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Full text of "Report of the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners. 9-14. 1887-92"

PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 11 



ANNUAL PEPOKT 



OF THB 



HAEBOE AND LAND COMMISSIONERS 



For the Year 1890. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE {PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1891. 
c/ 



v e 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Commissioners' Report. 

PAGE 

South Boston Flats, 5 

Progress of the Work, 6 

Reserved Channel, 7 

Congress Street, 8 

Provision for Continuing the Work, 9 

Charles River, 9 

Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor, 13 

Legislation by Congress, 14 

South Bay, 15 

Mystic River Improvement, 16 

Gloucester, Essex and Ipswich Boundary Lines, ... 16 

Fdsld and Office Work, 19 

Miscellaneous Surveys, 19 

Licenses Granted during the year 1890, 21 

Receipts from Grants of Public Lands, 27 

Harbor Improvements by the United States, .... 28 

On the Eastern Coast of Massachusetts, 28 

On the Southern Coast of Massachusetts, 32 

Connecticut River, 34 

Protective Works at Hadley, 35 

River Banks at West Springfield, 37 

Lease of Hangman's Island, . . 38 

Appendix. 

Establishment of Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor, .... 43 

In Charles River, 43 

In Mystic River, 48 

In Maiden River, 53 

In Island End River, 54 

In Chelsea Creek, 50, 55 

On East Boston shore, 58 

In Dorchester Bay, 59 

River and Harbor Act of 1890, Sections 4 to 12, . . . . 63 

Agreement between the Commonwealth and New England Dredging 

Company for widening Channel on South Boston Flats, . . 67 

Lease of Hangman's Island, 71 



Camm0iifomIt& of gtassatjjwsdts. 



HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



To the Honorable the Senate and the House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

The Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, in 
accordance with the provisions of law, respectfully submits 
its Annual Report for the year 1890. 

South Boston Flats. 

The work of filling and improving the tide-water lands 
of the Commonwealth at South Boston has been continued 
without material change in the plan or methods of opera- 
tion. 

The 100-acre lot, all of which is inclosed and filled, and 
on a portion of which the streets have been graded with 
gravel, is in substantially the same condition as at the date 
of the last report The sewers and other improvements 
are in good order. There have been sold from this lot the 
past year 21,421.5 square feet of land, lying between Con- 
gress and Fargo streets, for $10,710.75. Several parcels 
on the northerly or water front, 28,500 square feet in all, 
have been leased on such terms as not to interfere with any 
permanent disposition of the territory which it may be 
desirable to make hereafter. The license which was given 
to the city of Boston two years ago for the temporary use 
of about 1") acres of this lot for a play ground, lias been 
extended, on the 1 same conditions, to cover the year ending 
December 31, 181U. 



6 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Progress of the Work. 

The work of the last year has been mainly expended on 
the 75-acre lot, which adjoins the 100-acre lot on the east. 
This lot had been inclosed the previous year on its north- 
erly and easterly sides by a bulkhead. The sea-wall on 
the side toward the reserved channel, which was in proc 
of building at the date of the last report, under a contract 
with Mr. Charles H. Edwards, was completed and the 
work accepted early in July last. This wall. 1,828 feet in 
finished length, now extends easterly to a point about 80 
feet beyond the line of Congress Street as located across 
the reserved channel ; and completes the inclosure of the 
7. "»-acre lot, with the exception of temporary gaps left in 
the easterly line of bulkhead for the passage of dump- 
scows. The sea-wall will serve also as an abutment for 
the bridge by which Congress Street will cross the reserved 
channel. 

Upon the completion of the sea-wall in July, the Eastern 
Dredging Company deposited along its front about 6,000 
cubic yards of clay dredged at East Boston, at a cost of 22 
cents per yard. This was done to cover and strengthen 
the foundation of the wall, and to protect the timber in the 
foundation from the attacks of worms. In August, the 
New England Dredging Company was employed to dredge 
out a trench in the rear of the sea-wall, at a distance of 
about 40 feet so as not to disturb the stone ballast, and to 
place the material taken from the trench against the back 
of the wall. This method of tilling immediately behind 
the wall was adopted as likely to cause the least out- 
ward pressure against the wall. The trench was after- 
wards re-filled by dumping from scows other material 
dredged from the reserved channel. 

A contract, the terms of which were stated in the last 
report, was made with the New England Dredging Com- 
pany in April, 1889, to receive, elevate and deposit on the 
75-acre lot all suitable material which should be offered by 
parties engaged in dredging in other parts of the harbor. 
There have been deposited under this contract the last 
year about 75,000 cubic yards of such material, equivalent 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 7 

to nearly five acres of filled land, and making, with the 
work of the previous year, about 18 acres filled under this 
contract to date. All of this material has been deposited 
on or near the line of Congress Street extended to the 
reserved channel. Less than the usual quantity has been 
offered and handled under this contract the last vear, 
owing to the comparatively small amount of miscellaneous 
dredging which has been done in the harbor, either by the 
general government or by private parties, excepting that 
done by parties who were using the material for filling 
their own lands. The funds provided for government 
work by the river and harbor act of 1888 had been ex- 
hausted, and the act of 1890 was passed too late in the 
year for operations to begin the past season. A larger 
supply of such material is expected the present year. 

In addition to the filling under the above contract, nearly 
14,000 cart-loads of ashes and other refuse have been 
deposited on the 75-acre lot by the department of sanitary 
police of the city of Boston, and over 20,000 cubic yards 
of earth and waste material, from excavations for buildings 
and the like, by various other parties. The cost of the 
former material has been reduced the past year from 12| 
to (> cents per load ; and the latter is supplied without any 
cost except the wages of a man to superintend the dump- 
ing. 

Reserved Channel. 
In 1889, a channel 60 feet wide and 12 feet deep at mean 
low water was dredged from the head of the reserved 
channel to Lawley's yacht yard, and thence 65 feet wide 
and 8 feet deep to the main ship channel, — as more fully 
described in the last report. This channel was found to be 
too narrow lor safe and convenient use. In September 
last, a contract* was made with the New England 
Dredging Company, the lowest bidder, to widen both 
sections of the channel 50 feet, so that they should have a 
width of 110 and 115 feet respectively, with the same 
depths as before. The material taken from the channel 
has been used for filling the 75-acre lot. The work of 

*See Appendix, C. 



8 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

widening will be finished the present month. The channel 
will then probably answer the needs of navigation for some 
years to come, or until the whole improvement is further 
advanced. 

Congress Street. 

In view of the importance of Congress Street, as being 
the most direct and convenient public avenue by which 
access is had to the Commonwealth's land. and. when 
finished, by far the shortest and best thoroughfare for 
business and travel betw r een the centre of the city and 
South Boston, much of the work of the last year has been 
directed to its early completion. 

Congress Street extends across the territory of the 
Commomvealth from B Street easterly to the reserved 
channel, a distance of more than half a mile, with a width 
of 75 feet. All the material required to complete the 
filling of the land under and adjacent to the street, to the 
line of the sea-wall on the reserved channel, is now in 
place ; and that portion of the street which is not already 
graded, will be ready for the gravel the coming spring. 
It is expected that the graveling will be finished during the 
next working season. 

The city of Boston is just now making a contract for 
the further extension of L Street towards the line of the 
reserved channel on the South Boston side. The city 
engineer is considering the plans for a bridge across the 
channel to connect this street with Congress Street ; and 
the mayor has been empowered by the city council to 
apply to the legislature at its present session for authority 
to raise the funds for its construction. All these facts point 
to the conclusion that the opening of this important avenue 
across the property of the Commonwealth will not be long 
delayed. In the meantime, some effectual remedy must 
and doubtless will be found for the dangerous and unwar- 
ranted obstruction of Congress Street by the seven freight 
tracks of the New York and New England Railroad 
Company which now cross it at grade. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 9 



Provision for Continuing the Work. 

The balance in the " Commonwealth's Flats Improve- 
ment Fund" on the first day of January, 1890, available 
for carrying on the work, was $4,247.23 ; to which there 
has been added during the year $3,104.54 income of the 
fund, $10,850.79 rents of land and proceeds of land sold, 
and $127,000 paid into the fund from the treasury of the 
Commonwealth under the provisions of chapter 93 of the 
Acts of 1889 and chapter 12 of the Acts of 1890 ; making 
a total of $145,202.56 available for the work. Of this sum 
there has been expended during the year $44,507.70, leav- 
ing an available balance, January 1, 1891, of $100,694.86. 
In order to provide for the work now in progress and in 
contemplation, it is estimated that it will be necessary to 
provide for the payment of $20,000 into the fund the 
present year. 

Charles River. 

The order of the Secretary of War for the alteration of 
the four lower highway bridges across Charles River, 
which was served on the cities of Boston and Cambridge 
in December, 1888, has not resulted in the making of any 
changes in these bridges, at least for the present. 

At the date of the last report, application had been made 
in behalf of the cities to the present Secretary of War to 
revoke the order ; and the bridges in question had been 
referred by his direction to a board of engineers for con- 
sideration. This board made an interesting and exhaustive 
report in February last. 

As was to be expected from the character and ability of 
the board, the idea of a closure of the river to navigation, 
which has sometimes been unadvisedly advanced, finds no 
encouragement at its hands. After a careful review of 
the facts relating to the navigation of the river and the 
condition of the bridges, the report says : — 

The Charles River, where it traverses the city, still remains an 
important tidal reservoir, and a valuable highway for commerce, which 
the general government should not only unceasingly protect against 



10 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

wanton injury, but foster by increased facilities where such can be 
secured with a consistent regard to vested rights. 

The conclusion of the report is as follows: — 

The Board is of the opinion that, for the present, the draw-openings 
through the West Boston and Craigie's (Canal) bridges, although 
small, may be retained without material injury to commerce ; but that 
the openings through the Charles River and Warren bridges, now .')<; 
feet wide, ought to be enlarged, whenever the renewal of the bridges 
is taken in hand, to make the navigation through them "free, easy 
and unobstructed " for vessels exceeding about 700 tons. The Board 
was furnished by bridge-tenders with the names of several vessels 
which had applied to pass the bridges, but could not be accommo- 
dated because their beams exceeded the width of the draw ; and it is 
fair to presume that the known deficient width of the draws prevented 
applications from being made by other vessels. 

The draw-bridges, although of primitive type, are manoeuvred by 
steam power, with good appliances, and the time consumed in closing 
and opening the draws is not so great as to detain vessels unneces- 
sarily for this reason alone. 

The basin between the Charles River and Warren bridges is so 
limited in area that only seven to nine vessels can conveniently 
anchor there at one time. The only other possible anchorage, so 
long as the present bridge system is maintained, lies above the last 
railroad bridge. Therefore it may be said in general that there is no 
object in a vessel bound to the upper basin endeavoring to go above 
the Charles River bridge, unless facilities be given for its passing the 
entire bridge system. In practice, vessels lie at anchor below Charles 
River bridge, and pass through and above it in numbers corresponding 
with the opportunities afforded for going beyond the railroad bridges. 
For these reasons, while the Board is of the opinion that the 
draws of the Charles River and Warren bridges are not adequately 
wide for the largest class of vessels which may navigate the river, and 
that in the case of all the city bridges the flow of the water is 
excessively and needlessly obstructed, it does not recommend, in 
the absence of specific instructions as to the modifications to be 
made in the railroad bridges, that the city be required to incur at this 
time expenses for alterations in the bridges controlled by them, which 
might not conform to the alterations hereafter to be demanded from 
the railroad authorities. 

It is, however, recommended that when extensive repairs or re- 
building of these old city bridges become necessary, they shall be 
made to conform to modern practice, as has been done in the case of 
the new Harvard bridge just completed. Such a requirement would 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 11 

be far less onerous than the plans outlined by the joint commission, 
composed of the Harbor Commissioners and Railroad Commissioners, 
to which the subject was referred for report by the legislature of 
Massachusetts in 1870. 

These recommendations were approved by the Chief of 
Engineers, and thereupon Secretary Proctor made the 
following order : — 

The time fixed in the orders of the Secretary of War of December 
6, 1888, requiring the cities of Boston and Cambridge to alter their 
bridges by the first of January, 1891, is hereby indefinitely extended, 
subject to further action whenever the conditions suggested by the 
Board require it. 

The board of engineers was embarrassed by the fact that 
the railroad bridges, which form one system with the city 
bridges, were excluded from its consideration by the terms 
of the instructions under which it was acting. The rail- 
road bridges, as now maintained, are not only a more 
serious obstruction of the river than the city bridges, but 
the difficulties in the way of correcting their defects are 
more formidable. Although orders had been served on 
the railroad corporations at the same time and in the same 
terms as on the cities, the manner of altering the railroad 
bridges had not been prescribed or determined ; and, until 
this harder problem was solved, the board could not deal 
intelligently with the city bridges. The proper order of 
consideration had obviously been inverted. 

In the meantime, the railroad corporations have ap- 
parently ignored the orders of the war department. They 
have not asked for a revocation or modification of the 
orders, and have taken no steps to comply with them. 
The prescribed time for making the alterations has now 
expired. The case of the Charles River bridges is the 
first in the history of the government in which a Secre- 
tary of War or other national officer, in the exercise of a 
high discretionary power delegated by Congress, has 
undertaken to compel the reconstruction in this harbor of 
tide-water bridges long established and maintained under 
the hitherto unquestioned sanction of State law ; and the 
outcome will be awaited with much interest. 



12 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

By an act of the Massachusetts Legislature, passed in 
1888, the cities of Boston and Cambridge were required to 
widen the draws in the four highway bridges which cro 
Charles River next above the Harvard bridge, to 36 feet 
each. For reasons stated in the last report, there was some 
delay in complying with the act. The work has been taken 
in hand by the cities the past year, and, in the case of three 
of the bridges, the widening is now well under way or 
nearly finished. 

The new Harvard bridge still remains unopened to travel. 
The delay has been due to a contest in the courts respect- 
ing the manner of constructing the avenue of approach to 
the bridge on the Cambridge side. The supreme judicial 
court has just decided that the city of Cambridge had 
authority, under the act of 1882, chapter 155, to lay out the 
avenue on its own side of Charles River at grade acr* 
the Boston and Albany railroad ; that the act did not require 
that the city of Boston should concur in or agree to such 
lay-out ; and that the board of railroad commissioners had 
no authority to order the construction by the city of Cam- 
bridge of an overhead crossing over the railroad. This 
decision covers all the points in controversy, and there 
seems to be no reason for longer delay in the completion 
of the avenue and the much-desired opening of the bridge 
to the public. As compared with all the other bridges 
on the river, it is a model in construction and even in 
architectural effect. 

The private improvements in Charles River basin have 
been pushed vigorously the past year. The Charles River 
Embankment Company has extended its sea-wall about o< >< I 
feet westerly, and has dredged from the basin over 32,000 
cubic yards for filling. The contractors are preparing for 
larger operations the present year with improved appli- 
ances. On the Boston side, the filling of the Adams estate 
is completed, and on the adjoining estate the sea-wall is 
finished to Cousens' wharf, and the filling well advanced. 
Substantially all the filling has been dredged from the basin, 
improving its navigation, its sanitary condition and its 
beauty. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 13 



Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor. 

A harbor line board, consisting of General Abbott, 
Colonels Gillespie and Mansfield, and Major Livermore, 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, was constituted by order 
of the Secretary of War in 1888, under section 12 of the 
river and harbor act of that year, to consider harbor lines 
in Boston harbor. At the date of the last report, lines had 
been defined for some of the principal frontages of the 
harbor, which were described in that report. 

During the past year, the harbor line board has recom- 
mended lines for substantially the whole of the harbor and 
its estuaries not covered the previous year, and these lines 
have been approved by the Secretary of War. 

The sections of the harbor treated the past year are a 
part of the banks of the Charles River, the Mystic River 
and its tributaries, Chelsea Creek, the shore of East Boston 
from Jeffrey's Point to Breed's Island, and Dorchester Bay 
from South Boston to Moon Island. 

In almost every case where the State had previously 
established harbor lines, these lines have been adopted 
without modification by the harbor line board as the lines 
beyond which no structure of any kind shall extend. In 
some cases, an inner "bulkhead line," beyond which no 
solid filling shall hereafter be permitted, has also been 
defined. The lines have in some instances been extended 
farther up the rivers or along the shore than had been done 
by the State. In other respects, and upon the whole, the 
harbor line system already established by the laws of the 
State has been approved and confirmed. 

Descriptions of the several lines recommended by the har- 
bor line board and approved by the Secretary of War during 
the last year, are appended to this report.* Copies of two 
of the charts, on which the more important lines in the 
Charles and Mystic rivers are laid down, are also annexed. 
Copies of the charts on which all of the lines are shown, 
are on file in this office. For official copies of these charts, 
and of the documents containing the descriptions and 

* See Appendix, A. 



