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Full text of "Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor for the fiscal year ended .."

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^'-l-O"!, 



BUREAU OF FISHERIES 



U. S. national Museur 



REPORT OF 

THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1905 



AND 



SPECIAL PAPERS 



GEORGE M. BOWERS 



commissioner 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 



APR 29 1907 



CONTENTS 



vReport of the Commissioner of Fisheries i'or the fiscal year ended June 30, 

1905. 46 p. (Issued January 19, 1906. ) 
The propagation and distribution of food fishes in 1905. Bureau of Fislieries 

Document No. 602, 64 p. (Issued October 1, 1906.) 
The commercial fisheries of Alaska in 1905. By John N. Cobb. Bureau of 

Fisheries Document No. 603, 46 p. (Issued October 16, 1906.) 
Dredging and hydrographic records of the U. S. Fisheries Steamer Albatross 

for 1904 AND 1905. Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 604, 80 p. (I.«sued 

December 1, 1906.) 

Statistics of the fi.sheries of the Middle Atlantic States for 1904, Bureau 
of Fisheries Document No. 609, 122 p. (Issued February 19, 1907.) 

The commercial fisheries of the Pacific Coast States in 1904. By W. A. 
Wilcox. Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 612, 74 p. ( Issued February 25, 1907. ) 

Survey of oyster bottoms in Matagorda Bay, Texas. By H. F. Moore. Bureau 
of Fisheries Document No. 610, 86 jj., pi. i to xiii, 1 chart. (Issued March 6, 1907.) 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF nSHERIES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905 



CO^TEISTTS 



Page. 

Propagation of food fishes 5 

General discussion of the year's work o 

Stations operated 7 

Summary of the distributions 8 

Transportation of the hatchery output 8 

Distribution in the various states 9 

Relations with the states i 9 

Relations with foreign countries 13 

Rescue of fishes from overflowed lands 13 

Acclimatization of fish 15 

New stations and improvements 16 

Alaska salmon hatcheries 18 

Biological investigations and experiments 19 

Oyster legislation and experiments 19 

Legislation 19 

Investigations in Maine 20 

Oyster survey of Matagorda Bay, Texas 21 

Experiments at Lynnhaven, Va 21 

Oyster and clam experiments in North Carolina 22 

Experiments in sponge culture 22 

Experimental culture of diamond-back terrapin 22 

Studies of particular fishes 23 

Trout of the southern High Sierras of California 23 

Physiological studies of the Pacific salmons 23 

The spoonbill catfish 24 

Food of dogfishes 24 

Studies of small lakes 25 ~ 

Connecticut lakes and neighboring waters 25 

Lakes of northern Indiana 25 

Fish diseases, water pollutions, etc 26 

Marine biological laboratories 26 

Expedition to the eastern Pacific 27 

Statistics and methods of the fisheries 27 

Condition of the fishing industry 27 

Statistical inquiries and reports - 30 

Some new features of the fishing industry 30 

Purse seines in the bank cod fishery 30 

Seine-pursing machine 31 

Gill nets in the mackerel fishery 32 

Improvements in salmon canneries 33 

New products of the Pacific fisheries 34 

The shrimp and crab fisheries of Puget Sound 34 

Export trade in frozen and mild-cured salmon 35 

3 



4 CONTENTS. 

Page. 

Miscellaneous administrative matters 37 

Operations of vessels 37 

Steamer Albatross 37 

Steamer Fish Hawk 37 

Schooner Grampus 37 

New launches, etc 37 

Publications and library ■. 38 

Expositions - 39 

North Carolina shad fishery and legislation 40 

Foreign inquiries 41 

American Fisheries Society 41 

International Fishery Congress 42 

Appropriations - 42 

Recommendations 43 

New fish hatcheries - 43 

Improvement of stations - 43 

Fish lakes, Washington, D. C 44 

Acclimatization of eastern lobster on the Pacific coast 44 

Protection of fishes 44 



REPORT 



COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1905. 



Department of Commerce and Labor, 

Bureau of Fisheries, 
Washington^ December i, 1905. 
Sir: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of the 
Bureau of Fisheries during- the fiscal year ended June 30, 1905. The 
scope and progress of the work are presented in a review of the 
respective branches — namely, the propagation and distribution of 
food fishes, scientific investigation of subjects relating to aquatic life 
and the development of aquatic resources, and the collection of statis- 
tics and other information concerning the fisheries. 

PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
GENERAL DISCUSSION OF THE YEAR's WORK. 

It is gratifying to be able to record another very successful season 
in fish-culture. While the artificial propagation of some valuable food 
fishes was on a smaller scale than usual, the general results as gaged 
by the output of the hatcheries were considerably greater than those 
of any previous season. 

Marked progress has been made in the appliances and methods em- 
ployed in several branches of the work, leading to increased efiicienc}-, 
larger output, and diminished expense. Some of the newly perfected 
methods of handling eggs and ivy mark a distinct epoch in American 
fish-culture and suggest that still more important discoveries may be 
expected. 

The popularity of the government's efl^orts to maintain the suppl}^ 
of native fishes and to stock barren or depleted waters is yearly increas- 
ing. By delivering fish at the nearest railway station free of charge 
to applicants, and rendering assistance in various other ways, the Bu- 
reau encourages the utilization of private and intrastate waters, and 
during the year has supplied nearly 5,000 such applicants. The great 

5 



6 REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

commercial fishes are for the most part planted by the Bureau's 
employees directly in public waters. 

Conditions affecting important branches of the work in certain 
states are such as to occasion solicitude for the welfare of the fisheries 
because of the failure of the states to appreciate the necessity of 
insuring the survival of a certain proportion of the run of fish until 
the eggs are deposited naturally or taken by the fish-culturist. The 
intelligent adaptation of artificial propagation to particular fisheries 
will insure the perpetuation of the species and permit the greatest 
freedom in the fisher}^, but artificial propagation unaided can not 
maintain fisheries that are conducted with such vigor and energy that 
the percentage of fish which reach the spawning grounds is each year 
growing smaller. The Bureau can not contemplate without concern 
the trend of the shad fisheries of Chesapeake Bay, the salmon fisheries 
of Oregon, Washington, and Alaska, and the whitefish fisheries of the 
Great Lakes, and believes that the situation demands the prompt atten- 
tion of the various states concerned. The failure of these important 
fisheries may not be imminent, but that it is certain, if the present 
conditions are permitted to continue, no unbiased and well-informed 
person can doul)t. 

The regular fish-cultural work of the Bureau is now addressed to 
about fifty difierent species, while a number of others are handled from 
time to time, and new fishes are yearly added to the list of those culti- 
vated. The list includes the principal food and game fishes in all parts 
of the country, and so comprehensive have the operations become that 
few economically important fishes of the lakes and streams are now 
neglected. The salmon and bass families have the largest number of 
species among those handled, but twelve other families also are 
represented. 

Among the species propagated in larger numbers than in any pre- 
vious year are the Pacific salmons, the lake trout, the cisco or lake 
herring, the pike perch, the yellow perch, the large-mouth black bass, 
the pollock, and the lobster. The output of whitefish, cod, and the 
smaller trouts was of average size; and the shad was the only impor- 
tant fish of which the yield was much smaller than usual. 

The operations of the salmon-hatching stations on the tributaries of the 
Sacramento River, California, were more extensive than ever before, and 
the take of eggs could have been considerablj^ increased had there been 
facilities for handling it. The season closed with over 103,000,00(» 
eggs (about 7,000 gallons) in the hatcheries. In marked contrast with 
this work was that on the Columbia River and its tri))utaries, where 
the egg collections amounted to only 80 per cent of those of the pre- 
vious year, notwithstanding that the work was most actively pushed 
and several new field stations were established. The unfavorable out- 
come is attributed to the action of the state authorities in permitting 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 7 

unrestricted fishing- during the closed season, the sahnon having no 
protection whatever during their run to the spawning grounds. 

An almost unprecedently small run of shad in the tributaries of 
Chesapeake Bay and in other waters where the Bureau has hatcheries 
resulted in one of the poorest seasons in the history of shad culture. 
The spring was unusually favorable for all kinds of net fishing in the 
bays and estuaries, and consequently a ver}' large proportion of the run 
was caught before the fish reached the spawning grounds. It is 
reported that the catch of shad in the Potomac River in 1905 was the 
smallest ever known. Unless the number of shad nets that may be 
set in and below the mouths of streams is limited and the survival of 
a fair proportion of the spawning fish is insured, the efforts of the 
Bureau to maintain this important fishery may not be successful. 

The completion of the hatchery on the Maine coast was promptly 
followed b}^ extensive operations, and the outlook for effective marine 
culture in that state is unusually bright. The principal purpose of 
the hatchery is the propagation of lobsters, and the first season's rec- 
ord fully justifies its establishment. From impounded lobsters and 
from lobsters purchased from the fishermen more than 80,000,000 eggs 
have been taken. As an adjunct of lobster cultivation, this station 
has been equipped for cod hatching, the field for which appears to be 
extensive and promising, and the first year's output — nearly 50,000,000 
vigorous fr}^ — is gratifying. 

In connection with the carp, the distribution of which was discon- 
tinued many years ago, it may be noted that the Bureau receives dail}' 
applications for this fish for planting in public and private waters, 
and it is quite evident that among a large proportion of the population 
this species is regarded with favor for stocking certain kinds of waters. 

STATIONS OPERATED. 

In the past year fish-cultural operations were conducted at 55 sta- 
tions and substations, located in 29 states and territories. On the 
northeast coast cod, pollock, flatfish, and lobsters were propagated at 
3 stations; on the rivers of the Atlantic seaboard salmon, shad, striped 
bass, white perch, and yellow perch were hatched at 8 stations; on the 
Great Lakes the eggs of whitefish, lake herring, lake trout, and pike 
perch were incubated at T stations; on the Pacific coast rivers the 
various salmons received attention at 11 stations; and on the interior 
waters landlocked salmon, rainbow trout, black-spotted trout, brook 
trout, grayling, black bass, crappie, sunfish, etc., were handled at 25 
stations. 

The field of operations in all branches of this work was wider than 
in former years, owing to the establishment of numerous egg-collecting 
stations in conjunction with the regular hatcheries. On the New 
England coast there were 11 such stations; on the Great Lakes, 22; 
on the Pacific salmon streams, 1; and on the interior waters, 17. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 



SUMMARY OF THE DISTRIBUTIONS. 

The output of the hatcheries in 1905 was larger than in any previous 
}^ear, aggregating- l,751»,475,00O, of which upward of 410,480,000 rep- 
resented fertilized eggs, 1,337,371,000 fry, and 11,623,700 tingerlings, 
yearlings, and adults. As will be seen from the following table, the 
output of each of two species exceeded 300,000,000, and that of each 
of six others was more than 100,000,000. 

DistrUxdion of fish and eygs durlny the fiscal year 1905. 



Species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Total. 


Catfish ... . . . 




427,425 
214, 000 


427, 425 


Buffalo-fish 




214, 000 


Shad 


378, 000 
60, 963, 000 

380, 000 
87, 040, 000 
96, 055, 775 

107, 000 


32, 859, 000 

268, 405, 000 

1,000,000 

35, 000, 000 

21, 620, 288 

10, 633, 900 

7,819,281 

635, 905 

442, 160 

727, 462 

275, 004 

41,205 


33,237,000 


Whiteflsh 




329, 368, 000 
1,380,000 










122, 040, 000 


Chinook salmon 


5, 125 


117,681,188 




10, 740, 900 




10, 000 

51, 638 

345, 204 

289, 188 

130, 477 

6, 388, 031 

3,479 

2, 062 

11,469 

1, 083, 454 

269 

20 

62, 200 

859, 592 

58, 099 

2, 200 

191,665 

713,111 

447, 908 

395 

326, 715 


7, 829, 281 




139, 400 
286, 000 
8,000 
192, 000 
305,000 


826, 943 


Rainbow trout . . 


1, 073, 364 


Atlantic salmon 

Landlocked salmon 

Black-spotted trout 


1,024,650 

597, 481 

6, 734, 236 




3,479 




27,000 

35, 993, 26G 

8,933,881 

157, 490 

450, 000 


29, 062 




5,320,000 
456, 000 


41,324,735 


Brook trout . . 


10, 473, 335 




157, 759 


Grayling 


400,000 


850, 020 


Pike. 


62, 200 








859, 592 








58, 099 








2,200 








191, 665 








713, 111 








447, 908 


Pike perch 


152, 750, 000 
5,000,000 


246, 148, 775 
139,452,521 

2, 463, 000 
23, 700, 000 

2, 983, 000 
109, 577, 000 

8,456,000 
203, 356, 000 
116,214,000 


398, 899, 170 


Yellow perch 


144, 779, 236 




2, 463, 000 


White perch . . 


700, 000 




24, 400, 000 




2, 983, 000 


Cod 






169, 577, 000 


Pollock 






8, 456, 000 


Flatfish 




203,356,000 








116,214,000 










Total 


410, 480, 175 


1,337,371,138 


11,623,726 


1,759,475,039 







TRANSPORTATION OF THE HATCHERY OUTPUT. 

In distributing the product of the hatcheries to all parts of the 
country six special cars are emploj^ed. These cars are provided with 
small permanent crews, are equipped with all necessary apparatus for 
the safe carriage of young and adult fishes, and are attached to pas- 
senger trains. Many of the railroads, appreciating the benefits aris- 
ing from the stocking of waters along their lines, render this service 
gratis; others collect regular fares for cars and men. When plants of 
fish are made off the main lines they are carried in baggage cars in 
charge of detached messengers of the car service. During the fiscal 
year 1905 the cars of the Bureau were drawn 82,794 miles and the 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 



9 



detached messengers traveled 297,950 miles, of which 1-1:,262 miles 
and 113,701 miles, respectivel}', were free. The amount of the rail- 
road transportation required is a fair index of the activity' and growth 
of the fish-cultural work, and it will be noted that in 1905 the increase 
over 1904 was 20 per cent in mileage of cars and 188 per cent in mile- 
age of messengei's. 

DISTRIBUTION IN THE VARIOUS STATES. , 

The work of the Bureau in increasing the tish suppl}" now extends 
to every state and territor}' except Alaska, and will include that 
territoiy in the fiscal year 1906. The extent to which the various 
states were recipients in the distribution of food and game fishes is 
here shown. Owing chiefly to the existence of local hatcheries and to 
the extent of the local fisheries, California, Maine, Mainland, Massa- 
chusetts, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and 
Virginia have received the largest number of fish, although it must be 
borne in mind that fish deposited in the Great Lakes and interstate 
waters maj" benefit other states quite as much as those in which the 
plants are originally made. 

Distribution offish and eggs in states and terntories in. 1905. 



State or territory. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana , 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts , 

Michigan , 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 



Number of 
fish and eggs. 



137, 
159, 
370, 
222, 
9, 

10, 



68, 797 
6, 650 

56, 077 
297, 155 
423, 040 
132, 643 
2,360 
838, 200 
3, 600 

43, 003 
125, 050 
719, 240 
856, 968 

15, 328 
485, 114 

35, 525 

34,990 
6,713 
480, 577 
808, 404 
763, 637 
978, 059 
826, 745 

44,996 
754, 547 
044, 300 



State or territory. 



Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire . 

New Jersey- , 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina . . 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina... 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Total 1, 757, 419, 039 



Number of 
fish and eggs. 



42, 
5 

362 



11, 
147: 



137, 765 
7,000 
006, 655 
511,300 
125, 650 
486, 700 

567. 698 
54, 903 

365, 783 

12, 100 

951, 147 

549, 145 

201, 200 

74,046 

079, 100 

92, 651 

129, 448 

818, 975 

908, 206 

810. 699 
195, 149 
424, 930 
348, 731 
720, 550 



RELATIONS WITH THE STATES. 



The usual friendl}' relations and mutually beneficial cooperation 
between the Bureau and the fishery authorities of the various states 
have been maintained. One line of policy that has been adopted, 
which will minimize the possibility of injury as a result of the intro- 
duction of nonindigenous fishes into given waters, is that the Bureau 



10 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 



refers to the proper state officers for approval or rejection most appli- 
cations for fish that are not native to the respective states. The neces- 
sity for this course has arisen from the receipt of numerous requests 
for predaceous or destructive fishes for the stocking of waters in which 
weaker species exist. An instance of this is the eflort of residents of 
the Pacific States to introduce black bass into trout streams and lakes, 
or into waters tributary to salmon streams. 

The Bureau has allotted to the state fish commissions the usual large 
number of eggs, which are hatched under state auspices and the 
resulting fry deposited in state or public waters. The donations of 
eggs and fish in 1905, as shown in the following table, aggregated over 
400,000,000 and reached twenty-one states. 

Allotments of eggs and fish to state fi^h commissions in 1905. 



State and species. 


Eggs. 


1 Finger- 

Frv. \'."§^^' ^''^'^r- 
lings, and 

adults. 


California: 

Chinook salmon 


95,585,775 
150, 000 

75,000 












Colorado: 

Black-spotted trout. 




(Connecticut: 

Shad 


1,239,000 




Landlocked salmon . 


10, 000 
200, 000 




Lake trout 




Delaware: 

Rainbow trout .. 




1,000 

75 
200 


Kansas: 












Maine: 

Silver salmon 


55, 000 
50,000 




Landlocked salmon . .... 




Maryland: 

Shad 


4, 998, 000 




Rainbow trout 


38, 000 
5,000,000 

20,000 

100, 000 

5,000.000 

10,000 

2, 436, 000 

100,000 

52, 400, 000 

100,000 
10,000,000 

41,000 




Yellow perch 





Massachusetts: 

Landlocked salmon 








Pike perch 






Michigan: 






Lake trout. 






Grayling 






Pike perch 






Missouri: 

Brook trout 






Pike perch 






Nebraska: 

Rainbow trout 




10,000 


Brook trout 




4,000 


Pike perch 


15, 000, 000 

50, 000 

10,000 

250, 000 






New Hampshire: 

Silver salmon 






Landlocked salmon 






Lake trout 






New Jersey: 

Shad 


3,2.56,000 




New York: 


500, 000 
3, 000, 000 




Whitelish 






Brook trout 


260, .540 






5, 000, 000 

4,144,000 
50, 000, 000 






Ohio: 

Whitefish 




Lake herring 




Oregon: 

Lake trout 


8,000 
70,000 




Pennsylvania: 

Shad 


378, 000 





REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 11 

Allotments of eggs and fish to state fish commissions in 1905 — Continued. 



State and species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Finger- 
lings, year- 
lings, and 

adults. 


Pennsylvania— Continued. 

Whiteflsh 


42, 809, 000 

37, 040, 000 

30, 000 

5, 000 

1,000,000 






Lake herring 






Rainbow trout 






Atlantic salmon 




Lake trout 






Brook trout 




4 000 


Pike perch 


63, 350, 000 






Yellow perch 


225, 000 




Rhode Island: 




400 


Large-mouth black bass 




800 


Utah: 

Lake trout 


100, 000 
100, 000 
50, 000 

500, 000 

25,000 
50, 000 
50,000 






Brook trout 






Grayling 






Vermont: 

Lake trout 






Wyoming: 

Steelhead trout 






Lake trout 






Grayling 












Total 


394,811,775 


10,056,540 


20,475 





In the work on the Great Lakes large numbers of whitefish, lake 
trout, and pike perch eg-gs have been assigned to the Penns3dvania, 
Ohio, and Michigan fish commissions, the resulting fry being very 
largely deposited in the Great Lakes. Pennsylvania and Ohio bear a 
part of the expense of collecting whitefish and pike perch eggs in 
Lake Erie. The yield of salmon eggs in California has been so large 
that the Bureau's hatcheries could not accommodate them, and, as 
heretofore, a ver}^ considerable j)art of the take has been transferred 
to the hatchery of the state fish commission. 

The Bureau has operated the hatchery of the Oregon fish commission 
on the upper Clackamas River; the hatcheries of the Michigan fish 
commission at Detroit and Sault Ste. Marie, the latter in conjunc- 
tion with the state commission; and the hatchery of the Pennsylvania 
fish commission at Torresdale, on the Delaware River. 

The Massachusetts fish commission tendered the use of its launch for 
making collections of egg-bearing lobsters from outlying points between 
Boston and Beverly; the Maine fish commission extended a similar 
courtesy; and the New Jersey fish commission placed at the Bureau's 
disposal a launch for use in the shad-hatching work on the Delaware 
River. 

On April 8, 1905, an important conference was held at Chicago 
between representatives of the various states bordering on the Great 
Lakes, for the purpose of promoting the interests of the fisheries in 
those waters. The meeting was largely attended by fish commission- 
ers, members of the fishery committees of state legislatures, fish war- 
dens, superintendents of hatcheries, and others. The Bureau was 



12 KEPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

invited to participate, and designated the superintendents of its stations 
in Michigan and Illinois to represent it. Among- the resolutions 
adopted by the conference was one reconnnending to the state legis- 
latures the enactment of a law authorizing the Bureau of Fisheries to 
collect fish spawn during the closed seasons; another providing for the 
licensing bj' the states of both commercial and rod fishermen; another 
recommending to the state legislatures the enactment of uniform pro- 
tective fishery legislation, as formulated l)y a special joint committee 
of the conference; and the following, in which this Bureau is particu- 
larly interested: 

That this convention recommend to the legislatures of the several states repre- 
sented that they memorialize Congress to take jurisdiction of international and inter- 
state waters for the purpose of propagating and protecting fish in said waters, and 
that said states express their willingness to cede to the federal government all juris- 
diction that rests in said states. 

At the invitation of the governor of Michigan the Commissioner 
visited that state in April, 1905, for a conference relative to the 
Bureau's work in the Michigan waters of the Great Lakes. The 
superintendent of the Michigan stations accompanied the Commis- 
sioner, and the state was represented by the governor, the president 
of the state board of fish commissioners, and the state fish and game 
warden. The subject of the conference was the interference of the 
fish and game warden with the Bureau's fish-cultural operations, as 
noted in the last annual report. The outcome of the meeting was 
very satisfactory, and steps were taken to insure a continuance of the 
government's work without molestation. A bill that was drafted 
at the conference was shortly thereafter introduced in the Michigan 
legislature and became a law in May. The full text of the act is as 
follows: 

AN ACT to provide for the gathering of spawn in the Great Lakes bordering upon this State by the 
United States Bureau of Fisheries, and to provide a penalty for the unauthorized use or imitation 
of ensigns and markers used by the United States Bureau of Fisheries in taking such spawn; and to 
repeal section six of act number eighty-eight of the public acts of eighteen hundred ninety-nine. 

The people of the State of Michigan enact: 

Section 1. It shall be lawful for the United States Bureau of Fisheries, through its 
duly authorized agents, representatives, or employes, to catch fish in any manner 
and in any of the waters of this State during any and all seasons of the year for the 
purpose of fish culture and scientific investigations; to have and to hold ripe and 
unripe fish in order to take sjmwn therefrom, and to sell all such ripe and unripe fish 
as are of legal size and devote the proceeds of such sales exclusively towards the 
defraying of the expenses incurred in catching such fish and the work of collecting 
and hatching such spawn by the United States Bureau of Fisheries in the State of 
Michigan: Provided, That the State Game and Fish AVarden or other proper oflicer 
shall be duly notified of the time and place of such fishing: And provided further, 
That at least seventy-five per cent of the fry resulting from the spawn so taken shall 
be planted in the waters of this State: And jirocided farther, That the State Board of 
Fish Commissioners shall receive an annual report of the operations under this act. 

Sec. 2. All boats, buoys, nets, and appliances for catching fish, as herein provided. 



REPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 



13 



shall carry such ensigns and markers as shall distinctly show that they are being used 
bj' the United States Bureau of Fisheries. It shall be unlawful to have in possession 
or use such ensigns and markers or imitations thereof upon any boat, buoy, net, or 
fishing appliance except when in use by the United States Bureau of Fisheries; and 
the person or corporation which shall violate this provision shall be deemed to be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of 
not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars, or by impris- 
onment in the Detroit house of correction for a period of not more than one year, or 
by both such fine and imprisonment in the discretion of the court. Any fine imposed 
upon a corporation under this act may be recovered of said corporation by a suit in 
the circuit court for the proper county, and any recovery shall carry with it full costs 
of suit. 

Sec. 3. Section six of act number eighty-eight of the public acts of eighteen hun- 
dred ninety-nine, being an added section to act number one hundred fifty-one of the 
pul)lic acts of eighteen hundred ninety-seven, entitled "An act to regulate the catch- 
ing of fish in the waters of this State by the use of pound or trap nets, gill nets, 
seines, and other apparatus," is hereby repealed. 

RELATIONS WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

In response to requests coming through diplomatic channels, the 
Bureau has furnished eggs of five species of sahiionoid fishes to the 
governments of Argentina and New Zealand, as follows: 



Countries. 


Species. 


Number of 
eggs. 






100, 000 
92 000 




Rainbow trout 




Lake trout 


224, 000 

30, 000 

1,000,000 

300 000 




Landlocked salmon 


New Zealand 


Whiteflsh 




Chinook salmon 




Landlocked salmon 


10, 000 






Total 


1,756,000 







In addition to furnishing the foregoing shipments, the Bureau has 
acted as agent in obtaining 300,000 brook trout eggs for Argentina, 
100,000 rainbow trout eggs for an applicant in Germany, and 15,000 
rainbow trout eggs for an applicant in France. 

Through the courtesy of the fisher}^ authorities of the Province of 
Ontario, the Bureau has continued to collect whitefish and lake trout 
eggs in the Canadian waters of Lake Erie and Lake Superior. The 
immense numbers of whitefish, lake herring, lake trout, pike perch, 
and other fishes which the Bureau plants in the open waters of the 
Great Lakes are of almost equal benefit to Canadian and American 
fishermen. In June, 1905, some 300,000 young lake trout were 
deposited in the Canadian waters of Lake Superior near Rossport. 



RESCUE OF FISHES FROM OVERFLOWED LANDS. 

The rescue of fishes from the sloughs formed by the overflow of the 
Illinois and Mississippi rivers was conducted on a somewhat larger 



14 EEPORT OK THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

scale than heretofore. These sloughs in summer either become entirely 
dry, or, with the high temperature of the water, hll with a rank 
growth of vegetation which smothers the fish; in winter they freeze. 
Thus the tish in them must perish unless removed, and the work of 
the Bureau consists in seining these overflowed places and transferring 
the fish to suitable waters. Millions of fish have thus been rescued 
and returned to the rivers; and large numbers are retained for distri- 
bution by the car and messenger service to applicants in all parts of 
the countr3% these sloughs being one of the chief sources of suppl}^ for 
large-mouth black bass, crappie, and sunfish. The greater proportion 
of the fish are young, whose presence is accounted for by the fact that 
the adult fish have found the sloughs satisfactory spawning places and 
the eggs and young have been left as the water receded. Those des- 
tined for distribution are first transferred to stations along the river, 
where they are retained in tanks and ponds until hardened. 

On the Illinois Kiver this work centers at Meredosia, the Illinois 
state fish commission cooperating with the Bureau to the extent of 
furnishing a steamer and crew. On the Mississippi River stations for 
the hardening and distribution of fishes are maintained during the 
collecting period at Bellevue and North Gregor, Iowa. At the close 
of the year a third station was in course of construction at La Crosse, 
Wis. The season's operations on the Illinois River were rather dis- 
appointing owing to high water, but on the Mississippi the work was 
very satisfactory except when interfered with as reported below. The 
field for Avork of this character is ver^^ extensive, and the operations 
of the Bureau are limited only b}^ the funds available. 

In September, 1904, a crew of employees of the Bellevue, Iowa, 
station, engaged in rescuing food and game fishes from the over- 
flowed lands adjoining the Mississippi in Jo Daviess Covinty, Ilk, were 
set upon by the sheriff of that county, subjected to manj^ indignities, 
and imprisoned over night in wet clothes. The alleged ground for 
this arrest was violation of the state law; as a matter of fact, the 
Bureau was operating in strict accordance with the law, and this was 
well known to the sherift". An Illinois statute provides that — 

* * * it shall be lawful for the Fish Commissioners, or persons authorized by 
them, to take fish in any way, at any time, and in anv such places as they deem best 
for the purpose of propagation, distribution, or destroying of objectionable fish, 

and in pursuance of this authority the state fish commissioners issued 
a formal written permit to the Bureau's representatives to carr}' on 
this work, which has been in progress in that section for many j^ears. 
After a hearing that had some farcical features the case against the 
Bureau's agents was not allowed to come to trial, ])eing dismissed b}^ 
the prosecution. 

It has been intimated that the sherifl' will make further eflorts to 
stop the fishery work in the county in question, and it will be impor- 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 15 

tant to have the rights of the Bureau tested before a competent tri- 
bunal, as the rescue of millions of iish annually in the interior waters 
is involved. Jo Daviess County extends from East Dubuque, 111., to 
a point about 20 miles below the Bellevue station, a distance of about 
35 miles, and comprises a long stretch of low islands, swamps, etc., 
on which are hundreds of shallow lakes and pools made by the over- 
flow water from the Mississippi River. This is the very best field for 
the Bureau's work on the upper Mississippi, and on account of this 
fact the special collecting station was established at Bellevue some 
years ago. There are not many overflow lakes on the Iowa side of 
the river within easy reach of the station, and if the Bureau is pre- 
vented from taking fish from the Illinois side in Jo Daviess County 
the work will be seriously crippled in future and will probably have 
to be abandoned. 

ACCLIMATIZATION OF FISH. 

Although the results of introducing certain fishes of the eastern 
seaboard into western waters have been often mentioned in the 
Bureau's reports, reference should again be made to the increasing 
abundance of the shad and the striped bass on the Pacific coast. The 
yearly catch of these fish for market at this time is upward of 4,000,000 
pounds, for which the fishermen receive nearly $200,000. The reported 
aggregate sales of the two species to the end of the calendar year 1904 
were 26,400,000 pounds with a value of 1955,000 at the prices actually 
paid to the fishermen. 

By way of reciprocity, in past years experiments have been made 
upon a rather extensive scale to acclimatize the chinook salmon on the 
Atlantic coast, large numbers of eggs having been transported across 
the continent, hatched, and distributed in waters deemed suitable for 
the purpose. No results appear to have followed these efforts, and it 
is probable that the northeastern rivers are no longer capable of 
sustaining such a large, vigorous species. It has therefore been 
determined to attempt the introduction of other west-coast salmons 
particularly the silver salmon and the humpback salmon. 

The excellent steelhead trout of the Pacific coast, introduced into 
Lake Superior about ten years ago, appears to have become firmly 
established in the lake and its tributaries, and has now begun to figure 
in the commercial fisheries. Some eggs have been taken from wild 
fish and hatched at the Duluth, Minn., station. 

Another noteworthy case of acclimatization in Lake Superior is that 
of the bluefin or blackfin whitefish, introduced from Lake Michigan. 
This fish has now become exceedingly abundant, and many millions of 
pounds have been caught and sold by the fishermen. Its eggs are now 
regularly collected and incubated at the Duluth hatchery. 



16 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The value of the Bureau's efforts to increase the supply of game and 
food fishes in the interior waters has been strikingly illustrated in Col- 
orado, where a number of nonindigenous trouts have been thoroughly 
established. The principal fish thus introduced is the eastern brook 
trout, which is widel}^ distributed in the state and probably exists 
there in greater aliundance than in any other state. Colorado has 
now become the Bureau's chief source of supply for the eggs of this 
species, and nowhere else is it possible to collect such large quantities 
of eggs from wild brook trout. 

The spotted catfish of the Mississippi basin, which was so success- 
fully planted in the Potomac River a number of years ago, has become 
more abundant, and is now caught in large numbers by anglers and 
market fishermen. The fish attains a weight of upward of 20 pounds, 
and is a general favorite on account of its excellent food and game 
qualities. In 1905 the fishermen about Washington began to catch 
another nonindigenous catfish, of which samples were submitted to 
the Bureau for identification. The fish proved to be the great fork- 
tailed catfish of the Mississippi, which was doubtless introduced at the 
same time as the other species, the young of the two being much alike. 
This fish attains even a larger size than the spotted cat, and examples 
weighing over 30 pounds have been reported by local fishermen. 

An experiment that ma}' prove of some economic importance is 
the planting of salt-water animals from the Gulf of Mexico in a large 
natural salt lake at Palestine, Tex. The lake was examined by the 
superintendent of the San Marcos (Tex.) station, and was found of 
such a character that an attempt to utilize it in this way was thought 
to be warranted. Accordingly there were planted in it March 11, 
1906, 67 sea mullet, 20 squeteague, 12 redfish, 30 croakers, and 38 sil- 
ver perch, all adults, together with 21 blue crabs and 1 barrel of 
oysters. 

NEW STATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

At Mammoth Spring, Ark., a topographical survey of the property 
acquired during the last year was made, maps were prepared showing 
locations of ponds, pipe lines, buildings, roads, etc., and plans and 
specifications for the necessary buildings were drawn. Actual con- 
struction was begun early in the year and is now well under way. 
Arrangements are being perfected to begin fish-cultural operations on 
a limited scale at an early date without waiting for the completion of 
•the station. 

At Tupelo, Miss., a building for ofiice and workshop and a barn 
have been erected. Both these buildings are frame, one and a half 
stories high, the former 30 feet by 30 feet and suitably divided for the 
desired purposes, the latter providing accommodations for two horses 
and necessary vehicles. Pond 6 has been nearly completed, pipe lines 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OB^ FISHERIES. l7 

laid, walks and drives built, grounds graded, trees set out, and vari- 
ous other work has been carried on. 

The lobster and cod station at Boothbay Harbor, Me., has been com- 
pleted and propagation work has begun. During the year boilers and 
pumps and a steam-heating plant were installed, piping run, and hatch- 
ing apparatus constructed and set up. The hatchery is provided with 
14 lobster tables, 16 feet by 3 feet 3 inches, and 12 cod tables of 9 boxes 
each, the entire floor space, except passageways, being thus occupied. 
The frame dwelling originally on the premises has been repaired and 
remodeled into a residence for the superintendent, and an old store- 
house has been fitted up as quarters for the men. The grounds have 
been graded and a stone retaining abutment, TO feet long, built along 
the north wall of the hatcher}'. By January 10 the station was ready 
to accommodate cod eggs, and ]\y April the lobster equipment was in 
place and the hatcher}? fully supplied with the most approved hatching 
apparatus. 

Special appropriations have provided for improvements at several 
of the older stations. At White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., there have 
been erected a foreman's cottage, 39 by 37 feet, li stories high, con- 
taining T rooms; a workshop, 30 b}' 30 feet, 1 story high, containing 
suitable rooms; a stable, 30 by 20 feet, arranged for 2 horses and 
vehicles; and an ice house. These buildings are all frame. Three 
more large bass ponds and 6 spawning ponds have been constructed, 
pipe lines laid, grounds graded, and trees set out. 

At Green Lake, Me., the improvement of the water supply has 
been in progress. The dam at Rocky Pond has been rebuilt, lumber 
obtained for a new flume, and the construction of the latter begun. 
Seven of the rearing ponds have been repaired, buildings repaired and 
painted, roads graded, and bridges put in order. No work has yet 
been undertaken on the Droposed new road to the hatchery owing to 
the difficulty of obtaining a proper title to the land. 

At Gloucester, Mass., several much-needed improvements to the 
buildings and station have been completed. Among the principal of 
these were the laying of a marine telephone cable from the island to 
the mainland, and a considerable addition to the pier. A wing to the 
hatchery, 20 by 30 feet, was erected, and the foundations of the build- 
ing and those under the boiler and chmmey were strengthened. The 
main hatchery, containing the lobster apparatus, was fitted throughout 
with galvanized-iron pipe, and b}? a rearrangement of the tables room 
was made for 5 additional cod tables, thus increasing the total capacit}^ 
from 50,000,000 to 6.5,000,000 cod eggs. 

An appropriation of $.5,000 provided for the protection of the sta- 
tion at Manchester, Iowa, against floods. Plans and specifications 
were accordingly prepared for altering, broadening, and deepening 
the channels of the two streams flowing through the grounds, raising 
1082—06 2 



18 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

an old stone retaining wall and constructing new walls along their 
banks. A 50-foot span iron bridge was also designed in place of a 
wooden one that had been carried away by a flood. The work was 
done by contract and satisfactorily completed by May 27, in accord- 
ance with the plans, although some consequent grading, etc., is now 
in progress. 

At Northville, Mich., the course of a creek flowing through the 
station grounds has been widened, and a cement wall 1,310 feet long 
has been built to prevent damage from overflows. The creek has been 
straightened also, and the space thus gained has permitted the build- 
ing of an additional pond of an area ecjual to the others. The basin of 
the main supply spring has been excavated and enlarged and its banks 
strengthened. 

At Beaufort, N. C, an iron landing pier was constructed in place of 
the temporary wooden one, and the east shore of the island on which 
the laboratory is built was protected from the encroachments of the 
sea b}^ rock work and two stone jetties, A new coal shed was built, 
walks laid, and a number of minor improvements made. At the request 
of the Bureau of Equipment, Navy Department, permission was given 
for the establishment of a wireless-telegraph station for the Navy, and 
space on the island has been set aside for the erection of the mast and 
quarters for the attendants. 

At Wytheville, Va. ,and Leadville, Colo., buildings and ponds were 
put in good repair, and desirable alterations were made. 

ALASKA SALMON HATCHERIES. 

The special commission appointed in November, 1902, by direction 
of the President, to inquire into the needs of the salmon fisheries of 
Alaska, pointed out (H. Doc. 177, 58th Cong., 2d sess.) the necessity 
for artificial propagation as a factor in maintaining this important 
industry. The matter received favorable congressional consideration, 
and in an act approved March 3, 1905,- provision was made for the 
establishment of one or more salmon hatcheries in Alaska. As the 
appropriation became available immediately, preparations to carry 
the law into efi'ect were begun at once. 

After a careful consideration of various localities and all interests 
involved, the special commission recommended that if possible the 
first hatchery be in readiness for operation during the season of 1905, 
and that it be built on the lake, now known as McDonald Lake, near 
the head of Yes Bay, a narrow inlet opening into the west shore of 
Behm Canal, Cleveland Peninsula, about 20 miles northward from 
Loring. This site was the best available in southeast Alaska; the 
location was reported as comparatively easy of access, not far from 
the main line of travel of regular steamers, and with building mate- 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 19 

rial at hand, as having a plentiful supply of water obtainable by 
gravity and an abundance of spawning salmon in the season, and as 
an exceptionally advantageous center from which to distribute the f r}-. 
This recommendation was therefore approved and a site was selected 
on the right bank of the stream flowing into the head of McDonald 
Lake, about a quarter of a mile above its mouth. Yes Bay and its 
catchment basin had been temporarily exempted from settlement 
November 5, 1903, by an order of the Secretary of the Interior, until 
such time as a site for a salmon hatchery could be determined upon 
and a permanent reservation made. 

Plans were prepared for a hatchery with a capacity for 25,000,000 
eggs, and the construction work was placed in charge of an experi- 
enced superintendent in the service of the Bureau, who, having com- 
pleted preliminary arrangements for materials and supplies, left Seat- 
tle for Alaska on June 22. The steamer Alhati'oss was also dispatched 
to Yes Bay, to carry on scientific investigations and at the same time to 
afford assistance in the establishment of the station. 

BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS AND EXPERIMENTS. 

Most of the scientilic work during the year was in continuation of 
inquiries and investigations previousl}'^ begun, pertaining to the biology 
and culture of useful and commercially important aquatic animals and 
plants. Among the most important subjects that have been engaging 
attention are the oyster, the commercial sponges, the diamond-back 
terrapin, the Alaska salmon, the habits of the fresh- water and anadro- 
mous fishes of New England, the diseases of fishes, the ecology of 
small glacial lakes, and the extensive studies at the marine biological 
laboratories of the Bureau. Among the special inquiries taken up 
during the year may be mentioned a survey of the oj^ster beds of 
Matagorda Bay, Texas; a study of the golden trout and other trouts 
of the southern High Sierras in California; and the life history of the 
spoonbill catfish. Studies in the hydrography, oceanography, and 
biolog}^ of the eastern Pacific Ocean were conducted during an extended 
cruise of the steamer Albatross in that region. 

OYSTER LEGISLATION AND EXPERIMENTS. 

Legislation. — The Bureau finds reason for satisfaction in the wide- 
spread attention that is now being paid to the subject of oyster culture 
and the marked advance in the character of oyster legislation enacted 
by the various states. It is yearly becoming more apparent that 
dependence upon the natural beds alone to supply the rapidly growing 
demands of the markets results in the depletion of the beds and a 
shrinkage of the industry in the locality" concerned. Those states that 
adhere to the old policy of suspicion and restriction toward private 



20 EEPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

oyster culture are rapidly becoming relatively smaller factors in the 
business, while others, which have sought to encourage the occupation 
of barren bottoms by citizens in sevei'alty for purposes of oyster 
planting, are steadily gaining, with resultant proht to both the state 
and the citizens. 

Owing to divergent conditions the same laws and methods are not 
strictly applicable to all parts of the coast and in each case the work 
and recommendations of the Bureau are aimed to supply the local 
requirements, both as to the means of conservation of the natural beds 
held liy the state as a common possession of the people and the devel- 
opment of oyster culture under private ownership. The investiga- 
tions of the government have frequently served as the scientific basis 
for new laws. In 180S the Bureau published a report on the oj^ster 
beds of Louisiana which contained a number of recommendations look- 
ing to the improvement of the methods of the o^^ster industry and the 
laws controlling it. After protracted agitation, the legislature in 
1904 passed a law embodying all of the recommendations, with one 
minor exception, and ample machinery has been provided for the 
enforcement of the act, the beneficial effects of which are reported to 
be already apparent and constantly becoming more marked. A sim- 
ilar result in North Carolina has followed the publication of a report 
on experiments in oyster culture conducted jointly by this Bureau 
and the State Natural Histor\^ Survey. Sufficient time has not yet 
elapsed to determine the practical effects of the new order; but it can 
hardly fail to be beneficial. New 03'ster legislation is now being advo- 
cated for Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina, and the work of • 
the Bureau has been useful in furnishing information and advice. 

Investigations in Maine. — Although there is indubitable evidence 
that oysters at one time occurred on the coast of Maine in considerable 
numbers, they were practically' extinct at the time of the first white set- 
tlements except in the Sheepscot River and one or two minor localities. 
In the Sheepscot there were scattering large oysters with few if any small 
ones until about 1898, when spat and young were noticed on the timbers 
of a new dam at Alna. During the following year conditions for 
breeding and spat production seem to have been favorable, and in Juh", 
1904, the rocks and gravel in the river for several miles above the dam 
were found to be well covered with an apparently vigorous .young growth. 
With the knowledge of the existence of these volunteer 03'sters several 
persons have been encouraged to undertake experiments in oyster cul- 
ture on a small scale, but though the seed oysters have lived, fattened, 
and in one case, at least, produced ripe eggs, none of these small artifi- 
cial deposits has made any progress toward reproducing. 

In response to the solicitations of citizens of Maine, an assistant of 
the Bureau was sent to the state in July, 1904, to determine the 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 21 

causes of the failure of the oysters to reproduce, and to make inves- 
tigations preliminary to experiments b}^ the Bureau looking to the 
establishment of self -perpetuating beds in the coastal waters of the 
state. During a period of about five weeks 59 localities were exam- 
ined, covering, in general, the entire coast between Portsmouth, 
N. H., and Rockland, Me. From the data collected it appears that in 
many of these localities adult oysters would thrive and fatten, but the 
density and temperature conditions are such that there would be prac- 
tically no hope of establishing self -perpetuating beds. In many 
places the temperature is permanently too low; in others it sometimes 
reaches the minimum at which spawning takes place (about 68*^ F.), 
but the fluctuations due to the flow and ebb of the tides are too violent. 
In a few places — for example, about the dam at Alna, in the tidal dam 
at York Harbor, and in Great Bay, New Hampshire — the conditions 
appear to be favorable both in degree and constanc}^ and in the same 
places and for the same reasons the salinity is also apparently satis- 
factory. The three places named, however, are deficient in food sup- 
ply, and oysters planted therein would in all probability never fatten 
to a degree to give them a good place in the markets. 

In view of the results of this preliminary work, it appears probable 
that if oyster culture is introduced on the coast of Maine it will be 
necessary to subdivide the process, raising the young seed oysters in 
one locality and growing them for market in another. During the 
ensuing fiscal year the Bureau contemplates undertaking experiments 
in breeding oysters in some suitable locality in the state. 

Oyster sxurvey of Matagorda Bay^ Texas. — Pursuant to a request 
from the governor of Texas, the Bureau during the past winter and 
spring made a survey of the oyster beds of that portion of Matagorda 
Bay lying northeast of Half Moon light, a body of water 39 miles 
long, with an average width of li miles and an approximate area of 
146 square miles. The object of the work was the determination of 
the character and extent of the natural oyster beds, the locating 
of the bottom suitable for oyster culture, and the biological and phys- 
ical features of the bay with special relation to oysters and the oyster 
industry. The results of the surve}^ will be published in a forthcom- 
ing special report, which will contain charts of the oyster grounds 
and recommendations looking to the further development of the oyster 
industry of the region. 

Experiments at Lynnhaveii, Va. — The oyster-fattening experiments 
at Lynnhaven have been continued, but the illness and death of the 
local agent, who has had supervision of the work from its inception, 
has militated against a successful conclusion. As has been stated in 
previous reports, the same conditions that are desirable in stimulating 
the growth of diatoms, the oyster's food, are favorable also to the 



22 EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

growth of undesirable unicellular and filamentous algfe, which give to 
the oyster a disagreeable muddy flavor. The use of copper sulphate 
for the destruction of such algse has given satisfactory results. 

Oyster and clam, experiments in North Carolina. — The oyster-grow- 
ing experiments in North Carolina conducted in connection with the 
Beaufort laboratory have been continued. The increasing importance 
of the quahog, or hard clam ( Yenus mercenaria)., in North Carolina, 
owing to the development of the canning industry, has suggested an 
inquiry into the habits, growth, and propagation of this species, and 
in connection with the oyster work experiments in the planting and 
cultivation of this valuable mollusk have been undertaken. 

EXPERIMENTS IN SPONGE CULTURE. 

The experiments in the raising of sponges from cuttings at several 
points on the coast of Florida have been continued, and the results of 
the year's operations show conclusivelj^ that it is possible to raise 
sponges of merchantable size in this manner, a number of specimens 
6 inches in diameter having developed from plants made three 3^ears 
before. The sponges artificially grown are of excellent shape and 
quality, and are superior in both of these respects to sponges growing 
naturally in the same localities. The economic aspects of the experi- 
ments, however, are still to be demonstrated, as the search for a suit- 
able material for support of the cuttings until the}" reach commercial 
maturity is yet unrewarded. Bricks, rocks, and similar bodies on the 
bottom will undoubtedly serve, but this method, besides having cer- 
tain mechanical drawbacks, produces sponges inferior in shape and 
texture to those grown suspended above the bottom. They more 
nearly resemble the natural sponges, especially in the possession of a 
"■root," which is the raw surface resulting from detachment from the 
support; it is the "root" that first wears out in use, and the durabil- 
ity of this part determines the wearing qualities of the sponge as a 
whole. Sponges grown artificially on wires raised above the bottom 
have a surface uniformly felted and with corresponding uniform 
wearing qualities. 

During May, 1905, there was a considerable mortalit}^ among the 
sponges planted at Anclote Key, aft'ecting principally those in shoal 
water and near the surface. It seems probable that the condition was 
due to the prevalence of hot weather with heavy showers, coincident 
with exceedingly low tides. The extreme sensitiveness of sponges to 
the influence of rain water has before been noted. 

EXPERIMENTAL CULTURE OF DIAMOND-BACK TERRAPIN. 

During the summer of 1904 the investigation of the diamond-back 
terrapin was continued at an experimental pound on the eastern shore 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 28 

of Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, with a view to devising a method by 
which terrapins may be hatched and reared for market. In August a 
few of the impounded terrapin made nests and laid eg'gs, and the 
young made their appearance about six weeks later. These furnished 
material for determining the rate of growth, the effects of different 
kinds of food, etc, B}^ June, 1905, some of them had increased more 
than 100 per cent in length and 400 per cent in weight, while others 
had undergone but slight growth. The stock of adult terrapins was 
carried through the winter with little loss and with general marked 
improvement in condition. 

STUDIES OF PARTICULAR FISHES. 

Trout of the souther7i High Sierras in California. — Early in 1904 the 
President called the attention of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the 
golden trout of Volcano Creek and the imminent danger of its exter- 
mination. Unusual interest attaches to this species, not only on 
account of its great beauty, gameness, and delicious flavor, but also 
because of its very restricted habitat and the scenic beauty of the 
region in which it is found. Acting on the request of the President, 
the Bureau made an investigation for the purpose of determining the 
natural geographic distribution of the golden trout, its habits, food, 
and spawning time ; the streams into which it has been transplanted, 
and with what results; the other streams into which it may be advan- 
tageously introduced; whether its artificial propagation can be under- 
taken by the Bureau, and what measures should be provided for its 
protection. Man}' important facts concerning the golden trout and 
other tiout of the southern High Sierras were learned, all of which 
will be set forth in a detailed report soon to be published. 

The investigations showed that the golden trout is native to but one 
stream. Volcano Creek, and unless prompt action be taken to provide 
adequate protection the fish is in serious danger of extermination. It 
is recommended that the state of California transplant it to a number 
of barren streams that can be easily reached, and that the general gov- 
ernment undertake its artificial propagation. It is further recom- 
mended that the limits of Mount Whitney Military Reservation be 
extended to include Volcano Creek, and that all fishing in that creek 
be prohibited for a term of three years; that thereafter restrictions be 
placed on the size and number that may be caught, and that fishing 
during the spawning season be prohibited. 

Physiological studies of the Pacific salmons. — As is well known, the 
Pacific salmons die after once spawning, a phenomenon which, next to 
reproduction itself, constitutes the most important fact in the life of 
these fishes. The causes that lead to this departure from the ordinary 
course of life of fishes are obscure, and the specific object of these 
investigations is to determine the physiological changes attending the 



24 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

passage of the lish from the sea to the fresh waters of the spawning- 
grounds at the river heads, with the belief that light will be thrown on 
the causes of death. The work so far done has been largely of a pre- 
liminary nature, consisting mainly of measurements of a series of fish 
and their principal organs; the collection of specimens for chemical and 
biological analysis; the determination of the rate of respiration, the 
rate and force of the heart, and the blood pressure, and the measure- 
ment of the electric conductivity and freezing point of the blood. All 
the data have been obtained from fish taken, respectively, in salt, 
brackish, and fresh waters, and at progressive stages of reproductive 
activity, for the purpose of comparative stud}^ when the material has 
been completely worked up and analyzed. A special report covering 
certain phases of the study has recently been published. 

The s2K>onMU catfish. — This large but rather coarse food fish of the 
Mississippi Basin, known to science as Polyodon sjjafhula. is the object 
of rather important local fisheries, and as it is liable to commercial 
extermination its feeding and breeding habits were made the subject 
of investigation during the summer of 1904. The work has cleared 
up certain misapprehensions as to the feeding habits of this fish, but 
concerning the breeding season and habits nothing positive was deter- 
mined, not one of 1,500 fish examined having significantly developed 
sexual glands. 

Food of dog-fishes. — For several years there have been conducted 
investigations upon the food of certain fishes of little or no food value, 
though of considerable indirect importance, and this work has been 
continued in 1905. Two species, the smooth dogfish and the horned 
dogfish, which were studied in southern New England, have been shown 
to be so destructive to food species as to be a distinct menace to the 
fisheries. 

The smooth dogfish feeds principally on large crustaceans, nearly 
all of which are of direct economic value, and conspicuous among 
which is the lobster. Estimating the number of smooth dogfish in 
Buzzards Bay as 100,000, which is conservative, and allowing each 
dogfish one lobster in three days, there would be represented a 
destruction of 150,000 lobsters in one month, or 750,000 during the 
five months of the presence of the dogfish in the region. 

In the vicinity of Woods Hole the principal food of the horned dog- 
fish is a little jell^^fish, but observations on other parts of the coast 
indicate that not only food fishes but the nets and lines of the fisher- 
men are destroyed. Ground fishing in Boston Bay in 1903 yielded an 
average of $3 a day per man during July and August, but in 1901: the 
horned dogfish was present in such great numbers that it was impos- 
sible to catch anything else. When fish of value were taken they 
were torn in pieces by dogfish before they could be landed. Herring, 
mackerel, and other food fish are torn from the gill nets by this 



REPORT OF THE COMMlSSIOlSrER OP FISHERIES. 25 

species, which, when itself enmeshed, so tears the twine with its teeth 
and abrades it with its rough scales as to ruin the nets. It is esti- 
mated that in 1904 the loss in catch and gear from this cause amounted 
to $10,000 in Boston Bay alone, and the destruction extends in even 
greater measure northward. The damage has vastly increased in 
recent years. 

The most practicable way to hold these destructive fishes in check 
would be to make them of commercial value. Although they have 
fewer enemies than most fishes, on the other hand they do not breed 
so rapidly, and if a market for them were created it would not be long 
until their numbers would decrease. This species ofi'er commercial 
possibilities, of which some are suggested: (1) The skin makes a good 
polishing leather for metals and hard wood; it is used for this purpose 
by cabinetmakers in many parts of Europe. (2) The liver, at least of 
the horned dogfish, when boiled down into oil gives a fair yield, but 
at present the price of dogfish livers is too low to make this business 
pay. (3) The fins 3'ield a considerable amount of glue; by simple boil- 
ing a fair quality was extracted. (4) The flesh is a wholesome food, 
and is eaten in Europe and elsewhere; it is free from bones, and when 
cooked it is of delicate texture, somewhat dry, with a good flavor, 
resembling halibut, but more delicate 

STUDIES OF SMALL LAKES. 

Connecticut lal'es and neighhoring vmters. — In pursuance of the plan 
of the Bureau to undertake biological investigations of the principal 
waters of each of the large river basins of New England, the Connecti- 
cut lakes and neighboring waters in northern New Hampshire have 
been examined with special reference to the habits and distribution of 
the fishes. Sixteen species of fishes were ascertained to be indige- 
nous to these waters, and 5 other species had been introduced, but of 
the latter only the landlocked salmon and the European brown trout 
are known to have survived. Apparent^ these lakes are well suited 
in every way to trout, lake trout, and landlocked salmon, having fairly 
deep, cool water and plenty of small fish to serv^e as food. 

Lakes of nortliern Indiana. — The study of the lakes of northern 
Indiana was continued, the principal line of investigation pertaining 
to the aquatic plants and their relation to the fish life. Each of 18 
small lakes in the region was examined with reference to the species 
of aquatic plants growing therein, the depths in which each species 
grows, the relations of each to the fish food, and the character of the 
bottom. Lake Maxinkuckee, Which had been previously studied more 
thoroughly, was used as a standard with which to compare the condi- 
tions in other lakes. The general biology of Lake Maxinkuckee was 
studied during the fall and winter, special attention being given to the 
food of the diflerent species of fishes at that season of the year. The 



26 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

stomach contents of many examples of several different species were 
critically examined and much valuable information was obtained. The 
results of these various investigations will be published in a special 
report in due time. 

FISH DISEASES, WATER POLLUTIONS, ETC. 

A number of investigations of fish epidemics and stream contamina- 
tion by factory and other refuse have been conducted during the year. 
These subjects are of very great and growing importance, and the 
Bureau, in addition to the consideration of diseases affecting fishes at 
its own stations, is constantly consulted by the state authorities regard- 
ing them. Instances of especial interest and requiring extended inves- 
tigation have been an epidemic among brook trout at the Cold Spring 
Harbor station of the New York Forest, Fish, and Game commission; 
an epidemic that attacked the fish in the trout preserves of the South 
Side Sportsmen's Club, at Oakdale, Long Island; distress and mortal- 
ity among fishes in the Bureau's aquarial exhibit at the Louisiana Pur- 
chase Exposition, where the service water contained an excess of lime 
due to the clarification process used by the city; and a mortality among 
trout at the Bayfield hatchery of the Wisconsin fish commission, which 
was being studied at the close of the year. Laboratory experiments 
have been conducted to determine the effects upon fishes of waters pol- 
luted with various industrial wastes, and at the request of the Mary- 
land fish warden an effort was made to discover the cause of the weak- 
ness and death of numl)ers of fish in the Potomac at Cumberland and 
above, with the result that acid wastes from mining operations were 
found to be responsible. 

IMAKINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORIES. 

The marine biological laboratories of the Bureau at Woods Hole, 
Mass., and Beaufort, N. C, were open during the usual summer season, 
and their tables were occupied by investigators from the principal 
institutions of learning in all parts of the United States. The facili- 
ties of the laboratories were used for the investigation of various 
questions important in the work of the Bureau and in marine biology 
in general, and a number of researches were made at the Bureau's 
instance and in its particular interest. 

At the Woods Hole laboratory the principal feature of the work for 
the past two seasons has been the biological survey of neighboring- 
waters and the cataloguing of results. The dredgings made by the 
steamers F'tsli Ilawl and Phalarojye, which were detailed for the pur- 
pose, furnish data from which, when complete, it is intended to com- 
pile records of the distribution of the entire fauna and flora of the 
region. Of other investigations of scientific and practical interest there 



REPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 27 

may be mentioned a study of the special senses of fishes, which was 
continued during the summer of 1904 with reference to the ear of the 
squeteague; the food of fishes of little or no food value, mentioned 
elsewhere in this report; an epidemic disease of menhaden in Narra- 
gansett Bay and certain parts of Buzzards Bay; the effects of various 
sorts of metal piping upon marine organisms kept in aquaria; certain 
properties of the blood of various marine animals; parasites of fishes; 
the quantity of fish consumed by marine birds, etc. 

The fauna of the Beaufort region is being studied in a series of 
investigations undertaken by specialists in the various groups. The 
chelonians, crustaceans, tunicates, echinoderms, sponges, actinians, 
anthozoa, and also the alga? received attention during the summer of 
1904, and in addition to the general collecting and observation of fishes 
of the region some studies of particular species were conducted. The 
oyster and clam experiments carried on at this laboratory have been 
mentioned elsewhere. 

EXPEDITION TO THE EASTERN PACIFIC. 

Early in the fiscal year arrangements were made to utilize the 
steamer Albatross in carrying on certain investigations in the eastern 
Pacific under the immediate direction of Mr. Alexander Agassiz. The 
vessel left San Francisco October 6, and several months were devoted 
to the work. Lines of soundings and dredgings were run from 
Panama to the Galapagos Islands; from the Galapagos Islands to 
Callao, Peru; Callao to Easter Island; Easter Island to the Galapagos; 
the Galapagos to the Gambler Islands, and thence to Acapuleo. The 
character of the ocean floor was thus developed, and important collec- 
tions resulted from the dredgings, affording many valuable data for 
the elucidation of the fauna of the regions visited. 

STATISTICS AND METHODS OF THE FISHERIES. 
CONDITION OF THE FISHING INDUSTRY. 

The fisheries of the United States exhibit a substantial increase from 
year to 3^ ear and as a whole are in a flourishing condition. Their 
growth has resulted from the invasion of new fishing grounds, the 
increased abundance of fishes due to protection and artificial propaga- 
tion, the more active prosecution of the business in long-established 
lines, and the greater utilization of products which until a compara- 
tively recent time were entirely disregarded or considered as of little 
economic value. These factors have more than compensated for the 
decline in some important branches owing to indiscreet fishing or to 
the inevitable efiects of civilization on certain kinds of animal life and 
on certain small waters. 



28 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The value of the water products taken and sold by United States 
fishermen in 1905 was approximately $56,250,000, and this sum is 
exclusive of the very considerable fisheries of insular possessions and 
the immense quantities of fish taken for home consumption and by 
sportsmen. In no other country are the commercial fisheries more 
valuable as a whole than in the United States, and in no country is the 
financial condition of the fishing population better. The number of 
persons who make a livelihood in this industry is about 232,000, and 
the capital invested exceeds $82,000,000. 

The most valual)le of all the fishery products is the oj^ster, in the 
output of which the United States surpasses all other countries com- 
bined. The crop of 1905 may be placed at 32,000,000 bushels, with a 
market value of $15,760,000. The most significant feature of the 
industr}^ is the growing- appreciation of the benefits of oj^ster culture 
and of the desirability of selling or leasing barren bottoms for oyster 
planting. Each year a larger proportion of the oyster crop is taken 
from cultivated grounds and the business is thus placed on a more 
secure basis. It is estimated that in 1905 over 11,875,000 bushels, 
valued at $8,775,000, were marketed from private grounds. Virginia 
has recently assumed the first rank as an oj^ster-producing state, owing 
chiefly to the more general practice of oyster farming, the state's 
jdeld being now upward of 8,500,000 bushels, with a value to the 
producers of $3,250,000. 

The great high-sea fisheries for cod, haddock, hake, halibut, mack- 
erel, herring, and other well-known food fishes have been fairly suc- 
cessful as a whole, and have yielded about $7,500,000. The catch of 
both fresh and salt cod was somewhat less than in the previous year; 
that of haddock and hake was larger. The halibut fishery has been 
followed by fewer vessels, with a consequent falling ofl' in catch. The 
take of mackerel was less than in any of the four preceding- years; the 
sudden decrease in the abundance of this fish, beginning in 1886 and 
continuing to the present time, is one of the most remarkable cases of 
the kind. Swordfish were probably never known to be so abundant 
as in the summer and fall of 1904, and large numbers were captured 
for the New England markets. 

The lobster fishery continues to show a diminishing yield, with a 
disproportionate increase in value. In 1905 the catch was less than in 
the previous year, and on the Massachusetts coast was particularly 
light. The decrease in the abundance of the lobster, which began 
about fifteen years ago and has been due to overfishing and violation 
of law, can be arrested only by extensive cultural operations and 
rigidly enforced restrictive measures. At present a large part of the 
lobsters consumed in the United States comes from Nova Scotia. 

The whale fishery, which at one time was carried on l)y an immense 
fleet of fine sailing vessels and was the leading fishing industry of the 



EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 29 

country, is now conducted chiefly with steamers in the north Pacific 
and Arctic oceans, and is an expensive, uncertain, and often unremu- 
nerative business. The value of the baleen, blubber oil, and sperm oil 
taken has been less than $900,000, and there is no reason to believe 
that the fisher}^ will ever show any permanent improvement. 

The anadromous fishes of the Atlantic and Pacific seaboards — the 
salmons, the shad, the alewives, the striped bass, the perches, etc. — ■ 
have come to the streams in abundance, and represent $15,000,000 of 
income to the fishermen. The run of Atlantic salmon in the spring 
of 1905 was the largest in a number of years, and is generally attrib- 
uted to artificial propagation, as natural reproduction is now almost 
suspended. The shad fishery was poor in the rivers, but good in the 
bays and along the outer shores. The salmon pack on the Pacific coast 
in 190-1, aggregating over 2,800,000 cases, was somewhat less than in 
the previous year and very materially less than in 1902 and 1901. The 
decrease was in part due to the growing utilization of the catch in 
other ways than b}" canning, but also represented a decrease in the run 
of fish in two important regions — Alaska and Puget Sound. In the 
Sacramento River there was a noteworthy increase in the abundance 
of salmon, while in the Columbia River a larger catch was made at the 
expense of the future supply. 

The fisheries of the Great Lakes have yielded over $2,700,000, 
and in general are in a satisfactory condition. The lake trout, lake 
herring, and pike perch have occurred in their usual abundance, but 
the whitefish has decreased, notwithstanding most active fish-cultural 
work. - 

The sponge fishery, confined to the coast of Florida, has special 
interest at this time because of the efforts of the Bureau to perfect a 
method of cultivation for maintaining the supply. The yield has con- 
tinued to fall below that of previous years, and owing to the absence 
in the markets of desirable sizes the price has reached a higher point 
than ever before. The catch on the "key grounds" has been very 
small for several years, and the spongers attribute the fact to the 
prevalence of cloudy water, but there is little doubt that it is in large 
measure due to actual exhaustion of the grounds. Unquestionably 
there are places where the water rarely clears and on which a large 
catch could be made under favorable conditions, but the turbidity of 
the water in these places is no new thing and should not be cited 
as the cause of the continued small catch in the key region. On the 
"bay grounds" also the catch has been light for several years, owing 
to the depletion of the shoal-water grounds and the prevalence of 
unfavorable conditions which prescribed or interfered with the opera 
tions offshore. The limit of possibility of taking sponges by the 
ordinary method of hooking is reached in a depth of between 40 and 
50 feet; but it is known that there are good sponges in greater depths 



30 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

than that, and at the close of the fiscal year an attempt was being- made 
by persons skilled in the methods used in the Mediterranean to take 
the sponges by diving on the virgin deep-water beds far from shore. 
Both sponge buyers and sponge fishermen are watching the results of 
this work with considerable interest. 

STATISTICAL INQUIRIP^S AND REPORTS. 

The facilities of the Bureau do not permit the collection of fishery 
statistics for the entire country every year, and it is therefore neces- 
sary to limit the inquiries to particular regions each year, the various 
groups of states being taken in turn. During 1905 the regular field 
force of statistical agents completed the canvass of the fisheries of the 
Great Lakes begun in Ma}- , 190-1, and also took up and finished the 
fisheries of the Misissippi River and its tributaries and Lake of the 
Woods. Canvasses of the fisheries of the Middle Atlantic and Pacific 
States were begun and were in progress at the close of the year. Local 
agents at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., have obtained and submitted 
statistics of the extensive vessel fisheries centering at those ports; this 
information has been published in monthl}^ bulletins and distributed 
among the trade, and an annual bulletin embodying current and com- 
parative statistics has been issued. Statistical reports on the fisheries 
of the Gulf States, the South Atlantic States, and the interior waters 
of New York and Vermont have also been published. 

SOME NEW FEATURES OF THE FISHING INDUSTRY. 

It is proper at this time to notice at length certain recent develop- 
ments and aspects of the American fisheries which are destined to have 
an important influence on the industry for many j^ears to come. The 
following notes, based on information obtained b}^ the agents of the 
Bureau, pertain to some of the leading branches of the fisheries on the 
Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 

Purse seines in the hank cod fishery. — The introduction of the purse 
seine in what is known as the salt bank fishery dates from April, 1904, 
when the schooner Ifaxine Elliott.^ of Gloucester, sailed for Sable 
Island equipped with a specially constructed purse seine and seine 
boat for catching cod and pollock. In May and June these fish have 
been observed to school in large numbers on the bars about Sable 
Island and in the bends of the island, where it is usually very difiicult 
to take them with trawls, the fish often failing to notice the baited 
hook owing to the abundance of live food. As is well known, the 
native fishermen on the Labrador coast at certain times make fine 
hauls with small seines, and it was this fact that first led the captain 
of the Maxine Elliott to consider seriously the question of using a 
purse seine in the salt bank cod fishery. It was obvious that if the 



KEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 31 

small seines could be used to such good advantage larger hauls could 
be made with purse seines and a fare secured in a much shorter time 
than by trawling or hand-lining. The schooner in question arrived 
home from the trip on June 23, 1904, with 203,000 pounds of salted 
pollock and 37,000 pounds of salted cod. 

In the spring of 1905 two Gloucester vessels, the schooners Mama 
E. Wltherell and Tattler^ which are among the largest in the fleet, 
were fitted out for purse-seine cod-fishing. The}^ sailed April 6, went 
to the Sable Island ground, and made quick fares. The former vessel 
arrived home June 26 with 263,600 pounds of salted pollock and 20,000 
pounds of salted cod; and the latter arrived July 1 with 363,325 pounds 
of salted pollock and 11,000 pounds of salted cod. These fares were 
made in three to five weeks of actual fishing, a much shorter time than 
in the regular fishery, in which the vessels sail in February or March 
and are seldom home by July 1, and furthermore the quantities of fish 
caught were equal to or in excess of the fares of any vessels in the 
ordinary salt cod fishery. 

The seines used in this new venture were ITO to 200 fathoms long 
and 12 fathoms deep, with a 1-inch mesh throughout. The method of 
fishing was the same as in the mackerel fisher}'. The fish were caught 
in water from 1 to 25 fathoms deep. The captains state that the seine 
can be used to advantage only in taking cod and other ground fish in 
shallow waters, such as those about Sable Island and at certain places 
on the Labrador coast and around the island of Anticosti, and not on 
the fishing banks in general; while pollock, which school near the sur- 
face, can of course be fished for wherever seen, without regard to the 
depth of the water. With reference to the size of the hauls, it is reported 
that 50,000 pounds were sometimes taken at one lift, and that a Nova 
Scotia vessel, the only other vessel thus far engaged in this fishery, at 
one set inclosed what was estimated to be 100,000 pounds, and came 
near losing her seine and boat as the fish settled; the purse line had 
to be cut and the fish allowed to escape, it being impossible to handle 
them. 

While it is too soon to state the probable effect of the inauguration 
of purse seining on the prosecution of the salt cod fishery, it is believed 
that the method will be continued, that more vessels will engage in it, 
and that large fares of cod and pollock will be brought to our ports 
from grounds not hitherto exploited by American fishermen. 

8eine-])ursln<j machine. — Pursing jnachines have been in use for 
several years, and, having given satisfaction, have been adopted by 
nearly every vessel in the mackerel-seining fleet. Previous to their 
introduction the work of "pursing up" occupied from thirt}- to forty 
minutes and required the united efl'orts of the 15 men in the boat's 
crew. With one of these machines 6 men now can do the work in less 
than half that time and much more easily. 



32 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The machine consists of a set of cogwheels fixed to a shaft and 
geared so as to admit of considerable speed, and at the same time pow- 
erful enough to withstand a heavy strain. To each end of the shaft is 
attached a crank, the handle of which is long enough to permit three 
men to work abreast. When the seine has been set around a school of 
fish the ends are brought together in the usual manner, the purse 
davit shipped, the purse line rove through the snatch blocks fore and 
aft, and the seine is pursed by hand until there is a perceptible strain 
on both parts of the purse line, which are then led to the machine and 
placed around the drum, a man being stationed on the port side of the 
boat to coil the line as it is hove in and also to slack away if necessar3^ 
The men working the machine are relieved at intervals of a few minutes, 
and by the time two or three shifts have been made the seine is pursed. 

G')U nets in the mackerel fishery. — Gill netting for mackerel was in 
vogue at the time hook-and-line fishing was extensiveh' carried on, but 
a few years after purse seines came into general use it ceased to be 
remunerative, and was entirely abandoned by vessels until about seven 
years ago. The continuous scarcity of mackerel along the Atlantic coast 
for a number of years, during which seining proved very unprofitable, 
led to the revival of the old method, which has now been put in practice 
by a considerable portion of the seining fleet. During the last few 
years about 150 vessels, large and small, hailing from all parts of the 
New England coast, but many of them from Gloucester, have been 
engaged in this fisher3^ Seines are used only for schooling mackerel, 
but in order to be prepared also for fish not seen at the surface but 
thought to be near, the large vessels equipped with seines carry gill 
nets in addition. 

"Dragging" for mackerel requires a considerable number of nets fas- 
tened together in one long string, called a ''gang," and set from the 
vessel. The number of nets depends on the size of the vessel, 100 
being the maximum and about 60 the average. As this kind of fishing 
is always carried on at night, it is somewhat difficult to keep track of 
the nets, particularly when it is ver}^ dark and a dozen or more vessels 
are operating in the same locality. To prevent other vessels of the 
fleet from crossing the nets, lights are attached to the outer and mid- 
dle section of the gang, the buoys supporting the lanterns consisting 
of two pieces of boards fastened together in the shape of a cross, with 
a hole bored in the center to admit a staff some 3 or 4 feet long, from 
which hang the lanterns. Besides serving the purpose of warning 
other vessels as to the position of the nets, the light acts as a guide 
when it is necessary to cast the nets adrift on account of rough weather. 

When the weather is pleasant and fish are fairl}^ plentiful the nets 
require constant attention. They are visited in dories, and one man 
is supposed to tend 12 nets. Additional care is necessary when dog- 
fish are numerous, and this is often the case when mackerel fishing is 



REPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 33 

best. It is sometimes necessary to haul the nets in order to prevent 
their complete destruction. A school of dog'fish can in a single night 
damage a gang of nets sufficientl}' to keep an entire crew mending for 
a week. Larger sharks are even more destructive when in any con- 
siderable numbers, and not only tear the nets in their endeavors to 
roach the captured mackerel, but entangle themselves in such a way 
that they can scarcely be extricated without serious injury to the nets. 
The profits of the gill-net fishing may be largely measured by the pres- 
ence or absence of these marauders during a season. For a number of 
years some of the larger vessels were compelled to abandon gill nets 
entirely and relied upon seines alone. 

Both gill nets and purse seines are particularly well adapted to the 
mackerel fishery, but from an economic viewpoint it would seem that 
small vessels are better suited for dragging than large ones. The 
large vessels that have given up gill nets are few compared with the 
number of small craft that have adopted them, and the present indi- 
cations are that dragging for mackerel will continue to be the chief 
method of capture by man}^ vessels of this class. 

Improvements in salmon canneries. — During the past decade great 
improvements have been made in the salmon canneries throughout 
Alaska. Large and well-lighted buildings have taken the place of 
low, small, and inferior ones; kerosene lamps have given way to elec- 
tric lights iri many instances, and other improvements have been intro- 
duced from time to time as the industry- expanded; buildings, machin- 
cr}'^, and nearly everything connected with the business have undergone 
a complete change. 

All buildings connected with the salmon fishery are erected close to 
the water's edge, in order that the catch may be landed at the door of 
the cannery with one handling and to facilitate the loading of the 
ships at the end of the season. The early canneries were divided into 
spaces for storing nets, boats, lumber, boxes, cans, and other material, 
only a portion of the building l)eing utilized for canning purposes. 
Most canneries now have separate storehouses, or are large enough 
to accommodate the material which is to be kept under cover without 
infringing upon the working room in the cannery proper. Besides 
the buildings formerly considered requisite, several more — such as 
blacksmith, machine, and boat shops, also a box factory and labeling 
room — are now counted indispensable to a first-class cannery. 

The introduction of improved machiner}" and the much greater 
demand for salmon led to the installation of additional lines of 
machinery, until, from the one and two lines that were formerly con- 
sidered sufficient, the number has gradually increased until six or 
seven lines are now used in some canneries. For the early canneries 
20,000 cases in a season was an average pack; the improved machinery 
doubled the capacity of such canneries, and the installation of more 
1082—06 3 



34 EEPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

lines has brought about still further increase. There is a difference 
of over 4,000 cases per day between the output of a single-line and a 
seven-line cannery. 

New jproducts of the Pacific fisheries. — Considerable attention is now 
being given to the utilization of offal from salmon canneries, the 
demand for fish fertilizer having gradual!}^ increased in the last ten 
3'ears until there are now three factories on the Pacific coast and two 
more will soon be in operation. The Hawaiian Islands and European 
countries are the principal importers of the product. Small shipments 
have been made to Japan also. The supply of material is practically 
inexhaustible. The offal from the Alaskan canneries in the last four 
years has amounted to about 43,000,000 pounds annualh% and from 
canneries in Washington, Oregon, and California, 15,000,000 pounds 
annually. Two fertilizer plants, on the Columbia River and Puget 
Sound, use salmon offal almost entirely, but one located in Alaska 
depends chiefly on herring for its supply, although when there is a 
small run of herring whole humpback and dog salmon are used to 
some extent. Besides fertilizer, a considerable quantity of oil is manu- 
factured at these establishments. 

The canning of salmon and sardines on the Pacific coast has been 
followed by the canning of shad, halibut, etc. These products, how- 
ever, have not met with extensive sale, as they are as yet in the exper- 
imental stage. The local demand at times has been quite encouraging, 
and the outlook seems to warrant more extended operations. The 
canned halibut placed on the market has met with considerable local 
favor, and as a result a company has been formed to exploit tliis prod- 
uct. Fancy brands of smoked halibut also are being prepared on 
Puget Sound, 

For a number of years a compan}^ at Point Roberts, Wash., has 
been engaged in putting up salmon paste. The fish are ground up, 
cooked, and seasoned with spices, etc., and canned with gravy, making 
a very palatable dish. When warmed over and spread on bread or 
crackers, in the form of sandwiches, salmon paste is said to be delicious. 
It is a comparatively new article of food on the Pacific coast, but in 
Norway it has been used for many years. 

The shrimp and crah fisheries of Puget Sound. — The casual catching 
of shrimp in Puget Sound waters in the last few years has led fisher- 
men to believe that an industr}^ of considerable importance might be 
developed, although until recently there was little or no sale for the 
product. The demand has slowly increased, however, and the fisher- 
men have made a closer investigation of the grounds. Trials were 
first made with hand dredges from small boats in various parts of 
Hood Canal, and while no large body of shrimp was discovered the 
result was quite satisfactory, and soon two small steamers were engaged 
in the fishery, marketing their catch at Seattle and Tacoma. The 



EEPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OB^ FISHERIES. 35 

apparatus used is now largely beam trawls, in water ranging- from 10 
to 25 fathoms in depth. It is stated by the fishermen that the amount 
of shrimp taken has not been as large as was expected, and as yet the 
catch is barely sufficient to supply the local demand. Only a small 
portion of the ground in Puget Sound has been exploited for this 
product, however, and further trials may develop profitable areas. It 
is thought bj^ fishermen that the Strait of Juan de Fuca, or the north- 
ern part of Puget Sound, in the vicinity of the San Juan Islands, may 
yield good results. 

The crab fishery of Puget Sound is of considerable importance. 
Large numbers of crabs are taken annually in Semiahmooand Belling- 
ham bays and in waters adjacent to Dungeness. Smaller quantities 
are caught also in other parts of the sound. Wire pots, baited and 
buoyed in the same manner as lobster pots, are the principal means of 
capture. Most of the crabs taken are sold fresh, the chief market 
being Seattle, from which point they are shipped to various parts of 
the coast. The annual catch now amounts to nearly 300,000 pounds, 
with a value to the fishermen of approximately |12,000. 

A few years ago the abundance of crabs in Semiahmoo Bay attracted 
the attention of cannerymen, and a crab cannery was established at 
Blaine, Wash., with a capacity of about 100 cases per day. The plant 
has been operated for several seasons, always at a loss, but there 
seems to be no reason why this product should not meet with a steady 
demand. It has been shipped in carload lots to brokers in various 
parts of the country, but only small quantities have reached the public, 
which is not aware of the existence of this excellent preparation. 

Export trade in frozen and fnlld-cnred salmon. — In the general 
expansion of the Pacific coast fisheries the salmon industry, the most 
important, has likewise undergone changes in the last few years. The 
major portion of the catch, as formerly, is canned, but with the grow- 
ing demand for salted salmon the output of this product has increased 
until this branch of the industr}^ has attained great importance. There 
has arisen also a considerable demand for mild-cured and frozen 
salmon, both finding a market in Europe, and the latter being sold in 
the United States also. 

For a number of years the frozen salmon shipped to Europe were 
lightl}^ smoked by the continental dealers, who thawed the fish and 
cured them in the usual way. It was found, however, that salmon 
which had been frozen for some time were not in as good condition 
for mild-curing as those cured shortly after being caught, and recently 
the curing has been done at cold-storage plants in the United States 
and the smoking has been done in Europe. Since 1892, when the 
shipping of fresh salmon to Europe in quantities began, the cold-storage 
plants have been improved, and the product now exported is of much 
better grade than that ten years ago. 



36 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The process of mild-curing followed shortl}' after the shipping of 
frozen salmon to Europe began, and the mild-cured product has met 
with considerable favor wherever introduced. The demand in the 
United States is said to be steadilj'^ increasing, and presumably the time 
is not far distant when as much of this product will be consumed in 
this countr}?^ as is exported to Eui-ope. Thus far Germany has offered 
the principal market, the superior facilities of the German cold-storage 
plants enabling them to supph^ many other European countries. 

In order to meet the growing demand for mild-cured and frozen 
salmon, many of the Columbia River canneries have erected cold- 
storage plants, and these products are now prepared by all the packers 
on the Paciiic coast. In the process of mild-curing onl}" the choicest 
king salmon are accepted, and only the sides of the fish are used. They 
are " slack-salted " in tierces holding 800 to 1,000 pounds, and are kept in 
a cold room at even temperature until ready for shipment, when they 
are loaded into refrigerator cars, shipped across the continent, and 
thence to Europe. From the time of leaving the Pacific coast until 
arriving at their destination the fish undergo no change of tempera- 
ture, and when unloaded from the ship are again stored in a freezing 
plant, where they remain until smoked. Owing to the fact that they 
are likely to deteriorate quickly when taken from cold storage, only 
enough are smoked at a time to supply the immediate demand. 

Mild-cured salmon when smoked are considered much superior to 
the hard, dr^^-salted article; they bring 15 to 18 cents a pound, the 
latter 8 to 10 cents. The demand for the high-grade fish is chiefly 
from the first-class hotels and cafes, but the family trade also is large. 
The fish are cut into thin slices and made into sandwiches, or are pre- 
pared in other appetizing ways known to the Germans. 

In 1904 there were 31 mild-curing and cold-storage plants on the 
Pacific coast — ll on the Columbia River, 6 on the Sacramento River, 
4 on Puget Sound, 3 on Eel River, 1 at Grays Harbor, 1 on the Oregon 
coast, 1 at Monterey, and 1 at Taku Harbor. The output of mild- 
cured salmon in 1904 was over 12,000,000 pounds, a substantial increase 
over the preceding year. The amount prepared since 1897 has been 
approximately 38,204,000 pounds, with a total value to the fishermen 
of nearly 12,000,000. 

In connection with this industry steamers fitted with freezing plants 
are now being brought into use, being especially valuable in collecting- 
fish from waters where the run of salmon is not large enough to war- 
rant the building of cold-storage plants. After being transported long 
distances in the usual way, salmon are unfit for mild-curing or freez- 
ing, and the catch in such isolated places has therefore been canned 
or salted. The vessels equipped with cold-storage facilities prove an 
advantage to the fishermen, who can thus dispose of their catch with- 
out the labor and expense of carrying it to the canneries, and can also 



REPOKT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHEEIE8. 37 

profit, because salmon suitable for mild-curing bring a higher price 
than do fish sold to the canneries. The expansion of this feature of the 
salmon trade will undoubtedly materially increase the importance of 
numerous small streams now of little consequence. 

MISCELLANEOUS ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS. 
OPERATIONS OF VESSELS. 

Steamer Albatross. — A liberal appropriation for the purchase and 
repair of scientific equipment allowed, for the first time since this ves- 
sel was built, the complete renewal of old apparatus, and the purchase 
of much-needed new equipment. The work of the vessel during the 
3^ear consisted of a cruise of scientific exploration in the eastern Pacific, 
elsewhere described, which occupied the period from October 6, 1904, 
to April 5, 1905, and services in connection with the establishment of 
the new salmon hatchery in Alaska, in which she was engaged at the 
close of the year. 

SteamefT Fish Hawk. — The necessity for extensive repairs to this 
ship also developed during the year, and a special appropriation for 
this purpose and for an electric lighting plant permitted considerable 
refitting. The machinery is antiquated, however, has seen long serv- 
ice, and in the interests of safety and economy must soon be replaced. 
The vessel rendered service during the j'ear in a survey of the oyster 
grounds of Matagorda Bay, Texas, as elsewhere mentioned, and was 
thus occupied from November 17 until May 12, when she was ordered 
to Woods Hole, Mass., for work in connection with the Bureau's bio- 
logical laboratory at that place. 

Schooner Grampus. — ^As in previous j^ears, the Grampus was 
employed in strictly fish-cultural work connected with the marine 
hatcheries on the New England coast. Lobster eggs were collected 
for the Gloucester station early in the summer, and brood cod for 
the Woods Hole station were caught on Nantucket Shoals in October 
and November. On April 1 the vessel was again placed in commis- 
sion and went to the Maine coast, where she was engaged in collecting 
lobster eggs at the close of the fiscal j^ear. At such times as she 
was not in active use, her crew was utilized on shore at the different 
hatcheries. This schooner, which was built in 1886, is beginning to 
show the effects of long service and will soon be in need of considera- 
ble repairs and rebuilding to put her in seaworthy condition. Some 
alterations in hull and rigging are also necessary to insure efficiency 
and to keep pace with modern requirements. It is regarded as espe- 
cially desirable that she be supplied with auxiliary motor power, which, 
without materiall}^ increasing the expense of maintenance, would add 
greatly to her usefulness. 

New launches, etc. — A special appropriation provided for the pur- 
chase of a powerful gasoline launch suitable for harbor use in heavy 



38 EEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

weather at the Gloucester, Mass., station. This boat is especially 
adapted for the work required, is 33 feet long and 9 feet beam, has an 
8-horsepower motor, and is stoutly built with inclosed cabins. Launches 
were purchased also for the Baker Lake (Wash.) station, and for the 
auxiliary station at La Crosse, Wis. These are motor boats 27 feet 
and 30 feet long, respectively, and are indispensable for conducting 
the work at those points. 

PUBLICATIONS AND LIBRARY. 

During the year the bound volumes of the report for 1903 and the 
bulletin for 1902 were issued, the parts composing these volumes 
having been published and distributed separately some time before. 
The bulletin for 1903 has been reserved for the various contributions 
on the aquatic resources of the Hawaiian Islands resulting from the 
special investigations in 1901 and 1902; some of the special papers of 
this series have already appeared, but owing to the large amount of 
material in some of the collections and the time required for its study, 
a 3^ear or more may elapse before the final volume is issued. The fol- 
lowing pamphlet extracts from reports and bulletins were published 
and distributed in 1905: 

Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 

for the year ending June 30, 1904. 
Report of the special commission for tlie investigation of the lobster and the soft- 
shell clam. Report for 1903. 
Publications of the United States Fish Commission available for distribution on June 

30, 1903. Report for 1903. 
The commercial fisheries of the interior lakes and rivers of New York and Vermont. 

By John N. Cobb. Report for 1903. 
The echinoderms of the Woods Hole region. By Hubert Lyman Clark. Bulletin 

for 1902. 
List of fishes dredged by the steamer Albatross off the coast of Japan in the summer 

of 1900, with descriptions of new species and a review of the Japanese Mac- 

rouridse. By Davicl Starr Jordan and Edwin Chapin Starks. Bulletin for 1902. 
Investigations for the promotion of the oyster industry of North Carolina. By Cas- 
well Grave. Report for 1903. 
A revision of Malaclemmys, a genus of turtles. By William Perry Hay. Bulletin 

for 1904. 
The medusEe of the Woods Hole region. By Charles W. Hargitt. Bulletin for 1904. 
The osteology and immediate relations of the tile-fish, Lopholatilus chamaileonticeps. 

By Frederic A. Lucas. Bulletin for 1904. 
The blood vascular system of the tile-fish, Lopholatilus chama^leonticeps. By C. F. 

Silvester. Bulletin for 1904. 
The fish parasites of the genus Argulus found in the Woods Hole region. By Charles 

B. Wilson. Bulletin for 1904. 
The seaweed industries of Japan. The utilization of seaweeds in the United States. 

By Hugh M. Smith. Bulletin for 1904. 
The function of the lateral-line organs in fishes. By G. H. Parker. Bulletin for 

1904. 
Isopods from the Alaska salmon investigation. By Harriet Richardson. Bulletin 

for 1904. 
List of fishes collected in Boulder County, Colo., with description of a new species 

of Leuciscus. By Chancey Juday. Bulletin for 1904. 
The biological relation of aquatic plants to the substratum. By Raymond H. Pond. 

Report for 1903. 
State ichthyology of Massachusetts. By Theodore Gill. Report for 1904. 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 39 

The fish fauna of the Tortugas Archipelago. By David Starr Jordan and Joseph C. 

Thompson. Bulletin for 1904. 
The distribution of sewage in the waters of Narragansett Bay, with special reference 

to the'contamination of the oyster beds. By Caleb Allen Fuller. Report for 1904. 
Statistics of the fisheries of the South Atlantic States, 1902. Report for 1903. 
Statistics of the fisheries of the Gulf States, 1902. Report for 1903. 
New star-fishes from deep water off California and Alaska. By Walter K. Fisher. 

Bulletin for 1904. 
The cultivation of marine and fresh-water animals in Japan. Bv K. Mitsukuri. 

Bulletin for 1904. 

There Avere sent out during- the year 2,513 bound and 16,166 pam- 
phlet publications of the Bureau. The principal recipients of the 
publications are libraries, institutions of learning, collaborators, and 
specialists; but aside from these there is a larg-e and increasing demand 
for the various articles from persons interested in the particular phases 
of the fisheries therein discussed. Requests are received daily for 
certain publications the supply of which has been exhausted, the 
demand for the Manual of Fish Culture being particularly active. 
Two editions of this very popular and useful work have been entirely 
distributed, and another edition should soon be provided. 

The library has been increased b}' the addition of 159 bound vol- 
umes and 307 unbound volumes and pamphlets, these, as usual, being 
works pertaining to the special needs and functions of the Bureau. 

EXPOSITIONS. 

The exhibit of the Bureau at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at 
St. Louis, which came to a close December 1, 1904, won favorable 
comment. The fisheries building was unique in design, and lent itself 
to an advantageous and attractive installation. It was 136 feet square, 
with a central court 74 feet square, having in the center a pool 24 feet 
square open to the sk}^ In the court was arranged the general exhibit, 
and separated from it by screened corridors 15 feet wide was the 
aquarium, extending around the building. The aquarium tanks, 40 in 
number, were along the walls and lighted from the rear; the corridors 
being in semidarkness, the animals in the tanks were plainl}^ visible, 
and the general effect was pleasing to the e3"e. The machinery room, 
containing pumps, motors, filters, refrigerating machine, etc., and the 
reservoirs of fresh and salt water were underneath the main floor. 

In the aquarium were kept the fresh and salt water fishes propagated 
bj' the Bureau and such other important and curious fishes and water 
animals as it was possible to obtain and transport. From 100 to 150 
species were always in the tanks, and were constantly renewed by fresh 
supplies brought from different parts of the country in the care of the 
Bureau. The Illinois state commission contributed to the interest of 
the display by maintaining in one of the large tanks a fine collection of 
the river fishes of that state. The central pool contained seals, sturgeon, 
large catfish, and various kinds of turtles. 



40 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The general exhibit was designed to show the scope and functions 
of the Bureau as comprehensive!}' as possible, and was as complete as 
space would allow. Artificial propagation was illustrated b}^ examples 
or models of apparatus and appliances used in collecting and hatching 
eggs and distributing fishes, and throughout the exposition there were 
demonstrations of actual hatching on a scale of considerable magni- 
tude, many millions of eggs being utilized. This was supplemented 
by mutascope pictures of fish-cultural methods as applied to different 
species, as well as photographs and drawings, together with charts 
showing some of the practical results. A model of the special railwa}^ 
cars used in transporting live fishes was shown, and on a railway siding- 
near the building one of the cars employed in bringing stock for the 
aquarium was open for inspection when in the- grounds. 

It is not easily possible to show the work of the division of scientific 
inquiry with any degree of completeness, but in the space allotted to 
this branch were exhibited the appliances used for collecting speci- 
mens, such as trawls, dredges, tangles, seines, and surface, interme- 
diate, and deep-sea tow nets, etc., the appliances for physical research, 
and models of vessels maintained for ocean investigation. Experi- 
ments in oyster culture and sponge culture were illustrated, and a fine 
working model of the apparatus used by the Rhode Island fish com- 
mission in rearing lobsters was in operation. There were collections 
showing the anatomy, growth, variations, and distribution of lobsters, 
oysters, clams, and other crustaceans and mollusks, and a series of 
enlarged models of trout eggs in different stages of development. 
Studies in fish pathology were illustrated by a display of cultures of 
bacteria and by a series of colored drawings of fishes showing the 
gross appearances of special diseases. 

Products of the fisheries were shown by a small but comprehensive 
display of fish prepared for food in various ways, collections of oils, 
fertilizers, glues, isinglass, leathers made from skins of water animals, 
furs, whalebone, walrus ivory, tortoise shells, pearl shells, etc. ; and 
the methods of capture by models of types of modern fishing vessels 
used on various parts of the coast, and by specimens of nets, traps, 
seines, trawls, hand lines, dredges, tongs, and other appliances. There 
was also a very complete series of colored photographs and mutascope 
views of fishing scenes. 

At the close of the exposition most of the material was shipped to 
Portland, Oreg., as part of the exhibit of the Bureau at the Lewis and 
Clark Centennial exposition, which opened May 1, 1905. 

NORTH CAROLINA SHAD FISHERY AND LEGISLATION. 

For several years the very valuable shad fisher}^ of North Carolina 
has been declining, and in consequence of the scarcity of ripe fish the 
Bureau's shad hatching operations in that State have been much inter- 



EEPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 41 

fered with. The decline is generally ascribed to the capture of an 
increasing! 3^ and inordinately large percentage of the run of spawning 
tish in salt water, owing to the setting of numerous fixed and movable 
devices in such a way as to intercept the schools. The seriousness of 
the situation was fully appreciated by the state legislature, and meas- 
ures for the protection of the shad were considered at the last session. 
The deputy commissioner of the Bureau, haying made an investigation 
of the condition and needs of the fisher}-, appeared before the legisla- 
ture by invitation and gave the results of his observations and made 
suggestions for improving the fishery. Shortly afterwards the legisla- 
ture enacted special laws along the lines advocated by the Bureau, which 
it is expected will prove efl'ective. 

FOREIGN INQUIRIES. 

In past years, as opportunity afforded or occasion arose, the Bureau 
has conducted special investigations of the fisheries and fish-cultural 
work of foreign countries. In 1905 there was undertaken an inquiry 
concerning the cod fishery and the cod- liver oil industry of Norway, 
with a view to determining the factors that contribute to the supe- 
riority of the medicinal cod-liver oil prepared in Norway, this inquiry 
being in pursuance of a joint study of domestic and foreign fish oils 
which has been in progress by this Bureau and the Bureau of Chemistry 
of the Department of Agriculture. A representative of the Bureau 
of Fisheries visited the cod-fishing districts of Norway and became 
personally acquainted with the methods of fishing, of handling the 
fish and livers, and of extracting and refining the oil. 

In conjunction with the foregoing inquiries, various European fish- 
cultural establishments were inspected, in order that the Bureau 
might be informed regarding the methods and progress of pisciculture 
abroad. Among the stations visited was the celebrated cod and lobster 
hatchery near Arendal, Norwa}-, which was the first of its kind and 
has served as a model for the marine hatcheries in other countries, 
including the United States. 

AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY. 

The thirty-first annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society 
was held at Atlantic City, N. J., July 26-28, 1904. The president for 
the current year was Mr. Frank N. Clark, superintendent of the 
Michigan stations of the Bureau of Fisheries. About 70 persons, 
representing 28 states and territories, were in attendance, and all 
branches of the fishery interests were represented. The papers and 
discussions covered many phases of the work in which the Bureau and 
the various states are engaged, and the meeting proved one of the 
most successful in the history of the society. At the invitation of the 
United States Fish Commissioner, the society voted to hold its next 



42 EEPOET OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

meeting at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., with a view to giving the 
members an opportunity to inspect the newly completed government 
fish hatcher}^ at that place. 

In conjunction with the meeting, most of the station superintendents 
were ordered to report for a conference with the administrative 
officers of the Bureau. All the superintendents are members of the 
society, and, besides taking active part in the proceedings, they were 
enabled to compare methods and experiences, and to receive instruc- 
tions looking to the more complete systematization and coordination 
of the work between stations and stations and between stations and 
the central otiice. Such gatherings of the station superintendents are 
productive of much good to the service, and should be held annually, 
preferably in conjunction with the meetings of the American Fisheries 
Society. 

INTERNATIONAL FISHERY CONGRESS. 

An international fishery congress was held at Vienna in June, 1905, 
under the patronage of the Austrian fishery society. About 20 
countries were ofiicially represented, and nearly 400 delegates were in 
attendance, including the most distinguished fishery, fish-cultural, and 
ichthy ©logical authorities of Europe. The United States was repre- 
sented by the deputy commissioner of the Bureau of Fisheries. The 
proceedings of the congress cov^ered a wide range of subjects and 
proved of great practical interest. On behalf of the Secretary of Com- 
merce and Labor and of the Commissioner of Fisheries an oflScial invi- 
tation was extended to the congress to hold its next meeting in the 
United States, The invitation was unanimouslv accepted, the time for 
the meeting was fixed for the latter part of September, 1908, and the 
place selected was Washington, D. C. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

The appropriations for the Bureau of Fisheries for the fiscal year 
1905 were as follows: 

Salaries $271 , 660 

Miscellaneous expenses: 

Administration 12, 500 

Propagation of food fishes 230, 000 

Inquiry respecting food fishes 25, 000 

Statistical inquiry 7, 500 

Maintenance of vessels 50, 000 

Protection of salmon fisheries in Alaska 7, 000 

For the establishment of one or more salmon hatcheries in Alaska 50, 000 

For the purchase of additional land, for improvements, and for completion 
of stations at — 

Boothbay Harbor, Me 10, 000 

White Sulphur Springs, W. Va 11, 000 

Tupelo, Miss 7, 500 

Neosho, Mo 11, 000 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES, 43 

For improvements and completion of stations at — 

Craig Brook, Me $9, 300 

Green Lake, Me 15, 700 

Gloucester, Mass 5, 500 

Wytheville, Va 2, 200 

Manchester, Iowa 5, 000 

Northville, Mich 5, 000 

Leadville, Colo 7, 500 

For additions and improvements, biological laboratory at Beaufort, N. C. 6, 000 

For purchase and repair, scientific equipment, steamer Albatross 10, 000 

For general repairs, steamer Fish Hawk 7, 500 

For purchase of launch 2, 000 

Total 768, 860 

A report of the expenditures under these appropriations will be 
made in accordance with law. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 
NEW FISH HATCHERIES. 

During the Fifty-eighth Congress many bills providing for new fish 
hatcheries were presented in the House and Senate and later referred 
to the Bureau by the proper committees for recommendation. In 
most cases it was possible to make favorable reports on the measures, 
as the bills provided for the establishment of hatcheries either in 
states where none now exists or in regions where additional stations 
are clearly demanded by the magnitude of the fisheries and the extent 
of the waters to be stocked. As it is a much simpler task to maintain 
the fish supply of given waters than to restock the waters after deple- 
tion, the early passage of the most meritorious of the bills is advocated. 

The popularity of catfish for the stocking of public and private 
waters is yearly becoming greater, and the Bureau is unable, with its 
present facilities, to meet the demand. The various species of cat- 
fishes are hardy, prolific, and very palatable, and are among the best 
fishes for certain waters, especially those of the central region of the 
United States. It is therefore recommended that Congress authorize 
the establishment of a station where catfish shall be the principal 
species cultivated. 

IMPROVEMENT OF STATIONS. 

At several of the fish-cultural stations of the Bureau, improvements, 
constructions, and repairs are required which can not be paid for out 
of the general appropriation for propagation of food fishes, and will 
therefore have to be provided for by special appropriation. Among 
the stations at which such improvements are necessary are Battery 
Island, Md., "Wytheville, Va., Manchester, Iowa, and Baird, Cal. ; 
items covering the desired work will be inserted in the next estimates 
of the Bureau. 



44 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

The fish-cultural property of the Bureau at San Marcos, Tex., would 
be improved by the elimination of the public road that now inter- 
sects the government reservation, necessitating the maintenance of 
two otherwise unnecessary fences and completelj^ isolating that part 
of the propert}^ which abuts on the San Marcos River. It is recom- 
mended that authorit}" be granted to acquire, by purchase or otherwise, 
the section of road through the station grounds and to provide the 
city of San Marcos with another and more direct road across the river. 

PISH LAKES, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

The fish lakes of the Bureau located in the city of Washington near 
the Potomac, and comprehended in the parking system, were established 
many years ago by act of Congress for the propagation of carp, but 
for a long time have been devoted exclusiveh' to the cultivation of the 
basses. The station grounds are quite extensive, and the necessity for 
maintaining them in a manner befitting government property in the 
Mall considerably increases the operating expenses of the station 
without any benefits to the fish-cultural work. Under these circum- 
stances, the abandonment of this station is to be recommended as soon 
as provision is made for conducting this work elsewhere. The new 
site should be in Maryland or Virginia, preferably in the vicinity of 
Washington, and should be provided with an ample supply of water 
secured by gravity and with adequate space for an elaborate pond 
system. 

ACCLIMATIZATION OF THE EASTERN LOBSTER ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Although the efforts heretofore made by the Bureau to acclimatize 
the eastern lobster on the Pacific coast have not been successful, there 
is every reason to believe that the scheme is feasible, and the attempt 
should be renewed on a scale commensurate with the extent of the 
waters to be stocked. There is probabl}^ no other fishery product of 
the eastern seaboard whose acclimatization would be such a boon to 
the entire west coast, and the prospective economic importance of the 
project warrants the government in undertaking it. It is therefore 
strongly recommended that Congress make a sufficient appropriation 
to enable the Bureau to collect, transport, and plant a large consign- 
ment of lobsters at a number of suitable points in California, Oregon, 
Washington, and Alaska. 

PROTECTION OF FISHES. 

Several cases have recently arisen suggestive of the benefits that 
might accrue to the fishing industry if the general government exer- 
cised jurisdiction. These cases also show how the fish-cultural work 
of the Bureau of Fisheries and of the state fish commissions ma}' be 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 45 

counteracted and perhaps rendered entirel}^ nugatory, and how valu- 
able station property may be rendered worthless, through failure of 
the states to afford proper protection to the fishes. 

Attention may be drawn particularly to the salmon fisheries of the 
Pacific States. These fisheries are so extensive and exhausting, and 
the property interests involved are so valuable, that every precaution 
should be taken to insure the unimpaired perpetuation of the various 
species of salmon, as has been done in California. It would appear, 
however, that elsewhere the trend of public sentiment is in the direc- 
tion of the greatest freedom of fishery, with little or no regard for 
even the near future. This is shown by the curtailing of already too 
short closed seasons on the Columbia and other rivers, by the erection 
of impassable dams in streams that salmon are wont to ascend to 
spawn, and by the unrestricted operation of fishing dcAnces in locali- 
ties where they are known to be unnecessarily destructive. A per- 
nicious example of the last-named condition is the multiplication of 
pound nets and gill nets about the mouth of the Skagit River on Puget 
Sound, notwithstanding the well-known facts that it is the only stream 
in that region in which there is a noteworth}^ run of blueback or sock- 
eye salmon for spawning purposes, and that the onl}^ hatchery operated 
chiefly for this species is located on Baker Lake, at the head of that 
stream. In 1905 some of the pound nets in question took 10,000 blue- 
backs in twenty-four hours, and the entire run of fish for reproductive 
purposes was reduced to 2,500. The present indications are that the 
Baker Lake hatchery ma}^ shortly have to be abandoned, because the 
run of fish will have been annihilated. 

The attitude of indifference on the part of particular states to the 
preservation of valuable natural resources like the fresh-water and 
anadromous fishes and the lack of appreciation of the beneficent work 
carried on by the government through the Bureau of Fisheries demand 
serious attention. It is respectfully recommended that consideration 
be accorded the proposition to discontinue all government fishery 
work in those states that exhibit no healthy sentiment in favor of 
the preservation of their supply of food and game fishes, Congress 
being asked to grant such authority, if necessary. 

Another ver}^ serious menace to the welfare of food fishes in the 
Western States is the irrigation operations. While the industries 
dependent on irrigation are, of course, much more extensive than fish- 
ing, this would seem to be no valid reason for overlooking or neglect- 
ing the fish life of the streams. The damage to the fish supply caused 
b}' irrigation depends on several factors. Thus a large portion of the 
volume of a stream or even the entire volume may be diverted from 
regular channels into irrigation ditches, carrying fish of all kinds and 
sizes, which eventually perish on the irrigated lands. Again, when a 
large volume of water is taken from a natural stream the remaining 



46 REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF FISHERIES. 

water often becomes warm, stagnant, and unfit for trout or other 
desirable species. In some states the destruction of fish life from 
these causes has already become serious and is generally deprecated. 
Much of the loss might be averted by placing a simple and inexpensive 
device — such as a paddle wheel or screen — at the head of ditches so 
that fishes would be frightened away from the intake or prevented 
from entering it. The general state superintendent of fish hatcheries 
for Colorado reports that unless laws are enacted requiring the placing 
of screens or wheels in the irrigation ditches the fishing industry- 
of that state will be seriously imperiled; and similar testimony has 
come from well-informed persons in Montana and other states. In the 
event of the failure of the state legislatures to afford effective and 
prompt relief, a general federal law, applicable to all waters for the 
utilization of which the government has given aid, may become 
necessary. 

Respectfully, George M. Bowers, 

Commissio7ier. 
The Secretary of Commerce and Labor. 



O 



THE PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES 

IN 1905 



Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 602 



THE PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES IN 1905* 



INTRODUCTION. 

The principal function of the Bureau of Fisheries, the maintenance 
and increase of the available supply of ac{uatic food products, has 
its largest fulfilment in the artificial propagation and distribution of 
fish and eggs. The extensive and depleting commercial fisheries for 
a number of species and the constantly growing demand for food 
and game fishes for stocking private lakes and streams have led to 
such an enlargement of the field of operations that about fifty spe- 
cies are now cultivated, the list including the principal fishes of all 
parts of the country. Nor is the work confined to the hatching and 
rearing of fish by artificial methods. A very important feature is the 
rescue of young fishes from the overflowed lands in the Mississippi Val- 
ley, where they would be lost when the waters recede, for the sloughs, 
cut off from the river, become dry in the heat of summer or freeze in 
winter. Furthermore, some of the most valuable and far-reaching 
results have come from the acclimatization of nonindigenous fishes 
in various waters. 

SPECIES CULTIVATED AND DISTRIBUTED.* 

The following species, listed by families, were handled in 1905: 

The catfishes (Siluridze): 

* § Spotted cat, blue cat, channel cat (Jctalurus punctatus). 

* § Horned pout, bullhead, yellow cat {Ameiurus nebulosus). 

* Marbled cat {Ameiurus nebulosus marmoratus). 
§ Black cat {Ameiurus melas). 

TUE SUCKERS AND BUFFALOFISUES (CaTOSTOMID^) : 

§ Buffalofishes, chiefly Ictiobus bubalus. 
The minnows and carps (Cyprinid^): 
t II Carp {Cyprinus carpia). 
I II Goldfish {Carassius auratus). 

X II Tench {Tinea tinea). Cultivated variety, golden tench. 
X II Ide {Leuciseus idus). Cultivated variety, golden ide. 

The shads and herrings (Clupeid^): 

* Shad {Alosa sapidissima) . 

a The fishes artificially propagated are designated thus, *; those simply collected and 
distributed, thus, §; those propagated as food for other fishes, thus, f ; those propagated 
for ornamental purposes, thus, X ', and introduced species, thus, || . 

3 



4 PEOPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

The salmons, trouts, whitefishes, etc. (Salmonid^s:) : 

* Common whitefish {Coregonus dupeiformis) . 

*Bluefin whitefish {Argyrosomus nigripinnis). 

*Lake herring, cisco {Argyrosomus artedi). 

♦Chinook salmon, king salmon, quinnat salmon {Oncorhynchus tschawytscha). 

♦Silver salmon, coho (Oncorhynchus Msuich). 

♦Blueback salmon, red-fish, sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka). 

♦Humpback salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). 

♦Steelhead, hardhead, salmon trout (Salmo gairdneri). 

♦Rainbow trout (Salmo irideus). 

♦Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). 

♦Landlocked salmon (Salmo sebago). 

♦Yellowstone Lake trout, cutthroat trout, black-spotted trout (Salmo lewisi). 

♦Colorado River trout, black-spotted trout (Salmo pleuriticus) . 

♦Arkansas River trout, green-backed trout (Salmo stomias). 

♦Yellow-finned trout (Salmo macdonaldi). 
II ♦Sea trout, salmon trout (Salmo trutta). 
II *Loch Leven trout (Salmx) trutta levenensis). 

♦Lake trout, Mackinaw trout, longe, togue (Cristivomer namaycush). 

♦Brook trout, speckled trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). 

♦Golden trout, Sunapee Lake trout (Salvelinus aureolus). 

♦Canadian red trout (Salvelinus mnrstoni). 

♦Hybrid trout (Sahelinus fontinalis -\- aureolus). 

The graylings (Thymallid^): 

♦Montana grayling (Thymallus montanus'). 
The pikes and pickerels (Esocid^): 

♦Pike or pickerel (Esox lucius, Esox reticulatus) . 

The basses, SUNFISHES, and CRAPPIES (CENXRARCHIOiE): 

♦ § Crappie (Pomoxis annularis). 

♦ § Strawberry bass, calico bass (Pomoxis sparoides). 

♦ § Rock bass, red-eye, goggle-eye (Ambloplites rupestris). 

♦ § Warmouth, goggle-eye (Chsenohryttus gulosus). 

♦ § Small-mouth black bass (Micropterus dolomieu). 

♦ § Large-mouth black bass (Micropterus salmoides). 

♦ § Bluegill sunfish (Lepomis incisor). 

§ Other sunfishes, chiefly Eupomotis gibhosus. 

The perches (Percid^): 

♦ § Pike perch, wall-eyed pike, yellow pike, blue pike (Stizostedion vitreum). 

♦ § Yellow perch (Perca flavescens). 

The sea basses (Serranid^e) : 

♦Striped bass, rocktish (Roccus lineatus). 
♦White perch (Morone americana). 

The labri'ds (Labrid^): 

♦Tautog (Tautoga onitis). 
The cods (Gadid^): 

♦Cod (Gadus callanas). 

♦Pollock (Pollachius virens). 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 5 

The flounders (Pleuronectid^): 

♦Winter flounder, American flatfish (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). 
Crustaceans: 

♦American lobster {Homarus americanus). 

THE OUTPUT, 

The output for the year 1905 was over 250,000,000 more than for 
any previous year in the history of the Bureau. This increase rep- 
resents in particular a greater production of Pacific sahnons, lake 
trout, pike perch, yellow perch, large-mouth black bass, lake herring, 
and lobster, and in addition the propagation of the bluefin white- 
fish for the first time. Cod, whitefish, and all other species culti- 
vated, except the shad, furnished an average yield. The shad out- 
put was unusually small, owing, apparently, to the fact that an 
unusual proportion of the marketed fish were caught in salt or brack- 
ish water, but few being left to reach the spawning grounds, where 
the eggs are obtained for the hatcheries. 

A summary of the output for the year 1905 is shown in the follow- 
ing table: 

Summary of Distribution of Fish and Eggs During the Fiscal Year 1905. 



Species. 



Catfish 

Buffaioflsli 

Sliad 

Wliiteflsli 

Bluefin whitefisli 

Lake iierring 

Ciiinook salmon 

Silver salmon 

Blueback salmon 

Steelhead trout 

Rainbow trout 

Atlantic salmon 

Landlocked salmon 

Blackspotted trout 

Scotch sea trout 

Loch Leven trout 

Lake trout 

Brook trout 

Golden trout 

Grayling 

Pike and pickerel 

Grapple and strawberry t 

Rock bass 

Warmouth bass 

Small-mouth black bass. 
Large-mouth black bass. 

Sunfish or bream 

Pike perch 

Yellow perch 

Striped bass 

White perch 

Tautog 

Cod 

Pollock 

Flatfish 

Lobster 



Total. 



Eggs. 



378,000 
60,963,000 

380,000 
87,040,000 
96,055,775 

107,000 



139, 400 
286,000 
8,000 
192,000 
305,000 



5,320,000 
456,000 



400,000 



152,750,000 
5,000,000 



700,000 



Fry. 



32,859,000 

268,405,000 

1,000,000 

35,000,000 

21,620,288 

10,633,900 

7,819,281 

635,905 

442, 160 

727,462 

275,004 

41,205 



27,000 

35,993,266 

8,933,881 

157,490 

450,000 



246,148,775 
139,452,521 

2,463,000 
23,700,000 

2,983,000 
169,577,000 

8,456,000 
203,356,000 
116,214,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



427,425 
214,000 



5,125 



10,000 

51,638 

345,204 

289, 188 

130,477 

6,388,031 

3,479 

2,062 

11,469 

1,083,454 

269 

20 

62,200 

859,592 

58,099 

2,200 

191,665 

713,111 

447, 908 

395 

326,715 



410,480,175 



1,337,371,138 



11,623,726 



Total. 



427,425 

214,000 

33,237,000 

329,368,000 

1,380,000 

122,040,000 

117,681,188 

10, 740, 900 

7,829,281 

826, 943 

1,073,364 

1,024,650 

597, 481 

6, 734, 236 

3,479 

29,062 

41,324,735 

10,473,335 

157, 759 

850,020 

62, 200 

859, 592 

58,099 

2,200 

191,665 

713,111 

447,908 

398,899,170 

144,779,236 

2,463,000 

24,400,000 

2,983,000 

169,577,000 

8,456,000 

203,356,000 

116,214,000 



1,759,475,039 



6 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 



In addition to the above the experiment was tried of introducing 
into Lake Sahne, near Palestine, Tex., 1 barrel of reef oysters, 24 blue 
crabs, and 157 marine fishes, among which 5 species were represented. 

THE STATIONS. 

Fish-cultural work is at present conducted at 32 stations and 
numerous substations, the latter being auxiliaries operated only at 
particular seasons. Some of thein are the principal sources of the 
egg supply in their respective regions; others are important as dis- 
tributing points. In the following list, which shows the output of the 
various stations, the character of the work conducted at each is indi- 
cated by arbitrary signs, thus: Stations where eggs were hatched 
during 1905, *; stations used merely as egg-collecting points, §; sta- 
tions concerned in the work of rescuing fishes from the overflowed 
lands, f . 

Stations and Substations Operated in 1905. 



Name and location. 


Period of operation. 


Fishes handled. 


* Baird, Gal 


Entire year 


Quiimat salmon and golden trout. 


♦Battle Creek, Cal 


Sept. 6 to Deo. 19 

Sept. 23 to leb. 6 

Entire year 


Quinnat salmon. 


* Mill Creek, Cal 


Do. 


* Baker Lake, Wash 


Blueback, silver, and quinnat salmons. 




do 




♦Battery, Havre do Grace, Md 


Feb. 16 to May 28.... 
Entire year 


Yellow perch, white perch, and shad. 
Cod and lobster. 


§ Johns Bay, Me 


July 1 to May 30 

July 1 to Aug. It) and 

Apr. 1 to June 30. 
Entire year 


Lobster. 


§ Portland, Me 


Do. 




Brook, rainbow, steelhead, and blackspot- 

ted trouts; grayling and whitefish. 
Blackspotted troiit. 
Grayling. 




Apr. 1 to June 30 

Apr. 6 to June 26 

Mar. 9 to May 20 






Yellow perch and shad. 


* Cape Vincent, N . Y 


♦Central Station and aquaria, D.C 
♦Clackamas, Oregon City, Oreg 


.do 


trouts; landlocked salmon, and pike 
perch. 

Whitefish, brook trout, silver salmon, yel- 
low iJferch, pike perch, spotted catfish, 
and shad. 

Quinnat, landlocked, and silver salmons; 


do 


§ Cedar Creek, Oreg 


Feb. 10 to Mar. 30 

Jan. 15 to Apr. 30 

July 1 to Feb. 12 

Latter part of August 

to Nov. 30. 
Aug. 23 to Oct. 24 


rainbow, lake, and brook trouts. 
Steelhead trout. 




Silver salmon and steelhead trout. 


♦Little White Salmon, Wash.. 
§ Big White Salmon, Wash . 

§ Eagle and Tanner Creeks, 
Oreg. 


Quinnat salmon. 
Do. 

Do. 

Quinnat and silver salmons; rainbow, 


§Tolo, Oreg. . . 


Mar. 16 to Apr. 30 

Aug. 1 to Nov. 30 and 

May 4 to June 30. 
Apr. 7 to June 30 

Entire year. 


stocllicnd. and blackspotted trouts. 
Steellii'ad trout. 


♦ Upper Clackamas, Orog 

♦Willamette, Portland, Oreg.. 
♦Cold Springs, Bullochville, Ga . . . 

♦Craig Brook, East Orland, Me. .. 


Quinnat salmon. 

Blackspotted, brook, rainbow, and steel- 
head trouts; landlocked salmon. 

Large-mouth and small-mouth black 
bassos; warmouth bass, strawberry 
bass, crappio, catfish, and sunfish. 

Atlantic, landlocked, and silver salmons; 


do 


§ Sebec Lake, Me 


Sept 26 to Nov. 10 and 

Apr. 10 to May 31. 
Nov. 15 to May 25 

Apr. 22 to May 31 


brook, lake, rainbow, and Scotch sea 
trouts. 
Landlocked salmon. 


♦ Upper Penobscot, Stacyville, 
♦ Delaware River, Torresdale, Pa. . 


Atlantic salmon. 
Shad. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Stations and Substations Operated in 1905 — Continued. 



Name and location. 


Period of operation. 


Fishes handled. 


♦Duluth, Minn 


Entire year 


Lake, brook, and steelhead trouts; land- 


§ Isle Royale, Micli 


Oct. 17 to Oct. 30 

Oct. 8 to Nov. 2 

Oct. 15 to Nov. 8 

Sept. 17 to Nov. 4 

Sept. 16 to Oct. 9 

do 


locked salmon, whiteflsh, bluefin white- 
fish, and pike perch. 
Lake trout. 




Do. 


§ Marquette, Mich 


Do. 






§ Point Magnet, Ontario 

§ Rossport, Ontario 


Lake trout 
Do. 




Nov. 1 to Nov. 19 

Mar. 29 to May 5 

Apr. 4 to May 16 

Entire year. 


Do. 


*Edenton,N. C 


Shad. 


* Weldon, N. C 


Striped bass. 

Brook and rainbow trouts; large-mouth 

and small-mouth black basses, rock 

bass, sunflsh, and catfish. 
Large-mouth black bass and crappie. 
Cod, flatfish, pollock, and lobster. 


* Erwin, Tenn 


* Fish Lakes, Washington, D. C. . . 

♦ Gloucester, Mass 


..do 


do 




Apr. 1 to June 30 

do. 


Lobster. 


§ Beverly, Mass 


Do. 


§ Boston, Mass 


July 1 to July 10 and 

Apr. 1 to June 30... 

. ..do 


Da 


§null. Mass 


Do. 


§Kittery Point, Me 


July 1 to July 10 and 

Nov. 15 to June 30.. 

Apr. 1 to June 30 

July 1 to July 10 and 

Apr. 1 to June 30. 
July 1 to July 10 and 

Nov. 15 to June 30. 
July 1 to July 10 and 

Apr. 1 to June 30. 
do .... 


Cod, pollock, and lobster. 




§ Portsmouth, N. H 


Do. 




Cod, pollock, and lobster. 
Lobster. 


§ Salt Island, Mass 


§ York Harbor, Me . . 


Do 


* Green Lake, Me 


Entire year 


Landlocked salmon and brook trout. 


§ Branch Pond, Me 

* Grand Lake Stream, Me 

* Leadville, Colo 


Sept. 1 to Nov. 26 

Sept. 1 to June 30 

Entire year 

Oct. 21 to Nov. 4 

Nov. 9 to Nov. 19 

Oct. 28 to Nov. 6 

Oct. 30 to Nov. 17 

July 1 to Aug. 20 and 

June 1 to June 30. 

Aug. 10 to Sept. 5 

Apr. 10 to May 31 

Feb. 26 to Mar. 6 and 

Nov. 24 to Nov. 29. 
Sept. 20 to Nov. 30... 

Apr. 20 to May 20 

Oct. 19 to Nov. 29 

Oct. 28 to Nov. 29 

Oct. 22 to Nov. 10 

Oct. 1 to June 30 

Entire year 


Do. 

Landlocked salmon. 

Blaekspotted, brook, and rainbow trout. 




§ Derry's Lake, Colo 


Do. 


§ Lake Edith, Colo 


Do. 


§ Lake Eldora, Colo 

* Grand Mesa Lakes, Colo 

* Grand Lake, Colo 


Do. 
Blaekspotted trout. 

Do. 


§ Gunnison River, Colo 


Rainbow trout. 


§ Musgrove, Colo 


Brook trout. 


§ Lake San Cristobal, Colo 

§ Smith's Lake, Colo 


Rainbow trout. 


§ Wellington, Colo 


Do. 




Do. 


* Mammoth Spring, Ark 


Large-mouth black bass. 

Brook, rainbow, blaekspotted, lake, and 
steel-head trouts; quinnat and land- 
locked salmons; rock bass and yellow 
perch. 

Large-mouth black bass, crappie, catfish, 
yellow perch, sunflsh, pike and pickerel, 
and buffaloflsh. 
Do. 

Brook, rainbow, lake, hybrid, golden and 
steelhead trouts; landlocked salmon. 

Brook and golden trouts; landlocked sal- 
mon. 

Rainbow, brook, and steelhead trouts; 


* Manchester, Iowa 


t Belle vue, Iowa « 


July 11 to Oct. 31 

July 17 to Oct. 31 

Entire yea r 


t North McGregor, I jwa o 

* Nashua, N. H 


§ Sunapee Lake, N. H 

♦Neosho, Mo 


Sept. 15 to Nov. 21 ... 
Entire year 


* Northville, Mich 


do 


landlocked and quinnat salmons; gray- 
ling, large-mouth black bass, rock bass, 
crappie, and strawberry bass. 


* Alpena, Mich 


Feb. 28 to June 30 

Apr. 6 to May 2 

Oct. 29 to Nov. 25 

Oct. 20 to Dec. 6 

Mar. 1 to May 3 

Entire year 


trouts; small-mouth black bass. 


§ Bay City, Mich 


Pike perch. 


§ Beaver Island, Ilich 


§ Belle Isle, Mich 


Whiteflsh 






♦Detroit, Mich 


Whiteflsh and pike perch. 



a The steamer Curlew is operated on the Mississippi River for the rescue of flshes from the overflowed 
lands on both sides of the river from Savanna, 111., to Lynxville, Wis. Bellevue and North McGregor 
arc stations for retaining and distributing flshes thus secured which are not planted in the river. 



8 PKOP.VGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Stations and Substations Operated in 1905 — Continued. 



Name and location. 



Northville, Mich.— Continued. 

§ Fairport, Mich 

I Grassy Island, Mich 

§ Manistique, Mich 

§ Ojibwa, Ontario 

§ Roberts Landing, Mich.. 

*Saiilt Ste. Marie. Mich... 
* Put-in-Bay, Ohio 



§ Kelleys Island, Ohio. 
§ Middle Bass, Ohio... 
§ Monroe, Mich 



§ North Bass, Ohio 

§ Pelee Island, Ontario 
§ Port Clinton, Ohio... 



§ Toledo, Ohio... 
Quincy, 111 

tMeredosia, 111. a. 

*St. Johnsbury, Vt.. 



§ Darling Pond, Vt.. 
§ Lake Mansfield, Vt. 
I Lake Mitchell, Vt.. 

*Swanton, Vt 

* San Marcos, Tex 



*Spearflsh, S. Dak. 



*West Thumb, Yellowstone 
Park. 
* Tupelo, Miss 



* White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 



* Woods Hole, Mass 

§East Greenwich, K. I. 

§ Noank, Conn 

§ Plymouth, Mass 

§ Waquoit, Mass 

*Wytheville, Va 



Period of operation. 



Oct. 25 to Nov. 22 

Oct. 26 to Nov. 30 

Oct. 23 to Nov. 23... 

Nov. 4 to Nov. 24 

May 3 to May 29 

Feb. 1 to June 20 

Entire year 



Nov. 16 to Nov. 30.... 
Nov. 15 to Nov. 30.... 
Nov. 2 to Dec. 2 and 

Apr. 4 to Apr. 30. 

Nov. 13 to Dec. 1 

Nov. 15 to Nov. .30.... 
Nov. 1 to Nov. 30 and 

Apr. 6 to Apr. 30. 

Apr. 1 to Apr. 30 

Entire year 

July 1 to Nov. 30 and 

Mar. 1 to June 30. 
Entire year , 



Sept. 7 to Dec. 22.. 
Sept. 13 to Dec. 15. 
Sept. 9 to Jan. 3... 
Mar. 1 to May 24. . 
Entire year 



do 

May 20 to Aug. 10 

Entire year 

do 



do 

Mar. 13 to Apr. 12. 
May 6 to June 30. . 
Nov. 21 to Mar. 21. 
Mar. 20 to Apr. 8.. 
Entire year 



Fishes handled. 



Lake trout. 

Whitefish. 

Lake trout. 

Whitefish. 

Pike perch. 

Lake trout and whitefish. 

Whitefish, lake trout, and lake herring, 

pike perch. 
Whitefish. 

Do. 
Whitefish and pike perch. 

Whitefish. 

Whitefish and lake herring. 

Whitefish and pike perch. 

Pike perch. 

(Office headquarters.) 

Large-mouth black bass, crappie, sunfish, 
yellow perch, catfish, and carp. 

Brook, lake, rainbow, and steelhead 
trouts; landlocked salmon, and small- 
mouth black bass. 

Brook trout. 
Do. 
Do. 

Pike perch and yellow perch. 

Large-mouth black bass, strawberrj^ bass, 
rock bass, sunfish, crappie, and catfish. 

Loch I>even, brook, rainbow and black- 
spotted trouts. 

Blackspotted trout. 

Large-mouth black bass, strawberry bass, 

crappie, and sunfish. 
Brook and rainbow trouts; small-mouth 

black bass. 
Cod, flatfish, lobster, and tautog. 
Flatfish. 
Lobster. 
Cod. 
Flatfish. 
Brook and rainbow trouts; large-mouth 

black bass, small mouth black bass, and 

rock bass. 



u The State Fish Commission steamer Illinois was operated on the Illinois River for the rescue of 
fishes from the overflowed lands on both sides of the river at points not otherwise covered from Mere- 
dosia. The launch Egret was used for making collections covering a distance of 10 to 12 miles above 
and below Meredosia. Meredosia is a station for retaining and distributing fishes thus secured which 
are not planted in the river. 

The following table shows the distribution of iish and eggs by sta- 
tions. In some instances a portion of the stock of a station was 
transferred to another station to be hatched or reared and distrib- 
uted. In such cases the transferred stock is credited in the table to 
the station from which it was actually distributed. That each sta- 
tion may have due credit for its total product, however, footnotes 
have been added to explain the transfers. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Output of Fish and Eggs by Stations. 



Source of supply. 


Species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Baird, Cal 


Quinnat salmon 

Golden trout 


8,661,510 


7,561,380 






269 


Battle Creek (sub.station), 


Quinnat salmon 

do 


50,644,800 
36,719,465 






Cal.a 
Mill Creek (substation) , Cal . . . 






Baker Lake, Wash.a 


do 


72,798 

5, 629, 895 

7,819,281 

3,205 

96,760 

2,441,186 






Silver salmon 












10,000 






14,400 


Birds view (substation). 


Quinnat salmon 




Wash.a 




107,000 
100,000 






Steelhead trout 




Battery, Md 


Shad 


6,8.34,000 
23,700,000- 
89,607,149 
47,105,000 
81,518,000 






White perch 


700,000 
5,000,000 












Cod 






Lobster 












25,000 
20,200 












Blackspotted trout 

Brook trout 


100,000 




777,500 






120,000 




Lake trout 






2,000 




Grayling 


400,000 


450,000 

800,000 

18,313,000 

43,881,000 

24,700 

775, 540 

4,876.000 

4,800 

21,000,000 

6,500,000 

5.38,000 

29,500 

4,600 

445,000 

1,105,000 

950,000 

4,006,779 

3,000 

3,000 

22,075 

10,450 

12.500 

1,218,842 

101,000 
2,138,500 

1,928,214 

4,740,653 

31,590 

4,30,000 

5,585 

26,205 

1,075,204 

15,000 






Whi'teflsh 




Bryans Point, Md.a 


Shad 








Yellow perch 






Cape Vincent, N. Y 


Steelhead trout 








B rook trout 








Lake trout 








Landlocked salmon 








Whiteflsh 








Pike perch 






Central Station, D. C 


Shad 








Brook trout 








Silver salmon 








Whiteflsh 








Yellow perch 








Pike perch 






Clackamas, Oreg 


Qu innat salmon 

Landlocked salmon 


15,000 










Steelhead trout 








Rainbow trout 








Brook trout 








Lake trout 






Grants Pass (substation). 


Silver salmon 






Oreg. a 


Steelhead trout 






Little White Salmon (sub- 


Quinnat salmon 






station), Wash. 
Big White Salmon (substa- 


do 






tion, Wash.) 
Rogue River (substation). 


do 






Oreg.o 


Silver salmon 








Steelhead trout 


25,000 






Rainbow trout 






Blackspotted trout 




3,285 


Upper Clackamas (substa- 


Quinnat salmon 

Blackspotted trout 


15,000 




tion!, Oreg. 
Willamette (substation), 




Oreg. 
Cold Springs, Ga 


Large-mouth black bass 
Small-mouth black bass 
Strawberry bass 




155 150 






200 




1 


190 




Warmouth bass 






2,200 




Sunfish 






20,750 




Catfish 






829 


C raig B rook. Me 


Landlocked salmon. 






1 996 




Atlantic salmon 

Silver salmon 


8,000 


727,462 
1,307,787 


289, 188 




Steelhead trout 






8,740 



a In addition to the above the following transfers were made: 

From Battle Creek to Balrd, 5,993,900 quinnat salmon eggs. 

From Baker Lake to Birdsview, 10,000 blueback salmon fry. 

From Birdsview to other stations. 300,000 steelhead trout eggs. 

From Bryans Point to Central Station, 182,000 shad eggs and 1,300,000 yellow perch eggs. 

From Grants Pass to Clackamas, 10,000 steelhead trout eggs. 

From Rogue River to Cape Vincent, 25,000 steelhead trout eggs. 



10 PEOPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Output of Fish and Eggs by Stations — Continued. 



Source of supply. 


Species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Craig Brook, Me 


Rainbow trout 






1 207 








529, 196 
42,400 


55,843 




Lake trout 






Scotch sea trout 




3,479 


Delaware River, Torresdale, Pa.o. 


Shad 


378,000 


3,326,000 

4,903 

45,000 

117,000 

8,139,000 

24,860,000 

1,000,000 

4,100,000 

3, 848, 000 

2,463,000 

36, 750 

19, 250 


Dulutli, Minn 








Steelhead trout 








Brook trout 








Lake trout 


774,000 






Whiteflsh 






Bluefln whiteflsh 

Pike perch 


380,000 








Edenton, N. C 


Shad 






Weldon (substation), N. C. . . 


Striped bass 






Erwin, Tenn. .■. 


Rainbow trout. . . . ' 


123 121 




Brook trout 




53 757 




Large-mouth black l^ass 
Small-mouth black bass 
Crappie 




32,516 








6, 938 
600 










Rock 1 )ass 






1 883 




Sunflsh 






1 1 , 450 


Fish Lakes, D. C 


Large-mouth black bass 
Crappie 






55, 855 








5,373 


Gloucester, Mass 


Cod 




68,578,000 

150,881,000 

8,456,000 

21,680,000 

242,011 




Flatfish 








Pollock 








Lobster 






Green Lake, Me.a 


Landlocked salmon 

Rainbow trout 


192,000 


• 122 081 




20 545 




Brook trout 




719,000 


2,053 
3 550 


Leadville, Colo." 


Steclliead trout 






Rainbow trout. . . 


95,000 
165,000 
385,000 


11,000 


8 340 




Blackspotted trout. . . . 
Brook trout. . 


4,045 104 




2,690,300 


532 981 




Lake trout 


1,900 




Landlocked salmon 




50 


Mammoth Spring, Ark 


Large-mouth black bass 
Steelhead trout 






7 000 


Manchester, Iowa « 






2,255 
45 384 




Rainbow tiout. . . 


89,000 


85,000 
275,000 




Brook trout 


68,031 
642 




Blackspotted trout .... 






Loch Leven trout 




250 




Lake trout 






2,210 

2,150 

75 




Quinnat salmon 








Landlocked salmon. . . . 














8,075 




Yellow perch 




25,666 


Bellevue (substation), Iowa.. 


Large-mouth black bass 
Crappie 




175 825 








625,900 




Sunflsh 






252, 050 




Yellow perch 






243, 550 




Pike perch 






395 




Pike and pickerel 






50,000 




Catfish 






290, 100 




Buflalofish 1 




139,000 


North McGregor (substation). 








94, 896 

222,001 
136, 280 
83,200 


Iowa. 


Crappie 








Sunfish 








Yellow perch 








Pike and pickerel ' 




12,200 




Catfish 1 




137,505 




Buflalofish 1 




75,000 


Nashua, N. H 


Landlocked salmon ..! . 




5 820 




Rainbow trout 




13, 178 




Brook trout j 


460,695 
72, 537 
10,000 

157, 490 


89,519 




Lake trout. ... 






Steelhead trout ' 






Golden trout 





nJn addition to the above the following transfers were made. 

From Delaware River, Torresdale, Pa., to Central Station, District of Columbia, 500,000 shad eggs. 

From Green Lake to other stations, 70,000 landlocked salmon eggs, 42,000 landlocked salmon fry, 
and 280,000 brook trout fry 

From Leadville to other stations, 195,000 rainbow trout eggs, 970,000 brook trout eggs, and 10,000 
blackspotted trout eggs. 

From Manchester to other stations, 299,500 rainbow trout eggs. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Output of Fish and Eggs by Stations — Continued. 



11 



Source of supply. 


Species. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Neosho, Mo. i 


Quinnat salmon 






2 975 




Landlocked salmon. . . . 






40 








44, 200 


32 084 




Steelhead trout 




2,240 
20 




Brook trout 








Grayling 






20 




Large-mouth black bass 
Cra ppie 






22,735 
1,225 
6,709 


















Rock bass 






29, 110 


North ville, Mich, a 






16,000 

48,000 

795, 000 

3,475,000 


32 








1,315 




Brook trout. . 




13 560 




Lake trout 


4, 540, 000 


030 








12 




Small-mouth black bass 






102, 150 


Alpena (substation), Mich. a. . 




5,039,000 






Whitoflsh 




25,000,000 






Pike perch 


10,000,000 


8,000,000 
0, 170, 000 
25,000.000 
20,000,000 
13,000,000 
7,144,000 

25,000,000 

120,300,000 

913,000 

35,000,000 
153,700,000 




Charlevoix (substation) , Mich 






Whitefish 






Detroit (substation), Mich. a. . 


.do 


1,010,000 
47,400,000 






Pike perch 




Sault Ste. Marie (substation), 


Lake trout 




Mich. 








Put-in Bay, Ohio « 


do ... 


59,953,000 






Lake trout 








87,040,000 
88, 350, 000 






Pike perch 




Quincy, 111. (Meredosia station) . . 


Large-mouth black bass 


14,400 








500 




Sunfish 






1,350 


St. Johnsbury, Vt. " 






20, 290 
3,000 


430 








9,930 




Rainbow trout 


1,150 




Brook trout 


71,000 


1,146,200 
178,829 








4,755 
3,929 




Small-mouth black bass 
Pike perch . 




Swanton (substation), Vt. "... 


7,000,000 


59,898,875 
4,834,-372 




Yellow perch 




San Marcos, Tex 


Large-mouth black bass 
Crappie. 




102,255 
5,163 
















400 










12,370 
8,970 




Sunfish 








Catfish 






275 


Spearflsh, S. Dak. « 


Rainbow trout. . 




37,500 






Blackspotted trout 


40,000 


1,566,500 




730,000 
27,000 


60,000 
1,800 




Loch Leven trout 




Tupelo, Miss 


Large-mouth black bass 




13, 350 




Crappie 






1,337 










2, 859- 




Sunfish... 






19,200 
17,050 


White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. . . 


Rainbow trout 




20,000 

725, 000 




Brook trout 




34,8.50 




Small-mouth black bass 
Cod 




07,550 


Woods Hole, Mass 




53,894,000 
52,475,000 
13,016,000 
2,983,000 






Flatfish 








Lobster 








Tautog 






Wytheville, Va. « 


Catfish 




23 




Rainbow trout. . . 


102,000 


138,300 
6,000 


65,500 




Brook trout 


59, 150 




Large-mouth black bass 




69, 775 




Small-mouth black bass 
Rock bass 






11,445 








16,905 









a In addition to the above, the following transfers were made: 

From Neosho to other stations, 302,300 rainbow trout eggs. 

From Northville to other stations, 28,224,800 lake trout eggs. 

From ,\lpena to Duluth, 5,000,000 pike perch eggs. 

From Detroit to other stations, 100,500,000 whitefish eggs. 

From Put-in Bay to other stations, 30,920,000 wliiteflsh eggs and 10,000,000 pike perch eggs. 

From St. Johnsbury to other stations, 13.'),000 lirook trout eggs and 75,430 brook trout fry. 

From Swanton to other stations, 12,000,000 pike perch eggs. 

From Spearflsh to Bozeman, 400,000 blackspotted trout eggs. 

From Wytheville to other stations, 200,000 rainbow trout eggs. 



12 PROPAGATION ATSTD DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

THE DISTRIBUTION. 

The first consideration in the distribution of the product of the 
hatcheries is to make ample return to the waters from which eggs 
have been collected. The remainder of the fish are sent to appli- 
cants throughout the country for stocking state waters, fishing pre- 
serves, private ponds and streams, etc., and are delivered free of 
charge to the applicant, at the railroad station nearest the point of 
deposit. In 1905,4,908 such applications were received, an increase 
of 15 per cent over the previous year, and a demand so far in excess 
of the resources of the Bureau that many applications had to be con- 
tinued on file, to be filled from the succeeding year's stock. The 
output especially of black bass (both large-mouth and small-mouth), 
crappie, and the catfishes was inadequate, although many more of 
these fishes were produced in 1905 than in any previous year. 

Fishes are distributed at various stages of development, according, 
to the species, the numbers in the hatcheries, and the facilities for 
rearing. The commercial fishes, such as the shad, whitefish, lake 
trout, pike perch, cod, etc., which are hatched in lots of many million, 
are necessarily planted as fry; it is customary to distribute them 
just before the umbilical sac is completely absorbed. Atlantic sal- 
mon, landlocked salmon, and various species of trout in such num- 
bers as the hatchery facilities permit are reared to fingerlings from 
1 to 6 inches in length; the balance are distributed as fry. The 
basses and sunfishes reared at fish-cultural stations are distributed 
from the time the young rise from the spawning beds until they 
have reached such size as makes it impracticable to feed them in 
the hatcheries; the last lots distributed are usually of fish 3 to 5 
inches in length. The numerous kinds of fishes collected in over- 
flowed lands — basses, crappie, sunfishes, pike and pickerel, catfishes, 
yellow perch, bufl^alofish, and others — are 2 to 6 inches in length 
when taken and distributed. Eggs are distributed only to state 
hatcheries or to applicants who have facilities for hatching them. 

