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Full text of "Report of the Commissioner of Crown Lands of the Province of Ontario, 1897-1906"

REPORT V. 



COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 



OF Tnz 



PROV^INCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1897. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO: 

WARWICK BBO'S A. RUTTER, Pbintebs 4o., «8 and 70 Fboni 8tb»« Wkst. 

1898 






1/^5^0(0. 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Report : — Page. 

Sales — Crown Lands III. 

" Clergy Lands IV. 

I " Common School Lands. V. 

" jrammar School Lands V. 

" Railway Lands V. 

" University Lands V. 

i Collections and Revenue V. 

Disbursements V. 

Woods and Forests VL 

Fire Ranffinsr VIH. 

Fi>.h»Tie9 IX. 

PablicParks IX. 

Free Grants IX. 

Crown Surveys X. 

Municipal Surveys X. 

Mining Surveys • X. 

Colonization Roads >. XI. 



Appendicps : — 

No. 1. Retnm of Officers and Clerks in the Department 2 

" 2. " Crown Land Agents 4 

" 3. Statement of Lands Sold and Leased, and Collections 6 

" 4. " Gro%s Revenue . . 6 

" 5. " Receipts considered as Special Funds 7 

" 6. " Gross Disbursements i 8 

" 7. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 21 

" 8. " Timber and Amounts Accrued from Dues, etc 22 

*' 9. Return of Locations, etc., under Free Grants Act 24 

" 10. " • Fishery Overseers 28 

" 11. " Patents Issued 29 

" 12. " Letters Received 80 

" 13. •' Municipal Surveys 31 

" 14. '* Crown Surveys Completed 32 

" 15. " Crown Surveys in Progress 33 

" 16. Surveyor's Reports, Township of Burwash 34 

" 17. " " " Cherriman 35 

" 18. " " " Hendrie 37 

" 19. " " " Jennings 38 

" 20. " " •• Loudon 39 

" 21. " " " Archibald... 43 

" 22. " " •• Curtis 42 

•• 23. " " " Harrow 43 

" 24. •« •• " Tupper 46 

" 25. " " " Sanford 47 

" 26. " " " Zealand 49 

" 27. " " Base and Meridian Lines, Rainy River 63 

"28. " •• " » " 66 

*■ 29. Report on Colonization Roads ... 69 

North Division , 69 

West Division 66 

East Division , 71 

Mining Roads 34 

Summary of Expenditure g6 

Recapitulation . 9q 

" 30. List of Licensed Cullers gi 



A 



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REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

FOR THE YEAR 1897. 



To His Honour the. Honourable SiR Oliver Mow at, G.C.M.G., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oj Ontojrio. 

May it please your Honour : 

As required by law, I submit for the information of your Honour and the 
Legislative A.ssembly, a report of the management of the Crown Lands of the 
Province for the year ending Slst December, 1897. 

CROWN LANDS. 

The area of Crown Lands sold during the year was 60,1 47| acres, aggregat- 
ing in value $84,409.66. The collections on account of these and sales of former 
years amounted to $93,045.93 There was also leased as raining land under the 
leasing clauses of The Mines Act, 86,014 acres, on which and on lands previously 
leased, rent amounting to $168,356.54 was collected. See Appendix No. -'i, page 6. 

The anticipations expressed in last year's report as to activity in the mining 
industry of the Province during 1897 were fully realized. The number of com- 
panies incorporated under the laws of Ontario last year was 140, with an aggro- 
gate authorized capital of $101,531,000, as against 26 in 1896, with capital 

iii. 



amounting to Si "jjCOO.OOO. The area of mining lands disposed of by the Crown 
io 1897 by sale and lease, and the sums received therefor exceeded the transactions 
for the five years. 1892-ii6, as follows ; 

1892-96 98,821f acres. $131,518.38 

1897 115,809 " 144,299.06 

The interest centered largely in gold mining, and the bulk of the lands disposed 
of were in the gold dijstricts <jf Lake of the Woods, Seine River, Manitou and 
Wabigoon. Prospecting was vigorously prosecuted during the year, and numerous 
discoveries of gold bearing quartz rewarded the efforts of explorers both within 
and beyond the boundaries of previously known fields. Many properties were 
under development, and several of them entered the list of producing mines 
during the year. Some immense deposits of low grade quartz |in the Upper 
Seine region and elsewhere have been exploited during the year, and results 
appear to show that they will prove remunerative if worked on a large scale. 
The Sultana Mine, the oldest and most highly developed in the Lake of the Woods 
region, has increased its capacity from 10 to 30 stamps. The other producing 
mines in Western Ontario, namely, the Regina, Foley and Mikado, have been 
engaged in putting themselves in shape for steady and continuous working. The 
mill on the last named property began work in August. A large and fully 
equipped 20-8tamp customs mill has been erected at Keewatin by the Ottawa 
Milling and Mining (Jompany for the treatment of ores from properties bordering 
on liake of the Woods. In Hastings County the Deloro mine has been producing 
gold from auriferous mispickel. The total quantity of bullion produced in the 
year was 11,412 oz. valued at $190,244, an increase of sixty per cent, in quantity 
and value ovei- 1 896. Discoveries of gold in the valley of the Michipicoton river 
were made in the summer of 1897, and on 9th September an Order in Council was 
paswed setting apart the Michipicoton Mining Division with an area of about 
5,000 square miles. Mineral lands situated in this division may be taken up and 
held as " mining claims," as provided in the regulations made under The Mines 
Act. 

Tlie copper-nickel mines of the Sudbury District smelted a greater quantity 
of ore in 1897 than in any previous year. The Canadian Copper Company was 
the principal prf)ducer. 

clp:rgy lands. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 676 acres, aggregating in 
value $670.60. The amount collected on account of these and former sales wsm 
$3,165.21. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 



V. 



COMMON SCHOOL LANDS. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 1 ^ acres, aggregating in 
value S5. The amount collected on account of these and former sales was 
$10,751.55. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL LANDS. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 329 acres, aggregating in 
value S385.15. The collections on account of these and former sales amounted 
to $2,414.12. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

RAILWAY LANDS. 

Under The Railway Aid Act of 1889, 52 Victoria, chapter 35, 56^ acres were 
sold, aggregating in value S193. The collections were $176.58. See Appendix 
No. 3, page 5. 

UNIVERSITY LANDS. 

Of these lands there were sold 5,913 acres, aggregating in value $2,957.50, 
wn which was collected $895.04. See Appendix No. 3, page 6. 

COLLECTIONS AND REVENUE. 

The total collections of this Department on account of all sources of revenue 
were $1,609,285.90. See Appendix No. 4, page 6. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

The total disburaements of the Department were $329,417.14. This is con- 
siderably in excess of last year's expenditure, and arises from the large sum spent 
under the vote for mining development, and other special services. The following 
may be mentioned as abnormal expenditures : — Mining Roads, $32,986.05 ; Mining 
Schools. $9,552.70: Rat Portage Mining Agency $1,646.23; Michipicoton Mining 
Division, $2,898.72 ; pajTnent out of Iron Mining Fund under The Mines Act 
1897, $4,000. The.se items represent an expenditure of $51,083.70. In addition 
there was paid as compensation to Ontario Timber licensees for timber limits 
included within the Whitefish Indian Reserve as claimed by the Federal Govern- 
ment, $13,905. The refund expenditure was also considerably larger than was 
estimated owing to parties failing to complete their purchases within the time 
required by The Mines Act and withdrawing their money. The refunds exceeded 
those of last year by $15,685.62. On account of the great increase in the work of 
the Department incident to the mining excitement, particularly in the Surveys 
Branch, a considerable number of extra clerks had to be temporarily employed, 
which is responsible for an increase in contingencies of $3,199.70. 



WOODS AND FORESTS. 

The total revenue from Woods and Forests for the year 1897 amounts to 
$1,327 140.08. Of this, $190,918.90 was on account of bonus and $54,166.62 on 
account of ground rent, leaving the net revenue from timber dues, etc., 
$1,082,054.56. See Appendix No. 4, page 26. 

The revenue from timber dues is larger than was expected at the beginning 
of the year. The accounts for timber dues accrue due in the month of December 
subsequent to the winter in which the cutting takes place, and are paid more or less 
promptly according to the condition of the trade. The output of sawlogs, etc., for 
the winter of 1895-96 was, as stated in my last report, the largest in the history of 
the Province, representing the sum of over one million dollars for timber dues 
alone. These dues did not become payable until December, 1896, and a consider- 
able portion of them would not be paid until the year 1897. Owing to the con- 
tinued depression in the lumber trade and the uncertainty prevailing as to the 
reimposition of an import duty on sawn lumber passing into the United States, it 
was expected that payments would not be made so freely and punctually as 
usual ; consequently the estimate of revenue from Woods and Forests was not 
increased in proportion to the large increase in accruals. When it became evident 
that an import duty would be imposed on lumber passing into the United States, 
heavy purchases were made for that market and some of our own lumbermen 
shipped their lumber over there and piled it up, this action being taken in advance 
of tariff legislation, the object in both cases being to escape the duty. The sales 
improved the financial position and consequently larger payments were made than 
was looked for, the result of which has been the increased revenue collected from 
timber dues. 

The present state of our relations with the United States so far as sawn 
lumber is concerned is very one sided and unfair. Formerly our lumber paid $2 
per thousand. Under what was known as the McKlinley tariff, this was reduced 
to $1 per thousand on the Government of Canada agreeing to remove the export 
duty of $2 per thousand on Canadian sawlogs. Later, under what was known as 
the Wilson tariff, the import duty on sawn lumber was removed and our lumber 
was admitted free into the United States, which was a great advantage to the 
trade as it enabled the Canadian lumberman to send a coarser grade of lumber 
into that market than he could when he had to pay $2 or even $1 per thousand. 
Owing, however, to the long continued depression in ttie United States, we did 
not reap the immediate benefit which was hoped for from this removal of the 
duty, and just when the depression looked like passing away, the Republican 
party of the United States commenced to revise the tariff on protectionist lines. 
When the " Dingley Bill " was under discussion it soon became evident that lum- 
ber would be removed from the free list unless very strong efforts were put forth. 



Vll. 



Those interested in Canadian limits, with very few exceptions, made a strong 
fight to keep lumber on the free list or to keep the duty down to the McKinley 
tariff rate, viz., SI per thousand. It was believed that this would be done, but at 
the last minute the duty was made $2 per thousand. This was quite unexpected, 
but what was more unexpected still was the insertion of a clause in the tariff pro- 
viding for the addition to the import duty on lumber of any amount which might 
be imposed as an export duty on logs sent to the United States. This meant that 
if the Government of Canada put on the old export duty of $2 per thousand oh 
logs, then the duty on lumber would be S4 per thousand. This state of affairs 
caused an agitation to spring up for relief from such a one sided arrangement. 
The Government of Canada not having signified its readiness to pat on an export 
duty, attention was turned to the Government of Ontario, and it was pressed to 
put a condition in all timber licenses requiring sawlogs cut under their authority 
on the Crown domain to be sawn into lumber in Canada. To deal with this ques- 
tion intelligently requires full information and grave consideration. The views 
of those interested have been heard and the Legislature will shortly be asked to 
approve regulations dealing with the whole situation. Meanwhile regulations 
have been passed excluding aliens from working in the taking out of logs and 
timber on licensed lands of the Crown and an officer has been appointed to enforce 
these regulations. In advance of the submission of the new regulations for the 
sanction of the Legislature with respect to the manufacture of timber, those lum- 
bermen operating under authority of timber licenses issued some months ago have 
been warned against attempting to cut an abnormal quantity of logs for export, 
and the various rangers have been instructed to watch very closely the quantities 
being taken out, and it has been intimated to the lumbermen that should any abnor- 
mal cut be attempted the Department might feel called upon to take action in 
the piemises. 

For some time past there has been considerable excitement over the discovery 
of gold in the region lying north and east of Lake Wahnapitae, and large 
numbers of prospectoi-s and miners had flocked into the townships of Kelly 
Davis, Rathbun and Scadding. These men had spent considerable money in 
developing the prospects which they had discovered and in order to render them 
valuable and make sale of them they had been pressing the Department for'title. 
The Department had been averse to opening these townships for sale, lease or 
settlement because the pine timber had not been sold, and it was feared that in 
clearing, etc., fire would be used to such an extent that bush fires would certainly 
ensue and the pine timber would be destroyed. Early last spring the Department 
was very strongly pressed to allow titles to issue and so pronounced did the feeling 
become that threats were made through the Press and in correspondence and 
otherwise that if the timber stood in the way of the opening up of the townships 
it would be burned up. In view of theee facts and of the presence of such an 



VUl. 



army of prospectors as had rushed in, the position became acute and the Depart- 
ment reluctantly concluded that it would be necessary to sell the timber in order 
to realize the bonus, put the timber under license, and then place on the shoulders 
of those who would buy it the responsibility of watching it and cutting from 
time to time whatever quantity might be damaged or was in danger. This course 
it was felt would relieve the intense feeling prevailing in the locality. Ad- 
vantage was taken of the holding of a sale to sell other small exposed areas and 
a few berths in the Rainy River District, which, owing to the mining exploration 
there, were likewise in danger. The townships offered were not by any means 
iirst class pine townships, though parts of them were fairly timbered. The sale 
was held on the 17th of August last, and 280 miles were offered for sale, of which 
159^ were sold for $265,162.50, or an average bonus of $1,665.07 per square mile. 
Considering the quantity of pine on the limits and its character, the showing was 
as good a one, so far as the price was concerned, as at any previous sale. A con- 
dition of the sale was that all the timber cut on the limits sold must be sawn into 
lumber in Canada. This somewhat narrowed the competition. Down to the 
close of the year there has been paid in on account of bonus of this sale, 
$122,141*67. Since these townships have been opened for sale and lease the 
miners and prospectors have been enabled to procure their titles and very good 
feeling seems to prevail between the miners and the timber licensees. 

FIRE RANGING. 

As is generally known, the fire ranging staff is composed of a number of 
expert and energetic woodsmen selected by the timber limit owners from among 
their lumbering staff, and in order to clothe them with power under the 14th 
section of the Fire Act, they are appointed Bush and Fire Rangers by the Com- 
missioner of Crown Lands. The men are familiar with the territory they have 
to guard and being under the eye of the licensees they are careful and active in 
the discharge of their duties. They are placed on duty on the 1st May and taken 
off on the 3Uth September, unless some special circumstances require their reten- 
tion, for a longer period. Their duties consists of travelling about the territory 
under their charge warning settlers, hunters, prospectors, miners and others to be 
careful in the use of fire, to extinguish fires when found, or to call in assistance 
in doing so, should that be necessary, to bring to justice those who disregard or 
violate the provisions of the law% and generally to do everything to preserve the 
forests from destruction by fire. They are expected to keep very close watch 
over every paVt of the territory under their charge and to report from time to 
time everything of interest to their employers and to the Department as it occurs. 
They are paid such rates as they may be engaged at, not however, exceeding $2 
per day, and they are allowed such expenses as they properly incur in the interest 
of their work. One half of the total cost of this service is borne bv the Govern- 



IX. 



ment and the other half by the limit holders. During the past summer sixty-nine 
timber limit owners made application to have rangers placed on their territory and 
179 rangers were put on duty. In addition, as foreshadowed in ray last report, 
rangers were placed on certain territory wholly the propertj' of the Crown, in 
the immense body of pine lying north and east of Lake Wahnapitae extending 
over to the Ottawa river and north of Lake Temiscamingue, and also on the head 
waters of the Mississaga river and in the Rainy River District. Al\ these local- 
ities are now the haunts of the prospector, and require v«>n- close surveillance. 
Twelve rangers were thus employed and of course their entire cost was borne by 
the Government. Fortunately the summer was more than ordinarily wet and 
consequently although there was an immense number of men in the woods 
prospecting for golH, no serious fires occurred and no pin*^ timber destroyed. 
The service has had an admirable etfect in inculcating a spirit of care on the part 
of those requiring to use fire in the bush during the summer months, and where 
formerly nobody seemed to care or bother about a fire after they had cooked or 
warmed themselves with it. and left it to go out or spread as the case might 
be, now everybody recognizes that it is their duty to be careful of Hre while it is 
in use and to extinguish it when they no longer require it. This is a valuable 
revolution which has been brought about by the fire ranging service. 

During the year just closed a Royal Commission composerl of experienced 
lumbermen, the Clerk of Forestry, the Superintendent of Forest Rangers for the 
Province, and the Chief Clerk of the Sales Branch of the Department, has been 
investigating the better preservation of the forest wealth of the Province, and 
it will, no doubt, give the question of fire prevention their close attention and 
make valuable suggestions upon the matter. 

FISHERIES. 

The fishery service has been transferred to the Department of the Attorney- 
General, where it is now administered. Particulars, therefore, do not appear in 
this report. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

Public parks have also been attached to the Department of the Attomey- 
(jeneral and the expenditure in connection with them does not, therefore, appear 
in this report. 

FREE GRANTS. 

There are 161 townships open for location under The Free Grants and 
Homesteads Act. During the year 683 locations were made on 91,910 acres of 
land, and 49 locatees purchased 2,197 acres ; 268 patents were issued to locatees. 
See Appendix No. 9, page 24. 
2* C.L. 



:c. 



CR')WN LANDS. 

Tlie following surveys of townships have been carried out this year :— 

In the District of Nipissing the townships of Casimir, Haddo, Cherriman, 
Jennings, Hendrie, Burwash and Loudon have been sub-divided into lots of 320 
acres each. In the District of Rainy River the townsliips of Sanford, Zealand and 
Aiibiey. near Wabigoon on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway, have been 
sub-divided into lots of 320 Jicres each. The joint survey of the western- boundary 
of the Province, from the north-west angle of the Lake of the Woods, to the 
English river, has been completed, Mr. Elihu Stewart, O.L.S., acting for the 
Dominion Goverment, and B. J. Saunders, O.L.S., acting for the Ontario Govern- 
ment. In the District of Rainy River several meridian lines have been nin north 
and south of the Canadian Pacific Railw^ay, and a base line from the boundary 
line between the Districts of Thunder Bay and Rainy River from the 120th mile 
westerlj^ a distance of ninety miles, connecting with the surveys in the neigh- 
borhood of Dryden. These meridian and base lines, for the most part, pass 
through valuable mining territory. 

, In addition, the tow^n plot of Dryden has been surveyed, rendered necessary 
by the demand for land in that section, and several other minor surveys have 
been performed during the year. The returns of the above named surveys so far 
as have been received in the Department, have been examined and closed. The 
particulars of the surveys will be found in Appendices Nos. 14 to 28, inclusive, 
pages 32 to 58, inclusive. 

MUNICIPAL SURVEYS. 

The Department has during the year, on the petitions of the municipal 
councils of the townships of Rochester, Whitchurch and O.sgoode, and the counties 
of Wellington and Halton, issued instructions for surve}^ of the road allowance 
between lots numbers six and seven in the concession east of the river Ruscum, 
township of Rochester, the road allowance between lots numbers fiftee© and 
sixteen, in ^the 8th concession of Whitchurch, the road allowance between the 
lOth and 11th concessions of Osgoode, from lot number twelve northerly to the 
north boundary of the township, and the boundary line between the townships 
of Eramosa and Nassagaw^eya. The particulars relating to these surveys will be 
found in Appendix No. 12, page 30. 

MINING AND OTHER SURVEYS. 

The Mines Act, 1897, requires that applicants to purchase or lease mining 
lands in unsurveyed territory shall file surveyor's plans, field notes and descrip- 
tions by metes and bounds of their locations in this Department before any sale 
or lease is carried out. 



XI. 



Under Or(l<M>i in Council of date 23rd January. 1892, 3rd December. 189'2, 
nud 22nd September, 1893, applictxnts to purchase islands or locations in the 
Districts of Thunder Ba}' or Rainy River for agricultural pui-pcses, in unsurveyed 
temtory, are required to tile surveyor's plans, lield notes and descriptions by 
metes and bounds, together with the necessary affidavits of their locations, which 
are required to be of the form and size, wherever practic-able, prescribed by The 
Mines Aqt, 1897. Under tliese regulations a nural>er of applicants in the 
Districts of Algoma, Thunder Ba}* and Rainy River have filed plans, etc., and an 
area of 27,493 acres has l)een sold and patented to them, for which S.57.543 has 
l)een received ; and an area of 70.068, acres has been leased at $1 per acre for thi' 
first year's rental. 

COLONIZATION ROADS. 

'I'he work done during the year was hh follows : Miles of new colonization 
rojui constnict<M:l, 106i : miles of road repaired, 668^ ; twenty-four bridges of 
various dimensions, aggr(;gating a total length of 3,082 feet, constructed. Of 
mining roads 51 1 miles were opened and three miles improved, besides the erectio)i 
of two large dams, details of which will V>e found in thfe report of the Superintendent 
of (colonization Roads. The work done was carefully inspected and reported to 
})o of a sulxstantial and satisfactory character. 

Respectfully submitted. 



J. M. (JIBSON, 

Commissioner. 



Department of Cbowv Land.s, 

Toronto, 31st Deceml^er, 1897. 



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APPENDIX No. 3. 



Statement of Lands Sold and Leaaed, Amount of Salep, and Amount of Oollections 
oa Sales and Leases for the year 1897. 



Service. 



Acres sold and 
leased. 



Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands . . . 
Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

Rent 

University'Lands 



60,l47i 
676 

li 
329 
96i 
86,014 
.5,913 



Amount 
Amount of sales collected on 
and leases. sales and leases. 



$ c. 
84,409 66 
670 bO 
6 00 
383 15 
193 00 



2,957 50 



153,177i 



88,618 91 



$ c. 

93,045 93 

3,165 21 

10,751 55 

2,414 12 

176 58 

168,356 54 

■ 895 04 



278,804 97 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assi-itant Oommissioner. 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 189i 



APPENDIX NO. 4. 



Statement of the Revepue of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Service. 



Land Collections : 

Crcwn Landb 

Clergy Lands . . 

Ccmmon School Lands 

Grammar Schcol Lacds 

Railway Lands 

University Lands / 

Minirg Leases 

Rect 

Woods and Forests •' 

Timber dues 

Grcund dues 

Bonus 

Casual fees 

Cullers' fees 

Expenditure Refunds : 

Bureau of Mines 

Inspections 



93,045 93 

3,165 21 

10,751 55 

2,414 12 

176 58 

895 04 

2,942 15 

168,356 54 



1,082,054 

54,166 

190,918 




5> C. 



281,747 12 



1,327,140 08 



350 48 



48 22 



1,609,285 90 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Department op Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1897. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Asbietant Oommiesioner. 



APPENDIX NO. 5. 

Statement of the Receipts of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897, 
'which are considered as special fands. 



Seivice. 


•$ e. 

1,723 22 
1,441 99 


$ c. 


Clergy Lands : 

Principal ... . 




Interest 


3,165 21 






Common School Lands : 
Principal 


3,676 33 
7,075 22 

1,315 86 
1,098 26 


Interest 




Orammar School Lands ; 

Principal 


10,751 55 


Interest 








2,414 12 


Railway Lands: 

Principal 


159 65 
16 93 


Interest - - 








176 58 


University Lands : 

Principal .... 


892 14 
2 90 


Interest - - 






- 


895 04 








17,402 50 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



Department op Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1897. 



APPENDIX No. 6. 
Statembnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897 



Name. 



Agents' Salabibs. 
Land. 



Annis, A. E 

Armstrong, Jno. . . 

Best, S. G 

Cockburn, J. D . . . 
Chapman, E, A . , 
EI#maD, T. G. .. 

Gilligan, B. J 

Hamilton, Geo. ., 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm 

Hollands, C. J. . . 

Kirk, Wm , 

McKay, Theresa 
MacphersoD, R. .. 

Marsh R. J 

Macdonald, D. G. 
Nichols. W. L.... 
Iteeves, James. . . . 

Ruttan, J. F. 

Ryan, T. J 

Scarlett, J. S 

Stewart, C. R . . . , 
Stewart, .James . . 
Stephenson, Wm. 

Tait, J. R 

Turner, Wm 

Whelan, Jno 

Wood, A. W 



Timber. 

Campbell, P. C , 

Garrow, E , 

Halliday, F , 

Landry, J. P 

Margach, Wm 

Munro, Hugh 

McWilliams, J. B 



Agents' Disbdbsembnts. 



Land. 



Annis, A. E 

Armstrong, Jno. . 

Best, S. G 

Cockburn, J. D . . 
Gilligan, B. J.... 
Hamilton, Geo. . . 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm. ... 
Hollands, C. J. . 

Kirk, Wm 

McKay, Theresa. 



$ c. 



112 60 
500 00 
500 00 
5C0 no 
400 00 
312 50 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
350 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
100 00 
500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
248 00 
400 00 
500 00 
600 GO 
300 00 
200 00 
500 CO 
200 00 
300 00 
100 00 



1,600 00 


1,400 00 


1,600 00 


100 00 


1,600 00 


1,200 00 


2,500 00 



Carried forward 



50 07 
34 55 
45 00 
12 94 

12 15 
1 59 

13 61 
6 34 

28 9.5 
16 09 
11 81 



233 10 



$ c. 



9,773 10 



10,000 00 



19,773 10 



S c. 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 



Brought forward 

Marsh, fi. J 

NicholB, W. L 

Ruttan, J. F .... 

Ryan, T. J 

Stewart, C. R 

Stewart, James . . . 

Stephenson, Wm 

Tait, J. R 

Whelan, Jno 

Wood, A. W 



Timber. 

Campbell, P. C 

Gjtrrow, E 

Halliday, F 

Mar(?ach, Wm 

McWilliams, J. B 



Miscdlantous. 

Ames, D., guarding islands in Lobjro' Lake 

Bowles, T., Inspector ^. . 

Cameron, VVm, do 

Davis, S., caretaking Leonard Islandb 

Jones, C. S., travelling expenses 

Taylor, T C, do 

White, A., do 

Willmott, J. H., inspection 

Wilson, Jas. , do 

Yeigh, F. , travelling expenses , 



Alien Labor Service. 
White, Jonathan, disbursements .... 



Cbown Tihbkb Offiob, Ottawa. 



Darby, E. J., acting agent. 

Lar jse, S. C, clerk 

Rainboth, E. J., surveyor . 



Disbursements . 



Cbown Timbeb Office, Qokbec. 



"Nicholson, B., agent 

fiamey, Thoj., caretaker and messenger 



Rent 

Disbursements 



$ 0. 



233 10 



3 15 


27 50 


8 02 


29 05 


10 43 


7 00 


15 07 


10 34 


3 04 


5 39 


493 26 


85 54 


200 34 


1,199,26 


989 68 


20 00 


8 00 


5 00 


20 00 


75 00 


25 00 


29 25 


5 00 


6 00 


49 90 



Carried forward 



1,200 00 
900 00 
200 00 



1,40) 00 
50 00 



125 00 
32) 16 



9 c. 



19,773 10 



$ c. 



V * 



352 09 



2,968 08 



243 15 



2,3X) 00 
654 99 



23,336 42 
300 00 



1,450 00 

415 16 



2,954 99 



1,895 16 
28,486 57 



10 



APPENDIX No. %.— Continued. 
Statbmekt of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Broxtght forward 






28,486 57 


CuLLEBs' Examinations. 

Mather, D. L., surveyor 

Munro, Hugh, expenses 




8 00 
13 05 




21 05 


Wood Ranging and Inspection op Timbeb Lands. 
Bale, Geo. S 


102 00 
15 00 
26 GO 

1,213 80 

1,107 83 

1,046 00 
163 33 
203 50 
898 70 
194 12 
293 ]0 
108 00 
876 15 
447 OC 

1,C65 00 
166 93 
669 31 

1,658 77 
120 03 

1,312 88 

108 00 

52 00 

1,348 63 
265 49 

1,120 00 

1,351 03 
278 00 
830 00 

1,561 85 
200 00 
150 00 
222 25 

19 00 
273 45 

76 m 

912 50 

140 00 

150 76 

404 00 

1,227 7S 

1,5.'>4 24 

1,688 67 

1,369 70 

1,422 93 

1,149 73 

20 00 
183 07 

25 CO 

1,363 58 

975 00 


Bartlett, G. W 






Burns, Chr s ; 






Bremner, J. Ij 






Belding, A. W 






Brady, John 






Brown, John 






iJoyd, J. F 






Christie, W. P 




' * 


Carrick, J. S 






Cochrane, Geo ., 






Ferguson, Geo. A 






Frg ser, Duncan 






Gardner, John .• 






Halliday, Jame s . . 






Hurd. Edward 




Henderson, Chas 






Johnson, S. M 






Kearney, Michael 


' 




Kennedy, John C 






Lewis, Clififord 






McKay, Herbert 






McCogherty, P 






McDougaJ), D 




McGowp, Wm 






Macdonald, D. F 






Mooney, Thos 






Malone, W. P 






Moore, D. H 






Margach, Wm 






Mooney, Wm 






MauRhan, Joseph 






Newburn, Wra ; 






O'Connor, P 






Pearson, J. J 






Pearson, John P 












Quinn, Wm 










Regan, John 












Smith, J. W 












Sinclair, Finlay 






Shields, F. A 






Swanston, Jan es 






Tait, Thos 






Wigg, Thomas G 
















32 0^0 6T 








Carried forward 


00,538 23 



11 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Continued. 
Statembkt of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 



9 c. 



Brought forward. 



FiBE Ranging. 



Argu», Wit. 

Ardill, A 

Armstrong, Ed. . . . 

AikenB, G. M 

Airhart, Asel 

Aylward, J 

Bow'and, Wm. . . . 
Disbursements 



Bowlaud, A. G 

Bowland, John J 

Bertram. M 

Brown, S. J., 1896 

DisbufK-ments 



Ber inquette, Jules 
Blaine, Harvie T. . 

Bellow, Louis 

Disbursements 



Bell, J. C 

Baskerviile, James. 

Brannan, i^am'i . . . 

Disbursements 



Bromley, Tho«. . . . 
Disbursements 

Brewer, Chs. . . 
Brown, Hugh R. . . . 

Brady, Wm 

Bartlett, Geo. W. 

Corley, S 

Cameron, John . . . . 
Cassidy, .James . . . 

Carlton,. Jag 

Carlin, T 

Disbursements 



Carmtchael. R. 

CarsweH, David 

Caddel, Wm 

Cunningham, Thos 

Callahan, Nicholas 

Campbell, James , 1896 

1897 



Campbell, J. M . . . . 
Campbell, C. H. . . . 
Campbell, Wm. . . . 
Disbursements . 



Cardiff, G. M 

Disbursementa. 



.1896 

1897 



Carried 'forward. 



133 00 
8 25 



65 00 
13 01 



132 00 
8 25 



119 00 
3 75 



97 00 
20 63 



157 00 
5 00 



122 00 
111 00 



158 75 
41 00 



16 00 

4 05 

124 00 



$ c. 



121 00 

72 00 

108 00 

118 00 

43 50 

87 00 


141 25 

118 00 

129 00 

27 75 


78 01 
101 00 
100 00 


140 25 
107 00 
167 CO 



122 75 



117 63 


100 00 


134 00 


61 00 


124 CO 


67 00 


20 00 


13 00 


100 00 


162 00 


102 00 


118 00 


93 00 


144 00 


139 00 


233 00 


146 00 


105 00 



199 75 

144 05 
4,093 94 



60,558 23 



00,538 23 



APPENDIX No. &.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Urown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 



Brought forward. 



FiRK Ranging. -Continued. 

Crombie, John 1895 

Disbursements 

1897 



Christie, Peter, R. 



1896 



Christie, W. P. 



Co'e, John 

Disbursements. 



.1896 
1897 

.1895 



$ c. 



131 00 
110 75 
118 00 



152 00 
146 00 



30 65 
507 60 



.1896 



Cole, Geo 

Dokis, Wm 

Drumm, Pat'k 

Duford, Louis , 

Duf . md, Itfnace 

Dupont, A. B 

Driver, Joseph 

Dwyer, James 

Dilworth William 

Dunlop, .John 

Dawkins, John 

Dumouchel, H. G 

Dickson Company 1893 

Eagle, Sidney 

Edey, A. B 

Frazer, Wm. A 

Frazer, Alex 

Disbursements 



Frazer, John 

French, John 

Finlayson, J. H 

Fitzbeury, John 

Foisey, M 

Guthrie, John 

-Gilmonr and Company . 

Godin, Peter 

Disbursements 



1896 



23 00 
144 00 

15 00 



148 00 
4 07 



Disbursements. 



1897 



Gongeon, A 1896 

Gardner, John 1896 

Grofif. Anthony 

Grawberger, The? 

Grozelle, A. D 

Gunther, H. M 

Hawlev, D. J 

Hale, John B 

Henlerson, C 

Disbursements 



132 00 
99 65 

132 00 
65 85 



Carried forward . 



283 70 
32 50 



$ c. 



4,093 94 



359 75 


298 00 


538 25 


182 00 


146 00 


68 00 


130 OO 


118 00 


99 00 


74 00 


131 00 


101 00 


142 00 


105 00 


113 00 


106 00 


57 94 


98 13 


118 00 


90 00 


152 07 


148 00 


129 00 


149 00 


100 00 


27 00 


78 00 


21 32 



429 50 

131 00 

164 20 

47 00 

131 00 

119 00 

126 00 

90 00 

98 00 



316 20 
9,615 30 



n c. 



60,538 23 



60,538 23 



13 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Xame. 



Rr aught forward. 



FiRK Ranging.— Con<int«'d. 



Humphreyp, Tho8. W. 
Haye", Martin 



.1896 



Haskin, Wm. . 

Hawkesbury Lumber Co 1896 

Hus'oo, Joseph 

Haley, Cornelius 

Uis-bursements '. 



Higginf, John 

Heron, John 

Irwin, Wm. & Co 1895 

Disbursements 

Johnson, R. W • 

Disbursements 



Jordan, John 

Jackson, Geo 1896 



James, Phillip 

Kennedy, John C 1896 



Kenntdy, Robt 

Keown, Louis 

Kissick, Robt 

Kerr, James 

Koch, John 1896 



9 c. 



55 20 
94 00 



146 00 
6 00 



144 00 
40 60 



140 63 
79 00 



100 00 
186 00 



154 00 
114 00 



King, Alfred : 

Kerby, John 

Lebrash, Jas. P 

Lebrasb, J. O. 

Disbursements 

LaSalle. H. N 1895 

Disbursements 

1896 



....1895 



Lafour, Alfred . . . . 

Lowry, James 

Langevin, Joseph. . 

Logan, Hugh 

Lyle, Jas 

Lalonde, Jos 

Lemyre, Meddy . . . 
Disbursements . 



Loyst, Andrew . . . . 

Lone, H, R 

Lynch, Jas. 

Morrison, Angus... 
Disbursements 



Carried forward . 



97 C5 

111 06 

33 00 



91 00 
13 50 



100 00 
61 .50 



$ c. 



9,615 30 



113 00 



149 

131 00 

70 21 

120 00 


152 00 
69 56 
4S 00 



96 00 



184 50 
94 00 


319 63 
105 00 


286 00 

88 00 

106 00 

100 00 

19 35 


268 00 
50 44 
31 00 

107 OC 



155 10 



241 31 
131 00 
50 00 
105 00 
129 00 
105 00 
131 00 



104 50 
112 00 

105 00 
104 00 



161 50 
13,857 60 



60,538 23 



60.538 23 



14 



APPENDIX No e.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 


$ 0. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




13,857 60 

175 05 
296 00 
100 00 

136 50 

118 00 

117 00 

82 00 

94 00 

59 26 

9«00 

129 00 

65 50 

133 58 

115 00 

77 00 

7 50 
104 00 

374 82 

277 30 
131 00 
131 00 
131 00 
131 00 
131 00 
97 00 

133 50 
26 00 

8 00 
139 00 

67 00 
123 00 
149 00 
129 00 
13100 

20 00 
131 00 
13100 
131 00 
131 00 

66 60 
131 00 
135 OC 
374 24 


60.538 23 


FiRK RAyciTXG. —Continued. 

Mar^ach, J. A 

Disbursement-" 


92 50 

82 55 




Macdonald, John D 




Macdona'd, D. F 






Moore. David 

Disbursements 

Manneii'ig, Rich'd 


.. ..1895 


75 00 
61 50 




Marshall, Wm 


1896 






Marshall, Thcs • 


1»<)6 




Mascott. R 




Max weH. John 




Maher. P 






May, Wm 




Moore, rreo 




McMavter, Wm 

Disbursements 


. ..1895 


20 58 
113 00 




McBrien, Rich'd 




Mc Vaughton. D. A., 






McConkey, Robt 


1«QR 






McElroy, Kobt 






McKay W. (; 


1<t<M 




Disbursements 




McNabb, R. J 


iKa.*; 






Disbursements 




McComb, J ames 






McTntyre, Wm 






McGuey, Denis 












Mcintosh, D 






McFarlane, John W 






McOreieht, John 


131 00 
2 50 




Disbursements 








McMillan, J H 






McOermett, P 






McCrindle, Jas 






Mcnermett,Ed 






McAdam, Jas 










McKay, Angus 






McEvoy Frank 

McDonell, Alex 










Nitz, Aupfust 












Nolan, John 








; ;;;;;.;;*; 




O'Brien, D. ' 




O'.Veil. A. J 




Oag, Wm 


1895 








•■ 


19,307 34 






60,538 23 



15 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 



Brought forward. 



FiRK Kasqihg.— Continued. 

Disbureementi 

Pickard, John 

Potvin, Jules 

Piche, John 

Pommerelly, Theo 18% 

Disbursements 



$ c. 



Plourd^ Chs.... 
Phillips, W. J . . . 
K tbinRon, Tho« . . 
Ripley, Thos. L . 
Rawson, Chaf». E 
Regan, Hugh .... 



.1896 



Roden Bros. , Disbursements 

Ryan, Jno 1896 

Blade, Wm 1896 

1897 

Smith, Wm 1896 

1897 



74 38 
33 75 



99 00 
92 CO 



Smith, Matthew . . 

Scantlin, James . . . 

Disbursements. 



Scantlin, John A.. 
Disbursements . 



Stanley, John 

Skuce. Thomas 1895 

Disbursements 

1897 

Disbursements 



Sharpe, Jame^ A . . 
Stewart, James . . . . 
Stewart, Frank . . . . 

Seeley, L 

Snell, John 

Sullivan, John . . . . 
Disbursements . 



105 00 
103 00 

131 00 
131 00 



60 00 

7 53 

157 00 

8 00 



Taylor, James A 1894 

Disbursements 



Trudean, Paul 

Thaxter, Robt 

Vandette, E 1895 



Di.sbursements . 



Carried forward . 



130 00 

65 95 

105 00 

15 50 

107 00 



126 64 
66 50 
11 00 



$ c. 



19,307 34 



619 00 


63 00 


114 00 


123 00 


108 13 


118 00 


113 00 


118 00 


43 00 


43 00 


191 00 


41 22 


72 00 



210 00 



262 00 
102 00 



67 53 



165 00 
73 00 



276 50 
254 00 
126 00 

86 00 
117 00 

25 00 



195 95 



227 50 
108 00 
132 00 



203 14 
23,704 31 



60,538 B3 



60,638 23 



16 



APPENDIX No. e.^Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1897, 



Name. 



Brought forioard . 



FiRB 'RhSQiso.— Continued. 



Vincent, Joseph 1896 

Urquhart, John 

Williams, Geo 

Watson, W. F 

Walsh, Isaac 

Disbursements 



Warren, Joseph 

Wells 

Wright, Wm 1896 

Welsh, Ed 

Winters, John 

Walters, Thos 

Yates, Stephen 

Young, Wm 1896 



144 00 
43 50 



$ c. 



23,704 31 



115 00 
131 00 



Jjess amount refunded by limit holders. 



BuBEAU OP Mines. 



Contingencies. 



Blue, A., travelling expenses 

Coleman, A. P. do 

Gibson, T. W. do 

Leonard, R. W. do 



Burnasb, Ed. M., services and report 
Black, C. H., reporting evidence 



James, O. S., assaying 

Typewriters 

Aueroid barometer .... 



Printing and binding. 
Stationery 



Carried forward . 



300 00 

27 05 
52 35 

28 30 



50 00 
60 00 



116 50 
25 00 



631 04 
270 79 



79 00 

131 00 

90 00 

18 50 



187 50 

52 50 

118 00 

117 00 

16 00 

18 00 

81 00 

106 00 



246 00 

24,963 81 
436 72 



407 70 

110 00 
62 00 

141 50 

901 83 
1,623 03 



60,538 23 



24,527 09 



85,065 32 



17 



APPENDIX No. ^.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the jeftr 1897. 



Name. 



Bronght foruard. 



BcBXAD or Minis.— Continued. 



Contingenoits. 



Postage 

Telegrapbinsr 

Exprees and freif^ht. 



Extra clerks 
Advertising . 
Sabscriptiun . 
Books 



Sondriee 



FOBISTBT. 



Contingeneiei. 



Sonthwortb, Thos.j travelling expenses 

Printing and binding , 

Htationery , 

Postage, telegraphing and express 



Thompson, P., services. 
O'Brien, S. J., do 
Brodie,W. do 



Subscriptions 
Backs 



Sundries 



RzruNDS 

Colonization Roads 
SOBVBTS 



Carried fonoard 



9 c. 



190 40 
67 78 
67 94 



466 00 
94 80 
76 89 



36 91 
71 58 
27 09 



286 75 

180 00 

16 00 


27 87 
67 80 



$ c. 



1,628 03 



316 07 
79 60 



625 89 
59 05 



150 00 
185 58 

481 75 

86 17 
29 48 



$ c. 



85,065 32 



2,703 .54 



831 98 
26,210 04 
93,379 10 
39,075 02 

246,265 00 



2 C. L. 



18 



APPENDIX No. ^.—Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 


t c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forvmrd 






246,265 00 


MiNiKO Dkvblopuknt. 

Bat Portage Office. 

Stewart, Glihu, sal&ry, afj^ent (resigned) 


427 40 
320 00 
120 00 


867 40 
778 83 


Charleaworth, L. 0.. ialary, ag^nt (actings) 




Winder, C. R , salary, clerk 








DiaburaemenU. 
Rent , 


180 00 
100 00 
110 00 
106 60 
117 76 
166 48 




Typewriter 

Safe 




Furniture 

•Stationery 

Sandries 










7,600 00 

1,000 00 

260 00 

400 00 

400 00 
2 70 


1,646 23 


Mining Sohoolt. 
School of Mines, Kins ston 




Summer School of Mines 




Ontario Mining Institute 

Experimental Treatment of Ores, School of Practical 
Science, Toronto 




Exijerimental Treatment of Ores, School of Practical 

Science, Kingston 

Map and School Supply Oo., test tubes 






457 50 
637 00 


9,652 70 


Mining Explorations and Inbpcotions. 

Inspector of Mint, East. 

Bow, J. A., salary 


1,094 60 
760 00 

670 20 
384 02 


do disbursements 




Intpeetor of Sfirua, We$t. 

Blaght, A., salary 




Miehipieoten Mining Divition. 
Boyd. D. G. inspector, salary 


262 00 
46 26 

268 76 
43 69 
69 60 




do disbursements 

Supplies 




Stationery 






164 02 
140 00 

48 00 
42 00 




do services 








Quackajigick,A., do 








2,898 72 






Carried forward 


260,362 65 



19 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 






260,362 65 


Mining ExpijOrationb and Inspkctions.— (7o»Um«erf. 

Expiorations. 

Millei, W. G., disbursements 

Modf^oD, R , services 


150 00 
68 00 
74 00 
50 00 


342 00 

1,111 25 
100 00 

10 65 
50 




Rogers, W. C. do 




Mason, W. do 








Coleman, A. P., salary 

Disbursemen te .... 


600 00 
611 25 








Parks, W. A. , services 






Bain, J. W., do 






Cartage - • 








496 24 

84 54 

407 34 
144 20 


1,564 40 


Dianwnd Drill. 

H. CoBsette, salary 

do disbursements 

Roche, W. , salary 

do disbursements 


580 78 

651 54 

466 59 

106 50 

13 55 

707 48 

601 86 
496 51 

3,524 81 
864 81 






Judge, J , salary 

do disbursements 

Delouix, D., salary 


418 59 
48 00 




Gibson, T. W., travelling expenses 

Sullivan Machine Co., supplies 


iioej" 

596 81 

231 80 
370 06 




Carbons 

Freight 

Supplies, etc 




Labor 

Refunded 




Mining Roads 




2,660 00 
32,986 05 


Mineral Collection, 




25 00 

231*22 

138 62 

28 00 

80 00 

418 53 




Goodwin, W. D., do 


138 62 
92 60 




do travelling expenses 

Miller, W. G. , services 




Bonstead, W. E., do 






Mineral specimens 






Oases, etc., for display of npinerals 






Carried forward 


921 37 


297,573 10 



20 



APPENDIX No. e.— Concluded. 
Siatement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1897. 



Name. 



Brought forward. 



Blow pipes, etc . 

Labels 

Freight, etc 



Slides . 



Iron Mining. 



Hamilton Blast furnace 

Bain, W. J., travelling expenses 



PiGKON RrVEB SLIDE AND DAM 

BlSCOTASING FIEB COHMIB8ION 

Whitefish Rbsebvk 

COLONIZATION H008K AND WHARF, TeHIBCAHINODE. 



Contingencies. 



Printing and binding 
Stationery 



Postage, telegraph and express 

Cab hire 

Car fare 



Sabscriptions and advertising 

Typewriters 

Mathematical instruments . . . 



Kirkpatrick, fJ. B., extra services. 

Mounting maps 

Extra clerks 

Sundries 



19 45 

12 70 

100 33 



1,416 25 
2,125 19 



1,755 84 
82 60 
45 00 



244 75 
22 05 



4,327 70 
294 13 



921 37 



132 48 
11 00 



4,000 00 
6 30 



3,541 44 



1,883 34 
1,722 73 



266 80 

200 00 

55 85 



4,621 83 



297,573 10 



1,064 86 



4,006 30 
160 87 

315 83 

13,905 00 

99 ao 



12,291 99 



$329,417 14 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accoantant. 
Dbpartment of Ceown Lands, 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



ToBONTO, 3l8t December, 1897. 



21 



APPENDIX No. 7. 

Woods and Forksts. 

Statement of revenue collected daring the year ending Slst December, 1897. 



■ 


$ c. 


$ c. 




Amuunt of Western District collections at Department 

" " " Quebec 


828.961 60 
40,586 66 


869,547 26 


Amuunt of Belleville collectionti 


64,589 05 

383,867 77 
9,146 00 


Amount of Ottawa collections 


64.689 05 


" *■ at Quebec 

Total 


893,003 77 
1,327,140 08 







AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner 



J. A G. CROZIER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 

Ukpartmknt of Crown Lands, 

WooDb AND Forest Branch, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1897. 



22 



APPENDIX 

Woods and 

Statement of timber and amounts accrued from timber dupH, ground 





Area 
covered 
by timber 
license. 


QUANTITY AND 




Saw Logs. 


Boom and 


A|;enciee. 


Pine. 


Other. 


Pine. 




S(^aare 
milec. 


Pieces. 


Feet B. M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B. M. 


• 
Western Timber District. 

Belleville Timber District. 

Ottawa Timber District. . 


7,699 
1,429 
7,272 


3,211,323 

449,803 

1,720,385 


238,902,079 

55,795,687 

183.018,682 


71,740 
46,509 
49,318 


3,169,072 
2,277,158 
3,312,486 


75,685 
10,466 
59,580 


14.964,441 
2,0.55.981 
9.064,316 


Total 


16,400 


6,381,511 


477,716,448 


167,567 


8,768,716 


145,731 


26,084,737 





GENERAL STATEMENT OF 



Agencies. 


Tan Bark. 


Railway 
Ties. 


Posts. 


Tel^aph 
Poles. 


Staves 

and Shingle 

Bolts. 


Piles and Head 
Blocks. 




Cords. 


Pieces. 


Cord. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Western Timber District. 




164,769 
15,986 
08.200 


47 
356 
203 




• 860 
228 
378 


60 


64.937 


Belleville Timber District. 




447 
146 




Ottawa Timber District . . 


126 








1 "-' -' 






Total 


125 278,965 


606 


593 


1,466 


60 


64,937 



J. A. G. OROZIER, 

Chief Olerk in Charge. 
Department op Crown Lands, Woods and Forests Branch, 
Toronto, Slat December, 1897. 



23 



No. 8. 

Forests. 

rent and bonns during the year ending the 3l8t of December, 1897. 



DESCRIPTION OF TIMBER. 



dimension timber. 


Square Timber. 


Cedar. 


Cordwood. 


Other. 


White Pine. 


Birch, Ash, Oak, 
Tamarac. 

1 


Hard. 


Soft. 


Pieces. 


FeetB. M. 


Pieces. 


Cubic 
feet. 


Pieces. 


Cubic 
feet. 


Lineal feet . 


Cords. 


Cords. 


508 
S.337 
2,029 


72,404 
406,013 
228,443 


31,808 

3 

6,858 


1,623,840 

122 

353.488 


B. 632 
A. 82 

0. 42 

A. 20 

B. 213 
A. 48 
T. 28 


18,106 
2,314 

405 

532 

5,763 

1,054 

636 


1,830 

32,089 

211,225 


619 

90 

795 


2,926 
280 
40» 


4,774 


706,860 


38,609 


1,977,400 


B. 845 
A. 150 
0. 42 
T. 28 


23,869 

3.900 

405 

686 


245,144 


1,504 


3,614 



TIMBER, Etc.— Continusd. 



West 

India 

Staves. 


Pulp 
wood. 


Travbrses. 


Inverest. 


Trespass. 


Amounts accrued. 


Timber 
dues. 


Bonus. 


Groud 
Rent. 


Total. 


Feet. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


« 0. 


t c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


< 0. 


7,700 


46,009 




7,162 37 
1,634 99 
6.977 95 


1,261 20 
146 39 

2,876 15 


316,192 08 

69,461 33 

208,085 15 


229,272 14 


29,026 44 

4,770 00 

19,932 00 


682,914 23 

76,012 71 

237,871 25 




379 


926 








7,700 


46,388 


926 


16,775 31 


4,283 74 


593,738 56 


229,272 14 


53,728 44 


896,798 19 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant OommiBsioner. 



24 



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29 



APPENDIX No. 11. 
Statement of Patente, etc., issued by the Patents Branch daring th^ year 1897. 



Grown Lands 

School do 

Mining do 

Pnblic do (late Clergy Reserves) . . 

Free Grant Lands (A. A.) 

do do (under Act of 1880) . 

Rainy River do (Mining and Crown) 

Mining leases 

Licenses of occupation 

Total 



Number. 



291 
54 

as 

24 

33 

21.'5 

489 

671 

12 



1,820 



CHARLES S. JONES, 

Chief Clerk. 



Departxbnt op Ceown Lands, 

ToBONTO, 3l8t December, 1897. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant CommisBioner 



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34. 



(Appendix No. 16.) 
TOWNSHIP OF BURWASH. 

District of Nipissing. 

Chatham, Ontario, 
November 8th, 1897 

Sir, — -I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the 
township of Burwash, in the district of Nipissing. 

In pursuance of the instructions received from the Director of Surveys* 
dated the 21st day of June, 1897, I left Chatham in the following August to 
carry cut his directions. I proceeded to the south-east corner of the township 
above mentioned, where I found the tamarac post referred to by the Director, 
marked VI. M. on the west side planted by 0. L. S. Bell in 1874 At this 
point I commenced my survey, retracing the south and east boundaries, 
giving the concessions along the latter a depth of eighty chains. Taking 
an observation from the north star, I found the east boundary bearing 
manifestly to the east. Upon referring to the plan of parts of the dis- 
tricts of Nipissing and Algoma, furnished to me by the Director, I found an 
apparent jog between the east boundaries of the townships of Burwash 
and Cleland of half a mile. According to the projected plan accompanying and 
forming part of my instructions, the south-east corners of the above mentioned 
townships were connected by a straight line, which included the east boundary 
of the boundary of the township of Burwash. I therefore did not give lot 1 
along the south boundary a width of forty chains, supposing that if I had done so 
and run the side lines north astronomically lot 1 in all the concessions would far 
exceed the desired areas, and lot 12 would be wanting in the sixth concession. 
In consideration of these probabilities, I ran the front of the fourth concession 
west, astronomically from the east boundary, giving lots 1 and 2 each a width of 
fprty chains. I then ran a meridian between lots 2 and 3 to the north and south 
boundaries. I then gave the lots a width of forty chains along the south boun- 
dary, from where the line between lots 2 and 3 intersected it. I might incident- 
ally mention that there were two lines run and blazed in establishing the east 
boundary of the township. This I never knew until I had surveyed about one- 
quarter of the township. I afterwards accidentally ascertained from an Ontario 
fire* ranger, who assisted in the establishment of this boundary, that there were 
two lines and that the easterly one was correct, I then discovered the two lines 
and found that I had closed some of the concessions upon one line and others upon 
the other, naturally supposing them to be one and the same line. These two 
lines give me additional work, necessitating alterations and corrections. I ran 
the concessions and side lines respectively west and north astronomically. I 
found the south and west boundaries in some places entirely obliterated, owing 
to forest fires, where I ran straight lines between points where these boundaries 
could be clearly and satisfactorily ascertained. The west boundarj' bears to the 
east although not as much as the east boundary. The north and south boun- 
daries run practically due east and west. I planted iron posts ore and a quarter 
inches in diameter at the south-west and north-west comers of the township. 
The post at the former corner being marked " Burwash " on the north-east side, 
the one at the latter, " Burwash " on the south-east side, " Cleland " on the north- 



35 



east side and " Dill " on the north-west side. The geological formation belongs 
to the Laurentian. The township has been visited upon a great many occasions 
with forest fires, extending over a period of about seventy -five years, the most 
recent destruction having been done two years ago. The township has a few 
high and rocky hills, but on the whole is comparatively level and is well adapted 
for agricultural purposes, there being large tracts of perfectly level land covered 
with hay and having a clay sub-soil. There is a large quantity of valuable white 
pine in the township, which I understood was sold about thirty years ago. I 
met with the usual timber common to this region, that above mentioned, together 
with red pine, balsam, spruce, cedar, tamarac, birch, poplar, maple, oak, black ash 
and elm. The last three in small quantities. I could not suggest any better 
method of taking out this timber than that which has already been adopted. 
The companies who have been lumbering in this township have dammed the 
small streams, thus forming lakes, down which they float the timber. They have 
also built a chute in the dam for the purpose of floating through large quantities of 
timber with as small a quantity of water as possible. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

W. F. O'HARA, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Hon. J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Ont. 



(Appendix No. 17.) 

TOWNSHIP OF JHERRIMAN. 

District of Nipissing. 

Leamington, 

nth December, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the 
township of Cherriraan, in the District of Nipissing, subdivided by me this year 
as directed by instructions from your department bearing date 21st June. 1897. 

Obtaining my supplies and most of my men in North Bay, I proceeded from 
there with my party and supplies up Lake Nipissing by a small steamer chartered 
for the purpose direct into the south portion of lot number one in the fifth 
concession of the township. I found on reaching the township that the line run 
by 0. L. S. McAree in 1882 as the boundary between timber berths twenty and 
twenty-eight and which line was to form my east boundary, had recently been 
retraced and opened out by O. L. S. Fitzgerald as the west boundary of ihe 
township of Haddo, and following west from the lake along this line, I found the 
iron post planted last year by Coad and Robertson to mark the northwest angle 
of the Township of Martland, which post was to form the starting point of my 
survey. This post had the word " Martland " marked on the southeast side of it, 
and I cut with a cold-chisel on the northeast side the word " Haddo." and on the 
northwest side the word •' Cherriman," as directed, and having obtained an 
observation of Polaris at its greatest elongation, I proceeded to lay out the town- 
ship from this post as a starting-post, running a line therefrom due west 



36 



astronomically for the front of my first concession. Planting the lot posts at 
regular intervals of forty chains each, and from the same starting point 1 chained 
north along the east boundary, planting the posts at regular intervals of 80 
chains for the starting points of the concession lines, and from the posts thus 
planted I ran each alternate lot line up to lot 11 due north astronomically and 
each concession line due west, astronomically. At the southwest angle of the 
township I planted a pine post with the iron post provided by your department 
along side of it, marking each on the northeast side with the word " Cherriman." 
This angle of the township I determined by producing my west boundary due 
south astronomically from the post in a stone cairn at the northwest angle 
of the township marked XXIX. on the north east side, XXVIII. on the south- 
east side. XXXVI. on the southwest side, and XXXVII. on the northwest side, 
until it intersected the line which I ran west for my south boundary. Good; 
substantial posts, properly marked, were planted at the front angles of all the 
lots and on the north boundary at the intersection with the lines fun to it 
O. L. S. McAree's old post on the east boundary were all found, and also those of 
O. L. S. Beatty planted on the north boundary, and their respective positions as 
I found them are noted in the field notes. 

The township throughout is rough and rocky, a small tract of land in the 
1st concession in the southeast aijd southwest portions of the township being 
the best land at present fit for agricultural purposes. There are, however, a 
large number of beaver meadows and swamps, which, if drained, would make fairly 
good grazing land. 

Lake Nipissing forms the outlet for the waters of the greater portion of the 
township, the southwest part draining into what is known as Trout Lake, 
which traverses the southwest part of the township. 

The township may be said to be denuded of timber of a merchantable 
character, fire having apparently run over it a number of times, and left nothing 
standing but some scattering pine stubs. It is now grown up with small poplar, 
birch, spruce, pitch pine, balsam and alder and willow bushes, a few scattering 
white pine are to be found along the north side of Trout Lake, and on lots 11, 
12 and 13 groves of small pitch pine. 

Some lumbering around the lakes in the west portion of the township has 
been carried on in recent years as indicated by the logs found lying in the creek 
along the west boundary and the old cuttings found. 

Pickerel, pike and black bass abound in the lakes of this township. 
Red deer and moose are plentiful and, from , the indications seen, bear* 
beaver, and wolf are to be found. 

No economic minerals were met with during the work of survey. 
The variation of the magnetic needle was very regular throughout the 
vey, being 7' 15" west. 
Hoping you may find the accompanying returns satisfactory, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 

(Sgd.) ALEXANDER BAIRD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto, Ont. 



37 

{Appendix No. 18.) 

TOWNSHIP OF HENDRIE. 

District of Nipissing. 

Woodstock, Ontario, 

26th October, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the 
township of Hendrie under instructions from your Department dated June 2 1st, 
1897. 

I proceeded to the work on the 17th of August via Sturgeon river and Lake 
Nipissing with a party of fourteen men. A tug was employed for the first day's 
journey, when the water becoming shallow, canoes were made use of. 

The eastern boundary of the township was reached at noon on the 18th. 
The post at the southeast angle of the township described in the instructions was 
found without difficulty. The survey was carried on without interruption till its 
completion at the north west angle of the township on Friday, 1 7th September. 
The party returned to Sturgeon Falls via Lake Nepawassing, Veuve river, Lake 
Nipissing and Sturgeon river, the trip lasting two days. The township of 
Hendrie is exceedingly well watered by numerous lakes and small creeks, with 
the exception of the north easterly portion the surface is rocky and undulating, 
occasional small areas of moderately fertile land are met with, on which the soil 
is sandy loam and there are a great many rich beaver meadows which could be 
easily drained as the outlets are rocky creeks with rapid fall. The northeasterly 
portion of the township is flat, the soil a light sandy loam interspersed with 
rocky knolls. There would probably be 20 per cent, of the land of the township 
suitable for cultivation or grazing. 

The township has been lumbered over except the southwest corner on which 
is standing valuable white pine. 

The northeast portion was overrun by fire some years ago and is now de- 
void of timber. Quantities of Norway pine 8 to 10 inches in diameter are still 
standing on the other portions. 

No economic minerals were met with, the rocks being of the Laurentian 
formation. 

Red deer, moose and bear are plentiful, the lakes are well stocked with fish — 
black bass and pike. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



WM. MAHLON DAVIS. 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



38 

(Appendix No. 19.) 

TOWNSHIP OF JENNINGS. 

District of Nipissing. 

Hamilton, 

November 23rd, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report the completion of the survey of the 
township of Jennings in the District of Nipissing, under your instructions, dated 
21st June, 1897. 

On July 14th. I left VVarren, a small village on the Canadian Pacific Railway, 
about forty-three miles west of North Bay, with m}'^ party and there being a fair 
bush road made by the settlers who have taken up land in the northern portions 
of the townships of Casimir and Jennings, I was enabled to drive waggons con- 
taining my outfit and supplies right into northeast angle of the township where 
I arrived the same evening. 

I commenced work as instructed, at the southeast angle of the township' 
and retraced and rechained my south boundary, planting posts at regular distances 
of forty chains apart until I arrived at the southeast angle of lot number thirteen, 
continuing my chainage west to the southwest angle of the township I found 
lot thirteen to be forty-one chains and twenty-four links. 

The northern portion of the township is in general rolling. 

The soil consists of clay and sandy loam. 

Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions and all of concession 
six are well adapted for agricultural purposes, and are at the present time being 
settled by French Canadians from the Ottawa and Quebec districts, the balance of 
the 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions is broken by rocky ridges with small stretches of 
good land between them. 

The greater portion of concessions 1 and 2 is very rough and rocky, 
particularly in the vicinity of the lakes. 

The whole township has been burnt over several times, and is now covered 
with second growth poplar, birch, spruce, tamarac and pitch pine, on the high 
lands, and thick willow, and alder on the low. There is very little green pine 
now standing, and that is found principally along the ridges surrounding the 
large lake which is situated in the southwest portion of the township. 

There are two mill sites in the township, the first on lot 9 concession 1 
near the south boundary, the second on a creek emptying into Waubumac Lake 
on lot 8 concession 1 at a point about ten chains northerly from the lake, each 
site having a natural fall of about ten feet. 

On the first site mentioned there is at present a dam and slide which has 
been built and used by the lumbermen operating on the lakes west of it. 

The lines are all well cut out and blazed and substantial posts planted. 

No economic minerals were found during the progress of the survey. 

There are a great number of lakes in the township all of which abound with 
fish, principally pike, pickerel and bass. 

Considerable large game was seen during the survey, several moose and red 
deer, also four bears, wolves were heard frequently during the nights, partridges 
were also plentiful. 



39 



On account of the dryness of the season the waters in the creeks and lakes 
were very low, the former in most cases completely dry. The water in the large 
lake in the southwest angle of the township fell nearly three feet during the 
progress of survey. Accompanying this report is a general plan, timber plan, 
statement of settlers claims, field notes and account duly sworn to. 

I have the honor to b6, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOMAS R. HEWSON, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Appendix No. 20.) 

TOWNSHIP OF LOUDON. 

District of Nipissino. 

Parry Sou^d, 

November 23rd, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report that I have surveyed the township of 
Loudon in the Nipissing District under your instructions, dated June, A.D. 1897. 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township, where I 
found an iron bar, and which I marked " Loudon " facing to the northwest and con- 
cession 1 to the north and chained north on the old Meridian line or East Boundary 
of the township to the south shore of West Bay and planted posts at the depth 
of eighty chains at the front of the second and third concession, the weather was 
cloudy at the time, and I could not observe Polaris, and I opened up the old line 
for about half a mile and turned off a right angle at the front of the third con- 
cession aTid ran line west to lot 4 where I observed Polaris at eastern elonga- 
tion on the night of August 2nd, Azimuth 1' 47' 30" and found my line running 
four minutes too much to the south, I corrected the bearing and made said line a 
base tor my work. 

I surveyed all that part of the township south of West Bay before doing 
any work on the north side, said West Bay continues all the way across, the 
township dividing it into nearly two equal parts. 

After finishing the survey south of the Bay, I moved over to the north side,^ 
and carried the survey from the west boundary eastward, having previously run 
the east boundary across the Bay and triangulated the distance. 

I chained the west boundary from the southwest angle of the township to 
West Bay and found my chaining agreeing with the field notes furnished me 
from your office, and was informed by Mr. Fitzgerald that he had 
chained the other two miles of the Boundary, and that his chaining 
exactly agreed with original survey, I therefore concluded that it 
was not necessary to rechain, and have not given any field notes 
for the West Boundary. I ' was only able to chain the north boundary 
from the northwest angle to the line between lots 4 and 5 on account of 



40 



deep water in a marsh through which a large creek empties into middle west 
Bay. I was informed by the Indians that the water in Lake Nipissing was con- 
siderably higher than in other years at the same season, making the marshes 
which in several places border bays of the lake impassable, notably the one just 
mentioned, and a large one at the west end of West Bay in concession 4 where 
what I have shewn as islands one and two are usually in the summer season 
attached to the main land by marsh that can be travelled over, although always 
in the spring the marsh is navigable for canoes. 

There is very little difference in the character of the surface soil or timber 
throughout the whole township excepting on the point between west and middle 
West Bays where there is some scattered white pine, bat not of a very good 
quality, the other part of the township is timbered with small poplar and pitch 
pine, poplar prevailing on the south side of the bay and pitch pine on the north 
side. 

The soil is generally light, but in a few places there is good loam as indicated 
in the field notes, but there is not sufficient good land in any one place to form 
a large settlement. 

There is no settler living in the township, and the only improvement is a 
small chopping on lot 9 concession 6. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

DAVID BEATTY. 
The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Appendix No. 21.) 

EAST PART OF THE TOWNSHIP OF ARCHIBALD. 

District of Algoma. 

Tilbury, January 26th, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the 
east part of the township of Archibald, in the District of Algoma, under instruc- 
tions from your department, bearing date the 18th June, 1896. 

I commenced the survey at the south-east angle of the township at a cedar 
post, where I also planted an iron post alongside of it, of gaspipe three feet long, 
one and a quarter inches in diameter, forged at the top and pointed at the bottom, 
and marked with a cold chisel the words, " Archibald " facing the northeast and 
Tupper facing the southwest. 

I then retraced the north boundary of the township of Tupper, which is the 
front of my first concession, planting the lot posts thereon as directed in the 
instructions, until I reached the line run or retraced by O. L. S. Joseph Cozens in 
1893 for the east boundary of the Indian Reserve, where I planted a similar iron 
post and also the old post alongside of it, which I found lying down and nearly 
decayed. The iron post is marked with the words "Archibald" facing the north- 
east and Tupper facing the .south-east and I. R., for Indian Reserve^ facin^ the 
west. 



41 



I then surveyed the other concession lines and side lines as directed in 
instniction'j, or as nearly so as possible. 

I also planted a similar iron post at the northeast angle of the township 
alongside of the old cedar post, which was the only old post that was found 
standing throughout the survey, and the marks were quite distinct on it. The 
iron post was marked " Archibald ' facing the southwest. 

I also planted a similar iron post at the northwest corner of lot 7, con- 
cession 6, or east limit of the Indian Reserve marked "Archibald" facing the south- 
east and I. R. for Indian Reserve facing the southwest. 

The west boundary was rather difficult to retrace, owing to the trees being 
blazed rather lightly and too far apart in places and the line not being run exactly 
straight. 

This portion of the township is rather rough and mountainous, but the soil 
is principally sandy loam of a very good quality, except in the marshes, where it 
is a very light sand. There will be about fifty per cent, of the township that 
would make fairly good agricultural and pasture land. 

There are no rocks in the township worth mentioning except an occasional 
l)luff in the mountains and a few scattered boulders, none of which are of any 
•economic value. 

There is not sufficient pine in the township to^make it of any commercial 
value, as it is so scattered that it would cost nearly as much to get it out as the 
timber would be worth. 

The principal timber is hard maple, white and black birch of medium size, 
but rather short and scrubby. There are some balsam, cedar and spruce, which 
generally grows in the swamps or low lands. 

There is good water nearly all through the township in small streams or 
spring creeks, and a branch of the Chippawa River enter-s the town- 
ship in lot 1 in the sixth concession and crosses into the fifth concession about 
the centre of lot 1 and thence runs westerly all the way across the fifth conces- 
sion, crossing the west boundary nearly in the centre of the concession. It will 
average about fifty feet in width and is very shallow, in many places at present, 
there being not over three or four inches of water confined into a narrow channel. 
The water is very clear and the bottom is stony or gravelly. There are no lakes of 
any size in the township. There was very little game seen in the township, 
except some caribou, partridge and porcupine. There are no settlers in this part 
of the township. The variation of the magnetic needle was four degrees west 
and very regular throughout the survey. 

Accompanying this report are plan, field notes and account. 

I hive the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOS. M. TIERNAN, 
O. L. S. 
To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



42 



(Appendix N^o. 22.) 

TOWNSHIP OF CURTIS. 

District of Algoma. 

Essex, January 29th, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the 
Township of Curtis, in the District of Algoma, performed under instructions front 
your Department, dated 18th June, 1896 : 

From the village of Garden River, where I obtained my supplies and most o^ 
my men, I proceeded up the Garden River with my party and supplies in small 
flat bottomed boats to where the river is crossed by the north boundary of the 
Township of Gillmor. The passage up the river on account of the shallow water 
and the great stretches of rapids in the same, being very tedious. We were forced 
to wade Che river about three-quarters of the distance from its mouth to the 
township and tow our boats with the provisions and lift them over the innumer- 
able rapids, which entailed a great amount of labor and loss of time in reaching the 
township. This was he easiest and only expeditious way of getting in my sup- 
plies. Having found the north boundary of the Township of Gillmor, where it 
crosses Garden River, I retraced it east to the northeast angle of that township, 
where I found the cedar post standing which was to form the starting point of 
my survey and the southeast angle of the Township of Curtis, alongside of which 
post I planted a new cedar post marked "Gillmor" on the south side "Curtis, Lot 1 " 
on the west side and concession 1 on the north side, and alongside of these posts 
I drove firmly in the ground the iron post with the names Curtis and Gillmor cut 
with a cold chisel, the names facing the respective townships, and from these posts 
I started my survey by retracing and chaining west along the north boundary of 
Gillmor for the front of my first concession and placinsr the lot posts thereon at 
regular intervals, and I ran from the said iron post due north astronomically 
for my east boundary, planting the posts for the front of each concession at regu- 
lar intervals as directed and from the posts thus planted in front of my first 
concession, I surveyed out each alternate lot line and from the posts planted on 
my east boundary I ran the several concession lines as directed 

At the southwest angle of the township and northwest angle of Gillmor I 
found P. L. S. Thompson's cedar post lying on the ground marked " Gillmor,"' 
and where I found this post I planted a new cedar post marked " Gillmor, Chesley " 
and " Curtis, Con. 1, Lot 12," and an iron post alongside the same marked 
Gillmor, Chesley and Curtis, cut with a cold chisel, the names facing the 
respective townships, and built a stone cairn around the posts. 

At the northeast angle of the township I planted a Spruce post marked on 
the southwest side Curtis, Con. VI. Lot 1, and alongside of this an iron post 
marked Curtis, cut with a cold chisel, the name facing the township and built a 
stone cairn around the same. 

At the nort .west angle of the township, which is the northeast angle of 
the Township of Whitman, I found O. L. S. Bolger's cedar post standing marked 
" Con. vi. Lot 1," and alongside of this I planted a new cedar post marked "Curtis, 
Con vi.. Lot 12," on the east side, and Whitman on the west side, and " Con. vi." 
on the south side, and along side of these posts I drove firmly in the ground an 
iron post marked " Whitman and Curtis," cut with a cold chisel, and with the 
name facing the respective townships. 



43 



The township throughout is very rough, stony and rocky. The rocky hills 
reaching from 100 to 300 feet in height, the only good level land being found in 
the valley of the Garden River. 

Garden River, and a fair sized creek which is a branch of the river, traverse 
the greater portion of the township, and form the outlet for the drainage of the 
same. The timber of the township can be readily floated doAvn this river during the 
spring floods. In this river abound the largest sized and finest speckled trout I 
have ever seen. 

The timcer consists principally of spruce, cedar, tamarac, maple, birch and 
balsam, some very good pine being found in the north part of the sixth concession 
and along the west side of the branch of Garden River ; spruce, suitable for 
pulp-wood, being found in large quantities along the branch of the river and in 
the southeast portion of the township. 

Beaver, red deer, moose and black bear are to be founJ n tho township, 
judging from the numerous footprints seen during the survey. 

No economic minerals were met with during the w^ork of survey. 

The variation of the magnetic needle was found to be 4' 15" west, and was 
very regular throughout the survey. 

Trusting you may find the returns of the survey accompanying this report 
satisfactory, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



JAM>:;S S. LAIRD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor.. 



(Appendix No, 23.) 

TOWNSHIP OF HARROW. 

Fenelon Fall, 

31st December, 1896. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report that in accordance with \ our instructions 
dated 24th June, 1896, I have made a survey of the Township of Harrow, in the' 
District of Algoma, dividing it into farm lots of 320 acres each. 

The total area of this township is 24,227 acres, of which 20,995 acres are 
land, and 2,182 acres are water, and 1,050 acres are minino- lands. 

It is bounded on the west by the Hon. Hudson Bay Co.'s property known as 
Fort La Cloche ; on the north by the Township of May ; on the east by the Town- 
ship of McKinnon; and on the south by the "Georgian Bay," and embraces 
within its bounds the La Cloche mountains, which are the highest on the north 
shore of Lake Huron. 

In going to the field T engaged a tug at Little Current, which landed me on 
the north shore, as near as I could estimate, to the west boundary of the Town- 
ship of McKinnon, which I found after a short search. Here, alongside the post 



44 



which defines the southwest angle of the Township of McKinnon, and in a cairn 
of stones, I planted an iron post three feet long by one and one-fourth inchesin 
•<liameter and painted red, the name " Harrow " cut into the west side with a 
<;old chisel, and " McKinnon " cut into the east side. 

I then moved my camp north along the boundary to the post between con- 
cessions A and 1 of McKinnon, and that evening, Thursday, 16th of August, 
observed Polaris for Azimuth, and next day ran my first line — that between 
concessions A and 1, starting from the post between those two concessions in the 
Township of McKinnon on a course due west astronomically one mile across lots 
1 and 2, and turned off the angle for the first sideline, running it due north. 

I then moved camp to a small stream a short distance west of sideline 2 and 
3, and from there produced concessions A and 1, one and one-half miles further 
also the line between lots 2 and 3 south to Lake Huron and north to the line 
between concessions II and III, and also concessions I and II, two miles 
west from the east boundary ; when I moved camp west to the line be- 
tween lots 4 and 5, which I ran north to the line between concessions 
I and II and south to the lake; also the line between concessions A and 
I, one mile further west, and the line between lots 6 and 7 south to 
Lake Huron and north to La Cloche Lake. From this I moved camp west to 
a point on the north side of the south bay of La Cloche Lake, where I estimated 
the liae between lots 8 and 9 would cross, and from there ran all the lines south 
of and ipcluding the line between concessions II and III to the west boundary, 
also traversed the south boundary of the township. 

I then moved by water to and up McKinnon Creek to the road which 
leads to Thompson Smith's depot in the Township of McKinnon, and packing 
one and one-half miles east, camped while I ran all the lines convenient from 
there and moved north by the line between lots 4 and 5, to the line between con- 
cessions IV and V, and from thence in two moves west to the line between lots 
8 and 9, and finished the survey in the northwest corner of the township. 

I did not find any post at the southwest corner of the township, as men- 
tioned in my instructions, neither did I find any bearing tree at this point. But I 
was shown the spot where the post had stood by an Indian half-breed, also a few 
blazed trees indicating the west boundary. Here I planted in a cairn of stones a 
large cedar post with an iron one alongside of it, both marked " H. B. C." on the 
. west side and " Harrow " on the east side, and marked also a bearing tree. At the 
northeast and northwest corners I found posts as indicated in my instructions, 
and planted alongside of each an iron post similar to those at the other two 
angles, i.e., three feet long by one and one-fourth inches in diameter, painted red, 
the name 'Harrow " cut on one side, and those of the adjacent townships cut on 
the other sides. 

All the other posts are made of the best material available, none less than 
six inches square, the figures cut into them with a proper marking iron, and 
bearing .trees taken wherever they were to be had. 

Harrow was at one time a valuable timber berth, but the pine is now all 
taken ofi", except a few thousand pieces near the east end of the first and second 
concessions. 

A great part of the township has been burned over several times. The 
mountain.i south of Lake La Cloche are nearly bare, with only a few clusters of 
small Jack pine, white birch and poplar scattered here and there. But in the 
def'per valle3s bet^veen the highest mountain ranges there are still considerable 
groves of large maple, beech, birch and hemlock, with a dense undergrowth 



45 



affording food and shelter to Moose and Caribou, which are there in considerahle 
numbers. 

Between the two branches of La Cloche Lake the timber is still nearly all 
green, also on the line between concessions IV and V from the lake on lot 2 to lot 6. 
The same concession line also passes through green woods from about the middle 
of lot 10 to the west boundary. Nearly all the remainder of the township north 
of this, also along the east boundary north of the centre of the second concession 
is nearly all stripped of timber, the latest tire occurring a year ago last August. 

The proportion of good land in the township is small. The mining location 
16 P., the property of Messrs. Cutler & Savage, is nearly all good land ; also in 
lot 3, concessions V and VI, there is sufficient good land to make a couple of farms. 
Also a narrow .strip of good land on the north end of lots 6 and 7 in concession 6. 

All of concessions V and VI, west of and including lot 8, is good land, with 
the exception of a few ridges of rock. 

The soil is a heavy clay, but has been nearly all burned over and the 
vegetable mould destroyed. I found settlers on all this section except on lots 11 
and 12 in the I Vth concession, and two men began underbru.shing on those lots 
the day after I ran the concession line. 

They all expres.sed themselves as being well satisfied with their success 
during the short time they had been there, and had excellent crops last season. 

All the balance of the township is worthless for agriculture. East 
and south of La Clochu I^ke it is one continuous mass of towering mountains 
with numerous precipices. In one day I had to make two triangulations, it being 
impossible to chain the line. Small streams are numerous, but .some of tiiLin diy 
up in the summer. The water is all of the very purest quality. 

Ihe rocks south of La Cloche Lake are chiefly quartzite ; those to the north 
are nearly all granite or gnei&s, with occasional outcropping of Huronian. 

The northwest corner of the township is within two miles of the villajje of 
Massey Station on the Sault Ste. Marie branrjh of the C. P. Railway, to which 
there is a fairly good waggon road. A small amount of money judiciously 
expended would make a good road into all that part fitted for settlement. 

I enclose also my plan and field notes of the survey. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JAMES DICKSON, 

"O. L. S." 
The Honorable, J. M. Gibson. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands. 
Toronto. 



46 



(Appendix No. 2^.) 

EASTERN PART OF TOWNSHIP OF TUPPER. 

District of Algoma. 

Tilbury, Nov. 3rd, 1896. 

Sir, — T have fche honor to submit the following report of the survey of the 
east part of the Township of Tupper, in the District of Algoma, under instruc- 
tions from your Department, bearing date the 18th Jane, 1896. 

Procuring teams at Sault Ste. Marie, I started north on what is known as 
the Government road, with my men and supplies, to the south boundary of 
Tupper and leaving the Government road a little to the north of this I followed 
a lumber road easterly across the west part of Tupper or Indian Reserve to 
within one- half mile from the west limit of lot seven. 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township at a cedar 
post where I also planted an iron post, made of gas pipe, one and a quarter inches 
diameter, three feet long, forged at the top and pointed at the bottom and marked 
with a cold chisel the words "Tupper " on the north-west and " Vankoughnet" on 
the south. I then retraced the north boundary of Vankoughnet, as the front of my 
first concession, planting posts thereon at regular intervals of forty chains, as 
directed in the instructions, until I reached the east boundary of the Indian 
reserve, surveyed or retraced by 0. L. S. Joseph Cozens, in 1893. I did not find 
any post at this point, merely the intersection of the two lines. I planted a 
similar iron post in stone mound at this point, marked Tupper on the north and 
Vankoughnet on the south, and I. R., for Indian reserve, on the west. I then 
surveyed the other concession lines and side lines, as directed in the instructions, 
or as nearly so as possible under the circumstances. The west boundary was 
rather difficult to retrace in some places, as the blazes were rather too far apart in 
places, and the line not having been run straight. 

The township is well watered with numerous small streams, or spring creeks, 
of nice clear water, and there are quite a number of lakes, varying in size from 
three or four acres to three or four hundred acres, which abound with beautiful 
fi.sh, such as black bass, pike, etc. The soil is principally sandy loam of a very 
good quality, but, owing to the surface being so very rough and hilly, it will not 
be so well adapted for agricultural purposes as the nature of the soil would entitle 
it to. There will be about sixty per cent, of the township that will make fairly 
good farming land. 

The township is timbered principally with hardwood, birds-eye maple, white 
and black birch of medium size, but rather shorb and scrubby. There is but 
very little pine in the township, and it is so scattered that it is of very little 
commercial value. The other kinds of timber are balsam, cedar and spruce. 

The township does not appear to ever have been burnt over. 

The only game seen throughout the survey was cariboo and partridge, which 
.seemed to be fairly plentiful. 

There are no settlers in this part of the township. ' 



47 



No indications of mineral were found in the township, and the variation of 
the magnetic needle was about four degrees west, and was very regular through- 
out the survey. 

Accompanying this report you will find plans, field notes and account, which, 
I trust, you will find satisfactory. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOS. M. TIERNAN, 

O. L. S. 

The Hon. J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner Crown Land^, 

Toronto, Ont. 



(Appendix No. 25.) 

TOWNSHIP OF SANFORD. 

District of Rainy River. 

St. Thomas, Ontario. . 

19th November, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the 
Township of Sanford, in the District of Rainy River, performed under instruc- 
tions received from your Depirtment, and dated the eighth day of July, 1897. 

This township is bounded on the east by theTo\ynship of Eton, on the south 
by the Township of Aubrey, and on the north and west by unsurveyed lands of 
the Crown. 

The southeast and northeast angles were each marked by an iron and a 
wooden post, as being the southwest and northwest angles i espectively, of the 
township of Eton, surveyed in 1896 : the southwest angle was also marked by an 
iron and a wooden post, planted by O. L. S. Stewait, in his survey of Canadian 
Pacific Railway and outlines of townships, in 1896, as the southwest angle of 
township thirty-five (now Sanford). 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township, taking an 
observation for azimuth, and running d :e west on the south boundary, on which 
I planted posts at regular intervals of forty chains, for the front angles of lots in 
the first concession. I afterwards ran the several concession lines and the north 
boundary due west astronomically, giving to each concession a depth of eighty 
chains, and the side lines between lots two and three, four and five, six and 
seven, eight and nine, ten and eleven, and the west boundary due north astro- 
nomically, from their respective posts on the south boundary. I also made a 
survey of those portions of the Eagle and Wabigoon rivers, and of the Can- 
adian Pacific Railway, which lie within the township. 



48 



On each of the concession lines the posts between lots 2 and 3, 4 and 
5, etc., were planted at the intersections with the side lines, and marked with 
the numbers of the lots on the east and west sides, and the numbers of the 
concessions on the north and south sides. The posts between lots 1 and 2, 
3 and 4, etc., were planted so as to give to lots 1, 3, 5, etc, an exact 
width of forty chains, and marked with the numbers of the lots on the east 
and west sides, and the numbers of the concession on the north side. On the 
north boundary posts were planted at the intersections with the side lines, and 
marked with the numbers of the lots on the east and west sides, and " Con. vi." 
on the south .side. The field notes show in detail the markings of the posts at 
the angles of the township. 

Throughout the course of the survey I made frequent observations for 
azimuth, excepting for a few days in the northeastern portion of the township, 
when the weather did not permit. The declination of the needle was observed in 
various places, and was from six to ten degrees east, averaging six degrees in the 
eastern part of the towr.ship, and six and one-half degrees in the western part. 

The sixth and a part of the fifth concession consist maiftly of high ridges of 
rocks. The other portions of the township are undulating, the soil generally being 
good clay or clay loam, suitable for agricultural purposes, with only an occasional 
out crop of rock. The land in these portions could be readily cleared, as the 
timber is not heavy, and in places has Deen burned off completely. The only 
large timber in the township is the spruce and tamarac in the swamps at the 
northeast, and a small grove of pine on the north end of lot 10 in the sixth 
concession. 

The township is crossed from east to west by the Wabigoon River, two 
chains wide at the east boundary, and nearly five at the west. The current is 
slow, and the water discolored with clay. On lot 6, in the third concession, it 
receives the Beaver River, a similar but smaller stream. The Eagle River, which 
has a width of about five chains, enters the township from the south, on lot 
twelve, in the first concession, and after traversing part of lots 12 and 11 
crosses the west boundary and leaves the township, entering again, however, and 
joining the Wabigoon on lot 12, in the third concession. This river has a 
rapid current, clear water and high rocky banks. On lot 11, in the first 
concession, it has two rapids — one with a fall of about twenty feet, and the other 
about six feet ; either of these would furnish excellent water power. 

These rivers, and the Canadian Pacific Railway which passes through the 
southeast corner of the township, afford ample facilities for reaching any part of 
the township. Eagle Rivei* station is about half a mile to the south, where the 
railway crosses Eagle River. 

There were no settlers or miners in the township at the time ot the surve3\ 
Bear, moose, cariboo, duck and partridge were seen during the course of the 
survey, and indications were that these were very plentiful. 

The plan, timber plan and field notes of survey accompany this report. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient serv^ant, 

GEO. A. McCUBBIN, 

0. L. S. 
The Hon. J, M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, - 
Toronto. 



49 



{Appendix No. 26.) 

TOWNSHIP OF ZEALAND. 

District of Rainy River. 

SiMCOE, Nov. 12th, 1897. 

Sir, — Acting under instructions from you, bearing date July 12th, 1897, I 
proceeded with the survey of the Township of Zealand, and completed the same 
in accordance with the accompanying plan and field notes. 

1 commenced my survey at the southeast angle of the township at a cedar 
post with an iron post alongside, planted by O. L. S. Stewart in 1896, marked 
XXXIII on the northwest side, XXXII on the southwest side, and XXXI on 
the southeast side. 

This post I marked 'Zealand' on the northwest side, and then running due 
west astronomically from it I planted posts at the end of every 40 chains for. 
lots 1, 2 and 3, and continued west until the line intersected the east limit of 
the mining location, 86 S. V., lot 4, having a width of 47 chains and 56 links. 

From this point, where I planted a post marked IV on east side. Con. I on 
north side, and 86 S. V. on west side. I measured north to S. 218 and east 
along S. 218 to the west limit of 92 S. V. 

Starting again at the southeast angle of the township, I ran due north 
astronomically from a second observation on Polaris to check the first one from 
which the south boundary was run, planting posts every 80 chains between 
concessions I and II, II and III, etc., marking the posts 1 on the west side and 
with the respective concession numbers on south and north side, until we 
reached the end of the sixth mile, where I planted a taraarac post, marked con. 
VI on south side and 1 on west side, alongside an iron post marked Zealand on 
south-west side. Con. VI on south side and 1 on west side. As these posts were 
planted in an open swamp there is no bearing tree, and as there were no stones 
within three-quarters of a mile no stones were piled around them. 

Bearing trees were marked at all posts where a tree of two inches or over 
could be found. 

The east boundary intersected a mining location 116 S. V. in concession I, 
through which we ran our line, but did not blaze it. 

Beginning the second concession line at the post planted 80 chains north of 
the southeast corner of the township, I ran west astronomically, planting a post 
at the end of 40 chains, marked 1 on east side, 2 on west side and Con. II on 
north side, until the line intersected the east limit of Location 117 S. V., where I 
planted a post marked 117 S. V. on west side, 11 on east side, Con. I on south 
sine and Con. II on north side. From this point I ran due west across 117 S. V., 
leaving a mark at 80 chains from east boundary to the intersection of the west 
limit of 117 S. v., where I also planted a post, marking it as before, only using 
the proper lot number, etc. From here I ran still due west, planting a post 1 20 
chains from the east boundary, and continuing to the east boundary of S. 218, 
where I planted a post as at intersection of the south boundary with 86 S. V. 

The concession lines were all started from the east boundary, excepting the 
sixth, which was run from the southwest angle of lot 4, con. VI, to the east 
boundary. 

4 c.L. 



50 



Posts were planted at the intersections of all the north and south lines and 
midway between said intersections, the first named posts being marked with the 
proper lot numbers on the east and west sides and concession numbers on north 
And south sides. The latter named posts were similarly marked, except the 
south side, on which nothing was put. 

Where mining locations intersected a line in such a way as to cover the 
corner of a lot, they were posted as in case of a lake, e. g. 117 S. V., mentioned 
on con. II above. 

When a mining location intersected a line between posts it was not posted, 
^. g., 116 S. V. on east boundary. 

The line between concessions III and IV was run west to 0. L. S. Stewart's 
line between townships XXXIII and XXXIV, as marked. From the intersection 
of these two lines at O. L. S. Stewart's III mile post, I began a traverse, running 
first due north to the 0. P. R'y, thence up the C. P. R'y, planting the post on 
Lake Wabigoon between lots 13 and 14 until I had 80 chains of departure, and 
thence due north until I had 80 chains north latitude from the said III mile 
post. From this point I ran east to Thunder Lake, west to line between lots 16 
and 17, and north 80 chains to con. ,V. 

Concession lines between con. IV and V and V and VI were first run to 
Thunder Lake and then continued west from Thunder Lake by means of this 
traverse. As a check on this traverse and line between lots 14 and 15 a line 
was thrown across Thunder Lake between lots 12 and 13 and its length ascer- 
tained by triangulation from a base line between 11 and 12 chains in length. 
These two lines checked almost exactly when continued to the north boundary. 

West of Thunder Lake,. Concession VI was first run until it intersected the 
•east boundary of VanHorne township, which it did 3.07 south of the sixth con., 
VanHorne. Posts were planted every 40 chains along this line until I reached lot 
23, which I made 45.70 chains wide. 

This sixth concession line was checked by an observation on the sun, as given 
in field notes, the forest fires after Sept. 15th rendering it almost impossible to 
catch Polaris at all. From this line the side lines were run north across the sixth 
concession and south to Lake Wabigoon. 

The country west of Thunder Lake is rather open, and as a check on the 
traverse of Lake Wabigoon the lines were run between every two lots, viz. : 11 
and 12, 15 and 16, 17 and 18, 19 and 20, and 22 and 23. These lines were not 
blazed, but were carefully chained, and are given on the pages in field book as 
noted in index. The post on Lake Wabigoon between lots 21 and 22 was planted 
by traverse alone, but all the others were planted by running south, as shewn in 
tield notes, and checked by traverse. 

The only post to plant on the north shore of Thunder Lake was planted by 
running south from the north boundary and was checked by triangulation. This 
is the post between lots 1 1 and 1 2. 

Wherever a line crossed the C. P. E. a post was planted on either of the 
right of way which was, except in the case of Barclay Station grounds, two 
chains wide, measuring one chain either way at right angles to the centre of the 
track. 

The north boundary, from the north-west angle of lot 14, was the last line 
to run, and it was continued due west until it intersected the east limit of 
Vanhorn, 3,18 chains south of the north-east angle of said township. Here I 
planted a spruce post marked " Con. VI " on the south side and " 1 Zealand " on 



51 



the east side. I did not mark the iron post at the northeast corner of Vanhorne 
" Zealand " on the south side, as it was not the northwest angle of the township 
as surveyed. I piled a cairn of large stones around this post at the north angle 
of the township. 

In running the north boundary, posts were planted only where the lines 
between the alternate lots intersected the boundary. 

The fifth concession line across lot 23 was run from the west limit of the 
township due east astronomically 45.70 chains. 

Wherever a line intersected a surveyed location measurements were taken 
to the corners of the location. 

Posts were planted on the north limits of mining locations where they 
intersected the lot lines (5, 6,) (7, 8,) and (9, 10,) by measuring along said 
locations, as shewn in field notes, from lines (4, 5,) (6, 7,) and (7, 8). 

In the whole township there was only one line that was not intersected by 
a lake or mining location, and that was the north boundary. 

The line between lots 2 and 3 across cons. II, III and IV, as first run, was about 
1.40 too far east. This was corrected by starting again from the south boundary 
and running the line parallel to the east boundary. The notes are for the 
corrected line. 

The magnetic variation was very erratic throughout the township, varying 
from ^ to 1 1 ® east and changing every few chains in the portion of the 
township. On the sixth concession the variation was from 45 ® west at south- 
east angle of lot 1 to 42 "^ E at south-west angle of lot 2. 

Thunder Lake was triangulated from two base lines, as given in field notes. 
The pickets were planted, and sketches made of the shore by means of a canoe, 
and some of the pickets were used to tie others by angles. This triangulation 
materially delayed us, owing to the smoky air, which at times made it impossible 
to catch a sight over 10 or 15 chains in length. 

The south shore of Lake Wabigoon was traversed, or triangulated from the 
west boundary to the mouth of Thunder River, east of which being all taken up 
by mining locations 

Wherever obtainable stones were piled around the posts, and where no bear- 
ing tree could be had, considerable trouble was gone to get stones for this pur- 
pose. 

The mining locations in the township all have gold-bearing quartz on them, 
but as to whether it is in paying quantities or not can only be ascertained by 
development. There are still a number of veins " marked up " which will prob- 
ably be surveyed within the next few months. These are fo^ the most part along 
the south boundary of the township. 

Soil : The soil around the Wabigoon townsite and as far north as fourth con- 
cession is generally clay with rock outcropping in places. All west of Thunder 
Lake is more or less sandy, with rock and clay in places. The northern portion 
of the township is generally sandy east of Thunder Lake. The rank growth of 
berry bushes and alders in the clearings speaks well for the fertility of the soil. 
On the whole I would say that three-fourths of the township is fit for farming 
purposes. 

Timber : The only timber in the township of any value is tamarac and cedar, 
and all of this of sufficient size, for railway ties have been cut, There are a few 
jack pine trees about one foo^ in diameter, scattered over the northeastern part 



52 



of the township, nearly all of which are defective, having at some time been 
scorched by fire. Along the east shore of Thunder Lake, and on patches along 
the north shore of Lake Wabigoon. I found poplar, spruce, birch and cedar, 
some of which would reach two feet in diameter. 

Small jack pines from one to six inches in diameter are the most common* 
and they are met with everywhere except perhaps in the centre of the swamp- 
Spruce and poplar come next in about equal proportions. 

The timber for the most part is growing, and while the land can generally 
be easily cleared there is suflficient timber to give an almost inexhaustible supply 
of firewood and building material for the settlers for many years to come. 

Water : The township is generally well watered by a number of creeks, 
which flow for the most part in a southwesterly direction. Thunder Lake is a 
beautiful sheet of clear water about three miles long in a northwest and south- 
east direction, by about two miles wide in a northeasterly direction. It is fed 
by a number of small creeks from the north and east and empties through 
Thunder River into Lake Wabigoon. Thunder River leaves the lake by a rapids 
extending for four or five chains, and then forms a pool which pours over a fall 
of about 15 feet in height, giving an excellent opportunity for a mill site. The 
river would be navigable for canoes even in dry seasons, were it not for the 
sunken logs, etc., which abound along its course. 

Settlers : There are about fifteen settlers in the Elm Bay and Barclay 
district besides some five or six who informed me that they intended beginning 
to clear at once in the same district, and three or four more intended settlers 
near Wabigoon. These men all speak in glowing terms of the country, their 
chief complaint being a lack of communication, by land, with a market. A road 
could be easily constructed from Elm Bay to Wabigoon and from Elm Bay to 
Dry den. 

A road has been cut from Wabigoon to 114 S. V. since I surveyed tha'' 
portion of the township, and this could be extended north of 85 V and thenc® 
westerly across Thunder River and north of the C. P. R. to Grovers' clearing, 
from where a wagon road runs to Barclay Station, and from this a road can be 
built across comparatively open country to the west limit of the township. 

This road, along with the road at present being constructed by the C. P. R. 
from Wabigoon to Minnetakie Lake, would open up a greater part of the 
township. 

Some of the country was exceptionally rough, especially the line between 
lots 4 and 3, con. Ill, and between lots 16 and 17, cons. V and VI, and portions 
of the north boundary. In these places the rock rises to a height of from 100 
to 200 feet above the surrounding country, rendering it exceedingly diflSculc to 
chain or keep a straight course. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. C. FAIRCHILD. 
To the Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto, Ont. 



53 



{Appendix No. S7.) 

BASE AND MERIDIAN LINES. 

District of Rainy River. 

Haliburton, Ontario, November 13th, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of 
certain meridian and base lines lying north of the Canadian Pacific Railway, in 
the District of Rainy River, surveyed under instructions from your Department, 
dated 10th May, 1897 : 

Leaving Haliburton on the 12th of May, I reached Ignace on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway on the 16th, and the following morning commenced taking in 
my supplies to my starting point, viz., the 30th mile-post on my base line of 1893, 
east of the fifth meridian. 

I reached that point on the 20th, and after obtaining the necessarj'^ observa- 
tions, commenced work on the morning of the 21st and ran north astromically 
thirty-six miles, crossing the Sturgeon or English River on the twenty-fourth mile. 

Returning to the Sturgeon River, I made my way across the country easterly 
up the said river and through a chain of lakes to Sturgeon Lake and thence 
along the northerly shore of that lake to the boundary line between the Districts 
of Rainy River and Thunder Bay, thence north along that line seven miles to 
the 120 mile post or the termination of the line run in 1890, the trip across the 
country occupying a week. 

From the 120-mile iron post, I ran west astronomically about sixty miles, 
or to about where the base line would be intersected by the fifth meridian line- 

I then returned along the line to Big Vermilion Lake and taking the canoe 
route down Vermilion River through Pelican, Abrams, Minnietakie, and Big Sandy 
Lakes, made my way to the C. P. R., coming down the wagon road to Dinorwic, 
thence along the C. P. R. easterly about fifteen miles to the fifth meridian line. 
Going north along that line to its termination, at the sixtieth mile I produced 
it north astronomically thirty-three miles and from this point ran east 45 c. 83 1. 
and tied in Indian Reserve No. twenty-eight, striking the w^est boundary of said 
Reserve 25 c. 14 1. north of its south-west angle. 

Returning to the intersection of the fifth meridian with my fourth base line 
I continued it west astronomically to the eighty-ninth mile, and then goino- south 
to the northeast angle of Rugby Township, I ran north astronomically a continu- 
ation of the sixth meridian, until I intersected the fourth base line, thus com- 
pleting the work and returning to Haliburton on the 22nd September. 

The lines were well cut out, well blazed and carefully measured, wooden 
posts were planted at every mile, and iron posts at every three miles. Upon the 
latter, the number of the mile was marked with a cold chisel. 

The posts on meridian north-easterly from Ignace were numbered from 1 to 
36 miles on the south side, the numbering of posts on fifth meridian was con- 
tinued froEQ 60 to 93 miles on the south side of the posts, and those on the 
sixth meridian from 84 miles at northeast angle of Rugby to 90 miles where it 
intersected the fourth base line were also marked on the south side. 

The posts on fourth base line were marked on the east side from 1 to 90 
miles, commencing at the 120 mile district boundary posts. 



54 



The broken distances at intersections of meridians and base line were not 
taken into account in the numbering of posts. 

The intersections of the Ignace meridian with the fourth base line (in 30 
mile lake) was called 36 miles from the third base and 30 miles from the district 
boundary, an iron post was planted on the meridian at the south side of the lake 
at 35 miles 49 c. 43 1. and maiked " 86 miles," likewise an iron post on the base 
line at the east side of the lake at 28 miles 19.00 c. marked " 29 miles." 

The post at the intersection of the fifth meridian with fourth base line was 
marked "90 miles +" on south side and " 60 miles — " on east side, while the 
post at intersection of the sixth meridian with the fourth base line was marked 
" 90 miles +" on south side, and " 90 miles — " on east side, stone mounds were 
built around all posts wherever practicable and bearing trees taken marked 
" B;T." and course and distance from posts noted. 

The post for a mile ending in a lake or river was planted on the line on the 
nearest land and distance noted and marked on the wooden post. 

Iron posts in these cases were marked with a plus or minus sign as the case 
might be. 

The courses given in the field notes from posts to bearing trees are magnetic. 

Astronomical observations were taken whenever practicable, generally about 
six miles apart, the details of which will be found in the field notes, the magnetic 
declination of the needle was from 5° to 8° east, and I have called the general 
average 6' 45" east. As will be seen by the plan, the country may be said to be 
well watered, the lines crossing numerous lakes and streams. 

The largest lakes within the limits of the survey are Minnietakie (dirty 
water) about 25 miles long, and Big Vermilion about 14 miles, the latter is 
beautifully clear and full of islands, the outlet of both is through the Sturgeon 
River to Lac Seul, all the water within the limits of the survey is tributary to the 
Winnipeg River and Hudson's Bay, Sturgeon or English River is a stream from 
5 to 20 chains in width, often expanding into lakes with strong current and 
numerous rapids, the navigation of which is not without danger. 

The meridian line commencing north of Ignace runs generally through a 
hillv broken and rocky country, the soil is mostly sandy and stony, some clay on 
the' 8th, 13th, 20th. 24th, 25th, 26th, 32nd 33rd and 35th miles, the country has 
been burnt in places at different times, and the timber is small to medium sized, 
chiefly spruce, white birch, pitch pine, balsam, tamarac in places, very little 
cedar, and no red or white pine to speak of. Along the fifth meridian line from 
the 60 mile post to the 72nd mile the country is very hilly, stony and sandy, with 
large boulcers in many places, there is some clay land in the vicinity of Minnietakie 
Lake on both sides, and also along the line in places to Big Vermilion Lake, the 
country has nearly all been burnt along this line from the 67th to the 93rd mile, 
and as far beyond that to the north as could be seen, probably to Lac Seul. 

The timber is generally small to medium sized spruce, pitch pine, white birch, 
balsam, poplar and a few cedar. Along the sixth meridian line the clay extends 
north to end of 87th mile — the 88th, 89th and 90th miles are rolling and sandy — 
swampy in places with ridges of sand and stones the brule extends from Rugby 
nearly to the fourth base line and is generally covered with spruce, pitch pine, 
white birch and poplar of about thirty years' growth. The base line going west 
from the district boundary runs through a rolling rocky country much cut up by 
lakes. The soil is generally sandy and stony, very little clay throughout the 
whole ninety miles. 



55 



The line for the first twenty-eight miles passes through green bush, thtre 
having been no recent fires along that part of the line, and the timber is in general,, 
spruce, pitch pine, white birch, balsam, poplar, with tamarac and cedar in places. 
From a hill on the twenty-sixth mile, about 300 feet above Long lake, the country 
can be seen to the northwest, north and northeast for from twenty to thirty miles. 
It is rolling with an occasional hill, and there are some very high hills in the far 
north. The bush is all green (no brule) and timber, apparently spruce, pitch 
pine and white birch. From about the twenty-eighth to the middle of the forty- 
first mile the country has been burnt, the burn extending a considerable distance 
south and a long way north ; very little green timber is left in this area, only in 
low places. From the forty-first to the fifty-seventh mile the line again passes 
through green bush and then the country is again burnt to the sixty-sixth mile, 
from which point to the end of the line there is no brule with the 
exception of the eighty-third mile, which touches the edge of the exten- 
sive brule to the south running down to the C. P. R. There is no very valuable 
timber along the base line; a few red and white pines are found in places and some 
fairly good pitch pine, the balance is spruce, white birch, balsam, poplar, tamarac 
and small quantities of cedar. In some places the pitch pine and spruce would 
be large enough for lumbering purposes. Most of the lakes contain fish of the 
usual kinds, pike, pickerel etc. Moose and caribou. were very plentiful as well 
as partridge and rabbits ; a number of lakes containing beaver were met with 
and a few bears were also seen. The geological formations passed over were the 
Laurentian, and Huronian. A number of prospectors were met with about Abrams 
and Minnietakie lakes, but as Mr. Parks who accompanied me will report on the 
geology of the country it is unnecessary for me to say more. Herewith are full 
returns of the survey. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



Honorable J, M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



NIVEN, 
Ontario Land Surveyor. 



56 



(Ajypendix No. 28.) 

BASE AND MERIDIAN LINES. 
District of Rainy River. 

Toronto, 27th November, 1897. 

Sir. — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of base 
and meridian lines in the Saw Bill lake region of the district of Rainy river, 
surveyed under instructions from your Department, dated 12th July, 1897 : 

I left Toronto on 15th July and proceeded to Wabigoon where I organized 
the party. 

Leaving the Canadian Pacific at Bonheur, the party was divided, some going 
by the canoe route and the remainder by the new Bonheur-Saw Bill road, to the 
head of Surprise lake. From this point we continued the journey by the canoe 
route, through Surprise, Elbow, Red Point, Forbes, Martin and Saw Bill lakes to 
the Seine waters and Moose lake. 

I began the survey at the twenty-fourth mile post, west of the district 
boundary line, between Thunder Bay and Rainy river, on Ontario Land Surveyor 
Niven's second base line. This point is marked by an iron bar beside a tamarac 
post, each bearing on the east side the marks " 24 miles." From this bar I ran 
due north twelve miles, leaving a temporary mark at that distance. 

Returning to Seine river, we travelled up that stream to the point where it 
crosses the district boundary, about half a mile north of the forty-eight mile post 
on the same. The iron post and pitch pine post in stone mound, placed at the 
forty-eight mile point by Ontario Land Surveyor Niven, were found, and from 
this post I ran west astronomically on chords of a parallel of latitude, deflecting 
the line six minutes north at every six miles, and establishing the last corner at 
the intersection with the meridian line previously run by me. From this point 
of intersection, I continued the meridian line north a further distance of twelve 
miles, completing the twenty-four miles of meridian line as instructed. 

I then ran east, astronomically, seven miles, to locate the position of the 
Bonheur-Saw Bill road, and this concluded the survey. 

The lines were well cut out and blazed, wooden posts, marked with the mile 
numbers, were planted at every mile, and iron posts, numbered with a cold chisel, 
were planted at every three miles. The numbers were in all cases placed on the 
side of the post nearest the commencement of the line to which it belonged. 

Where the end of the mile came in a lake or river, I planted the post or 
posts on the line at the nearest land with the number of mile and fraction. 
Wherever practicable, a stone mound was placed about the post, and bearing trees 
marked and noted. 

Frequent observations, details of which accompany the field notes, were 
taken during the progress of the work. The magnetic variation was generally 
uniform, and averaged about five degrees east of astronomic north. 



57 



General Description. 

On the meridian line, the country is rocky and hilly, and broken by numerous 
lakes and streams, prominent among which are the Moose lake on the first mile, 
River Seine on the fifth mile, Saw Bill lake on the sixth and seventh, and Clear- 
water lake on the eighth and ninth miles. The soil is chiefly stony and sandy. 

The portion of the meridian to the south of Clearwater lake has been over- 
run with fire at different times during the past thirty years, and a very small pro- 
portion of the timber now standing is of any commercial value. The prevailing 
varieties are spruce, jack pine, poplar, birch, balsam and cedar, with occasional 
red and white pine trees of good quality. To the north of Clearwater lake the tim- 
ber is green and consists of jack pine, spruce, birch and poplar, of fair size, a 
considerable quantity being suitable for railway ties and pulpwood. 

On the twenty-four mile base line, the face of the country is similar to that 
on the meridian. In the third mile from the district boundary, the Seine river is 
crossed, being at this point a stream about two hundred feet in width and eight 
feet in depth, with moderate current. The Bonheur-Saw Bill wagon road was 
crossed in the twentieth mile, and the canoe route, by way of Red Paint lake, in 
the twenty-first mile. In the first six miles the prevailing kinds of timber are 
second growth poplar, birch and jack pine, of little value, with occasional clumps 
of the original forest trees. 

Early in the seventh mile an area of white pine, with trees from twenty to 
fifty" inches in diameter, begins and continues as far as the middle of the eleventh 
mile. This area of pine land was visible for a distance of two to three miles on 
each side of the line. Much of this timber is of fair quality, the remainder being 
" faulty." The Seine river and its tributaries will furnish an outlet for this 
timber when required. From the eleventh to the eighteenth mile the timber is 
chiefly jack pine, spruce, tamarac, poplar and birch, up to fifteen inches in 
diameter, with occasional small areas of white pine of fair quality. 

Bruld,of about ten to twenty years, covers the distance between the eighteenth 
and twenty-first miles, the remainder of the line to the west of Red Paint lake 
passing through green jack pine, spruce, tamarac and birch, averaging about eight 
inches in diameter. 

On the second or seven mile base line the physical features and timber, as 
far as the fourth mile, are similar to that on the north part of meridian line. 
From the fourth mile to the east end of this base, the timber is of better quality, 
being chiefly large white birch, spruce, tamarac and poplar. About half a mile 
cast of the meridian line, and between the twentieth and twenty-fourth miles on 
the same, and extending easterly to Surprise lake, there is a considerable area 
covered with white pine, from twenty to forty inches in diameter, and of good 
quality. By way of lake Gamble and several smaller lakes, this timber would 
find an outlet to Surprise lake and the Bonheur-Saw Bill road. The Bonheur- 
Saw Bill road crosses this base on the seventh mile. 

The soil on the base lines is of the some character as that on the meridian 
line, a very small proportion being for agricultural purposes. The number of 
mining locations laid out, and the mines already in operation, are good indications 
of the mineral wealth of the region. 

Special attention has been paid to the geological features of this region by 
the Geological Survey department of the Dominion government. 



68 



The Huronian formation predominates, but in many places the Laurentian 
outcrops. 

The general character of the rock formation met with on the various lines 
seems to promise as rich a field for exploring as the more accessible parts have 
ah-eady yielded to the prospector. 

The water in the streams and lakes is generally of good quality, and well 
stocked with fish. 

Evidences of large game were frequently seen. 

Accompanying this report, I beg to transmit field notes and a plan showing 
the lines, together with such additional information as to water routes, etc., as 
could be gathered during the progress of the survey. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 



To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



T. B. SPEIGHT, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



{Appendix No. 29.) 
REPORT 



OP 



THE SUPERINTENDENT 



OP 



COLONIZATION ROADS. 



To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Ontario. 

Sir. — I have the honor to present the annual report of the Colonization 
Roads branch of the Crown Lands Department for the year 1897, including 
Mining Roads, for which special appropriations were made at the last session o£ 
Parliament. 

Of Colonization Roads one hundred and six and a quarter miles were con- 
structed and six hundred and sixty-eight and a half miles repaired. Twentj'^- 
four bridges of various dimensions were erected, aggregating a total length of 
three thousand and eighty-two feet. 

Of tJining Roads there were fifty-one and three-quarters miles opened, and 
some three miles improved besides the erection of two large dams ; detads for all 
of which are given in the following report and summary : 



COLONIZATION KOADS. 
NORTH DIVISION. 

Balfouu Roads. 

Three and a quarter miles have been chopped, cleared and grubbed, begin- 
ning between lots 4 and 5 of the 2nd concession of Balfour, and thence one mile 
south to the 1st concession, and thence west two miles, with sixty rods cleared 
and opened opposite lot number one. 

Bar River Bridge. 

A bridge renewed on the Port Finlay road in the township of Laird. 

It is 120 feet long, composed chiefly of pile bents, good stringers and cover- 
ing of two-inch plank. 

[59] 



60 



Bruce Mines and Ophir Road. 

Repairs of bridge and washout in Plummer, the bridge costing $60, and 
saving timber and bridge iron, $15. 

Bridge Repairs. 
The repair of Paipoonge and Kaministiquia bridges in West Algoma. 
Bruce Mines and Desert Lake Road. 

Two miles and one- eighth were this year opened from last year's operations, 
extending now to within about one mile of' the road which it is intended to 
reach. 

Carpenter and Lash Road. 

This work commenced from that previously done, namely, south half of lot 
number 8, concession 1, Carpenter, and was continued across the south halves 
of lots 7 and 6, and to the southwest corner of lot number 5. 

The chopping and grubbing were heavy, and the road was opened forty feet 
wide throughout. 

Chelmsford Creek Bridge. 

This bridge, which is over Chelmsford Creek, on the town line between 
Balfour and Eayside is to replace one carried away by freshets. 

It is a pile structure and well and substantially constructed. 

Cob fin and Coffin Additional Roads. 

Half a mile opened on blind line across lot 5 in the 2nd concession to 
give an outlet to the main road, and half a mile was substantially repaired across 
lot 1 in the 1st concession, both the above being in Coffin Additional. A mile 
and three-quarters was also repaired in the east side of Desert Lake in Plummer 
township. 

Coffin and Galbraith Boundary Road. 

The repair of a very bad hill on the boundary line named, and in the first 
conces"'ion. An excellent job is reported. 

Crozier and Lash Road. 

The chief work was cutting a ditch toward a lake for the purpose of 
reclaiming a quantity of land, and to assist in grading the road bed. 

Ttie creek which empties into Rainy River on lot 12 ; River Range, 
Township of Aylesworth, was cleaned out a distance of two miles and fifty-five 
chains, and a ditch made from thence between sections thirty-five and thirty-six 
twenty-six chains, to strike the town line between Aylesworth and Lash, and 
thence east on said town line fifty-seven chains, leaving yet about a mile to open 
before the lake is reached. 

The bush and timber was chopped out twenty-five feet wide, the ditches 
being about five feet wide with average depth of about three and a half feet, and, 
the inspector says, .should be opened to the lake. 



61 



Bale's Hill and McLean's Mountain Road. 

A work between lots 5 and 6, concession 6, Howland, on Manitouliii 
Island, being the lepair of a very rough portion through the 7th concession 
a quarter of a mile long. 

Galbraith Second Concession Road. 

This portion of road, which is across a tamarac swamp, was ditched across 
lot 8 and half of lot 9, and grubbed and cleared across lot number 7, something 
like three-quarters of a mile. 

Gladstone Fourth Concession Road. 

Beginning at Lake Chibleau, on the 3rd concession between lots 10 and 
11, work was continued west one mile, thence south forty rods, thence again 
west half a mile, making over two miles of new road opened in a very satis- 
factory manner. 

Grand Portage Road. 

A mile and three-quarters of repairs from the termination of last year's 
operations, namely, lot number 12, concession 1, township of Wells, north- 
easterly to the 2nd concession, between lots 8 and 9. 

It was a rough, stony section, but is now an excellent road, and will 
doubtless be so for a long period, 

HoNOKA Bay Road. 

The completion of a low swampy section between lots 28 and 29 through 
concessions 8 to 11 of the township of Bidwell, the distance being a little more 
than two miles. 

Keewatin Bridge Piers. 

The expenditure in this instance was made in preparing the foundations for 
piers which were supplied by contract with the Central Bridge and Engineering 
Company of Peterborough, and now in place, ready for the superstructure. The 
same company are under contract to construct and complete the bridge, material 
for which is upon the ground, but not yet in place. Unusual water freshets have 
added somewhat to the cost of pier foundations and appear to have prevented the 
bridge company completing the contract at an earlier date. 

Lake Shore Road. 

A mile and three-quarters opened, and a bridge with a twenty-two-feet span 
erected in the township of Lefroy. 

La Cloche Bridge. 

A bridge 158 feet long built over La Cloche creek opposite Massey station 
on the " Soo Branch " composed of one large crib and five bents. Approaches to 
the bridfire were also made. 



62 



Lee's Road. 

Three miles of excellent road opened from concession 3 on the boundary be 
tween May and Hallam north and east toward Webb wood. 

Little Current and Saeguindah Road. 

Very substantial work in repairing throught concessions 2 and 3 of How- 
land, some two miles. 

Manitowaning and Michaei/s Bay Road. 

Five miles of repairs from lot 17, concession 1, Assignac, eastward ; two miles 
being ditched, and three gravelled. 

Miller's Bridge. 

A bridge 240 feet long built over Thessalon river at Bell's Rapids in the 
township of Lefroy. It is comprised of six twenty-foiu' feet spans; two of 
eighteen feet and three of ten feet resting upon eight cribs filled with stone. 
The grant of S300 is a contribution, the balance of cost having been borne by the 
settlers. 