14 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

approval of the several lines, this board has been indebted 
to the courtesy of the harbor line board. 

Legislation by Congress. 

The river and harbor acts of 1884 and 1^*8 had inserted 
in them certain sections, in the nature of general laws, 
relating to bridges, harbor lines and the removal of wrecks 
in navigable waters, the provisions of which have been 
stated and explained in previous reports. 

In the recent river and harbor act of September K>, I*! 1 *). 
those sections have been amended in some particulars, and 
other sections have been inserted extending their scope, 
providing severer penalties for their violation, ' and dele- 
gating larger discretionary powers to the Secretary of War. 
For information and convenience of reference, the sections 
of the act of 181)0, 4 to 12 inclusive, are appended to this 
report.* 

The control of Congress over waters within the limits 
a State, whether fresh or tide waters, is incidental to its 
power, under the constitution of the United States, "to 
regulate commerce with foreign nations and between the 
several States." Its right of control is therefore limited to 
such waters within the several States as are accessible to 
and navigable by vessels engaged in foreign or interstate 
commerce. It extends only to such water-ways and water 
areas as are suitable and necessary for the convenient 
passage and safe anchorage of such vessels. It does not 
extend to all the tide waters, any more than to all the fresh 
waters, w r ithin State limits ; nor does it include the regula- 
tion of their use and improvement for any other purposes 
than those of navigation. 

In the absence of legislation by Congress, the questions 
that have hitherto arisen have been chiefly those affecting 
the extent and limits of the pow r ers of the States in respect 
to the regulation of waters within their confines. Now that 
Congress has undertaken to legislate in this direction, 
questions are not unlikely to arise touching the extent and 
limits of the power of the national government in the reg- 
ulation of State waters. 

* See Appendix, B. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 11. 15 

South Ba.y. 

This bay has never been regarded of much if any value 
as a tidal reservoir of the main harbor, and the project of 
filling up the whole of it, as well as Fort Point channel 
which is its outlet, was recommended not many years ago 
by a committee of the legislature. The commerce in the 
bay, and especially along the channel, is now of too much 
importance to admit of the serious consideration of such a 
scheme. 

Harbor lines were established in a portion of the bay as 
early as 1847, by chapter 278 of the acts of that year. 
These lines were extended around the entire bay by chap- 
ter 293 of the acts of 1856, and were slightly modified by 
chapter 310 of the acts of 1864. 

Since these lines were established, the New York and 
New England railroad has been built solid across the bay, 
excepting a pile section of about 260 feet, and the part cut 
off by the railroad is no longer used or has any real value 
for navigation. The natural size of the bay was con- 
siderably enlarged some 40 to 50 years ago by digging 
away the marshes, to about the level of low water, for 
filling elsewhere. This artificial area, and other portions 
of the bay which are bare at low tide, are at times offensive 
and noisome. 

There can be little question that it would be a public 
improvement to fill some portions of the bay and to deepen 
others. This can be done in such a way as to increase 
rather than diminish the present facilities for wharves and 
navigation. The harbor lines stand in the way of such 
improvement. 

An act was passed in 1871, chapter 335, authorizing 
changes in the lines with reference to a similar improve- 
ment then in contemplation but not carried out. The 
present powers of this board under that act, by reason of 
subsequent legislation and upon other grounds, are not 
clear. It is recommended that such legislation be now had 
as will remove any obstacles which the existing harbor 
lines present to the improvement of the bay, under proper 
guards and limitations, in the direction above indicated. 



16 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Mystic River Improvement. 

This work involves the filling and improvement of about 
90 acres of land and flats lying between the north and 
south channels of Mystic River. The original grant was 
to the Mystic River Corporation, in 1855, upon the con- 
dition of deepening and improving the river. 

The Boston and Maine Railroad, which has acquired 
the rights and assumed the obligations of the original 
grantee, has completed the past year the bulkhead on the 
line of Elm Street extended, and tide water is now 
excluded from the whole tract of 90 acres. The platform 
along the face of the wharf below Chelsea bridge has been 
finished, and also above the bridge to a point about 150 feet 
beyond the dock ; and more than half the piles have been 
driven for its remaining length. 

The dredging the last year has been done in the river 
above Chelsea bridge; but only a very small part of the 
excavation has been to the required depth. About 280,000 
cubic yards of dredged material have been deposited on 
the enclosed area, mostly by methods of re-handling which 
are new to Boston harbor, and which have worked in a 
satisfactory manner. 

The amount of filling and of required excavation in the 
river which remain to be done, is very much larger than 
can be accomplished, by the methods and apparatus now 
in use, within the time allowed by statute for the com- 
pletion of the whole work, which expires March 1. 1891. 
A reasonable extension of the time may properly be 
granted. 

Gloucester, Essex and Ipswich Boundary Lin 

This board was directed, bv chapters 77 and 97 of the 
resolves of 1889, to examine and define the boundary lines 
in tide water between the city of Gloucester and town of 
Ipswich, and between the towns of Essex and Ipswich, 
and to report to the next General Court. 

A partial report was made to the last legislature. The 
survey and map of the territory in dispute, then under 
way, have been completed the past year. A copy of the 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 17 

map, much reduced in size, on which the proposed bound- 
ary lines as defined by the board are laid down, is annexed 
to this report. 

The water area in controversy is a tidal bay, about a 
mile in diameter and four square miles in extent. Much 
the larger part of it is dry at low water. Upon consider- 
able portions of the flats, clams are found in abundance. 
Each city and town has the right by statute to regulate the 
taking of clams within its own limits. Hence arose the 
question, which the courts declined to settle, as to the 
boundaries in the present case. 

The Essex River enters the bay at its south-westerly 
corner, and the Castle Neck River at its north-westerly 
corner ; and both rivers flow out through the bay, between 
Castle Neck in Ipswich and Two Penny Loaf in Gloucester, 
to the sea. 

No doubt has been felt about the proper location of the 
tide-water line for dividing the city of Gloucester from the 
towns of Essex and Ipswich. The present land line 
between Gloucester and Essex has been extended in the 
same course across the bay, and out through its mouth to 
the exterior line of the Commonwealth in tide water as 
defined by this board under chapter 196 of the acts of 
1881. The map is not large enough to show its stretch 
beyond the mouth of the bay. 

The only difficulty is in regard to the tide-water line 
between Ipswich and Essex. The second parish of 
Ipswich was set off and incorporated into the town of 
Essex by chapter 85 of the acts of 1818. That part 
of the boundary line between the old and the new town 
which is here concerned, is described in the act as 
"running down said brook to the creek, so called; thence 
continuing down said creek to the river ; thence down the 
channel of said river on the north side of Hog Island 
to the sea" 

The river referred to is the Castle Neck River ; and if 
that river had always kept to one and the same channel, 
no question would have arisen as to the boundary between 
the towns. On the contrary, the river has had at different 
times two very different channels. One, the present 



18 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

channel as shown on the map, extends along the shore of 
Castle Neck on the north side of the bay. By the other, 
the river, after passing Story Island and the thatch banks, 
turns south, and runs down on the easterly side of Dilly 
Island and the adjoining marsh, and unites with the Ea 
River near Cross Island. The southerly portion of the last 
described channel is still open, as indicated on the map. 

In 1792, as proved by ancient town maps, the river was 
flowing in the Castle Neck channel. Before 1830, it had 
shifted to the Dilly Island channel. The coast survey map 
of 1857 shows that it was then in the Dilly Island channel. 
Some six or seven years ago, owing probably to the dam- 
ming of ice, it broke through the loose and shifting sand, 
and resumed the old channel along Castle Neck, where it 
now runs. 

The changes from one channel to the other, which are 
liable to occur at any time from natural causes, have not been 
gradual but more or less sudden , and when one channel 
has opened, the other has closed up. If, then, "the 
channel of said river" is held to be the boundary line, a 
very large body of flats will be found sometimes in the one 
town and sometimes in the other. 

It has seemed best, therefore, to divide the bay, as fairly 
as may be, by lines which are fixed and easy to run out. 
A cluster of rocks on the Hats, known as the Black Rocks, 
is the only permanent landmark in the bay. A copper 
bolt has been placed in the highest point of the main ledge 
of these rocks for a monument. 

As defined by the board and shown on the map, the 
boundary line in tide water between Ipswich and Essex 
begins at a point in the line which divides the city of 
Gloucester from said towns, which point bears South 40° 
East and is distant 435 t Jq feet from the copper bolt; and 
runs thence North 40° West, passing through the copper 
bolt, until it comes to the channel of Castle Neck River on 
the north side of Choate's (formerly called Hog) Island. 
This line gives a larger portion of the flats to Ipswich, 
and a larger portion of the best clam-ground to Essex. 

The boundary line in tide water which divides the city of 
Gloucester from the towns of Essex and Ipswich, as defined 




MAP SHOWINGTHE 

BOUNDARY LINES IN TIDE WATER 

BETWEEN THE CITY OF GLOUCESTER 

AND TOWNS OF IPSWICH AND ESSEX 

AS DEFINED BYTHE BOARD Of HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS 
UNDER CHAPS.77AND 97 OF RESOLVES OF 1889. *> 

DECEMBER, 1890. 

SCALE OF FEET 



■WO 200 100 



1-200 1600 i WOO 






i 



\ 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 11. 19 

by the board and shown on the map, begins at a stone 
bound near the shore in tne land line between Gloucester 
and Essex ; and runs thence North 29° 30' East across the 
bay, passing through the south-easterly end of the line 
between Ipswich and Essex as above described, and out to 
sea until it comes to the exterior line of the Commonwealth 
in tide water. This line, as before stated, is an exten- 
sion of the present land line between Gloucester and 
Essex. 

As often as occasion may require, these lines can be run 
and staked out across the clam-grounds and flats, from the 
copper bolt and stone bound, one or both, by an engineer 
or surveyor, without difficulty. The courses as given above 
refer to the true meridian, and allowance must be made for 
variations of the magnetic needle. 

Field and Office Work. 
Miscellaneotis Surveys, 

The work on the South Boston flats has, as usual, 
occupied the larger part of the time of the Engineer and 
his assistants. 

In February, a survey and plan were made of the 
locations of the mooring buoys below Charles River bridge, 
for use in the hearing on a complaint that they were 
dangerous obstructions to steamers entering and leaving 
the Hoosac Tunnel docks. 

A survey and plan were also made of the railroad bridge 
over Belle Isle Inlet, between Breed's Island and Winthrop, 
with reference to the plans for building the metropolitan 
sewer across the inlet. 

In June, the positions of seventeen stations in the South 
Bay were determined by triangulation from the basis of the 
harbor re-survey, and the positions calculated and plotted 
on plane-table sheets, preparatory to making plans of the 
bay as soon as other work permits. 

A survey was also made of the section of Fort Point 
channel between the New York and New England Railroad 
and Congress Street bridges, and between the draw-piers 
of the bridges and the wharf of the Boston Electric Light 



20 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Company, and plans and specifications drawn for dredging 
this section to the depth of 10 feSt below mean low water. 

A survey was also made of Salter's Beach in Plymouth, 
for a short distance north of Gurnet Light, to determine to 
what extent, if any, the beach had been or would be injured 
by the removal of fine drift-gravel, under licenses given to 
Mr. Joseph L. Boardman, as authorized by chapter 212 of 
the acts of 1881. The comparison of this survey with that 
of June, 1889, did not show that any material change in 
the beach had taken place. 

In July, a plane-table survey was completed and map 
made, based on the triangulation done in November, 18 v 
as stated in the last report, of the bay at the mouth of the 
Essex and Castle Neck rivers, for use in defining the 
boundary lines in tide water between Gloucester, Ipswich 
and Essex, as already described in this report. 

In October, an examination was made of the banks of 
the Connecticut River at Springfield and West Springfield, 
to ascertain the extent of the giving away and exposure of 
the banks on the West Springfield side, and of the en- 
croachments on the Springfield side. 

In October and November, a survey was made of the 
section of the Merrimac River and its banks lying between 
Haverhill and Bradford. Twenty-two triangulation points 
were established and connected with the work of the coast 
survey through the work of Professor Quimby in the 
determination of the state line between Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire. Based on these points, two plane-table 
sheets were made, on a scale of ^ oVo' showing the river 
from the Boston and Maine railroad bridge down to a little 
below the junction of Water and Groveland streets in 
Haverhill, — a distance of 1| miles. The sheets include 
the river and its shores between Washington, Merrimack 
and Water Streets on the Haverhill side, and the George- 
town Branch railroad on the Bradford side. There remains 
a few days' work on the Bradford side to complete the 
lower sheet. 

This survey is preparatory to the establishment of 
harbor lines on the Haverhill and Bradford banks of the 
river, one or both. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 21 

Licenses Granted During the Year 1890. 

The following licenses, eighty-one in number, have 
been granted the last year. The licenses which are 
required under recent statutes for structures in the Connec- 
ticut River and in great ponds, as well as those in tide 
waters, are included in the list. 

Noe. 

1226. Petition of the American Powder Mills for license to place 

a mooring for one of its powder-boats on the South 
Boston flats in Boston harbor. Granted January 23, 
1890. 

1227. Petition of the*Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Railroad 

. Company for license to build a ferry-slip at its Boston 
terminus in Boston harbor. Granted January 30, 1890. 

1228. Petition of the Boston Land Company for license to fill 

solid in Chelsea Creek at Breed's Island in East Boston. 
Granted January 30, 1890. 

1229. Petition of Selina C. Washburn for license to fill a dock 

adjoining her wharf on Maiden River in the city of 
Maiden. Granted February 20, 1890. 

1230. Petition of the Old Colony Railroad Company for 

license to fill solid the pile bridge of the Nantasket 
Beach railroad across an arm of Hingham Bay, near 
Point Allerton, in the town of Hull. Granted February 
20, 1890. 

1231. Petition of William Minot, Jr., for license to drive piles 

at his wharf on Charles River in the city of Boston. 
Granted February 27, 1890. 

1232. Petition of the Boston and Maine Railroad for license to 

rebuild and widen the pile platform at Mystic wharf on 
the south channel of Mystic River in the city of Boston. 
Granted February 27, 1890. 

1233. Petition of the city of Boston for license to dump snow 

and ice into the rivers and tide waters in and around said 
city. Granted March 0, 1890. 

1234. Petition of the city of Salem for license to build stone 

piers to support water and gas pipes at North Street 
bridge on North River in the city of Salem. Granted 
March G, 1890. 

1235. Petition of the North Packing and Provision Company for 

license to build a wharf and well on Miller's River in the 
city of Somerville. Granted March (5, 1890. 



22 HARBOR AXD LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Nos. 

1236. Petition of Colcord Upton for license to build a wharf at 

Raker's Island in Massachusetts Bay in the city of 
Salem. Granted March 6, 1890. 

1237. Petition of Simon P. Humphrey for license to build a pile 

wharf in Onset Bay in the town of Wareham. Granted 
March 13, 1890. 

12§8. Petition of Annie H. Litchfield for license to build a 
sea-wall or bulkhead and fill solid in Hull Bay in the 
town of Hull. Granted March 13, 1890. 

1239. Petition of the Central Railroad of New Jersey for 
license to widen and extend Phillips wharf, on piles, in 
Salem harbor in the city of Salem. Granted March 13, 
1890. 

12 10. Petition of Joseph H. Burgess for license to build a wharf, 
partly solid and partly on piles, in Onset Bay in the 
town of Wareham. Granted March 20, 1890. 

1241. Petition of Daniel H. J. Holmes and Mary F. Gaff for 

approval of plans for building a bridge across Centre- 
ville River in the town of Barnstable, as authorized by 
chapter 30 of the acts of 1890. Approved March £0, 
1890. 

1242. Petition of the Bunker Hill Yacht Club for license to 

build a club-house, on piles, near the south draw of 
Chelsea bridge on Mystic River in the city of Boston. 
Granted March 25, 1890. 

1243. Petition of the city of Lynn for license to build an outfall 

sewer in Lynn harbor in the city of Lynn. Granted 
March 27, 1890. 

1244. Petition of the East Boston Dry Dock Company for 

license to build a marine railway, and to widen and ex- 
tend its northerly pier, on piles, in Boston harbor at East 
Boston. Granted April 10, 18 

1245. Petition of the city of Newburyport for approval of plans 

for building a sewer outfall in Merrimack River in the 
city of Newburyport, as authorized by chapter 233 of 
the acts of 1889. Approved April 17. 1- 

1246. Petition of the Boston and Albany Railroad Company for 

license to rebuild the bridge on its Grand Junction 
branch railroad across Mystic River in the city of Som- 
erville and town of Everett. Granted April 17. 
124 7. Petition of James H. Winchell & Company for license to 
build stone piers for the support of a building on Little 
River in the city of Haverhill. Granted April 24, 1890. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. . 23 

Nob. 