The difference in methods of hatching applicable to the different 
species is a determining factor in the supply of particular fishes 
available for distribution, and consequently of the number allotted 
to individual applicants. The area and character of the water to 
be stocked must likewise be considered, for the same water area 
which would receive a million pike perch fry would perhaps be assigned 
no more than 200 or 300 black bass 3 or 4 inches long, or four to 
eight times that many if the bass were planted as fry. The explana- 
tion is in the fact that pike perch can be propagated by the hundred 
million, while black bass, hatched by other methods or collected from 
overflowed lands, can be produced only in comparatively small num- 
bers. The Bureau does not attempt to assign any applicant more 



PROPAGATION AND DISTEIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 



13 



than a liberal brood stock of the basses or sunfishes. With brook 
trout, which are distributed both as fry and fingerlings, assignments 
of fry are twenty -five to fifty times larger than assignments of finger- 
lings 3 to 4 inches long. 

The following tabulation shows, by species and waters stocked, 
all distributions of fish and eggs during the year ended June 30, 
1905. The waters are grouped according to states and localities, 
which are arranged in alphabetical order, with the exception of assign- 
ments to foreign governments. A total of 1,756,000 eggs was shipped 
to the governments of Argentina and New Zealand. 

• Details of Distribution. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Catfish. 
Arizona: 


100 
100 

75 
125 
100 

75 
200 

75 

37 
100 
125 
117 
125 
100 
125 
100 

100 
100 
150 
100 

200 

100 

30,000 

100 

20,000 

100 

45,000 

30,000 

250 
100 
ISO 
250 
250 
100 
100 
5,700 
100 
200 
250 

88 

40,000 

600 

1,800 

1,200 

20,000 

25,000 

4,500 

45,000 
10,000 
7,800 


Co//!sft— Continued. 

Iowa— Continued. 

Lainsville, Mississippi River 

Manchester, Maquoketa River.. 
North McGregor, Mississippi 

River 

Smith Ferry, Mississippi River. 




Silver Pond 


10, 000 




6,000 


Jerome, Chick Slough 


Oak Creek Pond 

Pecks Lake . . . 


25,000 
20, 000 




2,700 




Waterloo, Cedar River 


4,000 


Georgia: 

Biillochville, Parhams Pond 


Winthrop, Wapsipinicon River. 
Kansas: 

Arkalon, lake 


3,000 
75 


Haddock, Roberts Pond 

Hamilton, pond 


Atchison, Sulphur Springs Lake 
Burrton, Bendenbough Pond... 


100 


Ochillce, Harp Mill Pond 

Shiloh, Crofl'ord Spring Pond... 
Thomaston, Barron Pond 


100 






Codell, Stockwood Creek 


120 
200 




Coldwater, pond. . 


100 


Culdesac, pond 


Columbus, Statons Pond 

Ellis, Big Creek Dam 








Brighams Lake 


Eureka, pond 


150 


Everest, Hegendefler Pond 

Garden City, pond.. 


75 




75 




Renick Pond 

Harper, Dotterers Pond 

Hays City, ponds (5) 


75 


Benton, railroad pond 

Blanding, Mississippi River 


200 
905 


Hill City, pond 


100 


East Dubuque, Mississippi 
River 


Kensington, East Cedar Pond.. 
Kinsley, Parker Pond 


100 






75 


Galena, Mississippi River 

Savanna, Mississippi River 


Leoti, Beaver Creek Pond 

Mankato, Rock Island Pond 

Mineral, Rvans Pond 


150 
50 
150 




Munden, pond 


125 


Chambers Lake 


Ness City, Sunset Lake and Wal- 
nut Creek 


200 




Osage City, Welsh Lake 

Phillipsburg, Crystal Lake 


100 




100 




50 






75 






75 


Lebanon, gravel pit pond 

Osceola, pond 


Wellington, Slate Creek . 


200 


Kentucky: 

Burgin, Cedar Creek Pond 

Franklin, Red Pond .. . 




Pleasant Lake, Golden Lake 

Indian Territory: 


100 
150 


Jackson, Kentucky River 

Paris, Muir Pond. . . 


200 




100 


Bellevue, Mississippi River 

Calmar, Big Turkey River 

Charles City, Cedar River 

Chester, Upper Iowa River 

Clayton, Mississippi River 

Dubuque, Mississippi River 

Fairfleld, City Waterworks Res- 




100 


Michigan: 

Iron River, Eastman Lake 

Newaygo, Twin Lake 

Mississippi: 

Centerville, pond 

Magee, Burnhams Pond 

Newton , pond 


150 
200 

100 
100 
150 


Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 


Missouri: 




Green Island, Mississippi River. 
Iowa Falls, Iowa River 


Deepwater, tile factory pond ... 
Hermann, pond 


100 
100 



14 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Catfish— Continued. 

Missouri— Continued. 

Mondota, pond 

Pomona, pond 

Walnut Grove, Toalson Pond . 
Nebraska: 

Albion, Beaver River 

Max, Rose Pond 

Valley, Woodwortiis Lake 

Verdon, Wardens Lake 

New Mexico: 

Albuquerque, pond 

reservoir 

Columbus, Nesquit Pond 

Deming, Currys Pond •. . . 

Taylors Pond 

Dorscy, pond 

Florida, pond 

Lordsburg, pond 

Hart Rancli Pond. 

Nutt, ponds (3) 

Portalcs, Busiiongs I'ond 

ponds (2) 

Millers Pond 

Grand Tank 

Silver City, Barnes Pond 

North Dakota: 

Devils Lake, Devils Lake 

Larimore, Harts Pond 

Ohio: 

Dayton, Soldiers Home Lake.. 

Euclid, PoUyvi'ogrun Pond 

Jerusalem, Mann Pond 

Maria Stein, pond 

Marietta. Ohio River 

Montpelier, Faith Pond 

pond 

Oklahoma: 

Cache, pond 

Edmond, Houchens Pond 

Elgin, ponds (2) 

Gutnrie, pond 

Hunter, Fishers Pond 

Lawton, pond 

Mulhall, Kent Pond 

ponds (3) 

Okarehe, ponds (2) 

O Keeno, pond 

Piedmont . pond 

Riplpy, Pickerill Resort Pond . 

Wellston, pond 

Woodward, Spring Lake 

Oregon: 

Ashland, Buck Lake 

Oswego, Sucker Lake 

Pennsylvania: 

Rowland, Burchew Pond 

Scranton, Cobbs Lake 

Moosic Lake 

Mud Pond 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



100 
100 



400 

200 

200 

75 

100 
100 
280 
100 
100 
100 
130 
100 
150 
390 
100 
200 
100 
100 
130 

300 
150 

305 
150 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 

100 
100 
200 
150 
100 
100 
100 
350 
150 
150 
100 
250 
75 
100 

410 
300 

200 
1.50 
200 
200 



Species and disposition. 



Ca?/;s/i— Continued. 

South Dakota: 

Glenhani, Elkhorn Creek 

Loyalton, ponds (2) 

Seneca, Lester Pond 

White Lake, Nelsons Lake 

Texas: 

Brownsboro, pond 

Canyon City, Terra Blanca 
Creek 

Channing, Fount Deaugh Creek. 

Dalhart, pond 

Hereford, ponds (2) 

Locust Grove Lake . . 

Italy, Williams Pond 

Middle Water, Boyce Pond 

pond 

San Antonio, San Antonio River 

Summerfleld, Roberson Pond... 

Waco, Payne Pond 

Virginia: 

Abingdon, Middle Pond 

Charlottesville, Ravanna River. 

Glasgow, Mathews Pond . . . 

Wytheville, Reed Creek 

Washington: 

Addy, Duck Lake 

Arlington, pond 

Elma, Kinwamans Lake 

Wisconsin: 

Cassville, Mississippi River... 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River. 

Lynxville, Mississippi River. . 
Wyoming: 

Walcott, Rosander Reservoir. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Total o. 



Buffalofish. 
Illinois: 

Blanding, Mississippi River. .. 

East Dubuque, Mississippi 
River 

Savanna, Mississippi River 

Iowa: 

Bellevue, Mississippi River 

Clayton, Mississippi River 

Dubuque, Mississippi River. . . . 

Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 
River ; 

Green Island, Mississippi River, 

Lainsville, Mississippi River 

North McGregor, Mississippi 
River 

Smith Ferry, Mississippi River. 
Wisconsin: 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River... 

Lynxville, Mississippi River 

Total 



200 
350 
200 
300 



75 
50 
10 
25 
10 
10 
10 
10 
20 
10 
20 

75 
75 
100 
23 

1,50 
1.50 
200 



10,000 
20, 000 
20,000 

200 



427, 425 



10,000 
23,000 

22, 000 
15,000 
5,000 

50,000 
7,000 
10,000 

15,000 
12, 000 

5,000 
20, 000 
15,000 

214,000 



Species and disposition. 



Shad. 
Connecticut: 

Connecticut Fish Commission, Joshuatown retaining 

ponds 

District of Columbia: 

OfJ Fish Lakes, Potomac River. . .- 

Maryland: 

Maryland Fish Commission, Chesapeake Bay 

mouth of Susquehanna 
River 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



1,239,000 

538, 000 

2, 499, 000 

2,499,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



a There were lost in transit 1,307 catfish. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



15 



Species and disposition. 



Sha^ — Co ntinued. 

Maryland— Continued. 

Battery Haul, Chesapeake Bay 

Western Channel, Chesapealie Bay 

Western Flats. Chesapeake Bay 

Off Broad Creek, Potomac River 

Off Bryans Point, Potomac River 

Off Pamunky Creek, Potomac River 

Off Piscataway Creek, Potomac River 

Off Swan Creek, Potomac River 

New Jersey: 

New Jersey Fish Commission, State waters. 
North Carolina: 

Avoca, Salmon Creek 

Cherry Point, Edenton Bay 

Hornblowers Point, Albemarle Sound 

Newbern, Neuse River 

Washington, Pamlico River 

Wilmington, Cape Fear River 

Pennsylvania: 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Torresdale. 
Virginia: 

Courtland, Nottoway River 

Franklin , Black Water River 

OH Dogue Creek, Potomac River 

■ Off Little Hunting Creek, Potomac River. . . 

Off Occoquan Creek, Potomac River 

Off Pohick Creek, Potomac River 



Total. 



White fish. 
Michigan: 

Belle Isle, Detroit River , 

Charlevoix, Lake Michigan , 

Detour, Lake Huron , 

Fishermans Home, Lake Superior 

Forester, I^ake Huron 

Fox Island Reef, Lake Michigan 

Irishmans Reef, Lake Michigan 

Mackinaw, Straits of Mackinac 

Manistique, Lake Michigan 

Marquette, Lake Superior 

Naubinway, Lake Michigan 

North Point, off Thunder Bay 

Ontonagon, Lake Superior 

Point Iroquois, St. Marys River 

Salt Point, Lalie Superior 

Scarecrow Island, Lake Huron 

Thunder Bay Island, Lake Huron 

Vandalia, Shavehead Lake 

Washington Harbor, Lake Superior. 

Whitefish Point, Lalie Superior 

Minnesota: 

Grand Marais, Lake Superior 

Two Harbors, Lake Superior 

Montana: 

Belton, Lake McDonald 

Kalispell, Foys Lake 

Radnor, Stillwater Lake 

Whitefish, Whiteflsh Lake 

New York: 

New York, Battery Park Aquarium 

Bear Point, Lake Ontario 

New York Fish Commission, Caledonia. 

Cape Vincent, Wilsons Bay 

Fullers. Bay 

Coopersto wn , O tsego Lake 

Grenadier Island, Lake Ontario 

Ohio: 

Ballast Island Reef, Lake Erie 

Catawba Island, Lake Erie 

Gull Island Reef, Lake Erie 

Ohio Fish Commission, Lakeside 

Lutes Point, Lake Erie 

Niagara Reef, Lake Erie 

North Bass Island Reef, Lake Erie 

Port Clinton, Lake Erie 

Put-in Bay, Lake Erie 

Starve Island Reef, Lake Erie 



Eggs. 



378,000 



378,000 



10,000 



3,000,000 



4,144,000 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



795,000 

500,000 

541,000 

2,3.57,000 

935,000 

1,115,000 

1,822,000 

2,031,000 

3,256,000 

972,000 
299,000 
420,000 
401,000 
450, 000 
400,000 

70,000 

466,000 

440,000 

1,899,000 

2, 898, 000 

3,208,000 

809,000 



32,859,000 



25,950,000 
15,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,200,000 
4,000,000 
5,000,000 
5,000,000 
3,000,000 
5,000,000 
4,000,000 
1,000,000 
8,500,000 
7,000,000 
3,000,000 
6,000,000 
9,000,000 
3,600,000 
50,000 
2,800,000 
1,000,000 

2,800,000 
1,000,000 

200,000 
200,000 
200,000 
200,000 



500,000 



14,000,000 

3,000,000 

445,000 

3,500,000 

10, 000, 000 
8,000,000 
10,000,000 



10,000,000 
10, 000, 000 
20,000,000 
20,000,000 
22,300,000 
10,000,000 



16 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Whitefish— Continued. 
Pennsylvania: 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Erie. . 
Wisconsin: 

I ron River, Lake Superior 

Wisconsin Fisli Commission, Oshkosli. 

Woodruff, Crooked Lake 

New Zealand: 

New Zealand Government, Auckland . . 



Total. 



Bluefin white fish. 
Minnesota: 

Duluth, Lake Superior 

Missouri: 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 

Total 



Lake herring. 
Ohio: 

Kelleys Island, Lake Erie 

Ohio Fish Commission, Lakeside 

Put-in Bay, Lake Erie 

Pennsylvania: 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Erie. 

Total 



Eggs. 



42,809,000 



10,000,000 
1,000,000 



60,963,000 



380,000 



50,000,000 



37,040,000 



Fry. 



2,800,000 



260,000 



268,405,000 



1,000,000 



1,000,000 



15,000,000 



20,000,000 



87,040,000 35,000,000 



Chinook salmon. 
Arkansas: 

Mammoth Spring, Mammoth Spring 

California: 

Baird, McCloud River 

California Fish Commission, Eel River 

Sisson 

Iowa: 

Spirit Lake, West Okoboji Lake 

Missouri: 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

Oregon: 

Clackamas, Clackamas River 

Spring Branch 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition 

Rogue River Station, Elk Creek 

Rogue River 

LTpper Clackamas Station, Clackamas River 

Washington: 

Little White Salmon Station, Columbia River 

Little White Salmon River 

Skagit County, Phinney Creek 

Whatcom County, Hatchery Creek 

Lower Baker River 

Argentina: 

Argentine Government, Buenos Ayres 

New Zealand: 

New Zealand Government, Auckland 



Total . 



Silver salmon. 
Maine: 

Brownville, Penobscot River 

Bucksport, inlet to Hancock Pond 

outlet to Jacob Buck Pond. . . 

Stu))bs Brook 

Cherryficld, Narragangus River 

Danui'riscotta Mills. Damariscotta River. 

Dennysville, Di'iiiiys River 

East "Bucksport, Copeland Brook 

East Orland, Alanioosook Lake 

Heart Pond 

Toddy Pond 

tributary of Patten Pond.. 

Ellsworth Falls, Union River 

Freeport, Spar Creek 

Newport, Sebasticook River 

Presque Isle, Aroostook River 

Saco, Saco River 

Surry, Toddy Pond, 



8,414,9.50 

87,170,825 



70, 000 



100,000 
300, 000 



96, 055, 775 



2,000 



7,561,380 



3,543,249 
448,930 
14, 600 
2,905,653 
1,835,000 
1,075,204 

2,582,800 

1,483,914 

96,760 

15,000 

57, 798 



21,620,288 



228, 700 

2, 250 

3,750 

6,000 

50, 000 

88,000 

125, 700 

16, 000 

33, 738 

5,000 

19,111 

10,215 

50,236 



142,800 
88, 000 
54, 600 
19,587 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution— Continued. 



17 



Species and disposition. 



Silver salmon— Continued. 



Maine— Continued. 

Union, Seven Tree Pond 

Vanceboro, St. Croix River 

Vassalboro, Kennebec River 

Maine Fisli Commission, Wmthrop 

New Hampshire. 

East Rochester, Salmon Falls River ,. . - 

New Hampshire Fish Commission, Laconia. 

Oregon: 

G rants Pass, Jones Creek 

Rogue River 

Rogue River Station, Elk Creek 

Washington: , r. , 

Skagit County, G randy Creek 

Phinney Creek 

Whatcom County, Lower Baker River 



Eggs. 



55,000 



Fry. 



10,000 
114,700 
169,000 



75,000 



Total. 



BluebacI: salmon. 



50,000 



107,000 



*^Vhatcom County, Lower Baker River. 
Steelhead trout. 
Mammoth Spring, Mammoth Spring. - . 



Colorado: _ ^ , 

Leadville, Middle Evergreen Lake 

Upper Evergreen Lake 

°^ Forest City, Shell Rock River 

Maine: „ , , , 

Augusta, Lake Cobbosseecontee 

Rockland, Moody Pond 

Michigan: 

Detroit, park pond - - 

Negaunee, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company. 

Paris, Muskegon River 

Minnesota: 

Duluth, French River 

Lester River 

Fergus Falls, Anna Lake 

Long Lake 

Klondike, Crocker Lake 

Alis^ouri" 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 



394, 312 

824,. 530 

31,. 590 

945, 173 
1,496,013 
5,629,895 



10,633,900 



7,819,281 



Montana: 

Bozeman, Spanish Creek 

Divide, Big Hole River 

Missoula, Bitter Root River 

Toston, Crow Creek 

Nevada: . -.^ , i n- tj:,.^,. 

Battle Mountain, Humboldt Rner 

New Hampshire: 

Enfield, Crystal Lake 

New York: 

Long Lake West, Wolf Pond 

Oregon: 

Grants Pass, Rogue River. - - 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition . . . 

Rogue River Station, Elk Creek 

Tolo, Rogue River 

Vermont: 

Barton, Crystal Lake 

Swanton, Dioms Brook 

Westmore, Willoughby Lake 

Washington: 

Hamilton, Carys Lake 

^Wyoming Fish Commission, Ranchester. 



50,000 



16,000 



1,840 

1,000 
50 

700 

4,370 
4,370 



15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



870 
400 



50,000 



Total a. 



10,000 

24, 700 

34,000 

3,000 

430,000 

67,000 



596 

4,000 
8,000 
8,000 
5,000 

2,500 



3,000 



14, 400 
25,000 



3,205 



4,965 
'4,'965 



139,400 



635,905 



51,638 



a 109 yearling steelhead trout were lost in transit. 



2367—06 2 



18 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Rainbow trout. 
jyabama: 

Perdido, Havards Pond 






390 


Arizona: 

Flagstaff, Live Oak Creek 






775 


West Fork of Live Oak Creek 






775 


Jerome, Beaver Creek 






925 


Clear Creek. 






925 


Oak Creek 




775 


Sycamore Creek 






Arkansas: 

Beaver, Leatherwood Creek 




5,000 




Bentonville, pond 




300 


Eureka Springs, Blue Spring 




5,000 








800 


Greenwood, Vache Gras River. 






2 000 


Mammoth Spring, Mammoth Spring 






3,200 


Mena, Mena I'ark Lake 




i6,666 






1 972 


Monte Ne, Monte Ne Lake 




10,000 




Colorado: 




20 


Granite, McFadden Lake 






2 000 


Salida, Ridgwav Pond 




11,000 




Delaware: 

Delaware Fish Commission, Wilmington 




1 000 


Georgia: 

Blue Ridge, Weavers Creek 






1 500 


Cornelia, Hazel Creek 






2 300 


Crawfordville, Moores Mill Pond 






600 


Ellija V, Snuths Pond 






•>oo 


Gainesville, Woodys Pond 






500 








•'00 


Kensington, Mill Creek 






540 


Wiley, West Branch of Tiger Creek 






800 


Idaho: 

Blaekfoot, Branch of Boon Creek 






400 


Hope, Gamblin Lake 






1 000 


Mackav, S. I. Shaw 


5,000 






Montpelier, Grove Lake 




600 


Pebble, Willow Leaf Pond 






200 


Shoshone, Little Wood River 






1 OQO 


Indiana: 




7,000 
4,000 




Fairmount, Winslows Pond 






Indian Territory: 

.'\ rdmore, W'inans Mill Pond 




300 


Iowa: 

Chester, Etna Creek 






4 000 


Forestville, Maquoketa River 




10,000 
5,000 


5,740 


Harpers Ferry, Bolger Cooley Creek 






Lansing. X'lllage Creek 




5,000 


McGregor, Spring Creek 




5,000 
5,000 


Manchester, Honev Creek 






Spring Branch 




600 


Mason Citv, Shell Rock River 






5,000 


North McGregor, Spring Creek 




5,000 
7,000 
5,000 


Waukon, Duck Creek 






North Fork Creek 






Paint Creek 




5,000 


Spring B ranch 




5,000 

27,000 

7,000 




Village Creek 






Waterloo Creek 






Kansas: 

Hutchinson, Cow Creek 




1,000 


Kentucky: 

Hopkinsville, Fast Fork of Little River 






1,500 


Sinking Fork of Little River 






1,500 


Maine: 

East Orland, Alamoosook Lake 






1,207 


Monmouth, Lake Cobbosseccontee 






2,000 


Otis, Green Lake 






18,545 


Maryland: 

Marvland Fish Commission. Baltimore 


38,000 






Deer Park, North Blade Creek 




800 


Giyndon, I^ake Jorosa 






300 


Hagerstown, Marsh Run 






800 


Hoods Mills, Hammonds Ice Pond 






300 


Jessups, lake 






200 


Oakland, Marsh Run 






300 


Rocky Ridge, Owens Creek 






1,000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



19 



Species and disposition. 



Rainbow trout— Continued. 



Eggs. 



Massacliusetts : 

Cushman, Cranberry Lalse 

Grafton, KittviUe Pond 

Lynn, Ulmedon Lake 

Saundcrsvillo, Dorithy Brook 

State Line, State Line Brook 

Wilmington, Silver Lake 

Worcester, Agricultural Society Pond 

Michigan: 

A lanson. Spring B rook 

Brighton, Birds Creek 

Ore Creek 

Hillsdale, Cold Springs Pond 

Mill Creek, Mill Creek 

Northville, De Kay Creek 

Rouge Creek 

Somerset, Smiths Pond 

Sparta, Camp Lake 

Watersmeet, Loon Lake 

Minnesota: 

Little Falls, Swan River 

Mississippi: 

Corinth, Moore Lake 

Missouri: 

Anderson , pond 

Arlington, Gasconade River 

Bourbon, Meramec Klver 

Brookline, Me Lau^'hhn Pond 

Crocker, Gasconade liiver 

Fanning, August Lauth 

Joplin, pond 

Leasburg, Meramec River 

Marshfield, Osage River 

Monctt, reservoir 

Moselle, Meramec River 

Neosho, McMahons Springs 

ponds (2) 

Newburg, Little Piney River 

Niangua, Osage Fork River 

Platte City, Rock Spring Lake 

Robertsville, Meramec River 

Spnngneld, Spring Creek 

St. Louis, I-ouisiana Purcliase Lxposition 

Stanton, Meramec River 

Warrcnsburg, Roseland Pond 

Montana; 

Bonita, Rock Creek 

D-illon, Black Tail Deer Creek 

Boatman Lake 

Boot Lake • 

Esler Lake 

Left Fork of Black Tail Deer Creek 

Pear Lake 

Elliston, Little Blackfoot Creek 

Kalispell, Millers Creek 

Lewistown, Beaver Creek 

Lothrop, Pattee Creek 

Missoula, Rattlesnake Creek 

Pony, South Willow Creek 

Sheridan, Bradleys Lake 

Silver Bow, I£ricksons Pond 

Toston , Spring Creek Lake 

Nebraska: 

Imperial, Cimninghams Pond 

Kilpatrick Lake 

Nebraska Fish Commission, South Bend, Big Sandy 

Creek 

South Bend 

Zell, trout pond 

Nevada: 

Elko, ITuraboldt River 

New Hampshire: 

Sugar Hill, Star Crescent Pond 

Warren, Bakers River 

Wentworth, Bakers River 

New Jersey: 

Belvidere, Montalena Pond 

Gallia, pond 

Netcong, Barbosa Brook 

Ramseys, trout brook 



Fry. 



7,000 
7,000 



10,000 



5,000 



8,000 
10,000 



2,800 
1,260 



5,000 



3,000 



41,000 



1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 
28 



300 
212 
298 



100 
300 



2,000 
555 

400 
1,125 
1,125 

300 
1,125 



200 
1,125 
1,125 



1,125 

283 

260 

1,200 

1,125 



1,125 
300 
168 

1,125 



1,200 
1,500 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
800 
1,200 
1,000 
1,200 
1,000 
300 
800 

1,000 
2,000 

10,000 



1,000 

2,500 

400 
2,000 
1,500 

400 
400 
800 
700 



20 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Rainbow <ro«<— Continued. 
New Mexico: 

Cloudcroft, Hendrix Reservoir 

Las Vegas, Trout Springs 

New Yorlc: 

New Yoric, Battery Park Aquarium 

Pouglikeepsie, Vassar College Brook , 

North Carolina: 

Balsam, Fork of Balsam Creek 

Rickards Pool 

Boonford, tributaries of Toe River 

Bostic, Huntington Creek 

Brevard, Allison Lake 

Cedar Rock Creek 

Bushnell, Forney Creek 

Clyde, Cataloocliee Creek '. 

Elk Park, Cane Creek 

Salem Mission Pond 

Fletcher, Cain Creek 

Hendersonville, Green River 

Hungry Creek 

Upper Hungry Creek 

Horseshoe, French Broad River 

Shaws Creek 

Huntdale, Cane Creek 

Lenoir, Rainbow Pond 

Marion, Harijins Lake 

Morgans Pond 

Toms Creek 

Mast, Cone Creek 

Melrose, Mill Creek 

North Pacolet River 

Morris ville. Sycamore Creek 

Penland, Toe River 

Raleigh, Batts fish pond 

Penitentiary Lake 

Rutherford ton. Cove Creek 

Spruce Pine, Grassy Creek 

Toxaway , Flat Creek 

Middle Fork French Broad River. 

Tryon, Alstons Creek 

Spring Creek 

WaterviUe, Big Creek 

Waynesville, Bald Creek 

Campbells Creek 

Cataloochee Creek 

Cherry Cone Creek 

Deep Gap Creek 

Hemphill Creek 

Jonathan Creek 

Massey Fork Creek 

Piatt Creek 

Shiney Creek 

Slesta"tchee Creek 

Willetts, Scotts Creek 

Zirconia, Green River 

North Dakota: 

New Salem, Spring Brook Pond 

Oklahoma: 

Mangum, Moss Creek 

Waynoka, Spring Lake 

Oregon: 

Albany, Yaquina River 

Cottage Grove, East Fork Willamette River. 

Mosby Creek 

Row River 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition 

Rogue River Station, Rogue River 

Pennsylvania: 

Alexandria, Loop Run 

Ashland, Shoemaker Creek 

Bedford , tributary of Bobs Creek 

Belle Vernon, pond 

Brandonville, Torberts Run 

Butler, Pine Run 

Canadensis, Middle Branch Creek 

Stony Run 

Chambersburg, Falling Spring Creek 

Columbia Crossroads, Sugar Creek 

Corry, Pennsylvania Fish Commission 



10,000 



3,715 



8,100 



8,000 
8,100 



15,000 
"8,166' 



9,000 



00,000 



3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
10,000 
5,585 



30,000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



21 



Species and disposition. 



Fry. 



Rainbow <rou<— Continued. 

Pennsylvania— Continued. 

Coudersport, Claris: Spring Brook 

Dingman Creek 

Fee Brook 

Gardiner Spring Brook 

Gordon Spring Brook 

Haskell Spring Brook 

Earl Spring Brook 

Lent I'ond 

Mehring Brook 

Nelson Run 

Reese Hollow Run .' 

Spring B rook 

Steer Brook 

Stellman Spring Brook 

Terrcnce Fee Pond 

Wedsworth Spring Brook 

Currys Station, Meadow Branch 

Danville, pond 

Ellwood, Fishing Creek 

Fern Glen, Big Tomhieken Creek 

Crooked Run 

Davis Run 

Little Tomhieken Creek 

Roberts Run 

Rock Glen Run 

Sand Spring Run 

Schlanchs Run 

Singleys Run 

Gaines Junction, Elk Run 

Galeton, Pine Creek 

Gold Mine, Gold Mine Creek 

Jeffs Creek 

Mount Eagle Creek 

Good Spring, Rausch Gap Creek 

Gordon, Little Mahanoy Creek 

Hamliurg, Furnace Creek 

Renos Creek 

Pennsylvania Fish Conunission, Herrick Center. 

Hopewell, Yellow Creek 

Hosensaek, Indian Creek 

Jenkintown, Rogers Lake 

McCalls Ferry, Tucquan Creek 

Mahanoy City, Condorrie Creek 

Head of Locust Creek 

Kadora Creek 

mill pond , 

Marietta, Evans Run , 

Millerstown, Marsh Run 

Mountain Home, Goose Pond Run , 

Mount Pocono, Sebrings Pond 

Timl^er Creek 

Newville, Big Run , 

Paint Creek, Clear Shade Creek 

Cub Run 

Dark Shade Creek , 

Paint Creek 

Roaring Fork Creek 

Sorrel Run 

Ralston, Rock Run 

Reading, Browns Brook 

Richmond, Upper Conocoeheague Creek 

Rising Springs, Laurel Run 

Penns Creek 

Rock, Hering Lake 

Shocks Mills, Hoffraans Run 

Tomhieken, Schaars Run 

Tower City, Clarks Creek 

Pine Creek 

Washington, Berks Fish Pond 

Wingerton, Crystal Lake 

Woodstock, Conocoeheague Creek 

York, Gitchezumel Pond 

Kreidiers Run 

South Carolina: 

Greenwood, Yoes Spring Branch 

South Dakota: 

Buffalo Gap, Beaver Creek 

Nelsons Spring 



10,000 
2,000 



22 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — -Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Rainbow trout— ContinueA. 

South Dakota— Continued. 

Englewood, Elk Creek 

Gamble, Stanley Creek 

Hill City, Palmer Creek 

Spring Creek 

Oreville, Spring Creek 

Rochford, Copper Creek 

Spearflsh, SpearDsh Creek 

Sturgis, Hodgsons Lake 

Tennessee: 

Algood, Spring Creek 

Ashland City, Sycamore Creek 

Athens, Bon Ton dairy pond 

Belfast, pond 

Clinton, Clinch River 

Elizabethton, Doe River 

Watauga River 

Erwln, Mclnturfl Pond 

Fishery, Spring Branch 

Indian Creek 

Fish Springs, Watauga River 

Franklin, Big Ilarpeth River 

Greenville, Paint Creek 

Hampton, Doe River 

Laurel Fork Creek 

Lower Torrell Creek 

Simerley Creek 

Spring Creek 

Upper Torrell Creek 

Hunter, Perry Lake 

Stoney Creek 

Johnson City, "Soldiers' Home Lake 

Knoxville, Tennessee River 

Lawrenceburg, Clear Creek 

Shoal Creek... 

Spring Creek 

McMillan, Holston River 

McMinnville, Sink Creek 

Milligan, Buffalo Creek 

Mountain City, Mill Creek 

Roan Creek and tributaries. 

Silver Lake 

Roan Mountain, Doe River 

Warner, pond 

Texas: 

Clarendon, Allan Creek 

Utah: 

Provo, Provo River 

Vermont: 

Barton, Crystal Lake 

Brattleboro, Bakers Brook 

Greenes River 

Marshfield, Onion River 

Proctor, Beaver Pond 

Pico Pond 

Sugar Hill, Star Crescent Pond 

Westmore, Willoughby Lake 

Virginia: 

Allegheny, Snake Run 

Atkins, Holt Branch Pond 

Shupe Branch Pond 

Cascade, Cascade Creek 

Chilhowie, Mill Creek 

Christiansburg, Mountain Stream 

Damascus, White Top River 

Duffield, Carters Pond 

Leesburg, quarry pond 

Luray, Spring Farm Pond 

Lynchburg, Orphans Home Branch 

Marion, Holston River 

Middle Fork Holston River 

Stalcys Creek 

Martinsville, Smith River 

Mount Jackson, Smiths Creek 

Natural Bridge, Cedar Creek 

Newcastle, Craig Creek Pond 

Willow Pond 

Roanoke, Roanoke River 

Rural Retreat, pond 



3,000 
3,0'X) 
4,nn0 
4,000 
5,000 
3,000 
500 
3,000 



4,000 



2,000 



5,000 
10,000 



5,000 



10,000 
7,000 
10.000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5,000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 23 

Details of Distribution— Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Rainbow (roM«— Continued. 

Virginia— Continued. , „. 

Rye Valley, South Fork of Holston River. . . . 

Sevenmile Ford, Holston River 

Sugar Grove, South Fork of Holston River.. 

Waynesboro, spring 

Wytheville, Tates Run 

West Virginia: 

Belva, Gauley River 

Beverly, Beaver Creek 

Files Creek 

Brookside, Brookside Lake 

Davis, Blackwater River 

Little Blackwater River 

Sand Run - -.- 

Elkins, tributaries Tygarts Valley River 

Howesville, Bires Creek Pond 

Martmsburg. pond ; ■.; v; ■ " "i" 

Mill Creek Logging Camp, Mill Creek 

Montrose Barnett Pond ....-.---- 

Roaring Creek Junction, Middle Fork Creek. 
Roaring Creek 

Romney, Cedar Run 

Roneeverte, Baileys Pond 

Wisconsin: 

Glen Beulah, Otter Creek 

Argentina: 

Argentine Government Buenos Ay res 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



20,000 
10,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



5,000 



Total a. 



Atlantic salmon. 
Maine: 

Brownville Pleasant River V\--'V' ill'^' 

Freeport, Casco Bay Fish Culture and Angling Asso- 
ciation ■ • ■ • " 

Grindstone, East Branch Penobscot River 

Oakfield, East Branch Mattawamkeag River. 

Penobscot County, East Branch Penobscot River 

Missouri: 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

Pennsylvania: „ . ^ • „ 

Pleasant Mount, Pennsylvania Fish Commission 



92,000 



286,000 



3,000 



4,000 



442,160 



1,250 

'2,250 

2,000 
500 
500 
800 

1,000 
940 
310 
400 
200 
300 
800 
500 

1,000 

1,800 
800 

1,000 



Total. 



5,000 



8,000 



10,000 



727, 462 



727, 462 



345,204 



190,717 



45,220 
53,165 



289, 188 



20.000 



6,000 



17,000 



Landlocked salmon. 

Colorado: 

Leadville, Upper Evergreen Lake 

Connecticut: _ i „„i „ 

Connecticut Fish Commission, Windsor Locks 

Maine: 

Bangor, Upper Brewer Pond 

Bar Harbor, Great Pond 

Brooks, Colson Pond 

Brake Pond 

Hadley Pond 

Passagassaewakeag Lake 

Randall Lake 

Camp Caribou, Parmachenee Club 

Canton, Lake Anasagunticook 

Deadham, Branch Pond 

Phillips Lake 

Ellsworth, Branch Pond 

King Pond 

Ellsworth Falls, Long Pond 

Enfield, Cold Stream Lake 

Eustis, Arnold Pond 

Farmington, Clear Water Lake 

Sweets Pond 

Barnums Pond 

Green Lake, Arnold Pond 

Holden, Fitz Pond 

Jackman, Spencer Pond - - . ■ - ------ 

Maine Fish Commission, Greenville Junction 

Mattawamkeag , Molunkus Lake 

North Anson, Emden Lake 

Oldtown, Pushaw Lake 

a There were lost in transit 6,310 fry and 3,870 fingerUng rainbow trout, 



50 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 

'iiooo 



50,000 



6,000 



7,011 
6,000 



1,000 
17,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,000 



1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



24 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Landlocked salmon — Continued. 

Maine— Continued. 

Otis, Green Lake 

Perry, Lake Boj'den 

Phillips, Mount Blue Pond 

Portage, Portage Lake 

Presque Isle, Squawpan Lake 

Princeton, Lake Sysladobsis 

Searsmont, Quantabacook Pond 

Searsport, Swan Lake 

Sebago Lake, Sebago Lake 

Sullivan, Tunk Pond 

Union, Crawfords Lake 

Sennebec Pond 

Warren, South Lake 

Washington County, Grand Lake 

Wilton, Wilson Lake 

Winn, Duck and Junior lakes 

Massachusetts: 

Grafton, Kitwell Pond 

Massachusetts Fish Conimi.»sion, Wilkinsonvillt 

Plymouth, Plymouth Rock Trout Co 

Pocasset, G. H. Richards 

Tehanto Club 

Michigan: 

Michigan Fish Commission, Sault Ste. Marie 

Missouri: • 

Joplin, pond 

St. Louis, lyouisiana Purchase Exposition 

New Hampshire: 

Bristol, Pasqueney Lake 

Concord, Penacook Lake 

Laconia, Lake Winnipesaukee 

Lake Sunapee, Lake Sunapee 

New Hampshire Fish Commission, Laconia 

Potter Place, Pond No. 1 

Warner, Winnepecket 

Wolfeboro, Lake Winnipesaukee 

New York: 

New York, Battery Park Aquarium 

Caledonia, James Annin, jr 

Long Lake, South Pond 

Prospect, Big Rock Lake 

North Dakota: 

St. John, Gordon Lake 

Oregon: 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition 

Vermont: 

Barton, Parkers Pond 

Barton Landing, Willoughby Lake 

Greensboro, Caspian Lake 

Norton, Big Averill Lake 

Little Averill Lake 

West Burke, Newark Pond 

Argentina: 

Argentine Government, Buenos Ayres 

New Zealand: 
. New Zealand Govermnent, Wellington 



Total a. 



Blackspotted trout. 
Colorado: 

Antonito, Conejos River 

Aspen, Castle Creek 

Hunter Creek 

Keno lakes 

Maroon Creek 

Berrys Ranch, Eagle River 

Cebolla, Cebolla Creek ; 

Gunnison River 

Cimarron, Big Cimarron River 

Silver Tip Lake 

Colorado Fish Commission, Denver 

Colorado Springs, Prospect Lake 

Creede, Rio Grande 

Cripple and Spring creeks, between Colorado Springs 
and Cripple Creek ; 



Eggs. 



20,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 

10,000 



10,000 



2,000 
10, 000 



30,000 
10,000 



192,000 



75,000 



Fry. 



18,000 
0,000 



6,000 



150.000 
"26,066 



2,400 
2,400 

4,903 

3,000 

3,000 
3,000 
0,290 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



o There were lost in transit 15 yearling landlocked salmon. 



PROPAGATION AND DiSTRIBlTTION OF FOOD FISHES. 25 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Blackspotted «roM<— Continued. 



Eggs. 



C olorado— Continued. 

De Beque, pond 

Mesa and Lily lakes 

Del Norte, Fienas Creek 

Delta, Gunnison River 

Delta County, Alexander Lake 

Barren Lake 

Battlement Mesa Lake 

Deep Slough 

Dirty George lakes 

Eggleston Lake 

Forest Lake 

Johnsons Reservoir 

Kiser Creek 

Lake Castle 

Little Eggleston Lake 

Mosquito Pond 

Surface Lake 

Twin Lakes 

Ward Creek 

Ward Lake 

Dillon, Fry Lake 

Snake Creek 

Soda Creek 

Ten Mile Creek 

Willow Creek 

Eagle County, tlomestake and Eagle rivers - 

Frying Pan River and tributaries, between Ivanhoe and 

Thomasville 

Georgetown , Green Lake 

Glenwood, Canon Creek - - ■ 

Glenwood Springs, Grizzly and No Name creeks 

Grand County, Columbine Lake... 

Frazier River 

G rand Lake 

Grand River 

Little Beaver Creek 

North Fork Grand River 

South Fork Grand Lake 

South Fork Grand River 

Stillwater Creek 

Willow Creek 

Grand Lake, East Inlet of Grand Lake 

North Inlet of Grand Lake 

North Shore of Grand Lake 

Gunnison River, between lola and Cimarron 

Leadville, Arkansas River 

Lake Creek 

Lake Park Reservoir 

Tennessee River 

Upper Evergreen Lakes 

Longmont, St. Vrain River 

Loveland Big Thompson River 

Lawn Lake 

South Fork, Big Thompson River 

•Lyons, St. Vrain River 

Mammoth, South Boulder Creek 

Parachute, Battlement Creek - - 

Platte River, between Grant and Pme Grove 

Robinson, Placer Lake v: : " "A ", 

Rio Grande County, South Fork, Rio Grande 

Salida, Fairview Pond 

Snowmass, Snowmass Creek 

South Fork, South Fork, Rio Grande 

Thomasville, Lake Alicia 

West Cliff, Hermit Lake 

Idaho: 

Council, Lick Creek 

Kootenai County, Bonanza Pond 

Oneida County, Samaria Creek 

Rathdrum , Fish Lake 

Shoshone, Snake River 

Missouri: 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

Montana: ^ , 

Anaconda, Warm Springs Creek 

Belt, Belt Creek a: • i" ■ - • \y-; • W " " V ' " 

Between Lombard and Harlow, Sixteen-Mile Creek.. 



Fry. 



100,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



20,000 

40,000 

30,000 

20,000 
150,000 
100,000 

10,000 

25,000 

10,000 
100,000 

30,000 

20,000 

30,000 

20,000 

25,000 

25,000 

20,000 

30,000 

30,000 
100.000 

15; 000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

75,000 

250,000 
25,000 
10,000 
50,000 
5,000 
50,000 
180,000 
50,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
10,000 
10,000 
■ 5,000 
25,000 
10,000 
15,000 
100,000 
20,000 
20,000 
15,000 
30,000 
50 
40,000 
30,000 
15,000 
30,000 
250,000 
100,000 
15,000 
250,000 
20,000 
35,000 
25,000 
55,000 
25,000 
80,000 
15,000 

12,000 
15,000 
6,000 
20,000 
15,000 

96 

12,000 
10,000 
90,000 



26 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Blackspotted <ro«<— Continued. 

Montana— Continued. 

Boulder, Muskrat Creek 

North Fork of Little Boulder Creek 

Bozeman, Bridgcr Creek 

pond 

Butte, Lake Palmer 

Little Beauty Pond 

Chester, Lairds Reservoir 

Chinook, Clear Creek 

Craig, North Fork Sun River 

Dillon, Jake Canyon Creek 

Price Creek 

Spring Creek 

Dorsey, Smith River 

Drummond, pond 

Emigrant, Emigrant Creek 

Gallatin County, East Gallatin River 

Lyman Creek 

Great Falls, Sun River 

Jefferson Island, Lost Cabin Lake and Creek 

Kalispell, Patrick and Bowland creeks 

Lennep, Allebaugh Creek 

Comb Creek 

Lewistown, Braids Pond 

Little Casino Creek 

Spring Creek 

Tributary of Box Springs and Cottonwood 

creeks 

Tributaries of Spring Creek 

Livingston, Yellowstone River 

Lothrop, Nine-Mile Creek 

West Branch of Pattee Creek 

Melrose, Canyon Creek 

Missoula, Lo Lo Creek 

Moore^ Calbreth Coullee Creek 

Nei hart, Belt Creek 

Middle Fork of Judith River 

Pipestone, Big Whiietail Creek 

Pipestone Creek 

Pony, Cedar Lake 

Salesville, trout pond 

Sheridan, Branham Lake 

Thompson, Graves Creek 

Townsend, Deep Creek 

Duck Creek 

Twin Bridges, Lauterbaeh Pond 

W hi tehall, Pri ze Creek 

Nebraska. 

Chadron, Beaver Creek 

Big Bordeaux Creek 

Chadron Creek 

Little Bordeaux Creek 

New Mexico: 

Chama, Chama River 

Grants, San Luras Creek 

Oregon: 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition 

Rogue River Station, Elk Creek 

Trail, Rogue River 

South Dakota. 

Artesian O'Neal Lake 

Black Hawk, Bogus Jim Creek 

Box Elder Creek 

Hot Mountain Gulch Pond 

Buffalo Gap, Beaver Creek 

Custer, French Creek 

Sylvan Lake 

Dead wood. Polo Creek 

Elmore, Speariish Creek 

Upper Spearflsh Creek 

Englewood, South Fork of Spearflsh Creek 

Whitewood Creek 

Galena, Bear Butte Creek 

Hill City, Grizley Creek 

Spring Creek 

Sunday Creek 

Hot Springs, Cascade Creek 

Hat Creek 

Piedmont, Spring Creek 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



27 



Species and disposition. 



Blackspotted <roMt— Continued. 



Soutli Dakota-Continued. 

Rapid City, Box Eider Creek. 
Cleghorn Tond . 



c'gh' 
Lime Creek I'ond. 

Pond and creek 

Rochford, Casllu Creek 

Rapid Creek 

Nortti Fork.. 

Rouljaix, Elk Creek 

St. Ongc, McNeills Pond 

Savoy, Little Spearflsh Creek 

Spearflnh, Chicken Creek 

Crow Creek 

Mountain Lake 

Spearfish Creek 

Summers Creek 

Sturgis, City Park Lake - • - - ■ 

Silver and Warren creeks... 

White Owl, Rock Creek 

Utah: „ , 

Indianola, Spencers Pond 

Provo, Provo River 

Salt Lake City, George Calder 

Washington: „ .„ t i 

Colville, Little Pend O'Reille Lakes. 

Goldendale, Summit Creek 

Wyoming: 

Aladdin. Pine Creek 

Beulah, Sand Creek 

Cody, Wood River 

Dale Creek, Dale Creek 

Sheridan, Big Goose Creek 

Jackson Creek 

Lakes (5) 

Prairie Dog Creek 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



30,000 



15,000 



Total". 



305,000 



Scotch sea trout- 
Maine: , T 1 . 
East Orland, Alamoosook Lake. 

Loch Leven trout. 



Iowa: „ 

Forestville, Spring Branch 

Michigan: 

Detroit, City Aquarium 

^'Tt" Louis Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 
South Dakota: 

Rapid Citv, Rapid Creek. 

Savoy, Little Spearfish Creek 



27,000 
11,250 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 
90,000 
15,000 
05,000 
10,000 
51,000 
15,000 
30,000 
30,000 
447,000 
20,000 
15,000 
50,000 
15,000 

20,000 
250,000 



15,000 



41,205 



20,000 
30,000 
25,000 
150,000 
25,000 
14,000 
14,000 
14,000 



6,388,031 



Total 

Lake trout. 

Colorado: ^ ^^ 

Idaho Springs, Lake Ohman 

Ivanhoe, Ivanhoe Lake 

^""coMCCticut Fish Commission, Windsor Locks. 



200,000 



27,000 
27,000 



3,479 

200 

12 

50 

1,800 

2,062 



1,200 
700 



Iowa: ^ , 

Clear Lake, Clear Lake 

Storm Lake, Storm Lake 

Maine: , 

Farmington, Varnums Pond 

Fryeburg, Lake Kegar 

Michigan: 

Alpena, Hubbard Lake 

Lake Huron 

Au.sable, Lake Huron 

Beulah, Crystal Lake 

Charlevoix, Lake Michigan 

Pine Lake 

Chippewa County, St. Marys River 

Detour, Lake Huron 

Fish Island, Lake Superior i 

a There were lost in transit 5,000 fingerling blackspotted 



20,000 
20,000 

125,000 
1,450,000 
1,500,000 
15,000 
3,437,500 
1,488,500 

500,000 
2,000,000 

320,000 

trout. 



359 
225 



28 PROPAGATION AND DISTEIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Lake <ro«<— Continued. 

Michigan— Continued. 

Granite Point, Lalve Superior 

Hougiiton, Lake Superior 

Irisliinans Reef near Cliarlevoix, Lal^e Mieliigan. 

Iroquois Point, Lalie Superior 

Keystone. Lake Superior 

Isled'Or Reef, St. Marys River , 

Long Poitit, Lake Superior 

Mackinac Island, Straits of Mackinac 

Manistique, Lake Mieliigan 

Marquette, Lake Superior 

Michigan Fish Commission, Sault Ste. Marie 

Mosquito Bay, St. Marys River 

Naubinvvay, Lake Michigan 

North Point, Thunder Bay 

Oakland County. Union Lake 

Ontonagon, Lake Superior 

Point Aux Pins, St. Marys River 

Presque Isle, Lake Huron 

Rock Harl)or, Lake Superior 

Salt Point, Lake Superior 

Scarecrow Island, Lake Huron 

Sturgeon Point, Lake Huron 

Thunder Bay Island, Lake Huron 

Tobins Harbor, Lake Superior 

Todds Harbor, Lake Superior 

Topsail Island, St. Marys River 

Washington Harbor, Lake Superior 

Whitefish Point, Lake Superior 

Minnesota: 

Beaver Bay, Lake Superior 

Chicago Bay, Lake Superior 

Collegeville, St. Johns Lake 

Duluth, Lake Superior 

French River, Lake Superior 

Grand Marais, Lake Superior 

Grand Portage, Lake Superior 

Mouth of Poplar River, Lake Superior 

Ogilvie, Lewis Lake 

Two Harbors, Lake Superior 

Missouri: 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition 

Montana: 

Bozeman, Sparrs Pond 

Nebraska: 

Imperial, Bussell Lake 

Champion Lake 

Maranville Lake 

New Hampshire: 

Ashland, Squam Lake 

Franklin, New Found Lake 

Freedom, Moon Lake 

Hancock, Long Pond 

New Hampshire Fish Commission, Colebrook 

Weirs, Lake Winnisquam 

West Ossipee, Lake Ossipee 

New York: 

Cape Vincent, Wilsons Bay 

Charity Shoals near Cape Vincent, Lake Ontario. 

Cooperstown, Otsego Lake 

jJutch Point, Lake Ontario 

Fullers Bay, Lake Ontario 

Grenadier Island, Lake Ontario 

New Yort, Battery Park Aquarium 

New York Fish Commission, Caledonia 

Tibbets Point, Lake Ontario 

North Dakota: 

St. John, John Jay Lake 

Lake Gervais 

Ohio: 

Kelleys Island, Lake Erie 

Put-in Bay, Lake Erie 

Oregon: 

Oregon Fish Commission 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition 

Pennsylvania: 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Corry 

Utah: 

Utah Fish Commission, Murray 



Eggs. 



2,436,000 



50,000 



250,000 



10,000 
.500,000 



1,000,000 
100,000 



Fry. 



309, 000 
310,000 
1,250,000 
1,000,000 
3ti0, 000 
500,000 
300,000 
500,000 
505,000 
670,000 



500,000 

250,000 

1,680,000 



1,080,000 
394,000 
635,000 
300,000 
500,000 

1,615,000 
640,000 
344,000 
320,000 
320,000 
.500,000 
300,000 
500,000 

360,000 
360,000 
25,000 
75,000 
180,000 
360,000 
.360,000 
360,000 
25,000 
180,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
2,400 



12,. 537 
15,000 

530,000 
300,000 
25,000 
750,000 
300,000 
2,203,000 



768,000 

20,000 
15,000 

840,000 
73,000 

8,000 
4,500 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 29 

Details of Distribution— Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Lake (roM<— Continued. 

Vermont: , , . , 

Barton Landing. Willougliby Lalie 

Greensljoro, Caspian Lake 

Island Pond, Echo Lake 

Norton, Big Averill Lake 

Vermont Fish Commission, Roxbury 

Wisconsin: 

Bark Point, Lake Superior . . . - 

Between Port Wing and Sand Island, Lake Superior. 
Wyoming: . . 

Wyoming Fish Commission, Sheridan 

Argentina: . 

Argentine Government, Buenos Ayres 

Canada: 

Rossport, Lake Superior 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



500,000 



Total a. 



40,000 
58,829 
40,000 
40,000 



320,000 
360,000 



50,000 
224,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlidgs, 
and adults. 



300,000 



5,320,000 



35,993,266 



49,000 
24,500 
14,700 
9,800 
50,000 



15,000 



10,000 



50,000 
200,000 
10,000 
10,000 
25,000 
10,000 
15,000 
15,000 



15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
135,000 



25,000 



50,000 



Brook trout. 

Colorado: 

Arrowhead, Baskcrs Creek 

Beaver Creek 

Frazier River 

pond on Frazier River 

Baileys, North Fork of South Platte River 

Between Shawnee and Baileys, Platte Hiver. 

Between South Fork and Crede, Rio Grande River.. 

Buena Vista, Ilartenstein Lake 

trout pond 

Buffalo, Choesnian Lake 

Wi'llington Lake 

Cimarron, Deep 1 .ake 

Vco Creek 

Clyde, Middle Beaver Creek 

Colorado Springs, No Name Lake 

trout ponds (0) 

Crossons, North Fork of South Platte River 

Denver, G. 11. Thompson 

Dillon, BouMer Creek 

Sh;nli- Cnrk 

WilldW Creek 

Eldora, Lake Kldora 

Falcon, pond 

Florence, Beaver Creek • ■ - - ■ ■ - 

Georgetown, South Branch of South Clear Creek. . . 

Gillette, Upper Rhyolite Reservoir 

Glenwood Springs, private pond - . ■ ■ 

tributaries of Grand River 

White River 

Grand Lake, Grand Lake 

Granite, pond 

trout pond - - -. 

Grant, North Fork of South Platte River 

trout ponds 

Greenland, Lake WiUiam Dale 

Idaho Springs, Ilassell Lake 

Lake Edith 

St. Marys Lake 

Ivanhoe, Frying Pan River and tributaries 

La Jara, trout pond 

Lake County, Derrys Ponds 

Crystal Lake 

Musgroves Lake 

Sugar Loaf Reservoir 

Leadville, Lead villc High School 

Lower Evergreen Lake 

Middle Evergreen Lake 

Smiths Pond 

trout ponds 

waterworks reservoir 

Loveland, Big Thompson River 

Hour Glass Lake 

Lyons, St. Vrain River 

Malta, Crystal Lake 

Montrose, Haskill Lake 

Middle Spring Creek 

Morrison, Cony Lake 

Moraine Lake 

Witter Lake 

5,000 fry and 26 fingerling lake trout 



24,500 
10,000 



20,000 
15,000 



100,000 



.50,000 
10,000 
7,500 
69,800 
453,200 
50,000 



25,000 
87,000 



50,000 



10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 



4,745 



11,469 



10,000 
15,000 



2,000 



5,000 



2,000 
5,000 



5,000 



10,000 



5,000 

20,000 

4,000 

4,000 



30 
4,700 
1,000 



75,000 
10 



36,200 
8,000 
9,000 



o There were lost in transit ' 



30 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Brook ;roM<— Continued. 

olorado — Continued. 

Morrie, Frying Pan River 

Quimis, Nortli Forlc of Frying Pan River 

Roscniont, East Beaver Creek 

Salida, Fairview Fish Pond 

Ridgway Pond ^ . ■. . . 

Sellar, Frying Pan River and tributaries 

Shawnee, Nortli Fork of South Platte River 

Telluride, Coal Creek 

Texas Creek, trout ponds 

Thoinasville, Frying Pan River 

Lake Alicia 

Utc Park, Chipita Lake 

Wellington Lake, Wellhigton Lake 

Woodland Park, Beaver Creek 

Connecticut: 

Abington, Mashmoquet Creek 

Avon, Knod Brook 

Branford, Branford River 

Brooksvale, Mill River 

Madison, Neck River 

New llaven, Foxon Lake 

Norwalk, Barnum Brook 

Orange, Race Brook 

Portland, Walnut Hill Creek 

Springdale, Spring Brook 

Stratford, pond 

Wilton, Norwalk River 

Idaho: 

Bliss, Billingsley Creek 

Riley Creek 

Bonners Ferry, Sarvis Berry Lake 

Hailey, Purdums Pond 

Robinson Creek ,... 

Lewiston, pond 

McCammon, Trout Lake 

Market Lake. Spring Creek 

Oneida County, Samaria Springs 

Pocatello, Fall Creek 

Soda Springs, Harris Pond 

Spencer, Sheridan Lake 

Thomas Turton 

Troy, Nelson Pond 

Indiana: 

Crawf ordsville, trout pond 

South Bend, Spring Brook 

Iowa: 

McGregor. Petersen Creek 

Manchester, Spring Branch 

Waterville, Little Paint Creek 

VVaukon, Bacons Branch 

Bear Creek 

Burr Oak Spring 

Clear Creek 

French Creek 

South Branch of Paint Creek 

Maine: 

Aliens Mills, Bishop Brook and Clear Water Lake. 

Belfast, St. Georges River 

Bethel, B Pond 

Songo Lake 

Bingham, Rowe Pond 

Blue Ilill, First, or Billings Pond 

Third, or Woods Pond 

Brooks, Great Farm Creek 

Brownfield, Shepherd River 

Bucksport, W illiams Pond 

Bumham, Fletcher Brook 

Camden, Canaan I^ake 

Lake Alf ord 

Lake Magunticook 

Camp Caribou, Parmachenee Club 

City Point, Oak Hill Lake 

Coplin, Greens Pond 

Cumberland Center, Red Rock Pond 

Rowes Pond 

Dedham, Branch Pond 

Green Lake 

Morrison Ponds 

Phillips Lake 



50,000 



50,000 
25,000 
10,000 



7,800 
25,000 
50,000 
10,000 



05,000 

190,000 

10,000 



10,000 



9,700 



7,495 
8,000 



5,000 



5,000 
5,000 
8,000 
5,000 
5,000 
8,000 
5,000 

127.500 
35,000 



31,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 



18,685 
25,000 
30,000 
25, 000 
25,000 



20,000 



100,000 
104,000 
25,000 
25,000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



31 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Brook trout — Continued. 

Maine— Continued. 

East Orland, Craig Brook 

Craig Pond 

Heart Pond 

Toddy Pond 

Ellsworth, Pattens Pond 

Famiington, Little J im Pond 

Great Brook, Green Lake 

Holden, Ilolbrooks Pond 

Kingfleld, Tufts Pond 

Madison, Enibden Lake 

Morrill, Pasagasa wakeag Creek 

Newport, Pillsbury Pond 

Oquossoc, MooselookiBaguntic Lake 

Orono, Chemo Pond 

Otis, Green Lake 

Presque Isle, Squa Pan Lake 

Rangeley, Gull Pond 

Salmon Lake 

Searsport, Swan Lake 

Sebago Lake, Sebago Lake 

Springvale, Lone Pond 

Surry, Toddy Pond 

Vienna, Flying Pond 

Maryland: 

Albcrton, Brices Run 

Baltimore, Baltimore College 

Deer Park, North Glade Creek 

Glencoe, Piney Run 

Monkton, Elliotts Run 

Oakland, Browning Dam 

McLains Run 

Perry ville, dam on Mill Creek 

Washington County, Nichols Branch 

Massachusetts : 

Byfleld, Jackman, Taylor, and Wheeler brooks. 

Fall River, Shingle Island River 

Hingham, Plymouth River 

Lawrence, Willow Pond ■ 

Leominster, trout pond 

Lowell, Spring Brook 

Massachusetts Fish Commission, Hadiey 

Medfield, Spring Creek 

Northampton, Aliem Creek 

Roberts Meadow Brook 

Saunders ville, Champneys Brook 

Misco B rook 

Shelbume Falls, Ciessons Lake 

Deerfield River 

• Taunton, Cobbs Spring 

Worcester, William Lawrence 

Lake Quinsigamond 

Agricultural Society Pond 

Michigan : 

Addison, Posey Creek 

Alger, Bear Creek 

Alpena, Mitchell Creek 

Newton Creek 

Ausable, East Branch of Pine River 

Black River, Black River 

Corunna, Crooked Creek 

East Tawas, Silver and Gold creeks 

Emery Junction, Johnson Creek 

Smith Creek 

Fenton, Cranberry Creek 

Prestons Creek 

Grand Haven, Bass River 

Greenbush, Cedar Creek 

Greenville, Slopes Creek 

Hillsdale, Happy Hollow Ponds 

Stocks Pond 

Holland, Half Way Creek 

Holly, Buckhom Creek 

Hudson, Fellows Creek 

Iron River, Lake Fifteen 

Kalamazoo, Campbell Creek 

Davis Creek 

Delnoes Creek 

Haden Creek 

Hall Spring Brook 



1,000 



10,000 



4, .501 
30,656 
22,000 

4,166 
50,000 
31,000 
100,000 
25,000 
31,000 



25,000 



25, 000 
60,000 
30,000 



32,000 

9,188 



3,500 



11,000 
3,000 



6,000 



5,000 
6,000 



5,000 
5,000 



1.5,000 
5,000 



10,000 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

60,000 

3.5,000 

5,000 

60,000 

30,000 

100,000 

5,000 

5,000 



10,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 



20,000 



14, 750 
9,500 

10,000 
9,500 
9,500 



32 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook /roM<— Continued. 

Michigan— Continued. 

Kalamazoo, Hampton and Portage lakes. . 

May ville, Bear Creek 

Succor Creek ... 

Millington, Millington Creek 

New Buffalo, trout pond 

Northville, Spring Creek 

Onaway, Owens Creek 

Rainy Creek • 

Upper Black River 

Owosso, Willow BrooK Pond 

Oxford, Benning Creek 

Kile Creek 

Kishpaugh Creek 

Meyers Creek 

Reeds Creek 

Stodard Creek 

Tanners Creek 

Pentwater, Cedar Creek 

Quinn Creek 

Plymouth, Orchard Hill Spring Brook 

Roscommon, Douglas Creek 

Thompson Creek 

Tawas City, Silver Creek 

Thompsonville, Betsey River 

Tobins Harbor, Tobins Harbor 

Union City, Pine Creek 

Washmgton Harbor, Grace Harbor Creek. 
Washington Creek . . . 
Minnesota: 

Caledonia, Crooked Creek 

Carson, Rice River 

Rocky Run 

Detroit, Pelican River 

Duluth, pond 

Fishers Creek 

French River 

Lester River 

Little Colquit Creek 

Midway River 

Spring Brook 

Sucker River 

Talmadge River 

Little FaUs, Clough Creek 

Pentoga, Brule River 

Preston, South Branch of Root River 

St. Charles, Trout Run 

St Peter, Noonans Creek 

Pauls Creek 

Roberts Creek 

Tower, Flint Creek 

Vemdale, Wing River 

Missouri: 

Jophn, trout pond 

Missouri Fish Commission, St. Joseph 

St. James, Merrimack Springs 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 
Montana: 

Alder, Spring Brook 

Belt, Belt Creek 

Big Bend, Trout Run 

Boulder, Buffalo Creek 

Bozeman, Hell Roarmg Creek 

Meadow Brook 

Butte, Fish Creek 

Chester, Bear Gulch Lake 

Half Breed Brook 

Wearley Lake 

Dillon, Cat Creek 

Cottonwood Creek 

Rattlesnake Creek 

Fork of Black Tail Deer Creek 

Emigrant, Fridley Creek 

Gallatin County, Bridger Creek 

Glen, WiUow Creek 

Kalispell, Cusick Creek 

Hamans Creek 

Millers Creek 

Upper Lost Creek 

Lewistovirn, Fergus Pond 



Eggs. 



100,000 



Fry. 



14,250 
10,000 
10,0G0 
10,000 
15,000 



5,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
5,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5,000 
25,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
5,000 
9,500 
5,000 
5,000 



6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,000 



5,000 



5,000 
6,000 



Fingeriings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIHUTION OB^ FOOD FISHES. 33 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook <roM<— Continued. 

Montana — Continued. 

Lewistown, Spring Creek 

Strouf s Pond 

Tyler Creels 

Lima, Warm Spring Creelc Pond 

Lombard, Sixteen-Mile Creek 

Lotlirop, Butler Creek 

Missoula, Grant Creek 

Lo Lo Creek 

Rattlesnake Creek 

Neihart, O'Brien Creek 

Red Rock, Wild Rose Lake 

Sappington, pond 

Sheridan, Crystal Lake 

Silver, Little Prickly Pear Creek 

Stevensville, Spring Creek 

Nebraska: 

Imperial, pond 

Lake Kunkel 

Nebraska Fish Commission, South Bend, Verdigris Creek. 
Nevada: 

Battle Mountain, Pine Creek 

New ila.mpshire: 

Ashland, Brown Brook 

Bradford, Mountain Brook 

Bristol, Danforth Creek 

Canaan, Indian River 

Ca vender, Peterboro Brook 

Charlestown, Big Brook 

Chamberlain Brook 

Ilackett Brook 

Claremont, Little Sugar River 

Red Water Brook 

Colebrook, Big Diamond Pond 

Grcenough Pond 

Concord, Dallapp Brook 

Quarry Pond 

Thayers Pond 

Dover, Isinglass River 

Mill Brook 

Exeter, Dudloj' Brook 

Fabyans, Ammonusuc River 

Saco Lake 

Grafton, Spring Creek 

Greenville, Cold Spring Brook 

Furnace Brook 

Miller Brook 

Groveton, Nash Creek Pond 

Hillsboro Shed River Brook 

Hinsdale, Liscom Creek , 

Hookset , Bear Hill Pond 

Lake Sunapec, Lake Sunapee 

Littleton, Profile Lake and tributaries 

Manchester, Bakersville Brook 

Bowman Brook 

Damon Brook 

Damon mill pond 

Dearborn Creek 

Dr. Little Brook 

Duin]iling Brook 

Farm I5rook 

Golf Club Creek 

Harris Brook 

Harry Brook 

James Brook 

Mantor Brook 

Mead Brook 

Millstone Brook 

Nigger Brook 

Patten Brook 

Peters Brook 

Pierce Brook 

Pulpit Creek 

Ray Brook 

Spring Creek 

Spring Pond , 

Stump Meadow Brook 

Sudden Pitch Creek '. 

Tannery Brook .,..;.-..,..,..., .,..,. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



3,000 

4,000 

20,000 

6,000 



8,000 



5,000 
5,000 



6,000 
10,000 
8,000 



7,000 
8,000 
5,000 
6,000 



5,000 
5,000 
7,000 
4,000 



6,000 
6,000 



5,000 
10,000 
7,000 



5,000 
6,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



3,500 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
4,500 
2,500 
3,500 
500 
3,500 
1,250 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
1,500 

800 

800 

4,000 

2,000 

1,500 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,800 
1,500 



1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 



1,500 
4,700 
1,000 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



1,125 
1,800 



2,000 
2,500 
1,500 



2,000 
1,500 



1,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 



1,500 
1,500 



2,000 
2,000 
1,500 



1,500 

200 

1,000 



1,000 



2367—06- 



34 PKOPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook <roM<— Continued. 

New Hampshire— Continued. 

MilTord, Nanagnog Creek 

Nashua, Brickyard Brook 

Chase Brook 

Chase and Brickyard brooks 

Collins Brook 

VVentworth Pond 

New London, Lake Sunapec 

Peterlioro, Town Line Brook 

Plymouth, Clay Brook 

Halls Ponds 

Potter Place, Cole Pond 

Ragged Mountain Pond 

Raymond, Branch River 

Dudley Brook 

Forbray Brook 

Lanes Brook 

Pine Hill Brook 

Scribners Brook 

Robys, Slaughter Brook 

Sanl.iornville, Mountain Lake 

Suncook, Boat Meadows Creek 

Troy, Sand Brook 

Warner, Osgood Brook 

Silver Brook 

Stevens and French brooks 

West Alton, Emmerson brook 

West Springfield, Koleleniook Pond 

West Swanzcy, Spring Brook 

Wilton, Blood Brook 

Spring Pond 

Winchester, Roaring Brook 

Wolfboro, Hayth Brook 

New .lersey: 

Blairstown, Wildricks Brook 

New Mexico: 

Between Osiers and Chaina, Los Pinos and Chama rivers 
New York: 

Apulia, Butternut Creek 

Beaver River, Twichel Creek 

Bliss, Wiscoy Creek 

Boonville, Spring Brook 

Catskill , Kiskatom Creek 

Cattaraugus, Branch Cattaraugus Creek 

Chenango Forks, Castle Creek 

Page Brook 

Thomas Brook 

Coopers Plains, Dry Run 

East Branch, Twaddell Brook 

Ellenville, Sanburg Creek 

Fleischmans, trout pond 

Freeville, Fall Creek T 

Halfway , Carpenters B rook 

Horseheads, Catherine Brook 

Hhaca, trout pond 

Liberty, Middle Mongaup Creek 

New York, Battery Park Aquarium 

New York Fish Commission, Cape Vincent Station 

Northville, Stony Creek 

Oneonta, Otsego Creek 

Otego, Otsdawa Creek 

Owego, Vv'c^«t Creek 

Richfield, Otsego Lake 

Richland, Pekin Brook 

Potter Brook 

Stittvillc, Spring Brooks 

Syracuse, Geddor Brook 

Montfredy Brook 

Waterville, East Canada Creek 

Oriskney Creek 

North Carolina: 

Boonford, Big Rush Creek 

Big Crabtree Creek 

White Oak Creek 

Brevard, Bushy Creek 

Cagle Creek 

Kmgs Creek 

Kuykendall Creek 

Nigger Fork Creek 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



0,000 
0,000 
5, 000 



0,000 



5,000 
0,000 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
ii, 000 
5,000 
5,000 
0,000 



5,000 
(i, 000 
0,000 
0,000 
0,000 
7,000 



5,000 



10,000 



50,000 

30, 000 
25, 000 
30, 000 
15,000 



15,000 



15,000 
20, 000 
1 5, 000 
20, OCO 



15,000 
15,000 
25, 000 
15,000 
30,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



2C0, 5'iO 
30,0(X) 
30,000 
20,000 
30,000 
15,000 
25,000 
25,000 
10,000 



15,000 

'36,"666 

1.3,500 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 35 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 




Brook <roM<— Continued. 

North Carolina— Continued. 

Hendcrsonville, Finlays Crceli 

Penlami , Bailoy Creek 

North Dakota: 

Oakes, Denning Lake 

St. John, mill lake 

Oak Lake 

Ohio: 

Bellefontaine, Huckinghalas Crook 

Mad River 

Stony Creek 

Chillicothe, Spring Lake 

Cleveland , Chagrin Valley Creek 

Lucas, Crystal Lake 

Ravenna, Cuyahoga River tributaries . 

Unionville, Cunningham Lake 

Oregon: 

Cottage Grove, Champion Creek 

Portland, Lewis and Clark Exposition. 

Roseburg, Deer Creek 

Pennsylvania: 

Altoona, Blair Run 

Canoe Creek 

Clover Creek 

McAllisters Pond 

Mill Run 

Piney Crook 

Spring Run 

Ashland, Broad Mountain Run 

Old Buck Mountain Pond 

Auburn, Stony Creek 

Bear Run, Boar Run 

Sir Johns Run 

Bellefonte, Bald Eagle Creek 

Buffalo Run 

Greens Valley Creek 

Little Fishing Creek 

Logans Branch 

McBrides Gap Creek 

Pleasant Gap Run 

Spring Creek 

Berlin, Laurel Run 

Brandon ville, Deebels Run 

Messa Run 

Ulshafer Creek 

Wolfs Creek 

Bushkill, Big Bushkill Creek 

Little Bushkill Creek 

Canadensis, Broadhead Creek 

Goose Pond Run 

Mill Creek 

Rattlesnake Creek 

Carlisle, Letort Creek 

Center Hall, Laurel Run 

Confluence, Draketown Run 

Youghiogheny River 

Cresco, Broadhead Creek 

Buck Hill Creek 

Bushkill Creek 

Crooked Hollow Run 

Currys Station, Cotter Creek 

Hoffmans Creek 

Middle Branch 

Mountain Creek 

Woodbury Dam 

Delaware Water Gap, Caldeno Creek... 

Cherry Creek 

Dcpews Run 

Felkers Run 

Lamberts Run.. 
Mountain Run. . 

Stiles Run 

Wild Cat Creek. 

Du Bols. Anderson Creek 

Ebensburg, Blacklick Creek 

Noels Run 

Falls Creek, Wolf Run 

Frackville, Blackberry Run 

Little Mahanoy Creek , 

Tower Run 



5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



GOO 



250 



500 
600 
500 
400 
500 
500 
500 
400 
200 
400 

1,000 
300 
700 
000 
COO 
600 
500 
400 
400 

1,000 
400 
400 
400 
400 
400 
600 
600 

cm 

600 
500 
400 
GOO 
500 
300 
1,000 
1,200 
400 
GOO 
500 
500 
600 
1,200 
600 
300 
400 
300 
300 
400 
300 
400 
300 
400 
450 
600 
300 
400 
300 
600 
400 



36 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Brook <roit<— Continued. 

Pennsylvania— Continued. 

Frazer, Valley View farm pond 

Gaines Junction, Pine Creek 

Gans, Crystal Pond 

Good Spring, Good Spring Pond 

Gordon, Rattling Run 

Ravine Creek 

Spring Creek 

Tar Run 

Teipolts Run 

Hopewell , Maple Run 

Otts Run 

Yellow Creek 

IlughesviUe, Spring Brook 

Ilyndman, Wills Creek 

Keating Summit, Portage Creek 

Kennet Square, Pocopson Creek 

Lehighton, Branch of Mahoning Creek 

Lcwisljurg, Cherry Run 

Rapid Run 

Lorane, Antietam Creek Pond 

McCalls Ferry, Kellys Run 

Mahanoy City, Deep Creek 

Locust. Creek 

Stony Creek 

Marietta, Gladfelter Creek 

Markleton, Markleton Creek 

Mcadville, Spring Branch 

Munin , Big Run 

Maccdona Run 

Mount Pocono, Devils Hole Creek 

Wilsons Spring Run 

Mountain Home, Levis Branch 

New Bethlehem , Sloans Run 

Nordmont, Cherry Run 

Hunters Run 

Long Brook 

Muncy Creek 

South Branch Falls Run 

Spring Run 

Parsons, Deep Hollow Creek 

Gardner Creek 

George Run 

Kelly Pond 

Laurel Run 

Sandy Run 

Tenmile Creek 

Warden Creek 

Warden Town Creek 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, He.rrick Center. 

Port Allegheny, E. R. Helmer 

Skinner Creek 

Pottsville, Cold Run 

East Branch of Cold Run 

Francis Creek 

Millers Creek 

Schwartz Creek 

Silver Creek 

Tar Run 

Wolf Creek 

Ralston, Pleasant Brook 

Rattling Run, Rattling Run 

Reading, Browns Brook 

Rising Springs, Penns Creek 

Rosemont, trout pond 

Salix, Big Paint Creek 

Saylorsljurg, Gowers Run 

Princess Run 

Shenandoah, Davis Creek 

Stony Creek 

Snow Shoe, SouthFork of Beech Creek 

Starrucca, McKane Creek 

Merrigan Creek 

Shadagee Creek 

Thompson Creek 

Stewartstown, Anderson Branch 

Stroudsl3urg, Broadhead Creek 

Daniels Run 

Marshalls Creek 



25, 000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 37 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook /roM^— Continued. 



Pennsylvania— Continued. 

Strondsliurg, Pocono Creeli 

Rock Springs Brooli 

Susquciianna, Brushville Creeli 

Canawacta Creek 

Cold Spring Brook 

Drinken Creek 

Egypt Creek ■ 

Little Hemlock Creek 

Shattague Creek 

Starrucca Creek 

Tamaqua, Bushy Run...... 

Tomhicken, Sugar Loaf Creek 

Tower City, Rattling Creek 

Treinont, Black Creek 

Crane Creek 

Gold Mine Creek 

Jeffs Creek 

Middle Creek 

Poplar Run 

Troy, Bullard Creek 

Coreob Creek 

Fellms Creek 

Kifl Run 

Morgan Creek 

Porter Creek 

Rathbone Creek 

Sam Millers Run 

Webber Creek 

Wampum, trout brook 

Westover, Rogue Harbor Creek 

AVetham, Rattlesnake Run 

Williamsport, Wolfe Creek 

South Dakota: 

Belle Fourchc, Hay Creek - 

Buffalo Gap, Beaver Creek mill pond 

Custer, Sylvan Lake vv-a--';-" 

Elmore, East Branch Little Spearftsh Creek. . 
South Branch Little Spearflsh Creek. 

Si)earfisli Creek - ■ - - - - - 

Englewood, Bear, Butte, and Big Elk creeks. 

Pond 

Spring Pond 

■ Whit(! wood Creek 

Hill City, Spring Creek 

Hot Springs, Cascade Creek 

Kyle, American Horse Creek 

Hermans Pond 

Koccrs Pond 

Medicine Root Creek 

Pierre, Medicine Creek Pond 

Rapid City, Rapid Creek 

Rochford, Castle Creek 

Little Rapid Creek 

Rosebud, Cedar Creek 

Lone Creek 

Rosebud Creek 

Soldier Creek 

Willow Creek 

Savov, Little Spearflsh Creek 

Spearflsh , Coxes Lake 

Crow Creek 

Driskill Pond 

Montana Lake 

Schmidt Pond 

Spearflsh Creek 

Spring Pond 

Summers Pond 

trout pond 

Watercress Creek ■ 

Tennessee: 

Fishery, Spring Branch 

Greenville, Davis Creek 

Harriman, Emory River 

White Pine, French Broad River 

Utah: ^ , 

Gunnison, T welvemile Creek 

Manti, Manti Creek 

Sixmile Creek 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



15,000 



25, 000 

25,000 

30, 000 

25, 000 

30,000 

5,000 

5, OOO 

15,000 

25, 000 

15,000 

7,500 

5,000 

4, 000 

7,500 



25,000 

25, 000 

25,000 

7,500 

10, 000 

7, 500 

7,500 

10,000 



10, 000 
25, 000 



15,000 

10,000 

128, 500 

5,000 



20, 000 



2, 000 



10, 000 
15,000 
10, 000 



600 
300 
400 
500 
400 
400 
500 
400 
500 
650 
400 
500 
500 
500 
400 
600 , 
500 
400 
300 
500 
600 
400 
400 
400 
000 
600 
400 
600 
900 
400 
1,200 
400 



3,500 
15,000 



3, 000 



3,000 



3,000 



2,000 
3,500 



1,200 
1,200 



38 PROPAGATION AND DTSTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Eggs. 


Fry. 


Fingerlings, 

yearlings, 

and adults. 


Brook /ro«(— Continued. 

Utah— Continued. 

Mount Pleasant, Mount Pleasant Creek 




15,000 
55,000 




Provo, Fish and Thistle creelis and White River 






Prove River .. 1 . - 


4 775 


Salt Lalce City, Bungalow fish ponds 




10,000 




Thistle Junction, Log Cabin Spring 




2 000 


Tributaries of Provo River, lictween I'rovo and Ileber. 




135,000 
10,000 




Tucker, Tucker Creek .- 






Utaii Fish Commission, Murray 


100,000 




Vermont: 

Braintree, Brackett Brook 


15,000 
G,000 
6,000 




Brattleboro, Cane Brook 






Murder Hollow Brook 






Salmon Brook 




1,500 


Slate Rock Creek 




10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10, (X)0 
0,000 
8,000 
125, 000 
5,000 
0,000 
25,000 




Spring Creek 






Waites Creek 






Whetstone Brook . . . 




1 000 


Chester, Love Lane Brook 






South Branch 






Groton, Darling Pond 






.Tamaica, Kidder Brook 






Pikes Falls Brook 






Lyndon ville. Spring Brooks 






Manchester, Spring Brook 




1,900 


Middleburv, Ridley and Hewitt Ijrooks 




30,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 




Montpelier, Bennett Brook 






Ilerrick Brook 






Langdon Pond 






Nicholas Pond 




500 


Wordners Pond 




20, 000 
20,000 
10,000 




Yatter Pond 






North Troy, Hunts Pond 






Poultney, Poultnev River 




1,000 
2 000 


Proctor j Pico Pond 






Putnev, Iloughtons Pond 




5.000 
10,000 
25,000 
25, 000 
20,000 
20,000 
20, 0(K) 
25, 000 
20, 000 
20, 0(H) 
25, 000 
15,000 
25,000 




Westminster Brook 






Randolph, Ayres Brook 






Chandler Brook 






Hatch Pond and Brook 






Mafeba Lake 






Mud Pond 






Peth Brook 






ponds (2) 




, 


Roxbury Creek 






Wellington Brook 






White River 






Richford, Harwood Pond 






Rutland, Lendon Branch 




1 (X)0 


St. .lohnsbury, frog pond 




25, 000 
20, 000 
30,000 
25, 000 
30,000 


1 125 


Iloveys Pond 






South Ryegate, Dawes Pond 






Scott Brook 






Webster Brook 






Springfield, Whitmores Brook 




000 


Swanton, Diana Brook 




25,000 




Townshend, Joy Brook 




500 








500 


Waterbury, Lake Mansfield. 




100, 000 
35, 000 


500 


Wells River, Peach Brook 






Wells River Fish and Game Club Pond ... 




750 


West Hartford, pond and stream. 






1 000 


West Norwich Lake Mitchell 




125,000 
31,2(K) 
25,000 
20,000 
25,000 
20,000 
25,(X10 
25,000 

30,000 




Williamstown, branch of White River 






Woodstock, Black Pond 






Dean Brook 




1 000 


Lakota Lake 






Meccawe Lake 






North Pomfret Brook 






Winslow Brook 






Virginia: 

AlU^ghany County, Jerrys Run 






Amherst, Big Piney River 




800 


Bedford City, Gunstock Creek 






S(X) 








SOO 


Blue Ridge, Rieley Mill Pond 




5,0(M) 
50,000 
49,,'-)00 
20,000 




Clifton Forge, Smith Creek 






Wilsons Creek 






Covington, Castle Run 







PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 39 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook <roM<— Continued. 

Virginia— Continued. ^ . „ 

Covington, Falling Spring Branch 

Laurel Run 

Pounding Mill Fond 

Fairwood, Fox Creek 

Front Royal, Indian Creek 

Gala, Mill Creek 

Harrisonburg, Dry River 

Hot Springs, Kelly and Spring runs 

Hunters, Snake Den Creek 

Millboro, Mill Creek 

rotters Branch 

Newcastle, Barbers Creek 

Spencer, North Mayo River 

Winchester, Darbs Creek 

West Virginia'. 

Bartow, East Branch Greenbrier River... 

Beverly, Beaver Creek 

Files Creek 

Camden on Gauley, Oauley River 

Capon Springs, branch of t apon River 

Cheat Bridge, F. A. Dealer 

Cranberry, Cranberry Creek 

Davis, Beaver Creek 

Blackwater River 

Durbin, New Meadow Pond 

Eglon, Horseshoe Pond - . - 

Elkins, tributary of Tygarts Valley River 

-HflPkftrs Junction, Tygarts Valley River.. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



25,000 



Hackers Junction, Tyga 

Hannan, Spruce Run 

Holly Junction, Elk River 

Jobs Knob, Big Clear Creek 

Limerick Junction. Buckhannon River 

Mill Creek logging camp. Mill Creek 

Ricbwood, Cherry Creek ■■■■■•■• t-" " V "o" ' '.^V 
Roaring Creek Junction, Middle Fork River. 
^ Roaring Creek. 



Shryock, Meadow Creek /,■••;•" 

North Fork of Anthonys Creek. 



Sutton, Elk River • ■ - 

Terra Alta, pond.... ■ i,- ■■ •■ 

Wildell, West Fork Greenbrier River 

Wisconsin. 

Alma, Hitts Creek • - • 

Knabe Creek - 

Little Waumanbee Creek .-. 

Mill Creek ••• 

Sliver Creek --- 

Trout Creek - - - 

Wingers Creek ' - .-■ 

Alma Center Alma Creek - . 

Boree Creek 

Amherst, Peterson Creek - ■ 

Tomarron River 

Waupaca River - . 

Arcadia, American Valley Creek 

Augusta, Beef River - - 

Travis River ■ . 

Birnamwood, Plover River - . 

Blair, Trunks Creek - • : 

Vosse Cooley Creek --■■-• •; • -x" • • ", • - • 

Chippewa Falls, West Fork of O'Neills Creek 

Eleva, Trout Creek ; v/ V, " ;'o-' ' '; ' ' ' 

Elkhard Lake, branch of Mullet River 

Fairchild, Scott Creek • - ■ 

Spring Creek -■..-■ • - • 

Fountain City, Bohris Valley Creek. 

Kochenderfer Valley Creek 

Branch Eagle Valley Creek 

Oak Vallev Creek 

Right branch of Eagle Valley Creek. 

Schoepps Valley Creek 

Galesville, Beaver Creek 

French Creek 

Greenwood Black Creek 

Cawley Creek 

Gile Creek 

North Fork Rock Creek 

Norwegian Creek --- 

Rocky R un 



20,000 
40,000 
20,000 



40, 000 
50,000 
50,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



29,500 



50,000 



49,600 



49,000 
50,000 



25,000 
'19,' 966 



30,000 
30,000 



50,000 



4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,500 



3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 



GOO 
1,000 



1,000 

11,700 

1,000 

1,000 



800 
1,100 



500 

500 

1,500 

500 



500 

625 

1,625 



200 

400 

1,000 



1,000 



1,000 
800 
1,300 
1,000 
1,800 



1,000 

1,000 

300 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



1,200 
1,000 
1,500 



1,200 

1,200 

1,000 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

800 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 



40 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OP FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Brook «roM<— Continued. 

Wisconsin— Continued. 

Hazelliurst, Rocky Run 

Hixton, Tank Creek 

Independence, Chimney Rock Creek 

Travcrs Valley Creek 

La Crosse, Adams Valley Creek 

Irish Coolie Creek 

Krauts Creek 

Morman Coolie Creek 

North Branch of Chipmonk Coolie Creek. . . 

North Branch of Coon Creek 

Rose Creek 

South Branch of Half Way Creek 

State Road Coolie Creek 

Lake Nebagamon Hansons Creek 

Wilson Creek 

Menominee, Annis Creek 

Clacks Creek 

.Gilbert Creek 

Hay Creek 

Irving Creek 

Knights Creek 

Lambs Creek 

Little Elk Creek 

Varney Creek 

Merrill, Prairie River 

Mondovi, Ford Creek 

Harvey Creek 

Rock Creek 

Rossman Creek 

New Auburn Duncan Creek 

Sand Creek 

New Lisbon, Jackson Creek 

Norwalk, branch oi Morse Creek 

Morse Creek 

Plymouth, Mullet River 

Rhinelander, Indian Creek 

Richland Center, Ash Creek 

Rockland, Big Creek 

Fish Creek 

Sparta, Tar Creek 

Taylor, Pine Creek 

Viroqua, Bishop Branch 

Cheateni Branch 

Cook B ranch 

Duck Egg Creek 

Esofa Creek 

Getter Creek 

Harrison Creek 

Lees B ranch 

Middle Bad Axe Creek 

South Bad Axe Creek 

Tainter Branch 

Waupaca, Dayton Creek 

Wausau, Black Creek 

Gimmore Creek 

Kennedy Creek 

Little Rib River 

Little Trappe Creek 

Moe Creek 

Sand Creek 

Wautonia White River 

West Salem, Spring Creek 

Whitefish Bay, Lalce Mninehaha 

Whitehall , Elk Creek 

Fly Creek 

Pigeon Creek 

Whittlesey Fish Lake 

Wild Rose, Pine River 

Wilton, Sink Creek 

Woodman, Big Green River 

Wyoming: 

Between Cheyenne and Laramie, Dale Creek and Reser- 
voir 

Benlah, Sand Creek 

Cheyenne, Gramte Springs 

Cokeville, Smiths Fork River 

Granite Canyon, Crow Creek and Reservoir 

Kemmcrer, tlams Fork of Green River 

Mammoth Hot Springs, ice pond 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
7,000 
3,500 



3, 500 
3,500 



3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
0,000 
0,000 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3,500 
3, 500 
3, 500 
3,500 
8,000 



3,500 
3,500 



4,000 
3,500 



(i, .500 
3,. 500 
3,. 500 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



3,000 
3,000 
3,600 
3,500 
3,500 
4,000 
4,000 



4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,500 
4,000 
3, 500 
3, ,500 
3,500 



4,000 
3.500 
3,500 



50.000 
15, 000 



40, (KJO 
20, 000 
11,OOU 



Fingerlings, 

yearlings, 

and adults. 



2,(i(X) 
2.000 



■I.IKIO 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution— Continued. 



41 




'^'"Tcfrt.lanrt, Lewis and Clark Exposition 
Grayling- 



^''^Mfchigan fish commission, Detroit 
Missouri: 

Joplin, pond 

Montana: n^^ni- 

Gallatin County, Bozeman Crcelv 
Bridger Creek.. 
East Gallatin River 
Lyman Creek 

^'Tortlaud, Lewis and Clark E.xposition 

Utah: . . .»,,._.,v 

Utah fish commission, Murra> 

'^^^w'yoliing fish commission, Sheridan 
Total 



Illinois: T>„rn^ 

B landing, Mississippi River . 
East Dubuque, Mississippi 

River ■vv^'" ;' '■ 

Galena, Mississippi River. . . . 
Savanna, Mississippi River. . 

Bellevue, Mississippi River. . 
Clayton, Mississippi River. . 
Dubuque, Mississippi River . . 
Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 

River ■."■'•" Vi •" . 

Green Island, Mississippi River. 
North McGregor, Mississippi 

River 



5,000 
9,000 
5,500 

13,300 
1,500 
1,200 

7,200 
2,000 



Wisconsin: . . „. 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River. .. 
Lynxvillc, Mississippi River. ... 



Total . 



1,500 
2,000 
5,000 

62,200 



Illinois— Continued. 

ColumlMa, Aherns Lake ._..----.- 
East Dubuque, Mississippi 

River .■ - - .- 

Galena, Mississippi River 

Hillsboro, Bogues Lake. ■■■-■■- 

Glens Stretch Creek. 

Hillsboro Lake 

pond .•- 

Lone Tree, Lone Tree Lake. . . . 
Millstadt, Pistors Pond 

nond - 

Richland Pond 

Monmouth, Cloverdale Pond. . . 

Paris, Fish Club Lake 

Savanna, Mississippi River 

^""^Bufomington, Quarry Pond.'. . - 



Crappie. 



Idaho: 

Troy, pond 

Blanding, Mississippi River. 
CoUinsville, brickyard pond . 



o There were lost in 



Boonville, pond. 

Culver, Lake Maxmkuckee 

Dana, pond ■ - - - - -y-:-' 

Evansville, Country Clubs Lake. 
Georgia, Birdfield Pond....... 

Indianapohs, West Fork of 

White River ■■.-■- 

Lake (^icott. Lake Cicott 

Lapel, Stony Creek Pond 

transit 94,250 fry and 6,310 yearling brook trout. 



200 

50,000 
150 



200 

40,000 
85,000 
150 
200 
200 
100 
200 
100 
150 
100 
100 
200 
66,000 

50 
100 
750 

500 
150 

1,000 

109 



42 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Crappie— Continued. 

Indiana— Continued. 

Lebanon, Higgins Gravel Creek. 


65 
100 
150 
300 
300 
300 
300 

300 
95 

125 
CO 

200 

400 
50 
45 

200 
200 

150 

76,000 
4,>s50 

600 
30,000 

250 
30,000 

5,500 

115,000 

40,000 

170 

5,000 
•50,000 

300 
3,000 

25,000 
200 

70, 000 
5,000 
3,000 
2,500 

75 
100 
100 
200 
100 

75 
100 
200 
150 

;t 

100 
75 
100 
250 
80 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
200 
50 
115 
100 
50 

200 
100 
100 

200 


Crappie— Continued. 

Kansas— Continued. 

Oakley, pond 










Pittsburg, Hogans Pond 






-r 


Martindalc Creelj 




100 


Nolands Fork Creek 

Symons Creek . . 


Summertield, Elisa Lake 

Wellington, Slate Creek 

Zenda, Willowdale Lake 

Kentuckj' : 

Covington, lake 


!50 
2011 


West Fork of Wliite 
River 


1.^.0 


Montipello, Tippecanoe River 


200 






200 


Perth, gravel pit 


Erlanger, Blick Place Pond 

Frankfort, Maple Pond 


!00 


Plynioutli, Pretty Lake 




Rushville, Big Flat Rock River. . 

Somerville, Martins I ake 

Tipton, Plum Grove Pond 

Indian Territory: 


Trimbles Pond 

Ilodgensville, Slaughter Pond.. 
Ilopkinsville, Little River 


40O 
300 
200 
150 


Ardniore, Railroad Lake 




100 


Swan Lake 


Roaring Fork River. . . 


o^5 


South McAlester, waterworks 


150 






75 








Bellevue, Mississippi River 




1.50 


Charles City, Cedar River 

Chester, upper Iowa River 

Clayton, Mississippi River 

Clear Lake, Clear Lake 


Summers Pond 

Willow Pond 


75 
150 


Morganfield, Houston Pond 


100 

75 


Dubuque, Mississippi River. . . . 


Salvisa, Royalty Pond 


1.50 


Fairfield, city waterworks res- 
ervoir 


Stanford, water company's res- 


150 


Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 
River " 

Green Island, Mississippi River. 

Hawkeye, Alpha Mill Pond 

Iowa Falls, Iowa River 


Versailles, Hampton Pond 

Oakview Pond 

Williamstown, Lagoon Springs . 
Winchester, Bush Pond 

Ecton Pond 

pond 


75 

100 
125 
100 


Lainsville, Mississippi River 


100 


Lime Springs, upper Iowa 
River 


RedmonPond 

Spahr Pond 

Wheeler Lake 

Waterworks Lake . 
Louisiana: 

Calhoun , pond 


lOv/ 
100 


Manchester, Maquoketa Rivrr. 
North McGregor, Mississippi 
River 


150 
200 


St. Ansgar, Red Cedar River. . . 


150 


Smiths Ferry, Mississippi River. 
Wadena, Volga River . . 


Mansfield, Hewitts Pond 

Parsons Pond 

New Orleans, Davis Pond 

Shreveport, Bungalow Pond 

Trenton, pond 


150 
100 


Waterloo, Cedar River 


100 


Winthrop, Wapsipinicon River. 
Kansas: 


100 


Abilene, Bass Lake 


Maryland: 

iliverdale. Eastern Branch Po- 




Blue Rapids, Big Blue River . . . 
Brownell, pond 


300 


Burdett, Pawnee River 

Burlingame, Guiles Pond 


Michigan: 

Clare, Tobacco Creek 


175 


Burton, pond 


Minnesota: 

Fergus Falls, Lost Lake 

Mississippi: 

Boonville, Boonville lake 

Columbus, gravel pit 




Cairo, Cairo Lake 


200 


Cambridge, Grouse Creek 

Emporia, Cottonwood Creek . .. 
Great Bend, Evergreen Lake. . . 


637 


Luse Pond 


Corinth, Adams Lake 


300 


Heizer, pond 


Coon Creek Pond 


300 


Hoisington, pond 


COO 


Hutchinson, Red Rock Pond... 
ponds (2) 


Santa Fe Lake 

Durant, railroad pond 


200 
50 


Kansas City, Whites Pond 

Kansas Fish Commission, Pratt 


Fayette, McGintys Pond 

Hazelhurst, Bass Pond 


75 
125 


Kingman, lake 




400 


Weinschenks Lake... 


Scooba, ponds (5) 


450 


Lang, pond. ... . . 


Shuqualak, Combs Pond 




Lenexa, Allans Pond 


100 


Leoti, ponds (2) 


Missouri: 

Greenwood, Hillerest Lake 

Independence, ponds (3) 

St. Louis, Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition 




Logan , pond 


100 






McCracken, pond 




Mankato, Rock Island ponds... 


20 


Marion, ponds 


Montana: 




Mulberry, ponds (3) 


100 


Ness City, pond 


Nebraska: 

Lodgepole, oberfelder Lake No.4 

SeyiiKiur, Lake Scymonr 

Ve'rdon, Hardens Lake 




McB rides Pond 

South Fork of Wal- 
nut Creek 


350 
400 
100 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF POOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



43 



Species and disposition. 



Crappie — Continued. 

New Yorlc : 

Utica, water company's reser- 
voir 

Nortli Carolina: 

Littleton, Johnstons Pond 

Ohio: 

Chillicothe, Elensmere Lake 

Dayton, Soldiers' Home Lake. . . 

Geauga Lake, Geauga Lake 

Oak Hill, pond 

Oklahoma: 

Ahne, pond 

Aurora, pond 

Comanche County, Walnut 

Creek 

Dover, pond 

Edmond, Kdmoud Lake 

Guthrie, pond 

Guymon, Frisco Creek 

Lawton, Payette Pond 

Okarche, pohd 

Walter, pond 

Pennsylvania: 

Coolbaugh, Coolbaughs Pond . . . 

Hickory Run, Big Lake 

Lake Harmony.. 
Round Pond .... 

Honesdale, Beech Lake 

Paint Creek, Dark Shade Creek. 
South Dakota: 

Britton, Clear Lake 

Mitchell, James River 

Spencer, Kruse Pond 

Texas: 

Alice, Artesian Lake 

lake 

Austin, pond 

Blanket, pond 

Brady, Live Oak Lake 

Brownwood, lake 

Bryan Railroad Lake 

Buda, Onion Creek 

Caldwell, McArthur Pond 

Channing, Cheyenne mill pond. . 
Rita Blanco Creek... 

Cleburne, Johnsons Pond 

Simpsons Pond 

Coppell, Bullock Pond 

Corsicana, Orphans' Home Pond 

Crockett, Davy Crockett Lake. . 

Fosters Lake . . . 

pond 

Elgin, Austin Pond 

Railroad Lake 

ponds (3) 

Elkhart, Elkhart Lake. . . 
Encinal, Lake La Palma. . 

Gilmer, Bartons Pond 

Goldthwaite, Isings Pond 

Granbury, pond 

Greenville, reservoir 

Halletsville, ponds (3) 

Henderson, Lake Surprise 

lakes (2) 

Smiths Pond. 

Hereford, Frio Creek 

lake 

ponds (2) 

Terra Blanco Creek... 

Wamble Lake 

Hubbard, lases (2) 

Willott Lake 

Jacksonville, Park Lake 

Jewett, pond 

Kerens, pond 

Laredo, ponds (6) 

Lockhart, waterworks pond 
Longview, Club Lake 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



400 
200 
150 
100 

75 
75 

75 
30 



50 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 

200 
300 
100 

100 
50 
40 
20 
40 
80 
80 
50 
30 
70 

170 
20 
40 
30 
75 
70 
50 
40 
50 
50 
50 

200 
40 
20 
40 
60 

100 
40 
40 

100 
40 
70 
30 
60 

100 

109 
50 
70 
75 
40 
00 

100 
24 
50 



Species and disposition. 



Crappie — Continued . 

Texas— Continued. 

Longview, lake 

Lake Thorne 

Lufkin, pond 

Lyons, Pietzsch Pond 

ponds (3) 

Manchaea, Onion Creek 

Manor, pond 

Marlin, pond 

Marshall, Lake Bonita 

Paw Paw Creek 

Mertens, Thomas Lake 

Navasota, lake 

Railroad Lake 

Oakwood, Stan Mise Lake 

Palestine, Crystal Lake 

Pessoney Lake 

ponds (5) 

Spring Park Lake. .. 

Pettus, i)ond 

Proctor, pond 

Rockwall, ponds (2) 

Rusk, Penitentiary Reservoir. 

San Angelo, ponds (3) 

San Antonio, ponds (3) 

San .\ntonio River 
West End Lake.. 

Stone, Watson Lake 

Sulphur Springs, pond 

Pounds Lake . 

Taylor, AUisons Lake 

Las Olmos Lake 

waterworks pond 

Temple, Lake Polk 

Trenton , Stock Pool 

Tyler, Greenbrier Lake 

Lake Park Lake 

Scotts Lake 

Waco, Lake Eloise 

Palmetto Lake 

pond 

Standefcr Pond 

Whitehouse, pond 

Virginia: 

Ashburn, Broad Run 

Catlett, Cedar Run 

Gordonsvillc, Hickory Hill 

Pond 

Martinsville, Rug Creek Pond . . 
Orange, Meadow Farm Pond 

Rockcastle, Fitch Mill Pond 

Whitehall, Sleepy Hollow Pond. 
West Virginia: 

Buckhannon, Buckhannon 

River 

Fairmont, Monongahela River.. 
Parkersburg Shattucks Pond . . 
Wisconsin: 

Augusta, Augusta mill pond 

Dells Pond 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River... 
Lynxville, Mississippi River 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Total a. 



Strawberry bass. 
Georgia: 

Bullochville, Parhams Pond... 
Indian Territory: 

Kinta, Scotts Pond 

Louisiana: 

Athen«, pond 

Blanchard, pond 

Gloster, Graves Pond 

Mansfield, Hewitt Pond 

Marks ville, pond 

Mira, Grays Lake 



50 
50 
40 
30 
60 
50 
10 
30 

100 
40 
70 
30 
9 

100 

150 
75 
75 

100 
20 
20 
30 
40 
80 

150 
50 
50 
50 
20 
20 
20 
40 
40 

100 
20 

100 

170 
30 

100 
70 
40 
40 
20 

3/5 
200 

200 
100 
100 
225 
100 



180 
250 
100 

200 

300 

25,000 

50,000 

45, 000 

850, 350 



100 
100 
100 
100 

ISS 
150 



a There were lost in transit 11,743 crappie. 



44 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Strawberry bass — Continued. 

Louisiana— Continued . 

Natchitoches, Cedar Hill Pond.. 


50 
100 
100 

259 
300 
300 
1,000 
700 
300 

84 
900 

1,000 

800 

1,000 

1,000 

150 
100 
100 


Rock 6ass— Continued. 

Kansas — Continued. 
Belleville, pond 


75 




Blaine, pond 


.50 


Lake Marie 


100 


Mississippi: 

Boonvillo, Boonville Lake 




100 


poncfs (5) 


550 




South View Pond 

Cawker Citv, ponds (2) 


100 




150 


Olive Braneli, MeCorgo Pond 


Clifton, poiid . . . 


100 




Codell . pond 


66 


Wenasoga, Willow Lake 

Missouri: 


100 


Colby, ponds (2) 

Collyer, Big Creek 


132 

75 






■ 100 


Nevada, Lake Park Springs .... 
Newburg, Little Piney Creek . . . 


Colunibus, pond 


100 


Coniiskev, South Pond . 


50 




100 


Springfield, Spring Pond 

Elkhart, Elkhart Lake 




100 


Dresden, .) ohnson Pond 

Garfield, Elys Pond 


100 
100 


Palestine, Coney Island Lake... 


pond 

Goodland, pond 


100 
100 




400 


Total « 


9,236 




150 




Hays, Haddock Pond 

pond 






100 

100 
100 

107 
100 
100 
112 

400 

300 
100 
300 
150 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
150 
150 
100 
100 

150 

250 

100 
100 
100 

75 
90 


225 


Arkansas : 


Hiawatha, pond 

Wolf Lake 


90 
90 


Colorado: 


Hill City, pond 

Hutchinson, pond. 


66 
10.) 


Arriba, Inavaie Lake 


VVhetzellPond.... 


lOi) 


Georgia: 

Marietta, Split Rock Park Pond. 
Rome, head of Spring Creek 


100 


Kimbal, Roseland Reservoir 

Kingman, pond 

Snlflv Pond 


100 
100 




Lancaster, pond 


so 


Walker County, Chickamauga 


Lamed, ponds (3) 


300 


Lebanon, pond 


50 






90 




Lincoln Center, pond 


70 




Logan, ponds (2) 


100 






50 


Maddo-x Lake 

Miltord Silver Mere Lalw . . . 


Manhattan, Allingham Pond . . . 
Merriam , pond 


100 






75 






66 


Bloomington, quarry pond 


Norton, pond 


75 




100 


Greencastle, Stoners Pond 


Ottawa, Reynards Pond 

Phillipsburg WordermansPond. 


100 

75 


Knightstovvn, Mitcliell Pond 


50 




50 




Quinter, Big Creek Lake 


75 










100 




Sawyer, pond 


100 




Spring Hill, pond 


100 




Vennillion. ponds (2) 

Vliets, pond 


100 




50 




Wakefield, pond 






Wallace, reservoirs (2) 


150 




Wellsville, pond 


100 


Soutfi Bend, Updegraff Lake. . . 
Spiro, Derryberry Pond 




90 


Kentucky: 

Allensville, ponds (2) 


250 






100 




Bardstown, waterworks reser- 




Indian Territory: 


100 




100 


Rod and Gun Club's 




100 




Corinth, Beard Pond 


100 


Iowa: 




100 




300 




Lebanon, Roaring Fork River.. 
Lexington, Lake Kllerslie 


300 




100 




100 




Louisville, Dicksons Pond 

pond 


100 


Baker, pond 


100 



a There were lost in transit 922 strawberry bass. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



45 



Species and disposition. 



Rock boss— Continued. 

Kentucky— Continued. 

Marion, Tyner Pond 

Maysville, Downing Pond 

Morganfield, pond 

Mount Sterling, Black Creek 

pond 

Olaton, Johnstons Pond 

Owensboro, ponds (3) 

Shelby ville. Spring Pond 

Sonora, pond 

Tonieville, pond 

Walton, Armstrong Pond 

Webbvillo, Forest Glen Pond.. 
Louisiana: 

Homer, Ferguson Lake 

Many, pond 

New Orleans, Riverside Pond.. 

Shreveport, Fairfield Pond 

Maryland : 

beer Park, pond 

Frederick, pond 

Rocky Ridge, Toms Creek 

Mississippi: 

Ackcrman, Woodward Pond. . 

Alton, poftd 

Amory, pond 

Baldwyn, Fisli Lake 

Bolton, City Pond 

Horton Pond 

ponds (3) 

Boonvillc, Boonville Lake 

Carpenter, Beech Pond 

Centervillc, McKies Pond 

Corinth, Clear Creek 

Morrison Mill Pond... 

Seven Mile Creek 

Tuscumbia River 

Vanderfords Mill Pond 

Waukomis Lake 

Crystal Springs, pond 

Gloster, Cassels Pond 

pond 

Hazelhurst, Hampton Pond 

Ililandale, Jones Pond 

Lexington, Jordans Pond 

Macon, Clements Pond 

Clines Pond 

Elkin Pond 

Farmers Lake 

Horse Shoe Lake 

Howard Lake 

Lomond Lake 

pond 

Muldon, Cunningham Pond 

Olive Branch, Lee Pond 

Red Lick, pond 

Scooba, pond 

Shuqualak, pond 

Starkville, artificial pond 

ponds (13) 

Self Mill Pond 

Toomsuba, Hurtts Ponds 

Missouri: 

Atlanta, ponds (2) 

Carthage, pond 

Exeter, Yarnalls Pond 

Labelle, pond 

Neosho, pond 

McMahons Spring 

St. James, Meramec Springs 

Nebraska: 

Danbury, pond 

Hendley, Myers Pond 

Lodgepole, Oberfelder Lake 

No.3 

St. Paul, pond 

Utica, pond 

Verdon, Wardena Lake 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



100 
100 
100 
300 
100 
7.5 
300 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

200 
100 
200 
100 

200 

150 
200 

60 

180 

60 

60 

CO 

60 

180 

300 

60 

60 

120 

60 

120 

180 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

60 

180 

60 

60 

60 

90 

60 

60 

90 

60 

60 

180 

90 

60 

60 

60 

60 

780 

120 

60 

200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
560 
150 

100 
100 

200 
100 
150 
90 



Species and disposition. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Rock 6ass— Continued. 

New Mexico: 

Ancho, ponds (2) 

Columbus, Barley Ranch Pond. 

Deming, Hyatt Lake 

Smyer Pond 

Portales, Gleghocn Powd 

Gregg Pond 

Justice Pond 

mill pond 

Pinron Pond 

ponds (7) 

Stinnett Pond 

Stone Pond 

Roswell, pond 

New York: 

Troy, pond 

North Carolina: 

Bostic, Freemans Pond 

Gastonia, Loray Pond 

Ohio: 

Barberton, pond 

Hanover, Mc Knight Pond 

Lancaster, pond 

Oak Hill, pond 

Sardinia, pond ,.. . 

Willoughliy, pond 

Yel vcrton, Liles Pond 

Oklahoma: 

Blackwell, pond 

Comanche County, Barnard 

Lake 

Comanche County, Hendricks 

Pond ; 

Dover, pond 

Elk City, ponds (2) 

Guthrie, pond 

Homestead, Howerton Pond. . . 

Kingfisher, pond 

Lawton, pond 

VV^eaver Spring Lake . . 

Okarche, pond 

Wcatherford, Cofley Creek . 

Pennsylvania: 

Allegheny, Decker Ponds 

Areola, Perkiomen River , 

Myerstown, Little Swatara 

Creek 

Penllyn, pond 

Phoenixville, French Creek 

Pickering Creek,.. 

Pigeon River 

Royal Spring 

Creek 

Stoney Run 

Whitehaven, Long Pond 

South Dakota: 

Broadland, Artesian Pond 

Faulkton, pond 

Ferney, pond 

Groton, pond 

Nemo, Robinson Pond 

Woonsocket, Davis Pond 

Tennessee: 

Beans Station, Round Pond... 

Bryant, pond 

Chattanooga , C h i c k a m a u g a 

Creek 

Crawfish Spring. 

Columbia, Ladd Pond 

Concord, Calloway Pond 

■ Henry, Caton Pond 

Lone Mountain, pond 

Louisville, French Pond 

Newport, Holibert Pond 

Niota, Hannond Pond 

Philadelphia, Cannon Pond 

Portland, Deming Pond 

Selm&r, Cypress Fund 

pond 



150 
100 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
525 
75 
75 



100 
128 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
150 
100 



100 

50 

200 

75 

150 

150 

50 

50 

100 

100 

400 
300 

170 
100 
200 
200 
200 

200 
200 
300 

150 
200 
100 
100 
100 
200 

120 
104 

240 

240 

104 

100 

90 

100 

100 

100 

100 

100 

104 

60 

60 



46 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OB' FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Rock bass — Continued. 

Texas: 

Alice, pond 

Alpine, pond 

Alto, Crustcrncr Pond 

Amarillo, Donaldson Pond 

Bassett, pond 

Bedias, pond 

Bell Branch, Railroad Lake. . . . 

Benavides, pond 

Blanket, Turner Pond 

Brownwood, Brownwood Lake. 

Smith I^ake 

WilUs Lake 

Williams Lake 

Bryan, Cavitt Pond 

Railroad r^ake 

Burton, Fuchs Pond 

Calvert, pond 

Canyon City, pond 

Terra Blanco 

River 

Celina, lake 

Channing, pond 

Cha])i'l Hill, i)ond 

Chillicothe. Bray Pond 

Clareniion, pond 

Colenian, artificial ponds 

Home Creek 

Corpus Christi, Shannon Pond.. 

D'llanis, pond 

Dalhart, Dawson Pond 

ponds (5) 

Dawson, Oil Mill Pond 

Falfurias, lake 

Forney, Davis Pond 

Spellman Lake 

Fort Worth, pond 

Franklin, pond 

Oanahl, Stoneleigh Pond 

Gonzales, Maurin Quarry Pond. 

Goodnight, pond 

Grandluiry, pond 

Grapevine, jiond 

Helibronville, Benton Lake 

Hempstead, Clear Creek 

Ilannay Lake. . . 
Le Grand Pond. 

Hereford, ponds ((i) 

Rock Lake 

Slover Pond 

Iluhljard, ponds (2) 

Irene, Railroad Lake 

Kerrville, pond 

Kingsville, Johnstons Reservoir 
Lampasas, Sulphur Fork of 

Lampasas River 

Laredo, Ygnacio Pond 

Lufkin, pond 

Marshall, Katrine Pond 

Mart, Railroad Lake 

Mount Pleasant, pond 

Navasota, Railroad Lake 

Otto, Gill Pond 

Palestine, Crystal Lake 

pond 

Pearsall, Hess Pond 

Penelope, Railroad Lake 

Pittsburg, pond 

Proctor, pond 

Roans Prairie, Cuthrell Pond... 
Williamson 

Pond 

Rockd 1 ', Flake Pond 

Sabinal, Durham Pond 

Oiik Hearst Pond .. 

San Antonio, San Antonio River 

pond^ (2) 

Went End Lake. . . 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



125 

75 

100 

120 

75 

75 

100 

50 

50 

150 

150 

150 

150 

100 

25 

125 

100 

75 

100 
125 
100 
100 
100 
200 
200 
300 
150 
100 

50 
450 
125 
100 
150 
150 
100 
100 

75 

75 
100 
100 
125 
100 
125 

75 
120 
475 
300 

30 
225 
100 

75 
175 

300 
100 
100 
150 
100 

75 

25 
225 

50 
100 

75 
100 
200 
100 
150 

125 
75 
100 
75 
200 
100 
277 



Species and disposition. 



Bock bass — Continued. 

Texas— Continued. 

Seguin, Battle Ground Pond. . . 

Sommerfield pond 

Spofford, pond 

Stockdale. ponds (2) 

reservoir 

Stratford, Green Pond 

Hill and Ashbrook 

ponds 

ponds (11) 

Spurlock Ponil 

Sulphur Springs, Carter Lake. . 
Electric Light 

Lake 

pond 

Terrell, Brin Pond 

GrifTith Lake 

Jordan Pond 

Uvalde, pond 

Walling, pond 

Wawaka, pond 

Waxahachie, pond 

Weaver, Allen Pond 

Utah: 

Cove, pond 

Virginia: 

Charlottesville, Busbys Pond. . . 

Crewe, pond 

Edinburg, Stony Creek 

Ellerson, Bates Pond 

Luray, pond 

Maiden, pond 

Petersburg, Branders Pond . 

Princess Amie, Briekhole Poi d. 

Pulaski, Martin Pond 

Red Hill, pond 

Remington, Rappahannock 

River 

Richmond, Custis Mill Pond 

Dearheart Pond . . . . 
Steels Tavern, Marl Creek Mill 

Pond 

Sweet Hall, Lees Mill Pond 

Wytheville, Reed Creek 

West Virginia: 

Dingess, pond 

Hinton, ponds (2) 

St. Alban, pond 

Total" 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Warmouth bass. 
Alabama: 

Allenton, pond 

Garland, Bonanza Pond 

Georgia: 

Albany, Flint River 

Arlington, Ichawaynochaway 

Creek 

Leary, Cordray Mill Pond 



Total 

Small-mouth black bass. 

Connecticut: 

Kent, Ilousatonic River Pond 

Norfolk, Togey Pond 

Georgia: 

Box Springs, Lake Mohignoc. 

Raleigh, Cane Creek 

Indiana: 

Cedar I ake. Cedar Lake 

Lake Park, Bass Lake 

Massachusetts : 

Plymouth, Great South Pond. 
Long Fond 

Smiths Ferry, Connecticut River 



55 
100 

50 
150 



100 

780 

75 

125 

125 
75 
100 
120 
200 
75 
200 
75 
75 
75 



200 
100 
300 
200 
100 
150 
200 
100 
100 
300 

300 
750 
300 

100 

300 

10,105 

IGO 
L'50 
150 

58,099 



000 
600 



•;oc 

200 



2,200 



200 
498 



100 
100 



2,000 

2,000 



;95 



a There were lost in tran.sit 10,234 rock bass. 



lUlOI'AGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



47 



Species ami disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
jx'arlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Small-mouth black 6os«— Continued. 

Massacliusetts— Continued. 

Southls ridge. Hatchet Lake 

Webster, Clianbunagunga- 


200 

200 
300 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

1,000 

5,000 

5,000 

500 

5,000 

- 5,000 

2,000 

5,000 

500 

990 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

500 

1,000 

970 

500 

500 

5,000 

1,000 

500 

5,000 

5,000 

250 

1,000 

1,975 
1,905 
1,900 

200 
50 

400 

38 

70 

70 

70 

1,000 

76 

594 

594 

593 

594 

875 

1,500 

400 
900 

150 

300 

7.500 
10,009 

1,935 


Small-mouth black 6ass— Continued. 

West Virginia- 

Keyser, Pattersons Creek 

Montrose, Leading Creek 

Roniney, South Branch of Poto- 


15,000 

15,000 








Uffington, Monongahela River. . 
Total a 




Michigan : 

Birmingliain, Black Walnut 


14,900 
191 , 605 




Large-mouth black bass. 

Alabama: 

Andalusia, pondr (2) 








Island Lake 

Long Lake 

Wing Lake 


1,000 




Anniston, Oxford Lake 


500 


Corunna, Shiawassee River 

Doster, Pine Lake 

Frankfort, Crystal Lalce 


Asheville, Williams Pond 


500 
500 


Belle Ellen, Cahaba River 


2,000 
800 


Grand Il'aven, Spring Lake 




1,000 


Brierlicld, Little Cahaba River.. 
Cedar Blufl", Chattooga River. . . 


2,000 

4,000 

500 


Jackson', Clarks'Lake , 

Wolf Lake 


Kalamazoo , White Lake 




500 


Winns Pond 


500 




200 






470 


Mattawan Wheeler Pond 


Spring Pond 


740 


Northville, Walled Lake 




404 


Gadsden, Big Mills Creek 

Gantt, Gantt Pond 


2,000 




2,000 


' Tuttle Lake 




500 






300 




Healing Springs, Causey Pond. . 
Inverness, mill pond 


200 




700 






500 


Yorkville Gull Lake 




800 


New Hampshire: 


Jacksonville, Germania Spring.. 


500 

3,000 

COO 


Pond 


Kingston, Kingston Mill Pond. . 


North Carolina: 

Canton, East Fork of Pigeon 


800 




800 


Lcesburg, Terrapin Creek 

Livingston, Lee Place Pond 

Montgomery, Electric Pond 


1,700 


Ohio: 


500 
1,200 




800 


Wiekliffe. Jones Pond 


Oxford, Mountain Creek 


1,000 




300 


Gettysburg, Marsh Creek 

Ilollidaysburg, Juniata River. . 
Rhode Island: 

Rhode Island Fisli Conunission, 


Pell City, Broken Arrow Creek . 
Pink Springhead Pond 


2,000 
) , 800 


Pleasant Gap, Hurricane t reek. 

River Falls, Ca ton Pond 

Riiiind Mouiilain, Yellow Creek. 
Russellvillc, Spring Branch 


2,000 
500 
500 


South Carolina: 

SpartanViurg, city reservoir 


1,000 
1,000 




800 


Gunn, East Fork Sugar Creek. . 
Mockeson Creek 


Phillips Lake 


1 , 000 


Scale Lake 


1 , 200 


West Fork Sugar Creek. . 
Knoxville, Pigeon River 




500 


Kenan Pond 


1,000 


Moore Pond 


500 


Marvville, Crooked Creek 

Ellijav Creek 

Little River 


Schuh-Millcr Pond 

Shelby, Kcwaliatchie Spring 

Spring Garden, Mill Creek 

Tallassee, Burt Mill Pond 

Troy Ross Pond 


1,300 

500 

l,.50O 


Nails Creek 


500 




500 


Nasliville, Cumberland River 


Watkins Pond 


500 


Vermont: 


Vinegar Bend, Vinegar Bend 
Pond 


200 


. South Londonderry, West River 
Virginia : 

Dunlop, Swift Creek 


Wagar, Grindle Hole Lake 

Warrior, B-lack Warrior Creek. . 


500 

1,000 

500 


Providence Forge, Providence 
Forge Lake 


White oak Springs, Bishop Mill 
Pond 


800 


Strasburg, North Branch of 
Shenandoah River 




1,000 


Teague Pond. . . . 


200 






000 


Washington: 

Lakeview, American and Grav- 


Arizona' 

Flagstaff, Lake Mary 


100 


elly lakes 


Morenci, Eagle River 


250 



a There were lost in transit 547 small-mouth black bass. 



48 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black bass — Continued. 

Arizona— Continued. 

Prescott, Granite Dells Pond... 


100 
100 
100 
100 

500 

800 
3,000 
500 
500 
300 
200 
100 
350 
150 
1,200 
500 
300 
SOO 
300 
300 
300 
500 
150 
300 
75 
200 
1,300 
100 
660 
334 

150 

300 
150 
200 
200 

100 
100 
300 
100 
100 
350 
200 

350 
250 
150 

600 

200 

3,500 
800 

1,500 

1,200 
2,000 

200 
1,000 

800 
1,000 
2,000 
1,000 

500 
1,200 

800 
1,200 
1,000 
1,700 
1,200 

500 


Large-mouth blade bas.t— Continued. 

Georgia— Continued. 

Walker County, Chickamauga 


100 




Walker County, Crawfish 




Williams, railroad pond 

Arkansas: 


1,300 


Illinois: 


100 


West Fork of White 
River 


Anna, Fair Ground Lake 


100 
150 


Arkadelphia, Ouachita River... 
Ashdown, Pine Prairie Lake 


Lake Marie 


150 


Aurora, Fox River. 


1 000 


Town Pond 




190 


Batesville, White River 

Berry ville, Osage River 

El Dorado, artificial lake 

ponds (2) . 


Belvidere, Kishwaukee River... 

Blanding, Mississippi River 

Carbondale, Greathouse Lake .. 

Chicago, South Park lakes 

West Park lakes 

Collinsville, brickyard pond . ... 
Crystal Lake, Crystal Lake 


400 

1,000 

150 

600 


Greenwood, Vachegras Creek... 
Higginson, Richland Creek 


1,000 
100 
390 


Lake Village, Lake Chicott 

Malvern, Carmichaels Mill Pond 


300 


Deer Park, Emerald Lake 


195 
95 




Du Quoin, pond 

East Dubuque, Mississippi River 

Edwardsville, Mirror Lake 

Fairbury, Munz Sand Pit 

Freeburg, Freeburg Lake 

pond 

Galena, Mississippi River 


75 


Ouachita River 

Stanleys Pond 

Mansfield, brickyard pond 


2,000 
150 
500 
300 


Rogers, Maxwell Pond 


100 


St. Paul, White River 


4,000 




300 


Spinola, saw mill pond 


Grays I/ake, Grays Lake 

Hillsboro, Bliss Lake 


200 


Thompson, Lallars Creek 

White River 

Colorado: 

Boulder, Twin Lakes. 


100 


city reservoir 

Hillsboro Lake 

lake 


200 

■ 200 

150 


Grand Junction, Grand and 


pond 


100 




Seymour Pond 

Johnson City, Richerson Pond . 
Joliet, ponds (3) 


450 


Mancos, Bauer Reservoir 

Olncv, Lewis Reservoir . 


200 
800 






400 


Connecticut: 

Chester, Slater Pond 


Lone Tree, Lone Tree Lake 

Long Lake, Long Lake 


200 
250 


Coscob, pond 


Millstadt, Eckert Pond 


100 


Goodspceds, Bashan Lake 

New Haven, Colonial Lake 


Millers Pond 


100 


Wirth Pond 


100 


Norwalk, pond 


Naperville, Glen Lake 


200 




Oneida, Thayers Lake 


100 


Waterbury, Hitchcocks Pond.. . 


Oswego, Fox River 


290 


Ottawa , pond 


295 


Harrington, Boons Mill Pond.. . 


PrinceviUe, Spring Pond 

Raymond, pond 


100 
75 


Milton, Paynters Pond 


Rockefeller, Diamond Lake 


200 




250 




Salem , Deer Lick Pond 


200 


District of Columbia: 

Washington, fish ponds 


ponds (2) 

Savanna, Mississippi River 


50 

4,500 

195 




Sheridan, pond 


290 


Georgia: 

Ashburn, pond .... 




75 


Waverly, pond 


150 


Augusta, Augusta Game Pre- 
serve Club Pond 

Carmichaels Fishing 
Club Pond 


Wheaton, Butterflcld LaTce 

Indiana: 

Albion, Long Lake 


200 
600 


Anderson, Westbrook Pond 

Aurora, South 11 ogan Creek 

Bloomington, stone quarry pond 
Boonville, Cypress Creek 

Hooppole Creek 

Little Pigeon Creek.. 


200 


Jones Pond 

Columbus, Garrards Pond 

Crawfordville, Chapmans Creek. 
Jordan Mill Pond 

Little River 

Ogeechee River.. 

Dalton, Crystal Lake 


200 
100 
400 
200 
750 
300 


Cedar Lake, Cedar Lake '. 


298 


Greensboro, Champion Pond . .. 

Hampton, Edwards Pond 

Jonesboro, Flint River Pond... 
Mundys Mill Pond . . 
Ringgold, Chickamauga Creek.. 
Sycamore, ponds (2) 


150 




150 


Culver, Lake Maxinkuckee 

Cutler, Wild Cat River 


6,900 
300 


Delphi, Wabash River 


200 


Dillsboro, pond 


100 


Tilton, mill pond. . 


Elkliart, St. Joseph River 

Evansville, brewery pond 


450 


Upatoie, Jenkins Pond . , 


100 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OV FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



4\) 





Fingerlings, 


Species and disposition. 


yearlings, 




and adults. 


Large-mouth black 6a«.s— Continued. 




Indiana— Continued. 




Evansville, brickyard pond 


75 


Country Clnli I>alie. 


800 


Schmadcls I'ond 


75 


Stringtown Sjtrings 


100 


West Heights Park 






150 


Winiberg Pond 


100 


Fairinount, Jones Pond 


100 


Fort Wayne, Lake Everett 


200 


Round Lake 


200 


Spring Lake 


200 


Wayne Lake 


150 


Frenclr Liclc, French Lick 




Springs Reservoir 


400 


Gosport, West Branch White 




River 


300 


Henry ville, Norris Pond 


100 


Kewanna, Bruce Lake 


200 


Knightstown, Hillside Pond 


175 


Lnfayette, Millers Pond 


50 


Lake Cicott, Lake Cicott 


595 


Ligonier, Diamond Lake 


200 


Lucerne, Fletchers Lake 


200 


Mishawaka, St. Jo.seph River... 


295 


Monticello, Tippecanoe River. . . 


590 


Muncie, Anderson Pond 


100 


New Albany, Falling Run 


225 


Farn.sley Pond . . . 


150 


Silver Hill Pool... 


100 


Silvtr Creek and 




Silver Lake 


375 


New Carlisle, Hudson Lake 


290 


Oakland City, lake 


200 


ponds (2) 


400 


waterworks lake. 


75 


Osceola, St. .Joseph Mill Pond... 


295 


Pendleton, Fall Creek 


400 




150 


Ridgevillc, Pequameha Lake . . . 


250 


Rolling Prairie, Prairie Lake . . . 


268 


Shelburn, mining company's 




lake 


100 


Sullivan, Mildred Lake . 


100 


Terra Haute.Warren Park Lake. 
Tipton, pond . 


200 


72 


Union City, gravel pit. . 


1.50 


Walcott, Pine Grove Pond 


100 


Wawasee, Wawa.see Lake.. . 


(iOO 


Willianisport, Waliash River... 


2.50 


Winamae, Chapman gravel pit.. 


100 


Windfall, Wild Cat Creek 


190 


Indian Territory: 




Antlers, pond 


100 


Ardmore, A. & C. Lake 


200 


Caddo Creek 


400 


Chickasaw Lake.." 


350 


Choctaw Lake 


300 


City Lake. 


450 


Moores Pond . 


150 


Pittmans Bayou 


150 


Swan Lake 


150 


Comanche, brickyard pond 


100 


Wilsons Pond 


100 


Duncan, Weaver Lake 


100 


Marlow, liurkes Pond 


100 


Kloiidvkc Pond 


150 


mill pond 


175 


Spring Lake 


175 


Minco, Campbells Lake 


100 


pond ... 


1.50 


Poteau, Long Lake 


500 


RofI, Blue River 


200 


Sapulpa, Rock Creek 


150 


South McAlester, waterworks 






4,750 


Spiro, La Flure Pond 


500 


Sulphur, lake 


100 


Tishomingo, Deep Water Lake. 


100 


2367—06 4 






Large-mouth black bass — Continued. 

Indian Territory — Continued. 

Vinita, Lynehs Lake 

pond 

White Lake 

Winier Lake 

Welling, Barren Fork of Illinois 

River 

Wynnewood, Rod and Gun Club 

Lake 

Iowa: 

Bellevue, Mississippi River 

Bussey, Way Pond 

Calmar, Big Turkey River 

Cedar, pond 

Cedar Falls, Cedar River 

Charles City, Cedar River 

Chester, pond 

Upper Iowa River 

Clarinda, lake 

Clayton, Mississippi River 

Clear Lake, Clear Lake 

Council Bluffs, Lake Manawa. . . 
Cresco, Big Turkey River Mill 

Pond 

Decorah, Badger, Beaver, Ca- 
noe, Coldwater, and Ten-Mile 

creeks 

Dubuque, Mississippi River. ... 
Fairfield, Water Works Lake... 
Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 

River 

Gravity, pond 

Green Island, Mississippi River. 

Grinnell, artificial lake 

IIav>'keye, Alpha Mill Pond 

Henderson, pond 

Ilumeston, artificial pond 

Iowa Falls, Iowa River 

Jefferson, Raccoon River 

Kensett, Shell Rock River 

Lainsville, Mississippi River 

Lime Springs, Lipper Iowa River 
Manchester, Maquoketa River.. 
New Hampton, Little Cedar 

Creek 

Norman, Silver Lake 

North McGregor, Mississippi 

River... 

Northwood, Shell Rock River.. 

Silver Lake 

Numa, pond 

St. Ansgar, Cedar River 

Smith Ferry Mississippi River. 

Stuart, pond 

Tipton, Godden Pond 

Wadena, Volga River 

Washington, Highland Park 

Lake 

Waterloo, Cedar River 

Waucoma, Little Turkey River . 

Waverly, Garner Pond 

West Liberty, Crystal Lake 

Potters Pond 

Winterset, Shaws Pond 

Winthrop, Wapsipinicon River. 
Kansas: 

Abilene, Bass Lake 

Barclay, pond 

Blue Rapids, Big and Little 

Blue rivers 

Box Springs, Willow Creek 

Brazilton, pond 

Bronson, County Pond 

ponds (2) 

Burdett, Pawnee River 

Carlos, artificial pond 

Holland Lake 

Cawker City, lake 

Cedar Point, Cedar Creek 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



225 
150 
150 
150 

3,100 

150 

300 

100 

1,000 

150 

300 

5,000 

200 

14,000 

250 

2,000 

7,400 

1,350 

300 



(iOO 
1,.500 
5,000 

2,200 
125 

1,000 
250 
300 
150 
150 

3,000 
250 
200 

2,000 

400 

12,000 

300 
300 

1,500 
7,300 

200 
75 

500 
1,000 

100 

100 
5,000 

100 
6,000 
200 
100 
150 
1.50 
125 
7,000 

75 
100 

350 
1.50 
100 
75 
225 
200 
100 
1.50 
100 
200 



50 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species aud disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black 6os.s— Continued. 

Kansas — Continued. 

Chierryvale, Drum Creek 

Coldwatcr, Middle Kiowa Creek. 

Spring Creek 

Council Grove, Neosho River... 


200 
200 
250 
200 
1.50 
100 
200 
100 
100 
150 

75 
100 
100 
700 
100 
200 
200 
150 
250 

50 
300 
100 
100 
150 
150 
200 
100 
150 

80 

75 
150 
200 
100 
100 
100 
475 
100 
100 
100 

50 
100 
100 
200 
310 
175 
200 

75 

50 

75 
150 
100 
100 

75 

50 
100 

50 

25 
100 
100 

75 
125 

50 
100 
100 
100 

25 
100 
100 

50 
100 

50 
225 

50 
100 

25 
100 

25 

25 


Large-mouth black boss— Continued. 

Kansas — Continued. 

Manhattan, Robinson Lake 

Silver Creek 

Seven Mile Creek. . . 

Story Lake 

Sweet Creek 

Tuttle Creek 

Upper Cedar Creek. 

Upper Deep Creek . 

Warners Pond 

Wild Cat Creek . . . . 

Mankato, Rock Island Fond 

Montrose, pond 


50 
100 
100 

25 
1.50 




100 


Dodge City, Buckner Creek 


75 
100 




25 


Englewood, Antelope Creek 

Formosa, Libhart Fond 

Garden City, artificial pond .... 
Garden City Pond. 


150 
50 

70 


Morland, pond 


70 


Morrowville, pond 


50 


reservoir 


Mound City, Little Sugar Creek. 
Muncie, Turkey Creek 


200 




70 




Neodesha, Verdigris Creek 

Neosho Falls, Neosho River., . . 


300 


Great Bend, Fawnee Lake 


200 
105 




Newton, ponds (4) 


005 


Ilalstead, Little Arkansas River. 


Nickerson, pond 


150 


Olathe, Big Cedar Creek 

Hadlevs Lake . . . 


200 




105 


Hill City, ponds (2) 


Lake Como 


150 




Lake Gladys 


100 




Osage City, Chisham Pond 

Pleasant View Pond 
Osawatomie, Fond No. 8 




Glendale Pond 


100 
100 




Osborne, South Fork Solomon 
Ri vp r 






150 


Kinsley, pond 


Faola, Bull Creek and Marais 

des Cygnes River 

Wea Ri ver 




Lakeview, Baldwins Lake 


300 
300 


Fulmer Pond 


Pa.\ico, Mill Creek 


150 




I'eabody, Doyle Creek 


200 




Spring Creek 


200 




Pleasanton, pond 


100 






.50 






200 




Kansas Fish Commission 
Prescott, pond 


200 


Leoti, Beaver Creek 


100 


pond 


Randall, pond 


80 




Roberts, Siegfried Pond 

Salina, mill pond 


150 


Lincoln Center, Oak Creek 


75 




St. Francis, pond 


125 


Lyndon, Salt Creek 


St. John, Rattlesnake Creek 

Scott, Beaver Creek 


50 




300 


Wild Horse Fond 


Spring Creek 


150 


Manhattan, Berrys Fond 

Big fjlue River 

Blaine Creek 

Carnahan Creek 


Sharon Springs, Blufl Springs 
Pond 


125 


Syracuse, Herndon Reservoir... 
Toronto, Toronto Lake 


100 
75 


Cedar Creek 

Clarke Creek 


Wakeeney, Allbright Pond 


125 
150 


Clear Creek 


Rock Creek 


400 




Washington,- Mill Creek 


100 


Dempsey Lake 




50 




50 


Eureka Lake No. 1. 
Eureka Lake No. 2 


Wellington, Slate Creek 


200 
50 






150 


Finnlev Lake 

Fuller Creek 


Kentucky: 

.Idairville, Bell River 


300 




Allcnsville, Gills Lake 


100 


Gohen Slough 


Hughes Pond 


75 




Moseley Lake 

ponds (3^ 


150 


Kings Creek 


400 
150 


Lower Deep Creek . 
McDonald Lake 


Bardstown, waterworks reser- 
voir 


200 


McDowell Creek 

Mclntvres Creek 


Beattyville, Kentucky River 

Burgin, Cox Pond 


250 
125 


Mill Creek 


Hawkins Pond 


100 






100 


Ffial Creek. 


Oliver I'ond 


100 


Pillsbury Pond 

pond 




100 


Burnside, Cumberland River... 


500 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details op Distribution — Continued. 



51 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerhngs, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black bass — Continued. 

Kentucky— Continued. 
Butler, Willow Lake.. 


75 
400 
100 
150 
400 
100 
100 
100 
375 
100 
300 

75 
100 1 
100 

90 i 

90 ! 
150 
200 
100 
125 
150 
150 
150 
100 
300 
125 
300 i 
150 

75 
125 
350 
575 
300 
400 
200 
125 
125 

75 
300 
100 

200 
150 

200 

200 
100 

200 
150 
400 
200 
150 

150 
300 
150 

90 
150 
100 
150 
200 

75 
100 
100 
200 
200 
200 
100 
200 
200 
200 
125 
150 
175 
200 


Large-mouth black bass— Continued. 

Kentucky— Continued. 
Richmond, Lake Reba 


300 


Cadiz, Little River 


Rinev ville, ponds (2) 


250 


Campbells ville,\VilJocks Lake. . 
Clark, pond . . . 


Ryland, lakes and ponds 

St. Marys, Brown F'orman Pcmd 
Silver Creek, pond . . . 


200 
150 


Earlington, Loch Mary Lake... 
Early Times, Beam Pond 


100 




90 


Lamptons Lake 

Masons Pond 


90 


Elkton, pond 


90 






500 


Falmouth, Ewing Lake 




1.50 


Frankfort, Elkhorn River. 


Snnford Pond 


150 


Quarles Pond 


Springfield , pond 


200 


Smither Pond 

Franklin, Red Pond 


Springfield Lake 

Stanford, waterworks reservoir. 
Stanton, Red River 


400 
500 


Glendalo, pond 


300 


Highland Pond 

Greensburg, Perkins Pond 

Henderson, pond 


Trenton, Smith Pond 


250 


West Fork of Red 
River 


200 


Ihirtmann Pond 

Ilodgensville, Davenport Pond, 
ice pond 


Vanceburg, Kinniconick River.. 
Versailles, Childers Pond 

Dufort Pond 

Hifner Pond 


400 
175 
100 


Kenneday Pond. . 
Walters Pond 


100 


pond 


100 


Ilopkinsville, Leaford Pond 

Little River 


Wellsburg, North Fork of Lick- 


300 


Hunters, Distillery Pond 

Jackson, Kentucky River 


Williamstown, New Lake 

Wilmore, Lowrv Pond 


100 
150 


Lancaster, Lake Placid 


Winchester, Big Stoner Creek . . 
lake. 


500 


Robinson Lake 


150 


waterworks lake 


Reed Lake 


1.50 


Lebanon, Roaring Fork P.iver.. 
Lexington, Reservoir No. 3 


waterworks lake . . 


550 
150 


Louisa, Big Sandy River 

Louisville, reservoir 


Louisiana: 

vVthens, Marsalts, and Gaudy 
Pond 




Ludlow, Lu<!low Lagoon 


150 


Madisonville, Monarch Pond. .. 
Victoria Pond 


Baton Rouge, Island Lake 

Callioun, lake 


150 
100 


Mavfleld. pond 


Coushatta, Corley mill pond 

Smith Pond 

Gloster, Burford Pond.. . 


200 
100 
100 


Miilersljurg, Ilinkston River 

Mount Sterling, Anderson Lake. 