MiNDEMOYA Road. 

Repairs from the fifth to the fifteenth side road along the sixth concession of 
Tehkummah ; and on the fifth side line south to Michael's Bay, a length 
altogether of four miles. 

MiNDEMOYA AND SaNDFIELD ROAD. 

Work commenced on the second concession of Sandfield and continued 
through to Carnarvon, grading and gravelliog about three-quarters of a mile. 

MuDGE AND Gore Bay Road. 

Three miles of very substantial and permanent repairs in the township of 
Allen on Manitoulin Island between concessions 8 and 9, and from lot No. 15 
eastward. 

Oliver Township Roads. 

Repairs from the town line between Oliver and Mclntyre on the second con- 
cession to Murillo station — three and a quarter miles; and on the line between 
lots 7 and 8 on the second and third concession line, two miles. 

Otter Tail Creek Dam. 

A contribution of S500 to assist in the repair and reconstruction of a dam at 
the foot of Otter Tail lake in Bruce Mines district. 

The inspector reported, recommending the grant, urging as a reason that the 
breaking away of the existing old structure would endanger" and probably carry 
away .six Government bridges. 

The cost of renewal was, according to the attested statement furnished, 
$1,114, and the inspector reports the work as strong and substantial. 



63 



Parke Township Road. 

This work, begun last year, is now completed, this year's operations being 
from sections 11 and 12 between sections 13 and 14 to Algoma Park on Lake 
Superior — a mile and a quarter of road opened. 

Parkinson Road. 

Two and a half miles of construction beginning between lots 8 and 9 conces- 
sion 3, Parkinson, thence north one-quarter mile, thence east half a mile and 
thence north a mile and three-quarters. It was somewhat easy of construction, 
and therefore the overseer was enabled to make two and a half miles for the 
appropriation. 

Port Finlay and McKay's Road. 

One portion of this work is on a blind line from Port Finlay west to McKay's 
mill, three-quarters of a mile ; a second portion being on the fifth concession line 
of Tarbutt, extending east of Port Finlay road two miles. Another section a 
quarter of a mile long was repaired. 

Prince Township Road. 

Between lots 19 and 20 of this township there was three-quarters of a mile 
of heavy grading done along a deep ravine requiring a cutting through almost 
the entire length. 

Rainy River Road. 

The repair of two sections of a very heavy character, one being from the 
east side of lot 12, River Range, township of Woodyatt, westward to the west 
side of lot 17 of the same township and called Big Forks section ; the other, called 
Pine River section, being from east side of lot 25, River Range, in the township of 
Dilke. westward to the west side of lot 30, and altogether a mile and a quarter of 
grubbing and heavy ditching. 

Rayside Roads. 

This expenditure was upon several roads in the township, to benefit as large 
a number of settlers as possible. Improvements were made on the town line of 
Balfour and Rayside ; between concessions 2 and 3, 4 and 5 ; and on east Rayside 
road, some four miles of work. 

Robinson, Dawson and Burpee Roads. 

These townships are on Manitoulin Island. Nearly three miles of new road 
were opened in Dawson township, and repairs were made over sections in Dawson 
and Burpee, amounting to about four miles. 

Savanne Bridge. 

A substantial bridge was build over Savanne river, ninety-six feet long with 
main piers twelve feet high. Over a mile and a quarter of road was also opened 
between the Canadian Pacific Railway station and Savanne village. 



64 



This work was begun last year but unfinished for lack of money, and is still 
in need of gravel to make it available at all seasons. 

St, Joseph Island Roads. 

Altogether there were three and a quarter miles of ditching, grading and 
other improvements made upon the Island, and a mile and a quarter of new road 
opened, as follows : On P line from the 20th side line eastward, repairs were 
made over a mile and a quarter. A heavy hill was cut down on the R line and 
on the 13th concession a mile of grading and gravelling from S and T line north. 

Three-quarters of a mile was well improved on K line from Huron line west^ 
and one mile of excellent grading from D line south on Huron line. 

On the 16th concession line from F and G line three-quarters of a mile was 
chopped out southward and U line was extended half a mile opposite concessions 
12 and 13, the distance being chopped out and levelled. 

Slate River Valley Road. 

About two miles and a half opened, commencing at concession A on line 
between lots 10 and 11 Paipoonge. thence south one hundred chains, thence west 
twenty chains, and thence again south to concession 4. 

The line between lot 15 and 16 was also opened southward twenty- 
five chains, and at the latter point a bridge was constructed over a creek, the 
bridge having a clear opening of twenty-five feet. A ditch, twenty chains long, 
was, in addition, opened on lots 8 and 9. 

The above work will be of great advantage to a settlement which has 
incresed rapidly in the past few years. 

Spanish River and Kenabutch Road. 

Three miles of grading from the Indian Reservation towards Spanish river, 

Tarentorus and Rankin Boundary Road. 

An expenditure of $49.50 for the repair of a bridge. 

Thessalon River Bridge. 

A bridge near the southeast corner of the township of Morin over Thessalon 
river. 

Its main span is a fifty-feet King truss, resting at each end upon eight piles. 
There are additional bents at each end, making the length of the bridge eighty 
feet. 

Vermillion River Bridge. 

A large and substantial bridge built over Vermillion river at Whitefieh on 
the Soo branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway. There are two spans of 100 feet 
in the clear, and a total length of 258 feet. 

The main spans rest upon cut- water piers, fourteen feet above low water 
mark, each filled with stone and each truss well housed for protection against 
weather. 



65 



Victoria and Salter T. L. Road. 

Three-quarters of a mile of grading on the town line and the rebuilding of a 
bridge carried away last spring. 

Wabigoon Bridge. 

• 
A structure composed mainly of five spans,* averaging thirty feet to thirty- 
seven feet, all king post trusses. The bridge is over Wabigoon river at Dry den 
village, and as the river separates large farming areas, was absolutely necessary 
to give access to the only market there. 

The work is of a most substantial character and ought to last for a great 
many years. 

Wainwright and Eton Roads. 

Twelve miles and a half of new road were opened this season, that is to say ; 
from the bridge across Wabigoon river just described and near foot of rapids at 
Dry den westward to the line between lots 5 and 6, and concessions 5 and 6, Van 
Home, about half a mile, thence north between concession 5 and 6 half a mile to 
the line between lots 6 and 7, thence north half a mile to the town line between 
Wainwright and VanHome, thence west on town line one mile, thence north 
between lots 8 and 9, one mile to the 1st and 2nd concession line, thence west on 
last named line five miles to the line between lots 6 and 7 of the township of 
Eton and thence northward between the lots last mentioned somewhat over three 
and a half miles to Wabigoon river. 

Woodyatt Road. 

A ditch from a small lake on lot 33, River range, was opened to drain the 
land eastward into a creek, its dimensions being three feet deep, five feet wide 
and length forty-seven chains. 

A single drain was also opened from the same lot, fifty-five chains long, the 
material of which was used in grading the Woodyatt road to its intersection with 
Crozier and Lash road. 

A mile of repairs was made north of Orozier and Lash road, and another 
mile from the N. E. quarter of section 17 to N. E. quarter of section 30 was 
graded over one-half its length and the remainder partially opened and cross- 
wayed, making altogether about one mile of new road and two of repairs. 



WEST DIVISION. 

Armour and Kearney Road. 

The opening of a mile and three-quarters, beginning at the town line of 
Armour and extending southward through lots 32 and 33 concession 14 of Perry, 
and thence angling through lots 33 and 34 concession 13, to unite with Kearney 
No. 1 road. 

The location was made by the municipality to give an outlet for settlers in 
the southeast portion of Armour and others to the railway. 

5 c.L. 



66 



Akmour and Strong Road, 

A mile and a quarter opened through heavily timbered land across the 
13th and 14th concessions of Armour, connecting with work of last season, open- 
ing thus a road to Burk's Falls for settlers in Strong and eastern portion of 
Chapman. 

• 

Baxter Bridges. 

A principal work was the renewal of a structure over the Severn River 
between the townships of Baxter and Matchedash over which is the only outlet 
the inhabitants of Baxter have to a market. The new bridge has one fifty- 
six feet span and another of forty feet which with the approaches give a total 
length of 112 feet. 

A second bridge was renewed over "Little Chute" in Baxter, and on the main 
and only road there ; having a twenty-two feet span and length of seventy feet. 

Bethune 25 AND 26 Side Line Road. 

The construction of a mile and a quarter on the side line named through 
concessions 11 and 12. A deviation was made on lot 25 concession 12 for which 
the right of way was secured. Some 40 rods are reported as yet unopened and 
which would make connection with the 12th and 13th concession road. 

Bethune 5 and 6 Side Line Road. 

Repairs from concession 9, extending towards Lynx lake, representing one 
mile properly graded through a heavy section of the township. 

Chapman and Lount T. L. Road. , 

This was a somewhat expensive piece of work through a low tamarac swamp 
on the town line mentioned, extending from lot number 2 eastward nearly a mile 
and a quarter, and involving 163 rods of crosswaying. 

Christie No. 2 Road. 

A mile and a half of heavy work, chiefly the filling up of an opening over a 
creek on the town line of Humphrey and Christie to open communication between 
Rosseau and the railway at Maple Lake station. 

Christie and Foley Road. 

Something like one mile has been chopped out and graded beginning between 
concessions 9 and 10 of Foley and extending southward. 

Dalton and Washago Road. 

Repairs from Muskoka road extending eastward a mile and three-quarters. 
It is the main road for many eastern townships to the railway, and was scarcely 
travelable prior to these improvements. 



67 



Draper 7th Con. Road. 

The general improvement and widening of that opened last year. The length 
is two and a half miles, costing some $200, aided by a municipal grant last year 
of $50. 

Distress River Bridge. 

A bridge having a fifty-eight feet queen truss span resting upon piers com- 
posed of ten piles each was built over Distress River on Magnetawan road. 

More than half a mile of road was also made about two very heavy and steep 
hills, and was necessary to make bridge and road available for general traflSc. 

Golden Valley Road. 

Repairs from about lot number 15, concession 10 of Mills township to within 
about half a mile of the Mills and Wilson road. 

The distance was two and a half miles, being grading, including tap drains 
and twenty-one stone culverts. It is the chief road in that district. 

GouGH Bridge. 

The renewal of a bridge between lots 20 and 21 and concessions 14 and 15 
of Himsworth. Its length over all is 122 feet and replaces one built many years 
ago. 

GuRD Road. 

This work was the openii^ of a difficult portion through a rocky and 
mountainous section. 

It is over a mile long and passes through lots 22 to 26 in the 6th concession 
of Gurd. It is. the Inspector says, one of the most useful works of the season. 

Himsworth 5 and 6 Side Line Road. 

A mile and a half opened beginning at concession 1 1 and extending south. 

The road allowance could not be followed throughout owing to the roughness 
of the country and deviations were made upon lot 5, concession 10 and lot 6, con- 
cession 9. 

JoLY Bridge. 

A bridge over Magnetawan river between concessions 2 and 3 of Joly with 
a forty-eight foot span and length of sixty feet, costing about $200. 

Repairs were made too on the 4th and 5th concession line of the same town- 
si. ip opposite lot 14, of a very dangerous hill some 500 feet long which cost $150 

Kearney No. 1 Road. 

Two and three-quarter miles of repairs, continuing from work of two years 
ago, on the 3rd concession of Proudf cot, now ending at the town line of Bethune 
This road is through a rough broken country but is a very necessary and useful 
one for settlers. 



68 



LaURIER 12 AND 13 CON. LiNE ROAD. 

From lot number 25 improvements were made one mile into the township of 
Machar, leading to Trout Creek station. The length repaired was nearly a mile 
and a half. 

McAumond's Bridge. 

The renewal of the superstructure and raising the bridge three feet to guard 
against freshets. The openings are fifty-four feet and thirty -six feet and total 
length 118 feet. The piers were also renewed from low -water mark. - 

Magnetawan Road. 

Something like two miles of repairs made, eighty-seven rods being a devia- 
tion through heavily timbered land. The work was from lot 17, concession 9, of 
Croft towards Ah-mic harbor. 

Magnetawan River Bridge. 

A work not yet completed. 

McKellar Centre Road. 

Three miles of repairs, beginning at the second concession of McKellar, and 
from thence towards Orrville, making a very fair road to the railway at Edgington 

Macaulay Road. 

From near Baysville westward six miles of v^ery satisfactory repairs were 
made and the road reported as in a fair state of repair throughout, that is to say, 
between Bracebridge and Baysville. 

McDouGALL Road. 

One mile of work, largely the covering of rocky sections to make the road 
passable, from lot 9, concession 2, McDougall, eastward. 

Between McDougall and McKellar townships, from Junction No. 2 road 
northward, two miles were grubbed and fairly graded, enabling settlers about 
Hurdsville to reach a cheese factory, which will be a decided advantage. 

Mills and Golden Valley Road. 

The opening of one mile from the eighth concession of Mills, southerly, and 
again on the south end of lot number 2, concession 5, almost half a mile of 
repairs were made. 

MONTEITH AND PeRRY ROAD. 

Two miles of repairs over an almost impassable section, from Rosseau and 
Nipissing road eastward, in the township of Monteith, leading to Seguin Falls 
railway station. 



G9 



MONTKITH, 10 AND 11, SiDE LiNE ROAD. 

Through heavy timber, from concession 4 angling through lot 11, concession 
5, lot 12, concession 6, and lot 13, concession 7, a mile and three-quarters were 
opened, the road allowance being considered impracticable. 

Settlers are by this highway enabled to reach Bear Lake station on the rail- 
way, as they have, without assistance, opened the road through concessions 9 
and 10. 

MUSKOKA AND BOBCAYGEON ROAD. 

Between lot 16, concession 13 and lot 5, concession 5, Franklin, a length of 
six and a half miles was very well repaired and the road generally reported as in 
a fairly good condition. 

Northern Road. 

Repairs from the seventh concession of J'erris northward six and a half 
miles. It is the main road in that district. 

North-west Road. 

This is the main and only opened road between Parry Sound and Byng 
Inlet and is used chiefly in winter. It passes through the townships of McDou- 
gall, Carling, Shawanaga, Harrison and Wallbridge and is about fifty miles in 
length. 

Repairs have this year been made over twenty-nine miles and the bridges 
over Shawanaga and other rivers and streams along the route carefully and 
firmly repaired or renewed. 

The Holland and Emery Lumber Company furnished all the necessary 
planking for bridges without charge, in lieu, to some extent, of the benefit which 
they may enjoy in having a travelable winter road. Teams have already passed 
over the entire length. 

Perry and Chaffey Road. 

A mile and a half of grubbing and grading from near Novar Station of the 
railway about the north shore of Fish Lake, which was chopped out three years 
ago through low land. 

A bridge with a thirty-one feet span was built and 216 rods of crosswaying 
were laid. 

Portage Road. 

The repair of the portage betwen Peninsula lake and Lake of Bays, in the 
township of Franklin. The traflic over this road is very heavy, amounting to 40 
or 50 heavy loads daily during the summer months. 

Port Cockburn and Christie Roads. x 

Repairs where most necessary over some eight miles or the distance between 
Port Cockburn and Maple Island station of the Parry Sound railway. 

Rama Bridges. 

This grant was a contribution towards the renewal of several bridges in the 
township of Rama. 



70 



The inspector has reported that material is upon the ground for two steel 
bridges, that a bridge across Boyd's creek has been renewed, and one over Black 
river repaired. The expenditure by the township will therefore be a large one. 

ROSSEAU AND NiPISSING EOAD. 

This was the repair of a serious washout on Commanda Creek valley, in- 
volving the filling in of about one thousand cubic yards of material in order to 
restore the road to its original usefulness, * 

Ryde Centre Road. 

Beginning at the third concession of Ryde, near Lewisham, two and a quarter 
miles were opened southward to the town line of DaltoD, and portions of the 
same were graded. 

Another mile was opened in the latter named township to the Dalton and 
Washago road, completing an intended connection, but in a somewhat rough 
manner through want of more money. 

Seguin River Bridge. 

A new bridge having a 40 feet clear span and total length of 58 feet built 
over Seguin River on the Rosseau and Nipissing road in the township of Mon- 
teith. A 50 feet approach at one end and one 100 feet long at the other were 
also well and firmly made. 

North Seguin bridge, with two lesser ones and some bad hills, were at the 
satne time repaired and improved. 

Sinclair and Franklin T. L. Road. 

A mile and a half of grubbing and grading from lot 10 to lot 17 on the town 
line mentioned. This road enables settlers to the east to reach Huntsville, and is 
the only road they have. 

Stephenson 2 and 3 Con. Bridge. 

A floating bridge across the Muskoka river, between concessions 2 and 3 of 
Stephenson township. It is 258 feet long and composed chiefly of four main 
stringers of dry pine and a covering of 2-inch pine plank, which supports the 
loads, and is reported as a satisfactory work. 

Stisted 12 AND 13 Con. Road. 

This was the opening of 192 rods, leaving yet 100 rods to fully complete, 
although the latter length has been opened as a winter road. 

The work was from lot 6 westward on the concession line mentioned, making 
a desirable road for a settlement in Stisted to reach Rosseau. 

Strong 30 and 31 Sideline Road. 

Necessary repairs to a bridge over Maganetawan River, between the 1st and 
2nd concession of Strong. 



71 



Surprise Lake Road. 

The repair of a road in the Township of Laurier, leading to Surprise Lake, 
It is not yet fully reported. 

Tjny Road. • 

A road two miles and a half in length opened and well graded from about 
the line between the Townships of Tiny and Penetanguishene, passing through 
concession 17 ; the Government Reserve, and onward. 

The conditions of this grant were that $600 would be given after the muni- 
cipality had expended at least $1,500. 

Westphalia Road. 

A grant of $50 for replanking a bridge, the plank being supplied by the 
municipality. 

Willett Road. 

A mile and three-quarters of repairs between Rose's Point and Parry Harbor 
It is a road over which there is very heavy teaming from the railway. 

Wood Lake Road. 

Repairs from the town line of Oakley towards Uffington, two miles; of which 
almost one-half required blasting and hauling of clay for covering of road. 

Messrs. Mickle & Dyment contributed, the inspector says, $25 towards the 
work. 



EAST DIVISION. 

Addington Road. 

Fourteen miles repaired from Clare river north, and twenty- three miles be- 
tween Cloyne and the Mississippi road, improving the condition of the same 
generally. 

Anglesea Road. 

Repairs from lot number 4, Range A. W. S. Addington road in Anglesea 
southwesterly towards Flinton, seven miles : a useful cheese factory road. 

Alice 25 and 26 Side Line Road. 

One mile of repairs through concessions 9 and and 10 dating from work 
of 1895. 

Alice 12 and 13 Con. Road. 

From lot number 20 very heavy repair's were made westward about one 
mile. The section was both hilly and swampy. 



72 



Alice and Wilberforce T. L. Road. 

This work was begun where concession B. Alice intersects the town line, and 
was continued along the town line to the south boundary of Wilberforce, a length 
of a mile and a half. 

Again, beginning on the same town line where the line between lots 5 and 6 
intersects it, half a mile was opened southward on the last named line, making 
two miles altogether from Eganville, leading to Renfrew. 

Anstruther Road. 

Ten miles of repairs from lot number 3 concession 2 Anstruther (near Aps- 
ley) to lot 38, concession 13. 

Anstruther and Chandos Road. 

From lot number 4, concession 14 Chandos, eleven miles were repaired, end- 
ing at lot 32, concession 17. 

• Barry Bay and Combermere Road. 

From a point about half a mile east of Barry Bay repairs were extended 
seven miles towards Combermere. 

This is a main road between Combermere and Barry Bay station, of Ontario, 
Ottawa and Parry Sound Railway. 

Bedford, 9th Concession Road. 

Repairs were begun at Fermoy, lot 18, concession 9, Bedford, and continued 
to Bedford station, on the Kingston and Pembroke Railway, a distance of about 
thirteen miles. The road is a mail and stage line. 

Bellrock Road. 

Seven miles of repairs from Bellrock, in Portland, to the south boundary of 
the Township of Hinchinbrooke, leading to Whitman's cheese factory. 

Bell's Rapids Road. 

Repairs from between lots 15 and 16, concession 8, Bangor, north two.miles 
to the Madawaska River and to a cheese factory. 

BucKHORN Road. 

Twelve miles of repairs from Hall's Bridge northward to the boundary of 
Harvey. 

Bonfield 5 AND 6 Side Line Road. 

The opening of a mile and a quarter through concessions 10 and 1 1, giving a 
good outlet to Bonfield Station of the railway, and access to some good land on 
Lake Taillon. 



73 



BONFIELD 30 AND 31 SiDE LiNE ROAD. 

Through concessions 5 and 6, three-quarters of a mile was chopped, grubbed 
and graded, and half a mile graded, giving an outlet for settlers to Ruther Glen 
station, on the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Burleigh Road. 

Sixteen miles of improvements made from about half a mile north oi Burleigh 
Falls northward, the cost being about $300. 

Burnt River Bridge. 

Constructed across Burnt River, on lot 8, concession 9, Somerville. 

The bridge is 132 feet long, and has five openings, the main one being forty- 
four feet, and the remainder fourteen feet each, the whole superstructure resting 
upon pile piers, well driven and sheeted. 

The chords are also covered with sheet iron for protection. 

Blackdonald and Mount St. Patrick Road. 

From lot 6, concession 4, Brougham, repairs were extended in a southerly 
<iirection three miles toward Renfrew. 

Blezard Road. 

^ Improvements of a substantial character were made in this instance, from 
lot number 4. concession 1, to lot 6, concession 5, in the township of Blezard. 

Brudenell and Killalce Road. 

For the Government expenditure, $853.74, two miles and a half of road were 
opened from the 3rd concession line of Hagarty, southerly on the line between 
lots 9 and 10. There was also spent the sum of about $274, under the manage- 
ment of a committee appointed by the residents — the money being contributed 
by individuals — in continuing the road to Brudenell and Killoloe Station of the 
Ottawa, Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway to open a main and direct route for 
all purposes. 

Caldwell No. 3 Road. 

Some three miles of grading upon portions chopped out last year, being 
across lots 3 to 9 inclusive, between concessions 2 and 3 Kirkpatrick. Another 
half mile has been brushed ready for grading, 

Cameron Road. 

From lots 1 to 10, concession B, Cameron, about two and a half miles were 
opened through a burnt district to unite with Papineau town-line. 

Other repairs were made between concession B and concession 25 of a useful 
and necessary character. 



74 



Garden and Dalton T. L. Road. 

A mile and a quarter of repairs and nearly a mile of new road, the repairs 
being from lot 25, concession 4, Garden side of line west and the new work be- 
tween lots 25 and 26, Dalton, to the 1st concession. Another mile was opened 
from the boundary of Dalton and Rama eastward, the whole costing only $357.60. 

Gavendish Roads. 

In this case the chief work was the repair of sixteen miles from near Kinmount 
eastward through Gal way and Gavendish on the line between concessions 16 and 
17 to lot number 18, where the Buckhorn road is intersected. 

A road was also opened from 1 to 6 on the 17th concession for a mile 
and a half, largely new work, and which, with some repairs on several side roads 
represents seventeen miles of repairs and a mile and a half of new work. 

CmsHOLM 10 and 11 Side Line Road. 

A mile and a half of new road, roughly opened in concessions 6 to 9. 
The sum spent $201.01, could only open the distance as a winter road. 

Chishohm 12 and 13 Goncession Road. 

This was the construction of a mile from lot number 5 eastward on the line 
mentioned. Forty rods were opened through green bush, the balance having 
been previously chopped out in a rough manner. A bridge, forty-two feet long,, 
and clear opening of thirty feet was built within the distance stated. 

Ghisholm Road. 

Three-quarters of a mile grubbed and graded through very heavily tim- 
bered land, opposite lots 18, 19 and 20, between concessions 16'and 17, giving an. 
outlet for many settlers to the Wisawasa road. 

Clarendon Station Road. 

From Clarendon on the Kingston and Pembroke railway repairs were made 
westward eight and a half miles. 

This road is the stage and mail route for the chief use and benefit of the 
townships of Oso and Olden. 

Desert Lake and Janesville Road. 

Repairs beginning at lot number 4, concession 1, Bedford, and extending^ 
three miles to the south boundary of the township. 

Dummer and Stony Lake Road, 

Three miles of new road were in this case opened through a rough, rocky 
section about the head of Stony Lake from lot 30, concession 11, Dummer, to 
lots 3 and 4, concession 14, Burleigh. Some fifty men were employed and the 
entire work was finished in twelve days. 



75 



DuNNET Road. 

Work began between lots 2 and 3 concession 5, Dunnet, continuing south to 
concession 4, thence west to lots 6 and 7, and thence again south to the 2nd and 
3rd concession line, a length of about four and a quarter miles, of which three- 
quarters of a mile was new work and the balance repairs. 

The land in this district is of good quality, and an extension of the road 
southward would reach a good settlement. 

Eels Creek Bridge. 

A bridge 100 feet long and main opening of 32 feet on lot 37, concession' 8, 
Anstruther. The main piers are 11 feet high. 

Eganville and Foymount Road. 

Two miles of repairs from lot number 2 to lot number 7 in the Township of 
Sebastopol. 

Eldon 1 AND 2 Con. Road. 

This work was the opening of a swamp or muskeg three-quarters of a mile 
long through lots 19 and 20. The entire distance being formed 3 feetJG inchea. 
above the swamp level. 

Ferris and South-East Bay Road. 

From lot 21, concession 3, Ferris, at what is known as Willett's crossing, a 
road has been opened one mile eastward to connect with the Government road 
for access to South-East bay. 

The land was exceptionally rough, but a good location has been secured. 
Ferris, 8 and 9 Con. Road. 

A narrow road had been opened by the settlers and this expenditure was for 
its improvement over two and a half miles. 

The work was from lot number 5 westward and across the fronts of lots 22 
to 28. 

Frontenac Road. 

Repairs from lot 14, concession 5 of Mattawatchan northward to the Mada- 
waska river, two miles, and thence westward along the river four miles. 

Galway Roads. 

Several roads in this township were improved, namely: — What is known 
as Reid road was repaired from lot 3 to lot 15, three miles; and on the 14th 
concession line two miles were repaired from lot 1 to lot 8 ; again between con- 
cessions 12 and 13 two miles and a half were worked upon across lots 5 to 15 ; 
while on the 10th and 11th concession line, from lot 4 to lot 22, four and a half. 



76 



miles were well repaired ; and lastly, there was a mile improved between lots 5 
and 6 on the 13th and 14th concession line, making together fourteen and a 
quarter miles of substantial improvements. 

Galwa^ 4 AND 5 Con. Road. 

Repairs were made on this line from Bobcaygeon road eastward to about lot 
number 5. Then again a quarter of a mile of practically new work was done, 
and the road put into good condition as far as lot number 8, three miles. 

There was also half a mile of new road opened on the east boundary of the 
township, and which leads to Nogies' Creek. 

Gal WAY AND Cavendish Road. 

Six and a half miles of repairs, and the opening of one mile from lot 20 
Galway, to lot 14, Cavendish, and generally upon the road allowance between 
concessions 14 and 15. A mile remains to be opened before Buckhorn road is 
reached. 

Govehnment Road. 

A road to a cheese factory and railway, and being from the line between lots 
5 and 6, concession 9, Monteagle, westward on the concession mentioned — two 
and-a-half miles of improvement upon an old and rough road. 

GORMANVILLE ROAD. 

The repair of two miles and one of new work, the first being the improvement 
of the road from between lots 22 and 23, concession A, Widdifield, northward, 
and the latter from the line between concessions B and 1, crossing the latter con- 
cession and opening to the line between concession 1 and 2. 

Harvey, 29 and 30 Road. 

Three-quarters of a mile of new road opened from between lots 28 and 29, 
Harvey, eastward, with a quarter mile of repairs upon the town line of Harvey and 
Verulura leading to the above road. 

Hastings Road. 

On this main highway through the County of Hastings ten miles of repairs 
"vere made from the north side of McKenzie lake northward, in the townships 
of Lyell and Sabine ; sixty miles were more or less improved between Millbridge, 
in the south part of Tudor, and south side of McKenzie lake ; and two miles and 
a half were repaired from lot number 20, " free grant," Wicklow northward. 

Hagarty and Opeongo Road. 

From the 3rd concession line of the Township of Hagarty, which is near 
Emmet P.O., repairs were made over about 4 miles, reaching Opeongo road. This 
is the main road from Rockingham and Palmer Rapids to Wilno, on the Ottawa, 
Arnprior and Parry Sound Railway. 



77 



Hagarty, 4 AND 5 Con. Road. 

Two miles of improvements from lot 28 to the western boundary of the 
township, leading to the new railway. 

Howe Island Road. 

The repair of three-quarters of a mile in the township of Pittsburg, from 
lot 27, concession 2, to the Ferry landing. It is the only waggon road settlers 
have to reach the ferry and main land. 

Island Road. 

The repair of three miles on Peterson line between lots 5 and 6, northerly, to 
concession 6 and lots 6 and 7 in the township of Stanhope. 

Jack's Lake Road. 

Three-quarters of a mile opened from lot 19, concession 16, Burleigh south 
towards Jack's Lake. The grant was not sufficient to finish the opening. 

Jones Falls and Battersea Road. 

Repairs from Jones Falls on the Rideau Canal south-westerly three miles 
towards Battersea, and is a cheese factory and milk road generally. 

From lot 19, concession li, Storrington repairs were extended two miles to lot 
23; concession 13. 

Keenan Road. 

Opened from "Salter Line," concession 1, between lots 2 and 3, Caldwell 
west, to the line between lots 3 and 4, and thence south to the river — a mile and- 
a-quarter of grading and ditcning. 

Kennebec Road. 

Repairs from a point about five miles south of Ardeu for eleven miles in the 
direction of Tarn worth. It is a main highway and is known also asTamworth and 
Arden road. 

Killaloe and Rochefort Road. 

Three miles of improvements in the Township of Hagarty extending to 
Rochefort and leading to Killaloe station of the 0. A. & P. S. Railway. 

Killaloe and Eganville Road. 

Repairs from lots 26 and 27, concession 8, South Algona, extending westerly 
about three miles and a half. 

It is a road over which there is a large amount of traffic. 



78 



Lav ANT Road. 

From the boundary between Palmerston and Lavant repairs were extended 
eastward to McPhail's bridge, a distance of about ten miles. It is the main road 
in that district to the railway. There were also eight miles and a half of repairs 
effected from the above starting point westward to Ompah. 

LouGHBORo' Road. 

Repairs from the south boundary of the township of Loughboro' northward 
along the road allowance on the west side of the township, three miles on largely 
a cheese factory road. 

Lutterworth Road. 

From Miner's Bay, lots 17 and 18, concession 7, two miles and a half were 
repaired westward to Belfre3'^'s school house, and again from the school south 
five miles were substantially improved. 

Madawaska Bridge. 

A bridge over the river named on the Hyde's Chute and Sanson road. The 
work of renewal is now in progress as ice and snow are required for procuring 
timber, and it can therefore be built more economically during the winter months. 

Mattawatchan Branch Road. 

This expenditure represents two miles of repairs from Hyde's Chute and 
Sanson road (about five miles north of Hyde's Chute) westward to lot 26, con- 
cession 6, township of Griffith. It is a very rough section. 

Maitawa and Callender Road. 

Two miles of repairs in the township of Calvin, between lots 5 and 17. 

Mattawa Bridge. 

This was a contribution of $200 towards the repair and re-planking of this 
large bridge, the municipality supplementing the grant with $152, 

Mattawa and Temiscamingue Road. 

Two and a quarter miles of repairs and three-quarters of a mile opened 
through light brush" and timber on the 4th concession line of Mattawan township. 

McConnell's Creek Bridge. 

A bridge erected over McConnell's Creek on lot 13, range 8, township of 
Ralph. Two abutments 12 feet high, 14 feet by 20 feet; an opening of 12 feet 
and full length of 100 feet completed the structure. 

Methuen Road 

Eleven miles of repairs from lot 25, concession 4, Chandos, to lot 8, conces- 
sion 2, Methuen. 



79 



MONTEAGLE ROAD. 

Repairs with grading from lot 21, concession 6, Monteagle, southward about 
three and a half miles. It is an important highway leading to the Irondale, 
Bancroft and Ottawa railway. 

Monteagle Valley Settlement Road. 

From Mississippi road, about a mile and a half east of Bancroft, repairs were 
extended about eight miles to lot number 11, concession 5, of Monteagle ; a milk 
and cheese factory road very largely. 

Monmouth Road. 

This work was begun at lot number 32, concession 4, Dysart, and continued 
■easterly to lot 28, concession 14, of Monmouth ; a course of general repairs 
extending over eleven miles. 

Monmouth Branch Road. 

From lot 17, concession 12, to lot 18, concession 11, Monmouth, a mile and a 
half of repairs were made over a road upon which nothing had been spent for 
■eighteen years. 

Mountain Road. 

Repairs from lot 5 in the 10th concession of Kennebec eastward three miles 
and a half towards Parham. 

Mud Lake Narrows Bridge. 

This bridge is in the township of Garden, on the main road between Kirk- 
field, Bolsover, Sebright and Orillia, and first erected twenty-seven years ago. 

In the year 1889 the upper portion was renewed at a cost of $851.73, of 
■which the County of Victoria contributed one-half. 

This season further and very permanent work was done in the introduction 
of three additional crib piers, reducing fifty feet spans to openings of about twenty 
feet, and which, with other repairs, cost $459.60, the county giving $50 of this 
sum. The structure is 240 feet long, and with the shortened spans can no doubt 
be maintained in future without Government aid. 

Nogie's Creek Road. 

From lot 17, concession 1 6, Harvey, repairs were made northward to Bass 
Lake settlement in Gal way, crossing the Gal way boundary at lot 22, concession 
14, covering a length of about six miles. 

The object of this road is to serve a settlement at Bass Lake, and open to a 
number of lots which are located but without means of ingress or egress. 

North Harvey Road. 

Ten miles of repairs from lot 6, concession 1, Harvey, westward to lot 21, 
concession 13. 



80 



North Methuen Road, 

The repair of fifteen miles from the boundary of Cardiff and Chandbs (lot* 
23 and 24) to lot 27, concession 5, Chandos. 

North Shore Road. 

General repairs over seven miles, beginning at lot 14, concession 8, Dysart,- 
and extending to lot 27, concessiou 7, of Minden, 

Opeongo Road. 

Four miles of repairs from D'Acre eastward. 

Opinicon Road. 

A bridge was built at the outlet of Rock Lake, which is altogether 75 feet 
long ; and five miles of road were repaired from lot 8, concession 14, Storrington,. 
to lot 16 at the south boundary of Bedford. 

Palmer Rapids and Budrich Road. 

About two miles of repairs from a point a mile and a half east of Palmer 
Rapids southerly. The road leads into and accommodates a large German settle- 
ment in the township of Raglan. 

Papineau 8 and 9 Con. Road, 

Two and a quarter miles opened through a burnt district from lot number 1 
Cameron west to lot 13 and up to lot 17, giving an outlet to Mattawa. 

Papineau 10 Con. Road. 

The opening of two miles and a half of new road, beginning at the 10th 
concession and extending south between lots 30 and 31 to concession 8, and 
thence west from lot 30 to the town line of Calvin, opening a way for a German 
settlement in Calvin who previously had no general highway. 

Pauquett's Rapids Road. 

From about one mile south-east of Westmeath village three and a half milea 
were repaired along the southeast side of Ottawa River. 

Peterson Road. 

Eleven miles repaired from about five miles west of Combermere westward. 

Pigeon Lake Road. 

Seven miles of repairs from lot 9, concession 10, Harvey westward to Pigeon 
lake. 

Pigeon Creek and Mud Lake Road. 

, A small grant for the repair of the road, chiefly through the township of 
Ennismore. 



81 



Round Lake Road. 

Repairs between concessions 9 and 10 of Belmont across lots 20 to 25, and 
in addition, 65 rods, of cross waying, representing more than two and a half miles 
of work. 

RiDEAu Lake Road. 

Fifty dollars spent upon some necessary crosswaying between Fermoy and 
Westport. 

Sebastopol and Lyndoch Road. 

# 

Repairs from lot number 1, concession 4, Sebastopol, to lot 7, a length of two 
miles. This road leads from a German settlement, and intersects the Opeongo 
road at Vaubrugh. 

Sebaitopol and Grattan Road. 

The repair of a mile and a quarter on the town line indicated, from lot num- 
ber 30 eastward, 

Snowdon Road. 

A road six miles long between Trondale and Gelert station, in the township 
of Snowdon, was repaired through almost the entire length. 

This road is about twenty years old, and not having had anything done 
upon it since that time was in almost an impassable state. 

South Alqona 2 and 3 Con. Road. 

A mile of new road was opened from lot 30 to lot 34, between the conces- 
sions mentioned, and another mile from lot, 6, concession 3 westward leading to a 
cheese factory. 

South Algona 5 Con. Road. 

This was the opening of a mile and a quarter across lots 10 to 15 as a branch 
to connect with Eganville and Foymount road leading to the railway. 

South Shore Road. 

Some three and a half miles opened, beginning at lot 32, concession 18 Fer- 
ris, and continuing from thence eastward to lot 20 on the line between conces- 
sions 16 and 17. 

Shield's Pit Road. 

The grading of a mile and three-quarters in the township of Calvin from 
lot 29, concession 8, west to the boundary between Calvin and Bonfield. This 
road is now completed between Eau Claire and Ruther Glen a distance of seven 
or eight miles. 

6 C.L. 



82 



Shamrock and Dennehan Road. 

Repairs from Opeongo road (about two miles west of Shamrock) northerly 
three miles, 

Squaw River Road. 

This work was from lot 20, concession 12 Harvey to lot 31, concession IS, 
about six miles, of which two were very nearly new. The inspector recomniends 
an extension of this road for the accommodation of settlers. 

Sudbury and Massey Bay Road. 

Two miles and a half of road were opened from lot 10, concession 1, on the 
boundary between Garson and Neelon to lot number 6. Again, from lot 5, con- 
cession 2 Garrow, w^ork was continued in a northeasterly direction to lot 6, con- 
cession 4 of Scadding, on the shore of Massey Bay on Lake Wahnipitae. This 
latter distance is about twelve miles ; three of which were deviations, and the 
balance general repairs. Two daily stages travel over this route in addition to a 
large general traffic. 

Springer Road. 

From concession A, Springer, about a mile and a half of repairs were made, 
with ditching, between lots 1 and 2. Half a mile of new road was also opened 
tow'ards Lake Nipissing, leaving yet half a mile before the shore is reached. 

In another portion of the township, namely from lot 11, concession 5* north- 
ward to lot 9, concession 1 Field, some two miles were opened and two miles of 
old road repaired. 

Sturgeon River Road. 

Six miles of heavy and substantial repairs from lots 4 and 5 concession 2, 
Springer, north to the boundarj^ of Springer and Field ; thenee east one mile on 
the boundary line, and thence south to the river. There is about a mile and a 
half of new w^ork here in addition to the repairs. Land is being^ rapidly taken 
up in this district and a large number of settlers are already upon the farms. 

Stafford 4 and 5 Concession Road. 

Two miles repaired from one mile north of the south boundary of Stafford 
northward to Fish Creek. 

Temiscamingue Road. 

The improvement of a section of low, swampy land and, in addition to the 
expenditure of SSOO by the Government the settlers gave, it is reported and 
understood, fully SlOO worth of labor. 

Vader's Bridge. 

The repair of a bridge which it is stated was first built about twelve yeai-s 
ago over the outlet of Lavelle lake on the line between lots 26 and 27, concession 
4 of the township of Faraday. The bridge is 300 feet long. 



83 



Vansickle Road. 

A mile was opened across lots 1 and 2 for the purpose of reaching a cheese 
factory ; and four miles were repaired from lot 3 concession 1, Methuen, westward 
to the 4th concession. The district is hilly. 

Yerner and Badgerovv Road. 

Repairs amounting to tive and a quarter miles, and one mile of new work 
from lots 9 and 10 concession 6, Caldwell, to lots 7 and 8 concession 6 of 
Badgerow. 

Wellington Ro.vd. 

From lot 34, concession! I, Anstruther, eight miles of repairs were made 
reaching to lot 20, concession 2. Chandos, 

Wkstmkath 10 and II, SiDK Line Road. 

Two miles of repairs through concessions 5 and G ot Westmeath, the main 
road to Cobden station on the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Widdifield Road. 

Repairs through concessions B to 3, both inclusive. Through concessions 4 
and 5 the road was chopped out and some grading done. 

A bridge was also built over Duchesney creek on the same line (between lota 
20 and 21 ) 94 feet long, well and firmly constructed, 

Wilberforce 16 Concession Road. 

A mile and a quarter opened across lots 32 to 35 leading to the railway. 

WisAWASA Road. 

The grading of three-quarters of a mile through the 13th concession of 
Chisholm to meet the road now opened between concessions 12 and 13, 

A mile and a half was also partially repaired making — the inspector says — 
good roads in that township. 

Wylie Road. 

Repairs from Chalk river station on the Canadian Pacific Railway about four 
miles, all in the township of Wylie. 



84 



MINING ROADS. 

BONHEUR AND SaW BiLL LaKE RoAD. 

In making this location three routes were considered, namely : from Martin, 
English River, and Bonheur. 

As to distance and grades there was no serious dirterence, but the line from 
Bonheur was selected because of less swamp and consequently less crosswaying to 
be done and which latter is always expensive, and if it can be avoided, undesirable. 

The road begins at Bonheur station of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and 
from thence is made in a southwesterly direction until it crosses Gull river when 
a still more southwesterly course is followed so as to cross the portage between 
Gull lake and Surprise lake keeping close to the latter lake. 

Owing to the rough country between Gull lake and Red Paint lake it became 
necessary to keep fuither westward, and, when within two miles of Red Paint 
lake the line was changed a little eastward to get about the lake, but from this 
point a fairly direct course was taken to Saw Bill lake. 

The entire length of road is thirty and a half miles, chopped out thirty feet 
wide, grubbed twenty feet wide and graded the entire length, excepting the length 
crosswayed which aggregates a distance of five miles and a half. 

Three bridges only occur over the entire distance, and each has but an open- 
ing or span of 40 feet. 

Upon the first five, and last mile the timber was light ; but the balance was 
of heavy growth, and the labor of opening it by no means easy. 

Two rather heavy hills occur on the line which could not be avoided, but 
teams have hauled 2,400 pounds over them without much difficulty, and with 
some further outlay in improving these and covering crosswa3's for protection 
against fire, it may be characterized as a good road, and the best mining road ever 
built in the country. 

Jackfish Bay and Long Lake Road. 

A continuation from last year's operations a little over three miles to mining 
location 220, passing through a rough, broken area, but easy grades have been 
secured and the work understood to be very satisfactory. 

Rat Portage and Rainy Lake Road. 

This road was continued from near Hilly lake almost to mining location 219 
— or Pine Portage mine. There is a very considerable amount of traffic over this 
road to mines, and the inspector says it should be continued to Long Lake 
Narrows. 

RossLAND Road. 

A road opened from the vicinity of Rat Portage through lands which are 
in some degree agricultural, but leading principally to mines and mining lands. 
The length is some 5 miles and the road is an excellent one. A larger expenditure 
was made than at first contemplated, and it is desirable that an additional 
sura be given to complete the work and pay the men employed. 



85 



ScHREiBER Bridge. 

A structure of 104 feet long, having three spans of 26 feet each and two 
spans of IS feet each, with two main piers 22| feet high. It crosses a deep 
ravine near the village of Schreiber, and was a necessary work to give access to 
mining and other lands. 

SiioAL Lake and Bad Vermillion Road. 

Half a mile of road was opened towards Bad Vermillion lake, partly on 
mining location 712P ; and from a point about half a mile from Mine Centre two 
miles and a quarter were repaired reaching to what is known as Sand Hill. 

Portions of the road had been crosswayed by the Ferguson Mining Company, 
but it was not suflBciently wide for general traffic. 

Turtle Lake Road. 

This road was commenced at a bay on Bad Vermillion lake, near the south- 
east corner of mining location H.P. 9S. from whence it was continued north- 
westerly to Turtle lake, passing through about the centre of mining location 
H,P. 439 — a distance of three and a quarter miles, all of which was graded and 
opened forty feet wide. This road connects with Shoal Lake and Bad Vermil- 
lion mining road by water in summer and ice during the winter months. 

Wabigook Manitou, and Rainy L.\ke Road. 

Beginning at the head of Minnehaha lake this road is constructed to and 
passes over to Trafalgar bay on Lake Manitou, a length of, practically, seven 
miles and a half. The district through which the road is made is hilly but good 
grades have been established and the whole length well graded, excepting a mile 
and a half which was crosswayed. 

In connection with this work and in terms of the appropriation, a dam was 
constructed on Manitou river 24S feet long and eight feet high from the mud sill, 
with a stop-log gate twelve feet wide, and a waste-gate also. The effect of this 
dam is to raise the water sufficiently to provide navigation over the entire 
length of Manitou lake, which is aV)out fifty miles. 

A second dam was built above the falls of Wabigoon river at the village of 
Dryden. This structure is 140 feet long, from five to eight feet in height, built 
of squared timber throughout, and of a most substantial, character. It is built up 
to what is undei-stood to be high water mark of the lake, the effect of which will 
be and is making navigable the whole length of Lake V^abigoon, some thirty 
miles. 



86 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE ON COLONIZATION ROADS AND 
BRIDGES IN THE YEAR 1897. 



Name of work. 



North Division. 

Balfour roads and ChelmBtord bridges 

Bar River " 

Bridge repairs, West Algoma 

Bruce Mines and Uesert Lake road 

Bruce Mines and Ophir " 

Carpenter and Lash . . . " 

Coffin and Coffin, Additional " 

Coffin and Qalbraith boundary * ' 

Crozier and Lash '" 

Eades Hill and McLean's Mountain " 

Grassy River (balance) " 

Galbraith, 2nd Con " 

Grand Portage " 

Gladstone, 4th Con " 

Garden River bridge 

Honora Bay. . . ^ road 

Ignace and Sturgeon "Falls .trail 

lasppction 

Jackfish Bay road 

Keewatin bridge piers 

Lavelle (balance) bridge 

La Cloche 

Lake Shore road 

Lees 

Little Current and Sheginandah " 

Itlanitowaning and Michael's Bay " 

Mindemoya 

Miller's bridge 

Mindemoya and Sandfield road 

Mudge and Gore Bay " 

Minnehaha and Mountain Lake Portage " 

Ottertail Creek dam 

Oliver Township roads 

Pine River (balance) bridge 

Pine Portage (balance) road 

Parke Township : " 

Parkinson 

Port Finlay and McKay's " 

Prince Township " 

Rainy River " 

Rainy River, Shoal Lake and other tiails 

Rayside roads 

Robinson, Dawson and Burpee ** 

Savanne (balance road 

Seine River and Manitou trail 

South Bay and Mudge Bay (balance) roads 

Spanish River ferry scow 

St. Joseph Island roads 

Savanne bridge 

Slate River road 

Spaniih River and Kenabutch " 

Tarantorus and Rankin 

Ihessa'on River bridge 

Vermillion River ■ 

Victoria and Salter T. L »•< ad 

Wabigoon bridge 

Wainwright and Eton roads 

Woodyatt 

Total 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



746 26 
332 16 
519 77 

499 90 
75 00 

.500 00 
586 74 
100 12 
950 00 
198 78 
16 43 

300 00 
521 47 
400 01 
180 00 

301 42 
43 59 

3,297 45 

4 98 

2.350 00 

16 16 
150 00 
200 00 
400 46 
399 15 

500 02 
280 00 
300 00 
292 30 
480 00 

50 00 
500 00 
300 00 

10 13 

17 00 
300 00 



529 13 


399 19 


180 00 


1,000 00 


200 00 


490 00 


504 05 


5 14 


35 00 


s 70 : 


60 73 ; 


631 18 


750 00 


700 00 


,500 00 


45 00 


413 50 i 


2.664 00 ! 


198 75 1 


825 00 


2,0)0 00 ' 


750 00 j 


29.053 67 



Municipal 
grants. 



87 



SUMMARY OF EXPE^DITVRE— Continued. 



Name of work. 



Wbst Division. 

Armovir and Kearaey road 

Armour and Strong 

Baxter ..bridKOi 

Bethune, 25and26S. !■ ro«a 

Bethune, 5 and 6 S. L ." 

Broad River (ba'ance) bridge 

Christie (balance) road 

Chapman and Loant T. L " 

Christie, No. 2, and Port Cockbom roads 

Christie and Foley road 

Dalton and Washago " 

Distress River bridge 

Draper, 7 Con road 

Golden VaUey ." 

Grongh bridge 

jnrd road 

Himsworth, 5 and 6 S. L " 

Inspection 

Joly bridge 

Kearney, No. 1 road 

Laurier, 12 and 13 Con " 

Magnetawan 

Maff anetawan River bridge 

Monteith and Perry roiid 

McKellar Centre " 

Mills and Golden Valley " 

Monteith, 10 and 11 S. L " 

Macaalay .... " 

Moskoka and Bobcaygeon . " 

McDongall ." 

McAmmond bridge 

North Segnin River (balance) " 

Northern road 

North- We^t Road .' bridges 

Portage road 

Perry and Chaffey " 

RydeCentre " 

Rosseaa and Nipissing " 

South River bridge 

Surprise Lake road 

Segfuin River bridge 

Stephenson, 2 and 3 Con " 

Stisted, 12 and 13 Con road 

Sinclair and Franklin T. L . . " 

Strong, 30 S. L " 

Tiny " 

Willett " 

Wood Lake " 



Less Township of Monck grant to Beaver Creek Bridge of 1896 
Total 

East Division. 

Addington road 

Anstmther " 

Anstruther and Chandos " 

Alice, 25 and 26 S. L " 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



400 02 


468 46 


7^9 22 


514 25 


250 11 


28 31 


31 86 


501 78 


720 00 


240 00 


441 25 


490 65 


200 20 


502 00 


611 89 


304 68 


506 50 


1.250 00 


351 30 


301 14 


500 39 


498 51 


600 00 


305 53 


503 25 


300 26 


301 10 


299 14 


503 66 


351 60 


319 58 


26 74 


551 75 


1.249 32 


513 70 


.'592 63 


424 30 


200 08 


41 38 


180 00 


472 25 


200 00 


350 65 


206 00 


34 25 


600 00 


150 36 


180 00 


19,199 55 


66 21 


19,133 34 


1,046 08 


30C CO 


309 00 


300 00 



Municipal 
grants. 



88 



SUMMAKY OF EXPENDITURE— aoniiTiuerf. 



Name of work. 



East Division— Continued. 

Alice and Wilberf orce T, L road 

Alice, 12 and 13 Con " 

Anslesea " 

Bedford, 9 Con " 

Bellrock , *' 

Burle'gh and J ack's Lake roads 

Buckhorn road 

Barry Bay and Combermere " 

Black Donald and Mt. St. Patrick " 

Brudecell and Killa'oe " 

Bonfield, 30 and 31 S. L " 

Blezard . . " 

Burnt River bridge 

B-ll's Rapids road 

Bonfield, 5 and 6 S. L " 

Bonnechere (balance) bridge 

Brudenell and Killaloe (balance) road 

Clarendon Station " 

Cameron " 

Cardea and Dalton T. L . " 

ChiBholm, 12 and 13 Con " 

Garden and Dalton " 

Cavendish roads 

Caldwell, No. 3 road 

Chisholm, 10 and 11 S. L " 

Chisholm, 5 and 6 Con " 

Desert Lake and Janesville " 

Dunnett " 

Dummer and Stony Lake " 

D'Acre and Opeongo (balance " 

Eldon, 9 Con " 

Eels' Creek bridge 

Eganville aod Foy road 

Eldon, 1 and 2 Con " 

Ferris and South-East Bay " 

Ferris, 8 and 9 Con " 

Frontenao and Mattawatchan " 

Galway a«d Cavendish roads 

Galway " 

German ville road 

Government " 

Galway, 4 and 5 Con " 

Hinchinbrooke (balance) " 

Hastings " 

Howe Island " 

Hagarty and Opeongo " 

Hagarty, 4 and 5 Con " 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



Island 

In«pection 

Jones' Falls and Battersea road 

Kennebec " 

Keenan 

Killaloe and Eganville " 

Killaloe and Rochefort " 

Lutterworth " 

Lotighboro' " 

Lavant 

Madawaska .bridge 

Mittawa ". 

Mountain road 

Monteagle 



280 00 

303 25 
201 37 
500 00 
398 74 
500 00 
397 67 
400 15 
280 00 
853 74 

300 00 

304 93 
603 24 
101 25 
4C6 79 
143 44 

34 10 
403 77 

301 58 
257 60 
498 65 
100 00 
616 09 
400 00 
201 01 

302 29 
400 00 
400 00 
508 20 

23 90 

80 00 

221 75 

301 68 
380 00 
502 07 
200 50 
292 55 
758 10 
627 76 
400 90 

52 00 
410 68 

12 87 
1,261 36 

60 00 
284 54 

302 54 
300 00 

3,029 80 
780 30 
497 90 

299 10 

300 23 
440 00 
300 42 
250 00 
900 00 

1,217 50 
200 00 

400 00 

401 68 



Municipal 
grants. 



$ c. 



100 00 



60 00 



89 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE— (7(mcZurfec/. 



Name of work. 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



Municipal 
f^ranta. 



East Divisioy—ConlifiUfd. 

Monteagle Valley Settlement road 

Monmeunt, M. Branch and North Shore roads 

Mud Lake Narrows bridge 

Methaen road 

Mattawatchan Branch " 

McConnell's bridge 

Mattawa and Oallender road 

Mattawa and Temiscamingue " 

North Harvey " 

Nogie's Creeic and Harvey W and 80 " 

North Methuen " 

Opinicon 

Opeongo 

Pembroke and Barry Ba,y (balance) " 

Palmer Rapids and Budrick '* 

Papineau 8 and 9 Con " 

Paquette's Rapids •' 

Pigeon Lake " 

Papineau, 10 Con " 

Peterson '• 

Pigeon Creek and Mud Lake " 

Round Lake ' 

Rideau Lake ... " 

Rama . . bridges 

Shield's Pit road 

Sturgeon River " 

Shamrock and Deenahan's " 

Stafford, 4 and 5 Con " 

South Algona, 2 and 3 Con 

South Algona, 5 Con " 

Sudbury and Massey Bay " 

Squaw River " 

Springer *' 

Sebastopol and Lyndoch " 

Sebastopol and Grattan " 

South Shore . , " 

Snowdon roads 

Temiscamingue " 

Vaders » bridge 

Verner and Badgerow road 

Vansickle " 

Wilberforce, Ist S. L. (balance) " 



Wyli 

Widdifield 

Westmeath, 10 and 11 S. L 

Wilberforce, 16 Con 

Wellington , . 

Wiesawasa 



200 00 


893 77 


409 60 


204 88 


303 26 


223 00 


304 37 


403 25 


424 31 


694 73 


300 00 


399 70 


402 89 


8 75 


300 76 


505 21 


301 99 


209 68 


399 63 


200 00 


200 OO 


250 00 


50 00 


1,000 00 


405 25 


504 00 


305 70 


305 59 


597 32 


300 65 


997 65 


298 40 


70i 18 


293 61 


199 50 


500 29 


402 30 


300 00 


100 «4 


.500 09 


100 00 


37 50 


302 41 


408 26 


400 00 


299 91 


99 50 


399 64 



50 00 



Total 



45,192 09 



90 



RECAPITULATION. 

I. North Division $29,053 67 

II. West Division 19,133 34 

III. East Division 45,192 09 

Total Departmental Expenditure $93,379 10 



MUNICIPAL GRANTS REFERRED TO IN ABOVE. 

Township of Loughboro' $ 50 00 

County of Victoria 50 00 

Township of Portland 100 00 

Total $200 00 



MINING ROADS, 1897. 

Bonheur and Saw Bill Lake road $19,443 10 

Jack Fish Bay " 900 00 

Partridge Lake and Seine River trail 30 00 

Rat Portage and Rainy Lake road 600 00 

Rossland " 800 00 

Schrieber bridge 300 00 

Shoal Lake and Bad Vermillion road 500 00 

Turtle Lake " 1,983 55 

Wabigoon and Manitou roads 8,429 40 

Total $32,986 05 

HENRY SMITH, 

Superintendent of Colonization Roadsv 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1897. 



91 



APPENDIX No. 30. 



List of Persons holding Culler's Licenses issued under The Ontario Culler's Act 

31st December, 1897. 




Anderson. M. M I Almonte. 

Allan. James D Bracebridgp. 

Appleton, Erwin B Bracebridge. 

Albert, Andrew 'Ottawa. 

Adamn, J. Q . . : Longford Mills. 

Anderson. Patrick J Canaphellford. 

Anderson. J. C i iravenhurst. 

Allan, Alfred ^Ottawa 

Aikins, Geo. M I French River. 

Appleby, Ridley I Katrine. 

Adams. James Si iSaolt Ste. Marie. 

Aylward, James i Peterborough. 

Archibal <, John L jKeewatin. 

Austin, Wm. G Renfrew. 

Anderson, Charles I Little Current. 

Anderson, John Cartier. 

Adair, Thomas Albert jGananoque 



Andert>on, J. 6 

Aleyander, Samuel 

Adams, Wm 

Armstrong, James Theodore 



Alliens, Mich. 
Arden. 
Westmeath. 
McKellar. 



Boland, Abraham Cartier. 

Brown, Singleton Bracebridge. 

Barry, Th'>ma« James iHaRtings. 

Blanjhet, Paul Frederick Ottawa. 

Bird, W. S IParry Sound. 

Bayley, James T JGravenhnrst. 

Bell. Henry jOttawa. 

Beach, Herbert Mahlon Ottawa. 

Barry, Thomas Millbridge, 

Beaty. W. R Parry Sound. 

Brooks, Frederick William j Mackey's Station. 

Brown. Robert D Port Sydney. 

Breed, Arthur G jPenetaoguishene. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Cold water. 

Penetanguishehe. 

Musk oka Mills. 

Thessalon. 

Peterborough . 

Peterborough. 

Warren. 

Klock's Mills. 

Eganville. 

Aylmer, Que. 

Pembroke. 

Admaston. 

Pembroke. 

Little Current. 

Barrie. 

West Huntingdon. 

Rat Portage. 

Boboaygeon. 



Barnes, Thomas George Lee. 

Buchanan, Robert 

Beck, Jacob Frederick 
Bird, .J< seph Manly .. 

Boyd, John F 

Brandon, Martin W .. 

Bell, John C . 

Bartlett, George W . . 

Brown, Silas 

Boland, W. G 

Baulke, George R 

Bromley, Thomas . . . 
Bremner, John L .... 

Bromley, W. H 

Bower'', Isaac 

Brown, Thomas 

Bass, Walter R 

Bates. Robert 

Bick, Thomas 



Bennett. Edward Clinton 
Blaine. Harvie Thomas . 

Barrett, Thomas 

Bray, James ' . . . 

Bissell, George Thomas . . 
Baxter. Richard 

Breeausrh, Edward 

Boyd, George A , 

Buchan, Frederick 

Barrett, Patrick 

Brundage. Alfred W 

Brougham, Thomas 

Blair, Robert I 

Benson, John W 

Beck, Charles M., Jr .... 

Beatty, W. J 

Burns, C. W . Jr 

Bell, John Henry 

Bettes, John Hiram .... 

Brady, John 

Beattie, W. J 

Bromley, William 

Bissell, Hartie 

Brown, Bobert 

Beaton, Hugh 

Bailey, Arthur 

Burd, James Henry 

Bailey, Samuel James . . . 

Burton, Tinswood 

Boyes. James 

Brown, John 

Brennen, Edward Scott 
Bell, John Arguey 

Callaghan, Dennis 

Campbell, Alexander J . . 

Carson, James 

Campbell, J. M 

Campbell, Robert 

Clairmont, Joseph 

Olarkson, Robert J .... 

Carruthers, Aaron 

Calder, Wm. J 

Chew, Joseph 

Cole, James Colin 

Cameron, William 

Cain, Robert 

Crawford, Stephen W , . , 

Cochrane. George 

Coburn, John , 

Crowe, Nathaniel 

Cameron, Alexander 

Ch ysler, Frank R. L... 
Carson, Hugh 



Ahraic Harbor. 

Orillia. 

Harrie. 

Kinmount. 

Trenton. 

Deseronto. 

Deseronto. 

Thessalon. 

Ainprior. 

Am prior. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Am prior. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Coldwater. 

South River. 

Burk's Falls. 

Mu"koka Mills. 

Renfrew. 

Am prior 

Wpstmeath. 

Trenton. 

Starrat. 

Waubaushene. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Orilliia. 

Renfrew. 

Huntxville. 

Rockdale. 

Sundridge. 

Klock's Mills. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

f^ampbellford. 

Parry Sound. 

Hintonburg. 

Bark Lake. 

Gray< nhurst. 

Ottawa . 

Collins' Inlet. 

Midland. 

Thessa'on 

Peterbo'ough. 

Lindi-ay. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Webbwood. 

Rat Portage. 



92 



APPENDIX No. iiO.— Continued. 



Name. 




Carson, Melvin Little Current. 

Cameron, John K Spanish River. 

Cassidy, William Little Current. 

Coon?, George Washington Peterborough. 

Chisholm, George Leopold Sault. Ste. Marie. 

Chalmers, George James Peterborough . 

Caverly, David Charles I Parry Sound. 

Campbell. Arichibald J Little Current. 

OloBe, John L Amprior. 

Campbell, James R Eganville. 

Campbell, John A Galetta. 

Caillier, Hyacinthe Amprior. 

Chamberlin, Thomas Bobcaygeon. 

Oooper, David Allan Millbrook. 

Cox, Henry Bellerica, Que. 

Currie, James Ottawa . 

Clarkson, A E Midland. 

Clainnont, E Gravenhurst. 

Oameron, W. F Sturgeon Bay. 

Connolly, Daniel . . . .: Gravenhurst. 

Campbell, P. C Sault Ste. Marie. 

Cadenhcid, Alexander Midland. 

Carpenter, R J Amprior. 

Christie, William Pringle Severn Bridge. 

•Campbell, C. V Sault Ste Mane. 

Clegg, Samuel Peterborough. 

Olairmont, William L Gravenhurst. 

Cahill, Thomas Nosbonsing. 

Chew, Manley Midland. 

Cooper, James Eddly Saurin. 

Cook, Reinhardt South River. 

Crowe, Cecil Bobcaygeon. 

Cassidy, S. C Dunchurch. 

•Charleson, John Baptiste Ottawa. 

Comer, Billa F Tweed. 

•Carter, George Sundridge. 



DnrriH, John W Ottawa. 

Dickson, John : Sundridge. 

Danter, R. W |Parry Sound. 

Doyle, T. J Eau Clare. 

Dobie, Alexander R Blind River. 

Donally, Richard S .' Sudbury. 

Devine, William jCook's Mills. 

Durrill, William Nosbonsing. 

ihapet, Patrick Quyon, Que. 

Davis, J. P bobcaygeon. 

Drum, Pat^rick : Belleville. 

Durham, Edgar S . Rosseau 



Duquette, Charles. 

Davis, William Albert 

Dickson, Robert Alexander 

Dawkins, John 

Doxsee, James E 

Didier, L. P 

Devine, Patrick J 

Dinsmore, Richard 



Ebert, Andrew P 

Ellis, Alexander 

Ellis, John 

Enington, Joseph 

Edgington, Henry John 
Eager, James 



Forbes, Christopher McKay. 
Fitzgerald. E. Clair 



Webb wood. 
Bobcaygeon. 
Keene. 
Gravenhurst. 
Gravenhurst. 
Aylmer, Que. 
Sheenboro. Que. 
Hunts ville. 

Pembroke. 
Amprior. 
Westmeath. 
Sundridge. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 

McLean's .Depot. 
Parry Sound. 



Name. 



P. O. Addre-8. 



Farrell, W. H 

French, Lewis Wm 

Fraser, Wro. A 

Fortune, Owen 

Fraser, David 

France, John 

i Ferguson, Ernert A 

I Ford, Charles 

[Fraser, Alexander, Jr 

Fairbairn, William 

Fraser, Wm. A 

Fraser, Foster 

Fraser, William 

Fraser, Hugh Alexander 

Flaherty, John 

ilFisher, William 

liFox, Th'.mas 

l;Falli8, James W 

i I Fairbairn, N. H 

; Freil, John 

jJFox, CharJe- 

i Feathers' onhaugh, Wm. Henry 

jFrair, Schuyler 

1 1 Feren, Joel 

I i Fraser, Duncan 



Ironside, Que. 

Bying lulet. 

Mattawa. 

Trenton. 

Norman. 

Collins' Inlet. 

Baysville. 

Wahnapitae. 

Westmeath. 

Calabogie. 

Pembroke. 

Pembri ke. 

Little I urrent, 

Pembroke. 

Lindsay. 

Trenton 

Deseronto. 

Sturgeon Bay 

Webbwood. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Penetangni^hene. 

Westmeath. 

Sivanne. 

Big Forks. 



JGreej, Norman A Gilmour. 

Green, Samuel E .... Parry Sound. 

iGrant, John Fiinton. 

JGreene, Arthur Ottawa. 

[George, R Parry ^ ound. 

iGardiner, John Parry Sound. 

Golden, Frank J Trenton 

Garson, Robert iThe-sal n. 

Gropp, August lPenetaugui»hene. 

jGrozelle, Antoine t) . . .' iMuskoka Mills. 

Goulaif, James Peterboio igh. 

iGraysoD, Charles Keewat'n . 

Gladstone, Henry E Cook's Millf. 

Graham, Edward G Wahnj'pitae 

JGriffin, James Spanish River. 

IGordon, Alexander B Pembroke. 

iGareau, Noah J Pembroke. 

jGordoo, Robert W \ Pembroke. 



I^etawawa. 
Rat Poitage. 
Gilmour. 
Mi.lbridge. 
Fenelon FhUs. 
Braftside. 



Guertin, Nelson 

iGardener, John 

iGunter, Peter M 

jGlennie, William 
iGorman, Maurice J 
iGillies, John A . . 

Gadway, .lohn j Parry S >und. 

Garrow, Edward Nipissing Junction. 

Holding, William {Dorset. 

Gillies, Harry i White Lake. 

Gordon, Herbert C Nelson 

Gillespie, M. H jCook's Mills. 

GrifiBn, William Huntsville. 

Ganton, David Trout Creek. 

Graham, George L I Arnpnor 

Graham, Frelerick S 'Amprior. 

Gill, Cuthbert Orihia. 

Graham, James Robert Rat l^ortage. 

Hartt, Jame.s . . ... 'Gilmour. 

Hayes, James Enterprise. 

Humphrey, I'. W Gravenhurst. 

Huckson, A. H French River. 



93 



APPENDIX No. SO.~Continued. 



Name. 



Howe, Alexander 

Hmd, Edwin 

HuflF, J. S. Morris 

HuttoD, John 

Hutchinson, Wm. E 

Hogarth, Joseph Rowan . 

Humphrey, John 

Hill, Joshua 

Hall, David 

Hartley, Charles 

Hawkins, Henry Charles . 
Hines, Philip Wallace . . . 

Hudson, John Lewis 

Helferty, Dennis 

Hamilton, Robert 

Hoppins, Abiram 

Hoppins. Deosmore 

Haystead, John 

HenderHon, John Irwin . 

Hartley, William 

Higgins, John C 

Harrison, John, Jr 

Hawkins, E 

Henderson, Charles 

Halliday, Frank 

Halliday, James 

Hurdman, J. A 

Hawkins, Stonewall J . . . 

Hinchliflfe, William 

Hillis, James M 

Hogg. W. J 

Hoxie. E. P 

Hawkins, W alter 

Howard, James 

Howard, William 

Hogan, Enos W . . . 

Home, John T 



Irwin, Thomas H 



Jackson, Robert 

Johnson, Finlay 

Jones, Albert 

Johnson, Thomas 

Johnston, Archibald M 

Julien, Charles 

Junkin, Henry 

Johns, Frank 

Jessnp, Edward D 

Johnson, Frank N 

Johnston, John 

Johnson, S. M 

Jones, Frederick James 
Johnston, William A . . 

Jervis, Henry 

Jones, William 



Kerby, John 

Kennedy, Robert 

Kitby, Louis Russell 

Kennedy, Timothy 

Kirk, Henry 

Knox, Milton 

Kinselia, Michael Pierce. 

Kitchen, D 

Kelly, Jeremiah 

Kelly, Ferdinand 




Queensborough. 

Hurdville. 

Arnprior. 

Hut ton House. 

Huntsville. 

Pembn ike. 

Gravenhurst. 

Midland. 

Loverlng. 

Peterborough. 

Blind River. 

Huntsville. 

Combermere. 

Eganville. 

Rat Portage. 

Kingston. 

Kiogi>ton. 

Parry Sound. 

Bobcaygeon. 

MiUbridge. 

Peterborough. 

Pembroke. 

Le Breton Flats. 

Bracebridge. 

Parry Sound 

Springtown. 

Ottawa. 

Meldrum Bay. 

Gunter. 

Sutton West. 

North Bay. 

Katrine 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Baysville. 

Savanne. 

Fort William. 

Parry Sound. 

Brechin. 

Bracebridge. 

Victoria Harbor. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Trenton. 

Marmora. 

Nipissing Junction. 

Cache Bay. 

Ottawa. 

Peninsula Lake. 

Arnprior. 

Flinton. 

Castleford. 

Wisawasa. 

Fenelon Fall. 

Belleville. 

Marmora. 

Ottawa. 

Enterprife. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

French River. 

Sudbury. 

Mattawa. 



King, Napoleon 

Kean, B. F 

Kemp, Orval Wesley 

Kirk, Charles Barron 

Kingsland, W. P 

Kerr, John B 

Kennedy, Walter 

Kennedy, John 

Knox, Wm.M 

Kearney, Michael John . 

Kendrick, John 

Kennedy, John L 

Lloyd, Alfre.'i 

Lawrie, Frank A 

Latimer, James 

Lemyre, Middey 

Lutz, Jacob 

Luby, John E 

Lochnan, James 

Lozo, John 

Loughrin, Lawrence 

Linton, J. H 

Ludgate, James 

Lee, Robert 

Langford, Mark 

Letherby, Edwin 

Lovering, William James 

Lane, Maurice 

Lenton, George 

Low, Thomas A 

Livingston, Robert M. . . . 

Londry, William E 

Labelle, James 

Labelle, Eli 

Ladurante, J. D 

Ludgate, Theodore 

Lucas, Frank 

Lunam, Duncan 

Lott, George 

Lawrie, John D ... 

Lovering, George Francis 

Lavigne, John 

Landell, Charles S 

Long, Henry Elisha 

Malloy, Mark 

Miller, R O 

Menzies, Archibald 

Manning. James 

Martin, Philip , 

Malone, William Patrick. 

Marsh, Esli Terrill 

Millar, John W 

Mutchenbacker, Asa 

Morris, George F 

Murray, George, Jr 

Maughan, .Joseph 

Margach, William J 

Murray, George, Sr 

Maniece, William 

Murray, Wiliam 

Morgan, Richard J 

Magee, Thomas Arthur. . 

Murdoch, .Tames 

! Munroe, Peter P 

Mason, Benjamin 

Monaghan, John B 



Mattawa 

Orillia. 

Trenton. 

Queensborough. 

Ottawa. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Pembroke. 

FescertoD. 

Buckinfrham, Que. 

Burk's Kalis. 

Burk'» Fall^. 

Severn Bridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Frank's Bay. 

Campbellford. 

Parry Sound. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Treiiton. 

Pembroke. 

Parry Sound. 

Peterborough. 

Huntsville. 

Baysville. 

Midland. 

Coldwater. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Peterborough. 

Renfrew. 

Huntsville. 

Sault Ste. Marie.. 

Waltham, Que. 

Waltham, Que. 

Ottawa. 

Peterborough. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

CoUfield, Que. 

Trenton. 

Parry Sound. 

Coldwater. 

Aylmer, Que. 

Huntsville. 

Mattawa. 

Baysville. 
Gravenhurst. 
Burk's Falls. 
Trenton. 
Stoco. 
Ottawa. 
Trenton. 
Huntsville. 
Roseau Falls. 
French Bay. 
Waubaushene. 
Fort William. 
Pore Arthur. 
Waubaushene. 
Peterborough. 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portajre. 
Cook's Mills 
Command a. 
Weatmeatb. 
Arnprior. 



94 



APPENDIX No. SO.— Continued. 



Name. 


P. 0, Address. 


Name. 


P. 0. Address. 


Monaghan, &L J 


Arnprior. 

Amprior. , 

Rockingham. i 

Arnprior. | 

Manitowaning. 

Dereronto. ' 

Deseroato. 

Chelmsford. 

Braeside. j 

Braeside. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. i 

Spanish Station, [ 

Huntsville. | 

Peterborough. 

Arnprior. \ 

Chelmsford. ' 

Ethel. i 

Burk's Fal's. | 

Orillia. 

Arnprior . 

Kingston. 

Rochesterville. * 

Gravenhurst. 

Rama. i 

Toronto. 

Parry Sound. 

Cache Bay. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Ottawa. 

West Gravenhurst. i 

(Graven hurst. 

Parry Sound. 

Cam jjbell ford. 

Oiiliia. 

Madoc . 

Parry Sound. 

Ottawa- 

Carleton Place. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Baysville. 

Parry Sound. 

Longford. 

French River. 

Port Severn. 

Thessalon. 

Port Arthur. 

Lindsay. 

Keewatin. 

Thessa'on. 

Bracebridge. 

Warren. 

Sudbury. 

Byng Inlet. 

Algoma Mills. 

Klock's Mills. 

Klock's Mills. 

Mattawa. 

Cartier. 

Arnprior . 


McGregor, Duncan 


Burns town. 


Mulvihill. John 

Moran, Andrew 


McLean, Peter W 

McManup. .John C 


Sand Point. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 


Mulvihill, Michael 


McNabb, Alexander 


Mann, John 

Marrigban, Richard 

Monaghan, John Dorland 

Matheson, William 

Monro. Alexander G 


McFariane, Alexander 

VIcFarlane, J. D 


Renfrew. 

Stewarts ville. 


McFariane, Duncan 


Renfrew. 


McKendry, Wm. B 

McPhee, Hugh 


Arrp-ior. 
Renfrew. 


Monro. Philip 

Mangan, Patrick 


Mc Phee, John 

McLachlm, Peter. 


Arnprior. 
Arnprior. 
Arnpr or. 
Arnprior. 
Trenton. 


Marcil. Peter 

Main, Samuel . 


McLachlin, Alexander 

Mackey, PMward . 

•VlcEwen, Henry 

McDonald, Altrt-d 


Morley, Ch hs 

Moore, David Henry 

Murphy. John 

Matheson, Daniel 

Milne, William 


McGeary, John J 

McDonald, Archibald W 

McCaw, John Gillen 


Sundridge. 

Gilmour. 

Queensborongh. 


Mangan, Charles 

Mooney. Lincoln 

Mangan, John 

Mooney, Thomas 

Mason, R-beit T. ... 

Moore, William John 

McPherson, James S 


McCauley, Barney 


McDougall, James T.. 

Mcloenly, Thomas 

Mc Bride. Archibald 


Klock's Mills. 
Quebec, t^ue. 
Arnprior. 
Arnprior. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 
South River. 


McFariane, Robert L 

McGown, Wm .. 

McGown, Th>mas 

Mc Dermet, Pati ick 


McK-nley, Edward C 

McClelland, John 

McFariane J. W . 

McDonald. Roderick 

McCorutack. William 

Maci>her80i'; John 

McEachern, John A 

McLeod, Dugald 


McKay, Angu.s 

McUonald, A. J 

Mclnnei>, Angus D 

McKendry, Alexander 

McGuire, Timothy 

McGratb, John 

Mc William?. John Bannon 

McCagherty, Patrick 

' McKendrv. Daniel 

Macdonald, i >. F 

i McManns, Thomas .1 

Macfarlaue; David R 

McColgan, Edward 

jMc Michael, Charles 

IMcIlroy. Thomas Davis 

! McDonald. Wm Henry 

iMcGaw, William Thomas 

'McMillan, L 

1 McDermott, John L 

' McDonald, Charles M 

1 Mc Phee. Benjamin . 

i McGep, John Edward 

1 Macf«r ane, Mack 

.VlacCallum, Alexander 

MacCallum, Ai Ijert. 

McGonigal, John 

McConachie, John 

Newton, Frank 

Newburn, William 


South River. 

Longford. 

Gravenhurst. 

Waubaufhene. 

North Bay. 

Peterborough. 

Peterboiough. 

Westmeath. 


McClelland, R. H 


Arnpiior. 
Parry Hound. 
Renfrew. 


McEvoy, Frank 


McDermott, Peter 


Mcllroy, John 


Ottawa. 


McNab, Robert J 


Quyon, (Jue. 


McFadden, James 


North Seguin. 


Mcintosh, James G 


Madoc. 


McInnC'', Hector D 

McKinnon, Malcolm 


Trenton. 
Callendar. 


McLean, Daniel 

McKinnoD, Archie, J 

McKay. D. 

McDonald, J' mes 


Callendar. 
Oriliia. 
Pembroke. 
Pembroke 


McPherson. Allan 


Parry Sound. 

Arnprior. 

Brae.side. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Huntsville. 


McDonald, James P 

McFarland, Ji seph C 

McNabb, -Vlexander 


McGillivray, Archibald 

McGran'i Edward 


McLeod, Donald, Jr 




McDonald. Hector R 

McDougall, Duncan 


Gravenhurst. 
Parry Sound. 
Arnprior 
Osceola. 


McNabb, Alexander D 


jNiblett, tfame:* 


McCormack, John C 


1 Niblett, Robert 




Newell, John H 


Parry Harbor. 
Longford Mills. 


McGillivray, Duncan O 

Mclntyre, Daniel A 


Overend, George J 




O'Brien, Andrew 


Ottawa. 


McDonald, Sidney, C 

McCool, Christopher L 

McCallum, Donald 


O'Connor, John 

Oliver, Darcy 


Hintonburg. 
Wahnapitae. 


O'Connor, William 


Nosbonsmg. 



95 



APPENDIX No. SO— Continued. 



Name. 



O'Neill, Jainea W . . 
O'Donnell, William 
Owens, Richard . . . . 
O'Reilly, Patrick . . 

O'Neill. Mark 

Orrill, John 



Pomery, Peter 

Perry, Pringle K 

Purcell, William G.. 

Purvis, John 

Porter, James 

Pearson, John James. 

Patereon, John 

Paterson, Alexander. 

P«rke, James 

Paquette, Oliver 

Palmateer, Sherman. 

Paget, George 

Pounder, Joseph 

Pell, Richard D 

Perry, Frederick . . . . 



Quinn. William 



Richardson, Frederick George 

Ri( hards, Richard 

Riddell, George Alexander... 

Richey, Evan 

Randall, Louis G 

Richardson, Charles Mervyn . 

Rochester, Paniel Baillie 

Riddell, James 

Rice, Asa A 

Roberts, T. A 

Rob.s, Andrew 

Rose, Donald M 

Rawson, Charles Edgar 

Ross, George 

Roberts, Percy T 

Ritchie, William D 

Ramsay. Robert 

Ritchie, J. F 

Ritter, Samuel G 

Robinson, William 

Reid, Joseph B 

RoBB. Walter M 

Ruttle, H. A.... 

Richards, Benedict 

Regan, John 

Russell, William 

Ramsay, Charles 

Rankin Anthony 

Ross, Angus 

Robinson, Albert E 

Robinson, Edward 

Robmson, Thomas G 

Revell, Lionel Oliver 

Regan, Judd Patrick 

Robbins, Etna Rosedale 




Scanlan, William. 
Sutherland, D. H. 

Spanner, John 

Shier, James D . . . 



North Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Baain l>epot. 

Cartier. 

Renfrew.- 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Byng Inlet, North. 

Ottawa . 

Parry Sound. 

Uphill. 

Lindsay. 

Wahnapitae. 

OriUia. 

Gravenhurst. 

Webbwood. 

Gravenhurst. 

Huntsville. 

Westmeath. 

Arnprior. 

Port Arthur. 

Peterborough. 

Trenton. 

Tam worth. 

Rochesterville. 

Brentwood. 

French River. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa . 

Ottawa . 

Hull, Que. 

Huntsville. 

Longford Mills. 

Rat Portage. 

Cold water. 

Waubaushene. 

Keewatin. 

Little Current. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Ah Mic Harbor. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Lindsay. 

Ottawa . 

Oarleton Place. 

Ottawa . 

Orillia. 

Pembroke. 

Sudbui^. 

Cache Bay. 

Orrville. 

Washago. 

Washago. 

Washago. 

West Gravenhurst. 

Warminster. 

Orillia. 

Enterprise. 
Gravenhurst, 
Huntsville. 
Bracebridge. 




Spooner, W. R 
Simpson, Alfred E. 
Souliere, John B . 

Shiels, James A ICarleton Place. 

Spargo, George Ottawa. 

Smyth, W. H Byng Inlet, North. 

Salmon. R. H ! Baysville. 

Salmon, Alexander C < Bayaville. 

Stremer, A iOttawa . 

Shields, Frank A Parry Sound. 

Smyth, Job E ^ ! Cache Bay. 

Sage, Nelson ... Muskoka Mills. 

Shaw, Thomas B i Waubaushene. 

Swanston, James i Peterborough . 

Simpson, William ■ Hall's Bridge. 

Sadler, Thomas 1 Lindsay. 

Smith, Patrick Albert [Norman. 

Snaith, William J . . . . Mattawa. 

Sinn. Wm. F Arnprior. 

Scrim, Robert ... Arnprior. 

Sharp, James A Sudbury. 

Shaneay, Harry S Cook's Mills. 

Smith, William ; Ottawa . 

Stewart, Daniel Braeside. 

Waubaushene. 

Parry Sound. 

West Saginaw,Mich. 

Campbellford. 

Sault St. Marie. 

Sudbury. 

Cartier. 

Burk's Falls. 

Thedford. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa . 

Massey. 

Coldwater. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Rapid River. 



Sheehan, Michael H . . 

Scott, Thomas 

Smith, Lawrence 

Shea, Stewart 

Sullivan, John 

Sinclair, Finlay 

Shiels, Henry F 

Smith, Gideon Oasley 
Smith, John Wallia... 

Smith, Henry G 

Story, John A . . 

Sweezey, Benjamin . . . 
Sheppard, Charles H . . 

Sinclair, Armon D 

Smith, Sidney E 

Sleeman, William 



Tait, Thoma* B 

Taylor, CM 

Thornton, W. D 

Trussler, Gilbert 

Thompson, George S 

Thomson, Frederick AH 
Thomson, Francis Henry. 

Tufify, John 

Train, A. C 

Turgeon, George 

Thomson, Alexander W. . 

Taylor, Thomas G 

Tait, Ralph 

Train, William 

Turner, Gavin F 

Tilson, Joseph 



Udy, Dean . 



Vigrass, Percy J 
Vincent, Joseph. 
Vollin, Samuel . 



Burk's FaUs. 
Grvenhurst. 
Longford Mills. 
Trout Creek. 
Lindsay. 
Callendar. 
Nosbonsing. 
Cartier. 
Rowan Mills. 
Cook's Mills. 
Arnprior. 
Gravenhurst. 
Arnprior. 
Burk's Falls. 
North Bay. 
Burk's Falls. 

French River. 

Dufferin Bridge. 

Warren. 

Nosbonsing. 



Vannier, Nelson Joseph Bobcaygeon. 



96 



APPENDIX No. 30.— Concluded. 



Name. 



WatsoD, William 

Webb, George W 

Wilcox, Thomas 

Wheeler, J. A. McL , . . 

Ward, Joseph W 

Wilkinson, William 

Waldie, John E 

Wigg, Thomas 6 

Wall, Patrick B 

Wells, John R 

Whiteside, John 

Watt, William 

Wilson, George 

White, Thomas 

Watson, Williauj 

Weston, Frank R 

White, James B 

Wilson, James A., Jr. . . 

Whaley, Thomas 

Webster, William Alfred 



P. O. Address. 



Huntsville. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 
Tam worth. 
Ottawa . 
French River. 
Victoria Harbor. 
Thessalon. 
Cheyboygan, Mich. 
Little Current. 
Huntsville. 
Peterborough. 
Lindsay. 
Parry Sound. 
North Bay. 
Midland. 
Manitowaning. 
Webbwood. 
Huntsville. 
Bracebridge. 



Name. 



Warrell, William 

Wims, Peter 

Wickware, Philip Almont . . . 

Wilson, Edward 

Whelan, P.J 

Whyte, John Thomas Goth. . 

White, William James 

Warrell, George 

Wells, George W 

Wilson, Frederick Gould 

Young, William 

Young, A. J 

Young, Samuel 

Young, Patrick P 

Yuill, Thomas 

YuJll, A. D 

Total 



p. O. Address. 



Trout Creek. 

Blessington. 

Cloyne. 

Deseronto. 

McDougall. 

Ottawa. 

Muskoka Falls. 

Powassan. 

Little Current. 

Rat Portage. 

Severn Bridge. 
Cache Bay. 
Coldwater. 
Young's Point. 
Arnprior. 
Braeside. 



660 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December 31st, 1897 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 



OF THB 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1898. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO: 
WARWICK BROS' & RUTTER, PRINTERS, &c. , 68 & 70 FRONT STREET WEST. 

1899. 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Report : — Page. 

Crown Lands v. 

Water Powers vii. 

Mining vii. 

Clergy Lands viii. 

Common School Lands viii. 

Grammar School Lands viii. 

Railway Lands viii. 

University Lands viii. 

Collections and Revenue viii. 

Disbursements viii 

Woods and Forests ix. 

Fire Ranging xi. 

Crown Surveys xi. 

Municipal Surveys xi. 

Mining and other Surveys xiii. 

Free Grjtnts xiii. 

Colonization Roads , xiii. 

Appendices : — 

No. 1. Return of Officers and Clerks in the Department 2 

2. ' ' Crown Land Agents 4 

3. ' ' Lands Sold and Leased, and Collections .... 5 

4. " Gross Revenue , 6 

5. " Receipts considered as Special Funds 7 

6. " Gross Disbursements 8 

7. " Timber and amounts accruing from Dues, etc 22 

8. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 24 

9. *' Patents Issued 25 

10. " Locations, etc., xmder Free Grants Act 26 

11. " Letters received 30 

12. ' " Municipal Surveys Ordered 31 

13. " " " Confirmed 33 

14. " Crown Surveys Completed 34 

15. " " " in progress 35 

16. Surveyors' Reports, Township of Casimir 36 

17. " " " Creelman 37 

18. " " " Hadio 38 

19. " " " Secord 39 

20. " " " Tilton 41 

21. " " " Aubrey 42 



IV. 



Page 

22. Surveyors' Reports, Township of Burriss 43 

23. *' " " Kingsford 46 

24. " *' " Mather 47 

25. *' " Meridian line, Algonia 49 

26. " " Boundary line between the Districts of Algoma and 

Nipiasing 61 

27. Report on Colonization Roads 57 

North Division 57 

West Division 64 

East Division ... , . . 70 

Mining Roads 83 

Summary of Expenditure 85 

Recapitulation 90 

28. List of Licensed Cullers 91 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 



OP THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

FOR THE YEAR 1898. 



To Bis Honor the Honorable Sir Oliter Mowat, G.CM.G, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honor : 

As required by law, I sabmit for the information of your Honor and the Legislative 
Assembly, a report of the management of the Crown Lands of the Province for the year 
ending 31st December, 1898. 

GROWN LANDS. 

The area of Grown Lands sold during the year was 50,231 acres, aggregating in 
value $60,353.87. The collections on account of these and sales of former years amounted 
to $42,602.87. Then was also leased as mining ^land under the leasing clauses of the 
Mines Act, 48,911 acres, on which and on lands previously leased, rent amounting to 
$68,944 60 was collected. (See Appendix No. 3, page 5.) 

The total collections on account of Grown Lands sold and leased was $106,547.47. 
(See Appendix No. 3, page 5.) 

The principal part of the revenue derived from Crown Lands has been received from 
mining sales and leases. The area sold for farming purposes has been relatively imall, 
but this has not been due to any scarcity of good agricultural land available in the Pro- 
vince. It has happened in recent years that attention has been directed mainly to the 
prairiee of the Northwest, and the all too limited influx of immigration has flowed entirely 
in that direction. Numbers of our own people in search of new homes have also gone to 
that region. Previous to the opening of the Great Northwest, farmers in Ontario who 
desired to enlarge their holdings or find homes for their sons naturally turned their eyes 

V 



VI. 



to the newer parts of their own Province, and thus the flower of our population, the 
youBg men brought up on the farm, were not lost to us but transferred their strength 
and experience from the older to the newer parts of the Privince. This is not the case 
now. The advantages of the prairie country are kept continually before our people. Agents 
of the Governments and transportation companies interested in the Great Northwest 
are ever on the alert. Literature is distributed, correspondence entered into, the people 
are visited in their own homes and deacriptiona and inducements presented to them which 
for the time eliminate every difficulty and open up to their vision an endless vista of whea* 
fields ready for the reaper. It is therefore no wonder that the broad river of settlers 
has flowed to the West while we have received but a few straggling s-ireama. This oaght 
not to be so, if our people would bear in mind that Ontario has plenty of good land avail- 
able at prices much below what they will have to pay in the Northwest ; that these lands 
are easy of access and close to their old homes, with better markets for everthing they 
can grow ; that they are easily cleared and that the timber which will have to be removed 
is saleable almost everywhere, the proceeds of which will assist in tiding over the early 
pioneer period. They have, too, an unlimited supply of fael for the mere taking of it» 
and plenty of pure water on almost every lot, and there are other advantages incident to 
living in a wooded country which need not be dwelt upon. 

There are large areas of wild land suitable for agriculture near the centres of population 
in the Algoma, Thunder Bay and Rainy River Districts ; while in the District of Northern 
Nipissing, north and west of Lake Temiscamingue and adjacent to it in Algoma there is 
found to be thousands of square miles of as good land as there is anywhere in Ontario. 
From the explorations made towards James Bay in the years 1896 and 1898 by Mr. 
Niven, O.L.S , whose report is to be found in Appendix No. 26, and from information 
received from Hudson B*y Company's officers and others who have travelled that im- 
mense territory, it is estimated that between the eastern biuadary of the Province and 
Missanabie river there is a block of liad 175 t) 203 miles in length aad from 50 to 120 
miles in breadth, say 13,000 square miles or 8,320,000 acres, 75 per cent of which is 
good for agricultural purposes. The prosperous settlements in the Rainy River District 
at Dryden and on the banks of the beautiful river which gives the District its name, are 
evidencss of the success which attends settlement there. The territory lying west of 
Port Arthur also contains thriving settlements with large areas of good unoccupied land 
lying contiguous thereto, in Algoma District, in the country surrounding Sudbury on 
the main line of the C P. R., as well as on the Algoma Branch east of and surrounding 
Sault Ste Marie, are large settlements with plenty of first class land still available. In 
the territory extending east from Sudbury to Mattawa there are excellent tracts of land 
yet to be taken up. The new settlement at Lake Temiscamingue is flourishing, and this 
region only lacks better facilities of travel to be one of the most prosperous and important 
sections of the Province. Thirty -six townships containing an area of 900 square miles 
have be^n laid out, all of which is suitable for settlement. Cooaparatively few people 
have settled there yet, although those who are there have abundant crops and are rapidly 
becoming comfortably off. These lands are sold at 50 cents per acre on easy terms of 
payment. 



Vll. 



WATER POWERS. 

Regulations for the disposal of water privileges, pareuant to the provisions of 61 
Victoria, chap. 8, were adopted by Order-in Council of 2l8t June, 1898. These regula- 
tions provide for leasing such powers and land adjacent, instead of alienating them abso- 
utelj, as was formerly done, and with such conditions attached as will secure their 
development within a specified time, in default of which they revert to the Crown. 

The recent developments in electrical science, and particularly in the transmission of 
electrical energy through long distances, has given an importance and value to water 
powers, especially to those not too remote from centres of population and manufacture, 
which they did not formerly possess. This Province is singularly well endowed by nature 
with the means of power in the numberless falls and cascades which abound on the rivers 
and streams of the newer parts of Ontario, capable of producing in the aggregate an 
enormous, almost incalculable, amount of energy. These water powers constitute, in 
fact, one of the great undeveloped resources of the Crown domain, and promise to form 
in the not distant future a highly important factor in the progrees and prosperity of the 
Province, as well as to make a sensible contribution to the public revenue. Situated in 
the tew«r districiF, atd surrourdtd by raw material for a variety of industries, such as 
pulp and pai er mills, saw-mills, sash and door factories and other wood- working estab. 
lishncents, and in the mining regions by bodies of gold, copper, nickel and iron ore, the 
cheap power which they will provide must greatly stimulate the development of manu- 
facturing and mineral industries, which in turn will afford a remunerative home market 
for the products of the farm. Electric railways can be operated, too, by power from 
these falls, and thns means of transportation and communication provided in districts 
where an ordinary railway would be an expensive and premataire undertaking. Light 
can also be supplied to the inhabitants of adjacent towns and villages, rendering life 
there more comfortable and attractive. It is evident that the public interest demands 
the speedy utilization of all such water pjwers where they can be profitably turned to 
account, and the above-mentioned regulations have been framed with a view to bring 
this about. A number of applications have been made for water powers under these 
regulations, and the policy of the Department, so far, has been to fix the annual rental 
at a moderate sum and thus secure the establishment cf new industries, rather than to 
obtain the highest possible return which the privilege might be made to yield. 

MINING. 

During the year there has been great interest taken in the mining lands of the 
Piovince. The discovery of bodies of corundum-bearing rock in the east has created 
new interest Pending considerat'on as to the best means of development in the inter* st 
of the Province, the corundum belt has been withdrawn from sale or location. The 
increased value of copper has stimulated the search for that mineral. Considerable 
capital has been invested in exploration and development, notably on Michipicoton 
Island, where a large force of men is at present engaged in developing and opening 
up the copper mines there which have been shut down for years. 



Vlll. 



The interest in gold mining has continued unabated. The production of gold bullion 
in the Province during the year was 16,075 ounces, worth $271,906.48, not including 
the output of one mine for which returns have not yet been received. Compared with 
1897 it is by weight 4,663 ounces and by value $81,662.48 more than in that year? 
and there appears to be no doubt that the present year will see a much larger increase. 

The mines in the Sudbury District produced during the year in the form of matte 
the equivalent of 8,373,560 pounds of fine copper and 5,567,690 pounds of fine nickel, 
which, valued at the selling prices at the works, represents $268,080 worth of the former 
metal and $514,220 of the latter. All of the matte is shipped out of the country to the 
refining works in New Jersey. 

The pig iron product of the Province was 48,253| tons of 2,000 pounds, valued 
at the smelting works at $530,789. 

CLERGY L4NDS. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 834 acres, aggregating in value 
$518.25. The amount collected on account of these and former sales was $2,507.03. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

COMMON SCHOOL LANDS. 

The area of these lands sold during the year was 3f acres, with a value of 
$103.00. The amount collected on account of these and former sales was $9,535.27. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOL LANDS. 

The area of these l&nds sold during the year was 212 acres, aggregating in value 
$230.10. The collections on account of these and former sales amounted to $576.32. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

RAILWAY LANDS. 

The collections on lands sold under the Railway Aid Act of 1889, 52 Victoria, 
chapter 35, were $53.99. See Appendix 3, page 5.] 

UNIVERSITY LANDS. 

Of these lands there were sold and leased 6,885^ acres, aggregating in value 

$5,714.51, on which and on former sales there was collected, $8,191.81. See Appendix 

No. 3, page 5. 

COLLECTIONS AND REVENUE. 

The total collections of the Department on account of all sources of revenue were 
$1,112,582.16. See Appendix No. 4, page 6. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

The total disbursements of the Department were $311,348.45. Included in this 
expenditure are the following : Mining Schools, $9,935 ; Payments out of Iron Mining 
If I . 2.606 ; Mining Roads, $13,253.23 ; Mining Explorations, $4,318.73; Diamond 
$3,2i9.58 ; Refunds, $24,910.98. 



IX. 



WOODS A.ND FORESTS. 



Thfl total revenue from Woods and Forests for the year 1898 amounted to 
186.45. Of this, 8159,698.74 was on account of bonus and $65,053.37 on account of 
ground rent, leaving the net revenue from timber dues, etc., $756,434.34. See Appendix 
No. 4, page 6. 

There is a decrease in the revenue of this service as compared with last year of 
$345,953.63. Of this, $325,620.22 is in Grown dues, $31,220.16 in bonus, while there 
is an increase in ground rents of $10,886.75. As explained in my last report, the revenue 
from timber dues for the year 1897 was abnormally large, the sales of lumber having 
been stimulated by the special situation then existing, that is, the desire to reach the 
American market before the $2 import duty took effect. 

In my last report I referred to the acute feeling which then existed in Ontario in 
consequence of the re-imposition by the United States of an import duty of $2 per thou- 
sand feet on Canadian lumber with the provision that any export duty imposed by any 
country on logs passing into the United States should be added to the import duty on 
lumber imported from such country, the effect of which in our case, should the export 
duty of $2 per thousand on Canadian logs have been re-imposed, would be to increase 
automatically the duty un Canadian sawn lumber to $4 per thousand. I pointed out 
that under these circumstances the Government of this Province had been looked to to 
relieve the unfair situation so far as Ontario was concerned. I intimated that the Legis- 
lature would be asked to approve regulations dealing with the situation, pending which 
provision had been made for the exclusion of alien labor from our lumber woods and for 
the prohibition of the importation of supplies, and that an officer had been appointed to 
enforce such exclusion. I also stated that steps had been taken to prevent any increased 
cutting for export under authority of existing licenses by warning the timber licensees and 
others that such abnormal cutting might call for some action in the premises. Briefly, 
this was the position of affairs at the date of my last report. 

It was feared by some that the intimation as to excessive cutting would not have the 
desired effect but would rather have a tendency to increase the cut, and various estimates 
and speculations as to what the export of logs would be were indulged in. Five hundred 
millions of feet board measure seemed to be the favorite estimate of the volume of export. 
The Department had from time to time obtained information from its rangers and the 
lumbermen themselves as to the probable cut of logs for eyport, and these figures indicated 
a probable cut for this purpose of from 156 to 160 millions. The actual export of logs cut 
last winter was, in round figures, 211 millions, being 289 millions less than 500, the 
unofficial eBtimate, and 51 millions more than was anticipated by the Department. It is 
a fact which attests the accuracy of the Department's estimate that the parties who were 
cutting for export at the time the estimate was made exported only fifteen millions more 
than was anticipated, the balance of the excess, 36 millions, arising through Canadians 
who had always sawn in Canada being offered prices for their logs which induced them 

2» C.L. 



to sell for export rather than saw into lumber here. Bat the fact remains that no such 
abnormal cut for export as was predicted took place. The Alien Labor Regulations 
were stringently enforced, in consequence of which supplies purchased after the passing of 
the regulations were bought in Canada, and the labor, with the exceptions provide d for 
in the regulations, was entirely Canadian. Subsequent to the issue of my last report the 
Legislature approved regulations requiring that after the 30th of April following the 
date thereof all saw logs cut on licensed lands of the Grown must be sawn in Canada, 
with the exception of one or two small areas in the District of Algoma. These regulations 
have been given effect to by embodying them in all renewals of timber licenses for the 
current season, with penalties of forfeiture of license, etc., should they not be observed. 
Steps will be taken to see that the conditions are rigidly observed, although it is not 
anticipated that there wiU be any attempt to violate what is now the law of the Province. 
It may be interesting to note here that this is not the first occasion on which regulations 
affecting the export of logs have been passed. In the Crown Timber Regulations of 1851 
it was provided that all saw logs exported from the Province should be charged dues at 
double the ordinary rates. This regulation was abrogated by the passing of the Reciprocity 
Treaty, which provided for free interchange of raw materials between the two countries. 
The Statute under which the regulations were passed was incorporated in the Statutes of 
Ontario at Confederation and is, of course, beyond the reach of any disallowance. The 
Province has therefore the power to fix discriminating rates against logs exported if that 
should appear to be in the public interest. 

The effect of the prohibition of export has been to materially reduce the cut of saw- 
logs this present winter, and so far as can now be seen there will be from one hundred and 
sixty to two hundred million feet less taken out than was taken out last winter. The 
falling off, of course, is in the operation of American limit holders, few of whom are 
cutting this winter. The export next year will probably not be more than from forty to 
fifty millions, made up of some fifteen millions cut on the areas excepted from the pro- 
hibitory regulations and quantities cut under authority of last year's licenses which were 
stuck in the streams and in the bush. There will be some fifty millions taken out this 
winter by parties who formerly exported. These fifty millions will have to be sawn in 
Canada by contract, either at the existing mills or others to be erected. The lumber 
trade appears to be in a healthy condition, as prices have stiffened and the demand has 
been very active. Whatever may have been feared as to the result of the action of 
Ontario, no bad effect has been visible, and the trade now appears to be almost a unit 
in favor of maintaining the status quo in Ontario until at any rate terms equal and 
satisfactory to both countries are arrived at. The Ontario lumbermen have come to 
regard the position with a feeling that the future is with us in respect to raw forest 
materials. We possess large quantities of white pine which is daily growing more 
valuable, and it would appear from information in possession of the Department, that 
the Hudson's Bay slope, — a- few years ago regarded as being destitute of timber of com- 
mercial worth — has immense forests of spruce, which timber is daily increasing in value, 
and it may well be that that region will in the end prove our most valuable timber pos- 



XI. 



Bession. Bearing this in mind, and remeirbering the ability of our merchants to exploit 
markets afar when those nearer at home are denied us, the people of Ontario need not 
fear any stagnation of their timber industries. 

FIRE RANGING. 

The fire ranging serdce continues to give satisfaction to all the timber licensees as 
well as to the Department. It was taken advantage of more largely than ever last 
season. One hundred and ninety-five fire rangers were on duty on licensed lands, and I 
am glad to be able to state that very few fires, and those of very small importance, 
occurred in the territory supervised. In the pineries of the Orown north and west of 
Temiscamingue and in the Rainy River District some eleven fire rangers were placed on 
duty. Their presence in the territory has had an excellent effect, as they were constantly 
coming into contact with prospectors and travellers whom they cautioned, and in whom 
they inculcated a spirit of care in the handling of fire, and not a single fire of any magni- 
tude occurred in the territory of which they had charge. 

CROWN SURVEYS. 

The following surveys of townships have been carried out this year : 

In the District of Nipissing the townships of Aylmer, Creelman, Hutton, Mackelcan, 
MoCarthy, Parkin, Tilton and Secord have been sub-divided into lots of 320 acres each. 
In the District of Rainy River the townships of Burriss, Burk, Kingsford, Mather, 
Melgund and Southworth have been sub-divided into lots of 320 acres each. A meridian 
line, being the boundary between the Districts of Nipissing and Algoma, which wag run 
in 1896 to a point one hundred and twenty miles due north of the northeast angle of th® 
township of Lumsden, was continued by Mr. O.L S. Niven to a point near Moose Factory 
on James' Bay, 300 miles from the north-east angle of the township of Lumsden, being 
180 miles run this year. The whole line from its initial point on Lake Huron, a little 
west of the mouth of the French river to the above mentioned point near Moose Factory, 
runs a distance of 353 miles. In the District of Algoma a meridian line, extending from the 
north-east angle of the township of Hodgins to a point on the main line of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, about three miles east of Dalton station, a distance of ninety-two miles, 
was run by Mr. O.L.S. T. B. Speight. Several other minor surveys have been performed 
during the year. The returns of the above named surveyi, so far as they have been 
received in the Department, have been examined and closed. The particulars of the 
surveys will be found in Appendices Nos. 16 to 26 inclusive, pages 36 to 56 inclusive. 

MUNICIPAL SURVEYS. — — 

. 'HP 

The Department his during the year, on the petitions respectively of the muaici- 
pilities of Port Carling, Roshester, Pelham, Mariposa, Arthur and Ross, issued instruc- 
tions for survey of the village lots of the Bailey estate in the town plot of Port Carling ; 
the road allowance between the sixth and seventh concessions of the township of Roches- 



Xll. 



ter in part ; the road allowance between lot number twenty in the seventh concession 
and lots numbers sixteen and seventeen, north of the Middle Road, in the said township ; 
the road allowance between lots numbers two and three in the fifth concession of the 
township of Pelham ; portion of the line between concessions C and D in the township 
of Mariposa ; the road allowance between lots numbers three and four in the third and 
fourth concessions of the township of Arthur, also the side road allowance between lots 
numbers eighteen and nineteen in the eleventh and twelfth concessions of the same town- 
ship ; the blind line between the eleventh and twelfth concessions from lot number 
seventeen to lot number twi nty, both inclusive, in the same township ; part of the first 
concession west of Muskrat Lake in the township of Ross, also portions of concession 
line between ranges five and six in the same township. The following municipal surveys 
have been confirmed during the year under the provisions of R.S.O., 1897, cap. 181, s. 14, 
sub-s. 4, such surveys so confirmed being final and conclusive upon all parties : Part of 
the town line between the townships of Ross and Westmeath lying westerly of Muskrat 
Lake; the road allowance between lots numbers fourteen and fifteen in the second con- 
cession of the township of North Grimsby ; the road allowance between the second range 
north of the Longwoods road, and the first concession of the township of Ekfrid, across 
lot number one ; the boundary line between the townships of Eramosa and Nassagaweya ; 
the side road allow^ance between lots numbers fifteen and sixteen in the eighth concession 
of the township of Whitchurch. The particulars relating to these surveys will be found 
in Appendix No. 13, page 33. 

MINING AND OTHER SURVEYS. 

The Mines Act, 1897, requires that applicants to purchase or lease mining lands in 
unsurveyed territory shall file surveyor's plans, field notes and descriptions by metes and 
bounds of their locations in this Department before any sale or lease is carried out. 

Under Orders in Council of date 23rd January, 1892, 3rd December, 1892, and 22nd 
September, 1893, applicants to purchase islands or locations in the Districts of Thunder 
Bay or Rainy River for agricultural purposes, in unsurveyed territory, are required to 
file surveyor's plans, field notes and descriptions by metes and bounds, together with the 
necessary affidavits of their locations, which are required to be of the form and size, 
wherever practicable, prescribed by The Mines Act, 1897. Under the terms of The 
Mines Act, 1897, and of the above regulations a number of applicants in the Districts of 
Algoma, Thunder Bay and Rainy River have filed plans, etc., and an area of 17,579 
acres has been sold and patented to them, for which $35,007 has been received ; and an 
area of 53,657 acres has been leased at $1 per acre for the first year's rental. 

FREE GRANTS. 

There are 163 townships open for location under the Free Grants and Homesteads 
Act, two townships, Gorham and Scoble in the District of Thunder Bay, having been 
opened in 1898 During the year, 780 locations were made on 102,947 acres of land, and 
109 locatees purchased 4,449 acres ; 254 patents were issued to locatees. See Appendix 
No. 10, page 28. 



XUl. 



COLONIZATION ROADS. 

The work done during the year was as follows : Miles of new colonization road 
constructed, 135 ; miles of road repaired, 670; 4,374 lineal feet of bridging constructed. 
Of mining roads, 36 miles have been constructed and 27 miles repaired with some 
bridging. The work done was carefully inspected and reported to be of a substantial 
and satisfactory character. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. M. GIBSON, 

Commissioner. 
Dbpartment of Cbown Lands, 

Toronto, December 31. 1898. 



3* C.L, 



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APPENDIX No. 3. 

Statrmbnt of Lands Sold and Leased, Amount of Sales, and Amount of Collections 
on Sales and Leases for the year 1898. 



Service. 



Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands. . 
Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

University Lands 

Leases 



Acres sold and 
leased. 



50,231 
834 

212 



Amount of sales. 



6,886i 
48,911 



107,076iS 



60,363 87 
518 25 
103 00 
230 10 



5,714 51 
48,063 63 



114,983 36 



Amount 

collected on sales 

and leases. 



$ c. 

42,602 87 

2,507 03 

9,535 27 

576 32 

53 99 

8,191 81 

63,944 60 

127,411 89 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommissioner. 



Department op Obown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1898. 



APPENDIX ISO. 4. 
Statement of the Revenue of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



Service. 



LomdL CoUtctiont: 

Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands . . 
Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

University Lands 

Mining Licenses 

Rent 



Woods and Forestt . 
Timber Dnes . 
Ground Rent 
Bonos 



Callers Fees. 
Casual Fees . 
Assay Fees 



Xwpenditure Refunds ; 

Inspections 

bhirveys 



t 0. 



42,602 87 

2,507 03 

9,535 27 

576 32 

53 99 

8,191 81 

3,223 85 

63,944 60 



f 56, 434 34 

65,053 37 

159,698 74 

124 00 
343 32 
241 30 



9 00 
42 35 



$ 0. 



130,635 74 



981,186 45 



708 62 



51 35 



$1,112,582 16 



D. GEO. ROSS, 
Accountant. 

Dbpartmbnt of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Slat December, 1898. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Aisistant Commissioner. 



APPENDIX No. 5. 

Statement of the Receipts of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898, 
which are considered as Special Funds. , 



Service. 


f 0. 


$ c. 


Otergy Landa : 

PriDcip&l 


1,559 62 
947 41 

3,188 85 
6.396 42 




Interest 




Common School Landt : 

Principal 

Interest . . . . 


2,507 03 






9,686 27 


Orammar School Lands : 
Principal 


576 82 


Interest 












576 32 


Baxltoajf Landt: 

Principal 


44 24 
9 75 


Interest 










ftS 00 


Univeraity Landa: 

Principal 


8,185 00 
5 81 




Interest 






8,191 81 
$20,864 42 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



Department of Grown Lands, 
Toronto, Slst December, 1898. 



APPENDIX No. 6. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 



Agbnts' Salaries. 



Land. 



Annis, A. E 

ArniBtrong, John 

Best, S. G 

Chapman, E. A . . . 
Campbell, W . . . . 
Cockburn, J. D . . . 
Eastland, T. G . . . 

Ellis. James 

Gilligan, B. J . , . . 
Hamilton, George 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm 

Hollands, C. J . . . 

Kirk, Wm 

Mackay, Theresa 
Macpherson, R. . . 
Macdonald, D, G 
Nichols, W. L.... 
Reeves, James . . , 
Ruttan, J. F . . , 

Ryan, T. J 

Scarlett, J. S . . . . 
Stephenson, Wm 
Stewart, C. R . . . 
Stewart, James . 

Tait, J. R 

Tnrner, Wm . . , , 

Whelan, John 

Wood, A. W . . . , 



Timber. 

Campbell, P. C . . . .' 

Garrow, E 

Halliday, F 

Landry. J. F 

Margach, Wm 

Munro, H 

Mc Williams, J. B 

Rnssell, Wm 



AOENTS' DiSBCBSEMENTS. 



Land. 



Annis, A. E 

Armstrong, John 
Bpst, S. G 
Chapman, E. A . . 
Cnckbum, J. i) . . 
Hamilton, George 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm 

Hollands, C. J . . . 

Kirk, Wm 

Mackay, Theresa 



Carried forward. 



$ c. 



200 00 


500 00 


500 00 


400 00 


277 80 


500 00 


250 00 


41 67 


500 CO 


200 00 


500 00 


350 00 


300 00 


500 00 


458 33 


250 00 


500 00 


200 00 


300 00 


250 00 


400 00 


500 00 


200 00 


50O 00 


300 00 


500 00 


200 00 


300 00 


100 00 


1,600 00 


1,400 00 


1,600 00 


100 00 


1,600 00 


1,200 00 


2,500 00 


1,600 00 



42 69 

34 92 

9 70 

22 50 

18 86 

2 13 

9 09 

7 15 

10 50 

15 36 

10 78 



178 68 



$ c. 



9,977 80 



9 c. 



11,600 00 



21,577 80 ' 



9 



APPENDIX No. Q— Continued. 
Statembnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 



Brought forward. 



Nichols, W. L 

Ruttan, J. F . 
Scarlett, J. S ... 
Stephenson, Wm . 
Stewart, C. R ... 
Stewart, Jamea . . . 

Tait, J. R 

Whelan, John .... 
Wood, A. W 



Timber. 



Campbell, P. C . 

Halhday, F 

Mar^ach, Wm 

McWilliams, J. B 



Miicellantoui . 



Ames, D., guardin^i^ islands Loboro' Lake 
Danis, Samuel, guarding Leonard lalanda 

Francis. J. H., inspection ... 

Graham, W., *' 

Jonee, 0. S., travelling expenses 

Kennedy, Geo., " " 

McGrath, M,, inspection 

Ro88, D. G., travelling expenses ..... . 

Taylor, T. C, " " 

White, Aubrey, " " 



Crown Timber Offick, Ottawa, 



Darbey, E. J. , acting agent 

Larose, S. C, clerk 

Rainbotb, E. J., surveyor.. 

Rent 

Disbursements 



Crown Timber Offick, Quebec. 



Nicholson, B., agent 

Homey, Thos., caretaker and messenger. 

Rent 



Disbursements 

Carried lorward . 



$ c. 



178 68 



23 05 
10 46 
32 40 
34 28 
10 04 

6 00 
9 04 

7 01 
21 88 



250 00 
158 03 
399 92 
623 00 



20 00 


20 00 


1 00 


377 50 


83 00 


]6 85 


9 00 


61 50 


29 60 


27 10 



1,200 00 
900 00 
200 00 



1,400 00 
150 00 



$ c. 



$ c. 



21,5/7 80 



332 83 ! 



1,430 96 



545 55 



2,300 00 
400 00 
306 80 



23,987 13 



3,006 go 



1,550 00 
125 00 
409 87 



2,084 87 
29,078 80 



10 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 



$ 0. 



$ c. 



Brought forward. 



Wooo Ranoino and Inspection of Timber Lands. 



Bradv, John 

Booth, J. R 

B/own, John 

Bremner, Wm . . . 
BeldiDg, A. W . . . 

Bremner, J. L 

Christie, W. P 

Campbell, O. V . . . 
Dinsmore, Rich. J 
Dulmage, G . 

Fraser, D .... . 

Garrow, E 

Henderson, Cbas . 
Halli'Jay, James. . . 

Johnson, S. M 

Johnson, John 

Kennedv, John . . . 

Lloyd, E. B 

Macdonald, A. P . 
Marerach, W. J 
Macionald, D. F.. 
Moore, L). H . . . . 

Malon°, W. P 

Mooney, Thos 

Mc^iown, Wm 

McWilliams, Theo. 

McCoghprty, P 

McCoRherty, Jas . 

McDougall, D 

Pardee, J. B 

Pearson. .John. . . , 

Qninn, Wm 

Rega", John 

Robinson, Wm 

Ross, D 

Sullivan, .T<-hn 

Smith, J.W 

Sinclair, Finley . . . 

Sleeman, Wm 

Wigj?, Tho3. G . . . . 
White, J..... 



FiBE Ramginq. 



Airhirt Aspl 


1897 


43 50 

125 00 

46 50 


Disbursements 


1898 
1898 


Ardifl, Alex 


115 00 
21 13 


DisbnrBements 


Carried forward 



935 00 


18 00 


96 84 


100 00 


986 35 


710 30 


812 20 


54 00 


42 00 


18 20 


262 00 


89 54 


1,316 5>» 


1,198 10 


1,663 63 


245 10 


1.626 33 


387 54 


24 00 


1,049 18 


1,421 55 


1,527 50 


745 CO 


311 25 


1,151 20 


652 35 


1,194 81 


34 50 


32 00 


657 50 


385 10 


419 65 


1,259 31 


894 55 


62 00 


1,081 15 


1,240 fiO 


1,164 75 


57 60 


1,200 00 


1,016 00 



216 00 

136 13 
351 13 



89,078 80 



28,143 27 



57,222 07 



11 



APPENDIX No. Q.—Continvsd. 
Statement cf the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 



Brought forioard 



FiBK Rauqiso.— Continued. 