1 248. Petition of F. A. Merriam & Company for license to build a 

pile platform, fill solid, and dredge a channel in Dorches- 
ter Bay in the city of Boston. Granted April 24, 1890. 

1249. Petition of Isaac Pratt, Jr., for license to fill solid at 

the McKay wharf in Boston harbor at East Boston. 
Granted May 1, 1890. 

1250. Petition of James N. Cowin for license to widen and 

extend his wharf by filling solid on Mystic River in the 
town of Medford. Granted May 8, 1890. 

1251. Petition of Charles Bassett for license to build a dike with 

a tide-gate therein across Buck's Creek in the town of 
Chatham. Granted May 15, 1890. 

1252. Petition of John C. Haynes for license to widen a portion 

of Liverpool wharf, on piles, on Fort Point channel in 
the city of Boston. Granted May 15, 1890. 

1253. Petition of Ezra B. Whittier for license to build a pile 

pier in Winthrop harbor in the town of Winthrop. 
Granted May 22, 1890. 

1254. Petition of Wilhelmina C. Clifford for license to build a 

timber wharf in Buzzard's Bay in the town of Dartmouth. 
Granted May 22, 1890. 

1255. Petition of the King Philip Boat Club for license to build 

a boat-house in Mount Hope Bay in the city of Fall 
River. Granted May 22, 1890. 

1256. Petition of the Lincoln Boat Club for license to build a 

boat-house in Sandy Pond in the town of Lincoln. 
Granted May 22, 1890. 

1257. Petition of George R. Bradford for license to extend his 

wharf, on piles, in Gloucester harbor in the city of 
Gloucester. Granted May 22, 1890. 

1258. Petition of the Lockwood Manufacturing Company for 

license to extend its wharf by filling solid in Boston 
harbor at East Boston. Granted May 29, 1890. 

1259. Petition of the city of Gloucester for license to build a 

catch-basin in Gloucester harbor in the city of Glouces- 
ter. Granted May 29, 1890. 

1 2G0. Petition of the Chelsea Yacht Club for approval of plans for 
building a club-house, on piles, jiear Chelsea bridge on 
Mystic River in the city of Chelsea, as authorized by chap- 
ter 311 of the acts of 1890. Approved May 29, 1890. 

1261. Petition of the Simpson's Patent Dry Dock Company for 
license to extend its dry dock No. 1 in Boston harbor 
at East Boston. Granted May 29, 189C, 



24 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Nob. 

12G2. Petition of the Commercial Wharf Company for license to 
extend the south pier of Commercial wharf, on piles, 
in Boston harbor in the city of Boston. Granted May 
29, 1890. 

12G3. Petition of William H. Swift & Company for license to 
extend their wharf by filling solid on Chelsea Creek at 
East Boston. Granted June 5, 1890. 

12G4. Petition of the Constitution Wharf Company for license to 
drive piles at Constitution wharf in Boston harbor in the 
city of Boston. Granted June 5, 180". 

12G5. Petition of Emma J. Goodnow for license to build a wharf, 
partly solid and partly on piles, in Lake Quinsigamond 
in the city of Worcester. Granted June 12, 1890. , 

12G6. Petition of Augustus T. Crashing and others for license to 
build a pile wharf and float in Town River Bay in the 
town of Weymouth. Granted June 12, 1890. 

1267. Petition of the city of Boston for license to rebuild 

Federal Street bridge on Fort Point channel in Boston 
harbor. Granted June 19, 180". 

1268. Petition of James A. Norcross for license to build a pile 

wharf at Monument Beach in the town of Bourne. 
Granted June 19, 1890. 
12G9. Petition of the Gloucester Lighterage Company for license 
to build a wharf, partly solid and partly on piles, in 
Gloucester harbor in the city of Gloucester. Granted 
June 19, 1890. 

1270. Petition of John Girdler for license to widen his wharf, 

partly solid and partly on piles, in Beverly harbor in 
the town of Beverly. Granted June 26, 1890. 

1271. Petition of the board of Park Commissioners of the city 

of Boston for approval of plans for tilling solid in 
Boston harbor at South Boston Point in said city, 
as authorized by chapter 438 of the acts of 1889. 
Approved June 26, 1890. 

1272. Petition of William O. Cutter for license to build a pile 

wharf and float-stage in Onset Bay in the town of 
Wareham. Granted July 3, 1890. 

1273. Petition of Isarac Pratt, Jr., for license to build a pile 

platform at the McKay wharf in Boston harbor at East 
Boston. Granted July 10, 1890. 

1274. Petition of the Gardner Boat Club for license to build a 

boat-house in Crystal Lake in the town of Gardner. 
Granted July 10, 1890. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 25 

Nos. 

1275. Petition of William B. Nelson for license to extend his 

wharf in Mattapoisett harbor in the town of Matta- 
poisett. Granted July 17, 1890. 

1276. Petition of Charles H. Heath, trustee, and the Riverbank 

Improvement Company for license to build a sea-wall 
and fill solid on Charles River in the city of Boston. 
Granted July 17, 1890. 

1277. Petition of Edward Kendall & Sons for license to extend 

their wharf, partly solid and partly on piles, on Charles 
River in the city of Cambridge. Granted July 17, 
1890. 

1278. Petition of the Brookline Gas Light Company for license 

to build a sea-wall and pile platform and to fill solid on 
Charles River in the city of Boston. Granted July 17, 
1890. 

1279. Petition of John M. Brooks for license to drive piles for 

launch-ways and for other purposes in Boston harbor 
at East Boston. Granted July 24, 1890. 

1280. Petition of the Lockwood Manufacturing Company for 

license to widen and extend its wharf, on piles, in 
Boston harbor at East Boston. Granted July 24, 
1890. 

1281. Petition of William B. Thorn & Company for license to 

build a stone wharf on Merrimack River in the city of 
Haverhill. Granted August 7, 1890. 

1282. Petition of the Haverhill Iron Works for license to build 

a stone wharf on Merrimack River in the city of Haver- 
hill. Granted August 7, 1890. 

1283. Petition of the city of Cambridge for license to rebuild 

and widen its portion of River Street bridge on Charles 
River in the city of Cambridge. Granted August 22, 
1890. 

1284. Petition of the city of Boston for license to widen its 

portion of River Street bridge on Charles River in the 
city of Boston. Granted August 22, 1890. 

1285. Petition of the Haverhill Electric Light Company for 

license to extend its wharf by filling solid on Merri- 
mack River in the city of Haverhill. Granted Septem- 
ber 4, 1890. 
128G. Petition of the Boston and Maine Railroad for license to 
excavate a channel and build a culvert with a tide-gate 
therein on Diamond Creek in the town of Revere. 
Granted September 4, 1890. 



26 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Nop. 

1287. Petition of the city of Boston for license to widen the 

passage-way for vessels in North Harvard Street brt 
on Charles River in the city of Boston. Grunted 
September 11, 1890. 

1288. Petition of the board of Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 

missioners for approval of plans for rebuilding the tidal 
culvert crossing Saratoga Street in East Boston, as 
authorized by chapter 139 of the acts of 18 
Approved September 18, 189<>. 

1289. Petition of the board of* Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 

missioners for approval of plans for building a portion 
of section 9 of a main sewer in Chelsea Creek, within 
the location of Addison Street at East Boston, 
authorized by chapter 439 of the acts of 1880. 
Approved September 18, 189<>. 

1290. Petition of the board of Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 

missioners for approval of plans for building a pile 
wharf in Boston harbor at Deer Island, as authorized 
by chapter 439 of the acts of 1889. Approved 
September 18, 1890. 

1291. Petition of the town of Winthrop for license to widen 

Shirley Street in Boston harbor near Cottage Hill 
in the town of Winthrop. Granted September 25, 
1890. 

1292. Petition of William Campbell and Wilson Campbell for 

license to fill flats in Charles River in the city of Cam- 
bridge. Granted September 25, 189<». 

1293. Petition of Josiah C. Bennett for license to build sea- 

walls and fill flats in Lynn harbor in the city of Lynn. 
Granted October 2, 1890. 

1294. Petition of the city of Boston for license to extend L 

Street in Boston harbor at South Boston. Granted 
October 2, 1890. 

1295. Petition of Leavitt T. Bobbins for license to extend his 

wharf by filling solid in Plymouth harbor in the town of 
Plymouth. Granted October 2. 1890. 

1296. Petition of Roswell C. Downer for license to build a stone 

breakwater at Nye's Neck in the town of Falmouth. 
Granted October 16, 1890. 

1297. Petitiou of the city of Boston for license to widen the 

passage-way for vessels in Essex Street bridge on Charles 
River in the cities of Boston and Cambridge. Granted 
October 23, 1890. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 27 

Nos. 

1298. Petition of the board of County Commissioners of 

Hampden County for approval of plans for building a 
bridge across Connecticut River between the city of 
Holyoke and the town of Chicopee, as authorized by 
chapter 350 of the acts of 1881). Approved October 
30, 1890. 

1299. Petition of the board of County Commissioners of Essex 

County for approval of plans for building abridge across 
Powow River in the town of Amesbury, as authorized 
by chapter 6Q of the acts of 1890. Approved October 
30, 1890. 

1300. Petition of George A. Hall for license to build a wharf 

by filling solid on Merrimack River in the city of Haver- 
hill. Granted November 6, 1890. 

1301. Petition of Choate Burnham for license to widen and 

extend his wharf, on piles, in Old Harbor Bay in the 
city of Boston. Granted November 6, 1890. 

1302. Petition of Albin M. Richards for license to extend his 

wharf by filling solid on Mystic River in the city of 
Boston. Granted November 25, 1890. 

1303. Petition of the Riverside Boat Club for license to build a 

boat-house, on piles, on Charles River in the city of 
Cambridge. Granted November 25, 1890. 

1304. Petition of the West End Street Railway Company for 

license to dump snow and ice from bridges and wharves 
into tide waters in the cities of Boston, Cambridge and 
Chelsea,- and the town of Medford. Granted December 
4, 1890. 

1305. Petition of the city of Boston for license to build a pile 

pier at the north ferry in Boston harbor at East Boston. 
Granted December 4, 1890. 

1306. Petition of the West End Street Railway Company for 

license to build a pile wharf in South Bay in the city of 
Boston. Granted December 4, 1890. 

Receipts from Grants of Public Lands. 
The amount received during the past year for grants of 
rights and privileges in lands of the Commonwealth, under 
licenses of this board for filling and for the erection of 
wharves and other structures in and over tide waters and 
great ponds, is $14,330.24. Other like assessments for a 
considerable amount have been made during the year, for 



28 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

which the money has not yet been paid into the treasury. 
Payment for such grants was first required by chapter 284 
of the acts of 1874, now chapter 19, section 10, of the 
Public Statutes. Since the passage of that act, the total 
amount so received and paid into the State treasury 1 
been $274,894.60. 

Harbor Improvements by the United States. 

The works of the national government for the preserva- 
tion and improvement of the rivers and harbors on the coast 
of Massachusetts, have remained under the supervision of 
the same able and efficient officers of the Corps of Engineers, 
U. S. A., who had charge of them at the date of the la&t 
report, — those on the Eastern section of the coast in charge 
of Lieut. Col. Samuel M. Mansfield, who is stationed at 
Boston, and those on the Southern section in charge of 
Maj. William R. Livermore, whose headquarters are at 
Newport. 

To both of these gentlemen, as to their predecessors, 
this board is indebted for courteous cooperation, and the 
public for valuable service. 

Improvements on the Eastern Coast of Massachusetts. 

At the request of the board, Colonel Mansfield has 
kindly furnished the following condensed report of the 
work done in the rivers and harbors under his charge 
during the year 1890 : — 

United States Engineer Office, 

Boston, Mass., December 22, 1890. 

The Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners of Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with your request of this day. I 
have the honor to furnish the following summary of the work 
clone by the general government, during the year, in those rivers 
and harbors of Massachusetts which are under my charge : — 

1. Newburyport Harbor. 

The general project for the improvement of this harbor has not 
been changed. 

No active operations have been in progress, and the condition 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 21) 

of the several works of improvement remains essentially as stated 
in the report for last year. 

The entranee channel over the bar has straightened and deep- 
ened, as shown by the survey of June, 1890. 

The funds provided for this work by the act of September 19, 
1890, $25,000, will be expended during the next working season 
in extending the full section of the north jetty. 

2. Harbor of Refuge, Sandy Bay, Rockport. 

No change has been made in the project. 

During the year 40,039 tons of rubble-stone were deposited in 
the breakwater, and its sub-structure is now essentially completed 
between cross ranges 140 and 3,540. 

The present available funds will deposit, approximately, 185,000 
tons of stone in the sub-structure, and will extend it about 750 
feet. 

3. Gloucester Harbor. 

The condition of the improvement remains as stated in the 
report for last year, no work having been done. 

The sum of $15,000 now available will be expended in widening 
the channels in Harbor Cove 100 feet, and in completing the 
proposed improvement of the main harbor from its entrance to 
the steamboat wharf. 

4. Manchester Harbor. 

No change has occurred in the condition of this improvement. 
During the next working season, a channel 40 feet wide, and 4 
feet deep at mean low water, will be dredged from the entrance 
qf the harbor to the railroad bridge. 

5. Salem Harbor. 

The funds provided for this harbor by the act of September 
19, 1890, will be expended in dredging a channel 50 feet wide 
from deep water off Derby wharf light to the head of navigation 
in South River. This channel will be 8 feet deep at mean low 
water to near the inner end of Derby wharf, and thence 6 feet 
deep. 

6. Lynn Harbor. 

No change has taken place in the condition of this improvement 
since the date of the last report. The present available funds 
will be expended in completing the anchorage basin and in widen- 
ing the inner channel. 



30 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 



7. Winthrop Harbor. 

The funds now available for this harbor will be expended in 
dredging a channel 3 feet deep at mean low water, and 35 t 

wide, from the entrance to Rice's wharf. 

8. Boston Harbor. 

No change has been made in the general project for the 
improvement of this harbor. During the year the ledges uncovered 
by dredging at the Upper Middle were removed, and repairs were 
made to the north head sea-wall at Deer Island. 

A detailed survey of the west end of Brewster spit showed 
that the main ship-channel had decreased in width, since it \ 
dredged in 1874, to such an extent that the 23-foot curves, at 
mean low water, were but 475 feet apart. 

The funds now available for this harbor will be expended in 
widening the main ship-channel, at the west end of Brewster spit, 
to the full projected width, 625 feet; in extending the Gallop's 
Island sea-wall about 300 feet to the south-east ; in repairing 
the sea-wall at Great Brewster ; in extending the rip-rap shore 
protection at Long Island ; in widening and deepening the channel 
between Nix's Mate and Long Island so that it will be 300 feet 
wide, 15 feet deep at mean low water ; in widening the channel 
leading to Nantasket beach so that it will be 150 feet wide. 9£ 
feet deep at mean low water ; in extending the main ship-channel 
from Grand Junction wharf towards Jeffrey's Point, approxi- 
mately 300 feet wide, 18 feet deep between Grand Junction 
wharf and the most eastern dry dock, thence gradually shoaling 
to a junction with 15 feet depth off Jeffrey's Point ; in continuing 
the improvement of Charles River when the draws in the upper, 
bridges shall have been altered ; and for such other dredging, 
blasting, or repairs of sea-walls as may be found necessary. 

9. Hingham Harbor. 

No change has occurred in the condition of this improvement. 
The funds now available will be expended in deepening the 
channel to 10 feet at mean low water. 

10. Scituate Harbor. 

The project for the improvement of this harbor has not been 
changed. During the next working season the present available 
funds will be applied in widening and deepening the channel 
connecting the anchorage basin with the town wharves, so that it 
will be 100 feet wide, 3 feet deep at mean low water. 



1891. PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11 31 



11. Plymouth Harbor. 

No change has occurred during the year. The funds provided 
by the act of September 19, 1890, will be expended in completing 
the basin, and in widening the channel of approach to 130 feet. 

12. WelJfleet Harbor. 

The general project of improvement remains unaltered. 

No work has been done during the year, nor is any expected 
immediately, as the funds provided for this harbor by the last 
river and harbor act are not sufficient to effect any appreciable 
benefit to commerce. 

13. Provincetown Harbor. 

No work was done during the year. A bulkhead about 2,000 
feet long will be built, during the coming working season, on the 
inside of Long Point to cover its weakest section, about -\ mile 
north-west of Wood End Light. 

14. Merrimack River. 

No work has been done during the year, and the funds now 
available are specifically appropriated for the improvement of 
Mitchell's Falls. 