Donaldson 
Creek 


Hacklcy, Bogue Chitto River... 


300 
200 


Fox Pond 




100 


Grassy Lick 


Scott Pond 


100 


Creek 


Marksville, ponds (2) 


300 


Greenbrier 
River 


Natchitoches, Chaplins Lake . . . 
lake 


200 
200 


Hamelino Pond 
Little Slate 

Creek 

Morris Lake . . . 


Lake Brezeale 

Lake Marie 

Parker Place 
Pond 


1.50 
200 

150 


Slate Creek 

Spencer Creek.. 


Scarborough 
Lake 


200 


Spratts Pond., 
w a t e r w rks 

reservoir 


Shreveport, Lake Hayes 

pond ' 

Slidell, Holt Pond 


GOO 
150 
200 


Whitsett Lake. 




150 


Newport, Maple Pond 


Winnfield, Crawfords Pond 


100 
150 


Nolin, Duvall Pond 


Olmstead, Cottonwood Pond... 
pond 


Maine: 

Poland, Range Ponds 


Whipporwill Creek . . 

^^'illow Pond 

Paint Lick, pond 


300 


Maryland: 

Big Pool, Big Pool 


'100 


Paris, Alexander Pond . . 


Elkton, Freemans mill pond 

Funkstown, .\ntietain Creek. .. 

Hancock, Potomac River 

Montgomery County, Patuxont 
River 


(iOO 


Clay Pond 


700 


Green Creek 


1 250 


Ilinkston Creek 




Houston Creek 


300 


pond 


New Windsor, Dickinson Run.. 
Rawlings, Nortli Branch of Po- 


200 


Stoner Creek 




Strodes Creek 


1 , 300 


Paynes, Elkhorn Creek 


Rising Sun. Octorara Creek 

Riverdale, Eastern Branch of 


200 


Pembroke, Lea veil Pond 

Peru, Tuford Pond 


300 


Pewee Valley, Kice Lake 

Richmond, ponds (2) 


Rocky Ridge, Monocacy River. 
Westminster, Winters mill pond 


(iOO 
100 



52 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black bass— Continued. 

Massachusetts: 

New Bedford, Johs Neck Pond . 
Pittsfield, Onota Lake 


200 
150 
150 

150 
300 
150 
150 
150 
150 
200 
400 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
300 
300 
300 

300 

275 
1,000 
525 
200 
200 
200 
275 
200 
150 
200 
450 
200 
300 
300 
200 
200 
200 
200 

100 
150 
150 

75 

75 
150 
200 
150 
300 
150 
150 
100 
400 
100 
100 
100 

75 

75 
125 
150 
150 
300 
200 
350 
100 
150 
200 

75 
150 

75 
150 

75 


Pontoosuc Lake 

Michigan: 


Channing, Sawyer Lake 




Little Toha'co Creek 

Mater Lake 




Crystal Falls, Fortune Lake 

Edwardsburg, Pleasant Lake... 
Greenville, Turk Lake 


Iron Mountain, Bat Lake 

Horseshoe Lalce 
Lake Antoinc . . 




Vulcan, Lake Ilanburry 

Watersmeet, Clark Lake 

Crooked Lake 

Duck Lake 

Thousand Island 
Lake 


Minnesota: 

Chisago, Lake Chisago 




Duluth, Eagles Nest Lake 

Schells Lake 


E veleth , Ely Lake 


Fergus Falls, Wall Lake 

Groningen, Crystal Lake 

Lincoln, Fish Trap Lake 

Little Falls, Alexander Lake . . . 
lake 




Ortonville, P.ig Stone Lake 

Osakis. Osiikis Lake . ... 


Oshawa. Middle Lake 


Saginaw Station. Grand Lake. . 
St. Peter, Lake Emilv 


Lake Jefferson 

Lake Washington 

Mississippi: 

Abbeville, Graham Lake 

Aberdeen, Horseshoe Lake 

Irvm Lake. 


Ackernian, pond 


Woodward Pond . . . 


Lakeview Pond 


ponds (2) 


Robinson Pond 


Bogue Chitto, pond 


Booneville Boljbie Smith Lake. 

Brookhaven Decell Pond 

Simpson Mill I'ond 
Canton pond 


Carpenter Beech Lake 


Centcrville, pond 

Ilagaman Pond:... 

Clinton, Bogue Chitto Creek 

pond . . 


Coahoma, Moon Lake 


Coffeevilie, Durden Creek 

Columbus, Tomliigliee River 

Crenshaw, Delta Pond 


Edwards Barber Pond. 


Enterprise, Kamper Pond 

Gallman, Gallman Pond 

Gioster, Wagoners Creek 

W alker Branch 

Walker Creek. .. 


Hazelhurst, bass pond 




Large-mouth black boss— Continued. 

Mississippi — Continued. 

Hazelhurst, lake 

Hampton Pond . . . 
Long Island Pond 

Pleasant Pond 

Slay Pond 

Helm, pond ". 

Highlandale, Mose Lake 

Indianola, Bay Lake 

Isola, Martin Lake 

Laurel, Knights Mill Pond 

Liberty, pond 

Lonnan, ponds (3) 

Macon, Big Lake 

pond 

Magce, Burnam I'ond 

pond 

Purvis Pond 

Meridian, Live Lake 

Merrill, mill pond 

Michigan City, pond 

Miller, Coldwater River 

New Albany, Catahoula Lake. 

Folev Pond 

RatfifT Pond 

Tippah Pond 

Newton, pond 

Russells Mill Pond... 

Smith Mill Pond 

Quitman, Rolling Creek Mill 

Pond 

Rienzi, Holts Lake 

Ripley, Pearce Pond 

Rucker Pond 

Rockwall, Hatchie Pond 

Scooba, ponds (3) 

Sessums, ponds (2) 

Shuqualak, pond 

Starkvillc, .losey Mill Pond 

McPherson Lake... 

mill pond 

Pearson Pond 

ponds (5) 

Vernon Pond 

Tomnolen, lake 

Tunica, McKinney Lake 

Verona, Lake Walka 

Vossburg, Eucutta Pond 

Wenasoga, Willow Lake 

West Point, Moseley Pond 

ponds (2) 

Winchester, Meador Lake 

Missouri: 

Aurora, Crane Lak^ 

Boaz, Meramec River 

Brookline, Wilson Creek 

Clapper, Bick Pond 

Railroad Pond 

Cuba, pond 

Culverton, Culver Pond 

Golden City, pond 

Greenwood, Hillerest Lake. . . . 
Ilumansville, Embray Pond... 
Independence Dickinson Lake. 
Iron Mountain, Iron Mountain 

Lake 

Jasper County, North Fork 

Spring River 

Jefferys, pond 

Joplm, Buffalo Pond 

Kansas City, Stark Lake 

Mansfield, lake 

Miller, Spring Lakes 

Nevada, E wing Pond 

K. P. Allen Reservoir . 

Neosho. Crescent Pond 

Pratt City, Richland I-ake 

Randolph, I'urber Pond 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



PROPAGATIOlSr AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 53 

Details op Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Fingcriings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Species and disposition. 



Large-mouth black boss— Continued. 

Missouri— Continued. 

St. Louis, Bell Point Creek 

Louisiana Purchase 

Exposition 

Springfield, Elfindale Lake 

Sac River. 

Versailles, Spring Lake 

Montana: 

Chester, Bourns Reservoir 

lake 

Strode Lake 

Kalispell, Bowser Lake "... 

Helena, Lake Sewell 

Nebraska: 

Beaver City, Beaver Creek 

Cedar Creek, Atwoods Sand Pit. 
Cedar Creek Lake. . 

Fremont, Idlcwild Lake 

Gordon, Claymore Pond 

Indianola, Loomis Pond 

Lodge Pole, Oberfelder Lake 

No. 1 

Oberfelder Lake 

No.2 

Oberfelder Lake 

No.5 

Oberfelder Lake 

No. 6 

Ord, North Loop Creek 

Palisade, Brough Lake 

Rushville, Pine Creek 

Seymour Park, Lake Seymour. . 
New Jersey: 

Blackwood, Blackwood Lake. 

Bloomfleld, Verona Lake 

Hopatcong, Ilopatcong Lake. 

Lakehurst, Horicon Lake 

Longl)ranch, Tintern Lake... 
New Egypt. Oakford Lake... 
Newfoundland, Green Lake... 
Oakridge, Pequaiinoek River... 

Sewell, Sunset Lake 

Sussex, Lake Rutherford 

Swartzwood, Big Swartzwood 

Lake 

Williamstown, Fries I^ond 

McClures Pond. 

Woodbury, Keans I^ond 

New Mexico: 

Ancho, pond 

Clayton North Lake 

Dexter, Townsloy Reservoir 

Las Vegas, Lake Chapman 

Raton, Sugarite Lake 

Wagomnound. Santa Clara 

River 

New York; 

Antwerp, Indian River 

Berlin, Kendall Lake 

Caldwell, trout lake 

Central Valley, Summit Lake. . 

Twin Lake 

Dover Plains, Lake Allis 

Friendship, waterworks reser- 
voir 

Highland Mills, Cromwell Lake 
Medina, Oak Orchard Creek. .. 

Monticello. Iviamesha Lake 

Munroe Mombasha Lake 

Round Lake 

Walton Lake 

Montrose, West Dam 

Port Jervis, Mashipacong Lake 
Sterling Forest, Greenwood 

Lake 

Stockport, Smith Lake. . . 

Utica, waterworks reservoir... 
Water Mill, Nowoeaonah Lake. 



21 
100 
200 
150 

200 
1,50 
150 
200 
300 

400 
200 
200 
200 
150 
150 

188 



ISS 
400 
,300 
300 
500 

150 
200 
400 
200 
200 
1.50 
200 
200 
1.50 
200 

200 
1.50 
150 
1.50 

120 
150 
75 
100 
200 

200 

100 
1.50 
150 
200 
200 
200 

300 
200 
600 
1.50 
200 
200 
200 
200 
160 

200 
150 
100 
200 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Large-mouth black 6ass— Continued. 

North Carolina: 

Aberdeen, Upchurch Pond 

Airlie, Thorn Mill Pond 

Allenton, Spring Branch 

Apex, Norris Pond 

Boontord, South Toe River 

Browns Summit, Maple Pond. , 
Buckhorn, Heckist Creek Pond. 
Carthage, Ilaggordsville Mill 

Pond 

Charlotte, Country Club Lake., 

Clyde, Smather Lake 

Eure, Taylors mill pond 

Fayetteville, Beaver Lake 

Beaver Dam Pond 

Greens Pond 

Lakewood Pond . 

Flat rock, Smyth Lake 

Fremont, pond 

Fuquay Springs, Powells I'ond 

Galax, Toe River 

Goldsboro, Country Club Lake 

ponds (2) 

Tara Farm Pond . . 

Graham, Alamance Creek 

Greenlee, Catawba River 

Uavelock, Morton Mill Pond .. 

Ilendersonville, park pond 

Hickory. Ellis Pond 

Laurel "Hill, McMillan Pond 

Laurinburg, Fairley Pond 

Lee Mill Pond . . . 

McNiell Pond 

Lenoir, Bass Lake 

Yadkin River Dam 

Maiden, Williams Pond 

Marion, Bush Creek below falls. 

Catawba River 

North Fork Catawba 

River 

Matthews, Paddle Branch Pond 

Munroe, Houston Pond 

Morganton, McDowells Pond.. 

Mornsville, Ferrell I'ond 

Mount Airy, Ararat River 

Buck Shoals Pond. 
Mount Gilead, Clarks Creek .. 
Mount Olive, Goodson Pond.. 

Polkton pond 

Reidsville, Lake Manana 

Rowland. McCallum Pond 

Salisbury, Fishers Mill Pond.. 

Springhopo, pond 

Stokesdale. pond 

Ogbnns Pond 

Wilbon, Marsh Branch 

Wilmington, lake 

North Dakota: 

Bottineau, Lake 

Rose Lake 

Willow Lake 

Denhoft, Brush Lake 

EUendale, .lohnson Pond 

Glcnellen, Curlew Creek 

Richardton, lakes (2) 

RoUa, Indian Lake 

Magock Lake 

Rabbitt City Lake 

Zeeland, Richter Pond 

Ohio: 

Bellaire, storage dam 

Alliance, pond 

Lake Park Lake 

Brooklyn, Spring Pond 

Chardon, Cass Lake ; 

ChiUicothe, Elensmere Lake... 

Chippewa Lake, Chippewa 

Lake 



100 
100 
75 
50 
200 



200 

100 

75 

200 

100 

100 

100 

100 

1,0(X) 

75 

1.50 

1,000 

150 

175 

50 

100 

1,400 

75 

100 

150 

75 

75 

75 

75 

150 

1,125 

975 

1,000 

1,400 

1,400 
2,850 

50 
1.50 

50 
100 
175 
100 
100 

75 
1.50 
175 
100 

75 

87 

88 
100 

75 

200 
.300 
300 
200 
200 
200 
300 
200 
300 
200 
150 

1.50 
375 
400 
150 
575 
625 

493 



54 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 

yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearling.s, 
and adults. 


Large-motith black 6a.ss— Continued. 

Oliio— Continued. 

Cincinnati, Delhi Pilce Pond . . 


.300 
6,375 
500 
400 
450 

300 

100 
600 
.300 
150 
400 
300 
200 

75 
200 
200 
150 

95 
500 

90 
100 

225 
75 

150 

100 
75 

150 

100 

100 

100 

100 
150 

75 
100 
200 
100 

75 
150 

75 

50 
150 
100 
150 
1.50 
150 

50 
100 

150 
200 
300 
150 
150 

75 
575 
275 

50 
100 
150 
250 
100 

50 
150 
150 
100 

75 
225 


Large-mouth black 6ass— Continued. 

Oklahoma— Continued. 

Weatherford, pond 


100 


Cuyalioga Falls, Cuyahoga River 
Dayton, Soldiers Ilotne Lake... 

Stillwater River 

Delaware Seioto River 


Woodward, Spring Lakes 

Pennsylvania: 

Areola, Perkiomen River 

Bethlehem, Lake Poponoraing.. 

Lehigh River 

Brackney, Quaker Lake 

Brillhart, South Branch of 


225 

,300 
500 




300 


Epworth Heights, Little Miami 
River 


100 


Freedom Station, Crystal 
Spring Lake . 


250 


Bushkill, Delaware River 

Forest Lake 


300 


Geauga Lake, Geauga Lake 

Hudson, Mud Brook Pond 

Macedonia, Shadow Lake 


200 


Chambersburg, Conococheague 
Creek 


1.50 


Mantua, Cuyahoga River 

Milford, Little Miami River . . 


Colledgeville, Perkiomen Creek . 
Coolbaugh, Lake Echo 


500 
200 


New Carlisle, Silver Lake 

Oakhill, Lime Stone Pond 

Pleasanthill, Stillwater River 


Curtin, Bald Eagle Creek 

Delav.'are Water Gap, Delaware 
River . . . . 


50 
400 


Portsmouth, Fish Lake 


Frackville, Mud Run Dam 

Gaines Junction, Pine Creek 

Hanover, Conewago Creek 

Harrisburg, Conodoqulnet 
Creek 


150 


Toledo, Buckeye Pond 


300 


Uniopolis, Copeland Lake 

West Milton, Stillwater River.. 
West Salem, McFadden Pond .. 


250 
1,50 


Wilmington, gravel pit pond . . . 
Oklahoma: 


Hollidaysburg, Juniata River. . . 
Hopewell, Raystown Branch of 


.3.50 
100 


Altus, pond 


Lehigh Gap, Aquashicola Creek . 

Lehighton, Harmony Lake 

Lizard Creek 

Mahoning Creek. ... 

Stedman Pond 

Milton, Susquehanna River 

Naomipines, Lake Naomi 

New Freedom, ponds (2) 

Nordmont, Lopey Pond 

Norristown, Oaklawn Lake 

Phoeni.xville, French Creek 

Pickering Creek . . . 

Pigeon Creek 

Royal Spring 
Creek 


300 


Apache, pond 


300 




200 


Blackwell, pond 


300 


Cement, McCartio Creek 

(Jhattanooga, Chattanooga 
Lake 


200 
.300 
200 


Comanche County, Branch of 
Little 

Beaver 

Creek 

K e t c h a m 

Lake 

McManomy 

Pond . . 


450 
300 
100 
300 
.300 
300 

200 


mill pond ... 

Wood Lake . 

Cushing, Cushing Pond 


Stony Run 

Port Indian, Norristown Dam 

in the Schuylkill River 

Riverside, North Branch of 

Susquehanna River 


200 
1,500 


Davenport. Octone Pond 

Dover, pond 


1.50 


Drummond, pond 


Rising Springs, Sinking Creek.. 


300 




1.50 


Elgin, Big Four Pond 


Rowland, Big Tink Lake 

Tcedyskung Lake 

Scotland, Conococheague Creek. 
Scranton, gravel pond 


200 




100 


Elreno, Peach Lake 

pond 


100 
100 




Shenandoah, Raven Run Dam . 

Starrucca, Coxtown Lake 

Stroudsburg, Delaware River .. 
Hunters Range 
Pond. 


1.50 


Erick, Terrell Lake 


100 




200 


Fletcher, Meadow Brook 
Pond 


200 


Fort Cobb, Spring Creek 

Frederick, Prairie Spring 
Pond 


McMichaels Creek. 

Susquehanna, Susquehaima 

River 


400 
150 


Grant County, Spring Creek 

Guthrie, Ellison Lake , . 

Lower Lake 


Tower City, Wiconisco Creek 

Waynesboro, Lake Royer 

Weissport, Big Creek 


150 
200 
300 






200 


pond 


Winwood, Sister Lake. 


100 






150 


Ilobart, pond 


York, Little Conewago Creek 

Rhode Island: 

Rhode Island Fish Commission, 


250 


Kingfisher, pond 








Lexington, Farmers Lake.. 


500 


Maramec, Maramec Lake 

Marshall, pond 


Rhode Island Fish Commission, 


300 




South Carolina: 




Olustee, pond 


1,200 


Perry pond 


Town Creek 

Barnwell, llagood mill pond 

Turkey Creek 

Batesburg, Hartley Pond 


1,200 




1,000 


Stillwater, pond . .. . 


1 , 000 


Gun CI u lis Pond 


1 , 000 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Fingcilings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Large-mouth black ba.s«— Continued. 

South Carolina— Continued. 

Denmark, Savannah Pond 

Easto ver, pond 

Enoree, Beaver Dam Creek 

Buck Head Creek 

Cedar Shoal Creek 

Elisha Creek 

Enoree River 

Fork Shoal Creek 

Poyes Creek 

Two Mile Creek 

Warrior Creek 

Fountain Inn, Big Creek 

Reedy River 

Gray Court, Reedy River 

Greenville, Buck Horn Creek... 
Middle Tyger Creek. . 

Mount Creek 

Reedy River Mill 

Pond 

Richland Creek 

South Enoree Creek 
South Saluda River. 

Woods Pond 

Jefferson, Big Fork Creek 

Black Creek 

Lynchs River 

liocky Creek 

.Johnston, Satclier Pond 

Kershaw, Freeman Pond 

Lanford, Beaver Dam Creek 

Leesville, Quattlebam Mill Pond 

Livingston, Bohn Pond 

Little Beaver Pond. 

Lynchburg, Lynchs River 

Maredon, pond 

MuUins, Little Pee Dee River... 

Neescs, Bolin Pond 

Johnson Pond 

Otranto, Goose Creek 

Owings, Saxons Pond 

Rock Hill, Catawba PowerCom- 

pan v pond 

Spartanlnirg, Drayton Mills 

lower pond 

Drayton Pond ... 

Floyd Pond 

High Pond 

Lawsons Fork 

Creek 

Nesbit Pond 

Roquie Pond 

Whites mill pond. 

Sumter, Friar Pond 

Swansea, Third Branch Pond . . 

Trenton, Hatchie Pond 

Troy, Davis Pond 

Kennedy Pond 

Solomons Pond 

Verdery, Reedy Branch 

Wellford, Berry Shoal Pond... 

Westville, pond 

Williston, Addison mill pond.. 
South Dakota: 

Alpena, Brayton Ranch Lake . 

Delasca Lake 

Lake -Vlpena 

Schmidts Lake 

Serfkins Lake 

Artesian, Fish Lake 

Bellefourche, Redwater River. 

Canton, Sioux River 

Carthage, Redstone Creek. .'. .. 

Clear Lake, Clear Lake 

Fairfax, Frasch Pond 

F'orestburg, lake 

Sunset Lake 

Kimball, McKee Lake 

Miller Lake 



1,200 
250 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

2,000 

1,000 

1,325 

825 

1,325 

825 

800 

1,300 

1,000 

1,000 

200 

500 

133 

500 

550 

.500 

500 

2,500 

800 

5,250 



800 
800 

2,000 
800 
800 

1,.500 
500 
300 
800 
800 
800 
800 
250 

2,500 
800 
400 

1.50 
200 
150 
200 
100 
150 
300 
300 
200 
700 
350 
.300 
200 
150 
1.50 



Species and disposition. 



Large-mouth black 6a«s— Continued. 

South Dakota— Continued. 

Loyal ton, pond 

Menno, James River 

Mitchell, James River 

Oelrichs, Alkire Pond 

Pierre, pond 

Medicine Creek 

Plankinton, pond 

Redfield, Crystal Lake 

Rosebud, Cut Meat Creek 

Eagle Creek 

Upper Cut Meat Creek 

White Horse Pond ... 

Tyndall, lake 

Vermilion, Vermilion River 

Waubay, Blue Dog Lake 

White Lake. Severance Pond . . . 

Woonsocket, lake 

pond 

Yankton, artificial lake 

Dakota River 

James River 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Tennessee: 

Bean Station, Thorn Hill Pond. . 
Cedar Hill, Sulphur Fork of 

Red River 

Chattanooga, Chickamauga 

Creek 

Chickamauga 

Lake 

East Lake 

Lookout Creek. . 

Read Lake 

Clarksville, Red River 

Cleveland, Edge wood Lake 

Columbia, Duck River 

Delrio, Big Creek 

Laurel Creek 

Dunn, Peach Rolls mill pond. . . 

Estill Springs, Klk River 

Franklin, Big Ilarpeth River.. 

Lick Creek 

West Ilarpeth River 

Gallatin, Lane Pond 

Ilelenwood, New River 

Hornsprings, Horn Springs 

Johnson City, Knol) Creek 

Sinking Creek... 

Knoxville, Tennessee River 

Lawrenceburg, Beelcrs Fork... 
Crowson Creek.. 
Knob Creek. 
Shoal Creek. 
Leadvale, French Broad River. . 

Mason, Hamblett Lake 

Medon, Piny Pond 

Montgomery County, pond. 
Murfreesboro, Stones River. 
Nashville, Watauga Lake.. 

\\ elsh Pond 

Newport, Big Pigeon River. 

Raines Pond 

Noeton, German Creek 

Holston River 

Normandy, Waite Lake 

Ozone, Fern Lake 

Persia, Dodsons Creek 

Pulaski, Weakley Creek 

Selmer, Expansion Lake 

Smyrna, Stuarts Creek 

Springfield, Sulphur Fork of 

Red River 

Summerton, Little Buffalo 

Creek 

Tellico Junction, McDaniel Lake 

Tracy City, East Fork Pond 

Wilton, Cosby Creek 

Shavers Creek 



100 
300 
500 
100 
400 
500 
150 
200 
500 
200 
200 
200 
150 
300 
300 
1.50 
200 
200 
100 
300 
.300 



300 

2,000 

1,000 

50 

1,6.50 

1,000 

200 

300 

310 

100 

100 

66 

150 

750 

1,500 

600 

50 

53 

53 

150 

1,400 

225 

185 

66 

185 

185 

100 

100 

75 

75 

825 

50 

180 

450 

50 

53 

1,975 

1,000 

53 

53 

1,000 

1.50 

50 

1,125 

185 
50 
7C 

150 
75 



56 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Large-mouth black bass — Continued 

Texas: 

Adlcins, pond 

Alba, pond 

Alpine, lalce 

Alto, Hills Pond 

Alvarado, pond 

Amarillo, East Amarillo Creek. . 

Arlington, Jones I'ond 

Arp, Ilughos Pond 

Atlanta, Big Lake 

Atlast, Thompson Lake 

Austin, Spring Lake 

Avery, Douglas gin pond 

ponds (2) 

Axtell, pond 

Bassette, Corley Pond 

May Pond 

Bay City, B rady Lake 

Hudgins Lake : 

Beaumont, Mirror Lake 

Bellbraneh, railroad lake 

Bellevue, railroad lake 

Belton, Leon River 

Bettie, Anderson Pond 

Big Springs, Mesquite Pond 

Bonham, Club Lake 

lakes (2) 

pond...- 

Rogers Lake 

Booth, Smitliers Lake 

Bo Vina, pond 

Brady, pond 

Bransford, railroad lake 

Brownsville, Lake Elmno 

Lake view Pond. . 
Lower Guerra Re 

saca Pond 

Resaca do la Palma 

Pond 

Upper Guerra Re- 
saca Pond 

Brownwood, Anderson Pond... 

Holgatc Pond 

Johnson Lake 

lake 

ponds (4) 

West Lake 

Bryan, Fin and Feather Club 

Lake 

pond 

• railroad lake 

Bryson, Hunt Pond 

Salt Creek 

Calvert, Little Brazos River 

ponds (2) 

Valley View Pond 

Cameron, -\ngell Pond 

Jenks Pond 

pond 

Rogers Pond 

Canyon City, Terra Blanco 

River 

Carmona, pond 

Caro, upper pool 

Channing, McDowells I'ond. . .. 

Childress, railroad lake 

Chilton, Cow Bayou 

Cisco, lake 

La kc Bernie 

Clarksville, pond 

Jamison Pond 

Cleburne, Johnsons Ranch Lake 

Clevenger, pond . . ." 

Coleman, Ilenderson Pond 

Coleman Junction, J unction 

Lake 

Colorado, pond 

Coolidge, reservoir 

waterworks lake 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



40 
100 
200 
200 
100 
1,300 
120 
200 
525 
825 
150 
120 
350 
300 

20 
100 

rm 

400 
100 
2,027 
500 
500 
300 
200 
150 
800 
400 
120 
300 
50 
100 
150 
300 
300 

250 

300 

250 
150 
120 
200 
200 
800 
300 

300 
300 
13 
200 
1,000 
500 
350 
150 
200 
200 
200 
150 

950 
150 
400 
150 
500 
1,000 
400 
400 
120 
500 
40 
300 
100 

500 

75 

1,400 

300 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large^mouih black fta.ss— Continued. 

Texas — Continued. 

Corpus Christi, Fortuna Pond.. 
Corsicana, Cunningham Pond . . 

Johnson Pond 

lake No. 3 


300 
50 
200 
120 


Morse Pond 


50 


ponds (5) 


fiOO 


Walton Pond 

Covington, reservoir 


50 
300 


Craft, Dover Pond 


200 


Crockett, Patrick Lake 


500 


South End LalvC 

Crush, Crush Pool 


150 
400 


Cuero, pond 


150 


D'Hanis, Seco River 


1,000 


. Dallas, Exall Lake 


300 


Lindale Lake 


500 


j Trinitv River .. 


320 


Denison, Carlat Pond 


120 


Detroit, Caton Pool 


100 


Clubs Lake 


300 


oil company's lake 

Duncan Lake. 


300 
200 


light plant pond 

Whitlev Lake 


200 
200 


Dodd City, Hunters gin pond... 
, oil mill lake. 


100 
150 


Dodge, Sheppard Lake 


300 


Electra, Cottonwood Pond 

Hereford Lake 


150 
500 


Elgin, Christian Lake 


200 




100 


lakes (2) 


250 


Pinsons Lake 


200 


ponds (3) 


425 


Sandifers Lake. . . . 


125 


Sharp Pond 


100 


Elkhart, Elkhart Lake 


1,200 


El Paso, smelting works pond.. 
Vinton Lake. . 


120 
120 


Emory, Holmes Pond 


200 


Ennis, Moore Pond 


300 


Eskota, Wilson Fork of Brazos 
River 


500 


Falls Citv lake 


300 




200 


' Forney, pond 


120 


1 Fort Worth, pond 


200 


hike 


300 


Sycamore Lake . . . 

Franklin, Running Pond 

Graham, Clark Pond 


250 
200 
150 


Drv Creek Pond 

Elm Creek 


150 
1,000 


lake 


200 


Phillips Lake 


500 


Salt Creek 


500 


Spring Lake 


300 


Turtle Hole Lake 

ponds (23) 


500 

3,S10 

400 




Greenville Fords Lake 


100 


reserv'oir 


20 


Hallville, Cain Pond 


100 


Henderson, Graham Lake 

Hereford, pond 


300 
150 


Middle Tulc Pond 

Terra Blanco River. . 

Tlillsboro, Lake Park Lake 

Honeygrove, I'rovine Lake 

Houston, Highland Park Lake . 


150 
1,000 
1,000 
200 
300 
50 




250 


Hubbard Reservoir.. 

Jim Jones Pond 

Mills Brothers Pond . 
pond 


1,200 
150 
100 
l.W 




400 


Prairie Lake 


250 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 57 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black 6o.ss— Continued. 
Texas— Continued. 


120 
100 
200 
150 
400 
150 
120 
400 

12 
100 
320 
500 
150 
150 
300 
120 
300 
150 
250 
120 
400 1 
GOO 
350 ' 
300 
150 
200 
150 
150 
200 
020 
200 
150 ' 
100 
1.50 
400 

50 
150 
150 
1.50 
200 
100 
300 
100 
120 
200 
163 
400 
500 

75 

100 

200 

40 

12 

1.50 

150 

.300 

300 

200 

200 

75 

75 

500 

500 

150 

150 

500 

500 

200 

200 

.500 

150 

200 

2,028 

40 

400 

50 

600 


Large-moulh black bass — Continued. 

Te.xas— Continued. 

Riverside, Thomas Lake 

Rockdale, Hicks Pond 


150 




200 




pond 


125 






200 


Yonljapin Lake 




500 




300 




Spring Pond 


300 




Sabinal, Dinner Creek 


500 




San Angelo, Dove Creek 

Kickapoo Creek 

Spring Creek 

San Antonio, Madarazy Pond.. 

Mitchell Lake 

pond 


1,500 


Italy, Belle Branch Lake 


1,000 
1,000 


Jacksonville, Black Lake 


200 
500 




100 




San .Vntonio River 

Vernor Lake 

Sanger, Duck Creek 


50 


Kaufman, Bruton Pond 


100 
1,000 


Electric Light Pond . 




300 


Saron, pond 


300 


Murdock Lake 

Park Lake 


Seguin, Guadaloupe River 


1,300 
100 




ponds (4) 


200 




Sherman, VV'indv Lake 


150 




Shiner, Martin Pond 


150 




Stone, Brenham Gun Club Lake 

Strawn, McCollister Lake 

Sulphur Springs, Coleman Lake 

Hurley Pond.. 

Katy Pool.... 

McKay Pond . 

Scale Pond 

Withers po on 
Pond 


500 




300 




200 




150 




400 


Laredo, San Ygnacio Pond 


1.50 
100 


Lockh'art, Montgomery Pond... 


150 




200 


Lufkin, Lake Elmira 


Sweetwater, Bridges Pond 

ponds (2) 


120 




520 






800 




Taylor, Flag Springs 


3,50 




Turkey Creek 


1,000 


mill pond 


Tehuacana, Tehuacana Lake . . . 


(iOO 




1.50 






100 






100 




Bass Lake 


300 


Marqnez, Carrington Lake 


Cate Ranch Pond 

Country Clul> Lake 

McCartney Pond 


200 
500 


Millsa|i, Briinc'tt Pond 


120 




250 




Story Pond 


100 






200 






300 


Nacogdoches, Willow Lake 




500 


Thorndale, CalTey Pond 


200 


Navasota, railroad lake 


Thornton, Bradley Pond 


120 
200 






150 






200 


Otto, Big Lake 


Evergreen Lake 


300 




Flag Lake 


500 




Greenbrier Country Club 






1,000 




North Lake 


300 






1,000 




Spicer Lake 


300 


Palmer, Payne Pond 


Willow Park Lake 


300 


Eeddell Pond 


1,000 


Panhandle, Antelope Creek 




150 




500 




Crippen Lake 


200 




Days Lake 


700 




Horn Lake 


200 




lakes (2) 


800 


Penelope, Penelope Lake 


Palmetto Lake 


300 




300 


Pettus, pond 


Waller, McKinney Island Creek 
Walling, White Pond 


300 




100 




Waxahachie, Sims Pond 

Weatherford, Clear Lake 


150 


Quannah, Beaver Creek Pond. . 


400 



58 PKOPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 


Fingerljngs, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Species and disposition. 


Fingedings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 


Large-mouth black 6a.5s— Continued. 

Texas— Continued . 

Weatherford, pond 


150 
200 
200 
300 
150 
500 
200 
400 
100 
250 

100 

500 
100 
500 
200 

500 
200 
200 
800 
7,800 

500 
450 
200 
150 
750 
200 
150 
300 

200 
300 
100 
50 
200 
300 
200 
500 
GOO 

700 

400 
200 
400 
400 

1,000 
1,000 
150 
500 
250 
800 

700 
200 
200 
400 
500 

300 
400 
200 

450 

450 
500 
100 
200 

200 
200 
300 


Large-mouth black 6a«s— Continued. 
Virginia— Continued. 


100 


Silver Lake 

Whitesboro, Anderson Pond 

Wichita Falls, Souter Lake 

Willspoint, lake 


Widewater, Aquia Creek 

Bellfair Mill Pond.. 

Wilcox Wharf, Buckland Pond.. 

Indian Field 

Pond 


800 

400 

l,.00O 


Winnsboro, Green Pond 


1,000 


Steed Pond 

Winnsboro Pool — 


Williamsburg, Kings Mill Pond, 
pond 


300 
500 


Wolfe City, pond 


Wytheville, Reed Creek 


50,052 
100 


Restover Pond 


' Zuni, pond 


Utah: 

Mount Pleasant, Spring Pond... 


Washington: 

Buckley, Lake Tapps 


500 


Virginia: 

Arrington, Big Piney River 


Lakeview, American and Grav- 
elly lakes 


n, 275 
300 


Ashburn, Goose Creek 


Seattle, Gazzon Lake 


Ashland, King Pond 


Tradistion Lake 

Tacoma, Carp Lake 


300 


Atlee, Diamond Hill Pond 


300 


Beaver Dam, Little River Mill 
I'ond 


Spanaway Lake 


300 
300 


Boyce, Shenandoah River 


Whatcom, Lake Wildwood 

West Virginia: 

Alderson, Greenbrier River 

Chester, Rock Springs Park 
Lake 


200 


Catletts, Cedar Run 


300 


Cedar Creek, Jackson River 

Charles City County, Shirley 


150 


Fairmount,Monongahela River. 
Grafton, Tygarts Valley River . . 
Great Caeapon, Great Cacapon 
River 


050 


Cohoke, Cohoke Pond 


450 


Covington, Jackson River 

Potts Creek 


600 




Huntington, Guyandotte River. 
Inwood, Back Creek. . . 


200 


Emporia, Meherrin River 


350 


Fries, Now River 


Morgantown, Monongahela 
River 




Gordonsville, Grassdale Pond... 


1,550 


Mountain View 
Pond 


Parkersburg, Shattuck Pond 

Valley Falls, Tygarts Valley 
River. . . 


150 


Hanover, Spring Pond 


600 




Wheeling, Big Whc>eling Creek.. . 
Wisconsin: 

Augusta, Augusta Pond 

Beef River 


400 


Tunnel Pond. 

Hot Springs, Jackson River 

Laurel, Bolton I'ond 


200 
300 




Bridge Creek 


200 


Willow Branch Pond... 
Lorraine, Tuckahoe Creek 


i Coon Fork River 

! Dell Pond 


.300 
300 


Maidens, Upper Beaver Dam 
Creek 


Eau Claire River 

Beloit, Rock River 


GOO 
200 


Manchester, Licking Creek Club 
Pond 


Burlington, Browns Lake 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Fjlcho, Enterprise Lake. 


300 
1,000 


Midlothian, Midlothian Pond... 


200 


Mineral, North Anna River 


i Gagen, Twin Lakes 


200 


Morrison, Causey Mill Pond 

Mount Jackson, North Branch 


Glenbeulah, Crystal Lake 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River... 

Hillsl)oro, Baraboo Creek Pond. 

j I ron River, lake 


300 

1,000 

200 


Occoquan, Occoquan River 

Orkney Springs, Orkney Lake.. 


200 


Lake Nebagamon, Lake Nebag- 


200 


Rapidan, Breese Lake 

Rapidan River 

Remington, Rappahannock 
River 


Lynxville, Mississippi River 

Necedah, Big Yellow Creek 
Pond 


1,000 
200 


Rhinelander, Indian Lake 

Lake George 

North Pelican 


300 


Richmond, Clarendon Pond 


300 


Minge Pond 

Schwams Pond 


200 


Woodruff, trout lake 


200 


West Hampton 


Wyoming: 

AUadin, Bush Reservoir 

Cody, Blirstin'Lake 


300 


Woo Id ridge Pond... 


300 




350 






175 


andoah River 

South Branch Shen- 
andoah River 

Rockfish, Rockfish River 


Sheridan, Dutch Creek Pond 

Totals 

Sunfish or bream. 

Alabama: 

Atmore, Mobly Mill Pond 

Attalla, Big Spring 


1,725 


713,111 




Strasburg, Shenandoah River.. 

North Fork Shenan- 
doah River 

Tumbling Run 

Toano, Whitakers Mill Pond . . . 


400 
200 


ponds (2) 


400 



a There were lost in transit 20,586 large-mouth black ba.ss. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 59 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 




Sunfish or 6rea7n— Continued. 

Alabama— Continuod. 

Birmingham, ponds (2) 

Calera, Calera Lake 

Choccolocco, pond 

Clanton, pond 

Columliia, I'ottiis Pond 

Demopolis, Knox Lake 

ponds (2) 

Elba, Thomas Lake 

Epes, Gibbs Pond 

Eiifaula, Bells Pond 

Foy Pond 

ponds (3) 

Glenallen, pond 

Inverness, Hough Pond 

Jacksonville, Linder Pond 

Jasper, reservoir 

Keener, pond 

Lincoln, Franklin Pond 

Montgomery, Tyson Pond 

Mountain Creek, Falkner Pond. 

Ohatchee, Ingram Lake 

Opelika, pond 

Owassa, Shell Pond 

Ozark, pond 

Pell City, Spring Pond 

River Falls, Gantt Pond 

Russellville, branch of Cedar 

Creek 

Morrow Pond 

Seals, Dudleys Lake 

pond ." 

Selma, Oil Mill Pond 

Spring Branch Pond 

Talladega, Talladega Creek 

Tennille, Clear Water Creek 

Pond r 

Troy, Ross Pond No. 2 

Union Springs, Handle Pond ... 
Walker Pond... 
Georgia: 

Albany, Flint River 

Americus, Hooks Mill Pond 

Athens, Oconee River 

pond 

waterworks pond 

Atlanta, Valley Hill Pond 

Augusta, .Vugusta Game Pre- 
serve Pond 

Box Springs, Lake Mohignac 

Brownwood, Kinchafoonee 

River 

Cairo, Big Tired Pond 

ponds (2) 

Clito, pond 

Cochran, pond 

Spring Lake 

Columbus, Garrard Pond 

Mossey Place Pond.. 

ponds (2) 

Cornelia, Hazel Creek 

Cusseta, pond 

Cuthl)crt, Crystal Lake 

Ellijay, Smith Pond 

Fitzgerald, DormineyMill Pond. 

Griffin, Grantland Pond.. 

Hogansville, pond 

Jefferson, Silnion Pond 

Jonesboro, Pine Lake 

Waldrop Pond 

Whaley Lake 

Juniper, Chandler Pond 

Lavonia, pond 

Leary, Cordray Mill Pond 

Lithonia, pond 

Macon, Bibb Mill Pond 

Swift Creek 

Marshall ville, Rock Spring Pond. 
Montezuma, Mill Pond 



400 
400 
150 
200 
150 
200 
670 
200 
238 
150 
150 
600 
200 
300 

75 
200 
200 

75 
100 
300 
300 

75 
300 
200 
200 
100 

200 
500 
100 
100 
200 
100 
800 

400 
200 
100 
100 

100 
,100 
300 
150 
175 
250 

400 
500 



200 

400 

250 

300 

200 

100 

150 

350 

150 

200 

400 

200 

500 ! 

400 

300 

150 

300 

350 

350 

500 

200 

500 

150 

250 

500 

400 

400 



Sunfish or bream — Continued. 

Georgia— Continued. 

Sandersville, Knight Pond 300 

Thomson, pond 150 

Winder, Smith Pond 150 

Zehulon, Cadenhead Pond 200 

Illinois: 

Blanding, Mississippi River 

Chicago, South Park Lake 

East Dubuque, Mississippi 

River 20, 000 

Galena, Mississippi River 50,000 

Savanna, Mississippi River 45,000 

Indian Territory: 

Ardmore, Chickasaw Club Lake . i 200 

Choctaw Lake 100 

Iowa: 

Bellevue, Mississippi River 15,000 

Charles City, Cedar River 500 

Clayton, Mississippi River 30, 000 

Duiuique, Mississippi River. . . . 25,000 
Gordons Ferry, Mississippi 

River 68,000 

Green Island, Mississippi River. 5,000 

Iowa Falls, Iowa River 100 

Lainsville, Mississippi River 10,000 

North McGregor, Mississippi 

River 30, 000 

Smith Ferry, Mississippi River. 18,01X) 

Wadena, Volga River 300 

Winthrop, Wapsipinicon River. 50 

Kentucky: 

Butler, lake 150 

Crab Orchard, Spring Lake 100 

Elkhorn, Belle Brook Pond 1(H) 

Eminence, Sanford Pond 100 

Frankfort, Kentucky River 

Pond . ; 350 

Trimble Pond 200 

Mount Sterling, Chenonet Pond. 150 

Louisiana: 

Natchitoches, Chaplin Lake 200 

Mississippi: 

Belden, pond 300 

Booneville, pond 125 

Brooksville, Cunningham Mill 

pond 450 

Ilaynes Mill Pond. 4.50 

Madison Pond .... 300 

Moon Pond 300 

Plantation Pond.. 300 

pond 450 

Canton, Coleman Pond 200 

Carrollton, pond 225 

Corinth, Bell Pond 150 

Chambers Creek 2,000 

Clear Creek 650 

Coon Creek Pond 1,000 

Derryberry Pond 200 

Elairis Creek 1,200 

Long Pond 200 

Powells Lake 500 

Reynolds Mill Pond . . . 300 

Tuscumbia River 2,000 

Vanderford Mill Pond. 500 

Voyle Pond 150 

Wallace Pond 500 

Waukomis Lake 300 

Wilson Pond 150 

Deer Brook, pond 450 

Guntown, pond 125 

Harriston, Cato Mill Pond 100 

Lockhart, pond 400 

Macon, Cavett Pond 800 

Mill Pond 300 

Martin, Bariand Pond 150 

Meridian, Wagni>r Pond 600 

Myrtle, Springdale Pond 450 

Pl'antersville, Stovall Pool 400 



60 PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details of Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Sunfish or ftream— Continued. 

Mississippi — Continued. 

Pleasant Hill, Bridgforth Tond 

Shiiqualak, pond 

Tupelo, Filgo Pond 

Verona, Walkers Pond 

Missouri: 

St. Louis. Louisiana Purchase 

Exposition 

North Carolina: 

Haw River, pond 

Hendersonville, Ewart Pond . . 
Lower Hungary 

Creek 

pond 

Khetts Pond . . 

Monroe, Houston Pond 

Raleigh, McCuller Pond 

pond 

Richardson Pond. . . . 

Wyatts mill pond 

South Carolina: 

Barnwell, Hair Pond 

Batesburg, Hossepen Creek. . . 

Charleston, Goose Creek 

Columbia, lake 

Cowpens, Martin Pond 

Darlington, Charles mill pond . 

Enoree, Enoree River 

ponds (2) 

Yarbrough Pond 

Greenville, pond 

Lancaster, pond 

Landrum, Belue Pond 

Belue mill pond. . . . 

CoUis Creek 

Page Pond 

Smith Creek 

Quattlebaum mill 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



Leesville, 
pond. . 

McBee, Little Fork Creek , 

Lowery Pond , 

Welsh Pond 

Rockhill, Catawba Creek , 

Spartanburg, city reservoir. . . . 
Drayton Pond . .. 
Upper Drayton 

Pond 

Trenton, pond 



450 
225 
400 
300 



30 

300 
400 

400 
GOO 
600 
300 
300 
100 
300 
350 

75 
100 
800 
200 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 

50 
150 

50 

50 
400 
300 
500 

100 
150 
150 
150 
100 
300 
200 

50 
100 



Species and disposition. 



Sunfish or bream— Continued. 

South Carolina— Continued. 

Trov, Talbert Pond 

Williston, Smith Pond 

Tennessee: 

Nashville, Cumberland River... 
Texas: 

Amarillo, Bonita Creek 

Bellliranch, Railroad Lake 

Bransford, Railroad Lake 

Brownsville, Lakeview Pond ... 

Bryan, Railroad Lake 

Clarendon, Buntin Pond 

Corpus Christi, pond 

El Paso, old river-bed 

Smelter Pond 

Franklin, pond 

Fort Worth, Field Pond 

Greenville, Foster Lake 

G ravcyard Pool 

Nichol Pond 

reservoir 

Henderson, pond 

Irene, Railroad Lake 

Italy, Belle Branch Lake 

Manor, Prinz Pond 

Mart, Railroad Lake 

Mount Pleasant, pond 

Tennison Pond 

Navasota, Railroad Lake 

Overton, Norvell Pond 

Penelope, Railroad Lake 

Piano, Huffman Pond 

San Antonio, Mitchell Lake. . . . 
San Antonio 

River 

West End Lake... 

Stone, Lake Watson 

Sulphur Springs, Lake Keasler. . 

Terrell, Brin Pond 

West Virgina: 

Hinton, New River 

Wisconsin: 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River... 

Lynxville, Mississippi River 

Total o 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



100 
200 



200 
400 
100 
300 
450 

75 
150 
200 
150 
100 
150 
200 

75 

70 
100 
125 
400 
200 

50 
400 

75 

50 
450 
100 
400 

50 
1,500 

1,100 

1,000 

200 

100 

50 

400 

20, 000 
15,000 
15,000 

447,908 



Species and disposition. 



Pike perch. 
Connecticut: 

Bethel, Taunton Lake 

Indiana; 

Albion, Sand Lake 

Bremen, Lake of the VVoods 

Columbia City, lake 

Middlebury, ilunter Lake 

Iowa: 

Calmar, Big Turkey River 

Fairfield, Water Works Reservoir 

Iowa Falls, Iowa River 

Manchester, Maquoketa River 

Winthrop, SVapsipimcon River 

Maryland: 

Greenmount, Gunpowder River 

Massachusetts: 

Gloucester, Cope Pond 

Haverhill, Chad wicks Pond 

Masiachusetts Fish Commission, Wilkinsonville. 



Eggs. 



Fry. 



500,000 

300,000 
500,000 
300,000 
700,000 



350,000 



500,000 
500,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



70 
100 

5C 
150 



a. There were lost in transit 2,242 sunfish. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FI8HES. 
Details of Distribution — Continued. 



61 



Species and disposition. 



Pike pcrcA— Continued. 
Michigan: 

Alpena, Thunder Bay 

Bay City, Saginaw Bay 

Belle. Isle, Detroit River - 

Beulah, Crystal Lake 

Michigan Fish Commission, Detroit 

Pentoga, Indian Lake 

Pontiac, Cass Lake 

Roberts Landing, St. Clair River 

Minnesota: * 

Barniim, Bear Lake 

Fergus Falls, Indian Lake 

Long Lake 

i,ittle Falls, Green Prairie Lake 

St. Peter. Lake Jefferson 

West Duluth, Lake Berg 

Missouri: . r,^ t ^ 

Missouri Fish Commission, St. Joseph 

Nebraska: . . . „ ,, t^ , 

Nebraska Fish Commission, South Bend 

New Jersey: 

Williamstown, McClure Lake 

New York: 

Hemlock, Hemlock Lake 

Near Cape Vincent, St. Lawrence River 

New York, Battery Park Aquarium 

New York Fish Commission, Caledonia 

Ohio: 

Beckett, Muskingum River 

Catawba Island, Lake Erie 

Locust Point, Lake Erie 

Lowell, Muskingum River 

Marblehead, Lake Erie 

Marietta, Muskingum River 

Port Clinton, Lake Erie 

Put-in Bay, Lake Erie 

Pennsylvania: 

Beavertown, Middle Creek 

Clearfield, Susquehanna River - . - - 

Hopewell. Raystown Branch of Jumata Kivt 

Milton, Susquehanna River - -. 

West Branch of Susquehanna River. 

Orson, Bone Lake 

Independent Lake 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Erie 

Saegerstown, French Creek 

Scranton, Cobbs Pond 

Watsontown, Susquehanna River 

Vermont: . 

Cambridge Junction, Lamoille Uiver 

Chester, Lowell Lake 

Fairlee, Lake Morey 

Hard wick. Lake Greenwood 

Ludlow , Electric Light Pond 

Montpelier, Curtis Pond 

Piedmont, Lake Morey 

Ricker Mills. Small Pond 

Swanton, Big Otter Creek 

Little Otter Creek 

McQuani Bay 

MiKsisquoi Bay 

Missisquoi River 

Winooski, Winooski River 

Virginia: 

Norfolk, Lake Smith 

Wisconsin: 

Baraboo Devils Lake - 

Greenwood, Black River 



Eggs. 



52,400,000 



10,0(X),000 
15,000,000 



2,000,000 
5,000,000 



03,350,000 



Total o. 



Fry. 



5,000,000 
3,000,000 
,S, 000, 000 
1,000,000 



500,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 

500,000 
300, (HX) 
.300,000 
500,000 
800, 000 
200,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



249,900 

500,000 
3,550,000 



900,000 
30,000,000 
20,000,000 

900,000 
20,000,000 

900,000 
23, 200, 000 
50,000,000 

250,000 
250,000 
250,000 
500,000 
250,000 
150,000 
150,000 



152,750,000 



Yellow perch. 
District of Columbia: 

Washington, Fish Lakes 

Illinois: 

Blaiiding, Mississippi River 

East DubtKiue, Mississippi River 

Galena, Mississippi River 

Savanna, Mississippi River ■ 

o There were lost in transit 100 pike perch fry. 



250,000 
150,000 
250,000 

500,000 

500,000 

300,000 

500,000 

500,000 

000,000 

500,000 

500,000 

500,000 

500,000 

1,000,000 

3,000.000 

48,498,875 

1,000,000 

350,000 

500,000 
500,000 

240,148,775 



300,000 



395 



10,000 
10,000 
45,000 
60,000 



62 PKOPACIATIOK AND DISTRIBUTION OF B^OOD FISHES. 

Details ok Distribution — Contimu'd. 



Species and disposition'. 



Yellow perch— Continued. 
Indiiina: 

Sumniitvillc, Hulls Lake 

Iowa: 

Bellevuc, Mississippi River 

Calmar, Big Turkey River 

Charles City, Cedar River 

Clayton, Mississippi River 

Dubuque, Mississippi River 

Fairfield, waterworks reservoir 

Gordons Ferry, Mississippi River 

Green Island, Mississippi River 

Iowa Falls, Iowa River 

Lainsville, Mississippi River 

Manchester, Maquoketa River 

Nortli McGregor, Mississippi River 

Smith Ferry, Mississippi River 

Wadena, Volga River 

Winthrop, Wapsipiuicon River 

Maryland: 

Battery Haul, Chesapeake Bay 

Bryans Point, Potomac River 

Cecil County, Elk River 

Mouth of North East River. 

Harford County, Swan Creek 

Maryland Fish Commission, Baltimore... 

off Accokeek Creek, Potomac River 

off Piscataway Creek, Potomac River 

Waterbury , fish pond 

Western Flats, Chesapeake Bay 

Massachusetts: 

Hubbardston, pond 

New York: 

Millerton, Indian Pond 

North Pond 

Rudd Pond 

Verinont: 

Groton, Groton Pond 

Virginia: 

Danville, Dan River. 

Mount Vernon, Potomac River 

off Dogue Creek, Potomac River 

off Little Hunting Creek, Potomac River. 
Wisconsin: 

Cassville, Mississippi River 

Glenhaven, Mississippi River 

Lynxville, Mississippi River 



Total a. 



Striped bass. 
North Carolina: 

Elliott, Six Runs River 

Weldon, Roanoke River , 



Total. 



White perch. 
Maryland: 

Battery ILiul, Chesapeake Bay 

Western Channel, Chesapeake Bay 

Western 1-lats, Chesapeake Bay 

Pennsylvania: 

Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Torresdale. 
Rhode Island: 

Oakland Beach, Cresent Lake 

Vermont': 

Montpelier, Groton Pond 



Eggs. 



5,000,000 



5,000,000 



700,000 



Total. 



Tautog. 
Massachusetts: 

Devils Foot Island, \'ineyard Sound. 
Lackeys I^ay, Vineyard .Sound 



Total. 



700,000 



Fry. 



25,000 



26, 107, 049 

650,000 

1,060,020 

1,500,000 

2,500.000 



9,975,000 

15,697,0(X) 

355,000 

57,089,480 

500,000 

300,000 
225,000 
225,000 

4,334,372 

7.')0,000 
4,777,000 
8,225,000 
4,257,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



139,452,521 



200,000 
2,263,000 



16,025,000 



7,050,000 
225,000 
200,000 
200,000 



23,700,000 



1,. 587, 000 
1,396,000 



2,983,000 



165 

22,000 
1.50 
500 

25,000 
4,000 
2,000 

35,000 

20,000 
700 

15,000 



15,000 

20,000 

2,000 

1,200 



12,000 
15,000 
12,000 

326,715 



a There were lost in transit 35 yellow perch yearlings. 



PROPAGATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 63 

Details of Distribution— Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs- 



Cod. 
^'"Boothbay Ilarlior, mouth of Linekin Bay. 



Georgetown, ocean. 

Sheepscot Bay. 



Fry. 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



llarpswell 

Monhegan 

Orrs Island, ocean 

Casco Bay 

Pemaquid, ocean ■■■,;■ 

Muscongus Sound . 

Pemaquid Harlior. 
Small Point, Casco Bay 



Southport, ocean. 

K!-,encook Harbor. 



'pscot Bay. 

Sheepscot River 

South Portland, ocean 

Massachusetts: 

Gloucester ■ 

Gosnold, Vineyard Sound 

Gay Head, Vineyard Sound 

Jobs Neck, Vineyard Sound ■■-■•-- 
Nobska Light, Vineyard Sound. 
Robinsons Hole, Vineyard Sound. 

Rockport - ■ ; 

Tarpaulin Cove Light 

Weepecket Islands 

Woods Hole Harbor 



1,. '162,000 . 

813,000 !■ 
7,544,000 

980,000 i 
:j,406,0(.O ! 
2,124,0tX) ; 
1,189,000 i 
1,007,000 
1,203,000 
2,068,000 

940,000 
5,653,000 

390,000 
1,832,000 
6,890,000 
9,414,000 

55,210,000 

264,000 

1,978,000 

1,320,000 

4,220,000 

9,637,000 

13,368,000 

32,062,000 

3,349,000 

1,064,000 



Total. 



Massachusetts: 
Gloucester.. 



Pollock. 



Fhitfish. 



ssiichusetts: 

Gloucester ■ 

Tarpaulin Cove 

Waquoit Bay 

Woods Hole Harbor. 



169,577,000 



8,456,000 



Total. 



Lobster. 



^""nsh^^island. Fishers Island Bound 

Morgans Point Light, Inshers Island Sound. 



Maine: 

Bass Harbor -■ w •■,'■■ 

Boothbay Harbor, Bootlibay Harbor. 

Linekm Bay 

Gape Porpoise 

Cranberry Island. - 

Cutler 

Deer Island - ■ • - ■ ■ .• 

Fletchers Neck, Gulf of Manie 

Friendship ■ 

Georgetown, Sheepscot Bay 

Sheepscot River 

Horse Shoe Island, Small Point Bay., 

Jonesport, Moose Peak Reach 

Kennebunk Beach 

Kennebunk Beach Cove 

Kennelmnkport, ocean 

Kittery Point ;--■;;■: 

Lowells Cove, Gulf of Maine 

Orrs Island 

Small Point Bay 

Matinicus Harbor, Gulf of Maine. . . . 

off entrance 

Matinicus Island, off North End 

off South End 

Millbridge, Narraguagus River 

Monhegan Island 

Pemaquid 

Petit Manan Light 

Portland 

Prospect Harbor 

Rockland ;■,•;;■•• 

Skipper Joe Cove, Gulf of Maine 



150,881,000 
2,875,000 
12,891,000 
36,709,000 



203,356,000 



998,000 
2,134,000 



1,050,000 
7,168,000 
1,075,000 
3,660,000 
1,050,000 
2,800,000 
3,325,000 
3,000,000 
700,000 
600,000 
1,200,000 
1,000,000 
875,000 
1,000,000 . 
925,000 . 
1,000,000 , 
3,550,000 
2,500,000 
1,375,000 
1,000,000 1 
2,500,000 { 
1,500,000 
750,000 
750,000 ' 
1,710,000 
2,500,000 I 
1,000,000 I 

875,000 

3,000,000 

2,900,000 

500,000 

680,000 



64 PROPAGATION AND DISTKIBUTION OF FOOD FISHES. 

Details ov Distribution — Continued. 



Species and disposition. 



Eggs. 



l,o6«<cr— Continued. 

Miiine— Continued. 

Small Point, Casco Bay 

Southport, Ebcnc'ook Harl)or 

Southwest Harbor, Mount Desert 

Steuben, Dyers Bay 

Indian Harbor 

Stonington 

St. George, Georges Island Ilartjor... 
Port Clyde Harbor 

Swan, Blue Hill Bay 

Tenants Harbor 

Turbine Cove 

Vinalhaven 

Westport, Slieepscot Kiver 

Winter Harbor 

Wood Island Harbor 

York Harljor 

Massachusetts: 

Beverly 

Clarks Point Light, Buzzards Bay — 

Cohasset Bay. north from 

Cuttyhunk, Buzzards Bay 

Eastern 1 -ight 

Egg Island 

Fawn Bar Buoy, Boston Bay 

Gloucester 

Graves Whistling Buoy, Boston Bay. 

G reat Ledge, Vineyard Sound 

Gull Island Buoy, Buzzards Bay 

Gumett Light, Massachusetts Bay. . . 

Ilardings Ledge, Boston Bay 

Lackeys Bay, Vineyard Sound 

Manchester 

Marblehead 

Minots Ledge 

Noliska lyight 

Pcnzancr Point, I?uzzards Bay 

Point Allcrton, Boston Bay.." 

Quissett Harbor, IJuzzards Bay 

Rockport 

Salem 

Salt Island 

Scituate 

Squam 

Tarpaulin Cove 

Thieves Ledge Buoy, Boston Bay 

Weepecket Islands 




Total. 



2,000,000 
1,000,000 
2,0.50,000 
1,900,000 
1,140,000 
1,200,000 
2,400,000 
1,0.50,000 
1,200,000 
4,125,000 
660, 000 
1,900,000 
2,150,000 
2,275,000 
2, .500, 000 
1,250,000 

2,000,000 

1,072,000 
447,000 
700, 000 
500,000 

1,250,000 
377,000 

4,500,000 
378, 000 
390,000 

1,047,000 

78,000 

300,000 

153,000 

1,200,000 
400,000 
156,000 
542, 000 
767, 000 
125,000 
609,000 

2,380,000 
100,000 
750,000 

2,856,000 

1,400,000 
905,000 
125,000 

1,257,000 

116,214,000 



Fingerlings, 
yearlings, 
and adults. 



o 



THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905 

By John N. Cobb 

Assistant Agent at the Salmon Ft ''.^ries of Alaska 



Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 603 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Introduction 

Importance of the Alaskan fisheries 

The fishing grounds 

The cod fishery "- 

History ^^ 

Fisliing banlis 

Fishing stations 

Vessel fisheries 

. . 14 

Statistics 

The halibut fishery 

History ^^ 

Fishing grounds 

Methods of the fishery 

Preparation of the catch 

The herring fishery 

History ^j 

Fishing grounds 

Statistics 

The salmon industry 

Canneries - „^ 

„ , . 24 

Saltenes 

Freezing salmon - 

Hatcheries -' - 

Fertilizer plants ■ 

Aquatic furs 

Miscellaneous aquatic animals 

General statistics for 1905 

Other fishery resources of Alaska 

Fisheries carried on in Alaskan waters and credited to places outside of the distnct . . 45 

3 



THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905, 



By John N. Cobb, 
Assistant Aqent at the Salmon Fisheries of AlasTca. 



INTRODUCTION. 

The salmon and seal fisheries of Alaska constitute such conspicuous 
features of the fishing industry in that region that published reports 
have to a great extent neglected the other aquatic resources, and no 
complete compilation of statistics has ever been made. The Tenth 
(1880) and Eleventh (1890) censuses covered the ground partially, but 
the census agents had to deal with all phases of Alaskan endeavor and 
their reports upon the commercial fisheries were consequently not so 
complete as could be desired. The salmon fishery was treated by 
them in considerable detail, and has been canvassed and reported upon 
very fully by the Bureau of Fisheries. « The seal fishery has been the 
subject of investigation and legislation recorded in many volumes 
published by the Treasury Department, and more recently in the 
reports of the Department of Commerce and Labor. No special can- 
vass of the other fisheries, however, has heretofore been made, the 
information published at' varying periods by the Bureau of Fisheries 
being such as could be gathered by its agents at San Francisco in con- 
nection with their canvass of the Pacific coast states. 

The data presented in the following pages for the year 1905 are the 
result of the writer's personal canvass of a portion of the region and 
the collection of reports from various fishing firms and officials of the 
government in Alaska. A history and recapitulation of results of the 
various fisheries is also given 

IMPORTANCE OF THE ALASKAN FISHERIES. 

Long before the acquisition of Alaska was even dreamt of by our 
statesmen its wealth in fishery products was known, by hearsay at 
least, to the hardy mariners of the Pacific coast, as well as to the 

a The salmon and salmon fisheries of Alaska. Report of the operations of the U. S. Fish 
Commission Steamer Albatross for the year ending June 30, 1898, by Jefferson F. Moser. 
Bulletin U. S. Fish Commission 1898, vol. xvni, 1899, p. 1-178, pi. 1-63, charts a and b. 
Idem, 1900 and 1901, Bulletin 1901, vol. xxi, 1902, p. 173-398 and 299*-401*, pi. i-xliv, 
pi. A and charts a, b. 

5 



6 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

whalers from New Bedford, Mass., and other Atlantic ports, who fre- 
quented the waters of the north Pacific and Arctic oceans. In the 
memorial to the President of the United States adopted by the legisla- 
ture of Washington Territory in the winter of 1866 especial stress was 
laid upon the fishery resources of the territory and the need for an 
arrangement with Russia by which our fishing vessels would be 
enabled to resort to the Alaskan harbors for shelter and to procure 
fuel, water, and provisions. Even at that time our fishermen were 
engaged in cod fishing on the Alaskan banks, the first vessel having^ 
gone there in 1863, while our whalers had been working in Bering Sea 
and along the Arctic shore for years. 

The treaty of cession between Russia and the United States w^as 
signed March 30, 1867, ratified by the Senate May 28, and proclaimed 
by the President June 20 of the same year. Formal and actual pos- 
session was taken on the 16th of the following October. Much doubt 
was expressed in this country as to the wisdom of paying so large a 
sum of money for such an apparently sterile region as Alaska, and it 
was feared that the expenditure would never be justified. Such cal- 
culations were much at fault, however. The United States has not 
only been more than reimbursed directly, but through the fisheries 
alone has been many times compensated for the financial outlay. The 
rental from the fur-seal islands has inore than paid the initial cost of 
the district, and at the present time the tax derived from the salmon 
fishery amounts to about $90,000 a year. 

The following table shows, so far as it has been possible to secure 
reliable information, the quantity and value of fishery products secured 
in Alaskan waters from 1868 to 1905 (both inclusive). In some 
instances, where but rather fragmentary data could be obtained, esti- 
matesbased upon the figures in hand havebeen inserted forthe missing 
years. The second column in the table shows the products in units 
as put on the market, but in the third column all have been reduced to 
pounds for convenience in comparison. The dates given indicate the 
number of years the fishery in question has been prosecuted. No 
account has been taken in this table of the very extensive intertribal 
commerce of the natives in fishery products, as there are no accurate 
data for this feature. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 7 

Quantity and Value of the Fishery Products of Alaska Marketed in Stated 

Years, 1868 to 1905. 



Species. 



Quantity. 



Prepared 
weight. 



Value. 



Codfish (1868-1905) pounds. 

Halibut (1890-1905) do. . . 

Herring (1878-1905) do. . . 

Guano do. .. 

Oil gallons. 

Salmon (1868-1905) pounds. 

Sardines, canned (1904) cases. 

Trout (1904-5) pounds. 

Fish oil, other than herring (1890-1905) gallons. 

Fish guano, other than herring (1904-5) pounds. 

Clams, canned (1898-99. 1903-4) cases. 

Walrus ivory (1808-1905) pounds. 

Walrus oil (1868-1905) gallons. 

Whalebone (1868-1905) b pounds. 

Whale oil (1868-1905) b gallons. 

Beaver (1868-1905) number. 

Muskrat (1868-1905) do. . . 

Otter: 

Land (1868-1905) do. . . 

Sea (1868-1905) do . . . 

Fur (1868-1905) do. . . 

Hair (1868-1905) b do... 

Total 



156, 125, 684 

37, 999, 506 

10, 365, 877 

29, 319, 800 

4,281,420 

11,517,944,726 

3,173 

55, 382 

30, 486 

1,800 

1,137 

843, 930 

3,064,001 

246, 166 

26, 518 

150,683 

251, 225 

93, 272 
107, 121 

3, 345, 784 
191,042 



Pounds. 

116,511,629 

29, 630, 373 

7, 793, 885 

29,319,800 

32,110,650 

1,141,319,343 

152, 304 

44,306 

228, 645 

1,800 

54, 576 

843, 930 

22,980,007 

246, 166 

198, 885 

150,683 

31,403 

233, 430 
535, 605 

20, 074, 704 
573, 126 



1,403,035,250 



$4, 072, 626 

921,562 

202, 492 

349, 349 

1,055,368 

68, 818, 792 

12,059 

2,307 

8,657 

30 

4,440 

343, 542 

1, 582, 219 

567, 417 

15,911 

752,011 

13, 123 

497, 041 
10, 732, 867 

47, 896, 383 
194, 442 



138,042,638 



a Includes 21,784,106 eases of canned salmon, with an estimated value of ! 
b Estimated from data covering a portion of the period. 



; per case. 



THE FISHING GROUNDS. 

The district of Alaska is enormous in extent, being equal to nearly 
one-sixth of the United States proper. The total length of mainland 
from southeast to northwest is about 1,150 miles, the greatest width 
is about 800 miles, and the area is about 590,000 square miles. 
Because of the thousands of islands scattered along the coast, or, as 
in the case of the Aleutian chain, extending out to sea hundreds of 
miles, the district has an exceedingly long coast line and one well 
adapted to fishing, owing to the many large and safe bays, the shel- 
tered channels betw^een the islands and the mainland, and the numer- 
ous rivers which debouch from the mainland. The Nushagak River is 
to-day one of the important fishing streams of the world. 

Following is a list of the fishing banks of importance off the Alaskan 
coast and in adjacent foreign w^aters so far as they have been discov- 
ered and charted. Notwithstanding the extensive fishing in this 
region, there are doubtless many fishing banks still unknown. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 









1 




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COMMEECTAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 9 

THE COD FISHERY. 
HISTORY. 

The presence of cod along the Alaskan coast has been known for 
many years. The first mention was made by a Russian navigator in 
1765, who reported "cod, perch, pilchards, smelts" as being fomid 
around the Fox Islands. Other navigators and explorers who 
reported the presence of cod were Cook (1786), Portlock (1787), 
Meares, Billings (1792), Langsdorf (1804), Sutke, and Sir George 
Simpson (1841), all of whom speak of it as being a very common fish. 
But little use was made of it, however, owing to the abundance of 
salmon. Early in the sixties American vessels from S:m Francisco 
discovered and fished on the cod banks in the Okhotsk Sea, the first 
American vessel to visit Alaskan waters apparently being the schooner 
Alert, which made a voyage to Bristol Bay in 1863. She secured but 
9 tons of cod, however, the capttiin's principal mcentive to make the 
trip probably being to trade with the natives. 

On March 27, 1865, Captain Matthew Turner, with the schooner 
Porpoise (45 tons), of San Francisco, sailed for Alt.ska, and arrived 
at the Shumagin Islands May 1 . The vessel returned on July 7 with 
30 tons of cod, having left the banks early in order to get back to San 
Francisco before the Okhotsk fleet. This was the first fare ever 
taken from around the Shumagins, one of the best grounds in Alaska. 
The Simeonoff Bank was discovered by the Minnie S. Atkins in 1867. 

The acquisition of Alaska by the United States in 1867 proved a 
boon to the cod fishermen, as it secured the Americans, who did all the 
fishing, from any interference on the part of the owners of AL ska. 
This is well shown by the fact that while the fleet in 1867 numbered 
3 vessels, with a catch of 136,000 fish, the fleet of 1868 comprised 14 
vessels, which made a catch of 608,000 fish. 

It was early discovered that the time required for the vessels to 
reach the banks from San Francisco and return was wasted, and in 
1876 T. W. McCollam & Co., which firm later merged into the Union 
Fish Company, one of the first to engage in the fishery on a large 
scale, established a permanent fishing station at Pirate Cove on Popoff 
Island, one of the Shumagin group. From this station fishermen in 
dories went out each day, returning in the evening with the day's 
catch. In this way fishing could be carried on the 3^ear through, and 
the plan was followed as time went on until now nearly all of the com- 
panies operating vessels in Alaska have one or more stations. Cer- 
tain vessels are employed in carrying supplies to these stations from 
the home ports and in taking back the cod caught. 

The first Alaskan vessel in the fishery was one owned by Captain 
Haley, of Wrangell, who in 1879 fished on the Hoochenoo Bank in 
Frederick Sound, and sold his catch in Wrangell for $100 per ton. 
The regular Bering Sea fishery was inaugurated by the Tropic Bird in 
1883. 

7115—06 2 



10 COMMERCIAL FISHEEIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

For years the fishery was followed by San Francisco firms only, but 
in 1891 Capt. J. A. Matheson, of Anacortes, Wash., brought the 
schooner Lizzie Colby ( 142 tons) around Cape Horn and sent her to 
Bering Sea, and he has continued in the fishery there ever since. The 
Western Canadian Fish Company, of Vancouver, British Columbia, 
sent a vessel to Bering Sea in 1903 and continued the venture until 
1905, when the company failed. The Robinson Fisheries Company, 
of Anacortes, and the Seattle and Alaska Fish Company, of Seattle, 
sent their first vessels to Alaska in 1904. In 1905 King & Wing, of 
Seattle, and the Blom Codfish Company, of Tacoma, entered the 
fishery. 

FISHING BANKS. 

While most of the fishing banks were kno^vn to the fishermen in a 
general way, it remained for the steamer Albatross to survey and plat 
them during her investigations in Alaskan waters from 1888 to 1892." 

Following is a summarized description of the banks, first those in 
Bering Sea: 

Slime Bank. — This is the first of the larger fishing grounds reached 
after entering Bering Sea through Unimak Pass. The bank begins 
directly off the Northwest Cape of Unimak Island, is elongate in 
shape, and follows approximately the trend of the adjacent coast to 
within a few miles of Amak Island, its inner margin lying only a short 
distance off the land. It is about 85 miles in length and 17 miles in 
average width, broadening somewhat at the eastern end; its total 
area is estimated at about 1,445 square miles, and the depths range 
from 20 to 50 fathoms. The bank derives its name from the presence 
of immense numbers of a large jelly-fish, measuring from 6 to 18 inches 
across the disk, and provided with long, slender tentacles having 
great stinging powers. These animals are not found upon the sur- 
face, but seem to occupy an intermediate zone toward the bottom, 
where at times they occasion much annoyance to the fishermen by 
becoming entangled with the fishing gear. 

Baird or Moller Bank. — This is the largest bank yet discovered on 
the Alaskan coast. It commences a few miles east of Amak Island 
and extends northeastward off the northern side of the Alaska penm- 
sula to the vicinity of Cape Chichago at the mouth of Ugaguk River, 
a distance of about 230 miles. It has an average width of about 40 
miles and an extreme width of 58 miles, its total area being estimated 
at about 9,200 square miles. The boundaries have not been thor- 
oughly established, and possibly comprise a greater area than is 
stated above. 

In Kulukak Bay are numerous spots where cod are found, but none 
are of sufficient size to entitle them to be called banks. 

o Fishery investigations of the steamer Albatross from July 1, 1888, to July 1, 1892, 
by Richard Rathbun. Bull. U. S. Fish Com., 1892, p. 127-201. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 11 

Gravel Bank. — Fishermen sometimes visit this small bank, which 
lies about 16 miles southwest from the southern end of Hagemeister 
Island, and they state that large cod are abundant there. The depths 
are from 16 to 20 fathoms. 

The Albatross investigations were not carried north of Cape Newen- 
ham. According to Petroff , in the Tenth Census, codfish have been 
reported at a few points along the xirctic coast, but no banks have been 
located, ver}^ likely because no efl'ort has been made to find them. 

Unalaska Harbor, etc. — Fishermen have reported cod banks in the 
neighborhood of Unalaska Harbor, but the investigations of the Alba- 
tross do not seem to sustain the claim. The cod fishing directly off 
Chernoffsky Bay is said to be excellent. 

On the southern side of the Alaskan peninsula are the following 
banks : 

Davidson Bank. — This bank was discovered about 1870 by Prof. 
George Davidson, of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
after whom it is named. It lies south of Unimak Island, and ex- 
tends westward from the neighborhood of the Sannak Islands to about 
the longitude of the southern entrance to Unimak Pass (about longi- 
tude 164° 40' W.). Its eastern end is continuous with the shoal 
water surrounding the Sannak Islands; its area was estimated at 
about 1 ,600 square miles. 

Sannak Bank. — To the east and southeast of the islands of the 
same name lies Sannak Bank, somewhat elongate in shape and 
trending in a general way northeast and southwest. It is estimated 
to have an area of about 1,300 square miles. 

The region between Sannak Bank and the Shumagin Islands was 
only partly surveyed, but about 1,800 square miles fairly well adapted 
to fishing were covered. 

Shumagin Bank. — Lying to the south and southeast of the Shuma- 
gin Islands, with its outer margin following approximately the trend 
of the coast line formed by the adjacent islands, is Shumagin Bank, 
which has been traced westward to about longitude 159° 52' W., but 
probably extends farther in that direction; east of the Shumagin 
Islands it reaches north to the latitude of Big Koniuji Island. Its 
width inside of the 100-fathom curve varies from 15 to 35 miles, while 
its area has been estimated at about 1,800 square miles. 

From the Shumagin Islands to Kadiak Island the area was only 
partially surveyed, but the work done indicated the existence of sev- 
eral fishing banks. 

Albatross Bank. — Ofi' the southeastern side of Kadiak Island is 
Albatross Bank, extending the entire length of that island as well as 
in front of the Trinity Islands. At the eastern end it is practically 
continuous with Portlock Bank. Along some portions of the coast, 
as in the neighborhood of Sitkalidak Island, the bank is sej)arated 



12 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

from the land by comparatively deep water, while in other places 
shoal water intervenes. The 100-fathom curve is distant 25 to 45 
miles from the land, inside of which limit there is an estimated area 
of 3,700 square miles. 

Porilock Baiik. — This bank extends northeastward from Kadiak 
Island in the direction of Middleton Island, a distance of about 120 
miles, and is irregular in shape. It is the largest single bank south 
of the Alaska peninsula, its area inside of the 100-fathom curve being 
about 6,800 square miles. 

The Albatross continued her investigations as far to the eastward 
as Middleton Island, but no banks were found. 

Codfish have been reported in the western part of the Gulf of Alaska 
and in the waters of Southeast Alaska, but nowhere do there seem to 
be any banks which it would be profitable to work with vessels espe- 
cially devoted to this fishery. 

FISHING STATIONS. 

At the present time nearly one-half of the codfish taken in Alaska 
are caught by fishermen from the numerous stations scattered along 
the Alaska peninsula and the islands adjacent thereto on the south- 
ern side. The business of fishing from stations has fluctuated con- 
siderably from year to year. The year 1892 was the banner year, 
2,208,035 pounds of fish being taken by fishermen from stations, to 
1,742,155 pounds secured by the fishing vessels. The stations soon 
after began to be abandoned, and for a few years but few were in 
operation. Of late years, however, they have regained their popu- 
larity, and it is probably only a question of a few years until all of 
the cod fishing outside of Bering Sea w^ill be carried on from the shore 
stations. During the season of 1905 the following stations were 
operated. 

Union Fish Com'pany. — Pirate Cove, Popoff Island; Northwest 
Harbor, Big Koniuji Island; Sanborn Harbor, Wedge Cape, and 
Eagle Harbor, on Nagai Island; Pavlof Harbor and Johnsons Har- 
bor, on Sannak Island. 

Alaska Codfish Company. — Moft'etts Cove and Companys Har- 
bor, on Sannak Island; Dora Harbor, on Alaska peninsula; and Win- 
chester and Banenhoff, on Unga Island. 

Seattle- Alaska Fish ComjMny. — Squaw Harbor, on Unga Island. 

Aleutian Live Stock and Mining Company. — Lost Harbor, Akun 
Island. 

This year (1906) the Pacific States Trading Company is erecting 
two stations on the Shumagm group. 

Nearly all of these stations are open the whole year round, the 
fishermen going out in their dories each da}^ when the weather is 
favorable, and but rarely having to go more than 5 miles from any of 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 13 

the stations before good fishing grounds are reached. There is usually 
one man to a boat and trawl lines are quite generally employed, 
although a few hand lines are used. In good weather the trawls are 
hauled two or three times a day, but the fish are not dressed until 
the last haul for the day has been made. 

\^^ien not out in the dories the fisherman's time is his own. He 
is paid from $25 to S30 per thousand fish of 26 or more inches in 
length, and he must dress and salt them. The wage is less for fish 
under 26 inches. The station owner furnishes the men with boats, 
lodging, food, and fuel, the fishermen providing only the fishing gear. 
The catch is kench cured, and later shipped away to San Francisco 
and Puget Sound ports on the transporting vessels, where the final 
curing is accomplished. 

VESSEL FISHERIES. 

Nearly all of the fleet fish in Bering Sea, where the banks are 
too far from the shore for shore fishing, or where harbors are not 
available. 

With the exception of three vessels which use trawl lines, all fish- 
ing is with hand lines from dories,, one man to a boat. The fisher- 
men do not dress and salt their own catch, as is the custom on the 
Atlantic coast, but each vessel carries a dressing gang, varying with 
the number of fishermen, and a splitter and Salter, who do this work. 
The captain usually receives about $125 per month; the cook, $75; 
the first mate, $40; the second mate, $35; the fishermen, $25 and 
$27 per 1,000 fish, according to the size; dressing gang, $25 per 
month each, and the splitter and Salter, $75 per month. All hands 
get board also. When not engaged in their regular work the 
dressing gang usually fish over the side of the vessel and are paid 
$25 per 1,000 for all fish so caught. A vessel usually makes but 
one trip to the banks, leaving in the spring and returning in the 
late summer or early fall, but sometimes if she meets with good 
luck on her first trip she will make a second one. The fish are 
salted in bulk in the hold of the vessel, about 1 ton of salt being 
required for 1,000 fish, and the balance of the curing is done at the 
vessel's home port. The crew have nothing to do with unloading 
the vessel, that work being done by the employees at the home 
station. 

The principal bait used in both shore and vessel fisheries is hali- 
but, sculpins, and cuttlefish. In hand-lining only a small quantity 
of bait is brought on the vessels, because after the first few hours' 
fishing the shack fish brought up will suffice for baiting. For 
trawling, however, more bait is required, and the stations generally 
gather it at various places and furnish it to the fishermen either 
fresh or salted, as may be most convenient. 



14 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



Certain of the vessels do nothing but ply between the stations and 
the home ports, bringing up supphes and carrying back the salted 
fish. These vessels make from three to four trips a year. 

But few of the tongues, sounds, and livers of the cod are saved, 
either in shore or vessel fisheries. 

STATISTICS. 

The table below shows, by years, the condition of the fishery since 
its inception, in 1863. An interesting feature of this table is that 
while the average cured weight of a codfish was slightly over 2f 
pounds in 1868, in 1905 the average had risen to 4 pounds. This 
is due to the fact that the vessels now work largely on the outer 
banks, where the fish are larger than on the banks close to shore, 
which were the ones from which most of the fish came in the early 
days of the fishery. For some years the fishery was almost sta- 
tionary, owing to the lack of an expanding market for Pacific cod, 
but during the past five years the demand has been quite heavy and 
has resulted in a considerable increase in the fleet and a correspond- 
ing increase in the catch. 

Vessels Engaged in Cod Fishing in Alaskan Waters, Together with the Quantity 
AND Value of Cod Taken, 1863 to 1905. 



Year. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Fish taken. 


Saltod 
weight. 


Value. 


Year. 


Ves- 
sels. 


Fish taken. 


Salted 
weight. 


Value. 


1863 a 

1865 b 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 c 

1877 

1878 d 

1879 

1880e 

1881 

1882/ 

1883? 

1884 

1885 


1 
1 

2 

14 
8 

10 
6 
3 
4 
4 
4 

7 
9 

10 
5 
3 
9 
9 
5 
8 


0,000 
24,000 
40,000 
130,000 
608,000 
412,800 
500,200 
304,800 
120,000 
220,000 
152,400 
201,000 
303,200 
300,000 
.524,000 
690,000 
289,000 
297,000 
.529, 0(X) 
737,000 
655,000 
881.000 


Pounds. 

18,000 

60,000 

90,000 

340,000 

1,684,480 

1,032,000 

1,265,500 

914,400 

360,000 

660,000 

457,200 

604,800 

909,600 

900,000 

1,574,000 

2,088,000 

867,000 

891,000 

1,587,000 

2,211,000 

1,965,000 

2,643,000 


$2,340 
7,800 
11,700 
42,500 
202, 138 
92,880 
82,258 
64,008 
25,200 
39,600 
27,432 
42,330 
54,570 
45,000 
78,700 
83,. 520 
43,350 
44,. 550 
03,480 
88,440 
98,250 
79,290 


1886 

1887 

1888^.... 

1889 

1S90 

1S9U 

1892 

1893;.... 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902*.... 
1903^ .... 

1904 

1905 m . . . 

Total . . 


7 
6 
6 
4 
4 
8 

6 
5 
6 
9 
10 
10 
11 
10 
10 
12 
13 
16 
21 


794,000 

795,000 

735,000 

520,000 

771,580 

1,188,000 

1,312,000 

1,216,000 

894,000 

847,637 

728,000 

1,005,000 

817,000 

1,377,000 

1,565,725 

1,504,000 

2.248,000 

2,177,000 

2,742,111 

3,030,836 


Pounds. 
2,382,000 
2,385,000 
2,386,000 
1,560,000 
2,314,740 
3,751,711 
3,936,000 
3,648,000 
2,682,000 
2,542,910 
2,184,000 
3,195,000 
2,451,000 
5, .508, 000 
6,067,000 
0,016,000 
;s, 992, 000 
8,708,000 
11,004,944 
12,123,344 


$83,370 

71,550 

.59,847 

,39, 150 

57,868 

93,793 

118,080 

109,440 

80,460 

76,290 

76,440 

127,800 

122,. 5.50 

20C,.550 

218,5.50 

180,480 

269,700 

261,240 

201,316 

.303,084 




34,270,889 


117,019,629 


4,130,966 











a First vessel to fish for cod in Bristol Bay. 
b Beginning of the Shumagin Islands fishing. 
c Shore fishing station established at Pirate Cove. 
d One vessel lost. 

e Schooner Nagay lost in the spring, 
/ Schooners General Miller and H. L. Tiernan lost, 
fl Schooner Wild Gazelle lost, 
ft Schooner Isabel lost with 14 men. 
i Schooner Dashing Wave lost. 
i Schooner John Hancock lost. 
* Schooner Anna lost with full cargo. 

' Includes schooner Blakeley, of Vancouver, British Columbia; 2 Seattle (Wash.) firms began this 
year: schooner Mary and Ida lost with 78,000 fish. 
"» Schooner Pearl lost with 30 men; schooner Nellie Coleman lost with all on board. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 15 

THE HALIBUT FISHERY. 
HISTORY. 

The halibut is now one of the most extensively sought species in our 
commercial fisheries. For many years the Atlantic banks amply sup- 
plied the constantly growing demand, but ultimately these began to 
show the effects of the heavy drain upon them, and then the impor- 
tant eastern fishing companies began to turn their attention to the 
Pacific, where large banks had been reported. 

The inception of the industry on the Pacific coast may be said to 
have been about twenty-one years ago, when several schooners from 
Port Townsend, Wash., began to fish off Cape Flattery, but their 
catches were small. A few years later an eastern fish firm established 
a branch at Tacoma, which caused a transfer of the business almost 
entirely to that city. In the meantime, a demand had been created 
in the West for Pacific halibut, and in a few years more the fish 
houses of Seattle began to compete for the fish caught by the schooners, 
with the result that the trade shifted to that city, and the bulk of 
the schooner trade has been done there ever since. At the present 
time the International Fisheries Company, of Tacoma, a connec- 
tion of an eastern house, handles the bulk of the steamer trade on 
the American side, while the New England Fish Company, of Van- 
couver, British Columbia, handles the bulk of the steamer trade on 
the Canadian side. The latter company, however, is an American 
corporation, with American-built vessels, and nearly all of its catch 
enters this country in bond free of duty. Both companies have 
special arrangements with the transcontinental lines by which their 
fish, fresh in refrigerator cars, are rushed through by passenger service, 
thus enabling the companies to place the fish on the Boston and 
Gloucester markets in from six to seven days after it is landed on the 

coast. 

The New England Fish Company was the first to employ steamers 
in the fishery, beginning in 1897. At present it operates three steam- 
ers, while the Tacoma company has four steamers employed in fishing 
and transporting. Within the last year several steamers and power 
boats have been fitted out at Seattle to engage in the industry. 

It was about 1895 when the southeast Alaska banks began to be 
resorted to by Seattle schooners in the winter, it not being possible 
to do anything on the Cape Flattery banks at that season of the year, 
and the British Columbia banks being closed to them. Most of the 
vessels fished around Dixons Entrance, while others worked in 
Chatham Strait and Frederick Sound, the latter making their head- 
quarters in Wrangell Narrows and shipping the fish to Puget Sound 
ports on the regular steamers. The fishing was quite desultory, how- 



16 COMMERCIAL nSHERIES OP ALASKA IN 1905. 

ever, until 1899, when the Icy Strait Packing Company built a salmon 
cannery and a wharf at Petersburg, near the upper end of Wrangell 
Narrows, and arranged with the steamship companies to make regular 
calls for freight. From that time on the business rapidly concen- 
trated at Petersburg, until now nearly all of the vessels make it their 
headquarters. 

Since then a great development of the Alaskan halibut fisheries has 
occurred. In addition to the Seattle fleet, which comes up each winter 
to remain during the season, a few Alaskan sail and power vessels 
have entered the fishery. A considerable part of the business, how- 
ever, is conducted on entirely different lines. A company or indi- 
vidual builds its plant in some place convenient to the fisheries and 
engages crews to go out in dories from day to day. Some have one 
central station and a number of subsidiary stations and employ a 
steamer to carry supplies from the former to the latter and bring back 
the fish caught. The principal halibut stations are Tee Harbor, Taku 
Harbor, Pleasant Bay, Wrangell Narrows, Ketchikan, Kake, Hoonah 
Village, Juneau, Fanshaw, Windom, and Farragut bays. At Tee 
Harbor and Taku Harbor large cold-storage plants are in operation in 
which the fish are frozen for shipment. 

In addition to the wharf at Petersburg there were located in 
Wrangell Narrows in 1905 three large scows, each capable of taking 
care of from 200 to 400 boxes of halibut at a time. The schooners 
find it much easier to come alongside and discharge on these scows 
than on the wharf, while the steamer has very little difficulty in trans- 
ferring the boxes from the scow to its hold. The scows are resorted to 
almost exclusively by the schooners and other sailing vessels from 
Seattle. Most of the steamers and power boats that fish in Alaskan 
waters in winter return to their home port to unload as soon as a fare 
has been secured. They usually make about two trips a month to 
the banks. 

FISHING GROUNDS, 

In the Pacific the halibut ranges from Bering Sea on the north, as 
far as present knowledge extends, to San Francisco and the Farallones 
on the south. According to the observations of Dr. T. H. Bean, the 
center of abundance is in the Gulf of Alaska, particularly off Kadiak 
and the Shumagin islands. Outside of Alaska the principal bank near 
American territory is found off Cape Flattery, in the mouth of the 
Straits of Fuca, in the state of Washington. Practically the entire 
catch by American vessels during the summer is made on this bank. 
In the winter months the supply comes entirely from scattering banks 
in southeastern Alaska, or from banks on the British Columbia coast 
outside the three-mile limit. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 17 

Of the former banks, Mr. A. B. Alexander", formerly fishery expert 
of the steamer Albatross, writes as follows: 

Across Dixon Entrance, on the south side of Prince of Wales Island, in the vicinity of 
Nicholas Bay and Cape Chacon, a few schooners have taken good fares. Here, as at Cape 
Scott, the ground is made up of small "spots," which can only be located by landmarks. 
Only a few vessels can fish on this ground; it is said that even a small fleet would soon 
exhaust the ground, not permanently, but for some weeks. The Indians of this locality 
catch halibut here in considerable numbers, and from these people the white fishermen soon 
learn the best places. 

Halibut on the northern banks are sometimes very erratic; in places where they are 
numerous one day few will be found the next. It frequently happens that a vessel will 
have good success for several days, and in a few hours' time fish will become so scarce that it 
is useless to remain longer on the ground. It is thought the fish are traveling in schools 
from one bank to another. 

On all grounds halibut are more plentiful in winter than in summer and are scarcer in 
June than at any other time of the year. At this season they scatter all over. 

During the salmon-canning season (June to November) many hali- 
but are to be seen near the canneries, where they feed on the salmon 
offal thrown overboard. 

No effort has yet been made to fish the large banks in central and 
western Alaska, owing to the distance from markets and the poor 
shipping facilities, but ultimately these will furnish the bulk of the 
product. r 

Very important grounds are located off the Queen Charlotte Islands 
and along the coast of British Columbia, but most of these are barred 
to American fishermen because they are within the three-mile limit. 

It is barely possible that more extensive investigation would reveal 
the presence in southeast Alaska of large banks similar to those off the 
British Columbia coast. 

METHODS OF THE FISHERY. 

The method of catching halibut is almost the same as on the 
Atlantic coast. When the grounds are reached, the vessel scatters 
its dories around in favorable spots and then lies to for a while. 
There are generally two men to a dory. First the buoy is launched 
and the buoy line thrown out, this line being usually about 150 feet in 
length with an anchor attached to the end. The trawl lines in the 
vessel fisheries are generally about 1,800 feet in length, and usually 
three are joined together so as to make one continuous line. The 
gangings are about 5 feet long, are attached to the ground line, and 
are placed about 15 feet apart. They have the hooks and bait (usu- 
ally herring) attached, and are placed so as to rest on the bottom. 

a Notes on the halibut fishery of the northwest coast in 1895, by A. B. Alexander. Bull. 
U. S. Fish Com., vol. xvii, 1897 (1898), p. 141-144. 

7115—06 3 



18 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905, 

As soon as the buo3Mine anchor has reached the bottom, the trawl is 
thrown from the side of the dory, and considerable skill is then neces- 
sary in order to place the trawl so that it will cover as much ground 
as possible and at the same time not get tangled up and crossed. In 
lifting the trawl the buoy line, with anchor, is taken in first and 
then the trawl. Sometimes a hurdy-gurdy (small windlass) is used 
in this work in order to facilitate matters. The fish are hauled to the 
surface, hit on the head with a club, unhooked, and thrown into the 
dory. Various other species besides the halibut are secured, but 
nearly all are thrown away. One of the greatest pests in the halibut 
fisheries of the Pacific, as well as of the Atlantic, is the dogfish, many 
of which get caught on the lines. They range in weight from 8 to 20 
pounds, and are utterly valueless to the fishermen. 

In the dory fishing from the regular Alaska shore stations the 
fishermen generally use 6 lines of about 1 50 feet each to each skate of 
gear, and 2 skates are used to a dory. Generally one skate is set out 
in the morning and the other in the afternoon. As a general thing 
the lines are set from one and a half to two hours and then taken up 
in the manner described above. 

Hand lines, occasionally employed by the white fishermen, are 
nearly always used by the natives, who attach hooks of a very primi- 
tive but quite effective shape. 

On the steamers the fishermen are generally paid from 20 to 25 
cents apiece for the fish caught, the owner of the vessel furnishing 
everything necessary for carrying on the fishery, including provisions. 
The fisherman receives the same price for a small fish as for a large 
one. On the schooners the fishing is generally done on shares, the 
vessel as a usual thing taking one-third and the crew the balance. 
Under this plan all the living expenses are taken from the returns 
before the division is made. The boat furnishes the gear. 

PREPARATION OF THE CATCH. ' 

In shipping fresh fish the entrails are removed and the fish packed 
in ice in boxes holding about 500 pounds net weight. The ice used 
is gathered from tlie neighboring glaciers, and is in the best form for 
use if ground in a mill made for the purpose, but often it is merely 
broken into fine lumps with a club. 

The large halibut and those secured where the opportunities for 
shipping are infrequent are fletched. In this process the two sides 
are taken off in two complete pieces, which are then put into bins and 
buried in salt so that the brine will run off. Here they remain from 
eight to ten days and are then repacked, being resalted if necessary, 
and allowed to remain until cured, when they are packed in boxes for 
shipment. A considerable part of this work is done during the sum- 
mer months when it is not profitable to ship halibut fresh. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 19 

Large quantities of halibut are prepared each year by the Indians 
for food in the winter season. The fish are cut in strips, partially 
dried in the open air, and then suspended in the smoke from the fires 
generally built on the floor in the center of most of the Indian houses. 

The possibility of developing an important and profitable industry 
in the canning of halibut has often been canvassed in Alaska, but the 
difficulty of interesting capital in an untried industry, when the prof- 
its of salmon canning have been so sure for many years, has usually 
been too great for the promoters. The first halibut canned in Alaska 
were put up at the Klawak cannery in 1878, when 200 or 300 cases of 
2-pound cans (2 dozen cans in a case) were packed. This venture 
was continued for a few seasons, not more than 300 cases of 2-pound 
cans being packed in any one season, and then abandoned owing to the 
lack of a market for the product. In the summer of 1904 the Alaska 
Fish and Halibut Company opened a small cannery on Wrangell Nar- 
rows, just above Tonka, and put up an experimental pack of 41 cases 
of 1 -pound flats (48 cans to the case) . Some of the cases were shipped 
to Boston and other eastern points, and the balance distributed on 
the Pacific coast, where they have met with a very good reception. 
If the results of the experiment justify it, the company expects to put 
up a one-line cannery to be devoted exclusively to the packing of 
halibut. During the winter of 1904-5 the Juneau Packing Company, 
of Juneau, put up 36 1 -pound cans as an experiment, and expects to 
enter into the business on a large scale should the goods meet with a 
favorable reception. The writer had an opportunity to see and taste 
these goods, and found them both pleasant to the eye and agreeable 
to the taste. The West Point Packing Company, at Petersburg, 
expected to put up a small pack in the winter of 1905-6. 

One very favorable feature of this industry, if it be established, is 
that it can be prosecuted at all seasons of the year. Salmon can- 
neries could be utilized when not engaged in the packing of salmon, 
thus saving the initial cost of a plant put up especially for halibut. 
The salmon canning season begins in June usually, and, with the 
exception of a few plants, closes by October. Halibut are most 
abundant during the winter months, the very season when the salmon 
canneries are shut down. 

The Juneau Packing Company, of Juneau, put up a large smoke- 
house during 1904, and is now engaged in the smoking of halibut, 
herring, and salmon. The greater part of its prepared product is 
shipped to Puget Sound ports. 



20 COMMERCIAL FISHEEIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

THE HERRING FISHERY. 
HISTORY. 

As early as 1878 persons in Wrangell engaged in the business of 
catching herring, from which they extracted the oil, in addition to salt- 
ing and drying the fish. In 1880 the Western Fur and Trading Com- 
pany, at their St. Paul (Kadiak Island) fishery, put up 500 boxes (30 
pounds each) of smoked herring and 25 one-quarter barrels and 100 
kits of salted herring. 

The fertilizer plant at Killisnoo, on the island of Kenasnow, close 
to the western shore of Admiralty Island, owned and operated by the 
Alaska Oil and Guano Company, is the largest and oldest concern 
engaged in the herring fisheries. In 1882 the Northwest Trading 
Compaiiy, the predecessor of the present company, established at 
Killisnoo a small plant for extracting oil. As it proved successful it 
was gradually enlarged, and in 1884 the plant for the manufacture of 
guano was installed. The works at present are quite extensive, with 
commodious storehouses and a fine wharf. The common barrels used 
are made on the premises by machinery. As the fish while breeding 
are very poor and furnish no oil, the factory does not begin to operate 
until June, by which time the fish are feeding again and have com- 
menced to fatten. In June it is estimated that one barrel of fish will 
furnish about half a gallon of oil; from tliis time the quantity obtained 
increases, until in the early part of September one barrel of fish pro- 
duces about 3^ gallons of oil. It then begins to decrease until in 
December a barrel of fish will produce about 2 gallons of oil. The 
factory is generally operated from June to December. The season is 
frequenth^ shorter, however; in 1905 it ran from June to October. 
Three steamers are employed and the fish are taken by means of 
purse seines. A few herring are salted each season, also. 

During the season of 1905 the Alaska Fish and Development Com- 
pany, of Pleasant Bay, on Glass Peninsula, installed a fertilizer plant 
aboard a large hulk anchored in the bay, but they were unable to get 
it in readiness to operate before the season closed. They put up a 
considerable quantity of salted herring, however. In 1904 this com- 
pany operated a trap net for herring in the bay, but it was not set in 
1905. 

From 1899 on, various companies and individuals put up salted 
herring at points along the coast south of the Aleutian chain. The 
fishing in Norton Sound and on the Yukon River is done by natives 
with seines, and the fish caught are either consumed locally or ex- 
changed with the interior tribes for other articles. 

On June 15, 1904, the sardine cannery of the Juneau Packing Com- 
pany was opened at Juneau, and during the balance of the year put 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 21 

up 3,173 cases of one-quarter oil and three-quarters mustard sardines, 
valued at $12,059. These were prepared from young herring. None 
were packed in 1905, owing to inability to compete with the excess- 
ively low prices quoted for eastern sardines. As the prices of the 
latter have gone up to a normal figure again, it is probable that it 
will now be profitable to operate the cannery. The company also 
put up smoked and salted herring in addition to other fishes. 

There is room for a very great development of the herring industry. 
For many years salmon absorbed all the attention and capital, but 
since -the slump in profits in the latter business during the last four 
years more attention has been directed to herring. 

FISHING GROUNDS. 

Herring are found in abundance at certain seasons of the year 
at many places on the Alaskan coast south of Bering Straits. They 
are rather erratic in their movements, however, being in one place 
especially abundant one year and totally absent the next, possibly 
returning again after several seasons in greater numbers than before. 
In southeast Alaska the herring arrive in April for the purpose of 
breeding, and deposit their eggs in countless numbers in the sea grass 
and rockweed near shore and on boughs of trees along the beaches 
near low-water mark. For many years the inlet at Kootznahoo, on 
Chatham Strait, was the favorite resort for herring, but they are 
much less abundant now, owing, it is claimed, to the constant fishing 
for them with purse seines, which breaks up the schools and drives 
them away. The northern shore of Kuiu Island and Gastineau Chan- 
nel are also favorite spots, although the fish have been rather scarce 
in the latter place the last two seasons. They are quite abundant in 
Yakutat Bay, while Seldovia or Herring Bay, just inside the mouth 
of Cook Inlet, is a famous resort for them, immense schools making 
their appearance here each spring and autumn. About the middle 
of August large schools usually appear in the vicinity of Kadiak 
Island, and Captains Harbor, Unalaska Island, is frequented at cer- 
tain seasons by large schools of exceedingly fat herring. Herring 
usually begin to arrive in the Yukon River from the 5th to the 20th 
of June. The run in Norton Sound is of very short duration, the 
fishing lasting only a fortnight, but the schools are said to be enor- 
mously large. 

STATISTICS. 

The table on page 22 shows the condition of the herring fishery from 
1878, the first year for which reliable data could be secured. This 
table is not complete by sinj means, as salteries frequently spring up 
and are gone in a season, leaving no trace behind as to what they did. 



22 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

Extent of the Herring Fisheries of Alaska, 1878 to 1905. 





Fish utilized. 


Products prepared. 


Year. 


Pickled. 


Smoked. 




Half barrels. 


Barrels. 


1878 


Pounds. 
37,500 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. 

150 

100 

19 


Value. 

S900 

650 

133 


Pounds. 


Value. 


1879 


25,000 
27,900 










1880 






15,000 


$750 


1881 








1882 . . 


3, 040, 000 
8,400,000 
13,200,000 
17,000,000 
22,000,000 
22, 200, 000 
6,000,000 
10,492,000 
10, 485, 000 
17,644,400 
18, 716, 000 
14, 450, 000 
15, 306, 000 
6,510,000 
5,550,000 
7, 120, 000 
9,048,000 
8,110,000 
13, 006, 250 
14, 600, 000 
9,546,800 
13,689,000 
15, 963, .500 
15,109,113 




j 






1883 




1 






1884 






1 




1885 . 






\ 




1886 












1887 












1888 














1889 














1890 










1 


1891 


1,000 


S3, 750 






1 


1892 








1893 




1 [ 


1894 


i,666 

500 
250 
950 
1,300 
1,650 
185 
400 


3,500 ' ' 


1895 


1,750 

875 
2,850 


1 


1896 






1897 








3,900 

4,950 

555 

1,200 






1899 


3,200 
3,885 
8,000 
5,490 
2,225 
2,250 
9,216 


16,000 
19, 425 
40,000 
27, 450 
11, 125 
11,250 




1900 


1 


1901 






1902 






1903 


710 
150 
375 


2,130 

450 

1,115 








450 


50 


1905 


46,200 24,435 


1,534 






Total 


297,276,463 


8,470 


27,025 


34,535 


173, 133 


39,885 


2,334 









Products prepared— Continued. 


Total 
value. 


Year. 


Sardines 
(canned) . 


Oil. 


Guano. 


1878 


Cases. \ Value. 


Gallons. Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


$900 


1879 








650 


1880 








883 


1881 












1882 


1 


30,000 
81,000 
192, 000 
300,000 
368,000 
335, 000 
100.000 
157, 900 
156, 750 
242, 050 
318,900 
223, 450 
234,350 
101,650 
90, 650 
125,000 
165,500 
128,000 
172, 000 
200,000 
117,250 
146, 250 
152,500 
143, 220 


87,500 
20,500 
48,000 
75, 000 
92,000 
83, 750 
25,000 
39, 475 
39, 188 
60,513 
79,725 
55,863 
58,588 
22,363 
20,850 
31,250 
33, .375 
25,600 
34,000 
50,000 
36, 175 
39,473 
41,, 375 
35,805 







7,500 


1883 


-.^1 






20,500 


1884 




1,200,000 

(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
(a) 


$16,800 

(a) 
(a) 
(a) 
(a) 


64,800 


1885 




75,000 


1886 




92,000 


1887 • 




83, 750 


1888 1 




25,000 


1889 - . 




39, 475 


1890 








39, 188 


1891 ' 




1,600,000 
1,400,000 
1,800,000 
1,600,000 
1,000,000 
1, 100, 000 
1,560,000 
1,772,000 
1,428,000 
2,388,000 
2,500,000 
1,624,000 
2,688,000 
3,041.800 
2,618,000 


22, 275 
15,400 
22,500 
16,000 
10,000 
11,000 
17,600 
14, 962 
12,852 
26,400 
33, 750 
25,360 
33,600 
38,125 
32,725 


86,538 


1892 




95,125 


1893 




78,363 


1894 . .. 






78,088 


1895 






34, 113 


1896 






32,725 


1897 






51,700 


1898 






52,237 


1899 






59,402 


1900 






80,380 


1901 






124, 950 


1902 






88,985 


1903 






86,328 


1904 


3,173 


$12,0.59 


103,309 


1905 


117,379 


Total 








3,173 


12,059 


4,2.81,420 


1,055,368 


29,319,800 


349,349 


1,619,268 



oNo record. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



23 



THE SALMON INDUSTRY.o 



CANNERIES. 



The first two canneries in Alaska were built in the spring of 1878 — 
one at the Redoubt, Old Sitka, and the other at Klawak, both in South- 
east Alaska. The latter was built by the North Pacific Trading and 
Packing Company, which still operates it. In Central Alaska the first 
cannery was built in 1882 at Karluk. The first in Western Alaska 
(Bristol Bay region) was constructed on the Nushagak River in 1884. 
By 1889 there were 37 canneries in operation, with a total output of 
719,196 cases, a flood of canned salmon which was too much for the 
markets, so that by 1892 the number of canneries had fallen to 15, 
with an output of 474,717 cases. From this time on there was a 
gradual increase until 1902, when there were 64 establishments in 
operation, packing 2,545,298 cases; but the low prices prevailing dur- 
ing the last few years, owing to excessive competition, again reduced 
the number very materially, and in 1905 there were but 47 canneries, 
which put up 1,894,516 cases. The table below shows by sections 
and years the number of canneries operated and the pack. It has 
been found impossible to give the value of the pack, owing to the wide 
fluctuations in price and the fact that establishments frequently held 
their pack for several seasons before disposing of it. 

Pack of Canned Salmon in Alaska, 1878 to 1905. 





Southeast Alaska. 


Central Alaska. 


Western Alaska. 


Total. 


Year. 


Can- 
neries. 


Pack. 


^*.^" Pack 
neries. •^^*'^- 


Can- 
neries. 


Pack. 


Can- 
neries. 


Pack. 


1878 


2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

4 

4 

3 

4 

5 

6 

12 

12 

11 

7 

8 

7 

7 

9 

9 

9 

9 

16 

21 

26 

21 

12 

13 


Cases. 

8,159 

12, 530 

6,539 

8,977 

11,501 

20, 040 

22, 189 

16, 728 

18, 660 

31, 462 

81, 128 

141, 760 

142, 901 

156, 615 

115, 722 

136, 053 

142,544 

148, 476 

262, 381 

271, 867 

251, 385 

310, 219 

456, 639 

742, 914 

915, 150 

645, 232 

464, 545 

433, 607 


Cases. 




Cases. 


2 

2 

1 

1 

3 

6 

7 

6 

9 

10 

16 

37 

35 

30 

15 

22 

21 

23 

29 

29 

30 

32 

42 

55 

64 

60 

55 

47 


Cases. 
8,159 

12,530 
6,539 
8,977 

21 745 


1879 






1880 


1 




1881 


1 




1882 


2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

6 

21 

19 

14 

6 

11 

10 

10 

12 

13 

14 

14 

14 

13 

12 

12 

11 

9 


10,244 
28, 297 
42, 297 
52,687 
74,583 
102, 515 
241, 101 
461,451 
421, 300 
511,367 
295, 496 
399, 815 
435, 052 
327, 919 
485, 990 
382, 899 
395, 009 
356, 095 
492, 223 
562, 142 
583,690 
417, 175 
499,485 
371, 755 




1883 


1 


48, 337 
64,886 
83,415 
142,065 
206,677 
412, 115 
719 196 


1884 


1 6 400 


1885 


1 

3 
3 

4 

4 

4 

5 

2 

3 

4 

6 

8 

7 

7 

9 

12 

21 

26 

27 

32 

25 


14,000 

48, 822 

72, 700 

89, 886 

115, 985 

118, 390 

133,418 

63, 499 

107, 786 

108, 844 

150, 135 

218, 336 

254, 312 

318, 703 

411,832 

599, 277 

719, 213 

1,046,458 

1, 186, 730 

989, 716 

1,089,154 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890 


682, 591 

801,400 

474, 717 

643, 654 

686, 440 

626, 530 

966, 707 

909, 078 

965, 097 

1,078,146 

1, 548, 139 

2,024,269 

2, 545, 298 

2, 249, 137 

1,953,746 

1,894,516 


1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 


Total 


■ 5,975,923 


7,950,587 ! 


7,857,596 


21,784,106 



a No effort is made to give a detailed history of the fishery or of the methods followed, as these 
have been treated of, quite at length, in the publications of the Bureau and in the yearly reports of 
the agents appointed by the government to see that the salmon law is enforced. 

& Experimental pack. 



24 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



SALTERIES. 



The oldest Alaska salmon saltery now in existence is that established 
by Baronovich, a Greek or Slav, who had married the daughter of 
Skowl, one of the old-time chiefs of the Kasaans, and received from 
him the fishery on Karta Bay now known as Baronovich's Fishery. 
The saltery is operated only occasionally now. 

The table below shows the pack of salted salmon since 1868. The 
salt salmon trade was so overshadowed by its giant brother, the 
canned trade, that it is frequently lost sight of or swallowed up in the 
latter. As a result it has been an exceedingly difficult matter to 
secure accurate data, and it is probable that a considerable part of 
the trade, especially in the earlier years, has been overlooked. The 
preparing of dry-salted dog salmon for market was first attempted in 
1899. In 1900 a number of persons rushed into the business and over- 
stocked the market, with the result that the industry became unprof- 
itable and nothing was attempted for two seasons, when the demands 
of the Japanese trade for a cheap dry-salted fish caused a revival of 
the business. From 225 to 250 dog salmon are required to make a 
prepared ton of dry salted. These are packed in boxes holding about 
560 pounds net. Fifteen pounds of salt are required to a box of fish, 
while the box itself weighs 95 pounds. 

Pack of Salted Salmon in Alaska, 1868 to 1905. 



Year. 


Salmon. 


Salmon bellies. 


Dry-salted salmon. 


Barrels. 


Value. 


Barrels. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


1868 


2,000 

1,700 

1,800 

700 

1,000 

900 

1,400 

1,200 

1,800 

1,950 

2,100 

3,500 

3,700 

1,760 

5,890 

7,251 

6,106 

3,230 

4,861 

3,978 

9,500 

6,457 

18,039 

8,913 

17, 374 

24,005 

32,011 

14,234 

9,314 

15, 848 

22, 670 

22, 382 

31,8.52 

24, 477 

30, 384 

27,921 

13, 674 

19,071 


816,000 

13,600 

14.400 

6, 300 

9,000 

7,200 

11.200 

9.600 

14.400 

15, 700 

16, 800 

28,000 

29,600 

15, 840 

53, 010 

65, 259 

54,954 

29, 070 

43, 749 

35, 802 

85,500 

58, 013 

162, 351 

71, 304 

140,057 

120,083 

176,060 

85,404 

65, 198 

110,936 

181,360 

167, 865 

238, 890 

171,339 

212, 688 

223, .368 

89,209 

143.811 










1869 










1870 










1871. 










1872. 










1873 










1874 










1875. 










1876 








^ 


1877 










1878 










1879 










1880 


300 


$3,300 






1881 






1882 










1883 










1884 










1885. . . . 










1886 










1887 










1888 










1889 










1890 










1891 










1892 


53 


815 






1893 






1894 










1895. . . . 










1896 


150 

2,846 
580 
235 

2,353 
652 
328 

3,667 
208 

1,360 


i,266 

28,460 
5,800 
2.350 

23, 5.30 
3,816 
2,952 

32,973 
1,950 

11,35.5 






1897 






1898 






1899 






1900 


511, 400 


$10, 228 


1901 




1902 






1903 


300,000 

966, 812 

7, 280, 234 


5,500 


1904 

1905 


16,180 
115,643 


Total 


404,952 


3, 108, 952 


12, 732 


118,501 


9,058,446 


147, 551 







COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 25 

FREEZING SALMOIS. 

The preparing of frozen salmon began in 1902. The San Juan Fish- 
ing and Packing Company, soon to be succeeded by the Pacific Cold 
Storage Company, put up a cannery and cold-storage plant at Taku 
Harbor, Southeast Alaska, in 1901, though it did not operate the cold- 
storage portion until 1902. The quantity prepared that year was not 
reported by the company. It appears that in 1903 the pack was 
valued at $50,000 and in 1904, 57,427 pounds were frozen. In 1905 
the pack was as follows: King salmon, 21,643 pounds, valued at 
$866; silver salmon, 22,334 pounds, $893; pink salmon, 16,348 pounds, 
$654, and steelhead trout, 12,306 pounds, $738. Nearly all of this 
frozen fish is sliipped to Europe. 

The season of 1905 witnessed the inception of a new branch of the 
salmon fishery. About the middle of January king salmon were 
observed in the vicinity of Ketchikan, but it was not until January 23 
that the first fish were brought to this place for sale. News of the 
heavy run of fish having spread very rapidly, there were soon a large 
number of whites and Indians out in canoes catching them. The fish 
were feeding on the schools of young herring, and as they were close to 
the reefs nets could not be employed, and trolling lines were brought 
into use. At first herring bait was employed, but it was soon dis- 
covered that a nickel trolling spoon would answer the purpose just as 
well. The vicinity of Point Comano and Point Stewart seemed to be 
favorite spots for the fish, but they were to be found almost every- 
where within a radius of 50 miles from Ketchikan. Several firms in 
Ketchikan early saw the financial possibilities of the business and soon 
had out steamers and launches to collect the fish from the fishing boats 
and bring them to Ketchikan to be packed in ice and shipped to Puget 
Sound ports. The fish averaged 25 pounds in weight. One weighed 
77 pounds and several 75 pounds each. About 25 per cent of the catch 
consisted of white-meat fish and 75 per cent of red-meat fish. For 
the former the fishermen were paid 25 cents each and for the latter 
50 cents each. During the run, which lasted until May 18, 271,644 
pounds, valued at $15,600, were shipped. A considerable quantity 
was cured by the Indians for their own use also. 

HATCHERIES. 

A few of the more far-sighted cannerymen early saw the necessity 
of repairing, by artificial means, the enormous drain upon the supply 
of salmon caused by the large number of canneries in operation. 
In 1891 the several canneries in operation at Karluk combined 
forces and built a hatchery on the lagoon at that place. There were 
2,500,000 eggs taken, but owing to bad water, crude appliances, and 
want of experience, only about 500,000 fish were hatched. As the can- 
nerymen could not agree in regard to fishing operations in 1892, the 



26 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

hatchery scheme also fell through and the plant was closed up. In that 
year Mr. John C. Callbreath, manager of the Point Ellis cannery, on 
Kuiu Island, operated a small hatchery on the left bank of Kutlakoo 
stream. It was a very primitive affair, the work all being conducted 
without shelter. About 1,000,000 eggs were fertilized and placed in 
the baskets, but after they commenced hatching an exceptionally high 
September tide destroyed the plant and it was never rebuilt. During 
the spring of the same year the Point Ellis cannery burned, and Mr. 
Callbreath, after seeing to the operation of the hatchery, returned to 
Wrangell to engage in business. Here his attention was attracted 
again to hatchery work and he made arrangements with the Indians 
for the right to Jadjeska stream, which empties into McHenry Inlet on 
Etolin Island, and in the fall of 1892 built a small hatchery about 200 
yards from the mouth of the stream. The stream is about one-half 
mile in length and is the outlet of a small lake 42 feet above tide water. 
Finding the location unsuitable, Mr. Callbreath removed the hatchery 
in 1893 to the northern side of the lake, about three-eighths of a mile 
from the head of the outlet, where it at present stands. This hatchery 
is a private enterprise, being unconnected with any cannery or fishery, 
and is supported wholly by its public spirited and enterprising owner. 

In 1896 the Baranof Packing Company, which operated a cannery 
on Redfish Bay, on the western coast of Baranof Island, built a small 
hatcher}^ on the lake at the head of Redfish Stream. When 200,000 
eggs were in the water very cold weather set in and not only froze the 
flume solid, but also froze the whole cataract. As the hatchery was 
thus left without water, the eggs were put into the lake and left to 
their fate and the hatchery closed down permanently. 

In May, 1896, the Alaska Packers' Association broke ground for a 
hatchery at the eastern end of the Karluk lagoon, near the outlet of 
Karluk River, and but a short distance from where the hatcher}^ was 
located in 1891. This was the first large hatchery built in Alaska and 
at the start had a capacity of several million eggs, which was largely 
increased from season to season for some years until in 1905 it had 
a capacity of about 40,000,000. 

In 1897 the North Pacific Trading and Packing Company, at Kla- 
wak. Prince of Wales Island, established a hatchery near the head of 
Klawak stream, close to Klawak Lake. In 1898 the establishment 
was moved to the mouth of Threemile stream, a lake feeder on the 
northern side. 

The Pacific Steam Whaling Company in 1898 erected a small hatch- 
ery on Hetta stream on the west side of Prince of Wales Island, which 
was operated until the close of the hatcliing season of 1903-4, when 
the Pacific Packing and Navigation Company, successor to the original 
owner, went into the hands of a receiver. This company was the 
owner of two other small hatcheries also, both built in 1901, one on 
the stream entering Mink arm of Quadra Bay, on the mainland, and 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



27 



one on a stream entering Freshwater Lake Bay, Chatham Strait. 
These likewise closed when the company failed. 

In 1901 the Alaska Packers' Association erected a hatchery on 
Heckman Lake, the third of a series of lakes on Naha Stream, and 
about 8 miles from Loring, where the association has a cannery. The 
association has expended a great deal of money on this hatchery and 
has made it the largest and most expensive in the world. At present 
it has a capacity of 110,000,000 eggs, but it has never been possible 
to secure enough to fill it. 

The Union Packing Company, at Kell Bay, on Kuiu Island, and 
Mr. F. C. Barnes, at Lake Bay, on Prince of Wales Island, in 1902 
built and operated small hatcheries, but with very indifferent suc- 
cess, and both abandoned the attempt after one season's work. 

In 1905 the United States Bureau of Fisheries took up the work 
of hatcliing in Alaska, and began the erection of a hatchery on 
McDonald Lake, which empties through a short stream into Yes Bay, 
on Cleveland Peninsula. As the hatchery proper was not far enough 
complete to operate when the time for stripping came, in September, 
the eggs secured were placed in the flume built to bring the water to 
the hatchery. 

Five hatcheries were in operation in 1905-6, and the value of these, 
together with the Hetta h'atchery, which is in condition to operate 
at any time, is about $315,000. 

The table below shows the hatcheries which operated successfully 
from 1892 or at least one season, and gives the number of eggs secured 
and the number of fry liberated each season. This represents almost 
wholly redfish, but a few million cohoes having been hatched. The 
periods represented are fiscal years, because the spawning season, 
the winter months, covers parts of two calendar years. 

Output of the Salmon Hatcheries of Alaska, 1893 to 1906. 



Year ended 
June 30— 


Callbreath's hatchery. 


Karluk hatchery. Klawak hatchery. 


Eggs taken. 


Fry- 
liberated 


Eggs taken. 


libJr7ted. ; Eggs taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


1893 


900,000 
3,000,000 
6,300,000 
6,200,000 
5,400,000 
3,400,000 
3,000,000 
3,400,000 

6,000,000 
6,000,000 
6,000,000 
6,0.50,000 
7,700,000 


600,000 
2,204,000 
5,291,000 
5,475,000 
4,390,000 
2,526,000 
2,0.50,000 
2,335,000 








1894 








1895 




j 




1896 








1897 


3,236,000 
8,454,000 
4,491,000 
10,496,900 
19,334,000 
32,800,000 
23,400,000 
28,113,000 
45,500,000 
36,933,000 


2,556,440 


1898 


6,340,000 i 2,023,000 
3,369,000 1 3,600,000 
7,872,000 1 3,600,000 
15,566,800 1 (c) 
28,700,000 1 3,. 500, 000 
17, .555, 000 3,500,000 
22,000 000 , 3,000.000 
33,670,000 , 2,800.000 
32,501,040 1 2,800,000 


800,000 

3,000,000 

1,000,000 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


5,500,000 
5,000,000 
5,000,000 
5,250,000 
6,500,000 


2,800,000 
1,500,000 
1,700.000 
2,000,000 
2,000,000 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906d 


Total.. 


6 63,350,000 


52,121,000 


212,757,900 


170,130,280 j 24,823,000 


14,800,000 



a A hard freeze killed most of the eggs. 
6 None stripped, 
c Eggs all frozen. 

d As the take of eggs for 1905-6 had not been hatched out when this report was prepared, the number 
of fry had to be estimated. 
« The number of eggs taken in each season at this hatchery has been estimated. 



28 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

Output of the Salmon Hatcheries of Alaska, 1893 to 1906 — Continued. 



Year ended 


Hetta hatchery. 


Quadra Bay 
hatchery. 


Freshwater Bay 
hatchery. 


Fortmann 
hatchery. 


June 30— 


Eggs 
taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


Eggs 
taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


Eggs 1 Fry 
taken, liberated. 


Eggs 
taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


1893 
















1894 
















1895 
















1896 
















1897 


















1898 


















1899 


2,800,000 
2,000,000 
1,800,000 
2,500,000 
4,800,000 
5,127,500 

in 
in 


2,600,000 
1,500,000 
"500,000 
1,700,000 
4,000,000 
3,750,000 

in 
in 














1900 














1901 














1902 


4,500,000 

5,500,000 

600,000 

in 
in 


3,500,000 
4,000,000 
c 400,000 

in 
in 


1,500,000 

in 
(d) 

in 
in 


1,000,000 

in 
i") 
in 
in 


11,460,000 
40,050,000 
22,203,000 
65,010,000 
71,139,000 


10,300 000 


1903 


29,005,000 


1904 


13,780,000 


1905. 


63,181,000 


1906/ 


65,313,710 


Total.. 


19,027,500 


14,050,000 10,600,000 


7,900,000 


1,500,000 


1,000,000 


209,862,000 


181,-579,710 



Year ended 
June 30— 


Kell Bay hatchery. 


McDonald hatchery. 


Total. 


Eggs taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


Eggs taken. 


Fry planted. 


Eggs taken. 


Fry 
liberated. 


1893 










900,000 

3,000,000 

6,300,000 

6,200,000 

8,636,000 

13,877,000 

13,891,000 

19,496,900 

21,134,000 

62,260,000 

85,750,000 

65,043,500 

119,3n0.000 

125,572,000 


600,000 


1894 










2,204,000 


1895 










5,291,000 


1896 











5,475,000 


1897 










6,946,440 


1898 










9,666,000 


1899 










11,019,000 


1900 










12,707,000 


1901 . ... 










16,066,800 


1902 










53,. 500, 000 


1903 


2,500,000 

in 
in 
in 


2,000,000 

in 
in 
in 






63,060,000 


1904 






46,630.000 


1905 






104,101,000 


1906/ 


7,000,000 


5,000,000 


111,314,750 


Total . . 


2,500,000 


2,000,000 


7,000,000 


5,000,000 


551,420,400 


. 448,580,990 



a Many eggs frozen. 
b No run of fish. 

<■ Hatchery was not used, the eggs being hatched out in the lake. 
d No report. 
« Not operated. 

/ As the take of eggs for 1905-6 had not been hatched when this report was prepared, the number 
of fry had to be estimated. 

FERTILIZER PLANTS. 

As noted elsewhere, the Alaska Oil and Guano Compan}- has oper- 
ated a herring fertilizer plant at Killisnoo for some years. During 
1905 the Alaska Fish and Development Company, at Pleasant Bay, 
built a small fertilizer plant in an old hulk, which can be moved from 
place to place as desired. The company expects, when the plant is 
working, to utilize the salmon and herring offal from its saltery. 

The Pacific Coast and Norway Packing Company also put in a small 
fertilizer plant in connection with its salmon cannery at Tonka in 
1905. The plant cost about $3,500 and will have a capacity of 12 
tons daily. The intention is to use the waste product of the can- 
nery, and as the noxious gases which make a fertilizer plant so offen- 
sive are piped off into the furnace and there consumed it has been 
possible to build the plant immediately alongside the cannery build- 
ing. The manager of the cannery estimates that when reduced a ton 
of salmon offal will make from 400 to 500 pounds of fertilizer and 
150 pounds (about 20 gallons) of oil. 



COMMERCIAL, FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 29 

In 1904 the North Pacific Fish and Oil Company estabHshed a fer- 
tiHzer plant at Grace Harbor, on Dall Island. It was the intention 
of the company" to utilize the ofi^al from a nearby salmon saltery 
and also such little used species as mud sharks, dogfish, etc. Unfor- 
tunately the plant proved unworkable and has not yet been remod- 
eled to suit Alaskan conditions. 

As the ofi'al from the salmon canneries alone amounts to over 
35,000,000 pounds in a season, all of which is at present thrown over- 
board and allowed to pollute the waters, it is easily to be seen that if 
small fertilizer plants could be installed at each cannery to treat this 
offal, as is done at the sardine canneries in Maine, this enormous 
annual wastage would be obviated and the waters adjacent to the 
canneries rendered more agreeable, not only to the denizens of the 
water but also to the chance visitor. 

Oil. — For many years the Indians have engaged in catching the 
dogfish (Squalus sucMii Girard) and extracting from it an oil which 
they sell to the traders. Loring has always been a favorite resort for 
these fishermen, as the dogfish are especialfy abundant in that vicinity. 
It is estimated that as much as 10,000 gallons of this oil were obtained 
in 1892. The only firm of white men engaged in this business at pres- 
ent is the Ketchikan Ka-ko Oil Company, which has a small plant at 
Loring. The livers alone are utilized, the rest of the fish being thrown 
away. The oil, because of its heavy body and freedom from grit, is a 
most desirable lubricant and finds a ready sale in logging camps as 
"skid grease." In 1904 the company refined part of its product and 
is now endeavoring to introduce it as a medicinal oil, for which they 
claim it is well suited. ' 

AQUATIC FURS. 

Of the few industries followed in Alaska that of hunting the fur- 
bearing animals is one of the most important. Owing to the immense 
extent of territory still unoccupied except by a few small tribes of 
Indians or Eskimos, it is probable that the industry, so far as it relates 
to aquatic animals in the interior waters, will thrive for some years to 
come. Those fur-bearing animals, such as the seal and sea otter, 
found along the shores of the mainland and adjacent islands and the 
open sea, where they can easily be hunted, are rapidly becoming 
extinct. This fact has already had a very important bearing on the 
welfare of the coast tribes, as they have been dependent at many 
places upon their catch of these animals for the means wherewith to 
secure the very necessaries of life. 

The fur traders have their stations located 'at convenient points, 
and from these in the spring and summer send out vessels to visit 
branch stations or certain rendezvous, where they secure from the 
natives their catch of the past year and pay for the same in goods. 
In the interior the traders usually fit out trusty natives with small 



30 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

stocks of goods to travel among those more distant tribes which can 
not reach the stations. . The prices paid are regulated by the stand- 
ard price of red fox or marten, called 1 skin, which in 1890 was about 
$1.25. In 1890 a prime beaver w^as put in as 2 skins; black bear, 4 
skins ; lynx, 1 skin ; land otter, 2 or 3 skins. Five yards of drilling or 1 
pound of tea or 1 pound of powder, or half a pound of powder with 1 
box of caps and 1 pound of shot, are given for 1 skin; 50 pounds of 
flour for 4 skins; 5 pounds of sugar for 1 skin. In the mining districts 
the prices are much higher, to conform to those paid by the miners. 
Beaver. — This is the most valuable of the fur-bearing aquatic ani- 
mals of the interior waters of Alaska, and since the district was 
acquired by the United States has been hunted with such vigor 
that its numbers are very much diminished and diminishing. The 
range of this animal covers all of the mainland of Alaska, excepting 
only the belt of barren-coast country bordering the Arctic Ocean 
from Point Hope north and east to the Canadian line. The numer- 
ous lakes and ponds and the clear streams of the interior, especially 
those bordered by alders and willows, are the beaver's favorite resorts. 
It generally avoids the large rivers, owing to the great change in level 
likely to occur at different seasons. The natives catch beavers in 
steel traps set at a frequented spot or shoot them from a concealed 
place near their house or dam. The natives of eastern Siberia prize 
the fur of the beaver very highly for trimming their fur clothing, and 
during the summer months many of the skins are taken across Bering 
Straits by the Eskimos and traded to the Siberian natives for the skins 
of the tame reindeer. Castoreum, an oily odorous compound secreted 
by the preputial glands of the animal, also the dried preputial follicles 
and their contents, are sometimes prepared and find a sale in China, 
where they occupy a place in the pharmacopoeia. In 1905 but 5 
pounds, valued at about SI 6, were prepared. From 1745 to 1867, the 
period covered by the Russian occupation of Alaska, 413,356 beaver 
skins were secured by her traders. 

Muskrat. — Wherever bogs and ponds or running water occur on the 
mainland, except along the extreme northern coast line, this animal 
will be found; it is also found upon Nunevak and St. Michaels islands. 
It is trapped in small steel traps or in wicker fish traps. The greater 
part of the skins are bought by the traders for the purpose of bartering 
them off in other localities for more valuable furs, hence but few of 
them reach the outside world. They are used by the natives for 
making fur clothing and blankets or robes. 

LaTui. otter. — This species is one of the most widely distributed in the 
district, being found on the whole coast of Alaska from the southern 
boundary to the northern shore of Norton Sound. It also occurs on 
all the islands inside of these limits as far as Unimak in the west and 
Nunivak in the north. Within the Arctic Circle it is confmed to the 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



31 



upper courses of the rivers emptying into the Arctic Ocean. It is 
quite generally distributed over the interior of the Territory and is also 
found on the Kadiak Archipelago. The land otters found upon Sit- 
kalidak, one of the Kadiak group, are famous for their very dark fur. 
A steel trap is generally used in capturing the animal. According to 
Russian records 244,538 of these skins were bought by the traders 
from 1745 to 1867, the date of American annexation. Since then the 
supphi' has remained fairly constant. 

Sea otter. — When Bering and his party first explored the Aleutian 
Islands in 1760-1765 they found the sea otters exceedingly numerous 
all along the Aleutian chain. They are now almost unknown around 
a greater part of it, their principal resort at present being among the 
reefs and outlying islets surrounding Sannak Island, near the eastern 
end and on the Pacific side of the chain. The Aleutian hunters are 
brought to this point in vessels belonging to the trading companies 
and to private individuals, and landed with their bidarkas or skin 
canoes and hunting equipment. Here they remain for months, scour- 
ing the sea in all directions or lying upon rocky points and islets await- 
ing the approach of an otter within long rifle shot. The fur of this 
animal is the most valuable in the world. Even as far back as 1 880 
from $80 to SI 00 in cash were paid by the traders to the Aleuts for 
particularly fine skins. At the London sales in 1888 the average 
price received for these skins was £21 10s.; in 188.9, £33; and in 1891, 
£57. A single skin, however, has sold for as high as $1,400, and in 
1905 a trader at Nome valued one skin which he had secure 1 at $2,000. 
During the Russian occupation (from 1745 to 1867) 260,790 sea otter 
skins are reported as having been shipped from Alaska. 

The following table shows the number and value of the aquatic furs, 
other than seal, obtained in Alaska and shipped from the district 
from 1868 to 1905, both inclusive: 

Aquatic Furs Obtained in Alaska, 1868 to 1905.« 





Beaver. 


Miiskrat. 


otter, land. 


otter, fsea. 


Total. 


Year. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
Oei. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


1868-1870 

1871-1880 

1881-1890 

1891-1900 

1901-1904 

1905 


17, 041 
41,217 
60, 940 
21,810 
7,740 
1,935 


S85,205 
200,085 
304, 700 
109,050 
38, 700 
8,271 


17, 908 
50,322 
90, 000 
30, 000 
50.396 
12, 599 


S895 
2,516 
4,. 500 
1,500 
2,520 
1,192 


6,367 

27,730 

'27,730 

21,000 

8,556 

1,889 


$31,835 
188. d50 
1.38,650 
105. 000 
68, 448 
14, 4.58 


12, 208 
40, 283 
47,842 
6.467 
260 
61 


SI, 220, 800 

4,028,300 

4, 784, 200 

646, 700 

,39.090 

13,867 


53, 524 
159,5,52 
226,512 
79.277 
66. 952 
16, 484 


$1,338,735 

4,375,551 

5, 232, 050 

862, 250 

148,668 

37 788 






Total.. 


150,683 


752,011 


251,225 


13, 123 


93,272 


497,041 


107,121 


10,732,867 


602.301 


11,995,042 



a The values given, except in 1905, are the prices realized in I>ondon. 

Fur seal. — It would be superfluous to go into any detail in regard 
to the general subject of the fur seal, as the existing literature devoted 
to this animal would constitute a large library in itself. The only 
breeding grounds are on the islands of St. Paul and St. George in Ber- 
ing Sea. From about 1745 until the district of Alaska was annexed 



32 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



to the United States in 1867 the Russians took from these islands 
3,354,478 skins. In 1870 the Alaska Commercial Company secured 
from the Government the exclusive right to kill fur seals on the islands, 
and retained this right until 1890, when it was succeeded by the North 
American Commercial Company, which is still in possession. The 
decrease in the number of seals since 1867 has been enormous. It is 
estimated that in 1867 the herd numbered about 5,000,000, while in 
1905 it was only about 200,000. A considerable part of this decrease 
is attributed to the killing of female seals by the pelagic sealing ves- 
sels. On their way to the breeding grounds the seals follow the coast 
line from Santa Barbara Channel northward and throughout this jour- 
ney they are eagerly sought by the pelagic sealers. A little measure 
of relief to the harassed herd was extended by the decision of the Ber- 
ing Sea Arbitration Tribui.al in 1893, but the slaughter was soon 
resumed. The table below shows the catch of fur seals from 1867 to 
date both on the islands and from pelagic and other sources, presum- 
ably within Alaskan waters. The values given are those received in 
London at the great auction sales held there several times each year. 

Fur-Seal Skins Obtained from the Seal Islands and from Pelagic and Other 
Sources, All in Waters of Alaska, 1868 to 1905. 



Year. 


From seal islands. 


From pelagic and 
other sources. 


Total. 




Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


Number. 


Value. 


1868 


140,000 

85,901 

23, 773 

102, 960 

108,819 

109, 117 

110,585 

106,460 

94, 657 

84, 310 

109,323 

110,511 

105, 718 

105,063 

99,812 

79,509 

105, 434 

105,024 

104,521 

105, 760 

103,304 

102,617 

28, 859 

14,406 

7,509 

7,390 

15,033 

14,846 

30,654 

19,200 

18, 047 

ie,812 

22,470 

23, 066 

22, 182 

19, 292 

12,960 

12,723 


$700,000 

644,258 

166,411 

1,544,400 

1,218,774 

1,418,421 

1,448,663 

1,357,365 

828, 249 

822, 023 

1,071,365 

2,340,713 

2, 347, 687 

2, 086, 193 

1,357,443 

1,606,082 

1,340,096 

1,491,341 

1, 788, 335 

1,480,640 

2, 014, 370 

1,744,489 

1,053,354 

432, 180 

225, 270 

199, 530 

318, 176 

300,631 

521, 118 

297,600 

288, 752 

437, 112 

719,040 

770, 848 

721, 175 

566, 754 

388,800 

508,920 


4,367 

4,430 

8,686 

16,911 

5,336 

5,229 

5,825 

5,033 

5,515 

5,210 

5,540 

8,557 

8,418 

10, .382 

15, 581 

16, 587 

16,971 

23,040 

28, 494 

30,628 

36, 389 

29, 858 

40,814 

59, 568 

46, 642 

30,812 

61,838 

56, 291 

43, 917 

24, 332 

28, 552 

34, 168 

35, 191 

24, 050 

22,812 

27,000 

11,523 

12,660 


$8, 734 

8,860 

21,715 

40, 586 

12,806 

20,886 

49, 513 

45,297 

28,954 

31,260 

38,780 

111,241 

117,852 

80,979 

79,463 

104,498 

114,554 

149, 760 

199,458 

235, 836 

283,834 

291, 116 

620, 403 

938, 196 

792,914 

385, 150 

541,083 

576,983 

351,336 

158, 158 

185, 588 

350, 222 

563, 056 

366, 763 

439, 131 

499, 500 

232, 140 

253, 200 


144, .367 
90,331 
32,459 
119,871 
114, 155 
114,346 
116,410 
111,493 
100, 172 
89, 520 
114,863 
119,068 
114, 136 
115,445 
115,393 
96, 096 
122,405 
128,064 
133, 015 
136,388 
139,693 
132,475 
69,673 
73,974 
54, 151 
38, 202 
76,871 
71, 137 
74, 571 
43, 532 
46,599 
,TO, 980 
57, 661 
47, 116 
44,994 
46,292 
24,483 
25, 383 


$708, 734 


1869 


653, 118 


1870 


188, 126 


1871 


1,584,986 


1872 


1,231,580 


1873 


1,439,307 


1874 


1,498,176 


1875 


1,402,662 


1876 


857,203 


1877 


853,283 


1878 


1, 110, 145 


1879 


2,451,954 


1880 


2,465,539 


1881 

1882 

1883 


2, 167, 172 
1,436,906 
1,710,580 


1884 


1,454,650 


1885 

1886 


1,641,101 
1, 987, 793 


1887 


1,716,476 


1888 


2, 298, 204 


1889 


2,035,605 


1890 


1,673,757 


1891 


1,370,376 


1892 


1,018,184 


1893 


584, 680 


1894 


859, 259 


1895 


877,614 


1896 


872, 454 


1897 


455, 758 


1898 


474, 340 


1899 


787,334 


1900 


1,282,096 


1901 


1,137,611 


1902 


1,160,306 


1903 


1,066,254 


1904 


620,940 


1905 


762, 120 






Total 


2,488,627 


38,566,578 


857, 157 


9, 329, 805 


3, 345, 784 


47,896,383 







COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. .33 

At one time it was thought that the problem of furnishing a perma- 
nent supply of food for the natives on the Pribilof and Aleutian groups 
could be solved by salting the carcasses of the fur seals and shipping 
these to the various settlements. In 1880, 1,000,000 pounds, valued at 
$10,000, were so prepared, but owing to the fact that the meat did not 
keep very well, and to other causes, the project was soon abandoned. 
The natives living on the Pribilof group, however, still depend quite 
largely upon the seal carcasses for food. 