Ant'er, Ferdinand 

Aikinn, G. Vt 

Armstrong, J. C 

Armstrong, Ed 

ArmKtrong, F 

Alexander, Sam'l . 
Dirburaementa 



Aylward, James 

Brown, C. J. S 

Brown, H. R ... 

Bowland, A G 

Bowland, J. J 

Bowland, Wm 

Buchanan, Robt. F. 
Disbursements . . 



.1897 



Barrow, Wm 

Brannon, Sam'l 

Barton Hros , 

Disbursementii '. 1895 

Bertram, Melville 

Brewer, Chas 

Disbursements , 



9 c. 



39 00 
39 68 



Brady, Wm 

Bellow, Lewis 

Disbursements . 



Bartlett, J. S 
Berlinquette, Jules 

Burns, John. . . 

Bromley, Thos 

Disbursements 



Burk, Hy 

Cochrane, John 



1897 

1898 
Disbursements 1898 



Chamberlain, Ben. E 

Caswell, Grant 

Christie, W. P 

Disbursements . . . 



Christie, Peter R . . 

Crawford, S. W. . . 

Cassidy, Joseph . . . 

Disbursements. 



Cardiff, G. M . . . 
Callaghan, John. 
Creswell, Wm... 
Campbell, James 



Carried forward. 



69 00 
31 60 



128 00 
14 00 



131 00 
88 70 



111 CO 
21 17 



140 CO 

148 00 

76 00 



393 00 
76 60 



26 00 
15 75 



$ c. 



851 13 



78 60 

83 00 

65 50 

106 00 

105 00 



78 68 
72 00 
40 63 
137 00 
118 00 
131 00 
139 00 



ICO 50 
121 00 
143 00 



64 10 
33 75 



142 00 
99 00 



219 70 
131 00 
105 CO 
103 CO 



132 17 
131 00 



363 00 

131 00 

45 00 



469 50 

139 00 

76 CO 



41 75 
137 00 
123 00 

23 00 
129 00 



4,711 91 



$ c. 



67,222 07 



67,222 07 



12 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbarsements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 c. 


Brought forward 




4,711 91 

130 00 
103 00 
119 00 
114 00 

101 15 

128 00 
118 00 

156 26 
76 00 

148 00 

162 00 
144 00 
86 00 
90 00 
121 00 
121 00 
106 00 

351 25 

131 00 

132 00 
118 00 
131 00 
131 00 

105 OO 
55 OO 

262 00 

640 73 
101 00 

162 62 

106 19 
185 00 
131 00 

131 40 


67,222 07 


FiRjt Ranoisg.— Continued. 






Cox Hagh . . . . 












Corley, Stewart 






Cameron, Thos 


92 00 
9 15 












Cunningham, Thos 


126 00 
2 00 




Disbursements 








Crombie, John 








142 00 
14 25 




Disbursements 




Cole, J. J 




Cole, Greorge 


145 00 
3 00 

149 00 
300 




Disbursements , 




Cousins, Thos 




Disbursements 








Chalmers Andrew . 






Davies, J ohn , 






Dufoud, Ignace 






Demmie, Middy 






Didier, L. P 






I>ram, Patk '. 


144 66 
207 26 




Disbursements 




Dillworth, Wm 






Dawkins, John 






Dubord, L 


















Dunlop, John 










£tmanski, John 1895 

1897 


181 00 
131 00 




Ellis, Jas 

Disbursements .... 


395 63 
246 20 




Elliott H. B 




Eagle, Sidney 


167 00 
6 62 

89 44 
16 76 




Fraser, W. A 




Disbursements 


















133 00 
1 40 




Disbursements 














Carried forward 


1 9,662 60 


57,222 07 



18 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands, for the year 1898. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




9,552 50 

131 00 
120 00 

148 50 
ISl 00 
141 00 
131 CO 

28 00 
70 00 
140 00 
225 00 
54 00 
41 00 

118 00 

280 00 
84 00 
43 00 

105 00 

106 00 
128 00 
122 00 
126 00 

• 118 00 

82 62 
116 00 
131 00 

133 10 

170 75 
106 00 
100 00 
6 00 
166 96 
32 00 
105 00 

119 CO 
99 00 

157 25 

51 00 

149 25 
114 00 

63 00 
105 GO 


57 222 07 


FiBB Rahqino.— Continued. 
French, John 






Finlayson, .T. H 






Guthrie, John ,... 


i46 00 
2 60 




Disbursements 




<iodin, Peter 


!;!..'i897 




Goldie, J. S 






Grawberger, Thos 






Gendron, R. M 

Guppy, W. H 


1897 






Gunter, H. M ... 






Gorman, John 






GagQon, Jas 






Gadway, John 






Grepn, John 






HofT, J. 8. Morris 

Hall, W. H 


1897 

1898 

1M7 


138 01 
142 00 




Herron, John 






Hartley, M 






Harvie. A 






Humphrey, Thos. W 






Hayes, Martin 






Hawley, D. J 






Hale. John B 






Hijffrins, John 


78 00 
4 62 




Disbursements 




Houston, Joseph 






■- 




Haley, Cornelius 


131 00 
2 10 

131 00 
39 75 








Disbursements 

Jackson, Geo 










James, Martin 






Kennedy, Robt 


.... 1897 






Kelly, James 








Kelly, F 












Kidd, Joseph 

Disbursamenta 


131 00 
26 25 












50 00 
1 00 

82 00 
67 25 




Disbursements 




Kirby, John 








Klock, John 




Leitch, Hueh 
















Gamed forward 






14,149 73 


57,222 07 



14 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statpment of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands, for the year 1898. 



Name. 



Brought fonoard. 



FiHK RA.N6INO. — Continued. 



Lemyre, Middy . . . 
ijisburdements . 



Lowry, Jaa 

lioyst, A 

Disbursements. 



$ c. 



99 00 
6 00 



Langrevin, Joseph 

Labrash, J. P 

Labrasb, W. C 

Lomprey, Oscar . . . . , 

Latour, Alfred 

Lalond, Alex 

Logan, Hugh 

Linklater, Richard . . 
Marshall, Rubiusoa., 

Mavfs, Wm 

Mannering, Richard. 

Moore, Geo 

May, Isiac 

Malioy, Mark 

Margach, J. A 

Disbursements . . , 



Macdonald, J. D 

Maxwell, John 

Mojeau, Alex 

McFarlane, R. L 1897 

1898 



McFarlane, J. W. 
DidbursEmenta. 



141 00 
66 16 



151 25 
108 05 



131 00 
133 00 



101 00 
445 79 



McEvny, F 

McCreight, John . . 
Disbursementa . 



Mcintosh, M 

McCoU, A 

McDonald, David. 
McDoDa'd, Alex... 
McDonald, A.J... 
McQnesiion, Ben.. 
McGuey, Dennis . . 
D.sbuisements. 



131 00 
76 



McNanghton, D. A . . . 

McLeod, Doug^ld 

McOulIough, Peter... 

McKie, Chas 

McMaster, Wm 

Disbursements 



Mc Alpine, John.. . 

McGee, Jas 

McAdam, Jas 

Dibbureements 



Carried toxioard 



131 CO 

170 84 



120 00 
2 70 



104 00 
3 44 



14,149 73 



105 00 


17 00 


197 18 


86 00 


112 00 


117 00 


123 00 


13100 


120 00 


117 00 


101 00 


90 00 


98 00 


118 00 


59 50 


131 00 


36 00 


269 30 


288 00 


68 50 


141 00 



264 00 



546 79 
7 00 



131 75 

66 00 

66 00 

105 00 

131 GO 

110 CO 

43 00 



301 84 
49 00 
24 00 
79 CO 
71 00 



122 70 
124 00 
105 00 



107 44 



19,088 91 



% c. 



57,222 07 



57,222 07 



15 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 189{5. 



Nftme. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




19.088 91 

131 00 
131 00 
131 00 
181 CO 
98 25 
131 00 

108 76 
131 00 

364 40 
131 00 

296 57 
13 00 
73 00 

119 13 
111 00 

99 00 
118 00 
118 00 

90 00 

99 m 

105 00 

117 00 
1 8 00 
131 OO 

118 00 

121 87 
100 00 

840 25 

5 CO 

105 00 

136 00 
131 00 

195 fO 
130 00 
109 00 

23,677 01 


57,222 07 


Fire Rakginq.— Continued. 
McNeil, Archie 




Mc K ay, Angus 






Mc 1 'ermett, P 






Mclntyre, Wm 






Mclntyre, Gilbert 






Nitz, August 






Nicholson, W. J 

Disbarsnments 


105 00 
3 75 




Nevers, Chas 




O'Neil, A. J 

DiBburssmenta 


860 00 
4 40 




Oram, John 




Pomerrelle, Theo 1897 

1898 
Disbursements 1898 

Parent, Joseph 


110 00 

136 00 

50 67 




Paquette, 






Pyburn, John 


36 00 
83 13 




Disbursements '. 




Pringle, D 




Payne, S 






Plurde, Chas 


. 




Poivin, Jules 






Reilly, Wm 






Rawson, Chas. E 


78 00 
21 88 




Disbursements 




Ramsey, David 










Robinson, Thos 












Romaine, Frank 

Disbursements 


7200 

49 87 




Ricker, Chris 






270 00 
70 25 




Disbursements 




Snell, John 










Smith, Patk 

Disbursements 


135 00 
1 00 




Smith, Wm 




Sknce, Thos 


143 00 
52 00 




Disbursements 








Scott, Alex 






Carried forward 




1 

57,222 07 



16 



APPENDIX No. e— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



Name. 



Brought fonoard . 



Fire Ranging. — Continued. 



Sunstnun, John . . . 
Stanley, John . . . . 
Stewart, Robert A. 

Seeley, Lewis 

Slade, Wm 

Scantlin, Jas 

Disbursements 



Trudeaa, Paul 

Taylor, James A . . 

Thompson, J. H . . . 

Disbursements . 



Thompson, J. C . . . 
Disbursements . 



Thompson, A. W 

Thaxer, R , 

TJrquhart, John 

Valker, Philip D 

Watson, 0. F 1897 

Welsh, E 

Disbursement 



Wilson, Robert 

Wilson, J. D 

WeUs, J. R 

Walter, Thomas... 
Disbursements 



Warren, Joseph ... 

Wood, R 

Walsh, J 

Williams, Geo 

Young, William . . . 
Disbursements . 



Yates, Steve 



Less amount refunded by limit holders 



Odllkrs Examination. 



Mather, D. L., services 

Munroe, H,, expenses . 

Paget, Geo., services . . . 

Expenses . . 



TurnbuU, W., services. 
Advertising 



$ c. 



138 00 
8;.00 



188 CO 
29 53 



126 00 
80 88 



60 00 
78 63 



120 00 
3 00 



131 00 
1 25 



16 00 

1 25 



fiarried forward 



$ c. 



23,677 01 



157 00 
109 00 

64 00 
130 00 

86 00 


146 00 
98 00 
76 00 



227 53 



156 88 

37 00 

131 00 

131 00 

99 00 

18 50 



128 63 
300 00 
105 00 
101 00 



123 00 
105 00 
103 00 
118 00 
92 00 



132 25 
98 00 



26,749 80 
.332 00 



4 00 

8 80 



17 25 
12 26 
17 81 



I 0. 



57,222 07 



26,417 80 



60 11 



83,699 9rf 



17 



APPENDIX No. e.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898^ 



Name, 



Brought forward 

BuBSAD OF Minks. 
Continffineies, 



Blue, A., travelling expenses 
Gibson, T. W do 



Printing and Binding 
Stationery 



Bain, J. W., assaying 
James, O. S do 
Speller, F. W do 



Postage 

Telegraphing 

Express and freight. 



Glackme^er, F. J., services 

Advertising 

Subscriptions 

Books 



Sundries 



FOBKSTBT. 



South worth, Thomas, travelling expenses. 

Printing 

Stationery 



Postage and telegraphing 
Express and freight 



O'Brien, S. J., services. 
Sheridan, W. J. do . 



Brodie, Wm. , articles on Tussock moth . 

Burbank, L., seed walnuts 

Staples, O. P., Drawings of galls 



Subscriptions . 

Books 

Photo supplies. 



Diamond Dbill. 



Roche, W. W., salary 

do disbursements . 



Carried forward. 
2 C.L. 



$ c. 



160 06 
126 60 


298 64 
321 44 


54 00 
17 00 
20 OC 


216 66 

67 07 
66 76 



593 07 

175 61 

52 76 



7 80 
41 76 


30 52 
12 87 


231 00 
54 00 


15 00 
6 00 
6 00 



41 92 
35 75 
28 26 



266 28 
25 30 



$ c. 



276 66 
620 08 

91 00 

340 39 
104 00 



821 43 
37 00 



160 00 

49 56 

43 39 

286 00 

26 00 

105 93 

281 58 



281 68 



$ c. 



83,699 98 



2,289 55 



659 88 



86,649 41 



18 

APPENDIX No. ^.—Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crow^n Lands for the year 1898, 



Niune. 



Brought forward. 



Diamond Drill.— Con<mucd. 



Oyster, L. A., salary 

do disbursements , 



Judge, J., salary 

do disbursements , 



Transport 
Storage . . , 
Labor 



Supplies 
Carbons . 



Refunded 



Refunds 

Colonization Roads 
SOBVKYS 



? c. 



726 88 
2H8 59 

467 94 
41 90 



$ c. 



Mining Development. 
Rat Portage Agency. 



Charlesworth, L. C, salary 1897 

1898 
Windsor, C. R., salary 



Disbursements 1897 

1898 

Rent 



Miehipieoton Mining Division. 



Boyd, D. G., salary 
Disbursdments . . 
Rent 



Buchan, L., services 
Disbursements . . 



Carried forward. 



483 07 

18 25 

1,009 49 

,S16 78 
664 98 



281 58 

965 47 
509 84 

1,510 81 

981 76 

4,249 46 
999 88 



140 41 
910 00 
241 10 

178 48 
161 01 
360 00 



1,000 00 

202 12 

75 00 



1,291 51 



699 49 



88 00 
67 80 



1,277 12 
146 80 



1,422 92 



$ e. 



86,649 41 



3 249 58 

24,910 98 

107,454 29 

36,500 00 



1,991 OD 



260,755 26 



1!) 



ABPENDIX No. e—Contintied. 
Statement of the DlBbarsements of the Department of Crov^n Lands for the year 1898. 



NAME. 



Brought forward 

Mining Dkvblopment.— Continued. 
Michipieoton Mining Division. — Continued. 



Conlon, T. F., services 

do disbursements . 



Keisman, K. D., services. 



Inspector of Mines, West. 



Bow, J. A., salary . 
Disbarsements . 



Inspector of Mines, East. 



Slaght, A., salary . 
Disbursements . 



De Kalb, C. salary 
Disbursements . . 



Mining Explobations. 



Parks, W. A., services 

do disbursements 

do travelling expenses 



Charlton, W. A., services 

do disbursements 

do travelling expenses 



Coleman, A. P., salary '..... 

do travelling expenses and disbursements 



Coulthard, R. W., services' as assistant 
Willmott, A., services as assistant .... 



Gracey, A. H., services 

do travelling expenses 



Miller, W, G., services 

Disbursements , 

Chown, G. Y., disbursements re corundum 



Carried forward 



* c. 



67 50 
117 05 



871 67 
482 89 



.381 00 
203 60 


5P0 00 
352 76 



493 00 

64 89 

160 15 

222 00 
12 15 
59 63 

500 00 

772 33 



1,272 33 

59 00 

288 05 

127 00 
75 25 

500 00 
272 22 
130 74 



S c. 



1,422 92 J 



184 65 
180 00 



1,364 56 



584 60 



902 76 



718 04 
293 78 

1,619 38 
202 25 

902 96 



3,736 41 



« c. 



260.755 26 



1,787 47 



2,841 92 



265,384 65 



20 



APPENDIX No. Q.—Contintied. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1898. 



NAME. 



Brought forward 

Mining. — Continued. 
ExplorcUion. — Continued. 



Hodgson, R. T., services 

do disbursements. 



Rogers, W. C, services 

do disbursements 



Carter, W. E., services 

Belleville Assay Cffiee. 



Wells, J. W., salary 

do dirbursements 

* 

do supplies 

do furnishings . . . 



Mineral Collection, 

Mackintosh Granite Co 

Iron Mining. 



Hamilton Blast Furnace 

Bain, J. W., travelling expenses 

Mining Roads 



Mining Schools. 



Bain, J. W., travelling expenses 
do services 



Goodwin, W. L., services. . 
do expenses 



Nichols, W., services . 
do expenses 



School of Mines, Kingston 

BoAKD OP SoBVKiroRS, 1897 and 1898 
PiGKON RrvEB Slide and Dam 

CONTINGENCIKS. 



Printing' and binding 
Stationery 



Carried forward 



$ c. 



94 00 
91 73 



94 00 
34 69 



450 00 

278 96 

636 75 
443 12 



240 00 
259 62 



150 00 
63 19 



150 00 
71 92 



2,136 91 
2,045 16 



$ c. 



3,736 41 



185 73 



128 59 
268 00 



728 96 
1,080 17 



2,603 95 
2 75 



500 00 
213 19 



221 92 
9,000 00 



4,182 07 
4,182 07 



§ c. 



265,384 65 



4,318a7» 



1,809 13 
2 50 



2,606 70 
13^53 2a 



9,935 11 
400 OO 

175 36 



297,885 41 



APPENDIX No. &.— Concluded. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1898 



NAME. 


$ c. 


S c; 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




4,182 07 

1.890 61 

984 35 

500 00 
5,335 90 

570 11 


297,885 41 


MimsQ.— Continued. 

Contingeneies. — Continued. 
Posta^fe, Telegraphy and expenses. 


1,763 61 
82 00 
45 00 

877 .35 
107 00 


Cab hire 

Carfare 




Subscriptions and advertising , . . . 




Books 








G. B. Kirkpatrick, extra services 

Peter Ryan, Services as auctioneer 


200 00 
300 00 




Extra clerks 


148 55 
261 21 
160 35 




Travelling expenses 




Legal services 




Sundries 








19 4f!a 04 


Total 












311,348 45 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner 



Department op Crown Lands, 

ToRONOT, 31st December, 1898. 



22 



APPENDIX 

Woods and 
Statement of timber and amounts accrued from timber dues, ground 





Area 

covered by 

timber 

license. 










QUANTITY AND 




Saw logs. 


Boom and 


Agencies. 


Pine. 


Other. 


Pine. 




Square 
miles. 


Pieces. 


Feet B. M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet B.M. 


Western Timber District. 
Belleville Timber District. 
Ottawa Timber District. . 


7,062 

972 

6,985 


6,127,814 
480,795 
807,619 


400,238,004 
62,708,570 
81,510,565 


^ 77,237 
37,784 
52,292 


4,063,564 
1,635,800 
2;525,078 


86,597 
22,308 
36,369 


14,649,38R 
4,522,273 
6,468,578 


Total 


15,019 


7,416,228 


544,457,139 


167,313 


8,224,442 


145,274 


25,640,239 







GENERAL STATEMENT OF 





Cord wood. 


Tan bark. 


Railway 

ties. 


Posts. 


Telegraph 
poles. 


Shingle 


Agencies. 


Hard. 


Soft. 


bolts. 




Cords. 


Cords. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


Western Timber District. 
Belleville Timber District 


309 
709 


29,829 

391 

7 


547 


1,000,699 

8,383 

143,131 


375 
452 
370 


6,486 

1,468 

36 


1,199 
410 


Ottawa Timber District . . 




286 








Total 


1,018 


30,227 


547 


1,152,213 


1,197 


7,980 


1,895 



J. A. G. CROZIER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1898. 



No. 7. 

Forests. 

rent and bonus daring the year ending the 31st of December, 1898. 



DESCRIPTION OP TIMBER. 














dimension timber. 


Square timber. 


Pile timber. 


Cedar 


Other. 


White pine. 


Elm, tamsrac, ash, 
birch. 




Pieces. 


Feet B. M. 


Pieces. 


Cubic feet. 


Pieces. 


Cubic 
feet 


Pieces. 


Feet. 


Lineal feet. 


1,324 
2,604 
6,531 


248,440 
373,019 
715,763 


22,744 

17 

7,210 


1,172,206 

936 

286,489 


E. 5 
T. 106 

A. 254 

B. 179 


188 
3.386 
9,764 
5,210 


2,288 


342,299 


15,672 
48,652 


T. 8 


209 






97,586 








9,459 


1,337.222 


29,971 


1,459,631 


E. 5 
T. 114 

A. 254 

B. 179 


188 
8,594 
9,764 
6.210 


2,288 


342,299 


161,860 



TIMBER, 'Etc.— Continued. 



' 


Pulp wood. 


Interest. 


Trespass. 


Amounts accrued. 


Head blocks 


Timber dues 


Bonus. 


Ground rent 


Total. 


Pieces. 


Cords 


-S c. 


$ c. 

1,785 62 
262 55 


S c. 


S c. 


•S c. 


$ c. 


194 


16,196 
147 
106 


11,693 33 

466 85 

6,189 30 


498,193 26 

78,902 75 

106,037 60 


164.361 59 


38,928 85 

4,259 00 

19,491 00 


714,962 84 
83,891 1» 


46 




130,717 90 








240 


16,448 


17,349 48 


2,048 17 


683,133 60 


164,361 59 


62,678 85 


929,571 69 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



24 



APPENDIX No. 8. 

Woods and Fobbsts. 

Statement of revenue collected daring the year ending Slat December, 1898. 



Amount of Western District collections at Department 

Quebec 



Amount ot Belleville collections 



Amount of Ottawa collections . 



at Quebec. 



otal 



J. A. G. CROZIER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Woods and Forest Branch, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1898. 



$ c. 



$ c. 



602,110 45 
27,809 77 

60,197 72 

278,776 48 
12,292 03 



629,920 22 



60,197 72 



291,068 51 



981,186 45 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



25 



APPENDIX No. 9. 
Statement of Patents, etc. issued by the Patents Branch daring the year 1898. 



Orown Lands 

School do 

Mining do 

Public do. (late Clergry Reserves) 

Free Grant Lands (A. A. ) 

do. do. (under Act of 1880). . 
Hainy River do (Mining and Crown). 

Mining leases 

Licen?es of occupation 

Rondeau Harbor leases 

•Crown leases 

Mining Lands (University) 

Mining leases do. 



Total. 



Number. 



372 

44 

34 

20 

39 

195 

280 

510 

7 

2 

2 

2 

6 

1,513 



CHARLES S. JONES, 

Chief Clerk. 



Department of Cbowji Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1898. 



AUBREY WHITE 

Assistant Commissioner. 



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36 



(Appendix No. 16.) 

TOWNSHIP OF CASIMIR. 

District Nipissing. 

Peterborough, Nov. 29th, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to present herewith the returns of survey of the 
Township of Casimir, performed under instructions dated June 21st, 1897. 

Casimir is immediately north of tlie Township of Haddo, about six miles 
south of Warren Station, C.P.R., from which a fair w^aggon road runs down to 
Con. III. The position of the south boundary is explained in report of Haddo. 

The west arm of Lake Nipissing extends through Cons. I. and II. but for the 
remainder of the Township it is hardly broken by water. 

In common with the country around, this part has suffered from fire and is 
now largely overgrown with mixed brush of the kind usual in burnt lands. 

Though affording ample timber for local use there is none of any commer- 
cial value. 

The east half of the Township is undulating with occasional rocky ridges, 
the tracts between, at many places, Ijeing fairly tit for cultivation. 

The west half is, for the greater part, good clay land with loam, having 
good depth and is being rapidly settled upon. 

In the north-west quarter there are twelve settlers who have come in during 
recent years. They have erected suitable buildings, made considerable clearings 
and other improvements, and this season had proportionately fair and good crops. 
A list of these improvements and approximate values is herewith furnished and 
it will be noticed that the progress so far made is assuring and promises well for 
a speedy and thriving settlement. 

As might have been expected the survey lines have not quite coincided with 
those run by the settlers themselves, but it is expected the differences will be 
amicably adjusted by the parties interested. 

In all other respects the characteristics of the Township are those common 
to this section of the Nipissing District. 

Hoping the returns will prove satisfactory to the Department. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

J. W. FITZGERALD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Honorable J. M. Gibson. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



37 



(Appendix No. 17) 

T0W^•SH1P OF CREELMAN. 

Little Current, Ontario. 

December lOth, 1898. 

Sir, — I Imve the honor to submit to you the following report of the survey 
of the Township of Creehnan, in the District of Nipissinor, which was sub-divided 
into lots of 320 acres each in accordance with your instructions, dated July 
8th, 1898. 

1 proceeded to the Township by Sudbury, thence by waggon eighteen miles 
to the Vermilion River, and up the Vermilion in canoes. 

I commenced my work by determining the south west angle at the twelfth 
mile on the District line, and ran due east for the south boundary, making each 
lot forty chains in width. I paid special attention to the correct marking of the 
posts and, as instructed, saw that none of the half-mile posts were marked on the 
south side. The wooden posts at the Township corners have marked thereon the 
name of each Township on the proper side, also the lot and concession as far as it 
refers to Creehnan. 

The iron post at the eighteenth mile of the District line marks the north 
west angle of Creehnan. 

The instrument used was a six inch Burt's Solar Compass, made by W. & L. 
E. Gurley, Troy, N. y. 

The posts were made of the most convenient durable wood, as shown in field 
notes. They are mostly six inches square. As instructed I procured from the 
Crown Land Agent at Sudbury the iron posts supplied and planted them firmly 
at the south west, south east and north east angles of the Township. 

The lakes are mostl}' small. The Vermilion river flows southeasterly 
through the Township, and is mainly a succession of small lakes and ponds con- 
nected by swift currents and rapids. 

The general character of the country is undulating rock, with an occasional 
precipitous bluff and steep hill. Lots one, two and three, concessions two and 
three, are very mountainous, and form a water shed between the Vermilion 
waters and a water system to the east. The level portions are muskeg and 
beaver meadows and a few flats of sand and gravel. Only the most abrupt 
elevations were noted. 

There is but little 'arable land. Possibly some of the beaver meadows and 
muskeg by draining could be made productive. 

The timber is mostly jackpine, balsam, canoe birch, spruce, taramac, white 
and Norway pine. The latter two are fairly abundant in the central, northern 
and eastern portions, but the white pine is mostly " shaky," though of fair size. 
The spruce and tamarac is of good quality. Very little cedar, ash, maple or black 
birch was found. 

The only burned portion is a few hundred acres on lots five and six, conces- 
sion six. 

The Vermilion could only, at a very great expense, be made available for 
driving saw-logs. None of the small streams could be used for that purpose. 



38 



There is a water power on the Vermilion at location W.R. 84, also one at the 
Pothole falls on lot number seven, concession one. 

At the south limit of lot number eleven, concession four, along the Vermilion, 
■a few colors to the pan of placer gold were found. At other places on the river 
«,nd through the Township panning was done, but nothing worth mentioning was 
found. No other minerals were seen. 

Moose, caribou and red deer are in abundance. Plenty of mountain trout, 
black bass and pike were obtained by our party in the Vermilion and the lakes. 
Beavers are working on some of the streams. 

As will be seen on the plan, a pack trail, cut by our party, runs easterly from 
boundary lake on the Vermilion to about a mile from the east boundary, thence 
southerly and westerly again to the Vermilion. This trail was well chopped out 
and blazed, and no doubt will be useful for those who wish to go through the 
Township. 

I have sent with the returns of survey a few specimens of the rock forma- 
tions. On each sample is marked the locality where found 

I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) T. J. PATTEN, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Ontario. 



(Appendix No. 18.) 

TOWNSHIP OF HADDO. 

District Nipissing. 

Peterborough, Nov. 29, 1897. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith the plan and Field Notes of the 
Township of Haddo in the Nipissing District surveyed by me during the past 
summer under your instructions dated June 21st, 1897. 

Haddo is on the West arm of Lake Nipissing. 

It is about twelve miles South of Warren station on the C.P.R. 

Owing to a surplus error of ten chains ninety-nine links in the West 
boundary, the point fixed for the North-west corner of the township is so much 
North of the true point, consequently the North boundary, (South boundary 
Casimir) instead of being a due West line, is run on a bearing to meet the altered 
position which is North 88°, 4-3' West, astronomically. 

The Township is much intersected by long narrow arms, or water stretches 
which penetrate it throughout — these are of considerable depth in places. The 
shores are generally low sloping rock and the bottom often the same, or stone and 
gravel. At a few points the banks and bottom are clay and here the water is 
shallow and filled with tall reeds. There is no perceptible cuiTcnt in the arms 
or bays. 



39 



Viewed from the Lake or approach to tlie township the aspect is rather 
barren, but on proceeding a short distance inland the scene is changed, good land 
is met with of a fertile kind, strong clay loam. 

The general surface is undulating and a few of the hills so called, attain a 
height of forty feet. 

The country around is what is known as brule having been swept over by 
•fire, it is said, some thirty years ago. It is now cov^ered with a thick growth of 
small poplar, white birch, willows, alder, and in places jack pine, balsam and 
cedar. 

There is little, if any, timber of commercial value. 

There are numbers of islands in the arms and bays, varying in size from a 
mere dot to several hundred acres. The larger islands are treated as ordinary 
lots in their respective concessions. The islands of medium size are calculated 
separately and lettered, with the areas marked thereon as instructed, and the 
smaller islands mostly rock, are numbered for convenient reference, the acreage 
in each and all being so small as deemed to be of no importance. 

Lists of these two classes of islands are given in field book. 

As yet there are no settlers in the township, but in view of the settlement 
going on in some of the adjoining townships, especially in Casimir, there is 
no doubt but its favorable situation will gain attention very soon. 

In the lake close by and in all the arms there is an abundance of fish, pike 
maskinonge, bass, etc., and the lands and woods supply red deer and moose in 
annually increasing numbers. 

No fur-bearing animals were seen. 

The rock bed is of the usual kind found in the district and at many points 
where the outcrop is exposed bears the mark of the prospector. 

About forty per cent, of the land aret is fit for cultivation while a large 
percentage of the remainder is suitable for pasturage and other purposes, the soil 
throughout being a stiflf clay loam more or less free from stone and easy to work 
in season. 

Hoping these returns will be found satisfactory, 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

(Signed) J. W. FITZGERALD, 
Honorable J. M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Grown Lands, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



(Appendix No. 19.) 

TOWNSHIP OF SECORD. 

District of Nipissing. 

Peterboro, Ontario, 

December 12th, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report the completion of the survej^^ of the Town- 
ship of Secord, in the District of Nipissing, performed under your instructions of 
11th July this year. 



40 



This township is on the Wahnapitae River, which flows through it fron> 
north to south, and situate about fifteen miles south of Wahnapitae station on 
the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

The survey was commenced, as per instructions, at the southeast corner, by 
laying off the lots forty chains in width along the south boundary, which I 
reopened and brushed out for the purpose — and the concessions eighty chains in 
depth along the east boundary. Working north and west, running the side lines 
north astronomically and the concession lines west astronomically, I completed 
the survey of the lines. The river and lakes were subsequently surveyed. 

The aspect of the township, as seen from the river, is rocky and hilly ; but 
back from the river, a mile or so, the country improves, being somewhat level or 
gently rolling land of a sandy clay soil, but stony. 

The township has been extensively lumbered over, especially during the last 
six years, and is now practically cut out of pine timber. 

The remaining timber in the town.ship is of little commercial value 
being chiefly fepruce, white birch, cedar, alder, willows and small red and white 
pine saplings. This spring a fire ran over a good portion of the township. It 
started on lot number nine, concession three, running in an easterly direction to 
the river and across it at some point*, all of w^hich are indicated in the field 
notes. 

The water in the township is clear and good, tributary to the Wahnapitae 
River which has an average width of two chains and thirty links, and generally 
having a strong, steady flow. The shores of the river and lakes are mostly low 
and of sandy clay loam, <ri-avel and small stone. 

There are three falls on the river within the township : the first White Pine 
Chute, lot number two, concession five, about eight feet in four chains and fifty 
links ; the next on lot number three, concession two, about fifteen feet in two 
chains ; and the third Burnt Chute on lot number three, concession one, with a 
fall of about thirty feet in six chains and fifty links, presenting good mill sites or 
power stations. The river supplies pike, pickerel, etc. Red deer and moose are 
plentiful, but fur-bearing animals are scarce. As throughout all this district the 
arable land is scattered, but probably ten to fifteen per cent, of the land area is 
fit for cultivation. 

Iron posts have been planted as follows: At the southeast angle of the town- 
ship ; iron post marked " Burwash " on the northeast face and " Secord " on the 
northwest face. 

At the northeast angle, iron post marked " Cleland " on the northeast face, 
" Dill " on the northw^est face, " Burwash " on the southeast face, and " Secord " 
on the southwest face. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 



(Signed) J. W. FITZGERALD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



41 



(Appendij; No. 20.) 

TOWNSHIP OF TILTON. 

District of Nipissing, 

Peterboro. Ont , December 12th, 1898. 

Sir. — I have, the honor to report on the survey of the Township of Tilton, 
in the District of Nipissing. 

This township lies immediately west of Secord and was survej'ed under 
instructions of the same dat^, July 11th, 1898. 

The survey was commenced and executed in conformity with instructions. 

Although differing somewhat in its appearance from the Township of 
Secord, there is naturally much in common to both. 

Some thirty years ago the present township site was burnt over and is now, 
generally speaking, covered in the valleys and hill-slopes particularly with a 
dense growth of small poplar, birch, spruce, alder, etc. White and red pine of fair 
quality, averaging eight to fourteen inches in diameter, are frequently scattered 
over the southern two-thirds of the township ; the thickest and best bunches 
lying around White Oak and Bluff Lakes ; the former being the largest body of 
water in the township. Both lakes flow into the Wahnapitae River about twelve 
miles southeast. The northern part, about one-third of the township, is brule, 
covered mastly with mixed brush, poplar, spruce, birch, etc. Sawlogs are being 
cut this season by the owners of the berth. 

There are no settlers, and no clearances worth notice, nor are there likely to 
be any of importance, as no area large enough for profitable cultivation has been 
met with in the township. 

As a whole the township is very broken and rocky, offering little or no pro- 
spect for successful .settlement. 

The usual kinds of fish and game found in the Nipissing District are quite 
plentiful ; but evidences of fur-bearing animals were not often seen. 

As instructed, the iron posts supplied by the department, have been planted 
as follows : One on the southeast angle, marked " Tilton " on the northwest face, 
and " Secord " on the northeast face ; and at the southwest angle of the town- 
ship one marked " Tilton " on the northeast face. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Signed) J. W. FITZGERALD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



42 



(Appendix No. ^1.) 

TOWNSHIP OF AUBREY. 

District of Rainy River, 

Tilbury, December 16th, 1897. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from your Department, dated 
8th July, 1897, I have made a survey of the Township of Aubrey, in the District 
of Rainy River, and beg to report thereon as follows : — 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township at cedar 
and iron posts planted by O. L. S. Niven in 1894, and ran thfe south boundary 
due west astronomically until I reached the east boundary of the Indian Reserve 
number twenty-seven. I then ran the other concession lines and side lines as 
directed in the instructions. 

The township is rather rolling throughout and the soil is principally clay of 
a very good quality and would be easily cleared as there is no large timber in 
the township at all, and a good portion of the small timber was burnt over a year 
or tw^o ago and is almost falling down now, 

There is also a large area which is almost fit for the plough at present, 
namely, lots four and five in the second, third and fourth concessions, as the 
timber has been burnt off almost clean and the ground is growing up with wild 
peas, wild buckwheat and grass and some small bushes. 

The township would also be easil}^ drained as there are some four or five 
small lakes in the eastern portion of the township, and the Beaver River to 'the 
north in the middle portion of the township, and Eagle River and Eagle Lake to 
the west and southwest respectively. 

Considering these advantages and the close proximity to the railway, this 
township should make very cesirable land for settlement. 

There are several mining locations in the township, situate principally in the 
eastern and southwestern portions of the township. 

There are some parties commencing to do some development work on lot 
number twenty -three, concession two, and there are ssveral prospectors looking 
through the township, and I think as soon as men of means can be secured to 
invest in the mines and develop them that it will prove very profitable. 

There is considerable game in the township such as moose, caribou and bear, 
which were frequently seen during the course of the survey and also small game 
such as partridge and rabbit, and the lakes and Eagle River abound with plenty 
of fish. 

There are only two settlers in the township who are located at Eagle River 
Station on lots number twenty-three and twenty-four in the sixth concession. 
There are also a couple of fishermen squatters on lot number eighteen, concession 
four, on Eagle Lake, where there used to be an old Hudson's Bay Post. 

Accompanying this report are plan and field notes of the township, which I 
trust you will find satisfactory. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) JOS. M. TIERNAN. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



43 



(Appendix No. -12.) 

TOWNSHIP OF BURRISS. 

District of Rainy Riveu. 

Rat Portage, Juxe 14th, 1898. 

Sir,— In accordance with your instructions, dated 16th March, 1898, I have 
made the survey of the Township of Burriss, in the District of Rainy River. 

I left Rat Portage on the 23rd of March, and proceeded to the township. 

At the time your instructions were received it was a very difficult matter to 
get conveyance from Rat Portage to the locality of the township, as the ice was 
at that time dangerous, and tlie roads were very bad, so in order to expedite 
matters I purchased a liorse and conveyance in Rat Portage, and sold th^m on 
my arrival at Emo. 

I laid in my supplies at Emo, and secured assistants who had Ijeen 
employed on the survey of a number of other townships in the vicinity. 

Owing to the season it was very difficult to pack in the supplies, as the 
snow was too deep to go without snowshoes and too soft to use them. For this 
reason I also had to pay the men higher wages in order to keep them. 

I left Emo for the township on the 28th of March, and camped on the 
southwest corner of it on the night of March 29th, and continued at work 
surveying it out until the 10th of May, when I put in the last post, completing 
the field work. 

I went back to Emo immediately, and paddled down the river to Boucher- 
ville, where the first boat from Rat Portage this season lay. Owing to low water 
it was unable to go up the rapids. I reached this boat on the morning of May 
11th, having been nearly the whole night in the canoe and towing it along the 
rapids. 

I arrived at Rat Postage on March 12th. 

At the time of the year the survey was made I could not get Polaris at its 
greatest elongation, so I took it as near as possible, and allowed for the difference 
in Azimuth, which is very little ^or a couple of hours before or after, as the 
«tar moves very slowly then. My calculations are given in the field notes. 

I used the standard time of our watches in taking observations at first 
when a minute or two of error in time would not afiect the result, the star 
-changing its azimuth so slowly when so near the elongation, these observations 
being taken very near the elongation. Later on I took the mean solar time from 
the sun at noon, when it was not clouded, and checked my watch by it, and in 
my calculations used the mean solar time, which differed less than a minute from 
the apparent solar time, which difference I allowed for as given in the Canadian 
Almanac. I got apparent noon by noting the time the standard of a string drawn 
from the centre of the end of the telescope, and the centre of the plate fell on 
the zero point of the instrument. The time in this way, checked with my watch, 
was within less than half a minute from day to day. This error in time 
would give but a few seconds error in azimuth, much closer than my instrument 
■would read. 



44 



The rock does not crop out in the township except in few places: however, in 
the northeast corner of lot number one and two, concession six, there is con- 
siderable bare granite. 

At the northwest angle of lot number three, concession three, there is ar> 
outcropping of hornblende gneiss. * 

The hill shown in the north of lot number twelve, concession three, is com- 
posed of bare trap rock. 

All the outcropping but this last belong to the Laurentian formation. But 
this seems to be of the Huronian or Keewatin. 

On the west side of lot number four, concession four, the magnetic needle 
varies very much, as shown by the field notns. Also in the north of lot number 
twelve, concession three, the needle turns south at one point. 

All the land where poplar predominates is high clay land of very good 
quality. Where balsam, birch, balm of gilead, ash, and pine are found, the land 
is good for farming. Where spruce predominates the land is not good for 
working at present, but when it is drained it will be perhaps the best, owing ta 
its richness. By examining the accompanying timber map, these diflerent parta 
will be easily distinguished. 

The land is all good rolling land except where spruce, cedar, or tamarae 
predominates, where it is level. 

The river La Vallie makes good drainage for the west half of the township^ 
and it and the creeks that run into it will supply cattle and people on a great 
portion of this part. i 

Owing to the deep snow while I was engaged in the southeast part of the 
township, I, of course, could not note the small creeks, which, however, no doubt 
exist. 

There is none of the timber dense enough to warrant separating it into 
a timber berth, but there is enough to be of great use to the farmers ; in fact, the 
whole of the township is well wooded. 

The accompanying field notes show very fully the details as to how the 
lines were run, and where posts were planted. 

The lot lines were run north and south, and the ct)ncession lines east and 
west, astronomically. 

I commenced the survey at the south east angle of the township at a point 
fifty links east of the post planted for the north east angle of Devlin, and retraced 
the north boundary of Devlin westerly, planting lot posts at the distance of one 
chain due north from said line, and marked them with the letter " R " for road 
on the south side, and the number of the lot on the east and west sides, and 
" Con. 1 " on the north side, until I reached the west boundary. 

I ran the east boundary of the township from the southeast angle, north to 
the post planted by Mr. Niven at the northeast angle of the township, where 
there is an iron post set beside a spruce, post marked " VI M " on the east side. 

In performing this survey my lines were well opened and blazed. I planted 
firmly in the ground at the front angles of the lots durable and substantial posts, 
taking care to mark with a proper marking tool the numbers of the lots on the 
east and west sides thereof, and the numbers of the concessions on the north side 
thereof. The concessions being single fronted, I did not mark anything on the 
south sides of the posts between lois one and two, three and four, five and six^ 



45 



etc , in any of the concessions, as these posts have no reference to the lots south 
of them, but form the starting point for their respective side lines, which will 
be drawn parallel to their several governing lines. 

I did not lay out any concession or side road allowances, with tlie exception 
of the road allowance on the south side of the township which is provided for 
by the original survey of Devlin. 

I have shown in my plan and tield notes the intei"section of the concession 
and side lines of the adjoining townships with the outlines of the township. I 
noticed the distance from the intersection of my north and soutli lines with 
Niven's hne to his nearest pasts, as will be seen in the field notes. 

The regular lots have a dfepth of eighty chains and a width of forty chains, 
and contain an area of 320 acres each : the lots are numbered from east to west 
from number one to number twelve inclusive, and the concessions from south to 
north, from number one to six inclusive. . 

I did not run the lines between lots numbers one and two, three and four, 
five and six, seven and eight, nine and ten, eleven aud twelve. 

In consequence of not leaving any allowances for roads there was a surplus 
over the width of twelve full lots; this surplus I divided etiually between lots 
numbers eleven and twelve in each concession, such surplus was found by meas- 
uring to the surveyed line on the east boundary of the Township of Carpenter, 
and divided the balance into two equal portions and planted posts for lots num- 
bers eleven and twelve accordingly. Concession six is deeper than the eighty 
chains and is the depth from the rear of the fifth concession up to the line run by 
O. L. S„ Niven in 1892, winch forms the north boundary of the township. 

An excellent site for a town is at the northwest angle of lot number eight, 
concession two ; and an excellent location for a road to be constructed is directly 
west from this point to intersect the road already running up north in the Town- 
ship of Carpenter from Emo. 

There is already* a kind of roatl running south near this town site to Big 
Forks, on the Rainy River. It will be seen from the map that this latter road 
runs up north for a considerable distance. 

Thus these two roads will give connection with both Emo and Big Forks, 
and they pass through the part of the township that will be just settled. 

There is also a good road from Emo crossing lots numbers twelve, eleven, 
ten and nine, in the concession six, to a lumber camp as shown on my map. 

There were no squatters in the township at the time of the survey. 

All the land in the township is good agricultural land with the exception of 
the spruce swamps and cedar swamps which will be good some day when they 
are properly drained. These swamps, however, form a very small percentage of 
the total area of the township. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) M. W. HOPKINS, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



46 



(Appendix No. 23.) 

TOWNSHIP OF KINGSFORD. 

District of Rainy River.^ 

St. Thomas, Ontario, 

November 2nd, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the 
Township of Kingsford under instructions dated July 8th, 1898, from your 
Department ; 

This township is bounded on the south by the Township of Carpenter, on the 
west by the Township of Mather, and on the north and east by lines run by 
O.L.S., Niven, in 1892. 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township where I 
found an iron and a wooden post. The wooden post, which I found lying on the 
ground, I replaced by a tamarac post properly marked. From this point I 
retraced the south and the east boundaries of the township. On the south 
boundary, I planted posts at regular intervals of forty chains until lot number 
eleven was reached. I placed the post between lots eleven and twelve, midway 
between the post between lots ten and eleven, and the post at the southwest 
angle of the towmship. On the east boundary, I planted posts at regular in- 
tervals of eighty chains until concession six was reached, all the land between 
concession five and the north boundary being placed in concession six. I after- 
wards ran the several concession lines due west astronomically from the posts- 
planted on the east boundary and the side lines between lots numbers two and 
three, four and five, six and seven, eight and nine, ten and eleven, due north 
astronomically from their respective posts on the south boundary. I found the 
west boundary run as far as the post between concessions three and four of the 
Township of Mather. From this point I ran it due north astronomically until it 
intersected the north boundary where I planted a spruce post and an iron post 
marked according to instructions. 

On each of the concession lines, the posts between lots number two and three, 
four and five, &c., were planted at the intersections with the side lines and marked 
with the numbers of the lots on the east and west sides and the numbers of the 
concessions on the south and north sides. The posts between lots number one and 
tw^o, three and four, &c., were planted so as to give to lots numbers one, three, . 
five, &c., an exact width of forty chains and marked on the east and west sides 
with the numbers of the lots and on the north side with the number of the con- 
cession. On the north boundary, posts were planted at the intersections with the 
side lines and marked with the numbers of the lots on the east and west sides 
and with " Con VI " on the south side. The iron posts at the four corners of the 
Township were marked with the word " Kingsford " on the side facing the Town- 
ship, Stones, where obtainable, were placed around all the posts. 

The township in the southeast part and in the northwest corner is well 
wooded with poplar, spruce, tamarac, birch, pitch pine, and a few cedar and white 
pine. The northwest half, excepting the north-west corner, has been burnt over 
and is now covered with small poplar, birch, spruce, tamarac and alder and 
willow bushes. 



47 



The township has, running through it, a number of small streams which are 
discolored by clay. In the township is found one lake which is shallow and is 
surrounded by low swampy land. The township is comparatively level, no hills 
of any large size occurring. The soil is principally clay loam and is well suited 
for agricultural purposes, except in the north east corner where the rock is very 
near the surface. 

No indications of mineral were found in the township and the variation of 
the needle, which was about eight degrees, thirty -live minutes east, was quite 
regular throughout the township. 

Moose, partridge and prairie chicken were seen and appeared to be plentiful. 

There were no settlers in the township at the time of survey. 

The plan, timber plan, and field notes accompany this report. 

I have the honor to be, Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) W. W. MEADOWS, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Appendix No. 24- 

TOWNSHIP OF MATHER. 

District of Rainy River. 

Sarnia, Ontario, 

October 31st, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit »the following report of the survey of the 
Township of Mather, in the District of Rainy River, made under instructions 
from your Department dated July 8th, 1898. 

I proceeded to the north-east angle of the Township of Dobie where I found 
an iron post marked "D" for Dobie on the south-west and "C" for Carpenter on 
the south-east. From this post I ran the east boundary of the Township of 
Mather across the first, second and third concessions. After surveying the south- 
east portion of the township and returning to the east boundary I found that 
0. L. S. Meadows had already run the boundary across the fourth, fifth and sixth 
concessions as the west boundary of the Township of Kingsford. I therefore 
adhered to his line. 

Having retraced the north boundary of the Township of Dobie I found the 
iron post at the northwest angle of Dobie. I removed this post fifty 
links west so as to leave the road allowance between the Townships of 
Tait and Mather one chain wide instead of one chain and fifty links and at each 



48 



concession line posts for the west boundary of Mather were planted one chain east 
of the line run by D. L. S. Reid for the east boundary of Tait. Most of the posts 
on Reid's line were missing, having evidently been burned out. 1 planted an 
iron post at the northwest angle of the township, one chain east of the post at 
the northeast angle of the Township of Tait. This post and also the iron posts 
at the other angles of the township were marked " Mather " on the side next tlie 
township. 

The regular lots are forty chains in width and eighty chains in depth contain- 
ing 320 acres. The space between side line ten and eleven and the west boun- 
dary is divided equally between lots eleven and twelve which are over the regu- 
lar width. The lots in the sixth concession are over the regular depth. Posts 
were planted at the front angles of all lots, marked with the numbers of the lots 
on the east and west sides and the numbers of the concessions on the north and 
south sides, exceptinij the posts on the line between lots numbers one and two, 
three and four, &c., &c., which have no mark on the south side. 

The southeastern portion of the Township of Mather is thickly timbered 
with large spruce, tamarac, poplar, l)alm of gilead, cedar, and a few scattered pine. 
The rest of the township has been burned over except some scattered spruce and 
cedar swamps Much of the brule having been over run by successive fires is 
nearly clear, but part is covered with small poplar and willows and part by dead 
spruce, cedar and pine, and windfalls. There is very little green pine in the 
township and it is too much scattered to be of much ccrnmercial value. 

The township is well watered by the Pine river and the two branches of 
Sturgeon river and tributaries. There is one lake at lot number three concession 
six. The water in all creeks and rivers is discolored by the spruce swamps. 

The land is level or slighth' rolling with some scattered rocky hills. The 
soil is mostly a good clay loam, but there is a strip of sandy and stony land run- 
ning from lot number nine in the third concession to the lake at lot number three 
in the sixth concession. The whole of the township is fit for agricultural pur- 
poses and especially for stock-raising and dairying. 

Game is abundant including moose, prairie chicken, rabbit and partridge. 

Blueberries, red raspberries, plums, and in the muskegs cranberries are 
plentiful. 

The best way to open the township for settlement would be by constructing 
a road from Barwick to the south-west angle of Mather. From that point it 
could be easily extended east and north through a comparatively dry and open 
country. 

Herewith are submitted general plan, timber map, and field notes. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) W. S. DAVIDSON, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



49 



A'ppendix No. 25 

MERIDIAN LINE. 

District of Algoma. 

Toronto, Ontario, October 31st, 1898. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of a 
meridian line, extending from the north-east angle of the Township of Hodgins 
to a point on the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway about three miles 
easterly from Dalton station, pursuant to instructions from your Department 
dated 8th July, 1898. 

Leaving Toronto on 9th July I proceeded to Garden River station by way of 
Sault Ste. Marie A timber road, about twenty iniles in length, leading from 
Garden River station to a camp known as " Headquarters," owned by the Sault 
Ste. Marie Power and Pulp Company and situated on the Goulais River near the 
centre of the Township of Hodgins, was utilized for transporting outfit and 
supplies for the earlier part of the work. At this point a second detachment of 
my party was met. they having come by canoe from Sault Ste. Marie by way of 
Batchawaung Bay and Goulais River. 

The continuation of the timber road along the south easterly side of the 
Goulais River for a further distance of about five miles had been rendered 
impassable by reason of the destruction of its bridges b}' fire. 

Arriving at the north-east angle of the Township of Hodgins on the evening 
of the 14th of July, 1 found th6 original spruce post marked " Hodgins " and 
" Con. VI." At the north side of this old post 1 planted a new cedar post marked 
"Hodgins" on its south-west side and an iron bar at the south of the old post 
similarly marked. 

I retraced and opened out the irregular line forming the northern part of the 
east boundary of the Township of Hodgins southward as far as the north-west 
angle of the Tow^nship of Whitman, where I found an old post and planted an 

iron bar marked " Whitman." 

«k 

From the north-east angle of the Township of Hodgins I ran due north, 
astronomically, planting a wooden post at the end of every mile and an iron post 
at the end of every third mile, in each case marking the number of the mile on 
the south side of the post. The wooden posts were made of the most durable 
timber to be found in the vicinity, and, wherever practicable, a mound of stone 
was erected about the post, and bearing trees marked and noted in the usual 
manner. 

Where a mile terminated in a lake or river the posts were planted on the 
line on the nearest land and marked with the number of miles plus the number 
of chains and links. 

Astronomical observations for the purpose of verifying the course of the line 
were taken whenever practicable, being at distances averaging about five miles 
apart. Details of these are appended to the field notes. The magnetic variation 
was generally uniform throughout, the average being between three and four 
degrees west of astronomic north. 

4 c.L. 



50 



Owing to the absence of navigable waterways and lakes of any great extent, 
considerable difficulty was met with below the Montreal River in transporting 
supplies for my party, numbering in all nineteen men. 

Generally speaking, the country through which the line passes may be 
termed hilly, and in places almost mountainous. In the first twenty miles many 
hills, rocky but not precipitous, rise to a height of 500 fe(?t above the level of the 
surrounding valleys, the country for a distance of from ten to fifteen miles on 
each side bearing a similar character. 

From the twentieth to the eighty-third mile the altitude of the hills is 
not so great. The remainder of the line passes through a hilly region similar in 
character to that of the first twenty miles, but broken by the rocky gorges 
through which the Windermere River flows. The soil is principally sandy and 
stony, a very small portion being of value for agricultural purposes. 

South of the Montreal River the prevailing timber is maple, yellow and white 
birch, white and red pine, spruce, balsam, tamarac and pitch pine, with occasional 
poplars and cedars. Ridges of hardwood, the trees being of large size, occur on 
the slopes of the hills, the soft woods predominating in the valleys. White and 
red pine of good quality form the prevailing timber in the twenty-first, twenty- 
second, twenty-third, twenty-fourth, twenty -ninth and thirtieth miles. Although 
the trees in the denser parts of these belts are not generally more than twelve to 
twenty inches in diameter, those in the more sparsely timbered areas reach a 
diameter up to forty inches. Nearly all the timber on this section of the line is 
green, occasional small patches of brule forming the exception. 

Between the first crossing of the Montreal River and the north terminus of 
the survey the timber consists chiefly of small to medium sized spruce, white 
birch, poplar, pitch pine, tamarac and balsam of no great commercial value. 
Fire has recently overrun the forty-first, forty-second, forty-third, forty-fourth, 
part of the forty-sixth, the fiftieth to fifty-sixth (inclusive) and the north two 
miles adjoining the railway. 

Mr. J. C Kennedy who was attached to the party for the purpose of explor- 
ing and estimating the extent of the timber as far as practicable without imped- 
ing the progress of the survey, will doubtless furnish further details. 

The line repeatedly crosses the Goulais river in the first ten miles, the var- 
ious branches of the Batchawaung in the twenty-eighth to the thirty-seventh 
miles, the Montreal river in the forty-second to the fifty-first miles and Winder- 
mere river on the eighty-fourth mile. All these streams are very rapid, canoe 
naviofatiou in the two first named being very difficult owing to the numerous 
" rapids." 

The Montreal river where first ciossed by the line is a fine stream of about 
five chains in width with a large volume of water, but abounding in falls and 
rapids in the vicinity of the line. I made a track survey of this stream from its 
crossing with our line in the Hfty-first mile to its source and continued the survey 
over the water shed and along the canoe route to Chapleau, the whole being 
shown on the accompanying map. 

Windermere River is a stream of clear water with varying width of one to 
three chains expanding into lakes. The rapids in the river proper are numerous, 
navigation thereon leing not unattended by danger. JSo lakes of more than half 
a mile in breadth were crossed by the line. 

The geological formations passed over were the Laurentian and Huronian» 
the latter being met with chiefly between the Batchawaung and Montreal Rivers. 



51 



The geology of the country will be specially reported upon by Mr. Charlton, 
who accompanied the party for that purpose. 

Very little game of any kind was seen. In the Goulais and Batchawaung 
Rivers splendid trout were plentiful. Pike were caught in the Montreal River 
and white fish in the Windermere lakes. 

A map and field notes accompany this report. 

. . I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) T. B SPEIGHT. 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



( Appendix No. 26.) 

HALipuRTON, Ontario, December 2Sth, 1898. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of part 
of the boundary line between the Districts of Algoma and Nipissing, surveyed 
under instructions from your Department dated 14th May, 1898. 

This line had been run in 1896 by me to a point 120 miles north of the 
northeast angle of the Township of Lmnsden and marked by an iron post, and 
this post was therefore my starting point in the present survey. 

I left Toronto on the 20th May going to Temiscamingue Lake via Mattawa 
by rail and thence to Haileybury near the head of that lake by steamer, from 
there by portage and lakes with six Peterborough canoes to Montreal River, 
thence up that river to .Vlatachewan Lake and thence following the route I came 
out in 1896 to Night Hawk Lake and so on to my point of commencement, the 
journey from Lake Temiscamingue occupying two weeks. 

My party numbered nineteen inckiding Mr, Parks of Toronto University 
who went as geologist, and his assistant, Mr. Carter of the School of Practical 
Science. 

I took with me sufficient supplies from Lake Temiscamingue to carry on 
the survey to Abitibi river, and sent those required for the remainder of the line 
to Lake Abitibi via the Hudson's Bay Company's route through the Province of 
Quebec from the head of Temiscamingue Lake. 

Having started four men with canoes to get supplies ahead to diflferent 
points and to bring along those forwarded to Abitibi Fort, I commenced at the 
120 mile post on the 6th of June and ran north astronomically 180 miles to a 
point about four miles north of the Moose river, crossing the Abitibi nver twice 
and the Moose river at a point about nine miles southwesterly of its junction 
with the Abitibi and about twenty-nine miles south west of Moose Factory. 

The survey was given up on the 7th of October, at the 300th mile post, there 
being no time, owing to the approach of winter, to connect the line with Moose 
Factory as was intended. 



52 



The party returned along the line to the second crossing of the A.bitibi river 
at the 289th mile and froih there started on the homeward trip on the 10th of 
October. 

The journey up stream was a laborious one the canoes having to be "tracked" 
or " poled " a great part of the way. 

Newpost (H. B. Cos trading post) was reached on the 15th, passed the first 
crossing of river (179th mile) on the 21st and got to west end of Abitibi Lake on 
the 27th October. 

Here we found the lake frozen and remained four days until the ice was 
strong enough to travel upon. 

After three days travelling along shore and across points the lake again 
opened and having brought along two of our canoes and obtained two more from 
Indians, we reached the Hudson's Bay Company's Post at Abitibi on the 6th of 
November. 

On the morning of the 7th the lake was again frozen over and we remained 
at the Fort till the I5th when we set out for Temiscamingue on the ice with 
ten toboggans and one sleigh drawing a canoe. 

Having got away from Abitibi Lake and gone some distance up the Upper 
Abitibi river, we found it again open, so continued journey, canoing, walking on 
ice and in the woods along lake and river shores to within thirty miles of Temis- 
camingue, when all our outfit was abandoned excepting what could be carried 
and we continued the journey on foot, reaching the head of the lake on 24th 
November. 

On morning of the 25th the head of Lake Temiscamingue was frozen over 
so walked to Bale de Pere, 25 miles by road, and on 26th reached Mattawa by 
boat and rail and Toronto on 28th. 

I regret to say that one of our canoes, having got separated from the others 
in a fog on the oth of November on Abitibi lake about midnight, struck a large 
piece of floating ice and went down shortly afterwards. An Indian half-breed 
from Lake Temiscamingue named Toussaint Hunter was drowned and the re- 
mainder of the party, five in number, had a narrow escape. 

Abitibi river, as laid down on the maps, I found very much out in both 
latitude and longitude and it was consequently very misleading and caused con- 
siderable trouble in locating supplies Owing to this, much time was lost and we 
frequently ran short of food. 

The line was well cut out and blazed and carefully measured, wooden posts 
were planted at every mile and iron posts every three miles marked with a cold 
chisel, " Nipissing" on the east, " Algonia " on the west, and the number of miles 
on the south following on in order from 120 to 300. 

Bearing trees w^ere also taken marked " B.T." and their course and distance 
from the posts noted. Stones were put round the posts where they could be 
found but there were very few to be had along the line. 

It is worthy of note that of the 180 posts planted, 174 were tamarac, five of 
the remaining six being cedar and one pitch pine. 

Where the end of a mile came in a lake or river the post was planted on the 
line on the nearest land and the distance noted. In these cases the iron post was 
marked with a plus or minus sign as the case might be. 

Astronomical observations were taken frequently, the details of which will 
be found in the field notes. 



i 



53 



The magnetic variation of the needle was generally about lO"" west often 
very constant for long distances, but in some places, notably near Frederick House 
River, subject to change from west to east at short intervals. 

Although I have stated that the line terminates at 300 miles, the end of a 
six mile block, as a matter of fact it terminates at the south side of a river about 
two chains wide, at 299 miles, 38 chains, 90 links. The last three miles were run 
by my assistant, Mr. Neeland, of the School of Practical Science, (this being his second 
year with me), on the 6th and 7th October, while I had gone to Moose Factory 
to get supplies for the home journey and another canoe for one that was wrecked 
in the Long Sault coming down the Abitibi River in July. The party struck 
this river in the afternoon of the 7th October and having left their canoe at the 
Moose River (not thinking it would be required again) had not time to get it and 
run to the end of the mile on that day, and had they remained over another day 
they would have had nothing to eat, consequently the 300 mile post was planted 
on the south bank of the river at 299 miles, 37 chains, 00 links, and marked " 300 
miles, — 43 chains." The party returned to Moose River that evening and the 
following day to Abitibi River. 

General Description. 

The line throughout its entire length passes through almost one unbroken 
level country or rather an inclined plane falling to the north, but so gradually as to 
be imperceptible to the eye. 

Where streams are crossed the inequalities are simply gulleys, not hills, for 
although you may descend 20, 40, or even 80 feet in crossing them, an ascent on 
the opposite side of the same number of feet will generally bring you to the same 
plane as before, so that if the trees are cut out of the valleys you may look along 
the line for long distances and see no indication of a river intervening. 

For over 100 miles from the point of commencement the line runs through a 
splendid tract of farming land, clay soil, often covered with black muck ; parts 
of it might be called swampy and parts of it muskeg, but taken altogether I do 
not know many places in Ontario where a line can be run for the same distance 
through such an even, uniform good tract of land. 

The best land and best timber is, of course, along the streams where the water 
can get off the land. 

The soil being clay holds the water so that when one goes back from a river 
or creek the land is wet, but this would all be changed were the country cleared 
and the ordinary drains opened incidental to the settlement of a new country. 

From about the 230th mile to the north end of the line the country is more 
swampy and often muskeg; indeed the clay, or what looked like farming land, 
is only in patches and one feels inclined to say that the whole country is worth- 
less. Nevertheless along the banks of streams where the water has a chance to 
get away, as along the banks of the Abitibi and Moose and the i«-lands in those 
rivers, the land and timber is good ; also at Moose Factory (on Moose Island). 
The land where cleared is excellent. 

Undoubtedly, however the country along the line and as far as could be 
seen from the line for 60 miles south of the Moose is of little value, being almost 
altogether muskegs: ponds and sloughs, in many places, covered to a great depth 
with spongy moss ; some places almost treeless and the timber small, scrubby 
spruce, and tamarac, slow of growth and tough as whalebone. Of course there 
are tracts that are ordinary swamp, with fair sized spruce and tamarac timber. 



54 



The country along the 7 miles of line between the Abitibi and the Moose 
and the 4 miles north of the Moose is generally swamp and muskeg, that only 
along 'the banks of the rivers being of any value. 

Timber, 

The timber along the whole line is chiefly spruce, tamarac being next 
in order and poplar where the land is dry, with white birch, balsam and balm of 
gilead. Very little cedar in the country, generally only a fringe along the rivers. 
The spruce is ,i:tenerally from four to five inches in diameter and thick on the 
ground. 

In some places there is considerable scattering white spruce of large size* 
eighteen to thirty inches in diameter, notably along the 170th, 173rd, 174th. and 
175th miles. 

The tamarac is in many places of good size and fit for railway ties. 

I saw no white or red pine from one end of the line to the other. 

Saw a few trees at Abitibi Lake on my way home and there is likely to be 
some along the eastern boundary of Ontario, south of Abitibi Lake to the height 
of land. 

The banks of the Abitibi River throughout its whole length, excepting a 
few burnt places, are well clothed with timber of all kinds natural to the country. 
I saw considerable pitch-pine along the Abitibi River but the line surveyed by me 
passed through very little. 

The poplar timber is generally tall and from six to sixteen inches in diameter 
and sometimes larger. 

Water. 

As will be seen by the plan there are no large lakes along the line. 

I was told there is a lake of considerable size on the Little Abitibi River, 
east of the line, but at the time I crossed this stream on the 212th mile I did not 
know that it was the Little Abitibi and did not have any exploration made to 
the east. 

The Abitibi River is a stream varying in width from five to ten and fifteen 
chains as a general thing, but often wider, and on the fifty miles before entering 
the Moose it is often half to three-quarters of a mile in width. The water is 
muddy and the current strong, often swift, and there are many chutes and rapids, 
some of them miles in length. In high water it is a fine river to go down but it is- 
a difficult matter coming up. The banks are sufficiently high in all places to keep 
the water from flooding the country and in some places rise to 100 and 150 feet. 
As a rule they are clay and sand and occasionally gravel with a few rock 
exposures. 

The line crossed this river at the 179th mile flowing west and at the 288th 
mile flowing east and about fifteen miles from the junction with the Moose, or 
about two miles up stream from a large red stone in the middle of the river known 
as " Red Rock " 

The Moose River was crossed on the 296th mile where it w^as a mile wide, with 
an island 15 chains long with clay soil and large spruce and poplar timber in the 
centre. The banks are about forty feet high and high water mark about thirty 
feet over water level on the 5th October. The current was strong and the water 
shallow and muddy. 



65 



I went down the Abitibi from the line to the Moose and then down the 
Moose to Moose Factory on the 6th of October. The distance is about thirty-five 
miles. The time going was about seven hours and the water so shallow that 
considerable ingenuity was required to keep off' the shoals and stones with a 
Peterborough canoe. The jcrurney up stream took two days. 

Porcupine River crossed the line flowing easterly on the 131st mile. It is 
about Ij chains in width and falls into Night Hawk Lake. 

Frederick House River, as will be seen by the plan, drains Frederick and 
Night Hawk Lakes and falls into the Abitibi River. It comes within 3| chains 
of the line on the 149th mile just below the three falls and crosses the line near the 
end of the 157th mile. It is about four chains in width and has a considerable vol- 
ume of water. 

The Little Abitibi River was crossed on the 212th mile and at the line was 
2| chains in width (perpendicular) and ^three feet deep with fast current. It 
flows northwesterly and falls into the main Abitbi River about twenty-eight 
miles above the line. 

The west branch of French River was crossed four times as follows : 
On the 225th mile, flowing west. 
On the 231st mile, flowing east. 
On the 247th mile, flowing west. 
On the L68th mile, flowing east. 

It was about four chains wide at the last two crossings and six feet deep, 
and joined the main French River about nine miles down stream, whence it flows 
into the Moose about ten miles southwest of Moose Factory. 

There are numerous creeks crossing the line along its whole length, and 
therefore no scarcity of water in the country. 

I may say, however, that it rained at least half the time during June, July* 
August and September, so that between the rain and the water in the swamps 
we were scarcely ever dry. 

Very few exposures of rock occurred on the line. 

A bed of gypsum about 1 1 miles wide was passed over on the 276th and 277th 
miles. The surface of the ground was very uneven and full of deep holes and 
crevices. The water in this formation had a strong sulphur taste ; was so hard 
that soap would not dissolve in it and it made bad tea. 

Saw some lionite at Blacksmith's Rapids, on the Abitibi on my way home, 
but of this Mr. Parks will have something to say. 

We got no fish to speak of diiring the season. The water, as a rule, was too 
muddy for trolling. Saw a couple of white porpoises in the Moose River about 
ten miles above Moose Factory. 

There are no red deer in the country. There were signs of moose and 
caribou on the first 100 miles of the survey, but beyond that none. The 60 
miles south of the Moose seemed to be almost entirely destitute of everything in 
the way of game. A few, and only very few, partridges along the river banks, 
A flock of forty prairie chicken were seen on the 242nd mile in a level, open, grassy 
part of the country. There were very few ducks on the rivers. A few wild 
geese were seen flying about on Moose River, but being hunted so much by 
the Indians it is impossible to get near them. 

Beaver were frequently met with along the line chiefly from the 180th to 
the 230th mile, their ponds often being troublesome to get across. 



56 



The Hudson's Bay Company's post of Moose Factory is said to have been 
established over 200 years ago, and has a population of about 500 when the 
Indians return from their hunting in the Spring, but at the time of my visit 
they were nearly all away, there being only besides the Bishop of Moosonee and 
his family, the Hudson's Bay Company's officers and employees there. 

The post is in charge of Chief Factor W. K. Brougiiton, who has been 30 
years in Canada. 

The Company have quite a number of buildings including a good store, and 
goods can be purchased at very reasonable rates, everything coming in by the 
ship which arrives from England in August, and anchors in the Bay about ten 
miles from the Factory. The goods are then brought to the Factory by smaller 
vessels, 

Chicago pork and Manitoba flour that has been twice across the Atlantic, 
sell there the former at $27.00 per barrel, and the latter at $10.00, 

The Company keep a number of cattle, well-bred animals, and rolling fat* 
They are fed in Winter by hay cut from meadows six or seven miles down stream. 

The cleared land is clay and produces good crops and all kinds of vegetables 
were growing in the Bishop's garden when I was there on the 7th of October. 

The tide water rises at Moose Factory from three to fourteen feet accord- 
ing to the direction of the wind on James' Bay. 

New Post on the Abitibi 130 miles from Moose Factory is a post of the 
Hudson's Bay Company that was established about thirty years ago. Only the 
officer in charge, Mr. Jobson, and two men are kept there. 

Abitibi on Lake Abitibi is an old post, established over 100 years ago. 
Mr. Skine is the officer at present in charge. A clerk and a number of employees 
are kept, and between 3 and 400 Indians are said to be there in Summer. 

Our first snowfall was on the 5th of October, about three inches fell and lay 
on the ground two days. 

Coming up the river, about 18 inches fell on the 25th and 26th of October. 
This thawed away to some extent but we were never again free from snow till 
we reached Temiscamingue where we found very little. 

The line, if produced north of the 300 mile point about twelve miles, would be, 
according to the latitude, due west of Moose Factory, and the distance to the 
Factory probably about twenty miles. 

In conclusion I have only to say that the Hudson's Bay Company's officers 
rendered me every assistance in their power and but for their kindness at Fort 
Abitibi the party would have fared much worse than they did. 

Herewith are full returns of the survey. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient Servant, 

(Signed) A. NIVEN, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Appendix No 127.) 

REPORT 

OF 

THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF 

COLONIZATION ROADS. 



To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands.. 
Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the annual report of roads and bridge 
works, conducted under the superintendence of the Colonization Roads branch of 
your Department in the year 1898, including Mining Roads made and improved 
during the same period. 

One hundred and thirty-five miles opened ; six hundred and seventy miles 
repaired and generally improved ; and four thousand three hundred and seventy- 
four lineal feet of bridging represents the work in connection with Colonization 
Roads; and of Mining Roads thirty-six miles have been constructed and twenty- 
seven miles repaired, with some bridging. The works are as follows : — 



COLONIZATION ROADS. 

NORTH DIVISION. 

Balfour Roads. 

The extension and improvement of the following roads in Balfour namely : 
half a mile opened from the boundary between Balfour and Rayside, from 
concession 1 north ; four miles of roughly opened roads graded from lot 2, 
concession 2 west to lots 4 and 5, thence south one mile, and from the latter 
point west two miles to lots 8 and 9. A mile and a half was also improved of 
the Larch wood Road from lot number 2 westward, between concessions 3 and 4. 

Base Line Road. 

t 

Rather above a mile of very extensive repairs on this road, which is between 
the townships of Korah and Awenge, and the work across the south side of sec- 
tion 36 Korah. 

L57] 



58 



BiDWELL AND GrEEN BAY RoAD. 

A road on Manitoulin Island, graded and ditched from the road allow- 
ance between concessions 2 and 3 of Bidwell, through concessions 3 and 4, and 
westward between concessions 4 and 5 to lot number ] 0, two and a quarter miles. 

Birch Lake Road. 

Two miles and a half well graded and ditched from lots 6 and 7, and centre 
of concession 6 westward to lots 11 and 12 in the township of Hallam. 

Bridge North of Blind River. 

A bridge situated about the centre of lot 1, concession 1, township of Cobden. 

It is a floating bridge 436 feet long and has been renewed as to stringers 
and cross timbers with a considerable quantity of new planking. 

Bruce Mines and Desert Lake Road, 

A road opened to connect with the established Government road in Coffin 
township. It is more than a mile and a half in length, begun between lots 10 
and 11 Plummer and made northward across the boundary of Coffin to the centre 
of lot 10, con. 1, of the latter township. Sixty rods of repairs were also made on 
the old road. 

BuRRis Road. 

From the townline between Carpenter and Burris township two and one- 
eighth miles were opened east between concessions 2 and 3 of the latter township 
for the purpose of developing agricultural interests and assisting the settlers. 

Campbell 6 con. Road. 

Two miles of new road opened from the 25th side road of Campbell west to 
its boundary and across lots 1, 2 and 3 of the township of Mills. 

Carnarvon 25 and 26 Side Line Road. 

This work was opening the side line named through concessions 1 and 2 to 
connect with Mindemoya and West Bay road, and thus giving to settlers a good 
highway to Little Current, their market. 

Carpenter 8 and 9 Road. 

A road opened from the south boundary of Carpenter north between lots 8 
and 9 two miles, thence between concessions 2 and 3, three miles were opened 
east to Burris township uniting with Burris road and described under the latter 
title. 

Clark's Bridge. 

A bridge over Thessalon River in the township of Lefroy which was 
repaired, involving the substitution of a new sixty foot truss, and done at the 
marvelously cheap cost of $149.89. 



59 



Coffin 3 anc 4 con. Road. 

From the point between lots 10 and 11 this road was extended west 240 
rods, thence south 120 rods, thence west 80 rods, thence south 40 rods, and con- 
tinued 180 rods further to the travelled Government road ; and of which, sixty- 
chains were gi-aded and ditched, and thirty chains chopped and grubbed. 

Crozier and Lash Road. 

From its intersection with Woodyatt road to the northeast comer of sec. 1, 
township of Lash, forty-eight chains were graded ; and from thence sixty-two 
chains of ditch made west. There was also 5,800 feet of ditching done espec- 
ially for drainage purposes. 

Crozier Road. 

This road leaves the Crozier and Lash road at the southeast corner of section 
10, Crozier, and was made from thence north one and three-quarter miles. 

Desbarats Road. 

A road opened as follows : — Commencing at a point 225 feet north of Des- 
barats station, in the township of Johnson, and from thence west thirty- six 
chains ; thence south fourteen chains to railway crossing, and thence in a south- 
westerly direction twenty rods to the northwest angle of No. 44 Desbarats location. 

The whole length, nearly a mile, was chopped and graded, and a short road 
opened from the northeast comer of lot 55 of the above location to a proposed 
dock. 

DOBIE 1 AND 2 CON. ROAD. 

From the town line between Dobie and Shenston nearly two miles were 
opened east on the concession line mentioned to the Indian Reserve. 

Dock Repairs. 

At Emo the dock was repaired and extended twenty-five feet into Rainy 
River for the improvement and better accommodation of steamers and navigation 
generally. 

Eade's Mountain Road. 

The repair of two seriously bad hills : one being between lots 25 and 26, 
extending through concessions 7 and 8, the second across lot 5, between conces- 
sions 6 and 7, all in the township of Rowland, and representing a mile and a 
half of grading. ^ 

Echo Bay Road. 

Work was begun at the n.w. corner of section 17, township of Laird, from 
whence half a mile was chopped out north to centres of sections 7 and 8 and 
ditched on one side, making a good winter road. 

Echo Bay station is, however, not yet reached, which the inspector states is 
very desirable in the interests of that district. 



60 



Galbraith 2 and 3 con. Road. 

This work is across lots ^ to 8 inclusive and a continuation of last year's 
operations, about one half the whole two miles being new work, and the balance 
grubbing and grading. 

An off- take drain 44 rods long has been opened which it is said will bring 
into use 2,000 acres of good land heretofore flooded and useless for agricultural 
purposes. 

Grassy River Road. 

General repairs were made over two miles from the s.e. corner of section 1, 
Nelles township north on the town-line between Nelles and Patullo, effecting 
substantial improvements. 

Haughton Road. 

A mile and a quarter opened between lots 10 and 11 through [concessions 4 
and 5 of the township of Wells. 

It was through heavily timbered country, and at the same time rocky,' 
making it a diflBcult section to construct. 

HUGEL AND BADGEROW RoAD. 

Nearly a mile constructed on this line through a heavy swamp. 

HuGEL Road. 

From the line between lots 1 and 2 Hugel, work was continued west about 
half a mile, thence north on the line between lots 2 and 3, through concessions 
1, 2, and 3, ending on concession 4, making a length of three miles and a half of 
largely new work, as the location was but a trail, scarcely passable. 

The road serves a large number of settlers in and about Deer Lake. 

Indian Point Bridge. 

A bridge across the narrows between Lake Wolsey and Bayfield Sound, of 
the Georgian Bay, and stretching between " Indian Point," in the township of 
Gordon, to the nearest opposite shore in the township of Mills on Manitoulin 
Island. 

The total length of the bridge when completed will be 1,720 feet, of which 
over 1,300 feet are now; finished, with almost sufficient timber upon the ground 
for the balance of the bridge. 

The structure is made of cedar timber about 12in. diameter with cross ties 
every 6 feet, and firmly bolted. This crib work has an average height of about 
6 feet, and is filled with stone to within 8 inches of the top, when gravel is used^ 
making a solid, smooth, and permanent roadway. 

The Dominion Government voted $3,000 towards this work, which was spent 
" under direction of this Department. 



61 



Iron Bridge and DeaIj Lake Station Road. 

Some four or five miles of general repairs from the Ferry crossing of Missi- 
ssaga River, in the township of Thompson, to the iron bridge in the township 
of Gladstone. 

The roadway of the bridge mentioned was also renewed, representing about 
7,000ft. B.M. of planking. 

Jack's Bridge. 

A bridge situated at Jack's rapid — s.e. comer of sec. 9 township of Lefroy — 
which has been entirely renewed with a clear bridge span of 50 feet, and with 
approaches making a length of 100 feet. 

The greater part of the work was voluntary labor by the settlers, th.e 
Government giant of $50 being for the purchase of plank and assistance in 
erecting the truss. 

Johnson 6 and 7 con. Road. 

One mile of road was opened on each of the above concessions, and partially 
graded, to give an outlet for settlers on " Hinck's Location." 

Kaministiquia Bridge. 

This work was the renewal in a somewhat temporary manner of 132 feet 
which had been destroyed by freshets ; and replanking 323 feet of the other 
portion, making the bridge fully available for general traffic. 

Keewatin Bridge and Piers. 

In 1896 work in connection with this bridge was begun, but for reasons 
mentioned in my reports of that and the following year, was not completed until 
the present season 

The main structure, which I described two years ago, is satisfactory in all 
respects, and the entire work in connection with bridge, piers and roadway 
has, I believe, met with general approval. 

Killarney and Rutherford Road. 

This was the renewal of work done 15 years ago, through the settled 
portion of the township of Rutherford. The length of the work is 1,560 feet. 

Lee's Road. 

From Spanish River ferry, lot 10, con. 4, Hallam, half a mile was opened to 
connect with work of last year. Another half mile was .opened from con. 1 on 
boundary of Hallam and May These roads are in the centre of a large 
settlement. 

Little Current and Sueguiandah Road. 

The repairs of three very bad hills between Sheguiandah and the 2nd and 
3rd concessions of Rowland, representing a mile and a quarter of excellent work. 



62 



McDonald and Laird Boundary Road. 

This work was commenced at the Government road at n.w. corner, sec. 4, 
Laird, working from thence east three miles ; one-half of which was repairs and 
the balance new work. 

McIntyre Road. ^ 

A road opened from lot B in the township of McIntyre, south easterly to 
lot 19, and between concessions 4 and 5 of Neebing, and from thence eastward 
along the last named concession line, the length opened being three and a half 
miles. 

MlSSISSAGA AND BlIND RiVER RoAD. 

Four miles of general repairs between Blind River village and Mississaga 
River, including repairs of the west branch of the Blind River bridge. 

The road being in many places low and wet, was gravelled over one mile of 
its length, showing good work for the expenditure of $300. 

MuDGE Bay Road. 

Through concessions 6 to 8 of Billings, a mile and a quarter of practically 
new road was opened, as the trail previously used was very bad, and upon a 
wrong location. 

Oliver Township Roads. 

Work in this township consisted chiefly in gravelling through swamps and 
low lands, amounting to six miles. Owing to unfavorable weather only about 
half the appropriation was spent, and a re-vote of the unspent sum has been 
requested. 

Otter Tail Bridge. 

This bridge, 204 feet long, had four new stringers throughout, with a new 
40-foot span, new covering and hand rail. 

Parkinson Road. 

From concession 5 of Gladstone north between lots 4 and 5, to and into con- 
cession 2, Parkinson, three miles were ditched and graded making now an 
excellent road. 

Patton and Dean Lake Station Road. 

Three miles of work between lots 10 and 11, concession 3, Patton north, to 
the southern boundary of sections 5 and 6, Thompson, connecting at the latter 
point with Mississaga River road. 

Pennefather and Vankoughnet Road. 

Through section 36 of the township of Pennefather a mile of road, 50 feet 
wide was opened out, close cut and grubbed gn -rally 20 feet wide. Owing to 
the isolated position, work was done at mure than the usual cost, but the neces- 
sary supply of blankets and other requisites may be used again for this or other 
roads. 



63 



Port Finlay Road. 

Two and a half miles of ditching and repairs between Port Finlay and 
McLennan P.O., with one hundred rods of off-take drain, making now an excel- 
lent road. 

Prince Township Roads. 

Work was done upon several portions of roads in this township, aggregat- 
ing half a mile of new, and two miles of repairs. The whole work is reported as 
very satisfactory. 

Rainy River Road and Bridges. 

Between lot 17, river range, in the township of Woodyatt, to the west side 
of lot 32, in the same township, nearly two miles were improved ; and again, 
from the west of lot 43, river range, in Lash, to and into the Indian Reserve to 
the west, two miles were brushed, grubbed and graded. 

More than a mile was also properly grubbed and graded, in the township of 
Dilke, from lot 31, river range, westward. 

Of bridges, four over Lavelle River were very substantially renewed and 
repaired, representing 340 feet in length. 

Ra\side Roads. 

Four miles of repairs were made in the above named township and a pile 
bridge, 90 feet long constructed, the latter being on the 5th concession on East 
Rayside road. 

Shenston and Dobie Townline Road. 

On this line a mile and a quarter was opened north from the line between 
concessions 1 and 2, and 24 chains graded. 

Spanish River and Kenabutch Road. 

A new portion opened from southwest corner of section 84, Sheddon, across 
section 34 and to centre of section 35, the plSce of the proposed crossing of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Sudbury and Whitefish Road. 

About four miles of repairs from the boundary between Snider and^McKim 
westward. 

St. Joseph Island Roads. 

On the 15 and 16 side line, west of con. I, to F and G line, five-eighths of a mile 
of that chopped out last year, was graded, and on A line a road was opened up 
across lots 51, 52 and part of 53. 

On K line nearly a mile was opened across lots 20, 21, 22 and an 80 rod jog ; 
also half a mile chopped, 50 feet wide, on the 20th side line from " Irwin's " school 
house on concession 1, eastward; and lastly, half a mile of repairs were effected 
on P line across lots 22 and 28, making altogether two and five-eighths miles of 
new road opened and over one mile ol' improvements. 



64 



Tarbutt Mill Road. 

The repair of six miles between McLennan P.O. and Desbarats Station 
Road. 

Victoria and Salter Townline "Road. 

From the railway crossing on the above townline half a mile was graded 
north, and half a mile chopped out through concession 3. 

Again from the southwest angle of section 36 a mile and a half of very bad 
road to section 31 on Massey and Walford road ; also from between sections 37 
and 38 Victoria eastward to lot 20, broken front of Salter, two miles were well 
and properly ditched. 

West Bay and Mindemoya Road. 

A mile and a quarter opened through concessions 2 and 3 of Carnarvon on 
the road allowance between lots 5 and 6, connecting with the Gore Bay and 
Providence Bay road, and upon which latter half a mile of improvements were 
made. 



WEST DIVISION. 

Ah-mic Road. 

A short road for the purpose of letting settlers out to Ah-mic Harbor, and 
is from lot 19, concession 2, Croft, about the lake shore through lot 20, concession 
2, and lot 21, concession 3, towards the harbor. 

Bala Road. 

Repairs from Bala two miles westward in the township of Wood towards 
the Oka Indian Reservation. 

Baysville and Huntsville Road. 

Three miles and a half of improvements from the town line of Chaffey south 
to concession 6, Brunei. The municipality of Brunei spent $100 in continuing 
repairs. 

Bethune and Proudfoot T. L. Road. 

The ditching and grading of three-fourths of a mile across lots 16, 17 and 
18, which was a low, flooded section, requiring an off-take drain 80 rods long^ to 
make and keep it permanently dry. 

Bracebridge Road. 

Between the townships of Draper and Macaulay, from lot 10 and extending 
to lot 26, three and a half miles have been improved and the road put into very 
good condition. 



65 



Cardwell Road. 

A deviation of nearly a mile about a hill for the purpose of making an 
available road for an Icelandic settlement. The work was from lot 61, concessioa 
B of Parry Sound Road survey eastward. 

Carling Township Road. 

The repair of three-quarters of a mile between North West road and Carling 
cheese factory, situate about lot 9, concession 1, township of Carling. 

Chaffey 30 AND 31 Side Line Road. 

This work, which is new, was begun at concession 13 and opened southward 
through concession. 12, and part of concession 11, two hundred and seventy rods 
altogether, most of which was graded, and in which were fifty rods of crosswaying. 

Chapman and Lount Town Line Road. 

This was partly new work and partly repairs — the new being from the town 
line of Strong westward half a mile to connect with last season's work, and the 
repairs a mile and a half of the westerly portion of the town line. 

Dalton and Washago Road. 

Repairs over nearly five miles from lot 1 to lot 18 Dalton, with another mile 
and a half of improvement upon work done last year. 

Dee Bank and Ufford Road. 

Three miles of substantial improvements from Dee Bank road towarda 
Ufford. 

Draper Road. 

Beginning at the town line of Ryde and extending south via McLean's 
corners, five miles have been improved and put into good condition. 

Fox Point Road. 

The opening of a new road in the township of Franklin from lot 10, conces- 
sion 8, angling through lot 11, concession 8 ; lots 12 and 13, concession 7, and 
lots 14 and 15, concession 6. 

The length is three miles, through a sandy district and light timber. 

Franklin and Peninsula Lake Road. 

This road has been opened through lots 26, 27 and 28, concession 12, Frank- 
lin, somewhat over one mile. In addition to the above a mile and a half of 
repairs were made from Portage road to lot 26, and twenty rods were opened on 
the town line between Franklin and Brunei. 

The road is made as a more direct line through the district to Huntsville by 
way of Casselman's Mills from Trading Lake and will be — it is reported — a great 
advantage to both settlers and travellers. 

5 c.L, 



0(3 



Golden Valley Road. 

A continuation of work from that of last season, lot 25, concession 9 Mills, 
two miles toward Loring, the work being of a heavy and permanent character. 

GuRD Road. ' 

The opening of some sixty rods about two very bad hills, almost impas-able 
for teaming purposes. 

HiMswoRTH 15 and 16 Side Line Road. 

A mile of this side line was opened in concessions 9 and 10 to enable settlers 
in the 7th and 8th concessions to reach Powassan, their market. 

HiMSWORTH 5 and 6 SiDE tiNE ROAD. 

A mile and a quarter opened through concessions 7 and 8. 

One hundred rods of grading was also done through a flat portion of the 
same side road in the 10th concession. • 

HiMSWORTH AND ChISHOLM T. L. RoAD. 

» _ ' I 

Three-quarters of a mile of work through a very heavily timbered section. 

HooDSTOWN Bridge. 

The renewal of a bridge destroyed by fire last season. It is 95 feet long 
with main truss of 40 feet, resting upon piers 14 feet high filled with stone. 

Indian Peninsula Roads. 

Improvements were made over the main roads through the various town- 
ships of this North Bruce Peninsula, namely, Albermarle, Eastnor, Lindsay and 
St. Edmunds, and represents 14 to 15 miles of work on the two chief and only 
highways known as East road, and West (or Bury road). 

Joseph River Bridge. 

The re-building of a structure erected many years ago and entirely worn 
out. The present bridge is 359 feet long composed of 14 bents and two piers, 
with the necessary opening for navigation. 

Junction No. 2 Road. 

Two portions of this road were repaired between Rosseau and Maple Lake 
station of the O. A. & P. S. Railway, making a very fair highway between thes6 
points over which a mail is carried daily. 

Kearney Station Road. 

This was the permanent filling in of a low swamp opposite lot 34, con. 10, 
of Perry, the entire length being 900 feet and protected for the most part by a 
hand railing. It is the only road to a railway station for a number of settlers. 



(i7 



Kelly's Swamp Road. 

The improvement of a swamp opposite lots 33 aud 34, between concessions 
4 and 5 of Gurd. 

LoRiMER Lake Road. 

Between the north town line of MoDougall and Lorimer Lake three and a 
half miles were improved, or as far as the appropriation would permit. 

McDougall Road. 

Two miles of repairs continued from last year's work — lot 15, between con- 
cessions 2 and 3 northward — and is of much advantage to settlers. 

MgKellar Centre Road. 

The repair of three miles from concession 2 northward. It is the main 
highway to Edgington and railway station. 

Macaulay Road. 

Over a mile of a rough section from Corset westward was substantially 
improved. 

Machar Road. 

The opening and completion of a mile and a quarter through a heavily tim- 
bered and rough section on the road allowance between lots 5 and 6, from con- 
cession 10 northward to connect with Trout Creek road. 

Maganetawan Bridge. , 

A bridge 133 feet long with main opening of 36 feet. The two main piers 
are 19 feet high, 18 feet x 9 feet filled with atone. It is over Maganetawan 
River near Burk's Falls and is in lieu of that on the Muskoka road which was 
entirely unsafe and has been abandoned. * 

Maganetawan and Ahmic Harbor Road. 

One mile of very heavy work from that of last season to Ahmic Harbor, 
with lighter repairs eastward over several other portions. There was a large 
amount of stone filling, and 22 culverts were put in, besides a good deal of planking. 

Maple Island Bridge. 

The covering and repair of this bridge which is over Maganetawan river, 
on the northern road in Hagerman. The length was 134 feet. 

Mills and Golden Valley Road. 

A mile and a half opened through heavily timbered land with grubbing and 
light grading through concessions 3, * and 5 of Mills township, and angling 



«cS 



through lot 2, con. 3; lot 2, con. 4, and lot 1, con. 5, and thus with last year's 
work forming a connection with Golden Valley road and Northern road on con. 1. 

Mills and Wilson Road. 

This was the chopping out and grading of two and a half miles from Lot 18 
to lot 7, between concessions 2 and 3 of Hardy. A good deal of crosswaying 
was done and a 250 feet log bridge built, making a large amount of work repre- 
sented for the grant. 

Morrison Lake Road. 

Repairs from about lot 30, con. 12, Wood township, extending two miles for 
the benefit of some settlers in a rough section of country. 

MusKOKA Road. 

From South Falls southerly three and a half miles were very substantially 
improved, and in the township of Stephenson four miles from the town line of 
Macaulay northward to concession 8. 

NcpissiNG 6th Concession Road. 

Nearly half a mile was opened through a dense swamp, on or about lot 25, 
and about six miles were repaired from Sharpe's corners in Himsworth north- 
ward towards South East Bay of Lake Nipissing. 

North West Road. 

Bridge repairs costing $67.56. 

Northern Road. 

Between Dunchurch and Maple Island, a mile and a half of a very rough 
portion was much improved. 

Otter Lake Road. 

Nearly two miles of repairs were made commencing at the 6th concession of 
Foley and extending southward, making a passable way to the Parry Sound Road, 

Parry Sound Road. 

About two miles of repairs towards Parry Harbor. The Municipality of 
Foley spent $100 on this same portion with a view to permanent work. 

Peninsula Road. 

Repairs from concession 6, Humphrey southward a mile and a quarter through 
a very rough section, but the only outlet for settlers in the south portion of the 
township. 

Perry 5 and G Side Line Road. 
The opening of a mile and a quarter through concessions 9 and 10. 



Of) 



Perry and Chaffey Road. 

From the ending of last season's work nearly a mile and a quarter was opened 
south from the shore of Fish Lake between lots 25 and 26 of ChafFey to the 
centre of concession 13. It was a rough stony srction requiring nine large cedar 
culverts. 

Rainy Lake Road. 

From con. 11 McMun'ich to con. 4 Ryerson, four miles have been well im- 
proved. Settlers gave labor to the value of $25, and the township of Ryerson 
also spent $25 for the betterment of the road. 

RossEAU River Bridge. 

A new structure 95 feet long with a main opening of 45 feet and two of 18 
feet built over Rosseau River on Parry Sound road in Cardwell township. 

Ryde Centre Road. 

Three miles of repairs as a continuation of last year's work — concession 3 
Ryde — north ^ard. Some deviations were made to avoid rocky portions. 

Ryerson 8 and 9 Con. Road. 

A winter road four and a half miles long was chopped out 'Mi feet wide 
beginning at lot 11 between concessions 8 and 9, thence west on road allowance 
to lot 18, thence angling through lots 18, 19 and 20, concession 9, and 21, 22, 23 
and part of 24, concession 10, thence on road allowance to where road was built 
to lot 33, concession 10, and thence angling through lots 33, 34, and through lot 
74 Nipissing Road survey, township of Spence to cT)nnect with Ahmic Lake 
road, and thus permitting winter traffic between Burk's Falls and Ahmic Harbor. 

Sinclair 15 and 16 Side Line Ruad, 

A mile and a quarter opened on the side line named between concessions 5 
and 8; with slight deviations into lot 15, concession 7, and also on lot 16 in the same 
concession to obtain a proper creek crossing. 

Sinclair and Franklin Road. 

This work was the opening and grading of one mile from lot 7 to lot 12 on 
the town line indicated, and the inspector says it is a valuable piece of road to 
settlers. 

Stisted Road. 

Eighty rods of crosswaying through a muskeg, opposite lots 2 and 3 on the 
12th and 13th concession line of Stisted. 

Strong 30 Side Line Road. 

Repairs from concession 4 to concession 9 of this side line, a length of two 
and a half miles, and reported as exceedingly good work. 



70 



Westphalia Road. 



From Trout Creek eastward two hundred rods were opened requiring 72 
rods of solid stone work over a hill which could not be avoided, and 46 rods of 
cross way ing through a muskeg. ^ 

On the same road between lots 15 and 30 of Gurd, two miles of repairs and 
improvements were effected putting the road into a generally good condition. 



EAST DIVISION. 

Abinger and Miller T. L. Road. 

From lot 30, township of Miller repairs were made northerly on the town 
line two and a half miles, improving, levelling and grading the road bed. 

Addington Road. 
Ten miles of repairs from Kaladar Station of the C. P. R'y. northward. 

Alice 25 and 26 Side Line Road. 

The repair of a mile and a quarter from the road allowance belween conces- 
sions 12 and 13 northward. It was low land requiring raising and gravelling in 
many places. 

Alice 10 Concession Road. 

From lot 16 to lot 24 two miles of repairs. Hills were reduced in grade and 
the road opened to a greater width and improved generally. 

• Anstruther Road. 

Ten miles improved from lot 34 concession 2 to lot 38 concession 13. A 
bridge over Eel's Creek was also renewed. 

Anstruther and Chandos Roads. 

Altogether seven miles of substantial repairs were made in the townships 
stated, namely: — from lot B Chandos Block east to the boundary of Chandos, two 
miles; across lots 1 and 2, concession 3, and concessions 4 and 5, two miles; 
through lots 13, 14 and 15, concession 12, a mile and a half ; and in Anstruther, 
through lots 28 and 29, concession 1, half a mile ; across lots 36 and 37, conces- 
sion 2, half a mile, with some improvements on intervening lines to complete the 
length mentioned. The above are mostly cheese factory routes, the present 
important industry in that locality. 

ASHDAD AND Mt. St. PATRICK ROAD. 

From the Kingston and Pembroke railway station easterly four miles were 
improved, including new culverts, bridging and general widening of the road. 

ASHDAD AND RENFREW ROAD. 

A cheese factory road opened from Ashdad and Springtown road northeast- 
ward a mile and a quarter. 



71 



Bangor 15 and 16 Side Line Road. 

The repair of three sections namely : — from Peterson road north to conces- 
sion 9 three miles, and southward from the same road a mile and a half ; and 
again from concession 9 westward three-quarters of a mile. 

Balsam Rive;r Bridge. 

A bridge in the tow^hip of Fenelon over Balsam river, lot 31, concession 8» 
It spans the Trent Valley Canal and has been renewed at a cost altogether of 
S4,000 to S5,000. Nearly $1,000 of this sum was borne by the municipality, the 
balance having been given by the Dominion Government less the $200 con- 
tributed by this Province. 

Barry Bay Road. 

Repairs from lot 3, concession 9, Fraser westward two and a half miles. 

Barry Bay and Paugh Lake Road. 

The improvement of a rough road or trail two miles long which had been 
opened by settlers, and is from Free Grant, lot 170, Opeongo Road northward 
towards Paugh Lake in the township of Sherwootl. 

Bark Lake and Barry Bay Road. 

Four miles of general repairs from one mile west of Barry Bay westward. 

Bedford Road. 

From lot 15, concession 12, Bedford, repairs were extended westward to 
Desert Lake road — five miles. 

BOBCAYGEON ROAD. 

General improvements over six miles from Kinmount south to what i» 
known locally as Limestone hill. * 

BONFIELD AND BoULTER ROAD. 

This was the opening of a road from the line between concessions 2 and 3 of 
Bonfield into Boulter between lots 30 and 31 and westward to lot 29, two miles, 
of excellent work. 

Bromley 2 and 3 Concession Road. 

A mile and a quarter thoroughly improved. A bridge over Stouge creek 
was also rebuilt. 

BucKHORN Road. 

From Hall's bridge northward twelve miles were improved, and from the 
Monck road northward to the boundary of Dysart eight miles, were also 
repaired. 



Burleigh II^ad. 

Repaii-s from lot 84, concession 1, Anstruther, s-outh through the township 
of Burleigh and into Harvey to within half-a-mile of Burleigh Falls — seventeen 
miles. 

BosKUNG Bridge. 

This bridge has a length of 600 feet over all with a main truss span of 72 
feet and another of 40 feet, the balance being trestle work and permanent filling. 
It is on the Peterson road between Stanhope and Minden. The work is repre- 
sented as in all respects satisfactory. 

Byrne's Line Road. 

This is a mile of road opened as an approach to a bridge built last year over 
Burnt River in the township of Somerville, and is from lot 5 to lot 8 on the line 
named. ' ' ^ 

Calvin Road. 

Somewhat over a mile of substantial improvements made on this road 
between lots 30 and 31 Mattawan. 

Caldwell No. 3 Road. 

Two and a half miles opened from lot 3 concession 3 Kirkpatrick west to 
lot 7, both lots inclusive. An extension of this road southward is desirable the 
inspector says, to develop some fertile lands. 

Cameron Road. 

From Concession B., township of Cameron, between lots 10 and 11, almost a 
mile and a quarter was opened. Two small bridges were built over Bennett's 
<Ureek and half a mile on town line between Papineau and Calvin was constructed 

Carlow Road. 
The repair of six miles from near the north boundary of Carlow southward. 

Cashel Road. 

This road was extended a mile and a half in a northeasterly direction from 
Tudor road at lot 19, concession 8, Cashel. . ] 

The settlers had cut it out as a winter trail, and though now made passable j 
for waggons is not yet a first-class highway. 

Cavandish Roads. 

From lot 14, concession 9, two miles were opened westward to the west side 
of lot 12, and between lots 8 and 9 of concessions 12 to 14, a mile and a quarter 
was constructed. Again on lot 3, concession 18, a deviation of 110 rods was 
made about some steep and heavy hills. 



7;} 



Chan DOS Rdads. 

In the Township of Chandos there wus a mile and a half of construction and 
three and three-quarter miles of improvements as follows : From lot 23, conces- 
sion 4, a deviation of half a mile to avoid a heavy hill about the shore of Loon 
Lake — one mile on the boundary of Chandos and Anstruther ; three-quaaters of 
a mile on lot 22, concession 10 ; half a mile across lots 14 and 15, concession 10 ; 
one mile of repairs on lots 8 and 9, and a mile and a half from lot 8 to lot 14. 

Chemung Lake Road. 

Two miles of work from lot 18, concession 8, Smith, to lot 24. The road is a 
direct line between Lakefield and Chemung Lake and up to the present was not 
passable. The ^''ounty of Peterboro' and township of Smith contributed $50 
each, a sum equal to the government grant. 

Cheddar Road. 

Four miles opened between Chetldar and Wilberforce of the Irondale, 
Bancroft and Ottawa railway, beginning at lot 1 1 , concession 13, Cardiff, and 
ending on lot 38, concession 10, Monmouth. 

Chisholm Roads. 

Four and three-quarter miles were opened in the township of Chisholm on 
the following sections: On the 8 and 9 concession line from centre of lot 12 to 
east side of lot 16, one mile was built to connect with Bonfield road; between 
concessions 7 and 8 a mile and a quarter was opened and graded south between 
lots 10 and 11, and a quarter of a mile graded on the concession line ; half a mile 
was opened from the boundary between Himsworth and Chisholm eastward ; a 
mile and a quarter opened and graded from lot 7, between concessions 12 and 13, 
to comer of lot 10, thence south to corner of lot 1 1 and thence east to Wisawasa 
Creek ; with three-quarters of a mile between lots 19 and 22, on concession 18, 
and a deviation on lot 21, to avoid a bad hill. 

Clarendon Station and Olden Road. 

Improvements from lot 20, concession 7, Olden, extending in a northeasterly 
direction to lot 26, concession 9, four miles. Deviations were made in some cases 
to secure a better road location and the avoidance of natural difficulties. 

Davis Lake Road. 

Repairs were begun at lot 1, concession 3, Lutterworth, and continued to the 
7th concession, four and a half miles. The road serves a large settlement and is 
their only outlet to Kinmount. 

Deer Lake Road. 

Ten miles of substantial improvements in the township of Cardiff, from lot 
1, concession 22, eastward to lot 25, concession 16. It is l^gely a cheese factory 
road and was very much out of repair. 



74 



District Line Road. 

Repairs from lot 11, concession 9, Bromley, northward three miles. 

DUMMER AND StONY LaKE RoaD. 

From lots 30 and 31, concession 10, Dummer, eastward to lot 30, concession 
11, and thence northward about the head of Stony Lake to lot 1, concession 11, 
Burleigh, two miles and a half were repaired ; and on the 9th concession line of 
Dummer from lot 30, southward, four miles and a half were improved. 

DuNNET Road. 

Beginning about the middle of concession 3 this road was opened south 
between lots 6 and 7, to the line of division between concessions 1 and 2, a mile 
and a half. Good land it is said exists to the south and west in the township of 
Appleby, which a production of the road would reach. 

Concession Road. . 

The completion of three-quarters of a mile between the 1st and 2nd quarter 
line of the township of Eldon, beginning between lots 7 and 8. It had been 
chopped out many years ago by settlers who appear never to have been able to- 
finish the work, which was unusually difficult. 

Eldon 10 Concession Road. 

A mile of repairs from lots 5 and 6, concession 10, northward across lots S 
and 7, with a mile and a half of grading from lot 20, concession 5, eastward. A 
mile was also improved from lot 19 to lot 22. 

The municipality granted $100 towards this work. 

EsTis Road. 

From a point on Sharbot Lake and Maberly road, about a mile and a 
quarter east of Sharbot Lake, (lot 14, concession 2, Oso), three miles of gi'ading 
was done. 

Fermoy and Westport Road. 

A very steep hill situate about one mile west of Westport in the township 
of Crosby, composed of limestone rock was reduced in gradient by quarrying and 
filling. About 500 feet was miproved by this method. 

Ferris and Lake Nosbonsing Road. 

Three miles opened from Bonfield and Lake Nosbonsing road northward 
between lots 14 and 15 Ferris as a winter road but requiring grading to make 
it good for all purposes. 

Ferris 8 and 9 Con. Road. 

Three miles of repairs over a very rough section from lot 1 westward. 



Ferris 14 and 15 Con. Road. 

« 
Half a mile of excellent road opened on this line from lot 34. leaving yet 
about a mile to complete from Lake Nipissing to North Bay road. 

Fish Creek Bridge. 

A bridge over the creek named in Bedford on the road between Tichbounae 
and Fermoy 105 feet long with a 16 foot opening. The piers which support the 
superatructure are each 20 feet high, built of cedar. 

The work was intrusted to the municipality and paid after the report of the 
inspector that the work was completed. 

Fraser Road. 

This road is from lot 18 con. 3 in Bagot northward and was repaired over 
about five miles, making necessary off- take drains and improving the same 
generally. 

Galway Roads. 

Five miles of repairs, namely : — from lot 2 con. 14 east to lot 8 a mile and a 
half ; between lots 5 and 6 coo. 13 three-fourths of a mile, and from lot 11 con. 
11 to lot 22, two and a half miles, with some 20 rods of crosswaying and a 30 
foot bridge. 

Galway and Cavendish Road. 

Beginning at lot 40 con. A, Galway and continuing in a southeasterly direc- 
tion to lots 8 and 9 con. 14 Cavendish, twelve miles were generally improved, 
and a mile and a quarter opened on a blind line to connect with this road. 

Galway 4 and 5 Con. Road. 

Two miles were repaired from Bobcaygeon Road eastward, and in addition 
half a mile was opened from lot number 6 eastward and three-quarters of a mile 
on the boundary line which intersects this road eastward, leading to Nogie's 
Creek. 

Gannon's Narrows Road. 

Some years ago the County of Peterboro granted $1000 for a ferry at these 
" Narrows " upon condition, I understand, that the Government would complete 
or at any rate aid in completing the approaches. Grants have this year been 
made, and $100 given to supplement contributions from the County of Peter- 
boro' and township of Harvey, of $50 each, and the total sum spent under 
the management of this Department. 

Glamorgan and Cavendish Road. 

A new road and one, the inspector says, highly prized by the entire White 
Lake settlement. It starts from lot 7 con. 1 Glamorgan and from thence follows 
a westerly course to lot 14 con. 3 a length of three miles, and available for 
general traffic. 



7G 



Grattan 6 AN'D 7 Con. Road. 

Repairs from lot 9 easterly a mile and three-quarters. 

Grattan 10 and 11 Con. RoAp. 

Work across lots 15 to 21 and on what is known as Perrault Settlement 
load A mile and a quarter was improved by raising the road bed and widen- 
ing the road generally. 

Grattan and South Algona Road. 

From the intersection of the west boundary of Grattan with the 20th con- 
cession line a mile and a half was opened southward on the said west boundary 
through a swampy portion which had to be timbered throughout. 

Hagarty 3rd Con. Road. 

Three miles of general improvements from the west boundary of Hagarty 
along the 3rd concession to the Opeongo road. 

Hagarty and South Algona Road. 

The repair of a bridge over Silver Creek (lot 1 con. 16 Brudenell) and 
improvement of a mile from the bridge northward. 

Hagarty and Sherwood Road. 

Repairs from Opeongo road to Wilno station on the O. A. & P. S. railway — 
four miles on the town line named. 

Hastings Road. 

Six miles of repairs from about four miles south of Maynooth northward. 
A deviation 60 rods long was made at Papineau Creek for the general advantage 
of the public. 

Hyde's Chute and Sanson Road. 

This road was repaired between Hyde's Chute on the Madawaska River and 
Opeongo road sixteen miles. 

J one's Falls and Battersea Road. 

From lot 7 con. 8 South Crosby, repairs were made westward to lot 6 con. 9 
about three miles. Many hills were reduced in gradient and a general improve- 
ment effected over the length mentioned. 

Kaladar N. Boundary Road. 

This road is from a point on the Addington road about two and a half miles 
south of Cloyne running westward and on which five miles of work was done. 



Lavant Road. 

Work commencing at lot 2 con. 2 Lavant and extending seven miles to the 
7th concession of Darling. On the Lavant Branch road ten miles were improved 
from near Flower station of the K. and P. railway eastward to lot 9 con. 6, Dar- 
ling. 

LouGHBORo' Lake Road. 

Improvements from lot 6, con. 12 Storrington four miles north-easterly to 
lot 12, con. 12, of the same township, and making a very fair waggon road. 

McClure Township Road. 

Repairs from Lake St. Peter (lot 11, con. 10, McClure township) south-easterly 
to a cheese factory on the Hastings road at Free Grant lots 10 and 11, six 
miles. 

McKiM Township Road. 

Work was begun at lot 12, con. 6, township of Neelon, and continued east 
half a mile. Again from between lots 11 and 12 crossing to lot 9 a mile and a 
half was opened. 

Maple Lake Road. 

A road from the boundary between Stanhope and Guilford (lot 32, con. 4 
Stanhope) to lot 26 in the same concession and the length two miles. 

Mattawa and Temiscamingue Road. 

Four miles and a half repaired north of Mattawa. 

Maria Township Road. 

Through the township two and a half miles were graded and improved, 

Methuen Road. 

Thirteen miles were worked over from between lots 3 and 4, con. 8, Chandos, 
northwesterly to lots 20 and 21, con. 14; thence east to lots 25 and 26, and 
thence northeast to lot 32, con. H. There were also thirteen miles more or less 
improved from lot 24, con. 6, south into Methuen to Oak Lake settlement. 

Mississippi Road. 

Repairs over fifteen miles from Bronson to Hartsmere. 

MoNCK Road. 

Nine miles from the townline of Monmouth and Glamorgan westward, and 
eleven miles from lot 36, con. 2, Digby, to lot 6, con. 10, Laxton, were well 
repaired. Also a bridge over Head River in Dalton was built anew from its 
foundations and is substantial in every respect. 



7H 



MONTEAGLE ROADS. 

On the 7th concession two miles were repaired from lots 6 to 9 inclusive. 
On the 6th concession a mile was improved from Johnson's Corners on Basting's 
Road eastward, and a bridge over Bird's Creek repaired. On the 10th concession 
a mile and a quarter was repaired between lots 10 and 16, and two miles from 
Hybla cheese factory (lot 9) eastward, and on the 14th concession two miles 
were worked upon from lot 26 eastward. 

Mountain Road. 

Repairs from lot 9, con. 12, Sheffield, easterly to the east boundary of the 
township, about five miles. 

Mountain Road (in Miller). 

From a point on the'^Frontenace Road about a mile northwest from Play- 
fairs' Corners repairs were extended northward about three miles, and very sub- 
stantial improvements effected. 

Mountain Lake Road. 

Two miles of what was merely a trial has been opened from lot 3, con. 6 to 
lot, 8 con. 8, of the township of Minden. 

Mount Julien Road. 

This work was from lot 8, con. 6, Burleigh south to Julien's Landing, and 
tjie length, a mile and a quarter. 

Mountain Road (Bromley). 

Repairs from lot 27, con. 7, Bromley, easterly a mile and a half, including 
construction of a new pier for a bridge over Snake Creek and filling the pier 
with stone. 

MuRCHisoN Road. 

Three miles of practically new road to Madawaska station of the O. A, and 
P. S. Railway from the Hastings Road at lot 22, con. 2, Murchison, and making a 
fair waggon road. 

Nogie's Creek Road. 

A bridge over Nogie's Creek ninety-two feet long was entirely renewed, and 
two miles of the road from lot 27, con. 17, Harvey, northward, were substantially 
improved. 

North Algona and Wilberforce Road. 

Beginning at the townline indicated repairs were made southward a mile 
and a half, and eastward on the 18th concession, two miles. 



79 



North Bay and Temiscamingue Road. 

Seven miles substantially repaired from lot 20, con. B, northward, to lot 14, 
<;on. 4, township of Widdifield. 

NoHTH Harvey Road. 

The general improvement of this road from Mississaga east to Burleigh 
Falls, nine miles. 

Gpeongo Road. 

Six miles from Shamrock eastward to the Kingston and Pembroke railway, 
und three miles from Brudenell westward were substantially improved. 

Papineau 8 CON. Road. 

The opening of one mile from concession 10 south between lots 30 and 31 to 
"Connect with concession 8. A mile and a quarter of repairs was also made through 
concessions 10 to 12 between lots 25 to 26. 

Parham and Sharbot Lake Road. 

Repairs from the south side of Sharbot Lake bridge southerly towards 
Parham, a length of six miles. A. deviation was made for the improvement of a 
•certain portion. 

Paquette's Rapids Road. 

Repairs from lot 20, con. 6, Westmeath, westward three miles to Mill Creek 
bridge. 

Peterson Road. 

Twenty miles more or less improved from about 5 miles west of Maynooth 
eastward. y 

Proof Line Road. 

A mile of repairs on the 7th concession of South Algona between lots 15 
.and 16 extending to Silver Lake. 

Rockingham and Palmer Rapids Road. 
Repairs between Palmer Rapids and Peterson road — about seven miles. 

Round Lake Road. 

This road, not yet completed, is from the head of Stony Lake to Havelock, 
and the distance sixteen miles, of which one mile was this year repaired, leaving 
«ome three miles which ought to be improved. 

Sandy Lake Road. 
Seven miles of repairs from half a mile west of Hall's Bridge, westward. 



so 



Sharbot Lake Road. 

This was six and a half miles of work from Sharbot Lake eastward towards 
Maberly, on the east side of the township of Oso. 

Silver Lake Road, ^ 

A work from the old Silver Lake road (lot 14, con. 4, Oso) eastward, opened 
and improved about three miles, forming a fair waggon road. 

Snowdon 10 Side Line Road. 

The opening of two and a half miles between lots 10 and 1 1 to the 6th 
concession of Snowdon — a very satisfactory work. 

South Algona and Killaloe Road. 

From the boundary between Hagarty and South Algona repairs were made 
eastward two miles towards Eganville, and westward three miles to Killaloe. 

South Algona 10 con. Road. 

One mile of road opened between lots 28 and 30, and made passable for 
waggons. 

South Algona 2 and 3 con. Road. 

Three-quarters of a mile opened from between lots 10 and 11 to lot 8, 
through low land, requiring more than ordinary labor upon it. 

• South Algona and Silver Lake Road. 

From lot 25, con. 5, South Algona, one mile was improved etistward, the 
work being chiefly raising a crossway for 50 rods, three feet, to prevent annual 
flooding. 

Springer Road. 

A continuation of work from lot 1, con. 12, northerly, to con. 3, and to lot 
11, township of Field, a length of two and a half miles of general grading. 

Stafford 3rd con. Road. 

The repair of two miles from lot 10 westward — a low swampy portion. 

Stone Dam and Craig Road. 

Five and a half miles of work from lot 5 con. 13, Portland, to lot 2, con. 2. 
Hinchinbrooke, and thence westward on the Frontenac road about two miles north 
of Verona. 

Storrington Road. 

Repairs from lot 22, con. 10, Storrington, westward to Brass' Point, on the 
Welland Canal, three miles. 



81 



Sturgeon River Road. 

This work was from lot 3, eon. 3, Springer, north, to Sturgeon River — seven 
miles. 