15. Powoiv River. 

i 

No action by the town authorities of Amesbury, in the matter 
of the drawbridge, has as yet been reported to this office, which 
will warrant the expenditure of the funds now available. 

16. Ipswich River. 

No change in the condition of this improvement has occurred. 
The funds now available are not sufficient to complete the present 
project. 

17. Weymouth Fore River. 

The general project for the improvement of this river is to widen 
and deepen the natural channel, so that six feet depth at mean 
low water can be carried to the head of navigation. The projected 
channel will be 100 feet wide to near the wharves at Weymouth 
Landing, thence to Braintree bridge 80 feet wide, and above the 
bridge 50 feet wide. 

The present available funds will be applied in dredging a 
channel of the full projected depth, 40 feet wide to Braintree 
bridge, and 25 feet wide above this bridge. 



32 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. (Jan. 



During the year surveys have been made, and project 
improvement are being considered, for the following localities : 
Kingston harbor, Weymouth Back River, Town River, Chatham 
harbor, Essex River, Mystic and Maiden rivers. 

It will be noticed that but little progress has been made in □ 
of the improvements during the year. This is owing to the ex- 
haustion of the funds provided by the act of 18S8, and the very 
late date during the present year when additional funds were 
provided. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

8. M. Mansfield, 
Lieutenant Colonel of Engineers. 

Improvements on the Southern Coast of Massachusetts. 

The board is indebted to the courtesy of Major Liver- 
more for a copy of the official report of the work done in 
the rivers and harbors under his charge during the year 
ending June 30, 1890, from which the following facts arc- 
taken : — 

1. Hyannis Harbor. 

No work was done during the year ending June 30, 1889. 
During the last year the work of dredging in the 15^-foot anchor- 
age ground protected by the breakwater, was resumed with dredge, 
tug # and scows belonging to the general government. The execu- 
tion of the project of deepening this anchorage area will be 
continued. 

The amount available for the work, including an appropriation 
of $8,000 by the river and harbor act of September 1 ( J, 1890, is 
$9,916.00. 

2. Nantucket Harbor. 

During the last year 6,055 tons of stone have been placed in 
the eastern jetty under a contract, and 830 tons with plant 
belonging to the United States. 

It was reported in May, 1890, that the steam-boat running to 
Nantucket had difficulty in entering the harbor on account of the 
shoaling of the channel. A survey in June showed that the 
7J-foot channel still existed, but that it was to the eastward of 
the course followed by the steam-boats, and about in the same 
position as the preceding November. 

It is proposed to continue the construction of the eastern jetty 
as far as the funds will permit. The amount available, including 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 33 

$25,000 appropriated by the river and harbor act of 1890, is 
$25,048.70. 

3. Vineyard Haven Harbor. 

The plan of improvement contemplates the protection of the 
chops at the mouth of the harbor from the action of storm waves, 
by jetties and other works along the shore. 

A temporary wharf and three jetties, 150 feet, 80 feet, and 100 
feet long, were completed on the West Chop the last year. The 
work of protection will be continued, beginning at the East Chop. 

The amount available, including $i 0,000 appropriated by the 
river and harbor act of 1890, is $11,661.00. 

4. Wareham Harbor. 

The dredging of the southern half of Reach No. 8 to a width of 
175 feet and depth of 10 feet was completed, and the Middle 
Ground, a shoal in mid-channel of Reach No. 9, was removed, 
during the last year. 

The amount available for continuing the improvement, including 
an appropriation of $5,000 by the river and harbor act of 1890, 
is $5,031.47, which will be applied to the completion of the 
channel and the further building up of Long Beach. 

5. New Bedford Harbor. 

During the last year, 43,665 cubic yards of mud, sand and 
gravel were dredged in excavating a channel, 100 feet wide and 
18 feet deep at mean low water, from the deep water of Buzzard's 
Bay, near the 11-foot bank, to the vicinity of the New Bedford 
wharves. 

The work of dredging in the new channel will be continued with 
the funds available, $10,033.98, including an appropriation of 
$10,000 by the river and harbor act of 1890. 

6. Edgartown Harbor. 

The sum of $2,000 was appropriated by the river and harbor 
act of 1890 for improving the inner harbor by dredging, and will 
be expended for that purpose. 

7. Taunton River. 

No work was done in this river the last year. The sum of 
$7,012.78 now available, including an appropriation of $7,000 by 
the recent river and harbor act, will be applied in completing the 



34 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

widening and deepening of the channel at a few points above 
Berkley bridge, and in the removal of a small amount of ledge 
rock uncovered in dredging below the bridge. 

Vessels of 11 feet draught can now reach Taunton at the head 
of navigation. 

Connecticut River. 

The " general care and supervision of the Connecticut 
River within the confines of this Commonwealth, and of 
the banks thereof, and of all structures therein," were 
committed to this board by chapter 344 of the acts of 1885. 
This was done " in order to prevent and remove un- 
authorized encroachments and causes of every kind which 
may in any way injure the said river, and in order to 
protect and develop the rights and property of the public 
therein.'" 

As a means of securing these ends, it was provided in 
the act that all persons authorized by the general court to 
build any structures in the river, should first obtain from 
this board its approval of the plans and mode of peforming 
the work ; and the board was further empowered to license 
the building of structures in the river upon such terms as 
it should prescribe. The provisions of chapter 19 of the 
Public Statutes applicable to structures in tide waters, 
were in general made applicable to structures in this river. 

Since the passage of this statute, the board has not 
infrequently been called upon to approve and license new 
structures, or to investigate cases of actual injury or 
threatened danger from the natural action of the river, or 
from structures built and encroachments made by riparian 
owners and others. There is evident need of the regula- 
tion and protection which the act was designed to secure, 
and its provisions will prove more useful as they come tp 
be better known and understood. 

In order, however, that the statute may fully accomplish 
the desired results, there should be a more prompt and 
effectual remedy than it now provides for the prevention 
and abatement of unauthorized and injurious works. 

It is provided in chapter 19, section 17, of the Public 
Statutes, that every erection and work made or done in 
tide water without authority from the general court or from 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 35 

this board, or in a manner not sanctioned by the board 
where its approval or license is required, shall be deemed 
a public nuisance, and be liable to indictment as such ; and 
that the board may order suits on behalf of the Common- 
wealth to prevent or stop any such nuisance by injunction 
or otherwise ; and that the attorney-general and district 
attorneys within their districts shall conduct such suits. 
The same provision is found in chapter 318, section 6, of 
the acts of 1888, for the protection of great ponds. It is 
recommended that similar provision be made for the more 
effectual protection of the Connecticut River. 

Protective Works at Hadley. 

The work authorized by the General Court to be done 
under the direction of this board " to prevent the further 
inroads of the Connecticut River upon the northerly side of 
the town of Hadley, and the destruction of the principal 
streets in said town," has been completed. The necessity 
for undertaking the work, and the methods of conducting 
it, have been explained in previous reports. 

The operations of the last year, and the success of the 
work so far as its results can now be known or foreseen, 
are detailed in the following report of Mr. Emory C. Davis 
of Northampton, who has been the engineer in immediate 
charge of the work from the beginning, conducting it with 
much skill and good judgment, and to the entire satisfaction 
of the board : — 

To the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners of Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen: — The following is a report upon the work done 
the past year for the protection of the town of Hadley against 
the further encroachments of the Connecticut River upon said 
town, as provided for by chapter 9fj of the resolves of 1888, and 
chapter 17 of the resolves of 1889, of the legislature of Massa- 
chusetts. 

The work done during the summer and fall of 1889, in sloping 
the banks of the river and laying mats and riprapping thereon, 
was set the past spring with young willows, and these have made 
a satisfactory growth during the summer, and will serve as a 
support for the riprap work after the decay of the mats above the 
water line. • 



36 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

Soundings were taken in June last, on the same lines across 
the river as in previous years, to ascertain what changes, if any, 
bad taken place in the general character and profile of the river 
bottom since the commencement of the protective works in lh~ 
These soundings are shown on the accompanying profiles of the 
river bottom. The black lines indicate the contour of the bottom 
on the different lines across the river in June, 1888, before the 
protective works were commenced ; the red lines, the contour on 
the same lines across the river in June, 1889 ; and the green lines, 
the contour in June, 1890. 

The soundings of June last show a decided shoaling of the 
water against the protective works, and a corresponding scouring 
on the bottom of the river and increase in depth of water on the 
opposite side ; and, so far as can be ascertained, the works are 
accomplishing in a highly satisfactory manner the results antici- 
pated at the commencement of the work. 

The work done the past season has been confined principally 
to completing and securing the work at the head of Front Street, 
where left in an unfinished condition at the close of operations in 
1889, consequent upon the usual fall freshets. Mats and riprap 
work have also been laid in places on the bauk of the river for a 
distance of 400 feet below Front Street, where there were indica- 
tions of scouring and weakness in the bauks. 

Judging from all present appearances, and from the general 
conduct of the river against these works, the town of Hadley is 
effectually protected from further encroachments of the river on 
its lands within the limits of these works. 

The total cost of the work done and material furnished the 
past season is $613.04, including the cost of setting willows and 
other work done in the spring. All bills incurred in the prosecu- 
tion of the work have been paid, and all claims presented by 
parties for damage to crops, brush taken, etc., have been satis- 
factorily adjusted and paid, with the exception of that of Mr. 
Thaddeus Graves of Hatfield, for a small lot of brush taken in 
1889, of which mention was made in my report for that year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. C. Davis, 

Northampton, Mass., December 20, 1890. Superintendent. 

The whole amount which has been appropriated for the 
protective work at Hadley, is $30,000. The total cost has 
been $29,581.55, leaving a balance of $418.45 uncalled for 
in the treasury. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 37 

River Banks at West Springfield. 

In September last, the board was petitioned by the select- 
men of West Springfield to investigate the condition of the 
banks of the river in that town, which, it was alleged, 
were wearing away and caving in, and thus undermining 
a dike which had been built along the bank for the pro- 
tection of the public highways of the town, and the 
private property of a large number of its inhabitants, in 
times of freshet. 

The locality was visited in October, and such examina- 
tions were made by the engineer of the board and his 
assistant as the high stage of the water at that season of 
the year would permit. It was found that the bank was 
caving and receding in several places on the West Spring- 
field shore, and at some points quite rapidly. The greatest 
wearing was in the vicinity of the Boston and Albany 
railroad bridge; and, about 70 feet below the bridge, it 
had reached to within 8 to 12 feet of the foot of the slope of 
the dike. 

It was also found that at various places on the opposite 
bank, in the city of Springfield, retaining walls and other 
structures had been built by the railroad companies and 
others below the high-water line, and that, in some places, 
the dumping of a considerable or large amount of ashes> 
cinders and other material, outside or beyond the line of 
the walls, was going on. These encroachments tend to 
direct the force of the current against the West Springfield 
bank, and, by narrowing the width of the river channel, to 
increase the height of the water in times of freshet ; and 
they are likely to be especially injurious when made on 
that section of the river opposite the dike. 

This dike appears to have been built under the direction 
of the county commissioners, pursuant to the provisions of 
chapter 80 of the acts of 1868, the cost being apportioned to 
the town and the several owners of land benefited. It is to 
be maintained, repaired or rebuilt by the town, the expense 
to be divided in like proportions by the selectmen, as pro- 
vided in chapter 389 of the acts of 1869. 

For the distance of about 100 feet immediately below the 



38 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

railroad bridge, the dike was most in need of immediate 
repair. A temporary bulkhead had been built by the 
town authorities, which would probably be of little use unless 
backed by earth and rubble. But there appears to be 
ample statute provision for the maintenance of the dike, and 
the emergency and cost do not at present seem to be beyond 
the reasonable ability of those most directly concerned to 
provide for. 

But the unauthorized and injurious encroachments on 
the Springfield side of the river ought not to continue. If 
these are prevented, expedients maybe adopted to arrest the 
wearing of the opposite bank now going on. It is the 
intention of the board to make further investigations when 
the season of low water in the river arrives. 



Lease of Hangman's Island. 

All lands and waters within the territorial limits of the 
Commonwealth, to which no individual or body corporate 
shows or can show title, are the property of the Common- 
wealth. It is to be presumed in such cases either that the 
State and its predecessors, the Colony and Province, have 
never granted the original title derived from the crown of 
England, or else that the title has revested in the State by 
escheat or otherwise. 

The State not only has jurisdiction or dominion, as the 
sovereign power, over such lands and waters, but is the 
owner of the fee, and may convey or lease them as pro- 
prietor. 

Outside of the public domain in tide waters and great 
ponds, and the Province lands in the town of Provincetown. 
it is not known or supposed that there are any considerable 
tracts of territory to which the State holds title as above. 
There are, however, parcels of such land. Quite a 
number, in the form of islands in tide waters and great 
ponds, have come to the knowledge of the board during 
the last few years ; and leases of some of them have been 
given in the name of the Commonwealth. 

The board is authorized, with the approval of the gov- 
ernor and council, to lease public lands for periods not 



1891."" PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 39 



j 



exceeding five years. Such a lease (see Appendix, D) 
has been given the last year of Hangman's Island in Boston 
harbor. 

This island, less than an acre in extent, is within the 
tide-water limits of the city of Quincy ; but neither that 
city nor any other municipality or person has shown or 
claimed the ownership of it. The island has been occupied 
for some years by a small colony of industrious and thrifty 
fishermen, who desired to acquire a legal right of possession 
and improvement, and to have the power to exclude persons 
making it a place of irregular resort. The lease has been 
given to a trustee for their common use and benefit. 

The foregoing Report is respectfully submitted. 

JOHN E. SANFORD. 
JOHN I. BAKER. 

CHARLES H. HOWLAND. 

Boston, January I, 1891. 



APPENDIX. 




APPENDIX. 



[A-] 

[See page 13 of this Report, ante.] 

Establishment of Harbor Lines in Boston Harbor, as recom- 
mended by the Harbor Line Board and approved by the 
Secretary of War, during the year 1890.* 

I. Charles River. 

Left Bank of Charles River from Grand Junction Railroad Bridge 
to the Navy- Yard — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

The State of Massachusetts has never fixed bulkhead as distin- 
guished from pier-head lines. The Board has deemed it best 
to, do so, and the accompanying maps sufficiently indicate the 
proposed location of the bulkhead lines, beyond which it is under- 
stood that no solid constructions shall hereafter be extended. 

On the left bank of the Charles River basin, between Grand 
Junction Railroad bridge and Craigie's bridge, the pier and bulk- 
head line has been drawn to coincide with the line established by 
the State legislature. 

The tidal prism of the Charles River basin has already been 
unadvisedly reduced, and this line contemplates a still further 
reduction ; moreover, the forest of piles driven in the water-way 
below interferes with the current at the mouth of the river. A 
comparison of the survey of 1888 with that of 1861 shows a 
shoaling below the bridges of 712,415 cubic yards, reducing the 
average depth by 3.66 feet over an area of more than 120 acres. 

Several Boards and all the officers of the Corps of Engineers, 
who for many years have discussed and reported upon this 
subject, have insisted upon the preservation of the Charles River 

* The following explanations and descriptions of the several Harbor Lines as 
approved by the'Secretary of War, are taken from the Reports of the Harbor Line 
Board recommending their adoption. 



44 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [J*n. 

basin as a tidal reservoir for the maintenance of the channels of 
the harbor. But heretofore the General Government has never 
exercised the right to control and direct this matter, although the 
fact of these encroachments has been officially placed on record. 
Meanwhile the State of Massachusetts has authorized the filling 
up of this basin to the line above mentioned without a corre- 
sponding enlargement of the tidal prism in other places, and baa 
granted privileges involving a great outlay of capital. To move 
the pier and bulkhead line back as would be desirable for the 
" protection and preservation of the harbor," would therefore 
interfere with vested rights of great value. In granting these 
privileges the State of Massachusetts has virtually assumed the 
responsibility for any injury to the harbor that has accrued or may 
accrue from this cause, and the Board therefore recommends for 
the approval of the Secretary of War the lines above indicated. 

From Craigie's bridge to the navy-yard at Charlestown. the 
Board has deemed it expedient for the " preservation and protec- 
tion of the harbor" to establish a bulkhead line, as well as a pier- 
head line. These two lines coincide as far as Warren bridge, and 
up to the Eastern Railroad bridge conform to the existing harbor 
line enacted by State law. Beyond the Eastern Railroad bridge 
the State harbor line is abandoned, and the new lines, located 
coincidently, assume a new direction, closer to the original shore 
line, as far as Warren bridge. Eastward of Warren bridge the 
pier-head line coincides with the State harbor line as far as the 
navy-yard, while the bulkhead line follows a nearly parallel course 
to the northward, at a distance of 600 feet, approximately. The 
State line and the proposed lines are delineated upon accompany- 
ing charts. 