MISCELLANEOUS AQUATIC ANIMALS. 

Grampus. — This mammal, commonly known as the beluga in 
Alaska, is quite abundant in the summer along the Alaskan coast 
north of the Aleutian chain, being particularly numerous about the 
mouths of rivers and frequently ascending the larger streams far 
above tide water. It is migratory, and its movements are regulated 
by the ice. The numerous tidal creeks along the low flat coast from 
St. Michaels to the Kuskoquim River, in which tomcods are abundant, 
are the chief resort of the beluga, which comes in to feed on the fish. 
The Eskimos catch them with strong, large-meshed nets, heavily 
weighted, set off outlying points. In rough weather, when the ani- 
mals can not see the nets, many are taken, but in clear weather the 
catch is small. Some are speared, some shot, but unless the shot goes 
through the spinal column these generally escape. The flesh of a j^oung 
beluga is tender and not unpalatable, but is rather coarse and dry. 
The fat, or blubber, is clear and white and is highly valued by the 
natives, who extract the oil from it and use it in barter with the inte- 
rior tribes. The intestines are made into waterproof garments or 
floats, and the sinews are very much prized. The small ivory teeth 
are carved into toys or ornamental pendants, while the skin is made 
into strong lines or very durable boot soles. The epidermis, wliicli is 
nearly half an inch thick, when well cooked is considered choice eat- 
ing, having a flavor somewhat resembling chestnuts. 

Hair seals. — While these animals form a very insigniflcant part of 
the commerce in wliich the white traders participate, owing to the 
fact that their fur is worthless, they are of immense importance to the 
natives, for from the flesh and oil is secured a considerable part of 
their winter food, while the skins are highly prized for covering the 
kyacks and umiaks and for boot soles, trousers, mittens, clothing 
bags, and caps, and when cut into strips make a very strong and dura- 
ble cord. The skin in its raw state is thick and unwieldy, but when 
nicely tanned becomes soft and pliable. The coast natives also 
barter the flesh, oil, and skins with the interior tribes for reindeer 
hides and furs, thus creating a very important branch of trade, of 
which it is impossible to form an idea, owing, to the inaccessibility of 



34 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

most of the tribes. The very fragmentary record kept of the skins 
sold to white traders shows that in 1889, 3,500 skins, valued at $7,000, 
in 1890, 3,444, valued at $6,888, and in 1905, 9,098 skins, valued at 
$5,554, were so disposed of. These meager figures are probably too 
low. 

The species taken are the bearded seal {Erignathus harhatus); the 
ribbon seal (Phoca fasciata) , a rare species; the ringed seal {PJioca 
fcstida), the most common; the harp seal {Phoca groenlandica) , quite 
rare; and the harbor seal {Phoca vitulina), which is quite common 
and the most widely distributed. 

When the ice leaves the coast the natives hunt the seals in kyacks, 
using a light spear or a rifle. At this season many of the ringed seal 
are found upon the ice packs well offshore and are taken by the Eskimo 
in a curious manner. The latter wear a shirt made of white sheeting, 
and, paddling cautiously up to a piece of ice on which the seals are 
gathered, are enabled by means of the disguise to land and get among 
the seals without alarming them, and sometimes kill quite a number 
with a club before the herd takes flight. When the cold storms of 
September set in the seals return along shore again and seek refuge in 
the inner bays and sheltered coves. At this season the natives set 
many rawhide nets with large meshes off the rocky points, and large 
numbers are taken thus. Later, when the sea is frozen over, nets 
are set about the holes which the seals make in order to be able to 
come to the surface to breathe. Many of the seals also are killed at 
these holes by the hunters armed with spears. 

Steller's sea lion. — This animal, which at one time was extremely 
abundant on the Pribilof Islands and along the Aleutian chain, is now 
almost extinct. A few still haul up on the former islands, but they 
are becoming less and less each year, a fact which means a serious loss 
to the natives, as they made more use of this animal than of any other 
they hunted. Its skin, flesh, intestines, bones, sinew^s, and oil all came 
into play as food or in the primitive manufactures. The skins were 
considered an indispensable covering for the umiak, or large canoe, 
used in hunting, and after the animal became practically extinct on 
the Aleutian chain the traders imported such skins from the coast of 
Lower California and Mexico for the use of their hunters. The sea 
lion never became other than a subject of intertribal barter. 

Walrus. — This enormous mammal, which is not found south of the 
Bering Sea shore of the Aleutian chain, was at one time very numer- 
ous north of there, and the hunting of it and the seal formed the prin- 
cipal occupation of the Eskimos during the summer. It goes north as 
the ice breaks up in spring and returns again in the fall, stopping but 
a short time at any spot, and keeping close to the ice pack all this 
time. When in the water it is hunted by the Eskimos in kyacks, with 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 35 

ivory-pointed spears and seal-skin line and floats. When the animal 
is exhausted by its efforts to escape the hunters draw near and give 
the death stroke with a lance. 

According to The Friend, published at Honolulu, Hawaii, March 1, 
1872, the whalers began to turn their attention to walrus-catching 
about the year 1868. During the first part of every season there is 
but little opportunity to capture whales, they being within the limits 
of the icy barrier. As a result, much of the whaler's time during 
July and August was devoted to capturing walruses. Men would be 
landed on the shore in June and left to watch for the animals to haul 
up on the beach at certain points. The walrus must either come 
ashore or get on the ice, and when a herd is well ashore one or two old 
bulls are generally left on watch. The best shot among the hunters 
now creeps up, and by a successful rifle shot or two kills the guard. 
Owing to their very defective hearing, the noise made by the rifle 
does not awake them. The gun is then put aside and each hunter, 
armed with a sharp ax, approaches the sleeping animals and cuts the 
spines of as many of them as possible before the others become 
alarmed and stampede for the water and escape. 

The white hunters rarely make use of anything but the two long, 
curved tusks with which the animal is equipped and which average 
about 5 pounds to the pair. If time permits, however, the flesh is 
boiled and the oil saved. To many of the Eskimos, especially on the 
Arctic shore, the walrus is almost a necessity of life, and the devasta- 
tion wrought among the herds by the whalers has been, and is yet, the 
cause of fearful suffering and death to many of the natives. The 
flesh is food for men and dogs; the oil also is used for food and for 
lighting and heating the houses; the skin, when tanned and oiled, 
makes a durable cover for the large skin boats; the intestines make 
waterproof clothing, window-covers, and floats; the tusks are used for 
larfce or spear points or are carved into a great variety of useful and 
ornamental objects, and the bones are used to make heads for spears 
and for other purposes. At the present time the Kuskoquim district 
is the only one in which the walrus is fairly common. 

In addition to hunting the walrus themselves, the whalers also pur- 
chase from the Eskimos the tusks, or ivory, that they have secured. 
The table on page 36 shows the quantity and value of walrus oil and 
ivory secured since 1868. Part of this was undoubtedly secured from 
the natives of Siberia, but that is more than offset by the large quan- 
tity which has been brought down by the whalers and not reported. 



36 COMMERCIAL FISHEEIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

Waleus Ivory and Oil Secured in Alaska, 1868 to 1905. 



Year. 


Ivory. 


Oil. 


Year. 


Ivory. 


Oil. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Gallons. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Gallons. 


Value. 


1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 


40,000 
70,000 
63,800 
37,600 
32, 000 
44,000 
33,000 
25, 400 
31,500 
74, 000 
30,000 
38, 318 
24, 650 
19, 475 
22,085 
27, 725 
7,026 
6,564 
3. 550 
6,730 


.?2,000 
3,500 
3,190 
3,760 
3,200 
4,400 
3,300 
3,810 
4,725 

14, 800 
6,000 

19, 159 

24, 650 

19, 475 
22,085 

20, 794 
7,026 
6,564 
3,550 
5,384 


173,000 
303,000 
315, 000 
189, 000 
160, 000 
220, 500 
165, 000 
126, 000 
157, 500 
221, 000 
125, 000 
190, 000 
127,000 
84, 392 
95, 702 
120, 142 
30, 446 
28,444 


$86,500 

166,650 

163, 800 

101, 200 

128, 000 

50,000 

74,250 

81,900 

157, 500 

44,200 

56, 250 

76,000 

57, 150 

60, 762 

38, 281 

108, 128 

15, 527 

12. sm 


1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895" 


5,158 
6,228 
5,799 
5,200 
4,800 
7, 900 
12,313 


$5, 158 
4,982 
4,639 
3,900 
3,360 
6,320 
9,850 


22, 351 
26, 988 
25, 129 
20,000 
18, 196 
21, 400 
15,100 


$10, 505 
13,594 
9,549 
9,800 
8,006 
9,630 
5,534 


1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 


1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

Total.. 


10, 000 

41,714 

25, 700 

22, 300 

5, 969 

7,000 

12, 491 

14,100 

8, 500 

11, 335 


8,000 

31,286 

17, 990 

16, 725 

5,969 

7,000 

9,993 

11,985 

6,800 

8,213 


12, 444 
8,400 
5, 111 
6,310 
2,200 
1,200 
1,800 
700 
1,000 


4,604 

3, 360 

1,845 

2,330 

880 

480 

792 

280 

400 


1886 

1887 








29' 163 


16,040 

i 


843,930 343,542 


3,064,001 


1,582,219 



a Data missing. 

^liales. — Whaling at the present time is participated in to a very 
hmited extent by the natives of Alaska, the Eskimos living along the 
Arctic coast being the only ones engaged. At one time, however, 
the natives of the Aleutian chain and the shores of Bering Sea fol- 
lowed whaling whenever possible during the summer months. As 
from the beginning, almost all of the whaling is done by the fleet 
which rendezvous at San Francisco. About 1867 from 10 to 12 of 
these whalers visited what are known as the Kadiak grounds, but this 
ground was soon exhausted and the whole fleet now works exclusively 
in the Arctic. Large numbers of humpback whales {Megaptera ver- 
sahilis) are to be seen during the summer months in southeast Alaska, 
but no effort is made to capture them. The bowhead {Balsena mys- 
ticetus) is the common Arctic whale, and the one generally secured b}^ 
the whalers, although a few right whales {Balsena sieboldii) are taken 
in certain seasons. The principal object of whale fishing at the pres- 
ent time is the whalebone, which brings as much as $5 per pound in 
the markets. x\s the whaling fleet generally pursues its prey in the 
open sea and has its headquarters outside of Alaska, its work does 
not come within the scope of this report except as it deals with the 
natives. 

The belt of open water bordering the American coast from Icy 
Cape to the mouth of the Colville River is a favorite resort for whales 
during the latter part of summer and until winter sets in. Froni Icy 
Cape to Point Barrow the coast is low and sandy and backed by 
shallow lagoons, its southern portion" being known to whalemen as the 
"graveyard," owing to the great number of vessels that have been 
wrecked there. It is along this stretch of coast that the natives do 
their whaling. In April the ice pack begins to loosen, and soon there 



COMMEECIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 37 

are cracks, or "leads," as they are called, open 6 or 7 miles from the 
shore, extendmg often for miles parallel to the land, but continually 
changing, frequently disappearing altogether as the wind veers. It is 
in these '' leads" of open water that the whales work their way to their 
unknown breeding grounds in the northeast, passing by Point Barrow 
chiefly during the months of May and June. 

Each village fits out as many boats as it can supply with crews. 
The crews, 8 or 10 men to the boat, or occasionally women when men 
are scarce, are selected during the winter. The owner, who is always 
the captain and steersman, sometimes hires them outright, paying 
them with goods, and sometimes he allows them to share in the 
profits; he always feeds them while the boat is in commission. The 
harpooner is posted in the bow, while another man, armed with a 
bomb gun, is located amidships. As soon as a whale is seen the boat 
is launched and the pursuit begun. Instead of harpooning the whale 
and keeping the end of the line fast in the boat, wdiich the whale is 
compelled to drag about until the crew can manage to haul up and 
lance him to death, as is the practice of the white w^halers, the Eski- 
mos have but a short line attached to each harpoon, to the end of 
which are fastened two floats made of whole sealskins inflated, which 
are thrown overboard as soon as the harpoon is fixed in the whale. 
Each boat carries four or five harpoons, and as man}^ boats as possible 
crowd around and endeavor to drive a harpoon into the whale each 
time he comes to the surface, until he can dive no longer and lies 
upon the water ready for the death stroke, which is given with a lance. 
Occasionally an opportunity occurs to use the bomb gun as soon as 
the whale is struck, and the contest is then ended at once. As soon 
as killed, the whale is towed to the edge of the solid floe and the work 
of cutting him up begins. The skin, blubber, and flesh, according to 
a custom universal among the Eskimos, belong to the whole com- 
munity, no matter who killed it, but at Point Barrow^ the w^halebone 
must be equally divided among all the boats that were in sight when 
the whale was killed. Everything is soon carried home to the village. 
The blubber is not tried out, but is packed -away in bags made of 
whole sealskins, and with the meat is stowed away in little under- 
ground chambers, of which there are many in the villages. 

There is very little data showing the extent of the whaling as fol- 
lowed by the Eskimos. In 1891 they took from 10 to 15 whales, 
while in 1892 — a very poor season, owing to the large quantities of ice 
on the eastern shore at the time the whales were passing north — about 
15,000 pounds of w^halebone were secured. In 1905, 8,057 pounds of 
bone, valued at $51,197, were taken. All of the bone secured by the 
natives is sold to the whaling vessels, and it is very probable that 
large quantities so obtained in barter are reported at the home port as 
part of the catch of the vessel. In 1880 it is estimated that natives 



38 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

put up 5,000 gallons of whale oil, valued at S500. During the period 
from 1883 to 1889, both inclusive, the Alaska Commercial. Company 
shipped 33 packages of whalebone from Alaska. The weight and 
value of the packages are not given. In 1882, 166 barrels and in 
1889, 13 barrels of whale oil were shipped from Alaska by the same 
company. 

GENERAL STATISTICS FOR 1905. 

The fisheries of Southeast Alaska in 1905 were canvassed by the 
writer in person; the figures for the salmon fisheries of Central and 
Western Alaska are compiled from the reports sent in by the canneries 
and salteries to the agent at the salmon fisheries of Alaska ; data for 
the cod and other fisheries of the same sections were secured either 
by personal interviews or by correspondence with the owners of 
fishmg vessels and stations, nearly all of whom are located either in 
California or Washington ; the yield of fur seals from the Pribilof 
group was obtained from the report of the agent at the fur seal 
islands, and of the balance of the fur seals and the other aquatic furs 
and skins, also the whalebone, walrus ivory, etc., from the custom- 
house records at Juneau, Alaska. The custom-house records show 
the fiscal year (1904-5) ; all other data in the following tables rep- 
resent the calendar year 1905. 

In order that the data might be shown with greater clearness, the 
district has been divided into four geographical sections. Southeast 
Alaska embraces all that narrow strip of mainland and the numerous 
islands adjacent, from Portland Canal northwestward to, but not 
including, Yakutat Bay; Central Alaska embraces everything on the 
Pacific, or south, side from Yakutat Bay westward, including the 
Aleutian chain ; Western Alaska the shores of Bering Sea and islands 
in this sea; and Arctic Alaska, from Bering Strait to the Canadian 
border. As these divisions are already quite generally recognized 
throughout the district, their use here will not be confusing. 

The number of persons employed was 11,467, of which 4,028 
were engaged directly in fishing and 6,856 in the canneries, salteries, 
and other shore work, while 583 were employed on the transporting 
vessels. In the salmon fishery the employees of the cannery or salt- 
ery are usually taken to the latter place aboard a sailing vessel, which 
remains until the season's work is ended, when she returns to the 
home port with the employees and the season's pack. While lying 
idle during the fishing season most of the crew, not being needed 
aboard the ship, are employed as fishermen, and have been counted as 
such, thus materially reducing the number of transporters. 

The total investment in the fisheries was $22,038,485, of which 
Western Alaska furnished more than one-half. The only fishing ves- 
sels (for herring and halibut) are those in Southeast Alaska. An 
important feature is the large number of transporting vessels — 185 — 
with a tonnage of 67,109 and a value of $3,112,307. Nearly aU of 



COMMEKCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 39 

these vessels are employed in the salmon industry. In number gOl 
nets lead the other forms of apparatus, but are not so effective as the 
traps. 

In variety of products secured, Southeast Alaska leads all the other 
divisions. This is largely owing to its greater accessibility and to the 
fact that its fisheries have been worked for a much longer period than 
the others. The halibut, herring, and trout fisheries are confined 
entirely to this section. The cod fishery proper is confined to Central 
Alaska, only a few thousand pounds being secured incidentally in 
Southeast Alaska. Western Alaska leads in the value of salmon 
canned. The only products given for Arctic Alaska are walrus skins, 
whalebone, walrus ivory, and a whale's head and skull, the latter 
being a natural-history specimen. Owing to the inaccessibility of 
the greater part of Western and Arctic Alaska, practically nothing is 
done during the winter and early spring months, but as soon as the ice 
breaks up in the spring the trading vessels make their rounds of the 
native villages and camps and coUect the skins and furs which the 
natives have taken during the winter and ship these to Pacific coast 
ports. On account of this method of handling the business, the fiscal 
year is the better way of showing the year's catch in this section, as 
one whole season thus appears, and not parts of two seasons, which 
would be the case were the calendar year shown. It was found an 
impossibility to secure anything like accurate data as to the persons 
employed or the investment in the business of hunting aquatic animals, 
as it is prosecuted in conjunction with that for land animals, such as 
bear, marten, mink, lynx, etc., and seems to be general among the 
natives. Neither has anything been showm of the fishermen and 
investment in the Arctic region, owing to the impossibility of securing 
even approximate data on such matters. The natives keep no rec- 
ords, and besides are in many instances migratory in their habits, thus 
makmg it an impossibility to keep track of them. 

The total quantity of products secured amounted to 117,247,398 
pounds, valued at $7,711,981. As it was found necessary to show 
in full the prepared products, the figures given represent dressed 
and cured weights, and not that of the products as taken from the 
water. There is a tremendous wastage in the Alaska fisheries, 
especially in that for salmon, fully one- third of the round weight of 
the latter fish being thrown away in the process of dressing and 
packing. Had the round weight for all species been shown in the 
table the total would have been about 155,000,000 pounds. The 
salmon and herring fisheries of Alaska are carried on in a somewhat 
different manner from that followed in other parts of the country. 
Owing to the lack of what might be called "resident fishermen" in 
the district, the canneries and guano factory have to do their own 
fisliing, and in order to accomplish tliis import the necessary fisher- 
men from the Pacific coast states each season. These men are fur- 



40 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



nished with fishing gear, boats, lodging, and food throughout the 
season, and are paid either a certain sum per thousand for each 
species of sahnon (the price paid varying from place to place) or else 
straight wages. At the end of each season the men are returned to 
the point from whence they sailed. On account of this procedure 
it has been found impossible to secure even approximately correct 
data as to the cost of the fish as taken from the water for the salmon 
canneries and the one guano factory, and their products have been 
shown as marketed. So far as the salted salmon and herring and 
other species are concerned, the data given is in the same form as 
shown for other sections of the country in the reports of the Bureau. 
The tables follow. 

Persons Employed in the Alaska Fisheries in 1905. 



How engaged. 


Southeast 
Alaska. 


Central 
Alaska. 


Western 
Alaska. 


Total. 


Fishermen: 

Whites 


543 

1,147 

9 


658 
129 


1,470 
72 


2,671 




1,348 




9 










Total 


1,699 


787 


1,542 


4,028 






Shoresmen: 

Whites 

Natives 


457 
512 
375 
208 


329 
103 
552 
208 
30 


902 

374 

1,591 

1,215 


1,688 

989 

2,518 




1,631 




30 










Total 


1,552 


1,222 


4,082 


6,856 


Transporters: 

Whites 


187 
10 


184 


202 


573 




10 










Total 


197 


184 


202 


583 








3,448 


2,193 


5,826 


11,467 







Apparatus and Capital Engaged jn the Alaska Fisheries in 1905. 





Southeast 
Alaska. 


Central Alaska. 


Western Alaska. 


Total. 


Items. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Fishing vessels: 

Steam and other power. . 


8 

209 

8 

81 

59 

1,221 

10 

6,456 
794 

6 


$49,775 










8 

209 

8 

81 

131 

5,758 

54 

61,351 

2,039 

6 


$49,775 














5,550 










5,550 














Transporting vessels: 

Steamers and laimches . . 

Tonnage 

Sailing 


261,450 


27 

921 

12 

14,207 

317 


S276,300 


45 

3,616 

32 

40,688 

928 


$1,023,357 


1,561,107 


143,200 


328,000 


1,680,666 


1,551,200 








100,685 

5,000 
2,494 

16,075 

44,950 

25,050 

164,000 

5,381 

1,842,550 

1,374,978 


84,555 


237,782 


423,022 


Apparatus, vessel fisheries: 


5,000 






1 




2,494 


Apparatus, shore fisheries: 


57 
123 
197 

32 


44 

1 

48 

23 


21,000 

1,000 

2,780 

24,000 

10,500 

3,147,144 

1,756,404 






101 

124 

1,154 

70 


37,075 








45,950 




909 
15 


57,577 
19,300 


85,407 


Traps 


207,300 




15,881 








7,023,506 
2,904,142 




12,013,200 


Shore and accessory property 




6,035,524 


Total 




4,041,138 




5,651,683 




12,345,664 




22,038,485 









COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 
Products of the Alaska Fisheries in 1905. 



41 



Species. 


Southeast Alaska. 


Central Alaska. 


Western Alaska. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Codfish: 


3,200 
3,650 


$99 
136 










Salted 


5,492,000 
2,060 
7,975 


$180,710 
82 
432 






Codfish roe, salted 






Codfish tongues, salted 










Halibut: 


3,144,614 

316,341 

16 

1,213,845 

46, 713 

1,880,700 

24,435 

2,618,000 

1,074,150 

280,444 

22, 334 
16, 348 
21,643 

531, 792 
1,807,980 
6,816,384 

262,080 
9,954,000 

45,000 

7, 122, 160 

346,600 

129,874 

400 

17,013 

7,000 
255,000 


85,326 

12,641 

1 

48,554 

2,382 

10,331 

1,534 

32, 725 

35,805 

15,773 

893 
654 
866 

215,875 
102,207 
420,614 
21, 733 
723, 937 

1,452 

106,320 

10,654 

9,212 

12 

1,155 

210 
10,400 






Frozen 




















Salted 










Smoked 










Herring: 

Salted 










Smoked 






























Salmon: 










Frozen— 










Humpback 




















Canned— 
Coho 


792,864 


51,543 


470,256 

205, 776 

1,120,992 

1,451,424 

49,030,944 


$31,542 
10, 849 


Dog 




155, 280 

308,496 

16,582,800 

3,600 


9,058 

20,567 

1,174,615 

144 


68, 522 


King 


99,699 




3,436,995 


Salted- 


Dog 
















King 






91,200 
3,355,600 


3,224 


Soekeye 






128, 436 


Smoked 








Coho 






3,800 


285 


Humpback 








King 






2,700 
3,600 


190 








270 


Trout: 


12,306 

32,000 

100 

21,413 

799 
18 

1,927 


738 

1,569 

5 

735 

3,952 
18 

7,109 








Other- 
Fresh 










Frozen 




















Aquatic furs and skins: 

Beaver 

Muskrat 

Otter- 


435 
598 

1,585 
300 


1,873 
258 

3,930 
11,867 


701 
961 

1,220 
5 

76, 368 
3,267 


2,446 
916 

3,419 


Sea 


2,000 


Seal- 
Fur 


5,028 

23,688 

90 


7,138 

4,512 

75 


508,945 


Hair . .. 


399 
129 


139 
71 


903 


Walrus ivory . 










Total 


38,059,085 


1,897,352 


23,348,521 


1,455,289 


55,818,814 


4,298,641 







4*^ 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 
Products of the Alaska Fisheries in 1905 — Continued. 



Species. 



Arctic Alaska. 



Pounds. 



Value. 



Total. 



Pounds. 



Value. 



Codfish: 

Fresh 

Salted 

Codfish roe, salted 

Codfish tongues, salted 

Halibut: 

Fresh 

Frozen 

Canned 

Salted 

Smoked 

Herring: 

Salted 

Smoked , 

Herring guano 

Herring oil 

Salmon: 

Fresh, king 

Frozen — 

Coho 

Humpback 

King 

Canned— 

Coho 

Dog 

Humpback 

King 

Sockeye 

Salted— 

Coho 

Dog 

Humpback 

King 

Sockeye 

Smoked 

Salmon bellies, salted: 

Coho 

Humpback 

King 

Sockeye 

Trout: 

Steelhead, frozen 

Other- 
Fresh 

Frozen 

Fish oil other than herring. 
Aquatic furs and skins: 

Beaver 

Muskrat 

Otter- 
Land 

Sea 

Seal- 
Fur 

Hair 

Walrus 

Walrus ivory 

Whalebone 

Whale's head and skull 



Total. 



25 
11,046 
8,057 
1,850 



7,992 

51, 197 

1,500 



20, 978 



60, 699 



3,200 

5,495,650 

2,060 

7,975 

3,144,614 

316,341 

16 

1,213,845 

46, 713 

1,880,700 

24, 435 

2, 618, 000 

1,074,150 

280,444 

22,334 
16,348 
21, 643 

1,794,912 
2, 013, 756 
8,092,656 
2, 022, 000 
75,^67, 744 

48,600 

7, 122, 160 

346, 600 

221,074 

3,356,000 

17,013 

10, 800 

255,000 

2,700 

3,600 

12,306 

32,000 

100 

6 21,413 

c 1,935 
d 1,577 

<4,732 
• /305 

ff81,396 

A 27, 354 

i25 

11,265 

8,057 

i 1,850 



117,247,398 



180,846 
82 
432 

85,326 

12,641 

1 

48,554 
2,382 

10,331 

1,534 

32,725 

35,805 

15, 773 

893 
654 
866 

298,960 
113,056 
498, 194 
141,999 
5,335,547 

1,596 
106,320 
10, 654 
12,436 
128,448 
1,155 

495 

10, 400 

190 

270 

738 

1,569 

5 

735 

8,271 
1,192 

14,458 
13,867 

516,083 

5,554 

10 

8,138 

51, 197 

1,500 



7,711,981 



a Represents 143,220 gallons. 
b Represents 2,855 gallons. 
c Represents 1,935 skins. 
d Represents 12,599 skins. 



« Represents 1,889 skins. 
/ Represents 61 skins. 
g Represents 13,566 skins. 



h Represents 9,098 skins. 

i Represents 1 skin. 

j A natural-history specimen. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



43 



The following table shows in greater detail than the preceding the 
number of cases (together with the size and style of cans) of each 
species of salmon canned, and the value of same: 

Output of Salmon from Alaska Canneries in 1905. 



Species. 


Southeast Alaska. 


Central Alaska. 


Western Alaska. 


Total. 


Cases. 


Value. 


Cases. 


Value. 


Cases. 


Value. 


Cases. 


Value. 


Coho: 

i pound, flat . . . . 


516 

394 

40, 169 


$1, 754 

1,340 

129,696 










516 

394 

66,484 


SI, 754 


i pound, flat . . . . 










1,340 


1 •■pound, tall. . . . 


16,518 


$51,543 


9,797 


$3i,542 


212, 781 


Total.. 


41,079 


132, 790 


16,518 


51,543 


9,797 


31,542 


67,394 


215,875 




Dog, or chum: 1 


37,685 
142, 008 


102,207 
420,614 






4,287 
23,354 


10, 849 
68,522 


41,972 
168,597 


113,056 


Humpback: 1 pound, 
tall 


3,235 


9,058 


498, 194 


King: 

1 pound, flat .... 


4,248 
1,212 


17,585 
4,148 










4,248 
37,877 


17,585 


1 pound, tall 


6,427 


20, 567 


30, 238 


99,699 


124,414 


Total 


5,460 


21, 733 


6,427 


20,567 


30,238 


99,699 


42,125 


141,999 






Sockeye: 

J pound, flat .... 


12,915 

18, 725 

175,735 


46,674 
67,410 
609, 853 




! 




12,915 

18, 725 

1,542,788 


46, 674 


1 pound, flat. . . . 


i 




67, 410 


1 pound, tall 


345, 575 


1,174,615 


1,021,478 


3,436,995 


5,221,463 


Total 


207,375 


723,937 


345,575 


1,174,615 


1,021,478 


3, 436, 995 


1,574,428 


5, 335, 547 






Grand total 


433,607 


1,401,281 


371, 755 


1, 255, 783 


1,089,154 


3,647,607 


1,894,516 


6,304,671 



OTHER FISHERY RESOURCES OF ALASKA. 

By no means are all of the fishery resources of the district utilized 
even yet. The lakes, streams, and coastal waters teem with the 
steelhead, Dolly Varden, cutthroat, rainbow, and lake trouts, but the 
steelhead is the only one shipped, a small quantity being frozen each 
season. The lake trout (Cristivom.er namaycush) is abundant in the 
Yukon River, and large quantities are caught and sold fresh in the 
mining towns along the river. Other fresh- water species are the com- 
mon pike ( Esox lucius) ; the arctic grayling ( Thymallus signifer) ; 
seven species of white-fish ( Coregonus) , nearly all of which are impor- 
tant articles of food to the natives living along the rivers entering 
Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean, who generally catch them with gill 
nets set under the ice and in traps ; the inconnu ( Stenodus mackenzii) , 
which attains a length of 5 feet and a weight of 50 pounds; smelt 
{Hypomesus olidus), which are very abundant and used as food both 
fresh and dried; burbot or losh (Lota maculatus) ; sucker (Catostomus 
longirostris) , and the lamprey (Ammocmtus aureus), of which a vast 
quantity is captured through the ice on the Yukon River each season 
by the natives and frozen for future use. The eulachon, or candle- 
fish ( Thaleichthys pacificus), is one of the best known of the anadro- 
mus species, but appears to be abundant in Alaskan rivers only at 



44 COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 

infrequent periods. It has been reported at times as occurring lq 
great abundance in the Stikine, Unuk, and Chilkat rivers, and in the 
rivers entering into Cook Inlet. It is much prized by the natives 
because of its oiliness. 

In the (for Alaska) densely populated delta between the mouths of 
the Kuskoquim and Yukon rivers a small black-fish ( Dallia pectoralis) 
is exceedingly abundant and forms the principal food of the natives 
during the winter months. This fish does not exceed 5 or 6 inches in 
length, but is very fat, and, in addition to using it whole as food, the 
natives try out from it a pellucid oil of which they are excessively 
fond. 

Among the sea fishes not described elsewhere in this report and 
at present of commercial importance to the natives along shore or 
to the whites living in the vicinity of the fisheries are the fol- 
lowing : 

Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius) , which are not 
mackerel at all, merely resembling them in flavor, are quite abundant 
along the southern shore of the Aleutian chain, especially around the 
island of Attu. They run from May to December, being most plenti- 
ful in June, July, and August, and are found in greatest abundance 
among the kelp in from 3 to 40 fathoms. They retire to deep water 
in the winter. In length the fish average about 18 inches, with an 
average weight of about 2 J pounds. They are an important article of 
food to the Aleutians, who also salt a few barrels annually which they 
sell to vessels calling at Dutch Harbor and Unalaska. The North 
American Commercial Company has experimented with these fish for 
some years and reports them as good food fish. In 1903 the Alaska 
Attu Mackerel Company was formed at Seattle, Wash., to engage in 
fishing for and curing this species, and during the same year put up 400 
half barrels as an experiment. There is no record of any subsequent 
operations of the company. The fishery will doubtless be a very 
important one some day. 

Black cod {Anoplopoma fimbria) and the cultus cod (Ophiodon 
elongatus) are very common in Southeastern Alaska and the Gulf of 
Alaska, and are excellent food fishes. The well-known redfish of 
Sitka (Sehastodes melanops) is one of several other species of rockfish 
found in Alaskan waters, and is exceedingly abundant in the Gulf of 
Alaska. Flounders seem to be abundant nearly everywhere. Scul- 
pins, capelin, and lance, or lant, are exceedingly i^bundant along the 
shore and make excellent bait for the better species. 

Along the shores of Norton Sound occurs the tomcod ( Microgadus 
proximus), or wachna of the natives. This fish, which is very abun- 
dant in the fall and spring, is of immense importance to the natives, 
as they depend quite largely upon it for their winter's supply of food. 



COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA 11^ 1905. 



45 



At first it is caught from boats anchored close to the shore, but when 
the new ice becomes strong enough to hold them the natives erect 
stakes with mats hung between to keep off the wind, and fish through 
holes cut in the ice. The fish are allowed to freeze, and in that con- 
dition are stored away in suitable receptacles untU needed. They 
also form an important article of dog feed. 

Throughout Southeastern Alaska clams are quite abundant. In 
1898 and 1899 the North Pacific Trading and Packing Company packed 
each year several hundred cases of clams and clam juice, but then 
abandoned the business for some unknown reason. The clams were 
packed in September, usually, as they were then in the best condition. 
In 1903 the Alaska Packing and Navigation Company buUt a small can- 
nery at Wrangell and put up about 20 cases that same year, but owing 
to lack of capital the cannery has not been operated since. In 1904, 
42 cases were put up by the Alaska Fish and Halibut Company on 
Wrangell Narrows. There is an excellent opening in this line for 
experienced persons with a moderate amount of capital. 

Along the Alaska peninsula and the Aleutian chain mussels, crabs, 
and shrimps are very abundant, and squid, octopus, and beche-de- 
mer are quite numerous. All of these are at present utilized as food 
by the natives and a few of the whites, and large quantities are used 
as bait in the other fisheries. It is probable that when shipping 
facilities become better a trade in these products with Puget Sound 
ports can be built up. The natives also gather certain varieties of 
algae and, after drying them, store them away to be eaten in winter. 



FISHERIES CARRIED ON IN ALASKAN WATERS AND 
TO PLACES OUTSIDE OF THE DISTRICT. 



CREDITED 



Ood. — In addition to the cod fisheries carried on from the shore sta- 
tions there is a fieet of vessels which operate on the Alaskan banks, but 
as they hail from ports outside of Alaska they can not be credited to 
the district. The table below gives full data in regard to the opera- 
tions of these vessels during 1905. Their methods of work, etc., have 
already been described in fuU elsewhere in this report. 

Cod Fishing Conducted in Alaskan Waters in 1905 by Vessels from Outside 

Ports. 



Home port. 


Vessels. 


Lines. 


Salted codfish. 


Num- 
ber. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Crew. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


San Francisco, Cal 


6 
4 
4 
1 

1 


1,382 
849 
422 
195 


888,380 
46,096 
31,552 
8,512 
8,512 


201 
93 
70 
24 
24 


$1,260 

4,600 

950 

1,200 

1,200 


2,800,000 

2,528,000 

948, 000 

240, 000 

312,000 


885, 460 

76, 904 

28,694 

7,320 

9,516 




Seattle, Wash 


Tacoma, Wash 


Vancouver, British Columbia 


Total 


16 


2,848 


183,052 


412 


9,210 


6,828,000 


207,894 





46 



COMMEECIAL FISHERIES OF ALASKA IN 1905. 



Halibut. — The above remarks on the codfish fleet from ports outside 
of Alaska apply equally well to the Puget Sound fleet operatmg in the 
waters of Southeast Alaska for halibut. Full information in regard to 
this fleet is given elsewhere in this report. The table below shows 
the number of vessels engaged in the fishery and the catch, together 
with all other necessary data. The catch of the sail and auxiliary 
power vessels in Alaskan waters has been taken from the custom- 
house records at Juneavi, but the catch of the steamers had to be esti- 
mated, as these vessels return to their home port with their catch and 
lump the catch taken in Alaskan waters with that obtained outside. 

Halibut Fishing Conducted in Alaskan Waters in 1905 by Vessels from Outside 

Ports. 





Steamers. 


Sail and auxiliary 
power vessels. 


Crew. 


Lines. 


Fresh halibut. 




Num- 
ber. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Ton- 
nage. 


Value. 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Port Townsend, 
Wash 








4 

28 
1 


40 

503 

17 


$2,710 

38,340 

1,030 


16 

187 
81 

58 


$1,050 
13, 180 
6,550 

2,700 






Seattle Wash 


1 
2 

2 


128 
274 

130 


$45,600 
80,000 

60,000 












Vancouver, Brit- 
ish Columbia 
















Total 


5 


532 


185,600 


33 


560 


42,080 


342 


23,480 5,367,422 j$161,023 



o 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF THE 

U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS 

FOR 1904 AND 1905 



Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 604 



CONTENTS, 



Introduction and explanation of tables 3 

Explorations on the Califoi'nia coast 7 

Cruise in the eastern Pacific 44 

Investigations during Alaska cruise 78 

2 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF THE U. S. FISHERIES 
STEAMER ALBATROSS FOR 1904 AND 1905. 



INTRODUCTION AND EXPLANATION OF TABLES. 

The operations of the Albatross in 1904 and 1905 included dredg- 
ing and other collecting, also hydrographic and meteorologic obser- 
vations, in three regions, (1) the southern portion of the California 
coast, (2) the eastern Pacific Ocean, and (3) the Pacific coast of 
North America between Seattle and Wrangell Island. The stations 
occupied during these explorations, with complete data for each, 
are recorded in the following tables. For the convenience of natur- 
alists who may be interested in a particular region the three cruises 
are treated separately, and to facilitate tabulation the serial tem- 
perature records where taken are embodied in separate tables. The 
form of presentation, abbreviations, etc., are essentially the same 
throughout. 

The various kinds of apparatus used at each station are recorded 
in chronological order, each on a separate line, under the station 
number. All stations where apparatus was employed to collect 
natural history material are given numbers in the "dredging" or 
collecting station series, and are indicated by the prefixed letter D. 
The hydrographic stations have another series of numbers and are 
designated by the letter H. At times specimens were taken with 
dip nets or small open tow nets during the occupation of a hydro- 
graphic station, but, on account of the irregularity of such collecting, 
the station was not regarded as a dredging station. 

The "position" of a station is that point occupied by the vessel 
as determined by the navigator by means of sights, bearings, or 
dead reckoning at the time of beginning the first operation at that 
station. The position of the subsequent operations under the same 
station number correspond in a general way to the line as indicated 
under "Drift." The distance covered by all the operations of a 
station, however, is usually not greater than the negligible error of 
observation, except in stations near shore determined by bearings. 
In the case of those stations in which only the pump filter was 
operated, contrary to all other cases, the station number is applied 
to the position at the end of the haul. 

3 



4 DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

All positions so far as possible are located by the true bearing 
from the ship of the nearest important or prominent shore feature; 
for stations too far from land to locate in this manner, only the 
astronomical position in degrees and minutes of latitude and longi- 
tude is given. To obviate, in locating positions, inaccuracies that 
may arise from the incorrectness of charts, the number and edition 
of the chart used is given in a separate column. In the case of 
stations H. 4828 to H. 4831, where the chart used is obviously 
inaccurate, the navigator's angles also are recorded. 

"Time of day ", as assigned in that column to each operation, is, in 
the case of a sounding, the time when the plummet struck bottom; 
in the case of the haul of a net or piece of collecting apparatus, it is 
the time when such apparatus was in place and the actual towing 
or dragging commenced, except in case of the pump-filter, as else- 
where explained. With surface nets, this is the time when they were 
in the water and began to be towed or the current to pass through 
them; with intermediate or bottom apparatus, when it had reached 
bottom, or the level at which it was to be towed or from which it was 
to be hoisted vertically. In reaching such position the apparatus 
is assumed to have sunk vertically without making any catch. The 
"time" of a temperature observation is the time when the ther- 
mometer was capsized. 

"Depth" (in fathoms) is the depth obtained by the sounding when 
a sounding was made. In cases where no sounding was made the 
depth is estimated from the chart. The least and greatest depths 
are given when the operation was of long continuance. 

Under "Temperatures" the minimum and maximum for the 
whole period occupied at the station are given. Where a single 
temperature is given it indicates that no change occurred during 
the occupation of the station. 

In the double column "Trial" is indicated the depth at which appa- 
ratus was worked, as well as the duration of operation." In the case of 
surface nets, this latter is the time towed ; for intermediate nets, 
the time towed at the depth shown in the depth column is indicated 
by the first quantity, the time occupied in hoisting by the second. 
The duration for beam trawls is the time during which the trawl 
was supposed to be dragging on the bottom, up to the beginning of 
reeling in. 

In the double column of "Drift" is shown approximately the gen- 
eral direction in which the gear was hauled as well as the distance." 
The state of the currents and of the wind, with the exigencies inci- 
dent to the steering of the ship, make this more or less inaccurate. 

Surface nets were always towed from lower boom at a distance of 
about 24 feet from the ship's side, unless otherwise specified. 

oSee footnote on p. 11 for exception in records of California cruise. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 5 

Nets set tandem were one in front or one above another, with a 
space of about 1 fathom between the tail of the first and tlie bridle 
of the second. 

When two Kofoid nets were towed astern it is understood they 
were side by side, on separate lines, about 10 to 12 feet apart. 

When nets were hauled vertically it is understood the haul was from 
the depth indicated in the "Trial" column to the surface, unless 
otherwise indicated. 

Beam trawls were almost always rigged with wing nets at each 
side and mud bag at the tail. 

The various forms of apparatus employed are indicated by abbre- 
viations and the manner of their use by affixed symbols, as follows: 

APPARATUS, ETC. 

8' Agassiz 8-foot Agassiz beam trawl. 

8' Alb-Blk S-foot Albatross-Blake beam trawl. 

[The same abbreviation with other figures indicates the other sizes of the same apparatus.] 

Sj' Alb-Blk. spl .. .5^-foot Albatross-Blake frame, with a net designed for manganese 
bottom. 

10' Blk 10-foot Blake beam trawl; similarly Si-foot ditto. 

1). d boat dredge. 

botm bottom. 

C. S Coast Survey. 

Cuhn 5-foot Cuhn net. 

D .dredging, or collecting, station. 

e. I electric light. 

H .hydrographic station. 

H. O hydrographic office. 

int. 1 open intermediate net 5 feet in diameter, about 11 feet long, with 

bobbinet, scrim and no. 12 silk lining. 

int. 2. .a net of 2-inch mesh web, about 10 feet in length, hung on a 4-foot 

ring, with a lining of i-inch mesh and linen. 

int. 3 a ship's not on a 5i-foot ring; net 13 feet long, of nn. 000 grit gauze 

with about 3 feet of no. 3 silk, and a brass bucket attached at bottom. 
In the work of the summer of 1905, 2 Kofoid nets, on 14-inch rings 
and 6 feet in length, one on each side, cither of no. 20 silk, K. 2, or 
of no. 3 silk, K. 3, were used in conjimction. 

K. 1 no. 1 Kofoid or small plankton net, made of no. 12 silk, on a 12-inch 

ring. 

K. 2 no. 2 Kofoid or small plankton net, with no. 20 silk on 14-inch ring. 

K. 3 a similar type, of no. 000 silk, on a 2-foot ring. See also int. 3 above. 

Lt. Ho .Light-House. 

Luc. sdr. . for the Lucas sounding machine. 

m. 1) for mud bag. 

m. c mud can. 

pump-filter a bag or net of no. 12 or no. 20 silk, on a 14-inch ring, and 35 inches 

long, supported in a metal cylinder, so that a water pressure of 4J 
inches could be developed. Into this bag water was run as taken 
from the circulating pump and drawn from the main injection at 
approximately 12 feet depth. A supply sufficient to keep the net 
a little less than full was used, but for the reason that the pump afford- 
ing this was frequently in demand for the evaporators, the opera- 
tion of the filter was more or less discontinuous. 



6 



DEEDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 



pump-filter (con.).. In labeling the collections from this apparatus, contrary to the usual 
custom, the station number of the position at the end of the haul 
was applied. This should be understood to indicate that the col- 
lection of this apparatus is continuous from the last station number 
for which the filter is recorded, and the collecting may thus have 
been continued through intervening numbers. 

op. plank open plankton net, small silk nets of various patterns and sizes, rang- 
ing from 10 to 16 inch rings. This term includes also the Kofoid 
nets as elsewhere described. 

Petersen int Cuhn-Pctersen closing net. 

s. d ship's dredge. 

Sig. sdr Sigsbee sounder. 

surf surface. 

surf. 1 old style 4-foot ship's surface net, with no silk lining. 

surf. 2 4-foot ship's surface net, with silk lining. 

surf. 3 conical net 5 feet in diameter, about 10 feet long, ^-inch mesh web, the 

lower half lined with 000 silk. 

surf . 4 4-foot net, about 10 feet long, of ^-inch mesh web; about one-third 

of the bottom lined with 000 silk. 

surf, tow surface tow net, same as surf. 1 . 

swabs tangle swabs. 

8' Tnr S-foot Tanner beam trawl. Similarly other lengths of beam. 

Tnr. int Tanner intermediate net. 

Tnr. sdr Tanner sounder. 

therm Negretti and Zambra thermometer, with Tanner case. 

Town, int Townsend intermediate net. 

wat. hot Sigsbee water bottle. 

wng wing-nets, formerly called " butterflies.'' 



MANNER OF USE. 



No sounding made. 



* signifies depths and character of bottom taken from chart. 

t signifies nets set tandem about 2 fathoms apart. 

^ signifies hauled vertically between depths indicated, then closed. 

I signifies nets towed astern, from taftrail, side by side and about 10 feet apart. 

II signifies apparatus open, hauled vertically to surface. 

§ signifies apparatus towed (horizontally) at depth indicated by number of minutes given in 
first period: then ^msfe(Z (vertically) to surface, net opfn, in time ne.xt shown. 

<p signifies pump in operation from station at which last emptied, and throughout occu- 
pation of intervening stations. 

"Character of bottom," determined by the specimens from the 
sounding cup, is expressed by symbols, the key to wliich is appended. 
Where no sounding is recorded for the station the bottom character 
may be taken from the chart. 

M....Mud. 
Mang. .Manganese. 
Nod. . .Nodules. 
Oz. . . .Ooze. 

P Pebbles. 

Part.. .Particles. 

Pter Pteropods. 

R Rock. 

rad. . . .radiolarian. 

rd red. 

rky rocky. 



bk black. 


For .. 


, . Foraminifera 


bl....blue. 


Frag . 


.Fragments. 


br brown. 


G.... 


.Gravel. 


brk... broken. 


Glob. 


. .Globigerina. 


C Clay. 


gn.... 


. .green. 


choc, .chocolate. 


gy- - - - 


-gray. 


Co.... Coral. 


hrd... 


. .hard. 


Corln. Coralline. 


inf... 


, .infusorial. 


crs coarse. 


Lav. . 


.Lava. 


dk dark. 


Ige . . . 


. .large. 


fne...fine. 


It 


.light. 



S Sand. 

sft . soft. 

Sh Shells. 

sml small. 

Sp Specks. 

St Stones. 

stky. . .sticky. 

vol. volcanic. 

wh . white . 

yl yellow. 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 7 

I. EXPLORATIONS ON THE CALIFORNIA COAST. 

In the interest of a comprehensive scheme for the study of the 
marine biology of southern California ", undertaken by the Bureau 
of Fisheries in cooperation with Stanford University and the Uni- 
versity of California, the steamer Alhatross on March 1, 1904, began 
investigations in the vicinity of San Diego. The work was continued 
in this region until April 15, and then, after an interval, was renewed 
in Monterey Bay, where it was conducted from May 10 until June 15. 
The investigations included the occupation of 139 collecting stations 
and substations and 15 hydrographic stations, all in the region south of 
Point Conception; and 128 collecting stations in Monterey Bay — a 
total of 282 accepted stations.'' In addition to these the tables show 
the records of 2 collecting and 1 sounding station made in September, 
1904, on the Farallone Plateau, off the entrance to vSan Francisco. 

Trials with various forms of apparatus were made for bottom 
material at 127 stations in the southern region, and at 129 stations 
in Monterey Bay, or 256 in all ; only 1 1 stations were occupied for other 
collecting work. At 69 stations in the first part of the work more than 
one form of collecting apparatus was employed ; and in the second part 
58 stations were made where two or more styles of gear were used. 

In accordance with recent practices of the Bureau, at nearly all 
collecting stations several soundings were taken to develop any 
changes in the depth, but only those essential to show such changes 
are tabulated in the records. 

Losses of apparatus and accidents were not unusual, but not more 
than might well be expected considering the character of some of the 
bottom worked over, which, particularly in the vicinity of the islands 
off the southern coast, is extremely rugged and uneven. 

In addition to investigations of purely scientific interest, the work 
of the vessel included the development of a number of fishing banks 
hitherto only locally known. A rocky shoal or ledge was located off 
the San Diego coast, and was named, for the fisherman acting as guide, 
Cabral Bank. A number of banks and ledges m Monterey Bay, all 
good rockfish (rock cod) grounds, were developed and charted. Off 
Point Santa Cruz is a small area called Rock Oyster Bank; an 
extensive rocky ledge, called Black Point Reef, extends entirely 
across the harbor of Santa Cruz ; off Sauquel Point is a ledge called 
Sauquel Reef. About midv/ay between Sauquel Cove and the mouth 
of the Pajaro River, parallel to the shore and about a mile distant, is a 

a See Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries for 1904, p. 107. 

b The last previous stations occupied by the Albatross, D. 4302 and H. 4788, August 24, 
1903, were in Southeast Alaska, where the vessel was engaged in an investigation of the 
condition and needs of the Alaska salmon fisheries. The tabulated records of that cruise 
are published in the Report of the U. S. Fish Commission for 1903, pp. 123-138. 



8 DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

long narrow reef called Rock Cod Ledge; and off the mouth of the 
Estero Grande is a small spot similarly named. In the vicinity of 
Point Pinos are four fishing grounds milch frequented by the boats 
from Monterey. Seventy Fathom Bank, or Coopers Rock, lies about 
3.5 miles west of the point; Italian Ledge, a smaller bank, is about the 
same distance north of the point; Portuguese Ledge, still smaller, lies 
about 3 miles north-northeast of Point Pinos; and Humpback Rock, a 
tiny spot, is about 2 miles east of it. 

South of Point Conception the various forms of apparatus were 
employed as follows: 

Tanner beam-trawl, 11-foot. — At 15 stations was dragged over the bottom an average of 
29 minutes and a distance of 0.9 mile. At another station it was fouled almost as soon as 
landed on the bottom. 

Tanner heam-trawl, 0-foot. — At 23 stations dragged an average of 26 minutes eafh, an 
average distance of 0.9 mile. 

Tanner heam-trawl, 8-foot. — Not considering two stations where this gear was fouled 
within five minutes of the time it landed, it was used 54 times for an average of 25 minutes 
each, and dragged over the bottom an average distance of 0.7 mile. 

Blalce heam-ti'aui, 10-foot. — Hauled 11 times, an average of 24 minutes each, over an 
average distance of 0.9 mile. 

Blalce heam-travi, 5\-foot. — Used once for 30 minutes and dragged 1.1 miles ; and again for 
40 minutes, 0.8 mile. 

Tangle swabs, S on triangular frame. — Dragged 15 times, an average of 15 minutes each, 
an average distance of 0.6 mile. 

Tangle swabs, 7 on frame. — Used once, for 13 minutes, 0.4 mile. 

Tangle swabs, -3 on short bar. — Used once, 16 minutes, 1.3 miles. 

Tangle swab. — A single tangle swab was seized to the tail of a trawl net at one station and 
dragged 2 minutes. 

Ship's dredge. — Put over but once, when it was lost. 

Mud bag. — Used at 49 stations : lashed to the foot of trawl net at 43, and to the crown of 
tangle-frame at 6; average time dragged, 24 minutes, and average distance 0.7 mile. 

Townsend intermediate net. — Used vertically at 18 stations, a total of 22 hauls, from 
various depths. 

Open planlcton nets. — These were small contrivances, of various patterns and dimensiois, 
ranging between 10 inches and 16 inches in diameter of ring at mouth, and of varjdng lengtlis. 
Those most often used were what was known also as a "Kofoid net," 12 inches in diameter 
of hoop or ring, with a bucket at the lower end, designed by Dr. C. A. Kofoid, of the Uni- 
versity of California. These nets were used vertically in 59 hauls, from depths of 10 to 500 
fathoms. They were towed at the surface at 10 stations, in 38 separate hauls, average 
duration of haul 10 minutes, and average distance towed 0.33 mile. At one of these sta- 
tions, where 8 separate hauls of the net were made, the electric light also was towed at the 
surface, directly in front of the mouth of the net. At another station a Kofoid pattern net 
was secured in the mouth of the 4-foot surface net and towed twice with success. 

Surface tow net. — This apparatus, the regulation 4-foot ringed tow net, was towed, at 58 
stations, 72 times, an average of 23 minutes at each haul, and an average distance of 0.66 
mile. As already noted, at one station two hauls were made with a Kofoid-pattern open- 
plankton net secured in the mouth of the surface net. 

Dip nets. — Twice employed at night for surface collecting, the electric light being utilized 
at the same time to attract free-moving forms. At one station 3 nets were used from the 
rail for 2^ hours; at another 2 nets If hours. 

Hand lines. — Used incidentally at 4 stations, an average of 7 being fished an average of 
33 minutes at each trial. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 9 

Lobster -pots- — Three lobster pots were set out twice over night for periods of 12 and 11 
hours, respectively. 

GiU nets. — Two small gill nets, such as are used for herring, were set on one occasion and 
left out over night for 11 hours. 

Series of water densities, by means of the Sigsbee bottles, and subsurface temperatures, 
by the usual self-registering Negretti and Zambra thermometers, were taken at 3 sta- 
tions, as follows: From 800 fathoms to 50 fathoms, 1 series; from 1,000 fathoms to surface, 
2 series. 

In Monterey Bay apparatus was employed as follows : 

Tanner beam traui, 16-foot. — At 10 stations was dragged an average of 20 minutes each 
time and a distance of 0.8 mile. 

Tanner beam traui, 11-foot. — Except one station where it fouled in less than 5 minutes, 
15 hauls were made of an average duration of 27 minutes each and an average distance of 1 
mile. 

Tanner beam traui, 9-foot. — Leaving out one station of less than 5 minutes, there were 8 
hauls of this apparatus, averaging 27 minutes and 0.8 mile. 

Tanner beam traui, 8-foot. — Hauled at 25 stations an average of 22 minutes for a distance 
of 0.8 mile on the average. 

Blake beam traui, 10-foot. — Made 46 hauls, averaging 20 minutes time, and 0.6 mile over 
the ground. 

Albatross-Blal-e beam traui, 8-foot. — Used at 7 stations an average of 23 minutes each 
and dragged an average distance of 0.75 mile. 

Tangle swabs, 8 on frame. — Hauled 8 times, an average of 13 minutes each, an average 
distance of 0.5 mile over the bottom. 

Tangle swabs, 6 on frame. — Eight hauls, averaging 17 minutes, and 0.6 mile each. 

Tangle swabs, 2 on frame. — Used with trawl nets 6 times, an average of 17 minutes each, 
an average distance of 0.66 mile. 

Tangle sirab, single. — Used with trawl nets 5 times; average time, 17 minutes; average 
distance di-aggcd, 0.5 mile. 

Boat dredge. — Used as an auxiliary to hauls of tangle swabs twice, an average of 14 
minutes each, for 0.6 mile. 

Mud bag. — Used 20 times as an auxiliary to other apparatus — 7 times with the beam 
trawls and 13 times with tangle swabs. The average time towed was 20 minutes and 
average distance 0.7 mile. 

Mud can. — This was an ordinary 1-gallon galvanized pail, which was seized to the tail of a 
trawl net for the purpose of securing a specimen of the bottom. It was used at 6 stations- 
Open plankton' nets. — Used vertically in 15 hauls, depths 100 to 300 fathoms. This 
work was all done at 5 stations, three different nets being hoisted simultaneously on 
the same line. 

These nets were towed at the surface at 8 stations, 13 hauls being made of an average 
duration of 11 minutes and an average distance of 0.4 mile. One haul was inside a surface 
net. 

Surface tow net. — Used at 11 stations, 13 hauls being made; average duration, 17 minutes; 
average distance towed, 0.5 mile. At one trial a Kofoid pattern open plankton net was 
rigged inside the surface net. 

Wing nets. — These were small, conical nets, hung to light rings of varying diameters, 
seized to the frames of beam trawls for the capture of small forms close to the bottom. 
The bags of the nets were of bolting cloth or silk gauze. CTne was used at 2 stations and 2 
were used at 17 stations. 

The depth of a bottom haul is indicated in these tables by the several soundings necessary 
to show the range in depth. When but a single sounding is given it may be assumed that 
the depth was regidar. Where a depth is "estimated" the angle and scope of the dredging 
cable is used for this determination. 



10 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4.'^03 
D. 4,304 
D. 4^05 
D. 4306 



D. 4307 



D. 4308a 



D. 4308b 
(H47S9) 
D.4309 



H. 4790 
D. 4311 



D. 4312 



Vicinity of San Diego, Cal. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 12° 
W., 6.1 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 2° 
W., 5.9 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 39° 
E., 9.6 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 32° 
E., 10.3 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 32° 
E., 10.6 miles. 



At anchor, San Diego en- 
trance. Point Loma Lt. 
Ho., S. 34° W., 1 mile. 



C. S. 5100 

....do 

....do 

....do.... 



..do.... 



C. S. 5106 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 42" 

E., 9.5 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 4r 

E., 8.6 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 46° 
E., 8.1 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 43° 

E., 8.5 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 52° 

E., 7.2 miles. 



Point Lom^a Lt. Ho., N. 56"^ 
E., 7.9 miles. 



C. S. 5100 
do... 



..do. 



.do... 



1904. 
Mar. 1 



Mar. 1 
Mar. 2 
Mar. 2 



Mar. 2 



Mar. 3 



Mar. 3 
Mar. 3 



Mar. 3 



Mar. 4 



3.53 p. m. 

4.00 p. m. 
4.27 p. m. 
4.43 p. m. 
4.51 p. m. 
5.13 p. m. 
8.36 a. m. 

9.01 a. m. 
9.30 a. m. 

10.35 a. m. 
11.00 a. m. 

11.04 a. m. 



11.07 a. m. 

11.40 a. m. 
11.45 a. m. 

2.31 p. m. 

3.05 p. m. 

3.12 p. m. 

3.22 p. m. 

3.58 p. m. 

4.14 p. m. 
9.00 a. m. 

9.10 a. m. 

9.15 a. m. 
9.40 a. m. 
9.40 a. m. 



9.46 to 
10.27 a. m. 



1.03 p. m. 
1.05 p. m. 

1.27 p. m. 
1.44 p. m. 

1.53 p. m. 
2.05 p. m. 
2.19 p. m. 
2.23 p. m. 

2.54 p. m. 
3.03 p. m. 
3.16 p. m. 

3.28 p. m. 
3.30 p. m. 
8.36 a. m. 

9.25 a. m. 
9.27 a. m. 

9.38 a. m. 
9.44 a. m. 

9.47 a. m. 
10.54 a. ni. 
11.03 a. m. 
11.15 a. ni. 
11.18 a. m. 
11.40 a.m. 



fms. 

21 

21-24 

24 

25 

25 

25 

67 

67-116 

116 

207 

207-497 

207-497 



346 

497 
497 
169 

169-490 
490 

490-496 
496 
496 



71 

71 

67 

67-73 

67-78 

73 

78 

78 

71 

71-75 

71-75 

75 

75 



110 
110 

110-129 
129-143 

129 
143 
135 
135-95 
135-95 
95 



gy-s 

gy. S.,Co., G.. 
G. 



crs. yl. S 

crs. yl. 8.,Sh.,G 
crs. yl. S., Sh., G 

gy. S.,Sh 

gv. S.,Sh 

fne. gy. S 

gn. M., fne. S . . . 
gn. M., fne. S., G 

gn. M.,fne. S., G 



gn. M.,fne. S., G 

gn. M.,fne. S., G 
gn. M.,fne. S., G 

fne. S 

fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S.. . 
gn. M., fne. S.. . 
gn. M., fne. S.. . 
gn. M., fne. S... 
gy. S. (hard) . . . 

gy. S. (hard) . . . 

gy. S. (hard)... 

gy. S. (hard) . . . 

gy. S. (hard) . . . 



gy. S. (hard) . 



fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. S., 
fne. gy. 
gn. M., 
gn. M., 
gn. M., 
gn. M., 
fne. gn. 

gn. M. 

gn. M . 



Sh 

Sh . . . . 
Sh.... 
Sh., R. 
Sh.,R. 

R 

R 

R 

S 

fne. S. 
fne. S . 
fne. S . 
fne. S. 
S 



gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S., R 

gn. M., fne. S.. 
gn. M., fne. S. . 
fne. g>'. S., R.. 
fne. gy. S., R. . 
fne. gy. S., R. . 
fne. gy. S., R.. 



THE U. S. FISHEKIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations op the Albatross, 1904. 



11 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial.a 


Drift." 




Air. 
oF. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


oF. 


oF. 






h. m. 




mi. 




64 


63 




Tnr. sdr 




36 


S 


1.0 




64 
64 

64 
6S 


63 

62 
61 
60 


52." 6' 
52.0 


11' Tnr 


Bottom. 


25 


S 


.9 




Tnr. sdr 






Tnr. sdr 




31 
19 


N. 38° E . . 
N. 38°E.. 


1.1 
.9 




11' Tnr.; m. b . . 


Bottom. 




63 
60 
65 
67 
70 
70 


60 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 


52.0 
49.9 

48.6' 


Tnr. sdr . . 












Tnr. sdr 




58 
25 


N. 51° W . 
N.51°W.. 


1.3 
.9 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




1 35 
43 


S. 40° W.. 
S. 40° W.. 


1.7 
1.0 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 




















[Mud bag, fast to tail of 


70 


59 




11' Tnr.; m. b .. 


Bottom. 


35 


S. 40° W.. 


.8 


i. trawl net came up afoul 

I of mouth of net. 

1 Hauled obliquely on a scope 


70 


59 




Tnr. sdr 










i. of 100 fms. cable from a 












1 depth estimated at 75 fms. 


69 


59 


40.2 


Op. plank 

Tnr. sdr 




19 








69 
69 
67 


59 
60 
61 


40.2 












Tnr. sdr 




i 50 
35 


S. 50° W.. 
S. 50°W.. 


1.8 
1.0 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 




67 
66 


61 
61 
















11' Tnr.; m. b .. 


Bottom. 


34 


S. 50° W.. 


1.0 




66 
66 


61 
61 


40.3 
40.3 


Tnr. sdr 












Op. plank 11 


100 fms . 


10 


None 






54 


57 






2 




4.0 


Seining party ashore. 














rent. 




55 


57 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


23 


Tide - cur- 
rent. 


.7 


Towed in usual manner as 
current swept past. 


55 


57 




Op. plank 


3 fms . . . 


/ 


Tide -cur- 
rent. 


. 2 


1 Hauled through water from 
1 depth of about 3 fms. to 


56 


57 




Op. plank 


3 fms . . . 


4 


Tide -cur- 
rent. 


.1 


( surface; tide too strong 
) to get net to bottom. 


56 


58 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


21 


Tide-cur 
rent. 


.6 


■7 hauls of open plankton 
nets, made at intervals of 
about 5 minutes at depths 
between 3 and 8 fms. and 
surface in average time of 
1 minute. Tide slacking. 


5V 


5.S 




Op. plank 


3-8 fms . 


t 


None 




\ FromO to 10 a. m. ebb tide 


















running about 3 miles per 


















hour, slacking after 10 to 


















about 1 mile at 11 a. m. 


















Work interfered with by 


















eel grass and kelp carried 


















down by tide. 


62 
6? 


61 
61 




Tnr. sdr 




9 

7 








Op. plank II 


100 fms . 


None 






62 
63 


61 
61 




Tnr. sdr 




1 
36 


S. 73° W.. 
S. 73° W.. 


1.0 

.8 




11' Tnr.; m. b... 


Bottom. 




65 


61 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


28 


S. 73°W.. 


.6 




67 
67 


61 
61 




Tnr. sdr 












Op. plank |l 


50 fms . . 


8 


None 






67 
66 
66 


61 
61 
61 


49 .'7" 


Tnr. sdr 












Sig. sdr 




32 
23 


S. 88° W . . 
S. 88° W.. 


.9 




11' Tnr.; m. b . . 


Bottom. 




66 


61 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


11 


S. 88° W.. 


.3 




66 


61 




Op. plank 1 


50 fms . . 


8 








66 
57 

62 
fft. 


61 
59 

59 
5.) 


48.0 
48.0 


Tnr. sdr 






None 






Tnr. sdr 




3 

1 30 
9 








Tnr. sdr 




S. 76°W.. 


.4 




Op. plank 


(?) 


No record of depth of haul; 
believed to be from 50 fms. 


















63 


59 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


27 


S. 76° W.. 


.3 




64 


59 




ll'Tnr.; m.b... 


Bottom. 


50 


S. 76° W.. 


.4 


Trawl frame and net 
wrecked; mud bag lost. 


64 
70 
70 
70 


60 
60 
60 
60 




Tnr. sdr 












Tnr. sdr 












Tnr. sdr... 




47 
25 


N. 76° W . . 

N. 76°W.. 


.9 
.6 




8' Tnr.; m. h. .. 


Bottom. 


Mud bag wrecked. 


70 


60 




Surf, tow 


Surface . 


22 


N.76° W.. 


.5 




70 


m 




Tnr. sdr 






None 







a In the records of this cruise the entire time occupied in all the operations of any given station and 
the general direction and total distance of drift are shown in the respective columns opposite the 
ioitlal operation at that station, wtiich was usually a sounding. 



12 



DREDGING AND HYDROGKAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



D. 4313 



D.4314 



D.4315 
D.4316 



D.4317 



D.4318 
D.4319 
D.4320 
D. 4321a 
D.4322 



D.4323 



D.4324 



D.4325 



Position. 



Vicinity of San Diego, Cal. — 
Continued. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 57° 
E., 9.5 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 34° 
E., 9.8 miles. 



Chart. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 42° 

E.,9.1 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. 35° 

E., 10.4 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho. 
E., 11 miles. 



Soledad Hill, Point La JoUa, 

S. 70° E., 4.6 miles. 
Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 

S. 70° E., 3.8 miles. 
Soledad Hill. Point La Jolla, 

S. 43° E., 2.9 miles. 
Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 

S. 43° E., 3.1 miles. 
Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 

S. 34° E., 3.2 miles. 



Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. E., 3.7 miles. 



At anchor off Pacific Beach, 
Soledad Hill, Point La 
Jolla, N. 24° E., 3.1 miles. 



Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. E., 4.4 miles. 



Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. 50" E., 5.6 miles. 



C S. 5100 



....do... 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



..do.. 



..do.. 



...do.. 



...do... 



Date. 



1904. 
Mar. 4 



Mar. 



Mar. 5 
Mar. 5 



Mar. 



Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



Mar. 



Mar. 8 



Mar. 8 



Time of 
day. 



1.07 p. m. 
1.07 p. m. 



1.22 p. m. 92-243 

1.27 p. m. 92-243 

1.54 p. m. 243 

2.47 p.m. 64 



Depth. 



fms. 



2.47 p.m. 

2.57 p. m. 
3.01 p. m. 

3.04 p.m. 

3.20 p. m. 

3.51 p. m. 
8.35 a.m. 
8.38 a. ra. 
8.56 a. m. 

8.59 a. m. 

9.14>a„ m. 
9.14 a. m. 
9.33 a. m. 

9.45 a. m. 
10 a. m. 
10.01a.m. 
10.34 a.m. 
10.40 a.m. 
10.13a. m. 
10.13a.m. 

10.44 a.m. 

10.45 a.m. 
11.11 a.m. 
11.11 a.m. 

11.27 a.m. 

11.28 a.m. 
1.19p.m. 
1.33p.m. 
1.35p.m. 
1.35 p.m. 
1.38 p.m. 
2.08 p.m. 
2.10p.m. 
2.40 p.m. 

2.46 p.m. 

2.52 p.m. 
3.22 p.m. 
5.30 p.m. 
5.30 p.m. 
6.30 p.m. 

6.35 p.m. 
7.35 p.m. 

8.44 a.m. 

8.45 a.m. 
8..54a.m. 
9.11a.m. 
9.17 a.m. 
9.43 a.m. 

9.48 a.m. 
10.06 a.m. 
10.09 a.m. 
10.23 a.m. 

10.25 a.m. 
10.37 a.m. 
10.45 a.m. 



64 



64-248 

72 



72-492 



248 
492 



161 

161 

161-510 

492 

471-510 

471 

510 

510 

114 

114 

55 

55 

55 

55 

206 

206 

110 

110 

110 

110-199 

110-199 

199 

199 

227 

227 

227-193 

193 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

191 

191 

191-292 
275 

275-292 
292 
292 
280 

280-243 

264-243 



Character of 
bottom. 



gj'. S., Sh. 
g.v. S., Sh. 



gv. S., Sh 

gy. S., Sh., R... 
gy. S., Sh.,R... 
It. gv. S.,bk. Sp. 

Sh., G. 
It. gy. S.,bk. Sp. 

Sh., G. 
br. M., fne. S., G 
gy.S., G 

br. M., fne. S., R 

br. M., fne. S. 
gn. M 

fne. gy. S . . . . 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 



fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

gn. M., fne. S. .. 
gn. M., fne. S. . 
gn. M., fne. S. . 

gn. M 

gn. M., 

gn. M 

(No specimen). 
(No specimen). 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

dk. gn. M 
dk. gn. M 
gn. M., Sh. 
gn. M., Sh. 
gn. M., Sh. 
sft. gn. M. . 
sft. gn. M.. 
sft. gn. M.. 
sft. gn. M.. 
sft. gn. M.. 
sft. gn. M.. 
sft. gn. M. . 
sft. gn. M.. 

gy.S 

gy-s 

gy-s 



gy.S.... 
gy-S.... 

gn. M., fne. S. . 
gn. M., fne. S. . 
gn. M., fne. S. . 
gn. M., fne. S. . 
gn. M., fne. S. . 

gn. M , 

gn. M 

(No sounding) . 



sft. gn. M.. 

264 • sft. gn. M.. 
243 ! sft. gn. M.. 
243 i sft.gn. M.. 



a Between stations D. 4.321 and D. 4322 temperatures taken as follows: 55 fms., 49°; 100 fms., 4 
fms., 45°. 
b Between stations D. 4325 and D. 4326 temperatures taken as follows: 50 fms., 51°; 100 fms., 48° 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS, 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



13 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 

04 

64 

64 
64 
64 
61 

61 

60 
60 

60 

60 
61 
64 
64 
64 

64 

64 
64 
62 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
71 
71 
69 
69 
67 
67 
70 
70 
74 
73 
73 
73 
73 
72 
72 
72 
72 
72 
73 
69 
69 
62-58 

62-61 
62 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
66 
66 
67 
67 
68 

68 
69 
70 


°F. 

01 

61 

61 
61 
61 
60 

60 

60 
60 

60 

60 
61 
60 
60 
60 

60 

60 
60 
60 
00 
00 
60 
60 
60 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
62 
62 
62 
62 
63 
63 
03 
63 
63 
63 
63 
63 
64-60 

64-62 
64 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 

62 
62 
62 


°F. 
"44.1 

'46.' 2' 
49.0 
49.0 
49.0 

49.0 

47.0 
47.0 

•io.'o' 

40.0 

'so.'s' 

50.5 

'58.'6' 
58.0 



'4.5.'4' 
45.4 



45.8 

46.6' 
46.0 

'■43.0" 
43.0 


Tnr. sdr 




h. m. 

54 

28 
21 


S. 77° W . . 
None 


mi. 

.8 




Op. plank 

Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m. b ... 
Tnr. sdr 


(?) 

Surface . 
Bottom. 


(No record of depth of haul; 
•J believed to be from 50 fms. 


S. 77° W.. 
S. 77° W.. 
None 


. 7 
.5 


t Ring broken. 






1 13 
2 
31 


S. 32° W.. 
None 


1.9 




Op. plank II 

Surf, tow 


50 fms . . 
Surface . 




S. 32° W.. 
None 


1.2 




11' Tnr.; s.d.... 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


39 


S. 32°W.. 
None 


1.5 


(Lost trawl frame and com- 
< plete ship's dredge; trawl 
[ net wrecked. 
Temperature at 75 fms., 49°. 








None 






Tnr. sdr 




5 
2 
5 

2 

1 53 

1 

1 1 


None 






Op. plank 1 


50 fms . . 


None... . 






None 






Op. plank 

Sig. sdr. 


70fm.s... 


None . . 




(Hauled obliquely on a scope 
< of 100 fms. cable from a 


S. 6°W... 


2.3 


[ depth estimated at 70 fms. 


Op. plank II 

Surf, tow 


50 fms . . 
Surface . 




S. 6° W... 
None 


2.0 


Temperature at 70 fms. ,49. 5°. 


9' Tnr.; m. b ... 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


30 


S. 6° W . . . 
None 


2.0 




Op. plank II 


100 fms.. 


5 


None. . 






None 










6 
4 
7 
5 
3 
2 
6 
4 
3 
40 
4 
29 
30 


None 




Lost sounding lead. 


Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 








None 






Op. plank 1 

Sig. sdr. 


50 fms . . 


None 






None 






Op. plank II 


50 fms . . 


None 






None 




Temperature at55 fms. ,49.5°. 


Op. plank II 

Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 
100 fms.. 














NW 

None. . . . 


.5 




Op. plank II 

9' Tnr.; m. b.... 
Surf, tow 


100 fms.. 
Bottom. 
Surface . 




NW 

NW 

None 


.4 
.4 




Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms.. 


5 
56 
31 
25 


None 






N.22° W.. 
N. 22° W. . 
N. 22° W.. 
None 


.7 
. 5 
.4 




Surf, tow 

11' Tnr.; m. b... 
Sig. sdr.. 


Surface . 
Bottom. 






13 

1 
12 

2 30 

1 

1 11 

3 

44 


None 




Night anchorage. 


8 hand lines 

3 lobster pots. . . 

3dipnets&e.l.. 
Op. plank 1 &e.l 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
Bottom. 

Surface . 
10 fms... 


None 




Fished from ship's rail. 


None 




Set in edge of kelp patch near 


None 




anchorage. 


None ... . 






N. 69° W. . 


1.3 




Op. plank II 

Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms.. 
Surface . 




N.69° W.. 
None 


1.1 




9' Tnr.; m. b.... 
Sig. sdr... 


Bottom. 


30 


N. 69° W. . 
None 


.7 




Op. plank II 


150 fms.. 


7 
56 
28 
14 








W 

W 

w 

None 


.6 
.4 
.2 


Depth estimated. 


'44.0" 
44.0 


Surf, tow 

9' Tnr.; m .b.... 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


Net wrecked from weight of 
mud. 


Op. plank 1 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms.. 


7 








None 







907—06- 



14 



DREDGING AND HYDROGEAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



Date. 



D.4327 

D.4328 
D.4329 

D.4330 
D.4331 
D.4332 
D. 4333a 

D. 4334 
D.4335 

D.4336 
D. 4337 

D.4338 
D. 4339 

D. 4340 



Vicinity of San Diego, Cal.— 
Continued. 

Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. 54° E., 6.3 miles. 



Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. 40° E., 1.4 miles. 

Soledad Hill, Point La Jolla, 
S. 38° 30' E., 1.9 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 18° 
E., 10.8 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 22° 
30' E., 11 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 25° 
E., 11.3 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 27° 
E., 12.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 33° 
30' E., 13.6 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 36° 
E., 14.1 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 38° 
30' E., 14.8 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 38° 
30' E., 15.6 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 33° 
E., 10.5 mi-les. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 36° 
E., 11.2 miles. 



C. S.5100 

do... 

....do... 

....do... 
....do... 
....do... 
....do... 

....do... 
.-...do... 

....do... 
....do.... 

do.... 



Time of 
day. 



1904. 
Mar. 



Mar. 8 

Mar. 8 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 9 

Mar. 10 

Mar. 10 

Mar. 10 



...do Mar. 10 



S. point South Coronado Is- 
land, N. 87° E., 1.8 miles. 



..do.. 



Depth. 



Mar. 11 



11.16a.m. 
11.20 a.m. 
11.22 a.m. 
11..30a.m. 
11.38 a.m. 
11.55 a.m. 
11.57 a.m. 

2.16p.m. 

2.21p.m. 

2.20 p.m. 

2.43 p.m. 

2.50 p.m. 
2..50p.m. 
2.53 p.m. 
3.30 p.m. 
8.30 a.m. 

8.38 a.m. 

8.39 a.m. 
9.11a.m. 
9.14a.m. 
9.27 a.m. 

9.40 a.m. 

9.42 a.m. 
10.09 a.m. 
10.25 a.m. 
10.27 a.m. 
10.38 a.m. 
10.45 a. m. 
11.14a.m. 

1.09 p.m. 
1.36 p.m. 

1.44 p.m. 
2.04 p.m. 
2.08 p. m. 
2.46 p.m. 

3.06 p.m. 

3.20 p.m. 
3.36 p. m. 

3.44 p.m. 
9.23 a.m. 

9.43 a.m. 

9.51 a.m. 

10.21 a.m. 

10.25 a.m. 
11.12 a.m. 
11.15 a.m. 

11.22 a.m. 
11.43 a.m. 

12 m. 

12.02 p.m. 
2.22 p.m. 
2.33 p.m. 
2.28 p.m. 
2.40 p.m. 

2.49 p.m. 

3.07 p.m. 

3.08 p. m. 
3.17 p.m. 

3.21 p.m. 

3.50 p.m. 

3.55 p.m. 
9.38 a.m. 



Character of 
bottom. 



gn. M 

fne.gy.S.,bk.Sp., 
G. 

fne.gy.S.,bk.Sp., 
G. 

gv. S.,bk. Sp 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

oBetween stations D. 4333 and D. 4334 temperatures taken as follows: 100 fms., 48.8°; 200 fms., 45.5° 



10.07 a.m. 
10.09 a.m. 



fms. 

263 

263 

263-3.30 

263-330 

299 

330 

330 

71 

71-57 

57 

128 

128-112 

128-112 

112 

112 

55 

55-57 

57 

57 

57-58 

58 

62 

62-183 

183 

301 

301 

301-487 

412 

487 

525 

525-541- 

514 

541 

514 

514 

500 

500-530- 

524 

530 

524 

524 

518 

518-565 

518-565 

565 

565 
617 
617-680 
617-680 
680 
679 

679 
168 
168-254 
168-254 
254 
254 

241 

241-369 

287-369 

287 

369 

369 
46 

46-87 

87 
87 



sft. gn. 
sft. gn 
sft. gn 
sft. gn 
sft. gn 
sft. gn 
sft. gn 
fne. gy 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
It. gn. 
It. gn. 
It. gn. 
It. gn. 
It. gn. 
gy- S., 
gy- s., 
gy- s., 
gy. s., 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



M... 

M... 

M... 

M... 

M... 
, M... 

M... 
.S... 
, fne. 



, fne. S. . 
, fne. S.. 
, fne. S.. 
, fne. S.. 
, fne. S.. 

S 

S., R... 
S 



S., R 

S., R 

bk. Sp.... 
bk. Sp., R 
bk. Sp., R 
bk. Sp., R 



, fne. S... 



gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S. . . . 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



gn. M 

fne. gy. S 

gn. M.,fne.S.,R. 
gn. M.,fne.S.,R. 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Coutinued. 



15 



Temperature. 




Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Apparatus. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
72 
72 
72 
73 
74 
76 
76 
66 
66 
66 
67 
67 
67 
67 
68 
60 
60 
60 
65 
65 
66 
67. 
67 
69 
69 
69 
69 
70 
71 
65 
65 

65 
66 
66 
65 
64 

64 
64 

64 
58 
59 
59 
60 

60 
61 
61 
61 
61 
60 

60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 

.59 
56 

56 

57 
57 


°F. 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 

60 
60 
60 
61 
61 

61 
61 

61 
58 
58 
59 
59 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 

59 
60 
60 
60 
59 
59 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 

59 
59 

59 

59 
59 


°F. 

43.' 5' 

43.5 






h. m 
56 
4 

33 
24 


N. 56° W. . 
None. 


mi. 
1.1 




Op. plank II 

Surf, tow ' 

8' Tnr 


1.50 fms.. 
Surface . 
Bottom. 




N. 56° W. . 
N. 56° W. . 
None 


.8 
.6 




Op. plank IJ 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 


8 


None 






None 






Tnr. sdr.. 1 


16 
2 


S.15° W.. 
S. 1.5° W.. 
None 


.2 
.1 




"49.'5' 




50.5 


■4i.'7' 
40.1 


8'Tm-.; 1 swab. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 


Frame lost; net wrecked. 


Tnr. sdr . 




50 
6 
9 


N. 48° W. . 
N. 48° W. . 
N. 48° W. . 
None 


.3 
.2 
.3 




8' Tnr 

Surf, tow 


Bottom. 
Surface - 


Net wrecked. 


Op. plank il 

Tnr. sdr 


25 fms... 


2 
26 
5 


None 1- 




N. 88° W. . 
N. 88° W. . 
None 


.4 
9 




8' Tnr 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 


Net badly torn. 


Tnr. sdr... 




22 


S. 84° W . . 


.6 
.5 




9' Tnr 

Tnr. sdr. 


Bottom. 


15 S. 84° W . . 
. None 


Frame bent; net wrecked. 


Tnr. sdr... 




33 j S. 51° W. . 

25 1 S. 51° W.. 

. . . None 


1.0 
.9 




8 swabs; m. b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. 




59 1 N.84° W.. 


1.6 




Op. plank II 

8' Tnr.. 


150 fms.. 
Bottom. 


13 
30 


None 




N.84° W.. 
None 


1.0 




Sig. sdr. 




Sig. sdr.. . 






None 






Sig. sdr. 




1 28 
28 


S.83° \V.. 
S. 83° W.. 

None 


.8 
.4 




lo.'o" 

40:0 

'39." 5" 
39.5 

'39.6' 
39.0 

'38.' 5' 
38.5 

"44.' 6' 

44.0 

'41.' 5' 
41.5 


8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr. . 


Bottom. 




Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms . 


13 


None 












Sig. sdr 


1 25 
30 


S. 83° W.. 

S. 83° W . . 

None 


1.0 
.6 




8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Town. int. 11 

Sig. sdr 


50 to 25 
fms. 


4 


None 






None 






Sig. sdr. 




1 23 

26 

27 

5 


S. 39° W.. 
S. 39° W . . 

S. 39° W.. 


1.4 

.8 
.8 




Surf, tow 

8' Tnr 

Town. int. H 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 

Bottom. 

150 to 100 

fms. 




None 






Sig. sdr 1 


1 8 
44 
25 


S. 75° W . . 
S. 75° W.. 
S. 75° W.. 


i.5 

1.3 

.7 




Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m. b.... 
Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 




Town. int. H 

Sig. sdr 


150 to 100 

fms. 


5 


None 












Sig. sdr. 




42 
12 
12 


S. 73° W.. 
S. 73° W.. 
S. 73° W.. 

None. . . . 


.9 
.4 
.4 




8' Tnr.; m. b... 

Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


Net torn; mud bag damaged 


Town. int. 11 

Sig. sdr 


125 to 50 
fms. 


7 

1 7 
40 
29 


None 






N. 65° W . 
N. 65° W . 
N. 65° W . 
None 


1.1 
.9 
.7 




Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m. b ... 
Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 




Town. int. "I.... 
Sig. sdr 


150 to 50 
fms. 


5 














Tnr. sdr 




44 
29 
9 


S.71°W.. 
S. 71° W.. 


1.6 
1.2 




8' Tnr.; ni. b ... 

Op. plank II 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 
50 fms . . 




None 







16 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California CoAsr 



Station 
No. 



D. 4341 

D. 4342 
D.4343 

D. 4344 

D. 4345 
D. 4346 
D. 4347 

D. 4348 



Position. 



D. 4349 



Vicinity of San Diego, Cal. — 
Continued. 

S. point South Coronado Is- 
land, N. 79° E., 3.3 miles. 



S. point South Coronado Is- 
land, S. 72° E.,2.b miles. 

S. point South Coronado Is- 
land, S. 60° E., 3.6 miles. 



S. point South Coronado Is- 
land, S. 68° E., 5.3 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 1° 
E., 12.4 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 35° 
E., 4.2 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. 43° 
E., 5.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 49° 
E., 5.8 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. E. 
6.5 miles. 



Chart. 



D.4350 Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 51"= 
E., 8.2 miles. 



D. 4351 



D.4352 



D.4353 



D.4354 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 36° 
E., 12.3 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 40° 
E., 13.4 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 47° 
E., 14.7 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 49° 
E., 15.6 miles. 



C.S. 5100. 



-do.. 
-do.. 



-do.... 

-do.... 
-do.... 
.do.... 

-do.. 



Date. 



.do... 



.do.. 



..do... 



.do 



..do. 



1904. 
Mar. 11 



Mar. 11 
Mar. 11 

Mar. 11 

Mar. 11 
Mar. 12 
Mar. 12 

Mar. 12 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Mar. 12 



Mar. 12 



Mar. 14 



Mar. 14 



Mar. 14 



Mar. 14 



10.22 a.m. 
10.43 a.m. 

10.43 a.m. 

10.44 a.m. 
11.05 a.m. 
11.58 a.m. 
12.03 p.m. 

12.23 p.m. 
1.34 p.m. 

1.40 p.m. 
1.48 p.m. 
1.51 p.m. 

2.06 p.m. 

2.14 p.m. 

2.15 p.m. 
2.30 p.m. 
2.30 p.m. 

2.41 p.m. 

4.13 p.m. 
4.18 p.m. 
4..30p.m. 
8.02 a.m. 

8.07 a.m. 
8..33 a.m. 
8.45 a.m. 
8.47 a.m. 
8..52 a. m. 

9.16 a.m. 
9.33 a.m. 

9.39 a.m. 



10.14 a.m. 

10..34a.m. 

10.37 a.m. 

10.39 a.m. 
10.39 a.m. 

11.11 a.m. 
11.26 a.m. 

11.38 a.m. 
11.43 a.m. 

11.45 a.m. 

12.11p.m. 

9.36 a.m. 

9.44 a.m. 
10 a.m. 
10.32 a.m. 
10.36 a.m. 
11.07 a. m. 
11.26 a.m. 
11.28 a.m. 
12.03 p. m. 

1.38 p.m. 

1.38 p.m. 

1.56 p. m. 

2.06 p. m. 

2.27 p. m. 
2.33 p. m. 
3.11 p.m. 

3. 28 p. m. 

3.29 p.m. 
4.04 p. m. 



fms. 

188 

266-323 

266-323 

266 

323 

53 

53-66 

66 

55 

55-155 

60 

60-155 

61 

155 

155 

224 

224 

224 

25 

25-25 

25 

46 

46-50 

50 

55 

55-58 

55-58 

58 

83 

83-113 

fl6 



113 

75 

7.5-1.34- 

81 

82 

82-134- 

81 

134 

81 

81 

81-84 

81-84 



423 

42.3-488 

42.3-488 

488 

488 

549 

549-585 

549-585 

585 

639 

639-628- 

640 

639-628- 

640 

628 

640 

640 

646 

646-650 

64(>-6.50 

650 



Character of 
bottom. 



gy. S.,bk. Sp 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

gy.s 

gy-s 

gy. S., bk. Sp 

Ine. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

(No specimen) 

(No specimen) 

Rky 

gy.s 

gy-S 

gy.s.. 

dk. gn. 
dk. gn. 
fne. gy 
fne. gy, 
fne. gy, 
fne. gy. 
fne. gy. 
gy. M., 
Sp. 

gy- M., 

Sp. 

gy. M., 

Sp. 

gy. M., 

Sp. 
gv. M., 

Sp. 
gn. M., 
gn. M., 



gn. M., fne. S. 
gn. M., fne. S. 



M., fne. S 
M., fne. S 

.S 

s 

s 

s 

S., bk. Sp. 
fne.S.,bk. 

fne. S., bk. 

fne.S.,bk. 

fne.S.,bk. 

fne.S.,bk. 

fne. S 

fne. S 



gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

crs. gy. S , 

gn.M.,crs.S.,Sh. 

G. 
gn.M.,crs.S.,Sh. 

G. 
gn. M.,ers.S.,Sh. 
G. 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



17 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
57 
58 
58 
58 
59 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 
60 
60 
52 
52 
55 
57 
57 
58 
60 
62 

63 

64 

64 

67 

67 
67 

67 
67 

68 
68 
68 
68 

68 

68 

65 
68 
71 
70 
70 
70 
70 
70 
68 
66 
66 

65 

65 
63 
63 
61 
61 
61 
61 


"F. 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 

59 
59 
59 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
58 

58 

58 

58 

58 

58 
58 

58 
58 

59 
59 
59 
59 

59 

58 

58 


°F. 
46.0 

'42.'6' 
'48.'9' 

'so.' 4' 

'56.' 4' 
48.0 

'so.'o' 

49.0 


Tnr. sdr 




h. m. 
50 
24 
IG 


S. 63° W.. 
S.63° W.. 
S. 63° W.. 
None 


mi. 
1.1 
.9 
.6 




8' Tnr.; m. b . . . 
Surf, tow 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Sig. sdr 






None 






Tnr. sdr 




26 
16 


S. 81° W.. 
S. 81° W.. 
None 


.7 
.5 




8' Tnr.; m. b . . . 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




44 
32 


S. 85° W.. 
S. 85° W.. 
Nbne 


1.2 
1.0 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 




8' Tnr.; m. b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 


22 


S.85°W.. 
None 


.7 




Op. plant. 1 

Tnr. sdr 


50fms.. 


4 






Bag torn. 


None 




Sig. sdr 




55 
18 

7 

23 
16 


N. 79° W. 
N. 79° W. 
N. 79° W. 

S. 77° E... 

S. 77°E... 


.5 
.4 
.2 

.4 
.3 


Lost sounding lead. 


Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m. b... 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


Gear fouled on bottom, but 
no damage. 


8' Tnr.; m. b . . . 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




35 
23 


S. 67° W.. 

S. 67° W.. 


1.3 
1.1 




8' Tnr.; m. b . . . 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




39 
25 
20 


S. 86° W.. 
S. 86°W.. 
S. 86° W.. 


.8 
.6 
.5 




8' Tnr.; m. b.... 

Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Tnr. sdr 




47 
30 


S. 79° W.. 
S.79° W.. 
None . . 


1.6 
1.0 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 




8' Tnr.; m. b.... 
Sig. sdr . 


Bottom. 


35 


S. 79° W.. 
None 


1.2 




Tnr. sdr 




57 

48 


S. 60° W.. 
S. 60° W.. 


1.2 
1.1 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 




8' Tnr.; m. b.... 
Sig. sdr. 


Bottom. 


45 


S.60° W.. 
None 


1.0 




Sig. sdr 






None 






Tnr. sdr 




38 
25 

19 


S. 51° W.. 
S. 51°W.. 

S. 51°W.. 

None 


1.4 
1.2 

.8 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 

Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Sig. sdr 




1 24 
46 
30 
12 


S. 76° W.. 
S.76° W.. 
S. 76° W.. 


1.5 
1.2 
.9 




59 1 

60 1 

60 

60 40.0 
59 ' 


Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m.b.... 

Town. int. || 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 
125 fms. 




None 






Sig. sdr 1 


1 23 
29 
22 


S. 71° W.. 
S. 71° W.. 
S. 71° W.. 

None . . . 


1.3 

.7 
.4 




59 
59 
59 
59 
59 

59 

59 


'39.' 6' 


8' Tnr; m.b.... 

Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Sig. sdr t _ - 


1 23 
50 

27 


S. 80° W.. 
S. 80° W.. 

S. 80° W.. 


1.0 
.9 

.5 




Surf, tow 

8' Tnr.; m.b.... 
Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 




59 1 .30-0 


Op. plank. II 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms . 


7 


None 






59 
59 
59 
59 
60 


39.0 
"38."5' 


None 










1 17 
27 
58 


S\V 

sw 

sw 

None 


1.0 
.5 
1.0 




8' Tnr.; m.b 

Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 





18 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4355 



li. 4791 
D. 4a5C 



D.4357 



D. 4358 



D. 4a59 



D. 43fi0 



D. 4361 



D. 4363 



D. 4.3C5 

O. 4360 

D. 4367 

D. 4.368 

D. 4369 

H. 4792 
H. 4793 
D. 4370 



IJicinity of San Diego, Cal. — 
Continued. 

At anchor, off Quarantine, 
San Diego Harbor. 



Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. 31° 

E., 2.6 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 82° 

30' E., 5.9 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 81° 
E., 7.5 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 82° 
30' E., 8.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 85° 
E., 9 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 86° 
30' E., 9.4 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 87^ 
E., 9.9 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 89° 
30' E., 10.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 81° 
E., 11.1 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 81° 
E., 5.5 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 81° 
E., 6.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 82° 
E., 7 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 82° 
30' E., 7.8 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho.. S. 83° 
E., 8.5 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 82° 
E., 10 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 88° 

E., 10.8 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 89° 

E., 10.3 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 88° 

E., 10 miles. 



C. S. 5100 
do.... 



...do. 



.do... 



1904. 
Mar. 14 



Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 



Mar. 1.5 



Mar. 15 



....do. 



..do... 



..do.. 



..do... 



Mar. 15 



Mar. 15 



Mar. 15 



Mar. 15 



...do I Mar. 16 



...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 

...do.. 
...do.. 
...do.. 



Mar. 16 

Mar. 16 

Mar. 16 

Mar. 16 

Mar. 16 
Mar. 16 
Mar. 16 



8.20 p. m. 

8.20 p. m. 

9.45 p.m. 
7.49 a. m. 

8.25 a. m. 
8.35 a. m. 
9.04 a. m. 
9.06 a. m. 
9.20 a.m. 
9.25 a. m. 

9.32 a. m. 

9.33 a. m. 

9.56 a.m. 

9.57 a.m. 
10.11 a.m. 
10.17 a.m. 
10.20 a. m. 
10.23 a. m. 
10.47 a. m. 

10.55 a. m. 



11.11 a.m. 

11.17 a.m. 

11.18 a.m. 

11.42 a.m. 

11.43 a.m. 
1.06 p.m. 
1.12 p.m. 
1.. 30 p.m. 

1.35 p. m. 

1.45 p. m. 
1.51 p. m. 
1..55 p. m. 
1.58 p.m. 
2.05 p. m. 

2.36 p. m: 

2.40 p. m. 

2.41 p.m. 
2.55 p. m. 
3.08 p. m. 
3.16 p. m. 
3.27 p. m. 
3.49 p. m. 
8.44 a. m. 
8..50 a. m. 

9.12 a.m. 

9.13 a.m. 
9.25 a. m. 
9.34 a. m. 
9.54 a. m. 

10.00 a. m. 
10.10 a.m. 
10.14 a.m. 

10.35 a.m. 

10.36 a. m. 
10.51 a.m. 
10.56 a. m. 
11.20 a.m. 
11.35 a.m. 
11.38 a.m. 
12.00 m. 

1.08 p. m. 
1.16 p.m. 
1.44 p.m. 

2.09 p. m. 

2.15 p.m. 

2.27 p. m. 
2. .32 p. m. 

2.46 p. m. 



fms. 
7 

7 

7 
37 

120 

120-131 

131 

131 

134 

134-1.55 

142-155 

142 

155 

155 

167 

167-191 

177-191 

177 

191 

191 

191 

191-220- 
98 

220-98 

220 

98 

98 

108 

108-92 

92 

2 

97 

97-91-93 

91 

91-93 

93 

100 

100-159 

100-159 

159 

207 

207-348 

315 

348 

101 

101-129 

129 

129 

130 

130-158 

158 

158 

176 

176-181 

181 

181 

201 

201-215 

215 

240 

240 

240 

260 

260-284 

284 

198 

179 

99 

99-147 
147 



gy. M., ers. S 

gy. M., crs. S 

gy. M., crs. S 

f ne. gy. S 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M., br. Sp., R 

gn. M., br. Sp., R 
gn. M., br. Sp... 
gn. M., br. Sp... 
gn. M., br. Sp . . . 

R 

fne. gv. S., R 

fne. gy. S., R 

fne. gy. S., R 

fne. gy. S 

gy. S., M., Sp. R. 
fne. gy. S., bk. Sp 
fne. gy. S., bk. Sp 

gv. S.', R 

fne. gy. S.,bk. Sp 
fne. gy. S., bk. Sp 
fne. gy. S.,bk. Sp 
fne. gy. S., bk. Sp 

fne. gy S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gy. S., R 

gy. S., M., R 

gh. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M., S., R 

gy-S., R 

gy. S 

gy-S 

gy. s., R 

gy-S., R 

gy. s., R 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMEK ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



19 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Deptli. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
57 

57 

57 
56 

57 
57 
56 
55 
55 
55 
55 
56 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
58 

59 

59 

60 

61 
61 
64 
64 
68 
68 
66 
66 
65 
65 
65 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
64 
63 
63 
63 
63 
63 
63 
65 
70 
71 
71 
71 
72 
72 
73 
73 
74 
73 
73 
73 
66 
66 
65 
64 

64 

64 

64 
62 


op 

59 

59 

59 
57 

57 
57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 

60 

60 

60 

60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
59 
59 

59 

59 
59 
59 


°F. 

'48."2" 
48.2 

"46." 8" 
46.8 

'45.' 4' 
45.4 
45.4 

'49.' 6" 

49.0 
"42.'8" 






h. m. 




mi. 


Night anchorage. 
(Tide ebbing latter part of 
\ trial. 


fElec. surf. light, 
\ 2 dip nets. 

Op. plank. ||. 

Tnr.iSdr 


jsurface . 
7 f ms . . . 


1 45 

3 
5 

48 
28 

7 






None 




None 






Tnr. sdr 




S. 77° W.. 

S. 77° W.. 




1.7 
1.2 




8' Tnr.; m. b 

Town. int. II... . 
Tnr. sdr . 


Bottom. 
100 f ms . 




None . 






Tnr. sdr 




45 
28 
21 


N. 83° W.. 
N.83°W.. 
N.83° W.. 


.7 
. 5 
.4 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 
Surf, tow 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Town. int. II 

Tnr. sdr . 


100 fms . 


7 


None 






None . 






Tnr. sdr 




50 

28 
25 


N.60° W.. 
N.60° W.. 
N. 60° W.. 


.9 

.6 
.G 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 

Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Town, int.!! 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms . 


7 


None . 


Temperature at 100 fms., 
48.9°. 

.\lso beginning of ne.xt sta- 
tion. 

Position same as end of pre- 
ceding station. 

Frame lost; fragments of 
net recovered. 


None 




Sig. sdr 




50 
23 

21 


N. G9°W.. 

N.69° W.. 

N.69°W.. 
None 


.6 
.4 
.4 


8' Tnr.; m.b 

Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr. . 


Bottom- 
Surface . 


Town. int. || 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms . 


6 


None 












Tnr. sdr. 




30 

7 
3 


N.8G° W.. 
N.86° W.. 


.4 
. 2 




8 swabs; m.b . . 

Op. planlc.ll 

Tnr. sdr. 


Bottom. 
100 fms . 


Mud bag slightly damaged. 


None 






Tnr. sdr 




26 
15 


N. 28°W.. 

N.-28° W.. 
None . 


. 5 
.4 




8 swabs; m. b .. 
Tnr. sdr.. 


Bottom. 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 


7 


N.28° W.. 


.2 




Tnr. sdr 




28 
16 
15 


S. 27° W.. 
S. 27° W.. 

S. 27° W.. 
None 


1.8 
1.2 
1.2 




Surf, tow 

8 swabs; m.b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




52 
26 


S. 55° W . . 
S. 55° W.. 


.8 
.6 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
















"■48." 6" 
48.0 

47.6 
47.0 

'46.' 6' 

46.0 

'45.' 6" 

'43.' 8' 

'43.' 6' 


Tnr. sdr 




36 
24 

7 


N.81° W.. 
N. 81° W.. 
None 


.6 
.5 




8' Tnr.; m.b 

Op. planli:.|| 

Tnr. sdr. . 


Bottom. 
100 fms . 










Tnr. sdr 1 . 


40 

20 

4 


W 

w 


.8 
.6 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 

Op. planlc.ll 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
100 fms . 










Sig, sdr 




31 
20 


N.84° W.. 
N.84° W.. 
None 


.8 
.6 




8' Tnr.; m.b.... 

Op. plank. II 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 
150 fms . 














Sig. sdr. 




38 
19 


W 

W 


!5 




8' Tnr.; m.b 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr... 




30 
19 


N.79° W.. 
N.79° W.. 


l.v- 

.7 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr. . 1 


50 
20 


N.81° W.. 
N.81° W.. 


1.1 

.7 




8' Tnr.; m.b 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




6 

5 

27 
13 








Tnr. sdr 










1 
Sig. sdr i 


S. 89° W . . 
S. 89° W.. 
None 


.4 
.3 




8 swabs; m. b . . 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 





20 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



I 

Time of T-v tu 

day. ^'^Pt'^- 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4371 
D. 4372 
D. 4373 

D. 4374 

D. 4375 

D. 4376 

H. 4794 
H. 4795 
H. 4796 
D. 4377 



D. 4378 



D. 4379 



D. 4380 



D. 4381 



D. 4382 



D. 4383 



Vicinity of San Diego. Cal.— 
Continued. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 84° 
E., 9.5 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 82° 
30' E., 9.8 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., S. 85° 
E., 9.3 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 85° 
E., 9.8 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 81° 
E., 10.1 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 86° 
30' E., 10.3 miles. 

Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 76° 

•E., 8.5 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 67° 

E., 9.8 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 63° 

E., 9.9 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 57° 

E., 10.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 57° 
E., 11 miles. 



S. point North Coronado 
Island, N. 52° 30' E., 2.1 
miles. 



S. point North Coronado 
Island, N. 59° E., 2.5 miles. 



S. point North Coronado 
Island, N. 64° E., 4 miles. 



S. point North Coronado 
Island, N. 64° E., 5.4 miles. 



N. point North Coronada 
Island, S. 79° E., 2.3 miles. 



C. S. 5100 

do..., 

do... 

do..., 

do... 



..do. 

..do. 
..do 
..do. 
..do. 



.do... 



do.. 



....do. 



.do. 



.do... 



1904. 
Mar. 16 



Mar. 16 
Mar. 17 

Mar. 17 



Mar. 17 

Mar. 17 

Mar. 17 

Mar. 17 

Mar. 17 



Mar. 17 



Mar. 18 



Mar. 18 



Mar. 18 



Mar. 18 



Mar. 18 



3.12 p.m. 
3.20 p.m. 

3.27 p.m. 

3.50 p.m. 

3.53 p.m. 
4.08 p.m. 

8.55 a.m. 
9.24 a.m. 
9.24 a. m. 
9.49 a.m. 

9.51 a.m. 

9.56 a.m. 
10.00 a.m. 
10.15 a.m. 
10.17 a.m. 
10.26 a.m. 
10.30 a.m. 
10.45 a.m. 
10.52 a.m. 
10.55 a. m. 

11.04 a.m. 

12.05 p. m. 

1.19 p.m. 
1.47 p.m. 

2.16 p.m. 

2.20 p.m. 
2.20 p. m. 

2.28 p.m. 
2.30 p.m. 
2.42 p.m. 
2.42 p.m. 

2.54 p.m. 
3.11 p.m. 

3.13 p.m. 
3.40 p. m. 
3.46 p. m. 
3.58 p.m. 

9.06 a. m. 



9.22 a. m. 

9.23 a. m. 
9.40 a.m. 

10.08 a. m. 
10.26 a.m. 
10.50 a. m. 
10.50 a. m. 

10.55 a. m. 
10.55 a. m. 

11.30 a.m. 

11.46 a.m. 

11.47 a.m. 
11.52 a.m. 
12.15 p.m. 

1.15 p.m. 
1.30 p.m. 
1.32 p.m. 
1.37 p.m. 
2.02 p.m. 
2.06 p.m. 
2.06 p. m. 

3.12 p.m. 

3.21 p.m. 

3.22 p.m. 
3.22 p. m. 

3.35 p.m. 

3.36 p.m. 
3.43 p. m. 



fms. 

145 

145-89 

89 

87 

87-102 

102 

225 

170 

170-95 

95 

93 

93-88 

93-88 



88-86 
88-86 
86 
93 
93-164 
164 
102 



gy- S., 
g.V- S., 

gy. s., 
gy. s., 
gy- s., 
gy. s., 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
crs. S. 
gy. S., 
gy. s, 
gy. s, 
gy. s. 



R... 

R... 

R... 

R... 

R... 

R... 
, S., K 
, S., R 
, S., R 
, S., R., 
, Sh., R 
, Sh., R, 
, Sh., R, 
, Sh., R 
, Sh., R, 
, Sh., R 
, Sh., R, 
, Sh., R 

Sh., R. 

Sh., R. 

Sh., R. 

R 



97 gy. S., R.... 
103 gy. S., R.... 



127 

145 

145-299 

213-299 

213 

299 

299 

376 

458-594 

458 

594 

594 

594 

257 



320 
320-408 
408 
530 
530-018 
618 
618 

018 
618 

618-654 

654-667 
654 

654-667 
667 
656 

642-666 
642 

642-666 
066 
666 
666 

287 

326 
326-363 
326-363 
363 
395 
395 



gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 
gn. M., S. 



gn. M., br. Sp.,R, 



gn. M.,br. Sp., R 
gn. M.,br. Sp.. R 
gn. M.,br. Sp., R 

gy.s 

gn. M.,gy. S 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



21 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
60 
60 
60 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
61 
62 
62 
62 
61 

59 

59 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 

62 

63 
63 
64 
66 
68 
71 
71 

72 
72 

73 
73 
73 
74 
74 
72 
71 
71 
71 
68 
68 
68 

68 

68 
68 
68 
68 
68 
68 


°F. 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 

60 

60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 

59 

59 
•59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 

60 
60 

60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 

61 

61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
01 


°F. 

"41'. i' 
'38.9' 

38.9 

38.9 
38.9 

"42. 5 
42.5 
42.5 

li.'s' 

41.5 


Sig. sdr 




h. m. 
30 
15 


S. 52°'w.. 
S .52° W . . 


mi. 
.4 
.3 




8 swabs; m. b . . 
Sig. sdr ... 


Bottom. 


Lost mud bag. 






22 
16 


S.2° W... 
S. 2° W... 


1.7 
1.3 




3 swabs 






Sig. sdr 1 




Sig. sdr 




50 


S. 19° W.. 


1.6 




Sig. sdr 






8 swabs 


Bottom. 


17 


S. 19° W.. 


.6 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




25 
15 
.15 


S. 8° W... 

S. 8° W... 
S. 8° W . . . 


.9 

.7 
. 5 




8 swabs 


Bottom. 
Bottom. 




2 hand lines 

Sig. sdr 








30 

15 
15 


S. 7° W . . . 
S. 7° W... 
S. 7° W . . . 


.8 
.0 
. 5 






Bottom. 
Bottom. 




2 hand lines 

Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




16 

7 


S. 77° W . . 
S. 77° W . . 


. 5 
.3 




8 swabs. 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 












Sig. sdr 












Sig. sdr 












Sig. sdr 




31 


S. 54° W.. 


.9 




Sig. sdr 






8' Tnr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


20 
12 


S. 54° W.. 
S. 54° W.. 


.6 
.4 




Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr.. . . 




Op.plank.il 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 


4 


None 












Sig. sdr. . 




1 20 
31 


S. 84° W . . 
S. 84° W.. 


.8 
.5 


- 


8' Tnr.; m. b... 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. 












Op. plank. II 

Town. int. || .... 

Sig. sdr 


150 fms.. 

150 to 50 

fms. 


9 
5 

44 


None 






None 






S. 84° W . . 


. 5 




Sig. sdr. 






8' Tnr.; m. b.. . 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


8 


S. 84° W.. 


.2 




Sig. sdr 




1 15 
22 

7 

7 


S. 73° \V . . 
S. 73° W . . 


1.5 

.8 




8' Tnr.. . 


Bottom. 

100 fms.. 

200 to 100 

fms. 




Op. plank. II 

Town. int. || 

Sig. sdr 


IHauled simultaneously on 
) same line. 


None 










Sig. sdr 




2 12 

18 

47 


S. 64° W.. 

S. 64° W.. 

S. 64° W . . 


1.4 

.3 

1.1 


Position same as end of pre- 
ceding station. 


Surf, tow 

8' Tnr 


Surface. 
Bottom. 


Sig. sdr 




Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 


43 


S. 64° VV . . 


1.0 




Sig. sdr 




1 17 
26 


S. 69° W . . 
S. 69° W.. 


1.3 

.8 




Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 


20 


S. 09° W.. 


.6 




Sig. sdr 




Op. plank. II 

Town. int. || 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 

200 to 100 

fms. 


6 
6 

40 


None 




IHauled simultaneously on 
J same hne. 


None 




N.73°W.. 


.7 




Sig. sdr 






10' Blk 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


10 

12 


N.7.3°\V.. 
N.73° W.. 
None 


.3 
.4 


Net wrecked. 


Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 




Op. plank. II ... . 
Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 


4 


None 






None 







22 



DREDGING AND HYDROGEAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No. 



Chart. 



Time of 
day. 



Deptli. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4384 



H. 4797 
D. 4385 

H.4798 
H. 4799 
H.4800 
H.4801 
H. 4802 
D. 4386 



Vicinity of San Diego, Co?.— 
Continued. 

Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. 08° 
E., 7.7 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 71° 

E., 8.0 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 71° 

E., 9.2 miles. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 59° 

E., 9.2 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 57° 

E., 9 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 55° 

E., 8.8 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 53° 

E., 8.6 miles. 
Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 51° 

E., 8.7 miles. 
32° 30' 30" N., 118° 05' 10" W . 



D.4387a 



D. 4387b 



D.4388 



D. 4389 



32° 32' 40" N., 118° 04' 20" W 



Gulf of Santa Catalina, coast 
of southern California. 

32° 29' 30" N., 118° 05' W 



32° 20' N., 117° 57' W 

Vicinity of San Diego, Cal. 



Point Loma Lt. Ho., N. 53° 
E., 11.9 miles. 



C,S. 5100.. 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do.... 



C. S.5100.. 



.do.... 



C. S.5100. 



1904. 
Mar. 21 



Mar. 21 
Mar. 21 



Mar. 21 

Mar. 21 

Mar. 21 

Mar. 21 



Mar. 23 



Mar. 24 



a.m. 
a. m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

a.m. 
a. m. 
a. m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

a.m. 

a. m. 

a.m. 

a.m. 

p.m. 
p. m. 
p. m. 

p.m. 

p.m. 

p.m. 

a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

a.m. 
a. m. 



1.43 p.m. 
1.43 p:m. 
1.43 p.m. 
1.43 p.m. 
1.43 p.m. 



2.50 p.m. 
3.33 p. m. 

9.20 a.m. 



3.45 p.m. 
4.05 p.m. 
4.40 p. m. 
4.45 p. m. 
4.49 p.m. 
5.13 p. m. 
6.00 p.m. 
6.00 p. m 

6.04 p. m. 
6.15 p. m. 

6.58 p.m. 

7.24 p. m. 

7.42 p. m. 



fms. 
139 
164 
164-85 
139 
139-85 
85 
85 



1,012 
1,012 
1,012 

1,012 

1,012 

1,012 

1,059 
1,059 
1,059 
1,059 
1,059 

1,059 
1,059 

1,059 
1,059 
1,059 
1,059 
1,059 



1,000* 
1,000 



gy. s., R. 
gy. s., R. 
gy. s.,R. 

gy. S., R. 

gy. s.,R. 
gy. S., R. 
gy. s., R. 

crs. S., R. 
ers. S., R. 
crs. S., R. 
ers. S., R. 
crs. S., R. 



ers. S., R 

crs. S., R 

crs. S., R 

crs. S., R 

(No specimen) 
(No specimen) 
(No specimen) 

(No specimen) 

(No specimen) 

(No specimen) 

(No specimen) 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gn. M. 
gn. M. 



gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



608 


gn. 


M 


608 


gn. 


M 


671 


gn. 


M 


671-639 


gn. 


M 


671-639 


gn. 


M 


671-639 


gn. 


M 


671-639 


gn. 


M 


671-639 


gn. 


M 



671-639 
671-639 



639 



(No sounding). 
M., crs. S., G.. 

(No sounding). 



gn. M. 
gn. M. 

gn. M. 

gn. M. 

gn. M. 



-gy- s. 
■ gy-s. 

gy. s. 

gy-s. 

gy-s. 

gy- s. 

gy-s- 
gy-s. 

gy-s. 

gy-s. 

gy-s. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



23 



Temperature. 



Sur- 
face 



Bot- 



Apparatus. 



Sig. sdr... 
Sig. sdr... 
8 swabs.. . 
Sig. sdr... 
Surf. tow. 
Sig. sdr... 
Sig. sdr... 



Sig. sdr... 
Surf. tow. 
8 swabs. . . 
Sig. sdr... 
Sig. sdr... 



Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr 
Sig. sdr 
Sig. sdr 



Trial. 



Depth. 



Bottom. 



Surface 



Surface . 
Bottom. 



Sig. sdr 

Op. planlc. II . 
Town. int. 1]. 

Surf, tow 



Op. plank, in- 
side surf. tow. 
Op. plank 



Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Surf, tow 

Op. plank. II 
Town, int.il. 



50 f ms 
200 to 100 

fms 
Surface . 

Surface 

Surface. 



Op. plank . II 
Op. plank. II 

Op. plank. 
Op. plank. 
Op. plank. 
Op. plank. 
Town . int. || 



8' Tnr 

Op. plank. 



Sig. sdr 

Op. plank. I 
Sig. sdr ... 

8' Tnr 

Surf. tow.. 
Surf. tow. . 
Op. plank. 1 
Surf. tow.. 



Op. plank. 
Surf. tow. 



Town. int. J... 
Town. int. H... 
Town. int. IJ. .. 



Dura- 
tion. 



h. m. 

58 



Bottom 
Surface . 
100 fms . 
200 to lOO 
fms. 
310 fms . 
500 fms . 

50 fms . . 
100 fms.. 
200 fms. . 
300 fms.. 
1,000 fms 



Bottom. 
Surface . 



300 fms. . 



Bottom. 
Surface . 
Surface . 
Surface . 
Surface . 

500 fms. . 
Surface . 

200 to 150 

fms. 
200 to 100 

fms. 
200 to 50 

fms. 



1 30 
30 



6 53 
16 
13 
11 
U 



4 

10 

16 

22 

1 5 



1 52 

17 



Drift. 



Direction. 



N. 88°W . 

None 

N.88°W. 

None 

N.88'' W. 

None 

None 



S. 15° 
S. 15° 
S. 15° 
None. 
None. 

None . 



Dis- 
tance. 



None. 



N. 75°W.. 

None 

None 



N.75° 

N.75° 

N.75° 

S. 10° 
S. 10° 
S. 10° 
None. 
None. 



W. 



None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



S.80° E.. 
S.80° E.. 



N.75° W. 



S. 32° W. 

None 

None 

S. 32° VV. 
S.32° W. 
S.32° W. 



mi. 
1.5 



S. 32° W . 



None 

S.32° W. 



None. 
8 I None. 
11 I None. 



1.2 
1.0 
.9 



Remarks. 



5. I Lost sounding cup. 

\Hauled simultaneously on 

J same line. 



6 hauls (15 minutes each) 
between 6.06 and 8.08 p. m. 

2 hauls (15 minutes each) 
between 6.26 and 7.03 p. m. 

3 hauls (15 minutes each) 
between 7.10 and 8.08 p. m. 

Lost sounding lead. 

Big load of mud brought up. 



3.8 



4.0 
.5 
.4 



IHauled simultaneously on 
( same line. 



^"°® 1 1 [-Hauled on sounding wire. 

Small open pankton net se- 
cured at each position on 
dredge rope and hauled 
vertically and simultane- 
ously. Townsend inter- 
mediate net, open, used in- 
stead of plankton net at 
1,000 fms. 



3.0 
.5 



Not evidently dragged up- 
side down. 

Towed astern from sound- 
ing machine. 



3 hauls between G and 6.50 

p. m.; port boom. 
Hauled on sounding wire. 
2 hauls between 6.15 and 6.50 

p.m.; starboard boom. 



24 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OP 

Dkedging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No 



D. 4389 



D. 4390 



D. 4391 



D. 4392 



D. 4393 



D. 4394 



D. 4395 



D. 4390 



D. 4397 



D.4398 



11.4803 
D.4399 



Position. 



Chart. 



Vicinity of San Diego, Cat.— 
Continued. 

Point Loma Lt. IIo., N. 53° 
E., 11.9 miles. 



Off Santa Catalina Islands, 
coast of southern Califor- 
nia. 

33° 02' 15" N., 120° 42' W.... 



33° 02' 15" N., 120° 36' 30" W 



33° 00' 50" N., 120° 45' 20" W 



32° 54' 20" N., 121° 11' 15" W 



32° 54' 20" N., 121° 15' W. 



33° 01' 35" N., 121° 28' 30" W 



33° 01' 35" N., 121° 32' W. 



C.S.5100. 



C. S.5002. 



-do. 



..do.. 



..do... 



..do.. 



33° 10' 15" N., 121° 42' 15" W 



From San Diego, Cat., 
through Santa Catalina and 
Santa Barbara islands. 

32° 43' 20" N., 117° 42' 10" W. . 



32° 44' 20" N., 117° 40' 45" W. 
32° 44' 50" N., 117° 48' 45" W. 



..do.. 



C.S.5100. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Date. 



1904. 
Mar. 24 



Mar. 28 



Time of 
day. 



Mar. 


29 


Mar. 


30 


Mar. 


30 


Mar. 


31 


Mar. 


31 


Apr. 


1 


Apr. 


7 


Apr. 


7 


Apr. 


7 



7.50 p. m. 
8.i2p.m. 

8.25 p.m. 

8.26 p. m. 



6.33 a.m. 
8.54 a. m. 
9.09 a.m. 

9.18 a.m. 



1.21p.m. 

1.23 p.m. 

2.55 p.m. 

4.15 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. 

5.35 p.m. 

1.31p.m. 
3.21p.m. 

4.32 p.m. 
6.20 p.m. 

7.25 p. m. 

6.32 a.m. 
9.40 a. m. 

11.13 a.m. 
11.13 a.m. 

2.33 p.m. 



6.28 a. m. 
8.12 a.m. 

11.27 a.m. 
11.27 a.m. 

2.33 p.m. 

5.42 p.m. 

7.07 p.m. 

6.29 a. m. 

8.43 a.m. 

11.01 a.m. 
11.30 a.m. 



1.32 p.m. 

2.09 p.m. 

2.10 p.m. 
3.48 p.m. 

4.10 p.m. 
4.18 p.m. 

4.30 p.m. 
4.32 p.m. 
4.47 p.m. 
5.38 p.m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
639 
639 
639 
639 



2,182 
2,182 

2, 182- 
1,350 

2, 182- 

1,350 

1,350* 

1,350- 

675 

1,350- 

675 
675 

675 

675 

2,124 
2,124 

2,124 
2,124 

2,124 

2,113 
2, 113- 
2,259 
2,259 
2,259 

2,259 



2,045 
2,045- 
2,228 
2,228 
2,228 

2,228 
2,228 

2,228 

2,196 
2. 196- 
2,228 
2.228 
2,228 



620 
620 

620 
154 

245 
245-285 

264 

264-285 

285 

285 



Character of 
bottom. 



gn. M., gy. S. 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gy. M., fne. S .. 
gy. M., fne. S .. 
gy. M., fne. S .. 

gy. M., fne. S .. 
(No sounding) . 



gn. M., bk. Sp., 

Glob., R. 
gn. M., bk. Sp., 

Glob., R. 
gn. M., Glob., fne. 

S. 
gn. M., Glob., fne. 

S. 
gn. M., Glob., fne. 

S. 

It. gn. gy. M 

It. gn. gy. M 



It. gn. gy. M. 
It. gn. gy. M . 

It. gn. gy. M . 



sft. gy. M... 
sft. gy. M... 

sft. gy. M... 
sft. gy. M... 

sft. gy. M... 



bl. gy. M 

bl.gy. and rd. M . 



rd. M . 
rd. M. 



rd. M . 
rd. M. 

rd. M. 

gy. M . 
gy- M. 

gy. M. 
gy. M. 



gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

gn. M., R.... 

fne. gy. S., 

Sp., R. 
fne. gy. S., R. 
fne. gy. S., R. 

fne. gv. S., R. 
fne. gv. S., R. 
fne. gv. S., R. 
fne.gy. S., R. 



bk. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



25 



Temperature. 



55 



Sur- Bot- 
face. torn. 



°F. 
57 
57 
57 
57 



58 



°F. 



Apparatus. 



Trial. 



i^epth- ^r- 



h. m. 
250 fms.. 15 



Op. plank. II 

Sig. sdr ' ' 

Surf, tow I Surface . i 28 

Op. plank I Surface . ' 27 



35.0 Sig. sdr 

Surf, tow I Surface . 

8' Tnr Bottom. 



Surf, tow . 



Surface . 



Surf, tow 

8' Tnr 

Town. int. ^. .. 

Sig. sdr 

Town. int. || . . . 



Sig. sdr 

Town. int. 11- 



Surface . 
Bottom. 



200 to 100 
fms. 



200 fms. 



1,000 to 
500 fms. 

Surf, tow I Surface. 

Surf, tow I Surface. 

Op. plank I Surface . 

Sig. sdr I 

8' Tnr i Bottom. 



Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 

5V Blk.. 



Sig. sdr 

5V Blk Bottom. 



3,5.0 
35.0 



Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 



8' Tnr j Bottom. 

Op. plank Surface 

Op. plank, and Surface . 
elec. surf, light. 

Sig. sdr 

8' Tnr 



Sig. sdr... 
Op. plank 



Sig. sdr. 
8' Tnr.. 



Surf. tow. 
Sig. sdr... 



Sig. sdr... 
Op. plank . 



Sig. sdr.. . 

8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr. . . 
Op. plank. 



Bottom. 



Surface 



Surface . 



Surface 



Bottom.! 



Surface .| 



5 53 
15 
38 

10 
4 24 
1 26 

33 
2 



5 41 
. 32 



5 50 
40 



9 23 



21 
1 10 



1 20 



5 22 

26 



3 50 
24 



Drift. 



Direction. 



None . . . 

None 

S.32° W 
S.32° W 



E. 



S. 55° E . 
S. 55°E. 
S. 55°E. 

None 

None . . . 
None . . . 



S 

None . 



None. 
W . . . . 



W. 



None. 

NW.. 



NW. 
NW. 



sw. 
sw. 



None. 
SW.. 



N. 77° W 
N. 77° W 



N. 77° W 
None . . . 



N. 67° W 
N.77° W 



None... 

N.67° W 
None . . . 
N.67° W 



Dis- 
tance. 



5.0 
.5 
1.2 

.3 

4.0 
3.0 



6.0 



.6 
1.3 



4.0 
1.0 



4.0 
1.1 

3.5 



10.0 

.6 
2.2 

2.4 

4.0 
.9 



2.0 



Remarks. 



[Position approximately 
< same as end of preceding 
I station. 
5 hauls between 1.23 and 

3.21 p. m. 
Frame lost; only fragments 

of net recovered. 



2 hauls between 6.20 and 7.15 

p. m. 
6 hauls between 7.25 and 8.40 

p. m. 



Position same as end of pre- 
ceding station. 

Gear sliglitly damaged. 
Temperature at 1,010 fms., 
37.9°. 

Lost frame; net wrecked. 

Harpooned a large sunfish. 
Position same as end of pre- 
ceding station. 

7 hauls (10 minutes each) be- 
tween 5.42 and 7.05 p. m. 

8 hauls (10 minutes each) be- 
tween 7.07 and 8.50 p. m. 



Frame bent; net slightly 
damaged. 



4.0 

1. 1 ' 2 hauls between 4.18 and 4.46 



.7 j Net badly torn. 



2.0 8 hauls (5 minutes each) be- 
I tween 5.38 and 7.58 p. m. 



26 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OP 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 




From San Diego, CaL, 
















through Santa Catalina and 
















Santa Barbara islands — 
















Continued. 




















1904. 




fms. 




D.4400 


32° 50' 20" N., 118° 03' 30" W. . 
32° 52' 40" N.,118° 13' 40" W.. 


C. S. 5100 
do.... 


Apr. 
Apr. 


8 
8 


7.30 a.m. 
8.05 a.m. 
8.48 a.m. 
10.20 a.m. 


500 

500-507 

507 

468 


gn. M 




gn. M 




gn. M. 


D.4401 


gn.M.,bk.S.,I)... 












10.57 a.m. 


468-448 


gn.M.,bk.S.,D... 












11.34 a.m. 


448 


ii 


D.4402 


E. point Northwest Harbor, 


do.... 


Apr. 


8 


1.22 p.m. 


542 


gn. M 




San Clemente Island, N. 








1.51 p.m. 


542-599 


gn. M 




74° W., 5.8 miles. 








2.31 p.m. 


599 


gn. M 


D.4403 


E. point Northwest Harbor, 
San Clemente Island, N. 


do.... 


Apr. 


8 


2.31p.m. 


599 


gn.M 




68° 30' W., 5.4 miles. 








3.35 p.m. 
4.17 p.m. 


599-505 
505 


gn. M., bk. G., 

Sh., R. 1 
bk. G., Sh., R ....i 


D.4404 


At anchor, Wilson Cove, San 
Clemente Island. 


....do 


Apr. 


8 


7.30 p.m. 


15 


S.. R 




E. point Northwest Harbor, 


do.... 


Apr. 


9 


7.30 p.m. 

7.30 p.m. 
7.46 a.m. 


15 

15 
654 


S., R 




S., R 


D.4405 


gn. M 




San Clemente Island, S. 
72° W., 2.9 miles. 
SE. point Santa Catalina 


do.... 


Apr. 


9 


8.10 a.m. 
9.00 a.m. 
10.34 a.m. 


654-704 
704 
650 


gn. M 




gn. M 


D.4406 


gn. M 




Island, N. 32° E., 8.2 miles. 








11.07 a.m. 


650 


gn. M 


D.4407 


SE. point Santa Catalina 


do.... 


Apr. 


9 


1.27 p.m. 


334 


gy. S., R :... 




Island, N. 19° 30' E., 3.2 








1.55 p.m. 


478 


gy. S., R 




miles. 








1.55 p.m. 
2.27 p.m. 


478-600 
600 


gv. S., R 




gy.s.,R 


D.4408 


SE. point Santa Catalina 


do 


Apr. 


9 


3.29 p.m. 


117 


gy. s.,R 




Island, S. 57° W., 2.5 miles. 








3.37 p.m. 
4.08 p.m. 


117-104 
104 


g.v. S., R 

gy. s., R 


D.4409 


SE. point Santa Catalina 


do.... 


Apr. 


9 


4.20 p.m. 


88 


fne. gy. S 




Island, SW., 2.1 miles. 








4.21 p.m. 
4.53 p.m. 


88-52 
52 


fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 


D.4410 


Long Point, Santa Catalina 


do.... 


.4.pr. 


11 


7.37 a.m. 


178 


fne.gy.S., R 




Island, N. 79° W., 2.8 miles. 








7.50 a.m. 
8.04 a.m. 


178-195 
195 


gy.s., G., R 

gy. S., G., R 


D.4411 


Long Point, Santa Catalina 


do.... 


Apr. 


11 


8.55 a.m. 


143 


fne. gy. S 




Island, S. 18° 30' E., 2.6 








9.04 a.m. 


143-245 


gy. S., Sh 




miles. 
Bird Rock, Santa Catalina 
Island.S. 69° W., Smiles. 


do.... 


Apr. 


11 


9.38 a.m. 
10.01 a.m. 


245 

274 


gy. S., Sh 


D.4412 


gn. M 
















10.14 a.m. 


274-265 


gn. M., G., R 












10.46 a.m. 


265 


gn. M., G., R 


D.4413 


Bird Rock, Santa CataUna 


do.... 


Apr. 


11 


11.17 a.m. 


152 


dk. gy. S 




Island.S. 15° E., 2.1 miles. 








11.24 a.m. 


152-162 


fne. gy. S 


D.44I4 


NW. point Santa Catalina 


do.... 


Apr. 


11 


11.51 a.m. 


162 


fne It. gv. S 




Island, S. 77° E., 4.8 miles. 








1.08 p.m. 

1.19 p.m. 
1.41 p.m. 


156 

156-131 
131 


fne. gy. S., M 

gy. vl. S., M., R... 
yl. S.. R 


D.4415 


NE. point Santa Barbara 


C. S. 5200. . 


Apr. 


11 


3.02 p. m. 


638 


gn. M 




Island, N. 89° W., 8.6 miles. 








3.33 p.m. 


638-302 


gn. M 












4.05 p.m. 
7.55 p.m. 


302 


gn. M 


D.4416 


fSW. rock, Santa Barbara 
1 Island, N. 49° W.. 4.7 miles. 


|....do.... 


Apr. 


12 


448 


dk. gn. M 












8.17 p.m. 


448-323 


dk.gn. M., R 












8.52 p.m. 


323 


dk. gn. M., R 


D.4417 


SW. rock, Santa Barbara 
Island, N.8° W., 0.3 miles. 


do.... 


Apr. 


12 


9.48 a.m. 
9.48 a.m. 


29 
29 


fne. yl. S., Corln., 

R." 
fne. yl. S., Corln., 

R. 
fne. yl. S., Corln., 

R. 
gv. S 












10.10 a.m. 


29 


D.4418 


SW. rock, Santa Barbara 
Island, N. 8° E., 6.9 miles. 


do.... 


Apr. 


12 


11.00 a.m. 
11.07 a.m. 


238 
238-310 




dk. M., S., R 












11.35 a.m. 


310 


bk. M 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



27 



Temperature. 



Air. 



Sur- 
face. 



Bot- 
tom. 



°F. 



40.2 
40.0 



30.4 



Apparatus. 



Sig. sdr. 
8' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
8' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
8' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 

9' Tnr.. 



Sig. sdr 

Hand lead. 



3 lobster pots. 



Depth. 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 
Bottom. 



Bottom 



Bottom. 



2 small gill nets. Surface 



Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 



10' Blk. 



Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr. . 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 



Bottom 



Dura- 
tion. 



h. m. 

1 39 

32 



1 2.5 
13 



34 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 
Bottom. 



9' Tnr Bottom 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

9' Tnr | Bottom. 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 



9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 



Bottom 



9' Tnr Bottom 

Sig. sdr 



Sig. sdr. 

9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 
Sig. sdr. 



16 hand hues. . 
8 swabs 



Sig. sdr. 
9' Tnr.. 
Sig. sdr. 



11 
11 



1 28 
30 



Bottom. 
Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Drift. 



1 40 

27 

1 18 



28 



1 14 

28 



1 15 

29 



1 

43 

21 

54 
32 



N.75° 
N.75° 
None. 
N.85° 
N.85° 
None. 
S. 53° 
S. 53° 
None. 
N.75° 

N. 75° 

None. 
None. 

None. 



W.. 

w.. 



Dis- 
tance. 



mt 
3.0 
1.0 



None. 



N.37° E .. 
N.37° E .. 

None 

N. 37° E . . 

N. 37° E . . 

S. 25° E. . . 

None 

S. 25° E... 

None 

N.82° W.. 
N.82°W.. 

None 

N.53° W.. 
N.53°W.. 

None 

N.16° W.. 
N. 16° W.. 

None 

N.33° W.. 
N.33° W.. 

None 

N.88° W.. 



N.88° W.. 

None 

N.68° W.. 
N.68° W., 
None. ... 
S. 25° E. . 

S. 25° E. . 
None .... 
N.12° W. 



N.12° W. 
None 



N.76° W.. 

N.76° W.. 

None 

S. 73° W.. 

S. 73° W . . 

S. 73° W.. 

S. 73° W.. 
S. 73° W.. 
None 



2.0 
.4 



.4 

"i's 

1.0 



2.0 
1.0 



2.6 



2.3 

1.8 



1.5 
1.0 



1.6 
1.2 



1.0 



1.5 
1.2 



1.3 

.7 



1.4 

.9 

"i.'3 

1.2 

.6 



Remarks. 



Net badly torn. 



Position same as end of pre- 
ceding statiou. 



Anchorage overnight. 

(Set in edge of kelp patches 

near anchorage. 
Set out from beach between 

2 kelp patches. Wrecked 

by sea lions just prior to 

hauling. 



Net fouled of frame when 
hoisted. 



Net slightly torn. 



Net slightly torn. 



Bird Rock is ofl Isthmus 
Cove. 



[SW. rock is the rocky islet 
lying a short distance SW. 
of the island. 



On Osborne Bank. 



28 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



station 
No. 



Position. 



From San Diego, Cal., 
through Santa Catalina and 
Santa Barbara islands — 
Continued. 

r> AAin (K. point San Nicolas Island, 
1^-4419 I s 73° W., 8.4 miles. 



D.4420 E. point San Nicolas Island, 
S. 77° W., ."5.7 miles. 

D.4421 E.point San Nicolas Island, 
N. 26° W., 3.8 miles. 



D.4422 E. point San Nicolas Island, 
S. 6° W., 2.5 miles. 

D.4423 E.point San Nicolas Island, 
S. 7.6 miles. 

D. 4424 E.point San Nicolas Island, 
S. 13 miles. 

D. 442.5 E. point San Nicolas Island, 
S. 7° E., 21.8 miles. 



D. 4426 Point San Pedro, Santa Cruz 
Island, N. 17° E., 4 miles. 

D. 4427 Point San Pedro, Santa Cruz 
Island, N. 3.5° E., 7 miles. 

D.4428 Point San Pedro, Santa Cruz 
Island, N. 34° E.. 10.3 miles 

D. 4429 Gull Islet, s. coast of Santa 

Cruz Island, N. 21° W., 2.9 

miles. 
D.4430 Gull Islet, s. coast of Santa 

Cm/, Island. N. 40° E., 2.7 

miles. 
D. 4431a Brockwav Point, Santa Rosa 

Island.S. 43° \V., .5.2 miles. 
D. 4431b Brockway Point, Santa Rosa 

Island, S. 41° W., 4.6 miles. 

D. 4431c Brockwav Point, Santa Rosa 
Island,"S. 38° W., 4 miles. 



D. 4431d Brockwav Point, Santa Rosa 
Island,S. 35° W., .3.5 miles. 

D. 4432 Brockway Point, Santa Rosa 
Island, S. 8 miles. 

D. 4433 Brockwav Point, Santa Rosa 
Island,'S. 10° E., 7.5 miles. 

D. 4434 Harris Point, San Miguel Is- 
land, S. 21° E., 9.5 miles. 

D. 4435 Harris Point, San Miguel Is- 
land, S. 13° W., 7.7 miles. 

D. 4436 Harris Point, San Miguel Is- 
land, S. 7° E., 9.8 miles. 

Monterey Bay, California. 

D.4437 Point Pinos Et. Ho., S. 88° 
W., 3.2 miles. 

D. 4438 Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 62° 
W., 2.1 miles. 



Ic. 



Chart. 



S. 5200 

....do.... 
....do.... 

....do... 
....do... 
....do... 
....do... 

....do... 

....do... 

....do... 

....do... 

....do... 

....do... 
....do... 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do.... 

C. S. 5498 
do.... 



Time of 
day. 



Apr. 12 

Apr. 12 
Apr. 12 

Apr. 13 
Apr. 13 
Apr. 13 
Apr. 13 

Apr. l4 

Apr. 14 

Apr. 14 

Apr. 14 

Apr. 14 

.\pr. 15 
Apr. 15 

.Vpr. 15 

Apr. 15 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 15 

May 10 
Mav 10 



1.20 p.m. 

1.35 p.m. 

2.25 p.m. 
2.31 p.m. 
2.58 p.m. 
3.37 p.m. 
3.54 p.m. 

4.03 p.m. 

4.26 p.m. 

7.27 a.m. 
7.31 a.m. 

7.54 a.m. 
8. 44 a. m. 
9.01 a.m. 
9. 25 a. m. 

10.34 a.m. 
11.02 a.m. 
11.11 a.m. 

1.25 p.m. 

2. 02 p. m. 

2. 33 p. m. 
7. 40 a. m. 

7. 40 a. m. 

8. 09 a. m. 

8.55 a.m. 
9. 11 a.m. 

9.28 a.m. 
10.27 a.m. 
10.58a.m. 
11.05 a.m. 

1. 19 p.m. 
1.42 p.m. 

2. 05 p. m. 

3. 05 p. m. 
;-). 15 p.m. 
3. .35 p. m, 
8. 05a.m, 
8. 10 a. m, 
8. 24 a. m, 

8. 27 a. m. 
8. 46 a. m. 

8. 47 a. m. 
8.58 a.m. 
9.13 a.m. 

9.13 a.m. 

9. 27 a. m. 
10. 14 a.m. 
10. 29 a. m. 
10. 46 a. m. 
11.21 a. m 
11..32a. m. 
11.41 a.m. 

1. 14 p. m. 

1.20 p.m. 
1.45 p. m. 
2.19 p.m. 
2. 32 p. m. 

2. 50 p. m. 
.3. 44 p. m. 

3. 56 p. m. 
4.16 p.m. 



7. 46 a. m. 

7. 49 a. m. 

8. 30 a. m. 
8.43 a.m. 
8. 47 a. m. 
9. 02 a. m. 



Depth. 



fms. 