The land in this vicinity is of good quality, and largely occupied. 

Sudbury and Wahnapitae Road. 

Fourteen miles of repairs from the boundary between McKim and Neelon, 
northeastward to Wahnapitae Lake, making a generally good road through its 
entire length. 

Swamp (con. 6, Bromley) Road. 

On the 6th concession of Bromley, from the line between lots 9 and 1 ; and 
between lots 9 and 10, con. 5, two miles of work was done, including some bridge 
repairs. 

Temiscamingue Roads. 

For an expenditure of $3,360.56 there has been opened fifteen and a half 
miles, and ten and a quarter miles improved in the townships of Bucke, Harris, 
Hudson, and Casey, in all of which townships settlement is increasing, and from 
the reports received it appears quite certain that within a very few years, with 
better road accommodation, this district will be both populous and prosperous, 
as arable land of excellent quality exists almost without stint. In detail the 
roa'ls upon which money was spent are : — 

Between Dawson's Point and Liskeard about the lake shore, where five 
miles were improved, mostly in the township of Harris ; and in the same town- 
ship two and a half miles were opened from Dawson's Point north between 
lots 3 and 4 ; and again from the lake shore between concessions 3 and 4 a road 
was opened west to the line between lots 4 and 5, thence south through con- 
cession 8, thence west across lots 4 and part of lot 3, three miles, making alto- 
gether five and a half miles of new road and five of repairs in Harris. In the 
township of Casey work was as follows : — Commencing at the Provincial Bound- 
ary between Ontario and Quebec at the line between concessions 2 and 3, thence 
north westerly through lots 10 and 11, concession 1, and 9 and 10, concession 2. 
Wright's Creek was bridged with a substafttial structure 82 feet long, and with 
the earth approaches 135 feet; the spans or openings being two of each 37 and 
35 feet, and the length of road opened one mile and a quarter. 

In the townships of Dymond and Hudson, three and three quarter miles of 
the existing road was ditched and improved to its north boundary, on what is 
known as North Dymond road, and in the same township four miles were 
improved and a new portion four and a half miles long opened on the 3rd and 
4th concession line from the road just mentioned west to, and across a portion of 
lot 5 in the township of Hudson. Two miles were also opened north between 
lots 2 and 3, Hudson, through concessions 4 and 5. There were also four miles 
of new road cut out 20 feet wide in Dymond from centre of concession 5 between 
lots 4 and 5, northwest through lots 4, 3, 2, and thence north between lots 1 and 
2 to north boundary, thence west to the township corner, and thence north 
between Harley and Kerns half a mile, with one mile and a half of the existino- 
road repaired. 

In Bucke township two and a quarter miles were opened along or near the 
lake shore towards Haileybury, and one and a half miles opened from near 
6c.L. 



82 



Haileybury south across Mill Creek, where a bridge was erected, and the road 
continued southwest to the point between concessions 1 and 2, lots 13 and 14, 
and thence west on the concession line a quarter of a mile. 

, Verner and Badgerow Road. ^ 

From lot 7, concession 1, township of Gibbon, south to lot 10, concession 2, 
Badgerow, this road which has been under construction for some years, was this 
season repaired over four and a half miles of its length, and two miles and a half 
cut out in straightening portions of the same. 

Wabis Creek Bridge. 

A bridge in Temiscamingue District, over Wabis creek, in the township of 
Dymond, near the village of Liskeard. The length is 155 feet, with a main clear 
span of 62 feet, and the substructure piles. 

Warren and Hugel Road. 

General improvements over about eight miles from lot 3, concession 1, Rut- 
ter, westward. A bridge 100 feet long over Deer creek was also renewed. 

Wellington Road. 

A general course of repairs from Apsley eastward eleven miles through the 
township of Chandos 

Westport and Mississippi Road. 

Improvements from lot 8, concession 4, North Sherbrooke, to lot 5, in the 
same concession, about two miles through a rough section. 

Widdifield 3rd Concession Road. 

This was work from North Bay and Temiscaminque road, lot 14, Widdifield 
eastward, about two and a half miles, one mile being new and the balance repairs 

Wilberforce and Mud Lake Road. 

A mile and a quarter repaired from Byer's corners, which is about three 
miles west of Eganville westward towards Mud Lake. 

The work was chiefly the reduction of grades upon various hills for the 
general advantage of traffic. 

Wilberforce Five Proof Line Road. 

This work was a mile of construction through concessions 13 to 15, between 

lots 25 and 26. 

Wilberforce Six Proof Line Road. 

Between lots 30 and 31, and through concessions 19 and 20, a mile and a 
quarter of very rough road was substantially improved. 

Wilberforce Twenty-second Concession Road. 
Improvements from Eganville road to District line, a mile and a half. 



83 



WisAWASA Road. 

The repair of three miles from the 14th and 15th concession line of 
Nipissing. The bridge over Wisawasa creek was repaired also. 

MINING ROADS. 

BONHEUR AND SaW BiLL LaKE MiNING RoAD. 

General repairs were made over nineteen miles, consisting chiefly in the re- 
moval of boulders and raising and covering crossways. The expenditure was 
largely required in consequence of continuous rains throughout the season, flood- 
ing the road beyond any usual expectation, making it quite impassable. 

Rainy and Cedar Lake Mining Road. 

This road starts from a small lake near the dam at the foot of Manitou lake, 
and is from thence in a south-westerly direction to Rainy Lake, ending about a 
mile below " Devil's Cascades." The length is six and a half miles ; chopped 30 
feet and grubbed 20 feet wide the entire distance. 

New Klondyke Road. 

Leaving Dyment station of the C. P. Railway, about 15 miles east of 
Wabigoon, this road is in a southerly direction, crossing Little Wabigoon river 
into the New Klondyke mining region. A good road has been made six miles 
through a practically level country timbered chiefly with jack pine, and the soil 
of a sandy character. 

RossLAND Road. 

This grant was for the completion of work done last year, and payment of 
certain outstanding accounts, as stated in my report of 1897. 

Seine Bay and Foley Mine Road. 

A winter road from Seine Bay on Raiyy Lake, at the northwest corner of 
Indian Reserve, 23 B easterly to Shoal Lake, ending a shoit distance west of 
Foley mine. The length is six and three-quarter miles, chopped out and close 
cut 15 feet wide throughout. 

Shoal Lake and Bad Vermillion Road. 

General repairs from Bell City, on Shoal Lake, to the Golden Star mine, a 
length of four miles. It was also opened from the mine mentioned to Little 
Turtle Lake, more than two miles. The road runs past the corner post of mining 
location H. P. 426 and A. L. 132, and thence in a northerly direction almost 
parallel with the eastern boundary of mining location H. P. 204 to Little Turtle 
Lake. 

Sturgeon Falls Road. 

A road starting from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve 23 B 2, near 
Sturgeon Falls, and running in a northeasterly direction to Cedar Lake, a dis- 
tance of three miles, chopped out 30 feet wide and grubbed 22 feet wide. 



84 



Trill ABELL 15 Mining Road. 

The chief expenditure in this instance was through concessions 3 and 4 
Drury, in draining a large marsh which constantly flooded the road Two large 
ditches, each half a mile long, were opened, and the mater^ial used in raising the 
road bed. Light improvements were, however, made into Drury mine from the 
railway. 

Wabigoon Bridge. 

A bridge over Little Wabigoon river, just above the falls, on the New 
Klondyke mining road, about five miles south of Dyment station of the C. P. 
Railway. It is 116 feet long, composed of three cribs, each 15 feet high, with the 
superstructure. 

Wabigoon and .Minnetakie Road. 

Opened from half a mile beyond Jacktish Creek — to which point settlers 
had built a road- to Minnetakie Lake, between Cross and" Flat Rock lakes, and 
ending at or about mining location H. W. 16. The distance from Wabigoon to 
the lake is about 21 miles, and the length now opened as a winter road is 12 
miles. 

Wabigoon and Manitou Dam and Road. 

For the purpose of lowering the waters of Wabigoon and Maniton lakes, 
which a dam recently built had raised above the elevation expected, an enlarge- 
ment of waterway, was made by opening a sluice through the rock six feet wide 
and six feet deep. This appears to have had the effect desired, and it is hoped 
and expected that no further difiiculty will occur in this matter. 



85 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE ON COLONIZATION ROADS AND 
BRIDGES IN THE YEAR 1898." 



Name of Work. 



NoBTH Division. 

Ansonia (balance) Bridge 

Balfour Roads 

Base Line Road 

Bidwell and Green I'ay " 

Birch Lake " 

Bridge repairs W. Aleronia 

Bridge north of Blind River .... 

Bruce Mines and Desert Lake ... Road 

Burris " 

Campbell (6 Con) " 

Carnarvon, 26 and 26 S.L " 

Carpenter'.. " 

Carpenter and Lash (balance) " 

Clarke's Bridge 

Coffin, 3 and 4 Con .Road 

Coffin and Coffin additional (balance) " 

Cook'sDock " 

Crozier and Lash " 

do (balance) " 

Crozier " 

Desbarats " 

Dobie, 2 and 3 Con '* 

Dock repairs Rainy River 

Eads Mountain , Road 

Echo Bay " 

Galbraith, 2 and 3 Con " 

Grassy River " 

Houghton " 

Hugel and Badgerow .'. " 

Hugel " 

Indian Point Bridge 

Inspection 

do (balance) , 

Iron Bridge and Dean Lake Station Road 

Jacks Bridge 

Johnson, 6 and 7 Con Road 

Kaministiquia Bridge 

Keewatin '* and piers 

Keewatin (balance) Bridge 

do do , Piers 

Killarney and Rutherford Road 

Lake Shore (balance) " 

Lees " 

Little Current and Shequiandah " 

McDonald and Laird boundary line " 

Mclntyre " 

Mississaga and Blind River s . " 

Mudge Bay " 

do and Gore Bay (balance) " 

Oliver Township Roads 

do " 

Pttertail Bridge 

Parkinson Road 

Patton and Dean Lake Station " 

Pennef ather and Vankoughnet " 

Port Finlay " 

Prince Township Roads 

do (balance) " 

Rainy River Bridges and road 

do (balance) " •' 



Departmental 
Expenditure. 



99 28 
511 09 
400 12 

298 00 
300 00 
156 37 
150 00 
300 00 
498 76 
255 75 
804 44 

1.758 93 

95 80 

150 00 

299 74 

25 00 
150 37 

1,929 37 
31 79 
603 35 
239 33 
607 89 
315 27 
193 80 

100 00 
297 23 
609 06 
489 76 
428 34 

300 07 
2,850 00 

3.633 48 
400 69 
289 26 

60 OO 

201 46 

498 38 

3,921 60 

108 31 

82 93 

301 13 

101 90 

299 99 
100 00 
399 99 
402 94 

300 00 
392 32 

54 63 

315 67 

36 26 

302 34 
289 25 
399 98 
500 82 
200 20 
200 00 

20 62 

2.634 92 

26 32 



Municipal 
grants. 



3,000 00 



86 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE— Ccmiinued. 



Name of Work. 



North Divmion —Continued. 

Rayside Roada 

do (balance) " 

Sbenston and Dobie T. L Road 

Slate River (balance) " 

Spanish River and Kenabutch " 

Sudbury and Whitefish •' 

Storage of tools (balance) " 

Sudbury and Massey Bay (balance) " 

St. Joseph Island Roads 

do do (balance)l " 

Seine River do Trail 

Tarbutt Mill Road 

Tarentorus and Rankin (balance) " 

Victoria and Salter T. L " 

Vermillion River (balance) Bridge 

Wabigoon (balance) •' 

Wainwright and Eton (balance) Roads 

West Bay and Mindemoya Road 



Less refund on Woodyatt Rd 

do Rat Portage and Whitefish Bay trail . 



West Division. 

Ah-mic , Road 

Bala " 

Baysville and Huntsville " 

Bethune and Proudfoot T.L. " 

Bracebridge " 

Cardwell '• 

Carling Township " 

Chaffey, 30 and 31 S. L " 

Chapman and Lount " 

Dalton and Washago " 

Dee Bank and Ufiford .. " 

Draper " 

Fox Point "■ 

Franklin and Peninsula Lake " 

Golden VaUey.. . " 

Gurd " 

Himsworth, 15 and 16 S. L " 

do 5 and 6 S. L •* 

do and Chisholm T, L , " 

Hcodstown , Bridge 

Indian Peninsula Roads 

Inspection 

do (balance) 

Joseph Hiver Bridge 

Junction, 'No. 2 Road 

Kearney Station " 

Kelly's Swamp " 

Lorimer|Lake " 

McDougall " 

McKellar Centre , " 

Macaulay " 

Macharl " 

Maganetawan Bridge 



.91 
75 



Departmental 
Expenditure. 



500 04 


19 01 


501 62 


73 79 


300 00 


400 00 


5 00 


38 90 


601 29 


69 82 


25 00 


200 00 


4 50 


600 19 


41 79 


17 88 


28 80 


407 30 


34,749 13 


5 66 



34,743 47 



101 17 
409 45 
250 00 
249 81 
305 88 
310 00 
75 50 
307 03 

500 00 

301 41 
400 12 
497 83 
151 90 
604 82 
516 57 

50 12 
209 70 
499 25 

302 56 
445 95 

1,300 67 

1,746 58 

98 15 

868 89 

300 00 

309 82 

60 35 

199 22 

200 00 

501 50 
300 07 
607 81 
279 69 



Municipal 
grants. 



87 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE.— Continued 



Name of work. 


Departmental 
expenditure. 


Municipal 
grants. 


Wkst ViVKios— Continued. 

Maganetawan and Ah-Mic Harbor 

Maple Island 


...Road. 

. .Bridge. 

. Road. 
It 


$ c. 

508 71 

90 00 

300 25 

610 86 

200 00 

663 21 

802 72 

67 56 

163 08 

303 79 

140 00 

75 09 

280 GO 

300 00 
600 05 

25 00 
536 80 

69 29 
400 00 

301 71 
722 06 
311 71 
410 00 
262 00 
503 10 

20 00 

999 44 

49 50 

53 18 

S22,710 93 

395 90 
405 79 
20 00 
403 61 
400 33 
319 24 
306 40 
400 00 

300 00 

281 40 
200 00 
303 68 
311 10 
294 00 

500 22 
20 85 

850 37 

501 44 
305 25 
653 70 
298 00 
994 91 

1 05 
150 37 

301 85 
400 09 
309 11 
200 60 
150 12 
321 96 


$ c. 


Mills and Golden Valley 




Mills and Wilson 




Mf>rrisr>n I/ake 


. . . " 




Muskoka 




Nipiasing, 6 Con ..... '* 




North West " 




Northern 


'• 




Otter Lake * . 


60 00 


Parry Sound " 




i« It 




Peninsula 


. . Bridge. 
. . Road . 
. . BriHge. 




Perry, 5 and 6 S. L 




Perry and Chaflfey 

Rainy Creek 






Rainy Lake 




Ray's Rapids (balance) 




Rosseau River 




Ryde Centre 


...Road. 




Ryerson, 8 and 9 Con 




Sinclair, 15 and 16 S. L 

Sinclair and Franklin 


<> 




Stisted 




Strong, 30 side line " 




Surprise Lake (balance) 


. . Bridge. 
..Road. 




Westphalia 




Whitestone 








East Division. 
Abinsrer and Miller, T. L 


.Road. 








Alice and Wilberforce (balance) *' 






.. " y 




Alice, 10 Con ; " 




Anstruther and Chandos 






Ashdad and Renfrew 






. . Bridge. 
..Road. 




Balsam River 








Barry Bay and Faugh Lake 






(( 




Bedford 




Blackdonald and Mt. St. Patrick (balance) " 




Boycaygeon " 






. " 1 




Bromley, 2 and 3 Con ,, 




Backhorn , 


tt 




Burleigh 


. . Bridge. 




Buskong 

Burnt River (balance) 






. .Road. 

" 1 




Calvin 








Cameron 


i 




Carlow 




Cashel " 1 




Cavendish 


. Roads. i 





88 



SUMMARY OF EXFENBITJJ RE.— Continued. 



Name of work. 



East Divibios— Continued. 

Chandos . . , Roads. 

Chemong Lake Road. 

Cheddar " 

Chisholm Roada. 

Glarendon Station and Olden Road. 

Davis Lake ' 

Deer Lake " 

District Line '* 

Douglas and Clontarf (balance) " 

Dummer and Stony Lake .... " 

Dunnet " 

Eldon, 1 and 2 Con " 

Eldon, 7 Con " 

Eldon, 9 Con. (balance) " 

Eldon, 10 Con " 

Estis " 

Fermoy and Westport " 

Ferris and Lake Nosbonsing " 

Ferns, 14 and 15 Con " 

Ferris, 8 and 9 Con " 

Fish Creek Bridge. 

Fra«ier Road . 

Galway Roads. 

Galway and Cavendish " 

Galway, 4 and 5 Con Road . 

Gannon's Narrows " 

Glamorgan and Cavendish " 

Gratton, 6 and 7 Con ... " 

Gratton, 10 and 11 Con " 

Gratton and S. Algona " 

Hagarty, 3 Con •• 

Hagarty and S. Algona " 

Hagarty and Sherwood T. L •* 

Hastings " 

Howe Island (balance) " 

Hyde's Chute and Sanson " 

Inspection 

" (balance) 

Jones' Falls and Battersea ". . Road . 

(balance) " 

Kaladar, north boundary " 

Lavant " 

Loughboro' Lake .... * 

McClure Township *' 

McKim " " 

Maple Lake : " 

Mattawa and Temiscaming^e " 

Maria Township " 

Methuen *' 

Miss'ssippi " 

Monck '. . . " 

Monteagle Roads. 

Mountain (Miller) Road. 

Mountain (Parham) " 

Mountain Lake " 

Mount Julien *' 

Mountain (Bromley) " 

Murchison " 

Nogie's Creek '■ 

North Algona and Wilberforce " 

North Bay and Temiscaminque " 

North Buckhorn (balance) " 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



302 25 
100 00 
505 03 

1,605 42 
495 08 
200 35 
208 07 
261 80 

47 52 
300 00 
300 00 

23 19 
18U 00 

12 77 
402 00 
322 55 
200 00 
438 84 
330 00 
402 25 
300 00 
259 80 
313 70 
511 00 
310 25 
100 53 
202 65 
300 OC 
313 85 

303 80 

300 00 
245 00 
398 00 
307 19 

15 00 

411 16 

3,154 90 

39 75 
305 99 

20 70 
299 32 
500 CO 
603 07 
402 00 
500 52 
200 05 
200 00 
303 49 
548 49 
404 00 
1,292 79 
602 70 

500 00 

501 65 
200 00 
100 00 
151 22 
396 76 
500 00 
500 00 

301 45 
229 94 



Municipal 
grants. 



S c. 



100 00 



100 00 



100 00 



89 



SUMMARY OF EXPE^DITJIUE.— Concluded. 



Name of work. 



East Division.— Contintud. 

North Harvey Road 

Opeongo. 

Papineau 8 Con " 

Parham and Sharbot Lake. " 

Paquette's Rapids " 

Peterson . " 

Pigeon Creek and Mud Lake " 

Proof Line " 

Rockin$7h»m and Palmei Rapids " 

Round Lake " 

Sandy Lake " 

Sharbot Lake " 

Silver Lake " 

Snowdon 10 Side Line " 

South Algona and Killaloe ** 

South Algona, 10 Con " 

South Algona and Silver Lake " 

South Agona, 2 and 3 " 

Springer " 

Stafford, 3 Con " 

Stone Dam and Craig .....; " 

Storrington * " 

Sturgeon River . .. " 

Sudbury and Wahnapitae " 

Swamp (6 Con. Bromley) '* 

Temiscamingue " 

Verner and Badgerow " 

Veuve K i ver Bridge 

Wabis Creek " " 

Warren and Hugel Road 

Wellington '• 

Wf^stport and Mississippi " 

Widdifield, 3 Con " 

Wilberforforce and Mud Lake " 

Wilberforce, 5 Proof Line " 

Wilberforce, 6 Pr .of Line " 

Wilberf..rce, 22 Con " 

Wisawasa " 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



$ c. 



399 58 


1,018 36 


249 71 


405 82 


670 00 


305 00 


22 50 


102 93 


317 27 


200 00 


198 80 


502 60 


267 12 


299 18 


295 55 


100 00 


300 00 


301 40 


306 21 


803 08 


509 65 


315 00 


602 90 


391 30 


160 00 


3,860 56 


603 63 


45 00 


1,053 13 


200 00 


204 10 


298 78 


254 04 


299 74 


400 07 


219 50 


240 00 


299 32 



49,999 89 



Municipal 
grants. 



$ c. 



90 



RECAPITULATION. 

North Division $ 34,743 47 

West Division ^ 22,710 93 

East Division • ? 49,999 89 



$107,454 29 

MUNICIPAL GRANTS REFERRED TO IN SUMMARY. 

Dominion Government $3,000 00 

Township of Foley 60 03 

County of Peterboro' 100 00 

Township of Harvey 50 00 

Township of Smith '. 50 00 

Township of Eldon 100 00 



$3,360 00 



MINING ROADS, 1898. 



Name of work. 



Bonheur and Saw Bill Lake road 

" " (balance) " 

Crooked River improvements 

•Tackfish Bay (balance) road 

Mininc: trails 



ing 
Kl. 



New Klondyke road 

Kainy and Cedar Lake " 

Rat Port-ige and Rainy River (balance) " 

Rossland " 

Seine Bay and Foley Mine , " 

Shoal Lake and Bad Vermillion " 

Schrieber (balance) bridge 

Sturgeon Kails (Rainy Lake) road 

TriJlabeUe [\ 

Turtle and Shoal Lake (balance) 

Wabigoon bridge 

Wabigoon and Minnetakie road 

Wabigoon and Manitou ( Dryden Dam) and " 

Wabigoon and Manitou (balance) " 



Departmental 
expenditure. 



$ c. 



Total 



3,309 40 


6 60 


44 00 


Ifi 21 


100 00 


729 25 


3,313 63 


67 36 


600 00 


399 31 


999 46 


84 76 


1,003 55 


496 46 


5 25 


517 97 


399 90 


858 34 


245 62 


56 27 


$13,253 23 



HENRY SMITH, 

Superintendent of Colonization Roads. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December 31st, 1898. 



91 



APPENDIX No. 28. 



List of Persons holding Culler's Licenses issued under The Ontario Culler's Act 

up to 31st December, 1898. 




Anderson, M. M , 

Allan, Janoea D 

Appleton, Erwin B 

Albert, Andrew . . , 

Adams, J. Q , 

Anderson, Patrick J , 

Anderson, J. C 

Allan, Alfred , 

Aikins, Geo. M ,,. . , 

Appleby, Ridley , 

Adams, James M , 

Aylward, James , 

Archibald, John L 

Austin, Wm. G 

Anderson, Charles , 

Anderson, John 

Adair, Thomas Albert , 

An<.'ersr>n, J. G 

Alexander, Samuel 

Adams, Wm 

Armstrong, James Theodore. 



Boland, Abraham 

Brown, Singleton 

Barry, Thomas James 

Blanchet,. Paul Frederick . 

Bird, W. S ... 

Bayley, James T 

Bell Henry. 

Beach, Herbert Mahlom 

Barry, Thomas 

Beaty, W. R 

Brooks, Frederick William . . 

Brown, Robert D 

Breed, Arthur G 

Barnes, Thomas George Lee 

Buchanan, Robert 

Beck, Jacob Frederick 

Bird, Joseph Manly 

Boyd, John F 

Brandon, Martin W 

Bell, JohnC .... 

Bartlett, George W 

Brown, Silas 

Boland, W. G 

Baulke, George R 

Bromley, Thomas 

Bremner, John L 

Brumley, W. H 

Bowers, Isaac 

Brown, Thomas 

Bass, Walter R 

Bates, Robert 

Eick, Thomas 

Eurke, John Thomas 

Benson John Bird 

Bronnon, Ricliard Lawrence 
Brown Hugh Ris'de 



Almonte. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebrldge 

Ottawa. 

Longford Mills. 

Campbell ford. 

Graveuhurst. 

Ottawa. 

French River 

Katrine. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Peterborough 

Keewatin 

Renfrew. 

Little Current. 

Cartier. 

Gananoqne. 

Alpena, Mich. 

Arden. 

Westmeath 

McKellar. 

Garner. 

Bracebridge. 

Hastings. 

Ottawa 

Parry Sound. 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Millbridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Mackey's Station. 

Port Sidney. 

Penetanguishene 

Muskoka Mills. 

Coldwater. 

Penetanguish ene. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Thusalnn. 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 

Warren. 

Klock's Mills, 

Eganville. 

Aylir er. Que. 

Pembroke. 

Admaston. 

Pembroke. 

Little Current. 

Barrie. 

West Huntingdon. 

R-^t Portage. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Midland. 

Midland. 

PeterborouBh. 

Huntsville. 



Bryan, Frank 

Bennet, Edward Clinton 
I Blaine, Harvie Thomaa . 

Barrett, Thomas 

Bray, James 

Bissell, George Thomas . 

Baxter, Richard 

Breeaugb, Edward 

Boyd, George A 

Buchan, Frederick 

Barret, Patrick . . . . 

Brundage, Alfred W 

Brougham, Thomas 

Blair, Robert I 

Benson, John W 

Beck, Charles M., Jr ... 

Beatty, W. J 

Burns, C. W., Jr 

Bell, .John Henry 

Bettes, John Hiram 

Brady, John 

Beattie, W. J 

Bromley, William 

Bissell, Hartie 

Brown, Robert 

Beaton, Hugh 

B «iley, Arthur 

Burd, James Henry 

Bailey, Samuel James . , . 

Burton, Tinswood 

Boyes, James 

Brown, JiJhn 

Brennen, Edward Scott. . 
Bell, John Arguey 



Callaghan, Dennis 

Campbell, Alexander J. 

Carson, James 

Campbell, J. M 

Campbell, Robert 

Clairmont, Joseph 

Clarkson, Robert J . . . . 

Carruthers, Aaron 

Calder, Wm. J 

Chew, Joseph 

Cole, James Colin 

Cameron, William 

Cain, Robert 

Crawford, Stephen W. . . 

Cochrane, George 

jCoburn, John 

ItJrowe, Nathaniel 

Cameron, Alexander 

jChrysler, Frank R. L . . 

Carson, Hugh 

Calder, George 

{Callaghan, Dennis 

Corrigan, Elobert T 



Keewatin. 

A.hmic Harbor. 

Orilla. 

Barrie. 

Kinmount. 

Trenton. 

Deseronto. 

Deseronto. 

Thessalon. 

Am prior 

Arnprior. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville, 

Arnprior. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Coldwater. 

South River. 

Burk's Falla. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Westmeath. 

Trenton. 

Star rat. 

Waubauvhene . 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Orillia. 

Renfrew'. 

Huntsville. 

Rockdale. 

Sundridge. 

Klock's Mills. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebripere. 

Campbell ford. 

Parry Sound- 

Hintonburg. 

Burk Lake, 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

Collins' Inlet. 

Midland. 

Thessalon. 

Peterborough, 

Lindsay. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Webbwood. 

Rat Portage. 

Woodville. 

Campbellford. 

Emo. 



92 



APPENDIX No. 28.— Contimued. 




Cameron, John H 

Carson, Mel vin , 

Cameron, John K 

Oassidy, William 

Coons, George Washington . . 

Chisholm, George Leopold 

Chalmers, Geoi^e James 

Oaverly, David Charles 

Campbell, Archibald J 

Close, John L 

Compbell, J»mes R 

Campbell, J ohn A. . 

Caillier, Hyacinth 

Chamberlin, Thomas 

Cooper, David Allan 

Cox, Henry 

Currie, James , 

Clarkson, A. E 

Clairmonr, E , . . , 

Cameron, W. F .'. 

Connolly, Daniel 

Campbell, P C 

Cadenhead. Alexander 

Carpenter R J . 

Christie William Pringle 

Campbell, C. V 

Clegg, Samuel 

Clairmont, William L 

Cabin, Thomas 

Chew, Manle / 

Cooper, James Eddly 

Cook, Reinhardt 

Crowe, Cecil 

Cassidy, S. C 

Cbarleson, John Baptiste .... 

Comer, Billa F 

Carter, George 



Durrill, John W 

Dickson, John 

Danter. R. W 

Doyle.T.J 

Dobie, Alexander R 

Donally, Richard S 

Devine, Wi Ham 

Durrill, William 

Draper, Patrick 

Davis, J. P 

Drum, Patrick 

Durham, Fderar S 

Duquette, Charles 

Davis, William Albert 

Dickson, Robert Alexander 

Dawkins, John 

Doxsee, James B 

Didier, L. P 

Devine, Patrick J 

Dinsmore, Richard 



Ebert, Andrew P 

Ellis, Alexander 

Ellis, John . 

Errington, Joseph 

EdgingtDU, Henry John. 
Eager, James 



Rat Portago. 

Little Current. 

Spanish River. 

Little Current. 

Peterborough. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Peterb r^ ugh. 

Parry Sound. 

Little Current. 

Am prior 

Eganville. 

Galetta 

Arnprior 

Bohcaygeon. 

Millbrook. 

Bellerica, Que. 

Ottawa. 

Midland. 

Gravenhurst. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Gravenhurst. 

Sault S'e. Marie. 

Midland. 

Arnprior. 

Severn Bridge. 

Sault St«. Mario. 

Peterborough. 

Gravenhurst. 

Nnsbonsing. 

Midland. 

Saurin. 

South River. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Dunchurch. 

Ottawa. 

Tweed. 

Sundridge. 

Ottawa. 

Sundridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Eau O^are. 

Blind River. 

Sudbury. 

Cook's Mills. 

Nosbonfing, 

Quyon, Que. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Belleville. 

Rosseau. 

Webbwood. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Keene 

Gravenhurst. 

Gravenhurst. 

Aylmer, Que. 

Sheenbr>ro, Que. 

Huntsviile. 

Pembroke. 
Arnprior. 
Westmeath. 
Sundridge. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 



Forbes, Christopher McKay 

Fitzg-rald, E. Clair 

Farrell, W. H 

French, Lewis Wm 

Fraser, Wm. A 

Fortune, Owen 

Fraser, David 

France, John 

Ferguson, Ernest A 

Ford, Charles 

Eraser, Alexander, Jr 

Fairbaim, William 

Fraser, VVm. A 

Fraser, Foster 

Fraser, William 

Fraser, Hugh Alexander . . . 

Flaherty, John . . 

Fisher, William 

Fox, Thomas 

Fallis, James W 

Fairbairn, N. H 

Freil, John 

Fox, Charles 

Featherstonhaugh, Wm. Henry 

Frair, Schuyler 

Feren, Joel ... 

Fraser, Duncan 

Freeston, Walter 



Green, Norman A 

Green, Samuel E 

Grant, John 

Greene, Arthur 

George, R 

Gardiner, John 

Golden, Frank J 

Gar son, Robert 

Gropp, August 

Grozelle, Antoine D 

Goulais, James . . . . 

Grayson, Charles 

Gladstone, Henry E . . . 
Graham, Kdward G . . . 

Griffin, James 

Uordon, Alexander B.. 

Gareau, Noah J 

Gordon, Robert W 

Guertin, Nelson 

Gardener, John 

Gunter, Peter M 

Glennie, William 

Gorman, Maurice J 

Gillies, John A . . . 

Gadway, John 

Garrow, Edward 

Golding, William 

Gillies, Harry 

Gordon, Herbert C 

Gillespie, M. H 

Griffin, W.lliam 

Ganton, David 

Graham, George L . . . . 
Graham, Frederick S . . 

Gill, Cuthbert 

Grraham, James Robert . 



McLean's Depot. 

Harry Sound. 

Ironside, Que. 

Byine Inlet. 

Mattawa 

Trenton. 

Nofm»n. 

Collins' Inlet. 

Baysville. 

Wahnapi ae. 

Westmeath. 

Oalabogie. 

Pembroke. 

Pembrcike. 

Little Current. 

Pembroke 

Lindsay. 

Tienton. 

Deseronto. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Webbwood. 

Trenton 

Trenton. 

Pen etanguishenft. 

Westmeath. 

Sava-ine. 

Big Forks. 

Bulk's Falls. 

Gilmour. 

Parry Sound. 

Flint ou. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound 

Parry Sound. 

Trenton. 

Thessalon. 

Penetangui-hene. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Peterborough. 

Keewatin. 

Cook's Mills. 

Wahnapi tae. 

Spanish River. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Petawawa. 

Rat Portage. 

Giltnonr. 

Millbridge 

Fenelon Falh. 

Braeside. 

Parry Sound. 

Njpissing Junctioa. 

Dorset. 

White Lake. 

Nelson. 

Cook's Mills. 

Huntsviile. 

Trout Creek. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Orillia. 

Rat Portage. 



93 



APPENDIX No. SO.— Continued. 




Graham, Thomaa Jordan. . 
-Gaudaur, Antoine Daniel. 



Hartt, James 

Hayes, James 

Humphrey, T. W 

Huokson, A. H 

Handley, Robert 

Howe, Alexander 

Hurd, Edwin 

Huff, J. S. Morris 

Hutton, John 

Hutchinson, Wm. E 

Hogarth, Joseph Rowan . 

Humphrey, Juhn 

Hill, Joshua 

Hall, David 

Hartley, Charles 

Hawkins, Henrv Charles. 
Hrne^, Philip Wallace... 
Hudson, John Lewis .... 

Helferty, Dennis 

Hamilton, Robert 

Hcppios, Abiram 

Hoppina, De ismore 

Haystead, Juhn 

Henderson. John Irwin.. 

Hartley, William 

Higgins, John C 

Harrison, John, Jr 

Hawkins, E 

Henderson, Charles 

Halliday, Frank 

Halliday, James 

Hurdman, J. A 

Hawkins, Stonewall J. . , 

Hinchliffe, William 

Hillis, James M 

Hogg. W. J 

IHoxie, E. P 
Hawkins, Walter , 
Howard, James , 
Howard, William 
Hogan, Enos W , 
Home, John T , 
Irv 
L 



rwin, Thomas H. 



Jackson, Robert 

Johnson, Finlay 

Jones, Albert 

Johnson, Thomas 

Johnston, Archibald M. . 

Julien, Charles 

Junkin, Henry 

Johns, Frank 

Jessup, Edward D 

Johnson, Frank N 

Johnston, John 

Johnson, S. M 

Jones, Frederick James. 
Johnston, William A... 

Jervis, Henry 

Jones, William. 



Byng Inlet. 
OriUia. 

Oilmour. 

Enterp'ise. 

Crraveohurst. 

French River. 

Doutflas. 

Queensborougb. 

Hurdville. 

Arnprior. 

Button House. 

Huntsville. 

Pembroke. 

Gravenhurst. 

VlidUnd. 

Lovering. 

Peterborough. 

Blind River., 

Huntsville. 

Oombermere. 

EganvilJe. 

Kat Portage. 

Kingston. 

Kiags:on. 

Parry Sound. 

biobsaygeon. 

Millbridge. 

Peterborough. 

Pembroke. 

Le Breton Flats. 

Bracebridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Springtown. 

Ottawa. 

Meldrum Bay, 

Gunter. 

Sutton West. 

North Bay. 

Katrine. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Baysville. 

Suvanne. 

Fort William. 

Parry Sound. 

Brechin. 
Bracebridge. 
Victoria Harbor. 
Bobcaygeon. 
Norman. 
Trenton. 
Marmora. 

Nipissing Junction. 
Cache Bay. 
Ottawa. 

Peninsula Lake. 
Arnprior. 
Flinton. 
Castleford. 
Wisawasa. 
Fenel'm Fall. 



Kennedy, Rfjbert , 

Kirby, Louis Russell. ... 

Kennedy, Timothy 

Kirk, Henry , 

Knox, Milton .... 

Kinseila, Michael Pierce 

Kitchen, D . 

Kelly, Jeremiah 

Kelly, Ferdinand 

King, Napoleon 

Kean, B. F 

Kemp, Orval Wesley . .. 
Kirk, Charles Barron . . 

Kingsland. W. P 

Kerr, John B 

Kennedy, Walter 

Kennedy, John 

Knox, Wm. M. 

Kearney, Michael John 

Kendrick, John 

Kennedy, John L 



Lee, James 

Lloyd, Alfred 

Lawrie, Frank A....; 

Latimer, Jam»'8 

Lemyre, Mid>ley 

Lutz, Jacob 

Luby, John E 

Lochnan, James 

Lozo John 

Loughrin, Lawrence 

Linton, J. H 

Ludgate, James 

Lee, Robert 

Langford, Mark 

Letherby, Edwin . 

Lovering, William James 

Lane, Maurice 

Lenton, George 

Low, Thiftmas A 

Livingston. Robert M 

Londry, William E. . . . . 

Labelle, James 

Labelle, Eli ... 

Ladurante, J. D 

Ludgate, Theodore 

Lucas, Frank 

Lunam, Duncan 

Lott, George 

Lawrie, John D 

Lovering, George Francis 

Lavignp, John 

Landell, Charles S 

Long, Henry Elisha 

Lynch, W. H 



James, Martin The Flats 

Kerby, John Belleville, 



Malloy, Mark 

Miller, R. O 

Menzies, Archibald 

Manning, James 

Martin, Philip 

M alone, William Patrick. 

Marsh, Esli, Terrill 

Millar, John W 

Mutchenbacker, Asa . . . , 
Morris, George F 



Marmora. 

Ottawa. 

Kntfrprise. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

French River. 

Sudbury. 

Mattawa. 

Mattawa. 

OriUa. 

Trenton. 

Queensborougb. 

Ottawa. 

Arnprior. 

Amprior. 

Pembroke. 

Fenserton. 

Buckingham, Qne. 

Burk's Falls. 

Bark's Kails. 

Warren. 

Severn Bridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Krank's Bay. 

Campbellford. 

Parry Sound. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

Pembroke. 

Parry Sound. 

Peterborough. 

Huntsville. 

Baysville. 

Midland. 

Coldwater. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Peterborough. 

Renfrew. 

Huntsville. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Waltham, Que. 

Waltbam, Que. 

Ottawa. 

Peterborough. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

CoUfield, Que. 

Trenton. 

Parry Sound. 

Coldwater. 

Aylmer, Que. 

Huntsville. 

Mattawa. 

CoUingwood. 

Baysville. 

Gravenhurst. 

Burk's Falls. 

Trenton. 

Stoco. 

Otbawa. 

Trenton. 

Huntsville. 

Rosseau Falls. 

French Bay. 



94 



APPENDIX No. SO.— Continued. 



Name. 



Murray, George, Jr 

Maughan, Joseph 

Margacb. William J 

Murray, George, Sr 

Maniece, William 

Murray, William 

Morgan, Richard J 

Magee, Thomas Arthur . . . 

Murdoch, James 

Mucroe. Peter P 

Mason, Benjamin 

Monaghan, John B 

Monaghan, M. J 

Mulvihili, John 

Moran, Andrew 

Mulvihili, Michael 

Mann, John 

Marrighan, Richard 

Monaghan, John Dorland. 

MathesoD, William 

Monro, Alexander G 

Munro, Philip 

Mangan, Patrick 

Marcil, Peter 

Main, Samuel 

Morley, Charles 

Moore, David Henry 

Murphy, John 

MathesoD, Daniel 

Milne, William 

Mangan, Charles 

Mooney, Lincoln 

. Mangan, John 

Mooney, Thomas 

Mason, Robert T 

Moore, William John 



McPhersoD, James S . . . 
McKinley, Edward C . . 
McClelland, John ... . 
McFarlane, J. W. ... 
Mc I )onald. Roderick . . 
McCorraack, William.. 
Macphereon, John .... 
McEachern, John A . , . 

McLeod, Dugald 

McClelland, R. H 

McEvoy, Frank , 

McDermott, Peter 

Mclllroy, John 

McNab, Robert J 

McFadden, James 

Mcintosh, James G. 

Mclnnis, Hector D 

McKinnon, Malcolm. . . 

McLean, Daniel 

M .Kinn' n, Archie J 

McKay, D. C 

McDunatd, Jamf s 

McPhersoD, Allan 

McDonald, James P 

McFarland, Jt.seph C. ., 

McNabb, Alexander 

MtGillivfjiy, \rchibald 

McGrane, Edward 

McLeod, DoDblfl, Jr.... 
McDcnald, Hector R... 



P. O. Address. 



Waul ausheae. 

Fort William. 

Port Arthur. 

Waubaushene. 

Peterborough. 

Rat Portage. 

Rat Portage. 

Rat Portage. 

Cook's Mills. 

Commanda. 

Westmeath. 

Arnprior. 

Am prior. 

Arnprior. 

Rockingham. 

Arnprior. 

Manitowaning. 

Deseronto. . 

Deseronto. 

Chelmsford. 

Brae side. 

Brae side. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Spanish Station. 

Hunts vjUe. 

Peterborough. 

Arnprior. 

Chelmsford. 

Ethel. 

Burk's Falls. 

OriJlia. 

Arnprior. 

Kingston. 

Roches terville. 

Gravenhurst. 



Rama. 

Toronto, 
larry Sound. 
Cache Bay. 
Pembroke. 
Pembroke. 
Ottawa. 

West Gravenhurst. 
Gravenhurst. 
Parry Sound. 
Caropbellford. 
Orillia. 
Madoc. 
Parry Sound. 
Ottawa. 
Carleton Place. 
Bracebridge. 
Bracebridge. 
Bracebridge. 
Bracebridge. 
BaysviJle. 
Parry Sound. 
LoDb ford. 
Kreniih River. 
Port Severn. 
' hess >lon. 
Port Aithur. 
Lindsay. 
Kt-e- atin. 
Thessalon. 




McDougall, Duncan 

McNabb, Alexander D . . , 

McCormack, John 

McNamara, John 

McGillivray, Duncan D. .. 

Mclntyre, Daniel A 

McNamara, Lewis 

McDonald, Sidney C 

McCool, Christopher L . . . 

McGoUum, l>onald 

McDowell, William 

McConachie, Roy Stewart 

Mc he«, Ronald 

McKay, George Donner. . . 
Mc Williams, Maxwell Theodore 

McLeod, John 

McPherson, George 

McDougall, John D 

McGregor, Duncan 

MoLeap, Peter W 

McManus", John 

McNabb, Alexander 

McFarlane, Alexander 

McFarlane,. J. D 

McFarlane, Duncan 

McKendry, Wm. B 

McPhee, Hugh 

McPhee, John 

McLachiin, Peter 

Mc Lachlin, Alexander 

Mackey, Edward 

McEwen, Henry 

McDonald, Alfred 

McGeary, John J 

McDonala, Archibald W 

McCaw, John Gillen 

McCauley, Barney 

McDougall, .James T 

Mclnenly, Thomas 

McBride, Archibald 

McFarlane, Robert L 

McGown, Wm 

McGowu, Thomas 

McDermet, Patrick 

McKay, Angus 

McDonald, A. J 

Mclnnis, Angus D 

McKendry. Alexander 

McGuire, Timothy 

Mc^Trath, John 

McWillians, John Bannon 

M cCagherty, Patrick 

McKendry, Daniel 

Macdonald, D. F 

McManus, Thomas J 

'Macfarlane, David R 

McColgan. Edward 

McMichael, Charles 

Mcllroy, Thomas Davis 

McMonald, Wm. Henry 

McGaw. William Thomas 

McMillan, L 

M c I 'ermott, John L 

McDonald, Charles M 

McPhee, Benjamin 

McGep, John Edward 

Macfarlane, Mack 

MacCallum, Alexander 



P. O. Address. 



Bracebridge. 

Warren. 

Sudbury. 

Byng Inlet. 

AJgoma Mills. 

Klock's MJls. 

K lock's Mills. 

Mattawa. 

Cartier. 

Arnprior. 

Cache Bay. 

HuntsvilJe. 

Bracf- bridge. 

Dorset. 

Peterborough. 

Keewatin. 

Keewatin. 

Rat Portage. 

Bumstown. 

Sand Point. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Ranfrew. 

Stewarts vi He. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Trenton. 

Peterborough. 

Sundridge. 

Gilmour. 

Queensborough. 

Trenton. 

Klock's MiUs. 

Quebec, Que. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

South River. 

South River. 

Longford. 

(irav en hurst. 

Waubaushene. 

North Bay, 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough, 

Westmeath. 

Arnprior. 

Parry Sound. 

Renfrew. 

( >ttawa. 

Quyou, Que. 

North Seguin. 

Madoc. 

Trenton. 

Callendar. 

Callendar. 

Orillia. 

Pembroke. 

Pembn ke. 

Parry Sound. 

Arnprior. 

Braeside. 



95 



APPENDIX No. SO.— Continued. 




MacCallnm, Albert 
McGoniga', John . . 
McConachie, John. 



Newton, Frank 
Newburn, William 
Nibl- 1 , .tames . , . . 

Niblett, RoVrt 

Neweil, John U. . . 



Overend, George J . . 
O'Brien, Andrew . . . 

O'Connor, John 

Oliver, Darcy 

O'Connor. William . 
O'Neill, James W.. 
O'Donnell, William 
Owecs, Richard . . . 
O'RM'ly. Patri k ... 

O'Neill, Mark 

Orrill, John 



Pattinson. Thomas 

Pomery, Peter 

Perry, Prinfrle K 

Paroell, William G 

Purvis, John 

Porter, James 

Pearson, John James 

Paterson, John 

Paterson, Alexander 

Parke, James 

Paquette, Oliver 

Palmateer, Sherman 

Paget, George 

Pounder, Joseph ... , 

Pell, Richard p 

Perry, Frederick 

Paget, Charles Edward 

Porter, Thomas Robert Mark 



Quinn, William 



Richardson, Frederick George 

Richards, Richard 

Ridde'l, (leorge Alexander... 

Richey, Evan 

Randall, Louis G 

Richardson, Charles Mervyn. 

Rochtster, Dan el Baillie 

Riddell, .lames 

Rice, Asa A 

Roberto, T. A 

Ross, Andiew 

Rose, Donald M 

RawsoD, Charles Edgar 

Ross, George 

Roberts, Percy T 

Ritchie, William D 

Ramsay, Robert 

Ritchie, J. F 

Ritter, Samuel G 

Robinson, William 

Reid, Jr seph B 

Ross, Water M 

Ruttle, H. A 

Richards, Benedict 



Am prior. 
Arnprior. 
Huntaville. 

Gravenhurst 
Parry Sound. 
Arnprior. 
Oi^ceola. 
Parry Harbor. 

Longford Mills. 

Ottawa. 

Hintonburg. 

Wahnapitae. 

Nowbonsing. 

North Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Basin Depot. 

Cartier. 

Renfrew. 

Trenton. 

Brace bridge. 

Trenton. 

Byng Inlet, North. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

Uphill. 

Lindsay. 

Wahnnpitae. 

Orillia. 

Gravenhurst. 

Webbwood . 

Gravenhurst. 

Huntsville. 

Westmeath. 

Arnprior. 

Port Arthur. 

Novar. 

Dorset. 

Peterborough. 

Trenton. 

Tamworth. 

Rochesterville. 

Brentwood. 

French River. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Hull, Que, 

Huntsville. 

Longford Mills. 

Rat Portage. 

Coldwater. 

"•V aubauehene. 

Keewatin. 

Little Current. 

Arnprior. 

Arti prior. 

Ah-Mic Harbor. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Lindsay. 

Ottawa. 

Carleton Place. 

Ottawa. 



Regan, John 

Russell, William 

Ramsay, Chailes 

Rankin, Anthony , 

Ross, Angus 

Robinson, Albert E . 

Robinson, Edward , 

Robinsof, Thr mas G 

Revell, Lionel Oliver 

Regan. Judd Patrick ..., 
Robbin", Etna Rcsedale 
R.'gan, John, jr 



jScanlan, William . . 

I Sutherland, D. H 

Spanner, John 

IShier, James D 

Spooner, W. R 

Simpson, Alfred E. . . . 

Souliere, John B 

Shields, James A 

Spargo, George 

Smyth, W. H .. 

Salmon, R. H 

Salmon, Alexander C. 

Stremer, A 

Shields, Frank A 

Smyth, Job E 

Sage, Nelson 

Shaw, Thomas B 

Swanston. James .... 
Simp-'on William . . . 

Sadler, Thomas 

Smith, Patrick Albert 

Snaitb, William J 

Sinn, Wm. F 

Scrim, Robert 

Sharp, James A 

Shaneay, Harry S . . . . 

Smith, VS^m 

■^tewart, Daniel 

SheehKn, Michael H . . 

Scott, Thomas 

Smith, Lawrence 

Shea, Stewart 

Sullivan, John 

Sinclair, Finlay 

Shiels, Henry F . . 
Smith, Gideon Ousley 
Smith, John Wallis . 

Smith, Henry G 

Story, John A 

Sweezey, Benjamin . . 
Sheppard, Charles H. . 

Sinclair. Armon D 

Smith, Sidney E 

Sleeman, Wm 

Sheehan, Peter F 



Tait, Thomas B 

Taylor, CM 

Thornton, W. D 

Trussler, Gilbert 

Thompson, George S . . . . 
Thomson, Fredeiick A. H 
Thomson, Francis Henry. . 
Tufify, John 



Orillia. 

Pembroke. 

Sudbury. 

Cache Bay. 

Oirviile. 

^'ai-hago. 

Washago 

Washago, 

^v est Gravenhurst. 

Warminster. 

Orilia. 

Or.Uia. 

Enterprise. 

Gravel hurst. 

Huntsville. 

Bracebridge. 

Kstrine. 

Wakefield. 

Ottawa. 

Carleton Place. 

Ottawa. 

Byng Inlet, North. . 

Bayoville. 

Baysville. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

C»ch« Bay. 

Mufkoka Mills. 

Wanbaushene. 

Peterborough . 

Hall's Bridge. 

Lindsay. 

Norman. 

Mattawa. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior, 

Sudbury. 

Cook's Mills. 

Ottawa . 

Braeside. 

Waubaushene. 

Parry Sound. 

West Saginaw, Mich. 

Campbeliford. 

Sault St. Marie. 

Sudbury, 

Cartier. 

Burk's Falls. 

Thedford. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Massey. 

Coldwater. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Rapid River. 

ILoring. 

Burk's Falls. 
Gravenhurst. 
Longford Mills. 
Trout Creek. 
Lindsay. 
Callendar. i 

Nosbonsing. 
Cartier. 



96 



APPENDIX No. ^0.— Concluded. 




Train, A. C 

Turgeon, George 

Thomson, Alexander W 
Taylor, Thomas Gr .... 

Tait, Ralph .' 

Train, William 

Turner, Gavin F 

Tilaon, Joseph 



Udy, Dean 



Rowan Mills. 
Cook's Mills. 
Am prior. 
Gravsnhurst 
Arnprior. 
Burk's Falls. 
North Bay. 
Burk's Falls. 

French River. 

DuflFerin Bridge. 



Vigrass, Percy J 

Vincent, Joseph i Warren, 

Vollin, Samuel 

Vannier, Ne!son Joseph . 
Vincent, James 



Watson, Wm 

Webb, George W . . 

Wilcox, Thomas 

Wheeler, J. A. McL 
Ward, Joseph W . . . 

Wilkinson, Wm 

Waldie, John E . . . 
Wigg, Thamas 6 . . . . 
Wall, Patrick 6 . . . . 

Wells, John R 

Whiteside, John 

Watt, Wm 



Nosbonsing. 
Bobcaygei-n. 
Fess-rton. 

Huntsville. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 
Tamworth, 
Ottawa. 
French River. 
Victoria Harbor. 
Thessalon. 
Cheboygan, Mich. 
Little Current. 
Huntsville. 
Peterborough. 



Wilson, George 

White, Thomas 

Watson, Wm 

Weston, Frank R 

White, James B 

Wilson, James A., jr 

Whaley, Thomas 

Webster, Wm. Alfred 

Wornsdorf, Frederick Gutlep. 

W arrell, Wm 

Wims, Peter 

Wickware, Philip Almont 

Wihon, Edward 

Whelan, P. J , . . 

Whyte, John Thomas Goth.. 

White, Wm. James 

Warrell, George 

Wells, George W 

Wilson, Frederick Gould 

Wallace, John Thomas 



Young, Wm 

Young, A. J 

Young, Samuel . . 
Young, Patrick P 
Yuill, Thomas.... 
Yuill, A. D 



Total 



Lindsay, 

Parry Sound. 

North Bay. 

Midland. 

Manitowaning 

Webbwood. 

Huntsville. 

Bracebridge. 

Pembroke. 

Trout Creek. 

Blessington. 

Cloyne. 

Deseronto. 

McDougall. 

Ottawa. 

Muskoka Falls. 

Powassan. 

Liitle Current. 

Rat Po tage 

Thessalon. 

Severn Bridge. 
Cache Bay. 
Coldwater, 
Young's Point. 
Arnprior. 
Braeside. 

682. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December 31st, 1898. 



REPORT 



I OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF CI\OWN LANDS 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1899. 



PRINTED BY ORDER" OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OFIONTARIO. 




TORONTO: 

WARWICK BROS. & RUTTER, Printers. 
1900. 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Repobt : — 

Crown Lands v. 

Clergy Lands v. 

Common School Lands v. 

Grammar School Lands vi. 

Railway Lands vi. 

University Lands vi. 

Collections and Revenue vi. 

Disbursements .... vi. 

Free Grants vi. 

Colonization Roads vi. 

The Mining Industry vii. 

The Unexplored Crown Domain viii. 

Woods and Forests ix. 

Export of Logs x. 

Timber Sale xii. 

Fire Ranging xiii. 

The Pulp Industry xiii. 

Forest Reserves xiv. 

Departmental Chaitges xv. 

Water Powers xv. 

Public Parks xvi. 

Crown Surveys xvii. 

Municipal Surveys xvii. 

Mining and other Surveys xviii. 



Appendices : — 

No. 1. Return of Officers and Clerks in the Department 2 

2. " Crown Land Agents 4 

.3. " Lands Sold and Leased, and Collections 5 

4. " Gross Revenue 6 

5. '* Receipts considered as Special Funds 7 

6. " Gross Disbursements 8 

7. " Timber and amounts accruing from dues, etc 22 

8. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 24 

9. " Patents issued 24 

10. '* Locations, etc., under Free Grants Act 25 

11. " Letters received 29 

12. " Municipal Surveys ordered 30 

13. " " confirmed 32 

14. " Crown Surveys completed 34 

15. " V' in progress 35 

16. " Surveyors' Report, Ontario-Manitoba Boundary 36 



17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 



Township of McCarthy 39 

" Mackelcan 40 

" Aylmer 41 

Parkin 42 

[iii.] 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



Appendices : — Cmi. 

No. 21. Return of Surreyors' Report, Township ofJHutton 



22. " " " Burk 

23. " " Line connecting Islands in Georgian Bay 

24. " " Township of Southworth 

25. " " " Melgund 

26. " " Base Line in Algonia 

27. " " Base and Meridian Lines. 

28. " K Township of Delamere 

29. " " " Cosby 

30. " *' Re-survey part of Blake 

31. " " Township of Mason 

32. " Superintendent's Report, Rondeau Park 

33. " " Algonquin Park 

34. Report of Superintendent Colonization Roads 

North Division 

West Division 

East Division 

Mining Roads 

Summary of Expenditure , 

Recapitulation 

35. List of Licensed Cullers 



PAGE. 

43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
49 
51 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
57 
61 
61 
66 
70 
79 
81 
85 
87 



1899 I CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. v. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS FOR 

THE YEAR 1899. 

Td^His Honour the Honourable Sir Oliver Mowat, G. C. M. G., Lieutenant- 
Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May It Please Your Honour : 

In compliance with the law, I have the honor to submit for your informa- 
tion and that of the Legislative Assembly, a report on the management of the 
Crown Lands of the Province of Ontario for the year ending 'Ust December, 1899-^ 

CuowN Lands. 

'yiie area of Crown lands sold during the year was 69,279 acres, having a 
total value of S95,949.50. On account of these sales'and those of former years 
there was collected the sum of $87,286.72. Under the provisions of the Mines 
Actfor the leasing of Crown lands for mining purposes, there were leased 63,258 
acres, and the rental received for same and lands already under lease amounted 
to $111,169.32. 

The total collections on account of Crown lands sold and leased were 
$198,456.04. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

A comparison with the receipts from the same source during 1898 will show 
a large increase over that year, amounting to $91,908.57, or about 86 per cent. 
As in 1898, the greater part of the receipts has been on account of lands sold and 
leased for mining purposes. The activity which began to be manifested in min- 
ing matters in Ontario in the year 1896 has by no means spent its force, and the 
result of it has been to materially increase the •revenue derived from the disposal 
of land for mining purposes. With the exception of the year 1897, when the 
receipts were unusually large, the income from mining lands for 1899 was 
greater than for any year since 1890. 

Clergy Lands. 

The area of Clergy lands sold during the year was 803 acres, having a value 
of $731. The amount collected on these and former sales was $3,625.93. See 
Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

Common School Lands. 

The area of Common School lands sold during the^^ear was 173 acres, with 
a value of $740.15. The amount collected on account of these and former sales 
was $9,179.59. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 



THE REPORT OF T&E [ No. 3 



Grammar School Lands. 

There were sold during the year 100 acres of Grammar School lands, having 
a value of $200. The amount collected on account of these and former sales was 
$1,737.90. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

Railway Lands. 

The collections on account of lands sold under the Railway Aid Act, 52 
Victoria, chap. 35, amounted to $78.93. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

University Lands. 

The area of University lands sold and leased was 3,953 acres, equal in value 
to $4,848. On account of these and lands previously sold and leased there was 
collected the sum of $3,619.46. See Appendix No. 3, page 5. 

Collections and Revenue. 

The total collections of the Department on account of all sources of rev- 
enue were $1,315,368.02. See Appendix No. 4, page 6. 

Disbursements. 

The total disbursements of the Department were $314,391.03. In this 
amount are included the following sums: Diamond drill, $1,469.33 ; Mining De- 
velopment, $10,269.60 ; Mining Schools. $9,866.49 ; Mining Roads, $7,463.66 , 
Payments out of Iron Mining Fund, $8,647.19 ; Refunds, $44,546.94. See Ap- 
pendix No. 6, pages 19, 20, 21. 

Free Grants. 

There are 163 townships open for location under the Free Grants and 
Homesteads Act, the same number as in 1898. During the year there have 
been 633 persons located for 85,194 acres of land, and 59 locatees have pur- 
chased 2,379 acres; 291 patents were issued to locatees who had fulfilled the 
conditions of settlement called for by the Act, See Appendix No. 10, page 25. 

Colonization Roads. 

The work done in 1899 was as follows : — Miles of new colonization roads 
made, 108 ; miles of road repaired, 441 ; 3,094 lineal feet of bridging constructed 
representing some twenty structures. There were also built 14 miles of new 
mining roads ; miles repaired, 33. The work done has been carefully inspected, 
and reported to be of a satisfactory and substantial character. The net expen- 
diture was $97,927.75, particulars of which will be found in the report of the 
Superintendent of Colonization Roads, Appendix No. 34, page 61. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 

I 



The Mining Industry. 

The development of the mining industry of the Province continues to go on 
steadily. The largeness of the receipts from the sale and lease of mining lands 
is of itself sufficient to indicate the confidence of miners and capitalists in the 
permanency and profitableness of the mining business in this Province. The 
output of gold during the year 1899 was 27,594 ounces, worth $424,568, an 
advance of 11,333 ounces in weight and S149,490 in value over the yield of 1898, 
notwithstanding that several of the largest mines, mainly for reasons connected 
with future operations, contributed little towards the year's product. Thus, the 
Sultana, with 30 stamps, has crushed very little ore since it passed into the 
hands of an English company last summer, though underground work has been 
actively carried on. The Olive ran its mill for a short time only, operations 
being for the most part suspended during the process of adding 15 stamps to its 
equipment. The Foley and Regina have also been idle for all or most of the 
year, though it is understood that both are likely to resume work in the near 
future. The Hammond Reef 40-stamp mill is also expected to begin work early 
in 1900, and will commence in earnest the exploitation of one of the large dikes 
or bodies of low-grade ore which are characteristic of our western gold fields. 
The Mikado and Golden Star have run steadily throughout the year, the former 
especially giving good results. In Eastern Ontario the mispickel mine at Deloro, 
and the free-milling quartz property of the Cordova Mining CJompany in Bel- 
mont have also been producing bullion on a considerable scale. 

There have been some noteworthy developments in the iron mining business 
during the year. Important discoveries have been made in the Michipicoton 
Mining Division, and preliminary work done on one deposit of brown hematite 
ore at Boyer Lake has shown it to be of great extent and good quality. A 
railway has been built to connect the mine with a shipping point at Little Gros 
Cap on Lake Superior. It is intended, if all the plans at present projected by 
the parties intsrested are carried out, to smelt the ore at Sault Ste. Marie and 
also at Midland, where blast furnaces are being erected, and probably at other 
places. The iron ranges of the Mattawin and Atik-okan rivers are to be further 
explored, and are likely to become the site of producing mines, now that the 
Ontario and Rainy River Railway, in course of construction, will afford the ores 
an outlet. In the County of Hastings, and along the line of the Kingston and 
Pembroke Railway a number of iron mines have been re-opened and are worked 
for the purpose of supplying ore to the blast furnace at Hamilton. 

The production of iron ore during the year amounted to 16,911 tons, and 
the output of pig iron was 64,749 tons, worth $808,157. On account of ore 
raised and smelted in the Province there has been paid out of the Iron Mining 
Fund the sum of $8,647.19. * 

There has also been much activity in the nickel-copper district of Sudbury. 
The Canadian Copper Company had seven smelters going at the close of the 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



year and their output of matte is returned as equal to 5,744,000 lbs. fine nickel' 
worth $526,104, and 5,668,000 lbs. fine copper, worth $176,237, these figures 
being for the unrefined metals in the matte. One or two other concerns have 
acquired mining properties in the district and contemplate the erection of plants 
for the treatment of ores on a considerable scale. 

The condition of the mining industry is very closely related to the prosperity 
and progress of the agricultural community or communities of New Ontario. The 
market for the animal and vegetable products of the farm which is provided by 
the operations of the great lumber companies engaged in cutting and removing 
the pine and other timber from the land, has its counterpart in the demand for 
the same class of supplies to which a successful mining industry gives rise. For 
everything a farmer can grow or raise a mining camp furnishes a ready market, 
usually at good prices. Thus the three great natural industries of Ontario, lum- 
bering, mining and agriculture, may be said to be inter-dependent, or at least the 
two former are linked to the last by strong ties of common interest. This fact 
has an important bearing upon the welfare of the farmers of New Ontario, and 
the circumstance of the arable lands of the newer districts being scattered 
throughout the lumbering and mining districts, instead of occurring in more com- 
pact areas, is not without its compensating advantages, in that it secures to the 
farmer certain and easy access to first-rate markets for his products. 

The Unexplored Crown Domain. 

The vast extent of the Crown domain in this Province is yet largely an un- 
known land, and the great, triangular-shaped tract which has its base on the 
height of land, its apex on James Bay, its western side on the Alban}' River, and 
its eastern side on the boundary between Ontario and Quebec, has as yet been 
little explored. Our knowledge of the character of its soil, the kinds of timber 
prevailing there and their value, the geological formations which constitute or 
underlie the surface, and the existence or non-existence of valuable mineral de- 
posits, the possibility of raising and ripening crops of grain and of breeding cat- 
tle and sheep ; in short, of the whole range of facts upon which the usefulness 
and value of the territory and its capability of supporting a large population de- 
pend, is very limited indeed. Those portions of New Ontario which are contigu- 
ous to the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway have been laid open to the enter- 
prising explorer, who, aided by the network of waterways which nature has 
provided for his accommodation, can operate easily and over large areas of terri- 
tory with the railway as his base of supplies. The search for gold, iron, nickel 
and other minerals has brought to light many facts concerning the natural re- 
sources of Newer Ontario : besides defining in a number of localities the limits 
and belts in which ore bodies of value are more likely to occur, it has thrown 
much light on the agricultural and pastoral capabilities of the areas explored, 
has made known the conditions of the forest growth, revealed the presence of 



1899] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. ix. 

valuable water powers, and in other ways contributed to our stock of informa- 
tion respecting the wild lands of the Province. 

Not less valuable have been the results of the direct explorations made from 
time to time by this Department and the Bureau of Mines under the direction of 
experienced surveyors and competent geologists, whose reports have been pub- 
lished in the annual volumes of the Department and the Bureau. These ex- 
peditions have accumulated a store of facts, considerable in extent and reliable 
in character. They have shown that the resources of New Ontario in soil, min- 
erals, timber, water powers and the other raw materials of civilization are ex- 
tensive and valuable, and while not indicating the existence of an Eldorado are 
yet suflScient to warrant the belief that the northern and western portions of 
Ontario are quite capable of becoming the home of a hardy, thrifty and prosper- 
ous people, many millions in number. 

The climate of northern Ontario is not unlike that of northern Europe, and 
its soil also is equal to that of many thickly peopled portions of the old world 
while extensive spruce and pine forests and large deposits of gold, iron, nickel 
and copper ores are provided by nature to form the basis of large industrial en- 
terprises into whose service many of the water powers which abound there will 
no doubt some day be largely brought. 

The public interest which has been manifested in the newer districts of the 
Province, and the great advantages which would accrue from their early develop- 
mennt and settlement, seem to point to the desirability of adopting some plan of 
systematic exploration by which more certain, detailed and complete information 
may be speedily procured respecting this great heritage, yet to so large an extent 
lying dormant. It would be quite possible to put on foot during the coming 
season a number of parties under the guidance of experienced surveyors who 
would penetrate, not into every corner of so extensive a region, but into most 
parts hitherto unvisited and unknown, and so acquire a fund of information 
which would be representative of the country as a whole. Such a work would 
involve the expenditure of a large sura of money, but there is every reason to 
believe that the results would be commensurate with the expense. 

Woods and Forests. 

The total revenue for Woods and Forests for the year 1899, was Sl,092,81-8.64.. 
Of this $296,752.79 was on account of bonus; $69,713.44 on account of ground 
rent, and $20 on account of transfer fees, leaving the net revenue from timber 
dues $726,362.4-1. See Appendix 4, page 6. 

The gross revenue is larger than that of 1898 by $111,662.19. The receipts 
> from timber dues are less by $30,071.93, but on the ojbher hand there is an 
increase in bonus of $137,054.05, and in ground rent of $4,660.07. 

The legislation requiring sawlogs cut on the Crown domain to be sawn in 
Canada first came into operation on 30th April, 1898 ; consequently the year 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



just closed is the first under the new order of things. It may, therefore, be 
interesting to advert at some length to the general effect of this legislation 
on production and labor. During the winter of 1898-99 a number of American, 
limit-holders who had formerly exported their logs did not operate their limits, 
hoping that the action taken would be relaxed in view of pending negotiations 
between Canada and the United States, or that the courts would declare the 
legislation of last session ultra vires. Owning as they did extensive sawmill 
plants in Michigan, they preferred ceasing operations until their situation 
was determined, and they had either to saw in Canada or seir their limits. As a 
consequence of the cessation of cutting by these firms, it was anticipated that 
the output of last winter would be decreased by perhaps 200 millions of feet 
B. M. and the revenue correspondingly reduced. But the changed circumstances 
in the sawed lumber trade over-ruled the probabilities at the date of my pre- 
decessor's last report. A wave of prosperity swept over both Canada and the 
United States ; the demand for lumber at once expanded, and as there was no 
supply to meet the demand, prices went up enormously. When this became 
apparent, those lumbermen who sawed in Ontario and had their men in th^ 
woods strained every nerve to increase their cut. Americans who sawed in 
Ontario did the same, as did also some few Michigan mill-owners who were 
operating to consume supplies on hand and perhaps hoping against hope that 
they would be able to export. The result of this unlooked-for combination of 
circumstances is, that instead of a falling off of 200 millions, the decrease of the 
cut of 1899 compared with last year is only 45 millions of feet B.M. There was 
an increased output of pine dimension timber, of dimension timber other than 
pine, of square timber and pulpwood, which made up for the decrease in sawlogs. 
and the result is that the revenue from timber dues is only $30,071.93 less than it 
was in 1898. 

There was an increase in 1899 in the receipts from ground rent of S4,160.07, 
while in 1898 there was an increase of $10,886.75 over the receipts of the year 
before. The collections on account of bonus showed an increase over those of 
1898 of $137,054.05, caused by collections on account of the sale held on 20th 
December last. There is an item of new revenue in receipts from " transfer fees." 
Heretofore no charge has been made on the transfer of a timber license from one 
person to another, although considerable labor and responsibility are thrown 
upon the Department in such matters. In order to recoup the Department, a 
regulation was passed on 1st December, 1899, fixing a bonus or fee of $1 per square 
mile on 6,11 limits transferred after that date. 

Export of Logs. 

The export of logs for last summer was estimated last year at from 40 to 50 

millions of feet. The event proved this to have been an over-estimate, for the 

quantity actually exported was only some 29 millions. These logs had been 

aken out previous to the coming in force of the law, and were stuck in the 



1899 ] CROWN LA.NDS DEPARTMENT. xi. 

streams or bush, and there was some cutting on two small areas exempt from the 
legislation. The export of logs cut from Crown lands is now at an end except 
what may be cut on the areas referred to, and thfesc will probably be stripped 
next year. 

It was necessary to take strong precautions to see that the law requiring logs 
to be sawn in Can§,fla wa§ strictly observed, so that everybody might realise that 
the policy adopted by the Legislature was one deliberately adopted and was 
intended to be enforced. Accordingly'', rangers and assistants were placed at the 
mouths of the various rivers from Matchedash river to Sault Ste. Marie under 
the control and supervision of Mr. J. B. Mc Williams, Supervising Ranger for the 
Province, and it is satisfactory to know that no logs went out which should hare 
been sawn in Canada, and that there was a general disposition to observe the 
law. This work entailed considerable expense, but as an object lesson of 
Ontario's intention it has had an excellent effect. 

During the year a suit was entered to test the Province's right to pass the 
legislation referred to. This suit, known as Smylie vs. the Queen, was tried 
before Mr. Justice Street at Osgoode Hall, who found in favor of the Province. 
It has been carried to the Court of Appeal, and may go to the Imperial Privy 
Council before the parties will rest satisfied. 

The strict enforcement of the law, the absence of any relaxation, and the 
verdict in favor of the Province, have forced Americans not owing mills in Canada 
to consider whether they had not better accept the situation instead of remaining 
idle during a period of prosperity in the trade with their investments unpro- 
-ductive. The great demand for and increased price of lumber, with the pro- 
bability of still further advances next season, has helped to thaw the ice of their 
determination until there has been a flood of effort to get out large stocks and 
prepare to saw them in Ontario. The increased cut of this year over last will 
probably reach over 300 millions of feet B.M., the early fall having been favor- 
able for cutting. At the commencement of the hauling season the absence of 
snow was very much felt, but should snow soon come a determined effort will be 
made by the lumbermen to get the entire cut to the mills. As a coiisequenee of 
the increased activity, wages have materially advanced and trade generally 
has been benefitted. The increased cut has necessitated increased sawing capacity. 
Many American mill-owners are building mills on this side. Others have 
purchased old mills long idle and refitted them. Our own* mill-owners are 
extending their capacity and preparing to run night and day, and withal it is 
doubtful if there will be mills suflScient to turn the logs into lumber. Taking 
everything into consideration, it is many years since there was such activity and 
confidence in the lumber trade as now prevails. The la# requiring logs to be 
sawn in Canada has necessitated the expenditure of large sums on building and 
repairing mills, and it is not too much to say that it will cause millions of dollars 
to be expended here in wages, freight, etc., which would otherwise have been 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No 3 



expended in Michigan. It has secured for Canadian labor and Canadian capital 
all the benefits of the expansion which has taken place. 

Timber Sale. 

During last summer rumors reached the Department that forest fires had 
occurred in the townships of Foy, Bowell and Harty. Rangers were instructed 
to proceed to the locality and report. Their reports caused the Department ta 
make an immediate exploration and estimation of the townships for the purpose 
of ascertaining how far the timber had been damaged, the quantity on 
the territory, etc., in order that if necessary to save the value of the timber, a sale 
might be held in time to permit its being cut this winter. The reports showed 
that about fifty per cent, of the timber in the above-named townships had been 
seriously damaged and that it ought to be sold. Advantage was taken of the 
holding of this sale to offer the townships of Norman and Capreol, which were 
being overrun by mining prospectors and for lands in which numerous applica- 
tions had been received. These latter townships were surrounded on all sides by 
territory which had been cut over, and the debris lying on the ground rendered 
the timber liable to be burned the next summer. The pine in the township of 
Lumsden had been disposed of .at the sale of 1892, but the purchasers were sub- 
sequently permitted to surrender it to the Crown on payment of a considerable 
sum of money. This timber was also exposed to serious risk from fire and would 
be placed in still greater danger by the proposed sale, and it was therefore 
decided to again ofler this, township along with the others. A few lots in the 
township of Widdifield, and an area north of Craig were also in a very exposed 
state, and there were a few scattered remnants of berths in Rainy River District 
which were left out when the sale of 1890 was held. It was determined to ofier 
these as well. The whole area sold was 360 square miles, of which 287f square 
miles were in the districts of Nipissing and Algoma, and the remainder in the 
district of Rainy River ; 106 square miles were damaged and had to be sold, and 
254 square miles were so exposed either to fire or trespass, or both, as to make a 
sale necessary and in the public interest. The expectation was that perhaps the 
sale could be postponed until 1900, but when the reports of the wood rangers were 
received it became evident that the berths must be disposed of at once. The latest 
date for holding the sale if the timber was to be cut during the winter of 1899-00^ 
was late in the month of December. The area being only 287 f miles in Old Ontario 
it was considered that two months would be ample notice for all who desired 
to have examinations made. The Rainy River berths were known to be of 
comparatively little value and easily accessible for purposes of exploration, 
and the quantity of the timber was so well known to the Department that any 
berths not bid up to their fair value could be withdrawn. The sale took place on 
the 20th December, and was largely attended. The opinion of those best qualified 
to judge was that the prices obtained were the full value of the timber offered, 
and that the sale was in point of fact the most satisfactory ever held. Three 



1899 1 CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. xui. 

hundred and sixty miles were sold ; 287f miles in Old Ontario realized in bonus 
an average of $2,426 per mile; 71 1 miles of small scattered areas sparsely- 
timbered in Rainy River District averaged $855 per mile. The average of the 
whole sale was $2,010 per mile, which was $725 per mile in advance of the 
averasre realized at the sale of 1897, where the berths were situated in the same 
region. The total amount for which the berths were sold was $723,550, of which 
$190,060 has been paid, leaving $533,490 to be collected during 1900. 

Fire Ranging. 

The number of licensees having rangers on their limits during the year was 
73. There were 190 rangers employed on licensed territory, who cost the Depart- 
ment for wages $17,795.33, and for expenses extinguishing fires $1,666.40 ; and 
the licensees like amounts. There were twelve rangers employed on Crown 
territory in Rainy River and the Temagaming country, which latter region is well 
timbered and is becoming a favorable resort for tourists. The expense amounted 
to $3,173.51, See Appendix No. 6, pages 11 to 17 inclusive. 

The service continues to meet with the approval of all those who are 
acquainted with the valuable work that is being done. There were no serious 
fires on licensed territory where rangers were employed. On territory owned 
by the Crown, fires occurred in the townships already referred to as having 
been sold on the 20th December. The service should be extended on lands of 
the Crown, and efforts put forth to see that rangers are employed on all licensed 
territory. It is not fair that large sums should be expended by lumbermen to 
protect their timber, when this expenditure may be rendered useless by fire 
running over from territory on which the licensee was either too careless or too 
penurious to employ rangers. The fire ranging system has been in existence 
over fourteen years, and in the opinion of the undersigned it has long ago passed 
the experimental stage. Litigation which has arisen between individuals as to 
the payment of rangers and involving their duties and powers makes it expedient 
that the service should be put on a statutory basis so that such doubts may 
be set at rest, and the service itself strengthened and more eflBciently organised. 

The Pulp Industry. 

The growing demand for timber suitable for paper pulp and the great 
benefits derived from the establishment of pulp mills at Sault Ste. Marie and 
Sturgeon Falls, render it expedient that pulpwood should as far- as possible be 
manufactured in the Province. The Sault Ste. Marie Pulp Company has now 
invested $2,000,000 in buildings, plant, etc. Its expenditure during the past 
year for wages has been $300,000, and -700 men have been constantly employed. 
The advantages conferred on the town of Sault Ste M^rie and its neighbor- 
hood by the presence of such a business require no arguments to prove them. 
This giant industry has rendered possible the establishment of other important 
affiliated enterprises which present possibilities of expansion that may yet make 



THE REPORT OF TBE [ No. 3 



Sault Ste Marie one of the important manufacturing points of the continent. 
The Sturgeon Falls Pulp Company has also put up extensive mills and i» 
rapidly increasing its plant. It has expended $600,000 on capital account, has 
employed over 200 hands all the year round, and bids fair to do for Sturgeon 
Falls and the surrounding country what the Sault Ste Marie Company is doing^ 
for that town and its vicinity. 

The pulp and paper industry is likely to become a very important factor 
in developing new Ontario bj- affording plenty of employment and good wages> 
two great desiderata in opening up the back country. The spruce timber in 
the region tributary to lakes Huron, Superior and the Ottawa river is very 
scattered, being only in isolated patches ; but on the slope of the northern 
watershed it is believed to be plentiful and of good quality. As this industry 
developes and pulp timber becomes more valuable, pulp and paper mills will 
either be erected on the Hudson Bay slope or railways will be constructed ta 
bring the timber along with other raw materials to be manufactured in mills 
built and to be built on this side of the height of land. 

Forest Reserves. 

In addition to the Algonquin Park, which combines the object of a national 
public park, where the fauna and flora of the forest may be observed and studied 
with advantage and amidst exquisite surroundings, and that of a reservoir for 
important rivers and streams, other forest reserves have been set apart during 
the past year or are in contemplation. In the eastern part of the Province 
80,000 acres, situated in the Townships of Miller, Barrie and Clarendon, in the 
County of Frontenac, and the Township of Abinger, in the County of Lennox and 
Addington, have been withdrawn from settlement, and are being protected from 
cutting and fire in order that the young pine which abounds there may have 
opportunity to grow and become a valuable asset for the use of succeeding gen- 
erations. My predecessor made a trip through the Temiscaming and Temagaming 
regions during the past summer and was much impressed with the beauty of the 
Temagaming country and the glorious sheets of water which made that region a 
sylvan paradise. He was much struck with the large quantities of pine timber 
on the Crown domain still unlicensed and with the importance of protecting it 
from destruction by fire. It may be necessary and expedient to create a portion 
of the territory, if not all of it, into a forest reserve, so that people may be kept 
from squatting or attempting to settle in a region chiefly valuable for its exten- 
sive areas of pine timber, which, if protected and preserved, will be the most val- 
uable asset the Province has. The beauty of the region, which has no great 
agricultural capabilities, joined with the preservation of the pine, make it desir- 
able that its pristine loveliness should be preserved. A more beautiful park 
region there is not on the continent. 



1899] CROWN LAJNDa DEPARTMENT. xv. • 

Departmental Changes. 

Certain changes have been made in the scope and organization of the Depart- 
ment during the past year. The Colonization Roads branch has been detached 
from the Department of Crown Lands and added to that of Public Works, while 
the management of the Public Parks, recently vested in the Department of the 
Attorney-General, has been restored to that of Crown Lands, to which it origin- 
ally belonged. The work formerly carried on in the Immigration branch has 
been taken over by this Department, and under the title of Colonization will 
henceforth be conducted in connection with the Bureau of Forestry. There 
is no more important end to be aimed at in the public interest than the 
peopling of the unsettled portions of our own Province, and allusion 
has been made to this subject already. If Ontario is to retain her 
place as the foremost province of the Dominion and to continue the 
steady march of progress and development which has hitherto marked her his- 
tory, it is essential that her waste places be settled upon, and her dormant 
resources developed. It will be the aim of this Department to make known the 
advantages of soil, climate and surroundings which the wild lands of the Province 
can offer, and as far as possible to direct the movement of population from the^ 
older portions of the country and continent, and from other lands, to those dis- 
tricts where the best prospects of success are to be found. The regions which 
have been most in favor during the past year are those near Port Arthur, where 
the valleys of the Slate and Whitefish rivers have received a considerable influx 
of settlers, and the banks of the Rainy River, where a prosperous settlement 
h ior some time been taking form. Both these sections will receive the benefit 
of closer connection with the rest of the Province when the Ontario and Rainy 
River Railway, now being built, is completed. Besides these, the fertile lands of 
Lake Temiscaming, the free grant territory of Parry Sound and Nipissing, the 
townships along the main line and the Sault 6te. Marie branch of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, in the neighborhood of the model farm at Dryden, and else- 
where, have attracted a share of the inflow of agricultural settlers. An effort 
will be made to systematize the work of peopling the lands of the Crown by 
concentrating settlement so far as possible in given localities, and thus enabling 
the colonist groups to enjoy the advantages which propinquity and co-operation 
confer in the early stages of settlement. Roads, schools, churches, markets, etc., 
are all more easily and nuickly attained by a closely settled than "by a sparse 
and scattered community. The work of colonization will be pushed with all the 
vigor which its importance demands. 

Water Powers. ^ 

Many applications continue to be received for water powers under the pro- 
visions of the Order in Council dated 21st June, 1898. The object of the Regu- 
lations is to secure bona Jide development of the water powers which are so 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. S 



numerous in northern and western Ontario, and which seem destined to play an 
important part in the industrial future of those portions of the Province. A 
number of these applications have been approved, and several leases have been 
issued or are in course of preparation at the close of the year. One is for a power 
at Steep Rock falls of the Seine river, providing for the development of 500 
horse power within three years from the date of the lease ; another is for a second 
large power lower down on the same river, under which the lessees undertake to 
render available 6,200 horse power within one year, while a third provides for 
the development of a privilege on the Sand Island river to the extent of 1,000 
horse power within two years. It is noteworthy that all the three foregoing 
water privileges are to be utilized in the mining industry, which cannot fail to 
be benefitted by the cheap motive power they will furnish. The rental which 
the Department has stipulated for in the above cases is a nominal one for the 
first year or two until the power is developed, and afterwards at the rate of 
twenty-five cents per horse power per annum. It is quite within the bounds of 
probability that the abundant water power of northern Ontario may in time be 
made to contribute materially to the public revenue, while the conditions under 
which the leases are issued are such as to protect the public interest and prevent 
monopoly, at the same time providing those engaged in mining or other indus- 
tries with the means of producing power at very low cost. 

Public Parks. 

Some at leai>t of the objects which the Legislature had in view in creating the 
Algonquin National Park in the District of Nipissing bid fair to be achieved. The 
protection afforded game and fur-bearing animals has allowed of a very decided 
increase in the number of such animals. In particular, the beaver, at one time 
threatened with extinction, has again become very numerous, while the moose 
a,nd deer are now also plentiful. The benefits accruing to the water supply and 
climate of a considerable part of the Province by the permanent retention of so 
extensive a tract in a wooded state are more intangible, but not less important 
and as time goes on the wisdom of reserving for forest purposes this large area 
of rough land, unattractive from an agriculturist's point of view, will become 
more and more apparent. For further particulars respecting the Park, see 
the Superintendent's report, Appendix No. 33, page 57. 

Rondeau Provincial Park is a much smaller reservation and one of a differ- 
ent character. It is a remnant of the magnificent forest which at one time 
covered the south-western peninsula of Ontario, one of the most varied and 
valuable of the original forests of America. Since the establishment of the Park 
in 1894 a block of 500 acres reserved for ordnance purposes has been purchased 
from the Dominion Government and added to the Park. The Ranger's report 
will be found in Appendix No. 32, page 57. 



899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. xvii. 

Crown Surveys. 

The following surveys of townships have been carried out this year : 
In the District of Algoma the townships of Bowell, Harty and Foy have been 
sub-divided into lots of 320 acre's each. In the District of Nipissing the town- 
ships of Cosby, Cox, Delamere, Hoskin, Mason and Waldie, and in the District of 
Rainy River the townships of Miscampbell, Mutrie, Sifton and Sutherland have 
been sub-divided into lots of 320 acres each. In the District of Thunder Bay 
portions of the townships of Blake and Moss have been re-surveyed. A base line 
has been run in the District of Algoma from the 120th mile, north of the town- 
ship of Lurasden, on the district line between Algoma and Nipissing, near Night 
Hawk Lake. This line has been run due west for 120 miles. Another base line 
has been run from a point near Dalton station, on the Canadian Pacific Railway 
in the District of Algoma, a distance due west of 33 miles ; and a meridian line 
18 miles in length near Michipicoton, in the same district. Several other minor 
surveys have been performed during the year. The returns of the above named 
surveys, so far as they have been received in the Department, have been exam- 
ined and closed. The surveyors' reports will be found in Appendices Nos. 16 to 
31 inclusive, pages 36 to 56 inclusive. See also Appendices 14 and 15, pages 34 
and 35 respectively. 

MuNicii'AL Surveys. 

The Department has during the year, on the petitions respectively of the 
municipalities of the county of Carleton, townships of Richmond, Etobicoke, East 
Gwillimbury, Markham, Douro, McNab and West Gwillimbury, issued instiuc- 
tions for the survey of portion of the boundary line between Gloucester and Os- 
goode ; portion of the road allowance between the seventh and eighth concessions 
of the township of Richmond ; the road betweefl, on, or through lots numbers six- 
teen and seventeen in concessions A, B and C, and concessions one, two, three and 
four, township of Etobicoke ; side-road allowance between lots numbers twenty-five 
and twenty six in the sixth and seventh concessions of the township of East 
Gwillimbury ; portion of the allowance for road between the third and fourth 
concessions of the township of Markham ; portion of the road allowance between 
the third and fourth concessions of the township of Douro ; concession line be- 
tween broken front concessions A and B of the township of McNab ; side-road 
allowance between lots numbers twenty and twenty-one in the thirteenth con- 
cession of the township of West Gwillimbury. 

The following municipal surveys have been confirmed during the year under 

the provisions of R. S. 0. 1897, cap. 181, s. 14, s.-s. 4, such surveys so confirmed 

being final and conclusive as to all parties Lots twenty-eight, twenty -nine 

thirty and thirty-one in the eighth concession of the township of Enniskillen* 

the village lots of the Bailey estate in the town plot of Port Carling ; the line be- 

ween concessions C and D, across lots fourteen, fifteen and sixteen in the town- 
2* c.L. 



xviii. THE REPORT OF THE CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. [ No. 3 

ship of Mariposa ; road allowance between lots numbers three and four in the 
third and fourth concessions of the township of Arthur ; the front of lots numbers 
one, two and three in the first concession west of Muskrat Lake, in the township 
of Eoss, also the concession line between ranges five and six, from lot number six 
to lot number ten, and the concession line between ranges five and six, from lot 
number one to lot number five in the same township ; side line between lots 
numbers eighteen and nineteen in the eleventh and twelfth concessions of the 
township of Arthur, also blind line between the eleventh and twelfth concessions, 
from lot number seventeen to lot number twenty, both inclusive, in the same 
township; side road allowance between lots numbers twenty-five and twenty-six 
in the sixth and seventh concessions of the township of East Gwillimbury. The 
particulars relating to these surveys will be found in Appendix No. 12, page 13. 

Mining and Other Surveys. 

The Mines Act, 1897, with amendments thereto, requires that applicants to 
purchase or lease mining lands in unsurveyed territory shall file a surveyor's 
plans, field notes and descriptions by metes and bounds of their locations in this 
Department before any sale or lease is carried out. Under Orders in Council of 
date 23rd January, 1892, 3rd December, 1892, and 22nd September, 1893, appli- 
cants to purchase islands or locations in the Districts of Thunder Bay or Rainy 
River for agricultural purposes, in unsurveyed territory, are required to file sur- 
veyor's plans, field notes and descriptions by metes and bounds, together with the 
necessary aflBdavits of their locations, which are required to be of the form and 
size, wherever practicable, prescribed by The Mines Act, 1897, and amendments 
thereto. 

Under the above Act and regulations a number of applicants in the Districts 
of Algoma, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River and Thunder Bay have filed 
plans, etc., and an area of 30,307| acres has been sold and patented to them, for' 
which $42,149.50 has been received ; and an area of 52,569 acres has been leased 
at $1 per acre for the first year's rental. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 3l8t December, 1899. 



E. J. DAVIS, 

Commissioner. 



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1899 ] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 3. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Lestsed, Amount of Sales, and Amount of OoUections on 

Sales and Leases for the year 1899. • 



Service. 



Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands.. 
Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

Iniver-sity Lands 

Lea.ses 



Acres sold and 
leased. 



69,279 
8a3 
173 
100 



3,953 
63,258 



137,566 



Amount of sales 
and leases. 



95,949 50 
731 00 
740 15 
200 00 



4,848 00 
62,626 79 



Amount of 

Collections on 

sales and leases. 



165,095 44 



87,286 72 
3,625 93 
9,179 59 
1,737 90 
78 93 
3,619 46 
111,169 32 



216,697 86 



O. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Department of Grown Lands, 

Toronto, 30th December, 1899. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommissioner. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 4. 
Statkmknt of the Revenue of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Service. 

Land Collections. 

Crown Lands 

Clergy Lands 

Common-School Lands 

Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands , 

University Lands 

Rents , 

Woods and Forests. 

Timber Dues 

Ground Rent 

Bonus .... 

Transfer fees 

Mining Licenses 

Casual fees 

Cullers' fees 

Assay fees 

Algonquin Park 

Expendit/ure Refunds. 

Inspections 

Agents' Salaries 



$• c. 



87,286 72 
3,625 93 
9,179 59 
1,737 90 
78 93 
3,619 46 
111,169 32 

726,362 41 

69,713 44 

296,752 79 

20 00 



a c. 



4,154 00 

541 38 

24 00 

1,066 40 

6 25 



7 GO 
22 50 



216,697 85 



1,092,848 64 



5,792 03 



29 50 



1,315,368 02 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Dbpartmbnt of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 30th December, 1899. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommissioner. 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 5. 

Statement of the Receipts of the Department of Crown Lands which are considered 

as Special Funds. 



Service. 



Clergy Lands. 

Principal 

Interest t 

Commmi School Lands. 

Principal 

Interest 

Qrammar School Lands. 

Principal 

Interest 

Railway Lands. 

Principal 

Interest , 

University Lands. 

Principal 

Interest , 



9 c. 


t c. 


2,522 84 




1,10.3 09 


3,625 9a 


3,338 33 




5,841 26 


9,179 59 


803 98 




933 92 


1,737 90 




49 76 




29 18 


78 93 


3,593 36 




26 10 


3,619 4« 




. 


18,241 81 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Department op Orown Lands, 

Toronto. 30th December, 1899. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPBNDIX No. 6. 

Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands 
for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Agents' Salaries. 

Lartd. 

Annis, A. E 

Armstrong, J 

Best, S. G 

Brodie, D. M •....;... 

Chapman, E. A 

Campbell, VVni : 

Cockburn, J. D 

Eastland, T. G 

Ellis. Jas 

Hamilton, Geo 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm 

Hollands, C. J 

Kirk, Wm 

Macpherson, J 

Macdonald, D. G , 

Nichols, VVm 

Reeves, James 

Ruttan. J. F " 

Ryan, T. J 

Scarlett, J. S 

Stephenson, Wm 

Stewart, C. R 

Stewart, James ' 

Tait, J. R 

Turner. Wm 

Whelan, Jno 

Wood, A. W 



Campbell, P. C; 

Garrow, E 

Halliday, Frank . . 
Londry, L . . . . . 
Margach, Wm. . . . 

Munro, H 

Mc Williams, J. B. 
Russell, Wm 



Timber. 



Carried fortoard 



$ c. 



200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
391 12 
300 00 
200 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
350 00 
300 00 
500 00 
250 00 
125 00 
300 00 
300 00 
250 00 
400 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
100 00 



9,416 12 



1,600 00 




1,400 00 




1,600 00 




100 00 




1,600 00 




1,200 00 




2,500 00 




1,600 00 






11,600 00 



21,016 12 



1899] 



CrtOWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. %.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Brought fcn-voard 

AoENTs' Disbursements. 



Annis, A. E. ... 
Armstrong. Jno. 

Best. S. G 

Brodie, D. M . . . 
Chapman, E. A . , 
Campbell, VVm . , 
Cock burn. J. D. . 

Ellis, Jas 

Hamilton, Geo. . . 

Handy, E 

Hartle, Wm 

Kirk, Wm 

Nichols, Wm. L . 

Ruttiin, J . F 

Ryan, T. J 

Stephenson, Wm 
Stewart, C. R . . . 
Stewart, James . . 
Whelan, Jno . . . . 
Wood, A. W . . . . 



Land. 



Timber 



Campbell, P. C . 



Garrow, E 

Halliday, Frank 
Margach, Wm . . 



(1898, $297.17.) 



Mc Williams, J. B 
Russell, Wm .... 



(1898, $666.77.) 



Miscellaiieous. 



Andrew, Thos. , Inspection 

Ames, D., care of Islands in Loboro' Lakes 

Bilton, G., care of Islands in Mud and Loon Lakes . . 

Danis, S., care of Leonard Islands 

Gibson, Hon. J.M., White, Aubrey, and Southworth, 

Thos., travelling expenses 

Jones, C. S., do >" 

Ross, D. G., do 

Taylor, T.C., do ...........'..'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. 

White, Aubrey, do 

Yeigh. F., do '.'.W' 



Carried forward 



$ c 



8 07 
17 10 

7 81 
55 

17 55 
11 46 
11 62 

5 00 
2 36 

6 65 

6 72 
13 02 
11 49 
58 20 
17 75 
22 25 

8 13 

7 50 
7 06 

13 95 



864 49 

130 31 

161 25 

2,292 01 

760 87 
149 52 



10 45 
20 00 
25 00 
20 00 

275 80 
85 85 
44 62 

22 80 

23 85 
14 80 



5« c. 



21,016 12 



254 84 



4,358 45 



543 17 



26,172 58 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. e.-^Cantinued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1899 



Name. 



Broright forward 



Crown Timber Office, Ottawa. 



Darby, E. J., agent. 
Larose, S. C, clerk. 



Rainboth, E. J., surveyor 
Bent 



Disbursements 

Crown Timber Office, Quebec. 



Nicholson, B., agent 

Harney, Thos., caretaker and messenger. 



Rent 

Disbursements. 



WOODRANGING AND INSPECTION OF TiMBER LaNDS. 



Allison, G. S 

Rowland, A 

Belding, A. W., jr 

Belding, W. A., funeral expenses of his son 

Bremner, J. L 

Brady, Jno 

Christie, W. P 

Charlton, W. A., jr 

Chew, Geo 

Craig, Norman 

Dunkly. Jos 

Eraser, Duncan 

Henderson, Charles , 

Halliday, James , 

Jarvis, H , 

Johnson, S. M 

Kennedy, John 

Lewis, CliflFord 

Lloyd, E. B , 

Malone W. P 

Margach, .James A 

Margach, W. I 

Moore, D. H 

Mooney, Thomas , 



Carried forward 



1,200 00 
900 00 

200 00 



416 66 
U2 69 



1,400 00 
150 00 

125 00 
352 56 



$ c. 



2,300 00 



559 35 



1,550 00 
477 56 



268 00 

36 40 

608 60 

145 00 

1,562 02 

967 00 

732 95 

308 55 

90 00 

90 00 

10 00 

698 50 

1,394 51 
955 25 
117 80 

1,445 84 

1,307 08 
195 00 
277 35 
423 20 
289 70 
895 85 

1,468 20 
349 50 



14,596 30 



$ c. 



26,172 5& 



2,859 35 



2,027 56 



31.059 49 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



II 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statembnt of the Disbarsements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Br(yitght forward 



WoOU RANGING AND INSPECTION OF TiMBER 

Lands. — Goii. 



McNainara, Michael. 
Mc Williams. Theo . 
McCracken, John. . . 

McGown, Win 

Macdonald, D. F . . 
McCogherty, P . . . . 

Pardee, J. B 

Pearson, J. J .... . 

Quinn, Wm 

Roberts, Alex 

Regan, John 

Robinson, Wm . 

Russell, Wm 

Smith, J. W 

Sullivan, John 

Sinclair, Fiuley 

Taylor, Thos. G 

Wigg. Thos 

White, J. B 



$ c. 



Fire Ranging. 



Aylward, James . . . . 

Ardiel, Alex 

Disbursements 

Armstrong E 

Disbursements 

Armstrong. F. H . . 

Armstrong, J. C . . . 

Disbursements 

Airhart, Asel 

Aikins, G. M 

Avery, James 

Anderson, Robt . . . 



Brewer, Chas. E. . . 
Disbursements 

Bromley, Thos 

Disbursements 

Brannan, Samuel , . 
Bellard, Lewis . . . . 



126 00 
151 25 



133 00 
9 00 



60 00 
54 50 



Carried f(yrward 



124 00 
23 10 



127 00 
22 51 



14,596 30 



1,04) 50 
743 45 
480 00 

1,101 75 
365 16 

1,279 17 
912 50 
320 85 
388 00 
262 00 

2,251 38 

1,293 26 
289 65 

1,128 45 

47 60 

950 00 

25 00 

1,583 50 

1,208 00 



71 00 



277 25 



142 00 
112 00 



114 50 

74 00 

55 00 

120 00 

120 00 



147 10 



149 51 
122 00 
120 00 



1,624 36 



31,059 49 



29,259 52" 



60,319 01 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Bro^ight forward 



Fire Ranging. — Con. 



Barry, T. .J 

Disbursements 



Rowland, A. G.... 

Rowland, Wm 

Disbursements 



Rowland, .Tno. .J. . . 
Rrown, Hugh R 

Rurns, Jno 

Rerlinquet, Jules . . 

•Cole, .Jno 

Cole, Geo 

Disbursements 

Cousins, Thos 

Currier, Victor . . . . 
Corrigan, M. R. . . 

Orombie, Jno 

Disbursements 



Cox, H 

Conway, Richard . . 

Coghlan, Thos 

Currier, .lames . . . . 

Cardiff, G. M 

Christie, W. P . . . . 
Disbursem ents 



Christie, P. R 

Columbus, Frank . . 

Collins, Chas 

Collins, Phillip . . . . 
Cosgrave, Jas. P . . 
Coulon, Jas. J . . . . 
Disbursements 



Campbell, .James . . 
Cunaingham, Thos 
Dufond, Ignace . . . 
Dwyer, James . . . . 
Disbursements 



Didier, L. P . . . 
Dupuis, Eugene. 
Ihiver, J 



$ c. 



224 00 
78 53 



130 00 
93 02 



145 00 
15 75 



Carried forward 



132 00 
4 50 



411 00 
135 10 



143 00 
8 00 



122 00 
3 00 



1,624 30 



302 53 
82 00 



223 02 
113 00 
132 00 
115 00 
122 00 
139 00 



160 75 

132 00 

107 00 

45 00 



136 50 
83 00 
122 00 
132 00 
118 00 
111 00 



546 10 
126 00 
107 00 
119 00 
34 00 
71 00 



151 00 
124 00 
120 00 
103 00 



125 00 
111 00 

119 00 

120 00 



5,976 26 



00,319 01 



60,319 01 



1899] 



CKOVVN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



13 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Continued. 
Statbuent of the DiabarBements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 


« c. 


$ c. 


8 c. 


Brought forward .• 




5,976 20 

156 00 

180 00 
140 02 

281 58 
61 00 

78 00 
127 00 

150 25 

100 00 
120 00 

29 56 

425 75 
132 00 

243 00 

101 00 

119 00 

120 00 
60 00 
90 00 

127 00 
95 00 

120 00 

120 00 

128 50 

121 00 

295 25 

165 80 

135 00 
119 00 


60.319 01 


Fire Ranoinu.— Coit. 
D-iwkins, Jno 


105 00 
50 00 




Disbursements 




Ellis. Jas 


180 00 
6 00 




Disbursements 

Eagle, Sidney 




Ferris, Walter 


224 00 

57 58 




Disbursements 








Finn, Jno 






Fitzhenry, Jno 


. 




Finlayscn, J. H 






Fraser, Jno 


129 00 
21 25 




Disbursements 




Fraser, W. A 




French, Jno 




Gorman, Jno., disbursements, 1898 




( Jardner, Jno 


272 50 
153 25 




Disbursements 








Grawberger, Thos 


115 00 
128 00 




(irozelle, A 




1898 




Gunter, H . M 








Gauthier. Antoine 




Gagnon, Noel 




(iadway, .Jno 










Gates, S 


. 




Hoflf, J. S. Morris 






Hai-vie, A 




. 


Humphreys, Thos. W : 


126 00 
2 50 




Disbursements 








Hayes, Martin 








132 00 
163 25 

107 00 

58 80 

132 00 
3 00 




Disbursements 




Hutcheson, Edw 




Disbursements 




Disbursements 




Houston, Joseph 










Carried forward 




10,134 57 


60,319 01 



14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 6 —Continued 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



-B I ought forward 



Fire Ranging. — Con 



Jacison, Geo. . . . 
Disbursements 

Janasen, D 

Johnston, Wm . . . . 

Johnson, R. W 

Disbursements 

James, M 

Disbursements 

Kelley, James .... 

Kirby, John 

Disbursements 



Kennedy, Robt .... 
Kelly, Ferdinand . . 
Kirkwood. Robt . . . 
Labrash, James P. . 
Leblanc, Oliver . . . . 
Lemyre, Middy . . . . 
Latour, Alfred . . 
Loyst, Andrew . . . 
Leblanc, Eustache . 
Lowry, James . . . . 
La Riviere, John . . 
Lauthiere, Arthur. . 

Logan, Hugh 

Lalonde, Alex . . . . 
Lomprey, Oscar . . . . 
Mooney, John P . 
Disbursements 

May, Wm 

Moore. R. J 

Disbursements 



Morrison, John* . . . 
Mannering, R . . . . 
Marshall, Wm . . . . 
McDonald, J. D . . 

McDonald, D 

MacDonald, D. F . . 
Disbursements 



McElroy, Robt . 
McMaster, Wm. 



Cai ried forward 



180 00 
21 00 



120 00 
115 79 

111 00 
5 06 



40 00 
14 37 



280 00 
10 70 



118 00 
31 16 



177 00 
88 50 



10,134 57 



201 00 

119 00 

96 00 



235 79 



116 06 
106 00 



54 37 

20 00 

133 dO 

132 00 

108 00 

98 0(» 

36 00 

146 00 

129 00 

60 00 

12 00 

85 00 

56 00 

125 00 

89 00 

132 00 



290 70 
120 00 



149 10 
106 OO 
134 Of 
120 00 
288 00 
94 00 



265 50 
117 00 
119 00 



14,227 16 



60,319 01 



60,319 01 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



15 



APPEN^DXX No 6.— Continued. 
8TATBMBNT of the Disbaraements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1899 



Name. 



Brcyttght Jorward . 



FiBE Ranging. — Ccm. 



McKay, Wm 

Disbursements 



McKay, Angus 

McAdam. Jms 

McAtlani , Alfred 

McAdam, James, Disbursements 

McHugh, P 

McColgan, E. R 

McGuey. Dennis 

McOee, Jas 

McDermott, Patrick 

McDerinott, Frank 

McDerraid. Alex 

McGuire, James 

Mclntyre, Wm 

McDonell, Alex 

McCartney, Thos 

Disbursements 



Macfarlane, R. L. . . 
Disbursements. 



Mclnnes, A. D 

Disbursements. 



McCoU, Archd 

Nitz, August 

Nicholson, Wm. . . . 

Oram. Jno 

O'Neil, A. J 

Disbursements . 



O'Neill, P. J 

O'Brien. Dennis. . . 

Pommerelle, Theo . 

Parent, Joseph . . . . 

Disbursement s. 



Phillips, W. H 

Plourd, Chs 

Disbursements. 



Piper, Richard 
Picott, Wm . . . 



$ c. 



105 00 
39 37 



127 00 
25 26 



129 0" 
8 25 



12 00 
1 25 



370 0' 
4 40 



280 00 

8 70 



ion o<t 

306 42 



Carried forward. 



$ c. 



14,227 15 



144 37 
120 ()0 

86 00 

110 00 

1 50 

113 (lO 

73 00 
132 00 
120 00 
120 00 

94 00 
143 00 
116 0(1 
132 00 
132 00 



152 26 



137 25 



13 26 

70 00 
120 00 

87 00 
132 00 



374 40 

94 00 

116 00 

120 00 



288 70 
53 50 



414 42 
120 00 
li6 00 



18,272 80 



60,319 01 



60,319 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. e.—Continwd. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Brought forward. 



Fire Ranging. — Cow. 



Potvin, Jules 

Ruxton, James 

Robinson, T. G 

Robinson, Thos., Jr. 

Rawson, Chas 

Disbursements . . 



Ross, Geo 

Regan, Hugh 

Ricker, Chris 

Seeley, L. F 

Stanley, Jno 

Smith, Pat'k 

Scanthrie, Jas . . . . 

Skuce. Thos 

Disbursements 



Strachan, Arthur . . 
Disbursements 



Sawyers, Hy 

Scott, A.J 

Scott. Edw. J 

Smith, Matthew . . 

Smith, A. H 

Scoular, John . . . . 
Disbursements 



Sloan, VVm 

Short, Patrick J . . 

Thaxter, Eobt 

Thompson, J. 0. . . 
Disbursements 



Thompson, Wm. . 

Turner, Geo 

Trudeau, Paul .... 
Trudeau, A . . .,. . 

Tobin, John 

Urquhart, John . . . 
Vandette, Eustace. 



$ c. 



30 00 

78 00 



132 00 
26 25 

116 00 
5 25 



38 00 
312 37 



125 00 

57 28 



Walker, P. D 

Wilson, Robt 

Wilson, J. D 

Wilson, R. J (1898) 



Carried Jorward 



$ c. 



18 272 80i 60,319 01 



107 00 
16* 00 
120 00 
103 00 



108 00 
6 00 
120 00 
117 00 
130 00 
101 00 
132 00 
125 00 



158 25 



121 25 
12 00 

102 00 
48 2.0 

124 00 
80 25 



350 37 
93 53 
44 06 

132 00 



182 28 
7 50 

60 00 
120 00 

86 82 
143 00 
120 00 

57 50 

132 00 

127 00 

132 00 

20 2: 1 



22,060 111 60,311) 01 



1895) j 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



17 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statembnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899,. 



Name. 



Brought forward 

FiKE Ranging.— Con. 



Wilson, Alex 

Disbursements 



Watters, Thos 

Winters, Jno 

Wingle, Jno 

Warren, Josephus . 

Wells, Jno. R 

Disbursements 



Welsh, Edw 

Weart, E. B 

Walsh, Isaac 

Disbursements 



Young, Wm 



Refunds 

Cullers' Examinations. 

Mather, D. L., services 

Bureau of Mines. 
Contingencies. 



Printing and Binding 
Stationery 



Postage 

Telegraphing 

Express and freight 



Blue, A., travelling expenses 

Parks, W. A., assaying, mapping, etc 

Bain, J. W., assaying 

Charlton, H. W., assaying 

Lamb, G., rock sections . . . . 



Advertising . . 
Subscriptions . 
Books 



Bain, J. W., services. 
Disbursements . . 



Carried forward . 
2 C.L. 



70 00 
47 25 



93 00 
39 00 



114 00 

72 89 



356 78 
183 48 



188 77 
52 65 
77 80 



55 75 
25 00 
10 00 
10 40 



188 75 

108 85 

61 60 


36 00 
7 65 





$ c. 



22,060 11 



117 25 

102 Oo 

106 00 

36 00 

55 50 



132 00 

20 00 

114 CD 



186 89 
94 00 



23,023 75 
388 51 



540 26 



319 22 
356 90 



101 15 



359 20 



43 65 



1,720 38 



S c. 



60.319 01 



22,635 24 



4 OQ- 



82,958 2& 



16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbarsements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 



Brmight forward . . . , 
Bureau of Minks. - 



-Con. 



Heffernan, N., services 
Sacco, E., do 

Thompson,' P. , do 
Trow, A. E., do 

Sundries 



Forestry. 
Contingencies. 



Printing . . 
Stationery 



Postage 

Telegraphing and express . 



Dickson, G. M., services. 
Sh^ridHn, W. J., do 
Thompson, P., do . 

Books 

Subscriptions 

Photographic supplies . . . 



Wood, W. A., travelling expenses 
Sundries 



Diamond Drih. 



Oyster, L. A., salary 

do disbursements . 

Judge, .7., salary 

do disbursements 



Carbons 

Drill furnishings 

Freight 

Labor 

Supplies, etc . . . . 



Jiejunded 



Carried foncard . 



$ c. 



288 00 
15 00 
15 00 
51 00 



3 80 
32 43 

26 33 
1 05 



g c. 



1,720 38 



369 00 
45 41 



128 34 


6 00 


72 00 


64 25 


23 21 


27 48 



1,080 64 
145 81 



458 26 
5 02 



526 52 
.373 86 

35 44 

1,170 54 

249 36 



36 23 

27 38 

206 34 



114 94 
31 35 
14 55 



1,226 45 
463 28 

900 38 

1,455 34 



4,045 45 
2,576 12 



« c. 



82,958 25 



2,134 79 



430 79 



1,469 33 



86,993 ]6 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



19 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbarsementa of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 


$ c. 


% c. 


1 c. 


Broiufht fonoard 






86,993 16 


Mining Development. 

Rat Pm-tage A(jenc.y. 

Charleswortli, L. C, sjilary 




910 00 

618 21 
385 00 

1,167 12 

98 00 

621 05 


do rent 


360 00 

176 46 

81 75 




do disbursements 




do travelling expenses 




Winder, C R , services 






HdltviUe Asiay Office. 
Wells, J. W., salary 


826 00 
.?42 12 

65 00 
33 00 


1,913 21 


do disbursements 

Huffman, A , services as assistant 

Pratt, Wm., do do 








Furnishing.s 


318 67 
302 38 




Supplies 










1,000 00 
180 64 


1,886 IT 


Micliipicoton Mining Division. 
Boyd, D. G., salary 


1,180 64 
148 55 

1,400 00 

873 58 

1,275 64 


Disbursements 








Conlon, T. F.. services 


101 ro 

47 55 

• 1,000 fO 
400 00 

350 00 
523 58 




Disbursements 




Inspector of Mines,- West. 
Bow. .1. A. , aalarv 


1,.329 19 


Disbursements 




Inspector' of Mines, End. 
DeKalb, C. , salary 




Disbursements 








Mining Explorations. 
Coleman, A. P., salary .... 


500 00 
658 64 
117 00 




Disbursements 




Willmott, A. B., services as Assistant 








Carried forward 


3,549 22 


92,121 93 



2U 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 189^. 



Name. 



Carried forurard 

Mining Development. — Con. 
Mining Explorations. — Con. 



Parks, W. A., services , 

Disbursements 

Michie, H. S. , services as Assistant . 



Miller, W, G. , services , 

do do for 1899 

Hart Emery Wheel Co., testiag corundum 
Charlton, W. A., disbursements (1898) . . . 



Mining Sdwols. 



School of Mines, Kingston . 

Goodwin, W, L,, services . 

Disbursements 



Nicol, Wm., services 
Disbursements . 



Mining Roads 

Iron Mining Fund. 

Hamilton Blast Furnace 

Prevention of Export of Logs. 



Ciaig, A., services . 
Disbursements 



Flisher, Thos., services 
Lawrence, G., do 
Disbursements . . . , 



Nighswander, D. B., services 
Disbursements 



Ross, D., services . 
Disbursements 



Sullivan, J . , services 

Mc Williams, J. B., disbursements 



Carr'ed forward . 



$ c. 



218 00 
345 99 
109 00 



100 00 

500 00 

269 82 

48 00 



210 00 

239 77 

204 00 
212 72 



282 00 
30 20 



82 00 
28 10 

86 00 
25 50 

230 00 
17 85 



« c. 



3,549 22 



672 99 

917 82 

9,000 00 

449 77 

416 72 



312 20 
60 00 



110 10 



111 50 



247 85 

400 (0 

30 00 



f c. 



92,121 73 



5,140 03 



9,866 49 
7,463 66 



8,647 19 



1,271 K5 
124,510 75 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



21 



APPENDIX No, G.— Concluded. 



Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1899. 



Name. 


$ c. 


S c. 


f c. 


JBrouqht fitrtoard 






124,510 75 


Forest Reserve, Addington. 
Critchley, J. , services as Fire Ranger 




151 50 

186 26 

57 00 




Wood, A. W., salary 


145 83 
40 42 

18 00 
39 00 




Disbursements 




Hickory and Walnuts 




Planting do 




Colonization Roads 


394 75 
90,464 


Pigeon Rfver Slide and Dam 






700 36 


Surveys 






41,390 5 


Board of Surveys 






200 


Refunds 






44,546 94 


Contingencies. 

Printing and binding 

Stationery 


2,139 07 
2,333 14 

1,488 23 
67 50 
50 00 

319 52 
96 86 


4.472 21 

1,605 73 

416 38 
5,208 85 
196 85 
120 50 
163 27 




Postage, express and telegraphing 




Cab hire.. 




Car fare 




Subscriptions and advertising 




Books 








Extra Clerks 






Travelling expenses ^ 







Typewriters 






Sundries 




12,183 79 






•• 






314,.391 08 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Acconntant. 

Department op Grown Lands, 

Toronto, 30th December, 1899. 



AtTBREY WHITE, 

As-istant Commissioner. 



22 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



APPENDIX 

Woods and 
Statement of timber and amounts accrued from timber dues, ground 





Area 
covered 

by 

timber 
licenses . 


QUANTITY AND 




Saw logs. Boom and 


Agencies. 


Pine. 


1 
Other. Pine. 




Square 
miles. 


Pieces. 


Feet, B.M. 


Pieces. 


Feet, : „. 

B.M. : P'««^- 


Feet, 
B.M. 


Western Timber 
District 

Belleville Timber 
District 

Ottawa Timber 
District 


8,913 
1,386 
5,358 


6,005,236 

474,037 

1,042,649 


349,434,507 

46,968,831 

102,203,730 


127,606 

93,120 

103,220 


5,344, 469i 120,135 

t 

3,59i;557 23,858 
6,460,367 58,005 


16.372,353 
5,102.679 
7,886,663 


Totals 


15,657 


6,521,922 


498,607,068 


323,946 


15,396,393 


201,998 


29,361,695 



GENKRAL STATRMFNT ( F 





Cordwood, 

4«s 


Railway ties. 


i 






Head blocks. 

• 


6 




Agencies. 


Hard. 


J 
Soft. s 


Telegn 
polef 


.2 =2 

■1- 

OS 






Cords. 


! 

Cords. jCords. 


Pieces. 


Cords. 


P'c's. 


Cords . 


P'cs. 


Cords, 


Pes. 


Western Timber 

District 

Belleville Timber 


32 

93 

160 


17,409| 1,267 
383i 




273,958 

15,473 

164,424 


1,206 
925 
948 


385 
38 


2,024 


19 


28,235 




Ottawa Timber 


2,808 






1,603 


2,094 










Totals 


285 


17,792 1,267 


453,855 


3,079 


3,231 2,024 


19 


29,838 


2,094 



J. A. G. CROZIER, 

Ohief Clerk in Charge. 

Departmbnt of Crown Lands, Woods and Forests Branch, 
Toronto, 30th December, 1899. 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



23 



No. 7. 

Forests. 

rent and bonus during the year ending 30th of December, 1899. 



DESCRIPTION OF TIMBER. 



Dimension timber. 


Square 


timber. 








Other. i 


White Pine. 


Birch, 


Ash, Ehn, 
Tamarac. 


Maple? 


Pile 
Timber. 