The harbor lines which are recommended for adoption are 
defined as follows : — 

Beginning at a point on the northerly side of West Boston Bridge at 
its intersection with the face of the wharf, and marked by a copper tack 
through an iron plate on the cap outside of the brick sidewalk, and 
indicated on the plan by the letter A ; thence running southwesterly on 
a curve of 951.34: feet radius (tangent to a line to be hereafter described 
running between West Boston and Craigie's bridges) for a distance of 
503.01 feet: thence continuing southwesterlv on a straight line tangent 
to said curve for a distance of 6,838.19 feet; thence westerly on a cufve 
of 1,200 feet radius tangent to the last named line, for a distance of 
496.97 feet; thence westerly on a straight line tangent to the last named 
curve to the Grand Junction Railroad Bridge. Again beginning at the 
point on the northerly side of West Boston Bridge marked A (previously 
described) ; thence northeasterly to point B, which is on the southerly 
side of Craigie's Bridge at its intersection with the face of the wharf, 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 11. 45 



and is marked by a copper tack through an iron plate on the cap outside 
of the sidewalk, and is referred to point B/ which is at the southeasterly 
corner of the Boston and Lowell machine-shop; distance from B to W i 
73.39 feet; bearing from B to B', 224° 46' 19" ; thence northeasterly to 
point C at the southerly side of the Boston and Lowell Railroad passen- 
ger bridge at its intersection with the face of the wharf, and marked 
on the cap-sill of the bridge by a copper tack through an iron plate; 
thence the line continues northeastwardly to the point O. 

The point O is 58 feet southerly (measuring along the face of the 
solid bulkhead) from the intersection of the line B C (just described) 
prolonged to an intersection with the solid bulkhead of the Fitch tfurg 
Railroad Bridge ; C is 853 feet approximately northeasterly from C. 

From C the line follows the faces of the solid bulkhead of the Fitch- 
burg Railroad in an easterly direction to the point D', which is at the 
intersection of said solid bu khead with the westerly side of Warren 
Bridge. 

At the point D' the pier and bulkhead lines separate. The pier-head 
line lies in the west face of Warren Bridge to the point D, which is 
about 66 feet southerly from the outer face of the wharf on the same 
westerly side of Warren Bridge, and is marked by a copper tack through 
an iron plate ; thence the pier-head line extends to the point E, which is 
at the easterly side of Charles River Bridge, about 80 feet southerly 
from the outer face of Tudor's Wharf on the same easterly side of said 
Charles River Bridge, and is marked by a copper tack through an iron 
plate ; thence northeasterly to the point F, which is about 80 feet south- 
easterly from the southwesterly corner of Hittinger's Wharf, and nearly 
in the alignment of the westerly side of said Hittinger's Wharf produced, 
and is referred to point E ; distance from point F to point E, 379 feet; 
bearing from point F to point E is 59° 6' 27" ; thence northeasterly to 
point G, which is at the southwesterly corner of the navy-yard shears 
wharf, and is referred to point G\ which is near the same southwesterly 
corner of the said navy -yard shears wharf, and is marked by a copper 
tack through an iron plate; distance from G to G 7 , 1.40 feet; bearing 
from G to G', 150° 35'. 

From the point D' the bulkhead line runs northeasterly in a straight 
line (parallel to the pier-head line F G) 1,470 feet approximately to an 
intersection with the boundary wall of the navy-yard. 

[Approved by the Secretary of War, February 13, 1890.] 

Charles River from near Brookline Street Bridge to Market Street 

Bridge. 
The State of Massachusetts has never established lines upon 
this portion of the river, but the Board has deemed it necessary to 
do so. The lines recommended are indicated upon the chart and 
described as follows : 

The line on the north side of Charles River begins at the Grand 
Junction Railroad Bridge, at the intersection of the east side of the 



46 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan 

bridge and the harbor line approved by the Secretary of War, February 
18, 1890 ; thence in a straight line, making an angle with the harbor line 
above referred to of 166° 20', measuring from a northeasterly to a north- 
westerly direction, 1,020 feet approximately to the point B, which is 
situated on a line parallel to and 600 feet north of the northeastern rail 
of the main line of the Boston and Albany Railroad; thence parallel to 
said rail 675 feet to the point C ; thence to the point D by the arc of a 
circle of 860 feet radius, tangent to the line last described, said arc sub- 
tending an angle at the center of 64° 4.0', measuring from a southwesterly 
to a westerly direction ; thence, on a tangent to the last described circle, 
850 feet to the point E; said tangent on the line D E, if produced, 
will intersect the east side of River Street Bridge produced 155 feet 
northeastward from the face of the easterly stone abutment of said 
bridge ; thence to the point F at the southeast corner of said abutment : 
thence, following the face of said abutment and the faces of the stone 
wharf of the Riverside Press Company, to the point G at the northv 
corner of said stone wharf ; thence to the point H, which is at the north- 
west corner of the solid abutment of Western Avenue Bridge on the 
Cambridge side ; thence to the point I, which is in the line of the south 
side of the first street north of Sands street (Cambridge) extended 
westerly 320 feet from the west side of B inks street ; thence to the point 
J, which is 400 feet from the west side of Banks street, measuring 
westerly along the south side of the second street north of Sands street : 
thence to the point K, which is at the southeast corner of the wharf at 
the foot of Otter street; thence to the northwest corner of said wharf: 
thence to the southeast corner of Wellington's Wharf ; thence to the 
southwest corner of said wharf ; thence to the west corner of College 
Wharf; thence to the east corner of the solid abutment of the Brighton 
Street Bridge on the Cambridge side ; thence to the point L, which is in 
the line of the west side of that part of Murray street which runs south- 
westerly, extended southwesterly 760 feet from the south side of Lyman 
street; thence to the point M, which is in the line of the north side of 
that part of Murray street which runs southeasterly, extended north- 
westerly 830 feet from the w r est side of Brighton street ; thence to the 
southeast corner of the Cambridge Gas Company's Wharf ; thence to the 
point X, which is in the line of the east side of Willard street extended 
southerly 180 feet from the north side of Mount Auburn street : thence 
to the point O, which is 115 feet from the north side of Mouut Auburn 
street, measuring at right angles therewith from a point 155 feet west 
of the west corner of Willard street; thence parallel to Mount Auburn 
street 315 feet to the point P; thence to the southeast corner of the 
Monument Wharf, marked Q on the tracing. 

The line on the south side of Charles River begins at the northeast 
corner of the solid part of Abbot's Wharf, near Brookline Street Bridge 
and at the end of the harbor line approved by the Secretary of War 
July 27, 1889 ; thence in a straight line 980 feet to the point B', which is 
120 feet distant from the northerly rail of the Boston and Albany main 
track ; thence parallel to said rail 830 feet to the point C ; thence to the 
point D' by the arc of a circle of 1,200 feet radius tangent to the line 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 47 

last described, said arc subtending an angle of 66° 12' at the center, 
measuring from a southwesterly to a westerly direction ; thence, tangent 
to the circle last described, 915 feet to the point E' ; said tangent if 
produced will intersect the east side of River Street Bridge 65 feet, more 
or less, northeast from the solid abutment of the bridge on the Boston 
side ; thence to the point F' at the north corner of the solid abutment of 
Western Avenue Bridge on the Boston side; thence, parallel to the line 
HI on the opposite side of the river, 500 feet to the point G' ; thence to 
the point H', which is 315 feet distant from the opposite point J, measur- 
ing on a line at right angles to the line IJ at J; thence to the point I', 
which is 280 feet distant from the opposite point K, measuring on a line 
perpendicular to the face of the wharf at K; i hence to the point J', 
which is 300 feet from the northwest corner of the opposite wharf, 
measuring perpendicular to the face of the wharf at said corner ; thence 
to the point K', which is 300 feet from the east corner of Wellington's 
Wharf, measuring on a line perpendicular to the face of said wharf at 
said corner; thence to the point L/, which is 320 feet from the west 
corner of College Wharf, measuring on a line perpendicular at said 
corner to the line joining said corner with the west corner of Wellington's 
Wharf ; thence to the east corner of the solid wharf east of Brighton 
Street Bridge ; thence along the faces of said stone wharf to the abut- 
ment of the Brighton Street Bridge and the face of the stone wharf 
west of said bridge, and continuing in said line 280 feet from west 
side of bridge to a point marked Mf ; the line last described makes an 
angle of 76° 26' approximately with the west side of Brighton Street 
Bridge, measuring from a southwesterly to a westerly direction ; thence 
to the point N', which is 340 feet from the opposite point L, measuring 
on a line bisecting the angle at L ; thence to the point O', which is 3±U 
feet from the opposite point M, measuring on a line perpendicular to 
the line joining the point M with the southeast corner of the gas wharf; 
thence to the point P', which is 240 feet from the southeast corner of 
said wharf, measuring on a line perpendicular to the face of said wharf 
at this corner ; thence to the point Q', which is in the east line of Willard 
street extended southward 420 feet from the north side of Mount 
Auburn street; thence to the point R', which is 320 feet from the north 
side of Mount Auburn Street, measuring on a line perpendicular thereto 
through the opposite point O ; thence to the point S', which is distant 210 
feet from the opposite point P, measuring on a line bisecting the angle 
at P ; thence to the point T', which is 200 feet distant from the east 
corner of Monument wharf, marked Q on tracing, measuring on a line 
perpendicular to the line joining said corner with the point P. 

Above the points Q and T the lines follow the meanderings of the 
river as laid down on the map. They are parallel and 200 feet apart 
to the northwestern corner of Cassidy's Wharf near Arsenal Street 
Bridge ; thence they gradually narrow to 140 feet at the bridge, and 
preserve this width to Market Street Bridge. 

[Approved March 17, 1890.] 



48 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

II. Mv-tk; River. 
From the Mouth of the River to Medford Street Brjix 

South side of South Channel of Mystic River — Pier and Bulk- 
head Lines. 

The pier and bulkhead lines are coincident, beginning at the north- 
westerly corner of the sea-wall of the United States navy-yard, and run 
westerly in a straight line to the present northwesterly corner of 
Holmes 1 Wharf; thence continue westerly in a straight line to the 
present northeasterly corner of Stone's Wharf; thence continue west- 
erly, following and coinciding with the northerly face of said Stone's 
Wharf, and continue in the same direction to the present northeasterly 
corner of Clark & Smith's Wharf ; thence continue westerly in a straight 
line to a point in the northeasterly line of Elm street produced northerly 
at the westerly end of said South Channel, and distant 1 .00 feet southerly 
froni the northwesterly corner of said channel as said channel is defined 
in chapter 481 of the acts of the general court of Massachusetts of the 
year 1855. This line coincides with the line established by the State in 
chapter 302, acts of 1874. 

South side of Mystic River — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at the point where the southeasterly line of Johnson's 
"Wharf extended to the North Channel intersects a line drawn from the 
northeasterly corner of Tuft's mill-pond to a point on Chelsea Bridge 
700 feet northerly from the northerly side of the south draw in said 
bridge, the line runs easterly 820 feet by an arc of a circle curving 
northerly, and having a radius of 3,500 feet ; thence continues easterly 
bv a straight line tangent to said arc, and in such a direction that it shall 
pass through a point on the northwesterly side of said bridge 770 feet 
southerly of the southerly side of the north draw in said bridge, running 
by said straight line to a point 341 feet westerly of the westerly side of 
said bridge ; thence running southeasterly by an arc of a circle turning 
southerly, and having a radius of 675 feet, said arc to be continued 
until a straight line drawn tangent to said arc would, if continued, 
pass through the northeasterly corner of the timber dock of the navy 
yard of the United States, said line tangent to be continued to the north- 
erly side of the South Channel to a point 500 feet distant from said 
corner of said dock, and 817 feet distant from the easterly side of 
Chelsea Bridge bv a line drawn at rig-tit angles with said bridge ; thence 
running westerly by a straight line which extended would strike the 
line of the northeasterly s&de of Elm street produced 500 feet from the 
northerly side of Medford stree'' measured on said northeasterly side of 
Elm street, to a point 320 feet easterly from said northeasterly side of 
Elm street produced ; thent r fnning southwesterly by an arc of a circle 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 49 

turning southerly, and having a radius of 600 feet, to a point on said 
easterly line of Elm street extended northerly 375 feet from the north- 
erly side of Medford street. This line coincides with the line established 
by the State in chapter 481, acts of 1855, and chapter 150, acts of 1867. 

The portion of the line thus described between its point of beginning 
and where it first intersects the easterly line of Elm street produced 
northerly to the channel, and a straight line drawn from this point of 
beginning to the northeasterly corner of Tuft's mill-pond, is to be 
considered a pier-head line beyond which no pile structure shall be 
extended ; and the remainder of the Hue above described is to be con- 
sidered a bulkhead line beyond which solid filling shall not hereafter 
be permitted. 

Beginning again at the point where the line above described first 
intersects the northeasterly line of Elm street produced northerly to the 
channel, the bulkhead line follows the line of the northeasterly line of 
Elm street produced northerly, in a southerly direction to a point 600 
feet distant from the pier-head line measured on a line at right angles 
thereto ; thence runs westerly, in a line parallel to and 600 feet inside of 
the pier-head line, to the easterly face of the wall bounding Tuft's mill- 
pond on the east ; thence along the face of this wall to the northeasterly 
corner thereof ; thence the pier and bulkhead lines are coincident, and 
follow the channel-face of Tuft's mill-pond wall to the southerly 
abutment of the Maiden Bridge ; thence along this solid abutment and 
its northeasterly face to the north corner thereof ; thence in a straight 
line which, if produced, will strike the easterly corner of the solid 
filling of the Boston and Maine Railroad Company's coal dock above the 
Eastern Railroad bridge, to the easterly face of the Eastern Railroad 
bridge ; thence along the easterly face of this bridge to a point distant 
375 feet northeasterly from the northeasterly corner of the solid abut- 
ment of said last-named bridge on the southerly side of the channel ; 
thence the pier-head line runs northwesterly to a point on the easterly 
side of the bridge of the Boston and Maine Railroad, distant 625 feet 
northerly from the northeasterly corner of the solid abutment of said 
last-named bridge on the southerly side of the channel ; and the bulk- 
head line between the Eastern Railroad Bridge and the Boston and 
Maine Railroad Bridge is parallel to and 30 feet within said pier-head 
line. 

The pier-head line so described between the Eastern and Boston and 
Maine Railroad bridges coincides with the line established by the State 
in chapter 231 of the acts of 1873. 

The line of the channel wall of Tuft's mill-pond was established as a 
harbor line by chapter 293 of the acts of 1856. Between the south- 
easterly line of Johnson's Wharf prolonged and Tuft's mill-pond, and 
between the Maiden and Eastern Railroad bridges, the State has estab- 
lished no harbor line. 

Beginning again at the point of intersection o. the bulkhead lines of 
the northerly side of the South Channel **d Main Channel, said point 
being 500 feet in a northerly direction from the east comer of the timber 
dock of the United States navy-yard, the ] ad line coincides w ith 



50 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

the bulkhead line of the Main Channel for a distance of 005 feet ; thence 
runs northerly in a straight line to a point which is distant 385 feet 
easterly from the easterly side line of said avenue;, measuring at right 
angles to said avenue from a point in the said easterly side line, which 
latter point is distant 100 feet southerly from the top face of the north- 
erly abutment of said avenue, measuring said latter distance on said 
easterly side line; thence turning and running northwesterly in a 
straight line to a point in the easterly side line of said avenue extended 
northerly, which point is distant 65 feet northerly from the top face of 
the abutment aforesaid, measuring on said easterly side line so extended. 
Then beginning again at a point in the westerly side line of said avenue 
extended northerly, which point is distant 65 feet northerly from the top 
face of the abutment aforesaid, measuring on said westerly side line so 
extended ; thence running westerly in a straight line to -a point which is 
distant 30 feet northerly from the northwesterly angle of the sea-wall 
of said corporation as now built ; thence turning a little and running 
still westerly in a straight line parallel to and 30 feet distant northerly 
from the top face of the northerh- sea-wall of said corporation as the 
same is now authorized to be built, until the said straight line inter- 
the easterly side line of Elm street extended northeasterly ; thence 
southerly along said line of Elm street to the bulkhead line. 

Said pier-head line coincides with the line established by the State in 
chapter 272 of the acts of 1**5. 

The pier-head line on the north side of the South Channel is parallel 
to the bulkhead line and 35 feet outside of it, as established by the State 
in chapter 19 of the acts of 1859. 



Chelsea Side of Mystic River and Chelsea Creek between Chelsea 
Bridge and Meridian Street Bridge — Pier ayid Bulkhead Lines. 