238 

238 

33 

33-32 

32 

291 

291-229- 

298 

229 

298 

31 

31-32 

32 

339 

339-216 

210 

.594 

594-581 

581 

1,100 

1,100- 

1,084 

1,084 

129 

129-218 

218 

447 

447-510 

510 

704 

764-891 

891 

506 

506-680 

680 

197 

197-281 

281 

41 

41 

41 

41-.38 
38 

38-40 

40 

40 

40-45 

45 

272 

272-270 

270 

205 

205-243 

243 

281 

2S1-270 

270 

287 

287-274 

274 

271 

271-264 

204 



26 
20-41 

41 

41 
41-46 

46 



Character of 
bottom. 



hrd. bk. M 

bk. M., R 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

gy. M", R 

gy.M., R 

gy.M., R 

gv. M., R 

gy. s., Sh 

gv. S.,Sh 

gy. s.,sh 

gy. S.,bk. P.,Sh. 
gy. S.,bk. P.,Sh. 
gy. S.,bk. P.,Sh. 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gv. S 

gn. M", fne. S., Glob 
gn. M., fne. S., Glob 

gn. M., fne. S., Glob 

fne. gv. S., R 

fne. gv. S., R 

fne. gv. S., R 

bk. M., St 

bk. M., R 

bk. M., R 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M.,bk. P.,Sh. 
gn. M., bk. P.,Sh.. 

bk. S., P 

bk. S., P., R... 
bk. S., P., R... 

vl. M., R 

vl. M., K 

gn. M., R 



gn. M., R 
crs.gj'.S.,bk.Sp..R 

crs.gv.S.,bk.Sp.,R 
crs.gy.S.,bk.Sp.,R 
fne. gy. S., R.... 
gn. M., gy. S., R. 

gn. M 

gn. M 
gn. M 
gn. M 
gn. M 
gn. M 
gn. M 



gn. M. 

gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 



hrd. gy. S.. 
hrd. gy. S.. 
hrd. gy. S.. 
fne. gy. S . . 
fne. gy. S.. 
fne. gy. S.. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



29 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 

°F. 

58 

58 
59 
.59 
59 
59 
59 

59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
60 
60 

60 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 
60 
60 
59 
60 
60 
60 
58 
58 
58 

58 

58 

58 
59 
59 
50 
59 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
50 
59 

57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 

62 

62 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 

60 
60 
64 
64 
64 
66 
67 
67 
69 
69 
69 
68 
65 

64 
70 
70 
70 
68. 
68 
68 
65 
65 
64 
6b 
62 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
61 
62 

62 

64 

64 
65 
66 
66 
67 
70 
69 
68 
67 
67 
66 
64 
64 
63 
62 
62 
62 
61 
61 
61 

60 
60 
61 
61 
61 
60 


°F. 


Sig. sdr. 




h. m. 

20 

7 
.19 
30 


S. 65° W.. 

S. 65° W.. 
S. 60° W . . 
S. 60° W.. 
None 


mi. 

.5 

2 
2". 8 
2.0 


[E. point is the extreme east- 
1 ern end of the island, and 


9' Tnr 


Bottom. 


] is north of the anchorage 
[ shown on chart. 
Frame bent; net wrecked. 


Sig. sdr 




10' Blk.. 


Bottom. 


Strong current. 


Tnr. sdr 


Sig. sdr 




59 
26 


S. 67° E. . . 
S. 67° E. . . 

None 


. 7 
.6 




10' Blk... 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr.. . 




Sig. sdr 




None 






Tnr. sdr 





34 
26 


W 

W 

None 


.9 
.8 






10' Blk... . 


Bottom. 






Tnr. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 5 

28 


S. 20° W . . 
S. 20° W.. 


i.3 
.9 




10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




1 24 

26 


S. 55° W.. 
S. 55° W.. 
None 


1.7 
.8 




10' Blk. 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr.. 




Sig. sdr 




2 24 
32 


S. 27° W.. 
S. 27° W.. 

None 


1.3 

.8 




9' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




48 
30 


S. 50° W.. 
S. 50° W.. 
None 


2.3 

1.7 




9' Tnr. 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. . 




Sig. sdr 




1 23 
30 


S. 25° W.. 
S. 25° W.. 

None 


2.4 
1.4 




10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr . 




i 4i 

26 


S 


2. 5 

1.2 




9' Tnr 


Bottom. 


s...; : 




Sig. sdr 






Sig. sdr 




1 21 

27 


S. 40° W.. 

S. 40° W.. 
None 


2.0 
1.0 




9' Tnr. . 


Bottom. 


Frame bent shghtly. 


Sig. sdr 


Sis. sdr. . 




50 
21 


S. 33° W.. 
S. 33° W.. 

None.. .. 


1-3 




10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


Net wrecked. 


Tnr. sdr 




15 
2 

15 

7 
17 

13 


S. 60° W . . 
S. 60° \V . . 
S. 60° W . . 

S. 60° W . . 
S. 60° W.. 

S. 60° W.. 
None .*.... 


.(> 
.1 
.() 

.4 
.5 

.4 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 


Inner net foul of mouth. 


Tnr. sdr 


Position same as end of pre- 




Bottom. 


ceding station. 


Tnr. sdr. 


Position same as end of pre- 


7 swahs 


Bottom. 


ceding station. 
Tangle frame bent. 


Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr. 




21 
16 


S. 60° W.. 
S. 00° W.. 


.8 
.6 




8 swabs 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 1 
27 


S. 69° W.. 
S. 69° W.. 
None 


1.7 
1.1 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. . . 




Sig. sdr . 


46 
13 


N. 75° E . . 
N. 75° E . . 
None 


.5 
.3 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr.. 




Sig. sdr.. . 




1 

28 


S. .54° W.. 
S. 54° W.. 


2.0 
1.4 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 


Gear slightly damaged. 


Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr. . 




56 
24 


S. 68° W.. 
S. 68° W.. 


1.0 
1.1 




11' Tnr... 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr. . 




1 
30 


S. 67° W.. 
S. 67° W.. 


1.7 
1.0 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




40 
43 


N.60°W.. 
N.T,0°W.. 
None 


1.5 
1.3 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




27 
23 


N. 41°W.. 
N.41°W.. 
None 


.8 
.7 




8' Tnr.: m. c ... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 





907—06- 



30 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coasi 



Station 
No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4439 
D. 4440 
D.4441 
D. 4442 
D. 4443 

D.4444 

D. 4445 
D. 4440 

D. 4447 

D. 4448 
D. 4449 
D. 4450 

D. 4451 

D. 4452 
D. 4453 
D. 4454 
D. 4455 

D. 4456 
D. 44.57 

D. 4458 
D. 4459 



Monterey Bay, California — 
Continued. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 38° 
W., 1.5 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 83° 
W., 2.1 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., N. 87° 
W., 1.7 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 67° 
W., 4.6 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 69° 
W., 3.7 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 67° 
W., 2.9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 13° 
E., 6 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 2° 
W.. 5 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 21" 
W., 4.5 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 41° 
W., 4. 8 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 58° 
W., 5.2 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 8° E. 
3.9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 23° 
W., 3.2 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 21° 
W., 3.4 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 17° 
W.,2.3 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 13° 
.E., 8.3 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 6° E. 
7.6 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 10° 
W., 6.9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 21"^ 
W., 6.1 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. .35° 
W., 6 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S, 42° 
W., 7.6 miles. 



1904. 
C. S. 5498 May 10 

.do May 10 

.do May 10 

-do ' May 10 



-do.. 



do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do... 

do.... 

do..., 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 



May 10 



..do I Mav 10 



May 11 
May 11 

May 11 

May 11 
May 11 
May 11 

May 11 

May 11 
May 11 
May 12 
May 12 

May 12 
May 12 

May 12 
Ma^y 12 



9.33 
9.41 
10.10 
10.20 
10.24 
10.54 
11.16 
11.22 
11.39 
1.50 
1..58 
2.24 
2.39 
2.42 
3.08 



a.m. 
a. m. 
a. m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 
a. m. 
a.m. 
a. m. 
p. m. 
p. m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 
p. m. 
p.m. 



3. 22 p. m. 

3. 23 p. m. 

.3. 54 p. m. 
8. 27 a. m. 

8. .31 a.m. 

9. 02 a. m. 

9.14 a.m. 

9. 18 a. m. 
9. 40 a. m. 
9. 45 a. m. 

9.49 a.m. 
10.03 a. m. 
10.03 a.m. 

10.07 a.m. 
10.40 a. m. 
10.50 a.m. 
10.50 a.m. 
11.20 a.m. 
11.26 a.m. 
11.29 a.m. 
11.40 a.m. 

1.31 p.m. 

1.37 p.m. 

1.44 p.m. 
2.07 p. m. 

2.19 p.m. 
2.23 p. m. 
2.26 p. m. 
2.48 p. m. 
3.29 p.m. 
3.36 p. m. 
4.00 p. m. 

4.15 p.m. 
4.21 p.m. 

4.45 p. m. 

8.46 a. m. 
8.46 a. m. 

8.53 a. m. 
9.05 a. m. 
9.11 a.m. 

9.40 a.m. 

9.50 a. m. 

9.54 a. m. 
10.17.a.m. 
10.34 a. m. 
10.38 a. m. 
10.53 a.m. 
11.07 a.m. 
11.28 a.m. 

11.32 a.m. 



1.32 p.m. 
1.32 p.m. 
1.37 p.m. 



fms. 
42 

42-40 
40 
39 

39-26 
26 
35 

3^28 
28 
26 

26-31 
31 
32 

32-37 
37 

40 

40-40 

40 
66 

66-GO 
60 
59 

59-52 
52 
52 
52 
52 

52-42 

52-42 
42 
45 

45-34 
34 
29 

29-22 
22 
CO 

60-55 

60-55 
55 
52 

52-47 

5J-47 
47 
49 

49-50 
50 
49 

49-51 
51 
71 

71-65 
65 
62 

62-56 

56 

55 

55-49 

49 

46 

46-40 

46-40 

40 

37 

37-32 

32 

13 

13-15 

15 



gv. S., Sh 

gy. S., Sh 

gy. s., Sh. 

gy-s., s;i 

gy. s., Sh 

gy. S., Sh 

gy.s 

bl. M., S., Sh.... 

bl. M., Sh 

fne. gy. S 

f ne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M., S 

gy- S 

dk. gn. .At 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

gn. M..S 

gn. M..S 

gn. M., S 

gn. M., S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

gn. M., fne. S 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

gn. M.,S 

gn. M.,S.,G 

gn. M., G 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M 

dk. gn. M.,fne.S 

bk. Sp. 
dk. gn. M., fne. S 

bk. Sp. 
dk. gn. M.,fne. S 

bk. Sp. 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 

fne. gy. S 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



31 



Ten 
Air. 


iperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift 






Sur- 
face 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
58 
57 
56 
53 
56 
56 
56 
56 
57 
64 
64 
63 
62 
61 
60 

60 

60 

60 
56 
50 
54 
.53 
.53 
53 
52 
52 
52 
52 

52 
52 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
55 
55 
54 
53 
53 
53 
53 
55 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 

55 

54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
55 
56 
56 

56 

56 

59 
59 
59 


°F. 
58 
58 
.58 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 

.59 

59 

59 
57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 

59 
58 
58 
58 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
56 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 

54 

53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
54 
54 
54 

54 

54 

55 
55 
55 


°F. 

'48.' 6' 

'48." 6" 
48.0 

48.0 
46.5 

"47." 7" 
47.7 

"47."2' 

47.5 



"47.' 9' 
47.9 

'48.' 6' 
49.0 

"48.'6' 

"48." 6' 
48.2 

'■48.' 5" 
47.8 

"48." 5' 
48.5 

"49." 6" 

"48."6" 


Tnr. sdr 




h. m. 
41 
30 


S. 48° E... 
S. 48° E... 
None 


mi. 
1.3 
1.0 




8' Tnr.; m. c ... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr ... 




37 
30 


S. 49° E... 
S. 49° E... 
None 


1.1 
1.0 




8 Tnr.; m. c 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




29 
21 


S. 50° E... 
S. 50° E... 

None. 


.8 

.7 




8' Tnr.; m.b 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




36 
30 


S. .58° \V.. 
S. 58° W . . 
None.. .. 


.6 




11' Tnr.; m. b . . 
Tnr. sdr.. . 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




35 

27 


S. 59° W.. 
S. 59° W.. 

None 


. 7 
.6 




11' Tnr.; m. b.. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




37 
32 


(N. 10° W.. 
\N. 62° E . . 
JN. 10° \V.. 
\N. 62° E.. 
None 


.3 
. 5 




11' Tnr.; m. b.. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




39 
30 


S. 62° E. . . 
S. 02° E . . 
None 


1.5 
1.3 




ir Tnr.; m. b.. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




39 
31 


S. 62° E... 
S. 62° E... 
N one . . . 


1.4 
1.2 




11' Tnr.; in. b.. 
Tnr. sdr . . 


I$ottom. 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 


12 


S. 62° E... 
None 


.5 




Tnr. sdr. . . 




38 
30 

30 


S. 68° E... 
S. 68° E . . . 

S. 6S° E . . . 


1.4 
1.3 

1.3 




Surf, tow 

11' Tnr.; m. b .. 
Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


3 hauls (10 minutes each) be- 
tween 10.03 and 10.43 a. m 


Tnr. sdr 




30 

27 


S. 54°E... 
S. 54° E . . . 


1.2 
1.1 




11' Tnr.; m. c... 
Tnr. sdr... 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




17 
11 


S. 56° E . . . 
S. 56° E . . . 
None 


.4 
.3 




11' Tnr 

Tnr. sdr... 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 






S. 63° E . . . 
S.63°E... 
S.63°E... 


1.4 
1.2 
.8 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


30 
20 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




37 
29 
10 


S. 64° E . . . 
S.64°E... 
S. 64°E... 
None 


1.3 

1.1 

.4 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 
Surface . 




Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




38 
27 


S. 25°W .. 
S.25°W.. 
None 


.8 
.6 




10' Blk.; m. c... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




38 
28 


S. 58° W . . 
S. 58° W . . 


.8 
.6 




10' Blk.; m.c... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




23 
9 


S.67°E... 
S. 67°E... 


.7 
.3 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 


Net badly torn. 


Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




41 

28 


S.67°E... 

S. 67° E . . . 

None . 


1.7 
1.4 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 


[Whale fouled sounding gear 
i carrying it afoul of pro- 


Tnr. sdr 




37 
29 


S. 38° E . . . 
S.3S°E... 
None 


1.0 
.9 


[ peller and parting wire. 


11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr... 




Tnr. sdr 




36 
30 
10 


SE 

SE 

SE 


.7 
.6 
.2 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


Net torn by weight of mud 


Surf, tow 




Tnr. sdr. 




20 
19 


SE 

SE 


.8 
.6 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr. 




11 

8 


N.39° W.. 
N.39° W.. 
None 


.4 

.3 






10' Bik 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 





32 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4460 

D. 44G1 

D. 4462 

D. 4463 

D. 4464 
D. 4465 
D. 4466 

D. 4467 
D. 4468 

D. 4469 
D. 4470 
D. 4471 



Monterey Bay, California — 
Continued. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 12° 
E., 10.8 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 3° 
E. 9.3 miles.' 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 5° 
W., 8.5 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 17 
W., 8 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 20° 
W., 7.8 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 29° 
W., 7.6 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 19° 
W., 7 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 28° 
W., 8.8 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 32° 
W., 10.3 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 3° 
E., 1.9 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. E., 
2.8 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 33° 
E., 5.3 miles. 



D. 4472 \ Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 29° 
E., 3.6 miles. 



D.4473 Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 1.5' 
1 E., 2.8 miles. 



D. 4474 
D. 4475 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 34° 
W., 1.2 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 15° 
W., 9.7 miles. 



D. 4476 ! Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 22° 
I W., 9.4 miles. 



D. 4477 
D. 4478 
D. 4479 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 31° 
W., 9.2 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. IIo., N. 13° 
W., 3.8 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 25° 
W., 5.1 railed. 



C. S. 



do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

....do.. 
....do.. 

....do.. 
....do.. 
....do... 

....do... 

....do... 

....do... 
....do... 

....do... 
....do... 
....do... 
....do... 



1904. 
May 12 



May 12 

May 13 

May 13 

May 13 
May 13 
May 13 

May 13 
May 13 

May 14 
May 14 
May 14 

May 14 

May 14 

May 14 
May 16 

May 16 
May 16 
May 16 
May 16 



2.55 p.m. 
3.00 p. m. 

3.07 p. m. 
3.09 p. m. 
3.19 p.m. 
3.37 p. m. 
3.55 p. m. 

4.09 p. m. 
4.24 p. ni. 
8.41 a. m. 
8.55 a. m. 
8.59 a. m. 
9.05 a. m. 
9.30 a. m. 
9.37 a. m. 

9.40 a.m. 
10.05 a. m. 
10.09 a. m. 
10.40 a.m. 
10.53 a.m. 
10.56 a. m. 
11.23 a.m. 

2.05 p. m. 

2.13 p.m. 

2.18 p.m. 

2.18 p. m. 

2.30 p.m. 

2.39 p. m. 
2.47 p. m. 
3.07 p. m. 

3.16 p.m. 
3.21 p.m. 

3.34 p. m. 
3.52 p. m. 

7.40 a. m. 

7.45 a. m. 

8.17 a.m. 
8.29 a. m. 
8.33 a.m. 

8.46 a.m. 

9.31 a. m. 

9.43 a. m. 
9 43 a.m. 

10.05 a. m. 
10.17 a.m. 
10.23 a. m. 
10.26 a. m. 
10..38 a. m. 
10..54 a. m. 
10.59 a. m. 
11.09 a.m. 
11.17 a.m. 
11.35 a.m. 
11.42 a.m. 
11.53 a.m. 

8.44 a.m. 
8.50 a. m. 
8.50 a. m. 

9.06 a.m. 
9.50 a. m. 
9.55 a.m. 
10.15 a. m. 

10.29 a. m. 

10.30 a.m. 
10.50 a.m. 

1.41 p. m. 
1.46 p.m. 
2.03 p. m. 
2.14p.m. 
2.19 p.m. 
2.36 p. m. 



fms. 
55 

55-67 + 

67-167 

67 

167 

285 

285-323- 

357 

323 

357 

313 

265 

265-161 

161 

111 

111-48 



51 

51-36 

36 

31 

31-21 

21 

86 

194 

74 

74-50 

50 

54 

54-51 

51 

51 

51-309- 

32 

309 

32 

54 

54-63 

63 

61 

61-69 

69 

303 

144 

144-65 

65 

65 

65-71-59 

71 

59 

59 

59-65-54 

65 

54 

43 

43-34 

34 

142 

85 

85-58 

58 
39 

39-25 
25 
19 

19-11 
11 
30 

30-30 
30 
33 

33-45 
45 



gn. M., G. 
gn. M., G. 

gn. M., G. 
gn. M., G. 
gn. M., G. 

gn. M 

gn. M 



gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gn. M. 
gy- M. 

rky 

rky... 



rky 

sft. dk. gy. M. 
sft. dk. gy. M. 
sft. dk. gy. M. 
hrd. gy. S. . . . 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

g!i. M., R 

gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

sft. dk. gn. M. 
sft. dk. gn. M. 
sft. dk. gn. M. 

fne. S 

fne. S 



fne. S 

fne. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gv. S 

hrd. gy., S 

hrd. gv., S 

gy. S.,'R 

gy- s 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S , 

hrd. S 

gv. S., M 

gy.s.,M 

gy. S.,M 

gy. s., M 

hrd. S., M 

hrd. S., M 

hrd. S., M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 



sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



33 



Temperature. 




Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- Bot- 
face. tom. 


Apparatus. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
58 
58 

58 
58 
58 
58 
59 

59 
59 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 

5o 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 
57 

57 
57 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
54 
54 
54 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
54 
54 
53 
56 
56 
66 

55 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
53 
56 
56 
55 
55 
55 
55 


°F. 
56 
56 

56 
56 
56 
56 
56 

55 
55 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 

53 
53 
53 
63 
53 
63 
63 
54 
54 
54 
54 
64 
64 
54 
54 
64 
54 

54 
54 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
63 
53 
63 
53 
53 
63 
53 
54 
56 
55 
55 
65 
56 
54 
54 
55 
55 
65 

55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
65 
55 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 


°F. 

'44.4" 

"49.5" 

'41.0' 
'44." 5" 


Tnr. sdr 




h. m. 
30 

20(?) 

11 


S. 54° E . . . 
S.54°E... 

S. 54° E . . . 
None 


mi. 
1.2 

.8 

.3 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 
Surface . 


Probably not on bottom all 


Surf, tow 

Tnr. sdr 


the time. 


Tnr. sdr 
















1 9 

29 


S. 65° E . . . 
S. 65° E . . . 

None 


1.6 
1.0 




10' Blk.. 


Bottom. 
























40 


S. 65° E . . . 
None 


1.2 








10' Blk 


Bottom. 


6 


S. 65° E . . . 
None 


.5 


Net wrecked. 


Sig. sdr 




20 

4 


S. 68° E . . . 
S. 68° E . . . 


.2 
.1 




11' Tnr 


Bottom. 


Net torn slightly; large rock 




l)rought up. 






36 
30 


S.56° E... 
S. 56° E . . . 


.8 
. 7 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 








Sig. sdr 




35 
30 


S.59°E... 
S.59°E... 


1.0 
.9 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 








Tnr. sdr 




31 


S. 55° E . . . 
None 


1.5 




Tnr. sdr 






Tnr. sdr 










8' Tnr 


Bottom. 


15 


S.55°E... 
None 


1.0 




Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr ' 


28 
15 


S. 57° E . . . 
S. 57° E . . . 
None 


1.0 

.7 




8' Tnr 

Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr.. . 


51 
30 


SE 

SE 


2.0 
1.7 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 


Probaljly not on bottom all 




of time. 








None 






Sig. sdr. 




42 
32 


N.81° W.. 
N.81°W.. 
None 


1.4 
1.3 




8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. 1 - - 


28 
19 


S. 68° W . . 
S. 68° W . . 
None 


.8 
.6 




8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. ! 


34. 


S. 42° E... 


1.0 




Sig. sdr ' 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 


18 


S. 42° E... 


.0 




Sig. sdr. - - 


32 
20 


S.61° E... 
S. 61°E... 
None 


i.6 

.8 




10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 


29' 

19 








S. 55° E... 
S. 55° E... 


.9 

.7 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 








None 








Sig. sdr 




25 

15 


S. 42° E... 
S. 42° E... 
None 


.9 

.7 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




27 


S. 58°E... 


.9 










10' Blk 


Bottom. 


15 


S. 58°E... 
None 


.6 


Net slightly torn from 


Sig. sdr. 


weight of mud. 


Sig. sdr 




32 
25 


S. 57° E... 
S. 57°E... 
None 


1.1 
.9 




19' Blk 

Sig. sdr. 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr. 


Bottom. 


26 
23 


S. 43° E... 
S. 43° E... 
None 


.8 

.7 




Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


iBottora. 


29 
21 


S. 53° E... 
S. 53° E... 
None 


1.2 
1.1 




Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


29 
20 


S. 64° E... 
S. 54° E... 
None 


.8 





34 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OP 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



D. 4480 
D. 4481 
D. 4482 
D. 4483 
D. 4484 
D.4485 

D. 4486 
D. 4487 
D. 4488 
D. 4489 
D.4490 
D. 4491 
D. 4492 

D. 4493 
D. 4494 
D. 4495 
D. 4496 

D.4497 
D. 4498 
D.4499 
D. 4500 

D. 4501 
D." 4502 



Position. 



Monterey Bay, California — 
Continued. 

Santa Cruz Lt. IIo., N. 31° 
W., 6.1 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 37° 
W., 7.5 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 39° 
W., 8.7 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 41° 
W., 9.5 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 43° 
W. 10.8 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 44° 
W., 12.1 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 7° 
E., 1.1 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. IIo., N. 24° 
W., 1.6 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 34° 
W., 2.5 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 42° 
W., 3.7 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 47° 
W., 4.4 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 51° 
W., 5.8 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 54° 
W., 7 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 51° 
W., 8.5 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. IIo., N. 51° 
W., 10.1 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 52° 
W., 11.5 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho. N. 
W., 2.1 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 76° 
VV.,2.6 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. IIo., N. 71° 
W., 3.7 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 68° 
W., 5 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 67° 
W., 6.3 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 66° 
W., 7.6 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 65^ 
W., 8.9 miles. 



Chart. 



C. S. 5498 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 

do..., 

do..., 

do.... 



1904. 
May 16 



May 16 

May 17 

May 17 

May 17 

May 17 

May 17 

May 17 

May 17 

May 18 

May 18 

May 18 

May 18 

May 18 

May 18 

May 18 

May 19 

May 19 

May 19 

May 19 

May 19 

May 19 

May 19 



Time of 
day. 



2.56 p.m. 
2.59 p.m. 
3.15 p.m. 
3.27 p. m. 

3.34 p.m. 
3.44 p. m. 
8.25 a. m. 
8.27 a. m. 

8.48 a.m. 
9.10 a.m. 

9.15 a.m. 
9.30 a.m. 
9.47 a.m. 
9. 50 a. m. 
10.12 a.m. 

10.18 a.m. 
10.25 a. m. 

10.43 a.m. 

2.10 p.m. 
2.14 p.m. 
2.42 p.m. 
3.06 p. m. 

3.11 p.m. 
3.29 p. m. 
3.39 p. m. 

3.42 p. m. 
3.58 p. m. 

7.35 a. m. 
7.41 a. m. 
7.50 a.m. 
8.06 a. m. 
8.10 a. m. 
8.33 a. m. 
8.55 a.m. 

8.57 a.m. 
9.18 a.m. 
9.32 a. m. 

9.35 a.m. 

9.53 a.m. 
10.06 a. m. 

10.19 a.m. 
10.36 a. m. 
10.52 a. m. 
10.54 a. m. 
11.15 a.m. 
11.23 a.m. 
11.27 a.m. 
11.43 a.m. 

7.37 a. m. 

7.39 a. m. 

7.43 a.m. 

8.03 a. m. 

8.04 a. m. 
8.32 a.m. 
8.47 a.m. 

8.49 a.m. 
9.08 a. m. 

9.16 a.m. 

9.17 a.m. 
9.37 a.m. 
9.46 a. m. 
9.49 a.m. 

10.08 a.m. 
10.17 a.m. 



10.37 a.m. 
10.47 a.m. 
10.49 a.m. 

11.12 a.m. 



Depth. 



fms. 

76 

76-53 

53 

50 

50-45 

45 

43 

43-44 

44 

45 

45-44 

44 

45 

46-109 

109 

108 

108-39 

39 
16 

16-17 
17 
18 

18-19 
19 
20 

20-22 
22 
20 

20-18 
18 
20 

20-16 
16 
20 

20-23 
23 
26 

26-27 

27 
29 

29-29 
29 
27 

27-24 
24 
23 

23-19 
19 
10 

10-10 

10 
11 

11-14 
14 
16 

16-15 
15 
15 

15-14 
14 
14 

14-12 

12 

12 



11 

11 

11-9 



Character of 
bottom. 



dk. gn. M., S... 
dk. gn. M., S... 
dk. gn. M., S... 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S... 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

gn.M., S 

gn. M., S 

gn. M., S 

sft. gn. M., S.. 
sft. gn. M., S. . 

sft. gn. M., S.. 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S., li... 
hrd. gy. S., R.. 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

hrd. gy. S 

fne. gy. S. 



fne 
fne 
dk 
dk 
dk 



gy-s 

• gy-s 

gys 

gy.s 

^... g>'. s 

hrd. fne. gy. V> 
hrd. fne. gy. S 
hrd. fne. gy. S 

hrd. gn. S 

hrd. gn. S 

hrd. gn. S. . . . 
sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M., R. 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

sft. gn. M 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

fne. gy.s., R. 

fne. gy.s., R. 

fne. gy. S., R. 
gy-S.,R 

gy.s.,E 

gyS.,R 

gy.s.,M 

gy-S.,M 

gy.s„M 

hrd.S : 

hrd.S 

hrd.S 

hrd. fne. gy.s. 
hrd. fne. gy. S . 

hrd. fne. gy.s. 
hrd.crs.S 



hrd.crs. S. 



hrd.crs.S. 

hrd.S 

hrd.S 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



35 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
54 
54 
54 
54 
55 
55 
51 
51 
52 
53 
53 
53 
52 
52 
52 
52 
52 

53 
57 
57 
57 
56 
56 
56 
56 
56 
50 
57 
57 
56 
55 
55 
55 
54 
54 
54 
54 

54 

54 
55 
55 
55 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
52 

52 

52 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
53 
62 
52 

52 
52 

52 

53 
54 

54 

54 


°F. 
54 
54 
54 
54 
55 
55 
53 
53 
53 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 

54 


°F. 


Sig. sdr 




h. m. 
36 
20 


S. 57°E... 

S. 57° E... 
Nonp 


mi. 
1.2 
.9 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




27 1 SE 

15 SE 

None 


1.1 

.8 




10' Bile 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




30 S. 56°E... 
21 S. 56°E... 

None 


.6 
.5 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 








Sig. sdr 




29 1 S. 58° E... 
21 S. 58° E... 


1.0 

.8 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 








Sig. sdr 




25 1 S. 57° E... 
20 1 S. 57° E... 


1.0 
.8 




10' Blk . 


Bottom- 








Sig. sdr 




35 : S. 57° E... 

10 S. 57°E... 


1.0 

.7 




10' Blk . 


Bottom. 


Net wrecked from weight 
of mud. 


Sig. sdr 






56 ' 

56 1 

56 1 

50 : 

50 i 

56 i 

56 1 

56 ; 

56 i 

55 

55 

55 1 

55 1 

55 ...'.. 


Sig. sdr 




43 
31 


S.06° E... 
S. 06° E... 
None 


.6 
.5 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 


Not i)adly torn. 




Sig. sdr. 1- . . 


29 
21 


S. 53° E... 
S. 53°E... 


. 7 
.0 




8' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




25 
20 


S. 60° E... 
S.60° E... 


1.2 
1.1 




8' Tnr . . . . 


Bottom. 








Tnr. sdr 




24 
16 


S. 62°E... 
S. C2°E... 
None . . . 


.5 

.4 




16' Tnr 

Tnr. sdr. . .. 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




41 
34 


S. 63° E... 
S. 63°E... 
None 


1.2 
1.1 




16' Tnr 


Bottom. 




55 
54 
54 
54 
54 

54 

54 
54 
54 
54 
54 
54 




Tnr. sdr . 




Tnr. sdr.. . 




26 
22 


S. 50° E... 
S. 50° E... 
None 


1.0 
.9 




16' Tnr.; 1 wng. 
Tnr. sdr. 


Bottom. 


Wing net 10 inches diameter. 


Tnr. sdr 




26 
20 


S.20° E... 
S.20°E... 
None 


1.4 
1.3 




10' Tnr.: 1 wng. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom 


fWing net buried in mud and 
i wrecked. Large rock 
[ brought up in trawl net. 


Tnr. sdr 




37 
21 


S. 56° E... 
S. 55°E... 
None 


1.1 
1.0 




16' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




27 
20 


S. 57° E... 

S. 57°E... 
None 


1.0 
.9 




16' Tnr 


Bottom. 




54 

54 

54 

54 

64 


Tnr. sdr 




Tnr. sdr 




26 
19 


S. 55° E... 
S. 55° E... 
None 


1.1 
1..0 




16' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr. . 




Tnr. sdr 




13 
5 


S.OO°E... 
S.GO°E... 
Nono 


.3 
.3 




64 

64 

53 




IC Tnr. 


Bottom. 


[Net and frame badly dam- 
< aged. Large piece fossil 
[ rock brought up. 


Tnr. sdr 


Tnr. sdr 




33 
31 


S.00° E... 
S.GO° E... 
None 


1.0 
.9 




53 


10' Blk . 


Bottom. 


Net slightly torn. 


r,i 


Tnr. sdr 


53 

53 i 

53 


Tnr. sdr 




24 S.61°E... 

20 S.01°E... 

None- 


1.0 
.9 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr... 




53 
53 
53 
54 
54 

55 
55 

55 

55 
56 
55 

55 





Tnr. sdr 




21 S.OO°E... 

20 S.60°E... 

None 


1.0 

.9 




8' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr. 




Tnr. sdr 




25 1 S.6n° E... 


1.0 
.9 




8' Tnr.; 2 wng.. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 


20 


S.60° E... 
None. . 


Wing nets, 12 inches diam- 
eter. 


Tnr. sdr 




23 

20 


S.01° E... 

S.01° E... 

None 

S.00° E... 
S.00° E... 

None 


1.0 
.9 

"'i.o' 

.9 




/8' Tnr. -,2 swabs; 
I 2 wng. 

Tnr. sdr 


[■Bottom 


fSwabs lashed to tail of 
< trawl net; wing nets se- 
1 cured inside top of runner. 


Tnr. sdr 




26 
22 




8' Tnr.; 2 swabs; 

2 wng. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 





36 



DKEDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OP 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



static: 
No. 



D. 4503 



D. 4505 



D. 4506 



D. 4507 



D. 4.508 



D. 4.509 



Position. 



D. 4511 
D. 4512 



D.4513 



Monterey Bay, California— 
Continued. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., S. 81° 
W., 3.8 miles. 



Santa Craz Lt. Ho., S. 
W., 4.0 miles. 



Santa Craz Lt. Ho., N. 8.5° 
\V.,5.8 miles. 



Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 81° 
W., 6.9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 13° 
E., 8.7 miles. 



Chart. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 4° 
E.,8.7 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 13° 
W., 8.6 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 15° 
W., 9.3 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 1.3° 
W., 9.3 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 23° 
E.,9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 31° 
E., 9.3 miles. 



C. S. 5498 



..do.... 



.do... 



...do. 



.do.. 



..do... 



Date. 



1904. 
May 19 



May 19 



May 19 



May 19 



May 20 



May 20 



May 20 



.do j May 20 

I 

.do ' May 20 

.do May 23 



.do. 



May 23 



Time of 
day. 



1.01p.m. 
1.06 p. m. 

1.10 p.m. 



1.21p.m. 


8 


1.39 p.m. 


10 


1.39 p.m. 


10-10 


1.40 p.m. 


10-10 


1.51 p.m. 


10 


2.00 p. m. 


10 


2.00 p. m. 


10-10 


2.04 p. m. 


10-10 


2.22 p.m. 


10 


2.36 p. m. 


9 


2.36 p. m. 


9-8 


2.40 p.m. 


9-8 


2.57 p.m. 


8 


9.02 a.m. 


308 


9.02 a. m. 


308-383 


9.29 a.m. 


383 


9.30 a. m. 


383-347 


9.46 a.m. 


383-347 


9.51 a.m. 


383-347 


10.02 a. m. 


347 


10.18 a.m. 


347 


10.18 a.m. 


347 


10.18 a.m. 


347 


10.46 a. m. 


356 


10.54 a. m. 


356-292- 




303 


10.55 a.m. 


356-292- 




303 


11.02 a.m. 


292 


11.08 a.m. 


292-303 


11.20 a.m. 


303 


1.06 p.m. 


286 


1.25 p. m 


286-152 


1.28 p.m. 


286-152 


1.30 p.m. 


1.52 


2.25 p.m. 


184 


2.35 p.m. 


156 


2.39 p.m. 


156-91 


2.48 p.m. 


91 


3.32 p.m. 


130 


3.45 p.m. 


130-155 


3..52p.m. 


1.55 


9.16 a.m. 


469 


9.45 a.m. 


469-530- 




334 


10.00 a.m. 


.530 


10.28 a.m. 


309 


10.28 a.m. 


309 


10.28 a.m. 


309 


10.31 a.m. 


309 


11.09 a.m. 


456 


11.28 a.m. 


456-389- 




413 


11.30 a.m. 


389 


11.44 a.m. 


-113 


12.00 m. 


413 


12.00 m. 


413 


12.00 m. 


413 



Depth. 



fms. 



Character of 
bottom. 



gy-s 

gy-s 

gy-S 

gy.S 

hrd.gy. S, 
hrd.gy.S. 

hrd.gy. S. 

hrd.gy. S. 
hrd.gy.S. 
hrd.gy.S. 

hrd.gy.S. 
hrd.gy.S. 
hrd.gy.S. 
hrd.gy.S. 

hrd.gy.S. 
hrd.gy.S. 

gn.M 

gn. M 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn.M. . . . 

gn. M 

gn.M 

sft.gn. M. 
sft. gn. M. 

sft.gn. M. 

sft. gn.M. 
sft. gn.M. 

sft. gn.M. 
gn. M. . . . 
sft. gy.M.. 
sft.gy.M.. 

sft. gy.M.. 

gy.M 

gy.M 

gy.M 

gy.M 

hrd. gn. M, 
hrd. gn. M 
hrd. gn. M. 
hrd. gn.M. 
hrd. gn.M, 

hrd. gn.M. 
hrd. gn. M. 
hrd. gn.M. 
hrd. gn. M. 
hrd. gn. M. 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn.M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn.M 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



37 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 

h. TO. 
30 

22 
22 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
63 

63 

63 

63 
62 
62 

62 

61 
50 
50 

.')0 
.» 
58 
58 

58 
57 
53 
53 

53 
53 
52 
52 

51 
51 
51 
51 
51 
51 

51 

51 
51 

51 
57 
57 
57 

57 
56 
56 
56 

56 
58 
58 
58 
55 
55 

56 
56 
56 
56 
57 
58 
. 58 

57 
66 
56 
56 
56 


°F. 
57 

57 

57 

57 


°F 


Tnr. sdr. 




S.56°E... 
S.56° E... 

S.56° E... 
None 


mi. 
.8 

.7 

. 7 




f8' Tnr.; 2 swabs; 
t 2 wng. 

Op. plank 

Tnr. sdr 


1 
Bottom. 

Surfai^e . 


[Frame of beam trawl bent; 
1 net torn; wing net 12 
] inches diameter; 1 net 6 
1 inches diameter. 
[2 small plankton nets towed 
1 separately for a total of 22 
1 minutes between 1.10 and 
[ 1.31p.m. 


57 1 

57 1 

1 

.57 i 

i 
57 


Tnr. sdr 




16 
13 

14 


8.64° E... 
S.64°E... 

S.64° E... 

None 


1.0 
.9 

.9 




Op. plank 

8' Tnr.; 2 swabs; 

2 wng. 
Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


2 hauls between 1.;J9 and 
1.47 p.m. 


57 

57 

57 
57 
57 
57 

56 
56 
53 
53 

53 
53 
53 
53 

54 
54 
54 
54 
53 
53 

53 

53 
53 

53 
55 
55 
55 

55 
55 
55 
55 

55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 

55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 
55 

55 
55 
56 
56 
56 


44.0 
44.0 
44.0 
44.0 

44.0 

Is.'o" 


Tnr. sdr 




26 
20 

21 


S.61°E... 
S.61° E... 

S.61° E... 
None.. 


.8 
.7 




Op. plank 

16' Tnr. ; 2 wng . 
Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


2 hauls (10 minutes each) 
between 2 and 2.25 p. m. 


Tnr. sdr 






S.4'J° E... 
S.40° E... 

S.40° E... 


.7 
.6 

.6 




Op. plank 

IG' Tnr.; 2 wng. 
Tnr. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


20 
19 


2 hauls (10 minutes each) 
between 2.36 and 2.59 p. m. 


Sig. sdr. . 1- 


1 39 
33 


N.70° E... 
N.79° E... 


1.0 

.7 




Surf, tow 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 


Found silk lining cut from 
net. 


lO'Blk.; 2 wng.. 

Surf, tow 

Surf, tow and 

op. plank. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 


30 
20 
10 


N. 79° E.. . 
N.7;,° E... 
N. 79° E.. . 

None 


.6 
.5 
.2 


Small plankton net secured 
in mouth of surface net. 


Op. plank. II 

Op. plank. II 

Op. plank. 1 

Sig. sdr. 


100 fms.. 
200 fms.. 
300 fms.. 


4 

14 

23 

1 8 

40 

36 


None 




[Hauled simultaneously on 
1 same line. 


None 




None 




N.79°E... 
N.79°E... 

N.79° E... 

None 


1.2 
1.2 

1.0 




Surf, tow 

Op. plank 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Surface . 




10'Blk.;lswab; 

2 wng. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


23 


N.7y°E... 
None 


.7 


Trawl net torn badly; wing 
•nets full of mud. 


Sig. sdr 




52 
10 
11 


S.()2° E... 
S.02° E... 
S.62° E... 

None. 


.4 
2 
'.2 




Op. plank 

8' Tnr.; 2 wng.. 

Sig. sdr 


Surface . 
Bottom. 


Trawl net badly torn; larger 
wing net torn. 


Sig. sdr. 




34 


S.64° E... 
None 


.5 




Sig. sdr 






9' Tnr.; 2 wng.. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


11 


S.64°E... 
None 


.3 


Net slightly torn from 
weight of mud. 


Sig. sdr 




35 
14 


S.41° VV... 
S.41° W... 


.7 
.5 




8' Tnr.; 2 wng.. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr. . . . 




1 20 
30 


S.C2° E... 
S.62° E... 


1.9 
1.2 




lO'Blk.; 2 wng.. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


1 wing net fouled of its own 
mouth. 


Op. plank. 1 

Op. plank. 1 

Op. plank. 1 

Sig. sdr 


100 fms.. 
200 fms.. 
300 fms.. 


3 

6 
9 


None 




\ 


None 




IHauled simultaneously on 


None.. 




[ same line. 








Sig. sdr 




58 
20 


S.61° E... 
S.61° E... 

None 


i.2 

1.7 




10'Blk.;lswab; 

2 wng. 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 






None 

None.. 






Op. plank. II 

Op. plank. 1 

Op. plank 


100 fms.. 
200 fms.. 
300 fms.. 


4 
"l^ 










None 




same line. 



38 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



D. 4514 



D. 4515 



D. 4517 

D. 4518 

D. 4519 
D. 4520 

D. 4521 
D. 4522 
D. 4523 
D. 4524 
D. 4525 

D. 4526 
D. 4527 

D. 4528 

D. 4529 
D. 4530 

D. 4531 



Position. 



Monterey Bay, California — 
Continued. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 39° 
E.,10.7 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 18° 
E.,8.1 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 49° 
E., 12.5 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 52° 
E.,9.1 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 42° 
E., 5.7 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 30° 
W., 11.8 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 28° 
W., 11.2 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 25° 
W., 10.8 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 21° 
W., 10.1 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt.Ho., S. 17° 
W., 9.5 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 10' 
W., 9.9 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 10° 
W., 9.4 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 7° 
W., 9.3 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 10° 
\V., 8.5 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 58° 
E., 12.7 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 01° 
E., 10.9 miles. 



Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 78° 
E., 6.8 miles. 



Point Pino'^ Lt. Ho., N. 64° 
E., 2.1 miles. 



Chart. 



C S. 5498 



Date. 



..do... 



...do... 

...do... 

...do... 
...do... 

...do.. 

...do.. 
....do.. 

...do.. 
....do.. 

....do.. 
....do.. 

....do.. 

....do.. 
....do.. 



1904. 
May 23 



May 23 



May 24 



May 24 

May 24 

May 20 
May 20 

May 20 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 
May 26 

May 26 
May 26 

May 27 

May 27 
May 27 

May 28 



Time of 



1.20 p.m. 
1.44 p.m. 
1.44 p.m. 

1.53 p.m. 
2.36 p.m. 
2.53 p.m. 

2.55 p.m. 
2.55 p.m. 
3.20 p.m. 
9.23 a. m. 



10.28 a. m. 
10.38 a. m. 
10. .38 a.m. 
10.38 a.m. 

1.10 p.m. 
1.12 p.m. 
1.40 p.m. 
1.52 p.m. 
1.52 p. m. 
1.52 p.m. 

3.00 p. m. 

3.08 p.m. 

3.09 p. m. 

3.12 p.m. 
3.15 p.m. 

3.24 p. m. 
8.-53 a. m. 
8.58 a. m. 

9.01 a.m. 

9.13 a.m. 

9.14 a.m. 
9.18 a.m. 
9.23 a. m. 
9..36 a. ni. 
9.37 a. m. 
9.45 a. m. 

10.05 a. m. 
10.11 a.m. 

10.24 a.m. 
10.44 a.m. 
10.49 a. m. 
10..59 a.m. 

11.25 a.m. 
11.35 a.m. 
11.44 a.m. 

1.11 p.m. 

1.26 p.m. 

2.13 p.m. 
2.22 p. m. 
2.40 p. m. 

3.15 p. m. 
3.. 32 p.m. 
3.. 32 p. ni. 
3..52 p. m. 
9.18 a.m. 

9.54 a. m. 
9.56 a. m. 

10.16 a.m. 
11.15 a.m. 
11.15 a.m. 
11.37 a.m. 
1.49 p. m. 

2.25 p. m. 
2.28 p. m. 

2.55 p. m. 

8.03 a. m. 

8.04 a. m. 
8.18 a.m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
524 
406 
406-394 

394 

368 

368-495- 

198 

495 

495-198 

198 

756 



718 

718 

718 

718 

766 

766-750 

750 

750 

750 

750 

140 

76 

76-66 

76-66 

76-66 

66 

35 

35-27 

27 

44 

44-32-43 

32 

43 

119 

119-140 

140 

149 

149-130 

1.30 

108 

108-75 

75 

228 

228-213 

213 

222 

222-222 

204 

204-239 
239 
282 
337 

337-183 
183 
545 

766-800 
7(i6 
800 
780 

780-799 
799 
958 
847 

847-755 

755 

26 

26-28 

28 



Character of 
bottom. 



gn.M 

gn. M 

gn.M.,K 

gn.M.,R 

gn. M.,bk. Sp.,Sh 
gn.M.,crs.S.,Sh. 

hrd.gy.S 

hrd.gy. S 

hrd.gy.S 

gn. M 



gn. M. 



gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M., S... 
gn. M., S... 
gn. M., S... 
gn. M., S.. 
gn. M., S.., 
gn. M., S.. 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S 

hrd. S-. . . . . 
hrd. gy. S. 
hrd. gy. S. 
hrd. gy. S. 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gn. M 

dk. gn. M. 
dk. gn. M . 
dk. gn. M. 
gy. S., Sh . 
gy. S., Sh . 
gy. S., Sh . 
sft. dk. M. 
sft. dk. M. 
sft. dk. M. 
sft. gy. M. 
sft. gy. M. 
sft. gy. M. 
sft. gy. M . . 

sft. gy. M . . 

sft. gy. M . . 
sft. gy. M . . 
sft. gv. M . . 

hrd.S 

hrd. S 

hrd.S 

hrd.S 

sft. gy. M. . 
sft. gv. M . . 
sft. gy. M . . 
sft. gv. M . . 
hrd.M.,S. 
hrd. M.,S. 
hrd. M.,S. 
sft. gy. M . . 
sft. gv. M . . 
sft. gy. M . . 



sft. gy. M 

fne.gv. S.,P..R.. 
fne.gy. S.,l^,R.- 
fne.gy. S.,P.,R.- 



THE U. S. FISHEETES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 190J — Continuecl. 



39 



Temperature. 



56 



Sur- Bot- 
face. torn. 



°F. 



Apparatus. 



Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

lO'Blk.; Iswab; 
2 wng. 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

9' Tnr 



Sig. sdr 

2 op.planlj 

Sig. sdr 

Si?, sdr.... 



9' Tnr. 



Sig. sdr 

Op. plank II 

Op. plank II 

Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk; 2 wng. 

Sig. sdr 

Op. plank II 

Op. plank II 

Op. plank II 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk; 2 wng . 

Surf, tow 

Op. plank 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr , 

Sig. sdr 



10' Blk. 



Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

9' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

10' Blk 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

Sid. sdr.... 

9' Tnr 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

Sig. sdr 

8' Alb. Blk. 



Trial. 



T^„^+v, Dura- 
Depth, tion. 



Surface 



Bottom. 



100 fms. 
200 fms. 
300 fms. 



Bottom 



100 fms. 
200 fms. 
300 fms. 



Bottom 
Surface 
Surface . 



Bottom. 



Bottom 



Bottom 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Bottom. 
Bottom. 



Bottom. 



Bottom 



Sig. sdr 

Tnr. sdr 

10' Blk. I Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr 



Drift. 



h. m. 
1 10 



1 3 

28 



1 20 
19 



1 17 
20 



33 



S.G2°E.. 

None 

8.62° E.. 



None. 
SE... 
SE... 



Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



None 

SE 

None 

S. 49° E. . . 



S. 49° E. 



None 

None 

None 

None 

S. 78° E... 
S. 78° E... 

None 

None 

None 

None 

S. 42° E... 

None 

S. 42° E... 
S. 42° E... 
S. 42° E... 

None 

S. 62° W.. 
S. 62° W.. 

None 

S. 85° W.. 
S. 85° W . . 

None 

None 

S. 69° W . . 
S. 69° W . . 
None. . . 
S. 75° W 
S. 75° W 

None 

S. 80° W.. 
S. 80° W.. 
None. . . 
S. 14° W 
S. 14° W 
None. . . 
S. 32° E. 



S. 32° E. . . 

S. 28° E... 
S. 28° E. . . 

None 

S. 12° E... 

None 

S. 12° E... 

None 

S. 38° E. . . 
S. 38° E. . . 

None 

None 

S. 40° E. . . 
S. 40° E. . . 

None 

S. 18° E... 

None 

S. 18° E... 



None . . . . 
N. 48° W . 
N. 48° W . 
None 



1.2 
.7 



1.0 



1 wing net torn; trawl net 
torn badly. 



2 nets towed side hy side. 



Some bottom fish floated up 
out of net; dusky alba- 
tross devoured some; few 
recovered by lowering a 

. boat. 

[Hauled simultaneously on 
I same line. 



iHauled simultaneously on 
I same line. 



1.0 

.6 



Heavy load of mud. 



vVhale fouled sounding wire 
and parted it at an inter- 
mediate station. 

Net slightly torn. 



Net badly torn from weight 
of mud. 



Frame bent; net torn. 



40 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



I 



Station 
No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 




Monterey Bay, California— 
















Continued. 




1904 






fms. 




D. 4532 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., N. 70° 


C. S. 5498 


May 


28 


8.36 a. m. 


30 


gy-s.,R 




E., 2.3 miles. 








8.39 a. m. 


30 


gy-s.,R 


D. 4533 


Point Pinos Lt IIo., S. 73° 


do.... 


May 


28 


9.18 a.m. 


293 


gn. M.,S 




E., 4.9 miles. 








9.39 a.m. 
9.58 a. m. 


293-144 
144 


gn.M.,S 

gn.M.,S 


D. 4534 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 80° 


do.... 


May 


28 


10.14 a.m. 


86 


hrd.gy. S 




E., 4 miles. 








10.22 a. m. 
10.36 a.m. 


86-76 
76 


hrd.gy.S 

hrd.gy. S 


D. 4535 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., N. 86° 


do.... 


May 


28 


10.47 a. m. 


71 


hrd.gy.S 




E., 3.7 miles. 








10.51 a. m. 
11.12 a.m. 


71-54 

54 


hrd. gy. S 

hrd.gy.S 


D. 4536 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 05° 


do.... 


May 


31 


8.56 a. m. 


1,000 


hrd. S.,M 




E., 9.6 miles. 








9.47 a. m. 
10.20 a. m. 


1,006- 

1,041 

1,041 


hrd. S.,M 

hrd. S.,M 


D. 4537 


Point Pino= Lt. Ho., S. 74° 


do.... 


May 


31 


11.23 a.m. 


1,062 


hrd.S.,M 




E., 7.4 miles. 








11.38 a. m. 
12.00 m. 


1,002- 
861 
861 


hrd. S.,M 

hrd.S.,M 


D. 4538 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 85° 


do.... 


May 


31 


1.29 p.m. 


871 


hrd.gy.S 




E., 6.5 miles. 








1.59 p. m. 
2.32 p. m. 


871-795 
795 


hrd.gy.S 

hrd.gy.S 


D. 4539 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., N. 02° 


do.... 


May 


31 


3.32 p. m. 


609 


hrd. S.,M 




E., 4.8 miles. 








3.45 p. m. 
3.45 p. m. 
4.05 p. m. 


518 

518-465 

465 


hrd.S.,M.. 

hrd.S.,M 

hrd. S.,M 


D. 4540 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., SE. 11.2 


do.... 


June 


1 


9.04 a.m. 


551 


gn. M 




miles. 








9.28 a.m. 
9.48 a.m. 


551-389 
389 


gn. M 

gn. M 


D. 4541 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 41° 


do.... 


June 


1 


10.28 a. m. 


381 


gn.M.,S 




E., 9.3 miles. 








10.44 a.m. 
11.19 a.m. 


381-633 
633 


gn. M.,S 

gn. M.,S 


D. 4542 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 35° 


do.... 


June 


1 


1.15 p.m. 


677 


hrd.S.,M 




E., 7.2 miles. 








1.30 p. m. 
1..32 p. m. 
2.00 p.m. 


456-331 
456 
331 


hrd.S.,M 

hrd.S.,M 

hrd.S.,M 


D. 4543 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 2.5° 


do.... 


June 


1 


2.26 p. m. 


93 


hrd.S.,R 




E., 5.4 miles. 








2.27 p.m. 
3.29 p.m. 


93-53 
53 


hrd. S.,R 

hrd.S.,R 


D. 4.544 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 50° 


do.... 


June 


2 


9.55 a.m. 


724 


gv. S.,M 




E., 10.9 miles. 








10.21 a.m. 
10 57 a.m. 


724-1,000 
1,000(?) 


gy. S.,M 

gy. s.,M 


D.4545 


Point Pinos Lt. IIo., S. 56° 
E., 7.7 miles. 


do.... 


June 


2 


1.08 p.m. 

1.53 p.m. 
2.25 p.m. 


900 

900-700 
700 


hrd. S.,M 

hrd. S.,M 

hrd. S.. M 


D.4546 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 46° 


do.... 


June 


3 


8.43 a.m. 


849 


fne. bk. S 




E., 8.4 miles. 








9.22 a. m. 


849 


fne. bk. S., R 


D.4547 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 82° 


do.... 


June 


6 


9.30 a. m. 


1,083 


sft. gy. M 




E., 10.5 miles. 








10.30 a. m. 


1,083 


gy.M.,R 


D.4548 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 26° 


do.... 


June 


7 


8.37 a.m. 


46 


crs. S., Sh., R 




W., 3 miles. 








8.45 a.m. 
8.58 a.m. 


46-54 

54 


ers. S., Sh., R 

crs. S., Sh., R 


D.4549 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 9° 


do.... 


June 


7 


9.01 a.m. 


56 


crs. S., Sh., R 




W., 2.6 miles. 








9.07 a.m 
9.15 a.m. 


56-57 

57 


crs. S., Sh., R 

crs. S., Sh., R 


D. 45.50 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 0° K., 


do.... 


June 


7 


9.35 a.m. 


50 


gn. M., R 




4.6 miles. 








9.42 a.m. 
10.00 a.m. 


50-57 
57 


gn. M., R 

gn.M.,R 


D. 4551 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 9° E., 
4.5 miles. 


do.... 


June 


7 


10.18 a.m. 
10.29 a.m. 
10.43 a.m. 


56 

56-46 

46 


crs. S., Sh., R 

crs. S., Sh., R 

crs. S., Sh., R 


D. 4552 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 73° 


do.... 


June 


9 


8.40 a.m. 


73 


gn. M., R 




E., 4 miles. 








8.41 a.m. 
8.53 a.m. 


73-66 
66 


gn. M., R.. 
gn. M., R.. 




D. 4553 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 67° 
E., 3.7 miles. 


do.... 


June 


9 


9.19 a.m. 
9.25 a.m. 
9.47 a.m. 


74 

74-65 

65 


R 

R 

R 




D. 4554 


Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 76° 
E., 3 miles. 


do.... 


June 


9 


10.04 a.m. 
10,07 a.ra. 
10.38 a.m. 


60 

00-80 

80 


gn. M., R.. 
gn. M., R.. 
gn. M., R.. 





THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



41 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
56 
56 

56 
55 
55 

55 
67 
04 

62 
60 
59 

58 
60 
59 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
63 
62 
61 
60 
60 
59 
64 
63 
63 
61 
61 
61 
61 
58 
58 

57 

58 

57 
57 

60 
60 
61 
62 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
62 
60 
57 
57 

57 

57 
61 
61 
61 
59 
59 
59 
57 
57 
57 


°F. 
5S 
58 
58 
58 
58 
57 
57 

57 
57 
57 

57 

58 
58 

58 
59 
59 

59 
59 
59 
59 
58 
58 
58 
58 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
59 
58 
58 

58 

58 

58 
58 

56 
56 
56 
55 
57 
57 
57 


°F. 

38.5 






Tnr. sdr 




h. m. 
11 
14 
47 
19 


N. 22°W.. 

N. 22° W.. 
N. 80° E . . 
N. 80° E . . 


mi. 
2 
A 

.6 
.4 




9' Tnr.; 2 swabs. 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 


Not badly torn. 


8' Tnr; 2 swabs. 


Bottom. 








27 
15 


S. 6° E.... 
S. 6° E.... 

None 


.5 

.4 




8' Alb. Blk.; 1 
swab. 


Bottom. 








29 
20 


S. 69° E. . . 
S. 69° E. . . 

None 


.8 




8' Alb. Blk-.: 1 

swab. 
Sig. S(ir 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 






S. 41° E... 
S. 41° E... 

None 


1.8 
.6 




8' Alb. Blk 

Sig. sdr. 


Bottom. 


18 




Sig. sdr 




1 52 
18 


S. 5°E.... 
S. 5° E. . . . 

None 


.8 
.3 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 








1 39 
25 


S. 37°E... 
S. 37° E. . . 
None 


O 9 
'1 




8' Alb. Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




55 


S. 47° E. . . 


.9 










10' Blk 


Bottom. 


15 


S. 47° E... 
None 


.4 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 16 
15 


S. 60° E. . . 
S. 60° E. . . 
None 


1.6 
.6 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 18 
35 


S. 61°E... 
S. 61° E... 


2.1 
1.5 




10' Blk 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 2 

28 


S. 61° E... 
S. 61° E... 


1.7 
.8 




9' Tnr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




Sig. sdr 












Sig. sdr 




1 13 
1 2 


S. 60° E... 
S. 60° E. . . 


2.0 

1.8 




9' Tnr 


Bottom. 


Net wrecked. 


Sia;. sdr 




Sig. sdr 




1 48 
30 


S. 35° E... 
S. 35°E... 

None 


3.1 

1.5 




9' Tnr . . 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 


(Depth estimated; wire tend- 
\ ing at a large angle from 


Sig. sdr 




2 19 
29 


S.35° E... 

S.35° E... 
None 


2.3 
1.0 


1 perpendicular. 
Depth estimated; sounding 


8' Alb. Blk 

Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 


wire not perpendicular. 
Depth estimated; sounding 


Sig. sdr 




1 57 
24 

2 5 
16 
23 
11 


S.52°E... 
S.52° E... 
S. 60° W . . 
S. 60° W . . 
S.83° W.. 
S. 83° W . . 


2.1 
.9 

3.1 
.6 

1.0 
.6 


wire not perpendicular. 


8' .\lb. Blk 




Net badly torn. 


Sig. sdr 






10' Blk 


Bottom. 


Net wrecked. 


Tnr. sdT 






Bottom. 




Tnr. r,dr 




57 


Tnr. sdr. .. 




17 
8 


S. 83° W . . 
S. 83° W.. 


.6 
.4 




57 
57 
67 
57 
58 
58 

58 

58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
58 
57 
57 
57 




8 swabs; m.b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. cdr 




27 
16 


South 

South 

None 


1.0 

.8 




6 swabs; b. d.. . 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




T'.ir. sdr 




28 
13 


S.37° E... 
S.37°E... 
None 


.6 

.4 




6 swabs; b.d. .. 
"■'nr. sdr 


Bottom. 


[Lost one swab; tangle 
i frame bent; boat dredge 
[ net and bag torn badly. 


'■'^nr. sdr 




24 

14 


S. 20° E . . . 
S. 20° E . . . 


.7 
.4 




y, swabs; m.b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Tnr. sdr 




31 
21 


S.2° E.... 
S.2° E.... 
None 


1.0 

.8 




8 swabs; m.b... 
Tnr. sdr 


Bottom. 




Sig. sdr 




38 
32 


N.84° W.. 
N.84° W.. 
None 


1.2 
1.0 




6 swabs; m.b... 
Sig. sdr 


Bottom. 





42 



DEEDGING AND HYDKOGEAPHIC EECOEDS OF 

Dredging Records of the California Coast 



Station 
No. 



Position. 



Chart. Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D.4555 
D.4556 
D.4557 
D.4558 
D. 4559 
D. 4560 
D. 4561 
D.4562 
D. 4563 
D. 4564 



H.4804 
D. 4566 



Monterey Bay, California — 
Continued. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 63° C. S. 5498 
E., 3.4 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 7° E., do 

3.7 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 25° do. 

W., 3.1 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., S. 79° do. 

W., 2 miles. 

Point Pinos Lt. Ho., N. 76° do 

W., 2.3 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 71° do 

W., 2.4 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 73° do.. 

W., 3.3 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 72° do 

W., 8.1 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 87° do.. 

W., 1.9 miles. 

Santa Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 85° ' do.. 

W., 1.6 miles. 

i 
San Francisco entrance, 
California. 

SE.Farallone Id.Lt.Ho.,N. C. S. .5500 
56° E., 9 miles. 

SE. Farallone Id. Lt. Ho., N. \ do. . 

51° E., 9.3 miles. 
Point Bonita Lt. Ho., N. 66° do.. 

E., 10.5 miles. ! 



1904. 
June 9 



June 9 
June 9 
June 9 
June 9 
June 11 
June 11 
June 11 
June 11 
June 11 

Sept. 16 

Sept. 16 
Sept. 16 



11.25 a.m. 
11.29 a.m. 
11.43 a.m. 

1.17 p.m. 

1.19 p.m. 

1.36 p.m. 

2.03 p.m. 

2.05 p.m. 
2.19 p.m. 

2.40 p.m. 

2.41 p.m. 
2.59 p.m. 

3.06 p.m. 
3.08 p.m. 
3.32 p. m. 
7.52 a.m. 
7..54 a.m. 
8.00 a.m. 
8.38 a.m. 
8.40 a.m. 
8.52 a. m. 

10.13 a.m. 

10.14 a.m. 

10.43 a.m. 

11.34 a.m. 

11.35 a.m. 

11.44 a.m. 

11.48 a.m. 

11.49 a.m. 
11.57 a.m. 



10.19 a.m. 
11.14 a.m. 
11.54 a.m. 
11.54 a.m. 

3.33 p.m. 
3.36 p. m. 



fms. 
66 

66-69 
69 
56 

56-59 
59 
53 

53-54 
54 
40 

40-28 

28 

22 

22-8 

8 

10 

10-12 
12 
15 

15-14 
14 
10 

10-11 
11 



9-10 
10 



587 

587--; 95 

495 

495 

22 
22 



gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

gn. M., R 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R 

fne. gy. ._ 
fne. gy. S 
fne. gy. S 
fne. gy. S 
fne. gy. S 
fne. gy. S 
ers. S., Sh 
ers. S., Sh 
ers. S., Sh 
hrd. S., R 
hrd. S., R 
hrd. S., R 
Tky.. 
rkv. . 
rlcy.. 
ricy . . 
rliy.. 
rky.. 



bl. M . . .,. 

bl.and gn. M., R 

gn. M 

gn. M 

gy-s 

gy.s 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Investigations of the Albatross, 1904 — Continued. 



43 



Temperature. 



"F. 



Trial. 



Apparatus. 



T^„„*^, Dura- 
I^^Pth- Won. 



Sig. sdr 1 

8 swabs; m. b... Bottom. 

Sig. sdr '' 

Sig. sdr 

6 swabs; m. b...' Bottom. 

Sig. sdr I 

Sig. sdr ! 

8 swabs; m. b... Bottom. 

Sig. sdr ' 

Tnr. sdr 

6 swabs; m.b... Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr 

Tnr. sdr - 

10' Blk ' Bottom. 

Hand lead 

Tnr. sdr | 

6 swabs; m.b... Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr ■.' 

Tnr. sdr 

8 swabs; m. b. .. Bottom. 
Tnr. sdr 



/;. m. 
21 
14 



Tnr. sdr 

6 swabs; m.b... Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr 

Tnr. sdr 

8 swabs; m.b... Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr 

Tnr. sdr 

8 swabs; m.b Bottom. 

Tnr. sdr 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb. Blk 
Luc. sdr. .. 
Luc. sdr. . . 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb. Blk 



Bottom. 



1 54 
17 



Drift. 



S. 87° W 
S.87° W 
None. . . 
S. 11°E. 
S.ll° E. 
None. . . 
S. 15° E. 
S. 15° E. 
None. . . 
S.5° E.. 
S.5° E.. 
None.. . 
S.6° E.. 
S.6° E.. 
None... 
S.52° E. 
S.52°E. 
None. . . 
N. 86° W 
N.86° W 
None. . . 
N.40° W 
N.40° W 
None. . . 
S.81° W 
S.81° W 
None. . . 
S.50° W 
S.50° W 
None . . . 



S.29° E... 
S.29° E... 

None 

None 



Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



1.2 

.4 



Lost 1 swab. 



Mud bag badly torn. 
Bottom very rougli. 



Net torn. 

Position same as H. 4804. 



44 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 



2. CRUISE IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC. 

From October 6, 1904, to February 24, 1905, the Albatross, in 
charge of Mr. Alexander Agassiz, was detailed for i ivestigations in 
the eastern Pacific in the region lying between Panama, Callao (Peru), 
Easter Island, and the Gambler Islands. This was the vessel's second 
cruise in these waters, similar explorations, also conducted by Mr. 
Agassiz, having been made in 1891. Much interest attaches to this 
work, be.cause there is no other oceanic region situated at so great a 
distance from a continental area and interrupted by so few islands. 
The eastern tropical Pacific extends south from a line between Aca- 
pulco and the Galapagos and to Cape San Francisco as a northern 
boundary, to a distance of over 3,000 miles, as far as the latitude 
of Manga Reva, Easter Island, and a point north of Valparaiso. 
The distance from Manga Reva to the South American coast is fully 
3,500 miles, with nothing to break this vast expanse of water. (Gen- 
eral Report of the Expedition, by Alexander Agassiz, Memoirs of the 
Museum of Comparative Zoology, vol. xxxviii, 1906.) 

The collections are rich in material for studies of oceanic fauna 
and bottom deposits, and they include also some plants from Manga 
Reva and Easter Island which possess much interest in a considera- 
tion of the origin and distribution of the flora of the eastern Pacific. 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 



D. 4567 

D. 4568 
D. 4569 

D. 4570 
D. 4571 

D. 4572 
D. 4573 



Coast of California. 

Pigeon Point Lt. Ho., S. 
34° E., 10.5 miles. 
(37° 19' N., 122° 30' W.) 

fPoint Pinos Lt. Ho., E., 

\ 12rnilos. 

[ (36° 38' I-'., 122° 11' W.) 

Point Aiguello Lt. Ho., 

S. 63° E., 14.5 miles. 

(34° 41' N., 120° 55' W.) 

Point Conception Lt. Ho., 

N. 4° W., 7 miles. 
(34° 20' N., 120° 27' 30" W.) 
IE. point Santa Rosa Id., 

N. 50° W., 25 miles. 
I (33° 40' N., 119° 35' W.) 



IE. point, San Nicolas Id., 

S. 3° W., 16 miles. 
[ (33° 30' N., 119° 25' W.) 



I Point Banda (lower Cali- 
fornia) N. 81° E., 74 
miles. 
(31° 35' N., 118° 10' W.) 



Chart. 



H. O. 1006; 
published 
June, 1887; 
ext. cor. 
Nov., 1899. 

.do 

-do.... 

.do.... 



..do. 



..do. 



Date. 



1904. 
■Oct. 6 



Oct. G 
Oct. 7 



Oct. 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 7 



Oct. 8 



Time of 
day. 



1.30 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 
6.00 a.m. 

9. 00 a.m. 

3. 30 p. m. 

3.47 p.m. 
3.47 p.m. 

5.30 p.m. 



7.00 a.m. 



Depth. 



fms. 



30-600* 
40-600* 

50-200* 

900* 

900* 
900* 

20-900* 



400-900* 



Character of 
bottom. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 



45 



Incidentally collections were made at a niiinber of stations en route 
to Panama from San Francisco. 

During the cruise there were made 203 hauls with plankton nets. 
Of these, 134 were surface hauls, 65 with large nets and 69 with small 
Kofoid nets; 54 were intermediate hauls (these exclusive of 4 trials 
with the Tanner intermediate net and 1 with the Cuhn-Petersen), in all 
of which Kofoid nets were used in conjunction with larger nets; 15 
were vertical hauls. Forty-three hauls were made with beam trawls. 
Of these, 30 employed the Albatross-Blake trawl, 2 the 9-foot, 14 the 
8-foot, 7 the 6-foot, and 7 the 5 5-foot. In 5 the 8-foot Tanner frame 
was used and in the remaining 8 the 8-foot Agassiz pattern. In 10 
of the 43 hauls the net was either wrecked or upset. The tangles 
were used once in a deep haul, but made no catch. The soundings 
numbered 111. 

The Albatross' regular series of dredging and hydrographic sta- 
tion numbers were maintained in this cruise. Through an error in a 
previous cruise the hydrographic series as originally published in 
the Memoirs of the Museum of Comparative Zoology does not cor- 
respond with the vessel's corrected record; an additive factor of 301 
is required for all of the hydrographic numbers there published — 
thus station H. 4504 should be H. 4805, etc. This correction, which 
applies only to the hydrographic stations, however, is necessary to 
prevent a duplication of the vessel's numbers. 

Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5. 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
59-03 

(■)7-(i3 
02-00 • 

01-04 

C9 

09 
09 

04-70 
OT-05 


°F. 
03-00 

07-04 
03-00 

03-04 

GO 

00 
00 

04-60 
04-07 


°F. 


Pump-filter </). 

Pump-fllter»^ . 
Pump-filter<|> . 

Pump-filter.^. 

K. 2: surf. 2 til 

Surf. 1 

K. 1; K. 2t... 

Pump-filter (^ . 
Piuiip-flltert^ . 


2fms.... 

2fms.... 
2fms.... 

2 fms. . . 

[300 frns. 
i to sur- 
[ face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

2 fms.... 
2 fms.... 


h. m. 

3 30 

4 

12 30 

3 

22 

18 
18 

8 30 

13 30 


S 


mi. 
.35.0 

4.'>.0 
140.0 

35.0 




S. 22° E. .. 

S. 28°E... 

S. 47° E... 


(■Distance from shore, 3 
1 to 15 miles. Course 
1 crosses mouth of Mon- 
[ terey Bay. 
Distance from shore, 5 to 
18 miles. 

Distance from shore, 4 to 
14 miles. 


S. .50° E. . . 
S. 50° E... 

SE 

S. 30° E. . . 


.0 
.0 

75.0 
135.0 


Distance from shore, IJ 
to 21 miles; course 
across Santa Barbara 
Channel and through 
Santa Cruz Channel. 

Distance from shore, 14 
to 05 miles; course 
through channel be- 
tween San Nicolas and 
Santa Barbara Islands 
and between Cortez 
and Tanner Banks and 
San Clemente Island. 



907—06- 



46 



DREDGING AND HYDEOGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 



D. 4575 
D. 4576 

D. 4577 
D. 4578 

D.4579 
D. 4580 



D. 4581 
D. 4582 



D. 4583 



D. 4584 



D. 4585 
D. 4586 

D. 4587 
D. 4588 

D. 4589 
D. 4590 
D. 4591 

D. 4592 



Position. 



West Coast of Lower Cali- 
fornia. 

iCape Colnett, N. 65° E., 

{ 58 miles. 

[ (30°35'N., 117°23'W.) 



Cape San Quentin, N. 84° 
E., 60 miles. 
(30° 15' N., 117° 10' W.) 
Cape San Qiientin, N. 75° 
E., 55 miles. 
(2'3°52' N., 116° 56' W.) 

N. point, Cerros Id., S. 
87° E., 37 miles. 
(28° 25' N., 115° 55' W.) 

Abreojos Point, S. 71° E., 

61 miles. 

(27° 2' N., 114° 40' W.) 
Cape San Lazaro, S. 57° 

E., 60 miles. 

(25° 20' N., 113° 13' W.) 
Cape San Lazaro, S. 70° 

E., 23 miles. 

(24° 55' N., 112° 45' AV.) 



(Cape Tosco, N. 55° E., 7.5 

\ miles. 

I (24° 15' N., 111° 52' W.) 

Cape False, S. 57° E., 35 

miles. 

(23° 12' N., 110° 32' W.) 
Cape Falso, N. 35° E., 9 

miles. 

(22° 45' N., 110° 5' W.) 



Cape San Lucas, N. 40° 
W., 62 miles. 
(22° 05' N., 109° 10' W.) 

Southwest Coast of Mexico, 

{Cape Corrientes Lt. IIo., 
S. 71° E., 112 miles. 
(21° 00' N., 107° 37' W.) 

[Cape Corrientes Lt. IIo., 

\ S. 78° E., 82 miles. 

( (20° 40' N., 107° 10' W.) 

Cape Corrientes Lt. Ho.,1 
N. 50° E., 37 miles. 
(20° 00' N., 106° 12' W.) J 

Cape Corrientes Lt. Ho., 
N. 31° E., 37 miles. 
(19° 52' N., 106° 02' W.) 
fFarralon Point, N. 21° 
\ W., 35 miles. 
I (18° 50' N., 104° 50' W.) 
do 



[II. 0. 1006; 
published 
June, 1887; 
ext. cor. 

[Nov., 1899. 



.do., 
-do.. 



Point Telmo, S. 86° E., 9 

miles. 

(18° 20' N., 103° 40' W.) 
Point Telmo, N. 61° E., 4 

miles. 
(18° 17' 30" N., 103° 35' W.) 



.do... 
.do... 

.do... 



..do. 



...do. 

...do. 



■Oct. 12 



..do. 



■II. 0. 1006; 
published 
June, 1887; 
ext. cor. 

.Nov., 1899. 

..do... 



....do.... 

....do 

M.O.1007; 
published [-Oct. 13 
Mar., 1887. ] 
....do Oct. 13 



1904. 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 8 

Oct. 9 

Oct. 9 

Oct. 10 

Oct. 10 



Oct. 10 
Oct. 11 



Oct. 12 
Oct. 12 



Time of 
day. 



.do... 
.do... 



Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 



3. 16 p. in. 



3.35 p.m. 
3.35 p.m. 
5.30 p.m. 



8.35 p.m. 
8.35 p. m. 

7.00 a. Tn. 

7.00 p. in. 

7.00 a. III. 



11.22 a.m. 
11.22 a.m. 

7.00 p. ni. 

7.00 a.m. 

10.20 a.m. 

11.02 a.m. 
11.02 a. m. 

7.00 p. m. 



7.00 p. m. 

8.31 p.m. 

8.33 p.m. 
10.18 a.m. 
10.30 a.m. 

7.00 p.m. 

7.35 p. m. 
7.37 p. ni. 



Depth. 



Cliaracter of 
bottom. 



fins. 
1,4 



1,400* 

1,400* 

700-1,400* 



1,500* 
1,500* 

1 , 000-2, 000* 

50-1,000* 

500-1,500* 



320* 
320* 

.50-500* 

50-300* 



1,000^ 
1,000* 



1,500-1,800* 
2, 000* 

1,000-2,000* 

1,500* 

1,500* 

1,000* 

700-1,500 

500-1,000* 

250= 
250^ 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



47 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 


°F. 


°F. 






h. 


m. 




mi. 




7(1 


69 




K. 1; K. 2t II-. 


(300 fms. 
I tosur- 
l face. 


\ 


- 














7r> 

76 
G7-7ti 


69 

69 

70-68 




Surf. 2 

K. 1: K. 2t... 
Pump-filter (|> . 


Surface . 
Surface . 
2 fms 


10 


17 
17 
30 


S. 30° E. . . 
S. 30° E... 
S. 33° E. . . 


.6 

.6 

95. 


Distance from shore, 58 
to 70 miles. 


(17 


69 




Surf. 2 


Surface . 




16 


S. 30° E... 


.5 




07 
70-65 
69-74 


69 
70-66 
70-71 




K. 1; K. 2t... 
Pump-filter <^ . 
Pump-flltcr.^ . 


Surface . 
2 fms.... 
2 fms 


13 

12 


10 
30 



S. 30° E. . . 
S. 30° E. . . 
S. 40° E... 


.5 
130.0 
120.0 


[Distance from shore, 20 
1 to 60 miles; course 
] crosses mouth of Sebas- 
[ tian Vizcaino Bay. 
Distance from shore, 7 to 
20 miles. 


69-71 


70-73 




Pump-fi]ter(^ . 


2 fms.... 


12 





S. 37° E... 


125.0 


Distance from shore, 15 
to 65 miles. 


74 

74 
74 

72-82 

75-79 


76 

76 
76 

72-77 

7(V-S2 




K. 1; K. 2t II- 
Cuhn 


(300 fms. 
I to sur- 
[ face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

2fm.s.... 

2 fms 


1 

12 
12 


15 

13 

17 











S. 50° E. . . 
S. 50° E... 

S. ,50° E. . . 

S. .50° E . . 


.4 
.5 

100. 

95.0 


1 Towed from boom. Tow 
< line parted; damage 


K. 1; K. 2 t-- 
Pump-filter<|) . 
Pump-fllter(f) . 


1 slight. 

[Distance from shore, 5 to 
I 60 miles; course across 
1 mouth of Magdalena 
\ Bay. 

Distil nee from shore, 7 to 
22 miles. 


82 

83 
S3 

80-90 


83 

83 
S3 

81-87 




K. 1; K. 2tll- 
Surf. 2 

K. 1; K. 2t-- 

Pump-filt(>ri^ . 


[300 fms. 
\ to sur- 
l face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

2 fms.. . 


12 


10 

18 
18 










S. 50°E... 
S. 50° E. . . 

S. 48° E... 


.6 
.6 

95. 


(Distance from shore, 9 to 
J 60 miles; course cross- 
1 ing mouth of Gulf of 
I California. 


82-80 


80-83 




Pump-filter<J) . 


2 fms.... 


12 





S. .53° E. . . 


105. 


[Distance from shore, 60 
J to 100 miles; course 
1 crossing mouth of Gulf 
[ of California. 


82 


82 




K. 1; K. 2t ||. 


foOO fms. 
■| to sur- 
[ face. 


1 


10 






J Position in mouth of Gulf 
\ of California. 






81-90 


81-83 




Pump-filter 0- 


2 fms 


12 





S. 53° E... 


100.0 


[Distance from shore, 28 
J to 65 miles; course 
) crossing mouth of Gulf 
[ of California. 


82 


81 




Surf. 3; e.l..-. 


Surface . 




18 


S. 50° E... 


.6 




82 

83 

81-83 

86-98 


81 

83 

81-83 

83-87 




K. 1: K. 2t-. 
K. 1; K. 2t ||. 
Pump-filter (^ . 
Pump-flltcr<|) . 


Surface . 
[300 fms. 
■I tosur- 
l face. 

2 fms.. . . 

2 fms 


1 

15 

8 


17 
22 
30 
30 


S. 50° E. - . 
None 


.6 


(With about 200 fms. out, 
\ stopped 5 minutes 


S. 49° E- . . 
S. 6.5° E... 


105.0 
75.0 


[ while heaving in. 
Distance from shore, 15 

to 35 miles. 
Distance from shore, 5 to 

20 miles. 


84 


83 




Surf. 3; e.l..-- 


Surface . 




IS 


S. 6.5° E. . . 


.6 




84 


83 




K. 1; K. 2t-- 


Surface . 




18 


S. 6.5° E. . . 


.6 





48 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4593 



Southwest coast of Mexico — 
Continued. 



D. 4595 



D. 4596 



Morro de Papanoa, S. 75° 
E., 43 miles. 
(17° 25' N., 101° 50' W.) 

{Morro de Papanoa, S. 86° 
E., 27 miles. 
(17° 17' N., 101° 35' W.) 
Acapulco Lt. Ho., N. 88° 
E., 32 miles. 
(16=48' N., 100° 28' W.) 
Acapulco Lt. Ho., N. 88° 

E. (nearly), 32 miles. 
(16° 48' N., "100° 27' W.) 

(Point Escondido, N.3° E., 

13 miles. 
[(16° 07' 30" N.,98° 37' W.) 



Galera Point, S. 86° E. 

28 miles. 

(15° 58' N., 98° 13' W.> 
Point of Rocks, N. 46° E.. 

10 miles. 

(15° 36' N.,97° W.) 
Point of Rocks, NE., 10 

miles. 

(15° 36' N., 96° 59' W.) 

Salinas Cruz Lt. Ho., N. 
2° E.. 72 miles. 
(14° 58' N., 95° 1.5' W.) 



D.4598 
D. 4599 



D. 4601 



D.4603 
D.4604 



D. 4605 
D. 4(i06 



D. 4608 

D. 4609 

D. 4610 
D. 4611 

D. 4612 

D.4613 
D. 4614 

D. 4615 



11° 03' N., 89° 3.5' W. .. 

10° 32' N.,88°26' W. .. 
10° 32' N.,88°25' W . .. 



60 



(Point Guionos, E 
< miles. 

I (9° 5.3' N., 86° 42' W.) 
l"oint Guionos, N. 73° E., 
35 miles. 

(9° 43' N., 86° 15' W.) 
Cape Blanco, N. 3° E., 27 
miles. 

(9° 06' N., 85° 08' W.) 
....do 



n. 0. 1007; 
published 
Mar., 1887. 

...do.... 

...do.... 



.do. .. 
.do. .. 

.do... 



II. O.1007: 
>!iublished 
Mar., 1887. 

do... 



13° 38' N., 93° 50' W do 



Southwest coast of Central 
America. 

San Jose de Guatemala 

Lt. Ho., N. 50° E., 135 

miles. 

(12° 30' N., 92° 32' W.) 
San Jose de Guatemala 

Lt. Ho., N. 43° E., 130 

miles. 

(12° 22' N., 92° 20' W.) 
San Jose de Guatemala 

Lt. Ho., N. 41° E., 127 

miles. 

(12° 20' N., 92° 13' W.) 
San Jose de Guatemala 

Lt. Ho., N. 20° E., 123 

miles. 

(12° 00' N., 91° 30' W.) 
....do 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 



11° 10' N., 89° 50' W do 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 

.do. 
.do. 



1904. 
Oct. 14 



Oct. 14 
Oct. 14 



Oct. 15 

Oct. 15 

Oct. 15 

Oct. 15 



10.15 a.m. 
7.00 p.m. 



7.06 p.m. 
7.08 p. m. 



10.17 a. ni. 
7.00 p. m. 



7.05 p. m. 

7.06 p. m. 



•Oct. 17 
Oct. 17 



Oct. 17 
Oct. 17 



7.30 a. m. 
10.00 a. m. 



12..58 p. m. 
7.00 p.m. 



7.03 p. m. 
7.03 p. m. 
Oct. 18 8.00 a.m. 



Oct. 18 

Oct. 18 

Oct. 19 

Oct. 19 

Oct. 19 



10.17 a.m. 

7.00 p. ni. 
7.03 p.m. 
7.03 p. m. 
7.00 a.m. 

lO.lG a. m. 
7.00 p.m. 

7.02 p.m. 
7.02 p. m. 



fms. 
100-800* 



500* 
500-1,000* 



700* 
700* 



100-900* 



,500* 
100-1.000* 



500^ 
500* 



2,000-2.400* 



. 200-2, 400* 
2, 200* 



2, 200* 
,500-2,500* 



2,000* 

2,000* 

,600-2,000* 



2, 000* 

1,800-2,000* 
1,800* 
1 , 800* 

1,600-1,800* 

1,.500* 
1,200-1,800^ 

1,500* 
1,500* 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



49 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- I 
tion. 1 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 


"F. 


°F. 






h. 


TO. 




mi. 




S4-S0 


S4-S1 




Pump-filterif) . 


2 tms 


12 





S. 63° E. . . 


120. 


Distance from shore, 3 to 
25 miles. 


8.3 


84 




K.l; K. 2t II . 


1300 fms. 
tnsur- 


1 


15 


None 




/Caught a turtle at this 














1 


[ face. 


1 










8.S-99 


SS-S.^ 




Pump-nitcr.;) . 


J fms 


12 





S. 63° E... 


90. 


Distance from shore, 10 
to 20 miles. 


86 


84 




Surf. 3; e. 1.... 


Surface . 




IS 


S. 60° E . . . 


.i; 




8(i 


84 




K.l; K.2t. .. 


Surface . 




16 


S. (>0° E . . . 




Disiaiice from shore, 10 
to 20 miles; changed 


84-81 


84-Sl 




Pump-filtor*. 


2 fms... 
HOO fms. 


12 





S. 70° E . . . 


115.0 


silk in filter from no. 20 
to no. 12 at beginning 
of this station. 


83 


84 




K.l; K.2t||.- 






18 












face. 












82-J3 


8.'S-82 




rump-filtertfr. 


'? fms. . . 


12 





^.70°E... 


100.0 


Distance from shore, 5 to 
15 miles. 


85 


82 




K. 1; K.2t .. . 


surface . 




20 


S. 75° E . . . 


. 7 




8.^ 


82 




Snrf.3; e.l.... 


Surface . 




18 


S.75°E... 


.6 


(Distance from shore, 8 to 


84-81 


83-81 




Pnmp-filter<|). 


2 fms... 


12 





S. 70° E . . . 


110.0 


1 60 miles; course across 
1 mouth of Gulf of Te- 
[ huantepec. 
(Distance from shore, 60 


80-87 


7J-82 




Pump-filter <|). 


2 fms . . . 


12 





SE 


115.0 


I to 115 miles; crossing 
i mouth of Gulf of Te- 
1 huantepec. 






































(Distance from shore. 100 


82-83 


81-83 




Pump-filteri^. 


2fms. .. 


12 


30 


SE 


105. 


1 to 110 miles; crossing 
1 mouth of Gulf of Te- 
[ huantepec. 


84 


84 




K.l; K.2t.. . 


Surface . 
(300 fms. 


1 


30 


S. 65° E . . . 


.8 




81 


85 




K l; K.2tl|.. 




I 


'>4 












[ face. 


1 










83-01 


8a-85 




rump-fllter<;>. 


2 fms.. . 


11 


30 


K, 65° E . . . 


70.0 


Distance from shore, 105 
to 115 miles. 


83 


83 




Siirf.;^; C.I.... 


Surface . 




18 


S.65°E... 


.6 




83 


83 




K.l; K.2J... 


Surface . 




18 


S. 05° K . . . 


.6 




83-81 


82-83 




Pump-filtorc^. 


2 fms.. . 
(300 fms. 


13 
1 





S.63°E... 


110.0 


Distance from shore, 115 
to 135 miles. 


82 


81 




K.l; K.2t II-. 


i to sur- 


\ 


16 


None 














1 face. 


1 








(Distance from shore. 135 


86-78 


82-78 




Pump-filterf/). 


2 fms.. . 


11 





S. 63° E . . . 


95.0 


i to 145 miles; off Gulf of 
[ Eonseca. 


78 


7S 




Surf. 3; e.l... 


Surface . 




18 


S. 70° E . . . 


.6 


Position off Gulf of 
Fonseca. 


78 


78 




K.l; K.2t... 


Surface . 




20 


S. 70° E . . . 


.7 


(Distance from sliore, 55 


79-78 


78-80 




Pump-fllter<|). 


2 fms.. 


12 





S. 70° E . . . 


110.0 


\ to 135 miles; oft" Gulf of 
[ Fonseca. 










[300 fms. 


1 








81 


SO 




K.1; K.2t |!-. 


< to sur- 


f 


16 


None 














[ face. 










79-88 


82-79 




Pump-fllter<^. 


2 fms.. . 


12 





S. 63° E . . . 


105.0 


Distance from shore, 25 
to 55 mile.''-. 


81 


80 




Surf. 3; c.L... 


Surface . 




18 


S. 60° E . . . 


.6 


Position off Gulf of Ni- 
cova. 


81 


80 




K.l; K.2t. . 


Surface . 




18 


S. 60° E . . . 


.6 





50 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 



D. 4616 



D.461S 
D. 4619 

D.4620 
D. 4621 

D.4622 

D. 4623 

D. 4624 

D.4625 

D. 4626a 

D. 4627 

D. 4628 

D.4629 
D. 4630 

D. 4631 

D. 4632 

H. 4805 



D. 4633 
D. 4634 



Southwest coast of Central 
A merica— Continued . 

Burica Point, S. 80° E., 
44 miles. 
(8° 10' N.,83°36' W.) 

South coast of Panama. 

Montuosa Islet, N. 43° E., 
10 miles. 
(7° 21' N., 82° 21' W.) 



Montuosa Islet, N. 12° V 
12 miles. 
(7° 17' N., 82° 11' \V.) 



.do. 



(Mariato Point, N. 63° E., 

\ 60 :niles. 

[ (6° 45' N., 81° 47' W.) 

Mariato Point, N. 55° E., 

63 miles. 

(6° 36' N., 81° 45' W.) 
Mariato Point, N. 52° E., 

66 miles. 

(6° ,31' N., 81° 44' W.) 
Mariato Point, N. 22° W., 

14 miles. 

(6° 58' N., 80°48' W.~) 
....do 



Chart. 



H. 0. 1007; 

^pul)lished 
Mar., 1887. 



H. O.1007; 
published 
Mar., 1887. 



.do. 



..do. 
..do. 

..do. 



Cape Mala, S. 40° W., 42 
miles. 
(8° 00' N., 79° 33' W.) 

I Anchorage off Panama, 
summit of Perico Is- 
land, S. 20° W., 0.4 mile. 
(8° 55' N., 79° 31' 30" W.) 

From Panama to Gala- 
pagos Islands. 

Cape Mala, N. 30° W., 7.5 
miles. 
(7° 21' N., 79° 56' W.) 

Cape Mala, N. 13' W., 11 
miles. 

(7° 17' N. 79° 57' W.) 

fMariato Point, N. 70° E., 
\ 51 miles. 

[ (6° 55' N., 81° 42' 30" W.) 
,..do 



.do. 



....do. ... 

H. 0. 1019; 
published 
Aug.. 1887; 
ext. cor. 
May, 1901. 



H. 0. 1007; 
published 
Mar., 1887. 



.do... 



.do... 
.do... 



Mariato Point, N. 51° E., \ do... 

72 miles. 

(6° 26' N.. 81° 49' W.) 
Mariato Point, N. E., 118 

miles. 

(5° 48' N., 82° 10' W.) 

5° 36' N., 82° 28' W H. 0. 1007; 

published 
Mar., 1887. 

4° 40' N., 83°25' W do.. 

4° 3.V 30" N., 83° 32' 30" W do . 



Date. 



1904. 
Oct. 20 



•Oct. 20 

Oct. 20 

Oct. 20 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 21 

Oct. 22 

>Oct. 22 



Time of 
day. 



Nov. 2 

Nov. 3 

Nov. 3 

Nov. 3 

Nov. 3 

Nov. 3 



Nov. 4 
Nov. 4 



7.00 a.m. 



4.05 p.m. 

4.27 p. m. 
4.27 p.m. 
7.00 p.m. 



7.00 p.m. 

7.00 p.m. 

8.00 a. m. 

9.20 a. m. 
10.14 a.m. 

11.14 a.m. 
12.00 m. 

7.00 p. m. 



7.03 p.m. 
7.03 p. m. 

7.00 a.m. 



7.00 p. m. 



7.07 p. m 
7.07 p. m. 



8.00 p. m. 



8.15 a.m. 
8..59 a. m. 



11.55 a. m. 
12.58 p. m. 



8.00 p. m. 



10.37 p. m. 



8.00 a. m. 
10.55 a. m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
900-1,500* 



1,000* 

1,000* 

200-1,200* 



1,000* 

1,000* 

100-1,000* 

581 
581 

581 
581 

500-1,000* 

800* 
800* 

75-1,000* 
5-75* 



60* 
60* 



5-500* 



50-800* 



556 
556 



774 

774 



500-1,800* 



1,885 



1,800-2,000* 
1,729 



1,729 



Character of 
bottom. 



gn.S 

gn. M. R 

gn.S 

gn. S. R 

gn.S 

gn. S 

gn. S 

gn.S 

gn. M 

gn. M., Glob 
gn. M.,Glob 



a While at anchor off Panama, between Oct. 23 and Nov. 1, collections were made along the shores 
of the islands of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's station oft" l^anama and the Taboga Islands. 
Plankton nets were used during the same periods about the anchorage and between there and the 
Taboga Islands. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904^5 — Continued. 



51 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Deptii. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 


°F. 


°F. 






h. 


m. 




mi. 


(■Distance from shore, 15 


80-78 


80-70 


Pump-filtcr</). 


2rms., . 


12 





S. 60° E . . . 


110.0 


\ to 45 miles; off Gulf of 




















[ Nieoya. 










[300 fms. 


) 










77 


78 




K. 1; K.2t l-. 


< tOSUT- 

[ face. 


I 


IG 














■ 77 


78 




Surface 3 


Surface . 




18 


S. 65° E . . . 


.6 




77 


78 ' 


K. 1; K.2t... 


Surface. 




18 


S. 65° E . . . 


.6 




80-7'; 


80-77 1 


Pump-filter <^. 


2 fms . . . 


12 





S. 58°E... 


105.0 


Distance from shore, 5 to 




















35 miles. 




















[6 hauls, 20 minutes each; 




















last landed at 9.24 p. m. 


78-77 


79-78 




Surf. 3 


Surface . 


2 





S. 65° E . . . 


4.0 


Electric light used at 
firsi,, third, and fifth 
hauls. 


78 


79 




K.l; K 2t.. . 


Surface . 




20 


S. 65° E . . . 


.6 


[Distance from shore. 5 to 


77-79 


78-79 




Pump-filter (|). 


2 fms.. . 


13 





fS. 70° E . . . 
ts.7°E.... 


25.0 
25. 


1 30 miles. Hove to off 
) Jicaron island part of 
[ night. 


8i 
83 


79 

79 


40.5 
40.5 


Luc .'>dr 








None . 






8' AlV..-Blk.; 


Bottom. 




12 


S. 10° E . . . 


.3 


Jyost mud bag. 








m. b.; 2 wng. 














86 
85 


79 
79 




T>uc. sdr 








None . . . 






8' Alb.-Blk.; 


Bottom. 




21 


SVV 


.7 


Trawl- net slightly torn. 








m.b.: 2 wna;. 














80-87 


78-81 




Pump-filter <J). 


2 fm.s . . . 


11 





iS. 10°E... 
IN. 63° E . . 


15.0 


\]iisi,anoe from shore, 15 
j to45milc>. 
















60 


82 


79 




Surf. 3; e.I.... 


Surface . 




20 


N. 65° E . . 


. 7 




82 


79 




K. 1; K. 2t. .. 


Surface . 




20 


N. 65° E . . 

IN. 70° E. . 
\N.5° E... 


. 7 

75.0 
35.0 


(Distance from shore, 5 to 


79-81 


7J-80 




Pump-fllter</). 


2 fms.. . 


12 





\ 35miles. Entering Gulf 
1 of Panama. 




















(Distance from shore, i to 


80-98 


80-84 




Pump-filter ij> . 


2 fms.. . 


1^ 





N 


60.0 


\ 30 miles; Gulf of 




















[ Panama. 


82 


82 




Surf. 3; e.I 


Surface . 




20 


S. 15° W . . 


. 7 




82 


82 




K.l; K.2t... 


Surface . 


20 


S. 15°W.. 


.7 






















[Pump started at 9 a. m. 




















at Panama; distance 


91-82 


82-83 




Pump-filter <;>. 


2 fms... 


11 





S. 15° W . . 


100.0 


i from shore, i to 30 


















miles; in Gulf of Pana- 




















ma. 




















[Distance from shore, 3 to 


82-78 


81-79 




Pump-filter (^ . 


2 fms... 


12 





S. 78° W . . 


120.0 


i 30 miles; south coast 
I of Panama. 


79 

82 


81 
81 


40.5 
40.5 


Luc. sdr 






None . 




1 Trawl net came up afoul 


9' Alb.-BIk.; 


Bottom, if 


19 


SE 


.6 








m. b. ; 2 wng. 




1 


32 


NW 


1.0 / of frame. 


85 
87 


82 
82 


38.0 
38.0 


Luc. sdr . 














9' Alb.-Blk.: 


Bottom. 




30 


NW 


i.6 








m.b.; 2 wng. 












88-80 


83-79 




Pump-filter . 


2 fms . . . 


12 





S. 30° W.. 


75. Distance from shore, 20 
to 120 miles. 


79 
78-81 


80 
80-79 


36.4 


Luc. sdr 








None 






Pump-filter (j) . 


2 fms . . . 


12 





SW 


100.0 


Off shore. 


79 
81 


80 
80 


35.9 
35.9 


Luc. sdr 








None 






K. 1; K. 2; 

K. 3 til 


f300 fms. 
i to sur- 
t face. 


1 


19 


None . . . 













52 



DEEDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIG EEGORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 




From Panama to Gala- 
pagos Islands— Cont'd. 




1904. 




fms. 




D. 4635 


3° 52' 30" N., 84° 15' W 

3° 11' 30" N., 84° 57' 30" W. 
2° 45' N., 85° 25' W 


H.O.1007; 
published 
Mar., 1887. 

do 

H. O. 526; 
published 
Jan., 1874; 


Nov. 4 
Nov. 5 
•Nov. 5 


7.32 p. m. 
7.32 p. m. 
8.00 p. m. 
3.17 a.m. 

/ 8.00 a. ni. 
i 8.30 p. m. 


1,700* 
1,700* 
1,700-1,800* 
1,705 

1,.500-1,700* 
1,500-1,600* 












H. 4806 


gn. M., Glob 


D. 4636 








ext. cor. 
Oct., 1896. 








D. 4637 


1°31' N., 86° 32' W 


do.... 


Nov. 5 


9.32 p.m. 
10.02 p. m. 


1,541 
1,.541 


lt.gn.Oz.,lge.Glob 
lt.gn.Oz.,lge.Glob 


D. 4638 


Mt. Pitt, Chatham Id., S. 
60° W., 142 miles. 
(0°2r N., 87° 13' W.) 


H. 0. 1798; 
published 
June, 1899. 


Nov. 6 


7.54 a. m. 
8.00 a. m. 
8..53 a. m. 


1,450 

1,400-1,500* 

1,450 


bk. gy. glob. Oz . . . 
bk. gy. glob. Oz ... 
bk. gy. glob. Oz . .. 


D. 4639 
II. 4S07 


Mt. Pitt, Chatham Id., S. 

67° W., 105 miles. 

(0°04' S.,87°40' W.) 
Mt. Pitt, Chatham Id., S. 

74° W., 83 miles. 
(0° 21' S., 87° .57' 30" W.) 
Mt. Pitt, Chatham Id., S. 

86° W., 65 miles. 

(0° 40' S., 88° 11' W.) 


do.... 

do.... 

do.... 


Nov. 6 
Nov. 6 
Nov. 6 


9.26 a. m. 
1.22 p.m. 
1.44 p. m. 
1.44 p. m. 
5.17 p. ill. 

S..30 p. m. 

8.32 p.m. 
8.32 p. m. 
9.12 p.m. 


1,450 
1,418 
1,418 
1,418 
1,433 

1,000-1,500* 

1,061 
1,061 
1,061 


bk.gy.glob. Oz... 
It. gy. glob. Oz . . . 
It. gy. glob. Oz... 
It. gy. glob. Oz.. . 


D. 4640 














(No specimen) 


D. 4641 


(E. (Ripple) point, Hood 
{ Id., N. 41° W., 12 miles. 
1 (1° 35' S., 89° 30' W.) 


■....do.... 


Nov. 7 


8.16 a. m 

8.30 a.m. 
9.10 a.m. 


633 

600-1,000* 
633 


It. gy. glob. Oz .. . 




It. gy. glob. Oz . . . 


I). 4642 


E. (Ripple) point, Hood 

Id., N. 41° W., 4 miles. 

(1° 30' 30" S., 89° 35' W.) 


do.... 


Nov. 7 


10.38 a. m. 
11.15 a.m. 


300 
300 


brk. Sh., Glob.... 
brk. Sh., Glob.... 


D.4643 


|W. (Hood) point. Hood 
{ Id., N. 24° E., 5 miles. 
1(1° 29' S., 89° 48' 30" W.) 

From Galapagos Islands 
to Sechura Bay, Peru. 


• ....do.... 


Nov. 7 


1.43 p.m. 
2.14 p.m. 


100 
100 


brk. Sh., Glob.... 
brk. Sh., Glob.... 


D. 4644 


W. (Hood) point. Hood 
Id., N. 5° W., 49 miles. 
(2° 13' S., 89° 42' W.) 

3° 37' 30" S.,89°43' W.... 

4° 02' S., 89° 16' W 


H. 0. 1798; 
published 
June, 1899. 
II. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar.. 1896. 
do 


Nov. 7 
Nov. 8 

Nov. 8 


8.03 p.m. 
8.03 p. m. 
8.56 p. m. 
8.32 a. m. 
10.45 a. m. 

7.05 p. m. 
7.05 p. m. 

7.27 p.m. 

8.43 p. m. 


1,752 
1,752 
1,752 
1,955 
1,955 

2,058 
2,058 








D. 4645 
D. 4646 


fne. It. gy. glob. Oz 
fne. It. gy. gloti.Oz. 
fne. It. gy.glob.Oz. 


















2,058 
2,058 












It. gy. and br. glob. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Contiuued. 



53 



Temperature. 



Air. 



°F. 

79 

79 

83-78 

77 

78-77 
80-76 



73 
75-73 



73-76 
75 
74 

75 



76 



Sur- Bot- 
face. torn. 



°F. 
79 
79 

80-79 

78 

78-78 
78-76 



77-75 



76-74 

75 
75 
75 



75-74 
74 
74 

74 
73 



35.4 
35.4 
35.4 



37.4 
37.4 
37.4 



39.5 
48.6 



67.2 



35.4 
35.4 
35.4 
35.2 
35.2 



35.4 
35.4 



35.4 
35.4 



Apparatus. 



Surf. 3; e.l.. 
K. 1; K.2t . 
Pump-fllter i 
Luc. sdr 



Pump-filter <^ 
Pump-filter 4> 



Luc. .sdr .. 
K. 1: K. 

K.3tli 



Drift. 



Depth. S' Direction. ^^ 



Surface . 
Surface , 
2fms ... 



h. m. 

22 



2fms. 
2 fma , 



12 
12 30 



Pump-filter (j> . 
K. 1; K. 2t .. 



Surf. 3 

Luc. sdr 

Surf. 3 

K. 1; K. 2t. 
Luc. sdr 



Pump-fllter (j> . 

Surf. 3: e.l. .. 
K. 1; K. 2t... 
Luc. sdr 



Luc. sdr . 



Pump-filter <t> 

8' Alb.-Blk.; 

m. b.: 2 wng. 

Luc. sdr 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



2 fms . . , 
1300 fms. 
to sur- 
[ face. 
Surface 



Surface 
Surface 



2 fms . . 



Surface . 
Surface . 



2 fms . . . 
Bottom 



' Alb.-Blk. 
2 wng.; 10 [-Bottom, 
swabs. 



Luc. sdr . 



■ Alb.-Blk.; 
2 wng.; 10 
swabs. 



Surf. 3: c. 1. .. 
K. 1; K.2t.-. 

Luc. sdr 

Luc. sdr 

S' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng. 



•Bottom 



Surface 
Surface 



K. 3; e. 1 Surface . 

K. 1; K. 2t...l Surface 

' [300 fms 
Surf. 3; 2 K. 2 §1.^ tosur- 

1 [ face 
Luc. sdr 



11 30 
32 
10 



SW . . 
SW.. 

SW. . 
None 



SW 100.0 

S. 40° W . . 100. 



None , 
None . 



None 

S. 30° W. 

None 

SW 



15 SW.. 
15 SW.. 
None 



12 



12 
20 



SW. 



SW... 
SW.. 
None 



S. 55° W . 

NW 



NW, 



S 

s 

None , 



S. 80° E . 
S. 80° E . 

S. 80° E , 
None. . . 

None . . . 



90.0 

.7 



Remarks. 



95.0 

.7 



Off shore. 



Ofl shore. 

Off shore; after this date 
no positions or stations 
were given for the 
pump-fllter alone. 

Thermometer fouled. 



Thermometer failed to 
trip. 

Off shore. 

(With about 200 fms. line 
i out, stopped heaving in 
[ for 15 minutes. 



Distance from shore, 65 
to 140 miles. 



E. (Ripple) point is the 
southern of the points 
on the east coast of 
Hood Id. embraced by 
the dotted line, abreast 
of the name and sym- 
bol of Ripple. 

Distance from shore, 12 
to 65 miles, a 



Full tangle set of 10 
swabs on triangular 
frame locked to tail of 
trawl-net. 

W. (Hood) point is the 
northern of the two 
points in the off-lying 
rock symbols on the 
west coast of Hood Id. 

Gear rigged as in pre- 
vious station; lost 1 
swab. 



1.0 



a No detailed record of filter work was kept hereafter, though the custom of ;emptying the filter 
about 8 a. m. and 8 p. m. was continued until the arrival at Acapulco in Feb., 1905. Material col- 
lected from the filter was labeled with the numbers of stations occupied about these hours, or, m 
their absence, merely with the date ard time. 



54 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 



Chart. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4647 



D. 4G48 



D. 4f349 



D.4651 



D.4652 



H. 4808 
D. 4053 



II. 4809 
D. 4654 
D. 4055 



From. Galapagos Inlands 
to Sechura Bay, Peru- 
Continued ■ 

4° 33' S., 87° 42' 30" W . . . . 



4° 43' S., 87° 07' 30" W 



5° 17' S., 85° 20' W , 



5° 21' S., 84° 39' W. 



Aguja Point, S. 83° E. 
Ill miles. 

(5° 42' S., 8.3° W.) 



Aguja Point, S. 83° 30' E. 
91 miles. 
(5° 45' S., 82° 40' W.) 



Aguja Point, S. 72°E.,36 

miles. 
(5° 43' 30" S., 81° 44' W.) 
Aguja Point, S. 61° E., 17 

miles. 
(5° 47' S., 81° 24' W.) 

From vicinity of Sechura 
Bay, Peru, seaward to 
ninetieth meridian \V. 
long., thence to Callao, 
Peru. 

Aguja Point, S. 64° E., 20 

miles. 
(5° 46' 30" S., 81° 27' W.) 
Aguja Point, S. 68° E., 24 
miles. 

(5° 46' S., 81° 32' W.) 
Aguja Point, N. 87° E., 40 

miles. 
(5° 57' 30" S., 81° 50' W.) 



H.0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar , 1896. 



.do. 



..do. 



.do... 



H. 0.1177; 
published 
Dec. ,1889; 
ext. cor. 
Nov., 1901. 



.do. 



.do... 
.do... 



.do... 
.do... 
.do... 



1904. 
Nov. 9 



Nov. 9 



Nov. 10 



Nov. 11 



Nov. 12 
Nov. 12 
Nov. 12 



8.28 a. m. 
11.02 a.m. 

2.28 p. m. 
2.28 p.m. 



7.04 p. m. 
7.04 p. m. 



.18 p.m. 



8.30 a. m. 
10.59 a.m. 



2.17 p.m. 

2.17 p.m. 
7.03 p. m. 
7.03 p. m. 

7.18 p. m. 

8.31 a. m. 
10. 54 a. m. 



2.13 p.m. 
2.13 p.m. 
2.13 p.m. 

2.54 p. m. 



Nov. 11 


7.03 p. m 
7.03 p. m 




7.19 p. m 




8.20 p. m 




9.04 p. m 


Nov. 12 


7.36 a.m. 


Nov. 12 


10.33 a. m 
11.17 a. m 



1.10 p.m. 



2.03 p. m. 
3.19 p.m. 

7.04 p. m. 
7.04 p. m. 

7.22 p. m. 



fms. 
2, 005 



2,005 
2,005 



2,000* 
2, 000* 

2,000* 

2,235 
2,235 



2,235 
2, 200^ 
2, 200* 

2, 200* 

2 222 
2! 222 



2,222 
2 222 
2,222 

2,222 

2, 200* 
2,200* 

2,200* 

2, 200* 

2, 200* 
2, 312 



536 
536 



It. gv- and br.glob. 

Oz. 
It. gv. and br.glob. 

Oz. 



fne. stky. gy. M . 
fne. stky. gy. M . 



fne. slk., gy. M . 
fne. stk., gy. M . 



1,0.36 
1,036 



2,200*!. 
2, 200*1 , 



fne. bl.M. 



dk. br. vol. M. 
dk. br. vol. M. 



dk. gn. M. 



dk.br. M.. 
dk.br. M.. 



2,200*1. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5— Continued. 



55 



Temperature. 



Air. 



72 



Sur- 
face. 



66 



'F. 
70 



Bot- 
tom. 



°F. 
35.4 

35.4 

3.5.4 
35.4 



Apparatus. 



Trial. 



Depth. 



Dura- 
tion. 



.35.4 
.35. 4 



35.4 
35.4 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb.-Blk , 
m. b.; 2 wng. 



8 themi . 

K. 2 11... 



35.4 
35.4 



35.4 
35.4 
35.4 

.■55.4 



K. 3; e.l... 

2 K. 1 .t ... - 

Surf. 3; 2 K.2§ 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b. ; 2 wng. 

9 therm 



Bottom. 

(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 
800 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
Surface . 
Surface 
300 fms 
to sur- 
face 



h. m. 



Drift. 



Direction. 



Surface . 
(300 fms. 1 
I to sur- }■ 
I face. I 



Wat. bot . .. 
K. 3; e.l.... 
2 K. U 



Surf. 3; 2K.2§ 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 
K. 2 II ... . 



None 
E.... 



None . 
None . 



E 

E 

E 

None . 



Bottom. 

f Surface 
\ to 800 
fms. 
800 fms . 
Surface . 
Surface . 
[300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



8 therm . 

K. 3; e.l- 
2K. 1 %■■ 



None . 
30 E . . . . 



34.9 



41.3 
41.3 



Surf. 3; 2 K. 2 § 

Surf. 3; 2 K. 2 § 

Surf. 3; 2 K. 2 § 
Luc. sdr 



Bottom. 

(Surface 
\ to 800 
[ fms. 
800 fms.. 
(800 fms. 
to sur- 
[ face. 

(5 to 100 
fms. 

Surface . 

Surface 

400 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

200 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

100 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



None . 

None . 

E 

E 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.;2wng. 



E 

None . 

None 
E.... 



None. 
None. 
None. 

None. 



20 E 

16 None. 



63 38. 5 



.37.3 
37.3 



Luc. sdr. 



E 

None . 



E 

None. 

None . 



Luc. sdr 

8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.;2wng. 
K. 3; e. 1. 

2 K. 1 ± Surface . 

1400 fms. 
Surf . 3; 2 K. 2 § K to sur- 
face. 



Bottom. 
Surface .1 



[400 fms. 1 
J to sur- !• 
\\ face. ] 



None 



None . 
SE... 



SW... 

SW.. 

SW.. 
None. 



Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
{ 50, 100, 200, 300, 400. 600, 
{ and 800 fms. 
Attached below ther- 
mometers. 



1.0 



(Temperatures at surface, 
\ 25, .50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
I 600, and 800 fms. 



1.0 



(Temperatures at surface 
25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 



(Attached below ther- 
mometers. 
(Temperatures at 5, 10, 20, 
\ 30, 40, 50, 75, and 100 
\ fms. 



56 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OP 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 



D. 4657 



D. 4658 



IX 4(i60 



D.4661 



D. 4662 



D. 4663 



D. 4664 



D. 4005 



D. 4666 



D. 4667 



From vicinity of Sechura 
Bay, Peru, seaward to 
ninetieth meridian W. 
long., thence to Callao, 
Peru — Continued. 

6° 55' S.,8.3° 34' W 



7° 12' ;W" S.,84°09' W. 



8° 30' S.. 85° 36' W 



8° 55' S., 86° 05' W. 



9° 55' S.,87°30'W. 



10° 17' S.,88°02' W 



11° 14' S.,89°35' W. 



11° 20' S.,88°55'W. 



11° 30' S., 87'' 19' W. 



11° 45' S., 86° 05' W 



11° 55' S.. 84° 20' W. 



12° S., 83° 40' W. 



Chart. 



n. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar., 1896. 
do.... 



....do... 



.do.. 



.do... 



.do.. 



.do 



.do. 



.do... 



.do.... 



.do... 



.do... 



Date. 



1904. 
Nov. 13 



Nov. 13 



Nov. 14 



Time of 
day. 



8..30 a. in. 
11.13 a.m. 

7.03 p. m. 
7.03 p.m. 

7.20 p. m. 

8.29 a.m. 

11.03 a.m. 

2.1Gp.m. 



Nov. 


14 


7.02 p.m. 

7.03 p.m. 

7.49 p. m. 


Nov. 


15 


8.33 a. m. 
11.02a.m. 


Nov. 


15 


7.04 p. in. 
7.04 p.m. 

7.18 p.m. 


Nov. 


16 


8.33 a. m. 
11.13 a.m. 

2.07 p. m 
2.07 p. m 
2.07 p. m 


Nov. 


16 


7.03 p. m 
7.03 p. m 

7.18 p. m 


Nov. 


17 


8.10 a.m 
8.10 a. m 

8.21 a. m 
9.18 a.m 


Nov. 


17 


7.02 p. m 
7.02 p. m 

7.16 p. m 


Nov. 


18 


8.35 a. in 
11.25 a.m 

2.25 p. m 
2.25 p. m 
2.25 p. m 


Nov. 


18 


7.01 p.m 
7.01 p.m 



7.15 p. m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
2,222 

2,222 



2, 200* 
2,200* 

2, 200* 

2,370 

2,370 

2,370 

2,400* 
2,400* 

2,400* 

2, 425 

2,425 

2,400* 
2,400* 

2, 400* 

2,439 

2, 4.39 

2,439 

2,439 

2, 439 

2,400* 
2, 400* 

2,400* 

2,500* 
2, 500- 



2,500* 
2,500* 



2,500* 



2,000 
2,600 



2,600 

2,600 

2,600 

2,600* 
2,600* 

2,600* 



Character of 
bottom. 



fne.gn.M.,mang. 

Nod. 
fne.gn. M.,mang. 

Nod. 

fne.gn. M.,mang. 

Nod. 
tne.gn. M.,mang. 

Nod. 

mang. Nod 

ma.ng. Nod 

(No specimen) . . 
Rough 

fne. gy. rad. Oz. . 
fne. gy. rad. Oz.. 

fne. gy. rad. Oz.. 
fne. gy. rad. Oz.. 
fne. gy. rad. Oz.. 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATEOSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904—5 — Coiitiuued. 



57 



Temperature. 



Sur- 



Bot- 
tom. 



Apparatus. 



Trial. 



D^ptb. ?r- 



Drift. 



Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



69 
73 

70 
70 

70 

71 

75 



°F. 
35.2 



35.2 



35.3 
3.5.3 



35.4 
35.4 



35.2 
35.2 

35.2 
35.2 
35.2 



34.9 
34.9 



34.9 
34.9 
34.9 



h. m. 



8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. h.\ 2\vng. 



K. 3; o. 1. 
2K.2t.. 



Surf. 3; 2 K. 2 § 
Luc. sdr 



Bottom. 



Surface . 

Surface . 
1300 fms. 
\ to sur- 
[ face. 



8' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng. 

Tnr. int.§ .... 



2K. It-. 
K. 3; e. 1. 



Int. 1;2K.2§. 

Luc. sdr 

\W Alb.-Blk.; 
\ m. b.; 2 wng. 

Surf. 3; c.l... 
2K. 1+ 



Bottom. 

[300 fms. 

to sur- 
[ face. 
Surface . 
Surface . 
1300 fms. 

to sur- 
I face. 



Int. 1; 2K.2§ 
Luc. sdr 



s-Bottom. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

1300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



6' Alb.-Blk.; 
2 wng. 

9 therm 

Wat. bot 

K.lll 



Surf. 3; e. 1.. 
2K. It 



Int. 1; 2K.2§. 



Surf. 3. 

2K. IJ. 



Int. 1; 2K.2§, 



Tnr. int§. 



Surf. 3; e. 1 .. 
2K. It 



Int. 1; 2K.2§. 



Luc. sdr 

6' Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng, 



Bottom. 

(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 
800 fms.. 
(800 fms. 
< to sur- 
[ face. 
Surface . 
Surface . 
300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
Surface . 
Surface . 
300 fms. 
to sur^ 
face. 
300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
Surface . 
Surface . 
300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K. HI 



Surf. 3; e. 1. 
2K. It 



Int. 1; 2K.2§. 



Bottom. 

[Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 

800 fms. 

SOO fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 
(300 fms. 
< to sur- 
[ face. 



None 

N. 60° E . 



SW. 

sw. 



SW... 
None. 

None . 



SW 

None 

SW 

SW 

SW 

None 

None 

N. 60° E.. 



NE... 
NE... 

NE... 
None. 

None 



N. 60° E . 



None . 



None . 
None . 



E.... 

E.... 

E 

None. 

E 

E 



E 

None. 



E 

None. 

E 

E 

E 

None. 

None . 
E 



None . 
None. 
None. 



E 

None. 



(Net was not closed 
through fouling of purs- 
[ ing lines. 



Bridle stops parted; net 
capsized and slightly 
torn. 



Bottom probalily of man- 
ganese. 
Bridle stops parted; 

trawl net capsized. 
(Temperatures at surface. 
{ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
[ 600, and 800 fms. 

/Attached below ther- 
\ mometers. 



Net was not closed 
through fouling of purs- 
mg lines. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
{ 25, 50, 100. 200, 300, 400, 
i 600, and 800 fms. 

(Attached below _ther- 
\ mometers. 



58 



DKEDGING AND HYDKOGRAPHIC RECOEDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 



Position. 



From vicinity of Sechura 
Bay, Peru, seaward to 
ninetieth, meridian W. 
long., thence to Callao, 
Peru — Coutinued . 

12° 09' S., 81° 45' W , 



12° i:i'S., 80°25' W. 



Palominos Lt. Ho.,E.,105 

miles. 
(12° 09' S.. 79° 02' 30" W.) 



Palominos Lt. Ho., S. 89° 
K., 71 miles. 
(12° 07' S., 78° 28' W.) 



Palominos Lt. Ho., NE., 

88 miles. 
(13° 11' 30" S., 78° 18' W.) 



Palominos Lt. Ho., N. 

57° E., 40 miles. 
(12° 30' 30" S. , 77° 49' 30" W.) 



Palominos Lt. Ho., N. 

77° E., 79 miles. 
(12° 26' 30" S. ,78° 34' 30" W.) 
Palominos Lt. Ho., N. 

86° E., 80 miles. 

(12° 14' 30" S. ,78° 43' 30" W.) 

Palominos Lt. Ho., N. 
60° E., 89 miles. 
(12° 54' S., 78° 33' W.) 



From Callao, Peru, to 
Easter Island. 

13° 48' S., 80° 13' W 



14° 29' S., 81° 24' W... 



Chart. 



H. O.S23a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar., 1896. 
do.... 



H. 0. 1178; 
published 
Feb. ,1890. 



....do.. 



-do.. 



....do. 
....do. 



..do.. 



H. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar., 1896. 
do.... 



Date. 



1904. 
Nov. 19 



Nov. 20 



Nov. 21 



Nov. 22 
Nov. 22 



Dec. 4 



Dec. 



Time of 



7.00 p. m. 
7.00 p. m. 



7.17 p. m. 



7.46 a. m. 
11.02 a.m. 



2.49 p. ra. 

2.49 p.m. 

2.49 p.m. 

7.01 p. m. 
7.01 p.m. 

7.16 p.m. 

8.10 p.m. 

7.32 a. m. 
10.15 a. in. 

1.24 p. m. 
7.01 p. ni. 
7.01 p. in. 
7.16 p. ni. 

7.59 p. m. 

7.26 a. m. 

9.44 a. m. 

12.10 p.m. 

7.01 p. m. 
7.01 p. m. 

7.16 p.m. 

8.27 p. m. 

7.26 p. m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
2, 620 



2, 620 



•312 p. m 

I 
3.12 p. m. I 



2, 600* 
2,600* 



3,209 
3,209 



3, 209 

3,209 

3,209 

1,490 
1,490 

1,490 

1,490 

2,845 
2,845 

2,845 

4.58 

458 

458 

458 
1,949 

2,338 

2,338 

3.120 
3,120 

3,120 

3,120 

2,543 



2,714 
2,714 



2,714 
2,714 



Character of 
bottom. 



fne. gy. glob, and 
rad. Oz. 

ffno gv. elob. and 
\ rad. Oz. 



fno. dk. br. M. 
fne. dk. br. M. 



fne. dk. gn. C 

fne. dk. br. inf. M 
fne. dk. br. inf. M 



R 

fne. dk.gn. M 

fne. dk. gn. M 

fne. dk.gn. M.,R. 



fne. dk. gn. M 

fne. It. gy. Oz 

fne. dk. br. Oz 

fne. dk.br. Oz.,R. 

fnc.dk.br. Oz.,R. 
fne.dk.br. Oz.,R. 



THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Ckuise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



59 



Temperature. 



fi8 



Sur- 
face. 



68 



Bot- 
tom. 



35.4 
35.4 



35.4 

35.4 

35.4 

35.4 
35.4 

35.4 

35.4 

35.2 
35.2 

35.2 

42.5 

42.5 

42.5 

42.5 
35.2 

35.1 
35.1 



x\.pparatus 



Luc. ,sdr. 



Tnr. iiit § 

Surf. 3; e. 1.. 
2 K. It 



Trial. 



Depth. ^-- 



Int. 1; 2K. 2§. 



Luc. sdr 

6' .\lb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng. 



9 therm . . 
Wat. hot. 
K. 111.... 



Surf. 3; e. 1. 
2K. U 



.300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



Int. 1; 2K. 2§. 
Luc. sdr 



fS'Alb. 
t m.b.; 



3.5.4 
35.4 



35.4 
35.4 



Luc. sdr 

C'AIb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2 wng. 

Tnr. int. § 

Surf. 3;e. I.... 

2 K. U 

Int. I; 2 K.2§ 



Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 



Bottom. 

Surface 
to 800 
fms. 

800 fms. . 

800 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 

300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



Luc. sdr. 



-Blk-.; 
2 wng. 

Surf. 3;e. 1.... 
2K. 1. t 

Int.l; 2K.2§. 

Luc. sdr 



Bottom. 

300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 
[300 fms. 
to sur- 
I face. 



^Bottom. 

Surface. 

Surface . 
(300 fms. 
l to sur- 
[ face. 



Luc. sdr. 



Luc. sdr. 



/6' A lb. -Blk.; 
i m.b.; 2 wng. 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 



20 



Bottom. 



fiSurface 
to 800 
I fms. 
800 fms.. 



Drift. 



None . . 




E 


1.0 


None 




E 

E 


.7 


E 


.7 


None . 




None . . 




S 


.5 










E 


.7 


E 


.7 


E 


.7 


None . 








E 


.6 


N. 20° E.. 
None 


10 



N.30° E.. 

N. 30° E . . 

N. 30°E.. 
None 

None 

None 



None. 



N 

N.... 

N.... 
None. 

None. 



Dis- 
tance. 



None. 



None. 
None. 



Remarks. 



Middle of bag of net 
pursed up tight befon; 
hoisting to surface. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
{ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
\ 600, and 800 fms. 

(■.attached below ther- 
\ niometers. 



"Silicious infusorial 
earth."— A. A. 



Middle of bag of net 

gursed up tight before 
oisting to surface. 



Bridle stops parted ; 
trawl net capsized ; 
catch lost; net also 
badly torn. 



(Bottom very rough. 
Lost beam-trawl frame 

■ and wing nets; recov- 
ered mud bag aind frag- 

I ments of trawl net. 

I Temperatures at surface, 

\ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 

[ 600, and 800 fms. 



60 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 
day. 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D.4676 


From CaUao, Peru, to 
Easter Idand— Con. 

14° 20' S., 80°24" W 


H.O 823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar., 1896. 


1904. 
Dec. 5 


3.12 p. m 
3.53 p.m. 


fms. 
2,714 

2, 714 


fne. dk.br. Oz.,R. 
fne. dk.br. Oz.,R. 


D. 4677 


14° 37' 30" S.,81°41' W.... 

15° 39' S., 83° 27' 30" W 

16° 31' S.,85°04' W 


do.... 

do.... 

do 


Dee. 5 

Dec. 6 
Dec. 6 

Dec. 7 


7.18 p.m. 
7.18 p.m. 
8.31 a. m. 
7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 
8.26 a. m. 


2, 700* 






2,700* 

2,620 

2,500* 




II. 4812 
J). 4678 


It. br. rad. Oz. . . . 




17° 26' S., 86° 46' W 


do.... 


2,500* 
2, 485 




D. 4679 


It. br. rad. Oz . 










9.21 a. m. 


2,485 


It. br. rad. Oz 


D. 4680 


17° 55' S. , 87° 42' W 


do 


Dec. 7 
Dec. 8 


11.15 a.m. 
7.29 p. m. 
7.'29 p. m. 
8.27 a. m. 


2,485 

2,400* 

2,400* 


It. br. rad. Oz . 




18° 47' S.,89°26'W 


do.... 




D. 4681 


2,395 


It.'br. 'rad! Oz. '.'.'.' 










9.20 a. m. 


2,395 


It. br. rad. Oz 










11.36 a. m. 


2,395 


It. br. rad. Oz 










2.34 p. m. 


2,395 


It. br. rad. Oz 










2.34 p.m. 


2,395 


It. br. rad. Oz 










2.34 p. m. 


2,395 


It. br. rad. Oz 


D. 4682 


19° 07' 30" S.,90°10' W.... 
20° 02' 30" S. , 91° 52' .30" W . 


do.... 

do.... 


Dec. 8 
Dec. 9 


7.32 p.m. 
7.32 p.m. 
8.29 a. m. 


2,400* 
2,400* 
2,385 








D. 4683 


dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 










9.27 a. m. 


2,385 


/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
t Oz. 










10.21 a. m. 


2,385 


fdk. choc. rd. rad. 
\ Oz. 


D. 4684 


20° 40' S., 93° 19' W 


do 


Dec. 9 
Dec. 10 


10.21a.m. 

7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 
8.23 a. m. 


• 2,385 

2,300* 
2,300* 
2,205 


dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 




21° 36' S., 94° 56' W 


do.... 




D. 4685 


dk. choc. rd. rad 
Oz. 










9.15 a.m. 


2, 205 


/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
\ Oz. 










10.24 a. m. 


2,205 


/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
t Oz. 










10.24 a. m. 


2,205 


dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 










10.24 a. m. 


2,205 


/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
1 Oz. 










12.11p.m. 


2,205 


dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 


D. 4686 


22° 02' S., 95° 52' W 


do 


Dec. 10 
Dec. 11 


7.32 p. m. 
7.32 p. m. 
8.25 a. m. 


2,200* 
2,200* 
2,184 






22° 50' S.,97°30' W 


do.... 




D. 4687 


dk. choc. rd. rad. ! 
Oz. 










9.13 a.m. 


2,184 


fdk. choc. rd. rad. 
1 Oz. 










11.09 a. m. 


2,184 


/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
\ Oz. 


D. 4688 


23° 17' S., 98° 37' 30" W 




Dec. 11 


7.32 p. m. 
7.32 p, m. 


2,100* 
2, 100* 









THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



61 



Temperature. 



Air. 



84 



Sur- 
face. 



Bot- 
tom. 



°F. 
35.4 



35.-2 



35.3 
35.3 
35.3 



35.4 
35.4 
35.4 

35.4 
35.4 
35.4 



35.2 

35.2 

35.2 
35.2 



35.3 

35.3 

35.3 
35.3 

35.3 
35.3 



35.4 
35.4 
35.4 



Apparatus. 



Surf.3;2K.2§. 

Surf. 3;e. 1..., 
K. l; K. 2t .. 

Luc. sdr 

Surf. 3;e.l... 

2K. 1 t 

Luc. sdr 



Trial. 



Depth. 



Dura- 
tion. 



(800 friis. 
i to sur- 
l face. 
|300fms. 
i to sur- 
l face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 



Int. 1;2K.2§. 



10 .swabs 

Surf.3;e.l.. 
2 K. !{.... 
Luc. sdr 



Surface 
Surface 



Int. l;2K.2§. 

5y Alb.-Blk.; 
m. b.; 2wng. 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K. Ill . . . . 



Surf. 3; e. 1... 

2K.lt 

Luc. sdr 



Int.l.;2K.2§, 

9 therm 

Wat. bot 



Surf.3;e.l... 

2 K. 1 1 

Luc. sdr 



Int. l;2K.2§. 

9 therm . . . 
Wat. bot.. 



K. 1 



5Y Alb.-Blk. 

spl.; m. b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 3;e.l... 
K. 1; K.2t .. 
Luc. sdr 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Bottom, 

Surface . 

Surface , 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Bottom, 

Surface 
to 800 
fms. 

800 fms. 

1800 fms. 
to sur- 

[ face. 

Surface 

Surface 



h. m. 



Drift. 



None. 



Dis- 
tance. 



W.... 
None. 

W.... 
W.... 



SW. 

sw. 



N. 60°E. 
None 

N. 60° E. 

SW 

SVV 



21 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

(Surface 
\ to 200 

[ fms. 

200 fms.. 



Surface . 
Surface . 



(300 fms. 
I to sur- 
l face. 
(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 
800 fms. . 



Cuhn;2K.2§. 



Int.l;2K.2§. 

Surf. 3; e. 1 

K. l; K.2t ... 



(800 fms. 
to sur- 
t face. 

Bottom. 



Surface 
Surface 
None... 



(300 fms. 
i to sur- 
I face. 
1,800 to 
2,000 
fms. 
Surface 
Surface . 



N. eo'E. 
None 

N. 60° E . 



None. 

None. 

None. 

SW.. 
SW.. 
None. 



W.... 

None. 

None. 

None. 

SW.. 
SW.. 
None. 



N 

None. 



None. 
None. 



None 

S.25°E.. 



SW. 
SW. 



20 SW . . , 
16 None. 



21 
1 15 

21 
21 



SW.. 
None. 

SW.. 
SW.. 



fAttached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



.3 



Trawl net badly torn; 

one leg of bridle parted. 

(Temperatures at surface, 

\ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400. 

[ 600, and 800 fms. 

(■Attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 
[ 175, and 200 fms. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 100, 200 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 



fAttached below thcr- 
\ mometers. 



Towed near bottom. 



907—06- 



62 



DEEDGmC AND HYDROCRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging ItECOROs of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 



t). 4689 



Position. 



Chart. 



From Callao, Peru, to 

Easter Island— Con. 
24°05'S., 100° 20' W 



H.0.823a; 
I published 
j July, 1882; 

ext. cor., 
I Mar. 1896. 



Date. 



1904. 
Dee. d2 



Time of 
day. 



D. 4690 
D. 4091 



D. 4692 



H. 4813 



D. 4693 



H.4814 
H. 4815 



H. 4816 



H. 4817 
H. 4818 



H. 4819 
D. 4694 
D. 4695 



24°45'S., 101° 45' W 

NW. point, Sala v Gomez 
Id.; S. 60° W. 122 miles. 
(25°27'S., 103° 29' W.) 



NW. point, Sala y Gomez 

Id.; S. 59° W., 91 miles. 

(25° 40'30"S., 104° 01' W.) 

NW. point, Sala y Gomez 

Id.;S. 15° W., 105 miles. 

(26°17'30"S.,105°25' W.) 

NW. point, Sala v Gomez 

Id.; N. 82° E., 15 miles. 

(26°30'00"S.,105°45'W.) 



Cape Roggewein, Easter 

Id.; S. 79° W.. 95 miles. 

(20° 50' S., 107° 30' W.) 
Cape Roggewein, S. 67° 

W., 18 miles. 
(27° 01' 30" S.,108°56'W.) 
From Easter Island to 

Galapagos Islands.a 

North Cape, Easter Id., 
S. 26° W., 7 miles. 
(26" 59' S., 109° 20' W.) 



North Cape, S. 31° W., 12 

miles. 
(26° 5.5' S.,109° 16'30"W.) 
North Cape, S. 35° W., 

17.5 miles. 
(26° 51' S., 109° 12' 30" W.) 



North Cape, S. 35° W., 

21.5 miles. 
(26°47'30" S.,109°09'30" W.) 
North Cape, S. 36° W., 39 

miles. 
(26° 34' S., 108° 57' 30" W.) 
North Cape, S. 41° W., 

135 miles. 
(25° 22' 30" S., 107° 45' W.) 



....do... 

Referred 
to H. O. 
1119; pub- 
lished Dec. 
1888; ext. 
cor. Nov., 
1904. 



....do. 
....do. 
....do. 



Dec. 12 



8.25 a. m. 

9.14 a.m. 

10.23 a. m. 
10.23 a. m. 

10.23 a. m. 



7.30 p. m. 
, 7.30 p. m. 
Dec. 13 8.23 a. m. 



9.06 a. m. 
11.02 a. m. 



..do.. 



Referred 

to H. O. 

1119; pub- 
lished Dec, 

1888; ext. 
cor., Nov., 

1904. 
do.... 



.do. 



...do... 
...do... 
...do... 



Dee. 13 
Dec. 14 
Dec. 14 

Dec. 15 
Dec. 15 

Dec. 22 

Dec. 22 
Dec. 22 



DfC. 22 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 23 



7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 

8.12 a.m. 
11.21 a. m. 

12.29 p. m. 
2.25 a. m. 
1.13 p. m. 

11.15 a. m. 

12.40 p.m. 

2.13 p.m. 
3.41 p. m. 
3.41 p.m. 
3.41 p. m. 
5.09 p. m. 



7.58 p.m. 
7.58 p. m. 

8.29 a.m. 



9.12 a. m. 
11..38a. m. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



fms. 
2,185 



2,185 

2, 185 
2, 185 

2, 185 



dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 

(dk. choc. rd. rad. 
1 Oz. 

/dk. choc. rd. rad. 
I Oz. 

dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 

)dk. choc. rd. rad. 
Oz. 



2, 000* 

2,000*1 

1,939 j It. br. glob. Oz. 



1,939 
1,939 



1,500*1 
1,500* 



It. br. glob. Oz. . . 
It. br.glob. Oz.,R. 



885 R 

1,142 mang. Nod. 



1,142 



1,696 



1,145 



1,627 

1,733 
1,7.33 
1,733 
1,733 
1,770 

1,800* 
1,800* 

2,020 

2,020 
2,020 



mang. Nod., R. 
rky (no specimen) . 
vol. R., Glob.. 



fne. vol. 
For. 



S., few 



"Small shore collections were made at Easter Isl.and while the ship was coaling 



It. br. Oz 


, Glob. . 


It. br. Oz 


, Glob . 


It. br.Oz 


, Glob. 


It. br. Oz 


, Glob . . 


fne. It. br. 
Glob. 


vol. M., 1 


It. br. vol 


Oz 


It. br. vol. 


Oz 


It. br. vol. 


Oz 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, IQO'i-S — Continued. 



63 



Temperature. 



Air. 



Sur- 
face. 



Bot- 
tom. 



Apparatus. 



Trial. 



T-, iu Dura- 

I^epth. tion. 



Drift. 



Direction. 



i Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



81 



°F. 
35.4 



35.4 

35.4 
35.4 

35.4 



(?) 



35.4 

35.4 

35.4 
35.4 



35.4 

35.4 
35.4 
35.4 
a5.4 
35.3 



Luc. sdr 

Int. l;2K. 2§. 

9 thenn 

Wat. bot 



None. 



h. m. 



K.11 



Surf. 3; e. 1 

K.l;K.2J... 
Luc. sdr 



(300 fms. 
< to sur- 
l face. 
fSurface 
\ to 800 
[ fms. 

800 fms. 

800 fms. 
to sur- 
face. - 

Surface . 
Surface . 
None 



Int.l;2K.2.§. 



8' Alb.-Blk.; 



f8' Alb 
\ m.b.; 



2 wng. 



Surf. 3; e.l... 
K.1; K.2t .. 

Luc. sdr 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

•Bottom. 



Surface . 
Surface . 



None. 



None. 



f5r Alb.-Blk. 
l spl. m. b.; 2 
[ wng. 



Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 



Bottom 
None 



Luc. sdr. 



,Luc. sdr. 

Luc. sdr. 
9 therm . 
Wat.bot. 

K. 1 |.... 
Luc. sdr. 



(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 
800 fms. 
1800 fms. 
I. to sur- 
\ face. 



Int. 1; e. 1 Surface 

2 K. 1 J Surface. 



Luc. sdr. 



Int.l; 2K.2§. 

5i' Alb.-Blk. 
spl.; m. b.; 
2 wng. 



[300 fms. I 

I to sur- [■ 

I face. J 

Bottom. 



SW.. 
None. 



None. 
None. 

None. 

SW... 
SW... 



SW... 
None. 



SW. 



SW. 
SW. 



NE. 



None . 



None . 



None . 

None . 
None. 
None , 
None 
None 



N.20° E. 
N.20°E 



None . 



S 

None. 

SW.. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
•' 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 



Attached below 
mometers. 



Bottom thermometer 
registered 32.4° F. (?). 



(Lost beam-trawl frame 
•j and 2 wing nets; trawl 
net wrecked. 



Bridle stops of beam 
trawl parted; net cap- 
sized and slightly torn. 
Lost one wing net; 
mud-bag frame broken. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
\ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
\ 600, and 800 fms. 

(Attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



Wire parted while reeling 
in; lost instruments. 



64 



DEEDGING AND HYDROGKAPHIO RECORDS OP 

DredgiiNG Records of the Eastern Pacific 



station 
No. 



D. 4696 



D. 4697 



D. 4698 
D. 4699 



D.4700 
D. 4701 



Position. 



D. 4702 
D. 4703 



D. 4704 
D. 4705 



D. 4706 
D. 4707 



D.4708 
D. 4709 



D. 4710 



From Easter Island to 
Galapagos Islands— 
Continued. 

24° 40' S., 107° 0.5' \V 



23° 25' S., 106° 02' W 



22° 50' S., 105° 32' W. 
21° 40' S., 104° 30' W . 



20° 29' S., 103° 26' W.... 
19° 11' 30" S., 102° 24' W. 



18° 40' S., 102° W 

17° 19' S.,.100° 52' 30" W . 



16° 55' S., 100° 25' W. 
15° 05' S., 99° 19' W.. 



14° 19' S.,98°46'W. 
12° 53' S., 97° 42' W. 



11° 40' S., 96° .5.5' W. 
10° 1.5' S., 95° 41' W. 



9° 30' S., 95° 08' W. 



Date. 



H. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor., 
Mar., 1896. 
do.... 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



.do.. 