Cedar. 


1 i 
Pieces. Feet, B.M.j 

1 I 


Pieces. 


Cubic f oet . 


Pieces. 


Cubic feet. 


Feet. 


Lineal feet. 


1 
3,5141 446.004! 


22,224 


1,131,958 


B 
A 


489 
5 


11,614 
110 


135,843 




4,223 
11,495 


' : 

613,898 . 
i;i30 097| 


15,554 


11,969 


591,316 


T 
B 
A 
M 
E 


10 

78 

32 

6 

1 


279 
1,770 
1,128 

134 
18 




72,676 








19,232 


2,189,998 


34,193 


1,723,274' T 

B 

' A 

M 

E 


10 

567 

37 

6 

1 


297 

13,384 

1,238 

134 

IS 


135,843 


88,230 



TIMBER, Etc.— Continued. 



Transfer 
Bonus. 



I c. 

20 00 



20 00 



Amounts accrued. 



Interest. 

$ c. 
6,144 93 
4,929 95 
1.067 05 



12,141 93 



Trespass. 



8? c. 

4,204 83 

86 06 



4,290 89 



Timber Dues. 



$ c. 

435,344 02 

58,384 72 

130,327 42 



624,056 16 



Bonus. 



iS c. 
296,941 56 



296,941 56 



Ground Rent. 



$ c. 

43,070 50 

4,570 00 

20,358 00 



67,998 50 



Total. 



I c. 

785,725 84 

67,970 73 

151,752 47 



1,005,449 04 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner, 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 8. 

Woods and Forbsts. 

Statement of Revenue collected daring the year ending December 30th, 1899. 





■ 
$ c. 


$ c. 


Amount of Western District collections at Department 

do do do Quebec 


767,990 40 
27,332 26 


795,322 66 


Amount of Belleville collections 


111,362 33 




111,362 as 


Amount of Ottawa collections 


182,392 40 
3,771 25 


do do at Quebec 






186,163 65 






Total 


1,092,848 64 







J. A. G. CROZIER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



Department of Crown Lands, Woods and Forests Branch, 
Toronto, December 30th, 1899. 



APPENDIX No. 9. 

Statement of Patentf, etc.-, issued by the Patents Branch during the year 1899. 

Number, 

Crown Landn 374 

School do : 61 

Mining do 56 

Public do (late Clergy Reserves) 24 

Free Grant Lands (A. A.) 75 

do do (under Act of 1880) 238 

Rainy River do (Mining and Crown 252 

Mining Leases 498 

Licenses of Occupation 8 

Crown Leases 6 

Mining Lands (University) 12 

Mining Leases do 20 

Crown Lands do 1 

Pine 27 

Total 1,652 

AUBREY WHITE, 
CHARLES S.JONES, Assistann Commissioner. 

Chief Clerk. 

Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 30th December, 1899. 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



25 



APPENDIX No. 10. 



Return of the number of locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of 
acres sold ; of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties ; and of patents 
issued; under the "Free Grants and Homestead Act," during the year 1899. 





Distric 

or 
County 


t 

Agent. 


No. of Persons 
located. 


No. of Acres 
located. 


No. of Pur- 
chasers. 


No. of Acres 
sold. 


No. of Lots 
resumed. 


OS 

c5.2 
5Z5 


Baxter 

Brunei 


Muskoka 

•■• 
Parry Soi 


.. . W. Kirk, Bracebridge 3 

j ■■ 2 
1 5 


382 
393 


1 


46 


1 
2 


4 
5 


Ct.affey 


! 


Draper 


395 
645 




1 
3 


4 


Franklin 


1 


8 


Macaulay . . . 


t( 




i . . . . . 


1 


Medora 

Monck 

Morrison 




9 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1,314 
100 
200 
100 
186 
100 
133 


3 





3 
1 


7 
2 
1 


Musi- oka. . . . 


] 


1 
1 


1 


McLean .... 


; 




)akley .... 
Ridout 


" • 1 
1 




4 


3 
2 


Rydo 












Sinclair 


9 


1,272 
199 
285 
463 
336 
402 

837 

1,453 

908 




1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


3 


Sherboume. . 


::• :: i I 

4 

5 
3 

ind. J. Ellis, Parry Sound. 6 

10 

1 6 






Stephensm. . 




1 


Sti-sted 


1 




Watt 


1 


3 


Wood 


1 


1 


Cardwell .... 






8 
13 
11 


1 


Carling 






4 


Christie 






2 


Ferguson . . . 










93 


1 i 1 


Foley 


2 


297 

99 

465 


3 


3 


Hagerraan . . 


1 








1 


Humphrey . . 
Montieth . . 




2 


.2 


139 


3 


1 
1 


McConkey . . 


1 


200 
674 








1 


McDougall . . 


i 6 






8 
1 
2 
2 


3 


MacKenzie . . 






2 


41 


f 2 


MacKellar . . 




2 


300 




Shawanaga . . 


S. G. Best, Maganet- 








1 


Wilson 










2 


Chapman . . . 


8 


1,135 
692 






5 

5 
6 


2 


Croft 


awan. '' 

5 








Ferrie 




...... 








Gurd 


2 


206 






4 


Lount 








1 


Machar 


1 «( 


1 


169 






2 


1 


Mills 








Pringle 














Ryerson 


4 


434 

386 
400 

717 
943 






2 
2 
3 

4 

5 


4 


Spence 


3 
3 

E. Handy, Emsdale.. 5 
6 






4 


Strong 






7 


Armour .... 






5 


Beth una .... 


1 




18 


1 



26 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No 10.— Continuid. 





District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


OS 

h 

•si 


33 

-si 


No. of pur- 
chasers. 


No. of Acres 
sold. 


No. of Lots 
i-esumed. 


_2 


Joly 


Parry Sound. 

n 
11 
il, 
( ( 
k< 

Haliburton . . 

n 
It 
(t 
(( 
ti 

Peterborough 

(( 

n 

Haliburton . . 

Peterborough 

Haliburton . . 
Hastings .... 

(( 

K 
t( 
(( 
(( 
ii 

«t( 
(( 
(( 

Addington . . 

it 

Frontenac . . . 

(t 

t( 

(C 

Renfrew 


E. Handy, Emsdale. . 

it 

<t 
it 

J. S. Scarlett, Po- 

wassan. 
t> 

t( 

(t 

(t 

t( 

Wm. Hartle, Minden. 


3 
1 
2 
4 

19 


296 

82 

348 

494 

2,213 






i 
3 


3 


McMurrich . . 






() 


Perry 

I*roudfoot . . 






2 
3 

4 


o 






8 


Chishulm . . . 






4 


Hardy ..... 
Himsworth . . 






2 


11 
5 
4 


1,738 
800 

784 






12 
3 

2 


5 


Laurier 






3. 


Nipissing .... 
Patterson . . . 


1 


84 


2 
1 


Anson 














Glamorgan . . 
Hindon 


tt 

( t 
1 1 
<( 
( t 
(t 

J. B. McWilliams, 

Peterborough. 

(t 

t( 
« 

C. R. Stewart, Hali- 
burton. 

tt 

t< 
1 1 
t ( 
tt 

J. K. Tait, L'Amable 
(t 

t( 
tt 

t( 
ti 

'a. W. Wood, Plevna 

i( 
(. 

(( 
(( 
<t 

J. Reeves, Eganville 


4 

1 
4 
6 
1 
2 

2 

3 
1 
1 

1 


568 
119 
500 
663 
100 
262 

200 

307 
100 
100 

200 






2 











Lutterwo'^h . 






1 
2 

1 
1 

2 

1 


1 








1 


Snowdon 

Stanhope .... 

Anstruther 


1 
.♦ 


25 


4 






1 


Burleigh .... 







1 

2 


Methuen . . . 









1 


Cardiflf 








5 










2 


Galway 


4 
10 

7 

1 


410 

1,388 

646 

189 


1 


3 


1 


4 
2 


Bangor 


1 


13 


2 
1 








2 
1 


2 




2 


219 






1 


Cashel 


1 






Dungannon. . 
Faraday 


6 
5 
2 
3 
6 
9 
2 

1 
2 

1 


590 
730 
.307 
384 
828 
881 
114 

100 
302 
100 


1 ..... . 




4 
4 
2 
3 


1 






4 






2 








2 


Mayo 

Monteagle . . 


! 




2 






2 


7 






3 


Abinger 

Denbigh 

Canonto, S . . 

" N 






1 
4 








4 


1 


65 














1 


27 




3 


Millpr 






2 


Palmerston . . 

Algona, S . . . 


7 
2 


1,208 
200 


3 


21 


3 


3 
1 



.899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



27 



APPENDIX No \0.-Continne,K 





Distric 

or 
Count] 


t 

Agent. 


No. of Persons 
located. 


No. of Acres 
located. 


1 No. of pur- 
1 chasers. 


No. of Acres 
sold. 


No. of Lots 
resumed. 


No. of Patents 
issued . 


Algona, N. . . 


Renfrew 

k< 

(( 
< ( 
it 

(i 

<( 

n 
i< 
( t 
it 
(( 
(( 

n 
<( 
^^ 

(i 

^l. 
>t 

tt 

Nipissing 

(( 

(( 
(( 
«t 

Algoma , . 

n 

Thunder I 

t( 
t ( 

a 
(( 
(t 

Rainv Riv 


. . . . J. Reeves, Eganville 

(( 

t( 

(( 

(t 

... J. Whelan, Brudenell 

(k 

(t 

i> 

J. Stewart, Pembroke 

. . . " 

ii 
i( 

tk 


1 
1 

< 

7 

1 


106 

50 

672 

1,1 04 

100 






1 


Brougham . . 

Grattan 

Hagarty .... 
Richards .... 








1 


1 
4 


96 
170 


3 


3 
5 


Wilberforce. . 








2 


Brudenell . . . 


6 
1 

11 
4 
2 

23 
7 
4 

3 


803 

100 
i 1,406 
! 546 

300 
3,020 

661 
! 463 

' 286 






1 


6 


Griffith 








Lyndock .... 








1 


Matawatchan 






1 


2 


Radcliffe 








Raglan 

Sebastopol . . 
Sherwood . . . 

Alice 


1 


9 


2 
5 

1 


7 
2 


2 


111 


3 
6 


Buchanan . . . 








Eraser 


1 


100 








2' 


Head ... 








2 


Maria . . 












1 


McKay 














Petawawa . . . 


1 

1 
2 


1 ioi 

100 

soo 






1 




Rolph 








Wylie 






2 




Cameron .... 


1 


12 


1 


Bon field .... 


3 
5 
6 
2 
4 


293 
600 
600 
296 
400 


1 


Calvin 








3 
6 
3 
1 


3 


Ferris 








6 


Mattawan . . . 










Papineau. . . . 




1 

1 


8 
118 


6 


Korah 


. . . W.Tumer,S.Ste."Ma'e 

tk 

. . . W.L. Nichols, Thess'ln 

. . . G. Hamilton, Rich- 
ard's Landing. 

Jay. J.F.Ruttan,Pt.Arth'r 

k. 

.k 
(( 
ki 
k( 

n 
k( 
kl 

er. W. Campbell, Rainy 
River P. 0. 




Park 










Prince 


3 

1 
22 

9 

1 


417 

88 

2,317 

1,440 
200 










Plutnmer 








1 


St. Joseph's [s 
Blake 


1 


100 


16 


6 


Crooks 










Dawson, Road 










Dorion 


1- 
28 
56 
10 

8 


160 

4,477 

8,942 

1,597 

896 










Gillies 






6 




O'Connor . . . 






1 


Oliver 






3 
3 


1 


Paipoonge . . . 






3 


Gorham 








Scoble 


5 
3 


807 
349 










Atwood 






1 


3 


X 









28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No, 10 —Concluded. 





District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


No. of persons 

heated. 

1 


No. of Acres 
located. 




CO 

2 
< 

. o 

O CP 


n 

CM S 


CO 
P-TT 


Blue 


. . Rainy River. 

an. " 
1. . " 


W. Campbell, Rainy 
River P. 0. 

W. Stephenson, Big 
Forks. 


1 
6 
t 

11 
2 
4 
1 

12 
4 
2 

3 

1 

6 

15 

14 

7 
8 
2 
6 


160 
802 
868 

1,700 

324 

538 

72 

1.694 
644 
295 

446 

107 

859 

1,854 

1,648 

997 

1,248 

323 

940 










Curran 






3 
4 
4 

1 
2 


1 


DUke ... 
Morley . . 
Nelles . . . 
Pattullo . 


1 
1 
1 


45 
81 
54 


2 
6 


Roaeberry 












4 
1 

1 




Tait 








Worthingt< 
Ayleswortl 
Barwick 






1 


2 


45 








Carpenter 
Crozier 


5 


197 


1 

8 
2 
3 


1 
1 


Devlin . . . 
Dobie . . . 
Lash .... 
Roddick . 
Woodyatt 


8 
2 
2 
1 
4 


334 
70 
44 
42 

258 


1 

""2 
1 

1 


Totals. 


633 


85,194 


59 


2,379 


278 


291 











JOSEPH J. MURPHY, Clerk in Charge. 



AUBREY WHITE, Assistant Commissioner. 



Department of Ckown Lands, 

Toronto, December 30th, 1899. 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



2& 



00 
CO 



04 

oo 









uioaj psfi^W 



pauan;)©^ 



•[lounoQ-ui 
-sjapiQ 



•sajnsopug 



paxaput 8dia«^ 



6 tj 



ft' 



5 

Ok 

<3 



s 



a 

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36 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. S 

APPENDIX No. 16. 

Report of Survey of the Boundary between Ontario and Manitoba. 

Toronto, Ontario, April 30th, 1899. 

Sirs : — We have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the 
boundary line between the Provinces of Ontario and Manitoba, performed in accordanco 
with instructions from your Departments, dated the 21 at and 19th of August, 1897^ 
respectively. 

After visiting Ottawa in company with the Director of Surveys for Ontario, and 
conferring with the Deputy Minister of the Interior, and the Surveyor General of the 
Dominion, we proceeded to arrange for the work and after due preparation left for Rat 
Portage with our staff. At this point we engaged the remainder of our party, purchased 
our supplies and having hired a small steamer to carry our party and outfit to the point 
of commencement of the line near the north-west angle of the Lake of the Woods. Wo 
left Rat Portage on the Ist of September reaching the north-west Angle River the same 
evening and camped near where we were to begin our work. This point is marked upon, 
the ground by an iron monument planted about six chains north of the North-west Anglo 
River and it was from this monument that measurements were taken to locate the initial 
point of the Ontario and Manitoba boundary. This monument and a similar one at a 
distance of thirty nine chains and thirty-nine links due north of it were planted by tho 
International Boundary Oommissioners in 1872, and mark the boundary at these points 
between Canada and the United States. They are the iron posts referred to in the above 
mentioned instructions and are also shown in the plan and field notes herewith submitted. 
It will be noticed that the distance between these two iron posts, or monuments, a» 
deduced from the figures given in our instructions is thirty-nine chains and thirty 
links, whereas, our measurements as checked on the ground shew it to be thirty-nine 
chains and thirty- nine links. 

It may be well to state that all our measurements along the line were taken by two 
different sets of chainmen, each set using a Ohesterman steel tape one of which w&& 
sixty-six feet, and the other one hundred feet in length. 

Pages 88 to 90 of the returns show a comparative statement of the measurements 
with each chain for each mile. 

In fixing the north-west point which was to be our initial point we made it one 

hundred and fifty chains and one link north from the first mentioned or south boundary. 

The boundary we were called upon to lay down is defined in Chapter 26, 52 Victoria, 

1888-89, of the Imperial Parliament in the following words : " thence along a line 

drawn due north until it strikes the middle line of the course of the river discharging 
the waters of the lake called Lake Seul or the Lonely Lake, whether above or below its 
confluence with the stream flowing from the Lake of the Woods towards Lake Win- 
nipeg, " 

Having taken an astronomical observation for Azimuth on the evening of the 1st of 
September at -our point of commencement, the work of opening the line was begun on the 
following day, we then continued the line due north to its intersection with the Winnipeg 
River at a point about seven miles below the mouth of the English River. The distance 
from the initial point at the north-west angle to a post which we planted on the left bank 
of the Winnipeg river and twenty lints from the water's edge, being fifty-eight miles 
twenty-seven chains and twenty links. The Winnipeg River at this point is about fifteen 
chains wide. 

In running and laying down the line two instruments were used, one a small light 
transit in charge of one of our assistants who kept near the axemen and directed them in 
their work of opening and clearing the line, the other a Dominion Lands reiteration 
transit thpodolite with which astronomical observations were taken, and by means of 
which the line was actually laid down from the points of greatest elevation along its 
course, thus insuring as long sights as possible consistent with accuracy. These eights, as 
will be seen from the field notes, averaged over a mile in length, and as a sky-line was 
cut out in advance all instrumental stations were well selected so that in many cases 
under favorable conditions two back stations could be seen in the production of the line. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



By this means as will be noticed from the table of observations only 8lis[ht corrections in 
Azimuth \rere found necf saary. Owing to the intense cold and cloudy weather from the 
latter part of November up to the time of th^ completion of the field-work on the 17 th 
of December we found it impossible to get the exact result from the observations that »e 
attempted to take at diffierent points towards the end of the work. Two of these latter 
observations though not entirely satisfactory owing to the f'ost interfering with the move 
ments of the plates of the instrument, wera sutEcient to show that the line was wi hin 
reasonable limit of error and not out more than the average error shown by previous 
observations. 

The initial point being under water it was impossible to mark it upon the ground by 
a post or monument and it will therefore be seen that the first posts planted are situated 
on hard ground at 25.00 chains on the first mile They consist of a cedar post with an 
iron post three feet long, one and three-eight inches diameter, alongside, each being marked 
■with the words *' Ont " on the east side and " Man " on the west side, with the additional 
wording " 25 chains N.W. angle " on the south tide of the cedar post. 

Each and every mile of the boundary excepting where the mile point falls in witer 
is defined by similar posts, each marked with the words " Ont " and " Man," with the 
number of the mile from the initial point followed by the letter " M '' on the south side. 

Bearing trees where available were taken and regularly marked as shown on the 
field-notes, and the trees on either side of the line throughout the work were blazed on 
the three sides as directed. In addition to the regular mile posts, good cedar posts with 
iron posts alongside were planted on the shores of Shoal Lake, Snow Shoe Bay and Indian 
Bay and all the larger lakes, and also on the islands crossed by the line in Indian Bay 
and High Lake ; these are marked on the East and West sides the same as thosa above 
mentioned, while the cedar posts in each and every instance has the distance from the 
initial post marked on its south side. Similar cedar and iron posts were planted at the 
intersection of the line with the Southerly and l!^ortherly limits of the Right of Way of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, marked '• Ont " on the East side and " Man " on the 
West tide and '• 0. P. R." on the side facing the right of way. 

Although not instructed to do so, we planted wooden posts at the intersection of our 
line with the boundaries of the Indian Reserves met with in the work. These posts have 
the words " Ont " and " Man " on the Eist and West sides respectively and " I. R " on 
the side facing the Reserve A cedar post also, marked as above on the East and West 
sides, was planted at the intersection of the portage from Long Pine Lake to West 
Hawk Lake, being on a frequently travelled route. 

With the exception of six, the above mentioned posts are surrounded with well built 
cairns of stones called stone mounds in the fi,eld notes. The field notes show explicitly 
how each and every post is marked, as well as their position. 

The lines run in the survey of Dominion Lands, Indian Reserves, and Mining Loca- 
tions in the vicinity of the boundary were connected with our work. 

A careful traverse with transit and chain was also made along the line of the Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway eastward from the boundary to the Dominion Governpaent Astro- 
nomical Station at Kalmar, and the latitudes and departures of the various courses in this 
traverse were duly calculated and are shown in the field-notes. The boundary line is 
intersected by the Canadian Pacific Railway at a point twenty eight miles and seventy- 
three chains from the initial point at the North-west angle. This point of intersection is 
very nearly ninety-three and three quarters miles East of Winnipeg and about two miles 
West of Ingolf Station. 

In addition to the running of the boundary line and the traverse of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway considerable micrometer work was done in the traversing of parts of 
Shoal Lake, Indian Bay, High Lake, and West- Hawk Lake, also in the survey of that 
part of the Winnipeg River and its expansions from our line easterly to the mouth of 
the English River. 

The results of the explorations on either side of the line are shown upon the plans 
herewith. 

The country on each side of the North-west Angle River is comparatively leva 
and the soil is of good quality ; the chief timber is Poplar. On proceeding North the 
land becomes swampy up to Shoal Lake and is thinly timbered with Spruce and 
Tamarac. 



38 THfc REPORT OF THE [ No. S 



After leaving the Bay of Shoal Lake higher land is reached, broken with hills and 
swamps. The soil is clay and the rocks belong to the Laurentian and Huronian forma- 
tions ; the timber consists o! Poplar, Birch and Pitch Pine. This class of country 
extends to the neighborhood of Rice Bay, and from there to Snow Shoe Bay is quite 
broken and the timber has been very nearly all destroyed by fire. 

Indian Bay is a fine sheet of water about five miles long, and two wide, and con- 
tains a number of islands of various sizes, nearly all of which are wooded with green 
timber, principally Birch, Spruce, Poplar and Oedar, with a few clumps of White Pine. 
Some very good oak timber was noticed at the narrows leading from the bay into Shoal 
Lake. Between Indian Bay and High Lake the land is hilly and covered with green 
timber ; the soil is sandy with frequent rock exposures. 

The line crosses a point and two islands in the High Lake and intersects the Third 
Base Line of the Dominion System of surveys on the most northerly of the latter. 

From High Lake to the thirty-second mile post the country is mostly burnt, and a 
large portion was entirely stripped of timber by the far-reaching and destructive fire 
which extended East from the prairie in the fall of 1897. 

The country in both Provinces adjoining the boundary South of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway is attracting considerable attention from the Mining men at the present time 
owing to the discoveries of gold in the vicinity, and numerous Mining Locations and 
claims have already been laid out, and evidences of development work were seen in & 
number of places. 

The contacts between Laurentian and Huronian rocks are noted in the field notes 
where they were visible. The last contact we saw occurs near the centre of the 27th 
mile, and from this point to the end of the work only Laurentian rocks were seen North 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway the country as a rule is very rocky and broken, with 
very little soil fit for cultivation. It contains numerous lakes with clear water, well 
stocked with fish. 

The timber consists of Pitch Pine, Poplar Spruce, Birch and Tamarac, where not 
completely destroyed by fire. The efiects of the recent and destructive fires above refer- 
red to was not entirely lost sight of until we reached the neighborhood of Trout Like on 
the 4l8fe mile, although some belta had escaped its ravages. 

From Trout Lake to the Winnipeg River the timber is generally small and of poor 
quality, consisting of Pitch Pine, Birch, Spruce and Tamarac. Some railway ties have 
been taken out in the vicinity of the thirty-third and thirty-fourth miles, and a few 
swamps farther North contain a small quantity of fair-sized Spruce and Tamarac. It is 
perhaps worthy of note to mention that no Cedar timber exists batween the Canadian 
Pacific Railway and the Winnipeg River, along the line, and our wooden posts for this 
portion of the work were all brought from West-Hawk Lake. 

As stated in the first part of this Report the boandary line strikes the stream of 
the Winnipeg River at a point about seven miles below the confluence of the English 
River with the former. 

The waters of the two rivers unite in a wide, lake-like expansion, having some ten 
or twelve islands in it. They pass to the North and West of a Urge island and unite 
again in a narrow channel, and after a short distance once more divide and pass to the 
North and South of another large island about two and a half miles long and one and 
one-half miles wide, Upon each of these latter divergent streams there is a water-fall 
of five or six feet, the northerly one being again divided in two by a small island. These 
two main divergent streams flow, the one along the North side and the other along the 
East, South and West sides of the last mentioned large island, and after having widened 
out into lake-like areas unite about one mile up stream from where the boundary line 
intersects the river proper. There are a number of islands in all these stretches and the 
main shores are generally rugged. The exact position of these two rivers between their 
junction and our line is shown on the plan of the boundary line herewith, and on the tra- 
verse sheet accompanying the field notes. 

The necessity for having the boandary line laid down has been felt for some time by 
the people in the vicinity, especially so in that portion south of the railway where mining 
work has been going on. 

The route we travelled in the prosecution of tlie work is shown on the plan. 

After completing our field work we returned with our men to Ingolf by way of North 



1899 ] CROW N LANDS DEPARTMENT. 39 

Crow Duck Lake and a chain of lakes leading to Cross Lake and down the latter to the 
Canadian Pacific Railway and thence to Rat Portage where our men were paid oflF. It 
was then decided that we should meet in Toronto for the purpose of preparing our re- 
turns of survey. 

In concluding this report which we have made as brief as possible, we desire to say 
that any differences of opinion which we may have had in carrying on the work were all 
satisfactorily adjusted by ourselves. 

We deeire to express our gratitude to the officials ot both the Department of the 
Interior and the Department of Crown Lands with whom we came in contact in connect- 
ion with the work for their many courtesies extended to us, and to thank the members 
of our staff for their untiring efforts in the prosecution of the survey. 

Herewith will be found the full returns in triplicate, one copy being for the Dom- 
inioD, one for Ontario and one for Manitoba. 
We have the honor to be. 
Sirs, 
Your obedient servants, 

(Signed) E. STEWART. 

B. J. SAUNDERS. 
Dominion and Ontario Land Surveyois, Boundary Commissioners. 
The Hon. J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 
The Hon Clifford Sifton, 

Minister of Interior, 

Ottawa. 

(Appendix No. 17.) 

TOWNSHIP OF McCarthy. 

District of Nipissing. 

Parry Sound, Ontario, Dec. 15th, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report that I have surveyed the Township of McCarthy* 
iu the Nipissing District, under your instructions bearing d*te July 8th, 1898. 

I commenced the survey at the south-east angle of the township where I planted an 
iron post marked KELLY on the south-west side and McCARTHY on the north west 
side. I then brushed out and chained the south boundary, and not being able to observe 
the Pole Star for Meridian at the time, on account of cloudy weather, I opened up about 
half a mile of the Meridian South from said angle and produced said Meridian North- 
two miles, and turned an angle of ninety . degrees West and raa the line between Cons. 
II and III a little over a mile when I observed the Pole Star at the Eistern Elongatioa 
for Meridian using Azimuth 1° 4' 8", I found my line running two minutes too far 
North. I corrected bearing and carried said line West to the line between Lots 6 and 7 
and ran South to the South boundary and North to the North boundary, repeating my 
observations for Meridian. After having run the East boundary to the north-east angle 
of the township, where I planted a pine post and beside it an iron bar marked MC- 
CARTHY on the south west sidp, Con. VI on th«^ south side and I on the west side. I 
then surveyed the east portion of the township and ran the north boundary through to 
the north-west angle of the township leaving said angle to be established by Mr. Brown, 
who was surveying the Township of Mackelcan, immediately west of McCarthy, and wha 
by agreement or understanding with me was to locate said north-west angle at the inter- 
section of his East boundary with said North boundary. I ran the line between Cons. I 
and II west from line between Lots 6 and 7, after having again taken meridian from 
Pole Star and found as I ran the lot lines south that my line and the South boundary 
were diverging, and I intersected the West boundary run by Mr. Brown over 3 chains 
north of his corresponding line. 

The Township is drained by the Sturgeon River, or rather the greater portion is 
drained by a branch of said river, which expands into several lakes entering the Town- 
ship on the West side in Cons. Ill & lY , and passes out near the South-east angle on 
the South side. The Sturgeon River proper touches the East boundary near the North- 
east angle. 



40 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 

There is no part of the Township suitable for agricultural purposes, a small portion 
of the surface being exposed rock, and the greater part seemingly a bed of stones or 
boulders a few inches under the surface with occasionally a gravel ridge. 

The rock formation is slate with numerous veins of quartz from a few inches to two 
feet in width. There are a number of Mining Locations laid out or surveyed in the 
Township, and from samples of quartz shown me by prospectors and owners of Locations 
they seem to be rich, having seen many samples thickly studded with free gold. 

The Eastern portion, comprising nearly one-half of the Township, is fairly well 
timbered with pine, but principally of a second growth. From some charred remains of 
timber to be found in many places, the country was evidently burnt over many years 
ago leaving small patches here and there of the original pine timber which was not killed 
by the fire. 

I would recommend that the Township be not pat into the market for agricultural 
purposes, it being chiefly valuable for timber and mineral. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) DAVID BEA.TTY, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
To the Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Grown Lands, ^ 

Toronto. 

(Appendix Ifo. 18.) 

TOWNSHIP OF MAOKELGAN. 

District of Nipissing. 

MoBRisBURG, December 26th, 1898. 

Sib. — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the Township 
of Mackelcan in the District of Nipissing, under instructions from your Department 
bearing date July 8th, 1898. 

Having secured supplies and axemen, I started with equipment from Sudbury, on 
August 5th, by wagon, and proceeded to the south shore of Lake Wahnapitse. Here 
we were fortunate enough to find a small steamer which conveyed party and equipment 
across the Lake to Grystal Mining Gamp. From this point we proceeded by canoe and 
skiff to the east branch of Lake Metagamasing, where we went into camp, about two 
miles north of the north boundary of the Township of Rathbun, said boundary being 
quite visible from the canoes as we proceeded up the Lake. 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the Township, where I found a 
cedar post well planted, and beside it an iron bar marked '* Kelly " on the southeast side. 
Upon the northwest side of this iron bar I cut the word *' Mackelcan " and then pro- 
ceeded to retrace from this point westward. The north boundary of the Township of 
Rathbun (said north boundary being also the south boundary of the Township of Mac- 
kelcan) planting posts thereon at regular distances of forty chains as directed in instruc- 
tions, until I reached the northwest angle of Lot No. 12, in the 6th Goncession of the 
Township of Rathbun, where I found a spruce post marked Concession 6, on south side, 
12 on east side, and 13 on west side, and beside this an iron bar marked Aylmer on the 
northwest side and Mackelcan on the northeast side. 

I then surveyed t6e other concession lines and side lines as directed in instructions, 
or as nearly so as circumstances permitted. 

I found it necessary, in order to work to the best advantage, to move camp three 
times. From the first three camps I was able to complete the eastern half of the Town- 
ship and the south-western portion, thus leaving the northwest quarter to be completed 
from our last camp, that on Wolfe Lake. 

The survey was a difficult on3 to perform on account of the very hilly nature of the 
country, the large amount of green timber and the very large number of lakes. 

There is very little arable land in the township ; even in the valleys, where some 
soil might naturally be expected. Upon clearing away the moss, a bed of boulders was 
invariably exposed. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 41 



The timber consists principally of red pine, white pine, J3M5kpine, spruce, tamarac, 
birch and poplar, with occasionally a small scrubby oik or maple. The red pine is of 
good size, and so also is some of the white pine, but as a rule the white pine is of poor 
quality , being either hollow or dozy. The pine is so scattered and the natural facilities 
for its removal so limited, that from a commercial standpoint the timber of this Township 
is not of great value. It is possible that with the development of the mines, most of it 
that ie available will be utilized. 

With two exceptions there are no settlers in the Township. On Lot 8, Concession 
4, oni Davis has erected a log house, a stable, and at the time of the survey was living 
there with his family. He has, however, made no clearing for himself, and is employed 
by the Mountain Mining Company. 

On L-)t No. 8, Con 2, a h*lf- breed by the name of Pilo has cleared about an acre 
and seems to have found one of the very few pieces of land in the Township that might 
be termed soil. At the time of the survey he had nob erected a house, but was living in 
tents. 

There are three good mill sites in the Township. One at the outlet of Weasel Lake, 
Lot 2, Con. 4, having a natural fall of about 20 feet, one on Mining Location A. T. W. 1, 
having a fall of about ten feet, and one on mining location W. D. 76, having a fall of 
about 70 feet. Upon this latter site a small saw mill has been bnilt and operated by 
the Mountain Mining Company. 

At the time of the survey thirteen Mining Locations had been surveyed, but there 
was no work being done on any of them, although on some of them, considerable work 
had been done. 

Large game was said to be very plentiful, but during the survey we saw but one 
moose and one deer. Partridge, however, were abundant, and all the lakes seemed to be 
well stocked with fish, some of them very large of their kind. 

Accompanying this Report are plans, field notes, and accounts. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) GEORGE B. BROWN, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

OommiEsioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 

(Appendix No. 19.) 

TOWNSHIP OF AYLMER. 

Hamilton, Ontario, 

20th December, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report the completion of the survey of the Township of 
Aylmer, under instructions from your Department bearing date of 8th July, 1898. 

The late T. R, Hewson proceeded to the work with a party of thirteen men on the 
15th August, from Wahnapitfe Station via waggon road to Lake Wahnapitse, thence by 
steamer to the north shore of said lake, a distance of some three-fourths of a mile south of 
the north boundary of the Township of Rathbun, which forms the south boundary of the 
Township of Aylmer. 

Work was commenced at a spruce post planted for lots numbers twelve and thirteen 
on this northern boundary of the Township of Rathbun, which was marked *' lot 1 " on 
the wesj side and "con. 1" on the north; an iron post marked "Aylmer" on the 
north-west side, " Mackelcan " on the north-east side and '* Rathbun " on the south side, 
was planted alongside the spruce post. 

The survey of the township was carried out uninterruptedly till the Ist October, 
when the late T. R. Hewson was attacked by fever and brought down to Sudbury Hos- 
pital with great difficulty, at which place he died on the 2 Ist October. I proceeded with 
the completion of the work on the 10th October and brought the same to a close on the 
30th of the same month. 

Bad weather was encountered and sickness was very prevalent amongst the men. 



42 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



The larger portion of the township has been slightly over-run by fire some thirty or 
forty years ago, and is now re-timbf^red with Pine, Poplar, Birch, Balsam and Spruce. 
There is still some very good pine left standing in places, more particularly shown on the 
timber map, nearly all of which can be easily brought to Lake Wahnapitse by means of 
the upper and east branches of the river bearing the jsame name. 

Where there is soil it is of a sandy nature and of very little depth. Rocky ridges 
abound, generally trending northwest and southeast and in places are very steep. 

There are several good sized lakes, all having rocky shores, being deep and abound- 
ing with fish. 

The Upper Wahnapitse Eiver flows in a very circuitous northwesterly direction 
through the township, following a narrow valley of level land between high ridges and 
has steep sandy hanks, and deep water. 

No economic minerals were met with dariag the progress of the work. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) WILLIAM B. FORD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



{Appendix No. 20.) 

TOWNSHIP OF PARKIN. 

District op Nipissing. 

St. Mary's, Ontario, 

May 4th, 1899. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the survey of the Town 
ship of Parkin, in the District of Nipissing, surveyed under instructions from your 
Department dated 8th July, 1898. 

On the 3rd of September, procuring teams at Sudbury, I proceeded by what is 
known as the government Road, with my party and supplies to Le Moines' Landing, on 
Lake Wahnapitse, crossing this late by tug to lot 23, concession 6, in the Township of 
Rathbun, I arrived at the southeast angle of my township on the 8th of September, and 
commenced the survey by brushing out and chaining the southern boundary of the town- 
ship planted the posts to mark the front angles of the lots in the first concession. 
The direction of the south boundary was found to be considerably north of a due west 
line, consequently the north boundary instead of being a due west line is run on a bearing 
to connect the two northerly angles of the township which is N. 88°-05° W astronomical. y 
I planted at the southeast angle of the township a jack pine post with an iron post along- 
side marked on the southwest side *• Norman," on northwest side " Parkin," on the 
east side " Aylmer ; " and I planted iron posts, suitably marked, at the other angles of 
the township. 

I surveyed the various concessions and sidelines as shown on the accompanying plan 
and field notes and in accordance with instructions. The general character of the surface 
of the township is rocky and hilly, with very little land fit for settlement, the percentage 
of arable land being small. The lower levels are covered with stones, boulders and mossy 
swamps in many places. A very high hill in the north-easterly portion of the township^ 
attains an elevation of about 500 feet. Mountain Oreek drains the greater portion of 
the township. This stream could be made available for driving purposes without incur- 
ring very much outlay. 

This stream, on lot 8, concession III, has a falls of about 15 feet in height, giving an 
excellent opportunity for a mill-site. The Wahnapitse River flows through lots 1 and 2, 
concession 6 , and is a shallow stream with a rapid current having a average width of 
about 150 feet. 

The east half of the township contains a considerable quantity of white and red 
pine of a merchantable quality 10 to 24 inches in diameter, the details of which are given. 



1899 J ;^CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 43 

in the timber map sent herewith. Extensive areas of jack pine were met with, and also 
sprace and tamarac, suitable for pulp-wood and ties. 

The rock exposures are generally the qoartzites, felsites, clay slates, etc., of the 
Huronian age, with small areas of diorite and diabskse, in the south-westerly part of 
the township the gneiss and granite of the Laurentian formation are found, although not 
80 much exposed. 

The township is overrun with moose, red deer, bear and the small fur-bearing 
animals ; partridges were also very plentiful. 

There were no settlers or miners in the township at the time of survey. 

The magnetic variation of the needle was found to be 5 degrees west. 

Herewith I send plan, field notes, timber map, etc., with account. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) H. R. McEVOY. 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

CommiBsioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(^Appendix No. 21.) 
TOWNSHIP OF HUTTON. 

District op Nipissing. 

Bracebridgb, Ontario, 

December 20th, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the Township 
of Hutton in the District of Nipissing, under instructions from your Department dated 
July 8th, 1898. 

Leaving Sudbury on the 4th of August, I proceeded by wagon road to the Vermil- 
ion River, near the northeast angle of the Township of Hanmer, thence by canoes up the 
river to the south boundary of the Township, where I commenced the survey by retracing 
and re-chaining this boundary, planting the posts to mark the front angles of the lots in 
the First Concession. 

The east boundary had been run for over two miles in the survey of Mining Loca- 
tions, and, after obtaining an observation of Polaris at the northeast angle of W. R, 76, 
I continued this boundary due north until it intersected the south boundary of the 
Township of Creelman, produced, which had been run by O. L. S., T. J. Patten, before I 
reached that portion of the Township. 

I planted a wooden post, with the lot and con. marked on the proper sides thereof, 
at the northeast angle of the Township, and also an iron post marked " Hutton" facing 
the southwest, and " Parkin" facing the southeast. 

The first five concessions were given a depth of 80, chains, as nearly as practicable, 
and the 6 th Con. is somewhat lefs tfcan 80 chains, owing to the last mile of the south 
boundary bearing to the south of west. 

The Township is much broken by rocky ridges, some of which attain a considerable 
elevation in the southerly portion, where the rocks are of Laurentian age ; while in the 
northerly portion felsite greywackes and clay-slates of the Huronian formatipn aie met 
with, though not so much exposed. 

The lower levels throughout the Township are extensively covered with boulders, 
stones, and gravel, with very little soil, and the beds of streams are generally a mass ot 
boulders, so that only a very small percentage is suitable for agriculture. The Township 
is well supplied with water, the Vermilion River with its lake expansions draining the 
easterly part, and the west branch, a wide, shallow stream, much obstructed by rapids, 
drains the westerly portion. 

Deposits of gravel are frequently met with, along the streams, containing fine gold 
and magnetite, and a number of prospectors have staked out claims during the summer. 



44 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 

These gravel and sandy deposits have evidently been brought down from the nonh, as 
the material of which they are composed, namely, conglomerates, quartz, slates, garnets, 
etc., is generally different from the adjoining country rock. Ths gold is found in the 
sandy loam, sand, and gravel, near the surface of the ground and within 5 or 6 feet of 
the surface ; at greater depths only traces are found as a rule, and prospecting has not 
as yet been carried down to bed-rock. 

A number of promising claimg have been discovered along the west branch of the 
Vermilion River, particularly in concessions four and five, from which 50 to 150 colors 
to the pan have been washed with the ordinary gold pan. The timber throughout the 
Township is jack-pine, spruce, white birch, poplar, white pine, tamarac, balsam and red 
pine. Along the south and west boundaries is found white pine from 12 to 24 inches in 
diameter, the particulars of which are given in the tioaber map herewith. The variation 
of the magnetic needle was very irregular, more especially in the swamps and river val- 
leys. The average variation was found to be 6° 10' W. There were no settlers in the 
Township at the time of the survey. The plan, timber map and field notes accompany 
this report. I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) W. GALBRAITH, 

The Honourable J. M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Oommissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 

(Appendix No. 22.) 

TOWNSHIP OF BURK. 

District op Rainy River. 

PoFT Arthur, Ontario, 

December 28th, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the Township 
of Burk, District of Rainy River, made by me under your instructions, dated the 8th of 
June, 1898. 

This Township is situated around the Canadian Pacific Railway station of Bonheur, 
and is bounded on all sides by the unsurveyed lands of the Crown. 

I commenced at a post on the east boundary planted by O. L. S. Stewart, marked 
88 chains to south boundary, and ran the east boundary south to the south easb corner, 
where I planted an iron bar marked ' Burk " on the north west side, alongside a wooien 
post in a stone mound ; from this point a straight line was run to the south-west corner 
as established by 0. L. S Stewart, and the iron bar planted by him was marked " Burk " 
on the north east side ; also his wooden post marked Con. 1 on the north and Lot 12 on 
the east sides, posts were planted on this line at each 40 chains. The several concesnon 
lines and north boundary were run west astronomically, and the side lines, with east and 
west boundaries, north astronomically, and posts planted as instructed. Iron bars were 
planted alongside of wooden posts at the north-east and north-west corners marked 
** Burk " on the southwest and southeast sides respectively. 

The magnetic variation was almost uniformly five degrees east of north. 

With the exception of a number of gravel ridges and moraines, the Township is 
comparatively level, the surface consisting of sand, gravel, muskeg, and numerous small 
lakes. This being an unusually wet season the muskegs were full of water, and the lakes 
had overflowed their banks for several chains. 

The Township has been at some time completely burnt over, and is now covered by 
a thick growth of Jack-pine, poplar, birch and spruce of small size about 10 or 20 years 
old. I only came across a very few small patches of spruce that averaged 8 inches in 
diameter and no pine. I may say that there is no timber of value in the Township. 

The only game I met with were beaver, partridge and a few moose. 
I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) A. H. MACDOUGALL, 
The Honourable J, M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



1899] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 45 

(Appendix No. 2S.) 

TIE LINE OONNEOTING ISLANDS IN GEOEGIAN BAY. 

District op Parry Sound 

Meapord. Ont., 14th Dec, 1898. 

Sir, — I beg to herewith hand you my diary, map and report of my survey of 
certain islands and traverse line connecting them lying in front of the Townships of Con- 
ger and Cowper, Georgian Bay, performed under instructions from the Honourable Com- 
missioner of Grown Lands, dated the 8th day of July, 1898. 

After a careful perusal of my written instructions and in accordance with the verbal 
ones given me by Mr. Kirkpatrick, Director of Surveys, I ascertained and defined the 
most westerly portion of Moose Deer Point and from there after having taken a careful 
observation for Azimuth, latitude ana magnetic variation, ran a line due west astro- 
nomically to the most westerly and outlying islands on said line, and connected all by 
triangulation. At each station was planted a post properly marked in a substantial 
mound of stones. 

I found that in doing this that the entire Jubilee Island group lie to the ^outhward 
of this line. I then continued the traverse of the mainland northerly and easterly to 
what is shown on the map of Oonger Township as Moose Point, but is in reality a narrow 
neck of land some three chains in width, connecting lot No. 59 in the Third Concession 
of the Township of Oonger with what has been erroneously termed Loon Island but is 
really part of the mainland and should form part of the said Totwnship ot* Conger. 

I might state here that the firm of Newton <fe Bros, were at the time of survey taking 
logs off this part of the mainland under their license from the Indian Df partment which 
only includes and allows them to cut on the islands south of Moose Deer Point. I men- 
tioned this in one of my letters to the Department while making the survey, I continued 
my traverse along the northerly side of the mainland to side road between lots Noa. 55 
and 56, the centre of which I found marked by a pine poEt in a mound of stones. I also 
found the old blazed line in the centre of Road allowance, this I retract d for a consider- 
able distance. The post mentioned stands about one chain from the water's edge. I 
then traversed the southerly shore of main-land from Loon Portage to t he centre of town- 
line between the Townships of Freeman and Conger, which is marked by an iron bar and 
a cedar post driven in the ground about one chair from the water's edge. The old blazed 
line in the centre of the road allowance is well blazed. 

I also made a complete traverse of the additional part of Conger from Loon Portage 
north-westerly, northerly and easterly back to the place of beginning at the Portage, the 
bearings and distances of which are all fully shown on the accompanying map. 

I also connected all the islands along my traverse line by actual measurement and 
triangulation from Station No. 24 on Moose Point to Station No. 73, on Turning Island. 
All the stations are well marked by posts bearing their proper numbers and all securely 
planted in mounds of stone^ 

I connected my previous surveys for private partien with the main traverse line now 
established from Station No. 46 to Alice Island, this enables me to show all the islands 
I have surveyed up to date on the map. 

The group of islands of which Sadie and Brownie form a part has been connected by 
traverse to the town line of Freeman and Oorger at Lot No. 41 in the latter Township. 
It was necessary to establish this connection in order to locate and tie in a number of 
islands surveyed along the channel to Moon River, Wood's Bay and Sweet's Bay, all are 
famous for the good fishing they provide. 

Station No. 24 is at Latitude 45° 7' North and approx. Long. 80'' 5' West and the 
Magnetic Vi-riation is 5" 55 ' West of the true meridian which I established from thid point, 
this station is marked on the ground by a pine post 5" x 5" marked thus Lat. 45° 7' 
Long. 80° 05 ' and securely planted in a well built mound of stonep. 

I would just say in conclusion a word in regard to the protection of the fish that can 
be caught among the islands. I have, during my surveys among the islands on various 
parts of the shore accidentally come across people who were fishing by illegal means and 
using improper and illegal nets for the killing of bass and pickerel, which in my opinion 



46 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. '3 

should be bbtter protected than heretofore, and one very effectual way would be to en- 
tirely prohibit the sale of bass and pickerel. These fish will not gill easily and are 
caught in hoop and trap nets provided with long leads which the fish follow until they 
reach the funnel shaped mouth of the part of the net called the pot, here they enter and 
stay until the pirate or pot hunter of a fisherman, as he should be called, lifts his net. 
On OQe occasion I saw three hundred pounds of bass and pickerel rotting on the rocks 
the product of a haul of one of these trap nets. 

This kind of destruction, if allowed to continue, would soon deplete the supply and 
would be a great injustice to the true sportsman who visits the islands and spends con- 
siderable money in purchasing an island and beautifying it and who is satisfied with a 
reasonable catch as provided by law. 

The tourist you meet on the island is invariably anxioms to protect the fish by 
every means in his power, and very seldom do you ever see him killing a fish which 
v^eighs less than a pound and is satisfied with a catch of from six to ten per man. 

There were more people than ever before in my recollection on the islands during 
the past summer, and as the bay has now become one of the most popular and accessible 
summer resorts on ttie continent the number is bound to increase every year. 
1 have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

( Signed) J. G. SING, 

D. & O. L Surveyor. 
The Honourable J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Grown Linds, 
Toronto. 



Appendix No. 2Jf. 

TOWNSHIP OF SOUTHWORTH. 
District of Rainy River. 

Tilbury, Ontario, December 26th, 1898. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the Township 
of Southworth, in the District of Rainy River, performed under instructions from your 
department, bearing date the 12th July, 1898. 

I commenced the survey of the Tawnship as directed at 0. L. S. Stewart's iron and 
wooden posts, planted on the north and south sides of the right of- way of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, near the two hundred and thirty nine mile board, and then ran south astro- 
nomically the distance of one hundred and thirty chains and thirty links from the posts at 
the south side of the right of- way of the said railway, where 1 planted tamarac and iron 
posts for the southeast angle of the township, and marking the iron post with a cold 
chisel with the word Southworth and facing it to the northwest. 

I then ran the south boundary west astronomically, planting the lot posts thereon, 
until I reached the Little Wabigoon Lake, where I planted cedar and iron posts, marking 
the word Southworth on both of them and facing them towards the northeast. 

The other concession' lines and side lines, with a few exceptions, were run west and 
north respectively, except the portion of the north boundary from the south-east argle of 
of the township of Zealand, which was run east astronomically until it intersected the 
east boundary of the township. 

There was great difficulty in getting out to Little Wabigoon and Wabigoon Lakes 
with the concession lines and side lines where the land was level and low banks along the 
shore, owing to the water having backed up from the lakes and flooding over the land to 
the depth of from one to five ieet, and sometimes extending back half a mile or even a 
mile from the shore. I could not start the eight and nine side line or the ten and eleven 
side line from the shore of the lake at all in the fourth concession, and bad to run those 
lines south from the concession line in the rear, as far as I could until I was prevented by 
the water which was from two to three feet deep, as will be shown in the field notes. I 
have been informed by the residents of Wabigoon that the water has risen five or six 
feet in Wabigoon Lake on account of the dam being placed in the Wabigoon River at 
Dryden and will likely stay at this level. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 47 

The eastern portion of the township is rather rough and rocky having quite a num- 
ber of swamps lying between the rocky ridges and would not be very well adapted to agri- 
cultural purposes ; but the central and western portion of the township is more level and 
rolling and the soil is principally clay and clay loam, which i? particularly adapted for farm- 
ing purposes, I should think that there would be about fifty per cent, of the township that 
would make good farming land, and it would be an easy matter to make roads through it, 
as the principal part of the btst farming land lies close to the Canadian Pikcific Railway 
and is pretty level. 

The township is well watered by two large creeks running through it, namely, 
the McKenzie and McHugh's Creeks and several small ones, and then there is Wee Sandy 
Lake and some two or three smaller lakes in the interior portion of the township, besides 
the Wabigoon and Little Wabi^oon Lake? in the southern part of the township 
The lakes contain the usual kind of fish, such as baas, pickerel, pike and some white fish. 

Large game was rather scarce, such as moose, caribou and bear, bat the small game 
was rather plentiful, such as partridge, rabbit and duck. 

There is no pine in the township, nor timber of any kind that would be of any com- 
mercial value, as the fires have overrun this township several times in the past, and all 
the timber was burnt off. The land is now covered with small spruce, tamarac, poplar, 
and birch of recent growth. 

There are no settlers in the township except in the Village of Dinorwic and also one 
on H. W. 519 called McKevir's Point, where a pwty has put up a couple of shanties and 
has about half an acre cleared, but is not living there at present. 

There has not been any development work done on the mining locations this season 
in this township that I have seen, but a shaft has been sunk some time ago in the Ruby 
Mine on H. W. 125, The rock formation is principally Huronian and the indications 
show that some very good mines might Ve bad by proper investigation and development. 

The Village of Dinorwic seems to be a very prosperous village and by straightening 
the McKenzie River or Creek, by dredging the channel a little wider and cutting of the 
short bends, it would make a good steam boat route to Manitou Mining District. And 
1 understand that a wagon road has been built as a porcage between the lakes by the 
Hudson's Bay Com piny from their psst in this village northward to the Lac Seul Dis- 
trict, and I understand that it run; through the Minnietakie Mining District ; and by 
spending a little money judiciously on this road it could be made a good wagon road be- 
tween this village and the Minnietakie Mining District, where I understand they are 
putting in considerable mining machinery and also erecting a stamp mill. 

There was very little local attraction, the viriationa being 6 degrees, 30 minutes 
east and was pretty constant throughout. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) Jos. M. Tiernan, 
To the Hon. J. M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Comissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Ont. 

(Appendix No. 25.) 

TOWNSHIP OF MELGUND, 

District op Rainy River. 

Tilbury, Ontario, Jan. 2l8t, 1899, 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the Township 
of Melgund, in the District of Rainy River, surveyed by me under instructions from 
your department bearing date 10th day of Septeoiber, 1898. 

I commenced the survey of the township at the southeast angle thereof as directed 
in the instructions, at the 54th mile on O. L S. A. Nivea's Fifth Meridian Line, where 
he planted iron acd wooden posts. These posts I marked with the word Melgund and 
placed them towards the northwest, I marked the spruce post with the lot number and 
concession number on the west and north sides respectively. I then retraced O. L. S. 
Niven's Third Base line for the front of my first concession, planting the lot posts thereon 
at regular intervals of 40 chains except where Mining Locations were already surveyed, and 



48 



THE REPORT OP THE 



[ No. 3 



where the posts should be planted, until I reached the 6th mile post from the meridian, 
where O. L. 8. A. Niven had planted iron and wooden posts. I also marked these posts 
with the word Me'lgund and faced them tawards the north east. 

The iron and wooden posts at the northeast and northwest angles of the township 
were also marked in a similar way and the word Melgund placed towards the township. 
I then ran tne other concession lines and the side lines due west and north respectively 
except where interfered with by Mining Locations. 

The township is comparatively level except the southerly part of the 6th concession 
which is rather rough and mountainous. The soil is principally clay and clay loam of a 
very good quality and would make very good agricultural land. Hay and root crops 
could be grown to good advantage here and they always command a good price. The 
marshes and muskegs are geneially sandy, but in some places there is beautiful black 
loam, with clay sub-soil, which would be excellent land for farming purposes. 

The township would be very easy to drain as the surface naturally inclines towards 
the Little Wabigoon River, through several creeks and swales, and it would not takfr 
very much excavation and improvement on these to make them sufficient to properly 
drain the land. 

The township is well watered by the Little Wabigoon River which enters the town- 
ship in Lot 1, in the 2nd Concession, and flows westerly in a very tortuous course through 
the 2nd and 3rd Cons., crossing the west boundary in the 3rd Concession. There is also 
a portion of Shallow Lake and Long Lake rivers in the Townships, the former entering 
the Township in Lot 4 in the 1st Con. flowing northerly and westerly through Lots 4 
and 5 and entering the Little Wabigoon River in Lot 6, in the 2nd Con. Long Lake 
River crosses into the Township a few chains in two places on the West boundary in the 
2 ad Concession. 

Bear Creek is also quite a large stream which enters the Township in Lot 4, in the 
6th Concession, and flows southeasterly through Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, in the 6th, 5th,, 
4th and 3.d Concessions, entering the Little Wabigoon River in Lot 9, in the 3rd Con. 

There are also a couple of small lakes in the 6 th Concession, namely, Burnets and 
part of Kannabutch Lake, the former on the west boundary and the latter on the north 
boundary. The water in the lakes is very clear and abounds with beautiful fish. Bass, 
pickerel, pike and white fish being the principal varieties, the river waters are very dark 
except Long Lake river and scarcely any fish in them. There are several falls and rapids 
in Shallow Lake and the Little Wabigoon River east of Lot seven which would furnisb 
excellent water-power. The average width of the rivers is about 50 feet. 

There is no pine in the township except a few pitch-pine scattered here and there, 
neither is there any other timber that would be of any commercial value, except a small 
portion in Lots 4 and 5, in the 4th concession, and in the 5th concession, which has some 
pretty fair s^zed Tamarac on from 8 to 16 inches in diameter 

There has been quite a lot of prospecting done in the township, but there has not 
been much developing work done, that I could see. There is an old shaft put down on 
E 163, and has been abandoned several years ago. The machinery is still there. As the 
hole was filled up with water we could not see how deep the shaft was sunk. There are 
some four or five prospectors located on their locationp, viz : S V 249 and S V 255, who 
are doing some developing work on their claims The Canadian Pacific Railway crosses 
the township in the 6th concesiion from lot 1 to 8 inclusive. 

Dyment Station appears to be a village that will be very prosperous in the near 
future, as the Government Road is built from the south to the New Klondike, and if the 
mines there turn out favorably, which fiom the present indications there is little doubt 
ot, then this would be the principal distributing point for all the mines in that vicinity,, 
and as far south as the Manitou, and also for any mines to the north of this place. 

There are no settlers in the township except those before mentioned on their loca- 
tions. Game ia rather plentiful — moose, cariboo, partridge, rabbit, and also fox and 
mink. 1 have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



The Hon. J. M. Gibson, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(SigLed) Jos. M. Tiernan, 

Ontario Land Survey w 



1899 J CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 4d 



(Appendix N'o. 26). 

BASE LINE, DISTRICT OF ALGOMA. 

Halibubton, Ontabio, 

October 30th, 1899. 

yiR, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of 120 miles of 
base line in the Algoma District, surveyed under instructions from your Department, 
dated 2Dd June, 1899. 

Leaving Toronto on the 5th of June, I proceeded to Matagami Station, on the 
Canadian Pacific Railway, in the Algoma District, and from this point I went in with 
canoes via the Spanish and Matagami Rivers a distance of over 100 miles, to a point 
about two miles north of where my line was supposed to cross the Matagami River, 
thence by Portasje Lake and stream to Porcupine Lake, and thence easterly through the 
woods six miles to my starting point near Night Hawk Lake, viz, the 120th mile post 
from the north east angle of the Township of Lumsden, planted in 1896 on the boundary 
line between the Districts of Algoma and Nipissing, being in latitude 48*^ 27' 54" north. 

I commenced my survey of the 20th of June, running west astronomically from said 
120 mile post and continued the survey from day to day until the 16th of September. 

I crossed the Matagami River on the 17th mile, the Groundhog on the 45th mile, 
the Pisbkanogama at the 63rd mile, Trout River on the 82nd mile, entered Miesanabie 
Lake on the 111th mile and left one of its bays at the 117th mile, terminating my sur- 
vey at the 120th mile in accordance with instructions and returning to Toronto via. 
Missanabie Lake, and the Canadian Pacific Railway on the 19th of September. 

The line was well cut out and blazed and carefully measured, wooden posts were 
planted at every mile and iron costs every three miles, marked with a cold chisel on the 
east side « III. M.." "VI. M," " IX. M.," etc., up to "CXX. M." Mounds of stone, 
where stones could be found, were built around the posts. Bearing trees were also 
taken marked " B. T," and their size, course, and distance from the posts noted. 
T^bere the end of a mile came in a lake or river the post was planted on the line on the 
nearest land and the distance noted. In these cases the iron posts were marked with a. 
plus or minus sign as the case might be. 

Astronomical observations were taken frequently, the details of which will be found; 
in the field notes. The magnetic variation of the needle averaged about 6 deg. W, being 
10 deg. west at the beginning of the line and 4 deg. west at its termination. 

{Genbbal Description. 

The initial point of the line, the 1 20th mile post on the District boundary, is in a 
level clay country timbered •with spruce and poplar, which may be described as a part of 
the Abitibi Valley. Going wesc from this point the line leaves the level country at 
about ihe end of the 4th mile and enters upon a more or less broken and rocky section 
of the Huronian formation extending to the end of the 10th mile. From this point the 
country is comparatively level to the Matagami River on the 17th mile, and for some 
distance beyond, the soil being clay in places, with sand and sandy loam in others, with 
belts of tamarac, spruce and cedar swamps. 

From the Matagami River on the 17th mile to the 50th mile the line passes through 
a country not particularly rough or smooth, exposures of Huronian rock in places, strips 
of swamp and flats of spruce, with an occasional hill, are the general features, while the 
soil is clay in places but generally sandy, sand and stones frequently, and the timlx r of 
all kinds, spruce predominating with poplar, tamarac, birch, balsam and pitch pine, with 
now and then cedar in the swamps. 

From the 50th to th« 59th mile the country is more rolling and hilly than the pre- 
ceding 30 miles and there is not much good land along this part of the line. The 59th 
mile is through level land, sandy loam and large spruce birch and balsam. Miles 60 and 
61 are again undulating, and the line then enters a brule about 25 years old. The 
brule extends about two miles south and about 16 ntjiles north and west (occasionally 
broken by green bush) to Trout river oa the 82nd mile. This tract of country may be 
described as rolling and occasionally hilly with a few rock exposures (gneiss) and tamarac 
and spruce swamps. The soil is sandy and sandy loam. 
4 C.L. 



60 .THE REPORT OF THE [No. 3 

From the 70th mile west the country is of a rougher description than to the east. 
From Trout river on the 82nd mile to Miasanabie lake and the 111th mile the country 
is a little more broken by lakes, and it is also hilly in places. The soil is sometimes 
clay but generally saudy with considerable brule from the 9 2 ad to the 105 th mile. 

From the west side of Missanabie lake to the end of the line at the 120th mile, the 
country is again rolling, rocky and hilly, sandy soil and occasionally burnt. In fact most 
of the country along the west side of Missanabie lake to the Canadian Pacific Railway 
has been burnt over and presents a rocky, desolate appearance. 

Timber. 

Spruce is the principal timber along the whole line. Tamarac is the next in the low 
land but a large proportion of it is for some reason or other dead, in many places almost 
all dead. There is a large amount of poplar along '^he line and of good size. Spruce and 
poplar on the dry level land is the principal timber the general size being from 8 to 16 
inches in diameter. The line runs through a large amount of this timber particularly on 
the firat 40 miles. Fitch pine, white birch, balsam, cedar and balm of Gilead are the 
other kinds of timber. Cedar is not to say plentiful, bat was frequently found of fair 
size and quality in the swamps and along the lake shores throughout the whole length of 
the line. A considerable amount of pitch pine was passed through on the highlands, 
principally on the central and west part of the line. In m»ny places it is of good size 
fit for lumber and railway ties. 

There is no white pine on the first 50 miles of the line, a small grove of red pine on 
the shore of a lake on the 39th mile, on the 52nd mile we got a little white pine and on 
the 74th mile the line passes through a groove of fairly good timber, from 12 to 20 inches 
diameter, about 2^000 logs in sight, and from this to the end of the line a few trees of red 
and white were occasionally met with. 

' Water. 

The line crosses ail the rivers in the country flowing north to James' Bay, and 
quite a number of lakes, the largest being Missanabie. 

The Matagami River, where the line crosses, is 2 chains 40 links wide, and quite 
deep. This is one of the three large rivers forming the Moose, and has a length of about 
300 miles 

Kamiskataia River, 1 chain, 85 links wide, falls into the Matagami about 12 miles 
north of the line. 

The Grounihog River at the 45th mile has a general width of about three chains, 
flows north, and after receiving the waters of the Pishkanogama River falls into the Ma- 
tagami about 90 miles north of the line. 

The Pishkanogama River at the 63rd mile is about 3 chains wide and joins the 
Groundhog about 25 miles north of the line. 

Trout River on the 82nd mile is 10 chains wide where the line crosses with about 6 
chains of grass on each side. Slow current and no rapids for 30 miles to the south. It 
joins the Kapuskasing River, which crosses the line on the 87 th mile, at a point about six 
miles down stream and about a mile north of the Kapuskasing Lake, and the united 
streams under the name of Kapuskasing, then falls into the Matagami River, about 100 
miles north of the line. A bay of Kapiskasing Lake was crossed on the 86th mile. 
This lake ia about 8 miles long and two miles in width at its widest part. 

ffay Creek was crossed on the 107 th mile, 1^ chains wide, flowing north into Miss- 
anabie River, so called because the Indians and H. B. Oo. cut their hay from the flats, 
the gra's growing very luxuriantly for many miles on both sides of the creek. 

The most important sheet of water is Missanabie Lake. It is about 30 miles in 
length and from one to five miles in width, with numerous bays. Where the lines crossed, 
abiut three miles south- west of Brunswick post of H.B. Oa., it was abont If miles wide. 
The water falls into the Missanabie River and forms a part of the great highway from 
Lake Supprior to James Bay. 

In addition to the waters mentioned, the line crosses numerous small streams and 
lakes as shown by the plan accompanying this report. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 61 



The geological formations crossed were the Hnronian and Laarentian, but of these 
Mr. W A. Parks, B.A., of Toronto University, who accompanied the party as geologist, 
will report fal y. I may here say that Mr. Parks obtained much valuable information 
as to water communication in the country through which the line passes, he having tra- 
versed nearly all the canoe routes between the Canadian Pacific Railway and the line, 
and for some distance north of the line. 

Signs of moose and caribou were frequently seen on the survey, and partridge were 
plentiful. Fish of the usual kind, pike and pickerel, were plentiful in most of the lakes, 
trout, both salmon and speckled, in some of them, emptying into the Missanabie River. 
Duck were plentiful on the rivers, and the usual fur-bearing animah are to be found in 
the country, but the ground is pretty well occupied by the Hudson B^y Company's In- 
dians during the trapping season. 

Herewith are fall returns of the survey, including copy of the barometric observa- 
tions taken along the line from Night Hawk Lake to Mitsanabie Like, and connected 
with the elevation of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Missanabie Station. 

I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) A. NIVEN, 



To the Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 



Ontario Land Surveyor. 



Appendix No. 21. 
BASE AND MERIDIAN LINES. 

District of Algoma. 

Toronto, Ontario, 

28th September, 1899. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of base and 
meridian lines in the Michipicoton region of the District of Algoma, pursuant to instruc- 
tions from your department dated 5th of June, 1899. 

Leaving Toronto on the 4th of July, I proceed* d to Chapleau where I organized a 
party of fifteen men and prepared the outfit and provisions necessary for the work. 

Having arranged for the shipment of part of the supplies to Missanabie and Grasett 
stations, and thence down the Magpie River, we took tbe remainder with us to Dalton 
station and, following the line of railway, reached the starting point of the survey, being 
xhe intersection of the boundary between townships numbers 43 and 45, as run by O.L S. 
E. Stewart in 1893. 

This point, situate a short distance south of the 665th mile bmrd on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, was shown in the instructions to be distant 202 chains and 58 links 
west from the north east angle of townsh'p number 43, and was defined on the ground 
by a cedar post and iron post marked " 43 " on the south side and •• 45 " on the north 
side. From this point I ran west astronomically on chords of a parallel of latitude for 
thirty three miles, enumerating from the north east angle of Township No. 43, the line 
being deflected six minutes north at every sixth mile post. 

From the thirty- third mile post I ran due south for eighteen miles and thence dae 
>«est a distance of four miles, eleven chains and seventy-two links to the east limit of 
mining location Y 122, that location being now the town site of Michipicoton. 

Except where such point occurred in a lake or rivpir, a wood^-n pist was planted at 
the end of every mile and an iron post 3 feet long and \\ inches in diametfrr at the end ; " 
every third mile, the number of the mile being marked on the side of the post neartst the 
starting point. The wooden posts were made of the most durable timber to be found in 
the vicinity, and wherever practicable a mound of stones was erected about the post and 
bearing trees marked and noted in the usual manner. 



62 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3; 

Where a mile terminated in a lake or river the post was planted on the line on the 
nearest land and marked with the number of the mile, pins or minus the number of chains 
and links. Astronomical observations, for the purpose of verifying the course of the line, 
were taken at short intervals. 

The magnetic variation, except in two or three instances, was uniform at three 
degrees west. 

Generally speaking, the country through which these base and meridian lines pass is 
rugged and broken, that in the vicinity of Wawa Lake and the Magpie River being almost 
mountainous, some of the rocky blufi-i rising to an altitude of five hundred feet above the 
surrounding valleys, and with precipitous sides. Scarcely any level land was met with, 
and, in consequence, it was generally found impossible to move the camp outfit along the 
surveyed line, winding trails having to be cut for that purpose. 

The soil is principally sandy and stony, the greater part being rocky. Only in one or 
two instances was clay soil seen, that being north of the first mile on the Second Baise line. 

The timber consists chiefly of white birch, spruce, tamarac, balsam, poplar and cedar, 
with a few scattered white and red pine trees. Braid of abotit twelve years covers the 
first twelve miles of the First base line, also from the twenty-seventh to the thirty third 
mile of the same. Between the twelfth and twenty-eighth miles of this base lite the timber 
is fairly heavy, a considerable part of the spruce having a commercial value as pulp wood, 
and the same is true of the timber on the meridian line, with the exception of braid on the 
seventh, eleventh, twelfib, thirteenth and fourteenth miles. On the Second base line the 
first two and a half miles and the fourth mile contain fairly valuable timber of the same 
character. Jack pine plains extend from the Michipicoton River to within a short dis- 
tance of this base line opposite the third and fourth miles, but the timber is chiefly of 
small size. 

In the fifteenth mile on the First base line, Manitowick lake, a body of good fresh water, 
about twelve miles long and from one-quarter to one and one-half miles wide, is crossed by 
the line. This lake is a part of the main canoe route between Missanabie and Michipi- 
coton, and, prior to the construction of the Canadian Pacific Eiilway, formed a part of an 
important canoe route between Lake Superior and James Bay. The Magpie River, a fine 
stream of an average breadth of from two to three chains, with occasional lake expansions, 
is crossed by the First Base line on the thirty-second mile and by the meridian line on the 
fourth, fifth and seventh miles, and runs thence about parallel to the meridian line for a 
distance of about three miles, thence trending southwesterly to its junction with the 
Michipicoton Biver at a point about one mile from Lake Superior and near the production 
of the Second Base line. 

The almost continuous rapids between its mouth and the Canadian Pacific Railway 
prevent the Magpie River being much used for traffic between those points, but the pos- 
sibilities for the development of water-power may prove of much value to the district if 
mining operations in the future are carried on. 

Wawa Lake, having a length of five miles by a breadth of about one mile, is crossed 
by the meridian line in the thirteenth mile. Numerous small lakes were crossed by both 
base and meridian lines. 

The Laurentian formation prevails in the first twelve miles of the First Base line, 
the remainder of the survey being through the Huronian formation. Hematite iron ore 
was seen on the twenty ninth and thirtieth miles of the First Base line, also between 
Walbank and Wawa Lakes, on the meridian line. 

Numerous iron mining claims were staked by prospectors in the- localities mentioued, 
and some development work had been done. To reach these properties a railway is already 
being built from Gros Cap on Lake Superior, and indications are tbat active mining opero- 
tions will at once begin and ore may be shipped before the close of navigation. 

A considerable number of gold mining claims are beiug opened up and developed to the 
south of Wawa Lake. The number of iron and gold mining claims already laid ouc and the 
development work in progress, in addition to the mineral indi:ations above noted, are con- 
vincing proofs of thhe mineral wealth of this region. Special attention has been devoted to 
the Michipicoton country by geological experts on behalf of the Federal and Local Govern- 
ments, and further details in this report would be but repetition of what has already been 
made public. 

Specimens of ore secured daring my survey will be sent to the Bureau of Mines. 



imt ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 53 

The water in the streams and lakes met with is o! good quality and, generally, wpU 
stocked with lake trout, speckled trout, pickerel and pike. 
Small fruits were abundant in the burnt country. 

Accompanying this report, I beg to submit field notes and a general plan showing the 
lines surveyed, together with such additional information as to water routes, etc., as could be 
gathered during the progress of the work. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) T. B. SPEIGHT, 
To the Honorable J. M. Gibson, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Grown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Appendix No. 28) 

TOWNSHIP OF DELAMERE. 

di8tbict of nipi8sing. 

Hamilton, Ontario, 

15th November, 1899. 

Sir, — We have the honour to report the completion of the survay of the Township 
of Delamere, in the District of Nipissing, performed under instructions from your 
Department, dated July 13tb, 1899. 

The work was performed by our W. B. Ford and a psurty of twelve men, who pro- 
ceeded to the township from Sturgeon Falls on the 24th of July, via steamboat and 
canoe, across Lake Nipissing and down the French River, reaching the locality on the 
evening of the 25 th. The work was carried on uninterruptedly till the completion of 
the same on the 27th of August, 1899. 

The dry hemlock post, mentioned in the instructions from your Department, as Mr. 
McAree's second mile post, could not be found, but the witness post on the west shore of 
the bay of French River was found standing in a cairn of stones, and. consequently the 
Bontheast angle of the township was taken as being 59.33 chains east of said witness 
post. 

At the S.E. corner the iron post planted at the noith shore of the French River was 
marked Delamere on the N.W. side and Cosby on the northeast side; the wooden post 
was marked con. 1 on the north and 1 on the west side. 

At the southwest corner the iron post was marked Delamere on the N.£. side, and 
Oox on the N.W. side ; the wooden post was marked con. 1 on the north, on the west, 
and 13 on the east sides. 

At the N.E. corner the iron post wsus maiked Delamere, on the S.W., Cosby on the 
S.E., and Cherriman on the N. side and the wooden post was marked con. YI. on the 
south, 1 on the west and 13 on the east sides. 

The whole of the township has been overrun by fire at different times, so that very 
little timber exists, what there is being chiefly small second growth poplar and birch, 
with belts of jack-pine towards the northern part of the township. There appeared to be 
very little second growth red and white pine. 

Nearly all that portion of the township lying between the chain of lakes connecting 
with the upper and lower Sturgeon Lakes, and the straight narrow sheet of water now 
known as the Murdock River, but shown on Mr. McAree's field notes of the south limit 
of timber berth 35, run in 1882 as the Johnston River, is good farming country, the soil 
being chiefly clay and sandy loam, the southern portion being almost void of timber, the 
northern portion becoming more rocky and undulating, and having more timber. 

In the south-easterly portion of the township the country is rocky and mountainous ; 
in the north easterly portion it becomes level and marshy, and in the north-westerly por- 
tion and west of the Murdock it is undulating and rocky, the ridges all trending in a 
north-westerly and south-easterly direction, the valleys being filled with thick alder 
swamps. 



64 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



The constrnction of the prop38ed Toronto to Sudbury branch of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway, which according to the projected line will pass throus^h the south-westerly por- 
tion of the township, will provide access to nearly all the land fit for cultivation. 

No compass lines were run — saving one between lots 4 i>nd 5 in concessions 1 and 2 
which was re-run with the transit — in the performance of the work. The variation of the 
needle was very erratic, ranging from 19° 40' west, to 13° east, and seldom remained the 
same at two adjoining stations. 

The country abounds with deer and moose, hardly any other game being seen,, 
wolves were heard frequently, and the lakes are plentifully stocked with fish, chiefly bass. 
No economic minerals were met with during the progress of the work. The geologi- 
cal formation appeared to be Laurentian, the rocks merging; from granite to diorite gneiss. 
Accompanying this report are plans, field notes, etc., of the survey. 

We have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Signed) TYRRELL & FORD. 
Hon. E J. Davib, 

Commissioner of Grown Lands, 

Toronto. 

[AppmdixNo. 29). 
TOWNSHIP OF OOSBY. 

District of Nipissing. 

Peteeborough, Ontario, 

December 12 th, 1899. 

Sir,— I have the honor to submit herewith the returns of survey of the Township of 
Coeby, Nipissing District, carried out this autumn under instructions from your Depart- 
ment. 

I commenced the survey at the wood post planted by O.L.S. McAree in 1882, and 
the iron post planted at the same point by O.L.S. Goad to define the south-west angle of 
the Martland township. 

These posts define also the south-east comer of Cosby. Upon the north-west face of 
the iron post I chiselled the word Cosby. 

The south boundary I retraced west to the bay on French River wherein the south- 
west angle of the township comes, giving to each lot the regular width of 40 chains, run- 
ning mean- time, the several side lines north two concessions. 

Around the bay I ofifsetted west to the boundary which, at this place, I found had 
just been run by Messrs. Tyrell and Ford, for the south end of the east boundary of Dela- 
mere. The frontage of lot 13 is 28 81 chains. 

The iron post at the south west comer of Cosby is placed 1.65 chains north of the 
theoretic angle in the bay. Upon its south east face was properly cut the name Cosby. 

Returning to the starting point, at the south-east angle, I retraced the east boundary 
to the north east comer where I found the iron post that defined it. This I marked 
Cosby on the south-west face. From the east boundary I ran the concession lines west 
astronomically, all but the last two, which were run east from side Inie lots 2 and 3. 

En route west I took up the side lines to the north boundary. 

I also ran out the west boundary (east boundary Delamere) through Concessions IV., 
V. and VI. to the south boundary of the Township of Cherriman. At point of intersrc- 
tion with it, I planted an iron post marked " Cosby " on south-east face and " Delamere " 
on south- west face. 

The west boundary strikes Cherry man 12.40 chains east of its south-west angle. 

All that part of the township lying south of Wolf and Wolseley Rivers, comprising 
the first four concessions and about one half of the fifth, is good clay land, tolerably free 
from stone, pretty level, gently undulating, easily cleared, and well adapted for settle- 
ment. The tract north of these streams is more or less broken, very sandy, and hardly 
suited for general farming purposes. 

The country around here has evidently, within a not remote period, been overrun by 
a succession of fires, as is sufficiently attested by the relics of the old, aa well as by the 
kind and character of the new forest growth upon it. Except a narrow strip of red and 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



white pine of medium size along the north bank of Wolseley River, in Lots 2 and 3, Oon- 
oession V., there is no timber of vsdue in the Township. The great proportion is covered 
with poplar, white birch, small spruce, alder, willows, &c. 

Yerj stringent means are necessary to be put in force in order to protect the forest 
resources of the Province from fires, which annually destroy, or render valueless, millions 
of dollars worth of timber. 

The lakes and rivers contain good maskinonge, bass, &,c. Signs of moose, deer and 
bear have been frequently met with, and there is no doubt these animals are on the 
increase 

Of the land area in the Township, I consider 70 per cent, good, requiring little labor 
to clear and cultivate. 

Hoping the returns will be found satisfactory to the Department, 
I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed), J. W. FITZGERALD, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
To the Hon. E. J. Davib, 

Oommifisioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto. 

{Appendix No. 30.) 

RE-SURVEY OF PART OF THE TOWNSHIP OF BLAKE. 

District op Thundbb Bay. 

Port Arthur, Ontario, 

November, 10th, 1899. 

Sir, — I have the honor to report that, in accordance with your instructions, dated 
August 2nd, 1899, I have completed the re survey of part of the Township of Blake. 

On September 30th, with five men and supplies, I drove to the north-west corner of 
Blake. After some difficulty I found a starting point at the south east corner of Section 
X[, Concession 1, where 1 found the old bearing-trees and original post lying down. 
From this I traced the old blazes to the west boundary of the township. At this inter-' 
section I found the point of the original post. From this point I was able trace the 
boundary by following occasional old blazes to the south boundary of Paipoonge. At the 
intersection of the south side of the road allowance and this line, I planted a large wooden 
post and iron bar, marked " Paipoonge " on the north, " Blake " on the south-east, and 
" Scoble " on the south-west. With this start I was able to trace by closely following the 
old blazes (which were in places very scarce) and chaining all the lines in finding the 
places of all the original posts, except some of the quarter section ones. These seem to 
have been only about two inches square and, in a number of cases, all traces of them and 
their places had been completely destroyed. In these cases I planted new posts half way 
between section comers. All section comer posts were marked with scribing iron with 
number of section on east and west, and unmber of concession on north and south sides. 

The whole of this part of the township has been burnt over and the timber destroyed, 
except a small portion in the north. It is now covered by a dense growth of hazel and 
other scrub. 

The only portions surveyed fit for cultivation are Concessions 1 and part of Sections 
X and XI, Concessions II, III and IV. The rest consists chiefly of a series of trap blufia 
and ravines, from 300 to 600 feet high. Two or three of the lines I did not retrace on 
that account. 

The good land seems to extend up the valley of Slate River and on to Jarvis River^ 
where it covers a considerable area. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) A. H. MAODOUGALL. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



-66 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 

{Appendix No. Si.) 
TOWNSHIP OF MASON. 

DiSTBICT OP NiPISSING. 

Peterborough, Ontario, 
December 12th, 1899. 

Sir, — I beg herewith to submit the plan and field notes and account of the survej 
X)f the Township of Mason on the French River, surveyed by me according to Depart- 
mental Instructions dated August 25th, 1899. 

Mason is bounded west and south by the French Eiver, on the north by the Town- 
ship of Cosby, and east by lands not yet surveyed. 

I commenced the survey as instructed by tracing the east boundary from the south- 
east angle of the Township of Cosby 80 chains south. From this point I ran west 
astronomically the line for the front of Concession VI to the French River giving to the 
lots a uniform frontage of 40 00 chains. 

From the proper points established on this line I ran the several side lines to the 
north boundary and south to the South branch of the French River on Meridian bearing. 
The lines for the fronts of Concessions III, IV and V, I also ran from the east boundary 
west to the French River, giving them a depth each of 80 chains on the east boundary. 
The posts between Lots 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6, etc., for Concession 2, I planted at high 
water mark on the South branch of the French River at the distance of 40 chains 
astronomically west from the side lines immediately east of them. As will be seen by 
the Timber Plan herewith furnished, the easterly one-third of the Township is covered 
with heavy green bush, hemlock, birch, basswood, cedar, maple, etc. This timber is 
generally of size and quality suitable for commercial uses. The remaining two-thirds, or 
nearly so of the township, is a brule overgrown with poplar, birch, alder and willows, inter- 
spersed in places with spruce and cedar swamps, and small clumps of mixed green bush 
of little value. That portion of the township lying north of the north channel of the 
French River with the exception of a strip averaging about 15 chains wide on the 
shore of the river, including lots 1 to 4 in conce'ssions III and IV, is good clay land 
suitable for settlement, but for the rest the country is rocky and broken, and unfit tor 
cultivation generally. The north channel of the French River is on the proposed route 
of the Ottawa and Georgian Bay Ship Oanal. It is of considerable depth, and lies in a 
depression of some fifty to eighty feet below the general level of the surrounding 
country. Its shores are bold and rocky, and it ranges in width from a chain or two up 
to half a mile or more in some open stretches. There is but one rapid in its course 
through the township. It occurs on lot 8, concession VI, where the river falls about 
three feet in a distance of about 4 chains. The iron post at the north-east angle of 
the township I marked in the proper way with the word Mason on its south-west face. 
The iron post properly marked on its north-west face, I planted on the east boundary at 
high water mark on the south branch of the French River. I also planted an iron post 
at the inter-section of side line 12 and 13 with high water mark on the same branch 
^th the word Mason properly cut into its north-east face according to instructions. The 
usual kinds of fish, game, etc., are found in plenty, and seem to be multiplying rapidly. 
About 30 per cent, would, I think, represent the arable portion of this township, 
although much of the remainder is capable of supplying extensive pasturage for stock- 
raibing purposes. 

Hoping the returns will be found satisfactory to the Department, 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) J. W. FITZGERALD, 

Ontario Land Suiveyor. 

The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



18&y ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 57 



{Appendix No. 32.) 

RONDEAU PROVINOIAL PARK. 

Rondeau Provincial Park, 

Morpeth, January 2nd, 1900. 

To the UoHorable E. J. Bavig, Commissioner of Crown Lands, Toronto. 

SlB,— 

I have the honour to submit this my report as caretaker of the Rondeau Provincial 
Park for the year 1899. 

It is five years last June since this Park opened as a Provincial Park. Since that time 
it has become very popular as a summer resort, although it has two very serious draw- 
backs. One is the poor road between the town line of Howard and Harwich and the 
Park, which is only one and a half miles. For that distance the passengers of heaviV 
loaded vehicles must get out and walk. The sand is so deep that horses coming long dis 
tances find ic all they can do to draw the empty carriages. The second great need is for 
a public house to accommodate choi>e from a distance who would like to stay there a week, 
a month or three months. It is inconsistent with its purpose that a place like Rondeaa 
Park, which nature has made one of the most beautiful spots in Ontario, should be held 
back when a small amount of money would make it all that could be desired. Another 
thing very much needed is a telephone from Morpeth which is only six miles away. The 
wire from Ridgetown to Morpeth has been in operation for many years. For the last 
two years the campers have been urging to have the wire extended to the Park. It would 
save the Government horses many long trips and would be a great convenience to the 
public who resort here and would be much bolster than a post office for this place. 

We have seventy-three Mongolian and English pheasants enclosed so that they can- 
not get away into the bush. However, several did esoi^pe before we got them into 
the covered enclosures. They all look strong and healthy. Daring the last three years 
we have allowed about two hundred to escape to the bush, hoping they would live there 
through the winter and multiply rapidly. We know that some of the pheasants have 
wintered in the bush, and have hatched their young there the following spring. I saw 
several of their young last June, bat where they have over three thousand acres to run in 
the greater part of which is exceedingly dense with underbrush, it would be hard to say 
how many there might he there now. They have a great many enemies to contend with, 
such as foxes, raccoons, skunks, weasels and even snakes, which swallow the little ones. 
The hawks and owls are also very destructive to the game fowl. We succeeded in shoot- 
ing and trapping about forty hawks and owls this fall. The native quail, partridge and 
black squirrels are getting very numerous since shooting has been prohibited in the Park, 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Isaac Gardiner, 

Ranger. 



{Appendix No. S3.) 
ALGONQUIN NATIONAL PARK. 

Algonquin National Park, 

Mowat P.O., January 1, 1900. 

To tlbs HoTiorable E. J. Davis, Commissioner of Crown Lands, Toronto. ' 

Sir,— 

As superintendent of the Algonquin N'alional Pirk of Ontario, I respectfully 
beg to hand you the following report for the year 1899, hoping that after having read 
the same you will feel satisfied that considerable progress has been made in the purposes 
for which the Park was established. The staff consists of nine rangers, one constable 
at Canoe Lake and myself. The duties of the rangers are many and very arduous, 
especially during the trapping season when each pair of rangers has to cover a large area 
-of unbroken forest, during the summer and fall with canoe and tump strap, and in the 
winter months with snow shoe and sled. From 1st June to 1st September there is no 



68 • THE REPORT OF THE [ No, S 

trapping done, and the rangers are employed in bnildicg sfaelter bouees, cleaning oat 
portages, improving grounds at headquarters (Cache Lake), making and repairing canoes, 
etc., etc. During the past y€ar we have made five new canoes, seven pairs of snow- 
shoes, built a Page wire enclosure for the deer and done a good deal of clearing up at the 
headquarters. We have built two new shelter houses, one on Mink Lake and one on 
Maniton Lake, and repaired some others. Portages were cut out as follows : From head- 
quarters to Cranberry Lake, and from Joe Lake to Lake Manitou on the north end of 
the Park. The boundary has been carefully blazed from Ragged lake east to the Eouth- 
east corner, thence north across the townships of Preston, Dickson, Anglin and part of 
Deacon to Trout lake ; also from Tea lake across the townships of Wilkes and Pentland 
to Crooked lake. We have also got our winter's supply of wood up at headquarters and 
several sleds, etc., made ready for winter use. 

Game and Fur-bearing Animals. 

During the trapping season the rangers travel in pairs taking with them sufficient 
provisions for two or three months. These have to be forwarded by canoe during the 
open season and carried with tump strap across the portages, nnd in winter by sleds 
which the rangers draw after them. Our boldest trappers come in from Haliburton, and 
I am pleased to be able to report the capture of three of the worst of these, who are now 
serving a sentence in Parry Sound gaol. One was fined fifty dollars and costs, which was 
paid by the lumberman in whose employ the party was. I do not think in some 
instances we get the support from the lumbermen we should. If foremen insisted upon 
their men observing the law it would to a great extent do away with trapping from the 
camps. The fur-bearing animals are now so numerous that a skilful trapper can in a 
few days secure a lot of valuable fur, a fact which, of course, increases the temptation to 
run the risk of being caught by the rangers. Our force is not sufficient to patrol the 
Park as it should be patrolled, but I have no hesitation in saying that my rangers have 
done excellent work during the past year, and that a number of intending trappers have 
sought other grounds, finding the Park rangers aware of their presence near the borders 
of the Park. Rangers Sawyer and Ross took two prisoners from the north end of the 
Park to Mattawa for trial. These parties were fined five dollars each; and here I 
should like to state that it seems impossible to get a fine imposed on hunters and 
trappers encroaching on the Park that is sufficient to make any impression on others. 
It is very discouraging to a ranger after following trappers for days and succeeding in 
capturing them, to see them allowed to go with a fine of five dollars. This matter, I think, 
shoidd have the consideration of the Department. 

We are annoyed a good deal with moose hunters coming in from the Mattawa 
and Bonnechere. The snow is not deep enough yet this season for this, but I hope 
during this year to be able to make an example of some of them. Moose are getting 
very numerous in the Park, a fact to which all visitors of this season bear testimony. 

I had a visit during the past summer from Ohief Big Canoe, after whom Canoe Lake 
is named, he having trapped there some forty years ago. I gave him permission to visit 
all his old trapping grounds, and on his return he told me with delight that he found 
beaver everywhere. As a proof of this fact and to show you how rapidly these most 
interesting and valuable animals are increasing, I might state that out of the one hun- 
dred lakes shown on the map of Algonquin Park, eighty-nine are known to have beaver 
families on them, and there are innumerable little lakes, creeks and rivers that contain 
beaver. The Oommissicn of 1893 state in their report that the area of water in the 
Park is 106,393 acres. We find, however, that there are a great number of lakes not 
shown on the map. On the north end, in the townships of Pentland, Osier and Biggar, 
the rangers have located twenty lakes not hitherto laid down. These are full of beaver. 
Ranger Sawyer, who trapped for years over this section before it became a Park, statea 
that the beaver have more than trebled in number since the Park was established. Otter, 
fisher, marten and mink are also very numerous 

Red deer are to be found everywhere, and so indifiFerent to the presence of man 
have they become that the tourist has no difficulty in obtaining photographs of them in 
their native home, the forest and marsh. At headquarters we have two does, a fawn 
raised last season and a year-old buck. These we keep in a large enclosure, and they 
are a great attraction to passengers on the Oanada Atlantic Railway. Our does arft 



i899] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 59 

both with fawn, proving that there is no difficulty in breeding them when in captivity. 

1 have been instructed by the Department to secure a pair of caribou, and have 
arranged with Mr. Cormier, of Aylmer, Qaebec, for a pair to be delivered this winter. I 
hope to be able to breed them at headquarters, and after a time to allow them to roam at 
will through the Park. I feel confident of success with the caribou, and should like very 
much to have a pair of elk. There is no doubt elk at one time inhabited this section of 
country, and I believe could be again induced to breed and remain here. 

The wolf, the red deer's greatest enemy, is very numerous this year, and I have had 
, poison put out in large quantities, in some cases having a deer shot and the whole cir- 
cass poisoned. In this way I hope to destroy a large number of these pests before deep 
snow comes, the time when they do the greatest damage among the deer. 

As no doubt you are aware, the lakes of the Park are well stocked with trout of 
the finest quality, as are the brooks with speckled trout. Some of our lakes also have 
burbot, catfish, eels and whitefish. During the past season some 500 very fine black 
bass, from one to four pounds in weight, were brought from Parry Sound and put into 
Cache, White and Source Lakes. These were procured before the spawning season and 
successfully carried to their destination in a tank car supplied by the Canada Atlantic 
Railway, the General Manager, Mr. Chamberlain, as well as the other officials, taking a 
great interest in the experiment aud doing all in their power to ensure its success. I 
should like to see one of the lakes stocked- with pickerel. This, I believe, could also be 
done snccessZuUy in the same way. Of the bass, some five hundred odd, I do not think ik 
dozen were lost, and I look for good results from this venture. 

The Park as a Health akd Pleasure Resort. 

Few sections of Canada present such variety of scenery in lake, river and woodland^ 
as Algonquin Park. I do not think under this heading I can do better than give you 
the views of Dr. R. D. Bruce Smith, of Hamilton, and Dr. W. Burt, of Paris, both of 
whom have kindly given me permission to do so. Daring the summer of 1899 a party 
consisting of yiessrs. Tinling, Orr, Callahan, Kirwan, Martin and Dr. R. D. Bruce 
Smith, of Hamilton, and Messrs. Green and Varley, of Toronto, visited the Park and 
spent two weeks in a trip through a circuit of lakes. Dr. Bruce Smith, on behalf of the 
above gentlemen, has given the following expression of his opinion of the natural beauties, 
of the district : 

" Our visit has been one of the most enjoyable outings, and has served to acquaint us 
with a portion of Ontario regarding which few as yet have any knowledge. We left the 
train at Oanoe Lake, proceeding from there to Joe Lake, and passing up a most pictur- 
esque river to Island Lake, thence to Otter Slide Lake, White Trout, Long, Red Pine, 
Burnt, Perley, and Catfish Lakes. We then turned and went back to White Trout Lake, 
and proceeding west went through Grassy Bay, up the Misty River to Misty Lake, Jubi- 
lee Lake, Crane Lake and Sawyer's Lake, and on to Rainy Lake, at the head of which 
our party broke up after a fortnight's pleasure which will be long remembered. Some of 
us went on to Cache Like and from there visited Cranberry Lake and several other 
beautiful lakes which make the Park in the immediate vicinity of headqaarters an ideal 
bpot for every lover of the grand in nature. During our interesting trip we saw se^n 
moose, eighteen red deer, several beaver and other animals. We wera all very much 
impressed with the ease with which we could get close to the deer. They are not at all 
wild. They almost gave us the impression that they knew they were under the protec- 
tion of the Ontario Government and would not be shot at. In fact, one morning on 
Catfish Lake in suddenly passing around a point in our canoes we came unexpectedly 
upon two moose swimming about, and we were able to get so close to one that Mr. Tinling 
reached out and caught it by the ear and held on for several seconds. We were able 
through Mr. Varley's skill to get several very interesting photographs which were treas- 
ured as momentoes of our visit. We had some excellent fishing at Algonquin Park. It 
may well be described as a paradise for the brook trout fisherman. We certainly saw 
the largest speckled beauties we had ever seen. Mr. Callahan drew the greatest prize 
from the water, a fine speckled trout which weighfd exactly three and three quarter 
pounds. We could have had trout for every meal. Some of the small lakes are fairly 
alive with water fowl, and as our canoes would glide along we often disturbed great num 



60 THE REPORT OF THE No. 3 



bers of docks sporting themselves in the water. While Algonqain Pnrk is to be greatly ad- 
mired for the large quantity of game found there in a thoroughly protected state, to my mind 
its greatest attraction is the beauty of the scenery, its great variety of fauna and the 
ozone-laden air, which gives it a right to be considered a natural sanitarium. The eleva- 
tion at Oache Lake is about 1037 fett above Mnskoka Lakes. With the purity of air 
found at such an elevation we might well expect the most beneficial results to all invalids, 
and particularly those threatened with pulmonary disease. Persons suffering from ner- 
vous prostration find in Algonquin Park a resting place where life may be made as active 
as one wishes, going from lake to lake, or as quiet as the primeval forest can make it, by 
residing at one of the thousands of camping places, surrounded by a perfect picture of 
mountain, lake and stream. I am proud to think that Ontario has such a valuable asset, 
the value of which cannot well be estimated ; and if it can be preserved as a natural 
park with a thorough protection to the game of all kinds, the future will prove in unmis- 
takable terms the wisdom of guarding and improving such a reservation." 

Dr. Wm. Burt visited the Park later in the season but enjoyed his stay immensely, 
and has written me regarding the benefit he derived to his health and the pleasure he 
«xperieuced in terms quite as enthusiastic as those used by Dr. Bruce himith. 

Lumbering Operations. 

Notwithstanding that annually a large quantity of timber is removed from the 
Algonquin Park, there is still a great deal of both red and white pine, and in order to 
get this to market it will be necessary to build a number of dams on lakes and streams 
that up to the present time have not been improved. This, though very much to be 
regretted, cannot in many cases be avoided, it being impossible to float the logs on to 
the larger streams without doing so. The principal damage to timber along lake fronts 
is done after the water gets warm, and all dams should be so constructed that as quickly 
as possible after the logs have passed oat the water can be brought to its normal level. 
Mr. J. R. Booth has found it necessary this year to build three dams on the Little Nip- 
issing. These are at points where the banks are high and very little if any damage will 
result from them. Next to the pine the birch is the most valuable timber found in the 
Park. Of this there is a great quantity, and of a fair average. Spruce is found in some 
Eections, but not in large quantitif>s. Hemlock attains a good average size and is found 
almost everywhere. The cedar generally is small and very faulty. Maple and beech 
are found in some sections and balsam everywhere The limit holders who are operating 
this year in the park are W. Mackey, the Hawkesbury Lumber Co., J. R. Booth, Shep- 
pard & Co., the Brennan Manufacturing Co., Gilmour & Co., Mickle, Dyment & Son and 
the St. Anthony Lumber Co. Considerable damage has been done to the timber on some 
of the lakes owing to the water being kept up late into the summer. Nothing lessens 
the beauty of a lake so much as a fringe of dead timber along its shores. The limit 
holder must have the water to enable him to get his timber off small streams, but in 
many caises water is kept up much later into the season than is really necessary, and as 
soon as it becomes warm the tree is scalded out and the damage done. 

I am glad to be able to report that little or no harm has been done to the standing 
timber this year. We had three small fires, but they were all in old burns and really did 
no damage. The Park has suffered very little from fire since its establishment. Al- 
though the Canada Atlantic Railway runs through a portion of it great care has always 
been exercised by the employees and very few fires are started. 

I failed last winter to secure any good pine seed. The cones seem to be empty in 
most cases. If the Department will supply me with good seed I should like to make some 
experiments with it. I am confident the white pine can be successfully grown from 
«eed, and I believe when large fires occur the Government would do well to have pine 
«eed scattered. I know of whole townships in other parts of Ontario that have been burnt 
over and nearly every pine killed, yet whenever a few old pine were left young pine grew 
lup after the fire and I have lumbered through them, getting a very nice average of logs. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. W. Bartlbtt, 

Superintendent. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENf. Gl 



(Appendix N^. 34.) 

REPORT 

OF 

THE SUPERINTENDENT 

OF 

COLONIZATION ROADS. 



To the Honorable E. J. Davis, 

Commissioaer of Grown Lands, 
Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honor to present the report of work done under the management of 
the Culonizition Roads branch for the year 1899. 

There have been one hundred and e'ght miles' opened and four hundred and forty- 
one miles improved and maintained with three ^housAnd and ninety-four feet of bridging 
representing some twenty structures. 

Of Mining Roads about fourteen miles were opened and thirty-three repdred, besides 
a number of miles of winter trails and a mail road specially referred to in this report. 

The works are the following : — 

NORTH DIVISION. 

Aldbbson Road« 

Beginning on the old town line, between Coffin and Ooffin Additional, and working- 
northward, about a mile of road was opened north. 

Atwood Road. 

A bridge seventy -two feet long was built, and about a mile and a quarter of repairs 
were made — a very much needed work — for the improvement of the main road through 
the township of Atwood. 

Balfour and Rayside Roads. 

On the boundary between Balfour and Rayside from the first concession half a mile 
was ditched and graded south, and on the second concession line a mile was opened as a 
cheap winter road across lots 6 and 7. On the Ejist Raysidu road another mile was 
graded and improved between concessions 3 and 5. 

There were also some four miles of repairs m^de between lots 4 and 5, concession 2 
of a road previously opened, extending south one mile, and thenc« eastward to lots 8 
and 9. 

A winte rroad a mile in length was also opened on the fifth concession line between, 
lots 6 to 9. 

Barrie Island Road. 

Substantial work was done in repairing about five miles from lot 25, concession 8^ 
Gordon, to Barrie Island bridge. 



62 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



Batchawaning Road. 

This work was chiefly the improvement of a dangerously bad hill near s. e. corner of 
sec. 37, township of Havilland, half a mile long. 

Bridge at Drtden. 

In the year 1897 a bridge was built over the outlet of Wabigoon Lake. 

Subsequently a dam was erected above the bridge for purposes of navigation, and as 
repairs were required of the first structure it was deemed advisable and more economical 
tiO construct a new one upon the dam, using material from the first bridge, all of which 
was done for the sum of $204.18. 

Bruce Mines and Thbssalon Road Bridge. 

A bridge over a deep ravine in Lefroy township was replaced by a large box 
culvert properly covered with earth. 

Buntin's Greek Bridge. 

A substantial structure two hundred and thirty-three feet long built over the creek 
mentioned on Rainy River road. The work is highly spoken of. 

Campbell 20 Side Line Road. 

Through, concessions 10 to 12 on the Campbell 20 side line a mile and a quarter of 
grading was done ; and again from the boundary between Campbell and Mills west to 
lots 2 and 3, and thence north to concessionb 6 and 7 a mile and three quarters was 
graded and improved. 

Carpenter Road. 

Between lots 8 and 9, Carpenter, to within half a mile of Burriss' town line, very 
substantial improvements were made, covering one mile of grubbing, and almost a mile 
of crosswaying, with many culverts and small bridges. 

Carpenter and Dobie Town Line Road. 

Some three miles were opened from Rainy River road north, and about two hundred 
and ten feet of bridging. 

Carpenter and Lash Town Line Road. 

On this line about a mile and a half was opened, and an equal length graded. 

CocKBURN Island Roads. 

Something over four miles of repairs have been made on the main roads on this 
Island. 

Coffin 3 and 4 Con. Road. 

Three quarters of a mile has been opened on this line, continued from last year's 
work. The full opening of the road is however nob yet finished and it may require about 
.$200 to complete it 

Crozier and Lash Road. 

There were over five miles of single ditching and sixty-six drains of crosswaying 
made between lots 8 and 9 river front a- d east corner of sections 3 and 10 Devlin and 
north-west corner of section 4 Crozier, representing about four miles of substantial work, 
beside the ditching mentioned. 

Day and Thessalon Town Line Road. 

From the south boundary of Day and Thessalon work was done on the town line 
between these two townshipn, north to the Great Northern road to the north h%lf of lot 
7 con. 1 Day, making one mile of road. 



1899 J CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 63 



Dbvun Road. 

From the south-west angle of sec. 9 Devlia work was done to the centre of sec. 28, 
something like a mile and three qaarters. An eqaal length of ditching was also done, 
and seven new culverts introduced. 

Echo Bay Road. 

The grading of a portion cut out last year from north west corner of section 17, in 
the township of Laird, north one mile ; and again, on the same line at concession 2, 
McDonald to concession 3, a mile of new road was opened. 

Eton and Sandford Roads. 

Somie ten miles of improvements on roads mostly in the township of Eton, but lead 
ing into the township of Sandford. 

Galbraith, Con. 1, Bridge. 
A bridge fifty-five feet long built on lot 6. Its main span is thirty feet. 

Galbraith 2 and 3 Con. Road. 

The completion of ditching and draining commenced last year ; the former amounting 
to sixty three rods with half a mile of drains opened. 

Grbat Northern Road. 

The work in this instance was chiefly repairing and renewing wooden structures 
from Echo Bay westward. Some three miles of road improvements were however dono 
m addition over eighteen or more miles of the road. 

Ihdian Point Bridge. 

This work referred to in my report of last year, and fully described, is now practi- 
cally finished. The chief unfinished portion of the bridge was the construction of a steel 
awing, necessary to allow the passage of vessels into and out of Lake Wolsey. There is 
nov full traflic over this bridge, and it is understood, is of great value to the settlers, 
shortening the distance to their main and only market at Gore Bay by at least twelve 
miles. The Dominion Government granted this year, and paid towards the work. $1,500, 
or approximately one-half the txpenditure. A balance is still due upon the work, 
which may be asked for in the estimates of next year. 

IsB ESTER Station Road. 

Beginning betwe^^n lots 6 and 7 con. 1, Taifbutt, and working north to the boundary 
between Tarbutt and Laird, and thence along said boundary to n. e. corner, sec. 27, 
Laird, and thence noth to s w. corner of sec. 2, ending at Isbester Station, about four 
miles and three-quarters of road were improved. 

Kobah Road. 

One mile clpared, stumpei and grubbed from Base Line north to the second line. It 
was a low and difficult portion to make, and therefore more expensive than usual. Another 
mi'e was opened from between sees, 10 and 11, north to about centre of sec. 3, giving an 
outlet to several settlers. 

Lake Wolseley Road. 

From the town line of Robinson and Dawson, general repairs were made to lot 23 
Robinson, some five miles. Improvements were also made from the line first mentioned 
to lot 8, con. 8, Burpee, and the line straightened across lots 8, 9 and 10, altogether some 
fourteen miles of repairs. 



64 THE REPORT OF THE ^a No. * 



Lee's Road. 

The chief oatlay in this instance was for a scow, 17 feet by 34 feet, with two steel 
cables to permit travel across Spanish river. Forty rods in length however opened 
between North and South halves of lot 11, concession 2, Hallam, and half a mile on east 
and west boundary in concession 1. 

Lton's Creek Bridge. 

A bridge on Rainy Eiver road in the township of Lash, two hundred and ninety- 
two feet long with average height of eighteen feet, a pile structure of a substantial char 
acter. Again over Shorties' creek a bridge one hundred and fifty-five feet long and 
entirely of cedar was erected. 

Manitowaning and Sheguiandah Road. 

Repairs between concessions 3 and 8 Sheguiandah, about two and a half nvles- 
altogether, making an excellent road. 

May and Salter Town Line Road. » 

The chopping out and grading through a heavily timbered swamp of nearly half a. 
mile at S^ lot 12, con. 3 ; and again from con. 4 north, another half mile was opened, 
with some repairs of work done last year. 

MoRLBT Township Road. 

This work was from the n. w. quarter of sec. 26, Morley, north a mile and a half, the 
whole length being chopped and grubbed, with some ditching. 

MORLET AND PaTULLO T. L, RoAD. 

Nearly two miles of new; work, from Morley road east on the town line, consisting^ 
of chopping, grubbing, crosswaying and ditching. 

Morley and Shenston Road, 

From the n. e. comer of sec. 25, Morley, to n. e. cor. 8e<?. 28, Shenston, three mile» 
have been chopped, grubbed, graded and generally ditched. 

MuDGE Bat Road. 

Work was commenced between lots 25 and 26, concession 8, Billings, and continued 
south t:i Mad River bridge, amounting to aboat three-qairters of a mile, of ditching 
mostly. 

Oliver Township Roads. 

The returns and accounts for these works were not received at the time of closing 
iixe report for the year. 

OuiMET AND Black Bay Road. 

The repair chiefly of thirteen small bridges, which were entirely worn out through age, 

Parkinson Road. 

Half a mile of road opened from lot 4, concession 3, Gladstone, north through cen- 
cession 6. 

Five miles were repaired on the southern portion of the road, showing a very full 
amount of work done for an expenditure of $419 03. 

Parkinson Road. 

This road is on Manitonlin Island, consisting of repairs from lots 25 and 26, conces- 
sion 6, Bid well, south to concpsaions 4 and 5 ; thence west to lot 26, and thence pouth- 
westerly across lots 26 and 27 to the third concession, a distance of two miles, and which^ 
with offtake drains, makes an excellent road. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 65 



Patton and Dran Lake Load, 

ContinuiDg from last year's operations at concession 2, Patton, on line between lota 
10 and 11, work was continued south to concession 5, Thompson, and to Mississaga River 
aroad, improving about three miles. 

Plummer and Lbfrot T. L Road. 

This work was begun at the s. w. comer of section 18, Lefroy, and grading and ditch- 
continued north half a mile. The road was chopped oat in 1897. 

Plummer Sixth Concession Bridge. 
A sixty feet bridge, with a clear span of twenty-four feet. 

Port Finlay and Port Lock Road. 
Commencing at Desbarats Station, a mile was opened or improved westerly. 

Port Lock and Desbarats Lake Road. 

Two miles have been opened and graded from between lots 4 and 5, concession 2, 
Johnson, to lots 4 and 5, concession 4. 

Prince Township Road. 

Beginning at the 4th cor cession n. e. ^ section 24, three-quarters of a mile waa 
opened westward between sections 13 and 24. 

Rainy River Road. 

Four and three quarters miles of excellent work was done east of Emo with tap and 
off-take drains. 

Another three miles in the vicinity of Big Fork were very well improved. 

A mile and a quarter was brushed, grubbed, and thoroughly improved from the west 
town line of Barwick westward, with a mile or more ditching and half a mile of crosa- 
waying. 

A bridge was also constructed over Elatt's creek, one hundred and twenty-seven feet 
long ; nine miles of road improvements beside the bridges. 

Rat Portage Road and Bridge. 

This work was chiefly building a bridge of three 20-feet spans and full length of 
ninety three feet and location of a portion of the road. 

Savanne Road. 

The completion of a road opened in 1897, and the work of the present year being 
mostly gtavelling. The inspector suggests another small grant to fully finish the work. 

Spanish Stition Road. 

This was chiefly new work from n. e. cor. sec. 39, Sheddon, and intersection of Great 
Northern road half a mile south to Spanish river and to a steamboat landing. Other 
work was done improving some hills and building a cedar bridge. 

St. Joseph Island Roads. 

About four and three-quarters miles of road were graded and otherwise improved ; 
work being upon A line, S and T line, U and D line and one or two others, all work 
being reported as satisfactory. 
5 C.L. 



66 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. a 



Thessalon Rivbr Bridges. 

Three bridges of importance were repaired, namely West's bridge, lots 6 and 7, con. 
3, Plummer ; Stewart's bridge, lot 6, con. 2, Coffin, and McDonald's bridge on town line 
between Coffin and Galbraith. 

Vankoughnet Road. 

From n. w. angle of section 36, Fenwick, where work ended Iswt year under the 
supervision of the Department of Indian Affairs, and on which road they had spent about 
$500, work was continued for a mile and a half, and a bridge one hundred feet long was 
erected over Cranberry creek near the town line of Fenwick and Pennefather. 

Victoria and Salter T. L. Road, 

This work was almost exclusively the bridging of Black* creek| on sec;* 38 Victoria 
It is a queen truss of 55 feet span with neceseary approaches. 

Wainwright and Van Hornk Road. 

Repairs were made in the townships of Wainwright and Eton, over seventeen or 
eighteen miles of road, and between Dry den and Barclay in the township of Zealand, 
some three or four miles were roughly opened for the benefit of settlers generally. 

Wells 2 and 3 Con. Road 

From the road allowance between lots 4 and 5 westward nearly two miles of sub- 
stantial repairs were effected and the road reported as in a very fair condition. 



WEST DIVISION. 
Ah-Mic Road. 

More than one mile of road opened towards Ah-mic Harbor. 

There is work yet to be done before the contemplated improvements are finished. 
The construction this year was from lot 31, con. 5, Croft, northerly through said lot and 
the same number of lot in con. 6. 

Ah-Mic Harbor Bridge. 

A bridge almost one hundred feet long over an arm of Ah-mic lake, lot 23, con. 9^ 
Croft. The previous structure erected many years ago was entirely destroyed. 

Baxter Roads. 

Three miles were opened through a rough section from lot 32, between concessions 4 
and 5, through lots 31 and 32, through concpssions 5, 6, 7 and part of 8. Repairs were 
also made over a mile and a half from lot 25, con. 4 to lot 23, con. 7, all in the township 
of Baxter. 

Beatty's Creek Bridge. 

This is a bridge in Nipissing township, built over the cre^k named, and is one hun- 
dred and twenty feet long, resting upon teven bents with 3 inch plank covering. 

Bethdne 25 AND 26 Side Line Road. 

A mile opened from last season's operations extending northward, giving a way for 
settlers to Ravensworth station on the Ottawa, Arnprior and Pairy Sound Railway. 



1899] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. &r 



Cardwbll Road. 

The opening, grubbing and grading of somewhat less than a mile through lots 6 and 
7, con. 8, Cardwell, included in which is almost an eighth of a mile of crosswaying with 
nine stone culverts. The work is as a deviation about a large hill on the main road. 

Cardwbll No. 3 Road. 

More than half a mile opened and graded through lot 26, con. 3, and through lot 
25, con. 11, giving settlers access to Rosseau. 

Chaffbt 30 AND 31 Side Line Road. 

A mile and a half chopped, grubbed and graded, beginning at lot 31 and angling 
through said lot and partly through lot 30, con. 10, where it unites with the road proper 
between lots 30 and 31, forming thus a through connection with Huntsville, and is of 
great service to settlers. 

Chapfey Bridges and Road. 

A bridge over East River on Muskoka road was largely renewed and some road work 
done on the side line between lots 5 and 6 of Chafiey. 

A contribution of $50 was also given to the municipality towards the renewal of a 
bridge on lot 7, concession 1, and which cost, according to statement furnished, $226.39. 

Christie Road. 

Three miles and a half of repairs, from lot 3, concession 11, Foley, eastward to lot 23j. 
concession 9, Christie. 

Christib and Foley Road. 

The opening of three quarters of a mile through heavily timbered land to give an 
outlet to certain settlers in Christie and Foley to the railway, the work being from conces- 
sion 7 between lots 10 and 11, south between lots 125, and 126, of the Parry Sound road 
survey, to the Parry Sound railway. 

Distress River Road. 

Half a mile of road opened across lots 14 and 15, generally between concessions 8 
and 9, Chapman, with some heavy work about lot 6, involving a quantity of stone-filling 
and earth-work. 

Dorset and Huntsville Road. 

From concession 6, Franklin, repairs were made towards Dorset, two and a half 
miles, the whole length being very well graded, including the re-covering of three bridges. 

Draper Road. 

Repa'rs from Maskoka Falls, south-easterly two miles and a half, including some heavy" 
rock blasting. 

Fox Point Road. 

A mile and a half opened and made fairly passable from lot 1 4, concession 6, Frank- 
lin, following the lake shore through lots 15 and 16i concession 5, and 15, 16 and 17 con- 
cession 4, to the line between concessions 3 and 4, giving settlers an outlet to the 
Muskoka and Bobcaygeon road. 

Golden Valley Road. 

Repairs beginning at lot 6, concession 12, Mills were extended to lot 33, a length of 
a mile and a half ; also from lot 2, between concessions 8 and 9, Fringle, west to lot 11^ 
three miles were fairly improved and will be of much advantage to settlers. 



•68 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



GuRD 20 AND 21 Side Link Road. 

This work was the chopping out and grabbing of a mile and a quarter, through con- 
<;es8ions 3 and 4, of the side line mentioned. 

Haobrmak 25 AND 26 Side Line Road. 

The repair of two and a quarter miles through concessions 4, 5, 6, and part of 7, oa 
the side line referred to, and good work reported. 

HiMswoRTH Road. 

Nearly two miles improved from concession 14 to concession 18, of the township ot 
Himsworth, making a good road between Powassan and Himsworth. 

Humphrey and Conger Road. 

Beginning at Parry Sound road, work was extended south three and a half miles on 
the town line named, excepting two deviations amounting to seventy rods of crosswaying. 

Junction No. 2 Road. 

A mile and a half of extensive repairs from lot 22, concession 3, McKellar, westward 
with another half mile in the same direction. 

Long Lake Bridge. 

A floating bridge six hundred and forty feet long at lot 14, concession 6, township 
of Stephenson, re-planked throughout, and otherwise substantially repaired. 

Magaulat Road. 

The repair of this road was made from lot 14, concession 7, Macaulay, a mile and a 
half over a rough rocky section between Dorset and Baysville, the main and only road in 
that district. 

Maganetawan River Bridges. 

A bridge one hundred and seventeen feet long was renewed, one span bring 53 feet 
in the clear, and another 45 feet. 

A second bridge with a 34 feet clear span was bnilt on the same (Poverty Bay 
road). This is the most important road in that district and the only one between Maga- 
nstawan and Ahmie Harbor. 

McKenzie Township Roads. 

In this case a mile and a quarter was chopped out, grubbed and levelled, from lot 20, 
concession 3, at Whitestone road, to concession 4, for an outlet to settlers. Six miles were 
repaired, in addition to the foregoing work, from lot 5, concession 2, westward between 
concessions 2 and 3 to lot 30, all in the township of McKenzie. 

Mills and Wilson Road. 

This work was chopping and grubbing through heavily timbered lands two and a half 
miles, beginning at lot number 9 between concessions 2 and 3, Hardy, and from thence 
eastward to lot number 1, township of Patterson. 

Some deviations were made from the road allowance across lots 2, 3 and 4 in the 
township of Hardy. 

In connection with the work a log bridge two hundred and thirty two feet long was 
built over a creek on lot 5, between concessions 2 and 3, Hardy, representing a large 
amount of work for the expenditure of |494 50. 

MusEOKA Road. 

Half a mile of road opened from the first concession of Nipissing along the road 
allowance at the south-east end of lots 189 and 190 of the Rosseau and Nipissing road 
survey. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 6» 

It is through a very rough section, but when connected with Alsace road will be 
valuable to settlers. 

MusKOKA Bridge. 

A bridge was built over Muskoka river on lot 17, between concessions 7 and 8, town- 
ship of Draper, the condition being that the Government would give a contribution of 
$300 (as in Estimates), if the municipality would complete the work satisfactorily. 

The bridge is a steel superstructure built upon stone abutments and cost, the In- 
spector has reported, about $750. The main opening is sixty-three feet, with a fourteen- 
feet roadway. 

MusQUOSH Road. 

Repairs from Bala (lot 34, concession 6, Wood), south-easterly along old Main road to 
about lot 28, concession 7, something like a mile and a half. 

Nkville Road. 

About half a mile of grading and chopping out, from lot 13, concession 3, McDougall, 
eastward. It Is a road extensively used by settlers, as also that mines are being developed 
in that vicinity. 

NiPissiNG Road. 

Repairs for South River bridge, near Nipissing village, to Sharp's Corners, lot 20» 
concession 18, Himsworth, a length of five and a half miles, and with the work upon 
Himsworth road, opens a very fair highway between Nipissing and Powassan, over which 
there is constant traffic. 

Northern Road. 

Two bridges were repaired on this road, one being Maple Island bridge, the other 
Deer River bridge. 

Repairs were also made over a mile of the road between lot 2, concession 2, McELenzie^ 
and lot 31, concession 6, Ferrie. 

Northwest Road. 

Three bridges on this road, which leads to Byng Inlet, were renewed, one being over 
Rainy Creek, seventy feet long; a second near Shawanaga river, three hundred and fifty- 
six in length, and a third one near 34-mile post, one hundred and twenty-nine feet long. 

Oaklet, Draper and Ryde T. L. Road. 

From lot 31 on the town line between Longford and Oakley, and angling from thence 
through lots 32 and 33, Oakley, thence again angling through lots 35, 36, 37, Longford, 
and further on or near the town line between Ryde and Draper, westward a length of 
three miles, were very well improved. The road was opened some six years ago, but fires 
and storms had so destroyed it that travel was impossible. It is a rough, rocky section 
unfit for settlement ; but of great advantage to those on either side, giving a much shorter 
way to markets at Gravenhurst and elsewhere. 

Peninsula Road. 

This work was repairs upon bad hills, one being on lot 9, concession 7, Humphreyi 
and the other on lot 1 1, concession 6, aggregating a length of about half a mile. 

Perry 12th Ooncbssion Road. 

The opening of over a mile of new road from lot 26 eastward, giving an outlet to 
Emsdale settlers living on the 12th concession of Perry. 

Perry and Chaffey Road. 

The grubbing and grading of over a mile from last year's work southward to the 10th 
concession of ChaflFey. The work is highly mentioned. 



70 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



ROSSBAU AND OhRISTIB EoAS. 

Repairs between concessions 10 and 13 of the township of Humphrey, in length 
«boat three-quarters of a mile, and in addition to which an ofi-take drain forty rods long 
W81S made for drainage purposes. 

RoSSBAU AND NlPISSING RoAD. 

Four miles of repairs from the railway crossing lot 28, Nipissing road survey, in 
Monteith, northward to lot 44, Spence. This portion is now in excellent condition. 

Sinclair and Bobcaygeon Road. 

Improvements between Field's comers, lot 16, between concessions 4 and 5, Sinclair, 
-eastward on the concession line mentioned to lot 3, concession 7, Finlayson, a length of 
seven and three-quarter miles. 

Sinclair and Franklin Town Line Road. 

This was the opening and grading of a mile and a quarter through a rough and rocky 
tract of land opposite lots 4, 5, 6 and 10 and 11, giving an outlet to settlers east of the 
work. The road will be and is now extensively used in teaming to Hunts ville. 

Stisted 12 and 13 Ooncession Road. 

For this outlay, $107.75, 31 rods of cross-waying were laid through what is called 
Stisted swamp, and a very substantial work effected. 

Stony Lake Inlet Bridge. 

A bridge over the outlet of Stony Lake where 20 piles were driven for the sub- 
structure and all other material necessary for completion of the bridge built in and the 
work finished. The municipality of the township of Strong supplied all material, so 
that the Government expenditure was for labor only. 

Westphalia Road. 

The chopping, grubbing and grading of one hundred and fifteen rods through a rocky 
section in order to reach a better and more level district. The work was from lot 16, 
between concessions 1 and 2, to the line between lots 14 and 15, a short but important 
road. 



EAST DIVISION. 

Addington Road. 

The improvement of three miles and a half in the township of Lyndoch from lot 10 
concession 13, south-westerly. 

Airy Township Road. 

A work extended from Whitney station, on the 0. A. and P. S. Railway, (lot 9, 
concession 5, Airy), southerly to lot 10, concession 1, about four miles. 

Anson Road. 

^"'^This work was commenced on the east side of lot 1, between concessions 4 and 5 
Anson, and continued north-westerly to the road allowance, between concessions 6 and 7. 
The first half mile was through cleared land and the balance through bush equalling two 
miles of new road which the inspector says was well and fairly done. 



1899] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 71 



Anstruthbr Roa.d. 

Some ten miles of repairs from lot 34, concession 4, Anstruther, north to lot 39, 
concession 13. Several bridges on the road were also restored to general efficiency. 

Anstruther, Burleigh and Chandos Roads. 

In the above-named townships work was done in Chandos in making repairs on con- 
cessions 2, 13, 14, 17 and 18 to the extent of eleven miles ; and in Burleigh milk routes 
were improved in concessions 3,5,12 and 1 6, amounting to two miles. 

BONFIBLD AND BoCLTBR RoAD. 

The grading of three quarters of a mile on the boundary between Bonfield and 
Boulter and the construction of a bridge two hundred and thirty feet long. 

Brudenkll and Haoartt Road. 

Repairs from lot 26, concession A, Hagarty, eastward three miles making the rosul a 
good travelable one. 

BucKHORN Road, 

Seven miles of substantial repairs from Hall's bridge northward, consisting chiefly of 
stone and earth filling upon crossways. 

Burleigh Road. 

From about one mile south of Burleigh Pftlls, five miles were very well improved by 
grading and macadamizing. The County of Peterboro and township of Smith gave each 
$100 to supplement an equal sum by the Government. On this same road from Apsley 
southward thirteen miles were also substantially repaired. 

Burnt River Bridgb. 

A bridge renewed over the north branch of Burnt river, between lots 10 and 11, 
concession 5, Snowdon, composed of two thirty feet spans and length one hundred feet. 
A second bridge over the main stream on lot 10, concession 1, was also renewed, the 
structure being of a similar character with the first named and only two feet longer. 

Oaldwell No. 2 Road. . 

One mile of repairs were made upon the old road, new work beginning at concession 2, 
continuing south between lots 8 and 9, three-quarters of a mile on which length a bridge, 
with an opening of 32 feet, was erected and permanently completed as to approaches with 
stone and earth filling. 

Calvin 30 and 31 Side Line Road. 

This was the grading, ditching and gravelling of about five-eighths of a mile between 
concessions 2 to 5. A further grant of $250 to $300 is required to complete the contem- 
plated work. 

Cardiff Bridge and Road. 

A bridge was erected over a river on lot 21, concession 16, one hundred and twenty 
feet long of a very substantial character ; and from Deer Lake station to lot 21 the bridge 
above mentioned, three and a half miles well repaired at a cost of about $300, while at the 
south end of the same road four miles were also improved. 

[^Carlow 5 AND 6 Concession Road.' 

Between lots 15 and 20, on the concession line indicated, a mile and a quarter 
previously cut out roughly by settlers was further opened and improved, making the 
length now fairly passable. 



72 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. $ 



Cablow Road. 

From lot 24, con. 13, township of Mayo, a quarter of a mile was opened between 
Fort Stewart and McArthmr's mills in a northerly direction. 

Cashel Road. 

Repairs from ending of last year's work (lot 11, con, 8, Oashel) eastward to let 5, 
oou. 8, making a fair waggon road for a length of a mile and three quarters. 

Uasimir Township Rsad. 

Beginning at lot 7, con. 2, Bunnet, a mile of extensive improvements were aade 
west on the 2nd concession line, and again starting from the north boundary of Oasimir, 
three miles were opened south between lots 10 snd 11, two and a quarter miles being 
graded and the balance cut out and levelled only. 

Ghandos Road. 

A road from Apsley eastward, and otherwise known as Wellington road. Th» 
work this year was from lot 25, con. 2, Chandos, about three miles eastward, and being; 
general repairs. 

Oavendish Roads. 

Two miles and a half of repairs were made from lot 3, con. 18, eastward, to lot number 
12 ; and from lot 11, con. 10, east to Buckhorn road, a mile and a quarter was opened ; 
also between lots 8 and 9, through concessions 13 and 14, another mile and a quarter 
was opened. 

Chisholm Township Roads 

In this township half a mile was opened between concessions 16 and 17, and a- 
bridge built over Depot creek. A mile was also opened from the road allowance between 
lots 10 and 11, west, between concessions 11 and 12. 

On the 10th and 11th con. line more than half a mile of crosswaying was done, and on 
the 6th and 7th con. line a mile and a quarter was opened from lot 11 eastward to lot 15» 
making altogether three and a half miles of new road. 

COMBERMEBB AND PaLMBB RaPIDS RoAD. 

Repairs from Palmer Rapids west along or near the north shore of Madawaska 
river to Combermere, about six miles, making a passable waggon road throughout the 
whole length. 

DuMMBR Road. 

The repair of this road near Waraaw, and a leading road. The County of Peterboro* 
and the township of Douro gave each $100, leaving ^96.11 as the outlay by the Govern- 
ment. 

Eganvillb and Fotmodnt Road. 

Three and a half miles improved from a point about 7 miles south of Eganvill© 
(near Hurd's Creek bridge) south-westerly. 

Febbis Township Roads. 

The construction of a mile and a quarter on the 8th and 9th concession line, opening 
the concession to lot 19. Three quarters of a mile was also opened from North Bay road 
west, between concessions 14 and 15, crossing the C. P. Ry. Another section was opened 
between lots 14 and 15, from Lake Nipissing to 0. P. Ry., a mile and a quarter long. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 73 



Field Road. 

A road was opened from lot 12, con. 1, Field, to lot 11, con. 4, about two and a half 
miles. Three miles were also repaired of portions opened within the past two years, 
representing a considerable amount of work for the money spent. 

Field No. 2 Road, 

This was a continuation westerly on the south side of Sturgeon river of a road 
between lots 6 and 7, con. 3, of Field, equalling three miles of new work. 

Field 2 and 3 Con. Road. 

From lot 1, con 2, Field, a road was opened eastward to boundary between Field 
and Grant, thence north half a mile, and thence east to lot 11, Grant, altogether three 
miles. 

FOTMOUNT AND BbUDBNELL RoAD. 

The repair of foar miles between Foy mount and Brudenell.' 

Fort Stewart Road. 

Five miltS of general improvements from Fort Stewart; in the township of Mayo, 
northward to the south boundary of Oarlow. 

Frontenac Road. 

Small bridge and road repairs. 

Galway Roads. 

Twelve miles of substantial repairs were effected in this township, namely : On the 
Monck Road through lots 42, 43 and 44, vith two miles of work east of said lots. Also 
between lots 30 and 31, and between concessions 10 and 11 and concessions 12 and 13, 
continuing in each instance to the side line between lots 15 and 16. 

Galway 4 and 5 Con. Road. 

The repair of about three miles from Bobcaygeon road east, which, through washouts 
and freshets, were in bad condition. A quarter of a mile was also opened on the 
boundary between Galway and Harvey for the advantage of settlers. 

Galway and Cavendish Roads. 

A continuation of work from lot 32, between concessions 13 and 14,° east to lot 15 
Cavendish, some four and a half miles of substantial repairs. 

Grattan 30 AND 31 Proof Line Road. 

Improvements from lot 20 northward between lots 30 and 31, a mile and a quarter, 
making a fair waggon road. 

Grattan 4th Chute and 14th Concession Road. 

The opening of a mile and a quarter, from lot 19, concession 14, Grattan, eastward on 
the 14th concession road, for the benefit of a number of settlers in the east portion of the 
township. 

Hagarty 2nd Concession Road. 

From lot 13 westward a mile and a half was well repaired between concessions 2 and 
3, in blasting, covering long crossways, and other improvements. 



74 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. f^ 



Harborn Road. 

This work was commenced at lot 31, concession 1, Dysart, and continued to the 
Peterson road in Harbarn. Six miles of repairs are reported as having been satisfactorily 
made. 

HiNCfllNBROOKB 5 AND 6 SiDE LiNB RoAD. 

The improvement of two miles from concession 1 1 westward to Hinchinbrooke boun- 
dary and practically on the road allowance between lots 5 and 6, opening a very passable 
road. 

HuGEL Road. 

From the boundary of Hngel and Badgerow westward one mile, between lots 1 and 
2, and thence north two miles. The last mile was opened and the £rst two miles repaired. 

HuGEL AND Badgerow Road. 

The object of this road is to open a general highway to Lake Tamagamingue, but is 
not yet completed. The appropriation this season has, however, improved a road from 
the north end of lot 1, Badgerow, north for two miles, with half a mile of repairs on the 
southern portion. 

Hyde Chute and Sanson Road. 

Repairs from Sanson's corners, or intersection of this with Opeongo road, in a south- 
westerly direction, about six miles ; and again from Hyde's Chute bridge, on Madawaska 
river, north-eastward some nine miles, or fifteen miles altogether. 

Jack's Lake Road. 

Commencing at lot 24, concession 6, Burleigh, repairs were continued south to lot 16, 
concession 16, some two miles. 

Jones' Falls and Battersea Road. 

Work was continued from that of last year eastward one mile from lot 6, concession 
9, South Orosby, consisting in repairing rough, rocky hills and filling up low, wet portions 
of the road, 

KiLLALOE AND EmMET RoAD. 

Beginning at lot 9, concession A, Hagarty, repairs were extended southerly to the 
Opeongo road, a length of three and one half miles. 

KiLLALOE AND BoNNECHERE ROAD. 

In this case the work consisted in opening a large drain or ditch of an average depth 
of nearly four feet and equal width, from lot 1, concession 6, Hagarty, west to lot 4 : and 
again, from concession 6, on the line between lots 5 and 6, southward three-quarters of a 
mile ; altogether a mile and a quarter of ditching. 

KiRKPATRICK AND McPhERSON RoAD. 

This work was from the boundary of Kirkpatrick and McPherson and west boundary 
of Oaldwell, westward, on the said boundary between Kirkpatrick and McPherson, to the 
west side of lot number eight, four miles ; with, however, an intervening section not yet 
properly opened, and which may require another small appropriation. 

Lonsdale and Brjdgewater Road. 

Improvements on the line between concessions 3 and 4 of Hungerf ord, north, on the 
line between lots 24 and 25 to the road allowance between concessions 4 and 5, one mile. 

LouGHBORo' Lake Road. 

Beginning at lot 12, concession 13, SDorringbon, and end of last season's operations, 
repairs were extended to lot 20, coneessioa 12, three and one half miles. Again, from lot 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



1, concession 11, to lot 6 farther improvements were effected, including a 32 feet bridge, 
^th clear span of 18 feet. 

Lyndooh 13 Concession Road. 

Repairs from lot 7, concession 16, Lyndocb, eastward a mile and a half, the work 
'Consisting chiefly in covering crossways and making new culverts. 

Martland Township Road. 

Beginning between lots 5 and 6, concession 1, township of Haddo, work was con- 
tinned south to the Martland boundary, one mile, and two and a half miles into the latter 
township ; and thence west to lot 7, a length of four miles altogether, openins up one of 
the best portions of Nipissing district. 

Mattawatchan Road. 

From lot 1, concession 3, Mattdiwatchan (the south boundary), repairs were extended 
northward to lot 10 in the 4th concession, a length of about five miles. 

Matt aw AN Township Road. 

Nearly half a mile of ditching was done from lot 34 west, between concessions 8 and 
"9, with the repair of a hill on lot 24, concession 13. 

Mississippi Road. 

From Addington road eastward to the east boundary of Abinger, fourteen miles 
were very much improved by blsisting, levelling and making off-take drains. A bad hill 
on Mississippi and Addington Junction road was also improved bj grading and levelling. 
On this same, from its junction with Lavant road in Palmerston, work was extended 
westward about eight miles and a half ; several necessary deviations were made and many 
crossways gravelled and otherwise improved. Four miles of repairs were also efiected 
between Bancroft and Bronson. 

MoNCK Road. 

The repair of this road was begun at Bancroft and extended west about eight miles, 
consisting in part of four deviations, the covering of crossways, and introduction of several 
new culverts. 

MONTEAGLE ROAD. 

Between lot 9, con. 3, and lot 12, con. 4 of Monteagle, a mile and three-quarters 
which had been opened by the municipality as a winter road, has been formed into a 
passable highway for general traffic at all seasons. 

Mount St. Patrick and Blackdonald Road. 

Repairs from the line between the lots 4 and 5, con. 12, Brougham, southerly, on 
the road namsd, a mile and a quarter of very substantial work. 

Nogie's Orbbk Road. 

Three miles were improved northward from lot 22, con. 14, Harvey. Another 
three miles in the same township were repaired on the same road, which, with a mile 
between lots 29 and 30, con. 3, represents seven-miles of substantial work. 

NoRTe Algona 8th Con. Road. 

From concession 6, township of Hagarty, northward on the bpundary between Hag- 
arty and South Algona to Bonnechere river, repairs covering two and a quarter miles 
were made. Extensive off take drains were also opened to carry off water and drain the 
road, which was somewhat expensive, but necessary to make a good and permanent 
highway. 



V6 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3. 

North Harvby Road. 
Seven miles well repaired, from lot 10, con. 8, Harvey, eastward. 

NOETHBROOK ROAD. 

From Northbrook, a point on Addington road at lot 27, con. 8, Kaladar, improve- 
ments were made eastward four and a half miles between lots 25 and 26 Kennebec. De- 
viations were also made for the improvement of location, and some bridges and cnlverta 
were re-bailt. 

Opbongo Road. 

Four and a half miles improved, from Plaunt's hotel, easterly, of a substantial char- 
acter. 

Papineau Bridges. 

A bridge was built over Boom creek, on side line between lots 14 and 15, con. 12, Pap- 
ineau, one hundred feet long, with an opening of 24 feet, and balance of earth approaches. 
A second bridge was erected on the 12th and 13th concession line, over the same creek^ 
of the same length as above, but with an opening of nineteen feet only. There was a 
third bridge constructed over a creek on cor. 10, about seventy feet long, with a 12-feek 
opening, and approaches of each thirty feet 

Papineau Egad. 

The work in this instance was grading and improving on con. 8, Papineau, across 
lots 30 and 31, half a mile; also on the side line between lots 30 and 31, six hundred 
yards were repaired, while on the side line between lots 25 and 26, through concessions 
10 to 12, a mile and a quarter was repaired, representing gcod work for the appropriation. 

Petbwawa 24 AND 25 Proof Line Road. 

This work was from con. 2, Range B, at the north end of the 2nd concession of 
Petewawa, on the line between lots 24 and 25, northerly, about three-quarters of a milft 
it was through a low and wet tamarac swamp. 

Radcliffb and Brudenbll T. L. Road. 

Four and a half miles of substantial work, from Peterson road, at Rockingham, on: 
approximately the town line named to the south boundary of Brudenell. 

RoLPH Bridge, 

This was the construction of a road over McOonnell's creek, on the Pembroke and 
Mattawa road, in the township of Rolph. 

Round Laeb Road. 

A road between Stony lake and Havelock, on concession 10, Belmont. Last year 
the road was opened to lot 26, and this season further opened from lot 20 to lot 25» 
two miles. There is yet half a mile to construct, which might be done for $75 or $100. 

Etan Road. 

Between New Carlow and Gombermere road, lot 6, con. 13, Carlo w, six miles were 
improved on this "Ryan road," which had been roughly opened by lumbermen about 
forty years ago. 

Scott Line Road. 

Three and a half miles of repairs from lot 29, con. 12, of Wollaston westward. This 
portion is now said to be a very good waggon road. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 77 

Shields' Road. 

Work was commenctd at lot 15, con. 14, Bradenell, and extended easterly a mile 
and a half, very much improving the road. 

Smoky Falls Bridge. 

Smoky Falls bridge spans Sturgeon river, on lot 2, con. 1, Field, with a full length 
of two hundred and sixty nine feet. There are two 55-feet clear openings, and six piers 
altogether, the entire work being of a strong and substantial ch:iracter, and will, no doubt 
withstand the great freshets which annually occur on this river. 

South Algona Road. 

This work was commenced between ^ots 5 and 6, con. 6, and extended north on the 
«ide line named in South Algona, to the Indian Reserve, a length of three-quarters of a 
■mile — opened, grubbed and graded, making a good waggon road. 

Springer Road. 

Half a mile in this case was opened, from the ending of work two years ago, extend- 
ing from lot 2, con. A, south to lake Nipissing. 

Springer A and B Con. Road. 

From lot 1, con. A, work was continued west about three-quurters of a mile, opened 
to reach several settlers in that vicinity. 

Sturgeon River Road. 

Repair's from con. 2, Springer, north, to con. 1, Field, six miles of satisfactory work. 

Sudbury and Chelmsford Road. 

In this case four miles of road were opened from near Sudbury, on the south side of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway north-westerly. Of the length mentioned two miles and a 
iialf have been well finished, and the balance, though opened, is not fully completed for 
general trafl&c. The townships of McKim, Balfour, and the town of Sudbury contributed 
eacb $50 towards this work. 

Temiscamingue Roads. 

In the above district about ten miles of roads were opened, and about ten miles re- 
paired, and a bridge 169 feet long erected, the operations being as follows : — A mile and' a 
half cut out on con 3, Dymond, from the boundary of Harris, north to corner of lots 10 and 
11, thence west to join Dawson Point and Liskeard road, and towards which settlers gave 
$30 00 free labour. There was also a quarter of a mile ditched on the said Liskeard and 
Dawson Point road. A mile and a quarter of double ditching was done from lots 2 and 
3, con. 4, Dymond, eastward, to a bad swamp. From the s. e. corner, lot 1, con. 2, 
Kearns, to the comer of the four townships of Kearns, Dymond, Harley and Hudson, a 
mile was opened, nearly half a mile on the Provincial line, and nearly three-quarters of a 
mile in the township of Dymond on the third and fourth con line, from lots 1 to 3. A mile 
and a quarter of West Dymond road was graded from Liskeard and half a mile stumped 
and further improved ; the bridge over the west branch of Wabis creek was raised four feet 
for better waterway, involving a new pier and other changes. On the Haileybury and 
Liskeard road four miles ware stumped and partially graded, fifty-four chains of which 
were cut out anew, while on Bucke township road, from Haileybury south, three miles of 
work was done, mostly drainage. Again, between cons. 1 and 2, Bucke, half a mile of 
road was opened, and a substantial bridge, one hundred and sixty-nine feet long built 
over Mill creek ; three miles were also cut out between cons. 3 and 4, Bucke, and three 



78 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3- 



small bridges were bnilt. A new road was cut out from Wright's creek bridge north- 
westward to the line between lots 8 and 9, con. 3, and thence north to cons. 3 and 4, 
Casey, three-quarters of a mile ; and in the same township on the said 3rd and 4th con- 
cession line a road was cut out and partially stumped, from White River east to side 
line between lots 8 and 9, thenco north to Wright's creek, thence west to lots 6 and 7,. 
con. 5, and thence north between lots 6 and 7, to bend of Wright's creek — a distance of 
two and a half miles. A portion of this distance is, of course, but roughly opened. Lastly^ 
from the bend of Wright's creek, lots 6 and 7, north, half a mile to concessions 5 and 6,^ 
and thence west to White river two miles and a half were opened, one and a half of 
which was only logged and stumped. 

Vkuvb Riybr Bridges. 

A bridge over Yeuve river, on lot 5, between concessions 1 and 2, Oaldwell, and is 
comprised of two abutments, two piers, and a superstructure. The main opening is fifty- 
fivi feet in the clear, and there are two others of twenty -eight feet each. The floor of 
the bridge is fourteen feet above average water, and the total length of the structure ia 
one hundred and seventy-six feet. The wooden piers are filled to the top with stone for 
solidity. Another bridge over the same river, about two and a half miles east of Warren^ 
was also constructed, and is locally known as Bartlstt's bridge. It is one hundred and 
fifty- six feet long, with pile substructure, and is reported to be an excellent bridge. 

Vbrnee and Badgerow Road. 

Four miles of general repairs, from concession 1, Gibbon, to lot 8, concession 3^ 
Badgerow. 

Victoria Rord. 

From the boundary line between Garden and Dalton, eight miles of work was done- 
southward to Talbot river. The total expenditure on this road was $507.80, towards 
which the Oounty of Yi«toria gave $150, township of Garden $33 33, township of Lax- 
ton $33.34, the township of Bexley $33.33, making in all $250 of a grant towards th& 
road. The Departmental expenditure is therefore only $257.80. 

Wahnapitae Road. 

Seven miles of repairs from near Wahnapitae Station northward, and another mile- 
from the station westward. 

Warren Bridge. 

A bridge one hundred and eighty feet long, built over Yeuve river, about a quarter of 
a mile south of Warren village, on the line of Dunnet road. It stands upon twenty- 
four piles, has a span of forty feet, the superstructure being nineteen feet above general 
water level for the purpose of guarding against spring freshets. A contribution of 
$382.09 was made by the municipality for this work. 

Westport and Mabbrlt Road. 

The improvement of about three and a half miles, from lot 14, concession 12, South 
Sherbrooke, to lot 14, concession 9. A large portion of the expenditure was made in 
renewing a bridge over Boulton's creek, requiring two new piers. The bridge is two 
hundred and fifty feet long. 

WiDDiFiELD Roads. 

A road was opened from lot 9, concession A, to concession 2, two miles ; the last 
quarter being for a winter road only ; and on the 2nd and 3rd concession line, from the 
west side of lot 12 east to the east side of lot 10, — a mile and a half was opened. The 
sum of $100 was also spf-nt on the 4th and 5th concession, from the west side of lot 
number 10, eastward, to the east side of lot number 9, the latter being three quarters of a. 
a mile of new road. 



1899 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



WoLL ASTON Road. 

Six miles were improved from Coe Hill, southerly, to the boundary line of WoUaston 
at lot 22, concession 8, and thence to lot 29 in the 1st concession. 

WiSAWASA Egad. 

This work was a mile of ditching from the 15th and 16th concession line of 
Ohisholm, along the road mentioned. 

MINING ROADS. 

Bell City and Mine Centre Road. 

Something like a mile of ditching and draining wss done on this road for its improve- 
ment. It was previously opened by miners, bub was not in anything like good, travelable 
shape. 

Bonheur and Saw Bill Road. 

General improvements were made over this road in repairing crossways, drainage, 
and other vork. 

Gbos Cap and Lake Wawa Road. 

Six miles and a half have been opened between Gros Cap and Lake Wawa, in 
Michipicoten, from a point at Harbor Beach, one hundred and fifty-six feet east of the 
s. w. corner post of Indian Reserve, about N. 10° E,to intersect with Michipicoten tote road. 
Over Magpie river a bridge two hundred feet long was erected, comprised cheaply of two 
seventy feet spans, with pile substructure and protection piers, to guard the bridge against 
ice and spring freshets. Contributions were received from various mining companies for 
the furtherance of this work, amounting altogether to 8465. 

Jacefibh Bat and Long Lake Road. 

Improvements were made over this road, which was first opened in 1896, from Jack- 
fish Bay, of Lake Superior, northward. It was the northerly portion which was worked 
upon, to enable miners to take in their machinery. 

Lake Wabigoon District Road. 

Some four or five miles have been opened npon the south side of Big Sandy lake, to 
connect a road from Wabigoon on the west side of the lake with an existing road built by 
the Hudson's Bay Company to the south end of the same lake. It may be deemed 
necessary to make an extension about the east side of the lake to advance the develop- 
ment of mining properties in that vicinity. 

New Klondyke Road. 

Two miles of road were opened fairly, and another mile cut out twelve feet wide 
and fairly cleared. There was al-o three-quarters of a mile of corduroying, with a con- 
siderable amount of ditching. The position of this road was pretty tully given in last 
year's report. 

Olive Mine Road. 

This is a road from Olive mine and other mining locations leading to Bad 'V'Jrmillion 
lake, and which I believe the Olive Mine Company, with others, spent some $400 in 
opening. The expenditure by the government this year will of coarse very much 
improve it. The length is about five miles. 

Shoal Lake and Turtle River Road. 

A general course of repairs over the whole ro*d, but chiefly cross way ing, ditching 
and draining^ The grant was not sufficient to grade the road completely. 



80 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



Upper Manitou Road. 

This is a road about seven miles long, between Wabigoon lake and the Upper Mani- 
tou lake, over which there is a large general traffic, and this was repaired. 

Wabiqoon and Mine Centre Mail Route, 



This work is, as its name indicates, a mail route, and for winter purposes only. 
The object is to carry mail matter from Wabigoon southward to miners and inhabitants in 
that district, to meet the mail route of the Seine river. Without this line, it appears 
necessary to obtain letters through the United States, via Tower, in Minnesota, — the 
result being much delay and a greater distance to traverse ; and it is hoped that a more 
regular mail service will be established over this line than hertofore. 



1899 J 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



81 



SUMMARY OF EXPEI5DITURE ON COLONIZA.TION ROADS AND BRIDGES 

IN THE YEAR 1899. 



Name of work. 



North Division. 

Alderson road. 

Atwood roads. 

Balfour and Rayside " 

Barrie Island road. 

Batchewaning " 

Bridge at Dryden 

Bruce Mines and Thessalon River bridges 

Buntin's Creek bridge 

Campbell 20 S. L road. 

Carpenter " 

C!arpenter and Dobie T. L " 

Carpenter and Lash T. L " 

■Carpenter and Lash (balance) " 

Cockburn Island roads. 

Coffin, 3 and 4 Con road. 

Crozier and Lash " 

Day and Thessalon T, L " 

Day and Mills bridge 

Dean Lake road. 

Devlin " 

Echo Bay , " 

Eton and Sanf or I roads. 

Oalbraith, Con 1 bridge 

Galbraith, 2 and 3 road. 

Great Northern - " 

Indian Point bridge 

Inspection 

Iron Bridge 

Iron Bridge and Dean Lake Station (balance) road. 

Isbester Station " 

Kaministiquia bridge 

Keewatin " 

Korah road. 

Korah 10 and 11 " 

Lake Wolseley " 

Lee's Road and Scow, Spanish River 

Lyon's Creek bridge 

Manitowaning and Shequiandah road. 

May and Salter T. L " 

Morley Township " 

Morley and Pattullo T. L " 

Morley and Shenston " 

Mudge Bay :• " 

Oliver Township " 

Ouimet and Black Bay " 

Parkinson .... " 

Parkinson's (Rockliffe) " 

Paipoonge bridge 

Patton and Dean Lake road. 

Plummer, 6 Con bridge 

Pbimmer and Lefroy T. L road 

Port Lock and Debarats " 

6C.L. 



Depart- 


mental Ex- 


penditure. 


^ c. 


130 CO 


780 00 


507 49 


200 00 


201 00 


204 18 


59 00 


799 52 


310 59 


761 85 


798 50 


780 00 


15 60 


270 00 


302 49 


1,685 85 


100 01 


50 00 


50 00 


800 00 


298 58 


777 91 


90 00 


100 00 


300 62 


1,892 17 


2,020 00 


90 CO 


23 75 


501 34 


339 86 


800 00 


400 14 


90 00 


300 57 


499 .38 


1,150 00 


311 50 


400 31 


780 00 


680 00 


800 97 


302 00 


300 00 


304 22 


417 38 


300 35 


169 47 


402 38 


50 00 


75 13 


401 64 



Municipal 
or other 
Grants. 



$ c. 



1,500 00 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. a 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE.— ConiinMec^. 



Name of work. 



North Division. — Continued. 

Port Lock ank Port Fiulay . . road. 

Prince Township " 

Rainy River " 

Rainy River (in sections) " 

Rat Portage road and bridge 

Savanne road. 

Spanish Station " 

St. Joseph Island roads. 

Thessalon River bridges 

Vankoughnet road. 

Victoria and Salter " 

Wainwright and Vanhome " 

Wells, 2 and 3 " 

Winnipeg River piers 

Total 



West Division, 

Ah-mic road. 

Ah-mic Harbour '. bridge 

Baxter roads 

Beatty's Creek bridge 

Bethune, 25 and 26 S. L roaid. 

Cardwell " 

Cardwell (balance) " 

Cardwell, No. 3 , " 

ChaflFey, 30 a- d 31 S.L " 

Chaffey Bridges and " 

Chaffey bridge 

Christie road. 

Christie and Foley " 

Distress River " 

Dorset and Huntsville " 



Draper " 

Fox Point " 

Golden Valley " 

Gurd, 20 and 21 S. L " 

Hagarman, 25 and 26 S. L " 

Hirasworth " 

Humphrey and Conger T. L " 

Inpection 

Junction No. 2 road. 

Long Lake (Stephenson) bridge 

Macaulay road. 

Magnetewan River bridge 

McKenzie Township roads. 

Mills and Wilson road. 

Muskoka (Gurd) " 

Muskoka (Draper) bridge 

Musquosh road. 

Musquosh bridge 

Neville road. 



Depart- 
mental Ex- 
penditure. 



300 04 

70 00 

999 65 

1,507 78 
151 62 
350 50 
296 00 
497 40 
528 87 
480 00 
343 19 

1,022 29 
200 05 
125 95 



31,049 09 



306 18 

299 85 
541 56 
335 53 

300 59 
405 00 

7 00 
209 43 

403 92 
250 00 

50 00 
500 00 
247 50 
296 75 
416 10 
212 63 
155 58 
508 51 
298 87 
300 00 
300 00 

404 14 
1,167 45 

411 50 
350 05 
403 92 
751 19 
599 55 
494 50 

201 20 

300 00 

301 18 
22 19 

202 75 



Municipal 
or other 
Grants. 



1.500 OO 



J899] 



CRO\VN LAJfDS DEPARTMENT. 



83 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE— Con<mue</. 



Name of work. 



West Division — Continued. 

Nipiasing , road. 

Northern (Maple and Pickerel bridsfea) *' 

North-West Road bridges 

Oakley, Draper and Ryde T. L road. 

Peninsula (Humphrey) *' 

Perry, 12 Con " 

Perry and Chaffey " 

Rosseau and Christie . . *' 

Rosseau and Nipiss ng " 

Rosseau Rirer (balance) ■. bridge 

Sinclair and Bobcaygeon road. 

Sinclair and Franklin T. L ♦ " 

Stisted, 12 and 13 Con *' 

Stony Lake Inlet .... bridge 

Tiny (balance 1897) road. 

AVestphalia " 



Total 



East Division. 



Addins;ton road 

Airy Township 

Anson " 

Austruther " 

Anstruther, Burleigh and Ohandos roads 

Ashdad and Renfrew (balance) road 

Ashdad and Mt. St. Patrick (balance) " 

Bangor, 15 and 16 (balance) " 

Belmont and Meyersburg " 

Bonfield and Boulter , roads 

Brudenell and Hagarty road 

Buckhom " 

Burleigh " 

Burleigh (between Burleigh Falls and Apsley) " 

Burnt River bridges 

Buskong (balance) bridge 

Caldwell No. 2 road 

Calvin 30 and 31 S. L " 

Cardiff Bridge, and " 

Carlow " 

Carlow 5 and 6 , " 

Cashel " 

Casimir Township , "*. " 

Cavendish roads 

Chandos road 

Chisholm Township . . . ., roads 

Combermere and Palmer Rapids road 

Dummer '• 

Eganville and Foymount " 

Eldon 7 Con. (balance) " 

Ferris Township roads 

Field road 



Depart- 
mental 
Expenditure. 



502 75 
150 16 
378 16 
600 05 
200 00 
305 98 
300 10 
300 00 
511 22 

13 37 
400 62 
418 63 
107 75 

63 87 
140 00 
304 41 



16,551 69 



527 30 

400 00 

200 00 

311 54 

402 40 

32 00 

45 10 

17 50 

200 00 

400 61 

380 00 

402 58 

225 00 

301 74 

507 79 

7 67 

400 00 

304 83 

774 58 

101 18 

52 92 

150 35 

431 90 

505 63 

200 87 

1,200 65 

416 65 

96 11 

299 70 

21 25 

830 28 

498 21 



Municipal 
or other 
Grants. 



200 00 



200 00 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ N... 3: 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE— C'ow<tnt*«d. 



Name of work. 



East Division — Gontimied. 

Field No. 2 road 

Field 2 and 3 " 

Fort Stewart " 

Foymount and Brudenell *' 

Frontenac " 

Galway roads 

Galway, 4 and 5 Con road 

Galway and Cavendish roads 

Grattan, 30 and 31, Proof Line road 

Grattan 4th Chute and 14th Con " 

Hagarty, 2nd Con " 

Hagarty and S. Algona (balance) " 

Harbum " 

Hinchinbrooke, 5 and 6 S. L " 

Hugel • " 

Hugel and Badgerow " 

Hydes Chute and Sanson " 

Inspection ; 

Inspection (balance) 

Jack's LaKe road 

Jones Falls and Battersea " 

Killaloe and Emmet " 

Killaloe and Bonnechere " 

Kirkpatrick and McPherson " 

Lonsdale and Bridgewater " 

Loughboro' Lake " 

Lyndoch, 13 Con " 

Martland Township : " 

Matta watchan " . 

Mattawan Township roads 

Madawaska (balance) bridge 

Mississippi road 

Mississippi (Snow) " 

Mississippi (Bancroft to Bronson) " 

Monck (Faraday) " 

Monteagle " 

Monteagle, 10 Con. (balance) " 

Mt. St. Patrick and Blackdonald " 

North Algona, 8th Con " 

North Harvey " 

Northbrook " 

Nogie's Creek " 

Opeongo " 

Papineau " 

Papineau bridges 

Petewawa, 24 and 25, Proof Line .... road 

Radcliffe and Brudenell T. L " 

Rolph bridges 

Round Lake road 

Ryan "■ 

Scott Line " 

Shields' " 

Smoky Falls , bridge 

South Algona road 



Depart- 
mental 
Expenditure. 


Municipal 
or other 
Grants. 


$ c. 

414 90 
601 75 


$ c. 


50 00 




313 45 




50 00 




475 00 




375 00 




433 37 
301 90 




300 00 




305 86 




21 15 




180 00 




251 69 




300 00 
500 25 




718 22 




3,138 45 




14 23 




200 00 




201 10 
411 23 




234 10 

600 77 




150 00 




516 19 




180 00 




549 50 




396 25 
104 .50 
250 15 




490 66 




517 24 




100 50 
203 60 




151 50 




9 90 




301 53 

502 73 
392 50 




299 96 




400 38 




530 00 
299 68 




276 37 




299 85 




500 35 
155 73 




200 00 




298 20 
150 00 




300 00 




2,373 35 
308 50 







I8y9 J 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



85. 



SUMMARY OF EXPENDITURE— ConcZwo^ed. 



Name of work. 



East Division — Vo^iHniied. 

Springer road 

Springer A and B " 

Sturgeon River ' " 

Sudbury and Chelmsford " 

Temiscamingue roads 

Temiscamingue (balance) '* 

Veuve River (East of Vemer) bridge 

"Veuve River (West of Vemer) " 

Vemer and Badgerow road 

Victoria " 

Wabis Creek (balance) bridgf 

Wahnapitaj road 

Wahnapitaj (balance 1896) " 

Warren bridge 

Westport and Maberley road 

Widdifield roads 

Wisawasa road 

WoUaston ' ' 

Less refund on Mountain Lake Road 



Depart- 
mental 
Expenditure. 



$ c. 



210 30 


100 07 


303 20 


730 00 


4,656 20 


1 93 


940 51 


800 61 


199 63 


257 80 


46 28 


470 60 


488 02 


400 20 


280 00 


500 36 


199 73 


45 00 


42,877 31 


14 00 



42,863 31 



Recapitulation. 



^iorth Division 
West Division . 
East Division . . 



Municipal Grants Referred to in Summary. 



Dominion Government 

Victoria County and Townships Cardan, Laxton and Bexley 

Peterboro' County 

Township of Smith , 

Township of Douro 

Townships McKim and Balfour 

Town of Sudbury 

Municipality of Dunnett and Ratter 



Grants Referred to in Mining Roads. 



Great Northern Mining Co 

Hornblende Mining Co 

J. P. Moran Mining Co 

J. R. Van Every Co 

Contributions from several Mining Co's. 



Municipal 

and other 

Grants. 



a c. 



15(1 00 



250 00 



38-' 09 



1,182 09. 



31,049 09 


16,551 69 


42 863 31 


90,464 09^ 


1,600 00 


250 00 


200 00 


100 00 


100 00 


100 00 


50 00 


382 09 


2,682 09 


50 00 


25 00 


30 00 


50 00 


310 00 



465 OO 



^6 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 



MINING ROADS. 



Name of work. 



Bell City and Mine Centre Mining road 

Bonheur and Saw Bill " " 

Free Wharf at Wabigoon *' 

Gros Cap and Lake Wawa " road 

Jackfish Bay and Long Lake " '* 

Lake Wabigoon District " roads 

Manitou " dam 

Mining (West Algoma) " trails 

New Klondyke " road 

Olive Mine " " 

Rainy and Cedar Lake (balance) " 

Seine River and Manitou Lake Mining trails 

Shoal Lake and Turtle River road 

Upper Manitou . . " 

Wabigoon dam 

Wabigoon and Mine Centre Mail ., route 



Less Refund Rainy and Cedar Lake Road S 7 00 

" " Jackfish Bay and Long Lake Road 40 08 



Depart- 
mental 
Expenditure. 



303 04 

490 00 
500 00 
1,420 04 
380 00 
800 00 

78 50 

150 00 

780 00 

690 00 

3 00 

65 00 
492 97 
408 30 
543 89 
500 00 



Municipal 

and 

other Grants. 



7,510 74 



47 08 



7,463 66 



465 00 > 



HENEY SMITH, 

Superintendent of Colonization R<iads. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December 30th, 1899. 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 35. 

List of PerBons holding Oullers' Licenses issued ander The Ontario Callers' Act up to 

31 St December, 1899. 




Anderson, M. M 

Allan, James D 

Appleton, Erwin B 

Albert, Andrew 

Adams, J. Q 

Anderson, Patrick J 

Anderson, J. C 

Allan, Alfred 

Aikins. Geo. M 

Appleby, Ridley 

Adams, James M 

Aylward, James 

Archibald, John L 

Austin, Wm G 

Anderson, Charles , 

Anderson, John 

Adair, Thomas Albert 

Anderson, J. G 

Alexander, Samnel 

Adams, Wm 

Armstrong, James Theodore , 



Boland, Abraham Cartier. 

Brown, Singleton Bracebridge. 

Barry, Thomas James Hastings. 

Blanchpt, Paul Frederick Ottawa. 

Bird. W. S Parry Sound. 

Bay ley, James T Gravenhurst. 

Bell, Henry Ottawa. 

Beach, Herbert Mablom Ottawa. 

Barry, Thomas Millbridge. 

Beaty, W. R Parry Sound. 

Brooks, Fredeiick William Mackey's Station. 

Brown, Robert D Port Sidney. 

Breed, Arthur G Penetanguishene. 

Barnes, Thomas George Lee. . . Muskoka Mills. 

Buchanan, Robert Coldwater. 

Beck, Jacob Frederick Penetanguishene. 

Bird, Joseph Manly Muskoka Mills. 



Almonte. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Ottawa. 

Longford Mills. 

Campbellford. 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

French River. 

Katrine. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Peterborough. 

Keewatin. 

Renfrew. 

Little Current. 

Cartier. 

Gananoque. 

Alpena, Mich. 

Arden. 

Westmeath. 

McKellar. 



Boyd, John F 
Brandon, Martin W 
Bell, John C. 



Thessalon. 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 



Bartlett, George W [Warren. 

Brown, Silas » Klock's Mills. 

Boland, W. G Eganville. 

Baulke, George R Aylmer, Que. 

Bromley, Thomas Pembroke. 

Bremner, John L Admaston. 

Brumley, W. H Pembroke. 

Bowers, Isaac Little Current. 

Brown, Thomas Barrie. 

Bass, Walter R West Huntingdon. 

Bates, Robert Rat Portage. 

Bick, Thomas Bobcaygeon. 

Burke, John Thomas Midland. 

Benson, John Bird Midland. 

Brennan, Richard Lawence . . . Peterborough. 

Brown, Hugh Risside jHuntsville. 

Bryan, Frank . . [Keewatin. 

Bennett. Edward Clinton JAhmic Harbor. 

Blaine, Harvie Thomas Orillia. 

Barrett, Thomas . - jBarrie. 

Bray, James Kinmount. 



Bissell, George Thomas . 

Baxter, Richard 

Breeaugh, Edward 

Boyd, Geerge A 

Buchan, Frederick 

Barret, Patrick 

Brundage, Alfred W . . . . 

Brougham, Thomas 

Blair, Robert I 

Benson. John W 

Beck, Charles M., Jr . . . 

Beatty, W. J 

Burns, C. W., Jr 

Bell, John Henry. . ,, 
Bettes, John Hiram . . . 

Brady, John 

Beattie, W. J 

Bromley, William 

Bissell, Hartie 

Brown, Robert 

Beaton, Hugh 

Bailey, Arthur 

Burd, James Henry 

Bailey, Samuel James . . 

Burton, Tinswood 

Boyes, James 

Brown, John 

Brennen, Edward !Scott. 
Bell, John Arguey 



Callaghan, Dennis 

Campbell, Alexander J 

CarsoD, James , , . 

Campbell, J. M 

Campbell, Robert 

Clairmont, Joseph 

Clarkson, Robert J 

Carruthers, Aaron 

Calder, Wm. J. 

Chew, Joseph 

Cole, James Cdin 

Cameron, William 

Cain, Robert 

Crawford, Stephen W 

Cochrane, George 

Coburn, John 

Crowe, Nathaniel 

Cameron, Alexander 

Chrysler, Frank R. L 

Carson, Hugh 

Calder, George 

Callahan, Dennis 

Corrigan, Robert T 

Cameron, John H 

Carson, Melvin 

Cameron, John K 

Cassidy, William 

Coops, George Washington.. 
Chisholm, George Leopold . . 
Chalmers, George James.... 

Caverly, David Charles 

Campbell, Archibald J 

Close, John L 



Tronton. 

Deseronto. ' 

Defeeronto. 

Thessalon. 

Arnprior. 

Arn prior. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Arnprior. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Coldwater. 

South River. 

Burk's Falls. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Westmeath. 

Trenton. 

Starrat. 

Waubashene. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Orillia. 

Renfrew. 

Huntsville. 

Rockdale, i 

Sundridge. 

Klock's Mills. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Campbellford. 

Parry Sound. 

Hintonburg. 

Burk ii&ke. 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

Collins' Inlet.' 

Midland. 

Thessalon. 

Peterborough. 

Lindsay. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Webbwood. 

Rat Portage. 

Woodville. 

Campbellford. 

Emo. 

Rat Portage. 

Little Current. 

Sp»nish River. 

Little Current. 

Peterborough. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Peterborough, 

Parry Sound. 

Little Current. 

Arnprior. 



«8 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 



APPENDIX No. Z5— Continued. 




Oampbell, James R 

Oampbell, John A 

■Cailher, Hyacinth 

Ghamberlin, Thomas 

Cooper, David Allan 

Cox, Henry 

■Carrie, James 

Clarkson. A. E 

Olairmont, E 

Cameron, W. F. 

Connolly, Daniel 

Campbell, P. 

Cadenhead, Alexander 

Carpenter, R. J 

Christie, William Pringle . . 

Campbell, C. V 

Clegg, Samuel 

©lairmont, William L 

Cahill, Thomas 

•Chew, Manley 

Cooper, James Eddly 

Cook, Reindardt 

Crowe, Cecil 

Oassidy, S. C 

CJharleson, John Baptiste. . . 

Comer, Billa F 

Charter, George 

Corrigan, Robt. J 

Durrill, John W 

Dickson, John ». 

Danter, R. W 

Doyle, T. J 

Dobie, Alexander R 

Donally, Richard S 

Devine, William 

Durrill, William 

Draper, Patrick 

Davis, J. P. 

Drum, Patrick 

Durham, Edgar S 

Duquette, Gharles 

Davis, William Albert 

Dickson, Robert Alexander 

Dawkins, John 

Doxsee, James E 

Didier, L. P 

Devine, Patrick J 

Dinsmore, Richard 

Ebert, Andrew P 

Ellis, Alexander 

Ellis, John 

Errington, Joseph 

Edgington, Henry John . . . 
Eager, James . . 

Forbes, Christopher McKay 

Fitzgerald, E Clair 

Farrell, W. H 

French, Lewis Wm 

Fraser, Wm. A 

Fortune, Owen 

Fraser, David 

France, John 

Ferguson, Ernest A 

Ford, Charles 



Eganville. 

Galetta. 

Arnprior. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Millbrook. 

Bellerica, Que. 

Ottawa. 

Midland. 

Gravonhurst. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Gravenhurst. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Midland . 

Arnprior. 

Severn Ridges. 

Sault Ste, Marie. 

Peterborough. 

Gravenhurst. 

Nosbossing., 

Midland: 

Saurin. 

South River. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Dunchurch. 

Ottawa. 

Tweed. 

Sundridge. 

Emb. 

Ottawa. 
Sundridge. 
Parry Sound. 
Eau Clare. 
Blind River. 
Sudbury. 
Cook's Mills. 
Nosbossing. 
Quyon, Que. 
Bobcaygeon. 
Belleville. 
Rosseau. 
Webbwood. 
Bobcaygeon. 
Keene. 
Gravenhurst. 
Gravenhurst. 
Aylmer, Que. 
Sheenboro, Que. 
Hunts ville. 

Pembroke. 
Arnprior. 
Westmeath. 
Sundridge. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 

McLean's Depot. 
Parry Sound. 
Ironside, Que. 
Byng Inlet. 
Mattawa. 
Trenton. 
Norman. 
Codlins' Inlet. 
Baysville. 
Wahnapitae. 



Eraser, Alexander, Jr 

Fairbaim, William 

Fraser, Wm. A 

Fraser, Foster 

Fraser, William 

Fraser, Hugh Alexander 

Flaherty, John 

Fisher, William 

Fox, Thomas 

Fallis, James W. . . . , 

Fairbaim, N. H 

Friel, John 

Fox, Charles 

Featherstonhaugh, Wm. Henry 

Frair, Schuyler 

Feren, Joel 

Eraser, Duncan 

Freeston, Walter 

Green, Forman A 

Green, Samuel E , 

Grant, John 

Greene, Arthur 

George, R 

Gardiner, John 

Golden, Frank J 

Garson, Robert 

Gropp, August 

Grozelle, Antoine D 

Goulais, James 

Grayson, Charles 

Gladstone, Harry E .... ..... 

Graham, Edward G 

Griffin, James 

Gordon, Alexander B 

Gareau, Noah J 

Gordon, Robert W 

Guertin, Nelson 

Gardener, John 

Gunter, Peter M 

Glennie, William 

Gorman, Maurice J 

Gillies, John A 

Gadway, John 

Garrow, Edward 

Golding, William 

Gillies, Harry 

Gordon, Herbert C 

Gillespie, M. H 

Griffin, William 

Ganton, David 

Graham, George L 

Graham, Frederick S 

Gill, Cuthbert 

Graham, James Robert 

Graham, Thomas Jordan 

Gaudaur, Antoine Daniel 

Hartt, James 

Hayes, James 

Humphrey, T. W 

Huckson, A. H 

Handley, Robert 

Howe, Alexander 

Huri, Edwin 

Huff, J. y. Morris 



Westmeath. 

Calabogie. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Little Current. 

Pembroke. 

Lindsay. 

Trenton. 

Deseronto. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Webbwood. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Penetanguishene. 

Westmeath. 

Savanne. 

Big Forks. 

Burk's Falls. 

Gilmour. 

Parry Sound. 

Flinton. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Trenton. 

Thessalon. 

Penetanguishene. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Peterborough. 

Keewatin. 

Cook 3 Mills. 

Wahnapitae. 

Spanish River. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Petawawa. 

Rat Portage. 

Gilmour. 

Millbridge. 

Fenelon Falls. 

Braeside. 

Parry Sound. 

Nipissing Junction. 

Dorset. 

White Lake. 

Nelson. 

Cook's Mills. 

Huntsville. 

Trout Creek. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Orillia. 

Rat Portage. 

Byng Inlet. 

Orillia. 

Gilmour. 
Enterprise. 
Gravenhurst. 
French River. 
Douglas. 
Queensborough. 
Hurd ville. 
Arnprior. 



1891) 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



89 



APPENDIX No. 35 ^Continued. 



Name. 



Huttoo, John 

Hutchinson, Wm. E ..., 
Hogarth, Joseph Rowan , 

Humphrey, John , 

Hill, Joshua 

Hall, David 

Hartley, Charles 

Hawkins, Henry Charles 
Hines, Philip Wallace . . 
Hadson, John Lewis. ... 

Helferty, Dennis 

Hamilton, Robt 

Hoppins, Abiram 

Hoppins, Densmore 

Haystead, John 

Henderson, John Irwin . 

Hartley, William , 

Higgins, John C 

Harrison John, Jr 

Hawkins, E 

Henderson, Charles ... . 

Halliday, Frank 

Halliday, James 

Hurdman, J. A 

Hawkins, Stonewall J... 

HinchlifiFe, William , 

Hillis, James M 

HogR, W.J 

Hoxie, E. P 

Hawkins, Walter 

Howard, James 

Howard, William 

Hoc^an, Enos W 

Home, John T 

Hamilton, Chas. E 

Irwin, Thomas H 

Irwin, Eli 

Jackson, Robert 

Johnson, Finlay 

Jones, Albert. . . 

Johnson, Thomas 

Johntson, Archibald M . 

Julien, Charles 

Junkin, Henry 

Johns, Frank 

Jessup, Edward D , 

Johnson, Frank N 

Johnston, John , 

Johnson, S. M 

Jones, Frederick James. 
Johnston, William A... 

Jervis, Henry 

Jones, William 

James, Martin 

Kerby, John 

Kennedy, Robert 

Kirby, Louis Russell 

Kennedy, Timothy 

Kirk, Henry 

Knox, Milton 

Kinsella, Michael Pierce 

Kitchen, D 

Kelly, .Jeremiah 

Kelly, Ferdinand 

7 C.L. 



P. 0. Address. 



Hutton House. 

Huntsville. 

Pembroke. 

Gravenhurst. 

Midland. 

Levering 

Peterborough. 

Blind River. 

Hunt«ville. 

Combermere. 

Eganville. 

Rat Psrtage. 

Kingston. 

Kingston. 

Parry Sound. 

Bcbcaygeon. 

Millbridge . 

Peterborough. 

Pembroke. 

Le Breton Flats. 

Bracebridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Sptingtown. 

Ottawa. 

Meldrum Bay. 

Gnnter. * 

Sutton West. 

North Bay. 

Katrine . 

Pembr; ke. 

£iganville. 

Baysville. 

Snvanne. 

Fort William. 

Rat Portage. 

Parrv Sound. 
Rat Portage. 

Brechin. 

Bracebridge. 

Victoria Harbor. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Trenton. 

Marmora. 

Nipissing Junction. 

Cache Bay. 

Ottawa. 

Peninsula Lake. 

Arnprior. 

Flinton. 

Castleford. 

Wisawasa. 

Fenelon Falls. 

The Flats. 

Belleville. 

Marmora. 

Ottawa. 

Enterprise. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

French River. 

Sudbury. 

Mattawa. 




King, Napoleon 

Kean, B. F 

Kemp, Orval Wesley . . . 
Kirk, Charles, Barron . . 

Kingsland, W. P 

Kerr, John B 

Kennedy, Walter 

Kennedy, John 

Knox, Wm. M 

Kearney, Michael John . 

Kendrick, .fohn 

Kennedy, John L 



Lee, James 

Lloyd, iXlfred 

Lawrie, Frank A 

Latimer, James 

Lemyre, Middey 

Lutz, Jacob 

Luby, John E 

Lochnan, James 

Lozo, John 

Loughrin, Lawrence 

Linton, J. H . . 

Ludgate, James 

Lee, Robert 

Langf ord, Mark 

Letherby, Edwin 

Lovering, William James. 

Lane, Maurice 

Lenton, George 

Low, Thomas A 

Livingston, Robert M.... 

Londry, William E 

Labelle, James 

Labelle, Eli 

Ladurante, J. D 

Ludgate, Theodore 

Lucas, Frank 

Lunam, Duncan 

Lott, George 

Lawrie, John D 

Lovering, George Francis. 

Lavigne, John 

Landell, Charles S 

Long, Henry Elisha 

Lynch, W. H 



Malloy, Mark 

Miller, R. O 

Menzies, Archibald 

Manning, James 

Martin, Philip 

Malone, William Patrick . 

Marsh, Esli, Terril 

Millar, John W , 

Mutchenbacker, Asa 

Morris, George F , 

Murray, George, Jr 

Maughan, Joseph , 

Margach, William J 

Murray, George, Sr 

JManiece, William 

I Murray, William 

Morgan, Richard J 

Magee, Thomas Arthur , . 
Murdoch, James , 



P. O. Address. 



Mattawa. 

Orillia. 

Trenton. 

Qneensborough. 

Ottawa. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Pembroke. 

Fesserton. 

Buckingham, Que. 

Burk's Falls. 

Burk's Falls. 

Warren. 

Severn Bridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Frank's Bay. 

Campbellford. 

Parry Sound. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

Pembroke. 

Parry Sound. 

Peterborough. 

Huntsville. 

Baysville. 

Midland. 

Coldwater. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Peterborough. 

Renfrew. 

Huntsville. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Waltham, Que. 

Waltham, Que. 

Ottawa. 

Peterborough. 

Sault Ste. Marie . 

Collfield, Que. 

Trenton. 

Parry Sound. 

Coldwater. 

Aylmer, Que. 

Huntsville. 

Mattawa. 

CoUingwood. 

Baysville. 
Gravenhurst. 
Burk's Falls. 
Trenton. 
Stoco. 
Ottawa. 
Trenton. 
Huntsville. 
Rosseau Falls. 
French Bay. 
Waubaushene, 
Fort William. 
Port Arthur. 
Waubaushene. 
Peterborough. 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portage. 
Cook's Mills. 



90, 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 



APPENDIX No. Zb.—C<mt%nued. 




Munroe, Peter P 

MasoD, Benjamin 

Monaghan, John B 

Monaghan, M. J 

Mulvihill, John , 

Moran, Andrew 

Mulvihill, Michael 

Mann, John . . . , , 

Marrighan, Richard , 

Monaghan, John Dorland . . , 

Matheson, William , 

Munro, Alexander G 

Monro, Philip 

Mangan, Patrick , 

Marcil, Peter 

Main, Samuel 

Moriey, Charles 

Moore, David Henry 

Mnrphy, John 

Matheson, Daniel .,,... 

Milne, William 

Mangan, Charles 

Mooney, Lincoln 

Mangan, John 

Mooney, Thomas 

Mason, Robert T 

Mocre William John 



McPherson, James S 

McKinley, Edward C. 

McClelland, John 

McFarlane, J. W 

McDonald, Roderick. . . . 
McCormack, William. .. 

Macpherson, John 

McEachern, John A 

McLeod, Dugald 

McClelland. R. H 

McEvoy, Frank 

McDermott, Peter 

McIUroy, John 

McNab, Robert J 

McFadden, James 

Mcintosh, James 6 

Mclnnis, Hector D 

McKinnon, Malcolm . . . 

McLean, Daniel 

McKinnon, Archie J . . . . 

McKay, D. C 

McDonald, James 

McPherson, Allan . . . . 

McDonald. James P 

McFarland, Joseph C. . , 

McNabb, AJexander 

McGillivray, Archibald. 

McGrane, Edward 

McLeod, Donald, Jr 

McDonald, Hector R... 
Mc Dougall, Duncan , . . . 
McNabb, Alexander D. . 

McCormack, John 

McNamara, John 

McGillivray, Duncan D. 
Mclntyre, Daniel A . . . . 
McNamara, Lewis 



Commands. 

Westmeath. 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

Amprior, 

Rockingham. 

Amprior. 

Manitowaning. 

Deseronto. 

Deseronto. 

Chelmsford. 

Braeside. 

Braefide. 

Amprior. 

Ottawa. 

Spanish Station. 

Huntsville. 

Peterborough. 

Amprior. - 

Chelmsford. 

Ethel. 

Burk's Falls. 

Orillia. 

Amprior. 

Kingston. 

Rochesterville. 

Gravenhurst. 

Rama. 

Toronto. 

Parry Sound. 

Cache-Bay. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Ottawa. 

West Gravenhurst. 

Gravenhurst. 

Parry Sound. 

Campbellford. 

Orillia. 

Madoc. 

Parry Sound. 

Ottawa. 

Carleton Place. 

Bracebridge. 

Braoebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Baysville. 

Parry Sound. 

Longford. 

French River. 

Port Severn. 

Thesaalon. 

Port Arthur. 

Lindsay. 

Keewatin. 

Thes^alon. 

Bracebridge. 

Warren. 

Sudbury, 

Byng Inlet. 

Algoma Mills. 

Klcck's Mills. 

Klock's Mills. 



McDonald, Sidney C 

McCool, Christopher L 

McCollum, Donald 

McDowell, William 

McConachie, Roy Stewart. . , 

McPhee, Ronald 

McKay, George Donner .... 
Mc Williamp, Maxwell Theodore 

McLeod, John 

McPherson, George 

McDougall, John D 

McGregor, Duncan 

McLean, Peter W , 

McManus, John C 

McNabb, Alexander ... . , 

McFarlane, Alexander 

McFarlane, J. D 

McFarlane, Duncan 

McKendry, Wm. B 

McPhee, Hugh , 

McPhee, John 

McLachlin, Peter 

McLachlte, Alexander 

Ma-'key, Edward 

McEwen, Henry , . , . , 

McDonald, Alfred 

McGeary, John J 

McDonald, Archibald W. . 

McOaw, John Gillen 

McCauley, Barney 

McDougall, James T 

Mclnenly, Thomas 

McBride, Archibald 

McFarlane, Robert L 

McGown, Wm 

McGown, Thomas 

McDermet, Patrick 

Mc^ay, Angus 

McDonald, A. J 

Mclnnis, Angus D 

McKendry, Alexander 

McGuire, Timothy 

McGrath, John 

Mc Williams, John Bannon 

McCagherty, Patrick 

McKendry, Daniel 

Macdonald, D. F 

McManus, Thomas J 

Macf arlane, David R 

McColgan, Edward 

McMichael, Charles 

Mcllroy, Thomas Davis .... 
McDonald, William Henry 
McGaw, William Thomas. 

McMillan, L 

McDermott. John L 

McDonald, Charles M 

McPhee, Benjamin 

McGee, John Edward 

Macfarlane, Mack 

MacCallum, Alexander .... 

McRae, Farquhar 

MacCallum, Albert 

McGonigal, John 

McConachie, John 



Mattawa. 

Cartier. 

Amprior. 

Cache Bay. 

Huntsville. 

Bracebridge. 

Dorset. 

Peterborough . 

Keewatin. 

Keewatin. 

Rat Portage. 

Burnstown. 

Sand Point. 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

Renfrew. 

Stewartsville. 

Renfrew. 

Amprior. 

Renfrew. 

Amprior, 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

Trenton. 

Peterborough. 

Sundridge. 

Gilmour. 

Queen sborough. 

Trenton. 

Klock's Mills. 

Quebec, Que. 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

South River. 

South River. 

Longford. 

Gravenhurst. 

Waubaushene. 

North Bay. 

Peterborrugh. 

Peterborough. 

Westmeath. 

Amprior. 

Parry Sound. 

RenfreMTs 

Ottawa. 

Quyon, Que, 

North Seguin. 

Madoc, 

Trenton. 

Callendar. 

Callendar. 

Orillia. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Parry Sound. 

Amprior. 

Braeside. 

Rat Portage. 

Amprior. 

Amprior. 

jHuntsville. 



i 



1899] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT 



91 



APPENDIX No. 35.— Continued. 



Name. 



McKay, D. G 



Newton, Frank 

Newburn, William 
Niblett, James . . . . 

Niblett, Robert 

Newell, John H . . . 



Overend, (Jeorge J . . . . 

O'Brien, Andrew 

O'Connor, John 

Oliver Darcy 

O'Connor, William . . . . 

O'Neill, James W 

O'Donnell, William.., 

Owens, Richard 

O'Reilly, Patrick 

O'Neill. Mark 

Orrill, John 



Pattinson, Thomas 

Pomeroy, Peter 

Perry, PrinRle K 

Pmcall William G 

Purvis, John 

Porter, James . 

Pearson, John Jamea 

Paterson, John 

Paterson, Alexander 

Parke, James 

Paquette, Oliver 

Palmateer, Sherman 

Paget, George 

Pounder, Joseph 

Pell, Richard D 

Perry, T^'rederick 

Paget, Charles Edward . 

Porter, Thomas Robert Mark . 



Quinn, William. 



Richardson. Frederick George 

Richards, Richard 

Riddell, George Alexander 

Richey, Evan 

Randall, Louis G 

Richardson, Charles Mervyn 

Rochester, Daniel Baillie 

Riddell, James 

Rice, Asa A 

Roberts, T. A 

Ross, Andrew 

Rose, Donald M 

Rawson, Charles Edgar 

Ross, George 

Roberts, Percy T , 

Ritchie, William D 

Ramsay, Robert 

Ritchie, J. F 

Ritter, Samuel G 

Robinson, William , 

Reid, Joseph B 

Ross, Walter M 

Ruttle, H. A 

Richards, Benedict 

Regan, John 

Russell, William 

Ramsay, Charles 



P. O. Address. 



Rat Portage. 

Gravenhurst. 
Parry Sound. 
Amprior. 
Osceola. 
Parry Harbor. 

Longford Mills. 

Ottawa 

Hintonburg. 

Wahnapitae. 

Nosbonaing. 

North Bay. 

Penetanguishene. 

Basin Depot. 

Cartier, 

Renfrew. 

Trenton. 

Bracebridge. 

Trenton. 

Byng Inlet, North, 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

Uphill. 

Lindsay. 

Wahnapitae. 

Orillia. 

Gravenhurst. 

Webbwood. 

Gravenhurst. 

Hunts ville. 

Westmeath. 

Amprior. 

Port Arthur. 

Novar. 

Dorset. 

Peterborough. 

Trenton. 

Tam worth. 

Roches tervi lie. 

Brentwood. 

French River. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 

Hull, Que. 

Hunts ville. 

Longford.Mills. 

Rat Portage. 

Coldwater. 

Waubaushene. 

Keewatin. 

Little Current. 

Arnprior. 

Amprior. 

Ah-Mic Harbor. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Lindsay. 

Ottawa. 

Carleton Place. 

Otta'^a. 

Orillia. 

Pembroke. 

Sudbury. 




Rankin, Anthony 

Ross, Angus 

Robinson, Albert E 

Robinson, Edward 

Robinson, Thomas G.... 
Revell, Lionel Oliver.... 

Regan, Judd Patrick 

Robbins, Etna Rosedale 

Regan, John, Jr 

Ryan. James 



Scanlan, William 

Sutherland, D. H 

Spanner, John ....... 

Shier, James D 

Spooner, W. R 

Simpson, Alfred E 

Souliere, John B 

Shields, James A 

Spargo, George 

Smyth, W. H 

Salmon, R. H 

Salmon, Alexander C. . 

Stremer, A 

Shields, Frank A 

Smyth, Job E 

Sage, Nelson . . 

Shaw, Thomas B 

Swanston, James. .... 

Simpson, William 

Sadler, Thomas 

Smith, Patrick Albert.. 

Snaith,:William J 

Sinn, Wm. F 

Scrim, Robert 

Sharp, James A 

Shaneay. Harry S 

Smith, Wm 

Stewart, Daniel 

Sheehan. Michael H... 

Scott, Thomas 

Smith, Lawrence 

Shea, Stewart 

Sullivan, .Tohn 

Sinclair, Finlay 

Shiels, Henry F 

Smith, Gideon Ousley. 

Smith, John Wallis 

Smith, Henry 6 

Story, John A 

Sweezey, Benjamin. . . . 
Sheppard, Charles H. . . 

Sinclair. Armon D 

Smith, Sidney E 

Sleemen, Wm 

Sheehan, Peter F 



Tait, Thomas B 

Taylor, CM 

Thornton, W. D , . . 

Trussler, Gilbert ... 

Thompson, George S 

Thompson, Frederick A. H 

Thompson. Francis Henry 

Train, A. C. 

Turgeon, George 

Thomson. Alexander W 

Taylor, Thomas G 



P. 0. Address. 



Uache Day. 

Orrville 

Washago. 

Washagu. 

Washago. 

West Gravenhurst, 

Warminster. 

Orillia. 

Orillia. 

Savanne. 

Enterprise. 

Gravenhurst. 

Hunts ville. 

Bracebridge 

Katrine. 

Wakefield. 

Ottawa. 

Carleton Place. 

Ottawa. 

Byng Inlet, North. 

Baysville.. 

Baysville. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

Cache Bay. 

Muskaka Mills. 

Waubaushene. 

Peterboro. 

Hall's Bridge. 

Lindsay. 

Norman. 

Mattawa. 

Arnprior. 

Amprior. 

Sudbury. 

Cook's Mills. 

Ottawa. 

Braeside. 

Waubaushene. 

Parry Sound. 

West Saginaw, Micb. 

Campbellford. 

Sault St. Marie. 

Sudbury. 

Cartier, 

Burk's Falls. 

Thedford. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Macsey. 

Co' d water. 

Arnprior. 

Ottawa. 

Rapid River. 

Lorlng. 

Burk's Falls. 
Gravenhurst. 
Longford Mills. 
Trout Creek. 
Lindsay. 
Callendar. 
Nosbonsing. 
Rowan Mills. 
Cook's Mills. 
Arnprior. 
Gravenhurst . 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT 



[No. 



APPENDIX No. 35.—Concluded. 



Name. 



Tait, Ralph 

Train, William . 
Turner, Gavin F . 
Tilson, Joseph . . . 
Tuflfy, John 



Udy, Dean 



Vigrass, Percy J 

Vincent, Joseph . . 

VoUin, Samuel 

Vannier, Nelson Joseph 
Vincent, James 



Watson, Wm 

Webb, George W. . . . 

Wilcox, Thomas 

Wheeler, J. A. McL . 

Ward, Joseph W 

rt ilkinson, Wm 

Waldie, John E 

Wigg, Thomas G.... 

Wall, Patrick B 

Wells, John R 

Whiteside, John 

Watt, Wm 

Wilson, George .... 
White, Thomas 



P. O. Address. 



Am prior. 
Burk's Falls. 
North Bay. 
Burk's Falls. 
Cartier. 

French River. 

Dufferin Bridge, 

Warren. 

Nosbonsing. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Fesserton. 

Huntsville. 
Parry Sound. 
Parry Sound. 
Tamworth. 
Ottawa, 
French River. 
Victoria Harbor. 
Thessalon. 
Cheboygan, Mich. 
Little Current. 
Huntsville. 
Peterborough. 
Lindsay. 
Parry Sound. 



Name. 



Watson, Wm 

Weston, Fzank R 

White, James B , , 

Wilson, James A., jr 

Whaley, Thomas 

Webster, Wm. Alfred 

Wornsdorf, Frederick Gutlep 

Warrell, Wm 

Wims, Peter 

Wickware, Phillip Aimont.. 

Wilson, Edward . . . 

Whelan, P. J 

Whyte, John Thomas Goth . . 

White, Wm. James . 

Warrel, George 

Wells, George W 

Wilson, Frederick Gould 

Wallace, John Thomas 

Young, Wm 

Young, A. J ... 

Young, Samuel 

Young, Patrick P 

Yuill, Thomas 

Yuil), A. D 

Total 



P. O. Address. 



North Bay. 

Midland. 

Manitowaning. 

Webbwood. 

Huntsville. 

Bracebridge. 

Pembroke. 

Trout Creek. 

Blessington. 

Cloyne. 

Deseronto. 

McDougall. 

Ottawa. 

Muskoka Falls. 

Powassan. 

Little Current. 

Rat Portage. 

Thessalon. 

Severn Bridge. 
Cache Bay. 
Cold water. 
Young's Point. 
Arnprior. 
Braeside. 



688. 



Drparthbnt of Crown Lands. 

Toronto, December 30th, 1899. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommiesioner. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONER OF CROWN LANDS 



OF THE 



PROVhNCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1 900. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




T O RO X TO . 

Frixted and Published by L. K. CAMERON, 

Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty. 
1901. 




WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, Printers. 
TORONTO. 



CONTENTS. 



Commissioner's Repobt : — 

Pi 

Crown Lands , 

Clergy Lands 

Common School Lands 

Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

University Lands 

Collections and Revenue 

Disbursements 

Free Grants v 

Woods and Forests ". v 

Extension of Settlement • ' v 

The Pulp Industry vi 

Forest Reserves vi 

Fireranging vii 

The Mineral Industry • vii 

Public Parks ix 

Crown Surveys ix 

Exploration of Northern Ontario ix 

Municipal Surveys x 

Mining and other Surveys xi 



Appendices 



No. 1. Return of Officers and Clerks of the Department 2 

2. *' Crown Land Agents 3 

3. ' ' Lands Sold and Leased, and Collections 4 

4. " Gross Revenue 5 

5. " Receipts considered as Special Funds 6 

6. *' Gross Disbursements 7 

7. " Expenditure on Special Services 18 

8. " Timber and amounts accruing from dues, etc. .*. . 19 

9. " Revenue from Woods and Forests 20 

10. " ' Patents issued 20 

11. " Locations, etc., under Free Grants Act 21 

12. " Letters received and sent out 24 

13. " Municipal Surveys ordered 25 

14. " •' confirmed 27 

15. " Crown Surveys in progress 29 

16. " " completed 30 

17. " Surveyors' Report, Township of Sifton .'. 32 

18. " " " Sutherland 33 

19. " " " Harty 34 

20. " " " Foy 35 

2L " " " Mutrie 36 

22. " " " Bowell , 38 

23. " " " Hoskin <0 

24. " " " Cox 41 

25. " " " Miscampbell 42 

26. " " ", Waldie 44 

27. " " Islands in Georgian Bay 44 

28. " " Base Line in Nipissrng 45 

29. " " " Algoma 53 

30. Superintendent's Report, Rondeau Park 57 

31. " Algonquin Park 58 

32. Land Tenure in Canada 60 

33. List of Licensed Cullers 86 

[iii] 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF GROWN LA.NDS FOR THE YEAR 

1900. 

To His Honor the Honorable Sir Olivbr Mow at, G. C. M. G., Lieutenant- Governor of 
the Province of Ontario. 

May It Plkasb Your Honor : 

In compliance with the law, I have the honor to submit for your informat ion and 
that of the Legislative Assembly, a report on the management of the Grown Lands of the 
Province of Ontario for the year ending Slst December, 1900. 

Crown Lands. 

The area of Grown lands sold during the year was 65,996 acres, having a total value 
of $91,837.08. On account of these sales and those of former years there was collected 
the sum of 868,861.43. Under the provisions of the Mines Act for the leasing of Crown 
lands for mining purposes, there were leased 27,835 acres, and the rental received for 
same and lands already under lease amounted to $69,714.41. 

The total collections on account of Crown lands sold and leased were $138,575.84. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 4. 

Clergy Lands. 

The area of Glergy lands sold during the year was 1,096 acres, having a value of 
$601.00. The amount collected on these and former sales was $4,271.30. See Appen- 
dix No. 3, page 4. 

Common School Lands. 

The area of Oommon School lands sold during the year was 210 acres, with a value 
of $836.50. The amount collected en account of these and former sales was $13,512 45. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 4. 

Grammar School Lands. 

There were sold during the year 45 acres of Grammar School lands, having a value 
of $180.00. The amount collected on account of these and former sales was $2,407.45. 
See Appendix No. 3, page 4. 

Railway Lands. 

The collections on account of lands sold under the Railway Aid Act, 52 Victoria, 
chapter 35, amounted to $152.10. See Appendix No. 3, page 4. 

University Lands. 

The area of University lands sold and leased was 4,336 acres, having a value of 
$3,782.13. On account of these sales and lands previously sold and leased there was 
collected the sum of $2,708.14. See Appendix No. 3, page 4. 

OOLLECTIONS AND REVENUE. 

The total collections of the Department on account of all sources of revenue were 
$1,447,949.78, See Appendix No. 4, page S. 

Disbursements. 

The total disbursements of the Department for the year were $272,257.66. This 
includes $24,682.38 paid on surveys, and refnads amounting to $38,072.45. (t also in- 
cludes the sum of $93,690.93, expended on special services un-ler the direction of the 
Department, such as Diamond Drill $9,208.98 ; Mining Schools, $19,200.00; Iron Min- 
ing Act, $12,765.82; Exploratiou? in Northeru Oanario, $34,507.58; Emigration, 
$6,257.46 ; Colonization, $3,243. 17 ; Proviucial Parks, $8,507.92. See Appeadices 6 and 
7, pages 17 and 18. 



190« ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



Fkeb Grants. 

Daring the year the townships of Marks and Strange, in the District of Thunder 
Bay, Burriss in the District of Rainy River, Lyell in the District of Nipissing, and Jones 
in the County of Renfrew, five townships in all, were appropriated for settlement under 
the Free Grants and Homesteads Act. so that there are now 168 townships open for 
settlement under this Act. There were 965 persons located on 132,665 acres and 140 
locatees purchased 4,524 acres according to the regulations. Three hundred and twenty- 
nine patents were issued to persons who had complied with the con litions of the Act 
and the regulations. See Appendix 11, page 23. 

Woods and Forests. 

The revenue from woods and forests durine the year was $1,276,376.48. Of this 
$636,464.54 was on account of bonus ; $61,704 70 on account of ground rent ; $1,886.25 
on account of transfer fees, leaving the net rev<»nue from timber dues $576,320.99. See 
Appendix 4, page 5, and Appendix 9, page 20. 

The cut of last winter was much heavier than that of the previous winter, but consider- 
able payments on account o^ timber dues have not been received in time to be included in 
this year's accounts. The lumber trade has been in a prosperous condition and prices 
have been well maintained. A number of new mills have been erected and increased 
employment has been afforded by the regulation requiring the manufacture within the 
Dominion of pine sawlogs cut on Crown lands in this Province. In addition to the 
wages which are paid in the mills, the country has received the benefit of the purchase of 
large quantities of supplies, the freight on the sawn lumber, and so forth. The question 
of the right of the Province to enforce the " Manufacturing Condition " which at the date 
of my last report was expected to be carried to the Court of Appeal has been heard bv 
that Court and the judgment of the lower Court sustained. It is understood that the 
idea of carrying the case to the Privy Council has been abandoned, and all lumbermen 
have now come to recognise the fact that for the future pine sawlogs cut under author- 
ity of license from this Department will have to be manufactured in the country. A 
strict watch was kept during the summer along the north shore of Lake Huron, but there 
were no attempts to evade the law by rafting logs over to the United States. 

During the year several examinations of cullers were held, and those qualified were 
licensed under the Ontario Cullers Act. Their names appear in the list of licensed 
cullers to be found in Appendix 33, page 86. 

Extension op Sbttlembnt. 

During the year an increased number of settlers have gone into the newer parts of 
the Province. In the older parts, of course, the free grant land is pretty well taken up 
and only the rough or " cull" lots remain unlocated. In the newer districts, however, 
more particularly in Thunder Bay and Rainy River where the lands are free grant, there 
has been a large influx of homeseekers. The construction of the Ontario and Rainy 
River railway, which will be one of the great highways between the West and the head 
of navigation on Lake Superior, is op<^ning up fertile areas in these two districts, and 
sections hitherto remote from civilization are being largely taken up by people from the 
United States and the older portions of our own Province. 

In the Temiscaming district settlement is- reported to be steadily progressing. 
The population of this district is growing year by year There is plenty of good land 
and a fine, healthy climate, the only drawback being the difficulty of communication with 
the outside world during the winter months ; and when this is removed we may look 
for a large increase in population In the districts of Algoma and Nipissing settlement 
has gone on apace. A large number of people are reported in the section around the head 
of Lake Nipissing and it may be a necessity within a short time to place several town- 
ships there upon the market, while along the main line and the Michip:coton 
Branch of the Algoma Central railway which is now being built from Sault Ste 



THE REPORT OF THE [ ^o.i3 



Marie north to the Oanadian Pacific railway a number of people have gone in. 
The Dryden settlement, too, has received its fair share of settlers daring the past summer. 

The Crown Land Agents in the northern and western parts of the Province all report 
the settlers in their districts as becoming better off every year. They note the erec- 
tion of good comfortable houses, the increase in horses and live stock, the improvement 
of roads, the building of schools and churches, and so forth ; and on the whole, 
the settlements in New Ontario from the Ottawa to the Rainy River country are all in 
a prosptrous and thriving condition. 

The policy of the Government as outlined in my last report to make known the 
advantages of the soil and climate of our newer parts, and to direct thither the move- 
ment of population from the older portions of the Province and other coantries, has been 
vigorously prosecuted. The Colonization Branch was established for the purpose of dis- 
seminating information respecting the capabilities of the various districts, of advising 
people of the particular section best suited to their needs and of arranging for transpor- 
tation for intending settlers. An eaormous correspondence has grown up with this 
Branch, showing that the people thoroughly appreciate the advantage of having some 
source from which they can get reliable information about the different localities where 
good fertile land is to be had. This Province possesses millions of acres of fine farming 
land with as great attractions as are offered by any other country, and the work under- 
taken by the Colonization Branch will be further developed and extended, as the peopling 
of the great areas of the Province now lying dormant and unproductive which are 
capable of supporting an enormous and prosperous population is a matter of firsb-rate 
importance. 

The Pulp Industry. 

The activity in the demand for woods suitable for the making of pulp and paper has 
been uadiminished. The Sault Ste. Marie Pulp & Paper Company have operated their 
mechanical pulp mill continuously throughout the year and have also erected a sulphite 
mill of large capacity. Work at the Sturgeon Falls mill has been suspended through 
litigation respecting this property. Since my last report three new agreements have 
been entered into bv the Government and ratified by the Legislature for the erection of 
pulp and paper mills, namely, with th^ Spanish River Palp & Paper Oompany, the 
Blanche River Pulp & Paper Company and the Nepigon Palp & Paper Company. The 
Spanish River company have prepareid elaborate plans for the establishment of their 
industry and are proceeding with the erection of dams, mills, etc. The other two com- 
panies, viz., the B'anche River and the Nepigon, have not yet succeeded in settling mat- 
ters in conn -action with the water powers for their proposed mills. 

The explorations in the country north of the height of land have revealed the fact 
that this Province has almost boundless resources in pulp woods, and with the higher 
prices and the greater demand for this class of raw material, we may confidently look for 
a great expansion in the pulp and paper industry in the not distant future. 

Regulations have been passed prohibiting the export of spruce pulp wood cut 
on lands of the Crown, as well as of hemlock bark to be used for tanning purposes, 
the object being as in the case of pine sawlogs, to realize for the Province all the benefits 
rising from the utilization of these natural resources in our own country. 

Forest Reserves. 

In my last report reference was made to the expediency of creatine a forest reserve 
in the vicinity of Lake Temagaming, in the district of Nipissing. Thie region has so 
often been described that it is not necessary here to enter upon details as to its scenery or its 
magnificent water stretches and the multitude and beauty of its lakes and islands. The 
country has not much value as a farming section, but it is well wooded with various timbers. 
There is a great quantity of pine around the shores of lakes Temagaming and Lady 
Evelyn and to the north, and it was considered expedient, in order to give this timber 
protection from fire and to preserve as far as possible the natural beauty of the 
landscape, to create it into a forest reserve. Accordingly an area of 2,200 square miles 
has been set apart in this region by Order in Council under authority of the Forest Re- 



lilOO] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



Bfrves Act. The erection of this territory into a forest reset v^e marks an important step - 
in the progress of the forestry policy of the Government. It is the first area of virgin 
territory which has been so set apart, the forest reserve system having been hitherto con- 
fined to cut-over territory. 

In the township cf Sibley, on Thunder Cape, in the district of Thunder Buy, an area 
of 45,000 acres of cut- over territory on which a crop of young pine was springing 
up, has also been erected into a forest reserve. 

FiRERANGING. 

The number of licensees who had firerangers on their limits last season was 79, 
and the number of rangers employed on licensed lands was 185. There were also 12 
rangers employed on Crown lands in the Temagaming country (which is a favorite resort 
for tourists), and in the Wahnapitae country and the district of Rainy River, where 
prospectors have gone in. The total cost of the service to the Department was $26,986.43. 
See Appendix 6, page 14. 

In the Ottawa country and in the districts of Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nipissing, 
the season was comparatively wet and there were no large fires. In the districts of 
Algoma, Thunder Bay and Rainy River, however, the summer was a particularly dry 
one and some serious fires occurred, especially on limits in Algoma and Rainy River. 
In the township of Dana, on the Sturgeon River, owned by the Grown, a fire broke out 
in June. The Department's rangers from Tem«gamiDg hurried to the scene and suc- 
ceeded in confining the fire to some lots in the first concession. A good deal of timber 
was damaged,* and after an inspection by woodrangers of the Department it was decided 
to dispose of the timber standing on lots I to 5 in ehe first concession, so that its value 
might be realized to the Province. 

At the last session of the Legislature the fireranging system was put upon a statu- 
tory basis, and whereas in the past the employment of firerangers was merely optional 
on the part of limit owners, the Department has now authority to place men on licensed 
territory, where there may be danger from fire, and charge half the cost of the 
same to the lumberman. This was undoubtedly a proper step, as it was manifestly 
unfair that a licensee who had protected his limits year after year by the employ- 
ment of rangers should be exposed to loss from fire running over from the limit 
of his neighbor who employed no rangers. 

It has been the practice of the Department to keep close watch on the fireranging 
system iu order to see that it is being properly carried out, and to strengthen it from 
time to time where it may be weak. In order to get definite information upon the work- 
ing of the system, it has been customary every two or three years to send out a circular 
to all those licensees who have employed firerangers asking them a series of questions as 
to the working of the system, and what suggestions they have to offer in the direction 
of improving it. This year circulars were sent out to those licensees who had em- 
ployed firerangers during last summer and replies have been received, and from these 
it appears that there were about 90 fires extinguished by the different fire- 
rangers before they got much headway, which, if there had not been fire rangers on 
duty, would no doubt have spread and destroyed large quantities of timber. The 
licensees all expressed themselves as satisfied with the management of the service and 
in only one or two instances out of the whole number employing rangers were any sug- 
gestions made, and they were all in the direction of increasing the number of firerangers 
and making more severe the penalties for setting out fire or leaving it burning in the bush 
during the dangerous period. It has been suggested that the forest rangers of 
the Crown should be kept on duty daring the. whole summer, and have supervision 
of the firerangers. Perhaps the service would be benefitted by a closer inspection, 
but without an increase of the vote for forest ranging it is not possible to keep the 
rangers on duty longer than is required to supervise the cutting operations in the 
winter, and collect the sworn returns of the same. 

The Mineral Industry. 

The progress made by the mineral industry, especially in certain directions, has been 
very marked during the year. The manufacture of pig iron is now firmly established, 



THE REPORT OF THE \ No. 3 



the two furnaces in operation duriagj 1899 beins; sapplemented by a third built by the 
Canada Iron Furnace Oompany Limited and situtited at Midland, which was inaugurated 
in December. The demand for iron ore for home use is now large and constant, and the 
result is that new sources of supply are being opennd up to meet it. The Helen mine in 
the Michipicoton District — a deposit ranking in importance with the great mines of 
Michigan and Minnesota — began shipping ore to the Midland furnace during the present 
season, and for the first time in the history of the Province a line of steamers was pat in 
motion to supply furnaces in one part of Ontario with ore from another part, thus dupli- 
cating on our side of the international line what for years has been a familiar feature of 
the iron trade of the United States. Other proji^cts for smelting furnaces are being put 
forward at Collingwood, Kingston, SauH Ste. Marie and elsewhere, some or all of which 
will no doubt arrive at fruition. At the last named place Mr. F. H. Clergue and his 
as'tociates have a large Bessemer plant and rolling mills now in process of construction, 
and will doubtless in due time carry oat that part of their programme which provides for 
the erection of a blast furnace or furnaces. On the Atikokan iron range, several locations 
have been placed under optiion to an American company, and work is being done to final- 
ly prove the value of the properties, which has already been partially demonstrated. The 
likelihood is, now thatt he Ontario and Rainy River Railway is almost ready to haul out the 
ore, that ore docks at Fort William will shortly be built and shipments begun. The mines of 
eastern Ontario have also been largely operate^!, mainly for shipment to the Hamilton 
smelter, but also in part for export to the United States Men of experience in the iron 
trade of America entertain the opinion that in view of the extent of the ore deposits, and 
the facilities for transportation, especially by witor, central and eastern Ontario are on 
at least an equality of footing rs regards the production of iron and steel with the most 
favourably situated districts of the United States, and that there is no presumption in 
looking forward to the time when Ontario will be the seat of an important and highly de- 
veloped industry in the making of iron and steel. The. production of iron ore for the 
year was 90,302 tons, valued at $111,805, and payments out of the Iron Mining Fund at 
the rate of $1 per ton of pig iron produced from Outario ore amounted to $12,7(55.83. 
Pig iron was made to the extent of 62^386 tons, valued at $936,066, Open hearth steel 
was made for the first time in the history of the Province, the Hamilton Steel and Iron 
Company turning out 2,819 tons, having a value of $46,380. 

The nickel and copper mines have been more active than at any previous time. 
The Canadian Copper (Jompany continues to be the chi^-t prodacer of nickel and copper 
matte, the nickel contents of which for the year amounted to 7,080,000 lbs. of fine metal 
worth $756,626, and th<! copper contents to 6,728,000 lbs. worth $319,681, these values 
being for the unrefined matte at the smelters 

At the Victoria mines. Dr. Ludwig Mond has acquired valuable nickel lands, and 
is erecting extensive works to produce matte carrying a high percentage of metallic 
contents, and a plant for retreating the Canadian Copper Company's matte is being 
erected by the Ontario Smelting Company at Copper Cliff, which will also smelt ores from 
the latter Company's mine near Massey Station now being developed. The Gertrude 
mine in Creighton Township is being brought into producing condition by the Lake Su- 
perior Power Company, and will supply the nickel ore to be used in the manufacture of 
ferro nickel and nickel steel at Sault Ste. Marie. Much interest attaches to the operations 
of the Nickel-Copper Company of Hamilton, which proposes to produce refined nickel and 
copper by the Frasch process. In addition to these the Bruce Copper Mines Limited, an 
English Company, is re opening the old workings and putting up a large concentrating 
plant at Bruce Mines which yielded so largely 40 years ago, and at Rock L»ke, the Rock 
Lake Mining Company is pushing d<^velopments upon a copper vein of unusual promise, 
and is likewise erecting works to treat the ore. The total quantity of nickel and copper 
ores raised in the Province during the yf ar was 221,695 tons. 

The quantity of gold extract^-d from Ontario mines was 18,767 ounces, having a value 
of $297,861. The falling off as compared with 1899 is due to the closing down of several 
producing mines in the western part of the province, soms of which are likely to resume 
operations during the coming year. In eastern Ontario the yield of gold is increasing, 
and arsenic and corundum from this region are being added to the list of mineral products 
The decrease in the output of gold is partly made up by the increase in that of silver, 
the yield of which in 1900 was 160,612 ounces, worth $96,367. 



1900] • CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



The Public Parks. 

The reports of che saperiatendeots of Algonquin National Park and Rondeaa Pro- 
vincial Park will be found in Appendices Nos. 30 and 31, pages 57 and 58 respectively. 
The former park is becoming widely known and appreciated as a place of resort daring 
the heated term, and the strict enforcement of the regaUtiona prohibiting shooting and 
trapping within its boundaries is having the effect of greatly increasing the numbers of 
all the wild animals, including moose, deer, beaver, otter, etc., etc. The efforts of the 
Department ^o diversify the fishing in the waters of the park by introducing blauk bass 
from the Georgian Bay appear to have resulted successfully, and in several of the park 
lakes this desirable game fish ia thriving and propagating its kind, where formerly the 
only varieties were those of the trout family. 

Rondeau Park fills a useful part in the sou !;h western peninsula of the Province by 
providing a place where thousands of visitors can pic-nic in sylvan surroundings remin- 
iscent of ancient forest glories The duck shooting on Rondeau harbor is being seriously 
interfered with by the German carp which now swarm in its waters and root up the water 
celery and wild rice on which the duck were accustomed to feed — a noteworthy instance 
of the unexpected results which sometimes follow on the disturbance ot nature's equili- 
brium by the introduction of new forms of life. 

Crown Survbys. 

The following Crown surveys of have been carried out this year : — 
In the District of Nipissing, the townships of Bertram and Latchford have been sube 
divided into lots of 320 acres each. A base line h%s been run east and west from the 
district line between Algoma and Nipissing from the 198th mile, on the east for a distanc- 
of 70f miles to a point near the boundary between the Province of Ontario and the Pro 
vince of Quebec which has not yet been defined on the ground, and on the weSt from the 
198th mile to the Miesinabie River, a distance of 102 miles ; and the base line partially 
run last year in the District of Algoma, from the 120th mile post on the district line be- 
tween Algoma and Nipissing near Nighthawk Lake, due west for 120 miles, has been 
continued to a point north of the Canadian Pacific Railway station at Missinabie, and 
thence south connecting said base line with said station, a distance of 30| miles. Some 
townships in the District of Thunder Bay have been re-surveyed in portions where the 
original monuments have been destroyed, and re-posted for the convenience of parties 
taking up land. Several other minor surveys ha^e been performed during the year.- 
The surveyors' reports of survey of the following townships Bowell, Cox, Foy, Hartyj 
Hoskin, Miscampbell, Mutrie, Sifton, Sutherland and Waldie,(the accounts for which have 
been closed this year,) will be found in Appendices No3. 17 to 26 inclusive, pages 32 to 44 
inclusive. 

Exploration op Northern Ontario. 

At the last session of the Legislature the sum of $40,000 was voted for the explora* 
tion of that part of the Province lying between the Canadian Pacific Railway and James 
Bay. The knowledge possessed of this country, its topography and the character and 
extent of its resources in minerals, timber and agricultural land, was of a general 
nature and was limited indeed. It was believed from official and other information that there 
were in this country extensive forests of woods suitable for the making of pulp and 
paper, and great areas of tillable land. Early in the summer ten exploration parties 
were organized and sent out by the Department, each being assigned a separate and 
distinct section, and while it was not anticipate?! or hoped that they would succeed in 
penetrating every corner of so extensive a region, yet it was expected that enough 
would be learned to show that in the region north of the height of land dividing the 
James Bay from tie St. Lawrence River waters, there are great areas of fertile country 
and immense forests of spruce and other pulpwoods. 

The result of the exploration is that a tiact of arable land has been found north of the 
height of land, stretching from the Quebec boundary west across the districts of Nipissing 
Algoma and Thunder Bay, comprising an aroaof about 24,500 square miles or 15,680,000 
acres. ^^The soil is a clay or clay loam, nearly all suitable for farming purposes, and the 
regionjis watered by the Moose and its tributaries, the Abitibi, Mettagami and Missin- 
2*C.L. 



THE REPORT OF THE • [ No. 3 



able, and the Albany and its tributaries, the Kenogami and Ogoke. Along this latter 
stream alone, about which almost nothing was known, a tract of good land was found 
extending on both sides of the river for a distance of over forty miles, and in the district 
of Rainy River, between the surveyed townships around Dryden and Lac Seul, another 
extensive area of good land was found, about 600 square miles or 384,000 acres in 
extent. 

The climate of this region is reported to have no features which would prevent the 
ripening of grain or the growing of root crops. It lies for the most part south of the 
50th parallel of latitude, which cropses the Province of Manitoba near Winnipeg, and 
its climate will not diflfer much from that of the latter Province. Crops of grain, pota- 
toes and other vegetables and even small fruits were found growing as far north as James 
Bay. 

A great pulpwood forest has been located north of the height of land extending 
across the districts of Nipissing, Algoma and Thunder Bay, with a depth in some places 
of 150 miles. The timber embraces all the common pulp woods, such as spruce, poplar, 
jackpine and balm of gilead, as well as tamarac and cedar along the banks of the 
streams. It is generally of good quality, usually thick on the ground and ranges in size 
up to three feet in diameter. In the district of Nipissing south of the height of land an 
extensive pine forest was explored and estimated to contain about 3 billions of feet B.M. 

On the whole, the information brought in by these exploration parties has been 
extremely gratifying and the benefit to the Province of conducting the exploration of so 
extensive a country has been abundantly demonstrated. It is now established that in 
this section of the Province, hitherto but liotle known, we have illimitable quantities of 
pulpwoods and millions of acres of good agricultural land, which are capable of sustaining 
a large population of industrious people. 

I regret to state that two of the surveyors in charge, Messrs. Tiernan and Davidson, 
have died since their return, Mr. Tiernan very soon after he reached home, while Mr, 
Davidson was not spared to complete his report. 

The work entailed on the Department in planning the work, organizing and despatching 
the different parties in so short a space of time, the purchase of supplies, etc., was very 
great, but I am pleased to say that it was carried out with economy and success. The 
reports of the various exploration parties, logether with a map of the country explored, 
will be printed and presented to the Legislature concurrently with this report. 

Municipal Surveys. 

The Department has during the year, on petition from the municipalities of the 
counties of Carleton and Lanark, and the townships of Mariposa, McNab, South Sher- 
brooke, Westmeath and Williamsburg, issued^ instructions for the survey of a portion of 
the boundary line between the townships of Gloucester and Osgoode ; the boundary line 
between the townships of Montague and Beckwith ; portion of the road allowance 
between the ninth and tenth concessions of the township of Mariposa ; part of the south- 
east town line and part of the road allowance between concessions A and B in the town 
ship of McNab ; portion of the road allowance between the eighth and ninth concessions 
of the township of South Sherbrooke ; portions of the blank concession lines between the 
first and second concessions west of Muskrat lake, and between the third and fourth 
concessions east of Muskrat Lake, in the township of Westmeath ; and portion of the 
road allowance between the fourth and fifth concessions of the township of Williamsburg. 

The fallowing municipal surveys have been confirmed during the year under the 
provisions of R.S.O. 1897, cap. 181, s. 14, s.-s. 4, such surveys so confirmed being final 
and conclusive as to all parties : The allowance for road between the third and fourth 
concessions of the township of Orford, from the town line between Orford and Aldbor- 
ough westerly across the several lots to lot number fifteen ; that portion of the road 
allowance between the townships of March and Torbolton crossing the second concessions 
thereof; that portion of the road allowance between the seventh and eighth concessions 
of the township of Richmond from lot number seven to thirteen inclusive , the road 
between or through lots numbers sixteen and seventeen in concessions A, B, 0, one, two, 
three and four in the township of Etobicoke ; the allowance for road between the 
thi'-d and fourth concessions of the township of Markham adjoining lots nam- 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



bers one to five inclusive ; the side road aUowance between lots numbers twenty 
and twenty one in the thirteenth concession of the township of West Gwillimbury ; part 
of the south-east town line along concession A, the road allowance between conces- 
sions A and B across lots numbers one and two in the township of McNab ; part of the 
road allowance between the eight and ninth concessions of the township of South Sher- 
brooke from lot number ten westerly to the boundary line of the township of Oso ; the 
allowance for road between the ninth and tenth concessions of the township of Mariposa, 
across lots numbers eight and nine ; the blank concession line between the first and second 
concessions west of Muskrat Lake in the township of Westmeath between side road 
between lots numbers ten and eleven and lots numbers fifteen and sixteen, and between 
the third and fourth concessions east of Muskrat Lake, from side road allowance between 
lots numbers ten and eleven to side road allowance between lots number fifteen and six- 
teen ; and the allowance for roads between the townships of Montague and Beckwith. 
The particulars relating to these Surveys will be found in Appendices No. 14, page 27. 

Mining and Other Surveys. 

The Mines Act requires that applicants to purchase or lease mining lands in unsur- 
veyed territory shall file in the Department surveyors' plans of their locationsjwith 
field notes and descriptions by metes and bounds before any sale or lease can be carried 
out ; and under Orders in Council dated 23rd January, 1892, 3rd December, 1892, and 
22nd September, 1893, applicants to purchase islands or locations for agricultural pur- 
poses in unsurveyed territory are required to file surveyors' plans of their locations, 
which are to be of the form and eize, wherever practicable, prescribed by the Mines Act, 
together with the necessary affidavits. 

Under the above Act and regulations in the Distric^^s of Parry Sound, Nipissing, 
Algoraa, Rainy River, and Thjinder Bay an area of 20,957 7/20 acres has been sold and 
patented during the year for which the 'sum of $42,883 has been received ; and an area 
of 16,844 7/10 acres has been leased at $1 per acre for the first year's rental. 



Department of Crown Lands, E, J. DAVIS, 

Toronto, December 31, 1900. Commissioner. 



APPENDICES 



1 C.L. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 1. 
Return of Officers and Clerks in the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1900. 



Braoeh. 



Sales and Free ' 
Grants -! 



Surveys and I 
Patents { 



Woods and 

Forests. . 



Accounts , 



Bureau 
Mines 



»'.....{ 



Colonization 
and Forestry 



Name. 



Hon. E. J. Davis. 
Aubrey White. ... 

George Kennedy. . 
W. A. B. Findlay 

A. Kirkwood 

J. J. Murphy 
E. S. Williamson . 
T. M. Hennassey. 
W. E. Ledger . . 
M. Bengough 

G. B. Kirkpatrick. 

W. Revell 

W, F. Lewis .... 

J. B. Proctor . 

C. S. Jones 

C. E. Burns 

J. A. 6. Grozier . 
Theo. C. Taylor . . 
Kenneth Miller . . . 
Alex. McLaren . . 

J. B. Cook 

K. H. Browne ... 

H. Gillard 

D. G. Ross 

E. Leigh 

M. J. Ferris , 

A. Robillard 

Frank Yeigh 

H. Cartwright 

A. Blue 

T. W, Gib'on 

F. A. Brown 

Thos. Southwoith. 
D. Spence 

M. G. Dickson .... 
H. Brophy 



Designation. 



Commissioner. . 
Assistant Com- 
missioner 

Law Clerk 

Secretary 

Chief Clerk.... 
Chief Clerk .... 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Stenographer . . 

Director of Sur- 
veys 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk ........ 

Chief Clerk of 
Patents 

Clerk 

Chief Clerk .... 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk and Ar- 
chivist 

Clerk 

Accountant .. 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Registrar 

Clerk 

Director 

Director 

Stenographer . . 

Director 

Secretary and 
Intelligence 
Officer 

Clerk 

Messenger and 
Caretaker . . . 



When Appointed. 



1899, Oct. 2l8t.. 

1882, Jan. Ist... 
1872, Feb. 1st... 
1897, May 8th.. 

1854, March 2l8t 
1872, May 1st.. 
1889, May Ist . 
1881, May 14th 
1894, Feb. 15th 
1896, Oct. 23rd. 



1866, Jan. 30th 

1871, Oct. 2nd . 

1872, Feb. 5th . 

1897, Jan. 15th 

1890, May 22nd 
1900, April 9th 

1867, Dec. 1st . 
1888, Aug. 1st. 

1891, Nov. 1st . 

1890, May 22nd 

1898, Aug Ist . 

1900, March 2nd. 
1900, April 9th . . 

1861, April 15th . 

1873, Dec. 20th 

1892, April Ist. 
1894, May 4th . 

1880. March Ist 

1893, Oct. Ist.. 

1891, May 8th . 
1891, June 19th 
1898, May Ist.. 

1895, April 17th 



1873, Jan. 13th 
1900, Oct. Ist.. 



1898, Oct. Ist. 



Salary 

per 
Annum. 



4,000 00 

3.000 00 

2,000 00 

800 00 

1,900 00 
1,800 00 
1,300 00 
1,050 00 
750 00 
450 00 



2,200 00 

1,300 00 

1,000 00 

650 00 

1,550 00 
650 00 

1,800 00 
1,450 00 
1,000 00 
900 00 
1,100 00 

1,000 00 
650 00 

1,800 00 

1,200 00 

1,00J 00 

700 00 

1,500 00 
1,000 00 

2,600 00 

2,200 00 

400 00 

1,600 00 



1,500 00 
400 00 



600 00 



Remarks. 



/Resigned Novem- 
t ber 15th, 1900. 

{Transferred from 
Department of 
Public Works. 



/ Resigned July 
\ 31st, 1900. 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Acconntant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Comm^'ssioner. 



Department of Oeown Lands, 

Toronto, December 3l8t, 1900. 



1900 ] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



i 



00 

< 



*^ So 

9 t«60 
O g g 

*> a a 



-2 "SO 



be 



He 



be 

< 






88S 



o 

X 
Q 

<1 



o 

o 

05 



a 

e8 

d 
o 
O 



§888888S888.§g-i8SgS8SSg888 



a 

a 

oq 





■S i ^^ i« 

Q S&j OS'S 
©t^ o „ 0.2 

h,M u S fc< to 
c6 cB eS o 08 tf 

CLii-qpuiHPuiP 



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u^ .S u-i vi a: uj 
O g O O O O 

cQ *^ c3 flB ^ ^ 



•2" o <a. 



0-S 



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of 

O c8 

EhP-i 



^ d S a 
_^ „ PQ a > eg . .^ 

gW-S-g a >.>..= 2.SS2S 
Oo&3b£«j-Sga«g,a5 

00 .„ J3 »— c3 C3 A ID C3 *J?' ^ (^ 

:^ o;2;H<Jp4Ma«w<!p^6^ 

® a® 

-g^-gs : : s : 3 3 ; : : 

eS O el 



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o 



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U 



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•a 
^^P5a 



a ^ 

I ^ 

s « 

g « 

8 o 

<3 3 



-^02 



s a 



,2 2JJ |g§= SsS-S-i!. 



- -E-i -»^ a • . 

aa *>a)fcifcii— ,1. 
a-ri'S !> t» _r a 



►^a 



OQ 
C» 

O 

(4 

d 



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J3^ >S _ 

^S.2ii^^SoSs*'S*0'--2'55Ss>jSs^jsss 
•<MP3P3ooooWHWtnMWW;zieMaiairtMa3wa}?-H 






THE REPORT OF THE 



tN<x 3 



APPENDIX No. 3. 

Statement of Lands Sold and Leased, Amount of Sales, and Amoant of Collections on 

Sales and Leases for the year 1900. 



Service. 



Grown Lands 

Cleric Lands 

Common School Lands. 
Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

University Lands 

Leases . . . 



Acres sold and 
leased. 



65,996 

1,096 

210 

46 



4,336 
27,835 



99,518 



Amount of salen 
and leases. 



f c. 

91.837 08 
601 00 
836 50 
180 00 



3,782 13 
27,678 90 



Amoant of 

collections on 

sales and leases. 



124,915 61 



$ 0. 

68,861 43 
4,271 30 

13,512 45 

2,407 45 

152 10 

2,708 14 

69,714 41 



161.627 28 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commisaioner. 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Department op Grown Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1900. 



loeo] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 4. 
Statkmknt of the Revenue of the Department of CroMm Lands for the year 1900. 



Seryioe. 



Land CoUeetiom. 

Crown Lands 

Clergy 1 ^ands 

Common School Lands 

Grammar School Lands 

Railway Lands 

University Lands 

Kent '. 

Wood* and Foretts. 

Timber dues 

Gronnd Rent .... 

Bonus 

Transfer fees 

Mining licenses 

Casual fees 

Cullers' fees 

Assay fees 

Algonquin Park 

Rondeau Park 



f c. 



f c. 



68,861 43 




4,271 30 




13,612 46 




2.407 46 


• 


162 10 




2,708 14 




69,714 41 






161,627 28 


676,320 99 


61,704 70 




636,464 64 




1,886 25 






1,276,376 48 


6.800 66 


408 42 




648 16 




1,496 40 




218 00 




874 60 






9,946 02 




1,447,949 78 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 

Dbpartmbnt op Grown Lands, 

Toronto, Slat December, 1900. 



,AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommissioner. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. » 



APPENDIX No. 6. 

Statimknt of the Receipts of the Department of Grown Lands, which are considered 
as Special Funds, for the year 1900. 



Service. 


9 0. 


$ c. 


Principal 


Clergy Lands. 


2,506 65 
1,765 65 




Interest 








Common School Lands. 


4,271 30 


Principal 


4,882 34 
8,630 21 


Interest - 






Orammar School Lands. 


13,512 45 


Principal ....... 


1,752 35 
655 10 


Interest - 






Railway Lands. 

r 


2,407 46 


Principal 


111 66 
40 44 


Interest 






University Lands. 


152 10 


Principal 


2,670 28 

37 86 












2,708 14 








23,051 44 



D. GEO. ROSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



Dbpabtment of Grown Lands, 

Toronto, 3 let December, 1900. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 6. 

Statbmbnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands 

for the year 1900. 



Name. 



AoKirrs' Salabiks. 
Land. 



Annis, A. E 

Arowtrong, J 

Best, S. G 

Brodie, D. M 

Chapman, E. A .... 
Campbell, WiUi»m . 
Cookburn, J. D . . . . , 

Eastland, T. G 

ElliB, Jas 

Hamilton, 6 

Oommission 

Handy, E 

Hartle. William 

Hollands, 0. J.. ., 

Kirk, William 

Nichols, W. L 

Reeves, Jas 

Ryan, T. J 

Ruttan, J. F 

Scarlett, J 

Stephenson, W 

Stewart, C. R 

Stewart, James. . . 

Tait, J. R 

Turner, William . . . . , 

Whelan, J 

Wood, A. W 



Timber. 



Campbell, P. C... 

Garrow, E 

Halliday, F 

Londry, D 

MarRach, W 

McWiUiams, J. B 

Munro, H 

Russell, W 




Agents' Disbdbsehekts. 

Land. 

Annis, A. E 

Armstrong, J . ; . . . 

Best, D. G ■■■ 

Brodie, D. M 

Campbell, William 

Cockburn, J. D.. 

Ellis, Jas . . . '.'.'.'.'.'.'.v. 

Hamilton, G. 

Handy, E 

Hollands, C. J. 

Kirk. WiUiam ....'.'. 

Nichols, W. L '..'.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.. 

Carried f»mmrd •. 



200 00 
500 00 
600 00 
500 00 
200 00 
200 00 
500 00 
260 00 
500 00 
200 00 
30 35 
600 00 
350 00 
300 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
400 00 
250 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
100 00 



1,600 00 


1,400 00 


1,600 00 


200 00 


1.600 00 


2,500 00 


1,200 00 


1,600 00 



29 01 


17 36 


4 73 


11 51 


11 51 


9 45 


24 04 


2 13 


13 72 


1 53 


11 69 


13 46 



150 13 



9,080 35 



11,700 00 



f c. 



20,780 35 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. e.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ 0. 


$ c. 


Brought forieard 


150 13 

2 00 
39 75 

150 73 
26 78 

4 50 
7 70 

10 13 

5 10 

3 94 


20,780 35 

400 76 
3,894 64 

242 00 




Reeves, Jas 




Ryan, T. J 




Ruttan, J. F 

Stephenson, J 




Stewart, James 




Stewart, C. R 




Tait, J. R 




Whelan, J 




Wood, A. W 








Timber. 

Campbell. P. 

Garrow, E ■ 


844 42 
116 63 
180 29 
1,708 04 
932 09 
113 17 




Halliday, F 




Margach, W 




Mc Williams, J. B 




Russell, W 








Mitedlaneous. 
Ames, D. H., care of Loboro' and Day Islands 


20 00 
26 00 
15 00 

4 00 

5 00 

20 00 

4 00 
10 00 
10 00 
88 00 

21 00 
15 00 

5 UO 




Bilton, Geo., care of Islands in Mad and Loon Lakes 

Oarlaw, D. , inspection in Seymour . 

Carr, M. , do Himsworth 




Danis, S., care of Leonard Islands 








Dunkley, J., care of Gore Murray and Seymour. 

Jones, C. S., travelling expenses 

McDiarmid. J., inspection in Southwold 


25,317 75 








1,200 00 
900 00 
200 00 




Cbown Timber Offices. 

Ottawa. 

Darby, E. J., agent 


2,300 00 

580 72 








Rainboth, E. J., surveyor 








Rent 


500 00 
80 72 




Disbursements 


2,880 72 




1.400 00 
150 00 




Quebec. 
Nicholson, B., agent 


1,560 00 
468 S3 








Disbursements 


125 00 
143 33 
200 00 








2,018 33 








30,216 80 



1900 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Orown Linds for the year 1900. 



Name. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 






30,216 80 


VVOODBANGINO AND INSPECTION OF TiMBKR LaNDS. 
Allison, S 




264 76 
781 35 
844 90 
301 60 
694 02 
683 40 
610 00 
132 00 
1,400 00 

121 40 
840 CO 

1,600 00 

1,403 81 
283 00 
758 20 
218 00 

1,080 75 

655 10 

370 00 

10 50 

1,354 75 

122 20 
385 70 
940 00 
960 00 

32 00 

819 80 

1,078 90 

60 50 

289 31 

365 10 

377 50 

488 15 

1,564 40 

1,120 36 

70 00 

966 50 

240 70 

1,323 90 

384 90 

5 50 

312 00 

1,701 00 

1,386 75 


Bremner, J. L •. . 






Brady, John 






Craig, Norman 






Crawford, A 






Christie, W. P 






Carroll, Wm 






Doane, F 






Henderson, Ohas 






Hanes, J. L 






Halliday, James 






Johnson, S. M 






Kennedy, John 






Loughrin, L 






Lloyd, E. B 






Lfiwis, C 






Maughan, J 






Malone, W. P 






Mooney, Thoe 






Miller, Thoa 






Moore, D. H 






McNamara, M 






McGillivray, A 






Mc Williams, Theo 






McCaugherty, P 






McPherson, D. G . . . 






McCracken, .John 












Newman, Jno. P 












Pearson, J. J 












Quinn, Wm 












Regan, Jno 












Sinclair, Finlay 












Smith, J. W 












Rice Lewis & Son 












White, J. B 
















29,292 60 


FiBK Ranging. 


90 00 

97 50 
103 00 

68 00 
74 00 

123 00 

98 00 
131 00 

144 60 


Armstrong, Jas. C 












Barrett, Tho8 (1899) 












Bromley, Thos 


122 00 
1 00 


















Bowland, John J , . , . 








131 00 
13 60 




Disbarsements 
















929 00 


59,509 40 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. ^.—Continued. 
Statkmbnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 


$ c. 


S c. 


a c. 


Brought forward 




929 00 

129 00 
110 00 

103 50 

73 44 

133 00 

33 80 

122 00 

119 00 

85 00 

131 00 

106 00 

107 00 
9 00 

601 75 
85 00 

288 25 

131 00 

115 00 

131 00 

10 50 

55 00 

127 00 

96 00 

70 00 

50 00 

19 60 

131 00 

106 00 

119 00 

210 40 

105 00 
124 00 

130 00 

131 00 

106 00 
131 00 
100 00 

108 00 

343 20 
131 00 
106 00 
106 00 
131 00 
130 00 


59,609 40 


FiBK Ranging.— Continued. 
Burns, John 




Barns, Clifton H 






Bachanan, Robt 


96 00 

7 50 




Disbnrsements 








Baker, John L 


40 00 
33 44 




Disbursements 








Bellow, Louis 






Biggs, Wm. E., Disbursements . 

Cousins, Thos 






Crombie, John 






Corripran, M.B 






Couvrette, Daniel 






Columbus, Frank : 






Cunningham, Thos ' 

Chamberlin, Thos 






Christie, W. P.... 

Disbursements . 


420 00 

81 75 




Christie, Peter R 






Cochrane, John, 1899 


132 00 
27 00 

112 00 
17 25 




Disbursements 




Cochrane, John 1900 

Disbursements 








Conway, Rich'd 






Caswell, Gr«o 












Crawford, A. C . , Disbursements 






Crawford, David 






Campbell, James 






Cox, Henry 






Cleary, John 1899 

Cole, Wm 












Dugas, Joseph 






Dean, Geo 






Dougherty, J. M 


i22 50 

87 90 




Disbursements 














Didier, L. P 






Xhifond, Ignace 






Driver, Joseph 






T)upuis, Eugene 






Dennison, Harry ....,.,.,... 












Dacey, .John 








298 00 
46 20 




Disbursements 




Eagle, Sidney 












Fraser, Wm 












Finlay^on J, H ...... r , ...... 














6,369 34 


59,509 40 



1SH)0] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



11 



APPENDIX No. %.—C(yntinued. 
Statement of the Disburaementa of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 


$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


Brought forward 




6,369 34 

123 00 

128 07 

527 76 
126 00 
131 CO 
66 00 
10 00 
119 00 
131 00 

128 00 
99 00 

122 00 

123 00 
113 00 
103 00 

18 00 
131 00 

122 00 

94 50 
92 00 

105 00 
81 00 
92 00 

139 25 
98 00 

155 75 

129 00 
205 00 

92 00 

106 Oo 

95 00 
119 00 
131 00 

71 00 
111 00 
111 00 

130 00 

131 00 

123 00 
131 00 
118 00 
131 00 

65 00 
91 00 

77 25 

84 50 
129 00 


69,509 40 


Fire RAsama.— Continued. 
Fitz^immons, H 




Guthrie, John 


118 00 
10 07 




Disbursements 








Gardner, John 

Disbursements 


305 00 
222 76 








Grant, Benjamin A 






Grenkie, Chs 






Gagnon, Noal 






Gillespie, W. A 






Grawbergrer, Thos 






Garceau, Adolphe 






Grozelle, A.D 






Gadway, Jno 






Gosslin, Alfred 1899 

Genereau, Nelson , 







Henderson, A , 






Harvie, Andrew 






Harvie, Albert 1899 

Haley, Cornelioa 






Haves, Martin 






Hoff, J. S. Morris 






Hodgins, Henry 






Houston, Jos 






Jenkins, Walter 






Jenkins, James 






Johnson, James 

Disbursements 


131 00 

8 25 








Johnston, John 






Johnson, R. W 


131 00 
24 75 




Disbursements 








Johnston, Wm 






Jackson, Geo 






Janaaen, Daniel , 






James, Martin 












Kennedy, Wm. B 






Kennedy, Robert 






Kurby, John 












Kelly, James C . , 










' 


Lomprey, < >8car 












Latour, Alfred 












Lesag;e, Peter .•> 












Lacroix, Charles 








36 00 
41 25 




Disbursements !!!!!!.!!.!,!!!!!!!! 




Lemyre, Meddy 


38 00 
46 50 
























Carried forward 




11,877 42 


69,509 40 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



I No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbnrsements of the Department of Grown Lands for the year 19 )0. 



Name. 



Rrought forward. 



FiBB Ranging.— Con«m«ed. 



Labelle, James . . . 
Disbursements . 



Lavigne, David . . . 
Ludgate, Anthony, 
tariviere, Joseph . 

Loughrin, L 

Disbursements 



LeBlanc, Olivier . . . 
Disbursements 



Lawson, David . . . 
Disbursements . 



Molntyre, Wm.... 
McElroy, Robt . . . . 

McKinnon, A 

Disbursements. 



Macdonald, John D 
Disbursements . . 



McDonald, Donald 
McDonald, David . 
McDonald, A. J . . . 
McDonald, Alex . . . 
McDonell, Alex . . . 

McCooI, James 

Disbursements . 



McAdam, James . . 
Disbursements. 



McAdam, Alfred . 

McGuey, Dennis . . 

Disbursements 



McNamara, M. . . . 
Disbursements . 



McCogherty, .Tames 
McKay, Angus . . . . 
McClelland, Robt . . 
McPhee, Hugh . . . . 

McKie, Chas 

McGhie, Chas 

McGrath, Matthew 
Disbursements . . 



McCartney, Thos 

McCormack, Duncan 1899 

McDermott, Frank 

McDougall,D 1899 

Macf arlane, R. L 

McKenzie, Murdock , 

McGuire, James 

McGarvey, Robt 

McColl, Arch 

McDermid, Alex 



Carried forward 



107 00 
537 26 



294 00 
504 64 



129 00 
1 13 



54 00 
5 88 



122 50 
70 75 



286 00 
27 87 



30 00 

5 83 



121 00 
8 25 



131 00 
107 17 



162 50 
40 90 



131 00 
112 29 



11,877 42 



644 26 
47 00 
42 00 
89 00 



798 64 
130 13 



59 88 

131 00 

71 00 



193 25 



313 87 
43 00 
104 00 
111 00 
119 00 
131 00 



36 83 



129 25 
101 00 



238 17 



203 40 
21 00 
113 00 
131 00 
251 00 
262 00 
123 00 



243 29 
131 00 
120 00 
104 00 

81 00 
131 00 

97 00 
125 00 

99 00 

48 00 
124 00 



< e. 



59,509 40 



17,817 39 



59,509 4» 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



13 



APPENDIX No. 6.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbarsements of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 


$ c. 


S 0. 


« c. 


BrougM, forward 




17,817 39 

104 00 
104 00 

118 00 

119 00 
66 00 

158 50 

32 25 

140 00 

126 17 

120 00 
185 15 

23 00 

131 00 

131 00 

96 76 

96 00 

140 32 
129 00 

405 94 
101 00 
131 00 
119 00 

91 CO 
119 00 

53 50 

201 40 
113 00 
113 00 

91 00 
108 00 

49 00 
131 00 

76 00 

142 75 

136 62 

116 00 

72 00 

106 00 

134 00 
125 00 


59,509 40 


FiBE Ranoino.— ConiinMfti, 
McColgan, E. R 






Marshall, Wm .-. 






Maher, Patrick 






ManneriDg, Richard 






Millichamp, Thoa. A ► , 






Munroe, J ames H 


131 00 
27 50 




Disbursements 








Moriarty, Michael 


27 00 
5 26 




Disbursements 








May. Henry 


181 00 
9 00 




Disbursements 




Malloy, Mark 1899 

Disbursements 


54 00 
72 17 








May, Albert 

Mirgach, Wm 






Martin, A. R 1899 






Mongeau, Napoleon 






Mongeau, Alex 






Nicholson, W. F 






Nadon, Telesphore , 

Neill, Wm 


131 00 " 

9 32 




Disbursements 










O'Nfill, A. J 


372 50 
33 44 


















Oram, John 












Palmer, Qosea 












Phillips, W, H 








i92'66*' 
9 40 




Disbursements 








Robinson, Thos. G 






Robinson, Thos 






Regan. John L '. 












Reynolds, John 












Stanley, John 






Scantlin, James 


134 00 

8 75 




Disbursements 




Skuce, Thos ....'. 


131 00 
5 62 








Btearns, Albert 






Sheridan, Peter ". . ... 












Smith, Patrick 


132 00 
2 00 












Smith, Joseph 
















22,771 74 


69,509 40 



u 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ N... 3 



APPENDIX No. 6 —Continued. 
Statbmbnt of the Disbursements of the Department of Orown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 



$ c. 



Brought forward . 



FiBE Ranginq. — Continued. 



Sweezey, Benjamin 

Seeley, Louis 

Secular, John P . . . 

Scott, M. J 

Taylor, James A . . 

Turner, John 

Disbursements . 



TesHier, Basil 

Therriault, James .. 

Thaxter, Robt 

Turner, Geo 

Thompson, James 
Thomson, F. A. H.. 

Takle, James 

Urquhart, Jno 

Vaudette, Eustache 

Volker, P. D 

Wilson , Daniel 

Wilson, John D 

Wilson, Kobt 

Wilson, Alex 

Waiters, Thos .... 
Disbursements . . 



244 00 
158 38 



112 00 
13 50 



Wallace, Greo 

Winters. John 

Weart, E. B 

WUliams, Daniel W 

Wood, Thos, A 

Welsh, Ed w 

Young, Wm 

Yuill, Archie 

St. Anthony Lumber Co.; one-half award and costs, O'Neil 
& Ferguson vs. St. Anthony Lumber Co 



Refunds 



Cullers' Exahinationb. 



Campbell, P. C, expenses 

Clairmont, J., services ... 

do expenses . . 



Halliday, Jas.. services. . 
do expenses 



Lummis, W. D., services., 
do expenses 



12 00 
5 00 



16 00 

7 33 



12 00 
8 20 



Moore, D. H., services., 
do expenses 



Munro, H., expenses 

Mather, D. L., services . 
MoCaugherty, P. do 

do expenses 



Carried forward 



12 00 
5 50 



16 00 
7 25 



S c. 



22,771 74 



131 00 

131 00 

36 00 

90 00 

186 00 



402 38 

121 00 
123 00 
131 00 

86 00 
131 00 
131 00 
106 00 
75 00 
59 50 
119 00 

122 00 
106 00 
131 00 
150 00 



125 50 
119 00 

117 00 
129 00 
131 00 
114 00 

18 00 

118 00 
140 00 

1,069 31 



27,220 43 
235 00 



10 55 
17 00 
23 33 
20 20 



17 50 

11 00 

8 00 



23 25 



130 83 



$ c. 



59,509 40 



26,985 43 



86,494 8S 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



15 



APPENDIX No. 6 —Continued. 
Statement of the Disburaementa of the Department of Crown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 



Brouffkt forward. 



Cdllkhb' Examinations.— Continued. 



McDonald, A., services. 

White, J. B., services. . 

do expenses . 

Advertising 



BuBXAC OF Mines. 



Contingeneiei. 



Printing and binding . 
Stationery 



Postage 

Telegraphinj? 

Express and freight. 



Advertising . . 
Subscriptions 
Books 



Blue, A., travelling expenses 

Bain, J. W., do . 

Davis, Hon. £. J., and T. W. Gibson, travelling expenses. 

Evans, J . W., map of Sudbury (proportion) 

Hammond, W. O., report of Sudbury conference 

Preston, W. R., travelling expenses, re report on Nickel... 

Passinghan, T. , services re well cuttings 

do disbursements 



Thompson, P., services 

Photographs and photo supplies 

Registrars' fees 

Sundries 



Colonization and Fobestby. 



Contingeneiea. 



Printing and binding. 
Stationery ,. ., 



Postage 

Travelling expenses. 



Subscriptions . 

Books 

Photo supplies . 
Maps 



Dickson, M. G.. services. 
Thompson, P., do 



South worth, Thos., travelling expenses 
Sundries 



Carried forward . 



S c. 



12 00 
7 79 



653 53 
211 50 


185 66 
79 98 
54 10 


515 00 
88 02 
53 12 


240 00 
112 90 
100 67 


126 00 
58 30 
66 00 


15 00 
20 00 


15 00 
52 10 
22 18 
79 90 



162 90 
202 74 



83 66 
73 53 



48 00 

24 50 
56 76 

25 00 

167 50 
94 50 



$ c. 



130 83 



12 00 



19 79 
18 00 



865 03 

319 74 

656 14 

453 57 

249 SO 
35 00 

169 18 



365 64 
157 19 



154 26 



262 00 

269 75 

40 90 



$ c. 



86,494 83 



180 62 



2,747 9ft 



1,249 74 



90,673 15 



16 



THE HEPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. &.— Continued. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Crowns Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 


1 0. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brought fotward 






90,673 16 


Mining Dkvelopmknt. 

Rat Portage Agency. 

Charlesworth, L. C, salary 

do six months' rent 

do diBbursements 

do travelling expenses 




910 00 
290 03 


180 00 
90 03 
20 00 




Belleville Assay Office. 
Wells, J. W., salary 


900 00 
76 00 

278 86 


1,200 03 


1,263 86 

223.00 
8 70 

637 61 


do disbarsements : 




Dickson, G. H., services 


72 50 

125 50 

26 00 




Pratt, Wm., do 




Nicholson, G. F., do 








Bain, J. W, , travelling expenses '. 








568 58 
69 03 




Furnishings 








Michipicoton Mining IHvision. 


1,000 00 
97 44 


2,123 17 


1,097 44 
83 32 


do disbnrsements 




Rent 


66 67 
26 65 




Advertising 




Inspection of Mines West. 
Bow, J. A. , salary 


666 00 

224 74 

260 00 

32 50 


1,180 76 


1,173 24 
1,764 43 

1,162 61 

1,060 86 
13 66 


do disbnrsements 




Carter, W. E. H , do 








Inspection of Mines East. 

De Kalb, 0., salary, balance 1899 

do do 1900 


400 00 

1,000 00 

364 43 




do disbursements 








Coleman, A. P. , salary , 


500 00 

632 81 

9 70 

20 00 








Lamb, G., rock sections 












Miller, W. G., salary 


600 00 

397 19 

12 66 

141 00 




do disbursements . . 




do balance account 1899 




Benn, L. L., services 












353 00 
16 70 


5,164 68 


Pbsvention or Expobt or Logs. 


366 70 
443 65 


do disbursements 


















810 25 


Carried forward 




101,152 04 



1»00] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



17 



APPENDIX No. Q.— Concluded. 
Statement of the Disbursements of the Department of Orown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 



Brought fonoard 



Eastbbn Forest Rbsebte. 



Malloy, J., iervices. 
Wensley, F. H. do . 



Wood, A. H., services 

do disborsements , 



SCBVBTS 

boabd of subveyobs. 
Refunds 



OONTINOENOIES. 



Printing: and binding. 
Stationery 



Postafife . 
Express 



Tele^rraphing 

Telephoning 

Cab hire 

Car fare and petty expenses 



Advertising. . , 
Subscriptions 



Extra clerks 

Davis. Hon, E. J., travelling expenses 

Ryan, P., auctioneer's fees : . 

Evans, W. T,, map of Sudbury District (proportion). 
Sundries 



? c. 



8 00 
195 00 



260 00 
7 00 



1,807 57 
2,339 79 



960 68 
118 95 



381 93 
58 00 
56 50 
60 00 



2.100 88 
276 33 



750 00 

62 50 

150 38 



§ c. 



4,147 36 
1,079 63 

556 43 



2,377 21 

4,802 00 

74 35 



962 88 



203 00 

257 00 



$ c. 



101,152 04 



460 00 
24,682 38 

200 00 

38,072 45 



13,999 36 



178,566 73 



D. GEO. EOSS, 

Accountant. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Oommiseioner. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1900. 



2 C.L. 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No a 



APPENDIX No. 7. 

Statement of Expenditure on account of various services under the direction of the 
Department of Grown Lands for the year 1900. 



Name. 



Diamond Dbill. 



Gozette, H., salary 
Disbursements . 



Judge, J., salary . . 
Disbursements . 



McLean, H., salary . 

Roche, E. K., salary. 

Disbursements . . . 



Trethewey, W. J., salary. 
Disbursements 



Boyd, D. G. , travelling expenses 
Holden, H., do 

Jenkins, F., do 



Advertising .. 
Telegraphing 



Oarbons 

Drill furnishings. . . 
Cost of Drill No. 2. 



Freight and express 

Labour 

Supplies 



Refunded 



Mining Schools . 
Ibon Mining Act 



Explorations in Nobthebn Ontabio. 



Baird, A«, and party 
Beatty, D., do 

Davidson, W. S., do 



Grey, G. R., 
McAree, J., 
Niven, Alex., 
Proudfoot, H. B. 
Robertson, Jas , 
Speight, T. B„ 
Tieman, J. M., 
Equipment .... 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Ehiobation. 



Liverpool Agency 
Ontario Agency . . 



Colonization 

Algonquin Park. 
RoNDKAt Pabk .. 



$ c 



321 29 

78 80 


308 20 

48 85 


622 09"' 

69 30 


301 46 
18 20 


79 00 
600 

8 50 


4 37 
13 30 


3,469 15 
1,077 84 
1,803 10 


196 58 

1,915 72 

560 87 



$ c 



400 09 



367 05 
285 75 



691 39 
319 66 

93 50 
17 67 

6,350 09 

2,678 17 



11,188 37 
1,979 39 



19,200 00 
12,765 82 



2,851 34 
4,294 83 
2,529 24 
4,355 42 
3,519 08 
2,278 66 
3,720 00 
1,700 00 
3,836 55 
3,590 00 
1,832 46 



4,817 13 
1,440 33 



$ c 



9,208 98 
31,965 82 



34,507 68 



6,267 46 
3.243 17 
6,944 18 
1,663 74 



93,690 93 



D. GEO. ROSS, 
Accountant. 

Department cf Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1900. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



1900 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



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no 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 9. 

Woods and Forests. 
Statement of Bevenae collected daring the year ending SIst December, 1900. 





$ c. 


$ c. 


Amount of Western District collections at Department 


1,075,499 77 




do do Quebec 

A.mount of Belleville collections -■ 


31,272 89 
68,281 36 


1,106,772 66 








68,281 36 


Amount of Ottawa Gollsctions ........... ••• 


96,053 62 
6,268 84 


do do at Quebec ...-- 








101,322 46 






Total 


$1,276,376 48 








J. A. G. OROZIER, 

Chief Clerk in Charge. 


AUBREY WHITE, 





Assistant Commissioner. 



Department of Grown Lands, 

Toronto, December Slst, 1900. 



APPENDIX No. 10. 



Statement of Patents, etc., issued during the year 1900. 



Orown Lands 

School do 

Mining do 

Public do (late Clergy Reserves) 

Free Grant Lands (A.. A.) 

do do (under Act of 1880) . 

Rainy River Lands (Mining and Crown) 

Mining Leases 

Licenses of Occupation 

Crown Leases 

Mining Lands (University) 

Mining Leases do 

Orown Lands do 



Number . 

332 

67 

103 

18 

56 

229 

166 

263 

6 

6 

8 

8 

2 



Total. 



1,264 



CHARLES S. JONES. 

Chief Clerk. 



Department of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, Slst December, 1900. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



lOOO] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



21 



APPENDIX No. 11. 

Return of the number of locatees and of acres located ; of purchasers and of acres 
sold ; of lots resumed for non-performance of the settlement duties ; and of patents issued 
under The Free Grants and Homesteads Act, during the year 1900. 





District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 

- 


00 

a 

O 

2 
6-2 


No. of Acres 
locat d. 


Is 

d o 


00 
< 

(O 


^1 


00 
*> 

a 

1 

. d-2 




Mnskoka 

<i 

(> 
<< 

<t 

<c 
tk 
>< 
« 
tl 
<( 

Parry Sound 

(< 

(t 
i' 

<< 
« 
<t 

i< 
it 

<« 

(( 
i< 
<i 
t< 
i< 
>■ 
(t 
<i 

(< 

« 

i< 

«« 
<< 
« 

" .... 

c. 

t( . * * ' ' 


Wm. Kirk, Bracebridge. 

« 
« 

t< 

(C 

tl 
(< 
>< 
(< 
(1 
« 
<( 

James Ellis, Parry Sound 

t< 
• t 
(( 

<• 
<t 
<< 
<■ 
(( 
i< 
<< 
(t 

S. G. Best, Maganetawan 

<i 
it 
« 
i( 

(t 

E. Handy, Emsdale .... 

•• 
« 

J. S. Scarlett, Powassan. 
t( 

« 












3 


Brunei 


3 
2 
4 

17 
2 

8 

i' 


301 
297 
588 
3,290 
301 
878 

190* 


2 

..... 

3 


95 

is' 

104 
"169 


2 

2 
4 
9 

""6 

""i 
""h 

6 

1 
1 
9 


2 


Chaffey 


2 


Draper 


5 


Franklin 

Macaulay 

Medora 

Monck 


6 

1 
8 
6 










""s 




McLean 


4 
4 

1 

1 

12 


520 

776 

43 

100 

1,640 


1 




Oakley 


3 




1 


Ryde. 

Sinclair 


'"'i' 


"28 


""q 






Stephenson 

Stisted 


2 
4 
6 
7 

4 

6 

7 

21 


288 

475 

380 

1,234 

600 

914 

1,173 

3,075 


1 


84 


2 

4 

6 

10 

1 
6 
2 


i 
4 


Watt 


4 

1 

"l 
3 
3 


142 
14 

20 
18 


8 


Wood 


1 


Cardwell 

Carlingf 


2 
2 


Christie 








Ferguson 

Foley 

Hafferman 






3 
1 
2 


289 
146 
206 







""1' 
3 
1 


2 
3 


Humphrey 

Monteith ...... 


2 


84 


4 

1 


MoConkey 

McDougall 

McKenzie 

McKellar 














1 
2 

1 


48* 

374 
98 










1 


25 


2 
2 


4 


Shawanaga 

Wilson 








1 

6 
5 

1 


202 

643 
665 
200 


1 

2 
1 


2 

72 
16 


2 

2 
6 


1 


Chapman 

Croft 


2 
3 


Ferrie 




Gurd. 










Lount , . 


3 
14 

1 


396 

2,278 

150 






5 
9 
2 


2 


Machar 






6 


MQls 






2 


Prinele 






1 


Ryerson 

Spence 


6 
5 
5 

5 
8 
2 
4 
2 

11 
1 

16 
3 

11 
2 


716 
684 
600 

472 
499 
1,298 
263 
584 
389 

1,620 
200 

2,011 
550 

1,672 
349 






2 

4 

4 

5 
6 
5 
3 
2 
6 

2 

"12 
5 

11 
2 


5 

2 


Strong 






3 


Armour 






6 


Bethune 

Joly 






5 
2 


McMurrich 






1 


Perry 






1 


Proudfoot 






2 


Chisholm 

Hardy 


2 
•••4 


41 
"i78' 


4 
2 


Himsworth 

Laurier 


9 
1 


Nipissing 

Patterson 


1 

1 


11 
3 


4 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX U.— Continued. 





District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


a 

a 

% 


m 
1 

•s| 

d.5 


No. of Pur- 
chasers. 


< 


6 2 


5 

fl 

1. 


Anson 


Haliburton 

<< 

(( 

(C 

(< 
<( 

Peterborough . . . 
<< 

Haliburton . . . . 
Peterborough . . . 

Haliburton .... 
Hastings 

(t 

i( 

(1 
(< 
<t 
ii 
ii 
«< 
<i 

Addington 

Frontenac 

<i 

M 
<( 

Renfrew 

<( 

« 
(1 


William Hartle, Minden 
« 

« 
<t 

<( 

T. G. Eastland, Apsley. 
<< 

C. R. Stewart.Haliburton 
(< 

« 

J. R. Tait, L'Amable . . 
<< 

It 

(( 
<t 
<{ 

c< 

A. W. Wood, Plevna. . . . 

<c 














Glamor(ipan 

Hindon 


6 
1 
3 
6 
3 
4 

1 
3 
3 
1 

3 
6 
5 


800 
197 
306 
668 
400 
377 

98 
345 
404 
200 

299 

598 
502 









1 


Lutterworth 

Minden 

Snowdon 


'""i 


"'"14 


S 
3 
1 
3 

1 
2 
1 


""*2" 
3 


Stanhope 








Anstruther 








Burleigh 

Chandos 


1 
1 


11 

8 


2 

7 


Methuen 


9 


Cardiff 






1 

8 

...... 

6 




Cavendish 

Galway 


2 
1 


98 
4 


2 
1 


Monmouth 


3 


Bansror 


6 
1 
3 

7 
1 
7 

14 
6 
4 
1 

12 
1 

1 
6 


979 

99 

411 

769 
100 
859 

1,839 
862 
360 
101 

1,613 
99 

105 
769 






2 


McClure. 








Wicklow 


1 


10 






Carlow 


2 

2 

5 

12 

8 
1 

""e 

1 
2 




Cashel *, 






1 


Dungannon 






6 


Fariiday 


3 

1 


206 
6 


9 


Herschel 

Limerick 


1 
2 


Mayo 


1 
3 

1 
1 


37 
57 

5 
4 


s 


Monteagle 

Wollaston 

Abinger 


5 
2 


Denbigh 




Ganonto, South . . 


1 


Oanonto, North . . 


<( 














Olarendon 


ii 


4 


338 






i 

1 
1 

1 


1 


Miller 








Palmerston 

Algona, South . . . 


II 

James Reeves, Eganville 

<( 
II 
« 
II 
II 

John Whelan Bmdenell 


1 

2 
2 
4 
3 
12 
1 
5 

15 
3 

16 
2 

18 
2 
4 

20 
9 
9 

1 
3 


211 

100 
200 
315 
494 
1,464 
100 
540 

1,787 
300 

2,660 
381 

2,015 
290 
344 

2,343 
907 

1,023 

85 
443 


1 


11 


2 
4 


" North. . . 






2 


Brougham 

Grattan 


" "l 


"147' 


1 
2 

1 


2 

3 


Hagarty 


6 


Richards 








Wilberforce 






1 


1 


Bmdenell 






3 


Griffith 


« 

(< 
>< 

<< 
<i 

(1 
<t 
<< 


II 
II 

II 
II 
II 

II 
Jas. Stewart, Pembroke 

t< 

II 
II 
Ii 
II 
II 










Jones 









9 


Lyell 


i 

1 

... ^. 

2 


10 

1 

""2 

60 






Lyndoch 

Matawatchan .... 

Radcliffe 

Raglan 


2 
1 

■■■2' 
2 

1 

I 


■'2' 
7 


Sebastopol 


3 


Sherwood ... . , 
Alice . . 


1 


5 


3 
4 


Buchanan 

Cameron 


"l' 


'••'Y 




Fra«er 








1 


Head 














Maria 










McKay 












Petewawa 

Rolph 


2 
1 


197 

181 







2 


3 
2 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



23 



APPENDIX n.—OorUinued. 





District 

or 
County. 


Agent. 


go 

a 

til 




s . 

o o 


2 
< 

d IS 


5 . 

QQ 


00 

1 

° S 
d.2 


Wylie 

Boniield 


Renfrew 

Nipisaing . 


Jas. Stewart, Pembroke 














4 
2 
12 
2 
6 


371 
300 
1,299 
456 
700 


2 


165 


4 


4 


Calvin. ..... 


« 

n 

Algoma 

.i 

Thunder Bay .. 

Rainy River... 

<t 
<( 
it 
<< 
« 
<( 
<i 
«• 
II 

II 
« 
It 
II 
■1 
II 

II 

II 


II 
II 

<i 

W. Turner, St. Ste. Marie 
11 

W. L. Nichols, Tbessalon 

G. Hamilton, Richard's 
Landing. 

J. F. Ruttan, Pt Arthur 
II 


4 


Ferris 


2 


18 


7 
1 
4 

4 


6 






Papineau 

Korah 






6 







1 


Parke 






1 


Prince , 


1 


160 






9 

1 

15 

17 


2 










St. Joseph's Island 
Blake 


37 

17 


3,980 
2,482 


1 
1 


31 

160 


5 


Conmee 


















Dawson Road. . . . 


II 














Dorion 


<i 
II 
<i 

i< 
11 
ti 

II 
II 

W. Campbell, Boucher- 

vaie. 

II 

II 

11 

II 

II 

*' 
II 
II 
i< 

W.Stephenson, Big Forks 

K 

«• 
<l 

11 

il 

II 

l< 


6 
29 
21 
35 

7 
32 

7 
31 

8 

7 

1 
10 

5 

9 
18 
14 
27 

1 

18 
16 

6 

6 
1 
9 
9 
21 
15 
5 
8 
4 
4 


828 
4,661 
3,318 
5,530 
1,126 
5,021 
1,129 
3,689 
1,160 
1,129 

26 
1,618 
732 
1,357 
2,594 
2.185 
4,356 

77 

2,826 

2,582 

806 

737 

178 

1,436 

1,396 

2,856 

1,867 

676 

1,335 

549 

798 










Gillies 


2 
2 


81 
26 


16 
1 

1 
1 

17 
8 

18 


1 


Gorham 




Lybster "... 




Marks 








O'Connor 

Oliver 

Paipoong^ 

Scoble 


4 

1 


168 
2 


"'2* 
6 


4 


87 




Strange ... 






Atwood. 

Blue 


1 


59 


1 




Curran 






4 
3 

5 

4 
3 




Dilke 


2 

4 
1 


6 

105 

80 


2 


Morley 


5 


Nelles 




Pattullo 




Roseberry 






2 


Shenstone 

Tait 


2 


46 


6 

7 
4 

2 


5 


WorthinRton 

Aylesworth 

Barwick 


5 
2 


646 
70 


1 

2 
1 


Burriss 


i 

4 

il 

3 
5 
2 
3 


1 

105 

179 

466 

82 

176 

8 

88 






Carpenter 

Crozier 


2 
7 
3 
2 
3 
3 


2 • 
5 


Devlin 

Dobie 


2 
2 


Lash 

Roddick 


3 
1 


Woodyatt 


2 




965 


132,665 


140 


4,524 


458 


329 



J. J. MURPHY, Clerk in Charge. 

Dbpartmbnt of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, December Slat, 1900. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



I No. a 



APPENDIX No. 12. 

Statement of the number of letter? received and mailed by the Department in 1898, 

1899, 1900. 





Letters Received. 


o 

S 
S 

OS 


'3 

a 

§ 
D 
a 

o 


1 


Letters, circulars 
and reports mailed 
from Department. 


Year. 


i 

4 

eg 


00 

> 




i 

a 


Mi 
11 


1 
1 


1898 

1899 

1900 


10,059 
13,175 
12,504 


8,863 
9,813 
7,665 


4,427 
4,756 
5,800 


3,507 
3,593 
3,414 


623 

649 

1,961 


30,083 
34,254 
31,344 


43,237 
48,391 
44,216 


83 
98 
87 


77 
87 
51 


37,125 
40,273 
41,650 



FRANK YEIGH, 

Registrar. 

Dbpabtmbnt of Grown Lands, 

Toronto, 31st December, 1900. 



AUBREY WHITE, 

Assistant Commissioner. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



25 



gi-H (B 

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32 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 17. 

TOWNSHIP OF sirroN. 

District of Rainy Rivee. 

Port Arthur, December 14th, 1899. 
Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from your department, dated 5th of 
July, 1899, I have made a survey of the Township of Sifton, in the District of Rainy 
River, and beg to report thereon as follows : — 

On my arrival on the ground, I found that T. R. Deacon, O.L.S., had established the 
south-east corner of the township of Sutherland, one chain north of the intersection of 
Reid's first correction line with the line run by A. L. Russell in 1875, and had planted 
there a wooden post with an iron bar alongside marked " Sifton" on the north east face 
and '* Sutherland " on the north-west. My instructions were to adhere to this post for 
my south-west corner. I commenced my survey by chaining along Reid's correction line 
which forms the north boundary of the townships of Pattullo and Tait, and planted 
posts for the front angles of the lots, at a distance of one chain north of Reid's correction 
line, leaving a road allowance of one chain between Sifton township and the townships 
of Pattullo and Tait. As instructed, I made lots eleven and twelve of a width of forty- 
four chains and fifty links each. The remaining lots were each made forty chains wide, 
the south east corner of the township was established four hundred and eighty-nine 
chains east of my starting point, and one chain north of Reid's correction line. Here I 
planted a substantial cedar post, with an iron bar driven beside it marked "Sifton " on 
the north-west face and " Bertram " on the north-east. From this post I ran north 
astronomically a distance of four hundred and eighty-nine chains to the north- east comer 
of the township, where a substantial wooden post with an iron bar beside it was driven. 
This iron bar was marked *' Sifton " on the south-west face and " Bertram " on the south- 
east face, and a cairn of stones was raised so as to make this comer practically indestruct- 
ibel. As instructed, concession Yl was made eighty-nine chains deep, all the others be- 
ing of the regular depth of eighty chains. The front of concession VI was run across 
the township before the north boundary was started, in order to have a trial line by 
whiwh to run the north boundary, as my instructions were that the north boundary was 
to be a straight line from the north-east corner of Sifton township to the northeast cor- 
ner of Sutherland. This line struck the east boundary of Sutherland township, one 
chain sixteen and a half links north of the front of concession YI. The chainage from 
this point to the north-east corner of Sifton being obtained, I was enabled to run a 
straight line from the north-east corner of Sifton township to the north-east corner of 
Sutherland, the bearing of this line is S. 89 degrees, 43 minutes west. The southerly and 
westerly portions of the township are mostly swamp, portions of which are well-timbered 
with tamarac, spruce and cedar, but the greater portion was only stunted spruce and tam- 
arac of no value. This area, however, while now very wet can be well drained by the 
branches of the Pine river, one branch of which runs through the north-west portion of 
the township, and a tributary to the other branch, which runs through the north part of 
Pattullo, affords a splendid opportunity for draining the south-eastern portion. These 
streams have sufficient fall to afford excellent drainage, and this portion of the township 
will eventually become excellent agricultural land, owing to its natural richness. 

The north-east portion of the township is somewhat broken up by rocky ridges. No 
minerals of value were seen, but both tha Laurentian and the Huronian formations show 
up strongly in this section. A large portion of the eastern and northern parts of the 
township, however, is composed of clay land covered with second growth poplar and tam- 
arac and contains some excellent farming land. 

Some small areas of pine exist, but much of it is unsound. No timber areas exist 
which are of sufficient importance to justify being reserved for timber purposes. There 
were no settlers in the township at the time the survey was made. 

Game is plentiful including moose, partridge, prairie chicken and rabbits. Beaver 
are numerous in the north-western portion of the township, along the branch of the Pine 
river. Care was taken to see that the lines were well opened and blazed, that the posts 
were of good material, properly marked and that stones were piled around them wherever 
possible. 



1900] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMKNT. 33 



The magnetic variation which is about 8 degrees, 35 minutes east was very constant 
throughout. 

The plan, timber plan and field notes are submitted with this report. 
I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) James S. Dobie, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner oi Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 18. 

TOWNSHIP OF SUTHERLAND. 

District qp Rainy River. 

Rat Portage, Oct. 4th, 1899. 

Sir : — I have the honor to report that in accordance with instructions dated July 
5th, 1899, the township of Sutherland, in the District of Rainy River, has been survey- 
ed into lots of 320 acres or thereabouts, by me. Some difficulty was at first experienced 
in picking up the old line forming the north boundary of the townships of Nelles and 
PattuUo, but eventually the original post at the south east angle of section 36 in the east 
limit of Nelles was discovered, and the east boundary of Nelles traced north till the north 
limit was discovered. Having once located the north limit of Nelles, the old post at the 
north east angle of section 32 Pattullo was discovered and the old line exactly 63 links 
east thereof, as given in the instructions. This old line was re-traced north and the post 
at the north-east angle of Sutherland also found, though planted 25 years ago. An ob- 
servation was made on Polaris at the south-east angle of Sutherland and the survey was 
commenced from this point and carried to completion. The mean magnetic variation 
throughout the township is 8 degrees, 25 minutes east. Iron posts were marked as per 
instructions and planted at the corners of the township. At the north-west and south- 
west angles the name " Sutherland " was cut on the posts previously planted by O. L. S. 
Proudfoot in his survey of the township of Pratt, 

The township of Sutherland contains a considerable area of good agricultural land, 
easily cleared, as there is practically no heavy standing timber in the township except a 
small strip on the west side. Of a total area of 24,466 acres, about 14,350 acres are 
suitable for agricultural purposes and the balance is composed of low swamp with small 
scattered black spruce and tamarac scrub and muskeg and cranberry marsh, with the 
two small lakes shown in the plan. The whole township is very flat and has no great 
elevation above the water level of the creeks and Pine river. The oiily outcrops of 
rock formation are granite and syenite and in one place a small area of conglomerates, 
very unpromising from a mineralogical standpoint, though it is probable coal might be 
found at some depth. 

This township has, previous to its being burned over, been covered with a fine 
forest of poplar, pine and cedar, which is now lying in a partially decayed state on the 
ground. From the appearance of the fallen timber, I estimate that $50,000 worth of 
timber has been destroyed here by fire, a striking instance of the immense damage done 
annually by forest fires. 

There are no large streams in the township and until a good road is built across the 
swampy portion of tbe first concession, access to the better lands of the township will 
be found to be difficult. 

Moose and large game are fairly numerous. A plan of the township, a timber plan, 
a copy of the field notes and account for survey are enclosed herewith. 

I have the honor to be Sir, 

Your obedient servant, ' 

(Signed) , Thos. R. Deacon. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 
3 C.L. 



34 THE REPORT UK THE [ No. 3 

APPENDIX No. 19. 
TOWNSHIP OF hIeTY. 

DiSTBICT OF AlGOMA. 

West Montrose, Nov. 7th, 1899. 

SiE, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the survey of the town- 
ship of Harty, in the District of Algoma, surveyed by^me under instructions from your 
Department, bearing date July the 6th, 1899. 

I proceeded by rail from Sudbury with men and supplies to Onaping Station on the 
C. P. R., and from there followed along the trail leading to Stobie'a Mine on lot 3, in 
concession 4 of the township of Levack, and from there I cub a good trail along side-line 
of lots Nos. 2 and 3, through the 5th and 6th concessions to the north boundary of 
Levack. 

I commenced the survey by retracing the north boundary of Levack, planting posts 
at Tegular intervals of 40 chains as the front of the Ist concession of the township of 
Harty, and then proceeded with the other side lines and concession lines, as instructed, 
running the easterly part of the township first and finishing upon the southwest corner, 
leaving lot 13 on the first concession 29.74 chains, instead of 39.20 chains, as indicated 
by the field notes of the north boundary of Levack. 

I also retraced and reblazed the east boundary of the township of Hess, and show 
in my field notes the distances apart of the concession lines in Hess with those run by 
me in Harty. .[ planted an iron post at each angle of the township, marking them a& 
directed by the instructionp, e. g. the post at south east angle of the township is marked 
Foy on the east side, Harty, on the north west side and Levack on south west side, 
and the post on the south west angle of the township is marked Cartier on the south 
west side, Levack on the south east side, Hess en the north west side, and Harty on the 
north east side. The other posts in the township were all marked with a proper mark- 
ing iron on the east and west sides the numbers of the lots, and on the north and south 
sides, where side lines and concession lines intersect, with the numbers of the concessions- 
and the other posts on the concession lines were marked on the east and west with lot 
numbers and on the north side the numbers of the concession. 

The township is very rough and rocky, broken by numerous lakes and ponds which 
have been measured and connected with the lines on which they occur. 

A very small portion of the township would be fit for agricultural purposes, the 
best for that purpose being found on lots 6 and 7, concessions 2 and 3, along the river 
on lots 10 and 11 in the 5th and 6th concessions and the north halves of lots 8 and 9 in 
the 5th concession. 

The Onaping river enters the township on the north boundary on lot 11 and runs 
south- westerly, touching the west boundary on lot 13 in the 3rd concession, thence east- 
tjrly and southerly leaving the township on lot 10, concession 1. There are several 
rapids and small falls on the river as shown on the notes, some of which would afford 
good mill and water privileges. 

The township is well timbered throughout except part of lots 3, 4 and 5 in the 5th 
and 6th concessions which has been burned over a number of years ago, but even this 
bruld has on it a large number of red and white pine of good quality. The balance of the 
lots are, generally speaking, pine, spruce, cedar and balsam, spruce and balsam predomin- 
ating slightly in the easterly part of the township and pine in the westerly part through 
the whole of the township. I would judge it would make a good average pine limit. On 
lots 11, 12 and 13, in the 5th and 6th concessions, considerable square timber has been 
cut and removed. ^^^^- g^ 

The rocks in the township as a general thing are of granite formation, though along 
the easterly boundary, and in the south westerly portion of the township diorites 
were found and strong local attraction of the magnetic needle in places as shown in notes. 



1900] CKOWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 35 



Nothing of oomtne'-ciU v;\lae was foaad. The geaeral mtgi^tic variatioa of che needle 
WAS 5° 40' west. The township aboands in large and smHlI game such as moose, red deer,, 
bear, mink and a few beaver and the lakes in pike. 

Accompanying this report I beg to submit plan and field notes and accoant. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) C. D. Bowman, 
The floN. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Oommiesioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



aIpPENDIX No. 20. 
TOWNSHIP OF FOY. 

District op Algoma. 

RiDGBTOWN, Dec. 30th, 1899. 

Sir, — Acting under instructions from the Commissioner of Crown Lands, bearing 
date July 5th, 1899, whereby I was instructed to survey the township of Foy, in the 
District of Algoma, into lot of 320 acres each, I have the honor to submit the following 
report. 

I left Ridgetown on the 15 th day of August, and went by rail to Toronto and to Sud- 
bury. Thence with wagons to within about two miles of the southeast corner of the 
township of Bo well or Trout Lake ; then I packed to the lake and canoed across it, to 
the northwest corner, where I found a trail which I followed leading into the township of 
Foy at Lot 1, concession III. 

On Au^st 23rd, I found the northeast corner of the township of Morgan, which is 
also the southeast corner of the townahip of Foy, here I found a four inch birch post 
planted by O.L S. DeGurse in 1886, which post is 9 chains and 8 links north of the 
southwest corner of the township of Bowell. Beside this birch post I planted an iron 
post three feet long with a diameter of If inches and painted red. On the east face of 
this post is cut tihe word " Bowell," on the southwest face the word " Morgan " and on the 
northwest face the word •' Foy." 

From this comer I reblazed the north boundary of the township of Morgan, which 
is the south boundary of the township of Foy, planting posts every 40 chains marking 
lots 1, 2 and 3, concession 1, of the township of Foy. 

On August 25th I took an observation on Polaris at the south boundary between lots 
two and three, and the next day ran north and began the actual survey of the township. 
Other observations were taken at different times during the progress of the work to 
secure accuracy, and the times and places of these observations are shown in the accompany- 
ing field notes. 

The average variation of the compass was N 6° 45' W. Posts were planted at the 
intersections of Uie north and south lines and others midway between said intersections, 
the first named posts being marked with the proper lot numbers on the east and west 
sides, and the concession numbers on the north and south sides. The latter named posts were 
■itnilarly marked except the south side on which^ nothing was put. An iron post three - 
fe3t long with a diameter of If inches and painted red was planted beside the spruce post 
planted by O.L S. DeGurse which marks the southwest corner of the township of Foy, on 
the northeast face of this iron post was cut the word •' Foy," on the southeast face the 
word •' Morgan" and on the west face the word " Levack ". At the northeast corner of 
the Township of Foy I planted an iron post three feet long with a diameter of If inches 
and painted red, on the southeast face of this post is cut the word " Bowell "^ 
and on the southwest face the word •' Foy ". At the northwest corner of the township 
O.L S. Bowman planted a similar iron post on the southeast face of which is cut the word 
♦* Foy " and on the southwest face the word " Harty ". 



36 'J'HK REPORl' OF THE [ No. 3 



The instraments nsed were 5 inch transit theodolite made by Potter and a 6 inch Hearn 
and Potter transit and a steel band chain. 

There are a number of small lakes in the township, these being larger and more 
numerous in the northern part. There are also a number of brooks and creeks. 

There is a large creek beginning in the northwest corner of the township and run- 
ning south and a little east across the township. 

The general direction of all the creeks and brooks is south towards the Vermilion 
River, which is approximately four miles south of the south boundary of Foy. 

The township is generally hilly, rolling and rocky, but there are a number of alder 
swamps and beaver meadows. 

The timber is chiefly white pine, tamarac, jack-pine, cedar, balsam, birch and poplar. 
The white pine in the southwest part of the township is fairly large and quite valuable. 
The central western part was overrun by fire this summer jast previous to the time of 
survey. 

The soil consists of muck in the meadows and marshes, but the high lands are chiefly 
sand, gravel, stones and rock. 

The township is chiefly adapted for grazing, being well watered by streams and lakes. 

There is some little show of mineral in the rocks from lots 1 to 6 in the 3rd conces- 
flion. Specimens of the fixed rocks in diflerent parts of the township accompany this 
report. 

Accompanying are plans and field notes prepared in accordance with the instructions. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) Akgus Smith, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 

Toronto, 



APPENDIX No. 21. 

TOWNSHIP OF MUTRIE. 
District of Eainy River. 

Tilbury, Dkc. 30th, 1899. 

Sir, — In accordance with instructions received from your Department, dated July 
lObh, 1899, I have made a survey of the township of Mutrie, in the District of Rainy 
River, and beg leave to report thereon as follows : 

The township is bounded on the east by the township of Sanford, and on the north, 
south and west by the unsurveyed lands of the Grown. 

I commenced the survey at the southeast angle of the township, where I found posts 
as specified in the instructions, viz.: an iron post of gas-pipe 1;^ inches in diameter and 
two wooden posts, all marked as shown in the field notes, an'1 retracoid 0. L. S. E. Stew- 
art's line due west to the Canadian Pacific Railway and produced the same due west 
until I intersected Eagle lake for the front of mv fir^t coucsssion or south boundary, 
planting lot posts thereon at regular intervals of 40 chainp. 

I then ran out the other concession lines and nide lines as directed in the instructions. I 
could not find the iron post plan'ed by O. L S. E. Stewart at the lake in the northwest 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPAKTiMENT. 37 



corner of the township, the wooden post I marked with the word Matrie, facing the town- 
ship in addition to the other reqaisite markp. 

The iron post at the northeast corner was marked with the word Matrie facing the 
township ; it had also on it the word Sanford facing the Houftheast. I also planted the 
iron posts as directed at the intersection!^ of the sou'h and west boundaries with Eagle 
lake, marking thereon the word Matrie facing the township. 

The greater portion of the township is rolling land, and for the most part the soil 
is of clay and clay loam, and is very good soil for agricaltural or grazing purposes. Bat 
there are places where the soil is a very light sand and would not be of mnch account 
for either a^cultural or grazing parposes, and this oo urs principally in lots four, five, 
six and seven in the first and second concessions There is also considerable swamp land 
in the township in which the soil varies as much as it does on the high land. Where 
there is a clay sab-soil with black mack on top the soil is very rich, and as a general 
thing would be easily drained, as it occurs principally along or close to the rivers or 
lakes or has a creek running through it and by doing a little excavating in those creeks 
or low bottom lands they could be made efficient to drain large areas of this swamp land. 

I should judge that there would be about forty per cent, of the township that would 
make very good farming land. There was no valuable timber to be seen in the town- 
ship that would be of any commercial valae, as it has nearly all been run over with fire 
some 25 or 30 years ago and has grown up with small timber about 6 or 7 inches in 
diameter. 

There was not any white pine in the township except a few on an island in Eagle 
lake, south of the side line between lots twelve and thirteen which ran from 8 to 1 6 
inches in diameter, bat not enough to be of commercial value. 

There are a great number of windfalls in the township which make it very di fficult 
to get through, as the timber is piled up 5 and 6 feet high in some places and small scrab 
growing up through it, especially in swampy land. These windfalls occur principally on 
side line between lots two and three and side line between four and five, and also on 
the third and fourth concession lines. 

The township is well supplied with water,Eagle river entering the township in first con- 
cession and crossing lots one, two and three, when it takes a northeasterly course and 
crosses the east boundary in the third concession and joins the Wabigoou river about half 
a mile outside of the township. The Wabigoon river enters the township in the third 
concession and flows in a northwesterly direction across lots one to ten inclusive, in the 
third, fourth, fifth and sixth concessions, crossing the north boundary about one and one- 
half chains east of the side line between lots ten and eleven. There are also two small 
lakes within the township besides two more on the boundaries, one on the east boundary 
and another on the north west corner of the township, in addition to Eagle lake at the 
south-west part of the township. fu.,". 

There was no indication of mineral met with during the progress of the survey, and 
the rock was of the usual kind met with in this district. 

Game was very scarce in the township but the rivers and lakes abound with beauti- 
ful fish, such as pike, pickerel, and black bass, and I was told by a fisherman that the 
white fish were very plentiful in Eagle lake. 

There is but one squatter in the township who is a fisherman, and lives on a small 
island in Eagle lake. 

Accompanying this report please find field-notes and plan of the township, which I 
trost you will find satisfactory. 

I have the honotir to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) Jos. M. Tibrnan, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



38 THE REPORT OF THE No. 3 



Appendix No. 22. 

TOWNSHIP OF BOWELL. 

District op Algoma. 

SiMCOB, Nov. Ist, 1899. 

SiE : — Acting under instructions from you bearing date July 5th, 1899, I proceeded 
to Sudbury on August 9th, and executed the survey of the township of Bowell in accord- 
£mce with the accompanying plan and field notes. 

I purchased my supplies at Sudbury, and sent them in along with my men on wagons 
via the Blezard mine and an old lumber road leading to Marion's camp, near the north- 
west angle of the township of Hanmer. I went in via Rayside, thence north-east to 
Brisboise farm and on to the Vermillion river where I struck the river over which the 
supplies went. 

I began the survey at a pine post planted by 0. L. S. Laird at the north east angle of 
the township of Lumsden. Here 1 planted an iron post which I obtained along with two 
others from Mr. T. J. Ryan at Sudbury. This post, I marked as follows : Bo well on the 
north-west, Wisner on the north-east, Hanmer on the south-east, and Lumsden on the 
south-west. 

I retraced the north boundary of Lumsden planting posts every forty chains and an 
iron post at the north-west angle, marked as follows : Bowell on the north east, Lumsden 
on the south-east, and Morgan on the west. This post is 9.08 chains south of the north- 
east angle of Morgan where O. L. S. Smith planted an iron stake at the south-east angle 
of the Township of Foy. 

I then retraced the east boundary of the township i. e. Proudfoot's meridian line. 
This line I found well cut out and very easily followed. 

The second concession line, I began at Proudfoot's one mile post and ran westerly 
until it intersected Trout Lake and then westerly again from the westerly limit of Trout 
Lake until it intersected mining location W. D. 239, then again from the westerly limit 
of W. D. 37 to 0. L. S. Salter's old meridian line. Posts were planted in this concession 
every forty chains and at the edge of the lake and mining locations. All posts planted 
on the south boundary are marked with concession I. on the north side and lot numbers 
on east and west side. On the line between the first and second concessions posts were 
similarly planted and owing to the numerous breaks in the line, posts were also planted 
at each edge of the lake and mining locations. These latter posts were marked with con- 
cessions on north and south, and lot numbers on one side and location number on the 
other side. The post between lots nine and ten was the only post on the line set at an 
intersection of a north and south line. It was of course marked con. II on north, con. I 
on south, IX on east and X on west. The line in front of concession III was similarly 
run and posts planted. The lines in front of the fourth, fifth and sixth concessions were run 
down through and posts planted every forty chains and marked when between one and 
two, — three and four, etc., — on N. E. and W. sides and on the others on all four sides 
as per instructions. The north boundary was run through and posts planted at each 
eighty chains, or when the lines between lots two and three, four and five, etc., intersect- 
ed. 

On the eastern boundary, I planted posts beside Proudfoot's for cons. I, II, III, IV. 
At concession V, I used the old post already marked con. IV on south, con. V on north 
and XII on east, putting I on the west side also in front of concession VI and at N, E. 
angle of township where I found an iron stake and marked it "Bowell " on the south- 
west side. It was already marked " Hutton " on the north-east side and •* Wisner " on 
the south-east side. On the line between lots two and three, a post is planted at each 
intersection with a concession line, and on the south and north shores of Trout Lake, these 
latter being marked III on west side and II on east side. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



39 



The other lines were similarly run excepting the west boundary which 'followed 
P. L. S. Salter's old line. The line between lots six and seven, con. IT, which would run 
about three chains wfst of and parallel to the western limit of W. D. 237 was not run 
as a mining claim, was marked up here, and the prospector, Mr. Henry Ranger, assured 
me he was going to have Messrs. DeMorest and Silvester survey the claim, filling in the 
space between W.D. 244 and W.R. 89. 

While camped on the shores of Trout Lake, I made a triangulation of the lake 
which is included in the field notes along with traverses of other lakes in the township. 

The western boundary, Salter's old line, was very difficult to find, but I found sev- 
eral very old pine stumps in the first mile, a few in the second mile, along the whole 
course of the line. I found three stumps and one blazed tree south of W. D. 253 and 
one large stump north of W.D. 233 near the fourth concession line. From this point 
O.LS. Smith traced the line out to the north limit of the tovenship where we found a 
pile of stones and remains of an old stake. 

Observations were taken on Polaris on August 16bh, August 24th, and September 
8th. 

The first was a check of Proudfoot'd line from which I turned my angles. The 
second was taken on the north shore of Trout Lake as a check on the outlines of W.D. 
17 and W.D. 229. The third was taken at the camp on Nickel Lake from which the 
line between lots six and seven was run across concessions III, IV, V, and VI. Lot 
posts w»«re planted on north limit of W.D. 252, W.D. 251, W.D. 243 and W.D. 38. A 
majority of the posts were planted in a pile of stones, as no earth could be found in which 
to drive them. 

Owing to the extreme roughness of the country, I was forced to use a transit in 
itinning all the lines, and even with all the care taken I did not get entirely satisfactory 
results. The line between the fifth and sixth concessions was checked at lots 6 and 7 
and found correct, but from there it runs as shown on plan, north of due west. 

Soil — The country was very rough and oroken and has no soil fit for agricultural 
purposes. 

Rivers — The rivers are scarcely worthy of the name of river, most of them being 
narrow enough where there was a current to be stepped across, and in many places com- 
pletely disappearing amongst the boulders that filled the water-course. 

Minerals. — I visited nearly all the locations surveyed and marked up in the town- 
ship, and found a great showing of nickel, copper, and in one case, W.D. 252, zinc ore. 
In my opinion, the township is extremely rich in nickel, and only needs development to 
prove its worth. 

Timber. — A belt of medium sized pine surrounds Trout Lake and small bunches are 
also found in the south-west corner and on the fourth concession of lots three and four, 
while the north-east portion of the township has a considerable quantity of fine large 
pine although a part of this timber has been cut off in years past. The chief drawback 
to the development of the township is hck of communication with the towns to the south, 
Sudbury in particular; the present road, via the Blezard mine, taking a team a whole day to 
cover the distance to Marion's Camp, and if at all heavily loaded, they can not do even 
that, while 1,500 pounds is considered a maximum for the road. A better road would 
be from Rayside North, but in either case a bridge should be erected over the Vermil- 
lion River. 

There are no settlers in the township, and unless the mines are worked, probably 
never will be. 



I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant. 



The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



(Signed) 0. C. Fairchild, 

Ontario Land Surveyor 



40 THE REPORr OF THE L No. a 



APPENDIX No. 23. 

TOWNSHIP OF HOSKIN, 

District op Nipissinq. * 

Sudbury, December 29th, 1899. 

Sir, — "We have the honor to su'jmit the following report on the survey of the town- 
ship of Hoskin, in the district of Nipissing, performed under your instructions, dated 
July 13th, 1899. 

Leaving Sudbury on July 31 at we proceeded to Markstay Station, on the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, thence by waggons to Nepewasing Lake, thence by canoes, via Nepe- 
wasing and Barlow Lakes and the chain of water running down the east boundary of the 
township, to Trout Lake. 

Proceeding to the south-west angle of the township of Cherriman, we chained north 
eighty chains along its westerly boundary, and planted the post between ^concessions 1 
and 2, Hoskin. We took an observation at this point on the evening of Friday, August 
4th, running due west therefrom, and continuing the line to the shore of Dodd Lake, on 
the westerly boundary of the township. Here a triangulation was made, connecting the 
end of this line with the westerly boundary at its intersection with the southerly shore 
of Dodd Lake. 

This, with the chainage along the westerly boundary, from the latter point to the 
south-west angle of the township, as defined by Bell's post marked VI M., gave the 
necessary data for running the south boundary of the township. 

The survey was then completed in the usual manner, and an iron post planted at 
the south-west angle, marked, according to instructions, Hoskin on the north-east side,, 
and Oox on the south side. The iron posts already planted at the other angles were also 
marked with the word Hoskin. 

P. L. S. Bell's old line of 1874, forming the west boundary, was easily retraced, all 
the original posts being found in place. 

On account of the small surplus in the width of the township, about four and a 
half chains, we deemed it advisable to depart slightly from the instructions, and make 
only the usual twelve lots in each concession. 

The timber south of Trout Lake consists mainly of small second growth, probably 
twenty years old, the first concession containing considerable muakeg. 

North of the lake timber is more open, being principally poplar and birch, with a 
good deal of small white and red pine, with, however, a belt of very dense small jack 
pine and spruce along the sixth concession line. 

There is a small belt of hardwood in the north-west corner of the township. 

Most of the marketable pine lies in the north east portion of the township, princi- 
pally close to the shores of Judge's Lake, with a fine bunch also on island ♦' E " in Trout 
Lake. 

The arable land in the township is probably less than one-tentb of the total area,^ 
and occurs in small scattered patches. 

Bass, trout, maskinorge and pickerel are abundant in the lakes. 

Deer, moose and bear are also quite numerous. 

A few indications of mink, marten, fisher and otter were found, but none of beaver. 

The rock formation throughout the township is Laurentian, consisting principally 
of coarse granitic gneiss, with, however, small areas of the finer biotitic gneiss, chiefly in 
the south-east part of the township. 

A small area of syenitic gneiss occurs in the extreme south east angle of the town- 
ship. The strike of the rock formation is very generally north-west and south east. 

Numerous dykes of pegmatite and felsite were noticed, usually cutting the forma- 
tion ; the former in some cases carrying good-sized crystals of mica. 

The country shows the usual signs of glaciation, striae being visible on most of the 
unweathered outcrops, bearing south thirty-three degrees west. 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARIMENT. 41 



No indications of valuable minerals were seen in the township. 

South of Trout Lake thf rock ridges are uniformly low, rarely exceeding twenty- 
five or thirty-five feet in height ; while in the northern part of the township the surface 
is more broken, with numerous perpendicular faces, but without any very prominent 
elevations. 

There was practically no running water in the township at the time of the survey, 
the season, however, being exceptionally dry. 

Mo settlers or clearings were found in the township, and no mininsc locations were 
developed or staked. 

The survey of the lines was completed on September 2l8t, and the traversing of the 
lakes was done subsequently with a Rochon micrometer. 

Herewith are submitted also a general plan, traverse plan, timber map and field 
notes. 

We have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servants, 

(Signed) DbMorbst and Silvbsteb, 

Ontario Land Surveyors. , 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Grown Lands, 

Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 24. 
TOWNSHIP OF OOX. 

DiSTBICT OF NiPISSING. 

Glencoe, January 29th, 1900. 

SiE, — I have the honor to submit the following report of the survey of the township 
of Cox, in the district of Nipissing : 

I proceeded to the* township by way of CoUingwood to French River Village, and 
thence by canoe up the French and Wahnapitae rivers which latter runs through its 
south-west comer. 

Finding the line described in your instructions to me as run by O.L.S. McAree in 
1882, and which line now forms the south boundary of Cox, I retraced it and fixed the 
south-east angle of the township on this line as directed by said instructions. 

From this angle I ran the east boundary, but instead of this line striking the south 
boundary of Hoskin as indicated, it ran some distance westerly of the south-west angle 
of Hoskin, as shown in the field notes. 

I found the post planted by O.L.S. McAree as described in the instructions, at the 
south-west angle of Cox, and for its west boundary, I retraced McAree's line north- 
ward but found that it did not meet with P.L S. Bell's 6 m. post which, by the instruc- 
tions, was to mark the north-west angle of Cox. I found, however, that O.LS. Beatty 
had a few days previous to our reaching this corner planted a post as marking the north- 
east angle of the township of Waldie, and I made the north-west angle of Cox identical 
with it, marking the wooden post and setting the marked iron post beside it. 

For the north boundary I retraced the line described as run by P.L.S. Bell in 1874, 
and in doing so found his post which I was directed would be the north-west angle of 
Cox, but which is 37 chains and 10 links east from it. 

The iron posts were marked and set at each angle of the township as directed. I 
might mention, however, that the one at the north ease angle, being marked before the 
corner was located, had " Hoskin " marked on the north side, bwt I tried to eraae it and 
conjeal it as much as possible against the wooden post, but a close inspection will still 
reveal this name, which of course should not now be on it. 

The concession and side lines were run as directed and shown in the field notes. 



42 THK REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



The township is well watered. The chief stream is the River Wahnapitae throafjh 
the south-west corner. It has a steady flow through the township and is fairly deep. 

Murdoch Creek through the north-east corner, although narrow and shallow in the 
vicinity of both boundaries, is a stream of some considerable size and has evidently been 
used for running logs through from further north. 

The chain of lakes, shown as Mullin River, are mostly deep with rough, rocky shores. 
The channel is very narrow with considerable fall near the north-west corner of lot 7, 
concession 1, and a water power of limited capacity might readily be obtained here during 
seasons of ordinary rainfall. The long narrow lake on lots numbers 8 and 9, concessions 
3, 4 and 5 lies between rocky ridges and has its outlet to the south. 

On account of the exceptionally dry season nearly all of the smaller streams had 
stopped flowing, and many of the channels were dry, so that it was difficult to determine 
the direction of the flow of water in them. 

Except lots 10, 11 and 12, in concessions 3, 4, 5 and 6, the township for the most 
part is not adapted for agricultural purposes, bat is broken and rocky. The rock, in parts, 
being thrown up in a series of ridges running in a northerly and southerly direction as 
might be indicated by the lakes on lots numbers 8 and 9, in concessions 4, 5 and 6. The 
north-west part of the township, however, as indicated by the lots already referred to, is 
a clay soil of good quality and fairly level. 

Except a narrow strip of river flats a few chains wide along the Wahnapitae, the 
township is a bruM, having evidently been burnt over about thirty years ago. It is now 
grown up with scattering patches of pitch pine, poplar and birch, very little of which is 
more than six inches in diameter, besides this there is a lesser amount of scrubby maple, 
cherry and bash white pines in places, also willows, and alders in parts. The pitch pine 
is confined to the westerly part of the township as indicated by the part colored green on 
the timber map. There are some dry pine stubs scattered throughout the township and 
particularly in the easterly part, but there is little or no timber of commercial value in 
the township. 

Most of the lakes and rivers abound in flsb, and moose, red deer, bear and wolves 
are numerous. 

Blueberries are abundant in the easterly half of the township. 

There are no settlers in the township. 

We left the township by way of the Mullin River, which we found to be much easier 
than by the way we had entered it, as there is only one short portage to make, which 
is about half a mile south of the south boundary between the township and the French 
Eiver. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed.) J^mes Robertson, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 25. 

TOWNSHIP OF MISCAMPBELL. 

District op Rainy River. 

Fort Frances, October 14th, 1899. 

Sir : — 1 have the honor to submit the following report on the survey of the town- 
ship of Miscampbell, in the District of Raiuy River, performed under instructions from 
your Department dated July 2l8t, 1899. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



43 



This township is bounded on the south by the township of Crozier, and partly by 
the township of Mclrvine ; on the west by the township of Burriss ; on the north by a 
line run by 0. L. S. Niven in 1892, and on the east by half-breed Reserve D 16, and 
also by Indian Reserve B 18. 

I commenced the survey as instructed at the south west angle of the township at a 
cedar post planted 50 links east of the northeast angle at the township of Devlin, and 
one chain north of the same. I placed an iron post marked " R " on the south side, 
** Miscamphell " on the north-east face,. and " Burriss " on the north-west face. 

I then re-ran and re-blazed, easterly the north boundary on the townships of Crozier 
and Mclrvine, planting posts for the first concession . r< / chains apart and one chain north of 
the line. These posts I marked " R " on the south side. Oon. I on the north side, with 
the numbers of the lots on the east and west sides. 

I then ran the several side lines and concession lines north and east astronomically 
respectively, taking observations for Azimuth on each of the side lines and on the 4th 
concession line as a check. 

On each of the concession lines the posts between lots 4 & 5, 6 & 7, 8 & 9, 10 & 11 
were planted at the interseciion with the side lines and marked with the lot numbers on 
the east and west sides and concession numbers on the north and south sides. The posts 
between lots 12 and 11, 10 and 9, 8 and 7, 6 and 5 were planted so as to give to lots 
12, 10, 8, and 6 an exact width of forty chains and were marked with the lot numbers on 
the east and west sides, and concession numbers on the north. 

On the north boundaiy posts were planted at the intersection of the side lines, marked 
with the lot numbers on the east and west sides, and con. YI on the soutbT side. 

Finding that lot 3 in concessions 2 to 6 would only have a width of 2 chains, I omit- 
ted these lots, marking the posts on the west boundary of the half-breed reserve 4 on the 
west side, and the concession numbers on the north and south sides, with the exception' 
of the post on con. II, on the south side of which I put no marks. 

The magnetic declination is from 7°30, to 8*30, east throughout the township with the 
exception of lot 9 con. 4 On this lot the declination varies from 15° E to 30" W. 

The fifth and sixth concessions consist only of high ridges and rock with muskegs 
between the ridges. In these concessions the only land of present vcdue borders on Wasaw 
Greek along which there is a belt of first class land, and on which hay has been cut for 
many years past. I noticed a good many stacks of hay which had been put up this year. 
The westerly parts of concessions 3 and 4 consist of Muskeg. 

The other portions of the township are undulating the soil generally being good clay 
or clay loam suitable for agricultural purposes, concession 1, in fact contains an area of 
farming land of the highest quality, there being none better in this district. 

Portions of this township are included in the timber berths 32 and G 5 but most of 
the pine has been cut, and logging operacions were in progress during the survey, to re- 
move the balance of the pine. The northerly and westerly portions of the township have 
been burnt and re-burnt and are covered with small jackpine windfall. On the rest of 
the township wherever there was pine there is to be found first-class cedar growing on 
high land, sound and of value for telegraph poles &c. <fec. 

Several settlers are located on concession 1 having houses built and crops in, and 
during the survey several intending settlers were met with examining the land. 

The northern part of the township is simply a deer park, Moose, Cariboo, and Red 
Deer being very plentiful. 

I forward several samples of rock collected during the survey which seemingly are 
of no economic value. 

Plan, timber plan and field notes accompany this report. 



I have the honor to be, Sir, 



The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commisssoner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



Your obedient servant, 
(Signed) D. J. Gillon. 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 



44 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. » 

APPENDIX No. 26. 
TOWNSHIP OF WALDIE, 

DiSTBICT OF NiPISSING. 

Pabrt Sound, Dec. 20th, 1899. 

Sir : — I have the honor to report that I have surveyed the township of Waldie, in 
the Nipissing District under my instructions, dated July 1st, 1899. I commenced the 
survey at the southeast angle of the to-wnthip where I found an iron bar marked 
Cox, facing to the northeast which I marked 1 on the -vest side, and Waldie facing to 
the northwest, and brushed out and chained the south boundary. I then chained the east 
boundary and observed Polaris at the front of concession II for meridian (Azimuth 1° 47* 
40") and ran said concession line due west to the line between lots four and five, which line 
I ran due north to the third concession. This line I ran due east and west making 
it a base line for the balance of the work in the south part of the township and carried 
the line between lots four and five north to concession six. Fiom this point 1 ran the 
sixth concession line due east to the east boundary, and again west across the township. 
From the point where this line intersected the west boundary I ran a trial line due north 
to find the northwest angle crossing an old line at 65 chains, 75 links which I traced 
eastward and found the place of the post at said northwest angle where I planted a cedar 
post in a cairn of stones marked XII on the east side and an iron bar marked Waldie 
facing to the southeast. I then ca'culated *he courses of the west and north boundariea 
having previously chained the south and east boundaries. 

The township is drained by the Wahnapitse River which crosses the north boundary 
on lot 1 1 and has an average breadth of about 4 chains. There are two good water power* 
one on lot four concession IV, and one on lot two concession IV. 

The township has all been burnt over many years ago and the timber destroyed 
excepting a few acres in the southwest corner which is timbered with green pine. The burnt 
portion is grown up with poplar, white birch and willows. 

There are many clay flats scattered throughout the township which comprise about 
one-sixth of the whole atd which I think will make good agricultural land, resembling 
the country about Chemsford on the Canadian Pacific Railway where the top soil haa 
been burnt off, but when the clay subsoil is tilled it grows good crops. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) David Beatty, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ontario Land Surveyor, 

Oommissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 27. 
SURVEY OF ISLANDS, GEORGIAN BAY. 

Mbapobd, January 20th, 1900. 

Sir, — I have the honor to hand you herewith my maps, diary, accounts and report 
of my survey of certain main traverse lines and islands north of Moose Deer Point in 
the Georgian Bay, performed under instructions from you dated the 10th day of August, 
1899. 

I commenced my burvey at Station number 46 on main traverse line of last season 
on Frying-pan island connecting it by triangulation to Station number 111 on lot num- 
ber twenty-six, concession A, in the township of Oowper, thence to Station V on BuflTalo 
Camp island, and so on to Moon island and along the northerly side of Moon island to 
connect with my transverse line at Captain Allan's straits. At every station a post has 
been placed four inches square in a mound of stones ; each post is properly and plainly 
marked with the number of the station, thus M. T., IX., M. T. X., etc., so that any of 
them may be used when required in tying in or locating any island subsequently surveyed 
in the North Channel. 



1JK)0 ] CROWJS LANDS DEPARTMENT. 45 

All triangulations across the many bays were carefully made by measuring the angles 
with the transit and correctly computing the distances. 

All the mining locations on this line were connected, and duly plotted on my map. 

This portion of my work lies along one of the most beautiful channels on the north 
shore of Georgian Bay, abounding as it does in varied and ever changing scenery, some 
of which reaches a state of magnificence not to be excelled anywaere. The northerly 
side of Moon island is very rugged and prettily wooded, being fringed directly to the 
water's edge as a rule. 

After completing this portion of my work, I moved to near Campbell's island just 
south of Parry island. 

There I began my survey of the second part of main traverse line from Station num- 
ber 73 on Turning island to Station number 93 on Campbell's Rock at Good Cheer island, 
and as I established my traverse line, I located several of the mining locations surveyed 
by Mr. D. Beatty. 

1 found Ansley island and D. B. 33 to be the one and the same island. 

At all points of deflection posts were planted in stone mounds, posts being marked 
thus, M.T. LXXIV, M.T. LXX V, and firmly built in mounds to prevent danger of being 
knocked down by the wind or snow. 

There are many islands near this line all of which can and will be properly located 
by connecting them with this line. 

The work done under your instructions this season and last season will be found to 
be of very great service and use when you conclude to have a complete survey of all your 
islands south of Point Aux Baril. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) J. G. Sing. 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 28. 
SURVEY OF BASE LINE, NIPISSING DISTRICT. 

Toronto, November 16th, 1900. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit the following report on the surveys performed by 
me under instructions from your department, dated 12th June, 1900 : — 

The object of the work entrusted to me, as snt forth in those instructions, was the 
exploration of the comparatively unknown part of the District of Nipissing, bounded on 
the north by the Great Muskeg, adjoining the southern shore of James' Bay, and on the 
south by the southern water-shed of Abitibi Lake. In this exploration was contemplated 
the acquiring of all obtainable information regarding the topography, the nature and 
extent of timber lands, the soil and its capabilities, the minerals, water-powers, and 
water-ways, the flora and fauna of the country, in brief, all the natural and possible 
resources of the territory included, were to be noted. A further object was the acquire- 
ment of necessary geographical information. 

For the purpose of systematic exploration, the instructions required the establishing 
of a permanently marked base-line formed by six mile chords of a parallel of latitude 
passing through the one hundred and ninety-eighth mile post, north from the north-east 
angle of the township of Lumsden on the west boundary of the District of Nipissing, and 
extending across that district to the approximate inter-provincial boundary, that boundary 
not being, as yet, defined upon the ground. 

Two exploring parties, each composed of a timber and land estimator, a geologist and 
a canoeman, were attached to the usual survey party, the duties of these exploring parties 
at this stage of the work being to examine the country on either side of the base line, as 
far north and south therefrom as was compatible with the keeping up of communication 



46 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. S 



■with the main pirty during the progress of the line survey, all available water-ways boing 
Btilized for the purpose of penetrating the intetior. Messrs. P. F. Graham Bell uf To- 
ronto, and Thomas G. Taylor of Gravenhurst, were appointed as timber and land explor- 
ers, and Messrs. R. W. Coulthard of Toronto, and M. B. Baker of Stratford, attended to 
the geological department. 

Upon the completion of the base line and examination of the adjacent country, the 
Department directed a micrometer survey to be made of the shores of Upper and Lower 
Abitibi Lakes, and of Abitibi River from the outlet of the latter lake down the stream 
to some suitable point in the vicinity of Iroquois Falls, whence a compass " tie line" was 
to be run west to connect the river and lake survey with the west boundary of the Dis- 
trict of Nipiesing. These surveys together with available water-ways were to be utilized 
for the exploration and examination of the surrounding country by the exploring parties. 

Agreeably to instructions, the party was organized as speedily as possible, and on. 
the 18th of June I left Toronto, accompanied by the explorers and Msistants from this 
part of Ontario, and on arriving at Mattawa, several additional men were engaged, the 
remainder of the party being secured at North Temiscaminsr. 

By prior arrangement, the necessary supplies had been shipped in advance fron> 
Mattawa, and preceded us to Quinze Lake. A brief description of the route may be of 
interest. Our journey from Mattawa was by Canadian Pacific Railway to Temiscaming 
Station at the foot of Lake Temiscaming — a distance of thirty-nine miles — and thence 
by steamer to North Temiscaming at the head of the lake of that name. About seven- 
ty-five miles from this point, which is near the inter-provincial boundary, the canoes were 
taken by way of Quinze River to Klock's Depot, those of the party not required for thi& 
service, going over the Portage Road to the Depot, about sixteen miles of lumbermen's 
wagon road connecting these points. The supplies were t»ken by wagon over this road. 
From Klock's Depot about ten miles of canoeing, easterly and northerly, brought us to 
the mouth of Riviere Barrier, up which stream at a distance of nearly three miles, a port- 
age on the east side of fifteen chains in length is necessary to pass rapids. At the north 
end of this portage Lac Barrier is met with. An ancient Indian practice of constructing 
dams at the outlet of this lake, for the purpose of facilitating their fishing operations, is 
said to have been the origin of its name. The length of Lac Barrier is about fifteen 
miles to the point where a small river, called Lonely River, enters it. Following the 
winding course of this stream for a distance of eight miles we entered an arm of Long 
Lake. Passing through this arm longitudinally, through the main body of the lake, and 
keeping to the eastern arm of its upper end, in all about twenty-five miles, we reached the 
mouth of a creek. As this creek is too shallow for canoe navigation, a portage of about 
fifteen chains is necessary to reach a lake about one mile in length, at the farther end of 
which begins the •• Height of Land Portage." Crossing this portage, which leads half a 
mile in a north-westerly direction, we came to a small lake forming the head waters of the 
James Bay water-shed, though in high water, a part of its contents flows towards th& 
Ottawa. 

Beyond this lake, which is about one and one quarter miles long, we entered a small 
winding creek, and followed its meanderings for about one mile to its entrance to Island 
Lake, so called from the number and variety of its islands. After a delightful trip of 
about ten miles on this lake and its northerly arm, we arrived at its outlet, wliere rapids 
and a fall necessitate the making of three portages within a mile, known as " The Three 
Oarrying Places." Seven and a half miles farther down the river we came to a short 
portage to pass a fall, after which navigation to Upper Lake was uninterrupted, the total- 
distance between Island and Upper Lake being estimated at twelve miles. Grossing 
Upper Lake north-westerly and north easterly for about six miles, we reached its outlet,, 
and continued down the river for two and a half miles, whence a short portage to pass a 
fall of about twelve feet was made. Five miles farther down the stream we arrived at 
Abitibi Lake, and crossing to a peninsula two and three-quarter miles from the mouth of 
the river, reached the Hudson's Bay Company's Post, which was made the base of supplies 
for our season's operations. 

A whole week had been consumed in transporting our f ve tons of supplies, camp 
equipage, etc., over the ninety miles lying between Klock's Depot and Abitibi Post 
through the Province of Quebec, with a force of twenty-five men, all told. The road 
traversed had been in almost constant use by the employees of the Hudson's Bay Com- 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 47 



pany uuiing the summer uioutbH since th« udv^ut of sceamers on liiti Temiouamiug and 
railway connection thence with Mattawa, and the portages have been much improved, 
good landing docks having been constructed where necessary. 

Abitibi Post was established in 1755 by the Hudson' <3 Bay Oompany, and has been 
continuously occupied since that date. It is situated on a picturesque point which ex- 
tends into the lake from the eastern end. Up to the time that steamers began to ply on 
Lake Temiscaming the Post was supplied from Moose Factory, on James Biy, whence 
the goods were laboriously conveyed up the river after the arrival of the annual vessel 
from England. The population at last census (1898), including Indians belonging to the 
Post, was 450 souls. 

Having stored the bulk of the supplies at this point, we proceeded westward about 
thirty miles to the "Narrows" between Upper and Lower Abitibi Lakes, where a trader 
named W. F. Biederman has a store for trading with the Indians. 

Passing through the " Narrows " about four miles in a northwesterly direction, we 
entered Lower Abitibi Lake, and continued in a general northwesterly direction about 
sixteen miles to the mouth of a river called Tapa-saqua (Low Bush), which enters the 
most northwesterly bay of Lower Abitibi Lake. 

Proceeding up this stream for three days, during which ten portages were rendered 
necessary by rapids and fallf, we reached the height of land portage, about thirty-five 
miles from the lake. We next crossed this portage, which it- about two and a half miles 
in length, and leads northwesterly to a small lake, named by us " Welcome Lake," about 
half a mile in length, and arrived at another portage about thirty chains in length, lead- 
ing to a small lake about one and one-half miles long, which we named " Michel Lake." 
Having crossed this lake, we reached another portage of two and a half miles, which 
leads over a rise of more than three hundred feet. This brought us to another small 
lake, which we named " La France." Grossing La France Lake, about one and a half 
miles in extent, we entered Little Abitibi River, here a shallow, weedy stream, 
with moderate current and increasing depth of waterway, and followed down 
it and its expansions, about ten miles to Little Abitibi Lake. We crossed 
this lake on a course slightly west of north six miles to its outlet. Half a mile down the 
stream a portage was made to pass rapids and a fall about eight feet in height. Another 
half mUe brought us to a lake one and a half miles long by one mile broad, which we 
named " Williston Lake." Continuing down the stream for a mile and a quarter, we 
reached a lake five and a half miles long by three miles broad, which we named " Pierre 
Lake." This lake contracts at its lower end, and is divided by only a short "narrows" 
from Montreuil Lake, an irregular body of water about four miles in length on a winding 
30urse Another "narrows" at the lower end brought us to Harris Lake, which is about 
two miles long by two miles broad. Having decided that we were then about opposite 
the initial point of the base line to be run, we cached a part of the supplies, and turning 
westerly followed a small tributary stream, and thence by means of a series of small 
lakes and intervening portages, we reached the west boundary of the District of Nipis- 
sing, two and a half miles south of the initial point of the base line, on the 10th of July. 
On the following day, the course hsving been determined by astronomical observation, 
the work of running the base line was begun at the 198th mile post, it being marked by 
an iron post with a tamarac post standing beside it. From this point I ran due east 
astronomically on chords of a parallel of latitude for seventy and three-eighths miles, the 
line being deflected six minutes north at every six-mile post. Except where such 
point occurred in a lake or river, a wooden post was planted at the end , of every mile, 
and an iron post three feet long and one and one-quarter inches in diameter at the end of 
every third mile, the number of the mile being marked on the west side of the post or 
posts. The wooden posts were made ot the most durable timber to be found in the 
vicinity, and wherever practicable a mound of stones was erected about the posts, and 
bearing trees marked and noted in the usual manner. Where a mile terminated in a 
lake the post was planted on the line on the nearest land and marked with the number 
of the mile, plus or minus the number of chains or links. Astronomical observations for 
the purpose of verifying the course of the line were taken at short intervals. The mag- 
netic declination was noted throughout, and found to be generally uniform at about 
eleven degrees west. 



48 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



From the time of leaving Lower Abitibi, the exploring parties were active in exam- 
ining the coantry traversed by our ronte so far as opportunity permitted, and from 
Harris Lake Messrs. Taylor and Baker proceeded down the Little Abitibi river to explore 
the country to the north of the proposed base line, Messrs. Bell and Conlthard having 
remained behind at Lower Abitibi lake to examine that region. Both exploring parties 
again connected with the surveying party at the thirteenth mile on the base line, and 
examined the district on their respective sides of the base line as far as the forty-fifth 
mile, when, finding from the unchanging character of ihe district traversed, it was useless 
to pursue their quest in that direction, they returned to Lake Abitibi, examining the 
geological features along its shores and from time to time penetrating the interior by 
means of the rivers met with while the survey of the base line was being completed. 

The country crossed by the base line may for the purposes of description be divided 
at about the 25th mile post. The land in the first 25 miles is chiefly good clay, but the 
frequent occurrence of small lakes, muskegs and marshes detracts materially from its 
value for agricultural purposes. The surface is almost level and well watered by small 
Streams of excellent water, the beds being sufficiently below the general surface to afiord 
drainage when improved. Spruce and tamarac of a maximum diameter of 16 inches, but 
average of about 8 inches, are found in fair sized groves along the banks of streams and 
extending inland therefrom about half a mile. Beyond this distance the growth is 
atunted. Other timbers, including poplar, balm of gilead, white birch and cedar are less 
abundant, and cannot be counted as of sufficient value for more than passing mention. 

Along the remaining forty-five miles of the base line the surface of the country is 
similar in appearance to that of the fi.rst twenty-five miles, but becomes lower and more 
even towards the east ; swamps and muskegs become more numerous and extensive, 
unMl, at the eastpm boundry of the district, it terminates in a vast muskeg, where no 
timber, except an occasional scrub spruce or tamarac, is seen. Great difficulty was ex- 
perienced here in transporting the necessary camp outfit, owing to the generally swampy 
and wet character of the country. In many cases it was necessary to build a flooring of 
poles, covered with boughs, to make the tents h-%bitable. The soil continues a heavy clay 
throughout, but covered to a considerable depth by moss and vegetable matter. Sound- 
ings in many places showed a depth of ten feet of overlying vegetable matter. With the 
exception of the immediate vicinity of the streams and lakes, where belts of about a 
quarter of a mile in breadth of fair timber are found, the easterly forty- five miles of the 
line may be said to be devoid of timber of any commercial value, the growth diminishing 
until the confines of the *' Great Muskeg " are reached. 

The effect of at least seventy per cent, of the territory tributary to the base line be- 
ing covered by a thick coating of moss has been to prevent drainage, and as a result of 
the protection from the sun's rays, the winter's ice is retained all summer. This serves 
to account for the retarded growth of timber remote from streams, and for the icy tem- 
perature of the water in the muskegs. In many places the accumulation of ages of moss 
growth has produced beds of peat. On the line between the thirtieth and fortieth mile 
posts, large areas of that fuel-of-the-future were found, and oar geologists assure us that 
its quality is unsurpassed. 

About midway between the base line and Abitibi Lake, lies a ridge of rocky hills, in 
many places three hundred feet in height, forming the water-shed between the waters of 
that lake and of James Bay proper. This ridge is broken by sandy plains, muskegs, and 
numerous small lakes. The rivers on either side of the water-shed are necessarily short, 
and the means of penetrating the country to any considerable distance correspondingly 
limited. 

Having completed the base line, we returned as far as Burnt Bush Eiver, near the 
centre of the fifty-first mile, whence I made a track survey down that stream to its junc- 
tion with Hannah Bay River, and thence up the latter stream to the height of land, 
whence by portage of nine miles I reached White Fish River, of which I made a track 
survey to the mouth, about five miles north-east from Abitibi Post. 

Burnt Bush River, where it crosses the base line, is about two and a half chains in 
width and runs in a southerly direction far about twenty miles, to the point where it is 
joined by Mud River, running north-easterly, from which junction it runs easterly and 
north easterly about twelve miles to where it empties into Hannah Bay River running 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 49 

northerly. About fifteen miles farther up the latter stream, the inter-provincial boundary 
is crossed. 

Along the banks of all three of these rivers, poplar, spruce, balm of gilead, tamarac, 
balsam, white birch and banksian pine to a maximum diameter of tweaty inches, and an 
average of about eight inches, grow in abundance ; at distances varying from five chains 
to half a mile from the streams the timber becomes stunted, and beyond that limit 
diminishes. 

The soil is generally clay and clay loam with occasional sandy ridges. 

The river banks vary from four to ten feet in height, while the general surface inland 
is lower than the river banks. The spring freshets carry down great quantities of ice to 
ba stranded on the banks as the water recedes. As the ice melts under the action of the 
sun, deposits of mud, small timber, etc., are released, and the banks are thus slowly but 
surely built up. This, in a measure, accounts for the lack of good drainage from the 
surrounding swamps. 

The same is true also of nearly all the rivers and larger streams flowing through flat 
country in the Abitibi region. 

Having reached Abitibi Post, at the end of the track survey above described, I dis- 
charged eight men not required for the latter work, made the necessary arrangements for 
supplies, and proceeded to rejoin the remainder of the party at Biederman's. 

Leaving Biederman's on the Ist of September, we journeyed westward to the outlet 
of Lov^er Abitibi Lake, and thence down the Abitibi River to the Iroquois Falls, one of 
the exploring party branching off at Black River, and the other continuing down the 
Abitibi to explore the territory between Iroquois Falls and the district boundary. At a 
point about a mile down the stream from Iroquois Falls, I ran by compass a tie line due 
west, a distance of eighteen and a half miles to connecc the river at this point with the 
district boundary. In the first four miles of this line the soil was a fine clay loam with 
rolling surface. The timber included spruce, poplar, tamarac and balm of gilead, with a 
few balsams, birch and banksian pine. The fifth and sixth milfs were broken by rocky 
and sandy ridges. Banksian pine, birch, poplar and occasional balsam and balm of gil- 
ead comprised the timber met with in this stage The seventh, eighth and ninth miles 
passed through continuous swamp and muskeg, with none but scrub timber. Early in 
the tenth mile a rocky ridge occurred and extended for half a mile. The remainder of 
the line passed through flat clay country with occasional sandy ridge?, spruce, tamarac, 
poplar, white birch and occasional balsam comprised the chief timber. Some of the poplar 
and balm of gilead here attain a diameter of sixteen to twenty inches. 

Arriving at the boundary between the Districts of Nipissing and Algoma, which we 
intersected in its 143rd mile, we retraced our steps to Abitibi River, up which we made 
a traverse with compass and micrometer to Lower Abitibi Lake. Next taking the north 
shore, I made a traverse of Lower Abitibi Lake with transit and micrometer. By this 
time the season was so far advanced that to have remained to make a traverse survey of 
the shore of Upper Abitibi Lake would have detained us beyond the closing of navigation. 
We therefore contented oun elves with running a traverse line from island to island, on 
as direct a course as possible, to connect the lower lake survey from Biederman's at the 
*' Narrows " with the Hudson's Bay Company's Post at the eastern end of Upper Abitibi 
Lake, planting in suitable places at each end of such line an inm post one and seven- 
eighth inches in diameter and three feet in length and thus concluding the survey for the 
season. 

By survey of tie line and calculations by latitudes and departures the following dis- 
tances are obtained : — 

Difference in longitude between west boundary of Nipiss- 
ing and east end of tie line . 18m. 36c. 381ks. 

Difference in longitude between west end of tie line and 

outlet of lake *. . 23m. 41c. lOlks. 

Outlet of lake to Biederman's 1 Im. 66c. 441k8. 

Biederman's to Abitibi Post 26m. 62c. 891k8. 

To€al 89m. 46c. 811ks. 

West boundary Nipissing to east bounday of Ontario . , 71m. 12c 

Difference equals distance of post east of east boundary 

of Ontario 9m. 34c. Silks. 

4 CL, 



60 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. a 

Un each of the thrte ocoasions ou wbioh L visited Abilibi Post the weather was 
unfavorable for astronomical observations and I therefore qnote the latitude from obser- 
vations taken by Mr. William Ogilvie ten years before, viz.: 

.Latitude 48° 39' 32" 

By cacnlation the latitude at Biederman's is found to be .... 48° 43' 48" 

During the whole course of the tie line and traverse surveys the explorers were 
engaged in examining the country to the west, south and north of Lower and Upper 
Abitibi Lakes, where they report large areas of good clay land and a fair amout of pulp- 
wood timber. As in the cases alre*dy mentioned the timber was found to be much better 
along the banks of streams than in the interior. 

A brief summary of the results of the season's work may be given as follows : — 

Timber. 

White pine to the north of the height of land is found in only a few places, and 
where seen, consisted of scattered trees of inferior value. Here and there small areas of 
red pine occur but are not of considerable importance, the largest being on the south 
shore of the outlet of Lower Abitibi Lake, where the quantity is estimated at 100,000 feet 
board measure. On Lake Montreuil another small tract of 50,000 feet occurs. Long 
Point in Lower Abitibi is estimated to have 60,000 feet of red pine, together with about 
800,000 feet of Banksian pine, running about forty feet board measure per log. 

Pulp-wood timber of fair quality, though small in size, occurs in many places, the 
most valuable tract being on Low Bush River and Circle River, with their tributaries. 
Mr. Graham Bell estimates this at 806,400 cords. Aloug the Little Abitibi River 
between Harris Lake and the District Boundary, Mr. Taylor reports 750,000 cords of 
pulp wood. He also reports considerable areas of pulp wood to the west and south of 
Lower Abitibi Lake. For details of timber found by the explorers, reference may be 
hs^d to the reports of Messrs. Graham Bell and Taylor, accompanying this report. As to 
the present value of the pulp wood of the territory little can be said. When, in the 
future, railway communication is opened some point on the Mooee T.liver may be utilized 
for the collection of the raw material, or the water powers at Couchiching and Iroquois 
Falls will furnish energy for manufacturing pulp and paper. As a large percentage of 
the pulp timber consists of poplar and balm of gilead, the difficulty of floating for long 
distances will have to be considered. 

Soil. 

As already stated, the section traversed by the base line is clay and clay loam. The 
same is true of t-he greater part of the whole territory examined. In general the land,, 
beginning at a distance varying from a few chains to two miles back from the rivers is- 
low-lying and marshy, the impervious nature of the clay preventing filtration, and thus 
promoting the growth of moss. This moss absorbs moisture in such large quantities that 
evapoiation is retarded, and the winter's ice is preserved throughout the summer. The 
efiect of these conditions is that an immense territory with, generally speaking, good rich 
soil, is rendered comparatively unproductive in a climate which, so far as our observation 
and information extend, offers no serious obstacle to as successful farming as Manitoba 
is capable of. We experienced but two frosts during the entire summer. At Abitibi 
Post potatoes were planted on the 29th of May of this year, and taken up on 27th of 
September. The yield was satisfactory and quality good. Oats ripened, and a good 
harvest was reaped. Timothy hay is grown and thrives. 

Within the scope of our cursory examination, during the season, the land which is, 
or, with proper drainage, could be made, suitable for farming, amounts to at least one 
million acres. In addition to this, we are informed by residents in the vicinity that the 
well known clay soil found on the Blanche River above Lake Temiscaming, extends all 
the way up to the land above described. 

From this it wUl be seen that the agricultural resources of Ontario are capable of- 
expansion to an extent hitherto little dreamed of. 



190W 1 CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 51 



MlKEUAUi. 

The geologists accompanying the expedition report no minerals of commercial value. 
Gold-bearing qaartz in small veins was seen, but the highest assays from picked samples 
gave only 62.20 per ton. 

Kaolin also was noted in various places, but not in large quantities. The extensive 
deposits of moss peat, before referred to, would seem to be the most valuable resources 
discovered. 

The Huronian formation extends from the southern limit of the territory examined 
to a considerable distance north of the Abitibi River and Lower Abitibi Lake ; and as^ain 
appears near the intersection of Little Abitibi River by the district boundary, from 
which point it stretches to the north as far as the season's explorations extended. 

From the north shore of Upper Abitibi Lake, and following the northern limit of 
the Huronian tract first referred to, the Laurentian formation includes all the remainder 
of the territory examined. The exact lines of contact are, however, ditficult to follow, 
owing to the rarity of rock exposures. 

Watkb Powkb. 

The only wafer powers of considerable magnitude met with are the two on Abitibi 
River, below Abitibi Lake. The first of these, at Oouchiching Falls, is roughly estimated 
at about five thousand horse-power, and the second, at Iroquois Falls, a'< rather more than 
half that amount. Both are included within surveyed locations, indicating that applica- 
tion has already been made to your Department for the right to develop them. 

Abitibi Lakes and Rivbb. 

These lakes, locally known as Upper and Lower Abitibi Lakes, are connected by 
'Narrows" about two miles in length, with a minimum breadth of about two hundred 
yards. The area covered by the Upper Lake is approximately one hundred and ninety 
square miles, of which about fifty-five Equar« miles lie within the Province of Quebec. 
The length from the narrows to the eastern extremity ia about thirty-one miles, and the 
breadth from north to south shorea varies from three to eighteen miles. For a lake of its 
dimensions, it is remarkably shallow, from four to ten feet being the prevailing depth 
throughout. Owing to its shallow nature, ordinary winds make canoe navigation difficult 
and but for the shelter afiorded by the islands travel would be extremely dangerous. The 
water being impregnated with clay, the winter's ice reaches the bottom of the lake for a 
considerable distance from the shore in the shallower parts. It is said to be customary 
for the Indians at the Post to be obliged to travel a distance of five to six miles in order 
to reach water of sufficient depth for fishing in mid- winter. Notwithstanding this fact 
fish are abundant. This lake has a very irregular shore line of about one hundred and 
fifty miles, roughly estimated. Nearly fifty per cent of the shore line is rocky, another 
twenty-five per cent, boulder -strewn, and the remainder about equally divided between 
sand and clay beach, the general height of the banks being from four to ten feet. Islands 
innumerable, of all shapes, and varying in size from a few square feet to about six square 
miles, aie scattered all over the lake, giving it a natural beauty not excelled by the far- 
famed St. Lawrence. A range of hills three hundred to four hundred feet in height, be- 
ginning two to three miles from the southern shore, affords a grand view of the lake. 
From one of these hills two hundred islands were counted. On a few of the larger islands 
much of the original forest has been swept away by fire and succeeded by second-growth 
timber. Where this has not occurred, the usual mixed timber prevails, and in some in- 
stances small areas of good pulp timber are found. Considerable areas of fair agricul- 
tural land were seen on several of the larger islands. 

Lower Abitibi Lake covers an area of one hundred and forty-five square miles, and 
has a shore line one hundred and fifty miles in length. Its greatest breadth from east to 
west is seventeen miles, and from north to south nineteen miles. The general depth 
slightly exceeds that of the Upper Lake, From the centre of the south shore a sandy 
peninsula, named Long Point, extends about seven miles into the lake, and includes an 
area of probably twenty square miles. The proportion of rock boulders and beach on the 
whole shore line is about the same as estimated for the Upper Lake. Islands are lesa 



52 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



nnmerons, the more important being in the northern part. As in the other lake, the 
larger islands contain much agricultural land of fairly good quality. 

The official meteorological records kept at the Post show the following dates of the 
opening and closing of navigation on these lakes : — 

Opened. Closed. 

1897 (not ou record). 8th November. 

1898, 11th April. 27th October. 

1899, 24th April. 11th November. 

1900, 2l8t April. (Not yet received). 

Abitibi River, which discharges the waters of the lakes above described, leaves the 
Lower Like from a point on its southwestern shore and flows westerly for a distance of 
about twenty mile? to the junction of Misto-ago River from the north. It then takes 
a northwesterly* course for about nine miles, where it is met by the Black River, from 
the south. From this point it runs in a general northwesterly direction, crossing the 
district boundary near the one hundred and eightieth mile post. 

The general breadth is from two hundred and fifty to three hundred feet, with 
■depth varying from four to ten feet, where not interrupted by rapids or falls. At the 
time we visited it, the water was about four to eight feet below the general level of the 
bsmks, which were composed of clay. The most important falls are Couchiching, which 
occur about four miles below the river's mouth, and Iroquois, about thirty miles farther 
down. In the former the main chute is about thirty feet in height, but supplemented 
by about ten feet more in the rapids below that cataract. Iroquois Falls has a descent 
of about fourteen feet. Rapids and other falls of minor importance occur frequently 
throughout the whole course of this river,. and at a point about eight miles above the 
district boundary Long Sault Rapids is said to begin and to extend a distance of five 
miles. Not having been able to reach Long Sault, I cannot speak from my own know- 
ledge, but the total descent is reported to be about seventy feet in that distance. 

With regard to the feasibility of a plan for reclaiming a part of the lands covered 
by the waters of Abitibi Lakes, I may say that, in my judgoaent, 9 comparatively small 
expenditure in the lowering of the brink of Oouchiching Falls would reduce those lakes 
to about one-half their present area. Whether the land so reclaimed would be found to be 
valuable is an open question. The loss in head and storage for the valuable water power 
at the falls should also be seriously considered. On the other hand, the improved drain- 
age facilities for an immense area of land surrounding the lake to be afforded by such a 
work should not be lost sight of. 

Game and Fish. 

The fur-bearing animals ot this territory include moose, caribou, red deer, bear, wolf, 
lynx, fox, beaver, otter, marten, fisher, rabbit, mink and muskrat. Of these, wolf, mink, 
rabbit and fisher are scarce 

The feathered tribe includes duck (chiefly black duck and redhead), loon, craae, 
partridge, hawk, owl, and many small birds. Fish were found in abundance, among the 
varieties being pike, pickerel, white fish, tulabie, white and red sucker, and, below the 
falls, sturgeon. Botanical specimens were taken at various points throughout the coarse 
of the work, and are returned herewith together with notes as to their location. 

I regret that the brevity of the seison precluded our covering as much ground with- 
in the allotted territory as the instructions contemplated, but a complete examination 
was out of the question. 

The uniform courtesy and assistance accorded by the officers of the Hudson's Bay 
Company at all points touched did much to further the success of the expedition, and 
should not be passed without special mention. 

Accompanying this report I beg to submit : 

(a) A general map on scale two chains. 

(b) Field notes of the base line. 

(c) Field Eotes of the tie line. 

{d) A traverse plot on tracing cloth, showing traverse work, 
(e) Special report on land and limber, by Messrs Graham Bell and Taylor. 



1900] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. . 53 



(/) Spt:ciai reports ou guoiogioiii features, by Mcudrs. Oouithard aad Baker, with, 
maps. 

(g) Photographs and negatives, etc. 
(h) Accounts and vouchers in triplicate. 

I hftve the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Signed) T. B. SPEIGHT, 

Ontario Land Surveyor, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 29. 
SURVEY OF BASE LINES, ALGOMA DISTRICT. 

Halibdrton, November 24th, 1900. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report on surveys made by me dur- 
ing the past summer, under instructions from your Department, dated 8th June, 1900. 

My party was known as Exploration Party No. 2, of the general exploration of 
Northern Ontario during the present year. 

The work assigned to the party was the running of a base line west of the 198th 
mile post on the Nipissing and Algoma District boundary to the Missinabie River, about 
100 miles, and the exploration of the country for a distance of fifty miles on each side of 
this line, and thence southerly up the Missinabie River to near Missinabie ^jake ; also the 
continuation of my base line of 1899 from the 120th mile point, a distance of twenty- 
four miles west, and thence due south six and a half miles to Dog Lake, and connecting 
with O. L. S Stewart's survey of 1893 along the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

The object of the exploration was the obtaining as much information as possible re- 
garding the topography of the country, the timber, the soil, the minerals, water-ways, 
and water powers, the flora and fauna, and, in short, everything that would give a proper 
idea of the country and its resources. 

Two exploring parties were attached to the survey party, each consisting of a land 
and timber estimator, a geologist and a lineman, and their duties were to examine and 
report upon each side of the line as far north and south as possible, to ascend and descend 
the rivers crossed by the line, with a view of obtaining all possible information during 
the time at their disposal. Messrs. J. L. Bremner, of Admaston, and J. M. Milne of 
Queensville were appointed to accompany the party as land and timber estimators, and 
Messrs. A. G. Burrowp, B. A., of Queen's University, and E. L. Fralick of the Kingston 
School of Mines ae geologists. 

Leaving Toronto on the 11th of June, accompanied by the two geologists, (the timber 
and land estimators joining me at Mattawa.) I proceeded via North Bay and Mattawa to 
Temisoamingue Station, the northern terminus of the Canadian Pacific Railway, at the 
head of the Long Sault Rapids on the Ottawa River, and the south end of Temisoamingue 
Lake, thence by steamer to the head of the lake, seventy miles, and thence by the usual 
canoe route through Quebec, which has been fully described by Mr. Ogilvie, over 
the height of land, and down stream to Abitibi Lake, thence by the Abitibi River to a 
tributary known as Jawbone Creek, where the exploring parties commenced their work, 
thence easterly to the district boundary, and north fourteen miles along said boundary 
to the initial point at the 198th mile post, being about 210 miles north of the Oanadian 
Pacific Railway at Sudbury, and in Isititude 49« 35' 30". 

The time occupied for the journey was twenty days. After obtaining the necessary 
astronomical observations, I commenced the survey of the base line on the 2nd day of 
July, running west astronomically on six-mile chords to the Missinabie River, which I 
crossed on the 100th mile ; the line was continued to the end of the 102nd mile to com- 
plete a six-mile chord, and after putting up a conspicuous cross on the east side of the 



54 • THE REPORT OF THE [No. 3 



river, and ascertaining that no line had been run from the west by exploration party No. 
3, within twelve miles to the north, and tying my line to an island, I proceeded up the 
Missinabie River to Missinibie Lake, and from the end of my base line of 1899, which 
was run west from the 120th mile post on the Nipisaiag and Algoma boundary, I con- 
tinued west twenty-four miles to the end of the 144th mile, from which point I ran south 
astronomically through Wabatongashene Lake to the Oftnadian Pacific Railway and Dog 
Lake. Here I connected my liae with 0. L. S. Stewart's survey of township boundaries 
along the Canadian Pacific Railway, and returned to Toronto at 10.20 p. m., on the 13th 
of October. The instructions called for a traverse of Missinabie Lake, but as the Kay 
Taffrail log with which I was supplied, did not work satisfactorily, and the season was 
well advanced, I thought it advisable to leave the traverse to a more suitable time. 

The line crosses the Abitibi River on the 14th mile and just north of Island Portage, 
the Mettagami River on the 33rd mile and immediately north of where Poplar Rapids 
River comes into it, the Groundhog River on the 40th mile, the Kapuskasing River at 
the 55th mile and the Opazatika River on the 79th mile. The lines were well cut out 
and blazed and carefully measured. Wooden posts, nearly all tamarac, were planted at 
every mile and iron posts every three miles, marked with a cold chisel on the east side 
" III. M.," '« VI. M.," " IX. M.," etc., up tD " OIL M." Mounds of stone, where stone 
could be found, were built around the posts. Bearing trees were also taken, marked 
" B.T.," and their size, course, and distance from the posts noted. Where the end of a 
mile came in a lake or river the posts were planted on the line on the nearest land and 
the distance noted. In these cases the iron posts were marked with a plus or minus 
sigD, as the case might be. No mounds were built on the 102 mile line, as no stones 
could be found, but on the 1899 extension line it was different, and nearly all posts 
planted were surrounded by stone mounds. 

Astronomical observations were taken frequently, the details of which will be found 
in the field notes. The magnetic variation of the needle ran between 5 and 1 2, averag- 
ing about 7 west on the 102-mile line and about 4 west on the line of 1899. 

Genbral Description. 

The initial point of the line, the 198th mile post on the district boundary, is in a 
level clay country timbered with spruce and tamarac, being in the Abitibi valley. The 
country along the whole length of the line is almost level. There are a few very slight 
elevations and the depressions are only at the rivers and creeks crossed by the lines and 
as soon as it crosses these it comes up to the same general plane. The soil is generally 
clay, not a hard white clay, but open and resembling grains of wheat. There are no 
stones to be seen as a rule, excepting in the river beds, and no exposures of rock to 
speak of. A large part of the country is covered with a heavy coating of moss, which in 
many places retains the winter's frost till late in the summer and retards the growth of 
the timber. The land east of the Abitibi River about fourteen miles and for about nine 
milep west, or to about the 23rd mile, is generally wet and swampy but the clay is ever 
present as a foundation, even in the muskegs, of which there are many. 

The timber on these twenty-three miles will run from four inches to twelve inches 
in diameter, probably seven inches average, and being of course smaller in the muskegs. 
From about the 23rd mile to the Mettagami River on the 33rd mile the land is not so 
wet and the clay comes to the surface in many places. The 29th, 30th, 31st and 32nd 
miles are about parallel to the river, running through splendid land and timber, large 
poplar, white spruce and balm of gilead. From the Mettagami River to the Groundhog 
River — miles 33 to 40 — the country is tolerably dry, being drained by the two rivers, 
and there is a change also in the country from the Groundhog to the Kapuskasing River 
— miles 40 to 55 — muskegs occurring less frequently than further east. From the 
Kapuskasing to the Opazatika River, at the end of the 78th mile, the country is dry but 
generally covered with a heavy coat of moss, in some places twelve to fourteen inches in 
depth. West of the Opazatika river and on the 87th mile I made the following note in 
my field book : " The country for a number of miles back is about two-thirds clay flat 
covered with heavy moss and about one-third clay and sometimes sandy loam ridges with 
very little moss and frequently clay to the surface with poplar and spruce timber." 
From this mile to the Missinabie river on the 100th mile the land is generally dry, in 



190O] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 56 



places a little rolling and very little muskeg, while from the Missinabie river west to 
the 102Qd mile I may quote from my notes : •* Level clay land, spruce, poplar and a few^ 
tamarac of fair size with balm of gilead." 

Summing up the whole line, it may bs said, that from start to finish it runs through 
as fine a tract of farming land as can be found in Ontario. Where else in Ontario can 
a tract of land one hundred miles square be found all alike level and good ? Muskegs 
there are in it, of course, but seventy-five per cent, of the whole country could be culti- 
vated as soon as cleared and the moss burnt off it, and of the twenty-five per cent, remain- 
ing, a considerable portion could be drained and cultivated. 

TiMBBB. 

Spruce, both white and black is the principal timber along the whole line. Tamarac 
is next in order, while poplar mixed with spruce is the principal timber on the dry level 
or sometimes undulating land. The general average of trees is from five to ten inches in 
diameter but along rivers and creeks where the land is drained the trees are much larger, 
often eighteen to twenty inches in diameter and frequently two feet. 

I would say that the best timber is to be found between the Mettagami and 
Opazatika rivers, or from about the 25th to the 75th miles. 

Balm of gilead is found in large quantities among the poplar and spruce on the dry 
land along the rivers and creeks. There is no great quantity of cedar in the country only a 
fringe along the river banks. There is no white or red pine along the line, and pitch or 
banksian pine only occurs at two or three places and in small areas, other woods are 
balsam and white birch. 

Watbb. 

The line crosses all the rivers in the country flowing north to James Bay and a few 
small lakes, but there are no lakes of any importance along the line. 

The Abitibi River where the line crosses on the 14th mile is eight chains wide. 
lb is one of the principal tributaries of the Moose River. It drains Abitibi Lake, and 
varies in width from three chains near its source to three-quarters of a mile near its 
junction with the Moose. It has numerous falls and rapids in its course, and is capable 
of developing a large amount of electrical power, if required. It was specially described 
by Mr. Ogilvie in 1890. The water is muddy from the clay through which it runs. The 
banks are from eighty to one hundred feet high at Island Portage and Falls where we 
crossed it. The rock formation at that point is the Laurentian. 

The Mettagami River where we crossed it (on the 33rd mile) is over a quarter of a 
mile in width with banks from twenty to fifty feet high and current three miles an hour. 
The water is bright, its source being in the high rocky lands of the south. It is larger 
in volume than the Abitibi. It receives many other rivers north of the line before en- 
tering the Moose, and is the principal tributary of that river. It has many fine water- 
falls and numerous rapids, and almost unlimited power could be obtained for industries 
of every kind that may hereafter be required. Poplar Rapids River, two and a half 
chains wide, enters it just south of the line. The Groundhog River, on the 40th mile, 
has a width of nine chains where the line crosses it, with fast current and banks forty 
feet high. It is a fine stream with numerous islands and a heavy flow of clear water. 
The explorers reported it to be one of the finest rivers in the country. It f aUs into the 
Mettagami river about nine miles north of the line. The Kapuakat-ing River at the fifty- 
fifth mile, six and a half chains wide, and flowing between banks from twenty to forty 
feet high is next in order. It rises over one hundred miles to the south of the line, and 
the explorers report it as having many beautiful waterfalls and an intere8*"ing river to 
canoe upon. It falls into the Mettagami about seventeen miles north of the line. 

After leaving the Kapuakasing, we cross the height of land between the Mattagami 
waters and those of Missinabie River and at the beginning of the 79th mile, cross the 
Opazatika (meaning poplar) River,the first stream of any importance that falls into the 
Missinabie. It is four chains in width and nine feet deep where the line crosses it. 
The banks are low, and during high water the shores are flooded. The water is dark 
and the current slow, and along the shores the high bush cranberries are abundant. It 
falls into the Missinabie River, about fifty miles to the north of the line. This river is 
much travelled by Indians coming from Moose Factory to Missinabie, being an easier 



56 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



river to paddie than the Missinabie which goes to show that the water stretches are loag- 
er and the falls higher than on the Miesinabie. 

Last, but not least, is the Missinabie River (swift water) on the lOOch mile, being 
part of the great highway between Lake Superior and Hudson's Biy. It is twenty chains • 
wide where the line crosses, and at a rapid which I supposed was the KaKagee (Oro>v) 
Rapids. I have since been told by Mr. Baird that his Indians who knew the river well 
called it the Biackfeather rapids. I am not now sure which it may be, but the point 
could be easily settled by any one knowing the locality, as the line is plainly visible from 
the river. I thought the water was low when my party ascended the river (in September)- 
to Missinabie Lake, but the Bishop of Moosonee, whom I met on his way to Moose 
Factory, assured me that he had seen it very much lower. 

It was my intention to have defined some points along the river by measurement 
and observation as I came up, as required by the iaatructions, but I found it impracti- 
cable to do this, with such a large party as mine; and moreover It was cloudy and raining 
nearly the whole time I was on the river. I managed to get an observation for latitude 
on Sunday, the 9th of September, on an island in a bend of the river, some distance sontb 
of Conkling's river, making it 48° 42' north. 

After seven days of hard paddling and poling up rapids, I arrived with my party 
at Missinabie Lake on the 11th of September and after getting to the end of my base 
line of 1899, — the 120th mile post and getting in supplies, commenced the prolongation of 
this line on the 15th of September. I continued west astronomically to the 144th mile, 
which 1 reached on the 4th October, and then turning south through Wabatongashene 
Lake, ran down to the Canadian Pacific Railway as before described. 

These twenty four miles of base line were through an exceedingly rough and difficult 
country, much cut up by lakes and high, rocky hills. There is practically no land fit for 
farming purposes along the whole line west of Missinabie Lake, and the timber, often for 
miles together was nearly all blown down ; the progress of the line was therefore neces- 
sarily slow, and the moving ot the camp and supplies along the line a very difi&cult 
matter. The soil is sandy and the whole country rocky and broken and covered with 
boulders. The timber is of all kinds, — pitch pine, birch, poplar and spruce, and in 
many places of large size, especially the pitch pine and spruce. On some of the high 
hills the timber is nearly all white birch of large growth with sandy loam soil. 

Much of the country along the line has been burnt and is practically useless. Away 
to the west of Wabatongashene Lake, the country is apparently all burned to the Oana- 
adian Pacific Railway and the white, rocky hills can be seen for miles. The geological 
formation along this line is the Laurentian. 

Exploration. 

As the rivers crossing the 102 mile line all run north to James Bay, it was not 
practicable for the explorers to be much on the line, and as a rule they only came to it 
where the rivers crossed it. Considerable intervals of time, therefore, elapsed without 
my seeing the explorers and geologists ; but eo far as I know they performed their duties 
faithfully, and their reports are submitted herewith. I have read the joint report of 
the land and timber estimators, and may say that I agree with them in what they say 
regarding the )and and timber thereon, judging from what I saw of the country along the 
line and from my previous knowledge of it. It was, of course, impossible during the 
months of July, August and September to explore the whole territory assigned to No. 
2 party ; but I am satisfied that the whole James Bay slope is very much alike, and 
that what is recorded of the part seen is a fair sample of the whole. Much of the 
information on the placB has been gathered from the geologists regarding the rivers, falls, 
lakes and portages. The portages were often difficult to find ; and if the explorers were 
sometimes useful to my canoemen, the caaoemen were often useful to the explorers. 

The matter of getting in supplies w^s a very important one. Four of my men devot- 
ed their whole time to it and I seldom saw them. Two of them I did not see from the 
time I left them at Abitibi River until tbey came to me at Missinabie River, and I had 
frequently to send men off the line to meet them and get supplies to keep the line going. 
Routes across the country from one river to another were difficult to find, and long trips 
had often to be made through territory unknown to the white man and seldom travelled 
by Indians. 



1900 



CROWN LA^DS DEPARTMENT. 



57 



The firdt froso was on the 6th of September. Wild fruits were abnndant — straw- 
berries, raspberries, and red and black carrants, cherries, etc. Signs of moose and cari- 
bou and bear were often seen, and beaver, otter, marten, rabbit, mink and muskrat are 
the principal for-beariug animals of the country. Partridges were very plentiful, and 
the rivers contain fish of the usual kind, viz. : pike, pickerel, whitefish and sturgeon 
(below the falls.) 

Specimens of the flora of the country were taken at various parts of the territory 
by Mr. Burrows, and are sent herewith. I regret to say that my aneroid got out of 
order immediately after leaving Toronto, and although sent back to be repaired it never 
reached me, and consequently I have no barometric observations to submit. 

Accompany ing this report I beg to submit : — 

(a) A general map of the base line of 1900. 

(6) A map of the base line of 1899 addinon&l, and meridian line to Dog Lake. 

(c) Field notes of the base line of 1900 and 1899 additional. 

(d) Account for base line of 1900 in triplicate. 

(e) Pay list exploration party, with statements of expenses in triplicate. 
(/) Account for base line of 1899 additional in triplicate. 

I have the honor to be. Sir 

Your obedient servant, 

[Signed] A. Nivbn, 

Ontario Land Surveyor. 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 

NoTB. — There are no barometric observations returned for the reason that the 
aneroid given me went out of order immediately after leaving Toronto. 

Upon getting to North Bay, 1 returned ib to be put in order with instructions to 
give it to Mr. Speight, who was following me a week later. Mr. Speight, however, had 
no opportunity of sending it to me, and conseqaendy I was without it all the season. 

[Signed] A. Nivkn. 



APPENDIX No. 30. 



RONDEAU PROVINCIAL PARK. 

Morpeth, December Slat, 1900. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit this my report for the year 1900, as caietaker 
and ranger of Rondeau Park, 

The year now closed has been a favorable one for the deer and pheasants on the Park. 
There are six red deer in the enclosure and four or five running at large in the bush 

There are 160 Mongolian and English pheasants in the bird enclosure, besides several 
which we let go in the bush, and which come down occasionally to visit their friends in. 
the enclosure. We intend to release quite a number in the spring so that they may breed 
in the bush. We exchanged with the caretaker at the London Insane Asylum three 
Mongolians for two golden pheasants, which we hope will raise some young next season. 

We had forty-one wild turkeys hatched last spring and by the 1st of November only 
nine were left, many of them dying while quite young. The only way wild turkeys can 
be raised here successfully is to have covered enclosures for them such as we have for the 
pheasants. 

The stable we moved from the old Weldon house has been a great convenience to the 
general public who visit the Park, which has become a favorite resort, especially during 
the months of summer. If we had a good large public house built, say seventy feet 
long and thirty feet wide, two stories high, with kitchen, dining-room and restaurant on 
first floor, and about sixteen bedrooms and one large room on second floor, and also a good 
road from town line to the Park, the visiting public would be satisfied. This latter ia a 
real necessity and should be made as soon as possible. 