The pier-head line coincides with the line established by the State in 
chapter 344 of the acts of 1887, and is as follows : Beginning at a point 
on the southeasterly side of Chelsea Bridge at the southeasterly corner 
of the solid portion of said bridge, as now built, at the Chelsea end 
thereof; thence running southeasterly down Mystic River, making an 
angle of 73° 6' taken from a southwesterly to a southeasterly direction 
with the southerly side of said bridge, and passing through the south- 
westerly corner of Black's Wharf, 697.57 feet to a point at or near the 
angle of junction of Chelsea Creek with Mystic River : thence turning 
7S J 58' 1 1" to the east and north and running northeasterly up Chelsea 
Creek, passing through the southeasterly corners of Gerrish*s Wharf and 
Bisbee's Wharf, 1,196.03 feet to a point on the westerly side of Meridian 
Street Bridge, marked by an iron plate and copper tack, and distant 23.3 
feet southerly from the abutment of said bridge at the Chelsea end 
thereof. 

The bulkhead line is parallel to and 300 feet within the pier-head 
line. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 11. 51 



North side of Mystic River betiveen Chelsea Bridge and Boston and 
Maine Railroad Bridge — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at a point where a line drawn on the north side of the 
channel, parallel to and 1,200 feet distant from the bulkhead line on the 
south side of the channel, intersects the westerly line of the north abut- 
ment of Chelsea Bridge, marked M on Boston Harbor Line Board Sheet 
" J," the pier-head line runs westerly in said parallel line 2,000 feet to a 
point marked N. Beginning again at a point marked O in said parallel 
line, at the point of its intersection with the easterly line of Elm street 
produced across the river, and running westerly in said parallel line 
2,475 feet to a point marked P ; thence in the arc of a circle curving 
west and north, and tangent to said line at said point P, with a radius of 
1,600 feet, to its intersection with the westerly line of the Maiden Bridge 
abutment ; thence northwesterly in a straight line to a point at the mouth 
of the Maiden River marked Q, said point being 710 feet from the 
easterly side of the Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge, measuring at 
right angles thereto from a point 570 feet northerly of the south end of 
the north abutment of said bridge. 

The bulkhead line is coincident with the pier-head line between the 
points M and X. Between Island End and Maiden Rivers, the bulkhead 
line is 600 feet within and parallel to the pier-head line, terminating in 
Island End River in the northeasterly line of Elm street produced north- 
erly, and in Maiden River in the line hereafter described for the left 
bank of that river. 

The harbor lines upon the north side of the river established by the 
State in chapter 293 of the acts of 1856, and chapter 302 of the acts of 
1874, are indicated upon sheet J. 

South Side of Mystic River above Boston and Maine Railroad 
Bridge — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at the northeast corner of the south abutment of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad Bridge, the bulkhead and pier-head lines are coin- 
cident, and follow the north face of said abutment to the west corner 
thereof ; thence run southerly along the westerly face of the said 
abutment a distance of 700 feet; thence continue northwesterly 1,200 
feet on a line which if prolonged would pass through the northeasterly 
corner of the south abutment of the Middlesex Avenue Bridge ; thence, 
turning westerly through an angle of 135° measured from a southeast- 
erly to a southwesterly direction, continue in a straight line for a 
distance of 300 feet ; thence turning northwesterly continue in a straight 
line to the northeasterly corner of the south abutment of Middlesex 
Avenue Bridge ; thence along the northerly face of said abutment to the 
northwest corner thereof; thence, by an angle of 62° with the west face 
of Middlesex Avenue Bridge, continue northwesterly in a straight line 
for a distance of 525 feet; thence, by the arc of a circle with a radius 
of 510 feet tangent thereto, measuring about 64° 30' from an easterly to 



52 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

a westerly direction, and by a tangent which extended would strike the 
southerly line of Mystic avenue at a point 1,420 feel westerly of the 
southwest corner of Mystic avenue and Taylor street, to a point 250 feet 
northeasterly from the south side of Mystic avenue, measured along said 
tangent ; thence northwesterly, by a Straight line making an angle of 
with said tangent, to the line of the northerly side of Mystic avenue at 
a point marked X. 



North side of Mystic River above Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge 
— Pier and Bulkhead Lines, 

Beginning at the easterlv corner of the north abutment of the B 
and Maine Railroad Bridge, the bulkhead and pier-head lines are coin- 
cident, and follow the southerly face of said abutment to the south \\ 
corner thereof; thence the westerly face of the said abutment for a 
distance of 400 feet; thence northwesterly, by a straight line making an 
angle of 40° with said line and said abutment, a distance of -T 
thence northwesterly, by a straight line which prolonged would strike the 
easterlv side of^liddlesex Avenue Bridge at a point 290 feet northerly 
of the end of the draw opening on the north side, a distance of 1. 
feet; thence northwesterly to a point in the westerly side of Middles 
Avenue Bridge 425 feet distant from the southwesterly end of the draw 
opening in the north side; thence turning westerly and southerly by the 
arc of a circle of 1,915 feet radius (the center of said circle being in the 
west face of Middlesex Avenue Bridge prolonged) through about I 
thence southwesterly, by a tangent to said arc which prolonged would 
strike the southerly side of Mystic Avenue prolonged at a point 1.725 
feet westerly of the southwest corner of Mystic avenue and Taylor 
street, to a point 560 feet from jfe intersection with the south side of 
Mystic avenue measured in said tangent; thence, by the arc of a circle 
turning from a southeasterly to a southwesterly direction and tangent 
to said last tangent line with a radius of 340 feet, to a line tangent 
thereto and 275 feet distant from and parallel to Mystic avenue at a 
point marked Y. 

Above the points X and Y the lines are coincident, and follow the 
meanderings of the river, with a variable distance apart as indicated 
upon Harbor Line Board Sheet L, to the Med ford Street Bridge in the 
town of Medford. 

The State has established no lines on the river above the Boston and 
Maine Railroad Bridge. 

[Approved June 20, 1890.] 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 53 



III. Malden River. 

From the Mouth of the River to the Dam in Maiden — Pier and 

Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at the point Q in the pier-head line on the north side of 
Mystic River, the pier-head line runs in the arc of a circle of a radius 
of 600 feet through 69°, turning in a northerly direction ; thence by 
a tangent to this arc to an intersection with the bulkhead line on the 
north side of Mystic River prolonged northwesterly, which point is 
marked R. 

Beginning again at the southeasterly corner of the north abutment of 
the Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge, the pier and bulkhead lines 
are coincident, and follow the easterly side of said bridge abutment a 
distance of 570 feet ; thence in a straight line to a point easterly of and 
170 feet distant from the easterly rail of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
measured at right angles thereto from a point on said rail 1,010 feet 
north of the south end of the north abutment of said railroad company's 
bridge ; thence runs more easterly in a straight line to a point 460 feet 
distant from the easterly rail of the Boston and Maine Railroad, meas- 
ured at right angles thereto from a point on said rail 1,355 feet north 
of the south end of the north abutment of said railroad company's 
bridge ; thence runs still more easterly to a point 815 feet distant from 
the easterly rail of the Boston and Maine Railroad, measured at right 
angles thereto from a point on said rail 1,615 feet north of the south 
end of the north abutment of said railroad company's bridge, which 
point is marked S. 

The distance between the points R and S is about 400 feet. Above 
these points the bulkhead lines follow the meanderings of the river, and 
converge gradually to a distance apart of 150 feet opposite the switch 
of the Medford branch of the Boston and Maine Railroad ; thence, in a 
distance of about 600 feet, they approach to 100 feet of each other and 
preserve this distance apart of 100 feet to a point about 200 feet below 
the second bridge near the rubber works ; thence they converge to a 
distance apart of 50 feet at said bridge. 

Above the points R and S, pile structures may be authorized to extend 
beyond the bulkhead lines to the line of mean low water. 
The State has established no lines for this river. 

[Approved June 20, 1890.] 



54 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 



IV. Island End River. 

Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at the point O in the pier-head line on the north side of 
Mystic River, the bulkhead line runs northerly in the line of the easterly 
side of Elm street produced across the Mystic River to its intersection 
with the bulkhead line at the point marked X on the north side of 
Mystic River; thence turning easterly by an angle of 10°, measured 
from a northeasterly to an easterly direction from the line of Elm street 
produced, it continues straight till it intersects the line of the north- 
easterly side of Beachem street produced southeasterly at the point 
marked Y ; thence in a straight line to the point marked Z, which point 
is 500 feet distant from the northwesterly face of the powder magazine 
on the opposite side of the river, measured in the line of the north- 
easterly side of the powder magazine wharf. 

Beginning again at the point N in the harbor line on the north side of 
Mystic River, the bulkhead line runs northwesterly at an angle of 1 2 
with the line M N, measured in a northerly and westerly direction, a 
distance of about 430 feet; thence turning at an angle of 119 , measured 
from a southeasterly to a northeasterly direction, it continues north- 
easterly about 625 feet till it intersects a line drawn parallel to the line 
Y Z on the opposite side of the river, from a point in the northerly side 
of the powder magazine wharf 100 feet distant from the westerly face 
of the powder magazine. 

Above the powder magazine wharf, the bulkhead lines follow the 
meanderings of the river, gradually converging to a distance apart of 
300 feet just below the fork of the river ; thence the lines preserve a 
distance apart of 200 feet in the main river up to the solid dike, and in 
the branch a distance apart of 100 feet up to the mill-dam. 

The lines thus described are bulkhead lines between which no solid 
filling shall be hereafter permitted, but pile wharves may be authorized 
to extend to the mean low water line. 

The State has established no lines for this river. 

[Approved June 20, 1890.] 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 55 



V. Chelsea Creek. 

East Boston side of Chelsea Creek between Meridian Street Bridge 
and Chelsea Street Bridge — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at the point A of the pier-head line in the westerly face of 
Meridian Street Bridge, adopted by the Secretary of War July 27, 1889, 
the pier-head line runs southeasterly to a point 945 feet northerly of 
Condor street, measured on a line at right angles thereto from a point in 
the northerly line of said street 840 feet east of its intersection with the 
easterly line of Meridian street ; thence continues southeasterly to the 
northwest corner of the Glendon Soiling Mills Wharf; thence south- 
easterly along the face of said wharf to the northeast corner thereof ; 
thence easterly about 460 feet to a point marked H situated 814 feet 
from the northerly side of Eagle street, measuring northerly and at 
right angles thereto from a point in said side of said street 460 feet 
westerly from the intersection therewith of the westerly side of Chelsea 
street; thence northeasterly about 415 feet to a point marked I situate 
685 feet from the westerly side of Chelsea street, measuring north- 
westerly and at right angles thereto from a point in said side of said 
street 685 feet northerly from the intersection therewith of the northerly 
side of Eagle street; thence northeasterly again about 1,015 feet to a 
point marked K on the west side of Chelsea Street Bridge, said point 
being 158 feet northerly from the face of the south abutment of said 
bridge. 

This line varies slightly from the line established by the State in 
chapter 204, acts of 1849, and delineated upon the chart. 

The bulkhead line commences at the termination of the bulkhead line 
in the west face of Meridian Street Bridge, adopted by the Secretary 
of War, July 27, 1889, and runs northerly to a point in the west face 
of said Meridian Street Bridge distant 515 feet from the north side of 
Condor street ; thence easterly to a point 500 feet northerly of Condor 
street, measured on a line at right angles thereto from a point in the 
northerly line of said street 840 feet east of its intersection with the 
easterly line of Meridian street ; thence continues southeasterly to 
the intersection of the northerly line of Condor street with the easterly 
line of Knox street ; thence easterly in the line of the northerly side of 
Condor street produced easterly about 1,038 feet to the westerly face 
of the East Boston Gas Company's solid wharf; thence northeasterly 
about 640 feet to a point 275 feet northwesterly of the northwesterly 
side of Chelsea street, measured on a line at right angles thereto from 
a point 830 feet northeasterly from the intersection of said side of said 
street with the northerly side of Eagle street; thence northeasterly 
about 820 feet to a point 120 feet southeasterly from the face of the 
south abutment of the Chelsea Street Bridge, measured in the line of 
the southwesterly face of the bridge ; thence to the point K in the pier- 
head line. 



56 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 



Chelsea side of Chelsea Creek between Meridian Street Bridge and 
Chelsea Street Bridge — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

The pier-head line coincides with the line established by the State in 
chapter 204 of the acts of 1849, with a slight variation near its termina- 
tion in Meridian Street Bridge, and is as folio \\ 

Commencing at a point on the west side of Chelsea Street Bridge, 
situated 202 feet southerly from the intersection of the same with the 
souther!}' line of Marginal street in the city of Chelsea, said point 
being marked L on the plan ; thence running southwesterly about 955 
feet to a point marked M, situate 306 feet from the south line of Mar- 
ginal street, measuring southerly and at right angles thereto from a 
point in said side of said street 15 feet easterly from the first bend 
therein west of Chelsea Street Bridge aforesaid ; thence again south- 
westerly about 317 feet to a point marked N, situate 394 feet from the 
southerly side of Marginal street, measuring southerly and at right 
angles thereto from a point in said side of said street 60 feet westerly 
from the afore-mentioned bend therein ; thence westerly about 386 feet 
to a point marked O, situate 455 feet from the southerly side of Marginal 
street, measuring southerly and at right angles thereto from a point in 
said side of said street 440 feet westerly from the afore-mentioned bend 
therein; thence again westerly about 210 feet to a point marked P, 
being the southwesterly corner of the^Glendon Rolling Mills Compan 
pier on the Chelsea Flats, situate in the division line of the Winnisimmet 
Company's water lots numbered 21 and 22, and 465 feet from the 
southerly side of Marginal street, measuring southerly and at right 
angles thereto; thence again westerly about 1,330 feet to a point 
marked Q, situate in the division line between Austin and Carruth's 
wharves, and 248 feet from the southerly side of Marginal street, meas- 
uring southerly and at right angles thereto ; thence again westerly 
about 740 feet to a point marked It, situate in the line of the southerly 
side of Hawes' Wharf continued, and 300 feet from the southerly side of 
Marginal street, measuring southerly and at right angles thereto ; thence 
again westerly about 640 feet to a point in the westerly side of 
Meridian Street Bridge marked by an iron plate and copper tack, and 
distant 23.3 feet southerly from the abutment of said bridge at the 
Chelsea end thereof. 

The bulkhead line is in rear of the pier-head line, and follows the 
southeasterly side of Marginal street from Chelsea street to the corner 
of Pearl and Williams streets. 



Chelsea side of Chelsea Creek above Chelsea Street Bridge — Pier 

and Bulkhead Lines. 

Beginning at a point in the easterly side of Eastern avenue, at its 
intersection with the stone wharf on the southerly side of Bass Creek, 
the pier-head line follows the northerly face of said stone wharf and its 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 57 

prolongation easterly for a distance of 560 feet ; thence by an arc of a 
circle of 400 feet radius turning easterly and southerly, and by a tangent 
to said arc, to the point L of the pier-head line in the westerly face of 
Chelsea Street Bridge, previously described. 

Beginning again at the point in the easterly side of Eastern avenue, 
above described, the pier-head line follows the easterly side of said 
avenue northerly a distance of 80 feet; thence turns easterly and runs 
parallel to the line on the southerly side of Bass Creek till it intersects 
with the westerly side of Marginal street ; thence turning easterly and 
northerly by the arc of a circle of 530 feet radius and a tangent thereto to 
a point in the south side of Willoughby street extended easterly 530 feet 
from the southwest corner of Willoughby and Marginal streets ; thence 
to a point in the north side of Dana street extended easterly 800 feet 
from the east side of Marginal street ; thence to a point in the north 
side of Bancroft street extended easterly 900 feet from the east side of 
Marginal street; thence to a point in the south side of Louis street 
extended easterly 1,100 feet from the east side of Marginal street; 
thence to a point 580 feet southeasterly from the east side of 
the abutment of the Eastern Railroad Bridge over Chelsea Creek, 
measuring in a line perpendicular thereto at a point 50 feet southwest 
from the northeast corner of said abutment ; thence by the arc of a 
circle of 200 feet radius turning northerly and westerly through an 
angle of about 141° ; thence in a tangent to said circle to the point 50 
feet southwest of the abutment above referred to ; thence to the north- 
east corner of said abutment; thence along the face of the abutment to 
the northwest corner ; thence in a straight line, making an angle of 65 
degrees with the western face of said abutment, to the dam of Slade's 
tide-mill. 