Time of 
dav. 



1904. 
Dec. 23 



Dec. 24 
Dec. 25 



Dec. 25 
Dec. 26 



Dec. 26 
Dec. 27 



Dec. 27 
Dec. 28 



Dec. 28 
Dec. 29 



Dec. 29 
Dec. 30 



Dec. 30 



7.45 p. m. 
7.45 p. m. 



9.21 a. m. 
11.30 a. ni. 

7.46 p.m. 
7.46 p. m. 

8.27 a. m. 

9.21 a.m. 

7.48 p. m. 
7.48 p. m. 
8.29 a. m. 

9.18 a.m. 

11.39 a.m. 

2.28 p.m. 

2.28 p.m. 

2.28 p.m. 

7.46 p. m. 
7. 40 p. m. 
8.23 a.m. 

9.10 a.m. 

11.29 a. m. 

7.45 p. m. 
7.45 p.m. 

8.25 a.m. 

9.11 a.m. 

11.26 a.m. 

7.48 p. m. 
7.48 p. m. 

8.26 a. m. 

9.12 a.m. 

10.20 a.m. 
10.20 a. m. 
10.20 a. m. 

7.45 p.m. 

7.45 p.m. 
8.23 a. m. 

9.12 a. m. 

11.25 a.m. 

7.46 p. m. 
7.46 p.m. 



Deptii. 



fms. 
2,000* 
2,000* 



2,188 
2,188 
2,188 

2,100* 
2,100* 
2,108 

2,168 



Cliaracter of 
bottom. 



rd. C 

rd.C 

rd. C, R. 



rd. C. 
rd.C. 



2,200* 
2,200*1 
2,265 rd.C. 



2,265 
2,265 



265 

265 

,265 

200* 
200+ 

228 

,238 

,238 

,200* 
,200* 
,031 

031 

031 

000* 
000* 
120 



rd.C. 
rd.C. 

rd.C. 
rd.C. 
rd.C. 



rd. C. 
rd.C. 
rd.C. 



lt.yl.br. glob. Oz 
It. yl.br. glob. Oz 
lt.yl.br. glob. Oz 



2,120 

2,120 

2,120 

2,120 

2,100* 
2, 100* 
2,0.35 

2,035 

2,0.35 

2,000* 
2,000* 



rd.C. 
rd.C. 

rdC- 
rd.C. 
rd.C. 



glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 



THE IJ. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



65 



Temperatu 


re. 


Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


°F. 
75 
75 


°F. 
74 
74 


°F. 


77 


75 


36. 4 


77 


75 


36.4 


80 


75 


36.4 


76 
76 
76 


75 
75 
75 


si's' 


76 


75 


35.5 


75 
75 
75 


74 
74 
72 


'35.3' 


79 


74 


35.3 


79 


75 


35.3 


77 


75 


35.3 


77 


75 


35.3 


77 


75 


35.3 


75 
75 

72 


73 
73 
73 


'ss.'s' 


75 


73 


35.3 


77 


74 


35.3 


73 
73 
75 


73 
73 

72 


'35.' 3' 


75 


72 


35.3 


75 


71 


35.3 


73 
73 
73 


72 
72 
72 


'ss.'s' 


74 


72 


35.3 


74 


72 


35.3 


74 


72 


35.3 


74 


72 


35.3 


73 
73 

72 


72 
72 
72 


'35."3" 


73 


72 


35.3 


76 


73 


35.3 


74 
74 


74 
74 





Apparatus. 



Surf. 4; c.l. 
2 K. 1 I 



Luc. sdr 

Int. 1; 2K. 2§ 

5i' Alb.-Blk. 

spl.; m. b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K. It 

Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K. It 

Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

8'Tnr.;m.b.; 
2 wng. 



9 therm . 
Wat.bot 

K. 1 II.... 



Surf. 4; e. 1. 
2K.lt.... 
Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

8'Tnr.; m.b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K.lt 

Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

8'Tnr.; m. b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K. It 

Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

9 therm 

Wat. bot 

K. 1 II 



Surf. 4; e. 1.. 

2K. 1 t 

Luc. sdr 



Int. 1;2K. 2§ 

8'Tnr.; m.b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1... 
2K. It 



Trial. 



T~. tt. Dura- 

Depth- tion. 



Surface . 
Surface . 



(oOO fms. 
< to sur- 
[ face. 
Bottom. 



Surface , 
Surface , 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 



(300 fms. 
•j to sur- 
( face. 
Bottom. 

(Surface 
i to 800 
I fms. 

800 fms.. 
IKOOfms. 
i to sur- 
l face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 



(300 fms. 
< to sur- 
l face. 
Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 



(300 fms. 
i to sur- 
I face. 

{Surface 
to 800 
fms. 
800 fms , 
(800 fms. 
< to sur- 
I face. 
Surface 
Surface 



(300 fms. 
■I to sur- 
I face. 
Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 



23 



Drift. 



Direction. 



SW. 
SW. 



None . 
NW.. 
None . 

NW.. 



N. 20° E .. 
N.20°E.. 
None 

N. 20° E . . 
None 

N. 20° E . . 
N.20°E .. 
None 



N. 20° E . 
None 

N.20°E. 



Dis- 
tance. 



None. 
None , 
None , 



N. 20° E . 
N. 20° E 
None 

NE 

None 



N.20°E. 
N. 20° E 
None 

NE 

None 

NE 



N. 20° E . 
N. 20° E . 
None 

NNE.... 
None 



None 
None 
None 



N. 20° E . 
N. 20° E , 
None 

NE , 

None 

NE 



20 NE. 
20 NE. 



.7 
1.0 



Remarks. 



Bridle stops parted; 
trawl net capsized. 



Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 
600, and 800 fms. 

(Attached below ther- 
mometers. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
{ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
I 600, and 800 fms. 

(■Attached below ther- 
\ mometers. 



66 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



station 

No. 



Position. 



Chart. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



D. 4712 
D. 4713 



D.4714 
D. 4715 



D. 4716 



H. 4823 



H.4824 



From Easter Island to 
Galapagos Islands — 
Continued. 

7° 47' 30" S., 94° or/ W .... 



7° OS'S., 93° 3.5' W. 
5° 35'S., 92° 22' W . 



4° 19' S., 91° 28' W 

^W. (Hood) point, Hood 

Id., N. 23° E., 83 miles. 

(2° 40' 30" S., 90° WOO" W.) 



\V. (Hood) point, Hood 

Id., N. 17° E., 57 miles. 

(2° 18' 30" S., 90° 02' 30" W.) 



From Galapagos Islands 
to Manga Rera, Pau- 
motu Group.a 

S. point, Charles Id., N. 

76° E., 38 miles. 

(1°31'S.,91°04'W.) 
S. point, Charles Id., N. 

70° E., 72 miles. 

(l''47'S.,91°36'W.:i 
S. point, Charles Id., N. 

67° E., 132 miles. 

(2° 14' S., 92° 30' W.) 
2° 42' 30" S., 93° 30' W... 



3° 34' S., 9.5° 35' W 



TI. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor., 
Mar., 1896. 



.do... 



H. 0.1798; 
pulilished 
June, 1899. 



.do.. 



H. 0.1798; 
published 
June, 1899. 
do... 



...do. 



H. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882; 
ext. cor. 
Mar., 1896. 
do... 



1904. 
Dec. 31 



Dec. 31 



1905 
Jan. 1 



Jan. 1 
Jan. 2 



S.27 a. m. 
9.34 a.m. 
9.34 a. m. 
9.-34 a. m. 

10.10 a.m. 



12.30 p.m. 

7.48 p. m. 
7.48 p. m. 

8.20 a. m. 

9.14 a.m. 

9.14 a. m. 

P 14 a.m. 



.45 p. m. 
.45 p. m. 
i.l8 a. m. 



15 a. m. 
15 a. m. 
15 a. m. 



9.52 a. m. 
12.04 p. m. 



7.33 p. m. 
7.33 p. m. 



7.53 p. m. 



Jan. 10 7.23 p. m. 

Jan. 11 j 12.28 a. m. 

Jan. 11 I 8.20 a. m. 

Jan. 11 i 4.21 p. m. 

Jan. 12 ' 8.33 a. m. 



fms. 
2,240 

2,240 

2,240 

2,240 

2,240 



2,240 



2,200* 
2,200* 

2,191 

2,191 

2,191 

2,191 

2,191 

2,000* 
2,000* 
1,743 

1,743 

1,743 

1,743 

1,743 

1,743 

1,700* 
1,700* 

1,700* 



glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz.. 

glob. Oz . 



glob. Oz . 



glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz . 
glob. Oz . 

glob. Oz. 



glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 

glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 



2,031 



(No specimen). 

glob. Oz 

glob. Oz 

glob. Oz 



It. glob. Oz. 



oExtensive collections were made at Wreck Bay, Chatham Island, and vicinity. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



67 



Temperature. 



'F. 

74 

76 
76 
76 



77 



Sur- 
face. 



'F. 
75 

74 

74 

74 



Bot- 
tom. 



"F. 
35.3 

35.3 

35.3 

35.3 

35. 3 



35.3 
35.3 
a5.3 
35.3 

35.3 



78 


76 


80 


7G 


76 
76 


75 
75 


76 


75 


77 


76 


76 


74 


SO 


75 


SO 


77 


82 


77 



Apparatus. 



Trial. 



Luc. sdr. . 
9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K.lll 



Int. 1;2 K.2§ 



Int. 2; K. 1.. 



Surf. 4: e. 1. 
2 K. 1 X.... 



Depth. 



1 Surface 
to 800 
fms. 
800 fms.. 
(SOOfms. 
i to sur- 
[ face. 
(300 fms. 
I to sur- 
I face. 



(?) 



Surface 
Surface. 



Luc. sdr. . 
8 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 
K. 1 1.... 



Int. l;2K.2^ 

Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K.lt 

Luc. sdr 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K. 1 1 . . . . 



Int.l; 2K.2§. 

8'Tnr.; m.b.; 

2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1.. 
2K. It 



Surface 
to 150 
fms. 

150 fms. 

150 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

.300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface 

Surface 



Dura- 
tion. 



h. 771. 



I 20 
f " 



(?) 



Int. 2§. 



1 Surface 
to 800 
fms. 
800 fms . 
1800 fms. 
} to sur- 
I fact. 
300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
Bottom 

Surface . 

Surface , 
(500 fms. 
\ to sur- 
face. 



Luc. sdr. 
IjUC. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 



77 I 35.3 ! Luc. sdr. ...I None 



None. 
None , 
None , 

NE.., 
None. 



(?) 



NE. 
NE. 



None . 
None . 
None 
None 



N. 25° E . 
None 

NE 

NE 

None 



None. 
None. 
None. 



E..... 
None. 



N. 20° E . 
N. 20° E . 

N. 20° E . 
None 



None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 



Dis- 
tance. 



CO 



{Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 100. 200, 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 

(.attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



Towed for 20 minutes, in- 
tending to clear bottom 
from 50 to 100 fms., but 
when landed both nets 
were full of manga- 
nese nodules and mud. 
Hoisted to surface in 1 
hour 33 minutes. 



[Temperatures at surface, 
\ 15, 30, 50, 75, 100, 125, 
and 150 fms. 



/Attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 

/Attached below ther- 
\ mometers. 



(Towed approx. at 500 
fms. depth; 600 fms. 
wire veered. 



68 



DREDGING AND HYDROGEAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Rkcords of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. Thneof 


Depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 


D. 4717 


From Galapagos Islands 
to Manga Reva, Pau- 
molu Group — Cont'd. 

5° 11' S., 98° 56' W 


H. 0.823a; 
published 
July, 1882: 
ext. cor. 
Mar.,lS96. 


190V 
Jan. 13 


8.22 a. m. 
9.39 a. m. 
9.39 a. m. 


fms. 

2,153 

2.1.53 
2,153 


rd. C.,glob. Oz... 
rd. C.,glob. Oz... 
rd. C.glob. Oz... 












9.39 a. m. 


2,153 


rd. C.,glob. Oz..J 












10.19 a. in. 


2,153 


rd. C.,g]ob. Oz... 












12.21 p. m. 


2,153 


rd. C, glob. Oz... 


D. 4718 


5° 32' 30" S.,99°32'W 


do 


Jan. 
Jan. 


13 
14 


7.01 p. m. 
7.01 p. m. 
8.25 a. m. 


2,200* 
2,200* 
2, 285 






6° 30' S., 101° 17' W 


do.... 




D. 4719 


rd. C, inang. Nod. 










9.14 a. m. 


2,285 


rd. C.,mang. Nod. 


D. 4720 


7° 13' S., 102° 31' 30" W 


do 


Jan. 
Jan. 


14 7.29 T>. m. 


2,200* 
2, 200* 
2,084 






8° 07' 30" S., 104° 10' W .... 


do.... 


15 


7.29 p. m. 
8.22 a. m. 




D. 4721 


'itVbr.,'globVbz'!! 












9.23 a. m. 


2,084 


It. br., glob. Oz... 












9.23 a. m. 


2,084 


It. br.,glob. Oz... 












9.23 a. m. 


2,084 


It. br.,glob. Oz... 












10.05 a. m. 


2,084 


It. br.,glob. Oz... 












11.55 a. m. 


2,084 


It. l)r.,glob. Oz... 


D. 4722 


9° 31' S., 106° 30' W 


do.... 


Jan. 


16 


8.18 a. m. 
9.01 a. m. 


1,923 
1,923 


(No specimen). . . . 
(No specimen) 


D. 4723 


10° 14' S., 107° 45' W 


do 


Jan. 
Jan. 


16 
17 


7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 
8.20 a. m. 


1,900* 
1,900* 
1,841 






11° 13' 30" S., 109° 29' W.... 


do.... 




D. 4724 


(No specimen) 












9.16 a. m. 


1,841 


(No specimen) 




, 








p.16 a. m. 


1,841 


(No specimen) ' 












9.16 a. m. 


1,841 


(No specimen) 












9.54 a. m. 


1,841 


(No specimen) 












11.48 a. m. 


1,841 


(No specimen) 


D. 4725 


11°38'S.,110°05'W 

12° 30' S., 111° 42' VV 


H. 0.824a; 
published 
Oct., 1882; 
ext. cor. 
July, 1896. 
do.... 


Jan. 
Jan. 


17 

18 


7.30 p. m. 
7.30 p. m. 

8.18 a. m. 


1,800* 
1,800* 

1,700 








D. 4726 


br. M.,glob. Oz.. 












10.00 a. m. 


1,700 


br. M.,glob. Oz. . 


D. 4727 


13° 00' S., 112° 45' W 


do 


Jan. 
Jan. 


18 
19 


7.26 p. m.. 
7.26 p. m.. 
8.10 a. m. . 


1,500* 
1,500* 
1,055 

1,055 






13° 47' 30" S., 114" 22' W. .. 


do 




D. 4728 


' r'/.'.'.'. .'..'.'.'.'. ...'.'. 












9.04 a. m. . 


R 












9.04 a. m. . 


1,055 
1,055 


R 












9.04 a. m:. 


R 







THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



69 



Temperature. 



Trial. 



lir. 


Sur- 
face. 


F. 

81 


75 


79 


76 


79 


76 


79 


76 


80 


76 


83 


76 


76 
76 

77 


76 
76 
75 


80 


75 


76 
76 
79 


76 
76 
75 


82 


75 


82 


75 


82 


75 


84 


75 


82 


75 


87 


75 


85 


76 


77 
77 
88 


76 
76 
77 


82 


77 


82 


77 


82 


77 


82 


77 


82 


76 


77 
77 


77 
77 


81 


78 


80 


77 


79 
79 
80 


77 
77 
77 


82 


78 


82 


78 


82 


78 



Bot- 
tom. 



35. 2 
35.2 
35.2 

35.2 
35.2 



(?) 



(?) 



35.1 
35.1 



35.1 
35.1 
35.1 
35.1 

35.1 
35.1 



35.1 
35.1 



35.8 
35.8 
35.8 
35.8 



Apparatus. 



Depth. 



Luc. sdr. 
9 therm . . 



Dura- 
tion. 



h. m. 



Wat. bot . 



Int. 1; 2K.2§. 

8'Agassiz; m. 

b.; 2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1... 

2K. It 

Luc. sdr 



Int.l: 2K.2§ 

Surf. 4; e. 1.. 

2K. It 

Luc. sdr 



11 therm . 
Wat. bot. 

K. HI 



Int.l: 2K.2§. 

8'Agassiz; m. 

b.; 2 wng. 
Luc. sdr 



Int.l; 2K.2§ 

Surf. 4; o. 1 . . 

2K. 1 t 

Luc. sdr , 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K.lll 



Int.l; 2K.2§. 

8'Agassiz; m. 

b.; 2 wng. 
Surf. 4; e. 1.. . 
2K. It 



Luc. sdr 

fS' Agassiz; m. 
[ b.; 2 wng. 

Surf. 4; e.l... 

2K.lt 

Luc. sdr 



9 therm . . 
Wat. bot. 

K. 1 II ... . 



[Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 

800 fms . 
(800 fms. 
■j tosur- 
[ face. 
[300 fms. 
•J to sur- 
[ face. 

Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 



300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 

Surface . 

Surface , 



(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 

800 fms . 
fSOO fms. 
■j to sur 
I face. 

300 fms 
to sur- 
face. 

Bottom. 



[300 fms. 
i to sur- 
1 face. 

Surface. 

Surface 



Surface 
to 800 
fms. 
800 fms . 
800 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
[300 fms. 
■j to sur- 
{ face. 
Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 



Bottom. 



Surface . 
Surface . 



[Surface 

•I to 800 

fms. 

800 fms.. 

800 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 



Direction. 



None 



None 








None 




E. 


. 7 


None 


E 


1.0 

.6 
.6 


SW 

SW 

None 


E 


.7 


None 


SW 

SW 

None 


.6 
.6 


None 




None .... 
None ..... 




E 


.5 


None 


E... 


.7 


None. . . . 


SW 

None 


.7 


SW 

S\\' 

None 


.6 
.6 


None 




None 




None 




NW 

None 


.7 


NW 

SW 

SW 

None 


2.0 

.6 
.6 


NW 

SW 

SW 

None 


2.0 

.6 
.6 


None 




None 




None 





Dis- 
tance. 



Remarks. 



[Temperatures at surface, 
\ 25. 50, 100, 200, .>00, 400, 
I 600, and 800 fms. 

f Attached below ther- 
\ momoters. 



Thermometer registered 
29.5°. 



Bottom thermometer 
registered 19.0°. 

{Temperatures at surface, 
25, 2 at 50, 100, 200, 300, 
400, 600, and 2 at 800 fms. 

/Attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



[Temperatures at surface, 
\ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
[ 600, and 800 fms. 

(■Attached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



No evidence when landed 
of gear having been on 
bottom. 



(Temperatures at surface, 
25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 
600, and 800 fms. 

f A-ttached below ther- 
1 mometers. 



70 



DEEDGING AND HYDKOGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Position. 



Chart. 



Date. 



Time of 
day. 



Depth. 



Character of 
bottom. 



From Galapagos Islands 
to Manga Reva, Pau- 
motu Group— Cont'd ■ 



13° 47'30"S., 114° 22' W. 



14° 15' S., 115° 13' W 
15°07'S., 117° 01' W 



15° 47' S., 118° 22' 30" W. 
16° 32' 30" S., 119° 59' W. 



16° 57' 30" S., 120° 48' W 
17° 36' S., 122° 15' W... 



18° 16' S., 123° .34' W , 
19° 00' S., 125° 05' W. 



H. 0.824a; 
published 
Oct.. 1882; 
cxt. cor. 
[July, 1896. 



.do.... 
.do 



19° 5/' 30" S., 127° 20' W .. 



.do 

.do.... 



.do... 
.do... 



.do... 
.do... 



...do 



20° 26' .30"S., 128° 30' W... do 



21° 03' S., 130° 10' W 

21° 36' S.. 131° 35' W 

Mt. Duff, Manga Reva 

Id.,S.57° W., 105 miles. 

(22° 11' S., 133° 21' W.) . 



do.... 

do.... 

H. 0. 2024; 

published 
Nov., 1902. 



190\. 
■Jan. 19 



Jan. 19 
Jan. 20 



Jan. 20 
Jan. 21 



Jan. 21 
Jan. 22 



Jan. 22 
Jan. 23 



Jan. 24 



Jan. 24 

Jan. 25 

Jan. 25 

Jan. 26 



10.58 a. m . 

7.30 p. m.. 
7.30 p.m.. 

8.22 a. m.. 

9.03 a. m. . 

7.30 p. m.. 
7.30 p. m.. 
8.21 a. m.. 

9.23 a. ni.. 
9.23 a. m. . 
9.23 a. m.. 

10.05 a. m . 

12.09 p. m. 

7.28 p. m.. 
7.28 p. m.. 
8.20 a. m., 

9.07 a.m.. 

7.30 p.m.. 
7.30 p. m.. 

8.25 a. m. . 



9.31 a. m.. 

9.31 a. m.. 

9.31 a. m.. 

10.12 a.m. 

12.24 p. m. 
8.21 a. m. . 
9.11 a. m.. 

9.54 a. m.. 

10.29 a. m. 

7.27 p. m.. 
7.27 p.m.. 
8.25 a.m.. 
7.24 p. m.. 
8.21 a. m.. 

9.21 a. m., 



fms. 
1,055 



1,055 glob. S., R 



1,200* 

1,200* 

1,912 I (No specimen). 



1,912 I (No specimen). 



1,900* 

1,900*1 

2,012 I glob. Oz. 



2,012 
2,012 
2, 012 

2,012 

2,012 

2,000* 
2,000*, 
2,019 



glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 

glob. Oz. 
glob. Oz. 



(No specimen). 
2,019 I (No specimen) . 



2, 100*; . 
2, 100*1 . 



2,289 

2,289 

2,289 

2,289 

2,289 

2, 289 
2,060 
2,060 

2,060 

2,060 

2, 100* 
2, 100* 
2,197 
2,123 
2,042 



dk. rd. br. M., 
mang. Nod- 
Glob. 

dk. rd. br. M., 

mang. Nod., 

Glob, 
dk. rd. br. M., 

mang. Nod., 

Glob, 
dk. rd. br. M., 

mang. Nod., 

Glob, 
dk. rd. br. M., 

mang. Nod., 

Glob, 
dk. rd. br. M., 

mang. Nod., 

Glob, 
rd. C.,glob. Oz... 

rd. C.,glob. Oz... 



rd.Cglol). Oz.. 
rd.C.,glob. Oz.. 

rd.'c.Vglob.'Oz.. 

rd.C 

dk. gy. glob. Oz. 

dk.gy.glob. Oz. 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904—5 — Continued. 



71 



Temperature. 




Trial. 


Drift 






Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Apparatus. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
81 

82 

79 
79 
86 

82 

80 
80 
89 

88 

88 

88 

88 

86 

78 
78 
88 

84 

81 
81 

i 90 

1" 

1 ^^ 
1 ^* 

|. 

i 86 
90 

88 

89 

88 

82 
82 
81 
79 
81 

81 


°F. 

78 

78 

78 
78 
79 

79 

80 
80 
81 

80 

80 

80 

80 

81 

80 
80 
81 

81 

81 
81 

81 

81 
81 
81 

81 

81 
81 
81 

81 

81 

81 
81 
80 
80 
79 

79 


°F. 
35.8 

35.8 

'35.0" 
35.0 

'si's' 

34.8 
34.8 
34.8 

34.8 
34.8 

'34.' 9' 
34.9 

34.8 

34.8 

34.8 

34.8 

34.8 

34.8 
34.8 
34.8 

34.8 
34.8 

'34.' 5" 
34.8 


Int. 1; 2K.2§. 

iby Alb.-Blk. 
i spl.; m. b.; 
I 2 wng. 

Surf. 4; e.l... 

2 K. U 

Luc. sdr 


(300 fms. 
i to sur- 
t face. 

[•Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 


h. m. 

1 20 
1 '* 

45 

20 
20 


NE 

None 


mi. 




NE 

SW 

sw 


2.0 

.7 


(Bridle stops partly car- 
< ried away, but net not 
( capsized. 


Int.l; 2K.2§. 

Surf. 4; e. 1. . . 
2 K. 1 1 


J366 fms. 
< to sur- 
l face. 

Surface . 

Surface . 


1 20 

1 ^^ 
20 
20 


SW 

None 


.7 




SW 

SW 


.6 
.6 




9 themi 

Wat. bot 

K.lll 

Int. 1;2 K.2§. 

8' Agassiz; m. 

b.; 2 wng. 
Surf. 4: e.l.... 

2 K. 1 1 

Luc. sdr 


(Surface 
{ to 800 

I fms. 
800 fms.. 








1 Temperatures at surface, 
\ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 






[ 600, and 800 fms. 


(800 fms. 

< to sur- 
[ face. 
(300 fms. 

< to sur- 
[ face. 

Bottom. 

Surface . 
Surface . 


[ - 

30 

20 
20 


None 




fAttached below ther- 
\ mometers. 


NE 

None . 


. 7 


NE 

SW 

SW 


1.0 

.0 
.6 




Int.l;2K.2§. 

Surf. 4; e. 1... 
2 K. It 

Luc. sdr. 


300 fms. 
> to sur- 
[ face. 

Surface . 

Surfacfe . 


1 20 

1 ^^ 
20 
20 


SW 

None 


. 7 




SW 

SW 

None 


.6 
.6 


(''No calcareous or sili- 
1 ceous matter in bottom 


9 therm 

Wat. bot 

K. 1 II 

Int.l; 2K.2§. 

(8' Agassiz; m. 
\ b.; 2 wng. 

Luc. sdr. . . 


(Surface 
to 800 
1 fms. 

800 fms.. 


1 


None 


1 specimen; only Qoecu- 
1 lentstuff."— A. A. 
(Temperatures at surface, 
i 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 


None . . 


{ 600, and 800 fms. 


(800 fms. 
i to sur- 
1 face. 
(300 fms. 
i to sur- 
l face. 

[•Bottom. 


I 25 

1 20 

1 ^^ 

.30 


None 


fAttached below ther- 


NE 


. 7 


i mometers. 


NE 


1.0 


(Bottom rough; net badly 
i torn; no catch but man- 
[ ganese slab^. 


Int.l; 2K.2§. 

Petersen int || . 

Petersen int ^. 

Surf. 4; e. I... 

2K. U 

Luc. sdr. . 


(300 fms. 
< to sur- 
1 face. 
(100 fms. 
\ to sur- 
l face. 
550 to 400 
fms. 

Surface . 

Surface . 


1 20 
f '' 

\ ^ 

5 

20 
20 


SW 

None 


.7 
















SW 

SW 

None 


.6 
.6 
















34.9 


Luc. sdr. 












34.9 


9 Therm 


Surface 
to 800 
fms. 








(Temperatures at surface, 
{ 25, 50, 100. 200, 300, 400, 






[ 600, and 800 fms. 



72 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 

No. 



D. 4739 



H. 4827 



H. 4828 



H. 4829 



H. 4830 



H.4831 



H.4832 



H. 4833 
H.4834 
H. 4835 
H. 4836 
D.4740 



D. 4741 



Position. 



From Galapagos Islands 
to Manga Reva, Pau- 
motu Group — Cont'd. 

Mt. Duff, Manga Reva, 
Id., S. 57° W. 105 miles 
(22°11'S., 133° 21' W.) 



Mt. DufE, S. 34° W., 15 

miles. 
(22° 55' S., 134° 48' 30" W.) 

From Manga Reva, Pau- 
motu Group, to Aca- 
pulco, Mexico, a 



Mt. Duff, N. 58° 30' W. 

7.6 miles. 
(23° 11' 30" S., 134° 50' 30' 

W.) 



Mt. Duff, S. 81° W.J 7.3 

miles. 
(23° 06' 30" S., 134° 49' 30" 

W.) 



Mt.Dufl, S.48°30' W.,5.7 

miles. 
(23° 04' S., 134° 53' W.) 



Mt. Duff, S. 42° W., 7.7 

miles. 
(23° 02' 00" S., 134° 52' W.) 



21° 05' 00" S., 133° 01' 00" W, 



18° 30' S., 130° 51' W 
10° 20' S., 128° 46' W 
13° 51' S., 126° 53' W 

ii°20's., 125° or W 

9°02'S., 123° 20' W. 



Chart. 



II. O. 2024, 
published 
Nov., 1902. 



do... 



190l 
Jan. 26 



8° 29' S., 122° 56' W . 



H. 0. 2024; 
published 
Nov., 1902. 



..do. 



.do.. 



H. O. 824a; 
published 
Oct., 1882; 
ext. cor. 
July, 1896. 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 



.do... 



Jan. 27 



•Feb. 5 



Feb. 



Feb. 



Feb. 6 



Feb. 7 

Feb. 8 

Feb. 9 

Feb. 10 

Feb. 11 



Time of 
day. 



9.21 a. m. 
9.21 a. m. 



12.04 p. m. 
7.06 a. m.. 



Depth. 



9.55 a. m. 



10.46 a.m. 



11.36 a. m 



12.28 p. ni. 



8.25 a. m.. 



8.25 a. m. 

8.25 a. m. 

8.26 a. m. 
8.22 a. m. 
8.29 a. m. 



9.36 a. m.. 
9.36 a.m.. 

9.36 a. m. . 

10.23 a.m. 

12.45 p. m. 

7.27 p. m.. 
7.27 p. m.. 



fms. 
■2, 042 

2,042 



2,042 

2,042 
2,070 



Character of 
bottom. 



dk. gy. glob. Oz... 
dk. gy. glob. Oz. . 

dk. gy. glob. Oz.. 

dk. gy.glob. Oz.. , 
It. br. glob. Oz 



Co. 



iCorln.,Pter.,brk. 
t sh. 



rrd. (no speci- 
men). 



1,394 Co., S. 



2,225 rd. C. 



2,319 
2,194 
2,185 
2,215 
2,422 



2,422 
2,422 

2,422 

2,422 

2,422 

2,400* 
2, 400* 



rd. C 

rd.CGlob 

dk. gy. Glob 

It. gy.glob. Oz 

dk. gy. glob, and 
rad. Oz. 

fdk. gy. glob, and 
L 'rad. Oz. 

dk. gy. glob, and 
rad. Oz. 

dk. gy. glob, and 
rad. Oz. 



fdk. gy. gl< 
\ rad. Oz. 



glob, and 



dk. gy. glob, and 
rad. Oz. 



a Extensive collections made along shores and reefs at Manga Reva. 



THE" U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross. 1904-5 — Continued. 



73 



Temperature. 



81 
81 

78 

8.3 

78 



Sur- Bot- 
face. torn. 



°F. 



I 83 
8.5 



Apparatus. 



°F. 

34.9 Wat. bot. 

34. 9 K. 1 1 



34.9 
34.6 



Int. 1; 2K.2§ 



f5i' 



53.5 



35.0 



34. 5 
.34. 5 
34. ti 
34.5 
34.2 



34.2 
34.2 

34.2 

34.2 
.34.2 



bV Alb.-Blk. 
spl.; m. b. 

Luc. sdr 



Trial. 



Drift. 



T~v „+i, Dura- 
I^'^Pth- tion. 



800 fms 
(800 fms 
to sur- 
face, 
1 300 fms 
to sur- 
face. 



h. m. 



(800 fms. I 
\ to sur- > 
I face. I 



Bottom. 



Luc. sdr. 



Luc. sdr. 



Luc. .sdr. 



Luc. sdr. 



Luc. sdr. 



Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 
Luc. sdr. 



9 Thenn . . 
Wat. bot. 



K. 1! 



Int. 1; 2K.2§. 



Direction. 



None. 
None. 



None. 



None. 



None. 



None. 



(Surface 
\ to 800 
I fms. 

800 fms.. 



fSOO fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
1300 fms. 
to sur- 
face. 
8' Agassiz; m. | Bottom. 

b. I 

Surf. 4; e. 1. ..i Surface 
2 K. It i Surface 



None. 



None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 



None. 
None 



25 None. 



N. 20°E. 
None. . . 

30 N.20°E. 



Dis- 
tance. 



N. 20° W . . 
None 



N.20°W.. 
None 



20 N. 20°E. 
20 N. 20° E. 



Remarks 



(■Attached below ther- 
I mometers. 



(Trawl net capsized; no 
\ catch except rock and 
[ manganese. 



Position about J mile off 
outer reef. Chart used 
incorrectly drawn. R. 
A. r. t. Aka Maru Id. to 
r. t. Au Kena Id. 33° 08'. 
L. A. r. t. Kamaka Id. 
to r. t. Aka Maru Id. 
41° .55'. 

Position about J mile off 
outer reef. R. A. r. 
peak Manga Reva Id. 
to 1. peak (west) Au 
Kena Id. 32° 20', L. A. 1. 
peak Au Kena Id. to 
1. 1. Kamaka Id. E0° 29'. 

Position about \ mile off 
outer reef. R. A. r. to 
1. t. Manga Reva Id. 
30° 57' 30". L. A. 1. t. 
Manga Reva Id. to 
peak Kamaka Id. 24° 
54'. 

Position about 1 mile oil 
outer reef. R. A. r. to 
1. t. Manga Reva Id. 
15° 46'. L. A. 1. t. 
Manga Reva Id. to 1. or 
Eastern peak on Au 
Kena Id. 23° 10' 40". 



(Temperatures taken at 
I surface, 25, 50, 100, 200, 
] 300, 400, 600, and 800 
I fms. 



/Attached below 
1 mometers. 



ther- 



74 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 

Dredging Records of the Eastern Pacific 



Station 
No. 



H. 4838 
H. 4839 
D. 4742 



D. 4743 
H.4840 



H. 4841 
H.4842 
H. 4843 
H. 4844 
H. 4845 
H. 4846 
H. 4847 
H.4848 



Position. 



From Manga Reva, Pau- 
motu Oroup, to Aca- 
putco, Mexico — Cont'd. 

7° 10' S., 122° 13' W 



4° 50' S., 120° 45' W 

2° 14' S.. 118° 55' W 

0° 04' 00" S., 117° 07' 00" W . 



H.0.824a; 
published 
Oct.,l8&2; 
ext. cor. 
July, 1896. 

do.... 

do.... 

do.... 



0° 21' N., 117° 02' 30" W. 
1°35'N.,116°38'W 



3°25'30"N.,115°05'W. 

4° 55' N., 112° 27' W 

7° 09' N., 110° 45' W 

8° 52' N., 108° 54' W 

10° 38' N., 106° 47' 30" W 
12° 42' 30" N., 104° 45' W 
14°50'N.,101°31' W.... 
Acapulco Lt. Ho., N. 5' 

E., 29' (16° 20' N., 99' 

58' 30" W.). 



.do... 



H. 0.527; 
published 
Jan., 1874; 
ext. cor., 
Apr., 1897. 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 

..do.... 
H. 0.933; 
published 
Nov., 1884. 



1904. 
Feb. 12 



Feb. 13 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 15 



Feb. 15 
Feb. 16 



Feb. 17 
Feb. 18 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 21 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 23 
Feb. 24 



Time of 

day. 



8.28 a. m. 



8.24 a. m. 

8.25 a. m. 
8.27 a. m. 



12.39 p.m. 



4.01 p.m. 

4.01 p.m. 
4.01 p.m. 



7.25 p.m. 
7.25 p.m. 
8.21a.m. 



8.26 a. m. 

8.24 a.m. 

8.25 a.m. 
8.24 a.m. 
8.21a.m. 
8.18 a.m. 
8.22 a.m. 
4.28 a.m. 



Depth. 



fms. 
2,380 



Character of 
bottom. 



(No specimen). 



2,350 It.gy.glob. Oz 

2,291 I It.gy.glob. Oz 

2,320 fne.lt.gv. glob. Oz. 



2,320 
2,320 

2,320 

2,320 
2,320 



2, 300* 
2, 300* 
2,189 



2,200 
2,174 
2,225 
2,058 
1,955 
1,753 
2,050 
2,474 



fne. It.gy.glob. Oz. 
fne.lt.gy. glob. Oz. 

fne. It.gy.glob. Oz. 

fne.lt.gy. glob. Oz. 
fne.lt.gy. glob. Oz. 



(No specimen) 



dk. gy. glob. Oz 
dk.gy. glob. Oz 
(No specimen) 

rd.C 

stty. br. M 

'■tky. br. M 

stky. br. M 

(No specimen) 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 
Cruise of the Albatross, 1904-5 — Continued. 



75 



Temperature. 


Apparatus. 


Trial. 


Drift. 




Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


Depth. 


Dura- 
tion. 


Direction. 


Dis- 
tance. 


Remarks. 


°F. 
82 

82 
81 

78 

74 

81 

81 

81 

81 

80 
80 
80 

82 
83 
82 
83 
82 
83 
80 
77 


"F. 
80 

79 
79 

77 

77 

77 

78 

78 

78 

78 
78 
78 

79 
80 
80 
80 
79 
79 
80 
82 


°F. 
34.3 

34.3 
34.3 
34.3 

34.3 

34.3 

34.3 
34.3 
34.3 

34.' 4" 

34.4 
34.4 
34.5 
34.7 
.34.4 
34.9 
35.2 


Luc. sdr 




h. m. 


None 


mi. 




Luc. sdr 






None . 






Lun. sdr j 








Luc. sdr 1 




None 






Int. 1;2K.2§. 

8' Agassiz;m. 
b.; 2 wng. 

9 therm 

Wat. bot 

K. Ill 

Surf. 4; e. 1... 
2 K. 1 j 


(300 fms. 
\ to sur- 
[ face. 

Bottom. 

(Surface 
to 800 
[ fms. 
800 fms . 


20 
16 

45 

1 


NE 

None 


. 7 


(Ring of large int. net 

badly bent; fine net- 

l ting torn from binding. 


NE 

None 


1.5 


Lining of one Kofoid 
net also carried away. 

[Temperatures at surface, 
{ 25, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 


None 




[ 600, and 800 fms. 


(800 fms.] 
< to sur-i 
I face. J 
Surface . 
...do ... 


23 

20 
20 


None 




fAttached below ther- 
\ moraeters. 


N. 35° E . . 
N. 35° E . . 


.6 

.6 








Luc. sdr 






None 






Luc. sdr 






None 






Luc. sdr 












Luc. sdr 






None 
























None 






Luc. sdr 






None 






35.2 


Luc. sdr 






None. . . . 



















76 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 



OiOiCi 
t^ 05 oi 



cq 



^ 



03 



SB 



^3-6 



SB 



(MOO to 
oioio 



lO lO 00 






!NM(N 



t^O Oi 

oidoo 



t* CO U5 .— < lO CO 1— < 



lO lO O iO to »o »o 






00 00 00 r~ c<5 lo t- 

00 I^ 00 00 d 00 05 
lO O O »0 "0 lO lO 



■N 6 



-B 



^s 



cq 



<^;2; 



oo ^ oooo 

.-I rH rt .-l(N 

' > > > > > > 

; o o o o o o 

r^ CTl 1—1 (N-^D o 

■m rr lO to ;© t^ 

O to CD CO O CO 



cocc 
nm 


■MO 

TOCO 


° ^^ 


t~co 


(MOO 


1-t ■^ 


00^ 


Tp rr 


49.4 
49.1 
50.6 
49.2 
51.0 



TTCO t~. 00-^ 

cor-H(MTrTi! 

u:) CO CD CO CO 



■*00iO t~00 

•<i^ r.^ 00 r^ 00 

CO O CO CD CO 



t^O OCD i-H 

lO 00 {^00(3 
COCO CO CO l> 



CO I^ t^ t^ t^ 



lO 00 050(M 



O O CJ o o o 

^ O) m 0) CD <p 

QQQQQ 



CO ^H rc ic CI 

t^ QOCIO OOCjO 
CO CO CO O O 



OQQQQ 



^ 



ft3 



36.8 
37.2 
37.3 
37.4 




(M 

§8 


1 


38.6 
39.0 
.39.1 
39.2 


d 


41.6 
41.3 
42.2 
43.4 


00 
CO 


53.2 

43.5 

. 45.1 

45.6 


°l 


56.2 
50.4 
49.2 
51.1 


CO 


° 














° 








00 

CO 




° 








•* 

s 




67.0 
68.5 
56.7 
54.9 

.54.9 
56.7 


1* 








CO 
CO 




68.8 
70.9 
69.8 
58.9 

62.5 
62.7 


" 














° 












73.6 
72.6 
72.5 
73.8 


:^ 


° 














° 










« 





- 






















74.6 

74.7 
72.7 
75.3 

75.2 

74.7 


1904. 
Dec. 22 
Dec. 26 
Dec. 29 
Dec. 31 

1905. 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 2 


; a 






p 




5>r 

■iP 


i 



THE U. S. FISHERIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 



77 



m CO CQ ^ ^ CO ^ 
1^ i-^ i^ t^ t^ r^ t^ 

CO CO CO CQ CO CO CO 



Tt« C^I O r-» CO Ol CO 
O Ol OS d O 00 Ol 

CO >.': .'o ^ CO CO CO 






05 CO ic '— < Oi -^ r^ 

(N Oq6o-h lO o 
lO »o ■^ ^ to »0 lO 



CO b- io CO ic r>. lO 

lO lO TJH t^ O rH 00 

«0 lO CO <© t^ o o 



t^ t-* 00 c-i o r- r* 

:D 1-H CO xiH CO ^ "^ 
CO t^ i>. t^t^ t^t^ 



o r^ o i^ CO CO lo 

CO i6 CO 30 t-^ CJ OS 

t^ t^ r^ !>. i>. w t^ 



cs i>- ^- IV oo o r^ 

cd lO CO GO O ^ i^ ' 

t^ r>- 1^ t^ 00 00 r- 



CO ».0 t^ Cl i— ' CO o 
. .-H i-H i-H i-( C^J W CVI 

§ d R d c n fi G 

cd cj OJ (^ 1^ ^ ^ 



r^ 1-H Tji 00 (M O Ol 

^ c^ c^i oi w-o i-'': CO 
t^ t^ i^ r^ r^ r^ r^ 



OQOQQOQ 
907—06 6 



;^ 



Ci 



1^ 



:^ 



(=q 



CO 



to 00 

©■o 



1-1 a o) 



ON 



fiP 



^.5 

So 



OS 


03 


Bl 


a, 






B 

o 


0^ 




fi 


•a 


o 


p 


■u 


■a 






03 


c 

o 

g 


.2 


60 


oj 


OJ 


•O 


■o 


H 


ojj- 





78 



DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS OF 



3. INVESTIGATIONS DURING ALASKA CRUISE. 
Incident to the employment of the Albatross to assist in establish- 
ing the salmon hatctiery at Yes Bay, Alaska, a number of hauls of 
plankton nets were made on the vo^^age from Seattle. These hauls, 

Dredging Records of 



Station 
No. 


Position. 


Chart. 


Date. 


Time of 

day. 


Bottom 
depth. 


Character of 
bottom. 




Seattle, Wash., to Yes Bay, 

Alaska. 








Fms. 




D. 4744 


Egg Id. light, S. 8° 40' E., 6.7 

miles. 
(51° 21' 25" N., 127° 51' .58" W.) 


H. 0. 1767 
(1899) 


1905. 
June 26 


1.33 p. m. 
1.48 p. m. 


56 
56 


f ne S 

fneS 


D. 4745 


Seabreeze Point, Kennedy Id. 

S. 72° 3.5' E., 1.1 miles. 
(53° 59' 45" N., 130° 11' 37" W.) 


H. 0. 1764 
(1899). 


June 28 


6.15 a. m. 
6.21 a. m. 


31 
31 


gy- s 

gy-s 


D. 4746 
D. 4747 


Mary Id. Ught, N. 39° 15' W., 

4 miles. 
(55° 02' 45" N., 131° 6' 39" W.) 
Bushy Point, S. 53° 45' E., 1 

mile. 
(55° 44' 23" N., 131° 45' 13" W.) 

Yes Bay to Anan River and 
return. 


C. & G. S. 
8075(1904) 

Q. S. 8105 
(1903) 


June 28 
June 30 


2.37 p. m. 
1.58 p. m. 


197-185* 
300-320* 


gn. M* 

Mud* 


D. 4748 


Bushy Point, S. 60° 45' E., 1 

mile. 
(55° 44' 18" N., 131° 45' 28" W.) 


C. S. 8105 
(1903) 


Aug. 29 


10.29 a. m. 
11.18 a. ra. 


300-185 
300-185 


M. and Sh.. 






D. 4749 


Guard Id. light, S. 4i° W., 6.3 

miles. \ 
(55° 33' N., 131° 51' 48" W.) 


C. S. 8100 
(1899) 

• 


Aug. 29 


12.59 p. m. 
1.43 p. m. 


233-220* 


S. and M?* . 




- 




D. 4750 


Tolstoi Point, N. 4S\° 'VV., 7.5 

miles. 
(55° 35' 15" N., 132° 33' W.) 


do 


Aug. 29 


4.18 p.m. 
4.58 p. m. 


290-340* 


M* 














D. 4751 


Lemesurier Point, S. 32° W., 

12.9 miles. 
(55° 56' 50" N., 132° 04' 20" W.) 


do 


Aug. 30 


11.14 a.m. 
11.53 a.m. 


369-288* 
288 


G* 










D. 4752 


Point Warde, S., J mile 

(56° 11' N., 151° 57' 30" W.) 


C. S. 8200 
1904. 


Aug. 30 


2.21 p. m. 
2.55 p. m. 


210-190* 


M* 








Yes Bay to Seattle. 


' 










D. 4753 


Bushy Point, N. 39J° E., 3 

miles. 
(55° 41' 30" N., 131° 46' 12" W.) 
Mary Id. light, N. 25^° W., 3J 

miles. 
(55° 03' N.. 131° OS' 48" W.) 
Old N. Sand Headlight, S. 


C. S. 8105 
(1903) 

C. S. 8075 
(1904) 


Oct. 1 
Oct. 4 
Nov. 5 


11.25 a. m. 

9.11 a.m. 

10.06 a. m. 
10.37 a. m. 


266-280-150* 
150* 
120* 


M* 


D. 4754 
D. 4755 


rky?* 

M* 




67° E., .3.4 miles. (1898) 
(49° 06' 30" N., 123° 21' 30" W.) 












D. 4756 


West Point light, N. 4^° E. 2 n S fi'i.'yi 


Nov. 16 


10..38 a. m. 
11.10 a.m. 


* 115* 


M* 




miles. 
(47° 37' 48" N., 122° 26' 20" W.) 


(1905) 





THE U. S. FISHEEIES STEAMER ALBATROSS. 



79 



13 in number, were distributed from Puget Sound to Bradfield Canal, 
near Wrangell Island, Alaska. Serial temperatures and water densi- 
ties also were taken for these stations. The cruise extended from 
June to the middle of November, 1905. 

Alaska Cruise, 1905. 



Temperal 


ure. 


Air. 


Sur- 
face. 


Bot- 
tom. 


O ]p 


o p 


p 


G4 
64 


59 
59 


...... 


53 
53 


52 
52 




60 


56 




61 


59 




53 


. 56 




54 


57 




57 


58 




59 


58 




59 


57 




67 


56 




63 


58 




58 


58 




69 


56 




63 


56 




45 


50 




50 


SO 




46 


49 




47 


48 




52 


52 











Apparatus. 



Tnr. sdr 

Int. 3; 2 K25 



Tnr. sdr 

Int. 3; 2 K2« 



Int. 3; 2 K2§ 
Int.2; K2... 



Int.3;K3,K2§ 

5 therm., 5 
wat. bot. 



Int.3;K3,K2§ 

6 therm., 6 
wat. bot. 



Int.3; K3,K2f 

6 therm., 6 
wat. bot. 



Int.3; 2K2§. 

6 therm., 6 
wat. bot. 



Int.3; 2K2§. 

6 therm., 6 
wat. bot. 

Int.3; 2K2§. 
Int.3; 2K2§. 

Int.3; 2K2§. 

5 therm., and 
5 wat. bot. 

Int.3; 2K2§. 

5 therm., 5 
wat. bot. 



Depth. 



40 fms. 10 
surface. 



15 fms. to 
surface. 

fl25fnis.to 
\ surface. 

f275fms.to 
1 surface. 



(200 fms. to 

i surface. 

Surface to 

100 fms. 



fl30fms.to 

t surface. 

Surface to 

125 fms. 



fl75fms.to 

\ surface. 

Surface to 

175 fms. 



f 175 fms. to 

\ surface. 

Surface to 

175 fms. 



f 125 fms.to 

\ surface. 

Surface to 

125 fms. 

fl50 fms.to 
\ surface. 

(75 ims. to 
\ surface. 

(75 fms. to 
1 surface. 
Surface to 
75 fms. 



75 fms 

Surface to 
75 fms. 



Dura- 
tion. 



h. m. 



Drift. 



True Dis- 

direction. tance. 



20 }n. 



8° W 



|n.23' 



{ 2MN.280W, 
{ ?«I}N.60E. 



20 |}S.57°W. 
5 i 



|s. 40° W 



5 1.... 



{ fJ¥ 



{ 1} 



^N.80°E. 



lis. 48° W 



{ ^:K 



. 35° E . 



20 ,|s. 18° W 
5 



N.15° W. 



Miles. 



Remarks. 



50 fms. cable out. Near 
mouth of Fit/.hugh Sound 
oil Rivers Inlet. Surface 
temperature increased 
from 52° at noon to 60° at 
3 p. m. Nearest land 
about 2h miles distant. 
20 fms. cable out. In re- 
gicyi of mouth of Slveena 
River. Nearest land \ to 
I mile distant. 
150 fms. cable out. Deep 
water off Boca de Q uadra. 
Nearest land 3 miles dis- 
tant. Bottom from chart. 
/300 fms. cable out. Near- 
\ est land 1 mile distant. 

.300 fms. cable out. Ran in- 
to bottom and filled net 
with mud. Wrecked the 
K 2. Thermometer and 
water bottle at 5, 10, 25, 
50, and 100 fms.; first two 
theiTnometers failed to 
trip. 

'200 fms. cable out. Near- 
est land IJ miles distant. 
Thermometer and water 
bottle at 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 
125 fms. Lowered 3 fms. 
before heaving in. First 
thermometer failed to 
trip. 

2.50 fms. cable out. Nearest 
land 1 mile. Thermome- 
ter and water bottle at 
5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 175, fms. 
Lowered 5 fms. before 
heaving in. a 

250 fms. cable out. Near- 
est land J mile. Ther- 
mometer and water bot- 
tle at 10, 15, 30, 55, 105, 180 
fms. Placed as before 
but in lowering 5 fms. be- 
fore heaving in wire 
fouled; 5 fms. added for 
correction. 

150 fms. cable out. Ther- 
mometer and water bot- 
tle at 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 125 
fms. Fouled and lowered 
in heaving in. 

200 fms. cable out. Land J 
mile distant at end of 
haul. 

flOO fms. cable out. Land 
\ IJ miles distant. 

1100 fms. cable. Off mouth 
of Fraser River, about 2§ 
miles from shoals. Ther- 
mometer and water bot- 
tle at 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 fms. 
1100 fms. cable. Nearest 
land \\ miles. Thermom- 
eter and water bottle at 
5, 10, 25, 50, and 75 fms. 



a Lowering 5 fathoms at time of heaving in. while not affecting the thermometers, makes it neces- 
sary tor entire accuracy to add 5 fathoms to the depth stated for the water specimens 



80 DREDGING AND HYDROGRAPHIC RECORDS. 

Serial Tempeeatuees and Water Densities Recorded During Alaska Cruise, 1905. 



Station 
No. 


Date. 


Position of thermometers. 




Sur- 
face. 


5 
fms. 


10 
fms. 


25 
fms. 


50 
fms. 


75 
fms. 


100 
fms. 


125 
fms. 


175 
fms. 


Remarks. 


D. 4748 


1905. 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 29 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 16 




56 
58 
57 

58 
56 
48 
52 


55.2 
53.' 7" 

53.8 
50.7 
49.8 



54.8 
56.8 
52.3 

49.9 
47.4 
407 


50.7 
57.8 
54.8 

45.6 
44.9 
49.6 
51.1 


47.6 
5L2 
43.5 

46.0 
43.1 
49.1 
50.6 


'49.' 6' 

50.2 


43.6 
42.6 
42.1 

42.9 
42.7 





° 


First two did not trip. 


D. 4749 
D. 4750 

D. 4751 
D. 4752 
D. 4755 


42.2 
'42.'8' 


'41.' 5' 
42.6 


First one did not trip. 

I See these stations in 
\ dredging record and 
footnote on p. 79. 


D. 4756 


51.4 .^i-2 



























Station 

No. 


Date. 


Position of water bottles. 




Sur- 
face. 


5 
fms. 


10 
fms. 


25 
fms. 


50 
fms. 


75 
fms. 


100 
fms. 


125 
fms. 


175 
fms. 


Remarks. 


D. 4748 


1905. 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 29 
Aug. 29 

Aug. 30 
Aug. 30 
Nov. 5 
Nov. 16 


* 

iis' 
21.0 

13.5 

9.0 

15.5 

21.5 


19.8 
15.2 
20.1 

20.6 
19.8 
18.3 
21.07 


21.6 
19.9 
20.4 

20.8 
20.6 
18.6 
21.2 


22.1 
23.1 
21.0 

22.3 

21.2 
20.2 
21.5 


22.2 
22.6 
23.6 

24.5 
2L7 
21.5 
21.5 


'2!.' 7' 
21.7 


24.4 
22.6 
24.3 

24.2 
23.7 





° 




D. 4749 
D. 4750 

D. 4751 
D. 4752 
D. 47.55 


24.0 
'24.' 3" 


24.' 7' 
24.1 


Apparent irregularity. 

See this station in dredg- 
ing record and foot- 
note on p. 79. 


D. 4756 





















o 



STATISTICS OF THE FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC 
STATES FOR 1904. 



Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 609. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Introduction 5 

General and comparative statistics: 6 

Persons employed 7 

Investment 8 

Products 9 

New York fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 12 

The fisheries by counties 13 

The products by apparatus ... 18 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — 

Oyster 27 

Clam and scallop 27 

Menhaden 27 

Bluefish 28 

Squeteague 28 

Shad 28 

Sturgeon 29 

Wholesale trade 29 

New Jersey fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 29 

The fisheries by counties 31 

The products by apparatus ... 40 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — 

Oyster 50 

Clam 51 

Mussel 52 

Crab 52 

King crab 52 

Lobster 52 

Squeteague 52 

Shad 52 

Bluefish 53 

Menhaden 53 

Sea bass 54 

Cod 54 



Page 
New Jersey fisheries — Continued. 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — Cont'd. 

Butterfish 54 

Carp 54 

Striped bass and white 

perch 55 

Sturgeon 55 

Whiting 55 

Pennsylvania fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 55 

The fisheries by counties 57 

The fisheries by apparatus. ... 59 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — 

Oyster 61 

Shad 61 

Wholesale trade 62 

Delaware fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 62 

The menhaden industry 66 

Maryland fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 66 

The fisheries by counties 68 

The products by apparatus ... 75 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries^ — 

Oyster '. . 84 

Crab 85 

Clam 85 

Shad 85 

Alewife 87 

Menhaden 87 

Striped bass and white 

perch 87 

Yellow perch 87 

3 



CONTENTS. 



Maryland fisheries — Continued. Page. 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — Cont'd. 

Sturgeon and caviar 87 

Eel 88 

Terrapin 88 

Other species 88 

Wholesale trade 88 

Virginia fisheries: 

General and comparative sta- 
tistics 89 



Virginia fisheries — Continued. Page. 

The fisheries by counties 90 

The products by apparatus ... 99 
Notes and detailed statistics of 
principal fisheries — 

Oyster 117 

Clam 119 

Crab 120 

Shad 120 

Menhaden 121 

Wholesale trade 121 



STATISTICS OF THE HSHERIES OF THE MffiDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

FOR 1904, 



INTRODUCTION. 

This report is based upon a canvass made by the regular statistical 
agents of the Bureau in 1905, and in general presents data for the 
calendar year 1904. The statistics of the oyster industry, however, 
in all sections except New York, Delaware, Worcester County, Md., 
and Accomac and Northampton counties, Va., represent the oyster 
season of* 1904-5. It should be noted that the statistics for 
New York and Pennsylvania do not include the fisheries of the 
Great Lakes and the interior waters of those states. The present 
statistics for the Middle Atlantic States have already been published 
in condensed form in Statistical Bulletin No. 184, issued August 6, 
1906. 

Earlier publications of the Bureau dealing with the fisheries of this 
region are as follows: 

The Fisheries and Fishery Industries of the United States, by G. Brown Goode and 
associates. Section II, Geographical Review of the Fisheries for 1880, pt. vi to 
XI, p. 341-473, 1887. Also Section V, History and Methods of the Fisheries, 1887. 

The Sturgeon and Sturgeon Industries of the Eastern Coast of the Jnited States, by 
John A. Ryder. Bulletin U. S. Fish Commission, vol. viii, 1888 (1890), p. 
231-328. 

The Oyster Industry of Maryland, by Charles II. Stevenson. Bulletin U. S. Fish 
Commission, vol. xii, 1892 (1894), p. 203-297. 

Notes on the Oyster Industry of New Jersey, by Ansley Hall. Report U. S. Fish 
Commission, 1892 (1894), p. 463-528. 

A Statistical Report on the Fisheries of the Middle Atlantic States, by Hugh M. Smith. 
Bulletin U. S. Fish Commission, vol. xiv, 1894 (1895), p. 339-467. 

The Shad Fisheries of the Atlantic Coast of the United States, by Charles H. Stevenson. 
Report U. S. Fish Commission, 1898 (1899), p. 101-269. 

Notes on the Extent and Condition of the Alewife Fisheries of the United States in 
1896, by Hugh M. Smith. Report U. S. Fish Commission, 1898 (1899), p. 31-43. 

The Sturgeon Fishery of Delaware River and Bay, by John N. Cobb. Report U. S. 
Fish Commission, 1899 (1900), p. 369-380. 

Statistics of the Fisheries of the Middle Atlantic States. Report U. S. Fish Com- 
mission, 1900 (1901), p. 195-310. 

Statistics of the Fisheries of the Middle Atlantic States. Report U. S. Fish Com- 
mission, 1902 (1904), p. 433-540. 

5 



6 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

Persons employed. — The number of persons employed in the fisheries 
of the Middle Atlantic States in 1904 was 83,103, of whom 62,361 were 
fishermen in the vessel and shore fisheries, and 20,742 were shoresmen 
in the wholesale fishery trade and shore industries related to the fish- 
eries. Maryland employed in its fisheries 30,337 persons; Virginia, 
28,868; New York, 11,493; New Jersey, 9,094; Delaware, 1,899, and 
Pennsylvania, 1,412. In comparison with their returns for 1901, the 
year for wliich the last previous canvass was made, all the states of 
this region show a decrease in the number of persons employed in the 
fisheries. The largest decreases were in Maryland, 5,923 ; in New 
Jersey, 2,936, and in Pennsylvania, 1,072. The aggregate decrease 
was 10,558. 

Investment. — The total amount of capital invested was $26,673,521. 
In New York the investment was $10,621,616; in Maryland, $5,983,- 
465; in Virginia, $4,614,934; in New Jersey, $2,685,796; in Penn- 
sylvania, $2,097,715, and in Delaware, $669,995. Compared with 
1901, the investment has increased $1,593,150, or 6.35 per cent. 
There has been an increase of $1,177,345 in New York, $12,798 in 
Delaware, and $981,830 in Virginia, but a decrease in each of the 
other three states. The investment included 3,583 fishing and 
transporting vessels, valued at $4,285,243 and having a net tonnage 
of 54,540 tons and outfits valued at $1,146,958; 32,760 boats in the 
shore fisheries, valued at $1,876,356; fishing apparatus used by 
vessels and boats to the value of $1,656,954; shore and accessory 
property valued at $9,373,710; and cash capital amounting to 
$8,334,300. The forms of fishing apparatus having the largest 
aggregate value were pound nets, trap nets, and weirs, $749,207; 
dredges, tongs, rakes, etc., $302,007; gill nets, $237,613; seines, 
$204,236; fyke nets, $84,864, and lines, $23,594. 

Products. — The products of the fisheries amounted to 811,857,062 
pounds, having a value to the fishermen of $18,963,976. Of this out- 
put New York produced 277,649,747 pounds, valued at $6,230,558; 
New Jersey, 90,108,068 pounds, valued at $3,385,415; Pennsylvania, 
2,046,294 pounds, valued at $167,499; Delaware, 5,608,289 pounds, 
valued at $259,590; Maryland, 81,128,866 pounds, valued at $3,336,- 
560, and Virginia, 355,315,798 pounds, valued at $5,584,354. The 
most important product of the fisheries of these states is the oyster, 
the yield of wliich was 17,866,673 bushels, valued at $11,547,629. 
Next in value was the menhaden, the catch being 511,777,571 
pounds, valued at $1,338,621. Menhaden represented 63 per cent of 
the total quantity, and oysters 60 per cent of the total value of the 
products. The yield of hard and soft clams aggregated 822,575 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 7 

bushels, valued at $1,018,653. Among the other important species 
were alewives, 31,717,124 pounds, $262,596; bluefish, 14,795,651 
pounds, $707,844; butterfish, 3,646,683 pounds, $113,835; cod, 
2,433,450 pounds, $106,547; eels, including fresh, salted, and smoked, 
1,858,266 pounds, $114,941; flounders, 3,160,316 pounds, $113,688; 
sea bass, 2,953,362 pounds, $122,103; shad, 16,954,738 pounds, 
$995,140; squeteague, 25,548,484 pounds, $669,482; striped bass, 
1,338,081 pounds, $136,143; crabs, hard and soft, 31,975,446 pounds, 
$674,633; and scallops, 148,799 bushels, .$145,646. Various other 
species were taken in noteworthy quantities. 

The products in 1904 compared with 1901 have decreased in 
quantity 7,189,514 pounds, but have increased in value $1,478,476. 
The yield has increased in both quantity and value in New York, and 
in value in Delaware and Virginia, but has decreased in both respects 
in all the other states. The increase in New York was chiefly in the 
catch of menhaden, squeteague, and oysters. The yield of shad 
decreased in all the states of this region except Virginia, where tliere 
was considerable increase in both the quantity and value. There was 
also an increase in the value of the catch in Delaware and Maryland. 
The decrease in the shad catch amounted in all to 14,942,949 pounds, 
or nearly 47 per cent in quantity, and $258,482, or over 20 per cent in 
value. The yield of oysters also has decreased, 1,883,004 bushels in 
quantity, but has increased $1,260,073 in value. The decrease was 
chiefly in New Jersey and Maryland; there was a slight decrease in 
the quantity taken in Virginia, but an increase in the value. 

The following tables give the number of persons employed, the 
amount of capital invested, and the quantity and value of the prod- 
ucts of the fisheries of the Middle Atlantic States in 1904, and also a 
comparison of the extent of the fisheries in 1901 and 1904. 

Number op Persons Engaged in the Fisheries op the Middle Atlantic 

States in 1904. 



States. 


Fishermen. 


Shoresmen. 


Total. 


New York 


8,496 

8,293 

820 

1,495 

20,054 

23,203 


2,997 

801 

592 

404 

10,283 

5, 665 


11, 493 




9,094 
1,412 




Delaware 


1,899 


MarvlaTid 


30, 337 


Virginia 


28,868 




Total 


62,361 


20, 742 


83,103 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Investment in the Fisheries of the Middle Atlantic States in 1904. 



Items. 



V^esaels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats 

Seines 

Gill nets 

Pound nets, trap nets, and 

weirs 

Fyke nets 

Stop nets 

Bag nets , 

Lines 

Fish baskets , 

Eel pots 

Lobster pots , 

Dredges, tongs, rakes, and 

hoes 

Other apparatus 

Shore and accessory prop- 
erty ". 

Cash capital 



Total investment. 



New York. 



No. 



482 

9,880 



204 
3,720 



4,894 

295 

1,093 

306 
8,946 



Value. 



SI, 314,275 



455, 120 
290, 375 



30,395 

320, 844 

57,977 

42,180 

105,965 
41,460 



7,372 



8,091 
6,405 



6,947 



7,964 
9, 715 



33,033 
326 



4,314,115 
3,590,500 



10,621,616 



New Jersey. 



No. 



366 
4,361 



6S 
775 



5,172 

282 

2,612 

225 

1,962 

56 

76 



3,279 
1,311 



5,188 



Value. 



8495,025 



125,461 
65, 550 



7,405 
441,989 
30.828 
92,396 

192,617 
16,231 
5,992 
1,250 
5,305 



4,495 
1,493 

60,896 
1,193 

905,620 
232,050 



Pennsylvania. 



No. 



16 

286 



243 
73 
90 



159 
1 



2,685,796 



Vahie. 



$48,200 



6,785 



10,685 
5,814 
4,132 



383 
100 



7 
1,195 



3,017 

482 



846.915 
1,170,000 



2,097,715 



Delaware. 



No. 



28 
225 



960 
179 
680 

42 
998 



1,795 
50 



Value. 



$18,050 



3,226 
6,500 



735 

40,558 

8,110 

20, 199 

1,580 
1,304 



826 
60 

3,044 
221 

342,540 
223,000 



669,995 



Items. 


Maryland. 


Virginia. 


Total. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Vahie. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing. . . 


777 
7,528 


$423, 130 


750 
9,149 


$843,988 


2,419 
31,429 


$3,142,668 




Outfit 


115,468 
4.53,500 


278, 187 
326,650 


984,247 


Vessels transporting 


438 
11,463 


447 
7,046 


1,164 
23,111 


1,142,575 


Tonnage. 




Outfit 


71,161 
470,8.51 
23, 431 
45, 749 
1,410 
98,320 
15,314 


53,015 

.591,429 

78,076 

32,957 


162, 711 


Boats 


9,276 
234 

3,835 

15 

963 

5,004 


12,215 
320 

8,144 


32,760 

1,383 

16, 454 

15 

3,192 

17,653 

57 

76 


1,876,356 


Seines 


204,236 


ill nets 


237,613 


Trammel nets 


1,410 


Pound nets, trap nets, and weirs. . . 
Fvke nets 


1,656 
584 


350,725 
10, 172 


749,207 
84, 864 


Stop nets 


6,092 


Bag nets 










1,250 


Lines. . . 




6,257 




4,611 


23, 594 


Fish baskets 






57 
18,947 

7,766 
42,623 

3,795 


1,195 


Eel pots 


4, .527 


2,441 


1,2.55 


1,280 


17,006 




11,268 


Dredges, tongs, rakes, and hoes 

Crab dredges and scrapes 


15,275 
2,655 


133,064 

8,600 

1,614 

1,798, .505 

2,314,650 


14,844 
1,140 


68,953 

3. 191 

1,.585 

1,166,015 

804, 100 


302,007 
11,791 




5, 421 








9,373,710 


Cash capital 








8,334,300 












Total investment 




5,983,465 




4,634,934 




26.673,521 













FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. { 

Quantity and Value op Products Taken in the Fisheries of the Middle 
Atlantic States in 1904. 



Species. 


New York. 


New Jersey. 


Pennsylvania. 


Delaware. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 








30,970 
896, 445 
96,000 


$450 
8,165 
1,500 










Alewives, fresh 


1,021,183 


$16,181 


97,800 
172,000 


$615 
2,925 


344, 860 


$4,495 








420 
250 


50 


Bluefish 


11,413,786 
310,025 
679, 150 
137,316 


556, 527 
12,508 
27,698 
6,995 


2, 723, 390 

597,501 

1,357,080 

112,440 

5,431 

1,261,855 

1,420 

342,341 

226, 110 

407, 284 

325 

1,052,239 

468, 300 

140,600 

389,850 

14,270 

12, 805 

20,826 

113,743 

37,609,805 

54,000 

3,000 


120,085 

24,499 

39,631 

8,418 

262 

53,789 

30 

7,066 

1,452 

25,920 

80 

37,563 

35, 373 

6,318 

10, 550 

310 

187 

2,587 

7,445 

109,090 

2,050 

45 






15 




















Catfish 


17,200 


1,147 


108,170 


5,815 






Cod 


1,170,485 


52, 710 






800 


36 




















25, 150 

3,500 

268, 255 


506 


Drum 










70 


Eels, fresh 


708, 937 


53, 832 


60, 650 


4,146 


14,037 




1,820,332 
253, 205 
307,685 
68,110 


67, 159 

15,913 

11,633 

1,527 






4,100 
216, 560 


187 


German carp 


10, 350 


549 


14, 099 






Hake 




































22,380 

212, 595 

216, 399, 600 


2,480 

13, 219 

693,929 






























Mullet, fresh 






4,000 


135 


Mullet, salted 














124,000 
39,375 
25, 273 
2,015 
73,500 


620 
2,945 
1,695 

190 
1,503 






1 




253, 350 

600 

600 

10, 234 

132,250 

36 

1,054,682 

2, 572, 046 

37, 200 

4,337,907 

20,575 

1,706 

10,925 

8,780 

7,525 

35,900 

10, 699, 301 

66,012 

227, 520 

8,432 

46,500 


19,620 

35 

55 

246 

2,061 

18 

32,067 

97,903 

348 

238, 517 

411 

213 

165 

1,599 

1,500 

1,560 

253, 200 

9,535 

12,622 

7,115 

3,308 






186, 050 


10, 689 










Pike and pickerel 

Pollock 






11,050 


544 


















Salmon, Atlantic 
















1,493,828 
320, 116 
261,030 
498,119 


48,068 

21, 546 

297 

36,826 
















600 


30 


Sea robins 








Shad 


835,544 


52,472 


951,020 


67,928 


SHarks 




Sheepshead 














Skates 


60,000 

1,375 

1,729 

3,750 

6,339,600 

52,766 

9,506 

579 

91,753 

12, 248 

60,000 

7,000 

68,870 

114,350 

20,010 

60,500 


60 

260 

339 

190 

212,623 

7,075 

633 

377 

4,450 

797 

60 

350 

2,020 

3,250 

1,278 

788 










Smelt 










Spanish mackerel 

Spot.. 














15,000 
773, 300 
40, 397 
83,800 
7,495 
13,470 


1,048 








15, 473 


Striped bass 


6,300 
11, 250 


687 
506 


4,836 


Sturgeon 


4,555 


Sturgeon caviar 


6,883 


4,300 


162 


532 


Sunflsh 




Swellfish . . 
















8,000 

145,475 

6,985 


580 

4,007 

347 










Tautog 






6,000 


300 


Tomcod 








Whitebait 










Whiting or silver hake 
Other flsh 


676,595 

660 

2,165,888 

973, 150 

67,200 

1,392,750 

9,164,274 

5,781,615 


11,515 

14 

351,758 

70,450 

6,000 

2,115 

1,298,508 

393, 445 


















Glams, hard . . 


1,336,016 

740,930 

92,080 

159, 100 

20, 079, 549 

3,225,775 

892, 794 

5,832,000 

79,060 

810,920 

15, 140 


303,599 

65,400 

6,720 

4,590 

3,413,893 

366, 459 

145,646 

4,512 

2,340 

8, .314 

770 






10,064 


1,593 










Clams, surf 










Mussels. 










Oysters, market 


630,000 
200,900 


90, 000 
14, 290 


807, 800 
883,225 


47,513 
46, 171 


Scallops 




Shells. 
















80,909 

224,499 

125,567 

1,638,000 

141,340 

4,949 

500 

4,700 

34,901 


2,064 

8,658 

19,600 

6,518 

18,269 

1,425 

2 

4,450 

727 




















Crabs, soft 






134,467 

665,000 

2,600 


5,960 


King craljs 






2,385 




229, 697 


27,059 






286 


Shrimp 








Porpoise 








::::::::;::;:::; 






605 


705 






676 
40,210 


531 


Turtles 






2,888 














Total 


277,649,747 


6,230,558 '90.108.068 


3,385,415 


2,046,294 


167,499, 


5,608,289, 


259,590 











10 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Qt^ANTITY AND VALrE OF PRODUCTS TaKEN IN THE FISHERIES OF THE MiDDLE 

Atlantic States in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 



Maryland. 



Lbs. 



Albacore 

Alewives, fresh 

Alewi ves, salted 

Black bass 

Bluefish 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Catfish 

Cero 

Cod 

Crevalle 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels, fresh 

Eels, salted 

Eels, smoked 

Flounders 

German carp 

Gizsard shad 

Haddock 

Hake 

Hickory shad 

Hogflsh 

Horse mackerel 

Kingflsh 

MackereL 

Menhaden 

Mullet, fresh 

Mullet, salted. 

Mumniiiiiog 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike and pickerel 

Pollock 

Pompano 

Round herring 

Salmon, Atlantic 

Scup 

Sea bass 

Sea robins 

Shad 

Sharks 

Sheepshead 

Skates 

Smelt 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteagues 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Sturgeon caviar 

Suckers 

Sunfish 

Swellfish 

Swordflsh 

Tautog 

Tomcod 

Whitebait 

Whiting or silver hake. 

Other fish 

Clams, hard 

Clams, soft 

Clams, surf 

Mussels 

Oysters, market 

Oysters, seed 

Scallops 

Shells 

Squid 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

King crabs 

Lobsters 

Shrimp 

Porpoise.. 

Frogs 

Terrapin 

Turtles 



9,589,430 

4,895,540 

14, 150 

91,460 

3,150 

375,062 

491,435 

5.130 

310 



165, 840 
30, 975 

250, 165 
76,300 



35,005 

139, 280 

7,225 



4,500 



7,610 

16, 240 

9,849,400 

24,935 



545, 053 
265,470 
42,317 



31,610 
59,600 



,912,249 
950 



1,950 

13,480 

785,215 

721,240 

164, 245 

20,600 

2,775 

7,450 



Total. 



4,000 
37,800 



.30,284,905 
722,645 



14,000 
12,665,282 
5, 732, 865 



Value. 



S55, 263 

82, 719 

1,325 

3,855 

102 

9, 890 

18, 381 

156 

12 



2,688 

301 

10, 705 

2,214 



1,192 

4,633 

136 



940 

1,296 

20, 189 

745 



30,841 
10,685 
3,716 



2,558 
2,580 



159, 772 
68' 



241 

411 

23, 207 

72, 207 

8,313 

18, 722 

72 

487 



2,400,642 
17,032 



418 
168,996 
189,851 



2,400 



3,923 
13,400 



81, 128, 866 



2,718 
456 



3,336,560 



Virginia. 



Lbs. 



14, 309, 226 
294,640 
153,600 
566, 765 
14, 460 
1,335,391 
556,325 



270, 125 

3, 842, 709 

192, 495 

86,350 



248,640 
141,625 
32,675 



355,883 
44, 895 



118,390 



M7, 918, 766 
239,000 



635,017 
180, 550 
36,400 



47,840 



49,260 
1,000 



, 419, 899 
"26," 745" 



357,000 
872, 800 
0,951,008 
451,366 
180,675 
23,211 
52,645 
24,800 



1,659,572 



40,043,290 
13, 242, 733 



10,356,052 
1,910,654 



3,220 

1,706 

72,3.35 



355,315,798 



Value. 



Total. 



Lbs. 



?87, 083 
3,650 
13, 192 
27, 302 
505 
36,616 
21,920 



7,409 

69,324 

2,519 

4,007 



7,587 

4,466 

6.53 



7,296 
4,451 



6,243 



515,413 
7,208 



29,501 
6,693 
2,954 



3,400 



1,545 
44 



439, 625 
"964 



39, 390 
37, 769 
164,979 
41,803 
15, 134 
16,848 
1.060 
514 



3.009,005 
450,671 



179,575 
92,909 



690 

320 

1,144 



5,584,354 



30 


970 


26,258 


944 


5,458 


180 


168 


170 


14, 795 


651 


925 


136 


3,616 


683 


1,422 


886 


10 


561 


2,433 


450 


271 


545 


4,376 


040 


453 


080 


1,781 


641 


76 


300 




3'2,=> 


3,160 


316 


1,229 


320 


39 


900 


448 


28.-) 


457 


960 


374 


6.53 


44 


895 


12 


805 


169 


206 


342 


578 


511,777 


,571 


321 


935 


3 


000 


124 


(K)0 


1,658 


845 


471 


893 


92 


382 


83 


734 


48 


140 


132 


250 




36 


2,629 


380 


2,953 


362 


298 


230 


16,954 


738 


20 


575 


23 


401 


70 


925 


10 


1.55 


368 


204 


940 


930 


25, .548 


484 


1,338 


081 


676 


996 


60 


317 


211 


443 


44 


498 


60 


000 


15 


000 


210, 


345 


121, 


;«5 


20, 


010 


737 


095 


4, 


660 


5,209, 


340 


1, 714, 


080 


159, 


280 


1,551, 


8.50 


101,009, 


818 


24,056 


893 


892, 


794 


5,832, 


000 


173, 


969 


24,056, 


7.53 


7,918, 


693 


2,303, 


000 


373, 


637 


7, 


349 




500 


3, 


220 


11. 


610 


U», 


84 tj 



Value. 



8450 

171,802 

90,794 

14, .567 

707, 844 

37,614 

113,835 

62,676 

418 

106,547 

7,439 

79,584 

4,342 

112,647 

2, 214 

80 

113,688 

75, 033 

789 

17,951 

12,077 

7,696 

4,451 

187 

12, 250 

21,960 

1,338,621 

10,138 

45 

620 

93, 596 

19, 108 

7,459 

1,749 

3,445 

2, 061 

18 

8-1, 238 

122, 103 

645 

995, 140 

411 

1,185 

225 

1,859 

41,470 

40, 978 

669, 482 

136, 143 

41, 763 

49,945 

9,584 

1.798 

60 

930 

6,327 

3,597 

1,278 

12, 303 

24 

882,803 

135, 850 

12, 720 

6,705 

10, 2.59, 561 

1,288,068 

145,646 

4,512 

4,822 

365,543 

309,090 

8,903 

45.614 

2,225 

2 

690 

8,724 

5,215 



811,857,062 I 18,963,976 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



11 



Supplementary Statement op Certain of the Above Products in Bushels 

AND Number. 







New York. 


New Jersey. 


Pennsylvania. 


Delaware. 


Products. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quan- 
tity. 


Value. 


'^"*"" Value 
tity. ^'^'"•^• 


Clams, hard. . .bushels. . 


167,002 

74,093 

11,510 

15,910 

2,868,507 

460, 825 

148,799 

97,200 

2, 432, 760 

45,420 


$303,599 

65,400 

6,720 

4,590 

3,413,893 

366, 459 

145,646 

4,512 

8,314 

770 


270, 736 

97,315 

8,400 

30, 215 

1,309,182 

825,945 


$351,758 

70, 450 

6,000 

2,115 

1,298,508 

393,445 






1,258 $1,593 


Clams, soft.. do.. 








Clams, surf do. . 








Mussels do.. 






1 


Oysters market.. do.. 

Oyster, 'seed do. . 

Scallops do. . 


90,000 
28,700 


$90,000 
14,290 


115,400 
126,175 


47,513 
46, 171 


Shells do.. 














Crabs, hard, .number 


673,497 
376, 701 
819,000 


8,658 
19,600 
6,518 










Crabs, soft do.. 






403,401 
332,500 


5,960 


King crabs do. . 






2,385 













Products. 


Maryland. 


Virginia. 


Total. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Clams, hard. . .bushels. . 


4,725 


$4,880 


207,446 


$220,973 


651, 167 

171,408 

19,910 

46, 125 

14,429,974 

3, 436, 699 

148, 799 

97, 200 

72, 170, 259 

23,756,079 

1,151,500 


$882, 803 
135, 850 


Clams, surf do 










12, 720 


Mussels.... ..do 










6,705 


Oysters, market .do 

Oysters, seed do 

Scallops do 


4,326,415 
103, 235 


2,400,642 
17,032 


5,720,470 
1,891,819 


3,009,005 
450,671 


10, 259, 561 

1,288,068 

145, 646 


Shells do 










4,512 


Crabs, hard. . .number. . 

Crabs, soft do 

King crabs do 


37,995,846 
17,198,595 


168,996 
189,851 


31,068,156 
5,731,962 


179, 575 
92,909 


365,543 

309,090 

8,903 















Comp.'X.rative Statement of the Extent of the Fisheries of the Middle 
Atlantic States in 1901 and 1904. 





Persons engaged. 


Capital invested. 


State. 


1901. 


1904. 


Decrease (— ) in 
1904. 


1901. 


1904. 


Increase (+) or 
decrease (-) in 1904. 




Nimi- 
ber. 


Percent- 
age. 


Amount. 


Percent- 
age. 




11,564 
12, 030 
2,484 
1,998 
36,260 
29, 325 


11,493 
9,094 
1,412 
1,899 
30,337 
28,868 


- 71 
-2,936 
-1,072 

- 99 
-5,923 

- 457 


- 0.61 
-24.41 
-43.16 

- 4.96 
-16.33 

- 1.56 


$9,444,271 
2, 729, 571 
2, 110, 162 
657, 197 
6,506,066 
3,633,104 


$10,621,616 
2,685,796 
2,097,715 
669,995 
5,983,465 
4, 614, 934 


+$1,177,345 
43, 775 

- 12, 447 
+ 12, 798 

- 522,601 
+ 981,830 


+ 12.47 




— 1.60 


Pennsylvania 


- 0.59 
+ 1.95 




— 8.03 


Virginia 


+ 27.02 






Total 


93,661 


83,103 


-10,558 


-11.27 


25,080,371 


26,673,521 


+ 1,593,150 


+ 6.35 









Products. 




Pounds. 


Value. 


States. 


1901. 


1904. 


Increase (+) or 
decrease (— ) in 1904. 


1901. 


1904. 


Increase (+) or 
decrease (-)inl904. 




Amount. 


Per 
cent- 
age. 


Amount. 


Per- 
cent- 
age. 


New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania. . 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 


228, 092, 285 

117,930,964 

6,029,538 

5, 835, 186 

82,975,245 

378, 183, 358 


277,649,747 

90,108,068 

2,046,294 

5,608,289 

81,128,866 

355,315,798 


+ 49,557,462 
-27,822,896 

- 3,983,244 

- 226, 897 

- 1,846,379 
-22,867,560 


+21.73 
-23.59 
-66.06 

- 3.89 

- 2.23 

- 6.05 


$3,894,270 
4, 755, 522 
251,491 
203,372 
3, 767, 461 
4,613,384 


$6,230,558 
3, 385, 415 
167, 499 
259. 590 
3,336,560 
5,584,354 


+ $2,336,288 

- 1,370,107 

83,992 
+ 56,218 

- 430, 901 
+ 970,970 


+59.99 
-28.81 
-33.40 
+ 27.64 
-11.44 
+21.05 


Total.... 


819,046,576 811,857,062 

> 1 


- 7,189,514 


- 0.88 


17,485,50018,963,976 


+ 1,478,476 + 8.46 



12 



FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



FISHERIES OF NEW YORK. 
GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

New York now ranks first among the Middle Atlantic States in the 
amount of capital invested in the fishery industries and in the value 
of the products. In 1904 these industries gave employment to 11,493 
persons and utilized $10,621,616 worth of vessels, boats, fishing 
apparatus, shore property, and cash capital. The yield aggregated 
277,649,747 pounds, for which the fishermen received $6,230,558. 

The returns for 1904, compared with those for 1901, show a decrease 
of 71 in the number of persons employed, but an increase of $1,177,345 
in the investment, and 49,557,462 pounds in the quantity and 
$2,336,288 in the value of the products. There has been a small 
increase in the number of persons on fishing and transporting vessels, 
and in the shore industries, but a decrease of 236 in the number em- 
ployed in the shore fisheries. The decrease in the number of shore 
or boat fishermen is due in a large measure to a falling off in the Hud- 
son River fisheries. Practically every branch of the fisheries of that 
stream has gone down, the number of persons employed in 1901 being 
1,685 and in 1904 only 1,287. 

The three following tables show, in condensed form, the number of 
persons engaged, the number and value of vessels, boats, apparatus 
of capture, the value of shore and accessory property, the amount of 
cash capital, and the quantity and value of the products of the fish- 
eries of New York in 1904. 

Number of Persons Employed in the Fisheries of New York in 1904. 



How engaged. 



On vessels fishing 

On vessels transporting. 
In shore or boat fisheries 
Shoresmen 

Total 



Number. 



Investment in the Fisheries of New York in 1904. 



Items. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats, sail and row 

Boats, motor 

Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Seines 

Gill nets 

Lines 

Eel pots 

Lobster pots 

Dredges 

Tongs 

Rakes 

Hoes 



No. 



482 
9,880 



204 
3,720 



4,781 
113 



283 



465 

3,160 

1,578 

337 

67 

5 



Value. 



$1,314,275 



455 
290 



30 

255 

65 

42 
7 
5 

5 

10 

1 



395 
069 

775 

850 
,085 
,069 

425 

490 
,996 
,428 

296 
6 



Items. 



Apparatus— shore fisheries: 

Seines 

Gill nets 

Pound nets 

Fyke nets 

Dip nets 

Lines 

Eel pots 

Lobster pots 

Spears 

Dredges 

Tongs 

Rakes 

Hoes 

Shore property 

Cash capital 



Total. 



No. 



209 

810 

306 

8,946 

18 



7,626 
3,245 

259 
1,364 
1,734 
1,205 

657 



3,158 

484 

4,854 

2,997 



11,493 



Value. 



$15, 127 

35,095 

105, 965 

41,460 

92 

2,303 

7,539 

4,225 

234 

4,703 

8,173 

6,822 

609 

4,314,115 

3,590,500 



10,621,616 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 13 

Products op the Fisheries op New York in 1904. 



Species. 



Alewives 1 

Blueflsh 11; 

Bonito... 

Bullheads 

Butterfish 

Carp, American 

Carp, German 

Catfish 

Cod 1, 

Eels 

Flounders 1, 

Haddock 

Hake 

Kingflsh ■ 

Ling ; 

Mackerel ( 

Menhaden. '216, 

Mummichog ' 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pickerel 

Pike 

Pollock 

Scup 1, 

Sea bass i 

Sea robins ' 

Shad 

Skates 

Smelt 

Spanish mackerel 
Spot 



Lbs. 


Value. 


021, 183 


$16,181 


413, 786 


556, 527 


310,025 


12,508 


121,116 


6,052 


579, 150 


27, 698 


23, 750 


1,230 


253,205 


15,913 


16,200 


943 


170, 485 


52, 710 


708,937 


53, 832 


820,332 


67, 159 


307,685 


11,633 


38,850 


1,067 


22,380 


2,480 


29,260 


460 


212,595 


13,219 


399,600 


693,929 ' 


124,000 


620 ; 


39, 375 


2,945 ' 


25, 273 


1,695 


695 


58 


1,320 


132 


73,500 


1,503 


493, 828 


48,068 


320, 116 


21,546 


261,030 


297 


498, 119 


36, 826 


60,000 


60 


1,375 


260 


1,729 


339 


3,750 


190 



Species. 



Lbs. 



Squeteague 6, 339, 600 

Striped bass 52, 766 

Sturgeon i 9, 506 

Caviar 579 

Suckers 68, 003 

Sunfish 12, 248 

Swellflsh 60,000 

Swordfish 7,000 

Tautog 58, 870 

Tomcod or frost fish 114,350 

Whitebait I 20, 010 

Whiting 60,500 

Crabs, hard 810, 920 

Crabs, soft o 15, 140 

Lobsters 229, 697 

Squid i 79,060 

Clams, hard, public I 6 957,096 

Clams, hard, private | c 378, 920 

Clams, soft ' d740,930 

Oysters, market, public ' « 145, 635 

Oysters, market, private ..1/19,933,914 



Oysters, seed, public 

Oysters, seed, private 

Mussels 

Scallops 

Skimmers or surf clams 

Terrapin 

Shells 



Total. 



g 762, 475 

ft 2, 463, 300 

i 159, 100 

k 892, 794 

I 92, 080 

605 

m 5, 832, 000 



277, 649, 747 



Value. 



S212,623 

7,075 

633 

377 

3,220 

797 

60 

350 

2,020 

3,250 

1,278 

788 

8,314 

770 

27,059 

2,340 

199, 851 

103, 748 

65,400 

24, 986 

3,388,907 

74, 536 

291,923 

4,590 

145, 646 

6,720 

705 

4,512 



6, 230, 558 



a 45,420 'n number. 
6 119,637 bushels, 
c 47,365 bushels. 
d 74,093 bushels. 



« 20,805 bushels. 
/ 2,847.702 bushels. 
g 108,925 bushels, 
ft 351,900 bushels. 



i 15,910 bushels. 
* 148,799 bushels. 
1 11,510 bushels. 
n» 97,200 bushels. 



THE FISHERIES BY COUNTIES. 

More than one-half of the fishery products of New York State are 
taken by the fishermen of Suffolk County. In 1904 the yield aggre- 
gated 234,338,945 pounds in w^eight and S3, 292, 978 in value, consist- 
ing principally of oysters and other shellfish, menhaden, squeteague, 
flounders, butterfish, cod, eels, scup, and a large number of minor 
species. The fisheries of Nassau County rank next, with an aggre- 
gate value of $882,957, and New York, Richmond, Kings, and Queens 
counties follow, with a value of $782,763, $464,400, $429,981, and 
$265,930, respectively. 



14 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



The extent of the fisheries in each county is given in detail in the 
following tables : 

Statement, by Counties, of the Number of Persons Employed in the 
Fisheries op New York in 1904. 



Counties. 



On ves- 
sels fish- 
ing 



On ves- 
sels 
trans- 
porting. 



In shore 
or boat 
fisheries. 



Shores- 
men. 



Total. 



Albany 

Columbia 

Dutchess 

Greene 

Kings 

Nassau 

New York. . . 

Orange 

Putnam 

Queens 

Rensselaer. . 
Richmond . . . 

Rockland 

Suffolk 

Ulster 

Westchester. 

Total.. 



42 
239 
978 



122 
'i'745' 



3,158 



191 



65 

157 

260 

85 

404 

060 

53 

93 

12 

235 

102 

392 

114 

,680 

256 

286 



484 



4,8.54 



22 

45 

1,994 



10 
963' 



2,997 



80 
158 
260 

85 

515 

1,007 

3,058 

93 

12 
331 
102 
609 
114 
4, 519 
256 
294 



11,493 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, and Apparatus Employed 
IN the Fisheries of New York in 1904. 



Items. 


Albany. Columbia. 


Dutchess. 


Greene. Kings. 


Nassau. 


No. 


Value. No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 




















16 

125 


$16,075 

""4,' 462 
32,800 

""3," 850 
28,697 
10,660 


66 
741 

"26 
484 



"sio 

30 

10 


$143, 375 






















Outfit 


















22,062 




















22 
296 


44, 575 






















Outfit 


















3,380 




32 


$660 


95 


$3,100 


156 


$6,005 


53 


$1,207 


484 
8 


38,846 




17, 720 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 
GUI nets 


















1.265 






















79 
265 
400 
245 

8 


1 720 




















265 

200 

16 

2 






















300 300 




















174 2.234 




















11 

21 
3 


72 


Apparatus — shore fisheries: 


8 


695 




18 
39 


1,135 
1,415 


11 
120 


570 
6,945 


U 
22 


640 
665 


1,970 


Gill nets 


7 

2 

20 


645 

1,000 

240 


235 












212 
4 


1,215; 336 


1,680 
50 


537 


2,660 


96 
2 


490 
10 








20 


10 














370 
584 
745 
22 
332 

1,889 

536 

136 

38,750 

6,000 
























474 
760 
28 
28 
338 
110 
145 


1,325 


1,176 








































67 
166 
380 
290 
124 


55 




















993 




















1,719 




















1,322 




















112 


Shore property 




27, 305 
15,000 




1,015 




1,410 




605 


97, 140 






























Total 




44,895 




8,395 




16,590 




3,617 




148,790 




379,271 











FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



15 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, and Apparatus Employed 
IN THE Fisheries of New York in 1904 — Continued. 



Items. 


New York. 


Orange. 


Putnam. 


Queens. 


Rens- 
selaer. 


Rich- 
mond. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. JNo. Value. 

1 1 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 




69 
3,450 


$377, 110 










8 


$15, 150 






28 
311 


$61,400 












86 








Outfit 


219,550 
16,250 












1,875 
40,225 






19, 205 




14 
, 170 










24 
516 






40 
473 


35, 850 


















Outfit 


2,275 
3,760 










2,691 
12,369 
3,420 






6,680 




55 


56 


$2, 170 


8 


$275 


288 
4 


45 


$890 


247 

7 


21,980 




8,000 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 


19 
245 


9,300 
2,280 
4,178 
3,000 
645 
















Gill nets 










































1,500 
16 


















500 
68 
19 
19 


1,000 












30 


234 






2,430 


Tongs 
















140 




4 

3 
4 


45 

' 185 
75 
















122 


Apparatus — shore fisheries: 
Seines 


11 
35 


755 
1,735 


3 
1 


165 
100 






14 


1,125 
80 




Gill nets 






4 


115 
2 
10 


1,470 








1,200 


Fyke nets 






162 


967 


11 


66 






186 
2 


1,005 
12 


400 




























535 


659 


60 
360 


50 


Lobster pots 


















700 
















15 
40 
194 
59 
55 


15 

260 

816 

261 

43 

19,750 










8, 160 
38i 232 
45 354 














14 

229 
235 


370 


Tongs 














1,394 
















1,664 


















Shore property 




3,481,340 
3, 389, 500 




455 




60 




770 




27, 825 


Cash capital 




























Total . 


7,510,239 




6,082 




666' 


97,768 




3,882 




191,880 













Items. 


Rockland. 


Suffolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 






293 
5,144 


$695, 165 






2 
23 


$6,000 
""766' 


482 
9,880 

"264" 
3,720 


$1,314,275 








1 




Outfit 






187,266 
120,675 


■■ 1 


455, 120 








78 
1,781 


. .1 




290, 375 
















Outfit 






11,519 
118,370 
25,975 

33,550 

3,540 

92 

160 

790 

5,143 

1,208 

129 

6 

5, 522 

6, 775 

103, 765 

29, 115 




1 


30, 395 




65 


$2,685 


1,992 
64 

67 

28 


148 |$6,570 


247 


7,485 


4,781 
113 

86 
283 


255, 069 




65, 775 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 






1 


i 


42,850 


Gill nets . . 






i 




7,085 








1 




5,069 








200 
660 
1,266 
305 
44 
5 

77 

186 

302 

6,720 








"es" 


465 

3,160 

1,578 

337 

67 

5 

209 

810 

306 

8,946 

18 


425 














5,490 


Dredges 










8 


10,996 












1,428 


Rakes 












296 


Hoes 














6 


Apparatus — shore fisheries: 
Seines 


8 
60 


375 
3,640 


13 
123 


1,175 
5,910 


11 
91 


815 
6,405 


15, 127 


Gill nets 

Pound nets 


35,095 
105,965 


Fyke nets 


65 


390 


384 


2,002 


207 


1,230 


41,460 


Dip nets . . 


92 


Lines 








1,933 

4,780 
2,555 

125 
2, .588 
2,087 
2,295 

228 










2,303 








4,942 
2,020 
132 
1,108 
546 
420 
243 






290 
105 
17 


290 
225 

17 


7,626 
3,245 

259 
1,364 
1,734 
1,205 

657 


7,539 


Lobster pots 










4,225 


Spears 










234 












4,703 


Tongs 










9 
46 
90 


36 

390 

90 

4,895 


8,173 


Rakes 










6,822 


Hoes 










609 






585 


611,050 
180, 000 




1,160 


4,314,115 


Cash capital . . .... 




3, .590, 500 

















Total 




7,675 




2,156,406 16,817 





28,643 




10,621,616 









14008—07- 



16 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield op the Fisheries of New York in 1904. 



Species. 


Albany. 


Columbia. 


Dutchess. 


Greene. 


Kings. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




53,610 


$935 


16.3.998 


$3,339 


52,785 


$1,049 


44,310 


$830 


9,850 
38,350 


$290 


Bluefish 




2,299 


Bullheads 


6,089 


305 21,668 


1,051 


24,050 


1,166 


5,842 


291 


Butte rflsh 


58,700 1-170 


Carp, American 


50 
14,976 


3 3. .570 


179 
942 


6,350 
13, 179 


315 700 
64511.720 


35 

625 






Carp, German 


804 


21,210 






Cod 






39, 370 
95, 120 


1,926 


Eels 


695 


65 


984 


93 


1,830 


164 


280 


26 


S .?19 


Flounders 


32, .300| 1 , ti07 


Haddock 
















2 450 llti 


Hake 


















22, 550 
8,000 
3,000 


616 


Ling 


















193 


Menhaden 


















42 


Perch, white 






1,640 

5,874 


123 
377 


2,155 

4,925 

50 


168 

325 

4 


250 

2,567 

20 


20 

191 

2 




Perch, yellow 


864 
125 


72 
12 






Pickerel 






Scup 






6,400 
6,920 

17,260 
3,750 

28,300 


320 


Sea bass 


















528 


Shad 


296 


29 


21, 194 


i,595 


140,843 


9,836 


6,400 


440 


1,384 


Spot 


190 


Squeteague 












1 




1,223 








300 
208 


36 
15 


760 
1,795 

145 
7,620 
3,725 


98! 40 
101 1.760 


5 
126 

30 
256 

21 






300 


is 






Caviar 


105 
352 
215 


40 

5,578 

313 







Suckers 


10,905 
1,055 


548 
75 


9,350 
1,230 


397 

74 












Tautog 


17,050 

250 

2,100 

2,000 

31,565 

116,360 

119,240 

303, 250 


852 












4,100 


205 






10 


Crabs, hard 














64 




















75 




















2,746 


Clams, hard, public reefs 


















20 082 


Clams, hard, private areas. . . 


















35, 945 




















27 onfi 


Oysters, market, private areas 
Mussels 


















1,622,719.321.0.34 


















85,000 


1,950 
429, 981 




88,965 


2,866 


250,566 


8,221 


264,312 


14,747 


79,820 


2,898 


2,671,854 





Species. 


Nassau. 


New York. 


Orange. 


Putnam. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 












10,000 


$300 








118,325 
4,900 


$8,399 
245 


10,913,626 

60,310 

50 


$526,834 

2,032 

3 


















14, 135 
3,650 
14, 775 


713 
210 
863 


2,532 
1,800 
4,000 


$137 






108 


Carp, German ' . . 




6,450 
281 , 675 


520 
12,265 


218 


Cod 


300,900 
124,870 
62,350 
80,275 


14,385 
9,598 
2,558 
3,265 




Eels 


1,158 


96 


10 


1 




1,062 

13, 800 

158,369 

13,000,000 


57 

502 

9,538 

31,750 








































3,280 
2,935 


233 
185 


120 
400 


9 






150 

862,750 

80,531 

2,840 


12 

28, 333 

3,590 

260 


37 


Scup 


3,700 


154 












Shad 




21,844 


1,538 


1,500 


110 




480 

325, 550 

5,690 


65 

13,690 

818 




Squeteague 


1,773,425 
300 


63,237 
33 










1,770 
200 

11,760 
435 

42,870 


240 
10 

584 
25 

721 


100 


14 












650 


21 


450 
225 


22 








18 
















13, 140 

7,500 

264,216 

107,r)80 

115,700 

3,847,270 

115,4.30 

448, 700 

74, 100 

11,400 

25, fiOO 


695 

975 

55,646 

31,525 

8,915 

661,404 

11,880 

51,550 

2,640 

1,350 

3,200 












47,108 
24, 480 
40,000 


6, 473 
4,580 
10,260 










Clams, hard, public reefs 

Clams, hard, private areas. . . 


























Oysters, market, private areas 

Oysters, seed, public reefs 

Oysters, seed, private areas. . . 


.566, 650 
10,150 


81,6.38 
825 




















































Skimmers or surf clams 














Total 


6,057,776 


882,957 


27,844,376 


782,763 


128,812 


5,718 


11,137 


674 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



17 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fisheries of New York in 

1904— Continued. 



Species. 


Queens. 


Rensselaer. 


Richmond. 


Rocliland. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 








100,460 


$1,690 


6,000 
2,400 


S198 
128 


5,220 


$166 
















4,400 
15,373 
674 
400 
795 
245 

1,712 


236 
741 
62 
36 
50 
22 
135 


2,930 

300 

1,320 

6,365 

300 


146 












18 


Eels 


40,850 


$3,497 


3,000 


270 


118 




419 












18 


Pickerel 












Siiad . . 






62,840 


5,051 


30,794 
500 

12,974 

525 

1,500 


2,434 








32 
















1,583 








460 

7,707 

515 


37 

394 

33 






38 












74 


Sunflsh .' 


















2,840 
55,460 
82,480 
16,800 


80 
5,900 
9,795 
2,048 




















Clams, liard, public reefs 


67,000 

52,800 

26,200 

1,234,100 


14, 569 

14,850 

2, 544 

230,470 
































2,758,875 
471,800 
66,480 


395,819 
41,591 
3,520 










































Total 


1,420,950 


265,930 


132, 741 


3,436 


3,528,975 


464,400 


62,728 


5,046 







Species. 


Suffolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




425,420 
341,085 
244,815 


$4,940 
18,867 
10,231 


139,280 


$2,227 


10,250 


$217 


1,021,183 

11,413,786 

310,025 

121,116 

579, 150 

23,750 

253,205 

16,200 

1,170,485 

708,937 

1,820,332 

307,685 

38,850 

22,380 

29,260 

212,595 

216,399,600 

124,000 

39,375 

25,273 

695 

1,320 

73,500 

1,493,828 

320, 116 

261,030 

498, 119 

60,000 

1,375 

1,729 

3,750 

. 6,339,600 

52,766 

9,506 

579 

68,003 

12,248 

60,000 

7,000 

58,870 

114,350 

20,010 

60,500 

810,920 

15,140 

229,697 


$16, 181 




556, 527 












12,508 




25,950 


1,297 


14,130 


707 


6,052 




520,450 


26,528 


27,698 




3,450 
27,027 


171 
1,352 


4,180 
17, 525 


209 
897 


1,230 


Carp, German 

Catflsli 


106, 670 
16,200 

548,540 

414, 155 
1,724,620 

211,160 
16,300 
22,380 
21,260 
54,226 
203,396,600 

124,000 
19,900 


8,288 

943 

24, 140 

29,260 

62,937 

7,750 

451 

2,480 

267 

3,681 

662, 137 

620 

1,591 


15,913 
943 


Cod 










52,710 


Eels 


2,361 


213 


21,630 


2,050 


53,832 


Flounders 


67, 159 












11,633 


Hake 










1,067 


Kingflsh . 










2,480 


Ling 










460 












13,219 












693,929 


Mummicliog 










620 




760 

3,660 

35 


58 

256 

3 


4,505 

2,803 

220 


288 

172 

15 


2,945 




1,695 


Pickerel . 






58 


Pike 


1,320 

73,500 

620,978 

232,665 

261,030 

12,684 

60,000 

1,375 

1,249 


132 

1,503 

19,261 

17,428 

297 

1,235 

60 

260 

274 


132 


Pollock 










1,503 












48,068 












21,546 












297 


Shad 


109,842 


7,738 


68,070 


5,042 


36, 826 




60 


Smelt 










260 












339 


Spot . . - 










190 




4,211,825 
22, 135 


134,441 
3,188 










212,623 








8,697 
345 


1,060 
21 


7,075 




3,913 

394 

4,900 

3,640 


267 
242 
212 

268 


633 








377 








7,583 
1,110 


.360 
68 


3,220 


Sunflsh 






797 


Swellfish 


60,000 
7,000 
41,820 
59, 330 
20,010 
()0,500 
805,980 


60 
350 
1,168 
1,780 
1,278 
788 
8,170 


60 












350 












2,020 


Tomcod or frostflsh 

Wtdtebait 


500 


20 


7.300 


514 


3,250 
1,278 


Whiting 










788 












8,314 












770 


Lobsters 


83, 4i4 


16,035 






4,650 


930 


27,059 



18 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fisheries op New York in 

1904— Continued. 



Species. 


SuSolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




79,060 
345, 280 

42,400 
261,580 

143,535 

9,818,200 

165,095 

1,925,350 


$2,340 

84,315 

9,120 

22,923 

24,686 

1,683,737 
20, 240 
229,535 










79,060 
957,096 
378, 920 
740,930 

145, 635 

19,933,914 

762, 475 

2, 463, 300 

159, 100 

892,794 

92,080 

605 

5,832,000 


$2, 340 


Clams, hard, public reefs. . 
Clams, hard, private areas. 






57,280 


$10,864 


199, 851 






103, 748 






34,200 
2,100 
86, 100 


4,012 

300 

14,805 


65,400 


Oysters, marliet, public 






24,986 


Oysters, marliet, private 






3, 388, 907 


Oysters, seed, public reefs. 
Oysters, seed, private areas 






74, 536 






89,2p0 


10,838 


291,923 






4,590 




881,394 


144,296 










145, 646 












6,720 




455 
5,832,000 


455 

4,512 






150 


250 


705 


Shells 






4,512 














Total 


234,338,945 


3,292,978 


325,712 


14,324 


442,078 


53,619 


277,649,747 


6,230,558 







THE PRODUCTS BY APPARATUS. 

The most important forms of fishing apparatus employed in the 
fisheries of New York in 1904 in respect to vahie of products secured 
were the dredges, tongs, rakes, etc., used in taking shellfish and crabs. 
The catch with these appliances aggregated $4,314,639 in value, or 
69 per cent of the total yield of the state, and consisted of oysters, 
3,329,332 bushels, valued at $3,780,352; hard clams, 167,002 bushels, 
$303,599; soft clams, 74,093 bushels, $65,400; scallops, 148,799 
bushels, $145,646; skimmers, or surf clams, 11,510 bushels, $6,720; 
mussels, 15,910 bushels, $4,590; shells, 97,200 bushels, $4,512; hard 
crabs, 316,800 pounds, $3,745, and soft crabs, 2,000 pounds, $75. 

The seine is the most important apparatus used in this state for 
the capture of fish, the 295 seines operated in 1904 taking 214,099,725 
pounds, with a value of $826,597 at first hand. Of this quantity 
210,110,600 pounds consisted of menhaden, valued at $681,178. 
Other species of importance were squeteague, 1,956,635 pounds, 
$70,969; scup, 858,550 pounds, $28,171; alewives, 429,035 pounds, 
$7,201; German carp, 206,065 pounds, $13,450; bluefish, 81,379 
pounds, $5,089; bonito, 60,310 pounds, $2,032, and flounders, 72,022 
pounds, $2,990. 

Of the remaining product lines took 13,495,155 pounds, $623,364; 
pound nets, 11,306,598 pounds, $242,808; gill nets, 3,786,531 pounds, 
$93,553; fyke nets, 1,380,761 pounds, $53,060; pots, 691,598 pounds, 
$61,211; spears, 179,120 pounds, $13,570, and dip nets, 33,215 
pounds, $1,756. 

The following tables present, by apparatus of capture, the products 
of the vessel and shore fisheries of New York in 1904: 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES, 



19 



Statement, by Counties, op the Catch by Dredges, Tongs, Rakes, etc., ii 

New York in 1904. 



Species. 


Kings. 


Nassau. 


New York. 


Queens. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Clams, liard— 

Public reefs 

Oysters, market — 

Private areas 

Oysters, seed — 

Public reefs 


7, 3(» 
79, 450 


$1,270 
12,970 


18, 728 

1,914,500 

78, 120 
448, 700 
25, 600 


$2, 845 

300, 395 

8,320 

51,550 

3,200 


6,400 $1,000 

1 

497,700 1 71,490 


3,200 
257,000 


$540 
55,910 












Skimmers 


















Total 


86, 810 


14,240 


2,485,648 


366,310 


504, 100 1 72, 490 | 200, 800 


56, 450 


Shore fisheries: 

Crabs, soft 


2,000 

109,000 

119,240 

303, 2.50 

85,000 

1,543,269 


75 

18,812 

35,945 

27,006 

1,950 

308,064 












Clams, hard — 

Public reefs 

Private areas 

Clams, soft 


245, 488 
107,680 
115,700 
74,100 

1,932,770 

37, 310 
11,400 


52,801 

31,525 

8,915 

2,640 

361,009 

3,560 
1,350 


18,080 i 3,580 
40,000 10,260 


63,800 
52,800 
26,200 


14,029 
14,850 
2,544 


Mussels 






Oysters, market- 
Private areas 

Oysters. seed- 


68,950 
10,150 


10, 148 
825 


976, 500' 


174, 560 


Scallops . 












1 






Total 


2,101,759 1 391,852 2,524,448 


461.800 


137,180 24,813 1,119,300 


205,983 


Grand total 


2,248,569 


406,092 5,010,096 


828, 110 


641,280 97,303 


1,380,100 


262, 433 



Species. 


Richmond. 


Suffolk. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Crabs, hard 




148,300 

93,304 
42,400 
2,880 

55,685 
69,377,620 

17, 465 

el, 916,950 

475, 542 

4,992,000 


$2,060 

25,296 

9,120 

360 

9,572 
1,601,832 

2,410 

228, 775 
77,975 
3,812 






148,300 

158,592 
59,200 

2,880 

55, 685 
14, 275, 870 

123,585 
2,454,900 

475, .542 

4,992,000 

74,480 


$2,060 


Clams, hard- 
Public reefs 


29,600 $3,592 






34, 543 


Private areas 


16,800 


2,048 






11,168 


Clams, soft 






360 


Oysters, market- 
Public reefs 










9,572 


Private areas 

Oysters, seed — 

Public reefs 


a2,062,900 
28,000 


296,710 
2,430 


80, 100 


$14, 805 


2,354,112 
13,160 


Private areas. 


89,250 


10,838 


291 163 


Scallops 






77, 975 
3,812 
5,350 


Shells 










Skimmers 


48,880 


2,150 


















Total 


2, 180, 180 


306,930 


17,122,146 |l, 961, 212 175,350 


25, 643 


22,821,034 


2,803,275 




Shore fisheries: 

Crabs, hard 






168,500 


1,685 






168,500 
2,000 

798,504 
319, 720 
738,050 
159, 100 

89,950 
5,658,044 

638, 890 

8,400 

417,252 

840,000 

17,600 


1,685 


Crabs, soft 










75 


Clams, hard- 
Public reefs 

Private areas 


52,880 


6,203 


251,976 


59,019 


57,280 


10, 804 


165, 308 

" 92,580 

65,040 

4,590 


Clams, soft. . . 






258,700 


22,563 


34,200 


4,012 


Mussels 






Oysters, market- 
Public reefs 






87,850 
440,580 

147,630 

8,400 

405,852 

840,000 


15,114 
81,905 

17,830 
760 

66,321 
700 


2,100 


300 


15,414 


Private areas. . . . 


695,975 
443,800 


99,109 
39, 161 


1,034,795 


Oysters, seed- 
Public reefs 






61,376 


Private areas 






760 


Scallops 










67,671 
700 


Shells 










Skimmers 


17,600 


1,370 






1,370 














Total 


1,210,255 


145, 843 


5 609 4SS 


265,897 


93,580 


15, 176 


9,856,010 


1,511,364 








Grand total 


3,396,435 452,773 19,731,634 


2,227,109 268,930 


40,819 


32,677,044 


4,314,639 



a Includes 560,000 pounds, worth $80,000, taken up by vessels owned in Connecticut and elsewhere. 
6 Includes 2,088,870 pounds, worth $324,135, taken up by vessels owned in Connecticut and elsewhere, 
c Includes 323,050 pounds, worth $39,670, taken up by vessels owned in Coimecticut and elsewhere. 



20 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of New York 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Albany. 


Columbia. 


Dutchess. 


Greene. 


Nassau. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 


53, 480 


$931 


148,130 


$3,011 


5,525 


$109 


29,510 


$530 






Bliiefish 


20,800 


$1,483 


Bullheads 


1,200 

50 

5,386 


60 

3 

249 


3,430 

3,080 

7,500 

26 


172 

154 

257 

3 


730 
5,300 
6,744 


35 

267 
321 


510 

700 

5,350 

20 


25 
35 

277 
2 


Carp, American 

Carp, German 

Eels 










4,500 
57,400 


360 


Flounders 










2 360 


Perch, white. . 






540 
120 


44 

8 


150 
445 


12 
34 


250 


20 




Perch, yellow 




















3,700 


154 


Shad 


296 


29 


8,124 


640 


6,615 


436 


4,300 


296 






100 

165,500 

5,690 


18 


Squeteague . . . 


















6,825 
818 


Striped bass 










440 


59 






Sturgeon 


300 
300 


18 
15 












Suckers 


1,788 


81 


2,540 
355 


115 
27 


320 
50 


15 
3 






Sunfish 




















Total 


61,012 


1,305 


172,738 


4,370 


28,744 


1 


,415 


41,010 


1,203 


257,690 


12 018 






Species. 


New York. 


Orange. 


Putnam. 


Rensselaer. 


Rockland. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Vessel fisheries: 

Blueflsh 


50,979 

60,310 

1,062 

13,000,000 

854,850 

6,421 

1,761,375 


$2,946 

2,032 

57 

31,750 

28,017 

296 

62,744 


















Bonito 


















Flounders 


















Mfinhfldpn 


















Seup 


















Sea bass 


















Squeteague 




































Total 


15,734,997 


127,842 


















Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


500 

1,480 

3,650 

14,715 

620 

965 


$15 

74 

210 

859 

41 

58 






98,890 
360 


$1,655 
18 


2,300 
420 


$77 


Bullheads... 


50 


3 


1,480 

1,800 

4,000 

120 

300 


$75 

108 

218 

9 

29 


21 


Carp, American 




Carp, German 

Perch, white 


6,450 


520 


8,930 

400 

200 

60 

212 


434 

36 

14 

5 

15 


300 
1,250 


18 
80 


Perch, yellow 


150 


12 




Piclierel 






Shad 






780 


36 






1,544 
500 

9,890 
325 
100 


128 


Squeteague 










32 


Striped bass 


300 


33 


1,000 


136 


100 


14 






1,195 


Sturgeon 


460 

2,975 

160 


37 

126 

12 


30 


Suckers 


650 


21 


9,570 
350 


466 
20 


250 
200 


12 
16 


4 


Sunfish 














Total 


7,600 


589 


33,630 


1,915 


8,250 


481 


112,647 


2,352 


16,629 


1 585 






Grand total 


15,742,597 


128, 431 


33,630 


1,915 


8,250 


481 


112,647 


2,352 


16,629 


1,585 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



21 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of New York 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Suffolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Bluefish 














50,979 

60,310 

1,062 

209, 310, 600 

854, 850 

6,421 

1,761,375 


$2,946 

2,032 

57 
































196, 310, 600 


$648,228 










679,978 

28,017 

296 




































62 744 




■ ■ 










Total 


196, 310, 600 

55,000 
9,600 


648,228 

355 
660 










212, 045, 597 

429,035 

30,400 

16, 880 

21,560 

206,065 

1,750 

800 

4,746 

70,960 

650 

800,000 

124,000 

19,030 

5,060 

195 

3,700 

1,375 

40,013 

100 

195,260 

33, 878 

1,113 

25, 293 

2,255 

20,010 


776 070 


Shore fisheries: 


35,500 


$510 


200 


$8 


7 201 


Bluefish.. ..-- 


2,143 




5,490 

2,800 

24,360 


274 

140 

1,218 


1,730 
4,180 
15,760 


87 
209 
795 


844 








1 126 


Carp, German 

Catfish... 


106, 570 

1,750 

800 


8,284 
90 
34 


13,450 
90 


Cod... . 










34 


Eels 


200 


18 






383 


Flounders 


13,560 

650 

800,000 

124,000 

14,950 


573 

85 

1,200 

620 
1,054 






2 933 


Kingfish 










85 


Menhaden . - . 










1,200 


Mummichog 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 










620 


200 
630 
35 


16 
47 
3 


550 

2,250 

100 


42 

136 
7 


1,354 
338 


Pickerel 






15 


Soup 






154 


Smelt 


1,375 


260 










260 


Shad 


16,792 


1,190 


1,450 


103 


2,873 


Spanish mackerel 






18 


Squeteague 


29,260 
14,025 


1,368 
1,920 










8,225 
4,480 


Striped liass 






2,433 


305 


Sturgeon 


28 

1,700 

340 


3 
74 
32 


88 


Suckers 






5,100 
800 


248 
48 


1,177 


Sunfish 






158 


White bait 


20,010 


1,278 


1,278 














Total 


1, 191, 550 


17,781 


88,075 


3,525 


34, 553 


1,988 


2,054,128 


50,527 






Grand total 


197, 502, 150 


666,009 


88,075 


3,525 


34, 553 


1,988 


214,099,725 


826, 597 



Note. — Very large quantities of the menhaden taken in the vessel fisheries were landed at oil and 
fertilizer factories in Maine, Rhode Island, Delaware, Virginia, and North Carolina. 



22 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Line Fisheries op New York 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Kings. 


Nassau. 


New York. 


Suffolk. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Bluefish 


20,300 


$1,147 






10,862,647 


$523,888 


7,, 590 
425 


$605 
22 


10,890,537 

425 

600,675 

42,200 

95,675 

1,200 

13,528 

109,270 

15,540 

7,000 

2,550 


$525,640 








22 


Cod 


18,100 


890 


300,900 


$14,385 


281,675 


12,265 


27 540 


Flounders . . . 


42,200 


1,926 


1,926 




1,600 
1,200 


68 
36 


80,275 


3,265 


13,800 


502 


3,835 
36 


Hake 






Scup 






7,900 
74,110 
12,050 


316 

3,294 

493 


5,628 

34,960 

1,690 

7,000 


335 

2,464 

76 

350 


651 


Sea bass 


200 
1,800 


16 

78 






5, 774 


Squeteague 






647 






350 


Tautog 


2,550 


142 










142 


















Total 


45,750 


2,377 


381,175 


17,650 


11,252,182 


540,758 


99,493 


5,778 


11,778,600 


566,563 






Shore fisheries: 

Bluefish 


17,400 
21,270 

500 
25,800 

850 

21,350 

8,000 


1,120 










,50,100 
.542,010 

3,125 

73,370 

211,160 

16,300 

19,900 

8,000 
70,2.50 
16,670 
45,250 
47,800 

2,650 


2,945 

23,837 

250 

2,955 

7,750 

451 

235 


67,500 

563,280 

3,625 

99, 170 
212,010 

37,650 

01 Qon 


4,065 


Cod 


1,030 

45 
1,282 

48 
580 
193 










24,867 


Eels . 










295 


Flounders 










4 237 


Haddock 










7,798 


Hake 










1,031 


Ling ... 










428 


Mackerel 










40o! s'nm 


400 


Pollock 












1,405 

640 

3,103 

1,.550 

410 


70,2.50 
23,070 
51,970 
65,800 
2,650 
14,500 
469, 180 


1 405 


Scup 


6,400 
6,720 
18,000 


320 

512 










960 


Sea bass 










3,615 


Squeteague 


805 










2,355 


Striped bass 










410 


Tautog 


14,500 


710 










710 


Crabs, hard 










469, 180 


4,225 


4,225 


















Total 


140,790 


6,645 










1,575,765 


50, 156 


1,716,5.55 


56 801 














Grand total . . 


186,540 


9,022 


381,175 


17,650 


11,252,182 


540,758 


1,675,258 


55,934 


13,495,1,55 


623,364 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Dip-net Fisheries of New 

York in 1904. 



Species. 


Albany. 


Columbia. 


Greene. 


Nassau. 


Rensselaer. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


100 

200 

3,650 

110 


$3 

10 

220 

10 


















100 

280 

18, 450 

130 

120 

30 

910 

55 

13,140 


$3 


Bullheads 


80 

12,230 

20 

120 


$4 

612 

2 

10 














14 


Carp, German... 


1,670 


$92 






900 


$45 


969 


Eels 






12 


Perch, yellow 














10 


Pickerel 


30 
760 


3 
39 














3 


Suckers 


150 
55 


7 
4 














46 


Sunfish 














4 


Crabs, soft 










13,140 


$695 






695 






















Total 


4,850 


285 


12,655 


639 


1,670 


92 


13,140 


695 


900 


45 


33,215 











FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



23 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Pound-net Fisheries of New 

York in 1904. 





Kings. 


Richmond. 


Suffolk. 


Total. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries : 


9,850 
650 


1290 
32 


6,000 


$198 


370,420 

139,690 

242, 740 

.520, 450 

5, 730 

64,650 

600, 640 

21,730 

1,360 

19,176 

4,163,000 

2,300 

3,250 

597,880 

151,805 

261,030 

12, 684 

60,000 

1,249 


$4,. 585 

5,728 

10, 103 

26, 528 

269 

4,963 

22,091 

2,395 

32 

907 

7,869 

250 

98 

18, 240 

11,813 

297 

1,235 

60 

274 


380,270 

140,340 

242, 740 

579, 150 

5,730 

64,650 

603, 740 

21,730 

1,360 

19, 176 

4,166,000 

2,300 

3,250 

597,880 

151,805 

261,030 

29,084 

60,000 

1,249 

3,750 

3,739,190 

79,060 

5,380 

60,000 

18,520 

60,500 

2,714 


$5, 073 


Bluefish 


5,760 








10, 103 


Butterfish 


58, 700 


1,170 


:::::: 




27, 698 


Cod 






269 


Eels . .. 










4,963 




3,100 


155 






22, 246 








2,395 












32 












907 




3,000 


42 






7,911 


Perch, white 






250 


Pollock... . 










98 












18,240 


Sea bass 










11,813 












297 


Shad 


2,800 


204 


13,600 


974 


2,413 




60 


Spanish mackerel 










274 


Spot . . . ... 


3,750 
8,500 


190 
340 






190 






4 


3,730,690 
79,060 

5, .380 
60,000 
18, 520 
60,500 

2,714 


116,609 
2,340 
846 
60 
458 
788 
375 


116,949 


Squid 






2,340 












846 


Swellflsh 










60 


Tautrg . . . 










458 


Whiting 










788 


Lobsters 










375 














Total 


90, 350 


2,423 


19,600 


1,172 


11,196,648 


239,213 


11,306,598 


242,808 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Gill-net Fisheries of New 

York in 1904. 



Species. 


Columbia. 


Dutchess. 


Greene. 


Kings. 


Nassau. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Bluefish . . . 


















92,225 

4,900 

380 


$6,535 




















245 




















47 


Squeteague .... 


















144,550 


6,225 




















Total 
















242,055 


13,052 


















Shore fisheries : 


15,868 


$328 


47,225 


$939 


14,800 


$300 










Bluefish 






5,300 


381 


Bullheads 


100 


5 


710 

500 

2,760 

1,625 

80 

134,328 


36 

24 

137 

133 

6 

9,399 




.:::::::::: 










1 








Carp, German 

Perch, white 


155 
100 


8 
6 


4,000 


220' 






















1" 






Shad 


13, 070 


955 


2,100 


144 1 fi.fi4n 


$640 






Squeteague 








15,500 


64C 


Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar 


300 
208 


36 
15 


320 

1,795 

145 

630 


39 
101 
105 

28 












1,760 

40 

1,600 


126 
30 
80 


















Suckers. . 


500 


20 




















Total 


30, 301 


1,373 


190,118 


10, 947 


24. .300 


900 


6,640 


640 


20,800 


1,021 










Grand total 


30,301 


1,373 


190,118 


10,947 


24,300 


900 


6,640 


640 


262,855 


14,073 



24 



FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Gill-net Fisheries op New 

York in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


New York. 


Orange. 


Putnam. 


Rensselaer. 


Richmond. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries : 

Mackerel 


158,369 


$9,538 
































Total 


158, 369 


9,538 




































Shore fisheries: 
Alewives 






9,500 


$285 






1,460 


$32 


1 


Bluefish 










2,400 1 $128 


Bullheads 






130 

2,460 

21,064 

770 

200 


7 

180 

1,502 

104 

10 












Perch, white 














1 


Shad 


2,840 


260 


1,500 


$110 


1,500 


120 


44,040 3,687 


Striped bass 


Sturgeon 


























1 


Total 


2,840 


260 


34, 124 


2,088 


1,500 


110 2,960 


152 


46,440 3,815 




Grand total 


161,209 


9,798 


34, 124 


2,088 


1,500 


110 2,960 


152 


46,440 1 3,815 



Species. 


Rockland. 


Suflolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


•Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Bluefish 






61,380 


$3,807 










153,605 

4,900 

158,369 

1,974,000 

380 

344,650 


$10, 342 


Bonito 














245 


Mackerel 


















9,538 


Menhaden 






1,974,000 


4,280 










4,280 


Spanish mackerel 














47 


Squeteague 






200,100 t 6.615 










12, 840 






















Total 






2,235,480 


14,702 










2,635,P04 


37,292 


















Shore fisheries: 
Alewives 


2,920 


$89 






103,780 


$1,717 


8,350 


$171 


203,903 

80,425 

1,650 

2,500 

500 

7,005 

6,&50 

100 

700 

27,050 

149,000 

13,755 

120 

1,320 

800 

650 

416,002 

217,785 

8,070 

8,393 

579 

3,330 

60 


3,861 

5,631 

106 


Bluefish . . 


72,725 
1,650 


5,122 
106 


Bonito 














Bullheads 


60 


3 






1,500 


75 


126 


Carp, American . . . 










24 


Carp, German 














90 


5 


370 


Catfish 






6,850 


412 






412 


Eels 










100 


9 


9 


Flounders 






700 

27,050 

149,000 

500 


39 

2,374 

560 

35 






39 


Mackerel 














2, 374 
















560 


Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 


5,115 


339 


150 


12 


3,805 


234 


939 
6 


Pickerel. . 














120 


8 


8 


Pike 






1,320 
800 
650 


132 
46 
48 






132 


Scup 














46 


Sea bass 














48 


Shad . . . 


29, 250 


2,306 


93,050 


6,548 


66,620 


4,939 


30,610 




202, 285 


8,223 


8,863 


Striped bass 

Sturgeon 


3,084 
200 


388 
8 






3,596 
345 


452 
21 


1,019 






3,885 
394 


264 
242 


545 








377 


Suckers 










600 
60 


24 
4 


152 


Sunfish 














4 
















Total . . . 


40,629 


3,133 463,,')30 


17,097 


201,259 


8,783 '85,186 


5,942 


1,150,627 


56, 261 






Grand total 


40,629 


3,133 


2,699,010 


31,799 


201,259 


8,783 


85, 186 


5,942 


3,786,531 


93,553 



B'ISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



25 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Fyke-net Fisheries op New 

York in 1904. 



Species. 


Albany. 


Columbia. 


Dutchess. 


Greene. 


Kings. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 


30 

4,689 


$1 
235 






35 

22,610 

550 

3,675 

1,830 

380 

4,400 

50 


$1 
1,095 
24 
187 
164 
23 
285 
4 










Bullheads 


17,398 

490 

1,325 

938 

1,000 

5,634 


$870 
25 
65 
88 
73 
359 


5,332 


$266 






Carp, American 






Carp, German 


5,940 
585 


335 
55 


700 
260 


36 
24 






Eels 

Perch, white 


950 


$95 


Perch, yellow 


864 
95 


72 
9 


2,567 
20 


191 
2 






Pickerel 






Shad 






7,820 


540 


Striped bass 














40 

3,658 

263 


5 
161 

18 




Suckers 


9,845 
1,055 


494 
75 


6,912 
1,175 


289 
70 


4,450 
3,370 
4,100 


209 
188 
205 






Sunfish 






Tomcod 


250 


10 


















Total 


23,103 


1,276 


34,872 


1,839 


45,450 


2,385 1 12 840 


703 


9,020 


645 











Species. 


Orange. Putnam. 


Rensselaer. | Richmond. 


Rockland. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 










110 
4,040 
5,543 

674 


$3 










Bullheads 


12,525 

60 

1,158 

200 

1,970 


$632 

4 

96 

12 

127 


1,052 


$62 


218 . 

262 1. 
62 1. 






2,450 


$122 


Carp, German 








Eels 


10 


1 






1,320 


118 


Perch, white 








Perch, yellow 


100 


8 


595 
185 


36': 

17 . 






300 


18 


Pickerel 








Shad 










5,200 


$390 






Suckers 


2,190 

85 

42,870 


118 
5 


200 
25 


10 
2 


4,732 
355 


268 


1,400 


70 


Sunfish 


21 1. 








Tomcod 


721 




























Total 


61,058 


1,715 1,387 


83 


16,234 


887 


5,200 


390 


5,470 


328 






Species. 


Suffolk. 


Ulster. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries; 

Alewives 










1,700 
10,900 


$38 
545 


1,875 

101,456 

1,690 

21,685 

7,600 

12,541 

994, 150 

4,290 

20,013 

350 

13,020 

2,788 

38,470 

9,878 

23,300 

107,050 

605 

20,000 


$43 


Bullheads 






20,460 

650 

2,667 


$1,023 
31 
134 


5 068 


Carp, American . . . 






' 80 


Carp, German 

Catfish 


100 

7,600 

1,025 

994,150 

2,150 


$4 

441 

87 

35,353 

252 


1,675 


97 


1,124 
441 


Eels 


2,161 


195 


1,630 


114 


1 099 


Flounders 


35 353 


Perch, white.'. 

Perch, yellow 


410 
3,030 


30 
209 


150 
553 


12 
36 


402 
1 341 


Pickerel 






32 


Shad 














930 


Striped bass 


80 


12 






2,668 

1,883 

250 


303 

88 
16 


320 


Suckers 


3,200 
3,300 


138 
236 


1 845 


Sunfish 






631 


Tautog 


23,300 

59,330 

455 

20,000 


710 

1,780 

455 

200 


710 


Tomcod 


500 


20 






2 736 


Terrapin 


150 


250 


705 


Crabs, hard 






200 














Total 


1,108,190 


39 294 


36 .^78 


5> mfi 


21,559 


1 dOQ 


1 38(1 7fii 


53 060 


























1 





26 



. FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Pot Fisheries of New York 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Kings. 


Nassau. , 


New York. 


Queens. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Eels 


34,950 
7,045 


$2,850 
986 
















7,500 


$975 


47, 108 


$6, 473 












Total 


41,995 


3,836 


7,500 


975 


47, 108 


6,473 








30,350 




Shore fisheries: 
Eels 


41,510 
2,100 
24,520 


3,538 

64 

•1,760 


72,670 


5,523 






$2,557 






































Total 


68, 130 


5,362 


72,670 


5,523 






30,350 


2,557 












110, 125 


9,198 


80, 170 


6,498 


47, 108 


6,473 


30,350 


2,557 









Richmond. 


Suffolk. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Eels - . . .. 






7,000 
16, 200 


$560 
1,930 






41,950 
100,353 


$3,410 




22,500 


$2,560 






12,924 








Total 


22,500 


2,560 


23,200 


2,490 


1 


142,303 


16,334 








Shore fisheries: 

Eels 


3,000 


270 


248,095 


17,181 


14,800 
7,300 


$1,390 
514 


410,425 
7,300 
4,940 

126,630 


30, 459 




514 




2,840 
32,960 


80 
3,340 






144 




64,500 


7,730 


4,650 


930 


13,760 






Total 


38,800 


3,090 


312,595 


24,911 


26, 750 


2,834 


549,295 


44,877 








61,300 


6,250 


335,795 


27,401 


26,750 


2,834 


691,598 


61,211 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of Fish by Spears in New York 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Kings. 


Nassau. 


Queens. 


Suffolk. 


Westchester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Eels 


17,210 
3,400 


$1,791 
170 


47,700 
4,950 


$3,715 
198 


10,500 


$940 


90, 260 


$6,219 


5,100 


$537 


170, 770 


$13,202 






8,350 368 
















Total 


20,610 


1,961 


52,650 


3,913 


10,500l 940 


90, 260 


6,219 


5,100 


537 


179,120 13,570 













FISHERIES OB' THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 27 

NOTES AND DETAILED STATISTICS OF PRINCIPAL FISHERIES. 

Oyster. — The increase in the value of the products from $3,894,270 
in 1901 to $6,230,558 in 1904 is due principally to the extension and 
success of oyster culture. In 1904, 2,847,702 bushels of market oys- 
ters- were taken from the private areas and only 20,805 bushels from 
the natural reefs, a remarkable exhibition of the development of the 
cultivated grounds. As regards the value of the output. New York 
is now the foremost American state in oyster culture. The recent 
growth of this industry has been especially extensive at the east- 
ern end of Long Island. Previous to 1900, oysters shipped from 
that region were planted elsewhere before marketing, but in recent 
years they have been permitted to remain until large enough for 
market. -Of the market oysters credited to the private areas of the 
state, 378,410 bushels, worth $404,135, and of the seed oysters 
46,150 bushels, worth $39,670, were taken up by vessels owned in 
Connecticut and elsewhere outside of New York. 

Clam and scallop. — The quantity of clams and scallops produced in 
1904 shows less change from that in 1901. The yield of hard clams 
on the public beds decreased from 175,536 bushels, worth $232,121, 
in 1901 to 119,637 bushels, worth $199,851, in 1904, but partial com- 
pensation for this is found in an increase on the private areas in the 
same period from 9,260 bushels, worth $25,565, to 47,365 bushels, 
worth $103,748. The cultivation of hard clams has made greater 
progress in this state than anywhere else in the United States. 
Little change occurred in the yield of soft clams, which amounted 
to 74,093 bushels in 1904, but there has been a steady increase in 
the market value. The price was 76 cents a bushel in 1901 and 88 
cents in 1904. The yield of scallops decreased from 184,954 bushels 
in 1901 to 148,799 bushels in 1904, but the price increased from 
53 cents to 98 cents a bushel. The scallop fishery is prosecuted 
principally in Peconic Bay, at the eastern end of Long Island, where 
the output has a much greater value than the combined yield of all 
other parts of the country. 

Menhaden. — As regards the weight of products the menhaden is 
by far the most prominent of all species of fish credited to New 
York; the yield in 1904 amounted to 216,399,600 pounds. The 
total value of the large catch, however, was only $693,929. This fish 
is used almost entirely in the manufacture of oil and fertilizer. 



28 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

The Menhaden Industry of New York in 1904. 



^ 


Items. 


No. 


Value. 


Factories 


2 


$400,600 


Cash capital. . 


180,000 


Persons in factories .. . 


218 

797 

184,208,000 

12, 138 

1,155,539 

o33 

2,866 






Menhaden received . 


362, 162 




274, 720 




237, 149 


Steam vessels fishing 


413, 100 




Outfit 


141,423 


Seines 


66 
3 

74 


33,900 




6,300 


Tonnage 


Outfit 


2,295 




3 


1,150 







a These vessels also supplied menhaden to factories in Rhode Island, Delaware, and Virginia. 

Bluefish. — Of the food fish, the bhiefish is the most important, 
the catch in 1904 amounting to 11,413,786 pounds, worth $556,527. 
In 1901 the yield of this species was 9,350,502 pounds, worth $473,- 
366. Most of the catch is taken by vessels sailino; from Fulton Fish 
Market, New York City. 

Squeteague. — The yield of squeteague, or weakfish, shows an 
increase from 2,346,683 pounds in 1901 to 6,339,600 pounds in 1904, 
which is the greatest percentage of increase among the prominent 
species. The squeteague were taken principally in the pound-net 
fisheries of Suffolk County, and by seines carried on the market 
fleet sailing from New York City. The yield by pound nets increased 
between 1901 and 1904 from 1,671,241 pounds to 3,730,690 pounds, and 
by vessels from 24,000 pounds to 1 ,761,375 pounds. This large increase 
in the vessel catch is due to the introduction of purse seines in that 
fishery, to which cause should also be credited the increase in the 
catch of scup from 804,589 pounds to 1,493,828 pounds. 

Shad. — The shad fishery, prosecuted almost entirely in the Hudson 
River and the waters at its mouth, shows a remarkable falling off, 
the yield decreasing from 3,432,472 pounds in 1901 to 498,119 pounds 
in 1904. Nearly all other species of fish taken in those waters also 
show a considerable decrease in the yield. It should be noted that 
the shad returns for 1901 were unusually large, being greater than 
for any other year since 1888; but the normal catch for the Hudson 
in recent years has approximated 2,000,000 pounds, so that the yield 
in 1904 is only about 25 per cent of the average. The price received 
by the fishermen averaged nearly 30 cents per fish, whereas formerly 
it was less than half of that amount. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 29 

The Shad Catch of New York in 1904. 



Counties. 


No. of 
fish. 


Value. 




74 

5,298 

35,211 

1,600 

4, 315 

710 

5,461 

375 

428 

15,710 

7,699 

3,171 

27,460 

17,018 


$29 




1,595 




9,835 




440 




1,384 




260 




1,538 




110 


Rensselaer 


135 




5,051 
2,434 
1,235 


Rockland. . 


- 


Sufiolk 


lister .. 


7,738 




5,042 










a 124, 530 


36,826 





a 498,119 pounds. , 

Sturgeon. — The sturgeon fishery, which yielded $46,573 worth of 
products in 1898, has become ahnost extinct, the vakie of the output 
in 1904 amounting to only $1,010. The fishery for this species on 
the south side of Long Island, which originated in 1892, and which 
in 1898 employed 187 men and yielded $43,864, was not prosecuted 
in 1904, owing to its unprofitableness in the last few years. 



WHOLESALE TRADE. 

Number op Persons Employed and Capital Invested in the New York City 
Wholesale Fishery Trade in 1904. 



lirancnes oi traae. 



Fresh-fish t radc 

Salted and prepared fish 
Oyster and clam trade. . 

Sponge trade 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



No. of 


No. of 


firms. 


persons. 


55 


638 


44 


574 


31 


488 


17 


208 


12 


94 


159 


2,002 



Value of 

shore 
property. 



$1,145,500 

1,040,700 

269, 950 

730, 100 

293, 750 



3,480,000 



Amount 
of cash 
capital. 



$952, 500 
995,000 
435, 500 
6.50, 000 
362, 500 



3, 395, 500 



FISHERIES OF NEW JERSEY. 
GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

The excellent shipping facilities in the state and the proximity to 
the large markets of New York and Philadelphia give great impor- 
tance to the fishing industries of New Jersey. Since 1901, however, 
owing to a falling ofi" in the catch of oysters, clams, shad, and bluefish. 
New York and Virginia have superseded New Jersey in rank for 
value of fishery products, and the latter now stands third among 
the Middle Atlantic States. 

The fisheries and wholesale trade in 1904 employed 9,094 persons. 
Of these 1,913 were on fishing vessels, 150 on transporting vessels, 



30 



FISHERIES OB' THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



6,230 in the shore or boat fisheries, and 801 in menhaden factories 
and other shore work. These figures represent a decrease since 1901 
of 2,936 persons, or 24 per cent, apparent mainly in the shore and 
boat fisheries. 