58 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 

We had a heavy windstorm last July, which blew down a lot of trees, and I think the 
Government acted wisely in selling the down timber at once before it had time to rot or 
become discolored by lying on the gronnd. The yonng red cedars are making a fine show- 
ing in the easterly end where there is not much other timber. The clearings near the 
ranger's house and barns are filling up with young cedars and the grass is getting quite 
thick in the bottom, which makes the easterly end and picnic grounds look beautiful. 

The duck shooting on the waters of the Eau has been on the decline for the last 
three or four years, chiefly owing to the uprooting and destruction of their feeding grounds 
by the German carp. There should be some means devised to have this objectionable fish 
exterminated in the waters of the Eau. 

The black squirrels are very plentiful and play around the house like domestic ani- 
mals. The partridge are also very numerous. 

I have the honor to be, sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

ISAA.C GARDINER, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Ranger. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands. 
Toronto. 



APPENDIX No. 31. 
ALGONQUIN NATIONAL PARK. 

MowAT, P.O., February 7, 1901. 

Sir, — I respectfully beg to hand you statement of work performed by the 
Algonquin Park staff for the year 1900. I am very glad to be able to state that the 
number of trappers who have during the past year trespassed in the Park is much less 
than in the previous year. I had in all four men before me, as follows : January 19th, 
Thomas Archer, trapping, fined $50 and costs; February 15th, Daniel Redner, trapping, 
fined $50 and costs; May 17th, John Francois, attempting to prevent constable from 
taking prisoner, one month imprisonment; August 14th, La Valley, trapping, fined $10. 

Work of the Rangers. 

I am pleased to say my rangers have done very good work and given general satis* 
faction. We have improved the grounds at headquarters a great deal by taking out 
stumps, ploughing and levelling, and have also cleaned the shore of Cache lake in the 
vicinity. The duties of the rangers are many. In addition to patrolling the Park, we 
make our own canoes, sleds, snowshoes, paddles, etc., cut wood for the houses here and- 
keep buildings in repair. During the past year we built three shelter houses, one on 
Misty lake, one on Boundary lake, and one on White Trout lake ; also repaired the 
shelter houses generally where required, and put a floor in the one at Grassy bay. We 
cut out portages across from Cache lake to Boundary lake, and thence on to Ragged lake. 
This is a new route and one that in past years was much used by trappers coming in 
from Halibarton. We cut out the portages on the north end and east side of the Park, 
a great many of which had been filled up by heavy wind storms. We also cleaned out 
Maggie's creek, making the canoe route very much better between Maggie's lake and 
Harry's lake. We made five bark canoes, several pairs of snowshoes, etc. 

Fish and Game. 

Daring the past year we have put in five hundred and thirty-two matured black 
bass procured from the Georgian Bay. These were brought from Parry Sound in a large 
tank car supplied by the Canada Atlantic Railway Company, and scarcely any of the 
fish were lost during transportation. They were placed in the following lakea in about 
equal numbers. Rainy, Bruld, Canoe, Source, and Cache. Of the succes? of this venture 
I can now speak with certaiat7, having taken a large number of young bass during the 
n»st year in minnow traps. These were from the previous year's shipment, and were to 

appearances very fine, healthy fish. 
Respecting pheasants, I regret to say that after experimenting I do not consider these 

(ice birds can be successfully introduced into the Park owing to the long winter and the 



1900] CROWN LAND§ DEPARTMENT. 59, 

great depth of snow, bat I am confident capercailzie coald be bred here and woald succeed, 
being accastomed to the snow and feeding on bads of the pine and birch. I think a 
great effort should be made to introduce this fine bird ; they breed rapidly when confined, 
and could be placed on one of the islands in Cache lake where I am confident they would 
live and from there spread all over the Park. 

I should also like to see the prairie fowl here. I have shot numbers of them along 
the C, P. R. near Sturgeon Falls. I am sure they would succeed here. 

Moose are getting quite numerous. Our tame deer have done well and I find no diffi- 
culty in breeding tHem in confinement. The deer throughout the Park are very plenti- 
ful and exceedingly tame; they can be seen all summer along the lake shores and even 
from the car windows along the railway track. 

I have arranged with Mr. McNab of Fraserville for a pair of cariboo to be delivered 
thii winter. These 1 hope to breed successfully in the Park. I ehould like very much 
to try elk also. 

Beaver are becoming very numerous in all the waters. They are to be found upon 
nearly every lake, creek, river and pond throughout the whole Park. Martin, mink and 
otter are also very numerous. 

Wolves have killed a great many deer of late years. Last year we succeeded in kill- 
ing a number. I adopted the plan of shooting a deer aad poisoning it, a? I found 
they refused other baits; the result is that some packs have been completely destroyed. 
Ranger Sawyer got three wolves at one place all lying dead together. 

Tourists and Visitobs. 

We have had many visitors to the Park during the past year, and from the num- 
erous letters I have already received this year many more will visit the Park. The ques- 
tion of allowing cottages tobe built throughout the Park will doubtless come before the Hon- 
orable CommiHsioner during the present year. It is a very difficult question to deal with, 
as not only the interests of the Paik but the rights of the limit holders have to be consid- 
ered. I am of the opinion that certain localities might be set apart for this purpose where 
the timber has been cut out, such as Oanoe, Source, Joe, and Potter lakes. I do not think 
the limit holders would object to this, and these localities would be quite sufficient for 
some time. I think Cache Lake should be kept as it is, being the P.irk headquarters. 
There are many things to be taken into consideration in this matter, the increased danger 
cf fires being the greatest. A close watch would be necessary and it would require the 
time of a ranger for this alone. 

Lumber Dams, 

It is very much to be regretted that so many of the lakes in the Park are being 
damaged by having the water kept up too long in the spring, thereby killing the timber 
around the lake shores. Dams must be built, it is true, but I think each spring the 
limit holders should be notified as they were last spring, to let off the water as early in 
the teabon as possible. 

We have had very little trouble with fires during the year, and no timber has been 
destroyed. 

My rangers have nearly all suffered with the grippe, some of them being very ill; 
apart from this, they have had a year of steady work. During the trapping season they 
are of coarse out continually. They travel in pairs and have to cover a great deal of 
country often experiencing considerable hardships. We have very little trouble daring 
the deer bunting season, and I do not think there^was any trespass. 

It was reported to the Department that partridges were being shot in the Park and 
shipped to Montreal. This is a mistake ; nothing of the kind has been done. The ran- 
gers have kept a close watch on all shipping points. 

I had ten rangers during the past year, one of whom is stationed at Canoe Lake per- 
manently. The rest have I think very successfully patrolled the Park considering the 
area each man has to cover. 

Your obedient servant, 

G. W. BARTLETT, 
The Hon. E. J. Davis, Superintendent. 

Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
Toronto. 



60 THE REPORT OF T«E ' f No. 3 

APPENDIX No. 32. 
LAND TENURE IN CANADA. 

By R. H. Browne, Archivist op thb Department op Grown Lands. 
A paper read before the Ontario HiBtorical Society, 29th August, 1900, and published at their request. 

On the 12th of January, 1598, the King of France in Letters Patent to the 
Lieutenant General and Governor first introduces the Seigniorial system into Oanada 
and Bays : — 

"In order to increase and extend the good-will, courage and affection of those 
who are about to embark in the said undertaking, and even of those persons who 
shall settle in the said countries, we have given him authority, as respects the said 
lands, to be acquired for us, in the course of the said voyage, to grant the same in 
full property to all tho?e to whom he may concede them, that is to say : to gentlemen 
and thope whom he shall consider persons of merit, in the form of Fiefs, Seignieuries, 
Chattelenies, Earldoms. Viscounties, Baronies and other dignities, to be held of us, in 
such manner as he shall consider due to the services performed by the respective parties, 
on the condition that they shall aid in the support and df fence of the countries ; and 
to other persons of inferior rank, on such dues and annual rents ai he may deem 
just, of which w-^ agree that they shall remain quit and discharged for the first six 
years, or such other period as our said Lieutenant shall believe to be right and 
necessary, excepting always the duty and services in the event of war." 

The next document, conferring additional powers on the Lieutenant General and 
Governor of Canada, is dated the last day of February, 1626, which document gives 
the Viceroy power to fix the " Charges and Conditions " of future grants, or to alter 
them in order the better to insure the colonization, clearing and cultivation of the lands. 

The third document is dated 10th March, 1626, and gives the Viceroy special power 
to make a concession of a grant of land to the Reverend Fathers of the Company of 
Jesus. 

In these three documents we have the commencement of the Feudal History of 
Oanada. 

In 1627-28 a charter was granted to the Company of New France, which con- 
stituted Canada a proprietary Government. This company which is generally known 
bv the title of *' The Hundred Associates " by the Act of Association, granted by the 
Cardinal de Richelieu, Grand Mapter, Chief and Superintendent General of the Navi- 
gation and Commerce of France, dated 29th April, 1627, ratified and confirmed by 
the Arret of the King in Council, and by Letters Patent of the 6th May, 1628, 
authorized to establish Courts of Justice, to distribute the lands to actual settlers on such 
terms as would best promote the settlement of the country, to encourage religious in- 
struction, to promote and encourage immigration, and grants forever the trade of all 
leathers, furs and peltries of New France. By virtue of this grant the " Hundred 
Associates " became proprietors of Canada " for ever in full property, justice and 
Seigniory." The fealty and homage is the Feudal tie which cannot be broken by 
the subject without the consent of the Sovereign. 

The first explorers of Canada, Jacques Cartier, Champlain and others, found these 
lands in all their natural wildness, which therefore constituted a great freehold, belong- 
ing to the Crown of France. The Sovereign alone could impress on them the char- 
acter of Feudality. This is what he did by the grant to the '* Hundred Associates " 
in 1627-28, and this is the justification for saying that this Charter is the origin of 
our Feudal Institutions. 

The alienation of the Fief to the Seigneur by the custom of Paris was orxly 
permissable. The Seigneur was not under any obligation to alienate. The Charter of 
1627-28 made it obligatory. 

Quebec fell into the hands of the British in 1629, and this necessarily suspended the 
operations of the company, but in 1633 the company re-entered into all their rights in 
consequence of the treaty signed at St. Germain-en-Laye on 29th March, 1632. 

The first period of feudal history ends in 1663, when the "Hundred Associates,'^ 
on the 24th February, adopted a resolution that a deed of surrender be given of their 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 61 



charter to the King of France, and this deed was accepted in March, 1664. The Gor- 
ernment of New France now ceased to be a proprietary government and became a royal 
government. An edict of the King of France in 1663 created a Sovereign Oonncil. 

The second period of the feudal history of Canada may be regardeil as dating from 
the re-establishment of the royal government in 1663 to the establishment of the West 
India Company in 1664. 

The third period commences with the West India Company in 1664 and by an edict 
of May of that year another proprietary government was created. This company was 
suppressed by an edict dated December, 1674. 

The fourth period was from the suppression of the West India Company to the pro- 
mulgation of two arrets of Marly on 6th July, 1711. The first arret relates to the 
Seigneur and to his obligation to concede, and prevents him from receiving entrance 
money. The second relates to the Censitaires and to their obligation to hold house and 
home, and to put their lands in a productive state. 

But from the time of the surrender of New France by the West India Company the 
King frequently made grants directly and issued regulations regarding grants already 
made by the companies. He also issued an edict revoking all grants on which settle- 
ment had not been commenced, £uid this was followed in 1672 by another edict, reducing 
all partly settled grants to one-half their original extent. When, in 1674, the Company 
of the West Ind'es gave up its rights, the King then empowered the Governor and 
Intendent to make grants on their responsibility, subject to ratification by the Crown, 
and from this time on grants became numerous. Lands were portioned out under five 
different forms of tenure. 

(1) In Franc Aleu Noble. — This was of all forms the most free and honorable, lands 
held thus being subject to no obligations of a feudal nature. One of these grants was a 
strip of land near Three Rivers to the Jesuits in the year 1634. Another was a grant 
to the same order, of Charlebourg, near Quebec, in 1637. 

(2) In Franc Aleu Rotourier. — This form was very similar to our free and common 
soccage. Land thus held was free and subject to no obligations other than the general 
ones to which its holder was liable as a citizen of France. The grant of Gaudarville to 
Lauzon in 1652 was under this form. 

(3) In Franc Aumone (or mortmain). — Numerous grants were made under this 
form, invariably to religious, charitable or educational institutions, the sole obligation 
attached to the grant being that of performing certain charitable or educational duties in 
return. An instance of this is the grant in 1647 of La Prairie de la Madelaine to the 
Jesuits, "in ordt r that we may be participating in their prayers and holy sacrifices." 

(4) En Fie/ or en Seigneurie. — It was under this form that most of the territory was 
granted. As to size, there was no fixed rule — the grants varied from 16 arpents by 50 
(arpent = 192 ft.) to 10 leagues by 12. All grants or fiefs or seigneuries entailed certain 
obligations to the Crown, the principal of which were : 

To render faith and homage to the Grown or other feudal superior whenever the 
seigniory changed hands, or in the case of siegniories held by corporations, after long 
stated intervals. Parkman gives an instance of the rendering of faith and homage, one 
under the old regime, as follows : — " That of Jean Guion, vassal of Giftord, seignior of 
Beauport. The act accounts how, in the presence of a notary, Guion presented himself 
at th« principal door of the Manor House at Beauport ; how, having knocked, one BouUe, 
a farmer, of Giffard, opened the door, and in reply to Gouin's question if the seigneur was 
at home, said that he was not, but that he, Boulle, was empowered to receive acknowl- 
edgments of faith and homage from the vassals in his name •• after the which reply," 
proceeds the act, " the said Gouin being at the principal door, placed himself on his 
knees on the ground, with head bare, and without sword or spurs, said three times these 
words : * Monsieur de Beauport, Monsieur de Beauport, Monsieur de Beauport, I bring 
you the faith and homage which I am bound to bring you on account of my fief du Bois- 
son, which I hold as a man of faith, of your seigneurie of Beauport, declaring that I offer 
to pay my seigniorial and feudal dues in their season, and demanding of you to accept 
me in faith and homage as aforesaid.' " The other case occurred a year after the army 
of Wolfe entered Quebec. •' Philip Noel had lately died, and Jean Noel, his son, inherited 
his seigniory of Tilly and Bonsecours. To make the title good, faith and homage must 
be renewed and Jean Noel was under the bitter necessity of rendering this duty to Gen- 



62 THE REPORT OF THE No. 9 



eral Murray, Governor fir ilie King of Grent Biitain. Noel r» pairs to G)vtrnment 
House at Quebec and knocks at the door; a servant opens it. Noel asks if the Gover- 
nor is there ; the servant replies that he is. Murray, informed of the visitor's object^ 
comes to the door, and Noel then and there, *' without sword or spurs, with bare head 
and one knee on the ground, repeats the acknowledgments of faith and homage for his 
seigneurie. He was compelled, however, to add a detested innovation, the oath of fidelity 
to His Britannic Majesty, coupled with a pledge to keep his vassals in obedience to the 
new sovereign." 

The seignior was also subject to a mutation fine known as the quint. This was the 
sole pecuniary tribute payable by the seigniors to the Grown on all grants made under 
the Couiume de Paris. It amounted to one-fifth of the value of the fief and became pay- 
able on every mutation of ownership by sale or by inheritance other than in direct suc- 
cession. 

The seignior was also under obligation to make, within forty days from the date of 
his grant, an aveu et denombryment, consisting of a declaration, duly drawn up and at- 
tested before a notary public, in the presence of witnesses, setting forth the extent and 
character of his grant, the privileges he possessed, and various other particulars. He was 
also subject to the Jeu de fief, or obligation to sub-infeudate his lands. The question as 
to whether this was a general obligation has been the subject of much dispute, and space 
will not permit of going into details. 

In addition to these four principal obligations, various others were frequently in- 
serted, such as the reservation of oak timber for His Majesty's navy, the disclosure of 
mines and minerals, and the reservation of whatever lands within the seigniory should 
be at any time subsequently found necessary for fortifications or other military purposes. 

(5) This form of tenure was that under which was held the sub-grants made by 
the Seigniors. These might be made (a) En urriere fief, in which case the sub-grantee 
received the same rights and incurred the same obligations with regard to his grants 
as the dominant Seignior had heretofore enjoyr d. Sub-grants under this form were not 
common. (6) En censive, in which case the grantee could not in turn sub-infeudate. 
Some encensive grants were made by the Crown direct, but only under exceptional 
circumstances, as in the case of a few concessions near Detroit where the original 
Seigniorial tub grants were declared invalid and new titles issued direct from the 
Crown. (A list of these grants made by the Crown near Detroit en censive is given on 
page 8 ) (c) En roture, a tenure similar to en censive, but with rules slightly difierent 
as regarded the descent of the land in the case of intestate succession. 

The rights of the Seignior over his grants, en censive or en roture, may be classed 
under three main heads : 

(1) The cens et rentes. — A ground rent composed of two parts, the cens payable 
in money, the rentes payable usually in kind. The cens is generally looked upon as 
having been a merely nominal due imposed solely in recognition of the Seignior's 
iuperiority, and valuable mainly as establishing his claim to other and more important 
rights. It amounted generally to one or two sols per superficial arpent, hut dififered in 
various Seigniories, and even in different parts of the same Seigniory. The rentes, on 
the other hand, was supposed to be a return for Seigniorial superintendencp. It con- 
sisted generally of one-half minot of com or one fat capon for each superficial arpent, 
but these might be commuted for cash at the current rate, which varied from ten to 
twenty sols. The habitant held by the inferior tenure, en censive, which consisted in the 
obligation to make annual payments in money or produce, or both. These payments 
were known as cens et rentes, and in the early days were very small, a common charge 
being half a sou and half a pint of wheat for each arpent. One condition was imposed 
on Seignior and Censitaire alike, which may be said to form the distinctive feature of 
Canadian feudalism, namely, that of clearing his land within a limited time on pain of 
forfeiting it. 

(2) The lods et ventes. This due was a direct descendant of the old feudal inci- 
dent known as " Fine on alienation." The land of the Censitaire passed free to his 
heirs ; but if he sold it, a twelfth part must be paid to the Seignior. Supplementary 
to this right, the Seignior enjoyed the droit de retraite, in virtue of which, he could pre- 
empt any property sold, by payment to the purchaser of the mutation price within forty 
days from the date of sale. The object of this was to afford the Seignior protection 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEP/ RTMENT. 63 



Bgaiukt V»iug (Ufiaad'd out (f hia propei lods et veriteK through the balj, hy Censilaires, 
of their lands for less than the proper price. There was also a variety of obligations on 
the Cenaitaire, partly imposed by custom and partly by agreement when the grant was 
first made. 

(3) A third Seigniorial right was that known as the banalite, or the droit de 
banal, which consisted of the obligation of the Censitaire of having his wheat ground 
at the Seignior's mill. There wa? also another species of banal right known as 
fours banal, comprising the right of the Seignior to build a Seigniorial oven and 
the obligation of the Censitaires to have their bread baked therein. 

(4) The corvee, which was the right of the Seignior to compel the performance by 
the Censitaire of a certain amount of labor upon the Seigniorial domain without com- 
pensation. 

There was also the right to reserve wood and stone necessary for building the 
Seignioral manor, mill or church ; the right of cJbdsse, i e., of hunting, on the Censitaire's 
lands, and the right of peche or to one fish in every eleven caught by the Censitaire in 
the waters fronting the Seigniory. This last was often commuted by payment of a cer- 
tain quantity of fish for the whole year. The right of ferry over rivers was also con- 
sidered as appertaining to the Seignior. 

Parkman gives us this picture of Canada in 1663. He says : " The head of the 
colony, that is to say, the Island of Montreal and the borders of the Richelieu, was the 
seat of a peculiar colonization, the chief object of which was to protect the rest of Canada 
against Iroquois incursion". The lands along the Richelieu, from its mouth to a point 
above Ohambly, were divided in large Seigniorial grants among several officers of the 
regiment of Oarignan, who in their turn granted out the land to the soldiers reserving a 
sufficient portion as their own. The officer thus became a kind of feudal chief, and the 
whole settlement a permanent military cantonment admirably suited to the object in 
view. The disbanded soldier was practically a soldier still, but he was also a farmer and 
landholder. The soldiers were maintained by the King while clearing the land and 
building their houses and thus lodged himself, he was required to aid in clearing the lands 
of those who came after him. The settlements formed long, thin lines on the edges of 
the rivers and with the exception of three villages in the neighborhood of Quebec, one 
could have seen nearly every house in Canada by paddling up the St. Lawrence and 
Richelieu." 

Even in this abbreviated sketch of Canadian feudal tenure I do not think i can 
afibrd to leave out the remarks of Mr. Bouchette, late Surveyor-Greneral for Lower 
Canada, than whom no one is better able to give an opinion that coincided with the views 
of his fellow countrymen. He says : 

" When Canada was first established as a colony of France, the feudal system still 
prevailed in Europe ; and, as might be expected, its spirit as well as its practice was at 
once transferred to those distant possessions, and the land therein universally granted 
under the feudal tenure. However a variety of modifications were from time to time 
introduced in the feudal code, that tended to abridge the exorbitant privileges of the 
seigneur and to add to the independence of the vassal. These modifications combined 
with the tacit relinquishment of several rights, have given to the feudal tenure in Lower 
Canada peculiarities that belong to itself and which seem singularly well adapted to the 
local circumstances of the country. 

" The remarkable delicacy of the Imperial Government on this subject is an instance 
of the magnanimity of a conqueror that cannot fail to add lustre to the British name, 
while its recollection must tend to draw the link still closer between the Mother country 
and the colony. 

" That it was intended to leave the inhabitants in the ample enjoyment of their 
ancient usages, religiously to respect and protect their laws and institutions, and in fur- 
therance of this intention to propogate the original tenure of the Province, is evident 
from the instructions to Guy Carleton, Governor of the colony, in 1775," which state ' it 
is therefore our will and pleasure, that all lands which now are or hereafter may be sub- 
ject to our disposal, be granted in fief or seigneurie, in like manner as was practiced ante- 
cedent to the conquest of the said province, omitting, however, the reservation of any 
judicial powers or privileges whatever, the properties of which seigneuries or fiefs shall 
be and remain vested in us, our heirs and successors.' " 



64 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 



In regard to the judicial powers referred to above, the aeigneura by the old laws 
were entitled to constitute Courts and preside as judges therein in what was denominated 
Havte, Moyenne et Basse Justice, which took cognizjnce of all crimes committed within 
their jurisdiction, except murder and treason. 

The Royal proclamation of 1763 empowerea the Governors of the several Provinces 
in North America to grant to reduced officers who had served in North America daring 
the late war and were actually residing there and applied personally for the same, the 
following quantities of land : 

To every person having the rank of a field officer, . . . 5,000 acres. 

•• captain 3,000 " 

" subaltern or stafi officer 2,000 " 

" non-commissioned officer 200 " 

" private man 50 *' 

The like quantities under the same conditions were to be granted to such reduced 
officers of the navy of like rank who served in the ships of war in North America at the 
time of the reduction of Louisburg and Quebec. " The said lands to be held under us our 
heirs and successors, seigneurs of the seigneurie or fiefs in which the same shall be situated 
upon the same terms, acknowledgments and services as lands are held in our Province 
under the respective seigneurs holding and possessing seigneuries and fiefs therein, and 
reserving to us our heirs and successors, from and after the expiration of ten years from 
the admission of the respective tenants, a quit rent of one half-penny per acre." This 
proclamation also strictly enjoins and requires that no private person do presume to make 
any purchase from the Indians of the lands reserved to them, and any squatters on Indian 
lands were to forthwith remove themselves, . 

"By 31st George III. cap. 31, commonly called in Canada, The Constitutional Act,'' 
says Bouchette, " the Province of Qusbec was divided into Upper and Lower Canada, 
evidently with a view of dividing the feudal from the soccage lands of the country. 

" Notwithstanding these repeated and powerful manifestations of the desire of the 
Crown to perpetuate the tenure of fief and seigniory in Lower Canada, no fresh grants in 
fief were made after the conquest, if we except those of Shoolbred and Murray Biy, and 
the whole of the lands of the Colony not previously granted under the feudal system, are 
now (1832) considered as soccage lands, and are almost wholly laid out in townships. The 
tenanciers, censitaires or holders of lands en roture, are subject to some particular condi- 
tions, but they are not at all burthensome ; for instance, they pay a small annual rent, 
usually between 2s. 6i. and 5s. for each arpent the farms have in front (though in many 
seigneuries the rents of new concessions have been considerably increased) ; to this is 
added some article of provision, such as a couple of fowls, or a goose, or a bushel of wheat, 
or 'something else of domestic consumption. They are bound to grind their corn at the 
moulin banal, or the lord's mill, when one fourteenth part of it is taken for his use as 
mouture, or payment for grinding ; to repair the highways and by-roads passing through 
their landq, and to make new ones which, when opened, must be surveyed and approved 
by the Grand Voyer (roadm aster) of the district and established by proces verbal. All the 
fisheries within a seigniory contribute to increase the proprietor's revenue, a? he receives 
a tithe of all the fish caught or an equivalent sum. Besides these rights he is privileged 
to fell timber anywhere within his seigniory for erecting mills, repairing roads or con- 
structing new ones or other works of public or general utility. Lands held by Roman 
Catholics under any of the aforementioned tenures are further subject to the payment to 
their curates of one twenty-sixth part of all grain produced upon them, and to occasional 
assessments (or building and repairing churches, parsonage houses or other works belonging 
to the Church. 

•* It may be thought from the foregoing enumeration of the obligations of the feudal 
tenant or censitaire, that his condition is by no means so happy as to render a propagation 
of the seigniorial tenure very desirable ; but however these obligations may, in theory, 
appear numerous or oppressive, they are not ab all considered so in practice, and the hab- 
itant of the country would not willingly forego his present modified vassalage, if indeed 
the independent condition of the Canadian censitaire can be so called, for the most absolute 
freehold. In looking a little further into the comparative advantages of both systems of 
tenure, at least as regards the early settlements of a sountry, it will perhaps be found that- 
the feudal system is the best calculated to aid and promote the first steps of colonization, 



1900] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 65 



from the circnmstance of its reqairicg less capital, and of its concentrating the energies of 
anew settlement in such a way as to enable the settlers mutually to assist one another- 
whilst, superadded to these advantages, they collectively enjoy the countenance and pro, 
tection of the seigneur, who is himself interested in the prosperity of a rising colony that 
is to give value to his property. The conditions ot the title are such as to forward the 
settlement of the country, from their being imperative upon the censiiaire to cultivate 
and reside on the land tenir feu et lieu — within a year and day from the date of the 
concession. The sdgneur cannot dispose by sale of forest lands, but is bound to concede 
them, and upon bis refusal to do so, the applicant may obtain from the Crown che con- 
cession he n quires, under the usual seigniorial stipulations, in which case the rents and 
dres appertain to the King We are not aware, however, of any recorded instance of 
this having taken place in the colony. 

" The total quantity of land granted en seigeurie in the Province exceeds twelve 
million superficial French arpents, or about 15,390 square miles. That laid oat in 
townships amounts to 6,300,000 acres. 

" The inhabitants of the townships were embarrassed by the particular mode in which 
soccage lands were originally distributed, every 2nd and 3rd lot alternately being reserved 
for the Crown and the Protestant clergy, whereby one-seventh of the whole township 
remained appropriated by law for the future disposition of His Majesty's Government 
and one-seventh for the support and maintenance of the Church of England in the 
Province. A change, however, took place under the administration of the Earl of 
Dalhousie, the chequered system having in numerous cases been superseded by the plan 
of blocking the reserves. 

" Another drawback to the settler was the granting of extensive tracts to leaders 
and their associates (the term leader applies to the person who made the applica- 
tion and paid all the fees). By the Royal Instructions of 1796 each leader had a 
right to make application and obtain for himself and 39 associates 1200 acres of 
land each, but in consideration of the expenses he was obliged to incur, a bond was 
generally entered into between the leader and the associates, by which the latter 
bound himself to convey to the former 1,000 acres out of his 1,200. These 
tracts were granted under conditions that were never fulfilled by the grantees, who have, 
nevertheless, by themselves or their representatives, continued the proprietors of the soil, 
which is left uncultivated. However, having a due regard to the settlement of the Pro- 
vince a Court of Escheats was provided by 6 George IV., cap. 59, which authorized 
the appointment of one or more Commissions of Escheats and forfeitures of land within 
the Province. These commissioners are empowered to enquire , into the liability of lands 
to escheat by reason of the non-performance of the conditions of settlement and the 
verdict of a jury of 12 men is to be obtained of the fact, whereupon the forfeited lands 
become re- vested in His Majesty, but it is provided that the lands so forfeited shall not 
be re-granted till after the expiration of one year from the date of their escheat, except- 
ing to the person or persons holding or claiming the same under the former letters patent 
thereof, or by a lawful title derived from the same." 

The Statute last quoted is not confined to the creation of a tribunal of escheats as 
its title shows. " An Act to provide for the extinction of Feudal and Seigniorial rights 
and burthens on lands held, a litre de fie/ and a litre de cens in the Province of Lower 
Canada, and for the gradual conversion of those tenures into the tenure of free and com- 
mon soccage, and for other purposes relating to the said Province." 

Bouchette remarks : "It is obviously intended to effect one way what the Con- 
stitutional Act was meant to accomplish another, that is, the extinction of repugnant 
tenures; with this difference, however, thafc the 31st George III., cap. 31, tended to 
leave to Lower Canada its ancient tenures, whilst the Canada Tenures Bill aims at 
the conversion of the Seigniories into soccage lands. That it is extremely desirable 
to do away with the existing dist notion of tenures in the Province, no one can doubt 
who is aware of the perplexity it produces, from the total disparity of the laws by which 
the different tenures are respectively governed, but strongly attached as it is well known 
the Canadians are to the feudal system, it is not probable that the seignorial will yield 
to the soccage tenure, nor have the seigniors of the country hitherto manifested the 
least desire of surrendering their present privileges to avail themselves of the latitude 
given them by the Act in question, of commuting the burthens which they themselves 
5 C.L. 



66 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. » 



bear as the direct grantees of the Orown. Since the promulgation of the law in 1825 
two instances only of applications having been made, under the sanction of that Act, are 
recorded, viz., one by the Seignior of St. Anne la Pocadiere, for the conversion into free 
and common soccage of one of the unsettled augmentations of his Seignory, and another 
by the Seignior of Groc dines for a part of his fief. Indeed we have reason to think that 
applications of that description will be of rare occurrence hereafter and that the end for 
which the statute was passed will, in consequence, be frustrated. When we reflect that 
a conversion of tenure carries with it a conversion of law, that the effect of a man's 
holding a farm in soccage instead of en roture, is to alter the rule of descent by inherit- 
ance, to change the whole body of the law applicable to real property and thus to intro- 
duce objects totally strange and novel to the Censitaire ; it is not suprising that 
insuperable obstacles should bar the success of any efl'ort to prevail on the Canadian 
agriculturalist to forsake his old tenure and relinquish those laws and usages to which he 
is from long familiarity so inveterately attached." 

The conversion of these tenures into free and common soccage was accomplished by 
Act of the Parliament of Canada in 1854 and cost the country upwards of four million 
dollars. 

In addition to Parkman and Bouchette I have to acknowledge my indebtedness 
to Mr. Wm. Bennett Munro from whose paper "^The Feudal System of Canada" I have 
taken much information. 

UPPER CANADA. 

Leaving Lower Canada and turning to our own province it might be well to make 
the charter to the Hudson's Bay Co. the starting point, as part of this province was in- 
cluded in the original grant to that company. 

In the year 1670, Charles II, as a suitable encouragement, granted a royal charter 
to ** The Governor and Company of Adventurers of England trading into Hudson's Bay,'* 
making thorn a body corporate for ever, upon their petition, setting forth that they had, 
at their own proper costs and charges made an expedition to discover a new passage into 
the South Sea, and for finding some trade of furs, mines and other comommodities ; and 
gave them the sole property of all the lands they should discover, together with the ex- 
clusive trade to all the countries within Hudson's Straits, not in possession of any of His 
subjects, or of any other Christian power, with the royalties of mines, minerals, gems and 
royal fish, to enable them to find out the passage, extend the trade, and to plant the coun- 
tries they should discover, paying two elks and two black beavers, whenever and as often 
as His Majesty, His heirs and successors should enter their territories ; granting to them 
the greatest privileges as Lords proprietors, saving only their faith and allegiance to the 
Orown of Great Britain. 

In 1821 they were granted the exclusive trade with the Indians for 21 years. This 
grant was surrendered in 1838 and a new one issued for a further term of 21 years. In 
1868 the charter was surrendered to the Dominion of Canada for the sum of £300,000. 

Amongst the records of the Department of Oronrn Lands I find only one statement 
of grants made under the French regime in that part of Quebec west of what now con- 
stitutes the western boundary of the Province. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DhPAKT:MENT. 



Statement of Lands en roture, granted in perpetuity, sitnated at Fort Fonchartrain at 
the narrows of Lake Erie (au detroit du Lac Erie). 

Extract from the Registers of Intendance and Superior Council. 



By whom the 

grants were 

made. 



By Beauharnois 
& Hocquart. . . 



Lafoncaire & 
Bigot 



Beauharnois & 
Hocquart . 

Lafoncaire & 
Bigot 



Duquesne & 
Bjgot 



Names of the Grantees. 



Chauvin 

Pierre Estave dit Le Jeune . . . 

Binault 

Louis Campault : . 

Marsil Derochers, Pere 

Jean Chapoton 

Pierre Maloche 

Jo. Gilbert, Sanspear , 

Jacques Campanlt 

Moraad 

Labutte 

La Deronte ... 

Chesne 

St. Aubin, Pere 

St. Aubin, Fils 

Fran. Lauson '. 

Chas. Bonhomme dit Beanpre 

Jacques Cardinal, Pere 

Jacques Cardinal, Fils 

Philippe Daniau 

Joseph du Tremble 

Frans Gilbert t^anspeor 

Claude Campault 

Pierre Cosme 

Pierre Laurent 

Gaetan Saguin 

Pierre Saguin 

Gabl. Casse St. Aubin* , 

Jacques Casse St. Aubin .... 

Etienne Saffard . , 

Hebert Hebert , 

Jean Bapt. Mailer 

Jean Chapoton , 

Jean Bapt. Beaubien 

Robert Navarre , 

Eustache Gamelin 

Le Chevr. de Longueuil 

Pierre Reaume 

Joseph Gillet 

Marie Barrois , 

Alexis Delisle 

Charles Chesne 

Claude Audry ^. . . 

Zacharie Chicot *. . . 

Hyacinthe Reaume 

Claude L'esprit dit Chamagne 

Antoine Robert 

Antoine Campault 

Pierre Labadie . 

Alexis Chesne 

Vital Caron .... 

Pierre Fenville 

Francois Barrois 

Desbuttes St. Martin 

Jacques Godet , 

Dequindre 



Dates. 



Of grants. Of confirmation , 



3 July, 




4 " 


." . . 


5 " 


" . , 


6 " 


ti 


7 " 


" . . 


8 •' 


•• . . 


9 " 


'♦ 


10 '• 


•• . . 


11 •• 


" .. 


12 " 


It 


13 '• 


" . . 


14 •• 


K 


15 " 


'• 


16 " 


" . . 


17 ••• 


" .. 


ISept, 


1736.. 


2 " 


" . . 


3 •• 


" . . 


4 '• 


" . . 


5 " 


11 


6 " 


i< 


7 " 


" . . 


8 " 


<< 


9 " 


" .. 


10 " 


" . . 


11 " 


<i 


12 " 


<( 


13 " 


" .. 


14 " 


<( 


15 " 


it 


16 " 


•♦ . . 


18 Feby. 


,1743.. 


30 May, 


1745.. 


1 " 


1747.. 


1 " 


<< 


1 April, 


1750.. 


1 " 




1 " 


(( 



IMay, 1747. 

1 April, 1750 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " " " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 << << 

1 " 

1 " 

1 " 

1 '• 

1 •• 

16 May, 1753. 



Extent of the grants. 



28 Feby, 1735 



16 April, 1737 



Front. 



Arpents. 
2 
2 
2 
5 
4 
3 

1* 

4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 

12 

2 

2 



68 THE REPORT OF THE [ SSo. 'd 



Oharoeb In Connection With the Concessions. 

A. To bring their grain to and have it ground at the public mill, when there is one 
erected, nnder pain of confiscation of the grain and arbitrary fines. 

Clauses, Conditions of Said Concession. 

B. To keep house and home thereon within one year, or at the most two years from 
the date of such concession, under pain of re- annexing the said concession to His Majesty's 
Domain, 

Bb. To clear or cause to be cleared the neighouring untilled land whenever it may 
be required, and to cultivate their land. 

Bbb. To leave the necessary roads for the public use, and they shall make the fences 
dividing the properties as the same may be regulated and ordered. 

Bbbb. And to cause the said concession to be laid out, measured and bounded in its 
whole width and depth, at their own expense. 

Pursuant to paragraph B., Bb., Bbb., Bbbb. — Idem as regards concessions — quisquis* 

The King's Rights and Reserves. 

C. To pay each year on the Festival of St. Martin, to the Receiver of His Majesty's 
Domain, or to his clerk, one half penny cense for each arpent in front, and twenty half 
pennies rent for each twenty arpents in superficies, moreover a half bushel of wheat for 
each of these arpents in front, the said cense bearing interest of lods et ventes of faults 
and fines, with all the Seignorial rights, when it shall so happen, according to the Oou- 
tume de la Prevotd et Vicomid de Paris. 

Cc. His Majesty reserves for himself the right to take from the said concessions all 
the timber required for the construction of forts, churches, parsonages and other build- 
ings which he may hereafter establish, also the ownership of the mines, mining places or 
minerals, if any there be throughout the extent of the said concessions. 

Ccc. To preserve all the oak and other wood suitable for the construction of His 
Majesty's vessels are the rights of exchange of estates against estates, established by an 
edict of the King, dated 20th March, 1673, of which particular Seigneurs have not the 
right to enjoy without requesting the same from His Majesty. 

Pursuant to C, Cc, Ccc, for the concessions. 

Next in order come the Indian lands with the deeds of surrender. This opens up a 
very large subject. Deeds innumerable were made by the Indians to the Crown, as well 
as to private individuals, the latter being subject to ratification by the Crown. The 
cessions were of two kinds, they were either for a specified sum or the lands were sur- 
rendered by the Indians to be sold for their benefit. 

The royal proclamation of 1763, which I have already quoted to show the quantities 
of land to be granted to reduced officers, also gives fall power to the Governor and Coun- 
cil " to agree with the inhabitants of the colony or any other person who shall resort 
thereto for any lands as are now or hereafter shall be in our power to dispose of, and to 
grant them to any such persons upon such terms, and under such moderate quit rents 
as have been appointed in other colonies." No warrant for survey was to issue and no 
patent to be granted for any lands which had not been ceded or purchased, which lands 
are reserved for the Indians. 

The Quebec Act of 1774 states that all the territories, islands and countries in North 
America, bounded on the south by the Bay of Chaleur belonging to Great Britain, with 
the exception of that part granted to the Hudson Bay Company shall be called the 
Province of Quebec, thus taking in the whole of Upper Canada. Section 3 provides 
that nothing in this Act shall be construed to alter or vary any right, title, etc., of or 
to any grant, conveyance or otherwise c£ or to any lands within the Province. Section 
8 provides that His Majesty's Canadian subjects (religious orders excepted) may hold 
all their possessions, together with all customs and usages relative thereto. 

• The word quifquis is the first word of a paragraph in Latin inserted in many documents concerning 
concessions and represents the foJlcwing : " iSeigniors who have held a limited territory from early times 
" possess alec direct sovereignty and jnriediction." 



1900 J CROWN LANDS D'EPARTMENT. 69 



Under this Act it was provided that the clergy of the Church of Rome should be 
entitled to all their accustomed dues, with respect to such persons only as professed 
that religion, and out of the rest of the accustomed dues ib should be lawful for His 
Majesty to make provision for the support of a Protestant clergy. It was evidently 
contemplated by the framers of that Act that the Protestant clergy should be sup- 
ported by tithes, and it was long held and probably correctly, that tithes might have 
been levied in Upper Canada. No attempt to do so was ever made, but it was deemed 
advisable to pass a declaratory Act in 1823 by the Legislature of Upper Canada, as 
follows : — 

" Whereas notwithstanding His Majesty has been graciously pleased to reserve for 
the support of a Protestant clergy in this Province one-seventh of all lands granted 
therein, doubts have been suggested that the tithe of the produce of land might still 
be legally demanded by the incumbent duly instituted, or rector of any parish ; which 
doubt it is important to the well doing of this colony to remove : Be it enacted by the 
King's Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative 
Council and Assembly of the Province of Upper Canada constituted and assembled by 
virtue of and under the authority of an Act passed in the Parliament of Great Britain, 
entitled ' An Act to repeal certain parts of an Act passed in the 14th year of His 
Majesty's reign entitled " An Act for making more e^ectual provision for the govern- 
ment of the Province of Quebec in North America, and to make further provision for the 
government of the said Province," and by the authority of the same that no tithes shall 
be claimed, demanded, or received by any ecclesiastical parson, rector or vicar of the 
Protestant church within this province, any law, custom or usuage to the contrary 
notwithstanding." 

We have already seen that the first instructions to Governor Guy Carleton in 1775 
authorized the land to be granted in jief or seigniory in like manner as was practised 
antecedent to the conquest. In 1786 the instructions to the same Governor were still 
more definite and stated that the lands granted to the settlers, who were really the 
officers, non commissioned officers and men of the forces, be divided into distinct seigni- 
ories or fiefs to extend from two to four leagues in front and from three to five in depth, 
if situated on a navigable river, otherwise to be run square. 

Upon raising the 84th Regiment its members were promised that when reduced they 
should receive grants of land according to their rank, the same as laid down in the Royal 
proclamation of 1763. The grants, therefore, to this regiment were larger than those 
allowed to other Provincial troops, and this was the cause of much discontent. Many 
petitions were forwarded to the Governor to have other regiments placed on the same 
footing. 

The King's instructions of 1783 directed allotments of land to be made to Loyalists 
and to fuch officers of the Provincial troops and to such non-commissioned officers and 
privates of the King's forces in general as might be reduced in the Province of Qaebec, 
and should be willing immediately to settle upon and improve the said lands, in the fol- 
lowing proportions : 

Every Field Officer 1,000 acres. 

Every Captain 700 " 

Every Subaltern, StaflF or Warrant Officer 500 " 

Every Non-Commissioned Officer 200 " 

Every Private Man 100 '« 

Every Loyalist, being the master of a family, 100 acres, exclusive of 50 acres for 
each person of which the family of such officer, non-commissioned officer, private or 
Loyalist should consist, and fifty acres for every single Loyalist. 

Any members of the corps known and distinguished by the name of the Corps of 
Associated Loyalists as might take refuge in the Province of Qaebec were entitled to the 
same allotments. U. E. Loyalists were to receive their grants free of all expense. 

In 1785 a petition was forwarded to the King entitled '* The Petition of Sir John 
Johnson and others on behalf of the Loyalists settled in Canada," asking to have their 
lands granted them in Free and Common Soccage. 

On the 4th June, 1787, the following instructions were issued to the Deputy Sur- 
veyor General by Lord Dorchester : 



70 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 3 

" For the encouragement of smch settlers, who besides supporting their former char- 
acters for loyalty to the King and attachment to the British Government, and a peaceable 
decent deportment have, by their industry, in improving and cultivating the lands 
already assigned them, given cause to presume that they will be good and profitable sub- 
jects, you are to add to every head of a family of that description two hundred acres, ex- 
clusive of what is allowed to the other members of it severally by the Royal instructions." 

On the 24th July, 1788, Lord Dorchester by proclamation set apart five new 
districts, viz., Gaspe, Lunenburg, Mecklenburg, Nassau, and Hesse. This arrangement 
was altered after the separation of Upper and Lower Canada, when Lunenbprg became 
the Eastern District, Mecklenburg the Midland, Nassau the Home, and Hesse the West- 
em District. 

By rules and regulations for the conduct of the Land Office Department, issued from 
the Council Chamber, Qaebec, 7th February, 1789, the Land Baards were appointed 
or were authorized to be appointed by the Governor, for the more easy accommodation of 
persons desirous of forming immediate settlements on the waste lands of the Crown. 
These Boards were empowered to receive applications until 1st May, 1791, only, unless 
continu'd by a new appointment. They were to hold stated and periodical meetings, 
made publicly known, to give free and easy access to petitioners and to examine into 
their loyalty, character and pretensions, and to take sufficient and satisfactory proofs by 
affidavit, deposition or otherwise. 

The safety and propriety of admitting the petitioner to become an inhabitant of this 
Province, being well ascertained to the satisfaction of the Board, they were to administer 
to every such person the oaths of fidelity and allegiance directed by law, after which the 
Board was to give every such petitioner a certificate to the Surveyor-General or any per- 
son authorized to act as an agent or Deputy Surveyor for the district, expressing the 
ground of the petitioner's admission ; and such agent was, within two days after the pre- 
sentment of the certificate to assign the petitioner a single lot of about 200 acres, but the 
said certificate was to have no effect if the petitioner should not enter upon the location, 
and begin the improvements and cultivation thereof within one year from the date of 
such assignment, or if the petitioner should have had lands assigned to him before that 
time in any other part of the Province. 

The Surveyor-General was to confine himself in the locations to be made by him to 
such lands only as were fit for common husbandry, to prevent individuals from monopo- 
lizing such spots as contained mines, minerals, fossils and conveniences for mills and • 
other singular advantages of a common and public nature, and he wa3 to reserve all such 
spots, together with all such as might be fit and useful for ports and harbors or works of 
defence, or such as contained valuable timber for shipbuilding or other purposes, conveni- 
ently situated for water carriage, in the hands of the Crown. A speciil Order-in-Oouncil 
was declared necessary to pledge the faith of the Government for granting any such spots 
as were reserved. 

The dimensions of every inland township were to be ten miles square, and such as 
were situated on a navigable river or water should have a front of nine miles and twelve 
miles in depth. 

The town plot in every township was to be one mile square, in an inland tow^nship it 
should be situated in the centre, and in a township upon a navigable river or water, it 
was to be in the centre of the front bordering upon the river or water. Every town lot 
was to contain 1 swre more or less; ev'ery town park lot was to contain 24 acres more or 
less, and every farm lot 200 acres more or less. There was to be a public square or a 
parade in the centre of the town containing 4 acres more or less, and four more public 
squares or parades of the like extent at equal and convenient distances from the centre. 
A square of 4 acres, more or less, was also to be reserved on each side of the centre 
square for places of Divine worship. A square of 4 acres more or less was to be reserved 
at each of the four corners of the town plot for a common burying ground, hospital, etc. 
Four squares of 4 acres each more or less were to be reserved for a market place at the 
four extremities of the town in a line with and at equal distances from the four corners. 
The eight principal streets leading from the centre square were to be 96 feet wide, all the 
other streets 60 feet wide. All the squares were to be open at the angles or corners. 
The area of half a mile more or less in depth surrounding the town was to be reserved 
for works of defence, if necessary, or such other disposition as might be thought proper 



19001 CROWN LANDS 1>EPARTMENT. 71 



at a future period. One town park was to be reserved for a minister and one for a school- 
master, adjoining each other. Two farm lots were to be reserved for a minister and one 
for a achool-master. In each of the four corners of every inland township 8 farm lots 
adjoining each other were to be reserved in the hands of the Crown. 

In each of the foar corners of every township situated upon a navigable river or 
water, 10 farm lots adjoining each other were to be reserved in the hands of the Crown. 

The roads in every township were to be 60 feet wide, and all roads and streets were 
to intersect each other at right angles. 

The Boards were to observe the following order in providing spaces for the general 
convenience of the townships : 

1. One or more place or places for the public worship of God. 

2. A common burying ground. 

3. One parsonage house. 

4. A common school house. 

6. A town park for one minister. 

€. A town park for one schoolmsister, common to the town. 

7. A glebe for one minister. 

8. A glebe for one schoolmaster, common to the town. 

9. The court or town house. 

10. The prison. 

11. The poor or workhouse. 

12. A market place. 

The Board was not to give certificates for more than one town lot of one acre, or 
one town and one town park of 24 acres together to the same person (being the head of 
a family), and this only on condition of his building a dwelling-house on such town lot 
and occupying the same within a year, and in case of competition to give the preference 
to the party for whose trade and occupation, the lots, on account of the situation near 
the water, might be best calculated, and to such sober and industrious mechanics whose 
trades were most necessary to the township in general. Town parks were not to be 
granted separately from town lots. 

The following is an extract from a letter of the Land Board of the Midland Dis- 
trict, dated 7ch November, 1792 : 

" The lands in Upper Oanad-i were originally distributed under the idea that they 
were to be held subject to the same feudal burthens^ as the other lands held under grants 
from the French king, in the Province of Quebec, and on this supposition, during the 
administration of General Hope, an order was published in his name pointing out par- 
ticular spots for the tite of mills, and forbidding their erection in any other places, or 
en any other terms than, that at the expiration of fifteen years, they should be given up 
ia good repair to the use of His Majesty, hi3 heirs and successors. This having given 
great uneasiness and created much discontent among the inhabitants, His Excellency 
LDrd Dorchester, af cer repeated assurances that they should have their lands on the same 
terms by which they were held by their fellow-subjects in Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick, was pleased to publish an extract of a letter from the Right Hon. Lord Sidney, one 
of His Maj' sty's principal Secretaries of State, dated Whitehall, 3rd September, 1788, as 
follows : 

" ' Your Lordship will, however, understand that it is the King's intention that the 
new settlers in that part of the Province (meaning the district west of Point au Baudet) 
who now bold their lands upon certificates of occupation, shall, at all events, be placed 
upon the same footing in all respects as their brethren in Nova Scotia and New Bruns- 
wick, by having their lands granted to them in free and common soccage, with a remis- 
sion of quit rents for tne first ten years.' " 

To show the esteem in which the Loyalists were held, I give an extract from the 
proceedings in Council at Quebec, on the 9th November, 1789. 

His Lordship (Lord Dorchester) intimated to the Council that it remained a ques- 
(ion, upon the late regulations for the disposition of the waste lands of the Grown, 
whether the Beard constituted for that purpose were authorized to make locations to the 
sons of Loyalists, on their coming to full age, and that it was his wish to put a mark of 
honour upon the families who had adhered to the unity of the Empire, and joined the 
Royal Standard in America before the treaty of separation in 1783. 



72 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 3 

The Council concurring with His Lordship, "it is accordingly ordered, that the 
several land boards take course for preserving a registry of the names of all persons falling 
under the description aforementioned, to the end that their posterity may be discriminated 
from future settlers, in the parish Registers and Rolls of the Militia of their respective 
districts, and other public remembrances of the Province, as proper objects, by their 
persevering in the fidelity and conduct so honourable to their ancestors, for distinguished 
bemfits and privileges." 

And it was also ordered, *' That the said land boards may in every such case, provide 
not only for the sons of those Loyalists, as they arrive at full age, but for their daughters 
also of that age, or on their marriage, assigning to each a lot of two hundred acres more 
or less ; provided, nevertheless, that they respectively comply with the general regulations, 
and that it shall satisfactorily appear, that there has been no fault in the due cultivation 
and improvements of the lands already assigned to the head of the family of which they 
are members." 

In 1791 The Constitutional Act was passed dividing the Province of Quebec into two 
separate Provinces, to be called the Provinces of Upper Canada and Lower Canada. The 
Governor was authorized to issue a proclamation dividing the Province of Upper Canada 
into districts, or counties, or circles, and towns or townships, and might be authorized to 
make allotments of land for the support of a Protestant clergy in each province, and to 
erect parsonages or rectories according to the establisnment of the Church of England, 
and endow them. The Act also provided that all lands which should be thereafter 
granted within the Province of Upper Canada should be granted in free and common 
soccage. It provided further that any person holding lands in Upper Canada by virtue 
of any certificate of occupation derived under the authority of the Governor and Council 
of the Province of Quebec, might surrender" the same to His Majesty, by petition to 
the Governor setting foith that he was desirous of holding the land in free and com- 
mon soccage. The Governor was thereupon to cause a fresh grant to be made to 
such person, of such lands, in free and common soccage. 

The following were the members of the first land boards appointed by Lord Dor- 
chester in 17»8-9 : 

District of Hesse : Farnham Close, Esq., Major in 65th Regiment of Foot, or the 
Officer Commanding at Detroit, William Dummer Powell, Esq., Duperon Baby, Esq., 
Alexander McKee, Esq., William Robertson, Esq , Alexander Grant, Esq., Adhemar de St 
Martin, Esq , or any three of them to be a quorum for the business intrusted to the whole 
Board in, and for the District of Hesse. 

Nassau: Lieut.Col. Hunter or Officer Commanding, Lieut.-Col. Butler, Peter Ten- 
brook, Esq , R. Hamilton, Esq., Benjamin Pawling, Esq., Nath. Petti t, Esq. 

Mecklenborgh : Rev. John Stuart, Neil McLean, Esq., James Clarke, Es^., 
Richard Cartwright, jr., Esq., the Officer Commanding for the time being. 

LuNEBURG : Richard Duncan, Esq., John MacDonell, Esq., Jeremiah French, Esq., 
Justus Sherwood, Esq., James Gray, Esq., John Mnnro, Esq. 

While at Quebec waiting for the arrival of a quorum of his councillors, Lieut.- 
Governor Simcoa issued the following proclamation signed by himself and Thos. Talbot, 
Acting Secretary. As this was Governor Simcoe's first official act I give the proclana- 
tion in full. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

To such as are desirous to settle on the lands of the Crown in the Province of Upper 

Canada. 

By His Excellency, John Graves Simcoe, Esquire, Lieutenant-Governor and Commandei- 
in-Chief of the said Province, and Colonel Commanding His Majesty's forces, etc,, 
etc., etc. 

Be it known to all concerned, that His Majesty hath by His Royal Commission and 
instructions to the Governor, and in His absence to the Lieutenant-Governor or person 



1900 J CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 73 



administering the Government for the time being of the said Province of Upper Oanada, 
given authority and command to grant the lands of the Crow^n in the sime by patent 
under the Great Seal thereof; and it being exptdient to publish and declare the Royal 
intention respecting snch grants and patents, I do accordingly hereby make kno^n the 
terms of grant and settlement to be : 

1st. That the Crown lands to be granted be parcel of a township, — if an inland 
township, of ten miles square, and if a township on navigable waters, of nine miles in front 
and twelve miles in depth, to be run out and marked by His Majesty's Surveyor or 
Deputy Surveyor General, or under his sanction and authority. 

2nd. That only such part of the township be granted bls shall remain after a reserva- 
tion of one-seventh part thereof, for the support of a Protestant clergy, and ona other 
seventh part thereof, for the future disposition of the Grown. 

3rd. That no farm lot shall be granted to any one person which shall contain more 
than two hundred acres ; yet the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor or person administering 
the Government, is allowed and permitted to grant to any person or persons such further 
quantity of land as they may desire, not exceeding one thousand acres over and above 
what may have been before granted to them. 

4th. That every petitioner for lands, make it appear that he or she is in a condition 
to cultivate and improve the same, and shall besides taking the usual oaths, subscribe a 
declaration (before proper persons to be for that purpose appointed) of the tenor of the 
words following, viz : " I, A. B , do promise and declare that I will maintain and defend 
to the utmost of my power the authority of the King in His parliament as the supreme 
legislature of this Province " 

5th. That applications for grants be made by petition to tae Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, or person administering the Government for the time being, and where it is 
advisible to grant the prayer thereof a warrant shall issue to the proper offioer for a sur- 
vey thereof, returnable within six months with a plot annexed, and be followed with a 
patent granting the same, if desired, in free and common soccage, upon the terms and 
conditions in the Royal Instructions expressed, and hereinafter suggested. 

6th. That all grants reserve to the Crown all coals, commonly called sea coals, and 
mines of gold, silver, copper, tin, iron and lead ; and each patent contain a clauss for the 
reservation of timber tor the Royal Navy of the tenor following : 

"And provided also, that no part of the tract or parcel of land hereby granted to 
the said and his heirs, be within any reservation heretofore made 

and marked for us, our heirs and successors by our Surveyor-General of Woods, 
or his lawful Ddputy ; in which case, this our grant for such part of the land 
hereby given and granted to the said and his heirs forever as 

aforesaid, and which shall upon a survey thereof being made, be found within 
any such reservation, shall be null and void, anything herein contained to the 
contrary notwithstanding." 

7 th. That the two- sevenths reserved for the Crown's future disposition, and the sup- 
port of a Protestant clergy, be not severed tracts each of one-seventh part of the township, 
but such lots or farms therein, as in the Surveyor General's return of the survey of the 
township, shall be described as set apart for these purposes, between the other farms of 
which the said township shall consist, to the intent that the lands so to be reserved may 
be nearly of the like value with an equal quantity of the other parts to be granted out as 
aforementioned. 

8th That the respective patentees are to take the estates granted to them severally 
free of quit rent and of any other expenses, thin stfch fees as are or may be allowed to be 
demanded and received by the different officers concerned in passing the patent and re- 
cording the same, to be stated in a table authorized and established by the Government 
and publicly fixed up in the several offices of the Clerk of the Council, ol the Surveyor 
General, and of the Secretary of the Province. 

9th. That every patent be entered upon record within six months from the date 
thereof, in the secretary's or registrar's offices, and a docket thereof in the auditor's 
office. 

10th. "Whenever it shall be thought advisable to grant any given quantity to one 
person of one thousand acres or under, and the same cannot be found by reason of 
the said reservations and prior grants within the township in the petition expressed, 



THL REPORT OF THE [ ^o. 3 



the same, or what shall be requisite to make up to such person the quantity advised, 
shall be located to him in some other township, upon a new petition for that purpose to 
be preferred. 

And of the said regulations, all persons concerned are to take notice and govern 
themselves accordingly. 

'■^ * Given under my hand and seal in the Oity of Qaebec, the seventh day of February, 
in the thirty second year of His Majesty's reign, and in the year of our Lord one thousand 
seven hundred and ninety-two. 



By His Excellency's Command, 

Thos. Talbot, Acting Secretary. 



JOHN GRAVES SIMCOE. 



f-uT By proclamation of Lieutenant Governor Simcoe, 16th July, 1792, Upper Canada 

•was divided into counties as follows : — 

f-,t Glengarry, Stormont, Dnndas, Grenville, Leeds, Frontenac, Ontario, Addington, 

Lennox, Prince Edward, Hastings, Northumberland, Durham, York, Lincoln, Norfolk, 

Suffolk, Essex and Kent. 

J^'"-' Although not strictly pertaining to this paper I give the representation each county 

was entitled to in the House of Assembly as set forth in this Proclamatidn. 

Glengarry, two ridings 2 representatives. 

Stormont 1 '• 

Dnndas 1 •' 

Grenville 1 •« 

Leeds and Frontenac (together) ; 1 " 

Ontario and Addington (together) 1 »' 

Prince Edward and the late Township of Adolphusto «rn 

in the Oounty of L°nnox 1 " 

Lennox (except the late Township of Adolphustown) 

with Hastings and Northumbf rland 1 " 

Durham, York, and the first riding of Lincoln 1 " 

Second Riding of Lincoln I '' 

Third Riding of Lincoln 1 " 

Fourth Riding of Lincoln and Norfolk 1 " 

Suffolk and Essex 1 " 

Kent 2 •« 

16 

The names of the Commissioners composing the Land Boards of the counties as laid 
out by above proclamation were : — 

Glengarry and Stormont — James Gray, Jeremiah French, John McDonell, Richard 
Wilkinson, Archibald McDonell. 

Grenville and Leeds, — Peter Drummond, Thomas Fraser, Ephraim Jones, Justus 
Sherwood, William Fraser, 

Dundas — Hon. Hugh Munroe, Malcolm McMartin, Richard Duncan, Thomas Smith. 

Lennox and Addington, Hastings and Prince Edward — Peter Vanalstine, Hazle- 
ton Spencer, Alexander Fisher, Archibald McDjnell, Joshua Booth 

The Land Board of the late District of Nassau to be limited to the County of 
Lincoln : — The officer commanding at Niagara, Hon. E. Hamilton, Peter Tenbrook, 
Nathaniel Pettit, John Warren, John McNabb, Lt. Ool. Butler, Benjamin Pawling, John 
Bnrch, Robert Kerr, Officer of the Engineers at Niagara. 

The Lind Board of the late District of Hesse to be limited to the Counties of Essex 
and Kent : — The officer comnanding at Detroit, Hon. Wm. Robertson, Wm. Dammer 
Powell, Adhemar de St. Martin, George Leith, Hon. Alex. Grant, Alex. McKee, John 
Askin, Montigny de Louvigny, the Officer of Engineers at Detroit. 

The Land Board of the late District of Mecklenburg to be limited to the County of 
Frontenac : — Hon. Richard Cartwright, Neil McLean, James McDowell, Hector Mc- 
Lean, Richard Oirtwright, Wm. Atkinson, Rev. J. Stuart, the officer commanding for 
the time being. 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 75 

Another proclamation was issued 1st January, 1800, dividing Upper Oanada into 
the following counties and districts : — 

The townships of Lancaster, Charlottenburg, Kenyon and the tract claimed by the St. 
Regis Indians, and the Islands in the St. Lawrence wholly or in greater part opposite 
thereto, shall constitute and form the Oounty of Glengarry. 

Glengarry, S torment, Dundas, Prescott and Russell shall form the Eastern District, 
Grenville, Leeds and Carleton the Johnstown District. 

Lennox and Addington and Prince Edward and all that tract of country which lies 
between the District of Johnstown, and a line drawn 16 degrees west from the N. "W. 
angle of the township of Rawdon till it intersects the limits of the province, and all is- 
lands in the Ottawa River opposite the Midland District. 

Northumberland, Durham, York and Simcoe the Home District. 

When Northumberland and Durham have reached a population of 1000 and the six 
townships therein hold town meetings, according to law, then the said counties with all 
the land in the rear, confined between their extreme boundaries produced north 16 de- 
grees west until they iHtersect the northern limit of the province, shall be the Newcastle 
District. 

Counties of Lincoln and Haldimand with such of the islands of this province lying 
in the Niagara River or Lake Erie, as are wholly or in greater part adjacent thereto, to- 
gether with the beach at the head of Lake Ontario between Burlington Bay and Salfleet, 
with the promontary between Burlington Bay and Coots Paradise, shall be the Niagara 
Distrct. 

Norfolk, Oxford and Middlesex with so much of this province as lies to the west of 
the Idome District and District of Niagara, to the south of Lake Huron and between them 
and a line drawn due north from a fixed boundary till it arrives at Lake Huron, the Lon- 
don District. 

Essex, Kent and so much of this Province as is not included in any other district 
thereof shall be the Western District. 

On 20th October, 1818, an Order-in Council was passed that no grant of land would 
be issued in future to persons of any description until a satisfactory certificate was filed in 
the Surveyor General's office that a habitable house had been erected on some part of 
the land to be granted, and a sufficient clearing thereon under fence, in the proportion of 
five acres per hundred. 

At the Council held in the council chamber at York on Saturday, 13th of March, 
1819, at which the following were present: His Excellency Sir P. Maitland, K. 0. B., 
Lieutenant-Governor ; the Hon William Dummer Powell, Chief Justice ; the Hon. James 
Baby, the Hon. and Reverend Doctor John Strachan, the following order was passed : — 

" Whereas great inconvenience accrues to emigrants desirous to become settlers in 
this province from the necessity of presenting themselves at York before they can obtain 
a location on the waste lands of the Crown, for remedy therefor His Excellency the 
Lieutenant Governor by and with the advice and consent of the Executive Council, is 
pleased to appoint in each of the districts certain persons to form a board with power to 
locate any emigrant or other person desirous to become a settler in the respective districts 
on a lot of 100 acres within the same,under such limitations, restrictions and rules as from 
time to time may be made for the government of the said land boards by any Order-in- 
Oouncil " 

Under the foregoing regulations, all persons who had served in the Colonial Corps 
during the revolutionary war with America were entitled, and I think I may say re- 
ceived, grants of land according to their rank. Those who had not borne arms previous to 
1783, but came into the country at the peace, were entitled to a grant of 200 acres or 
so much more as the size of their family or the extent of their means would justify. These 
latter, U. E. Loyalists and their sons and daughters born or to be born, received a 
grant of 200 acres on coming of age. Every Executive Councillor received a grant of 
6,000 acres free of conditions except the payment of a small fee, and his children re- 
ceived 1,200 acres each. Grants not exceeding 1,200 acres were, at the discretion of the 
Governor and Council made to clergymen, magistrates and barristers free from conditions ; 
in fact almost anybody could receive a 1,200 acre grant upon payment of the fee. Grants 
amounting to 48,520 aires were made to Colonel Talbot as a compensation for having 
settled 240 settlers upon 12,000 acres. Twelve thousand acres were granted to the heirs 



76 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 3 

of General Brock and twelve thoasand acres to the Bishop of Qaebec. Two bandred and 
sixty four thousand one hundred and eighty acres were granted to surveyors or persons 
contracting for the survey of townships in lieu of money payments. Large blocks of land 
were also purchased from the Indians. For instance, the Township of Woolrich (over 
86,000 acres) by Mr. Wallace ; the Township of Dumfries (over 94,000 acres) by Mr. 
Steadman ; the Township of Nichol (28,500 acres) by Hon. Thos. Olark ; the Township 
of Waterloo (upwards of 94,000 acres) by Richard Beasley ; a block of 30,800 acres by 
Mr. Jarvis, Provincial Secretary, and a block of 19,000 acres by Mr. Dochstetter. These 
purchases were all confirmed by the Home Government 

As for the U. E. grants instead of being settled upon by the grantees, by far the 
largest proportion was sold to speculators, the consideration being frooa a gallon of 
rum up to £6. The Hon. Robert Hamilton purchased about 100,000 acres. 

On 1 4th December, 1819, an Order-in Council was passed from which I extract the 
following : — 

" Whereas it is desirable to alleviate the situation of the poorer classes of settlers by 
an exemption from any charge on the Patent Fee, and also to remove all obstacles from 
the more free accommodation of others with larger grants than have been usually made, 
His Excellency, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased to order that the 
first mentioned class of settlers may receive a gratuitous grant of fifty acres under ex- 
clusion from any further grant from the Crown, but with liberty to lease the Reserves.'^ 
A special commission was appointed by Lord Bathurst in 1825 to value the lands 
which the Government had agreed to sell to the Canada Company. The commission con- 
sisted of Lieut, Col. Francis Oockburn, Simon McGillivray, Lt. Col. Sir John Harvey, 
K.C., K.C.B., John Gait and John Davidson. 

The Act 6th George IV., cap. 75, empowered the Government to sell one-half of the 
Clergy Reserves of Upper Canada to the Canada Company. This was changed by the 
arrangement made by the Colonial OflSce, Downing Street, in 1826, as follows : — 

" It appearing from the award of the commissioners that the Clergy Reserves valued 
by them, comprise 829, 430 acres, and those lands being valued at 3s. 6d. current money 
of Upper Canada, per acre, the Canada Company would have to pay to His Majesty's 
Government the sum of X145,150.5s., current money of Upper Canada, if those Clergy 
Reserves had been conveyed to them. In lieu of these 829,430 acres His Majesty's 
Government will grant to the Canada Company for the same amount a block of land 
containing 1,000,000 acres in the territory lately purchased from the Indians in the 
London and Western Districts." One-third of the amount was to be expended in public 
improvements and the balance paid to the Government, churches, school houses, wharves, 
canals, bridges and high roads to be understood as improvements. The Canada Company's 
total purchases from the Government were 2,484,413 acres. 

In 1838 the number of acres surveyed in Upper Canada was given as 17,000,000 in 
round numbers. The quantity located, or described, or for which there was authority to 
grant in the Land Office was as follows : 

For U.E Lovalists '. 3,206,989 acres. 

For Militia . ' 730,709 " 

Granted to discharged soldiers and seamen 449,400 " 

Granted to magistrates and barristers 255,500 " 

Granted to clergymen of different denominations 36,900 •* 

Granted to executive councillors and their families 142,960 '• 

Granted to legislative councillors and their families 49,475 " 

On 5th November, 1823, an Order inCouncil was passed by which a township was 
to be set apart and placed under the superintendence of Archibald McNab, of McNab, 
for settlement. Before locating his settlers he required them to sign a location ticket as 
follows : 

" I, Archibald McNab, of McNab, do hereby locate you, James Carmichael, upon the 
rear half of the 16th lot of the 11th concession of McNab upon the following terms and 
conditions ; that is to say, I hereby bind myself, my heirs and successors to give you the 
said land free of any quit rent for three years from this date, as also to procure you a 
patent for the same at your expense, upon your having done the settlement duties, and 
your granting me as a mortgage upon said lands, that you will yearly thereafter pay to 



1900] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 77 



me, my heirs and successors for ever, one bushel of wheat or Indian corn, or oats or like 
value, for every cleared acre upon the said lot of land in name of quit rent for the same, 
in the month of January in each year. Your subscribing to these conditions being bind- 
ing upon you to fulfil the terms thereof." 

*' Signed and sealed by us at Kennell Lodge this 12th day of August, 1825. 

•• Archibald MoNab, 
" James Oabmichael." 

McNab apparently received his quit rents for sixteen years ; when an Order in 
Council was passed ordering him to give to the Government all undelivered patents and 
his patent for timber ; that the settlers were to receive their lands on a valuation made 
by Mr. Francis Allen, a special commissioner, that all labor performed for and all rents 
paid to McNab were to be deducted for these payments for patents and the same to be 
withheld from the money coming to McNab from the Government. 

McNab at first claimed £9,000 for a surrender of all claims, but agreed to accept 
£4,000 and the lots already patented to him. He received the first instalment of £1,000 
and when the deductions afore-mentioned were made his claim for £4,000 was reduced 
to about £2,500. 

On the 21st November, 1825, an Order in Oouncil was passed embodying the follow- 
ing rules and regulations for the granting of lands. 

"A valuation will be forthwith made of the lands throughout the colony, and average 
prices will be struck for each district. 

" All the lands in the colony, not hitherto granted and appropriated for public pur- 
poses, will be offered for sale at the average prices thus fixed. 

" The purchase money is to be paid by four quarterly or five annual instalments, as 
the party applying may desire, but in the latter case legal interest shall be charged. Ten 
per cent, will be allowed for ready money payments. 

" On payment of the money, a grant will be made in fee simple to the purchaser, at 
the expense of the Crown, wioh the usual reservations of mines and minerals and of the 
white pine timber. 

" The largest quantity of land to be sold to any individual is 10,000 acres ; and 
when put up to sale, it will be ofiFered in such tracts, not less than 100 acres, as may be 
directed. Persons wishing more extensive purcha&eb, must apply in writing through the 
Lieutenant Governor in Oouncil, to His Majesty's principal Secretary of State for the 
Colonies, with full explanations of their objects and means. 

" Lands may also be obtained without purchase, but upon different conditions. 
" The largest grant that will be made without purchase is 1,200 acres. The smallest 
100 acres. 

" No grant will te made to any person without purchase unless the Government is 
satisfied that the grantee has both the power and the intention of expending in the cul- 
tivation of lands a capital equal to half the estimated value ; or, in case the grant do 
not exceed 200 acres, that he intends to reside upon or improve the same. 

'• A quit rent of £5 per cent, per annum, upon the estimated value, will be fixed 
upon the land granted without purchase. 

" The quit rent will be redeemable within the first 25 years next following the grant, 
on payment of a sum equal to twenty times the annual amount of it. 

" Until the expiration of the first seven years next succeeding each erant without 
purchase no quit rent will become due upon the lands comprised in it. 

" Every grantee, without purchase, must at the expiration of the before- mentioned 
seven years prove to the satisfaction of the Lieutenant Governor in Council that he has 
expended in the cultivation and improvement of his land a capital equal to half its value, 
as that value was estimated at the time of his grant, or in case the grant shall not exceed 
200 acres that he has during that time resided on and improved his land ; on failure of 
such proof his claim to the land shall be forfeited, and the same may be granted to 
another applicant. It is to be understood, howeVer, that if at any time within that 
period the condition of expenditure and cultivation shall have been complied with the 
patent may immediately issue. 

" U. E. Loyalists and other persons entitled to gratuitous grants by the general 
regulations of His Majesty's Government are not to be affected by these rules." 



T! E REPORT OF THE [No. 3 



The first sales of Olergy lands took place in \829, and were by auction, one-tenth 
of the purchase money being payable in cash and the remainder in nine eqnal annual 
instalments with interest. Prior to that date these lands were leased for a term of 
twenty-one years, the rent of a 200-acre lot for the first seven years being ten shillings 
per annum, or three bushels of good sweet, clean merchantable wheat (at the option and 
election of the Grown) ; during the second seven years £1, or six bushels of like wheat, 
and during the third term of seven years £1 lOa., or nine bushels of like wheat. 

The Olergy lands were afterwards valued and sold with Grown lands, but always on 
the terms as stated above. These land» were secularized by Act of the Ganadian Parlia- 
ment in 1854. Later enactments dealt with the use which should be made of the funds 
derived from such sales. 

A general order was issued by the Horse Guards in 1831 to the effect that officers of 
the army wishing to become settlers should, like, all other individuals, procure lands by 
purchase at public eales, but would be entitled to a remission of the purchase money 
to the following amounts : — 

£ a. d. 

Officers who have served 20 years and upwards a remission of, . 300 

" " 15 " . " .. 250 

" " 10 " .' " .. 200 

" " 7 years and less than IQ « .. 150 

The same indulgences were granted to the officers of the navy in 1832. 

In 1833 U. E. Loyalists and militia were denied deeds for their lands except on 
condition of actual settlement and occupation for two years, but if they proved the im- 
possibility of going upon their lands they were to be granted a location ticket for their 
location, entitling them to the price of the land when sold at a public sale. 

In 1831 Lord Goderich wrote to Sir John Colborne respecting the disposal of Grown 
lands. He says : — 

"I am of opiniOD, after having consulted those <yko are the most competent to give 
" an opinion on the subject, that some of the clauses by which the Gommissioner of Crown 
" Lands is now governed are liable to considerable objection." 

In regard to the quit rent of 5 per cent, on the estimated value, he says : " I alto- 
gether disapprove of this system, and I desire that the practice may be immediately 
discontinuad." Lord Goderich further stated that no free grants of land would be given 
to any person whatever in future, with the exception of military settlers, and he requested 
Sir John Colborne not to forward any application for free grants to him. 

New rules were then laid down, as follows : 

" The lands to be laid out in lots of 100 acres. 

" Notice to be civen in the Gazette, and in any other manner that circumstances will 
admit of, of the time and place appointed for the sale of lands in each District and of the 
upset price. If no offer made, the lands to be reserved for a future sale by auction. 

" The purchase money to be paid down, or by four instalments, with interest. The 
first at the time of sale, the second, third and fourth at intervals of half a year. 

•• If the instalments are not paid regularly the deposit money will be forfeited, and 
the land again referred to sale. 

" Public notice to be given in each District every year of the persons in arrear, "\nd 
if not paid before the commencement of the next sale these lots to be the first put up to 
auction." 

The Commissioner of Grown Lands was informed by letter from Golonel Rowan in 
1832 that U. E. Loyalists' rights would not bo acknowledged by the Executive Govern- 
ment unless the applicant who petitioned for the grant was the person entitled to it, * 

In 1839 a Commission was appointed to enquire into the state of the Public Offices. 
The Surveyor General was examined in regard to the work of his office, and was request- 
ed to give his opinion in regard to the land-granting system. He closes his remarks as 
follows : " In conclusion, I cannot help remarking thac the system upon which lands 
" have been granted was the greatest prostitution of a Sovereign's bounty ever practised 
" in any country. The intentions of the Sovereign will evidently appear from the 
•* instructions given for the settlement of the country wise and guarded, but the system 
" pursued waw corrupt. Actual settlement was required upon the grants, but the influence of 



1900 ] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 79 



• interest obtained for individualp, whose claims could not excetd 200 acres, large grants 
' to themselves and families, dead parents as well as infants who never lived to walk oat 
' of their cradles had Orders in Council passed in their names and their families event- 
' nally obtained the lands." 

In 1838 under the new Land Act no free grants of land were allowed to any person 
or persons whomsoever except U. E. Loyalists and their children, or other persons who 
were at the passage of the Act entitled under some Order in Council or regulation. Those 
entitled to free grants could select them in any of the Districts on such lands as were 
open for location. This was a departure from the old regulation which settled the military 
in certain Districts called military settlements. 

Under this Act no public lands were to be sold by private sale except thf y should 
have been first offered at public auction at an upset price, and the Governor in Council 
was authorized to appoint persons in each District to be resident agents for the sale of 
public lands. As soon as the purchase money was paid the purchaser should be entitled 
to his patent. 

In 1840-41 to establish Grammar Schools about 750,000 acres were set apart. Of 
this King's College (Toronto University) received 225,944 acres and Upper Canada 
College 66,000 acres. 

Ukion of U^peb and Lower Canada. 

In 1842 another Land Act was passed the provisions of which were shortly as 
follows : — 

Claims to free grants to be determined by the Governor in Council. 

No new claim to be admitted after Ist January, 1843, unless the claimant was a 
minor on that day, 

All claims under Order in Council or any regulation now in force and allowed by 
Governor in Council to be commuted for land scrip, or orders for nominal sums o! money. 
Scrip to be received as money on all sales of Crown lands not set apart for a specific 
purpose. (This precluded scrip froaa being taken in payment cf Clergy and School 
lands. ) 

The price of land to be fixed from time to time by the Governor in Council. 

Free grants of 50 acres may be made in the vicinity of any public road in the ne^ 
settlements to actual settlers. 

Lands on which moneys remain unpaid or settlement duties unperformed to be for- 
feited at the end of two years from the passing of the Act. 

Lands in arrears for one or more instalments to be advertised and sold. 

In the year 1850 an Act was passed setting apart one million acres of land to raise 
an income of £100,000 a year for the support of Common Schools. These lands were 
sold at 128. 6d. per acre, one tenth cash, and the balance in nine equal annual instal- 
ments with interest. The price was subsequently reduced to 10s. an acre. 

The prices fixed for Crown lands in 1852 was 7s. 6d. an acre west of the Counties 
of Durham and Victoria, and east of the County of Victoria at 48. per acre, 

The Land Act of 1853 provided that no claims for land not then located should be 
entertained, whether from Militia, U. E. Loyalist, or Military Rights. The Governor 
by Order in Council was authorized to fix the price of the public lands and the terms of 
settlement and payment. The Governor in Council might appropriate as free grants any 
public lands in the Province to actual settlers in the vicinity of any public road in the 
new settlements, but no free grant was to exceed 100 acres. The Governor in Council 
was also authorized to appropriate one-fourth of the proceeds of School lands, and one- 
fifth of the proceeds of unappropriated Crown lands as a fund for public improvements. 

In the year 1853 the Act, 16 Vic. cap. 153, was passed, section 4 of which provided 
that no person should be held qualified to vote at any election as the owner, or as the- 
occupant or tenant of any real property, on which any instalment of purchase money, or 
any rent or other sum of money which he migbt have undertaken to pay to the Crown 
therefor, should be overdue and unpaid. 

By the Regulations of 1859 Crown lands were to be sold at 70 cents per acre cash, 
or $1.00 per acre, one-fifth cash and the balance in four annual instalments with interest, 
all lands to be subject to sebtJement duties, and no patent (oven though the land should 
be paid for in full at the time of purchase) to issue to any person who should not have 



80 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 3 



taken possession within six months from the time of sale, and have been a bona fide occu- 
pant, and within four years at farthest have 10 acres under crop in every hundrfid. 

The Land Act of 1860 provided that all land scrip and certificates must be presented 
and established in the Office of the Commissioner of Grown Lands before the 1st day of 
January, 1862. 

The Canadian Land and Emigration Company in the year 1861 purchased ten Town- 
ships from the Government. The Townships were Dysart, Dudley, Harcourt, Harburn, 
Guilford, Bruton, Havelock, Eyre, Clyde and Longford, containing 403,125 acres, deduct- 
ing therefrom 41,000 acres for swamp. The price was 50 cents an acre, being $181,062.50, 
one-tenth of which the Company was allowed to expend on roads. The area subject to settle- 
ment duties was 261,544 acres, l/9th to be settled within 3 years from date of agreement ; 
5/9fch8 to be settled within 10 years ; the whole to be settled within 15 years. 

OONFEDBBATION. 

The year after Confederation an Act was passed by the Legislative Assembly of 
Ontario, entitled : An Act to secure Free Grants and Homesteads to actual settlers on 
Public Lands. 

Section 4 of this Act provides that the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may 
appropriate any public lands considered suitable for settlement and cultivation, and not 
being mineral lands or piile timber lands, as free grants to actual settlers, under such 
regulations as may from time to time be made by Order in Council, not inconsistent 
with the provisions of the Act. 

Patents are not to issue until the expiration of five years from the date of loca- 
tion, and not then unless 15 acres have been put under cultivation ard a habitable 
house, 16 X 20 feet, erected, and the locatee shall have actually resided upon the land for 
the five years, on failure in performance of these settlement duties the location to be 
forfeited. 

All pine trees growing or being upon land so located, and all gold, silver, copper, 
lead, iron or other mines are reserved, but the locatee may cut all trees necessary for 
fencing, building and fuel, and may also cut and dispose of all trees required to be 
removed in actually clearing his land for cultivation. All trees remaining on the land at 
the time the patent issues, pass to the patentee. 

In the year 1868 there were 15 townships opened, and up to the year 1899, 163 
townships had been placed under the operation of this Act, The sole male or female 
head of a family with children under 18 years of age may be located for 200 acres ; but 
the quantity of land to be located to any male without children under 18 ia 100 acres ; 
but in case he has not, by reason of water, rock or swamp 100 acres that can be made 
available for farming purposes, the quantity may be increased to any number of acres 
not exceeding 200, so as to make 100 acres of farming land. Any locatee, being the 
male head of a family, may purchase an additional 100 acres at 50 cents an acre. 

In the year 1868 (the year of the inauguration of the system of free grants) there 
were 46,000 acres located ; in the second year there were 56,000 acres ; in the third year 
155,000; and so on down to 1899, when the total number of locations made by the 
Department for the 31 years reached 4,012,378. Of course some of these have been 
cancelled for non-compliance with the requirements of the Free Grants' Act ; but no 
system of either sales or free grants can possibly be fenced with regulations that will 
prevent parties, who are so inclined, attempting to evade the law. The timber on the 
land being the temptation to these people to seek location ; if they cannot be located 
they will try squatting and proceed to cut and dispose of the timber as quickly as possi- 
ble, thus depriving the Government of the timber dues and the lumberman of his 
property when the land is held under timber license. During the same time, between 
1868 and 1899, there were 119,834 acres sold to locatees. 

The general provisions of the Free Grants and Homesteads Act before given, apply 
also to free grants in the Bainy River District, with these minor difierences : The 
limit of a Rainy River free grant is 160 acres. The male head of a family, or the 
sole female head of a family, having a child or children under 18 residing with him or 
her, may locate 160 acres, and may also purchase an additional 80 acres at $1 per acre. 

A male of 18, without children, may locate for 120 acres, and may purchaae an 
additional 80 acres at $1 per acre. 



1900] CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 81 

Tbe conditions of settlement, as regards cultivation and the erection of a house, are 
the same as in other free grant districts, but the length of occupation is only three 
years 

An amendment was madn to the Free Grants and Homesteads Acts in 1880 by 
which it was enacted that Patents for lands located or sold after the passing of this 
amendment should contain a reservation of the pine and a proportion of the dues received 
by the Crown on the pine taken from the land should be paid to the patentee 

About 50 townships have been opened for sale under settlement conditions since 
Oonfederation, the sales in which have averaged over 60,000 acres a year at prices vary- 
ing from 50 cents to $2 per acre. 

In 1872 an Act was passed by the Legislative Assembly authorizing an inspection 
of all the lands in the Province sold prior to Confederation for which patents had not 
issued with a view to a reduction in the price of those lota which were reported 
as having been sold at a price above their real value. These inspections took place, and 
in accordance with the reports of the inspectors reductions were made in the price of the 
lands sold in nearly all the old townships in Ontario and an abatement in the interest was 
alpo granted. 

In this paper I have endeavored to trace, as far as time would permit, a history 
of the laws and regulations which have governed the disposition of public land in 
Upper and Lower Canada, and the various changes and amendments which have taken 
place therein. It will be seen that one of the basic principles ot the land-granting 
system which has been pursued in Canada fiom the earliest times has been the resi- 
dence of the grantee or purchaser on his land, and the clearing and improvement 
thereof. This was one of the prime conditions of the old Seigniorial grants which 
distinguished Canadian feudalism from the feudalism of Earope, Seignior and Oensitaire 
alike being compelled to put so much of their holdings in a cultivable condition 
within a specified time on pain of forfeit. The principle has been in practice ever 
since down to the present day. Of course in the early days, when land had very little 
value, there were many prostitutions of it, but still it bas held, and is today the only 
condition upon which public land can be acquired, in the Province of Ontario. 

Many other subjects, such as a history of the timber trade, the clergy lands, the 
Indian treaties, which have all been under the jurisdiction of the old Land Office, (or as 
it is now called, the Department of Crown Lands), could be taken up and incorporated 
in a paper of this kind ; but each of these topics is worthy of separate treatment, and 
their importance could not be fairly estimated had I attempted to include them within 
the scope of this paper. 

Note — In addition to thp large grants mentioned on page 16 it might be well to 
state that Governor Simcoe proposed to hand over several townships to various prominent 
individuals for settlement. Sone ten townships in all were thus granted, when the 
number of applications became so large (50 it is said) that the Government rescinded this 
order and instead offered to each of the nominees 1,200 acres for himself and the same 
amount for every member of his family. All accepted, except Berezy who had under- 
taken the settlement of Markham, and who claimed to have spent S60,000 in hb work. 
(See Evidence in Lord Durham's Report.) 



6 C.L 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



Table shewing the distribution of full and half fees and survey fets, to be paid 
to the Crown, and to the officers of the Land Granting Department, on all grants of land 
from a town lot to one thousand acres inclusive, under the various regulations from the 
commencement of the Government of Upper Canada on the 8th July, 1792, being the 
day Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe was sworn in until the 6th March, 1830. Money in 
sterling. 





Prior to 


1796 








Surveyor of 
woods . 


Officers' 
patent fee. 


Total 
sterling. 


Town lots 


and grants under 100 acres 

100 " 

200 " 


£ 8. d. 
10|t% 
lOfft 
Ui|^ 
lOf A 
10|t^ 

o io|a 
io|a 

lOf,^ 
lO^A 
lOJ^ 
10|t^ 


£ 8. d. 
2 .4 3^ 
2 17 9 
2 17 9 
2 17 9 
2 17 9 

2 17 9 

3 13 6 
3 13 6 
3 13 6 
3 13 fi 
3 13 6 


£ s. d. 
2 5 2 
2 18 7|A 
2 18 7|tV 




300 " 

400 " 


2 18 1\^ 
2 18 l\4s 




500 " 

600 " 


2 18 71^ 

3 14 4JA 




700 " 


3 14 4i ,^ 




«00 " 

900 " 


3 14 4!^^ 
3 14 4|^o 




1,000 " 


3 14 4|t% 



9th July, 1796. 



Town lots and lots under lOO acres. 
lOO 
200 
300 

400 
500 
600 
700 
800 
900 
1,000 



Surveyor of 
woods. 



Officer's half 
patent fee. 




1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



83 



13 



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O o. 



Hcie>iccHo>»oa. > . > ^ i. > ii . I i| . H ' 



<^ OOOOOOOSON 



03 












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84 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 3 



6th July, I8O4. 





Crown 


Survey 


Officers Pat. 


Sum of fees. 


Officers' 










proportion. 


fees. 


fees. 


half pat. fee. 






£ 8. d 


£ 8. d. 


£ e. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


Town lots and lots 


under 100 acres.. 




18 
18 


5 11 

2 18 8 


6 9 
.'i 14 1 






100 " .. 


1 17 5 






200 " .. 


4 8 


1 \ 9 


2 18 8 


8 4 1 


19 4 




300 " .. 


7 10 4 


1 17 1 


2 18 8 


12 6 1 


19 4 




400 " .. 


11 


2 9 6 


2 18 8 


16 8 2 


19 4 




500 " . . 


14 18 9 


3 1 10 


2 18 8 


20 10 2 


19 4 




600 " . 


17 11 5 


3 14 3 


3 6 7 


24 12 3 


19 4 




700 " .. 


20 9 11 


4 6 7 


3 17 8 


28 14 3 


19 4 




800 " 


23 8 6 


4 19 


4 8 9 


32 16 4 


19 4 




900 " .. 


26 7 1 


5 11 4 


4 19 10 


36 18 4 


19 4 




1,000 " .. 


29 5 8 


6 3 9 


5 11 


41 5 


19 4 



5th January, 1819. 



Town lots and lots under 100 acres 
100 
200 
300 
400 
500 
600 
700 
800 
900 
1,000 



1 


17 


n 


9 


17 


8 


24 


8 


30 


17 


36 


18 


42 


16 


48 


15 


54 


13 


60 


11 



18 

2 9 

3 14 

4 19 

6 3 

7 8 

8 13 

9 18 

11 2 

12 7 





8 


18 


18 


8 


18 


8 


18 


8 


18 


8 


6 


7 


17 


8 


8 


9 


19 


11 


11 






5 


14 


1 


16 


17 


6 


24 


11 


7 


32 


5 


8 


39 


19 


9 


47 


3 


10 


55 


17 


11 


63 


2 





76 


16 


n 


78 


10 


2 



1st January, 1820 



• 


1st inst. on 
rect. of 
L. T. 


2nd instlt. 
cert, oi 
S. D. 


on 


3rd instlt. on 
Fiat for 
Patent. 


Sum of instal 
ments. 




Town lot? and lots under 100 acres 


£ s. d. 


£ 8. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


100 " 

200 ♦' 


4 
10 
20 
25 
41 6 8 
50 
58 6 8 
66 13 4 
75 
83 6 8 


4 
10 
20 
25 
41 6 
50 
68 6 
66 13 
75 
83 6 






8 

8 
4 

8 


4 
10 
20 
25 
41 6 8 
50 
58 6 8 
66 13 4 
75 
83 6 8 


12 
30 


300 " 

400 " 


60 
75 


500 " ... ■ 

600 " 

700 " 


125 
150 
175 


800 " 


200 


900 " 


225 0*0 


1,000 " 


250 







Ist January, 1820, and 2nd December, 1824' 





Ist inst. 
paid in. 


Officers' 
Pat. fees. 


Sum for 
grant. 




£ s. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


iOO " 


4 
10 


2 18 8 
2 18 8 


6 18 8 


200 " 


12 18 8 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



85 



24th April and Slnt January, 182^. 





Heads of fam- 
ilies, 5 or 
more children. 


Surveyed be- 
fore 1819. 


Surveyed 
since 1819. 




£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


£ 8. d. 


100 " 

200 " 

300 " 

400 " 

500 " 

600 " 

700 " 

800 " 

900 " 

1,000 " 


■ 8 ■4"'"l 


12 

30 

60 

75 

125 

150 

175 

200 

225 

260 


5 14 1 
16 17 6 
24 11 7 
32 5 8 
39 19 
47 13 10 
65 17 11 
63 2 
70 16 11 
78 10 2 









Before 1796 and Ist January, IS20, and 2nd December, 1824. 
£qual to 1st instalment on 100 acres and double the officers patent fee : On 



lots of 100 acres , 



£9 17e. 4d. 



26th March, 1826. 



• 


let instalment 
paid 


* Officers' 
patent fee?. 


Having wife 

and 5 

children. 


Lots of 100 acres 

" 200 " 


£ 8. d. 

4 

10 


£ s. d. 
2 18 8 
6 17 .6 


£ 8. d. 
12 is 8 







Distribation of the Fees. 



Governor 

Secretary 

Attorney-General 

Surveyor-General 

Auditor ... ... 

Clerk of the Executive Council . 

Register 

Deputy Surveyor of Woods 

Total 



O cSO 

I&2 



£8. d. 



5 11 



a n 

1-1 08 a 
goo 
£§•2 



£ s. 
18 
9 
9 
9 
6 



4 


6 


2 


3 




11 


2 18 


« 



8. <1. 

12 7f 
7 6 
7 6 

16 6 
4^ 
7 6 
7 6 
3 



3 6 7* 



8. d. 
14 Sis 

8 9 ' 

8 9 
19 3 

5 3 

8 9 

8 9 

3 6 



3 17 8it 



8. d. 
16 ^^ 
10 
10 

2 

6 
10 
10 

4 



8. d. 
18 lOfi 
11 3 



11 

4 

6 

11 

11 

4 



4 8 9M 4 19 lOfi 



£8 d. 
110 

12 6 

12 6 

17 6 

7 6 
12 6 
12 6 

5 

5 11:0 



The half fee to be paid by the Crown on all Patents for a les« quantity than 100 
acres to military claimants, U. E, Loyalists and the children of U. E. 
Loyalists 1 

The half fee on all similar Patents for 100 acres and upwards 1 



£ 8. d. 



86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No. 33. 

List of persons holding Oallers' Licenses issued under The Ontario Oallers Act up to 

3l8t December, 1900. 



Name. 



Anderson, M. M 

Allan, James D 

Appleton, Erwin H 

Albert, Andrew 

Adams, J. Q 

Anderson, Patrick J 

Anderson, J. C 

Allan, A f red 

Allen, R. A 

Aikiop, 6e'>. M 

Appleby, Ridley 

Adams, James M , 

Aylward, James 

Archibald, .Tobn L 

Austin, Wm. G 

Anderson, Cbarlea 

Anderson, .John 

Adair, Thomas Albert 

Anderson, J. G 

Alexander. Samuel 

Adams, Wm 

Arkle, George .... 

Armstrong, James Theodore *. 
Armstrong, Thos. J 



P. O. AddresB. 



Almonte. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Ottawa. 

Longford Mills. 

Campbellford. 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

Bannockbnrn. 

French Eiver. 

Katrine. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Peterborough. 

Keewatin. 

Renfrew. 

Little Current. 

Cartier. 

Gananoque. 

Alpena, Michigan. 

Arden. 

Westmeath. 

Rat Portage. 

McKellar. 

Arnprior. 

Boland, Abraham . Cartier. 

Brown, Singleton Bracebridge. 

Barry, Thomas James Hastings. 

Blanchet, Paul Frederick Ottawa. 

Bird, W. S Parry Sound. 

Bay ley James T Gravenhurst. 

Bell, Henry . . | Ottaw<». 

Beach, Herbert Mahlom , Ottawa. 

Barry, Thomas ' Millbridge. . 

Beaty. W. R '. Parry Sound. 

Brooks, Fr-derick William Mackey's Station. 

Brown, Robert D Port Sidney. 

Breed, Arthur (J- IPenetanguishene, 

Barnf 8, Thomas George Lee . . . | Mu^koka Mills. 

Buchanan, Robert iColdwatT 

Beck, Jacob Krfderick Penetangnishene. 

Bir i, JoHpph Manly jMuskoka Mills. 

Boyd, John F . . . .^^ 'Thessalon. 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 

Warren. 

Klock's Mills. 

Egan villa 

Aylmer, Que. 

Pembroke. 

Admaston. 

Pembroke. 

Little Current. 

Barrie. 

West Huntingdon. 

Rat Portage. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Midland. 

Midland. 

Peterborough. 

Hunts ville. 

Keewatin 



Brandon, Martin W 

Bell, John C... 

Bartlett, George W 

Brown. Silas , 

Boland, W. G 

Baulke, George R , 

Bromley, Thimas , 

Bremner, John L 

Bromley, W. H 

Bowerc, Tsaac 

Brown, Th^mw 

Baw, Walter R 

Bates, Robert 

Bick, Thomas 

Burke, John Thomas 

Benson, John Bird 

Brennan, Richard Lawrence 

Brown, Hueh Risside 

Bryan, Frank 

Bennett, Edward Clinton Ahmio Harbour. 

Blainp, Harvie Thomas 'Orillia. 

Barrett, Thomas j Barrie. 

Bray, J&m^s Kinmonnt. 

Bremner, Geo ' Arnprior. 




Bromley, Samuel 

Brown, A. C 

Berlinquet, Julius 

Blastorah, Kred. L.. . . 

Burns, Clifton H 

Beaumont, Ernest 

Beattie, Alex 

Brennan, Reginald 

Boyd, Gej 

BisseU, George Thomas . 

Baxter, Richard 

Breeaugh, Edward 

Boyd, George A 

Buchan, Frederick 

Barret, Patrick 

Brundage, Alfred W . . . 
Brougham, Thomas . . . . 

Blair, Robert I 

Benson, John W 

Beck, Charles M., Jr . . . 

Beatty, W. J 

Bums, C. W., Jr 

Bell, John Henry 

Bettei^, John Hiram 

Brady, John 

Beattie, W. J 

Bromley, William . ... 

Bissell, Haitie 

Brown, Robert 

Beaton, Hugh 

Bailey, Arthur 

Burd, James Henry . . . . 
Bailey, Samuel James . . . 

Burton. Tinswood 

Boyes, James 

Brown, .John 

Brennan, Kdward Scott. 
Bell, John Arguey 



Carpenter, John A 

Callaghan, Dennis 

Campbell, Alexander J. 

Carson, James 

Campbell, J. M 

Campbell, Robert 

Clairmont, Joseph .... 
Clarkaon, Robert J . . . . 

Carruthers, Aaron 

Calder, Wm. J 

Chew, Joseph . 

Cole, James Colin 

Cameron, William 

Cain, Robert 

Crawford, Stephen W. . 

Cochrane. George 

Coburn, John 

Crowe, Nathaniel 

Cameron, Alexander . . . 
Chrysler, Frank R. L. , 

Carson, Hugh 

Calder, George 

Callaghan, Dennis 



P. O. Address. 



Corrigan, Robert T Emo. 



Pembroke, 

Kitzroy Harbor. 

Opimican, Que. 

Harwood. 

Little Current. 

Parry Sound. 

Whitney. 

Gravenhurst. 

Gravenhurst. 

Trenton. 

Deseronto. 

Deseronto. 

Thessalon. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Arnprior. 

Sturgeon Bay. 

Fenetanguishene. 

Coldwater. 

South River. 

Burk's Falls. 

Muskoka Mills. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Westmeath. 

Trenton. 

Star rat. 

Waubashene. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Orillia. 

Renfrew. 

Huntsville. 

Rockdale. 

Sundridge. 

Klock's Mills. 

Arnprior. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Bracebridge. 

Campbellford. 

Parry Sound, 

Hintonburg. 

Bark Lake. 

Gravenhurst. 

Ottawa. 

Collins' Inlet. 

Midland. 

Thessalon. 

Peterborough. 

Lindsay. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Norman. 

Webbwood. 

Rat Portage. 

Wood ville. 

Campbellford. 



Cameron, .John H. 
Carson, Melvio . . 
Cameron, .John K. 
Cassidy, William . 



Rat Portage. 
Little Current. 
Spanish River. 
Little Current. 



1900] 



CROWN LANDS DEPARTMENT. 



87 



APPENDIX No. $^ —Continned. 



Name. 



P. O. Address. 



Coons, George Washington. .. . Peterborough. 

Chisholin, George Leopold Sault Ste. Marie.' 

Chalmers, George James Peterborough. 

Oaverly, David Charles Parry Sound. 

Campbell, Archibald J Little Current. 

Close, John L Arnprior. 

Carmichael, Uonald Arnprior. 

Carty, John Arnprior. 

Cleary , Patrick M Arnprior. 

Cuthbertson, Wm Arnprior. 

Carter, Roht. E Fe8«ert<>n. 

Coleman, Jos Baysville. 

Cardiff, George McDougall .. |Sudbtiry. 

Cameron, W. D Rat Portaee. 

Crandall, F Port Arthur. 

Campbell, James R Eganville. 

Campbell, John A Galetta. 

Caillier, Hyacinth Arnprior. 

Chamberlain, Thomas Bobcaygeon. 

Cooper, David Allan Millbrook. 

Cox, Henry Bellerica, Que. 

Currie, James Ottawa. 

Clarkson, A. E Midland. 

Clairmont, h (Jravenhurst. 

Cameron, W. F Sturgeon Bay. 

Connolly, [^ani*-! Gravenhurst. 

Campbell, P. C Sault St«. Marie. 

Cadenhead, Alexander Midland. 

Carpenter, R. J Arnprior. 

Christie, William Pringle Severn Bridge. 

Campbell, C. V Sault Ste. Marie. 

Clegg, Samuel Peterb. rough. 

Clairmont, William L Graven hurst. 

Cahill, Tbomas iNosbonsing. 

Chew, Manley Midland. 

Cooper. James Eddly iSaurin. 

Cook, Reinhardt 1 South River. 

Crowe, Cecil IBobcayjreon. 

Cassidy, S. C Dunchurch. 

Charleson, John Baptiste , Ottawa. 

Comer, Billa F . ..Tweed. 

Carter, Genrpe ISundridge. 

Corrigan, Robt. J Emo. 

DufiF, R. J 1 Arnpiior. 

Durnll, John W 'Ottawa. 




Sundridge. 
Michipicoton Harb'i 
Parry Sound- 
Ean Clare. 
Blind River. 



Dickson, John 
Dickson, Jas. L . . . . 

Danter, R. W 

Doyle, T.J 

Dobie. Alexander R 

Donally, Richard S I Sudbury. 

Devine, William [Cook's Mills. 

Durrill, William iNosbonsing. 

Draper, Patrick Quyon, Que. 

Davis, J. P jBohcaygeon. 

Drum, Patrick Belleville. 



Durham. Edgar S Rosseau. 

Duquette, Charles Webbwood. 

Davip, William Albert Bobcaygeon. 

Dickson, Robert Alexander Keene. 

Dawkinc. .John Gravenhurst. 

Doxsee. James E Gravenhurst. 

Didier, Tj F . . Aylmer, Que. 

Devine, Patrick J Sheenboro, Que. 

Dinsmnre. Richard Huntsville. 

Dunn, Percv E Loneford Mills. 

Duval, Chas Halfway. 

Donlevy, .Tas. ICftlabogie. 

Doris, Patrick iPeterboro. 

Doris, John I Peterboro. 

Donahoe, Michael lErinsville. 



P. 0. Address. 



Ebert, Andrew P Pembroke- 
Ellis, Alexander Arnprior. 

Ellis, John ^ Westmeath. 

Sundridge. 

Parry ."^ound. 

Parry Sound. 

Rat Portage. 



Errington, Joseph 

Kdgiugton, Henry John 

Eager, James 

Edgsr. J. E 



Forbes, Christopher McKay 

Fitzgenld, E. Clair 

Farrell, W. H 

French, Lewis Wm 

Kraser, Wm. A 

Fortune, Owen 

Eraser, David 

France, Jof n 

Ferguson, Ernest A 

Ford, Charles 

Findlay, J. « 

Frasec, Jas 

Fairen, Francis 

Faulkner, Jos 

Eraser, Alexander, Jr 

Fairbaim, William 

Eraser, Wm. A 

Fracer, Foster 

Eraser, William 

Frtwer, Hugh Alexander 

Flaherty, John 

Fisher, William 

Fox, Thomas 

Fallis, James W 

Fairbaim, N. H 

Friel, John 

Fox, Charles 

Featherstonbaugh, Wm. Henry 

Frair, Schuyler 

Faren, Joel 

Fraser, Duncan 

Freeston, Walter 



McLe.'in's Depot. 

Parry Sound. 

Ironside, Que. 

Byng Inlet. 

Msttawa. 

Trenton. 

Norman. 

Codlins' Inlet. 

Baysville. 

Wahnapitae. 

Rraeside. 

Renfrew. 

Pet^rbo^o'. 

Fe8«ert n. 

Westmeuth. 

Calabogie. 

Pembroke. 

Pembroke. 

Little Current. 

Pembrohe. 

rJndsay. 

Trenton. 

I ^eseronto. 

Sturgeon Ray. 

Webbwood. 

Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Penetangnishene. 

Westmeath. 

Savanne. 

Big Forks. 

Burk's F'allc. 



Griffith, Geo. F IPembroke. 



Graham, Jno 

Golden. Jno 

Gunter, Henry M . . . . 

Goltz, Ernest 

Green, Forman A. . . . 
Green, Samuel E. . . . 

Grant, John 

Green, Arthur.. 
George, R 

Gardiner, John 

Golden, Frank J 

Garson, Robert 

Gropp, August 

Grozelle, Antoine D. . 

Goulais, James 

Grayson, Charh s ... 
Gladstone. Harry E. . 
Graham, Edward G. . 

Griffin, James 

Gordon, Alexander B 

Gareau. Noah J 'Pembroke, 

Gordon, Robert W I Pembroke 



Arnprior. 

Gilmour. 

Trenton. 

Bardoville. 

Gilmour. 

Parry Sound. 

Flinton. 

Ottawa. 

Parry Sound. 

Parry Sound. 

Trenton. 

Thessalon. 

Penetangu'shene. 

Muskoka Mills, 

Peterb rough. 

Keewatin. 

Cook's Mills, 

Wahnapitae. 

Spanish River. 

Pembroke. 



Guertin, Nelson 
Gardener. John . , . . 
Gunter, Peter M . . . 
Glennie, William . .. 
Gorman, Maurice J. 

Gillies, John A 

Gadway, John 



Petawawa. 
Rat Portage. 
Gilmour. 
Millbridge. 
Fenelon Falls. 
Braeside. 
Parry Sound. 



GaTrow, Edward Webbwood . 



88 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 3 



APPENDIX No 33.— Continued. 



Name. 



Goldine, William. 

Gillii'p, Harry 

Gordon, Herbert C. .. 

Gille-pie, M. H 

Griffin, William 

GantoD, David 

Graham, Georj^e L . . . 
Graham, Fredericks. 
Gill. Cuthbert 



Dorset, 
White Lake. 
Nelcon, 
Cook's Mills. 
Huntsville. 
Trout Creek. 
Amprior. 
Am prior. 
Orillia. 
Graham, James Robert jRat Portage. 



P. O. Address. 



Graham, Thomas Jordan. 
Gaudaur, Antoine Daniel 
Gorman, Patrick 



Hartt, James 

Haves James 

Humphrey, T. W 

Huckson, A H 

Handley, Robert 

Howe, Alexander 

Hurd, Edwin 

Huff. J. S. Morris 

HalliHay. R.bt. J 

Hutt'U. John 

Hutchins n, Wro. E 

Hogarth, Joseph Rowan . 

Humphrey, John 

Hill, Joshua 

Hall, David 

Hartley, Charles 

Hawkins, Henry Charles. 
Hines, Philip Wallace . . . 

Hudson, John Lewis 

Helferty, Dennis 

Hamilton, Robt 

Hoppinf , Abiram 

Hoppins, Densmore 

Haystead, John 

Henderson, .Tr hn Irwin . . . 

Hartley, William 

Higginf, .John C 

Harrison, John, Jr 

Hawkins, E 

Henderson, Charles .... 

Halliday, Frank . . . . 

Halliday, James 

Hurdman, .J. A 

Hawkins, Stonewall J. . . . 
Hinchliffe, William ... . 

Hillis, .Tames M 

Hogg, W. J 

Hoxie, E. P 

Hawkins, Walter 

Howard, James 

Howard, William 

Hogan, Enos, W 

Home, John T 

Hamilton, Chas. E 



Byng Inlet. 

Orillia. 

Eganville. 

Gilmour. 

Enterprise. 

Gravenhurst. 

French River. 

Douglas 

Q neensborough. 

Hurdville. 

Arnprior. 

Lindsay. 

Hutton House. 

Huntsville. 

Pembroke. 

Gravenhi-rst. 

Midland. 

Levering. 

Peterborough. 

Blind River. 

Huntsville. 

Combermere. 

Eganville. 

Rat Portage. 

Kingston. 

Kingst-on. 

Parry Sound. 

Bi)bcaygeon. 

Millbridge. 

Peterborough. 

Pembroke. 

Le Breton Flats. 

Bracebridge. 

Parry Sound. 

Springtown. 

Ottawa. 

Meldrum Bay. 

Gunter. 

Sutton Wert. 

North Bay. 

Katrine. 

Pembroke. 

Eganville. 

Baysville. 

Savanne. 

Fort William. 

Rat Portage. 

Parry Sound. 
Rat Portage. 

Jackson, Robert IBrechin. 

Johnson, Finlay I Bracebridge. 

Jones, Albert I Victoria Harbor. 

Johnson, Thomas I Bobcaygeon. 



Irwin, Thomas H. 
Irwin, Eli 



Johnston. Archibald M. 
Julien, Charles . . . 
Jnnkin, Henry . . 

Johns, Frank 

Jeesup, Edward D. 
Johnson, Frank N. 



Norman. 
Trenton. 
Marmora. 
Nipissing Junction. 
Cache Bay. 
Ottawa. 




P. 0. Address. 



Johnston, .John Peninsular Lake 

Johnson, S. M Amprior. 

Jones, Frederick James Fllnton. 

Johnston, William A Castlef ord. 

Jervis, Henry 

Jones, William 

James, Martin 



AVisawasa. 
Fenelon Falls. 
The Flats. 



Kerby, John JBdleville. 

Kennedy, Robert i Marmora. 



Kirby, Louis Russell 

Kennedy, Timothy 

Kirk, Henry 

Knox, Milton 

Kirsella, Michael Pierce. 

Kicchen, D 

Kelly, Jeremiah 

Kelly, Ferdinand 

Kennedy, T. J . 

Kenning, Henry 

Kirby, D. F 

Kirkpatrick, David .Lindsav. 

Kelly, Michael J .. 'Baysville. 

Kirk, Wm. Jas iWebbwood. 

Kerr, E. G ... IThessalon. 

King, Napoleon Mattawa. 

Kean. B. F Orillia 

Kemp, Orval Wesley iTrenton. 

Kirk, Charles Barron IQueensborougb. 

Kingsland, W. P Ottawa. 



Ottawa. 

Entei prise. 

Trenton. 

Ottawa. 

Trenton. 

French River. 

Sudbury. 

Mattawa. 

Arnprior. 

Pembroke. 

Belleville. 



Kerr, John B Arnprior. 

Kennedy, Walter Arnprior. 

Kennedy, John Pembroke. 

Knox, Wm. M |Fesierton. 

Kearney, Michael John IBuckingham, Que. 

Kendrick, John iBurk's Falls. 

Kennedy, John L Burk's Falls, 

Leannoth, Francis Arnprior. 

Lee, James I Warren. 

Lloyd, Alfred Severn Bridge. 

Lawrie, Frank A Parry Sound. 

Latimer, James .... Frank's Bay. 

Lemyre, Middey Campbellford. 

Lutz, Jacob Parry Sound. 

Luby, John E Ottawa. 

Lochnan, James Ottawa . 

Lozo, John ; Trenton . 

Loughrin, Lawrence Pembroke . 

Linton. J. H. Parry Sound . 

Ludgate, James Peterborough. 

Lee, Robert Huntsville. 

Langf ord, Mark Baysville . 

Letherby, Edwin Midland . 

Lovering, William James Coldwater. 

Lane, Maurice Bobcaygeon . 

Lenton, George Peterborough. 

liOW, Thoma'» A I Renfrew 



Livingston, Robert M 

Londry, William E 

Labelle, James 

Labelle, Eli 

Ladurante, .T. D 

Ludgate, Theodore 

Lucas, Frank 

Lunam, Duncan 

Lott, George 

Lawrie, John D 

Lovering, George Francis.. 

Lavigne, John . . 

Landell, Charles S 

Long, Henry Elisha 



Huntsville. 
Sault Ste. Marie. 
Waltham, Que. 
Waltham, Que. 
Ottawa. 
Peterborough. 
Sault Ste. Marie. 
Oollfield, Que. 
Trenton. 
Parry Sound. 
Coldwater. 
Aylmer, Que. 
Huntsville. 
Mattawa . 



1900}] 



CROWN LANDS] DEPARTMENT. 



89 



APPENDIX No. 33.— Continued. 




Lynch, W. H 

Laplante, Francis 

Lindsay, Jas 

Labelle, Michael 

Legree, John 

Lagree, Jas. L 

Leigh, John Chas 

Lloyd, Edward B 

Malloy, Mark 

MUler, R.0 

Menzies, Archibald ... . 

Manning, James 

Martin, Philip 

Malone, Wm. Pat 

Marsh, Esli Terrill 

Millar, John W 

Mutchinbacker, Asa 

Morris, George F 

Murray, George, Jr 

Maughan, Joseph 

Margach, Wm J 

Murray, George, Sr 

Maniece, Wm 

Murray, Wm 

Morgan, Richard J 

Magee, Thomas Arthur . . 

Murdoch, James 

Mulvahill, Wm 

Murphy, Arthur 

Mayhew, Jacob 

Milne, Archie 

Murray, James 

Moore, Jas. A. E ... 

Moore, Henry R 

ADckle, Chas. S 

Mullen, Jas . . 

Morley, A. W 

Munroe, Peter P 

Mason, Benjamin 

Monaghan, John B 

Monaghan, M. J 

Mulvihill, John 

Moran, Andrew 

Mulvihill, Michael 

Mann, John 

Marrighan, Richard 

Monaghan, John Dorland 

Matheson, William 

Munro, Alexander G 

Monro, Philip 

Mangan, Patrick 

Marcil, Peter 

Main, Samuel 

Morley, Charles 

Moore, David Henry 

Murphy, John 

Mathieson, Daniel 

Milne, William 

Mangan, Charles 

Mooney, Lincoln 

Mangan, John 

Mooney, Thomas 

Mason, Robert T 

Moore, William John 

Mclntyre, John 

McGenigal, John H 

McCart, Patrick 

McGrath, Thomas B 

McCormick, Jas. J 

McCarthy, Wm 

7 O.J. 



Collingwood. 
Byng Inlet. 
Amprior . 
Amprior. 
Dacre. 
Calabogie. 
Gravenburst. 
King. 

Baysville. 
Gravenburst . 
Burk's Falls. 
Trenton. 
Stoco. 
Ottawa . 
Trenton . 
Huntsville. 
RoBseau Falls. 
French Bay. 
Waubaushene. 
Fort William. 
Port Arthur. 
Waubaushene. 
Peterborough . 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portage. 
Rat Portage. 
Cook's Mills. 
Amprior. 
Ottawa. 
Northcote. 
Amprior. 
Pelerborongh . 
Lakefield . 
Lakefield . 
Gravenburst. 
Webbwood. 
Winnipeg. 
Commanda. 
Westmeath. 
Amprior. 
Amprior. 
Amprior. 
Rockingham. 
Amprior. 
Manitowaning. 
Deseronto. 
jDeseronto. 
Chelmsford. 
Braeside. 
Brae^ide. 
Amprior. 
Ottawa. 

Spanish Station. 
Huntsville. 
Peterborough. 
Amprior. 
Chelmsford. 
Ethel. 

Burk's Falls. 
OriUia. 
Arnprior. 
Kingston. 
Rochesterville. 
Gravenburst. 

Amprior. 

Whitney. 

Arnprior. 

Peterborough. 

Trenton. 

Fenelon Falls. 



McA voy, Owen 

jMcConnell, Lewis 

McMuUen, Geo 

McNab, Angus 

McColgan, C. H 

McCailum, Webster 

McCaherty, Robert E . . . 

McNab, Archie 

McDonald, Malcolm 

Mclvor, J. A 

McCulloch, M 

McPherson, James 3 

McKinley, Edward . . . 

McClelland, John 

McFarlane, J. W 

McDonald, Roderick.