Bulkhead Line. — Beginning at the intersection of the south side of 
Marginal street with the west side of Chelsea Street Bridge, the line 
follows the southerly side of said Marginal street and its prolongation 
northeasterly to the easterly side of the Grand Junction Railroad Bridge ; 
thence northeasterly by line parallel to the pier-head line about 970 feet, 
and by an arc of a circle of 325 feet radius turning westerly to an inter- 
section with the pier-head line on the south side of Bass Creek ; thence 
it is coincident with the pier-head line to and along the easterly side of 
Eastern avenue and the northerly side of Bass Creek to the west side of 
Marginal street ; thence the bulkhead line turns easterly and northerly 
by the arc of a circle of 315 feet radius and a tangent thereto to a point 
in the side of Willoughby street produced easterly, distant 210 feet from 
the west side of Marginal street ; thence by a straight line to the north 
side of Dana street 470 feet easterty from the east side of Marginal 
street ; thence to a point in the south side of Louis street 615 feet east- 
erly from the east side of Marginal street ; thence follows the southerly 
side of Louis street prolonged to its intersection with the pier-head line ; 
thence the bulkhead line is coincident with the pier-head line to Slade's 
mill-dam. 



58 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 



Easterly side of Chelsea Creek above Chelsea Street Bridge — Pier 

and Bulkhead Lines, 

Beginning at the point K of the pier-head line in the westerly side of 
Chelsea Street Bridge, before described, the pier-head and bulkhead 
lines are coincident, and follow the high-water lines and the westerly 
side of the railroad embankment and trestle to Slade's mill-dam, as 
delineated on the chart. 

[Approved June 20, 1890.] 



VI. Shore of East Boston. 

From Jeffrey's Point to Breed's Island — Pier and Bulkhead Lines. 

The legal line from the point A near Jeffrey's Point, East Boston, to 
the point B at Breed's Island, established by section 5, chapter 293, acts 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts of 1856, is recommended for 
adoption as the pier-head line, beyond which no pile structure shall 
extend. 

Said point A "is in the southwesterly line of Sumner street extended 
southeastward^, and 800 feet from the southeasterly line of Jeffr 
street; thence the line runs easterly to a point in the northeasterly line 
of Everett street continued southeasterly, and distant 1,010 feet from 
the southeasterly line of Jeffrey's street ; thence the line runs northerl y 
to a point in the line of the northeasterly side of Xeptune street 
continued southeastwardly, and distant 1.500 feet from the southeasterly 
line of Shirley street ; thence the line runs straight northeastwardly to 
the point B on the southwesterly shore of Breed's Island, distant 1. 
feet from the southeasterly line of Saratoga street extended northt 
wardly, measuring at right angles therewith from a point distant 1,300 
feet from the southwesterly line of Trumbull street " 

A parallel line 600 feet in rear thereof is recommended for adoption 
as the bulkhead line, beyond which no solid filling shall hereafter be 
permitted. 

[Approved June 2, 1890.] 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 59 



VII. Dorchester Bay. 

From South Boston to Moon Island. 

For Dorchester Bay, between a point C at City Point and a 
point Y on Neponset River, the pier-head lines coincide with the 
lines now fixed by the laws of Massachusetts in chapters 293 of 
the acts of 1856, 351 of the acts of 1872, and 332 of the acts of 
1873. 

On the right bank of the Neponset, between the Neponset 
Avenue Bridge and the mouth, the pier-head line recommended 
follows the line established by the State in its general features, 
but modified to give a gradual increase of width to the water-way 
near the mouth, in accordance with the best modern practice in the 
case of tidal streams. 



Between the mouth of the Neponset River and the sewerage 
outlet. on Moon Island, the State has never defined harbor lines. 
This has been done by the Board, after several public meetings 
and full consultation with the riparian proprietors, in a manner 
which it is believed will protect the general interests of the harbor 
and serve the local needs of the district in question. 

The lines which are recommended for adoption are defined as 
follows : 

1. Pier- Head Lines. 

The pier-head line commences at a point marked C, which is in the 
westerly line of P street, South Boston, extended southwardly, and 530 
feet from the southerly line of Sixth street ; thence southwestwardly 
again to the point D in the easterly line of M street extended south- 
wardly, and 1,300 feet from the southerly line of Eighth street; thence 
westwardly, parallel with Eighth street, to the point E in the easterly 
line of Old Harbor street extended southwardly ; thence southwardly 
1,400 feet to the point F in the easterly line of Old Harbor street 
extended southwardly; thence eastwardly, making an angle of 104° 
(taken from a northerly to an easterly direction) with the line last 
described, to the point G in the easterly line of M street extended 
southwardly ; thence 3,200 feet to the point H in the easterly line of 
M street extended southwardly; thence southwestwardly 2,320 feet, 
making an angle of 124° (taken from a northeastwardly to a southwest- 
wardly direction) with the line last described, to a point marked X' ; 
thence continuing 1,900 feet westwardly a little more southwardly, 
making an angle of 5° 15' with the line last described extended, to the 
point marked P ; thence westwardly in a straight line which, extended, 
would strike the east side of the embankment of the Old Colony 
Railroad 515 feet northwardly from the north side of the present 



60 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

water-way through said embankment, to a point 500 feet < 
wardly from the east side of said embankment, marked J*; thence 
southwardly 590 feet parallel to the east side of said embankment to a 
point marked K 2 ; thence southeastwardly in a straight line to the point 
marked L, which is distant 200 feet from the northeasterly corner of 
Ranstead, Dearborn & Company's Wharf (as built in 1856), measuring 
at right angles with the northeasterly end of said wharf ; thence south- 
wardly to the point M, distant 1,350 feet from the northeasterly rail of 
the Old Colony Railroad, measuring at right angles therewith from a 
point distant 4,000 feet northwestwardly from the draw in its bridge 
over Neponset River; thence southeastwardly to the point X. di-tant 
1/200 feet from said rail, measuring at right angles therewith from 
a point distant 3,300 feet northwestwardly from said draw ; thence 
southeasterly to the point O, which is distant 1,460 feet from the said 
rail, measuring at right angles therewith from a point distant 2,070 feet 
northwestwardly from the said draw : thence southea-t wardly again to 
the point P, distant 1,030 feet from said rail, measuring at right angles 
therewith from a point distant 2,150 feet northwestwardly from said 
draw; thence southeastwardly again to the point Q, distant 1.700 feet 
northeastwardly from said rail, measuring at right angles therewith 
from a point distant 1,600 feet northwestwardly from said draw : thence 
southeastwardly again to the point R, distant 1,590 feet northeastwardly 
from said rail, measuring at right angles therewith from a point 1,090 
feet northwestwardly from said draw ; thence southeastwardly to the 
point S, distant 1,340 feet northeastwardly from said rail, measuring at 
right angles therewith from a point distant 630 feet northwestwardly 
from said draw; thence southerly to the point T, distant 1,140 feet 
northeastwardly from said rail, measuring at right angles therewith 
from a point distant 380 feet northwestwardly from said draw ; thence 
southwestwardly to the point U, distant 850 feet northeastwardly from 
said rail, measuring at right angles therewith from a point distant 270 
feet northwestwardly from said draw ; thence southwestwardly again to 
the point W on the southeastwardly corner of James Jenkins's Wharf, 
formerly so called ; thence southwestwardly again to the point X on 
the southeasterly corner of W. R. Chamberlin's Wharf, formerly so 
called ; thence continuing southwestwardly, along the southeast wardly 
ends of said Chamberlin's Wharf and of Edward Preston's Wharf, 
formerly so called, to the point Y on the eastwardly side of the 
Neponset Bridge. 

On the easterly side of Neponset River, the line begins at the point A' 
on the easterly side of the Neponset Bridge, and 400 feet southerly from 
the point Y on the west side of the river ; thence in a straight line to the 
point B' on the northeasterly side of the Old Colony Railroad Bridge, 
distant 400 feet southeastwardly from the line W X on the opposite 
side of the river between the points W and X, measuring at right 
angles from said line ; thence northeastwardly, parallel to the line W U 
on the opposite side of the river, to the point C, distant 400 feet south- 
eastwardly from the point U, measuring at right angles to the line 
W U ; thence northeastwardly again to the point D', distant 450 feet 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 61 

southeastwardly from the opposite point T, measuring on a line bisect- 
ing the angle at said point T ; thence northwardly to the point E', distant 
450 feet eastwardly from the opposite point S, measuring on a line 
bisecting the angle at said point S ; thence north a little westerly to the 
point ¥', distant 450 feet eastwardly from the opposite point R, measur- 
ing on a line bisecting the angle at said point R ; thence northerly a little 
more westerly to the point G', distant 500 feet easterly from the opposite 
point Q, measuring on a line bisecting the angle at said point Q ; thence 
northwesterly to the point IP, distant 650 feet northeasterly from the 
opposite point P, measuring on a line bisecting the angle at said point 
P ; thence northwesterly to the point F, distant 700 feet northeasterly 
from the opposite point O, measuring on a line bisecting the angle at O ; 
thence northwesterly to the point J', distant 900 feet northeasterly 
from the opposite point N, measuring on a line bisecting the angle at 
N ; thence northwesterly to the point K', distant 900 feet easterly from 
the point M, measuring on a line bisecting the angle at M ; thence 
northeasterly to the point L/, distant 1,000 feet from the point L on the 
west side of the river, measuring on a line perpendicular at L to the 
line L M ; thence to the point M', which is in the easterly side of M 
street, South Boston, prolonged southwardly 3,150 feet from the point 
H near the west shaft of the sewer tunnel ; thence due east to the point 
N 7 , which is 3,000 feet due west from Squantum Coast Survey Point ; 
thence easterly to the point O', which is 500 feet clue north from 
Squantum Coast Surve}' Point ; thence due east 4,000 feet to the point 
P' : thence to the north corner of the sewerage outlet at Moon Head. 



2. Bulkhead Lines. 

The bulkhead line is coincident with the pier-head line from the point 
C to the point F. 

From F it runs southwardly in a straight line to the point I, which is 
on the line which bisects the angle at G of the pier-head line and 600 
feet west of the line G H of the pier-head line ; thence, parallel to the 
pier-head line G H and 600 feet within it, to a point on the line bisecting 
the angle at H of the pier-head line ; thence parallel to the pier-head 
line H X' for a distance of 1,300 feet; thence turning by an angle of 
105°, measuring from an easterly to a northerly direction, and running 
2,000. feet; thence turning by an angle of 105°, measuring from a 
southerly to a westerly direction, and running 600 feet ; thence turning 
by an angle of 86°, measuring from an easterly to a southerly direction, 
and running 1,965 feet; thence turning an angle of 91° 15', measuring 
from a northerly to a westerly direction, and running 1,600 feet to a 
point marked II, which is at the intersection of two lines, one a line 
parallel to the pier-head line X 1 1 2 and 600 feet within it, and the other 
parallel to the pier-head line I 2 J 2 and 400 feet within it ; thence parallel 
to the line I 2 J 2 and 400 feet from it inland, to the easterly side of the 
Old Colony Railroad embankment; thence along the easterl}' side of 
said embankment to a point 160 feet southward of the draw-opening; 
thence eastwardly, parallel to K 2 L of the pier-head line, to the point III. 



62 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

The point ITI is in the line last described (parallel to K 2 L) at its inter- 
section with the north face of the Boston Gas Company's Wharf 
prolonged 920 feet westerly from the northeastern corner of said 
wharf; thence the line follows the faces of said wharf to an intersection 
with the pier-head line L M 250 feet southerly from L ; thence the bulk- 
head and pier-head lines are coincident to the point IV, which is 1,000 
feet southward from the point L ; thence in a straight line parallel to 
South Street, and 200 feet from the south side of said street, to a point on 
the eastern side of Commercial Street Bridge ; thence along the east side 
of Commercial Street Bridge 750 feet; thence to the point V, which u 
distant 900 feet northeastwardly from the northeastern rail of the Old 
Colony Railroad, measuring at right angles therewith from a point 
distant 3,300 feet northwestwardly from the draw in the bridge over 
the Neponset River; thence to the point VI, which is distant 1,350 feet 
northeastwardly from said rail, measuring at right angles therewith from 
a point distant 2,150 feet northwestwardly from said draw ; thence to a 
point distant 1,400 feet northeastwardly from said rail, measuring at 
right angles therewith from a point distant 1,600 feet from said draw ; 
thence to a point distant 1,250 feet northeasterly from said rail, measuring 
at right angles therewith from a point distant 1,090 feet northwesterly 
from said draw ; thence to the northeast corner of the sea-wall of 
Stearns 1 lumber wharf : thence to a point 155 feet northwesterly from 
the point W of the pier-head line, measuring along the northeastern 
face of said wharf; thence the bulkhead line is parallel to and 155 feet 
distant from the pier-head lines, to the city highway bridge over 
Neponset River. 

On the easterly side of Neponset River, the bulkhead line starts at a 
point on the east side of the highway bridge over Neponset River 750 
feet southeast from the point Y, measuring along the east side of said 
bridge, and runs in a straight line to a point in the east side of the Old 
Colon} r Railroad Bridge 350 feet southeastward from the point B' of the 
pier-head line, measuring along the east side of said bridge ; thence to 
the point VII, which is 350 feet distant from the point O of the pier-head 
line, measuring on a perpendicular to the pier-head line B' O at C ; 
thence to the point VIII, which is 350 feet distant from the point D' of 
the pier-head line, measuring on a perpendicular to the pier-head line 
C D' at D' ; thence to the point IX, which is in the pier-head line B' O 
extended eastwardly 1,050 feet from C ; thence to the point X, which is 
distant 2,420 feet from the northeasterly rail of the Old Colony Railroad, 
measuring perpendicular thereto from a point 1,090 feet from the draw 
in the bridge over the Neponset River; thence to the point XI, which is 
distant 2,775 feet northeasterly from said rail, measuring at right 
angles therewith from a point distant 3,300 feet from said draw ; thence 
the bulkhead line is parallel to the pier-head line, and 600 feet within it, 
to the point XI 1, which is at its intersection with the loot of the outfall 
sewerage embankment, near point P' of the pier-head line ; thence 
along said foot of the embankment to the north corner of the sewerage 
outlet, where the bulkhead and pier-head lines meet. 

[Approved February 13, 1890 ] 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 63 



[B.] 

[See page 14 of this Report, ante.] 

Sections 4 to 12 of the River and Harbor Act of September 

19, 1890, RELATING TO BRIDGES AND OTHER OBSTRUCTIONS IN 

Navigable Waters, to Harbor Lines, etc. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled, * * * * 
Section 4. That section nine of the river and harbor act of 
August eleventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, be amended 
and reenacted so as to read as follows : 

That whenever the Secretary of War shall have good reason to 
believe that any railroad or other bridge now constructed, or which 
may hereafter be constructed, over any of the navigable water-ways 
of the United States, is an unreasonable obstruction to the free 
navigation of such waters on account of insufficient height, width 
of span, or otherwise, or where there is difficulty in passing the 
draw-opening or the draw-span of such bridge by rafts, steam 
boats, or other water-craft, it shall be the duty of the said Sec- 
retary, first giving the parties reasonable opportunity to be heard, 
to give notice to the persons or corporations owning or controlling 
such bridge so to alter the same as to render navigation through 
or under it reasonably free, easy, and unobstructed ; and in giving 
such notice he shall specify the changes required to be made, and 
shall prescribe in each case a reasonable time in which to make 
them. If at the end of such time the alteration has not been 
made, the Secretary of War shall forthwith notify the United 
States district attorney for the district in which such bridge is 
situated, to the end that the criminal proceedings mentioned in 
the succeeding section may be taken. 

Section 5. That section ten of the river and harbor act of 
August eleventh, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, be amended 
and reen acted so as to read as follows : 

That if the persons, corporation, or association owning or con- 
trolling any railroad or other bridge, shall, after receiving notice to 
that effect as herein before required from the Secretary of War 
and within the time prescribed by him, willfully fail or refuse to 
remove the same, or to comply with the lawful order of the Sec- 
retary of War in the premises, such persons, corporation or asso- 



64 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

ciation shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction 
thereof, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thousand 
dollars ; and every month such persons, corporation, or association 
shall remain in default in respect to the removal or alteration of 
such bridge shall be deemed a new offense, and subject the per- 
sons, corporation, or association so offending to the penalties 
above prescribed. 

