarters and Company A, 105th Medical Battalion (-) 

Company B, 105th Medical Battalion 

230th Supply and Transportation Battalion (-) 

Headquarters and Company A, 730th Maintenance Battalion (-) 

Company B, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

Detachment, Company E, 730th Maintenance Battalion 

540th Transportation Battalion (Attached) 

c. Fort Bragg, North Carolina (31 May - 14 June 1969) 
Ground Surveillance Radar Sections 

Detachment Headquarters 

Ground Surveillance Section from each Infantry Battalion (Mech), 
each Armor Battalion and the Cavalry Squadron 

d. Fort Bragg, North Carolina (9-23 August 1969) 
1st Squadron, 196th Cavalry 

Company E (TAM), 730th Maintenance Battalion (-) 

e. Fort Bragg, North Carolina (16-30 August 1969) 

(Attached to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 82nd Air- 
borne Division Artillery for training) 



Report of The Adjutant General 67 

Radar Section, 1st Battalion, 113th Artillery (Mechanized) 
Radar Section, 1st Battalion, 178th Artillery (Mechanized) 
Radar Section, 1st Battalion, 230th Artillery (Mechanized) 

f. Fort Sill, Oklahoma (19 July - 2 August 1969) 
5th Battalion (Honest John), 113th Artillery 

3. TROOP MOVEMENTS: Troop movements were accomplished by 
motor convoy, military aircraft, and private automobiles. Travel by private 
automobile was limited to ten percent of the command. Organic vehicle 
convoy and private automobiles were employed for movement to and from 
Fort Stewart, Georgia by the major portion of the division. The same 
means was employed by the Cavalry Squadron to and from Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. Military Aircraft was provided by the North Carolina Air 
National Guard for the 5th Battalion, 113th Artillery to and from Fort 
Sill, Oklahoma. All movements were completed without serious mishap to 
personnel or equipment. 

4. PERSONNEL: The assigned strength of the division at Annual Field 
Training was, Fort Stewart^l2,566, Fort Sill— 195, and Fort Bragg— 747. 
During the training periods the health of the command was excellent. There 
were a small number of accidents this year, but none fatal. Only two in- 
dividuals were left at the Army Hospital beyond the end of Field Training. 

5. US ARMY RESERVE REINFORCEMENTS: The division received 
approximately 771 individual USAR fillers. Processing and assignment was 
accomplished in an orderly manner. Subsequent integration into units and 
overall performance of these individuals was excellent. In some cases, 
fillers had obvious physical defects which precluded performance of their 
training. 

6. TRAINING: The following training objectives were established and 
attained during Annual Field Training 1969. Mechanized Infantry Battal- 
ions — completion of rifle platoon army training tests. Tank Battalions — 
completion of tank crew gunnery. Artillery Battalions — completion of bat- 
tery army training tests. Throughout the training period, the raising of 
overall standards of proficiency in training, personnel; and material readi- 
ness was given special emphasis. All units at Fort Stewart and the Cavalry 
Squadron at Fort Bragg conducted training from a field bivouac. A com- 
mand post exercise and displacement during the hours of darkness was con- 
ducted by the headquarters of Division, each Brigade, and the Support 
Command. Schools established to provide training for selected individuals 
and elements were: A two week Chemical School, Pre-camp Mess Steward 
School, A Command Management Maintenance School, and A Track Vehicle 
Maintenance School at Fort Stewart and Fort Bragg. The Assault Vehicle 
Launched Bridge and Combat Engineer Vehicle sections and platoons of the 
Engineer and Tank Battalions attended a four day course of instruction at 
Fort Benning. 196 individuals assigned to the Ground Surveillance Radar 
Sections of the maneuver battalions attended a 92 hour course of instruc- 
tion on ground surveillance radar equipment at Fort Bragg. The Honest 
John Missile Battalion fired three Honest John rockets during scheduled 
battery army training tests. All units of the division were awarded a 
satisfactory rating by the Third U. S. Army Evaluation Board. 



68 Report of The Adjutant General 

7. LOGISTICS: Division Support Command provided area support and 
supply point distribution to elements attending field training at Fort Stevi^- 
art, Georgia. Division Engineer Battalion provided water and road main- 
tenance. 

Loan equipment required for training at Fort Stewart, was provided by 
Reserve Components Supply. Logistics support was provided by Host 
Stations for elements attending Annual Field Training at Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina and Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

DANIEL K. EDWARDS 
Major General, NC ARNG 
Commanding 



Report of The Adjutant General 69 

department of the army 

HEADQUARTERS 30TH INFANTRY DIVISION (MECHANIZED) 

North Carolina Army National Guard 

Post Office Box 10886 

Raleiffh, North Carolina 27605 

22 September 1970 

SUBJECT: After Action Report, AT 1970 

The Adjutant General 
State of North Carolina 
P. O. Box 26268 
Raleigh, N. C. 27611 

1. GENERAL: AT was conducted at three training sites: Fort Bragg, 
N. C; Fort Stewart, Ga.; and Fort Benning, Ga. Training was conducted in 
seven phases in order to accommodate specialist training, utilize the sites 
assigned, and the available equipment to best advantage. 

2. ORGANIZATION FOR AT: See Inclosure 1 (Inclosure Item 4-10, 
30th Inf Div (M) Pam 130-1). 

3. TROOP MOVEMENTS: Troop movements were accomplished by 
motor convoy, military busses, and private automobiles. Movements were 
completed without serious mishap to personnel and equipment. 

4. PERSONNEL: 

a. Physically Present (1st Day) 

1st Bde (23 May) Fort Stewart 3,006 

Div Troops (30 May) Fort Bragg 4.164 

3d Bde (13 Jun) Fort Stewart 2,619 
Troop D (Air Cav) l-196th Cav Sqdn (20 Jun) Fort Bragg 138 

Co E, 730th Maint Bn (5 Jul) Fort Bragg 168 

2d Bde (4 Jul) Fort Stewart 2,277 

AVLB Platoons and CEV Sections (11 Jul) Fort Benning 55 



TOTAL 12,427 

b. Accidents connected with training were minimal. However, off- 
duty accidents resulted in one death and several hospitalizations. 

c. Seven (7) individuals were left at Post hospitals beyond AT 
periods. 

d. Health and morale were excellent. 

5. US ARMY RESERVE REINFORCEMENTS: 

Unit Number of Fillers 

1st Bde 456 

Div Troops 97 

TOTAL 553 



70 Report of The Adjutant General 

6. TRAINING: 

a. The general training mission was to complete platoon level Army 
Training Tests, conduct company level training to include combined arms 
exercises, conduct training in command and staff functions, and conduct 
retraining at basic unit training level. 

b. Objectives established and attained were: 
(1) Mech Inf Bns 



Tank Bns (-) 
Cav Sqdn (-) 
Bde Commo Pits 
MP Co 



Completion of platoon ATT for 
all platoons not previously tested. 



(2) Engineer Bn (-) - Completion of locally devised platoon level 
tests and perform engineer construction on two combined arms live fire 
courses at Fort Bragg. 

(3) DS Arty Bns — Retraining in preparation for battery ATT. 

(4) GS Arty Bn— Completion of BUT. 

(5) Rocket Bn — Retraining to maintain proficiency, and conduct 
AUT. 

(6) All headquarters — Support, command, and control. 

(7) Div Hq ) 
SUPCOM (-) ) CPX 
Div Arty ) 

Sig Bn ) 

(8) Specialized units — Conduct MOS training. 

c. All units were awarded Satisfactory ratings by Third U. S. Army 
Evaluation Board. 

7. LOGISTICS: 

a. Each brigade was supported by respective slices of DISCOM as 
indicated on Inclosure 1. Division Troops and Div Arty were supported by 
the Hq (-) of DISCOM units. 

b. Maximum cross-loan of organic equipment among Division units 
and Non-Division units reduced the amount of equipment borrowed from 
Host Posts. 

c. Logistical support was provided by Host Posts for specialist units 
attending AT separately. 

DANIEL K. EDWARDS 
Major General, NCARNG 
Commanding 



Report of The Adjutant General 71 

30 April 1970 30th INF DIV (MECH) PAM 130-1 

ITEM 4-10 
ORGANIZATION FOR AT 

1. General: This item prescribes the troop organization for AT 1970. 

2. Application: See paragraph 2, Item 3, this pamphlet. 

3. Organization and Dates for AT: 

a. Fort Stewart, Ga (23 May - 7 Jun 70) 

1st Brigade, 30th Infantry Division (Mech) 

BdeHHC (M) 

l-119th Inf Bn(M) 

l-120th Inf Bn(M) 

l-252d Armor Bn (-) A VLB 

2-252d Armor Bn (-) AVLB 

1st MP Platoon, 30th MP Co 

Pers Admin Det, 30th Admin Co 

Co B, 105th Med Bn 

Co B, 730th Maint Bn 

Det, 230th S & T Bn 

Det, Div Sup Section, Hq Co, 230th S & T Bn 

1st Lt Trk Platoon, Co. B, 230th S & T Bn 

1st Fwd Sup Sec, Co A, 230th S & T Bn 

Bath Unit, Co A, 230th S & T Bn 

b. Fort Bragg, NC (30 May - 13 Jun 70) 
Division Troops 

HHC, 30th Inf Div (Mech) 

30th MP Co (- 3 MP Platoons) 

130th Sig Bn 

105th Engr Bn (- Co B, Co C, AVLB Platoon, CEV Sections) 

l-196th Cav Sqdn (-Trp D) 

Division Artillery 

HHB, 30th Inf Div (Mech) Arty 

l-113th Arty Bn 

l-178th Arty Bn 

4-113th Arty Bn 

5-113th Arty Bn 

Radar Section, l-230th Arty Bn 

SUPCOM 

HHC & Band, 30th Inf Div (Mech) SUPCOM 
30th Admin Co (-) 3 Admin Dets 
105th Med Bn (-) Co B, Co C, Co D 
730th Maint Bn (-) Co B, Co C, Co D, Co E 
230th S & T Bn (-) 3 Lt Trk Platoons, 3 Fwd Sup Sections, 
1 Bath Unit 



72 Report of The Adjutant General 

c. Fort Bragg, NC (30 May - 13 Jun 70) 
Artillery Radar 

d. Fort Bragg, NC (30 May - 13 Jun 70) 
ADM Platoon, 105th Engr Bn 

e. Fort Stewart, Ga (13 - 27 Jun 70) 

3rd Brigade, 30th Infantry Division (Mech) 

Bde HHC (M) 

l-121st Inf Bn (M) 

2-121st InlBn (M) 

l-108th Armor Bn (-) AVLB 

l-230th Arty Bn (-) Radar Section 

Co C, 105th Engr Bn (-) CEV Section 

3rd MP Platoon, 30th MP Co 

Pers Admin Det, 30th Admin Co 

Co D, 105th Med Bn 

Co D, 730th Maint Bn 

3rd Lt Trk Platoon, Co B, 230th S & T Bn 

3rd Fwd Sup Section, Co A, 230th S & T Bn 

f. Fort Bragg, NC (20 Jun - 4 Jul 70) 
Troop D (Air Cav) l-196th Cav Sqdn 

g. Fort Bragg, NC (5 - 19 Jul 70) 
Co E (TAM), 730th Maint Bn 

h. Fort Stewart, Ga (4 - 18 Jul 70) 

2nd Brigade, 30th Infantry Division (Mech) 

Bde HHC (M) 

l-118th Inf Bn (M) 

4-118th Inf Bn (M) 

2-263d Armor Bn (-) AVLB 

Co B, 105th Engr Bn (-) CEV 

2nd MP Platoon, 30th MP Co 

Pers Admin Det, 30th Admin Co 

Co C, 105th Med Bn 

Co C, 730th Maint Bn 

2nd Lt Trk Platoon, Co B, 230th S&T Bn 

2nd Fwd Sup Section, Co A, 230th S&T Bn 

i. Fort Benning, GA (11 - 25 Jul 70) 
AVLB Platoon, Co E, 105th Engr Bn 
AVLB Section, l-108th Armor Bn 
AVLB Section, l-252d Armor Bn 
AVLB Section, 2-252d Armor Bn 
AVLB Section, 2-263d Armor Bn 
CEV Section, Co A, 105th Engr Bn 
CEV Section, Co B, 105th Engr Bn 
CEV Section, Co C, 105th Engr Bn 



Report of The Adjutant General 73 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleiffh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. On 2 September 1968 a privately owned rest home re- 
ported to the Sheriff of Bladen County NC that one of its female patients 
was missing. The Sheriff requested assistance from the Governor of North 
Carolina to search a large thick wooded marshy area near the rest home 
for this person. Governor Dan Moore ordered the National Guard to render 
the requested assistance. A task force from the 1st Bn 252d Armor 
NCARNG was given this mission. After all probable areas had been 
thoroughly searched but with negative results, the search was terminated, 
and the Guardsmen released from State duty. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location: 030900 September 
1968 through 041605 September 1968 in the wooded area off NC Highway 
242 about 6 miles southwest of Elizabethtown NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved': 148 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type duty performed: Military support to civil authorities to aid 
in the search for a missing person. 

f. Commander of troops: LTC Harold A. Waldron, Commanding Offi- 
cer, 1st Bn 252d Armor NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. There was no formal prior planning for this 
operation as the units concerned did not know of the mission until the 
mobilization order was received. Personnel were alerted for duty by the 
procedures established in the unit alert plans. While the personnel were 
in the process of assembling at their armories, plans were formulated and 
coordinated with the Sheriff's Department of Bladen County. 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted under battalion 
control. An organized search was directed throughout a three square mile 
area of marshy woodland near the rest home that included much dense 
undergrowth and some cultivated fields of com and soybeans. No evidence 
concerning the missing woman or her whereabouts was discovered. The 
search was terminated at the end of the second day of searching by the 
Sheriff of Bladen County. 



HOME STATION 


Off 


Em 


Total 


Fayetteville NC 


4 


3 


7 


Elizabethtown NC 


3 


69 


72 


Bladenboro NC 


3 


66 


69 



74 Report of The Adjutant General 

c. Post-operations phase: All personnel were engaged in mainte- 
nance of equipment in order to bring it back to the required military stan- 
dards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved. 

UNIT 

HHC (-) 1st Bn 252d Armor 
Co A 1st Bn 252d Armor 
Co B 1st Bn 252d Armor 

10 138 148 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved. The Sheriff's Department of 
Bladen County. 

c. Special services: Not applicable. 

d. Casualties: Several Guardsmen were badly stung by yellow jac- 
kets with one individual requiring medical attention in addition to first aid 
treatment. 

e. Troop information: A thorough briefing on the mission and the 
plan of operation was conducted for all personnel prior to beginning the 
search. Additional briefings were conducted whenever deemed ncessary or 
appropriate. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment: Tank companies are not issued appro- 
priate radio equipment for this type operation. By using the issued radio 
equipment in the headquarters company of their battalion, the tank com- 
panies were able to establish internal radio communications. However, 
radio communications with the civilian agency directing the search opera- 
tion was no't' -existent due to the inability of the Guard equipment to net 
with the civilian equipment. This deficiency caused several time lags in the 
coordination of this joint operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: None. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged: None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel: In this type operation personnel who are familiar with 
the terrain in the search area were utilized to the maximum. 

b. Operations: None. 

c. Training and organization: None. 

d. Intelligence: Close cooperation and coordination with civil authori- 
ties is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of a military support 
to civil authorities mission. 



Report of The Adjutant General 75 

e. Log^istics: The lack of radio equipment that will net with civilian 
communications equipment is a problem whenever the National Guard and 
civilian agencies participate in joint operations of any kind. 

f. Public affairs: None. 

g. Other: None. 

FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



76 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation: On 31 December 1968 Mrs. Dayton Coleman of Ash NC 
was reported as missing from her home. The Sheriff of Brunswick County 
requested assistance from the Governor of North Carolina to aid in the 
search for this person. Governor Dan Moore ordered the National Guard to 
render the requested assistance. A task force from the 1st Bn (Mech) 120th 
Inf NCARNG was given this mission. Their search in and around the 
designated areas produced negative results. The search was terminated 
after three days. Mrs. Coleman, a mental patient, was found on 4 January 
1969 in a barn that had been thoroughly searched twice during the search 
operation. She was fully dressed and not suffering from exposure. Due to 
her unstable mental condition, she was admitted to a State mental hospital 
for indefinite confinement that same day. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location: 010700 January 1969 
through 0317000 January 1969 at the Coleman home near Ash NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 53 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type duty perfoi-med: Militaiy support to civil authorities to aid 
in the search for a missing person. 

f. Commander of troops: LTC William L. Eason, Commanding Officer, 
1st Bn (Mech) 120th Inf NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase: The planning phase for this operation began 
when the alert notice was received by the concerned units. Since a small 
task force was requested, the "in part" portion of an infantry company 
which is stationed near the area to be searched was selected to furnish 
the needed manpower. Plans were formulated, personnel alerted in accor- 
dance with the unit alert plans, and necessary logistical preparations were 
made prior to the hour of assembly on 1 January 1969. 



Report of The Adjutant General 



77 



b. Execution phase: This operation was conducted under battalion 
control the first day and then under company control for the remainder of 
the time. Personnel of the unit conducted an organized search within a 
three mile radius of the Coleman home. No evidence concerning the missing 
woman or her whereabouts was discovered during the search. At the end 
of the third day the Sheriff of Brunswick County terminated the search. 

c. Post-operations phase: All personnel were engaged in maintenance 
of equipment in order to bring it back to the required military standards 
of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units in- 
volved. 



Unit 

HHC (-) 1st Bn (M) 120th Inf 
Co B(-) 1st Bn (M) 120th Inf 
Co B(P1) 1st Bn(M) 120th Inf 



Home Station 

Wilmington NC 

Whiteville NC 
Shallotte NC 



Off 

3 
1 
1 



EM Total 

4 



1 

7 
40 



41 



48 



53 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved: The Sheriff's Department of 
Brunswick County, the Shallotte NC Rescue Squad, and Civil Air Patrol. 

c. Special sei-vices: Not applicable. 

d. Casualties: None. 

e. Troop information: A thorough briefing on the mission and the 
plan of operation was conducted for all personnel prior to beginning the 
search. Additional briefings were conducted whenever deemed necessary 
or appropriate. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment: Issued communications equipment was 
used throughout the opei'ation with good internal results. However, radio 
communications with the civilian agencies assisting in the search was non- 
existent due to the inability of our equipment to net with the civilian radios. 
This deficiency caused several time lags in coordinating joint efforts of 
the search operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: Two each civilian 
aircraft operated by members of the Civil Air Patrol. 

c. Equipment lost/ damaged: None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel: In this type operation personnel who were familiar 
with the terrain in the search area were utilized to the maximum. 

b. Operations: None. 

c. Training and organization: None. 



78 Report of The Adjutant General 

d. Intelligence: Close cooperation and coordination with civil authori- 
ties is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of a military support 
to civil authorities mission. 

e. Logistics: The lack of radio equipment that will net with civilian 
communications equipment continues to be a problem whenever the Nation- 
al Guard and civilian agencies participate in a joint operation. 

f. Public affairs: None. 

g. Other; None. 

FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS NCARNG 
MSPO 



Report of The Adjutant General 79 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation: On 15 January 1969 the Sheriff of Franklin County NC 
received a report that Brooks Merritt of the Moulton Community had been 
missing from his home since about 102130 January 1969. All searches 
proved fruitless, so the sheriff requested military assistance from the 
Governor of North Carolina. He desired the heavy w^ooded areas near the 
Merritt home to be searched for clues. Governor Scott ordered National 
Guardsmen to render the requested assistance. Personnel from the 5th Bn 
113th Arty conducted a thorough search at arms length throughout the 
designated areas with negative results. After this search was completed, 
officials stated there was little hope of finding any clues in these areas and 
terminated the National Guard assignment. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location: 020800 February 
1969 through 021700 February 1969 at the Moulton Community in the 
County of Franklin NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 190 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type duty performed: Military support to civil authorities to aid 
in the search for a missing person. 

f. Commander of troops: LTC John B. Fleming, Commanding Officer, 
5th Bn 113th Arty NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase: The planning phase of this operation ex- 
tended over several days. In order to have maximum participation with 
minimum disturbance to the individual Guardsman's civilian occupation, it 
was decided to conduct the search on the Sunday following receipt of the 
mobilization order. Individuals to participate in the search were notified 
by mail to report at 020800 February 1969 for this duty. Search patterns 
were established, transportation and messing arrangements developed, and 
overall plans were completed prior to the time of assembly. 



80 



Report of The Adjutant General 



b. Execution phase: This operation was conducted under battalion 
control from conception to termination. The battalion was able to follow 
the plans that had been formulated prior to the day of execution. The 
search plan was followed with negative results. The entire operation func- 
tioned smoothly even though rainy weather persisted throughout this phase 
of the operation. This inclement weather did not impede the search or other 
areas of the execution phase. 

c. Post-operation phase: All personnel were engaged in maintenance 
of equipment in order to bring it back to the required military standards 
of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved: 



Unit 

HHB 5th Bn 113th Arty 
Btry A 5th Bn 113th Arty 
Btry B 5th Bn 113th Arty 



Home Station Off 


WO 


EM 


Total 


Louisburg NC 11 


2 


68 


81 


Zebulon NC 5 


— 


58 


63 


Youngsville NC 5 


— 


41 


46 



21 



167 



190 



The Sheriff's Department 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved: 
from the County of Franklin NC. 

c. Special services: Not applicable. 

d. Casualties: One officer from Btry B 5th Bn 113th Arty received a 
sprained knee and one enlisted man from Btry A 5th Bn 113th Arty injured 
his neck. These injuries were considered to be of a very minor nature. 

e. Troop information: A thorough briefing on the mission and the 
plan of operation was conducted for all personnel prior to beginning the 
search. Additional briefings were conducted whenever deemed necessary or 
appropriate. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment: Issued communications equipment was 
used throughout the operation with good internal results. However, radio 
communications with members of the Franklin County Sheriff's Depart- 
ment was non-existent* due to our equipment not being able to net with 
theirs. Often this deficiency caused a time lag in the search operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: None. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged: None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel: None. 

b. Operations: Whenever and wherever possible the use of a TOE unit 
to handle this type mission achieves better results due to the maintenance 
of unit integrity. Staff personnel know the capabilities and abilities of their 



Report of The Adjutant General 81 

own units better than attached units. This factor saves time and enhances 
the assignment of specific tasks to the properly oriented unit. 

c. Training and organization: Units that do not have qualified organic 
medical personnel and equipment should have medical personnel and equip- 
ment attached when it becomes necessary for the unit to perform its duty 
in rough terrain areas. 

d. Intelligence: Close cooperation and coordination with civilian 
authorities is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of a military 
support to civil authorities mission. 

e. Logistics: The lack of radio equipment that will net with civilian 
communications equipment continues to be a problem whenever the Nation- 
al Guard and civilian agencies participate in a joint operation. 

f. Public affairs: This type operation promotes good will between 
the community and the National Guard. Much favorable publicity was re- 
ceived by the National Guard for its participation in this search even 
though the missing person or a clue to his whereabouts was not discovered. 

g. Other: None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



82 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation: On 10 February 1969 a group of white and Negro radical 
students at Duke University, Durham NC, presented a list containing thir- 
teen demands to the university president. Dr. Douglas Knight. These de- 
mands concerned special considerations to be given the Negro students at 
Duke. At 130730 February 1969 about thirty Negro students seized control 
of Allen Building, central records office for the school. At 1530 hours that 
day the administration of the university issued an order for the protestors 
to clear the building in one hour or face arrest.. To reinforce the Duke 
Security Police, university officials requested assistance from the City of 
Durham Police Department and State Highway Patrol. When the protestors 
did not leave the building on time, a new ultimatum was issued to clear the 
building by 1750 hours. When the students again refused to leave, the law 
enforcement agencies moved to clear the building. The protestors left the 
building by another door. As the police attempted to seal off the building 
the crowd of students outside the building now numbering about 2,000 be- 
gan throwing rocks and sticks. Tear gas was employed but the wind was 
not favorable and dampened effectiveness of the gas. Five policemen and 
twenty students were injured as the mob of students was dispersed. A 
three-day boycott of classes by all students was requested by the Afro- 
American Society, an organization of militant Negro students at Duke. 
The boycott was not too successful as such, but it caused tension to con- 
tinue. In order to control this massive display of civil disobedience, uni- 
versity officials also requested military assistance from Governor Robert 
W. Scott. He ordered the National Guard to render the requested assistance. 
A task force was mobilized while the building was being evacuated but 
never committed since the violent part of this disturbance terminated 
with the removal of the students from the building. This task force served 
as a stand-by reserve until the overall situation was considered normal. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location: 131630 February 
1969 through 161840 February 1969 at Durham NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 965 officers 
and enlisted men. 



Report of The Adjutant General 



83 



d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type of duty performed: Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance. 

f. Commander of troops: COL Ford L. Davis, Commanding Officer, 
30th Inf Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase: Prior planning for participation in this 
particular operation was almost non-existent as this demonstration was of 
a spontaneous nature. When the National Guard was ordered to mobilize, 
the units to be employed were alerted by procedures established by AGDNC 
OPLAN 2 and AGDNCPam 500-60 as augumented by directives from subor- 
dinate headquarters. 

b. Execution phase: This operation was conducted under the area 
task force concept according to the procedures set forth in AGDNC OPLAN 
2. Various units were assembled at the Durham armory to be deployed at 
nearby Duke University. The National Guard was not committed to the 
scene of the disturbance as the law enforcement agencies were able to re- 
store law and order without their assistance. Since the disturbance and 
the attempted class boycott increased tension in the area, the Guardsmen 
remained on duty as a back-up force for the law enforcement agencies. 
While in this status, much time was devoted to the conducting of riot con- 
trol training. 

c. Post-operation phase: This phase of the operation was conducted 
according to the procedures established by AGDNPam 500-60 as augmented 
by directives from the concerned subordinate headquarters. All personnel 
were engaged in maintenance of equipment in order to return it to the re- 
quired military standards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 



a. Actual and committed strength and 


home 


station; 


3 of 


units 


involved: 












UNIT 


HOME STATION 


OFF 


WO 


EM 


TOTAL 


HHC&Band 30th Inf 












Div(M) SUPCOM 


Raleigh NC 


15 


3 


65 


83 


30th Admin Co (-) 


Raleigh NC 


12 


2 


84 


98 


HHD 130th Sig Bn 


Durham NC 


10 


3 


39 


52 


Co A 130th Sig Bn 


Durham NC 


4 


1 


153 


158 


Co B 130th Sig Bn 


Burlington NC 


5 


— 


104 


109 


Co C (-) 130th Sig Bn 


Asheboro NC 


3 


— 


92 


95 


Co C (IP) 130th Sig Bn 


Siler City NC 


2 


— 


64 


66 


HHB 5-113th Arty 


Louisburg NC 


11 


2 


65 


78 


Btry A 5-1 13th Arty 


Zebulon NC 


5 


— 


58 


63 


Btry B 5-1 13th Arty 


Youngsville NC 


5 


— 


43 


48 


HHD NCARNG & atch pers 


Raleigh NC 


26 


10 


79 


115 



98 



21 



846 



965 



84 Report of The Adjutant General 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved: Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Durham, County of Durham, Duke University, and State 
of North Carolina plus FBI and MI Det, HQ, Third US Army. 

c. Special services: Newspapers, radios, books, magazines, and TV 
sets were available for use by off-duty personnel at the billeting area. 

d. Casualties: One enlisted man from Co A 130th Sig Bn cracked a 
bone in his foot when he slipped on the ice that had formed on the back 
porch at the armory. 

e. Troop information: All personnel were briefed on the legal liabil- 
ities, the rules of engagement, and degrees of force applicable to civil dis- 
turbance operation. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment: Direct commercial telephone lines were 
installed between the armory and the Durham Police Department. Issued 
equipment was used to the best extent possible but reliance on police and 
civilian radios was mandatory to achieve successful communications with 
the troops in the field. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: 

(1) Disperser, Riot Control, M5, mounted on Truck, Cargo, 3/4 
Ton, with protective shields constructed at local expense from HHC 30th 
Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 

(2) Two each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC) from 1st Bn 
252d Armor NCARNG. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged: None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel: None. 

b. Operations: This operation revealed that the staff of the AGDNC 
EOC can effectively function on a reduced strength basis. The full staff 
was employed from the beginning and as the operation progressed it be- 
came more and more obvious that a smaller staff would be more efficient 
in this type operation. A reduced staff will be utilized in such future 
operations. 

c. Training and organization: Staff personnel should be cross-trained 
so that when the reduced staff is used, all jobs can be represented. Due to 
the similarity of the staff job requirements for a civil disturbance opera- 
tion, the cross-training of personnel is a minor problem. 

d. Intelligence: Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
civil disturbance missions. 



Report of The Adjutant General 85 

e. Logistics: Adequate radio equipment that will properly function 
in a civil disturbance operation continues to be one of our biggest problem 
areas. 

f. Public affairs: Adequate coverage by the AG Public Affairs Teams 
in accordance with procedures established by AGDNCR 360-1. 

g. Other: None. 

FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



86 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 26 February 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, D. C. 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation: Due to a severe snow and ice storm, electric lines col- 
lapsed and electric power was disrupted in Richmond, Robeson and Anson 
Counties. The Mayor of the city of Ellerbe, the County Agents of Rich- 
mond, Robeson and Anson Counties, requested generators from the State 
Civil Defense Director, to be utilized for emergency power. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location: 171900 Feb 69 - 
261200 Feb 69. Richmond, Robeson and Anson Counties. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 47 ARNG 
and 10 ANG for a total of 57 persons. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: 

(1) 1—60 KW Generator 

(2) 1—15 KW Generator 

(3) 18—10 KW Generators 

(4) ' 4— 5 KW Generators 

(5) 4 — Truck, 3/4-1 Ton, Pickup (Commerical) 

(6) 4— Truck, Cargo, 3/4 Ton 

(7) 16— Truck, Cargo, 2 1/2 Ton 

(8) 7— Trailers, 3/4 Ton 

e. Type of duty performed: Operation of generators and military 
vehicles. 

f. Commander of troops: The State Adjutant General who desig- 
nated operational control to the County Agents and the Mayor of Ellerbe. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase: This phase of the operation was based on 
AGDNC Pamphlet 500-60. The Adjutant General initially alerted and placed 



Report of The Adjutant General 87 

on duty, one generator crew of two (2) individuals, and one 10 KW Genera- 
tor. The next day additional personnel and generators were requested by 
the State Civil Defense Director with the Adjutant General placing on duty 
other personnel with generating equipment. 

b. Execution phase: Generators were utilized as follows. — 

(1) Ellerbe: Four generators furnished power to water pumps for 
the city water supply. One 60 KW generator furnished power to a chicken 
hatchery. Ten generators were utilized by the County Agent on a rotating 
schedule throughout Richmond County to dairy farms to furnish power for 
milking machines. 

(2) Wadesboro: One generator furnished power for a school heat- 
ing system. Six generators were utilized by the County Agent throughout 
Anson County on a rotating schedule to dairy farms to furnish power for 
milking machines. 

(3) Hoffman: One generator furnished to Morriston School for boys 
to furnish power to heating system. 

(4) Lumberton: One generator furnished to Robeson County Agent 
to be utilized for power for milking machines throughout the county. 

c. Post-operations phase: This phase is being conducted according to 
the procedures established by AGDNC Pamphlet 500-60 and as augmented 
by battalion and company directives. Emphasis is being placed on a 
thorough maintenance check of all generating equipment as this equipment 
was operated under adverse conditions. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home station of units and 
personnel involved: See inclosure 1. 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved: None. 

c. Special services: None. 

d. Casualties: None. 

e. Troop information: None. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications: Commercial land lines used. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: None. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged: None. 

5. Problem areas and lessons learned. 

a. Personnel: All personnel performed in a superior manner. 

b. Operations: The placing of committed generators under the opera- 
tional control of the various county agents and the mayor of one city, 
worked very well. No problems were encountered under this arrangement. 



88 Report of The Adjutant General 

The Military Support to Civil Authorities Section of The Adjutant Gen- 
eral's Department dispatched all equipment and coordinated all request 
with the State Civil Defense Office. This arrangement worked very well 
with no complications. 

c. Training and organization: One of the problem areas encountered 
was a shortage of trained and licensed operators. A recommendation has 
been made to the proper authorities to solve this problem by conducting 
schools within each major command during home station training and 
annual field training periods. 

d. Intelligence: No problems or lessons learned. 

e. Logistics: Generators and vehicles were adequate for this mission. 

f. Public affairs: The civilian population was most cordial and ap- 
preciative to the National Guard and much good will was established by 
this mission. No adverse publicity of any kind has been reported or received 
by this office. 

g. Other: Overall the operation was accomplished in a superior man- 
ner. The agencies, i.e. National Guard, City Officials, State Civil Defense 
personnel. County Officials, all worked together in harmony and strived to 
assist the citizens of the cities and counties of the disaster areas. 

6. A copy of After Action Report for the City of Rockingham is in- 
closed at inclosure 2 to this report. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ROY E. THOMPSON 
Brigadier General, NCARNG 
Assistant Adjutant General 



Report of The Adjutant General 89 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. Two individuals left by boat to go fishing near Plymouth 
NC at or about 281600 February 1969. When they did not return within a 
reasonable time, a search was started. Their boat was found at or about 
282330 February 1969 with a large hole in the bow. An all-out search began 
on 1 March 1969. No trace of the missing individuals had been uncovered 
by 5 March 1969. The Sheriff of Bertie County then requested assistance 
from the Governor of North Carolina. He requested that National Guard 
troops aid by conducting a land search on the island near where the dam- 
aged boat was found. The island was mostly under water, and the indi- 
viduals' families had requested that this 1500 acre tract of land be searched. 
Due to water current action in this area, it was felt that the bodies could 
have been washed onto the island during high tides. The search revealed 
no evidence of the bodies or anything else useful. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 050900 March 1969 
through 061430 March 1969 at Rice Patch Island where the Roanoke River 
empties into Albemarle Sound about 6 miles north northeast of Plymouth 
NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 87 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment other 
than weapons was used as appropriate. 

e. Type duty performed. Military support to civil authorities to aid 
in the search for two missing persons. 

f. Commander of troops. CPT Kenneth L. Stalls, Commanding Officer, 
Co C 1st Bn (Mech) 119th Inf NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison officers from HHC 1st Bn (Mech) 
119th Inf NCARNG represented The Adjutant General of North Carolina 
at a meeting with the Sheriff of Bertie County concerning the use of 
National Guard Personnel in the search operation. It was decided that 



90 Report of The Adjutant General 

National Guard assistance was needed to conduct a search on Rice Patch 
Island and so this recommendation was made to The Adjutant General. 
Approval was given by Governor Scott and at 051025 March 1969 a task 
force was ordered into action from elements of the 1st Bn 119th Inf 
NCARNG. The personnel of the selected units were so notified by putting 
their unit alert plans into action. By 051415 March 1969 the task force had 
been assembled, briefed, and were on the way to the search area. 

b. Execution phase. The search was conducted on the island by 
forming the men in a line formation with approximately 5 feet between 
each man. The north end of the island seized as a guide for the first sweep. 
A tape was installed along the south boundary of the first sweep and also 
served as a guide for the next sweep. The entire island was searched by 
mid-day on 6 March 1969 at which time the Sheriff of Bertie County ad- 
vised the National Guardsmen that they had completed their mission. Just 
as the men were preparing for a new mission, searching the river shoreline, 
word was received that the body of one of the missing persons had been 
found in the river. The Guardsmen departed the search area after the dis- 
covery, as it was assumed the other body would be so found. It was dis- 
covered the next week in the water not too far from where the first body 
was found. 

c. Post-operation phase. All personnel were engaged in maintenance 
of equipment in order to return it to the required military standards of 
readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units in- 
volved. 

UNIT 

HHG (-) IstBn(M) 119th Inf 
HHC (PI) 1st Bn(M) 119th Inf 
Co C(-) Isfc Bn (M) 119th Inf 
Co C (PI) 1st Bn (M) 119th Inf 
Co C(P2) 1st Bn(M) 119th Inf 

5 1 81 87 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved. 

(1) Numerous civilians from the local area including friends of 
the families concerned and divers. 

(2) Rescue squads from the town of Edenton and the town of 
Windsor. 

(3) Sheriff's Department of the County of Bertie. 

(4) Area representatives of the NC Wildlife Commission and NC 
Department of Conservation and Development. 

(5) Helicopter from USCG Air Station at Elizabeth City NC. 

c. Special services. Not applicable. 

d. Casualties. None. 



HOME STATION 


OFF 


WO 


EM TOTAL 


Ahoskie NC 


3 


1 


16 20 


Tarboro NC 


— 


— 


2 2 


Elizabeth City NC 


1 


— 


1 2 


Edenton NC 


— 


— 


37 37 


Windsor NC 


1 


— 


25 26 



Report of The Adjutant General 91 

e. Troop information. A thoroug-h briefing on the mission and the 
plan of operation was conducted for all personnel prior to beginning the 
search. Additional briefings were conducted whenever deemed necessary or 
appropriate. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Issued communications equipment was 
used throughout the operation with very good internal results. However, 
radio communications with other governmental agencies was non-existent 
due to our equipment not being able to net with theirs. This deficiency 
often caused a time lag in the search operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. Several pairs of 
rubber boots from North Carolina Highway Commission. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. Complete instructions and proper organization for 
the mission should be accomplished prior to departure from home station. 
This presents the National Guard unit to the news media and spectators as 
an effective organization when they arrive at the scene of action. By 
making the necessary adjustments and prompt issuing of appropriate com- 
mands at the destination point, this task force created a favorable impres- 
sion when they arrived in the search area. 

c. Training and organization. See preceding subparagraph 5b. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian au- 
thorities is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of a military sup- 
port to civil authorities mission. 

e. Logistics. The lack of issued radio equipment that will net with 
civilian communications equipment continues to be a problem whenever the 
National Guard and civilian agencies participate in a joint operation. Also, 
there is a great need for certain individual winter clothing items. At pres- 
ent the individual Guardsman must furnish certain items of winter cloth- 
ing such as liners for field jackets and OG type unifoi-ms with accessories 
if he desires to keep himself warm while participating in these type 
missions. 

f. Public affairs. The favorable impression this highly organized 
task force created at the search area served to increase the prestige of the 
National Guard. It is not often that the National Guard has the oppor- 
tunity to reveal its organizational capability to the general public in times 
of strife; therefore, it is most gratifying when a National Guard unit 
presents itself to the public in such a way to receive praise rather than 
abuse while in the performance of a most undesirable type duty. 

g. Other. None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



92 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNG-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. During the month of February 1969 a number of em- 
ployees of Lenoir Dining Hall at the University of North Carolina in 
Chapel Hill went on strike. Leaders of the Black Student movement and 
Southern Students Organizing Committee, a white radical group, injected 
themselves into the dispute. During the evening meal on 4 March 1969 
a number of these dissenters blocked the dining hall's serving lines, pro- 
voked fist fights, and overturned several tables and chairs. The university 
officials ordei-ed the dining hall closed and announced it would not reopen 
on 5 March 1969. Since this university is a state supported school and the 
Governor of North Carolina is Chairman of the Board of Trustees thereto. 
Governor Scott ordered that Lenoir Dining Hall would be reopened on 5 
March 1969. The school officials did not comply with the Governor's order 
on 5 March 1969 as they said they were afraid of causing trouble. Gover- 
nor Scott ordered 100 State Highway Patrolmen into Chapel Hill with or- 
ders that Lenoir Dining Hall would reopen on 6 March 1969. At the same 
time he ordered The Adjutant General to mobilize a task force at the Dur- 
ham NC National Guard Armory to move into Chapel Hill in the event the 
law enforcement agencies needed assistance. The dining hall reopened on 

6 March 1969 and no major incidents were reported. Since the National 
Guard was not needed in this operation, the task force was deactivated on 

7 March 1969. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 051700 March 1969 
through 071540 March 1969 at Durham NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 603 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type of duty performed. Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance. 

f. Commander of troops. LTC Clifton E. Blalock, Jr., Commanding 
Officer, 130th Sig Bn NCARNG. 



Report of The Adjutant General 



93 



2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. The situation at Chapel Hill did not indicate 
that National Guard forces would be needed; therefore, very little planning 
for this operation was accomplished until late in the afternoon of 5 March 
1969. When the Governor issued the mobilization order, the units to be em- 
ployed were alerted by procedures established by AGDNC OPLAN 2 and 
AGDNCPam 500-60. The alert plans of the affected units received thorough 
operational tests with excellent results. 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted under the area 
concept plan as established by AGDNC OPLAN 2. A task force was formed 
with the 130th Sig Bn furnishing the bulk of the manpower and equipment. 
The task force remained at the Durham armory throughout the problem 
period, ready to deploy preselected elements to the trouble area about 10 
miles away on a moment's notice. The size of this force on immediate avail- 
ability status was a deterrent factor in the mob's hostile action and is felt 
had much to do with the relief of a tense situation. 

c. Post-operation phase. This phase of the operation was conducted 
according to the procedures established by AGDNCPam 500-60 as aug- 
mented by directives from subordinate headquarters. All personnel were 
engaged in maintenance of equipment in order to return it to the required 
military standards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units in- 
volved. 



UNIT 


HOME STATION 


OFF 


wo 


EM 


TOTAL 


HHD 130th Sig Bn 


Durham NC 


10 


3 


40 


53 


Co A 130th Sig Bn 


Durham NC 


4 


1 


153 


158 


Co B 130th Sig Bn 


Burlington NC 


4 


— 


110 


114 


Co C (-) 130th Sig Bn 


Asheboro NC 


3 


— 


90 


93 


Co C (IP) 130th Sig Bn 


Siler City NC 


2 


— 


64 


66 


30th MP Co 


Greensboro NC 


2 


— 


59 


61 


HHD NCARNG & atch pers 


Raleigh NC 


16 


3 


39 


58 



41 



555 



603 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Chapel Hill, County of Orange, University of North Caro- 
lina, and the State of North Carolina plus FBI and MI Det, Third US Army 

c. Special serVices. Newspapers, radios, books, magazines, and TV 
sets were available for use by off-duty personnel at the billeting area. 

d. Casualties. One wai-rant officer in HHD 130th Sig Bn died 052200 
March 1969 from an acute myocardial infraction due to coronary occlusion. 
One enlisted man in HHD 130th Sig Bn received a head injury that re- 
quired three stitches when struck by a falling gas can at the motor pool. 
One enlisted man in Co A 130th Sig Bn received an injury that required 
two stitches when struck in the face with a Ml rifle while practicing off and 



94 Report of The Adjutant General 

on truck loading. One enlisted man in HHD 130th Sig Bn required medical 
attention due to the tension created by the sudden death of the warrant 
officer who was his best friend. 

e. Troop information. All personnel were briefed on the legal liabil- 
ities peculiar to civil disturbance operations and given a review on the 
rules of engagement and degrees of force applicable to this type mission. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Since troops were not committed in 
the field, the issued equipment was considered to be adequate. Past ex- 
perience has proven that we must rely on police and civilian radios to 
maintain successful contact with the units in the field due to the nature 
of this type operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Disperser, Riot Control, M5, mounted on Truck, Cargo, 3/4 
Ton, with protective shields constructed at local expense from HHC 30th 
Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 

(2) Four each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC) from 2d Bn 
252d Armor NCARNG. 

(3) Floodlight set mounted on Truck, Cargo, 2% Ton, with pro- 
tective shields constructed at local expense from HHC & Band 30th Inf 
Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

(4) Two each Disperser, Riot Control, M3, from the 30th MP Co 
NCARNG. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. None. 

c. Training and organization. None. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
a civil disturbance mission. 

e. Logistics. Procurement of rations for the next meal in the terminal 
phases of an operation creates a problem. Due to the time frame necessary 
to secure the components and to prepare a meal, the unit supply and mess 
personnel are often placed in an undesirable position of not being able to 
accomplish their mission properly. Solutions to this problem are now being 
staffed at this headquarters to determine the best course of action to reme- 
dy this deficiency. 

f. Public affairs. None. 

g. Other. None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



Report of The Adjutant General 95 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. On the night of 11 March 1969 about 200 "students" 
from Duke University and 200 "students" from North Carolina College 
held a rally in the heart of downtown Durham NC. This rally was held to 
demonstrate for their demands to have a Black Studies program at Duke 
University. When the rally ended at about 2030 hours, approximately half 
of the demonstrators started a massive display of violence by breaking out 
over 25 large plate glass windows in some downtown businesses, damaging 
city buses, and uttering vile and abusive language. The mayor of Durham 
ordered a city curfew for the next night and requested assistance from the 
Governor of North Carolina when intelligence reports indicated that the 
demonstrations would be much larger and more violent than on 11 March 
1969. Governor Scott ordered the North Carolina National Guard to render 
the requested military assistance. During the night of 12 March 1969, the 
National Guardsmen assisted the Durham Police Department in enforcing 
the curfew. While this operation was in progress, the National Guard units 
in Durham were placed on a stand-by status to assist in the removal of 
certain Negro students from Manning Hall at the University of North 
Carolina in nearby Chapel Hill. No guardsmen participated in the Chapel 
Hill operation as the State Highway Patrol along with assistance from the 
Local law enforcement agencies removed these students from the build- 
ing. The curfew continued in Durham on the night of 13 March 1969 and 
ended on 14 March. By 15 March 1969 all personnel involved in this opera- 
tion had been released from State active duty. Over 150 persons were ar- 
rested for curfew violations during the two night curfew. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 121305 March 1969 
through 151600 March 1969 a.t Durham NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 660 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type of duty performed. Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance. 



96 



Report of The Adjutant General 



f. Commander of troops. LTC James C. Kannan, Jr., Commanding 
Officer, 730th Maint Bn NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison officers from the Military Support 
to Civil Authorities Section, this department, represented The Adjutant 
General of North Carolina at a conference with the mayor and other city 
officials of Durham on the morning of 12 March 1969. Intelligence reports 
were studied and it was decided at this meeting that it was necessary to 
place the city under curfew restrictions that night and request military 
assistance from the North Carolina National Guard. The request was made 
by the liaison officer to The Adjutant General via long distance telephone. 
When word was received that the Governor had honored the request, the 
National Guard units to be employed were alerted by procedures estab- 
lished by AGDNC OPLAN 2 and AGDNCPam 500-60 as augmented by 
directives from subordinate headquarters concerning State active duty. 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted under the area 
concept plan as established by AGDNC OPLAN 2. A task force was formed 
with the 730th Maint Bn furnishing the bulk of the manpower and equip- 
ment. While this task force was handling the situation in Durham, the 
nucleus of the Area B headquarters was mobilized for possible duty in 
nearby Chapel Hill. When the tense situation at Chapel Hill terminated, 
most of these additional forces were integrated with the Durham task 
force and so employed until the mission was accomplished. 

c. Post-operation phase. This phase of the operation was conducted 
according to the procedures established by AGDNCPam 500-60 as aug- 
mented by directives from subordinate headquarters. All personnel were 
engaged in maintenance of equipment in order to return it to the required 
military standards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved. 



UNIT 

HQ & Co A (-) 730th Maint Bn 

HQ & Co A (PI) 730th Maint Bn 

HQ & Co A (P2) 730th Maint Bn 

Co E 730th Maint Bn 

Co A 130th Sig Bn 

878th Engr Co (-) 

878th Engr Co (IP) 

HHD NCARNG & atch pers 



HOME STATION 


OFF 


wo 


EM 


TOTAL 


Butner NC 


8 


2 


105 


115 


Oxford NC 


1 


1 


55 


57 


Roxboro NC 


1 


— 


59 


60 


Morrisville NC 


2 


2 


148 


152 


Durham NC 


4 


1 


96 


101 


Warrenton NC 


2 


— 


47 


49 


Henderson NC 


3 


— 


54 


57 


Raleigh NC 


19 


3 


47 


69 



40 



611 



660 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Durham, County of Durham, and the State of North Car- 
olina plus FBI and MI Det HQ Third US Army. 



Report of The Adjutant General 97 

c. Special sei-vices. Newspapers, radios, books, magazines, and TV 
sets were available for use by off-duty personnel at the billeting area. 

d. Casualties. None. 

e. Troop information. All personnel were briefed on the legal liabil- 
ities peculiar to civil disturbance operations and given a review on the 
rules of engagement and degrees of force applicable in this mission. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Comunications equipment. Direct commercial telephone lines were 
used between the City of Durham EOC and the National Guard CP. Since 
most issued communications equipment is obsolete, reliance on police and 
civilian radios was mandatory to achieve successful radio communications 
with the troops in the field. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Disperser, Riot Control, M5, mounted on Truck, Cargo, 3/4 
Ton, with protective shields constructed at local expense from HHC 30th 
Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 

(2) Four each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC), from 1st Bn 
252d Armor NCARNG. 

(3) Floodlight set mounted on Truck, Cargo, 2% Ton, with pro- 
tective shields constructed at local expense from HHC & Band 30th Inf 
Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

(4) Searchlight mounted on Truck, Utility, 1/4 Ton, from HHC & 
Band 30th Inf Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. This operation was conducted under the area concept 
plan established by AGDNC OPLAN 2. Although it was not necessary, the 
operational machinery was ready in case a multi-employment situation de- 
veloped in Durham and Chapel Hill. 

c. Training and organization. Some service headquarters units do 
not have organic staffs that function best in this type operation. The main- 
tenance battalion is such a unit. This deficiency became more noticeable 
as this operation lengthened. While they performed to the best of their 
ability and rendered a commendable performance of duty, it is felt that 
line headquarters units are best suited for this specific mission. Such units 
will be so designated in the future if available and the situation so war- 
rants their employment. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
a civil disturbance mission. 



98 Report of The Adjutant General 

e. Logistics. As these type operations are conducted almost on an 
hourly basis, some problems have arisen on the procurement of rations for 
the next meal. In order to correct this problem, The Adjutant General has 
authorized purchase of rations for the meal if he or his representative has 
not notified the commander of the troops to cease operations four hours 
prior to the next scheduled meal. This authority vi^ill be incorporated into 
AGDNCPam 500-60 as a change thereto in the near future. 

f. Public affairs. None. 

g. Other. None. 

FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 

ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



Report of The Adjutant General 99 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) 
sponsored a "poor people's" march from Asheville NC to Raleigh NC. This 
march terminated in Raleigh on 18 April 1969 and was under the direction 
of Golden Frinks, a SCLC official in eastern North Carolina. Frinks issued 
numerous outrageous demands to the City of Raleigh while the march was 
in progress. These demands soon became threats and were of such a mali- 
cious nature that the city officials requested military assistance from the 
Governor of North Carolina to pi-event an outbreak of civil disobedience 
when the march reached Raleigh. Governor Scott ordered the North Caro- 
lina National Guard to render the requested assistance to the City of Ral- 
eigh. With the National Guard on the scene, the threats and the march 
termination ceremonies turned into a complete flop. No outbreak occurred 
and the National Guard was released from duty on 19 April 1969. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 180800 April 1969 
through 192245 April 1969 at Raleigh NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 452 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type duty performed. Military support to civil authorities to pre- 
vent a civil disturbance. 

f. Commander of troops. COL Ferd L. Davis, Commanding Officer, 
30th Inf Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison officers from the Military Support 
to Civil Authorities Section, this department, along with staff officers 
from Area B headquarters represented The Adjutant General of North Car- 
olina at the Raleigh Police Department during all planning conferences 
prior to 18 April 1969. When the Governor ordered the National Guard to 



100 



Report of The Adjutant General 



render assistance to the city, the units to be employed were alerted by pro- 
cedures established by AGDNC OPLAN 2 and AGDNCPam 500-60 as aug- 
mented by directives from subordinate headquarters concerning State ac- 
tive duty. 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted under the area 
concept plan as established by AGDNC OPLAN 2. Various units were 
formed into a composite task force under the command of the predesig- 
nated commander for Area B. The presence of this force within the city 
was all that was needed to stop the threat of a major civil disturbance by 
the SCLC mob. The National Guard was never committed to the streets as 
the situation did not deteriorate to warrant their employment. 

c. Post-operation phase. This phase of the operation was conducted 
according to the procedures established by AGDNCPam 500-60 as aug- 
mented by directives from subordinate headquarters. All personnel were 
engaged in maintenance of equipment in order to have it brought to the 
required military standards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved. 



HHC & Band 30th Inf 

Div(M) SUPCOM 
Co A (-) 1st Bn (M) 119th Inf 
Co A (IP) 1st Bn (M) 119th Inf 
Co C (-) 1st Bn (M) 120th Inf 
30th MP Co 
HHD NCARNG & atch pers 



HOME STATION 


OFF 


WO 


EM 


TOTAL 


Raleigh NC 


15 


1 


60 


76 


Wilson NC 


4 


— 


101 


105 


Nashville NC 


1 


— 


55 


56 


Smithfield NC 


4 


— 


116 


120 


Greensboro NC 


2 


— 


57 


59 


Raleigh NC 


9 


2 


25 


36 



35 



414 



452 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Raleigh, County of Wake, and the State of North Carolina 
plus FBI and MI Det, HQ Third US Army. 

c. Special services. Newspapers, radios, books, magazines, and TV 
sets were available for use by off-duty personnel at the billeting areas. 

d. Casualties. None. 

e. Troop information. All personnel were briefed on legal liabilities 
connected with a civil disturbance operation and rules of engagement for 
this type mission. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Since there was no actual deploy- 
ment of troops, the issued communications equipment was adequate. Ad- 
ditional commercial telephones were installed in the billeting areas and a 
direct telephone line between Raleigh Police Department and the Area B 
Command Post. It is felt that these additional telephone lines would have 
been sufficient if the units had been committed. 



Report of The Adjutant General 101 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Disperser, Riot Control, M5, mounted on Truck, Cargo, 3/4 
Ton, with protective shields constructed at local expense from HHC 30th 
Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 

(2) Three each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC), from 1st 
Bn 252d Armor NCARNG. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. None. 
5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. Since the actual date of possible trouble was estab- 
lished long: before the National Guard was ordered to State active duty, 
most detail planning had been accomplished when the alert was received. 
Unfortunately most civil disturbance outbreaks do not allow such an ex- 
tended period of time for preparations. This operation allowed the Nation- 
al Guard to accomplish its mission with a minimum of effort due to the 
lengthy planning phase. 

c. Training and organization. The units assigned to Area B by 
AGDNC OPLAN 2 are light in combat type troops. This operation again 
showed this deficiency as it was necessary to place an infantry unit from 
Area C in the task force. OPLAN 2 will be revised to correct this deficiency 
in the near future. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatoiy for the successful accomplishment of 
any mission in civil disturbance operations. 

e. Logistics. Since troops were not actually committed in this opera- 
tion and due to the long preparation period, logistical problems were al- 
most non-existent. 

f. Public affairs. None. 

g. Other. None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



102 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT 

Past Office Box 9573 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. Sporadic acts of arson, looting, sniping, and rioting oc- 
curred in the City of Winston-Salem during the night of 27 and 28 April 
1969. To prevent a major outbreak of civil disobedience, the city officials 
requested military assistance from the Governor of North Carolina in 
order to enact a curfew. A National Guard task force was ordered into 
the city by the Governor, and the curfew was imposed and enforced on 29 
and 30 April 1969. Indications that the civil disturbance was under con- 
trol allowed the National Guard to revert to their normal mission on 1 
May 1969. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 291300 April 1969 
through 011100 May 1969 at Winston-Salem NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 162 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type of duty performed. Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance. 

f. Commander of troops. LTC Hurley D. King, Commanding Officer, 
230th Sup & Trans Bn NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison officers from HHC 230th Sup & 
Trans Bn NCARNG represented The Adjutant General of North Carolina at 
the Winston-Salem Emergency Operations Center on 27-28 April 1969 to 
formulate plans for the maintenance of law and order in that city. The 
Winston-Salem Police Department was given the mission to enforce the 
curfew on the city. Due to the large area in the city to be sealed off, city 
officials requested military assistance from the State of North Carolina. 
Governor Scott ordered the National Guard to render the requested assis- 
tance. The 230th Sup & Trans Bn NCARNG was given the mission to fur- 
nish a 150 man task force. The units were alerted by procedures establish- 
ed by AGDNC OPLAN 2 and AGDNCPam 500-60 as augmented by the 
230th Sup & Trans Bn alert plans for State active duty. 



HOME STATION OFF 


wo 


EM 


TOTAL 


Winston-Salem NC 8 


1 


29 


38 


Winston-Salem NC — 


— 


3 


3 


Winston-Salem NC 3 


1 


105 


109 



Report of The Adjutant General 103 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted as a battalion task 
force operation according to procedures set forth in AGDNC OPLAN 2. 
Since nearly all personnel involved in this operation were from the same 
battalion, the operation was conducted as a battalion operation under battal- 
ion control. Shifts were established with personnel manning predetermined 
posts in conjunction with the Winston-Salem Police Department during 
the hours of darkness on 29-30 April 1969. All personnel were relieved from 
patrol and barricade duty at 010200 May 1969 as the situation was declared 
to be under control by the city officials. 

c. Post-operation phase. This phase of the operation was conducted 
according to the procedures established by AGDNPam 500-60 as augmented 
by battalion directives. All personnel were engaged in maintenance of 
equipment in order to return it to the required military standards of 
readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved 

UNIT 

HHC 230th S & T Bn 
Co A 230th S & T Bn 
Co B 230th S & T Bn 
HHD NCARNG & atch pers Raleigh NC 3 2 7 12 

14 4 144 162 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Winston-Salem, County of Forsythe, and State of North 
Carolina plus FBI and MI Det, HQ Third US Army. 

c. Special services. Newspapers, radios, books, magazines, and TV 
sets were available for use by off-duty personnel at the billeting area. 

d. Casualties. None. 

e. Troop information. Conferences were held daily at 1700 hours for 
all personnel. Information was disseminated to include what the overall 
mission was and the plan for accomplishing same. All personnel were 
briefed on the legal liabilities, the rules of engagement, and degrees of 
force applicable to a civil disturbance operation. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Grossly inadequate. Most issued com- 
munications equipment is obsolete and is not designed for the type of usage 
required in a civil disturbance operation. Reliance on police and civilian 
radios was mandatory to achieve successful communications with the troops 
in the field. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Barricades from the City of Winston-Salem Public Works De- 
partment. 



104 Report of The Adjutant General 

(2) Searchlight mounted on Truck, Utility, 1/4 Ton from HHB 
30th Inf Div (Mech) Arty NCARNG. 

(3) From 30th MP Co NCARNG: 

(a) Rifle, Caliber .30, Snipers with Scope M84, MID. 

(b) Launchers, Grenade, 40mm, M79. 

(c) Shotgun, Riot Type, 12 Gauge, 
c. Equipment lost/damaged. None. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. A 150 man task force was requested for this operation 
by the city officials. Later it was found that the size of the force needed 
for curfew duty was 150. This left no personnel for support and internal 
security purposes. This problem was quickly resolved by assigning fewer 
personnel to duty stations. In future operations support personnel require- 
ments will be developed at the time that line commitments are determined 
to insure that we have enough personnel to handle all phases of our 
operation. 

b. Operations. Since only troops from one battalion were involved, 
this operation was conducted as a battalion operation with no major prob- 
lems being encountered. 

c. Training and organization. All personnel had recently received 
the required sixteen hours training on civil disturbance operations which 
is considered adequate. Due to the infrequency of using this type training, 
the appropriate points of riot control techniques were given the troops as 
a refresher prior to actual commitment. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
civil disturbance missions. 

e. Logistics. Inadequate communications equipment is one big prob- 
lem area. It is often necessary to rely on civilian radio equipment to have 
dependable radio communications. 

f. Public affairs. Publicity was extremely favorable in all media. No 
problems were encountered. 

e. Other. None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



Report of The Adjutant General 105 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. On 161500 May 1969 about 200 young Negroes staged a 
demonstration at the City of Burlington school administration building to 
protest an election at Walter Williams High School because no Negroes 
were elected as cheerleaders. The demonstration quickly got out of control 
as outside agitators encouraged the students to storm the building. Once 
inside the youths upset desks, tossed objects out the windows, and thor- 
oughly littered the offices. City police cleared the building and made six- 
teen arrests. As tension and unrest increased in the city. Governor R. W. 
Scott ordered the State Highway Patrol and National Guard into Burling- 
ton to aid the local authorities. An outburst of violence including sniper fire 
at or about 162200 May 1969 made it necessary to commit the National 
Guard force to help clear the area. Several other outbursts of violence oc- 
curred during the night of 16 May 1969 with one Negro youth being killed 
and several police officers and Negroes injured. Curfew violations on 17 
May 1969 resulted in 203 persons being arrested and 47 persons on 18 May 
1969. The situation became dormant on 19 May 1969 with all National 
Guard units being released from duty by 21 May 1969. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 161845 May 1969 
through 210815 May 1969 at Burlington NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 502 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. 

e. Type of duty performed. Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance. 

f. Commander of troops. LTC Clifton E. Blalock, Jr., Commanding 
Officer, 130th Sig Bn NCARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison 'officers from AGDNC and 130th Sig 
Bn NCARNG met with Burlington city officials to formulate plans and 
keep The Adjutant General of North Carolina informed on the current 



106 



Report of The Adjutant General 



situation. When the Governor of North Carolina ordered the National 
Guard to render assistance to the City of Burlington for this emergency, 
units were alerted according to procedures set forth in AGDNC OPLAN 2 
and AGDNCPam 500-60 and as augmented by battalion and company di- 
rectives for State active duty. 

b. Execution phase. This operation was conducted as a task force 
operation according to AGDNC OPLAN 2. Since most of the units and 
personnel were from the 130th Sig Bn, execution of this operation closely 
resembled a battalion operation. Close coordination and cooperation with 
the other involved governmental agencies was in effect at all times. The 
130th Sig Bn has participated in more of these type operations than any 
other unit in the NCNG, and they used their accumulated experiences to 
their best advantage. 

c. Post-operations phase. This phase was conducted according to the 
procedures established by AGDNCPam 500-60 and as augmented by battal- 
ion and company directives. All personnel were engaged in maintenance 
of weapons and equipment in order to return them to the required military 
standards of readiness. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved. 



UNIT 

HHD 130th Sig Bn 
Co B 130th Sig Bn 
Co C (-) 130th Sig Bn 
Co C (IP) 130th Sig Bn 
878th Engr Co (-) 
878th Engr Co (IP) 



HOME STATION 

Durham NC 
Burlington NC 
Asheboro NC 
Siler City NC 
Warrenton NC 
Henderson NC 



HHD NCARNG & atch pers Raleigh NC 



OFF 

6 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 



26 



wo 



EM 


TOTAL 


4 


10 


134 


138 


90 


91 


63 


65 


72 


75 


75 


78 


35 


45 



473 



502 



b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Burlington, County of Alamance, and the State of North 
Carolina plus FBI and MI Det, HQ Third US Army. 

c. Special services. State of North Carolina provided free laundry 
service to all EM at the rate of one fatigue uniform laundried per day of 
duty. Salvation Army furnished dough-nuts, coffee, and magazines. TV sets, 
newspapers, radios, books, and playing cards were available for off-duty 
usage in the billeting areas. 

d. Casualties. One EM suffered a minor injury not caused by the 
rioters. One Negro was killed and several policemen and Negroes were in- 
jured prior to commitment of the National Guard. 

e. Troop information. All personnel were briefed on the legal aspects, 
rules of engagement, and degrees of force applicable to a civil disturbance 
operation. 



Report of The Adjutant General 107 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Grossly inadequate. Most issued com- 
munications equipment is obsolete and is not designed for the type of use 
civil disturbance operations require. Again as has been the case in all recent 
State active duty operations, reliance on civilian and police radios was 
mandatory to achieve any high degree of success in the operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Disperser, Riot Control, M5, mounted on Truck, Cargo, 3/4 
Ton with protective shields constructed at local expense from HHC 30th 
Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 

(2) Four each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC) from 1st Bn 
252d Armor NCARNG. 

(3) Floodlight set mounted on Truck, Cargo, 2^/2 Ton with protec- 
tive shields constructed at local expense from HHC & Band 30th Inf Div 
(Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

(4) Searchlights mounted on Trucks, Utility, 1/4 Ton, one each 
from HHC & Band 30th Inf Div (M) SUPCOM and one each from Co B 
730th Maint Bn. 

(5) Shotguns, Riot Type, 12 Gauge. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. Transformer on jeep-mounted search- 
light from Co B 730th Maint Bn burned out. A replacement transformer 
has been requisitioned but has not been received to date. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. Past experience revealed that this type operation does 
not require a staff as large as the classic combat situation. The battalion 
headquarters functioned adequately on a reduced strength basis. 

c. Training and organization. The abbreviated battalion staff func- 
tioned well as the task force headquarters. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
any mission in civil disturbance operations. 

e. Logistics. Communications equipment continues to be one of our 
biggest problem areas. Our equipment just does not function efficiently in 
cities. Also, we are experiencing trouble in securing a transformer to re- 
place the one that burned out of the jeep-mounted searchlight. Individual 
body armor is needed for our special teams personnel as they are usually 
exposed to sniper fire and/or missiles thrown by the rioters 

f. Public affairs. Adequately covered by the AG Public Affairs Team 
in accordance with procedures established by AGDNCR 360-1. 

g. Other. None. 



FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 



ARTHUR L. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



108 Report of The Adjutant General 

state of north carolina 

headquarters company 1st battalion 252d armor 

north carolina army national guard 

Post Office Box 4126 
Fayetteville, North Carolina 28366 

17 October 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report 

The Adjutant General 
State of North Carolina 
P. O. Box 9573 
Raleigh, NC 27603 

1. General. 

a. Situation: Missing person in Cedar Creek Community. 

b. Starting and ending date, time and location: 160ct69, 0730-1800 hrs, 
Cedar Creek Community, Cumberland County, North Carolina. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 4 Off; 1 WO; 
107 EM. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: 

(1) Trk Utility 1/4 ton M151A1, 8 ea 

(2) Trk FLA M170, 2 ea 

(3) Trk Cargo 2^/2 ton M35, 4 ea 

(4) Sedan Commercial 4-Pass, 1 ea 

(5) Pickup Commercial 3/4 ton, 1 ea 

(6) Pickup Commercial 1/2 ton, 1 ea 

e. Type duty performed: Concentrated on-foot and vehicular search of 
wooded area. 

f. Commander of troops: LEWIS H. CATON, JR., CPT, Armor, NC 
ARNG. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase: Planning /^alert phase was executed beginning 
approximately 2100 hrs 150ct69 with a reporting time of 0730 hrs 
160ct69 established. 

b. Execution phase: Troops moved from Armory Fayetteville NC to 
site of search mission in Cedar Creek Township escorted by Cum- 
berland County Sheriff. Troops were drawn into six (6) search i>arties 
and assigned areas of search as designated by the sheriff. This meth- 
od was continued throughout the day with negative results until 
the search was called off by the sheriff. 



Report of The Adjutant General 109 

c. Post-operations phase: Personnel returned to HOST, performed in- 
dividual and organizational maintenance and were dismissed by the 
troop commander at approximately 1800 hrs. 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units involved: 
17 Off 3 WO 254 EM; 4 Off 1 WO 107 EM; Fayetteville, Roseboro, 
Parkton, North Carolina. 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved: Cumberland County Sheriffs 
Department; Cumberland County Rescue Squad. 

c. Special services: Not applicable. 

d. Casualties: None. 

e. Troop information: Personnel briefed as to the situation and given 
a description of individual being sought. 

f. Consolidated Report of Daily Strength Accounting: Incl 1. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment: Five (5) ea radio-equipped 1/4 ton 
trucks. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue: None. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged: None. 

5. Problem areas and lessons learned. 

a. Personnel: None. 

b. Operations: None. 

c. Training and organization: None. 

d. Intelligence: None. 

e. Logistics: None. 

f. Public affairs: None. 

g. Other: None 

LEWIS H. CATON, JR. 
CPT, Armor, NC ARNG 
Commanding 



110 Report of The Adjutant General 

department of the army 

headquarters 690th maintenance battalion (gs) army 

north carolina army national guard 

Post Office Box 1066 
Kinston, North Carolina 28501 

22 April 1970 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report 

The Adjutant General 
State of North Carolina 
P. O. Box 26268 
Raleigh, NC 27611 

1. General. 

a. Situation: BG Roy E. Thompson contacted LTC William G. Waters 
Jr., Battalion Commander, at 1305 hours 10 April 1970 and informed him 
that a request had been submitted for National Guard assistance in con- 
ducting- a missing persons search. LTC Waters was instructed to contact 
local authorities and determine how many troops, if any, would be required 
also he was instructed to determine if the search would even be required. 
A meeting was quickly held with local authorities and it was determined 
that approximately 100 Guardsmen would be required. LTC Waters reported 
to BG Thompson and informed him that the situation was beyond the capa- 
bilities of the local officials and that National Guard assistance of approxi- 
mately 100 men should be sufficient to conduct the search. LTC Waters in- 
formed BG Thompson of this fact and requested permission to alert HHD, 
690th Maint Bn (-Staff) and the 696th Hv Equip Maint Co (-) both 
stationed in Kinston. Permission was received at 1430 hours and the Alert 
Plans of the two units were initiated. 

b. Starting and ending date, time and location: Order to alert troops 
was received at 1430 hours on Friday 10 April 1970 at Kinston, NC. The 
main body was released at 2400 hours on 10 April and the balance being 
released at 1200 hours on 11 April 1970. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved: 7 Officers 2 
Warrant Officers and 104 Enlisted Men. (Total 113) 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized: 
6—21/2 Ton Trucks 

6—1/4 Ton Trucks 

13/4 Ton Truck 

Kitchen equipment of the 696th Hv Equip Maint Co 

3 — Each radio sets 

e. Type duty performed: Assisted in missing persons search. 

f. Commander of Troops: LTC William G. Waters Jr. 



Report of The Adjutant General 111 

2. Operations: 

a. Planning/ Alert Phase: Unit Alert Plans were utilized in the mobi- 
lization of the units concerned. No problems were encountered and the 
plans worked. 

b. Execution Phase: At 1600 hours the first contingent of troops was 
dispatched to the search area, arriving at 1630 hours. LTC Waters assumed 
command of the search and rescue opei'ation, made an initial reconnaissance 
of the area pointed out to him as the most probable for this missing per- 
son to be in, assigned search areas to the sweep parties and ordered them 
into the woods at 1700 hrs. The search continued until dark (1900 hours) at 
which time the sweep parties were fed chow and ordered to establish posts 
and fires at strategic locations throughout the area of operations in the 
hope that the lost person would see the fires and come to one of them. At 
about this same time two of the sheriff's deputies put a boat into the mill 
pond around which the search area was and went to the head of it. Upon 
arriving they heard and saw the missing person, loaded him into the boat 
and brought him out at 2130 hours. He was cold and hungry, but otherwise 
returned in good condition. LTC Waters reassembled his search parties, 
returned to the unit armory, reported to LTC Hodgin the successful com- 
pletion of the operation and requested twenty (20) men per unit for duty 
the following day to perform maintenance and storage duty. The troops 
were dismissed at 2400 hours 10 April 1970 with the exception of the forty 
(40) maintenance men who were dismissed at 1200 hours the following day. 

c. Post-Operation Phase: Twenty (20) members from each unit 
were retained after the release of the main body to be utilized in cleaning, 
maintenance and storage of equipment utilized in the operation. 

3. Personnel : 

a. Actual and committed Strength and Home Station of Units In- 
volved: The strengths of units involved in this search was as follows: 

HHD, 690th Maint Bn 5 Off Warrant Off 48 EM 
696th Hv Equip Maint Co 2 Off 2 WO 56 EM 

Both units indicated above have their duty station in Kinston, NC. Of the 
total 113 individual's present for duty 103 were actually committed to the 
search. 

b. Non-National Guard Forces Involved: Lenoir County Sheriff's 
Dept. 

c. Special Services: None. 

d. Casualties: None. 

e. Troop Information: The troops were briefed by LTC Waters prior 
to commencing the search and brought up to date as to the current status 
of the situation. 

f. Consolidated Report of Daily Strength Accounting: Attached 

4. Logistics: 

a. Communications Equipment: Two each vehicles with radios were 
borrowed from the 691st Maint Co for use during this mission. The two 



112 Report of The Adjutant General 

alerted units each had one radio set, for a total of 4 sets available for the 
mission. By augmenting this communications with those of the Lenoir 
County Sheriff's Department, communications were considered adequate for 
this mission. 

b. Special equipment utilized and Source of Issue: None. 

c. Equipment Lost/ Damaged: None. 
5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned: 

a. Personnel: None. No problem areas. 

b. Operations: See paragraph 2b above. 

c. Training and Organization: Past training and present organiza- 
tion considered adequate for this operation. 

d. Intelligence: Intelligence summary submitted 13Apr70 in accor- 
dance with paragraph 17, AGDNC Pam 500-60. 

e. Logistics: Rations and gasoline were the only items expended in 
this area. Required reports concerning each have been submitted in ac- 
cordance with current regulations. 

f. Public Affairs: Area television and local newspapers covered the 
search operation with favorable comments concerning National Guard par- 
ticipation. 

g. Other: None. 

WILLIAM G. WATERS, JR. 
LTC, ORD C, NC ARNG 
Commanding 



Report of The Adjutant General 113 

state of north carolina 
the adjutant general's department 

Post Office Box 9573 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603 

AGDNC-MSCA 30 June 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report (RCS ARNGB-98) 

Chief, National Guard Bureau 
Departments of the Army and the Air Force 
ATTN: NG-MSCA 
Washington, DC 20310 

1. General. 

a. Situation. On or about 12 May 1969 officials at Dudley High 
School in the City of Greensboro announced that one of the student candi- 
dates would not be allowed to seek the office of student body pi'esident. 
Outside Negro agitators immediately claimed that the candidate was dis- 
qualified because of his activity in their militant organizations. Student 
demonstrations increased in tempo until 21 May 1969 until they were almost 
out of control. School officials then disclosed that the candidate had been 
disqualified because he was not academically qualified. The agitators re- 
fused to accept this explanation, and the demonstrations increased to such 
a magnitude that the civil authorities asked for military assistance. By 
the time the National Guard arrived on the scene, the student demonstra- 
tions had developed into full scale violence including massive sniper fire 
around NC A&T University, a nearby predominate Negro state supported 
college. The university president ordered his school closed at 211600 May 69 
but guerrilla activity increased on such a large scale that Governor R. W. 
Scott ordered the National Guard to clear the university of all rioters and 
demonstrators. When the rioters did not leave the campus in response to 
the ultimatum at 220700 May 1969, the National Guard began clearing the 
campus. They encountered sniper fire to include that from automatic wea- 
pons. Campus was secured at or about 221000 May 1969. By clearing the 
campus of the rioters, the demonstrations came to a halt. Curfew which 
had been in eff"ect on the night of 21 May 1969 was continued for the night 
of 22 May 1969. By 230900 May 1969 the curfew was lifted when the city 
officials decided that the situation had returned to normal. 

b. Starting and ending date, time, and location. 211415 May 1969 
through 250930 May 1969 at Greensboro NC. 

c. Total number of National Guard personnel involved. 735 officers 
and enlisted men. 

d. Military equipment, by type, utilized. All issued equipment was 
used as appropriate. Only small arms weapons were utilized. 

e. Type of duty performed. Military support to civil authorities due 
to a civil disturbance- 

f. Commander of troops. LTC Henry S. Lougee, Provost Marshal, 
30th Inf Div (Mech) NCARNG. 



114 



Report of The Adjutant General 



2. Operations. 

a. Planning/alert phase. Liaison officers from HHB 30th Inf Div 
(Mech) Arty NCARNG represented The Adjutant General of North Caro- 
lina in meeting with the city officials of Greensboro in formulating plans to 
cope with the tense situation. At the time of these meetings, the NCNG 
was rendering military assistance to the city authorities in Burlington due 
to a massive civil disturbance in that city. When the Governor of North 
Carolina ordered the National Guard to give military assistance to the 
City of Greensboro due to their emergency, units were alerted by proce- 
dures established by AGDNC OPLAN 2 and AGDNCPam 500-60 and as 
augmented by subordinate headquarters. 

b. Execution phase. This operation began with a 150 man task force 
as the only troops to be deployed. This was a composite force made up of 
personnel from several units under the command of the 30th Inf Div (Mech) 
NCARNG Provost Marshal. By the time this force was committed the riot 
was so severe and wide-spread that several additional units were called 
into action. The Provost Marshal assumed overall control of the situation. 
Operational control of the troops at NC A & T University was given to the 
commander of the 2d Bn (Mech) 120th Inf NCARNG, his battalion being 
the major force in that area. A liaison officer from AGDNC handled the 
continuous meetings with the city officials. The main CP was established 
at the Greensboro National Guard armory. Since this was an around-the- 
clock operation, the delegation of authority by the overall commander to 
his senior commanders, as appropriate, allowed this operation to receive a 
high degree of success as there was a responsible commander available to 
give answers immediately to problems as they occurred. 

c. Post-operation phase. This phase was conducted according to the 
procedures established by AGDNCPam 500-60 and as augmented by sub- 
ordinate headquarters. 



3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home stations of units 
involved. 

UNIT 

HHB 30th Inf Div(M) Arty 
30th MP Co 

Btry D 4th Bn 113th Arty 
Co B 730th Maint Bn 
HHC (-) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
HHC(PI) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
HHC(PI) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
Co B(-) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
Co B(IP) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
Co C(-) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
Co C(PI) 2d Bn (M) 120th Inf 
Co C(PII) 2d Bn(M) 120th Inf 
HHD NCARNG & atch pers 



HOME STATION 


OFF 


WO 


EM 


TOTAL 


Greensboro NC 


4 


1 


10 


15 


Greensboro NC 


8 


— 


108 


116 


Greensboro NC 


3 


— 


77 


80 


Greensboro NC 


2 


2 


71 


75 


Hickory NC 


9 


2 


26 


37 


Statesville NC 


1 


— 


1 


2 


Newton NC 


3 


— 


23 


26 


Lexington NC 


3 


— 


89 


92 


Salisbury NC 


2 


— 


76 


78 


Mt Airy NC 


4 


— 


53 


57 


Elkin NC 


2 


— 


59 


61 


Mocksville NC 


1 


— 


39 


40 


Raleigh NC 


14 


6 


36 


56 



56 



11 



668 



735 



Report of The Adjutant General 115 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Law enforcement agencies 
from the City of Greensboro, County of Guilford, and State of North Car- 
olina plus FBI and MI Det HQ Third US Army. 

c. Special services. State of North Carolina provided free laundry 
service to all EM at the rate of one fatigue uniform laundried per day of 
duty. Newspapers, books, magazines, radios, and TV sets were available 
to off-duty personnel at the billeting areas. 

d. Casualties. One EM received a gunshot wound in the right arm 
during the clearing of NC A & T University campus at 230732 May 1969. 
One Negro student was killed and several Greensboro policemen and Negro 
students were injured during this civil disturbance. 

e. Troop information. All personnel were briefed on the legal as- 
pects, rules of engagement, and degrees of force applicable to a civil dis- 
turbance operation. Additional oral briefings were conducted throughout 
the action whenever deemed necessary or appropriate. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Grossly inadequate. Most issued com- 
munications equipment is obsolete and is not designed for the type of use 
civil disturbance operations require. Again as has been the case in all 
recent State active duty operations, reliance on civilian and police radios 
was mandatory to achieve any high degree of success in the operation. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. 

(1) Four each Carriers, Personnel, Armored (APC) from 2d Bn 
252d Armor NCARNG. 

(2) Floodlight set mounted on Truck, Cargo, 2V2 Ton, with pro- 
tective shields constructed at local expense from HHC & Band 30th Inf 
Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

(3) Searchlight mounted on Truck, Utility, 1/4 Ton from HHC & 
Band 30th Inf Div (Mech) SUPCOM NCARNG. 

(4) Rifle, Caliber .30, Snipers, with Scope, M84, MID. 

(5) Shotgun, Riot Type, 12 Gauge. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. Several vehicles sustained minor dents 
on body and canvas torn from bricks and other missiles thrown by rioters. 
Few items of individual equipment were lost. No major items lost. 

5. Problem Areas and Lessons Learned. 

a. Personnel. None. 

b. Operations. Since this operation was on a 24 hour basis, a short- 
age developed in the top echelon of leadership. The task force commander 
found himself spread entirely too thin. By reassigning specific leadership 
responsibilities among his senior officers, this deficiency was partly solved. 
Future operations of this type should have more than one senior comman- 
der on duty. 



116 Report of The Adjutant General 

c. Training and organization. Combat type training in built-up areas 
that had been received by most personnel in previous training cycles proved 
most beneficial. Organizational deficiency was noted in preceding subpara- 
graph. 

d. Intelligence. Close cooperation and coordination with civilian law 
enforcement agencies is mandatory for the successful accomplishment of 
any mission in civil disturbance operations. 

e. Logistics. Lack of proper type cmmunications equipment con- 
tinues to be our biggest problem area for this type operation. Our TOE 
equipment is not adequate, and we must rely on the civilian law enforce- 
ment agencies' communications equipment to satisfactorily accomplish most 
phases of these type missions. 

f. Public affairs. This operation demonstrated that small 2 man PA 
teams function much better for this type operation than larger teams. The 
small teams are able to concentrate on strictly PA problems while the 
larger teams, due to their excessive size, often get involved in the operation 
itself. 

e. Other. None. 

FOR THE ADJUTANT GENERAL: 

ARTHUR J. BOUCHARD 
COL, GS, NCARNG 
MSPO 



Report of The Adjutant General 117 

department of the army 

company b (part i) 1st bn (mech) 120th inf 

north carolina army national guard 

P. O. Box 190 

Shallotte, N. C. 28459 

10 October 1969 

SUBJECT: Final (After Action) Report 

The Adjutant General 
State of North Carolina 
P. O. Box 9573 
Raleigh, N. C. 27603 

1. Genei-al. 

a. Situation. Unit was requested to help search for missing person, 
Mr. John White, thought to be either in woods helpless or drowned in 
Waccamaw River near Pireway Bridge. 

b. Starting and ending date, time and location: Unit went on State 
duty at 0600 hours 7 October 1969 at the Armory in Shallotte, N. C. and 
remained on duty until 1500 hours 8 October 1969. 

c. Total number of National Guard Personnel involved. 64 Enlisted 
Men and 2 Officers were on duty 7 October 1969 and 17 Enlisted Men and 
1 Officer on duty 8 October 1969. 

d. Military Equipment, by type, utilized. On 7 October 1969 unit 
used 3 each 2% ton trucks, 2 each 3/4 ton trucks, and 1 each 1/2 ton 
truck. One Pickup truck 3/4 ton and 6 Radio Sets AN/PRC-10 were used. 

e. Type duty performed. The personnel were dispersed in the wooded 
area along the banks of the Waccamaw River and searched that area for 
the missing person. Personnel were also used in boats along the river for a 
three to four mile area. Personnel operating boats used drag hooks in an 
effort to snag any object that may be below the water surface of the river. 

f. Commander of troops. Captain Joe T. Smith, Jr., Whiteville, N. C. 
commanded the troops on 7 October 1969, and ILT Lewis N. Sasser, Shal- 
lotte, N.C. commanded them on 8 October 1969. 

2. Operations. 

a. Planning /Alert phase. PSG Sam F. Frink went with the Brunswick 
County Sheriff, Mr. Harold Willetts, 6 October 1969 and determined that 
men walking the banks and boats with drag hooks would be needed. 

b. Execution phase. Upon arrival at the scene the commander of the 
troops dispersed the troops and boat operators with instructions to look for 
the missing person. 

c. Post-operations phase. After the body was found the unit personnel 
returned to the Shallotte Armory and made a complete check of personnel 
and equipment to determine the condition of both men and equipment. 



118 Report of The Adjutant General 

3. Personnel. 

a. Actual and committed strength and home station of units involved. 
Company B (-) 1st Bn (Mech) 120th Inf NCARNG, Whiteville, N. C. fur- 
nished 36 Enlisted Men and 1 Officer. One Officer and 28 Enlisted Men from 
Company B (Part I) 1st Bn (Mech) 120th Inf NCARNG, Shallotte, N. C. 
made up the remainder of the personnel used for duty on 7 October 1969. 
Only 17 Enlisted Men and 1 Officer from Company B (Part I) 1st Bn 

(Mech) 120th Inf NCARNG, Shallotte, N. C. were used for duty on 8 Octo- 
ber 1969. 

b. Non-National Guard forces involved. Approximately ten civilians 
were aiding in the search. These consisted of Local Rescue Squads 
primarily. 

c. Special Services. None. 

d. Casualties. No National Guard members were casualties. 

e. Troop information. None. 

f. Consolidated report of daily strength accounting. Attached. 

4. Logistics. 

a. Communications equipment. Six (6) each Radio Sets AN/PRC-10 
were used by personnel to aid in searching the wooded area. 

b. Special equipment utilized and source of issue. Small boats with 
outboard motors and life jackets were procured from members of the Shal- 
lotte unit. These items were personal items of the men. Eight (8) boats 
and motors were used. 

c. Equipment lost/damaged. One life jacket was lost during the two 
day period. The jacket was borrowed by the Shallotte Unit and was esti- 
mated to be worth around $10.00. 

5. Problem Areas and lessons learned. 

a. Personnel. No problem was encountered with personnel. 

b. Operations. A short delay was experienced due to the unit not 
having boats and motors in its possession. These were quickly acquired 
through unit personnel and no other problems came up. 

c. Training and organization. It is felt that the officers and men 
involved were greatly improved since this is the first time either portion 
of the unit has ever been involved in searching for a missing person that 
was lost in a river. 

d. Intelligence. None. 

e. Logistics. None. 

f. Public affairs. The unit gained much in putting across its public 
image as a team of men who are interested in people, public concern, and in 
accomplishing a mission. All civilians were greatly impressed with the unit 
and its operation. 

g. Other. None. 

LEWIS N. SASSER 
ILT INF NCARNG 
Commanding 



DIGEST OF GENERAL ORDERS 

1968 

GO No. 27, 23 Jul 68— Amendment of para 1, Section I, GO No. 1, 1968. 

GO No. 28, 28 Aug 68— Amendment of para 1, Section I, GO No. 1, 1968. 

GO No. 29, 4 Sep 68— State Special Duty— Missing Person. 

GO No. 30, 4 Sep 68— Section I, Revocation of para 1, GO No. 28, 1968; 
Section II, Amendment of para 1, Section I, GO No. 1, 1968. 

GO No. 31, 11 Sep 68— Section I, Revocation of para 1, Section II, GO 
No 30, 1968; Section II, Implementation of Functional Category Codes. 

GO No. 32, 26 Sep 68 — Section I, Redesignation and Reorganization of 
NCARNG Aviation Activities; Section II, Rescission of GO No. 5, 1966 

GO No. 33, 27 Sep 68 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medal. 

GO No. 34, 17 Oct 68 — Implementation of Consolidation Change Table 
300-37. 

1969 

GO No. 1, 2 Jan 69 — State Special Duty — Missing Person. 

GO No. 2, 17 Jan 69 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 3, 20 Jan 69 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 4, 30 Jan 69— State Special Duty — Missing Person. 

GO No. 5, 30 Jan 69— Award of The National Guard (State) Trophy to Co 
C (-), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf, NCARNG, Smithfield, North Carolina. 

GO No. 6, 31 Jan 69 — Reorganization and Redesignation of Co A, 1st Bn 
(M), 120th Inf, NCARNG. 

GO No. 7, 13 Feb 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbance. 

GO No. 8, 19 Feb 69 — State Special Duty— Weather Emergency. 

GO No. 9, 20 Feb 69 — State Special Duty— Weather Emergency. 

GO No. 10, 27 Feb 69 — Reorganization and Redesignation of Hq Hq Det, 
NCARNG. 

GO No. 11, 5 Mar 69 — State Special Duty — Missing Persons. 

GO No. 12, 6 Mar 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 13, 13 Mar 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 14, 26 Mar 69 — Implementation of Consolidated Change Tables 
300-38 and 300-39. 

GO No. 15, 10 Apr 69— Reorganization 696th Hv Equip Maint Co (-), 
NCARNG. 

GO No. 16, 18 Apr 69— Amendment of para 1, GO No. 14, 1969. 

GO No. 17, 18 Apr 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 18, 29 Apr 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 19, 29 Apr 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

GO No. 20, 5 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Stewart, 
Georgia. 

119 



120 Report of The Adjutant General 

GO No. 21, 5 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Gordon, 
Georgia. 

GO No. 22, 5 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Stewart, 
Georgia. 

GO No. 23, 5 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Sill, Okla- 
homa. 

GO No. 24, 5 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

GO No. 25, 9 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

GO No. 26, 9 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Stewart, 
Georgia. 

GO No. 27, 9 May 69— Annual Field Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, 
North Carolina. 

GO No. 28, 19 May 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 29, 26 May 69— State Special Duty— Civil Disturbances. 

GO No. 30, 31 and 32 were not used. 

GO No. 33, 2 Jun 69— Award of The Eisenhower Trophy to Co B, 1st Bn 
(M), 119th Inf. NCARNG, Scotland Neck, Williamston and Woodland, 
Woodland, North Carolina. 

GO No. 34, 4 Jun 69 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 35, 4 Jun 69 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 36, 4 Jun 69 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 37, 12 Aug 69— Amendment of para 1, GO No. 36, 1969. 

GO No. 38, 12 Sep 69— Section I, Redesignation of NCARNG Aviation 
Activity; Section II, Rescission of GO No. 32, 1968. 

GO No. 39, 18 Sep 69 — Deletion of SRF Designation 

GO No. 40, 7 Oct 69— State Special Duty— Missing Person. 

GO No. 41, 10 Oct 69— Amendment of para 1, GO No. 39 1969. 

GO No. 42, 16 Oct 69— State Special Duty— Missing Person. 

GO No. 43. 22 Oct 69 — Major Conley I. Clarke appointed Commanding 
Officer of HHD, 540th Trans Bn, NCARNG. 

GO No. 44, 28 Oct 69 — Implementation of Functional Category Codes. 

GO No. 45, 14 Nov 69 — Reorganization and Redesignation of HHC, 1st 
Bn, 252d Armor, NCARNG. 

GO No. 46, 4 Dec 69— Amendment of para 1, GO No. 45, 1969. 

GO No. 47, 4 Dec 69— Award of The National Guard (State) Trophy to 
Co C (-), 1st Bn (M), 120th Inf, NCARNG, Smithfield, North Carolina. 

1970 

GO No. 1, 14 Jan 70 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medal. 

GO No. 2, 20 Jan 70 — Reorganization and Redesignation of NCARNG 
units. 

GO No. 3, 20 Jan 70— Reorganization and Redesignation of NCARNG 
units. 



Report of The Adjutant General 121 

GO No. 4, 20 Jan 70 — Reorganization and Redesignation of NCARNG 
units. 

GO No. 5, 29 Jan 70 — Termination of Appointment of Major General 
Claude T. Bowers. 

GO No. 16, 13 Mar 70— Award of The Eisenhower Trophy to Go A, 230th 
Sup & Trans Bn, NCARNG, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

GO No. 7, 10 Apr 70— State Special Duty— Missing Person. 

GO No. 8, 27 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Stewart, Georgia. 

GO No. 9, 27 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Stewart, Georgia. 

GO No. 10, 27 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 11, 27 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 12, 28 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 13, 28 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 14, 28 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Camp Butner, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 15, 28 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 16, 28 Apr 70— Annual Training NCARNG, Fort Bragg, North 
Carolina. 

GO No. 17, 12 May 70 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 18, 12 May 70 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medal. 

GO No. 19, 12 May 70 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 20, 12 May 70 — Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 21, 12 May 70— Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medals. 

GO No. 22, 25 May 70— Award of North Carolina Distinguished Service 
Medal. 

GO No. 23, 23 Jun 70 — Implementation of Consolidated Change Tables 
300-43 and 300-45. 

GO No. 24, 30 Jun 70— Amendment of para 1, GO No. 23, 1970. 



122 Report of The Adjutant General 

NATIONAL AND ARMY AREA AWARDS 

EISENHOWER TROPHY 

1968 (Awarded in 1969) 

Company B, 1st Battalion (M), 119th Infantry, Williamston — Scotland 
Neck — Woodland 

1969 (Awarded in 1970) 

Company A, 230th Supply and Transport Battalion, Winston-Salem 

NATIONAL GUARD AWARD FOR EFFICIENCY IN MAINTENANCE 

Fiscal Year 1969 

Company D, 105th Engineer Battalion, Gastonia — Belmont 

Fiscal Year 1970 

No selection has been made as of the preparation of this report. 

NATIONAL GUARD (STATE) TROPHY 

Calendar Year 1968 

Company C (-), 1st Battalion (M), 120th Infantry, Smithfield 

Calendar Year 1969 

Company C (-), 1st Battalion (M), 120th Infantry, Smithfield 

THE ARMY NATIONAL GUARD SUPERIOR UNIT AWARD 

Training year 1968. 

No award made because of the reorganization of 1 January 1968. 

Training year 1969 

Unit Location 

HHC & Band, 30th Inf Div (M) SUPCOM Raleigh 

Hq & Co A, 105th Med Bn Goldsboro 

Co B, 105th Med Bn Goldsboro 

HHC, 230th S&T Bn Winston-Salem 

Co A, 230th S&T Bn Winston-Salem 

Co B, 230th S&T Bn Winston-Salem 

30th MP Co Greensboro 

Trp A, 1st Sqdn, 196th Cav Albemarle— Hamlet 

Co A, 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Morganton— Boone 

Co C, 2d Bn (M), 120th Inf Mt. Airy— Elkin— 

Mocksville 

1451st Trans Co Asheville 



Report of The Adjutant General 123 

SPECIAL MILITARY HONORS AND AWARDS 

Pursuant to the provisions of General Statute No. 127-37.1, the North 
Carolina Distinguished Service Medal vi^as avv^arded to the following individ- 
uals during the period of this report: 

Major General Winston P. Wilson FG0398325 Chief NGB 

Brigadier General William M. Buck 243-24-4566 NCARNG 

Brigadier General Clarence B. Shimer 0366079 NCARNG 

Colonel Samuel T. Arrington 02037114 NCARNG 

Colonel Arthur J. Bouchard 01287128 NCARNG 

Colonel James C. Cooper 0209195 NCARNG(RET) 

Colonel David W. Donovan 0372365 NCARNG 

Colonel Robert A. Hughes 241-16-7672 NCARNG 

Colonel William E. Ingram 238-16-9890 NCARNG 

Colonel Charles D. Isom, Jr. 0419097 NCARNG 

Colonel William P. Keeton 0525419 NCARNG 

Colonel Joseph T. Kornegay 0417597 NCARNG(RET) 

Colonel Guy C. Langston 240-05-7365 NCARNG 

Colonel Thomas B. Longest 0328125 ARNGUS (AD) 

Colonel Charles S. Manooch, Jr. 0531334 NCARNG 

Colonel Neil J. Pait, Jr. 0451371 NCARNG 

Colonel William W. Staton 240-62-7818 NCARNG (RET) 

Colonel William H. Vanderlinden, Jr. 243-38-8256 NCARNG 

Colonel Harold A. Waldron 204-01-2782 NCARNG (RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Walter H. Beale, Jr. 243-26-9934 NCARNG 

Lieutenant Colonel Clifton E. Blalock 01646950 NCARNG 

Lieutenant Colonel John W. Cartwright 239-12-1208 NCARNG 

Lieutenant Colonel James S. Coxe, Jr. 01325379 NCARNG 

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Dickson 244-48-1669 NCARNG (RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Samuel J. Ervin, III 01333449 NCARNG(RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert M. Grissom 01335276 NCARNG (RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Lillard F. Hart 01725202 NCARNG(RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Marvin Huntley FG565721 NCANG 

Lieutenant Colonel Homer R. Justis FG227-16-9140 NCANG 

Lieutenant Colonel Eugene T. Morris 246-01-0669 NCARNG(RET) 

Lieutenant Colonel Kenneth E. Nantz FG3041617 NCANG 

Lieutenant Colonel Oroon D. Palmer FG575834 NCANG 

Lieutenant Colonel John A. Scott FG415512 NCANG 

Lieutenant Colonel Laurence V. Senn 240-14-6169 NCANG 

Major Robert H. Craig 244-09-6281 NCARNG(RET) 

Major Samuel H. Houston 238-10-0220 NCARNG (RET) 

Major Elbert McPhaul, Jr. 02299224 NCARNG 



124 Report of The Adjutant General 

Chief Warrant Officer William M. Andrews, Jr. 245-14-8781 NCARNG 
Chief Warrant Officer Millard P. Burt W2000410 NCARNG 
Command Sergeant Major Donald B. Carrick 245-22-0961 NCANG 
Command Sergeant Major Billie D. Fish 237-12-5273 NCANG 
Sergeant Major Jaylon P. Jones 244-54-5577 NCARNG 
Sergeant Major Paul H. Watson NG25025619 NCARNG 
Staff Sergeant Major Hal F. Humphrey RA25028110 RA 
First Sergeant Francis E. Brooks NG34456079 NCARNG 
Chief Master Sergeant George H. Auten AF14074332 NCANG 
Master Sergeant Yates T. Caldwell AF25003356 NCANG 
Master Sergeant Channing F. Sapp 244-38-1374 NCARNG 
Master Sergeant Jack D. Dawson 244-22-1719 NCARNG 
Master Sergeant Leroy B. Nix NG24996117 NCARNG 



Report of The Adjutant General 125 

ADJUTANTS GENERAL OF NORTH CAROLINA 

(The Office of Adjutant General was created by Chapter XVIII, Section 7 

of the Laws of 1806) 

Name County Term 

Benjamin Smith Brunswick County 1806-1807 

Edward Pasteur Craven County 1807-1808 

Calvin Jones Wake County 1808-1812 

Robert Williams Surry County 1812-1821 

Beverly Daniel Wake County 1821-1840 

Robert Williams Haywood Wake County 1840-1857 

Richard C. Cotten Chatham County 1857-1860 

John F. Hoke Lincoln County 1860-1861 

James G. Martin U. S. Army, formerly of 

Pasquotank County 1861-1863 

Daniel G. Fowle Wake County 1863 

Richard C. Gatlin U. S. Army, formerly of 

Lenoir County 1864-1865 

John A. Gilmer, Jr Guilford County 1866-1868 

Abiel W. Fisher Bladen County 1868-1872 

John C. Gorman Wake County 1872-1877 

Johnstone Jones Wake County Jan. 1877-Dec. 1888 

James Dodge Glenn Guilford County Jan. 1889-Dec. 1892 

Francis H. Cameron Wake County 1893-1896 

Andrew D. Cowles Iredell County Feb. 1897-Dec. 1898 

Beverly S. Royster Granville County Dec. 1898-Dec. 1904 

Thomas R. Robertson Mecklenburg County Jan. 1905-Mar. 1909 

Joseph F. Armfield Iredelf County Apr. 1909-Oct. 1910 

Roy L. Leinster Iredell County Nov. 1910-Aug. 1912 

Gordon Smith Wake County Nov. 1912-Jan. 1913 

Lawrence W. Young Buncombe County Jan. 1913-June 1916 

Sept. 1917-Aug. 1918 

Beverly S. Royster Granville County June 1916-Aug. 1917 

Sept. 1918-June 1920 

J. Van B. Metts New Hanover County .... June 1920-July 31, 1951 

Thomas B. Longest Wake County, formerly 

(Actg.) of Biscoe, Va Aug. 1-Sept. 30, 1951 

John Hall Manning Durham County Oct. 1, 1951-Aug. 16, 1957 

Capus Waynick Guilford County Aug. 16, 1957-Jan. 31, 1961 

Claude T. Bowers Halifax County Feb. 1, 1961-Jan. 31, 1970 

Ferd L. Davis Lenoir County Feb. 1, 1970- 



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