The total investment in the fisheries and wholesale trade in 1904 
was S2, 685, 796, which is a decrease since 1901 of $43,775, or less than 
2 per cent. Of this investment $232,050 represents the cash capital, 
$905,620 is credited to shore and accessory property, $693,441 
represents the value of 366 fishing and 68 transporting vessels with 
their outfits, $441,989 the value of 5,172 boats under 5 tons, and 
the remainder, $412,696, the value of the apparatus used. 

The total catch in 1904 was 90,108,068 pounds, valued at $3,385,415, 
a decrease since 1901 of 23 per cent in weight and 28 per cent in 
value. Of this 40,811,065 pounds, valued at $1,458,631, were taken 
in the vessel fisheries, and 49,297,003 pounds, valued at $1,926,784, 
in the shore fisheries. Except in Cumberland County, which has 
very valuable oyster fisheries, shad is the principal product of the 
region bordering Delaware River and Bay. 

The following tables give in condensed form the number of per- 
sons employed, the amount of capital invested, and the quantity 
and value of the products of the fisheries of New Jersey in 1904: 



Number of Persons Employed in the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904. 



How engaged. 


No. 


On vessels fishing . . 


1 913 


On vessels transporting 


150 


In shore or boat fisheries 


230 


Shoresmen 


801 








Total 


9,094 





Investment in the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904. 



Items. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats, sail and row 

Boats, gasoline 

Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Seins 

Gill nets 

Fyke nets 

Lines, hand and trawl 

Eel pots 

Loiister pots 

Harpoons 

Oral) and mussel dredges. 

Oyster dredges 

Tongs and rakes 



No. 



366 
4,361 



68 

775 



4,467 
705 

a 12 
6 64 
100 



55 
580 



132 
580 
217 



Value. 



$495, 025 



125, 461 
65, 550 



7,405 
219,239 
222, 750 

7,120 

1,314 

250 

1,140 

55 

580 

35 

658 

36,397 

2,047 



Items. 



No. 



Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Seins I c 270 

Gill nets d2,548 

Pound nets 225 

Bag nets i 76 

Fyke nets I 1,862 

Stop nets I « 56 

Lines, hand and trawl I 

Eel pots I 3,224 

Lobster pots i 731 

Oyster tongs, rakes, and | 

dredges I 1,403 

Clam tongs, rakes, hoes, etc.l 2.856 
Minor apparatus ' 

Shore and accessory property 

Cash capital 



Value. 



$23, 708 

91,082 

192, 617 

1,250 

15, 081 

5,992 

4,165 

4,440 

913 

/6,982 

14,812 

1,158 

905, 620 

232, 050 



Total 2, 6&5, 



5,130 yards in length. 
6 5,765 yards in length. 
c 48,476 yards in length. 



d 564,170 yards in length. 
« 40,270 yards in length. 
/Includes value of patent winders. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Products of the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904. 



31 



Species. 



Albacore 

Alewives, fresh . . 
Alewives, salted. 

Blueflsh 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Catfish 

Cero 

Cod 

Crevalle 

Croalcer 

Drum 

Eels, fresh 

Eels, smolced 

Flounders 

German carp 

Haddock 

Halie 

Hickory shad 

Horse mackerel. . 

Kingfish 

Mackerel 

Menhaden 

Mullet, fresh 

Mullet, salted 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike and pickerel 

Pollock 

Round herring... 
Salmon, Atlantic 

Scup 

Sea bass 

Sea robbins 

Shad 

Sharks 



Lbs. 


Value. 


30,970 


S450 


896, 445 


8,165 


96,000 


1,500 


2, 72S, 390 


120,085 


597, 501 


24, 499 


1,357,080 


39,631 


112,440 


8,418 


5,431 


262 


1,261,855 


53, 789 


1,420 


30 


342,341 


7,066 


226, 110 


1,452 


407,284 


25,920 


325 


80 


1,052,239 


37,563 


468,300 


35,373 


140,600 


6,318 


389,850 


10, 550 


14,270 


310 


12,805 


187 


20, 826 


2,587 


113,743 


7,445 


37.609,805 


109,090 


54,000 


2,050 


3,000 


45 


253,350 


19, 620 


600 


35 


600 


55 


10,234 


246 


132, 250 


2,061 


36 


18 


1,054,682 


32,067 


2,572,046 


97,903 


37,200 


348 


4,337,907 


238,517 


20,575 


411 



Species. 



Sheepshead 

Skates 

Smelt 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Sturgeon caviar 

Suckers 

S wordfish 

Tautog 

Tomcod 

Whiting, or silver hake 

Other fish 

Clams, hard 

Clams, soft 

Clams, surf 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

King crabs 

Lobsters 

Mussels 

Oysters, market, natural 

rock 

Oysters, market, private 

beds 

Oysters, seed, natural rock. 
Oysters, seed, private beds. 

Porpoise 

Shrimp 

Squid 

Terrapin 

Turtles 

Total 



1,706 

10,925 

8,780 

7,525 

35,900 

10,699,301 

66, 012 

227, 520 

8,432 

46,500 

8,000 

145, 475 

6,985 

676, 595 

660 

o2, 165, 888 

b 973, 150 

c 67, 200 

d 224, 499 

e 125, 567 

/1, 638, 000 

141,340 

!7l,392,750 

h 234,220 

8,930,054 
;■ 5, 772, 515 
*9,100 
500 
4,949 
80,909 
4,700 
34, 901 



90,108,068 



Value. 



$213 

165 

1,599 

1,500 

1,560 

253, 200 

9,535 

12, 622 

7,115 

3,308 

580 

4,007 

347 

11,515 

14 

351,758 

70,450 

6,000 

8,658 

19,600 

6,518 

18, 269 

2,115 

24, 305 

1,274,203 

392,925 

520 

2 

1,425 

2,064 

4,450 

727 



3,385,415 



270,736 bushels. 
6 97,315 bushels, 
c 8,400 bushels, 
d 673,497 in number. 



e 376,701 in number. 
/ 819,000 in number, 
ff 30,215 bushels. 
h 33,460 bushels. 



n, 275, 722 bushels. 
;' 824,645 bushels. 
* 1.300 bushels. 



Note.— Under sharks, above, is included 11,300 pounds of dogfish, valued at $147. 



THE FISHERIES BY COUNTIES. 

Cumberland County ranks first among the counties of this state in 
the value of its fisheries, which in 1904 amounted to $1,090,157. 
The oyster fishery, centering at Maurice River Cove, and the gill-net 
fishery for shad are the most important branches. 

Monmouth County owes its position of second place to its im- 
portant pound-net fisheries, which exceed in value those of any 
other county in the United States except Whatcom County, Wash. 
Its hard and soft clam fisheries also contribute largely to its output. 
The oyster fisheries are valuable, but their decline in recent years 
has been very marked. 

Ocean County is third in importance. It outranks Monmouth in 
the value of its oyster fisheries, but its clam fisheries, though very valu- 
able, are far less so than those in Monmouth County. The difference 
is especially noticeable in the soft clam industry, which is prosecuted 
at only one town in Ocean County. This county has important pound- 
net and fyke-net fisheries, the latter apparatus being set mainly for 
flounders. 

14008—07 3 



32 FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Except an unimportant gill-net fishery for shad and alewives, the 
fisheries of Camden County are directed enthely to oysters, which 
are not taken in the waters of the county, but in Maurice River 
Cove by vessels owned in Camden. 

Atlantic County has valuable oyster and clam fisheries. The 
oysters are taken chiefly from private beds within the waters of the 
county, but a few vessels also work in Maurice River Cove. The clam 
fishery gives employment to more men than any other fishery. The 
net and line fisheries center at Atlantic City, though there are some 
quite important net fisheries on the Great Egg Harbor River. Im- 
portant seine fisheries are prosecuted back of Atlantic City in what is 
known as the "Thoroughfare," but most of the hand-line and all of 
the trawl-line fishing is carried on in the ocean. Notwithstanding 
its important fisheries, Atlantic City received very liea\^" shipments 
of fish from Seabright and other northern points during the summer 
season. 

About half of the value of the catch in Cape May County is credited 
to lines. This county also has quite important pound-net and seine 
fisheries. The remainder of the catch consists mostly of oysters 
from private beds, and clams. 

Salem County leads all others in the yield of shad, which are 
taken in the Delaware River with drift gill nets. This county also 
leads in the catch of carp and sturgeon. Comparatively few other 
species are taken in any considerable quantities. 

Middlesex County depends mainly upon its oyster and clam fish- 
eries, both of which have been declining during recent years. A 
few smelt are taken in the Raritan River at New Brunswick during 
the spring. 

Aside from the catch of oysters, clams, and shad, the fisheries of 
Burlington County are not ver^^ important. The catch of white perch 
and striped bass has been quite large, but recently there has been a 
very marked falling off, especially in striped bass. 

Practically the entire catch of Gloucester County consists of shad 
and carp. This county ranks second, or next to Salem County, in 
the catch of these two species. 

Hudson County ranks second to Monmouth County in the value of 
its lobster catch. A few oysters are taken in New York Bay off Jer- 
se}^ City, and shad are taken in New York Bay and the Hudson and 
Hackensack rivers. The remainder of the catch consists chiefly 
of carp. 

The catch in Bergen County consists of shad, carp, catfish, eels, 
suckers, striped bass, and smelt, in the order of their importance. 
The fishing is done in the Hudson and Hackensack rivers, the shad 
being taken mostly in the former and the other species in the latter. 
About two-thirds of the shad catch in the Hudson is taken by men 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



33 



from Monmouth and Ocean counties, who move up on the Hudson 
River during the shad season. 

With the exception of Union County, which has an oyster fishery 
at Elizabethport, the remaining counties of the state depend ahnost 
entirely for their products upon shad taken in the Delaware River. 
Essex County has no fisheries, but supports a wholesale fish trade at 
Newark, 

The following tables give the extent of the fisheries by counties: 

Statement, by Counties, op the Number of Persons Engaged in the Fish- 
eries OF New Jersey in 1904. 



Counties. 


On 
vessels 
fishing. 


On 
vessels 
trans- 
porting. 


In shore 
or boat 
fisheries. 


Shores- 
men. 


Total. 




122 


18 


699 
105 
368 
6 
459 
438 


28 

2 

6 

20 

6 

230 

24 

14 

14 


867 
107 


Bergen 


Burlington 




8 
3 
10 
13 


382 


Camden 


169 

41 

1,253 


198 


Cape May 




Cumberland •. 


1,934 
24 


Essex 


Gloucester 






221 

150 

41 

76 

194 

1,596 

1,135 

648 

4 

52 

38 


235 


Hudson 


7 




171 


Hunterdon 




41 


Mercer 








76 


Middlesex 


18 
151 


9 


2 
279 
176 


223 
2,094 
1,484 

648 


Monmouth 


Ocean 


152 21 


Salem 


Sussex 


i 




4 


Union 







52 


Warren 






38 










Total 


1,913 


150 


6,230 


801 


9,094 





Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, Shore Property, 
AND Cash Capital Employed in the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904. 



Items. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 


Burlington. 


Camden. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 


37 

285 


S29,800 










23 
358 


$63 650 


Tonnage 












Outfit 


8,830' 
5,900 










9 175 


Vessels transporting 


11 

84 






4 

44 


$4,250 


1 
10 

""2 

1 


1 400 


Tonnage 








Outfit 


790 
39, 157 
5,075 

810 
520 
267 

1,350 
300 

9,300 
600 






495 
19, 450 
2,690 


170 




854 
16 


62 

7 


$2,585 
1 ST."; 


267 
9 


100 
300 


Boats, gasoline 


Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Lines, hand and trawl 






Oyster dredges 


10 
50 

39 

61 

7 

20 










46 


3,837 


Tongs and rakes 


' 








Apparatus— shore fisheries: 

Seines 


4 
46 


690 
9,650 


16 
99 


3,278 
3,234 








4 


180 


Pound nets 


Bag nets 






56 

97 

3 


650 

123 

350 

1 






Fyke nets 












Stop nets 




9 


772 






Lines, hand and trawl 




551 
125 

1,170 

3,008 

54 

158, 125 

20,000 






Eel pots 


125 

234 
642 


200 


700 








Oyster tongs, rakes, and 
dredges 


60 

84 


300 
456 






Clam tongs, rakes, hoes, etc... 










Minor apparatus 




450 
11,775 






Shore and accessory property 






4,805 




23,500 
12,000 


Cash capital 


















Total 




285,732 





28,497 




40,082 




114 312 









34 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, Shore Property, 
AND Cash Capital Employed in the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904 — Con. 



Items. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Essex. 


Gloucester. 


Hudson. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 


6 
81 


$20,000 

is,' 955" 
2,550 

""346' 
5,361 
18,925 

400 
200 
330 


231 

2,628 

""4 

95 

' '245' 
73 

1 


$238,725 










3 
23 


$1,700 


Tonnage 










Outfit 


58,691 
3,200 










855 


Vessels transporting 


2 
15 














Tonnage 














Outfit 


730 
13,092 
22,300 

500 














Boats, sail and row 


269 
66 

1 
5 






72 
53 


$4,935 
19,850 


82 
5 


3,950 
1 350 


Boats, gasoline 






Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Seines 








Gill nets , 














Lines, hand and trawl 


















Eel pots 
















55 
290 


55 


Lobster pots 


















290 


Oyster dredges 






460 

7 
118 


31,367 

155 
13,916 












Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Seines 


16 
68 
122 
32 


480 

3,015 

19,277 

612 






3 
56 


4,300 
7,255 






Gill nets 






3 


675 


Pound nets 








Fyke nets 


203 

7 

'"'28' 


188 

805 

11 

30 










193 
9 


4 115 


Stop nets 






12 


2,360 


545 


Lines, hand and trawl 




280 
40 








Eel pots 


40 










34 
100 

110 


65 


Lobster pots 










100 


Oyster tongs, rakes, and 
dredges 


77 
241 


130 

1,260 

15 

26,525 

10,000 


218 
3 


1,491 
1 










550 


Clam tongs, rakes, hoes, etc . . . 












Minor apparatus 








56 
9,150 






Shore and accessory property 






122,055 
100,400 




$27,200 
11,000 






26 105 


Cash capital 




25 000 














Total . . 




123, 695 




607,657 




38,200 




47,906 




65,355 







Items. 


Hunterdon. 


Mercer. 


Middlesex. 


Monmouth. 


Ocean. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 












9 
66 


$4,350 

""i,"525" 
4,200 

'""'4i6' 
7,050 
3,800 


50 
554 

"""33' 

365 

"gis" 

256 

5 

59 

100 

290 


835,800 


7 

366 

...... 

114 

i,"i47" 
26 

5 


$101,000 


Tonnage 










Outfit r 










9,590 
33,950 


22,840 
10 100 


Vessels transporting 










2 

48 


Tonnage 












Outfit 










3,450 
35,885 
79,835 

2,220 

1,114 

250 

290 

35 

658 

638 

1,370 

3,030 
8,370 
143,480 
4,540 
2,662 
1,844 
755 

421 

5,062 

252 

313,485 

27,650 


1,020 


Boats, sail and row 


8 


$330 


28 


$915 


119 
12 


65,515 
6,800 

4,000 


Boats, gasoline 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 










Gill nets 














Fyke nets 




































Harpoons 


















Crab and mussel dredges 














132 
02 
130 

50 
610 

85 
367 






Oyster dredges 















2 
1 

75 

1,161 

11 

956 

i,'346" 
14 

401 
796 


35 


Tongs and rakes 










36 
16 


405 
1,945 


5 


Apparatus— shore fisheries: 

Seines 


7 


810 


7 
16 


1,955 
352 


3,838 
8,770 


Gill nets 


Pound nets 










20, 560 


Fyke nets 










14 


380 


6,023 
658 


Lines, hand and trawl 










Eel pots 










111 
17 

119 
36 


111 
30 

415 
253 


1,152 
600 

84 
1,054 


1 320 


Lobster pots 










28 


Oyster tongs, rakes, and 










2,005 

4,772 
236 












Minor apparatus 


















5,000 




1,170 




175, 475 


Cash capital ". 








26,000 




















Total 




1,140 




8,222 




26,044 




716,636 




461,000 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



35 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, Shore Property, 
AND Cash Capital Employed in the Fisheries of New Jersey in 1904 — Con. 





Salem. 


Sussex. 


Union. 


Warren. 


Total. 


Items. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 




















366 
4,361 


$495,025 






















Outfit 


















125,461 
65,550 




















68 
775 




















Outfit 


















7,405 
219,239 




361 
180 


$18,928 
59,750 


1 


$10 


25 
1 


$1,875 
200 


1 


$101 


4,467 
705 

a 12 
b64 
100 




222, 750 


Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 










7,120 


Gill nets 


















1,314 




















250 


Lines, hand and trawl 


















1,140 


Eel pots . . 


















55 
580 


55 




















580 




















35 


Crab and mussel dredges 


















132 
580 
217 

C270 

<i2,548 

225 

76 

1,862 

e56 


658 




















36, 397 




















2,047 


Apparatus— shore fisheries: 


22 
305 


1,675 
35, 365 


1 


12 






7 


190 


23, 708 


Gill nets 






91,082 


Pound nets 














192,617 


Bag nets 


















1,250 


Fylie nets 


















15,981 




16 


1,160 

2 

205 














5,992 


Lines, hand and trawl 














4,165 


Eel pots 


194 














3,224 
731 

1,403 
2,856 


4,440 


Lobster pots 














913 


Oyster tongs, rakes, and 
dredges 










100 


600 






/6,982 


Clam tongs, rakes, hoes, etc 














14,812 


Minor apparatus 




95 
1,250 














1,158 


Shore and accessory property. . . 
















905, 620 


Cash capital 
















232,050 






















Total.. . ... 




118,430 





22 




2,575 




291 




2, 685, 796 









o 5,130 yards in length. 
t> 5,765 yards in length. 



c 48,476 yards in length. 
d 564,170 yards in length. 



« 40,270 yards in length. 

/ Includes value of patent winders. 



36 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Products of the Fisheries of New Jersey 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 1 Burlington. 


Camden. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Albaeore 


2,500 
18,200 


$30 
241 














Alewives, fresh . 






160,000 
96,000 


$425 
1,500 


8,000 


$100 


Alewi ves, salted 








Bluefish 


44, 775 
3,025 
13,500 


2,535 
183 
500 










Bonito 




j 








Butterfish 




[ 








Carp, German 


57,500 
42,850 


$5, 790 27, 600 
4,260 21,150 


1,960 
1,581 






Catfish 


400 

225 

623,400 

100 

72,700 

27, 550 

55,925 

70,900 

11,250 

100 

10, 265 

3,000 

34,350 

250 

350 

5,625 


20 

22 

23,860 

2 

1,520 

1,350 

2,720 

2,975 

315 

2 

565 

375 

1,905 

25 

7 

63 






Cero 






Cod 




1 








Crevalle 




1 








Croaker 












Eels, fresh 


42,000 


2,800 










Flounders 


2,600 


100 






Haddock . . 






















Hickory shad 




1 








Kingfish 

Mackerel 




1 


















Perch, white 






35,200 
50 


2,300 
5 






Pike and pickerel 










Pollock.. 














i 








Salmon, Atlantic 






12 


3 








119,300 

143,800 

100 

6,080 

1,425 

300 


3,840 

7,425 

3 

710 

160 

9 














1 1 




Sea robins 




1 1 1 




Shad 


201,800 


17,758 341,866 18,463 


14, 400 


980 


Sheepshead 




Skates 










Smelt 


1,500 


270 










Spanish mackerel 


700 

2,000 

610, 100 

1,810 

2,000 

100 

1,400 

2,000 

1,000 

100 

438,248 

64,800 

41,000 

1,500 

1,368,050 

478, 275 

140,420 

7,000 

3,712 

1,000 

3,000 

300 


100 

105 

20, 495 

340 










Spot 














Squeteague 






20,200 

8,890 

300 


630 

938 

38 








7,800 


780 






Sturgeon .... 


105 
70 








Caviar and sturgeon eggs 










Suckers 


55 

90 

12 

2 

75,002 

5,900 

1,340 

300 

1,415 

66,225 

8,395 

400 

700 

13 

3,300 

5 


16. 100 


1,588 


8,S00 


626 






Tautog 








Whiting 














Other flsh 














Clams, hard 






75,200 


12,500 






Clams, surf . ... 
























Crabs, soft 














Mussels 


















143, 500 

28,eoo 


17,125 1,446.984 
1,500 1 563,500 


206, 712 


Oysters, seed, natural rock 

Oysters, seed, private beds 






42,175 








Shrimp 












Squid 












Terrapin 












Turtles 














1 








Total 


4,437,910 


235,731 


369,550 


33,246 


969,302 


59,694 2.032.884 


249,967 











FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



37 



^1. THP Products of the Fisheries op New Jersey 
Statement, by Counties, of ™^ J^S-CoSinued. 




Albacore 

Alewives, fresh 

Blueflsh 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Carp, German 

Catfish 

Cero 

Cod 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels, fresh 

Flounders 

Haddock 

Hake 

Kingflsh 

Mackerel 

Menhaden 

Mullet, fresh 

Mullet, salted 

Perch, white 

Perch, yeDow 

Pike and pickerel . . 

Scup 

Sea bass 

Shad 

Sheepshead 

Skates 

Smelt 

Spot 

Squeteague 
Striped hass 
Sturgeon... 

Caviar and sturgeon eggs 
Suckers 
Tautog 
Whiting 
Clams, hard 
Crabs, hard 

King crabs 

Oysters, market, private beds 
Oysters, seed, natural rock 

Squid 

Terrapin 

Turtles 



Total 



Alewives, fresh... 

Blueflsh 

Carp, German. 

Catfish 

Eels, fresh 

Flounders 

Menhaden 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Salmon, Atlantic. 

Shad 

Smelt 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon eggs. . . 

Suckers 

Tomcod 

Clams, hard 

Clams, soft 

Lobsters • ■ - 

Oysters, market, natural rock. 
Oysters, market, private beds. 
Oysters, seed, natural rock 



Total. 



150,500 



i^:iiriM^l 37,000 I 2,865 I 257,720 13,100 | 678,762 



69, 125 



38 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Products of the Fisheries op New Jersey 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Moimiquth. 


Ocean. 


Salem. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Albacore 


13,895 

247, 645 

2,248,805 

486, 626 

677,980 


$210 

2,724 

90,685 

19,992 

23, 411 


11,575 
278,800 
105, 610 
104, 350 
433,400 


$150 
2,523 
5,368 
4,149 
12,940 




Alewi ves, fresh 


6,000 


$120 


Blueflsh 




Bonito 




Butterflsh 


] 


Carp, German 


193,000 
20,800 


12, 440 


Catfish 






2,750 
2,675 

45,100 
400 

97,300 


110 
115 

1,590 
10 

1,250 


842 


Cero 


2,031 

141,555 

920 

158,341 

11,300 

202, 560 

140, 584 

325 

527, 799 

7,720 

197, 400 

9,770 

5,855 

5,401 

75, 628 

18,488,425 

21,000 

2,800 


100 

5,763 

18 

3,831 

147 

1,337 

8,477 

80 

16,907 

303 

2,432 

230 

87 

877 

3,852 

60,366 

585 

229 




Cod 






Crevalle 


1 


Croaker 






Dogfish 






Drum 


12,000 
94,380 


39 
4,805 






Eels, fresh 


11,000 


690 


Eels, smoked 





Flounders 


375,815 
5,380 
32,900 
4,400 
6,950 
1,160 
1,115 
15,325,550 
6,000 

168,000 

200 

2,100 

1,500 

182, 500 

390,000 
6,100 
6,470 


14, 738 

210 

559 

78 

100 

187 

78 

38, 470 

115 

14,469 

20 

43 

45 

5,715 

13, 625 

120 

595 




Haddock 


j 


Hake 






Hickory shad 






Horse mackerel 






fvingfish 






Mackerel 






Menhaden .• 






Mallet, fresh 






i^erch, white 


2,000 


160 


Pike and pickerel 




Pollock 


7,784 

125, 125 

442, 382 

1,085,446 

31,000 

94,500 

9,275 

72 

2,12o 

1,650 

6,050 

7,600 

7,423,751 

12, 735 

11,695 

1,226 

14,700 

8,000 

142,700 

2,000 

588,270 

560 

847,600 

958, 700 

2,400 

178, 866 

101,834 

14,000 

&5,240 

24,700 

30,975 

434, 924 

24,500 


196 

1,953 

11,722 

30,913 

225 

8, 591 

264 

15 

16 

162 

1,235 

170 

177,107 

2,160 

865 

1,006 

580 

580 

3,900 

100 

9,868 

12 

143, 735 

67,950 

100 

7,110 

15,800 

75 

10,214 

700 

3,520 

04, 638 

1,700 






Round herring 






Scup 






Sea bass 






Sea robins. .. 






Shad 


2,053,248 


99, 712 


Sharks 




Sheepshead 


9 

2,500 

30 

775 

1,800 

1,723,350 

12,077 

1,900 

. 75 

1,200 


2 

20 

5 

165 

45 

40, 621 

2,593 

103 

48 

60 






Skates 






Smelt 






Spanish mackerel 






Spot 






Squeteague 


6,000 

13,200 

158, 600 

4,400 


480 


Striped bass 


1,645 


Sturgeon. . . . 


7,660 


Caviar and sturgeon eggs 

Suckers 


3,740 


Swordfish. . . . 






Tautog 


575 

335 

84, 125 


11 

10 

1,541 






Tomcod 






Whiting 






Other fish 






Clams, hard 


509,200 
10,700 


79,357 
1,600 






Clams, soft 






Clams, surf. . . 






Crabs, hard 


4,033 
22,233 


133 
3,500 






Crabs, soft 






King crabs 






Lobsters 


300 


40 






Mussels 






Oysters, market, natural rock... 


115,745 

835, 737 

56,945 

2,100 

1,237 

500 

11,700 

2,300 


13,285 

116,501 

3,150 

120 

725 

2 

. 204 

51 






Oysters, market, private beds. . . 
Oysters, seed, natural rock 
















Shrimp 










Porpoise 










Squid 


32,709 
28,201 


682 
593 






Turtles 












Total 


36, 437, 660 


811,100 


21,105,961 


386, 108 


2, 468, 248 


127, 489 







FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



39 



Statement, by Counties, of the Products op the Fisheries op New Jersey 

IN 1904 — Continued. 





Sussex. 


Union. 


Warren. Total. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 
















30,970 

896, 445 

96,000 

2, 723. 390 

597, 501 

1,357,080 

468, 300 

112, 440 

5,431 

1,261,855 

1,420 

342, 341 

11,300 

226, 110 

407, 284 

325 

1,052,239 

140,600 


$450 
















8,165 
















1,500 


Blueflsh 


:::::::.::;:;;; 








120, 085 














24, 499 














39,631 


Carp, German 








1,000 


$50 


35, 373 


Catfish i 








8,418 


Cero . . 












262 


Cod -.'- 












53, 789 














30 














7,066 


Doeflsh 1 












147 


DrutQ 












1,452 


Eels, fresh ' 












25,920 














80 














37, 563 














6,318 














389,850 


10,550 


Hickory shad ... . . .1 












14, 270 

12,805 

20, 826 

113, 743 

37,609,805 

54,000 

3,000 

253, 350 

600 

600 

10,234 

132,250 

36 

1,054,682 

2,572,046 

37,200 

4,337,907 

9,275 

1,706 

10,925 

8,780 

7,525 

35,900 

10,699,301 

66, 012 

227,520 

8,432 

46,500 

8,000 

145, 475 

6,985 

676, 595 

660 

02,165,888 

6 973,150 

c 67, 200 

d 224, 499 

e 125, 567 

n, 638, 000 

141,340 

(71,392,750 

h 234, 220 

i8, 930, 054 

y5, 772, 515 

*9,100 

500 

4,949 

80,909 

4,700 

34,901 


310 








1 




187 


Kingfish 1 






1 




2,587 














7,446 














109,090 














2,050 












. 


45 














19, 620 


Perch, yellow 












35 














65 


Pollock 












246 


Round herring 












2,061 














18 


Scup 












32,067 


Sea bass 1 












97,903 
















348 


Shad . 


450 


$25 






11,220 


910 


238, 517 


Sharks .... 






264 
















213 
















165 


Smelt. 








1 




1,599 










1 




1,500 


Spot 1 


1 






1,560 


Squeteague . . . i 








253,200 


Striped bass 




. 






9,535 










1 




12, 622 














7,115 


Suckers 










2,600 


256 


3,308 


Swordflsb .... 




1 




580 


Tautog 










4,007 


Tomcod 










347 














11,515 














14 














351,768 


Clams, soft 












70,460 






1 








6,000 


Crabs, hard 




1 








8,658 


Crabs, soft 












19,600 


King crabs 1 




1 




6,518 


Lobsters 








1 




18,269 














2,115 


Oysters, market, natural rock. . . 














24,306 


Oysters, market, private beds. 














1,274,203 


Oysters, seed, natural rock 






66,500 


86,250 






392,926 


Oysters, seed, private beds 










520 


Porpoise 














2 


Shrimp 












1,425 














2,064 


Terrapin 














4,450 


Turtles 














727 


















Total 


450 


25 


66,500 


6,250 


14,820 


1,216 


90,108,068 


3,385,415 







a 270,736 bushels. 
6 97,315 bushels, 
c 8,400 bushels. 
d 673,497 in number. 



e 376,701 in number. 
/ 819,000 in number. 
4^30,215 bushels, 
ft 33,460 bushels. 



»■ 1,275,722 bushels. 
;■ 824,645 bushels. 
i 1,300 bushels. 



40 FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

THE PRODUCTS BY APPARATUS. 

Dredges, tongs, rakes, etc. — The most productive forms of apparatus 
employed in the fisheries of New Jersey, as determined by the value of 
the catch, are dredges, tongs, rakes, etc., used in the capture of oysters, 
clams, mussels, and crabs, the yield being 19,657,210 pounds, valued 
at $2,126,576. 

Pound nets. — Next in importance were pound nets, the catch 
amounting to 26,850,091 pounds of fish of various species, valued at 
$421,691. Nets are set along the entire coast of New Jersey, but are 
most numerous off Monmouth County. The few in Delaware Bay are 
fished mostly for king crabs and squeteague, a separate crib being 
added for the latter species. Port Monmouth, in Monmouth County, 
is the most important pound-net center, being within convenient 
reach of New York City, the market for all of the catch except men- 
haden. Menhaden, however, constitute more than half of the pound- 
net and fyke-net catch at this place. They are sold chiefly to hand- 
line fishermen at Seabright and vicinity, for bait. 

There are several large cold-storage plants on this coast, some of 
them with a capacity of three-quarters of a million pounds, and valued 
at $30,000 to $40,000. These plants are the result of a demand for 
means of retaining the catch until the prevalence of higher prices 
than those obtainable during the season. They are in some cases 
owned by the fishermen, in others by stock companies. 

Lines. — The line catch in 1904 amounted to 6,735,630 pounds, 
valued at $287,461. The most important line fisheries are located at 
Seabright and Galilee, in Monmouth County, Atlantic City, in Atlantic 
County, and Holly Beach and Anglesea, in Cape May County. At 
Seabright and Galilee bluefish is the most important species taken. 
At Atlantic City there is a trawl-line fishery for cod and a hand-line 
fishery during the summer for squeteague, sea bass, bluefish, flounders, 
and other species. At Holly Beach and Anglesea hand lining, espe- 
cially for sea bass, is much more important than trawl-line fishing. 
The line fisheries of Ocean County are important in the aggregate, 
but there is no distinctive center, as in Monmouth, Cape May, and 
Atlantic counties. 

Gill nets. — The yield of this apparatus was 5,271,711 pounds, valued 
at $245,470. Gill nets are used mainly in the Delaware and Hudson 
rivers, shad being by far the most important species taken. The 
sturgeon gill-net fishery in the Delaware River is also important, 
though it has declined very noticeably during recent years. Salem 
County supports the most important gill-net fisheries in the state, 
shad constituting nine-tenths of the value of the catch, and the 
remainder being sturgeon with the resulting caviar. Some of the 
shad gill nets are more than 1,200 yards in length. In some localities 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



41 



gill nets are used in the ocean for taking bhiefish and squeteague, and 
gill netting for mackerel assumes some importance during the spring. 
In past years large catches of white perch and striped bass have 
been made with gill nets in Barnegat Bay, but the catch in 1904 was 
very light, and a decline has been noticeable for several years. In 
Cape May County gill nets are employed in taking menhaden, which 
are used as bait on hand lines. 

Seines. — The most important species taken in seines are menhaden, 
shad, squeteague, white perch, and striped bass. The seine catch for 
Ocean and Monmouth counties far exceeds in value that of all the 
other counties combined, a fact due to the large catch of menhaden 
for fertilizer factories located near Tuckerton, in Ocean County, and 
at Port Monmouth, in Monmouth County. Seines are used under the 
ice in Barnegat Bay for white perch and striped bass. Profitable 
catches have been made in the past, but the decrease in the abundance 
of these two species has had a depressing effect upon the fishery. The 
catch in 1904 was 29,969,443 pounds, valued at $176,551. 

Eel and lobster pots took 371,545 pounds, valued at $31,454; fyke 
nets, 535,998 pounds, valued at .$31,130; stop nets, 369,300 pounds, 
valued at $29,352; and bag nets and other forms of apparatus, 347,140 
pounds, valued at $35,730. 

The following tables give in detail the quantity and value of 
products taken in the vessel and shore fisheries by each form of 
apparatus : 

Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Dredges, Tongs, Rakes, etc., in 

New Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Buriington. 


Camden. 


Cape May. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


33,600 

4,800 

570,000 


$5,710 
400 
450 










































Oysters, market, private 






1,446,984 
503,500 


$206, 712 
42, 175 






Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 


42,210 


2,695 














Total.. 


650, 610 


9,255 


. 1 


2,010,484 


248,887 














Shore fisheries: 

Claras, hard 


404, 648 
60,000 
798,050 

478,275 

98,210 

7,000 


69, 292 

5,500 

965 

66,225 

5,700 

400 


75,200 S12.500 






214,016 


S27, 930 


Clams, surf. . 












Mussels 














Oysters, market, private 
beds 


143,500 
28,000 


17, 125 
1,500 






135, 450 
12,950 


23,850 


Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 
Oysters, seed, private beds.. 






620 


















Total 


1,840,183 


148, 082 


240,700 ' 31,125 






362, 416 


52,400 










2, 496, 793 


157,337 


246,700 31.125 


2, 010, 484 


248,887 


302, 416 


52,400 













42 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Catch by Dredges, Tongs, Rakes, etc., in 
New Jersey in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Cumberland. Hudson. 


Middlesex. 


Monmouth. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Clams, hard 








51,800 


$8,200 


HI 360 SI? QfiO 


Clams, surf 








2,400 
112, 333 
24,700 

30,975 

84,000 
3,500 


100 


Crabs, hard 












4,300 
700 


Mussels 












Oysters, market, natural 
rock 














3 520 


Oysters, market, private 
beds 


5. 126. 184 


$732, 312 
240,925 










11, 320 


Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 3. 403. 400 










200 


Total 














8, 529, 584 


973, 237 






51,800 


8,200 


369,268 


38 100 










Shore fisheries: 

Clams, hard 


3,072 


384 






26, 752 
3,750 


4,650 
900 


736,240 
958, 700 


125,775 
67,950 


Clams, soft 






Oysters, market, natural 
rock 






87,500 


$7,500 


Oysters, market, private 
beds 


77,000 
1, 185, 800 


11,000 


252,000 
140,000 


35,840 
13,500 


350,924 
21,000 


53, 318 
1,500 


Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 


61,910 


150,500 


12, 800 


Total 


1,265,872 


73,294 238,000 


20, 300 


422,502 


54,890 


2, 066, 864 


•^48 543 






Grand total 


9,795,456 


1 046 531 ^ss nm 


20,300 


474, 302 


63,090 


2, 436, 132 


286, 643 









Species. 


Ocean. 


Union. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Clams, hard 










196, 700 

7,200 

112,333 

594, 700 

31,045 

6, 663, 237 
4,025,210 


$31,870 
500 


Clams, surf L. 






Crabs, hard 




1 




4 300 


Mussels 








1,150 


Oysters, market, natural 
rock 


70 

6,069 
12,600 


$10 

867 
900 






3,530 

951 211 


Oysters, market, private 
beds 






Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 






286, 895 












Total 


18,739 


1,777 






11,630,485 


1,279,456 








Shore fisheries: 

Clams, hard 


509,200 
10, 700 


79,357 
1,600 






1,969,128 

973, 150 

60,000 

798,050 

203, 175 

2,266,817 

1,747,305 

9,100 


319, 888 
70, 450 
5 500 


Clams, soft 






Clams, surf 






Mussels 1 L.- _-- 1 




965 


Oysters, market, natural 
rock 


115, 675 

829,668 
44, 345 
2,100 


13, 275 

115, 634 

2,250 

120 






20,775 

322, 992 

106,030 

520 


Oysters, market, private 
beds 






Oysters, seed, natural rock. . 
Oysters, seed, private beds.. 


66,500 


$6,250 












Total 


1,511,688 212,236 


66,500 


6,250 


8,026,725 


847 1''0 






Grand total 


1,530,427 214 01.'? 


66,500 


6,250 


19, 657, 210 


2, 126, 576 






■ 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



43 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Pound-net Fisheries of New 

Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 



Shore fisheries: 

Albaeore 

Alewives 

Blueflsh 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Catfish 

Cero 

Cod 

Crevalle 

Croaker 

Dogfish 

Drum 

Eels 

Flounders 

Haddoclj: 

Hake 

Hickory shad. . . 
Horse mackerel, 

Kingflsh 

Mackerel 

Menhaden 

Perch, yellow. . . 

Pollock 

Round herring.. 
Scup 



Atlantic. 



Lbs. Value. 



2,500 

1,800! 

1,400, 

600 

13,500, 



16 
110 

28 
500 



Cape May. 



Lbs. Value, 



225; 

1,400, 

100 

24, 000' 



22 

40 

2 

300 



7,000 



500 
3,000 



100 

5,625 

85,000 

9,000 

100 
6,000 



700 



Sea robins 

Shad 

Sharks 

Sheepshead . . . 

Skates 

Spanish mack 

erel 

Spot 

Squeteague j275, 000 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and 

st urgeon 

eggs 

Tautog 

Whiting 

Other fish 

Crabs, hard 

King crabs 

Lobsters 

Porpoise 

Squid 

Turtles 



Total. 



2,000 



100 



1,000 



1,000 
300 



443, 100 



50 
375 



2 

63 

,400 

525 

3 

700 



3,000 

17,500 

1,700 

3,500 

232,000 

150 

500 

400 



11,000 



11,550 

1,200 

53,000 



700 



2,600 

10,000 

70,000 

500 



25,000 
800 



4,500 



10, 312 



200 
6,000 

700 

4,500 

576, 200 

250 
7,140 



300 

200 

3,200 



1,624,000 



35,500 
4,100 



2,714,090 



162 

105 

175 

2,770 

6 

25 

16 



315 

""76 



696 

1,240 

220 

25 



850 
40 



469 



Monmouth. 



Lbs. Value. 



13, 895 
241,145 

71,605 
338, 151 
677, 080 



2,031 

35, 755 

920 

150,041 

11,000 

202, 460 

3,549 

289, 799 

1,220 

180,200 

9,720 

5,855 

5,307 

18 

9, 650, 425 



36 
120 



7,784 

117, 125 

419, 782 

810, 746 

31,000 

65, 750 

9,100 

72 

2,125 



182 6, 050 

240 3, 600 

6,725 7,020,301 

27 

684 11,695 



255, 

6 
94 



6,443 



1,226 

1,950 

530, 770 

560 

12,000 



1,420 



1,165 

781 



32, 709 
28, 201 



2,017 
3,499 
14,206 
23, 379 



100 

1,178 

18 

3,609 

123 

1, 336 

143 

9,144 

43 

2,077 

228 

87 

853 

2 

32, 479 



196 

1,863 

11,137 

22,035 

225 

6,081 

262 

15 

16 



Ocean. 



Lbs. 



11,575 
12,800 
12, 750 
98,300 
431,700 



Value. 



Total. 



2,675 

12,600 

400 

96,200 



12,000 

230 

62,400 



27,700 
4,400 
6,950 
1,160 
1,115 

30,950 



2,100 
1,500 
172, 700 
220,400 
6,100 
6,470 



$150l 

58 

003 

3,904 

12,890 



115 

400 

10 

1,225 



39 

5 

1,930 



359 

78 
100 
187 

78 
210 



43 

45 

5,345 

5, 600 

120 

595 



1,235 775 165 

90 1,800 45 

167,1961,446,500 31,450 



865 



1,006 
28 

8,753 

12 

435 



212 



682 
593 



1,900 



75 

575 11 

,125, 1,541 



800 



25 

500 

11,700 

2,300: 



4 

2 

204 

51 



25, 248 20, 904, 1421318, 388 2, 788, 759 67, 743 



Lbs. I Value. 



30, 970 

273, 245 

87, 455 

440, 551 

1,354,280 

150 

5,431' 

50,155 

1, 420l 

281,241 

11,000 

226, 010' 

4,979, 

412, 199 

1, 220 

208, 600; 

1-4,220 

12, 805, 

9, 567 1 

14, 133 

9, 651, 375 

500 

9,984 

124, 250 

702, 482 

1,040,946 

37, 200, 

84, 920 

9,100 

1,031| 

10, 925 



$450 

2,853 

4,317 

18, 373 

39, 539 

6 

262 

1,634 

30 

5,509 

123 

1,451 

228 

13, 193 

43 

2,450 

308 

187 

1,786 

1,695 

32,909 

25 

241 

1,971 

19, 732 

28,200 

348 

7,845 

262 

113 

165 



8,225 1,682 

9,900! 375 

9, 318, 001 209, 871 

250 27 

22,735 1,757 



1,701 

2,725 

019,095 

560 

12, 800 

1,624,000 

1,445 

500 

80, 909 

34, 901 



1,379 

45 

10,400 

12 

443 

6,443 

216 

2 

2,064 

727 



26,850,091,421,691 



44 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Line Fisheries of New Jersey 

IN 1904. 





Atlantic. 


Burlington. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Blueflsli 


26,300 

425 

502,000 

23,700 

10,550 

53,400 

9,350 

65 

250 

10,300 

107,000 

7,800 


$1,400 

15 

19,220 

620 

480 

2,275 

260 

5 

5 

340 

5,240 

240 






156,000 


$10,220 
















Cod 






346, 400 


17,320 






















3,400 

52,000 

6,200 


102 

2,600 

186 
















Halse 




















Pollock 




















34,500 
365,000 


1,320 
18,250 












100,000 


$4, 000 
























Total 


751, 140 


30, 100 






963,500 


49,998 


100,000 


4,000 










Sliore fisheries: 


16,300 

2,000 

120,000 

25,000 

350 

28, 400 

17,500 

1,900 

3,300 


970 
140 
4,600 
600 
20 
1,410 
700 
55 
180 






153, 500 


10,790 
















Cod 






105,000 
3,000 


5,240 
150 
















Eels 
















27,100 

4,600 

141, 400 

1,000 


904 

230 

7,044 

230 






































600 


$20 








24,000 

26,800 

675 

1,200 

203,800 

1,500 


1,100 

1,580 

100 

40 
8, 690 

60 


71,000 
482,000 


2,770 
23,500 


























Spot 
















8,200 


285 


20,500 


685 


9,000 


360 


Tautog 










600 


75 




















Total 


472,725 


20, 245 


8,800 


305 


1,009,700 


51,618 


9,000 


360 






Grand total 


1,223,865 


50,345 


8,800 


305 1 1.973.200 


101,616 


109,000 


4,360 






' 





Species. 


Monmouth. 


Ocean. 


Salem. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Bluefish . . 














182,300 

425 

848,400 

23,700 

13, 950 

105,400 

15,550 

65 

250 

44,800 

572,000 

7,800 


$11, 620 
















15 


Cod 














36,540 
















620 
















582 
















4,875 


Halie 














446 
















5 


Pollocli .... 














5 


Scup 












1, 660 














27, 490 














240 
















Total 














1,814,640 


84,098 


















Shore fisheries: 

Bluefish 


2,084,100 

132, 975 

105,800 

5,800 


$83, 411 

.5,006 

4,585 

125 


.58, 310 

5, 550 

32,500 

600 


$2,635 

225 

1,190 

20 






2,312,210 

140, 525 

363,300 

34,400 

350 

324,950 

33, 980 

165, 700 

4,300 

600 

127, 400 

953, 100 

675 

1,200 

316,200 

141,500 

600 


97,806 








5,371 


Cod 






15, 615 


Croaker 






895 


Eels 






20 




181,900 
6, 500 
17,200 


5,390 
260 
355 


87, 550 
5,380 
5,200 


2,650 
210 
200 






10,354 








1,400 








7,654 








410 
















20 


gScup 


22,600 
274, 700 


585 
8,878 


9,800 
109, 600 


370 
8,025 






4, 825 








41,983 








100 


Spot 














40 


Squetoague 

Tautog 


30, 500 
140,000 


88.5 
3,850 


38, 200 


1,500 


6,000 


$480 


12,885 
3,910 


Crabs, hard 










75 


















Total 


3,002,075 


113,330 


412, 690 


17,025 


6,000 


480 


4,920,990 


203,363 






Grand total 


3,002,075 


113,330 412.690 


17,025 


6,000 


480 


6,735,630 


287, 461 






' 









FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



45 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Gill-net Fisheries of New 

Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 


Burlington. 


Camden. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 














8,000 


$100 




5,400 


$435 












Shad 


200, 400 


$17, 623 


268,200 
12,000 


$15, 103 
345 


14, 400 


980 




1,500 


65 
5 






50 










Sturgeon 






300 
2,000 


38 
200 


































Total 


6,950 


505 


200,400 


17,623 


282,500 


15,686 


22,400 


1,080 





Species. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Gloucester. 


Hudson. 


Mercer. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 1 Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


10,000 


$800 
































Total 


10,000 


800 














j 


















Shore fisheries: 


14,000 

518.000 


1,100 
3,372 














1 


Menhaden 














1 


Pike L. .'..... 


100 

402,550 

45, 185 

2,271 

500 


$5 

20,042 

3,116 

1,957 

25 










1 


Shad ' 




734,400 


$35,698 


13,600 


81,230 


41,600 $3,120 


Sturgeon 






















Suckers. 
































Total 


532,000 


4,472 


450,606 


25, 145 


734,400 


35,698 


13, 600 


1,230 


41,600 i 3,120 






Grand total 


542,000 


5,272 


450, 606 


25, 145 


734, 400 


35,698 


13,600 


1,230 


41,600 j 3,120 



Species. 


Monmouth. 


Ocean. 


Salem. 


Total. 


lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


51,500 

100 

34,610 

77,500 

1,600 


$2,050 

7 

2,200 

1,950 

40 










51,. 500 

100 

44,610 

77,500 

1,600 


$2, 050 


Butterflsh 










7 












3,000 












1,950 












40 














Total 


165,310 


6,247 










175,310 


7,047 














Shore fisheries: 






43,300 

31,425 

500 


$410 

2,055 

20 






51,300 

57,225 

16,000 

500 

3,000 

540 

50 

55,000 

524,000 

51,850 

100 

3,743,485 

324, 100 

1,095 

204,085 

6,671 

3,500 

53,900 


510 


Bluefish . . . . 


25,800 

15,500 

500 

2,500 


1,167 

720 

18 

37 






3,222 








740 








18 




500 
540 


5 
20 






42 








20 


Hickory shad 


50 
41,000 


2 
1,650 






2 










2,750 




6,000 
46, 450 


15 
4,610 






3,387 












5,045 


Pike 










5 


Shad 


22,975 
171,250 


2,012 
3,999 






2,045,360 


$99,422 


195,230 




139,350 
1,045 


4,996 
221 


9,405 








226 


Sturgeon 






158, 600 
4,400 


7,660 
3,740 


10,814 












5,697 








1,000 


50 


275 


Whiting 


53,900 


1,035 






1,035 














Total 


333, 475 


10,640 


270, 110 


12,402 


2,208,360 


110,822 


5,096,401 


238,423 






Grand total 


498, 785 


16,887 


270, 110 


12,402 


2, 208, 360 


110,822 


5,271,711 


245. 470 



46 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of New 

Jersey in 1904. 



tjpccies. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 


Burlington. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Blueflsh 














5,000 


$150 






Menhaden 














3,124,830 


$0,500 


Scup 














180, 000 

5,000 

50,000 


5,850 

150 

1,000 




















Squeteague 




































Total 














240,000 


7,150 


3, 124, 830 


6,500 
















Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh 


16,400 


$225 






160,000 
96,000 


$425 
1,500 






30,800 


194 


Alewi ves, salted . 












Blueflsh 


775 


55 














Butte rflsh 










200 


10 






Catfish 


400 

100 

1,300 

9,975 


20 

2 

75 

560 


7,550 


$736 


12, 750 


1,061 


5,600 


288 


Chubs 








Eels 










35,000 
4,700 


3,390 
145 






Flounders . . 










100 
8,400 


4 


German carp 


7,500 


890 


8,600 


620 


547 


Kingflsh 


6,400 


330 


400 
27,000 
3,000 


32 

1,350 

45 




Mullet, fresh 






I 








Mullet, salted 


















Perch, white 


22,950 
250 


1,075 
25 






26,000 
50 

12 


1,750 
5 
3 


2,550 


153 


Pike and pickerel . . . 












Salmon, Atlantic 














Sea bass 


1,000 
80 


80 
10 














Shad 


700 
1,500 


60 
270 


73,600 


3,360 






7,819 


457 


Smelt 








Spot 


800 

122,000 

1,525 

1,400 

500 

21, 667 

330 


65 
7,000 
295 
55 
30 
140 
100 






20,000 

210, 500 

400 


1,000 
3,375 

48 






Squeteague 










3,500 

3,450 

300 


140 


Striped bass 






8,570 
6,200 


888 
390 


377 


Suckers 


15,500 


1,540 


18 


Tautog 


... t ■ . ■ 




Crabs, hard 
















Shrimp 










j 






















Total 


207,852 


10,142 


32, 750 


3,496 


391,782 


10,002 


301,200 9,395 


62, 519 


2,178 




Grand total 


207, 852 


10,142 


32,750 


3,496 


391,782 


10,002 


541,200 


16, 545 


3,187,349 


8,678 



Species. 


Gloucester. 


Hunterdon. 


Mercer. 


Middlesex. 


Monmouth. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries : 
















8, 400, 000 


$27,000 
















Total 










. . . 1 .. 






8,400,000 


27,000 


















Shore fisheries: 


20,000 


$100 






80,000 


$1,250 


25,700 
8,000 


$156 
232 


3,000 

15,200 

200 


30 


Bluefish 






510 


Butte rflsh 














4 


Catfish 










400 


4 


3,940 

70 

1,100 

600 

83,000 


185 

6 

38 

60 

102 




Eels 










10, 100 
5,000 


530 


Flounders 














166 












700 


41 














450,000 
21,000 


820 










1 




585 












5,000 


200 


250 

100 

7,450 

4,900 


15 

10 

702 

980 




Perch, yellow. . . . 














Shad 


168,000 


9,750 


37,000 


$2,865 


129, 520 


8,435 


3,600 
1,650 
4,000 
102, 200 
4,900 
14, 700 


270 


Smelt 


162 


Spot 












80 
















45, 000 

1,500 

900 

350 


1,510 
148 
100 

7 


2,440 


Striped bass 

Suckers 


200 


20 






500 


60 


875 






580 
































1,000 
3,600 
16, 167 


20 














' ^r 


225 














j 


2,550 


















Total 


188, 200 


9,870 


37,000 


2,865 


216, 120 


9,980 182,860 4,311 


656,317 


9,847 






Grand total 


188,200 


9,870 


37,000 


2,865 


216, 120 


9,980 


182,860 


4,311 


9, 116, 317 


36, 847 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



47 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Seine Fisheries op New 
Jersey in 1904 — Continued. 





Ocean. 


Salem. 


Sussex. 


Warren. | Total. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries : 

Blueflsh 


















5,000 

26,873,430 

180,000 

5,000 

50,000 


$150 




15, 288, 600 


$38,245 














71, 745 
















5,850 




















150 




















1,000 






















Total ... 


15, 288, 600 


38,245 














27, 113, 430 


78, 895 


















Shore fisheries: 


219,200 


1,995 


6,000 


S120 










561, 100 

96,000 

27,100 

2,100 

54,190 

100 

46,470 

21,000 

68,300 

6,800 

533,000 

54,000 

3,000 

175,800 

100 

500 

12 

1,000 

447, 327 

8,080 

24,800 

582,500 

45,022 

41,600 

500 

515 

1,000 

26, 167 

27,600 

330 


4,495 











1,500 




3,125 
1,700 
2,750 


75 
50 
110 














872 


Butte rflsh 














64 


Catfish 


20,800 


842 










3,246 


Chubs 










2 


Eels 


















4,001 




125 


5 














918 




41,500 


2,465 






1,000 


$50 


4,673 


Kingfish 










362 




















982 


Mullet fresh 


6,000 


115 














2,050 
















45 




117,050 


9,462 


2,000 


160 










12, 815 












10 


Pike and pickerel . . . 


200 


20 












50 














3 




















80 


Shad 






7,888 


290 


450 


$25 


11,220 


910 


27, 134 


Smelt 


30 


5 


1,417 


Spot . 














1,145 




99,300 
10,777 


2,675 
2,325 














17,140 


Striped bass 


13,200 


1,645 










6,671 






2,600 


256 


2,939 
















30 




165 


5 














12 
















20 




900 
11,433 


40 
1,925 








1 1 


405 










1 


4,475 













100 


















Total 


472, 755 


18,807 


91,388 


5,522 


450 


25 |14,820 i 1,216 


2, 856, 013 


97. 656 






Grand total 


15,761,355 


57,052 


91, 388 


5,522 


450 


25 Il4,820 1 1,216 

1 1 


29,969,443 , 176, 551 



Statement, by Counties, op the Catch op Eels and Lobsters, by Pots, in New 

Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Hudson. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 
Eels 


















3,000 
45,500 


$240 










::::::::::::: 


1 




5,715 












-- 






Total 










1 1 




48,500 


5,955 












[ 






Shore fisheries: 

Eels, fresh 


10,500 


$480 


42,000 


$2,800 


15,000 


$750 


1,100 


$68 


5,400 
29,500 


356 
2,180 




















Total 


10,500 


480 


42,000 


2,800 


15,000 


750 


1,100 


68 


34,900 


2,535 






Grand total. . .. 


10,500 


480 


42,000 


2,800 


15,000 


750 


1,100 


68 


83,400 


8,490 



14008—07- 



48 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch op Eels and Lobsters by Pots in 
New Jersey in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Middlesex. 


Momnouth. 


Ocean. 


Salem. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Eels. 


















3,000 
64, 300 


$240 






18,800 


$2,500 










8,215 


















Total 






18,800 


2,500 










67,300 


8,455 


















Shore fisheries: 

Eels, fresh 


6,900 


$600 


84, 525 

325 

44,970 


4,870 

80 

7,495 


51,950 


$2, 475 


11,000 


$690 


228, 375 

325 

75, 545 


13,088 
80 


Lobsters 


800 


120 


275 


36 






9,831 










Total 


7,700 


720 


129,820 


12, 445 


52, 225 


2,511 


11,000 


690 


304, 245 


22,999 






Grand total 


7,700 


720 


148, 620 


14,945 


52, 225 


2,511 


11,000 


690 


371, 545 


31, 454 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fyke-net Fisheries of New 

Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 


Burlington. 


Cape May. 


Cumberland. 


Hudson. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 














800 
4,000 
1,000 
2,600 


$20 
















400 


Catfish.. 


6,000 


$450 






12, 700 

2,900 

300 


$966 
226 
24 


100 


Eels 


11,000 
2,500 


$1,293 
125 


150 










Salmon, Atlantic 






24 
55,600 


15 


Shad 














7,630 








2,200 


270 








Sturgeon 










700 
60 


51 


Caviar. 














39 


















Total 


6,000 


450 


15, 700 


1,688 


15,900 


1,216 


64, 784 


8,405 






Species. 


Middlesex. 


Monmouth. 


Ocean. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 






1,900 


$100 






1,900 


$100 






. 








Shore fisheries: 


3,000 


$150 


3,500 
600 
100 


$77 
48 
3 


3,500 


$60 


10,800 

600 

100 

4,000 

19,700 

300 

100 

48,410 

275, 100 

94 

28,000 

10, 500 

8,000 

24 

61, 475 

175 

23,200 

10,890 

700 

60 

200 

750 

6,470 

1,000 

9,400 

14,000 

50 


307 


Bluefish 


48 


Butterfish 


1 






3 












400 


Catfish 














1,516 


Dogfish 






300 

100 

31,910 

49, 200 

94 

28,000 

2,800 

8,000 


24 

1 

2,394 

2,107 

24' 

67 

229 

90 






24 












1 


Eels 










4,063 


Flounders 


700 


56 


225,200 


10, 133 


12, 296 




24 












67 


Perch, white . 


400 


40 


4,500 


397 


815 




90 












15 


Shad 


3,700 


375 


2,175 

175 

22, 000 

7,835 


228 

2 

637 

1,285 






8,233 








2 




1,200 
600 


72 
81 






709 


Striped bass. 


255 


47 


1,683 




51 
















39 












200 


10 


10 


Tautog 






750 
2,000 
1,000 
9,400 
14,000 
50 


22 
100 

20 
175 

75 
7 


22 




4,300 


2.30 


170 


5 


335 




20 












175 












75 












7 














Total 


13,900 


1,004 


183, 989 


7,615 


233,825 


10, 652 


534,098 


31,030 


Grand total 


13,900 


1,004 


185, 889 


7,715 


233,825 


10, 652 


535, 998 


31,130 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



49 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Stop-net Fisheries of New 

Jersey in 1904. 



Species. 


Bergen. 


Burlington. 


Cumberland. 


Gloucester. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Carp, German 


50,000 

35,300 

700 


$4,900 

3,524 

75 


19,000 


$1,340 


54,300 
700 


$4,045 
56 


100,000 $8,000 


Catfish -. 




Shad 














400 


58 




Suckers. 


600 


48 


600 


36 












Total 


86,600 


8,547 


19,600 


1,376 


55,400 


4,159 


100,000 


8,000 







Species. 


Hudson. 


Salem. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Carp, German 


15,700 


$1,600 


92,000 


$5,670 


331,000 

36,000 

700 

400 

1,200 


$25, 555 




3,580 


Shad 










75 












58 


Suckers 










84 














Total 


15,700 


1,600 


92,000 


5,670 


369, 300 


29,352 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Bag-net Fisheries of New Jersey 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Burlington. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Catfish 






2,400 

2,600 

8,600 

320 


$70 

100 

530 

50 


2,400 

2,600 

14,600 

555 


$70 


Flounders 






100 




6,000 
235 


$395 
40 


925 


Striped bass 


90 






Total 


6,235 


435 


13,920 


750 


20, 155 


1,185 







Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Minor Apparatus in New Jersey in 

1904. 



Species. 


Atlantic. 


Bergen. 


Cape May. 


Gloucester. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Carp, German 














5,500 


$440 


Eels 


15,400 


$775 






7,600 


$640 






7,800 


$780 








19,333 

1,500 
3,382 
3,000 


1,200 
300 
600 

3,300 
































1 










1,700 


1,150 
















Total 


42,615 


6,175 


7,800 


780 


9,300 


1,790 


5,500 


440 







50 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Minor Apparatus in New Jersey 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Monmouth. 


Ocean. 


Salem. 


Total. 


Lbs., 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


8,000 


S580 










8,000 


$580 














Shore fisheries: 

Carp, German 










59,500 


$4,305 


65,000 

75, 700 

7,800 

64, 699 

96, 467 

4,619 

4,700 


4,745 


Eels 


10,500 


540 


42, 200 


$2,325 


4,280 








780 


Crabs, hard 


41,533 

85,(567 


1,975 
13,250 


2,333 

10,800 

1,237 


85 

1,575 

725 






3,560 


Crabs, soft 






14,825 


. Shrimp 






1,325 


Terrapin . 










4,450 


















Total 


137, 700 


15,765 


56,570 


4,710 


59,500 


4,305 


318,985 


33, 965 






Grand total 


145,700 


16,345 


56,570 


4,710 


59,500 


4,305 


326,985 


34, 545 







NOTES AND DETAILED STATISTICS OF PRINCIPAL FISHERIES. 

Oyster. — By far the greatest oyster-producing region in New Jersey 
is Maurice River Cove, a branch of Delaware Bay in Cumberland 
County. The value to the fishermen of the oyster catch in this county 
in 1904 was $1,046,147. Of this amount, .$973,237 is the value of the 
vessel catch, the balance being taken by boats under 5 tons. Prac- 
tically all the market oysters are taken from private beds, with 
dredges. The method of lifting dredges on vessels in this region 
has undergone some change through the use of a patent lifting 
machine run by gasoline, thereby dispensing with the labor of one or 
two men. 

The entire coast of New Jersey produces oysters, but the market 
supply comes chiefly from planted beds, from which the oysters are 
dredged. The most important of the beds on the outer coast are in 
Barnegat Bay and Great Bay, but here as elsewhere in 1904 the oysters 
were poor, and consequently a smaller quantity than usual was taken 
up. Keyport has a prosperous planting industry, and there are pro- 
ductive planted beds also at Perth Amboy, Chapel Hill, Pleasure Bay, 
Oceanport, Branchport, and in Atlantic and Cape May counties. In 
Cape May County the practice of planting shells for collection of spat 
has become quite profitable. In nearly every locality, however, the 
number of oyster planters has decreased in the last five years, this 
being especially the case at Perth Amboy and Chapel Hill. A serious 
drawback to the enterprise in some places, noticeably in New York 
and Newark bays and the Shrewsbury River, is a condition of the oys- 
ters known as "the greens." Pollution of the streams with refuse 
from copper refineries has been found to affect the oysters by giving 
them a greenish color and an unpleasant taste, which even rebedding 
for a season has not sufficed to remove. 

Oysters from the natural rocks are usually too small for market and 



FISHERIES O*^ THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



51 



are used for seed, being taken with tongs. This feature of the indus- 
try has become an important and remunerative business in many 
places. Lanoka, Bayville, and Forked River furnish market oysters 
from the natural beds. 

The total oyster output of New Jersey for 1905 showed a decrease 
since 1901 of 40 per cent in quantity and 24 per cent in value. 

The Oyster Fishery of New Jersey in 1904. 



Counties. 


Market oys- 
ters from 
natural rock. 


Market oysters 
from private beds. 


Seed oysters 

from natural 

rock. 


Seed oysters 

from private 

beds. 


Total. 




Bush. 


Value. 


Bush. 


Value. 


Bush. 


Value. 


Bush. 


Value. 


Bush. 


Value. 








68,325 
20,500 

206,712 
19,350 

743,312 


$66, 225 
17,125 

206,712 
23,850 

743,312 


20,060 
4,000 

80,500 

1,850 

655,600 

21,500 

20,000 
3,500 
8,135 
9,500 


$8,395 
1,500 

42,175 

620 

302,835 

12,800 

13,500 
1,700 
3,150 
6,250 


1,000 


$400 


89, 385 
24,500 

287,212 
21,200 
1,398,912 
34,000 
56,000 
70,057 

144,361 
9,500 


$75,020 


Burlington 






18,625 


Camden 










248, 887 

24,470 

1,046,147 












Cumberland 










Hudson 


12,500 


$7,500 






20,300 
49,340 
69,858 
133,056 
6,250 


Middlesex 


36,000 
62, 132 
119,391 


35,840 
64,638 
116,501 






Monmouth 


4,425 
16,535 


3,520 
13,285 


1 


Ocean 


300 120 


Union 
















Total 


33, 460 


24, 305 


1,275,722 


1, 274, 203 


824,645 


392,925 


1,300 


520 


2, 135, 127 


1,691,953 



dam. — From Perth Amboy south to Cape May and in Cape May 
and Cumberland counties on the Delaware Bay side of the state, the 
New Jersey coast produces large quantities of clams. The chief 
hard-clam fisheries are carried on at Keyport, Port Monmouth, and 
Belford, but in other counties, especially Atlantic, many persons 
depend upon clamming for a livelihood, and from West Creek, Ocean 
County, to Cape May it is the most important fishery industry next 
to oyster planting. At Somers Point, Atlantic County, numbers of 
men and boys come from inland places to dig for clams during the 
summer season. There has been such a decline in the abundance of 
this product at Keyport and Port Monmouth that vessel fishing has 
been to a great extent abandoned, and only small gasoline and row 
boats are now used. During the warm weather the fishermen often 
lay aside their tongs and rakes and wade for the clams. 

In some localities clams brought from states farther south are 
laid out in the local waters for a few weeks and then shipped to mar- 
ket. They are said thus to acquire the flavor of the native clam and 
to become more salable. 

Soft clams are not taken south of Point Pleasant, Ocean County, 
and by far the most of the catch comes from Monmouth County. 
Higlilands and vicinity is the most productive region, and the majority 
of the inhabitants are dependent upon this fishery. About one-tliii'd 
of the catch is sold opened, the remainder in the sheU. 

Surf clams are used chiefly for cod bait on trawl lines, the greatest 
demand being at Atlantic City, which supports the largest trawlmg 



52 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLAIS'tIC STATES. 

fleet in the state. These clams are sometimes sold in Atlantic City 
for hard clams, and are said to be as edible as the latter, except that 
they are with difficulty freed from sand. The taste is somewhat 
sweeter than that of the hard clam. 

Mussel. — Mussels are taken only in Monmouth County, where they 
are used entirely for food, and in Atlantic County, where a large por- 
tion of the catch is used for fertilizer. Some are cleaned and shipped 
in shell from Atlantic City, and a few are opened and sold locally. 

Crab. — Crabs are taken in several of the rivers and estuaries along 
the coast of New Jersey. In the soft stage they are caught mainly 
with scoop nets and seines. They are used both for food and as bait 
on hand lines. In recent years there has been a very noticeable 
diminution in the catch of soft crabs in New Jerse}^, and this has 
resulted in an increased demand upon Maryland and Virginia. In 
Monmouth County more than one-half the hard-crab catch is taken by 
vessels using dredges, the season usually extending from November 1 
to February 15, and the men remaining aboard of the vessel during 
that time. 

King crab. — Practically the entire king-crab catch is taken in pound 
nets set in Delaware Bay, ofi^ Cape May County. It is sold to factories 
and converted into fertilizer. This species is more abundant than it 
was in 1901. 

Lobster. — No special efl^ort to catch lobsters is made in this state 
south of Point Pleasant, Ocean County, and the fishery in 1904 was 
carried on chiefly by men hailing from Jersey City, Keyport, and Port 
Monmouth. A few came from Seabright and Long Branch. 

Squeteague. — This fish, commonly known as ''trout," or "weak- 
fish," is the most abundant of the edible species caught on the New 
Jersey coast. It is taken chiefly in pound nets and seines, and on 
lines. It represents the largest part of the pound-net catch. 

Shad. — Shad are taken in the Delaware and Hudson rivers, more 
than 85 per cent of the state's entire, catch, however, being taken 
in the Delaware. Since 1901 this species has decreased 69 per cent in 
quantity and nearly 50 per cent in value. The greater part of the 
Hudson River catch is made by men living down the coast, who move 
up with their gear every spring and remain during the run of shad. 
The apparatus commonly used in this stream is the stake gill net, but 
owing to alleged menace to navigation the government has recently 
placed certain restrictions upon these operations. It is now neces- 
sary to secure a permit to fish, and the stakes must be removed at the 
close of the fishing season. Shad fishing in the Hudson River has 
been quite profitable in the past, but would now be a total failure if, 
with the scarcity of fish, there were not the increased prices. A few 
fishermen living in the southern part of the state, on the Atlantic side, 
fish for shad in the Delaware River with drift gill nets. By means of 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



53 



gasoline boats they can make the trips from their homes to the fishing 
grounds better than they could formerly with sailboats. 

The following table shows the number of shad taken in each county 
of the state in 1904: 

Number and Value of Shad taken in Each County op New Jersey in 1904. 



Counties. 



Atlantic 

Bergen 

Burlington. . 

Camden 

Cape May. . . 
Cumberland. 
Gloucester.. 

Hudson 

Hunterdon.. 



No. 



. 1,737 

57,657 

89,050 

3, GOO 

1,675 

94,700 

188,000 

19,771 

7,400 



Value. 



$710 

17,758 

18,463 

980 

469 

20,499 

45,448 

8,860 

2,865 



Counties. 



No. 



Mercer 

Middlesex . . 
Momnouth. 

Ocean 

Salem 

Sussex 

Warren 

Total 



42,780 

3,186 

27,000 

1,849 

438,200 

100 

3,300 



a 980,005 



Value. 



Sll,555 

1,077 

8,591 

595 

99,712 

25 

910 



238,517 



a 4,337,907 pounds. 

Bluefish. — The most prolific bluefish grounds on the American 
coast lie from 4 to 10 miles off Seabright, N. J., and the most valuable 
fishery of this, the state's most important fishing center, is the blue- 
fish hand-line fishery. In 1904 it employed 96 gasoline boats, valued 
at $21,600, and 30 rowboats, valued at $2,500, a total of 126 boats, 
carrying 275 men. A majority of the men are Scandinavians. 

Menhaden. — With the exception of a few menhaden taken in Mid- 
dlesex County with seines, the entire catch is obtained in Monmouth, 
Ocean, and Cape May counties. In Monmouth County both pound 
nets and seines are used, most of the pound-net catch being taken at 
Port Monmouth and Belford, where it is sold mainly as bait to hand- 
line fishermen at Seabright and vicinity. Two fertilizer factories at 
this place utilize large quantities of the seine catch, which is made 
chiefly by vessels. A number of the vessels are owned by the 
factories. 

The Menhaden Industry of New Jersey in 1904. 



Items. 



Factories 

Cash capital 

Wages paid factory employees 

Persons in factories 

Persons on vessels 

Menhaden caught by vessels 

Menhaden caught in shore fisheries 

Menhaden, prest 

Dry scrap tons. 

Crude and acidulated scrap do. 

Oil. 



Steam vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Purse seines 

Sail vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Purse seines 

Sail vessels transporting. 

Tonnage 

Outfit 



.gallons. 



No. 



214 

226 

44,789,050 

17,893,958 

46,029,050 

2,717 

1,575 

150,645 

6 

392 



5 
132 



Value. 



$229,100 
51,000 
50,000 



71,745 
37,345 
60,060 
72,500 
21,800 
33,110 
109,000 



25,3(50 
4,500 
7,500 



4,595 
2,220 
3,300 



590 



54 FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Sea hass. — With the exception of a few caught in seines, the entire 
catch of sea bass is taken with Hnes and pound nets. The most pro- 
Hfic grounds are off Holly Beach and Anglesea, in Cape May County, 
and are frequented by line fishermen from these places during the 
summer. At Seabright sea bass are taken only incidentally with 
bluefish by the line fishermen, but here the reverse is the case. A 
great many are taken by vessels from Atlantic City also. Most of 
the catch shown under pound nets was caught along the coast of 
Monmouth and Ocean counties. 

Cod. — The most important cod fisheries are conducted from Atlan- 
tic City and Anglesea. With the introduction of gasoline engines on 
boats, and the consequently improved facilities for reaching the fish- 
ing grounds, this industry is prosecuted with much more vigor than 
formerly. 

In the fall of 1905 The Fisheries Company made an innovation in 
the method of catching cod off New Jersey by fitting up a menhaden 
steamer with an otter trawl similar to those used by English fisher- 
men in the North Sea. In one day 32,000 pounds of cod were taken, 
but owing to the fact that the company had not proper facilities for 
freezing the fish, and found it unprofitable to place such a large 
quantity on the market at one time, fishing was discontinued for the 
season. 

Trawl-line fishermen in New Jersey, as in other states along the 
coast, complain of the ravages of the dogfish, which eat either the bait 
or the fish that have been caught. 

Butterjish. — This species is very abundant along the coast of New 
Jersey. It is taken in large quantities in pound nets, and ranks 
second, or next to squeteague, in value among the species taken in 
that apparatus. In one pound-net fishery oft' High Point, Ocean 
County, butterfish were taken in much larger quantities than sque- 
teague even, and constituted nearly two-thirds of the entire catch. 

Carp. — This fish, which is one of the most marketable in the state, 
is made the special object of capture in several counties, especially 
in those bordering on the Delaware River. Three-fourths of the 
catch is made in stop nets (or "set nets," as they are sometimes 
called) and the balance in seines and cast nets. The stop nets com- 
monly used are about 7 feet deep, with a 4-inch mesh, and are fished 
from early in the spring until ice forms in the fall or winter. They 
are set at high water, nearly parallel to the shore, with a slight curve 
out toward the channel. As the tide recedes, the fish, caught behind 
the net, are unable to escape. They are removed at low water or 
when there is about 1 foot of water back of the net. 

New York City continues to be a very profitable market for carp, 
and fishermen living along the Hackensack River, especially favored 
by their proximity to the city, receive high prices for this fish. 



FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



55 



Jewish dealers drive direct from New York City to the fishing shores 
and have been known to pay as high as 26 cents a pound for carp. 

St7'iped hass and white perch. — Since 1901 the catch of striped bass 
has decreased 81 per cent in quantity and 80 per cent in value, and 
white perch 80 per cent in quantity and 75 per cent in value. Until 
recently the capture of these two species furnished remunerative 
employment to many fishermen during the winter months, especially 
along Barnegat Bay, but in the present scarcity the fishery hardly 
pays. Striped bass were particularly scarce in 1904. Seines and 
gill nets are the apparatus commonly used for their capture, these 
being fished mostly through the ice. The Mullica River, in Burlington 
County, one of the principal spawning streams in the state, has also 
been very prolific in these two species, but in 1904 the catch was 
very light. Bag nets and seines are the apparatus used in this river, 
the former being commonly fished through the ice in from 20 to 30 
feet of water. 

Sturgeon. — Comparatively little change has taken place in the 
sturgeon fishery since 1901. The largest catches are taken with gill 
nets in the Delaware River in Salem and Cumberland counties. A 
few are taken al^ in pound nets set in the ocean. The value of the 
fishery is much enhanced by the preparation of caviar from the eggs. 

The following table shows the quantity and value of sturgeon, 
including caviar, taken in New Jersey in various years since 1890: 



Year. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Year. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


1890 


3,635,350 
3,520.370 
3,187,342 
1,013,604 


$90,085 
86, 419 
64,982 
94,056 


1898 


868,326 
188,027 
235,952 


$100 966 


1891 


1901 


19,352 


1892 


1904. 


19 737 


1897 











Whiting. — This species, which is also locally called ''winter weak- 
fish" and ''frost-fish," was difficult to market a few years ago, but 
now brings a fair price. It is taken in large quantities from Novem- 
ber to February, many pound nets being kept in use after the reg- 
ular season especially for its capture. 

FISHERIES OF PENNSYLVANIA. 
GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 



The number of persons employed in the fisheries of Pennsylvania 
in 1904 was 1,412. Of these, 117 were on fishing vessels, 703 in 
shore or boat fisheries, and 592 were shoresmen, principally employees 
of the wholesale fish and oyster establishments of Philadelphia. 
The total investment was S2,097,715. The number of vessels was 
16, valued at S48,200, having a net tonnage of 286, with outfits 



56 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



valued at $6,785. The number of row and gasoline boats was 243, 
valued at S 10,685. The value of the fishing apparatus employed in 
the shore and vessel fisheries was $15,130, of shore and accessory- 
property, $846,915, and the cash capital was $1,170,000. The prod- 
ucts of the fisheries consisted of 1,215,394 pounds of fish, worth 
$63,209, and 118,700 bushels of oysters, with a value of $104,290, 
the total value of fish and oysters being $167,499. 

Compared with 1901 the decrease in employees is 1,072; the 
products show a decrease in pounds from 6,029,538 to 2,046,294, and 
in value from $251,491 to $167,499. The catch of shad has decreased 
from 703,031 to 188,571 in the number of fish, or from 2,982,868 
pounds, valued at $124,328, to 835,544 pounds, valued at $52,472. 
Alewives, fresh and salted, have decreased from 1,135,925 pounds, 
$9,408, to 269,800 pounds, $3,540; catfish from 193,199 pounds, 
$10,163, to 17,200 pounds, $1,147; eels from 140,504 pounds, $6,151, 
to 60,650 pounds, $4,146; and German carp from 161,895 pounds, 
$9,795, to 10,350 pounds, $549. 

The accompan3dng tables show in detail the persons, apparatus, 
and products of the fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904: 

Number of Persons Employed in the Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904. 



How engaged. 


No. 


On vessels fishing 


117 


In shore or boat fisheries 


703 


Shoresmen 


592 








Total 


1,412 







Investment in the Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904. 



Items. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats 

Gasoline boats 

Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 

Dredges 

Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Seines 

Gill nets 



No. 



16 

286 



232 
11 



Value. 



$48,200 



6,785 
7,285 
3,400 

3,017 

5,814 
4,132 



Items. 



Apparatus — shore fisheries — Ctd 

Stop nets 

Fyke nets 

Dip nets 

Lines 

Fish baskets 

Shore and accessory property 

Cash capital 



Total. 



No. 



1 
159 



Value. 



$100 

383 

482 

7 

1,195 

846,915 

1,170,000 



2,097,715 



Products of the Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904. 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh . 
Alewives, salted 

Catfish 

Eels 

German carp . . . 

Mullet 

Shad 



Lbs. 



97,800 

172,000 

17,200 

60, 650 

10, 350 

1,700 

835, 544 



Value. 



$615 

2,925 

1,147 

4,146 

549 

48 

52, 472 



Species. 



striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Suckers 

Oysters, market 
Oysters, seed . . . 

Total 



Lbs. 



6,300 

11,2.50 

2, 600 

630,000 

b 200, 900 



2,046,294 



Value. 



$687 

.506 

114 

90,000 

14, 290 



167,499 



90,000 bushels. 



t> 28,700 bushels. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



57 



THE FISHERIES BY COUNTIES. 

In 1904 the fisheries of eastern Pennsylvania were prosecuted in 
Bucks, Delaware, Northampton, Philadelphia, and Pike counties on 
the Delaware River, and in Cumberland, Dauphin, Juniata, Lan- 
caster, Perry, and York counties on the Susquehanna River. The 
extent of the fisheries in each of these counties in 1904 is shown in 
the following tables: 

Statement by Counties of the Number op Persons Employed in the Fisheries 
OF Pennsylvania in 1904. 



Counties. 


On 

vessels 
fishing. 


In shore 
or boat 
fisheries. 


Shores- 
men. 


Total. 






141 
4 
48 
58 
24 

141 
8 
34 
48 
23 

174 




141 


Cumberland 






4 


Dauphin 






48 


Delaware 




15 


73 


.Tnniat.fl, 




24 


Lancaster 






141 


Northampton ': 






8 


Perry 




577' 


34 


Philadelphia 


117 


742 


Pike 


23 


York 






174 










Total 


117 


703 


592 


1 412 







Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904. 



Items. 


Bucks. 


Cimiber- 
land. 


Dauphin. 


Delaware. 


Juniata. 


Lancaster. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Boats 


25 


$1,018 


4 


$40 


15 


$409 


26 
10 

1 

27 
50 


$2,305 
3,150 

150 

3,200 

150 


3 


$25 


62 


$885 


Gasoline boats 




Apparatus — shore fisher- 
ies: 


18 
6 


1,738 
135 






5 


555 


3 


90 


16 
29 
42 
14 


1 355 


Gill nets 






225 


Fyke nets 












81 


Dip nets 














68 


Lines 


















6 


Fish baskets 




4 


150 


7 


310 
390 








34 


505 


Shore and accessory prop- 
erty 




1,575 




11,750 
6,000 




565 


Cash capital 










































Total 




4,466 




190 




1,664 




26,705 




115 




3,690 







58 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES, 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904 — Continued. 



Items. 


North- 
ampton. 


Perry. 


Philadelphia. 


Pike. 


York. 


Total. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels, fishing 










16 
286 


$48, 200 










16 
286 


S48, 200 


Tnnnfigp 




















Outfit 










6,785 

1,050 

250 

3,017 

630 
450 
100 
90 










6,785 
7,285 
3,400 


Boats 

Gasoline boats . . 


2 


$23 


14 


$245 


17 

1 

32 

2 
10 

1 
37 


5 


$60 


59 


$1, 225 


232 

32 

b73 
C90 

dl 
159 

98 


Apparatus — vessel fisher- 
ies: 

Di'edges 


















o3,017 


Apparatus — shore fishei- 
ies: 
Seines 

Gill nets . . 


1 


25 


4 


220 


5 


101 


18 

18 


950 

122 


5,814 
4,132 
















100 


Fylce nets 














30 

77 


62 
379 


383 


Dip nets . 






7 


35 






482 










1 






7 








3 


90 
100 








9 


140 

165 


57 


1,195 


Shore and accessory prop- 
erty 








832,360 
1,164,000 




10 


846, 915 










1,170,000 






















Total .... 




48 




690 




2,056,933 


. 1 171 




3,043 




2,097,715 













a Includes 6 patent winders, value, $2,100. 
b 13,135 yards. 



c 28,625 yards. 
d 750 yards 



Statement, by' Counties, op the Yield of the Fisheries of Pennsylvania 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Bucks. 


Cumberland. 


Dauphin. 


Delaware. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


56, 000 

172, 000 

1,000 


$350 

2,925 

50 










40,000 


$250 














Catfish 










2,500 
1,500 


170 


Eels 


4,200 


$336 


11,050 
2,000 
16, 650 


$834 

80 

1,480 


90 


German carp 


1,575 

257,975 

300 


68 
17, 440 

27 




Shad 






175,500 
6,000 
11,250 


11,520 


Striped bass 






660 


Sturgeon 










506 


Suckers 


2,100 


100 


























Total 


490,950 


20,960 


4,200 


336 


29,700 


2,394 


236, 750 


13, 196 



Species. 


Juniata. 


Lancaster. 


Northampton. 


Perry. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. ■ Value. 


Alewives, fresh 






1,800 

4,650 

26, 500 

1,450 

950 

108,094 

300 


$15 

230 

1,535 

42 

27 

6,217 

8 






1 


Catfish 








1 


Eels 








5,000 $400 


German carp ' 


75 


$3 




MuUct 




1 


Shad 

Suckers 


7,200 


$570 


1,125 


30 


27,225 1 2,420 

1 














Total.. 


7,200 


570 


14,3,744 


8,074 


1,200 


33 


32,225 2,820 





FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES, 



59 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fisheries of Pennsylvania 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Philadelphia. 


Pike. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alcwives, fresh 














97,800 

172, 000 

17,200 

60, 050 

10, 350 

1,700 

835, 544 

6,300 

11,250 

2,600 

630,000 

200,900 


$615 
















2 925 


Catfish 


5,500 
4:000 
4,000 


$520 
330 
320 






3,550 

8,400 

1,250 

750 

185, 175 


$177 

621 

36 

21 

9, 180 


1 147 


Eels 






4 146 


German carp 






549 


Mullet 






48 


Shad 


49, 400 


3,115 


7,200 


$500 


52 472 


Striped bass 


687 


Sturgeon 














506 


Suckers 










200 


6 


114 


Oysters, market 


630,000 
200,900 


90,000 
14,290 






90 000 


Oysters, seed 










14,290 












Total 


893,800 


108, 575 


7,200 


500 


199,325 


10, 041 


2,046,294 


167,499 



THE FISHERIES BY APPARATUS. 



The vessel fisheries of the eastern part of Pennsylvania in 1904 
were confined to Philadelphia County, and were prosecuted by 16 
vessels, valued at S48,200, engaged in dredging oysters. The catch 
consisted of 90,000 bushels of market oysters, valued at $90,000, 
and 28,700 bushels of seed oysters, valued at $14,290, a total of 
118,700 bushels, valued at $104,290. 

In the shore or boat fisheries seines took 767,564 pounds of fish of 
various species, valued at $36,088; gill nets, 267,955 pounds, valued 
at $17,283; dip nets, 97,625 pounds, valued at $4,415; fish baskets, 
57,100 pounds, valued at $3,748; and fyke nets, stop nets, and lines, 
25,150 pounds, valued at $1,675. 

The following tables give the quantity and value of products taken 
in the vessel and shore fisheries b}' each form of apparatus: 



Yield of the Vessel Fisheries of Pennsylvania in 1904. 





Species and apparatus. 


Philadelphia County. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Dn'dges: 

Oysters, market 


630,000 
200,900 


$90, 000 


Oysters, seed 


14,290 








Total 


830,900 


104, 290 







60 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of Pennsyl- 
vania IN 1904. 



Species. 


Bucks. 


Dauphin. 


Delaware. 


Juniata. 


Lancaster. 


Northamp- 
ton. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


56,000 

172,000 

1,000 

1,575 

248,850 

300 

2,100 


$350 

2,925 

50 

68 

16,800 

27 

100 






40,000 


$250 






1,600 


$13 






Alewives, salted... 
















Catfish 






1,000 


80 














German carp 


2,000 
10, 650 


$80 
1,480 










7£ 
1,12£ 


S3 


Shad 






7,200 


$570 


57,864 


3,647 


30 


Striped bass 


5,000 


500 




Sucliers 






































Total 


481,825 


20,320 


18,650 


1,560 46,000 


830 


7,200 


570 69,464 


3,660 


1,20C 


33 


Species. 


Perry. 


Philadelphia. 


Pike. 


York. Total. 


Lbs. : Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 
















97,600 
172,000 
2,500 
5,650 
482, 414 
5,300 
2,100 


$613 


Alewives, salted. .. 


1 














2,925 
170 


Catfish 


1 


500 

2,000 

20, 800 


840 

160 

1,300 










German carp 












311 


Shad 


13,725 SI, 220 


7,200 


$500 


99,000 $5,895 


31,442 


Striped bass 


527 


Suckers 
















100 
















I 




Total 


13,725 1,220 


23, 300 


1,500 


7,200 


500 


99,000 5,895 


767, 664 


36,088 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Gill-net Fisheries of Pennsyl- 
vania IN 1904. 



Species. 


Bucks. 


Delaware. 


Lancaster. 


Philadel- 
phia. 


York. 


Total. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shad 


9,125 


$640 


175,500 
1,000 
11,250 


$11,520 


28,980 


$2,037 


28,600 


$1,815 


13,500 


$605 


255,705 

1,000 

11,250 


$16,617 
160 


Striped bass 


160 


Sturgeon 






506 














506 






















Total 


9, 125 


640 


187,750 


12, 186 


28,980 


2,037^28,600 1,815 


13,500 


605 


267,955 


17,283 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Fyke-net and Stop-net Fisheries 
OF Pennsyi.vania in 1904. 



Apparatus and species. 


Delaware. 


Lancaster. 


Philadelphia. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Fyke nets: 
Catfish .... 


1,500 
1,500 


.$90 
90 


1,550 

2,300 

250 

300 


$82 

129 

7 

9 


5,000 
1,000 


$480 
90 


2,000 

2,500 

900 

550 

100 


$100 

125 

27 

15 

3 


10,050 

7,300 

1,150 

850 

. 100 


$752 


Eels 


434 




34 


Mullet 










24 


Suckers 










3 



















Total 

Stop nets: 


3,000 


180 


4,400 


227 


6,000 
2,000 


570 
160 


6,050 


270 


19,450 1 1,247 
















Grand total 


3,000 


180 


4,400 


227 


8,000 


730 


6,050 


270 


19,450 1.247 









FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



61 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Dip-net Fisheries of Pennsyl- 
vania IN 1904. 



Species. 


Lancaster. 


Perry. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




200 
11,250 


«2 
533 










200 
97,425 


$2 


Shad 


13,500 


$1,200 


72,675 


$2,680 


4,413 






Total 


11,450 


535 


13,500 


1,200 


72,675 


2,680 


97,625 


4,415 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Line Fisheries of Pennsylvania 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Lancaster. 


Philadelphia. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Catfish 


200 
200 
150 
150 


$10 
10 
4 
4 






200 

3,200 

150 

150 


$10 


Eels 


3,000 


$240 


250 




4 








4 










Total 


700 


28 


3,000 


240 


3,700 


268 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fish-basket Fisheries of Penn- 
sylvania IN 1904. 



Species. 


Cumberland. 


Dauphin. 


Lancaster. 


Perry. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Catfish 








2,900 

24,000 

1,050 

650 


$138 

1,396 

31 

18 






1,550 

5,900 

350 

200 

100 


$77 

496 

9 

1 


4,450 


$215 


Eels 


4,200 


$336 


11,050 $834 


5,000 


$400 


50,150 3,462 




1,400 40 


Mullet 














850 24 


Suckers 










150 4 






250 7 


















Total 


4,200 


336 


11,050 834 


28,750 1,587 


5,000 


400 


8,100 


591 


57,100 3,748 



NOTES AND DETAILED STATISTICS OF PRINCIPAL FISHERIES. 

The oyster fishery, which is credited to Philadelphia County, is 
prosecuted in Delaware Bay by boats owned in Philadelphia. 

The recent decrease in the catch of fish in the Delaware and Sus- 
quehanna rivers is attributable to excessive fishing in the lower 
stretches of the rivers and about their mouths, and in some degree 
to pollution of the waters with acids, dyestuffs, and other factory 
refuse. 

The following supplementary table shows the number and value of 
shad caught in each county on these two rivers in 1904: 



Counties. 



Bucks 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Juniata 

Lancaster 

Northampton 



No. 


Value. 


57,350 


$17, 440 


3,700 


1,480 


40,500 


11,520 


1,600 


570 


24,021 


6,217 


250 


30 



Perry 

Philadelphia 

Pike 

York 

Total. 



No. 



6,050 
12,350 

1,600 
41,150 



188, 571 



Value. 



$2,420 

3,115 

500 

9,180 



52, 472 



62 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



WHOLESALE TRADE. 

Number of Persons Employed and the Capital Invested in the Wholesale 
Fishery Trade op Philadelphia and Chester in 1904. 



Items. 


Philadelphia. 


Chester. 


Total. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Establishments 


83 


$821,510 

1,164,000 

353, 475 


4 



$11, 450 
6,000 
3,000 


87 
"592' 


$832 960 


Cash capital 


1,170,000 
356 475 


Wages paid 




Persons engaged 


577 


15 













FISHERIES OF DELAWARE. 



GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

The returns for the fishery industries of Delaware for 1904 show 
little change in the totals from those of previous years. Compared 
wdth 1901 the number of persons engaged decreased from 1,998 to 
1,899; the value of vessels, boats, apparatus of capture, shore prop- 
erty, etc., increased from $657,197 to $669,995, and the catch 
decreased from 5,835,186 pounds to 5,608,289 pounds, but its value 
increased from $203,372 to $259,590. 

The most important fishery product of Delaware is the oyster, 
the yield of which in 1904 amounted to 241,575 bushels, worth 
$93,684, or 36 per cent of the value of the total products. Of this 
yield, 105,000 bushels were market oysters from public reefs, 10,400 
bushels w^ere market oysters from private areas, and the remaining 
126,175 bushels were seed oysters from the public reefs. In addition, 
large quantities of market oysters were taken from private areas 
owned by residents of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, to w^hich states 
they have been credited. In 1901 the yield of oysters credited to 
Delaware was only 173,190 bushels, for w^hich the fishermen received 
$62,608. 

Next in rank to the oyster industry comes the shad fishery, with a 
yield in 1904 of 237,755 fish, worth $67,928, or 26 per cent of the total 
for the state. The yield in 1901 was 341,988 shad, for which the 
fishermen received $56,605, an average of 17 cents per fish, while the 
average in the year covered by these returns w^as 28 cents. Owing 
to this increase in price of the fish, the shad fishery in 1904 was very 
profitable. 

The catch of minor species of fish in this state in 1904 compares 
favorably with that in 1901. The yield of eels increased from 230,650^ 
pounds to 268,255 pounds; German carp from 198,040 pounds to 
216,560 pounds; squeteague from 722,435 pounds to 773,300 pounds, 
and sturgeon, including caviar, from 86,199 pounds to 91,295 pounds. 
The principal decreases in the same period have been in alewives, 
from 597,374 pounds to 344,860 pounds; white perch, from 242,360 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



63 



pounds to 186,050 pounds, and catfish, from 130,280 pounds to 
108,170 pounds. Owing to the high price of caviar, the yield of the 
sturgeon fishery increased in value from $10,444 to $11,438. The 
output of caviar in 1904 was only 7,495 pounds, which was the 
smallest in more than twenty years. 

The following tables show, by counties, the extent of the fisheries of 
Delaware in 1904. A separate statement of the menhaden industry 
is siven also: 



Statement, by Counties, or the Number of Persons Employed in the 
Fisheries op Delaware in 1904. 



Items. 


Kent. 


New- 
castle. 


Sussex. 


Total. 




107 
5 

427 
6 






107 






15 
621 

378 


20 




320 
20 


1,368 




404 






Total 


545 


340 


1,014 


1,899 







St.'^.tement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore 
Property Employed in the Fisheries of Delaware in 1904. 



Kent. 



Newcastle. 



No. Value. No. Value 



Sussex. 



Total. 



No. Value. No. Value. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage '... 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats, row and sail 

Boats, motor 

Apparatus — vessel fisheries : 

Dredges 

Tongs 

Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Pound nets 

Seines (total length 25, 328 yards) 

Drift nets — 

Shad (total length 113,945 yards) . . 

Sturgeon (total length 24,990 yards) 

Miscellaneous (total length 20,000 

yards) 

Stake gill nets (total length 14,760 
yards) 

Fyke nets 

Eel pots 

Eel spears 

Lobster pots 

Lines 

Bow nets 

Dredges 

Tongs 

Rakes 

Other apparatus 

Shore and accessory property 

Cash capital 



28 
225 



?18,050 



3, 226 
3,600 



338 
4 



272 
40 



Total. 



155 
10 



125 
9,216 
1,215 

1,470 
212 

1,460 
2.920 

2,552 
G60 



230 

282 

20 



10 

21 

140 

905 

34 

132 

9.760 

2,500 

59,621 



154 
41 



$10, 425 
13,945 



423 



628 
570 



120 
1,725 

9,280 
1,980 

1,160 



708 
360 



1,185 
42 
50 



46,990 



$2, 900 



610 

5,757 



S, 465 



926 
1,235 



1,.301 
314 
446 
17 
60 
15 
10 



224 

53 

41 

325, 510 

220, 500 

563, 384 



28 
225 



7 
107 



915 
45 



42 
179 



230 
59 



376 

998 

1,795 

42 

50 



12 

8 

202 

35 



$18,050 



3,226 
6,500 

""735 
25, .398 
15, 160 

1,476 
212 

1,580 
8,110 

12,758 
3,875 



15 2,035 



1,531 

1,304 

826 

17 

60 

42 

31 

140 

1,129 

87 

173 

342, .540 

223,000 

669,995 



14008—07- 



64 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Fisheries of Delaware in 

1904. 



Species. 



Alewives 

Black bass. . . 

Blueflsh 

Carp, Gerinar. 

Catfish 

Cod 



Kent. 



Lbs. 



.55, 840 
43, 770 



17, 450 

3,500 

23, 460 



43, 350 
2,900 



Croaker 

Drum 

Eels 

Flounders 

Mullet 

Perch, white 

Pike 

Sea bass 

Shad 1 133, 400 

Spot 

Squeteague 440, 300 

Striped bass 15, 737 

Sturgeon 5, 355 

Caviar 825 

Suckers 2, 800 

Tautog 

Crabs, soft 

King crabs 605,000 

Lobsters 

Oysters: 

Market, pul)lic reefs .... 486, 500 
Market, private areas . . ' 72, 800 
Seed, public reefs j 883. 225 

Clams 3,040 

Turtles i 8, 200 

Terrapin 320 



Total 2,911,772 116,972:1,218,884 80,717 



Value. 



S72 



Newcastle. 



Lbs. Value 



107,880 
420 



3,500 
2,893 



160,720 
52,850 



1,171 
50 



10, 599 
2,381 



298 

70 

1,356 



91,030 



3,171 
215 



12,010 



1,066 



10,091 1 669,160 



7,368 

1,954 

306 

758 

112 



25, 939 
9,064 

46, 171 
472 
497 
280 



6,500 
5,400 

67,8.30 
5, 380 

10. 670 



29,010 
24 



4,969 



48, 182 



322 

650 

3,739 

4,915 

420 



2,235 
18 



Sussex. 



Lbs. 



232,980 



250 



11, 550 

800 

7,700 



153,765 

4,100 

4,000 

130, 690 

8,150 

600 

148, 460 

15,000 

326, 500 

19, 260 

10, 615 

1,290 



6,000 
134, 467 



2,600 
248, 500 



7,024 

3,000 

332 



Value. 



$3, 252 



541 

36 
208 



7,712 

187 

135 

6,452 

329 

30 

9, 655 

1,048 

7,783 

2,232 

510 

1,210 



300 
5,960 



286 
12,510 



1,121 
156 
233 



1,477,633 



61,901 



Total. 



Lbs. 



344,860 

420 

250 

216, 5(i0 

108, 170 

800 

25, 150 

3,500 

268, 255 

4,100 

4,000 

186, 050 

11,050 

600 

951,020 

15,000 

773, 300 

40, 397 

83, 800 

7,495 

13.470 

6,000 

a 134, 467 

665, 000 

2, 600 

b 735, 000 

c 72, 800 

d 883, 225 

<-io,oe4 

40,210 
676 



5, 608, 289 



Value. 



$4, 495 

50 

15 

14,099 

5,815 

36 

506 

70 

14,037 

187 

135 

10,689 

544 

30 

67,928 

1,048 

15, 473 

4,836 

4,555 

6,883 

5.32 

300 

5, 960 

2,385 

286 

38, 449 
9,064 

46, 171 

1,593 

2,888 

531 



259, 590 



" 403, 401 in number. 
b 105,000 bushels. 



f 10,400 bushels, 
o' 126,175 bushels. 



1,258 bushels. 



Statement, by Counties, 



OF the Yield of the Vessel Fisheries of Dela- 
ware IN in04. 



Apparatus and species. 



Dredges and tongs: 

Oysters, market, from public reefs. . 
Oysters, market, from private areas 
Oysters, seed, from public reefs 

Total 



Kent County. 



Lbs. 



8,400 

62,300 

407, 785 



478, 485 



Value. 



$440 

8,464 

23, 463 

32, 367 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



G5 



Statement, by Counties and Apparatus, of the Yield of the Shore Fisheries 

OF Delaware in 1904. 




Fyke nets 
Alew' 
Carp. German 
Catfish 
Eels 
Perch, white 
Pike 
Suckers 
Turtles 



Lines: 

Blueflsh 
Cod 

Croaker 
Sea bass 

Squeteaguc ] 62, 300 

Tautog 
Turtles 

Total 



66 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties and Apparatus, of the Yield op the Shore Fisheries 
OF Delaware in 1904 — Continued. 



Apparatus and species. 


Kent. 


Newcastle. 


Sussex. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Pots: 

Eels 

Lobsters 


3,000 


$180 


1 
35,430 $1,917 


99,990 
2,600 


$4,998 
286 


138, 420 
2,600 


$7,095 
286 












Total 


3,000 


180 


35,430 1,917 


102,590 


5,284 


141,020 


7,381 


Spears: 

Eels . .. 








34,600 


1,752 


34,600 


1,752 










Minor nets: 


' 6,240 

11,700 

650 

2, 120 


430 
862 
05 
185 








6,240 

11,700 

650 

2,960 

134, 467 


430 


Catfish 








862 










65 


Shad 







840 
134, 467 


68 
5,960 


253 


Crabs, soft 






5,960 














Total 


20,710 


1,542 






135,307 


6,028 


156,017 


7,570 










Dredges, tongs, etc.: 

Oysters, market, from 
public reefs 


478, 100 

10,500 

475, 440 
3,040 


25,499 

600 

22,708 
472 






248,500 


12, 510 


726, 600 

10,500 

475, 440 
10,064 


38,009 


Oysters, market, from- 






600 


Oysters, seed, from pub- 










22,708 








7,024 


1,121 


1,593 










Total. . 


967,080 


49,279 






255,524 


13,631 


1,222,604 


62, 910 










Other apparatus: 










70 


49 


70 


49 














Grand total 


2,4.3.3,287 


84, 605 


1,218,884 


80,717 


1,477,633 


61,901 


5,129,804 


227,223 



The Menhaden Industry. 



Items. 


No. 


Value. 




1 


$300, 000 




200,000 


Persons in factories 


204 

114,060,000 

7,240 

429,850 




Menhaden utilized. 


228, 120 






165,745 


Gallons of oil made 




89,230 









THE FISHERIES OF MARYLAND. 



GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

In 1897 Maryland held first rank among the Middle Atlantic 
States for the value of its fisheries. The oyster industry, however, 
was by far the most important of these, and its rapid decline by 1901 
had brought Maryland down to fourth place, to remain there ever 
since. Recent legislation affecting the oyster grounds is expected 
to prove effective in restoring the industry to its former productive- 
ness and value. 

The total number of persons employed in the fisheries of Maryland 
in 1904 was 30,337. Of this number 14,397 were occupied in the 
shore fisheries; 10,283 were engaged on shore in oyster shuck- 
ing, crab-packing, and other branches of the fisheries; 4,290 were 
engaged on fishing vessels, and 1,367 on transporting vessels. Since 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



67 



1901 there has been a decrease of 5,923, or 16 per cent, m the total 
number of men thus engaged, mainly because of the decline of the 
oyster fishery and the consequent reduction of force in oyster shuck- 
ing and canning houses. 

The total investment in the fisheries was $5,983,465, a decrease of 
$522,601, or 8 per cent, since 1901. Of this, $2,314,650 represents the 
cash capital employed, $1,798,505 the amount invested in shore and 
accessory property, $1,063,259 the value of 777 fishing and 438 trans- 
porting vessels with their outfits, $470,851 the value of 9,276 boats 
under 5 tons. The remainder, $336,200, represents the value of the 
apparatus used. 

The total products of this state in 1904 were 81,128,866 pounds, 
valued at $3,336,560, showing, since 1901, a decrease of 2 per cent in 
quantity and 11 per cent in value. The most important increases 
in catch were in menhaden and crabs, the greatest decreases in oysters 
and shad. Increased values are shown for crabs, alewives, menhaden, 
and several other species, but the total of this is small compared with 
the decreased value of the oyster product. 

The following tables show the number of persons engaged in the 
fisheries, the number and value of vessels, boats, and apparatus used, 
the value of the shore and accessory property and cash capital 
employed, and the quantity and value of products taken in the 
fisheries of the state in 1904: 

Number op Persons Employed in the Fisheries op Maryland in 1904. 





How engaged. 


No. 




4.290 




1,367 


In shore or boat fisherirs. . . .. . 


14,397 




10, 283 








Total 


30, 337 







Investment in the Fisheries of Maryland ix 1904. 



Items. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats, sail and row 

Boats, gasoline 

Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Oyster dredges 

Crab scrapes 

Tongs 

Seines 

Eel pots 

Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Seines 

Gill nets 



No. 



777 
7,528 



438 
11,4(53 



9,232 
44 

3,030 

167 

54 

a 10 

1,731 

b 224 
c3,835 



Value. 



$423, 130 



115,468 
453,500 



71,lbl 

450,956 

19, 895 

53,981 

542 

498 

4,250 

1,036 

19,181 
45, 749 



Items. 



Apparatus— shore fisheries- 
Continued. 

Pound nets 

Fyke nets 

Trammel nets 

Bow nets 

Minor nets 

Lines 

Eel pots 

Spears 

Oyster dredges 

Crab scrapes 

Tongs and nippers. . . . .. 

Shore and accessory property. 
Cash capital 



Total . 



No. 



963 

5,004 

dl5 

103 

2,284 



2,796 

39 

2, 123 



Value. 



$98, 320 

15,314 

1,410 

502 

1,067 

6,257 

1,405 

45 

20, 856 

8,058 

57, 729 

1,798,505 

2,314,650 

5,983,465 



a Total length, 2,640 yards. 
b Total length, 45,125 yards. 



c Total length, 434,587 yards. 
d Total length, 3,620 yards. 



68 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Products op the Fisheries op Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh . 
Alewives, salted 

Black bass 

Bluefish 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Carp, German . . 

Catfish 

Cero 

Cod 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels, fresh 

Eels, salted 

Flounders 

Gar pike 

Gizzard shad 

Hickory shad. . . 

Kingflsh 

Mackerel 

Menhaden 

Mullet 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow . . . 

Pike 

Pompano 



Lbs. 


Value. 


9,589,430 


155,263 


4,895,-540 


82,719 


. 14, 150 


1,325 


91, 460 


3,855 


3,150 


102 


375, 0B2 


9,890 


139, 280 


4,633 


491,435 


18,381 


5,130 


156 


310 


12 


165, 840 


2,688 


30, 975 


301 


250, 165 


10, 705 


76, 300 


2,214 


35,005 


1,192 


4,000 


10 


7, 225 


136 


4,500 


90 


7,610 


940 


16, 240 


1,296 


9, 849, 400 


20, 189 


24, 935 


745 


545,053 


30,841 


265, 470 


10, 685 


42,317 


3,716 


300 


45 



Species. 



Scup 

Sea bass 

Shad 

Sheepshead 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar 

Suckers 

Sunflsh 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

Shrimp 

Squid 

Oysters, market, natural 

"rock 

Oysters, market, private 

beds 

Oysters, seed, natural rock 

Clams, hard 

Turtles 

Terrapin 

Total 



Lbs. 



31,610 

59,600 

2,912,249 

950 

1,950 

13,480 

785, 215 

721, 240 

164, 245 

20,600 

2,775 

7, 450 

nl2, 665, 282 

6 5,732,865 

2,400 

14,000 

c 27, 032, 950 

d 3, 251, 955 

« 722, 645 

/ 37, 800 

13, 400 

3,923 



81,128,866 



Value. 



$2,558 

2,580 

159, 772 

68 

241 

411 

23, 207 

72, 207 

8,313 

18, 722 

72 

487 

168,996 

189, 851 

800 

418 

2,098,992 

301,650 

17,032 

4,880 

456 

2,718 



3,336,560 



137,995,846 in number. 
b 17,198,595 in numlier. 



c3,86r,850busliels. 
d 464,565 bushels. 



f 103,235 bushels. 
/ 4,725 bushels. 



THE FISHERIES BY COUNTIES. 

The leading county in the vahie of its fishery products is Somerset, 
the bulk of whose output consists of oysters and crabs. Dorchester 
County ranks second in the amount and value of its products, and out- 
ranks Somerset in the value of its oyster catch, but is exceeded by the 
latter in the catch of soft crabs. Talbot County ranks third in impor- 
tance, with a more valuable hard-crab industry than exists in any other 
county. These crabs are utilized mostl}^ at factories located at 
Oxford and vicinity, St. Michaels, and Tilghman Island, where the 
meat is picked fi'om the crabs and shipped in tin buckets. Anne 
Arundel County's oyster and crab industries place it fourth in impor- 
tance, and Annapolis is the center of both of these industries. Worces- 
ter, the only county bordering on the ocean, supports extensive 
pound-net and sturgeon gill-net fisheries, which, with its oyster-plant- 
ing industry, contribute very largely to the value of its products. St. 
Mary County owes its position as sixth in rank almost entirely to its 
oyster industry, the other fisheries being comparatively unimportant. 
The same may be said of Wicomico County, with the exception that 
the gill-net fishery for shad is of considerable value. Kent County 
supports the most important gill-net fishery in the state, the greater 
part being carried on from Betterton, in Chesapeake Bay. It supports 
also important seine and pound-net fisheries. Calvert County, 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



69 



besides its important oyster industry, has profitable pound-net 
fisheries. The products of Queen Anne County consist mainly of 
oysters, hard crabs, and striped bass. The oyster product is taken 
entirely with tongs. Baltimore City supports a very important vessel 
fishery for oysters, though there were in 1904 but little more than one- 
third as many vessels from that port as in 1901. Baltimore County 
(including Baltimore City) ranks first in the amount of investment 
and number of persons employed, because of its oyster canning and 
shucking trade. Charles is the only one of the remaining counties in 
which oysters are taken. Cecil County ranks first in the value of 
pound-net fisheries, followed by Worcester, Charles, Dorchester, and 
Talbot counties. Shad and alewives constitute the main catch of 
these nets. In Harford County these two species are taken mostly in 
seines. The salting of alewives is an important industry in both Cecil 
and Harford counties. The fisheries of Caroline County have de- 
creased ui value from $22,012 in 1897 to $1,571 in 1904, mainly on 
account of the diminished number of shad ascending the Choptank 
River. 

Statement, by Counties, op the Number of Persons Employed in the Fisheries 

OF Maryland in 1904. 



Counties. 


On ves- 
sels 
fishing. 


On ves- 
sels 
trans- 
porting. 


In shore 
or boat 
fisheries. 


Shores- 
men. 


Total. 




49 
447 
173 


156 

387 
63 


1,935 

53 

821 

33 

351 

490 

2,199 

517 

871 

99 

625 

1,277 

2,224 

1,353 

888 

661 


191 

5,559 

9 


2,331 




6,446 




1,066 




33 


Cecil 




2 

3 

203 

4 

63 


65 

23 

1,114 

214 


418 






516 




1,421 


4,937 




735 




60 


994 




3 


102 






10 
84 
240 
64 
49 
39 


635 


St. Marv 


10 

1,676 

426 

28 


48 

1,856 

1,030 

160 

11 


1,419 


Somerset 


5,996 


Talbot ^ 


2,873 




1,125 




711 








Total 


4,290 


1,367 


14,397 


10,283 


30,337 







a Includes Baltimore City. 



70 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, Shore Property, 
AND Cash Capital Employed in the Fisheries of Maryland in 1904. 



Items. 


Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. « 


Calvert. 


Caroline. . 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 


10 
116 


$7,050 

"2,673' 
41,750 

" "8,"673' 
2,792 
1,450 

406 
27 

1,551 

299 

4,450 


54 
1,373 

""'iof 

4,157 

25" 

1 

212 


$26,350 


35 
315 

20' 

501 

'""568' 
2 

114 
42 

7 

55 
65 


$43,055 












Outfit" . .. 


16,740 
99,425 


5,550 
15,700 






Vessels transporting 


58 

885 












Outfit 


2i,8i2 
705 
500 

2,330 


3,385 
41,435 
2,400 

1,710 
441 

585 

140 

6,085 






Boats, sail and row 


169 
3 

24 
6 

76 
24 
41 


17 


$160 






Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 
Oyster dredges. 






Tongs 




Apparatus— shore fisheries: 
Seines 


4 

5 

3 

372 


700 
50 
55 

2,217 


1 
57 

9 
34 


225 


Gill nets 


602 


Pound nets 


390 




320 




2 


60 
34 
452 












40 




45 

18 

42 

240 

10, 962 

1,562 

20,900 






Lines . . . 












23 


12 


45 

16 

1,044 
















Tongs and nippers 

Shore and accessory property 


1,338 


6,690 
15, 335 
12,500 












1,376,759 
1,989,200 




200 
















Total 




104,992 




3,530,895 




154,255 




1,897 









Items. 


Cecil. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Harford. 


Kent. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 










272 
2,049 


$114,600 






8 
153 


$3,600 






[ 1 






Outfit 




1 


27,425 
84,400 






1,805 


Vessels transporting 


1 
12 


$300 1 

8 

45 

8, 015 268 


$600 

'"'125" 
13,990 


59 
1,703 

i,'749 
4 

1,080 
64 
6 


2 
14 

""i54' 

7 


$450 

""75" 
9,115 
2,525 


30 
473 

'53i' 
8 

16 


16,500 






Outfit 


10,715 

87,000 

1,750 

18,810 
204 
30 


3,551 


Boats, sail and row 


158 

7 


25,830 




2,650 




2,470 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 






240 


Crab scrapes. 


1 










1 












1 






7 


1,250 


Eel pots 


1 


1,731 

14 
215 
214 

30 


1,036 

963 

1,294 

14,860 

330 








Apparatus— shore fisheries: 

Seines ... 


4 

492 

180 

2,044 

5 


597 

7,701 

12,400 

3,657 

150 


7 
108 
121 

2 


930 

3,628 

13,835 

. 50 


11 

663 

11 

2,074 

8 


7,050 
9,119 
300 
3,365 
1,200 


14 
927 

64 
159 


1,770 




7,095 


Pound nets 


5,775 


Fyke nets . . 


2,455 








1 1 


96 

1,176 

250 

7,862 

793 

10, 392 

67,310 

51,100 


1 








52 
32 
35 


388 
878 
254 








293 


Eel pots . 


250 


ioo 1 36 


274 


169 


255 


142 






7 
























282 


1,432 


2. 136 






778 


3,961 




10,658 


4,357 

600 




30,010 
3,000 


2,236 






2,000 










Total.. .. 




48,273 ' 


39, 666 




602,396 




66,378 




78,973 













a Includes Baltimore City. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



71 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, Shore Property, 
AND Cash Capital Employed in the Fisheries of Maryland in 1904 — Cont'd. 



Items. 


Prince George. 


Queen Anne. 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 












2 
20 


$900 


303 

2,777 

76' 

1,955 

"2,' sis' 

1,204 

103 

3 


$191,275 












Outfit 










375 
21,000 


44,805 
109,400 








4 
93 


$2,200 


28 
429 

'"'gii' 

8 






Outfit - - 




525 
15,280 


4,100 
49, 920 

160 


11,890 
121,870 

21,060 
338 


Boats, sail and row 


34 


$1,230 


426 


Apparatus — vessel flslieries: 

Oyster dredges 










Seines 






1 




3,000 


Apparatus— shore fisheries: 

Seines 


8 
14 
2 


2,550 

1,052 

200 


17 

120 

16 

29 


945 
435 
800 
270 


5 


535 


Gill nets 


53 
35 
54 
21 


441 




44 


6,825 


1 560 




658 


Bow nets 











105 


Minor apparatus 












511 


Lines 




2 


""266" 


445 
85 




177 


75' 

28 
1,178 
2,234 
1,164 


421 


Eel pots. . . . 




65 


Spears 




' 


35 


Oyster dredges 


1 






44 


224 


12, 495 


Crab scrapes 








7,265 




544 


2,720 
493 


.1,019 


7,115 
2,248 
3,000 


5,637 


Shore and accessory property ... .1 


5,858 


200 885 


Cash capital 1 


169, 200 


Total 










! 10,892 

1 




24, 198 




96,579 




902,916 



Talbot. 



Items. 



No. Value. 



Vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 

Boats, sail and row 

Boats, gasoline 

Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 

Oyster dredges 

Crab scrapes 

Tongs 

Seines 

Eel pots 

Apparatus — shore fisheries: 

Seines 

Gill nets 

Pound nets 

Fyke nets 

Trammel nets 

Bow nets 

Minor apparatus 

Lines 

Eel pots 

Spears 

Oyster dredges 

Crab scrapes 

Tongs and nippers 

Shore and accessory property. 
Cash capital 



673 



21 
•555 



Total. 



909 
4 



3 

41 

133 

18 



$33,800 



16, 255 
25,650 



Wicomico. 



No. Value. 



17 
391 



3,090 
40,523 
2,375 



572 
1 



105 

305 

13,480 

280 



2 
435 

17 



2,526 
65 



4,210 
57,274 
52,650 

261, 478 



$2,500 



440 
19,825 



2,280 

20,660 

300 

375 



Worcester. 



No. Value. 



14 

287 



428 

7 



100 
3,502 
2,100 
1,712 



51 
626 



82 

1 

661 



1,100 
11 



$16, 300 



1,495 
12,531 
3,475 



575 
10,086 
15, 205 



34 

443 

10 



3,525 
6,265 
10,500 

74,728 



218 i 1,085 
I 17,395 



78,949 



Total. 



No. Value. 



777 
7,528 



438 
11,463 



9,232 
44 

S,030 

167 

54 

10 

1,731 

224 
3,835 

963 

5,004 

15 

103 



2,796 

39 

2,123 

2,488 

10,068 



$423, 130 



115,468 
453, 500 



71,161 

450, 956 

19,895 

53,981 

542 

498 

4,250 

1,036 

19,181 

45, 749 

98, 320 

15,314 

1,410 

502 

727 

6,257 

1,405 

45 

20, 856 

8,058 

57,729 

1,798,845 

2,314,650 

5,983,465 



72 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Statement, by Counties, op the Yield op the Fisheries of Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore.o 


Calvert. 


Caroline. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


296,000 


13, 100 


55,600 

1,120 

850 


$345 
21 
85 


767, 400 
320,000 


86, 497 
5,000 


11,640 


$153 






• 




Blueflsh 


17, 100 


976 


1,100 
1, 500 
12,700 
18, 300 
5,000 
2, .500 


96 
75 
409 
784 
223 
125 
















Carp 

Catflsh 


49,900 

23, 350 

2,750 

100 


1,854 

863 

130 

6 


100 

9,400 

700 


2 

286 
41 


1,050 
1,250 


22 
40 








Mullet 


900 
26,000 
30,500 
2,650 


20 

1,060 

1,145 

270 






Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike 


33,950 

26, 150 

10,7,50 

42,280 

500 

325 

82, 100 

450 


2,i93 

1,489 
920 

2,981 
10 
16 

7,732 
18 


18, 800 

4,000 

200 

110, 508 


1,103 

204 

24 

C,.303 


5,700 
1,0.50 


265 
33 


Shad 


15,000 


842 


Spot 












2,700 

40,600 

700 

80 


105 

4,274 

54 

64 






Striped bass 


24,500 


940 


2,200 


216 














4,500 

1,230,500 

127,200 


390 
IS, 179 
12, 720 
















40, 625 
60,000 


487 
5,250 


















2,400 
880,950 


800 
85,944 






Oysters, marlcet, natural rock 
Turtles 


3, 582, 250 


257, 377 


1,665,6.50 
700 


114,689 
28 
























Total 


5,530,155 


305,954 


1,035,670 


90,959 


2,472,463 


145,794 


37,890 


1,571 



Species. 


Cecil. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Harford. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 

Alewives, salted 


1,934,000 
2,076,000 


$7,923 
31,315 


1,614,000 

217,920 

10, 300 

14, 550 


$8, 193 

4,086 

940 

725 


675, 220 
500 


35,805 
10 


480, 000 

2, 224, 000 

1,000 


$3, 445 

41,625 

100 


Bluefish 






35, 890 

1,400 

6,530 

56,915 

61,720 

4,230 

125, 410 

75,900 

405 

4,000 

6, 825 

7,560 

.30, 693 

23, 670 

8,605 

224, 475 

230 

1,150 

3,700 

38, 680 

4,000 

118 


947 

35 

215 

2,032 

1,049 

49 

4,721 

2,204 

18 

10 

126 

191 

1,586 

1,103 

795 

15, 267 

35 

46 

185 

3,013 

240 

37 




ButterflSh 










Carp 

Catflsh 


18,500 
90, 600 


662 

2,794 


11,700 
81,925 


290 
3,390 


18,500 
77,500 


478 
3,013 
















Eels, fresh 


7,600 


320 


4,500 


178 


13,666 


547 








8,900 


267 






























Mullet 










650 

.58,725 

36,550 

4,610 

557, 412 


15 


Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike..: 

Shad 


54,666 

33. 300 

2,500 

594, 540 


3,006 

1,164 

250 

27,584 


87, 100 

22, 450 

5,700 

207, 400 


4,769 

733 

355 

11,988 


3,918 

1,460 

512 

2(i, 318 


Spot 




1 














22,900 

89, 250 

1,955 

465 

2,775 

900 

208, 300 

4,000 

340, 5.50 


916 

8, 232 

155 

303 

72 

36 

3,125 

300 

23,257 






Striped bass 


15, 100 


1,844 


77,300 


9,351 




















Sunfish 






1,250 

1,318,200 

4.35, 699 

6, 689, 620 

■408,030 

3,018 


25 

19,628 

11,990 

487, 894 

35,040 

1,756 












Crabs, soft .. 




















Oysters, market, private beds 




































Total 


4,827,040 


76,862 


2,957,540 


72, 310 


10,253,643 


596,052 


3,549,847 


90,782 



FISHERIES OP THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



73 



wi^MENT, BY Counties, of the Yield of the Fisheries of Maryland in 

1904— Continued. 





Kent. 


Prince George. 


Queen Anne. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




773, 200 
32,000 


$2,917 
400 


834,000 

24,000 

2,000 


$3, 410 
262 
200 


240,800 


$1,150 














400 
2, 550 
30,375 
24, 150 


■ i6 

75 

918 

964 








12, 800 
16,900 
850 
2,870 
5,680 
8,875 
1,000 
65, 527 


479 

587 
28 

m 

288 

328 

94 

3,670 


700 
8, 250 
10, 800 
700 
11, 400 
9,900 
850 
5,620 


21 


Catfish 


282 




432 


Mullet 


18 




100, 750 

47, 5.50 

1,200 

560, 260 

9.50 

202, 2.50 

556, 2.50 

44,000 

1,022,700 


5,551 

1,677 

120 

33,781 

25 

20,352 

4,456 

4,400 

72,526 


648 


Perch, yellow. 


497 


Pike 


87 


Shad. 


366 


Spot 




Striped bass 


3,670 


356 


50, 250 

912, 500 

12,000 

1,259,650 


5,565 
6,376 








900 


Oysters, market, natural rock 
Turtles 






89, 965 


2,800 


28 














Total 


3, 398, 585 


148, 178 


980,972 


9,790 


2,523,420 


106, 307 



Species. 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 


Talbot. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


618,000 

4,600 

800 

500 

2, .500 


$2,279 

230 

24 

15 

102 


41, 450 
2,740 
150 
14,300 
13, 400 
5,600 
11,875 
400 
7,930 


$651 
111 
3 
614 
109 
100 
717 
10 
270 


1,045,600 
1,000 
3,200 
11,3.50 
8,500 


$6, 988 


Bluefi.sh 


50 


Carp 


96 


Catfish 


334 


Croaker . . 


180 












1,500 


75 












• 1,850 


49 


2,050 
400 


98 




10 




4,500 


90 








Menhaden 


9,325,300 


19, 424 






Mullet 






100 
19,700 
19,0.50 

100 
280, 412 


2 




6,900 


345 


6,960 

400 

450 

40,120 

45 

900 

32, 550 

5,760 

870, 849 

5,026,566 

5,036,185 

1,054,305 

641,445 

5,000 

800 

675 


477 

16 

41 

2, 403 

5 

24 

594 

503 

11,075 

152,111 

439, 515 

91,434 

14, 737 

850 

34 

800 


954 


Perch, yellow 


761 


Pike . . 






10 


Shad 


26, 550 


1,445 


14, 120 






Spot 


800 

28,300 

.36,200 

270, 083 

3,400 

2,347,275 


48 

1,213 

3,620 

3, 585 

180 

178,547 


4,480 


117 


Squeteasjue 




Striped bass 


24, 300 
7,0.31,2.50 

20, 000 
3,746,715 

47,600 


2,261 




105, 132 


Crabs, soft. 


2,000 


Oysters, market, natural rock 
Oysters, market, private beds 


265, 262 
6,272 


















Turtles 






























Total... 


3,3.52,2.58 


191,772 


22, 146, 155 


736, 628 


12, 267, 307 


404, 722 







74 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the T-'isheries of Maryland in 

1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


73,080 


$868 


129, 440 


$1,.539 


9,589,430 

4,89.5,540 

14,150 

91,460 

3,150 

375, 062 

139,280 

491,435 

5,130 

310 

165, 840 

30,975 

250, 165 

76,300 

35,005 

4,000 

7,225 

4,500 

7,610 

16,240 

9,849,400 

24, 935 

545, 053 

265, 470 

42,317 

300 

31,610 

59,600 

2,912,249 

950 

1,950 

13, 480 

785,215 

721,240 

164,245 

20,600 

2,775 

7, 450 

612,665,282 

c 5, 732, 865 

2,400 

14,000 

d 27, 032, 950 

<• 3, 251, 955 

/ 722, 645 

3 37,800 

13, 400 

3,923 


S55, 263 


Alewives, salted 


82, 719 
1,325 


Black bass 










Bluefish 






14,080 

3,150 

372, 162 


704 

102 

9,780 


3,8.55 


Bonito 






102 


Butterfish 






9,890 


Carp 


100 
49, 670 


3 

2,395 


4, 633 


Catfish .... 


850 
5,130 

310 
79,720 
21,145 
41,330 


34 
156 
12 
1,248 
152 
2,322 


18, ,381 




156 


Cod. 






12 








2,688 


Drum 






301 


Eels, fresh. . 


100 


7 


10, 705 




2,214 


Flounders. 






11,270 


359 


1,192 








10 












136 












90 








7,610 

16,240 

524, 100 

11,180 

60, 430 


940 

1,296 
765 
413 

3,660 


940 








1,296 








20, 189 


Mullet 


975 

17, 365 

2,025 

602 


26 

1,018 

75 

52 


745 




30 841 




10,685 


Pike 


3,100 

300 

31,610 

59,600 

46, 020 

950 

1,675 

4,700 

694, 740 

21,. 580 

155, 540 

19, 687 


186 

45 

2,558 

2,580 

2,825 

68 

201 

141 

20, 178 

3,217 

7, 761 

18, 101 


3,716 


Ponipano 


45 








2,558 








2,580 


Shad 


136, 125 


9,879 


159, 772 




68 








241 


Spot 






411 








23, 207 




7,500 

1,600 

250 


731 

85 

217 


72, 207 




8,313 




18, 722 


Suckers . 


72 


Sunlish 






800 
3,800 


36 
43 


487 


Crabs, hard 


222,925 


1,910 


168, 996 




189,851 












800 


Squid 






14,000 
28, 700 
937,510 
25, 200 
32,800 


418 

2,845 

110,464 

1,095 

4,030 


418 


Oysters, market, natural rock 
Oysters, market, private beds 
Oysters, seed, natural rock. . . 


1,033, .305 

804,510 

56,000 


81,171 

58, 440 

1,200 


2,098,992 

301,650 

17,032 

4,880 


Turtles 


9,100 


366 


456 




230 


162 


2,718 










Total 


2,415,232 


158,443 


3,380,689 


200, 436 


81,128,86f 


3, 336, 560 







a Includes Baltimore City. 
6 37,995,846 in number, 
c 17,198,595 in number. 
d 3,861,850 bushels. 



« 464,565 bushels. 
/ 103,235 bushels. 
9 4,725 bushels. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



75 



THE PRODUCTS BY APPARATUS. 

The most important forms of apparatus used in the fisheries are 
tongs, dredges, and scrapes. The catch by tongs (inchiding a few 
o^^sters taken with nippers) in 1904 was vahied at $1,593,554, while 
that taken with dredges and scrapes was worth $953,295. The latter 
represents the value of both oysters and crabs. Pound nets ranked 
third, with a catch valued at $220,852, followed by lines, gill nets, and 
seines. The principal species taken on lines are crabs; in gill nets, 
shad, sturgeon, and striped bass; and in seines, alewives, striped bass, 
and menhaden. The remainder of the catch was taken with fyke- 
nets, eel pots, trammel nets, bow nets, spears, and minor apparatus, 
including scoop nets, which are used mainly for catching soft crabs. 

Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Tongs and Nippers in Maryland 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Calvert. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Oysters, marlcet— 


6,300 


$502 


32,200 


$3,555 






7,000 


$450 










Shore fisheries: 

Oysters, marlcet — 

Natural rock 

Private beds 


3,491,250 


249,375 


817,950 


87,649 


316,050 


$21,682 


3,333,155 
408,030 


233,825 
35, 040 


















Total 


3,491,250 


249,375 


817,950 


87,649 


316,050 


21,682 


3,741,185 


268, 865 






Grand total 


3,497,5.50 


249,877 S.W. 1.50 91.204 


316,050 


21,682 


3,748,185: 269.315 















Species. 


Kent. 


Queen Anne. 


. St. Mary. 


Somerset. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fislieries: 

Oysters, market- 
Natural rock 


973,700 


$67, 491 


1,259,650 


889,965 


2,260,825 


$172, 192 


1,026,900 

1,054,305 

5,000 


$94,965 
91,434 


Clams, hard 














850 



















Total... 


973,700 


67,491 


1,259,650 


89,965 


2,260,825 


172, 192 


2,086,205 


187,249 











Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Oysters, market- 














45,500 $4,507 



















Shore fisheries: 

Oysters, market- 
Natural rock 

Private beds ..... 

Oysters, seed- 


2,592,065 
47,600 


$182,012 
6,272 


1.010,905 
804,510 


$79, 421 
58, 440 


28, 700 
937, 510 

25,200 
32,800 


$2. 845 
110,464 

1,095 
4,030 


17,111,150 
3,251,955 

25,200 
37,800 


1,281.422 
301,650 

1,095 


Clams, hard 










4,880 














Total 


2,639,665 


188,284 


1,815,415 


137,861 


1.024,210 


118,434 


20, 426, 105 


1,589,047 








2,639,665 


188,284 


1,815,415 


137,861 


1,024,210 


118,434 


20,471,605 


1,593,554 







76 



FISHERTES 0¥. THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Dredges and Scrapes in Maryland 

IN 1904. 



Species. 

■ 


Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. 


Calvert. 


Charles. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Oysters, market 
rock 


natural 


84, 700 


$7,500 


880,950 


885,944 


191, 100 


$20,835 














Total 


84,700 


7,500 


880,950 


85, 944 


191, 100 


20.S.^i 








natural 






Shore fisheries: 

Oysters, market, 
"rock 










23,800 


2,650 


24,500 .«1 .'i?.'; 
















1 .=;7S 


Total . . 










23,800 


2, 650 


24 500 
















Grand total . . 


84, 700 


7,500 


880,950 


85,944 


214,900 9^-4Hr, 


24,500i 1 .57."; 












' 



Species. 


Dorchester. 


Kent.' 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 


Lbs. 


V^aJue. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Oysters, market, natural 

rock 

Oysters, seed, natural 

rock 


a 2, 332, 995 


.IS 176, 576 


49,000 


$5,035 


36,050 


$2, ,575 


2,749,390 

635,600 
188, 066 


$233,970 

14,612 
4,935 


Crabs, soft .'. 


43,933 


1,200 






















Total 


2,376,928 


177,776 49,000 


5,035 


36,0.50 


2,575 


3,-573,0.56 


2.53,517 


Shore fisheries: 

Oysters, market, natural 
rock 


1.016.470 


77,043 






M, 400 


3,780 


1,259,895 

5,845 

486, 666 

3,-527,643 


110.580 


Oysters, seed, natural 
rock ! 






125 


Crabs, hard 














Crabs, soft 


178,833 


5,250 










107,355 














Total 


1,195,303 


82, 293 






50, 400 


3,780 


5,280,049 


223,615 










Grand total 


3,572,231 


260,069 


49,000 5,035 


86,450 


6,355 


8,853,105 


477, 132 



Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Oysters, market, natural 
rock 


1,154,650 


.$83,250 


22, 400 


$1,750 


7,501,235 

691,600 
231,999 


$617, 435 


Oysters, seed, natural 
rock 


56 000 


1,200 


15 812 


Crabs, soft 








6,135 




1 








Total . . 


1,154,650 83,250 


78,400 


2 950 


8 494 834 


639,382 






Shore fisheries: 

Oysters, market, natural 
rock 










2,375,065 

5,845 

486,666 

3,706.476 


195, 628 
125 


Oysters, seed, natural 
"rock 










Crabs, hard 










5,555 
112, 605 


Crabs, soft 




















Total 










6,. 574, 052 


313,913 












Grand total 


1,154,650 


83, 250 


78, 400 2. 9.50 


14,998,886 


953, 295 






' 





a Includes 2,800 poimds valued at $220, from private Beds. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



77 



Statement, by Counties, of the Pound-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries 

OF Maryland in 1904. 





Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. 


Calvert. 


Caroline. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




276,000 


$2,850 


21,600 


$135 


727,400 

320,000 

1,100 

1,500 

6,600 

8,400 

500 

2,500 

11,500 

1,600 

102,048 

2,700 

23,600 

700 

80 


$6,193 

5,000 

96 

75 

210 

360 

40 

125 

671 

84 

5,725 

105 

2,936 

54 

64 


4,600 


$66 






Bluo fish 


100 


6 
















Carp 


1,500 


45 








Catfish 






650 


26 




500 
100 

16,450 
3,7.50 

30,680 

. 41,600 
450 


20 

6 

948 

210 

2,256 

6 

3,842 

18 
























2,500 

550 

1,400 


125 


Perch, yellow 


1,000 


35 


16 


Shad 


87 
















2,100 


210 


































Total 


371,205 


10,207 


22,600 


170 


1,210,228 


21,738 


11,800 


530 







Species. 



Alewives, fresh.. 
Alcwives, salted. 

Black bass 

Bluoflsh 

Butte rflsh 

Carp 

Catfish 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels, fresh 

Flounders 

Gar pike 

Gizzard shad 

Mullet 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike..: 

Shad 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar 

Suckers 



Total. 



Cecil. 



Lbs. 



1,934,000 
2,076,000 



14,000 



27,^00 
10,800 



102,800 
""6,'566' 



4,171,400 



Value. 



Charles. 



$7,923 
31,315 



1,238,000 



1,500 
14,550 



6,100 
66,800 



1,385 
324 



4,582 
'""650 



46,579 



500 
8,900 



76,700 

15,600 

3,100 

51,900 



22,900 
76,750 



175 



1,583,475 



Value. 



$7,059 



120 

725 



157 
2,774 



18 
267 



4,200 
518 
155 

3,225 



916 

7,180 



27,i.l8 



Dorchester. 



Lbs. 



669,220 
500 



790 
,400 
,460 
,475 
,720 
,230 

700 

405 
,000 
,825 
,210 
,365 
,095 
,480 
,275 

250 
,700 
,280 
,000 

118 



1,072,498 



Value. 



$5,730 
10 



42 

35 

213 

1,423 

1,049 

49 

33 

18 

10 

126 

164 

948 

615 

673 

12,956 

10 

110 

1,843 

240 

37 



Harford. 



Lbs. Value 



2,000 



26,334 



1,800 
1,800 



5,600 



$10 



108 
90 



Species. 


Kent. 


Prince 
George. 


Queen Anne. 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




748,400 

32,000 

400 


$2,729 

400 

16 


30,000 


8150 


196,000 


$1,015 


618,000 


$2,279 


28,900 


$505 






Bluefish 










3,100 
800 


155 
24 


260 
150 

3,775 
13,400 

4,700 
775 

7,930 


14 


Carp 










3 


Catfish 


7,750 


250 


400 


20 


600 


18 


105 




1,900 


72 


109 
















70 




2,000 


100 














22 




1 






1,500 
4,500 


40 
90 


270 
































4,000 

2,485 


5 




40,050 

5,100 

.50 

31,960 


2,229 

174 

5 

1,927 


500 
200 


25 
6 


4,800 
1,300 


240 
39 


1,600 


80 


179 






Pike 










Shad 


800 


40 


4,100 


266 


26,550 

800 

17,800 

21,500 


1,445 

48 

732 

2,150 


16,070 

100 

12,550 

2,3.50 


897 


Spot... 


4 
















228 


Striped bass 


46,500 


4,070 


.300 


24 


6,000 


560 


213 






Total 


914,210 


11,900 


32,200 


265 


212,800 


2,138 


698,050 


7; 115 


97,445 


2,624 







78 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Pound-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries 
OF Maryland in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


1,045,600 


$6,988 


62,800 


S735 


16,630 


$241 


7,6U,150 

2,428,500 

1,500 

24,780 

3,150 

375,062 

21,710 

158,970 

5,130 

310 

153,980 

30,075 

4,975 

33,255 

4,000 

6,825 

4,500 

7,130 

16,240 

4,000 

6,460 

224,910 

62,015 

10,660 

300 

30,410 

868,. 505 

950 

1,675 

10,330 

691,145 

14,000 

273,000 

6,b80 

198 

175 

800 


$44,608 




,S6,725 
120 
















Bluoflsh 










4,480 

3,150 

372,162 


224 

102 

9,780 


1,278 












102 


Butterflsh 










9,890 


Carp 


100 
8,050 


3 
236 






G55 




7,070 


215 






5,827 


Cero 


5,130 

310 

68,460 

21,145 


156 

12 

1,072 

152 


156 


Cod 










12 


Croalc6r 


8, .500 


180 






2,482 








271 












233 




2,050 


98 






9,870 


303 


1,127 








10 
















126 
















90 












7,130 
16,240 


875 
1,296 


875 












1,296 












5 


Mullet 


100 
17,500 
5,950 


2 

827 
178 


iso 

2,360 
270 
30 


6 

130 

8 

3 






172 








12,095 








2,297 


Pike 






836 








300 

o0,410 

4,960 

950 

1,675 

4,700 

632,420 

14,000 


45 

2,510 

402 

68 

201 

141 

18,340 

418 


45 












2,510 


Shad 


279,212 


14,030 


19,750 


1,570 


49,408 




68 












201 


Spot 


4,480 


117 






320 








20, 437 












418 




20,750 


1,901 


370 


33 


25,612 




1,830 


92 


404 












101 
















4 


Sunflsh 










800 


36 


36 














Total 


1,392,292 


24,560 


92,800 


2,700 


1,216,752 


36,466 


13,106,355 


220,852 







Statement, by Counties, of the Line Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 

Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Calvert. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Catfish 














4,500 

1,318,200 

64,500 


$225 




1,230,500 
6,000 


$13, 179 
600 


40,625 


$487 


208,300 


$3, 125 


19,028 




1,400 


Turtles 


700 


28 






















Total 


1,236,500 


13,779 


41,325 


515 


208,300 


3,125 


1,387,200 


21,253 







Species. 


Kent. 


Prince 
George. 


Queen Anne. 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




















80 

4,550 

900 

400 

800 

19,700 

384, 183 


$2 


Catfish 
















248 




















30 




















10 


Spot 


















20 




















353 




556,250 
44,000 


$4,456 
4,400 






912,500 


$6,376 


270,083 


$3, 585 


5, 520 












2,800 


$28 










350 


14 


















Total 


600,250 


8,856 


2,800 


28 


912,500 


6,376 


270,083 


3,585 


410,963 


6,197 


fit 





FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



79 



Statement, by Counties, of the Line Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 
Maryland in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Bluefish 










9,600 


$480 


9,680 

37,100 

10,000 

900 

1,400 

850 

1,200 

59, (iOO 

800 

OC), 420 

12,178,616 

6 134,500 

10,450 


$482 


Catfish 






28,050 


$i, 520 


1 993 


Croaker 






10,000 


138 


138 


Drum 










30 


Flounders 










1,400 


56 


50 


Perch , white 






450 


40 


50 


Scup 






1,200 
59,600 


48 
2,580 


48 


Sea liass 










2,580 


Spot 










20 












46,720 
3,800 


1,260 
43 


1 613 




7,031,250 
20,000 


$;05,132 
2,000 


222,925 


1,910 


163 441 


Crabs, soft 


8,400 
336 


Turtles 


6,600 


266 


















Total 


7,051,250 


107, 132 


258,025 


3,736 


132, .320 


4,605 


12,511,516 


179 187 







36,535,848 in number. 



''403,500 in number. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Gill-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 

Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. 


Calvert. 


Caroline. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




16,000 
10,000 
260 
300 
100 
9,600 
500 


$200 
600 
25 
12 
10 
600 
50 






2,000 


819 


4,040 


$54 


Blueflsh 








Perch, white 


500 


$40 


1,200 


51 






Perch, yellow 






Pike 












Shad 






4,460 
2,700 


278 
202 


11,600 


640 


St ri ped bass 


1,500 


120 










Total ' 


36,750 


1,497 


2,000 


160 


10, .360 


550 


16,240 


694 







Species. 


Cecil. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Harford. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 








73,600 


$378 


6,000 
34,600 


$75 
865 




Blueflsh 


















1,500 
600 


345 


Perch, white 










100 

50 

100 

28,200 

230 


5 

2 

8 

2,311 

35 


48 












Pike - 








300 
484,612 

"52," 400" 


24 


Shad 

Spanish mackerel 


491,740 


$23,002 


1.38,000 


7,263 


22,263 




3,000 254 


4,000 

1,955 

465 


320 
155 
303 


6,320 
















:::;::::;:::::::::::::::: 












Total 


494,740 


23,256 


218,020 


8,419 


69,280 


3,301 


539, 412 


28,700 



Species. 


Kent. 


Prince George. 


Queen 


Anne. 


Somerset. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




7,000 


$92 




4,800 


$35 






Blueflsh 




2,400 


$95 




1,200 
1,000 


36 
30 


1 






Catfish 




100 
150 
100 
800 
50 
1,120 


3 
3 
5 

48 
5 

80 






Mullet 










24,950 

900 

500 

525,500 


1,037 

27 

50 

31,679 




















Pike 










Shad 


44,700 1 $2,250 
1 


10,250 
45 


725 




5 




31,050 


4,004 




4,900 


470 












Total 


592, 100 


37,015 


44, 700 2. 250 


12,020 


649 


12,695 


825 











14008^07- 



80 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Gill-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 
Maryland in 1904— Continued. 



Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 










24,640 


8285 


138,680 

48,000 

2,700 

1,300 

400 

480 

10,280 

54,240 

2,250 

1,235 

1,809,722 

275 

1,250 

108,830 

157,265 

20,402 


$1,138 




1,000 


$50 






1,610 


Carp 










81 


Catfish 


100 
400 


3 
10 


100 


$3 






39 


Gizzard shad 






10 


Kingflsh 






480 
10,030 
23, 120 


65 

360 

1,399 


65 


Mullet 






100 

2,820 

100 

85 

114,000 


2 

148 

3 

9 

8,130 


365 




600 

100 

100 

1,200 


45 
3 
10 
90 


2,803 
95 


Perch, yellow 


Pike 






116 


Shad 


4,740 


285 


99,596 
40 


Spanish mackerel 


Squeteague 










1,250 

8,280 

153,710 

19,687 


52 
1,229 
7,669 
18, 101 


52 


Striped bass 


500 


54 






13,083 


Sturgeon 


1,600 
250 


85 
217 


7,909 
18, 621 














Total . 


4,000 


265 


119,055 


8,597 


245,937 


29, 445 


2,417,309 


145,623 





Statement, by Counties, of the Seine Catch of Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. 


Calvert. 


Caroline. 


Cecil. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Val. 


Lbs. 


Val. 


Lbs. 


Val. 


Lbs. 


Val. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewivos, fresh 


4,000 

7,000 

48,400 

23,250 

2,250 

17,250 

20, 100 

8,650 

2,000 

500 

250 

40,000 

3,500 

28,400 


$50 
370 

1,809 
855 
110 

1,220 

1,067 

710 

125 

10 

10 

3,840 
310 

2,840 


32,000 


$200 


38,000 


$285 


1,200 


$18 






Bluefish 












6,100 
9,900 

300 
6,100 
2,400 

200 
4,000 


199 
424 

15 
381 
120 

24 
300 


500 


10 


18,500 


$662 


Catfish 








Eels, fr«sh 














Perch, white 


6,500 
3,500 


260 
140 


1,000 


30 






Perch, yellow 






Pike 










Shad 






1,200 


75 






Spot 










Squeteague 




















22,000 


760 


1 4. .'^00 


1,136 


100 


6 


2,500 


500 


Sunfish 






Crabs, soft 




































Total 


205, 550 


13,326 


64,000 


1,360 


81,300 


2,884 


4,000 


139 


21,000 


1,162 







Species. 


Char 


es. 


Dorchester. 


Harford. 


Kent. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Perch, white 














13,000 
101,000 


$1,130 


Striped bass 














10, 230 
















Total 














114,000 


11,360 


















Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh 


302, 400 

217,920 

8,800 


$756 

4,086 

820 






474,000 

2,224,000 

600 


$3,405 
41,625 

m 


2,400 


15 


Alewives, salted 








Black bass 










Bluefish 


500 


$40 






Carp 


5,400 
11,925 


129 
456 


6,000 
8,500 




180 
420 


1,150 
8,750 
1,550 
9,950 
3,350 
50 
2,800 
950 


33 




7,200 


240 


262 


Eels, fresh 


58 




8,fK)0 
6,300 
2,600 
17,500 


494 

200 

200 

1,500 


10, (iOO 

8,800 

800 


(MX) 
4(iO 
96 


24,800 

20,500 

250 

72,800 


1,774 

800 

30 

4,055 


508 




112 


Pike 


5 


Shad 


175 


Spot 


900 

1,000 

13,000 


36 

75 

1,135 


25 


Squeteague 












Striped bass 


7,700 

2,600 

900 


700 
08 
36 


6,000 


600 


20,650 


1,707 






Sunfish 


1,250 
2,934 


25 
1,698 










Terrapin 
























Total 


592,945 


9,445 


46, 984 


4,405 


2, 837, 450 


52,949 


51,600 


2,900 




Grand total 


592,945 


9, 445 


46,984 


4,405 


2,837,450 


52,949 


165,600 


14,260 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 81 

Statement, by Counties, of the Seine Catch of Maryland in 1904 — Cont'd. 



Species. 


Prince George. 


Queen Anne. 


St. Mary. 


Somerset. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 














9,321,300 


$19,419 


















Total 






, 








9,321,300 


19, 419 


















Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh 


804,000 

24,000 

2,000 


$3,260 
262 
200 


40,000 


$100 


































Blueflsh 






1,500 


$75 








12,800 
16,500 


479 
567 


200 
5,650 


6 
204 






Catfish 


500 
600 


15 
30 















850 


28 










Flounders 






350 


9 






Mullet 


2,870 
5,180 
8, 675 
1,000 
20,027 


60 
263 
322 

94 
1,380 










Perch, white 


4,800 

5,900 

350 

400 


330 

347 

35 

20 


5,300 


265 












Pike 










Shad 












10,500 
14,700 


481 
1,470 








3,370 


332 


39,000 
12,000 


4,500 
900 






Crabs, soft 




















Total 


901,272 


7,247 


108,300 


6,442 


33,450 


2,345 














901,272 


7,247 


108,300 


6,442 


33, 4% 


2,345 


9,321,300 


19,419 





Species. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 














9,321,300 
13,000 
101,000 


$19,419 
1,130 














Striped bass 














10,230 
















Total 






, 








9,435,300 


30,779 
















Shore fisheries: 




- 


120 


$3 


88,170 


$1,013 


1,786,290 

2,465,920 

11,400 

9,000 

101,450 

95, 125 

1,860 

4,950 

350 

524, 100 

4,020 

138, 890 

86, 525 

17,000 

126, 247 

2,350 

26,100 

199,070 

2,600 

5,650 

40,400 

2,934 


9,105 

45,973 

1,080 

485 








Black bass 














Blueflsh 














Carp .... 


2,400 
1,100 


$72 
33 










3,579 
3,635 


Catfish 


1,000 


25 


850 
1,260 


34 

38 




68 












211 
















9 


Menhaden 










524, 100 

1,150 

37,310 


765 

53 

2,261 


765 


Mullet 










113 




700 
7,000 


37 
280 


500 


25 


8,448 
3,848 


Perch, yellow 


Pike 






3, ioo 

4, 420 


186 
279 


1,380 


Shad 






1,100 


72 


7,981 


Spot . 






71 










14,350 
13,300 


526 
1,988 


1,092 




2,200 


220 


250 


26 


18,920 
68 


Suckers 


Sunfish 














371 
















3,740 


Terrapin 














1,698 


















Total 


13,400 


642 


2,970 


151 


688,010 


7,143 


5,652,231 


112,540 








13,400 


642 


2,970 


151 


688,010 


7,143 


15,087,531 


143,319 





82 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Fyke-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 

Mary'^land in 1904. 



SpfiCies. 


Baltimore. 


Caroline. 


Cecil. 


Charles. 


Llis. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




2,000 

1,120 
850 
100 

9,400 

500 

900 

19,000 

26,000 

2,650 


$10 

21 

85 

2 

286 

35 

20 

760 

970 

270 


1,200 


$15 




































550 
600 


12 
14 






200 
3,200 


$4 


Catfish 


73,600 
3,600 


$2,304 
190 


ii;o 


Eels fresh 




Mullet 












2,200 
.500 


110 

17 


25,100 

21,500 

1,000 


1,496 
810 
100 


1,.500 
550 


75 




15 


Pike 




Shad 


800 


40 






Striped bass 


1,000 


60 


2,100 


315 


800 


32 










Total 


63,520 


2,519 


5,850 


208 


126,900 


5,215 


6,250 


286 







Species. 


Dorchester. 


Harford. 


Kent. 


Queen Anne. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 








4,000 

400 

5,000 

67,500 

9,200 

450 

30,925 

14,250 

3,560 


$30 ' 
40 . 
120 
2,511 
321 
11 . 
1,952 

570 i 
. 408 


15,400 


$81 


















70 
3,740 
160 
1,350 
628 
725 
225 
400 
84 


$2 
144 
5 
27 
33 
26 
18 
35 
58 


200 
12,875 
4,. 300 


6 
376 

174 


500 

1,900 

600 

550 

1,700 

1,900 

450 

350 


$15 


Catfish 


57 




24 


Mullet 


15 




12,800 

38,200 

600 

3,050 


647 

1,364 

60 

281 


73 




63 


Pike 


47 




35 






















Total 


7,382 


348 


135,285 


5,963 


87,425 


2,989 


7,950 


329 







Species. 


Somerset. 


Talbot. 


Wicomico. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




12,550 


$146 






10,160 


$130 


45,310 

1,120 

1,250 

7,420 

192,790 

18,460 

400 

3,975 

106,963 

111,680 

9,422 

6,875 

300 

17,540 

84 

2,950 


$412 








21 
















125 


Carp 






700 
2,100 


$21 
62 


100 

12,000 

100 


3 

559 

7 


185 


Catfish 


5,875 


256 


6,729 




756 


Eels, salted 


400 


10 




10 


Mullet 






725 
8,285 
1,655 

487 
1,275 


18 
483 
64 
40 
107 


91 


Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike 


3,925 
400 
450 

4,800 
300 

3,360 


278 
16 
41 

181 
13 

284 


900 
6,000 


45 
300 


5,9.52 

4,215 

984 


Shad 






.328 


Squeteague . ... 






13 


Striped bass 


850 


86 


5,630 


546 


1,674 
58 


Turtles 


450 


20 






2,500 


100 


120 










Total 


32,510 


1,245 


10,550 


514 


42,917 


2,057 


526,539 


21,673 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



83 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch of Eels, by Pots and Spears, in Mary- 
land IN 1904. 



Counties. 


Eels, fresh. 


Eels, salted. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


111,300 


$4,113 


07,400 


$2,005 


178,700 


$0,118 




Shore fisheries: 

Baltimore . 


200 

4,200 

4,000 

4,000 

13,2.50 

4,400 

16,300 

10,200 

11,100 

l,.50O 

41,3.30 


6 
108 
130 
160 
570 
220 
632 
408 
095 
75 
2,322 






200 
4,200 
4,000 
4,000 
21,7.50 
4,400 
16,300 
10,200 
11,100 


6 


Calvert 






168 


Cecil 






130 


Charles 






160 




8,500 


199 


769 




226 


Kent 






032 


Queen Anne 






408 








095 


Talbot 






1,500 
41,330 


75 


Worcester 


1 


2,322 




1 




Total 


110,480 


5,392 


8, .500 199 118,980 


5,. 591 






Grand total 


221,780 


9,505 


75,900 


2,204 297.680 


11,709 











Statement, by Counties, of the Trammel-net C.^tch in the Shore Fisheries 

OF Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Anne Arundel. 


Cecil. 


Harford. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 












6,000 

1,500 

200 

600 


$133 

82 

4 

36 


6,000 
4,600 
200 
3,100 
3,000 
4,000 
19,900 
1,000 


$133 




100 


$8 


3,000 


$90 


180 


Mullet 


4 


I'erch white 




2,500 
1,000 
1,500 
1,000 


125 
30 
150 
125 


161 


J'crch, yellow 

Pike 


2,000 
2,000 


200 
200 


230 


500 
18,900 


50 
2,431 


400 
2,556 




1,000 


80 


80 














Total . ■ 


5,100 


488 


9,000 


520 


27,700 


2,736 


41,800 


3,744 







Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Minor Apparatus in the Shore 
^Fisheries of Maryland in 1904. 





Anne Arundel. 


Baltimore. 


Calvert. 


Charles. 


Dorchester. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Val- 
ue. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Val- 
ue. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




92,800 


$9,280 






60,000 


$5,250 


4,000 


$300 


148,433 


$4, 140 




2, 400 


$800 






















Total 


92,800 


9,280 


2,400 


800 


60,000 


5,250 


4,000 


300 


148,433 


4,140 





St. Mary. 


" Somerset. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Val- 
ue. 


Lbs. 


Val- 
ue. 


Lbs. 


Value. 












250 


$20 






250 

1,619,490 

2,400 

905 


$20 




3,400 


$180 


1,310,857 


$39,821 






58,971 












800 








675 


800 






230 


$162 


962 














Total 


3,400 

• 


180 


1,311,532 


40, 621 


250 


20 


230 


162 


1,623,045 


60,753 



84 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Bow-net Catch in the Shore Fisheries of 

Maryland in 1904. 



Species. 


Somerset. 


Wicomico. 


Worcester. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Catfish 


100 

150 

9,000 

50 


$5 
10 ! 
600 . 
6 1 


1,450 
2,700 


$73 
172 






1,550 

2,850 

40,900 

1,300 


$78 


Perch, white 




182 


Shad 


' 


31,900 81,859 


2 459 


Striped bass 


1,250 126 


132 








Total 


9,300 


621 


5,400 


371 


31 900 1 1 S-'^'* 


46,600 


2,851 






' 



NOTES AND DETAILED STATISTICS OF PRINCIPAL FISHERIES. 

Oyster. — In addition to the prolific waters of Chesapeake Bay 
Maryland has important oyster grounds in Tangier Sound and in the 
Potomac, Choptank, Nanticoke, and Patuxent rivers. Dredging is 
the method of oystering followed in the open waters of the bay, 
but oysters from the rivers are mostly tonged. 

Since 1901 the yield of oysters has decreased more than 22 per 
cent in quantity and 20 per cent in value. The decrease in quantity 
has been continuous for- several years, but 1904 is the first year 
recording diminished value, a condition attributed by many to the 
two consecutive cold winters, by which many oysters are said to have 
been killed. In a few localities the oysters were covered with a 
growth of mussels, which considerably reduced their market value; 
and in Wicomico and Dorchester counties oysters on private beds failed 
to fatten, in many cases remaining unfit for market during the entire 
season. 

The oyster-planting business in Somerset County shows a decided 
improvement since 1901. In this locality most of the oysters on pri- 
vate beds are raised from spat collected upon oyster shells deposited on 
the grounds. The same practice is followed in Dorchester and Wico- 
mico counties, but not to the same extent, most of the supply there 
being raised from seed oysters brought from the Potomac River. 
Baltimore, Cambridge, and Crisfield continue to support very exten- 
sive oyster-shucking establishments. The prosperity of Cambridge 
especially depends upon this trade. The following table shows the 
extent of the oyster fishery of Maryland during the season of 1904-5. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 85 

The Oyster Fishery op Maryland in 1904. 



Counties. 


Market oysters from 
natural rock. 


Market oysters 

from private 

beds. 


Seed oysters 

from natural 

rock. 


Total. 




Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Anno Arundel 


- 511,750 


$257,377 

85,944 

114,089 

23,257 

487,894 

72,520 

89,965 

178,547 

439,515 

265, 262 










511,750 
125, 850 
152, 150 
48, 650 
1,013,950 
146, 100 
179,950 
335, 325 
961,705 
542,045 
270,545 
141,630 


$257,377 




125,850 
152, 150 










85,944 
114,689 


Calvert . . . 


1 






Charles 


48, 650 
955,660 
146, 100 
179,950 
335,325 
719,455 
535,245 
147,615 
4,100 








23, 257 


Dorchester 


58, 290 $35, 040 




522,934 

72, 526 


Kent 










1 




89,965 
178,547 
545, 686 


St. Marv 


i 




Somerset. . . . 


1.50,615 
6.800 


91,434 

6,272 

58, 440 

110,464 


91,635 


$14,737 


Talbot 


271 , 534 


Wicomico 


81,171 1 114,930 
2,845 133,930 


8,000 
3,600 


1,200 
1,095 


140,811 
114,404 


Worcester... 




Total . . 


3,861,850 


2,098,992 464. .565 


301,650 1 103.235 


17,032 


4,429,650 


2,417,674 













Crah. — In contrast to the decline of the oyster industry in the 
past few years is the increasing importance of the Maryland crab 
fishery. Crabs are in growing demand from all parts of the country 
owing to the fact that for a number of years the supply in more 
nortliern waters has considerably decreased. Crisfield and Deal 
Island continue to be the principal shipping points for soft crabs, 
while Oxford, Cambridge, and Mount Vernon furnish most of the 
hard crabs. From Cambridge and Mount Vernon the crabs are 
sliipped alive, while at Oxford most of them are utilized by extract- 
ing the meat and shipping it in tin buckets. This latter feature of 
the industry has increased in importance since 1901 owing to a more 
constant supply, brought by local boats from Virginia waters. Hard 
crabs are caught on trot lines; soft crabs are taken mainly with 
scrapes and scoop nets, the former being operated entirely from 
sailboats and the latter from small skiffs and by men wading. 
The price of soft crabs has advanced somewhat in the last few 
years, and fishermen now stop catching when the price falls below 1 
cent per crab. At Crisfield the oyster industry, which formerly was 
the town's chief support, has been superseded in importance by the 
cra'b trade. As many as 1,000 boxes holding 15 dozen soft crabs 
each are sometimes shipped from this point by express in one day. 
With scarcely any outlay aside from his boat and scrapes or scoop 
nets, an expert crabber, aided by a small boy, can now make more 
than $100 a month during the season. 

Clam. — Clams are taken only in Chincoteague and Sinepuxent 
bays off Worcester County and in Tangier Sound near Crisfield. 
Owing to the more profitable crab fishery there has been quite a 
decrease in the number of clammers from the latter town. Most of 
them are negroes. 

Shad. — Although there has been a conspicuous falling off in the 
shad catch in the rivers of Maryland since 1901, the increase in Chesa- 



86 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



peake Bay has almost compensated so far as the total yield is con- 
cerned. The product for 1904 showed a 6 per cent decrease in quan- 
tity and an increase of 32 per cent in value. The large catch in the 
open waters, however, contrasting with the scarcity of fish in the 
streams, emphasizes the precarious condition of the fishery, the decline 
of which is inevitable when such a large proportion of the fish are 
captured l)efore reaching the spawning grounds. 

Number and Value of the Shad Taken in Each County of Maryland in 1904. 



Counties. 


No. 


Value. 


Counties. 


No. 


Value. 


Anne Arundel 


10,570 
27,627 
3,750 
148,635 
60,075 
74, 801 
139, 353 
140,065 
17, 122 


$2,981 

6,303 

842 

27,584 

11,988 

15,267 

26, 318 

33, 781 

3,670 


Queen Anne 


1,405 

S. 850 


$366 


Calvert 


St. Marv 


1,445 




Somerset 13, 35t) 

Talbot 70, 103 

Wicomico ' 45..S58 


2,403 


Cecil 


14, 120 
9, 879 


Dorchester 


Worcester 

Total 


11,505 


2,825 




a 772. .575 


159, 772 

















1 2,912,249 pounds. 

Below is shown the shad catch of the state by waters. It will be 
seen that nearly two-thirds of the total was taken from Chesapeake 
Bay. The Potomac, Susquehanna, Choptank, Nanticoke, Wicomico, 
and other rivers also furnished large quantities, but while the catch 
in the bay, compared with 1901, has increased 63 per cent, that in 
the rivers shows a decrease as follows: Potomac, 43 per cent; Susque- 
hanna, 41 per cent; Choptank, 71 per cent; Nanticoke, 11 per cent; 
Wicomico, 17 per cent. These figures apply to that portion of these 
waters within the boundaries of Maryland. In the upper portion 
of some of these rivers, where extensive shad gill-net fisheries were 
prosecuted several years ago, there is now practically no fishing. 

Shad Catch of Maryland in 1904, Shown by Waters in the Order of Their 
Importance, According to Number of Shad Taken. 



Waters. 



Chesapeake Bay . . . 
Potomac River. . . . 
Susquehanna River 
Choptank River. . . 
Nanticoke River. . . 

Wicomico River 

Pocomoke River. .. 
North East River. . 

Fishing Bay 

P.Ttuxent River 

Elk Kiver 

Sassafras River 

Pocomoke Sound . . 



No. 


Value. 


466, 163 


$96,368 


83,147 


16, 343 


39, 275 


8,087 


38,862 


7,907 


31,028 


7,308 


28,370 


5,946 ! 


13, 995 


3,179 


13,315 


2,626 


10,980 


1,801 


9,577 


2,483 


8,850 


1,600 


8,150 


1,592 


5,360 


814 



Waters. 



Chester River 

West River 

Blackwater River 

Little Choptank River 

Atlantic Ocean 

Tangier Sound 

Bush River ' 

Honga River 

St. Martins River 

Manokin River 

Total 



No. 



772,575 



Value. 



4,215 


$1,010 


3,750 


962 


2,088 


497 


1,405 


330 


1,240 


402 


1,090 


153 


866 


180 


718 


148 


115 


31 


16 


5 



159, 772 



The following table shows by states the total catch of shad in the 
interstate rivers. These figures show decreases since 1901 as follows: 
Potomac River, 53 per cent; Susquehanna, 30 per cent; Nanticoke, 
25 per cent; Pocomoke, 77 per cent. 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 87 

Catch ob' Shad in Interstate Waters. 



Waters and States. 


No. 


Value. 


Waters and States. 


No. 


Value. 


Potomac River: 


83,147 
289, 500 


816,343 
51, 709 


Nanticoke River: 

Maryland 

Delaware 


31.028 
22, 450 


$7, 308 




5,321 




Total 




Total 


372, 647 


68,052 


53,478 


12, 629 




Pocomoke River: 

Maryland 




Susquehanna River: 

Maryland 


39,275 
76,521 


8,087 
19,867 


5,360 
1,550 


814 
380 




Total 




Total 


115, 796 


27,954 


6,910 


1,194 









Aleioife. — In the catch of alewives since 1901 there is seen an 
increase of 5 per cent in quantity and 51 per cent in vahie, the latter 
being due largely to the greater quantity salted by the fishermen. In 
Cecil and Harford counties considerably less than one-half of the 
catch is sold fresh. The fishing season is so short and the quantities 
taken are so large that except when salted it is often impossible to 
dispose of the fish at any price. 

Menhaden. — Practically all of the menhaden shown for the state 
were taken by two steamers owned at •Crisfield and were utilized in a 
factory situated near that town. Some also were taken with seines 
in the shore fisheries of Worcester County. 

Striped bass and white perch. — Compared with 1901 the catch of 
striped bass in 1904 shows a decrease of 12 per cent in quantity and 
an increase of 5 per cent in value. The quantity and value of white 
perch are 20 per cent and 23 per cent respectively, an increase attrib- 
uted to artificial propagation by the state and, more recently, by 
the United States. 

The increase in the cjuantity of white perch is especially encourag- 
ing when it is remembered that it had fallen off 51 per cent in quantity 
between 1897 and 1901. The purse seine fishery for these two species 
in Chesapeake Bay, which is operated mainly by men living at Rock 
Hall, Kent County, shows a slight decrease in quantity but increase 
in value. It is claimed by the fishermen, however, that a recent law 
restricting the area of operations will make this fishery less profitable. 

Yellow perch. — There has been a decrease of 9 per cent in cpiantity 
and an increase of 1 1 per cent in value of the yield of this species. 
An increase is shown for Anne Arundel, Cecil, Dorchester, Talbot, and 
Harford counties, but a decrease for Baltimore and Kent counties. 

Sturgeon and caviar. — Owing to a more vigorous prosecution of 
gill-net fisheries in the ocean ofi^ Worcester County, the catch of 
sturgeon in this region since 1901 shows a considerable increase 
with a proportionate increase in the quantity of caviar prepared. 
The total yield of sturgeon from Maryland waters, however, show^s very 
little change since 1901. Most of these fish were taken incidentally 
with other species. 



88 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Eel. — Eels are taken very generally throughout the state, mostly in 
eel pots. At Cambridge, Dorchester County, the fishery is vigor- 
ously prosecuted for two or three months, beginning the middle of 
March. Vessels of 5 tons and over which have been used for dredg- 
ing oysters are fitted out at the close of the oyster season for eel 
fishing. Most of the catch is made in the Potomac River, the men 
living aboard the vessel and fishing from rowboats. The eels are 
either dressed and sold fresh or salted, or sold round. The latter are 
usually eels too small to be dressed and are disposed of as bait for 
hard-crab trot lines. 

Terrapin. — -Aside from Dorchester County, where an increase is 
shown, the catch of terrapin has varied little since 1901. In only a 
few localities is the supply sufficient to justify a special effort to 
capture these animals. 

Other species. — Other important species are catfish, butterfish, and 
squeteague, the catfish being taken in the rivers and the other spe- 
cies mainly along the coast of Worcester County. The catch of 
catfish shows a slight increase since 1901, but the quantity of butter- 
fish and squeteague has decreased. 

WHOLESALE TRADE. 

Baltimore City is the center of the wholesale trade of the state. 
In the quantity of oysters handled it leads all cities in the United 
States, and several of the largest firms have established branch houses 
on the Gulf coast within the past few years. Owing to the decline of 
this fishery, however, the investment and number of persons employed 
in canning and shucking houses shows a large decrease since 1901. 
There has also been a falling off in the production of lime from 
oyster shells, due, it is said, to a smaller demand from the gas com- 
panies, who formerly used the largest part of the output. 

The following table shows, by localities, the number and value of 
establishments, the cash capital employed, and the number of persons 
engaged in the wholesale fishery trade of Maryland in 1 904 : 

Wholesale Fishery Trade of Maryland in 1904. 



Localities. 



Annapolis and Shady Side 

Baltimore 

St. Michaels and Claiborne 

Tilghman Island 

Oxford and Bellevue 

Crisfield, Lawsonia, and Smith Island 

Deal Island and Chance 

Fairmount, Kingston, and Oriole 

Marion, Hopewell, and Slielltown 

Cambridge and Secretary 

Fishing Creek and Hoopersville 

Laliesville and Wingate 

Havre de Grace, Perryville, and North East 

Bivalve and Tyaskin 

Solomons and Benedict 

Total 



Establishments. 



No. 



4 
122 
6 
5 
10 
49 
14 
13 
7 
24 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 



268 



Value. 



$14,750 

1,376,544 

13,200 

10,350 

32,325 

153, 180 

8,780 

19,090 

17,735 

60,315 

3,000 

800 

6,650 

6,025 

1,100 



Cash 
capital. 



$12,500 

1,989,200 

9,650 

13,500 

29,500 

137,300 

3,850 

13,250 

14,800 

48,000 

2,000 

1,100 

5,000 

10,500 

21,500 



1,723,844 2,311,650 



No. of 
persons 
engaged. 



189 

5,559 

241 

224 

565 

1,147 

116 

235 

313 

910 

180 

24 

69 

160 

17 



9,949 



Wages 
paid. 



$32,500 

837,925 

11,225 

21,000 

i.5,900 

120, 650 

10,575 

2(), 650 

34,100 

79,100 

4,500 

700 

3,100 

4,000 

1,135 



1,223,060 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



89 



FISHERIES OF VIRGINIA. 
GENERAL AND COMPARATIVE STATISTICS. 

Virginia holds first rank among the Middle Atlantic States for 
quantity of its fishery products and second for value, being exceeded 
in the latter respect by New York. The fisheries of Virginia in 1904 
yielded 355,315,798 pounds, valued at $5,584,354, which, with the 
figures of 1901 in comparison, is a decrease of 22,867,560 pounds, 
but an increase of $970,970 in value. The decrease is largely in the 
menhaden catch. 

The number of persons engaged was 28,868. Of this number 
5,510 were on fishing and transporting vessels, 17,693 in the shore 
or boat fisheries, and 5,665 in the wholesale fish trade, oyster-packing 
establishments, and fish-fertilizer factories. Compared with the 
figures for 1901 a decrease of 457 persons is shown. 

The total investment in the fisheries, including vessels, boats, 
apparatus of capture, value of buildings, and cash capital in 1904 
was $4,614,934, an increase of $981,830 since the last canvass. 

The products of the vessel fisheries of the state amounted to 
258,205,295 pounds, valued at $1,400,905, and those of the shore 
fisheries 97,110,503 pounds, valued at $4,183,449. 

Number of Persons Employed in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



How engaged. 



No. 



In vessel fisheries 

On vessels transporting . 
In shore or boat fisheries 
Shoresmen 

Total 



4,327 
1,133 
17,693 
5,665 



28,868 



Investment in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Items. 


No. 


Value. 


Items. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing . . 


750 
9,149 


$843,988 

278,' i87 

326, 650 


Apparatus— shore fisheries- 
Continued. 
Gill nets 


8,144 
584 




Tonnage 




Outfit 


832,957 
10 172 


Vessels transporting 


447 
7,046 


Fyke nets 


Tonnage 




4 596 


Outfit 


53,015 
569,044 
22,385 

15 

39,905 

8,300 

7,969 

870 

625 

38, 171 
350, 725 




1,2.55 

9 

482 

9,269 

1,118 

2,344 

41 


1 280 


Boats— row and sail 


12, 177 
38 


Spears 


6 


Boats — gasoline 


Oyster dredges 


6 180 


Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 


Oyster tongs 


38, 827 


Lines 




2,566 
6 807 


Seines 


54 

462 

1,912 

375 

22 

266 
1,656 


Clam tongs, rakes, etc . . . 
Weirs and slat traps 


Oyster dredges 


1 295 


Oyster tongs 


284 


Clam tongs, rakes, etc . . . 
Crab dredges 


Shore and accessory property 




1,166,015 
804 100 


Apparatus— shore fisheries:. 
Seines 


Total 








4,614.934 


Pound nets 











90 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Products of the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh. 
Alewives, salted 

Black bass 

Blueflsh 

Bonito 

Butterflsh 

Cai-p, German. . 

Catfish 

Crevalle 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels 

Flounders 

Gizzard shad. . . 
Hickory shad. .. 

Hogflsh 

Kingflsli 

Menhaden 

Mullet 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow . . . 

Pike 

Pompano 

Scup 

Sea bass 



,309,226 
294, 640 
153, 600 
566, 765 

14, 460 
,335,391 
141, 625 
556, 325 
270, 125 
, 842, 709 
192, 495 

86, 350 
248, G40 

32, 675 
355, 883 

44, 895 
118,390 
,918,766 
239,000 
635, 017 
180, 550 

36, 400 

47, 840 

49, 260 
1,000 



Value. 



$87,083 
3,650 

13, 192 

27,362 
505 

36, 616 
4, 466 

21,920 
7,409 

69,324 
2,519 
4,007 
7,587 
653 
7,296 
4,451 
6,243 
515, 413 
7,208 

29,501 
6,693 
2,954 
3,400 
1,545 
44 



Species. 



Shad 

Sheepshead 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteagues 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon 

eggs 

Suckers 

Sunflsh 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

Terrapin 

Tui-tles 

Frogs 

Clams, hard 

Market oysters, natural 

rock 

Market oysters, private 

beds 

Seed oysters, natural rock. 

Total 



Lbs. 



7,419,899 

20, 745 

357,000 

872, 800 

6,951,068 

451,366 

180, 675 

23,211 

52, 645 

24, 800 

10,356,052 

h 1,910,654 

1,706 

72, 335 

3,220 

c 1,659, 572 

d 19, 054, 336 

« 20, 988, 954 
/" 13, 242, 733 



355, 315, 798 



Value. 



$439, 625 
904 
39, 390 
37,769 
164, 979 
41,803 
15, 134 

16, 848 

1,060 

514 

179,575 

92, 909 

320 

1,144 

690 

220,973 

1,300,549 

1, 708, 456 
450, 671 



5,584,354 



a Number, 31,068,156. 
b Number, 5,731,962. 



c Bushels, 207,446. 
d Bushels, 2,722,048. 



« Bushels, 2,998,422. 
/ Bushels, 1,891,819. 



THE FISHERIES BY COUNTIES. 

Thirty-two counties in Virginia were engaged in the commercial 
fisheries in 1904, but the three of special importance are Accomac, 
Northumberland, and Elizabeth City. 

The products of Accomac County were valued at $1,068,005, of 
which $702,890 represents the oyster fishery, $142,501 the clam 
fishery, $72,697 the menhaden fishery, and $72,397 the soft crab 
fishery. 

In Northumberland County the catch amounted to 127,722,641 
pounds, valued at $541,259. This was more in quantity than the 
yield in any other county in the state. The most important species 
taken were menhaden, 118,868,000 pounds, valued at $260,262; and 
shad, 1,676,850 pounds, valued at $108,300. 

Elizabeth City County ranks third in the importance of its fisheries, 
the value of the products amounting to $480,738. More than half 
this was derived from the oyster fisheries. 



FISHEEIES OB^ THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



91 



The following tables show the extent of the fisheries in each county 
for the year 1 904 : 

Statement, by Counties, of the Number of Persons Employed in the 
Fisheries op Virginia in 1904. 



Countios. 


In vessel 
fisheries. 


On vessels 
transport- 
ing. 


Inshore or 
boat fish- 
eries. 


Shoresmen. 


Total. 




9«9 


Ifi3 
24 


2,915 
79 
18 
222 
"82 
()?9 
200 
204 

1,226 
163 
259 
100 
184 
214 
193 

1,743 

1,031 

1.173 
553 
198 
656 
774 

1,132 
564 
137 
109 
384 
204 
39 
398 
369 

1,115 


554 
54 


4,601 
157 








18 


Charles City 








909 


Chesterfield 








82 


Elizabeth Pitv 


122 
10 


28 
11 


917 
36 
14 


1,756 


Essex 


323 




218 


Gloucester 


163 


139 


1,528 






163 


Isle of Wight 


192 


22 




473 


James Citj' 




100 




41 


4 
5 
68 
125 
SO 
85 
39 


32 


261 




219 


King William 


18 
310 


243 

751 


522 


Lancaster 


2,929 
1.111 




7 
331 


104 
105 


1,669 


Nansemond 


I,02S 


New Ker.t 


198 


Norfolk 


fiOl 
250 
714 


108 
92 
43 


1.743 

348 

548 

25 


3, 168 
1,464 


Northunilierland 


2,4.37 


Princess Anne 


589 


Prince Oeorsce 






1.37 


Prince William 




6 
42 

4 


4 
97 

17 


119 


Richmond 




523 


Stafford 




225 


Surry 




39 


Warwick 


116 
193 
230 


16 
17 
62 




530 


Westmoreland 


73 


652 


York .... 


1,407 






Total 


4,327 


1,183 


17,693 


5,665 


28,868 







Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Items. 


Accomae. 


Alexan- 
dria. 


Caro- 
line. 


Charles 
City. 


Chester- 
field. 


Elizabeth 
City. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Val. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 




170 
1,602 


$130,157 


















22 
240 


$46, 325 


Tonnage 



















Outfit 


28,877 
76,775 
















12, 230 


Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 


69 
1,286 

3,'i.34" 

8 


8 !£4.8.^0 


::::i::::: 










12 
253 


8,100 


90 
'48' 


















5,980 

176,295 

4,610 


1,200 
1,215 














925 


Boats— row and sail 

Boats — gasoline 

Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 


9 


$180 


128 


$2,358 


■41 


$925 


379 
6 


18,230 
3,125 


















15 




7 


.■i-OO."; 






















Oyster dredges 

Oyster tongs. . 


282 4, 550 
292 1.373 


















14 

28 


550 


















112 


Clam tongs, rakes, etc 


290 


786 


































16 

1 
131 


530 


Apparatus— shore fisheries: 


32 
190 
60 

7 


1,005 

33,260 

1,787 

150 

112 

6 

4,654 

8,605 

2,566 

4,598 

29 

94,675 

75, 900 


4 


825 






3 


1,475 






200 




3 

6 


300 
180 






35, 925 


Gill nets 


28 
40 


2,240 
600 


131 


2,819 


56 


1,228 






I 










20 








840 




9 

304 

1,717 

1,118 

1,475 










































Oyster tongs 
















225 


900 




















Clam tongs, rakes, etc 


















15 


180 


















8 








1,9.50 




50 




900 




55 




120,075 








118,200 














1 










Total 




661,755 -... 


12,880 ---- 


710 


.... 7.572 




2,208 




366, 470 























92 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries op Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 



Items. 


Essex. 


Fairfax. 


Glouces- 
ter. 


Henrico. 


Isle of Wight. 


James 
City. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Val. 




2 
20 


$3,500 




51 
424 


$17,375 






33 

360 


$18, 200 




















Outfit 


800 
1,750 






10, 670 
27,975 


1 


10,793 
4,500 








4 

28 






46 
889 




7 
98 






Tonnage 

Outfit 












525 

8,870 

900 

50 

16 






6,125 

28,775 






1,160 

8,815 

500 






Boats— row and sail 

Boats — gasoline 

Apparatus— vessel fisheries: 

Oyster dredges 

Oyster tongs 

Apparatus— shore fisheries: 


148 
3 

4 


57 


$4,573 


718 


89 


$1,685 


147 

1 


57 


$1,520 






















108 

20 

167 
150 
80 


432 

600 

33,400 

187 

1,000 

225 


i 


156 


653 






4 


11,300 

3,250 

1,010 

620 




3 

2 
793 
30 

75' 
50 


535 




14 
400 

8 


1,950 


'>8 








250 


Gill nets 


522 

135 

15 

75 

724 


18 
31 


115 
GO 


2,259 
180 


2,349 
34 


4,604 

662 

10 

50 

620 


1,016 
900 




55 


Eelpots 

Oyster tongs 


50 
181 












50 
155 


75 






969 

170 

1 


3,876 

425 

75 

3,150 






200 


















23 460 
160 






3 


75 


Shore and accessory property . 




2,350 
5,000 




4,945 




1,400 


575 










1 t 










Total 




27, 182 




25,698 L... 


134,290 




4,744 




51,967 




6,201 













Items. 


King and 
Queen. 


King 
George. 


King 
William. 


Lancaster. 


Mathews. 


Middlesex. 




No. 


Value. 


No. lvalue. 


No. 


\'alue. 


No. 

22 
808 

"42' 
696 

"942" 
14 

9 

4 

26 

3 

176 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 








6 $4,000 
83 


4 
51 


$3,400 

'i,"i66' 

14,850 

'2,' 556' 
1,930 


8109,375 






2 
14 


$500 














Outfit 








1,850 .... 


30, 160 
27,850 






375 


Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 

Outfit 


2 
31 


$1,550 

"'256' 

4,595 

200 


1 

18 

"94' 


800 1 25 

242 

150 .... 


26 
489 

'586 


$13, 375 

"3,466' 
31, 120 


28 
520 

i,'624' 


19,600 


6,275 
56,215 
9,400 

7,950 
100 
104 

900 
35,200 


4,200 


Boats — row and sail 


138 
1 


4,545 


142 


47,070 


Apparatus — vessel fish- 
eries: 


























12 


260 


::::::; 














14 

1 


56 
150 






4 

2 

42 


16 


Apparatus— shore fisher- 
ies: 


1 


2 500 
111 13,825 


20 
242 


200 
54, 150 


150 




7,800 


Gill nets 'i 1 I'^'i 


13 330 


946 


1,987 
140 
106 






9 110 


.54 1..340 1 7 










2 


40 








"'2 

1,076 


441 

50 

4,304 




300 


390 




4 24 






Oyster tongs 

Clam tongs, rakes, etc 
Weirs and slat traps.. 


120 , 480 


40 160 


4 


16 


505 
30 


1,945 

75 


1,129 


4,516 


2 1 100 




q 


540 














35 

193,800 
123,900 


_ 


23 
2, GOO 




32 


Shore and accessory prop- 
erty 




950 


.... 2.495 




17, 525 
46,500 




14,650 








2,000 


11, 500 


















Total 




9,260 


.... 32. 279 




90,850 




606,059 




107, 188 




110,839 



















FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



93 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904^Continued. 



Items. 


Nansemond. 


New Kent. 


Norfolk. 


Northamp- 
ton. 


Northumber- 
land. 




No. 


Value. 


No. Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 




61 
604 


$29,700 




134 
1,248 


$55,350 


60 
630 

"'47' 

585 

"826' 


$53,506 


56 
1,937 

""i4' 

269 

"'830' 


$320, 500 


Tonnage 

Outfit 






18, 545 
11,000 




42,752 
35, 775 


12,926 
38,275 


77, 309 


Vessels transporting 

Tomiage 

Outfit 


17 
196 




43 
593 


8,750 






2,025 
17,215 




6,015 
13,860 
2,050 


3,235 
28,683 


2,050 


Boats— row and sail 


253 


121 $1,146 


386 
3 


34,010 


Apparatus— vessel fish- 
eries: 











5 

8 

139 

85 
2 

8 
26 


4,350 

120 

586 

84 

65 

1,986, 
17, 170 


33 

78 


22,600 


Oyster dredges 












1,450 




330 


1,343 






579 


2,350 




Clam tongs, rakes, etc 


















4 

6 

10 

387 


30 

1,800 
8,300 
1,121 






Apparatus— shore fisher- 
ies: 


1 

3 

190 

13 


275 
900 
612 
390 
5 


6 


2,400 








286 


60,475 


Gill nets . 


166 
5 


2,971 
.50 
30 






3 


45 
374 






Lines 




276 


'"'so' 

140 
367 


491 






80 


Oyster dredges 














1,316 




392 


1,568 




330 
10 


1,320 
40 


410 
229 


1,620 
214 


1,388 


Clam tongs, rakes, etc 
Weirs and slat traps.. 






3 


45 
75 

7,550 
7,500 






] 








8 

369, 755 
219,000 








58 


Shore and accessory prop- 






350 






104,350 
67,600 




193, 700 






110,000 












Total 




98,748 1 j 6,947 

1 




759,802 




335, 189 




834, 177 









Items. 


Princess Anne. 


Prince 
George. 


-Prince Wil- 
liam. 


Richmond. 


Stafford. 




No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 












2 
13 


$800 

'"'275' 
1,889 


14 
169 

"247' 


$7,000 

"i,'925' 
5,990 


1 
9 

""7i' 


$700 














Outfit 










100 


Boats— row and sail 

Boats— gasoline 

Apparatus— shore fisher- 
ies: 


313 
2 


$5, 475 
1,600 


66 


$1,375 


38 


3,175 


4 


500 


5 
22 

7 
40 


3,750 

2,610 

380 

800 






10 
68 
12 
94 




127 
14 


4,475 
19,000 


4,745 


Pound nets 


37 

955 

6 


5,150 

1,282 

180 


4,815 


Gill nets 


71 


1,384 


725 




1 


150 
100 
1,000 
400 
120 

9,355 


1,880 






10 


49 




1,000 
100 
30 
























282 


1,128 






Clam tongs, rakes, etc. 
Shore and accessory prop- 
erty 
















225 




1,550 




4,925 
14,000 




4,800 


























Total 




41,675 




3,494 1 


12,054 




41,580 




20,989 













94 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Vessels, Boats, Apparatus, and Shore Prop- 
erty Employed in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904 -Continued. 



Items. 


Surry. 


Warwick. I^tnd."- 


York. 


Total. 




No. 


Value. 


No. Value. No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 






25 «10..525 31 


$18, 100 

" '8,'775" 
5,100 

'""8,50" 
7,690 


71 
586 

'"27" 
363 

"ni' 


$23,475 

"14,' 575' 

13, 575 

" '3," 625' 
36,055 


750 
9,149 

""""447' 
7,046 

"i2,"i77' 
38 


$843, 988 


Tonnage 






239 


303 

6,450 

3,700 5 

109 

775 

13, 110 210 




Outfit 


1 


278 187 


Vessels transporting 




7 
100 


326 650 


ToTinn.gp. 1 






Outfit 






.53,015 

569,044 

22,385 

15 


Boats— row and sail 

Boats — gasoline 


19 


$4.55 


205 


Apparatus— vessel fish- 
eries: 
Lines 

















Seines 


















54 

462 

1,912 

375 

22 

266 
1,656 
8,144 

584 

"i,'255' 

9 

482 

9,269 

1,118 

2,344 

41 


39,905 
8,300 
7 969 










62 


1,220 






Oyster tongs 






88 


352 


144 


576 


Clam tongs, rakes, etc 






......J 


870 


Crab dredges 










L. _ 






625 


Apparatus— shore fisher- 
ies: 
Seines 










4 
57 

2 
35 


400 

5,945 

60 

320 

."^7 






38 171 


Pound nets 






2 

1,200 

11 


250 

1,500 

220 

20 


25 


6,800 


350' 7S5 


Gill nets 


719 


1,728 


32 957 


Fyke nets. 


14 


260 
665 


10 172 


Lines 




5 


4,596 
1,280 


Eelpots 






Spears ' 




1 






6 


Oyster dredges v. 

Oyster tongs 




1 




32 t 136 
124 1 685 






6, 180 






303 


1,212 


790 


3,160 


38, 827 
2, 566 
6,807 
1,295 


Crab scrapes 






Clam tongs, rakes, etc 










1 


385 


1, 155 


Weirs and slat traps.. 












Minor apparatus 














16 
1,500 


5S4 


Shore and accessory prop- 
erty 




50 




625 


4. 97."; 




1 1. Kid ni.''i 


Cash capital 




L 




3,000 




804, 100 




















Total... . 




2,^8 




38,739 




57,313 




104,837 




4,614,934 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 95 

Statement, by Counties, of the Products of the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 





Accomac. 


Alexandria. 


Caroline. 


Charles City. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




506, 840 

300 

45,250 

1,600 

106, 700 


$5,599 

33 

2,442 

128 

2,537 






4,800 


$48 


42,400 
1,650 


$418 




9,600 


$960 


132 
























Butterflsh 

Carp 














825 
34, 400 


16 

1,720 


300 
1,500 


6 
45 


5,690 
4,825 


171 


Catfish 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels 


1,700 

172,550 

35, 100 

3,100 

24,830 


59 

3,391 

495 

181 

923 


195 














800 


34 




























13,400 
1,618 


268 














40 


Kingfish ■- 

Menhaden 

MuUet 

Perch, white 


17,950 

36,544,360 

73,400 

7,400 


934 

72,697 

2,240 

367 


































13,300 

22,000 

1,350 


665 

755 
135 


600 


30 


7,350 

2,500 

300 


402 
90 


Pike 








24 


Pompano 

Scup 


11,930 

7,000 

1,000 

497, 084 

30,550 

55, 130 

601, 100 

8,100 

42,500 
5,684 


1,114 

360 

44 

24,005 

2,967 

2, 197 

17, 025 

911 

2,625 

4,915 








1 














___j 


Shad 


99,350 


5,320 


9,450 


540 


200,894 


10,889 


Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon eggs. 




















2,000 


160 


800 


64 


4,850 

3,800 

480 

2,475 


485 
380 








408 


1,350 


27 




63 




193,600 

1,649,354 

206 


. 1,783 

72,397 

245 














. 








[ 












1,400 
840 


70 










180 




1,111,100 
3,216,045 
3,939,719 
2,455,670 


142,501 

234,935 

384, 049 

83,906 


! 1 _ 




Market oysters, natural rock . 
Market oysters, private beds. 
Seed oysters, natural rock 


1 








1 








■ ::::i:::. ... 


1 












Total 


51,366,852 


1,068,005 


184,975 


9,792 


17, 450 


733 


294, 472 


14,215 







14008—07- 



96 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Products of the Fisheries of Virginia in 

1904— Continued. 



Chesterfield. 



EUzabeth City 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh 44, 000 

Alewives, salted 

Black bass | 

Blueflsh ' 

Butterfish 

Carp 

Catfish 

Crevalle 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels 



FloTinders 

Hickory shad. 

Hogfish 

Kingfish 

Menhaden 

Mullet 

Perch, white.. 
Perch. veUow. 
Pike...' 



Pompano 

Scup 

Shad 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon eggs 

Suckers 

Sunflsh 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

Turtles 

Clams, hard 

Market oysters, natural rock 
Market oysters, private beds 
Seed oysters, natural rock. . . 



Total 110,000 




20,947 



Gloucester. 



Henrico. 



Isle of Vright. 



James Citv. 



Species. 



Value, i Lbs. Value. 



Lbs. 



Value. Lbs. Value. 



Alewives, fresh 

Black bass 

■Butterfish 

Carp 

Catfish 

Crevalle 

Croaker 

Drum 

Eels 

Flounders 

Gizzard shad 

Hickory shad '.. 

Menhaden 

Mullet 

Perch, white 

Pompano 

Shad 

Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon eggs. 

Suckers 

Crabs, hard 

Turtles 

Frogs 

Clams, hard 

Market oysters, natural rock. 
Market oysters, private beds. 
Seed oysters, natural rock 



360,000 S3,600 



115,600 $2,312 1 1 39,600 S392 

150 I 15 ' ' 



225.750 
5.600 
28,200 
93,400 
412,700 
35,000 
3,800 
57,000 



75,000 

300.000 

30,000 

9,700 

5.600 

721,262 

75,150 

15,000 

246,625 

18,700 

15,000 

1,500 



181,800 
25,000 



110,880 

1,120,700 

645,190 

955, loO 



Total 5,773,707 



6,772 
56 
846 

2.802 

6; 493 
350 
114 

2,280 



1,500 

500 

1,200 

485 

280 

51,444 

7,515 

600 

5.237 

1,820 

1,500 

750 



6.900 
26,2(» 


197 
1,310 


7,500 i 
35,500 j 


S225 
1,085 


7,700 
17,100 


261 
6S4 






47,520 1 


1,395 














1 


2,000 1 
18,775 j 


100 
413 


5,500 
'"'3,566' 


440 


] 




1 


70 


1 1 




; 


t 




1 


8,300 


445 


12,487 1 


990 


13,750 


872 


102,700 


5,325 


127,650 


8,045 


107,200 


7,900 


' 





27,832 

6,850 

7,110 

390 



836 
820 
600 
292 



2,727 
250 



2,500 



8,000 I 240 
29,250 3,290 



3,500 



2,000 
1,400 



100 
300 



16,632 
69, 7ft5 
48.185 
35.340 



485,800 28,915 ! 

455,000 I 32,500 248,500 21,300 
1,618,750 52.550 ' 



268,983 262,350 9,641 2,853,164 128,766 j 487,000 j 35,919 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



97 



Statement, by Counties, of the Products of the Fisheries of Virginia in 

1904— Continued. 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh . 

Black bass 

Blue.ish 

Butteriish 

Carp 

Catiish 

Croaker 

Drum 



Eels 

Flounders 

Gizzard shad 

Hickory shad 

Menhaden 

Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike 

Shad 

Spanish mackerel. 

Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon . 



King George. 



Lbs. Value 



1,538,400 

250 

4,000 



3,100 
109,950 



200 
12,300 
1,200 



80,350 

42,200 

200 

90,149 



$6,325 

25 

200 



64 

4,271 



347 
24 



4,751 

1,693 

15 

4,786 



10,200 
110,275 



376 
9,287 



King and Queen. 



Lbs. Value 



25,000 



200 
10,000 
2,500 



2,900 

400 

2,000 



1,500 



75,337 



100 
5,500 
6,700 



King WiUlam. 



Lbs. Value. 



$250 36, 400 
5 "275' 



$558 



325 
75 



78 



3,228 



5 

110 
654 



3,060 

26,700 

3,000 



56 

985 

60 



2,300 
1,600 
1,075 



5,500 



Lancaster. 



Lbs. 



425,600 Slr721 



7,800 
67,450 



312 
2,023 



4,200 

51,700 

3,500 

500 

5,350 



126 

1,041 

35 

15 

214 



25,350 
64,966,666 



507 
121,749 



161,025 7,397 



350 
9,700 
9,800 



15 
279 
950 



Caviar and sturgeon eggs. 

Suckers 

Crabs, hard 

Crabs, soft 

Market oysters, natural rock. 
Market oysters, private beds. 
Seed oysters, natural rock 



Total. 



168,875 i 10,855 



6,820 
120,000 



252,000 
492, 100 



21,600 
42,180 



10,500 

ii2,'666' 



1,800 

'i,'266' 



4,800 



697, 725 

25,400 

15,300 

179,500 

6,500 

12,500 

1,900 



285,826 

74,200 

1,379,000 

1,377,600 



2,171,649 I 43,025 I 876,712 68,647 j 510,105 ! 18,641 69,613,567 



39, 870 
3,048 

459 
4,510 

520 
1,000 
1,445 



4,937 

5,565 

98,500 

112,930 



400:527 



Species. 


Mathews. 


Middlesex. 


Nansemond. 


New Kent. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


1,392,800 


$13,928 


140,400 


$1,404 


2,250 


$58 


155,900 
1,100 


$1, 189 




102 


Blueflsh 


21,850 
200,900 


805 
4,100 


1,600 
68,500 


48 
1,960 










20,000 

700 

5,150 


600 
28 
184 












Catfish 






1,500 


45 


9,100 


425 




25,200 
172,600 
15,000 


756 

2,589 

150 






21,300 


548 


37,950 


759 










Eels 


::::::::::i;: 






200 

100 




8 




11,500 
98,550 
310,000 
25,000 


345 

1,971 

490 

650 


2,400 
6,250 
44,000 


72 
150 
440 


4,000 


80 


3 










::::::::::::::::::::;::; 


Mullet 


16,500 
4,950 


495 

197 


8,350 
3,800 
2,000 






3,000 


150 


662 








120 


Pike 














160 




5,000 

1,260,000 

3,500 

61,000 

16,450 

234,500 

3,000 

23,300 

4,155 


250 

72,000 

70 

6,100 

493 

4,690 

300 

2,330 

2,077 












Shad 


157,100 


8,070 


67,046 


5,677 


165,335 


7,321 








5,206 

2,000 

96,200 

18,500 

1,500 

135 


624 
60 
3,720 
1,850 
150 
67 


800 
20,000 
69,300 


80 

700 

1,769 






Spot 












1,700 


160 








Caviar and sturgeon eggs. 












7,300 


191 




840,000 
25,000 
25,000 


10,499 

1,825 

250 


466, 666 
19,300 


6.250 
1,610 
















Turtles 






1.500 
980 


75 




( 


210 




12,000 
847,000 
383,^00 

70,000 


1,800 
63.800 
41,850 

2,500 














1,643,250 
1,089,900 


117,375 
92,650 




1,558,396 

934,500 

1,461,950 


102,002 
66,750 
49, 225 




Market oysters, private beds. 
Seed oysters, natural rock. . . 


70,000 


6,000 




Total 


6,086,905 


236,618 


3,788,701 


237,243 


4,203,492 


228,604 


427,365 


16,626 



98 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Products of the Fisheries op Virginia in 

1904— Continued. 



Species. 



Alewives, fresh 135, 800 

Black bass 

Bluoflsh 53, 500 

Boiiito 

Butterflsh 73, 000 

Carp 350 

Catfish 

Crevalle 30, 500 

Croaker 303, 050 

Drum 23,000 

Eels 

Flounders 14, 400 

Hickory shad 

Hogfish 6,300 

Kingfish 29, 500 

Menhaden 300, 000 

Mullet 23, 500 

Perch, white 10, 350 

Perch, yellow 

Pike 

Pompano 

Scup 

Shad 50, 250 

Sheepshead 2,500 

Spanish mackerel 4, 000 

Spot 173, 250 

Squeteague 623, 150 

Striped bass 

Sturgeon 4, 825 

, Caviar and sturgeon 

eggs 855 

Sunflsh 

Crabs, hard 1, 

Crabs, soft 

Turtles 

Clams, hard 

Market oysters, natural 

rock 

Market oysters, private 

beds 2, 

Seed oysters, natural rock. 



Norfolk. 



Lbs. Value, 



816, 250 
14,400 
4,200 
12, 800 

3,005,730 

103, 500 
740, 803 



$2, 058 

'2,' lis" 



665 

6. 131 

300 



340 



040 
1,915 
795 
675 
393 



4,880 
125 



9,365 
17, 602 



386 
618 



40,750 

1.080 

70 

2,400 

196, 944 

149, 350 

24, 779 



Northampton. 



Lbs. 



49,200 



26,250 

1,810 

22, 750 



15, 325 

39, 360 

27,950 

600 

7,295 



Value. 



1,331 
54 

538 



380 
818 
627 
36 
228 



920 

11,530 

24,l(i0,000 



1,850 

8, 260 

19, 640 

120 

38, 125 

38, 120 

1,239,035 

11,850 

840 

16 



99, 352 
437, 325 



2, 426, 935 
1,077,370 



Total 9,559,763 467,346 31,276,828 333,288 127,722,641 541,259 5,262,495 192,211 



44 

525 

49,006 



223 

165 

982 

6 

4,570 

1,310 

20, 326 

1,237 

36 

12 



13, 798 

"i6,'384' 

29, 193 

163, 715 
33, 116 



Northumberland. 



Lbs. 



23,400 
'58,'706' 



42,950 



3,500 

18, 600 

120, 125 



Value. 



.120, 440 



1,354 
'i,"227' 



804 



105 

668 

2,662 



118,868,000 260,262 



1.676,850 



14,200 
34, 700 
252, 400 
28, 950 
19, 250 

3,025 



643, 716 

117,200 

3,000 



1,237,075 
266,000 



2,130 
1,270 
7,114 
2,746 
1,540 

1,917 



9,381 

9,592 

60 



86,887 
22,800 



Princess Anno. 



Lbs. 



147,200 
50,000 

202, 490 
11,050 

210, 130 
25,000 
15, 000 
27,750 
1, 315, 650 
42,100 
45,000 
18,150 



19, 875 
54, 510 



64, 100 
228, 530 
33,500 
13, 350 
11,385 



22,700 
14, 625 
59, 900 
384, 550 
1,291,980 
15,275 
10, 280 

915 

23,000 

690, 625 



835 
6,400 



120, 000 
80,040 



Value. 



S2, 053 

3,000 

8,448 

323 

6, 074 

025 

375 

569 

25, 419 

421 

2,250 

438 



2,327 
2,625 



1,788 

6,780 

1,005 

801 

824 



1,783 

701 

4,923 

15, 722 

38, 013 

1,169 

748 

816 

460 

14,162 



1,200 



40,000 
5,760 



Species. 


Prince George. 


William Richmond. Stafford. 


Surry. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Alewives, fresh ■ 


30,000 


S450 


460,000 


$2, 225 


105,520 


SI, 055 


1,360,000 
80,000 
59,850 
800 
25,450 
77,300 


$6,780 
1,250 
5,965 
40 
1,261 
3,360 






Alewives, salted . . 






Black bass 


5,500 


440 


10,200 


1,020 


;:;;;:::;:i:; : 






Bluefish 










Carp 


22,500 
12,300 


675 
515 


8,300 
35,450 


309 
1,655 


3,550 
10,500 
5,900 
1,800 


70 
327 
177 

54 






Catfish 






Croaker 






Eels 






2,300 


85 


2,500 
800 


100 
24 






Flounders. . . . 










Gizzard shad 


5,000 
3,500 
5,500 


ioo 

70 
300 






6,500 


150 






Mullet 














Perch, white 


19, 200 
16,600 
2,700 
9,675 


1,103 
652 
270 
432 


12,050 


602 


52,400 
39,5.50 
11,600 
19, 125 
1,000 
24,600 


3,019 
1,572 
1,160 
1,006 
40 
2,410 






Perch, yellow 






Pike ! ^ - 












Shad 


141,800 


7,400 


120, 137 
17,800 
18, 125 


6,865 

534 

1,460 


66,406 


$3, 552 


Squeteague 




Striped bass 


800 
5,125 

405 


64 
512 

344 


6,500 


583 


550 

7,560 

1,215 


44 


Sturgeon 


756 


Caviar and stur- 
geon eggs 

Suckers 














1,033 


8,850 


177 






9,000 


180 






1,500 
1,000 


75 
50 










Turtles . 










2,000 


85 






Market oysters, nat- 






294,000 
674,800 


25,200 
57,840 






Market oysters, pri- 
vate beds. 






















■ 














Total 


234,930 


10,995 


579,775 


8,511 


1, 270, 682 


94,334 


1,765,975 


28,252 


75, 731 


5,385 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



99 



Statement, by Counties, op the Products of the Fisheries or Virginia in 

1904— Continued. 



Species. 


Warwick. 


Westmoreland. 


York. 


Total. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives, fresh 


2,400 


$24 


960,000 


$3, 677 


73,020 


$576 


14,309,226 

294, 640 

153, 600 

566, 765 

14, 460 

1,335,391 

141,625 

556, 325 

270, 125 

3, 842, 709 

192, 495 

86, 350 

248, 640 

32, 675 

355, 883 

44,895 

118,390 

247, 918, 766 

239, 000 

635, 017 

180, 550 

36,400 

47,840 

49, 260 

1,000 

7,419,899 

20, 745 

357,000 

872,800 

6,951,068 

451,366 

180,675 

23,211 

52,645 

24,800 

10, 356, 052 

1,910,654 

1,706 

72, 335 

3,220 

1,659,572 

19, 054, 336 

20,988,954 

13, 242, 733 


$87,083 
3 650 
















13, 192 








5,900 


281 


14, 900 


1,162 


27 362 








505 












42,900 


1,252 


36, 616 
4 466 


Carp 






4,700 
27, 600 


165 
1,073 


Catfish 


4,250 


149 






21 920 


Crevallo 


16,000 

302,350 

3,000 


480 

4,722 

42 


7 409 


Croaker 


49,000 


775 






69, 324 
2 519 


Drum. . 






Eels 






1,050 
2,250 


36 
72 


4,007 

7,587 


Flounders 


1,000 


20 


6,400 


159 




653 


Ilickory shad 














7 296 


Hogflsh . . 


2,000 


160 










4 451 


Kingflsh . . 










6,243 










270,000 


540 


515, 413 
7,208 
29,501 
6,693 
2,954 
3,400 


Mullet 




^ 




Perch, white 


550 


30 75. 550 


4,182 
260 
139 






Perch, yellow 




6,300 






Pike 






2,400 






Pompano 










Scup 














1 545 


Sea bass. . 














44 


Shad 


54, 250 


3,140 


35, 850 


2,040 


45,150 


2,580 


439, 625 
904 


Sheepshead 


Spanish mackerel 














39, 390 
37 769 


Spot... 


3,500 
41,225 

475 


280 

829 

47 






8,500 

133, 100 

3,875 

5,650 

270 


265 

2,714 

360 

452 

229 


Squeteague 


15, 700 
82,300 


7i2 

7,688 


164, 979 
41, 803 


Striped bass... 


Sturgeon 


15, 134 












16, 848 
1,060 


Suckers 










Sunflsh 






1,500 
120, 496 


45 
1,812 






514 


Crabs, hard 






741,500 
7,200 


14, 372 
540 


179, 575 


Crabs, soft. 






92,909 
320 












Turtles 






900 


62 


1,800 


27 


1,144 








690 


Clams, hard 










195, 040 
1,445,325 
1,505,000 
2,283,400 


29, 256 
83, 590 
114,700 
76, 391 


• 220, 973 


Market oysters, nat- 
ural rock 


501,312 

532,700 

1, 465, 800 


28,663 
37,050 
50,574 


814, 345 


55,654 


1,300,549 


Market oysters, pri- 
vate beds 


1,708,456 


Seed oysters, natural 
rock 






450, 671 








Total 


2,658,462 


121,741 


2, 156, 841 


77,898 


7,103,380 


334, 409 


355,315,798 


5,584,354 





THE PRODUCTS BY APPARATUS. 



The pound nets operated in Virginia yielded a catch greater than 
that of all other apparatus in the state combined. The number of 
nets was 1,656, valued at $350,725, and the catch amounted to 
37,476,338 pounds, valued at $850,710. The nets were fished in 22 
of the 32 counties engaged in commercial fisheries. 

In Princess Anne County pound nets are set in the Atlantic Ocean 
off Virginia Beach, and in Lynnhaven Bay, off the mouth of Lynn- 
haven Inlet, there being, in 1904, 10 nets in the ocean and 4 in the bay. 

The pound-net fishery of Norfolk County is prosecuted at Ocean 
View, where 6 nets were operated, and also at Hampton Roads, 
where 4 nets were set off Sewells Point and Willoughby Spit. The 
number of nets fished in Norfolk County has decreased more than 



100 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

50 per cent since 1901, to some extent on account of changes in the 
location of nets which placed them in other counties. 

The eastern counties of Virginia, Accomac and Northampton, also 
have valuable pound-net fisheries. Accomac County shows an 
increase of 62 nets and Northampton 10. These, with the exception 
of a few nets fished in the ocean off Accomac County, are all located 
on the eastern, or Ohesapeake Bay, side of these counties. Sque- 
teague, shad, and Spanish mackerel were the most valuable species 
taken. 

The pound-net fisheries of Elizabeth City County are of great 
importance, and yield nearly one-half of the entire catch of the 
county. They aggregated, in 1904, 6,052,338 pounds, valued at 
$113,823, an output exceeded by only one county. The number of 
nets in use was 131, an increase of 28 over the year 1901. One 
hundred and four of these nets were set between Back River light 
and Fortress Monroe, and 27 between Hampton and Newport News. 

In York County, from the mouth of the Poquosin River to Toos 
Point Hght, 23 pound nets were fished, and in addition two were 
set in York River, near Yorktown, a total of 25 nets for the county. 

Most of the pound nets of Gloucester County are located in Mob jack 
Bay and vicinity. With the exception of the oyster fishery, the 
pound-net fishery is the most valuable branch in this county. 

The value of the pound-net catch in Mathews County is greater 
than that of any other form of apparatus used in the county. The 
number of nets fished in 1904 was 242, an increase of 53 since 1901. 
The greater portion were fished in the spring, only 35 being operated 
in the fall. Fifty-four were set in Chesapeake Bay, 4 in East River, 
and 184 in Mobjack Bay and vicuiity. 

In Middlesex County the pound-net fisheries are located principally 
in the Rappahannock River, though a few are fished in the mouth of 
the Plankatank River. They are not so extensively used in this 
county as on the western side of the bay, and are fished only in the 
spring. The catch is mostly shipped by steamer to Baltimore. The 
number of nets operated in 1904 was 42. 

In the upper part of the Rappahannock River, in Richmond, 
Essex, Carohne, and King George counties, a number of pound-nets 
were operated by farmers and others living near the river. These 
are much smaller than the nets fished near the mouth of the river. 
The catch consists of catfish, carp, perch, striped bass, shad, and 
some other species. 

Pound nets are the most productive apparatus used in the shore 
fisheries of Lancaster County. The fishing grounds are located in 
Chesapeake Bay and the Rappahannock River. The total number 
of nets fished was 176, most of which were set in the spring. The 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 101 

catch amounted to 1,830,275 pounds, valued at S57,346. Of this 
quantity 697,725 pounds, valued at $39,870, consisted of shad. 

Northumberland County has the most important pound-net 
fisheries in Virginia, leading all other counties in the number of nets 
operated and in the quantity and value of the catch. The nets are 
set in both the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay, 113 being 
credited to the former and 173 to the latter body of water. Those in 
the bay extend from the mouth of Wicomico River to Smiths Point, 
and those in the Potomac from Smiths Point to Hog Island. The 
Potomac River nets are fished in the spring only, the season extend- 
ing from March 1 to May 30. The catch consists principally of shad 
and herring. 

The pound nets of Westmoreland County are set in the Potomac 
River off Colonial Beach and vicinity, those of King George County in 
the Potomac River from the mouth of Upper Machodoc Creek to 
Maryland Point. The}^ are fished principally in the spring, though a 
few are operated m the summer and fall, about half of the summer 
catch being disposed of to hotels and boarding houses at Colonial 
Beach. 

Above Maryland Point, in the counties of Stafford, Prince William, 
and Fairfax, the pound-net fisheries are of much less importance than 
in the lower Potomac. The nets are smaller, and many of them are 
set in the creeks emptying into the river. The catch consists of 
perch, catfish, striped bass, black bass, and other species. 

James City, Nansemond, and Warwick are the only counties on the 
James River having pound-net fisheries. The total number of nets 
was 7, and the aggregate catch 156,350 pounds, valued at $5,784. 

Seines. — Considering the quantity of products taken, seines lead all 
other forms of apparatus used in the fisheries of this state. The 
total catch was 246,628,251 pounds, valued at $602,835, of which 
241,292,666 pounds, valued at $498,730, was menhaden caught by 
purse seines in the vessel fishery. The haul seines used in the 
shore fisheries caught 5,335,585 pounds of fish, valued at $104,105. 
Twenty-one counties in the state engaged in the haul-seine fishery. 
The seines vary in length from a few yards to 1,600 fathoms, one 
of the latter length being used on the Potomac River. 

Princess Anne County has the most valuable haul-seine fishery in 
the state. In 1904, 127 haul seines were operated in this county, 
securing a catch which had a value of $25,164, Back Bay, located in 
the southeastern part of the county, near the North Carolina line, 
furnishes more than half of the catch, 125 seines being operated in this 
small body of water, and giving employment to 250 fishermen. The 
seines averaged 150 yards in length. Large quantities of white perch, 
black bass, yellow perch, mullet, pike, and other species were taken, 
the catch amounting to 406,780 pounds, valued at $13,539. 



102 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

Lines. — Two kinds of lines are used, the trot or set line, and the 
hand line. The former is used principally for catfish and crabs, and 
the latter for bluefish, croakers, spots, squeteague, and other varieties 
of fish. The total catch by lines was 9,072,174 pounds, valued at 
$176,638. This amount includes 10,000 pounds of bluefish taken in 
the vessel fisheries. Of the total catch 8,145,912 pounds, valued at 
$140,651, represents hard crabs, leaving a remainder of 926,262 
pounds of food fish. The catch in the hand-line fishery shows a large 
decrease, but the set-line fishery for crabs shows an increase of over 
2,000,000 pounds. 

Gill nets. — Gill-net fishing is generally confined to the river courses 
of the state, and very few gill nets are used elsewhere. More than 
8,000 were operated in 1904, the catch amounting to 2,162,089 
pounds, valued at $100,506, of which shad constitute more than two- 
thirds in both quantity and value. The catch of sturgeon, including 
the caviar, was 63,315 pounds, valued at $10,615. More than half of 
tliis amount was taken on the ocean side of Accomac County by men 
fishing near Matomkin Inlet. 

Fylce nets. — The fyke-net fishery shows a small increase in the 
quantity and value of the products, but a decrease in the number of 
nets fished. The total catch was 687,714 pounds, valued at $31,549. 
The most important species taken were striped bass, catfish, perch, 
and squeteague, the catch of these four species constituting nearly 
two-thirds of the total. 

Eel pots and spears. — Eel pots and spears were used in six counties, 
the yield in all amounting to 62,600 pounds of eels, valued at $3,131. 
The largest catch was made in Princess Anne County, in the waters 
of Back Bay, where 1,000 pots caught 45,000 pounds, valued at $2,250. 

Minor apparatus. — Under this head are included dip nets, bow nets, 
and other forms of apparatus not shown elsewhere. The most im- 
portant is the dip net for soft crabs, the catch amounting to 325,566 
pounds of crabs, valued at $23,496. The bow nets were used in taking 
ale wives and shad. 

Weirs and slat traps. — Weirs are used principally in the York River, 
the catch consisting of alewives, catfish, squeteague, and striped bass. 
The slat traps are set in the falls and rapids of the James River and 
are fished by persons living in Richmond. In 1904, 23 of these traps 
were in operation, the catch amounting to 43,600 pounds. The com- 
bined catch of weirs and traps aggregated 149,005 pounds, valued at 
$4,965. 

Clajn tongs, Jioes, and rakes. — The vessel fishery for clams is of small 
importance compared with that of the shore fishery. Accomac and 
Northampton are the only counties in which vessels are used. The 
catch by vessels was 20,440 bushels, valued at $20,293. The shore 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 



103 



catch amounted to 187,006 bushels, valued at $200,680. A few soft 
clams were taken in Accomac County. 

Crab scrapes and dredges. — Scrapes are used in the shore fisheries for 
catching soft crabs, chiefly in Accomac County. The catch amounted 
to 1,585,088 pounds, valued at $69,413. In tliree counties dredges 
were used in the vessel fisheries for taking hard crabs, securing a catch 
of 2,210,140 pounds, valued at $38,924. 

The catch with dredges and tongs, which are used in both the shore 
and vessel oyster fisheries, is the most important product of the 
fisheries of Virginia. The catch by vessels was 2,075,567 bushels, 
valued at $842,158; the shore catch was 5,536,722 bushels, valued at 
$2,617,518. 

The following tables give the quantity and value of products taken 
with each form of apparatus in the vessel and shore fisheries of Vir- 
ginia in 1904: 

Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Pound-Net Fisheries op 

Virginia in 1904. 





Accomac. 


Caroline. 


Elizabeth City. 


Essex. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


506,090 

300 

44,750 

1,600 

106,700 


$5,587 

33 

2,417 

128 

2,537 


4,800 


$48 


252,936 


$2,504 


26,800 


$268 






Blueflsh 






52,975 


2,945 
















Butterflsh 






213,511 


5,577 


25,100 
1,500 
3,850 


876 




300 
1,500 


6 
45 


30 


Catfish 


1,700 


59 






115 




61,950 

827,629 

7,845 

41,790 

28,990 

800 

4,900 

2,155,740 

9,000 

12,075 

34,000 

405,259 

42,675 

80,850 

1,790,321 

1,691 

21,435 

2,266 


1,757 

13,427 

99 

856 

466 

80 

244 

8,934 

358 

709 

1,020 

23,910 

6,953 

3,328 

36,427 

149 

2,119 

1,925 






128,800 
26,100 
18, 150 


2,351 
339 

685 
























700 


25 










Hogfish 














Kingflsh 


700 

1,426,360 

2,850 

11,930 

7,000 

497,084 

30,550 

35,080 

380,340 

6,150 

10,240 

714 


86 

1,847 

142 

1,114 

360 

24,005 

2,967 

1,529 

10,447 

671 

725 

525 








' 














600 


30 


500 


25 














Shad -■ 


5,250 


300 


30, 450 


1,584 


Spanish mackerel 

Spot . . 
















14,900 
6,700 


596 




800 


64 


5.50 






Caviar and sturgeon 
















300 


6 


Turtles 










3,700 


36 














i 


Total 


3,243,188 


58,554 


13,250 


493 


6,052,338 


113,823 


110,800 


4,075 







104 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield op the Pound-Net Fisheries op 
Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Fairfax. 


Gloucester. 


James City. 


King George. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Ale wives 


360,000 
2,500 


$1,800 
250 


340,000 


$3,400 


12,000 


$120 


1,490,400 


.$6,065 


Black bass 


Bluefish 








4,000 


200 


Butterflsh 






225, 750 


6,772 








Carp 


1,200 
14,400 


48 
626 






1,100 
74,650 


22 


Catfish 






2,400 j 96 


2 928 


Crevalle 


93, 400 
398,000 
35,000 
50,000 


2,802 

5,979 

350 

2,000 




Croaker 














Drum 














Flounders 










11,500 
1,200 


315 


Gizzard shad 








« 


24 


Hickory shad . , . . 






75,000 
300,000 


1,500 
500 








Menhaden 














Ferch, white 


18,350 

2,800 

500 


1,077 
109 
50 






65,800 
39,900 


3 940 


Perch, yellow 










1 596 


Pike 














5,600 
716,012 
75, 150 
226,875 
2,500 
15,000 

1,500 


280 

51,144 

7,515 

4,537 

200 
1,500 

750 










Shad 


8,550 


410 


2,000 


150 


78,837 


4,221 


Spanish mackerel 


Squeteague 






8,000 
10,250 


240 
1,230 


10,200 

• 88,250 


376 




7,600 


635 


7,315 


Sturgeon 




Caviar and sturgeon 
eges 
















2,000 


40 










Turtles 


25,000 


250 
























Total 


417,900 


5,045 


2,585,387 


89,479 


34,650 


1,836 


1,865,837 


27,002 









Species. 


Lancaster. 


Mathews. 


Middlesex. 


Nansemond. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 


425,600 

7,800 

67,450 

4,200 


$1,721 

312 

2,023 

126 


1,392,800 

21,850 

200,900 


$13,928 

805 

4,100 


140,400 

1,(»0 

68,500 


$1,404 

48 

1,960 












Butte rfish 


20,000 


$600 


Catfish 






25,200 

172,600 

15,000 


756 

2,589 

150 










Croaker 


51,700 

3,. 500 

500 

5,350 

25,350 

300,000 


1,041 

35 

15 

214 

507 

500 


21,300 


548 


15,000 


300 


Drum 




Eels 










Flounders 


11,500 

98,550 

310,000 

10,000 

5,000 

1,260,000 

3,500 

61,000 

16,450 

234,500 

3,000 

23,300 

4,155 
25,000 


345 

1,971 

490 

200 

250 

72,000 

70 

6,100 
493 

4,690 
300 

2,330 

2,077 
250 


2,400 
6,250 


72 
150 


1,500 


30 












Mullet 
























Shad 


697,725 


39,870 


1.57, 100 


8,070 


10,000 


1,000 






Spanish mackerel 

Spot 

Squeteague 


25,400 
15,300 
179,500 
6,500 
12,500 

1,900 


3,048 
459 

4,510 
520 

1,000 

1,445 


5,200 

2,000 

96,200 

15,300 

1,500 

135 


624 

60 

3,720 

1,530 

150 

67 


800 
5,000 
30,000 


80 
250 
750 


Sturgeon 

Caviar and sturgeon 










Turtles 




















Total 


1,830,275 


57,346 


3,894,305 


113,894 


517,885 


18,403 


82,300 


3,010 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



105 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Pound-Net Fisheries of 
Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Norfolk. 


Northampton. 


Northumberland. 


Princess Anne. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


135,000 
45,000 


$2,050 
1,690 


49,200 

23, 150 

1,810 

22,750 


$628 

1,157 

54 

538 


4,291,000 
23,400 


$20,440 
1,354 


147,200 

157,490 

11,050 

210,130 


$2,053 
7,298 


Bluefish 


Bonito 


Butterflsh 


73,000 
350 
30,500 
143,250 
23,000 
8,000 


2,480 

10 

665 

2,927 
300 
208 


58,700 


1,227 


6,674 


Carp 


Crevalle 


15,325 
12,860 
9,450 

4,875 


380 
138 
82 
126 






27,750 

1,246,000 

42, 100 

18, 150 


569 

24, 159 

421 


Croaker 


42,950 


804 


Drum 


Flounders 


18,600 
120,125 


668 
2,662 


438 


Hickory shad 


Hogfish 


200 

15,700 

300,000 


30 

1,165 

795 


920 
7,680 


44 
365 


2,875 
43,360 


287 


Kingfish 






1 887 


Menhaden 


1,020,000 


1,700 




Mullet 






37, 100 
7,600 
11,385 


1 113 


Perch, white 


1,300 


39 










162 


Pompano 


1,850 

8,260 

19,640 

120 

38, 125 

20,320 

1,068,150 


223 

165 

982 

6 

4,570 

521 

14,265 






824 


Sculp 













Shad 


27,900 


3,050 


1,676,850 


108,300 


22,700 

14,625 

59,900 

173,800 

1,164,680 

4,475 

10,280 

915 
835 


1,781 
703 


Sheepshead 


Spanish mackerel 

Spot 


4,000 
21,000 
500,150 


480 

1,030 

13,632 


14,200 
34,700 
252,400 
28,950 
19,250 

3,025 
3,000 


2,130 
1,270 
7,114 
2,746 
1,540 

1,917 
60 


4,923 
5 705 


Squeteague 


32 268 


Striped bass 


421 


Sturgeon. . . 


4,825 

855 
4,200 


386 

618 
70 


840 
16 


36 
12 


748 
816 


Caviar and sturgeon 
eggs 


Turtles 


9 










Total 


1,338,230 


31,625 


1,305,341 


24,292 


7,607,150 


153,932 


3,414,400 


93 582 






Species. 


Prince William. 


Richmond. Stafford. | 


Warwick. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


332,000 


$1,660 


104,400 


$1,044 


356,000 
32,700 
14,700 
38,550 


$1,760 

3,250 

722 

1,755 


2,400 


J94 


Black bass 




Carp 


2,300 
13, 100 


69 
580 


2,400 
4,800 
5,900 
1,800 


48 
144 
177 

54 






Catfish 






Croaker 


8,000 


160 


Eels 












Flounders 






800 


24 


700 


14 


Gizzard shad 






6,500 
9,700 


150 
485 




Perch, white 


9,700 

5,000 

700 

1,050 


582 

200 

70 

55 


22,500 

23,550 

8,000 

1,225 


1,350 
932 
800 
56 






Perch, yellow 






Pike 










Shad 

Spot 


71,137 


4,065 


2,800 

500 

25,000 


200 
40 


Squeteague 






17,800 
15,000 


534 
1,210 




500 


Striped bass 


3,150 


315 


n nCK) 1 finn 






' > — I --- 






Total 


367,000 


3,531 


239,437 


7 911 ! ."ina K9fi 1 n 94q I 


39,400 


988 






' 1 


1 





106 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Pound-Net Fisheries of 
Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Westmoreland. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 


960,000 


$3,677 


69,520 


$541 


11,398,546 

35,500 

398, 415 

14,400 

1,335,391 

26,650 

180,950 

270, 125 

3,348,389 

164,995 

2,300 

200,365 

7,700 

354,265 

4,795 

72,340 

6,082,100 

47,100 

203,350 

75,050 

10, 100 

47,840 

49,260 

5,770,969 

18,245 

357,000 

405,000 

6,114,116 

273,116 

124,820 

15,751 

2,300 

1,500 

63,535 


$70,722 
3 533 


Black bass 


Bluefish 


2,500 


115 


13,900 


1,112 


19,453 


Bonito 


505 


Butterflsh 






42,900 


1,252 


36,616 


Carp 


2,800 
21,800 


92 
841 


1 047 


Catfish 






7,315 




16,000 

273,800 

3,000 


480 

4,151 

'42 


7,409 








58,751 


Drum 






1 818 


Eels 






69 




2,250 


72 


4,100 


120 


6,212 




174 


Hickory shad 










7,256 


Ilogfish 










441 












3,747 








270,000 


540 


15 306 


Mullet 






1 313 




55,450 

3,800 

900 


3,142 
160 
57 






11,332 








2,997 


Pike 






977 








3,400 


Soup 










1,545 


Shad 


34,250 


1,960 


45, 150 


2,580 


349, 693 




779 


Spanish mackerel 










39 390 


Spot 










14,685 




9,700 
66,300 


472 
6,378 


105,400 


2,153 


137,231 




24,834 


Sturgeon 


5,650 
270 


452 
229 


10,986 
10,381 














46 




1,500 


45 






45 


Turtles 


1,800 


27 


702 










Total 


1,161,250 


17,011 


851,490 


13,679 


37,476,338 


850,710 







Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Accomac. 


Alexandria. 


Charles City. 


Elizabeth 
City. 


Fairfax. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


V^alue 


Lbs. Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Vessel fisheries: 


35,118,000 


$70,850 


































Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh. 


750 


12 






40,000 


$400 






1,225,360 

214, 640 

8,000 

4,700 

20,900 


$3, 803 












2,400 


Black bass 






9,100 

225 

26,200 


$910 

4 

1,310 


1,500 
5,690 
4,300 


120 
171 
169 






800 


Carp. 










116 


Catfish 










751 


Croaker 


7,850 
500 


213 
10 








D rum 






...... 








Eels 


200 


10 








2,300 


92 




5,080 


i78 










Gizzard shad . 






is, 400 
1,618 


268 
40 








Ilickorv shad 


















Kingfish 


1,900 I 91 














Mullet 


24,600 
300 


676 
12 










3,000 


$90 






Perch, white 


9,500 

15,700 

850 


475 
566 
85 


6,700 
2,500 


350 
90 


9,200 
7,000 
1,000 


485 








280 


Pike 










100 


Sea bass 


150 


6 












Shad 






25,532 


1,749 






29,050 


1,900 


Spot 


15,650 
94,000 


448 
2,706 






5,000 
2,000 


300 
80 




Squeteague 

Striped bass. . . . 














2,000 
150 


160 
3 


4,850 
2,000 


485 
40 


8,800 
3,400 


880 












68 














Total 


150,780 


4,352 


63,925 


3,523 


108,090 


3,882 


10,000 


470 


1,534,350 


11,735 






Grand total 


35,268,780 


75,202 


63,925 


3,523 


108, 090 


3,882 


10,000 


470 


1,534,350 


11,735 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



107 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Gloucester. 


James City. 


King George. 


King Wil- 
liam. 


Lancaster. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


















64,166,666 


$120, 312 






















Shore fisheries: 






20,000 
6,200 


$200 
186 


44,000 


$220 


3,000 

500 

4,500 


$30 

15 

225 
















Catfish 






17,600 


807 








10,000 
5,000 


$400 
200 






























3,500 


70 




























500,000 


937 


Mullet 


30,000 


1,200 


















11,400 


684 


6,800 

1,500 

875 


408 
60 
45 


2,000 


100 


1 










Shad 


1 






1,950 


97 






Spot 


15,000 
12,000 


600 
480 











Squeteague 


















5,500 
3,500 


440 
70 


10,500 


1,050 


1,500 
1,500 


120 
30 


























Total 


72,000 


2,880 


50,100 


1,650 


81,275 


2,590 


14,950 


617 


500,000 


937 






Grand total 


72,000 


2,880 


50,100 


1,650 


81,275 


2,590 


14,950 


617 


64,666,666 


121, 249 





Mathews. 


Middlesex. 


Nansemond. 


New Kent. 


Norfolk. 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh 








- 






148,000 
700 


$1,110 
70 


800 


$8 


















Bluefish 














8,500 


425 


Catfish 














6,400 


320 














10,250 


$205 


131,000 
3,000 
5,100 
13,800 


2,620 
















60 


Hogflsh 


















510 




















750 








44,000 


$440 












Mullet 


15,000 


$450 










3,500 
9,050 


75 












6,800 
3,800 
1,400 
15,500 


.544 
120 
112 
750 


354 


















Pike 


















Shad 


















Spot 










15,666 
32,000 


450 
800 


127,250 
73,000 


7,085 
















2,520 












1,700 
6,000 


160 
145 








































Total 


15,000 


450 


44,000 


440 


57,250 


1,455 


190,300 


3.331 


375,000 


14,407 







108 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Seine Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Northampton. 1 Northumberland. 


Princess Anne. 


Prince George. 


Lbs. 


Value. Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Menhaden 


24,160,000 


$49,006 


117,848,000 


$258, 562 




















Shore fisheries: 

Alewives,' fresh . 














20,000 
5,500 


$300 












50,000 
45,000 
25,000 
15,000 
43,000 


$3,000 

3,150 

625 

375 

860 


440 


Blueflsh 


2,100 


124 








Carp 






22,500 
12,300 


675 


Catfish 










515 


Croaker 












Flounders 


1,900 


76 




















5,000 


100 


Kingfish 


650 


32 












Mullet 






27,000 

219,930 

33,500 

13,350 


675 
6,598 
1,005 

801 


3,500 
5,500 


70 










300 


Perch, yellow 










■ Pike 












Shad 










12,000 


600 


Spot 

Squeteague 

Striped bass 

Sunfish 


8,500 
76, 385 
11,850 


340 
3,426 
1,237 






163,500 
83,500 


5, 205 
4,410 
















800 


64 






23,000 


460 


















Total 


101,385 


5,235 






741,780 


25, 164 


87,100 


3,064 








Grand total 


24,261,385 


54, 241 


117,^48,000 


258, 562 


741,780 


25, 164 


87,100 


3,064 



Species. 


Prince William. 


Stafford. 


Westmoreland. 


Total. 


Lbs. Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Menhaden 














241,292,666 


$498,730 










1 




Shore fisheries: 

Alewives, fresh 


56,000 


$205 


800,000 

80,000 

19,650 

800 

5,450 

23,100 


$4,000 

1,250 

1,965 

40 

327 

979 






2,357,910 

294, 640 

99,350 

59,800 

73,565 

144,650 

202,100 

500 

6,000 

14,980 

21,900 

1,618 

5,100 

16,350 

544,000 

106,600 

328, 680 

76,700 

19,100 

150 

100, 107 

349,900 

379, 885 

84,950 

25,0.50 

23,000 


10,348 


Alewives, salted 






3,650 


Black bass 


4,900 


490 






7,795 


Bluefish 


3,400 

300 

3,700 


$166 

9 

148 


1,905 


Carp 


3,000 
10,650 


120 
525 


2,248 


Catfish 


6,124 


Croaker 


4, 298 


Drum 














10 


Eels 






2,500 


100 






202 


Flounders 










514 


Gizzard shad 














438 


Hickory shad 














40 


Hogflsh 














510 


Kingfish 














873 


Menhaden 














1,377 


Mullet 














3,236 


Perch, white 

Perch, yellow 

Pike 


6,200 
4, .500 
1,000 


323 
168 
100 


21,200 
5,700 
1,500 


1,147 
228 
150 


14,100 
2,500 


705 
100 


12, 485 
2,617 
1,348 








6 


Shad 


800 


40 


14,400 


800 






5,981 


Spot 






14,428 


Squeteague. . 






1,000 
18, 100 
6,000 


40 

1,810 

120 


6,000 
16,000 


240 
1,310 


14,702 


Striped bass 


3,350 
2,500 


268 
50 


7,984 


Suckers 


526 


Snnfish.. , 






460 


















Total 


92,900 


2,289 


999, 400 


12, 956 


46,000 


2,678 


5,335,585 


104, 105 






Grand total 


92,900 


2,289 


999, 400 


12, 956 


46,000 


2,678 


246,628,251 


602,835 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



109 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Line Fisheries of Virginia in 

1904. 



Species. 


Accomac. 


Charles City. 


Elizabeth City. 


Essex. 


Gloucester. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Vessel fisheries: 
Blueflsh 










10,000 


«800 




























Shore fisheries: 

Bluefish 


500 


$25 






95,700 


5,060 










Catfish 






750 


S23 






Croalver 


35.900 
8,500 
1,200 


827 
146 
48 






35,000 


700 






































Ilogflsh 






15,000 


1,200 












15, 150 

1,000 

700 

3,700 

123,760 

193,600 


747 

45 

29 

185 

3,782 

1,783 














Perch, white . 






10,500 


420 








Sea iDass 














Spot 






20,000 

40,000 

1, 138, 333 


1,400 

1,200 

27,400 










Squeteague 

Crabs, hard 






















181,800 


$2, 727 


Turtles 


1,400 


m 


























Total 


384,010 


7,617 


1,400 


70 


1,354,5.33 


37,380 


750 


23 


181,800 


2,727 


Grand total 


384,010 


7,617 


1,400 


70 


1,364,533 


38, 180 


750 


23 


181,800 


2,727 



Species. 


Isle of Wight. 


James City. 


King WiUiam. 


Lancaster. 


Mathews. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Catfish 


400 

1,600 

832 


$20 
32 
25 


8,200 


$328 


5,450 


$258 










Croalcer 










Squeteague 


















Crabs, hard 






120,000 


1,800 


285,826 


$4,937 


840,000 


$10,499 


Turtles 






2,000 


• 100 




















Total ; 


2,832 


77 


10,200 


428 


125,450 


2,058 


285,826 


4,937 


840,000 


10,499 





Species. 


Middlesex. 


Nansemond. 


New Kent. 


Norfolk. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Croaker 






3,200 
500 


$64 
10 






20,000 
3,000 
1,000 


$400 


flounders 










60 


Hogfish 








100 


Perch, white 






550 


16 








Sheepshead 










2,500 

25,000 

40,000 

1,491,250 


125 


Spot 














1 250 


Squeteague 






1,800 


54 






1 200 


Crabs, hard 


466, 666 


$6,250 






35,550 


Turtles 






1,500 


$75 
















Total 


466, 666 


6,250 


6,050 


144 


1,500 


75 


1,582,750 


38,685 





Species. 


Northampton. 


Northumber- 
land. 


Prince.ss Anne. 


Prince 
George. 


Stafford. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Shore fisheries: 

Blueflsh 


1,000 

26,500 

18,500 

520 


$50 
680 
545 
26 


















Croaker 






26,650 


$400 










Drum 














Flounders 


















Hogfish 






17,000 
7,550 
35,000 
28,500 
8,300 
690,625 


2,040 
37^ 

4,200 

570 

498 

14,162 










Kingfish 


3,200 

8,500 

94,500 


128 

425 

2,635 














Spot 














Squeteague 














Striped bass 














Crabs, hard 11,232,100 


9,978 


643,716 


$9,381 










Terrapin 




1,500 
1,000 


$75 
50 






Turtles 














2,000 


$85 


















Total 


1,384,820 


14,467 


643,716 


9 381 S1.S fi9.t; 


22,248 


2,500 


125 


2,000 


85 











110 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, or the Yield of the Line Fisheries of Virginia in 

1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Surry. 


Warwick. 


^^''laT'"'" York. ! Total. 


Lbs. 


Val- 
ue,. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 

Blueflsh 


















10,000 


$800 




1 
















Shore fisheries: 

Blueflsh 














1,000 


$50 


98,200 

14,800 

209,850 

27,000 

5,220 

35,000 

25,900 

12,050 

700 

2,500 

103, 700 

363,092 

8,850 

8,145,912 

1,500 

7,900 


5,185 
629 


Catfish 














Croaker 






41,000 


$615 


::::;:::::: 


20,000 


400 


4 118 


Drum 












691 


Flounders 


















144 


Hogflsh 






2,000 


160 










3 500 


Kingfish 














1 253 


Perch, white 


















481 


Sea bass 


















29 


Sheepshead 




1 












125 


Spot 




3.000 


240 

314 






8,500 
18,000 


265 
290 


7 965 






15. 700 






10,070 
542 


Striped bass 


550 


$44 










120,496 


$1,812 


741,500 


14,372 


140,651 
75 


Terrapin 










Turtles 


















380 




















Total 


650 


44 


61,700 


1,329 


120, 496 


1,812 


789,000 


15,377 


9,062,174 


175,838 


Grand total 


550 


44 


61,700 


1,329 


120,496 


1,812 


789,000 


15, 377 


9,072,174 


176, 638 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Gill-Net Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Accomac. 


Alexandria. 


; Caroline. 


Charles City. 


Chesterfield. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Alewives 














2,400 
150 
525 


$18 
12 
26 


44,000 


$880 


Black bass 
















Catfish 


















Kingfish 


200 
48,800 


$10 
1,564 














Mullet 


















Perch 










650 
300 

175,362 


52 

24 

9,140 






Pike 


















Shad 






99,350 


$5,320 


4,200 


$240 


66,000 


3,300 


Spot 


700 

3,000 

32, 260 

4,970 


35 

90 

1,900 

4,390 


Squeteague . . 


















Sturgeon 










3,s66 

480 
475 


380 
408 
23 






Caviar 














Suckers 
































Total 


89,930 


7,989 


99, 350 


5,320 


4,200 


240 


184, 142 


10,083 


110,000 


4,180 







Species. 


Essex. 


Fairfax. 


Gloucester. 


Henrico. 


Isle of Wight. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 
















95, 400 
102,350 


$1,908 
5,305 






Shad 


31,500 


$1, 446 


47, 950 


$2. 300 


5,250 


$300 


125, 100 

7,110 

390 


$7,830 


Sturgeon ... . 




600 


Caviar 
















292 






















Total . . 


31,500 


1,446 


47,950 


2,300 


5,2.50 


300 


197,750 


7,213 


132,600 


8,722 







Species. 


James City. 


King and 
Queen. 


King George. 


King William. 


Nansemond. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 




1,600 


$12 


16,000 


$160 






14,000 


$140 






Mullet 






16, 500 
39, 162 


$495 


Shad 


101, 200 


7,450 


73,937 


3,168 


9,187 


$455 


i55,92S 


7,120 


3,143 






Total 


102,800 


7, 462 


89,937 


3,328 


9,187 


455 


169,925 


7,260 


55, 662 


3,638 







FTSHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Ill 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Gill-Net Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


New Kent. 


Norfolk. 


Prince George. 


Prince 
William. 


Richmond. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 




7,400 

400 

1,200 


$74 
32 
60 






10,000 


$150 


72,000 


$360 
















Catfish 




















8,800 

400 

20,000 


$184 

12 

600 






























Mullet. . .... 
















Perch 


1,350 

600 

149,535 


108 

48 

6,556 














Pike 


















Shad 


22,350 
10,000 


1,830 
250 


129,800 


6,800 


7,825 


337 


48,685 


$2,782 












5, 125 512 




















405 344 












1,000 


40 


















1 i 










Total 


161,485 


6,918 


61,550 


2,876 


145,330 1 7.806 


79, 825 


697 


48,685 


2,782 






■ 





Species. 


Stafford. 


Surry. 


Warwick. 


Westmore- 
land. 


Total. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 




204,000 


$1,020 














466,800 

550 

1,725 

8,800 

400 

200 

85,300 

2,000 

900 

1,516,924 

700 

13,000 

55,855 

7,460 

1,475 


$4, 722 
44 


Black bass 














Catfish 


















86 


Croaker . . 


















184 


Flnurirlers 


















12 




















10 


Mullet... 


















2,659 


Perch. . 


















160 


Pike 


















72 


Shad 


3,500 


150 


66,406 


$3,552 


50, 750 


$2,900 


1,600 


$80 


81,504 


Spot 


35 


















340 








7,560 
1,215 


756 
1,033 










4,148 
















6,467 
















63 






















Total 


207,500 


1,170 


75, 181 


5,341 


50, 750 


2,900 


1,600 


80 


2,162,089 


100, 506 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield op the Fyke-Net Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904. 



Species. 


Accomae. 


Alexandria. 


Essex. 


Fairfax. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 






500 

600 

8,200 

600 


$50 
12 






4,500 

1,700 

10,600 

1,500 


$450 


Carp 






i.ioo 


$22 
222 


49 


Catfish 






410 7. 400 


424 


Eels 






24 




60 




400 
3,250 


$12 
168 










3,800 

6,300 

500 


190 
189 
50 


2,500 


125 


4,300 
4,300 
1,000 


233 




157 


Pike .. 










100 




150 
1,950 


9 

240 














2,750 


220 


3,500 

4,750 

300 


290 




1,200 


24 


95 


Sunfish 










9 


















Total 


5,750 


429 


21,700 


949 


13,750 


589 


36,450 


1,867 







14008—07—8 



112 



FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fyke-Net Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Gloucester. 


Henrico. 


Isle of Wight. 


James City. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewives 


15,000 
5,600 

25,200 
3,200 
3,000 
1,500 
8,500 


S150 
56 
756 
96 
90 
CO 
425 














Carp 






7,500 
35,100 
45, 920 


$225 
1,005 
1,363 


1,500 
0,500 


$75 


Catfish 


18, 000 


$900 


260 


Croaker. 




Eels 






1,000 


80 


Flounders 






is, 775 
12, 487 

2,550 
27,000 

6,850 


413 
990 
215 

811 
820 






3,000 


180 


2,350 
4,000 


188 


Shad 


300 


Squeteague 


6,566 
14,700 


195 
1,470 














13,500 


1 620 










Total 


83, 200 


3,298 


21,000 


1,080 


156, 182 


5,902 


28,850 


2,523 





Species. 


King George. 


King and 
Queen. 


King 

William. 


Middlesex. 


Nansemond. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Shore fisheries: 


4,000 

250 

2,000 

17,700 


$40 
25 
40 

536 


1,000 


$10 


5,400 


$108 






1,000 


$20 


Black bass 








Carp 


200 
4,300 


6 
154 


•2, 560 
8,450 


41 
253 












1,500 


$45 


4,800 
9,500 


160 


Croaker 


190 


Eels 


200 
800 

7,750 
800 
200 

1,250 


6 
32 
403 
37 
15 
65 


600 

200 

1,150 


18 

8 

61 


800 

800 

2,300 


24 
32 
115 














2,000 
3,900 


40 




3,000 


150 


156 


Perch, vellow 




Pike 


















Shad 














11,112 
5,500 


953 








1,200 
1,800 
3, 800 


24 
180 
38 






165 


Striped bass 


11,525 


922 


1,500 
400 


134 
8 


3,200 


320 




Suckers 




















Total . . 


46, 475 


2,121 


9,350 


399 


27, 110 


815 


7,700 


515 


37, 812 


1,690 







Species. 


New Kent. 


North- 
ampton. 


Princess 
Anne. 


Prince 

William. 


Richmond. 




Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Valuer 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Shore fisheries: 


500 


$5 














1,120 


$11 


Black bass. . . . 










5,300 
3,000 
11,700 
2,300 


$530 
120 
550 

85 




Carp 














1,150 
5,700 


22 


Catfish 


1,500 
200 
100 


45 
8 
3 










183 


Eels 


600 


$36 








Flounders 










Kingfish 






3, 600 
1,000 


$360 
20 












200 


16 






3,300 
7,100 
1,000 


198 
284 
100 


2,350 


117 


Perch, yellow 








Pike 


















Shad 


300 


15 










315 


18 




800 


24 


12, 250 
15,300 
2 500 


612 
765 
1'50 








Squeteague 




























3,125 


250 


Suckers 


300 


6 






6,350 


127 


















Total 


3,100 


92 


1,400 


60 


34,650 


2,007 


40,050 


1,994 


13,760 


601 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



113 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield of the Fyke-Net Fisheries of Virginia 

IN 1904 — Continued. 



Species. 


Staflord. 


Warwick. 


Westmore- 
land. 


York. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 














3,500 


$35 


31, 520 

18,050 

33, 810 

188, 650 

67, 170 

11,850 

26, 175 

3,600 

80, .387 

28, 800 

6,300 

150 

20,227 

13,050 

65,725 

71,250 

19,800 

300 

900 


$379 




7,500 
5,300 
15,650 


$750 
212 
626 










1,805 








1,600 
2,100 


$64 
84 






944 


Catfish 


4,250 


S149 






6,828 




8,550 


171 


1,820 


Eels 










1,050 


36 


467 








300 


6 


1,300 


39 


645 












360 




8,700 
10,300 
2,100 


522 
412 
210 


550 


30 


6,000 


335 






4,616 




1,079 


Pike 






1,500 


82 






557 












9 


Shad .... 






700 


40 










1,606 


Spot 














636 








525 
475 


15 
47 






9,700 
3,875 


271 
360 


2,246 












7,123 




3,000 


60 






358 
















9 












900 


62 






62 


















Total 


52,550 


2,792 


6,800 


287 


13,150 


663 


26, 925 


876 


687,714 


31,549 







Statement, by Counties, of the Yield by Eel Pots, Spears, and Minor 
Apparatus in the Shore Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Apparatus and counties. 


Alewives. 


Eels. 


Shad. 


Crabs, 


soft. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Eel pots and spears: 






3,100 
4,500 
. 2,000 
4,500 
3,500 
45,000 


$181 
135 
100 
360 
105 
2,250 




' 




















Isle of Wight 






































































Total 






62,600 


3,131 
























Minor apparatus: 














64,266 
4,000 
74,200 
25,000 
19,300 


$2,984 


Elizabeth City 














300 
















5,565 
















1,825 
















1,610 




1,250 


$38 






6,562 


$563 




Norfolk 






14,400 

117,200 

7,200 


1,080 








■ 








9,592 


York 














540 


















Total 


1,250 


38 






6,562 


563 


325, 566 


23, 496 












1,250 


38 


62,600 


3,131 


6,562 


563 


325,566 


23-, 496 







114 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Yield by Eel Pots, Spears, and Minor 
Apparatus in the Shore Fisheries op Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 



Apparatus and counties. 


Terrapin. 


Frogs. 


Total. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Eel pots and spears: 

Accomac 










3,100 
4,500 
2,000 
4,500 
3,500 
45,000 


$181 


Essex 










135 


Isle of Wight 










100 


James City - 










360 


Northnmbprland 










105 


Princess Anne 










2,250 














Total 










62,600 


3,131 














Minor apparatus: 

Accomac 


206 


$245 






64, 472 

840 

4,000 

1,400 

74, 200 

25,000 

19,300 

7,812 

980 

14,400 

117,200 

7,200 


3,229 


Charles City 


840 


$180 


180 


EUzabeth City 






300 


James City 






1,400 


300 


300 








5 565 


Mathews 










1,825 


Middlesex 










1 610 












601 


New Kent 






980 


210 


210 


Norfolk 






1,080 

9,592 

540 


Northumberland 










York 






1 












Total.. . 


206 


245 


3,220 1 690 


336,804 


25 032 








206 


245 


3,220 


690 


399, 404 


28,163 





Statement, by Counties', op the Yield op the Weir and Slat-Trap Fisheries 

OP Virginia in 1904. 



Species. 


Gloucester. 


Henrico. 


James City. 


King and Queen. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries: 

Alewi ves 


5,000 


$50 


20,200 
150 


$404 
15 


6,000 


$60 


8,000 


$80 


Black bass 




Bluefish ... 










75 


5 


Carp 






6,900 
8,200 


197 
410 








Catfish 


3,000 
900 
800 
500 


90 
18 
24 
20 






5,700 
2,500 
2,300 

200 
2,000 

350 
1,400 

100 
5,500 
5,200 


171 


Croaker 






75 


Eels 










69 


FIniindprs. . 










8 


Gizzard shad 










20 


Perch, white 


1,200 


60 


5,300 
350 


265 
20 






17 


Shad 






60 


Spot 










5 


Squeteague 


1,250 
1,500 


25 
150 










110 


Striped bass 










520 


Suckers 


2,500 


37 






















Total 


• 14,150 


437 


43,600 


1,348 


6,000 


60 


33,325 


1,140 







FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



115 



Statement, by Counties, op the Yield of the Weir and Slat-Trap Fisheries 
OF Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 





King William. 


Nansemond. 


Total 


Species. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Shore fisheries : 


14,000 


$280 






53,200 

150 

350 

7,600 

25,550 
6,400 
4,600 
1,500 
3,075 
8,550 
5,110 
450 

15,250 

13,200 
4,020 


$874 








15 




275 


14 






19 




700 
350 


828 
18 


225 


Catfish 


8,300 
3,000 
1,500 

800 
1,075 
1,200 
3,150 

350 
8,500 
6,500 
1,520 


249 
60 
45 
32 
21 
60 

180 
15 

255 

650 
30 


938 




153 


Eels - - . 






138 








60 








41 




500 
210 


25 

18 


427 


Shad. ...• 


278 


Spot 


20 








390 








1,320 








67 










Total 


50,170 


1,891 


1,700 


89 


149,005 


4,965 







Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Oyster Dredges and Tongs in the 
Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Counties. 



Vessel fisheries: 

Accomac 

Elizabeth City . 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Isle of Wight.. 
King William. 

Lancaster 

Middlesex 

Nansemond . . . 

Norfolk 

Northampton . 

Warwick 

York 



Total. 



Shore fisheries: 

Accomac 

Elizabeth City... 

Essex 

Gloucester 

Isle of Wight 

James City 

King George 

King and Queen.. 

King William 

Lancaster 

Mathews 

Middlesex 

Nansemond 

New Kent 

Norfolk 

Northampton 

Northumberland . 

Princess Anne 

Richmond 

Warwick 

Westmoreland . . . 
York 



Oyster tongs. 



Market oysters from 
natural rock. 



84, 030 
14, 700 
2,800 
177,800 
83,300 



53,900 
8,050 
639, 100 
, 888, 530 
43, 400 
123,312 
409,325 



3,528,847 



,115,415 
462, 658 
157, 500 
942,900 
402,500 



60,3''5 
252,000 

10, 500 
325, 100 
847,000 
,635,200 
919,296 



,117,200 
379,925 
559, 475 



294,000 
378,000 
259, 420 
,036,000 



Value. 



$5, 546 
840 
200 

12,325 
5,915 



Total 12, 154, 464 



Grand total 15, 683, 311 



3,850 

575 

42,905 

125, 124 

3,033 

7,063 

23,390 



230,766 



90,756 
30,991 
13,500 
57,380 
23,000 



Market oysters from 
private beds. 



049,600 



374,570 



1,024,170 



3,881 
21,600 

1,200 
94, 050 
63, 800 
116,800 
59,097 



71,820 
25, 100 
39,962 



25, 200 
21,600 
18, 530 
60,200 



839,067 



1,069,833 



2,992,269 
1,087,968 
633,003 
645, 190 
455,000 
248,500 



492, 100 



835, 100 

383, 600 

1,089,900 

934,500 

70,000 

2, 103, 500 

2,049,915 

266,000 

126,000 

674, 800 

532, 700 



1,505,000 



17,125,045 



18,149,215 



Value. 



$63, 736 



293, 468 
77,712 
54,257 
48, 185 
32,500 
21,300 



42,180 



66, 430 

41,850 

92,050 

66,750 

6,000 

149, 350 

130,515 

22,800 

40,000 

57.840 

37,050 



114,700 



1,395,537 



Seed oysters from 
natural rock. 



Lbs. 



528, 850 
167,300 
3,500 
178,150 
1,125,250 
J 12, 000 



863, 450 
740,803 
330, 470 
709, 800 
489, 650 



5,249,223 



1,890,140 
750,400 



777,000 
493,500 



70,000 
'598,'566 



733,600 
"so," 640 



756,000 
'i,'793,"756 



7, 943, 530 



1,492,263 



13,192,753 



Value. 



119,245 

4,780 

150 

7,590 

34,925 

4,800 



27,850 
24, 779 
12,110 
23, 574 
16, 379 



176, 182 



63, 315 
26, 800 



27,750 
17,625 



2,500 
'2i,"375 



20, 416 
"5," 760 



27,000 
66,612 



272,553 



448, 735 



116 



FISHEKIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Oyster Dredges and Tongs in the 
Fisheries op Virginia in 1904 — Continued. 





Oyster dredges. 


Tot 




Counties. 


Market oysters 
from natural rock. 


Market oysters 
from private beds. 


Seed oysters 

from natural 

rock. 


il. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


1,110,760 


$75, 476 


208,600 

1,961,939 

35,000 


$19,360 

140, 138 

2,500 


36,680 


$1,346 


2,619,120 

2,143,939 

41,300 

355,950 

1,208,550 

99,050 

U2,000 

508,900 

8,050 

1,502,550 

2, 629, 333 

778, 190 

357,000 

833, 112 

432,950 

898,975 


$184,709 
145, 758 


Elizabeth City. . 










2,850 




1""" ."■ 




19,915 


Isle of Wight.. 


! 








40, 840 


King George 


99,050 


6,367 




1 




6,367 
4,800 








Lancaster . . . . 






455,000 


39,000 






42,850 
575 


Middlesex 














1 







70, 755 


Norfolk 




:::::::::::;:::::::;;;:::::;;;:;::; 




149, 903 


Northampton 


14,000 
.357,000 


1,060 
24,025 


2,450 210 13,300 


590 


49,993 
24, 025 




1 




30, 637 




432,950 


28, 412 


1 




28, 412 


York 


1 ' 1.. 




39, 769 






1 






Total 


2,013,700 


135,340 


2,602,989 201,208 | 49,980 


1,936 


14,528,969 


842,158 






Shore fisheries: 


905,240 


63, 157 


89,250 7,485 






6,992,314 


518, 181 


Elizabeth City. . 


1 


2,301,026 

790,503 

2,365,090 

1,351,000 

248,500 

69,825 

744. 100 

10,500 

2,247,700 

1, 300, 600 

2, 725, 100 

2,452,296 

70,000 

3,220,700 

3, 103, 440 

1,140,075 

206, 640 

968,800 

1,666,700 

381,395 

4,334,750 


135, 503 


Essex 


1 1 1 


67, 757 






1 1 


133,315 


Isle of Wight 1 




1 


73, 125 








1 1 1 


21,300 


King George 


9,450 


607 


1 1 


4.488 


1 


1 


63,780 


King William. 






1 






1,200 








87,500 1 7,500 






108, 580 












108, 150 












209, 450 












147,222 












6,000 


Norfolk 








i 


221,170 










1 


176, 031 




320, 600 


22,900 




1 


85, 662 






1 


45,700 


Richmond 








1 


83, 040 












85,650 




121,975 


8,712 






27,242 


York 




1 


234, 912 














Total 


1,357,265 


95, 376 


176,750 1 14,985 




38,757,054 


2,617,518 










Grand total 


3,371,025 


230,716 


2,839,739 l 216,193 


49,980 


1,936 53,286,023 


3, 459, 676 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



117 



Statement, by Counties, of the Catch by Clam Tongs, Hoes and Rakes, and 
Crab Scrapes and Dredges in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 





Clam tongs, hoes, 
and rakes. 


Crab scrapes. 


Crab dredges. 


Fisheries and counties. 


Clams, hard. 


Crabs, soft. Crabs, hard. 




Lbs. 


Value. 


Lbs. 


Value. Lbs. 


Value. 


Vessel fisheries: 


142,200 


$17,903 




1 










1,602,240 
325,000 
282,900 


$29, 904 


Norfolk 










5,200 




21,320 


2,330 






3,820 










Total 


103, 520 


20. 293 






2,210,140 


38, 924 












Shore fisheries: 


1968,900 
112,000 
110,880 
12,000 
12,800 
78,032 
0, 400 
195,040 


124, 538 
10,800 
10,632 
1,800 
2,400 
8,054 
1,200 
29, 250 


1,585,088 


$09, 413 






Elizabeth City 
























Norfolk 






























York . ... 






















Total 


1,496,052 


200,680 1,585,088 


69, 413 












Grand total 


1,659,672 


220,973 1 1.585.088 


69,413 1 2.210.140 


38,924 















« Includes 34 bushels, or 340 pounds, of soft clams, valued at $39. 



NOTES AND DETAILED STATISTICS OF THE PRINCIPAL FISHERIES. 

Oyster. — In the oyster industry Virginia ranks first among the Mid- 
dle Atlantic States in the quantity of oysters taken, but the value of 
the product is less than half that of the New York output. The total 
catch in 1904, including the product from natural rocks and private 
beds and the seed oysters, was 7,012,289 bushels, valued at $3,459,676. 
This sum is more than half the value of all other fishery products 
combined. The catch by vessels was 2,075,567 bushels, valued at 
$842,158; by boats in the shore fisheries 5,536,722 bushels, valued at 
$2,617,518. Compared with 1901, there appears a decrease of 
273,158 bushels, but an increase of $536,220 in value. The decrease 
is more apparent than real in its relation to the actual supply, owing 
to the fact that the severe winter weather during part of the season of 
1904-5 affected the quality of the oysters so that some of the planted 
stock was not worth taking from the beds, and the tonging season on 
the natural beds was curtailed to a considerable extent. The increase 
in value was due in part to the natural rise in the price of oysters, in 
keeping with other food products. During the winter months of 
1904-5 the demand was great, and prices ranged from 50 cents to $1 
per bushel for oysters tonged on the natural beds. 

Oyster planting is a constantly growdng feature of the oyster indus- 
try in Virginia. Each year the available area is enlarged, and rent 
is now collected on 59,029 acres, of which 13,190 acres are on the 
eastern, or ocean side, of Accomac and Northampton counties. The 
quantity of oysters taken from private beds in 1904 was 2,998,422 



118 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

bushels, valued at .11,708,456. These figures represent oysters 
gro\\Ti from spat and seed stock whieh have been on the beds from 
two to tlu-ee years. In some instances leased bottoms have been 
used for bedding market oysters taken from natural rocks and placed 
on the beds to fatten, but as these oysters have been previously 
counted as from natural rocks, they are not included here. 

The use of oyster shells for the collection of spat continues in great 
favor mth planters, and the steady demand makes a good market for 
shells at 3 5 to 4 cents a bushel. 

There is a large market for seed oysters in the North, and the ves- 
sels of Isle of Wight County work almost entirely to supply this 
demand. The seed stock, from 6 months to 2 years old, is purchased 
at prices ranging from 20 to 27 cents a bushel, is planted, and left on 
the beds about 18 months. It is then taken up and shipped north, 
chiefly to New Jersey, where it is again bedded for a short time to 
fatten before being put on the market. 

The demand for Lynnhaven Bay oysters is greater than the supply, 
and the prices paid are higher than for any other shell stock in the 
state. The output from the beds in 1904-5 was estimated at 8,000 
barrels, or 18,000 bushels, valued at $40,000. The superiority of 
Lynnhaven oysters is due to the fact that more care is taken in their 
cultivation and fewer oysters are laid down in a given area. 

The work of tonging and dredging from vessels and boats on 
natural rocks gives employment to over two-thirds of the persons 
engaged in the fishing industries of this state. The product from 
natural rocks in 1904 amounted in all to 4,613,867 bushels, valued at 
SI, 751, 220. Tonging begins in September and is actively continued 
until about December 25, after which date many of the men leave the 
grounds and hire out to planters to work on private beds, leaving 
about one-third of the original number to finish out the season on the 
natural rock. 

Nearly all tonging connected with the vessel fisheries is done from 
skiffs. The latter are lap-streaked, made at Staten Island, N. Y., 
and cost about $125 each delivered at Norfolk. On a few vessels of 
small tonnage, tonging is done from the deck, no skiffs being used. 
Vessels are never licensed directly except for dredging. The license 
designates the number of boats to be carried and the number of tongs 
to be used. The vessel is used primarily as living quarters for the crew 
and also for the purpose of carrying the stock to market. Often two 
vessels work in company, one remaining on the grounds to furnish 
sleeping quarters for the crew while the other markets the stock. 

The oystermen who tong from canoes own their boats, valued at 
from $150 to $600 each and often equipped with a gasoline engine. 
These men usually sell their catch to ''buy-boats," which anchor on 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



119 



the tonging grounds until a load is secured, thus offering the smaller 
boats an opportunity to sell their catch without having to lose the 
time in going to market. The area of natural rock has become so 
circumscribed that great effort is put forth in the early part of the 
season to reach the more available grounds, and every advantage is 
taken of time and methods of getting to market. Under these circum- 
stances the ''buy-boat" is always welcomed, and even though the 
price paid is slightly under the market rate, a gain is made by the 
time saved. 

Statement by Counties of the Yield and Value of Oysters taken from 
Public and Private Areas in Virginia in 1904. 



Counties. 


Market oysters 
from natural rocli. 


Market oysters 
from private l^eds. 


Seed oysters from 
natural rock. 


Total. 




Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Bushels. 


Value. 




459, 435 
68, 194 
22,900 

160, 100 
69, 400 


8234,935 
31,831 
13,700 
09, 705 
28,915 


562,817 
435, 701 
95,429 
92,170 
65,000 
35,500 


$384,049 
217,850 
56, 757 
48, 185 
32,500 
21,300 


350,810 
131,100 
500 
136, 450 
231,250 


$83,906 

31,580 

150 

35, 340 

52,550 


1,373,062 
634,995 
118,829 
388, 720 
365, 650 

35, 500 

24, 125 
106, 300 

17,500 
393,800 
185, 800 
390, 450 
564, 978 

10,000 
835, 719 
563, 090 
214,725 

29, 520 
138, 400 
357,116 
116,335 
747,675 


$702, 890 


Elizabeth City 

Essex.. 


281,261 
70, 607 




153, 230 


Isleof Wiglit 

James City - . . 


113,965 
21,300 




24, 125 
36,000 
1,500 
197,000 
121,000 
234,750 
222, 628 


10,855 
21,600 
1,200 
98, 500 
63,800 
117,375 
102, 002 






10, 855 


King and Queen 


70, 300 


42,180 






63, 780 


16,000 


4,800 


6,000 


Lancaster 


196,800 
54,800 
155, 700 
133, 500 
10,000 
300,500 
346, 705 
38,000 
18,000 
96, 400 
76, 100 


112,930 
41,850 
92,650 
66, 750 
6,000 
149, 350 
163,715 
22,800 
40,000 
57,840 
37,050 


211,430 


Mathews 


10,000 


2,500 


108, 150 




210,025 




208,850 


49,225 


217,977 


New Kent 


6,000 


Norfollc. . . . . 


429, 390 
62,475 
176, 725 


196,944 
29, 193 

86, 887 


105,829 
153,910 


24, 779 
33,116 


371,073 


Northampton 


226,024 
109, 687 


Princess Anne. . 


11,520 


5,760 


45, 700 




42,000 

71,616 

116,335 

206, 475 


25,200 
28, 663 
55, 654 
83,590 


83, 040 


Warwicli 


209, 400 


50,574 


116,287 
55, 654 


Yorlf 


215,000 


.114,700 


326,200 


76, 391 


274, 681 






Total 


2,722,048 


1,300,549 


2,998,422 


1,708,456 


1,891,819 


450,671 


7,612,289 


3, 459, 676 



Clam. — The clamming industry of Virginia in 1904 produced a rev- 
enue to the fishermen of $220,973. The total catch in the state was 
207,446 bushels. Nearly all of the clams are taken in the shore fish- 
eries. The catch by vessels amounted to 20,440 bushels, taken in 
the waters of Accomac and Northampton counties. In recent years 
clamming has assumed great importance in these counties, the catch 
in 1904 being 151,306 bushels, valued at $152,885. Many persons in 
eastern Virginia find remunerative employment at clamming during 
most of the year, the prices ranging from $3.50 to $5 per thousand 
clams. The season in most localities is from April to August. In 
Norfolk and Princess Anne counties clains are scarce, the yield being 
only a few bushels caught by fishermen wlfile not engaged in other 
fisheries. In Elizabeth City County about 80 men engaged in the fish- 
ery, using 15 pairs of patent tongs and 50 pairs of ordinary tongs, and 
the catch amounted to 14,000 bushels. In the vicinity of Poquosin 
and Grafton, in York County, clamming is profitable, 275 men finding 



120 FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 

employment in digging and tonging. The catch is made in Poquosin 
and Back rivers and Chesapeake Bay, the output aggregating 16,000 
bushels, valued at SI 9,200. In Gloucester County clams are taken 
in the Severn River and tributaries, York River, and Mobjack Bay. 
They are shipped by steamer to Baltimore from wharves on the Sev- 
ern and York rivers. One hundred and seventy men were engaged 
in the fishery, and the catch amounted to 13,860 bushels, valued at 
$16,632. In Mathews County nearly all the clams were taken in the 
East and North rivers, 1,500 bushels constituting the entire catch. 

Crab. — The crab fishery of Virginia has increased over 100 per cent 
in value since 1901, and each season adds to its importance. The 
total catch of hard and soft crabs in 1904 was 12,266,706 pounds, 
valued at $272,484, of which amount 1,910,654 pounds, valued at 
$92,909, was soft crabs, and the remainder hard crabs. The crabs 
numbered 36,800,118, of these 5,731,962 being soft crabs. The in- 
crease in 1904 over 1901 was 4,865,005 pounds, valued at $153,649, 
due largely to winter fishing for hard crabs with dredges. Ten ves- 
sels engaged in this business in 1904, eight of them fisliing from Eliza- 
beth City County. The catch by vessels was 2,210,140 pounds, val- 
ued at $38,924. 

The soft-crab fishery of Virginia is especially important in the 
waters of Pocomoke and Tangier sounds. The catch is made prin- 
cipally with scrapes from May until the middle of October. The 
finest crabbuig districts of the state are found in these waters, and 
many oystermen living on Tangier Island and the mainland of Acco- 
mac County support themselves almost entirely throughout the sum- 
mer months by crabbing. The value of soft crabs caught in Accomac 
County was $72,397. 

SJiad. — The shad is one of the leading fisheries of Virginia, and in 
1904 the catch was greater than in any of the other Middle Atlantic 
States. It amounted to 7,419,899 pounds, representing 2,081,851 
fish, valued at $439,625, which compared with 1901 shows an 
increase of 447,687 pounds, worth $73,422, which was almost wholly 
in the catch by apparatus fished in the waters of Chesapeake Bay 
and tributaries. As in Maryland, the quantity of apparatus m 
these waters has been largely increased, greatly interfering with the 
fish on their way to the spawning grounds. The catch in the rivers 
shows a marked decline, especially in the Potomac, where the num- 
ber fell from 648,462 in 1901 to 289,500 m 1904. The Chicka- 
hominy River, with its length of only 50 miles, was formerly noted 
for the great quantity of shad taken in its waters, and eight or ten 
years ago the annual catch averaged about 150,000 shad. In 1904 
it was only 33,400. Nearly all the shad taken in the James and 
Rappahannock rivers are caught in gill nets, as is done in the Nanse- 
mond and Chickahominy. 



FISHEEIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 121 

Number and Value of the Shad Taken in the Fisheries of Virginia in 1904. 



Counties. 



Accomac 

Alexandria 

Caroline 

Charles City 

Chesterfield 

Elizabeth City. . 

Essex 

Fairfax 

Gloucester 

Henrico 

Isle of Wight... 

James City 

King George 

King anil Queen 
King William. . . 

Lancaster 

Mathews 



No. 


Value. 


124, 271 


$24,005 


26,(300 


5,320 


2,700 


540 


55,970 


10,889 


16, .500 


3,300 


103,671 


23,910 


17, 700 


3,030 


24, 300 


4,610 


206, 075 


51,444 


26,625 


5,325 


34, 625 


8,045 


27,200 


7,900 


25, 800 


4,786 


21,525 


3,228 


40, 100 


7,397 


194,350 


39,870 


360,000 


72,000 



Counties. 



Middlesex 

Nansemond 

New Kent 

Norfolk 

Northampton. . . 
Northumberland 
Princess Anne . . . 
Prince George. . . 
Prince William. . 

Richmond 

Stafford 

Surry 

Warwick 

Westmoreland . . 
York 

Total 



a2, 081, 851 



Value. 



45,000 


$8,070 


18,085 


5,677 


49,960 


7,321 


14,000 


4,880 


4,910 


982 


494.700 


108, 300 


5,350 


1,781 


37,000 


7,400 


2,750 


432 


34,325 


6,865 


5,3.50 


1,006 


17,759 


3,552 


15,500 


3,140 


10,250 


2,040 


12,900 


2,580 



439, 025 



a Represents 7,419,899 pounds. 

Menhaden. — The number of fish utilized in the menhaden factories 
in 1904 was 370,042,000, a decrease of 8,685,331 since 1901. An 
increase of 11 steamers is shown, making the total 32, valued at 
$481,500. The number of factories in operation was 21, an increase 
of 6, and the persons employed on vessels and in the factories was 
1,708, a gain of 131. Four sailing vessels were reported fishing for 
menhaden in 1904. The employment of sailing vessels as trans- 
porters has ceased, owing to the wide range and scarcity of fish, and 
the steamers now bring their catch direct to the factories. Three 
years ago menhaden were so plentiful that many oystermen equipped 
their boats with purse seines and engaged in catching menhaden for 
the factories. 

The Menhaden Industry in Virginia in 1904. 



Items. 


No. 


Value. 


Items. 


No. 


Value. ' 


Factories 


21 


$425,050 
215, 350 

115, 185 


Steam vessels fishing. . . 


32 
2,686 


S481 500 


Cash capital ... 




Wages paid factory em- 




Outfit 


111,554 


ployees 


Sail vessels fishing 

Tonnage 

Outfit 


4 
11 


4,200 


Persons in factories 


768 

940 

370, 042, 000 

29,088 

113 

647,333 


Persons on vessels. 




3,095 


Menhaden utilized 

Products: 

Dry scrap (tons) . . . 

Wet scrap (tons) . . . 

Oil (gallons) 


485,305 

749,252 

1,682 

115,948 


Apparatus on vessels: 
Seines (total length 
15,461 yards) 


54 


39,905 



WHOLESALE TRADE. 

The wholesale trade in fishery products was represented by 110 
firms in 1904, an increase of 30 since 1901. The value of establish- 
ments was $611,000, the number of persons engaged 4,701, the wages 
paid $674,196, and the amount of cash capital $595,750. 

There were 83 firms engaged in the oyster business. Norfolk is 
the center of the oyster trade and oysters are shipped thence to many 



122 



FISHERIES OF THE MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES. 



points in the United States and Canada. A large portion of the 
stock is opened before shipment. In recent years there has been a 
large increase in the number of oyster establishments located at 
various points on the Rappahannock River and its tributary creeks. 
Large quantities of oysters, opened and in the shell, are shipped by 
steamer from wharves on the Rappahannock River to Baltimore, 
whence they are distributed to many other points. 

Nine firms were engaged in preparing crab meat for shipment. 
One firm at Hampton engaged in canning crabs and three firms in 
Accomac County handled soft crabs. At Brighton, Northampton 
County, one establishment was engaged in canning clams and clam 
juice. 

In the wholesale fish trade two firms handled fish exclusively and 
five others handled fish and oysters. A few firms handle all of the 
products. 

The following table shows the persons and capital in the wholesale 
fishery trade of Virginia in 1904: 

Number of Persons Employed and the Capital Invested in the Wholesale 
Fishery Trade of Virginia in 1904. 



Localities. 



Chincoteague 

Saxis and Tangier Island 

Cashville, Chesconessex, and Folly Creek 

Franklin City, Messongo, and Hunting Creek. 

Mappsville, Parksley, and Dreka 

Wachapreague and Wishart 

Cape Charles and Brighton 

Oyster and Nassawadox 

Willis Wharf and Brownsville 

Bayford, Bridgetown, and Franktown 

Elizabeth City 

Whealton and Bowlers Wharf 

Irvington 

Weems 

U rbanna and Curi toman Point 

Suflolk 

Lewisetta, Mundays Point, Kinsale, and Mila 

Sharps Wharf 

Norfolk 

Portsmouth and Berkley 

West Point 

Total 



^Establishments. 



No. 



Value. 



S12,800 
4,350 
3,300 
5,750 
2,650 
4,200 
7,050 
1,250 
4,950 
1,100 

112,600 
21,000 
7,300 
2,650 
21,250 
6,450 
9,300 
4,100 

290, 300 
71,250 
17,400 



611,000 



No. of 
persons 
engaged. 



103 

86 
72 
53 
69 
84 
50 
37 
130 
54 
917 
318 
127 
83 
157 
105 
173 
97 
1,231 
512 
243 



4,701 



Cash 
capital. 



818,500 

6,950 

7,400 

13,000 

7,200 

8,500 

7,600 

2,000 

5,700 

2, 300 

118,200 

60,000 

12,900 

9,000 

16, 500 

7,500 

13,000 

14,000 

171,000 

48,000 

46,500 



595,750 



Wages 
paid. 



$11,200 

5,750 

5,950 

4,500 

3,950 

6,350 

5,150 

1,700 

5,310 

2,450 

99,366 

55, 550 

21,000 

12,800 

15,360 

8,500 

13,500 

8,550 

249,000 

98,300 

39,960 



674, 196 



o 



THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES OF THE PACIFIC COAST STATES 

IN 1904 

By W. a. Wilcox 

Ageiii , Bureau of Fisheries 



Bureau of Fisheries Document No. 612 



COJ^TTElsrTS 



Page. 

Introduction and general tables 5 

Number of persons emijloyed 5 

Investment 6 

Products 6 

Comparative summary for certain 

years 8 

Notes and statistics of important in- 
dustries .' 9 

Salmon 9 

Output in 1904 9 

Washington 10 

Oregon 10 

California 10 

Tables 11 

Halibut 13 

Cod 14 

Washington 14 

California 14 

Sardines 15 

Introduced fishes 15 

Oysters 16 

Washington 16 

< )regon 17 

California 17 

Clams 18 

Abalone 18 

Scjuid, algse, and sea urchins 19 

Crabs 20 

Washington 20 

Oregon 20 

California 20 

4 



Page. 
Notes and statistics of important in- 
dustries — Continued. 

Spiny lobsters 21 

Shrimp 21 

Washington 21 

California 22 

Green turtles 22 

Whales 22 

Wholesale fishery trade 22 

Seattle 23 

Tacoma 24 

Portland 25 

San Francisco 26 

Sacramento 27 

Los Angeles 28 

San Diego 29 

Washington fisheries 30 

Notes and general statistics 30 

The fisheries by counties 31 

The vessel fislieries 35 

The shore fisheries 36 

Oregon fisheries 42 

Notes and general statistics 42 

The fisheries by counties 44 

California fisheries 50 

Notes and general statistics 50 

The fisheries by counties 52 

The vessel fisheries 64 

The shore fisheries 66 



THE COMMERCIAL FISHERffiS OF THE PACIFIC COAST STATES 

IN 1904, 



By W. A. Wilcox, 
Agent, Bureau of Fisheries. 



INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL TABLES. 

The aiost recent official canvass of the fishing industries of the Pacific 
Coast States was made by the Bureau of Fisheries in 1905, and fur- 
nished statistical and other data for the calendar 3^ear 1904 which are 
here published in detail. A condensed statement of the same informa- 
tion was issued in Statistical Bulletin No. 185, under date of August 
31, 1906. 

As new avenues of distribution have been opened the fishing indus- 
tries of the Pacific coast have increased in importance and in 1904 rep- 
resented an investment of $12,839,949 in capital, employed 19,658 per- 
sons, and yielded 168,599,676 pounds, valued at $6,680,866. The 
demand for both salt and fresh fish is constantly increasing. Formerly, 
canned salmon was used but little in eastern states, and most of the 
pack went to England. Pacific cod and fresh sea products were seldom 
seen outside the cities on the west coast. Now canned salmon is found 
in nearly every retail grocery store in the United States, and a large 
export trade continues. Cod taken and salted by vessels from Cali- 
fornia and Washington ports is now in demand all through the Pacific 
States, and many carloads annually go to Chicago, New York, Boston, 
and even to Gloucester, Mass. By means of express and refrigerator 
cars fresh salt-water fish, oysters, crabs, shrimp, and smelt are daily 
sent in large shipments from San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, 
Seattle, and Tacoma to interior points in Colorado, Nevada, New 
Mexico, and Arizona. 

The following tables show in general the extent of the fisheries of 
the west coast in 1904, together with a comparison of statistics for 
recent years: 

Number op Persons Employed in the Fishing Industries of the Pacific Coast 

States in 1904. 



How employed. 


Washington. 


Oregon. 


California. 


Total. 




367 

240 

5,467 

2,755 




838 

77 

3,491 

1,124 


1,206 




84 
3,525 
1,690 


401 


In shore and boat fisheries 

On shore, in canneries, etc 


12, 483 
5,569 


Total 


8,829 


5,299 


5,530 


19, 668 



FISHERIES OF THE PACIFIC COAST STATES IN 1904. 
Investment in the Fisheries of the Pacific Coast States in 1904. 





Washington. 


Oregon. 


California. 


Total. 


Items. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Num- 
ber. 


Value. 


Vessels fishing 


50 
1,541 


8134,600 






37 
6,096 


$371,800 


87 
7,637 

'"'i39' 
2,745 

'7,"666" 
313 

o5 
8 

617 
9 

C27 

'"'i'j' 

130 

<i488 

602 

^6,272 

/I, 042 

446 

24 

1,163 

6,344 

5 

20 

49 

5, 269 


S506, 400 


Tonnage 






Outfit 


■ 66,418 
261,300 






223, 479 
100, 600 


289, 897 


Vessels transporting 

Tonnage 


80 
1,247 


36 
500 

'i,'826' 
19 


$115, 700 


24 
998 

"i,'798" 
231 

5 
8 
16 


477, 600 


Outfit 


42, 335 

309,610 

44,300 


14,350 

213,395 

25, 700 


ii,376 
218, 220 
202, 850 

1,400 

2,800 

880 


68, 066 
741 225 


Boats, sail and row •■ . 


3,448 
63 


Boats, ga.soline 


272,850 
1,400 


Apparatus — vessel fisheries: 
Seines 


Paranzella nets 











2 800 


Gill nets 


1 
9 


75 
671 






955 








571 


Trammel nets 






27 


2,700 

1,480 

29 

180 

21,230 


2 700 


Lines 




20,015 






21,495 










19 
130 

181 


29 


Pots 










180 


Apparatus— shore tislieries: 


257 

602 

1,537 


143, 885 

1,276,230 

183,485 


50 


25, 200 


190,316 

1,276,230 

909,234 

55, 730 




Gill nets 

Trammel nets 


2,631 


499,345 


2, 104 
1,042 
420 
24 
1,163 
2,790 


226,404 

55, 730 

4,120 

3,000 

23, 260 

5,535 


Fyke nets 

Paranzella nets . . .. 


6 


90 


20 


400 


4,610 
3,000 












23, 260 


Hoop nets and traps 

Reef nets . 


•125 

5 

20 

19 

2,744 


125 

2,500 

38 

52,000 

3,464 

895 

6, 525 


3, 429 


4,333 


9,993 
2, 500