Section 6. That it shall not be lawful to cast, throw, empty, 
or unlade, or cause, suffer, or procure to be cast, thrown, emptied, 
or unladen, either from or out of any ship, vessel, lighter, barge, 
boat, or other craft, or from the shore, pier, wharf, furnace, man- 
ufacturing establishments, or mills of any kind whatever, any 
ballast, stone, slate, gravel, earth, rubbish, wreck, filth, slabs, 
edgings, sawdust, slag, cinders, ashes, refuse, or other waste of 
any kind, into any port, road, roadstead, harbor, haven, navigable 
river, or navigable waters of the United States, which shall tend 
to impede or obstruct navigation ; or to deposit or place, or cause, 
suffer, or procure to be deposited or placed, any ballast, stone, 
slate, gravel, earth, rubbish, wreck, filth, slabs, edgings, sawdust, 
or other waste, in any place or situation on the bank of any navi- 
gable waters where the same shall be liable to be washed into such 
navigable waters, either by ordinary or high tides, or by storms 
or floods, or otherwise, whereby navigation shall or may be im- 
peded or obstructed : Provided, That nothing herein contained 
shall extend or be construed to extend to the casting out, unlad- 
ing, or throwing out of any ship or vessel, lighter, barge, boat, or 
other craft, any stones, rocks, bricks, lime, or other materials 
used, or to be used, in or toward the building, repairing, or keep- 
ing in repair any quay, pier, wharf, weir, bridge, building, or 
other work lawfully erected or to be erected on the banks or sides 
of any port, harbor, haven, channel, or navigable river ; or to the 
casting out, unlading, or depositing of any material excavated for 
the improvement of navigable waters, into such places and in such 
manner as may be deemed by the United States officer supervising 
said improvement most judicious and practicable and for the best 
interests of such improvements ; or to prevent the depositing of 
any substance above mentioned under a permit from the Sec- 
retary of War, which he is hereby authorized to grant, in any 
place designated by him where navigation will not be obstructed 
thereby. 

Section 7. That it shall not be lawful to build any wharf, pier, 
dolphin, boom, dam, weir, breakwater, bulkhead, jetty, or struct- 
ure of any kind, outside established harbor lines, or in any navi- 
gable waters of the United States where no harbor lines are or 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 65 

may be established, without the permission of the Secretary of 
War, in any port, roadstead, haven, harbor, navigable river, or 
other waters of the United States, in such manner as shall ob- 
struct or impair navigation, commerce, or anchorage of said waters ; 
and it shall not be lawful hereafter to commence the construction 
of any bridge, bridge-draw, bridge piers and abutments, cause- 
way or other works, over or in any port, road, roadstead, haven, 
harbor, navigable river, or navigable waters of the United States, 
under any act of the legislative assembly of any State, until the 
location and plan of such bridge or other works have been sub- 
mitted to and approved by the Secretary of War ; or to excavate 
or fill, or in any manner to alter or modify the course, location, 
condition, or capacity of the channel of said navigable water of 
the United States, unless approved and authorized by the Sec- 
retary of War : Provided, That this section shall not apply to any 
bridge, bridge-draw, bridge piers and abutments the construction 
of which has been heretofore duly authorized by law, or be so 
construed as to authorize the construction of any bridge, draw 
bridge, bridge piers and abutments, or other works, under an act 
of the legislature of any State, over or in any stream, port, 
roadstead, haven or harbor, or other navigable water not wholly 
within the limits of such State. 

Section 8. That all wrecks of vessels and other obstructions 
to the navigation of any port, roadstead, harbor, or navigable 
river, or other navigable waters of the United States, which may 
have been permitted by the owners thereof or the parties by 
whom they were caused, to remain to the injury of commerce and 
navigation for a longer period than two months, shall be subject 
to be broken up and removed by the Secretary of War, without 
liability for any damage to the owners of the same. 

Section 9. That it shall not be lawful for any person or per- 
sons to take possession of or make use for any exclusive purpose, 
or build upon, alter, deface, destroy, injure, obstruct, or in any 
other manner impair the usefulness of any sea-wall, bulkhead, 
jetty, dike, levee, wharf, pier, or other work built by the United 
States in whole or in part, for the preservation and improvement 
of any of its navigable waters, or to prevent floods, or as boun- 
dary marks, tide-gauges, surveying-stations, buoys, or other estab- 
lished marks ; nor remove for ballast or other purposes any stone 
or other material composing such works. 

Section 10. That the creation of any obstruction, not affirm- 
atively authorized by law, to the navigable capacity of any waters 
in respect of which the United States has jurisdiction, is hereby 
prohibited. The continuance of any such obstruction, except 



6Q HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

bridges, piers, clocks and wharves, and similar structures erected 
for business purposes, whether heretofore or hereafter created, 
shall constitute an offense ; and each week's continuance of any 
such obstruction shall be deemed a separate offense. Every per- 
son and every corporation which shall be guilty of creating or 
continuing any such unlawful obstruction in this act mentioned, or 
who shall violate the provisions of the last four preceding sections 
of this act, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on con- 
viction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding five thou- 
sand dollars, or by imprisonment (in the case of a natural person) 
not exceeding one year, or by both such punishments, in the dis- 
cretion of the court. The creating or continuing of any unlaw- 
ful obstruction in this act mentioned may be prevented, and such 
obstruction may be caused to be removed, by the injunction of any 
circuit court exercising jurisdiction in anv district in which such 
obstruction may be threatened or may exist ; and proper proceed- 
ings in equity to this end may be instituted under the direction of 
the attorney-general of the United States. 

Section 11. That it shall be the duty of officers and agents 
having the supervision, on the part of the United States, of the 
works in progress for the preservation and improvement of said 
navigable waters, and, in their absence, of the United States 
collectors of customs and other revenue officers, to enforce the 
provisions of this act by giving information to the district 
attorney of the United States for the district in which any viola- 
tion of anv provision of this act shall have been committed : 
Provided, That the provisions of this act shall not apply to Torch 
Lake, Houghton County, Michigan. 

Section 12. That section twelve of the river and harbor act 
of August eleventh, eighteen hundred and eightv-eight, be 
amended and re-enacted so as to read as follows : 

Where it is made manifest to the Secretary of War that the 
establishment of harbor lines is essential to the preservation and 
protection of harbors, he may, and is hereby authorized, to cause 
such lines to be established, beyond which no piers, wharves, 
bulk-heads or other works shall be extended or deposits made, 
except under such regulations as may be prescribed from time 
to time by him ; and any person who shall willfully violate the 
provisions of this section, or any rule or regulation made by the 
Secretary of War in pursuance of this section, shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction thereof, shall be 
punished by a fine not exceeding one thousand dollars, or 
imprisonment not exceeding one year, at the discretion of the 
court, for each offense. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 67 



[C] 



[See page 7 of this Report, ante.] 

Articles of Agreement, made this Twenty-Fifth Day of Sep- 
tember, IN THE YEAR EIGHTEEN HUNDRED AND NlNETY, BY AND 

between the commonwealth of massachusetts, acting by its 
Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, Party of the 
First Part, and the New England Dredging Company, a 
corporation duly established under the laws of said com- 
MONWEALTH, Party of the Second Part. 

The said party of the second part hereby covenants and agrees 
with the said party of the first part, to do and complete all the 
w T ork specified and described in the following specifications for 
widening a channel on South Boston flats, all of said work to be 
done and completed in the manner, and in accordance with and 
subject to the terms and conditions, in said specifications set 
forth : — 

Specifications. 

The party of the second part is to furnish all the plant, tools, 
appliances and labor necessary to widen, by dredging, a channel 
about 5,400 feet long on South Boston flats. 

The location and dimensions of the channel, and the widening 
required, are more exactly shown on a plan on file in the office of 
the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, entitled " Plan for 
widening channel on South Boston flats, September, 1890. Scale 
2*0"$*" ^aid P^ an * s referred to and made a part of these specifi- 
cations. 

The channel is to be widened, on its southeasterly side, so as to 
have the following dimensions, — that is to say, so as to be, after 



68 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

the work is completed, 12 feet deep at mean low water and 110 
feet wide on the bottom, with slopes 2 to 1 on each side, for a 
distance of 4,100 feet from its westerly end, and the remainder 
of the distance 8 feet deep at mean low water and 115 feet wide 
on the bottom, with slopes 2 to 1 on each side. 

The amount of material to be removed to widen the channel as 
above described, is about 69,000 cubic yards. 

The least present depth of water on the above area is 0.9 feet 
at mean low water, and the average depth is about 3 feet. 

The whole channel to have throughout, when the work is com- 
pleted, the depth of water, width and side slopes described above 
and shown on said Plan ; but no dredging to be required in that 
part of the channel already excavated to the depths above 
specified, except to remove such material as may be forced or 
dropped into it in the work of widening. 

No extra payment or allowance to be made for any excavation 
below the required depth or outside the prescribed limits of the 
channel. 

All ledges and bowlders and other obstructions which may be 
found, and which can be removed by dredging, to be removed as 
part of the contract without extra payment or allowance; but if 
any ledges or bowlders are found which cannot be removed by 
dredging, the covering material to be dredged away, and the ledges 
and bowlders left bare to the depth aforesaid ; and the Engineer 
of said Board to be the sole judge to determine whether any ledge 
or bowlder can be removed by dredging or not. 

All of the material dredged to be deposited on the South Boston 
flats, at such places on said flats as may from time to time be 
directed by said Engineer ; and all dumping of such material to be 
clone within one hour and one-half before or after high water. If 
dumped at the elevating station of the New England Dredging 
Company, the rules established by said company to govern such 
dumping, and the instructions of its authorized agent in charge of 
said station to be observed and followed. 

The said party of the second part to fill, with part of the ma- 
terial excavated, the trench in rear of the sea-wall on the north- 
erly side of the reserved channel on said flats, to as high a grade 
as practicable, and to furnish suitable scows or other appliances 
for doing this to the best advantage, and to the satisfaction of 
said Engineer. 

The aforesaid Plan, and the surveys and calculations based 
thereon, are believed to be correct; but said party of the second 
part must examine for itself, as no allowance will be made for 
an} 7 errors or inaccuracies which may be found therein. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 69 

In all questions which may arise concerning measurements, 
lines and grades, the decision of said Engineer to be final. 

All necessary aid and materials for giving or indicating lines 
and grades, to be furnished by said party of the second part at 
its own expense ; and convenient facilities for the inspection of 
the work to be furnished whenever requested. 

All instructions and directions of said Engineer to be strictly 
observed and followed. 

All of the work to be done to the satisfaction of said Engineer, 
and with such machinery and appliances, and by such methods, as 
shall be approved by him, and to the acceptance of said Board. 

The work to be commenced at once, and to be prosecuted 
vigorously in all suitable weather until completion ; and to be 
fully completed on or before the thirty-first day of December, 
1890. 

Estimates to be made by said Engineer of the amount of work 
done up to the end of each calendar month, and payment to be 
made thereon of 75 per centum of the proportional part of the 
whole contract price applicable to such work, as computed by said 
Engineer ; and the remaining 25 per centum to be paid upon the 
final completion and acceptance of the whole work. 

If said party of the second part refuses or neglects to prosecute 
the work, or in any other respect fails to carry out the provisions 
of the contract, said Board may annul the same, and contract 
anew with other parties, without prejudice to its claim for damages 
arising from breach thereof. 

The word "Engineer," as used herein, means the Engineer of 
said Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, or his authorized 
assistant in immediate charge of the work. 

And the said party of the first part, in consideration of the per- 
formance and completion of all of said work in the manner and in 
accordance with the terms and conditions aforesaid, hereby cov- 
enants and agrees to pay the said party of the second part the sum 
of nine thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars ($9,950), said 
sum to be in full therefor, and to be paid at the times, and in the 
manner, and upon the terms and conditions, set forth in the fore- 
going specifications. 

In witness whereof, on the day and year first above written, 
the said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, acting by its said Board 
of Harbor and Land Commissioners, has caused these presents to 
be signed and delivered in its name and behalf, and the seal of 
the Commonwealth to be hereunto affixed, and has also caused 
these presents to be approved by its Governor and Council ; and 
the said New England Dredging Company, by Charles H. Souther, 



70 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

its president and treasurer, thereunto duly authorized, I. -<-<! 

these presents to be signed and delivered in its name and behalf, 
and its corporate seal to be hereunto affixed. 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

By J<»iin E. Sam OBD, , 

T T ,. / Harbor and Land 

John I. Baker, > 

n ti tt \ Coin in 

Chas. H. IIoWl AM). .) 

NEW ENGLAND DREDGING COMPANY. 

By Charles H. Souther, c ™£5« and 

President and Treasurer. 



In Council, October 1, 1890. Approved. 

nwealth. 

Henry B. Peirce, Secretary. 



Witness the Seal of the Commonwealth. JSK££*!5L] 




1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 71 



[D.] 

[See page 39 of this Report, ante.] 

Lease of Hangman's Island. 

This Indenture, made this first day of January, in the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety, between the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, acting by its Board of Harbor and Land Commis- 
sioners, and 8. Albert Freeman, of Boston, in the County of 
Suffolk and Commonwealth aforesaid, 

Witnesseth, that the said Commonwealth doth hereby lease unto 
the said S. Albert Freeman, that tract of land in Boston Harbor 
known as Hangman's Island, to hold for the term of three years 
from the date hereof, in trust, nevertheless, for the uses and 
purposes, and upon the terms and conditions, hereinafter set 
forth, that is to say ; 

That, Whereas, said island is now occupied by Lawrence 
Hogan, Owen Hogan, Nathan S. Brown, James E. Hassett, 
William E. Greenfield, John R. Putnam, James Powers, Joseph 
Powers, and Thomas McKinley, fishermen, as a fishing station ; 
and whereas said 8. Albert Freeman, although not a fisherman, 
is the owner and interested in the ownership of certain personal 
property situated on said island, and used by said fishermen in the 
prosecution of their said business ; 

Now, therefore, the said S. Albert Freeman, trustee as afore- 
said, is to hold said leased premises in trust for himself and the 
above named Lawrence and Owen Hogan, Nathan S. Brown, 
James E. Hassett, William E. Greenfield, John R. Putnam, 
James and Joseph Powers, and Thomas McKinley, and all of 
said persons are to have the same and equal privileges upon said 
island and in the occupancy thereof ; and the use and occupancy 
thereof shall, during said term, be and continue substantially the 
same as heretofore, and all of the persons aforesaid shall have 



12 HARBOR AND LAND COMMISSIONERS. [Jan. 

and enjoy an equal .share in the control and management of said 

premises, and shall contribute to said Freeman in equal propor- 
tions the rental thereof, which is to be paid as hereinafter set 
forth. 

And it is expressly provided as one of the terms and conditions 
of this lease and of occupancy under the same, that no intoxicat- 
ing liquors of any kind shall be stored, kept or sold on said 
island ; and it is further understood that in case any person 
named as beneficiary herein shall for the space of one year 
neglect or refuse, upon demand in writing by said Freeman, to 
pay to said Freeman his proportion of the rental herein specified, 
then and in that case his rights herein shall terminate and cease : 
and in case said Freeman shall neglect to pay promptly to the 
Commonwealth the rent herein reserved, such neglect shall be and 
operate as a resignation of said trust and as a surrender of all 
his interest herein, and such other person may be designated 
trustee hereunder as may be in writing agreed upon by the parties 
hereto. But nothing herein contained shall be construed to excuse 
said trustee from the prompt payment of the rent herein reserved 
at the time the same becomes due as herein set forth, or to prevent 
a forfeiture of this lease in case of non-payment of rent. 

And the said Freeman, trustee as aforesaid, agrees to pay to 
said Commonwealth the sum of fifty dollars as rent for each and 
every year during the term hereof, the same to be payable on 
the first day of July annually, and not to lease or underlet the 
premises or any part thereof, and not to sell or assign this Leas 
and at the end of said term to quit and deliver up to said lessor 
or its agents or servants, said premises peaceably and quietly. 
And it is expressly understood that no alteration in the shores 
or surface of said island shall be made, and no structure built 
below high water mark, without the written consent and license 
of the Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners ; and that all 
persons in danger by perils of the sea. or from stress of weather, 
or otherwise, shall have full and free right to land upon said 
island. And said Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, and 
such other servants and agents of the Commonwealth as may be 
designated for that purpose, may at all times enter upon any part 
of said premises, and may at any time expel said lessee and any 
other persons claiming under this lease, if he or they shall fail to 
pay the rent as aforesaid, or shall fail to keep any of the terms 
and conditions of this lease. 

In ivitness whereof, the said Commonwealth, acting by its 
Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, has caused these 
presents to be executed in its name and behalf, and to be approved 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 11. 



73 



by its Governor and Council, and its seal to be hereto affixed ; 
and the said S. Albert Freeman, trustee as aforesaid, has here 
unto set his hand and seal, the year and day first above written. 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

By John E. Sanford, ") Harbor and 



John I. Baker, 
Chas. H. Howland, 

S. ALBERT FREEMAN. 
Witness ) John A. Noonan to S. A. F. 

In Council, March 19, 1890. Approved. 
Witness the Seal of the Commonwealth. 



Land 

Commissioners. 

[SBAE.] 



[SEAL OF THE 
COMMON WEALTH.] 



Henry B. Peirce, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth.